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Full text of "Universities and their sons; history, influence and characteristics of American universities, with biographical sketches and portraits of alumni and recipients of honorary degrees"

UNIVERSITIES 



AND 



THEIR SONS 



UNIVERSITIES 



AND 



THEIR SONS 

HISTORY, INFLUENCE AND CHARACTERISTICS OF 
AMERICAN UNIVERSITIES 

WITH 

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES AND PORTRAITS OF ALUMNI 
AND RECIPIENTS OF HONORARY DEGREES 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 
GENERAL JOSHUA L. CHAMBERLAIN, LL.D. 

EX-PRESIDENT OF BOWDOIN COLLEGE AND EX-GOVERNOR OF MAINE 

SPECIAL EDITORS 

Approved iy Authorities of the respective Universities 



HARVARD 1636 

WILLIAM ROSCOE THAYER, A.M. 

YALE 1700 

CHARLES HENRY SMITH, LL.D. 



PRINCETON 1746 

JOHN DeWITT, D.D., LL.D. 
JESSE LYNCH WILLIAMS, A.M. 

COLUMBIA 1754 

J. HOWARD VAN AMRINGE, Ph.D., L.HD., LL.D. 



BIOGRAPHICAL EDITORS 

CHARLES E. L. WINGATE, Harvard '83 JESSE LYNCH WILLIAMS, Princeton '91 

ALBERT LEE, Yale '91 HENRY G. PAINE, Columbia '80 

INTRODUCTION BY 
WILLIAM T. HARRIS, Ph.D., LL.D. 

united states commissioner of education 



ILLUSTRATED 



Vol. Ill 



BOSTON 

R. HERNDON COMPANY 

1899 



Copyright, j8gg, hy 
HERKDON COMPANY 



The University Press 
Camhrid^e, U.S.A. 



V3 



INTRODUCTION 



630896 



INTRODUCTION 



IN the first volume of this work it was the intention to set forth the general character of 
four representative Universities: — the inspiring motive of their establishment, their 
organization and equipment, their historical progress and development, and their large 
influence as public institutions and as powers in the social order. 

The second volume was concerned with the personal factors of the case : the character of 
the men, who for the great service of their instruction, guidance and inspiration, whether in the 
communication of positive knowledge or in the discipline of the powers, discernment of the 
aptitudes and cherishing of the nobler aspirations and faiths of their immediate pupils, deserve 
themselves to be cherished in lasting honor. 

Following in order now are the ranks of those so highl}* favored in being the objects of all 
this interest and devotion. From the Universities we turn our regard to the Sons. And in 
doing this, it cannot be expected that a complete account can be given of the character and 
career of anj^ ; still less would it be possible, within the compass of the work, even to make 
mention of all whose names have been inscribed on these honored rolls. What is attempted 
here is an exhibition of the widely varied results of the work of the Universities in their office 
of instruction and education as shown in their Alumni. This is not a selection of what may 
be arbitrarily considered the best examples, but a broad illustration from the whole range of 
academic preparation seen in every department of active life. While it may not be doubted 
that those who are here presented have achieved some eminence in their respective fields of 
activity, it will be borne in mind that the great number of those not in this list have also in 
manifold good works illustrated the genial influences and positive benefits of their University 
training. Indeed the larger usefulness, and perhaps we should saj- the great and supremely 
justifying end of the Universit)-, lies in what docs not easily respond to analysis, investigation 
or enumeration, but runs out into the thousand invisible but mighty influences that make up 
the daily life of man, and so have part in the development of human history. The examples 
herein are, then, of a representative character, — not only of the influence of University training, 
but of the \-aried active powers in human association for well-doing. Although it is said by 



viii UNIVERSJTJKS JM) rilElR SONS 

some, — we think without sufficient reflection, or it may be from a too professional point of 

view, that the glorj' of a Universit}' is in w hat it offers to the best endowed, there is a broader 

truth revealed in this contemplation, which allows us to believe that the glor>' of a University is 
in what it does for all, of any grade and aptitude, who are objects of its concern, and in the 
remote effects upon the community at large. 

The time is past when a University education necessarily implied a strict following of 
what was known as the " learned professions." Indeed, this term itself has had large extension 
within recent years. Law, medicine and theology, which made the noble scope of the mediaeval 
Universities, no longer bound the activities of the great schools which have inherited their name 
and still bear their prestige transported in place and broadened in scope. Journalism ; literary 
authorship; teaching, in its various lines and grades; engineering, in the construction and 
handling of the fast developing applications of modern physical science ; even more, perhaps, 
research, exploration, invention, in all fields of observation, and among the elements, forces 
or laws of action, whether in the jjhysical or psychical spheres, — all these demand a preparation 
for which the means and encouragements of the highest schools are none too ample. The 
successful prosecution of any of these aims may well deserve the rank of a " learned profes.sion." 

In fact, we might warrantably say that in these modern days science, philosophy and art 
have all enlarged their content and their scope. Geology, geography, meteorology, astronomy, 
have each revealed new aspects of the worlds; biology, new reaches of life; chemistry and 
molecular physics have opened to us glimpses of wondrous modes of action which we scarcely 
dignify by calling them laws, inasmuch as they seem like generative powers; the problems 
of psychology are investigated on new lines, and even the traditions of histor\- in its monu- 
ments, relics and languages are tried by new tests and lead to new grounds of conclusion. 

We might go even farther, and advancing to the problems arising from associated human 
effort under modern conditions of material and historic development, consider how great a part 
must belong to the schools of learning, where should be set forth the princijiles on which luiinan 
intercourse and effort arc to be conducted — the practical points of intersection of economic and 
moral laws, — self-advantage and self-surrender. Among these concernments, susceptible of 
study, — passing from simple to complex, from near to far, — are such matters as banking; 
insurance; instrumentalities of communication and transportation; methods of exchange and 
use of products ; the enfranchisement of industry and commerce, and the large handling of 
labor and capital necessitated by our complex civilization, — all economic considerations, in 
fact, affecting man's work and worth in the world. Nor can we stop short of taking into this 
account all the vast elements and interests which enter into the problems of modern politics, 
national and international, which demand the exercise of the highest powers and largest 
sympathies. The dealing with such interests and handling of such instruments is a great trust, 
the exercise of which w^ill be held to strict account before the tribunals of history and of the 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS ix 

Master of life. Surely such things require the best that our great schools can give for doctrine, 
instruction and reproof. It is by such things that civilization advances, — which is, or should 
be, a demonstration of the power and worth of manhood. 

What we have especially to remark here, without entering into discussion or detail, is the 
fact that in man's highest intellectual effort, in his mastery of knowledge, skill, and even of his 
own powers, he owes a large debt, whether recognized or not, to the great centres of instruction 
and discipline which make it their function to discover, produce, distribute and inculcate the 
truths that pertain to man's well-being. So related are human interests that no humblest worker 
in the associated eflbrt, now so diversified and so widely correlated, can fail to be affected by 
what the masters of science and inspircrs of ideals, as well as the captains of industry and enter- 
prise, develop and devote to practical ends out of what they know of the laws of things 
and of man. 

And those who have profited as they were able by years of personal, intimate relations 
with the chosen masters of knowledge in centres of educational influence, going out into the 
workl in tlicir own work and on lines opened by the public need, become in turn not only pro- 
ducers of their specialty, but new centres of influence radiating their light and strength into the 
great common life to which they belong. 

The whole reach and effect of these manifold activities it would be impossible to trace or 
estimate. But even by such mere sweep of the eye as we have given, and in such a list of 
names and services as is presented in the following volumes, enough can be seen of the place 
and part in life of the Sons of our Universities to justify the foresight of the founders of these 
institutions, the generosity of their patrons and the fostering care of the State. Enough of 
the larger beneficial result than that limited to immediate individual advantage can sureh' be 
apprehended to command not merely the affection of the alumnus, but the honoring regard 
of the community. It is this belief which justifies the publishers in presuming upon the 
kindly reception of the work which they have contemplated with more than a commercial 
interest, and to which they have devoted the best abilities at their command. 



^^ff^^M.^'-^^^^^t^aijiM^ 



Brunswick. Maine September i, 1899. 



UNIVERSITY SONS 



UNIVERSITY SONS 



WARE, William Robert 

Harvard A.B. 1852, SB. 1856. LL.D 1896. 

Born in Cambridge, Mass, 1832; graduated Harvard, 
1852; Lawrence Scientific School, 1856; Professor of 
Architecture, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 
1865-81 ; in Columbia since 1881. 

WILLIAM ROBERT WARE, LL.D., Archi- 
tect, and Professor in Columbia, was born 
in Cambridge, Massachusetts, May 27, 1832, the 
son of Henry Ware, Jr., (Harv. 1812, D.D. 1834) 
and Mary Lovell (Pickard) Ware, of descent from 
Robert Ware, who settled in Dedham, Massachu- 
setts, in 1 64 1. He received his early education in 
the Hopkins Classical School, Cambridge, at the 
Milton Academy and at Phillips-Exeter Academy, 
and was graduated at Harvard in the Class of 1852. 
He then entered the Lawrence Scientific School, 
from which he received the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in 1856. After studying architecture with 
E. C. Cabot in Boston and R. M. Hunt in New 
York, he practised his profession in Boston, being 
associated in the firms of Philbrick & Ware, 1860- 
1861, and Ware & Van Brunt, 1863-1881. Among 
Mr. Ware's works is the design of the American 
School of Classical Studies at Athens, Greece, and 
in conjunction with Mr. Van Brunt, the Memorial 
Hall at Harvard, the First Church in Boston and 
other public buildings. In 1865 he was made Pro- 
fessor of Architecture in the Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology, holding that Chair until 1881, when 
he was called to Columbia in the same capacity. 
He still holds this Professorship, residing at 30 
East Twenty-Seventh Street, New York City. He 
received the degree of Doctor of Laws from Harvard 
College in 1896. Professor Ware is a member of 
the leading architectural societies, including the 
Royal Institute of British Architects, the Soci^t^ 
Centrale of Paris, the American Institute and the 
Architectural League. 

VOL. III. — 1 



WATSON, Francis Sedgwick 

Harvard A.B 1876, M.D. 1879. 

Born in Milton, Mass., 1853 ; graduated from the 
Academic Department, 1876 ; from the Harvard Medical 
School, 1879; studied abroad two years ; now a leading 
surgeon of Boston ; has been connected with the 
various hospitals of that city ; with the Harvard Med- 
ical School for over ten years; inventor of several 
surgical appliances; and author of numerous articles 
relative to surgery. 

FRANCIS SEDGWICK WATSON, M.D., Sur- 
geon, and Instructor in the Medical Depart- 
ment of Harvard, was born in Milton, Massachusetts, 
May 31, 1853. He was educated in the private 
schools of Epps Dixwell and John Hopkinson, and 
at Harvard, graduating Bachelor of .Arts in 1876, 
and taking his Medical degree three years later. 
During his last year at the Harvard Medical School 
he acted as House Surgeon at the Massachusetts 
General Hospital, and the succeeding two years 
were devoted to advance study and professional 
observation in Vienna, Strassburg, Paris and London. 
His active professional career was inaugurated in 
Boston in 1881, and he has ever since been busily 
occupied with an extensive private and hospital 
practice, paying special attention to surgerj', in 
which he has acquired local distinction. He has 
filled the position of Surgeon to the Department of 
Genito-Urinary Diseases at the Boston Dispensary ; 
Assistant Surgeon to the Home of the Good 
Samaritan ; Assistant Visiting Surgeon to the City 
Hospital ; and Out- Patient Surgeon to the latter, 
the Children's and Carney Hospitals. In 1S8S he 
was called to the Medical Department of Harvard 
as Clinical Instructor in Genito-L'rinary Surgery ; 
was an Assistant in Clinical Surgery there from 
1890 to 1894, and in the latter year was appointed 
Instructor in Genito-L'rinary Surger)', which is one 
of the special features of his practice. Dr. Watson 
has contributed numerous articles to the medical 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



journals upon timely topics rfl;Uive to surgery; has 
invented a number of valuable surgical appliances ; 
is a member of the Massachusetts Medical Society 
and the American Association of Anthropologists, 
which later he represented at the International 
Medical Convention held at Berlin in 1889. On 
June 16, 1SS6 he married Mary, daughter of 
Thomas H. I'erkins, of Boston. 



WHITE. John Williams 

Harvard Ph D. and AM 1877. 
Born in Cincinnati, Ohio, 1849; educated at the Ohio 
Wesleyan University, in Europe, and at Harvard 
(1877); Assistant Professor of Greek at Harvard and 
then Professor of Greek; Chairman of the Managing 
Committee, and later Professor of the American School 
of Classical Studies at Athens ; President of the 
Archaeological Institute of America; member of the 
Imperial German Archaeological Institute, the Soci«t6 
Archiologique d'Athtnes, the Society for the Promo- 
tion of Hellenic Studies of Great Britain, the American 
Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Oriental 
Society, the American Philological Association, the 
American Association for the Advancement of Science, 
and the Archicological Institute of America; Editor 
(with others) of the Harvard Studies in Classical Phil- 
ology; Senior Editor of the College Series of Greek 
Authors ; Editor of the CEdipus Tyrannus of Sophocles ; 
of a Series of First Lessons in Greek ; and of numerous 
other works. 

JOHN WILLIAMS WHITE, Ph.D., LL.D., 
I'rofcssor of Greek at Harvard, was born in 
Cincinnati, Ohio, March 5, 1849. His mother, 
Anna Catherine Williams, was the daughter of Judge 
Hosea Williams a resident of Delaware, Oliio, but a 
native of Massachusetts, the family coming from Pitts- 
field. His father. Rev. John Whitney White, was born 
in Palmyra, Maine, and was the son of John White, 
whose native place was Fitchburg, Massachusetts. 
After passing through the Lancaster, (Ohio) High 
School, Mr. White entered the Ohio Wesleyan Uni- 
versity in Delaware, and there received the degree 
of Bachelor of .Arts in 1868. The year 1871-72 
was devoted to study in I'uropc, and then in 1874 
Mr. White entered Harvard where he received the 
degree of Doctor of Philosophy antl Master of .-^rts 
in 1877. Meanwhile in 1868-1869, he had held 
the Professorship of Greek and Latin at \\illoughby 
College; from 1869 until 1874 had been Professor 
at Baldwin University; and from 1874 to 1877 
Tutor in Greek at Harvard. In 1877 he was 
appointed Assistant Professor of Greek at Harvard, 
and held that position until the death of Professor 
Sophocles in 1884, when he was appointed full 



Professor of Greek. In 1896 he received from 
Wesleyan University, Middletown, Connecticut, the 
honorary degree of Doctor of Laws. Professor 
A\'hite has taken great interest in the American 
School of Classical Studies at .Athens and has 
accomplished a great amount of work in behalf of 
that Institution, first from 1881 to 1887, as Chair- 
man of the Managing Committee, and later in 1893- 
1894 as Professor. Since 1897 he has been the 
President of the Archa;oIogical Institute of America. 
His work has been recognized at home and abroad 
by election to learned societies, including the Impc- 




JOHN \VILLI.\MS WHITK 

rial German Archjeological Institute at Berlin, the 
Socidt^ .-\rch(5ologi(iue d'.Athfenes, the Society for the 
Promotion of Hellenic Studies of Great Britain, 
the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the 
American Oriental Society, the .American Philological 
Association, the .American .Association for the Ad- 
vancement of Science, and the Archaeological Insti- 
tute of America. He is Senior Editor of the College 
Series of Greek Authors, and Editor (with others) 
of the Harvard Studies in Classical Philology. His 
literary work, since 1S73, includes a College Edition 
of the O-^dipus Tyrannus of Sophocles, a Series of 
First Lessons in Greek (republished in England), 
the First Four Books of Xenophon's .Anabasis (with 
Professor \X. W. Goodwin), Selections from Xeno- 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



phon and Herodotus (with Professor W. \\'. Good- 
•AJn), an Introduction to tlie Rhythmic and Metric 
of the Classical Languages (republished in Eng- 
land), Stein's Dialect of Herodotus, Passages 
for Practice in Translation at Sight, an Illustrated 
Dictionary to Xenophon's Anabasis (with Professor 
M. H. Morgan), the Beginner's Greek Book, and 
the First Greek Book. Numerous pamphlets and 
articles in magazines have also been written by 
Professor White, including Greek and Latin at Sight 
(N. E. Journal of Education, 1878), seven reports 
on the American School of Classical Studies at 
Athens (18S2-1887 and 1S94), The Realia of 
Greek Literature (Addresses before the Massachu- 
setts Teachers' Association, 1882), The 'Stage' in 
Aristophanes (Harvard Studies in Classical Phil- 
ology, 1S91), The Pelargicon in the Time o 
Pericles (Ephemeris Archaiologike, 1894), The 
Opisthodomus on the Acropolis at Athens (Harvard 
Studies in Classical Philology, 1895), ^'Eschylus 
(Warner's Library of I'niversal Literature), two 
Reports as President of the Institute (American 
Journal of Archreology, 1897 and i8g8), and 
Graduate Instruction in the United States (The 
Graduate Handbook, 1899). 



WYMAN, Jeffries 

Harvard AB, 1833, M.D. :837. 
Born in Chelmsford, Mass., 1814 ; graduated Harvard, 
1833; M.D., 1837; Curator of Lowell Institute, 1839; 
Demonstrator of Anatomy, Harvard, 1838-40; Professor 
of Anatomy and Physiology. Hampden Sidney College, 
Va., 1843-47; Hersey Professor of Anatomy, Harvard, 
1847-74; Curator, Peabody Museum, 1868-74; President 
of Boston Society of Natural History, 1856-70; died 
1874. 

JEFFRIES WVMAX, M.D., Comparative Anato- 
mist, and Professor at Harvard, was born in 
Chelmsford, Massachusetts, August ii, 1814, and 
graduated at Harvard in 1833, taking the degree of 
Doctor of Medicine at the JNIedical School in 1837. 
He entered at once upon active work, receiving the 
appointment of House Physician at the Massachusetts 
General Hospital, and that of Demonstrator in the 
Harvard Medical School under Dr. John C.Warren, 
and in 1839 that of Curator of the Lowell Institute. 
The proceeds of a course of lectures on Comparative 
-Anatomy delivered by him in 1840, gave him the 
means of going abroad and pursuing his studies in 
the Jardin des Plantes at Paris and the College of 
Surgeons at London, and returning to America in 
1843, he accepted the position of Professor of Anat- 
omy and Physiology at Hampden Sidney College, 



Virginia, where he remained until 1847. In the 
latter year he was called to the Hersey Professorship 
of .Anatomy at Harvard, at the time when that was 
made a separate Chair, succeeding Dr. Warren. In 
this position he remained until the time of his death, 
which occurred in Bethlehem, New Hampshire, Sep- 
tember 4, 1874. The contributions of Professor 
Wyman to science were many and great, based 
largely upon original exploration and observation, 
especially in Central and South .America. In the 
field of comparative anatomy and physiology, in 




JEFFRIES W^'MAN 

paleontology, and later in that of ethnology, his ac- 
quirements were exceptional and his publications 
numerous. He published the first scientific de- 
scription of the gorilla, to which, indeed, he gave its 
distinctive name. On the foundation of the Peabody 
Museum of American Archaeology and Ethnology 
at Harvard, in 1866, he was named one of its seven 
'J'rustees and made its Curator, holding this position 
until his death. He was President of the Boston 
Society of Natural History from 1856 to 1S70, and 
in 1856 he was chosen President of the American 
Association for the .Advancement of Science. He 
was a member of the American Academy, the Na- 
tional Academy of Sciences, the Linnaean Society of 
London and many other learned bodies in this coun- 
try and in Europe. His bibliography includes one 
hundred and seventy-five titles. 



UNlVERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



WILLIAMS. Samuel 

Harvard A B. 1761 -Vale LL.D 17K 
Born in Waltham. Mass.. 1743 ; graduated Harvard. 
1761 ; licensed to preach, 1763, and Pastor of the church 
in Bradford. 1765-80; Mollis Professor of Mathematics 
and Natural Philosophy Harvard. 1780-88; Pastor in 
Rutland, and Burlington, Vermont. 1789-97 ; Editor of 
the Rutland Herald to the time of his death ; received 
the degree of LL.D. from Edinburgh and Yale ; died 
1817. 

S.\MLi:i. Wll.I.IAM.^. I.I..I)., Clergym.in, and 
I'rofcssor al Harv.inl, was born in WaltlKiiii, 
M;iss3chusctts, .\pril 23, 1743. He was the grand- 
son of Rev. John Williams ( Harvard 1683') of Deer- 




inmate of his family. In 17S0 he was appointtd 
I lollis Professor of .MatlKinatics and Natural History 
at Harvard, occupying that Chair for eight years 
and also lecturing on .Astronomy to the Senior class. 
While Professor at Harvard he observed an eclipse 
of the sun on Penobscot B.ay, by request of the 
.\merican .\cademy of .Arts and Sciences, and made 
a survey of the Western Houmlary of Massachusetts 
by appointment of the Colonial government. He 
resigned his Professorship in 1788 and returned to 
the ministry in Rutland, Vermont, and subsequently 
inllurlington in the same state, until i79S- He 
also lectured in the University of Vermont and made 
a survey of the Western boundary of that state by 
appointment of the Governor. The latter years of 
his life were occupied in editing the Rutland Herald 
and the Rural Magazine. He published a History 
of X'erniont, and left many v;duable manuscripts on 
Scientific Subjects. The University of Kdinburgh, 
Scotland, gave him the degree of Doctor of Laws in 
17S5, and Vale in 1786. He died in Rutland, 
Vermont, January 2, 181 7. 



.SAM I, \SILLlA.Ms 

field, M.issachusetls, wlio was carried into captivity 
by the Indians after the taking of that town in 1704. 
•Samuel Williams was graduated at Har\ard in 1761, 
and because of his proficiency in mathematics was 
selected to accompany Professor Winthrop to New- 
foundland to obsen-e the transit of Venus in that 
year. His choice of a profession, however, was the 
ministry, and studying theology while teaching at 
Bradford, he was licensed to preach in 1763 and 
settled over a church in that town, where he re- 
mained for fifteen years, from 1765 to 1780. He 
continued his school during his pastorate, having 
among his pupils in natural philosophy Benjamin 
Thompson, afterwards Count Rumford, who was an 



LANE, George Martin 

Harvard A.B. 1846. A.M. 1850. LL. D. 1894. 

Born in Charlestown, Mass., 1823 ; graduated at Har- 
vard 1846 ; studied abroad ; University Professor of 
Latin at Harvard 1851-1869 : Pope Professor i869-i£94 ; 
Professor Emeritus for the rest of his life; died 1897. 

GKORdE M.ARTIN l..\Ni:, Ph.D., LL.D., 
for over forty years Latin Professor of 
Harvard, was born in Charlestown, Massachusetts, 
December 24, 1823. His parents moved to Cam- 
bridge when he was a child, and he acquired his 
preliminary education in that city. .After graduat- 
ing at Harvard with the Class of 1846, he was a 
member of the College force of Instructors for a 
time. In order to thoroughly prepare himself for 
the profession of an educator he spent four years at 
the Universities of Berlin and Gottingen, receiving 
from tlie latter the degree of Doctor of Philosophy 
in 1851. Upon his return he joined the Faculty of 
Harvard as College Professor of Latin, holding that 
post until 1869. He was then called to the Pope 
Professorship of Latin, which he retained actively 
until 1894 when his name was placed upon the 
retired list as Professor Emeritus. Professor Lane 
died in 1897. While an undergraduate he dis- 
played unusu.il proficiency as a Latinist, deliver- 
ing the salutatory at Commencement in 1846 and 
the Latin address at the inauguration of President 



UNIVERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



Edward Kverett. He received from the College 
the degree of Master of Arts in 1850, and that of 
Doctor of Laws was conferred upon him on his 
retirement. He was well known both in the United 




GEORGE M. LANE 

States and Europe as an accomplished linguist, was 
a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and 
Sciences, and the author of a Standard Latin Gram- 
mar. For his first wife he married a Miss Gardiner, 
of Gardiner's Island, whose sister was the wife of 
the late Professor K. N. Horsford. She died in 
1S76, leaving three children: G. M. Lane, of the 
banking firm, Lee, Higginson & Company, Boston ; 
Louisa, married to W. B. Van Rensselaer, of .■\lbany, 
New York, and Miss K. W. Lane, an artist, now de- 
ceased. For his second wife Professor Lane mar- 
ried Mrs. Clark, of Cambridge, a sister to Gamaliel 
Bradford, of Boston. 



and was brevetted Brigadier-General of Volunteers, 
1863 ; died 1885. 

HE.NRV L.\\\R1::N'CE F.USTIS, A.^L, En- 
gineer, was born February i, 1819, in 
Fort Independence, Boston Harbor, where the 
regiment of artillery in which his father, Abra- 
ham Eustis (Harvard 1804) was Lieutenant-Colonel, 
was quartered at that time. He was graduated at 
Harvard in 1838, and the same year received ap- 
pointment as Cadet at the United States Militar)' 
Academy at West Point. There he pursued the 
prescribed course of four years, being graduated at 
the head of his Class in 1842 and assigned to the 
Engineer Corps. In his capacity as Assistant to 
the Chief Engineer, he was engaged in the con- 
struction of Fort Warren and Lovell's Island sea 
wall in Boston Harbor in 1843-1845 and in 1847 
was made Principal Assistant Professor of Engineer- 
ing at West Point. This position he occupied for 
two years, resigning in 1849 to take the Chair of 
Engineering at Harvard. He organized that De- 
partment in the Lawrence Scientific School and 




EUSTIS, Henry Lawrence 

Harvard A.B. 1838. 

Born in Boston, Mass., 1819: graduated Harvard, 
1838; U. S. Military Academy. 1842; Assistant Profes- 
sor of Engineering at West Point, 1847-49: Professor 
of Engineering at Harvard. 1849-85: Dean of the Scien- 
tific Faculty, 1862-85 ; entered the Civil War as Colonel 
of the Tenth Mass. Volunteers, served with distinction 



HEXRV L. EUSIIS 

remained at its head until his death, from 1862 to 
1865 being Dean of the Faculty of that SchooL 
General Eustis went in the Civil War as Colonel of 
the Tenth Massachusetts Volunteers, receiving the 



UNiyERSITIES JND THEIR SONS 



brevet of Brigadier-General by gallant service. He 
resigned from tiie army in 1S64, owing to impaired 
lieallli, and reHirne<l to his duties at Harvard. Ik- 
was a fellow of tlie American Academy and a member 
of many learned societies. He died in Cambridge, 
Massachusetts, January 11, 1S85. 



RICE, George Staples 

Harvard S.B. 1870. 
Born in Boston, Mass., 1849; educated at the Boston 
Latin School, the English High School, Lawrence 
Scientific School, Harvard, 1870; Assistant to Chief 
Engineer of Lowell Water Works, Assistant and Di- 
vision Engineer of the Boston Water Works, Assis- 
tant Engineer in charge of the construction of the 
Boston Main Drainage Works; engaged in mining 
and milling in the west ; Principal Assistant Engineer 
in charge of Main Drainage Works, Boston ; Deputy 
Chief Engineer New York Aqueduct; Chief Engineer 
Boston Rapid Transit Commission ; Consulting En- 
gineer on numerous public works ; Instructor in Water 
Supply and Sanitary Engineering at the Lawrence 
Scientific School, Harvard. 

GEORGE SrAPl.KS RlCi:, Kngineer and In- 
structor in Water Supply and Sanitary V.n- 
gineering at the I.awrence Scientific School, was 
born in Boston, Massachusetts, February 28, 1849. 
His father, Reuben Rice, was a descendant of 
Kdmund Rice, who came to this country in 1 634 from 
Harkhampstead, Kngland. His mother, Harriet 
Tyler Kettelle, was the daughter of Daniel Gookin 
Kettelle of Roxbiiry, Massachusetts. .After George 
Staples Rice had studied at the Boston I^atin 
School and graduated at the English High School 
he entered the Lawrence Scientific School of Har- 
vard, and there graduated in 1870. In the summer 
of 1S69, before graduating from the Scientific School, 
he was a member of the engineering party in the 
construction of Chestnut Hill Reservoir of the Bos- 
ton Water Works. In 1870-187 1 he was Assistant 
to the Chief Engineer of the Lowell, Massachusetts, 
Water Works, in 1S71-1877 was .Assistant and 
Division Engineer of the Boston Water Works, 
))nying especial attention during that time to the 
question of additional supply, and in 1S72 having 
charge of the party investigating the valleys of the 
Sudbury River, for Reservoir purposes. From 1873 
to 1877 he had charge of the construction of the 
lower part of the Sudbury conduit line, including 
P'cho Bridge in Xewton. From 1877 to 1880 Mr. 
Rice was the .Assistant Engineer in charge of the 
construction of the Boston Main Drainage ^\'orks, 
from 1880 to 1884 he was engaged in mining and 



milling in the southeastern part of .Arizona and 
from 1884 to 1887 carried on mining near George- 
town, Colorado. In the last named year he became 
Principal Assistant Engineer in charge of the Main 
Drainage Works of Boston, but for the ntxt four 
years was Deputy Chief Engineer of the New Crolun 
Aqueduct, New York. In 1891 he was api)ointcd 
Chief Engineer of the Rapid Transit Commission of 
Boston and from 1892 to date has been doing con- 
sulting engineering work with her.dcjuarters in Bos- 
ton. .Among his consulting works have been those 
of the city of Boston on Rapid Transit schemes 




GEORGE S. RICE 

and Subway studies, the East Boston tunnel esti- 
mates and ])lans, the Manchester, New Hampshire, 
Water Works, the New Bedford Water Works, the 
Xewton Boulevard an<l the Boston Elevated Rail- 
way on acquiring a bill before the Legislature in 
1S97. Since 1891 in addition to his regular engi- 
neering work he has held the position of Instructor 
in Water Supply and Sanitary Engineering at the 
Lawrence Scientific School, Harvard. The military 
experience of Mr. Rice has been that of private, 
corporal and sergeant in the First Corps of Cadets 
from 1876 to 1880. He has been Secretary of the 
Boston Society of Civil Engineers from 1874 to 
1880, member of the Grade Crossing Commission 
in Newton in 1893, of the Newton Water Board 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



1 893 to date, of the American Society of Civil En- 
gineers, Boston Society of Civil Engineers, American 
Institute of Mining Engineers and of numerous social 
organizations. He married at Yonkers, New York, 
October 10, 1889, Rose Breuchaud (Porter), and 
has one child, Albert Fetley Rice. 



ELLIS, Calvin 

Harvard A.B. 1846, M.D. 1849. 

Born in Boston, Mass., 1826; graduated Harvard, 
1846; M.D., 1849; Adjunct Professor of Theory and 
Practice at Harvard, 1863-65; Adjunct Professor and 
Professor of Clinical Medicine, 1865-83; Dean of Har- 
vard Medical School, 1869-83; died 1883. 

CALVIN ELLIS, M.D., Physician and Surgeon, 
was born in Boston, Massachusetts, in 1826. 
He was a graduate of Harvard in the Class of 
1S46, and after taking his degree in the Medical 




School in 1S49 he established himself in practice 
in Boston. In 1863 he was appointed .Adjunct Pro- 
fessor of the Theory and Practice of Medicine at 
Harvard, in 1S65 was given the same position in 
connection with the Department of Clinical Medi- 
cine, and in 1867 was made full Professor in the 
latter subject. This Chair he held to the time of 
his death, being also the Dean of the Medical 
School from 1869. Dr. Ellis made some valuable 



contributions to the literature of his profession, 
notable on bronchial and pulmonary affections, and 
for some years he was Attending Physician at the 
Massachusetts General Hospital. He was a fellow 
of the American Academy. His death occurred in 
Boston, December 14, 1883. 



PRESCOTT, Henry Lee 

Harvard A.B. 1894. 
Born in Salina, Kansas, April 13, 1870; educated at 
the Kansas Wesleyan College and at Harvard (1894); 
Instructor in English in the Indiana State University; 
Instructor in English at Harvard. 

HENRY LEE PRESCOTP, Instructor in Eng- 
lish at Harvard, son of John Henry and 
Mary Emily (Lee) Prescott, was born in Salina, 
Kansas, .Xpril 13, 1870. His early education was 
obtained at the Kansas Wesleyan College of Salina. 
Then turning to Cambridge, he took a four years' 
course at Har\-ard, graduating magna cum laude in 
1894. In the spring of his senior year he was a 
member of the victorious team in the Yale debate. 
For two subsequent years (1S95-1S97) Mr. Pres- 
cott was Instructor in English at the Indiana State 
University, but in 1897 was called to Har\-ard to 
become Instructor in English there. 



SHALER, Nathaniel Southgate 

Harvard SB. 1862, S.D. 1875. 

Born in Newport, Kentucky, 1841 ; educated at the 
Lawrence Scientific School and abroad ; served as a 
volunteer in the War of the Rebellion ; Assistant in 
Paleontology at Harvard ; in charge of the Instruction 
in Zoology and Geology at the Lawrence Scientific 
School ; Professor of Paleontology at Harvard ; Pro- 
fessor of Geology at Harvard ; Director of the Ken- 
tucky Geological Survey; author of numerous scientific 
works. 

N.VIHANIEL SOUTHGATE SHALER, So. 
D., Professor of Geology at Harvard, was 
born in Newport, Campbell county, Kentucky, Feb- 
ruary 20, 1S41. His parents were Nathaniel Burger 
and .\nn (Southgate) Shaler. For seven genera- 
tions, dating back to i6S6, Professor Shaler traces 
his line through American families. In 1S62 he 
graduated at the Lawrence Scientific School, Har- 
vard, and then entered the Federal volunteers in 
Kentucky to ser\-e as an officer in the artiller)- and 
on the staff during the Civil War. In 1864 he 
received the appointment of .Assistant in Paleontol- 
ogy at the Museum of Comparative Zoology at 
Harvard and the next year was put in charge of the 



8 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



Zoological and Geological Departments of the Law- 
rence Scientific School. That same year he re- 
ceived from Harvard the degree of Doctor of 
Science. In 1868 Mr. Shaler was appointed Pro- 




N. S. SHALER 

fessor of Paleontology at Harvard and in 1SS7 was 
made Professor of Cleology. Meanwhile he had 
been appointed in 1873 Director of the Kentucky 
Geological Survey and spent a part of seven years 
in that work. In 1884 he was made Geologist of 
the United States Geological Sun-ey in charge of the 
Atlantic Division. Besides belonging to many sci- 
entific societies he has written numerous articles on 
scientific subjects for the leading magazines. Among 
his books are Thoughts on the Nature of Intellect- 
u.il Property and Its Importance to the State, Illus- 
trations of the Earth's Surface (with William M. 
Davis) ; Glaciers, a First Book in Zoology, and 
Kentucky, the Pioneer Commonwealth in the Ameri- 
can Commonwealth series. 



SEARS, Philip Howes 

Harvard A.B. 1844, LL.B., 1849. 

Bom in Brewster. Mass., 1822 ; fitted for College at 
Phillips-Andover Academy, and graduated at Harvard, 
1844; Harvard Law School, 1849; Tutor at Harvard, 
1848-49; practised law in Boston, 1851-80-. member of 
the Boston Common Council and Trustee of Public 



Library, 1859 ; Representative in the Legislature, 
i860; Overseer, Harvard, 1859-65; died 1898. 

PHILIP HOWES SEARS, Lawyer, retired, 
was born in Brewster, Massachusetts, Decem- 
ber 30, 1822, was the son of John and Mercy 
(Howes) Sears, and was descended from Richard 
Sears, one of the founders of the town of Yarmouth, 
Massachusetts, in 1639. Tlie original homestead 
and land grant of Richard Sears, have come to him 
by inheritance which he retained. Mr. Sears re- 
ceived his preparation for College at Phillips-An- 
dover Academy, and was graduated at Harvard in 
1844. While pursuing his course in the Law School, 
from which he took his degree in 1849, he was em- 
Iiloycii as a Tutor in Mathematics in the University. 
He entered upon the practice of his profession in 
Boston in 1851, after a visit to Europe, building up 
a large and successful law business. -At the outbreak 
of the Civil War he was a member of the State House 
of Representatives, and was prominent in carrying 
forward the measures, looking to the national de- 
fence. He retired from practice in 1880 and 
devoted his time to literary pursuits and foreign 




p. H. SEARS. 



travel. Mr. Sears was a member of the .Vmerican 
.\rch?eological Institute, and served as an Overseer 
of Har\'ard from 1859 to 18O5. He died May i, 
189S. 



UNIFERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



CROWNINSHIELD, Francis Boardman 

Harvard A.B. 1829. A.M. (Hon.) 1843. 
Born in Salem, Mass., i8og ; graduated Harvard, 
1829 ; admitted to the Bar, 1833 ; Speaker of the Mas- 
sachusetts House of Representatives, 1848-49 ; member 
of the Massachusetts Senate ; President of the Old 
Colony Railroad; P'ellow of Harvard, 1861-77; died 
1877. 

FRANCIS BOARDMAN CROWNINSHIELD, 
Lawyer, was born in Salem, Massachu- 
setts, April 23, 1809, son of Benjamin A\'il- 
liams and Mary (Boardman) Crowninshieid. In 




F. B. CROWNINSHIELD 

direct descent from Joliann Kaspar Richter von 
Kroninschild, who came to New England from 
Saxony about 1686, the ("rowninshields were prom- 
inent merchants and ship-owners in Salem, Massa- 
chusetts, through several generations. The father 
of the subject of this sketch was Secretary of the 
Navy in the Cabinets of President Madison and 
Monroe, 1814-1819, and member of Congress 
from Massachusetts for eight years, 1824-1832, 
removing to Boston in the latter year. Francis 
Boardman Crowninshieid was graduated at Har- 
vard in the famous Class of 1829, was admitted to 
the Middlesex Bar in 1833, and established him- 
self in practice in Boston, where for a time he was 
a partner of Rufus Choate. Elected to the Legis- 



lature, he was niatle .Speaker of the House of 
Representatives in 1848 and 1849, ^"^l ^'^o served 
in the State Senate. For several years he was 
President of the Old Colony Railroad Company. 
In 1832, he married Sarah Gooll, daughter of Judge 
Samuel Putnam of Salem. Mr. Crowninshieid re- 
ceived the honorary degree of Master of .Arts from 
Harvard in 1843, and was a Fellow of that College 
from 1 86 1 to the time of his death, at Marblehead, 
Massachusetts, May 8, 1877. 



ROOSEVELT, Theodore 

Harvard A.B. 1880. 
Born in New York, 1858; educated at Harvard (i88o>; 
member New York Assembly; United States Civil 
Service Commission; New York City Police Com- 
mission; Assistant Secretary Navy; Lieutenant- 
Colonel and Colonel First Regiment Volunteer Cavalry, 
"Rough Riders"; Governor of New York; member 
of the London Alpine Club, Union League Club, Cen- 
tury Club and other organizations; Overseer of 
Harvard, 1895- 

THEODORE ROOSEVELT, LL.D., Governor 
of New York, was born in New York City, 
October 27, 1858. His mother was Martha Bul- 
lock ; his father was Theodore Roosevelt, the son 
of Cornelius Van Schaik ; and his ancestry were of 
Dutch, Huguenot and Scotch-Irish descent. En- 
tering Harvard, after a preliminary course of study 
under private tutors, he graduated in 1880. Two 
years later he was elected a member of the New 
York Assembly and received re-election in 1883 
and 1884. In 1889 he was appointed L'nited 
States Civil Service Commissioner and in 1895 was 
made a Police Commissioner of New York City. 
Mr. Roosevelt has been an Overseer of Harvard 
since 1895. In 1897 he was appointed Assistant 
Secretary of the Navy under Secretary John D. 
Long, and in that position accomplished notable 
work in preparation for the Spanish-American War 
of 1898. Immediately on the outbreak of the War 
he resigned his position in the Navy Department 
and with Dr. Leonard Wood (Har\-ard Medical 
School 1884) recruited and organized that unique 
body of troopers technically known as the First 
Regiment of Volunteer Cavalry, but popularly called 
the " Rough Riders." With this organization, 
formed of the best athletes of the country from the 
Colleges and from the prairies, Theodore Roosevelt 
as Lieutenant-Colonel and Leonard Wood as 
Colonel, went to the front and before Sitntiago look 
active part in the capture of the city, particularly in 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



the battle of San Juan Hill. On ColonclWood's 
promotion to a Hrigatiicr-Gcneralship, Lieutenant- 
Colonel Roosevelt was made Colonel of the "Rough 
Riders." Immedi.itelv on his return from the war 




IHEODORE ROOSEVELT 

he was nominated Republican candidate for Gov- 
ernor of New York, and was elected to take office 
in 1899. Governor Roosevelt received the honor- 
ary degree of Doctor of Laws from Columbia in 
1899. He is a member of the L'nion League, 
the Century, the Boone-Crockett Clubs (of which 
he has also been President), the London Alpine 
Club and the Naval and Military Order of the 
Spanish-.\merican War. Governor Roosevelt has 
also served as Trustee of the American Museum 
of Natural History and on the I5oard of State- 
Charities Aid Association. Throughout all his po- 
litical career he has been prominent in reform 
measures and while inilependent in thought and 
action, has yet held close allegiance to the Repub- 
lican party. Mr. Roo.sevelt has been an ardent 
hunter and explorer in the West and has turned the 
results of his experiences into very interesting mag- 
azine articles and books. As a capable historian he 
has also added to the literature of the country. His 
works include a History of the Naval War of 181 2 ; 
Hunting Trips of a Ranchman ; Life of Thomas H. 
Benton ; Life of Gouverneur Morris : Ranch Life 



and the Hunting Trail; besides a history of the 
Rough Riders and of the Naval preparation for the 
Spanish-.Xmerican War, the last two works having 
recently appeared in magazine form. Mr. Roose- 
velt married in 1886 Ethel Kermit Carew and has 
six children : Alice, Thcotlore. Kermit, Ethel, 
.Archibald and Quentin Roosevelt. 



LODGE, Henry Cabot 

Harvard A.B. 1871, LL.B. 1874, Ph.D. 1876. 

Born in Boston, Mass., 1850; graduated Harvard, 
1871 ; Law School, 1874 ; Editor of the North American 
Review, 1874-76; Editor International Review, 1879-81 ; 
Instructor in History, Harvard, 1876-79; member Mas- 
sachusetts House of Representatives, 1879-80; Rep- 
resentative in Congress, 1886-92; U. S. Senator from 
Massachusetts since 1893; PhD., Harvard, :876; 
LL.D . Williams, 1893 ! Overseer of Harvard, 1884-90. 

HENRY CABOT LODGE, Ph.D., LL.D., 
I' nited States Senator, was born in Boston, 
.M.issachusetts, May 12, 1850, the son of John 
Ellcrton and Anna Cabot Lodge, and was graduated 
at Harvard in the Class of 1S71. He studied law 




HENRY CAHOT LODGE 



at the Harvard Law School and was admitted to 
the Bar in 1875, but had already committed him- 
self to a literary career by accepting the Editorship 
of the North American Review, in which position 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



tl 



he remained two years. He had received from 
Harvard the degree of Doctor of Philosophy (His- 
tory) in 1875 for his thesis on 'I'he Land Law of 
the Anglo-Saxons, and the line of his literary effort 
was plainly marked out as that of history. This he 
assiduously cultivated, more especially biographical 
history, producing the Life and Letters of George 
Cabot in 1S77, and writing the lives of Alexander 
Hamilton, Daniel Webster and Cleorge Washington 
in the American Statesmen Series. He also edited 
the works of Hamilton, (in nine volumes), and has 
been a freciuent contributor to periodical literature 
and the author of other books of history and biog- 
raphy. Mr. Lodge has had a brilliant career in 
politics, beginning with his service of two years in 
the Massachusetts House of Representatives, 1879- 
1880, followed by his successful conduct of the 
Republican campaign in that State in 1883, his 
election to Congress in 1886, where he was con- 
tinued by re-election until he was chosen in 1893 
to succeed Mr. Davies in the United States Senate, 
where lie still holds a seat, having been elected for 
a second term by the Legislature of 1899. Sen- 
ator Lodge was Instructor in History at Harvard, 
1876-1879, and a member of the Board of Over- 
seers from 1884 to 1890. He married in 1871, 
Anna Cabot Davis, the daughter of Rear .'\dmiral 
Charles H. Davis. 



MASON, Amos Lawrence 

Harvard A.B. 1863, M.D. 1863, M.D. 1872. 

Born in Salem, Mass., 1842 ; graduated at Harvard, 
1863 ; attended Harvard Law School and Medical 
School and studied abroad ; has been House Physician 
of the Massachusetts General Hospital, Physician to 
the Boston Dispensary, Physician to the Carney Hos- 
pital, Physician to the Boston City Hospital: Associate 
Professor of Clinical Medicine at the Harvard Medical 
School ; Secretary and subsequently President of the 
Suffolk District Medical Society ; President of the 
Boston Society for Medical Improvement; one of 
the managers of the Boston Dispensary, member of 
the Association of American Physicians. 

AMOS LAWRENCE MASON, ALD., Physician, 
and Associate Professor in the Harvard 
Medical School, is the son of Charles and Su- 
sanna (Lawrence) Mason, and was born in Salem, 
Massachusetts, April 20, 1842. His father, a dis- 
tinguished clergyman, was the son of Jeremiah 
ALason, the eminent lawyer and United States Sen- 
ator from New Hampshire. The latter was the son 
of Jeremiah Mason, who lived in Connecticut and 
who command.ed a company of the Minute Men in 



the Siege of Boston and was later Colonel of the 
Connecticut Regiment. Dr. Mason's earliest an- 
cestor in .America was Major John Mason, who came 
to this country in 1672 and was Deputy-Governor 
of Connecticut and Commander-in-Chief of the 
Connecticut forces. After graduating in Harvard 
in 1S63, attending the Law School, 1863-1864, and 
receiving the degree of Doctor of Medicine at the 
Harvard Medical School in 1872, Dr. Mason be- 
came Physician to the Boston Dispensary, having 
previously served for a year as House Physician at 
the Massachusetts General Hospital. He remained 




A. L. M.ASON 

with the Dispensary until 1877, serving, also, for 
the four years 18 74-1 87 8 as Physician to the 
Carney Hospital. Since 1878 he has been Physician 
to the Boston City Hospital. Beginning service at 
Harvard as Instructor he was promoted to Assistant 
Professor in 1890 and as .Associate Professor in 
Clinical Medicine in 1893. In outside work he has 
won distinction as Secretary and subsequently Pres- 
ident of the Suffolk District Medical Society, Presi- 
dent of the Boston Society for Medical Improvement, 
1897, and as one of the managers of the Boston 
Dispensary, besides holding membership in the 
Massachusetts Medical Society and in the .Associa- 
tion of American Physicians. He married, Sep- 
tember 30, 1874, Louisa Blake, daughter of Rear 



] 2 



UNiyERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



NEWCOMB, Simon 

Harvard S.B. 1858, LL.D. 1884. 
Born in Wallace, N. S., 1835: educated under the 
direction of his father and at the Lawrence Scientific 
School; Professor of Mathematics in the U. S. Navy, 
1861-97; Superintendent of the Nautical Almanac 
nearly twenty years; eminent astronomer and mathe- 
matician ; prolific writer and member of many learned 
bodies; Lecturer at Harvard. 

SI.\[()X NKWfOMB, LL.D., S.D., Ph.D., R.S., 
Astronomer and Mathematician, was born in 
Wallace, Nova Scotia, March 12, 1835. Having re- 
ceived instruction in all ordinary branches of study 



Admiral Charles Steedman of the United States Bachelor of Science in 1 85 8, and accepting the ap- 
Navy, and has one daughter, Marion Steedman pointment of Professor of Mathematics in the United 
j^(.,5Q„_ States Navy in i86i, he was assigned to duty at 

the Naval Observatory in Washington, District of 

Columbia. In 1877 he became tiie Senior Pro- 
fessor and Superintcnilent of the Nautical Almanac 
office, which had been removed to the National 
Capital some years previous, and on his sixty- 
second birthday he was placed ujjon the retired list. 
Professor Newcomb has acquiretl fame as a math- 
ematician and astronouKT and is considered the 
foremost .American expert in astronomical mathe- 
matics, having prepare<l the most exact table illus- 
trating the motions of the planets yet computed ; 
planned the tower and dome of the Naval Academy 
and superintended the mounting of the twenty-six 
inch telescope; and assisted in equipping the Lick 
Observatory in California. In i860 he visited the 
Saskatchewan region to observe an eclipse of the 
Sim; went to Gibraltar for a similar purpose in 1870; 
and in 1882 he took a party to the Cape of Cood 
Hope to observe the transit of \'enns. He is one 
of the Board of Visitors to the Harvard Observatory, 
and having delivered a course of astronomical 
lectures at Johns Hopkins soon after Us foundation, 
was some years ago placed in charL;e of the Depart- 
ment of Astronomy and Mathematics at that Uni- 
versity. Besides his paper on four of the .Asteroids, 
read before the .American .Association in 1859, and 
his work on the Motions of the .Moon and Tables 
of the Planets above referred to, he is the author 
of over one hundred scientific papers, a series of 
astronomical and mathematical text-books, and a 
number of popular works relating to finance and 
political economy, upon which latter subject he 
lectured at Harvard in 18 79-1 880. Since his re- 
tirement from the Naval Observatory he has con- 
tinued his scientific investigations but has found 
occasional relief from the close study of mathemat- 
si.Mox NKWoj.Mi; ical problems in contributing to the scientific and 

popular magazines, and a story from his pen was 
from his father, who was a teacher, he turned his at- pidjlished in Harper's some time ago. He is also 
tention to educational pursuits at the age of eighteen, Kdilor of the .American Journal of Mathematics. 
and taught for some time in Maryland. Through Professor Newcomb has held the Presidency of the 
the friendship of Professor Henry and Mr. Hilgard, American .Association for the Advancement of 
who considered the young teacher fitted for a still Science, the .American Society for Psychical Re- 
higher field of usefulness on account of his superior search, and the .American Mathematical Society, 
knowledge of mathematics, he obtained a position and the Vice-Presidency of the National Academy 
in the Nautical .Almanac office, then located in of Science. Was at one time a fellow and later an 
Cambridge, Massachusetts, thus enabling him to associate fellow of the .American Academy of Arts 
become a student at the I^awrence Scientific School and Sciences ; is a member of the American, and 
(Harvard), from which he received the degree of the Philadelphia Philosophical societies, and the 




UNiyERSiriES AND rHEIR SONS 



13 



National Academy, and an honorary member of the 
New York Academy of Sciences. He is also a 
member of the Royal Societies of London ami 
Edinburgh, and the Royal Irish Academy, Dublin; 
holds honorary membership in the Manchester Lit- 
erary and Philosophical Society, Die Astronomische 
fleselkhaft, the Royal Institution of Great Britain, 
and the Royal CJeographic Society of Russia ; is an 
associate member of the Royal Astronomical Society 
of London and the institutes of P'rance, Russia, 
Belgium, Leyden and other scientific centres ; is an 
officer of the Legion of Honor, of France, and was 
a member of the Congres International de Chrono- 
mctrie. The degree of Doctor of Laws was con- 
ferred upon him by Columbian in 1874, Vale 1875. 
Harvard 1884, Columbia 1S87, Edinburgh 1S91, 
and Princeton 1896; that of honorary Doctor of 
Philosophy by the Universities of Leyden 1875, 
Heidelberg 1886, and Padua 1892, and that of 
Honorary Doctor of Science by the Dublin L'niver- 
sity in 1892. His degree from Heidelberg was 
bestowed on the five hundredth anniversary of that 
University. In 1878 he w-as awarded the Great 
Gold Huggins Medal by the University of Leyden, 
which is struck but once in twenty years, and given 
to the astronomer who has accomplished the most 
important work during that period, and he has 
received a gold medal from the Royal Astronomical 
Society, the Copley .Medal, also from England, and 
in 189S was the first reci[)ient of the Piouce Gold 
Medal from the .Astronomical Society of the Pacific. 
His portrait was painted for the collection of astron- 
omers at the Pulkowa Observatory, by order of the 
Russian (Government, and the Czar ordered a large 
jasper vase to be forwarded to him from that insti- 
tution. Professor Newcomb was selected to deliver 
the opening address at the Flower Observatory, 
L^niversity of Pennsylvania, and the Verkes Obser- 
atory, Chicago. 



MINOT, Francis 

Harvard A.B. 1841, A.M and M.D. 1844. 

Born in Boston, Mass., 1821 ; took his Bachelor's and 
Medical degrees at Harvard 1841 and 1844 respectively : 
practised in his native city upward of fifty years; Con- 
sulting Physician at Mass. General Hospital ; Instruc- 
tor at Harvard Medical School, 1S69-71 : Lecturer there 
till 1874; and Hersey Professor until i8gi ; died i8gg. 

FRANCIS MINOT, A.M., M.D., Physician, and 
Professor at Harvard, was born in Boston. 
Massachusetts, April 12, 1821. He was a graduate of 
Harvard (1841), and of the Medical School of that 



University (1844). His practice was confined to 
his native city, where he rapidly acquired profes- 
sional eminence which he maintained throughout 
his long and busy career embracing a period of 
nearly fifty years, a goodly portion of which he was 
a Consulting Physician to the .Massachusetts Gen- 
eral Hospital. Called to the .Medical Department 
of Harvard in 1869 as Instructor of Theory and 
Practice, he became a Lecturer there in 1871, and 
from 1874 to 1 89 1 he occupied the Hersey Pro- 
fessorship. Dr. Minot died May 11, 1S99. He 
was a fellow of the .American .\cademy of .Arts and 




IRAN'CIS MINOl 

Sciences, a member of the Boston Societies for 
Medical Improvement and Observation, and the 
Massachusetts Medical Society. The degree of 
Master of .Arts was conferred upon him by Harvard 
and Trinity College, Hartford. Connecticut, the 
latter in i860. 



MINOT, Charles Sedgwick 

Harvard S.D. 1878. 

Born in Boston, Mass., 1852; educated at the Insti- 
tute of Technology, Leipzig. Wiirzburg. Paris, and at 
Harvard ; Lecturer on Embryoiogy and later Assistant 
Professor of Histology and Embryology and finally 
Professor of Histology and Human Embryology at the 
Harvard Medical School : President of the American 



14 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



Society of Naturalists; President of the American 
Morphological Society ; President of the Boston Society 
of Natural History; member of the American Philo- 
sophical Society, the National Academy and the Amer- 
ican Academy of Arts and Sciences; corresponding 
member of the New York Academy, the Philadelphia 
Academy and the British Association for the Advance- 
ment of Science. 

CHARLES SEDGWICK MINOT, B.Sc., S.D., 
1,1. .D., Professor of Histology and Human 
Knibryology at Harvard, was born in Boston, Mas- 
sachusetts, December 23, 1852. He graduated in 




(_. s. MiNur 

the chemical course at the Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology in 1S72 and then studied biology in 
Leijiz-ig, Paris and W'lir/.burg. In 1878 he received 
the degree of Doctor of Science at Harvard, and 
two years later was made Lecturer on Embryology 
at the Harvard Medical School and Instructor in 
Oral Pathology and Surgery. In 18S3 he was 
given the Professorship of Histology and Embry- 
ology at the Medical School. Dr. Minot was Pres- 
ident of the .American Society of Naturalists in 1894, 
President of the .American Morphological Society 
in 1897 and President of the Boston Society of 
Natural History in 1897. He is a member of the 
.Vmerican Philosophical Society, the National 
Academy and the .American .Academy of .Arts and 
Sciences, and corresponding member of the New 



York .Academy, the Philadelphia Academy and the 
British Association for the Advancement of Science. 
Numerous papers have been written by him, for 
scientific journals, bearing on his researches on the 
physiology of the muscles, in respiration and on 
general biology and human embryology. His two 
most important ])ublications have been Human 
Embryology, 8vo, pp. 815, 1892, translated into 
German with additions and republished at Leipzig, 
1894, and Bibliography of Vertebrate Embryology, 
4to, Boston 1894. He devised two forms of 
automatic microtomes, both of which have come 
into general use. It was mainly through Dr. Minot's 
efforts that the .American Society for Psychological 
Research was established, but finally Dr. Minot be- 
came convinced that no evidence had been pro- 
duced to render telepathy a probable theory and so 
severed his connection with this society. He mar- 
ried, June I, 1889, Lucy Fosdick. In June 1899, 
he delivered the commencement address in Medicine 
at Vale, and received the honorary degree of Doctor 
of Laws. 



PUTNAM, Henry Ware 

Harvard A.B. 1869, LL.B. 1871. 

Born in Boston, Mass., 1847 ; educated at the Rox- 
bury Latin School, abroad, at Harvard (18691 and at the 
Harvard Law School ; practises law in Boston; Over- 
seer of Harvard; member of the Massachusetts Mil- 
itary Historical Society. 

Hi;\RV \\ARE PUTNAM, A.M., Lawyer, 
was born in Roxbury, (Boston), Massa- 
chusetts, on April 29, 1847. He is the son 
of George and Elizabeth Anna (Ware) Putnam, 
and is descended from the Salem and Danvers 
Putnams. .After entering the Roxbury Latin School 
in 1856, he spent seven years there and two years 
in travel and study abroad, and then became a 
student at Harvard where he received the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts in 1869 and Bachelor of Laws in 
1871. Mr. Putnam devoted still another year to 
studying at the Law School before he took up the 
practice of his profession in Boston. From 1886 to 
1892 he was an Overseer of Har\ard. Besides hold- 
ing membership in several social organizations, he is 
a member of the Massachusetts Military Historical 
Society. In 1873 Mr. Putnam married Florence 
Haven Thwing (who died in 1879) ; in 1882 he 
married Mary Nelson Williams (who died in 1895). 
He has had five children : Henry Ware, Jr., Amy, 
Eliot T., George T., and F. Delano Putnam. 



UNIVERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



15 



DAVENPORT, Charles Benedict 

Harvard A.B. 1889, Ph.D. 189s. 

Born in Stamford, Conn., 1866; educated at Harvard 
(i88gl and Harvard Graduate School; surveyor for 
railways; Assistant and later Instructor in Zoology at 
Harvard : Director of the Biological Laboratory of the 
Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences at Cold Spring 
Harbor, Long Island; President of Natural History 
Society ; Councillor of Boston Society of Natural 
History ; member American Academy of Arts and 
Sciences, Society of American Naturalists and Society 
of American Morphologists ; Fellow American Associ- 
ation Advancement of Science ; author of various 
papers. 

CHARLES BENEDIC r DAVENPORT, A.M., 
Ph.D., Zoologist, and Instructor at Harvard, 
was born in Stamford, Connecticut, June i, 1866, 
and is the son of Amzi Benedict and Jane Jorale- 
mon (Dinion) Davenport. From 1879 to 1886 
Mr. Davenport attended the Brooklyn Polytechnic 
Institute and afterwards Harvard, receiving the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Arts in 1889 and Doctor of 
Philosophy at the Harvard Graduate School in 
1S92. Meanwhile he had spent the year 1886- 
1887 as surveyor on railway location and construc- 
tion in Northern Michigan. In 1888 he was made 
Assistant in Zoology at Harvard, and in 1891 was 
appointed Instructor in Zoology. He served as 
Vice-President and Chairman of the Executive 
Committee of the Harvard Graduate Club, 1893- 
1894, Councillor of the Boston Society of Natural 
History, 1893, President of the Harvard Natural 
History Society, member of the American Academy 
of Arts and Sciences, the Society of American 
Naturalists, the Society of American Morphologists 
and fellow of the American Association for the Ad- 
vancement of Science. On June 23, 1894, he 
married Gertrude Crotty and has two daughters 
Millia C. and Jane Joralemon Davenport. Mr. 
Davenport has published various papers on the 
development of Bryozoa, a series of seven studies 
on Morphogenesis, two parts of a v.-ork on Experi- 
mental Morphology, and a book on Statistical 
Methods in Biology. 



RUSSELL, Frank 

Harvard A.B. 1896. A.M. 1897. Ph.D. 1898. 

Born in Fort Dodge, Iowa. 1868; educated at the 
State University of Iowa and at Harvard ; explorer, 
portrait painter ; Assistant in Zoology at the University 
of Iowa ; Assistant and later Instructor in Anthropol- 
ogy at Harvard; Associate Editor of the American 
Naturalist ; fellow of the American Association for the 
Advancement of Science, and member of the American 



Folk Lore Society, member of the National Geographic 
Society and the American Society of Naturalists. 

FRANK RUSSELL, S.M., Ph.D., Anthropolo- 
gist, and Instructor at Harvard, was bom in 
Fort Dodge, Iowa, .August 26, 1868. His father, 
David Chandler Russell, was of English descent, his 
ancestors two generations back having come to 
Pennsylvania from England about 1820. Frank 
Russell's mother, Elizabeth Carleton Russell, was a 
descendant of John Carleton, who was born in 
England in 1630 and came to New England in 
1 66 1. At the State University of Iowa Mr. Russell 




FRANK RUSSELL 

received the degree of Bachelor of Science in 1892 
and ^Laster of Science in 1895. .At Harvard he 
received the degree of Bachelor of .Arts in 1896, 
Master of .Arts in 1897 and L'Joctor of Philosophy in 
1898. Previous to this collegiate course he had 
spent two and a half years as explorer alone in the 
far north and one year as a portrait painter. His 
first position as teacher was that of .Assistant in 
Zoology at the University of Iowa in 1S92. Then 
he was called to Han-ard as .Assistant in .Anthro- 
pology from 1S96 to 1 89 7, and in 1S97 was made 
Instructor in .Anthropology. He became .Associate 
Editor of the .American Naturalist in 1S97, and a 
member of the editorial board in 1S99. Besides 
being a member of the .American Folk Lore Society 



1 6 



UNIFERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



and of the American Society of Natiirnlisls, Mr. 
Russell is a fellow of tlie American Association for 
the Advancement of Science. 



YOUNG, Edward James 

Harvard A B. 1848. 

Born in Boston, 1829; graduated at Harvard, 1848; 
Pastor at Newton, Mass, 1857-69: Hancock Professor 
and Dexter Lecturer, Harvard, 1869-80; Pastor at Wal- 
tham, Mass., 1880-92; S.T.D., Tufts, 1887. 

El )\VARI) JAMKS YOUN'C, S.T.I)., Clergyman, 
and Professor in Harvard Divinity School, 
\v;is born in Boston, .April i, 1S29, and graduated at 
Harvard in 184S. He took the degree of Master 




ICriWARl) J. YOUNG 

of .Arts in course, studied for two years in the H:ir- 
vard Divinity School, ami was ordained Pastor of a 
church in Newton, Massachusetts, June iS, 1857. 
He remained with his first charge twelve years, until 
in 1869 he was appointed Hancock Professor of 
Hebrew and other Oriental Languages at Harvard, 
and also Dexter Lecturer on Biblical Literature. 
This position he filled until 1880, when he resumed 
the work of the ministry in Waltham, Massachusetts. 
He received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from 
Tufts in 1887. 



ROPES, James Hardy 

Harvard A.B. 1889. 

Born in Salem, Mass., 1866; educated at Phillips 
Academy, Andover, at Harvard 1 1889), at the Andover 
Theological Seminary and abroad ; Assistant Professor 
of New Testament Criticism and Interpretation at the 
Harvard Divinity School. 

JAMES HARDY ROPES, Assistant Professor of 
New Testament Criticism and Interpretation 
at the Harvard Divinity School, was born in ,Salem, 
.NLassachusetts, September 3, 1866, and is the son 
of William Ladd and Harriet Lawrence (Peirson) 
Ropes. From Phillips .Academy, .Andover, Mr. 
Ropes entered Harvard, where he received the de- 
gree of Bachelor of .Arts in 1889. Then entering 
Andover Theological Seminary he graduated there in 
1893 and after that devoted two years to study in 
(iermany at Kiel, Halle and Berlin. In 1895 he 
was appointed Instructor in New Testament Crit- 
icism and Interpretation at Harvard, and in 1898 
Assistant Professor of the same subject. 



BIGELOW, Henry Jacob 

Harvard A.B. 1837, A.M. 1840, M.D. 1841, LL.D. 1882. 

Born in Boston, Mass.. 1818; graduated Harvard, 
1837 ; M.D., 1841 ; travelled and studied abroad, return- 
ing to Boston as a teacher in surgery in the Tremont 
Street Medical School, 1844 ; Surgeon to the Massa- 
chusetts General Hospital, 1846-86; Professor of Sur- 
gery, Harvard, 1849-82, and Emeritus after 1882; LL.D. 
Harvard, 1882 ; died 1890. 

HENRY JACOB lilGELOW, .M.D., 1.I..D., 
Surgeon, and Harvard Professor, was born in 
Boston, Massachusetts, March it, i8i8, son of 
Dr. Jacob (Harvard 1806) and Mary (Scollay) Bige- 
low. As a boy he attended the Boston Latin School, 
receiving there his jireparation for College, and was 
graduated from Harvard in the Class of 1837. For 
three years following his graduation, he studied 
medicine in the Harvard Medical School and under 
the tuition of his distinguished father, then visiting 
Europe for his health, and returning to take his 
degree of ]3octor of Medicine in 1841. Then en- 
sued several years of travel and study abroad before 
he established himself in his jirofession in Tioston, 
his first connection with an educational institution 
being that of teacher in the 'I'remont Street Medical 
School. In 1846 he was appointed Surgeon to the 
Massachusetts General Hospital, an institution with 
which his name became identified through forty 
years of service. He resigned this position in 1886. 



UNIVERSiriES ANB THEIR SONS 



17 



His connection with Harvard began in 1.S49, while 
his father still occupied the ('hair of Krving Profes- 
sor of Chemistry and Materia Medica, in which 
year he was appointed Professor of Surgery, suc- 




HENRY J. BIGELOW 

ceeding Professor Cieorge Hayward. This Chair 
he filled until 1S.S2, the first twenty years without 
an Assistant, then retiring from active service as 
Professor Emeritus, and holding that position until 
the time of his death in 1890. Dr. Rigelow's at- 
tainments in the medical profession were of the 
highest, and his rank is among the great surgeons 
of the world. He was a leader in the notable ad- 
vance of modern science, and his published writings 
are standard in the history of medicine and surgery. 
He made the original announcement of the discov- 
ery of anaesthesia in 1846, and in his subsequent 
writings contributed largely to the knowledge of the 
aiiplication and development of this great discovery. 
In orthopedic surgery he was notably successful, 
and was one of the highest authorities on that 
specialty. The mechanical appliances of his inven- 
tion, among them a lithotrite, an operating table 
and an autopsy table, have been adopted in all our 
leading hospitals. Dr. Bigelow received the degree 
of Doctor of Laws from Harvard in iSSi, and was 
a fellow of the .\merican Academy and of other 
learned societies. 
VOL. ni. — 2 



TENNEY, Benjamin 

Harvard M.D. 1892. 
Born in Thetford, Vt., 1863 ; educated at Dartmouth 
and at the Harvard Medical School ; practised in 
Boston; Physician to Out-Patients at the Boston City 
Hospital ; connected with the Carney Hospital and 
the Boston Dispensary ; member of various medical 
societies: Assistant in Anatomy and later Instructor 
at the Harvard Medical School. 

BKN'JAMIN TKNNEV, M.D,, Physician, and 
Instructor in the H ir\ar(l Medical School, 
was born in 'i'hetford, Vermont, October 6, 1863, 
his parents being Leonard and JLalvina (Baker) 
Tenney. He is of English descent, his ancestors 
coming to this country as early as 1638. .After re- 
ceiving the degree of IJachelorof .Arts at Dartmouth 
in 18S3 Dr. Tenney was a teacher for five years 
and then entered the Harvard Medical School. He 
graduated in 1892, serving for the last year of his 
course as House Officer at the Boston City Hospital. 
He immediately took up the practice of his pro- 
fession in lioston, and there also became connected 
with the Carney Hospital and tlie Boston Dispen- 
sary, besides being Phvsician to Out-Patients at the 




liENJ.\llI.\ lENNEV 

Boston City Hospital. He is a member of various 
medical societies and one of the original promoters 
of the University Club of Boston. In 1S93 Dr. 
Tenney was appointed .Assistant in .\natomy at the 



i8 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



Harvard ^[edical School, and three years later was 
made Instructor in Anatomy. He married, No- 
vember 8, 1893, Alice Parker, and has two children. 



MACVANE, Silas Marcus 

Harvard A.B. 1873. 

Born in Bothwell, P. E. I., in 1842: graduated at 
Horton Academy and Acadia College, N. S.. and at 
Harvard: Assistant Superintendent of Public Instruc- 
tion at the Education Office. Halifax; teacher in the 
Roxbury Latin School; Instructor in Political Econ- 
omy at Harvard; Assistant Professor in History: 
Professor in History and author of Working Principles 
of Political Economy. 

Sn.AS MARCUS MACVANE, Professor of His- 
tory at Har\'ard, is a native of Prince Edward 
Island, where he was born in 1.842. .After passing 




S\\..\% M. MACVAXE 

through Horton .Academy he entered .Acadia Uni- 
versity of U'olfville, Nova Scoti:i, and there grad- 
uated in 1865, and then entered Harvard College, 
where he graduated in 1875. From 1S65 to 1870 
he had been .Assistant Superintendent of Public 
Instruction at the Education Office in Halifax, 
and from 1870 to 1871 had studied abroad. He 
taught for two years in the Roxbury Latin School 
before receiving his first appointment as Instructor 
in Political Economy at Harvard in 1875. Three 
years later he was transferred to the History De- 



partment, where in 1SS3 he was made Assistant 
Professor in History, in 1886 Professor, and in 1887 
was advanced to tiie McLean Professorship of .An- 
cient and Modern History. His best-known work 
is Working Principles in Political Economy, but 
in addition numerous articles on economics have 
appeared in various magazines. 



WHITE, James Clarke 

Harvard A.B. 1853. M.D. 1856. 

Born in Belfast, Me. 1833; educated at Harvard 
(A.B., 18531, at the Harvard Medical School and in 
Europe; practised medicine in Boston; Instructor in 
Chemistry, Adjunct Professor in Chemistry, Profes- 
sor of Dermatology at the Harvard Medical School ; 
Visiting Physician of the Massachusetts General Hos- 
pital ; Physician to the Department of Skin Diseases, 
Massachusetts General Hospital ; President of the 
Massachusetts Medical Society; first President of the 
American Dermatological Association ; fellow of 
the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. 

J.\Mi;s CLARKE WHITi:, M.D., Dermatolo- 
gist, and Professor in the Harvard Medical 
School, was born at Belfast, Maine, July 7, 1833, his 
parents being James I'atterson and .Mary .Ann 
(Clarke) White. On his mother's side he comes of 
ICnglisii, Scotch and .Austrian ancestry. On his 
father's side he is descended from a Wliite who went 
from Lomlon to Londonderry, Ireland, in 166S, and 
was wounded in the defence of that place, and from 
his son, Williaui, whosurviveij the siege of London- 
derry, came to .America in 1725 and settled in Lon- 
donderry, New Hampshire, and later in Chester, 
New ILnnpshire. I'^itting for College at Belfast 
.Academy and with a resident clergyman, James C. 
White graduated from Harvard in the Class of 1853 
and then passed into the Harvard Medical School, 
where he received the degree of Doctor of Medicine 
in 1856. .After a year spent abroad he took up the 
practice of medicine in Boston and there has con- 
tinued ever since. In 1858 he was appointed In- 
structor in Chemistry in the Harvard Medical 
School, in 1866 was made .Adjunct Professor of 
("hemistry and in 1871 was promoted to his present 
position of Professor of Dermatology. In 1867 he 
was A'isiting Physician, and in 1870 Physician to 
the Department of Skin Diseases at the Massachu- 
setts Cencral IIos|)ital. He has been a fellow of 
the .American .Academy of .Arts and Sciences, and 
first President of the .American Dermatological .As- 
sociation. In 1892-1893 he was President of the 
Massachusetts Medical Society. On November 5, 



UNIFERSl-TIES .-IND THEIR SONS 



19 



1862, Dr. White married R[artha Anna Ellis, and 
has three children: McDonald Kliis (Harvard 1885), 
Perrin Ellis, and Charles James White (Harvard 
1890). 

WINSLOW, Kenelm 

Harvard B.A.S. 1883, M.V.D. 1886, M.D. 1891. 

Born in Boston, Mass.. 1863 : educated at the Bussey 
Institute, the Harvard Veterinary School and the Har- 
vard Medical School ; veterinary doctor ; practitioner 
of medicine ; Instructor of Zoology and later of Botany 
and then Assistant Professor in Comparative Thera- 
peutics at Harvard; Surgeon of the Newton Hospital; 
fellow of the Massachusetts Medical Society. 

KEN'ELM WIXSLOW, M.D., Assistant Pro- 
fessor in Comparative Therapeutics at Har- 
vard, was born in Boston, Massachusetts, 1863. He 
is a son of William Henry and Elizabeth Ryers 
(Kempton) Winslow, and is a direct descendant in 
the ninth generation of John Winslow and Mary 
Chilton (his wife) who came over in the Mayflower. 
John had three brothers, Edward the Covernor and 
Kenelm and Cjilbert who came to this country at a 
later date. Benjamin Pollard Winslow, grandfather 
of the present Kenelm \\'inslow, was a member of 
the famous Class of 1829, Harvard. From the Bos- 
ton Latin .School Kenelm Winslow entered the 
Busiey Institute of Harvard University where he 
graduated in 1883. He then passed through the 
Harvard Veterinary School, Class of 1S86, and the 
Harvard .Medical School, Class of 1891. Since 
1892 he has been established in the practice of 
medicine in Newton. Dr. Winslow was appointed 
Instructor in Zoology at Harvard in 18S6, and the 
same year was made Instructor in Botany. In 1893 
he was promoted to the Assistant Professorship in 
Comparative Therapeutics. He is Surgeon of the^ 
Newton Hospital and is a fellow of the Massachu- 
setts Medical Society. On October 17, 1893, he 
married Mary Olivia Folsom, and has one son, 
Kenelm Winslow, Jr. 



WINKLEY, Samuel Hobart 

Harvard S.T.B. 1846, A.M. (Hon.) 1865. 

Born in Portsmouth, N. H., 1819; educated at the 
Harvard Divinity School: Pastor of Pitts Street 
Chapel, Boston ; Pastor of Bulfinch Church for fifty 
years, and afterwards Pastor Emeritus ; Lecturer at 
Harvard, 1869-70. 

S.\ML1:L HOBART WINKLEV, A.M., Cler- 
gyman, retired, was born in Portsmouth, 
New Hampshire. April 5. 1S19. His parents were 



John and Jane Stevens (Hobart) Winkley. In 1846 
Mr. Winkley graduated from the Harvard Divinity 
School and was immediately ordained and installed 
Pastor of Pitts Street Chapel, Boston. Bulfinch 
Church was built to succeed this chapel and in the 
ministry of that church Mr. Winkley continued for 
fifty years until 1896. The remarkable work he 
accomplished during this period and the stronghold 
he acquired on the affections of his people are 
shown by his continuance as Pastor Emeritus of 
the church to the present time. In 1865 Har- 
vard gave him the honorary degree of Master of 




S. H. WINKLEV 

Arts. Mr. Winkley married first, November 3, 
1S40, Clarinda Richmond Andrews of Providence, 
Rhode Island, and second, .Vugust 13, 1S49, Martha 
Wellington Parker of Boston, Massachusetts. He 
has three surviving children : Frank Hobart, Martha 
Parker, wife of Col. Charles L. Suter, and Hobart 
William Winkley. 



VIRTUE, George Die 

Harvard A.B. 189:, A.M. 1893. 

Born in Abingdon, III., 1862; educated at Kansas 
State University and at Harvard (1892) ; Instructor in 
Political Economy at Harvard ; Tutor in Political 
Economy University of Chicago ; again Instructor in 



20 



UNirERSITIES JND THEIR SONS 



Political Economy at Harvard ; author of numerous 
articles. 

GKORGE OI.K VIRILE, I'h.D., Educator 
ami Political Economist, is the son of 
Joiin Freeborn and Cynthia (Jackson) Virtue, 
anil was born in Abingdon, Illinois, November 4, 
1S62. He was educated at the Kansas State Uni- 
versity and at Harvard, receiving at the latter C'ol- 
lege the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1S92, of 
Master of Arts in 1893, ''""^^ °f Doctor of Philosophy 
in 1897. With the exception of the year 1895- 
1896, spent as Tutor in Political Economy at the 




i;. (J. vikit'E 

University of Chicago, Mr. Virtue was Instructor in 
Political Economy at Harvard from 1894 to 1897, 
when he was appointed Professor of History and 
Civics in the State Normal School at Winona, Min- 
nesota. He has written a number of articles on 
economic questions for the Quarterly Journal of 
i:conomics and the Journal of Political Economy, 
and has made a study of the condition of the 
anthracite mine laborers of Pennsylvania for the 
Bulletin of the Department of Labor, Washington. 



of the Rcyal Meteorological Society, London, and cf 
the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and 
member of the Deutsche Meteorologische Gesellschaft. 

ROliKRl' DkCOURCV ward. Meteorologist, 
and Instructor at Harvard, was born in Bos- 
ton, Massachusetts, November 29, 1867, and grad- 
uated from Harvanl in the Class of 1889. In 1896 
he was appointed Instructor in Climatology at Har- 
vard, which position he continues to fill. He is a 
Fellow of tlie Royal Meteorological Society, Lon- 
don, and of the .American .Academy of .Arts and 
Sciences, antl is a member of the Deutsche Mete- 
orologische (}esellschaft. From 1892 to 1896 he 
was Editor of the .American Meteorological Journal 



WRIGHT, Charles Henry Conrad 

Harvard A.B. 1891. 
Born in Chicago, 111., i86g; graduated Harvard, 1891 ; 
A B., Oxford, England, 1895; Instructor in French at 
Harvard since 1895. 

CHARLES HEXRV CONRAD WRIGHT, In- 
structor in French at Harvard, w-as born in 
Chicago, Illinois, November i6, 1869. The family 
of his father, Charles Henry Wright, had originally 
settled in Delaware county. New York. His mother, 
Margaret Bertha (Upham) Wright, was descended 
from John L'pham, who came to .America in 1636. 
Mr. Wright's boyhood was spent in Europe, chiefly 
in France, England and Italy. Removing to .Amer- 
ica as a young man he entered Harvard and there 
graduated in 1891. He then attended Oxford 
where he received the degree of Bachelor of .Arts in 
1895 ; that same year he was appointed Instructor 
in French at Harvard, in which position he still 
continues. 



WARD, Robert DeCourcy 

Harvard A.B. 1889, A.M. 1893. 
Born in Boston, Mass., 1867; educated at Harvard 
(1889) i Instructor in Climatology at Harvard ; Fellow 



SKINNER. Prescott Orde 

Harvard A.B. 1896. 
Born in Boston, Mass., 1868 ; educated at the Boston 
Latin School; graduated Harvard, i8g6; Instructor at 
Harvard. 

PRESCOIT ORDE SKINNER, Instructor at 
Harvard, was born in Boston, Massachusetts, 
.April 28, 1868. His parents were John and Jeanny 
Reid (Terwilliger) Skinner. He was prepared for 
College at the Boston Latin School, from which he 
passed into Harvard, where he was graduated in the 
Class of 1896. One year, 1897-1898, was spent as 
Instructor at his Alma Mater. 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



21 



EDMANDS, John 

Yale B.A. 1847. 

Born in Framingham, Mass., 1820; attended Phillips 
AcatJemy, Andover, Mass ; graduated at Yale, 1847: 
studied in the Theological Department of Yale; As- 
sistant in the Library of Yale, 1851-56 ; Librarian of the 
Mercantile Library of Philadelphia since 1856: origin- 
ated the plan for Poole's Index ; invented system of 
classification and numbering for libraries ; Editor of the 
Quarterly Bulletin of the Mercantile Library of Phil- 
adelphia : has prepared various bibliographies and 
articles on library matters. 

JOHN ElJ.MANDS, Librarian and Bibliographer, 
was born in Framingham, Massachusetts, Feb- 
niarv i, 1820. His parents were Jonathan and 




JOHN EDMANDS 

Lucy (Nourse) Edmunds. His first term of educa- 
tion was in the public schools of his native town. 
Afterwards he went to that most famous of fitting 
schools, the Phillips Academy at Andover, where he 
was prepared for College. He entered Yale in 
1843 ^nd i'l 1S47 graduated with the degree of 
Bachelor of .Arts. While in College Mr. Edmands 
became interested and actively engaged in library 
work, and during the last two years of his course 
(1845-184 7) he was Librarian of the Society of 
Brothers in Unity of Yale College. .At this time he 
prepared and had printed a list of subjects, chiefly 
for debate, with references to articles in reviews 



and magazines. The value of the work can be 
realized when one learns that this list was the germ 
from which sprang the Poole's Index, now one of 
the greatest boons of the modern library. After 
graduation he taught for one year at Rocky Mount, 
North Carolina, and then returned to Yale for a 
three years' course in the Theological Department. 
From 185 1 to 1S56 he was Assistant in the Library 
of Yale, and left there to accept the appointment as 
Librarian of the Mercantile Library of Philadelphia, 
which position he occupies to-day after forty-three 
years of singularly able and valuable service. In 
1870 Mr. Edmands completed a catalogue for the 
Mercantile Library, which was made on the diction- 
ary plan. It was a royal octavo volume of seven 
hundred pages, at that time the most complete and 
adequate catalogue that had ever been printed for 
general use. In 1876 he devised for his library a 
system of classification which had so many superior 
qualities that it has been adopted by many other 
libraries; its distinguishing features are the com- 
bination of a perfect alphabetical and numerical 
arrangement of the books on the shelves, a unique 
scheme of numbering, and the use of capital and 
lowercase letters to designate classes and sub-classes. 
Since 1882 he has edited the Quarterly Bulletin of 
the Mercantile Library, and has prepared for it a 
list of Historical Fiction ; a Bibliography of Junius, 
and a Bibliography of the Dies Irse, nil of these 
being the most complete which had ever been 
printed. Besides these works he has prepared a 
large number of reading notes on current topics, and 
has written extensively for the Library Journal. 
F'ew men have contributed so liberally to the per- 
fection of library systems. In College he was a 
member of the Phi Beta Kappa. Since 1864 he 
has been a Deacon in the Central Congregational 
Church of Philadelphia. While the Whig Party 
was in existence he belonged to it, and he has since 
been a Republican. He has married three times : 
.August I, 1S54 to .Abigail Jane Lloyd, who died in 
1882 ; June 17, 1889 to Ellen E. Metcalf, who died 
in 1892; .August 23, 1893 to Clarinda .A. Roberts. 



MITCHELL, Donald Grant 

Yale B.A. 1841, LL.D. i8;8. 

Born in Norwich, Conn., 1822 : graduated at Yale, 
1841 ; studied law in N. Y. City but instead of entering 
the legal profession turned his attention to literary 
pursuits and agriculture : appointed U. S. Consul at 
Venice, 1853 ; member of the Yale Art School Council 



22 



UNIJERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



many years, Lecturer at Yale, 1884-85; and a noted 
author, lecturer, agriculturist and landscape gardener. 

DDNAl-D GRAM' MlTCllKI-l., LI-D., 
Author, was born in Norwich, Connccti- 
tiit, April 12, 1S22, son of the Rev. Alfred 
Mitchell (1790-1831), Vale 1809, a well-known 
Congregational Minister of his clay : anil grandson 
of Stephen Mix Mitchell, I,I..l)., (1743-1*^35) "'1" 
graduated at Vale in 1763 ; was a 'I'utor there from 
1766 to 1769; delegate to the Continental Con- 
gress in 1 783-1 785-1 787 ; succeeded Hon. Robert 
Sherman in the United States Senate, serving from 




DON.AU) G. MIICHELL 

•793 'o 1795; a"J became Chief-Justice of the 
Connecticut Superior Court in 1807. From Dr. 
John Hall's .\cademy, Ellington, Connecticut, Mr. 
Mitchell entered Yale, taking his Bachelor's degree 
with the Class of 1841, and having graduated in fee- 
ble health, he spent the succeeding three years work- 
ing upon a farm in the vicinity of his native town, 
where he conceived a fondness for agricultural pur- 
suits, with which his literary labors have for many 
years been interspersed. Crossing the Atlantic in 
1846 he divided the ne.xt two years between Eng- 
land, the Island of Jersey and the Continent, where 
he gathered material for the first literary eflfort, 
Fresh Gleanings, or .\ New Sheaf from the Old 
Fiel.l of Continental Europe, and upon another 



trip abroad in 1S48, he witnessed the political dis- 
turbances at Paris in June of that year, a descrip- 
tion of which is contained in his second work. 
The Battle Summer. He had previously read Maw 
in New Vork but his delicate health wotild not per- 
mit him to complete his legal preparations and he 
therefore turned to literature as a profession, later 
devoting a portion of his time to out-of-door exer- 
cise as a means of promoting physical vigor. From 
1853 to 1855 he was United States Consul at 
Venice, and in the latter year he settled upon a form 
located a short distance from New Haven, where 
he has ever since resided, and his progress as a 
farmer and landscape gardener has been adinirably 
depicted in several of his books, notably : My Farm 
of Edgewood ; Wet Days at Edgewood ; Rural 
Studies, with Hints for Country Places ; and Pic- 
tures of Edgewood. He is also the author of many 
other works of interest to formers, and landscajie 
gardeners, as well as the reading public in general, 
and his only venture within tlie field of pure fiction 
is entitled Dr. Johns. His Reveries of a Bachelor 
has perhaps enjoyed the most popularity, and his 
Dream Life is the favorite of the more critical 
reader on account of the originality of its concep- 
tion and the pure English in which it is expressed. 
His nom tk plume, under which several works have 
been written is " Ik Marvel." Mr. Mitchell was 
a]>pointed one of the judges of Industrial Art at the 
Centennial Exposition in 1876, and scrvnl as a 
United States Commissioner at the Paris Exposition 
in 1878. His services to Vale consist of an active 
membership of the Art-School Council for many 
years, h.iving joined that body at its organization in 
1865, and in 18S4-1SS5 he lectured at the College 
on English Literature. In 1878 he was made a 
Doctor of Laws bv Vale. 



ROBBINS, Edward Denmore 

Yale B.A. 1874, LL.B. 1879. 
Born in Wethersfield, Conn., 1853 ; attended Hart- 
ford, Conn . High School; graduated at Yale, 1874; 
studied abroad in France and Germany; studied at 
Yale Law School; Vice-President of New England 
Railroad Company since l8g6; Lecturer on Medical 
Jurisprudence at Yale since iSg6; member Ccnr.ecticut 
House of Representatives, 1882 and 1883 : member Con- 
necticut Board of Education since 1894 ; practises law 
in Hartford. 

EDWARD DENMORE ROBBINS, LL.B., 
Lawyer, and Lecturer at Vale, was born in 
Wethersfield, Connecticut, October 20, 1853. He 
is the soil of Richard Austin Robbins and Harriet 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



23 



(Welles) Robbins. He graduated from the Hart- 
fonl High School, where he received preparation 
for College. He then entered Vale and graduated 
with the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1874, 
being valedictorian of his class. He then went 
abroad, and studied at the University of France 
and the University of Jena, tlermany. Upon his 
return to America, he received the Douglas fellow- 
ship and continued to study in the Graduate De- 
partment of Yale until 1877. He entered the Yale 
Law School in 1878, from which he graduated in 
1880. After a year of travel abroad he began the 
practice of law in Hartford in 1881. Mr. Robbins 
served as a Tutor in the .\cademic Department at 
Yale from 1877 to 1880, and since 1896 has been 
a Lecturer in Medical Jurisprudence in the Yale Law 
School. Li 1896 Mr. Robbins was appointed Vice- 
Presitlent of the New Lngland Railroad Company, 
and continues in that office at the present writing. 
During the sessions of 1S82 and 1883 he was a 
member of the Connecticut House of Represen- 
tatives, and since 1884 he has served on the 
Connecticut State Board of ICducation. He is a 
member of the Hartford Club, the University Club 
of New York City, and the Century Club of New 
York City. 

STRONG, Frank 

Yale A. B. 1884, M A. 1893, Ph.D. 1897. 
Born in Venice, N. Y. ; attended Moravia Union 
School and Auburn High School, New York ; graduated 
at Yale, 1884; student in Yale Law School, 1884-85 : ad- 
mitted to the Bar at Rochester, N. Y , 1886: practised 
law in Kansas City, Mo., 1886-88: Principal Missouri 
High School, 1888-92; Superintendent of Public Schools 
in Lincoln, Nebraska, 1892-95 ; student in Graduate 
Department of Vale. 1895-97: received Ph.D. degree 
from Yale, 1897 ; Lecturer on History at Yale, 1897-99; 
President University of Oregon, 1899- 

FRANK STRONG, Ph.D., President of the 
University of Oregon, and formerly Lecturer 
in American History at Yale, was born in Venice, 
Cayuga county. New York. On the side of 
his father, John Butler Strong, he is descended 
from the Strongs who were the original settlers 
of Ipswich and Northampton, Massachusetts. 
Through his mother, Mary (Foote) Strong, he is 
descended from Captain Cordial Jennings, an officer 
of the Revolution. His early education and prepa- 
ration for College were received at the Moravia 
(New York) Union School and at the High School 
of .\.uburn. New York. In 1880 he entered Vale, 
where he graduated four years later with the degree 
of Bachelor of Arts. The next year he spent in the 



study of law at the Yale Law School. During the 
year 1885-1886 he studied in the Yale Law School, 
and in the law office of Hon. S. E. Payne at .-Auburn, 
New York, and in October of 1886 was admitted to 
the Bar at Rochester. For two years he practised 
in Kansas City, Missouri, with the firm of Crosby, 
Rusk & Strong. He was then Principal of the 
High School at St. Joseph, Missouri, from 188S to 
1892, and Superintendent of Public Schools in 
Lincoln, Nebraska, from 1892 to 1895. He held 
during this latter period the offices of Assistant 
Manager for the State of Missouri of the National 




FK.-iXK STRONG 

Education Association, and first Vice-President of 
the Nebraska State .Association of Superintendents 
and Principals. Li 1895 he returned to Yale to 
work in the Graduate Department, and after two 
years of study he received the degree of Doctor of 
Philosophy (in History) in 1897. In the same 
year he was appointed Lecturer in History at Yale. 
That position he held until June 1899, when he 
\v.as elected President of the University of Oregon, 
to succeed Dr. C. H. Chapman resigned. Dr. 
Strong has published a Life of Benjamin Franklin, 
also various historical papers and magazine articles. 
He is a member of the Psi Upsilon Society of Yale. 
He married, June 24, 1890, Mary Evelyn Ransom, 
of St. Joseph, Missouri. He has one child, Evelyn 
Robinson Strong. 



24 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



NORTHROP. Cyrus 

Yale B.A. 1857, LL.B. 1859, LL.D. 1886. 
Born in RiJgefield. Conn., 1834; graduated at Yale, 
1857; at the Yale Law School, 1859; Professor of 
Rhetoric and English Literature at Yale, 1863-84: 
chosen Clerk of the Conn House of Representatives, 
1861. and later of the State Senate; Collector of Cus- 
toms at New Haven, 1869-81 ; President of the Uni- 
versity of Minnesota 1884- 

•~>^VRUS NORTHROP, LL.D., President of the 



lliirtv, its stiulents from two hundred and seventy- 
eight to trtenty-nine hundred tucnty-five, its Faculty 
from twenty-five to two hunilred, and its Hl)rary and 
equipments in corresponding measure. In uSSq 
President Northrop was Moderator of the National 
Congregational Council at Worcester, Massachusetts, 
and in 1891 he was one of the two American Vice 
Presidents of the International Congregational Coun- 
cil in London. He has always been in demand as 



_. Universitv of Minnesota, formerly Professor a speaker and few men have made more addresses in 
of Rhetoric and English Literature at' Yale, was the last forty years than he. In recent years he has 
born in Ridgefield, Vonnecticut, September ;,o, given addresses at Commencement at many of the 

Colleges and Universities of the country. Many of 
his addresses have been printed. 




CYRUS NORTHROP 

1834. He was a student in both the Academic 
and Law Departments of Yale, taking the degree of 
Bachelor of .Arts in 1857, and that of Bachelor of 
Laws two years later. .After serving as Clerk of the 
Connecticut House of Representatives and subse- 
quently of the State Senate, he became in 1862 
I'.ditor in Chief of the New Haven Daily Palladium. 
He returned to the College in 1863 as Professor of 
Rhetoric and English Literature, and occupied that 
chair until 1884. when he was elected to the Presi- 
dency of the University of Minnesota ami immedi- 
ately assumed the duties of that office. Vale made 
him a Doctor of I^aws in 1886. During the fifteen 
years of his service as President of the Universitv of 
Miimesota, the institution has had a wonderful 
growth, its buildings having increased from five to 



STEARNS, Henry Putnam 

Yale B.A. 1853, M.D. 1855, M.A. 

Born in Sutton, Mass., 1828: attended Monson Acad- 
emy, Monson, Mass. ; graduated at Yale, 1853 ; received 
M.D. degree from Yale, 1855: studied in Edinburgh, 
Scotland; practised in Marlborough, Mass, 1856-59; 
commissioned Surgeon of the First Connecticut Regi- 
ment in 1861 ■ served with Major-General Fremont ; on 
staff of General Grant ; assigned to duty on the staff 
of General McClernand: Medical Inspector of Hos- 
pitals under Col. R. C. Wood, 1E62; Medical Director 
of the United States General Hospitals of the Northern 
Division of the Army of the Mississippi ; detailed by 
Col. R. C. Wood to superintend the building of the Joe 
Holt Hospital, at Jeffersonville, Ind. ; Medical Director 
of the United States General Hospitals at Nashville, 
Tenn. ; left the service September 1865 : resumed gen- 
eral practice in Hartford 1866; Superintendent of the 
Hartford Retreat for the Insane since 1874 : official in 
several insurance companies ; Trustee of the Hartford 
Trust Company; Lecturer on Insanity at Yale, 1E78- 

HENRV PUTNAM STEARNS, A.M., M.I)., 
Lecturer at Vale, was born in Sutton, 
Massachusetts, .April i8, 182S. His parents were 
Asa and Polly (Putnam) Stearns. Both the Steams 
and the Putnam families came from England about 
1640 and settled in Massachusetts. Dr. Steams was 
educated as a boy in the common schools, and 
later at the Monson Academy of Monson, Massa- 
chusetts. .At the .Academy he received preparation 
for College, and in 1849 '''^ entered Vale to follow 
the .Academic course of tliat institution. In 1853 
he graduated with the degree of Bachelor of .Arts. 
He then studied medicine for one year in Harvard, 
returning at the end of that time to Vale where he 
completed his medical work and received the de- 
gree of Doctor of Medicine in 1855. .After one 
year of post-graduate study at the University of 
Edinburgh, Scotland, he opened a practice in Marl- 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



25 



borough, Massachusetts, December 1856, where he 
remained for three years. In January i860 he 
removed to Hartford, Connecticut and he has made 
this city his j)lace of residence since that date. 
During the Civil War, Dr. Stearns made a military 
record of much importance and interest. On April 
18, 1 86 1, he was commissioned as Surgeon of the 
First Connecticut Regiment of three months troo[)s, 
and at the expiration of that service he received 
his commission as Surgeon of United States Vol- 
unteers, with orders to report to Major-General 
Fremont, then in commanii of the Western Depart- 




H. 1'. STK.ARNS 

ment. Soon after this he was assigned to duty on 
the staff of General U. S. Grant, commanding the 
Southeastern District of Missouri. When the army 
was reorganized prior to advancing up the Tennessee 
River, in February 1862, he was assigned to the 
staff of General McClernand as Medical Director of 
the right wing of the Army. In September 1862 
he was ordered to the position of Medical Inspector 
of Hospitals on the staff of Colonel R. C. Wood, 
.\ssistant Surgeon- General United States Army at 
St. Louis, Missouri. The following December he 
was appointed Medical Director of the United States 
General Hospitals of the Northern Division of the 
Army of the Mississippi. In the fall of 1863, hav- 
ing again reported to Colonel R. C. Wood, he was 



detailed to superintend the building of the Joe Holt 
Hospital at Jeffersonville, Indiana, and soon after 
that work was completed he was assigned to duty 
as Medical Director of the United States General 
Hospitals at Nashville, Tennessee, where he re- 
mained until September, 1865, when at his own 
rccjuest he was mustered out of the service. In 
1866 he resumed general practice in Hartford, 
Connecticut, and for eight years was the Medical 
.\d\iser and Consulting Surgeon of the Travelers 
Insurance Company. In 1.S74 he was appointed 
Superintendent of the Hartford Retreat for the 
Insane, which position he still holds, and since 1878 
he has been Lecturer on Insanity at \'ale. He is 
the author of two volumes on Insanity, also of many 
monographs and reports on medical subjects, and 
for many years has been a frequent contributor to 
the literature of medical journals. His professional 
brethren have honored him in many ways. He has 
been President of the Yale Medical .\lumni Associa- 
tion, of the Connecticut Medical Society, and also 
of the .\merican Medico-Psychological .Association, 
and for many years a member of its Council. He 
is a member of State and National Medical .Associa- 
tions, and an iionorary member of the Medical- 
Psychological .Association of Great Britain and 
Ireland, the Boston Medico-Psychological Society, 
etc. His reputation as an expert in mental 
diseases has led to his being employed in many 
important cases involving the responsibility of per- 
sons, by Courts in different parts of the country. 
Dr Stearns is a Director in two of the most im- 
portant insurance companies in Hartford, also of 
the Connecticut Humane Society, the Hartford 
Retreat, etc., and he is a Trustee of the Hartford 
Trust Company. He is a member of the Society 
of Colonial Wars, the Sons of the .American Revolu- 
tion, the Loyal Legion and other societies. He 
has been a Republican since the institution of that 
party. He married .August 29, 1857, .Annie Eliza- 
beth, daughter of Captain James and Elizabeth 
(Shaw) Storer of Glasgow, Scotland. His children 
are : Henry Stuart, Ellen Brodie and Charles 
Storrier Stearns. 



SHERMAN, Roger 

Yale M.A. (Hon.) 1768. 
Born in Newton. Mass.. 1721 ; educated in public 
schools and through his own exertions ; learned the 
shoemaker's trade ; settled in Connecticut and followed 
his trade for some years ; acquired proficiency in math- 
ematics ; studied law and rose to distinction : member 
of the Connecticut Legislature, 1765-91 ; delegate to 



26 



UNIVERSITIES ANB THEIR SONS 



the Continental Congress, member of the State Senate 
some years: an officer of the Superior Court twenty- 
three years ; member of the Committee of Safety 
during the Revolutionary War ; Mayor of New Haven, 
1784-93; signer of the Declaration of Independence, 
the Articles of Confederation, and the Federal Con- 
stitution ; Treasurer of Yale for twelve years; died, 
"793 

ROGKR SllKRMAN, M.A., Lawyer and States- 
man, was born in Newton, Massachusetts, 
April 19 (O.S.), 1 721. He was reared in Canton, 
same State, whither his parents removed when he was 




ROGER SHERiUN 

two years old. and having obtained the rudiments of 
an education in the public schools, he subsequently 
acquired a knowledge of mathematics and the 
higher branches of study through his own personal 
efforts. Learning the shoemaker's trade at the age 
of twenty-two, he settled in Connecticut, and in 
company with an elder brother, was engaged in 
business there until 1760. His proficiency in mathe- 
matics, which enabled him to compute almanacs, 
including eclipses, made him a marked man in the 
community in which he lived, and his reputation as 
a sur\'eyor extended throughout the Colony. He 
finally studied law, was admitted to the Bar, and 
having rapidly risen to distinction in the legal pro- 
fession, was called into public service in 1765. He 
was a member of the Connecticut Legislature con- 
tinuously until 1 791; serving first in the Lower 



House and subsequently in the Senate, was an officer 
of the Sujieriur Court for twenty-three years; was 
a local leader in the Revolutionary movement, and 
a member of the Committee of Safety during the 
^^'ar for Indeiicndence. .As a member of the Con- 
tinental Congress he was actively concerned in the 
series of events culminating in the Declaration of 
Independence, which he signed, and also assisted 
in framing the State and Federal Constitutions, and 
the .Articles of National Confederation. In 1784 
he was elected Mayor of New Haven, and continued 
in office through subsequent re-elections, until his 
death, which occurred in 1793. It is eminently 
worthy of mention that Roger Sherman's signature 
was affixed to what .aay rightly be considered the 
four most important state papers ever drafted in 
this country, namely : the Protest to the Crown, 
the Declaration of Independence, the .Articles of 
Confederation and the Federal Constitution. His 
interest in Vale was exceedingly advantageous to 
that institution, and besides serving as its Treasurer 
for twelve years, he assisted in various other ways in 
])romoting the general welfare of the College. He 
received the honorary degree of Master of .Arts 
from Yale in 1 768. 



SHIPMAN, Nathaniel 

Vale B.A. 1848, M.A. 1851, LL.D. 1884. 
Born in Southbury, Conn, 1828 ; attended Nor- 
wich Academy: graduated at Yale, 1848; studied at 
Yale Law School ; practised law for twenty years in 
Hartford, Conn.; Executive Secretary of Governor 
Buckingham, 1858-63 ; member Connecticut House of 
Representatives, 1857 ; appointed U. S. District Judge 
for the District of Connecticut, 1873 ; United States 
Circuit Judge for the Second Circuit, 1892; Lecturer at 
Yale, 1889. 

N.ATHANIEL SHIPMAN, LL.D., Lawyer and 
Judge, was born in Southbury, Connecticut, 
.August 22, 1828. Through his father, Thomas L. 
Shipraan, he is descended from a member of the 
Lord Say and Seal Colony — which landed at Say- 
brook, Connecticut. His mother, Mary Thompson 
(Deming) Shipman, was descended from ancestors 
of note in the Revolution. His preparation for 
College was received at the Norwich Academy. 
He entered Yale in 1844, and graduated with the 
degree of Bachelor of Arts in i S48. He then com- 
menced the study of law with Hon. Thomas B. 
Osborne, of Fairfield, Connecticut, and later he 
finished his law study at the Yale Law School. In 
1850 he began to practise his profession in Hart- 



y 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



27 



ford, Connecticut, where he opened an office, and 
four years later, 1854, he became a member of the 
law firm of Welch & Shipman and so continued until 
1870, when it was interrupted by the death of Mr. 




N. SHIPMAN 

Welch. He served as E.\ecutive Secretary of Gov- 
ernor Buckingham from 1858 to 1863. For 1857 
he was Representative from Hartford in the Con- 
necticut House of Representatives. He received 
the appointment as United States District Judge for 
the Itistrict of Connecticut, April 16, 1873, the 
appointment taking effect the following month. In 
1892 he was appointed United States Circuit Judge 
for the Second Circuit. Since 1889 he has been 
Lecturer on Jurisdiction and Procedure in United 
States Courts at the Yale Law School, from which 
L'niversity he received the honorary degree of 
Doctor of Laws in 1886. He married Mary C. 
Robinson, May 25, 1859. His children are Frank 
R., Arthur L., ^L^ry D. (who married Rev. S. B. L. 
Penrose) and Henry R. Shipman. 



SPERRY, Frederick Noyes 

Yale M.D. 1794. 

Born in New Haven, Conn, 1872; attended public 
schools of New Haven ; graduated at Yale Medical 
School, 1894 ; formerly Interne in the New Haven Hos- 
pital ; has practijed in New Haven since 1895; Assist- 



ant in Clinical Medicine at Yale 1896 ; Clinical Assistant 
in Diseases of Ear, Nose and Throat, 1897- 

VREDKRICK xXOYES SPERRY, NLD., Physi- 
cian, and Assistant at Yale, was born in New 
Haven, December 29, 1872. His parents, Alfred 
Noyes and Lois Emma (Ryerson) Sperry, are de- 
scended from families of early Colonial and Revo- 
lutionary history. Dr. Sperry was educated in the 
public schools of New Haven, receiving at the High 
School of that city his final fitting for University 
work. At Yale he at once entered the Medical 
School and finished the regular course there, taking 
the degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1894. He 
tlien had practical experience in his profession at 
the New Haven Hospital, where for a year and a 
half he served as Interne. Late in the year 1895 
he opened a practice in New Haven, where he con- 
tinues his ]irofessional work at present. His office 
is at 56 U'ooster Street. Dr. Sperry was made an 
.\ssistant in Clinical Medicine at Yale in 1896 and 
since 1897 has been Clinical Assistant in Diseases 
of the Ear, Nose and Throat. He Is a member of 
the New Haven County and Connecticut State 
Medical Societies, and of the New Haven Medical 




FREDERICK X. SPERRV 



Association. In 1898 he was First Vice-President, 
and in 1899 Chairman, of the Executive Committee 
of the Yale Medical .\lumni .Association. In politics 
he is a Republican. 



28 



UNIVERSHIES AND THEIR SONS 



TRACY, John Clayton 

Vale Ph.B. 1890, C.E. 1892. 

Born in WiUimantic, Conn, 1869; attended Hillhouse 
High School, New Haven ; graduated at Sheffield 
Scientific School, 1890; received the degree of Civil 
Engineer from Yale, 1892 ; Assistant in Civil Engineer- 
ing at Yale, 1891-93; Instructor in Civil Engineering 
and Drawing at Yale since 1894. 

Jt)HN CLAYTON TRAC\', I'h.R, C.K., In- 
structor in Civil Engineering and Drawing at 
Vale, was born in WiUimantic, Connecticut, Novem- 
ber 3, 1869, son of John 'I'lieoiiore and Annie 




JOHN C. I'RACV 

(Downer) Tracy. 'I'hrough his father lie is de- 
scended from Lieutenant Thomas Tracy, who came 
to this country from England in 1 636. Mr. Tracy 
was educated in the public schools of New Haven, 
Connecticut, completing his preparation for College 
at the Hillhouse High School. .At Yale he elected 
the work of the Sheffield Scientific School, gradu- 
ating after a three years' course in Engineering in 

1890. He then entered the employ of the King 
llridge Company, of Cleveland, Ohio, as draughts- 
m.an. He continued this work until the fall of 

1 89 1, when he returned to Yale and studied as a 
post-graduate in civil engineering. He received 
the degree of Civil Engineer from Yale in 1892. 
From 1 89 1 to 1893 he was .Assistant in Civil 
Engineering at Vale, receiving at the end of that 



time the appointment as Instructor in Civil luigi- 
neering and Drawing. He occupies this position at 
the present time. He is the author of An Intro- 
tluctory Course in .Mechanical Drawing (Harper & 
IJros. 1898.) Mr. Tracy is a member of the Yale 
chapter of tlie Sigma Xi Society. He married Eliza- 
beth Mary lilakeslee, a graduate of Wellesley College, 
Class of '91, October 23, 1890. His cliildren are : 
John Klakeslee and Louis Philip Tmry. 



TYLER, Morris Franklin 

Vale B.A. 1870, M.A., LL.B. 1873. 

Born in New Haven, Conn., 1848; educated in the 
public schools of New Haven; graduated at Yale, 
1870; received M.A. and LL B. degrees from Yale. 
1873; practised law from 1873 to 1878 ; President of the 
Soxithern New England Telephone Company since 
1884; Councilman in First Ward of New Haven 1879- 
80 ; member of New Haven Board of Education 1875-78 ; 
Executive Secretary of Governor H. B. Bigelow of 
Connecticut 1881-82; Instructor at Yale 1893-94; Pro- 
fessor of Law, 1894- 

MORRIS FRANKLIN TYLER, M.A., Pro- 
fessor of Law at Vale, was born in New 
ILufu, Connecticut, .\ugust 12, 1848. He is the 
son of Morris and Mary Friiibie (liutler) Tyler, 
both of whom represent old Connecticut families. 
He was ])repared in the ])ublic schools of his native 
city for the .Academic l)e])nrtnient of Vale. He 
entered Vale in 1866 and in 1S70 he graduated with 
the degree of Bachelor of .Arts. 'The next three 
vears he spent in newspaper work and in study at the 
\';ile Law School from which institution he recei\ed 
the degree of TSachelor of Laws in 1873. The Lfni- 
versity also conferred tlie degree of Master of Arts 
upon him in this same year. Li 1873 he com- 
menced a practice of law in New Haven, continuing 
his studies in connection with his jjractice. His 
work developed into the management of business 
enterprises, more than an active practice in the 
courts. Mr. Tyler served as an Instructor in luris- 
prudence in 1 893-1 894 when he became a Professor 
of Law at the Vale School. In 1884 Mr. Tyler was 
elected President of the Southern New F^ngland 
Telephone Company, and since 1S88 he has devoted 
the greater part of his attention to this work. For 
the two years, 1879 and 1880 he served as Council- 
man in the First Ward of New Haven. He was a 
member of the New Haven Board of Fklucation 
from 1875 to 1878. In 1881 he was Executive 
Secretary to Governor H. B. Bigelow of Connecti- 
cut. He is a member of the Phi Beta Kappa and 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



29 



Alplia Delta Phi Societies, of the Union League 
Club, of New York City and of the Colby Club. 
He married November 5, 1873, Delia Talman, 
daughter of Victor G. Audubon. His children are : 
Victor Morris, born 1875; Ernest Franklin, born 
1879; Leonard San ford, born 1881 ; Mary P.ulk-r, 
born 1884, and Audubon Tyler, born 1886. 



ST. JOHN, Samuel Benedict 

Yale B, A. 1866 — Columbia M.D. 1670. 

Born in Hudson, O.. 1845; educated in public schools 
of Ohio and Connecticut; graduated at Yale, 1866: 
graduated at College of Physicians and Surgeons, N. 
Y., 1870; Assistant Demonstrator of Anatomy, College 
Physicians and Surgeons, 1870 ; Instructor in Chem- 
istry, 1871 ; studied abroad, 1872-74; Surgeon to the N. 
W. Dispensary. New York, Eye and Ear Department, 
1874-78 ; Surgeon to New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, 
1875-78; Secretary American Ophthalmological Society 
since 1888; President New York Ophthalmological 
Society, 1890; Ophthalmic and Aural Surgeon in Hart- 
ford Hospital since 1896 : first President of the Hart- 
ford Public Library; Lecturer on Ophthalmology in 
Yale Medical School since 1884. 

SAMUEL BENEDICT ST. JOHN, M.D., Oph- 
thalmologist, and Lecturer at Yale, was born 
in Hudson, Ohio, July 24, 1845. The ancestors of 
both his fiither Samuel St. John, and his mother, 
Amelia Palmer Cranch (Curtis) St. John, were 
prominent in the Revolution, one of them Iieing a 
member of the flrmous band of " Indians " who 
figured in the " Boston Tea-Party." His early 
education was received in public schools in Hudson 
and Cleveland, Ohio, and in New Canaan, Con- 
necticut. He entered Yale at the age of sev-enteen. 
and following studies in the Academic Department, 
took his Bachelor of Arts degree with the Class of 
1866. For a medical course he then went to New 
York City and entered the ("ollege of Physicians 
and Surgeons of Columbia. After graduating with 
the degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1870, he was 
appointed Instructor in Chemistry at tlie College, 
1 87 1, and held the positions of .Assistant Demon- 
strator of Anatomy, House Surgeon in the Manhat- 
tan ICye and Ear Hospital, and House Surgeon in 
Bellevue Hospital. The two years 187 2-1 8 74 were 
spent abroad in hospitals in Berlin, Vienna, Paris 
and London. Returning then to New York City 
he at once received two imjiortant appointments, 
namely — Surgeon to the New York Dispensary, in 
tlie Throat Department (1874-1875) and Surgeon 
ti) the Northwestern Dispensary of New York, in the 
Eye and Ear liepartment (1S74-1878). In 1875 



he was appointed Surgeon to the New York Eye 
and Ear Infirmary, and held that position for three 
years. In 1884 Dr. St. John was called to Yale to 
accept the position of Lecturer on Ophthalmology 
in the Medical School ; he continues to occupy this 
position. Before the time of the Y'ale appointment 
he moved to Connecticut and entered upon active 
professional duties there. Since 1896 he has been 
Ophthalmic and Aural Surgeon to the Hartford 
Hospital, and since 1897 Consulting Ophthalmic 
and Aural Surgeon to the St. Francis Hospital of 
Hartford. ?'rom 1SS3 to 1888 he was Secretary of 




S. V. SI'. JOHN 

the Connecticut Medical Society. In 1890 he sen-ed 
as President of the New York Ophthalmological 
Society, and he was President of the New Plngland 
Ophthalmological Society from 1895 to 1897. He 
has been Secretary of the American Ophthalmological 
Society since 18S8. In his otificial positions with 
the societies and in his hospital and lecture-room 
work Dr. St. John has done valuable ser^'ice in the 
cause of Ophthalmology as a special science ; few 
men have so potently assisted the progress of con- 
certed thought anil study in this specialty. He is a 
member of the Colonial Club of Hartford ; the Vale 
.\lumni Association, of Hartford, ami of various 
College societies. He is also a member of many 
local and national medical associations, among them 
the American, the New York and the New England 



3° 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



Ophthalinological Societies. He married Mary 
Harris Morgan, of Hartford, October 1882. He 
has two daughters. Dr. St. John was the first Pres- 
ident of the Hartford Public Library. 



STARKWEATHER, George Pratt 

Yale Ph.B. 1891, M.E. 1894. 
Born in New Haven Conn., 1872; attended New 
Haven public schools ; graduated from the Sheffield 
Scientific School of Yale, 1891 ; teacher of Mathematics 
and Applied Mechanics at Yale since 1891. 

C>« EORCIE PRATl- STARKWEATHER, Ph.D., 
T M.Il., Instructor in .Applied Mechanics at 
V.ile, was born in Xew Haven. Connecticut, July 12, 




GEORGE p. STARKWEAIHF.R 

1872. Through his father, John Henry Stark- 
weather, he is descended from Robert Starkweather, 
who came from England, to Boston in 1640. His 
mother was Hannah Elizabeth (Winchester) Stark- 
weather. At the New Haven Grammar and High 
Schools, Mr. Starkweather was prepared for Yale. 
His work at the University was in the Sheffield Sci- 
entific School where he made a specialty of mathe- 
matical subjects. He graduated in 1891 receiving 
the degree of Bachelor of Philosophy. In the fall 
of the same year he accepted from the Sheffield 
Scientific School the appointment as Instructor in 
.Applied Mechanics and subjects relating to the 
theoretical side of Mechanical Engineering. This 



work he continues at the present time. In 1894 he 
received the degree of Master of Engineering and 
in 189S that of Doctor of Philosophy. Several 
papers by him relating to Mathematics and Physics 
have appeared in various scientific journals. He is 
a member of the Sigma Xi Society. 



WALKER, Francis Amasa 

Yale A.M. 1873, LL.D. 1881— Harvard LL.D. 
LL.D. 1887. 



1883 — Columbia 



Born in Boston, Mass., 1840 ; graduated Amherst, 
i860; enlisted Fifteenth Mass. Volunteers, 1861 ; pro- 
moted Colonel. 1862 ; wounded at Chancellorsville 1863 ; 
captured and confined in Libby Prison, 1864; brevet 
Brigadier-General of Volunteers, 1865; Instructor at 
Williston Seminary 1835-67 : Assistant Editor Spring- 
field Republican, 1868; Chief of Bureau of Statistics. 
Treasury Department, Washington, i86g : Superin- 
tendent of Ninth Census, 1870 : Commissioner of Indian 
Affairs, 1871 ; Professor Sheffield Scientific School, 
Yale, 1873-81 ; President Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology, 1881 ; Superintendent of Tenth Census, 
1880; Lecturer Harvard, 1883; Ph.D., Amherst. Halle ; 
LL.D., Amherst. Yale, Harvard, Columbia, St An- 
drews (Scotland), Dublin (Ireland) ; died 1897. 

FR.V.NCIS AM.AS.V WALKER, Ph.D.. LL.D., 
Statistician, and late President of the 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, was born 
in Boston, Massachusetts, July 2, 1840, son of 
.Amasa Walker, the distinguished political econo- 
mist. He graduated at .Amherst in the Class of 
i860, and entered upon the study of law in the 
office of Charles Devens and (ieorge F. Hoar, at 
Worcester, .Massachusetts. On the outbreak uf the 
Civil War, in the year following his graduation, he 
left his studies, joining as Sergeant- Major the regi- 
iment commanded by Colonel Devens, the Fifteenth 
Massachusetts Volunteers. He was promoted at 
once to be Assistant .Adjutant (ieneral of the bri- 
gade under General Couch, with the rank of 
Captain, and in the following year was made .Ad- 
jutant-General of General Couch's Division, with 
the rank of Major. In December 1862, he was 
further advanced to be Colonel on the staff of the 
Second .Army Corps, with which he continued, 
serving on the staffs of General Gouverneur K. 
Warren and General Winfield S. Hancock. He 
was severely wounded at Chancellorsville .in 1S63, 
captured at Riani's Station in 1864 and confined in 
Libby Prison with the result that when released, his 
health was so far impaired as to compel him to re- 
sign, January 12, 1865. He was made brevet Bri- 
gadier-General of Volunteers March 13, 1865. 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



31 



With the close of his brilHant career in the army, 
General Walker did not return to the study of law 
which the call of patriotism had interrupted, but 
entered as speedily as he might upon the life-work in 
which he was to achieve distinction. After two years 
as Instructor in Latin and Greek at Williston Semin- 
ar)', and a short time of service as Assistant I'^ditor of 
the Springfield Republican, he found his opportunity 
in the line of endeavor for which he had inherited 
talent from his distinguished father. The determin- 
ing point in his career was his appointment, in 
1S69, as Chief of the Bureau of Statistics in the 




FKAXCIS A. WALKER 

Treasury Department at \\'ashington. It naturallv 
followed that the taking of the Ninth Census in 
1870, should be placed in his charge: and as his 
executive and administrative talents became more 
clearly recognized, he was made in 1871, Com- 
missioner of Indian .\ffairs to straighten out the 
tangle in which the business of that bureau had be- 
come involved. In 1873 he was called to the Chair 
of Political Economy and History in the Sheffield 
Scientific School at Yale, which he occupied until 
in 1881, he was elected President of the Massachu- 
setts Institute of Technology. While holding this 
position he served also as Chief of the Bureau 
of Awards at the Philadelphia Centennial Exhi- 
bition in 1S76, and on leave of absence from Vale, 



superintended the takingof theTenth Census in 1880. 
In 1878 he attended the International Monetary 
Conference at Paris as Commissioner on the part of 
the United States. He delivered a course of lec- 
tures at Harvard in 1S83 on Tenure of I^nd. The 
advancement of the Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology under (General Walker's Presidency 
was rapid and substantial, and he lived to see the 
result of his labors in its attainment of a foremost 
position among the technical schools of the country. 
In the cause of general education General Walker 
was an energetic worker. During his residence in 
New Haven he serveil on the Board of Education 
of the State of Connecticut and on that of the cit)'. 
While a citizen of Boston he was elected a member 
of the School Committee, and was President of that 
Board. .As a member of the Art Commission, and 
in other capacities, he gave his services freely to the 
public. As an author, apart from his strictly statis- 
tical work, General Walker made many and valuable 
additions to the literature of political economy and 
finance, .\mong his works which have become 
standard are : The Maps Question ; Money : 
Money Trade and Industry ; Land and Its Rent ; 
Political Economy. He is also the author of The 
Indian Question, and a History of the Second .Army 
Corps. General Walker was a fellow of the .Ameri- 
can .Academy, a member of the Massachusetts His- 
torical Society, the National .Academy of Sciences, 
and numerous other learned bodies in this countrv, 
in England, France and Belgium, and an Officer of 
the Legion of Honor. He received the degree of 
Master of .Arts from .Amherst in 1863 and from 
Yale in 1873 ; Doctor of Philosophy from .Amherst 
in 1875 and Halle (Germany) in 1S94; Doctor of 
Laws from Amherst and Yale in 1881, Harvard in 
18S3, Columbia in 1S87, St. .Andrews (Scotland) 
in 1888, L'niversity of Dublin, (Ireland) in 1892. 
He died suddenly in his sleep at his residence in 
Boston, January 5, 1S97. 



WRIGHT, Arthur Williams 

Yale. B.A. 1859, Ph.D. 1861. 
Born in Lebanon, Conn., 1836; attended the Lebanon 
Academy: prepared for College at Bacon Academy, 
Colchester, Connecticut: graduated at Yale. 1859; 
received degree of Doctor of Philosophy from Yale, 
1861 ; graduate student until 1863 ; Tutor at Yale, 1863- 
68 ; admitted to Connecticut Bar in i865 ; Instructor in 
Physics at Sheffield Scientific School, 1867-68 ; studied 
abroad, 1868-69 : Professor of Physics and Chemistry 
in Williams College until 1872 ; Professor of Molecular 
Physics and Chemistry at Yale. 1872-S7: Professor of 
Experimental Physics at Yale since 1887 ; planned the 



V 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



Sloane Physical Laboratory; has made numerous re- 
searches and discoveries in science ; first scientist to 
obtain definite results from the R6ntgen Rays 

ARTHUR WILLIAMS WRIGHT, Pli.D., Pro- 
fessor of Experimental Physics at Yale, was 
born in Lebanon, Connecticut, September 8, 1836. 
He is the son of Jesse and Harriet (Williams) 
Wright, anil a descendant of old English families 
who came to America in 1620, 1637 and 1639. 
His early education was in the Academy at Lebanon, 
and later he went for College preparation to Bacon 
Academy in Colchester, Connecticut, and to William 
Kinne's private school in CanU-rbury, Connecticut. 





ARTHUR W. WRIGin 



At Yale he graduated with the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts in 1859, and remained in New Haven as a 
graduate student in the Department of Philosopliy 
and the Arts, receiving the degree of Doctor of 
Philosophy in 1861. He continued as a graduate, 
studying modern languages, mathematics and physi- 
cal science until 1863 when he was made Tutor in 
Yale. Until 1868 he held this position, studying 
law during that period and being admitted to the 
Connecticut Bar in 1866, although he did not enter 
upon the practice of law. He was appointed In- 
structor in Physics in the Sheffield Scientific School 
in 1867, and for one year assumed that work in 
addition to his other duties. In 1868 he was 
appointed Professor of Physics and Chemistry in 



Williams College, and after one year, 1868-1869, of 
scientific study in the Universities of Heidelberg 
and Berlin, Germany, he entered upon that work. 
He left Williams in 1872 to accept a jiosition as 
Professor of Molecular Physics and Chemistry at 
Yale. In 1887 this title was changed to that of 
Professor of Experimental Physics which office he 
fills to-day. Professor Wright will aKva5s be well 
known as the designer and superintendent of the 
erection of the -Sloane Physical Laboratory, of Yale, 
which, it is believed, was the first building devoted 
wholly to Physics erected in tiiis country. He has 
had cliarge of this building since 1883, having pre- 
viously introduced courses for the laboratory teach- 
ing of physics, in 1875. Professor Wright's career 
lias been notable for the original researches and 
scientific discoveries which he has to his credit. 
.Among the many scientific investigations and dis- 
coveries which lie has made and published may be 
mentioned the following : the discovery of the 
electric shadow ; discovery of gases in stony mete- 
orites ; analysis and measurement of the polarization 
of the zodiacal light, solar corona, etc. He was the 
first man in this country to obtain definite results 
from the Rontgcn Rays. He has been engaged on 
the Assay Commission to test coin in the United 
States Mint, of Philadelphia, and he was employed 
as Consulting Specialist to the United States Signal 
Service Bureau from 1881 to 1886. He has written 
extensively for various magazines and scientific 
journals. He was one of the collaborators upon the 
1864 and 1890 editions of Webster's Dictionary. 
He is a member of the Phi Beta Kappa, the .Aliiha 
Delta Phi, the Wolf's Head and the Berzelius 
Societies. He is a member of the National Acad- 
emy of Sciences, and is enrolled also in many 
other scientific organizations, both local and national. 
He married October 6, 1875, Susan Forbes Silli- 
man, daughter of Professor Benjamin Silliman. She 
died February 17, 1890. He has three children: 
Susan Silliman, Arthur Silliman and Dorothea 
Silliman Wright. 



ALLING, Arthur Nathaniel 

Yale B.A. 1886 Columbia M.D. 1891. 

Born in New Haven, Conn., 1862 : graduated from 
Hopkins Grammar School, New Haven; received A. B. 
degree from Yale, 1886; graduated at the College of 
Physicians and Surgeons, New York City, 1891 ; As- 
sistant Surgeon N. Y. Ophthalmic and Aural Institute; 
Instructor in Ophthalmology in the Yale Medical 
School; Chief of Ophthalmological Clinic in New 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



33 



Haven Dispensary; has practised Ophthalmology in 
New Haven since 1893. 

ARTHl'R NAIHAXIKI, AI.LIXC;, M.I)., 
Ophthalmologist, and Instructor at Yale, 
was born in New Haven, July i, 1862. He is the 
son of George Ailing, who is a direct descendant of 
Roger .Ailing — an emigrant to .America in 1638. 
At the Hopkins Orammar School of New Haven, 
he received early training and preparation for Col- 
lege. He entered Vale in 1882, and, following the 
work of the Academic Department, graduated with 
the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1886. After a 
year of travel he resolved to pursue a medical 
career, and entered the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons of New \'ork City graduating in i8gi. 
Dr. Ailing was then appointed to the position of 
Assistant Surgeon in the New York Ophthalmic and 
.\ural Institute. After some experience in that 
position he returned to his native city to take up 
the work of Instructor in his specialty at the Yale 
Medical School and Chief of the 0[)hthalmological 
Clinical the New Haven Dispensary. Since 1893 
Dr. Ailing has practised 0]ihthalmology in New 
Haven. He married Julia V. Walker, October 27, 
1887. His daughter Helen F. Ailing was born 
October 16, 1888. Dr. Ailing is a member of the 
Vale (iraduates' Club of New Haven, the New 
York Academy of Medicine and local medical 
associations. 



TORRANCE, David 

Yale M.A. iHon.) 1883. 

Born near Edinburgh, Scotland, 1840 ; during the 
Civil War was Captain, Major and Lieutenant-Colonel 
in the Twenty-ninth Connecticut Volunteers; Secre- 
tary of Connecticut, 1880-81 ; member of the Connecti- 
cut House of Representatives, 1871-72 ; Judge of the 
Court of Common Pleas of New Haven county, 1881- 
84; Judge of the Superior Court, 1885-90; Judge of the 
Supreme Court of Errors since 1890; Instructor at 
Yale, 1893- 

DAVID TORRANCE, M..\., Judge, and In- 
structor in Vale Law School, was born near 
Edinburgh, Scotland, March 3, 1840. His early 
education was obtained in the common schools of 
his native country. In June 1862, he enlisted in 
the United States Army of Volunteers anil served 
through the Civil War until 1S65, during the time 
receiving rapid promotion as an officer. He was 
first a Sergeant in Company .V of the Eighteenth 
Regiment of Connecticut Volunteers. Later he 
was Captain, .Major and Lieutenant-Colonel of the 
Twenty-Ninth Connecticut Regiment. He was ad- 

VOL. III. — 3 



mitted to the Bar of New Haven county, Connec- 
ticut, in 1868, and until 1885 he practised as a 
lawyer at that Bar. For the year 1871-1872 Mr. 
Torrance was a member of the Connecticut House 
of Representatives. He was State Secretary of 
Connecticut in 1 880-1 881. In 1881 he was ap- 
pointed to the position of Judge of the Court of 
Connnon Pleas of New Haven county. He occu- 
pied this office until 1885 when he was made Judge 
of the Superior Court of Connecticut. Since 1890 
he has been Judge of the Supreme Court of Errors 
in the State of Connecticut. Judge 'I'orrance has 




DAVID 10RK.-\NCE 

been Instructor on Sales and Evidence at Yale, 
since 1893. He is a member of the Grand .Army, 
the Army and Navy Club of Connecticut, and of 
the Masonic fraternity. He is a Republican in 
politics. He married .Annie France of Norwich, 
Connecticut, February 12, 1864. He has three 
children, Margaret, \Valter and James Torrance. 



HEERMANCE, Theodore Woolsey 

Yale B.A. 1893, Ph.D. 1898. 

Born in New Haven, Conn., 187a; fitted for College 
at the Alexander Military Institute. White Plains: 
graduate Yale, 1893; engaged in graduate work at 
Yale. 1893-94: studied at the American School of 
Classical Studies in Athens, Greece, 1894-96: Tutor 



34 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



in Greek at Yale. 1896-99; since 1899 Instructor in 
Greek and Archaeology. 

TIlHOnoRH WOOLSKY HEERMANCl-., 
I'h.n., Instructor in Clrcek anil Archseology 
at Yale, was born in New Haven, Connecticut, 
March 22, 1872. He is of Dutch descent, the name 
having originally been the Dutch " Heermans." He 
fitted for College at the Alexander Military Institute 
of White Plains, New York, and entered Yale, 1889, 
graduating in the Class of 1893. The first years 
after his graduation were spent in post-graduate 
work, at the University for one year and from 1894- 
1896 at the American School of Classical Studies in 




T. WOOLSEV HEERM.ANCE 

Athens, Greece. Returning to America in 1896 lie 
was appointed Tutor in Greek at Yale. He held 
this position for three years. He received the de- 
gree of Doctor of Philosophy at Yale in June 1898, 
and in .March 1S99 was appointed to his present 
position there. 



TUTTLE, Charles Ailing 

Yale Ph.B. 1888. M.D. 1890. 

Born in New Haven, Conn., 1864; attended New 
Haven High School ; graduated from Sheffield Scientific 
School. 1888; graduated from Yale Medical School, 
1890; studied in New York Orthopcedic Hospital and 
Dispensary; House Physician and Surgeon in New 



Haven Hospital; Assistant in Clinical Surgery at 
Yale, 1891-94; Lecturer in Orthopcedic Surgery at 
Yale, 1894. 

CHARLES AI.l.IXG TUTTLE, Ph.I!., M.D.. 
Lecturer in Orthopcudic Surgery at Yale, 
w;is born in New Haven, Connecticut, October 23, 
1864. He is the son of Philo Purr and Mary 
Maria (.-XUing) Tuttle. He pursued the regular 
work of the public schools of New Haven and 
graduated at the High School where he received 
preparation for College. -At Yale he entered the 
Shefifield Scientific School, where he graduated in 
1888. He tlien studied in the Yale Medical School 
iMitil 1 890 when he went to New York City to study 
there in the Orthopcedic Hospital and Dispensary. 
He had further practical experience in the New 
Haven Hospital, where he held the position of 
House Physician and Surgeon, and in Guy's Hos- 
pital of London, England. After his return to 
.America he was elected .Assistant in Clinical Sur- 
gery at Yale and served in that capacity from 1891 
to 1894. He was then appointed Lecturer in 
Orthopaedic Surgery, which position he still occu- 
pies. In addition to the above offices he has been 
since 1895 Lecturer in the .Anderson Gymnasium, 
of Yale, and since 1890 in the Connecticut Train- 
ing School. Dr. Tuttle is a member of the follow- 
ing societies; the Gamma Delta Phi; tlie Delta 
Epsilon Eta and the Graduates' Club, of New 
Iliven. He is also a charter member of the Yale 
.Medical Society. In politics he is a Gold Demo- 
crat. This year (1899) he is spending in Europe 
for recreation and study and will return to work 
about September i. 



MORRIS, Robert Clark 

Yale LL.B. 1890, M.L. 1892, D.C.L. 1893. 

Born in Bridgeport, Conn., 1868 ; graduated from 
Yale Law School. 1890; received degree of M. L. from 
Yale in 1892; Doctor of Civil Law, 1893; admitted to 
Connecticut Bar in 1890: admitted to New York Bar 
in 1894; Instructor in French Codes in Yale Law 
School; practises in New York City. 

ROBERT CLARK MORRIS, M.L.. D.C.L.. 
Lawyer, and Instructor at Yale, was born 
in Bridgeport, Connecticut, November 19, 1868. 
He is the son of Dwight and Grace Josephine 
(Clark) Morris. The lineage of the Morris family is 
of unusual interest and extent. Thomas Morris, the 
founder of the Morris family in America, was de- 
scended from the Morrises who lived for many 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



35 



generations in York, England, ami before that in 
Wales. Going further back the records tell of con- 
nection with Athelstan Gloddryd who lived in 933, 
and with one of the Knights of King Arthur's 




ROBKRl' C. MORKl!' 

Round Table. Mr. Morris received legal training 
at the Yale Law School, where he graduated with 
the degree of Bachelor of Laws in 1890. He then 
entered upon work in the Gra<luate Department of 
the Law School, receiving in 1892 the degree of 
^L^ster of Laws, and in 1893 that of Doctor of Civil 
Law. In 1890 he was admitted to the Bar of 
Connecticut, and he then commenced a practice in 
that state which continued until 1894, when having 
entered the Bar of New York he went to New York 
City and opened a practice there which he con- 
tinues at the present time. For the past three 
years he has, in addition to his practice in New 
York, given instruction in French Codes at the Yale 
Law School. He is a member of the Order of the 
Cincinnati, the Military Order of the Loyal Legion ; 
the Sons of the Revolution ; the Republican Club 
of the City of New York, the Society of Medical 
Jurisprudence of New York, The Yale Club, The 
Ocean, County, Hunt and Country Club, and the 
Tuxedo Club. He married Alice Augusta Parmelee, 
of New Haven, Connecticut, June 24, 1890. 



STRONG, Wendell Melville 

Yale B.A. 1893, Ph.D. lSg8. 

Born in Indianapolis, Indiana, 1871 ; attended High 
School at Montclair, N. J.; graduated from Yale. 1893 ; 
received M. A. degree from Cornell; graduate student 
at Yale ; appointed Tutor in Mathematics at Yale, 
1895; received Ph.D. degree from Yale 1898. 

WP:N1)LLL MF.LVILLE strong, Ph.D., 
Tutor in Mathematics at Yale, was born 
in Indianapolis, Indiana, February 6, 1871. His 
descent through both his father, Melville Strong, 
and his mother Persis Fidelia (Griffeth) Strong, is 
from the Puritans. His College preparation was 
obtained at the Montclair High School, Montclair, 
New Jersey. At Yale he obtained a high rank in 
scholarship — standing fourth in a class of nearly 
two hundred — and received several mathematical 
prizes. After graduating he spent several years in 
further study at Cornell, Yale and Gottingen. In 
189s he was appointed Tutor in Mathematics at 
Yale. Among Dr. Strong's writings are : Elements 
of Prigonometry ; and Logarithmic and Trigono- 
metric Tables ; in collaboration with Professor 




\V. M. STRONG 



Phillips, the chapter on Modern Geometry in the 
Elements of Geometry by Phillips and Fisher, an 
abridgment of the Elements of Geometry, and 
several mathematical papers. 



36 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



BEEBE, William 

Yale B.A. 1873. 
Born in Litchfield, Conn., 1851 ; graduated at Yale, 
1873; appointed Tutor there, 1876; Assistant Professor 
of Mathematics, 1882, and of Astronomy, 1885; and 
advanced to full Professorship of the former, 1898. 

WILLIAM BliEIiK, I'rofo.-,sor of iMalhematics 
at Vale, was born in Litchfield, Connecti- 
cut, September 4, 185 i, son of Philip Schuyler and 



Tutorship at the College (1876) was devoted to 
the study of higher mathematics and astronomy, 
and also to teaching. In 18.S2 he was appointed 
Assistant Professor of Mathematics at Vale, entered 
the Astronomical Department in the same capacity 
three years later, and in 1S98 was advanced to a 
full Professorship in Matliematics. Professor Beebe 
was married, June 22, 1S80, to I'^lizabeth Febiger, 
and has one son : Philip Schuyler lieebe 2d. 




HASTINGS, Charles Sheldon 

Yale Ph.B. 1870, Ph.D. 1873. 

Born in Clinton, N.Y., 1848; fitted for College at the 
Hartford High School; Ph.B., Sheffield Scientific 
School of Yale, 1870; Ph.D , Yale, 1873; Associate 
Professor of Physics at Johns Hopkins, 1876-84; Pro- 
fessor of Physics at Yale, 1884- 

CHARLES SHELDON HASTINGS, Ph.D., 
Professor of Physics at Vale, comes of an 
old New England family. His father, Panet Mar- 
sliall Hastings, M.D., was a well-known physician of 
Clinton, New Vork, where the subject of this sketch 
was born, November 27, 1848. Charles Sheldon 



WILLIAM BEEBE 

Lucy (Robbins) Beebe. He is of Puritan ances- 
try on both sides and a descendant in the eighth 
generation of John Beebe, who sailed from lOngland 
in 1650 accompanied by his seven children, and 
died at sea. His great-grand fiuher was Colonel 
Bezaleel Beebe, who was born in Litchfield, April 
28, 1747, served in Rogers's Rangers during the 
French War ; rose to the ranks of Colonel in the 
Continental .Army during the War for Independence ; 
was at one time acting Brigadier-General, and he 
died in his native town, May 29, 1824. Surrounded 
by superior social influences, William Beebe was 
early imbued with a desire for moral excellence and 
educational advancement. His preparatory studies 
were pursued at the Litchfield Select Academy, 
located at what was formerly the homestead of the 
Rev. Dr. Lyman Beecher, and he took his Bachelor's 
degree at Vale in 1873. The intervening time be- 
tween his graduation and the commencement of his 




C. S. HASTINGS 



Hastings, after a preparatory course at the Hart- 
ford High School, entered the Sheffield Scientific 
School of Vale, graduating 1870 with the degree of 
Bachelor of Philosophy, and after three years of 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



37 



post-graduate study received the degree of Doctor 
of Philosophy from the University in 1873. He 
went abroad, and spent two years in the study of 
pliysics at the German Universities of Heidelberg 
and Berlin, and one year in Paris at the Sorbonne, 
where he was made an Officicr de I'Instniction 
.Publique. On his return to America in 1876 he 
was tendered and accepted the Associate Profes- 
sorship of Physics at Johns Hopkins of Baltimore, 
remaining there for eight years, or until 1884, when 
he was called to the Chair of Physics at Yale. 
Professor Hastings is a member of several scientific 
societies, among them the National Academy of 
Sciences and the Societa degli Spectroscopisti 
Italiani ; a fellow^ of the American Association for 
the Advancement of Science, and a member of the 
Berzelius Club of the Sheffield Scientific School and 
the Graduates' Club of New Haven. He married in 
1878 Elizabeth T. Smith. They have one child, 
Katharine Panet Hastings. 



MIXTER, William Gilbert 

Yale Ph.B. 1867, M.A. 1887. 

Born in Dixon, 111 , 1846: received his early education 
in the public schools of Rock Island. 111. ; graduate of 
Sheffield Scientific School of Yale, 1867 : studied chem- 
istry in the University of Heidelberg two semesters 
and in Berlin one semester ; Assistant in Chemistry at 
Sheffield, 1867-1872: Instructor, 1874-75: Professor of 
Chemistry at Yale since 1875 : Inspector of gas meters 
and illuminating gas for the State- of Connecticut since 
1877. 

WILLIAM GH.BERT NHXTER, Ph.B., Pro- 
fessor of Chemistry in Yale, was born in 
Dixon, Illinois, September 23, 1846. He is of 
English ancestry. The first member of the family 
in .America came from England to ^Lassachusetts in 
1632. William Gilbert Mixter received his early 
education in the public schools of Rock Island, 
Illinois, and then entered the Sheffield Scientific 
School of Yale, graduating in 1867. Immediately 
on his graduation he was appointed .\ssistant in 
Chemistry at the Scliool, a position which he held 
until 1872 when he went abroad and spent some 
time in the study of chemistry, first at the Univer- 
sity of Heidelberg and later at that of Berlin. He 
returned to .America in 1874, and was immediately 
tendered and accepted the position of Instructor in 
Chemistry at Yale. He was called to the Chair of 
Chemistry in the following year, and his connection 
with the University in that capacity has since con- 
tinued. Since November 3, 1S77, Professor Mi.\- 



ter has also held the Post of Inspector of Gas 
Meters and Illuminating Gas for the State of Con- 
necticut. Professor .Mixter is a member of a 
number of Scientific Societies, among them the 
Berlin Chemical Society and the .American Associa- 
tion for the Advancement of Science. Among the 
social organizations with which he is connected may 
be mentioned the Graduates' Club of New Haven, 
the New Haven Lawn Club and the New Haven 
Golf Club. He is independent in politics, giving 
his support always to the best man, irrespective of 
party, but his other engagements preclude his active 




\VM. G. MI.KTER 



participation in the political struggles of the hour. 
He marrieil, August 21, 1875, Ada Louise Webber. 
They have two children : George Webber and Ellen 
Deere Mixter. 



CHASE, Frank Herbert 

Yale B.A. 1894, Ph.D. 1896. 

Born in Portland. Me.. 1870; fitted for College at the 
Haverhill, Mass.. High School: graduated at Yale, 
1894; taught at the Cheshire Academy; perfected his 
studies abroad: and appointed Tutor at Yale, 1898. 

FRANK HERBERT CHASE, Ph.D., Tutor at 
Yale, was born in Portland, Maine, in 1870. 
His College jjreparations were pursued at the High 
School in Haverhill, Massachusetts, and he was 



38 



UNlVERSiriES AND -THEIR SONS 



graduated from Yale in 1894, being Valedictorian 
of his Class. After teaching at the Cheshire Acad- 
emy for a time, he spent fifteen months in Kurope, 
studying principally at Berlin and in the Englisii 




I'KANK H. CHASE 

libraries, making special research in the latter for 
the purpose of adding to his knowleilge of Mnglish 
literature and Old English syntax. Upon his re- 
turn in 1898, he began his duties at Yale as Tutor 
in English, taking charge of the Ereshman Class in 
that Department, and he also inaugurated an elective 
course in the History of the English Language. Mr. 
Chase received the degree of Doctor of Philosophy 
from Yale in 1896. He has published a Ribliographi- 
cal Guide to Old English Syntax (Leipzig, 1S96), has 
edited a new text of portions of the Old English 
translation of Genesis, discovered by him in the 
library of Cambridge University (in Herrig's 
.Archiv, vol. c), and has contributed reviews of 
numerous works in English Philology to various 
periodicals. 



LOCKWOOD, Edwin Hoyt 

Vale Ph.B. 1888, M.E. 1892. 

Born in New Canaan, Conn , 1866; received his early 
education in public schools, and later taught there for 
one year; graduate of Sheffield Scientific School of 
Yale (Course in mechanical engineering) 1888 with 
the degree of Ph.B.; in business for one year ; grad- 



uate student at the Sheffield School, 1890 ; Honorary 
degree of M.E. from Yale, 1892; Instructor there at 
present. 

EDWIN HOYT LOCKWOOD, Ph.H., M.E., 
Instructor in tlie Sheffield .Scientific School 
of Yale, was born in New Canaan, Connecticut, 
October 31, 1866. Through his fatlier, Samuel 
Kellogg Lockwood, who married Mary Hoyt of New 
Canaan, he was a direct descendant of Robert Lock- 
wood, who came from England to Waterlown, 
Massachusetts, about 1630, removing to Norwalk, 
Connecticut, about 1650. The family has resided 
in New Canaan since the beginning of the eighteenth 
century. Edwin H. Lockwood attended an un- 
graded school in his native town until his sixteenth 
year, and liien studied for one year in a prix-ate 
school. Leaving there, he taught a district school 
for one year, and then entered the Sheffield Scien- 
tific School of Vale, taking the course of Mechanical 
Engineering and graduating in 1888 with the degree 
of Bachelor of Philosophy. On his graduation he 
entered the employ of the Diamond Match Com- 
pany as draughtsman of special machinery, remaining 
there during 18S9. In 1890 he returned to the 




E. H. LOCKWOOD 



Sheffield Scientific School as a graduate student. 
He was made Instructor in 1891, and is still con- 
nected with the University in this capacity. In 1892 
he received the degree of Mechanical Engineer 



y 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



39 



from Yale. Mr. Lockwood is a junior member of 
the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, and 
author of Notes on Mechanical Drawing. 



MERRITT, Alfred Kindred 

Yale B.A. 1893. 

Born in Weldon, N. J., i865 ; received his early edu- 
cation in the public schools of Newark. N. J., and 
Brainerd, Minn : engaged in business for six years : 
fitted for College at the Shattuck School of Faribault, 
Minn.; B.A. Yale, 1893; Registrar of Yale since 1893. 

ALFRKD KINDRED MERRITT, Registrar 
at Yale, was born in Weldon. Morris county, 
Ni'W Jersey, November 25, 1866. His parents 




.A. K. MF.RKiri 

were Munson I.yman and Cornelia Jane (Kindred) 
Merritt. In youth he attemled for a time the 
public schools of Newark, New Jersey, and later, 
his parents having meanwhile moved to !\[innesota, 
those of Brainerd in that State. On his graduation 
from the latter he was employed for a time in the 
office of the Northern Pacific Railroad. .After hav- 
ing been there for two years he entered the Shattuck 
School of Faribault, Minnesota, September, 1883, 
and on the completion of his course there in 
1885 re-entered the services of the Railroad. In 
1889 he entered the .Academical Department of Yale, 
graduating with the degree of R.achelor of .Arts in 



1893. Immediately on his graduation he was ap- 
pointed Registrar of the University, and his con- 
nection with the Institution in that capacity has 
since continued. Mr. Merritt is a member of the 
New Haven Lawn Club .Association, the (iraduates' 
Club of New Haven, and in his Junior year at Col- 
lege was elected a member of the Delta Kappa 
Epsilon. He takes no active interest in the polit- 
ical struggles of the day. 



MORRIS, Lewis 

Yale B.A. 1746, M.A. 1790. 
Born in Morrisania, N. Y., 1726; graduated at Yale, 
1746; took an important part in opposing British op- 
pression; member of the Continental Congress, 1775-77 
and as such signed the Declaration of Independence; 
served in the N. Y. Legislature and as Major-General 
of the State Militia: chosen Regent of Columbia, 1784 j 
died, 1798. 

LEWIS MORRLS, M..A., Signer of the Decla- 
ration of Independence, was born in Morris- 
ania, New York, in 1726. He was a great-grandson 
of Richard Morris, who served as an officer under 
Oliver Cromwell previous to emigrating from Eng- 
land, and about 1650 settled near Harlem, Nev,- 
York, upon a large tract of la!id purchased of the 
neighboring Indians. His grandfather, Lewis Morris, 
(1671-1746), son of Richard, was anoted lawyer and 
statesman of his day, serving as Chief-Justice and as 
Acting Governor of New York and New Jersey, 
which were separated in 1 738, largely through 
his instrumentality. Lewis Aforris 2d (1698- 
1762) was Chief-Justice of the Vice-.Admi- 
ralty Court. The latter's son Lewis (the signer), 
took his Bachelor's degree at Yale in 1746 and 
for a number of years after leaving College he 
was engaged exclusively in managing his large 
estate at Morrisania. His patriotic sentiment and 
lively interest in the welfare of the Colonies eventu- 
ally brought him into close relationship with the 
foremost leaders of the revolutionary movement, 
with whom he at length took a firm stand in opposi- 
tion to British oppression, and as a delegate to the 
Continental Congress from 1775 '^^ '777 ^^ signed 
the Declaration of Independence, knowing well that 
his patriotism would endanger his homestead prop- 
erty and this knowledge was subsequently verified. 
In the session of Congress iitimediately after the 
Battle of Lexington he served upon a committee 
under the Chairmanship of General Washington, 
formulated for the purpose of devising the most 
feasible means of procuring war material. He also 



40 



UNirERSITIES JND THEIR SONS 



served upon other committees and visited the west- 
ern frontier with the object of inducing the Indian 
tribes to transfer their allegiance from the liritish to 
the Continental authority. The total destruction of 
all improvements ujwn his ])roperty together with 
over one thousand acres of valuable woodland, 
pl.iced him in exceedingly straitened circum- 
stances, but after the evacuation he again turned 
his attention to agriculture which he pursued with 
such energv as to jKirtially retrieve his fallen fortune. 
Lewis Morris continued his public services by ac- 
cepting a seat in the New Vork Legislature and the 
M.ayor-f.eneral^hip of the State Militia. He was 
appointed a Regent of Columbia in 17S4, and in 
1790 was maile a \Lister of .\rts by \'ale. His 
death occurred at Morrisania, J.muary 2J, 179S. 



KOLBROOK, Richard Thayer 

Yale B.A. 1893. 

Born at Windsor Locks, Conn., 1870; fitted for Col- 
lege at Phillips Academy of Andover; graduate of 
Yale, 1893; studied Romance Philology at Paris, and 
Italian at Siena and Florence, 1894; studied in Berlin, 
1894-93: again studied at Paris. 1895-96; Instructor in 
Romance Languages at Yale since 1896. 

RICHARD IIIWKR HOLIiROOK, Instruc- 
tor in Romance Languages at Vale, was 
born at Windsor Ix)cks, Coiuiecticut, December 
13, 1870. He is seventh in descent from John 
Holbrook who emigrated from Derby, Kngland, and 
settled at Oyster liay, Long Island, about the mid- 
dle of the seventeenth century. His mother, Ka- 
lista Thayer, was descended from Richard Thayer, 
recorded as a " freeman " in Hraintree during 1640, 
and is also a connection of the family of John .Mden. 
He received his early education chiefly in a private 
school at Vonkers, New Vork : then at (Ireenwich. 
Connecticut, Great Birrington, Massachusetts, and 
the Vonkers High School, and fitted for College at 
the Phillips .Academy at .Andover, Massachusetts, 
graduating in 18S9. He entered Vale in that year, 
and during his Junior and Senior years studied ])rin- 
cipally history, Litin, Greek, German, French and 
Italian, the linguistic work being mostly of a literary 
character. Ciraduating from Vale in 1893 he went 
to Paris where he studied Romance Philology imder 
such men as Gaston Paris, P. Meyer, .\ntoine Thomas 
and others. He went to Italy in 1894 and studied 
Italian at Siena and Florence. The winter of 1894- 
1895 was passed in Berlin in attendance on the 
lectures of Tobler, Paulsen and Hermann Grimm. 
During the winter of 1895-1S96 he was again in 



Paris studying Romance languages at the College 
lie France, Sorbonne, licole des Chartcs. During 
his Slav in Europe he also made studies of the Ger- 
man and French stages. Since his return to .■Xmer- 
ica in 1S96 he has been Instructor in Romance 




RICH.^VRD J. HOI.llROOK 



Languages at Vale. He is a member of two of the 
Greek Letter fraternities, Alpha Delta Phi and Chi 
Delta Theta. 



TOWNSEND, William Kneeland 

Yale B.A. 1871, LL.B. 1874, M.L. 1878, D.C.L. 1880. 

Born in New Haven. Conn., 1849; graduated at 
Yale, 1871 : received degrees from Yale, LL B . 1874; 
M.L, 1879; D.C.L., 1881 ; admitted to the Connecticut 
Bar in 1874 : Professor of Contracts at Yale Law School 
since 1881 : Corporation Counsel City of New Haven ; 
Judge United States District Court, 1892. 

Wii 1 lAM km:i;i.ani) townsend, 
1).C.L., Judge, and Professor of Contracts 
and Torts in the Vale Law School, was born 
in New Haven, June 12, 1849. He is the 
son of James M. and Maria Theresa (Clark) 
Townsend, of ancestry dating back to the May- 
flower. He entered the .Academic Department 
of Vale in 1S67, graduating in 1S71. He 
then entered upon a course of study in law at Vale, 
receiving the degrees of Bachelor of Laws in 1S74, 
Master of Laws in 1879, and Doctor of Civil Law 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



4> 



in 1 88 1. In 1874 he was admitted to the Bar. 
From 1889 to 1891 he was Corporation Counsel of 
the City of Xesv Haven. In 1892 he was appointed 
United States District Judge for the District of 




Professor of Sacred Literature in the Divinity School 
of Yale. His mother, Mary .\nna VanCleve, was a 
daughter of John VanCleve, .M.D., of Princeton. 
New Jersey. Professor Gibbs fitted for College at 
the Hopkins Grammar School in New Haven, and 
entered Vale in 1854, graduating with the degree 
of Bachelor of .Arts in 1858. He spent some yeais 
in post-graduate study at the University, receiving 
the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in 1863. In 
1866 he went abroad and spent the ensuing three 
years in study at the Universities of Berlin, Heidel- 
berg and Paris. He became University Professor 
of Mathematical Physics at Yale in 1871. His 
special work has been mainly in Thermodynamics. 
He has written several articles in the Transactions 
of the Connecticut Academy of Arts and Sciences 
and the American Journal of Science, and mainly 
as a recognization of these, was elected a member 
of the Royal Society of London. AVjIljams College 
in 1893 and Princeton University in 1896 made 
him Honorary Doctor of Laws. He is a mem- 
ber of the National .\cademy of Science, th; 
Cambridge Phiiosojjhical Society, the London Math- 



W. K. TOWXSEXD 



Connecticut. He is in New York a member of the 
Century, University and Yale Clubs, and in New 
Haven of the L'niversity and Graduates' Clubs hav- 
ing been the first Vice-President of the latter. In 
1 88 1 he was appointed Professor in the Yale Law 
School. He there occupies the Edward J. Phelps 
Chair of Contracts. He married Mary Leaven- 
worth Trowbridge, July i, 1874. His children are : 
Winston Trowbridge. Molly Leavenworth and George 
Henry Townsend. 



/ 




GIBBS, Josiah Willard 

Yale B.A. 1858, M.A., Ph.D. 1863 — Princeton LL.D. 1896. 
Born in New Haven, Conn., 1839-; fitted for College 
at the Hopkins Grammar School; A.B. Yale. 1858: 
spent some years in post-graduate study, receiving 
the degree of Ph.D. in 1863: studied at Paris, Berlin, 
and Heidelberg. 1856-69 ; Professor of Mathematical 
Physics at Yale since 1871 ; received the honorary 
degree of LL.D., from Williams College in 1893. 

JOSI.VH WILLARD GIBBS, Ph.D., LL.D., ematical Society, the Konigliche Gesellschaft der 
Professor of Mathematical Physics at Yalej Wissenschaften of Gottingen, the Royal .Academy 
was born in New Haven, Connecticut, February 1 1, of Amsterdam and the Society HoUandaise des 
1839. His father, Josiah Willard Gibbs, LL.D., was Sciences. 



J. WILLARU GIBBS 



42 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



HOPKINS. Edward Washburn 

Columbia A.B. 1878. 
Born in Northampton, Mass., 1857; fitted for College 
at the Academy of Bridgewater, and privately; A.B. 
Columbia, 1878 : studied abroad for three years, 1878- 
81 ; Ph.D. Leipzig, 1881 ; Tutor in Latin and Zend, 1881- 
85; Professor of Greek and Sanskrit at Bryn Mawr. 
1885-95 ; Professor of Sanskrit and Comparative Phi- 
lology at Yale since 1895. 

EDWARD WASHBURN HOI'KINS, I'h.D., 
Professor of Sanskrit and Comparative I'lii- 
lology at Vale, comes of an old Colonial family, be- 
ing eighth in direct descent from John Hopkins of 




E. WASHBURN HOPKINS 

Staffordshire, England, who came to New England 
with the Rev. Mr. Hooker in 1633. His father, 
Lewis Spring Hopkins, M.D., was a well-known 
physician of Northampton, Massachnsetts, where 
the subject of this sketch was born, September 8, 
1857, and his mother was a descendant of John 
Washburn of Bridgewater, Massachusetts, one of 
the " original proprietors " of that town. Edward 
Washburn Hopkins received his eariy education 
under the guidance of private tutors, and after a 
preparatory course at the .Academy of Bridgewater 
entered Columbia in 1874, graduating with the Class 
of 1878. Immediately upon his graduation he went 
abroad and spent three years in study in Germany 
at the Universities of Leipzig and Berlin, taking the 



degree of Doctor of Philosophy at Leipzig in 1881 
in the three subjects of .Sanskrit, Persian and Greek. 
He was made Tutor of Latin and Zend at Columbia 
in the same year and remained there four years, 
leaving to take the Professorship of Greek and San- 
skrit at Bryn Mawr College. Ten years later, after a 
year spent in special study in India, he succeeded 
Professor W. I). Whitney in the Chair of San- 
skrit and Comparative Philology at Yale. He mar- 
ried June 3, 1893, Mary daughter of Cyrus Clark of 
New York City. They have five children. Profes- 
sor Hopkins, besides a number of special papers and 
essays on Oriental and Philological subjects in the 
Journals of the Oriental and Philological Societies, 
has published several books which have been widely 
distributed ; among them a translation of the Laws 
of ^Llnu for Triibner's Oriental Series ; Castes ac- 
cording to .Manu ; Social Position of Ruling Caste 
ill India ; and the Religions of India. He has been 
Secretary of the .\merican Oriental Society since 
1895, and is a member of the Phi Beta Kappa. 



MASON, Erskine 

Columbia A.B. 1857, A.M., M.D. i860. 

Born in New York City, 1837 ; graduated at Colum- 
bia, 1857, and from the Medical Department, i860 ; 
Assistant Demonstrator there, 1861-66 ; Demonstrator 
some years; Adjunct Professor of Surgery at the 
University of the City of New York ; Clinical Lecturer 
on that subject at the Bellevue Hospital Medical Col- 
lege ; and officially connected with various New York 
hospitals; died 1882. 

ERSKINK MASON, A.M., M.D., Demonstra- 
tor of .Anatomy at the College of Physicians 
;uid Surgeons, was born in New York City, May 8, 
1S37. His great-grandfather was Rev. John Mason, 
D.D., a noted Scotch theologian of his day ; Pastor of 
the Cedar Street Church, New York, and a Trustee 
of Princeton and Columbia. His grandfather. 
John Mitchell Mason, D.D., was a graduate of Colum- 
bia, Class of 1 789 ; was distinguished for his pulpit 
eloquence ; was one of the founders of the Union 
Theological Seminary, New York, and President of 
Dickinson College. Rev. Erskine Mason, D.D.. 
Dr. Mason's father, was graduated at Dickinson 
(r823),held Pastorates in Schenectady and New 
York City, and the Professorship of Ecclesiastical 
History at the Union Seminary. The latter's son 
Erskine was educated at Columbia College and its 
Medical Department, taking his Bachelor's degree 
in 1857 and that of Doctor of Medicine three years 
later, and was also made a Master of .Arts byColum- 



UNIVERSiriES JND THEIR iONS 



43 



bia. Joining the medical profession of the me- 
tropolis, he soon acquired a large private practice as 
well as holding official appointments in several of the 
public hospitals. In 1861 he became Assistant 
Demonstrator of Anatomy at the College of Physi- 
cians and Surgeons ; was appointed Demonstrator 
in 1866 ; was subsequently Adjunct-Professor of 
Surgery in the Medical Department of the Univer- 
sity of the City of New York ; and at the time of his 
death, which occurred April 13, 1882, he was 
Clinical Lecturer on Surgery at the Bellevue Hos- 
pital Medical College. Dr. Mason was President of 
the Pathological Society in 1873, and held member- 
ship in several other medical organizations. He 
was also widely known as a contributor to medical 
literature. 



MORRIS, Gouverneur 

Columbia A. B. 1768, A.M. 

Born in Morrisania, N. Y., 1752 ; graduated at King's 
College, 1768: admitted to the Bar, 1771; member of 
the N. Y. Provincial Congress, 1775; assisted in draft- 
ing the State Constitution, 1776; delegate to the Con- 
tinental Congress, 1777-80 ; Assistant Superintendent 
of Finance (Federal Governmenti. 1781-85; delegate 
to Federal Constitutional Convention, 1787; special 
U. S. Commissioner to England, 1789-92 ; Minister to 
France, 1792-94; U. S. Senator, 18C0-03 ; Canal Com- 
missioner, N. Y., 1810-15; and a Trustee of Columbia, 
1805-16; died 1816. 

GOUVERXEUR MORRIS, A.M., Statesman, 
was a descendant of Richard, the founder 
of Morrisania, a grandson of Lewis Morris, Colonel. 
Chief-Justice and .Acting Governor of New York 
and New Jersey ; and son of Lewis Morris 2(1, 
Chief-Justice of the Vice-.\dmiralty Court. Born 
upon the family estate at Morrisania, January 31, 
1752, he at an early age became a student at King's 
College, from which he was graduated in 1768, and 
preparing for the legal profession was admitted to 
the Bar in 17 71. The exciting political agitation 
which preceded the Revolutionary War aroused his 
patriotic spirit, and although one of the youngest 
to assume leadership among the supporters of the 
independence movement, he was not wanting in 
activity, enthusiasm nor intellectual ability. As a 
member of the first Provincial Congress (1775) he 
offered suggestions upon the national currency ques- 
tion which were aftenvard accepted by the Conti- 
nental Congress, and the wisdom he displayed in 
the handling of other momentous public matters 
caused his selection as one of the committee to 
draft a State Constitution in 1776. In 1777 he 



was elected a delegate to the Continental Congress, 
succeeding Lewis Morris, his half-brother, and he 
retained his seat until 1780, during which time he 
held a number of important committee appoint- 
ments, including one chosen to examine with Gen- 
eral Washington the condition of the .Army at 
Valley Forge. He was also upon the committee 
intrusted with the responsible task of considering 
the despatches from the .American Commissioners 
abroad, and the Treaty of Peace was based upon 
the report of that body. From 1781 to 1785 he 
acted as .Assistant Superintendent of the Federal 




GOUVERNEUR MORRlb 

Finances ; was a delegate to the Federal Constitu- 
tional Convention in 17S7; special United States 
Commissioner to England, 1789-1792; United 
States Minister to France from the latter year to 
I 794 ; occupied a seat in the National Senate from 
iSoo to 1S03 ; and was Chairman of the New York 
Canal Commission from its organization in 1810, to 
1815. He was in various other ways a conspicuous 
figure in the eariy history of New York as a State, 
took an earnest interest in all matters relative to its 
welfare, and for some time was President of the 
New York Historical Society. He received from 
Columbia the degree of Master of Arts, and was a 
Trustee of the College from 1805 until his death, 
which occurred November 6, i8i6. Gouverneur 



44 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



Morris was one of the most popular orators of his 
day. Many of his addresses were published and he 
was the author of Observations on the American 
Revolution (1779). While residing in Philadelphia 
attending Congress, a carriage accident resulted in 
the loss of one of his legs, and he thenceforward 
used an artificial limb without much visible incon- 
venience. In Paris during the Reign of Terror his 
carriage was on one occasion stopped by the infuri- 
ated populace, wlio chargeil its occupant with being 
an aristocrat, but when he thrust the wooden leg 
through the window with the e.xclaniation that it 
was a substitute for one lost in the cause of .Amer- 
ican liberty, their taunts were turned to cheers. 



two years was occupied in mine examinations and 
other professional work in Arizona, New Mexico, 
Colorado, North Carolina, and the Republic of 
Colombia, South .America. He was for a time 
Superintendent of the .Mudsill .Mine, near Fairplay, 
Colorado. In 1889 he went to Dutch Ciuiana and 
examined a number of placer gold projierties, also 
prospecting for gold. He returned to America for 
a year as Superintendent of the Red Jacket Mine in 
Oregon, but in 1890 returned to South America 
and during the following two years was occupied in 



PEELE, Robert 

Columbia E. M. 1883. 

Born in New York City. 1858; graduate of the School 
of Mines of Columbia (Mining Engineer) 1883; engaged 
in assaying aad mining work in North Carolina, Colo- 
rado and Arizona. 1883.86; went to England in 1886 to 
study systems of sewage disposal in inland towns ; 
engaged in professional work in Arizona, New Mexico, 
Colorado, North Carolina and Republic of Colombia, 
South America, 1887-88, and in Dutch Guiana and 
Oregon, 1889-90: engaged in examining silver, tin and 
gold mines in Peru, Bolivia and Colombia for the Peru- 
vian Exploration Syndicate, 1890-92; Adjunct Professor 
of Mining in the School of Mines of Columbia since 
1892. 

RfMiKRT PI'IKI.K, KM., Adjunct Professor 
of Mining at Columbia, was born in llie 
City of New York, July 15, 1S58. His father. 
Robert Peele, was the son of an Englishman who 
came to this country in 1835. The elder Peele 
married Anna Westervelt, a descendant of the Van 
Westerveldt family, which came from Holland in 
1662, settling in Bergen, New Jersey, and after- 
wards in New York City. Robert Peele received 
his early education in the jjubiic schools of New 
York City and entered the School of Mines of Co- 
lumbia, graduating after a four years' course in min- 
ing engineering with the tlegree of Mining I'^n- 
gineer. His first work after graduation in 1SS3 
was done as .Assayer at the DesignoUe Reduction 
Works at Charlotte, North Carolina. During part 
of 1883 and 1884 he held the position of .Assayer 
and Assistant Superintendent at the Silver King 
mine, Montezuma, Colorado. For two years there- 
after he was foreman of the dry-crushing and amal- 
gamating silver mill of the Silver King Mining 
Company in Arizona. In the latter part of 1886 
he went to England to study sy.stems of sewage 
disposal in inland towns, and during the following 




ROBERT PEELE 

examining silver, tin and gold mines in Peru, Bolivia 
and Colombia in the interests of the Peruvian Ex- 
ploration Syndicate of London. Appointed in 1892 
Adjunct Professor of Mining in the School of Mines 
of Columbia, he has since continued to hold that 
position. Since 1896 he has also been a member 
of the firm of Olcott, Fearn & Peele, consulting 
mining and metallurgical engineers of New York 
City. He is unmarried. Professor Peele is a 
member of the Alumni Association of the School ot 
Mines of Columbia and of several scientific societies 
in this country and England, among them the 
American Institute of Mining Engineers, the In- 
stitution of Mining and Metallurgy of London, the 
South Staffordshire and East Worcestershire In- 
stitute of Mining Engineers of Birmingham, Eng- 
land, and others. 



UNIFERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



45 



ADAMS, George Everett 

Harvard A.B. i85o, LL.B. 1865. 
Born in Keene,, N. H., 1840; educated at Keene, at 
Phillips-Exeter Academy, at Harvard (i860; and at the 
Harvard Law School; served in Battery A, ist Illinois 
Artillery ; practised law in Illinois : member of the 
Illinois State Senate and United States House of 
Representatives ; Director of Newberry Library, of the 
Field Columbian Museum; member of the Chicago 
Board of Education; Overseer of Harvard. 

GEORGE EVERETT ADAMS, Lawyer, and 
Overseer of Harvard, was born in Keene, 
New Hampshire, June i8, 1S40. His father, Benja- 
min Franklin Adams, born in iSoo, was a descendant 




GEO. E. AD.iMS 

of WilHam Adams, who settled in Cambridge in 
162S. .-Xfter George Everett Adams had passed 
through the academy and high school in his native 
town, he entered Phillips-Exeter Academy and then 
continued his educational course at Harvard, where 
he graduated in i860. Five years later he received 
his degree of Bachelor of Laws from the Har\-ard 
Law School. Between these two graduations he 
had seen service as jirivate in Battery A of the 
First Illinois .Artillery, in which organization he 
enlisted at the beginning of the war, April 19, 
1 86 1. Besides pursuing his occupation as a lawyer 
Mr. Adams was a member of the Illinois .State 
Senate in 1881 and of the L'nited States House of 
Representatives 1 883-1 891. He has also been a 



R' 



Director of the Newberry Library, of the Field Colum- 
bian Museum and of the Orchestral Association 
of Chicago. From 1 896 to 1 899 he was a member 
of the Chicago Board of Education, and from 1892 
to the present time an Overseer of Harvard. Mr. 
Adams married in 1871 Adele Foster, and has two 
children : Isabel and .Margaret .Adams. 



DANA, Richard Henry, Jr. 

Harvard A.B. 1837, LL.B. 1839. LL.D. i86«. 
Born in Cambridge, Mass., 1815 ; graduated Harvard, 
1837 : Law School, 1839; Instructor in Elocution, Har- 
vard, 1839-40; published Two Years Before the Mast, 
1839; made a tour of the world, 1859-60; edited Whea- 
tcn s International Law, 1866; stood for Congress 
against General Butler, 1868; was nominated Minister 
to England. 1876: went abroad for study and died at 
Rome, Italy, 1882. 

ICHARl) HENRV DANA, Jr., LL.D., Law- 
yer, was born in Cambridge, Massachu- 
setts, August I, 1815, and in early life manifested 
a strong predilection for the sea, his inclination 
being to enter the LTnited States Navy. He 
came of a line of distinguisheii Har\-ard gradu- 
ates ; his father, Richard Henry Dana, poet and 
author, one of the projectors of the North .American 
Review, was in the Harvard Class of 1808; his 
grandfather, Francis Dana, delegate to the Conti- 
nental Congress, taking a leading part in framing 
the Articles of Corporation, first Minister of the 
United States at St. Petersburg, was a graduate of 
Harvard in 1762; his great-grandfitther, Richard 
Dana, leader of the Boston Bar in the period im- 
mediately preceding the Revolution, was a member 
of the Harvard Class of 17 18. Family tradition 
and influence therefore, combined to prescribe that 
he should study at Harvard. His course was in- 
terrupted by an affection of the eyes, but he finally 
was graduated in 1837. In the meantime, how- 
ever, he had made a voyage as a common sailor on 
the Boston brig Pilgrim, around the Horn, partly 
for his health and partly to satisfy his early longing 
for sea-life ; and out of this voyage came the fas- 
cinating book. Two Years Before the Mast, which 
is probablv the most truthful picture of the sailor's 
lite ever published. The British .Admiralty adopted 
it for distribution in the Navy, and it has been 
translated into several foreign languages. Mr. Dana 
studied law under Judge Joseph Story and was 
admitted to the Bar in 1840. He still continued 
his literary work, however, though largely in the 
line of his profession, among other things preparing, 
by request of the family of Sir Henry Wheaton. a 



46 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



new edition of U'heaton's International Law. This 
work was later the cause of a heated controversy as 
to the authorship of some of the annotations. In 
1868, Mr. Dana took part as a principal in a politi 




KICH.-VKU H. DANA, JR. 

cal contest, growing out of the opposition to the 
election of General Benjamin F. Butler to Congress. 
He was defeated by General liutU'r, but to the 
animosities engendered in this canvass is attributed 
the refusal of the United States Senate to confirm 
Mr. Dana's nomination by General Grant as Min- 
ister to Great Britain in 1876. Mr. Dana was In- 
structor in Elocution in Harvard in 1839 and 1840, 
and Lecturer on International Law in 1866 and 
1868. He served two terms as Overseer, 1865- 
1877, and in 1866 received the degree of Doctor 
of Laws. Hobart College conferred upon him the 
degree of Doctor of Civil Law in 1853. He was 
a fellow of the .•\merican .'\cademy and a member 
of the Massachusetts Historical Society, and other 
learned bodies. In i88t he went abroad to pur- 
sue further his studies in International law, but died 
shortly after his arrival, at Rome, Italy, January 
7, 1882. 



1825; State House of Representatives, 1825 and in Sub- 
sequent years; State Senate, 1835; United States 
Attorney for Massachusetts, 1841-45; reappointed, 
1849; Lecturer on Law, Harvard, 1848-49; LL.D., 
Harvard, 1857; died, 1857. 

FRANKLIN DEXTKR, LL.D., Law Lecturer 
at Harvard, was born in Charlestown, Massa- 
chusetts, November 5, 1793, the son of Samuel, 
(Harvard 1781) and Catherine Gordon Dexter. 
He was graduated at Harvard in tlie Class of 1S12, 
studied law and soon became eminent at the Bar. 
.\ case in wliich he acquired great distinction, was 
the defence of the Knapjjs for the murder of Joseph 
White of Salem, in 1830, in which he was opposed 
by Daniel Webster, called in to the assistance of 
the jirosecution. He delivered the Fourth of July 
oration before the City Government of Boston, in 
1S19, and in 1825 entered that government as a 
member of the Common Council. In the same 
year he was elected a member of the State House 
of Representatives from Boston, a position to which 
he was chosen again in 1836 and in 1840, and in 
1835 he was elected to a seat in the State Senate. 
Mr. Dexter was appointed LInited States District 




FRANKLIN DEXTER 



Attorney for Massachusetts in 1841 and served 
through President Tyler's administration. He was 



DEXTER, Franklin 

Harvard A.B. 1812, LL.D. 1857. 

Born in Charlestown, Mass . 1793 ; graduated at Har- reappointed to the same office by President Taylor 
vard, 1812; member of the Boston Common Council, in 1849. In 1848 he was Lecturer in Law at Har- 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



47 



vard, and in 1S57 he received the degree of Doctor 
of Laws from that University. He married Cath- 
erine EHzabeth daughter of Judge William Prescott, 
of Boston, in 1S19, and died in Beverly, Massa- 
chusetts, August 14, 1857. 



FAY, Samuel Phillips Prescott 

Harvard, A.B. 1798, A.M. 
Born in Concord, Mass.. 1778; graduated Harvard. 
1798 ; admitted to the Bar 1802 ; Captain during Shay's 
Rebellion; member of Executive Council, 1818-19; 
member of the Massachusetts Constitutional Conven- 
tion, 1820; Judge of Probate, Middlesex county, 1821- 
56; Overseer, Harvard, 1824-52; died 1856. 

SAMUEL PHILLIPS PRESCOTT FAY, Lawyer, 
and Overseer of Harvard, was born in Con- 
cord, Massachusetts, January lo, 1778, son of Jona- 




SAMUEL p. p. FAY 

than and Lucy (Prescott) Fay. He was graduated 
at Harvard in the Class of 1798 and admitted to the 
Middlesex Bar in 1802. He began practice in 
Cambridgeport, Massachusetts, served as (_'aptain 
in Shay's Rebellion, and in 1S09 was on the staff 
of Governor Gore. In iSiS he was elected a 
member of the Executive Council. At the State 
Constitutional Convention he served as a member, 
in 1820, and the following year he accepted ap- 
pointment as Judge of the Middlesex Probate Court, 
holding this position until two months before his 



death, which occurred May 18, 1856. He married 
Harriet, daughter of Samuel Howard, one of the 
Boston Tea-Party. Judge Fay served as Overseer 
of Harvard from 1824 to 1852. 



CHASE, Thomas 

Harvard A.B. 1848, A.M. 1851, LL.D. 1878. 
Born in Worcester, Mass., 1827. graduated at Har- 
vard 1848, A.M., 1851 ; and was Tutor there 1850-53; 
spent two years travelling and studying in Europe ; be- 
came Professor of Philology and Classical Literature 
at Haverford College, Pa. 1855 and President 1856-75. 
one of the American revisers of the New Testament; 
and Senior Editor of Chase and Stuart's Classical 
Series of Text-books : died 1892. 

THOMAS CHASE, LL.D., Educator, was 
born in Worcester, Massachusetts, June i6, 
1827. He distinguished himself at Harvard, and 
becoming a Tutor there in 1850, continued in that 
capacity until 1853. (ioing abroad in tiint year 
he visited the localities immortalized by the Greek 
and Latin classics, and also profited by the lectures 
of Boeckh, Curtius and others at Berlin. Return- 
ing to America in 1855 he accepted the Profes- 
sorship of Philology and Classical Literature at 
Haverford College, near Philadelphia, and occupied 
the chair until 1S56, when he was chosen President 
of that mstitution. Professor Chase was given the 
honorary degree of Doctor of Laws by Harvard in 
1 8 78, and that of Doctor of Literature by Haverford 
in 18S0. He was Senior Editor of Chase and 
Stuart's Classical Series of Latin and Greek Text- 
Books, and was one of tiie .American committee 
appointed to revise the English translation of the 
New Testament. He was a member of the .Amer- 
ican Philosophical Society and of the .American 
Antiquarian Society. His public writings are : 
Hellas : Her Monuments and Scenery, an oration 
on Abraham Lincoln, several literary and biograph- 
ical essays, and an address on Liberal l-'ducation : 
its .Aims and Methods, delivered at Bryn Mawr 
College, Pennsylvania. Dr. Cliase died in 1892. 



DALY, Reginald Aldworth 

Harvard A.M. 1893, Ph.D. 1896. 

Born in Napanee, Canada, 1871 : educated at Victoria 
University, Toronto and at Harvard ; Instructor in 
Geology at Harvard; Parker Fellow (travelling in 
Europe) from Harvard; Instructor in Physiography. 

REGINALD ALDWORTH DALY, Ph.D., In- 
structor in Physiography at Harvard, was 
born in Napanee, Ontario, Canada, May 19, 1871, 
his parents being Edward and Jane (Jeffers) Daly. 



48 



UNIl'ERSITIES AND Til El R SONS 



In 1S91 he received the degree of H.ichelor of Arts 
and in 1892 the degree of Bachelor of Science at 
Victoria University, Toronto, and in 1893 received 
the degree of Nfaster of Arts and in 1896 the de- 




gree of Doctor of Philosophy at Harvard. During 
the year 1S95-1896 Mr. Daly was Instructor in 
(leology at Harvard. The next two years he spent 
in Europe as Parker Fellow from Harvard, and then 
returned to become Instructor in Physiography. 



NORTON, Charles Eliot 

Harvard A.B. 1846, A.M.. LL.D. 1887 - Columbia L.H.D. i888. 

Born in Cambridge, Mass., 1827; graduated at Har- 
vard, 1846 ; Lecturer at Harvard, 1863 and 1874 ; Pro- 
fessor at Harvard. 1875- 

CHARLKS ELIOT NORTON, LL.D., Litt.D., 
L.H.D., Emeritus Professor of the History 
of An and for many years at the head of the 
I-'inc Arts Department at Harvard, was born in 
Cambridge, Massachusetts, November i6, 1827. 
His parents were Andrews and Catherine (Eliotj 
Norton. On his father's side he is the si.xth in 
descent from William Norton, who with his brother. 
Rev. John Norton, came to .Massachusetts Bay in 
1634 and here married Lucy, daughter of Emanuel 
and Lucy Downing and niece of Governor Winthrop. 
.\fter being educated at the private schools at 



C'ambridge, Charles Eliot Norton entered Harvard 
where he graduated in 1846. The ne.xt three years 
he spent in a counting-room. Then he was made 
supercargo on a sailing shii) to India, and after si.\ 
months' stay and travel in India returncil home in 
1 85 1. Since that time he has made four visits to 
Europe. In 1863 and again in 1874 he was Lec- 
turer at Harvard College. In 1875 he was ap- 
pointed Professor of I'inc .\rt^. whi( h jjosition he 
held until recently. In 1.S62 he married Susan 
Sedgwick, daughtt-r of Theodore Sedgwick, Esq., 
and has six children. I'rofessor Norton received 
the degree of Doctor of Literature from Cambridge 
University (ICngland) in 1884, Doctor of Laws from 
Harvard, in 1887, and Doctor of Humanities from 
Columbia in 1888. He is a member of the Mas- 
sachusetts Historical Society, a fellow of the .Amer- 
ican .-\cademy of Arts and Sciences, and a member 
of the Imperial Cierman .Archaeological Institute. 
He has puljlished Notes of Travel and Study in 
Italy; Historical Studies of Church Building in the 
Middle Ages; and a translation of Dante's \"ita 
Nuova ami Divina Commedia. He has edited the 




CHARLES ELKjT NORTON 



Correspondence of Carlyle and Emerson, and that 
of Coethe and Carlyle, also Carlyle's Reminiscences 
and Letters, the Letters of James Russell Lowell, and 
tlie Orations and .Addresses of Georse William Curtis. 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



49 



BRENNAN, Ambrose Kirk 

Yale M.D. 1893. 
Born in New Haven, Conn., 1871 ; graduated at Yale 
Medical School, 1893; practised in New York City for 
some time: began practice in New Haven, 1895; now 
an Assistant in the Yale Medical School. 

AMBROSK KIRK BRhiNXAX, M.D., As- 
sistant in the Vale Medical Department, is a 
rising young piiysician of New Haven antl was born 
in that city January 12, 187 1. He is a son of 
Joseph and Josephine Cecilia (Kirk) Brennan. both 
of whom were born in Bridgeport, Connecticut, the 
former in 1841, and the latter in 1847. Joseph 




A. KIRK BREX\.\y 

Brennan was a well-known musician who died in 
1896. The son completed his early education at 
the Hillhouse High School, New Haven and took 
his Medical degree at Yale in 1893. After acquir- 
ing much valuable experience in the various New 
York Hospitals, including the Frangais and Lying- 
in, and the Roosevelt and West-Side German Dis- 
pensaries, he returned to New Haven (1895) where 
he has succeeded in building up a large practice. 
He is also Assistant in Obstetrics and Pediatrics, 



o 



HUBBARD, Oliver Payson 

Yale B.A. 1828, A.M. 
Born in Pomfret, Conn, 1809; educated in private 
academies and one year at Hamilton College, entering 
Yale as a Junior in 1826 and graduating in the Class of 
1828: Assistant in Yale Chemical Laboratory, 1831-36; 
Professor of Chemistry, Mineralogy and Geology, 
Dartmouth, 1836-66; Lecturer and Professor in Dart- 
mouth Medical School, 1866 83, when he became 
Professor Emeritus : Overseer Thayer School of Engi- 
neering, 1867-95, and Dartmouth ; M.D , South Carolina 
Medical College; LL.D , Hamilton; only survivor of 
Class of 1828. 

, LIVER PA\SO\ HL'BBARO, I.L.D., As- 
sistant in Chemistry at Vale, was born in 
Pomfret, Connecticut, March 31, 1809, the son of 
Stephen and Zeruiah ((irosvenor) Hubbard. The 
family removed to Rome, New \ork, in 181 1, and 
the son received his early and preparatory education 
at the Academy of Josiah Holbrook and at the 
Crosvenor Academy, of which his uncle was Prin- 
cipal, advancing so far in his studies as to be able 
to enter the Sophomore Class at Hamilton in 1825. 
He remained at Hamilton only until 1826, entering 
the Junior Class at Yale in that year and graduating 
in 1828. After teaching for three years, he returned 
to Vale, as Assistant to Professor Benjamin Silliman, 
Senior, in the Chemical Laboratory. In this capac- 
ity he remained until 1836, being associated with 
Charles (joodyear in his early experiments which 
led to the discovery of the vulcanizing of rubber, 
and being connected with Professor Silliman in an 
examination for the LTnited States Government of 
the culture of sugar cane and the manufacture of 
sugar in the L'nited States. Called to the Chair 
of Chemistry, Mineralogy and Geology at Dartmouth 
in 1836, he remained in that position for thirty 
years, resigning his Professorship in 1S66, but con- 
tinuing his lectures in the Medical School until 1883, 
when he was made Professor Emeritus. In 1853 
he built the Shattuck Observatory at Dartmouth, 
was Overseer of the Thayer School of Engineering 
from 1867 to 1895, and in 1863 and 1S64 served 
as a member of the New Hampshire Legislature. 
He also delivered lectures at Wesleyan University, 
Middletown, Connecticut, in 1835, on Geolog)', at 
Buffalo, New York, in 1848, and at Portland, Maine, 
in 1849. Professor Hubbard received the degree 
of Master of Arts from both Vale and Dartmouth. 



in the Medical Department of Yale and is proving the latter in 1873, ^nd was made a Doctor of 



a valuable addition to the force of under teachers. 
Dr. Brennan is a member of the City and County 
Medical Societies, and of the Vale Medical .\lumni 
Association. 

VOL. ni. — 4 



Medicine by the Medical College of South Carolina 
in 1837, and a Doctor of Laws by Hamilton in 
1861. He was a founder of the American Associa- 
tion of Geologists and Naturalists, 1S41, of the 



5° 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



American Association for the Advancement of 
Science at I'hilaiitlphia, 1848, and has been Presi- 
dent of the New York Academy of Sciences. He 
has contributed varions papers to the American 




having taken a special interest in physics. He was 
a Tutor at Yale from 1833 to 1S36, in wliicli year 
he went abroad for the jmrpose of completing his 
])reparations for scientific and educational work, and 
the succeeding year was spent in Paris, attending 
the lectures of Dulong, Biot, Arago, Pouillet, Poisson 
and other eminent scientists. Upon his return in 
1837 he was appointed Professor of Natural Phil- 
osophy, Mathematics and Astronomy at the Western 
Reserve College, Ohio, remaining in that capacity 
until 1 844, when he accepted the same Chair at 
the University of the City of New York, and four 
years later tliat of Natural Philosophy at Princeton, 
retaining the former for sixteen years, and the latter 
one year. In 1860 he was elected to the Munson 
Professorship of Natural Philosophy and Astronomy 
at Yale, which he held continuously for twenty-nine 
years until his death. His scientific investigations 
and labors in the field of astronomy and meteor- 
ology were begun immediately after leaving College. 
He was one of the first in the United States to 
determine the altitude of shooting stars; studied 
carefully the declination of the magnetic needle ; 



OLIVI.k 1'. JILUliAKl) 

Journal of Science, and tlie Magazine of American 
History, and is the author of a History of Dartmouth 
Medical Sciio(jl and Dr. Nathan Smith, its founder. 
Professor Hubbard married a daughter of Professor 
Benjamin Silliman, in 1837. 



LOOMIS, Elias 

Yale, B.A. 1830, M.A. 
Born in Willington, Conn., 1811 ; graduated at Yale, 
1830; Tutor there, 1833-36; student in Paris the follow- 
ing year; Professor of Natural Philosophy, Mathe- 
matics and Astronomy, Western Reserve College, 
1837-44 ; held the same chair at University of the City 
of N. Y., 1844-60; Professor of Natural Philosophy at 
Princeton, 1848-49 ; Munson Professor of Natural Phil- 
osophy and Astronomy at Yale for the rest of his life ; 
noted scientific investigator upon astronomical and 
meteorological subjects ; scientist and writer of inter- 
national repute ; died 1889. 

ELIAS I.OOMIS, I,I..D., Professor of Natural 
Philosophy and Astronomy at Yale, was born 
in Willington, Connecticut, .August 7, 181 1. His 
preparatory studies were directed by his father, and 
in 1830 he took his Bachelor's degree at Yale, 




liLIAS LOOiMIS 



was the first American discoverer of Halley's comet 
on its return to perihelion in 1835; and from 1846 
to 1849 was engaged with other scientists in deter- 
mining the exact longitude of various points in the 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



5' 



United States by means of telegraphic comparisons 
of time. Professor l,o6rais died in 1889. Tile 
degree of Master of Arts was conferred upon him 
by Yale, and tiiat of Doctor of Laws by the Uni- 
versity of the City of New York, the latter in 1854. 
Besides the principal American scientific bodies 
including the National Academy of Sciences, he 
was a member of the Royal Irish Academy, the 
Royal Meteorological Society, London, and the 
Societa Meteorologica Italiana. His contribu- 
tions to scientific literature comprise more than 
one hundred papers upon a varied line of subjects 
relative to his specialties, and he also prepared a 
series of valuable text-books, one of which, Analy- 
tical Geometry and Calculus has been translated 
into the Chinese language, and another on meteor- 
ology, "'as rendered into Arabic. 



NORTH, Simeon 

Yale B.A. 1825, M.A. 
Born in Berlin, Conn., 1802 ; graduated at Yale, 1825 ; 
at the Yale Divinity School, 1828; Tutor at Yale, 1827- 
29; Professor of Ancient Languages at Hamilton Col- 
lege, 1829-39 ; President of Hamilton, 1839-57; reviving 
the fallen fortunes of that institution ; ordained to the 
Congregational Ministry, 1842 ; died 1884. 

SIMEON NORTH, D.D., LL.D.. Tutor at 
Yale and afterward President of Hamilton, 
was born in Berlin, Connecticut, September 7, 1802. 
ICntering Yale, Class of 1S25, he took his Bachelor's 
degree and immediately began the study of theology 
at the Yale Divinity School, from which he was 
graduated three years later, and from 1827 to 1829 
he acted as a Tutor in the College. .-Vccepting in 
the latter year the Professorship of .\ncient Lan- 
guages at Hamilton, he retained '.he post for ten 
years, at the expiration of which time he was 
elected President of that College, holding office for 
eighteen years or until 1S57, when he resigned, and 
during his administration he revived the declining 
fortunes of that institution into a state of substan- 
tial prosperity. President North was ordained to 
the Congregational Ministry in 1842. His later 
years were spent in retirement in Clinton, New- 
York, and his death occurred February 12, 18S4. 
He received the degree of Master of Arts from 
Yale, and those of Doctor of Laws and Doctor of 
Divinity from Western Reserve and Wesleyan in 
1842 and 1849 respectively. He was the author 
of:' .\nglo-Saxon Literature; Faith in the World's 
Conversion ; "The .American System of Collegiate 
Education, etc. 



DUNCAN. George Martin 

Yale B.r>. 1884. 
Born in Haledon, N. J., 1857; studied at Paterson 
Seminary, Paterson, N. J ; graduate of New York 
University, Class of 1881 ; attended Yale Divinity 
School; Graduate Fellow of Yale: studied in German 
and French Universities ; Editor on the New York 
Examiner ; Professor of Philosophy in Yale. 

EOROL MARTIN DUNCAN, M.A., Pro- 
fessor of Mental and Moral Philosophy at 
Yale, was born in Haledon, New Jersey, November 
26, 1857. He is the son of James and Jane Martin 
(Torhel) Duncan, both of .Scotch descent. His 



G 




GEORGE .M. DUN'C.AN 

early training was at Paterson Seminary, Paterson, 
New Jersey, where he was fitted for College. From 
there he went to New York I'niversity, graduating 
in the Class of iSSi. Having decided to pursue 
philosophical and theological studies ^[r. Duncan 
went to the Yale Divinity School for three years. 
M the end of this time he was given a fellowship, 
and during the year of 1S84-18S5 he pursued ail- 
vanced studies, in philosophy under President 
Porter and in theology under the Professors of the 
Divinity School. He then went abroad and con- 
tinued his work in the Universities of Germany and 
France, studying in 1885 at the University of Jena, 
Germany; in 1886 at Leipzig University and 
Heidelberg ; in 1886-1SS7 at Berlin University and 



52 



UNjyERsrriEs and ruEm sons 



in 18S7-1SS8 in the I'niversity of I'aris, France. 
During tliis period of foreign study and until 1895 
Mr. Duncan travelled extensively, visiting among 
other countries Egypt, Palestine. Syria, Greece and 
Norway. For some time he was on the editorial 
force of the New York Examiner. Since 1888 he 
has taught philosophy at Yale and in 1894 he was 
apjiointed Professor of Philosophy in the University. 
He is a member of tlie .American Psychological 
.Association. He married, .Viigust 29, 1889, Mary, 
il.tughter of Theodore R. Carter, of Montclair, New 
Jersey. In politics Mr. Duncan is an independent 
Republican. 



PORTER, Frank Chamberlin 

Vale B.D. i836, Ph.D. 1889. 
Born in Beloit, Wis., 1859; attended Beloit High 
School and Beloit Academy; A.B., Beloit College, 
1880; A.M., Beloit College, 1883; B.D, Yale, 1886; 
PhD, Yale, 1889; D.D., Beloit College, 1897; teacher 
of Mathematics and Greek in Chicago, 1882-84; In- 
structor in Yale Divinity School, 1889 91 ; Professor of 
Biblical Theology in Yale Divinity School, 1891- 

FR.\NK CH.\N1)I.FR PORTER, Ph.D., D.D., 
Winkley Professor of Biblical Theology at 
\alc, was born in lieloit, Wisconsin, January 5, 1859. 
He is the son of ^Villiam and Ellen (Gertrude 
(Chapin) Porter. He received early training in 
the public schools of his native town, leaving there 
after the first year in the high scliool to enter the 
Beloit Academy, then known as the Preparatory 
Department of lieloit College. He then entered 
Beloit College where lie received the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts in 1880. Three years later ( 1 883) 
he took the degree of Master of .Arts at the same 
institution. .After graduating from Beloit in 1880 
he at once entered u])on a course of theological 
study which was to be of great extent and which 
has made him one of the leading theological and 
biblical scholars of the present time. This course 
of study was as follows: During the year of 1881- 
18S2 he studied at the Union Park Theological 
Seminary of Chicago ; 1884-1885 at the Hartford, 
Connecticut, Tlieological Seminary; from 1885 to 
1889 at the Yale Divinity School, during the period 
receiving two degrees. Bachelor of Divinity 1886 and 
Doctor of Philosophy 1889, from Yale. Later, 1897 
he received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from 
Beloit. From 1882 to 1884 he was a teacher of 
Mathematics and Greek in the Chicago High School. 
He was an Instructor in the Yale Divinity School 
during the year of 1 889-1 891, and he then received 
the appointment as Winkley Professor of Biblical 



Theology in the \'aie Divinity School. As an author- 
ity on the history of the period before and during the 
life of Christ, as a contributor to the literature of 
theology and as a teacher of Palestinian and Hellen- 
istic Jewish literature and of Gospel criticism Pro- 
fessor Porter has a wide reputation both in this 
country and in luirope. He is preparing a book 
on the Contemporary History of the New Testa- 
ment for the International Theological Library, 
also a book on The Spirit of God and the Word 
of God in Modern Theology. Me married, June 10, 
1S91, Delia Wood, daughter of the late Professor 




FR.-\NK C. l. iKMR 



C". S. Lyman, of \'ale. Mis children are: Lyman 
Edwards and William Quincy Porter, born respec- 
tively November 7, 1893 and February 7, 1897. 



Pond, Miles Albion 

Yale Ph.B. 1892. 
Born in Torrington. Conn., 1866; educated in his 
native town and at the Sheffield Scientific School Class 
of 1892; Instructor in Drawing there ever since his 
graduation. 

MILKS ALBION POND, Ph.B., Instructor in 
Drawing in the Scientific Department of 
Yale, is a native of Torrington, Connecticut, and 
was born December 8, 1866. He acquired a prac- 
tical education in the schools of his native town, 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



53 



after the completion of which he entered the Shef- 
field Scientific School of Vale, where he took the 
regular course in civil engineering and was gradu- 
ated in 1892. At the opening of the following term 




himself of the superior educational advantages ot 
the i:ast he entered Yale, and though he was with- 
out money he earned College expenses by constant 
work, and received three degrees from the Uni- 
versity. After three years in the Academic Depart- 
ment he received the Bachelor of Arts degree, and 
then entered the Law School. Here he graduated 
with the degree of Bachelor of Laws in 1893. He 
then spent a year in post-graduate work in the I^w 
School, and took the second degree in Law, Master 
of Laws in 1894. This same year he was admitted 
to the Bar of Tennessee, and practised in that state 
for one year. He then returned to Vale for further 
graduate work and to take charge of the University 
Dining Hall. In 1898 he was admitted to the 
Connecticut Bar, and he now practises law with 
the firm of White & Daggett, whose offices are in 
the First National Bank Building, in New Haven. 
While he was at Vale, Mr. Tilson was actively en- 
gaged in journalistic work. In 1891 he edited and 
published the Academic Senior Class Book, and for 
three years he was Editor of the Vale Banner. He 
was also founder, editor and publisher of the Law 



MILES ALBION' POND 



he began his duties as an Instructor in that Depart- 
ment and has continued in that capacity to the 
present time. 



TILSON, John Quillin 

Yale B.A. i8gi, LL.B. 1893, M.L. 1894. 
Born at Clear Branch, Tenn , 1866; educated in pub- 
lic schools of Tennessee ; graduated at Carson College, 
Tenn., 1888; received A.B. degree from Yale, i8gi ; 
graduated from Yale Law School, 1893 ; received degree 
of ML,, from Yale, 1894 ; admitted to the Bar of Ten- 
nessee, 1894 ; admitted to Connecticut Bar in 1898 ; 
Lieutenant in the Sixth United States Volunteer In- 
fantry; did extensive editorial work at Yale : practises 
law with White & Daggett in New Haven. 

JOHN QUILLIX TILSON, B.A., JSLL., Lawyer, 
and Steward at Yale, was born at t:iear Branch, 
Tennessee, .April 5, 1866. English, German and Irish 
families are the ancestors of his parents, William Er- 
win and Katherine (Sams) Tilson. By attendance at 
the public schools of Tennessee and by home study 
he fitted himself for Carson College, Tennessee, 
which Institution he entered in 1886. In 1888 he 
graduated th'ere with first honors and with the 
degree of Bachelor of Arts. Determined to avail during the recent war with Spain, and is now Cap- 




JOHX Q. TILSON 

School Annual, the Yale .Shingle. He was a Lieu- 
tenant in the Sixth Regiment United States Volun- 
teer Infantry, one of the " Immune "" regiments 



54 



UNIVERSITIES JND THEIR SONS 



tain of Company D, Second Regiment, Connecticut another course of study abroad. In 1888 he was 



National Guard. He is a member of the Psi Upsi- 
ion Society, and the Phi DeUa Phi (Corbey Court) 
of the Yale Law School. 



PENFIELD. Samuel Lewis 

Yale Ph.B. 1877, M.A. lfq6. 

Born in Catskill, N. Y., 1856; educated at the Cats- 
kill Academy, Wesleyan Academy, Wilbraham, Mass., 
the Scientific Department of Yale. Class of 1877, and 
in Germany; Assistant in Chemistry at Yale, 1877-79; 
Instructor, 1881-88; Assistant Professor till 1893; and 
appointed Professor of Mineralogy the latter year. 

SAMUEi, LKWIS i'i;.\FIf;i,L), .M.A., I'rofessor 
of Mineralogy at Yale, was born in Catskill, 
New York, January 16, 1856, son of George Hoyt 




s. I.. PEXFIF.1,1) 

and Ann .Augusta (Chessman) Pcnfield. Having 
attended the academy in his native town and the 
Wesleyan .Academy, Wilbraham, Massachusetts, he 
pursued the regular course at the Sheffield Scientific 
School of Yale, graduating in 1877. and sub- 
sequently studied abroad, attending the Universities 
of Strassburg and Heidelberg. He acted as an 
.Assistant in the Chemical I,aboratory at the Sheffield 
Scientific .School for the two years following his 
graduation, and after returning from his first visit to 
Europe (1881) was made an Instructor in Mineral- 
ogy at Yale, serving in that capacity for seven years 
with the exception of some months devoted to 



advanced to an Assistant Professorship and in 1893 
was appointed to the Chair of Mineralogy, which 
he still occupies. On January 26, 1897 he married 
Grace Chapman, of Menands, Albany, New York. 



PARKER. William Huntington 

Yale Ph.D. 1899. 
Born in Worcester, Mass., i86g ; graduate of Wor- 
cester High School; received degree of B.S. from 
Worcester Polytechnic Institute, 1893 ; Assistant En- 
gineer in the City Engineering Office of Worcester, 
1888-90; member of the Mass. State Board of Health, 
1893; Assistant in Chemistry in Yale Medical School, 
1894: Instructor 1897; Ph-D-. Yale, 1899. 

JAM HUNTINGTON I'ARKER, 
Ph.D., Instructor in Chemistry in the 
Yale Medical School, was born in \\'orcester, Mas- 
sachusetts, July 31, 1869. He is the son of Henry 
Langdon and Isabel Stanhope Hayden (Mason) 
Parker. His great-grandfather, on the paternal 
side, was Colonel William Parker, one of the Revo- 
lutionary officers in the Battle of Bunker Hill. He 
received his early education in the public schools of 



W't. 




W. H. r.ARKKR 



Worcester, graduating from the Classical Depart- 
ment of the Worcester High School. He then 
entered the Worcester Polytechnic Institute where 
he graduated. President of his class, in 189,?, re- 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



ceiving the degree of Bachelor of Science in chem- 
istry. Previous to his graduation he had served as 
Assistant Engineer in the City Engineering office of 
Worcester. In 1893 Mr. Parker became a member 
of the Massachusetts State Board of Health. He 
went to Yale in 1894 to accept the position of 
Assistant in Chemistry in the Medical School and 
was made an Instructor in 1897. He received the 
degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Physiological 
Chemistry from Yale in 1889. Is a member of 
the Yale Chapter of the Sigma Xi. Has pub- 
lished several articles of research work in Physio- 
logical Chemistry. He married, June 4, 1894, 
Isabel Morgan Cady. His children are : Clitheroe 
Mason and Dean Huntington Parker. 



55 

Kreiburg. Dr. Mendel is the author of some ex- 
tremely interesting publications on the digestive 
apparatus and kindred subjects. Among them may 
be mentioned a monograph On the Proieolysis of 
Crystallized Globulin, in which he collaborated with 
R. H. Chittenden, published in the Journal of 
Physiology; The Influence of Alcohol and Alco- 
holic Drinks on the Chemical Processes of Diges- 
tion, also in collaboration with R. H. Chittenden; 
On the Passage of Sodium Iodide from the Blood 
to the Lymph, with some Remarks on the theory 
of Lymph Formation ; also an article in the Archiv 



MENDEL, Lafayette Benedict 

Vale B.A. 1891, Ph.D. 1893. 
Born in Delhi. N. Y., 1872; fitted for College at the 
Delaware Academy of Delhi; B.A, Yale, 1891 ; Larned 
Scholar and Fellow, 1891-94: Ph.D., 1893; Laboratory 
Assistant in Physiological Chemistry at Sheffield Sci- 
entific School, 1892-93; Assistant, 1893-94; Instructor, 
1894; engaged in research work at the University of 
Breslau, Germany, 1895-96; at the University of Frei- 
burg, 1896; Assistant Professor of Physiological Chem- 
istry at Yale, 1897. 

LAFAYETTE BENEDICT MENDEL, Ph.D., 
Assistant Professor of Physiological Chem- 
istry in the Sheffield Scientific School of Yale, was 
born in Delhi, Delaware county. New York, February 
5, 1872. His father, Benedict Mendel, and his 
mother, Pauline (Ullman) Mendel, were both natives 
of Old Wurtemburg, Germany. Both his paternal 
and maternal ancestors for several generations have 
been natives of that kingdom. He received his 
early education in private schools and under the 
guidance of a private tutor. He went to the Dela- 
ware .'\cademy at Delhi, New York, at the age of 
eight years in 1880, and left there in 1887 to enter 
the .\cademic Department of Yale, graduating with 
the degree of Bachelor of .\rts in 189T. On his 
graduation he was appointed Larned Scholar and 
Fellow, and on this foundation spent the following 
three years in post-graduate study, receiving the 
degree of Doctor of Philosophy in 1893. He was 
Laboratory .Assistant in Physiological Chemistry 
during 1892-1893 in the Sheffield Scientific School 
of Yale ; was made Assistant in the latter year, In- 
structor in 1894, and since 1897 has held his pres- 
ent position at the University. In 1895 ^^ "'^"' 
abroad and spent the following year in research 
work at the German L'niversities of Breslau and 




LAl'AVKrriC I!. ,\IKNIiEr, 

fiir die gesammte Physiologie entitled L'eber den 
Sogenannten Paralytischen Darmsaft. His more 
recent papers are : The Chemical Composition and 
Nutritive Value of some edible .\merican Fungi ; 
On Absorption from the Peritoneal Cavity ; On the 
Paths of Proteid Absorption ; On the Excretion of 
Kynurenic .\cid (with H. C. Jackson) ; Further 
Observations on the Action of Alcoholic Drinks on 
Digestion with Especial Reference to Secretion 
(with H. R. Chittenden and H. C. Jackson) ; and 
The Chemico-Physiological Action of some Deriva- 
tives of the I'roteids (with R. H. Chittenden 
and Y. Henderson). These papers were for the 
most part published in the American Journal of 
Physiology. 



56 



UNIFERSiriES AND rHEIR SONS 



FISKE. John 

Harvard A.B. 1863, A.M.. LL.B. 1864. LL.D. 1894. 
Born in Hartford, Conn., 1842 ; graduated Harvard, 
1863; University Lecturer. 1869-71; Instructor in 
History, 1870; Assistant Librarian. 1872-79; Overseer, 
1879-81. 

JOHN' 1 l.-Ki:. Liu. I)., LL.D., Historian and 
.\iitlior, was born in Hartford, Connecti- 
cut, March 30, 1S42, son of Ldniund Brewster 
Green and Mary Fiske (Bound) Green. He took 
the name of his maternal great-grandfather. John 
Fibke, in 1855, and passed the early years of his 
life, until i860, at Middletown, Connecticut. Hi' 




JOHN FISKE 

was graduated at Harvard in the Class of 1863, 
taking the degree of Master of Arts in 1866, and 
that of Bachelor of Law from the Harvard Law 
School in 1865. Dr. Fiske is a member of the 
Massachusetts Bar but has never practised law. 
having devoted himself to literary and historical 
work and philosophical studies. He began writing 
for publication while yet an undergraduate, an 
article by him on Mr. Buckle's Fallacies appearing 
in the National Quarterly Review in 186 1. He 
has been a frequent contributor to .American and 
English periodicals, an<l his historical and philo- 
sophical works, among them some notable contri- 
butions to the expounding of the doctrine of 
evolution, arc numerous and important. Dr. Fiske 



has been connected with Harvard as Instnictor in 
History in 1870, University Lecturer in Philosophy, 
1869-1871, and Assistant Librarian, 1872-1879. 
He was twice elected a member of the Board of 
Overseers, serving continuously from 1879 to 1891. 
Since 1 88 1 he has lectured on History at Wash- 
ington L'niversity, St. Louis and since 1885 has 
occupied the Chair of American History in that 
institution, but continues to live in Cambridge, 
Mass. He lectured on the same subject at Uni- 
versity College, London, England, in 1879, and at 
the Royal Institution of Great Britain in 1880. 
Harvard conferred upon liim the degree of Doctor 
of ],a\vs in 1894, and in the same year he received 
that of Doctor of Letters from the University of 
Pennsylvania. Dr. Fiske is a fellow of the Amer- 
ican .Academy and a member of the Massachusetts 
Historical Society, and of many other learned 
societies. His published works are : Myths and 
Mytli-Makers; Cosmic Philosophy, 2 vols. The 
Unseen World ; Darwinism ; Excursions of an Evo- 
lutionist ; The Destiny of Man ; The Idea of God ; 
.American Political Ideas ; The Critical Period of 
-American History ; The War of Independence ; for 
Young People ; The Beginnings of New England ; 
Civil Government in the L'nited States ; The 
.American Revolution, 2 vols. ; The Discovery of 
.America, 2 vols. ; History of the United States ; 
Edward Livingston Youmans ; Old Virginia and Her 
Neighbours, 2 vols. ; Through Nature to (rod ; The 
]")utch and Quaker Colonies, 2 vols. ; .A Century of 
Science. 



STORER, John Humphreys 

Harvard A.B. i88:, LL.B. 1885. 
Born in Milton, Mass., 1859; educated in private 
schools of Boston and Cambridge, in Germany, at 
Harvard (1882) and at the Harvard Law School; en- 
gaged in real estate business and the management of 
trust properties ; from 1885 to 1898 Curator of Coins at 
the Harvard College Library; Director of the Work- 
ingmen's Building Association, Boston Co-Operative 
Building Company, Boston Water Power Company, 
Realty Company, \A^orkingmen's Loan Association 
Brooklyn Development Company. 

JOHN HUMPHREYS STORER, Curator of 
Coins in the Harvard College Library, was 
born in Milton, Massachusetts, September 28, 1859. 
He is the son of Dr. Horatio Robinson Storer. 
(Harvard 1850), grandson of Dr. David Humphreys 
Storer, who was Professor and Dean of the Har\'ard 
Medical School for many years, and great-grandson 
of Woodbury Storer, Chief-Justice of the Court of 
Common Pleas at Portland. Maine, as well as one of 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



57 



the founders a.iv\ Trustees of Bowdoin College. Mr. 
Storer is the tenth in descent from Rev. Thomas 
Storer, \'icar of Bilsby, Lincolnshire, England, 
whose son, Augustine Storer, came to America in 
1629 with his sister Marie and her husband Rev. 
John Wheelwright. Mr. Storer received his early 
education chiefly in private schools in Boston and 
Cambridge, and at Frankfort-on-the-Main, Ger- 
many. At Harvard he received the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts in 1882 and Bachelor of Laws in 
1885. While a student at the Harvard Law School 
he spent six months in the office of Ropes. Gray & 




Editor and Business Manager of the Harvard Daily 
Echo. Since graduation he has been Clerk of the 
Ames Gray Club, Director of the Harvard Law 
School Reading-Room Association and one of 
the organizers and the first Secretary of the Har- 
vard Club of Rhode Island. He was also one of 
the organizers and the first Treasurer of the Puritan 
Club of Boston. He is a member of numerous 
social organizations. Director of the Workingmen's 
Building Association, of the Boston Co-operative 
Building Company, of the Workingmen's Ix)an As- 
sociation, of the Boston Water Power Company, of 
the Brooklyn Development Company, and of the 
Realty Company. From 1885 to 1898 he was 
Curator of Coins in the Han-ard College Library. 
Mr. Storer in conjunction with Mr. Bradley and 
others has had a principal part in the organization 
of the Boston Ground Rent Trust, the Chicago 
Ground Rent Trust, the Boston Suburban Devel- 
opment Trust, the Wood Harmon Real Estate 
Association, the Metropolitan Storage Warehouse 
Company, the Brooklyn Development Company, and 
other smaller trusts and associations under which 
several million dollars have been successfully in- 
vested. In 1S85 Mr. Storer married Edith, daughter 
of Robert Treat Paine (Har\'ard 1850), the eminent 
Philanthropist. They have six children : Emily, 
John Humphreys, Edith, Robert Treat Paine, 
Theodore Lyman and Lydia Lyman Storer. 



JOHN H. STORER 

Loring, Lawyers, and in 1885 he was admitted to 
the Suffolk Bar. He did not enter active practice, 
however, but has devoted his whole attention since 
1885 to real estate and the management of trust 
properties. For ten years preceding 1895 he was 
associated with R. M. Bradley (Harvard 1S82) but 
since 1895 has been alone. His alliance with 
Harvard has always been very close. While in 
College Mr. Storer was a member of the Delta 
Kappa Epsilon, Listitute of 1770, .Alpha Delta Phi, 
Hasty Pudding Club, President of the Harvard 
Bicycle Club, Treasurer of the Harvard Natural 
History Society, and the St. Paul's Society, a 
Director of the Harvard Co-operative Association, 
and of the Harvard Reading Room Association, and 



MORSE, Robert McNeil 

Harvard A.B. 1857. 
Born in Boston, Mass., 1837; graduated Harvard. 
1857; admitted to the Suffolk Bar. i860; member of the 
State Senate, 1866-67 ; State House of Representatives, 
1880; Overseer of Harvard since 1880. 

ROBERT McNEILMORSE, Lawyer, and Over- 
seer of Harvard, was born in Boston, Massa- 
chusetts, August 11,1837, the son of Robert and 
Sarah Maria (Clark) .Morse, and graduated at Har- 
vard in the Class of 1857. He was admitted to 
the Bar at Boston in i860 and has continued the 
practice of his profession in that city to the present 
time. In 1S66 and again in 1S67 he was elected 
to the State Senate, and later in iSSo he serxed as 
a member of the State House of Representatives 
where he was Chairman of the Judiciary Committee 
and leader of the House. In his profession Mr. 
Morse has won a distinguished place, being recog- 
nized not only as highly successful in his practice, 
but as one of the foremost of the leaders of the 



58 



UNIVERSITIES AND THKIR SONS 



Massachusetts Bar. Although his holding public 
office has been liniitetl to the service as a member 
of the Legislature above mentioned, his influence in 
politics is widely felt because of the independence 




he received the degree of 15achclor of Arts in 1852, 
and the degree of Bachelor of Laws in 1856. 
Thirty-eight years later, in 1894, he was given the 
honorary degree of Doctor of Laws by his tt/f/ia 
mci/i-r, having already received the same degree in 
1891 from Iowa State L^niversity. Admitted to the 
Bar in 1856, Mr. Thayer immediately took up the 
practice of his profession in Boston, but in 1873 
became Royall Professor of Law at the Harvard Law 
School. In 1884 he was made Weld Professor of 
Law. Meanwhile, from 1864 to 1874 he had served 
as Master in Chancery. Mr. Thayer has published 
Cases on Evidence, Cases on Constitutional Law, 
and A Preliminary Treatise on Evidence at the 
Common Law ; together with many articles in Law 
Reviews and elsewhere. Also A Western Journey 
with Emerson ; and the Letters of Chauncey Wright 
(privately printed) were edited by him. Among the 
societies in which he holds membership are the 
Massachusetts Historical Society, the American 
Academy of Arts and Sciences and the Massachu- 
setts Colonial Society. He was a member of the 
Union Club of Boston from its organization until 



ROBERT M. MORSE 



of his views and his fearlessness in expressing them. 
Mr. Morse was elected an Overseer of Harvard in 
1880 and has been continued in that office by re- 
election in 1892 and 1S93 to the present day. 



THAYER, James Bradley 

Harvard A.B. 1855, LL.B. 1856. 
Born in Haverhill, Mass., 1831 ; educated at Har- 
vard (1852) and at Harvard Law School ; practised legal 
profession in Boston; Professor in the Harvard Law 
School; has been Master in Chancery; member of 
Massachusetts Historical Society, American Academy 
of Arts and Sciences ; received LL.D. from Iowa State 
University and from Harvard. 

JA.MES BRADLi:V THAVER, LL.D., Professor 
of Law at Harvard, was born in Haverhill, 
i\Lassachusetts, January 15, 183 1. His flither was 
Abijah Wyman Thayer, son of William Thayer of 
Peterboro, New Hampshire. His mother was Susan, 
daughter of Jonathan Bradley of Andover, Massa- 
chusetts. On his father's side Professor Thayer is 
descended from John Alden of ALiyflower fame. 
After completing the course at the public schools of 
Northampton, Mr. Thayer entered Harvard, where 




J. n. 1 HAVER 



1874 when he resigned on account of removal of 
residence to Cambridge. Professor Thayer mar- 
ried, .April 24, 1 86 1, Sophia Bradford Ripley of 
Concord, Massachusetts, and has four children : 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



59 



William Syilney, now Associate Professor of Medi- 
cine at Johns Hopkins ; Ezra Ripley, Counsellor-at- 
law in Boston and Lecturer at the Harvard Law 
School ; Theodora Willard of Cambridge, 
Sarah Ripley, wife of John \V. Ames, of the 
of Chase & Ames, Architects, of Boston. 



and 
firm 



SCHOFIELD, William Henry 

Harvard A.M. 1893, Ph.D. 1895. 

Born in Brockville, Ontario, 1870; educated at 
Toronto University, at the Graduate School of Har- 
vard and at European Universities ; teacher in the 
Collegiate Institute, Hamilton, Ontario; Instructor in 
English at Harvard; author of several works. 

WILLLAM HEXRV SCHOFIELD, Ph.D., 
Instructor in English at Harvard, was 
born in Brockville. Ontario, .\pril 6. 1870. His 




\V. H. SCHOFIELD 

father was Rev. William Henry Schofield, M..-\., 
the great-grandson of Dr. James Schofield who 
went from New York to Canada in 1796. His 
mother is Anna (Parker) Schofield. .\fter fitting 
for College at the Collegiate Institute, Peterborough, 
Ontario, Mr. Schofield entered Victoria College 
(now federated with Toronto University) and there 
graduated in jSSg. The next three years he spent 
as teacher in the Collegiate Institute, Hamilton, 
Ontario. .After that he pursued a course of threa 



years in the Graduate School at Harvard, where he 
received the degree of Master of Arts in 1893 and 
the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in 1895, and 
then went abroad for two years' study in European 
Universities. He was a Fellow at Har^•ard from 
1893 to 1897, and in the latter year was appointed 
Instructor in English. Mr. Schofield is the author 
of several literary and scholarly articles, besides two 
books of considerable size, chiefly on subjects re- 
lating to medijeval literature. 



THAYER, Joseph Henry 

Harvard A.B. 1850, A.M. 1864. S.T.D. 1884. 
Born in Boston, Mass, 1828; educated at Harvard 
(1850), at the Harvard Divinity School and at Andover 
Theological Seminary; usher in Boston Latin School; 
private tutor; preacher Evangelical Congregational 
Church, Quincy; Pastor Crombie Street Church, 
Salem; Chaplain Fortieth Massachusetts Volun- 
teers ; Professor of Sacred Literature Andover The- 
ological Seminary: Professor of New Testament 
Criticism and Interpretation Harvard Divinity School; 
member and later Secretary of the New Testament 
Company of American Revisers of the English Bible ; 
member of the American Academy of Arts and Scien- 
ces, American Oriental Society, American Philolog- 
ical Association ; Society of Biblical Literature and 
Exegesis; received degrees of S.T.D. from Yale, D.D. 
from Harvard and Princeton, Litt.D. from Trinity 
College, Dublin : translator, editor and author of 
numerous works. 

JOSEPH HENRY THAYER, S.T.D., Litt.D., 
Professor of New Testament Criticism and In- 
terpretation at the Harvard Divinity School, was 
born in Boston, Massachusetts, November 7, 1828. 
His father, Joseph Heyler Thayer, was the son of 
Amasa Thayer, of Boston. His mother, Martha 
Stevens Greenough of Newton, was the daughter of 
Rev. William Greenough. From the private schools 
of Boston and the Boston Latin School Mr. Thayer 
pas.sed into Harvard, where he graduated in 1850. He 
then studied theology, the first year in the Harvard 
Divinity School, and the second and third years at 
Andover Theological Seminary, where he graduated 
in 1857. The year 1850-1851 he had ser\-ed as 
usher in the Boston Latin School, the next two 
years as private tutor, and the next year had trav- 
elled in Europe. .After graduating at .Andover, he 
preached for a year, 1858-1859 at the Evangelical 
Congregational Church, Quincy, Massachusetts, and 
then was given the Pastor.tte of the Crombie Street 
Church in Salem. This latter position he held until 
February i364, having meanwhile, however, sened 
on leave as Chaplain of the Fortieth Massachusetts 



6o 



UNIVERSiriES AND TJIFJR SONS 



Volunteers from September 1862 to May 1863. In 
1864 he was appointed Professor of Sacred Litera- 
ture at the Andover Theological Seminary, and held 
that position until 1882. In 1884 he was given his 




JOSlil'H HENKV THAYKR 

present position of Bussey Professor of New Testa- 
ment Criticism and Interpretation at the Har\'ard 
Divinity School. Professor Thayer was a member 
and later Secretary of the New Testament Company 
of the American Revisers of the English Bible, 
1872-1 88 1, and holds membership in the American 
Academy of Arts and Sciences, American Oriental 
Society, the American Philological Association, the 
Society of Biblical Literature and Exegesis, the 
Essex Institute and a Republican Institution. He 
received the degree of Master of Arts from Han ard 
in 1864, and Doctor of Divinity from Yale, 1873, 
and from Harvard 1884, Doctor of Literature from 
Trinity College, Dublin, at its centenary 1892, also 
Doctor of Divinity from Princeton at its sesqui- 
centennial 1896. He has translated several text- 
books, has written The Change of .\ttitude towards 
the Bible, Books and Their Use, and a Biographical 
Sketch of Ezra Abbott, has edited a number of ed- 
ucational works and has contributed liberally to 
Biblical publications. Professor Thayer married 
November 30, 1858, Martha Caldwell, youngest 
daughter of Samuel and Lucy (Watson) Davis of 



Boston. They have had five children, Lucy Wat- 
son, who married Casper Ren6, Gregory Professor 
in the University of Leipzig ; Grecnough, who died 
in 1883; Grace Crombie ; Miriam Stuart, who 
married Professor Theodore W. Richards of Har- 
vard ; and Edith Lawrence Thayer. 



THAXTER, Roland 

Harvard A.B. i88i. Ph.D. and A.M. 1088. 
Born in Newtonville, Mass., 1858; educated at Har- 
vard ; Mycologist of the Connecticut Agricultural Ex- 
periment Station; Assistant Professor of Cryptogamic 
Botany at Harvard. 

ROLAND TH.\XTER, Ph.D., .Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Cryptogamic Botany at Harvard, 
was born in Newtonville, Massachusetts, .August 28, 
1858. His father was Levi Lincoln Thaxter and 
his mother w-as Celia Leighton Thaxter, the dis- 
tinguished poet. At Harvard Mr. Thaxter received 
the degree of Bachelor of .Arts in 1882 and Doctor 
of Philosophy and Master of .\its in 1888. From 
1 888 to 1 89 1 he was Mycologist of the Connecticut 
Agricultural Experiment Station and in 1891 was 




ROL.AXD TH.AXTER 



appointed .Assistant Professor of Cryptogamic Botany 
at Harvard. He married, June 8, 18S7, ^Label 
Gray Freeman, and has three children : Charles 
Eliot, Katharine and Elizabeth Thaxter. 



UNlVERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



6i 



TAFT, Ezra Fletcher 

Harvard D.M.D. 1876. 
Born in Dedham, Mass., 1846; educated at Amherst 
and at Harvard Dental School; practised dentistry. 

EZR.\ FLETCHER TAFT, D.M.D., Instructor 
in Operative Dentistry at Harvard, was born 
ill Dedham, Massachusetts, March 30, 1846. son of 




EZRA FLETCHER TAFT 

Ezra Wood and Lendamine Draper (Guild) Taft. 
.\ftEr a youth's education in the Dedham schools he 
entered .\mherst College, where he graduated in 
1867. Choosing the dental profession as his occu- 
pation he passed through the Har\'ard Dental 
School and then began the practice of dentistry in 
1876. In 1892 he became Instructor in Operative 
Dentistry at Harvard in which position he still 
remains. Dr. Taft married in 1877 Emma Howe 
Browne and has three children : Theodore Howard, 
Fletcher Wood and Roger Browne Taft. 



THAYER, William Roscoe 

Harvard A.B. 1881, A.M. 1886. 
Born in Boston, Mass , 1859; educated at St. Paul's 
School ; with a private tutor in Europe and at Harvard 
I18811; editorial writer: Instructor in English at Har- 
vard; Editor _ Harvard Graduates' Magazine; has 
written The Dawn of Italian Independence, poems 
New and Old, edited Best Elizabethan Plays, besides 
numerous political and historical essays ; member of 



the Massachusetts Historical Society ; officer of the 
Massachusetts Reform Club. 

WILLIAM ROSCOE THAYER, A.M., 
Editorial Writer, and author of the Har- 
vard Historical Sketch in Volume I, UNIVERSI- 
TIES AND THEIR SONS, was born in Boston, 
Massachusetts, January i6, 1859. He spent three 
years at St. Paul's School, Concord, New Hamp- 
shire, and then studied in Europe with a private 
tutor. Returning to enter Har\^ard, he graduated 
there in 1881, and after a few years' experience in 
journalism as an editorial writer, pursued a graduate 
course at Har\^ard (1885-1886) receiving the de- 
gree of Master of .\rts. In the year 1SSS-1889 he 
was Instnictor of English at Har\'ard. Mr. Thayer 
has been the Editor of the Harvard Graduates' 
Magazine since its founding in 1892. He has 
published two volumes on The Dawn of Italian 
Independence ; a volume of Poems, New and Old ; 
and a volume of essays, Throne-Makers : he has 
edited The Best Elizabethan Plays and has con- 
tributed political and historical essays to the .Atlantic 
Monthly, the C'entury, the Forum, the Review of 
Reviews, the International Journal of Ethics and 




WM. R. IHAVtK 



New World, in addition to his many reviews in the 
Nation, the Independent, etc. He is a member of 
the Massachusetts Historical Society and of the 
Massachusetts Reform Club. 



62 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



CORWIN, Robert NELSON 

Vale B.A. 1887. 
Born in Baiting Hollow, N.Y., 1864; graduated from 
Norwich Free Academy, of Norwich, Conn., 1883; 
graduated from Yale, 1887; taught German and Latin 
in Philadelphia ; Instructor in German at Yale, 1892- 
97; Assistant Professor, 1897; took degree of Ph.D. at 
Heidelberg, Germany, 1893; Professor, 1899- 

ROHERT NKLSON CORWIX, I'h.D., Profes- 
sor of German in the Sheffield Scientific 
School of Vale, son of Josiah Frank and Jane Amanda 
(Norton) Corwin, was born in Baiting Hollow, 
Suffolk county, New York, October 6, 1864. After 



1899. He was married, October 6, 1888, to 
Margaret AVardell, daughter of Leonard Woolsey 
Bacon. Their children are : Margaret Trumbull 
and Wallace Graham C'orwin. 




ROBT. N. CORWIN 

a term of schooling at the district school in his 
native village and at the Grammar School in River- 
head, New York, he went to the Free Academy of 
Norwich, Connecticut, for College preparation. 
Here he graduated in 1883 and entered Yale the 
same year, .\fter receiving his degree in 1887 he 
taught German and Latin in the William Penn 
Charter School of Philadelphia until 1890. He 
then went abroad to study at Berlin and Heidelberg, 
receiving from the latter institution the degree of 
Doctor of Philosophy in 1893. Li 1892 he was ap- 
pointed Instructor in German in the Sheffield Scien- 
tific School. He was appointed .Assistant Professor 
in 1897 and advanced to the full Professorship in 



DAY, George Edward 

Yale B.A. 1833, M.A. 
Born in Pittsfield, Mass., 1815 ; student at Hopkins 
Grammar School; graduated at Yale, 1833; teacher in 
New York Institution for the Deaf and Dumb; Assis- 
tant Instructor in Hebrew in Yale Theological Semi- 
nary, 1838; Pastor of Congregational Church at 
Marlboro, Mass., 1840; Pastor of the Edwards Church, 
Northampton, Mass., 1848; Professor of Biblical Lit- 
erature in Lane Theological Seminary. Cincinnati, O., 
1851 ; Holmes Professor of Hebrew at Yale i858 for 
twenty-five years ; Dean of Yale Divinity School, 1888- 
95; made Holmes Professor of Hebrew, Emeri- 
tus, 1895; Secretary of American Bible Revision 
Committee. 

GEORGE EDWARD D.\Y, D.D.. Holmes Pro- 
fessor Emeritus of Hebrew at Yale, was 
born in Pittsfield, Massachusetts, March 19, 181 5. 
He is directly descended from Robert Day, one of 
the early settlers of Hartford, Connecticut, and the 
ancestor of thirty-seven men of the name who have 
done much to make Yale's history; prominent 
among these is Rev. Jeremiah Day, D.D., President 
of Yale from 181 7 to 1840. After an early training 
in the Lancasterian School of New Haven, and the 
Hopkins Grammar School of that City, Professor Day 
entered Yale, at the early age of fourteen years. 
Graduating in 1S33 he spent two years as a teacher 
in the New York Institution for the Deaf and Dumb, 
after which he returned to Yale and from 1S35 to 
1838 was a student in the Yale Theological Semin- 
ary, and for the next two years, until 1840 .Assistant 
Instructor in Hebrew. He was in that year or- 
dained Pastor of the Union Congregational Churcli 
at Marlboro, Massachusetts, where he remained 
until 1848, when he was installed Pastor of the 
Edwards Church in Northampton, Massachusetts. 
He preached there until 185 1 when he resigned to 
take the Professorship of Biblical Literature in the 
Lane Theological Seminary at Cincinnati, Ohio, 
which position he held luitil 1866. Then for a 
period of twenty-five years (i 866-1 891) he was 
the Holmes Professor of the Hebrew Language and 
Literature and of Biblical Theology in the Yale 
Divinity School. Few men have done so much as 
Professor Day for the study of Semitic and Biblical 
subjects. His life-long devotion to the work, his 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



untiring research in Semitic subjects and his un- 
selfish senice as a teacher in his University can 
never be sufficiently estimated or rewarded. His 
has been the career of an honorable and eminent 
scholar. The many high offices bestowed upon 
him by the University are ample testimony of his 
singular ability and great knowledge. From 1888 



married Olivia Clark Hotchkiss of 
He is an Independent Republican. 



63 
New Haven. 



ELKIN, William Lewis 

Yale M.A. (Hon.) 1893. 
Born in New Orleans, La., 1855; educated in private 
schools in New Orleans, Switzerland and Germany; 
to 1895 he served as Dean of the Divinity School graduated as Civil Engineer from the Royal Polytech- 
whenhe resigned, and received the highest of the "'= School, in Stuttgart, Germany, 1876; graduated 



University's honors — the title Professor Emeritus. 
Since 1891 he has been engaged in collecting for 
the use of the Yale Divinity School and the other 
Departments of the University a Historical Library 
of Foreign Missions, designed to contain the Prot- 



Ph D. from University of Strassburg, Germany, i£8o ; 
engaged in astronomical work at the Royal Observa- 
tory at Capetown, South Africa, 1881-83; appointed 
Astronomer in charge of the heliometer at the Yale 
University Observatory, 1884; Director of Yale Ob- 
servatory since 1896. 



w 



ILLIAM LEWIS ELKIX, C.E., Ph.D., .As- 
tronomer at the Yale Obser\'atory, was born 
in New Orleans, Louisiana, .April 29, 1855. His 
parents were Lewis Elkin and Jane Magoon Fitch 
(Elkin). .As a boy he was educated in private 
schools of New Orleans and in Germany and Swit- 
zerland, where he was prepared for L'niversity work. 
He entered the Royal Polytechnic School, in Stutt- 
gart, Germany, and following there a course of 
study in Engineering received a diploma as Civil 
Engineer in 1876. He was then for some years 
engaged in study at the University of Strassburg, 
Germany, where he received the Doctor of Phil- 
osophy degree in 1880. In 1881 he went as 
volunteer obser%'er to the Royal Observatory at 
Capetown, South Africa, where, in company with 
Dr. David Gill, of the Royal Obsen-atory, he spent 
two years in making observations of the parallaxes 
of the southern stars. In 1884 he was appointed 
.Astronomer iu charge of the heliometer at the Yale 
University Observatory, in which position he made 
original researches on the parallaxes of the northern 
stars. His work also included a triangulatiou of 
the Pleiades with the heliometer, besides other re- 
searches with that instrument, which is the only one 
estant missionary literature of all denominations of its kind in America. He has also inaugurated a 
and of all countries. This library, now numbering system of observation of meteors by means of pho- 
between si.x and seven thousand volumes including tography. The results of this original work were 
pamphlets of a hundred pages and under, is one of published in the current astronomical journals, and 
the two largest of its kind in the world. The great they there made Mr. Elkin justly famous as a con- 
advantage of such a contribution to Yale can never tributor of much valuable information to the science 
fail to be recognized. Professor Day has been the of astronomy. In 1896 he was made Director of 
Secretary of the American Bible Revision Commit- the Yale Observatory where he continues his work 
tee since its organization. He is also a member of at the present writing. He is a member of the 
the Old Testament Company of Revisers and of the National Academy of Sciences, and foreign asso- 
Asiatic Society of Japan. He has married twice ; ciate of the Royal Astronomical Society of London. 
Amelia HotchWss Oaks, of New Haven, his first He married, in 1896, Catharine, daughter of Dr. 
wife, died March 25, 1S75. May 25, 1S76, he Daniel L. Adams. 




GEORGE E. DAY 



64 



UNIVERSiriES ANB THEIR SONS 



LEONARD, Arthur Willis 

Princeton A.B. 1897. 
Born in Savannah, Ga., 1873; primary education re- 
ceived at the Cincinnati, O. high schools and at the 
Leals School in Plainfield, N. J. ; graduated from 
Princeton, 1897; Fellow in English in University of 
Chicago, 1897 ; Instructor in Greek in Princeton, 1898. 

ARTHUR WII.I.IS I.KONARl), Instructor in 
Greek at Princeton, was born in Savannah, 
(Georgia, February 14. 1873, son of George Welling- 




ARTHUR \V. LEONARD 

ton and Mary Elizabeth (Holmes) Leonard. He 
attended the (.'incinnati High Schools and the Leals 
School in Plainfield, New Jersey, afterwards taking 
the Academic course at Princeton, and graduating 
with the degree of Bachelor of Arts in the Class of 
1897. Immediately upon graduation he was ap- 
pointed Fellow in English in the University of 
Chicago, where he remained one year. In 1898 
he accepted his present position, that of Instructor 
of Greek at Princeton. Mr. Leonard is a member 
of Whig Hall and of the Nassau Club of Princeton. 
He is unmarried. 



Mcelroy, Robert McNult 

Princeton A.B. 1896, A.M. 1897. 

Born in Perryville, Ky., 1872; fitted for College under 

private instruction; graduated from Princeton i8g6; 

held the Boudinot Fellowship in History, Princeton, 

for one year, receiving the Master of Arts degree in 



1897; held the South East Club University Fellowship 
in Social Science, Princeton, for one year; Instructor 
in American History at Princeton, 1898. 

ROBERT McNULT McELROV, A.M., In- 
structor in .American History at Princeton, 
was born in Perryville, Kentucky, December 28, 
1872, son of Wiilliam Thomas and Eliza (Casseday) 
McEIroy. He is descended from Scotch-Irish Pres- 
byterians of Virginia. In his early youth he was 
under the private instruction of the Faculty of the 
Male High School of Louisville, Kentucky, where 
he was fitted for College. He entered the Fresh- 
man Class of the .\cademic Department of Prince- 
ton in September 1892, and graduated with special 
honors in philosophy and history, in the Class of 
1896. During the years of his College course, he 
took part in three intercollegiate debates, two against 
Harvard and one against Vale, winning the first prize 
in the Baird Disputation Contest, and the first Lynde 
debate. He held the Boudinot Fellowship in His- 
tory at Princeton for one year, receiving the degree 
of Master of .\rts in 1897. He also held the South 
East Club L^niversity Fellowship in Social Science 
for a year at Princeton. In September, 1898, he 




ROBERT MCNULT MCELROY 

entered the Faculty of Princeton in the Department 
of .■\merican History. He is a member of the Uni- 
versity .\thletic Club of New Vork City, and the 
Nassau Club of Princeton. He is unmarried. 



J 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



65 



ARNOLD, Ernst Hermann 

Yale M.D. 1894. 
Born in Germany, 1865 ; acquired a good education 
including gymnastic training previous to coming to the 
United States ; graduated at the Normal School of 
Gymnastics, Milwaukee, Wis., i£88; Instructor of 
Physical Training in Trenton, N. J, till lEgi ; took 
courses at the University of Leipzig the latter year; 
Instructor in Gymnastics in New Haven until 1894; 
graduated at Yale Medical School the latter year; con- 
cluded his studies in Halle and Leipzig, 1895; now 
practising orthopedic surgery in New Haven. 

ERNST HERMANN ARNOLD, M.I)., Instruc- 
tor of Orthopedic Surgery in the Yale 
Medical School, was born in Krfurt, Oermany, 




E. H. ARNOLD 

February ii, 1865, son of Johann Bruno and 
Ernestine (Orzak'oxska) Arnold. His paternal an- 
cestors were German, and those on the maternal 
side German and Polish. He attended excellent 
schools in his native country including the Teachers' 
School at Weissenfels, and devoted considerable 
attention to physical training. After coming to the 
United States he acted as a newspaper corres- 
pondent for about two years, also attending the 
Normal School of Gymnastics, Milwaukee, Wis- 
consin, from which he was graduated in 1888, and 
for the succeeding three years he was a teacher of 
physical training in Trenton, New Jersey. A por- 
tion of the latter year was devoted to special courses 

VOL. III. — 5 



at the University of Leipzig, and while a student at 
the Yale Medical School, from which he was gradu- 
ated in 1894, he acted as Instructor in Gymnastics. 
His studies were concluded in Halle and Leipzig, 
and for the past four years he has practised ortho- 
pedic surgery in New Haven. Besides being Direc- 
tor of the Anderson Normal School of Gymnastics, 
he is Instructor in Orthopedic Surgery at the 
Medical School of ^■ale, and Instructor in Gymnas- 
tics at the New Haven State Normal School. Dr. 
Arnold is President of the New Haven Physical 
Education Society, Secretary of the Connecticut 
Physical Education .Association, Vice-President of 
the American Association for the .Advancement of 
Physical Education, and member of the .Advisory 
Council World's Educational Congress ; also a 
member of the City and County Medical Societies, 
and the Connecticut and .American Medical Asso- 
ciations : the National Educational .Association, and 
the North .American Gymnastic Union. Politically 
he supports the gold faction of the Democratic 
party, in national issues, but in local affairs he acts 
independently. On March 16, 1889, he married 
Mary Nagel. 



BEERS, George Emerson 

Yale LL.B. 1889. M.L. 1890. 
Born in Bridgeport, Conn.. 1865 ; graduate of the 
Natick I Mass. I High School; received degree of A.B. 
from Trinity College. 1886; A.M , Trinity, 1889; LL B. 
from Yale, i88g; M.L. from Yale, 1890: Principal of 
West Hartford, (Conn.) High School, 1886-87 ; admitted 
to the Bar, 1889 ; practised law in Tennessee in part- 
nership with Charles Seymour; Associate Professor of 
Law at the University of Tennessee; Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Law, and Secretary of the Law Faculty at 
Yale, 1892 ; member of the City Council of New Haven 
1896 ; member of the law firm of Arvine & Beers. New 
Haven, the other member being Earllios P. Arvine, 
Yale '96. 

GEORGE EMERSON BEERS, M..\., LL.B., 
M.L., Assistant Professor of Law and Secre- 
tary of the Law Faculty at Yale, was born in Bridge- 
port, Connecticut, October 7, 1S65. He is the son 
of Rev. John S. and Maria Josephine (Wakeman) 
Beers. His training for College was obtained at 
the Susquehanna Collegiate Institute of Towanda. 
Pennsylvania, and at the High School of Natick. 
Massachusetts. At the latter school he graduated 
in 1882, and at once entered Trinity College, of 
Hartford, Connecticut. Here he received two 
degrees. Bachelor of Arts with honors in 18S6 and 
Master of Arts in 1889. During this time Mr. 
Beers taught school both in the capacity of Principal 



66 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



of the High School ot West ILirtfonl, where he re- 
mained for the entire year of 1886-1887, and as 
Instnictor in a Summer School for boys. This 
summer class was established by Mr. Beers and Mr. 
Robert Thome, (Trinity 1885) in 18S7 with sessions 
at Southport, Connecticut, and at St. James, Long 
Island; it continued for three years. In 18S9, the 
year when he received the Master of Arts degree 
from 'J'rinity, Mr. Beers graduated from the Yale 
Ijlw School, taking the degree of Bachelor of Laws 
magna cum laiiiie, thus gaining the unusual distinc- 
tion of having in one year two advanced degrees 
conferred upon him by two separate institutions. 
In 1890 he completed his law study at Vale and 
received the degree of Master of Law. Soon after 
his admission to the Connecticut Bar in 1889 he 
moved to 'I'ennessee where he practised until 1892 
in company with Charles Seymour of Knoxville, a 
prominent land lawyer and brother of Professor 
T. D. Seymour, of Yale. During the last few months 
of this time Mr. Beers was Associate Professor of 
Law in the University of Tennessee. In 1892, 
having been elected Assistant Professor of Law in 
Yale, and Secretary of the Yale Law Faculty, he 
returned to New Haven to accept these appoint- 
ments and to practise in that city. He is a member 
of the law firm of .Arvine & Beers, the senior mem- 
ber of which is E. P. .\rvine (Yale 1869). He is 
a Republican in politics, but has taken no active 
part in public life except in the capacity of a mem- 
ber of the New Haven C'iiy Council. While in 
College he was manager of the Trinity Tablet, and 
besides being the author of numerous magazine and 
newspaper articles he has been an extensive con- 
tributor to the American and English Encyclopaedia 
of Law. He is a member of the Delta Psi Society. 
He married, ."Kugust 17, 1892, Margaret Lowry, of 
Covington, Kentucky. He has two children : Mar- 
garet Lowry, and Henry Samuel Beers. 



COLLINS. Edward Day 

Yale B.A. 1896, Ph.D. 1899. 
Born in Hardwick, Vt., 1869; student at Lyndon In- 
stitute; graduated at Yale, 1896; Ph.D., Yale, 1899. 

EDWARD DAY COLLINS. Instructor in 
History at Yale, was born in Hardwick, Ver- 
mont, December 17, 1869. His father, Squire 
Newell Bullock, died while he was slill an infant, 
and he was adopted into the family of I. D. R. 
Collins, taking the name of his adopted parents. 
His education began in the district school at Barton 



Landing, Vermont. .As a boy he worked upon the 
farm, in the mills of the village, and was clerk in his 
father's store. Having made some scanty savings, 
and thinking to better equip himself for mercantile 
work, he entered Lyndon Institute, and completed 
the Commercial Course of study. While here he 
came under the powerful inlltience of Mr. W. E. 
Ranger, the Principal, and turned his thoughts 
toward teaching as a profession. With this new 
aim, he returned to the Institute and in a second 
year completed the English-Scientific Course. He 
then betran teachins; in the rural schools. Mean- 




KDW.AKD D. COLLINS 

time his work in the Commercial College had come 
to the notice of a business firm, and greater re- 
muneration was offered him by them. Thus induced 
to make another change, he became book-keeper, 
pay-master, and office-manager of a large lumber 
concern. Success in this work did not dull his taste 
for the class-room, but it opened the way to a wider 
field, for a year's savings from his new position 
enabled him to return to his old master at the 
Institute and make a rapid preparation for College. 
He graduated from Yale in 1896, with Honors 
in History, and was elected to a Foote Fellowship 
in the Graduate Department of the University. In 
the fall of 1897 he was appointed Assistant in 
Medieval History, and in 1898 received the ad- 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



67 



ditioiial appointment of Assistant in American 
History. He received the degree of Doctor of Phil- 
osophy in 1899, and was appointed Instructor in 
Medieval History for the ensuing year. Mr. Collins 
is a member of the Congregational Church, and a 
hearty sympathizer in all Christian work. In the 
early days of the Christian Endeavor movement, he 
was active in organizing and promoting societies. 
In politics Mr. Collins has voted the Republican 
ticket, but is not bound to the dogmas of any party. 



LUQUIENS, Frederick Bliss 

Yale B.A. tSgy. 
Born in Auburndale, Mass.. 1875 : fitted for College 
at the Newton High School and Hopkins Grammar 
School ; A.B. (Yale I 1897 ; Instructor in French at the 
Sheffield Scientific School of Yale since 1897. 

FREDERICK BLISS LUQUIENS, Instructor 
in French at the Sheffield Scientific School of 
Vale, was born in .Auburndale, Massachusetts, De- 




F. B. LUQUIENS 

cembsr 10, 1875. He is of Swiss-.\merican ances- 
try, his father, Jules Luquiens, having been of Swiss 
descent. The subject of this sketch received his 
early education in the district scliools of his native 
town. He fitted for College at the High School of 
Xewton, Massachusetts, and later at the Hopkins 
Grammar School of Xew Haven, and then entered 



Vale, taking the Academic course and graduating in 
1897. Immediately on his graduation he was ap- 
pointed to his present position in the Sheffield 
Scientific School. Mr. Luquiens is a member of 
two of the Greek letter fraternities. Phi Beta Kappa 
and Beta Theta Pi, and is unmarried. 



ELY, John Slade 

Yale Ph.B. 1881, M.A. 1897 - Columbia M.D. 1886. 
Born in New York City, 1860; attended Williston 
Seminary, Easthampton, Mass. ; graduated from Shef- 
field Scientific School, 18S1 ; graduated from College 
of Physicians and Surgeons, New York City, 1886; 
studied in Europe ; Assistant in Pathology at the New 
York College of Physicians and Surgeons; Pathologist 
to the First Medical Division of Bellevue Hospital, 
N. Y., 1889-97 ; Professor of Histology and Pathologi- 
cal Anatomy in the Woman's Medical College, N. Y., 
1891-1899: President of the Nev/ York Pathological 
Society; Professor of the Theory and Practice of Med- 
icine in Yale, 1897; received the M.A. degree from 
Yale. 1897 ; Associate Editor of the American Journal 
of the Medical Sciences, 1893-1C97. 

JOHX SLADE ELY, M.A., M.D., Professor of 
the Theory and Practice of Medicine in the 
Vale Medical School, was born in New York City, 
December 4, i860. He is the son of John Cole 
and Lucy (Slade) Ely. After a term of early study 
at a private school in New York City he went to 
Williston Seminary, at Easthampton, Massachusetts 
where he received preparation for College. Enter- 
ing Yale in 1878 he elected the scientific studies of 
the Sheffield Scientific School, and graduated from 
that Department with the degree of Bachelor of 
Philosophy in 1881. The ne.xt two years were 
spent in post-graduate work in science at Vale, 
Johns Hopkins and the University of Berlin, Ger- 
many. He then entered the College of Physicians 
and Surgeons, of New York City, where he received 
the degree of Doctor of Medicine in 18S6. After 
eighteen months as Interne at the Bellevue Hospital, 
New York, he went abroad and pursued professional 
studies at the Hygienic Institute of Berlin ; the 
University of Heidelberg; the Senkenberg Institute 
of Frankfort-on-the-.Main, and the Ecole de M^<le- 
cine of Paris. He returned to New York in 1SS8 
to accept the appointment as Assistant in Pathology 
at the College of Physicians and Surgeons, which 
position together with that of Curator of the College 
Museum, he held until 1S97. During that period 
he held also the following offices ; .Assistant Physi- 
cian to the Out-Patient Department of the Roose- 
velt Hospital 18S8-1893; Pathologist to the First 
Medical Division of Bellevue Hospital 1SS9-1S97, 



68 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



and rrofessor of Histology and I'athological Anat- 
omy in the Woman's Medical College of the New 
\'ork Infirniary for Women and Children, WS90-1S99. 
He was elected I'resiilent of the New York I'aihoio- 
gical Society in 1896, and was re-elecled to the 
same position in 1897. In 1S97 Dr. V.\\ left his 
New Vork work to assume the duties of Professor of 
the Theory and Practice of Medicine in the \'ale 
Medical School ; this position he occupies at jiresent. 
During his first year at Vale (1897) the degree of 
Master of Arts was conferred upon him. Dr. I';iy 
was .Associate Editor of the .American Jijurnal of the 
Medical Sciences from 1893 to 1897, the depart- 
ment in his charge being that of Pathology and 
Hacleriology. He is a member of the Century 
Association and of the .Association of American 
Physicians. In politics he is an Independent Re- 
publican. He married Grace Taylor, April 29, 1S93. 



MARSHALL, William Crosby 

Yale Ph.B. 1890, M.E. 1894. 
Born in Avon, Conn., 1870; fitted for College at Hill- 
house High School of New Haven, Conn. ; took course 
in Mechanical Engineering at Sheffield Scientific School 
of Yale, graduating 1890 ; employed in engineering 
department of various prominent concerns, 1890-1893 ; 
took course in Graduates' School of Sheffield for degree 
of Mechanical Engineer which he received in 1894; 
Assistant in Mechanical Engineering there in 189; ; 
and Instructor in Drawing and Descriptive Geometry 
since 1895. 

WILI.IA.M CROSllV MARSHALL, M.E., 
Instructor at Vale, is a native of the Nut- 
meg State, having been born in .Avon, Connecticut, 
September 21, 1870. His parents were Henry 
Grimes and Marietta Crosby Marshall, buth mem- 
bers of old Connecticut families. The subject of 
this sketch received his early education in the 
schools of Charlemont, Massachusetts, and Middle - 
bury, Connecticut, and was fitted for College at the 
Hillhouse Higii School of New Haven, Connecticut. 
He entered the Sheffield Scientific School of Vale 
taking a course in Mechanical Engineering and 
graduating in 1890. On his graduation in July 
1890 he entered the Engineering Department of 
the Berlin Iron Bridge Company as draughtsman, 
but left in October of that year to accept a similar 
position with the Cowles Engineering Company of 
Brooklyn, New Vork. He returned to the Berlin 
Company in February 1891 and remained with 
them until September 1893, when he returned to 
the Sheffield Scientific School as a graduate student. 
After one year of study there he took the degree of 



Mechanical Engineer and was made an .Assistant 
in Mechanical Engineering. A year later he was 
tendered and accepted the position of Instructor in 
Drawing and Descriptive Geometry at Sheffield, 
which position lie has since retained. Mi'. Marshall 
is a Republican in ]X)litics though the pressure of 
his pedagogical duties leaves him no time to take 
an active part in the passing political struggles of 




\V. C. IU.\RSH.\I,L 



the day. He married, March 24, 1897, Anna Hall 
Coe, of Cromwell, Connecticut. 'I'hey have no 
children. 



MATSUMOTO. Matataro 

Yale, Ph.D. 1891}. 
Born in Takasaki, Kodzuke, Japan, 1865; descended 
from an Emperor of Japan ; attended English School 
at Yokohama; graduated at Tokyo Superior Middle 
School, i8go ; graduated at Literature College of the 
Imperial University, Tokyo, 1893 ; studied at the Uni- 
versity Hall of the Imperial University: Editor of a 
philosophical magazine at the Imperial University, 
Tokyo : Secretary of Philosophical Society of Toky • 
Lecturer in Philosophy in St. Paul's College and th 
Universalist College, Tokyo, 1893-96; Assistant in the 
Yale Psychological Laboratory, 1897; Litt.D.. Imperial 
University, Tokyo; Ph.D, Yale. 

MAT.X TARO M.VrSUMOTO, Ph.D., Litt.D.. 
.Assistant in the Psychological Laboratory 
at Vale, was born in Takasaki, Kodzke, Japan, Sep- 



UNIFERSTTIES AND THEIR SONS 



tember 15, 1S65. He is descended from Koko the 
fifty-eighth Kmperor of Japan, and is a member of 
one of the most powerful famiHes of that country, 
many generals famous in feudal struggles of the civil 
war period being of that line. When he was home, 
Japan was still in the throes of the feudal system, 
and his earliest education was, accordingly, by the 
feudal plan. After the political and social revolu- 
tion his education under the so-called " New 



Leipzig and Jena, 1884-85 ; Professor of Latin at Wil- 
liams College, 1885-91 ; Professor of Latin at Yale since 
1891. 

EDWARD I'ARMKLEE MORRIS, M.A., I'ro- 
fessor of Latin at Yale, was born in Auburn, 
New York, September 17, 1853. Through his 
father, Edward Dafyd<l Morris, he was of Welsh 
descent, his grandfather having come to America in 
1815. His mother, Francis Elizabeth Parmeiee, 



System " commenced, and he received the best of ^^'^^ "^ ^ ^'^^^^ England family, the first representa- 



Japan's educational advantages. He first attended 
the Takashima English School, at Yokohama, and 
from that proceeded through the regular course of 
the educational system, graduating at the Superior 
Middle School, of Tokyo, in 1890. He then en- 
tered the Literature College of the Imperial Uni- 
versity, at Tokyo, where he graduated in 1893 with 
a title which corresponds to the Master of Arts 
degree. Then in the L'niversity Hall of the Im- 
perial University, he took up the study of Theory 
of Perception. While at the University he was an 
Editor of a philosophical magazine published there, 
and at one time served as Secretary of the Tokyo 
Philosophical Society. From 1893 to 1896 he was 
Lecturer in Psychology in the St. Paul's College, 
and the Universalist College of Tokyo. In 1896 
he came to .America to continue his philosophical 
study, and since 1897 has been connected as .As- 
sistant with the Psychological Laboratory of Yale. 
After some further study in this country of the 
experimental method of investigation of mental 
phenomena, he went abroad to Leipzig, as a 
special Fellow of the Educational Department of 
Japan, to acquaint himself with the art and the 
educational institutions of Europe, returning to 
resume his connection with Yale, from which L^ni- 
versity he received the degree of Doctor of Phil- 
oso]:ihy in 1899. His aim is to contribute to the 
educational and artistic advancement of the Japan- 
ese people. He is a member of the Philosophical 
and Imperial Literary Societies of Tokyo, and in 
1899 received the degree of Bungak Hakuski 
(Litt.D.) from the Imperial LTniversity in that city. 



MORRIS, Edward Parmeiee 

Yale B.A. 1874. 
Born in Auburn, N. Y., 1853: prepared for College 
at the Woodward High School of Cincinnati ; graduate 
of Yale, 1874; taught in private schools in Cincinnati, 
1874-76; taught Latin in Purdue University, 1876-77; 
Professor at Lake Forest University, 1877-75 ; Professor 
of Greek at Drury College, 1879-84 ; studied abroad at 



live of which in this country came from Holland 
about 1650 and settled in Connecticut. Edward 







E. P. MORRIS 

Parmeiee Morris received his early education in the 
public schools of Columbus and Cincinnati, Ohio. 
He prepared for College at the Woodward High 
School of Cincinnati, and entered Yale in 1S70. 
graduating in 1874. He has had an extensive ped- 
agogical experience. For two years following his 
graduation he taught in private schools in Cincin- 
nati. In 1876 he went to the Purdue University of 
Lafayette, Indiana, as Instructor in Latin, and in 
the following year to Lake Forest University of 
Lake Forest, Illinois, as Professor of Mathematics. 
He left Lake Forest in 1879 to become Professor of 
("Tteek at Drury College of Springfield, Missouri. 
and remained there for five years. In 18S4 he 
went abroad, and spent the following twelve months 



JO 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



in stuciy at the German Universities of Jena ami 
Leipzig. Returning to America, he was made Pro- 
fessor of Latin and Instructor in German at Wil- 
liams College, and six years later was tendered and 
accepted the position of Professor of Language and 
Literature at Yale, which position he still retains. 
Mr. Morris has written a number of monographs 
and articles on subjects connected witli his profes- 
sion, among them two series of articles in the .Amer- 
ican Journal of Philology, on historical syntax, and 
has also edited four plays of Plautus. He is not 
actively interested in politics. Me married, Janu- 
ary 2, 1879, Charlotte Webster Humphrey. They 
have three cliildren : Frances Humphrey, NLtrgaret 
an<l Humphrey Morris. 

MOULTON, Edward Seymour 

Yale M.D. 1894. 
Born in New Bedford, Mass., 1868; attended public 
schools of Oberlin, O ; graduated at Oberlin College, 
1891 ; received MA. from Oberlin. 1894; graduated at 
Yale Medical School. 1894; did post-graduate work in 
New York Hospitals. 1895 '■ Assistant in Medical 
Clinic, at Yale, 1896; Assistant in Gynecology at Yale 
since 1897; practises in New Haven. 

EDWARD .Si;VMOUR MOULTON, A.M., 
M.rx, Physician, and .Assistant in the Vale 
Medical School, was born in New Bedford, Mas- 
sachusetts, April 26, 1868. He is the son of Rev. 
Tyler Calvin and Susan Abigail (Seymour) Moulton. 
Through his mother he traces his ancestry to 
Richard Seymour, the original proprietor of Hart- 
ford, Connecticut. Three of iiis ancestors were 
Revolutionary soldiers. His early education was 
received at the public schools of Oberlin, Ohio, 
where his family moved while he was still a chikl. 
He then went to the (Jrand River Institute, of 
.Austinberg, Ohio, where he completed a full course 
of study and graduated in 1887. He then entered 
Oberlin College and graduated there in 1891. In 
189 1 he matriculated at the Medical School of Yale, 
where he graduated with the degree of Doctor of 
Medicine in 1894, receiving at the same time the 
degree of Master of .Arts from Oberlin. .After grad- 
uating in medicine he had six months of post-grad- 
uate work in the New York Hospitals, and then 
opened a practice in Oakland, California. He 
remained there but four months, returning to New 
Haven at the end of that time to open a practice 
which has continued since 1895. In 1896 Dr. 
Moulton was elected Assistant in the Medical 
Clinic at Yale, and the following year, 1S97, he 
was appointed Assistant in Gynecology in the Yale 



Medical School, which position he still holds. He 
is a member of the Connecticut Medical Society ; 
the New Haven County Medical Society: the 




I DWAKD S. MOULIOX 



New Haven Medical .Association, and the .Ameri- 
can Association for the Advancement of Physical 
Education. In jiolitics he is a Republican. 



McDonnell, Ralph Augustine 

Yale B.A. i8go, M.D. 1892. 
Born in Topsham, Me., 1868; fitted for College at 
Siglar's Preparatory School; graduate of Yale, 1890; 
graduate Yale Medical School, 1892 ; studied abroad at 
Berlin and Vienna, 1892-93 ; has practised medicine in 
New Haven since 189- ; Instructor in Dermatology and 
Materia Medica at Yale, 1897- 

RAl.PH AL'GUSI'INI': McDONNELL, M.D., 
Instructor at Vale, was born in Topsham, 
Maine, .August 20, 1868. He is of Scotch-English 
ancestry. His father, John .A. McDonnell, «'as the 
son of Scotch parents who came to America in the 
second (}uarter of this century and his mother, 
Valeria G. Dennett, came of an English family. 
Ralph .Augustine McDonnell attended as a boy the 
public schools of Newburgh, New York, to which 
place his parents had removed ; and later, after a 
preparatory course at Siglar's Preparatory School of 
Newburgh, entered the .Academical Department of 
Yale graduating in 1890. Deciding to follow the 



UNIVERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



71 



medical profession he took up the study of medicine 
at the Vale Medical School and studied there for 
two years. In 1892 he went abroad and spent the 
following year perfecting himself in his profession 




A 



Tutor in Mathematics, 1877 ; Assistant Professor, 1881 ; 
Professor, 1891, and has been Dean of the Graduate 
School since 1895. 

NDREW WHEELER PHILLIPS, Ph. I)., 
Dean of the Graduate S<.hool, Yale, was 
born in Griswold, Connecticut, March 14, 1844, 
son of Israel Denison and Wealthy Browning 
(Wheeler) Phillips. Having pursued a thorough 
preliminary course of study in public anrl private 
schools, he turned his attention to educational 
work, teaching some four years in the common 
schools, and for eleven years in the Episcopal 
Academy, Cheshire, Connecticut. His collegiate 
training was obtained at Yale, where he took the 
degree of Bachelor of Philosophy in 1873, and 
remaining there as a graduate student received 
that of Doctor of Philosophy in 1877. He was 
the same year appointed a Tutor in .Mathematics, 
serving in that capacity until 1881, when he was 
made .Assistant Professor of that subject, and in 
1S91 was advanced to a full Professorship. From 
1895 '° ^he present time he has been Dean of the 
Graduate School. Trinity College conferred upon 
him the honorary degree of Master of Arts in 1S95. 



R. A. McDonnell 

at the Universities of Berlin and Vienna. On his 
return to America in 1S93 he entered upon the 
practice of his profession in New Haven, and has 
since been engaged in professional work there. 
He became instructor in Dermatology and Materia 
Medica at Yale in 1897, a position he continues to 
fill. Dr. McDonnell is a member of the Yale 
Medical Alumni Association of which he has been 
Secretary and Treasurer since 1895. He is also 
Secretary and Treasurer of the New Haven Medical 
Association. His political convictions are Repub- 
lican although he has never taken an active part in 
political life. He married, August 4, 1892, Lillian 
M. Washburn. They have two children : Ralph 
Edward and Frank McDonnell. 




PHILLIPS, Andrew Wheeler ^^^dkew w. Phillips 

Yale Ph.B. 1873, Ph.D. 1877. 

Born in Griswold. Conn., 1844 ; acquired his early \,ilon" his published works are Transcendental 

education in public and private schools ; taught school f- ° r-.mhic Algebra, and Orbit of Comet V : 

several years;' graduated at Yale in 1873 and continued >-"'>", vjic , . ^ , 

there as a graduate student four years ; appointed a Connecticut Almanac ; Elements ot Geometry ; 1 n^- 



72 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



onometry. Professor Phillips was chosen Trustee of 
the Cheshire Academy in 18X3, of the Hopkins 
Grammar School, New Haven, in icS,S6, and of the 
Hotchkiss School, I^ikeville, Connecticut, in 1891. 
On April 23, 1867, he married Maria Scoville 
Clarke, of Cheshire, Connecticut, and she died 
February 22, 1895, leaving no children. 



REYNOLDS, Horatio McLeod 

Yale B.A. 1880, M.A. 1896. 
Born in Wakefield. N. H.. 1857 ; began his education 
in the public schools ; prepared for College at the 
Maine Central Institute. Pittsfield. Me.: attended Bates 
College, Lewiston. Me,, two years ; graduated at Yale, 
1880; appointed Tutor in Greek there. 1883; Assistant 
Professor, 1888 ; and Professor of that study. 1893- 

HnRATIO McLl>:OD REYNOLDS, M..\., 
Professor of Creek at Vale, was born in 
Wakefield, New Hampshire, April 13, 1857, son of 




I 



HORATIO JM. REYNOLDS 

William Buzzell and Clara (Swazey) Reynolds. 
From the public schools of Lawrence, Massachu- 
setts, he went to the Maine Central Institute, Pitts- 
field, Maine, and from there to Bates College, 
Lewiston, same state, where he remained during his 
Freshman and Sophomore years, and entering Yale, 
Class of 1 880, took his Bachelor's degree at gradu- 
ation, and was inade a Master of Arts in 1889. 



Accej^ting a 'I'utorship in (ireek at \'ale in 18S3 he 
continued in that capacity until 1888, when he was 
chosen Assistant Professor, and being advanced to 
full Professorship of that study in 1893, is still occu- 
pying that chair. In politics Professor Reynolds is 
a Democrat. He is a member of the .\merican 
Archaeological Society, the American Philological 
Association, tlie L'niversity Club, Boston, and the 
Graduates' Club, New Haven. 



SEAVER, Jay Webber 

Yale B.A, 1880, M,D, 1885. M.A, 1893. 
Born in Craftsbury, Vt., 1855 ; attended Craftsbury 
Academy and Williston Seminary, Easthampton, 
Mass.; graduated at Yale, 1880; graduate at Yale 
Medical School, 1885 ; Instructor in Physical Training 
at Yale, 1883-92; Medical Examiner in the Department 
of Physical Training at Yale since 1885; President of 
the Chautauqua School of Physical Education since 
1893, 

JAY \VEBRER SEAVER, M,D., Medical Exam- 
iner in the Department of Physical 'I'raining 
at Yale, was born in Craftsbury, Vermont, March 9, 
1855. His father, ^\'illiam Seaver, was of English 
ancestry, and his mother, Betsy (L^rie) Seaver, was 
descended from Scotch families. His early educa- 
tion was received from the public schools of Crafts- 
bury, and for final College preparation he attended 
the Craftsbury Academy and the Williston Seminary, 
at Easthampton, Massachusetts. From here he 
went to \'d\e, and following a course of study in the 
Academic Department he graduated with the Bach- 
elor of Arts degree in 1880. He then matriculated 
at the Medical School of Yale and after three years 
of study there he received the Doctor of Medicine 
degree in 1885. While still in the Medical School 
Dr. Seaver became interested in the subject of 
Physical Training, and his knowledge of that subject 
won him an appointment as Instructor in Physical 
Training at Vale, which position he occupied from 
18S3 to 1S92. He was also, during this i)eriod, 
elected to the offices of Medical Examiner in the 
Department of Physical Training at Vale (1885); 
and Lecturer in Physiology in the Chautauqua 
School of Physical Education (1889). Both of 
these positions, together with that of President of 
the Chautauqua School, he occupies at present. He 
was elected President of the American Association 
for the Advancement of Physical Education in 1895. 
He married, July i, 1886, Leona M. Sheldon. He 
has one child, Ruth Buchanin Seaver, who was 
born October 20, 1888. 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



71 



JOUET, Cavalier Hargrave 

Columbia Ph.B. 1882, Ph.D. 
Born in New Jersey, i860; attended private day 
school and Trinity Church School in N. Y. City; Ph.B , 
School of Mines of Columbia ; took post-graduate 



ant of the first emigrant, the great-grandfather of 
the subject of this sketch, settled in St. John, New 
Brunswick, Canada, where he and his sons filled 
many ofifices of trust under the Crown. His mother 

course, receiving the degree of Ph.D.: practising (Henrietta Hearn), of New York City, is of an 

chemist, 1882-97 ! member of the Board of Education 

of Roselle, 1895 ; Assistant in Analytical Chemistry, 

Columbia, 1897- : Instructor in Chemistry, Newark 

Technical School since 1897. 



CAVALIER HARGRAVE JOUET, Ph.D., 
Assistant in the Department of .Analytical 
Chemistry at Columbia, was born at Mulford Station 
(now Roselle), New Jersey, November 7, i860. 




C. H. JOUET 

-Attended a private day school in his native village 
and later Trinity Church School, New York City ; 
graduated from Columbia School of Mines in 1882 
as Ph.B. Some years afterwards took a ])ost-grad- 
uate course, receiving the degree of Doctor of Phil- 
osophy. For many years he was engaged as chemist 
for various houses in New York City and as referee 
in various commercial tests. Through his father, 
Xenophon Joilet, he is of Huguenot descent ; his 
great-great-great-great-grandfather, Daniel Joiiet, 
son of Daniel Joiiet of the Isle of Rt^, France, with 
his wife and children, having fled from persecution, 
following the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes in 
1686. After .varied wanderings and the lapse of 
years and after the War of the Revolution, a descend- 



old English family who trace their descent from 
Jordan de Herioun, who followed in the train of 
William the Conqueror. The name Hem or 
Herioun may be found in the Battle .Abbey Roll. 
Dr. Joiiet since 1897 has been connected with the 
Newark Technical School as Instructor in Chemistrj-. 
During 1895 he served on the Board of Education of 
his native town. He is connected with three scientific 
bodies, — Society of Chemical Industry, London, 
England ; .American Institute of Mining Engineers 
and the American Chemical Society. He is likewise 
member of the Huguenot Society of America, the 
Alumni Association of the Columbia University 
Schools of Applied Science and the Royal Arcanum. 
He is now engaged on some special work soon to 
be published by the Smithsonian Institution at 
Washington, District of Columbia. 



Mcknight, Charles 

Princeton Class of 1771. 
Born in Cranbury, N. J., 1750 ; graduated at Prince- 
ton, 1771 ; studied medicine and served as a Surgeon in 
the American Army during the Revolutionary War; 
acquired professional distinction in New York; Pro- 
fessor of Surgery at Columbia, 1785-92 ; also Regent 
and Trustee of that College; died 1792. 

CHARLES Mcknight, M.D., Professor of 
Surgery at Columbia, was born in Cranburj-, 
New Jersey, October lo, 1750. He was the son 
of a Presbyterian clergyman of Middletown Point, 
New Jersey, who in 1778 died in prison, whither he 
had been incarcerated for supporting the American 
cause ; and his grandfather, who was a minister of 
the same denomination, emigrated to New Jersey 
in 1740. He was educated at Princeton, Class of 
1 7 71, and having completed his medical studies 
prior to the breaking out of the Revolutionary War, 
entered tlie .American service, in which he became 
Senior Flying Hospital Surgeon of the Middle De- 
partment, and was subsequently Surgeon-General 
of the cantonments on the Hudson River, near New 
Windsor, New York. Settling in New York City, he 
achieved professional distinction and was Professor 
of Surger)' at Columbia from 17 85 until his death, 
which occurred in 1792. He was also appointed a 
Regent and a Trustee of the College in 1 7S4, sen- 
ing in the latter capacity for three years, and was 



74 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



one of the early contributors to American medical 
and surgical literature. Dr. McKnight married a 
daughter of Cleneral John .Morin Scott. 



MIDDLETON, Peter 

Columbia M.D. i Hor.) 1768. 
Born in Scotland ; graduate of the Edinburgh Uni- 
versity ; emigrated to New York and engaged in the 
practice of medicine ; contemporary of Dr. John Bard; 
assisted in establishing the Medical Department of 
King's College ; one of its first Professors, and Gov- 
ernor, 1770-1780; died 1781. 

Pi:ri:R .\I11)1)1.I:1'(J.\. .M.D.. Governor of 
King's College, was a native of Scotland and 
a gratluate of the Fldinburgh University. Provided 
with a good medical education, he emigrated to 
America, and settling in New York about the middle 
of the eighteenth century, became one of tlie most 
noted physicians of his day in this coimtry. .\s a 
contemporary of Dr. John Hard he was associated 
with the latter in scienlific research, and the first 
dissection in .\merica of which there is any record 
was made by these two investigators. W iih a view 
of providing facilities for medical education and the 
advancement of science, he, with others in 1767, 
opened a medical school which subsequently became 
a part of King's College, and in which he was the 
first Professor of Physiology .ind Pathology, and in 
1770 he took the Chair of Chemistry and Materia 
.Medica in addition to his other duties, continuing 
to teach all of these studies until 1776. From 1770 
to 1780 he vvas (}overnor of King's College, which 
made him a Doctor of Medicine in i 768, and the 
same degree was conferred upon him by St. .\ndrews 
University. Dr. Middlcton died in New York in 
1 781. He is the aiuhor of Historical Inquiries into 
the Ancient and Present System of Medicine ; and 
a letter on Crou]i from his pen will be founil in 
Volume I.X. of the .Medical Repository. 



MITCHILL, Samuel Latham 

Columbia A.M. (Hon.) i;88. 
Born in Hempstead, N. Y., 1764; graduated in med- 
icine at the University of Edinburgh, 17S6; studied 
law in New York ; Professor of Botany at Columbia, 
1792-95: of Natural History, Chemistry and Agricul- 
ture, 1792-1801 ; of Natural History at the College of 
Physicians and Surgeons, 1808-20; of Botany and 
Materia Medica at the latter Institution, 1820-26 ; Vice- 
President of Rutgers Medical College, 1826 30; U. S. 
Commissioner to the Iroquois Indians, 1788: member 
of the New York Assembly, 1790-92 and again 1797-99 ; 
member of Congress, 1801-03 and 1810-13 ; U. S. Senator, 



1804-10 ; one of the foremost scholars of his day and 
the " Nestor of American Science ; " died 1831. 

SAMUl-.L L.YPHAM INHi'CHlLL, I\I.D., 
1,1,.D., Professor at Columbia College and 
its Medical Department, was born in Hempstead, 
Long Island, .August 20, 1764. His medical 
studies were pursued under the guidance of Dr. 
Samuel Latham, his maternal uncle, and Dr. Samuel 
liard of New Scotland, where he took his medical 
degree in 17S6. He was also for some time a law 
student in the office of Robert N'ates, of New York. 





■ 




^H 




^B 


^^BHI:;| 'j^— '^k 


'!^| 




% 1 




1 j 


^B^^^^H 


^^^^■^ujlgi 



S.AMUEI, I,. ^^TCHII.I. 

His membership of the Columbia Faculty began in 
1792 ns Professor of Botany, Natural History, Chem- 
istry and AgricultiH'e, retaining the first-named chair 
for three years, and the others until 1801. .\t the 
establishment of the College of Physicians and Sur- 
geons in 1807, he declined the Chair of Chemistry, 
but in the ensuing year accepted that of Natural 
History, which he e.xchanged for the I'rofessor- 
ship of Botany and Materia Medica in 1820, and 
resigned with the rest of the Faculty in 1826. In 
the latter year he was elected Vice-President of 
Rutgers Medical College and held office until 1830. 
Di. Mitchill's professional duties were interspersed 
with political services, having been from 1788 to 
1790 a member of the F'ederal Commission ap- 
pointed to negotiate with the Iroquois Indians for 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



75 



the purchase of their territory in Western New 
York, and he was a member of the Stale Assembly 
in 1790-1792 and again in 1797-1799. From 
1 80 1 to 1803, and again from 18 10 to 18 13 he 
was Representative to Congress, and from 1804 to 
1 8 10 he occupied a seat in the United States Senate. 
He was one of the founders of the Society for the 
Promotion of Agriculture, Manufactures, and the 
Useful Arts, and the New York Lyceum of Natural 
History, of which he was the first President ; was 
President of the County Medical Society in 1807 
and appointed Surgeon- General of Militia in 1818. 
Besides his large private practice and his pro- 
fessional services at the New York Hospital which 
covered a period of twenty years, he was a close 
student and a recognized authority on the natural 
sciences, the fine arts, philosophy and literature, 
and was known as the " Nestor of American 
Science." Dr. Mitchell died September 7, 1831. 
He was a frequent contributor to scientific litera- 
ture, and also published articles upon timely topics, 
notable among which are his Addresses to the 
Fredes or People of the United States, where he 
suggests the name of Fredonia as being a more 
appropriate name for the Republic. He was made 
an honorary Master of Arts by Columbia in 1788, 
and a Doctor of Laws by the University of Penn- 
sylvania in 1819. 



NEWTON, Henry 

Columbia E.M. 1869, Ph.D. 1877. 
Born in New York, 1845 ; graduated at the University 
of the City of New York. 1866: at the Columbia School 
of Mines, 1869: Assistant there in Mineralogy and 
Geology, 1870-75 ; assisted Professor John S. New- 
berry in the Geological Survey of Ohio ; Assistant 
Geologist under Walter P. Jenney in the Black Hill 
Scientific Expedition, 1876-77; noted specialist on the 
metallurgy of iron and steel ; died 1877. 

HKXRY NEWTON, E.M., Ph.D., Assistant in 
Mineralogy and Geology at the Columbia 
School of Mines, was born in New York City, 
August 12, 1845. He was a grandson of Abner 
Newton, an officer in the .\merican Army during 
the Revolutionary \\'ar. His father was Isaac New- 
ton (1794-1858), one of the early builders of 
steamboats, and founder of the People's Line be- 
tween Albany and New York. From the University 
of the City of New York, where he was graduated 
in 1866, he entered the Columbia School of Mines, 
receiving the degree of Mining Engineer in 1869, 
and he was an Assistant there in Mineralogy and 
Geology until 1875, taking the degree of Doctor of 



Philosophy for advanced scientific work in 1877. 
He assisted Professor John S. Newberry upon the 
Geological Sun-ey of the State of Ohio, and was 
appointed Assistant Geologist on the Scientific Ex- 
pedition to the Black Hills sent out by the Interior 
Department of the United Slates under Walter P. 
Jenney in 1876. In the following year he accepted 
the Professorship of Mining and Metallurg)- at the 
Ohio State University, but his assumption of that 
Chair was prevented by his death, which occurred 
in Deadwood, Dakota, August 5, 1877. Dr. Newton 
gave his particular attention to the metallurgy of iron 
and steel, in which he was an expert of recognized 
ability. He made some valuable contributions to 
the literature of his special line of work, the most 
notable of which is his Report on the Geology and 
Resources of the Black Hills of Dakota. 



W"- 



LOMBARD. Warren Plimpton 

Harvard A.B. 1878, M.D. 1881. 
Born in West Newton, Mass., 1855 ; received his 
early education in the English and Classical School 
and the High School of Newton: graduated from Har- 
vard (A.B 1 1878 : Harvard Medical School (M.D.) 1881 ; 
studied several years in Europe ; Assistant in Physi- 
ology at the College of Physicians and Surgeons of 
Columbia, 1886-88 ; Assistant Professor of Physiology 
at Clark University, 1889-92 ; Professor of Physiology 
at the University of Michigan since 1892. 

RRKX PLIMPTON LOMBARD, M.D., 
.Assistant at Columbia, and subseqtiently 
Professor in Physiology at the University of Mich- 
igan, was born in ^Vest Newton, Massachusetts, 
May 29, 1855 ; his parents were Israel Lombard 
and Mary Ann Plimpton. He attended in youth 
the English and Classical School at Newton, and 
later the Newton High School, and then entered 
Harvard, taking his degree in 1878. .\fter gradu- 
ation he studied medicine at the Har\ard Medical 
School, and after the completion of his course there 
studied for several years in Europe, chiefly in atten- 
dance at the University of Leipzig, but also in Paris 
and other Continental centres of learning. On his 
return to America in 1886, he was made Assistant 
in Physiology at the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons, the Medical Department of Columbia. 
In 1889 he went to Clark University as .Assistant 
Professor of Physiology and three years later was 
tendered and accepted the Chair of Physiology in 
the University of Michigan at .Ann .Arbor, which he 
has since occupied. He is a member of the Amer- 
ican Society of Physiologists and the Michigan State 
Medical Society. 



76 



UNIVERSITIES JND THEIR SONS 



REES, John Krom 

Columbia A.B. 1872, E.M. and A.M. 1875, Ph D. 1895. 

Born in N. Y. City. 1851 ; fitted for College at the Co- 
lumbia Grammar School, N. Y. City; A.B. Columbia, 
1872; E.M. Columbia School of Mines. 1875; and 
A.M. Columbia, same year ; Professor of Mathematics 
and Astronomy at Washington University, 1876-81 ; 
Director of the University Observatory, Columbi.i, 
since 1881. 

JOHN KROM REES, E.M., Ph.D., Professor of 
.Astronomy at Columbia and widely known 
throughout this country and Europe as the Director 
of the Observatory of Columbia and as an authority 
of weight on astronomical subjects, was born in New 
York City, October 27, 1851. His father, Hans 
Rees, was of Norwegian birth, and his mother, 
Lucinda Krom Rees, came of Huguenot and Dutch 
origin. Jolm Krom Rees received his early educa- 
tion in private schools and in the public schools of 
New York City. He fitted for College at the Co- 
lumbia Grammar School, and entered Columbia in 
his seventeenth year, graduating with the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts in 1872, and was appointed Fellow 
in Science. During the three years of his fellowship 
he studied at the Columbia School of Mines, grad- 
uating with the degree of Mining Engineer in 1875 
and receiving the degree of Master of Arts from the 
University in the same year. For two years previ- 
ous to his graduation he had been an Assistant in 
Mathematics at the School of Mines, but he left 
there in 1876 to take the Professorship in Mathe- 
matics and .Astronomy in Washington University of 
St. Louis, Missouri. He remained at Washington 
for five years, when he returned to Columbia as 
Director of the Observatory and Instructor in Ge- 
odesy and Practical Astronomy. In 1883 he was 
made Chairman of the Board of Editors of the 
School of Mines Quarterly, a position which he held 
for the ensuing seven years. He was promoted to 
the Professorship of .Astronomy in 1892. The Co- 
lumbia Observatory, under Professor Rees' ilirection, 
has during the last five years carried on two espe- 
cially important pieces of work — the reduction of 
the Rutherfurd photographs of the stars, and the 
determination of the variation of latitude at New 
York and of the Constant of Aberration. In this 
latter piece of work the Royal Observatory of Capo- 
dimonte Naples, Italy, co-operated. Thus for the 
first time two observatories on about the same par- 
allel of latitude arranged to observe the same stars 
for the purpose indicated above. Professor Rees 
has written numerous articles on scientific subjects 
for the leading scientific journals of the country. 



He has also published: Some Problems about to 
Confront .Astronomers of tiie Twentieth Century 
(first given in the form of an address as retiring 
President of the New York .Academy of Sciences in 
1S96) ; The Metric System: Detailed Information 
as to Laws, Practice, etc. ; Variation of Latitude (a 
reprint of a lecture before the New York Academy 
of Sciences in 1895) ; The \\T.riation of Latitude at 
New York and a Determination of the Constant of 
.Aberration at New York from Observations made 
at the Columbia University ; and other papers. He 




JOHN KROM REES 

married September 7, 1876, Louise F.. Sands, and 
they have three children. Professor Rees is a 
member of a large number of scientific societies 
liere anil in luirope, and has held office in many of 
them. .Among them are the New York Mathemat- 
ical Society (Vice-President 1891); New York 
Academy of '.Science (Chairman of the Section on 
Astronomy and Physics 1891-93, and President 
1894-1896) ; .American Metrological Society (Sec- 
retary 1S92-97, and Vice-President 1S97-99) ; 
fellow of the Royal .Astronomical Society of London 
since 1892; member of the .Astronomische Gesell- 
schaft since 1893 ; the .American Association for 
the -Advancement of Science (Secretary 1882) ; 
and niany others. He was Secretary of the L'niver- 
sity Council of Columbia from 1892 to 1898. In 
1895 the University conferred uj^on him the degree 



UNIFERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



77 



of Doctor of Philosophy. President McKinley ap- 
pointed him a United States Assay Commissioner 
in 1S98. 

YOUNG, Clarence Hoffman 

Columbia A.B. 1888, A.M. 1889, Ph.D. 1891. 
Born in New York City, i860; fitted for College at 
Everson & Halsey's School in New York; A.B., Co- 
lumbia, 18E8, and appointed University Fellow in 
Greek ; pursued post-graduate studies in the Classics 
and Greek Archaeology and Epigraphy, i888-gi ; re- 
ceived degree of A.M., 1889, and Ph.D., 1891 ; Assistant 
in Greek at Columbia, i888-gi ; student at American 
School of Classical Studies, Athens, Greece, 1891-92; 
Instructor in Greek at Columbia since 1892; Lecturer 
on Greek subjects under the New York City Board of 
Education and elsewhere. 

CLARENCE HOFF.MAN YOUNG, Ph.D., In- 
structor in Greek at Columbia, son of James 
Baxter and Julia Augusta (Wells) Young, was born 
in the City of New Y'ork December 24, 1S66. He 
received his early education in private schools in 
New York, and after a preparatory course at Ever- 
son & Halsey's School entered the Freshman class 
of Columbia in October, 1884. Graduating in June 
1888, he was appointed to a University Fellowship 
in Greek,' and on this foundation took post-graduate 
courses in the Classics and Greek Archaeology and 
Epigraphy during the following three years, acting 
as Assistant in Greek at the same time. He re- 
ceived the degree of Master of .Arts in 1889, and 
was made a Doctor of Philosophy in 189 1, the sub- 
ject of his Doctor's dissertation being " Erchia, a 
Deme of Attica." On the expiration of his fellow- 
ship in i8gi he went abroad and spent the ensuing 
year in study and research at the .American School 
of Classical Studies at Athens, Greece. He also 
spent sev-eral summers working in the museums of 
Europe and in Greece, studying Grecian antiquities. 
On his return to Ainerica in 1892, Dr. Young was 
made an Instructor in Greek at Columbia, a posi- 
tion which he has held since that time. He mar- 
ried, August 18, 1891, Ada Isabel Young, and 
they have one child : James Donald Young. Dr. 
Young has been for several years engaged in lectur- 
ing upon Greek subjects in the free educational 
courses given under the auspices of the Board of 
Education of New Y'ork City, and has also lectured 
upon Greece and its antiquities before the Brookl}^ 
Institute, the .\merican Geographical Society and 
the New Y'ork Society of the .Archaeological Institute 
of .America, of which he was Secretary from 1894 to 
1898. Since 1897 he has also been Secretary of 
the Institute ' and ex-officio a member of the 
Council. In the spring of 1899 he was chosen 



Business Manager of the American Journal of 
Archseolcgy, the official organ of the Institute. Dr. 
Young was Vice-President of the New York 
Delta of the Phi Beta Kappa fraternity during 
1888-1891 and 1892-1893, President during 1893- 
1897 and has been Vice-President of the Society 
since the latter date. He is also a member of the 
Phi Beta Kappa Alumni Association, the Columbia 
College Alumni Association, Columbia College Row- 
ing Club, American Philological Association, Archae- 
ological Institute of America and University and 
Barnard Clubs of New York City. While taking no 
active part in politics, he has supported the cause 
of good municipal government in New York City, 
having been a member of one of the Good Govern- 
ment clubs, and being at present connected with 
the Citizens' Union. 



OGILBY, John David 

Columbia A.B. 1829, A.M. 1833. 

Born in Dublin, Ireland, 1810 ; graduated at Colum- 
bia, 1829 ; Master of Columbia Grammar School the 
following year ; Professor of Languages at Rutgers, 
1832-40; prepared for the Episcopal ministry and took 
orders, 1838 ; Professor of Ecclesiastical History at the 
General Theological Seminary, 1841-51 ; died 1851. 

JOHN DAVID OGILBY, D.D., Master of the 
Columbia (irammar School, was bom in Dub- 
lin, Ireland, December 30, 18 10. He was edu- 
cated in the United States, whither he came at the 
age of six years, taking his Bachelor's degree at 
Columbia in 1829 and receiving that of .Master of 
.\rts in 1S33. The year following his graduation 
he held the Mastership of the ("olumbia Grammar 
School, and also engaged in the editing of classical 
works. From 1832 to 1840 he held the Chair of 
.Ancient Languages at Rutgers. Having studied 
theology he was ordained to the ministry of the 
Protestant Episcopal Church by Bishop Onderdonk 
in 1838, and being called to the Chair of Ecclesi- 
astical History at the General Theological Seminary 
in 1841 he retained that post for the rest of his life. 
The degree of Doctor of Divinity was conferred 
upon him by the University of Pennsylvania in 
1S43. During the last ten years of his life he 
batded constantly against ill health, making three 
visits to Europe with the hope of receiving bene- 
ficial results, and his death occurred in Paris, 
France, February 2, 1851. Dr. Ogilby was the 
author of .An Outline of the Argument against the 
Validity of Lay Baptism ; The Catholic Church in 
England and America, three lectures ; and was pre- 
paring an extensive work on Ecclesiastical History. 



78 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



FAIRBANKS, Arthur 

Yale Div.S. 188S-89. 
Born in Hanover, N. H., 1864; early education St. 
Johnsbury Academy; A.B., Dartmouth, 1886: Union 
Theological Seminary, 1887-88; Yale Divinity School, 
1888-89: Berlin and Freiburg Universities, 1889-90; 
Tutor and Assistant Professor at Dartmouth College, 
1886-87 and 1890-92; Lecturer Yale Divinity School, 
1892-95; Instructor Yale University, 1895-1898. 

ARTHUR FAIRBANKS, I'li.l)., Instructor in 
Comparative Religion in Yale, was born 
November n, 1S64, at Hanover, New Hampshire, 




ARTIUK KAIKliANKS 

son of Rev. Henry and Annie S. (Noyes) Fair- 
banks. His grandfather was Thaddeus Fairbanks, 
the inventor of the Fairbanks Scales, and his mater- 
nal grandfather was Daniel F. Noyes, Professor of 
Mental and Moral Philosophy in Dartmouth. Mr. 
Fairbanks attended the St. Johnsbury, Vermont 
.'\cademy, and graduated from Dartmouth in 1886. 
He then took a year at the Union 'Theological Sem- 
inary, and one at Yale Divinity School, and then 
attended the Herlin and Freiburg Universities for a 
year during 1889 and 1890. During the year suc- 
ceeding his graduation from Dartmouth, and for 
two years after his return from abroad, Mr. Fair- 
banks acted as Tutor and .'\ssistant Professor in 
Dartmouth. He lectured in the Yale Divinity School 
from 1892 to 1895 and was appointed Instructor in 
Comparative Religion, in the University in 1895. 



He was ordained to the Congregational ministry in 
January 1892. He has contributed a number of 
articles to the Pibliotiieca Sacra, the New World, 
and the American Journal of Theology ; has pub- 
lished an Introduction to Sociology, and an edition 
of the First Philosopliers of Greece. He is a mem- 
ber of the American Philological Association. He 
married Tllizahetli L. Moody, May 2, 1889, and 
has one child : Mary Lord (1890). 



THACHER, Thomas 

Yale B.A. 1871, M.A. — Columbia LL.B. 1875. 
Born in New Haven. Conn , 1850 ; attended the Hop- 
kins Grammar School, New Haven ; graduated at Yale, 
1871 ; graduated at Columbia Law School, 1875; ad- 
mitted to the Bar in New York City, 1875; has prac- 
tised law in New York since 1875 ; member of the firm 
Simpson, Thacher & Barnum ; Lecturer on Corpora- 
tion Law at Yale since 1887 ; President of Yale Alumni 
Association, of New York 1895-97; President of the 
Yale Club of New York City. 

THOMAS THACHER, M.A., Lawyer, and Lec- 
turer on Corporation Law at Yale, was born 
in New Haven, Connecticut, May 3, 1850. He is 
the son of Thomas A. and Elizabeth (Day) Thacher 
nnd a descendant of the 'Thomas 'Thacher who came 




THOS. THACHER 



from Salisbury, England, in 1635, and became the 
first minister of the Old South Church in Boston, 
Massachusetts. He is a grandson of Jeremiah Day, 
President of Yale 181 7-1846. In New Haven he 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



79 



attended the Webster Scliool and the Hopkins 
Grammar School receiving there preparation for 
College. He graduated from the Academic De- 
partment of Yale in 187 1. He taught, for one 
year following graduation, at the Hopkins Grammar 
School, and during the next year engaged in gradu- 
ate study at Vale. He then entered the Law School 
of Columbia, and after two years of study there, 
1873-1875, he graduated with the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws, hi iNIay 1875, he was admitted 
to the l!ar in New York City and since that time 
he has practised law in that city. He served as 
Clerk in the office of Alexander & Green until 
June 1876, when he started in business for himself, 
being at first especially occupied as Attorney for the 
Equitable Trust Company. In 1884 with John \V. 
Simpson (.\niherst 1S71) and William W. Barnum 
(Yale \?>ii), he instituted the law firm of Simpson, 
Thacher & Barnum. This firm continues at pres- 
ent with the addition of Philip G. Bardett, (Yale 
1881) as fourth partner. In 1887 Mr. Thacher 
was appointed Lecturer on Corporation Law at the 
Vale Law School, anil he occupies that position 
at present in addition to his regular practice. He 
was formerly a member of the Committee of 
Admissions of the Association of the Bar of New 
York City, and from 1894 to i8g6 a member of 
the Executive Committee of that .Association. He 
was Secretary of the Yale Alumni .^Association of 
New York City 1 884-1 885 and President 1895- 
1897. He is at present President of the Yale 
Club of New York City. Mr. Thacher is a mem- 
ber of the following clubs of New York City ; 
Century, Metropolitan, University, University 
Athletic, Yale and Lawyers'. He is also a mem- 
ber of the University Club of New Haven ; the Bar 
Association of New York and the Law Institute. 



JEPSON, Harry B. 

Yale B.A. 1893, Mus.B. 1894. 
Born in New Haven, Conn., 1870; fitted for College 
at Hillhouse High School; studied music with Dr. 
Gustav J. Stoeckel; graduate of Yale, 1893, taking 
special course in active music, receiving the degree of 
Mus.B. in 1894: Organist at Christ Church, New 
Haven, 1889-92 ; Organist and Choir-Master at Centre 
Church, 1892-95; Assistant Organist at Battell Chapel, 
Yale, 1894-95 ; Organist and Choir-Master since 1895; 
Instructor in Organ Playing, Yale School of Music 
since 1895 ; Representative of the London College of 
Music, 1896. 

HARRY B. JEPSON, Mus.B., Organist and 
Choit-Master in the Battell Chapel of Yale 
and Instructor in Organ Playing in the Yale School 



of Music, is of English ancestry. His parents, 
P.enjamin and Mary Louise (Wiswell) Jepson, were 
residents of New Haven, Connecticut, where Harr)- 
B. Jepson was born August i6, 1870. He fitted 
for College at the Hillhouse High School in New 
Haven and- studied music with Dr. Gustav J. 
Stoeckel. He entered Yale in 1889, graduating in 
1893, and taking special courses in music. After 
one year of post-graduate study he received the 
degree of Bachelor of Music. During part of his 
course at College he was Organist at Christ Church 
of New Haven, having been appointed in 1889, but 




H.ARRY B. JEPSON 

left there in 1892 to take the position of Organist 
and Choir-Master in the Centre Church. He was 
made Assistant Organist at the Battell Chapel in 
1894 and in the following year, having been pro- 
moted to Organist and Choir-Master, and given an 
Instructorship at the Yale School of .Music, left the 
Centre Church to devote himself entirely to Uni- 
versity work. In 1896 he was appointed Repre- 
sentative of the London (England) College of 
Music. Mr. Jepson married, August i, 1895, 
Mabel Preston Wyatt. Uhile at College he became 
a member of the Zeta Psi fraternity and the Yale 
University Glee Club, and after graduation a mem- 
ber of the Graduates' Club of New Haven, and the 
New Haven Country Club. 



8o 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



Hawkes, Herbert Edwin 

Yale B.A. 1896. 
Born in Templeton, Mass, 1872; fitted for College 
at the Williston Seminary: graduate of Yale, 1896; 
graduate work in Mathematics, 1896-97; Instructor in 
Mathematics since 1897. 

H|;RI!|;R r F.DWIN hawkes. instructor in 
.Mathematics at Yale, was born in Tem- 
pleton, Massachusetts, December 6, 1872. His 




11. I'. IIAWKI-.S 

parents were George P. and Abigail Elizabeth 
(Sparhawk) Hawkes. He received his early edu- 
cation in the public schools of his native place and 
the Templeton High School where he graduated in 
1890, and fitted for College at \\'illi;)ton Seminary, 
graduating in 1892. In September of that year he 
entered Yale, taking the degree of liarhelor of .Arts 
four years later. The year following his graduation 
was spent in graduate work in mathematics, and in 
1897 he was appointed Instructor in Freshman 
Mathematics, which position he still holds. He 
married, July 8, 1S96, Nettie May Coit. They have 
one son. 



Church of Guilford, Conn., 1870-73; Pastor of the Con- 
gregational Church of Salisbury, Conn., 1877-83; In- 
structor in Yale since 1886. 

CORNELIUS I.ADl) KITCHEL, Instructor 
at Yale, was born in Plymouth Hollow, 
now Thomaston, Connecticut, July 5, 1S41. He is 
eighth in descent from Robert Kitrhel, who caine to 
America from England in 1639, and settled at Guil- 
ford, Connecticut. Mr. Kitchel received his early 
education in the public schools of Detroit, Michi- 
gan, where his home was in boyhood, and prepared 
for C'ollege at Philli|)s .\cademy, Andover, Massa- 
chusetts, graduating in 1858. He took the 
Academic course at Yale, graduating with the Class 
of 1S62. Two years later he entered upon the 
study of theology at the Princeton Theological 
Seminary, but after a year there came to Yale The- 
ological Seminary in 1 865 and completed his course 
there, filling at the same time the post of Tutor in 
the College. In 1870 he was called to the Pastor- 
ate of the North Congregational Church of Guilford, 
Connecticut, and from 1877 to 1883 was Pastor of 
the Congregational Church of Salisbury in the same 
State. In 18S6 having been compelled by ill health 



■b 




^ 



KITCHEL, Cornelius Ladd c. i.. kitchel 

Yale B.A. 1862. M.A., B.D. 1867. 
Born in Thomaston, Conn , 1841 ; fitted for College 
at Phillips-Andover Academy; A.B. (Yale), 1862; 
studied theology in Princeton Theological Seminary, 
1864-65; in Yale Theological Seminary. 1865-67; Tutor 
at Yale, 1865-67; Pastor of North Congregational married, and has one son, William Lloyd Kitchel. 



to give up pastoral work he accepted the i)osilion of In- 
structor at Yale, and his connection with the University 
in that capacity has since continued. Mr. Kitchel 



UNIVERSITIES JND rHEIR SONS 



8i 



DANA, James Dwight 

Yale B.A. 1833, M.A. - Harvard LL.D. 1886. 
Born in Utica, N. Y., 1813; graduated Yale, 1833: 
Instructor in Mathematics, U. S. Navy, 1833-36; As- 
sistant in Chemistry, Yale, 1836-37; Mineralogist and 
Geologist in the Wilkes Expedition, 1837-42; Professor 
of Geology and Mineralogy, Yale, 1850-94; and Emeri- 
tus to the time of his death ; received degree of LL.D., 
from Amherst, Harvard and Edinburgh (Scotland) and 
Ph.D. from Munich; died 1895. 

J.\MES DWIGHT I)AN.\, Ph.D., LL.D., Profes- 
sor of Geology and Mineralogy at Yale, was 
born in LUica, New York, February 12, 18 13, and 
graduated at Yale in 1833. He received the ap- 




JAMES D. DANA 

pointment of Instructor in IMathematics to midship- 
men in the L'nited States Xavy, and passed three 
years in that ser^-ice on board naval vessels in 
foreign waters. During the years 1836-183 7 he 
was engaged as Assistant in Chemistry under the 
elder Silliman at Yale, but left that occupation to 
.sail with the government expedition under Captain 
Charles \Vilkes, as Mineralogist and Geologist, for 
the exploration of the Southern and Pacific Oceans. 
He returned in 1842 and thirteen years was en- 
gaged in studying the "material collected and pre- 
paring tlie reports for publication, residing at first 
at Washington and later in New Haven. At the 
foundation of the Silliman Professorship of Geology 

VOL. III. — 6 



and Mineralogy at Yale, he was appointed to that 
chair, which he occupied to the time of his death, 
being made Professor Emeritus in 1894. In ad- 
dition to his reports for the Government on the 
Wilkes f:xpedition. Professor Dana published a 
number of text-books and treatises on the natural 
sciences, chiefly geology and mineralogy, and con- 
ducted for many years the American Journal of 
Sciences and Arts. He was a member of the lead- 
ing scientific societies of Europe and .\merica, and 
received the degree of Doctor of Laws from Amherst 
in 1853, Harvard in 1886 and Edinburgh, Scotland 
in 1880, and that of Doctor of Philosophy from the 
University of Munich in 1S72. He died in New 
Haven, Connecticut, .April 1895. 



MARSH, Othniel Charles 

Vale B.A. i860, M.A. — Harvard LL.D. 1886. 
Born in Lockport. N. Y.. 1831 : fitted for College at 
Phillips Academy, Andover, Mass.; graduate of Yale 
i860 ; from Sheffield Scientific School 1862. also 
receiving degree of MA. ; studied abroad at Berlin, 
Heidelberg and Breslau, 1862-65; Ph.D. Heidelberg, 
1886; Professor of Paleontology at Yale, 1866 till his 
death in 1899 ; Curator of the Geological Collections of 
Yale, 1867-99; Paleontologist U. S. Geological Survey, 
1882-99; Honorary Curator U. S. National Museum, 
1887-99; received the first Bigsby Medal from the 
Geological Society of London, 1877, and the Cuvier 
Prize from the Institute of France, 1897; LL.D. Har- 
vard, 1886; author; died 1899. 

OTHNIEL CHARLES MARSH, Ph.D., 
LL.D., Professor of Paleontology at Yale, 
was born in Lockport, New York, October 29, 
1 83 1, son of Caleb and Mary (Peabody) Marsh. 
His ancestors on both sides were of English origin, 
and were among the early settlers of New England. 
He was fitted for College at Phillips .Academy, .An- 
dover, Massachusetts, 185 2-1 85 6; graduated from 
Yale as Bachelor of .Arts in the Class of i860 and 
from the Sheffield Scientific School in 1862 : in the 
latter year he received from Yale the degree of 
Master of -Arts. From 1862 to 1865 he studied 
in the universities of Berlin, Breslau and Heidelberg, 
Germany. In 1866 he was appointed Professor of 
Paleontology at Yale, which position he held until 
his death. This Professorship was apparently the first 
one established in that branch of science, either 
in this country or elsewhere. Professor Marsh 
taught classes in geology at Yale, 1 866-1 S6S, 
and in 1867 was appointed Curator of the Geo- 
logical Collections at that institution. He received 
the first Bigsby medal from the Geological Society 
of London, 1877; and the Cuvier Prize for "the 



82 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



most remarkable work either on the Animal King- 
dom or on Geology " from the Institute of France, 
1897. Besides the degrees he held from Yale, the 
University of Heidelberg gave him the honorary 
degree of Doctor of Philosophy in 1886 and Har- 
vard conferred upon him the degree of Doctor of 
Laws in the same year. Professor Marsh was con- 
nected with many scientific societies, having been 
a fellow of the Geological Society of London ; a 
member of the Geological Society of Germany; 
corresponding member of the Boston Society 
of Natural History and of the New York Academy 




O. C. MARSH 

of Sciences ; and the Academy of Natural Sciences of 
Philadelphia ; a member of the American Philosoph- 
ical Society ; the National Academy of Sciences ; 
corresponding member of the Zoological Society of 
London and of the British Association for the Ad- 
vancement of Science ; corresponding member of 
the Biological Society of Washington ; member of 
the Socidt^ Imp^riale des Naturalistes, Moscow ; the 
Geological Society of America; correspondent for 
the Museum d'Histoire Naturelle, Paris; member 
of the Academic Royale des Sciences et des Lettres 
de Danemark ; the Geological Society of Washing- 
ton, and also member and honorary member of 
various other scientific bodies. He devoted him- 
self especially to the investigation of the extinct 



vertebrate animals of the Rocky Mountain districts, 
and organized various scientific expeditions to those 
regions. In these explorations more than a thou- 
sand new species of vertebrates were discovered, 
many of which represented new orders and others 
not before discovered in America. Of these, 
nearly five hundred species have been described 
by Professor Marsh in papers, more than two 
hundred and fifty in number, most of which have 
ajjpeared in the American Journal of Science. 
From 1S76 until his decease he was engaged in 
preparing a series of scientific monographs, to be 
piiblished by the Government, giving fully illustrated 
descriptions of his Western discoveries. The first 
of these volumes, on the Odontornithes, or birds 
with teeth (thirty-four plates) was issued in 18S0, 
and a second memoir, on the Dinocerata (fifty-six 
plates) appeared in 1884 ; a third volume, on 
the Sauropoda (ninety plates) was nearly com- 
pleted and others were in preparation when, on 
March iS, 1899, he died after a week's illness of 
pneumonia contracted as the result of a sudden 
chill. By his will, all of his property, both real and 
personal, with the exception of ^10,000 bequest to 
the National Academy of Sciences, was left to Yale. 
This included his library of about five thousand 
volumes, and shortly before his death he had 
presented to the University valuable scientific col- 
lections belonging to him. These collections 
six in number, were in many respects the most 
valuable in the country. The six divisions included 
^'ertebrate Fossils ; Fossil Footprints ; Invertebrate 
Fossils ; Recent Osteology ; American Archeology 
and Ethnology and Minerals, and they contained 
many specimens that can never be duplicated. It is 
not too much to say, that in his direct line of work. 
Professor Marsh was one of the leaders of the world. 



STANLEY, Anthony Dumond 

Yale B.A. 1830, M.A. 
Born in East Hartford, Conn., 1810; graduated Yale, 
1830; Tutor at Yale, 1832-36 ; Professor of Mathematics 
in the Scientific School, 1836-53 ; died 1853. 

ANTHONY DUMOND STANLEY, Professor 
of Mathematics at Yale, was born in East 
Hartford, Connecticut, April 2, 1810, and gradu- 
ated at Yale in the Class of 1830. Two years after 
graduation he was appointed Tutor in that institu- 
tion, in which capacity he served until in 1836, he 
was made Professor of Mathematics in the Scientific 
School. He filled this Chair to the time of his 
death, which occurred March 16, 1853. Professor 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



8 



3 



Stanley was an industrious author, jiublishing a 
number of standard mathematical works. Among 
these were a Treatise on Spherical (leometry and 
Trigonometry and Logarithms and other tables. 




in 1850 went to Germany where he studied at 
Berlin and Tubingen under the eminent Orientalists, 
Ropp, Weber and Roth. He returned to this coun- 
try to take the Chair of Sanskrit Language and 
Literature at Yale, to which he was appointed in 
1854. To this was added in 1870, the Professor- 
sliip of Comparative Philology, in which capacity 
he sen-ed to the time of his death in 1894. Pro- 
fessor Whitney ranked among the foremost Sanskrit 
scholars of the world, and his publications form the 
most extensive contribution to the study of Oriental 
languages made by any American. In other de- 
partments of philology, he produced works which 
have become recognized standards. Professor 
Whitney was a member and correspondent of many 
foreign scientific and learned associations, of the 
National Academy of Sciences in this country and 
first President of the American Philological .Asso- 
ciation. The University of Breslau conferred upon 
him the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in 1861, 
and he received that of Doctor of Laws from 
W'illiams in 1868, William and Mary in 1S69, 
Harvard in 1876 and Edinburgh in 1889. St. 



ANTHONY D. STANLEY 



He also assisted in the revision of Webster's Dic- 
tionary in 1847 and edited an edition of Day's 
.•\lgebra. A number of unfinished works were left 
by him in manuscript. 




WHITNEY, William Dwight 

Vale M.A. (Hon.) 1867 - Harvard LL. D. 1876 — Columbia 
L.H.D. 1887. 

Born in Northampton, Mass., 1827; graduated Wil- 
liams, 1845 ; studied Sanskrit in New Haven and at the 
German Universities, and in 1854 was appointed Pro- 
fessor at Yale, retaining the Chair of Sanskrit and 
Comparative Philology to the time of his death ; re- 
ceived the degree of Ph.D. from Breslau, LL.D. from 
Williams, William and Mary, Harvard, Edinburgh; 
J UD. from St. Andrews ; L.H.D, from Columbia ; died 
1894, 

WILLIAM DWIGHT WHITNP:V, Ph.D., 
LL.D., Professor of Comparative Phil- 
ology at Yale, was born in Northampton, Massa- 
chusetts, February g, 1827, and graduated at 
Williams in 1845. Having a bent for Oriental 

languages, he devoted his leisure to the study of Andrews (Scotland) gave him the degree of Doctor 
Sanskrit while occupied for three years as a clerk of Civil Law in 1S74, and Columbia that of Doctor 
in a bank in Northampton, then under the instruc- of Literature in 1S87. He died m New Haven, 
tion of Professor Edward E. Salisbury at Yale, and Connecticut, June 1894. 



W1LU.\.M D. WHITNEY 



84 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



HIGGINSON, Henry Lee 

Harvard AM. (Hon ) l88a. 
Born in New York City, 1834 ; studied at Harvard but 
did not graduate ; attained the rank of Major and 
Brevet-Lieutenant-Colonel in the Civil War ; is a well- 
known banker of Boston, and actively interested in 
preserving a taste for classical music in that city; is 
also interested in the welfare of Harvard, and was 
made a member of the College Corporation in 1893. 

HKNRV LEE HIGGINSON, A.M., Banker, 
and Fellow of the Harvard Corporation, 
was born in New York City, November 18, 1834. 
His first .American ancestor was the Rev. Francis 
Higginson, who came from Englanil in company 
with Deputy-Governor Dudley in 1629, and was 
the first settled minister in Salem, Massachusetts. 
Though not a graduate of Harvard, Henry L. 
Higginson studied nearly two years at the College, 
withdrawing prior to completing his Sophomore 
term. Joining the First Massachusetts Volunteer 
Cavalry he served with distinction in the Civil War, 
receiving a serious wound at Aldie, Virginia, and 
advancing by promotion to the rank of Major and 
was mustered out as Brevet Lieutenant-Colonel. 
He has acquired wealth as a banker in Boston, and 
is prominently identified with the financial interests 
of that city. Mr. Higginson, who is an ardent lover 
of music, established and for years sustained, until it 
reached a firm liasis, the Boston Symphony Orches- 
tra, partly for his own satisfaction and more especially 
with a view of preserving the public's taste for the 
highest forms of musical composition. He is also 
the leading spirit in the Music Hall corporation and 
conceived the scheme of the new building bearing 
that name. His zeal for the continued prosperity 
of Harvard, which gave him tiie honorary degree of 
Master of .Arts in 1882, has proved exceedingly 
beneficial, and he was elected a member of the Col- 
lege Corporation in 1S93. 



CHEEVER, David Williams 

Harvard A.B. 1852, M.D. 1858, LL.D. 1894. 
Born in Portsmouth, N. H., 1831 ; educated at Har- 
vard (1852) and Harvard Medical School; Demonstra- 
tor of Anatomy : Adjunct Professor of Clinical Surgery, 
Professor of Clinical Surgery and later of Surgery and 
Professor Emeritus at Harvard; Senior Surgeon Bos- 
ton City Hospital ; Editor Boston Medical and Surgical 
Journal; author of numerous papers. 

D AVI DWHJJAMS CHEEVER., M.D., LL.D., 
luiieritus Professor of Surgery at Har\'ard, 
was born in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, Novem- 
ber 30, 1831, his parents being Dr. Charles A. 



(Harvard 181 3) and .Adeline (Haven) Cheever. 
His grandfather was Dr. .Abijah Cheever (Harvard 
1779), one of the Surgeons in the Navy during the 
Revolution. David W. Cheever graduated at Har- 
vard in the Class of 1852, and at the Harvard 
Medical School in 1S58. In 1S94 he received the 
degree of Doctor of J>aws. He was first appointed 
Demonstrator of .Anatomy in 1861 and held that 
place until 1867, when he w'as appointed Assistant 
Professor of Anatomy ; since 1S68 .Adjunct Pro- 
fessor of Clinical Surgery. In 1875 he was made 
full Professor of Clinical Surgery and remained 




DA\ID W. CHEEVKR 

in that chair until 1S82 when he was appointed 
Professor of Surgery. In 1S93 he was made Pro- 
fessor Emeritus. He has practised his profession 
in Boston ; has published a volume of lectures on 
surgery, besides short papers ; has acted as Senior 
Surgeon in the Boston City Hospital, and has edited 
the Boston Medical and Surgical Journal. He is an 
e.x- President of the Massachusetts Medical Society. 



Dalton, Edward Barry 

Harvard A.B. 1855 - Columbia M.D. 1858. 

Born in Lowell, Mass., 1834; graduated at Harvard, 

1855, from College Physicians and Surgeons, 1858 ; 

Surgeon U. S. N. and U. S Volunteers, 1861-1865; 

Sanitary Superintendent New York Metropolitan 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



85 



Board of Health, 1866-1869; Instructor in Medicine at 
Harvard, 1870-1872; died 1872. 

EDWARD BARRV DALTON, M.D., Instruc- 
tor in the Theory and Practice of Medicine 
at Harvard, was born in Lowell, Massachusetts, 
September 21, 1834. He was graduated at Har- 
vard in 1855, and at the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons in 1858, after which he settled in New 
York, where he was House Physician at Belle\iie 
Hospital till May 1859 when he became Resident 
Physician of St. Luke's Hospital. At the opening 
of the Civil War in 1861 he volunteered as a Sur- 




EDWAKU B. DALTON 

geon, and first ser\ed in the Navy, as medical officer 
of the Gunboat " Quaker City, " then as Surgeon 
of the Thirty-Sixth New York Volunteers and after- 
wards as Surgeon of United States Volunteers. He 
was successively ^^edical Inspector of the Sixth Army 
Corps ; Medical Director of the Department of 
Virginia ; Chief Medical Officer of Depot Field- 
Hospitals, .Army of the Potomac and in the final 
campaign of 1865 accompanied the troops as Medical 
Director of the Ninth Army Corps. .After his dis- 
charge he was brevelted Lieutenant-Colonel and 
afterwards Colonel of Volunteers. Returning to New 
York at the close of the War, Dr. Dalton was 
appointed Sanitary Superintendent of the New York 
Metropolitan Board of Health in which capacity he 



originated the city ambulance system which has since 
been in use for the transportation of the sick and 
injured. Resigning in January 1869, he devoted 
some time to seeking recuperation for his shattered 
health. In 1870 he accepted an appointment as 
Instructor of the Theory and Practice of Medicine 
in the Medical School of Harvard where he con- 
tinued to officiate until 1872. His health continued 
to fail, however, and when on a visit to the Pacific 
coast he died, a victim to consumption, at Santa 
Barbara, California, May 13, 1872. Dr. Dalton was 
the author of various medical papers and sanitary 
reports. 

HALE, Edward 

Harvard A.B. 1879, S.T.B. 1886. 
Born in Northampton, Mass., 1858 : educated at 
Phillips-Exeter Academy, at Harvard (1879) and at the 
Harvard Divinity School ; Secretary to President 
Eliot; student in architect's office; Associate Minister 
South Congregational Church, Boston ; Minister First 
Unitarian Church, Orange, N. J.; Assistant Professor 
of Homiletics, Harvard Divinity School: President 
Benevolent Fraternity of Churches; President of New 
England Association of the Alumni of Phillips-Exeter 
Academy. 

EDWARD HALE, Assistant Professor of Hom- 
iletics at the Harvard Divinity School, was 
born in Northampton, Massachusetts, Fcbruar)' 22, 
1S58. His father, William Bainbridge Hale, was 
the son of Harry and Lucinda (Eddy) Hale, Harry 
Hale being the descendant of Thomas Hale the 
glover, of Newbury, Massachusetts. His mother 
was Harriet Amelia (Porter) Hale, who was the 
daughter of Wright and Harriet (Bailey) Porter. 
Until he was fourteen years of age Mr. Hale at- 
tended the public schools at Northampton. The 
next three years were spent at Phillips-Exeter 
.Academy, where he graduated in 1875, and the 
subsequent four years at Har\'ard, Class of 1879. 
.After three years spent as a private tutor in Rome, 
Italy, Mr. Hale returned to .America and was Sec- 
retary to President Charles W. Eliot for a year and 
then for six months a student in the office of H. H. 
Richardson, the well-known architect of Boston. 
Deciding at that time to enter the ministr)', he 
returned to Harvard as a student in the Divinity 
School and there graduated with the degree of 
Bachelor of Divinity. From 1S86 to 1891 Mr. 
Hale was .Associate Minister with Edward Everett 
Hale, D.D., in the South Congregational Church, 
Boston. Leaving this church to accept the charge 
of the First Unitarian Church at Orange, New 
Jersey, he there remained until 1897, when he was 



86 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



appointed Assistant Professor of Homiletics at the 
Harvard Divinity School. Professor Hale was 
President of the Benevolent Fraternity of Churches, 
Boston, 1887 to 1S90, and President of tiie New 




EDWARD HALE 

England Association of the Alumni of Phillips- 
Exeter Academy, 1 890-1 891. He married, June 
19, 1889, Emily Jose Milliken and has had two 
children : Emily and William Peabody Hale. 



MONKS, George Howard 

Harvard A.B. 1875, M.D. 1880. 
Born in Boston, Mass., 1853; educated at Harvard 
(18751, Harvard Medical School and abroad ; practised 
in Boston; Surgeon to the Boston Dispensary and 
Carney Hospital; Assistant Visiting Surgeon to the 
Boston City Hospital; Instructor in Clinical Surgery 
and Assistant in Operative Surgery at the Harvard 
Medical School : Instructor in Surgical Pathology at 
the Harvard Dental School; member of the Medical 
Improvement Society; and Society for Medical 
Sciences, etc. 

GEORGE HOWARD MONKS, M.D., Surgeon, 
Instructor in the Harvard Medical School, 
was born in Boston, Massachusetts, March 28, 1853, 
and is the son of John P. and Delia (Hatton) 
Monks. As a youth he attended the Boston Latin 
School and then entered Harvard where he received 
the degree of Bachelor of .Arts in 1875. During 
the year 1879-1880 he was Surgical House Officer 



at the Massachusetts General Hospital, and from 
1880 to 1884 he studied in Europe, receiving a 
diploma of membership in the Royal College of 
Surgeons in I'lngland. Since 1884 Dr. Monks has 
practised his profession in Boston. He has been 
Surgeon to the Boston Dispensary and Carney 
Hospital, and is now Assistant Visiting Surgeon to 
the Boston City Hospital, and Instructor in Clinical 
Surgery and Assistant in Operative Surgery at the 
Harvard Medical School : also Instructor in Surgical 
i'athology at the Harvard Dental School, .\mong 
the societies to which he belongs are the Medical 
Improvement Society and the Society for Medical 
Sciences. 



TORREY, Joseph, Jr. 

Harvard Ph D 1896. 
Born in East Hardwick, Vt., 1862 ; educated at Bow- 
doin and in post-graduate study at Harvard ; Assistant 
in Chemistry Lafayette College, Penn. ; Professor in 
Chemistry Iowa College ; Assistant in Chemistry, Har- 
vard ; Instructor in Chemistry. 

JOSEPH TORREY, Jr., Ph.D., Instructor in 
Chemistry at Harvard, was born in East 
Hardwick, Vermont, July i8, 1S62. His parents 




JOSEPH TORREY, JR. 

were Joseph and Maria Thorpe (Noble) Torrey. He 
claims descent on his father's side from the Torreys 
of Weymouth, (Captain William Torrey) and from 
Rev. Manassah Cutler, and on his mother's side 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



S; 



from Admiral Jar\'is and Noel Bouton, Marshal of 
France. He is the seventh Joseph Torrey in direct 
descent, the name passing from father to eldest son. 
From the High School at Yarmouth, Maine, formerly 
North Varmoutii Academy, he entered Bowdoin 
where he graduated in 1884. The year 1884-1885 
was spent as .Assistant in Chemistry at Lafayette 
College, Pennsylvania, the next five years as Pro- 
fessor of Chemistry at Iowa College, Grinnell, Iowa. 
In 1890 Professor Torrey came to Harvard as a 
Morgan Fellow in Chemistry, but was soon made 
Assistant in Chemistry. A year later and for the 
succeeding years until 1894 he received the annual 
appointment as Instructor in Chemistry, and then 
was made permanent Instructor. In 1896 he re- 
ceived the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. Pro- 
fessor Torrey married August 28, 1887, Elizabeth 
Chandler Vose and has two children : Joseph and 
Mabel Cutler Torrev. 



HYDE, Clement CoUester 

Harvard A.B. 1892. 
Born in Gardner, Mass., 1871 ; educated at Harvard 
College ( 1892) and at Harvard Graduate School ; Assist- 
ant in Physics at Harvard and Radcliffe College ; In- 
structor at the Hartford (Conn.) High School; has 
been Gas Inspector of Hartford; member of the Con- 
necticut Valley Harvard Club. 

CLEMENT COLLESTER HYDE was born 
in Gardner, Massachusetts, June 27, 187 1, 
and is the son of John Milton and Mary Sawyer 
(\Vhitney) Hyde. On his father's side he is 
descended from Jonathan Hyde, who settled in 
Newton, Massachusetts, in 1647 ; on his mother's 
side from John Whitney, who came from England 
to Watertown, Massachusetts, in 1635. In 1892 
he received his degree of Bachelor of .Vrts at 
Harvard, and then spent the ne.xt two years in the 
Graduate School. During these two years he was 
.Assistant in Physics at Harvard and Radcliffe. In 
1894 he was appointed Instructor in the Hartford 
(Connecticut) High School. Mr. Hyde also served 
in 1 896-1 898 as gas inspector of Hartford. He is 
a member of the Connecticut Valley Harvard Club 
and several teachers' and scientific associations. 



CUMMINGS, John 

Harvard A B 1891, M.A., 1892. 
Born in Colebrook, N. H, 1868; educated at Har- 
vard (1891), at the Harvard Graduate School and at 
the University of Chicago : Instructor at Harvard. 

JOHN CU.>LMINGS, A.M., Instructor in Politi- 
cal Economy at Han'ard, was born in Cole- 
brook, New Hampshire, May i8, 1868, and is the 



son of Edward Noris and Lucretia Frances (Mer- 
rillj Cummings. After receiving a youth's educa- 
tion at the public schools of Woburn and Lynn, 
Massachusett.s, he entered Harvard, where he 
graduated in 1891, and then continued study for 
two years at the Harvard Graduate School and 




J. CU.M.MIXGS 



Still another year at the University of Chicago, taking 
there the doctor's degree. He was appointed in 
1894 Instructor in Political Economy at Har\ard. 



WATSON, Benjamin Marston 

Harvard A B. 1870. 
Born in Plymouth, Mass., 1848; educated at Harvard 
(18701; in nursery business at Plymouth; Instructor in 
Horticulture at Harvard, 1877. 

BENJAMIN MARSTON W.Al'SON, Instructor 
in Horticulture at Har\'ard, was bom in 
Plymouth, Massachusetts, November 24, 1848. His 
father was Benjamin Marston, son of Benjamin M. 
and grandson of John Watson. His mother was 
Mary (Russell) Watson. After passing through the 
Plymouth High School Mr. Watson entered Harvard 
College in the Class of 1870. From the year of his 
graduation until 1877 he was engaged in the nurser)- 
business at Plymouth. Since the latter year he has 
been an Instructor in Horticulture at the Bussey 
Institution (Harvard) . Mr. Watson is a member of 
the Massachusetts Horticultural Society and several 
social organizations. 



88 



UNiyERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



CUTLER, Elbridge Gerry 

Harvard A.B. 1868, M.D. 1872. 
Born in Farmington, Me., 1846; educated at Phillips- 
Exeter Academy; Harvard (i868) ; Harvard Medical 
School and abroad ; House Officer Massachusetts 
General Hospital; has practised medicine in Boston; 
Assistant, then Instructor in the Harvard Medical 
School ; member of Boston Society for Medical Im- 
provement, Association of American Physicians, etc. 

ELBRIDGE GERRY CUTLER, M.D., In- 
structor in the Theory and Practice of Medi- 
cine at Harvard, was born in Farmington, Maine, 
September 7, 1S46. His mother was Abby Daunty 
Belcher ; his father was John Lewis Cutler, who was 
the son of Nathan Cutler of Warren, Massachusetts, 
at one time President of the Massachusetts Senate 
and acting Governor of Maine. Mr. Cutler traces 
his ancestry back to James Cutler of England who 
settled in U'atertown in 1634. After passing through 
Framington (Maine) Academy anil Phillips-Exeter 
Academy, he entered Harvard where he received 
the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1868 and Doctor 
of Medicine in 1872. For the year previous to 
graduation he was House Officer of the Massachusetts 
General Hospital. His study of medicine was con- 
tinued for two years in Germany, France and Eng- 
land, and then in 1875 he began the practice of 
his profession in Boston, where he has remained 
ever since. From 1876 to 1881 he was Assistant 
in Pathology at the Harvard Medical School, from 
1 88 1 to 1888 was Instructor in Auscultation and 
from 1888 to date has been Instructor in the Theory 
and Practice of Medicine. Dr. Cutler is a member 
of the Massachusetts Medical Society, the Boston 
Society for Medical Improvement, the Association 
of American Physicians and several social organiza- 
tions. He married, October 8, 1885, Fanny Gore 
Bradford, and has two children : Anna Williams and 
George Hillard Bradford Cutler. 



ROMANS, John 

Harvard A.B. 1858, M.D. 1862. 
Born in Boston, Mass., 1836; graduated at Harvard, 
1858, and Medical School, 1862; completed his studies 
in Europe : served professionally in the Civil War ; 
Surgeon at several Boston Hospitals ; specialist in 
abdominal surgery; Clinical Instructor in the Diag- 
nosis and Treatment of Ovarian Tumors at Harvard 
since 1881. 

JOHN HOMANS, M.D., Surgeon, and Clinical 
Instructor at Harvard, was bom in Boston, 
Massachusetts, November 26, 1836, son of Dr. John 
Homans (Harvard, 18 12). His father was a physi- 
cian in Boston until 1867, and his grandfather, who 
graduated at Harvard in 1772, served as a Surgeon 



in the Revolutionary War, was present at the Battle 
of Bunker Hill, and was an original member of the 
Society of the Cincinnati. From the Boston Latin 
School John Homans 2d entered Harvard, gradu- 
ating from the Academic Department in 1858 and 
from the Medical School in 1862. Prior to entering 
the army he was House-Surgeon at the Massachu- 
setts General Hospital and in the service he was 
advanced to the rank of Division Surgeon-in-Cliief, 
and was Medical Inspector on General Sheridan's 
staff. The two years following his discharge from 
the army were spent in study abroad, and resuming 
the practice of his profession upon his return, he has 
ever since been busily engaged in private and hospi- 
tal work in his native city. Dr. Homans was for 
some time Surgeon at the Children's and Carney 
Hospitals and the Boston Dispensary ; was later 
appointed a Visiting Surgeon to the Massachusetts 
General Hospital, and has gained a high reputation 
in his specialty, that of abdominal surgery. Since 
1 88 1 he has been a conspicuous figure at the clinics 
of the Harvard Medical School as Instructor in the 
Diagnosis and Treatment of Ovarian Tumors. In 
Boston on December 4, 1872, he was joined in mar- 
riage with Helen Amory Perkins, and they have had 
six children. Dr. Homans is a member of the Mili- 
tary Historical Society of Massachusetts, the Boston 
Society for Medical Improvement and the American 
Academy of Arts and Sciences. He is a frequent 
contributor to Medical Literature. 



FRIZELL, Arthur Bowes 

Harvard A.B. 1893. 

Born in Boston, Mass., 1865; educated at the Massa- 
chusetts Institute of Technology and at Harvard 
(1893); Assistant at the Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology; Instructor at the New York University; 
Instructor at Harvard; member of the American 
Mathematical Society. 

ARTHUR BOWES FRIZELL, Instructor in 
Mathematics at Harvard, was born in Bos- 
ton, Massachusetts, July 14, 1865. His parents 
were Joseph Palmer and Julia Anna (Bowes) Frizell. 
On the maternal side he is descended from Henry 
Lamprey who settled in Hampton, New Hampshire 
about 1660, and from Edmund Johnson also of 
Hampton not later than 1640. On his father's side 
he is sixth in descent from James Frizell who was 
born in Scotland in 1697, was probably one of 
Cromwell's prisoners at Worcester or Dunbar, and 
who lived in Roxbury, Massachusetts, from 1656 to 
171 7. From the sub-freshman class of the Univer- 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



89 



sity of Minnesota Mr. Frizell turned to the Massa- natural philosophy and Latin translation. Declining 
chusetts Institute of Technology, where he spent a commission in the Hessian troops, he emigrated 
three years as a special student. This course was to America, in opposition to the wishes of his 
followed by two years at Harvard, where he received family, to " drink in a love of independence in the 

freest country of the Universe." He arrived at 
Boston in July 1780, and eng.nged in several trad- 
ing ventures with poor success, but for a time sup- 
ported himself by giving lessons in the French 
language. In this capacity he was appointed In- 
structor at Harvard, not receiving a regular appoint- 
ment but being permitted by the Corporation to 
teach such students as so desired. The compensa- 
tion which he received from the Corporation was 
$300. A successful investment in Virginia lands 
attracted him to that state, where he settled in 
1784, in that locality which is now Fayette county 
in Pennsylvania. His political career began at this 
period. He became a member of the Legislature 
and was elected to the United States Senate in 
1 793, but was not allowed to retain his seat by 
reason of defective naturalization. Becoming eligi- 
ble in 1795, he was elected Representative in 
Congress, holding his seat in that body until called 



AKIHL'R B. FRIZELL 

the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1893. Mean- 
while, in 1 888-1 89 1, he had been Assistant in 
Mathematics at the Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology. In 1895 he was appointed Instructor of 
Mathematics at New York University and held that 
position for a year. In 1897 he was made Instruc- 
tor of Mathematics at Harvard. Mr. Frizell is a 
member of the American Mathematical Society and 
of the Order of the White Rose. 




GALLATIN, Albert 

Columbia LL.D. (Hon.) 1841. 
Born in Geneva, Switzerland, 1761 ; graduated Uni- 
versity of Geneva, 1779; emigrated to America, 1780; 
Instructor in French at Harvard, 1782-83 ; removed to 
Virginia, 1784; elected to the United States Senate, 
1793; member of Congress 1795-1801; Secretary of the 
Treasury 1801-14; U. S. Minister to France, 1815-23; 
Envoy Extraordinary to Great Britain, 1826 ; died 
1849. 

ALBERT GALLATIN, Statesman, and Instruc- 
tor at Harvard, was born in Geneva, Switzer- 
land, January 29, 1761, and graduated at the Univer- 
sity of Geneva in 1779, standing first in mathematics, 




ALBERT GALLAriN 



by President Jefferson to take the Portfolio of 
Secretary of the Treasury in his Cabinet in 1801. 
In this position he soon acquired a reputation as 
one of the greatest financiers of the age. Gallatin 



90 



UNIVERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



continued as Secretary of the Treasury through 
Jefferson's two terms, was retained by Madison in 
the same position, and resigned in 1814 to serve, 
with James A. Bayanl, as United States Commis- 
sioner to treat for peace with Great Britain. The 
Treaty of Ghent is regarded as his special work. 
He was subsequently in 1815-1823, United States 
Minister to France and served the Government in 
otlier representative capacities, finally taking up his 
residence in New York, where from 1831 to 1S39 
he was President of the National Bank of New York. 
He died in Astori.i, Long Island, .\ugust 12, 1849. 

WOOD, Edward Stickney 

Harvard A.B. 1867, M.D. 1871, A.M. 1872. 
Born in Cambridge, Mass ; graduated at Harvard, 
1867: M.D, 1871 ; Assistant Professor in Harvard 
Medical School. 1871-76; Professor from 1876. 

EDWARD STICKNEY WOOD, M.D., Profes- 
sor of Chemistry in the Harvard Medical 
School, was born in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and 



.Arts from Harvard in 1S72 and is a member of the 
.-American .Academy of Arts and Sciences and other 
learned associations. 




EDW.AKD S. \\'OOU 

graduated at Harvard in 1867. He pursued his 
studies in the Harvard .Medical School, receiving the 
degree of Doctor of Medicine in 187 1, and the same 
year was appointed .Assistant Professor of Chemis- 
try in that school. He was made full Professor of 
Chemistry in 1S76 and has held that Chair ever 
since. Dr. \\'ood received the degree of Master of 



SAFFORD, Frederic Hollister 

Harvard A.M. 1894. 
Born in Lawrence, Mass., 1866; educated at the 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology and at the 
Harvard Graduate School; Instructor Brewster Acad- 
emy, Wolfboro, N. H.; Instructor at Harvard; Assis- 
tant Professor at the University of Cincinnati. 

FREDERIC HOLLISTER SAFFORD, Ph.D., 
Instructor at Harvard, was born in Lawrence, 
Massachusetts, June 20, i866, and is the son of 




F. H. S.AFFORD 

Joseph Henfield and Sarah Lodemi (Hollister) 
Siififord. From the Lawrence High School he 
passed into the Massachusetts Institute of Technol- 
ogy, where he received the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in 1888. The next few years were spent as 
Instructor in Science and Mathematics at Brewster 
Academy, ^Volfboro, New Hampshire. But in 1893 
Mr. Safford took up his studies again, entering the 
Harvard Graduate School and there receiving the 
degree of Master of .Arts in 1894 and Doctor of 
Philosophy in 1897. In 1895 he was appointed 
Instructor in Mathematics at Harvard and held that 
position until 1899 when he was made Assistant 
Professor of Mathematics and Mathematical Physics 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



91 



at the University of Cincinnati, Ohio. He married. 
January i, 1891, .Annie Barnard Flint of Andover, 
Massachusetts. 



ophy. The next year was spent in study at the 
University of Berlin and at the Sorbonne. Return- 
ing from abroad he was immediately made Assistant 
in Philosophy at Harvard, but resigned that position 
in the same year (1896) to become Instructor in 
Philosophy at Western Reser\'e. In 1897 he was 
Born in Dewittville, Quebec, 1866 ; educated at Mc- promoted to Associate Professor of Pedagogy but 
Gill University, at Harvard and at the Universities of 



MacDOUGALL, Robert 

Harvard A.M 1893, Ph.D. 1895 



Berlin and Paris ; missionary in the Lake Superior 
Mining Region; member of the Field Staff of the 
Canadian Geological Survey; Assistant in Philoso- 
phy and later Associate Professor in Pedagogy at 
Western Reserve ; Instructor in Psychology at Har- 
vard; member of the Natural History Society of 
Ottawa, the Cleveland Council of Sociology and the 
American Psychological Society. 

ROBERT M.AcDOUGALL, Pli.D., Instructor in 
Western Reserve College, was born in 
Dewittville, Quebec, Canada, June 12, 1866. He 




ROBERT MacDOUG.ALL 

is of Scotch descent, his father being William Mac- 
Dougall, and his mother being Christina (McPher- 
son) MacDougall. At McGill University Montreal, 
Mr. MacDougall received the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts in the year 1890, and then divided the ne.xt 
two years in work first as missionary in the Lake 
Superior Mining Region, and then as a member of 
the Field Staff of the Canadian Geological Survey. 
From 1892 to 1895 he was at Harvard, and in the 
latter year received the degree of Doctor of Philos- 



m 1S9S returned again to Harvard to become In- 
stmctor in Psychology. Mr. MacDougall has been 
a member of the Natural History Society of Ottawa, 
the Cleveland Council of .Sociolog)', and the Amer- 
ican Psychological Society, as well as numerous 
College Associations, and is both a member and 
Executive Councillor of the New England Graduate 
Society of McGill University. He married, June 
23, 1898, Carita Atwill Chapman, and has one 
child, a daughter. 



SIBLEY, John Langdon 

Harvard A.B. 1825, S.T.B. 1828. 
Born in Union, Me., 1804; studied at Phillips-Exeter 
Academy; graduated Harvard, 1825; appointed As- 
sistant Librarian, 1825 ; studied at Harvard Divinity 
School and settled as Pastor of the First Church in 
Stow, Massachusetts, 1829 ; resumed connection with 
the Harvard Library in 1841, as Assistant, and became 
Librarian in 1856 ; Librarian Emeritus, 1877 to the 
time of his death; A.M (honorary) Bowdoin, 1856; 
died 1885. 

JOHN LANGDON SIBLEY, A.M., Librarian 
of Harvard, was born in Union, Maine, Dec- 
ember 29, 1804, the son of Dr. Jonathan and Persis 
(Morse) Sibley, pursued his preparatory studies at 
Phillips-Exeter Academy, and was graduated at 
Harvard in the Class of 1825. He at once entered 
the Divinity School, at the same time receiving the 
appointment of .Assistant Librarian in the Harvard 
Library, in which position he served until, having 
completed his course in theology, he was ordained 
and settled as Pastor of the First Church in Stow, 
Massachusetts, in 1829. When the Library was 
removed from Harvanl Hall to Gore Hall, in 1S41, 
Mr. Sibley was again appointed .Assistant Librarian, 
filling that position until 1S56, when he succeeded 
Dr. T. W. Harris as Librarian. He continued in 
charge of the Library for twenty-one years, handing 
over the active duties of the position to Justin Winsor 
in 1877 but retaining his connection as Librarian 
Emeritus until the time of his death, in 1885. Mr. 
Sibley's services to the Library were invaluable, and 
in addition to his regular official duties, he edited 
all the triennial catalogues of Harvard from 1840, 
and the annual catalogue from 1850 to 1870. M- 



92 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



though not a man of large wealth, he made most 
generous gifts to the Exeter Academy, especially in 
provision for aid to students of slender means, 
manv of whom he assisted personally. Mr. Sibley 




JOHN LANGDON SIliLEV 

received in 1S56, the honorary degree of Master of 
Arts from Bowdoin, was a fellow of the American 
Academy and for many years an active member of 
the Massachusetts Historical Society. 



two years. Going to F.\irope for the purpose of 
completing his education, he studied at the Ecole 
des Mines in Paris, and at the Universities of 
Giessen and Berlin, and passed five years at these 
institutions and in travelling upon the continent. 
On his return to this country in 1847, he engaged 
in the Geological exploration of the Lake Superior 
Region, and in 1849 ^^^s appointed United States 
Geologist for that district. Upon the completion 
of this work he travelled for two years through the 
states east of the Mississippi for the purpose of 
collecting information regarding the mining and 
mineral resources of the country, the results of 
which appeared in The Metallic Wealth of the 
United States, described and compared with that 
of other Countries, giving very full statistics of the 
production of the metals in the different countries 
of the world. He was appointed in 1855 State 
Chemist and Professor in the State University of 
Iowa and was associated with Professor James Hall 
in the Geological Survey of that State. In i860 
he was appointed State Geologist of California, and 
was engaged in a scientific survey of that state for 



WHITNEY, Josiah Dwight 

Yale B.A 1839, LL.D. 1870. 
Born in Northampton, Mass., 1819 ; graduated at 
Yale, 1839; Assistant Geologist N. H. State Survey, 
1840-42 : studied abroad 1842-47 ; U. S. Geologist for 
the Lake Superior Land District, 1849; State Chemist 
and Professor in University of Iowa, 1855; State Geol- 
ogist of California. 1860-74; Sturgis-Hooper Professor 
of Geology, Harvard, 1865; University Lecturer, 1868: 
Dean of the School of Mining Engineering, 1868-75 ; 
LL.D. Yale 1870; died 1896. 

JOSIAH DWIGHT WHITNEY, I.L.D., Pro- 
fessor of Geology at Harvard, was born in 
Northampton, Massachusetts, November 23, 1819, 
the son of Josiah Dwiglu and Sarah (\\'illiston) 
Whitney. He graduated at Yale in 1839 and after 

passing six months in the chemical laboratory of fourteen years, until the work was discontinued by 
Dr. Robert Hare, in Philadelphia, he was appointed the Legislature. He was also occupied from 1858 
Assistant Geologist on the survey of New Hamp- to i860, in a survey of the land-region of the Upper 
shire, with which work he was connected for nearly Mississippi. His connection with Harvard dated 




J. D. WHUNEV 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



from 1S65, when he was appointed Sturgis-Hooper 
Professor of Geology in the School of Mining and 
Practical Geology, which was made by its founder 
a separate Chair in 1874. This position he held 
until his death, which occurred suddenly at Lake 
Sunapee, New Hampshire, August 19, 1896. Pro- 
fessor Whitney was one of the original members of 
the National Academy of Sciences designated by 
Act of Congress in 1863. Mt. Whitney, the high- 
est mountain in the United States outside of Alaska, 
was named in his honor. Tlie degree of Doctor of 
Laws was conferred upon him by Yale in 1870. 



pointed Curator of the Herbarium at Han-ard, 
which position he filled until his death in 1892! 
From 1 88 1 to 1884 he was also University Lecturer 
in Phytography at Harvard. Dr. Watson was the 
author of a number of standard works on Botany. 
He was a fellow of the American Academy and 



WILLSON, Robert Wheeler 

Harvard A.B. 1873. 
Born in West Roxbury, Mass., 1853; educated at 
Harvard (1873) and at Wurzburg; connected with the 
Argentine National Observatory and later with Har- 
vard College Observatory: Tutor in Physics at Har- 
vard ; connected with Yale Observatory ; Instructor in 
Astronomy at Harvard ; Assistant Professor of As- 
tronomy at Harvard. 

ROBERT WHEELER WILLSON, Ph.D., As- 
sistant Professor of Astronomy at Harvard, 
was born in West Roxbury, Massachusetts, July 20, 
1853, and is the son of Edmund Burke and ALartha 
Ann (Buttrick) Willson. He graduated at Harvard 
in 1873 and obtained the degree of Doctor of Phil- 
osophy at Wiirzburg in 1886. Before going to 
Europe for study, however, he had been connected 
in 1873 with the Argentine National Observatory, in 
1874 with the Harvard College Observatory, and for 
several years after 1875 with Harvard as Tutor in 
Physics, and then in 1881 with Yale College Observ- 
atory. He was appointed Listructor of Astronomy 
at Harvard in 1891, and Assistant Professor of -As- 
tronomy 1899. Mr. Willson married, Dec. 14, 1S81, 
Annie Downing West of Salem, l\Lassachusetts. 



I>v1fe- 



WATSON, Sereno 

Vale B.A. 1847, M.A. 
Born in East Windsor Hill, Conn , i825; graduated 
at Yale, 1847; Botanist U. S. Geological Survey of the 
Fortieth Parallel, 1867-71 ; Instructor in Phytography 
at Harvard, 1881-84; Curator of Harvard Herbarium, 
1874-92; Ph.D., Iowa College, 1878; died 1892. 

SERENO W.\TSON, Ph.D., Botanist, Curator of 
the Harvard Herbarium, was born in East 
Windsor Hill, Connecticut, December i, 1S26, and 
graduated at Yale in the Class of 1847. He was 
attached as Botanist to the United States Geological 
Survey of tho Fortieth Parallel, under Clarence 
King, from 1867 to 1871, and in 1874 was ap- 



-^ i 





SKREN'O W A I M IN- 

member of the .American .Association for the .Ad- 
\ ancement of Science. Iowa College conferred upon 
liim the degree of Doctor of I'hilosophy in 1878. 



WOLFF, John Eliot 

Harvard A.B. 1879, Ph. D. and A.M. 1889. 
Born in Montreal, Canada, 1857; educated at Adams 
Academy, Quincy, at Harvard (1879); engaged in 
geological surveys ; Instructor at Harvard, Assistant 
Professor; Professor; member of various scientific 
societies. 

JOHN ELIOT WOLFF, Ph.D., Professor of 
Petrography and Mineralogy at Harvard, was 
born in Montreal, Canada, November 21, 1S57. 
His father, Phillippe Wolflf, was a clergj'man, born 
in Geneva, Switzerland, and descended from Ger- 
man ancestry mingled witli French Huguenot and 
Swiss. His mother, Hannah Crocker Bowles Wolff, 
belongs to the noted New England fltmily of Bowles. 
.Mr. Wolff's early education w.as obtained in Mon- 
treal and by three years' study in SwiUerland 



94 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



and Germany, followed by a course at the Adams 
Academy, Quincy, Massachusetts. Entering Har- 
vard he received the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 
1 87 9 and Doctor of Philosophy in 1889. For 




JOHN ELUjr WOLFF 

seven years after graduating he was engaged in 
various geological surveys in the eastern and north- 
western states, with a year and a half abroad for 
study. Then he was appointed Instructor in Pet- 
rography at Harvard, in 1892 was made Assistant 
Professor and in 1895 was made Professor. He is 
also Curator of the Mineralogical Museum. Pro- 
fessor Wolff is a member of various scientific 
societies. He married in 1SS7, Ethel Pumpelly 
Loder and has two children : Philip and Henry 
Ensrelbert Wolff. 



SOPHOCLES, Evangelinus Apostolides 

Harvard A.M. (Hon.) 1847, LL.D. (Hon.) 1868 — Yale A.M. (Hon.) 
1837. 

Born in Tzangarada, Greece, 1807; came to America 
and studied at Amherst College, but did not take a de- 
gree ; Tutor in Greek at Harvard, 1842-49; Assistant 
Professor of Greek, 1859 ; Professor of Ancient, Byzan- 
tine and Modern Greek, i860 ; AM. Harvard and Yale ; 
LL.D. Harvard and Western Reserve; died 1883. 

EVAXGELINUS APOSTOLIDES SOPHO- 
CLES, LL.D., Professor of Greek at Har- 
vard, was born in Tzangarada, a village of Greece, 



situated near Mount Pelion, in 1807. His youth 
was passed for a considerable time in the Convent 
of Mount Sinai, chietly in the Cairo branch, and at 
the age of twenty-one he came to the United States 
under the auspices of the American Board of Com- 
missioners for Foreign Missions and pursued his 
studies in the Academy at Monson, Massachusetts, 
and at Amherst College where he took up a partial 
course. For a number of years he taught in schools 
in Amherst, Massachusetts, and Hartford and New 
Haven, Connecticut, and in 1842 was appointed 
Tutor in Greek at Harvard, holding that position 
until 1849 with the exception of two years in which 
he was absent through ill health. After a visit to 
his native country in 1850 he returned to America 
and occupied hitnself in the preparation of his great 
work, the Greek Dictionary of the Roman and 
Byzantine Periods. He was called to Harvard in 
1859 as Assistant Professor of Greek, and in i860 
was appointed to the Chair of Ancient, Byzantine 
and Modern Greek, which he held to the time of 
his death in 1883. Professor Sophocles received 
the honorary dearree of Master of Arts from Vale in 




E. A. SOPHOCLES 

1837 and from Harvard in 1847 ; that of Doctor of 
Laws from Harvard in 1868 and from the Western 
Reserve in 1862. He was a fellow of the American 
Academy. 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



95 



GOODWIN, William Watson 

Harvard A.B. 1851, LL.D. 1891 Columbia LL.D. 1887. 
Born in Concord, Mass., 1831 ; graduated at Harvard, 
1851 ; studied in German Universities ; Tutor at Har- 
vard, 1856-60; Eliot Professor of Greek Literature, 
since i860; first Director of American School at 
Athens, Greece, 1882 ; Ph.D. Gbttingen, 1885; LL.D., 
Harvard, Amherst, Columbia, Cambridge, (England), 
Edinburgh (Scotland); D.C.L., Oxford, (England), 1890. 

WILLIAM WATSON GOODWIN, Ph.D., 
LL.D., D.C.L., Eliot Professor of Greek 
Literature at Harvard, son of Hersey Bradford and 




W. W. GOC.lLAVlN 

Lucretia Ann (Watson) Goodwin, was born in Con- 
cord, Massachusetts, May 9, 1831. He was grad- 
uated at Harvard in the Class of 1851, and passed 
several years in study at the Universities of C^ot- 
tingen, Bonn and Berlin, Germany, obtaining the 
degree of Doctor of Philosophy from (Jottingen in 
1855. Returning to this country, he was made 
Tutor in Greek and Latin at Harvard, in 1856, and 
in i860 Eliot Professor of Greek Literature, which 
Chair he still occupies. Professor Goodwin was 
the first Director of the American School of Clas- 
sical Studies at Athens, Greece, in 1882-1883, and 
received from the King of Greece the decoration 
of Knight of the Cross of the Saviour. He is a 
fellow of the American Academy, the Massachu- 
setts Historical Society, antl member of many other 
learned societies in this country and in Europe. 



He was twice elected President of the American 
Philological Association. The degree of Doctor 
of Laws has been conferred upon him by Am- 
herst (1881), Cambridge, England, (1883), 
Columbia (1887), Edinburgh, Scotland, (1890), 
Harvard, (1891), and that of Doctor of Civil Law 
by O.xford, England, (1890). 

MASON, David Haven 

Harvard L. S. Class of 1844. 
Born in Sullivan, N. H., 1818; graduated Dartmouth. 
1841 ; admitted to the Suffolk Bar, 1843; Member of 
the Massachusetts State Board of Education, i860; 
Representative to the Legislature from Newton, 1863 
and subsequently Overseer, Harvard 1864-70; U. S. 
Attorney for Massachusetts, 1870-73; died 1873. 

DAVID HA\EN MASON, Overseer of Har- 
vard, was born in Sullivan, New Hampshire, 
March 17, 1818, the son of John and Mary 
(Haven) Mason, and graduated at Dartmouth in 
the Class of 184 1. He was admitted to the Bar in 
Suffolk county, Massachusetts, on the completion of 
his legal studies in 1843, and after a residence of 
five years in Boston removed to Newton where he 




U.AVID H. MASON 



remained until his death. Mr. ^L^son was actively 
interested in schools, and during his ser\ice on the 
State Board of Education, to which he was ap- 
pointed in i860, was influential in establisliing the 



96 



UNIVERSITIES AND rilEIR SONS 



State Normal School at Framingham. In Newton 
he secured the erection of a new high school builii- 
ing and his services are commemorated in the 
Mason Public School in that city, named for him. 
He represented Newton in the State House of 
Representatives in 1863, 1S66 and 1867, but de- 
clined nominations to the State Senate and to 
Congress. Mr. Mason was appointed by President 
Grant to be United States Attorney for Massachu- 
setts, upon the resignation of George S. Hillard in 
1870, and he held that ottice to the time of his 
death, May 20, 1873. He married, in 1845, Sarah, 
daughter of John Hazen and Roxanna (White) 
Wilson, of Rutland, Massachusetts. 



SANGER, George Partridge 

Harvard A B. 1840, LL B. 1844- 
Born in Dover, Mass., i8ig: graduated Harvard, 1840 ; 
Proctor, 1842; Tutor, 1843-46; graduate of Law School, 
1844; Assistant U S. District Attorney, 1849; District 
Attorney for Suffolk, 1853, and 1861-66; Justice of the 
Court of Common Pleas, 1854-69; member of the Bos- 
ton Common Council, i85o; Representative in the 
Legislature, 1873; U. S. District Attorney, 1873-82; 
died 1890. 

GEORGE P.^RTRIDGE SANGER, Lawyer 
and Judge, was born in Dover, Massachu- 
setts, November 27, 181 9, son of Ralph and Char- 
lotte (Kingman) Sanger, lineal descendant of 
Richard Sanger, who settled in Hingham, Massachu- 
setts in 1636. Mr. Sanger was graduated at Har- 
vard in the Class of 1840, and after teaching school 
at Portsmouth, New Hampshire, two years, he 
entered the Harvard Law School, receiving the 
appointment of Proctor. The following year he 
was made Tutor, a position which he held until 
1846, at the same time pursuing his law studies, 
and took the degrees of Master of .•\rts and Bachelor 
of Laws in course. He was admitted to the Bar in 
1846, and after practising in Boston for three years, 
he was appointed Assistant District Attorney of the 
United States, for the District of Massachusetts, re- 
taining this position during the Fillmore adminis- 
tration. In 1853 he became District Attorney for 
the Suffolk District, and in the following year was 
appointed a Judge of the Court of Common Pleas, 
retaining his seat on that Bench until the court was 
abolished in 1869. He was again appointed Dis- 
trict Attorney in the Suffolk District in 1861, and 
continued in that office by three re-elections until 
he declined to serve longer. He was a member 
of the State House of Representatives in 1873, ^"d 



in the same year was appointed by President Grant 
United States .Attorney for the District of Massa- 
chusetts, which office he held through reappoint- 
ment by President Hayes in 1877 and President 
Arthur in 1882. Judge Sanger served on the School 
Committee of Charlestown and the Board of Alder- 
men of that city before its annexation to Boston, 
and was a member of the Boston Common Council 
in 1870. By appointment of the Legislature in 
i860, together with Judge William A. Richardson, 
he prepared the General Statutes of i860 and the 
annual Supplements for twenty-one years. He 




GEORGE p. SANGER 

married in 1846, Elizabeth Sherburne Thompson of 
Portsmouth, New Hampshire, of which union there 
are four sons living, all graduates of Harvard. Judge 
Sanger died in Swampscott, Massachusetts, July 3, 
1890. 



STORER, Malcolm 

Harvard A.B. 1885, M.D. 1889. 
Born in Milton, Mass, 1862; educated at Harvard 
(A.B. 1885) and the Harvard Medical School (1889); 
Curator of Coins in the Harvard College Library; As- 
sistant in Gynecology in the Harvard Medical School. 

MALCOLM STORER, M.D., Curator of Coins 
in the Harvard College Library, was born 
in ^Milton, Massachusetts, .\pril 26, 1862 and is the 



UNIVERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



97 



son of Horatio Robinson and Emily Elvira (Gil- 
more) Storer. He was educated at Dr. Childs' 
school at Newport and at Harvard where he was 
a member of the Class of 1885, taking the Harvard 




The first Peirce ancestor in America was John Pers 
of Watertown, 1637. The mother of the younger 
Professor Peirce was Sarah Hunt Mills, the daughter 
of Elijah Hunt and Harriet (Elake) Mills. After 
receiving an early education at the Hopkins Clas- 
sical School in Cambridge, James Mills Peirce 
entered Harvard where he graduated in 1853. 
He then studied for a year at the Harvard Law 
School and again, from 1856 to 1859, at the Har- 
vard Divinity School. Meanwhile, however, he had 
served as Tutor of Mathematics at Harvard, 1854 
to 1858. In i860 he resumed tiie position of Tutor 
and in 1861 was made Assistant Professor. In 1869 
he became University Professor of Mathematics and 
in 1885 was given the Perkins Professorship, of 
which his father was the first incumbent. In 1890 
he became Dean of the Graduate School, but re- 
signed this office in 1895 to accept that of Dean 
of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, which he 
resigned in i S98. He is a fellow of the American 
Academy of Arts and Sciences, a member of the 
American Mathematical Society, and a member of 
numerous scientific and social organizations of 



MALCOLJI STORER 



Medical degree in 18S9. Among the societies to 
which Dr. Storer belongs are the Boston Society for 
Medical Improvement and the Obstetrical Society 
of Boston. 



PEIRCE, James Mills 

Harvard A.B. 1853, A.M. 

Born in Cambridge, Mass., 1834 ; graduated at Har- 
vard in 1853; studied at the Harvard Law School and 
the Harvard Divinity School ; Tutor in Mathematics at 
Harvard; Assistant Professor of Mathematics; Uni- 
versity Professor of Mathematics; Perkins Professor 
of Mathematics; fellow of the American Academy of 
Arts and Sciences and member of other organizations. 

JAMES MILLS PEIRCE, A.M., Professor of 
Mathematics in Harvard, was born in Cam- 
bridge, Massachusetts, May i, 1834. He was the 
son of Benjamin Peirce, who was for many years a 
noted Professor of Mathematics and Astronomy at 
Harvard, and exerted a great influence in develop- 
ing and guiding the progress of mathematical study 
in the United' States. Benjamin Peirce's parents 
were Benjamin and Lydia Ropes (Nichols) Peirce. 

VOL. III. — 7 




JAMES WILI.S PEIRCE 

Boston and New York. .Among his books are a 
text-book on .Analytic Geometry, Elements of Log- 
arithms, Three and Four Place T.ables, and ^L•lthc 
matical Tables mostly to Four Figures. 



98 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



MORSE, John Torrey 

Harvard A.B. i860. 
Born in Boston, Mass., 1840; graduated at Harvard 
1E60 ; lecturer there 1876-79 ; Overseer, 1879-91 ; member 
of the Massachusetts Legislature one term ; Associate 
Editor of the International Review two years ; well- 
known writer on a varied line of subjects. 

JOHN TORRKV MORSE, Author, and Overseer 
of Harvard, was born in Boston, Massachusetts, 
January 9, 1840. After the completion of his College 
course, he turned his attention to literature, especially 
that pertaining to law, and is the author of Treatise 
on the Law Relating to Banks and Banking ; Law of 
Arbitration and Reward ; Famous Trials ; Life of 
Alexander Hamilton ; lives of John Adams, John 
Quincy Adams and Thomas Jefferson, contributed 
to a series of American statesmen of which he was 
the Editor. He was for two years associated with 
Henry Cabot Lodge in the Editorship of the In- 
ternational Review, and has been an occasional 
contributor to the magazines. Mr. Morse has rep- 
resented his district in the lower branch of the 
Massachusetts Legislature for one term, but seems 
to prefer literary pursuits to political advancement. 
He was identified with Harvard from 1876 to 1891, 
the first three years as Lecturer on History, and the 
remainder of the time as an Overseer. As a ripe 
scholar and able writer, he is widely and favorably 
known, and is especially interested in the various 
institutions of his native state, including the Mas- 
sachusetts Historical Society, of which he is a 
member. 



Dental Society, was an officer of the American .\cad- 
emy of Dental Science, a corresponding member of 
the Odontological Society of New York, also a niem- 




(;fo. r. iM(l^^Al 1 



ber of the Boston Society of Natural History and of 
other scientific organizations. He died in Boston, 
April 2, 1895. 



MOFFATT, George Tufton 

Harvard M.D. i860, D.M.D. (Hon.) 1879. 
Born in Roxbury, Mass., 1836 ; graduated, Harvard 
Medical School, i860 ; Prof, of Operative Dentistry, 
Harvard, 1868-79 ; received honorary degree of D.M.D. 
from Harvard, 1870: died 1895. 

GEe)ROE TUFTON MOFl'ATr, M.D., 
D.^LI)., Professor in the Harvard Dental 
School, was born in Roxbury, Massachusetts, August 
7, 1836. Without pursuing an academic course, he 
studied in the Harvard Medical School, graduating 
with the degree of Doctor of Medicine in i860. 
Devoting himself especially to dental surgery, he be- 
came an authority in that branch of his profession 
and in 1868 was called to the Chair of Operative 
Dentistry at Harvard. He held this Professorship 
until 1879, receiving in 1870 the honorary degree 
of Doctor of Medical Dentistry from Harvard. Dr. 
Moffatt served as President of the Massachusetts 



RICHARDS, Theodore William 

Harvard A.B. 1886, Ph.D. and A.M. 1888. 
Born in Germantown. Pa, 1868; educated at Haver- 
ford College, Harvard (1886) and at Gottingen, Dresden 
and Leipzig ; Assistant Professor of Chemistry at 
Harvard ; member of the National Academy of Science ; 
fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences ; 
member of the British Association for the Advance- 
ment of Science. 

THEODORE W n.LL\M RICILARDS, Ph.D., 
Assistant Professor of Chemistry at Har- 
vard, was born in Germantown, Pennsylvania, 
January 31, 1868. His parents were William T. 
and .'\nna (Matlack) Richards, while his ancestors 
were of Quaker, Huguenot and Dutch descent. In 
1885 he obtained the degree of Bachelor of Science 
in Haverford College, and in 1886 the degree of 
Bachelor of .Arts at Harvard. In 1S8S he obtained 
a Master of Arts and a Doctor of Philosophy at 
Harvard. His education was also continued at 
Gottingen, Dresden and Leipzig. It was in 1894 



UNIFERSiriES JND THEIR SONS 



99 



that he was appointed Assistant Professor of Chem- 
istry at Harvard. Mr. Richards is a member of 
tiie National Academy of Science, and British 
Association for the Advancement of Science, and a 




THEODORE W.M. RICHARDS 



fellow of the American Academy of Arts and 
Sciences. He married, May 28, 1896, Miriam 
Stuart Thayer, and has one daughter, Grace 
Thayer, born on February i, 1898. 



TAUSSIG. Frank William 

Harvard A.B. 1879, Ph.D. and A.M. 1883, LL.B. 1886. 
Bom, 1859; educated at Washing:ton University, St. 
Louis, at Harvard (1879) at the Harvard Graduate 
School and at the Harvard Law School; Private Sec- 
retary to President Eliot ; Instructor in Political Econ- 
omy ; Assistant Professor; Professor; member and 
Secretary of the Commission to Examine the Tax 
Laws of Massachusetts; author of Tariff History of 
the United States; Silver Situation in the United 
States; Wages and Capital; Editor of the Quarterly 
Journal of Economics. 

FRANK WILLIAM TAUSSIG, Ph.D., Professor 
of Political Economy at Harvard, was born 
December 28, 1S59. His father, William Taussig, 
a native of Prague, Bohemia, came to the United 
States in 1846. His mother Adele Wuerpel, was 
the daughter of a Prussian schoolmaster, and was 
born in a village near Cologne ; she came to this 
country with her parents about 1848. Frank W. 



Taussig was educated at the public schools of St. 
Louis and later at the Academy and College of 
Washington University in St. Ix)uis. In 1876 he 
entered Harvard as a Sophomore and in 1879 re- 
ceived his degree of Bachelor oi Arts. After a year 
of study and travel in Europe he returned to .Amer- 
ica to become a graduate student at Harvard for 
three years and later to attend the Harvard Law 
School, where he received the degree of Bachelor 
of Laws in 1886. Meanwhile for two years he had 
been Private Secretary to President Eliot, and had 
received in 1882 the position of Instructor in Politi- 
cal Economy. He remained Instructor until 1886, 
when he was appointed Assistant Professor. In 
1892 he was made Professor. He wTote, a few 
years ago, two books on the Tariff History of the 
United States, and the Silver Situation in the United 
States, which were followed in 1896 by a theoretical 
work dealing with wages and capital. These were 
in addition to numerous articles for periodicals. 
Since 1896 Professor Taussig has been Editor of 
the Quarterly Journal of Economics, which is pub- 
lished for Harvard University. In the year 1896-97 
he was a member and Secretary of a Commission to 




F. w. T.\l.:SSIG 

Examine the Tax Laws of Massachusetts. He mar- 
ried, June 29, 1888, Edith Thomas Guild and has 
four children : William Guild. Mary Guild, Catherine 
Cromby and Helen Brooke Taussig. 



100 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



WALZ, William Emmanuel 

Harvard LL.B. i8gg. 

Born in Columbus, Ohio, i860; educated abroad, at 
Northwestern College (111.) and Harvard Law School; 
Instructor at Harvard. 

WILLIAM KMM.\MUI:L W.\LZ, a.m., In- 
structor in Cerman at Harvard, is tlie 
son of John and Charlotte (N'eumann) \\:x\/. and 
was born in Cohunbtis, Ohio, April 13, 1S60. He 
was educated in a private school and at tlie pubHc 
academies in tlermany and Switzerland. In 1S79 
he graduated at the Royal (lyninasiuni, Stuttgart, 




W. E. W.\LZ 

and in i SiSo at the Northwestern College, Illinois. 
During the year 1880-1881, Mr, Walz taught classics 
and history at Freeport Seminary. The next two 
years he was Principal of the Schuylkill Seminary, 
now Albright College, Myerstown, Pennsylvania, 
receiving meantime, in 1S82, tlie degree of Master 
of Arts from the Northwestern College. From 1883 
to 1S96 Mr. Walz was prominent as an educator in 
Japan. At the Imperial College at Tokyo, Japan, 
he made a distinguished record between 1887 and 
1896, his specialties being history and literature, 
medium of instruction, English and German. On 
leaving Japan he received. May 20, 1896, the 
twenty-ninth year of Meiji, the Order of the Rising 
Sun, with an imperial letter of recognition for ser- 



vices rendered to the cause of education in Japan. 
In that same year he was appointed Instructor in 
(lerman at Harvard and also at that time began 
attendance at the Harvard Law School. In 1S99 
he received the degree of Bachelor of Laws. Mr. 
Walz married March 25, 1883, Mary Louisa Chris- 
tina Deininger. 



WILLISTON, Samuel 

Harvard A.B. 1882, LL.B. and A.M. 1888. 
Born in Cambridge, Mass., 1861 ; educated at Harvard 
(1882); Secretary of the Northern Transcontinental 
Survey ; teacher at Media, Penn. ; graduated at Harvard 
Law School; Secretary to Judge Gray of the United 
States Supreme Court ; engaged in the practice of law 
in Boston ; Assistant Professor of Law in the Harvard 
Law School ; Professor of Law ; Editor of several legal 
works and author of sundry law articles. 

SAMUEL WILLLSTON, A.M., LL.n., Pro- 
fessor of Law at Harwird, was born in Cam- 
bridge, Massachusetts, September 24, 1S61. His 
father, Lyman Richards Williston, was tlie son of 
Rev. William Richards, one of the early mission- 
aries to the Sandwich Islands, and afterwards Min- 
ister of Education there. The father, born on the 
Islands, was sent to Massachusetts, where he was 
adopted by Samuel Williston of Easthampton, the 
founder of Williston Seminary, and a large bene- 
fiictor of Amherst College. Professor Williston's 
mother, Annie E. Gale, was the daughter of Rev. 
Wakefield Gale, a Congregational clergyman. All 
of Mr. Williston's ancestors (with the exception of 
his father) since the seventeenth century have been 
born in New England and have had a leaning 
toward the ministry or teaching. From the Cam- 
bridge High School Samuel Williston passed into 
Harvard where he received the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts in 1882, Master of Arts and Bachelor of 
Laws in 1888. For two years after leaving the 
College he was Secretary of the Northern Trans- 
continental Survey, Newport, Rhode Island, and 
during the subsequent year was engaged in teach- 
ing at Media, Pennsylvania. For a year before 
beginning the practice of law in Boston (1889) he 
was Secretary to Judge Gray of the United States 
Supreme Court. In 1 890 Mr. Williston was ap- 
pointed Assistant Professor of Law at the Harvard 
Law School, and in 1895 was made Professor. He 
prepared in 1893 the eighth edition of Parsons on 
Contracts, in 1894 edited a volume of Cases on 
Contracts anil a volume of Cases on Sales, and in 
1895 edited Stephen on Pleading. He has also 
written sundry articles for the Harvard Law Review 
and the American Law Review, In 1894 he was a 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



ioi 



member of the Board of I'^xaminers of Candidates 
for Admission to the Bar in Suffolk county. Pro- 
fessor Williston married September 12, 1889, Mary 




H. Davis. In 1857 he was appointed Professor 
of Mathematics in the United States Naval Academy 
at Annapolis, which chair he held until the removal 
of the Academy to Newport at the outbreak of the 
Civil War, except while engaged as Superintendent 
of the Almanac and as Assistant in the United 
States Observatory at Washington. On leaving the 
Academy, Professor Winlock resumed the Superin- 
tendency of the Almanac. He continued to perform 
the duties of this position until his appointment in 
1866 as Phillips Professor of Astronomy and Di- 
rector of the Astronomical Observatory at Han-ard, 
in which office he succeeded Professor George 
Phillips Bond. He was also appointed Professor 
of Geodesy in the School of Mining and Practical 
Geology, occupying that chair from 1868 to the 
time of his death. Professor \\inlock's Directorship 
of the Observatory was marked by a great increase 
of the facilities of that institution, and by much im- 
portant work, notably in cataloguing double stars 
and in stellar photometry. He had charge of the 
Coast Survey Observations of the eclipse of 1869, 
and conducted the expedition to Spain, for a similar 
purpose in 1870. Har\ard made him an honorarv 



SAMUEL WILLISTON 

Fairlie Wcllnian of Brookline, Massachusetts, and 
has two children : Dorothea Lewis and Margaret 
Fairlie Williston. 



WINLOCK, Joseph 

Harvard A.M. (Hon.) 1868. 
Born in Shelby Co., Ky., 1826; graduated Shelby 
College, 1845; Professor of Mathematics and Astron- 
omy, Shelby. 1845-52 ; Computer of Nautical Almanac, 
Cambridge, 1852-57; Professor of Mathematics, U. S. 
Naval Academy, 1857-61 ; Director of Harvard Observ- 
atory and Phillips Professor of Astronomy. 1866-75: 
Professor of Geodesy, Harvard School of Mining, 
1868-75 ; A.M. (honorary) Harvard, 1868 ; died 1875. 

JOSEPH WINLOCK, A.M., Director of the Har- 
vard Observatory, was born in Shelby county, 
Kentucky, February 6, 1826, son of Fielding and 
Mary (Peyton) Winlock. His father was Secretary 
of State of Kentucky, and served with distinction 
in the War of 181 2. Joseph Winlock was graduated 
at Shelby College, Kentucky in 1845, and immedi- 
ately appointed Professor of Mathematics and As- 
tronomy in that institution. He continued in that 

position until 1852, when he removed to Cambridge Master of Arts in 1868, and in 1S63 he was named 
Massachusetts, and became one of the computers of by Congress one of the Corporate members of the 
the American "Ephemeris and Nautical Almanac, at National Academy of Sciences. He die.i m Cam- 
that time under the Superintendency of Admiral C. bridge, Massachusetts, June 11, 1875. 




JOSEPH WINLOCK 



I02 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



KNAPP, Howard Hoyt 

Yale B.A. 1882, LL.B. 1884. 
Born in So. Norwalk, Conn., i85i ; fitted for College 
privately and at the Hopkins Grammar School : B.A. 
Yale, 1882; LL.B. Yale Law School, 1884; has since 
practised law at Bridgeport, Conn. ; Corporation Coun- 
sel, City of Bridgeport, 1892-93; Lecturer on Connecti- 
cut Practice at Yale Law School since 1892. 

H()\V.\R1) IIOVT KNAPP, Lawyer, and Lec- 
turer at Yale Law School, was born in 
South Norwalk, Connecticut, April 18, 1861. He 
is a descendant of Jonathan Knapp who was an 
active participant in the Revolutionary struggles 




HOW.\KU H. KNAPP 



about 'I'arrytown, New York, an Ensign in the 
Colonial Troops, and Captain of the boats at King's 
Ferry. On his mother's side he is connected with 
the Hoyt and Nichols families, who have been 
settled in Connecticut since the Colonial times. 
He received his early education in private and at 
the public schools of South Norwalk, and at a 
boarding school in Norwalk. He was fitted for 
College under private tutors and at the Hopkins 
Grammar School, New Haven, and entered the 
Academical Department of Yale 1878, graduating 
with the degree of Bachelor of .'\rts in 1882. He 
attended the Yale Law School during the two fol- 
lowing years, taking the degree of Bachelor of 
Laws in 1884, and immediately began the practice 
of law at Bridgeport, Connecticut, in the office of 



Seymour & Seymour. In 1S87 Mr. Knapp formed 
a partnership with Morris \\'. Seymour under the 
firm name of Seymour & Knapp, and has con- 
tinued tlie practice of his profession as a member 
of this firm ever since. In July 3892 he was 
elected for a one year term as Counsel to the Cor- 
poration of the City of Bridgeport. He was made 
a Lecturer at the Yale Law School, his subject being 
Connecticut Practice, 1892, and his connection 
with the school in that capacity has since con- 
tinued. He has been Treasurer of the Fairfield 
County Law Library Association since January 1894. 
Mr. Knapp married, February 9, 1888, Emily 
Perkins, daughter of Charles E. Perkins of Hart- 
ford, Connecticut. They have had two children, 
only one of whom, Farwell Knapp, born November 
28, 1893, survives. He is not actively interested 
in politics. 

FOX, George Levi 

Yale, B.A. 1874, LL.B. 1879, M.A. 1888. 
Born in New Haven, Conn., 1852; early education 
Hillhouse High and Hopkins Grammar School; A.B. 
Yale, 1874; M.A. Yale. 1888; LL.B. Yale, 1879; In- 
structor in Hillhouse High School, 1877-85 ; Rector 
Hopkins Grammar School, 1885- 

GEORGE LEVI FOX, Educator, and Lecturer 
on Comparative Municipal Government in 
the Graduate Department of Yale, was born Novem- 
ber 16, 1852, in New Haven, Connecticut, son of 
Levi Goodell and Elizabeth Hamlin (Bodfish) Fox. 
He prepared for College at the Hillhouse High and 
Hopkins Grammar -Schools, and graduated from 
Yale in 1874, receiving the degree of Master of 
Arts in 1888. He studied two years at the Yale 
Law School, and took the degree of Bachelor of 
Laws. Mr. Fox established the Classical Course in 
the Hillhouse High School, and was Classical teacher 
there from 1877 until 1885, when he became 
Rector of the Hopkins (Grammar School. He was 
appointed Lecturer on Comparative Municipal 
Government in the Graduate Department at Yale in 
1895. He is a member of the Reform Club of 
New York, and of the Graduates' Club of New 
Haven. He is Independent in politics, and an 
active member of the New Haven Good Govern- 
ment Club. He was a member of the Committee 
of Seven, on the Study of History in Schools, of 
the American Historical Association, and in their 
report published in 1899, he prepared the article 
on The Teaching of History in English Secondary 
Schools. In repeated visits to Europe he has 
made an especial study of municipal institutions 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



103 



and secondary schools of ?]urope. In 1893 he de- 
livered a course of twelve lectures before the Lowell 
Institute in Boston, Massachusetts, on The Public 




GEORGE L. FOX 



Schools of England. In 1895 he published in the Yale 
Review an article on the London Countv Council. 



LOWE, Walter Irenaeus 

Yale B.A. 1890. Ph.D. 1897. 
Born in Ilion, N. Y., 1867 ; fitted for College at Willis- 
ton Seminary, Easthampton ; A.B. (Yalei, i8go; Ph.D. 
(Yale), 1897 ; taught in Morris Academy, 1890-gi ; grad- 
uate fellow at Yale, 1892-4; taught in New Haven night 
schools and at Williams Memorial Institute, 1892 : In- 
structor in History, Sheffield Scientific School, of Yale, 
since 1893 ; Principal of New Haven night schools, 
1893-96. 

W.VLTER IREN.^US LOWE, Ph.D., In- 
structor in History at the Sheffield Scien- 
tific School of Vale, was born in Ilion, New York, 
January 30, 1867. His father, IrenKus H. Lowe, 
came of old New England stock, the first repre- 
sentative of the family in this country having settled 
in Boston in 1660. His mother, Jane Anne Grif- 
fith, is of Welsh ancestry. The subject of this 
sketch attended as a boy the \\'hitinsville public 
schools of the town of Northbridge, Massachusetts, 
and afterwards went to Williston Seminary at East- 
hampton, Massachusetts, to prepare for College. 
He entered Yale in 1886, graduating in 1S90. 



Part of the winter of 1889-1890, during his Senior 
year at College, he spent in teaching at the Catskill 
(New York) Free Academy, rejoining his class in 
the spring. During the year following his gradua- 
tion he taught in Morris Academy at Morristown, 
New Jersey, but returned to Yale in 1892 on a 
graduate fellowship. During that winter he taught 
in the night schools of New Haven and also at the 
Williams Memorial Institute of New London, during 
the illness of its Principal. In the following year he 
was appointed to his present position in the Shef- 
field Scientific School, and was also made Principal 
of the New Haven night schools. This latter post 
he held for three years. Dr. Lowe holds honorary 
membership in the Berzelius Society of the Sheffield 




WALTER I. LOWE 

School and is connected with a number of scientific 
societies, among them the American Historical Asso- 
ciation, American Statistical Association, New Eng- 
land History Teachers' .Association, New Haven 
Colony Historical Society. He is also a member of 
the Graduates' Club of New Haven and the National 
Conference of Charities and Correction. In politics 
he is a supporter always of the best interests of the 
community rather than the selfish ends of any party, 
and is an active worker in the Good Government 
Club of New Haven. He married, June 6. 1894, 
Catharine Young Caskey of Morristown, New Jersey, 
and they have two children. 



104 



UNIVERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



WEBB, James Henry 

Yale LL.B. 1877. 
Born in Santa F^, New Mexico, 1854; attended Win- 
chester Institute, Conn., and Hudson River Institute, 
Claverack, N. Y., graduated at Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural College. Amherst, Mass., 1873 ; studied history 
and political economy as post graduate at Yale ; grad- 
uated at Yale Law School, 1877 ; admitted to the Bar of 
Connecticut, 1877; has practised law in New Haven 
since 1877, in partnership with John \A^. Ailing since 
1883; member of the Board of Control of the Connecti- 
cut Agricultural Experiment Station at New Haven; 
since 1895 he has been Instructor in Criminal Procedure 
at the Yale Law School ; member of the Bar of the 
United States Supreme Court. 

J.AMi;S H1:NRV \\I:1;B, Lawyer, and Instructor 
at the Yale Law School, was born in Santa ¥i, 
New iMe.xico, December 22, 185^. His father, 




J.AMES H. WF.Bl! 

James Josiah Webb, after retiring from business 
purchased a large farming estate in Hamden, Con- 
necticut, (which is now the family residence) where 
he developed a wide reputation for intelligent 
agriculture. It was the particular desire of the 
senior Webb that his son should become versed in 
scientific agriculture, and in accordance with that 
wish, Mr. Webb entered the Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural College at Amherst, Massachusetts, after early 
training in the Winchester Institute, Connecticut, 
and the Hudson River Institute at Claverack, New 
York. He graduated from the Massachusetts 
.Agricultural College with the degree of Bachelor of 



Science in 1873. After a year of post-graduate 
study in history and political economy at Yale, he 
entered the Yale Law School where he graduated 
with honors in 1877. The same year he was 
admitted to the Bar of Connecticut, and at once 
opened a practice in New Haven which he has 
continued up to the present time. In 1883 he 
went into partnership with John W. .Mling, President 
of the New Haven County Bar, and the firm now 
known as Ailing, Webb & Morehouse, has an ex- 
tensive and important practice. For the past 
several years he has been a member of the Board 
of Control of the Connecticut Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station which is located at New Haven, and 
in addition to his other duties, is largely and prac- 
tically interested in agricultural affairs. He was 
appointed Instructor in the Yale Law School in 
1895, and since that time he has given instruction 
there in Criminal Law, Criminal Procedure and 
Expert Testimony. Mr. Webb is a member of the 
Bar of the United States Supreme Court, in which 
capacity he has argued important cases. He is a 
member of the American Bar Association, the 
Catholic Club of New York City and of the Gradu- 
ate Club and Quinnipiac Club and the New Haven 
Colony Historical Society of New Haven. In 1898 
he was nominated by the Democratic party as its 
Candidate for Congress from the Second Connecti- 
cut District, but was defeated by the Hon. N. D. 
Sperry, who was re-elected by a greatly reduced ma- 
jority. Mr. Webb is married and has several children. 



SILLIMAN, Benjamin 

Yale B.A. 1796, M.A. 
Born in North Stratford, (now Trumbull) Conn., 1779; 
graduated at Yale, 1796 ; Tutor at Yale, 1799-1802 ; Pro- 
fessor of Chemistry, Mineralogy and Geology 1802, and 
Emeritus 1853 to the time of his death ; received the 
degree of M.D. from Bowdoin in 1818 and LL D. from 
Middlebury in 1826; died in 1864. 

BENJAMIN SILLIMAN, M.D., LL.D., Profes- 
sor of Chemistry at Yale, was born in North 
Stratford, (now Trumbull), Connecticut, .August 8, 
1779, and graduated at Yale in 1796. After teach- 
ing for a year in Wethersfield, he returned to New 
Haven, where he received the appointment of Tutor 
at Yale, performing the duties of that position while 
studying law w^ith Simeon Baldwin. He was ad- 
mitted to the Bar in 1802, but on the advice of Pres- 
ident Dwight he abandoned the profession of law 
and devoted himself to science, the Professorship 
of Chemistry and Mineralogy being offered him in 
1802. This chair to which Geology was added in 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



105 



181 7, was held by Professor Silliman until his death, 
as Professor Emeritus from 1853. His appointment 
as Professor carried with it permission to qualify 
himself for teaching the branches included in his 
department, and he passed several years abroad and 
in study with Professor James W'oodhouse in the 
University of Pennsylvania. The beginning of his 
scientific work outside his academic duties as Pro- 
fessor, was an examination of the meteor which fell 
in 1807 near Weston, Connecticut, of w^hose sub- 
stance he made a chemical analysis. In his experi- 
ments with the oxy-hydric blowpipe he obtained for 




BENJA.MIX SII.LIMAX 

the tirst time in this country the metals sodium and 
potassium, in 181 1. The fusion of the carbon in the 
voltaic arc was also deinonstrated by his experiments. 
For many years he delivered lectures in various 
cities throughout the United States, developing a 
great popular interest in the growing sciences of 
chemistry and geology. His published works are 
numerous and in 18 18 he founded the American 
Journal of Science, conducting it as sole Editor for 
twenty years, and in 1846 transferring it to his son. 
Professor Benjamin Silliman Jr., and his son-in-law, 
Professor James I). Dana. Professor Silliman re- 
ceived the degree of Doctor of Medicine from 
Bowdoin in 181S and of Doctor of Laws from 
Middlcbury in 1S26; he was chosen in 1S40 first 



President of the American Association of Geologists 
and Naturalists, the predecessor of the American 
Association for the Advancement of Science, and 
was named by Congress one of the corporate mem- 
bers of the National Academy of Sciences in 1863. 
He died in New Haven, November 24, 1S64, and 
his statue in bronze was erected in 1884 on the Yale 
grounds in front of Famham College. 

SEYMOUR, Thomas Day 

Yale B.A. (Hon.) 1870 
Born in Hudson, O., 1848 ; graduated at Western 
Reserve College, 1870 : studied Classical Philology in 
Germany; degree of A B. (ad eundem) conferred by 
Yale, 1870; Professor of Greek in Western Reserve, 
1872-80; received LL.D. degree from Western Reserve 
in 1894; editor of Greek books and philological pub- 
lications ; author of articles in leading magazines. 

THOMAS DAY SEYMOUR, LL.D., Hillhouse 
Professor of Greek at Yale, was born in 
Hudson, Ohio, April i, 1848. His parents, Nathan 
Perkins and Elizabeth (Day) Seymour, were de- 
scended from some of the oldest families of New 
England. At the Preparatory School of Western 
Reserve College he received preparation for the Col- 
lege Department of that institution. He graduated 
in 1870 with the degree of Bachelor of Arts, receiving 
the same year the degree of Bachelor of .Arts ad 
einiiicm from Yale. The next two years were spent 
in the study of Classical Philology at the L'niversi- 
ties of Leipzig and Berlin, Germany, with some 
travel and study in Italy and Greece. He returned 
to a Professorship in Greek at the Western Reserve 
College in 1872, which position he left in 1880 to 
accept the appointment as Professor of Greek at 
Yale. He still occupies that position, having been 
made Hillhouse Professor in 1884. .As an editor 
and writer of philological works Professor Seymour 
has a wide reputation. His editions of the Iliad, 
the Odyssey, and the Odes of Pindar are well 
known and extensively used in schools throughout 
the country. .\ book called Homeric I-anguage 
and Verse appeared in 1885. With Professor White 
of Har\ard he is Editor-in-Chief of the College 
Series of Greek Authors. Since 1887 he has been 
Chairman of the Managing Committee of the Amer- 
ican School of Classical Studies at Athens. In 
1889 he was elected an .American Editor of the 
Classical Review, and he still holds that position. 
In 1889 he W.1S made President of the .American 
Philological Association. He has been a contrib- 
utor to such leading magazines as Scribner's, the 
New Englander and others, where his articles on 



io6 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



philological subjects have furnished valuable and 
interesting reading. He is a Vice-President of the 
Council of the Archaeological Institute of America, 
and Honorary Member of the Arcliaaological Society 







sentations and through his exertions, and he was 
placed in charge as Professor, a position which he 
held until 1869. This was the basis of the Yale 
Scientific School, which has borne since i860 the 
name of Joseph E. Sheffield, its chief benefactor. 
From 1849 to 1854, he occupied the Chair of 
Medical Chemistry and Toxicology in the Medical 
Department of the University of Louisville, Ken- 
tucky, when he was recalled to Yale in consequence 
of the retirement of his father from active service, 
and resumed the Professorship of Chemistry which 
he held to the time of his death. Professor Silli- 
man had, like his father, wide popularity as a public 
lecturer on science. The line of his researches was 
especially that of the application of science to in- 
dustry, and his reports upon questions connected 
with the chemical arts and manufactures, upon 
agricultural and mining subjects, and notably one 
which he made in 1882 on the use of sorghum 
for the production of sugar, have been held of 
the greatest importance. Professor Silliman was 
a charter member of the National Academy of 
Sciences ; member of the American Association of 



THd-MAS DAY SEYMOUR 



of .Athens, Greece. He married Sarah M. Hitch- 
cock, July 2, 1874. His three children are : Eliza- 
beth Day, Clara Hitchcock and Charles. 



SILLIMAN, Benjamin, Jn 

Yale B.A. 1837. M.A. 
Born in New Haven, Conn., 1816 ; graduated at Yale, 
1837; Assistant in Chemistry, 1837-46; Professor of 
Applied Chemistry, 1846-53 : Professor of Medical 
Chemistry and Toxicology, University of Louisville, 
Ky., 1849-54 '• Professor of Chemistry, Yale, 1854 to 
time of his death; received the degree of Doctor of 
Medicine from the University of South Carolina, and 
Doctor of Laws from Jefferson Medical College; died 
1885. 

BENJ.\MIN sn.LIMAN, Jr., M.D., LL.D., 
Professor of Chemistry at Yale, was born in 
New Haven, Connecticut, December 4, 1816, the 
son of Benjamin Silliman (Yale 1796), and gradu- 
ated at Yale in 1837, entering at once upon the 
duties of .\ssistant to his father in the Department 
of Chemistry, Mineralogy and Geology. In this 
ser\'ice he continued until in 1846, when the School 
of .Applied Chemistry was organized upon his repre- 




BENJAMIN SILU.MAX, JR. 

Geologists and Naturalists and its Secretary in 1843- 
1844; Editor of the American Journal of Science 
from 1845 to the time of his death. The South 
Carolina Medical College conferred upon him the 



UNIVERSITIES AND rHEIK SONS 



[07 



degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1849, and Jefferson Physic, Surgery and Obstetrics at Yale, holding that 



Medical College that of Doctor of Laws in 1884 
He died in New Haven, January 14, 1885 



SMITH, Nathan 

Harvard M.D. 1790. 
Born in Rehoboth, Mass., 1762; served in Vermont 
militia in the Revolutionary War ; graduated at Har- 
vard Medical School. 1790 ; established Medical Depart- 
ment at Dartmouth, 1798, where he taught as Professor 
until 1813; Professor in the Yale Medical School, 1813 
to the time of his death ; died 1828. 

NATHAN S.\nTH, M.D., Professor in the 
Yale Medical School, was born in Reho- 
both. Massachusetts, September 13, 1762. He 




NATHAN SMITH 

ser\^ed in the Vermont militia during the last eigh- 
teen months of the Revolutionary War, and after 
peace was secured led the life of a pioneer and 
hunter until, when twenty-four years of age, he 
decided to become a physician. To this end he 
studied, and practised for a time in New Hamp- 



position to the time of his death. He also lectured 
1820-1825, at Bowdoin and at the University of 
Vermont, conducting at the same time a private 
practice throughout New England. As Surgeon he 
acquired great repute ; it has been stated that he 
was the first in this country to perform the opera- 
tion of extirpating an ovarian tumor. Dr. Smith 
received the degree of Master of Arts from Dart- 
mouth in 179S, and that of Doctor of Medicine 
from that College in 1801 and from Han-ard in 
1811. He died in New Haven, Connecticut, July 
26, 1828. 



THACHER, Thomas Anthony 

Vale B.A. 1835, M.A. 
Born in Hartford, Conn., 1815; graduated Yale, 1835; 
appointed Tutor in Yale, 1838; Assistant Professor of 
Latin, 1842-51; Professor, 1851-86; LL.D., Western 
Reserve, 1869 ; died 1886. 

THO.MAS ANTHONY TH.-^CHER, I.I..D., 
Professor at Yale, was born in Hartford, 
Connecticut, January ii, 1815, the son of Peter 
and Anne (Parks) Thacher. Through his father, 
Professor Thacher traced his descent from Thomas 
Thacher, first Minister of the Old South Church in 
Boston, and through his mother from Thomas 
Buckingham of Saybrook, Connecticut, one of the 
founders of Yale College. Thomas A. Thacher re- 
ceived his preparation for College at the Hopkins 
Grammar School in Hartford, and was graduated at 
Yale in the Class of 1S35 with high honors. For 
three years following his graduation he taught school 
in Connecticut and inOeorgia, and in 1S38 received 
appointment as Tutor in Latin at Yale. The con- 
nection thus formed was terminated only by his 
death, nearly half a century later, at which time he 
was the oldest member of the Faculty in continuous 
service. After four years as Tutor, Mr. Thacher 
was advanced to the .Assistant Professorship of the 
Latin Language and Literature, becoming full Pro- 
fessor on the retirement in 185 1, of Dr. James L. 
Kingsley from the active duties of that position. 
The year following his appointment as .Assistant 



shire and then entered the Medical Department of Professor he was given leave of absence for travel 



Harvard, graduating in 1790. The Medical De- 
partment of Dartmouth was established by him in 
1798, and in this he taught personally almost all 
the branches of the art. He held the Chair of 
Anatomy and Surgery until 18 10 and that of Theory 
and Practice .until 1813, in which year he was ap- 
pointed Professor of the Theory and Practice of 



and study in Germany and Italy, which he improved 
by careful observation of the methods practised in 
the Gymnasium and University of Berlin. During 
his residence in that capital he gave instruction to 
the CrowTi Prince of Prussia and his cousin. Prince 
Frederick Charles. In 1845, Professor Thacher 
returned to Yale and resumed the duties of his 



lot 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



Professorship, which thereafter were not interrupted. 
It was not only as an Instructor but as an admin- 
istrator that the abilities of Professor Thacher were 
displayed in his ser\Mce at Vale. As a disciplinarian 




THOMAS A. THACHLK 

he was remarkably successful, maintaining a firm 
control of unruly elements among the imdergrad- 
uates, while preserving in a wonderful degree the 
confidence, respect and friendship of the whole 
body of students, individually and collectively. The 
sturdy manliness of his character and the sincerity 
of his purpose were recognized and appreciated, 
and by the many College generations that passed 
under his influence there is no name cherished with 
warmer sentiments of regard. Outside of his con- 
nection with the University, he performed generous 
work in the cause of education. For a number of 
years he was an active member of the State Board 
of Education, and for forty-eight years he served as 
Trustee of the Hopkins Grammar fc'cliool in New 
Haven. He was a fine classical scholar, and con- 
tributed numerous articles on classical subjects to 
periodicals. This was in addition to his works 
published in book form, among which may be men- 
tioned his edition of Cicero's De Ofificiis and his 
adaptation of Madvig's Latin Grammar. Professor 
Thacher received the degree of Doctor of Laws 
from the Western Reserve in 1869. He died in 
New Haven, .April 7, 1886. 



LANGZETTEL, George Henry 

Yale B.F.A. 1898. 
Born in Springfield, Mass , 1864 ; received his early 
education in the Hillhouse High School of New Haven; 
engaged in wood-engraving for illustrative purposes 
for some years; graduate of the Yale Art School ; has 
since been connected with the School as Instructor in 
Drawing and Librarian. 

GEORGE HEXRV LANGZETTEL, Librarian 
and Assistant Listructor in Drawing at the 
Vale .\rt Scliool, was born in Springfield, .Massachu- 
setts, April 3, 1864. Both his father, Theodore 
Langzettel, and his mother, Margarelha .Augusta 
(Punzelt), Langzettel were natives of Bavaria. 
Their marriage occurred at Norwalk, Connecticut, 
September 20, 1859. George H. Langzettel, after 
completing the course of study at the grammar 
schools of New Haven, attended the Hillhouse 
High School in that city. After graduating from 
there in 1882 he took up the trade of wood-engrav- 
ing for illustrative purposes, and worked at it until 
about the year 1889, when he took up the study of 
drawing at the Vale Art School, graduating in 1893. 
Since completing his studies there he has been 
connected with the school as .Assistant Instructor in 




GEORGE H. LANGZETTEL 

Drawing and later also as Librarian, both of which 
positions he now holds. At commencement of June 
1898 he was given degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts, 
Vale University. 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



KENNA, William Matthew 

Yale Ph.B. i8go, M.D. 1892. 

Born in Little Falls, N. Y., 1868; fitted for College at 
the Hillhouse High School ; graduated, Yale Scientific 
School, 1890, taking the Biological course; Yale Medi- 
cal School, 1892; engaged in Hospital work on Black- 
well's Island and Ward's Island, New York, 1892-95; 
has since been engaged in private practice in New 
Haven; Assistant in Clinical Medicine at Yale, 1897. 

WILLIAM MATTHEW KP:XNA, M.D., Biol- 
ogist, Physician and Assistant at Yale, was 
born in Little Falls, New York, November i, 1868. 
His father, Thomas Matthew Kenna, was the son of 




\V. JI. KENNA 

Irish parents who settled in the L'nited States in 
the first half of this century. He received his early 
education in the grammar schools of New Haven, 
Connecticut, and fitted for College at the Hillhouse 
High School there, graduating in 18S7, and was 
class orator at the Commencement exercises of tliat 
year. He entered the Sheffield Scientific School in 
1897, taking the biological course, and on his 
graduation in 1890 attended the Yale Medical 
School, taking his degree in 1892. While there he 
was Secretary of his class. From September, 1S92, 
to December, 1S95, Dr. Kenna was engaged in 
Hospital work at the City Hospitals on Blackwell's 
Island and Ward's Island, New York. In the lat- 
ter year he removed to New Haven, and has since 



been engaged in professional prac. 
Dr. Kenna was made a member ot 
Town Physicians, New Haven, in April 1897, a.. 
he became an Instructor in Clinical Medicine at 
the Yale Medical School in the same year. In July 
of that year he was commissioned First Lieutenant 
in Company C. of the Second Regiment of the 
Connecticut National Guard. He is a member of 
the Delta Epsilon Iota, the Connecticut Medical 
Society, the Alumni Association of Yale Medical 
School, the Knights of St. Patrick and other socie- 
ties, and is a stanch Democrat on the political 
questions of the day. 



LOCKE, James 

Yale B.A. 1890. 

Born in Buffalo, N. Y., 1869; attended Buffalo Clas- 
sical School; graduated, Yale, 1890 ; in business with 
American Glucose Co. of Buffalo, 1890-92; received 
Ph.D. degree from Heidelberg University, 1896. 

JAMES LOCKE, Ph.D., Chemist, and Instructor 
in Chemistry at Yale, was born in Buffalo, 
New York, November 28, 1S69. He is the son o! 
Franklin D. and Frances (Cooper) Locke. At the 
Buffalo Classical School he prepared for College, 
and entered Yale in 1886. Here he was enrolled 
in the .Academic Department and gave particular 
attention to the study of chemistry. He received 
the Bachelor of .\rts degree in 1890. For the next 
two years he was in business with the American 
Glucose Company of Buffalo, New York. He then 
went abroad and continued his chemical studies at 
the University of Heidelberg, Germany, where he 
received the degree of L")octor of Philosophy in 
1896. In Yale Mr. Locke was a member of the 
Delta Kappa Epsilon Society. He is a Republican 
in politics. In 1897 he was called to Yale as 
Instructor in Chemistry, which position he still 
occupies. 



TAYLOR, Nathaniel William 

Yale B.A. 1807, MA. 

Born in New Milford. Conn., 1786: graduated Yale. 
1807 ; Pastor First Congregational Church. New Haven. 
Conn., 1812-22 ; Professor of Didactic Theology at 
Yale, 1822-58 ; received degree of D.D. from Union, 
1823 : died in New Haven, 1858. 

NATHANIEL WILLIAM T.\YLOR, D.D.. 
Professor of Didactic Theology at Yale, 
was born in New Milford, Connecticut, June 23, 
1786, and graduated at Yale in 1807. He studied 



I K 



UNlVERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



theology in New Haven, under the luilion of 'riino- 
thy Dwight, whom he served as amanuensis for two 
-years, and with whose doctrinal views he became 




N. \V. TAYLOR 

imbued. In 1812 he was installed Pastor of the 
First Congregational Church in New Haven, per- 
forming the duties of this position until in i(S2 2, 
on the foundation of the Dwight Professorship of 
Didactic Theology, at Yale, he was called to that 
chair. Dr. Taylor was the leader of the New 
Haven school of theology, as distinguished from 
the more liberal Congregationalists, and took a 
prominent part in the Unitarian controversy. In 
1823 he received the degree of Doctor of Divinity 
from L'nion. He held his Professorship to the 
time of his death, which occurred in New Haven. 
Connecticut, March 10, 1858. 



SMITH, Herbert Eugene 

Yale Ph.B. 1879. 
Born in Hartford, Conn., 1857; attended Hartford 
High School; graduated at Sheffield Scientific School, 
'879 ; graduated at the Medical School of the University 
of Pennsylvania, 1882; Lecturer on Chemistry at the 
Yale Medical School, 1882: Professor of Chemistry, 
1885; Dean of the Yale Medical Faculty, 1885 ; Chemist 
of the Connecticut State Board of Health. 

HKRBERT EUGENE SMITH, M.D., Pro- 
fessor of Chemistry and Dean of the 
Medical Faculty of Vale, was born in Hartford, 



Connecticut, October 21, 1857. His parents were 
Henry Hart and Mary Buckley (Morgan) Smith. 
The public schools of his native city furnished early 
training for him, and after graduating at the South 
School and the High School of Hartford he entered 
Yale. Here he chose the studies of the Sheffield 
Scientific School and took the degree of Bachelor 
of Philosophy, which is regularly conferred by that 
Department in 1879. He then went to the Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania to take a course of medical 
study. He graduated there witli the degree of 
Doctor of Medicine in 1882. During the same 
year he received from Yale the appointment as 
Lecturer on Chemistry in the Medical School, this 
position being succeeded, in 1885, by that of Pro- 
fessor. He was also in 1885 elected Dean of the 
Yale Medical Faculty. He holds these offices at 
present. In 1S89 Dr. Smith was appointed one of 
the State Chemists of Connecticut. He has also 
been Chemist for the Connecticut State Board of 
Health since 1890. He is a member of the .Ameri- 
can Physiological Society and of local and state 
metlical societies. He is also a member of the 




HERBERT E. SMITH 



Graduates' (Jlub of New Haven. In politics he is 
a Republican. He married Emily Scull Dinnin, of 
Philadelphia, June 30, 1885. His children are 
Emily D., Mary M., and Elizabeth B. Smith. 



UNIFERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



HALSTED, George Bruce 

Princeton A B 1875, A M. 1878- 
Born in Newark, N. J., 1853; fitted for College at the 
Newark High School, from which he graduated as 
prizeman ; graduated from Princeton, with the degree 
of A.B., in the Class of 1875; completed his education 
abroad ; as Mathematical Fellow of Princeton, studied 
a year at the Columbia School of Mines; was twice 
Fellow of Johns Hopkins ; appointed Instructor in 
Post-Graduate Mathematics in Princeton, 1878 ; since 
1882, has been Professor of Mathematics at the Uni- 
versity of Texas. Received the degree of M.A. from 
Princeton in 1878, and that of Ph.D. from Johns Hop- 
kins in 1879. 

GKORGE BRUCE HALSTED, Ph.D., Pro- 
fessor of Mathematics in the University of 
Texas, was born in Newark, New Jersey, Nov- 




GEORGE BRUCE HALSTED 

ember 25, 1853, son of Oliver Spencer and Martha 
Adela (Meeker) Halsted. His father, grandfather 
and many other members of the Halsted family were 
Princeton Alumni. His grandfather, Oliver Spencer 
Halsted, was a prominent New Jersey jurist. Mayor 
of Newark in 1840 and Chancellor of the State. 
George Bruce Halsted graduated as prizeman from 
the Newark High School, and then entered Prince- 
ton, graduating there, with the degree of Bachelor of 
.^rts, in 1 87 5. As Mathematical Fellow of Princeton, 
he studied a year at the Columbia School of Mines, 
and was twice Fellow of Johns Hopkins. He went 



I 1 I 

abroad to perfect his studies in Berlin, and upon his 
return was appointed Instructor in Post-Graduate 
Mathematics in Princeton, a position he held from 
187S until 1882, when he accepted the Professorship 
of Mathematics at the University of Texas, at Austin, 
a chair he continues to fill. He received the 
degree of Master of Arts from Princeton in 1878. 
and that of Doctor of Philosophy from Johns Hop- 
kins in 1879. He is the author of several volumes 
of scientific and mathematical works known as 
the Neomonic Series, also Elements of Geometry, 
Synthetic Geometry, the Prismoidal Formula, and 
many other mathematical and scientific works. He 
is a member of the American Mathematical Society ; 
member of the London Mathematical Society, 
member of the Association for the Improvement of 
Geometrical Teaching; fellow of the American 
Association for the .Advancement of Science ; mem- 
ber of the Mathematical Association; membrc 
d'Honneur du Comit^ Lobatchefsky ; President of 
the Texas Academy of Science; Miembro de la 
Sociedad Cientifica " .-^Izate " de Mexico ; Socio 
Corresponsal de la Sociedad de Geografia y Esta- 
distica de M(5xico ; Societaire Perp^tuel de la Sociit^ 
]\L-ith6matique de France ; Socio Perpetuo del 
Circolo Matematico di Palermo ; Mitglied der 
deutschen ALithematiker-Vereinigung. He was mar- 
ried, Jime 17, 1 886, to Maggie Swearingen. They 
have three children : .\rthur, Harbeck, and Halcyon 
Halsted. 



HORNBLOWER, Joseph Coerten 

Princeton A M. (Hon.) 1823, LL.D. 1841. 

Born in Belleville, N. J., 1777; acquired prominence 
as a lawyer, politician and jurist; Chief-Justice of New 
Jersey fourteen years ; Vice-President of the Repub- 
lican National Convention, 1856; President of the New 
Jersey Electoral College, i860 ; Professor of Civil Law 
at Princeton, 1847-1855; one of the original members of 
the American Bible Society and first President of the 
New Jersey Historical Society; died in Newark, 1864. 

JOSEPH COERTEN HORNBLOWER, LL.D.. 
Law Professor at Princeton for eight years, 
was born in Belleville, New Jersey, May 6, 1777. 
He was the son of Josiah Plornblower, a native of 
Staffordshire, Englanil, builder of the first steam- 
engine ever brought to or used in America, member 
of the New Jersey Colonial Assembly and the Conti- 
nental Congress, and Judge of the Essex County Court 
of Common Pleas. Delicate health prevented Joseph 
C. Hornblower from pursuing a collegiate course, hut 
he acquired a good knowledge of classics and math- 



I I 2 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



ematics through private instruction. He studied 
law in Newark under the direction of David 
B. Ogden, wiili whom he was subseeiuently engaged 
in practice, and was admitted to the Dar in 1.S03. 
From 1832 to 1847 he served as Chief-Justice of 
the State, was a member of the State Constitutional 
Convention in 1844, \"icc- President of the Repub- 
lican National Convention held in Philadelphia in 
1856, and President of the State Electoral College 
in i860. For eight years (1847-1855) he occu- 
pied the Chair of Civil Law at Princeton, which 
had previously conferred upon him the degrees of 
Master of .\rts and Doctor of Laws, the former in 
1823 and the latter in 1841. Judge Hornblower 
was a charter-member of the American Bible So- 
ciety, of which he held the Presidency from its 
organization in 1845 until his death in Newark, 
June 1 1, 1S64. 



STRONG, Oliver Smith 

Princeton A.B. 1886, and A.M. 

Born in Red Bank, N. J., 1865; graduated Princeton, 
1886; graduate course at Princeton, 1886-1890: Assis- 
tant in Lake Laboratory at Milwaukee, 1890 ; University 
Fellow, Columbia, 1891-92; Assistant and Tutor since 
1892, and Instructor in the Marine Biological Labora- 
tory at Woods Hole, Mass. 

OLIVER SMFIH STRONG, A.IVL, Biologist, 
and Tutor in Columbia, was born in Red 
Bank, New Jersey, December 29, 1865, the son of 
Benjamin and .\dcline Torrey (Schenck) Strong. 
After graduating at Princeton, in the Class of 1886, 



HORNBLOWER, William Henry 

Princeton A.B. 1838, A.M. 

Born in Newark, N.J., 1827; graduated at Princeton, 
1838 and from the Theological Seminary, 1843; Pastor 
of a church in Paterson, N. J., for over twenty-seven 
years; Professor of Sacred Rhetoric and Church Polity 
in the Western Theological Seminary at Allegheny. 
Penn. : Trustee of Princeton. 1864-1871 ; a member of 
the Allegheny Seminary Faculty twelve years; died in 
Allegheny, Penn., 1883. 

WILLLAM HENRY HORNBLOWER, D.D., 
Clergyman, was born in Newark, New 
Jersey, March 21, 1820, son of Joseph C. Horn- 
blower, formerly Chief-Justice of the Supreme Court 
and Law Professor at Princeton, .'\fter graduating 
from the above named College in 1838, he studied 
law for two years and then entered the Theological 
Seminary, where he completed the regular course in 
1843. In the following year he was ordained to 
the Presbyterian ministry, having previously spent 
some months as a missionary. He accepted a call 
to the First Presbyterian Church in Paterson, New 
Jersey, retaining the Pastorship for more than 
twenty-seven years. From 1871 to 1883 he held 
the Chair of Sacred Rhetoric and Church Govern- 
ment at the Western Theological Seminary, at 
,\llegheny, Pennsyhania. He was a Trustee of 
Princeton from 1864 to 1871. Dr. Hornblower 
died in .Allegheny, July 16, 1883. He was made a 
Master of .Arts by Princeton, and in i860 the de- 
gree of Doctor of Divinity was conferred upon him 
by Rutgers. 




OLIN'ER SMITH SIRONG. 

he remained as a graduate student and Fellow in 
Biology until 1890, when he went to Milwaukee, 
Wisconsin, as Assistant in the Lake Laboratory 
at that place. Returning to the East, he was made 
.Assistant in the Department of Biology at Columbia 
in 1892, Tutor in Zoology from 1S95 to 1897, 
and .Assistant in Histology from 1895 to the pres- 
ent ; also Tutor in Comparative Neurology, since 
1897. Mr. Strong has served as Instructor in the 
Marine Biological Laboratory, at Woods Hole, Mas- 
sachusetts, since 1895, and is .Associate Editor of 
the Journal of Comparative Neurology. He is a 
member of the Princeton Club, of the .American 
Society of Naturalists and the American Society of 
Morphologists. 



UNIFERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



I I 



HENRY, J. Addison 

Princeton A.B. 1857, A.M. 

Born in Cranbury, N. J., in 1835 ; fitted for College 
at "Edge Hill" preparatory school: graduated from 
Princeton in the Class of 1857; studied Theology in 
Princeton Theological Seminary, graduating in i86o; 
became Pastor of Princeton Presbyterian Church of 
Philadelphia in i85o, and fills this pulpit at the present 
time ; from 1873 to 1897, made nine visits to the Old 
World ; in 1873, while abroad, represented his church 
in the General Synod of the United Presbyterian 
Church of Great Britain and Ireland, held at Edinburgh ; 
received the degree of D.D. from Washington and 
Jefferson College, and from Centre College in Kentucky. 

J. ADDISON HENRY, D.D., Trustee of Prince- 
ton, was born in Cranbury, New Jersey, in 
1835, son of the Rev. Symmes C. Henry, D.D., 




J. ADDISOX HENRY 

who was, for thirty-seven years, Pastor of the Pres- 
byterian Church at Cranbury, New Jersey. His 
grandfather was Colonel James Henry of Laming- 
ton, New Jersey. Dr. Henry was fitted for College 
at " Edge Hill " preparatory school and graduated 
at Princeton in the Class of 1857. He then took 
the Theological course at Princeton Theological 
Seminary, and graduated in the Class of iS6o. On 
the day of his graduation a call to the Princeton 
Presbyterian Church of Philadelphia was placed in 
his hands, ami he has since been steadily laboring 
in that congregation. In 1873 he represented his 
VOL. in. — 8 



church in the General Synod of the United Pres- 
byterian Church of Great Britain and Ireland, held 
at Edinburgh. The degree of Doctor of Divinity 
was conferred on him by Washington and Jefferson 
College in Washington, Pennsylvania, and by Centre 
College in Danville, Kentucky. He has been con- 
nected with many religious institutions. Formerly 
he was a member of the Presbyterian Board of 
Publication, also of the Board of Home Missions, 
under the Old School Presbyterian Church, and for 
several years was Recording Secretary of that Board. 
He has represented the Presbytery in seven differ- 
ent .Assemblies of the Presbyterian Church, and has 
been Chairman of some of the principal committees 
of that Body. When the Presbytery of Philadelphia 
and the Central Presbytery were united, Dr. Henry 
was appointed to open the new Presbytery with a 
sermon, and was made its first Moderator. He was 
appointed by the General Assembly Principal Dele- 
gate to the General Council of the Presbyterian 
Alliance, held in Belfast, Ireland — which however 
he was unable to attend — and he attended as 
Principal the General Council held in Glasgow in 
1896. At the present time (1899) he is a member 
of the Executive Committee making arrangements 
for the next General Council, to be held in Wash- 
ington in September next. He is a Trustee of 
Princeton, one of the corporators of the Presbyter- 
ian Hospital, and President of the Pennsylvania 
Industrial Home for Blind Women. Dr. Henry 
has made the church over which he has had charge 
for thirty-nine years an educational as well as a 
religious influence in the city of Philadelphia, and 
it may be said of him that he is a great man in the 
ministry, and that his life has been well spent as a 
faithful Pastor. 



ROBERTS, William Charles 

Princeton A.B. 1855, LL.D. 1886. 
Born in Wales, 1832 ; graduated, Princeton, 1855 ; 
Theological Seminary, 1858; preached in Wilmington, 
Del., Columbus, O., Elizabeth, N. J., 1858-66; Corre- 
sponding Secretary. Board of Home Missions. 1881 ; 
President of Lake Forest University, 111.. 1887; Trus- 
tee of Lafayette, 1859-1863: Trustee. Princeton. 1866- 
1886; D.D., Union, 1871 ; LL.D., Princeton, 1886. 

WILLIAM CHARLES ROBERTS, D.D., 
LL.D., President of I^ke Forest Uni- 
versity, Illinois, was born at .Alltmai, in Wales, 
September 23, 1832, educated in the Evans High 
School in Wales, and coming to .America, was grad- 
uated at Princeton in the Class of 1S55. On leaving 
the Theological Seminary in 1S58, he at once 



1 14 



UNIFERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



assumed the Pastorate of the First Presbyterian 
Church in Wihuington, Delaware, subsequently re- 
moving to Columbus, Ohio, and finally settling with 
the Westminster Church in Elizabeth, New Jersey, 
in 1866. He was made Corresponding Secretary 
of the Board of Home Missions in :88i and was 
Chairman of the Committee that laid the founda- 
tions of Wooster University, Ohio. He declined 
the Presidency of Rutgers College in 1882, but in 
September 1S86 he became President of Lake For- 
est University, Illinois. In 18S7 the Rush Medical 
College and the Chicago College of Dental Surgery 
became Departments of the University, in 1889 
the Chicago College of Law was added, and the 
Durand Institute and the Gymnasium were erected 
in 1891. President Roberts resigned in 1892, hav- 
ing added $800,000 to the endowment funds of the 
institution. From 1859 to 1863 Dr. Roberts was a 
Trustee of Lafayette College, and he held the same 
office at Princeton for twenty years, 1866 to 1886. 
Union College conferred upon him the degree of 
Doctor of Divinity in 1871. 



1864. His death occurred in Edinburgh, Scotland, 
December 4, 1870. 



OWEN, Joseph 

Prir.ceton A.B. 1885, A.M., D.D 1864. 
Born in Bedford, NY.. 1814: graduated at Princeton, 
1835; and at the Princeton Theological Seminary. 1838; 
Tutor in the College while preparing for the ministry; 
missionary in India, 1840-68 ; and President of Allaha- 
bad College; died 1870. 

JOSEPH OWEX, D.I)., Mission.ary, was born 
in Pjedford, New York, June 14, 1814. Grad- 
uating at Princeton with the Class of 1835 he 
held a Tutorship there while a student at the Theo- 
logical Semmary from which he was graduated three 
years later, and was ordained a Presbyterian evange- 
list in 1839. Entering the service of the .American 
P>oard of Foreign Missions in 1840 he immediately 
sailed for India, where he remained for the ensuing 
twenty-eight years, during which time he acquired a 
sufficient knowledge of the language to translate 
parts of the Bible, and also to prepare text-books 
for the use of natives, and he accomplished much 
toward propagating the Christian religion in the fur 
East. His philanthropic labors were not confinetl 
exclusively to religious teaching, as he diligently 
applied himself to the arduous task of assisting the 
native converts in their endeavors to procure educa- 
tional advancement, and for some years he occupied 
the Presidency of .-\llahabad College, and also a Pro- 
fessorship in the Theological Seminary of that place. 
Dr. Owen received the degree of Master of Arts and 
also Doctor of Divinity from Princeton, the latter in 



PARKER, James 

Columbia A.B. 1793. 
Born in Bethlehem, N. J., 1776; graduated at Colum- 
bia, 1793; Merchant in N.Y. City some years; member 
of both houses of the N. J. Legislature and President 
of the Senate ; Collector of Customs at Perth Amboy, 
1829-30; served two terms in Congress; delegate to the 
State Constitutional Convention, 1844; benefactor of 
Rutgers ; and a Trustee of Princeton, 1825-29 ; died, 
1868. 

JAMES PARKER, A.B., Trustee of Princeton, 
was born in Bethlehem, Hunterdon county. 
New Jersey, March 3, 1776, son of an extensive land- 
owner of the same name, who served in the Provin- 
cial Council prior to the Revolutionary War. ,-\fter 
taking his Bachelor's degree at Columbia (1791), 
he remained in New York and was engaged in mer- 
cantile business there until his father's death, when 
he settled in Perth Amboy, New Jersey. Entering 
actively into public affairs he represented his district 
in the Lower House and the Senate, serving as 
President of the last named body ; was a member of 
Congress two terms ; Collector of Customs at the 
Port of Perth Amboy for the years 1829-1830 ; and 
a delegate to the State Constitutional Convention of 
1844. During his membership in the Legislature he 
originated and secured the enactment of laws pro- 
hibiting local slave trade, for the establishment of a 
school fund, for regulating the partition of real estate 
and the rights of aliens to become landed proprie- 
tors. In educational and other useful objects he 
took an active interest, donating the land for the 
erection of the present Rutgers College buildings, 
and as a Trustee of Princeton (1825-1829), he 
rendered valuable services to that institution. Mr. 
Parker was for many years a Vice-President of the 
New Jersey Historical Society, and occupied the 
Presidential chair the last four years of his life, 
which terminated April i, 1868. 



PATTON, Robert Bridges 

Yale A B. 1817. 
Born in Philadelphia, 1794; graduated at Yale, 1817; 
at the University of Gottingen, 1821 ; Professor of 
Greek and Latin at Middlebury College some four 
years; of Languages at Princeton, 1825-29; and of 
Greek at the University of the City of N. Y , 1834-38 ; 
died, 1839. 

ROBERT BRIDGES PATTON, Ph.D., Pro- 
fessor of Languages at Princeton, was a son 
of Robert Patton, a Revolutionary patriot, and his 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



"5 



birth took place in Philadelphia, September 25, 
1794. He was of Irish descent, his father having 
emigrated from Westport, Ireland, to the Quaker 
City about the year 1762 at the age of seven years, 
attained the rank of Major in the American Army 
under Lafayette during the War of Independence, 
and was appointed Postmaster at Philadelphia under 
the Federal Government, serving in that capacity 
for nearly twenty years. The son studied at Yale, 
graduating in 1S17 and was also given the degree 
of Bachelor of Arts by Middlebury College in the 
following year. His studies were completed at the 
University of Gottmgen, where he was made a 
Doctor of Philosophy in 1821, and joining the Mid- 
dlebury Faculty upon his return from Europe, he 
occupied the Chair of Greek and Latin there about 
four years. Called to Princeton as Professor of 
Languages in 1S25 he remained there until 1829, 
when he resigned and for a time was Principal of 
Edge Hill Seminary in the town of Princeton, but 
returned to College work again in 1834, and was 
Professor of Greek at the University of the City of 
New York until 1838. Professor Patton died in 
New York, May 6, 1839. ^^ ^^'^s one of the most 
able Greek scholars of his day, and added to educa- 
tional literature a revised edition of Donnegan's 
Greek Lexicon, and a translation from the German 
of Thiersch's Greek Verbs. 



JACOBUS, Melancthon Williams 

Princeton A.B. 1877. 
Born in Allegheny City, Pa., 1855 ; graduated Prince- 
ton College, 1877 ; Princeton Theological Seminary, 
1881 ; studied at the Universities of Gottingen and 
Berlin, Germany, 1881-1884 ; Pastor of Presbyterian 
Church. Oxford, Pa., 1884-1891 ; Professor of New 
Testament Exegesis and Criticism, Hartford (Conn.) 
Theological Seminary (Congregational) 1891-; Trustee, 
Lincoln University, Pa., 1887 ; Trustee, Princeton Col- 
lege, 1890 ; D.D. Lafayette, 1893. 

MELANCTHON WILLIAMS J.\COBUS, 
D.IX, Trustee of Princeton, was born in the 
City of -Allegheny, Pennsylvania, December 15, 1855. 
He prepared for College at the old Newell Insti- 
tute and at the \Veslern University of Pennsylvania, 
situated in Pittsburgh. He entered Princeton in 
the fall of 1873, graduating with honors in 1877. 
He remained one year in Allegheny in business con- 
nected with the settling of his father's estate. In 
1878 he entered the Theological Seminary at Prince- 
ton, graduating in 1881. In the fall of that year 
he went to G'ermany for further study, which was 
carried on at the Universities of Gottingen and Ber- 



lin. He returned to this country in the spring of 
1884 and in October of that year was called to the 
pastorate of the Presbyterian Church of Oxford, 
Pennsylvania. He remained in Oxford until 1891, 
when he accepted the invitation of the Hartford 
Theological Seminary (Congregational) to occupy 
its Chair of New Testament Exegesis and Criticism 
which position he still retains. While pastor at 
Oxford he was chosen to the Board of Trustees of 
Lincoln University (1888) and to the Hoard of 
Trustees of Princeton College (1890). In 1893 




M. W. J.\a)BL> 

he received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from 
Lafayette College. In 1897 he delivered the Stone 
Lectures at Princeton Theological Seminary. 



HARDING, John 'Ward 

Princeton Class of 1886. 
Born in Tunkhannock, Pa., 1863 : fitted for College 
at Wyoming Seminary in Kingston, Pa. ; entered 
Class of 1886 at Princeton, and left at end of Junior 
year; admitted to the Bar as Attorney-at-Law by the 
New Jersey Supreme Court in June 1889. and as Coun- 
sellor-at-Law, Feb. 1893 

JOHN WARD HARDING, Lawyer, was born in 
Tunkhannock, Pennsylvania, M.iy 28, 1863, 
son of William B. and Cynthia (Ward) Harding. 
He is of English extraction, his ancestors having 
migrated to this country with John Endicott's com- 



ii6 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



pan\-. He attended school at Wyoming Seminary 
in Kingston, Pennsylvania, ami afterwards entered 
Princeton in the Class of iS86, leaving, however, at 
the end of his Junior year. After studying law, lie was 
admitted as Attorney-at-Law in the Supreme Court 
of New Jersey in June 1SS9, and as Counsellor-at 
Law in February 1893. Mr. Harding was appointed 
Referee in Bankruptcy in 1898. He is a member, 
and was formcrlv Secretary of the Hamilton Club 




\ 



ISO. W. HAkljl\>. 



of Paterson, New Jersey, is a member also of the 
North Jersey Country Club of Paterson, and of the 
Lotos Club of New York. In politics he is a 
Republican. 



father was Benjamin Wright Raymond, a native of 
New York State who removed to Chicago in 1837, 
was twice elected Mayor of that City and founded 
the Elgin National Watch Company. George L. 
Raymond studied at A\'illiams, graduating in the 
Class of 1862, and after a course of study at Prince- 
ton Theological Seminary and in Ciermany was called 
to a Pastorate at Darby, Pennsylvania, where he 
preached from 1870 to 1S74. Li the latter year he 
was in\ited to the Chair of Oratory at \\'illiams, 
which he filled until 1S81, tlien went to Princeton 
as Professor in the same branch. In 18S3 he as- 
sumed the Chair of Oratory and .-Ksthetic Criticism, 
and since 1S93 has been Professor of .'Esthetics 
in Princeton. Professor Raymond is the author 
of several volumes, among others The Orator's 
Manual, a text-book. Modern Fishers of Men, a 
novel ; A Life in Song ; Ballads of the Revolu- 
tion and Sketches in Song, poems ; and the 
following works on .■Esthetics : Poetry as a Repre- 
sentative .'\rt ; 'I'he Cenesis of .\rt-Form ; Art in 
Theory ; Rh\thm and Harmony in Poetry and Music; 
and Painting, .Sculpture and .Architecture as Rep- 




RAYMOND, George Lansing 

Princeton A.M. l8g6. 

Born in Chicago, III., 1839 ; graduated Williams, 1862 ; 
studied theology at Princeton : Professor of Oratory, 
Williams, 1874-81 ; at Princeton, Professor of Oratory, 
1881-83; ''"d of iEsthetic Criticism, 1883-93; of ^Es- 
thetics, since 1893; degree of Master of Arts from Wil- 
liams 1865 and from Princeton 1896; L.H D , Rutgers, 
1883, and Williams, 1889 resenlative Arts. He received the degree of Master 

GEORGE LANSING R.^YMOND, L.H.D., of Arts from Williams in 1865, and from Princeton 
Professor of Esthetics at Princeton, was in 1896; Doctor of Letters from Rutgers in 1883 
born in Chicago, Illinois, September 3, 1839. His and from Williams in 18S9. 



GEO. L. R.AV.MOND 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



"7 



HOUSTON, William Churchill 

Princeton A. B. 1768, A.M. 
Born in North Carolina, 1740; graduated at Prince- 
ton, 1768; Tutor there, 1767-1771 ; Professor of Math- 
ematics and Natural Philosophy till 1783 ; Captain in 
the Militia in the Revolutionary War; member of the 
New Jersey Assembly, 1777: Council of Safety, 1778; 
delegate to the Continental Congress, 1779-80-81 ; en- 
gaged in the practice of law, 1783; again in Congress, 
1784; delegate to the Annapolis Convention, 17^6 ; 
Treasurer and Librarian of Princeton ; died in Frank- 
fort, Penn., 1788. 

WILLI.AM CHURCHILL HOUSTON, A.M., 
member of the Princeton Faculty during 
the Revolutionary War, was born in Cabarrus county. 
North Carolina, in 1740. His father was an Irish- 
man who emigrated in company with Lord Cabarrus. 
The son went to Princeton as a student and educa- 
tor, teaching in the College Grammar School while 
pursuing his classical course. He took his Bache- 
lor's and Master's degrees, the former in 1768, and 
having been chosen a Tutor in the College in his 
Junior year, acted in that capacity until elected 
Professor of Mathematics and Natural Philosophy 
in 1 77 1. At the breaking out of the American 
Revolution, President Witherspoon and Professor 
Houston were the only members of the College 
Faculty who remained at their posts. While Prince- 
ton was occupied by the British these two patriotic 
educators rendered valuable assistance to the cause 
of independence, the Professor commanding a scout- 
ing party and receiving a Captain's commission in 
the Second Battalion Somerset Militia. He re- 
turned to his post after the cessation of hostilities 
in that neighborhood continuing with the Faculty 
until 17S3 when he began the practice of law at 
Trenton. He also served for a time as College 
Treasurer and Librarian. He was a member of 
the New Jersey Assembly in 1777, of the Council 
of Safety in 1778 and of the Continental Congress 
in 1779-1780-1781. In 1784 he was again elected 
to Congress, was a delegate to the preliminary con- 
vention held at Annapolis, Maryland, in i 786, but 
was prevented by feeble health from attending the 
Constitutional Convention at Philadelphia in 1787. 
His death occurred in Frankfort. Pennsylvania, 
.August 1 2 of the following year. 



Princeton from 1889-91, receiving degree of MA. from 
that University in 1831 ; Assistant in Chemistry at 
Princeton 1891 : Instructor in Chemistry 1892-98 : Fellow 
in Chemistry in University of Chicago, 1896-98; As- 
sistant Professor of Chemistry at Princeton since i3g8. 

FRED NEHER, A.M., Assistant Professor of 
Analytical and Organic Chemistry at Prince- 
ton, was born in Troy, New York, April 30, 1867, 
son of John Henry and Harriet Vandenborgh, 
(Price) Neher. In his early youth he was a student 
in the city schools of Troy, New York, in Trey 
Academy from 1880 to 1884, and at Saratoga In- 
stitute from 1884 to 1885. In 1885 he entered 
Princeton and graduated with the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts in the Class of 1889. From June to October 
1890, he was employed as Chemist of the United 
States Fish Commission. He was a graduate student 
at Princeton from 1889 to 1891, receiving the de- 
gree of Master of Arts in 1891, when he was also 
made .Assistant in Chemistry, at the University. In 
1892 he was promoted to be Instructor in Chemis- 
tr\^, a position he held until 1898, during which time 
he was also Fellow in Chemistry in the L^niversity 
of Chicago, from 1896 to 1898. Since 1S98 he 




K. NEHER 

NEHER, Fred 

Princeton A.B. 1889. A.M. 
Born in Troy. N. Y.. 1867; early education in city 
schools of Troy. New York, at Troy Academy and at ^^^^^ ^^ Princeton, of the American Chemical 

U. S. Fish Commission, 1890; 



has been Assistant Professor of Chemistn,' at Prince- 
ton. Professor Neher is a member of the Nassau 

Saratoga Institute; graduated Princeton, 1889 ; Chemist , „ , .,^1 • u /- „„ii 

graduate student at Society, and of the Deutsche Chemische Gesell- 



1 1 



8 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



scliaft. He was married September 7, 1S98, to 
Harriet Hutchins, at ISeioit, Wisconsin. 



STARR, Moses Allen 

Princeton A.B. 1876, Ph.D. 1884, A.M. 1887, LL.D. 1889. 
Born in Brooklyn, N. Y., 1854; fitted for College 
privately: A B., Princeton, 1876; studied 1876-79; 
A.M., 1887 ; graduate of the College of Physicians 
and Surgeons of Columbia, i88o ; on the staff of Belle- 
vue Hospital, 1880-82; studied abroad, 1882-83 ; Ph.D., 
Princeton, 1884; specialist in nervous diseases in New 
York City since 1884; Professor of Nervous Diseases 
at the New York Polyclinic, 1884-1888: Professor 
at the College of Physicians and Surgeons, 1888-90; 
Professor of Nervous Diseases there since 1890 : Con- 
sulting Physician to the Presbyterian Orthopaedic, 
St Vincent's and St. Mary's Hospitals and the New 
York Eye and Ear Infirmary ; he received the honorary 
degree of LL D. from Princeton, 1889. 

MOS[':S ALLEN STARR, M.D., Ph.D., LL.D., 
Professor of Xervoiis Diseases in the Medi- 
cal Department of Columbia, was born in lirooklyn. 
New York, M:iy i6, 1854. He is a son of Egbert 
Starr and grarnlson of Peter Starr, a well-known 
lawyer and jurist of Middlebury, \'ermont. His 
mother was Charlotte Augusta .Mien, daughter of 
Moses Allen, a banker of New York City. He 
fitted for College in a private school at Orange, 
New Jersey, and entered Princeton in 1872 taking 
the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1876. He after- 
ward studied in Berlin for a year, and was tnade 
Master of .\rts in 1S79. He attended the College 
of Physicians and Surgeons at Columbia from 1S77, 
taking his degree in 1880. The following two 
years were spent on the House Staff of Bellevue 
Hospital, New York City, and in 1882 he went 
abroad and for a twelvemonth studied medicine in 
Heidelberg, Paris and Vienna. He received the 
degree of Doctor of Philosophy from Princeton in 
1884, and began practice as a specialist in nervous 
diseases in New York City in 1884. In the same 
year he was appointed Professor of Nervous Dis- 
eases at the New York Polyclinic. He held this 
position for four years when he resigned to take the 
Clinical Professorship of Diseases of the Mind and 
Nervous System in the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons. One year later he was given his present 
position there. He is also consulting Physician to 
the Presbyterian, Orthopcedic, St. Vincent's and St. 
Mary's Hospitals and the New York Eye and Ear 
Infirmary. Professor Starr is the author of a num- 
ber of standard text-books on nervous diseases and 
kindred subjects. Among them may be mentioned. 
Familiar Forms of Nervous Disease ; Brain Surgery, 
which has been translated into several languages ; 



and an .Atlas of Nerve Cells. He has also pub- 
lished numerous articles and monographs in the 
medical journals of the country. He is associate 
Editor of the Psychological Review and of the Jour- 
nal of Mental and Nervous Diseases. He married 
in June 1898, Alice Dunning. He is a member of 
a number of scientific and professional societies, 
among them the New York Academy of Sciences ; 
the New York Academy of Medicine of which he 
has been Corresponding Secretary since 1 890 ; the 
New York Neurological Society, the Ainerican 
Neurological Association of which he was President 
during 1S97-1898 and the Association of American 
Physicians. He is also a member of the Century, 
the LTniversity, and the Nineteenth Century Clubs. 
In June 1889 Princeton University conferred upon 
him the degree of Doctor of Laws. 



WINANS, Samuel Ross 

Princeton A.B. 1874, A.M., Ph.D. 1882 
Born in Lyons Farms, near Elizabeth, N. J., 1855; 
received his early education in the common schools, 
and in the Classical Academy of Elizabeth ; entered 
Sophomore year at Princeton, 1871 ; won Junior first 
honor scholarship, 1873; graduated with mental science 
fellowship, 1874 ; studied at Princeton as fellow, 1874- 
75; was classical teacher in academy at Elizabeth, 
1875-76 ; appointed Tutor in Greek at Princeton, 1876- 
81 ; made Adjunct Professor of Greek and Instructor 
in Sanskrit, 1881-83 > since 1883 has been Professor of 
Greek and Instructor in Sanskrit at Princeton. 

SAMUEL ROSS WINANS, Jr., Ph.D., Professor 
of Greek and Instructor in Sanskrit at Princeton, 
was born in Lyons Farms, near Elizabeth, New 
Jersey, March i, 1855, son of Samuel Ross and Ann 
( Woodruff) Winans. On the paternal side he is of 
Scotch and Dutch descent, an ancestor of the 
\Vinans (originally Wynants) having migrated from 
Holland to Staten Island in 1638. His mother's 
family were English. He was prepared for College 
in the Classical Schools of Dr. David H. Pierson and 
Dr. John F. Pingry at Elizabeth, New Jersey, and 
entered Princeton in the Sophomore Class, in 1871. 
In College he pursued all the courses in CIreek and 
Latin and in mental philosophy available in those 
days of limited specialization. He graduated at 
nineteen in 1874, with the Greek salutatory, and 
winning the mental science fellowship. He then 
studied in Princeton as fellow, from 1S74-1875. 
He was appointed classical teacher in the Acaderny 
at Elizabeth in 1875. The next year he went to 
Princeton as Tutor in Greek, and in 1S81 was made 
Adjunct Professor of (]reek and Instructor in San- 
skrit, and full Professor in 1883. A few months' 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



119 



absence in Germany in 1884 makes the only inter- 
ruption of his teaching work since 1876. He 
received the degree of Doctor of Philosophy from 
Princeton in 1882. Professor Winans has edited 




S. K. WINANS 

Xenophon's Memorabilia, Xenophon's Symposium 
and Xenophontis Libri Socratici. In politics he is 
an Independent. He was married to Sarah Mac- 
donald, of Sherbrooke, Nova Scotia, July 27, 1886. 
They have four children : James, Mary, Gertrude 
and David Winans. 



NIXON, John Thompson 

Princeton A.B. 1841, A.M., LI^.D. 1877. 

Born in Fairton, N. J., 1820; graduated at Princeton, 
1841 ; prepared for the legal profession and located in 
Bridgeton, N. J. ; served as Speaker of the New Jersey 
House of Representatives; member of Congress, and 
Judge of the United States District Court; chosen a 
Trustee of Princeton, 1864; died 1889. 

JOHN THOMPSON NIXON, LL.D., a Trustee 
of Princeton, was born in Fairton, New Jersey, 
August 31, 1820. He was a graduate of Princeton, 
Class of 1 84 1, and immediately began liis prepara- 
tions for the legal profession, being admitted to the 
Virginia P)ar in 1844, and to tlie courts of his native 
state the following vear. Locating permanently in 
liridgeton, he. engaged in ])ractice and being shortly 
afterward called into jniblic life w.is a member of 



the Lower House of the Legislature in 184S, and 
chosen Speaker in 1849; Representative to Con- 
gress from 1859 to 1863; and in 1870 was ap- 
pointed Judge of the United States District Court 
by President Grant. Judge Nixon was selected by 
the late John C. Green as one of the four residuary 
legatees to execute the latter's will which divided 
an estate valued at over seven million dollars among 
various benevolent objects. He was an active Pres- 
byterian, siding with the old-school members in his 
doctrinal views and rendering valuable assistance in 
securing a union of the opposing factions in 1 869, 
and served upon the committee appointed by the 
General Assembly to revise the Book of Discipline 
and form of church government. At the annual 
meeting of Princeton's two literary societies in 1863, 
he delivered the address, choosing for his subject 
that of Endurance, Individual and National. In 
1864 he was chosen a Trustee of Princeton, which 
conferred upon him the degrees of Master of Arts 
and Doctor of Laws, the latter in 1S77. Judge 
Nixon died in 1889. He was the author of Forms 




JOHN T. NIXON' 

and Proceedings under the Uiws of New Jersey, 
and prepared the second, third and fourth editions 
of Judge Elmer's Digest of the Laws of New Jersey, 
now known as Nixon's Digest. 



120 



UNIVERSITIES ANB THEIR SONS 



BILLINGS, Harry 

Harvard Class of 1884. 
Born in Quincy, Mass., 1862 ; educated at Adams 
Academy, and at Harvard ; engaged in insurance busi- 
ness in New York ; entered the service of the Pennsyl- 
vania Railroad Company; Contracting Agent of the 
Pennsylvania Railroad ; member of the Naval Reserve 
Association of the State of New York. 

H.\RRY BILLINGS, Contracting Agent of the 
Pennsylvania Railroatl Company, was born 
in (Quincy, ^L^ssaciulsetts, September 26, 1862. 
His parents, who were both of English descent, were 
Lemuel and Mary Rawson (Soule) Billings. After 



Reserve Association of the State. He is also a 
member of the Railroad Freight and Passenger 
Association and the Reform Club. 




H.-VRRY BILLINGS 

fitting for College at Adams Academy, Quincy, 
Massachusetts, Harry Billings passed through the 
four years Academic course at Harvard in the Class 
of 1884, although he did not take his degree. 
.After some time spent in Colorado he came to New 
York City, and went into the Insurance business in 
May 1886. For three years he was connected with 
the Norwich Union Fire Insurance Company. 
Then he entered the service of the Pennsylvania 
Railroad Company at its freight station in New 
York City, was transferred about a year later to the 
Broadway office and then after four years of clerical 
work, was made Contracting .Agent. He served for 
five years as a member of the First Naval Battalion 
of New York and is now a member of the Naval 



BURNHAM, Daniel Hudson 

Harvard and Yale A.M. (Hon.) 1895. 

Born in Henderson, N. Y., 1846: educated at Snow's 
Swedenborgian Academy, Chicago, public and hif,h 
schools of Chicago, Waltham (Mass.), Swedenborgian 
School,and with a private tutor; studied architecture in 
architects' offices for three years ; entered active busi- 
ness in 1872 at Chicago : from 1873 to 1891 was head of 
the firm of Burnham & Root, architects, since then has 
continued practice alone; was Chief of Construction, 
and subsequently Director of Works, Chief Engineer 
and Architect, of the World's Columbian Exposition; 
has built many important structures in Chicago and 
other principal cities of the United States: received 
the honorary degree of A.M. from Harvard and Yale in 
1895 ; is a member of leading clubs in New York, 
Buffalo, Chicago, etc. 

DANIEL HUDSON BURNHAM, A.M., Archi- 
tect, was born in Henderson, Jefferson 
county, New York, September 4, 1846, son of 
Edwin and Elizabeth (Weeks) Burnham. He is 
eighth in line from his ancestor who landed at Cape 
Ann, Massachusetts, in 1635. His great-great- 
grandfather and great-grandfather moved from 
Ipswich, Massachusetts, to Ipswich, Connecticut, and 
thence to Middletown, Vermont. Both of these 
men were in the Revolutionary War, both were in 
the Convention that formed Vermont out of the 
State of New York, and both were on the Committee 
on Constitution. Mr. Burnham's grandfather was a 
farmer in Vermont, and subsequently moved to the 
northern part of New York. His father was in 
youth a country merchant in New York, and after- 
wartis a wholesale merchant in Chicago, where he 
acquired wealth and influence, and was President of 
the Merchants' E.xchange. Daniel H. Burnham's 
early education began at Snow's Swedenborgian 
Academy, which was located in Chicago where the 
commercial building called "The Fair " now stands. 
Subsequently he attended public and high schools in 
Chicago, and after\vards spent three years in the 
Waltham (Massachusetts) Swedenborgian School, 
and one year with a private tutor, Mr. Hayward, of 
Bridgewatcr, ^h^ssachusetts. Altogether his educa- 
tion covered a thorough course in the classics, 
English, mathematics and science. He then studied 
architecture in architects' offices for tliree years. 
In the fall of 1872 he began active business in 
Chicago, and in May 1873 the firm of iSurnham & 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



I 21 



Root was formed ; the partner, John W. Root, being 
a young man who had tlien an experience of only a 
year and a half in architects' offices, and no previ- 
ous training. The partnership continued until the 
death of Mr. Root, on January 15, 1S91, and dur- 
ing the time of its existence the business of the firm 
was very large, amounting to about forty millions of 
dollars. The practice covered dwellings, com- 
mercial buildings, churches, hotels and office build- 
ings, besides fountains and other monumental work. 
In the fall of 1S90 Mr. Burnham was made Chief of 
Construction of the World's Columbian Exposition, 




DAXIEL H. BURNHAM 

and later became Director of Works, Chief Engineer 
and .\rchitect of that gigantic enterprise, having con- 
trol of all the physical activities, namely, the planning 
and designing, landscape, construction of buildings, 
fire and guard service, operation and maintenance. 
His partner, Mr. Root, was made Consulting Archi- 
tect, but died four months after his appointment and 
before anything had been done except to make a 
rough plan, which plan was designed by Messrs. 
Burnham & Root and Messrs. Olmsted & Codman 
of Boston. During the Exposition, and up to the 
present time, Mr. Burnham has continued in the 
practice of architecture. He has built most of 
the important structures in Chicago, besides many in 
Buffalo. Cleveland. Columbus, Detroit, Philadelphia 



and other cities. He has been at one time or 
another a member of the Union and Century clubs 
of New York ; the Ellicott Club of Buffalo ; Union 
Club of Kansas City; the Chicago, Union League, 
University, Argo, Technical, Literary, Quadrangle 
and Athletic Clubs of Chicago; the Evanston, 
County and Boat clubs of Evanston, Iliinois. 
where he resides ; and the Glen View Golf and 
Polo Club. In the spring of 1893, Har\'ard and 
Yale conferred ujion him the honorary degree of 
Master of Arts, both on the same day. In 1861, at 
the age of fifteen, Mr. Burnham enlisted in the 
Nineteenth Illinois Volunteers, the first regiment 
formed in Chicago for the Civil War; but his father 
had his signature taken off from the rolls because of 
his age. At the age of twenty-three he ran for the 
State Senate of Nevada, where he spent a year in the 
mines, but was defeated. This was his sole political 
experience. He was married January 20, 1876, to 
Margaret Sebring Sherman, the only daughter of 
John B. Sherman, of Chicago ; five children have 
been born to them : Ethel, John, Hubert, Daniel 
and Margaret Burnham. 



DORSEY, George Amos 

Harvard A.B. 1890, Ph.D. 1894. 

Born in Hebron. Ohio, 1868; educated at Denison 
University, at Harvard (1890) and at Harvard Graduate 
School ; Special Assistant of Department of Ethnology 
at the World's Columbian Exposition ; explorer, hon- 
orary commissioner World's Columbian Exposition to 
South America; Superintendent in Archaeology 
World's Columbian Exposition ; Assistant, later In- 
structor, at Harvard ; Assistant Curator and later 
Curator Department of Anthropology of Field Colum- 
bian Museum, Chicago ; fellow of the American Asso- 
ciation for the Advancement of Science ; member of the 
American Folk Lore Society, Boston Society of Natural 
History, American Society of Naturalists and Associ- 
ation of American Anatomists ; author of numerous 
papers. 

GEORGE AMOS DORSEY, Ph.D., Archaeolo- 
gist and Ethnologist, was born in Hebron, 
Ohio, February 6, 1868, and is the son of Edwin 
Jackson and Mary Elma (Grove) Dorsey. He 
received the degree of Bachelor of -Arts at Denison 
University, Granville, Ohio, in 1888, the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts at Harvard in 1890 and the degree 
of Doctor of Philosophy at the Har\^ard Graduate 
School in 1894. In 1 891-189 2 he was special 
Assistant of the Department of Ethnology at the 
\\'orld's Columbian Exposition. In 1892 he was 
appointed Honorary Commissioner to South .America 



122 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



for the World's Columbian Exposition ami con- 
ducted explorations in Peru, Chili, Ecuador and 
Colombia in 1892-1S93. He was later made 
Superintendent of Archeology at the Department 
of Ethnology World's Columbian Exposition. For 
the year 1 894-1 895 Mr. Dorsey was Assistant in 
Anthropology at Harvard, and for the next year was 
Instructor in the same branch. In 1896 he was 
appointed Assistant Curator in the Department of 
Anthropology at the Field Columbian Museum, 
Chicago, and a year later was made Curator. Mr. 
Dorsey is a fellow of the American Association for 
the Advancement of Science, and member of the 
American Folk Lore Society, the Boston Society of 
Natural History and the .American Society of Nat- 
uralists and the Association of .American .Anatomists. 
He married Ida Chadsey December 8, 1892, and 
has two children : Florence Dorothy and (ieorge 
Chadsey Dorsey. ,\ large number of papers have 
been written by him for anthropological and ana- 
tomical journals. 



EDES, Robert Thaxter 

Harvard A.B. 1858, M.D. 1861. 

Born in Eastport, Me., 1838; graduated Harvard, 
1858; M.D. 1861 ; Assistant Surgeon, U.S.N. , 1861-65; 
Assistant Professor of Materia Medica at Harvard, 
1870-75; Professor 1875-84; Jackson Professor of Clin- 
ical Medicine, 1884-86 ; practised in Washington, D. C. 
1886-91 ; now practising in Boston. 

ROI5ER r THAXTER EDES, M.D., Physician, 
and for more than ten years Professor at 
Harvard, was born in Eastport, Maine, September 
23, 1838, son of Rev. Richard Sullivan Edes 
(Brown 1830, Harvard Divinity School, 1834). 
He was graduated at Harvard in the Class of 1858 
and took his degree in medicine there in 1861. 
Offering his professional services to the Govern- 
ment at the outbreak of the Civil ^^'ar, he was 
appointed Acting .Assistant Surgeon in the United 
States Navy, and by successive promotions was 
advanced to the grade of Passed Assistant Surgeon, 
with which he resigned at the close of the War in 
1865. After a period of study in Europe, he 
practised his profession in and about Boston, and 
in 1870 was called to Harvard as .Assistant Professor 
of Materia Medica. He was made full Professor in 
1875, occupying that chair until 1884, when he 
was appointed Jackson Professor of Clinical Medi- 
cine. In 1886, Dr. Edes resigned his Professor- 
ship and removed to Washington, District of 



Columbia. During his connection witli Harvard 
he was for fourteen years Visiting Physician at the 
Boston City Hospital and a frequent contributor to 
medical journals and author of published works. 
He was a fellow of the American Academy, and is a 
member of the Association of American Physicians, 
American Neurological .Association, and olher 
Medical Societies, and of the Loyal Legion. In 
A\'ashington he was one of the visiting Physicians at 
the Garfield Memorial Hospital, and a member of 
the Philosophical Society. In T891 he returned to 




ROBERT 1. EDEb 



Boston as Resident Physician of the .Adams Nervine 
Asylum where he remained until 1897. He now re- 
sides and practises in Jamaica Plain, Boston. 



PRESCOTT, William Hickling 

Harvard A.B. 1814, LL.D. (Hon.) Columbia 1840 and Harvard 1841. 

Born in Salem, Mass., 1796 ; graduated Harvard, 
1814; devoted himself to historical work; received the 
degree of LL.D. from Harvard, Columbia, William and 
Mary, and the College of South Carolina; D.C.L., Ox- 
ford, England; died 1859. 

WILLIAM HICKLING PRESCOTT, LL.D.. 
D.C.L., Historian, was born in Salem, 
Massachusetts, May 4, 1796, the son of William 
Prescott (Harvard 1783, Fellow and Overseer) 
and graduated at Harvard in the Class of 18 14. 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



123 



His intention was to follow the profession of the 
law, but an accident which partially destroyed his 
eyesight, while he was yet an undergraduate, changed 
the entire course of his life and gave the world a 
great historian. A crust of bread thrown at ran- 
dom and without intention by one of his compan- 
ions, struck one of his eyes, seriously injuring it, 
and the other eye becoming sympathetically affected, 
the power of vision was altogether destroyed. Al- 
though thus handicapped, Mr. Prescott set himself 
bravely and patiently and with marvellous industry 
and persistence to the work which he had chosen. 




WM. H. PRESCOIT 

"I proposed," he wrote, in referring to this period, 
" to make myself a historian in the best sense of the 
term, and hoped to produce something which pos- 
terity would not willingly let die." He was obliged 
to make his researches and studies by the aid of 
readers, and to write without seeing, by the aid of 
a contrivance of parallel wires along which he 
moved a stylus tracing characters from a sheet of 
carbonized paper. In such laborious fashion he 
produced his Ferdinand and Isabella in 1837, his 
first work, which established at once his standing as 
a historian. It was published in translations in 
France, Spain, Germany and Italy. This was fol- 
lowed by his Conquest of JVIexico in 1843, and by 
others of that notable series of histories which 
charm as well as instruct the reader. Mr. Prescott 
received the distinction of membership in learned 



societies in Europe as well as in this countrj', and 
the University of 0.\ford, England, conferred upon 
him the degree of Doctor of Civil Law, in 1850. 
He was made Doctor of Laws by Columbia in 1840, 
by William and Mary and the College of South 
CaroHna in 1841, and by Harvard in 1843. He 
died in Boston, January 28, 1859. 



DWIGHT, Thomas 

Harvard A.B 1866, M.D. 1867. 

Born in Boston, Mass., 1843: studied two years at 
Harvard with the Academic Class of 1866; graduated 
at the Harvard Medical School 1867; spent two years 
in study abroad ; Instructor in Comparative Anatomy at 
Harvard, 1872-73: Lecturer and Professor Anatomy 
at Bowdoin 1872-76; Instructor Histology at Harvard 
1874-80 and Topographical Anatomy 1880-83 : Professor 
Anatomy and Physiology at Harvard 1885- 

THO^L\S DWIGHT, M.D., LL.D., Physician. 
Author, Lecturer, and Professor of .\natomy 
and Physiology at Harvard, was born in Boston, 
Massachusetts, October 13, 1843. He entered 
Harvard with the Class of 1866, but after two years 
transferred his study to the Medical Department 
from which he was graduated in 1867. For his 
essay on Intercranial Circulation, he was awarded 
the first Boylston Prize on graduation, and ten years 
later a paper on the Identification of the Human 
Skeleton won for him the ]irize of the Massachu- 
setts Medical Society. In 1872, on his return from 
a two years' period of study abroad. Dr. Dwight 
was given his Bachelor of Arts degree and was ap- 
pointed Instructor in Comparative Anatomy at 
Harvard. From 1S72 to 1876 he was Lecturer 
and Professor of .Anatomy at Bowdoin. In 1874 
he was made Instructor of Histology at Harvard, in 
which capacity he officiated until 1883, when he 
succeeded Oliver Wendell Holmes as Parkman Pro- 
fessor of Anatomy and Physiology. Dr. Dwight has 
the distinction of being the first of the Roman 
Catholic faith to hold a Harvard Professorship. He 
is a fellow of the .American Academy, member of 
the .American Philosophical Society, and has ser^-ed 
as President of the Catholic Union of Boston. He 
is also a member of various medical societies, has 
been Editor of the Boston Medical and Surgical 
Journal, has delivered courses of lectures before 
the Lowell Institute in Boston and other bodies, 
and is the author of several books and various 
published papers on subjects connected with his 
profession. 



124 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



MARSH, Arthur Richmond 

Harvard A.B. 1883. 
Born in Newport, R. I., 1861 : educated at Harvard 
(1883) and in Europe ; Professor of English Literature 
University of Kansas ; Professor of Comparative Lit- 
erature Harvard ; corresponding member of the Spanish 
Academy; Secretary of the Dante Society. 

ARTHUR RICHMOND MARSH, Professor of 
Comparative Literature at Harvard, was born 
in Newport, Rhode Island, October 3, 1861, and is 
the son of Ivory White Richardson and Mary Shep- 
herd (Whitman) Marsh. On his father's side he 
belongs to a branch of the Salem Marshes that set- 
tled in Sutton, Massachusetts, and then sent an 
offshoot to Andover, Vermont, where Professor 
Marsh's grandfather was born. On his mother's 
side he claims descent from the Whitmans and 
Keiths of Plymouth and the Bridgewaters of Mas- 
sachusetts. His earliest education was obtained in a 
school established by his mother in Newport after 
his father's death in 1S6S. Then he attended the 
Rogers High School in Newport and in 1S77 entered 
Harvard. On account of ill health he was obliged 
to abandon his College course during the years 1877 
to 1 88 1, but returned to graduate in 18S3. During 
the years 1 889-1 891 Mr. Marsh was engaged in 
study and travel in Europe. Before the latter period 
he had been for three years Professor of English 
Literature at the University of Kansas, and after his 
return from abroad was made Assistant Professor of 
Comparative Literature at Harvard. Since 1892 he 
has been corresponding member of the Spanish 
Academy, Madrid, and since 1893 Secretary of the 
Dante Society. On March 20, 1886 he married 
Marie Bigelow and has three children, John Bigelow, 
Dorothea Bigelow and William Barton Marsh. 



SHATTUCK, George Cheyne 

Harvard A.B. 1831. 

Born in Boston, 1813 ; graduated Harvard. 1831 ; M.D., 
1835 ; Professor in Harvard Medical School, 1855-74, 
and Dean 1864-69 ; Professor of Physiology in Trinity 
College, Hartford, Conn. ; died 1893. 

GEORGE CHEYNE SHATTUCK, M.D., 
Physician, and Professor in the Harvard 
Medical School, was born in Boston in 1813, son of 
Dr. George C. Shattuck. He was educated at the 
Boston Latin School and at Round Hill School, 
Northampton, Massachusetts, and graduated at 
Harvard in 1831. He took the degree of Master 
of .Arts in course, and graduated as a Doctor of 
Medicine from the Harvard Medical School in 1835. 



He spent the two following years in the study of 
medicine in Paris, and the next year in Great 
Britain. Clermany and Italy. In 1850 he was ap- 
pointed Visiting Physician to the Massachusetts 
General Hospital, a position which he held for 
many years, and in the following year he accepted 
the Professorship of the Institute of Medicine at 
Trinity College, Hartford, Connecticut. In 1855 
he was appointed Professor of Clinical Medicine 
in Harvard Medical School, and in 1859 was made 
Hersey Professor of the Theory and Practice of 
Medicine, holding that position until 1874. From 




CEO. c. SH.^nCCK 

1S64 to 1S69 he was Dean of the Medical School. 
Dr. Shattuck was President of the Massachusetts 
Medical Society from 1872 to 1874, and was a 
Fellow of the American Academy, also a member 
of other scientific societies. He died March 22, 
1893. 



KINNICUTT, Francis Parker 

Harvard A.B. 1868, M.A. i86g. 

Born in Worcester, Mass., 1846; A.B. Harvard, 1868; 
A.M. Harvard, i86g; M.D. College of Physicians and 
Surgeons, 1871 ; member of the resident staff of Belle- 
vue Hospital, 1871-73; studied abroad at Vienna, 
London and Heidelberg : Physician to St Luke's, the 
Presbyterian and Cancer Hospitals ; Consulting Phy- 
sician to Hospital for Ruptured and Crippled, Women's 
Hospital, Babies' Hospital; Minturn Hospital for 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



I 2i 



Contagious Diseases ; Member of the Advisory Board, 
New York Board of Health ; Professor of Clinical 
Medicine at the College of Physicians and Surgeons. 

FRANCIS PARKER KINNICUTT, A.M., M.D., 
Physician, and Professor of Clinical Medicine 
at the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Cokniibia, 
comes of old New England stock on both sides of 
the family. His father, Francis Harrison Kinnicutt, 
was eighth in direct descent from Roger Kinnicutt 
who settled at Warren, Rhode Island, in 1666, 
where the homestead is still in possession of the 
family. His mother, Elizabeth Waldo Parker, was 
descended from Captain James Parker, the first pro- 
prietor of Groton Massachusetts in 1660. The fam- 
ily has furnished many distinguished representatives 
to the Colonies and later to the State. He was born 
in Worcester, Massachusetts in 1846, received his 
early education privately and entered Harvard in 
1864, taking the degree of Bachelor of .Arts in 1868, 
and the degree of Master of Arts in 1869. He 
attended the College of Physicians and Surgeons, 
now the Medical Department of Columbia, becom- 
ing a full-fledged Doctor of Medicine in 1871, and 
was for a year and a half a member of the resident 
staff of Bellevue Hospital. On the conclusion of 
his services in the Hospital he went abroad and con- 
tinued his studies at the Hospitals of Vienna and 
London and the University of Heidelberg. Pro- 
fessor Kinnicutt has held many important profes- 
sional positions besides his post at Columbia. He 
is a Physician to St. Luke's, the Presbyterian and 
the Cancer Hospitals and Consulting Physician to 
the Hospital for the Ruptured and Crippled; the 
Women's Hospital ; the Babies' Hospital and the 
Minturn Hospital for Contagious Diseases, and is a 
member of the Advisory Board of the New York 
Board of Health. He is a Republican in politics 
and is a member of the Century, University, Har- 
vard and City Clubs. He married in 1875 Eleanora 
Kissel of New York City. They have two children : 
Francis Harrison (Harvard .A.B. 1897) and Gustav 
Herman Kinnicutt (Harvard .A.B. 1898). 



HARRIS, Thaddeus William 

Harvard A.B, 1815, M.D. 1820. 

Born in Dorchester, Mass., 1795 : graduated from 
Harvard 1815 ; studied medicine and practised at Mil- 
ton, Mass. several years ; was Librarian at Harvard 
1831-56 during which time he acted as Instructor in 
Botany and Entomology; appointed Commissioner for 
a zoological and botanical survey of Mass., 1837, and 
catalogued the insects of that state ; prepared a report 



on Insects Injurious to Vegetation, and was a distin- 
guished antiquarian ; died in Cambridge, 1856. 

THADDEUS WILLIAM HARKI.S, A.^L, 
M.D., Botanist and Entomologist, was born 
in Dorchester Massachusetts, November 12, 1795. 
Graduating at Harvard in 1815 and subsequently 
studying medicine, he was engaged in practice at 
Milton Hill, until 183 1, in which year he returned 
to Harvard as Librarian and Instructor in Botany 
and Entomology, remaining there for the rest of his 
life. As Commissioner for the Zoological and 
Botanical Survey of Massachusetts, the duties of 
which he began in 1837, he collected specimens 
and prepared a catalogue of insects common to that 
State, amounting to two thousand three hundred and 
fifty different species, and his report on Insects 
Injurious to \'egetation was issued at the State's 
expense. Dr. Harris organized the Harvard 
Students' Natural History Society, was a member 
of the Massachusetts Historical and Horticultural 
Societies and a fellow of the American Academy. 
He received the degree of Master of .Arts from 
Harvaril in course and that of Doctor of Medicine 
in 1820. His death occurred in Cambridge, Jan- 
uary 16, 1856. He was widely known as an anti- 
quarian and wrote over fifty papers relative to his 
researches in that direction. William Thaddeus 
Harris, son of the above, born in Milton, January 
25, 1826, was graduated from Harvard with the 
Class of 1846 and prepared for the legal profession. 
.A serious physical disability cut short a life that 
promised unusual brilliancy in the field of scholar- 
ship, and his death occurred in Cambridge, October 
19, 1840, at the age of twenty-eight years. For the 
Massachusetts Historical Society he edited and 
added new and important notes to Hubbard's His- 
tory of New England, was also the Editor of the 
third volume of the Historical and Genealogical 
Register, and published Epitaphs from the Old 
Burying-Ground at Cambridge. 



JACKSON, John Barnard Swett 

Harvard A.B. 1825, M.D. 1829. 

Born in Boston, Mass., 1806; graduated Harvard 
1825; M.D. ,1829; Professor in Harvard Medical School 
from 1847 to the time of his death, and Dean of that 
School, 1853-55; died 1E79. 

JOHN BARNARD SWETT JACKSON, M.D., 
Physician, and Professor at Han-ard, was born 
in Boston, Massachusetts, in 1S06, and graduated at 
Harvard in 1825, taking the degree of Doctor of 



26 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



Medicine at the Medical Sclioul of tliat University 
in 1829. Ht attained eminence in the practice of 
his profession, and in 1847, when the Professorship 
of Pathological Anatomy was established at Harvard, 
he was called to that Cliair. He continued in this 
position to the time of his death, the title being 
changed, in 1854, to that of the Shattuck Professor- 
ship of Morbid Anatomy. He was Dean of the 
Medical School from 1S53 to 1855, succeeding 
Dr. Oliver Wendell Holmes in that office. Dr. 
Jackson was connected witii the Massachusetts Gen- 
eral Hospital as Pathologist, Assistant Physician and 




J. U. b. JACKSU.N 

Physician for nearly thirty years, and to him was 
largely due the formation and care of the Anatomical 
Museum of the Boston Society for Medical Improve- 
ment. A large part of the labors of his life was 
devoted to the pursuit of Morbid Anatomy, and the 
results of his researches were published from time 
to time, mainly in the Boston ]\Iedical and Surgical 
Journal. He was a Fellow of the American Acad- 
emy and other learned societies. He died in 
1879- 

MYERS, James Jefferson 

Harvard A. B. 1869, LL.B. 1878. 

Born in Frewsburg, N. Y., 1842: graduate of Har- 
vard i86g, and of the Law School 1873; Instructor in 
the College, 1871-72; admitted to the Bar in Boston, 



and began practice there in 1874; prominent in society 
and club circles, public improvement and reform move- 
ments of Cambridge ; Representative to the Legisla- 
ture three terms. 

JA:MES JEFFERSON MYERS, A.M., Lawyer, 
was born in Frewsburg, New York, November 
20, 1842. He is a son of Robert and Sabra 
(Stevens) Myers, his father of Dutch descent, and 
his mother of New England ancestry. The acade- 
mies of Western New York afforded him excellent 
opportunity for preparatory training, and while 
fitting for College his studies were interspersed with 
occasional outings in the lumbering districts of the 
upper Ohio and Alleghany rivers, acquiring through 
severe exercise in the open air, a vigorous constitu- 
tion and superior muscular development. Entering 
Harvard with the physique of an athlete and his 
mental fiiculties equally well developed, he was an 
ideal student in every particular, excelling in field 
and aquatic sports as well as in all of his studies. 
(Graduating in 1S69 he spent a year abroad before 
entering the Law School, and during the College 
year of 1871 and 1872 he was an Instructor in 
Mathematics. After completing the regular legal 
course (1873) he concluded his preparations in a 
law office in New York, and having been admitted 
to the Suffolk Bar in Boston, in 1S74 he becaine a 
member of the law firm of Myers and Warner of 
that city. About the year 1875, Mr. Myers look up 
his permanent residence in Cambridge, and immedi- 
ately identified himself with the social life of the 
University City, taking a lively interest in its general 
welf;ire and entering into the prevailing desire for 
advancement with such fervor as soon to be actively 
concerned in the principal institutions, clubs, social 
events, reform movements and measures for public 
improvements. Besides being a member of the Citi- 
zens' Trade Association and a Trustee of the Prospect 
Union, he holds membership in several clubs, in- 
cluding the Cambridge and Colonial Clubs, of which 
latter he was elected President in 1895 ; was 
Treasurer of the Citizens' Committee for raising 
funds for the public library ; has for tiiany years served 
upon the Executive Committee of the Cambridge 
Civil Service Reform .'Association, and Treasurer of 
the local branch of the Indian Rights Association ; 
and was President of the Library Hall Association 
in 1892. He is also a member of the IMassachusetts 
Republican Club, the Massachusetts Reform, Mid- 
dlesex, Union, St. Botolph, Merchants and Univer- 
sity Clubs of Boston ; and of the Zeta Psi, and 
University Clubs of New York. Elected to the 



UNIVERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



Lower House of the Legislature from the First 
Middlesex District in November 1892, and re- 
elected in 1893 and 1894, he was recognized as a 
leader upon the floor and in the committee-room 
during his membership of that body, and was the 
promoter of several enactments, the enforcement of 
which has fully attested the wisdom of his judgment. 
Mr. Myers received from Harvard the degrees of 
Master of Arts and Bachelor of Laws, the latter in 
1873- 

PERRY, Thomas Sergeant 

Harvard A.B. 1866. 
Born in Newport, R. I., 1845 : graduated at Harvard 
1866; Tutor there 1868-72 ; Instructori877-8i : Lecturer 
1881-82; Editor of the North American Review 1872-74; 
author of several instructive works. 

THOM.\S SERGEANT PERRY, A.AL, Author, 
is a descendant of Commodore Oliver Haz- 
ard Perry, U. S. N., and of Benjamin Franklin, and 
was born in Newport, Rhode Island, January 23, 
1845. His classical studies were supplemented 
with courses at the Sorbonne and College of France, 
Paris, and at the L'niversity of Berlin. Returning 
to Harvard as Tutor in German in 1S68, he con- 
tinued in that capacity till 1872, was an Instructor 
in English Language and Literature from 1877 to 
1 88 1, and for the succeeding year a member of 
the lecture force. .As a writer of books of an in- 
structive character Mr. Perry has won merited 
distinction, and is the author of: Life and Letters 
of Francis Lieber ; English Literature in the Eigh- 
teenth Century ; From Opitz to Lessing ; The 
Evolution of the Snob; and History of Greek 
Literature. From 1872 to 1874 he was Editor of 
the North .American Review. 



NEWELL, Otis Kimball 

Harvard M,D. 1882. 
Born in Boston, Mass., i860; educated in the public 
schools and by private tuition : took his Medical degree 
at Harvard in 1882; concluded his studies abroad; 
located for practice in Boston ; appointed Out-Patient 
Surgeon to the Mass. General Hospital; served as 
Chairman of Overseers of the Poor; on Board of Man- 
agers of Farm School; Commissioner of Public Insti- 
tutions, 1891-92 ; Assistant iu Anatomy at Harvard, 
1884-87; and Assistant Demonstrator till i88g. 

OTIS KIMBALL NEWELL, M.D., Surgeon, was 
born in Boston. Massachusetts, December 
14, i860. .After concluding his attendance at the 
public schools he took an advanced course of study 
under private instruction, and when ready for his 



127 

professional training he entered the Medical De- 
partment of Harvard, graduating in 1882. A year 
and a half later he left the Massachusetts General 
Hospital (where he had been House Officer since 
his graduation) for the purpose of pursuing a year's 
study in Vienna, and shortly after commencing the 
practice of his profession in Boston he was appointed 
Out-Patient Surgeon to the .Massachusetts General 
Hospital. His public services consist thus far of 
the Chairmanship of the Overseers of the Poor, 
Boston ; membership of the Board of Managers of 
the Farm School, Thompson's Island, Boston Har- 




OTIS K. NEWELL 

bor; and of the Public Institutions Commission, 
upon which he served in 1891-1892. Dr. Newell 
was an .Anatomical .Assistant at the Harvard Medical 
School from 1884 to 1887, and .Assistant Demon- 
strator of that subject till 1889. He is Secretary of 
the Boston Society of Medical Science, and a mem- 
ber of the Boston Societies for Medical Improve- 
ment, and for Medical Observation, and the 
Massachusetts Medical Society. He was the first 
practitioner in the United States to use an electric 
illuminating apparatus for examining the cavities of 
the body, and he has also contributed a number 
of translations and original articles to medical 
literature. Public affairs and political economy 
also absorb a portion of his interest. 



128 



UNIFERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



BUCKINGHAM, Charles Edward 

Harvard A.B. 1840, M.D. 1844. 

Born in Boston. Mass., 1821 ; graduated Harvard, 
1840; M.D. ,1844; Adjunct Professor of the Theory and 
Practice of Medicine, 1865-68; Professor of Obstetrics 
and Medical Jurisprudence, 1868-77; died 1877. 

Cii.\i<i.i;s i;inv.\RD Buckingham, M.n.. 
Piiysici.in, and Professor in the Harvanl 
Medical School, was born in Boston, Massachusetts, 
in 1S21. He was the son of Joseph T. Bucking- 
ham, the printer and subsequently the editor of the 
Boston Courier. .After attending the Boston T.atin 




CHAS. E. BUCKINGHAM 

School and the Cambridge Classical School, he 
graduated at Harvard in 1840. He then began the 
study of medicine under Dr. Morrill Wyman of 
Cambridge, and pursued his studies in the Harvard 
Medical School, receiving the degree of Doctor of 
Medicine in 1844. In 1865 he was appointed 
.Adjunct Professor of the Theory and Practice of 
Medicine in Harvard, holding that position until 
1868, when he assumed the Chair of Obstetrics and 
Medical Jurisprudence, which lie occupied until his 
death, in 1877. Dr. Buckingham was among the 
first of the Surgeons appointed to the Boston City 
Hospital ; and was actively engaged in practice in 
that city. 



FITZ, George Wells 

Harvard M.D. 1891. 

Born in New York, N. Y., i860; educated at Oswego 
State Normal School and at Harvard Medical School ; 
teacher of Science in Cook County Normal School; 
Instructor in Physiology and Hygiene and later Assis- 
tant Professor at Harvard ; Corresponding Secretary of 
the American Association for the Advancement of 
Physical Education; member of the American Phy- 
siological Society, American Association for the 
Advancement of Physical Education and the Massa- 
chusetts Association of Boards of Health. 

GEORGE WELLS FITZ, M.D., .Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Physiology and Hygiene at Har- 
vard, was born in New Vork City, March i6, i860. 
His father, Henry Fitz, was the first in America to 
make refracting telescopes of which he was the 
leading manufacturer until his death in 1863. His 
giandfitlier was Henry Fitz, a well-known writer, 
editor and Universalist preacher. His mother, Julia 
-Ann (Wells) Fitz, was a direct descendant of Wil- 
liam Wells, Esquire (1600-1652), an English law- 
yer, who was one of the first settlers of Southold, 
New York. The early education of Dr. Fitz was 
obtained at private schools in New York, and at the 
Oswego State Normal School, from the scientific 
course of which he w-as graduated in 1883. He 
immediately accepted from the Cook County Nor- 
mal School of Illinois an offer of a position as In- 
structor in science. He remained here until 1887 
when he tendered his resignation, that he might 
study medicine. He entered the Harvard Medical 
School the same year, from which he was graduated 
in 1 89 1, after the service of the Children's Hospital 
and of the McLean .Asylum. During the year 1891- 
1892 he held a Fellowship at the Medical School, 
carrying on investigation in the physiology of exer- 
cise. In 1892, he became connected with Har- 
vard University as Instructor in Physiology and 
Hygiene. Having organized the department and 
demonstrated the possibility of establishing a system 
of medical visitation, he was, in 1894, appointed 
.Assistant Professor in Physiology and Hygiene and 
Medical Visitor. In 1899, he resigned from the 
Lhiiversity to engage in private practice. He has 
contributed many articles and papers to various 
magazines and scientific publications on physiologi- 
cal, medical, hygienic and educational subjt-cts, and 
is the inventor of numerous pieces of apparatus for 
investigation and demonstration. He is a fellow of 
the Massachusetts Medical Society and of the 
.American Association for the .Advancement of Sci- 
ence, and a member of the .American Physiological 



UNIVERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



129 



Society, the Boston Society of Natural History, the 
Massachusetts Association of Boards of Health, 
and of various educational organizations. He has 
been Corresponding Secretary of the American As- 




G. W. FITZ 



sociation for the Advancement of Pliysical Education 
since 1895 and is Editor of the American Physical 
Education Review. He was married in 1897 to 
Rachel Kent Taylor of Cambridge. 



VERRILL, Addison Emory- 
Harvard SB. 1862, A.M. 1867. 
Born in Greenwood, Me., 1839; attended the Norway 
Liberal Institute, Norway, Me. ; graduated at the Law- 
rence Scientific School of Harvard, 1862; Special 
Assistant of Louis Agassiz in Cambridge, Mass., 1860- 
64; Professor of Zoology at Yale, 1864-67; received 
A.M. from Yale, 1867; Curator of the Zoological De- 
partment of the Peabody Museum at Yale since its 
foundation ; Professor of Comparative Anatomy and 
Entomology in the University of Wisconsin, 1867-70: 
Instructor in Geology in the Sheffield Scientific School. 
1871-94 : has made and published many original re- 
searches and discoveries in science ; has made valuable 
zoological collections especially in cooperation with the 
U. S. Fish Commission. 

ADDISON EMORY VERRILL, A.M., Z06I- 
ogist, and Curator of the Zoological De- 
partment of the Peabody Museum at Yale, was born 
in Greenwood, Maine, February 9, 1839. His an- 

VOL. HI. — 9 



cestors for six generations back have been English, 
those of the family who emigrated having settled in 
towns on Cape Ann, Massachusetts. His parents 
were George W. and Lucy (Hilborn) Verrili. In 
1852 the family moved to Nor\vay, Maine, and in 
the Liberal Institute of that place Professor Verrili 
was prepared for College. He entered Han-ard in 
1859, and electing the studies of the Lawrence 
Scientific School graduated with the degree of Bach- 
elor of Science in 1862. Until 1864 he acted as 
Special Assistant to Louis Agassiz, the famous scien- 
tist of the Zoological Museum at Har\'ard. In 1864 
he was appointed Professor of Zoology at Yale and 
remained in that position until 1867, receiving dur- 
ing that time an appointment as Curator of the Zoo- 
logical Department of the Peabody Museum, which 
position he fills at the present time. In 1867 having 
received the degree of Master of Arts from Yale, he 
went to the University of Wisconsin to assume the 
duties of Professor of Comparative .Anatomy and En- 
tomology in that Institution. .Vfter three years he 
returned to Yale and accepted an appointment as In- 
structor in Geology in the Sheffield Scientific School. 




.\. E. VKRKII.I. 



He continued in that office until 1894 when he ceased 
teaching to devote himself to his other work. In 
addition to his work as a teacher, Professor Verrili 
has gained a wide reputation as an original investi- 



130 



UNIl'ERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



gator and collector of specimens, his most notable 
results having been obtained from extensive explora- 
tions of the sea bottom off the United States Coasts. 
He first began a systematic study of the marine 
animals of our coast in 1861, and for many years 
after that he continued the work. From 1871 to 
1888 he was .Assistant in Charge of the Deep Sea 
Dredging and other Explorations of the United 
States Commission of Fish and Fisheries. In this 
connection he collected a great portion of the nu- 
merous zoological specimens now in the Peabody 
Museum at Vale. The value of such a service to 
the University will be appreciated when it is remem- 
bered that before Professor Verrill's contributions 
commenced Yale had no collection of marine speci- 
mens worthy of mention. Extensive accounts of 
his discoveries have been published in a large num- 
ber of articles which he has written for various 
scientific journals. These papers, which will always 
be of greatest value in the world of science, are de- 
voted chiefly to original investigations of corals and 
related forms, many groups of marine animals, both 
native and foreign, being exhaustively treated. He 
is a member of the National Academy of Sciences 
and of many other such organizations both Amer- 
ican and European in which he has held important 
offices. Since 1868 he has been .i^ssociate Editor 
of the American Journal of Science. He married 
June 15, 1865, Flora Louisa Smith, sister of Pro- 
fessor Sidney Irving Smith, of Yale. He has five 
children : George Elliott, .Alpheus Hyatt, Edith 
Barton, Clarence Sidney and Lucy Lavinia ^'er^ill. 



BRODEUR, Clarence Arthur 

Harvard A.B. 1887. 

Born in Colchester, Vt., 1865; educated at Harvard 
(1887), and at the Boston University School of Law; 
Principal of the Hunnewell School, Wellesley, Mass. > 
Principal of the Franklin (Mass I High School.; ad- 
mitted to the Bar ; teacher of Mathematics, Tacoma. 
(Washington! Academy; Principal of the Tacoma 
High School; Superintendent of Schools at Warren, 
Mass., and later at Chicopee, Mass.; Secretary of 
Puget Sound Congregational Club; Secretary, and 
later President of the Massachusetts Superintendents' 
Association. 

CLARENCE ARTHUR BRODEUR, Superin- 
tendent of Schools at Chicopee, Massachu- 
setts, was born in Colchester, Vermont, September 
25, 1865, and is the son of Charles and Priscilla 
(Marsh) Brodeur. He was educated at the schools 
of Franklin Falls, New Hampshire, until he en- 



tered Harvard, where he graduated in 1887, grad- 
uating magna cum laude and receiving Honors in 
Natural History and Honorable Mention in His- 
tory. Later he passed through the Boston Univer- 
sity School of Law, and was admitted to the Bar 
in the State of Washington in September 1891. 
Before the latter event, however, he had served in 
1 887-1 888 as Principal of the Hunnewell School, 
Wellesley, Massachusetts, and in 1 888-1 890 as 
Principal of the Franklin, Massachusetts, High 
School. The bent of his talents, indeed, was 
strongly toward educational work, ujion which he at 




CLARENCE k. BRODEUR 

once entered. In 1892 he was made teacher of 
Mathematics at Tacoma Academy, Washington, and 
the same year was made Principal of the Tacoma 
High School. A year later he was called to War- 
ren, Massachusetts, as Superintendent of Schools, 
and in 1896 was given his present position at 
Chicopee, Massachusetts. Mr. Brodeur served in 
1891-1893 as Secretary of the Puget Sound Con- 
gregational Club, in 1 895-1 896 as Secretary of the 
Massachusetts Superintendents' .Association, and in 
1 896-1 89 7 as President of the same. He married, 
June 24, 1887, Mary Cornelia Latta, and had four 
children : Arthur Gilchrist, Mary Silsby, Marion 
Marsh and Harold Hills Brodeur; two of whom, 
Mary and Marion, died in 1892. 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



31 



EGLESTON, Thomas 

Yale 1854, M.A. (Hon.) 1857 — Princeton LL.D. 1874. 

Born in New York City, 1832; graduated at Yale, 
1854, and School of Mines, Paris, i860; connected with 
the Smithsonian Institution, 1861-64; planned and 
founded the Columbia School of Mines in 1864 and took 
the Chair of Mineralogy and Metallurgy the same year; 
served on the Geological Survey of the Union Pacific 
Railway, 1866; Commissioner to examine the fortifica- 
tions, 1868; Mint Commissioner, 1870-78-85; and well- 
known expert in Mining and Metallurgy. 

THOMAS EGLESTON, Ph.D., LL.D., 
Metallurgist, and Founder of the Colum- 
bia School of Mines, was born in New York City, 
December 9, 1S32, son of Thomas and Sarah Jesup 
(Stebbins) Egleston. He is a descendant of Bagot 
Egleston, who settled at Dorchester, Massachusetts, 
in 1630; and five years later removed to Windsor, 
Connecticut, of which town he was one of the 
founders. James Egleston, the next in line, who 
was born in England in 1628, fought in the Pequod 
War, receiving for his services the freedom of 
Windsor, and he died December i, 1679. The 
line of descent continues through Nathaniel Egles- 
ton born August 15, 1666. Joseph Egleston, who 
was born in 1700 and died ALay i, 1774, and Seth 
Egleston born April 19, 1731, and died March 20, 
1772, went from Sheffield, ALassachusetts, to the 
defence of Fort William Henry in 1757. Azariah 
Egleston, Professor Egleston's grandfather, who was 
born February 3, 1757, served as a ALxjor in the 
.American Army during the Revolutionary War, and 
his death occurred June 12, 1822. He married 
Hannah, daughter of General Paterson, and his son 
Thomas, the Professor's father, who was born Sep- 
tember II, 1800, died July 12, 1861. The subject 
of this sketch attended the schools in New York, 
Massachusetts and Connecticut. He was graduated 
at Yale with the Class of 1854, and at the Ecole des 
Mines, Paris, in i860. From 1861 to 1864 he was 
in charge of the extensive collections of mineral and 
metallurgical products at the Smithsonian Institu- 
tion, A\"ashington. His publication in 1863 of a 
plan for a School of Mines resulted in the present 
institution of that character connected with Columbia. 
He was made Professor of Mineralogy and Metal- 
lurgy there in 1864, and was joined in his plans by 
Charles F. Chandler and Francis L. Vinton, the 
school being developed under their joint super\-ision. 
In 1 866, Professor Egleston served the government 
as Commissioner to examine fortifications ; he was 
also Mint Commissioner in 1870, 1878, and 1885. 
His ser\ices were for many years in demand as 



Consulting Expert on Metallurgical subjects, and his 
professional opinion was extensively sought in min- 
ing matters, the treatment of ores, furnace construc- 
tion and allied problems. He received the degree 
of Master of Arts from Yale in 1857, that of Doctor 
of Philosophy from Princeton in 1874, and Doc- 
tor of Laws from Trinity in the latter year. Dr. 
Egleston became Professor Emeritus at Columbia in 
1897. He was President of the American Institute 
of Mining Engineers, and was for many years Vice- 
President of the New York Academy of Sciences, 
and a member of numerous scientific societies, 
from most of which he withdrew some time since. 
He was President of the Society of Civil Engineers, 
the Iron and Steel Institute, charter member of the 
Society of Mechanical Engineers and Society of 
Electrical Engineers, and the American Academy 
of Sciences. He was made Chevalier of the Legion 
of Honor of France in 1890, and an officer in 1895. 
He was Vice-President of the Protestant Episcopal 
Mission Society and the Bible and Common Prayer- 
Book Society, in which latter he was chairman of 
the Committee on Revisions in 1876; Convention 
Trustee of the General Theological Seminar)', mem- 
ber of Trinity Church Corporation, New York, and 
ex-officio Tnistee of the Leek and Watts Orphan 
Asylum ; is a member of the Century Club, and 
formerly belonged to other social organizations. 
In 1876 he was Secretary of the Public Park .Asso- 
ciation. He married Augusta McVickar, who was 
born June 22, 1828, and died January 9, 1895. 
Professor Egleston received a silver and bronze 
medal from the French Government in 1867. In 
1873 he was United States Commissioner to the 
Vienna Exposition. He took out, at various times, 
numerous metallurgical patents, has contributed 
extensively to scientific literature, published Life of 
Major General Paterson, and is engaged in prepar- 
ing a life of Major Azariah Egleston. 



FOSTER, Roger 

Yale B A. 1878, M.A. 1883 —Columbia LL.B iSSo. 

Born in Worcester, Mass., 1857; attended Boston 
Latin School and University of Marburg, Germany; 
graduated Yale, 1878; Columbia Law School, 1880; 
M.A. Yale, 1883; practised law in New York; member 
New York City Tenement House Commission, 1885; 
Lecturer in Yale Law School since 1888. 

OGER FOSTER, M.A., Jurist, was bom in 
Worcester, Massachusetts, April 21, 1857^ 
the son of Dwight and Henrietta Perkins (Baldwin) 
Foster. His father, the Hon. Dwight Foster, (Vale 



R 



132 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



1848) was one of the leading jurists of Massachu- 
setts, having held the office of Attorney-General of 
the State, 1S61-1S64, and holding a seat as Justice 
on the Supreme Bench, 1 866-1 1S69. Roger Foster 
attended the public schools in Worcester, then 
entered the Boston Latin School, and in 1S74 
studied at the University of Marburg in Germany. 
Returning to this country, he entered Yale, and was 
graduated in the Class of 1878, where he took the 
degree of Master of Arts in 1S83. His law studies 
were pursued in Columbia Law School, from which 
he graduated in 1880 and was admitted to the New 
Vork Bar. In 1885 he was appointed by Governor 
Flower a member of the New York City Tenement 
House Commission. He is the author of several 
text-books on legal subjects, among them a Treatise 
on Federal Practice and Commentaries on the Con- 
stitution. Since 1888, Mr. Foster has been Lec- 
turer on Federal Jurisprudence and Constitutional 
Law in the Yale Law School. 



HOPPIN, James Mason 

Yale B.A. 1840 — Harvard LL.B. 1842. 
Born in Providence, R. I., 1820; received his early 
education privately and fitted for College at a school in 
New Haven; A.B. Yale, 1840; LL.B. Harvard Law 
School, 1842 ; studied divinity for two years at the Union 
Theological Seminary, one year at Andover, Mass., and 
one year at the University of Berlin ; Pastor of a church 
in Salem, Mass., 1850-59 ; Professor of Homiletics and 
the Pastoral Charge at Yale, 1861-79; Professor of the 
History of Art at Yale, 1879-99; Emeritus Professor 
since 1899. 

JAMES MASON HOPPIN, D.D., Professor of 
Art at Yale and Emeritus Professor since 1S99, 
was born in Providence, Rhode Island, January i 7, 
1820. His parents were Benjamin and Esther 
Phillips Hoppin. The first representative of his 
family in this country was Stephen Hoppin, one 
of the founders of Dorchester, Massachusetts, whose 
name is on the deed of purchase from the Indians. 
His grandfather, Benjamin Hoppin, was a commis- 
sioned officer in the War of the Revolution. His 
mother was related to the Cotton, Winslow and 
Gushing families of Massachusetts. He received 
his early education in the private schools of Roswell 
Smith and Thomas Hartshorn in Providence, and 
fitted for College at the school of Dr. Aaron N. 
Skinner in New Haven, entering Yale in 1836 and 
graduating with the Class of 1840. After leaving 
College he entered Harvard Law School, continuing 
there two years and taking the degree of Bachelor 
of Laws. He then began the study of divinity. 



spending two years at the Union Theological Semi- 
nary in New York City, one year at Andover, Massa- 
chusetts and one year at the University of Berlin, 
Germany, under Neander. He remained three 
years in Europe and after his return to America in 
1850 was Pastor of a church in Salem, Massachusetts, 
for nine years. After a year's vacation in ]{;urope. 
Dr. Hoppin was made Professor of Homiletics and 
the Pastoral Charge in Yale in 1861. In 1879 he 
resigned his Professorship to take that of the History 
of .^rt which he held until 1899, when, in his eightieth 
year and after thirty-eight years of continuous ser- 




J. M. HOPPIN 

vice in the University, he retired, the Corporation 
recognizing his ability by requesting him to continue 
his connection with the University as Professor 
Emeritus. Professor Hoppin besides his professional 
work, has published a number of important books 
among which are : Old England ; Its Scenery, Art 
and People ; Office and Work of the Christian Min- 
istry ; Life of Rear-Admiral Andrew Hull Foote ; 
Memoir of Henry Armitt Brown ; Homiletics ; Pas- 
toral Theology; Office of the Ministry; Sermons 
on Faith, Hope and Love ; The Early Renaissance, 
and other Essays on Art Subjects ; and Greek Art 
and Greek Soil. During the latter years of his edu- 
cational work he has devoted himself especially to 
Greek Art and Literature, but his deepest enthu- 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



33 



siasm has always been for his early studies in the- 
ology and matters of the religious life. He is a 
Director in the New Haven Colony Historical Soci- 
ety, and Local Secretary of the Egyptian Explora- 
tion Fund ; and is a member of the American 
Oriental Society, the Victoria Institute of London, 
the Society of American History and the American 
Society of Church History. He married in 1850 
Mary Deming Perkins of Litchfield, Connecticut. 
They had two children ; Benjamin and James Mason 
Hoppin, the latter, a graduate of Oxford, England, 
having died in 1897. Professor Hoppin is a Re- 
publican on political questions with a tendency to 
independent action in the same. 



LEWIS, Charlton Miner 

Yale B.A. i885 —Columbia LL.B. i88g. 

Born in Brooklyn. N. Y, 1866; educated privately; 
fitted for College at the Berkeley School ; B.A.Yale, 
1886: spent one year in graduate work in miscellaneous 
studies ; LL.B. Columbia Law School, 1889 ; assisted 
in preparation Birdseye's edition of the New York 
Statutes, 1889-go; practised law in New York City, 
1890-94; engaged in literary and linguistic study, 1894- 
95; Instructor in English at Yale, 1895; Ph.D., Yale, 
1898 and made Assistant Professor ; appointed as Emily 
Sanford Professor of English Literature. 1899- 

CHARLTON MINER LEWLS, Ph.D., Emily 
Sanford Professor of English Literature at 
Vale, was born in Brooklyn, New York, March 4, 
1 866. Through his father, Charlton Thomas Lewis, 
he is a direct descendant of Evan Lewis, who came 
from South Wales to Haverford, Delaware county, 
Pennsylvania in 1681. The family traces itself 
back to Henry Miner, who is known to have re- 
ceived distinguished favors from Edward III. 
Through his mother, Nancy Dunlap McKeen, 
Professor Lewis is descended from the covenanting 
family which assisted in the defence of London- 
derry against James 11. (1689) and afterwards 
coming to America, settled Londonderry New 
Hampshire. He received his early education in 
private schools in Brooklyn, New York ; later at 
Mr. James H. Morse's School, and fitted for Col- 
lege at the Berkeley School, matriculating at Yale 
in 1882, graduating and taking the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts in 1886. He spent one year in 
graduate study of history and political science at 
Yale, and then entered the Law School of Columbia 
in 1887, during the same time attending the law 
office of Bangs, Stetson, Tracy & MacVeah. 
He graduated with the degree of Bachelor of Laws 



in 1889 and spent that winter assisting Clarence 
F. Birdseye in the preparation of his edition of the 
New York Statutes. During most of 1890 he per- 
fected himself in the detail of the legal profession 
in the office of George C. Holt and later with Hon. 
Charles F. MacLean. From November 1890 to 
November 1894 he practised law in the office of 
Sullivan & Cromwell. He spent about a year in 
literary and linguistic study in New York City, and 
in 1895 became connected with the Faculty of 
Yale as Instructor in Ilnglish. He was made .As- 
sistant Professor in 1898, and received the degree 




CH-^RLION M. I,E\\IS 

of Doctor of Philosophy and in 1899 was chosen 
by the Corporation as the first incumbent of the 
Emily Sanford Professorship in English Literature. 
Professor Lewis was a Democrat in politics until the 
wave of free silver sentiment swept that party. He 
supported Mr. McKinley in 1896 and is a sound 
money man. He is a member of the Graduates' 
Club of New Haven. 



GRAVES, Joseph Alvin 

Yale B.A. 1872, Ph.D. 1878. 

Born in Springfield, Mo., 1849 ; prepared in St. Louis 
High School; graduated Yale, 1872; Tutor, 1874-78; 
Ph.D., 1878; Principal of Schools in Springfield and 



34 



UNIVERSITIES JND THEIR SONS 



St. Louis, Mo , and New Haven, Conn. ; Principal 
South School District, Hartford, Conn., since 1881. 

JOSi:i'lI ALVIN GRAVES, I'h.l)., Educator, 
was born in Springfield, Missouri, September 
21, 1S49, son of Warren Henry and Sarah Cum- 
mings (Edwarils) Graves. He is a lineal descend- 
ant of Thomas Graves, who settled in Hartford, 
Connecticut, in 1643, and subsequently removed to 
Hatfield, Massachusetts ; and a great-grandson of 
Asa Graves, who ser\'ed as a soldier in the Revolu- 
tionary War and was a member of General Wash- 
ington's Body Guard. From the St. Louis High 
School he entered Yale and look his Bachelor's de- 
gree with the Class of 1872. Returning to Spring- 
field he was for a year Principal of the High School, 
and then for a year Principal of the Shaw School in 
St. Louis. From 1S74 to 1878 he was Tutor in Latin 
at Vale. In the latter year the L'niversity conferred 
upon him the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, and 
he remained in New Haven for the succeeding 
three years as Principal of the Skinner School. In 
1881 he accepted the position of Principal of the 
South School District, Hartford, Connecticut, which 
he still retains. Dr. Graves is a member of the 
Twentieth Century and Colonial Clubs, Hartford, 
Sons of the American Revolution and the Delta 
Kappa Epsilon Society. He has served two years 
in each branch of the city government, and in poli- 
tics he is a Republican. On June 20, 1876, he 
married Mary Frances Harmount, of New Haven. 
They have two children living. 



LINDSLEY, Charles Augustus 

Yale M.D. and M.A. 1852. 

Born in Orange, N. J., 1826; fitted for College pri- 
vately; studied in the Freshman class. University of 
Vermont, 1845 ; entered Junior class of Trinity College 
in 1847, graduating in 1849; Assistant to the Principal 
of Cheshire Academy, 1849-50; meanwhile studying 
medicine in the office of Dr. A. J. Driggs ; attended 
lectures at College of Physicians and Surgeons, N.Y. 
1850-51 and graduated at Yale Medical School in 1852, 
also receiving the degree of A.M. ; Professor of Materia 
Medicaand Therapeutics at Yale, 1860-83; Professor of 
the Theory and Practice of Medicine, 1883-97; resigned 
the latter year and made Professor Emeritus ; held 
various official and professional positions ; served in 
the Medical Department of the United States Army 
during most of the Civil War. 

CHARLES AUGUSTUS LINDSLEY, A.^L, 
M.D., Emeritus Professor of the Theory 
and Practice of Medicine in the Medical School of 
Yale, was born in Orange, now West Orange, New 



Jersey, August 19, 1826. He is a direct descendant 
of John Lindsley, who came from England to Bran- 
ford, Connecticut, before 1650. John Lindsley's 
son, Francis, migrated with the church of the Rev. 
Abraham Pierson to the banks of the Passaic River 
and became the first settlers of Newark, New Jersey. 
After the usual attendance at the common schools, 
Professor Lindsley fitted for College chiefly under 
the direction of his Rector, the Rev. James A. \\\\- 
liams, D.D., of St. Mark's Church, Orange, and also 
in the Rev. Dr. Tenbroek's School at Orange. He 
entered the University of Vermont as a Freshman 




C. A. LINDSLEY 

in 1845. His father's death occurring soon after 
compelled a change of plans and in 1847 he joined 
the Junior class of Trinity College, graduating in 
1849. In the autumn of that year he took the posi- 
tion of Assistant to the Principal of Cheshire Acad- 
emy for one year, and while there began the study 
of medicine in the office of Dr. A. J. Driggs. The 
following winter he attended lectures at the College 
of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia and the 
next winter at the Vale Medical School, graduating 
in 1852 and receiving the degree of Master of Arts 
at the same time. He entered at once upon the 
practice of his profession in New Haven, being for 
a year and a half associated with Dr. David A. Tyler. 
In i860 he was appointed Professor of Materia 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



135 



Medica and Therapeutics in Yale Medical College, 
which chair he held for twenty-three years. He 
served during the greater part of the Civil War as 
Acting Assistant Surgeon at Knight Hospital, New 
Haven, and at Lincoln Hospital in Washington. In 
1883 Professor Lindsley was appointed to the Chair 
of the Theory and Practice of Medicine, which posi- 
tion he held until 1897 when he retired, and was 
made Professor Emeritus, thus completing an active 
service of thirty-seven years. He was Dean of the 
Medical Faculty for upwards of twenty years, and 
has held many professional positions of importance. 
He was Attending Physician at the Connecticut State 
Hospital from 1864 to 1876 and Consulting Physician 
since 1876, and Secretary of the General Hospital 
Society from 1865 to 1877 ; Health Officer of New 
Haven from 1874 to 1888; has been a member of 
the Connecticut State Board of Health since its 
organization in 1S7S; Secretary of the Board and 
its executive officer, and Superintendent of Regis- 
tration of Vital Statistics in Connecticut since 18S4. 
He is also a member of the Connecticut Medical 
Society and was its President in its centennial year, 
1892. He has been President of the New Haven 
Dispensary ; President of the County Medical As- 
sociation, 1875-1876 ; President of the International 
Conference of State and Provincial Board of Health, 
1893-1894; was Vice-President of the American 
Public Health Association in 1S77 and is now Presi- 
dent ; honorary member of the New Jersey Medical 
Society. Professor Lindsley married April 13, 1852, 
Lydia Louisa Harrison of Orange, New Jersey. 
Three children were born to them, two of whom are 
now living : C. Purdy Lindsley, M.D. and Carolina 
Lindsley. He is a Democrat of mono-metallic 
tendencies in politics. 



MUNSON, Cyrus LaRue 

Yale LL.B. 1875, M.A. (Hon.) 1891. 

Born in Bradford, N. Y., 1854; fitted for College at 
the Episcopal Academy of Connecticut; graduate of 
Yale Law School, 1875 '• admitted to the Bar of Penn- 
sylvania, 1875; admitted to the Bar of the Supreme 
Court of the United States, 1883; received honorary 
degree of MA. from Yale, i8gi ; Lecturer at Yale, i8go- 

CVRUS LaRUE MUNSON, M.A., Lawyer and 
Lecturer on Legal Practice at Yale, was 
born in Bradford, New York, July 2, 1854. Through 
his father, Edgar Munson, he is descended from 
Captain Thomas Munson and other founders of the 
New Haven Colony in the early part of the seven- 



teenth century. His mother was Lucy Maria Curtis. 
He received his early education in the schools of his 
native place, and after taking a preparatory course at 
the Episcopal Academy of Connecticut in Cheshire, 
entered the Yale Law School, graduating with the 
degree of Bachelor of Laws in 1875. He was 
admitted to the Bar of Pennsylvania in August of 
that year, and has since practised law continuously 
at Williamsport, Pennsylvania. Eight years later, 
December 10, 1883, he was admitted to the Bar 
of the Supreme Court of the United States in \\'ash- 
ington, and in 1891 Yale conferred upon him the 




c. larue munson 

honorary degree of Master of Arts. He has been 
Lecturer on Beginnings of Legal Practice at Vale 
since 1890. Cyrus LaRue Munson is the author 
of a Manual of Elementary Practice, a standard 
legal text-book published in 1897. He is a mem- 
ber of the Ross Club of Williamsport, of which he 
was President in 1893; the .Alumni .Association of 
Cheshire Academy, President 1S85-1S87 ; and is 
also President of the Williamsport Iron & Nail 
Company, and the E. Keeler Company, and an 
officer in various other corporations. He is a 
member of the University Club of Piiiladelphia, 
and of the Society of Colonial Wars for Pennsylva- 
nia. When a member of the City Council of Wil- 
liamsport, 1880-S2, he was made chairman of the 



136 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



committee charged with the refunding of the city 
debt, receiving a note of thanks for his services in 
that capacity. He is a Democrat in politics, ahhough 
the demands of a large legal practice and other busi- 
ness engagements prevent his taking an active part 
in political life. Mr. Munson has been twice mar- 
ried. Hy his first wife, Josephine Anthony \Vhite, 
whom he married, November 8, 1877, he had two 
children : Edgar and George Sharp Munson. On 
October 20, 1891, some years after the death of his 
first wife, he married Minnie Wright Fuller of 
Rome, New York. 



LOGAN, Walter Seth 

Yale B.A. 1870— Harvard LL.B. 1871 -Columbia B.L. 1872. 

Born in Washington, Connecticut, 1847 ; early educa- 
tion received at " The Gunnery " in Washington (Con- 
necticut), the Fort Edward (New York) Institute, and 
the Connecticut Literary Institute at Suffield ; gradu- 
ated Yale, 1870 ; graduated from Harvard Law School 
1871, and took the degree of B.L. at Columbia Law 
School in 1872; practised law in New York City, and 
has been entrusted with much important litigation, has 
done much literary work, and has published numerous 
papers which have attracted wide attention ; is a stu- 
dent of Mexican politics, and is now writing a History 
of Mexico ; is one of the founders of the Lawyers' Club 
of New York, a member of many clubs and societies, 
social, literary, historical and patriotic; Vice-President 
of the New York State Bar Association, and of the 
Empire State Society of Sons of the American 
Revolution. 

W.\LTER SE'IH LOG.\N, Lawyer, New 
York City, was born in Washington, Con- 
necticut, April 15, 1847, son of Seth Savage and 
.\bigail Serene (HoUister) Logan. His ancestors 
were among the first settlers in ancient Woodbury, 
the original settlement in Litchfield county, Con- 
necticut. They came first to ^Vatertown, Massa- 
chusetts, thence to ^Vethersfield, Connecticut, thence 
to Stratford, thence to Woodbury. In each case 
the movement was a religious one, the church 
dividing on some doctrinal point and the minority 
moving off to form a new settlement. Mr. Logan's 
father, Seth S. Logan, who died in 1887, was pro- 
minent in Democratic politics, and for more than 
twenty years was a member in one branch or the 
other of the Connecticut Legislature, and was an 
intimate friend of many of Connecticut's most 
famous public men. On the maternal side he is of 
the seventh generation from Lieutenant John (born 
16 1 2, died 1665) and Joanna (Treat) Hollister. 
He received his early education at " The Gunnery " 
at Washington, Connecticut, going from there to 



the Fort Edward (New York) Institute, tiience to 
the Connecticut Literary Institute at Suffield, where 
he was prepared for college. He was graduated 
from Yale with the Class of 1870, then studied law 
at the Harvard Law School, where he was graduated 
in 18 7 1, and in the following year took the degree 
of Bachelor of Laws at the Columbia Law .School. 
He is probably the only gratluate to hold a sheep- 
skin from the three great universities of Yale, Har- 
vard and Columbia. The circumstances of liis 
coming to New York are related here in his own 
words: "It was in September 187 1 at Cambridge. 




W ALILR S. LOGAN. 

T had graduated at the Law School in July of thai 
year, but came back intending to spend another 
year in a post-graduate course. I arrived a day 
or two after the beginning of the term. T Iiad 
enjoyed during the year the special friendship of 
Professor C C. Langdell, Dean of the Law School, 
a formerly distinguished practising lawyer of New 
York and associate of Mr. James C. Carter. When 
I reached my room in Cambridge in September 
1S71, I found a note from Professor Langdell 
asking me to call at his room at once whether it 
was night, day or Sunday. I took him at his word, 
and aroused him from his bed within ten minutes 
after I had received his note. He said to me that 
his friend Mr. James C. Carter had lately visited 



UNIVERSITIES JND THEIR SONS 



137 



him and desired him to select from the graduates 
of the Law School some person to fill a particularly 
important and delicate position in his office in 
New York. Professor Langdell added, ' I have 
held this position for you and it is yours if you will 
take it, but you must decide at once ; Mr. Carter 
is waiting. You know how much I would like to 
have you with me for another year, but this is an 
opportunity which I do not think you can afford to 
lightly pass over.' I said, ' I will take it.' This 
was eleven o'clock. I had not unpacked my trunk 
and took a carriage, paid the Jehu an extra dollar 
and caught the midnight train for New York. The 
next morning at nine o'clock I met Mr. Carter 
in his office in New York and went to work with 
Mr. Carter and Mr. O'Conor on the famous Jumel 
case, which occupied for several years thereafter so 
much of the time and attention of the New York 
courts. I was able to do good work in that case 
and through it to make for myself a position in the 
New York Bar ; but more than all else, I was able 
to win the intimate and enduring friendship of Mr. 
Charles O'Conor and Mr. James C. Carter, the 
thing which in my whole career I have valued most." 
Since that time Mr. Logan has been in the active 
practice of his profession, and has been entrusted 
with much important litigation, .\mong the well- 
known cases in which he has been retained are the 
Wirt and the Waterman Fountain Ven cases, the 
Chesebrough Estate and the Phelps Estate litiga- 
tions, the Andrew J. Davis will case, the Myerle fs. 
the United States suit, the Van Ingen libel suits, 
and the water right controversies in the South 
West. These latter suits have brought him much 
business in Mexico, as a consequence of which he 
has become a student of Mexican politics, and is 
now engaged, as a pastime, in writing a history of 
Mexico. On commencing the practice of law he 
was for a time associated with .\Ifred C. Chapin, 
and later with Horace E. Deming and Salter S. 
Clark. His present firm of Logan, Demond & 
Harby has offices at 58 AVilliam Street, New York 
City. Mr. Logan finds time to do literary work, 
and is also an orator of no mean reputation and is 
in frequent demand on public occasions. In 1897 
he delivered the oration before the literary societies 
of Washington and Lee University on the Mission 
of the Saxon Scholar. His paper delivered before 
the Social Science .Association on the intricacies of 
the Latin Code, showed wide research and brought 
him many appreciative letters from prominent 
members of the Bar. Not less appreciated and 



comprehensive was his report as Chairman of the 
Committee on Commercial Law of the .American 
Bar .Association at Cleveland in 1897 on the subject 
of A Broader Basis of Credit, while his address in 
1896 as Vice-President of the New York State Bar 
.Association was an eloquent plea for international arbi- 
tration, and elicited universal commendation, among 
others a special letter from Sir Julian Pauncefote 
of the British Embassy. Mr. Logan is a member 
of many clubs, as is most natural in one of so wide 
a circle of friends to whom he is known as a prince 
of good fellows. He was one of the founders of 
the Lawyers' Club and the Reform Club and 
is also a member of the Manhattan, Democratic, 
Lotos, Nineteenth Century, New York Yacht, New 
York Athletic, Colonial, Marine and Field, and 
.Adirondack League clubs of New York, the Cosmos 
Club of Washington, Hamilton of Brooklyn, and 
Fort Orange Club of Albany. He also belongs to 
the Sons of the .American Revolution, Society of 
Colonial Wars, Society of Founders and Patriots, 
(Geographical Society, Historical Society and -Acad- 
emy of Sciences. He is Vice-President of the 
New York State Bar Association, and of the Empire 
State Society of the Sons of the .American Revolu- 
tion. Mr. Logan was married April 13, 1875, to 
Eliza Preston Kenyon of Brooklyn ; three children 
have been born to them : HoUister, Janette, and 
Walter Seth Logan, Jr. 



RICHARDS, Eugene Lamb, Jr. 

Yale B.A. 1885. 

Born in New Haven. Conn., 1863; graduated Yale, 
1885: member of University Football team. 1881-83, 
and Captain in 1884; Editor Yale Lit., 1884; Townsend 
Prize Speaker, 1885 ; studied law, and practising in New 
York City; Deputy Attorney-General of the State, 
1896-98, and Counsel for Superintendent of the Insur- 
ance Department. 

EUGENE LAMB RICHARDS, Jr.. Lawyer, was 
born in New Ha\ten, Connecticut, June 14, 
1863, the son of Eugene Lamb (Yale i860) and 
Julia Lavinia (Bacon) Richards. On his father's 
side, he is the descendant, four generations removed, 
of General John Lamb, first Collector of the Fort of 
New York under President Washington, and great- 
grandson of General Anthony Lamb, Secretarj- of 
State of New York under Governor Tompkins and 
President of the National Society of the Cincinnati. 
On his mother's side, he is a direct descendant of 
Jabez Bacon of Connecticut, one of the wealthiest 



138 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



merchants of this rountry during the RevoUitionary 
period. Mr. Richards prepared for College at the 
Hopkins (Irammar School and the Hillhouse High 
School, New Haven, and was graduated at Wale in tlie 
Class of 1885. He made a brilliant record as an un- 
dergraduate in both the academic and athletic lines of 
endeavor. In the former he won the liristol Scholar- 
ship for the best examination in the classics and 
mathematics, in 1882, and a philosoi)hical oration 
as his appointment at graduation ; while in literature 
he took the Sophomore composition prize in 1S82, 
was Editor of the Vale Litcrarv Magazine in his 




EUGENE LAMU KlcHAKl/: 



JU. 



Junior year, and a Townsend prize speaker in 1885. 
He was also the Freshman Fence Orator of his 
Class. In athletics, he was President of the Class 
Baseball Association and Captain of the Class Foot- 
ball Eleven ; member of the University Football 
Team, 1881-1S83, and its Captain in 1884. Of the 
undergraduate College societies, he was a member of 
Skull and Bones, Psi Upsilon, Chi Delta Theta and 
Eta Phi, also of the Phi Beta Kappa. Since gradu- 
ation, success has followed Mr. Richards in his 
chosen profession of the law. He studied with 
Alexander & Green, New York City, and on admis- 
sion to the Bar, became the managing attorney for 
that law firm until 1891, when he organized the firm 
of Janeway,Thacher & Richards. Since 1896, when 



that firm dissolved, he has ])ractised alone, at 31 
Nassau St.. New York City. Mr. Richards has made 
a national reputation in connection with important 
insurance litigations. For two years, 1 896-1 898, he 
was Deputy .\ttorney-General of the State of New 
\ork and Counsel for the Superintendent of the In- 
surance Department. He represented the prominent 
creditors in the prosecutions growing out of the 
failure of the American Casualty Company of Balti- 
more. With District .Attorney Fellows he drove 
out of business over one hundred fraudulent Lloyds 
Fire Insurance concerns, effectually disposing of 
millions of worthless or illegal insurance. On June 
iS, 1892, Mr. Richards married Florence Whittier 
Elmemlorf, by whom he has one daughter, Diana 
I'^lniendorf Richards. He is a member of the Law- 
yers' Club and the Yale Club in New York City, of 
the Richmond County Countiy Club of Staten Island, 
and President of the Staten Island Cricket Club. 
He is a Republican in politics. 



TWICHELL, Joseph Hopkins 

Yale B.A. 1859, A.M. 1886. 

Born in Southington, Conn, 1838; attended Lewis 
Academy, Southington; graduated at Yale, 1859; 
studied at Union Theological Seminary, New York, 
1859-61 ; studied at Theological Seminary at Andover, 
Mass. ; served during the Civil War as Chaplain of the 
Seventy-iirst Regiment New York State Volunteers ; 
since 1865 Pastor of the Asylum Hill Congregational 
Church at Hartford, Conn. ; Fellow of Yale, 1874- 

JOSEPH HOPKINS TWICHELL, M.A., Clergy- 
man, and Fellow of Vale, was born in South- 
ington, Connecticut, May 27, 1838. His parents 
were Edward and Selina Delight (Carter) Twichell. 
The original .'Vmerican progenitor of the Twichells 
came from England in the early Puritan emigration, 
and was made a freeman of the Massachusetts Bay 
Colony in 1634. Mr. Twichell was prepared for 
College in the public schools and at the Lewis 
.-\cademy in his native town. He entered Yale in 
185s and graduated four years later, 1859, with the 
degree of Bachelor of Arts, receiving that of Master 
of .Arts in 1886. With the design then of fitting 
himself for the ministry he entered the L'nion Theo- 
logical Seminary, of New York City, and continued 
his study there until the outbreak of the Civil War. 
He then entered the L'nited States service as Chap- 
lain of the Seventy-first Regiment New York State 
Volunteers, and he continued in that position until 
1864 when he was mustered out of the service with 



VNIFERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



the regiment. After the war he spent one year in 
study at the Andover Theological Seminary, and 
then accepted (1865) the position of Pastor of the 
Asylum Hill Congregational Church at Hartford, 
Connecticut. He is still engaged in that work. 
Since 1874 he has been a Fellow of Yale. He is a 
member of the Psi Upsilon and Scroll and Key 
Societies, of Yale ; the Monday Evening Club of 
Hartford, the Grand Army of the Republic and the 
Loyal Legion. His political views are those of a 
Republican Mugwump. He married Julia Har- 
mony Cushman, November i, 1865. He has nine 




JOSEPH H. TWICHELL 

children : Edward Carrington, Julia Curtis, Susan 
Lee, David Cushman, Harmony, Burton Parker, 
Sarah Dunham, Joseph Hooker, and Louise Hopkins 
Twitchell. 



HALE, Nathan 

Yale B.A. 1773. 

Born in Coventry, Conn., 1755; graduated at Yale, 
1773 ; taught school at East Haddam, Conn., also at 
New London ; Lieutenant, afterwards Captain, in the 
Continental Army ; died at New York, in 1776. 

N-VTHAX HALE, Soldier, Patriot and Martyr 
of the Revolution, son of Richard and 
Elizabeth Hale, was born at Coventry, Connecticut, 
June 6, 1755. He was the sixth of a family of 



^39 

twelve children, and as his parents were distin- 
guished for their strict piety he must have been 
educated in the most rigid form of New England 
Puritanism. His early education was under the 
care of Dr. Joseph Huntington, his Pastor. He 
then entered Yale at the same time with his older 
brother, Enoch. Here Nathan was a general favor- 
ite, — with his classmates on account of his sunny 
and fun-loving disposition ; with his instructors be- 
cause of his high character and the serious interest 
which he took in his work. After graduating with 
honors in 1773, he taught school, first at East Had- 
dam or Moodus through the winter of 1773-74 and 
then at a boys' school in New London. Soon after 
the battle of Lexington he gave up his school and 
on July 6, 1775, was commissioned Lieutenant of a 
company attached to Webb's State Regiment. With 
his regiment he marched to the Boston encampment 
and served through the siege of the town. His 
diary and memoranda written at this time are still 
preserved. One entry is especially characteristic of 
the patriot. It is a formal promise, which he after- 
ward fulfilled, made at a time when the army was 
threatening to disband and offering to pay his com- 
pany his own wages if they would stay a month 
beyond their enlistment. When his regiment was 
reorganized as the " Nineteenth Foot " in Washing- 
ton's Army of Continentals, Hale was made a Cap- 
tain. He then marched to New York, helped to 
fortify the city and shared in the daring capture of 
a sloop which lay under the very guns of a British 
war-ship. But the inaction of guard life in the 
entrenchments was too trying and when early in 
September, a small body of rangers was organized 
Hale became one of its Captains, under Lieutenant- 
Colonel Knowlton. At this time Washington was 
anxious to get information from the enemy's camps 
on Long Island. He spoke to Knowlton of his 
need and he in turn suggested the ser\'ice to his 
officers. The task was one of great danger, with 
little glory to one who succeeded and a most shame- 
ful death to one who failed. No one volunteered. 
Then Hale, in spite of the protests of his fellow 
Captain and College friend, William Hull/ offered 
himself, saying, " If the exigencies of my country 
demand a peculiar ser\-ice, its claims to the perform- 
ance of that service are imperative." After receiv- 
ing particular instructions from Washington, Hale 
left the camp at Harlem Heights and, disguised as 
a school-master, crossed from Norwalk, Connecticut, 
to Huntington, Long Island. Thence he made his 
way to New York which hati already been captured 



140 



UNIFERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



by the British. There Hale spent several days, 
making observations and accurate drawings which 
he hid between the soles of his shoes. He then 
returned safely to Huntington but there, either 
through treachery or suspicion of his true purpose, 
he was captured and taken aboard the British ship, 
Halifax. Here he was stripped and searched, the 
papers were found upon him, and he was sent to 
New York for trial before General Howe. No 
further concealment was necessary or possible. 
Hale acknowledged that he was an .American officer 
and a spy and was sentenced to be hung the next 
morning at daybreak. He went to his death firmly 
and courageously. His last words were, " I only 
regret that I have but one life to lose for my coun- 
try." By his life as well as by his death Nathan 
Hale honored his College, his Country and his God. 
His memory is honored by three monuments, one 
at South Coventry, another — a magnificent bronze 
statue — in the Capitol at Hartford and the third tlie 
familiar statue in City Hall Square, New York. 



Notes of a Professional Exile, a series of papers 
issued in 1S87. 



NADAL, Ehrman Syme 

Yale B.A. 1864, M.A. 1874. 
Born in Lewisburg, W. Va., 1843 ; educated at Co- 
lumbia and Yale, graduating from the latter in 1864; 
second Secretary American Legation in London, 1870- 
71 and again 1877-84; was for some years connected 
with the New York Evening Post ; Lecturer on English 
Composition at Columbia, 1892-93. 

EHRM.AN SYME N.MX-AL, M..-\., Journalist, 
was born in Lewisburg, West Virginia, Feb- 
ruary 13, 1843. He is a son of Bernard Harrison 
Nadal, D.D., (1812-1870), a noted Methodist 
clergyman of his day ; .Acting President of Drew 
Theological Seminary, and at one time Chaplain 
of the National House of Representatives. The 
subject of this sketch began his collegiate studies 
at Columbia, and they were completed at Yale, 
where he took his Bachelor's degree in 1864, 
and received that of Master of .Arts ten years 
later. In 1870 he was appointed Second Sec- 
retary of the American Legation in London, 
holding that post for about one year, and from 
1877 to 1884 he again served in that capacity. 
Turning his attention to journalism he was for some 
years connected with the New York Evening Post, 
and is now engaged in literary pursuits. Mr. Nadal 
held the Lectureship on English Composition at 
Columbia in 189 2-1 893. His more notable publi- 
cations are : Impressions of London Social Life ; 
Essays at Home anl Elsewhere ; and Zweibak, or 



TOWNSEND, James Mulford, Jr. 

Yale B.A. 1874 — Columbia LL.B. 1876. 
Born in New Haven, Conn , 1852; attended Hopkins 
Grammar School, graduated at Yale 1874; Columbia 
Law School 1876; admitted to the New York Bar 1876; 
Lecturer on Transfer of Monetary Securities at the 
Yale Law School. 

J.AMES MULFORD TOWNSEND, Lawyer, and 
Lecturer in the Yale Law School, was born in 
New Haven, Connecticut, .August 26, 1852. He is 




J.-V.MES .M. TOWNSEND, JR. 

of ancestry of Mayflower fame, the son of James 
M. and Maria Theresa (Clark) Townsend. .At the 
Hopkins (Grammar School, of New Haven, he was 
fitted for Vale anil entered the latter institution in 
1S70. He grailuated after a course in the .Aca- 
demic Department, receiving the degree of Bachelor 
of .Arts in 1874. Then in New York City he studied 
in the Law School of Columbia and worked as clerk 
in a law office until 1876, when he graduated with 
the degree of Bachelor of Laws, and was admitted 
to the Bar of New York. He became associated 
with the law firm of Chittenden & Hubbard and 
since 1888 he has been a member of that firm, 
which is now Chittenden, Townsend & Chittenden. 



UNIFERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



For several years Mr. Townsend has been Lecturer 
on Transfer of Monetary Securities at the Yale Law 
School. He is a member of the following clubs and 
societies in New York C'ity, University, Lawyers', 
Colonial, New Y'ork Athletic ami Barnard Clubs; 
.■Vssociation of the Bar of New York City, Yale Club 
and Yale .Alumni .Association. He married at Lex- 
ington, \'irginia, November 15, 1882, Harriet 



141 

founders of the famous Wolfs Head Society of 
Yale, and is a member of various other organizations. 
He is the author of Sketches from English History, 
and of many magazine articles of much interest. 
He has lectured extensively both in College and in 
public, on a wide range of subjects with which he 
has become familiar during his travels. He has 
received two honorary degrees, Nfaster of Arts from 



Bailey, daughter of Professor John L. Campbell, of Yale in 1888, and Doctor of Laws from Hamilton 
Washington and Lee University. His children are : in 1896. He married October i, 1879, Harriette 

Harriet, born 1884 ; James Mulford, 3d, born 
1886 ; John Campbell, born 1888 ; Kdward Howard, 
2d, born 1890, and Virginia and D(jnald Town- 
send, twins, born 1892. 



WHEELER, Arthur Martin 

Yale B.A. 1857, M.A. (Hon.) 1888. 
Born in Weston, Conn., 1836 ; prepared for College 
at Phillips Academy, Andover, Mass : graduated at 
Yale, 1857: taught school at Norwich, Conn., 1857-58; 
taught at Easton, Conn., 1858-59; spent next two years 
in post-graduate study at Yale: Tutor at Yale, 1861-65; 
studied abroad 1865-68 ; Professor of History at Yale 
since 1868; received honorary M.A. from Yale 1888; 
LL.D. from Hamilton College, New York, 1896. 

ARTHUR MARTIN WHKLLKR, LL.D., 
Historian, Lecturer and .Author, and Pro- 
fessor of History at Yale, was born in Weston, 
Connecticut, January 21, 1836. Through his father 
Willis Wheeler, he is descended from Stephen 
Wheeler, at one time Judge of the Superior Court 
of Connecticut, and from a Puritan family who 
settled in Concord, Massachusetts in 1632. His 
mother was Eliza (Fairchilil) Wheeler. Lntil he 
was ten years old he attendee 1 the district school 
of his native town, and then entered Staples 
Academy. .At the early age of thirteen he com- 
menced to teach school, and until he was seventeen 
he taught in various towns of Connecticut. He 
entered Phillips .Academy at .Andover, Massachusetts, 
in 1852, where he prepared for College. .At Yale 
he elected the work of the Academic Department 
and graduated with the degree of Bachelor of .Arts 
in 1857. The next year he taught school in Nor- 
wich, Connecticut, and in 1858—1859 in Easton. 
He then spent two years in graduate study at Yale, 
receiving an appointment as Tutor in 1861. He 
continued in that work until 1865, when he went 
abroad and spent three years and six months in 
study and travel. In 1868 he was appointed Pro- 
fessor of History at Yale and for more than thirty 
years he has filled that office and given valuable 
service to the University. He was one of the 




.\KIHLK .M. \MIKKM.K 



Skinner Staples of New Haven. His chiKIren are 
Arthur Stanley, Kenneth Knight and Harriette 
Staples Wheeler. 



WAYLAND, Francis 

Harvard L.S. Class of 1850— Yale M.A. (Hon.) 1881. 
Born in Boston, Mass., 1826; attended Phillips Acad- 
emy, Andover, Mass. ; graduated at Brown University. 
1846; attended Harvard Law School ; practised law in 
Worcester, Mass, 1850-58; has practised in New 
Haven since 1858 ; Judge of Probate in New Haven. 
1864-65; Lieut -Governor of Connecticut, i86g; Dean of 
the Yale Law School since 1873. 

FRANCIS U.AYLAND, I.L.D., Lawyer, and 
Dean of the Yale Law School, was born in 
Boston, Massachusetts, .August 23, 1826. His 
father, Francis Wayland, was President of Brown 
University from 1827 to 1855. His mother was 
Lucy Lane (Lincoln) Wayland. After early train- 
ing ill the Providence Rhode Island public schools, 



142 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



liL- went to Phillips Academy at Aiulover, Massa- 
chusetts, where he was prepared for College, l-'rom 
that school he entered Brown University and gradu- 
ated with the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1S46, 




FRANCIS WAV LAND 

while his father was still President of the University. 
He then turned to the study of law anil fitted him- 
self for practice at the Harvard Law School and in 
law offices of Providence Rhode Island, and Spring- 
field, Massachusetts. From 1850 to 1858 he prac- 
tised law in Worcester, Massachusetts, and at the 
end of that time removed to New Haven, Connecti- 
cut, where he practises at the present time. In 
1S64 Mr. Wayland was Judge of Probate in New 
Haven, and in 1869 Lieutenant-Governor of Con- 
necticut. Since 1873 he has been Dean of the Yale 
Law School. He is a member of the L'niversity 
Club of New York and the Oraduates Club of New 
Haven. He married October 6, 1857, Martha 
White Read of New Haven. Judge Wayland re- 
ceived the lionorary degree of Master of Arts 
from Yale and Brown, also that of Doctor of Laws 
from the University of Rochester in 1879 and from 
Brown in 1S81. 

SHARP, George Matthews 

Yale LL.B. 1875, M.A. 1889. 
Born in Baltimore, Md., 1851 ; educated in private 
schools in Baltimore ; graduated from Yale Law School, 



1875; Lecturer in Yale Law School, 1889-97 ; Chairman 
of Committee on Legal Education from American Bar 
Association, 1895 ; member of Committee on Education, 
from Maryland State Bar Association, 1896; Associate 
Judge of the Supreme Bench of Baltimore, since 1897, 

G1;0R(;K MATTHI'AVS sharp, M.A., Law- 
yer and Judge, was born in Baltimore, 
Maryland, November 17, 1851. His parents were 
A. T. Sharp and .Xnna (Matthews) Sharp. His entire 
training as a boy was in private schools of his native 
city, and from them he received preparation for 
LTniversity work. In 1872 he entered the Law 
School of Yale, and graduated there in 1875. Since 
his professional career commenced Mr. Sharp has 
held several important offices. From 1889 to 1897 
he was Lecturer on Insurance in the Yale Law 
School. In 1889 he was elected a member of the 
Committee on Legal Education — a branch of the 
.\merican Bar Association. Of this Committee he 
was in 1895 elected Chairman, and has since held 
that office. He was appointed in 1896 a member 
of the Committee on Education by the Maryland 
State Bar Association, and for one year he served in 
that capacity. Since 1897 Mr. Sharp has occupied 




GEORGE M. SHARP 



the position of Associate Judge of the Supreme 
Bench of Baltimore. He is a member of the Mary- 
land and University Clubs of Baltimore, and the 
University Club of New York City. 



UNIFERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



■M 



BURGESS, William 

Princeton B.S. 1877, M.S. 1880. 

Born in Brooklyn, N. Y., 1857; fitted for College at 
Jhe Montrose Military Academy in Orange, N. J. ; 
graduated Princeton Class of 1877 ; entered the busi- 
ness of importing china wares in 1879 in New York ; 
soon after began the manufacture of the same wares 
at Trenton, N. J., and is still in that business. 

WILLIAM BURGESS, Manufacturer, was 
born in Brooklyn, New York, January i8, 
1857, son of John and Elizabeth (Wilson) Burgess. 
He is of Scotch ancestry on both sides of his family, 




\V,M. BURGESS 

his father having been born in Annin Dumfrieshire, 
and his mother in Glasgow, Scotland. The Burgess 
family are direct descendants of the Royal Stewart 
(Stuart) clan; the Wilsons are descended from the 
Campbell and Cameron Clans. He received his 
early education at Montrose Military Academy in 
Orange, New Jersey, and was graduated from Prince- 
ton with the Class of 1877. Before graduating he 
was appointed assistant to Professor Cornwall in the 
Department of Chemistry, but owing to the death of 
his father did not take up the work. In 1880, he 
received the degree of Master of Science on account 
of some special work done along the lines of chemi- 
cal investigation. He decided to enter the medical 
profession, and with that object in view, became a 



student at the College of Physicians and Surgeons, 
in New York, but owing to a wound received at a 
post-mortem examination, which caused blood- 
poisoning, his health was so badly injured that he 
abandoned this profession and later entered the 
business of importing china wares in New York, in 
1879. He soon after began the manufacture of the 
same wares at Trenton, New Jersey, and continues 
in this business at the present time. His father was 
the founder of the firm of Burgess & Goddard of 
New York City, the largest importing house in china 
and earthenware in the United States. Mr. Burgess 
is President of the International Pottery Company, 
and its General Manager, President of the National 
Association of China Manufacturers of the United 
States, and was United States Consul to the Stafford- 
shire District of England — the great pottery centre 
— during Harrison's administration. He is a mem- 
ber of the Princeton Club, and an Elder in the 
Presbyterian Church. In politics, he is a Republi- 
can. He was married, January 7, 1879, to Clara 
Dwight Goodman. They have had four children, 
three of whom survive : William Jr., Clara G. and 
John Stewart Burgess. 



De WITT, JOHN 

Princeton A.B. 1861, D.D. 1877. 

Born in Harrisburg, Penn., 1842 ; fitted for College 
at Harrisburg Academy: graduated Princeton, 1861 ; 
studied law and later theology at Princeton, and at 
Union Theological Seminaries ; Pastor of the Pres- 
byterian Church at Irvington-on-the-Hudson, 1865-96 ; 
of the Central Congregational Church. Boston. 1869-76; 
of the Tenth Presbyterian Church, Philadelphia. 1876- 
82 ; Professor of Church History, Lane Theological 
Seminary, Cincinnati, 1882-88 ; Professor of Christian 
Apologetics, McCormick Theological Seminary, 1888- 
92; Professor of Church History at Princeton Theo- 
logical Seminary since 1892; D.D. Princeton, 1877: 
LL.D. Hanover College, Indiana, 1888; has published 
fifty or sixty reviews and pamphlets, and one volume, 
Sermons on the Christian Life. 

JOHN De WHT, D.D., LL.D., Professor of 
Church History at Princeton Theological Sem- 
inary, and Author of the historical sketch of Prince- 
ton in UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS, was 
born in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, October lo, 1S42. 
son of the Rev. Dr. William Radcliffe and Mary 
(Wallace) DeWitt. . He is of Dutch, English and 
Scotch extraction. After preparing for College at 
the Harrisburg Academy, he entered Princeton and 
was graduated in the Class of 186 t. He at first 



44 



UNIVERSITIES JND THEIR SONS 



intended to devote himself to the practice of law 
and studied with that end in view, but <leciding that 
the Christian ministry was his calling, he entered 
the Theological Seminary at Princeton, and later 
studied theology at Union Theological Seminary, 
New York. In 1S65 he accepted a call from the 
Presbyterian Church at Irvington-on-the-lludson, 
and remained in that charge until 1869, when he 
went to the Central Congregational Church of 
lioston, Massachusetts, where he remained between 
six and seven years. In 1876 he became Pastor 
of the Tenth Presbyterian Church of Philadel[)hia, 
remaining there for six years, when he gave up the 




JOHN liK VVIIT 

office of Pastor to become Professor of Church 
History at Lane Seminary in Cincinnati. He 
remained in that capacity from 1882 to 1888, when 
he was elected to the Chair of Christian .Apologetics 
at the McCormick Theological Seminary in Chicago, 
remaining there until 1892, when he was called to 
Princeton to occupy the Chair of Church History 
left vacant by the death of the late Dr. Moff;xt, 
which chair he still holds. He has received the 
degrees of Doctor of Divinity, and Doctor of Laws, 
from Princeton in 1877 and Hanover in 1888. In 
addition to numerous reviews and pamphlets and 
magazine articles he has published the volume 
called Sermons on the Christian Life. 



THOMPSON, David Allen 

Princeton A.B. 1868, A.M. 

Born in Framington, N. J., 1844 ; attended public 
schools, Friends' School and Salem Academy, 1854-64; 
Haverford College, 1864-66; then College of New Jer- 
sey, where graduated June 1868; graduated Albany 
Law School and admitted to Bar in May 1869, and 
since practised law in Albany; Private Secretary to 
Mayor of Albany, 1874-76 ; Trustee and Director 
Albany Orphan Asylum since 1879; Trustee Home 
Savings Bank since January 1880, and Vice-President 
since April 1882; Trustee Albany Mutual insurance 
Company since May, 1885 ; corporate member Amer- 
ican Board Commissioners for Foreign Missions since 
October 1895, and member Executive Committee Con- 
gregational Home Missionary Society since June i8g6; 
member American Whig Society, Princeton, N. J., also 
of Masters' Lodge, F. & A. M. 

D.Wll) .\LLEN THOMPSON, .A.M., Law- 
yer, .Albany, New York, was born in the 
township of Framington, Salem county, New Jersey, 
May 29, 1844, son of Andrew and Mary (Tyler) 
Thompson. His parents were of the Society of 
Friends, commonly called Quakers ; and his ances- 
tors, both the Thompson and Tyler families, were 
among the early English Quaker immigrants to 
Southern New Jersey, 1 680-1 685, settling in Salem 
county, where many of their descendants still re- 
main. His early education was commenced in the 
public schools at Salem, New Jersey, and was con- 
tinued in the Friends' School of that jjlace and at 
Salem Academy. From September 1864 to January 
1866 he attended Haverford (Pennsylvania) Col- 
lege. In P'ebruary 1866 he entered the College of 
New Jersey at Princeton (now Princeton University), 
where he was graduated in June 1868. In 1 869-1 870 
he was a law student and managing clerk in Shepard 
& Stedman's law ofifice at Albany, New York. 
Graduating from the Albany Law School in May 
1869, he was at once admitted to the Bar of New 
York, and since then has resided and practised his 
profession in Albany — alone until 1879, then in 
partnership under the successive firm names of 
Thompson & Andrews i879-i885,Stedman, Thomp- 
son & Andrews 1 885-1 896, and again as Thompson 
& Andrews since 1896. From September 1874 to 
May 1876 Mr. Thompson was private Secretary to 
Hon. F^dmund I. Judson, Mayor of .Albany. He 
has officiated as Trustee of the Home Savings Bank 
of Albany since January 8, 1880, and as Vice-Presi- 
dent of that institution since .April 17, 1882, also as 
Trustee of the Albany Mutual Insurance Company 
since May 4, 1885. He has also served as Treas- 
urer and Director of the Albany Orphan Asylum 
since 1879; as a corporate member of the Ameri- 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



H5 



can Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions 
since October 17, 1895, and as a member of the 
Executive Committee of the Congregational Home 
Missionary Society since June 4, 1896. He is a 
member of the American Whig Society, of Princeton, 
New Jersey, and of Masters' Lodge, Number Five, 
Free and Accepted Masons, of Albany. In national 
politics Mr. Thompson is a Republican. He was 
married October 4, 187 1, to Margaret, daugh- 
ter of James MacNaughton, M.D., and grand- 
daughter of Archibald Mclntyre, Comptroller of 
the State of New York 1 806-1 821. They have 




DAVID A. THOMPSON. 



three children: James MacNaughton, born 1872, 
graduated at Princeton 1S94; Andrew Thompson, 
born 1877, member of the Princeton Class of 1899 ; 
and Margaret MacNaughton Thompson, born 18S1. 



ALEXANDER, James Waddell 

Princeton A.B. i860, AM. 1863. 

Born in Princeton. N. J., 1839 ; fitted for College in 
schools in New York ; graduated from Princeton with 
the degree of A.B. in the Class of i860: received the 
degree of A.M. in 1863; studied law in New York and 
practised until 1866 ; became Secretary of the Equitable 
Life Assurance Society of New York City in i865; 
made Second Vice-President in 1871 ; First Vice-Pres- 
VOI,. III. — 10 



ident in 1874; elected President of the Society in May 
1899. 

JAMES WADDELL ALEXANDER, Trustee 
of Princeton University and President of the 
Equitable Life .Assurance Society, was born in 
Princeton, New Jersey, July 19, 1839, son of Rev. 
Dr. James Waddell and Elizabeth (Cabell) Alexan- 
der, both parents being Virginians by birth. His 
father, — one of New York's famous preachers and 
a noted scholar, — was for many years Pastor of 
the Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church, and his 
grandfather was the Rev. Archibald Alexander, 
D.D., also an eminent divine as well as scholar. 
His paternal great-grandfather was the Rev. James 
Waddell, D.D., of Virginia, described in William 
Wirt's British Spy as " the Blind Preacher," and 
his maternal grandfather, also a native of Virginia, 
was Dr. George Cabell of Richmond. \ paternal 
uncle was Dr. Joseph Addison of Alexandria, a Pro- 
fessor in Princeton Seminary ; another uncle, William 
C. Alexander, was an eminent lawyer and Senator 
of New Jersey and the first President of the F^quit- 
able Society. His maternal uncle was Dr. James 
L. Cabell, for fifty years a member of the Medical 
Faculty of tlie University of Virginia, and eminent 
throughout that State. It has been said of Mr. 
Alexander that " he came of noble stock, a family 
scintillant in intellect, spotless in character." He 
was fitted for College in New York schools, grad- 
uated from Princeton, with the degree of Bachelor 
of .\rts in the Class of 1 860, and three years later, 
received his Master of .Arts degree. Having de- 
cided to become a lawyer, he fitted himself for the 
practice of his profession in New York City, was 
admitted to the Bar and practised there until 1866, 
when he accepted the position as Secretary of the 
Equitable Society. During the thirty-three years of 
Mr. Alexander's connection with the Equitable he 
has held various offices, filling the position of Sec- 
retary for fi\'e years, when he was made Second 
Vice-President, and three years later, in 1874, he 
became the First \'ice- President, an office he held 
for a quarter of a century, when, in May 1899, upon 
the death of President Hyde, Mr. .Alexander was 
elected his worthy successor. Mr. .Alexander is a 
man of artistic, literary and social tastes, an earnest 
believer in the necessity and value of education, 
and is a member of many clubs and societies 
designed for the promotion of the pleasure as well 
as the instruction and elevation of mankind. He 
has been a member of the University and School 
Extension Association and of the University Settle- 



I 46 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



ment Society, is a member of the Museum of Natural 
History, of the National Art Society and the Muni- 
cipal Art Society. He is also a member of the 
Chamber of Commerce, a member and ])atron of 
the New York Free Circulating Library, member of 
the Metropolitan Club, the Lawyers' Club, the 
Century Association, the Suburban Riding and Driv- 
ing Club, the Princeton Club of New York, the Ivy 
and Nassau Clubs of Princeton and the University 
Club of New York City, of which he was the Presi- 
dent for eight years. He is also a Director in the 
Mercantile Trust Company, the Western National 
Bank, and the Delaware and Hudson Canal Com- 




JAMES W. ALEXANUKR 

pany. But, through all these various duties and 
interests, the welfare of Princeton has never been 
forgotten by Mr. Alexander. He is pre-eminently 
a loyal, devoted son to his alma mater, and any- 
thing designed for the promotion of her best in- 
terests is sure of his enthusiastic support. He 
regularly devotes much of his time and thought to 
Princeton, is a member of the Board of Trustees of 
the L^niversity, and was an active member and for 
several years President of the Princeton Alumni 
.Association — now the Princeton Club — of New 
York. As a Trustee of Princeton, he is a Chairman 
of the Committee on Grounds and Buildings, as 



well as a member of the Finance Committee. He 
was also Chairman of the Committee which raised 
the great endowment fund of nearly $2,000,000, in 
commemoration of Princeton's sesquicentennial. 
He has written a book entitled Princeton, Old and 
New, in which his love for, and pride in, his alma 
mahr are clearly shown. Mr. Alexander is an In- 
dependent in politics. He was married in Novem- 
ber 1864 to Elizabeth Beasley, daughter of Ex- 
Chancellor Williamson of New Jersey, granddaughter 
of Governor Williamson of New Jersey, also of Pro- 
vost Beasley of Philadelphia. They have three 
children : Elizabeth A., wife of the distinguished 
artist, Henry Martyn, James W. Alexander, Jr., a 
Princeton .Alumnus ami member of the New York 
Bar, and Frederick Beasley Alexander, an under- 
ijraduate at Princeton. 



CROWELL, James McMulIin 

Princeton A.B. 1848, D.D. 1863. 

Born in Philadelphia, Pa., 1827; early education at a 
school for boys in Philadelphia, Bolmar's School, and 
the Academy in \A^est Chester, Pa. ; graduated Prince- 
ton, 1848 ; graduated Princeton Theological Seminary 
and licensed to preach, ordained to the ministry and 
installed Pastor of Upper Octorara Presbyterian Church 
in Chester county, Pennsylvania, 1851 ; Pastor of the 
Seventh Presbyterian Church, Philadelphia, 1857 ; Pas- 
tor of St. Peter's Presbyterian Church in Rochester, 
New York, from 1869; Pastor of Woodland Presbyte- 
rian Church in Philadelphia, 1871 ; Secretary of Mis- 
sions in the American Sunday School Union, 1883 ; 
degree of D.D. from Princeton, 1883 ; Trustee Prince- 
ton, 1868-83. 

JAMES McMULLIN CROWELL, D.D., Clergy- 
man, and Trustee of Princeton University, was 
born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, June 9, 1827, 
son of Elisha and Susan (McMullin) Crowell. He 
is of Scotch-Irish extraction. He received his 
preparation for College in a School for Boys in 
Philadelphia, in Bolonar's School, ami in the 
Academy at West Chester, Pennsylvania. He grad- 
uated from the College of New Jersey in the Class 
of 1848, taking high honors in the .Academic De- 
partment and ranking fifth in a class of fifty-two. 
He decided to enter the ministry, and after a 
course in theology at Princeton Theological Semi- 
nary, was licensed to preach by the Presbytery 
of Philadelphia, January 6, 185 1. Five months 
later he was ordained to the ministry by the Pres- 
bytery of Newcastle, and at the same time in- 
stalled Pastor of Upper Octorara Presbyterian 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



H7 



Church in Chester county, Pennsylvania. Re- 
maining in this charge for nearly six years, he 
then became Pastor of the Seventh Presbyterian 
Church in Philadelphia. After a Pastorate in 




JAMES W. CROWELL 

that church for twelve years he was called to 
St. Peter's Presbyterian Church in Rochester, New 
York, from May 1869 to December 1870, and 
from January 1S71 to April 1883 he was Pastor 
of Woodland Presbyterian Church in Philadelphia. 
He was then elected Secretary of Missions in the 
American Sunday School Union. He received the 
degree of Doctor of Divinity from Princeton in 
1863 at the age of thirty-six and from 1868 to 1883 
was a Trustee in the College. Dr. Crowell is a 
member of the .-Vmerican Whig Society in Princeton. 
He was for ten years a member of the Board of 
Home Missions, member of the Board of Publication 
for sixteen years, and for the last fifteen years has 
been a member of the Board of Education, filling 
the office of Vice-President since 1881 



Bar in 1857 ; since then has been actively engaged in 
business in Peekskill. 

SAX FORD RKYNOLDS KN.\PP, Lawyer, was 
born in Peekskill, Westchester county, New 
York, December 8, 1832, son of Sanford R. and 
Mary (Brown) Knapp. He is of Huguenot descent. 
His father, who died in 1832, was a prominent New 
York physician ; his mother, Mary Brown, was a 
daughter of Stephen Brown, a large land owner in 
the town of Cortland, Westchester county. New 
York. He was fitted for College at Peekskill Acad- 
emy, entered Princeton in 1851 (Sophomore class), 
and graduated in the Class of 1854. He studied 
law with Edward Wells, Esq., of Peekskill, and was 
admitted to the Bar, July 14, 1857, and that year 
received the degree of Master of Arts from his a/ma 
mater, since which time he has been engaged in 
active business in Peekskill, not only in the practice 
of law, but in real estate and insurance business, 
he being the agent for many of the largest insurance 
companies in the world. He has always taken an 
active interest in all matters concerning the advance- 
ment of Peekskill. For over twenty years he was 
Secretary of the Board of Education of one of the 




KNAPP, Sanford Reynolds *• *"• ''■'^■^'''' 

Princeton A.B. ,854. 5^,^^^^, Districts, and is now the President of the 

Born in Peekskill. Westchester Co N. Y., 1832: Pgekskill Military .Academy. Since 1863 he has 

fitted for College at Peekskill Academy; entered , , _, r t n 1 i n c .:-™<- i}or.lr ;c 

D • . • c t ^, , „ J J J been the Secretary of the Peekskill Savings Bank, is 

Princeton in Sophomore Class of 1851, and graduated -^^ oct-inai^ ^^. i v j t- 

in Class of 1854 ; studied law and was admitted to the one of the incorporators and Secretary and Treas- 



148 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



urer of the Cortland Cemetery Association, and a 
member of tlie Kxccutive Committee of the West- 
chester County Bar Association. Since 1862 he has 
been an Klder in the First Presbyterian Church of 
Peekskill, and Secretary and Treasurer of the 
Church. For many years he was Superintendent 
of the Sabbath-School, and was often a delegate to 
the Church Courts. Presbytery, Synod and General 
Assembly, and also Secretary of the Board of Trus- 
tees of Presbytery of Westchester. He is a Re- 
publican, and while he has taken an active part in 
politics, he has never been willing to accept nomina- 
tion for public office. Physically prevented from 
going to the front in the war against the rebellion, 
he at his own expense procured and sent a substitute 
who entered the Navy of the United States. He 
married, October 15, 1861, Georgia Norris, daugh- 
ter of Rev. Dr. Knox of Newtown, Long Island. 
They have had five children, two of whom survive : 
Aletta Van Doren, now Mrs. James B. Thomson of 
New Britain, Connecticut, and William White Knapp, 
a graduate of Princeton in the Class of 1897, and 
now connected with the Elmira Bridge Company 
as a Civil Engineer. 



LEWIS, Morgan 

Princeton A.B. 1773. 

Born in New York City, 1754; graduated Princeton, 
1773 ; studied law; joined Continental Army 1774, as a 
volunteer, and was made Captain, and subsequently 
Major in a New York Regiment ; promoted to rank of 
Colonel, 1776, and commanded at the Battle of Crown 
Point, 1778; resumed his legal studies after the war 
and became Attorney-General of the State of New 
York, Chief-Justice of the Supreme Court, and Gov- 
ernor in 1804; promoted to the rank of Major-General, 
and took part in the War of 1812 ; appointed Regent 
of Columbia, 1784, and was Trustee, 1784-1804; died 
1844 

MORGAN LEWIS, Soldier, Statesman, Jurist 
and Trustee of Columbia, was born in 
New York City, October i6, 1754, the son of 
Francis Lewis, one of the signers of the Declaration 
of Independence. He was graduated at Princeton 
in 1773, "ind entered upon the study of law, but at 
the first call to arms he joined the patriot forces at 
Boston as a volunteer. He served with distinction 
throughout the War of the Revolution, gaining 
rapid promotion and commanding as Colonel at 
the Battle of Stone Arabia and at Crown Point. 
When peace was secured, he resumed his legal 
studies, was admitted to the Bar of New York, and 



was soon raised to tlie Bench of the Court of 
Common Pleas. In i79[ he was made Attorney- 
General of the State, Chief-Justice of its Supreme 
Court in 1792, and (Jovernor in 1804. It was 
under his administration and by his recommenda- 
tion as Governor that the Legislature established a 
permanent fund for common schools. ;\t the out- 
break of the war with Great Britain in 1S12 he was 
offered the Portfolio of Secretary of War in President 
Madison's Cabinet. This he declined but ac- 
cepted appointment as Quartermaster-General of 
the Armies of the United States. He served actively 






MORGAN LEWIS 

in this war, being promoted in 181 3 to the rank of 
^L^jor-General. and was in command at .Sackett's 
Harbor, and other engagements on the Niagara 
frontier. .\\. the close of the War he advanced 
the funds needed for the discharge of the American 
prisoners in Canada, and also remitted the rents 
of his own tenants who had gone or sent sons 
to the war. General Lewis was among those 
named as Regents of Columbia L^niversity by 
Act of the Legislature in 1784, and also a mem- 
ber of the Board of Trustees established by the 
Legislature in the same year. He resigned the 
office of Trustee in 1804, the year in which he 
became Governor of the Stale. He died in New 
York City, April 7, 1844. 



UNIFERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



149 



CABOT, John 

Columbia M.D. 1886. 
Born in Lawrence, Mass., 1855 ; graduate Lawrence 
High School, 1871 ; two years as special student at 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1873-75; in 
business in Chicago, 1876-80 ; in business in Lawrence, 
1880-84 ; graduate of the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons of Columbia, 1886 ; after one year in hospital 
work, spent three years in study abroad ; Assistant 
Surgeon in Out-Patient Department of Roosevelt Hos- 
pital, New York City, for a number of years ; Assistant 
Physician in the Skin Department of Vanderbilt Clinic. 

JOHN CABO r, M.D., Physician and Surgeon, is 
a direct descendant on the father's side from 
John Cabot, who came to America from Wales in 




and was engaged in business there from 1876 to 
1880. In the latter year he returned to I^wrence 
and entered the employ of the Lawrence Gas Com- 
pany. Deciding to take up the study of medicine, 
he came to New York in 1884 and entered the Col- 
lege of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia, grad- 
uating in 1886. After a year of hospital work in 
New York City he went abroad, and spent the fol- 
lowing three years in study at the Universities of 
Vienna, Prague, Leipzig, Berlin and in Stockholm 
and Paris. He returned to America in 1890 and 
took up the practice of his profession in New York 
City. Dr. Cabot was for a number of years Assist- 
ant .Attending Physician in the Out-Patient Depart- 
ment of Roosevelt Hospital, until the increasing 
demands of his private practice forced him to resign 
the position. Soon after beginning practice he 
became interested in dermatological work, and 
received the appointment of Assistant Physician in 
the Skin Department of the Vanderbilt Clinic, which 
he has since retained. In 1896 he was elected one 
of the Managers of the New York Society for the 
Relief of \Vidows and Orphans of Medical Men, 
and is still acting as such. He is also a member of 
the Academy of Medicine, the County Medical 
Society, the New York Society of Dermatology and 
Genito-Urinary Surgery and the Manhattan Medical 
Society among professional organizations, and the 
Barnard Club, Alumni Association of the College of 
Physicians and Surgeons of New York, .American 
Gas Light Association, New England Gas Light 
Association, Guild of Gas Managers and Massachu- 
setts Institute of Technology Society of New York 
among others of a non-professional nature. Dr. 
Cabot married, May 17, 1877, Caroline A. Cabot of 
Lawrence, Massachusetts. Tljey have two children : 
John, Jr., and George D. Cabot. 



JOHN CABOT 



1702, and settling in Salem, Massachusetts, married 
Anna Druce of the place. John Cabot 3d, their 
grandson, was of great assistance to the authorities 
of Massachusetts during the Revolution, advancing 
money from his private purse to equip the troops. 
George Dodge Cabot, their grandson and the fiither 
of the subject of this sketch, was born in Jamaica 
Plain in 1S12, and married Harriet Story Dodge of 
that place. John Cabot attended the public schools 
of his native city and later the Lawrence High 
School, graduating from there in 187 i. After two 
years as a spetial student in chemistry at the Massa- 
chusetts Institute of Technology he went to Chicago, 



AUCHMUTY, Samuel 

King's College (Columbia) A.B. 1775. 
Born in New York City. 1758: graduated. King's 
College, 1775 ; Officer in the British Army in the Rev- 
olutionary War; served in India and Egypt with dis- 
tinction and received the Order of the Bath in 1803 ; as 
Brigadier-Gen. captured Montevideo, 1807. and Java, 
1811 ; Lieut. -Gov. , 1813; Commander-in-Chief of the 
British forces in Ireland, 1822 ; died 1822. 

SIR SAMUEL AUCHMUTY, G.C.B., Soldier, 
was born in New York City, June 22. 175S. 
son of Rev. Dr. Samuel Auchmuty, a Governor of 
King's College and Rector of Trinity Church. He 
was graduated at Kings College in 1775 and, volun- 



15° 



UNIVERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



leering the following year in the British Army, was 
given a commission for gallant conduct at the Battle 
of Long Island. He servetl in three campaigns 
against the colonists, obtained a Captaincy, and 
from 1783 to 1796 served in India. In .•\ber- 
crombie's Egyptian Expedition in 1800 he was 
.Adjutant-Oeneral, and was appointed Governor of 
the Isle of Thanet in 1802. In 1803 he was made 
a Knight of the Bath. He went to South .-\merica 
as a Brigadier-General in 1806, captured Monte- 
video in 1807, was in command of the Carnatic in 
1 8 10, and reduced Java in iSii. On his return 




SAMUEL AUCHMUTY 



to England in 181 3 he was made a Lieutenant- 
General, and in 1822 he was appointed Com- 
mander-in Chief in Ireland, where he died in 
Dublin. .August i 1, of the same year. 



PRALL, William 

Columbia LL.B. 1875. 

Born in Paterson, N. J., 1853; educated at Edwards 
Place School, Stockbridge, Mass., University of Heidel- 
berg, Columbia University Law School, and De Lancey 
Divinity School, Geneva, N. Y. ; admitted to the New 
York Bar, and afterwards to the Bar of New Jersey ; 
member of the Assembly of New Jersey in 1883: 
drafted and secured the enactment of the law under 
which the free public libraries of the state have been 



established; first President of the Free Public Library 
of Paterson ; while studying for Holy Orders at Geneva, 
N. Y., was Instructor in Hobart College ; admitted to 
the Diaconate in 1886, and to the Priesthood in 1887 ; 
Assistant Curate in St. Paul's Parish, Albany, N. Y. ; 
Rector, Church of the Holy Communion, South Orange, 
N.J. ; since i8gi Rector of St. John's Church, Detroit, 
Mich. ; member General Convention of the Episcopal 
Church in 1892 and 1895. and delegate of the Conven- 
tion to the Synod of the Church of England in Canada 
in 1894; A.M. and Ph.D. from Heidelberg, LL B. from 
Columbia, and S.T.D. from Hobart College; member 
of the Holland, Huguenot and St. Nicholas societies 
of New York, also Society of Colonial Wars, Phi Beta 
Kappa, Kappa Alpha, etc. 

WILLI.\.M PR.VLL, Ph.D., S.T.D., Rector of 
St. John's Church (Episcopal), Detroit, 
Michigan, was born in Paterson, New Jersey, .April 
6, 1 85 3, third son of the late Honorable Edwin 'I'. 
Prall, sometime Mayor of Paterson, and Colonel 
of the Second Regiment Passaic Brigade. He 
comes of Dutch stock, being a descendant of .Arent 
Prall, who settled in Staten Island in i66o. He 
was educated as a boy at Edwards Place School, 
Stockbridge, Massachusetts, and afterwards at the 
University of Heidelberg, Germany, from which 
institution he received the degree of Master of .Arts, 
and that of Doctor of Philosophy in 1873. Sub- 
sequently he matriculated at Columbia University, 
New York City, receiving the degree of Bachelor 
of Laws from that institution in 1875. He was 
admitted to the New York Bar, but soon afterwaids 
took up his residence in his native city and was 
admitted as attorney and counsellor at law to the 
Bar of New Jersey. .Almost immediately he secured 
a practice, and became engaged in some of the 
most important cases that came before the Bar of 
the state ; among others, the celebrated labor case 
of the State 7-s. Joseph P. McDonald c/ <;/., editors 
of the Labor Standard. In 1883 Dr. Prall was 
elected to the .Assembly of New Jersey on the 
Democratic ticket. In that body he took a leading 
part in what was called the Railway Taxation 
Issue, having charge of the tax bills. He also 
drafted and securetl the enactment of the Free 
Public Library Law, under which all the free public 
libraries of New Jersey have been established. 
Subsequently he became the first President of the 
Free Public Library of Paterson, and did much to 
make that institution fulfil the requirements of the 
community. For personal reasons, Dr. Prall deter- 
mined to give up the practice of law, and to study 
for Holy Orders in the Episcopal Church. He 
became a student in the De Lancey Divinity School, 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



'5' 



Geneva, New York, and at the same time was 
Instructor in Hobart College. In 1886 he was 
admitted to the Diaconate, and in 1887 to the 
Priesthood, by the Bishop of Newark. His first 
cure was as .Assistant in St. Paul's Parish, .Albany, 
New York. He then became Rector of the Church 
of the Holy Communion, South Orange, New Jersey, 
and in 1891 was called from there to St. John's 
Church, Detroit, Michigan, one of the largest and most 
prominent parishes in the United States. Dr. Prall 
is a preacher of civic righteousness, and his utterances 
in Detroit have done much to create a social con- 




\\1LL1A-\1 I'KALL 

science. In 1895 he published a volume of sermons 
on Civic Christianity. He was a member of the 
General Convention of the Episcopal Church in 
1892, and again in 1895. In 1894 he was a delegate 
of the Convention to the Synod of the Church of 
England in Canada. In 1892 Hobart College con- 
ferred upon him the degree ot Doctor of Divinity. 
He is a member of the Holland, the Huguenot and 
the St. Nicholas societies of New York, also of the 
Society of Colonial Wars, the Phi Beta Kappa and the 
Kappa .\lpha. In 1881 Dr. Prall married Lilian, 
daughter of the late Thaddeus Porter, Esq., of 
Pittsfield, Massachusetts. Mrs. Prall died in 1884. 
In 1897 he rliarried Helen .\mes, daughter of the 
late Hon. George V. N. Lothrop of Detroit. 



w 



McVICKAR, William Augustus 

Columbia A.B. 1846, A.M. 1850, S.T.D. 1870. 

Born in New York City, 1827 ; educated at Columbia, 
Class of 1846; at the General Theological Seminary, 
New York; Rector of St Barnabas, Irvington, N. Y. ; 
the American Church, Nice, France, and of Christ 
Church, New York City ; Lecturer on the Evidences of 
Religion at Columbia, 1869-71 ; died, 1877. 

'11.1.1 AM .\UGUSTUS McVICK.AR, S.r.D., 
Episcopal Clergyman, was born in New 
York City, .April 24, 1827, son of Rev. Dr. John 
McVickar (1787-1868). His father was graduated 
at Columbia in 1804 ; became an Episcopal clergy- 
man in 181 1 ; was Professor of Moral Philosophy, 
Rhetoric, Belles-lettres and Evidences of Christianity 
at Columbia for nearly fifty years ; one of the found- 
ers of St. Stephen's College, .Annandale, New York. 
The path in life selected by the father was adopted 
by the son, who after taking his Bachelor's degree 
at Columbia with the Class of 1846, pursued the 
regular course at the General Theological Seminary, 
and took orders in the Protestant Episcopal Church. 
His Rectorships were those of St. Barnabas at In-- 
ington-on-the-Hudson, the .American Church at 
Nice, France, and that of Christ Church, New York, 
to which he was assigned in 1876. From 1869 to 
187 1 he lectured on Evidences of Religion at 
Columbia, which gave him the degrees of Master of 
.Arts and Doctor of Divinity, the former in 1850 and 
the latter in 1870. Dr. .McA'ickar died in New 
York. September 24, 1877. He published the Life 
of John McVickar in 1872. 



CROCKER, Francis Bacon 

Columbia E.M. 1882. 
Born in N. Y. City. 1861 ; graduate of the Columbia 
College School of Mines. EM., 1882; in business as 
patent attorney and expert, 1883-86: established in 1886 
with Charles A. Curtis, C.E , LL.B., the C. & C Elec- 
tric Motor Company; organized in 1888 with S. S 
Wheeler, Sc.D. the Crocker-Wheeler Electric Com- 
pany, head of the Electric Engineering Department of 
Columbia since 1889; Permanent Secretary Inter- 
national Electric Congress, at Chicago, 1893 

FR.XNCIS B.ACON CROCKER, K.M., Electri- 
cian, and Professor of Electrical Engineer- 
ing at Columbia, was born in New York City, July 
4, 1861. He is descended from the early settlers 
of New England, Deacon William Crocker having 
settled in Barnstable, Cape Cod, Massachusetts, in 
163S. As a youth, Francis B. Crocker attended the 
M. ^\'. Lyons Private School in Broadway, New 
York Citv. He entered the School of .Mines of 



52 



UNIVERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



Columbia in 1878 and graduated in 1882 witli the 
degree of Engineer of Mines. In 1883, shortly 
after his graduation, Mr. Crocker formed with 
Charles A. Curtis, C.E., LL.B., the firm of Curtis & 
Crocker, patent attorneys and experts. 'I'liey car- 
ried on experimental investigations and developed a 
number of inventions in telegraphy, telephony, elec- 
tric light and power, and electro-metallurgy. Cur- 
tis & Crocker established in 1886 the C. & C. 
Electric Motor Company, one of the first and most 
prominent enterprises in the development of electric 
power. In 1888 Mr. Crocker organized with S. S. 
Wheeler, Sc.D. the Crocker-Wheeler Electric Com- 
pany, widely known as manufacturers of electrical 
machinery. At the Columbian Exposition in 
Chicago in 1893 Mr. Crocker was Permanent Secre- 
tary of the International Electric Congress. He 
was elected President of the New York Electrical 
Society in 1893 for a two-year term. From 1889 
Professor Crocker has been head of the Electrical 
Engineering Department of Columbia. The Uni- 
versity conferred upon him the degree of Doctor of 
Philosophy in 1895. Besides numerous articles in 
various scientific periodicals, Professor Crocker is 
the author of a work on Electric Lighting, now in 
a second edition, and joint author with Dr. S. S. 
Wheeler of Practical Management of Dynamos and 
Motors, which has already run through three edi- 
tions. He is non-partisan in politics, working 
always for the good of the community rather than 
the good of the party. Professor Crocker was 
President of the American Institute of Electrical 
Engineers in 1897, serving one year. He is also a 
member of the University Club and the Racquet and 
Tennis Club of New York City. 



GIBBS, Oliver Wolcott 

Columbia A.B. 1841, LL.D. 1873 — Harvard LL.D. 1888. 

Born in New York City, 1822; graduated Columbia, 
1841 ; M.D. College of Physicians and Surgeons, N. Y., 
184s; studied chemistry abroad, returning to take the 
Chair of Physics and Chemistry in the College of the 
City of New York, 1849 : called to Harvard as Rumford 
Professor, 1863, and Professor Emeritus since 1887 ; 
LL D., Columbia and Harvard. 

OLIVER WOLCOTT GIBBS, M.D., LL.D.. 
Chemist, and Emeritus Professor at Har\'ard, 
was born in New York City, February 21, 1822, son 
of George Gibbs, the distinguished mineralogist, and 
Laura, daughter of Oliver Wolcott, Secretary of the 
Treasury under Washington and John Adams. He 
was educated in the preparatory school attached to 



Columbia, and graduated at that University in 1S41. 
.'\fter studying chemistry for a short time in the 
laboratory of Dr. Robert Hare in Philadelphia, he 
entered the College of Physicians and Surgeons at 
New York, and took his degree of Doctor of Medi- 
cine in 1845. '^^^ three years following he passed 
in study abroad under the most eminent Professors, 
and on his return to the United States he was 
called to the Chair of Physics and Chemistry in the 
College of the City of New York, which he held from 
1849 to 1863. He was then elected, to succeed 
Professor E. N. Horsford, to the Rumford Profes- 




WOLCOTT GIBBS 

sorship and Lectureship on the Application of 
Science to the Useful Arts in Harvard University 
in which he continued actively until 1S87 when he 
resigned, retaining his connection as Professor Eme- 
ritus. His work in this department has been bril- 
liant and distinguished, and although he has published 
no book, his contributions to the literature of sciences, 
in the form of memoirs of original investigations, are 
among the most valuable that have appeared in the 
technical periodicals of recent years. During the 
Civil War, Dr. Gibbs was actively associated with 
the work of the Sanitary Commission, and the orig- 
inal meeting to consider the feasibility of the plan 
of the Union League Club of New York, which grew 
out of this undertaking, was held at his residence. 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



53 



Dr. Gibbs was one of the charter members of the 
Xational Academy of Sciences, and holds member- 
ship in many of the learned associations of this 
country and of Europe. He was Dean of the Law- 
rence Scientific School at Harvard, 1865-1868. In 
1873 Columbia conferred upon him the degree of 
Doctor of Laws, and Harvard in 1888. 



MOTT, Valentine 

Columbia M.D. 1806. 

Born in Glen Cove, N. Y., 1785: took his Medical de- 
gree at Columbia, 1806 ; continued his studies in Lon- 
don under Sir Astley Cooper, and at the University of 
Edinburgh ; began practice in New York in i8og and 
acquired distinction as a surgeon while still a young 
man: Professor of Surgery at Columbia, 1811-13; at 
the College of Physicians and Surgeons till 1826, and 
at Rutgers till 1830: Professor of Surgery and Anatomy 
University of the City of New York for the rest of his 
life ; one of the first to perform a number of difficult 
operations, and recognized as one of the world's most 
eminent surgeons ; died 1865. 

VALENTINE MOTT, ^LD., LL.D., one of the 
most distinguished surgeons of his day, was 
born at Glen Cove, Long Island, August 20, 1785. 
He was a son of Dr. Henry Mott, a medical prac- 
titioner of New York, and a descendant of English 
ancestr)', his American progenitor, who was a 
Quaker, having located on Long Island as early as 
1660. His classical education was acquired at a 
private seminar)' in Newtown, Long Island, and his 
professional preparations, begun under the direction 
of Dr. Valentine Seaman, a relative, were continued 
at Columbia, which gave him his Medical degree in 
1806, after which he became a student of the 
famous Sir Astley Cooper in London, where he also 
profited by the lectures of other eminent surgeons 
and the facilities for dissection afiforded in the British 
metropolis. He completed his study at the Edin- 
burgh University. Entering the medical profession 
of New York City in 1S09, his reputation and 
practice increased with rapidity. Almost immedi- 
ately after engaging in active professional work. 
Dr. Mott turned his attention to the field of pro- 
fessional education, in which he continued to labor 
with but few interruptions as long as he lived, 
and for years his lectures and clinics formed the 
principal source of surgical instruction on this side 
of the Atlantic. As early as 18 10 he inaugurated a 
course of private lectures on surgery, and in the fol- 
owing year was chosen Professor of that Depart- 
ment at Columbia, remaining there until 1813, 
when with other members of the Medical Faculty 



he saw fit to transfer his services to the College of 
Physicians and Surgeons, then not a part of Colum- 
bia as at present. In 1830 he accepted the Chair 
of Surgery and Relative Anatomy in the Medical 
Department of the University of the City of New 
York, which he was instrumental in establishing, 
and with the exception of occasional visits to Europe 
for rest and obsen'ation, he retained his member- 
ship of that Faculty for the rest of his life. He was 
also connected with the New York, St. Vincent's, 
St. Luke's, the Women's, Hebrew and Bellevue hos- 
pitals. In addition to his numerous personal quali- 
fications for the profession, including keen eyesight 
and remarkable muscular strength and agility, 
especially in the hands, he possessed the necessary 
nervous force to preser\'e his coolness in sudden or 
unlooked-for emergencies, and a boldness of action 
seldom met with in a civil profession. He was not 
only the first to attempt a number of difficult opera- 
tions hitherto considered beyond the reach of human 
skill, but he repeatedly duplicated these surgical feats, 
the successful accomplishment of which depended 
as much upon the after treatment as in the thorough- 
ness of the operation itself. During his pro- 
fessional career he amputated nearly one thousand 
limbs, performed lithotomy one hundred and sixty- 
five times with a loss of but one patient in twenty- 
seven, and his success in rhinoplastic operations 
was unparalleled in the annals of .\merican surgery. 
Dr. Mott lived and continued useful to mankind 
until he was eighty years old, retaining perfect con- 
trol of his faculties and the ability to perform accu- 
rately and successfully the most difficult operations, 
and the year prior to his death, which occurred 
April 26, 1865, he served upon a committee of med- 
ical experts who went to .\nnapolis for the purpose 
of reporting upon the condition of federal soldiers 
who had been confined in Confederate prisons. Be- 
sides serving as President of the New York .\cademy 
of Medicine and holding membership in numerous 
American medical bodies, he was a fellow of the 
Medical and Chirurgical societies of London and 
Brussels, of the Imperial .\cademy of Medicine, 
Paris, and the Paris Clinical Society, and also of 
King's and Queen's College of Physicians of Ireland, 
the latter being a singularly exclusive institution, 
having elected but about twenty honorary members 
in the past two centuries. He was also invested with 
the Turkish order of Medjidieh by the Sultan Abdul 
Medjid, as a reward for having removed a tumor from 
the head of that monarch while on a visit to Con- 
stantinople. The University of Edinburgh conferred 



154 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



upon him the honorary (U-gree of Doctor of Medi- 
cine, and that of Doctor of Laws came from the 
Regents of the University of the State of New York 
in 1851. In connection with his other duties he 
was for many years President of the Medical Faculty 
of the University of the City of New \ork, and of 
the New York Inebriate Asylum. His will provided 
a trust fund to be used in defraying the expenses of 
three prize medals to be offered annually to gradu- 
ates of the New York University Medical College 
for the best preserved anatomical specimens, and 
the large library, together with the mementoes of 
his career not consumed in the fuc which destroyed 
the Medical College in Fourteenth Street shortly 
after his death, are deposited in the Mott Memorial 
Building on Madison Avenue. His contributions lo 
medical literature are both valuable and extensive. 
Of his three sons : Valentine, Alexander Brown, 
and Thaddeus Phelps Mott, the two first named 
became physicians, and the third has distinguished 
himself as a soldier in the United States and 
Egypt. Dr. Valentine Mott, Jr., introduced the 
use of chloroform in Palermo, Sicily, and after serv- 
ing in the insurrection against the Bourbon rule he 
returned to the United States and died at New 
Orleans, September 20, 1854. Alexander Brown 
Mott, M.D. served in the Civil War, was one of the 
founders of the Bellevue Hospital Medical College, 
New York, and is now Professor of Clinical and 
Operative Surgery there. 



HAVEMEYER, William Frederick 

Columbia A.B. 1823. 
Born in New York City, 1804; graduated at Colum- 
bia, 1823 ; Director of Merchants' Exchange Bank ; 
President Bank of North America, 1851-61 ; Mayor of 
New York, 1845-46-48-49, and again 1873-74; Presiden- 
tial Elector, 1844 ; President of Board of Emigration 
Commissioners, 1847-53: Chairman of Citizens' Com- 
mittee which overthrew the Tweed ring ; public-spirited 
citizen and benefactor of Columbia. 

WILLIAM FREDKRICK HAVEMEYER, 
Manufacturer, Financier and Politician, 
was born of German parents who emigrated toward 
the close of the eighteenth century, and his father 
founded the sugar refinery business which has ever 
since remained in the family. Born in New York, 
F"ebruary 12, 1804, he acquired a liberal education, 
graduating from Columbia in 1823, and having ob- 
tained a knowledge of the sugar refinery business, 
succeeded his father in 1828. In 1842 his personal 
fortune was sufficient to warrant his retirement from 



active participation in the business, which reverted 
to other members of the family, and he thencefor- 
ward gave much of his time to financial matters, 
being for some years a Director of the Merchants' 
I'^xchange Bank, and as President of the Bank of 
North America from 1851 to 1861, he safely finan- 
ciered that institution through the ])anic of 1857. 
Having taken a lively interest in imblic affairs from 
the time of his majority, he became a leading mem- 
ber of the local Democratic party ;'.nd was chosen a 
Presidential Elector in 1844. He served as Mayor 
of the City for the years 1845-1846, 1848-1849; 




WM. F. HAVEMEVF.R 

was the first President of the Board of Emigration 
Commissioners, holding office from 1847 till 1853 ; 
was Chairman of the Committee of Seventy formu- 
lated for the purpose of rescuing the municipality 
from the hands of the notorious Tweed ring ; was 
again elected Mayor in 1873; and died in office, 
November 30, 1874. Mr. Havemeyer had six sons, 
the survivors of whom are all more or less interested 
in the sugar refining business. 



CUTTING, Robert Fulton 

Columbia A. B. 1871, A. M. 1875. 
Born in N. Y. City in 1852; fitted for College at pri- 
vate school ; graduate of Columbia, 1871 ; President of 
the Association for Improving the Condition of the 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



Poor ; President New York Trade School ; President 
of the Citizens Union ; has large business interests. 

ROBERT FULTON CUTTINCi, A.M., Philan- 
thropist, and Benefactor of Columbia, was 
born in New York City, 1852. Both his father, Fulton 
Cutting, and his mother Elise Tustine Bayard, were 
members of old New York families. The first repre- 
sentative of the Cutting family in America, Leonard 
Cutting, took the degree of Master of Arts at King's 
College, the present Columbia University, in 1758. 
Nicholas Bayard, the founder of the Bayard family 
in America, settled in New Amsterdam in 1647 and 
was afterwards Mayor of New York. Robert Fulton 
Cutting received his early education through private 
tutors, and fitted for College at the private school of 
John McMullen (Columbia) in New York City. 
He entered Columbia in 1868, graduating in 1871, 
and four years later received the degree of Master 
of Arts from the University. Mr. Cutting has for 
many years been engaged in the direction of his 
large business and landed interests. He has been a 
Trustee of various railroad companies and of numer- 
ous other corporations in which he is interested. 
Mr. Cutting is deeply interested in philanthropic 
and educational work. He has been a munificent 
donor to Columbia, and has always taken an active 
part in measures tending to aid the poor. He is 
President of the .Association for Imiiroving the Con- 
dition of the Poor and of the New York Trade 
School. He is an Independent in politics, a stanch 
opponent of corrupt men and measures wherever 
found, and has been a leading spirit in the various 
reform movements which have from time to time 
been inaugurated in New York City for the purpose 
of securing better municipal government. He is at 
present President of the Citizens Union, a powerful 
factor for purity in politics. Mr. Cutting is also a 
member of the City Club of New York, the Century 
Association, and the Huguenot Society. He married 
in 1874 Nathalie C. P. Schenck, by whom he had 
one child : Robert Bayard Cutting. Mrs. Cutting 
died in 1875 ^"'i "■" 18S3 Mr. Cutting married 
Helen Suydam. They have five children : Helen, 
Elizabeth McEvers, Fulton, Charles Suydam and 
Ruth Hunter Cutting. 



WOODWARD, Benjamin Duryea 

Columbia A.B. 1888, A.M. 1889, Ph.D. i8qi. 
Born in Rutherford, N. J., 1868: educated abroad 
until 1886; Brevet d' Instituteur Acad^mie de Paris 
1885; B. es S., University of Paris, 1885; A.B. Colum- 
bia, 1888: A.M., Columbia, 1889; B. fes L , University 
of Paris, 1891; Prize Fellow in Columbia, 1888-90; 



Instructor in German, Barnard College, 1890-gi ; Tutor 
in the Romance Languages and Literatures, Columbia 
1890-94 ; Instructor in the Romance Languages and 
Literatures, Barnard College, 1891- ; and Columbia 
University, 1894- 

BEXJAMIN DURYEA WOODWARD, B. D. W., 
Ph.D., Philologist, and Instructor in Ro- 
mance Languages and Literatures at Columbia, and 
in Barnard College, the Woman's Department of the 
University, was born in Rutherford, New Jersey, in 
1868. His parents, (;eorge Evertsen and E. B. 




B. D. \VOOD\V.\RD 

Deodata Mortimer, went abroad while the subject of 
this sketch was still quite young, and his education 
until he was eighteen years old was received in 
European seats of learning ; at Paris, 1S73-1879; 
at Freiburg in Baden, Germany, during 1S79- 
iSSo; at Frankfurt-on-the-Main from 18S0 to 
1S83; at Florence, Italy, during 1883-18S4. 
In the latter year he returned to Paris and 
entered the .Acad^mie de Paris, receiving the Brevet 
d'Instituteur in 18S5 and the degree of Bachelier es 
Sciences from the University of Paris in the same 
year. In 1886 he came to .America and entered 
Columbia, taking the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 
1888. He was immediately appointed to the Uni- 
versity Prize Fellowship and studied on this founda- 
tion during the next two years. He received the 
degree of Master of Arts in 18S9. The University 
of Paris conferred upon him in 1891 the degree of 



■ 56 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



Bachelier 6s Lettres and the same year he received 
from Columbia the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. 
In 1S90, on the expiration of his Fellowship, he 
was given an Instructorship in German at Barnard 
College, and was also made Tutor in the Romance 
Languages and Literatures in the University of 
Columbia. He was appointed to his present posi- 
tion in Barnard in 1891 and in the Uni- 
versity in 1894. Dr. Woodward is a mem- 
ber of a number of scientific societies, among them 
the Modem Language Association of America and 
the .American Philological Association. He is also 
a member of the University Club of New York City, 
and of two of the Greek Letter fraternities, the 
New York Delta of Phi Beta Kappa, of which he was 
Treasurer 1890-1897, and the Delta Kappa Epsilon. 
He was also Secretary and Treasurer of the Class 
of 18S8-1898 and is a member of the Society for 
Literary Knowledge in New York City. August 31, 
1S98, Mr. Woodward was appointed by President 
McKinley to the post of Assistant Commissioner 
General of the United States to the Paris Exposi- 
tion of 1900. He entered at once upon his new- 
duties and was granted by the Trustees of Colum- 
bia University a leave of absence from academic 
fields, extending over the entire period of his three 
years' appointment. 



LUSK, Graham 

Columbia Ph.B. 1887. 
Born in Bridgeport, Conn., 1866 ; fitted for College at 
the Berkeley School in New York City; Ph.B, Colum- 
bia, 1887 : Ph.D., University of Munich, 1891 ; Instructor 
in Physiology at Yale, 1891 ; Assistant Professor, 1892; 
Professor, 1895 98 ; since 1898 Professor of Physiology in 
the New York University and Bellevue Hospital Medi- 
cal College. 

GR.\HAM LUSK, Ph.D., Physiologist, was born 
in Bridgeport, Connecticut, February 15, 
1866, son of William Thompson Lusk, M.D., LL.D. 
and Mary Hartwell, daughter of Simeon Baldwin 
Chittenden. His father was one of the most famous 
physicians in New York City — his reputation in fact 
extending much further : entered the Union .\rmy 
on the outbreak of the Civil War and rose from the 
ranks to the position of .Assistant .\djutant-General ; 
was Editor of the New York Medical Journal for some 
time ; and wrote several standard medical text-books. 
Graham Lusk fitted for College at the Berkeley 
School in New York City, and entered Columbia in 
1883, taking the scientific course and graduating 
with the degree of Bachelor of Philosophy in 1887. 
Following his graduation he studied abroad for 



several years, and received the degree of Doctor of 
Physiology from the University of Munich in 1891. 
He returned to .America in that year, and was ap- 
pointed Instructor in Physiology at Yale. He was 
promoted to the Assistant Professorship in 1892, 
and in 1895 was made full Professor. In 1898 he 
was called to fill the chair of Physiology in the New 
York University and Bellevue Hospital Medical Col- 
lege. Professor Lusk is of Colonial ancestry, one of 
the family h.aving fought in the Revolutionary A\"ar. 




GRAHAiM LUSK 



He is a member of the Calumet, City, University, 
and Century Clubs of New York, and the Graduates 
of New Haven, and is an Independent in politics. 



STRONG, George Templeton 

Columbia A.B. 1838. 
Born in New York City, 1820; graduated Columbia, 
1838; practised law in New York; Treasurer of the U. 
S. Sanitary Commission during the Civil War ; Trustee 
of Columbia, 1853 to the time of his death ; died 1875. 

GEORGE TEMPLETON STRONG, Lawyer 
and Litterateur, was born in New York City, 
February 26, 1820, the son of George Washington 
Strong, a distinguished lawyer in his day, and the 
grandson of Selah Strong of Setauket, New York, 
who was an officer in the Revolutionary War, dele- 
gate to the Provincial Congress, State Senator and 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



^S7 



first Judge of the Court of Common Pleas in his 
country. George T. Strong was graduated at 
Columbia in the Class of 1838, studied law, and 
established himself in practice in New York. He 
was an accomplished scholar, had a fine taste in 
literature, and an extensive knowledge of books. 
His library, which was sold in New York a few 
years after his death, was among the finest private 
collections in the country. During the Civil War, 
Mr. Strong was a member of the Executive Com- 
mittee of the United States Sanitary Commission 
and served as its Treasurer. In 1842 he married 




GEO. T. STRONG 

a daughter of Samuel B. Ruggles. Mr. Strong was 
elected a Trustee of Columbia in 1853 and helil 
that position until the time of his death, July 21, 

1875- 

LEFFERTS, George Morewood 

Columbia M.D. 1870. 
Born in Brooklyn, N. Y., 1846 ; educated at the Col- 
lege of the City of New York, the Medical Department 
of Columbia and in Europe ; Chief Assistant to Pro- 
fessor Carl Stoerk at the Imperial University, Vienna, 
1872-73; Clinical Professor of Laryngoscopy. College 
of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, 1874; noted 
specialist in diseases of the throat and chest. 

GEORGE MOREWOOD LEFFERTS, M.D., 
Laryngoscopist, and Professor of Laryngos- 
copy and Diseases of the Throat at Columbia, was 



born in Brooklyn, New York, Februar>' 24, 1846. 
He is a son of Marshall Lefferts, a noted electrical 
engineer and inventor of improvements in teleg- 
raphy. He studied at the College of the City of 
New York and at the Medical Department of 
Columbia, graduating from the latter in 1870, com- 
pleted his professional education at the Imperial 
University of Yienna, serving as Chief of Clinique 
to Professor Karl Stoerk in 1872-1873. Locating 
in New York as a specialist in diseases of the throat 
and chest, he shortly aftenvard won distinction as 
being the first surgeon in the United States to per- 
form the operation of subhyoidean Laryngotomy. 
In 1874 he was appointed Clinical Professor of 
Laryngoscopy at the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons. In 1876 he was chosen President of the 
New York Laryngological Society, is connected 
either officially or as a member with several medi- 
cal organizations, and has been regular or consulting 
surgeon to the different hospitals of the metropolis. 
Dr. Lefferts received the degree of Master of Arts 
from Dickinson College in 1869, and his medical 
degree was conferred by Columbia, in the interest 
of which he has so long and effectually labored. For 
some time he edited the quarterly reports of laryn- 
goscopy in the New York Medical Journal and the 
semi-annual reports of his specialties in the .\rchives 
of Dermatology. He is the author of Diseases of 
the Nose and Accessory Cavities ; Diagnosis and 
Treatment of Chronic Nasal Catarrh ; Pharma- 
copeia of Diseases of the Throat and Nose ; has 
made an English translation of Frankel on General 
Diagnosis of Diseases of the Nose, Pharynx, and 
Larynx, and of Ziemssen's Cyclopsedia of the 
Practice of Medicine. 



EWING, Thomas, Jr 

Columbia A.B. 1885. A.M. 1886. 
Born in Leavenworth, Kan., 1862 : received his early 
education in the public schools of Lancaster, O. : stu- 
dent at the University of Wooster, 1879-81 ; graduate 
of the School of Arts of Columbia, 1885 : Prize Fellow 
in Sciences and Tutor in Department of Physics, 1885- 
88; studied at Columbia Law School, 1887-88; LL.B., 
Georgetown University, 1890: Assistant Examiner 
United States Patent Office, 1888-90; admitted to the 
Bar of New York, 1891 : has since practised law and is 
a solicitor of Patents: member of the firm of Ewing, 
Whitman & Ewing since its formation in 1893. 

I^HO.MAS EWING, Jr., Lawyer, was born in 
Leavenworth, Kansas, May 21, 1S62. His 
parents were Thomas Ewing and Ellen Ewing 
(Cox) Ewing. The family is mainly Scotch-Irish 



158 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



and Irish, but has been long in this countr)', George 
lowing, great-grandfather of the subject of this 
sketch, having served in the New Jersey troops 
chiring the Revolutionary War. Thomas Kwing, Sr., 
was Chief-Justice of the Kansas Supreme Court, ami 
a Brigadier-Oeneral in the United States \'olunteers 
during the Civil War, and a representative in Con- 
gress from Ohio. His wife is a daughter of the 
Rev. William Cox of Piqua, Ohio. Thomas Kwing, 
Jr. attended in youth the public schools of Lan- 
caster, Ohio, and afterwards studied at the Univer- 
sity of Wooster, Ohio. He came to New York in the 




THO.M.'iS KWIXt;, JR 

year 1882 and entered the School of .-^rts of Columbia. 
On graduation in 1885 he was appointed Prize 
Fellow in Science, and took a post-graduate course 
there for some years on this foundation, also acting 
as Tutor in the department of Physics. He at- 
tended Columbia Law School for a year, and later 
Georgetown University at Washington, receiving 
the degree of Bachelor of Laws in 1890. From 
1888 to 1890 he served as Assistant Examiner in 
the United States Patent Office. Mr. Ewing was 
admitted to the Bar in February i89r, and has 
since been engaged in the practice of his profession. 
He is a specialist of weight on Patent Law, and 
has been a member of the firm of Ewing, Whitman 



& Ewing since it was formed in 1S93. He was 
named for Mayor of Vonkers, New York, by the 
Democratic party in the fall of 1897, but was un- 
able to overcome the last wave of the Republican 
landslide which began in 1896. He is a member 
of the Ohio Society of New York. Mr. Ewing 
married, October 24, 1894, Anna Phillips, daughter 
of William F. Cochran of Yonkers. They have two 
children : Alexandra and Tiiomas Ewing. 



JACOBY, Harold 

Columbia A.B. 1885, Ph.D. 1896. 

Born in New York City, 1865; fitted for College pri- 
vately; A.B., Columbia, 1885, Ph.D., 1896; spent some 
time in post-graduate study there ; member of the 
United States Eclipse Expedition to West Africa 1889- 
90; Voluntary Assistant, Royal Observatory, Cape of 
Good Hope. 1890 ; engaged in pedagogic work at Co- 
lumbia since i8gi ; Professor of Astronomy since 1894. 

HAROLD JACOBY, Ph.D., Astronomer, and 
Professor of Astronomy at Columbia, was 
born in the City of New York, March 4, 1865. His 
father, Max Jacoby, is of German descent, and his 
mother. Eve AL Jackson, came of American-Eng- 
lish parentage. He received his education in boy- 
hood and fitted for College at private schools in 
New York City, and entered Columbia in 1881, 
graduating in 1885 with the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts. He spent some time in post-graduate study 
of astronomy and kindred subjects at the University, 
and in 1889 went to West .Africa, as a member of a 
United States expedition sent there to observe a 
solar eclipse. He served as voluntary assistant in 
the Royal Observatory at the Cape of Good Hope 
during the latter part of 1890, and on his return to 
America took up work as a Tutor in Columbia. He 
was appointed to the Chair of Astronomy in 1894, 
and his connection with the University in that 
capacity has since continued. He is considered 
one of the most weighty authorities on astronomical 
subjects in the country, and has published a number 
of articles and monographs on subjects connected 
with astronomical photography, his special branch 
of study. He is a member of the Royal .Astronomi- 
cal Society of London, the Astronomische Gesell- 
schaft of Leipzig, the Century Club of New York City, 
and the Woods Hole Yacht Club of Woods Hole, 
Massachusetts. Professor Jacoby married, Decem- 
ber 28, 1890, -Annie Mary Maclear. They have two 
children ; Maclear and Eve Jacoby. 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



159 



WARE, Henry Jr. 

Harvard A.B. 1812, S.T.D 1834. 

Born in Hingham, Mass, 1794; graduated Harvard, 
1812 ; Assistant at Phillips-Exeter Academy, 1812-14; 
studied theology and became Pastor of the Second 
Church, Unitarian, in Boston, 1817 ; Overseer of Har- 
vard 1820-30; Professor in Divinity School, 1829-42; 
S.T.D. Harvard, 1834; died 1843. 

H i:\RV WARE, Jr., S.T.D., Clergyman, Over- 
seer of Harvard, and Professor in the 
Divinity School, was born in Hingham, Massachu- 
setts, April 2T, 1794, the son of Henry Ware, D.D., 




HENRV WARK, JR. 

(Harvard 1785, and Acting President in iS 10-1828). 
He was graduated at Harvard in 181 2, and after 
teaching for two years in Phiihps-E.xeter Academy 
he studied theology with his father and was ordained 
Pastor of the Second Church (Unitarian) in Boston, 
181 7. In the organization of the Unitarian body, 
Mr. Ware took an active part, and was the editor of 
the organ of that association, the Christian Dis- 
ciple, subsequently the Christian Examiner. In 
1829 he visited Europe for his health and on his 
return resigned his Pastorate to take the Chair of 
Pulpit Eloquence and Pastoral Care which was 
established that year in the Harvard Divinity School, 
the title being changed in 1S40 to Parkman Pro- 
fessorship of Theology. Dr. Ware resigned his Pro- 



fessorship in 1842. He was elected to the Board 
of Overseers in 1820, serving continuously for ten 
years. In 1834 he received the degree of Doctor 
of Divinity from Harvard. Dr. Ware's published 
writings, besides those of a historically religious 
character, include memoirs of Joseph Priestly, Noah 
Worcester and others, with essays and poems. He 
died in Framingham, Massachusetts, September 22, 
1843. 



WAYLAND, Francis 

Harvard D.D. 1829 — LL.D. 1852. 

Born in New York City, 1796; graduated Union, 
1813; Pastor First Baptist Church, Boston, 1821-26; 
Professor in Union, 1826-27; President of Brown. 1827- 
55; D D., Union and Harvard; LL.D. Harvard; died 
1865. 

^RANXIS WAVLAXD, D.D., LL.D., President 
of Brown University, was born in New York 
City, March ii, 1796, the son of Francis Wayland, 
a Baptist minister who came to this country from 
England and was pastor of churches in several of 
the cities of New York State. The son was gradu- 
ated at Union College in the Class of 1813 and 
pursued the study of medicine for three years im- 
mediately following graduation. In the meantime 
having united with the Baptist Church and feeling a 
call to the Christian ministry, he determined to lay 
aside medicine and entered tiie .-Xndover Theological 
Seminary in 1816. At the end of a year he left the 
Seminary to take the position of Tutor in L'nion 
College, which he filled for four years, accepting in 
1 82 1 a call to the Pastorate of the First Baptist 
Church in Boston. The five years of his ministry 
in Boston brought him wide recognition as one of 
the most gifted American preachers. In 1826 he 
resigned his Pastorate to accept the Professorship of 
Mathematics and Natural Philosojihy at Union Col- 
lege, and in February of the following year he was 
called to the Chair of Moral Philosophy and Meta- 
physics at Brown and made President of that L'ni- 
versity. The advent of President Wayland gave 
impulse and inspiration to the University and the 
twenty-eight years of his administration were marked 
by great advance and increasing prosperity. L'pon 
his retirement from the Presidency of Brown in 1855 
he resumed for a time the work of the ministr)-, 
ser^'ing a year and a half as Pastor of the First Bap- 
tist Church in Providence, Rhode Island. He then 
devoted himself more exclusively to works of human- 
ity, especially in connection with the public school 



i6o 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



and reformatory institutions. In this period also he 
produced some of his most important contributions 
to the Hterature of philosophy and ethics. Dr. Way- 
land was a prolific author, his bibliography includ- 




]••. W.AYLANI) 

ing, besides the treatises on Political Economy, 
Moral Science, Intellectual Philosophy ami other 
works which have become standard in the English 
language and in translations, some fifty sermons and 
addresses. Union conferred upon him the degree 
of Doctor of Divinity in 1S27, and Harvard in 
1829, following with the degree of Doctor of 
Laws in 1852. He died in Providence, Rhode 
Isl.xnd, September 30, 1865. 



COHEN, Eugene Yancey 

Harvard A.B. 1881. 
Born in Savannah, Ga , i860; educated at the College 
of the City of New York and at Harvard (1881) ; cot- 
ton broker, New York ; studied architecture ; became 
member of the firm of Stein, Cohen & Roth, archi- 
tects; has published Sir Cupid and Other Poems. 

EI(;ENE YANCEY COHEN, Architect, New 
York, was born in Savannah, Georgia, 
November 26, i860. He was the son of Jacob 
G. Cohen, who was born in South Carolina, and of 
Rebecca (Dessau) Cohen, who was born in Phila- 
delphia. On the paternal side his grandfather, a 
native of Pjristol, England, came to this country in 



1785 and settled in South Carolina, while his grand- 
mother was a native of Homburg, Germany. On 
the maternal side his grandfather was born in Hom- 
burg, Germany and came to this country in 1828, 
while his grandmother was born in Chatham, luig- 
land. From 1873 to 1878 Mr. Cohen attended the 
College of the City of New York, receiving the 
degree of Bachelor of .Arts in the last mentioned 
year and the honor of class poet. In tin- fall he 
entered the Sophomore Class at Harvard and there 
graduated in 1881. After that he made two trips 
to Europe, besides several journeys to the West 
Indies and other places. He was elected in 1885 
a member of the New York Cotton Exchange and 
continued inactive business as a broker until 1890 
when he began the study of architecture. Although 
still retaining membership in the P^xchange, he 
became in November, 1897, a member of tin- firm 
of Stein, Cohen &: Roth, architects, of New York. 
Mr. Cohen has been a member of the Harvard and 
Reform Clubs. He has been an active supporter 
of the single tax and a member of the Manhattan 
Single Tax Club. In 18S5 he published a small 




E. VANCEV COHEN 



volume entitled Sir Cupid and Other Poems. He 
married, October 14, [896, Isabel Henry of New 
York, and has two children : Katharine and Evelyn 
Cohen. 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



i6i 



KELLOGG, Warren Franklin 

Harvard A.B. 1883. 

Born in Brooklyn, N. Y., i860; graduated Harvard, 
1883; entered the publishing business ; Business Man- 
ager of the Boston Post, i88g, and Treasurer, 1890; 
owner and publisher of the New England Magazine 
since 1893. 

WARREN FRANKLIN KELLOGG, Pub- 
lisher, was born in Brooklyn, New York, 
November 24, i860, the only son of Loyal Porter 
and Augusta (Warren) Kellogg. He received his 
early education in private schools in Cambridge, 
Massachusetts, and at the High School of that 




WARKEN V. KEI.LOGU 



City, and entering Harvard, was graduated in the 
Class of 1SS3. Following his literary tastes, he took 
the first step of his career as a publisher by enter- 
ing, immediately upon graduation, the employment 
of James R. Osgood & Company, and in connection 
with this and other Boston houses he made rapid 
advancement in the business. In 18S9 he accepted 
the position of Business Manager of the Boston 
Post, a daily paper of high standing and wide 
influence, and in the following year was made 
Treasurer of the Post Publishing Company. These 
positions he filled with credit to himself and profit 
to the paper. It is in the development of the 
New England Magazine, however, that Mr. Kellogg 
has made his distinguishing mark in literature and 

VOL. III. — I I 



publication. This magazine which came upon the 
market through the stress of the hard times in 
1893, was bought by Mr. Kellogg, and by his skill, 
energy and good judgment was carried successfully 
through the long period of depression and placed 
upon a profitable basis commercially with increased 
literary prestige. Mr. Kellogg is himself an author, 
having published several volumes of his own trans- 
lations and compositions. He is a member of the 
Union Club of Boston, the University Club of New- 
York and the Eastern Yacht Club, and has been 
Secretary, Vice-1'resitient and President of the L'nion 
Boat Club of Boston. 



GUSHING, Joseph Mackenzie 

Harvard A.B. 1855. A.M. 1856. 

Born in Baltimore. Md., 1835; educated at Harvard 
(1855) ; entered into business as publisher, bookseller 
and stationer; Chairman of the Committee on Edu- 
cation in the Constitutional Convention of Maryland in 
1864 ; President Maryland Institute for the Promotion 
of Mechanic Arts ; Vice-President of the Charity Or- 
ganization Society; Director of the Savings Bank of 
Baltimore, and of the Associated Fire Insurance 
Company ; member of the State Board of Education, 
the Art Commission of the City of Baltimore, the 
Maryland Historical Society and other organizations; 
Chairman of the Republican State Executive Com- 
mittee ; President of the Baltimore Normal School 
for the Education of Colored Teachers. 

JOSEPH MACKENZIE ( USHING, A.M., Pub- 
lisher, Baltimore, Maryland, was born in Balti- 
more, December 15, 1835, and is the son of Joseph 
and Ann (Mackenzie) Cushing. He received at 
Harvard the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1855 and 
Master of Arts in 1856. Then he entered the store 
of Cushing & Bailey and the next year became a 
partner in the firm. He now conducts alone the 
same business as publisher, bookseller and stationer 
under the name of Cushing & Company. His 
life since 1S61 has been filled with public work and 
has been closely connected with the history of the 
Republican party of the Slate and with every move- 
ment for the improvement of the city and the suc- 
cess of its charities. In 1864 he was Chairman of 
the Committee on Education in the Constitutional 
Convention. In 1S86 he was made President of 
the Maryland Institute for the Promotion of 
Mechanic Arts and still holds that office. The 
Vice-Presidency of the Charity Organization Society 
was given to Mr. Cushing in 1895 and is still held 
by him. He was elected a Director in the Savings 
Bank of Baltimore in 1879 and a Director in the 



l62 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



Associated Fire Insurance Company in 1S94, a in the public schools of that city and ailmitted to 
member of the Art Commission for the City of Bal- Harvard in 185S. He grailuatcd in the Class 
timore in 1895, a member of the State lioanl of of 1862 as valedictorian, .?//«////</ (V/w /audi-. After 
E;ducation in 1896, President of the Baltimore graduation he remained at Harvard as Tutor in 

Latin, Greek and Ancient History, and at the same 
time pursued the study of law in the regular course 
at the Law School of the University. He was 
admitted to the 15ar in 1866, resigning his place as 
Tutor to enter the practice of his jirofcssion, and in 
1870, upon the retirement of Mr. Shattuck from 
the law firm of ("handler, Shattuck & Thayer, Mr. 
Hudson was admitted as a member. This con- 
nection was continued as Chandler, Thayer & 
Hudson, and then as Chandler, Man & Hudson 
until 1878. Upon the formation of the .'\merican 
Ikll Telephone Company in 1S80, Mr. Hudson 
became General Counsel of the company, and 
gradually, as the business of the corporation made 
greater demands upon his time, withdrew from 
other i)ractice. He took up the duties of General 
ALinager in 1885, in 1887 was made Vice-President 
and in 18S9 was elected President of the Comjiany, 
which position he also holds with the American 




JOSEPH M. CUSHING 

Normal School for tlie Education of Colored 
Teachers in 1886 and still carries on the duties of all 
these positions. In addition he was Chairman of 
the Republican State Executive Committee from 
1864 to 1866, and Republican candidate for Elector 
at the election of President Harrison and has been 
a member of the Good Government Association, 
the Maryland Historical Society, the ^Merchants' 
and Manufacturers' Association, the Archaeolog- 
ical Society of Maryland, the Civil Service Reform 
•Association and many social organizations. 



HUDSON, John Elbridge 

Harvard A.B. 1862. 

Born in Lynn, Mass., 1839; early education Lynn 
High School ; graduated Harvard, valedictorian of 
Class of 1802; Tutor Harvard, 1862-65; admitted to 
the Massachusetts Bar, 1866; general counsel of the 
American Bell Telephone Company 1880 and Presi- 
dent 1889; President American Telephone and Tele- 
graph Company. 

JOHN ELBRIDGE HUDSON, President of the 
.\merican Bell Telephone Company, was born 
in Lynn, Massachusetts, .August 3, 1839, educated 




JOHN E. HUDSON 

Telephone & Telegraph Company. The marvellous 
development of the telephone business has come 
about almost entirely since Mr. Hudson was called 
to the management of the present company. 



UNIFERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



163 



SILLIMAN, Benjamin Douglas 

Yale B.A. 1824, LL.D. Columbia 1873 ^"d Yale 1874. 
Born in Newport, R. I.. 1805; graduated Yale, 1824; 
Assistant in Chemistry 1824-1825; admitted to the Bar 
in New York 1829: member of the Legislature, 1838; 
appointed United States Attorney for New York, 1865; 
member of the Constitutional Commission, 1872; re- 
ceived the degree of Doctor of Laws from Columbia 
and Yale ; earliest living graduate of Yale. 

BEN7AMIN DOUGLAS SILLIMAN, LL.D., 
Lawyer, was born in Newport, Rhode Island, 
September 14, 1805, the son of Gold Sellick Sillinian 
(Yale 1796). He was graduated at Yale in the Class 



failed of election. He has achieved a high position 
in the law, and was one of the founders of the New 
York Bar Association, and one of its Vice-Presidents. 
Columbia conferred upon him the degree of Doctor 
of Laws in 1873 and Yale in 1874. 




BENJAAMN D. SILLIMAN 

of 1824, of which he is to-day (1899) the sole sur- 
vivor, being also the earliest living graduate of Yale 
College. For a year following his graduation he was 
employed as Assistant in Chemistry at Yale, under his 
uncle the older Professor Sillinian, and then, study- 
ing law, was admitted to the Bar in 1829, opening 
an office in New York, where he established his 
practice permanently. Mr. Silliman has held a num- 
ber of public offices, among them that of Represen- 
tative in the New York Legislature in 1838, United 
States District .Attorney for the Eastern District of 
New York in 1865, member of the Commission for 
revising the Constitution of the state in 1S72. He 
was nominated by the Republicans in 1873 as their 
candidate for Attorney-General of New York, but 



GULLIVER, Arthur Huntington 

Yale B.A. 1877. 
Born at Norwich, Conn., 1856 ; fitted for College at 
the Norwich Free Academy ; graduate of the Aca- 
demical Department of Yale, 1877; engaged in mechan- 
ical work with various corporations since his graduation, 
and since 1891 as Assistant Superintendent of the Lons- 
dale Company, having chaige of two large mills, one of 
716 looms and the other of 1160. 

ARTHUR HUNTING'ION GULLIVER, 
Manufacturer, was born at Norwich, Con- 
necticut, December 13, 1856, the second son of 
Daniel Francis Gulliver, M.D., who graduated at 
Yale in 1848 and at Jefferson Medical College in 
1852, and Mary Eunice Strong, daughter of Henry 
Strong, M.A., L.L.D., of the Class of 1806 at Yale, 
Tutor and ex-officio Fellow of the same University. 
Henry Strong was one of the leading lawyers of the 
State, and was born at Norwich, August 23, 1788, 
and was married to Eunice Edgerton Huntington, 
born in the same town September 13, 1797. John 
Gulliver, feither of Daniel, was born at Taunton, 
Massachusetts, September 2, 1792, and his wife, 
Sarah Putnam, was born at Reading in the same 
State, October i, 1790. His early education was 
received at a private school in Norwich, then one 
year at the grammar school of the district, entering 
the Norwich Free Academy and graduating in the 
Class of 1873, going from there to the .Academical 
Department of Yale and graduating in 1877. 
Having a decided preference for mechanical work, 
he made arrangements during that summer to 
take up cotton manufacturing, and November i he 
entered the employ of the \Vhitin Machine Works, 
Whitinsville, Massachusetts, working in their Erecting 
Department. From November i, 1877 to .April 13, 
1 8 78 he was a fitter on their looms and spinning 
frames both at the shop and at the Union Mills, 
Fall River. Owing to a reduction of the force he 
left there, and May 13 entered the employ of the 
Wauregan Mills, Wauregan, Connecticut, taking up 
in detail the various processes of manufacture in the 
mill itself. He remained there until July 24, 1S86, 
having special work to do in the office and the mills 
for the agent. On July 26 he took charge of the 
Pequot Mills at Montville, Connecticut, as Super- 



164 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



intendent of the plant there of two hundred and 
thirty-eight looms with preparatory machinery. On 
November i, 1887 he resigned to take the same 
position with the Grosvenor Dale Company of Gros- 
venor Dale, Connecticut, taking Mills Nos. 3 and 4 
of that Company with two hundred and eighty- 
seven and four hundred and thirty looms respectively. 
.•\fter three years' service there he resigned to accept 
a position as travelling salesman for the Pettee Ma- 
chine Works, Newton Upper Falls, Massachusetts, for 
their cotton machinery, devoting particular attention 
to their .American Built Revolvino; Flat Cards. He 




.ARTHtR H. GULLIVER 

gave up this position May 6, 1891, for that of As- 
sistant Superintendent of the Lonsdale Company, 
with residence at Ashton, Rhode Island, having 
charge of their mill of seven hundred anfi sixteen 
looms there, as well as the No. 4 mill of eleven 
hundred and sixty looms at Lonsdale, Rhode Island, 
belonging to the same corporation. Mr. Gulliver 
has always been a Republican in politics, but has 
held no elective position except in school affairs, 
being the District Committee in Wauregan, 1884- 
1886, and President of the School Board of Thomp- 
son, 1 889-1 890, while a resident of that town. He 
is a member of the Home Market Club and of the 
New England Cotton Manufacturers .Association, 
and is also a Past Master in the .Ancient Order of 



United Workmen, having been a member of Quine- 
baug Lodge since 1884. He married Freedie 
.Amelia, only child of David Emerson of Wauregan, 
Connecticut, .April 8, 1885. They had one child, 
Edith Emerson Gulliver, born January 26, 1886, who 
died September 22, 1893. 



WEBSTER, NOAH 

Yale B.A. 1778, LL.D. 1823. 

Born in Hartford, Conn., 1758 ; graduated Yale. 1778 ; 
admitted to the Bar, 1781 ; teacher, author and editor ; 
published his American Dictionary of the English Lan- 
guage, 1828; first President of the Board of Trustees 
of Amherst College : Alderman of New Haven : Judge 
of Connecticut Court ; member of the Legislature of 
that State and Massachusetts ; LL D. Yale and Middle- 
bury ; died 1843. 

NOAH WEBSTER, LL.D, Lawyer, Author and 
Statesman, was born in Hartford, Connec- 
ticut, October i6, 1758, a descendant on his father's 
side from John Webster, one of the early (lovernors 
of Connecticut, and on his mother's side from Wil- 
liam Bradford, second Governor of Plymouth Colony. 
He entered Vale in 1774, and although his studies 
were interrupted by service in the militia during the 
War for Independence, he was graduated in the Class 
of I 7 78. He studied law, took the degree of Master 
of Arts in course, and was admitted to the Bar in 
I 781 ; but as the distracted state of the country gave 
little opportunity for the practice of that profession 
he became a teacher, establishing himself in Goshen, 
New York, where he began the compilation of the 
text-books with which his name is associated. 
These were the Spelling Book, Grammar and Read- 
ing Book, originally published as A Grammatical 
Institute of the English Language, in three parts. 
The Spelling Book, which was in use everywhere in 
this country for more than a hundred years and is 
still used in many schools, was a great and per- 
manent success. Mr. Webster's royalty, although 
only one cent a copy, supported him and his family 
during the twenty years in which he worked on his 
Dictionary, and it has reached, in all its editions, 
the unprecedented issue of sixty-two million copies. 
.After the War of the Revolution, Mr. Webster gave 
much time and thought to the problems of govern- 
ment which the new Republic faced, publishing a 
number of pamphlets which exerted much influence 
in directing public opinion. The movement for a 
Federal constitution is thought to have received its 
first impulse from his pamphlet. Sketches of Amer- 



UNIVERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



.65 



ican Policy, in 17S4. For a time he was Superin- 
tendent of an Academy in Philadelphia, and for 
four years after his marriage to a daughter of 
William Greenleaf of Boston, he practised law in 
Hartford, Connecticut. In 1793 he established a 
daily paper in New York City, the Minerva, which 
subsequently became the Commercial Advertiser, 
and for five years was occupied in this publication 
and in other literary work, notably a History of 
Pestilences, which was published in New York and 
London in 1799. Mr. Webster removed to New 
Haven in 1798, intending to devote himself entirely 




MIAH WEBSTER 

to general literature, but the bent of his mind was 
strongly toward philology, and early in the new cen- 
tury the plan of his great work began to take shape. 
He had published in 1806 a vocabulary of words not 
contained in any existing lexicon, and in 1807 A 
Philosophical and Practical Grammar of the English 
Language, and he now devoted himself to the forth- 
coming American Dictionary of the English Lan- 
guage. In 1812, for more economical living, he re- 
moved with his family to Amherst, Massachusetts, 
where he took an active part in founding the College 
at that place and was made President of its first Board 
of Trustees. In 1822 he returned to New Haven, 
still at work on his Dictionary, and in 1824 went to 
Europe for consultation with literary men, finishing 



the manuscript of his work in the Library of Cam- 
bridge University, in 1825. The first edition, 
twenty-five hundred copies, was published in this 
country in 1828, followed by an edition of three 
thousand in England. Twelve years later Mr. 
Webster published an enlarged edition in two 
volumes. The great .American lexicographer was 
also an active man in public affairs. He served on 
the Bench as Judge in one of the Connecticut 
courts and as a member of the Legislature of that 
State and of Massachusetts, and was an Alderman of 
the City of New Haven. He received the honorary 
degree of Master of .Arts from Princeton in 1795, 
and of Doctor of Laws from Yale in 1823 and 
Middlebury in 1830. He died in New Haven, 
Connecticut, May 28, 1843. 



ANDERSON, Joseph 

Va:e D.D. (Hon.) 1878. 

Born in Scotland, 1836 ; graduated College of the City 
of New York, 1854: engaged in the work of the minis- 
try of the Congregational Church in Connecticut ; del- 
egate to the International Council of Congregational 
Churches, London, 1891 ; Moderator of the General 
Association and of the General Conference : D.D., Yale, 
1878; elected Fellow of the Corporation, 1884. 

JOSEPH A.VDKRSO.V, D.D., Clergyman, and 
Fellow of the Yale Corporation, was born in 
the Highlands of Scotland, at Broomton, Easter 
Ross, December i6, 1836, and came to .America 
with his parents in 1842. His education was be- 
gun in the public schools of New York City, and 
was continued in the College of the City of New 
York, where he was graduated in 1854, valedictorian 
of his class. He studied for the ministry and 
entered with energy into the work of the Congrega- 
tional Church in the East. His first Pastorate was 
that of the First Congregational Church in Stamford, 
Connecticut, which he held from 1858 to 1861, 
resigning to accept a call from the First Church in 
Norwalk. .A temporary failure of health led to his 
resignation of this charge in 1864, but in the fol- 
lowing year a temporary engagement to supply the 
pulpit of the First Church in Waterbury led to his 
permanent settlement over that congregation, with 
which he has remained to the present time. Dr. 
.Anderson has acquired a wide reputation as clergy- 
man, antiquary, historian, philologist and man of 
letters. The antiquities and history of the .American 
Indians have been his special study, and in his collab- 
oration with the Bureau of Ethnology at Washington 



I 66 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



his lieUl of research has been the Algonkin family 
of languages. He has published numerous sermons 
and addresses, is a frequent contributor to the 
newspaper press, and for more than a year, 1872- 




JOSI'.lMl AN'IJKRSON 

1873, he was the active editor of tlie Waterbury 
American. In 1874 he declined appointment to 
the Chair of English Literature in Michigan Univer- 
sity. For more than forty years he has been a 
prominent figure in the Congregational Church, 
taking a leading part in its organization and move- 
ments. He was one of the organizers of the 
American Congress of Churches, and at the Interna- 
tional Congregational Council at London, England, 
in 1 89 1, he was present as a delegate from the 
United States. He is President of the Connecticut 
Bible Society and director of the Missionary Society. 
He has been twice Moderator of the General 
.Association and once Moderator of the General 
Conference, being the only clergyman who has ever 
held the latter ofifice. In the City of Waterbury 
Dr. .Anderson has been actively interested in the 
cause of education, and he is a member of many 
learned bodies, among them the .American Anti- 
quarian Society and the .American Philological 
Society, and the Historical and Social Science 
Associations. On January 24, 1859, he married Anna 
Sands, daughter of Thomas Jefferson Gildersleeve 



of New \'ork City, 'i'hey have had five children, 
of whom two are living, .Anna Sands and Joseph 
Anderson, a graduate of Yale University and of the 
Yale Law School. He received the degree of 
Doctor of Divinity from Yale in 1S78, and was 
elected a Fellow of the Corporation in 1884, and is 
the only graduate of another College holding a seat 
in that bodv. 



DOWNER, William Victor 

Yale B.A. 1878. 

Born in Chittenango, N. Y., 1856; fitted for College 
privately ; B.A. Yale, 1878 ; engaged in grain trade since 
1879; Trustee of Merchants Exchange of Buffalo for 
several years; vestryman at Church of Ascension, 
Buffalo, for several years. 

WILLIAM ^•ICl■OK DOWNER, Merchant, 
was born in Chittenango, New York, July 
9, 1856, sonof Abner Patridge Downer and Harriet 
Uretta Hamblin Downer. The family is an old 
Vermont one, the first representative of which in 
this country settled in Plymouth during the early 
history of the Colonies. He received his early ed- 




W. \'. DOW.NEK 



ucation in private schools in Chittenango, New 
York, and fitted for College under the guidance of 
private tutors, entering Yale in 1874, and graduating 
with the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1878. Im- 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



167 



mediately on his graduation he became actively 
engaged in the grain trade in Chicago, New York 
and Biiffiilo. with which he has been connected ever 
since. He stands high in the mercantile world of 
Bufifido and was a Trustee of the Merchants Ex- 
change for several years. He is also active in 
church work, having been for several years a ves- 
tryman of the Church of the Ascension. Mr. Downer 
is a stanch adherent of the Republican party on 
political questions, but the engrossing duties of his 
business have left him no time for active partici- 
pation. He married, June 16, 1885, Helen Louisa 
French. They have two children : Huntington, 
born August 22, 1887, and Hobart French Downer, 
born November 4, 1889. 



BACON, William Turner 

Yale A.B. 1868. 

Born in Hartford, Conn., 1846; graduated at Yale, 
1868, and Medical Department University of New York, 
1871 ; Assistant in Physiology there, and Curator to 
Charity Hospital. 1873-76; Assistant Surgeon New 
York Eye and Ear Infirmary, and Attending Physician 
to Outdoor Poor, 1872-76; Ophthalmic Surgeon to 
Hartford (Conn.) Hospital since 1879; Consulting and 
Ophthalmic Surgeon to St. Francis Hospital. 

WILLIAM TURNER BACON, M.D., Phy- 
sician and Surgeon, was born in Hartford, 
Connecticut, .August 27, 1846, son of Leonard 
Holmes and Elizabeth Chester (Turner) Bacon. 
He is a direct descendant of Michael Bacon, an 
Englishman who emigrated in 1640 and was one of 
the early settlers in Dedham, Massachusetts, and 
of Nathaniel Turner, one of the founders of the 
New Haven Colony who came over with Governor 
Winthrop in 1630, and in 1646 sailed on the 
Phantom Ship for England. Nathaniel Turner was 
an original member of the .Ancient and Honorable 
Artillery of Boston. William T. Bacon completed 
the regular course at the Hartford High School in 
1863, and entering Yale the following year was 
graduated with the Class of 1868. His professional 
studies were pursued at the Medical Department 
of the University of the City of New York, where 
he took his degree in 1871, and acquired expe- 
rience at the Charity and Roosevelt Hospitals. 
From 1873 to 1876 he was Tutor and Assistant 
in Physiology at the University (Medical Depart- 
ment) and was also the Curator to the Charity 
Hospital ; was Assistant Surgeon to the New York 
Eye and Ear Infirmary and attending Physician in the 
Medical Department to the Outdoor Poor 18 72-1 876. 



Returning to Hartford he was appointed Ophthalmic 
Surgeon to the Hartford Hospital in 1879 ^^^ 
subsequently became Consulting and Ophthalmic 
Surgeon to St. Francis Hospital, and is still con- 
nected with both those institutions. He also has 
an extensive private practice. Dr. Bacon is a mem- 
ber of the American Medical .Association, the 
American Ophthalmological Society, the Congress 
of American Physicians and Surgeons, the State, 
County and City Medical Societies ; the Yale 
Alumni, and the Roosevelt Hospital Associations, 
Sons of the .Americnn Revolution, and the Colonial 




\\M. 1. u.^co.v 



Club of Hartford. In politics he is a Republican. 
On June 10, 1875, he married Mary Elizabeth Coit 
of Hartford. 



DAVIES, Henry 

Yale B.D. 1888, Ph. D. 1896. 
Born in London, England, 1864; studied at King's 
College, London, and at Chestnut College, Hertford- 
shire, England : took degrees at Yale in 1888 and 1896 ; 
ordained minister in Michigan: Pastor of First Church 
of Derby, Conn. ; Lecturer on History of Philosophy 
at Yale. 

HENRY D.AVIES, Ph.D., Clergyman, and 
Lecturer at Yale, was born July n, 1S64, 
in London, England, the son of James and Ellen 



i68 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



Uavies, both natives of \\'clsh counties, he is a de- 
scendant of the ancient Hues of ancestry which have 
been located in Shropshire and Montgomery for 
many years. His early education was obtained 
chiefly in the institutions connected with King's 
College, London ; this institution and King's Col- 
lege School were among tiie places where he had 
early training. Later Mr. Davies attended Chestnut 
College in Hertfordshire, ICngland, where he paid 
particular attention to the study of logic and meta- 
physics. After this he came to America, entered 
upon a course of study at Yale, and took there the 




IlKNKY DAVIES 

degree of Bachelor of Divinity in 1888. During 
this year he had charge of a Congregational Church in 
northern Michigan, and was there ordained. From 
1S89 to 1893 he occupied the pulpit of a Congre- 
gational Church in Westport, Connecticut, and from 
there he went to preach at the First Church of 
Derby, Connecticut. Until 1896 he continued his 
studies in Yale and in that year the degree of Doc- 
tor of Philosophy was conferred ujion him and he 
was appointed Lecturer in History of Philosophy in 
the University. He is an active member of the 
Philosophical Club. Mr. Davies married, March 
24, 1S94, Florence Martha Matilda Hughes, of 
London, England. Their children are : William 
Henry, born June 30, 1895, and Eleanor Davis, born 
December 5, 1896. 



LAWRANCE, Thomas Garner 

Yale Class of 1884. 

Born in New York City; entered Yale, 1880; athlete 
and Chairman of Junior Promenade Committee, 1882 ; 
died at New Haven in his Senior year, 1883 ; Lawrance 
Hall erected as a memorial gift by his mother. 

THOM.AS GARNKR L.-\\VRANCE, in wiiose 
memory Lawrance Hall at Yale was built, 
was the son of Francis C. Lawrance of New York. 
He entered Yale in the Class of 1884. He took a 
I)rominent place in his class, and was a fine athlete 
and the most popular man in his class, being elected 
Chairman of his Junior Promenade Committee, the 
highest social honor at Yale. He contracted typhoid 
fever while abroad, and died in New Haven early 
in his Senior year, October 16, 1883. A memorial 
gift of S5 0,000 made by his mother was used to 
])artially defray the expense of a new dormitory and 
the name Lawrance Hall was given to it in honor of 
her son. 



WRIGHT, Henry Parks 

Yale B.A. 1868, Ph.D. 1876. 

Born in Winchester, N. H., 1839 ; attended Phillips 
Academy, Andover, Mass ; graduated at Yale, 1868; 
Instructor in Chickering Institute, Cincinnati, Ohio. 
1868-70; Tutor in Greek at Yale, 1870-71; Assistant 
Professor of Latin at Yale, 1871-76 ; Dunham Professor 
of Latin at Yale since 1876 ; studied in Europe, 1877-78 ; 
Dean of Yale College Faculty, since 1884; received the 
degree of PhD. from Yale, 1876; and of LL.D. from 
Union in 1895. 

HENRY PARKS WRIGHT, Ph.D., LL.D., 
Professor of Latin and Dean of the Col- 
lege P'aculty at Yale, was born in Winchester, New 
Hampshire, November 30, 1S39. He is the son of 
Parks and Relief (Wolley) Wright, .'\fter the death 
of his parents he lived at Oakliam, Massachusetts, 
and tauglit in the schools of that town several years 
before entering College. For College preparation 
he entered Phillips Academy at Andover, and re- 
mained there until the end of the middle year, when 
he left to join the Fifty-first Regiment Massachu- 
setts Volunteers with which he served until its 
discharge in 1863. He then finished his prepara- 
tory study with Rev. Dr. F. N. Peloubet at Oakham, 
and entered Yale. He graduated with the degree of 
Bachelor of .-^rts in 1868, and became Instructor in 
the Chickering Institute at Cincinnati, Ohio, where 
he remained until 1870. He then returned to Yale 
to accept a position as Tutor in Greek. After two 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



169 



years he was appointed Assistant Professor of Latin 
and taught with that rank until 1876, when he was 
made Dunham Professor of Latin. The degree of 
Doctor of Philosophy was conferred upon him by 
the University in the same year. The year 1877- 




stenographer until 1865, since which date he has been 
actively engaged in the practice of his profession ; has 
been an officer in various business corporations, and 
has been Land Commissioner of the City of St Louis, 
Chief Supervisor of Elections. United States Commis- 
sioner. Special Master in Chancery of the United States 
Circuit Court, and has been President of the Civil 
Service Reform Association and of the St Louis Law 
Society. 

EDMUND THOMPSON ALLEN, M.A., law- 
yer, was born in Fairhaven, Massachusetts, .Au- 
gust 10, 1836. His parents were Edmund and Sarah 
Russell (Freeman) Allen. He received his early 
education at the Friends Academy of New Bedford, 
and the Williston Seminary of Easthampton, Massa- 
chusetts. He entered Yale in 1853, graduating in 
the Class of 1857 with the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts, and was given the degree of Master of .Arts in 
i860. Immediately on his graduation he entered 
the law office of John H. Clifford & Lincoln F. 
Brighams at New Bedford, and read law there until 
1859, when he was admitted to the Bar. He prac- 
tised his profession in New Bedford until 1863. 
Removing to St. Louis, Missouri, he was employed 



HENRY p. WRIGHT 

1878 was spent in study in Germany and Italy, 
after which he returned to Yale to continue his 
duties there. Since 1884 Professor Wright has 
been Dean of the College Faculty, and in this 
capacity he has come into intimate relations with 
the men of the later classes. He is a member of 
the Board of Trustees of the Hopkins Grammar 
School of New Haven. He married Martha E. 
Burt, July 7, 1874. His children are: Alice 
Lincoln, born 1875 ; Henry Burt, born 1877 ; 
.■Mfred Parks, born 1880 and Ellsworth, born 1S84. 




ALLEN, Edmund Thompson 

Yale B.A. i857, M.A. i860. 
Born in Fairhaven. Mass., 1836; received his early 
education at the Friends' Academy of New Bedford 
and the Williston Seminary of Easthampton. Mass. ; 
graduate of Yale, 1857 1 B A.I ; read law in office of John 
H. Clifford & Lincoln F. Brighams, New Bedford; ad- 
mitted to the Bar in 1859 ; in 1863 removed to St. Louis 
and employed in the Military Courts there as clerk and 



EDMfXD 



ALLEN 



in the Military Courts there as clerk and stenographer 
for two years, since which date he has been actively 
engaged in the practice of law in the Missouri 
metropolis. Mr. .Allen has held a number of politi- 



170 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



cal positions, having been Land Commissioner of 
the City of St. Louis in 1866, Chief Supervisor of 
Elections in the City of St. Louis under the United 
States Election Law, United States Commissioner, 
Special Master in Chancery of the United States 
Circuit Court ami is prominently identified with the 
advancement of the Civil Service, having been Presi- 
dent of the Civil Service Reform Association : and, 
for several terms, President of the St. Louis Bar 
Association ; is a member of the University, the 
St. Ix)uis and the Union Clubs. He has been iden- 
tified with a number of business enterprises as officer 
and Director, among which may be mentioned, the 
Crystal Plate Glass Company, the Crystal Railway 
Company, the South St. Louis Iron Company, the 
Union Dairy Company and the Brush Electric Com- 
pany. He is a Republican in politics. He married, 
January 13, 1863. Sylvia T. Boweu. They have 
three children: Clifford B. (Vale 1885), Anna A. 
Stevens and Edmund Allen (Yale 1888). 



ATTERBURY, Charles Larned 

Yale B.A. 1864. 

Born in Detroit. Mich., 1842 ; received his early edu- 
cation in the private schools of Detroit, and New 
Albany, Indiana ; graduated at Yale in the Class of 
1864, receiving the degree of A.B.: studied law in the 
office of Lothrop & Duffield, Detroit, for some time: 
on his admission to the Bar practised his profession 
privately until 1873 ; solicitor and counsel for Erie 
Railway Co. of N. Y., 1873-84, also special counsel for 
Pullman Palace Car Company and other corporations. 

CHARLES LARNED ATTERBURY, Lawyer, 
was born in Detroit, Michigan, December 
3, 1842. He is the son of John Guest Atterbury 
and Catharine Jones Larned, both representing old 
American families. He prepared for College in 
private schools in Detroit, and New .Albany, Indiana, 
and graduated at Vale in the Class of 1864 with the 
degree of Bachelor of .\rts. Immediately on his 
graduation he took up the study of law in the 
office of Lothrop & Duffield in Detroit. On his 
admission to the Bar he began the private practice 
of his profession there, and continued it until 1873 
when he removed to New York. He was solicitor 
and counsel for the Erie Railway Company in New 
York City from 1873 to 1884, also special counsel 
for the Pullman Palace Car Company, the Chicago 
and Atlantic Railway Company and other large 
corporations. Since 1884 he has devoted his at- 
tention principally to the interests of a large 



clientele of railway and industrial corporations. 
Mr. Atterbury is a member of the Century Associa- 
tion, the University and Grolier Clubs. His polit- 
ical sentiments are Republican. On January 7, 1868. 
he married Katherine Mitchell, daughter of .Marcus 
Y. Dow of New York City. They have one son, 
Grosvenor Atterbury, born July 7, 1869, who 




C. L. AlTERBfKV 



graduated from Vale in 1891, and is now engaged 
in the practice of his profession as an architect in 
New York Citv. 



CANNON, Charles Kinsey 

Yale B.A. 1867— Columbia LL.B. 1870. 

Born in Bordentown, N. J., 1846: graduated at Yale 
1867, and at Columbia Law School 1870; admitted to 
Bar the same year ; practised in Hoboken, N. J., nearly 
thirty years ; Corporation Attorney there 1877-78. 

CHARLES KINSEY CANNON, M.A., Attor- 
ney at Law, was born in Bordentown, New 
Jersey, November 12, 1846, son of Garrit S. and 
Hannah ( Kinsey) Cannon. His paternal grand- 
father. Rev. James Spencer Cannon, was a member 
of the Faculty of the New Brunswick (New Jersey) 
Theological Seminary. His great-grandfather on 
the maternal side, James Kinsey, was Chief-Justice 



UNlVERSiriES AND rHEIR SONS 



171 



of the New Jersey Supreme Court, and the latter was 
a son of John Kinsey, Chief-Justice of the Supreme 
Court of Pennsylvania. Charles Kinsey Cannon 
attended the Preparatory Department of Burlington 




A' 



appointed Tutor of Latin at Yale, 1895; reappointed, 
i8g8. 

RTHUR LESLIE WHEELER, Ph.D., 
Tutor in I^tin at Yale, was born in Hart- 
ford, Connecticut, .\ugust 12, 187 1. He is the 
son of William Ruthven Wheeler and Emily 
(Crego) Wheeler, of English and Scotch ancestry. 
His early education was received at the Hartford 
schools, among them the Hill School and the High 
School, from which he graduated in 1889. At 
eighteen years of age he entered Yale and four 
years later (1893) he graduated with the degree of 
Bachelor of .\rts. He then took a graduate course 
in classics, which lasted for two years, 1893-1895, 
and the next year he received the degree of Doctor 
of Philosophy. He had held several fellowships in 
the mean time. He was made Sophomore Instruc- 
tor in Latin after one year of graduate study in 
1894. In 1895 he received a three-year appoint- 
ment as Tutor of Latin. In 1899 he published, in 
conjunction with Dr. M. W. Mather of Han'ard 
University, a text-book of Latin writing (Harper 
Brothers). Mr. Wheeler is a member of the Delta 
Kappa Epsilon Fraternity, the Graduates' Club and 



CHAS. K. CANNON 

College (New Jersey) and entered Yale, graduating 
with the Class of 1867. His professional studies 
were pursued in the Law Department of Columbia, 
Class of 1870, and he was admitted to practice in 
the courts of New York and New Jersey the same 
year. Locating in Hoboken he soon established a 
large general law business which he has maintained 
for nearly thirty years, and from May, 1877, to May, 
1S78 he was Corporation .Attorney for the City of 
Hoboken. Mr. Cannon was formerly a member of 
the Linonia, Delta Kappa, Alpha Delta Phi and 
Phi Beta Kappa Societies at Yale ; and has been 
Vice-President of the Columbia Club, Hoboken, 
from 189s to the present time. On April 22, 1880, 
he married Agnes R. Herbert, and has two children : 
Garrit S. and .Agnes H. Cannon. 



WHEELER, Arthur Leslie 

Yale B.A. 1893. Ph.D. l8g6. 
Born in Hartford, Conn., 1871 ; attended the Hart- 
ford High School: graduated at Yale, 1893; took two 
years post-graduate study: received PhD. degree 
from Yale, 1896; Sophomore Instructor of Latin, 1894; 




A. I.. WHEELER 

the Lawn and Golf Clubs of New Haven. He 

married, June 20. 1895, May Louise Waters of 

Hartford. He has one daughter. Ruth Wheeler, 

born .April 21, 1897. 



172 



UNIFERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



McILVAINE, Charles Pettit 

Princeton A.B. 1816. 
Born in Burlington, N. J., 1799; graduated, Prince- 
ton, 1816; Chaplain and Professor in the United States 
Military Academy, 1825-27 : Professor in the Univer- 
sity of the City of New York, 1831 ; elected Bishop of 
Ohio 1832; President of Kenyon College; D.D. from 
Princeton and Brown; D C.L. from Oxford; LL.D. 
from Cambridge, Eng ; died 1873. 

CHARLES PKTnr iMcIl.VAINE, D.D., 
n.C.L., LL.D., Protestant Episcopal Bishop 
of Ohio, wns born in liurlington, New Jersey, 




CHAS. 



MC1LV.4LNE 



January i8, 1799, and graduated at Princeton in the 
Class of 1816. He studied for the ministry and 
took priest's orders in 1821, entering upon his 
duties in the parish of Christ Church, (leorgetown, 
District of Columbia, in tliat year. He resigned 
this charge wiu-n appointed in 1825 Professor of 
Ethics and Chaplain in the United States Military 
Academy at West Point, where he remained until 
called to St. Ann's Church, Brooklyn, New York, in 
1827. Shortly after, in 1831, he was appointed 
Professor of the Evidences of Revealed Religion 
and Sacred .Antiquities in the University of the City 
of New York, but held this Chair only until in the 
following year, he was elected Bishop of Ohio and 
removed to his diocese in October, 1832. In con- 
nection with the Bishopric, he assumed the Presi- 
dency of Kenyon College at Gambier and of the 



Theological .Seminary tiiere. P)ishop Mcllvaine was 
a member of the Sanitary Commission during the 
Civil War, and through his ecclesiastical and otiiet 
connections abroad, was able to influence in a con- 
sitlerable degree the views of thoughtful men in 
I'jigland in favor of the Union in that struggle. He 
was a voluminous writer, and his Evidences of 
Ciiristianity has passed through thirty editions. 
Dr. Mcllvaine received the degree of Doctor of 
Divinity from Princeton and Brown in 1832, that 
of Doctor of Civil Law from O.xford in 1853, 
and that of Doctor of Laws from Cambridge in 1 858. 
While on a visit to Europe for his health, he died in 
Florence, Italy, March 13, 1873. 



BUTLER, Elisha, Jr. 

Princeton A.B. 1865. 

Born in Birmingham, Pa., 1843 ; fitted for College at 
Hudson River Institute, Claverack, N. Y. ; gradu- 
ated, Princeton, Class of 1865 ; upon leaving College 
became Principal of Clinton Academy, East Hampton, 
L. I. ; resigned this position in about two years and 
became connected with the North America Life In- 
surance Company ; entered the freight service of the 
old New Jersey Railroad ; and Transportation Com- 
pany ; in the office of the General Freight Agent at 
Jersey City, N. J., in i86g ; transferred to Local Freight 
Office, in Jersey City, as Chief Clerk and Cashier, Jan. 
1872; since December, 1874, has been Freight Agent in 
charge. 

ELISHA BUTLER, Jr., Freight Agent Penn- 
sylvania Railroad, was born in Birmingham, 
Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, January 20, 1843, 
son of the Rev. Elisha and Martha Green (Ganoe) 
Butler. On the paternal side he is of English 
ancestry. His father, who was a native of Con- 
necticut, was a clergyman in the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church for over forty years. His paternal 
grandfather was captain of a vessel plying between 
New England ports and South America. On his 
mother's side he is of French Huguenot and Ger- 
man descent. He was a student at Rainsburg 
Seminary and New Columbus .Academy in Penn- 
sylvania, in early life ; was prepared for College at 
Hudson River Institute in Claverack, New York, 
and entered the Freshman class at Princeton, 
August 1 86 1. He graduated in the Class of 
1865, having taken a private final examination a 
few weeks in advance in order to take charge as 
Principal of Clinton Academy in East Hampton, 
Long Island, May i, 1865. This Institution num- 
bers among its graduates Miss Gardner, afterwards 
the wife of President Tyler ; also a grandson of 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



I 



73 



Jonathan Edwards. About two years later Mr. 
Butler severed his connecticn with the Academy 
to accept a position with the North America Life 
Insurance Company. On October i, 1869, he 




ELI.SH.\ UUTLER 

entered the freight service of the old New Jersey 
Railroad and Transportation Company in the office 
of the General Freight Agent at Jersey City, where 
he remained until January 1872, when he was 
transferred to the Local Freight Office in Jersey 
City as Chief Clerk and Cashier. Since Decem- 
ber, 1874 he has been the Freight Agent in 
charge. He has never cared to hold public 
office of any kind, although he has had fre- 
quent opportunities of so doing, but has preferred 
always the simple pleasures of a quiet home lite. 
He has been a member of the Masonic fraternity 
since 1872. He has always been a stanch Repub- 
lican. He was married to Mary Libya Mount of 
Wayne County, New York, in 1879, and has one 
child, Emma Melissa Butler. 



inary, 1877 ; studied at the University of Berlin, 1877-78 : 
Pastor United Congregational Church, Newport, R. I., 
1879-82 ; Pastor Brick Presbyterian Church, New York 
City, since 1883; author of several books; Lecturer on 
Preaching (Lyman Beecheri at Yale, 1895-96. 

HENRY VAN DYKE, D.D., LL.D., Pastor 
of the 15rick Presbyterian Church in New- 
York, and Professor of I'jiglish Literature in Prince- 
ton University, was born in Germantown, Pennsyl- 
vania, November 10, 1852. He is the son of 
Rev. Dr. Henry Jackson and Henrietta (.Ashmead) 
Van Dyke and is directly descended from Jan 
Thomasse Van Dyk and from four of that name 
who took part in the Revolution. He received his 
early education at the Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute 
where he was prejjared for College. He entered 
Princeton in 1869 and graduated four years later 
with the degree of Bachelor of .Arts. He entered 
the Princeton Theological Seminary in 1874 where 
he remained until 1877. He spent the two follow- 
ing years in study at the L'niversity of Berlin, (Jer- 
many, and then returned to .America to assume the 
duties of Pastor of the United Congregational 
Church, in Newport, Rhode Island. He was en- 




VAN DYKE, Henry 

Princeton A.B. 1873; D.D. Princeton 18 



Harvard 1896, Vale 1897. 



Born in Germantown, Penn., 1852; studied at the 
Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute; graduated at Prince- 
ton, 1873; graduated at Princeton Theological Sem- 



HENRV V.\N DYKE 



gaged in that work until 1882. Since 1883 he has 
been Pastor of the Brick Presbyterian Church, 412 
Fifth Avenue, New York City. He received the 
honorary degree of Doctor of Divinity from Prince- 



174 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



ton in 1SS4, from Harvard in 1S96, and frciin 
Yale in 1897; and the degree of Doctor of Laws 
from Union in 1898. In 1S99 he was elected 
Professor of English Literature at Princeton. 
As an author he has done more work in lit- 
erature than in technical tiieology. A partial 
list of his books is as follows : The Poetry 
of Tennyson ; Little Rivers ; The Builders and Other 
Poems ; The Story of the Other Wise Man ; The 
Lost Word ; The First Christmas Tree ; The Gospel 
for an Age of Doubt ; and The Gospel for a ^\'orld 
of Sin. During his residence in New York he has 
held the following offices : Director of the Princeton 
Theological Seminary ; Preacher to Harvard Uni- 
versity ; Lyman Beecher Lecturer at Yale ; Honor- 
ary Chancellor of Union L^niversity ; Convocation 
Orator at the University of Chicago ; Chaplain of 
the St. Nicholas Society ; and Poet at the One 
Hundred and Fiftieth Anniversary of Princeton, 
1897. He is a member of the Century, University, 
and Authors Clubs of New York City, of the St. 
Nicholas and Holland Societies, and of the Sons of 
the Revolution. He married December 13, 1881, 
Ellen Reid, of Baltimore, a great-grandniece of 
George Washington. His children are Fanny 
Brooke, Henry Jackson, Dorothea, Elaine, and 
Paula Van Dyke. 



BAILEY, Pearce 

Princeton A.B. 1886 - Columbia M.D. i88g. 

Born in New York City, 1865; graduate of Princeton, 
1886; Medical Department of Columbia, 1889 ; received 
degree of A.M. from Princeton, 1889; studied abroad 
for two years; Assistant in Pathology at Columbia, 
•895-97; Assistant in Neurology at Columbia, 1892 to 
date ; Consulting Neurologist to St. Luke's Hospital, 
1897 t° date. 

PKARCE BAILEY, A.M., M.D., Neurologist, 
and .Assistant in Neurology at Columbia, 
was born in New York City, July 12, 1865. His 
parents, William E. and Harriet B. (Pearce) Bailey, 
were both natives of Rhode Island. Their ances- 
tors were among the earliest settlers of Newport. 
Harriet B. Pearce Bailey was a descendant of Dr. 
Jacques Jerauld, a French Huguenot, who settled in 
Boston in 1700 and later practised medicine in 
Medfield, Massachusetts. His son removed to 
Rhode Island, where the family have since re- 
mained. Pearce attended the private schools until 
his entry into Princeton in 1883. Graduating from 
there in 1886, he studied medicine at the Medical 
Department of Columbia. He took his degree in 



18S9, and shortly after received the degree of 
Master of .\rts from PrinccUm. .After some ser- 
vice as Interne in St. Luke's Hospital of New- 
York City, he went abroad and spent two years 
in perfecting himself in his chosen profession in 
German Universities. On his return to America 
he began practice in New York City, and soon 
became widely known as a specialist in diseases of 
the mind and nervous system. In 1892 he was 
appointed .Assistant in Neurology at Columbia, a 
position which he still holds, and from 1895 to 
1897 was also Assistant in Pathology there. He 




Pl'.ARCF. ll.AILKV 

has had various connections with New York hospi- 
tals, and since 1897 has been Consulting Neurologist 
to St. Luke's Hospital, where, as a youth, he saw 
his first hospital service. Dr. Bailey is a n.ember of 
three professional societies, the Academy of Medi- 
cine, Neurological Society, and the Society of Medi- 
cal Jurisprudence, and also of the University Club, 
the Huguenot Society, and several other organiza- 
tions. 



HOSACK, DAVID 

Princeton A.B. 17B9. 

Born in New York City, 1769; graduated Princeton 

1789 ; M.D. College of Philadelphia, 1791 ; studied in 

Scotland and England, and returned to take the Chair 

of Botany at Columbia, 1795, to which that of Materia 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



175 



Medica was added in 1796; Professor in the College 
of Physicians and Surgeons, 1807-26 ; organized the 
Medical Department of Rutgers; edited the American 
Medical and Philosophical Monthly, 1810-14 ; LL.D., 
Union, 1818 ; died 1835. 

D.WID IIOSACK, M.I)., LL.D., Physician, 
and Professor in the Medical School of 
Columbia, was born in New York City, August 31, 
1769, the son of a Scotch artillery officer who 
served at the taking of Louisburg in 1758. He 
was graduated at Princeton in 1 789 and received 
the degree of Doctor of Medicine from the College 
of Philadelphia two years later. After practising 




D.WID HOSACR 

his profession for a year in .\lexandria, Virginia, he 
went abroad for the purpose of study in London 
and Edinburgh, receiving the degree of Doctor of 
Medicine from the University of the latter city. 
He brought back with him on his return to New 
York in 1794, the first collection of minerals ever 
brought into this country, and a duplicate of the 
herbarium of Linnaeus which is still preserved in 
the museum of the Lyceum of Natural History in 
New York. He was appointed Professor of Botany 
in 1795, and the following year succeeded Dr. 
William Pitt Smith in the Chair of ^L'lteria Medica. 
These positions he held until his resignation in 
iSii. Dr. Hosack in 1807 became Professor of 
Midwifery and Surgery in the College of Physicians 



and Surgeons, and afterward held the Chairs of 
Theory and Practice, of Obstetrics, and of Diseases 
of Women and Children, until in 1826, with others, 
he organized the Medical Department of Rutgers. 
Dr. Hosack published numerous medical and scien- 
tific works and for several years edited the Amer- 
ican Medical and Philosophical Monthly. He 
was one of the founders and the first President of 
the New York Historical Society, and President 
of the Horticultural, Literary and Philosophical 
Societies. He was a fellow of the Royal Society of 
London and Edinburgh, and in 1818 the degree of 
Doctor of Laws was conferred upon him by Union. 
He died in New York City, December 22, 1835. 



HERR, Charles 

Princeton A.B. 1875. 

Born in Harper's Ferry, Virginia, 1856; received 
his preliminary education at a private school in Wash- 
ington, D. C, and in Europe, where he spent two 
years; was a student at Georgetown College, D. C, 
for three years of his College course, then entered 
Princeton College for his Senior year, graduating with 
the degree of B.A. in 1875; took the course at Colum- 
bian Law School, and was admitted to the Bar of the 
District of Columbia : practised law until 1878. then 
entered Princeton Theological Seminary, from which 
he graduated in 1881 : was Assistant Pastor of the 
Central Presbyterian Church, Baltimore, from May 
r88i to December 1882; Pastor of the Presbyterian 
Church at Mansfield, Ohio, June 1883 to December 
1885 ; since January 1886, he has been Pastor of the 
First Presbyterian Church of Bergen, now Jersey City ; 
received the degree of S.T.D from Princeton. 1892. 

CHARLES HERR, S.T.D., Pastor of the First 
Presbyterian Church at Jersey City, was 
born in Harper's Ferry, Virginia, October 20, 1856, 
son of Abraham H. and Narcissa (Hoffman) Herr. 
He is of German descent on both sides of the 
family. .An ancestor on the paternal side was Hans 
Herr, the Pastor and leader of a band of refugees 
from religious persecution in the Palatinate, who 
settled in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, early in 
the eighteenth century. In his early youth he 
attended the private school of the Rev. Julius Soper 
at Washington, District of Columbia, and also spent 
two years in Europe, chiefly studying French and 
Clerman. Three years of his College course were 
spent at Georgetown College, a Jesuit institution in 
the District of Columbia, and his Senior year was 
spent at Princeton, from which he was graduated as 
B.ichelor of Arts, in the Class of 1875. The follow- 
ing three years were devoted to the study and 



176 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



practice of the law. He took tlie course at the 
Cohimbian Law School and was admitted to the 
Har of the District of Columbia. In 1878, having 
decided to enter the I'resbvterian ministrv, he 




CHARLES IIKRK 

abandoned the law, and entered the Princeton 
Theological Seminary, graduating with the Class of 
1881. From May 1881 to December 1882 he was 
Assistant Pastor of the Central Presbyterian Church 
at Baltimore, Maryland, under the Rev. Dr. Joseph 
T. Smith. The following June he w-as made Pastor 
of the Presbyterian Church at Mansfield, Ohio, where 
he remained until December 1885, when he accepted 
a call to the First Presbyterian Church of Bergen 
(now Jersey City), and this pulpit he continues to 
fill. In February 1892 he received the degree of 
Doctor of Divinity, from Princeton. Dr. Herr is 
a member of the Union League and University 
Clubs of Hudson County, New Jersey. He was 
married, June 14, 1881, to Helen Dougal, of Wash- 
ington, District of Columbia. They have four 
children living : William Dougal, Helen Hoffman, 
.Margaret and Malvina Adler Herr. 



W"t 



Princeton. Class of 1867 ; admitted to the Bar of New 
Jersey, June 1870; practised law in Trenton until 1874; 
since 1874, has been engaged in the practice of his pro- 
fession at Hackensack, N. J. 

[JAM MLNDRLD JOHNSON, Lawyer, 
was born in Newton, New Jersey, Decem- 
ber 2, 1847, son of W'liitfield S. and I<]llen (Green) 
Johnson. He received his preliminary education at 
Newton Collegiate Institute and at State Model 
School, in Trenton, New Jersey, where he was fitted 
for College. He graduated fiom Princeton in the 
Class of 1867. He studied law nt Trenton, and 
was admitted to the Bar of New Jersey in June 
1870. Until 1874 he practised in Trenton, but 
that year he removed to Hackensack, where ha 
has since been engaged in active practice. He 
was elected Senat<;r from Bergen county in New 
Jersey State Senate in 1895, reelected in 189S, and 
was Republican leader of that body in 1S98 and 
1899. He has been active in business and political 
affairs, having been Director and Counsel of various 
corporations. He is a member of the Oritani Field 
Club of Hackensack, of the North Jersey Country 




JOHNSON, William Mindred 

Princeton A.B. 1867. 
Born in Newton, N. J., 1847; fitted for College in 
State Model School at Trenton, N. J.; graduated, 



W.M. M. JOHNSON 

Club, and the Hamilton Club of Paterson. He 
was married to Maria E. White, October 22, 1872. 
They have two children living : George White and 
William Kempton Johnson. 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



■77 



FERGUSON, John 

Columbia A.B. 1795. 
Graduated Columbia, 1795; elected Mayor of the City 
of New York, 1815; U. S. Naval Officer for the Port of 
New York; Trustee of Columbia, 1830 to the time of 
his death; died 1832. 

JOHN FERGUSON, Lawyer, Mayor of New 
York and Trustee of Columbia, was graduated 
at Columbia in the Class of 1795. He studied 
law and was admitted to the Bar and established 
himself in the practice of his profession in New 
York City. Entering political life he was elected 
Mayor of the City of New York in 18 15, and sub- 




JOIIN FERGUSON 

sequently was appointe<l United States Naval 
Officer in the customs service at that port. He was 
chosen a Trustee of Columbia in 1830, and held 
that seat till the time of his death in iS?2. 



BETTS, Beverley Robinson 

Columbia A.B. 1846. 

Born in New York City. 1827; educated at Columbia 
and the General Theological Seminary ; was Rector of 
several different Episcopal churches ; appointed Libra- 
rian of Columbia in 1865, and resigned in 1883. 

BEVERLEY ROBINSON BETTS, A.M., 
Libi^rian of Columbia for eighteen years, 
was born in New York City, August 3, 1827. His 

VOL. III. — 13 



father, William Belts, LL.D., was a lawyer of repu- 
tation and at one time Law Professor at Columbia. 
Graduating from that College in 1 846, he pursued 
the regular course at the Protestant Episcopal Gen- 
eral Theological Seminary, and becoming a Priest 
of that church in 185 i, held during the next four- 
teen years several different Rectorships. Retiring 
from the Ministry in 1865 to accept the appoint- 
ment of Librarian at Columbia he issued a full and 
carefully prepared catalogue of the large library in 
1874, and resigning that position in 1883, he turned 
his attention to literature. Mr. Belts has contri- 
buted much interesting matter to the religious peri- 
odicals and for some years has been one of the 
editors of the New York Genealogical and Biograph- 
ical Record. 



HOLM, Charles Ferdinand 

Columbia LL.B. i88j. 

Born in New York City, 1862; educated at private 
schools in United States and Germany ; engaged in 
tutoring in New York City 1878-80; LL B. Columbia 
Law School, 1882; was for some time a journalist on 
the New York World and the Brooklyn Chronicle; has 
practised corporation law in New York City since 1889, 
having been active in the formation of many large 
corporations. 

CHARLES FERDINAND HOLM, lawyer, 
was born in New York City, March 8, 1862, 
son of Carl and Marie Martienssen Holm. The 
family goes back to Carl Holm, a Captain in the 
Army of Gustavus .Adolphus, who remained behind 
on the retirement of the Swedish .•Xrmy, and set- 
tled in Mecklenburg-Schwerin. The subject of this 
sketch was educated in early boyhood at a private 
school in Brooklyn, and from his eleventh to his 
eighteenth year at Grabow and Schwerin in Ger- 
many. He was engaged in tutoring in New York 
City from 1878 to 1880, meanwhile studying law 
with Merrill & Hartwell and Judge I. N. Mills. He 
entered Columbia Law School in 1S80 and received 
his Bachelor's degree in 1882. During the next 
seven years he devoted himself more to journalistic 
work than the practice of law, and was for a time a re- 
porter on the New York World. In 18S9 he entered 
into the practice of corporation law and organized the 
Consumers Brewing Company of New York, limited, 
by bringing together two hundred and sixty-five 
retail liquor dealers who collectively contributed 
six hundred thousand dollars. His work has been 
mainly in the organization of co-operative concerns. 
Among them may be named the Retail Butchers 



178 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



Trust with nearly four liundrcil members, the Man- 
hattan Soda-Water Company, the Kxcelsior Brew- 
ing Company, and the United Wine and Trading 
Company, the latter probably the largest co-oper.i- 




CHARLES !■■. HOLM 

live concern in the world. In 1S92, lie founded, in 
association with James F. Crahani, former Editor of 
the New Vork World and Jan^es Cordon, I'^dilori il 
writer of the Eagle, the Brooklyn Ciironicle, the 
first and only daily morning paper of which that 
city ever boasted. 'I'he pai)er was started to advo- 
cate the consolidation of Brooklyn with New York, 
and the ovcrthr.)w of a political ring. Both ends 
were effected. Mr. Holm is a member of the Mon- 
tauk, Knickerbocker Athletic, Parkway Driving, 
New York Sharp Shooters and other Clubs, and is a 
Republican in politics. He married June 9, 1884 
Carolina Martienssen, who died in 1896. He has 
two children : Una and Ion Holm. 



BLATCHFORD, Samuel Appleton 

Columbia A.B. 1867. 

Born in New York City, 1845 ; educated in Auburn 
anJ at George C. Anthon's School in New York; A.B, 
Columbia. 1867 ; studied law with, and became a mem- 
ber of. the firm of Blatchford, Seward & Griswold after 
his admission to the Bar in 1868, and so continued 
until 1885; since then has practised alone; Standing 



Master in Chancery, and Standing Examiner of the 
Circuit Court of the United States for the Southern 
District of New York since 1885 ; Official Reporter of 
the decisions of the United States Circuit Courts of 
Appeals since 1891 ; has published some legal works. 

S.XMUEl. .M'i'LKrON BL.VrCHFORD, Ofifi- 
cial Reporter of the United States Circuit 
Courts of Appeals, was born in New York City, 
September 9, 1845, ^o"^ of Samuel and Caroline 
Frances (.Aiipleton) Blatchford. The first member 
of the family in this country was the Rev. Samuel 
Blatchford, who came from F^ngland to America in 
1795, and carried on pastoral work in New York 
and Connecticut. His grandson, Samuel Blatchford, 
the son of Richard M. Blatchford of New York, was 
from 1S67 to 1893 respectively United States Dis- 
trict Judge for the Southern District of New York, 
United States Circuit Judge for the Second Circuit, 
and an .\ssociate Justice of the Supreme Court of 
the United States. The subject of this sketch re- 
ceived his early education in .\uburn, fitted 
for College at George C. .Anthon's School in 
New York, and entered Columbia, graduating in 
June 1867. After leaving College he studied law 




SAM'L a. BL.-iTCHFORD 

in the offices of Blatchford, Seward & Griswold, of 
which his father before his elevation to the bench 
had been the senior member, was admitted to the 
Bar in 1868, and immediately became a member of 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



179 



the firm, which was shortly afterward changed to 
Bfetchford, Seward, Griswold & Ua Costa, continu- 
ing so until 1885, when Mr. Blatchford began the 
practice of his profession alone. In December 
1885 he was appointed United States Commissioner 
for the Southern District of New York, a Standing 
Nfaster in Chancery and a Standing Examiner of 
said Court. On the organization of the United 
States Circuit Courts of .Appeals in 1891, he was 
appointed by each one of the nine Circuit Courts 
of Appeals in the United States the Official Reporter 
of its decisions, which position he now holds. In 
1884 he annotated the General Rules ' of the Su- 
preme Court of the United States, and published 
the same with the Equity and Admiralty Rules of 
that court and the Rules of Practice of other United 
States Courts in a volume entitled Blatchford's 
Rules and Statistics of United States Courts. He 
is a member of the Alumni Association of Columbia 
University, of the Bar Association of the City of 
New York, and of the New York State Bar Associa- 
tion, but is not a member of any club. He is 
Treasurer of the Parochial Missions Society for the 
United States, and a member of its Executive Com- 
mittee. He married June 10, 1867, Wilhelmina 
Bogart Conger. They have no children. 



FALLS, Thomas Jefferson 

Columbia LL.B. 1878. 

Born in N. Y. City, 1858; educated at Fitch's Pre- 
paratory School at South Norwalk, and in private 
schools in Germany and Switzerland; LL.B. Columbia 
Law School, 1878; admitted to Bar of State of New 
York, 1879 ; and practised law in N. Y. City since that 
time. 

THOMAS JEFFERSON FALLS, Lawyer, son 
of Thomas J., and Adelaide (Whippen- 
horst) Falls, was born in New York City, January 
26, 1858 and comes of an old Colonial family. 
His great-grandfather, William Falls, commanded 
a i)rivateer in the War of 1812. His grandfiither, 
Thomas J. Falls, was Chief Engineer of the Peru- 
vian Navy, and his father, of the same name, was 
Naval Constructor in the service of China, and was 
made a Mandarin of the Blue Button and Peacock's 
Feather. The subject of this sketch received his 
early education in Dr. Fitch's Preparatory School at 
South Norwalk, Connecticut, in private schools at 
Hamburg, Germany and the Institute Sillig Vevez 
in Switzerland. He studied law at the Columbia 
Law School, graduating with the degree of Bache- 



lor of Laws in 187S. He was admitted to the 
New York Bar as attorney and counsellor in 1879. 
Since that time he has been closely devoted to the 
practice of his profession, making a specialty of 
corporation law and management of decedent's 
estates, and has conducted litigations involving 
large sums and important interests. He is widely 
known as a careful, zealous and successful attorney. 
Mr. Falls is a member of the Reform Club and has 
taken a prominent part in Masonic matters, having 
been Master of Independent Royal .Arch I^dge 
No. 2 Free and .Accepted Masons of the City of 




THOS. J. F.\Lt^ 

New York. He is a Democrat in politics, and has 
actively supported his party iluiing m.iny cam- 
paigns. 

JOHNSON, Alexander Bryan 

Vale Ph. B. 1882 — Columbia M.D. 1885. 
Born in Albany, N. Y., 1861 : graduate of the Yale 
Scientific School, 1882 ; College of Physicians and Sur- 
geons, Columbia, 1885 ; on the House Staff of Bellevue 
Hospital, 1885-87; studied abroad at Heidelberg and 
Vienna, 1887-88; Attending Physician to the Out- 
patient Department of Roosevelt Hospital, Assistant 
Attending Surgeon in the hospital proper; Clinical 
Lecturer upon Surgery, Columbia, 1896. 

ALEXANDER BRYAN JOHNSON. M.D., 
Surgeon, and Clinical Lecturer at Columbia, 
was born in Albany, New York, September i6, 1861, 



i8o 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



son of Alexander Smith Johnson and Katharine 
Maria Cryslcr, liis wife, both of English ancestry. 
The fiimily moved to Utica, New York, when Alexan- 
der Bryan Johnson was very young, and he received 




ALEXANDER li. JcjHNSON 

his early education in the public schools of that 
place. He entered the Sheffield Scientific School 
at Yale in 1878, graduating in 1882, and then took 
up the study of medicine at the College of Physi- 
cians and Surgeons of Columbia. On receiving his 
degree in 1885, he became associated with the 
House Staff of Bellevue Hospital, and so continued 
during the three following years. In the summer 
of 1887 he went to Germany, and spent the follow- 
ing year studying the higher branches of medicine 
there, first at the University of Heiilelberg and later 
at the University of Vienna. On his return from 
Vienna in 1888 Dr. Johnson began the practice of 
medicine in New York City, and connected himself 
with the Surgical Department of the Roosevelt 
Hospital. At present he is attending to the Out- 
Patient Department of that institution, and Assist- 
ant Attending Surgeon in the Hospital proper. 
Since 1896 he has been an Instructor in Surgery at 
the College of Physicians and Surgeons, holding at 
present the title of Clinical Lecturer on Surger)'. 
He is the author of several scientific articles, among 
them one of some length to a symposium of medical 



knowledge for jfopular use entitled In Sickness and 
Health. He is unmarried. Dr. Johnson is a mem- 
ber of the University and Union Clubs of New 
York, the Pathological Society of New York, the 
Surgical Society of New York, the Linnxan Society 
and the Society of the .Mumni of Bellevue Hospital. 
He does not concern himself with the political 
disputes of tiie day. 



HYDE, Clarence Melville 

Columbia B. A. 1867. LL.B. i86g, A.M. 1870. 
Born in N. Y. City. 1846; educated as a boy in the 
public schools of N. Y. City ; fitted for College at the 
Columbia Grammar School; B.A., Columbia, 1867; 
LL..B., Columbia Law School, 1E69; practised law in 
N. Y. City from 1869 to 1891 when he retired from 
general practice. 

Cl.XRKNCI-: Ml'.LVIl.l.l'. IIVDF., Lawyer, was 
born in New York City, January it, 1846, 
son of Edwin and l^lizabeth Alvina (Mead) Hyde 
and is descended from an old Connecticut family, 
and is one of the seventh generation from William 
Hyde who came from England about 1633, settling 
first at Hartford, and afterwards at Norwich, Con- 




Cr.AREiVCE M. IIVDE 



necticut. Lieutenant James Hyde served in the 
American Army during the Revolutionary \Var, and 
many other representatives of the fiimily have held 
positions of trust and honor in the political life of 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



i8i 



Connecticut. Mr. Hyde attended Ward -School 
No. 35 in the City of New York from 1853 to 1858, 
and fitted for College at the Columbia Grammar 
School, matriculating at Columbia College in 1863 
and graduating with the degree of Bachelor of Arts 
in 1867. He entered the Law School of Columbia 
in 1867 and graduated in the Class of 1869 with 
the degree of Bachelor of Laws, shortly after which 
he was admitted to the Bar in New York City, 
practising law there from 1869 to 1891. In the 
latter year he retired from general law practice in 
order to be able to devote himself more especially 
to the interests of private life. Mr. Hyde is a mem- 
ber of numerous clubs and societies, mainly social ; 
among them, the L'nion League Club, the Metro- 
politan Club, the Church Club, Down Town .Associ- 
ation, Lawyers' Club, Bar Association, St. .Anthony 
Club, Sons of the Revolution, the Military Order of 
Foreign Wars and the Society of Colonial Wars. 
On March 4, 1891, he married Lillia Babbitt. 
'I'hey have one child, Clara Babbitt Hyde. 



PROVOOST, Samuel 

Columbia A.B. 1758. 

Born in New York City, 1742: graduated Columbia 
175S ; studied at Cambridge, England, taking the degree 
of A.B. 1765; ordained in London, 1766, and returned 
to New York to become Assistant in Trinity Parish, 
of which he was chosen Rector in 1784, after the War; 
a Regent of the University, 1784-87, Trustee 1787- 
1801, and Chairman of that Board, 1795-1801 ; First 
Bishop of New York, 1786, consecrated in Lambeth 
Palace, London, 1787 ; received degree of S.T.D. from 
the University of Pennsylvania. 1786; died 1815. 

SAMUEL PROVOOST, S.T.D., first Protestant 
Episcopal Bishop of New York, and Regent 
and Trustee of Columbia, was born in New York 
City, Februar)' 24, 1742, son of John Provoost, a 
wealthy merchant of Huguenot descent. He was a 
member of the first class graduated at Columbia 
(then King's College) carrying off the honors 
although the youngest but one of its members, being 
only sixteen years of age. Three years after grad- 
uation he went to England, entering St. Peter's 
College, Cambridge, where he continued his studies, 
receiving the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1765. 
In London he took orders and also married the 
sister of one of his classmates, Maria Bonsfield, 
daughter of a rich Irish banker, and in i 766 returned 
to this country, to take up the duties of Assistant 
Minister of Trinity Parish, New York. During the 
Revolutionary War he separated himself from Trin- 



ity, but, declining offers from other parishes, among 
them that of King's Chapel in Boston, he returned 
to New York after the declaration of peace, and 
was at once in 1784 chosen Rector of Trinity. In 
I 786 he was elected the first Bishop of New York, 
and sailing to England was consecrated by the Arch- 
bishop of Canterbury and York, in Lambeth Palace, 
February 4, 1787. Owing to declining health and 
domestic bereavements, he resigned the Rectorship 
of Trinity and his Bishopric in iSoi, but the House 
of Bishops refused to accept his resignation and 
gave him an Assistant. He died suddenly at his 




S.iMUEL PROVOOST 

residence in New York. September 16, 1815. 
Bishop Provoost received the degree of Doctor of 
Divinity from the University of Pennsylvania in 
1786. He was a Regent of Columbia, i 784-1 7S7, 
a Trustee, 1 787-1801, and Chairman of the latter 
Board, 1895-1801. 



HARDY. Charles James 

Columbia LL.B. 1885. 
Born in New York City, 1865 : graduated College of 
the City of N. Y., 1884; Columbia Law School, 1885: 
practising law in N. Y. City. 

CHARLES JAMES HARDY, I-awyer, was born 
in New York City in 1865, and educated 
in the New York City Public Schools and at the 



l82 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



College of tlie City of New York. He was grad- 
uated from Columbia Law School in 1885 ; admitted 
to the Bar in 1887, and has been engaged in active 
practice since that time. He is a member of the 




CHARLES J. HARDY 

firm of Hardy & Shellabarger, with offices at 5 
Beekman St., New York City, his partner being 
Mr. J. M. Shellabarger (Princeton, 1892) ; Mr. 
Hardy has devoted himself exclusively to the prac- 
tice of his profession, and has never held polit- 
ical office. He is a member of the Phi Gamma 
Delta fraternity, and of several clubs. 



WILDE, Norman 

Columbia A.B. 1889, M.A. 1890, Ph.D. 1894. 

Born at Dobbs Ferry, N. Y., 1867 ; fitted for College 
at the Columbia Grammar School, New York City; 
graduate of the Columbia School of Arts (A.B.) 1889; 
graduate student in philosophy at Columbia, 1889-91 ; 
M.A.. 1890; studied at the University of Berlin, 1891- 
93 ; at Harvard, if93-Q4 ; Ph.D. Columbia, 1894 ; Assist- 
ant in Philosophy at Columbia since ifg;: Lecturer on 
Logic and Psychology in the New York College for the 
Training of Teachers, 1897. 



iiaving come to the United States from Yorkshire in 
the first quarter of the nineteenth century. The 
elder Wilde married Harriet Richards DeW'itt of the 
old New York family of that name. The DeWitt 
family had several representatives in the Continental 
Army during the Revolution, and General Jed Hunt- 
ington, maternal grandfather of Mrs. Wilde, was a 
member of the court-martial which tried and con- 
demned Major Andr6. Norman Wilde received his 
Ccirly education under a private tutor at home, and 
fitted for College at the Columbia Grammar School 
in New York City. He entered the School of .Arts 
of Columbia in 1885, graduating with the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts four years later. During the two years 
following his graduation he was a graduate student 
in philosophy at Columbia, receiving the degree of 
Master of Arts in 1890. In 1891 he went to Ber- 
lin and studied at the University of that city during 
the following two years. On his return he spent 
one year at Harvard, and in 1894 Columbia con- 
ferred u])on him the degree of Doctor of Philosophy 
and made him Assistant in Philosophy. His con- 
nection with the University in that capacity has 
since continued. In 1897 he held the jjost of 




NORMAN WILDE 



NORMAN WILDE, Ph.D., .Assistant in Phil- Lecturer on Logic and Psychology in the New York 

osophy at Columbia, was born in Dobbs College for the Training of Teachers. He married, 

Kerry, New York, June 12, 1867. His father, August 8, 1S94, Edna May Jiidson. Mr. Wilde is 

James Wilde, was of English descent, the family a member of the American Psychological Associa- 



UNIFERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



'83 



tion, the Columbia College Alumni Association, 
the Sons of the American Revolution and the Phi 
Beta Kappa Society. He is an independent Demo- 
crat in politics, and a supporter of good government 
under any conditions. 



STUART, Sidney Harrison 

Columbia LL.B. 1864. 

Born in New York City, 1842 ; received his early 
education in New York City public schools ; graduate 
of the College of the City of New York, 1862 ; LL.B. 
Columbia Law School, 1864 ; studied law in the office 
of his father; has been engaged in the active practice 
of his profession in New York City since 1864. 

SlDNIiY HARRISON STUART, M.S., Lawyer, 
was born in New York City, August 4, 1842. 
His father Sidney Harrison Stuart, Sr., was of Scotch 




SIDNEY H. S'lU.-iK'r 

ancestry and was a lawyer in active professional life 
in New York City until his death in 187 1. The 
elder Stuart married .Maphare Melvin of Dutch- 
English ancestry. The subject of this sketch 
attended in boyhood the public schools of New 
York City, and later the New York Free Academy, 
now the College of the City of New York, graduat- 
ing in the Class of 1862, taking the degrees of 
Bachelor, and Master of Sciences. He spent 
some time studying law in the office of his father, 
and entered Columbia Law School on his gradua- 



tion from the Free .Academy, taking the degree 
of Bachelor of Laws in 1864. He has since been 
actively engaged in the practice of his profession 
in New York City, and numbers among his clients 
the New York Lumber Trade .Association and 
various building corporations and material men. 
He has also been largely engaged in Surrogate's 
practice and the settlement and management of 
estates. Mr. Stuart's political opinions are Republi- 
can, and he is a member of the Republican Club of 
New York City, the Manhattan Yacht and the New 
Rochelle Yacht Clubs. He married February 28, 
1878, Isabel Wells. They have two children: Sid- 
ney and Lucy Stuart. 



G" 



BREWER, George Emerson 

Harvard M.D., 1885. 
Born in Westfield, New York, 1861 ; A.B. (Hamilton) 
1881 ; A.M. (Hamilton) 1884: M D. (Harvard) 1S85; 
served on house staff of hospitals in Boston, Washing- 
ton and Baltimore ; studied pathology at the Patho- 
logical Laboratory of Johns Hopkins : house staff 
Roosevelt Hospital, New York, 1886-89; Clinical 
Assistant in Genito-Urinary Surgery, College of Physi- 
cians and Surgeons, 1889-91 ; Assistant Demonstrator 
of Anatomy there in 1891 ; Attending Surgeon, City 
Hospital. 

EORGE EMERSON BREWER, A.M., 
M.l)., Surgeon, was born in Westfield. 
New York, July 28, 1861. His father, Francis 
B. Brewer, was a son of Ebenezer Brewer, a 
well-known philanthropist of Pittsburgh, Pennsyl- 
vania, and his mother, Susan Rood Brewer, was a 
daughter of the Rev. Herman Rood, D.D., Presi- 
dent of the Theological Seminary at Gilnianton, 
New Hampshire. The subject of this sketch entered 
Hamilton in 18 78, graduating with the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts in 1881. He studied medicine at 
Harvard, taking his degree in 1885, and receiving 
the degree of INLister of .Arts from Hamilton in the 
same year. .After his graduation he ser\Td for a 
time on the house staff of the Boston City Hospital, 
and later at the Columbia Hospital for women at 
Washington. Leaving tnere, he went to Baltimore 
for the purpose of studying pathology at the Patho- 
logical Laboratory of Johns Hopkins, and was also 
for a time connected with the Bay View .Asylum of 
that city. He came to New York in 1886 and 
began the practice of his profession, first as a gen- 
eral physician and later as a surgeon. He was 
appointed .Assistant Surgeon in the Out-Patient 
Department of Roosevelt Hospital in 1SS6 and 



1 84 



UNIFERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



served until i S89, when he was appointed Clinical 
Assistant in Genito- Urinary Surgery at the College 
of Physicians and Surgeons. In 1891 he was made 
Assistant Demonstrator of Anatomy at the College. 
He has also held for some years the post of Attend- 
ing Surgeon at the City Hospital, besides attending 
to a large private clientele. Dr. Brewer married, 
June 29, 1892, Effie Leighton Brown of Chester, 
Pennsylvania. They have one child : Leighton 
Brewer, born December 27, 1895. While not ac- 
tive in political life. Dr. Brewer is a stanch Rcpubli- 




GEORGE E. I'.KEWEK 

can. He is a member of the University, Century, 
Larchmont Yacht and Oakland C.olf Clubs, and of 
the .Academy of Medicine. 



CROSBY, Edward NicoU 

Columbia A.B. 1887. 
Born in New York City, 1865; received his early edu- 
cation privately; graduate of Columbia, 1887; four 
years in the banking house of Spencer, Trask & Com- 
pany in New York City ; in the real estate business in 
New York City at present; Assistant in Columbia, 
1887-88. 

EDWARD NICOLL CROSBY, formerly Assist- 
ant at Columbia, was born in New York 
City, September 29, 1865. Both his father, Robert 



Ralston Crosby, and his mother, Jane Murray 
Livingston, were of old New York families, the 
elder Crosby of English ancestry, and Mrs. Crosby 
of Scotch and Dutch. Both families were promi- 
nently identified with the struggle of the colonies 
for independence. Edward Nicoll Crosby attended 
a day-school in New York City, and later fitted for 
College privately. He enteretl Columbia in 1884, 
taking his degree three years later, in June 1887. 
For the four years following his graduation he was 
employed in the banking house of Spencer, Trask 
& Company in New York City. In 1891 he be- 
came engaged in real estate operations, and has 
since followed that occupation. He has also held 
for some years the position of .Assistant in Creek at 
Cohmibia. Mr. Crosby takes a great interest in 
matters pertaining to the colonial history of the 
United States. He is a member of the Sons of 
the Revolution and the Society of the Colonial 
Wars of New York City, and also of the Colum- 
bia College Alumni xAssociation and the City Club. 
He is unmarried, and takes no active interest in 
the political struggles of the hour. 



GORE. John Kinsey 

Columbia A.B. 1883, A.M. 1886. 

Born in Newark, N. J., 1864; educated in private 
schools and the public grammar and high schools of 
Newark; A.B., Columbia, 1883, A. M., Columbia, 1886; 
teacher and manager of a preparatory school in New 
York City, 1883-92 ; has been with the Prudential In- 
surance Company since that time, as clerk. Mathema- 
tician. Assistant Actuary, and as Actuary since 
1897 ; School Commissioner in Newark, 1895-97. 

JOHN KINSEY GORE, .Actuary of the Prtiden- 
tial Insurance Company of America, was born 
in Newark, New Jersey, February 3, 1864. His 
ancestors on the maternal side were prominent 
during the Revolution. He received his early 
education in private schools and in the public 
grammar and high schools of Newark, entered 
Columbia in 1879, taking the Academical course 
and graduating with the degree of Bachelor of Arts 
in 18S3. During the nine years following his 
graduation Mr. Gore was engaged as teacher and 
manager of a preparatory school in New York City. 
He entered the employ of the Prudential Insurance 
Company in 1892, was made Mathematician in 
1893, .Assistant Actuary in 1895 and was promoted 
to his present position in 1S97. Mr. Gore has 
always been a Republican in politics but has held 



UNIVERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



185 



no political office save that of School Commissioner 
of Newark from 1S95 to 1897. He is a member 
of the American Mathematical Society, the Actuarial 
Society of America, the Riverside Athletic Club of 




JOHN K. GORE 

Newark (of which he was President from 1890 to 
1895), the Newark Athletic Club, the Essex Club 
of Newark, and the Omega Association of Phi 
Gamma Delta of New York City, of which he was 
President during 1897 and 1898. He married 
February 16, 1898, Jeannette Amelia Littell. 



HOBART, Moses Montague 

Columbia LL.B. 1875. 

Born in Amherst, Mass., 1846; educated in the dis- 
trict and High schools at Amherst and the Williston 
Seminary; A.B. Amherst College, 1872; entered Co- 
lumbia Law School in the fall of 1872, spent the year 
1873 in travelling, graduating at Law School in 1875; 
has practised his profession in Cleveland, Ohio, ever 
since ; City Prosecuting Attorney. 1877-78 : Supervisor 
United States Census, 1880: Clerk to the Mayor of 
Cleveland, 1881-82; President of the City Council, 
i888-gg. 

OSES MONTAGUE HOBART, Lawjer, 
was born in Amherst, Massachusetts, 



Esther Montague. His paternal ancestry goes back 
to the Rev. Peter Hobart who came from Hingham, 
England, about 1632 and settled near Boston. 
Through his father he is descended from William 
the Conqueror. On his mother's side his ancestry 
may be traced to Drogo de ^lontagu, one of the 
followers of \Villiam the Conqueror. He was 
educated in the district and high schools of Amherst 
and the Williston Seminary of Easthampton, Mas- 
sachusetts, and entered .Amherst College in 1868, 
graduating as Bachelor of .Arts in 1872. In the 
fall of that year he entered Columbia Law School, 
spent the year 1873 travelling in Europe, graduated 
at the Law School in 1875 and was admitted to the 
Bar. He located in Cleveland, Ohio, in July of 
that year and has been in active practice as a lawyer 
there ever since. He is a Republican in politics, 
and during 1877 ^id 1878 was the City Prosecuting 
.Attorney. He was Supervisor of the United States 
Census for the Sixth District of Ohio in 1880 ; Clerk 
to the Mayor of Cleveland, 1881 to 1882 and in 
1888 was elected President of the City Council. 
He is a member of the Union and ^Lisonic Clubs 




.M. M. IIOB.ART 



of Cleveland and the Chamber of Comm 

Hobart married December 5, 1882, 

Waterman Peckham. They have two 

March 26, 1846, son of Edmund Hobart and Marion Montague and Harold Peckham 



M 



erce. Mr. 
Elizabeth 
children : 
Hobart. 



i86 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



LOWELL, John 

Harvard Class of 1817. 
Born in Boston. Mass., 1799: prepared for College in 
the High School of Edinburgh, Scotland ; student at 
Harvard, 1813-1815; engaged in commerce; passed his 
life from 1831 in travel ; founded and endowed by his 
will the Lowell Institute of free public lectures; died 1836. 

JOHN LOWELL, Philanthropist, founder of 
the Lowell Institute of free public lectures in 
Boston, Massachusetts, was born in that city ^Lly 1 1, 
1799. He was in direct descent from Percival 
Lowell, a merchant of Bristol, England, who came 
to America in 1639 and settled at Newbury, Massa- 
chusetts. The family, through many generations 
and various branches, has been prominent in the 
intellectual, social and industrial life of Massa- 
chusetts. John Lowell's father, Francis Cabot 
Lowell (Harvard 1793) ^^^^ '^''' practicability of 
introducing the manufacture of cotton goods into 
this country, reaching this conclusion through ob- 
servations made by him in England, with the result 
of establishing mills in Waltham, Massachusetts, and 
subsequently at Lowell, which city was named in 
his honor. His grandfather, John Lowell (Hars'ard 
1760) statesman and jurist, was one of the founders 
of the American Academy of .Arts and Sciences, and 
as a member of the convention to frame the Con- 
stitution of Massachusetts in 1 7S0, secured the in- 
sertion of the phrase with which the Rill of Rights 
opens : " .411 men are born free and equal " ; thus 
decreeing the abolition of slavery in Massachusetts. 
John Lowell, the subject of this sketch, received his 
early education in the High School of Edinburgh, 
Scotland, and returned to the United States to take 
the .Academic course at Harvard. He entered that 
University in 18 13, but on account of impaired 
health he was compelled to withdraw at the end of 
his Sophomore year and seek recuperation through 
sea voyages. He sailed twice to India, and with 
his health re-established engaged in commercial 
business in Boston for several years. In 1830, 
domestic affliction, the death of his wife and chil- 
dren within a few months of each other, led him to 
retire from active business and pass the remainder 
of his life in travel. He visited Europe and the 
East, including Asia Minor, Egypt, Arabia and 
Hindostan, as well as all parts of the United States, 
and it was while in Egypt, at the ruins of the tombs 
of the Kings at Thebes, that he made the will which, 
as Edward Everett said, " will do more for human 
improvement, than for aught that appears, was done 
by all of that gloomy dynasty that ever reigned." 
By this will he bequeathed $250,000 as a founda- 



tion for the maintenance in Boston of annual courses 
of free public lectures on religion, science and the 
arts. Upon this fund was established, in 1839, the 
Lowell Institute, the first course of lectures being 
opened L)ecember 3 1 of that year. These courses 
have been continued to the present, with the result 
of fully equalling if not surpassing the prediction 
made by Mr. Everett in his opening address. John 
Lowell died in Bombay, India, March 4, 1836. 



BLAIR, Albert 

Harvard A.B. 1863. 
Born in Kinderhook, 111., 1840 ; educated at Phillips- 
Exeter Academy, at Harvard (1863), and at the Harvard 
Law School: freight agent at Macon of the North Mis- 
souri Railroad : Secretary of the Missouri & Mississippi 
Railroad ; Land Agent of the North Missouri Insur- 
ance Company, Macon; practised law at Macon; re- 
entered service with the North Missouri Railroad 
Company; Secretary of the Keokuk & Kansas City 
Railroad ; practised law in St Louis : helped organize 
the American Brake Company and the National 
Hollow Brake-Beam Company ; has been identified 
with the Missouri-Edison Company, the Wagner 
Electric Company, and the Phcenix Carbon Company : 
Chairman of the Executive Committee of the Civil 
Service Reform Association of Missouri; member of 
various organizations. 

ALlil^RT 111, AIR, Lawyer, was born in Kinder- 
hook, Illinois, October 16, 1840. His 
parents were William and Mary (Jackson) Blair. 
William Blair, son of William Montgomery Blair, was 
a native of Ohio, his parents having migrated from 
Bourbon county, Kentucky. ^Lary Jackson was a 
native of New Vork State, her paternal ancestor was 
the founder of Newton, Massachusetts. Albert Blair 
studied in the advanced class of Phillips-Exeter 
.Academy. .Admitted to the Sophomore Class at 
Harvard, he was graduated in 1S63. Although he 
was then offered several positions as teacher he de- 
clined them all, and in September of the year he was 
graduated, he entered the service of the North Mis- 
souri Railroad Company at Macon, Mo., at that 
time an important terminal station, and was soon 
thereafter appointed freight and ticket agent at that 
point. .Afterwards he became Secretary of the Mis- 
souri & Mississippi Railroad, and later was Land 
Agent of the North Missouri Insurance Company, 
Macon. Returning to Cambridge in 1865, he at- 
tended the Harvard Law School until the following 
spring, when he located at Macon, Missouri, and was 
admitted to practice. In 1867 on account of poor 
health he gave up his legal business, and in the fall 
of 1868 returned to railroading in the employ of the 
North Missouri Railroad Company. Four years 



UNIVERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



187 



later he was appointed Secretary of the Keokok & 
Kansas City Railroad Company and invested in the 
construction company that undertook to build the 
road-bed of that railroad. The enterprise failed and 



Committee for four years, 187 2-1876, and as Re- 
publican candidate for State Senator in 1898 in St. 

Louis. 




ALBERT BLAIR 

involved financial loss to nearly all concerned. 
Early in 1876 Mr. Blair resumed the practice of 
law and removed to St. Louis, which has been his 
home ever since and where he has been especially 
active in managing the legal affairs of corporations. 
He helped organize in 1879 the .American Brake 
Company and shared in establishing the National 
Hollow Brake Beam Company of Chicago, both of 
which enterprises have been successful. He has 
been identified with the Missouri-Edison Company, 
the Wagner Electric Manufacturing Company, West- 
inghouse Air Brake Company, the Phoenix Carbon 
Company and several other prosperous manufac- 
turing concerns of St. Louis, of some of which he 
has been Director and of all of which he has been 
legal adviser. For the years 1891-1892 Mr. Blair 
was Chairman of the Executive Committee of the 
Civil Service Reform Association of Missouri, ac- 
complishing efficient legislation against corrupt 
practices in elections. He was Secretary of the 
University Club for two years and a member of 
other social' organizations. In politics he has fig- 
ured as Chairman of the Macon County Republican 



GURNEY, Ephraim Whitman. 

Harvard A.B. 1852. 

Born in Boston, Mass., 1829; graduated Haivard, 
1852; Tutor, 1857-63; Assistant Prof, of Latin, 1863-67; 
Asst. Prof of Intellectual Philosophy, 1867-68; Assist- 
ant and then University Professor of History, 1868-86; 
McLean Professor of Ancient and Modern History, 
1886; Dean of the College Faculty, 1870-76; Fellow, 
1884-86 ; died 1886. 

EPHRALM WHITNEY GURNEY, Fellow of 
Harvard and Dean of the College Faculty, 
was born in Roxbury, Massachusetts, February i8, 
1829, and graduated at Har\-ard in the Class of 
1852. He filled the position of Tutor for six years 
from 1857 to 1863, and was then made Assistant 
Professor of Latin, and in 1867 Assistant Professor 
of Intellectual Philosophy. The following year he 
was appointed .Assistant in History, and in 1869 
was made L'niversity Professor in the same branch. 
This chair he held until 1886, when he succeeded 




E. \V. GURNEY 



Professor Terry as McLean Professor of History. 
Professor Gurney was Dean of the College Faculty 
from 1870 to 1876, and was a Fellow of Harvard 
from 1884 to the time of his death in i886. 



[88 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



TORREY, Henry Warren 

Harvard A.B. 1833. LL.D. 



1879- 



Born in Roxbury, Mass., 1814; graduated Harvard, 
1833; Tutor and Instructor in Elocution, 1844-48 ; Pro- 
fessor of Ancient and Modern History, 1856-86, and 
Emeritus. 1886-93 ; Lecturer in the Law School, 1886^7 ; 
Overseer, 1888-93; LL.D., Harvard, 1879; died 1893. 

HHNRV \\\RRi:X rORRKY, LL.D., Over- 
seer of Harvard and Professor, was born in 
Roxbury, Massachusetts, November 11, 1814, and 
graduated at Harvard in 1833. After four years 




HENRY W. TORREV 

spent in teaching and in assisting in the preparation 
of Leverett's Latin Lexicon, he studied law, and was 
admitted to the Bar in 1840, but immediately re- 
sumed teaching as an occupation. He was appointed 
Tutor at Harvard in 1844, and served as Instructor 
in Elocution from 1844 to 1S48. In 1856 he was 
inade McLean Professor of Ancient and Modern 
History, occupying that Chair until after thirty years 
of service he retired from its active duties in 1886, 
retaining his connection as Professor Emeritus. 
He also delivered lectures on Elocution in the Law 
School in 1886-1887. Professor Torrey received the 
degree of Doctor of Laws from Harvard in 1879, 
and was a member of the Board of Overseers from 
1888 to the time of his death in 1893. 



FOLSOM, Charles Follen 

Harvard A.B. 1863, A.M. 1865, M.D. 1870. 

Born in Haverhill, Mass., 1842; educated at Phillips- 
Exeter Academy, at Harvard (1862), at the Harvard 
Medical School and abroad: connected with Freed- 
men's Bureau in South Carolina; Visiting Physician 
Boston Dispensary, Massachusetts Infant Asylum, 
Carney Hospital and Boston City Hospital ; Assistant 
Physician McLean Asylum ; practitioner of medicine ; 
Secretary Massachusetts State Board of Health ; 
member National Board of Health ; Trustee Danvers 
Lunatic Hospital ; Lecturer on Hygiene and later As- 
sistant Professor of Mental Diseases Harvard Medical 
School; Overseer of Harvard; President Boston 
Society for Medical Improvement; fellow American 
Academy of Arts and Sciences ; member of other 
organizations. 

CHARLES FOLLEN FOLSOM, A.M., M.D., 
Assistant Professor of Mental Diseases at 
the Harvard Medical School 1882-85, subsequently 
Overseer of Harvard, was born in Haverhill, Massa- 
chusetts, April 3, 1842. His parents were Nathan- 
iel Smith and Ann Wendell (Penhallow) Folsom, 
both of whom came of English families that moved 
to this country in the seventeenth century. From 
Phillips-Exeter Academy Mr. Folsom entered Har- 
vard, where he received the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts in 1862 and Doctor of Medicine in 1870 and 
he served for one year as House Physician at the 
Boston City Hospital. He also pursued his medi- 
cal studies in Munich, Vienna and ]5erlin. In 1862 
he was appointed to the Freedmen's Bureau in South 
Carolina. Dr. Folsom was made Lecturer on Hy- 
giene in the Medical School in 1877 and in 1S82 
was appointed Assistant Professor of Mental Dis- 
eases. In 1 89 1 he was chosen Overseer of the 
College. Among the offices which Dr. Folsom has 
held have been those of Visiting Physician Boston 
Dispensary, Massachusetts Infant Asylum, Carney 
Hospital, Boston City Hospital, Assistant Physician 
of McLean .Asylum, Secretary of the Massachusetts 
State Board of Health, Trustee of Danvers Lunatic 
Hospital, member of the National Board of Health, 
member of the Commission in 1879 to investigate 
the causes of the epidemic of yellow fever in Mem- 
phis and New Orleans and to report on its preven- 
tion, and member of the commission to investigate the 
Public Charitable Interests and Institutions of Mas- 
sachusetts. He also holds membership in the Asso- 
ciation of .American Physicians, the Boston Society for 
Medical Improvement, of which he has been Presi- 
dent for two years, the Boston Society of the Medi- 
cal Science, and the Boston Medico-Psychological 
Society, of which he has been President for one 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



189 



year. He is a fellow of the American Academy of 
Arts and Sciences. When the St. Botolph Club of 
Boston was organized Dr. Folsom was one of the 
founders. On May 12, 1886, he married Martha 
Tucker Washburn. 



CHANDLER, Samuel Ward 

Harvard A.B. 1822. 
Born in Petersham, Mass., 1803 ; educated at Har- 
vard (1822); studied law ; entered mercantile business; 
retired. 

SAMUEL WARD CHANDLER, at the present 
time the earliest graduate living of Harvard, 
was born in Petersham, Massachusetts, July 12, 




SAMUEL WARD CHANDLFR 

1803, his parents being Nathaniel and Dolly 
(Greene) Chandler. He was descended from 
William and Annis Chandler, who came from Eng- 
land in 1637 and settled in Roxbury, ^Llssachusetts. 
From Leicester Academy Mr. Chandler entered Har- 
vard where he graduated in 1822. He then studied 
law for a year in the office of Theophilus Parsons, 
but ultimately decided on a mercantile life. Until 
1874 he continued in active business. He married 
November 18, 1S30, Elizabeth Pales Richmond, 
and had six children : Henry Richmond, George 
Crocker, Mar)' Elizabeth, Francis Ward, Kate 
Herbert and Arthur Chandler. 



ALLEN, Andrew Hussey 

Harvard A.B. 1878. 

Bom in New York, 1855; educated at Phillips-An- 
dover Academy at Harvard, and at the Columbia Law 
School ; admitted to the Bar but did not practise law ; 
Chief of the Bureau of Rolls and Library, Department 
of State ; Disbursing Agent of the Court of Commis- 
sioners of Alabama Claims ; Confidential Clerk to 
Second Assistant Secretary : Representative of the 
Department of State on the United States Board of 
Geographic Names ; inaugurated and now conducts 
the Bulletin of the Bureau of Rolls and Library ; one 
of the organizers, and later Treasurer of the Harvard 
Club at \A/ashington. 

ANDREW HUSSEY ALLEN, Chief of the 
Bureau of Rolls and Library in the Depart- 
ment of State, Washington, was born in New York 
City, December 6, 1855. His father was Julian 
Allen, a public-spirited citizen of New York who 
organized and offered to the Government (by which 
it was accepted July 22, 1861, for immediate service) ' 
one of the first volunteer regiments, after the en- 
listment of the regular State Militia, to go to the 
front, where it rendered a good account of itself 
throughout the war ; his mother was Mar)- .Abigail 
(Hussey) .Allen of Portsmouth, New Hampshire, a 
descendant of Christopher Hussey who came to the 
Colonies from Boston, England, settled in Haverhill, 
Massachusetts, and was at one time a part owner of 
the Island of Nantucket, later a resident at Hamp- 
ton, a member of the Governor's Council and an 
officer of the Colonial Militia. .Andrew H. .Mien 
prepared for College at Phillips .\cademy Andover, 
and graduated at Harvard in 1878. He then 
studied for a year at tiie Columbia Law School and 
in the office of .Arnoux, Rich & Woodford, New 
York, and was admitted to the Bar in North Caro- 
lina, but he never took up the practice of law. In 
1880 he was appointed a clerk in the Department 
of State, in 1882 was made Disbursing .Xgent of the 
Court of Commissioners of .Alabama Claims, in 
1S90 served as Confidential Clerk to the Second 
Assistant Secretary, and in the same year was made 
Representative of the Department of State on the 
United States Board on Geographic Names. In 
1892 he was appointed Chief of the Bureau of 
Rolls and Library. Mr. Allen inaugurated and now 
conducts the Bulletin of the Bureau of Rolls and 
Library. The first number appeared in the autumn 
of rS93 and with successive numbers contains the 
documentary history of the Constitution of the 
United States, and calendars of the historical 
archives of the Government. Mr. .Allen was one 



190 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



of the organizers of the Harvard Club in Washing- 
ton, 1883, and was also Treasurer of that club; a 
member of the Metropolitan Club, and later of the 
University Club. He holds membership in the 
Washington Golf Club alone, at present. Mr. Allen 
has done some newspaper work, and some literary 
work, while certain official reports published under 
his signature are authoritative upon the subjects of 
which they treat — diplomatic history, international 
law, etc. — e. g. Relations with the Hawaiian 
Islands since 1820; Method of Recognition of 
Foreign States and Governments by the United 




ANDREW HUSSEV ALLEN 

States, etc. He is the Custodian of the Historical 
Archives of the nation ; of the laws of the United 
States, treaties between the United States and other 
Powers, and Proclamations of the Presidents, and is 
charged with their promulgation. 



CHAILLE, Stanford Emerson 

Harvard A.B. 1851, A.M. 1833. 

Born in Natchez, Miss., 1830; educated at Phillips 
Academy, Andover, Mass., at Harvard 118511,31 the 
Medical Department of Tulane University of Louisiana, 
and France ; Resident Physician at the United States 
Marine Hospital and of the Circus Street Infirmary ; 
Co-Editor and Proprietor of the New Orleans Medical 
and Surgical Journal ; Attending Physician of the 



Charity Hospital ; Demonstrator of Anatomy in the 
Medical Department of the Tulane University of 
Louisiana ; Lecturer on Obstetrics ; Professor of Physi- 
ology and Pathological Anatomy ; Professor of Physi- 
ology in the Collegiate Department of the University ; 
Dean of the Medical Department ; Professor of Physi- 
ology, Hygiene and Pathological Anatomy; member 
and President of the Havana Yellow Fever Commis- 
sion; Executive Agent at New Orleans and Civilian 
member of the National Board of Health ; member of 
the Louisiana State Board of Health; author of nu- 
merous articles relating to medical subjects ; served in 
the Civil War, rising from private to Surgeon in Charge 
of Hospitals, and Medical Inspector Confederate Army 
of Tenn. 

STANFORD EMERSON CHAILLE, M.D., 
Dean of the Medical Department of Tulane 
University, was born in Natchez, Mississippi, July 9, 
1830. His parents, William Hamilton and Mary 
Eunice (Stanford) CiiailltJ, were natives of the 
Eastern Shore of Maryland. His ancestry is traced 
to the Chaillds of France, a Huguenot family of 
civic note as far back as 1396, whose descendants 
in America took prominent part in the Revolution- 
ary War. Mary Eunice Stanford was the daughter 
of Dr. Clement Stanford, and was descended from an 
English family of the Cavaliers, who landed in Virginia 
in 1635. Dr. Chaille received his education as a 
youth at Phillips Academy, Andover, Massachusetts, 
and then entered Harvard where he was graduated 
in 185 1. At the Medical Department of the Tulane 
University, Louisiana, he received the degree of 
Doctor of Medicine in 1853, and later became a 
student in physiology under Claude Barnard in 
Paris. Dr. Chaille was Resident Physician in New 
Orleans of the United States Marine Hospital, 
1853-1854 ; Resident Physician of the Circus Street 
Infirmarv, 1 854-1 860, Editor and proprietor of the 
New Orleans Medical and Surgical Journal, 1857- 
1868, and Attending Physician to the Charity 
Hospital for more than twenty years. In the 
Medical Department of the Tulane University of 
Louisiana he served as Demonstrator of .Anatomy, 
1 85 8-1 86 7, Lecturer on Obstetrics 1 865-1 866, and 
Professor of Physiology and Pathological Anatomy 
from 1867 to date. He was also Professor of 
Physiology in the Collegiate Department of the 
University, 1881 to 1885, and now holds the posi- 
tions of Dean of the Medical Department to which 
office he was appointed in 1885, and Professor of 
Physiology, Hygiene and Pathological Anatomy, to 
which he was appointed in 1890. As one of the 
ten chosen to deliver addresses at the International 
Medical Congress at Philadelphia in 1876, he spoke 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



191 



on Medical Jurispmdence. Besides this, for sev- 
eral years he delivered popular lectures on physi- 
ology and hygiene to school teachers and to the 
public. Dr. Chaille enlisted in the war as a private 



Louisiana State Board of Health, but served only 
a few months. Dr. Chaille has written many articles 
for medical journals, especially on public health, a 
great many of which were published in the New 



Louisiana in 1862, Surgeon and Medical Inspector 
of the Confederate Army in 1 86 2-1 863, Surgeon 
in Charge of f'airground Hospital Number Two, 
Atlanta, in 1863, Surgeon in Charge of Ocmul- 
gee Hospital, Macon, Georgia, from 1864 to 1S65, 
where he was captured and paroled. He returned 
to New Orleans in September, 1865. As one of 



1 86 1, was made Acting Surgeon-General of Orleans Medical and Surgical Journal from 1853 to 

1900. These articles include a series on Vital 
Statistics of New Orleans, also Importance of the 
Study of Hygiene in Schools, school books on 
physiology and hygiene. Yellow Fever, etc. As an 
undergraduate. Dr. Chaille was a memberof the Alpha 
Delta Phi and the Hasty Pudding Club. Among 
the societies with which he has since become asso- 
ciated are the American Medical and American 
Public Health Associations, the Medico-Chirurgical 
Faculty of Maryland, the Academy of Medical 
Sciences, Havana, Cuba, and Sons of the American 
Revolution. He also holds honorary membership 
in the College of Physicians of Philadelphia. His 
only political experience was as anti-lottery candi- 
date for the Louisiana State Convention. On 
February 23, 1857, Dr. Chailld married Laura 
Ellena, daughter of Lieutenant-Colonel John Mount- 
ford, U. S. A., who was the son of one of the 
"Boston Tea Party" of 1773. His only child is 
Mary Laura, wife of Dr. Jamison (deceased) of New 
Orleans by whom he has two grandsons, Stanford 
Chaille and David Chaille Jamison. 




S'lANFORD E. CHAILLE 

the twelve experts appointed by the United States 
Congress he investigated the great Yellow Fever 
epidemic of 1878 and was chosen Secretary of the 
Board of Experts 1878-1879. He was also ap- 
pointed by the United States National Board of 
Health one of the four members composing the 
Havana Yellow Fever Commission, and served as 
President thereof in 1879; was appointed the 
executive agent at New Orleans of the National 
Board of Health, serving from 1S81 to 1884, and 
was commissioned by President Arthur one of the 
seven civilian members of the National Board of 
Health, serving from 1S85 to 1893, when the 
Board was abolished. In 18 78 he was appointed 
by the Governor of Louisiana a member of the 



BARKER, Newell Alvin 

Harvard A.B. 1895. 

Born in Cambridge, Mass., 1872; educated at Har- 
vard (18951 • Assistant Master of Classics and Mathe- 
matics at the Brooklyn Latin School, and later 
Master of Classics at that school. 

NFAVELL ALVIN BARKER, Master of 
Classics at the Brooklyn (New York) Latin 
School, was born in Cambridge, Massachusetts, 
November 13, 1872, and is the son of John and 
Amelia Annie (Wyeth) Barker. The earliest 
known ancestor of his branch of the Barker fomily 
was Francis Barker of Concord, Massachusetts, wiio 
was born in 1646. From him the direct line 
followed down in seven generations, all of whom 
have lived in Massachusetts. Every War of the 
Republic has found members of the family among 
its defenders. The name of his mother's family has 
be'en identified with Cambridge from earliest times ; 
Nicholas Wyeth, who was born in England in 1595, 
came to this country about 1645. Newell A. Bar- 
ker passed from the Cambridge Latin School into 
Harvard where he graduated in 1895, magna cum 



192 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



laudc, and with lifinorable iiiciuion in Latin (i)is) 
and in Creek. During parts of several summers lie 
did some work witii Dr. Sereno Watson at the Clray 
Botanical Herbarium and with Dr. W. C. Farlow at 




the Cryptogamic Herbarium. Before graduating he 
was recommended for and accepted the position of 
Assistant Master of Classics and Mathematics for 
the year beginning September 1895 in the Brooklyn 
Latin School, a private preparatory school for boys. 
So successful was he in his work that at the end of 
his first year he was immediately given the appoint- 
ment of Master of Classics, and has held that 
position ever since. 



BREWER, William Augustus, Jr. 

Harvard S.B. 1854. 

Barn in Boston, Mass , 1835; educated at the Bos- 
ton Public Latin School and at the Lawrence Scientific 
School, Harvard ; attached to the civil engineering 
corps in the construction of the Lexington & Big 
Sandy Railroad in Kentucky; entered the Actuary's 
Department of the Mutual Life Insurance Company 
of New York ; appointed Secretary and Actuary in the 
Washington Life Insurance Company, and later Vice- 
President and then President ; served on numerous 
county and village commissions ; President of the 
Village of South Orange ; served in the early years of 
the War as private, corporal and Sergeant, and later 



w 



in the Draft Riots in New York; has been President of 
the New England Society of Orange, and numerous 
athletic organizations. 

'ILLI.AM .\UCUSrUS BREWKR, Jr., Pres- 
ident of the Washington Life Insurance 
Company, was born in Boston, Massachusetts, 
October 9, 1.S35, and is the son of \Villiam Augustus 
and ALarcy Sawin (Hunting) Brewer. He was 
descended directly from Daniel Brewer who was 
born in England in 1605 and settled in Roxbury, 
Massachusetts, in 1634. After graduating with 
honors at the Boston Public I^atin School, Mr. 
Brewer studied civil engineering and geology at the 
Lawrence Scientific School, Harvard, receiving the 
degree of Bachelor of Science in 1854. During 
the next two years he was attached to the civil engi- 
neering corps which laid out and supervised the 
construction of the Lexington & Big Sandy Railroad 
in Kentucky, and for the subsequent six months was 
etnployed as a draughtsman \\\ an architect's office 
in Boston. In ,\pril 1857 he entered the .-Actuary's 
Department of the Mutual Life Insurance Coinpany 
of New York and continued there until the Wash- 




BREWKR, JR. 



ington Life Insurance Company was organized in 
February i860, when he took the position of Sec- 
retary and Actuary of that company. In 1869 he 
was elected Vice-President and in 1879 President. 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



93 



Before the Civil War he was First Lieutenant in the 
New Jersey MiUtia, in iS6i he joined the Twenty- 
second Regiment, New York National Guard, and 
served as private, corporal and sergeant, and was 
also in the United States service in 1862 as well as 
during the Draft Riots in New York in 1863. 
Mr. Brewer has been a member of numerous com- 
missions in the County of Essex and the village of 
South Orange, was President of the village of South 
Orange for two terms, 1875-187 7, was twelve years 
Treasurer, two years Vice-President and two years 
President of the New England Society of Orange, and 
holds membership in numerous athletic associations. 
He married, August 13, 1863, Bella Calvert Fisher, 
and had six children : May, who married Eugene V. 
Connett, Jr., Curtiss, Graham Hunting (Harvard 
1888), who married Alice Humphrey, Elsie, Calvert 
(Harvard 1893) and Clara Brewer, who married 
William A. Minott. 



CREHORE, Frederic Morton 

Harvard A B 1881. 

Born in Newton Lower Falls, Mass. ; educated at 
Harvard (1881); engaged in the paper manufacturing 
business; member of the Common Council and Alder- 
manic Board, Newton; Water Commissioner and 
member of the School Board ; member of the Civil 
Service Reform League, the Reform Club, and numer- 
ous social organizations. 

FREDERIC MORTON CREHORE, Manu- 
fiicturer, Newton, Massachusetts, was born 
in Newton Lower Falls, Massachusetts, July i6, 
1858, and is the son of Charles Frederic and Mary 
Wyer (Loring) Crehore. His earliest American 
ancestor was Teague Crehore who landed in Dor- 
chester about 1640. Frederic I^L Crehore pre- 
pared for College at the English and classical schools 
in West Newton and under private tutors at home 
and in Cambridge, and then entered Harvard in 
the Class of 1881. After graduating he spent a 
year abroad. Returning he entered business with 
his father, running the paper mill that had been 
starte<l by his grandfather in 1845. '^Ir. Crehore 
was made a partner at the end of the year and 
since his fiither's death in 1893 has had entire 
control, devoting his manufacturing to press papers 
and Jacquard loom cards. He was a member of 
the Common Council of Newton in 1 890, an Alder- 
man in 1 89 1, Water Commissioner in 1 894-1 895, 
and a member of the School Board from 1S97 to 
the present time. Besides belonging to numerous 
VOL. III. — 13 



social organizations, Mr. Crehore holds member- 
ship in the Civil Service Reform League and Re- 
form Club, and also in the Military Order of the 
Loyal Legion of the United States, the latter by 
inheritance from his father, who was Surgeon and 
Medical Inspector during the war. Mr. Crehore 
married June i, 1897, Frances Isabelle, eldest 




FREDERIC M. CREHORE 

daughter of Henry A. P. Carter of Honolulu, who 
was for eight years Hawaiian minister at Wash- 
ington. 

SULLIVAN, James 

Harvard A.B. i8g4. A.M. l8g8. Ph. D. 1898. 

Born in Baltimore, Md., 1873 : educated at Harvard 
and abroad; Assistant in History at Harvard; In- 
structor in History and Paleography at Harvard. 

JAiMES SULLIVAN, A.M., Ph.D., Instructor in 
Histor>' and Paleography at Hanard, was 
born in Baltimore, Maryland, February 13, 1873, 
and was the son of James and Martha Jennie 
(Meeker) Sullivan. His father's family came to 
this country in the latter part of the seventeenth 
century, being connected with the settlement of 
Sullivan's Island, South Carolina, and took an active 
part in the colonial, state and national affairs. His 
mother's family was of English descent and was 



194 



UNIVERSITIES JND THEIR SONS 



settled originally in the Carolinas. Mr. Sullivan 
graiUiated at Harvard in 1894, receiving his degree 
of Bachelor of Arts, was^/ia cum laude utramqiie 
causam, with honorable mention in history and final 




JAMES SULLIVAN 

honors in history. For the year 1S94-1898 he was 
made an Assistant in the History Department and 
in the last mentioned year received the degree of 
Master of Arts. The next two years were spent 
abroad as Mr. Sullivan was awarded the John 
Thornton Kirkland fellowship and later the Parker 
fellowship. When in Rome he received his appoint- 
ment to an Instructorship in Paleography at Han-ard, 
and returned in 1897 to assume the position. In 
1898 he received the degree of Doctor of Philoso- 
phy in history at Harvard, his thesis being on The 
Life and Political Theories of William of Ockham. 
Among the work he has published have been two 
valuable articles in the American Historical Review 
entitled Marsiglio Padua and William of Ockham. 



BROWN, John Augustus 

Harvard A.B. 1879. 

Born in Exeter, N. H., 1857; educated at Phillips- 
Exeter Academy and at Harvard, 1879; private tutor ; 
substitute teacher in Phillips-Exeter Academy; en- 
gaged in fire-insurance business ; Secretary and Treas- 
urer of the Exeter Co-operative Bank •. member of the 



Exeter School Board and Public Library Committee 
and Board of Trustees of Robinson Female Seminary ; 
member of several social organizations. 

JOHN AUGUSTUS BROWN, Exeter, New 
Hampshire, was born in Exeter, September 
15, 1857. He was the son of Sebastian .Augustus 
and Abby Rowe (Hook) Brown and was descended 
in the direct line from John Brown, who was born 
in England and settled in Hampton, New Hamp- 
shire, in 1638, being one of the original grantees of 
that settlement. On his maternal side he is in direct 
descent from William Hook, who came to this 
country from Bristol, England, and settled near 
York, Maine, in 1633, and was the Governor of the 
Province of Maine, 1 638-1 640. From Phillips-Exe- 
ter Academy in 1875 Mr. ]kown entered Harvard 
where he graduated in 1879 and immediately began 
the profession of private tutor at Exeter. In this 
occupation he continued for twenty years, several 
times substituting in Phillips-Exeter Academy as a 
teacher of Latin and mathematics. In 1894 he 
entered the fire insurance business in Exeter. In 
1891 he was made Secretary and Treasurer of the 




JOHN A. BROvra 

Exeter Co-operative Bank, in 18S6 a member of the 
Exeter School Board and in 18S9 one of the Trus- 
tees of the Robinson Female Seminary. He was 
also on the Public Library Committee in 1 887-1 S89, 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



195 



and again since 1893. Mr. Brown belongs to the 
Phi Beta Kappa (Harvard) and the Exeter Civic 
Club, the Knights of Pythias and Improved Order 
of Red Men. 



COBB, Joseph Pettee 

Harvard A.B. 1879. 

Born in Abington, Mass., 1857; educated at Har- 
vard (1879,1, and at the Hahnemann Medical College 
and Hospital, Chicago : practitioner in Chicago ; Lec- 
turer on Physiology at the Hahnemann Medical Col- 
lege ; Clinical Professor of Paediatrics ; Registrar ; 
Senior Professor of Obstetrics and Paediatrics; Asso- 
ciate Editor of the Clinique. 

JOSEPH PETTEE COBB, Registrar and Senior 
Professor of Obstetrics and Paediatrics at the 
Hahnemann Medical College of Chicago, was born 




JOS. p. COBB 

in Abington, Massachusetts, June 12, 1857. His 
parents were Edward W., and Elmira (Howard) 
Cobb. From the Waltham New Church School 
Mr. Cobb passed into Harvard where he graduated 
in 1879, swd then entering the Hahnemann Med- 
ical College and Hospital at Chicago, there re- 
ceived his degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1883. 
Since graduating he has been engaged in general 
practice in Chicago. In 1889 he was appointed 
Lecturer on Physiology in the Hahnemann Medical 



College, in 1891 was elected Senior Professor of 
Histology and Biology and the same year was ap- 
pointed Clinical Professor of Paediatrics in Hahne- 
mann Hospital. In 1898 Dr. Cobb was elected 
Senior Professor of Obstetrics and Paediatrics and 
holds that position at the present time. He is also 
Registrar of the College, having been so appointed 
in 1893 and is Associate Editor of the Clinique. 
In 1899 he was unanimously elected First Vice- 
President of the American Institute of Homoeopathy 
(the oldest National Medical Society in America). 
On September 18, 1882 he married Edith H. 
Persons of Milwaukee and has one son, Edmond 
Persons Cobb. 



DE LANCEY, Edward Floyd 

Harvard L.S. Class of 1845. 

Born in Mamaroneck, N. Y., 1821 ; educated at the 
University of Pennsylvania, at Geneva (now Hobart) 
College, N. Y., and at the Harvard Law School : 
practised in Albany, N. Y., and then in New York 
City, retired ; one of the founders of the Bar Associ- 
ation of the City of New York, and Vice-President of 
the St. Nicholas Club of New York; Lieutenant- 
Governor of the Society of Colonial 'Wars, New York : 
Chairman of the Executive Committee of the New 
York Historical Society ; member of the American 
Philosophical Society of Philadelphia, of the Bio- 
graphical Society of New York, and of several social 
organizations. 

EDWARD FLOYD De LANCEY, retired law- 
yer, was born in ^Limaroneck, New York, 
October 23, 1821. His parents were William 
Heathcote De Lancey, Provost of the University of 
Pennsylvania, and first Bishop of Western New York, 
and Frances, second daughter of Peter Jay of New 
York and Mamaroneck. His great-grandfather was 
James De Lancey, Governor of the Province of New 
York and Chief-Justice of the same, who was the 
eldest son of Etienne De Lancey, a native of Caen, 
Normandy, France, driven from his native countr)' 
by the revocation of the Edict of Nantes, who came 
to New York in 1685. After studying one year at 
the University of Pennsylvania, Edward F. De Lan- 
cey entered Geneva (now Hobart) College, New 
York, and there graduated in 1843. The years 
1 845-1 846 were spent at the Har\-ard Law School, 
after which in December 1S46 he was admitted to 
the Bar and practised for two and one half years in 
Albany, New York. In 1S50 he removed to New 
York City where he continued in active practice 
until 1884 when he retired, and where he still 



196 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



resides. Mr. l)e Lancey was President of the St. 
Nicholas Society, of New York, also one of the 
founders of the Bar Association of the City of New 
York, Vice-President of the St. Nicholas Club of 
New York, Lieutenant-Governor of the Society of 




EUWAKU !•■. DE LANCEY 

Colonial Wars of New York (offices which he holds 
at the present time), Chairman of the Executive 
Committee, and Foreign Corresponding Secretary 
of the New York Historical Society, and member of 
the American Philosophical Society of Philadelphia, 
the second President of the Genealogical and Bio- 
graphical Society of New York, and member of sev- 
eral social organizations. He has been an extensive 
traveller not only in Europe, but also in Asia and 
Africa as well as in North America. He married, 
November 1848, Josephine Matilda de Zeny of 
Geneva, New York, and had six children : Caroline 
de Zeny, Frances Munro, William Heathcote, 
Edward Etienne, Josephine de Lancey ist, and 
Josephine de Lancey 2d. 



CARNEY, Sydney Howard 

Harvard M.D. 1861. 

Born in Lowell, Mass., 1837; educated at Amherst 
College and at the Harvard Medical School ; Resident 
Physician at the State Almshouse, Bridgewater, Mass. ; 



practitioner in Boston ; Sanitary Inspector of Boston ; 
Physician at the central office of the Boston Dispen- 
sary ; served as Volunteer Surgeon at Second Bull Run 
and Antietam ; Surgeon General for the Travelers' In- 
surance Company ; Superintendent of Agency, Medical 
Department, and Associate Medical Director of the 
New York Life Insurance Company; member of the 
Society of the Sons of the Revolution, Society of Colo- 
nial Wars, New York County Medical Society and 
other organizations. 

SYDNEY HOWARD CARNEY, ISLI)., Physi- 
cian, was born in Lowell, RLissachiisetts, 
.August 24, 1837, and is the son of James G. and 
Clarissa (Willett) Carney. He entered .\mherst in 
the Class of 1858 but left at the beginning of the 
Junior year, and became a member of the Class of 
1 86 1 at the Harvard Medical School. In i860 he 
served at the Massachusetts (General Hosjutal. In 
1 86 1 he was made Resident Physician of the State 
/Mnishouse at Bridgewater, Massachusetts. His prac- 
tice in Boston continued until 1870, and in that 
city he also served as one of the Sanitary Inspectors 
and for several years as Physician at the central 
office of the Boston Dispensary. In the time of the 
war he was Volunteer Surgeon at Secontl lUill Run 




SVDNEV H. CARNEY 



and Antietam. Becoming connected with the Trav- 
elers' Insurance Company as Surgeon-General in 
1867, he continued in that position until 1870, and 
from the last-mentioned time until June 20, 1895 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



197 



held the offices of Superintendent of Agency Medi- 
cal Department and Associate Medical Director of 
the New York Life Insurance Company. He be- 
longs to the Society of the Sons of the Revolution, 
the Society of Colonial Wars, the Massachusetts 
Medical Society and other organizations. On 
April 30, 1862, Dr. Carney married Hortense, 
daughter of Ebenezer T. and Ruth Hewes Abbott, 
and had four children : Sydney Howard, Jr., Charles 
Abbott, Philip Dean, and Hortense Abbott Carney. 



there received the degree of Bachelor of Laws in 
1875, since which time he has practised in Utica, 
New York. In College he was an Editor of the Har- 
vard Advocate and President of the Har%'ard Glee 
Club. Since the organization of the Harvard Club of 
Eastern and Central New York Mr. Fincke has been 
its President up to date. On June 22, 1875, he 
married Mary Deshon Wood, and had two children : 
Frances A. and Reginald Fincke. 



FINCKE, Frederick Getman 

Harvard A.B. 1873 — Columbia LL.B. 1875. 
Born in Jersey City, N. J., 1850; educated at Am- 
herst, at Harvard (1873) and at the Columbia Law 
School; practised in Utica, N.Y. ; President of the 
Harvard Club of Eastern and Central New York since 
its organization. 

VREDERICK GETMAN FINCKE, Lawyer, 

was born in Jersey City, New Jersey, January 

1850. His father, Charles Fincke, was descended 




FRED. G. FINCKE 

from Andreas Fincke ; his mother, .Anna N. (Mann) 
Fincke, was descended from Richard Mann. Mr. 
Fincke entered Amherst College in the Class of 
1872, but left in the Sophomore year to become a 
Sophomore at Harvard, where he graduated in 1873. 
He then attended the Columbia Law School and 



MUNDE, Paul Fortunatus 

Harvard M.D. ig66. 
Born in Dresden, Saxony, 1846; served as a Medical 
Cadet in the United States Army, 1864 ; graduated at 
the Harvard Medical School, 1866; served as Assistant 
Surgeon in the Bavarian Army, in hospitals in %Vurz- 
burg, and in the Franco-Prussian War; completed his 
studies in Vienna ; located in New York as gyneco- 
logical specialist, 1872; Professor of Gynecology at 
Dartmouth some years: also at the New York Poly- 
clinic ; Lecturer on Diseases of Women at Columbia, 
1881-82 ; Editor of the American Journal of Obstetrics; 
inventor of surgical instruments. 

PAUL FORTUNATUS MUNDE, M.D., Gyne- 
cologist, was born in Dresden Sa.\ony, Sep- 
tember 7, 1846, and came to the United States 
when three years old. He was a Medical Cadet in 
the Regular .Army during the latter part of the Civil 
War, and after taking his degree at the Har\-ard 
Medical School (1866), he returned to Germany, 
where he served as a Volunteer .\ssistant-Surgeon 
during the short campaign of that year. For some 
time he was an Assistant in the hospitals at Wiirz- 
burg, and joining the Bavarian forces as Battalion 
Surgeon he served through the Franco-Prussian War, 
after which he attended the University of Vienna, 
where he took the degree of Master in Obstetrics, 
and locating in New York in 1872, has acquired a 
national reputation as a gynecological specialist. In 
1880 Dr. Munde was called to theChair of Gynecol- 
ogy at Dartmouth which he occupied for some 
years ; was Lecturer on the Diseases of Women at 
Columbia in 1881-1882 ; and subsequently took the 
Professorship of his specially at the New York 
Polyclinic. He has held appointments in several 
of the New York Hospitals, and has increased the 
facilities for performing difficult gynecological 
operations by inventing a number of surgical in- 
struments. Besides editing the American Journal 
of Obstetrics he has contributed quite largely to the 
medical publications of the United States and Ger- 
many, and is the author of Minor Surgical Gyne- 
cology, and other valuable works. 



198 



UNIFERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



COOK, Elisha Woodbridge 

Yale B.A. 1837- 

Born in Manchester, Conn , 1816; graduated at Yale, 
1837 ; studied at the Andover and Yale Theological 
Seminaries ; entered the Congregational Ministry ; 
held Pastorates in various places ; now residing in 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

ELISHA WOODBRIDGE COOK, Clergyman, 
was born in Manchester, Connecticut, July 
28, 1S16, son of Rev. Elisha Baldwin and Esther 
Hills (Woodbridge) Cook. His fother was a Con- 
gregational minister of Manchester, and among his 
ancestors, especially on the maternal side, were 




K. W. COOK 

many College graduates who entered professional 
life. He entered Yale, Class of 1837, which is 
noted for having among its members an unusual 
number of men who subsequently attained distinc- 
tion, including the younger Silliman, who for many 
years acted as its Secretary. After graduating he 
taught school in various places during the succeed- 
ing five years, also spending some time at the 
Andover, (Massachusetts) Theological Seminary, 
and entering the Seminary at Yale, in 1842, he 
concluded his preparations for the ministry there 
three years later. Installed to the Pastorship of 
the Congregational Church in Haddam, Connecticut, 
in 1846, he remained there until 1852, and sub- 



sequently occupied pulpits in IlaydenviUe, and 
Townsend, Massachusetts ; Ho])kinton, New Hamp- 
shire, and Ripon, Wisconsin. Taking up missionary 
work in 1S68, he was stationed for different lengths 
of time at Yankton, Dakota ; Stockbridge, Wiscon- 
sin ; North Platte, Nebraska ; New Lisbon and 
Hudson, Wisconsin ; in the interests of the American 
Home Missionary Society. In 1895 he retired from 
active labor, and is now residing in Brooklyn, New 
York. From Yale he received the degree of Mas- 
ter of Arts in 1845. Mr. Cook is the author of 
a number of religious works including : A Theory 
of the Moral System ; Law and Penalty landless in 
an Endless Universe ; The Endless Future ; and 
The Origin of Sin and its Relations to God and the 
Universe. In 1847, he married Martha M. Smith 
of Danbury Ct., and the children of this union are : 
Emily Smith, born 1848, graduated at Ripon College 
in 1868, and has been for some twenty-eiglit years 
in the employ of the United States Government at 
Washington in the Department of the Interior; 
Harriet Woodbridge, born 1850, married Rev. J. A. 
Gilfillan, an Episcopal clergyman, and has had 
eight children; Evie Hutchinson, born 1853, and 
died in infancy ; Sarah Thacher, born 1855, attended 
the Iowa University, spent four years in Germany, 
and married Rev. A. E. Smith, a Methodist clergy- 
man. Has had two children ; Wells Woodbridge, 
born 1858, graduated at Ripon, engaged in edu- 
cational work and is an ornithologist of wide repu- 
tation ; he married Carrie A. Raymond of Ripon, 
and has had three children. He was for several 
years Director of the Agricultural Department in 
the Vermont State University, and now occupies 
a similar position in the State Agricultural College 
of Colorado; Horace Pitkin, born 1859, and died 
1871 ; Ellen Parmelee, born 1865. She is a gradu- 
ate of Smith College, Northampton, Massachusetts, 
and is now Assistant Professor of Chemistry in the 
same College ; George Thacher, born 1867, and died 
1895; and Mary Merrow Cook, born i86g. The 
daughters are members of the Society of Colonial 
Dames, and of the Daughters of the Revolution. 
Mr. Cook's wife died 1886, and in 1888 he married 
Charissa A. Welch of Hartford, Connecticut. 



HAND, Alfred 

Yale B A. 1837, M.A. i860. 
Born in Honesdale, Penn., 1835 ; fitted for College 
privately ; B.A. Yale, 1857 ; studied law under Wil- 
liam and William H. Jessupj commenced practice of 



UNIVERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



199 



law in partnership with them at Scranton, Penn., in 
i860; in partnership with Isaac J. Post, Yale, 1866-78; 
Judge of the Court of Common Pleas, 1878-88 ; Pre- 
siding Judge of the Court of Common Pleas and other 
courts of the district ; appointed Justice of the Su- 
preme Court in 1888 to fill a vacancy ; resumed the 
practice of law on the expiration of his term, in part- 
nership with his son, William H J. Hand. 

ALFRED HAND, M.A., Lawyer and Judge, 
was born in Honesdale, Pennsylvania, March 
26, 1835. His parents were Ezra and Catharine 
Chapman Hand. The family is descended from 




ALFRED HAND 

John Hand, who emigrated from Stanstede, England, 
in 1644 and settled at South Hampton. His mother 
is a direct descendant of George Chapman who 
came from Hull, England, to Boston, in 1635, later 
removing to the Say and Sele Patent at Saybrook, 
Connecticut. Alfred Hand attended in childhood 
a select school at Honesdale, afterwards a private 
school, and fitted for College under tutors from New 
England, entering Yale in 1S53, and graduating in 
1 85 7 with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. He 
received his legal training under William and ^Villiam 
H. Jessup, and commenced the practice of law in 
partnership with them at Scranton, in i860. This 
arrangement subsisted for six years when he formed 
a partnership with Isaac J. Post which lasted until 
his election to the Bench in 1878. In that year he 



was appointed Judge of the Eleventh Judicial District 
of Pennsylvania, was transferred to the Forty-fifth 
Judicial District in the same year, and was elected for 
a ten year term in that District. He was for some 
years Presiding Judge of the Common Pleas and other 
Courts of the District. In 1888 Judge Hand was 
appointed to the Supreme Court Bench by the Gov- 
ernor of Pennsylvania to fill a vacancy occasioned 
by the death of Justice Trunkey. On the expiration 
of his incumbency he resumed his practice of law 
with his son, William J. Hand. Judge Hand has held 
many offices of trust in charitable and eleemosynary 
organizations. He is President of the Lackawanna 
Hospital, President of the Scranton and Albright 
Public Library, President of the Pennsylvania Oral 
School for the Deaf, and served as a member of 
the Committee of the Presbyterian Church appointed 
to revise the Confession of Faith. He became a 
member of the Kappa Sigma Epsilon and Psi 
LTpsilon and Phi Beta Kappa at Vale, is a member 
of the Scranton Club, and has always been a Repub- 
lican on political questions. He married September 
II, 1861 Phebe \., daughter of Hon. William 
Jessup. Mrs. Hand died .April 25, 1872 leaving 
six children : Horace E., Harriet J., William J., Alfred 
Jr., Charlotte C. and Miles T. Hand. November 26, 
1873, Mr. Hand married Helen E. Sanderson. 
Two of their children, Helen S., and Ruth Boies 
Hand survive. 



GAINES, John Marshall 

Yale B.A. 1896. 
Born in New Haven, Conn., 1873; received his early 
education under his father; spent one year at the 
Cutler Academy of Colorado ; graduate of Yale, 1896; 
graduate student in Economics, 1896-97; appointed 
Assistant in Economics at Yale, 1897. 

JOHN MARSHALL GAINES, Assistant in Eco- 
nomics at Yale, was born in New Haven, 
Connecticut, May 11, 1873. He is the son of 
Marshall R. and Louise (Walker) Gaines, and is 
of old Colonial ancestry, being descended from 
Governor Winslow of Massachusetts and some of 
the earliest setders of Connecticut. He received his 
early education under the guidance of his father, 
and later attended for one year the Cutler .Academy 
of Colorado College. In 1892 he entered the 
Academic Department of Yale, graduating at the 
head of his class with the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts in 1896. He spent the following year in post- 
graduate study at Yale, in preparation for pro- 
fessional work as an Instructor in Economics, and 



200 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



in 1897 was appointed to his present position in the 
University. In the fall of '98 was obliged to take 
up the work of instruction \n Economics, owing to 
the illness of his superior. His own interest is in 




JOHN WARSUAI.I. GAINES 

the line of theoretical and mathematical economics 
and statistics. Mr. Gaines is a member of three 
of the Greek letter fraternities : Phi Beta Kappa, 
Psi Upsilon and Sigma Xi. 



HAYDEN, James Henry 

Yale Ph.B. 1887, LL.B. 1889. 
Born in New York City, 1866; prepared for College 
at St. Paul's School, Concord, N. H.; graduate 
(Ph.B.) of the course in civil engineering at the Shef- 
field Scientific School of Yale, 1887; LL B. Yale Law 
School, 1889; admitted to Connecticut Bar, i88g: ad- 
mitted to New York Bar, 1890; engaged in practice 
of law in Washington since 1891, and as a member of 
the firm of McCammon & Hayden since 1892, repre- 
senting large commercial interests. 

J.\MES HENRY H.WDEN, Lawyer, was born 
in New York City, February 23, 1866. 
Through his father, Henry Hubbard Hayden, he 
was descended from John Hayden, Esquire, of 
Devonshire, England, who settled in Massachusetts 
Bay in 1630. His mother was Mary Lenita Cairns. 
He fitted for College at St. Paul's School in Concord, 
New Hampshire, entering the Sheffield Scientific 



School of Yale in 1884, taking the course in Civil 
Engineering and graduating in 1887 with the degree 
of Bachelor of Philosophy. He then took up the 
study of law in the Yale Law School, at the same 
time studying in the office of Professor Johnson T. 
Piatt of the Yale Law School, and graduating with 
the degree of Bachelor of Laws in 1SS9. He was 
admitted to the Connecticut Bar in that year, and 
to the New York Bar in October of the follownig 
year. In April 1891 he engaged in the general 
practice of his profession in Washington, Distiict 
of Columbia, and in March, 1892, formed, with 
Hon. Joseph K. McCammon, the law firm of 
McCammon & Hayden. He has since continued 
practice as a member of this firm which represents 
as general counsel in Washington, among other large 
interests, the William Cramp & Sons Ship and En- 
gine Building Company; the Bethlehem Iron Com- 
pany ; the Southern Pacific Railroad Company and 
the New York and Porto Rico Steamship Company. 
The firm has a large practice before the Supreme 
Court of the United States, the Court of Claims, the 
Courts of the District of Columbia, the Executive 




JAMES H. H.AVDEN 



Departments of the Government, and Naval and 
Military Courts-Martial. Mr. Hayden is a member 
of the Metropolitan Club of Washington ; the Society 
of the Sons of the Revolution (Governor, 1896- 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



201 



1897) ; Yale Alumni Association of Washington 
(Secretary and Treasurer since 1895) ; the Chevy 
Chase Club (Governor and Treasurer) and the 
American Bar xAssociation. He is a supporter of 
the Democratic party, but his legal work leaves him 
no time for active participation in politics. 



MARTIN, Artemas 

Yale M.A. (Hon.) 1877. 
Born in Steuben county, N. Y., 1835; largely self- 
educated ; displayed at an early age an aptitude for 
mathematics in which he has achieved distinction ; now 
holds a government position in Washington, D. C. 

ARTEMAS MARTIN, Mathematician, was born 
in Steuben county. New York, August 3, 
1835, son of James Madison and Orenda Knight 
(Bradley) Martini He is a descendant in the fifth 
generation of Aaron Martin, ist, one of the earliest 
settlers in Sturbridge, Massachusetts, who was 
drowned in Quinneboag River in 1751. His great- 
grandparents were Aaron, 2d and Olive (Harding) 
Martin, of Sturbridge, and his grandparents were 
Artemas and Elizabeth Dickerson (Glover) Martin. 
He is also a great-grandson cf Sainuel Glover, of 
Sturbridge, a descendant of John Glover, of England, 
whose brother, Robert Glover, suffered martyrdom 
at the stake in 1555 ; and on the maternal side he 
is a grandson of Jonah and Rosanna (Weaver) 
Bradley, and great-grandson of Solomon Bradley. 
Aaron Martin. 2d, and Samuel Glover were Revolu- 
tionary soldiers. Artemas Martin's parents moved 
to the vicinity of Franklin, \'enango county, Penn- 
sylvania, when he was about two years old, and his 
educational advantages during his boyhood were 
confined to simple elementary studies which he was 
able to pursue at home. He knew nothing what- 
ever of mathematics until his fifteenth year when he 
began his attendance at the district school and com- 
menced the study of arithmetic, which he contin- 
ued for three winters, and during the last term he 
studied algebra. When seventeen years old he 
walked two and one half miles morning and night to 
the select school in Franklin, where he took a six 
months' course in algebra, geometry, natural phil- 
osophy and chemistry, and at the age of twenty he 
was able to attend for about ten weeks the Franklin 
.•\cademy, obtaining there a knowledge of trigonotn- 
etry, which concluded his attendance at school. 
About the year 1855 the hitherto attentive scholar 
became a teacher and taught in the district schools 
of Venango county four winters. His summers were 



usually devoted to farm labor, continuing his mathe- 
matical studies evenings, rainy days, and at any 
other time available for that purpose, and he also 
found employment at drilling oil wells. In 1869 
he accompanied his parents to Erie county, residing 
near and in the City of Erie for the succeeding six- 
teen years, and at one time he was successfully en- 
gaged in market gardening. The pursuit of his 
f;ivorite study seems to have afforded all the recrea- 
tion he desired or needed, as at eighteen, when 
most youtiis delight in amusements and out-door 
sports, we find young Martin contributing difficult 




ARTEMAS MARTIN 

solutions to the Pittsburg .Mmanac, and shortly 
afterward his mathematical problems began to ap- 
pear in the Riddler Column of the Philadelphia 
Saturday Evening Post, to which he continued a 
regular contributor for about twenty years. He 
also furnished problems and solutions to Clark's 
School Visitor (Philadelphia), afterward Our School- 
day Visitor, of which latter he was Mathematical 
Editor from 1870 to 1875, when that magazine was 
sold to the Scribners and merged into St. Nicholas. 
Besides editing a department of higher mathematics 
in the Normal Monthly (1S75-1S76), published at 
Millersville, Pennsylvania, by Professor Edward 
Brooks, he contributed to that publication a series 
of sixteen papers on the Diophantine Analysis. 



202 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



which were the most extensive ever published in 
this country up to that time. In 1877 he issued the 
first number of his Mathematical Visitor, which he 
still publishes at irregular intervals, and in 18S2 
appeared the first number of his Mathematical 
Magazine, which is still in the field and under his 
direction. These publications he puts in type him- 
self, anil, although he never served a single day's 
apprenticeship at the trade, they are considered by 
experts to be the finest specimens of mathematical 
printing yet executed. In 1S85 Dr. Martin was 
appointed to a responsible position at the head- 
cjuarters of the United States Coast and Geodetic 
Survey, Washington, District of Columbia, and has 
ever since resided in that city. He is a Fellow of 
the American .Association for the .Advancement of 
Science, and a member of the Philosophical Society 
of Washington, and of the American Mathematical 
Society ; the London and Edinburgh Mathematical 
Societies, and the Mathematical Association of Eng- 
land ; the Soci^tS Mathematique de France, and 
the Circolo Matematico di Palermo, Italy, and 
the Deutsche Mathematiker-Vereinigung. He has 
received honorary degrees from three Colleges, 
namely : Master of Arts from Yale in 1877, Doctor 
of Philosophy from Rutgers in 1882, and Doctor of 
Laws from Hillsdale in 1885. Besides his own pub- 
lications and those of others previously mentioned. 
Dr. Martin has contributed to the .Analyst ; The 
Annals of Mathematics ; The Illinois Teacher ; The 
Iowa Instructor ; National Educator ; the Maine 
Farmers' Almanac and other .American publications 
of a like character. He has also been represented 
in a number of English Mathematical periodicals 
including The Lady's and Gentleman's Diary ; 
Messenger of Mathematics ; the p;ducational Times 
and its Reprints ; and the Quarterly Journal of 
Pure and .Applied Mathematics. To the Witten- 
berger he contributed (1877-1879) a series oi 
thirteen articles on .Average, which are believed to 
be the first papers on that subject published in the 
United States. He possesses one of the largest 
mathematical libraries in this country, which also 
contains many quaint and curious volumes on vari- 
ous subjects, and some antique books issued soon 
after the invention of printing, and a collection of 
school text-books, some of which are printed in 
the Hawaiian language. His library contains over 
seventy five hundred volumes, more than half of 
which are devoted to mathematical and other scien- 
tific subjects. The collection of arithmetics numbers 
nearly nine hundred .American (United States) works, 



and nearly three hundred and fifty by foreign 
authors ; the collection of algebras numbers nearly 
three hundred .American (United States) works, and 
over two hundred by foreign authors ; these collec- 
tions are among the largest (if not the largest) 
private collections of the kind in the United States. 
He has also a Collection of nearly three hundred 
and fifty P^nglish Grammars published in the United 
States. 



HICKOK, William Oeville 

Yale M.E. 1895. 
Born in Harrisburg, Penn., 1874; fitted for College 
at St. Paul's School ; graduate of Sheffield Scientific 
School of Yale, ME, 1895; has been connected with 
the Hickok Manufacturing Company at Harrisburg 
since graduation ; Secretary since 1898 : Captain of Yale 
International Athletic team, 1894: Captain Yale Ath- 
letic team, 1895. 

WILLIAM OEVILLE HICKOK, Secretary 
o{ the W. O. Hickok Manufacturing Com- 
pany of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, was born in Har- 




W. O. HICKOK, 3" 

risburg, August 23, 1874. The family is an old 
English one. the first of the name in the United 
States having emigrated from Warwickshire, Eng- 
land (where the family had been well known since 
the twelfth century) and settled in Farmington, 
Connecticut. William Hickok was one of the land- 
holders in 1638. The subject of this article spent 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



203 



six years at school in Harrisburg and prepared for 
College at St. Paul's School, Concord, New Hamp- 
shire. He played on the football eleven, crew, 
cricket and track athletics at St. Paul's, and received 
there some of the training in the game which made 
him one of the best players Yale has ever had. He 
entered the Sheffield Scientific School in 1892, tak- 
ing the course in mechanical engineering and grad- 
uating in 1S95. He played on the Yale football 
eleven during the three years of his course, was 
Captain of the Yale International Athletic team 
which met the representatives of Oxford and Cam- 
bridge in 1894, and was Captain of the Yale Athletic 
team in 1895. He became a member of Book and 
Snake while at Sheflfield. After leaving College 
Mr. Hickok spent over a year in the machine shops 
of the W. O. Hickok Manufacturing Company in 
Harrisburg, training himself in the practical details 
of the business, and then went into the office as 
assistant manager. He was made Secretary in 1898. 
He is a member of the Harrisburg Country Club, is 
unmarried, and has never taken an active part in 
politics. 



J 



THOMPSON, John Walcott 

Yale LL.B. 1897, M.L. 1898. 

Born at Fort Brown, Brownsville, Texas, 1873; 
attended Racine College Grammar School, Racine, 
Wisconsin, 1886-89 ; graduated at Dartmouth, 1895 ; 
graduated at Yale Law School, 1897; engaged by law 
firm White & Daggett of New Haven, 1896-98; ad- 
mitted to Connecticut Bar, 1897; Instructor m Yale, 
1897-98; Master's degree from the Yale Law School, 
1898 ; admitted to the Utah Bar, i8g8. 

'OHN WALCOTT THOMPSON, M.L., 
Lawyer, was born in Fort Brown, Brownsville, 
Texas, February lo, 1873. His parents John 
Milton Thompson (now a Lieutenant-Colonel in 
the United States Army serving in the Philippine 
Islands) and Mary Elizabeth (Walcott) Thompson, 
are of Scotch and English ancestry ; both families 
came to America at an early date. Mr. Thompson 
was, until he reached the age of thirteen years, 
educated at home. He then went to the Racine 
College Grammar School, of Racine, Wisconsin, and 
later to the New Hampshire Conference Seminary 
at Tilton, New Hampshire. Here he was fitted for 
Dartmouth which he entered at the age of eighteen 
years. He was graduated in 1895, with the degree 
of Bachelor of Arts and with the honor of a Com- 
mencement' Oration and an election to Phi Beta 
Kappa. He then entered the Yale Law School 



where he was graduated in 1897 with honor. He 
was admitted to the Connecticut Bar in the same 
year and for a year following he was an Instructor 
at Yale. In 1898 the University conferred upon 
him the degree of Master of I^ws. For two years, 
1 896-1 898, Mr. Thompson was with the law firm 
of White & Daggett at New Haven. He is a 
member of the Delta Kappa Epsilon, the Phi Beta 
Kappa and the Phi Delta Phi fraternities ; while in 
New Haven he was a member of the Graduates' Club. 
He was also a member of Corbey Court of the Yale 
Law School. Mr. Thompson belongs to the Penn- 
sylvania Commandery of the Military Order of the 




J. WALCOIT THOMPSON 

Loyal Legion of the United States and to the New 
Hampshire Commandery of the Sons of the Amer- 
ican Revolution. In 1898 he formed a law partner- 
ship with George Jay Gibson who was graduated 
from Yale in 1895 and from the Yale Law School 
in 1897 magna cum laude and is now pr.tctising 
law in Salt Lake City, Utah. Mr. Thompson is a 
Republican in politics. 



SANFORD, Leonard Cutler 

Yale B.A., 1890, M.D.. 1893. 
Born in New Haven, Conn., 1869; graduate of the 
New Haven High School: graduated at Yale, 1890; 
studied in Sheffield Scientific School ; received Doctor 



204 



UNIVERSITIES ANB THEIR SONS 



of Medicine degree at Yale Medical School, 1893; had 
further training at College of Physicians and Surgeons, 
New York, and at the Presbyterian Hospital, New 
York; Assistant Demonstrator in Anatomy at Yale. 

LEONARD CLITER SANFORD, M.I).. 
rhysician, was born in New Haven, Connec- 
ticut, September 19, 1869. He is tlie son of 




L. C. SAMoUU 

Leonard T. ami .Xnnie (Ciitli-r) Sanford. At the 
high school of New Haven, where he graduated in 
1 886, he was fitted for College. At Yale his first 
work was in the Academic Department, and he 
graduated there with the degree of Bachelor of Arts 
in 1890. For one year then he studied in the 
Sheffield Scientific School, entering at the end of 
that time the Medical School. In 1893 he received 
the degree of Doctor of Medicine, and at once 
commenced practical professional work in New 
York City, at the College of Physicians and Sur- 
geons and at the Presbyterian Hospital. He is a 
member of the 1) K E Society of Yale; the Gradu- 
ates' ; the Yale University Clubs of New Haven and 
the University Club of New York City. 



York: graduate of the Sheffield Scientific School of Yale, 
1896 ; spent some years in post-graduate study of Phys- 
iological Chemistry in the Scientific School of Yale, 
Assistant, 1896- ; Ph.D. Yale, 1899. 

HOLMESCONDICT JACKSON, Ph.D., Assist- 
ant in Physiology at Yale, was born in New 
York City, February 18, 1875, and is eighth in 
direct lineal descent from John .\lden of the May- 
flower. The family has filled many positions of 
importance during the early history of the Colonies 
and since. Holmes Condict Jackson received his 
early education in the excellent public schools of 
New York City and later attended the College of 
the City of New York. After his graduation from 
there he was for a time engaged in tutoring for Col- 
lege, and then entered the Sheffield Scientific School 
of Yale, graduating in June 1896 with the degree of 
Bachelor of Philosophy. He immediately entered 
upon a course of post-graduate study in Physiologi- 
cal Chemistry at Sheffield in jjreparation for peda- 
gogical work, receiving the degree of Doctor of 
Philosophy from Yale in 1899. Since 1896 he has 
been an Assistant in Physiology at Yale. \Vhile in 




JACKSON, Holmes Condict 

Yale Ph.B. 1896, Ph.D. 1899. 

Born in New York City, 1875 ; graduate of the New 
York City public schools and College of City of New 



HOLMES C. JACKSON 

College he was a member of the Theta Delta Chi 
Fraternity, the Sigma Xi, Scientific Senior Society 
and the Tabard Club, and is also a member of the 
Graduates' Club of Yale in New Haven. 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



205 



JOHNSON, Samuel William 

Yale M.A. (Hon.) 1887. 
Born in Kingsboro, New York, 1830; student at Low- 
ville (New York! Academy; attended Yale Scientific 
School, 1850 ; studied science in Germany ; taught in 
New York State Normal School ; Instructor in Shef- 
field Scientific School of Yale, 1855-1895 ; member 
National Academy of Sciences. 

SAMUEL WILLIAM JOHNSON, M.A., In- 
structor in Science at Yale, was born in 
Kingsboro (now Gloversville) New York, July 3, 
1830, son of Abner A. and Annah W. (Gilbert) 
Johnson, who were descended from families of New 
England colonists. Having had early training in 
private and public schools of his native town he 
went to the Academy at Lowville, New York, where 
he graduated in 1847. For two years he taught 
in the common schools and in the Flushing Institute 
of Flushing, Long Island. Desiring then a more 
complete knowledge of his scientific subjects, he 
spent one year (i 850-1 851) at the Scientific School 
at Yale. After another year of teaching in the New 
York State Normal School, he went abroad and for 
the two years 1853-1855 he studied science at the 
University at Leipzig and the University of Munich. 
Returning to America he received an appointment 
as Instructor in the Scientific School of Yale, where 
for forty years (185 5-1 895) he rendered faithful 
and efficient service to the University, which con- 
ferred on him the honorary degree of Master of .Arts 
in 1857. He is a member of the National Academy 
of Sciences. He married, October 13, 1S58, Eliza- 
beth Erwin Blinn. He has one child, Elizabeth 
Annah Johnson. 



WHEELER, Lynde Phelps 

Yale Ph.B. 1894. 

Born in Bridgeport, Conn. 1874: attended Bridge- 
port High School ; graduated at Sheffield Scientific 
School, 1894 ; graduate student at Yale ; Laboratory 
Assistant in Physics in Sheffield School since 1895. 

LYNDE PHELPS WHEELER, Instructor in 
the Sheffield Scientific School of Yale, was 
born in Bridgeport, Connecticut, July 27, 1874. 
He is the son of Alexander and Mary Lorena 
(Marks) Wheeler. He is of Connecticut Colonial 
ancestry, and of the same line as President Dickin- 
son of Princeton. He was prepared for College by 
private leaching and by attendance at the Briilge- 
port High School. He entered Yale in 1 891, and 
after three years of study in the Sheffield Scientific 
School graduated with the degree of Bachelor of 



Philosophy in 1894. He has since then pursued 
post-graduate studies. He was appointed a Labora- 
tory Assistant in Physics in 1895, and since the fall 
of 1896 has given instruction in steam engine in 
addition. He is a member of the Sigma Xi 
Fraternity. 



VAN NAME. WiUard Gibbs 

Vale B.A. 1894, Ph.D. 1898. 
Born in New Haven, Conn., 1872; prepared for Col- 
lege at the Hopkins Grammar School, New Haven ; 
graduated at Yale, 1894; Assistant in Physiological 
Chemistry at Yale, 1894-95; Assistant in Biology, i£97- 

"ILLARD GliJBS VAN NAME, Ph.D., 
.\ssistant in Biology at Yale, was born in 
New Haven. Connecticut, April i8, 1872. He is 



w 




W. G. V.\N' NAME 

the son of Addison Van Name, who has been for 
more than thirty years Librarian of the Yale Library. 
He attended the Hopkins Grammar School in his 
native city, and was there prepared for College. 
.\t the age of eighteen he entered Yale, and follow- 
ing the studies of the Academic Department grad- 
uated with the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1894. 
In 1894 and 1895 he sen-ed as Assistant in Physio- 
logical Chemistry, and since 1897 he has been an 
Assistant in Biology at Yale. He received degree 
of Doctor of Philosophy at Yale in 1S9S. 



206 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



FARRAND, Wilson 

Princeton A.B. 1886. 
Born in Newark, N. J., 1862; fitted for College in 
Newark Academy; spent three years in a New York 
banking house before entering College ; graduated, 
Princeton. Class of 1886: was Assistant Editor of 
Scribner's Magazine, 1886-87 '• Master Newark Acad- 
emy, 1887-89; appointed Associate Head Master in 
1889, a position he still retains. 

WILSON FARR.Wl), A.M., Associate Head 
Master Newark Academy, was born in 
Newark, New Jersey, September 22, 1S62, son of 
Samuel A. and Louise (^Wilson) Farrand. On the 




WII.SON FARR.'iND 

paternal side he is descended from French Hugue- 
nots, while his mother's ancestors were natives of 
Holland. He attended a private school in New 
York when a boy, and was prepared for College in 
the Newark Academy, Newark, New Jersey. Before 
entering College he was employed for three years 
in a New York banking house. He graduated from 
Princeton in the Class of 1S86, and the following 
October became .Assistant Editor of Scribner's 
Magazine, a position he held until March 18S7, 
when he went to Newark, New Jersey, as Master in 
the Newark .Academy. In June 1889 he was 
appointed Associate Head Master of the Academy, 
— his present position. Mr. Ferrand was President 
of the Schoolmasters' Association of New York from 
1895 to 1896, and was a member of the National 



Commission on Uniform College Entrance Require- 
ments in English. He is a member of the Uni- 
versity and City Clubs of New York, and of the 
New England Society of Orange, New Jersey. He 
lias been a successful public sjieaker, having spoken 
frequently before educational associations, and also 
lectured on literary topics. He has contributed 
articles on educational subjects to the magazines, 
and edited Carlyle's Essay on Burns, and Tennyson's 
Princess for use in schools. He was married, 
November 23, 1889, to Margaret Washburne Walker 
of Boston, Massachusetts. They have three chil- 
dren : Margaret, Katharine, and Dorothy Farrand. 



BROOKS, John Milton 

Princeton A.B. 1889. A.M. 

Born near Cleveland. O., 1868; fitted for College 
at Cleveland public and high schools, graduated 
Princeton, Class of 1889 ; the following year, Fellow 
in Mathematics at Princeton, and was Instructor in 
Mathematics there in 1891 and 1892; studied at Got- 
tingen and Leipzig from June 1892 to September 1894, 
then returned to Princeton and is now Instructor in 
Mathematics. 

JOHN .MILTON BROOKS, A.M., Instructor in 
Mathematics at Princeton, was born near 
Cleveland, Ohio, January 19, 1868, son of Herbert 
E. and Jennie Maria (Putnam) Brooks. His fath- 
er's family came from Connecticut, and his mother's 
from Massachusetts, both families being of English 
origin. His early education was obtained at the 
Cleveland public and his later preparation for 
College at the Cleveland High School. He was 
graduated at Princeton in the Class of 1S89, and 
receiving the mathematical fellowship returned to 
Princeton the following year for advance work in 
his chosen line. His further training for his pro- 
fession was obtained at the German Universities of 
Gottingen and Leipzig, June 1892 to September 
1894, under Professors Klein and Lie. He was 
Instructor in Mathematics at Princeton in 1891 
and 1892, and after his study abroad returned to 
Princeton as Instructor in Mathematics in Septem- 
ber 1894. He is a member of the .American 
Mathematical Society. He is unmarried. 



MARR, Addison Graham 

Princeton A.B. 1866. 
Born in Lewisburg, Union county. Pa., 1844 ; pre- 
pared for College in public schools and private acad- 
emies ; graduated, Princeton, Class of 1866; admitted 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



207 



to the Bar, May, 1867: since August 7, 1867, has been 
engaged in the practice of law, banking and insurance 
business in Shamokin, Penn. 

ADDISON GR.\HAM MARK, Lawyer and 
Business man, was born in Lewisburg, Union 
county, Pennsylvania, January 24, 1844, son of 




A. G. ilARR 

Phineas Barber, and Mary (Graham) Marr. He is 
of Scotcii-Irish and Holland-nutcii ancestry. He 
was fitted for College in public schools and private 
academies, and graduated from Princeton in the 
Class of 1866. After reading law under John Blair 
Linn at Lewisburg, he was admitted to the Bar May 
1867. The 7th of the following August he settled 
in Shamokin, Pennsylvania, and is still engaged in 
the practice of law, banking and insurance business 
in that place. He is a Democrat in politics. He 
is a member of the Cliosophic Society of Princeton. 
He was married, January 24, 1871, to Margaret 
Winifred Sheriff and has two children : William 
Price, and Addison Graham Marr. 



BROWN, John Wilson 

Princeton A.B. 1855. 
Born in Baltimore, Md , 1836: entered Junior Class 
in Princeton in 1853. graduating in the Class of 1855; 
studied Theology at the Danville Theological Semi- 
nary; has been a Presbyterian minister since 1868, 



has been President of the Annapolis, Washington & 
Baltimore Railroad Company since its organization in 
1886; President of the Baltimore & Lehigh Rail- 
way Company since its organization in 1894 ; Pres- 
ident of the Baltimore & Annapolis Short Line 
Railroad Company since Sept. i, 1897 ; was Deputy 
Register of Wills for Baltimore from 1870 to 1880. 

JOHN WILSON BROWN, Banker, was born 
in Baltimore, Maryland, July 30, 1836, son 
of G. Harman and Margaretta (Wilson) Brown. 
In his early youth he attended a private school, 
then entered Princeton in 1853 in the Junior class, 
and was graduated in the Class of 1855. He after- 
wards studied Theology at Danville Theological 
Seminary, and since 1868 has been a Presbyterian 
minister. On the organization of the .Annapolis, 
Washington & Baltimore Railroad Company in 1 886 
he was made its President, and continues in that 
office. He has also been President of the Baltimore 
& Lehigh Railway Company since its organization 
in 1894 and President of the Baltimore & .Annapolis 
Short Railroad Company since September i, 1897. 
From 1870 to 1880 he was Deputy Register of 
Wills for Baltimore. He is a member of the .Ameri- 




JOHN WILSON BROWN 

can Whig Society and of Kappa Alpha Society. He 
was married, September 6, i860, to Elizabeth S. 
Baer. They have four children : John Wilson, Jr.. 
Elizabeth, Shellman B. and Rosa Brown. 



2o8 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



DORRANCE, Benjamin Ford 

Princeton A.B. 1868, AM. 1871. 
Born in Kingston, Penn., 1846; received his pre- 
liminary education in a public school, in the Presby- 
terian Seminary at Troy, Fenn., and in Wyoming 
Seminary in Kingston ; graduated, Princeton, Class of 
l868; studied law and was admitted to the Bar, 1870; 
practised law until 1888; now retired. 

BKXj.XMIX FORI) DORRANCE, A.M., Far- 
mer and Capitalist, was born in Kingston, 
Pennsylvania, August 14, 1S46, son of Charles and 
Susan (Ford) Dorrance. His paternal great-grand- 
father was George Dorrance who was killed at the 



are living : Anne, a graduate of '95, and Frances, 
a member of 1900 at \'assar. 




HE\J.-\.MI\ F. DUKR.ANCE 

Massacre of Wyoming, July 3, 1778. He attended 
public school in his early youth, also the Presbyte- 
rian Seminary at Troy, Pennsylvania, and Wyoming 
Seminary at Kingston, graduated from Princeton in 
the Class of 1868, studied law with Hon. A. T. 
McClintock, Wilkesbarre, Pennsylvania, and was 
admitted to the Bar, August 1870. For the follow- 
ing eighteen years he was engaged in the practice 
of his profession, when his sight failing he retired 
to his farm at Dorrancetown, Pennsj'lvania, where 
he now resides. Mr. Dorrance is a member of the 
Sons of the Revolution, and of the \\'yoming Com- 
memorative Association, and is a Gold Democrat. 
He was married to Ruth Woodhull Strong, May 22. 
1872. They have had three daughters, two of whom 



REED, Taylor 

Princeton A.B. 1886, A.M. 
Born in Reedsville, Pa., 1867 ; fitted for College 
at Lewistown Academy, Lewistown, Pa. ; graduated 
from Princeton with degree of A.B., Class of 1886; 
Fellow in Experimental Science at Princeton, 18S6- 
1887; Instructor in Mathematics, 1887-1888; since then 
Assistant in Astronomy. 

TAYLOR RKED, A.M., Assistant in Astronomy 
at Princeton, was born in Reedsville, Penn- 
sylvania, September 3, 1S67, son of John and Eliza- 
beth D. (Taylor) Reed. He is of Scotch-Irish 
ancestry. He received his early education at a dis- 
trict public school, and at the Lewistown Academy in 
Lewistown, Pennsylvania, where he was fitted for 
College. He graduated from Princeton with the 
degree of Bachelor of .Arts in the Class of 1 886, and 
for the following year (i 886-1 88 7) was Fallow in 
Experimental Science. From 1887 to 1888 he was 
Instructor in Mathematics in the University, and 
since then has been Assistant in Astronomy. He is 
a member of \\'hig Hall, and of the Nassau Club. 
He is a Republican. 



EWING, David Quail 

Princeton A.B. 1878. 
Born in Meadow Lands, Washington Co., Pa., 1858; 
received his early education at Jefferson Academy in 
Canonsburgh, Pa., and in Washington and Jefferson 
College in Washington. Pa. ; graduated, Princeton, 
Class of 1878 ; read law and was admitted to the Bar 
of Allegheny co , Pa., December, 1881 ; from Dec, 
1888, to Nov.. 1897, was Trust Officer and Solicitor 
of Fidelity Title and Trust Company of Pittsburg ; 
since then has been engaged in his own and foreign 
countries. 

D.WII) QUAIL EWING, Lawyer, was born 
in Meadow Lands, Pennsylvania, January 
13, 1858, son of Rev. William Ewing, Ph.D. and 
Isabella McCormick (Quail) F'wing. He is of 
Scotch-Irish descent on both sides of the house. 
His paternal ancestors came from Londonderry, 
Ireland in 1725 and settled first near Perth Amboy, 
New Jersey, but in 1 790 were living in Fayette 
county, Pennsylvania, and in 1810 Major John H. 
Ewing, the grandfather of the subject of this sketch, 
removed to Washington county, Pennsylvania. Mr. 
Ewing received his early education at Jefferson 
.Academy in Canonsburgh, Pennsylvania, and at 
Washington and Jefferson College, and graduated 
from Princeton in the Class of 1878. Deciding to 
adopt law as a profession, he fitted himself for its 



UNIVERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



209 



practice in the office of George Sliiras, Jr., (now 
Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States), 
at Pittsburg, and was admitted to the Bar of 
Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, in December 18S1. 




D. Q. EWLNG 

From December 1888 to November 1897 he was 
Trust Officer and Solicitor of Fidelity Title and 
Trust Company of Pittsburg, and since then has 
been engaged in travel in America, Europe, Asia, 
Africa and Pacific Islands. He is a member of 
the Pittsburg Club and of the University Club of 
New York. 



JONES, Richard T. 

Princeton A.B. 1879. 
Born near Aberystwyth, Wales, 1855 ; fitted for Col- 
lege at Wyoming Seminary in Kingston, Pa., gradu- 
ating from that institution in 1877; entered Princeton 
in the Junior Class, in the fall of 1877; graduated with 
the Class of 1879, then entered Princeton Theological 
Seminary and graduated in 1882 : was ordained and 
installed Pastor of the Susquehanna Avenue Presby- 
terian Church of Philadelphia, June, 1882; received 
the degree of D.D. from Rutherford College in 1895. 

RICHARD r. JONES, D.D., Clergyman, was 
born near Aberystwyth, Wales, March 25, 
1855, son of William R. and Margaret (Lewis) 
Jones. He received his early education in the 
public schoot of Spring Brook, Pennsylvania, and 
was prepared for College at Wyoming Seminary in 
VOL. III. — 14 



Kingston, Pennsylvania, from which he graduated 
in 1877. He then entered Princeton in the fall of 
that year as a member of the Junior class, graduat- 
ing in the Class of 1879. He then took a course 
in theology at Princeton Seminary, graduating in 
May 1882, and the following June he was ordained 
and installed Pastor of the Susquehanna .Avenue 
Presbyterian Church of Philadelphia, where he has 
labored ever since. He has been Moderator of 
Presbytery, Delegate to Synod and General As- 
sembly, and Editor of The Helper. He is also 
Chaplain of Welcome Lodge, 453 Free and Accepted 
Masons. In 1895 he received the degree of Doctor 
of Divinity from Rutherford College, North Carolina. 
In politics, he is a Republican on National Issues. 
When Dr. Jones was called to his present charge 
the church had just been organized, and had but 
twenty-three members, while during his Pastorate 
of sixteen years, a large and beautiful edifice has 
been erected at a cost of S6o,ooo, and there have 
been received into church membership one thousand 
and eighty-seven members, seven hundred of whom 
are now on the roll of communicants. He married 
Jennie Evans of Rome, New York, December 18, 




RICHARD T. JONES 



1883, and has had by this union, four children, three 
of whom survive : Edwin Evans, Richard T., Jr. 
and Jane Evelyn. Dr. Jones' address is 2560 North 
8th St., Philadelphia. 



210 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



BLUNT, Edgar Stuart 

Columbia A.B. 1880. 
Born in New York City, 1859 ; in boyhood was 
educated at home by private tutors and later at the 
Columbia Grammar School; entered Columbia in 1876, 
graduating in 1880 with the degree of A.B.; since 
graduation up to the present time engaged as a real 
estate broker in New York City: served six years in 
the Seventh Regiment of the New York State National 
Guard. 

EUCAR STUART BLUNT, since 1880 en- 
gaged as a real estate broker in New York 
City, was born there ATay 23, 1S59. Through liis 




EDGAR STUART BLUNT 

father, Orison Bhint, lie is of EngUsh- Puritan 
ancestry, and on his mother's side the family is 
English Canadian. His early education was ac- 
quired at home under the guidance of private 
tutors, and he later attended the Columbia Gram- 
mar School in New York City. He matriculated 
at Columbia in 1876, taking the Academic course, 
and graduating with the Class of 1880 as a Bachelor 
of .Arts. Immediately following his graduation, Mr. 
lilunt became a Real Estate Broker in New York 
City in which channel he has been successfully 
exercising his business ability ever since. He served 
for six years in the Seventh Regiment of the New 
York State National Guard, at the end of which 
time he received an honorable discharge. He is 
a member of the Delta Kappa Epsilon Club of 



New York City and life member of Columbia 
College .-Mumni .Association. His political senti- 
ments are Republican although a very active business 
life has precluded his giving special attention to 
politics. 

CONNOR, Leartus 

Columbia M. D. 1870. 
Born in Coldenham, N. Y., 1843 ; prepared for College 
at Wallhill Academy, Middletown, N. Y. ; A B. Wil- 
liams College, 1865, receiving the degree of A.M. from 
the same institution, 1868; Assistant Principal Mexico 
Academy, Mexico, N. Y., 1865-67 ; studied medicine 
with Dr. George L. Dayton ; Department of Medicine 
and Surgery of the University of Michigan, 1867-68 ; 
M D. Medical Department of Columbia, 1870 ; practised 
medicine at Searsville, N. Y., 1870-71, when he removed 
to Detroit, and since 1878 has devoted himself exclu- 
sively to Ophthalmology and Otology ; Lecturer on 
Chemistry, Detroit Medical College, 1871-72; Profes- 
sor of Physiology and Clinical Medicine, 1872-79; Pro- 
fessor of Didactic and Clinical Ophthalmology and 
Otology, 1878-81 ; Attending Physician to St. Mary's 
Hospital, 1872-79; Ophthalmic and Aural Surgeon 
Harper Hospital, 1881-94 and Consultant since that 
year ; Consultant Ophthalmologist Woman's Hospital 
since 1886 ; Ophthalmic and Aural Surgeon Children's 
Free Hospital since i885. 

LEARTUS CONNOR, A,M., M.D., Consultant 
Ophthalmologist to the "Woman's Hospital," 
and "Harper Hospital" and Ophthalmic and Aural 
Surgeon to the Children's Hospital in Detroit, was 
born in Coldenham, New York, January 29, 1843, 
son of Hezekiah and Caroline Connor. He is of 
Irish-English ancestry. His great-grandfather, John 
Connor, emigrated from Castle Pollard, West 
Meath, Ireland, settled in Scotchtown, New York, 
in 1765, and fought in the Revolutionary War. 
His grandfather William Connor was a soldier in 
the War of 181 2. His mother was a direct descend- 
ant of Matthias Corwin, who came from England 
and settled in Ipswich, Massachusetts in 1633 and 
joined the colony which founded Southold, Long 
Island. Her father was a soldier in the War of 1 8 1 2 
— his father in the War of the Revolution — his 
father in the War of the Revolution and French and 
Indian Wars — and his father in the French and 
Indian Wars. Leartus Connor prepared for Col- 
lege at Wallhill .Academy of Middletown, New 
York, and then entered Williams College, grad- 
uating in 1865 with the degree of Bachelor of 
.Arts. Three years later the College conferred upon 
him the degree of Master of -Arts. During the two 
years following his graduation he was Assistant 
Principal of Mexico Academy in Mexico, New 
York, meanwhile devoting his leisure time to the 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



21 I 



study of the flora, fauna and geology of the sur- 
rounding country. Moved by his love for the 
study of natural science he began the study of 
medicine with Dr. George L. Dayton of Mexico, 
New York, in 1865. From 1867 to 1868 he 
attended lectures and did laboratorj' work at the 
Department of Medicine and Surgery of the Uni- 
versity of Michigan, and spent the summer of 
1868 with a scientific exploring party among the 
mines, on the islands and along the shores of Lake 
Superior. He entered the Medical Department of 
Columbia in 1868 and received the degree of M.D. in 




LEARllS CiiNXOR 

1870. Before entering upon actual practice, he took 
practical Clinical courses at the New York Ophthal- 
mic and Aural Institute, and at De Milt Dispensary, 
and studied Pathological Anatomy in the Bellevue 
Hospital Morgue. He practised general medicine 
for about eight years, first at Searsville, New York, 
and later in Detroit, Michigan, where he removed 
in 187 1. Since 1878 Dr. Connor has devoted 
himself exclusively to Ophthalmology and Otolog}'. 
He was lecturer on Chemistry, including practical 
laboratory work, at the Detroit Medical College 
from 187 1 to 1872, Professor of Physiology and 
Clinical Medicine there during the next seven years, 
and from 1878 to 1881 Professor of Didactic and 
Clinical Ophthalmology and Otology. He was At- 
tending Physician to St. Mary"s Hospital from 1872 



to 1879, Ophthalmic and Aural Surgeon to Harper 
Hospital, 1881-1894, and Consultant there since 
that time. He has also been Consultant Ophthal- 
mologist to the Woman's Hospital and Ophthalmic 
and Aural Surgeon to the Children's Hospital since 
1886. Dr. Connor has at different times been an 
officer of the American Medical College Association, 
the Detroit Medical College, Detroit Academy of 
Medicine, American .Academy of Medicine, Ameri- 
can Medical Association and the American Editors' 
Association. He is also connected with various 
other medical and scientific organizations, was a 
member of the Tenth International Medical Con- 
gress and of the Pan-American Medical Congress. 
He is also a member of the Detroit, Michigan, 
Fellowcraft and Bankers' Clubs, a Director in the 
Home Savings Bank, and is an Elder in the Fort 
Street Presbyterian Church. He married August 
10, 1870, Anna .\., daughter of Rev. Charles Dame. 
They have two children : Guy Leartus and Ray 
Connor. From 187 1 to 1895 ^^- Connor edited 
a Medical Journal last known as the American 
Lancet and from 1871 to 1877 was its Publisher 
as well as Editor. He has been a prolific writer, 
and has furnished many contributions to medical 
literature. 



DUDLEY, Percy Sheldon 

Columbia A.B. 1886, A.M. 1887. LL.B. i838. 
Born in Brooklyn, N. Y., 1867; graduate of the Poly- 
technic Institute of Brooklyn, N. Y.; graduate of the 
Columbia School of Political Science, 1886 ; took a post- 
graduate course in the School of Political Science, 
1886-88; graduate of Columbia Law School. 18S8 ; ad- 
mitted to the New York Bar, 1889 ; entered upon the 
practice of law in New York City, 1894. 

PERCY SHELDON DUDLEY, A.B., Lawyer, 
was born in Brooklyn, New York, August 
20, 1 86 7. He is the son of Dr. William H. 
Dudley of Brooklyn and Charlotte G. Duckwitz. 
After a course at the Polytechnic Institute of 
Brooklyn, Percy Sheldon Dudley entered the 
Columbia School of Arts in 1882, and after spend- 
ing three years there transferred to the School of 
Political Science, graduating from the latter in 
1886, and following this by a post-graduate course 
there during the next two years. In 1SS6 he also be- 
came a student at Columbia Law School, taking 
his degree in 1888. He was admitted to the Bar 
of New York in May of the followng year, and 
entered upon the practice of his profession there. 
In 1 894 he became a member of the firm of Moore, 
Wallace & Dudley, and has since continued practice 



21 2 



UNiyERSiriES JND THEIR SONS 



in association with that firm. Mr. Dudley is not 
actively interested in politics. He is a member 
of the Crescent Athletic Club of Brooklyn and 
the University Club of New Vork City, and is 
inimarried. 



Archaeological Institute of .\merica, the American 
Philological Association and tlie American Dialect 
Society, also of the Church Club of the Diocese of 
l.ong Island. He is unmarried. 



McCREA, Nelson Glenn 

Columbia A.B. 1885. Ph.D. 1888. 
Born in Brooklyn, N. Y., 1863 ; graduate of the Clas- 
sical course of the Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute, 
1880; graduate of Columbia 1885, and appointed Uni 
versity Fellow in Classical Philology ; studied for three 
years on this foundation, and had charge of Freshman 
work in Latin, 1887-88; Tutorial Fellow in Latin, 1888- 
89; Ph.D., 1888; Tutor in Latin 1889-95 ; student at the 
University of Berlin, summer semester of 1894; In- 
structor in Latin at Columbia since 1895. 

NELSON GLKNN McCREA, Ph.D., Instruc- 
tor in Latin at Columbia, was born in 
Lrooklyn, New York, in 1863. His parents were 
Robert Glenn and Mary Jane Turner McCrea. He 
took the Classical course at the Brooklyn Polytechnic 
Institute, graduating in i88o, and entered Columbia 
in the fall of that year. Ill health obliged him to 
discontinue his studies in 1SS2, but he returned the 
following year and graduated in 1885. He was 
appointed at graduation University Fellow in Classi- 
cal Philology, and as such pursued his studies for 
three years. During this period he gained much 
practical experience in teaching as a private tutor, 
and in the last year of his Fellowship had charge of 
the Freshman work in Latin at Columbia. He was 
made Tutorial Fellow in Latin at the University in 
1888, receiving the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, 
and a year later Tutor in Latin. This latter post 
he held until 1895, since which date he has been 
Instructor in Latin. He spent the summer semester 
of 1894 in study at the University of Berlin. His 
publications include Ovid's Use of Color and Color 
Terms, an article on Classical Studies in Honour of 
Henry Drisler, issued by the Columbia University 
Press, and Translations of Twelve Passages, chiefly 
Latin, relating to the Invention of Printing, found 
in the Incunabula of the Bruce Collection, in A 
Description of the Early Printed Books Owned by 
the Grolier Club. He is a member of the National 
or " gold " wing of the Democratic party and during 
1896 and 1897 was Treasurer of the Seventh Ward 
National Democratic .Association of Brooklyn. Mr. 
McCrea is a member of the Delta Upsilon and Phi 
Beta Kappa fraternities, the Columbia College 
Alumni .Association, the Phi Beta Kappa .Associa- 
tion, and several scientific societies, among them the 



GORDON, Reginald 

Columbia B.A. 1888. 
Born in New York City, 1865; graduated Columbia, 
1888; graduate course at Johns Hopkins; Fellow in 
Physics, Columbia School of Mines, 1889 ; Assistant, 
tSgo; Tutor, 1892; Instructor, 1896. 

REGINALD t;ORDUX, A.l!., Instructor in 
Culumbia, was l)i)rn in New Vork City, 
November lo, 1S65. He received his early educa- 




REGIX.^LU GORDON 

tion in private schools of that city and entering 
Columbia in 1884 was graduated in the Class of 
1888. After a six months' course of post-graduate 
study at Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, he 
was appointed, in 1889, a Fellow in Physics in the 
School of Mines at Columbia. His promotion fol- 
lowed regularly, and he became Assistant in 1890, 
Tutor in 1892, and Instructor in 1896, which posi- 
tion he now holds. Mr. Gordon is a member of 
the New York Academy of Sciences, in which he 
has served two annual terms as Secretary of the 
Section of .Astronomy and Physics. He is also a 
member of the American Institute of Electrical 
Engineers. 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



213 



HORNBLOWER, Theodore Romeyn 

Columbia M.D. 1871. 
Born in South Bergen Township, 1849; received his 
early education in the public schools of Jersey City, 
New Jersey, and later attended the University Medical 
School. M D. College of Physicians and Surgeons, 
Columbia 1871 ; assistant county physician for the 
Hudson County Institute ; assistant U. S. Marshal in 
1863: now practising medicine in Jersey City. 

THEODORE ROMEVX HORNBLOWER, 
M.D., Physician, was born in South Bergen 
Township, New Jersey, January 9, 1849, son of 
William Hornblower, M.D., and Sarah Romeyn. 




THEO. R. HORNBLOWER 

Through his father he is descended from Joseph 
Hornblower, the first engineer sent to this country 
by the English government in 1 746, who con- 
structed the first engine made in America, and was 
elected to the first Congress which met in Wall 
Street, New York City, during the Revolutionary 
War. Dr. Josiah Hornblower, his grandfather, was 
the surgeon in charge of all the United States troops 
on (Governor's Island and Paulus Hook (now Jersey 
City) in the War of 181 2. Theodore Romeyn 
Hornblower received his early education in the 
public schools of Jersey City, New Jersey, and later 
attended the University Medical School there. He 
entered the College of Physicians and Surgeons of 
Columbia, graduating in 1871. He was Assistant 
United States Marshal in 1863. Shortly after his 



graduation he was made Assistant County Physician 
for the Hudson County Institute, and since that 
time has practised medicine in Jersey City. He 
does not take an active part in politics. Mr. Horn- 
blower was twice married, first, December 12, 1871, 
to Emma Sherwood, daughter of Edward Sherwood 
of Jersey City. Three years later, November 11, 
1874, he married Julia A. Nixon, daughter of 
Rev. John Ni.xon of the New York East Conference. 



A'' 



FREY, Albert 

Columbia M.D. 1888. 
Born in Newark, N. J.. 1863; educated at the Green 
Street German-English School of Newark, and later at 
Gymnasiums in the German cities of Munchen-Glad- 
bach and Carlsruhe ; returning to America he gradu- 
ated from Phillips Academy, Andover, i88i, spent 
a year in the Freshman Class at Yale and studied at 
the College of Pharmacy in New York City and the 
College of Physicians and Surgeons, N. Y. until 1885; 
after a year in study at Bonn, Germany, he returned to 
the College of Physicians and Surgeons, graduating in 
1888, and took up the practice of his profession in New- 
ark ; member of the Newark Board of Education, i8g8. 

LBERT FREY, M.D., Physician, was born in 
Newark, N. J., June 24, 1863, and is of 
Swiss ancestry. His family is of noble birth and 
dates back to the fourteenth century. His ancestors 
emigrated from Switzerland shortly after the Refor- 
mation and settled in Baden and during the last 
century held prominent positions in Carlsruhe and 
at the Court of the Grand Duke. The subject of 
this sketch received his early education at the 
Green Street German-English School, and spent 
several years in study at Gymnasiums at Munchen- 
Gladbach and Carlsruhe, aftenvards entering the 
Phillips Academy at Andover, where he graduated 
in iSSi. He matriculated at Yale in that year, 
but left after the close of his Freshman year, and 
spent the following three years at the College of 
Pharmacy, New York, and the College of Ph\si- 
cians and Surgeons, now the Medical Department 
of Columbia University. After a year of study at 
Bonn, Germany, he returned to the College of 
Physicians and Surgeons, graduating in iSSS, and 
immediately eng.aged in the practice of his profes- 
sion in Newark. He has been ver}' successful both 
in the medical and surgical branches of his profes- 
sion, and is one of the best known physicians of 
Newark. He was Secretary of the Newark Medical 
Association in 1891 and in 1S98 was elected to 
the Board of Education of the City of Newark. 
Dr. Frey has taken very Utile active part in politics. 



214 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



He belongs to many societies and organizations, 
among them, the Essex District Medical Associa- 
tion, the German Liederkranz of New York, the 
Ariun and Gcrmania Singing Societies of Newark, 




ALBERT FREY 

the Newark Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons ; 
Union Chapter No. 7 Royal and Arch Masons ; 
Kane Council No. 9, Royal and Select Masters. 
He married, December 10, 1884, Louise Jung. 
They had three children, of whom two survive : 
Ottmar Rudolf Weltekind and Millie Frey. 



SPENCER, Horatio Nelson 

Columbia M.D. 1868. 
Born in Port Gibson, Miss., 1842 ; fitted for College 
privately; B. A., University of Alabama, 1862 ; graduate 
of the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia, 
1868; Interne Bellevue Hospital, 1868; studied for a 
year in Berlin, paying especial attention to pathology 
and diseases of the ear ; began practice in St. Louis, 
1870 : established, in association with Drs. Blake, Bur- 
nett and others, the American Journal of Otology, 1879 ; 
Professor of Diseases of the Ear at the St. Louis Post- 
Graduate School of Medicine, 1881 ; Professor of Dis- 
eases of the Ear at the Missouri Medical College, 1890; 
honorary LL.D. from Westminster College, 1897. 

HORATIO NELSON SPENCER, LL.D., Pro- 
fessor of Diseases of the Ear in the Mis- 
souri Medical College, was born in Port Gibson, 
Mississippi, July 17, 1842. His father, Horatio 



Nelson Spencer, Senior (Vale 1821) was a lineal 
descendant of Ensign Garrard Spencer, who came 
from England in 1631 with Rev. Thomas Hooker. 
Other ancestors were the Rev. John Wilson, first 
pastor of the first church in Boston, Rev. Thomas 
I looker and Major Israel Spencer of the Continental 
.\rmy. Dr. Spencer received his early education 
at a school established by his father, furnished witli 
teachers who had graduated from Yale. He took 
the degree of Bachelor of Arts at the University of 
.■\labama in 1862, and entered the College of 
Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia in 1865, tak- 
ing his degree in 1868. .•\fter serving part of a 
term in Bellevue Hospital as Interne he went to 
Berlin and studied for a year, paying especial at- 
tention to pathology under Professor Virchow and 
to diseases of the ear under Professor A. Lucae. 
Returning from Europe he located in St. Louis, 
Missouri, April 16, 1870. In 1S79, in association 
with Dr. Blake of Boston and Dr. Burnett of Phila- 
delphia and others, he established the .'\merican 
Journal of Otology, to the columns of which he has 
since been a frequent contributor. Dr. Spencer 




H. N. .SPENCER 



was made Professor of Diseases of the Ear in the 
St. Louis Post-Graduate School of Medicine in 
1 88 1, and nine years later was called to his present 
l)osition in the Faculty of the Missouri Medical 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



215 



College. He is a member of the American Otolog- 
ical Society, having been elected at its third meet- 
ing in 1870. Has been Governor of the Missouri 
Society of the Sons of the Colonial \Vars for three 
years, and is a member of the Sons of the Revolu- 
tion and the St. Louis Club. Westminster College 
in 1 89 7 conferred upon him the honorary degree 
of Doctor of Laws. Professor Spencer married first 
.Anna E. Kirtland who died leaving five children. 
Some years after her death he married Elizabeth P. 
Uvvight of South Carolina. He is a sound money 
Democrat on national political questions and an 
Independent in local affairs, but the engrossing 
duties of his professional life leave him little time 
to devote to politics. 



DAVIS, Vernon Mansfield 

Columbia LL.B. 1879. 

Born in New York City, 1855 ; educated in public and 
private schools in New York City; A.B. College of the 
City of New York, 1876 ; A.M. College of City of New 
York, 1880 ; LL.B. Columbia College Law School, 1879, 
and studied law in the office of Everett P. Wheeler ; 
Instructor in Greek, Mathematics and Logic for six 
years in the College of the City of New York ; admitted 
to the New York Bar in 1879 and has been engaged in 
the practice of his profession there ever since ; Assist- 
ant District Attorney of New York Co , 1885-97, and 
District Attorney upon the death of Col. John R. 
Fellows. 

VERNON M.\NSFIELD D.WIS, A.M., Law- 
yer, son of Robert Vernon and Mary Semlee 
Davis, was born in New York City, Jantiary 29, 
1 85 5. He is of English-Dutch ancestry. One of 
his ancestors, Casper Semler, owned a farm in what 
is now the heart of New York City, part of it having 
been taken to make ATadison Square. He received 
his early education in public and private schools in 
New York City, and graduated from the College of 
the City of New York in 1876 and received the 
degree of Master of .Arts, in 1880. He studied law 
at Columbia Law School and in the office of Everett 
P. Wheeler, and took his degree of liachelor of Law 
in 1879, being admitted to the Bar in the same year. 
He was also Instructor in Greek, Mathematics and 
Logic for six years in the College of the City of 
New York. During his twelve years' service in 
the District Attorney's Office, Mr. Davis made a 
notable name for himself as a Public Prosecutor. 
He was made Assistant District .Attorney of the 
County of New York in 1885, and as such won the 
respect of the entire community for his successful 
efforts in the prosecution, among other important 



cases, of Madam Dis DeBar ; of the Electric Sugar 
Swindlers; the Lenox Hill Bank Wreckers. His 
last year in the District .Attorney's Office was signal- 
ized by his successful breaking up of organized in- 
cendiarism in New York City, having secured the 
conviction of about twenty persons charged with 
arson in its various degrees. He was appointed 
District .Attorney upon the death of Colonel John 
R. Fellows in 1896. Upon his retirement from the 
District Attorney's Office in 1897, Mr. Davis con- 
tinued the practice of his profession in New York, 
and in 1899 ^^''^^ appointed Commissioner of Educa- 




VERNON M. D.WIS 

tion of New York City, a member of the Board of 
Trustees of the College of the City of New York, 
Chairman of the Executive Committee of the Col- 
lege, and a member of the Board of Trustees of the 
Normal College of the City of New York. Mr. 
Davis has always been an active member of the 
Democratic party. He is a member of the Execu- 
tive Committee of the Protestant Ei)iscopal City 
Mission Society of New York ; Society of Medical 
Jurisprudence ; the Church, Manhattan, and Nine- 
teenth Century Clubs, the D. K. E. Eraternity, Phi 
Beta Kappa Society and the New York Bar Asso- 
ciation. He married June 17, 1885, Harriet, 
daughter of Rev. Francis l.obdell, D.D., .Archdeacon 
of Buffalo, New York. 



2l6 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



COLGATE, John Henry 

Harvard LL.B. 1853 
Born in New York, 1826; educated at the Harvard 
Law School : practised law. 

JOHN HEXRY COLGATE, Lawyer, was born 
in New York City, March i6, 1826. His 
father was Bowles, the son of Robert and Sarah 
(Bowles) Colgate, and his mother was Lourina 
Crownsend) Colgate. Entering the Harvard Law 
School Mr. Colgate graduated there in 1853 and 
took up the practice of his profession in New York. 
He married. August 19, 1853, Frances Lydia 




JOHN' H. COLGATIC 

Griggs, and had four children : Sedgwick, Sidney 
Doane, Sargent Bagley and Grace Colgate. 



BARNES, Charles Maynard 

Harvard A.B. 1877, LL.B. 1880. 
Born in Illinois, 1854 ; graduated. Harvard, 1877; Har- 
vard Law School, 1880; admitted to the Bar the same 
year ; engaged in practice in Boston, Mass. ; Instructor 
in Harvard Law School, 1882-88 ; died 1893. 

CHARLES MAYNARD BARNES, Instructor 
in the Har\'ard Law School, was born in 
Macon coinUy, Illinois, October 12, 1854. He was 
a son of Dr. W. \. Barnes of Decatur, that state. 
His preparation for College was made at Phillips 
.■\cademy, .\ndover, Massachusetts, and after taking 
his Bachelor's degree at Harvard in 1877, he entered 



the Law School from which he was graduated three 
years later with the degree of Bachelor of Laws. 
Having completed his legal studies with Meyers & 
Warner of Boston, he was admitted to the Suffolk 
Bar in 1S80, and was in partnership with Nathan 
Matthews, Jr., some two years later becoming a 
member of the firm of Barnes, Bond & Morison, 
general law practitioners. Besides his practice he 
figured quite prominently as a legal writer and edu- 
cator, editing the thirteenth edition of Kent's Com- 
mentaries, and froiTi 1882 to 1S88 he filled the post 
of Instructor in Sales at the Harvard Law School. 
He was a member of the Boston Bar Association 
and the Massachusetts Reform Club. Politically he 
acted with the Democratic party. Mr. Barnes died 
in Boston, March 9, 1893. His marriage took 
place October 31, 1882, with Lillian J. Young of 
Philadelphia. 

ADAMS, James Forster Alleyne 

Harvard M.D. 1866. 
Born in Boston, Mass., 1844; educated at the Law- 
rence Scientific School and at the Harvard Medical 
School ; medical cadet U. S. A. during a part of the War 
and later acting Assistant Surgeon, U. S. N. ; House 
Physician, Boston City Hospital; practitioner in Pitts- 
field, Mass. ; member of the Pittsfield Board of Health ; 
Medical Examiner; Examining Surgeon for Pensions; 
President of the Berkshire District Medical Society; 
member of the American Medical Association, the 
Association of American Physicians and other 
organizations. 

JAMi;s FORSTER ALLEYNE ADAMS, Physi- 
cian, was born in Boston, Massachusetts. 
March 20, 1844. His parents were William Joseph 
and Deborah Forster (Chickering) Adams. On his 
father's side he is descended from Henry Adams, 
one of the first settlers of Braintree, Massachusetts. 
The father of Dr. Adams graduated at Harvard in 
1822. His grandfather. Dr. Moses, graduated in 
1797 : his great-grandfather. Rev. Moses, graduated 
in 1 771. His maternal grandfather. Rev. Jabez 
Chickering of Dedham, also graduated at Harvard, 
his class being that of i 7 74. Fitting for College at 
his father's private school and later at the Dedharn 
High School, Mr. Adams spent two years at the 
Lawrence Scientific School of Harvard University, 
i860 to 1862, in the Department of Chemistry and 
Comparative Anatomy. From July 1862 to De- 
cember of 1863 he was a Medical Cadet in the 
United States Army in Judiciary Square Hospital, 
Washington. From 1864 until February 1865 he was 
.Acting Assistant Surgeon in the United States Navy 
in the East Gulf Blockading Squadron. Then 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



217 



returning to Han-ard he received the degree of 
Doctor of Medicine, in March 1866 and served 
during the year 1S66 as House Physician of the 
Boston City Hospital. The next year he spent 




J. F. ALLEVNE ADAMS 

abroad in study, after which he returned to begin 
his practice in Pittsfield, Massachusetts, where he 
has remained ever since. Dr. Adams was a member 
of the Pittsfield Board of Health from 187010 1880, 
Medical Examiner and Examining Surgeon for 
Pensions, from 1877 to 1881 ; President of the 
Berkshire District J^Iedical Society, 18S4-1885 ; 
Warden of St. Stephen's Church, Pittsfield, 1887 to 
1897; member of the American Medical Associa- 
tion and of the Association of American Physicians, 
also a member of the Loyal Legion, and of the Sons 
of the American Revolution. He married October 
20, 1870 Annah E. N., daughter of John Bailey of 
Washington and has two children : Lilian Bailey and 
Charles Lawrence Adams. 



Treasurer of the American Academy of Dental Science ; 
President of the Harvard Dental Alumni Association; 
President of the Rhode Island Dental Society; Associ- 
ate member of the New York Institute of Stomatology; 
President of the Harvard Club of Rhode Island; Pres- 
ident of the Philharmonic Society of Newport; Pres- 
ident of the Newport Horticultural Society; member 
of the School Committee of Newport; Trustee of the 
First Methodist Episcopal Church; member of the 
Newport Municipal League, Natural History Society, 
etc. 

FREDERICK BRADLEY, Practising Dentist in 
Newport, Rhode Island, and Instructor in 
Operative Dentistry at the Han-ard Dental School, 
was born in Huddersfield, Yorkshire, England, 
October 28, 1849, ^^^ his education was obtained 
in private schools in England. His parents were 
Henry and Ann (Beaumont) Bradley. Dr. Brad- 
ley spent his early life in the woollen business until 
1884 when he entered the Har\-ard Dental School 
and there graduated in 1886. He practised den- 
tistry in Boston and Dedham for a time, and was 
appointed Demonstrator at the Harvard Dental 
School, but resigned this position in 1887 to asso- 
ciate himself with his brother. Dr. Thomas Bradley, 




BRADLEY, Frederick 

Harvard D.M.D. 1886. 
Born in Huddersfield, Eng. 1849; educated in Eng- 
land and at the Harvard Dental School: practised 
dentistry in Boston. Dedham and Newport, R. I. ; De- 
monstrator at the Harvard Dental School: Instructor 
inoperative Dentistry at the Harvard Dental School; 



FREDERICK IK \l'i i \ 

of Newport, Rhode Island. For the last few years 
he has practised alone. Since 1S93 he has been 
Instructor in Operative Dentistry at the Harvard 
Dental School. Dr. Bradley is a fellow and Treas- 
urer of the American .-Vcademy of Dental Science, 



2l8 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



President of the Han-ard Dental Alumni Associa- 
tion ; President of the Harvard Club of Rhode 
Island, President of the Philharmonic Society of 
Newport and is an ex-Presielent of the Rhode Is- 
land Dental Society and of the Newport Horticul- 
tural Society. He is also a member of the School 
Committee of Newport and a Trustee of the First 
Methodist Episcopal Church, as well as organist of 
that church, a member of the Newport Municipal 
League, the Natural History Society, the Charity 
Organization and other local bodies. He is an 
associate member of the New York Institute of 
Stomatology. On January i8, 187 1, Dr. Bradley 
married Rosa Lena Hieland and has two children : 
Frederick Henry and Emily Mabel Bradley. 



BRACKETT, Elliott Gray 

Harvard M.D. 1886. 
Born in Newton, Mass., i860; educated in public 
schools; graduated, Harvard Medical School, 1886; 
Assistant there 1887-88 ; connected with various Boston 
Hospitals ; member of several medical societies. 

ELLIOTT GRAY BRACKETP, M.D., Physi- 
cian, was born in Newton, Massachusetts, 
.April 6, i860. .After completing his attendance 
at the Newton public schools, he took up the study 
of medicine, and entering the Medical Department 
of Harvard, was graduated in 1886. During the 
College year of 18S7-1888, he acted as Assistant 
in Materia Medica and Therapeutics at Har\ard. 
Having acquired an experience of a year and a half 
in general practice at the Boston City Hospital, he 
was for the succeeding year an Interne at the Lying- 
in Hospital, that city ; was subsequently appointed 
Physician to the Department of Nervous Diseases 
at the Boston Dispensary ; also an Assistant in the 
same Department at the City Hospital, and Assistant 
Surgeon at the Children's Hospital (Out-Patients' 
Department). Dr. Brackett is closely identified with 
a number of scientific bodies allied to his profession, 
including the Boston Society for Medical Improve- 
ment, the Psychological Society, the Boston Society 
for Medical Science, and the Massachusetts Medical 
Society. He has attained a high standing among 
the leading physicians of Boston, and his present 
practice is large and lucrative. 



Pastor of North Church, Salem, Mass., from 1820 ; 
Overseer, Harvard, from 1829; S.T.D , Harvard, 1836; 
died 1846. 

JOHN ERASER, S.T.D., Preacher and Essayist, 
Overseer of Harvard, was born in Worcester, 
Massachusetts, September 21, 17S9, the son of 
Samuel Braser, a baker in Charlestown, Massachu- 
setts, who was burned out when the British destroyed 
the town in 1775 and afterwards removed to Wor- 
cester and established his bakery in that place. 
John Braser received a common school education 
in Worcester, and at an early age was placed by 




BRASER, John 

Harvard A.B. 1813, S.T.D. 1836. 
Born in Worcester, Mass., 1789 : graduated. Harvard, 
1813 ; Tutor, 1815-17 ; College Prof, of Latin, 1817-20; 



JOHN BR.ASER 

his parents in a store in Boston, the intention being 
that he should follow mercantile pursuits. But his 
inclinations led in a different direction, and pre- 
paring privately for college he entered Harvard in 
iSio, and was graduated in 1813 with the highest 
honors of his class. .After graduation from the Col- 
lege he pursued the study of theology, continuing 
this while serving as Tutor in Greek from 1S15 to 
181 7. In the latter year he was made College 
Professor of the Latin Language and Literature, 
being the second occupant of that chair from its 
foundation in 1814. He resigned his Professorship 
in 1S20 to enter upon the work of the ministry, 
and was ordained over the North Church in Salem, 
Massachusetts, November 14, 1820, as successor of 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



219 



the Rev. John Emery Abbot. This charge he held 
to the time of his death. In 1829 he was chosen 
a member of the Board of Overseers of Harvard, 
retaining a seat in that body throughout his life, 
and in 1835 he delivered the Dudleian Lecture at 
Harvard. In the following year he received the 
honorary degree of Doctor of Divinity from that 
University. He married, .\pril 19, 182 1, Annie 
Warren, daughter of William and Sarah (Warren) 
Sever, of Worcester, by whom he had five chil- 
dren, three sons and two daughters. In January 
1S46, declining health induced Dr. Eraser to seek 
a change of climate, and he went to South Caro- 
lina, to the plantation of his classmate and friend. 
Dr. Benjamin Huger, on Cooper River, where he 
failed rapidly and died, February 26, 1846. Dr. 
Brazer was a frequent contributor to the North 
American Review and the Christian E.xaminer, and 
his sermons, addresses and essays published sepa- 
rately form a considerable bibliography. 



CALVERT, Sidney 

Harvard A.M. i8g2. 
Born in Rochdale, England; educated at the Ontario 
Agricultural College ; B Appl.Sci., McGill University, 
1890; A.M., Harvard Graduate Department, 1892 ; As- 
sistant at Harvard; Assistant Professor University of 
the State of Missouri. 

SIDNEY CALVERT, A.M., Assistant Professor 
in Chemistry in the University of the State 
of Missouri, was bom in Rochdale, England. His 
father, J. M. Calvert, was descended from a long 
line of English families. His mother, C. Telfer, 
was of Scotch descent. Educated first in \\"ake- 
field, England, and then at the Ontario Agricultural 
College, Guelph, Canada, Mr. Calvert next entered 
McGill University, Montreal, where he graduated in 
1S90, and continued his studies at the Harvard 
Graduate School, 1890-189 2, receiving the degree 
of Master of Arts in the latter year. For the next 
two years he was .Assistant in the Chemical Depart- 
ment of Harvard, but in 1894 was appointed As- 
sistant Professor in Chemistry at the University of 
the State of Missouri. He married, August 14, 
1897, E. D. Fyfer. 



Confederate Army, rising from Lieutenant to Briga- 
dier-General ; member of the 43rd, 44th, 45th, 46th and 
47th Congresses; Clerk of the United States House of 
Representatives for the 48th, 49th and 50th Congresses. 

JOHN BULLOCK CLARK, ex-Congressman, 
was born in Fayette, Missouri, January 14. 
1 83 1. His mother was Eleanor (Turner) Clark; 
his father was John Bullock Clark, the son of Ben- 
nett Clark of Clark county, Kentucky, a descendant 
of Christopher Clark, who came from Wales and 
was the first of the family to settle in Virginia. Not 
only was this Christopher Clark Captain in the 




CLARK, John Bullock, Jr. 

Harvard LL.B. 1854. 
Born in 'Fayette, Mo., 1831 ; educated at the Univer- 
sity of Missouri and at the Harvard Law School ; prac- 
tised law in Missouri; served during the War in the 



JNO. B. TURK, JR. 

Colonial forces, but also several of his descendants 
became prominent in military matters. John Bul- 
lock Clark, Sr., was a member of the United States 
House of Representatives before the war and then 
became a Brigadier-General in the Confederate 
Army and later a member of the Confederate House 
and Confederate Senate. His son joined the Con- 
federate Army when in his thirtieth year. He had 
meanwhile been educated at Fayette .Academy, at 
the University of .Missouri and at the Han-ard Law 
School, graduating at the latter institution in 1854 
and becoming a member of the Bar that year. In 
1 86 1 he joined the Missouri State Guard and was 
commissioned as Lieutenant of the Richmond 
Guards. In June of the same year he was pro- 
moted to Captain and a month later was promoted 



220 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



lo Major, participating as such at Carthage and at 
Wilson Creek. After Wilson Creek he was made 
t\>lonel and commanded Clark's brigade at the 
battle of Pea Ridge, Arkansas. In June 1862 he 
was commissioned Colonel of the Ninth Missouri in 
the Provisional Army in the service of the Confed- 
erate states and was promoted, by general order of 
Major-General Taylor, to Brigadier-General for 
gallantry on the field of battle at Mansfield, Louisi- 
ana. In 1864 he was transferred to the Cavalry 
and commanded Marmaduke's Brigade. On the 
close of the War, General Clark resumed the prac- 
tice of law at Fayette and was elected a member of 
the F'orty-third to Forty-seventh Congresses inclu- 
sive, and Clerk of the United States House for the 
Forty-eighth, Forty-ninth and Fiftieth Congresses. 
He married January 31, 1855, Marianna, daughter 
of Elias Edmunds Buckner of Caroline county, 
Virginia, and had si.\ children : Charles Buckner. 
Elias Edmunds Buckner, Augusta, Kate, Marianna 
and .Adah Clark. 



CHAUNCY, Charles 

Harvard A.B. 1721. 

Born in Boston, Mass., 1705 ; graduated Harvard, 
1721 ; Pastor First Church in Boston ; Dudleian Lec- 
turer at Harvard, 1762 ; received the degree of D.D. 
from Edinburgh, 1742; died 1787. 

CHARLES CHAUNCV, D.D., great-grandson 
of President Chauncy of Harvard, was born 
in Boston, January i, 1705. He graduated at Har- 
vard in 1 72 1, subsequently studied theology, and 
was ordained pastor of the First Church in Boston, 
as the colleague of the Rev. Thomas Foxcroft. 
This position he retained throughout his life, en- 
gaging actively in the theological controversies of the 
day and publishing numerous sermons and pam- 
phlets, among them his Uudleian Lecture at Har- 
vard in 1762. He was a stern opponent of the 
religious excitement attending Whitefield's preach- 
ing, and his Discourse on Enthusiasm and his 
Thoughts on the State of Religion in New England 
remain to express some of his views on this point. 
He was an ardent patriot during the Revolution, 
and his Thanksgiving Sermon on the Repeal of the 
Stamp Act testifies to the rigor of his opinions. 
His repute for learning and piety was as great as 
that which he enjoyed as a controversialist. In 
1 742 the degree of Doctor of Divinity was conferred 
upon him by Edinburgh University. He died in 
Boston, February 10, 1787. 



CALLENDER, Guy Stevens 

Harvard A.B. 1893, Ph.D. 1897. 
Born in Harts Grove, Ohio, 1865 ; graduated Oberlin, 
1891; Harvard, 1893 ; A.M. 1894; Ph.D. 1897; Instruc- 
tor in Political Economy since 1897. 

GLV Sii:VENS CALLENDER, Instructor in 
I'olitical Economy at Harvard, was born in 
Harts Grove, Ohio, November 9, 1865. Both his 
father and his mother are of English ancestry, his 
father, Robert Foster Callender, being born in Shef- 
field, Massachusetts, and his mother, Lois (Winslow) 
Callender. being one of the descendants of Keiielm 




n. S. C.AIXENDER 

Winslow, a brother of Governor Edward Winslow of 
Plyinouth. After graduating at Oberlin in i8gi, 
Mr. Callender entered Harvard, where he received 
the degree of Bachelor of .\rts in 1S93 ami then 
continued study for three years in the Department 
of Economics and Political Science at the Harvard 
Graduate School. In the year 1895 he was ap- 
pointed Instructor in Economics at Wellesley Col- 
lege. Two years later he took the degree of Doctor 
of Philosophy at Harvard and was appointed In- 
structor in Political Economy in that L^niversity. 



CLIFFORD, Henry Michael 

Harvard D.M.D. 1886. 
Born in Lewiston, Me. ; educated in the public 
schools ; began the study of dentistry in Auburn, Me. ; 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



221 



graduated Harvard Dental School, 1886; Demonstrator 
there, 1888-92; frequent contributor to the medical 
journals. 

HENRY MICHAEL CLIFFORD, D.M.D., 
Dentist, was born in Lewiston, ^L^ine. 
He was educated in the common and high schools 
of his native city, and was employed in mercantile 
pursuits prior to commencing the study of den- 
tistry, the elementary principles of which were 
taught him by Dr. Goddard of Auburn, ALaine. He 
later matriculated at the Harvard Dental School, 
from which he was graduated in 1886 with the 
degree of Doctor of Dental Medicine, and return- 
ing there in 1888 as Demonstrator of Operative 
Dentistry he continued to serve in that capacity 
until 1892. A number of interesting articles from 
Dr. Clifford's pen have appeared in the various 
dental journals, and he has read papers upon timely 
topics before the American Academy of Dental 
Science, the Massachusetts Dental Society, the Har- 
vard Odontological Society, and the Harvard Dental 
Alumni Association, in each of which he holds 
membership. 



DALTON, Asa 

Harvard A.B. 1848, A.M. 1851. 
Born in Westbrook, Me., 1824; educated at Harvard 
(18481 ; Assistant Minister Church of the Ascension, 
New York ; Rector of St. John's, Bangor ; Rector of St. 
Stephen's, Portland, Me. ; Editor of the Protestant 
Churchman ; Trustee and Corresponding Secretary of 
the Maine Bible Society ; Trustee of the Portland Be- 
nevolent Society: Director of the Portland Fraternity, 
Director of the Portland Y. M. C. A. ; member of the 
Maine Historical Society and of the New England 
Historic Genealogical Society. 

ASA DALTON, D.D., Rector of St. Stephen's 
Church, Portland, Maine, was born in West- 
brook, Maine, October 30, 1824. He is eighth in 
lineal descent from Philemon Dalton, one of the 
grantees of Dedham, JNLissachusetts, and also of 
Hampton, New Hampshire. .After fitting for College 
at the Cambridge, Massachusetts, High School he was 
graduated at Han-ard in 1848, Phi Beta Kappa. 
For two years he was .Assistant Minister at the 
Church of the .Ascension, New York City, and for 
six years was Rector of St. John's Bangor. In 1885 
he received from Colby the honorary degree of 
Doctor of Divinity. For many years Dr. Dalton has 
been Trustee and Corresponding Secretary of the 
Maine Bible Society, Trustee of the Portland Benev- 
olent Society, Director of the Portland Fraternity, 
and formerly for a long period of the Young Men's 



Christian Association, and has also held member- 
ship in the Maine Historical Society and the New 
England Historic Genealogical Society. In addition 
to his work in the pulpit he has rendered service to 
the community by a series of historical and literary 
lectures continued through fifteen years, which were 
the most popular ever delivered in the City or State. 
While in New York City, Dr. Dalton edited The 
Protestant Churchman, and for years contributed t(} 
the Protestant Episcopal Quarterly, and Protestant 
Episcopal Review, and numerous local journals, has 
published Epochs of Church History, and various 




.•f firw r^ n t 



ASA DALTON 



sermons. At this date, he is in the thirty-si.xth year 
of his Rectorship of St. Stephen's Parish, Portland 
Maine. 



COAR, John Firman 

Harvard A.M. 1897. 
Born in Berlin, Germany, 1863; educated at the Uni- 
versity of Bonn, Germany, and at Harvard Graduate 
School; Instructor at Park Institute. Pittsburg. Pa.; 
Principal of Adams Collegiate Institute, Adams. N.Y.; 
Principal of Canandaigua Academy, Canandaigua, N. 
Y. ; Assistant in German and afterwards Instructor in 
German at Harvard. 

JOHN FIRMAN COAR, A.M., Instructor in 
German at Har\'ard, was born in Berlin. Ger- 
many, July 26, 1863. Ou the side of his father, 



222 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



Finnan Wood Coar, he is descended from a Dublin 
family of the name of Cohar. On the side of his 
mother, Lucy (Blake) Coar, he is descended from 
Admiral Blake of the English Navy. After receiv- 
ing preliminary instruction at the Yonkers (New 
York) Military Academy and at the Kaiser AVilhelm 
Gymnasium, Cologne, Germany, he entered the 
L'niversity of Bonn for the year 1884-1885. From 
1896 to 1S98 he was a student at the Harvard 
Graduate School, receiving the degree of Master of 
.\rts in 1897. Meanwhile, he had served as In- 
structor in Classical and Modern Languages at Park 




J. F. COAR 

Institute, Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, as Principal of 
Adams Collegiate Institute, Adams, New York, 
(1S93-1894), as Principal of Canandaigua Academy, 
Canandaigua, New York, (1895-1896) and as As- 
sistant in German at Har\-ard (1896-1897). In 
the last named year he was appointed Instructor. 
On November 10, 1886, he married Emily Miller 
and has one son, Herbert Greenleaf Coar. 



CONANT, William Merritt 

Harvard A.B. 1879, M.D. 1884. 

Born in Attleboro, Mass., 1856 : graduated, Harvard, 

1879 ; Medical School, 1884 ; made Assistant in Anatomy 

there 1887; Assistant Demonstrator 1890; Instructor 

1893 ; Assistant in Clinical Surgery 1894 ; connected 



with a number of Boston Medical Institutions ; mem- 
ber of various professional bodies. 

WILLIAM MERRI'lT COXANT, M.D., As- 
sistant in Clinical Surgery at Harvard, 
was born in .Attleboro, Massachusetts, January 5, 
1S56. His preliminary studies were pursued at the 
Bridgewater Academy, and he prepared for College 
at the Adams Academy, Quincy, Massachusetts, 
taking his Bachelor's degree at Harvard in 1879. 
Immediately beginning the study of medicine he 
completed the regular course at the Harvard Medi- 
cal School in 1884. A period of eighteen months 
as House Officer at the Massachusetts General 
Hospital served a most fitting conclusion to his 
professional preparations, and although he has since 
acquired an extensive private practice, he preferred 
to retain his connection with the Boston Public 
Medical institutions, having served as Surgeon at 
St. Elizabeth's Hospital and Boston Dispensary ; 
and to the Out-Patient Departments of the Carney 
and Massachusetts General Hospitals. He is a 
member of the Boston Societies for .Medical Obser- 
vation and Medical Improvement; the Massachu- 
setts Medical Society, the Association of .\merican 
Anatomists and the Society of the Medical Sciences. 
In 1887 Dr. Conant joined the Instructor's force at 
the Harvard Medical School as an .'\natomical As- 
sistant, was made Assistant Demonstrator in 1890 
and an Instructor of Anatomy in 1893, and in the 
following year was appointed Assistant in Clinical 
Surgery. 



CORBIN, John 

Harvard A,B. 1892, A.M. 1893. 
Born in Chicago, 1870; graduated. Harvard 1892; 
studied at Oxford, England; Editor of Outing; Assist- 
ant Editor Harper's Magazine ; author of numerous 
articles, chiefly relating to Shakespeare and the drama 
and life and sports in England. 

JOHN CORBIN, A.M., Author and Magazine 
Editor, was born in Chicago, Illinois, May 2, 
1870. His parents were Calvin Rich and Caroline 
Elizabeth (Fairfield) Corbin, and his ancestry in- 
cludes the New England families of Rich, Cleveland. 
Dana and Fairfield, all of which date back to the 
middle of the seventeenth centurj'. He is directly 
descended from Clement Corbin, who landed in 
America in 1638. At Harvard Mr. Corbin earned 
the degree of Bachelor of .\rts magna cum laiide in 
1892 and Master of Arts with honors in English in 
1893. He also spent one year at Oxford, England. 
The year 1 893-1 894 Mr. Corbin was the Editor of 



UNIFERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



22 



3 



Outing, and since 1897 has been Assistant Editor 
of Harper's Magazine. He is a member of the 
Harvard Club of New York and the Players. In 
1895 he published Elizabethan Hamlet, and besides 
this work has written numerous articles, chiefly about 
Shakespeare and the drama and life and sports in 
England, for various publications. 



DUNIWAY, Clyde Augustus 

Harvard A.M. 1894, Ph.D. 1897. 
Born in Albany. Oregon, 1866; educated at Cornell 
and at Harvard ; has been printer, reporter, ranchman ; 
Instructor in History at Harvard; Assistant Professor 
of History at Stanford University. 

CLYDE AUGUSTUS DUNIWAY, A.M., Ph.D., 
Assistant Professor of History in Stamford 
University, was born in Albany, Oregon, November 
2, 1866. His parents, Charles and .A.bigail (Scott) 
Duniway moved from Illinois to Oregon in the early 
fifties. His grandparents were Kentuckians. Mr. 
Duniway received the degree of Bachelor of .Arts at 
Cornell in 1892, the degree of Master of .Arts at 
Harvard in 1894 and Doctor of Philosophy at Har- 
vard in 1897. He learned the printing trade and 
during his early business life served as reporter on 
New York and Chicago papers, as well as ranchman 
in Idaho. In the year 1896-1897 he was Instructor 
in History at Harvard ; then he was appointed .As- 
sistant Professor of History at Stanford University. 



ESCHELMAN, Simon 

Harvard D.M.D. Class of 1874. 
Born in Blair, Canada, 1852; educated at the Har- 
vard Dental School, the Philadelphia Dental College, 
the Royal College of Dental Surgeons, Canada, the 
Medical Department of the University of Pennsylvania 
and the Medical Department of the University of Ver- 
mont ; practised dentistry in Canadian cities ; practised 
medicine in Detroit ; resumed dentistry in Buffalo ; 
has been President and Treasurer of the Buffalo 
Dental Association, and President and Librarian of the 
8th District Dental Society of New York State. 

Sl^[ON ESCHELMAN, Dentist, was born in 
Blair, Ontario, Canada, .August 31, 1852, and 
is the son of Moses and Susannah (Stauffer) Eschel- 
man. It was in 1756 that Franz Eschelman emi- 
grated from Germany and settled in Reading, 
Pennsylvania. His son, Samuel, one of the early 
settlers of Ontario was a U. E. Loyalist. The lat- 
ter's son, Moses, was the father of the present 
Simon. Mr. Eschelman attended the Harvard 
Dental School in the term of 1873-1874, was gradu- 
ated from the Philadelphia Dental College, 1875, 



and from the Royal College of Dental Surgeons, 
Canada, the same year, attended the Medical De- 
partment of the University of Pennsylvania, 1878- 
1879, and was graduated from the Medical Depart- 
ment of the University of Vermont in 1879. He 
practised dentistry for some years in Guelph, Brant- 
ford and Toronto, and then for a short time gave 
up dentistry to take up medicine in Detroit. In 
1884 he resumed dentistry, locating in Buffalo. Dr. 
Eschelman has held the offices of President and 
Treasurer of the Buffalo Dental Association, and of 
President and Librarian of the Eighth District Deu- 



m. 




SI.MON ESCHEL.M.AN 



tal Society of New York Slate. He married Decem- 
ber 28, 1 88 1, .Annie Pauline de Bell Sinclair, and 
had two children : Karl Ferdinand Dormer and 
Leo Sinclair Eschelman. 



COX, Walter Smith 

Harvard LL B. 1847- 
Bom in Georgetown, D. C, 1826; educated at 
Georgetown College and at the Harvard Law School ; 
practised in Washington : Lecturer in the Law School 
of Columbian University. Washington ; Associate Jus- 
tice Supreme Court, D. C. 

ALTER SMITH COX, Associate Justice of 

the Supreme Court, District of Columbia, 

bom in Georgetown. District of Columbia, 



w 



224 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



October 25, 1826, and is the son of Clement and 
Mary M. (Ringgold) Cox. His ancestry was Eng- 
lish. In 1S43 he graduated at Georgetown College 
and then studied law with his fiither and at Harvard, 
receiving the degree of Bachelor of Laws in Jan- 
uary 1847. In October of that year he was ad- 
mitted to the Bar of the Circuit Court, District of 
Columbia, and there continued practice. On 




WALTER s. cox 

March i, 1879, Mr. Cox was appointed Associate 
Justice of the Supreme Court of the District. For 
more than twenty years Mr. Cox has been Lecturer 
at the Law School of Columbian University. He 
married October 20, 1866, Margaret L. Dunlop and 
has two children : Mary R. C. (who became Mrs. 
Legar6), and Walter D. Cox. 



GREENE, Charles Ezra 

Harvard A.B. 1862. 
Born in Cambridge, Mass., 1842 ; educated at Phillips- 
Exeter Academy, at Harvard (1862) and at the Mass. 
Institute of Technology ; engaged in rifle manufactur- 
ing ; served in the War as clerk in the Quartermaster's 
Department, as First Lieutenant, and later as Regi- 
mental Quartermaster: Assistant Engineer on location 
and construction of the Bangor and Piscataquis Rail- 
road in Maine ; United States Assistant Engineer ; 
City Engineer of Bangor; Professor of Civil Engineer- 
ing at the University of Michigan ; Dean of the Depart- 
ment of Engineering ; received honorary degree of 



C.E. from Michigan; Associate Editor of Engineering 
News ; Chief Engmeer Toledo, Ann Arbor & Northern 
Railroad ; Superintending and Consulting Engineer 
Wheeling & Lake Erie Railroad bridge, Toledo ; de- 
signer and Superintendent of Construction Ann Arbor 
Water Works; designer of Ann Arbor Sewerage 
Works; member of the American Society of Civil 
Engineers ; President of the Michigan Engineering 
Society; author of numerous works on engineering. 

CH.ARLKS KZR.\ GREENE, C.E., Dean of 
the Department of Engineering of the Uni- 
versity of Michigan, was born in Cambridge, Massa- 
chusetts, February 12, 1842, and is the son of 
James Diman and Sarah Adeline (Durell) Greene. 
Rev. James Diman Greene was the first Mayor of 
Cambridge and prominent in other offices of that 
city. He was descended from James Greene of 
Charlestown, freeman, of 1647. Sarah Adeline 
Durell Greene was the daughter of Daniel Meserve 
Durell, a prominent lawyer of Dover, New Hamp- 
shire, member of Congress, Chief-Justice of the 
Circuit Court and United States District .Xttorney of 
New Hampshire. After fitting for College at the 
Cambridge High School and at Phillips-Exeter 
Academy, Charles E. Greene entered Harvard and 
there graduated in 1862. He at once engaged in 
the manufacture of breech-loading rifles at Millbury, 
Massachusetts, and later at Worcester, but in Feb- 
ruary 1864 became chief clerk in the Quartermas- 
ter's Department at Readville, Massachusetts. He 
was then commissioned First Lieutenant in the 
United States colored troops and served as Regi- 
mental Quartermaster before Richmond, Va., and 
in Texas until 1866, when he resigned and entered 
the Massachusetts Institute of Technology to gradu- 
ate in Civil Engineering in 1868. From the last 
mentioned date until 1870 he was Assistant t^ngi- 
neer on location and constmction of the Bangor & 
Piscataquis Railroad in Maine. The next year he 
was United States Assistant Engineer on River and 
Harbor Improvements in Maine and New Hamp- 
shire, and then was appointed City Engineer of 
Bangor, also carrying on a general practice until the 
summer of 1872. At that time he was appointed 
Professor of Civil Engineering at the University of 
Michigan in Ann .\rbor, a position which he still 
holds, together with that of Dean of the Department 
of Engineering, established in 1895. In 1884 he 
received the honorary degree of Civil Engineer 
from Michigan University. Mr. Greene was Asso- 
ciate Editor of the Engineering News, 1876-1877, 
Chief Engineer of the Toledo, Ann Arbor and 
Northern Railroad, 1879-1881, Superintending and 



UNIVERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



225 



Consulting Engineer of the ^\'heeIing & Lake Erie 
Railroad bridge at Toledo, 1881-1882, designer 
and Superintendent of the construction of the Ann 
Arbor Water Works in 1885 and designer of the 




CHAS. E. GREENE 

Ann Arbor Sewerage system in 1S90. He has paid 
especial attention to the invention and development 
of graphical methods of analysis of frames, bridges 
and arches. His works on engineering have been 
well received by the profession and have been used 
in designing important structures. For three terms 
beginning in 1880 Professor Greene served the 
Michigan Engineering Society as President, and has 
also held office as Vice-President of the Farmer's 
and Mechanic's Bank, Ann Arbor. In 1872 he 
married Florence Emerson of Bangor, Maine, and 
had two children : Albert Emerson and Florence 
Wentworth Greene. 



GILES, Jabez Edward 

Harvard A.B. 1876. 
Born in Rockport, Mass., 1853 ; educated at the 
Rockport public schools; the Boston Latin School; 
the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and at 
Harvard (1876 1; taught in New York: graduated 
with degree of M.D. at the Medical Department 
of the University of New York ; practised medicine in 
New York; specialist in ophthalmology and otology; 
Attending Surgeon to the Manhattan Eye and Ear 
VOL. III. — i; 



Hospital ; member of Board of Directors of the same ; 
member of various medical societies. 

JABEZ EDWARD GU^ES, M.D., Surgeon in the 
Ophthalmic Department of the Manhattan Eye 
and Ear Hospital, New York, was born in Rock- 
port, Massachusetts, January 23, 1853, being the 
son of Newell and Elizabeth Whijiplc (Gott) Giles. 
Newell Giles was a prominent business man of 
Rockport. For two years (1871-1872) he was a 
member of the Massachusetts Senate. He was 
formerly Treasurer of Rockport Steam Cotton ^[ills, 
President of Rockport Railroad, Treasurer of Rock- 
port Savings Bank and held many other positions of 
responsibility. Edward Giles, the first of the name 
in this country, came from England and settled in 
Salem, Massachusetts, in 1634. Charles Gott, the 
first ancestor on the inaternal side in America, set- 
tled in Salem, Massachusetts, about 1629. He was 
deacon of the First Church of Salem. Si-x and per- 
haps seven of the ancestors of Dr. Giles served in 
the Revolutionary War and were all at the Battle of 
Bunker Hill. After graduating from the Boston 
Latin School, in 1872, the subject of this sketch 




J. EDW.VI^D G1LE.S 

attended the Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
with the intention of studying civil engineering, but 
later gave up this plan and in 1S74 became a mem- 
ber of the Junior class of Harvard and graduated 



226 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



with the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1S76. From 
1877 to '*^8i he was engaged in teaching in New 
York and vicinity, but then entered the Medical 
Department of the University of New York and 
there graduated in 1884. Immediately he took up 
the general practice of medicine in New York City, 
but for the past few years has limited his practice 
to the Departments of Ophthalmology and Otology. 
He was for several years Attending Surgeon at De- 
milt Dispensary in the Department of Ophthalmology 
and Otology. Several medical societies claim him 
as a member. He is an Independent in politics. 
On January 2, 1888 Dr. Giles married Sarah Hay- 
ward Backus. 



FLAGG, William Dodge 

Harvard Sp. 1894. 
Born in Holyoke, Mass., 1870; educated at Phillips- 
Andover Academy and at Harvard (1894) ; connected 
with the business department of the Cleveland (Ohio) 
Press and later with the editorial staff of the Cleveland 
World ; editor and publisher of the Holyoke Globe- 
Democrat. 

WILLIAM DODGE FLAGG, Editor and Pub- 
lisher of the Holyoke Globe-Democrat, 
was born in Holyoke, Massachusetts, August ii, 
1870, his parents being Ezra Hastings and Sarah 
Elizabeth (Dodge) Flagg. Before entering College 



GREENOUGH, Francis Boott 

Harvard A.B. 1859, M.D. 1866, A.M. 1870. 
Born in Boston, Mass., 1837; graduated. Harvard, 
1859; Medical School, 1866: completed his studies 
abroad ; House Physician at the Massachusetts General 
Hospital; Acting Surgeon in the U. S. A.; served on 
the staff of the Children's and Carney Hospitals ; Med- 
ical Lecturer at Harvard, 1871 to 1875; chosen an In- 
structor the latter year. 

FRANCIS BOOIT GREENOUGH, M.D., 
Medical Instructor at Harvard, was born 
in Boston, Massachusetts, December 24, 1837, son 
of Henry and Frances (Boott) Greenough. Com- 
mencing his preliminary studies in Germany and 
continuing them in Italy, he returned to the United 
States and attended the Cambridge (Massachusetts) 
High, and a private school in Boston. He took 
his Bachelor's degree at Harvard with the Class of 
1859, received his Medical degree there in 1866, 
and was made a Master of Arts in 1870. His pro- 
fessional education was continued in Vienna and 
concluded in Paris, and in 1868 he became House 
Physician at the Massachusetts General Hospital, 
and shortly afterwards Acting Surgeon in the Regular 
Army, remaining in the service six months. Dr. 
Greenough was a member of the original staff of 
Physicians at the Children's Hospital, was also on 
the first Surgical Staff at the Carney Hospital, and 
was later given charge of the Dermatological De- 
partment at the Boston Dispensary. He holds 
membership in the Boston Medical Society, the 
Boston Society for Medical Improvement, the Ameri- 
can Genito-Urinary Association, and in 1891 was 
chosen President of the American Dermatological 
Association. From 1871 to 1875 he was a Lecturer 
at the Harvard Medical School, and in the latter 
year began his duties as Clinical Instructor. 




WILLIAM D. I-LAGG 

he studied at the Friends' School, Providence, and a 
year at Phillips Andover Academy, after which four 
years were spent as a special student at Harvard, in 
the Class of 1894. During his College course Mr. 
Flagg was on the Lampoon and also wrote profusely 
for Life and other humorous papers. In September 
after graduating he became connected with the busi- 
ness department of the Cleveland (Ohio) Press and 
one year later with the editorial staff of the Cleve- 
land World. In the spring of 1898 he bought out 
the Holyoke Daily Democrat and changed it to the 
Holyoke Globe-Democrat, making it independent in 
politics. Under his management the paper became 
a leader in the affairs of the city, taking a fearless 
stand against corrupt government in municipal af- 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



fairs, and although Holyoke is nominally a Dem- 
ocratic city, yet the work of Mr. Flagg through his 
paper has contributed largely in electing a Republi- 
can !Mayor and Board of Aldermen. 



POST, Abner 

Yale B.A. i8 



) — Harvard M.D. 1870. 



Born in Westfield, Mass., 1844; graduated at Yale, 
1866; at Harvard Medical School, 1870 ; House Surgeon 
at Mass. General Hospital; concluded his studies 
abroad ; Assistant Surgeon at the Chelsea (Mass.) Hos- 
pital, 1872-75; located for practice in Boston the latter 
year; Surgeon to the Boston City Hospital; Medical 
Instructor at Harvard since 1882. 

ABNER POST, M.D., Surgeon, and Clinical 
Instructor at the Harvard Medical School, 
was born in Westfield, Massachusetts, August 9, 
1844. He prepared for College at the Williston 
Seminary, Easthampton, same state, took his Bach- 
elor's degree at Yale in 1S66, and his medical 
degree at Harvard in 1870; and having spent some 
time at the Massachusetts General Hospital as 
House Surgeon he visited Europe, completing his 
professional preparations in Vienna, and other 
places. In 1872 he accepted the post of Assistant 
Surgeon at the Chelsea, Massachusetts, Hospital, 
remaining there for three years, at the expiration 
of which time he established himself professionally 
in Boston, and subsequently joined the surgical 
staff at the City Hospital. Dr. Post is earnestly 
interested in all matters relative to the propagation 
of medical science, particularly the professional 
organizations, being a inember of the Boston Socie- 
ties for Medical Improvement and Medical Obser- 
vation, the Massachusetts Medical Society, and the 
American Association of Genito-Urinary Surgeons. 
Although his practice is sufficient to require his un- 
divided attention he prefers to devote a portion of 
his time to the service of Harvard, and from 1882 
to the present time he has been Clinical Instructor 
in Syphilis in the Medical Department of that 
University. He is a member of the St. Botolph 
Club, Boston, and of several other non-professional 
bodies. 



PEABODY, Francis Greenwood 

Harvard A.B. 1869, S.T.B. 1872 — Yale D.D. 1887. 

Born in 1847 ; graduated at Harvard, 1869 ; studied at 
the Harvard Divinity School; minister First Parish 
Church, Cambridge; Parkman Professor at Harvard 



Divinity School ; 
Morals at Harvard. 



227 
Plummer Professor of Christian 



VRAXCIS GREENWOOD PEABODY, D.D., 
Plummer Professor of Christian Morals at 
Har\'ard, was born December 4, 1847, son of 
Ephraim and Mary Jane (Derby) Peabody. He 
graduated at Harvard in 1869 and at the Harvard 
Divinity School in 1872. In 1887 he received from 
Yale the degree of Doctor of Divinity. For six 
years preceding 1880 Mr. Peabody was the Pastor 
of the First Parish Church, Cambridge, but was 
then made Parkman Professor at Harvard, and in 




FRANCIS G. PEABODY 

1886 was made Plummer Professor of Christian 
Morals. He married, June 11, 1S72, Cora Weld, 
and has four children, William Rodman, Gertrude 
Weld, Francis \Veld and John Derby Peabody. 



ROBINSON, Fred Norris 

Harvard A.B. i8gi, A.M. 1892. Ph.D. 1894. 
Born in Lawrence, Mass., 1871 ; graduated. Harvard, 
1B91; studied at the University of Freiburg 1892: Ph.D.. 
Harvard, 1894; Instructor in English at Harvard. 

1.RED NORRIS ROBINSON, Ph.D., Philol- 
ogist, was born in Lawrence, Massachusetts, 
April 4, 1 87 1, and is the son of David Franklin and 
Eliza Ann (Norris) Robinson. From the Lawrence 
public schools he passed into Harvard, where he 



228 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



receivfil the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1S91, the 
degree of Master of Arts in 1892, and the degree of 
Doctor of Philosophy in 1894. He then spent a year 
as Instructor in English at Harvard, but the next 
year went abroad to study the Celtic languages for 
twelve months at the University of Freiburg in 
liaden. Returning to America, he was immediately 
reappointed Instructor and has held that position 
ever since. His courses have been devoted to the 
Celtic Languages and Literature, Harvard being the 
first University in America to offer Instruction in 
these subjects. 



has publisheil a number of papers on geology and 
allied subjects. 



ROTCH. Thomas Morgan 

Harvard A.B. 1870, M.D. 1874. 
Graduated Harvard, 1870; Medical School 1874; In- 
structor, Assistant Professor, and afterwards Professor 
of Diseases of Children at Harvard; author of Pedia- 
trics, the Hygienic and Medical Treatment of Children. 

THOMAS MORGAN RO'l'CH, M.D., Physi- 
cian, and Professor of Diseases of Children 
at Har\ard, was graduated at Harvard in 1870 and at 
the Har\'ard Medical School in 1874, and then took 
up the practice of his profession. In 1878 he was 
appointed Instructor on the Diseases of Children at 
Harvard and held that position until 1888, when he 
was made .Assistant Professor. In 1893 he was 
made full Professor. The most elaborate work 
which he has written has been that on Pediatrics, 
the Hygienic and Medical Treatment of Children, 
a large and complete work used as a text book at 
Harvard and at a number of other Universities. 



WOODWORTH, Jay Backus 

Harvard S.B. 1894. 
Born in Newfield, N. Y., 1865; graduated Harvard 
Scientific School, 1894 : Assistant Geologist of the United 
States Geological Survey; Instructor in Geology at 
Harvard ; Fellow of the Geological Society of America ; 
member of the Boston Society of Natural History; 
author of papers on geology. 

J.\Y BACKUS WOODWORTH, Instructor in 
Geology at Harvard, was born in Newfield, 
New York, January 2, 1865, and graduated at the 
Lawrence Scientific School in 1894. From 1890 to 
1899 he was .Assistant Geologist of the United 
States Geological Survey. In 1893 he was ap- 
pointed to his present position as Instructor in 
Geology at Harvard. Mr. Woodworth is a fellow 
of the Geological Society of .America, and a mem- 
ber of the Boston Society of Natural History. He 



KENT, John Fuller 

Harvard A.B. 18/5. 
Born in West Newton, Mass., 1853 ; graduated Har- 
vard, 1875; Sub-Master Newton, Mass. High School 
seven years; Principal of the High School, Concord, 
N. H., 1882 to the present time. 

JOHN FULLER KENT, Educator, was born in 
West Newton. Massachusetts, November 15, 
1853, son of John Clark and Mary Caroline (Wills) 
Kent, and grandson of James Callendar Kent. He 
was educated in the common and high schools of 
his native town, and at Harvard, taking his Bach- 




JOHN F. KENT 

elor's degree with the Class of 1875. Shordy after 
graduating he was appointed Sub-Master of the 
Newton High School, retaining that post for seven 
years, or until 1882, when he became Principal of 
the High School in Concord, New Hampshire, where 
his abilities as an educator are highly appreciated. 
On December 25, 1877, Mr. Kent married .Annie 
Maria Collins, and of that union there is one son, 
Ralph Revere Kent. His second marriage took 
place October 11, 1882, to Cornelia Collins, and 
the children of this union are Ruth and Irving 
Fuller Kent. 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



229 



BARNEY, Samuel Eben 

Yale Ph.B. 1879. C.E. 1885. 
Born in New Haven, Conn., 1859; fitted for College 
in New Haven schools; graduated, Sheffield Scientific 
School, 1879; occupied in engineering and surveying 
work in the ^A^est, 1879-84: Instructor in Civil Engi- 
neering Sheffield Scientific School, 1884: obtained de- 
gree of C.E., 1885; made Assistant Professor 1895. 

SAMUEL EBEN BARNEY, C.E., Assistant 
Professor of Civil Engineering in the Sheffield 
Scientific School at Yale, was born in New Haven, 



He was married July 8, 1884, to Ida E. Bushnell, 
and has two children : Ida and Elizabeth Barney. 




SAM L E. BARNEY 

January 16, 1859, son of Samuel Eben and Eunice 
(Whittlesey) Barney. He attended public and 
private schools in New Haven, and graduated from 
the Sheffield Scientific School with the Class of 1879. 
For a year succeeding graduation he was a member 
of the engineer corps of the Burlington & Missouri 
River Railroad, and the next year he was in charge 
of exploration surveys in the Rocky Mountains for 
the same corporation. From 18S1 to 1883 he was 
with the engineer corps of the Union Pacific Rail- 
road, during which time he was occupied in inspec- 
tion and improvement of the Mountain Railroad, 
and in locating new roads. In 1884 Mr. Barney 
returned to New Haven and became Instmctor in 
Civil Engineering at the Sheffield Scientific School, 
receiving the degree of Civil Engineer in 18S5, and 
subsequently being appointed Assistant Professor. 



BISHOP, Frederic Courtney 

Yale B.A. 1892, M.D. 1895. 

Born in Minneapolis, Minn., 1870; graduated, Yale, 
1892; Medical School, 1895; served one year at the 
Bridgeport General Hospital; located for practice in 
New Haven, 1896; Assistant in Medicine at Yale, 1897. 

FREDERIC COURTNEY BISHOP, M.D., 
Physician and Assistant in Clinical Medicine 
at Vale, was born in Minneapolis, Minnesota, No- 
vember 9, 1870, son of Charles Kitchel and Julia 
Elizabeth (Lewis) Bishop. His original .American 
ancestors on the paternal side were among the 
founders of New Haven Colony, and his mother's 
lineage can be traced to Aaron Burr. His prelim- 
inary education was obtained in the common and 
high schools of Bridgeport, Connecticut, from which 
latter he entered Vale, graduating from the .Academic 
Department in 1892, and from the Medical School 
three years later. The ensuing year was spent on 




IREDERIC C. BISHOP 



the House Staff of the Bridgeport General Hospital, 
where his professional training was greatly enhanced 
by observ-ation and practical experience, and in 
1896 he returned to New Haven, which has ever 



230 



UNIFERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



since been the scene of his professional labors. 
Since 1S97 he lias officiated as Assistant in Clinical 
Medicine at Vale. In politics Dr. Bishop acts with 
the Republican party. He is unmarried. 



BISSELL, Leslie Dayton 

Yale B.A. 1887, Ph.D. 1896. 
Born in Dover, Vt. ; graduated, Yale, 1887 ; Instructor 
in Mathematics, Siglar's School, Newburgh, N. Y., 
1888-93; Assistant in Physics at Yale, 1894-98; Ph.D. 
Yale, 1896. 

LESLIE D.WTON BISSELL, Ph.D., Assist- 
ant in Physics at Yale, was born in Dover, 
Vermont, son of Lucius Warren and .Abbie Minerva 




L. D. BISSELL 

(Howard) Bissell. He is a descendant in the 
seventh generation of John Hissell, of Windsor, Con- 
necticut, directly through Captain John, Captain 
Ozias, Ozias 2d, to his grandfather .\ustin Bissell. 
Having completed the regular course at the Ver- 
mont Academy, Saxton's River, in 1883, he en- 
tered Yale the following year, and was graduated in 
1SS7. In 1888 he accepted the post of Instructor 
in Mathematics at Siglar's School, Newburgh, New 
York, remaining there until 1893, and returning to 
Yale in 1894 as Assistant in Physics he continued 
his connection with the University as graduate 
student and teacher until 1898, receiving the degree 



of Doctor of Philosophy in 1896. While at the 
Vermont .'\ca(lemy he served as Captain of Com- 
pany A, Military Battalion ; joined the Sigma Psi 
Society of Vale in 1S96 and was a member of tlie 
Graduates' Club of New Haven from 1S93 to 1898. 
Politically he is an Independent. 



CAMPBELL, James 

Yale M.A. (Hon.) l8gi. 

Born in Manchester, Conn., 1848; attended Man- 
chester Centre Academy; graduated. College of Physi- 
cians and Surgeons, Burlington, Vt., 1871 ; studied in 
European hospitals; received honorary degree of M.A. 
from Yale in i8gi ; Professor of Obstetrics and Diseases 
of Women at Yale ; Vice-President of Hartford County 
(Conn.) Medical Society; President of Hartford Board 
of Health; Physician to Hartford Hospital; practises 
in Hartford. 

JAMES CAMPBELL, M.D., Physician and Pro- 
fessor in the Yale Medical School, was born 
in Manchester, Connecticut, March 14, 1848. Both 
his father, James Campbell, and his mother, Esther 
(Griswold) Campbell, were descended directly from 
soldiers of the Revolution. His first educational 
training was in the public schools, the Manchester 
Centre Academy and private reading with a clergy- 
man of his native town. His medical study was 
first at the College of Physicians and Surgeons of 
New York City, and later at the College of Physi- 
cians and Surgeons of Burlington, Vermont. From 
the latter Institution he wms graduated in 1871, 
receiving the degree of Doctor of Medicine. For a 
short time he practised medicine in Kingston and 
Litchfield, Minnesota, but soon returned East and 
opened a practice at Hartford, Connecticut, which 
has continued to the present time, uninterrupted 
with the exception of about two years spent at 
different times in pursuing special studies in European 
hospitals. Dr. Campbell's professional appoint- 
ments and active offices are almost too numerous 
for mention here. He has been Secretary of the 
Hartford City Medical Society, Secretary of the Hart- 
ford County Medical Society, member of the Board 
of Censors in the Hartford City Medical Society, 
and President of the Obstetric Section of the 
Connecticut State Medical Society at its One Hun- 
dredth Anniversary meeting. He is at present 
Vice-President of the Hartford County Medical 
Society ; a member of the New York Academy of 
Medicine, the American Medical Association, and 
the American Public Health Association. He is 
President of the Hartford Board of Health and 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



231 



Physician to the Hartford Hospital, also Medical 
Examiner for the ^tna Life Insurance Company of 
Hartford. In 1891 he received from Yale the 
honorary degree of Master of Arts, and he is now 
Professor of Obstetrics and the Diseases of Women 
in the Yale Medical School. His society connec- 
tions are with the Free Masons, where he has 
reached the Thirty-Second degree ; the Sons of the 
American Revolution ; the Graduates Club of Yale ; 
the Hartford Club, and the Church Club of the 
Diocese of Connecticut. In politics he is a Re- 
publican ; for one year he served as Councilman 
from the old Fourth Ward of Hartford. He mar- 
ried Mary C. Pettibone, also of Revolutionary an- 
cestry, October 15, 1874. His children are: 
James Noel H., aged sixteen, and Grace Camp- 
bell, aged twelve. 



CLINE, Frederick Addison 

Yale B.A. 1874. 
Born in St. Louis, Mo., 1853; fitted for College in the 
Preparatory Department of Washington University, 
St. Louis; entered the Collegiate Department of the 
University in 1869, and on the completion of his Soph- 
omore year entered the Sophomore class of Yale, grad- 
uating in 1874 with the degree of B.A., took two years' 
course at St. Louis Law School, graduating in 1876, 
(magna cum laude) and receiving prize for best legal 
thesis; elected Justice of the Peace in and has served 
since 1894, also practising law in St. Louis. 

FREDERICK ADDISON CLINE, .Attorney at 
Law and Justice of the Peace for the Ninth 
District of St. Louis, was born in Missouri Metropolis 
November i6, 1853, son of George Washington and 
Livonia Dodds Cline. His father's grandfather 
came from .•\lsace, Germany, and settled in Penn- 
sylvania. When the Revolutionary War broke out 
he enlisted in the ranks of the Pennsylvania troops 
who hurried to the support of the movement for 
independence. Livonia Dodds Cline was of Eng- 
lish ancestry, being descended through her mother's 
family from Sir Francis Drake. Frederick .\. Cline 
fitted for College in the Preparatory Department of 
the Washington L^niversity of St. Louis, entering the 
Collegiate Department of the University in 1869. 
On the completion of his Sophomore year there he 
entered the Sophomore class of Yale, and graduated 
in 1874 with the degree of Bachelor of .Arts. On 
graduation he took up the study of law at the St. 
Louis Law School, the Law Department of Wash- 
ington University, taking the two years' course and 
graduating in June 1876, 7nag>ia cum laude, receiving 
also the first prize given for the best legal thesis. 



On the completion of his law course, Mr. Cline took 
up the practice of law in St. Louis, at first with his 
father, and then in association with Hugo Munch 
of the St. Louis Bar. In November 1894, he was 
elected a Justice of the Peace — an office corres- 
ponding nearly to the municipal judgeships of other 
large cities — on the Republican ticket, and has 
since served in that capacity. He married February 
2, 1880, Frances E. Holmes of St. Louis. They 
have five children : Frederick H., Louis C, John H., 
Alan P., and Isabel Violet Cline. Mr. Cline is a 
member of the St. Louis and University Clubs, the 




H<Lli| KICK \. CLINK. 



Merchants League, and the Delta Kappa Epsilon 
and Royal Arcanum fraternities. He has also been 
a stanch Republican on political questions. 



CHENEY, Benjamin Austin 

Yale B.A. l883, M.D. 1890. 
Born in Joliet, 111., 1867 ; attended public schools of 
New Haven, Conn. ; graduate of Yale and Yale Medical 
School ; had extensive study in Europe : practises med- 
icine in New Haven; Assistant Surgeon in Hospitals 
of Bohemia and Ireland ; Gynecologist and Obstetrician 
to New Haven Dispensary; Assistant Professor of 
Gynecology and Obstetrics in Yale Medical School. 

BENJAMIN .AUSTIN CHENEY, M.D., Phy- 
sician and .Assistant Professor of Obstetrics 
at Yale, was born in Joliet, Illinois, June lo, 1867. 



232 



UNIVERSmES AND THEIR SONS 



He is the son of Benjamin Hicks and Sarah Jane 
(Austin) Cheney. His early training was received 
in the Hopkins Grammar School, New Haven, and 
from private tutors. This work was preparatory for 
entering Yale, from which institution he received two 
degrees. He graduated from the .-Xcademic Depart- 
ment in iSSS and from the Medical School in 1890. 
Dr. Cheney then went abroad and continued his 
medical study in the Universities of Vienna, Paris 
and Dublin, and in the Hospitals of London and 
Reichemburg, Bohemia. During tliis time he held 
the positions of Licentiate in Midwifery in the Uni- 




B. A. CHKXEY 

versity of Dublin, .Assistant Surgeon in the Stefans 
Hospital of Reichemburg, Bohemia, and Assistant 
Surgeon in the Interne Rotunda Hospital of Dublin, 
Ireland. .After his return to .America Dr. Cheney 
commenced the practice of medicine in New Haven, 
which he now continues. He has been appointed 
Gynecologist and Obstetrician to the New Haven 
Dispensar)', and Assistant Professor of Gynecology 
and Obstetrics in the Yale Medical School. Dr. 
Cheney is a member of the Psi Upsilon fraternity 
and of the Yale Graduates Club of New Haven. 



from Yale, 1892; Ph.D., 1895; studied in Germany and 
Italy; Assistant in Biology. Sheffield Scientific School 
of Yale, 1892-95 ; Instructor in Comparative Anatomy 
at Yale. 

WLSLEY ROSWELL COE, Ph.D., Biologist, 
Instructor in Comparative Anatomy at 
Yale, was born in Middlefield, Connecticut, Novem- 
ber II, i86g. At the High School of Meriden, 
Connecticut, he was prepared for Yale, which in- 
stitution he entered in 1888. His work was mainly 
in the special lines of science and philosophy, anil 
when he graduated in 1892 it was with the degree 
of Bachelor of Philosophy. He at once started 
graduate work in the Lhiiversity, paying particular 
attention to Biology and Zoology. In this work he 
received, in 1895, the degree of Doctor of Phi- 
losophy. Determined to pursue his study still 
further, and in order to gain facilities for practical 
scientific investigation, he went abroad and spent the 
year 1S95-1896 in Wiirzburg, Germany, and in 
Naples, Italy, working in the zoological laboratories. 
From 1S92 to 1895 Mr. Coe had served as A.ssistant 
in Biology at the Sheffield .Scientific School, and 
upon his return to .America in 1896 he was elected 
Instructor in Comparative .Anatomy in Yale. This 
position he still occupies. 



COE, Wesley Roswell 

Vale Ph.B. i8g2, Ph.D. 1895. 
Born in Middlefield, Conn., 1869; attended the High 
School of Meriden, Conn.; received degree of Ph.B. 



COMSTOCK, William James 

Yale Ph.B. 1879. 

Born in Toledo, O., 1860; attended Williston Sem- 
inary at Easthampton, Mass. ; graduated, Yale Scientific 
School, 1679; received Fellowship in Chemistry and 
studied at Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, 1881- 
82; studied in Munich, Germany ; Instructor in Organic 
Chemistry at Sheffield Scientific School of Yale. 

WILLIAM JAMES COMSTOCK, Chemist 
and Instructor in Organic Chemistry at 
Yale, was born in Toledo, Ohio, June 15, i860. 
He is the son of James Muzzy and Lydia Ladd 
(Watkins) Comstock. After early training at a 
private school in Toledo and at the public schools 
of that city he went to the Williston Seminary at 
Easthampton, Massachusetts, for final College pre- 
paration. At Yale he entered the Sheffield Scien- 
tific School and followed there a special line of study 
in chemistry. He graduated in 1879, but con- 
tinued his studies in the Scientific School during the 
next year. In the year 1880-1881 he was Assistant 
in Chemistry at the Scientific School, and being 
there awarded, for ability in his specialty, a Fellow- 
ship in Chemistry, he spent the year 1881-1S82 at 
the Johns Hopkins University, of Baltimore, Mary- 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



233 



land. Mr. Comstock then went abroad, and for 
five years, 1882-1887, he studied at the University 
of Munich, Germany. He is now Instructor in 
Organic Chemistry at Yale. He is a member of 
the University Club of New York City, and of the 
Graduates' Club of New Haven. He married Mary 
King Bunce, February 9, 1895. He has one child : 
Mary Comstock. 



ELLSWORTH, Pinckney Webster 

Yale B.A. 1836, M.A. 1839 — Columbia M.D. 1839. 
Born in Hartford, Conn., 1814 ; fitted for College at the 
Hartford Grammar School and the Mt. Pleasant Clas- 
sical School; A.B.Yale, 1836; M.D. College of Physi- 
cians and Surgeons of Columbia, 1839 ; hospital service 
in Dublin, Paris and at Bellevue Hospital, New York 
City; practised medicine in Hartford until his death in 
1896. 

PI\CKNI:Y WEBSTER ELLSWORTH, ALD., 
for many years a practising physician and 
surgeon in Hartford, Connecticut, was born there 
December 5, 1814. His father, Hon. William 
Wolcott Ellsworth, was one of Connecticut's most 
distinguished citizens, having been Governor of the 
State for two terms, a Justice of the Supreme Court 
of Connecticut and a member of Congress. His 
grandfiither, Oliver Ellsworth, was one of the most 
learned jurists in the country in its early history, was 
Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of the United 
States, and was influential in the framing of the 
United States Constitution. On his mother's side 
Pinckney Ellsworth was a grandson of Noah Web- 
ster, the lexicographer. The family is descended 
from Governor Bradford of the Mayflower. He 
received his early education at the Hartford 
Grammar School; fitted for College at the Mt. 
Pleasant Classical School at .'\mherst, and entered 
Yale in 1832, graduating with the degree of Bachelor 
of .Arts in 1836, and Master of Arts in 1839. He 
studied medicine at the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons, New York City, now the Medical Depart- 
ment of Columbia, was House Surgeon at Bellevue 
Hospital, New York for a short period, and studied 
also in the hospitals of Dublin, Ireland and under 
eminent surgeons in Paris, France. .At the age of 
twenty-five he began practice as physician and 
surgeon in Hartford, where he remained until his 
death in 1896. He was without doubt the most 
brilliant surgeon in the State for many years, and 
his books show many most difficult cases success- 
fully cured, some of them the first of their kind in 
the medical history of Connecticut, or in fact of 
America. On the outbreak of the Civil War he was 



appointed Brigade Surgeon of United States Volun- 
teers by President Lincoln, having previously been 
appointed Brigade Surgeon of the State Militia by 
Governor Buckingham, July 9, 1S61. He was a 
member of the Connecticut Medical Society for 
fifty-six years, was one of the founders of the Hart- 
ford Medical Society and an honorary member of 
the New York Medical Society. Dr. Ellsworth was 
a stanch Republican during the greater part of his 
life, but in 1884 he voted the Democratic ticket 
and did so until his death. He was twice married, 
first to Julia Sterling of Bridgeport Connecticut. 




p. W. F,LI-SWORTH 



Their one child, William, died in infancy. Some 

years after his wife's death he married Julia 

Townsend Dow of New Haven, 'i'hey had seven 

children, six of whom survive. 



GALLAUDET, Edson Fessenden 

Yale A.B. 1893. 
Born in Washington, D. C, 1871 ; early education 
Hartford (Conn. I Public High School ; graduated, Yale, 
1893; Ph.D. Johns Hopkins, 1896; apprentice Westing- 
house Electrical Company, 1897; Instructor in Physics, 
Yale 1897- 

EDSON FESSENDEN G.-M.L.M'DET, Ph.D., 
Scientist, and Instructor in Physics at Vale, 
was born .April 2i, 1S71, in Washington, District of 



^34 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



Columbia, son of Edward Miner and Susan (Deni- mother, Sarah Cornell Glover, was a descendant of 
son) Gall'audet. His early education was acquired William Cornell, who received the patent of Little 
in private schools and the Hartford Public High Neck, Long Island, from Charles L His maternal 
School. He graduated from Yale with the Class of grandmother was a member of the Van Wick family 

of ^Laryland, whose genealogy is traced back in 
Holland to the thirteenth century. Mr. Glover 
attended in early childhood the school of Jeremiah 
Greenleaf in New York City, prepared for College 
at the .Academy of Fairfield, Connecticut, and en- 
tered Yale as a Sophomore in 1S43, graduating in 
1846. He spent the winter of 1S4S and 1S49 at 
Harvard Law .School under the regime of Simon 
Greenleaf, and also studied law in the office of 
Francis B. Cutting in New York, being admitted to 
the New York Bar in 1850. He formed a law 
partnership with David Hawley, a former classmate 
at Yale, which continued for fifteen years. While 
residing in Fairfield and practising law in New York 
City, Mr. Glover was twice elected to the Connect- 
icut Legislature, in 1863 and 1868. He had 
declined a nomination by the Democratic party, 
as such, and was chosen as a representative of the 
Constitutional L'nion party, the only member of 




E. F. GALLAUDET 

1893, and afterward matriculated at Johns Hopkins 
where he studied for three years and received the 
degree of Doctor of Philosophy in 1896. He 
served eight months as apprentice to the trade of 
machinist in the shops of the Westinghouse Electri- 
cal and Manufacturing Company of Pittsburgh, 
leaving there in l^'ebrnary, 1S97, and took up his 
work as Instructor in Physics at Yale in the fall of 
tiiat year. 



GLOVER, John Henry 

Yale B.A. 1846. 

Born in New York, 1827; fitted for College at Fair- 
field (Conn. I Academy; entered Yale as Sophomore in 
1843, graduating in 1846; spent winter of 1848 and 1849 
at Harvard Law School; admitted to the New York 
Bar, 1850: has practised law in New York City since 
that time, except for four years spent in Europe, at 
present as a member of the firm of Glover, Sweezy & 
Glover; twice elected to the Connecticut Legislature 
while residing at Fairfield, 1863, 1868. 

JOHN HENRY GLOVER, Lawyer, was born in 
New York, May 22, 1827, son of John and 
Debby Ann Sheaff Glover. His paternal grand- 




JOHN H. GLOVER 



that party in the Legislature, under the conviction 
that the result of the war would be to liberate the 
slaves, but that there was no constitutional right to 
carry on the war for the avowed purpose of the 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



235 



abolition of slavery. Mr. Glover went to Europe in 
1870 for the purpose of recreation and the education 
of his children, returning to .America in 1874 on 
the loss of his eldest son, John I. Glover, in March 
of that year. On his return to New York he re- 
sumed the practice of law, and subsequently formed 
a partnership with Richard L. Sweezy and Henry 
S. Glover, his only surviving son. He married in 
1852 Helen Otis, daughter of Jacob LeRoy of New 
York City. Three children survive : Charlotte Le- 
Roy, Henry S., and Martha LeRoy Glover. Mr. 
Glover is a member of the Church and Century 
Clubs of New York City. 



stone National Park. He was a member of the 
United States Forestry Commission appointed by 
the President of the National .Academy of .Sciences, 
at the request of the Secretary of the Interior to 
recommend a policy of forest preservation for the 
public lands of the United States. It was upon the 
recommendations of this commission that the pres- 
ent forest policy was enacted. Mr. Hague is a 
member of the National Academy of Sciences, the 
American Association for the Advancement of 
Science, London (Geological Society, and many 
other scientific societies in the United States and 



HAGUE, Arnold 

Yale Ph.B. 1863. 

Born in Boston, Mass., 1840; fitted for College at the 
Albany Academy; graduate of Sheffield Scientific 
School of Yale, 1863 : studied geology and chemistry at 
the Universities of Gottingen and Heidelberg and the 
Freiberg Mining Academy, 1863-67 ; engaged on the 
United States Geological Exploration of the 40th par- 
allel, 1867-78 ; attached to the United States Geological 
Survey since 1880. 

ARNOLD HAGUE, engaged in the work of 
the United States Geological .Sur\ey, was 
born in Boston, Massachusetts, December 3, 1840. 
His parents were William and Mary Bowditch 
(Moriarty) Hague. James Hague, the first repre- 
sentative of the family in the L'nited States, was the 
son of a clergyman in Scarboro, England. On the 
mother's side he is connected with one of the early 
New England families. Mr. Hague received his 
early education in the public schools of Boston, and 
fitted for College at the Albany Academy, graduat- 
ing from the Sheffield Scientific School of Yale in 
the Class of i S63. .After graduation he went abroad, 
and spent some years in the study of geology and 
chemistry at the Universities of Gottingen and 
Heidelberg and at the Mining Academy of Freiberg. 
Returning to America in 1S67, he joined the United 
States Geological E.xploration of the Fortieth Par- 
allel under Clarence King in May of that year. 
The exploration had been authorized by Congress 
to examine the country opened by the Pacific Rail- 
road. Mr. Hague served on the commission until 
1878, when he resigned. For two years he was 
engaged upon geological explorations in China, in 
the service of Li Hung Chang. Since 1880 he has 
been attached to the United States Geological Sur- 
vey as a Geologist, having had charge among other 
duties of the geological exploration of the Yellow- 




ARMOLD HAGUE 

Europe, and also of the University and Century 
Clubs of New York City and the Metropolitan Club 
of Washington. He married, November 14, 1S93, 
Mary Bruce Howe, daughter of George W. Robins 
of New York. They have no children. 



GREEN, Gervase 

Vale A.B. 1894, Ph.D. 1897. 

Born in England, 1869 ; early education Cowley Hill 
School, St. Helens, England, and Mount Hermon 
School. Mass.: graduated Yale, 1894 : Ph.D. Yale, 1897: 
Instructor in Philosophy, Yale, 1899. 

GERVASE GREEN, Ph.D., Instructor in Phil- 
osophy at Yale, was born December 27, 
1S69, at St. Helens, Lancashire, England. His 



236 



UNIVERSITIES JND THEIR SONS 



early education was acquired at the Cowley Hill John C.ies, having come to this country when a 
School of his native place and at the Mount Hcrmon youih, and later settled in Reisterstown, Maryland, 



School in Massachusetts. He was graduated from 
Yale with the Class of 1894, and was granted the 




G. GREEN 

Mason Fellowship. He spent the ne.xt three years 
as a post graduate student at the University, serving 
also as Lecturer in Philosophy during the last year. 
In 1897 he was given the degree of Doctor of Phil- 
osophy, and thereafter acted as Assistant in Philos- 
ophy and Pedagogy until March iSyy, when he was 
made Instructor in Philosophy. 



GIES, William John 

Yale Ph.B. 1894, Ph.D. 1897. 

Born in Reisterstown, Md., 1872 : received his early 
education in the public schools of Manheim, Penn., and 
the Manheim High School; graduate of Gettysburg 
College, 1893, with degree of B.S.; Yale Scientific 
School, Ph.B., 1894; graduate studies at Yale, 1894-97; 
Laboratory Assistant in Zoology there, 1895; Assistant 
in Chemistry since 1895; received degree of M.S. from 
Gettysburg, 1896 ; Instructor in Physiology, Yale, since 
1896; Ph.D., Yale, 1897. 

WILLI.AM JOHN GIES, Ph.D., Instructor 
in Physiology in the Sheffield Scientific 
School of Vale, is of German descent, his fiither, 



where \Villiam John Gies was born, February 21, 
1872. He received his early education in the 
]niblic schools of ^lanheim, Pennsylvania, and grad- 
uating from the Manheim High School in 1S88, 
entered Pennsylvania College, Gettysburg, in the 
following year, taking the degree of Bachelor of 
Sciences on the completion of his course in 1S93. 
On leaving Gettysburg he came to Vale, and after a 
year's study at the Sheffield Scientific School re- 
ceived the degree of Bachelor of Philosophy. The 
following three years were spent in graduate studies 
at Vale which conferred upon him the degree of 
Doctor of Philosophy in 1S97. In 1896 Gettysburg 
made him Master of Science. Dr. Gies has been 
engaged in teaching at Vale since 1895, when he 
was made Laboratory .-Assistant in Zoology under 
Professor Verrill. He was later made Assistant in 
Physiological Chemistry under Professor Ciiittenden, 
and has been Instructor in Physiology at the Shef- 
field School since 1896. During his course at 
Gettysburg he held various positions, among them 




W. J. GIES 

the Editorship of Spectrum and the College Monthly, 
and was a member of the Pen and Sword. At Yale 
he became a member of Sigma Xi. He is a Repub- 
lican in politics. 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



237 



GREGORY, Herbert Ernest 

Yale A.B. 1896. 

Born in Middle ville, Mich., 1869; received his early 
education at the public schools of Crete, Neb., and 
Gates Academy, Neligh, Neb. ; B.S. Gates College, 
i8go; Civil Engineer Boston & Maine Railroad, 1890-gi ; 
Instructor at Chadron Academy, 1891-93 ; Instructor 
at Gates College, 1893-95 : graduate of Yale, i8g6 ; Prin- 
cipal of New Haven Evening School, 1896-98; Assist- 
ant at Yale, 1896. 

HI:RBERT ERNEST GREGORY, B.S., As- 
sistant in Biology at Yale, was born in 
Middleville, Michigan, October 15, 1869. Through 
his father, George A. Gregory, he is a member of 




H. E. GREGORY 

the old Scotch Clan of McGregor. After losing 
property and position, one of his ancestors came 
to America and settled in Massachusetts, and from 
there the family moved to Erie county, New York, 
and tlien to Michigan. His mother, Jane .\nn 
Bross, comes of a Dutch family. He received his 
early education in the public schools of Crete, 
Nebraska, and fitted for College at the (iates .\cad- 
emy at Neligh, afterwards attending Gates College 
and graduating in 1S90 with the degree of Bachelor 
of Sciences. He was Business Manager of the Col- 
lege paper and of the foot-ball team there. Mr. 
Gregory did not permit lack of means to handicap 
him in securing a College education, and literally 



made his own way after he was eleven years of age. 
From 1890 to 1891 he was Civil Engineer on the 
Boston & Maine Railroad. For the next two years 
he was an Instructor at the Chadron Academy, of 
Chadron, Nebraska, and Instructor at Gates Col- 
lege from 1893 to 1895. He studied for a time at 
Yale, receiving the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 
1896. Since 1896 he has been an .Assistant in 
Biology at Yale. On his graduation from Yale he 
was for two years Principal of the New Haven 
Evening School. He became a member of Do- 
cendia and N.T.Q. at Gates College, and of the 
Glee Club, of which he was a Director for one year. 
He also belongs to the Phi Beta Kappa of Yale. 
In politics he is an Independent Democrat. 



LYMAN, Chester Smith 

Yale B.A. 1837. 
Born in Manchester, Conn , 1814 ; graduated at Yale, 
1837; studied theology at Union and Yale Seminaries; 
Pastor of a church in New Britain, Conn., 1843-45; 
spent several years in travel, visiting California and the 
Hawaiian Islands ; assisted in establishing the Shef- 
field Scientific School of Yale; Professor of Industrial 
Mechanics and Physics there, 1859-89 ; also of Astron- 
omy for several years and made Professor Emeritus, 
i88g; inventor of astronomical and optical instruments; 
author of numerous scientific papers ; died 1890. 

CHESTER SMITH LYMAN, A.M., Scientist, 
and Professor in the Scientific Department 
at Yale, was born in Manchester, Connecticut, Janu- 
ary 13, 1 8 14. A natural aptitude for astronomy and 
mathematics enabled him to obtain unaided a good 
knowledge of these subjects while yet a boy, and 
prior to entering upon his classical studies, he com- 
puted almanacs, calculated with exactness the occur- 
rence of eclipses for fifteen years to come, and 
constructed a number of astronomical and optical 
instruments. After taking his Bachelor's degree at 
Yale (1837) he took charge of the school in 
Ellington, Connecticut, remaining there two years, 
at the expiration of which time he began to prepare 
himself for the ministry, pursuing courses at Union 
and Yale Theological Seminaries. Installed in the 
Pastorate of the First Congregational Church, New- 
Britain, Connecticut, in 1843, he labored there until 
failing health compelled him to resign his charge in 
1S45, and the next few years were spent in travel, 
visiting among other places the Hawaiian Islands, 
where he explored the region about the crater of 
Kilauea, and was for a short time Principal of the 
Royal School at Honolulu. From 1S47 to 1S50 he 
was engaged in surveying in California, and his ac- 



238 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



count of the discovery of gold upon the Pacific 
coast was one of the first reliable reports of that 
event received in the East. Returning to New 
England, he busied himself with literary pursuits 
relating to science until 1858, when he became 
actively concerned in the establishment of the 
Sheffield Scientific School of Yale, and in the fol- 
lowing year he joined its Faculty as Professor of 
Industrial Mechanics and Physics. He subsequently 
took the Chair of Astronomy which he later filled 
exclusively, having retired from other departments, 
and the year previous to his death, which occurred 
in 1890, he was made Professor Emeritus. Pro- 
fessor Lyman was made a Master of Arts by Beloit 
College (Wisconsin) in 1864. He made some 
interesting discoveries in relation to celestial bod- 
ies, and was the inventor of several improved as- 
tronomical and optical instruments, including a 
combined zenith telescope and transit for latitude, 
longitude and time, apparatuses for illustrating the 
dynamics of ocean waves, and for describing acous- 
tic curves, and improved the compensating pendu- 
lum, and the clock escapement. He was President 
of the Connecticut Academy of Arts and Sciences 
in 1857 and again in 1877; was a member of sev- 
eral other learned bodies and an honorary member 
of the British .Association for the Advancement of 
Science. He was a frequent contributor to the 
scientific periodicals, and to the New Englander, 
and revised the definitions of scientific terms in the 
1864 edition of Webster's Dictionary. 



KELLOGG, Clifford Walcott 

Yale M.D. 1896. 
Born in Hartford, Conn., i860 ; fitted for College at 
the Hartford High School; graduated, Yale Medical 
School, 1896; on the staff of the New Haven Hospital 
two years; Assistant in Histology and Gynecology at 
Yale, 1896-97. 

CLIFFORD WALCOTT KELLOGG, M.D., 
.Assistant in the Medical School at Yale, 
was born in Hartford, Connecticut, July 27, i860. 
He is a son of Bela H. Kellogg and grandson of 
George W. Walcott, M.D. (Yale 1824). The 
family was originally Scotch, settling in Montague, 
Massachusetts, early in the last century. His 
mother, Elizabeth Kinne Walcott, was a descendant 
of John .Abbe of Wenham, England, who settled in 
Salem, Massachusetts in 1637. He received his 
early education in the public schools and the Hart- 
ford High School, graduating from the latter in the 
Class of 1876. Deciding to follow the medical pro- 



fession, he entered the Medical Department of Yale, 
taking his degree June 24, 1896. He was employed 
for nearly two years on the staff of the New Haven 
Hospital, and has since been a practising physician 
in New Haven, Connecticut. He held for one 
year following his graduation the post of Assistant 
in the Diseases of Women and Assistant in His- 
tology at the Yale Medical School. While at Yale 
Dr. Kellogg was a member of the Skull and Scepter 
and was President of the Society during 1 895-1 896. 
He was married October 30, 1895, to Edith Ray- 
mond of New Haven, Connecticut. They have one 




C. \V. KELLOGG 

child, Elizabeth Walcott Kellogg. In 1896 he was 
elected a member of the American Microscopical 
Society. He is not actively interested in political 
questions. 

HOPTON, Lemuel Robert 

Yale Ph.B. 1896. 
Born in West Stratford, Conn., 1873 : graduated Yale 
Scientific School, 1896 ; engaged in post-graduate work 
at the school, for the degree of M.E., and also acting 
as Instructor in Mechanical Engineering. 

LEMUEL ROBERT HOPTON, M.E., In- 
structor in Mechanical Engineering at Yale, 
was born in West Stratford, Connecticut, June 20, 
1873. His parents were Thomas and .Ann (Dixon) 
Hopton, and he is of Scotch English ancestry. He 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



239 



attended in youth the pubUc schools of New Haven, 
Connecticut and prepared for College under private 
tutors, entering the Sheffield Scientific School of Vale 
in 1893, and graduating in 1896. On his gradua- 




L. R. HOPTON 

tion he entered upon a post-graduate course of study 
for the degree of Mechanical Engineer, and was also 
an Assistant Instructor in Mechanical Engineering. 
Mr. Hopton has also had considerable business 
experience, having spent three years in the employ 
of the E. S. Wheeler Company of New Haven. He 
is a member of Sigma Delta Xi and Sigma Xi, and 
also cf the Engineers' Club of New Haven, and is 
unmarried. In politics he is a firm adherent of the 
Republican party. 



LOUNSBURY, Thomas Raynesford 

Yale B.A. 1859, M.A. 1887, LL.D. 1892 and Harvard 1893. 
Born in Ovid, N. Y. 1838; fitted for College at pri- 
vate schools; B.A. Yale, 1859; assisted in preparation 
of Appleton's New American Cyclopaedia, 1859-62; 
served throughout the Civil War as a member of the 
126th New York Volunteers : Instructor in English, 
Sheffield Scientific School, 1869-71; Professor since 
1871 ; Librarian Sheffield Scientific School. 

TH()M.\S R.AVNESFORD LOUNSBURY, 
r.I,.D., L.H.l)., Professor of English at 
Sheffield Scientific School of Vale and Librarian of 



the Sheffield Librarj', was bom in Ovid, New York, 
in 1838, and received there his early education and 
fitted for College there, entering Yale in 1855 and 
graduating in 1859 with the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts. He went to New York on his graduation and 
became associated with the editorial staff engaged 
in the preparation of .Appleton's New American 
Cyclopaedia. He joined the One Hundred and 
Twenty-Sixth New York Volunteers in 1862, and 
served throughout the war. His connection with 
the Faculty of the Sheffield Scientific School dates 
from 1869, when he was made Instructor in Eng- 
lish. He has been Professor of English there since 
1 871, and has also been for many years in charge 
of the Library of the School. Professor I.ounsbury 
is recognized as one of the highest authorities on 
the English Language and Literature in America. 
Probably the best known of his works are History 
of the English Language, and Life of Cooper. His 
Studies in Chaucer attracted wide-spread attention. 
Professor Brander Matthews, writing in the Century 
Magazine for February, 1898, and speaking of this 
latter work says, ■' By all it was accepted as the 




T. R. LOUKSBL'RY 



most important contribution to the great unwritten 
history of English Literature." Professor Louns- 
bury super\ised the preparation of a standard edi- 
tion of Chaucer's Pariiament of Foules in 1S77. 



240 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



He has also been a frequent contributor to the 
pages of the New Englander, the Atlantic Monthly 
and other standard magazines. 



McCABE, Edward Michael 

Yale M.D. 1887. 
Born in New Haven, Conn., 1863; attended Hill- 
house High School, New Haven ; graduated Man- 
hattan College, New York City, 1884 ; Yale Medical 
School, 1887; studied at Rotunda Hospital, Dublin, 
Ireland ; House Physician at St. Vincent's Hospital, 
New York City, 1888-1889; Assistant Surgeon at the 
New York Eye and Ear Infirmary; Assistant at Yale 
1897- 

EDWARD MICHAEL McCABE, M.D., Assist- 
ant in the Medical Department of Yale, 
was born in New Haven, Connecticut, December 
12, 1863. He is the son of Edward McCabe and 
Bridget (Conlan) McCabe. -At the Hillhouse High 
School of New Haven, he was prepared for College, 
anil in i S80 he entered Manhattan College, New 
York City. He graduated there in 1884, and at 
once matriculated at the Yale Medical School. He 
received the degree of Doctor of Medicine from 
Yale in 1887. His practical study was at the St. 
Yincent Hospital of New York City, and at the 
Rotunda Hospital of Dublin, Ireland, where he 
spent about two years after graduation. At the St. 
Yincent Hos|)ital, he occupied the position of House 
Physician from 1888 to 1889. From 1891 Dr. 
McCabe was .Assistant Surgeon in the New York 
Eye and Err Infirmary, until 1S97, when he went 
to Yale as Assistant in Clinical Ophthalmology in 
the Medical Department. He married Susan T. 
Sheehan, March 2, 1897. 



NICHOLS, George Warner 

Vale A.B. 1835. 
Born in Fairfield, Herkimer county, N. Y., 1817; 
graduated Yale, 1835; student at the General Theologi- 
cal Seminary, N. Y. ; ordained Deacon of the Protest- 
ant Episcopal Church 1837, ^rid Priest, 1841 ; held 
rectorships in various places and was for three years 
Associate Rector of the Church of the Messiah, Brook- 
lyn, N. Y. ; D.D. St. Stephens. 

GEORGE WARNER NICHOLS, D.D., Clergy- 
man, was born in Fairfield, Herkimer 
county, New York, May 12, 181 7, the son of the 
Rev. Samuel and Susan Nexsen (\Varner) Nichols. 
His paternal great-grandfather, George \\'arner, who 
served in the New York Assembly a number of 
years, was a prominent Episcopal layman, being for 
some time a vestryman of Trinity Church, New 



York. He married Magdalen Waldegravc, a rep- 
resentative of a distinguished family, whose burial 
vault is located in St. Paul's Churchyard, New York. 
Marble tablets to the memory of George ^Varner 
and his son Effingham were placed on the interior 
walls of St. Paul's Church. Effingham Howard 
Warner, an uncle of the subject of this sketch, was 
a successful New York merchant and one of the 
founders of St. Bartholomew's Church. Having 
attended the Academy in Bedford, New York, and 
Judge Jay's private school in the same town, George 
W. Nichols entered Yale, from which he was grad- 




GF.ORGE W. NICHOLS 

uated in 1S35, and almost immediately became a 
student at the General Theological Seminary, New 
York City. He was ordained a Deacon of the 
Protestant Episcopal Church at his father's church 
in Bedford in 1837, Bishop Onderdonk officiating, 
and to the Priesthood in Christ Church, Redtling, 
Connecticut, by Bishop Brownell, four years later. 
He held rectorships for different lengths of time in 
Litchfield, East Haddam, and East Haven, Connec- 
ticut, and for three years he was associated with the 
Rev. George E. Thrall, D.D., at the Church of the 
Messiah, Brooklyn, New York. For some years Dr. 
Nichols has lived in retirement. He was a member 
of the Society of the Brothers in Unity at Yale and 
also of the Yale'.Alumni of Fairfield county, Con- 
necticut. He has written a history of his life-work, 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



241 



Letters from Waldegrave Cottage (two volumes 
illustrated) ; and has also published a volume of 
-Miscellanies and Sermons. He married Elizabeth 
Ray Lott, of Xew York. 



PUTNAM, James Osborne 

Yale Class of 1839, M.A. 1865. 
Born in Attica, N. Y., 1818; Yale, Class of 1839; 
studied law and practised in Buffalo, N. Y. for many 
years; State Senator, 1854-55; Presidential Elector, 
i860; U. S. Consul at Havre, France, 1861-66; U. S. 
Minister to Belgium, 1880-82; U. S. Delegate to the 
International Industrial Congress at Paris, 1881 ; prom- 
inently identified with the public institutions of Buffalo ; 
a member of the Buffalo University Council for over 
fifty years, and its present Chancellor. 

JAMES OSBORNE PUTNAM, M.A., Lawyer 
and Diplomatist, was born in Attica, New 
York, July 4, 18 18, son of the Hon. Harvey and 
Myra (Osborne) Putnam. He is a lineal descendant 
of John Putnam, who emigrated from Bucking- 
hamshire, England, in 1634, settling in Salem, 
Massachusetts, and on the maternal side he is a 
great-grandson of Colonel Benjamin Symonds, of 
Williamstown, ^NLissachusetts, an officer of the Rev- 
olution. From the Middlebury Academy, Xew York, 
he entered Hamilton College, remaining there 
through his Sophomore year, after which he entered 
the Junior class of Yale of 1839. His legal studies 
were pursued under the direction of his father, who 
was a prominent lawyer of Attica, and he was ad- 
mitted to the Bar in 1841 and located in Buffalo. 
In 1844 he was appointed Secretary and Treasurer 
of the Attica & Buffalo and in 1846 of the Buffalo 
& Rochester Railroad Companies, and was their 
attorney until their consolidation with the New 
York Central Railroad. He was appointed Post- 
master of Buffalo by President Fillmore. He served 
in the State Senate in 1854-1855, and was the 
author and defender of the Church Property Bill of 
1855. .-Although a Conservative Whig, he earnestly 
opposed the introduction of slavery into the ter- 
ritories and was one of the two Lincoln State 
Electors-at-Iarge of New York in 1S60. He was 
appointed L'nited States Consul at Havre, France, 
by President Lincoln, holding the position during 
the Civil War. Paris was a rallying point for loyal 
American citizens on the Continent, and Mr. Put- 
nam was frequently called to the Capital on patriotic 
occasions. He wrote the address of American 
Citizens abroad, to their government, at the time of 
Lincoln's -assassination. He delivered a notable 
oration in Paris on Washington's birthday in 1S66. 

VOL. III. — 16 



In 1880 he was recalled to the foreign service by 
President Hayes, who appointed him United States 
Minister to Belgium, where he remained two years. 
In 1 88 1 he was appointed by the President a dele- 
gate to the International Industrial Property Con- 
gress held in Paris. Soon after his return home he 
was appointed by Governor Dix a member of the 
State Board of Charities, which he was not able to 
accept. He has been long identified with educa- 
tional and charitable institutions of Buffalo. For 
more than fifty years he has been a member of the 
Council of the L'niversity of Buffalo and is its pres- 




JAMES O. PLTN.Ail 

ent Chancellor. .A sketch of Mr. Putnam in a vol- 
ume of Men of New York, says of him : " Beginning 
life when the century was young, Mr. Putnam has 
passed through a youth of ambition and preparation, 
a manhood of struggle and achievement, an age of 
dignity and honor. Throughout his long career 
he has been an intellectual and moral force, ever 
strongly exeited in behalf of right. By pen and 
voice and personal effort he has helpeil fonvard the 
good work of the world. The graces and charm of 
his oratory linger in the memor)- of thousands. .-X 
volume of his orations and addresses published in 
1880 shows the wide range of his sympathy, the 
soundness of his judgment, the nobility of his 
ideals."' He is a member of the Buffalo Historical 



242 



UNIVERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



Society, and of the University and Saturn Clubs of 
that city. Yale gave him the degree of Master of 
Arts in 1865. Mr. I'utnam has been twice married. 
On January 5, 1842, he married Harriet Foster 
Pahner, of Buffalo, who died May 3, 1853, and tlic 
children of that union are : George Palmer, Harriet 
Osborne, and .Anna Jeannette Putnam, who is now 
Mrs. Robert Keating. His second wife, whom he 
married March 15, 1855, was Kate Frances Wright, 
daughter of the Rev. Worthington Wright, of Wood- 
stock, Vermont, and his children by this marriage 
are : Kate Elizabeth, Dr. James Wright, Harvey 
Worthington, and Rev. Frank Curtis Putnam. 



WALDEN, Percy Talbot 

Yale Ph.B. 1892, Ph.D. 1896. 
Born in Brooklyn, N. Y., i86g ; graduated, Yale Scien- 
tific School, 1892; graduate student there till i8g6; 
Assistant in Chemistry, 1892-94; Instructor in that De- 
partment to the present time; Ph.D., Yale, 1896. 

PIIRCV '1 AI.HOT W.ALDEX, Ph.D., Chemist, 
Instructor at the Sheffield Scientific School 
of Vale, was born in Brooklyn, New York, June 29, 
1869, son of Daniel T. and Caroline .A. S. (\\'il- 
liams) W'aldcn. The first .American ancestor of the 
W'aldens, who are of English origin, emigrated to 
Portsmouth, New Hampshire, and of the ^\■illiams 
family, one branch resided originally in Rhode 
Island and another in Pennsylvania. His early 
educational advantages were excellent, having at- 
tended the public school in District Number Eleven, 
Brooklyn, the .Adelphia Academy, and the Brooklyn 
Polytechnic Institute, previous to entering the 
Scientific Department of Yale, wliere he took his 
first degree with the Class of 1892, and remaining 
there as a graduate student for the ensuing four 
years, he received the degree of Doctor of Philoso- 
phy, in 1896. From 1892 to 1894 he acted as an 
Assistant in the Chemical Laboratory, and receiving 
in the latter year the appointment of Instructor in 
that Department, he is still serving in that capacity. 
Dr. Walden is a member of tlie Chi Phi and the 
Sigma Zeta fraternities, and of the Graduates' Club, 
New Haven. Politically he acts with the Demo- 
cratic party in National issues. 



WATROUS, George Button 

Yale B.A. 1879. 
Born in New Haven, Conn., 1858; attended Hopkins 
Grammar School; received four degrees from Yale, 
B.A., 1879; LL.B., 1883; M.L., 1884; D.C.L., 1890; 
studied law one year at Columbia Law School ; 
taught school at Litchfield, Conn., 1879; began practice 



of law in New Haven, 1883; Instructor in Yale Law 
School, 1886-92 ; Asst. Prof. 1892-95; Professor in Yale 
Law School. 1895; Councilman and Alderman in New 
Haven; Director in New Haven Public Library; Sec- 
retary State Bar Examining Committee, 1894. 

GEORGE DUTI'ON WATROUS, M.L., 
D.C.I,., Professor in the Law School of \'n\e, 
w.is born in New Haven, Connecticut, September 
18, 1858. His father, George Henry Watrous, was 
a graduate of Yale, a lawyer of New Haven, and for 
many years President of the New York, New Haven 
& Hartford Railroad. His grandfather was Kent 



4^ ^ 




GEORGE D. WAIROUS 

Professor of Law at Yale and Governor of Con- 
necticut. His mother was Harriet Joy (Dutton) 
Watrous. He was prepared for College at the Hop- 
kins Grammar School in his native city. From 
there he entered Yale and graduated with the Class 
of 1879, taking the degree of Bachelor of Arts. 
After a year's teaching in Litchfield, Connecticut, he 
returned to New Haven in 1880. The next year 
was spent at the Yale Law School and the year 
after at the Columbia Law School, in New York 
City. He then spent a year abroad and returned 
in 1883, receiving the degree of Bachelor of Laws 
from Yale. He continued his work at the Yale Law 
School during the next year and was made Master 
of Law in 1884. Since 1883 he has been in the 
jjractice of law at New Haven, and during the time 



tlNIFERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



243 



he has held a number of important positions, among 
others those of Director in and Counsel for several 
local corporations. In 1886-188 7 he was Instructor 
in the Vale Law School, in 1892, Assistant Professor 
and since 1895 he has held the position of Professor 
in that institution. In 1890 the University con- 
ferred upon him the degree of Doctor of Civil Law, 
thus making a total of four degrees conferred upon 
him in eleven years. Besides the offices mentioned 
Professor Watrous has held the positions of Council- 
man for one year in New Haven, Alderman for two 
years, and Director of the Free Public Library of 
New Haven for three years. Since 1894 he has 
been Secretary of the Connecticut State Bar Ex- 
amining Committee. He is a member of many 
clubs and societies, among them are Delta Kappa, 
'H Boiv\»;, A.K.E., and the Wolfs Head of Yale ; 
Phi Delta Phi-Corbey Court-of the Law School and 
the D.K.E. Club and the L^niversity Club of New 
York City, and the Graduates' Club, the Union 
League and the Young Men's Republican Club of 
New Haven. He married June 7, 1888, Bertha 
Agnes Downer. He has five children : Wheeler de 
Forest, Charlotte Root, George Dutton, Katherine 
Eliot and Charles Ansel Watrous. 



MERRIMAN, Mansfield 

Yale Ph.B. 1871, C.E. 1872, Ph.D. 1876. 
Born in Southington, Conn., 1848: graduated, Yale 
Scientific School, 1871 ; Instructor in Engineering 
there the following year; Assistant in the U. S Corps 
of Engineers till 1874 ; Assistant in Civil Engineering 
at Yale Scientific School till 1877; Instructor in same 
Department and in Astronomy till 1878; Professor 
of Civil and Mechanical Engineering at Lehigh Uni- 
versity, 1877 ; Acting Assistant on the U. S. Coast and 
Geodetic Survey, 1880. 

MANSFIELD MERRIM.W, Ph.D., Civil 
Engineer and sometime Instructor in the 
Sheffield Scientific School of Yale, was born in 
Southington, Connecticut, March 27, 1848. .-Kfter 
taking the degree of Civil Engineer at the Sheffield 
Scientific School, Yale in 1872, and acting as In- 
structor in Engineering there the succeeding year, 
he entered the United States Engineer Corps as an 
.Assistant. Returning to Yale in 1874 as .Assistant 
in Civil Engineering and also as an advanced stu- 
dent, he received the degree of Doctor of Philos- 
ophy in 1S76 for meritorious post-graduate work, 
and in 1877-1878 he was Instructor in Civil En- 
gineering and in .Astronomy. In 1878 he accepted 
the Chair of Civil and Mechanical Engineering at 
Lehigh University, and in 1S80 was appointed an 



Acting Assistant on the United States Coast and 
Geodetic Survey. Professor Merriman holds mem- 
bership in the American Philosophical Society, the 
American Society of Civil Engineers and other 
scientific organizations, both in the United States 
and Europe. He has published a number of books 
relative to his special line of work. 



JONES, Louis Cleveland 

Yale B.A. 1896. 
Born in Oak Hill, N. Y., 1871 ; graduated Yale, i8g5; 
Assistant in Kent Chemical Laboratory since 1896. 

LOUIS CLEVELAND JONES, .Assistant at 
Yale, was born in the little village of Oak 
Hill, New York, December 25, 1871. His father, 




L. C. JONES 

Daniel Sutherland Jones, was of Welsh ancestry, 
and his mother, Julia Ellen Cleveland, of French- 
Puritan. He received his early education in the 
district schools in the neighborhood of his native 
place, and entered Yale in 1892, graduating in 1S96 
with the degree of Bachelor of -Arts. Since 1S96 
has been .Assistant to Professor F. A. Goreb in the 
Kent Chemical Laboratory at the University. He 
is a member of the Phi Beta Kappa, and is a 
Republican on the political questions of the day, 
being especially ant.agonistic to the free silver 
policy. 



H4 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



WHITE, Albert Beebe 

Yale B.A. 1893. 

Bom in Holbrool;, Mass., 1871 ; attended Latin 
School at Boston, Mass.; graduated at Yale, 1893: 
received Ph.D. degree from Yale; taught at Siglar's 
Preparatory School, Newburgh, N. Y., 1893-95; Lec- 
turer on History at Yale, 1898; now Instructor in 
History at the University of Minnesota. 

ALBERT BEEBE WHI IE, Ph.D., Instructor 
in History at Yale, was born in Holbrook, 
Massachusetts, September 11, 1871. He is the 
son of Edmund and Sarah (Beebe) White, and 
through them is descended from Enghsh and 




ALBERT BEEBE WHITE 

Scotch famihes which came to America as early as 
1630. As a boy he attended the public schools of 
his native town and later went to Boston to prepare 
for College at the Boston Latin School. He gradu- 
ated there in 1889 and entered Yale the same year. 
At Yale he had four years' work in the .\cademic 
Department and graduated with the degree of 
Bachelor of .^rts in 1893. He then accepted a 
position as teacher in Siglar's Preparatory School at 
Newburgh, New York, where he remained until 
1895. Since 1895 he has been a graduate student 
at Yale and has taken the degree of Doctor of 
Philosophy in History. For the past year he was 
Lecturer on History at Yale, taking the place of 
Professor George B. Adams during the absence of 



the latter abroad. He was then called to the 
Instructorship in Mediaeval and English Consti- 
tutional History at the University of Minnesota, 
which position he has accepted. Mr. White was 
made a member of the Phi Beta Kappa Society at 
Yale in his Senior year in College. He married 
October 1, 1893, Mabel NVhite Jones. 



WURTS, John 

Yale LL.B. 1884. M.A. 1887. 
Born in Carbondale, Penn., 1855 ; studied at Hopkins 
Grammar School, New Haven ; graduated, Yale Law 
School, 1884; practised law in Jacksonville, Fla. ; ap- 
pointed Professor in Yale Law School, 1896. 

JOHN WURTS, M.A., Professor of Law in the 
Yale Law School, was born in Carbondale, 
Pennsylvania, July 10, 1S55. His parents were 
Charles Pemberton and Laura (Day) Wurts. At 
the Hopkins Grammar School, New Haven, Con- 
necticut, he received his early education and 
preparation for LIniversity work. From that school 
he entered the Law Department of Yale and 
graduated with the degree of Bachelor of Laws in 
1884. He at once opened a law practice in Jack- 
sonville, Florida, which he continued until 1896, 
when he received an appointment as Professor in 
the Yale Law School. He remains in that office at 
the present time. In 1897 he received the degree 
of Master of .Vrts from Yale. He has taken no 
active part in politics. He married, June 26, 1878, 
Florence La Tourette. He has five children : John 
Conrad, Bertha, Albert, Laura Burkhardl and 
Eleanor Wurts. 



CHRISTIE, Cornelius 

Yale B.A. 1855. 
Born in Bergen Co., N. J., 1835; graduated at Yale, 
1855 ; studied law in Trenton, N. J., the Harvard Law 
School, and at Jersey City; admitted to the Bar, i860; 
located in Jersey City: published the New Jersey 
Citizen, 1870-76; member of Assembly, 1867-68 ; Mayor 
of Leonia, N. J., 1894 to present time. 

CORNELIUS CHRLSrii:, M.A., Mayor of 
Leonia, New Jersey, was born in that place, 
Bersfen county, December 6, 1835, son of David 
and .Anna (Brinkerhoff) Christie. He is of Scotclj 
and Dutch origin and a descendant on the paternal 
side of James Christie, of Aberdeen, Scotland, 
through the latter's son, William, his great-grand- 
father, and James Christie, his grandfather. On the 
maternal side he is a descendant in the seventh 
generation of Joris Dericksen Brinkerhoff, who 



UNIFERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



245 



emigrated from Holland in 1738, and the line is 
traced through Hendrick Jorisen, Jacobus, Jacob 
and Albert Brinkerhoff, to his mother, Anna (Brink- 
erhoff) Christie. Cornelius Christie attended the 




C. CHRISTIE 

common schools and after comi)leting his College 
preparation under the care of the Rev. Dr. Mabon, 
he entered Yale, from which he was graduated with 
the Class of 1S55. The succeeding three years he 
devoted to the study of law, which was begun at 
Trenton, New Jersey, continued at the Harvard 
Law School, and completed in Jersey City, where he 
was admitted to the Bar in i860, and he immedi- 
ately engaged in practice. He was a member of 
the State Assembly in 1S67-186S, and from 1S70 to 
1876 he published in Hackensack, New Jersey the 
New Jersey Citizen, a weekly independent Dem- 
ocratic newspaper. Since retiring from journalism 
he has given liis attention to his law practice and to 
local public affairs, with which he is prominently 
identified. The Borough of Leonia was incorporated 
in 1S94 in whicli year he was elected its first Mayor, 
and has ever since continued in office through sub- 
sequent re-elections. He has also held other posi- 
tions of public trust. Politically Mayor Christie is 
an Independent Democrat, and in i S96 was a 
candidate for .Assembly man on the National Dem- 
ocratic ticket. 



H 



WELLS, Horace Lemuel 

Yale Ph.B. 1877, M.A. 1896. 
Born in New Britain, Conn., 1855 ; graduated, Yale 
Scientific School, 1877; graduate student, 1877-78; 
Chemist in Connecticut Agricultural Experiment 
Station, 1878-80; Chemist for a Colorado Coal and Iron 
Company, 1880-84: Instructor in Analytical Chemistry 
at Yale, 1884-88; Assistant Professor of Chemistry, 
1888-93; Professor of Analytical Chemistry and Metal- 
lurgy since 1893. 

ORACE LEMUEL \VELI„S, MA., Professor 
of Analytical Chemistry and Metallurgy in 
the Sheffield Scientific School of Yale, was born in 
New Britain, Connecticut, October 5, 1855. His 
parents Levi Sedgwick and Harriet (Francis) U'ells, 
were descended from early New England families. 
At the public schools of his native city, Mr. Wells 
was prepared for University work. At Yale he 
elected the scientific studies of the Sheffield School, 
and after a course there of special work in chemistry 
he graduated with the degree of Bachelor of Phil- 
osophy in 1877. He continued his work at the 
school through one year of post-graduate study. He 
then commenced his professional career as chemist 
to the Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station. 




HORACE L. WKI.LS 

In 1880 he resigned that position to go West as 
Chemist to the Colorado Coal and Iron Company 
of Pueblo, Colorado. He remained there until 
1884, and then returned East to accept an appoint- 



246 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



ment as Instructor in Analytical Chemistry at the 
Sheffield Scientific School. In iSSS he was made 
Assistant Professor of the same subject and since 
1893 he has been Professor of Analytical Chemistry 
and Metalhirgy. In politics he votes independently. 
He married Sarah Lonl Gritifin, October 7, 1896. 



SMITH, Frank Sullivan 

Yale B.A. 1872. 
Born in Short Tract, Allegany Co., N. Y., 1851 ; 
graduated Yale, 1872; admitted to the Bar 1876; en- 
gaged in practice in Angelica, New York; has been 
connected with various railroad companies as counsel 
and official ; now practising in New York City. 

FR.WK SULLIVAN SMITH, Lawyer, was 
born in Short Tract, Allegany county, New 
York, October 14, 185 i, son of Dr. William M. and 
Adeline (Weeks) Smith. He is a descendant of 
William Smith, who emigrated from Cheshire, 
England, on board the ship Expectation in 1635, 
and of Captain Hans Van Blarcom, one of the early 
Dutch settlers of New Amsterdam ; is a great-great- 
grandson of Benajah House, of Sandisfield, Massa- 
chusetts, a Captain in the Continental Army during 
the Revolutionary War, and a grandson of Reuben 
H. Smith, who served in the War of 1812. His 
fatiier was a surgeon in the Civil War, held the 
appointment of Surgeon General on the staff of 
Governor John A. Dix, and was Health Officer at 
the port of New York from 1880 to 1892. From 
the Angelica Academy he entered Yale, from which 
he was graduated with the Class of 1872, sub- 
sequently studying law with Messrs. Richardson & 
Flenagin, of Angelica, and was admitted to the Bar 
in Rochester, New York, April 7, 1876. P^ntering 
into partnership with his preceptors, under the firm 
name of Richardson, Flenagin & Smith, the concern 
was later known as Richardson & Smith, and he 
afterward became a member of the firm of Smith, 
Rockwell & Dickson which is now Smith & Dickson. 
Besides his profitable legal business in Angelica, he 
was counsel for the Buffalo, New York & Philadel- 
phia Railway Company from 1S82 to 1887; Presi- 
dent of the Allegany Central Railroad Company 
1881-1883; Vice-President and General Counsel 
of tlie Lackawanna & Pittsburg Railroad Company 
1 883-1 886 ; General Counsel for the Scioto Valley 
& New England Railroad Company 1 889-1 890 and 
for the Rome & Decatur Railroad Company 1891- 
1892 ; Vice-President and General Counsel of The 
Central New York & Western Railroad Company 
1892-1899 J and was Counsel for the Receivers of 



the Richmond & Danville Railroad Company 1894- 
1895. He is now \'icc-l'resident and Cleneral Coun- 
sel of The Pittsburg, Shawmut & Northern Railroad 
Company. In 1887 Mr. Smith opened an office in 
Wall Street, New York, still retaining, however, his 
connection witli the firm in Angelica, and is still i)rac- 
tising in the metropolis. When the Law School was 
established at Cornell Lhiiversity he was solicited by 
the Trustees to become its Dean, but declined, 
preferring to devote his time exclusively to the 
practice of his profession. From 1873 'o 1876 he 
served as School Commissioner for the First Dis- 




IKANK SULLIVAN SMITH 

trict of Allegany County; was Assistant District 
Attorney there for four years ; Supervisor of Angeli- 
ca in 188 1 ; a delegate to the Republican National 
Convention in 1884; State Committeeman for the 
Thirty-fourth Congressional District in 1887 and 
1888; and from 1887 to 1891 was Secretary of the 
Republican State Committee. He is a member oi 
the Loyal Legion and the Alpha Delta Phi fraternity, 
and the Society of Medical Jurisprudence ; the 
University, Yale and Barnard Clubs, New York; 
the City Club, Olean ; the Triton Fish and Game 
Club, Quebec, Canada ; and the Brookland Fishing 
Club. On October 17, 1877, he married Clara 
A. H., daughter of the late O. T. Higgins, Esq., of 
Rushford, New York. 



UNIVERSiriES AND rHEIR SONS 



247 



ELDER, Herbert 

Princeton A.B. 1887. 
Born in Harrisburg, Penn., 1864; fitted for College in 
Harrisburg Academy; graduated, Princeton, Class of 
1887 ; studied law for three years, and was admitted to 
the Dauphin County Bar in 1891 ; was a partner in the 
firm of Eutrekin-Elder Electric Company until 1895, 
since then has carried on the business under his own 
name, having bought out the interest of his partner. 

HERBERT ELDER, Merchant, was born in 
Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, October 14, 
1864, son of John and Mary Jane (Rutherford) 



Clinton, New Jersey. They have two children : 
Eleanor Rutherford and J. Charles Bloom Elder. 




HERBERT ELDER 

Elder, both parents being of Scotch-Irish descent. 
He received his early education in public schools 
and at Harrisburg Academy and then took the 
Academic course at Princeton, from which he 
graduated in the Class of 1887. In September of 
that year he entered tlie law office of Hall & Jordan, 
where he studied for three years, and was admitted 
to Dauphin County Bar in March 1891. Until 
August, 1895, he was a partner in the firm of 
Eutrekin-Elder Electric Company, but at that time 
he bought out the interests of his partner, and has 
since then carried on the business under his own 
name in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. He is a mem- 
ber of the Dauphin Co\mty Historical Society. In 
politics, lie is a Republican. He was married on 
December 10, 1891, to Efifie Matilda Conover, of 



DICKERSON, Mahlon 

Princeton A B. 1789. 
Born in Morris Co., N. J., 1771 ; graduated Prince- 
ton, 1789; licensed as an attorney, 1793; admitted to 
the Pennsylvania Bar, 1797; Common Councilman of 
Philadelphia ; Commissioner of Bankruptcy, 1802 ; Ad- 
jutant-General, 1805-08 ; City Recorder, 1808-10: Mem- 
ber of the New Jersey Legislature, 1812-13 ; appointed 
Justice of the Supreme Court, 1813 ; Governor of New 
Jersey, 1815-16; U. S. Senator, 1817-33; Secretary of 
the Navy, 1834-38; Judge of the U. S. District Court, 
1840-44; President of the American Institute, New 
York ; died 1853. 

MAHLON DICKERSON, Statesman, was 
born in Morris county. New Jersey in 
1771. He was of English origin and his first 
American ancestor, Philemon Dickerson, who with 
his brothers arrived in Massachusetts in 1638, was 
made a freeman in 1641 at Salem, from whence he 
removed to Southold, Long Island, in 1672. The 
sons of Philemon were Peter and Thomas Dicker- 
son, and the latter's four sons, one of whom was 
the grandfather of Mahlon, all located in Morris 
county. New Jersey, about the year 1745. His 
father, Jonathan Dickerson, became a man of 
affluence and at his death he left a valuable estate. 
Mahlon Dickerson graduated at Princeton in 1789, 
and in the following year accompanied Captain 
Kinney's mounted troop on an expedition to subdue 
the whiskey insurrection in Pennsylvania. Subse- 
quently taking up the study of law, he was licensed 
as an attorney in 1793. Four years later he was 
admitted to the Bar in Philadelphia, where he 
entered with spirit into public affairs as an ardent 
Republican, being at one time a member of the 
Common Council. He was appointed a Commis- 
sioner of Bankruptcy by President Jefferson in 1S02, 
and commissioned Adjutant-General by Gover- 
nor M'Kean in 1805, holding the latter post until 
appointed City Recorder in 1S08. In 18 10 he re- 
turned to Morris county, New Jersey, in order to 
manage in person the large estate left by his father, 
and continuing his interest in politics was elected 
to the House of .Assembly of that state in 181 2. and 
re-elected the ensuing year. Ajipointed a Justice of 
the Supreme Court in 1813, he resigned from the 
bench in 1S15 to take the dual office of Governor 
and Chancellor, to which he was re-elected for a 
second term, and entering the L'nited States Senate 
in 1S17, he served in that body continuously till 



248 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



1833. The Russian Mission was offered to and 
accepted by him in the spring of 1834, but for 
political reasons he at length decided to remain at 
home ; and entering President Jackson's Cabinet as 




M. DICKERSON 

Secretary of the Navy, he retained that office for 
four years. From 1840 to 1844 he was Judge of 
the United States District Court, and his retirement 
from that honorable post concluded his public 
career. Judge Dickerson was subsequently for two 
years President of the .'\merican Institute, New 
York. He died in Suckasunny, Morris county, New 
Jersey, in 1853, leaving a large fortune, but having 
never married, he left no posterity. 



CROSS, John Miller 

Princeton A.B. 1867, A.M. 
Born in Baltimore, Md., 1846; fitted for College in 
the private school of George G.Carey at Baltimore; 
graduated Princeton, Class of 1867 ; was Assistant 
Principal of G. G. Carey's School, 1867-70; entered 
Princeton Theological Seminary as a student in 1870. 
and graduated in 1873; spent the following year at the 
Seminary as a post-graduate student : appointed Tutor 
in Greek at Princeton in 1873, remaining there until 
1875; from 1876 to 1878 was Associate Professor in 
Latin and Greek, from 1878 to 1880 Assistant Profes- 
sor in Latin and Greek and from 1880 to 1882, Assistant 
Professor of New Testament Greek at Johns Hopkins ; 



Latin Master at Lawrenceville School, 1883-85 ; since 
1885 has been Principal Golden Hill School. 

JOHN MILLER CROSS, A.M., Educator, was 
born in Baltimore, Maryland, January 2, 1846, 
son of Rev. Andrew Boyd and Margaret Irvine 
(Dickey) Cross. He is of Huguenot, English, and 
Scotch-Irish ancestry. He was fitted for Col- 
lege in the private school of George G. Carey of 
Baltimore, and was graduated from Princeton in the 
Class of 1867. Immediately after graduation he 
was appointed Assistant Principal of G. G. Carey's 
School, a position he held until 1870, when he went 
to the Princeton Theological Seminary, from wjiich 
he was graduated in 1873, remaining however, one 
year thereafter as a post-graduate student. He was 
appointed Tutor in Greek at Princeton in 1873, and 
three years later Associate Professor in Latin and 
Greek at Johns Hopkins. He was successively 
.Assistant Professor of Latin and Greek (187S-18S0) 
and Assistant Professor of New Testament Greek 
(1 880-1 882), in the same University. In 1883 
he became Latin Master at Lawrenceville School 
and remained there until 1885, when he was ap- 
pointed Principal of the Golden Hill School, a 




JOHN M. CROSS 

position he continues to fill. While connected with 
Johns Hopkins he was also Registrar of the Univer- 
sitv from 1876 to r88o. Mr. Cross is a member of 
Whig Hall, of the Princeton Club of New York, and 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



249 



of the American Philological Society. He was mar- 
ried, March 24, 1878, to Chariotte Thayer Hazard, 
and has one child : Helen Stanhope Cross. 



HUEY, Samuel Baird 

Princeton A.B. 1863 A.M. 1866. 

Born in Philadelphia, Pa., 1843 ; received his early 
education in private schools and in Central High 
School, from which he graduated in 1859 ; graduated 
Princeton, Class of 1863, receiving the degree of A.B. ; 
entered the United States Navy in May 1863 as Cap- 
tain's Clerk, U. S. S. San Jacinto; was promoted to 
the rank of Ensign on the staff of Rear Admiral 
Bailey; appointed Paymaster in 1864; resigned Janu- 
ary 1866: received degree of A.M. from Princeton in 
1866 ; entered Law School of the University of Penn- 
sylvania, graduating with the degree of LL.B. in 1868; 
since 1868 has been engaged in the practice of law in 
Philadelphia, making a specialty of corporation and 
commercial law ; was admitted to the Supreme Court 
of Pennsylvania in 1870, and to the Supreme Court of 
the United States in 1889. 

SAMUEL BAIRD HUEY, A.M., Lawyer, was 
born in Philadelphia, January 7, 1843, son 
of Samuel Culbertson and Mary Scott (Baird) 
Huey. On the paternal side he is descended from 
the Hu^t family (the original spelling of the name). 
Huguenots, who emigrated to the North of Ireland, 
and thence to America. His maternal ancestors 
were Scotch for many generations. He attended 
private schools until 1855 when he entered Central 
High School, from which he graduated as Valedic- 
torian of his Class in 1859. He graduated from 
Princeton with the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 
the Class of 1863. He entered the L^nited States 
Navy in May 1863, as Captain's Clerk, L^nited 
States Ship San Jacinto, and was soon promoted to 
the rank of Ensign of the Staff of Rear Admiral 
Bailey. In 1864 he was appointed Paymaster. He 
was at both attacks on Fort Fisher, at Charleston 
and on .\tlantic Blockade. He resigned from the 
Navy in 1866 and entered the Law School of the 
University of Pennsylvania, graduating with the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Laws in 1868. From 1868 to 
the present time he has been engaged in the prac- 
tice of his profession in Philadelphia, making a 
specialty of corporation and commercial law. He 
was admitted to the Supreme Court of Pennsyl- 
vania in 1870, and to the Ignited States Supreme 
Court in 1SS9. He entered the Pennsylvania 
militia in 1867, was frequently promoted and at the 
time of his resignation in 18 78 was Major and As- 
sistant .\djutant-(ieneral of the First Brigade. In 
1S70 he became a member of the Board of Public 



Education, and in 1897 its President. He is a 
member of the Pennsylvania and American Bar 
Associations, the Military Order Loyal Legion, 
Grand Army of the Republic, Union League of 
Philadelphia (being its Vice-President), and of the 
Art, University, Lawyers' and Country Clubs. He 
is a Rejiubiican. He married Mary Hunt Abrams 




>.\.M U. HUEV 

of Concord, Massachusetts, June 4, 1868, and has 
five children : Arthur Baird, Emma Harvey, Samuel 
Culbertson, Malcolm Sidnej', and Mary Dorothy 
Huey. 

DULL, Andrew Jackson 

Princeton A.B. 1852. 
Born near McVeytown, Pa., 1830; fitted for College 
at Tuscarora Academy, Pa., and Strasburg Academy, 
Pa. ; graduated, Princeton, Class of 1852 : became a 
member of the firm of Reese, Graff & Dull, manu- 
facturers of iron and steel at Pittsburg ; organized and 
became President of the Grafton Iron Co. : retired 
from business in 1870: elected Secretary, Treasurer 
and General Manager of the Lochiel Rolling Mills, 
Harrisburg, Pa., in 1871 ; since 1875 has been Presi- 
dent of the Chicago & Block Coal R. R. Co., and an 
officer in various other corporations. 

NDREW JACKSON Dl'LL was born near 
McVeytown, Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, 
August 22, 1830, son of Casper and Jane (Junkin) 
Dull. He is of German and Irish descent, German 
through the Dulls, who came from Hesse-Darmstadt 



A-" 



250 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



to America in 1739 and settled in Montgomery 
county, Pennsylvania ; of Irish descent through the 
Junkins, who came from the north of Ireland in 
1740 and settled in the Juniata Valley, Pennsyl- 
vania. His early education was received in the 
common schools, and he was fitted for College at 
Tuscarora Academy, Juniata county, Pennsylvania, 
and in Strasburg Academy, Lancaster county, Penn- 
sylvania. He entered the Sophomore class of 
Princeton in the beginning of the second session, 
graduating with the Class in 1852. For several 
years he was engaged in the construction of public 




ANDREW JACKSON DULL 

works. In 1863 he became a member of the firm 
of Resse, Graff & Dull, and erected rolling mills in 
Pittsburg for the manufacture of iron and steel, and 
while a member of this firm, organized the Grafton 
Iron Company and was made its President, but, 
owing to failing health, retired from business in 
1870. He was elected Secretary, Treasurer and 
General Manager of the Lochiel Rolling Mills at 
Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, in 1871, and since has 
been President of the Chicago & Block Coal Rail- 
road Company, Vice President of the Corpus Christi, 
San Diego & Rio Grande Railroad Company, Di- 
rector of the Kansas City, Topeka & Western Rail- 
road Company, Director of the Norfolk & Western 
Railroad Company, President of the Pulaski Iron 



Company, with blast furnace at Pulaski, Virginia, 
President of the Virginia Mining Company and 
President of the Empire Lumber & Mining Com- 
pany. He was a member of Clio Hall while in 
College, helped to organize and was President of 
the Harrisburg Club for five years, and is a member 
of the Inglenook, the Country, and the Manufac- 
turers' Clubs of Philadelphia. He was married, 
June 3, 1 85 7, to Judith Reynolds of Kittanning, 
Pennsylvania. 



INMAN, Samuel Martin 

Princeton A.M. 1863. 
Born in Dandridge, Tenn., 1843; fitted for College in 
Maury Academy, and Maryville College, Tenn. ; mem- 
ber of the Class of 1863 in Princeton, but left before 
graduation to enter Confederate Army, and received 
diploma after the close of the Civil War; began busi- 
ness in Augusta, Ga. in 1865; established a cotton com- 
mission business in Atlanta, Ga., in 1867, and has been 
in that business ever since. 

SAMUEL MARTIN INMAN, Cotton Merchant, 
was born in Dandridge, Tennessee, P'ebruary 
19, 1843, son of Shadrach Walker and Jane (Mar- 
tin) Innian. He is of English descent on tlie 
paternal side, members of the family having settled 
in America before the Revolution, some of them 
serving in the Revolutionary Army. His maternal 
grandfather was of Scotch-Irish stock, while his 
maternal grandmother traced her ancestry back to 
the Campbell Clan of Scotland. He was fitted for 
College at Maury Academy and at Maryville College 
in Tennessee, and then entered Princeton College. 
He was a member of the Class of 1863, but left 
College before graduation to enter the Confederate 
Army. His diploma was granted to him by the 
Trustees after the close of the Civil War. He 
began business in Augusta, Georgia, in 1865, re- 
moving to Atlanta, Georgia however, two years later, 
where he established a cotton commission business. 
Since 1867 he has been actively engaged in business 
as a cotton merchant, his firm having for 
a long time one of the largest if not the largest 
cotton businesses in the world. He has held many 
positions of trust, among them being the following : 
a Trustee of the University of Georgia, of the 
Georgia School of Technology, and of the Atlanta 
Public Schools ; Director of the Central Railroad of 
Georgia, and of the Southern Railway, a Director of 
the Equitable Life Assurance Society of New York, 
Director Atlanta National Bank, and a Director of 
the Lowry Banking Company of Atlanta. He has 



UNIFERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



251 



been twice married. His first wife was Jennie Dick 
of Rome, Georgia, to whom he was married, Febru- 
ary 19, 1868. His second marriage was, December 
15, 1892, to Mildred McPlieeters of Raleigh, North 




S. M. IN.MAN 

Carolina. He has three children : Henry A. Inman, 
Mrs. Nellie Inman Cooper, and Frank M. Inman. 
Mr. Inman is at present (1S99) head of the great 
cotton exporting firm of Inman & Read, Houston, 
Texas, and has for the past three years resided in 
the City of New York. He still owns a handsome 
home in the city of Atlanta, Georgia, to which he 
will, no doubt, eventually return. 



VOORHEES, James Ditmars 

Princeton A.B. i8go— Columbia M.D. 1893. 
Born in Morristown, N. J., 1869; received his early 
education in the Morristown High School and the Mor- 
ris Academy; A.B. Princeton, 1890; graduate of the 
College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia, 1893; 
Resident Physician at the Presbyterian Hospital, 1894- 
96; and at the New York Foundling Hospital, 1E96-97; 
Resident Physician at the Sloane Maternity Hospital 
since 1897 ; Instructor in Obstetrics and Gynecology at 
the College of Physicians and Surgeons. 

JAMES DITMARS VOORHEES, M.D., In- 
structor in Obstetrics and Gynecology at the 
College" of Physicians and Surgeons, the Medical 
Department of Columbia, was born in Morristown, 



New Jersey, March 21, i86g. He attended the 
Morristown High School and Morris Academy at 
Morristown, and entered Princeton in 1886, grad- 
uating with the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1890. 
In the fall of that year he came to New York, and 
entered the College of Physicians and Surgeons of 
Columbia, graduating in 1893, ^"^ '" ^^^ following 
year was appointed Resident Physician at the Pres- 
byterian Hospital in New York City. He. held this 
position two years, and from 1896 to 1897 was 
Resident Physician at the New York Foundling 
Hospital. Since that year he has filled the position * 
of Resident Physician at the Sloane Maternity Hos- 
pit,al. In 1807, also, he was appointed to his 
present position in the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons. Dr. Voorhees is descended from one of 
the oldest of the old Knickerbocker families of 
New York, the first member of which in America, 
.Albert Coerte Van Voor Hees, settled on Long 
Island in 1620. While at College, Dr. Voorhees 
became a member of the Ivy Club and the Omega 
Society, and the University Glee Club. He is also 
a member of the Princeton Club of New York 




JAMES D. VOORHEES 

City, the .•\lumni Association of the Presbyterian 
Hospital, and the .Alumni Association of the Sloane 
Maternity Hospital. He is a stanch Republican in 
politics. 



252 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



BARRELL, Harry Ferdinand 

Columbia A.B. 18S2, M.A. 1884, Ph.D. 1885, LL.B. 1885. 
Born in Warwick, N. Y., 1858: fitted for College at 
private schools; A.B. Columbia School of Arts, 1882; 
M.A. 1884; Ph.D. Columbia College School of Political 
Science, 1885; LL.B. (cum laudei Columbia Law 
School, 1885: studied law in the office of Vice Chan- 
cellor Emery at Newark, N. J.; admitted to the New 
Jersey Bar as attorney at law, 1889, and as Counsellor 
at law in 1852 : managing clerk in the office of Hon. 
John R. Emery until the latter's appointment as Vice 
Chancellor in 1895; practised his profession at New- 
ark since that date. 

HARRV FERDINAND BARRELL, Ph.D., 
Lawyer, was born in \\'arn'ick, Orange 
county. New York, December 6, 1858. His 
parents were Henry F. and Elizabeth Wisner 
Barrel!, and he is eighth in descent from George 
Barrell, one of the first settlers of Boston. One of 
his ancestors in direct line was Lieutenant-Colonel 
Henry Wisner of Orange county, New York, who 
fought all through the Revolutionary War and was 
afterwards a member of the State Legislature. 
Joseph Barrell of Boston, great-grandfather of the 
subject of this sketch, was a wealthy and prominent 
merchant of his day, and was principal owner of 
the ship Columbia which discovered the Columbia 
River in Oregon in 1792, sailed along the north- 
west coast of the United States, and was the first 
American vessel to circumnavigate the globe. Mr. 
Barrell is also a descendant from the Schuyler 
family of Albany, New York and of the Boards and 
Kingslands of New Jersey on his mother's side. He 
is a great-grandson of Captain George Leaycraft of 
New York who was a lieutenant in Colonel Lamb's 
Artillery, served all through the Revolutionary War, 
and was one of the first members of the New York 
Society of the Cincinnati. Mr. Barrell is also 
descended from the Codwise family of New York, 
prominent in the colonial period, from the Webbs, 
Notts, Hoyts and Watcrhouses of Connecticut and 
from the Green family of Boston and the Went- 
worths, Langdons, Gerrishes and WaUlrons of New 
Hampshire. Mr. Barrell received his early educa- 
tion and fitted for College at private schools in 
Orange, New Jersey ; graduated from Columbia 
School of Arts with the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts in 1882, and after a post-graduate course 
took his Master of Arts in 1884. He graduated 
from the Columbia School of Political Science in 
1885 with the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, 
and also from Columbia Law School in the same 
year with the degree of Bachelor of Laws crnn laiule. 
He studied law in the office of the Hon. John R. 



Emery, now Vice-Chancellor at Newark, New 
Jersey ; was admitted to the New Jersey Bar as 
.Attorney at Law in June 1889 and as Counsellor at 
Law in June, 1892. He acted as managing clerk 
for Mr. Emery until the latter's appointment as 
Vice-Chancellor in 1895. Since that date he has 
practised law in Newark. Mr. Barrell has always 
been an active member of the Democratic party in 
politics — a follower of the school of John C. Cal- 
houn and Jefferson Davis, and a firm believer in the 
doctrine maintained by the South in the constitu- 
tional struggles leading up to the Civil War. He 




H.4RRY F. BARRELL 

has been a delegate to Democratic Conventions, 
State and County, but has never held political office 
except as a member of the Board of Education of 
Milburn township. Mr. Barrell is a life member of 
the .Alumni .Association of Columbia and is also 
connected with the Phi Beta Kappa Society ; the 
Society of Colonial Wars in the State of New Jersey ; 
the New Jersey Society of the Order of the Founders 
and Patriots of America of which he is State 
Registrar ; the New Jersey Society of the Sons of the 
.American Revolution and the Pennsylvania Society 
of the War of 181 2. Mr. Barrell in connection with 
Mr. Appleton Morgan of Westfield, New Jersey, 
founded the New Jersey Society of the War of 181 2 
and has twice been elected its Vice-President. 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



253 



BALDWIN, George Van Nest 

Columbia LL.B, i860. 
Born in New York City, 1838 ; educated in a private 
school at New Brunswick, New Jersey ; A.B. Rutgers 
College, 1856; LL.B. Columbia Law School, i860; has 
since been engaged in the active practice of his pro- 
fession in New York City. 

GEORGE VAN NEST BALDWIN, Lawyer, 
was born in New York City, January 23, 
1S38, son of the Rev. Eli Baldwin, I).U., and 
Phebe Van Nest. His father was a lineal descend- 
ant of Joseph Baldwin, a member of the original 
Colony of New Haven, one of the founders of W\\- 



$250 prize. He was admitted to the New York 
Bar in that year, and since tiien has been in 
active practice, enjoying a large and success- 
ful business and recognition. He was one of 
the original members of the Bar Association, 
was the first Vice-President and afterwards 
President, and also one of the founders of the 
University Club, and for many years a member of 
its council. He was for years Chairman of the 
Board of Trustees of the New York Society Library 
and is still Chairman of its Library Committee. He 
is a member of the Metropolitan, Union and Cen- 
tury Clubs, the St. Nicholas Society, and various 
other social and literary associations. 




GEO. V. N. BALDWIN 

ford, Connecticut in 1639, and who went to Newark, 
New Jersey, with a band of pioneers and founded 
that city. The f;tmily has been settled in Bucking- 
ham, England, since prior to the accession of 
\\'illiam the Conqueror. On his mother's side he is 
descended from the old Dutch family of Van Nest, 
his grandfather .Abraham \'an Xest having been one 
of the most prominent New Yorkers of the old 
school. The subject of this sketch received his 
early education in a private school in New Bruns- 
wick, New Jersey, entered Rutgers College in 1852, 
and graduated with the degree of Bachelor of .\rts 
in 1856. After leaving Rutgers he came to New 
York and" studied law at the Columbia Law School, 
graduating in 1S60 with high honors and winning the 



COX, Jennings Stockton, Jr. 

Columbia Met.E. 1887. 
Born in Baltimore, Md., 1866; attended public and 
private schools in New York and San Francisco, the 
San Francisco High School and the College of the City 
of New York until the end of the Freshman year ; 
Metallurgical Engineer, School of Mines, Columbia, 
1887; with Government Survey of Harlem Ship Canal, 
1887; at Homestead Steel Works, 1888-89; with the U. 
S. & Brazil Mail Steamship Co., 1891-92 ; Assistant 
Superintendent Aurora Iron Mining Company, 1892 ; 
engaged in mining engineering in the United States, 
British Columbia and Mexico, 1893-97 ; General Man- 
ager Spanish-American Iron Company, Santiago de 
Cuba, 1897-99. 

JENNINGS STOCKTON COX, Jr., Metallurgi- 
cal Engineer, General ]\Ianager of the Spanish- 
American Iron Company at Santiago de Cuba, was 
born in Baltimore, Maryland, November 23, 1866, 
son of Jennings Stockton Cox and Mary Ehzabeth 
Austin Mcjilton. James Co.x, the first of the family 
in .America, was one of the pioneer settlers of iSlary- 
land and was speaker of the House of Burgesses of 
that State which passed the law establishing religious 
liberty there. His maternal grandfather, John Nel- 
son Mcjilton D.l)., LL.D., was for many years 
prominent in church and educational matters and 
was rector of St. Stephen's Episcopal Church of 
Baltimore and Treasurer and Superintendent of the 
Schools of that City. His father has been a well- 
known banker and broker in Wall Street for more 
than thirty years. Jennings Stockton Co.x, Jr. re- 
ceived his early education in private schools of New 
York and San Francisco and the San Francisco 
High School, and also studied at the College of the 
City of New York to the end of the Freshman year. 
He entered the School of Mines, Columbia College, 
in 1S83, taking a four years' course, and after grad- 



254 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



uating with the degree of Metallurgical Engineer, 
which was that year given by Columbia for the first 
time, he was for a time employed on the Govern- 
ment Sur\ey of the Harlem Ship Canal in New 




JENNINGS S. cox, JR. 

York City. During the years 1888 and 1889 he 
was at the Homestead steel works, of Carnegie, 
Phipps & Company, first as draughtsman and 
afterwards as .\ssistant Master ^[echanic, leaving 
their employ in 1890 for that of the United States 
& Brazil Mail Steamship Company as inspector of 
the building of the steel steamers Seguranca and 
Vigilanca and afterward on work for the same com- 
pany in Brazil. During 1892 Mr. Cox was .Assistant 
Superintendent of the .\urora Iron Mining Company 
at Ironwood, Michigan, and from there went to 
Monte Crislo, Washington, to open the gold and 
silver mines of the Monte Cristo and several other 
mining companies. Later he was Ore Buyer of the 
Puget Sound Reduction Company and engaged in 
expert examinations of gold and silver mines in 
California, Washington and British Columbia. .4n 
accident which resulted in serious injury to his leg 
obliged him for a time to abandon the active pro- 
fession of raining engineer and during the years 
1894 and 1895 he devoted his attention, as .■Xgent 
of the Crocker-Wheeler Electric Company in Pitts- 
burgh, Pennsylvania, to the application of electric 



power to rolling mill, iron working and other heavy 
machinery, in some of which work he was a pioneer. 
In 1897 he was able to return actively to the field 
and was engaged in the expert examination of silver 
mines in Mexico. Since that time he has been 
General Manager of the Spanish-.Vmerican Iron 
Company, operating mines at Daiquiri, near San- 
tiago de Cuba. Mr. Cox is a member of the Uni- 
versity Club and the Strollers in New York, The 
University Club of Pittsburgh, the Rainier Club of 
Seattle, Washington, and The .Anglo-.American (now 
the Cosmopolitan) Club of Santiago de Cuba. 



BUSH, John Adriance 

Columbia LL.B. 1873. 
Born in Rye, N. Y., 1850 ; educated in Military 
Schools in New York and Connecticut: LL.B. Colum- 
bia Law School, 1873, and admitted to the New York 
Bar ; engaged in the practice of his profession in New 
York City since that time ; Trustee of New York and 
Brooklyn Bridge 1880-90. 

JOHN .\I)RI.\NCE BUSH, Lawyer, was born in 
Rye, New York, May 29, 1850. His father, 
William L. Bush, was of Dutch ancestry, and his 




J. ADRl.ANCE BUSH 

mother, Virginia Renshaw, was a daughter of Com- 
modore James Renshaw of the United States 
Navy. He received his early education in Military 
Schools in New York and Connecticut, and en- 



UNIVERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



255 



tered the Law School of Columbia in 1870, 
graduating with the degree of Bachelor of Laws in 
1873. Immediately after graduation he was ad- 
mitted to the New York Bar and began the practice 
of his profession, giving especial attention to corpora- 
tion law. He is now counsel for several large man- 
ufacturing corporations, and has been connected 
with the securing of franchises for several large 
bridges and in conducting litigation respecting 
them. He prepared the first bill for the building of 
a bridge across the Hudson River from Fort Wash- 
ington to Fort Lee, and has recently published a 
book on the National Bankruptcy Act of July i, 
1898, which has already met with wide notice. 
Mr. Bush has never held any political office. In 
1880 he was appointed to represent New York City 
as one of the Trustees of the New York and Brook- 
lyn Bridge and served for ten years. He is fond of 
sports of all kinds particularly riding and fishing 
and belongs to several country, fishing and golf 
clubs, and is also a member of the Century Associ- 
ation, the Union League, Metropolitan, New York 
Yacht, Lawyers', Lambs and Republican Clubs, the 
St. Nicholas Society and the Bar Association. He 
married October 26, 18S0, Eliza P. Raynor who 
died in 1S84. He has one daughter, .Anna Raynor 
Bush. 



BERRY, Wilton Guernsey 

Columbia B.S. 1866. 
Born in New York City, 1864; received his early 
education privately, and graduated at the Polytechnic 
Institute of Brooklyn : B.S., course in chemistry. School 
of Mines, Columbia, 1886; studied at the University of 
Berlin for some time ; Chemist in New York City 
Health Department, 1890-96 ; Secretary and Treasurer 
of Asepta Chemical Company since 1897. 

WILTON GUERNSEY BERRY, Chemist, 
was born in New York City, Januarj' 26, 
1864. His parents were Nathaniel and Johanna 
Dwight Berry. The Berry family is of English an- 
cestry, numbering among its line many of the lead- 
ing men of County Devon. The name is supposed 
to be derived from one Bearre, a descendant of the 
once famous monarchs of Ireland. The first of the 
line to come to .\merica was William Berry. He 
came to New Hampshire as a steward of the New 
Hampshire grants under Captain John Mason in 
1 63 1. The family furnished many distinguished rep- 
resentatives to the early Colonial life of New Hamp- 
shire and other Colonies. He received his early 
education in private schools in New York City, and 
later attended the Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn. 



entering the School of Mines of Columbia on the 
completion of his studies there, taking the course in 
Chemistry and graduating in 1886. He spent some 
time following his graduation in experimental chem- 
ical research at a German University. Mr. Berry 
was employed in the ser\'ice of the New York City 
Health Department as a Chemist from 1890 to 
1896. In 1897 he engaged in business as Secretary 
and Treasurer of the Asepta Chemical Company, 
with which concern he is still connected. He is a 
member of Psi L^psilon, Sons of the Revolution, the 
American Chemical Society, the Chemical Society 




WILTON" G. BERRY 

of the School of Mines, the Engineering Society of 
the School of Mines, the American Institute of Min- 
ing Engineers and the Natural Science .Association 
of Staten Island. He takes no active interest in 

politics. 

TUCKER, Samuel Auchmuty 

Columbia Ph.B. 1895. 
Born in New York City, 1869; Ph.B., Columbia 
School of Mines. 1895; for a time Assistant Demon- 
strator of Chemistry and Physics in the College of 
Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia ; at present Tu- 
tor in industrial chemistry at the University. 

SAMUEL AUCHMUTY TUCKER, Tutor in 
Industrial Chemistry at Columbia, is of dis- 
tinguished ancestry through both parents. His 



256 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



father, Richard Sands Tucker, was a grandson of 
Rear-Admiral Joshua R. Sands, U.S.N., who ren- 
dered valuable service to his country in three wars, 
the Second War for Independence, the Mexican 
War and Civil conflict of 1861-1865. Richard S. 
Tucker married Margaret Auchmuty, granddaughter 
of Sir Samuel Auchmuty, G.C.R., Lieutenant Gen- 
eral in the British Army, who was an extremely 
able officer in England's East Indian possessions, 
and also served with distinction in almost every 
quarter of the globe. Samuel A. Tucker received 
his early education privately and in the public 
schools of New York City, and afterwards entered 
the School of Mines of Columbia, graduating with 
the degree of ISachelor of Philosophy in 1895. 
Shortly after his graduation he was made Assistant 
Demonstrator in Chemistry and Physics at the Col- 
lege of Physicians and Surgeons, the Medical De- 
partment of Columbia, and after serving in this 
capacity for some time was made Tutor in Indus- 
trial Chemistry. He has since held this position on 
the educational staff of the University. He is a 
member of the Union and Knickerbocker Clubs of 
New York City, and is unmarried. He is not 
actively interested in the political questions of the 
times. 



DAVIS, Westmoreland De la Warr 

Columbia LL.B. 1886. 
Born in Paris, France, 1859 ; graduate of Virginia 
Military Institute ; studied law at the University of 
Virginia, and graduated from Columbia Law School ; 
has since been engaged in active practice in New York 
City. 

WESTMORELAND De la WARR DAVIS, 
Lawyer, was born in Paris, France, 1859, 
of American parentage, his mother and father and 
their ancestors being Southerners. Thomas Gordon 
Davis, his fiither, was a South Carolinian, and was a 
representative of a prominent and distinguished fam- 
ily. His mother, who still survives, was Anna Lewis 
Morris before her marriage, and belonged to the dis- 
tinguished Morris family long conspicuous in Virginia 
for their social position and wealth. If heredity 
brings its advantages and traits, then Westmoreland 
D. Davis should naturally, as he did, have aspired 
to 'the Bar and its distinctions, as his father and 
paternal grandfather both took high position in this 
exacting field of labor and learning. The work has 
been carried on by the grandson who, locating in a 
city whose fierce competition leaves little for those 
not equip|)ed for the struggle, in this day of the 



survival of the fittest, has achieved an enviable place 
in the ranks of his profession. Mr. Davis has won 
a recognized place at the Bar, enjoys a lucrative 
practice, and represents a number of large corpora- 
tions including several well-known insurance and 
transportation companies, besides important inter- 
ests in the South and a number of large estates in 
the City of New York. After a training at the 
^"irginia Military Institute, he read law at the L^ni- 
versity of Virginia, and availed himself of the 
Columbia course to better equip him for practice in 
New York. In politics he is a stanch Democrat, 




WESTMORELAND D. D.4VIS 

but not an extremist or partisan in his views, and 
has found in his busy and exacting law career, em- 
ployment for his energies which left him no time to 
take an active part in public life. His leading traits 
are decision of character and a fearless discharge of 
duty, and these have gained for him, whilst yet a 
young man, the well recognized success and position 
which he has attained. 



DEXTER, Franklin 

Columbia M.D. 1887. 
Born in Boston, Mass., 1857 ; educated at Williams, 
at the College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, 
and abroad ; teacher in New York ; Assistant Demon- 
strator at the College of Physicians and Surgeons; 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



^S7 



Demonstrator and later Assistant Professor of Anatomy 
at Harvard. 

FRANKLIN DEXTER, M.D., Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Anatomy at Harvard, was born in 
Boston, Massachusetts, May lo, 1857. His father 
was Franklin Gordon Dexter, the son of Franklin 
Dexter of Boston and the grandson of Samuel 
Dexter. His mother was Harriet Cutler Appleton. 
As a boy Mr. Dexter attended the Schools in Bos- 
ton, in England and in France, and then spent two 
years at Williams as a special student, after which 
he devoted seven years to the study of medicine 
before he took the degree of Doctor of Medicine at 
the College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, 
in 1887. The next four years were spent in Vienna. 
Then he taught for one year in New York and later 
served as .Assistant Demonstrator of .Anatomy at the 
College of Physicians and Surgeons. In 1884 he 
came to Harvard as Demonstrator of Histology and 
later was made Demonstrator of .Anatomy and then 
Assistant Professor of .Anatomy. Dr. Dexter mar- 
ried, September 12, 1893, Jane Dwight, and has one 
daughter, Harriett Dexter. 



FORBES, Francis 

Columbia LL.B. 1869. 
Born in New York, 1846 ; entered Rochester Univer- 
sity, 1862, left same to join Union Army, returned to 
University at close of war, and was graduated i865, A.B. 
Travelled and studied abroad until entrance to Colum- 
bia Law School in November 1867; graduated with 
Class of 1869, LL.B. ; admitted to New York Bar 1868 ; 
Supreme Court of the United States 1876; delegate 
from the United States to the Conference at Madrid, 
1890, under the Convention for the Protection of Indus- 
trial Property, and to the Conference under the same 
Convention at Brussels, 1897 ; member of the Constitu- 
tional Convention of the State of New York, 1894 ; 
author of legal subjects ; engaged in the practice of the 
law at New York City. 

FRANCIS FORBES, Lawyer, was born in New 
York City in 1846. His ancestors were 
Scotch who came to this country at the beginning 
of the eighteenth century. He volunteered in the 
Union .Army as soon as he reached the legal age of 
enlistment and reached the rank of first lieutenant. 
.After graduation from College he travelled abroad 
for upwards of a year. He was admitted to the 
Bar of the State of New York in 1868, and after- 
wards graduated from the Columbia College Law 
School in 1869. Mr. Forbes was the orator at the 
D.R.E. Ponvention of 1875. He made frequent 
trips abroad and took part in the Congress on 

VOL. III. — 17 



Industrial Property held at Paris in 1876, and 
was delegate from the Young Men's Christian 
Association of New York to the international 
meeting at Geneva, 1878. In 1890 he was 
appointed by the Secretary of State of the United 
States to represent it at the Conference at Madrid 
under the Convention for the Protection of Indus- 
trial Property, concluded at Paris, March 20, 1883. 
This Conference introduced several great commer- 
cial reforms such as an agreement for the suppression 
of false indication of origin of goods, and the inter- 
national registration of trade marks. In 1893 ^Ir. 




FR.AXCIS FORBES 

Forbes was elected a delegate to the Constitutional 
Convention of New York which met in 1894 and 
took an active part on the Committee on Corpora- 
tions, advocating the incorporation of a provision 
limiting the duration of public franchises, and also 
on the Committee on Charities, which reorganized 
the control of the charities of the -State. In 1S97 
he was again sent as a delegate to a .Conference 
under the Convention above for the Protection of 
Industrial Property which was, on this occasion, 
held at Brussels. He took an active part in the 
modification of the Convention in the interest of 
American exporters and the regulation of foreign 
trade. On his return, ho was appointed by Presi- 
dent McKinlev. with the advice and consent of the 



258 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



Senate, a Commissioner to revise the laws of the 
United States so as to make them conform to said 
Convention for the Protection of Industrial Property. 
He has, while in active practice of all branches of 
the profession, fountl time to write on international 
law and economic questions. He is an authority 
on international law relating to industrial property. 
He was, for many years, an active member and 
Chairman of Committees of the Young Men's 
Christian Association, which he joined on coming 
to the City of New York in 1867. He has been a 
member of the .Association of the Bar of the City 
of New York since 1872, and of the University Club 
since its organization. He is also a member of the 
D.K.E. fraternity, and of the .'\merican Bar .As- 
sociation, and the International Law .Association. 



HYDE, Edwin Francis 

Columbia LL.B. 1863. 
Born in New York City, 1842 ; acquired his early 
education in a private school in Middletown, Conn., and 
at the College of the City of New York, graduating in 
1861 ; LL.B. Columbia Law School in 1863; admitted 
to the Bar of New York, 1863; practised law in New 
York 1863-86 ; since that time a Vice-President of the 
Central Trust Company of New York. 

EDWIN FR.ANCIS HYDE, Lawyer, Vice- 
President of the Central Trust Company of 
New York, was born in New York City, June 23, 
1842, son of Edwin and Elizabeth .A. (Mead) Hyde. 
Both his parents represent old Colonial fiimilies 
who were prominent during the Revolutionary War. 
William Hyde was one of the first settlers of Hart- 
ford, Connecticut. He is also a descendant of 
Lieutenant-Colonel Simon Lathrop who commanded 
a Continental Regiment at the siege of Louisburg, 
and who was in charge of the Fortress after its 
capture. He attended in boyhood a private school 
in Middletown, Connecticut, and then the College 
of the City of New York, graduating with honors in 
the Class of 1861. Subsequently he matriculated at 
Columbia Law School, receiving the degree of Bach- 
elor of Laws from that institution in 1863, and was 
admitted to the New York Bar in November of the 
same year. During the next twenty-three years 
he was actively engaged in the practice of his pro- 
fession in New York City. He served for a time in 
the Civil War as a member of the Twenty-second 
Regiment of the New York State Militia. In 1886 
he was elected a Vice-President of the Central 
Trust Company of New York, which position he 
still holds, his duties having especial reference to 



the numerous railroads and private Trusteeships 
held by that corporation. Mr. Hyde is very much 
interested in orchestral music, and has been for 
more than ten years President of the Philharmonic 
Society of New York. He is a member of the 
Century, Metropolitan, Union League, Republican, 
City, Riding, .Arts, and Down Town Clubs ; also of 
the -American Geographical Society, the National 
Academy of Design, the National Sculpture Society, 
the .American .Association for the Advancement of 
Science, the Academy of Science, New York His- 
torical Society, .Association of the Bar, and the 




K. FRANCIS HYDE 



Presbyterian Union. His political views are Re- 
publican, but he has never held office. Mr. Hyde 
married November 18, 1868 Marie E. Brown. 
They have no children living. 



BIJUR, Abraham 

Columbia A.B. 1893. 
Born in New York City, 1873; educated privately ; 
graduated Columbia, 1893 ; attended Columbia Law 
School during his Senior year ; entered his father's busi- 
ness house and was admitted as a partner in 1895 under 
the style of I. Bijur & Son; served as one of the Commit- 
tee of Three chosen to represent the Tobacco Board of 
Trade before the Committee on Ways and Means, 1897 ; 
also associated with The Forum for some years. 

ABRAHAM BIJUR, Merchant, was born in 
New York City, March 22, 1873, son of 
Isaac and Henrietta (Sondheim) Bijur. He was 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



259 



educated in private schools, supplemented by 
tutors, and attended the School of Arts of Co- 
lumbia, graduating in 1893. He won a number of 
honors during his College course, taking the His- 




AP.RAHAM BIJUR 

torical Prize, and First Honor in History in his 
Sophomore year and the Chanler Historical Prize 
in his Senior year. During his Senior year he also 
attended Columbia Law School. After graduation 
he entered the office of his father, a well-known 
wholesale tobacco merchant of New York City, and 
became a member of the firm in 1895 under the 
style of I. Bijur & Son. He was one of the Com- 
mittee of Three chosen to represent the Tobacco 
Board of Trade before the Committee on Ways and 
Means of Congress in 1897. Mr. Bijur was also 
Treasurer of the Forum Publishing Company during 
1895 and 1896, Managing Director and member of 
the Editorial Council of Three of The Forum maga- 
zine from 1896 to 1898. He resigned in January 
of that year on account of pressure of other busi- 
ness. Mr. Bijur has always been an active Repub- 
lican, and during the Presidential campaign of 1896 
served as a member of the Executive Committee of 
the Business Men's and Sound-Money Organization, 
which arranged the Sound-Money parade in New 
York City in that year. He is also a member of the 
Harmonic Club and the Columbia College Alumni 
Association. 



KALBFLEISCH, Charles Conover 

Columbia A.B. 1891, A.M. 1892, LL.B. 1893. 
Born in New York City, i868 ; fitted for College at a 
private school in New York City; A.B. Columbia 
School of Arts, 1891 ; A.M. Political Science, 1892 ; 
LL.B., Columbia Law School, 1893 ; admitted to New 
York Bar, 1893 and has since practised his profession 
in New York City. 

CHARLES COXOVER KALBFLEISCH, A.M., 
LL.B., Lawyer, was born in New York City, 
July 30, 1868. He is the son of Charles Henry 
Kalbfleisch and Josephine Conover, and a grandson 
of the Hon. Martin Kalbfleisch, who served for two 
terms as ALayor of Brooklyn. His mother's ances- 
tors came from Holland about 1636. He was 
educated in Wilson & Kellogg's School in New York 
City, and then entered Columbia, graduating from 
the School of Arts in i89r, taking the degree of 
Master of Arts in the School of Political Science in 
1892, and receiving the degree of Bachelor of Laws 
from the Law School in 1893. He was admitted to 
the Bar of the State of New York in the latter year, 
and immediately began the practice of his profession 
in New York City. He is a member of the Associa- 
tion of the Bar of the City of New York, the .\lumni 




CHARLES C. KALBFLEISCH 



Association of Columbia College, the Dunlap Society, 
and the Players' and Grolier Clubs, also Down Town 
Association. He married, October 27, 1S97, Maud 
Kalbfleisch, a cousin. They have no children. 



26o 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



GRAY, Horace 

Harvard A.B. 1845, LL.B. 1849, LL.D. 1871. 
Born in Boston, Mass., 1828 ; graduated Harvard, 
1845 ; studied law at the Harvard Law School and with 
Judge Lowell; admitted to the Bar, 1851 ; Reporter of 
Decisions, Mass. Supreme Court, 1854-61 ; elevated to 
the Supreme Bench, 1864 ; advanced to the Chief-Jus- 
ticeship, 1873; appointed Justice of the U. S. Supreme 
Court, 1881. 

HOR.VCE CR.'W, Jurist, was born in Boston, 
Massachusetts, March 24, 1828. Taking 
his Bachelor's degree at Harvard with the Class of 
1845 he travelled in Europe previous to entering 
upon his professional studies, which were pursued 



1 88 1, Chief-Justice Cray was selected by President 
Arthur to fill the vacancy, and was commissioned on 
December 20th of that year. As a presiding Judge 
he was a strict disciplinarian, demanding a rigiil 
observance of technical correctness, and in the 
highest tribunal of the nation his opinions upon 
questions relating to the jurisdiction of federal 
authority are considered pre-eminent and exhaus- 
tive. He also entertains a higli regard for the 
judicial ability and wisdom of his associates, and up 
to the present time his dissenting opinions have 
been few in number. Judge Gray received the 
degree of Doctor of Laws from Harvard in 1871 
and from Brown in 1882. 




HORACE GR.AV 

in the Law Department of that University and in 
the office of Judge Lowell in Boston. He was ad- 
mitted to the Suffolk County Bar in 1851. The 
wisdom and discretion he displayed in handling 
several important cases while still a novice soon 
brought him an extensive practice, and he sub- 
sequently entered into partnership with Judge Hoar. 
In addition to his increasing business, he served as 
Reporter of Decisions of the State Supreme Judicial 
Court from 1854 to 1861, issuing sixteen volumes 
of reports during that time, and in 1864 was ap- 
pointed by Governor .-\ndrew an Associate Justice, 
remaining such until called to succeed Chief-Justice 
Chapman in 1873. On the death of Justice Nathan 
Clifford of the United States Supreme Court, in 



FINCK, Henry Theophilus 

Harvard A.B. 1876. 
Born in Bethel, Mo., 1854 ; educated at Harvard, 
(1876) ; and abroad under a Harvard fellowship ; joined 
the staff of the New York Nation ; became Musical 
Editor of the New York Evening Post; author of 
Wagner and His Works ; Chopin and other Musical 
Essays; Paderewski and His Art; The Pacific Coast 
Scenic Tour ; Spain and Morocco ; Lotos Time in 
Japan; Romantic Love and Personal Beauty; and 
Primitive Love ; Professor of Musical History at the 
National Conservatory. 

HENRY T. FINCK, Author and Musical 
Critic, was born in Bethel, Missouri, Sep- 
tember 22, 1854. His parents, Henry Conrad 
Finck, and Beatrice Fredericke Adelhaid Fink, 
came from Wurtemburg, Germany. For several 
generations Mr. Finck's ancestors on both sides 
were clergymen, while on his mother's side he is 
related to Gottlob Fink, the well-known Tubingen 
linguist, and to the poet, Gustav Schwab. The 
younger son, Henry, entered Harvard and there 
devoted himself chiefly to the study of classics and 
philosophy, also taking Professor Paine's courses in 
the history of music, harmony, etc. After grad- 
uating in 1876 he attended the first Bayreuth Festi- 
val, which he described in the New York World and 
the Atlantic Monthly, with William D. Howells and 
John Fiske as his literary sponsors. Returning to 
America the next year Mr. Finck studied sociology 
at Cambridge, and then under a Harvard fellowship 
spent three years abroad at Berlin, Heidelberg and 
Vienna, devoting his time to physiological and com- 
parative psychology. It was his intention to apply 
for a Professorship of Philosophy in some American 
College, but having attracted the attention of the 
editor of the New York Nation by letters to that 
paper he was offered a position on its staff. When 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



261 



the Nation was consolidated with the Evening Post, 
he was asked to become the Post's Musical Editor 
and has held that place ever since. Since 1890 Mr. 
Finck has also been Professor of Musical History at 
the National Conservatory. His first book, Roman- 
tic Love and Personal ISeauty, attracted great atten- 
tion. Since then two other classes of works have 
come from his pen. His musical books include 
\Vagner and His Works ; Chopin and Other Musical 
Essays ; and Paderewski and His Art ; and his 
books of travel include The Pacific Coast Scenic 
Tour ; Spain and Morocco ; and Lotos Time in 




HENRV T. FINCK 

Japan. He has also completed a treatise entitled 
Primitive Love and Love Stories ; and is finishing a 
volume on Songs and Song Writers. Numerous 
articles relating to his travels, to beauty, to gastro- 
nomic and psychological topics, and to music have 
been written by him for the leading magazines. 
On October 17, 1S90 Mr. Finck married .-\bbie 
Helen Cushman, whose ancestors came over in the 
NLayflower. 



HOFFMAN, Eugene Augustus 

Harvard A.B. 1848 - Columbia S.T.D. 1887. 

Born in New York City, 1829; studied at Rutgers, 
Harvard ^nd the General Theological Seminary ; or- 
dained a Deacon of the Episcopal Church in 1851, and 
a Priest in 1853 ; Rector of Christ Church, Elizabeth, 



N. J. 1853-63; of St. Mary's Church, Burlington, N. J. 
1863; of Grace Church, Brooklyn Heights, 1864-69; of 
St. Mark's Church, Philadelphia till 1879 ; and for the 
past twenty years. Dean of the General Theological 
Seminary, New York City. 

EUGENE AUGUSTUS HOFF>LAN, D.D., 
(Oxon.) LL.D., D.C.L., Dean of the Gen- 
eral Theological Seminary (Episcopalian) New 
York, was born in that city, March 21, 1829, son of 
Samuel Verplanck and Glorvina Rossell (Storm) 
Hoffman. On the paternal side he traces his an- 
cestry back through five generations to Martin 
Hoffman, a native of Revel, Sweden, who emigrated 
to America about 1657, whose wife's maiden name 
was Emmerentje DeWitt. Nicolaes Hoffman, son 
of ALirtin, married Janetje Crispel, daughter of 
Antonie Crispel, a Huguenot, " in whose veins 
flowed some of the best blood of France " and the 
eldest of their children. Colonel Martinus Hoffman, 
born in 1706, married Tryntje Benson, daughter of 
Robert and Cornelia (Roos) Benson. Harmanus 
Hoffman (son of Martinus) born in 1745, married 
for his third wife Catherine Verplanck, daughter of 
Philip and Effie (Beekman) Verplanck, and a des- 
cendant of the Van Cortlandt, Schuyler and Pro- 
voost families. Samuel Verplanck Hoffman, Dr. 
Hoffman's father, born in 1802, was united in 1828 
in marriage with Glorvina Rossell Storm, daughter 
of Garrit and Susan (Gouverneur) Storm. Eugene 
A. Hoffman prepared for College at the Columbia 
Grammar School, New York, and after graduating 
at Rutgers (1847) he studied a year at Harvard, 
taking his Bachelor's degree with the Class of 1848. 
In the same year he joined a scientific expedition 
under Professor Louis Agassiz, organized for the 
purpose of exploring the then unknown wilderness 
lying north of Lake Superior. Commencing his 
divinity studies immediately after his return, he pur- 
sued the regular three years' course at the General 
Theological Seminary, New York, and was ordained 
a Deacon in 1851, entering upon missionary work 
in (Jrace Church Parish, Elizabeth, New Jersey. 
Ordained a Priest of the Protestant Episcopal 
Church in 1853 and appointed Rector of Christ 
Church, Elizabetii, he retained that charge for the 
succeeding ten years, during which time he secured 
the erection of a new church edifice, parish school- 
house and rectory. During his Rectorship in Eliza- 
beth he organized the parish of ^[illburn and built 
St. Stephen's Church ; revived the congregation at 
Woodbridge which he also provided with a i^lace of 
worsliip; and cancelled the debt on St. James 
Church, Hackettstown, New Jersey, \\hile Rector 



262 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



of St. Mary's Church, Burlington, New Jersey, (1863- 
1864) he cleared off a debt of $23,000 on the 
building and i)laceil a peal of bells in the tower. 
He was then called to the Rectorship of Grace 
("hurch, Brooklyn Heights, where he remained until 
his health compelled him to seek an inland parish, 
and from 1869 to 1879 he was in charge of St. 
Mark's Church, Philailelphia, Pennsylvania. In the 
latter year he was appointed Dean of the General 
Theological Seminary, which position he has filled 
ever since with honor to himself and benefit to the 
institution. Through his instrunientalitv the Sem- 




EUGF.NF. AUG. HOFFMAN 

inary is now enjoying a financial prosperity unknown 
before in its history, and during his tenure of office 
he has not only raised the sum of $1,750,000 for 
its endowment and equipment, but has caused the 
erection of many new buildings and established two 
new Professorships and five Fellowships. Three 
important chairs and the office of Dean have been 
amply endowed by himself and members of his 
family, and the average attendance has nearly 
doubled. From 1856 to 1864 Dr. Hoffman was 
Secretary of the Diocesan Convention, and of the 
Standing Committee of the Diocese of New Jersey, 
and a Trustee of Burlington College, and St. Mary's 
Hall. He was President of the Standing Committee 
of the Diocese of Long Island 1 864-1 869, and a 
Trustee of the Church Charity Foundation 1864- 



1869. From 1869 to 1879 he was a Trustee of 
the Episcopal Hospital, the l'2piscopal Academy, 
the Diocesan and City Missions, and the Prayer- 
Book and Tract Societies, all of Philadelphia ; and 
since 1879 has been a member of the Board of 
Managers of the Domestic and Foreign Missionary 
Society of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the 
United States, of the Clergymen's Retiring Fund 
Society, of the Society for Promoting Religion and 
Learning in the State of New York, and of the 
Corporation for the Relief of Widows and Children 
of Clergymen ; President of Trinity School, and 
Chairman of the Building Committee of the Cathe- 
dral of St. John the Divine ; Deputy from the 
Diocese of New York to the General Convention 
seven times, member of the Joint Commission for 
the Revision of the Constitution and Canons of the 
Protestant Episcopal Church, of the New York Gen- 
ealogical and Biographical Society, and Foreign 
Corresponding Secretary of the New York Histor- 
ical Society. He is also a member of the Archaeo- 
logical Institute of America, the American Institute 
of Christian Philosophy, the Metropolitan Museum 
of Art, the American Geographical and Botanical, 
and the New York Numismatical Societies, the Cen- 
tury Association, Riding Club, South Side Sports- 
men's, Jekyl Island, Restigouche, Robin's Island 
and St. Nicholas Clubs, and the Huguenot Society. 
He is a Fellow of the American Museum of Natural 
History, to which he lately presented a valuable col- 
lection of American butterflies. The degree of Master 
of Arts was conferred upon him by Harvard in 1851 ; 
that of Doctor of Divinity by Rutgers in 1864, Ra- 
cine in 1882, General Theological Seminary in 1885, 
Columbia in 1886, Trinity in 1895 ; and Oxford in 
1895 ; that of Doctor of Laws by the University of 
the South in 1891, and Trinity University, Toronto, 
1893 ; and that of Doctor of Civil Law by King's 
College, Nova Scotia in 1890. On April 19, 1852, 
Dr. Hoffman married Mary Crooke Elmendorf, and 
his children are : Susan Matilda, now the wife of 
Rev. J. H. Watson; Mary Louise, now the wife of 
Rev. T. W. Nickerson, Jr. ; Margaret Euphemia, 
wife of Charles L. Hackstaff; Eugene Augustus, 
born in 1863, and died in 1891 ; and Samuel Ver- 
planck Hoffman, who married Louisa N. Smith. 



CHITTENDEN, Richard Percy 

Harvard A.B. 1888, LL.B. 1891. 
Born in Brooklyn, N. Y., 1866 ; educated at Polytech- 
nic Institute of Brooklyn, at Harvard (1888) and at 
the Harvard Law School, 1891 ; practised in Boston, 



UNIVERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



26 



3 



Chicago, New York ; Counsel for the Brooklyn Elevated 
Railroad Company ; Assistant Corporation Counsel for 
the Borough of Brooklyn ; member of the Corporation 
of the Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn; member of 
the Sons of the Revolution and of several social 
organizations. 

RICHARD PERCY CHITTENDEN, Assistant 
Corporation Counsel for the Borough of 
Brooklyn, 1897-1901, was born in that city June 
12, 1866. His parents were Richard Handy and 
Lucy (Brace) Chittenden, and his ancestry includes 
Governor Robert Treat, Judge Edmund Tapp, Rev. 
Richard Mather, and Cornelius Chittenden. In 




R. PERCY CHITTENDEN 

1879 as a young man he entered the Polytechnic 
Institute of Brooklyn and there received the degree 
of Pjachelor of .Arts in 18S7. He then passed one 
year at Harvard in the Class of 18S8, after which he 
entered the Harvard Law School, where he obtained 
the degree of Bachelor of Laws in 1891. The same 
year he was admitted to the Suffolk Bar, two years 
later to the Chicago Bar antl two years after that to 
the New York ]!ar, and in those cities took up the 
active duties of his profession, not only obtaining 
admirable e.xperience in association with leading 
law firms and in private practice, but also winning 
success in all branches. From 1896 to 1898 Mr. 
Chittenden" served as Counsel for the lirooklyn 
Elevated Railroad Company. In the last mentioned 



year he was made Assistant Corporation Counsel 
for the Borough of Brooklyn. He is a member of 
the Corporation of the Polytechnic Institute of 
Brooklyn, a member of the Sons of the Revolution 
and active in numerous social organizations. On 
January 28, 1892 he married, in Montreal, Louise 
Gertrude Fisher and has two children : Vernon 
Brace and Lloyd Percy Chittenden. 



HOOPER, Franklin William 

Harvard A.B. 1875, A.M. 1897. 
Born in Walpole, N. H., 1851 ; graduated Harvard, 
1875; Principal of Keene, N. H. High School, 1877-80; 
member of Adelphi College Faculty (Brooklyn, N. Y.| 
1880-89 '< became connected with the Brooklyn Institute, 
1887 ; actively concerned in reorganizing the latter into 
the present Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences ; 
has been its Director from 1889 to the present time. 

FRANKLIN WILLIAM HOOPER, Educator, 
was born in Walpole, Cheshire county. New 
Hampshire, F'ebruary ii, 185 1, son of William and 
Elvira (Pulsifer) Hooper. His father was born in 
1 81 2, and his mother in 181 5. His paternal grand- 
parents were James Hooper (i 778-1867) and 
Eleanor (Wellington) Hooper (i 784-1857), the 
latter a daughter of Ebenezer Wellington, a Revolu- 
tionary soldier ; and his paternal great-grandfather 
was Levi Hooper. His maternal grandparents were 
David and Rebecca (Lane) Pulsifer. Having pur- 
sued his primary studies in the district school and 
attended the Walpole High School four years (1862- 
1866) he began his collegiate preparations at the 
Antioch College Preparatory School, Yellow Springs, 
Ohio, and entering Antioch College in 1870, 
remained there through the Freshman year. Joining 
the Class of 1875 at Harvard at the beginning of its 
Sophomore year, he took his Bachelor's degree, and 
remained at Harvard as a graduate student during 
the college year 18 75-1 87 6, the first three months 
of the latter year being devoted to a scientific ex- 
pedition to the Florida Reefs. He had previously 
spent his vacations in assisting upon the home farm 
and after his return from the South he continued in 
that employment until March 1877, when he became 
Principal of the Keene (New Hampshire) High 
School, a position which he held for three years. 
During that time he taught botany, zoology, physics, 
chemistry, geology, astronomy, geometry and polit- 
ical science. In 1S80 he joined the Faculty of 
Adelphi College, Brooklyn, New York, as Professor 
of Chemistry and Geology, teaching in addition to 
these studies, zoology and the higher mathematics. 



264 



UNIFERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



He retained his Professorship tlierc until 1889. 
Elected a Trustee of the Brooklyn Institute in May 
1S87, he was appointed in the following October, 
Chairman of the Committee on Scientific Work, and 
immediately began the task of preparing plans for 
its reorganization, which were aiiopted in February, 
1888. He drafted a new charter which not only 
changed the name of the institution to the Brooklyn 
Institute of Arts and Sciences, but also provided for 
the establishment of a museum. He accepted the 
Directorship in June 1SS9, and has occupied that 
position continuously to the present time, laboring 




FRANKUN VV. HOOPER 

diligently and effectively to promote the usefulness 
and progress of that institution. Professor Hooper 
is a fellow of the American Association for the Ad- 
vancement of Science, and a member of the New 
York Academy of Sciences, member of the Long 
Island Historical Society, and the New England 
Society of Brooklyn, of which he is Treasurer and 
a Director; Chairman of the Brooklyn Citizens' 
League Council, member of the Hamilton, Montauk 
and Union League Clubs, and of the American 
Committee on Lectures upon the History of Relig- 
ion, Trustee of the Brooklyn Public Library, and of 
Antioch College, and member of the Brooklyn Board 
of Education. He has lectured extensively in the 
Eastern and ]\Iiddle States upon geological, geo- 



graphical and biological subjects, and has contributed 
numerous articles upon educational topics to the 
New York and Brooklyn newspapers. In politics he 
is independent. He was made an honorary Master 
of .\rts by Harvanl in 1897. On May 23, iS76,he 
married Martha S. Holden. They have had three 
children: Rebecca Lane, born March 22, 1877; 
William Sylvester, born June 22, 1880 and died 
April 4, 1884; and Franklin Dana Hooper born 
November 30, 1883. 



HUNTINGTON, William Reed 

Harvard A.B. 1859, — S.T.D. Columbia S.T.D. 1873, — D.D. 
Princeton and Harvard. 

Born in Lowell, Mass., 1838 ; graduated at Harvard, 
1859; Assistant in Chemistry there one year; studied 
theology with Dr. F. D. Huntington, Rector of Emman- 
uel Church, Boston ; Rector of All Saints Church, 
Worcester, Mass., 1862-83; now Rector of Grace 
Church (Episcopal), New York City. 

WILLIAM REED HUNTINGTON, D.D., 
D.C.L., L.H.D., Rector of Grace Church, 
New York, was born in Lowell, Massachusetts, Sep- 
tember 20, 1838, sonof Elisha and Hannah (Hinck- 
ley) Huntington. His father was a prominent phy- 
sician of Lowell, son of the Rev. Asahel Huntington, 
a minister of Topsfield, Essex county, Massachusetts 
and a descendant of Christopher Huntington, one 
of the founders of Norwich, Connecticut, settling 
there in 1660. His early education was obtained 
in private schools and at the Norwich (Vermont), 
University which he attended one year, and he was 
graduated at Harvard with the Class of 1859. For 
the following year he taught as Assistant in Chemis- 
try to Professor Josiah P. Cooke at Harvard, and 
then took up the study of tlieology under the direc- 
tion of Dr. Frederick Dan Huntington, Rector of 
Emmanuel Church, Boston, (now Bishop of Central 
New York) whose assistant he was until called to 
the rectorship of All Saints Church, Worcester, Mas- 
sachusetts. He remained in this parish continuously 
for twenty-one years, or until 18S3, in which year 
he was called to the Rectorship of Grace Church, 
New York which he has retained to the pre- 
sent time. He has been actively concerned in 
the revision of the Book of Common Prayer, the 
revival of the Order of Deaconesses, and has also 
labored diligently for the promotion of Church unity. 
Columbia, Princeton and Harvard have each be- 
stowed upon him the Divinity degree, that of Doctor 
of Civil Law was conferred upon him by the Univer- 
sity of the South and that of Doctor of Humanities 
by Hobart College. Dr. Huntington is a mem- 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



265 



ber of the Century, University, and Harvard Clubs, 
New York. He is tiie author of The Church Idea ; 
an Essay Toward Unity, Conditional Immortality, 
The Peace of the Church, Short History of the Book 
of Common Prayer, Popular Misconceptions of the 
Episcopal Church, A National Church, Psyche ; A 
Study of the Soul ; The Spiritual House ; Four Key- 
Words of Religion, Sonnets and a Dream, and 
numerous pamphlets, sermons and addresses. In 
October, 1863, he married Theresa Reynolds (died 
1872), daughter of Edward Reynolds, M.D. of Bos- 




W. R. HUXTINGTON 



ton, and a niece of Wendell Phillips : he has four 
children : Francis Cleaveland, Margaret Wendell, 
Theresa, and Mary Hinckley Huntington. 



KENT, Edward 

Harvard A.B. 1821. 
Born in Concord, N. H., 1802; graduated Harvard, 
1821 ; began the practice of law at Bangor, Me., 1825 ; 
Chief-Justice of the Court of Sessions, 1827-28 ; mem- 
ber of the Me. Legislature ; Mayor of Bangor ; U. S. 
Consul at Rio Janeiro ; Associate Justice of the Su- 
preme Court, 1859-73; died 1877. 

EDWARD KENT, LL.D., Jurist, was born in 
Concord, New Hampshire, January 8, 1S02, 
son of ^^"iHian1 .Austin Kent. His father, who is a 
native of Charlestown, Massachusetts, settled in 



Concord, and his mother, who was born in Sterling, 
Massachusetts, was a sister of Prentiss Mellen, first 
Chief Justice of the Maine Supreme Court. The 
Class of 1 82 1, with which Edward Kent was gradu- 
ated, sent out a number of men who subsequently 
won distinction, among them Josiah Quincy, Presi- 
dent of Harvard ; Robert Barnwell, President of 
South Carolina College; Ralph Waldo Emerson, 
and Judge Edward G. Loring. For preceptors in 
his legal studies, Mr. Kent had Benjamin Orr, a 
noted Maine lawyer of his day, and Chancellor 
Kent, the distinguished legal commentator; and, 
locating at Bangor, Maine, in 1825, he further 
qualified himself for his profession by practising in 
the Court of Common Pleas for two years, accord- 
ing to the established regulations, and was admitted 
to full membership of the Penobscot County Bar in 
1827. During his long and successful career, he 
was associated with but two partners, first with 
Jonathan Rogers, at one time .Attorney-General of 
Maine, and from 1S31 to 1849 "'''i Jonas Cutting, 
afterward Justice of the Supreme Court. From 
April 1827 to December 1828 he served as Chief- 
Justice of the Court of .Sessions, and was subse- 
quently active in local public affairs, taking particular 
interest in educational matters and holding for some 
time the office of Superintendent of Schools. He 
was elected to the Legislature in 1828 and re- 
elected in the following year, was Mayor of Bangor 
for the years 1S36-1837 ; was from the latter year 
until 1S42 Governor of the state, to which office he 
was elected by the Whig party. The North Eastern 
Boundary dispute which for a time threatened to 
culminate in a collision between the Maine State 
Militia and the British troops stationed in the ad- 
joining province of New Brunswick, reached during 
his administration, a state of excitement which 
made absolutely necessary an immediate and per- 
manent settlement ; and having succeeded in con- 
vincing President Tyler of the necessity of a speedy 
adjustment by the federal government, he was 
selected by the Legislature in 1842 as a commis- 
sioner from Maine to confer upon the subject with 
Daniel Webster, then Secretary of State. In 1S49 
Governor Kent was appointed L'nitcd States Consul 
to Rio Janeiro, Brazil, where he remained four 
years, and while residing there two of his children 
fell victims to yellow fever. Upon his return he 
resumed the practice of law, which he pursued with 
activity until raised to the Bench of the Supreme 
Judicial in 1859. At the expiration of his first term 
in 1866, he was reappointed, ser\*ing until 1873. 



266 



UNIVERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



The ensuing year was devoted to travel in Europe. 
On his return once more engaging in practice, he 
was a cons]>icuous figure in the state courts for the 
remaining three years of his hfe, which terminated 
May 19, 1877. His last public service was ren- 
dered as President of the Maine Constitutional 
Convention of 1875. In the discharge of his pro- 
fessional duties he was noted for his integrity and 
faithfulness, and as a Judge he was equally zealous 
in promoting the ends of justice, sustaining his high 
position with attractive dignity. His conception of 
tnic citizenship, which as near as possible ap- 



Rev. Otis Rockwood, of Lynn, Massachusetts ; they 
had one son, Edward Kent, who was graduated at 
Harvard in 1883, subsequently attended the Col- 
umbia Law School, and is now practising in New 
York City. 




EDW. KENT 

proached the ideal in loftiness, was marked by an 
earnest desire to improve the intellectual, moral 
and religious welfare of the community, and his 
views upon the latter subject were those of a liberal, 
high minded and sincere Christian. He was for 
forty-six years a member of the Maine Historical 
Society. Judge Kent married for his first wife 
Sarah, daughter of Nathaniel Johnston, of Hills- 
borough, New Hampshire, and the children of that 
union were Charlotte, who became the wife of an 
English gentleman in Rio Janeiro, and James, both 
of whom died in that city; and Kitty Kent, who 
died in 1857, surviving her mother, who died four 
years before. His second marriage which took 
place in 1855, was with Abby Anne, daughter of 



KIDDER, Camillus George 

Harvard A.B. 1872, LL.B. 1875. 
Born 1850; graduated Harvard, 1872 ; Harvard Law 
School, 1875 ; completed his legal studies in N. Y. City ; 
admitted to the Bar, 1877 ; is a successful lawyer of the 
metropolis. 

CAMILLUS GEORGE KIDDER, Lawyer, was 
born in Balitimore, Maryland, July 6, 1850, 
son of Camillus and Sarah (Herrick) Kidder. His 
original .\merican ancestor on the paternal side, 
James Kidder, of whom he is a descendant in the 
seventh generation, settled at Cambridge, Mas- 
sachusetts, in or prior to the year 1650; and his 
maternal great-great-grandfather, Israel Herrick, 
served through nineteen campaigns in the French 
and Indian Wars, participated in the Battle of 
Bunker Hill, and held the rank of Major in the 
Continental Army. I'he regular course at Phillips 
(Exeter) Academy prepared him for Harvard, 
where he took his Bachelor's degree with the Class 
of 1872, and after graduating from the Harvard Law 
School (1875) he com])leted his professional studies 
in New York City with James Emott, sometime 
Judge of the New York Court of Appeals. In 1877 
he was admitted to the Bar, and two years later 
became junior partner in the firm of Emott, Ham- 
mond & Kidder, which continued in business until 
the death of Judge Emott. In 1891 he formed a 
co-partnership with John S. Melcher, under the 
firm name of Kidder & Melcher, which in 1896 was 
changed to Ivins, Kidder & Melcher by the ad- 
mission of William M. Ivins, and this concern is 
transacting a large and profitable legal business at 
No. 27 William Street, New York. Mr. Kidder 
gives his attention chiefly to corporation and pro- 
bate business, seldom appearing in court as an 
advocate ; but has achieved a good reputation as a 
consulting lawyer, and also holds a number of 
trusteeships. Since 1S88 he has been a member 
of the Advisory Board of the Memorial Hospital of 
Orange, New Jersey, where he resides, and was 
School Commissioner there from 1S90 to 1893. 
He is a member of the Phi Beta Kappa Alumni 
Society and Harvard Alumni Association; the 
\Vashington Association of New Jersey, and the 
Bunker Hill Association of Boston; the New Eng- 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



267 



land Societies of New York and Orange, being at 
the present time Vice-President of the Orange 
Organization ; is Vice-Chancellor of the Colonial 
Order, (New York Chapter), and member of the 




C. G. KIDDEK 

Phillips (Exeter) Academy Alumni Association, the 
Orange Valley Social Settlement, the Geographical 
Society of New York, and other organizations. 
He is a Trustee of the Marine Biological Laboratory 
at Woods Hole, Massachusetts, and a member of 
the University, Harvard, and Reform Clubs of New 
York, and the Cosmos Club, Washington, District 
of Columbia. Politically he is a Sound-Money 
Democrat, has been identified with various reform 
movements in Orange tending toward improvement 
in municipal affairs, and belongs to the Civil Service 
Reform Association. On December 3, 1881, he 
married Matilda Cushman Faber ; they have three 
children : Jerome Faber, Lois Faber, and George 
Herrick Faber Kidder. 



ent time ; Prof. Surgery Detroit Homeopathic College ; 
Editor Medical Counselor. 

STEPHEN HERRICK KNIGIIP, A.^L, M.D., 
was born in Salem, Massachusetts, October 
31, 1862, son of Edward Hale and Mary ^[eek 
(Russell) Knight. He traces his ancestry to John 
and Richard Knight, who emigrated from Romsey, 
County Hants, England, in 1635, to Newbury, 
Massachusetts, being a lineal descendant in the 
eighth generation of the former and indirectly 
descended from the latter, and through the various 
marriage connections of his ancestors is descended 
from the Hale, Noyes, Jaques, Lowell, Little, 
Coffin, IJrocklebank and other l^ssex county (Mas- 
sachusetts) families. His mother's fiimily, the Rus- 
sells, were among the early settlers of Marblehead, 
that state. He was graduated at the Salem High 
School in 1879, at Harvard in 1883, and at the 
New York Homeopathic College and Hospital in 
1886. The succeeding two years were devoted 
chiefly to professional study at the Pellevue Medical 
College and Hospital, during which time he was the 




Sl'EPHEN H. KNIGHT 



KNIGHT, Stephen Herrick 

Harvard A.B. 1883. 
Born in Salem, Mass., 1862; graduated Harvard, t^ j xjr i i- 

1883 ; N. Y. Homeopathic College, 1886 ; A.M. Detroit Resident Surgeon at Professor William Tod Helmuth s 

College 1896 ; spent two years at Bellevue Hospital Surgical Hospital, and also spent six months in the 

Medical College; same length of time at Prof. Hel- Hahnemann Hospital, New York. In 188S he 

muth's Surgical Hospital; and six months at Hahne- , . t, . ,. a i; ,1,;,.,^ .i.lior/> ho Vnc sinrc 

,T • , «r ,,^- , J • T^ •.«,!• u located in Detroit, Michig.in, where ne nas since 

mann Hospital, N. Y. City; located in Detroit, Mich., ,. 1 l 

.888; Surgeon to the Grace Hospital from 1890 to pres- resided. Shortly after settling there he W..S ap- 



268 



UNIVERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



pointed House Surgeon at Grace Hospital, and 
from 1890 to the present time he has served as 
Surgeon to that institution and its Dispensary. He 
is Medical Examiner for the National Union and 
Federal Union ; is Local Surgeon for the Rankers' 
Accident Insurance Company, and is similarly con- 
nected with other organizations. Dr. Knight has 
been Treasurer of the Detroit I'hysicians' Protective 
.Association since 1S93, and President of the Detroit 
Practitioners' Society, 1896-189 7, and Correspond- 
ing Secretary of the Michigan State Medical Society 
in 1S98. In 1896 he became Editor of the Medical 
Counselor and in 1898 was elected Secretary and 
also Professor of Surgery in the Detroit Homeopathic 
Medical College. He is a member of the American 
Institute of Homeopathy, the Society of Colonial 
Wars, Sons of the .American Revolution, Detroit 
Commandery, Knights Templar, and the Athletic, 
Fellowcraft, New England, and Congregational 
Clubs. In 1896 Detroit College made him a Master 
of .Arts. On October 16, 1890, he married Sarah 
Elizabeth Gifford, daughter of Rufus B. and Sarah 
E. (Hayward) Gifford, of Salem, Massachusetts. 
They have two sons : Hale Gifford Knight, born 
October 26, 1891 ; and Rufus Hayward Knight, 
born July 6, 1S95. 



WEST, George Webb 

Harvard A.B. 1872, M.D. 1880. 
Born in Salem, Mass., 1850; graduated, Harvard, 
1872; Harvard Medical School, 1880; continued his 
studies in Vienna, Paris and London ; served on the 
Mass. General Hospital Staff, 1882-88; Demonstrator 
of Bandaging and Apparatus at the Harvard Medical 
School, 1884-88. 

GEORGE WEBB WEST, M.D., Physician and 
Instructor at the Harvard Medical School, 
was born in Salem, Massachusetts, May 17, 1850. 
From the Salem public schools he entered Harvard, 
taking his Bachelor's degree in 1872, and after two 
years of study and travel abroad he matriculated in 
the Medical Department of that University from 
which he was graduated in 1880. Having still 
further added to his professional preparations by 
pursuing advanced courses in Vienna, Paris and 
London, he was in 18S2 made a Staff Surgeon at 
the Massachusetts General Hospital, where he had 
previously served as an Interne, and he retained his 
connection with that institution until 1888, when 
failing health compelled him to resign. Dr. West 
is a member of the Boston Societies for Medical 
Improvement and Medical Observation, and from 



1884 to 1888 was Demonstrator of Bandaging and 
the Use of Surgical .Appliances at the Harvard 
Medical School. On November 6, 1885, he mar- 
ried Rose, daughter of the late Hon. Leverelt Sal- 
tonstall, of Chestnut Hill, Brookline, Massachusetts. 



INGALLS, Melville Ezra 

Harvard LL. B. 1863. 
Born in Harrison, Me., 1842 ; studied at Bowdoin ; 
graduated Harvard Law School, 1863 ; practised in 
Boston, 1864-73 ; member of the Massachusetts Senate, 
1868; now residing in Cincinnati, O.; President of the 
Chesapeake and Ohio Ry. and the Cleveland, Cincin- 
nati, Chicago & St. Louis Ry. 

MI^ATLLE EZRA INGALLS, Lawyer and 
Railroad President, was born in Harrisc)n, 
Maine, September 6, 1842, son of Ezra T. and 




.M. E. in(;ali.s 

Louisa (Maybury) Ingalls. He is of English de- 
scent and his ancestors came originally from Lincoln- 
shire. He attended the common schools and the 
North Bridgeton (Maine) Academy, from which 
latter he entered Bowdoin but left before the com- 
pletion of his course to become a student at the 
Harvard Law School, where he was graduated in 
1863. Locating in Boston, in 1864, he practised 
his profession successfully in that city until 1873 
when he became interested in western railways and 
subsequently held the Presidency of several different 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



269 



lines. He is at the present time President of the 
Chesapeake & Oiiio, and the Cleveland, Cincinnati, 
Chicago & St. Louis raihvays with headquarters in 
Cincinnati. During his residence in Boston, Mr. 
Ingalls was elected to the Massachusetts Senate, 
holding a seat in that body in the Legislature of 
1868. His club associations are with the Queen 
City Club, Cincinnati, the Metropolitan and Man- 
hattan Clubs of New York, and the Metropolitan 
Club, Washington, District of Columbia. On Janu- 
ary 19, 1867, he married Abbie Stimson. 



MERRILL, Edward Bagley 

Harvard Law School 1859. 
Born in New Bedford, Mass., 1835; graduated Bow- 
doin 1857; studied law in New Bedford, Mass., at 
Harvard, and in N. Y. City ; admitted to the Bar, i860 ; 
has ever since practised in New York. 

EDWARD BAGLEY MERRILL, Lawyer, was 
born in New Bedford, Massachusetts, Jan- 
uary 25, 1835, second son of Edward and ^L^ry 
(Converse) Merrill. He is of early Colonial an- 
cestry, being a lineal descendant of Nathaniel Mer- 
rill, of Newbury, Massachusetts, 1695, and his 
parents were both natives of Maine. His grand- 
father, Roger Merrill, who was born in Newbury, 
Massachusetts, February i, 1762, and served in the 
Revolutionary War from September 2 to December 
8, 1 781 as a private in Captain John Pearson's 
Company, Lieutenant Colonel Putnam's Regiment, 
married Dorothy Cushing, who was born RLay 2, 
1767, daughter of the Rev. John Cushing (Harvard 
1729) ; the latter a son of the Rev. Caleb and 
Elizabetli (Cotten) Cushing. Rev. John Cushing 
was first Pastor of the second church in Boxford, 
Massachusetts. On the maternal side he is a grand- 
son of Dr. John Converse, (born in New Hamp- 
shire in 1772), who was married in Windham, 
Maine, to Sarah Hanson, and was the first physician 
to settle at South-West Bend, Durham, that state, 
where he died in 1S15. In 1849 Pxlward B. Mer- 
rill entered the Norwich (Vermont) University, a 
military school, which he attended for a time, going 
from there to Phillips (Exeter) .Academy, where he 
was fitted for College with the Class of 1853, and 
was graduated at Bowdoin with the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts in 1857, receiving that of Master 
of .Vrts in course. The succeeding eighteen months 
were devoted to reading law in the office of the 
Hon. William W. Crapo, of New Bedford, after 
which he" attended the Harvard Law School for a 
year. He completed his professional studies with 



Messrs. Stanley & Langdell, New York City, and 
was admitted to the Bar in May i860. Locating 
permanently in the metropolis, he has resided there 
continuously to the present time, giving his prin- 
cipal attention to commercial and corporation law 
and practising in the State and Federal courts with 
success. During his professional career he has 
appeared in a number of important cases, one of 
which resulted in determining the property right of 
a seat in a Stock Exchange. This is now recog- 
nized as the leading case on the subject in Amer- 
ican law, in the books. Mr. Merrill is a member 




EDWARD H. .MERRILL 

of the Board of Managers of the New York State 
Colonization Society, of the Executive Committee 
of the New York Prison Association, and formerly 
one of the Managers of the Berkshire Industrial 
F"arm. He holds membership in the Citizens' 
L^nion, and the University, and Good-Government 
Clubs. Politically he favors Democratic principles, 
but acts independently, and has never sought for or 
held public office. He has contributed quite ex- 
tensively to newspapers and magazines upon timely 
topics, and has delivered a number of addresses 
which \vere well received and subsequently printed. 
On September 12, 1S61, he married Mary Eliza- 
beth Gibbs, third daughter of Alexander and Mary 
Gibbs, of New Bedford ; they have one son, Edward 
Gibbs Merrill (Columbia 1897). 



270 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



CURTIS, George Milton, Jr. 

Yale LL.B. 1893. 
Born in N. Y. City, 1872: educated at Mt. Pleasant 
Military Academy and at Lehigh University ; graduated 
Yale Law School, 1893 ; employed on the Democratic 
State Committee, 1893-94; served in the Corporation 
Counsel's office of New York City for some time, and 
then entered the office of William F. Sheehan, where 
he remained as confidential clerk until 1898, when he 
went to Brooklyn to try negligence cases for his firm ; 
Inheritance Tax Appraiser in the probate court. 

Gi:OR(;i': MILTON CURIIS, jr., Lawyer, 
was born in New York City, December 29, 
1872, son of George Milton Curtis, for over thirty 




ings for the Cornell Dam, which is the source of 
New York's water supply, and wliich involved awards 
of several huiulred tliousand dollars. In December 
1894, Mr. Curtis entered the law office of llun. 
William F. Sheehan, formerly Lieutenant-Governor 
of New York, where he has since continued, Mr. 
Sheehan forming a partnership wuh Charles A. 
Collin in 1895. The firm is one of the best known 
corporation law firms in New York, representing, as 
it does, the interests of the Belmonts, the Roswell P. 
Flower estate, the Brooklyn Rapid Transit Company, 
which system includes every line in King's County, 
both surface and elevated ; the American Indies 
Company ; the interests of Anthony M. Brady, the 
surface-railroad and gas magnate ; the Colonial and 
the Central Trust Companies ; the Edison Electric 
Company, and many other large corporations. Mr. 
Curtis, in his capacity as one of the attorneys for 
the Brooklyn Rapid Transit System, has charge of 
all the damage suits against the Brooklyn Trolley 
Lines, amounting to $500 and under, and involving 
a value of at least $50,000 per year. In charge 
of these cases he has a winning peicentage of over 
90%. He was appointed, by Surrogates .Arnold and 
Fitzgerald, Inheritance Tax .Appraiser for New York 
county, and as such passes on over one hundred 
estates every year. He is regarded as a rising 
negligence lawyer and Surrogate's Court practitioner, 
not only because of constant practice, but because 
of his natural aptitude for these branches of the law. 
Mr. Curtis is a member of the Pequod and Yale 
Clubs, Phi Delta Theta, the T. N. E. Society, Book 
and Gavel Law Society of Yale, has been a Demo- 
crat in politics, and is a member of Tammany Hall 
General Committee. 



GEO. M. CUKTIS, JR. 

years one of the most prominent members of the 
New York Bar, and Caroline Gertrude Minor. His 
father's family, originally Irish and Corsican, have 
been located in Massachusetts for over a hundred 
years, and his mother's family resided in New York 
before the Revolution. He was educated at the Mount 
Pleasant Military .Academy at Sing Sing, New York, 
and at the Lehigh Univeisity, and then entered the 
Yale Law School, graduating from the latter institu- 
tion in 1893. For some time after his graduation he 
was employed on the Democratic State Committee of 
New York, and in the spring of 1894 entered the 
office of the Corporation Counsel of the City of 
New York, having charge of condemnation proceed- 



BACKUS, Joseph Willes 

Yale B.A. 1846, M.A. 
Born in Franklin, Conn., 1823; prepared for College 
at the Bacon Academy, Colchester ; graduated Yale, 
1846; Tutor 1849-51; studied theology at Yale and 
was licensed to preach in 1852; elected Fellov/ of the 
Corporation, 1875. 

JOSEPH WILLES B.ACKUS, M.A., Clergy- 
man, and Fellow of the Yale Corporation, was 
born in Franklin, Connecticut, February 19, 1823, 
and fitted for College at the Bacon .Academy in 
Colchester. He was graduated at Yale in the Class 
of 1846 and at once entered upon the occupation 
of teaching. This he pursued for three years, when 
he received the appointment of Tutor at Yale, per- 
forming the duties of that position while studying 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



271 



theology at the Divinity School of the University. 
He was licensed to preach in 1852, and has since 
been settled as Pastor over several congregations in 
Massachusetts and Connecticut. He was elected a 




J. W. BACKUS 

Fellow of the Yale Corporation in 1875. At present 
Rev. Mr. Backus is retired from active service, and 
resides in Farmington, Connecticut. The degree 
of Doctor of Divinity was conferred on him by 
Olivet College in 1895. 



CAMP, David Nelson 

Yale M A. (Hon.) 1853. 
Born in Durham, Conn., 1820 ; fitted for Yale, but 
was prevented by illness from concluding his College 
course ; taught in public schools and academies, 1840- 
50; Professor in Conn. State Normal School, 1850- 
55; Associate Principal, 1855-57; Principal and State 
Superintendent of Schools of Connecticut, 1857-66: 
M.A. Yale 1853 ; Professor of St. John's College, 
Maryland. 1866-67: engaged in educational work in the 
Bureau of Education at Washington for some years; 
connected with manufacturing and financial corpor- 
ations as director and executive officer for the last ten 
years; Alderman of New Britain, Conn., 1872-76; 
Mayor, 1877-79 ; member of General Assembly, 1879, 
and Chairman of the Committee on Education. 

D.UTD NELSON CAMP, M.A., Educator, 
Was born in Durham, Connecticut, October 
3, 1S20, son of Elah and Orit (Lee) Camp. On 



his father's side he is a descendant of Nicholas Camp 
of Nasing, England, whose son, Nicholas, came to 
America and settled in Milford, Connecticut, about 
1660. His mother is descended from Theophilus 
Eaton, one of the first settlers of New Haven and 
the first Governor of the New Haven Colony. He 
was educated in public and private schools and 
under private tutors, prepared to enter Yale, but a 
long and severe illness, followed by great weakness 
of the eyes, prevented a full College course. From 
1840 to 1850 Mr. Camp taught in public schools 
and academies and in the latter year was made 
Professor in the Connecticut State Normal School. 
He became Associate Principal in 1855 and Princi- 
pal and State Superintendent of Schools in 1857, 
holding the latter position until 1866, when he 
resigned with the intention of devoting some time 
to visiting several of the principal educational in- 
stitutions of Europe. He visited the more impor- 
tant Universities, Colleges and Training Schools in 
England, Scotland, and Ireland, and several on the 
continent. While in Paris he was appointed Pro- 
fessor in St. John's College in Maryland. .After a 
3'ear's service in this position he resigned to engage 




U.WID X. CV.MP 



in work with Dr. Henry Barnard in the Bureau of 
Education in W'ashington, and subsequently was en- 
gaged in literary and educational work in Connecti- 
cut. Mr. Camp's work as an educator extends over 



272 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



Rudd's School in Huntington, Connecticut, prepara- 
tory to his matriculation at Vale in 1S26, graduated 
in 1829 with the degree of Bachelor of Arts, and 
engaged in farming, which he followed for twenty 
years. He was chosen a member of the State Sen- 
ate of Connecticut in 1845 ; was sent to the House 
of Representatives as a representative of his native 
town during five successive Congresses, and was 
again chosen member of the State Senate in 1856. 
In 1 86 1 he was elected Comptroller of Public Ac- 
counts of the State of Connecticut, was re-elected 



forty years, interrupted twice by ill-health, and was tion in private schools in his native town, attending 
finally relinquished on the advice of his physicians. 
}Ie is the author of the American Year Book, the 
History of New Britain and several school text- 
books and maps. Mr. Camp has been a Republican 
in politics since the formation of that party. He 
was chosen Alderman of the City of New Britain in 
1872, and served until 1876, and was Mayor in 
1877-1879. He was also a member of the General 
.Assembly in 1879, in which he served as Chairman 
of the Committee on Education. He was Secretary 
of the National Teachers .Association in 1S64, and 
was President of the Connecticut .State Teachers 
Association several years, and has been .Auditor of 
the Missionary Society of Connecticut since 1882 ; 
Auditor of the National Council of Congregational 
Churclics since 1883, and for the last ten years has 
been connected with a number of manufacturing and 
financial corporations as Director and executive 
officer. He is also actively interested in church and 
temperance work. He was President of the Con- 
necticut State Temperance Union for ten years, and 
is a member of the .American Board of Foreign 
Missions, the American Missionary .Association, 
American Bible Society, Congregational Home Mis- 
sionary Society, Connecticut Missionary Society, 
Connecticut Humane Society, Connecticut Bible 
Society, Connecticut Historical Society, and Con- 
necticut Congregational Club. Mr. Camp married, 
June 25, 1844, Sarah .Adaline Hovvd. They have 
two children : Ellen R. Camp, President of the 
Woman's Missionary Union of Connecticut, and 
(Mrs.) Emma Camp Rogers. 




CUTLER, Leman Woodward 

Yale B.A. 1829. 
Born in Watertown, Conn., 1807 ; fitted for College 
privately ; B.A. Yale, 1829 ; engaged in farming for 
twenty years ; member of Connecticut State Senate 
in 1845 ^"'i again in 1856, and a member of the House 
of Representatives during five Congresses ; elected 
Comptroller of Public Accounts of Connecticut, five 
times, 1861-65, 3nd again in 1866 to fill a vacancy ; 
Judge of Probate twenty-four successive years; Town 
Clerk of Watertown thirty-nine successive years ; 
Town Treasurer ten years ; County Commissioner, 
Litchfield county, six years. 

LEMAN WOODWARD CUTLER, for many 
years prominent in the public life of 
Connecticut, was born in Watertown, Connecticut, 
December 12, 1807, son of Younglove and Anna 
(^Woodward) Cutler, both of whom came of old 
Connecticut families. He received his early educa- 



L. W. CUTLER 

during the four following years and chosen by the 
Legislature in 1866 to fill a vacancy, the regularly 
chosen Comptroller declining to serve. He was 
elected Judge of Probate for twenty-four successive 
years, retiring at the age of seventy years under the 
provision of the Constitution inhibiting judicial ser- 
vice beyond that age. Mr. Cutler also served as 
Town Clerk of Watertown for thirty-nine years ; 
Town Treasurer for ten years and County Com- 
missioner for Litchfield county for six years. During 
his early life he was a Whig, but he has been an 
ardent Republican ever since the organization of the 
party. He is a member of Federal Lodge No. 17, 
Free and .Accepted Masons and was a Treasurer of 
the organization for twelve years. Mr. Cutler mar- 
ried October 31, 1831, Mary Elizabeth, daughter of 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



273 



the Rev. Frederick Holcomb. She died November 
30, 1897, leaving no ciiildren. He was no Lawyer, 
never studied any profession, but was a practical 
agriculturist. He was elected President of the 
Watertown Library association at the organization of 
this Society and was continued in that office for 
thirty-three years, when he resigned on account of 
old age and infirmities. 



FLINT, Joseph Nelson 

Yale B.A. 1861. 
Born in So. Dansville, N. Y., 1838; graduated at 
Yale, 1861; distinguished himself in the Civil War; 
engaged in educational pursuits about twenty years ; 
now a clerk in the U. S. Naval office, San Francisco, 
Cal. 

JOSKPH NELSON FLINT was born in South 
Dansville, Steuben county, New York, June 
16, 1838, son of Joseph and Susan (Phillips) Flint. 
His paternal ancestors came originally from Eng- 
land, and his mother was of Scotch descent. His 
great-grandfather participated in the Battle of 
Bunker Hill, and two of his great-uncles served at 
Queenstown Heights and Lundy's Lane in the War 
of 1812. Early in the nineteenth century his grand- 
father, Josiah Flint, accompanied by his wife, Anna, 
crossed the Hudson River and penetrated through 
the wilderness to Western New York, locating upon 
a tract of wild land in Steuben county, seven miles 
from the nearest settlement. Late on the day of 
his arrival he was obliged to visit the settlement for 
the purpose of procuring some necessary articles, 
and while returning in the darkness through the 
forest lost his way, thus being compelled to pass the 
night in a tree-top, where his lonely vigil was ren- 
dered still more uncomfortable by the savage cry of 
a panther. The dangers and privations which con- 
fronted him were eventually overcome, and as the 
approach of civilization made the hostile savages 
and wild beasts less troublesome, the sturdy pioneer 
was enabled to clear and bring his land into a good 
state of cultivation. The usual common school 
studies and the regular course at Perry .\cademy, 
Wyoming county, New York, prepared Joseph N. 
Flint for Yale, from which he was graduated with 
the Class of 1861, carrying off the Senior iLathe- 
matical Prize, a gold medal. For the succeeding 
year he taught mathematics at the Kingston (New 
York) Academy. In 1S62 he enlisted as a private 
in the One Hundred and Tliirtieth Regiment, New 
York Volunteer Infuitry, which in the following year 
was reorganized into a cavalry regiment and became 

VOL. III. — iS 



known as the First New York Dragoons. He rose 
in regular line of promotion to the rank of First 
Lieutenant, being thrice brevetted for gallant and 
meritorious conduct on the field. His regiment 
served with distinctiou under Generals Grant and 
Sheridan during the most important period of 
the War. The Dragoons i)articipated in forty-five 
engagements, captured one thousand five hundred 
and thirty-three prisoners, nineteen pieces of artil- 
lery, twenty-one caissons, two hundred and forty 
artillery horses, one hundred and si.xty draught 
animals, forty army wagons and ambulances, and 




J. X. FLINT 

four battle flags. The First Dragoons also lost more 
men killed and wounded than any other cavalry 
regiment in a single engagement (that at Todd's 
Tavern in May, 1864), and a full account of its 
achievements is contained in its history, which was 
written by the subject of this sketch and published 
by Gibson Brothers, Washington, District of Colum- 
bia. .\fter leaving the .Army he became Vice-Prin- 
cipal of Ten Broeck .\cademy, Franklinville, New 
York, remaining there two years ; was Principal of 
the public schools of Virginia City, Nevada, 1870- 
187 I ; Superintendent of schools in Storey county, 
Nevada, 1872-1875 ; City Editor of the Territorial 
Enterprise, Virginia City, for a number of years ; 
and settling in San Francisco, California, in 1886, 



274 



UNIVERSiriES AND rHElR SONS 



has ever since held a clerkship in the United States 
Naval office in that city. Mr. Flint has never 
married. He still possesses his old-time vigor both 
physically and mentally at the close of the century, 



mines — eleven in number — in the interests of four 
closely allied mining companies. He was Super- 
intendent and (Jeneral Manager for these allied 
companies from their inception in 1882 until 1.SS6, 



and finds much pleasure in keeping up the study of when ill health compelled him to resign from all 



Latin and mathematics. 



HULST, Nelson Powell 

Yale B.A. 1867, Ph.B. 1869. Ph.D. 1870. 
Born in East Brooklyn, N. Y., 1842; fitted for Col- 
lege in private schools; B.A. Yale, 1867; Ph.B. Shef- 
field Scientific School, i86g; Ph.D. Yale, 1870; engaged 
in mining engineering work in the Lake Superior 
district since graduation, since 1897 as General Man- 
ager of the Oliver Iron Mining Company; first Presi- 
dent of the Lake Superior Mining Institute. 

NELSON POWELL HULST, B..\., Ph.B., 
Ph.D., General Manager of the Oliver Iron 
Mining Company of Milwaukee, was born in East 
Brooklyn, New York, February 8, 1842, son of 
Garret Hulst and Nancy Powell. The family is 
of Dutch ancestry, and its representatives were 
among the very earliest settlers of the New Nether- 
lands. Nelson P. Hulst attended in childhood a 
private school in East Brooklyn, and later began 
preparation for College in the school of Caleb 
Hullowell, a Quaker, in .'Alexandria, Virginia. When 
that town became a military camp on the outbreak 
of the Civil War in 1861, Hallowell's school was 
closed, and the subject of this sketch went to Sandy 
Spring, Montgomery county, Maryland, finished 
his pre-collegiate work there, and matriculated 
at Yale in 1S63, graduating as Bachelor of Arts in 
1867. He entered the Sheffield Scientific School 
of Yale in that year, his studies being in the line of 
preparation for the work of mining engineer. Dur- 
ing his last year there he taught assaying, and 
graduated with the degree of Bachelor of Philosophy 
in 1869. After a year of post-graduate work the 
University conferred upon him the degree of Doctor 
of Philosophy in 1870. Before graduation in 1870, 
Mr. Hulst was offered the position of Professor of 
Chemistry in the Naval School at .Annapolis, but 
declined it to take the position of Chemist and 
Engineer with the Milwaukee Iron Company. In 
1872, as mine expert for this company, he made a 
reconnaissance of the then recently discovered 
Menominee Iron range. Having made a favorable 
report thereon, he was commissioned in that year 
to make extensive explorations along much of its 
length. During the interval from 1872 to 1877 he 
discovered or opened up nearly all of its largest 



duties. In 1887 Mr. Hulst became the Manager of 
the Pewabic Mining Company, but resigned in 1897 
to take his present position with the Oliver Iron Min- 
ing Company, one of the largest in the United 
States or elsewhere, which controls between twenty 
and thirty of the largest iron mines. Mr. Hulst was 
first President of the Lake Superior Mining Insti- 




NELSON P. HULST 

tute, and is a member of the Engineers' Club of 
New York, the University Club of Milwaukee, Kitchi 
Gammi Club of Duluth, Iron Mountain Club of 
Iron Mountain, Mich., and the American Institute 
of Mining Engineers, and is a Republican in politics. 
He married. May 12, 1875, Florence Terry of 
Milwaukee, Wis. They have five children. Mr. 
Hulst has been a member of the Plymouth Con- 
gregational Church of Milwaukee for over twenty 
years, and has several times served it as Deacon and 
Trustee. 

DeGROVE, Edward Ritzema 

Yale B.A. 1869 ; Columbia LL.B. 1871. 
Born in N. Y. City, 1848; received his early edu- 
cation and fitted for College at Russell's School in 



UNIFERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



^7S 



New Haven and Bacon's School in Woodbury ; B.A. 
Yale, 1869 ; LL B. Columbia Law School, 1871, and 
also studied law in the office of Norwood & Cogge- 
shall : entered the office of J. H. and S. Riker in 1872, 
later becoming a member of the firm which, since 1893, 
has been DeGrove & Riker; engaged in the practice 
of his profession in N. Y. City. 

EDWARD RITZEMA DeGROVE, Lawyer, was 
bom in New York City, May 5, 1848. His 
parents were Edward Weeks and Hester Strachan 
DeGrove. The famil\', originally French, emigrated 
to Holland and thence to New York during the 
early history of that Colony ; and on his mother's 




E. RITZEMA DeGROVE 

side he is descended from the Rev. Johannes Rit- 
zema, who came from Holland and preached for 
some years in the Old Dutch Church which formerly 
occupied the present site of the Mutual Life Build- 
ing in New York City. He received his early edu- 
cation and College preparation at Russell's School 
in New Haven and Bacon's School in Woodbury, 
Connecticut, entering Yale in 1865 and graduating 
as Bachelor of Arts in 1869. While at College he 
was prominent in athletics ; in base-ball during his 
Freshman and Sophomore years and in boating dur- 
ing the last two years of his course. He entered 
Columbia Law School in 1869, at the same time 
studying law in the office of Norwood & Coggeshall. 
He was admitted to the New York Bar in 1870 and 



graduated from Columbia College Law School in 
the year following. In 1872 he commenced a clerk- 
ship in the law office of J. H. & S. Riker, later 
entering the firm. Both of the original partners 
retiring, the firm in 1893 became DeGrove & Riker, 
Samuel Riker, Jr. becoming a partner. The firm 
has always been connected with the conve)'ancing 
branch of the law and is one of the oldest in the 
city, dating back to 1795. I' has had in its care 
the management of some of the largest estates in 
New York City, and has loaned large amounts for 
its clients on bond and mortgage. Mr. DeGrove 
is a Republican in politics though he never sought 
public office. He is a member of the L'nion 
League, the University, lawyers' and Yale Clubs, 
the Bar Association of the City of New York, the 
Surburban Riding and Driving Club and the Lieder- 
kranz Society. He married, October 18, 18S2, 
Henriette C. Waters, nee Cardoze, who had one 
daughter. Georgette, now the wife of Edward Perry. 
Mr. DeGrove has no issue now living of his marriage. 



DOSTER, William Emile 

Vale B.A. 1857 ; Harvard LL.B. 1859. 
Born in Bethlehem, Penn.. 1837; received his early 
education in the Moravian Schools of Bethlehem, and 
fitted for College at Van Kirk's Academy, entering 
Sophomore Class of Yale in 1854; B.A. Yale, 1857; 
LL.B. Harvard Law School. 1859 ; studied civil law at 
Heidelberg University, 1859-60; and the Code Napo- 
leon at Paris, i860; read law under Governor Reeder, 
and admitted to the Bar at Easton, Penn., 1864 ; prac- 
tised law at Washington, D. C, 1865: Register in 
Bankruptcy, Eastern District of Penn, 1C67-79 ; prac- 
tised law in Bethelem since that date, being counsel for 
many large corporations; served in Union Army 
throughout the Civil War, retiring as Colonel and 
brevet Brigadier-General. 

WIIJJAM E^^LE DOSTER, Lawyer, was 
born in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, January 
8, 1837. His parents, Lewis and Pauline Louise 
(Eggert) Doster, were both of the good old Mo- 
ravian stock for which that portion of Pennsylvania 
is noted, and he received his early education in the 
Moravian Schools of his native town. After some 
time spent in study at Yan Kirk's .Academy at Beth- 
lehem, he entered the Sophomore class at Yale in 
1854, graduating with the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts in 1857. On graduating he took up the study 
of law at the Harvard Law School, taking the degree 
of Bachelor of I^tws in 1859. He studied civil law 
at the University of Heidelberg during 1859-1S60, 
and spent part of the latter year in the study of the 
Code Napoleon at Paris. He read law for a time 



2/6 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



under Governor Andrew Reader at Easton, Penn- 
sylvania. Mr. Hosier entered the Union Army on 
the outbreak of the Civil War in 1861 as a Captain 
in the Fourth Pennsylvania Cavalr>-, and was suc- 




\V. E. DO.STER 

cessively promoted to Major, lieutenant-Colonel, 
and finally to Colonel of the Fifth Pennsylvania 
Cavalry, at times commanding a brigade in the 
Cavalry Corps of the Army of the Potomac. He 
was brevetted Brigadier-General for gallant and 
meritorious conduct, and acted as Provost Marshal 
in the City of Washington during 1862. General 
Doster was admitted to the Bar at Easton in 1864, 
and began the practice of law in the City of Wash- 
ington in 1865, being counsel for Payne and Atzerot 
in the famous conspiracy trial. He served as Regis- 
ter in Bankruptcy for the Eastern District of Per.n- 
sylvania from 1867 to 1879, and in the latter took 
up the practice of corporation law. He is counsel 
for many large corporations, among them the Beth- 
lehem Steel Company, the Lehigh Coal & Nav. 
Company, and many railroads and iron and coal inter- 
ests. He has always been a Republican on political 
questions, but has never taken an active part in polit- 
ical life. General Doster married Ruth, daughter of 
the late General Josiah Porter of New York. They 
have five children : Edward, Wadsworth, Alexis, 
Dorothy, and Beatrice Doster. 



GEISTHARDT, Stephen Leonard 

Yale B.A. 1883; Columbia LL.B. 1885. 
Born in Germany, 1862 ; passed boyhood in Preston, 
Conn. ; fitted for College at Norwich Free Academy ; 
B.A. Yale, 1883; LL.B. Columbia Law School, 1885; 
Instructor in Modern Languages at the University of 
Nebraska, 1885-87; has practised law in Lincoln, Neb., 
since 1887; Director of the City Library, 1888-96. 

STEPHEN LEONARD GEISTILXRI) T, Law- 
yer, son of Godfrey Geisthardt and Rosalie 
Thauer, and a practising lawyer in Lincoln, 
Nebraska, since 1887, was born in Germany, Janu- 
ary 29, 1862. He attended as a boy the district 
schools of Preston, Connecticut, and after a pre- 
paratory course at the Norwich Free .Academy, 
which he entered in 1874 and was graduated from 
in 1878, he matriculated at Yale in 1879, taking 
the Acatlemical Course, and receiving the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts on his graduation in 1883. Decid- 
ing to follow the legal profession, he took up the 
study of law at the Law School of Columbia, grad- 
uating with the degree of Bachelor of Laws in 1885. 
Immediately on his graduation Mr. Geisthardt 
accepted an appointment as Instructor in the De- 




S. L. GEISTH.^RDT 



partment of Modern Languages at the University 
of Nebraska. He held this post for two years when, 
having meanwhile been admitted to the Nebraska 
Bar, he took up the practice of his profession in 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



277 



Lincoln. He is a member of tlie Union-Com- 
mercial Club of Lincoln, and has served as a 
Director of the City Library for eight years, from 
1888 to 1S96. 



HIGGINS, Samuel 

Yale Ph.B. 1881. 
Born in San Francisco, Cal., i860; graduated Yale 
Scientific School, 1881 ; entered Erie Railroad Shop at 
Susquehanna, Penn., 1881 ; Assistant Superintendent 
of Motive Power, 1892-94; Superintendent of Molive 
Power, Lehigh Valley Railroad, since 1894. 

SAMUKL HIGGINS, Superintendent of Motive 
Power of the Lehigh Valley Railroad, was 
born in San Francisco, California, February 19, 




S. HIGGINS 

i860, son of Charles Seward and Isabella (Hinckley) 
Higgins. He attended in boyhood the public 
schools of Buffalo, New York, and later entered the 
Sheffield Scientific School of Yale, taking the 
Dynamic Engineering course and graduating in 
1 88 1. In December of that year he entered the 
Erie Railroad Shop at Susquehanna, Pennsylvania. 
His promotions here were rapid. He was made 
General Foreman in 1885, Assistant to the Super- 
intendent of Motive Power in 1886, Division Master 
Mechanic, in 1887, and Assistant Superintendent of 
Motive Power in 1S92. He held this position for 



two years, until February 1894, when he entered 
the employ of the Lehigh Valley Railroad as Super- 
intendent of Motive Power, which position he still 
holds. He is a Republican, but has never been 
actively interested in politics, and is a member of 
the Theta Xi Fraternity. He married June 4, 1884, 
Maye Corbin. They have three children : Isabella, 
Albert Corbin, and Harold Higgins. 



KEASBEY, Anthony Quinton 

Yale B.A. 1843. 
Born in Salem, N.J. 1824; graduated Yale, 1843; 
admitted to the Bar, 1846; located in Newark, 1853; 
U. S. District Attorney, i85i-86; died 1895. 

ANTHONY QUINTON KEASBEY, Lawyer, 
was born in Salem, New Jersey, March i, 
1824. He was descended from early settlers in 
Salem county, and his great-grandfiither, Edward 
Keasbey, was a member of the General .Assembly 
for the colonies of Salem and Cumberland from 
1 763 to 1 769, Deputy to the Provincial Congress, 
1775 and 1776, and a member of the Council of 
Safety in 1778. For many years his son Anthony 
served as Clerk of Salem County, and as member of 
the General Assembly from 1798 to 1801. Edward 
Q. Keasbey, father of Anthony Q., studied medicine 
with Dr. Philip Physick, of Philadelphia, and prac- 
tised in Salem for the rest of his life, which termi- 
nated in 1847. He was actively interested in 
politics, possessing much natural ability for public 
ser\'ice which he exercised in his later years as 
Judge of the Court of Common Pleas, and was 
chosen as Presidential Elector on the Whig ticket 
in 1844. Graduating at Yale in 1843, Anthony Q. 
Keasbey studied law in Salem and Newark, and after 
his admission to the Bar in 1846, located for prac- 
tice in his native town. In 1853 he settled in 
Newark, where two years later he became associated 
with Cortlandt Parker, in whose office he had studied 
law for a time, and this partnership continued for 
twenty years. From 1861 to 1886 he held the 
post of L'niled States District .Attorney, receiving 
his first appointment from President Lincoln and 
his last from President .Arthur, and his long contin- 
uance in office, which is somewhat remarkable 
considering the many changes in the federal ad- 
ministration, gave general satisfaction to the people 
of the district, who sincerely appreciated the ability 
with which he discharged his duties. In 1875 he 
formed a law partnership with his two sons, 
Edward Q. and George M. Keasbey. In ad- 



278 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



dition to his high reputation as a lawyer, he 
was universally esteemed for his many manly charac- 
teristics. During the financial panic of the early 
seventies, in the face of disastrous business reverses 




A. y. KliASBEY 

he calmly refused to take advantage of tlie bank- 
ruptcy laws, preferring instead to begin anew the 
struggle for financial success, solely for the purpose 
of meeting his every obligation, which he eventually 
accomplished. Mr. Keasbey was twice married, 
both of his wives having been daughters of the 
Hon. Jacob \V. Miller, of Morristown, New Jersey, 
who served two terms in the United States Senate. 
He died in Newark in 1S95. 



more extended account of his ancestry will be 
found in a sketch of Charles Huntington Morse, 
which appears in this work. His primary and pre- 
paratory studies were pursued in the common and 
high schools of Chicago, whither he went to reside 
when seven years old. Entering Yale with the 
Class of 1887, he took the Berkeley Premium and 
Sophomore Composition Prize, and at graduation 
was awarded, in addition to his Bachelor's degree, 
an honor in English Literature, and was Class 
Speaker at Commencement. During the ensuing 
two years he travelled in Europe and also studied 
law, being admitted to the Bar at Chicago in 1889, 
and immediately engaged in practice in that city. 
At College he was Treasurer of the Yale Navy and 
a member of 'H BovXi;, the Psi Upsilon fraternity, 
and Scroll and Key, was Secretary and Treasurer of 
the Yale Alumni Association of Chicago from 1895 
to 1898 and Chairman of the executive committee 
of the Association in 1899 and is a member of the 
University Club and the Law Club of Chicago. In 
politics he is a Democrat. Mr. Morse is the author 
of an Epitome of English Literature, an article on 



MORSE, Clarence Tomlinson 

Yale B A 1887. 
Born in Mobile, Ala., 1865 ; graduated Yale, 1887 ; 
admitted to the Bar, 1889 ; now practising in Chicago. 

ILARENCE TOMLINSON MORSE, Lawyer, 
was born in Mobile, Alabama, December 
22, 1S65, son of Charles Huntington and Laura 
(Compton) Morse. His father, who was a native 
of New Haven, Connecticut, and a graduate of Yale, 
(1S39) practised law in the South for thirty years, 
and afterwards in Chicago, where he died in 1897. 
His mother was born in Jackson, Tennessee, and a 



c 




CLARENCE 1. .MuKsE 



the University Club of Chicago, a Treatise on 
Modern European Histor)-, and formerly contributed 
to the Chicago newspapers. On December 27, 
1 888, he married Elizabeth Willis Bailey, of Pitts- 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



279 



burg, Pennsylvania. They have two sons : 
ingtou Tomlinson antl Henry Bailey Morse. 



Hunt- 



PARSONS, John Caldwell 

Yale B.A. 1855. 
Born in Hartford, Conn., 1832; graduated Yale, 1855; 
studied law in Hartford and at Harvard: practised in 
Hartford about forty years; Trustee and Executor of 
many estates ; President of the Security Company 
and the Society for Savings ; died 1898. 

JOHN CALDWELL PARSON'S, Lawyer, was 
born in Hartford, Connecticut, June 3, 1832, 
son of Francis and Clarissa (Brown) Parsons. His 




JOII.V C. PARSONS 

paternal grandfather and great-grandfather, both of 
whom graduated at Harvard, were successively 
Pastors of the Congregational Church in Amherst, 
Massachusetts, and his father, who graduated at 
Yale in 1S16, was a leading member of the Con- 
necticut Bar. His mother's ancestors were pros- 
perous merchants of Guilford, Connecticut, and his 
maternal grandfather, William Brown, was gradu- 
ated from Yale in 1784. His early studies were 
pursued chiefly in the Hartford Grammar and High 
Schools. He entered Yale with the Class of 1S54, 
but his course was suspended for about a year on 
account qf ill health, and he took his Bachelor's 
degree in 1855. His legal studies began at the 



Harvard Law School, and were continued under 
the guidance of his father, and also of the Hon. 
Thomas S. Williams, his uncle, Chief Justice of the 
Connecticut Supreme Court. By force of circum- 
stances rather than from choice, his practice was of 
a fiduciary or administrative character. He was 
called upon early in his professional career to accept 
the position of trustee and executor to such an ex- 
tent as to become closely identified with that kind 
of work and the ability and faithfulness with which 
he administered the many large estates intrusted to 
his charge commended him to the universal confi- 
dence and respect of his fellow-citizens. For a 
number of years he was President of the Society for 
Savings, Hartford, one of the oldest institutions of 
its kind in the United States, and from 1894 to 
1896 he held the same office in the Security Com- 
pany, a trust and banking company of that city. 
He was also connected with numerous financial in- 
surance and charitable organizations. Mr. Parsons 
was the author of a paper of considerable local 
historical interest, describing the early topography 
of Hartford, read at the two hundred and fiftieth 
anniversary of the First Congregational Church, of 
which he was a prominent member, and he printed 
privately a pamphlet on the duties of Directors and 
Trustees. His participation in political life was 
limited, the only civil office he ever held being that 
of Chairman of the Board of Street Commissioners 
of Hartford, 1872-1878. From 1875 to 1877 he 
served in the State Militia as Major of the Gov- 
ernor's Foot Guards. He died March 11, 1898. 
On April 7, 1870, he married Mary McClellan, 
daughter of Dr. Samuel and Margaret Carswell (Ely) 
McClellan, the former of whom was a graduate of 
Yale, Class of 1823, and the latter a daughter of 
Rev. Ezra Stiles Ely, Yale, 1804. Mrs. Parsons 
died January 22, 1871, leaving one son, Francis 
Parsons, who was graduated from Yale with the 
Class of 1893. 



PECK, Vincent Charles 

Yale B.A. 1884. 
Born in Trumbull, Conn., 1863 ; graduated Yale, 
1884; engaged in educational pursuits; founder and 
head master of the University School, Bridgeport, 
Conn. 



V" 



'INCENT CHARLES PECK, Educator, 
was born in Trumbull, Connecticut, Feb- 
ruary II, 1863, the son of Chailes W. and Mary J. 
(Shelton) Peck. He was educated in the district 



28o 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



schools of his native town, the High School of port Scientific and Historical Society. On June 
Birmingham. Connecticut, and Yale, graduating 26, 1888, he married Estella Nichols I'luuib, who 
with the Class of 1884. For the succeeding year died February 13, 1891, leaving one daughter, Ruth 
he was an assistant at the West Philadelphia Estclle Peck, and tlie latter survived her mother 

less than a year. 




VINCENT C. PECK 

Academy, and from 1885 to 1891 he held the 
post of Assistant Head Master of the Hamilton 
School in that City. In 1S92 he founded and 
became Head Master of Tiie University School, 
Bridgeport, Connecticut, which was established 
with a view of providing superior opportunities for 
the training of boys and young men in those 
branches that are the necessary foundation of col- 
legiate and professional studies, as well as the best 
preparation for a successful business life. Situated 
in one of the most desirable sections of the city, this 
school possesses every facility for insuring the com- 
fort and preserving the health of its pupils ; and the 
Head Master, assisted by an efficient corps of 
instructors, is obtaining gratifying results in the 
high standing in College and business of graduates 
of the school. Its scope and usefulness have greatly 
increased since its establishment, and in 1898 it 
was deemed advisable to open a Kindergarten and 
primary department for children of both sexes. In 
politics Mr. Peck is independent. He is a member 
of the First Congregational Church and Society, 
Bridgeport, the Contemporary Club, and the Bridge- 



PALMER, Charles Ray 

Yale B.A. 1855, D.D. 1889. 
Born in New Haven, 1834; graduated Yale, 1855; 
Andover Theological Seminary, 1859; Pastor of the 
Tabernacle Congregational Church, Salem, Mass., 
1860-72 ; Pastor of First Congregational Church of 
Bridgeport, Conn., until 1895, and since. Pastor Emeri- 
tus ; orator at the unveiling of memorial tablet to 
John Robinson at Leyden, Holland; D.D. Yale, 1889; 
elected to the Corporation, 1880. 

CHARLES RAY PALMER, D.D., Fellow of 
the Yale Corporation, was born in New 
Haven, Connecticut, and graduated at Yale in the 
Class of 1855. He studied for the ministry at 
Anilover 'I'heological Seminary and entered upon 
his first Pastorate in i860 at Salem, Massachusetts, 
where he remained for twelve years with the Tab- 
ernacle Congregational Church. While residing in 




CHAS. RAV PALMER 



Salem, Dr. Palmer look an active part in educa- 
tional affairs, serving for ten years as a member of 
the School Board of that city and aiding materially 
in building up the public school system there. 



VNIVERSITIES JND THEIR SONS 



8: 



2»I 



Finding his health unfavorably affected by the 
climate of Salem, Dr. Palmer accepted a call to the 
First Congregational Church of Bridgeport, Con- 
necticut, preaching there until 1895, when he 
retired from active service, retaining his connec- 
tion with the church to the present time as Pastor 
Emeritus. Dr. Palmer represented Yale, and the 
National Council of Congregational Churches, at 
the opening of Mansfield College, O-xford, England, 
in 1889, and also at the unveiling of the memorial 
tablet to Pastor John Robinson at Leyden, Holland, 
on which occasion he was the orator of the day. 
At the International Council of Congregational 
Churches in London, iSgr, he attended as a del- 
egate from the United States, and in 1897 he 
supplied for several months the pulpit of the 
Kensington Congregational Church in that city. 
In I S89 the degree of Doctor of Divinity was 
conferred upon him by Yale, and he was elected a 
Fellow of the Corporation in 1880. 



RUNYON, Theodore 

Yale B.A. 1842, LL.D. 1882. 
Born in Somerville, N. J., 1822 ; graduated Yale, 1842; 
admitted to the Bar, 1846; City Attorney of Newark; 
Mayor of that City, 1864; attained the rank of Major- 
General in the Civil War; first President of the Manu- 
facturers' National Bank, Newark ; Chancellor of N. J., 
1873-87; U. S. Minister to Germany, 1893-96; died in 
Berlin, 1896. 

THEODORE RUNYON, LL.D., Lawyer and 
Diplomatist, was born in Somerville, New 
Jersey, October 25, 1822. He was a son of Abraham 
Runyon, who in early life was a prosperous merchant 
in New Orleans, where he amassed a fortune, and a 
descendant of Vincent Rongneon, a Huguenot wlio 
emigrated from Poitiers, France, about the year 
1668, to Middlesex county. New Jersey, and was 
the progenitor of a numerous posterity. Graduating 
at Yale with the Class of 1842 and subsequently 
studying law in Newark, New Jersey, he was admitted 
in 1846 to the Bar in that city where he engaged in 
practice and acquired prominence in his profession. 
When the Manufacturers' National Bank was organ- 
ized he was chosen its first President, retaining that 
position until 1873, when he was appointed Chan- 
cellor of the State, the duties of which include those 
of Presiding Judge of the Court of Errors and 
Appeals, and Jmlge of the Court of Pardons. In 
addition to these judicial responsibilities, he was 
confronted; shortly after entering ujion the duties of 
his office, with the task of adjusting the affairs of the 



numerous corporations that suffered financial em- 
barrassment through the disastrous business de- 
pression of the day, together with the difficulties 
arising out of railroad receiverships, as in com- 
pliance with the laws he was called upon to manage, 
while under suspension, all such enterprises in the 
interest of the public and the stockholders. The 
vast amount of complicated business incumbent 
upon him during his tenure of office, which covered 
a period of fourteen years, was administered in a 
most thoroughly competent and satisfiictory manner. 
In 1857 he was commissioned Brigadier-General of 




THEODORE RL"X\"ON 

Militia, having previously codified the military laws 
of the state under appointment by the Governor, 
and entering the Federal service at the outbreak of 
the Civil War at the head of the New Jersey quota 
he commanded a division of General .McDowell's 
Army at the first battle of Bull Run, receiving the 
commendation of that commander, and by special 
act of the New Jersey Assembly he was brevetted 
Major-General in 1862. In 1869 he was com- 
missioned Major-Cieneral and assumed command of 
the entire New Jersey National Guard. He was at 
one time City Attorney of Newark, serv-ed in the 
City Council, and as Mayor in 1864, and was the 
Democratic candidate for Governor in 1865. In 
1S93 General Runyon was appointed by President 



282 



UNIVERSITIES AND rilEIR SONS 



Cleveland Envoy Extraordinary and Minister I'leni- 
potentiary of the United States to tlie (Icrman 
Empire, succeeding the Hon. William Walter l'hcli)s, 
and died in office at Berlin of heart failure, January 
27, 1896. He was made a Doctor of Laws by 
Wesleyan in 1867, by Rutgers in 1S75, and by Yale 
in 1882. 

POTTER, James Tracy 

Vale B.A. 1894. 
Born in Bennington, Vt., 1870 ; graduated Yale, 1894 ; 
admitted to the Bar, 1896; now practising in North 
Adams, Mass. 

J.\MI':S TR.\CV PO'ITER, Lawyer, was born in 
IJennington, Vermont, January 26, 1870, son 
of .\ndrcw and Sarah (McDaniels) Potter. His 




J.-V.MliS TRACY POriEK 

paternal grandfather, .Arnold Potter, was a resident 
of Vermont, and his father who was born in Pownal, 
in that State, in 1832, and graduated at Williams 
College with the Class of 1856, served in the 
Thirty-Fourth Regiment AL^ssachusetts Volunteers 
through the Civil War, and is now a well-known 
lawyer of North .Adams. His maternal ancestors 
also resided in Vermont, and his mother was born 
in Bennington, daughter of Thomas McDaniels, a 
banker and capitalist. He was educated in the 
public schools of Bennington and North .Adams, 
at Phillips (Andover) .Academy, and Vale, graduat- 



ing in 1894. Entering immediately upon the stuily 
of law under the direction of his father, he was 
admitted to the liar in 1896, and is now conducting 
a profitable general law business in North Adams. 
Mr. Potter is a cordial supporter of President 
McKinley and the present ailministration, and is 
serving upon the Republican City Committee. He 
is a mendjer of Lincoln Camp Number 9, Massa- 
chusetts Division, Sons of \'eterans, also member of 
Knights of Pythias and the Lhiiform Rank. On 
August 12, 1896, he married Millicent Louise 
Peirce, of North Adams (Wellesley, 1894) ; they 
have one daughter, Martha Erin Potter. 



WOODHULL, John Francis 

Yale B.A. 1880 — Columbia Ph.D. 1889. 
Born in Westport, N. Y., 1857; graduated at Yale, 
1880; teacher in secondary schools, 1881-85; student in 
chemistry. Harvard Summer School, 1884-85 ; in chem- 
istry and physics. Johns Hopkins, 1885-86; teacher of 
science, N. Y. State Normal School, 1886-88; Lecturer 
at National Summer School, 1888-91 ; Professor of 
Physical Science, Teachers' College, Columbia, from 
1888 to present time ; Lecturer at Martha's Vine- 
yard Summer School, iSgo ; student in physics. Har- 
vard Summer School, 1892 ; Lecturer at Chautauqua 
Summer School, 1894; student in physics and Chem- 
istry at Columbia, 1898-99. 

JOHN FR.ANCIS WOODHULL, Ph.D., Physi- 
cist and Professor of Physical Science at 
leachers' College, Columbia, was born in Westport, 
New York, July 2, iS57,son of Rev. John A. and 
Joanna (Brown) Woodhull. His paternal ancestors 
traced their lineage to an English baron who lived 
in the time of William the Conqueror, and those 
who sympathized with Cromwell in the civil strife 
which dethroned the Stuarts, emigrated to .America 
after the restoration. The motto " Sequor nee 
inferior " was inscribed upon their coat of arms. 
Having pursued his elementary studies in the com- 
mon schools, and his College preparations at the 
AVilliston Seminary, Easthampton, Massachusetts, he 
entered Yale, from which he was graduated with his 
Bachelor's degree in the Class of 1880. In the 
following year he began his career as an educator, 
teaching in secondary schools for tlie succeeding 
five years, but by no means relinquished his studies, 
as he was a student in chemistry at the Harvard 
Summer School during the sessions of 1884 and 
1885, and jiursued courses in chemistry and physics 
at Johns Hopkins in 1 885-1 886. For the next 
two years he taught science at a New York State 
Normal School, and lectured at the National Sum- 



UNIVERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



28- 



mer School from i<S,S8 till 1S91, having in the 
mean time, (1S88) been called to the Chair of 
Physical Science at Teachers' College, Columbia, 
which he still occupies. In 1890 he lectured in the 
Summer School at Martha's Vineyard, continued his 
studies in physics at the Harvard Summer School 
in 1892, and in 1S94 held a Lectureship in the 
Summer School at Chautauqua Lake. With a view 
of fully perfecting himself for his special line of 
work he entered upon an advanced course in 
physics and ciiemistry at Columbia in 1898, and 
received the degree of Doctor of Philosophy the 




JOHN F. WOODHULL 

ensuing year. During the past ten years his studies 
and educational work have been interspersed witli 
literary labors, being the author of eleven valuable 
educational publications, and part author of four 
others. In 1886 Dr. Woodhull married Minnie E. 
Hinkley ; they have two daughters: Mildred, born 
in 1887 ; and Hazel Woodhull, born in 1S90. 



WELLS, Philip Patterson 

Yale B.A. 1889. 
Born in Grand Rapids, Mich., 1868; graduated, Yale, 
1889; graduate student 1889-91; studied in Yale Law 
School, 1851-92 ; studied in Law School of Columbian 
University, Washington, D. C, 1892-93; admitted to 
the Connecticut Bar, 1893 ; practised law in New 



Haven, Conn., i£94-96; Librarian of Yale Law School 
since 1896. 

PHHJP P.VrrERSON WELLS, Librarian of 
Yale Law School, was born in Grand Rapids, 
Michigan, February 5, 1868. He is the son of 
Lewis Gray and Mary Ellen (Wetmore) Wells, and 
through them is connected with families of May- 
flower and Plymouth Colony fame, one of the 
representatives being Thomas Welles, who was Gov- 
ernor of Connecticut in 1655. Mr. Wells was 
prepared for College at the private school of Pro- 
fessor J. B. Chenault, at Louisville, Kentucky. At 
Yale he entered the Academic Department and was 
graduated with the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 
1889. For the next two years he was a graduate 
student of political science at Yale. He then 
entered the Law School where he spent one year, 
1891-1892, going at the end of that time to the I^w 
School of Columbian University in Washington, 
District of Columbia. He remained there one year 
and then took the examinations for and was admitted 
to the Connecticut Bar in June, 1893. He practised 
law in New Haven from 1894 to 1896, discontinuing 
the practice in 1896 to accept the appointment as 
Librarian of the Yale Law School, which position he 
has continued to fill up to the present time. He 
married, ^Lay 22, 1893, Eleanor Duncan, daughter 
of Rev. T. T. Munger, D.D., of New Haven. 



SKINNER, Samuel Wolcott 

Yale B A. 1842, M.D. 1846. 
Born in New Britain, Conn., 1S20; graduated Yale, 
1842 ; Yale Medical School, 1846 ; practised in Windsor 
Locks, Conn., until i£6i ; Surgeon in the Army through- 
out the Civil \Var ; practised in Toledo, O., from 1866 to 
the present time. 

SAMUEL WOLCOTT SKINNER, M.D., Physi- 
cian, was born in New Britain, Connecticut, 
June 19, 1820, son of Rev. Newton and Ursula (Wol- 
cott) Skinner. His original American ancestor on 
the paternal side arrived from England about the year 
1630 and settled in Windsor, Connecticut. The 
Wolcottsare one of Connecticut's historical families; 
one of them was a signer of the Declaration of 
Independence, and several of its members have 
held the governorship. The Rev. Newton Skinner 
was graduated from Yale in 1S04. The subject of 
this sketch attended schools in Hartford