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Full text of "Universities and their sons; history, influence and characteristics of American universities, with biographical sketches and portraits of alumni and recipients of honorary degrees"

UNIVERSITIES 



AND 



THEIR SONS 



UNIVERSITIES 



AND 



THEIR SONS 

HISTORY, INFLUENCE AND CHARACTERISTICS OF 
AMERICAN UNIVERSITIES 



WITH 

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES AND PORTRAITS OF ALUMNI 
AND RECIPIENTS OF HONORARY DEGREES 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 
GENERAL JOSHUA L. CHAMBERLAIN, LL.D. 

l;X-PRESII)liNT OF BOWDOIN COLLEGE AND EX-GOVERNOR OK MAINE 

SPECIAL EDITORS 

Approved h-f Authoritia of the respective Universities 



HARVARD 1636 

WILLIAM ROSCOE THAYER, A.M. 

YALE 1700 

CHARLKS HKNRY SMITH, LL IX 



PRINCETON 1746 



JOHN DeWITT, D.D., LL.D. 
JESSE LYNCH WILLIAMS, A.M. 

COLUMBIA 



1754 



J. HOWARD VAN AMRINCJE, I'm. D., L.H.D., LL.D. 



BIOGRAPHICAL EDITORS 

CHARLES E. L. WINCJATE, Harvard '83 JESSE LYNCH WILLI AMS, Princeton 'yi 

ALBERT LEE, Yale -91 HENRY G. PAINE, Columbia "So 

INTRODUCriOX BV 
WILLIAM T. HARRIS, Ph.D., LL.D. 

UNITED STATES COMMISSIONER OF EDUCATION 



ILLUSTRATED 



\'oi,. V^ 



BOSTON 
R. HERNDON COMPANY 

1900 



Copyright. I^OO. by 
R. HERN DON CO MP ANT 



The University Press 
Cambridge, U.S.A. 






UNIVERSITY SONS 



630898 



UNIVERSITY SONS 



ANGELL, Elgin Adalbert 

Harvard A.B. 1873, LL.B. 1875. 
Born in Forestville, N. Y.,1849; prepared for College 
at Adalbert Academy, Ontario; graduated Harvard, 
1873; Harvard Law School, 1875; practised law in 
Cleveland, O., 1877-98; commissioner to investigate 
the tax system in Ohio, 1893; died 1898. 

ELC.IN ADELBERT ANGELL, Lawyer, was 
born in tlie Angell Settlement, so-called, near 
Forestville in Chautauqua county, New York, Aug- 
ust 14, 1849, the son of Cyrus D. and Lucina 
(Shepard) Angell. He traced his descent directly 
from Roger Williams of Rhode Island, through his 
daughter, and from Thomas Angell, one of the 
Crown Commissioners for the settlement of Rhode 
Island. His preparatory school work was done in 
the common schools of Forestville and at Adelbert 
Academy in Belleville, Ontario, and he entered 
Harvard in 1S69, graduating with high honors in 
the Class of 1873. He then began a business 
career in the oil fielils of Western Pennsylvania with 
his fiither who had been a large and influential 
operator there for many years, but soon tiring of 
this entered Harvard Law School in November 1S73, 
and supporting himself by tutoring, principally in 
mathematics, graduated with the usual degree of 
Bachelor of Laws in 1S75. Entering the law office 
of General T. W. Sanderson of Youngstown, Ohio, 
he was soon after admitted to the liar, and in 1877 
came to Cleveland anil quickly became known for 
his thorough legal training and general abilities. 
In 1884 he formed a law jiartnership with J. H. 
Webster of that city, with whom he continued until 
his death, the firm being first known as Webster \- 
Angell and afterwards as Webster, .Angell & Cook. 
In 1S93, at the request of many of the leading 
citizens of the city and northern Ohio, Mr. .\ngell 
was chosen by the Governor, now President 
McKinley, as one of four forming a Commission to 
investigate the system of ta.\ation of the state and de- 

VOL. V. — I 



vise some new plan which would meet the demand of 
the present day anil afford relief from the inequalities 
and faults of the antiijuated code then in force. 
During the next year he gave his entire time to this 
work, in meetings throughout the state, in investiga- 
tion of local complaints, and in the taking of testimony 
of countless manufacturers, corporations, capitalists 
and farmers. He was chosen by his associates to 
prepare the report of this very important commis- 
sion and produced one of the most valuable mono- 
graphs ever published upon the subject. It was at 
once recognized by students of economics as a most 
valuable contribution to political science and won 
for its author an enviable reputation. Many articles 
upon the subject followed pubHshed by the Cleve- 
land Chamber of t'ommerce and in pamphlet form 
by the author, upon different pliases of the problem, 
including a very profound study in the Yale Review 
of February 1897. Mr. .\ngell as a lawyer loved 
the equity side of the practice. He was obliged in 
18S9 to investigate the novelty of a patent and de- 
fend its alleged infringement in order to protect his 
financial interests as a part owner therein ; and his 
brilliant success in this contention encouraged him in 
undertaking other patent cases until at the time of his 
death he had attained therein a reputation second to 
none in the state, and had adopted this as his special 
work. For many years Mr. Angell belonged to the 
llnion Club, the Rowfant Club and Country Club of 
Cleveland, and the Harvard Club of New \'ork, and 
just preceding his death had been elected to the 
University Club of New York and had aided in the 
preliminary organization of the University Club of 
Cleveland. He was also a very active and valued 
member of the Chamber of Commerce, the Bar 
.Association, the Ohio Society of the Sons of the 
.American Revolution and the .Archaeological Insti- 
tute of .America. He never held political office, 
but was a strong anil active Republican. He was 



UNIVERSITIES JND THEIR SONS 



married June 29, 18S7, to Lily Curtis of Stratford, 
Connecticut, and left two children : Ernest, born 
June 1, 1889 ; and Hildegarde Angell, born October 
22, 1892. His widow and both children survive 
him. Mrs. .'Xngoll with her little daughter spent the 
winter of 1897-1898 in ICurope. On July 2, 1.S9S, 
after attending his twenty-fifth class reunion at 
Hariard and bidding farewell to his little son, whom 
he left behind, Mr. Angell sailed on the steamship 
I^ Bourgogne expecting to meet his wife and 
daughter at Havre. July 4, at five in the morning, 
its passengers hushed in sleep, the steamer collided 




E. A. ANGF.LL 

off Sable Island, Nova Scotia, with the sailing ship 
Cromartyshire and soon sank with not a single first 
cabin passenger saved. .At a gathering of the Bar, 
July 1 2, in honor of his memory, it was said of him : 
" He was a man of very rare intelligence ; his intel- 
ligence was not fmly strong and rugged but it was 
exceedingly fine and polished. He not only knew in- 
stinctively what was right and best, but he appreciated 
it with a keenness given to few and he held to it 
with a tenacity before everything else. He was as 
clear and limpid as spring water ; there was no guile 
or deceit in his disposition. He was fair and manly 
and strong." Said another:"! never saw such a 
gentle intensity of affection evidenced by any other 
man toward his family. To see him with them and 



in his home was in itself a privilege and a blessing." 
.At a memorial service held in Trinity Cathedral, 
September i, after the return of his family, the Hon. 
S. E. Williamson, now General Counsel of the New 
York Central Railroad Company, delivered the 
oration. He said in part : " Mr. Angell's duties 
were not limited to family, to friendships or to his 
profession : his education, his inquiries and his wide 
reading had interested him in the history of the 
world and especially in the history of his own race. 
The latter was to him a grand and inspiring tale full 
of instruction and warning. With such thoughts 
and interests the obligation of a citizen could not 
rest lightly upon him ; he gladly gave his influence 
and power so far as he could to the promotion of 
gooil government ; his personal character governed 
all of his thougiits and actions ; pure, sympathetic, 
just, generous, truthful, he longed for the growth of 
justice, mercy, self-sacrifice and consequent happi- 
ness everywhere. And his part in promoting it was 
done well and faithfully." 



BISSELL, Herbert Porter 

Harvard A.B, 1880. 
Born in New London, N. Y., 1856; educated in com- 
mon schools, De Veaux College, and in Germany ; 
graduated Harvard, 1880; admitted to the Bar, 1883 ; 
now of firm of Bissell & Metcalf, Buffalo, N. Y. ; 
Director of several railway Companies ; Major and 
Judge-Advocate N.G.S.N.Y. 1885-94. 

Hh:RBERT PORTER BISSELL, Lawyer, was 
born in New London, Oneida county, New 
York, August 30, 1856, the son of .Amos Alanson 
and .Amelia Susan (Willse) Bissell. Having pursued 
his rudimentary studies in the cominon schools of 
New London and Lockport, New York, he con- 
tinued his education at De Veaux College, Suspen- 
sion Bridge, and at the Gymnasium Catharinareum, 
Braunschweig, Germany, and entered Harvard at 
the age of twenty, graduating with the Class of 1880. 
Commencing the study of law in the office of 
Greene, McMillan & Gluck, Buffalo, New York, he be- 
came their managing clerk in 1881 ; was admitted to 
the Bar in 1883 ; and remained with his preceptors 
until 1884, when he established himself in practice 
in that city. In 18S7 he became a member of the 
firm of Bissell, Sicard, Brundage & Bissell, which 
was subsequently changed to Bissell, Sicard, Bissell 
& Carey, and after the dissolution of the latter in 
1896, he organized the present firm of Bissell & 
Metcalf. He is interested in outside business affairs 
to a considerable extent, being a Director of several 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



railway companies, and has charge of the financial 
affairs of De Veaux College, of which he lias been 
Treasurer for two years and a 'I'nistee for the past 
twelve years. He was chosen a Director and Chair- 
man of the Law Committee of the Tan-American 
Exposition to be held in Buffalo in 1901. From 
1885 to 1894, Mr. Bissell served as Judge- Advocate 
on the staff of Brigadier-General Peter C. Doyle, 
National Guard of the State of New York, with the 
rank of Major ; was for several years President of 
the Cleveland Democratic Club, Buffalo, and is a 
member of the Buffalo, Saturn, EUicott University 




HERBERT P. BISSELL 

Liberal and Independent Clubs of Buffalo and the 
University Club of New York. He was the Demo- 
cratic candidate for State Senator in 1885, and for 
District Attorney in 1892. October 30, 1883, he 
married Lucy .\. Coffey, and has three daughters : 
Mary R., Harriet A., and Lucy \. Bissell. 



GERSTLE, Mark Lewis 

Harvard A.B. 1889, LL.B. 1892. 
Born in San Francisco, Cal., 1866; educated in public 
schools ; graduated Harvard, 1889 ; Harvard Law School, 
1892; practising law in San Francisco since 1893. 

MARK Li;\\IS G1:RS1'L1':, Lawyer, was born 
in San Francisco, California, May 28, 1866, 
the son of Lewis and Hannah Gcrstle. His early 



education was acquired in the public schools of his 
native city, and he entered Harvard in 1885, gradu- 
ating with tlie Class of 1S89. His legal studies were 
also pursued at Harvanl, where he took the degree 
of Bachelor of Laws in 1892. In the following year 
he was a'dmitted to the law firm of Chickering, 
Thomas & Gregory, San Francisco, and is still a 
member of that concern. September 14, 1893, 
Mr. Gerstle married Hilda Alice Hecht, and has 
one son : Mark Lewis Gerstle, Jr., born October 3, 

1897- 

COOKE, Elisha 

Harvard A.B. 1697. 
Born in Boston, Mass., 1678; graduated Harvard, 
1697 ; representative to the General Court, 1713-34 ; 
member of the Council, 1717 ; elected Speaker of House 
of Representatives, 1720; agent of the Province in 
London, 1723-26 ; Justice of the Court of Common 
Pleas, 1730; died 1737. 

ELISILV COOKE, Politician, was born in Bos- 
ton, Massachusetts, December 20, 1678, the 
son of Dr. Elisha Cooke (Harvard 1657), who was 
Justice of the Supreme Court of the Colony and 
prominent in the controversies of that day between 
the Colonists and the officers of the Crown. Elislia 
Cooke, the younger, was graduated at Harvard in 
1697 and early entered public life. He was a Rep- 
resentative in the General Court for twenty-one 
years, from 1713 to 1734, and succeeded in making 
himself a thorn in the side of the royal Governors. 
During the administration of Samuel Shute, in 181 7, 
Mr. Cooke was elected to the Council, and taking 
the popular side against the Governor aroused the 
hostility of that magistrate so strongly that when he 
presented himself at the chamber after re-election 
in the following year he was turned away with the 
information that " his attendance at the Board would 
be excused." .-^s this had happened on several 
occasions to his father, under Governor Phipps and 
Governor Dudley, it did not cause him great dis- 
tress. The crisis came when in i 720 he was elected 
Speaker of the House of Representatives and tiiat 
body refused to recognize the right of the Governor 
to dictate its choice of officers. Governor Shute 
solved the problem by dissolving the .Assembly alto- 
gether as the only means of getting rid of Speaker 
Cooke. Under .Vcting-Governor Dummer, he got 
along more comfortably, serving as agent in London 
for the Colony in 1723 and on his return in 1726 
occupying a seat in the Council. Mr. Cooke was 
appointed a Justice of the Court of Common Pleas 
in 1730. lie died in Boston, August 24, 1737- 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



EMERSON, William 

Harvard A B. 1895. 
Born in New York City, 1873; prepared for College at 
J. H. Morse's School, New York City ; graduated Har- 
vard, 1895 ; student at Columbia Architectural School, 
1896-97 ; Ecole des Beaux Arts, Paris, 1898-99; architect 
in New York City. 

WILLIAM EMERSON, Architect, was born 
in New York City, October 16, 1873, the 
son of Dr. John Haven antl Susan (Tompkins) Em- 
erson. His father graduated from Columbia, in 1S60, 
and received the degree of Doctor of Medicine in 
1864. His paternal ancestry include, besides the 



pleted at the Ecole des Beaux Arts, Paris, which he 
entered in 1S98, stantling second among the foreign 
students. In February 1899 he returned to America 
and immediately entered upon the practice of his 
profession. .'\t Harvard Mr. Emerson was a mem- 
ber of the Cercle Frangais, Institute of 1770, the 
Delta Kappa Epsilon Society and the Hasty Pudding 
Club, and during the years 1 893-1 895 he ser\'ed on 
the Editing ]!oard of the Harvard Crimson. He is 
also a member of the Harvard Club, New York. 
Politically he is an Independent Republican and a 
supporter of the Citizens' Union. 




WiM. EMERSON 

Emersons, the Harkins, Haven and Woodward fam- 
ilies, all of whom are of English origin ; and through 
his mother he is descended from the Wolfert, Webber, 
Mangle, Minthorne and Titus-Norton families, some 
of whom originated in Holland while others came 
from Fpgland. He was fitted for College at James 
H. Morse's School, New York City, and was gradu- 
ated at Harvard with the Class of 1895, giving 
special attention to French, German, History and 
Drawing. His knowledge of these studies enabled 
him to advance rapidly in the Department of 
Architecture at Columbia, where he accomplished 
somewhat more than three years' work in two 
winters and one summer. His studies were com- 



FISK, Arthur Gilman 

Harvard LL.B. 1894. 
Born in Baltimore, Md., 1868 ; attended San Fran- 
cisco public schools ; graduated Harvard Law School, 
1894; completed legal studies in San Francisco; prac- 
tising Lawyer in that city. 

ARTHUR GILMAN FISK, Lawyer, was born 
in Baltimore, Maryland, November 23, 
1868, the son of Asa and Lydia Beckwith (Gale) 
Fisk. His paternal grandfather. Captain Asa Fisk 
of Holliston, Massachusetts, commanded a com- 
pany of Minute-Men during the Revolutionary War. 
On the maternal side his grandfather, Gilman Gale, 
was a native of Vermont, who moved from that 
state to Lowell, Massachusetts, and represented that 
town in the General Court. His father, Asa Fisk, 
was at one time a member of the Massachusetts 
Legislature from Somerville. After attending the 
San Francisco Grammar and High schools, Arthur 
G. Fisk was a special student at Harvard, graduat- 
ing as Bachelor of Laws in 1S94. From January 
1895, to December 1898, he was associated with 
Hon. M. M. Estee, a prominent lawyer of San 
Francisco and Republican Candidate for Governor 
of California in 1884 and in 1894, and at the 
present time he is associated with Hull McClaughry. 
Mr. Fisk is a member of the LTniversity, Union 
League, Press and Harvard Clubs of San FVancisco. 
Politically he is a Republican. July 18, 1895, he 
married Kate Howard Wertheimer, and has one 
daughter: Helen Vanlora Fisk, born July 9, 1896. 



GORDON, Stephen Masury 

Harvard MD. 1885. 

Born in Fall River, Mass., 1858; educated in public 

schools and in Phillips-Andover Academy, Class of 

1879; special student. Harvard Academic Department, 

1880; graduated Harvard Medical School, 1885; practis- 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



ing in Fall River since 1885; Trustee of Fall River 
Hospital and President of staff. 

STEPHEN MASURY GORDON, M.D., Physi- 
cian and Surgeon, was born in Fall River, 
Massaciiusetts, June 9, 185S, the son of William 
Rufus and Mary Elizabeth (Masury) Gordon. He 
is of Scotch descent, from Sir Adam Gordon, who 
aided Wallace in 1297 to recapture the castle of 
Wigton, of which he was then made Governor. 
Alexander Gordon, the original of the American 
line, a native of the old Land of Huntly, was a 
Scotch Highlander in the Royalist Army under 




S. M. GORDON 

Monk, and was taken prisoner by the Parliamentary 
forces at the battle of Worcester in 165 1, when 
he was sent with many others to the American 
colonies for bond service. He reached Boston in 
1652, and about 1660 removed to New Hampshire, 
engaging in the lumber business at I'lxeter, where 
he married tlie daughter of his employer, Mary 
Lysson, and remained until his death in 1697. 
Stephen M. Gordon received his early education 
in the public schools of Fall River and the liigh 
school in Beverly, Massachusetts, where his father 
removed when he was eleven years old, and was 
prepared for Gollege at Philiips-Andover .Vcademy 
in the Class of 1S79. [''or a year after leaving 
Anduver, he i)ursued a course of elective studies 



in the Academic Department of Harvard and then 
entered the Medical School, from which he was 
graduated in 1885 with the degree of Doctor of 
Medicine. During his medical course he served 
for a time as an Interne at the Good Samaritan 
Hospital in Boston. Upon taking his degree he re- 
turned to Fall River, where lie has since practised 
his profession. Dr. Gordon is a Trustee of the 
Fall River Hospital and President of its staff and 
Surgeon ; also Surgeon on the staff of the Emer- 
gency Hospital in that city, and .Medical E.xaminer 
and Surgeon for accident insurance companies in 
Boston, New York, and London, England. He is 
a member of the American Medical Association, 
the Massachusetts and the Fall River Medical 
Societies and the Harvard Medical .Mumni .Associa- 
tion. He is a stanch Republican in politics, but 
holds no public offices. Dr. Gordon married, Sep- 
tember 27, 1888, Sue Batchelder Le Favour, of 
Beverly, ALassachusetts, and has three daughters : 
Alice Le Favour, born May 31, 1890; Katherine 
Huntly, born April 30, 1894; and Janet Gordon, 
born December 9, 1895. 



HASKELL, Mellen Woodman 

Harvard A.B. 1883, A.M. 1885. 
Born in Salem, Mass., 1863 ; educated at Roxbury 
(Mass.) Latin School, 1873-79; graduated Harvard, 
1883; Ph.D. Gbttingen, 1889; Instructor University of 
Michigan, 1889-go; Assistant Professor University of 
California to 1854 ; Associate Professor since 1894, and 
Dean of its College of Social Sciences, 1899. 

MELLEN WOODMAN HASKELL, Ph.D., 
Educator, was born in Salem, Massachu- 
setts, March 17, 1863. He is a son of Augustus 
Mellen (Harvard 1856) and Catiierine (^Voodman) 
Haskell, representatives of old New England families 
whose original American ancestors arrived in the 
Massachusetts Colony about the year 1630, settling 
in Beverly and Gloticester. Some of their descend- 
ants settled the town of New Gloucester, Cumber- 
land county, Maine. He was prepared for College 
at the Roxbury Latin School, Boston, from which 
he entered Harvard, taking his Bachelor's degree 
witii the Class of 1S83. He received final honors 
in mathematics and was elected to membershi]) in 
the Phi Beta Kappa Society. .After two years of 
post-graduate study he received his Master's degree 
from the same University. He was then ajjpointed 
to a Parker Fellowship and went to Germany for 
further study at the Universities of Leipzig and 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



Gottingen, from the latter of which he received the 
degree of Doctor of Philosophy in 1889. Upon his 
return he was apiiointcd Instructor in Mathematics 
at the University of Michigan, where he remained 
one year, at the expiration of which time he was 
called to the Assistant Professorship of that branch 
at the University of California, becoming Associate 
Professor in 1894, and Dean of the College of 
Social Sciences in 1899. Dr. Haskell holds mem- 
bership in the California Academy of Sciences and 
the American Mathematical Society, and was elected 
First Vice-President of the former for the year 1900. 



%i 




scended from John and Rebecca (Atkinson) Hey- 
wood, of Concord, Massachusetts, who were married 
in 1656. He attended the public schools and the 
Chauncy Hall School in Boston, Phillips Academy, 
Exeter, New Hampshire, and a school in Gottingen, 
Germany, and was graduated at Harvard with the 
Class of 1893. His legal studies were pursued in the 
office of Hon. A. L. Green of Holyoke, Massachu- 
setts, and he was admitted to the Hampden County 
Bar in November 1896. January i of the follow- 
ing year he became a member of the law firm of 
Green & Heywood, which existed until the close of 
1S98, and from January 1, 1899, to the present 
time, he has practised his profession alone in 
Holyoke. Mr. Heywood is a member of the Boston 
Athletic Association and the Bay State Club, the 
Connecticut Valley Harvard Club and the .Athletic 
Association of Harvard Graduates, the Mt. Tom 
Golf and the Holyoke Canoe Clubs. 



iM. W. HASKELL 

He is also a member of the University, Har\'ard 
and Unitarian Clubs, San Francisco, and of the 
Berkeley Club, Oakland. 



HEYWOOD, William Carter 

Harvard A.B. 1893. 
Born in Boston, Mass., 1872; educated public and 
Chauncy Hall Schools, Boston, Phillips-Exeter Acad- 
emy and in Germany; graduated Harvard, 1893; read 
law in Holyoke, Mass. ; practising lawyer in that city. 

WILLIAM CARTER HEYWOOD, Lawyer, 
was born in Boston, Massachusetts, Feb- 
ruary 23, 1872, son of George .Mpheus and Martha 
Anne Elizabeth (Carter) He)^vood. He is de- 



KAUFMANN, Franklin John 

Harvard M.D. 1887. 
Born in Syracuse, N. Y., 1863 ; educated in Syracuse 
public schools and at Phillips-Exeter Academy ; gradu- 
ated Harvard Medical School, 1887 ; student at Univer- 
sities of Vienna and Heidelberg, 1887-88; practising 
medicine in Syracuse since i88g. 

FRANKLIN JOHN KAUFMANN, M.D., Phy- 
sician and Surgeon, was born in Syracuse, 
New York, July 14, 1S63, the son of John Siitter- 
ling and Margarita Eva Hohenburg (Wanner) 
Kaufmann. His parents were natives of the Grand 
Duchy of Baden, his father being born in Auggen 
of Thuringian ancestry, and his mother in Elsenz, of 
Saxon descent. He attended the public schools of 
Syracuse and was prepared for College at Phillips- 
Exeter Academy and with instruction in languages 
by a private tutor, entering at once upon profes- 
sional study at the Harvard Medical School, where 
■ he was graduated with the degree of Doctor of 
Medicine in 1S87. Immediately upon leaving 
Harvard he went abroad for further study, matricu- 
lating at the Imperial and Royal LIniversity of 
Vienna in October 1887, and at the L'niversity of 
Heidelberg in the following summer, and for some 
months ser\ing as Assistant to Professor E. Von 
Leyden in the Royal Charity Hospital at Berlin. 
Before leaving the United States, Dr. Kaufmann 
was for a time connected with the Out-Patients 
Departments of the Massachusetts General and Bos- 
ton City Hospitals. L'pon his return he established 



UNIFERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



himself in general practice in Syracuse, New York, 
where for ten years he has held the position under 
the municipal government as District Physician for 
the Third District, and from 1S90 to 1896 was 
Assistant-Surgeon, with rank of First Lieutenant in 
the Fifth Battery of Light Artillery. Dr. Kaufmann 
is a member of the Association of Military Surgeons 
of the United States, the Syracuse Academy of 
Medicine, the Medico- Legal Society of New York 
and the Onondaga County Medical Society. F"or 
.ten years he has been Austro- Hungarian Consular 
Authority at Syracuse, New York. He is also a 




FRANKLIN JNO. KAUFMANN 

member of the Army and Navy Club of New York, 
of the .'\lumni Associations of Harvard University, 
Harvard Medical School and Phillips-Exeter, and 
is a Thirty-second degree Mason. He is a Re- 
publican in politics. June 4, 1890, Dr. Kaufmann 
married Anna Louise Cook and has two daughters : 
Anna Louise and Elizabeth .A.vdomar Kaufmann. 



PURRINGTON, William Archer 

Harvard A.B 1873 
Born in Washington, D. C, 1852; educated at Emer- 
son Institute, Washington ; graduated Harvard, 1873 ; 
LL.B. and LL.M. Columbian University, 1878; LL.B. 
University City of New York, 1880 ; Lecturer at the Uni- 
versity and BeUcvue Hospital Medical College, and 



New York College of Dentistry; upon Law in its rela- 
tion to Medical Practice ; Consular Clerk at Rome, 
1874-75; Secretary of Legation, Rio de Janeiro, 1875-77. 

WILLIAM ARCHER PURRINGTON, 
LL.M., Lawyer, was born in A\'ashing- 
ton. District of Columbia, December 22, 1852, the 
son of Tobias and .\mclia Josephine (Archer) 
Purrington. The Purinlons, as the name was 
formerly spelled, came originally from England, 
settling in Maine. His maternal grandparents were 
Wilham and f^liza (Wilson) Archer, of Washington, 
the latter of Irish descent and the Archers of Scotch. 
William A. Purrington prepared for College at the 
Emerson Institute in Washington, directed by C. B. 
Young, and was graduated from Harvard in 1873. 
In 1S74 to 1875 he served as Consular Clerk of the 
United States at Rome, Italy, and from the latter 
year to 1S77 was Secretary of Legation and Charge 
d'affaires tii/ inteiim at Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. While 
a law student at Columbian University, Washington, 
where he took the degrees of Bachelor and Master 
of Laws, he served as Clerk of the Senate Commit- 
tee on Manufactures, and he subsequently attended 
lectures at the LIniversity of the City of New York, 
which also made him a Bachelor of Laws in 1880, 
since when he has been engaged in the practice of 
the law in New York City, and has as Counsel of 
Medical and Dental Societies become identified 
with the framing and enforcement of laws regulating 
the practice of medicine and dentistry. He is also 
Lecturer on Law in relation to Medical Practice in 
the LTniversity and Bellevue Hospital Medical Col- 
lege and in the New York College of Dentistry, and 
author of numerous periodical articles. Mr. Pur- 
rington is a member of the New York City and 
State Bar Associations, the University, Harvard, 
Lawyers, .^rts anil Barnard Clubs, and the Society 
of Medical Jurisprudence, all of New York. Decem- 
ber 31, 1895, he married Anna C. Wheatley, daugh- 
ter of Salem Q. Russell. 



McLEOD, Sayre 

Harvard A.B. i8go. 
Born in Phelps, N. Y., 1867; prepared for College at 
St. John's Military School, Manlius, N. Y. ; graduated 
from Harvard University and Albany Law School; 
practising lawyer in Troy, N. Y. 

SAYRE McLEOD, Lawyer, was born in Phelps, 
New York, September 25, 1S67, the son of 
Atigustus Dickinson and Mary (Sayre) McLeod. 
His fother is Scotch, a direct descendant of the 



8 



UNIFERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



McLeods of Lewis, of whom the present chieftain is 
Norman Mcl.eod, Dunvegan Castle, Isle of Skye, 
Scotland. On the maternal side he traces his 
descent to a French Huguenot family named de 
Sais. Receiving his early education in the public 
schools of his native town and preparing for College 
at St. John's Military School, Manlius, New York, he 
entered Harvard, from which he was graduated in 
the Class of 1 890, and subsequently graduated from 
the .\lb.any Law School. .After admission to the 
Bar he opened an office in Troy, New York, where 
he has since been in active practice. At Harvard 




SAVRE McLEOD 

Mr. McLeod belonged to the Institute of 1770, the 
Delta Kappa Epsilon and the Hasty Pudding Clubs. 
He is now a member of the Harvard Club, New 
York, the Troy Club, Troy, the Watervliet Arsenal 
Golf Club, and the Mount Anthony Club, Benning- 
ton Centre, Vermont. October 17, 1895, he mar- 
ried Martha Mead I^-ine of Troy, New York, and 
has one son : George Tibbits I^ne McLeod. 



PRATT, John Mason Williams 

Harvard A.B. 1869, AM. 1872, S.T.B, 1877. 

Born in Taunton, Mass.. 1847 ; educated at Bristol 

Academy, Taunton, and Phillips-Exeter Academy; 

graduated Harvard, 1869 ; Harvard Divinity School, 

1877; Pastor at Wilmington, Del., 1878-80; held sev- 



eral Pastorates in Mass., 1881-92; Pastor of Unitarian 
Church in Templeton, Mass., since 1893. 

JOHN M.\SON WILLIAMS PR.\TT, Clergy- 
man, was born in Taunton, Massachusetts, 
December i6, 1S47, the son of Horatio and 
Elizabeth (Williams) Pratt. His grandfather was 
Solomon Pratt, a merchant and real estate owner of 
Mansfield, Massachusetts, and his father, Horatio, 
who was a graduate of Brown University, was a suc- 
cessful lawyer of Taunton, President of the first 
Common Council, District Attorney and a State 
Senator. On the maternal side he is a descendant 
of Richard Williams, one of the early settlers in 
Taunton. His grandfother, John Mason W'illiams, 
was Ciiief-Justice of the Court of Common Pleas. 
From Bristol Academy, Taunton, he went to Phillips 
.Academy, Exeter, New Hampshire, and from there 
to Harvard, where he took his Bachelor's degree in 
1S69. In 1S74 he entered the Harvard Divinity 
School, from which he was graduated three years 
later with the degree of Bachelor of Divinity, and 
the following year was installed Pastor of a Unitarian 
Church in Wilmington, Delaware, remaining there two 
and a half years. He subsequently held Pastorates 
in Pembroke, Rowe, Tyngsboro, and Yarmouth, 
I\Iaine, and from 1893 to the present time has 
occupied the Unitarian pulpit in Templeton, Massa- 
chusetts. .At Harvard Mr. Pratt belonged to the 
Pi F^ta Society, and he is a life member of the 
American Unitarian Association. At Hyde Park, 
Massachusetts, August i, 1878, he married filarian 
Elizabeth Ross of Boston, and has two children : 
.Alice Kinsell and Mason Ross Pratt. 



MARTIN, George Adams 

Harvard A.B. 1895. 

Born in San Francisco, Cal., 1873 ; educated in private 
schools in New York and California ; graduated Har- 
vard, 1895; engaged in mining business in San 
Francisco, Cal. 

GEORGE ADAMS MARTIN, Business Man, 
was born in San Francisco, California, 
February 2, 1873, the son of William H. and 
Rebecca Emerson (.Adams) Martin. On the pa- 
ternal side he is of Irish ancestry, emigrants from 
Londonderry who settled in New Hampshire, of 
which State his great-grandfather and grandfather 
were natives. His father, who was bom in Lyndon- 
ville. New York, graduated from the Rensselaer Poly- 
technic School, Troy, in 1856. His mother, who 
was born in Thomaston, Knox county, Maine, is of 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



Scotch ancestry, the first of whom in America arrived 
about the year 1700. She holds membership in the 
Daughters of the American Revolution. His early 
education was obtained at Morse's Private School, 
New York City, and the Belmont School, Belmont, 
California, and his collegiate studies were pursued 
at Harvard, where he took his Bachelor's degree 
with the Class of 1895. Returning to San Francisco 
in the ensuing year, he became associated with his 
father in the mining business, which he is still 
following. Mr. Martin is a member of the Univer- 
sity Club of San Francisco. 



ROPES, John Codman 

Harvard A.B. 1857, LL.D. 1897. 
Born in St. Petersburg, Russia, 1836; prepared for 
College at Chauncy Hall School ; graduated Harvard, 
1857 ; Harvard Law School, 1861 ; practising law in 
Boston ; since 1878 senior member of the law firm of 
Ropes, Gray & Loring ; author ot historical works ; 
LL.D. Harvard, 1897; died 1899. 

JOHN CODMAN ROPES, Lawyer and Historian, 
was born in St. Petersburg, Russia, April 28, 
1836, during the residence of his father, a merchant 
of Boston, in that country for commercial purposes. 
The family returned to the United States while he 
was a child, and he received his early education in 
the Chauncy Hall School, Boston, where he was 
prepared for College, studying also, during the last 
two years of his preparation, with Professor Goodwin 
of Cambridge. He was graduated at Harvard as 
Bachelor of Arts in 1857, and entering the J.aw 
School of that University received the degree of 
Bachelor of L.aws in 1861. In the same year he 
took the Bowdoin prize for resident graduates for 
an essay upon The Limits of Religious Thought. 
He also passed a year in the office of Chandler iS: 
Shattuck, prominent attorneys at law in Boston, anil 
began practice for himself in jiartncrship with John 
C. Gray (Harvard 1859). In 1878 William C. 
Loring (Harvard 1872) was admitted to the firm, 
which, under the style of Ropes, Gray & Loring 
has maintained a leading position at the Massachu- 
setts Bar. In his political action, Mr. Ropes was 
affiliated with the independent reform element of 
the Republican party, and in 1876 he took an active 
part in urging the nomination of Benjamin II. I'.ris- 
tow for President. He was the head of the Hristow 
Club of Pioston during that contest. Mr. Ropes 
passed a considerable part of his time in iMiropean 
travel, making frequent and long trips abroad to 
Great Britain and the continent. In 1878 he served 



as a member of the Board of Visitors to the United 
States Military Academy at West Point. Outside 
his professional work, Mr. Ropes gave much time 
and study to historical subjects, notably those of 
military history, and is regarded as one of the lead- 
ing authorities on the Napoleonic wars. He made 
a personal study of these battlefields, and in 1885 
delivered a series of lectures on Napoleon before 
the Lowell Institute. He was a member of the 
Massachusetts Historical Society, the founder of 
the Massachusetts Military Historical Society, a 
fellow of the American .Academy of Arts and 




JOHN COD.M.V.N' ROPES 

Sciences and the Royal Historical Society, honorary 
member of the United States Cavalry Association 
and the Royal .Xrtillcry .\ssociation. Many of 
his mc^nographs have appeared in the Proceedings 
of these bodies. Of his larger works, the more 
important are The .\rmy under Pope, which he 
wrote for Campaigns of the Civil Wars ; The First 
Napoleon ; a Sketch, Political and Military, which 
appeared in 1885, and the Camiiaign of W.aterloo, 
which was published in 1893 and aroused much 
comment and some controversy ; The Story of the 
Civil War, which unfortunately remains incomplete, 
two volumes having been issued, while two more are 
needed to comjilcte the history. In association 
with his partner, John C. Gray, he edited the 



lO 



UNiyERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



American I*iw Review during the first four years 
of its publication. He was elected a fellow of the 
Royal Historical Society of London in i8SS and 
in the same year was made an honorary member 
of the United States Cavalry Association. He held 
membership in the Loyal Legion as Companion of 
the Third Class from 1868. In the Union Club 
of Boston, of which he was a member for thirty- 
five years, he held the positions of Director, Treas- 
urer and Vice-President. He was a prominent 
member of the Protestant Episcopal Church, serv- 
ing as a Vestryman of Trinity for many years, and 
at the Church Congress in Boston, in 1S76, de- 
livered an address on The Relation of the Protes- 
tant Episcopal Church to Freedom of Religious 
Thought. Mr. Ropes maintained his interest in 
the welfare of Harvard, and was chosen a member 
of the Board of Overseers in 1868, in place of 
Stephen AL Weld, deceased, and at the expiration 
of that time was re-elected serving on the board 
until 1876. He died at his residence in Boston, 
October 28, 1899. 



Fellow of the Corporation. 
Mansfield, April 14, 1787. 



Dr. Salter died in 



SALTER, Richard 

Harvard A.B 1739. 
Born in Boston, Mass., 1723 ; graduated Harvard, 
'739 ; studied medicine and theology ; Pastor of Con- 
gregational Church at Mansfield, Conn., 1744-89 ; bene- 
factor of Yale, from which he received the degree of 
D.D., 1782; Fellow of Yale Corporation, 1771-80; died 
1787. 

RICHARD SALTER, D.D., Clergyman, was 
bom in Boston, Massachusetts, in 1723. 
.After his graduation at Har\'ard in 1739 he under- 
took the study of medicine, soon relinquishing this 
for theology, in which he qualified himself for the 
ministry and for some time supplied a pulpit in 
Boston. His first and only settled Pastorate was 
that of the Congregational Church at Mansfield, 
Connecticut, to which he was called in i 744, being 
ordained there June 27 of that year and retaining 
that charge until his death, a period of forty-five 
years. .After establishing himself in Connecticut, 
Dr. Salter took an active interest in Vale, especially 
in the Department of Greek, Hebrew and Oriental 
U-mguages, in which he was a proficient scholar. 
He gave the College a farm, in 1781, which was 
sold for $2000, the proceeds to be devoted to the 
promotion of the study of these languages. Yale 
conferred upon him the degree of Doctor of Divin- 
ity in 1782, and for ten years, from 17 71 to 1780, 
he was officially connected with the College as a 



SHARP, William Fuller 

Harvard D.M.D. i8gi. 
Born in Sacramento, Cal., 1866 ; graduated Univer- 
sity of California, Dental Department, 1890; Harvard 
Dental School, i8gi ; now practising in San Francisco, 
Cal. ; Instructor in Anaesthesia, University of Cali- 
fornia, 1891 to 1894 ; Instructor in Operative Dentistry, 
1895 ; Lecturer, 1895-99 ; Professor of Prosthetic Den- 
tistry, since 1899. 

WILLIAM FULLERSHARP,D.D.S.,D.M.D., 
Professor in the L'niversity of California, 
was born in Sacramento, September 21, 1866, son 




irrtiiwrnifiTfi 

WM. FULLER SH.ARP 

of William and Margaret (Graham) Sharp. He 
was educated in the Sacramento Grammar School 
and at the Oak Mound School, Napa City, Califor- 
nia. His professional studies were pursued in the 
Dental Department of the University of California, 
from which he was graduated a Doctor of Dental 
Surgery in 1890, and at the Harvard Dental School, 
where he took the degree of Doctor of Dental 
Medicine in 1S91. Returning to the Pacific coast, 
he established himself in San Franciyo, where he 
has practised to the present time with gratifying 
success. In 189 1 he was called to the Dental De- 
partment of the University of California as Instructor 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



1 1 



in Anaesthesia, which position he occupied until 
1894, when he became Instructor in Operative 
Dentistry for the following year, after which he 
was advanced to Lecturer of Prosthetic Dentistry 
(1895), and in 1S99 he was appointed, by the Re- 
gents of the University, a member of the Faculty 
and as Professor of Prosthetic Dentistry, which he 
still retains. Dr. Sharp was President of the Dental 
Alumni Association of the University of California 
in 1893, was the organizer and is Past Deputy- 
Supreme officer of the Delta Sigma Delta Fraternity 
for the Pacific Coast, is a member of the Harvard 
Club, San Francisco, and is the Pacific Coast Corres- 
ponding Secretary of the Harvard Dental Alumni 
Association. On September 15, 1897, he was 
united in marriage with Grace Bradford, and has 
one daughter : Margaret Graham Sharp. 



l^rinceton. Mr. Stoddard published a number of 
religious, doctrinal and controversial works, in addi- 
tion to his sermons and addresses. He died in 
Northampton, February 11, 1729. 



STODDARD, Solomon 

Harvard A B. 1662. 
Born in Boston, Mass., 1643; graduated Harvard, 
1662; Fellow, 1666-67; Librarian, 1667-72; Pastor of 
Congregational Church at Northampton, Mass., 1672- 
1729 ; died 1729. 

SOLOMON STODDARD, Clergyman, was born 
in Boston, Massachusetts, in 1643, the son of 
Anthony Stoddard who came from England in 1630, 
was a member of the General Court and married a 
sister of Sir George Downing (Harvard 1642). He 
was graduated at Harvard in 1662, studied theology, 
and for the sake of his health which had become 
impaired, went to Barbadoes as Chaplain to the 
Governor, where he preached for two years. In 
1666 he was appointed Fellow of Harvard, and in 
the following year, when the ofifice of Librarian was 
established, he was chosen for that position. He 
performed the duties of Librarian for five years, 
separating from the College only to enter definitely 
upon the work of the ministry at Northampton, 
Massachusetts, where he had been preaching tem- 
porarily since 1669. Mr. Stoddard was ordained 
Pastor of the Congregational Church in that place, 
September 11, 1672, and remained in charge until 
his death, a period of more than fifty-six years. 
Towards the end of his life, feeling the necessity of 
assistance, his grandson, Jonathan Edwards (Vale 
1720) was made his colleague, resigning a tutorship 
at Vale for that ]iuri)ose. Mr. Edwards came to 
Northampton in {'"ebruary 1727, and continued in 
the Pastorate after his grandfather's death until 
doctrinal controversies in the church caused his 
withdrawal, subsequently becoming President of 



RILEY, Francis James 

Harvard A.B. 1884. 
Born in Holyoke, Mass.; educated at Phillips- 
Exeter Academy ; graduated Harvard, 1884 ; private 
tutor some time ; Assistant at the Holyoke, Mass., 
High School, 1887-go; now Principal of the Chestnut 
Street School, Holyoke. 

FRANCIS JAMES RILEY, Principal of the 
Chestnut Street School, Holyoke, Massa- 
chusetts, was born in that city, son of Patrick 




FR.\NCIS J. RILEY 

John and .\nn (Markey) Riley. After concluding 
his attendance at the Holyoke public schools he 
pursued the regular preparatory course at Phillips- 
Exeter .Academy, from which he entered Har\ard 
and was graduated with the Class of 1884. For two 
years and a half he was employed as a private 
tutor in Erie, Pennsylvania, and was an assistant 
at the Holyoke High School from 18S7 to r890, 
when he was advanced to the head mastership of 
the Chestnut Street School of that city, in which 
cajiacity he is still serving. Mr. Riley is a member 
of the Park Lyceum and the Knights of Columbus. 



12 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



REED, William 

Harvard A.B 1864. 
Born in Newburyport, Mass., 1842; educated in pub- 
lic schools; graduated Harvard, 1864; entered Journal- 
ism, 1866; Editor and Proprietor, Taunton, Mass., Daily 
Gazette since 1872; member of the Legislature, 1878- 
79; State Senator, 1882; formerly member of School 
Committee and Sewer Commission; a Park Commis- 
sioner and President of Taunton Board of Trade. 

WILLIAM RKHU, Journalist, was bom in 
Newburyport, Massachusetts, December 2, 
1842, the son of William and Sophia (Ladd) Reed. 
His paternal ancestors settled in \Voburn, early in 
the colonial perioil, and several generations resided 
in Newbury and Newburyport. The first of his 
American ancestors on the maternal side of whom 
there is any record occupied the first surveyed farm 
in Haverhill, Massachusetts. His maternal great- 
grandfather was crippled for life by a British bullet 
at the battle of Stillwater, and his paternal great- 
grandfather was also a Revolutionary soldier. He 
attended the public schools of Newburyport, going 
from the high school of that city to the Cambridge 
High School, from which latter he entered Harvard 
with the Class of 1S64, and in addition to his 
Bachelor's degree, he also was awarded a Boylston 
Prize for English composition. He taught school 
for two years after graduation and then took up 
newspaper work in 1866, as Editor of the Fall 
River, Massachusetts, News. From 1868 to 1S69, 
he edited the Daily Herald of Helena, Montana; 
from 1869 to 1872 was principal of Erie, Pennsyl- 
vania High School ; and in latter year he purchased 
the Taunton, Massachusetts, Daily Gazette, which he 
has since edited and managed, at the same time 
carrying on a general publishing business. Mr. 
Reed has been largely identified with local and 
state politics, having served in the Massachusetts 
Legislature for the years 1878-1879, and as State 
Senator in 1882. He has been a member of the 
Taunton School Board and Taunton Sewer Com- 
mission, and is serving his fourth term as a Park 
Commissioner J has been several times elected 
Chairman of the Ward, City and District Repub- 
lican Committees, and is widely known as an able 
public speaker. He is President of the Taunton 
Board of Trade, a Director in various corporations, 
and a Trustee of Bristol .\cademy. He is a mem- 
ber of the Winthrop Club, Taunton, and of the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows since 1866. 
.\t Newburyport, December 26, 1870, he married 
Katharine T. Hale. Their children are : William 
Hale, George Hale, Katharine and Sophia Reed. 



THWING, Charles Franklin 

Harvard A.B. 1876. 
Born in New Sharon, Me., 1853 ; prepared for College 
at Phillips-Andover Academy ; graduated Harvard, 
1876; Andover Theological Seminary, 1879; Congre- 
gational Pastor in Cambridge, 1879-86; and of Ply- 
mouth Church in Minneapolis, 1886-90; President of 
Adelbert College and Western Reserve University 
since 1890 ; author and contributor to leading periodi- 
cals ; U.D. Chicago Theological Seminary, 1889; LL.D. 
Marietta and Illinois Colleges, 1894 ; Editor of The Ad- 
vance for three years ; Associate Editor of Bibliotheca 
Sacra. 

CH.'XRLES FR.\XKLIN THWING, D.D., 
LL.D., President of Adelbert College and 
Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio, was 




CH.-iRLES F. THWING 

born in New Sharon, Maine, November 9, 1S53. 
On the side of his father, Joseph Perkins Thwing, 
he comes of Puritan stock, while on the side of his 
mother, Hannah Morse Hopkins, he claims descent 
from one of the Mayflower emigrants. In 187 1 
Mr. Thwing graduated from Phillips-.Andover Acad- 
emy, in 1876 from Harvard and in 1879 from An- 
dover Theological Seminary. His first Pastorate 
was at the Congregational Church in Cambridge in 
the vicinity of Harvard College, where he ser\-ed for 
seven years. Then he continued his ministry at the 
great Plymouth Church in Minneapolis. In 1890 
Mr. Thwing became President of Adelbert College 



UNIFERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



and Western Reserve University, and under his ad- 
ministration the University has grown from a small 
institution to occupy one of the first places in edu- 
cation in the middle west. He received the degree 
of Doctor of Divinity from the Chicago Theological 
Seminary in 1889 and that of Doctor of Laws from 
Marietta in iS94an(l from Illinois College in the 
same year. President Thwing has written the fol- 
lowing books : American Colleges, Their Students 
and Work ; The Reading of Books ; The I'amil)', 
an Historical and Sociological Study (in collabora- 
tion with Mrs. Carrie F. Butler Thwing) ; Within 
College Walls ; The College Woman ; The Ameri- 
can College in American Life and The Best Life (a 
booklet) ; The Choice of a College. He is also a 
contributor to the North American Review, Harper's 
Monthly, the Forum and other journals. For three 
years Mr. Thwing served as Editor of The Advance, 
while engaged in clerical work, and at present he is 
an Associate Editor of Bibliotheca Sacra. He mar- 
ried September 18, 1879, Carrie F. Butler, and has 
three children : Mary Butler, Francis Butler and 
Apphia Thwing. 



SAVAGE, James 

Harvard A.B. 1803, LL.D. 1841. 
Born in Boston, Mass., 1784; graduated Harvard, 
1803 ; studied law and admitted to the Bar, 1807 ; Repre- 
sentative and Senator in Massachusetts Legislature ; 
Member of Executive Council ; Delegate to Constitu- 
tional Convention, 1820; founder of Provident Inst, for 
Savings, Boston, 1816 ; Editor of the Monthly Anthol- 
ogy, 1803-11 ; edited John Winthrop's Journal, 1825, 
and other historical and genealogical works; LL.D. 
Harvard, 1841 ; Overseer, 1838-53; died 1873. 

JAMES SAVAGE, LL.D., Antiquary, was born 
in Boston, Massachusetts, July 13, 1784, a 
descendant of ALajor Thomas Savage, who came to 
Massachusetts from England in 1635. He was 
graduated at Harvard in 1803, studied law and 
was admitted to the Bar at Boston in 1807. ,'\fter 
establishing himself in practice in Boston he gave 
considerable attention to iniblic affairs, both muni- 
cipal and state, serving in both Houses of the 
Legislature and as a member of the Executive 
Council, and being sent as a delegate to the 
Constitutional Convention of 1820. He was for 
some time a member of the School Committee 
of Boston, of the Common Co\mcil for three 
years, 1823-1825, and of the lioard of .Mder- 
nion in 1S27 and 1828. Mr. Savage was one 
of ilic founders of the Provident Listitution for 
Savings in Boston, the first savings bank in that 



city and the second to be established in the 
L'nited States, and was associated in its manage- 
ment for many years, holding successively the of- 
fices of Secretary, Treasurer, Vice-President and 
President. He was also for nineteen years Treas- 
urer of the Massachusetts Historical Society, sub- 
sequently its President, and the Editor of several 
of its publications. 'I'he distinguished critic, 
P'.dwin P. Whipple, called Mr. .Savage " a prodigy 
of genealogical knowledge," anil, apart from his 
labors in the establishment of the savings bank 
system in ALassachusetts, it is in his work as an 
antiquary that he left the most enduring memo- 
rial. He prepared and annotated the original 
manuscripts of John Winthrop's Journal, published 
in 1825, and a (Genealogical Dictionary of three 
generations of the first settlers of New England, 
which has been described as " the most stupen- 
dous work on genealogy ever completed." Mr. 
Savage was also noted in other fields of literature, 
serving for five years as Associate Editor of the 
Monthly Anthology, the precursor of the North 
American Review, and in 181 1 being appointed 
Orator of Boston to deliver the Fourth of July 
address before the municipal government. From 
1838 to 1853 ^^ ^^^ ^ member of the Boanl of 
Overseers of Harvard, and that LIniversity con- 
ferred upon him the degree of Doctor of Laws 
in 1 84 1. He died in Boston, March 8, 1873. 



WARD, Artemas 

Harvard A.B. 1748. 
Born in Shrewsbury, Mass., 1727 ; graduated Har- 
vard, 1748; Justice of the Peace, 1752; Major in the 
French and Indian War. 1755; General and Comman- 
der-in-Chief of the forces of Massachusetts Bay, 1774; 
First Major-General of the Continental Army, 1775; 
Chief-Justice of the Court of Common Pleas for Wor- 
cester Co., 1776; President of the Executive Council, 
1777 ; Member of Continental Congress, 1779; member 
of Massachusetts Legislature sixteen years and 
Speaker of the House in 1785; Representative in 
Congress, 1791-95; died in 1800. 

RTEMAS WARD, Major-General in the Rev- 
olutionary War, was born in Shrewsbury, 
Massachusetts, November 27, 1727, the son of 
Colonel Nahum and Martha (How) Ward. He 
was graduated at Harvaril in 1748, and entered 
public life at an early age. In 1752 he was Justice 
of the Peace in his native town. In 175S he began 
his military career as Major in the Third Regiment of 
Middlesex and Worcester, and of Lieutenant-Colonel 
in a s])ecial regiment raised for the .\bercrombie 



A' 



H 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



expedition ngainst Canada. His commission as 
Colonel of the Third Regiment was revoked in 
1766 for his opposition to arbitrary power, and 
for the same reason his election to the Executive 
Council was negatived by Governor Bernard in 
1768. As a Representative in successive Legisla- 
tures he took an active part in the controversies 
with the Colonial Governors, and when troops were 
raised for the actual struggle he was made Brigadier- 
General in 1774 and later Commander-in-Chief of 
all the forces of the Province of Massachusetts Bay, 
and from Head Quarters at Cambridge, by direc- 




ARTEXIAS WARD 

tion of the Committee of Safety, gave the orders 
which led to the battle of Bunker Hill. June 17, 
1774, he was nominated by John Adams, and unani- 
mously elected by the Continental Congress First 
Major-General of the Continental Army, and was in 
command of the troops besieging Boston until the 
arrival of General Washington, when he was given 
the command of the right wing, with quarters at 
Roxbury, and erected the works on Dorchester 
Heights which compelled the evacuation of Boston. 
On account of ill health he resigned, .^pril 26, 1776, 
but remained in the service until the close of the 
year, and November 7, 1776, Congress passed the 
following ; — " Whereas the late Major-General 
Ward since his resignation of his trust has contin- 



ued in command of the Eastern Department at the 
request of the Commander-in-Chief and still con- 
tinues therein at the request of Congress, it is 
therefore ' Ordered, that he receive the pay of a 
Major-General Commanding in a separate Depart- 
ment from the 26tli day of April last, being the 
time of his resignation, until a suitable person shall 
be appointed to take the command in liis stead, or 
it shall be otherwise ordered by Congress.' " In 
1776 he entered civil life as Chief-Justice of the 
Court of Common Pleas in Worcester county. In 
the following year he was elected a member and 
President of the Executive Council, was a member 
of the Legislature sixteen years and Speaker of the 
House in 1785, delegate to the Continental Con- 
gress in 1779, and elected twice to the Federal 
Congress, serving from 1791 to 1795. General 
Ward married, July 31, 1750, Sarah Trowbridge 
of Groton, I\Lassachusetts, great-granddaughter of 
Increase Mather and Maria Cotton, by whom he 
had six children : Ithamar, Nahuni, Sarah, Thomas 
Walter, Martha and Artemas Ward. General Ward 
died in Shrewsbury, October 28, iSoo. 



WARD, Artemas 

Harvard A.B 1783, LL.D. 184::. 
Born in Shrewsbury, Mass., 1762; graduated Har- 
vard, 1783: studied law and practised in Shrewsbury, 
1785-1809 ; Representative in Legislature ; member of 
Executive Council; member of Congress, 1813-17; 
Justice of Court of Common Pleas, 1819-39 ; 3r"l Chief- 
Justice from 1820; LL.D. Harvard, 1842; Overseer, 
1810-44 ; died 1847. 

ARTEMAS WARD, Jurist, the youngest son of 
General Artemas and Sarah (Trowbridge) 
Ward, was born in Shrewsbury, Massachusetts, 
January 9, 1762, graduated at Harvard in 1783, 
studied law and practised in his native town un- 
til 1809, when he removed to Boston. He entered 
public service as a Representative in the Legislature, 
subsequently as a member of the Executive Council, 
and was sent to Congress in 1S13 ; being elected on 
the "Peace" issue, and served until 1S17. He was 
appointed a Justice of the Boston Court of Common 
Pleas in 181 9, and, when the Court was abolished, 
he was made Chief-Justice of the Court of the same 
name for the Commonwealth, retaining his seat on 
this Bench until 1839, when he resigned. Harvard 
conferred upon him the degree of Doctor of Laws 
in 1842, and he served on the Board of Overseers 
from 1 8 10 to 1844. He died in Boston, Massachu- 
setts, October 7, 1847. 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



15 



WARD, Andrew Henshaw 

Harvard A.B. 1808. 
Born in Shrewsbury, Mass., 1784; graduated Har- 
vard 1808; studied law and practised in Shrewsbury, 
1811-1829; officer of U. S. Customs Boston, 1829-50; 
engaged in genealogical and historical work from 1850 
to the time of his death; died 1864. 

ANDREW HENSHAW WARD, Genealogist, 
the son of Thomas Walter and Elizabeth 
(Denny) Ward, and grandson of General Artemas 
\Vard, was born in Shrewsbury, Massachusetts, May 
26, 1784, graduated at Harvard 1808, received his 
Master's degree in course, studied law and practised 
in his native town from tSii to 1829, when he re- 
moved to Boston. He was appointed an officer in 
the United States Customs in 1829 and held that 
position, except for a short time, for over twenty 
years, when he resigned and devoted his time to 
genealogical researches, in which he was one of the 
pioneers. He compiled the Church History of 
Shrewsbury, and the genealogical records of the 
Ward family and the Rice family. He also col- 
lected and arranged the Names of the Land Pro- 
prietors of Maine and their .\ssessments, which 
were being used for waste paper in the Old Custom 
House, and after repeated efforts finally succeeded 
in getting the consent of the Secretary of the Treas- 
ury to their being deposited with the Massachusetts 
Historical Society for preservation and reference, 
where they now are. He died in Newtonville, 
Massachusetts, in 1864. 



WARD, David Henshaw 

Harvard A.B. 1853. 
Born in Boston, Mass., 1830; educated at Chauncy 
Hall School and Boston Latin School ; graduated 
Harvard, 1853; engaged in railroad construction, 1853- 
54; commercial business in Boston, 1854-57; coal busi- 
ness in Keokuk, la., 1858; manufacturer of woollens, 
Keene, N. H., 1859-66; retired from active business 
1866-74, removing to Oakland, Cal., 1873; since 1874 in 
charge of estates and manager of railroad, manufac- 
turing and agricultural enterprises. 

DAVID HENSHAW WARD, Business Man, 
was born in Boston, Massachusetts, June 
23, 1830, the son of Andrew Henshaw and Sarah 
(Henshaw) Ward, of distinguished Colonial and 
Revolutionary ancestry. He traces liis descent on 
his father's side from William Ward, a freeman of 
Sudbury, Massachusetts, in 1635. General .\rtemas 
Ward, (Harvard 1748) Commander of the Conti- 
nental forces at Boston, was his great-grandfather. 
His father, .\ndrew Henshaw Ward (Harvard iSoS), 
was for many years an officer in the Customs service 



at Boston, member of the Massachusetts Historical 
Society and distinguished as a genealogist. Through 
his mother he is descended from Thomas Henshaw of 
Foxeth Park, England, whose son William was killed 
at the siege of Liverpool 1644 and his son Joshua 
came to Dorchester 1653. This son Joshua was 
one of the original setders of Leicester, Massachu- 
setts, and with .\dams, Hancock and others promi- 
nent in the Revolutionary History. David Henshaw 
Ward received his education preparatory for College 
in the Chauncy Hall School in Boston and the Bos- 
ton Latin School, and was graduated at Harvard in 




D. HENSH-IW WARD 

the Class of 1853. For a year following his gradu- 
ation he was engaged in the work of railroad con- 
struction on the Rock Valley Railroad of Wisconsin, 
now the Chicago & Northwestern, and in 1854 
returned to Boston and connected himself with the 
house of Ward & Booth, in the dye-stuffs and 
chemicals trade. He remained three years with 
this concern and after a short experience in the 
coal business in Keokuk, Iowa, established himself 
in Keene, New Hampshire, in the manufacture of 
woollen goods, continuing there from 1S59 to 1S66, 
wlien he retired from active business pursuits. In 
1873 Mr. Ward removed to Oakland, California, 
and has since occupied himself in the care of estates 
antl the oversight of some large enterprises. From 
iSSo to 18S4 he was in charge at San Francisco of 



i6 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



the construction business of the Canadiaii Pacific 
Railroad in the interest of D. O. Mills; from 1883 
to 1SS9 he was General Manager and Vice Presi- 
dent of the Judson Manufacturing Company, rolling 
mills, machine shop and foundry; and since 1890 
he has been General Manager of the Natonia 
Vineyard Company. IMr. Ward has served on the 
Board of Education of Oakland and was a Trustee 
of the Oakland Free Library. He was President of 
the Har\-ard Club in 18S9, is Vice-Commander of 
the California Commandery, Military Order of the 
Foreign \\'ars of the United States, and a member 
of the Pacific Union Club. July 5, 1855, he mar- 
ried Julia Frances Noble, who died in Oakland, 
November 12, 1880. His second wife whom he 
married November 19, 18S1, is Sarah Harwood, 
widow of Dr. Heman P. Babcock and daughter of 
Rear-Admiral Harwood, United States Navy. 



WENDELL, Evert Jansen 

Harvard A.B. 1882. 
Born in Boston, Mass., i860; prepared for College 
at Dr. Callisen's School, New York and by private 
tutor; graduated Harvard, 1882 ; employed for a short 
time in a New York business office; associated with 
his father in managing latter's private interests until 
the latter's death in i8g8; identified with philanthropic 
work in the metropolis ; was actively interested in fra- 
ternities, clubs and athletics at Harvard ; made sev- 
eral track records, and is widely known in College, 
athletic, amateur, dramatic, club and business circles. 

EVERT JANSEN WENDELL, was born in 
Boston, Massachusetts, December 5, i860, 
tlie son of Jacob and Mary P.ertodi (Barrett) 
Wendell. He is a lineal descendant in the eighth 
generation of Evert Jansen Wendell, who arrived 
at New Amsterdam from Holland in 1640; and 
settled, later, at Fort Orange, now .Albany, New 
Vork, where he died in 1709. In 1863 Mr. Wen- 
dell's parents moved from Boston to New Vork, 
where his father acquired extensive business inter- 
ests, and died in May 1898. He pursued his pre- 
liminary and prei)aratory studies in New Vork at 
Dr. Callisen's School and under the tutorage of 
Frederick G. Ireland, after which he entered Har- 
vard, graduating with the Class of 1S82. He 
shortly afterward started on a fifteen months' tour 
of Europe and the East, during which he travelled 
through India in company with the late Bishop 
Phillips Brooks ; and upon his return to New Vork 
entered the office of John Paton & Company, where 
he remained about two years. He next became 
associated with his father in managing the latter's 



private interests. On his father's death he assumed 
important business cares, including membership of 
various boards of managers and directors ; but, 
nevertheless, has found time to gratify his desire to 
engage in charitable and philanthropic work. He 
is especially interested in promoting boys' clubs and 
providing for those needing protection, education 
and the beneficial force of manly e.xample and 
supervision. For ten years he has been one of the 
Managers and was for two years Secretary of the 
House of Refuge on Randall's Island, conducted by 
the Society for the Reformation of Juvenile Delin- 




EVERT JANSEN WENDELL 

quents ; and he was made one of the Trustees of 
the Cuban Orphan Fund on its formation in 1899. 
During the first seven years of the existence of the 
L^niversity Settlement Society he was a member of 
its Board of Management. He is actively inter- 
ested in amateur theatricals, having been one of the 
original members of the .\mateur Comedy Club, 
and appeared in the leading role at its first perform- 
ance in 18S4. He has also taken part in nearly all 
the most notable amateur performances given in 
New Vork since that time ; and has played, in 
addition, witli many professionals. At College he 
was a leading spirit in all class, fraternity, club and 
athletic affairs, and was a member of the A D, 
D K E, and Hasty Pudding Clubs, (being Secre. 



UNIVERSITIES ANB THEIR SONS 



17 



tary and Krokodeilos of the latter) ; of the Institute 
of 1770, llic Alpha Delta Phi, Zeta Psi, and several 
other organizations. He took part in all of the theat- 
ricals given by his Class in the I) K E and the 
Hasty Pudding Clubs ; was one of the four Mana- 
gers of the Harvard Assemblies for 1SS2; Chair- 
man of the Class Day Committee ; and for three 
years was Editor of the Crimson. In athletics he 
won special renown, being Captain of the first Mott 
Haven Team (1S80) that won the cup for Harvard, 
winning, himself, on that occasion the one hundred 
yards, two hundred and twenty yards, and quarter 
miles races, which is the only time in the history of 
the Inter-Collegiate Athletic Association tliat these 
three events have been won by one man on the 
same day. He was also the first College man to 
run one hundred yards in ten secontls. Mr. Wendell 
was Steward from his C'lass of the Harvard Athletic 
.Association and President of that body in 1882, and 
was Chairman of the Harvard- Yale graduate com- 
mittee having charge of the International competi- 
tion in track and field athletics with Oxford and 
Cambridge in 1899. Mr. Wendell accompanied 
the Harvard-Vale team to England in the above 
capacity. He is a member of the New England and 
Holland societies and a Steward of the St. Niciiolas 
Society, all of New York ; the Century .Association ; 
the University, New York .\thletic, University .Ath- 
letic and Harvard Clubs, of which latter he was 
Secretary seven years ; is one of the original mem- 
bers of the Players' Club, and an honorary member 
of the Harvard Club of Chicago. Mr. Wendell's 
devotion to track and field sports continues una- 
bated and he frequently officiates as referee, judge 
or timer at College, school and other amateur 
athletic meetings, in addition to his many other 
interests. 



WARD, Hugh Campbell 

Harvard A.B. 1886. 
Born in Westport. Mo., 1864; educated at William 
Jewell College, Liberty, Mo. ; graduated Harvard, 
1886; LL.B. St. Louis Law School, 1888; practising 
law in Kansas City, Mo., since i888 ; Director National 
Bank of Commerce; member of the Legislature, 1893; 
appointed Police Commissioner, i8g8. 

HUGH CAMPRELl, W.VRD, Lawyer, was 
born in Westport, Missouri, March lo, 
i8().i, the son of Seth Edmund and Mary Frances 
(Harris) Ward. He attended William Jewell Col- 
lege at Liberty, Missouri, where he was gradu- 
ated a Bachelor of .Arts and later received the 
Master's degree, and then entered Harvard, gradu- 

VOL. V. — 2 



ating with the Class of 1886. He subsequently 
studied law at the St. Louis Law School, graduating 
from that institution in i888 with the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws, and established himself in prac- 
tice in Kansas City, Missouri. For some time he 
has been a Director of the National Bank of Com- 
merce in that city and ably represented his district 
in the Missouri Legislature during the session of 
1893. In 1898 he was appointed by Governor 
Stephens a Police Commissioner of Kansas City. 
In politics he is a Democrat. Mr. Ward is a mem- 
ber of the American, Missouri State and Kansas 




HUGH C. WARIJ 

City Bar Associations, and of the Society of Colonial 
Wars. He was chosen President of the Country 
Club in 1897, and holds membership in the Kansas 
City and Commercial Clubs, and in the Harvard 
Club of the South-West, of which he is Secretary. 
Mr. Ward is chairman of the .Missoiui Democratic 
Judiciary Committee, a State political organization. 



WALLACE, Herbert Ingalls 

Harvard A.B. 1877. 
Born in Fitchburg, Mass., 1856; prepared for Col- 
lege in the Fitchburg High School ; graduated Har- 
vard, 1877; connected with Fitchburg Paper Co., since 
1878; member of School Committee; Vice-Pres. 
Fitchburg & Leominster Street Ry. Co. ; Director 
Fitchburg National Bank and Fitchburg Gas & Elec- 



i8 



UNIFERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



trie Light Co. ; Trustee Public Library since 1884, and 
of Ingalls Memorial Library, Rindge, N.H., since 1894. 

Hi;RliERT INGAI.I-S WALLACE, Manufac- 
turer, was born in Fitchburg, ^L■lssachusetts, 
February 17, 1856, the son of Rodney and Sophia 
(Ingalls) Wallace. His grandfather anil great-grand- 
father on the paternal side were each named David, 
the latter spelling the name Wallis. His mother was 
a descendant of Edmund Ingalls, of Lincolnshire, 
England, who came to New England in 1629, prob- 
ably with Winthrop. Herbert I. Wallace was fitted 
for College at the Fitchburg High School, and grad- 
uated from Harvard with the Class of 1877. The 
year following his graduation was devoted to Euro- 
pean travel, and upon his return he became a mem- 
ber of the Fitchburg Paper Company, with which he 
is still connected. He is interested in other local 
enterprises of importance, being Vice-President of 
the Fitchburg & Leominster Street Railway Com- 
pany, and a Director of the Fitchburg National Bank, 
and the Fitchburg Gas «S: Electric Light Company. 
Mr. Wallace has served upon the School Board for 
three years, was made a Trustee of the Public 
Library in 1S84, and a Trustee of the Ingalls Me- 
morial Library at Rindge, New Hampshire, in 1894. 
For thirteen years he has been Secretary of the Park 
Club, has served as Secretary and Treasurer of the 
Har\'ard Club for the past twenty-one years, and is 
a member of the .Athletic, College, (kin and .\lpine 
Golf Clubs. October 23, 1S79, he married .Amy 
Louise Upton and has had five children : Frederick, 
born .August 14, 1880 (Harvard 1902) ; Rodney, 
born December 24, 1882, and died December 11, 
1895 ; Amy Louise, born May 3, and died .August 
lo, 1885 ; Sophia Ingalls. twin sister of the latter, 
living ; and Robert Shurtleff Wallace, born Septem- 
ber 28, 1888. 



WOLLAEGER, Gustav, Jr. 

Harvard A.B. 1895. 
Born in Milwaukee, Wis., 1873 ; educated parochial 
and public schools; graduated Harvard. 1S95; LL.B. 
University of Wisconsin, 1897; practising law in Mil- 
waukee since 1897; appointed Regent of Normal 
Schools, State of Wisconsin, 1899. 

GUSIAN- WOLLAEGER, Jr., Lawyer, was 
born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, September 
'7. '873, the son of Gustav and Henriette (Thomas) 
Wollaeger. His fitther, whose birth took place in 
the city of Plathe, North Germany, April 6, 1836, 
came to the United States in 1858, and from 1870 
to the time of his death, which occurred July 21, 
1899, was Secretary of the Concordia Fire Insur- 



ance Company of Milwaukee. His mother is still 
living as is also his maternal grandfather, Godfried 
Thomas, who, in 1S48, took refuge in .America on 
account of religious disturbances in Germany and 
Hungary, and is now eighty-eight years old. The 
younger Wollaeger began his studies at a parochial 
school and later attended the public schools of 
Milwaukee, including the high school, where he was 
prepared for College. He took his Bachelor's 
degree at Harvard in 1895, and then entered as a 
law student at the University of Wisconsin, where 
he was graduated with the degree of liachelor of 




GUST.4V WOLUiEGER, JR. 

Laws in 1897. In July of the latter year he engaged 
in practice in Milwaukee as a member of the firm of 
Sheridan & Wollaeger, which has already acquired 
a profitable general law business, and a high reputa- 
tion for energy and fidelity. In August 1899, Mr. 
Wollaeger was appointed by .Acting-Governor Stone 
Regent of Normal Schools for the State of Wis- 
consin to succeed the elder Wollaeger, who was 
serving in that capacity at the time of his death. 
While a student at the L'niyersity of Wisconsin he 
was during his Senior year President of the Colum- 
bian Law Society, and he also joined the Sigma Chi 
and Phi Delta Phi Fraternities. January 18, 1900, 
Mr. Wollaeger married Helen Suedhe and made an 
extensive tour through Europe and the Orient. 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



19 



ALLEN, Joshua Wilson 

Yale B.A. 1888. 
Born in Hartford, Conn., 1864; prepared for College 
at Hartford High School; graduated Yale, 1888; Assis- 
tant Treasurer Hartford Theological Seminary; died 
1897. 

JOSHUA WILSON ALLEN, Late Assistant 
Treasurer of the Hartford Theological Semi- 
nary, was born in Hartford, Connecticut, March 2, 
1S64, the son of John and Mary (Bonner) Alien. 
He was a graduate of the Hartford High School, 
and took his liachelor's degree at Yale in 18S8, 
after which he entered the Vale Law School, but 
subsequently relincjuished his legal studies to accept 
the Assistant Trcasurcrship of the Hartford Theo- 
logical Seminary. Tliis position lie held until his 
death, wliich occurred October i, i!^gj. At Vale 
he was a member of the Psi Upsilon Fraternity, and 
his popularity as a student followed him into his 
later sphere of usefulness. Mr. Allen was Treas- 
urer of the Hartford Choral LTnion, one of the 
K.xecutive Committee of the RepubUcan Club, and 
an active member of the Colonial Club. June 10, 
1 89 1, he married Lucy Mather Brace. Their chil- 
dren are ; Russell, Julia Brace and Franklin Allen. 



BRUBACHER, Abraham Royer 

Yale B.A. 1897. 
Born in Shaefferstown, Pa., 1870 ; educated in the 
public schools ; B.S. Palatinate College of Myerstown, 
Pa., 1891 ; graduate of Phillips (AnUover) Academy, 
'893 ; graduated Yale, 1897 '• taught Greek and Latin at 
Williston Seminary, 1897-99; Soldiers' Memorial Fel- 
low at Yale, 1899-1900. 

AI'.R.\HAM ROVKR BRUBACHF.R, Sol- 
diers' Memorial Fellow at Vale, 1899-1900, 
was born in Shaefferstown, Pennsylvania, July 27, 
1870, son of Daniel B. and Katharyn (Royer) 
lirubacher. His father's family came from Cer- 
many at the close of the seventeenth century, and 
became connected with the Quaker community; 
his mother's family have lived in Lancaster county, 
Pennsylvania, since about 1750. He passed his 
youth upon a farm, until nineteen years old, re- 
ceiving his early education in public schools, and 
then taught school for a year in Conewago Town- 
ship, afterwanls entering Palatinate College at Myers- 
town, Pennsylvania, where he was gratluated in 1891 
as Bachelor of Science with valedictorian rank. 
From there he went to Pliillips .\cademy at .\ndovcr 
to prepare for a classical course, and in 1895 en- 
tered Vale, graduating in 1897 as Bachelor of .Arts. 



Both at .Andover and at Vale he supported himself 
and paid his way by private tutoring. During the two 
years following his graduation Mr. Brubacher taught 
Greek and Latin at the Williston Seminary, and in 
1899 was given the Soldiers' Memorial Fellowship 
at Vale. He is also a winner of the Winthrop Prize 
at Yale, which is given for special proficiency in the 
Greek and Latin poets. He is a member of the 
Vale Chapter of Phi Beta Kappa, being a Philo- 




A. R. imUBACHER 



sophical Oration appointment. He married .August 
24, 1897, Rosa Miranda Haas. They have one 
child : Ma.x Seller Brubacher. 



BREWSTER, Lyman Denison 

Yale B.A. 1855. 
Born in Salisbury, Conn., 1832; educated in Sedg- 
wick Academy, Salisbury, Conn., and Williams Acad- 
emy, Stockbridge, Mass.; graduated Yale, 1855; 
admitted to Bar, 1858; practised law m Danbury, 
Conn., since 1858; Representative to the Legislature, 
1870 and 1878-79; State Senator, 1880-81; Judge of 
Court of Common Pleas, 1870-74 ; member of commis- 
sion for Uniform State Laws since 1893, and Pres. of 
National Conference since 1895. 

LYMAN DKNISOX BRFWSTFR. Jurist, was 
born in Salisbury, Connecticut, July 31, 
1832, the son of Daniel and Harriet (Averill) 



20 



UNIl'ERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



Hrewster. He is a lineal ilescendaiU in the eighth 
generation of Kliler William Hrewster, Ruling Inkier 
of the Mayllower Pilgrims, through the latter's eld- 
est son. Jonathan, who settled in Norwich, Connec- 
ticut. On the maternal siile he is descended from 
John Whittlesey, of Saybrook, Connecticut, the first 
ferryman on the Connecticut River. His education 
was begun at Sedgwick .Academy, Salisbury, con- 
tinueil at Williams Academy, Stockbridge, Massa- 
chusetts, and completed at Vale, from which he 
was graduated in 1855 with honors, being chosen 
Class Poet and holding an oration stand at Com- 
mencement. In 1857, while a law student in the 
otlico of Hon. Roger Averill, of Danbury, Connec- 
ticut, he visited Europe, and after his admission to 
the liar, which took place in 1858, he settled in 
Danbury, where he has practised law continuously 
to the present time. Mr. Brewster was Representa- 
tive to the Connecticut Legislature for the years 
1870, 187S, 1879; State Senator in 1880-1881, 
serving as Chairman of the Committee on Judiciary, 
and was Judge of the Court of Common Pleas for 
Kairfield county from 1S70 to 1874. During the 
years 1 878-1879 he served upon a commission 
established to frame a new code of procedure for 
the state. In 1893 he was ajjpointed a member 
from Connecticut of the National Commission for 
uniformity in state laws, and in 1895 "^^'^^ chosen 
i'resident of the National Conference, holding these 
positions at the present time. He is one of the 
original members of the .American Bar Association, 
the Society of Colonial Wars and Society of tiie 
Descendants of the Mayflower Pilgrims. Politically 
he is a Republican. January i, 1868, he married 
Sarah .Amelia, daughter of George W. Ives, of 
Danburv. 



BUMSTEAD, Horace 

Vale B.A. 1863. 
Born in Boston, Mass., 1841 ; educated Boston pub- 
lic schools, Yale, Andover Theol. Seminary and Univ. 
of Tubingen; served as an officer in the Civil War; 
Pastor 2d Congregational Church, Minneapolis, Minn., 
1872-75 ; called to Faculty of Atlanta Univ., 1875 ; and 
now President of that institution. 

HORACE P.U.MS IKAD, D.l)., President of 
.Atlanta University, was born in Boston, 
.Massachusetts, September 29, 1841, son of Josiah 
Freeman and I.ucy Douglas (Willis) Bumstead. 
His paternal ancestry is traceable through seven 
generations and those on the maternal side through 
eight generations to early settlers in Boston. He 



attended the Boston public schools, graduating from 
the Latin School in 1S59, and was a student at 
Yale, taking his Bachelor's degree with the Class of 
1863. .Appointed M.ajor of the Forty-third United 
States Regiment (colored) in .Ajjril 1864, he served 
at the sieges of Petersburg and Richmond and sub- 
sequently in Texas, commanding the regiment about 
a year anil was mustered out in December 1S65. 
Entering the Andover (Massachusetts) Theological 
Seminary in 1866, he studied two years, and after 
spending a year in travelling through the southern 
states he resumed his divinity course, graduating at 




HORACE BL'M.STEAD 

Andover in 1870, and the following year was de- 
voted to study at the University of Tubingen, Ger- 
many. His first and only Pastorate was that of the 
Second Congregational Church, Minneapolis, Min- 
nesota, where he labored for three years, at the 
expiration of which time he relinquished pastoral 
work to enter the educational field as a member of 
the Faculty of the Atlanta (Georgia) University. 
Commencing his duties there as Professor of 
Natural Science in 1875, he was in 1880 transferred 
to the Chair of Latin, which he retained for seven- 
teen years; was Acting President in 1886-1887, 
and has held the Presidency of that University from 
1888 to the present time. He received the degree 
of Doctor of Divinity from New York University in 



UNJyERSirJES AND THEIR SONS 



21 



1 88 1. In politics President Rmnstead has usually 
acted with the Republican party, though nut accept- 
ing all its principles. He is a member of the 
Massachusetts Couimandery, Military Oriler of the 
Loyal Legion. On January 9, 1872, he married 
Anna M. Hoit, of North Conway, New Hampshire ; 
their children are : Arthur, born February 9, 1873, a 
graduate of Yale in 1895, and now a jjost-graduate 
student there; Albert Hoit, born July 18, 1875; 
Ralph Willis, born April 24, 18S1, a member of the 
Yale Class of 1903 ; Richard, born August 31, 1882 
(died September i8, 1883) ; and Dorothy Bumstead, 
born February 23, 1887. 



ELY, William Davis 

Yale B.A. 1836, A.M. 1839. 
Born in Hartford, Conn., 1815 ; fitted for College at 
Hopkins Grammar School, Hartford ; graduated Yale, 
1836; resident graduate, 1837-38; Tutor, 1839-42: made 
tour of Europe, 1842-43; admitted to Connecticut Bar, 
1843, and to Bar of U. S. Supreme Court, 1849; prac- 
tised law in Hartford until 1856 ; removed to Providence, 
R. I. 1856. 

WIl.IdAM DAVIS FIA', Lawyer, was born 
in Hartford, Connecticut, June 16, 1815, 
the sun of William and Clarissa May (Davis) I'21y. 
His father was a graduate of Yale in the Class of 
17S7, and his grandfather, the Rev. Richard Ely, 
of S.iybrook, Connecticut, took his degree there in 
the Class of 1754. His mother, born in IJoston, 
was a daughter of Major Robert Davis, one of the 
" Boston Tea Party," prominent in the movement 
for independence and in service at the siege of 
Boston. William D. Ely was fitted for College at 
the Hopkins (Irammar School in Hartford, under 
the instruction of Elijah P. Barrows (Yale 1826) 
William Carter (Yale 1828) and F. A. P. Barnard 
(Yale 1828), the late President of Columbia, and 
was graduated at Yale in the ('lass of 1836. .As a 
resident graduate, 1836-1838, Mr. Ely attended 
select coiu'ses in the Theological and Medical 
Schools of the University, especially those of i )r. 
Taylor on Moral Philosophy, of Dr. Knight on 
Anatomy and of Dr. Tully on Materia Medica. 
In 1839 he was appointed a Tutor in the College, 
— in Natural Philosophy for the Class of 1841, and 
later in Latin fur the Class of 1843. So limited was 
the Faculty at this time that Professor (later Presi- 
dent) Woolsey had to take daily charge of the 
three divisions of the Class in Greek. .At this 
period compulsory boarding in " Commons " was 
abolished, through persistent efforts of the tutors. 



The older members of the Faculty urged, that, 
according to President Dwight, "College could 
not be governed without Commons." 'Ihe reform 
deserves notice, for the removal of this obno.xious 
restraint on personal liberty jiroved a radical cure 
for clironic disturbances, and the system was never 
restored. Mr. Ely, having decided upon the law as 
a i^rofession, entered the Yale Law School and pur- 
sued his studies there, under Judges Daggett and 
Hitchcock. In the s])ring of 1842, he resigned his 
tutorship and went abroad, passing the winter in 
Italy, where he studied art and antiquities. There 




WILLIAM D. ELY 

meeting Grass, of Paris, the sculptor j\ist appointed 
to restore the Cathedral of Strasburg, they became 
travelling companions. After a visit to the British 
Islands in 1843, Mr. I'.ly retinncd to the United 
States and, completing his law studies, was admitted 
in that year to practice in the courts of Connecti- 
cut. His admission to the United States Supreme 
Court followed in 1S49. Mr. Ely was early con- 
nected with the work of procuring charters for a 
new railroad across Connecticut, from Providence, 
through Hartford to the Hudson Ri\er, — later 
known as the New York & New I'.ngland. They 
were obtained, after a sharp contest with the es- 
tablished railroads, and he was made Secretary of, 
a Director in and Cuunsel for the new coni])any. 



22 



UNIFERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



He was also SecreUry of and Counsel for the 
Standing Committee of the City of Hartford, ap- 
pointed to prevent tlie building of a railroad draw- 
bridge across Connecticut river at Middletown, a 
question which agitated the state for many years. 
Mr. Ely went abroad again in 1852, passing most 
of his time in the South of Europe, and soon after 
his return married, in 1S54, Anne Crawford, 
daughter of the late Zachariah .Mien, LL.U., of 
Providence, Rhode Island, of Huguenot descent 
and author of many scientific and literary works. 
Of two children, Harriet .Mien died in early youtli ; 
William, the sun-iving son, a graduate of Brown 
University in 1878, was a post-graduate student of 
Yale in 1 878-1 879. The death of Mrs. Ely oc- 
curred in 1888. Since 1856, Mr. Ely has resided 
in Providence, withdrawn from professional practice, 
but connected with several companies and corpora- 
tions. His literary work has been mainly on early 
Colonial subjects, in connection with historical 
societies. While associated with the Faculty of 
Yale, Mr. Ely was elected a member of the 
Connecticut Academy of Arts and Sciences. He 
subsequently became a member of the Connec- 
ticut Historical Society, and later of the Rhode 
Island Historical Society. He is also a member of 
the Huguenot Society of Oxford, Massachusetts ; 
of the Huguenot Society of .America ; of the Sons 
of the .American Revolution ; of the Churchmen's 
Club of Rhode Island, and of the Hope Club of 
Providence. 



DOW, Daniel 

Yale B.A. 1793. 
Born in Ashford, Conn., 1772; graduated Yale, 1793; 
studied theology and ordained Pastor of church in 
Thompson, Conn., 1796; D.D. Williams, 1840; Fellow 
of Yale Corporation, 1824-49 ; died 1849. 

DANIEL DOW, D.D., Clergyman, was born 
in Ashford, Connecticut, February 19, 
1772, and graduateil with honor at Yale in 1793. 
While studying for the ministry he taught psalmody 
for a livelihood, and on the completion of his theo- 
logical course was called to the Pastorate of the 
Congregational Church at Thompson, Connecticut. 
He was ordained there, .April 20, 1796, and re- 
mained in that charge throughout his life. \\\\- 
liams College conferred upon him the degree of 
Doctor of Divinity in 1840. Dr. Dow attained 
high reputation as a preacher. His discourses were 
never written, but delivered in clear and forcible 
style, without notes, and were models of logical 



arrangement. In addition to his sermons Dr. Dow 
produced and published works of religious and 
theological character, largely doctrinal and some 
of them controversial. For a quarter of a century, 
from 1824 to the time of his death, he was a Fel- 
low of the Yale Corporation. He died in Thompson, 
July 19, 1849. 



EWING, Martin Baum 

Yale B.A. 1855. 
Born in Cincinnati,©., 1834; graduated Yale, 1855; 
served in the Civil War 1861-65, attaining the rank 
of Lieut.-Col. ; Acting Assist. Adj't.-Gen'l. Reserve 
Artillery, Army of the Potomac, 1863; Inspector- 
Gen'l on Gen. Ammen's staff, 1864; Deputy-Collector 
of Internal Revenue Cincinnati 1878-85; Record Clerk 
at headquarters Cincinnati Police Dept. 1896 to the 
present time. 

MARIIX BAUM EWIXG, Public Official, 
was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, March iS, 
1834, son of .Alexander Hamilton and Mary Perry 
(Baum) Ewing. He is of Scotch-Irish descent on 
the paternal side, his ancestors having originally 
belonged to the McEwans of Clan Campbell. His 
maternal ancestry was both .Anglo-Saxon and Ger- 
man, one branch tracing its lineage back to .Alfred 
the Great and Charlemagne, and his grandfather, 
Martin Baum, who was a native of Hagerstown, 
Maryland, was prominent among the early German 
residents of Cincinnati, where he located in 1795. 
Martin B. F.uing's preliminary studies were pursued 
at Joseph Herron's Seminary, Cincinnati, and he 
prepared for College under the tutorage of James 
F. B. Orton (now State Geologist of Ohio), graduat- 
ing at Yale with the Class of 1855. He was en- 
gaged in various business pursuits until October 
1 86 1, when he enlisted as private and was promoted 
to Second Lieutenant of Battery H, First Regiment, 
Ohio Volunteer Light Artillery, and was subse- 
quently promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel of the 
Second Ohio Heavy .Artillery, also ser\-ing as .Acting 
Assistant Adjutant-General in the Reserve Artillery, 
Army of the Potomac in 1S63, as Inspector-General 
on the staff of General .Ammen at Knoxville, Tennes- 
see, and was mustered out of service .August 23, 
1865. Shortly after leaving the army he went to 
Green county, Ohio, where he resided on a farm 
for the succeeding four years, and in 1869 he went 
to Chicago for the purpose of taking charge of the 
office of the George W. Ewing estate, remaining 
there some six years. From June 18 78, to July 
1885 he served as United States Deputy-Collector 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



23 



of Internal Revenue at Cincinnati, and was in the 
fire insurance business from the latter year till 1890. 
In 1S96 he accepted the appointment of Record 
Clerk at the headquarters of the Cincinnati Police 
Department, and is still serving in that capacity. 
At College Colonel Kwing belonged to the Alpha 
Delta Phi Fraternity, and is now a member of the 
Ohio Commandery, Military Order of the Loyal 
Legion, and of the Lincoln Club, Cincinnati. In 
his religious belief he is an Episcopalian and was a 
delegate to the Diocesan Convention which elected 
the Rev. Boyd Vincent (Yale) Bishop of the 
Southern Diocese of Ohio. Politically he is a 
Republican. On October 4, 1855 he married 
Atlelaide Strobridge ; they have no children. 



GOODRICH, Chauncey 

Yale B.A. 1776. 
Born in Durham, Conn., 1759; graduated Yale, 1776 ; 
Tutor 1779-81 ; studied law and was admitted to the 
Bar, 1781 ; member of Connecticut Legislature, 1793; 
member of Congress, 1795-1801 ; member of State Exe- 
cutive Council, 1802-07; U. S. Senator, 1807-13; Lieut. - 
Gov. of Connecticut, 1813; delegate to the Hartford 
Convention, 1814; died 1815. 

CHAUNCEY COODRICH, Statesman, was 
born in Durham, Connecticut, October 20, 
1759, the eldest son of the Rev. Elizur Goodrich, 
D.D. (Yale 1752), and Mary Griswold Chauncey. 
He was a direct descendant in the fifth generation 
from Ensign \\'illiam (ioodrich, wiio came from 
ICngland in 1643 and settled in Wethersfield, Con- 
necticut. His fithcr, for forty years Pastor of tlie 
Congregational Church in Durham, was for a long 
time a Fellow of Yale and the second Secretary of 
the Corporation. Chauncey Goodricli was pre- 
pared for College under the tuition of his father 
and graduated at Yale in i 776, subsequently being 
engaged as Tutor in that College and studying law. 
He was admitted to the Bar in i 781 and established 
himself in practice in Hartford, Connecticut, where 
he rose to eminence in his profession and in public 
life. His first service in an elective capacity was 
as a Representative in the Legislature in 1 793, 
after which he was sent to Congress, being twice re- 
elected and sitting from 1795 '° 1801. For five 
years thereafter he was a member of the Executive 
Council of the State, and in 1S07 was chosen 
United States Senator from Connecticut. This 
oflfice he resigned in 181 3, shortly before the close 
of his term, to accejit that of Lieulenant-Governor 
of Connecticut. In the following year he was made 



a delegate to the noted Hartford Convention. Mr. 
Goodrich was twice married. His first wife was 
.Abigail, daughter of Dr. Smith of Hartford, Connec- 
ticut. October 13, 1789, he married Mary Ann, 
daughter of (Governor Oliver Wolcott of Connecticut, 
a signer of the Declaration of Independence, who 
was one of the most celebrated beauties of her 
time. Chauncey Goodrich died in Hartford, August 
18, 1815. 



HAYS, David Alexander 

Yale Ph.B. 1891. 
Born in Johnstown, N.Y., 1869; fitted for College at 
Holbrook's Academy at Sing Sing: graduated Yale 
Scientific School, 1891, and has since been engaged in 
banking business in Johnstown. 

^AVID ALEXANDER H.\YS, Banker, was 
born in Johnstown, New York, February 27, 
1S69, the son of David and Mary (Yost) Hays. 



D 




D.AVIIJ .\. H.WS 

He is descended from a family which has been 
prominent in the Colonial history of the country, and 
representatives of which served in the War for Inde- 
pendence, and is a member of the Sons of the 
.\merican Revolution. He received his early educa- 
tion in the common >,(-iiools of his native town, and 
after a preparatory course at Holbrook's Military 
Academy at Sing Sing, New York, entered the 
Sheffield Scientific Schoi)l of Yale, graduating as 



24 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



Bachelor of Philosophy in 1891. While in College 
he became a. member of Chi Phi fraternity. Since 
graduation Mr. Hays h.is been engaged in the busi- 
ness of bunking in Johnstown. He is a Republican 
in politics. 



HITCHCOCK. Henry 

Yale B.A. i&(8. LL D. 1874 
Born in Spring Hill. Ala.. 1829; took the degree of 
B.A. at University of Nashville, 1846, and then entered 
the Junior Class at Yale, graduating in 1848; teacher 
in high school at Worcester, Mass., 1848-49; studied 
law and was admitted to the Missouri Bar, 1851 ; has 
practised law in St. Louis since 1852; was active in 
deternnining the course of the state in reference to the 
Secession inovement and in directing its affairs during 
the Civil War; Assistant Adjutant-General U.S.V., 
1834-65; Prof, of Law and Dean of the Law Faculty, 
Washington Univ. 1867-84; LL.D. Vale, 1874. 

Hi'.NKV IHICIICOCK, L1..D., Lawyer, was 
born in Spring Hill, .■\bbania, July 3, 1829, 
son of Jutlge Henry and .Anne (Krwin) Hitchcock. 
The family is an old New ICngland one, but lias 
h.td distinguished representatives in all |>arts of the 
I'nitcd States. Sanniel Hitchcock, born in Massa- 
chusetts, after graduating at Harvard in 1777 and 
being admitted to the Bar, removed to Vermont, 
residing there milil his deatii in 18 13. He was a 
distinguished lawyer and held various important 
official positions. He was a member of the Ver- 
mont Convention which, in i 791, ratified the Consti- 
tution of the United States ; as an Elector-at-large, 
voted for W'.ashington for President in 1793; 
was appointed United States Circuit Judge by 
President .Ad.ims in 1801 and was one of the 
founders of the University of Vermont. He mar- 
ried Lucy Caroline .Mien, daughter of Ethan .Mien 
of Ticonderoga fame. 'J'heir eldest son, Judge 
Henry Hitchcock, the father of the subject of this 
sketch, removed to .Alabama in early manhood, 
served as Secretary of the Territory, later as 
.Attorney-General of the state and still later as 
L'nited States District .Attorney and Chief-Justice 
of .Alabama. He died at the early age of forty- 
eight, at the height of a distinguished and success- 
ful career. Henry Hitchcock attended in youth 
the University of Nashville, Tennessee, graduating 
in 1846, when he entered the Junior Class at Yale, 
graduating in 1848 with high honors. He then 
studied Law in New York City, in the office of 
Hon. Willis Hall, until November 1848, when he 
accepted the position of classical teacher in the 
high school at Worcester, Massachusetts. After 



remaining there a year he returned to Nashville 
and resumed tlic study of law uniler Hon. \\'illiam 
F. Cooper. In September 185 1, Mr. Hitchcock 
went to St. Louis, was admitted to the Bar there, 
and immediately began the practice of his profes- 
sion. .A few months later he became Assistant 
Editor of the St. Louis Intelligencer, a Whig news- 
paper. .At the end of a year he retired from edi- 
torial work and apjilied himself to the practice of 
his profession, and in 1854 made his first appear- 
ance before the Supreme Court of Missouri. He 
devoted himself especially to equity and commer- 




HENRV HITCHCOCK 

cial law, and became one of the prominent civil 
practitioners of the West. When tlie Republican 
party was organized he became a member of that 
party, and his first political speech was made in 
advocacy of Lincoln's election to the Presidency in 
i860. He was active in determining the course of 
the state in reference to the Secession movement, 
and took a leading part in the State Convention of 
Missouri which assembled in February 1861, and 
which in July 1S61, deposed the secessionist state 
government and Legislature, established a loyal 
provisional government and afterwards held the 
state firmly in the Union, finally adjourning in 1863. 
In October 1864, Mr. Hitchcock was appointed 
Assistant Adjutant-General of Volunteers in the 



UNIFERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



25 



Union Army, with the rank of Major, and assigned 
to duty as Judge-Advocate on the staff, and at the 
request of General W. T. Sherman. He was in 
active service until the close of the war, serving on 
General Sherman's personal staff during the March 
to the Sea and the subsequent campaigns through 
the Carolinas, and in April 1865, bore to Washing- 
ton the despatches from General Sherman announc- 
ing the celebrated truce with General Joseph E. 
Johnston. In June 1865, he was honorably mus- 
tered out of service with the brevet of Lieutenant- 
Colonel. He then went abroad for several months, 
when he returned to St. Louis and resumed the 
practice of law. In 1869 he was offered, but de- 
clined, the appointment of United States Circuit 
Judge for the ICighth Circuit. His health failed in 
1870, and in the following year he spent several 
months travelling in China and Japan. Since his 
return from the Orient he has been continuously 
in active and extensive practice in St. Louis From 
18S4 to 1890 he was senior member of the law firm 
of Hitchcock, Madill & Finkelnburg, and since that 
time has practised alone, chiefly in the .'\ppellate 
Courts of the State and the United States Supreme 
Court. He has been a member of the Board of 
Directors of Washington University since 1859 and 
its Vice-President since 1S85. He assisted in 
organizing the Law Department of that Lhiiversity, 
being Dean of the Law Faculty for about four- 
teen years and from 1867 to 1884 was a Professor 
and Lecturer there, giving his services during the 
entire period without compensation, also contribut- 
ing liberally to the endowment of the school. In 
1875 he received from Yale the honorary degree of 
Doctor of Laws. Mr. Hitchcock, under the will 
of the late Henry Shaw, was one of the original 
Trustees of the Missouri Botanical Garden, and has 
been Vice-President of that Board since its organiza- 
tion in 1889. He was President of the St. Louis 
Bar Association in 1880, and was one of the or- 
ganizers of the Missouri State Bar Association, of 
which he was President in 1882. He was also one 
of the founders of the American Bar Association, 
and at its annual meeting in 1S79 read a paper on 
the Inviolability of Telegrams, which was published 
in the Southern Law Review, and was cited with 
approbation by the Supreme Court of Missouri in 
the case of ex parte Brown, upon the question of 
the power of a court to compel the production of 
private telegrams in evidence. In 1887 he de- 
livered the Annual Address before the Association, 
taking as his subject, General Corporation Laws. 



In 1889 he was unanimously elected its President, 
and in 1890 delivered the President's Address, re- 
viewing the national and state legislation of the pre- 
ceding year. In January 1887, at the invitation of 
the New York State Bar Association, he delivered 
the annual address before that body, his subject 
being the Development of American State Consti- 
tutions. This paper was afterwards published in 
Messrs. Putnam's series of Questions of the Day 
and cited by Professor James Bryce in his American 
Commonwealth. In March 1889, Mr. Hitchcock 
was associated with Judge Cooley and other eminent 
jurists in delivering a course of lectures at the L^ni- 
versity of Michigan on the Constitutional History of 
the United States, his subject being, Constitutional 
Development in the LTnited States as influenced 
by Chief-Justice Marshall, and the lecture being 
a sketch of the life of the great Chief-Justice and 
a review of his constitutional decisions. In Feb- 
ruary iSgo, at the celebration, in New York City, 
of the centennial of the Supreme Court of the 
U:iited States, held under the auspices of the 
New York State Bar Association, and officially 
attended by the Justices of the Supreme Court, 
members of President Harrison's Cabinet and 
many other distinguished persons, he was one of 
the four eminent members of the liar, represent- 
ing different parts of the Lhiion, who by special 
invitation delivered addresses as part of the 
proceedings, the subject assigned to him being, 
The Exercise of the Powers of the Court. For 
many years Mr. Hitchcock has been an earnest 
advocate of civil service reform. In 1881 he or- 
ganized the Missouri Civil Service Reform Associa- 
tion, and served for several years as its President. 
He was also associated with George William Curtis, 
Carl Schurz and others in establishing the National 
Civil Service Reform League, of which he is a Vice- 
President and a member of the General Committee. 
Mr. Hitchcock is a member of the Loyal Legion 
and the Grand Army of the Republic, also of the 
University. Commercial and St. Louis Clubs of St. 
Louis, and the Union League, University and 
Lawyers' Clubs of New York. He married, March 
■5, 1857, Mary, daughter of George Collier, of St. 
Louis, and has two sons: Henry (Yale 1879) and 
George Collier Hitchcock (Yale 1890). 



GODCHAUX, Emile 

Yale B.A. l8g6, LL.B. l8g8. 
Born in New Orleans, La., 1874; educated in private 
schools in New Orleans and at Phillips-Exeter Acad- 



26 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



emy; graduated Yale, 1896; Yale Law School, 1898; 
admitted to practice in Connecticut, 1898; admitted to 
practice in Louisiana. 1898; has practised law in New 
Orleans, since that time and since 1899 in association 
with Guy M. Hornor; also interested in his fathers 
business. 

EM I I.I". C.ODCn.VUX, I>awyer, was born in 
New Orleans, Louisiana, January 29, 1874, 
son of Leon and Justine (Lamm) C.odchaux, both 
of whom were born in France of old French ances- 
try. He was educated in private schools in New 
Orleans and then attendetl Phillips-Exeter Academy 
for four years, graduating in 1S92. At Yale he took 




EMII.F. GOnCHAUX 

the Academic course, receiving the degree of 
Bachelor of .Arts in 1896. He also studied law at 
the Yale I^aw School, from which he was graduated 
a Bachelor of 1-aws in 1898. In June of that year 
he was admitted to practice in Connecticut, and in 
November to the Bar of Louisiana. He practised 
his profession in \ow Orleans alone until January 
1899, when he became associated with Guy M. 
Hornor, under the firm name of Hornor & God- 
chaux. Since July 1899, he has also been Secretary 
of the I^on Godchaux Company, Limited, and 
Secretary of the Leon Godchaux Clothing Com- 
pany, Limited. While at Yale Mr. Godchaux be- 
came a member of Corbcy Court Law Fraternity. 
He has never taken an active part in politics. 



HARRISON, Carter Henry 

Vale B.A. 1845. 
Born in Fayette Co., Ky., 1825; graduated Yale, 
1845; LL.B. Transylvania Law School, Lexington, 
Ky. ; in the real estate business in Chicago at time of 
the great fire ; County Commissioner, 1871-73 ; Repre- 
sentative in Congress, 1875-79; Mayor of Chicago, 
1880-88, and again in 1893; candidate for Governor of 
111., 1884; died 1893. 

CAR riCR HENRY HARRISON, Lawyer, was 
born in Fayette county, Kentucky, February 
15, 1&2S, and graduated at Yale in the Class of 
1845. Upon leaving College he read law for a 
time and engaged in farming, and then went abroad 
for travel. He passed two years in foreign coun- 
tries and upon his return home to the United States 
concluded his legal studies at the Transylvania Law 
School, Lexington, Kentucky, receiving the degree 
of Bachelor of Laws, and settled in Chicago. The 
real estate business presenting at that time a more 
advantageous field for his activity than was offered 
by the law, he engaged in this occupation, and was 
in that business at the time of the great fire of 1871. 
Following this disaster, he served as County Com- 
missioner of Cook county, and in 1872 was nomi- 
nated for Congress and defeated. After returning 
from another tour abroad, in 1874, he was renomi- 
nated a Representative in Congress. The first returns 
showed liim defeated, but a recount gave him the 
seat by a majority of eight. Mr. Harrison was re- 
elected for a second term in 1878 by a substantial 
majority. At the end of his second term in Con- 
gress he was elected Mayor of the City of Chicago 
and served four terms, by successive re-elections, 
from 1879 to 1887. It is an illustration of the 
strong hold which Mr. Harrison had upon the es- 
teem and confidence of his fellow citizens, that in 
one of his elections to Congress and in at least two 
of his elections as Mayor, he won the contest against 
the opposition of the entire newspaper press of 
Chicago, fighting him vigorously and unscrupulously. 
Mr. Harrison was the Democratic candidate for 
Governor of Illinois in 1884, but failed of election. 
He was again elected Mayor in 1893, and on 
October 28 of that year he was shot in his own 
house by an anarchist assassin, dying in a few hours. 
The crime shocked not only Chicago but the whole 
country, and in his own immediate community his 
death occasioned profound sorrow and regret. No 
one was more closely identified with the growth and 
prosperity of the western metropolis than he, and 
his memory is fitly preserved in a monument erected 
by popular subscription. His son. Carter H. Har- 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



27 



risoii (Yale, LL.B. 1883), now Mayor of Chicago, 
has succeeded to much of his father's popularity 
and worthily carries the name in public life. 



HUTCHINSON, George Albert 

Yale Ph.B. 1893. 
Born in Chicago, III., 1872 ; educated in Chicago pub- 
lic schools and the Manual Training School ; graduate 
of Sheffield Scientific School of Yale, 1893; member of 
the firm of W. H. Hutchinson & Son, incorporated. 

GEORGE ALBERT HUTCHINSON, Secre- 
tary and General Manager of W. H. Hutch- 
inson & Son, incorporated, was born in Chicago, 
Illinois, May 28, 1872, son of George Clinton and 
Charlotte (Foley) Hutchinson. The family can 
be traced in this country back to 1623, and in 
England to the beginning of the sixteenth century. 
He was educated in the public schools of Chicago 
and the Chicago Manual Training School, and after- 
wards attended the Sheffield Scientific School of 
Yale, graduating with distinction in 1893. Imme- 
diately on the completion of his College course he 
entered the firm of W. H. Hutchinson & Son, and 
on its incorporation under the name of \V. H. Hutch- 
inson & Son, incorporated, became Secretary and 
General Manager of the new concern. He is a mem- 
ber of Chi Plii, the University Club of Chicago, and 
the Chicago Athletic Club. He is unmarried and 
takes no active part in politics. 



LAMSON, Edwin Ruthven 

Yale B.A. 1893. 
Born in New York City, i865; graduated Yale, 1893; 
engaged in various enterprises ; now a publisher in 
Boston. 

EDWIN RUTHVEN LAMSON, Publisher, was 
born in New York City, March 12, 1S66, 
son of John S. and Mary Hart (Hunter) Lamson. 
His ancestors for several generations were clergy- 
men. His early education was obtained at private 
and public schools in New York City, Orange, Mont- 
clair, Plainfield and Elizabeth, New Jersey, and at 
Oberlin College, Ohio, and he was graduated from 
Yale with the Class of 1893. At the age of fifteen 
he entered the employ of the Vermont Marble Com- 
pany and was later with the Genesee Salt Company, 
working his way forward to the position of Manager 
of their works and subsequently of their New York 
office. With the intention of entering the ministry 
he resigned, and while studying at Oberlin he car- 



ried on a store in Mansfield, Ohio, during the vaca- 
tion season. While a student at Yale he published 
miscellaneous College souvenirs, and having decided 
after graduating to resume business pursuits, he was 
for the succeeding year in the employ of Messrs. 
Carter, Dinsmore & Company, ink manufacturers, 
Boston. Establishing the firm of E. R. Lamson & 
Company, publishers and advertising specialists, for 
the next six months he gave his particular attention 
to advertising publishing houses, and on February i, 
1S95, he formed a partnership with William B. 
Wolffe, a Harvard student, under the firm name of 




EDWI.N RUTHVEN L.AMSON 

Lamson, Wolffe & Company, for the purpose of 
conducting an importing and publishing business in 
Boston. Two months later Mr. Wolffe, who in addi- 
tion to his studies was issuing The Crimson and 
other publications, found it necessary to dispose of 
his interest in the new concern to Mr. Lamson, who 
carried it on, retaining the same firm name and re- 
maining at the same location. He also established 
an office in New York City, and engaged a repre- 
sentative in London to negotiate the sale of copy- 
rights and dispose of his publications to the English 
trade. In the selection of works for publication and 
in the style in which they are issued, Mr. Lamson 
has displayeil a literary and artistic taste both rare 
and admirable. Mr. Lamson is a member of the 



28 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



First Corps of Cadets, Massachusetts Volunteer 
Militia, the University Club, Boston ; the Corinthian 
Vacht Chib, Marblehcad, Massachusetts ; the Union 
League, the New York, and the Yale Clubs, New 
York Citv. 



LEWIS, Charlton Thomas 

Yale B.A. l8s3, M.A. 1861. 
Born in West Chester. Pa., 1834; prepared for Col- 
lege at West Chester High School ; graduated Yale, 
1853; studied law, 1853-54; studied for the Methodist 
ministry, 1855-56; Professor of Languages, Illinois 
Normal Univ., 1856-57; Prof, of Mathematics Troy, 
N. Y., Univ., 1858, and of Greek, 1859-62; U. S. Deputy 
Commissioner of Internal Revenue, 1863-64: practised 
law in New York, 1864-70; Managing Editor New York 
Evening Post, 1870-71 ; Secretary and Treasurer N. Y. 
Chamber Life Insurance, 1873-77; practising law in 
New York City since 1877. 

CIIAKI.ION THO.M.AS I.liWlS, Lawyer, was 
horn in West Chester, Pennsylvania, Febru- 
ar)' 25, 1S34, the son of Joseph Jackson and Mary 
Sinton (Miner) Lewis. His father, who was born 
in 1 80 1 and died in 18S3, was an able lawyer and 
served as I'nitcd States Commissioner of Internal 
Revenue luider ['residents Lincoln and Johnson. 
His grandfather, luioch Lewis, a mathematical 
author of note and Kditor of the Friends' Review, 
was the fifth in a direct line from Evan Lewis, who 
emigrated with his family from Narberth, South 
Wales, in 1682, and settling in Chester county, 
Pennsylvania, was prominendy identified with the 
early Quaker Colonists of that section, as were also 
his descendants tor six generations. His maternal 
grandfather, Charles Miner, was a descendant in the 
fifth generation of Thomas Miner, who arrived at 
Norwich, Connecticut, from England in 1645, and 
the latter was the ninth in descent from Henry 
Miner, of Somerset, who was the recipient of a coat 
of arms from King Edward HI., and whose death 
occurred in 1359. Charles Miner, member of Con- 
gress and friend and supporter of Henry Clay, was 
for many years Editor of the West Chester Village 
Record, and the author of a History of Wyoming, 
etc. Charlton 'I'. Lewis attended the West Chester 
public schools, and Crowell's Academy, and was 
graduated from Yale with the Class of 1853. He 
studied law and also for the Methodist ministr)', but 
turning his attention to educational pursuits he be- 
came Professor of Languages at the Illinois State 
Normal University in 1856-1857. Called to the 
Chair of Mathematics at the Troy New York Univer- 
sity in 1858, he was transferred in 1869 to the Greek 
Professorship, which he retained until 1862, when 



he gave up Collegiate work to take the position of 
Deputy United States Commissioner of Internal 
Revenue under his fiither at Washington. In 1864 
he returned to the practice of law in New York 
City, and during the years 1 870-1871 he was Man- 
aging Editor of the New York Evening Post. In 
1875 he was appointed Secretary and Treasurer of 
the New Y'ork Chamber of Life Insurance and held 
that position until 1878, when he returned to the 
business of law and is still practising his profession 
in that city. In 1S98 Mr. Lewis lectured in Cor- 
nell L-niversity upon The Principles of Insurance, 
and in 1899 he delivered courses successively in 
Harvard and Columbia Universities upon Life In- 
surance. His principal literary works have been 
Bengel's Cinomon of the New Testament, trans- 
lated and edited, 2 vols. 1861, republished in Lon- 
don as The Critical English New Testament, 5 
vols.; \ History of Germany, 1872; and several 
Dictionaries of the Latin Language ; besides contri- 
butions to many periodicals in classical, literary and 
economical subjects. Mr. Lewis has served as 
President of the New York Prison Association since 
1890 and of the Charities' hid .Association of New 
Jersey since 1S93. He has been President of the 
Delta Kappa Epsilon, and is a member of the Greek, 
Century, Yale, Lawyers' and .\uthors' Clubs of New 
York, and of the Cobden and Salisbury Clubs of Lon- 
don. In 1884 he left the Republican party and sup- 
ported Grover Cleveland for the Presidency, and in 
1S96 he voted with National or "Gold" Democrats. 
His first marriage took place July 25, 1861, with 
Nancy McKeen of Brunswick, Maine, who died in 
1883. The children of that union are : Joseph 
McKeen Lewis, who was born in 1863, graduated 
from Yale in 1883 and until the year of his death, 
which occurred in 1887, was connected with the 
American School at Athens, Greece ; Charlton 
Miner, born 1866, graduated at Yale 1886 and is 
now Professor of English Literature in that Univer- 
sity ; Elizabeth D., born 1873 ^"d graduated from 
Smith College in 1896 ; and Mary S. Lewis, born in 
1876. June 30, 1885, he married Margaret P. 
Sherrard, of Michigan. The children of this union 
are : Margaret Alice, born .April 27, 1886, and James 
McKeen Lewis, born December 27, 1887. 



LYMAN, Edward Branch 

Yale B.A. 1895. 
Born in Greenfield, Mass., 1872; educated at Willis- 
ton Seminary ; graduated Yale, 1865, and of Yale Art 
School same year; Pittsfield correspondent of the 



UNJFEKSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



2Q 



Springfield Republican, 1895-96, and on its staff as 
Athletic Editor, 1896-97 ; Associate Editor of the 
Greenfield Gazette and Courier during the absence 
of the regular incumbent, 1897 and again during part 
of 1898; Editor of the Daily Gazette published during 
the Spanish-American \A/ar and has also done other 
literary work ; Associate Editor Greenfield Gazette and 
Courier since 1899. 

EDWARD BRANCH lA'MAN was bom in 
Greenfield, Massachusetts, June 7, 1S72. 
His parents were Judge F^dward E., and Martha 
Lucretia (Branch) L\'man, the former descended 
from Richard Lyman who came from England in 




EDWARD BRANCH LYMAN 

1630, and whose descendants have been prominent 
in tlie colonial and state history of Massachusetts 
since that time. Martha Lucretia Branch was a 
descendant of William Branch who served under 
Washington at Valley Forge, and was one of the guards 
at the execution of ALijor Andr^. The subject of 
this sketch received his early education at Williston 
Seminary at Easthampton, INLissachusetts, graduating 
in 1 89 1. \Vhile there he was Editor-in-Chief of 
The Willistonian and a member of the L L 1^ and 
Adelphi Societies. He graduated from the .Xca- 
demic Department of Yale and from the Vale Art 
School in 1S95, having been during his course at 
College, Editor of the Vale Courant. Immediately 
after graduation from Vale he went to Pittsfield, 



Massachusetts as Berkshire county representative 
and correspondent of the Springfield Republican. 
After about a year there he joined the Republican 
staff at Springfield as Athletic Editor and writer of 
special articles. In January 1897 he went to 
Greenfield, and acted as Associate Editor of the 
Gazette and Courier during the absence in the 
Legislature of the regular Associate Editor. From 
July 1897 to January 1898 he did work of various 
kinds for a number of magazines and periodicals, 
and during the following six months again acted as 
Associate Editor of the Gazette and Courier, and 
also edited the Daily Gazette, published for forty 
days during the period of intense excitement of the 
Spanish-American War. He wrote stories, sketches 
and verses for various periodicals until January 1S99 
when, upon the resignation of the former .Associate 
Editor of the Gazette and Courier, he accepted that 
position. During the ^Var with Spain Mr. Lyman 
published in booklet form a story entitled : .A 
Tragedy of the Home-Coming, based upon an actual 
occurrence in the Second Massachusetts Volunteers. 
It has a large and wide sale, finding its way into 
hospitals and camps all over the country and being 
widely republished. Many prominent army and 
government officers wrote to the author of the way 
it had touched the heart of soldier sadness. Mr. 
Lyman is Vice-President of the Vale Alumni Asso- 
ciation of Western Massachusetts. 



MYGATT, Frederic EH 

Yale LL.B. 1891, ML. 1892. 
Born in New Milford, Conn., 1871 ; graduated at the 
Yale Law School, 1891 ; now in the office of Evarts, 
Choate & Beaman, New York City. 

FREDERIC ELI MVGATT, M.L., Lawyer, was 
born in New Milfonl, Connecticut, .August 6, 
1 87 1, son of Henry S., and Nancy (Faxon) M}gatt. 
He obtained his early education at the Gunnery in 
Washington, Connecticut, and after completing the 
regular course in the Law Department of Vale 
(189 1 ), he was for a time, early in 1892 a student 
in the office of i\Iessrs. .Mling, Webb & Morehouse, 
New Haven, Connecticut, going to New Vork in 
.April of that year, and continuing his legal prepara- 
tions with Messrs. -A. P. iS; W. Man, later Man & 
Man. In June 1S94, he entered the office of 
Evarts, Choate & Beaman, and is still in their 
employ. On October 6, 1896, Mr. Mygatt married 
Elizabeth Daniels, and has one son : Frederic Eli 
Mygatt, Jr. 



3° 



UNIVERSITIES JND THEIR SONS 



OTIS, Harrison Gray 

Yale B.A. i8<)g. 
Bom in Cleveland, O., 1875; educated at University 
School of Cleveland, and Taffs School; B.A. Yale, 
(899 ; engaged in iron and steel business since gradu- 
ation. 

H.XKRISON GRAV OTIS, Business Man, was 
born in Cieveianil, Ohio, October 19, 1875, 
the >un of Charles A. aixl Kiiza Ann (Shepherd) 
Otis. He atteniled in youth the Iniversity School 
in his native city, and after a preparatory course at 
Taft's School, in Connecticut, entered Yale in 1S95. 
While in College he was a member of the Sopho- 




HARRISON G. OTIS 

more Society of the Eta Phi, the Junior Society of 
Delta Kappa Kpsilon, and the Scroll and Key dur- 
ing his Senior year. On graduation he became 
connected with Otis, Hough & Company, iron and 
steel merchants of Cleveland, with whom he has 
since remained. He is a member of the Yale Uni- 
versity Club, The Tavern Club of Cleveland, is a 
Democrat in politics, affiliated with the wing of the 
parly opposed to free silver coinage at the existing 
ratio. 



PERKINS, Henry Bishop, Jr. 

Yale B.A. 1894. 
Born at Warren, O., 1871 ; educated in the public 
schools, and fitted for College at St. Paul's School, 



Concord, N. H. ; graduated Yale, 1894 ; in business life 
since graduation. 

HENRY BISHOP PERKINS, Jr., engaged in 
business in Warren, Ohio, was born in that 
city. May I, iSyi.the son of Henry Bishop and 
Eliza C.iddings (Baldwin) Perkins. He I's of 
English and Scotch ancestry. Mr. Perkins received 
his early education in the public schools of his 
native city, and fitted for College at St. Paul's School 
at Concord, New Hampshire, after which he entered 
Yale in iSgo, taking the Academic course and grad- 
uating with the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1894. 
He has been engaged in general business life since 
graduation. He is a Republican in politics, but has 
taken no active part in the political struggles of the 
day. 

PRIME, Ebenezer 

Yale B.A 1718. 
Born in Milford, Conn., 1700; graduated Yale, 1718; 
studied theology and was Pastor of church at Hunting- 
ton, L. I., 1723-79; died 1779. 

EBENEZER PRIME, Clergyman, was born in 
Milford, Connecticut, July 21, 1700, the 
grandson of James Prime, who, with his brother 
Mark, came from England to escape religious 
persecution in 1638. He was graduated at Yale 
in 1718, studied for the ministry, and was settled in 
Huntington, Long Island, in 1719,33 Assistant to 
the Rev. Eliphalet Jones. In 1723, upon the 
death of the Pastor, he was ordained minister of 
the church, in which position he labored until the 
time of his death. Mr. Prime entered the ministry 
as a Congregationalist, but in 1747 his church 
adopted the Presbyterian form of government, and 
with other congregations in that vicinity, formed 
a Presbytery, of which Mr. Prime was the first 
Moderator. During the War of Independence, Mr. 
Prime was the object of great animosity on the 
part of the Tories because of his ardent patriotic 
sentiments, and the British troops occupied his 
church and parsonage, using the books of his library 
for lighting their fires, and splitting up the pulpit 
and pews for fuel. Driven from home in his 
seventy-seventh year, he continued his ministra- 
tions of preaching in private houses, but succumbed 
after two years of this exacting labor and died, 
September 25, 1779. It is related that toward 
the close of the war. Colonel Benjamin Thompson, 
later Count Rumford, when ordered to occupy the 
village, tore down the church to use the mater- 
ials in building barracks in the graveyard and had 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



I 



his own tent pitched at the head of Mr. Prime's 
grave so that he " might have the pleasure of 
treading on the old rebel whenever he passed in 
or out." Mr. Prime kept a register of the ser- 
mons which he preached, with texts, dates and 
places of delivery. They number more than three 
thousand, many of which have been preserved in 
manuscript and some of which were published. 



ROCKWELL, Julius 

Yale B.A. 1826. 
Born in Coldbrook, Conn., 1805 ; graduated Yale, 1826 ; 
studied law and admitted to the Connecticut Bar, 1829; 
removed to Pittsfield, Mass., 1830; member of Legisla- 
ture, 1834-37, ^rid Speaker of House, 1835-37; Bank 
Commissioner, 1839-42; Member of Congress, 1844-51 ; 
Overseer Harvard, 1853-57; U. S. Senator, 1854-55; 
member of Legislature, 1858 ; Judge of Superior Court, 
1859-86 ; died 1888. 

JULIUS ROCKWELL, Jurist, was born in Cold- 
brook, Connecticut, April 26, 1805, and grad- 
uated at Yale in the Class of 1826. He studied in 
the Law School there and was admitted to practice 
at the Connecticut Bar in 1829, but in the following 
year removed to Pittsfield, Massachusetts, where 
he established himself permanently. His entrance 
into public life was made in 1834, when he was 
elected a Representative in the Legislature from 
the town of Pittsfield, serving in that capacity four 
years by annual re-election, and presiding over the 
deliberations of the House as Speaker of that body 
in 1 835-1836-1837. On retiring from the Legis- 
lature he was appointed Bank Commissioner of 
l\Lassachusetts, holding that position three years, 
and then was elected to Congress by the Whig 
party, serving four terms, from 1844 to 185 1. In 
1S53, he was sent as a delegate to the Massachu- 
setts Constitutional Convention, and the following 
year, on the resignation of Edward Everett of his 
seat as United States Senator, he was appointed 
to fill the unexpired term. From 1853 to 1857 
he was connected with the government of Har- 
vard as a member of the Board of Overseers. On 
the dissolution of the Whig party, Judge Rockwell 
allied himself with the Republicans, and was a 
Presidential Elector on the first national ticket put 
in the field by that jxirty in 1856. He served 
one more term in the Legislature, in 1858, being 
again chosen Speaker, and in 1S59 was made a 
Justice of the .Superior Court. In 1886, Judge 
Rockwell resigned his seat on the Bench and re- 
turned to Lenox, Massachusetts, where he resided 
until his death, in 1888. 



RICKETTS, William Reynolds 

Yale Ph.B. 1892 
Born in Wilkesbarre, Pa., 1869 ; graduated Sheffield 
Scientific School, Yale, 1892. 

WILLI.\M REYNOLDS RICKETTS was 
born in Wilkesbarre, Pennsylvania, July 29, 
1869, son of Colonel Robert Bruce Ricketts. He 
was educated at private schools in his native town 
and at St. Paul's School, Concord, New Hampshire, 
from which he went to the Sheffield Scientific 
School, Yale, graduating from the latter in 1892. 
Mr. Ricketts is a member of the Loyal Legion, 




WILLI.-iM REYNOLDS RICKETTS 

the Wyoming Historical and Geological Society, 
the Sons of the .American Revolution, and the 
Westmoreland and Wyoming Valley Country Clubs. 
Politically he is a Democrat. 



SCHMIDT, George V/illiam, Jr. 

Yale Class of 1897, 
Born in Pittsburg, Pa., 1874; educated at Shady 
Side Academy, Pittsburg, and Hopkins Grammar 
School, New Haven; at Yale, 1894-96; since 1896 en- 
gaged in the wholesale wine and liquor importation 
business in Pittsburg; served in the Spanish American 
War in the Pennsylvania Light Artillery. 

GEORGE WILLI.VM SCHMIDT, Jr., Im- 
porter, was born in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, 
February 7, 1S74, son of (U-orge William and Mary 



32 

Lavinia (O'Brien) Schmalt. His ancestry may be 
traced to the lime of the rehgious reformation in 
Kngland, and members of the family fought in the 
various German Wars and in the War for Indepen- 
dence in America. He studied in boyhood at the 
Shady Side Academy of I'ittsburg. fitted for College 
at the Hoj.kins Grammar School, and entered Vale 
with the Class of 1897, but left in his Junior year on 
account of illness. After leaving College he be- 
came a Director in his father's firm. On the out- 
break of the War with Spain in 1898, Mr. Schmidt 
went to the front as a member of liattery B, Penn- 



UNiyERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 




1729, and appointed a Tutor there two years later. 
While still engaged in his Academic work he be- 
came interested in the condition of the Indians and 
began to preach to these people at Housatonic, in 
Western Massachusetts, in 1734. In the following 
year he decided to devote himself to the work of 
Indian Evangelization, and settled permanently 
among them, acquiring their language and preach- 
ing to them in their own tongue. He was formally 
ordained missionary to the Indians in 1736, when 
the General Court made a large purchase of land 
from these original owners and in return granted 
them the township which is now Stockbridge, Massa- 
chusetts. There Mr. Sergeant was established, re- 
ceiving an allotment of one-sixtieth of the Indian 
grant. He established at Stockbridge a school for 
instruction in manual labor and conducted it suc- 
cessfully for a number of years, translated a large 
part of the Bible into the Indian language, and 
labored devotedly and with notable results for the 
elevation and Christianizing of these people, until 
his death, which occurred at the early age of thirty- 
nine years, in Stockbridge, July 27, 1749. 



GEORCr, WILLIAM SCII.MUjI, jk. 

sylvania Light .Artillery. He served with the First 
Army Corps during the Porto Rican campaign, 
and was honorably discharged on the cessation of 
hostilities. 



SERGEANT, John 

Yale B.A. 1739. 
Born in Newark, N. J., 1710; graduated Yale, 1729; 
Tutor, 1731-35 ; began to preach to the Indians at Hou- 
satonic, Mass., 1734 ; permanently settled as mission- 
ary, 1736; translator of the Bible into the Indian 
language ; died 1749. 

JOHN SERGE.VNT, Missionary, was born in 
Newark, New Jersey, in 1710, a grandson of 
Jonathan Sergeant who was one of the founders 
of Newark in 1667. He was graduated at Yale in 



SMYTH, Newman 

Yale D D 1895. 
Born in Brunswick, Me., 1843 ; graduated Bowdoin, 
1863; teacher in Naval Acad., Newport, R. I., 1863-64; 
Lieut. i6th Maine Vols., 1864-65; graduated Andover 
Theological Seminary, 1867 ; Pastor Mission Chapel, 
Providence, R. I., 1867-70; ist Congregational Church, 
Bangor. Me., 1870-75 ; ist Presbyterian Church, Quincy, 
111., 1876-82; ist Congregational Church, New Haven, 
Conn., since 1882 ; D.D. Univ. City of New York, i88l, 
Yale, 1895 ; Fellow of Yale since 1899. 

NEW.MAN SMYTH, D.D., Clergyman and 
.\uthor, was born in Brunswick, Maine, 
June 25, 1843, the son of Professor William Smyth, 
who for many years occupied the Chair of Mathe- 
matics at Bowdoin. Newman Smyth was graduated 
at Bowdoin in the Class of 1863 and taught for a 
short time in the United States Naval Academy at 
Newport, Rhode Island, but at the last call for 
troops, in 1864, he volunteered in the Sixteenth 
Maine Regiment and served until the close of the 
war. He held a Lieutenant's commission, com- 
manding a company at the front before Petersburg, 
and in the advance upon Hatcher's Run. He 
served as Acting Quartermaster throughout the Spring 
campaign. When mustered out at the conclusion 
of peace in 1S65, he resumed his studies at Andover 
Theological Seminary, graduating from that institu- 



UNIVERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



33 



tion in 1867, and entered upon the work of the 
ministry as Pastor of a Wisconsin Chapel in Provi- 
dence, Rhode Island. With the interval of a year's 
travel abroad, he continued in Providence until 
1870, when he was called to the First Congrega- 
tional Church at Bangor, Maine, remaining there 
five years ; then to the First Presbyterian Church at 
Quincy, Illinois, where he preached from 1876 to 
1882. In the latter year he came to New Haven, 
Connecticut, as Pastor of the Centre (First Congre- 
gational) Church in that city, and has retained that 
charge to the present time, having declined posi- 
tions in several Colleges. The University of the City 
of New York gave him the degree of Doctor of 
Divinity, in 18S1, and Yale in 1895 conferred upon 
him the same degree. In 1899 he was chosen a 
Fellow of the Corporation of Yale to fill a vacancy 
caused by the resignation of Dr. George Leon 
Walker. Dr. Smyth entered upon a career of author- 
ship at the time of his removal to Illinois and has 
continued in it to the present time. His bibliography 
includes, among other important works, treatises on 
the Religious Feeling, Old Faiths in New Light, The 
Orthodox Theology of To-day, The Reality of Faith, 
Christian Faitii and Forms, Personal Creeds, Chris- 
tian Fthics, tlie Place of Death in Evolution. 



STOKES, Anson Phelps, Jr. 

Yale B. A. 1896. 
Born in New Brighton, Staten Island, N. Y., 1874; 
educated at the Berkeley School, New York City ; pre- 
pared for College at St. Paul's School, Concord, N. H.; 
graduated Yale, 1896; B.D., Episcopal Theol. School, 
Cambridge, Mass., igoo; Secretary of Yale University 
since 1899. 

ANSON PHELPS STOKES, Jr., Secretary of 
Yale University, was born in New Brighton, 
Staten Island, New York, April 13, 1874, the son 
of Anson Phelps and Helen Louise (Phelps) Stokes. 
His mother's father, Isaac N. Phelps, and his 
great-grandfather on his father's side, Anson G. 
Phelps, were both descendants of George Phelps, 
born in Tewksbury, England, who came to this 
country in 1630 and with his brother William and 
other Colonists founded the town of Windsor, Con- 
necticut, in 1635. The Rev. Timothy Woodbridge 
of Hartford, Connecticut, one of the founders of 
Yale, is among his ancestors, with whom he also 
counts Governor Dudley of Massachusetts, and Gov- 
ernors Haynes and Wyllis of Connecticut. Anson 
Pheljis Stokes, Jr., attended the Berkeley School in 
New York City, and was prepared for College at St. 

VOL. V. — 3 



Paul's School, Concord, New Hampshire. He en- 
tered Yale with the Class of 1896, became a mem- 
ber of the D K E, Phi Beta Kappa and Skull and 
Bones Societies, and received his degree of Bachelor 
of Arts in due course. At Yale Mr. Stokes was a 
Deacon of the College Church and Chairman of the 
Board of Editors of the Yale News. He won the 
Junior Exhibition Prize Speaking, the Thacher Prize 
for Extemporaneous Debate and the De Forest 
gold medal. He was a member of the first Yale 
debating team to win from Harvard. The year 
following his graduation from Yale he passed in 




ANSON PHELPS STOKES, JR. 

foreign travel, making an extended tour in China, 
Japan, Java, Burmah, India, and other parts of 
Asia. He has also travelled considerably in Europe 
and for a time was a student at the L^niversity of 
Berlin. Mr. Stokes then entered the Episcopal 
Theological School at Cambridge, Massachusetts, 
as a student for tlie Christian ministry, and received 
from that institution the degree of liachelor of 
Divinity in June 1900. It was while he was pursu- 
ing his theological course at Cambridge that he was 
elected Secretary of the Yale Corporation, to suc- 
ceed Franklin Bowditch Dexter, who resigned in 
the spring of 1S99. Mr. Stokes is the ninth Secre- 
tary of the Corporation of Yale to hold that office 
by election. His predecessor, Professor Dexter, 



34 

occupied the position for tliirty years. It is the 
intention of Secretary Slokes to take the charge of 
a mission church in New Haven in addition to his 
University work. He is now a Trustee of Wellesley 
College and of the Mt. Hermon School for boys 
founded by the late Dwight L. Moody, and a mem- 
ber of the New England Association of Colleges 
and Preparatory Schools. Mr. Stokes is also a 
member of the Graduates' Club of New Haven and 
the University Club of New York. 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



Waller, and is of English ancestry. He received 
his early education at a preparatory school in 
Chicago and entered the Sheffield Scientific School 
of Yale in 1S91, graduating with the degree of 
Bachelor of Philosophy in 1S94. In October of 
that year he became connected with the Waller 
Coal Company, wholesale and retail dealers in coal, 
with principal offices in Chicago, and in 1S95 be- 
came the Manager of the concern, which position 



STRONG, Nehemiah 

Yale B.A. 1755. 
Born in Northampton, Mass., 1730; graduated Yale, 
'755; Tutor, 1757-60; Pastor at Granby, Conn., 1761-68; 
Prof. Mathematics and Natural Philosophy, Yale, 1770- 
81 ; died 1807. 

NEHICNn.\H STRONG, Educator, was born 
in Northampton, Massachusetts, February 
24, 1730, and graduated at Yale in 1755. He 
studied for the ministry, meantime sen-ing as Tutor 
at Yale, 1 757-1 760, and was ordained Pastor of 
the Church at Granby, Connecticut, in 1761. Upon 
the establishment of the Professorship of Mathe- 
matics and Natural Philosophy at Y'ale, he was 
called to that chair, the first Professor in these 
branches at the College, and continued in this 
office eleven years. He resigned in 1781 and 
studied law, but although securing admission to the 
Bar did not devote himself to the practice of his 
profession to any great extent, and after a residence 
of some years in New Milford, Connecticut, removed 
to Bridgeport, where he died, August 12, 1807. 
.After severing his connection with the College, 
Professor Strong prepared and published a text- 
book on astronomy which had extensive use. The 
romance of his life was his marriage with a woman 
whose husband was universally supposed to have 
been lost at sea, but who reappeared after the lapse 
of years and, unlike Enoch Arden, laid claim to 
his wife. She acknowledged the claim, leaving the 
Professor and returning to the sailor. 



WALLER, Francis Castleman 

Yale Ph.B. 1894. 
Born in Chicago, 111., 1873; educated at preparatory 
school in Chicago; graduated Yale Scientific School, 
1894; s"gaged in wholesale coal business since 1895. 

FR.VNCIS C.\STLK.MAN WALLER, Merchant, 
was born in Chicago, Illinois, September 26, 
1S73, the son of Edward and Mary (Rawson) 




F. C. WALLER 



he has since held. He is not an active partisan of 
any political party. Mr. Waller married. May 29, 
1899, Nina McGoodw^in of Louisville, Kentucky. 



POPE, William Spencer, Jr. 

Yale Ph.B. 1894. 
Born in St. Louis, Mo., 1872; graduated Sheffield 
Scientific School, Yale, 1894 ; St. Louis, Mo., Law 
School, 1896; now practising in St. Louis. 

WILUA.M SPENCER POPE, Jr., Lawyer, 
was born in St. Louis, Missouri, Decem- 
ber 27, 1872, son of William Spencer, Sr., and 
Caroline Elizabeth (Moore) Pope. His maternal 
great-great-grandfather, Roger Moore, while serving 
as a Sergeant under Ethan .-Mien at the siege of 
Montreal, was captured by the British and sent to 
England, but escaped and upon his arriv.al in 
.Xmerica re-enlisted as a Lieutenant of a Company 



UNIVERSITIES JND THEIR SONS 



35 



of Connecticut Minute-Men, and in 1777 was 
commissioned First Lieutenant in Colonel Roger 
Moses' State Regiment. His great-grandfather, 
Jehiel Moore, served as Captain in the Chautauqua 
County (New York) Militia under Colonel Hugh 
\V. Dobbin in the War of 181 2, and his grandfather, 
Henry J. Moore, who was born in 1802 and died 
in 1S75, commanded a company of home guards 
during the Civil War. William S. Pope, Sr. is a 
well-known attorney of St. Louis. The son attended 
Smith Academy in his native city, after which he 
was a student at the Sheffield Scientific School, 




W.\l. S. POPE, JR. 

Yale, receiving his degree with the Class of 1894. 
He subsequently attended the St. Louis Law School, 
and in 1896 was admitted to the Bar and engaged 
in the practice of law in that city, where he still 
resides. Mr. Pope is a member of the Book and 
Snake at Yale, the University Club of St. Louis, 
and Cooley Chapter Phi Delta Phi, St. Louis Law 
School. 



WALES, John 

Yale B.A. 1801. 
Born in New Haven, Conn., 1783 ; graduated Yale, 
1801 ; studied law and admitted to Connecticut Bar; 
removed to Wilmington, Del., 1815, and practised law 



there ; Secy, of State of Delaware, 1845 ; U. S. Senator, 
1849-51 ; died 1863. 

JOHN WALES, Lawyer, was born in New 
Haven, Connecticut, July 31, 1783. He was 
the son of the Rev. Samuel Wales, D.D., a graduate 
of Yale in 1767, for some years Professor of Divin- 
ity at that College, and a direct descendant of 
Nathaniel Wales who came from England to Bos- 
ton, Massachusetts, in 1635. John Wales was 
graduated at Yale in 1801, studied law and began 
practice in Connecticut. He subsequently removed 
to Baltimore, RLaryland, where he remained for two 
years, and in 1S15 established himself permanently 
in Wilmington, Delaware. There he practised his 
profession for some thirty years before entering 
public life in which he took a prominent part. In 
1845 he became Secretary of State of Delaware, 
and upon the resignation of United States Senator 
John M. Clayton, in 1849, to accept the Portfolio of 
State in the Cabinet of President Taylor, Mr. Wales 
was chosen to serve the unexpired term. He was 
succeeded, in 185 1, by James A. Bayard. Mr. Wales' 
public services in other fields than that of politics 
were conspicuous and valuable. He was one of the 
original promoters of Delaware College, was largely 
instrumental in procuring the charter of the City of 
Wilmington, was President of one of the oldest 
banks in that city, and was one of the earliest 
movers in the project for a railroad between Phila- 
delphia and Baltimore by way of Wilmington. He 
died in that city, December 3, 1863. 



THOMAS, Isaac Biddle 

Vale Ph.B. 1892. 
Born in West Chester, Pa., 1872; graduated Yale 
Scientific School, 1892 ; apprentice in the machine 
shops of the Pennsylvania R. R., Altoona, four years ; 
Inspector of Machine Shops for same company, 1897- 
99 ; now Inspector of Motive Power. 

ISAAC BHIDI.Iv THOMAS, Mechanical Engi- 
neer, was born in West Chester, Pennsylvania, 
June 26, 1872, son of George Brinton and Helen 
(Biddle) Thomas. He is a grandson of Dr. Isaac 
Thomas, of West Chester, and his maternal grand- 
father was William Canby Biddle, of Philadelphia. 
His father is a graduate of Yale, Class of 1857, and 
is a well-known Nurseryman of West Chester. His 
preliminary studies were pursued at the Friends' 
High School in his native town and at the Haver- 
ford Grammar School, Haverford, Pennsylvania. 
He took the regular course in Mechanical Engineer- 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



ing at the Sheffield Scientific School at Yale, gradu- 
ating with the degree of Bachelor of Philosophy in 
1892. Kntering the machine shops of the Pennsyl- 
vania Railroad, at Altoona, he completed a four 
years' apprenticeship there in 1S97, in which year 
he was appointed Inspector of that plant, and two 
years later was transferred to tiie office of the As- 
sistant Kngineer of Motive Power as Inspector, a 
position which he still holds. Mr. Thomas is a 



tures at the Columbia Law School and studied in 
the office of Tillotson & Kent in New York City. He 
entered upon the practice of his profession in 1890, 
and is at present connected with the firm of Darley, 
Bell & Crane, in the Borough of Brooklyn. He is 
a member of two of the Greek letter fraternities. 
Beta Xi and Delta Kappa Epsilon, and is a stanch 
supporter of the Republican party in politics, though 
he has never held or sought public office. 




I. B. THOMAS 

member of the Theta Xi Fraternity, the Merion 
Cricket Club, Haverford, and the University Club, 
Philadelphia. 

TOMES, Arthur Lloyd 

Yale B.A. 1885. 
Born in New York City, 1863 ; early education in 
Wiesbaden and Heidelberg, Ger. ; graduated Yale, 
1885; student at Columbia Law School; has practised 
his profession in New York City since i8go. 

ARIHUR LLOYU TOMES, Lawyer, is a 
native of New York City, born April it, 
1.S63. His parents were Robert and Catherine 
Tomes, both natives of the same place. Arthur L. 
Tomes received his education in boyhood first at a 
gymnasium in Wiesbaden and afterwards at one in 
Heidelberg. He matriculated at Yale in 1881, and 
after his graduation in 1885 devoted some time to 
recreation and travel, after which he attended lec- 



KINGSLEY, Edward Fanning 

Yale Class of 1871. 
Born in Norwich, Conn., 1849; attended schools in 
New York, West Newton, Mass., Philadelphia and 
West Haverford, Pa.; student at Yale in Class of 1871 ; 
in the insurance business, 1869-71 ; manufacturer of 
printing presses in England, 1872-75; joint proprietor 
Continental Hotel, Philadelphia, 2oyears ; sole proprie- 
tor The Rittenhouse in that city, 1897-99; died 1899. 

EDWARD FANNING KINGSLEY, Hotel 
Proprietor, was born in Norwich, Connec- 
ticut, September 29, 1S49, the son of Junius Edward 
and Ariana (Stewart) Kingsley. His motlier was a 
daughter of Charles and Maria Stewart, and his 
paternal grandparents were Jason W. and Eunice 
(Hartshorn) Kingsley. His preliminary studies 
were pursued at schools in New York, West Newton, 
Massachusetts, and Philadelphia, and he was fitted 
for College at the West Haverford (Pennsylvania) 
Private School, conducted by the Rev. James Gil- 
bourne Lyons. Mr. Kingsley entered Yale with the 
Class of 1871, but did not conclude the course, 
leaving College at the close of the Freshman year 
to go into business. For several years he was en- 
gaged in the manufacture of printing presses in 
England. Returning to the United States in 1875, 
he entered the hotel business and was for a period 
of twenty years joint proprietor of the Continental 
Hotel in Philadelphia. In 1S97 he became sole 
proprietor of The Rittenhouse in that city, which 
he carried on until his death, September i, 1899. 
Mr. Kingsley was a member of the Trades League ; 
the New England and Hibernian Societies ; the 
University, Art and Bachelor's Barge Clubs ; the 
Locust Club, a literary organization of which he was 
at one time President ; the Yale Alumni Association 
of Philadelphia, having served upon its Executive 
Committee ; and the Union League of Philadelphia, 
of which he was a Director for several years. In 
politics he was a Republican. In December 1883, 
he married Susan Doughten Bowen, of Philadelphia ; 
they had no children. 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



37 



RUTHERFORD, John 

Princeton A.B. 1776. 

Born in New York City, 1760; graduated Princeton 
1776; studied law and admitted to New York Bar; 
Regent and Trustee of Columbia, 1784-87; removed to 
New Jersey, 1787, and elected member of Legislature 
1788; U. S. Senator, 1791-98; served on boundary com- 
missions, 1826, 1829, 1833; died 1840. 

JOHN RUTHERFORD was bom in New York 
City in September 1760, the son of Walter 
Rutherford, an officer in the British Army who re- 
signed his commission to marry a daughter of James 
Alexander and became a citizen of New York. His 
grandfather was Sir John Rutherford of Edgerston, 
Scotland. John Rutherford was graduated at 
Princeton in 1776, studied law and was admitted to 
the Bar, and while continuing his residence in New 
York City served as clerk of the Vestry of Trinity 
Church, and had charge of much of the property of 
that corporation. He was also one of the Regents 
and Trustees of Columbia appointed under the Act 
of 1784. In 1787 he removed to Tranquillity, 
Sussex county. New Jersey, where he at once entered 
public life, being elected to the Legislature in 1788 
and the same year serving as a Presidential Elector. 
He was chosen United States Senator in 1791 and 
re-elected in 1797, but resigned in the following 
year in order to devote his attention to the manage- 
ment of his estates in New Jersey, where he 
interested himself in agriculture and in public im- 
provements. He was President of the Board of 
Proprietors of Eastern New Jersey, and served on 
the several commissions to adjust the boundaries 
between that state and New York and Pennsylvania. 
Mr. Rutherford married a daughter of Louis Morris, 
for whom his grandson, Louis Morris Rutherford, 
the distinguished scientist, was named. John 
Rutherford died in Rutherford, New Jersey, Feb- 
ruary 23, 1840. 



BAILEY, Judson Hooker 

Princeton A.B. 1894. 
Born in Albany, N. Y., 1871 ; fitted for College at 
Albany Academy; graduated Princeton, 1894; w^s 
messenger in the Albany County Bank from Sept. 
1894 to Jan. 1895, and on the latter date was appointed 
Assistant Teller; in the employ of Spencer, Trask & 
Co., July 1895 to October 1896; private secretary to 
President of the Dispatch Publishing Co. of Pittsburg, 
Pa. ; Secretary and a Director of the Pennsylvania 
Casting and Machine Co., Allegheny, Pa. 

JUDSON HOOKER BAILEY was born in 
.\lbany, New York, May 27, 1871, son of Hon. 
John Mosher and Adelia Louisa (Hooker) Bailey. 



He is a descendant, on his mother's side, of the 
Rev. Thomas Hooker. In his early youth he spent 
three years abroad in the study of the French and 
German languages at Paris, France and in Germany. 
He was prepared for College in .Albany Academy iu 
Albany, New York, and then took the Academic 
course at Princeton, graduating with the degree of 
Bachelor of .Arts in the Class of 1894. In Septem- 
ber of tliat year he became a messenger in the 
Albany County Bank, was appointed Assistant Teller 
in the January following, and from July 1895 until 
October 1896, was in the employ of Spencer, Trask 




J. H. B.^MLEY 

& Company, bankers and brokers of New York City. 
Since that time he has been the Private Secretary of 
the President of the Dispatch Publishing Company 
of Pittsburg, Pennnsylvania. He is now perma- 
nently located as Secretary of the Pennsylvania 
Casting and Machine Company, of Allegheny Penn- 
sylvania, of which corporation he is also a Director. 
Mr. Bailey is a member, and was Treasurer in 
1893, of the University Cottage Club of Prince- 
ton (also its President in 1894), is a member of 
the Military Order of the Loyal Legion, of Whig 
Hall at Princeton, and of the Princeton Club in 
New York and of clubs in Pennsylvania. He is 
a Republican. 



38 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



SAUSSY, Frederick Tupper 

Princeton A.B. 1896 
Born in Savannah, Ga., 1875 : received his early edu- 
cation in the grammar and high schools of Savannah, 
later entered Emory College in Oxford, Ga., graduat- 
ing as A.B. in 1894: entered Princeton in 1894 and 
graduated as A.B. in 1896; studied law and was ad- 
mitted to the Bar of Georgia in 1897. 

FRKDKRICK TUPPER SAUSSY, Lawyer, was 
born in Savannah, Georgia, October lo, 1875, 
son of Joachim Radcliffe and Harriet S. (\N'alker) 




FREDERICK TUPPER SAUSSY 

Saussy. He attended the grammar and high schools 
of Savannah in his early youth, later graduating from 
Emory College, at O.xford, Georgia, with the degree 
of Bachelor of .Vrts in 1894. That year he entered 
Princeton and was graduated from that institution 
in the Class of 1896. After studying law in the 
offices of Saussy & Saussy he was admitted to the 
Bar of Georgia on October 16, 1S97, and is prac- 
tising his profession in Savannah at the present time. 
Mr. Saussy is a member of the Savannah Yacht, 
the Georgia Hussars, and the Karrouel Clubs. 



uated Princeton, 1892 ; graduated with honor from the 
New York Law School, May 1894; received the hono- 
rary degree of A.M. from Princeton same year; ad- 
mitted to Bar in May 1894, and has since been engaged 
in the practice of law with Charles J. Hardy in New 
York City. 

JOSEPH MITCHELL SHELLABARGER, 
Lawyer, was born in Topeka, Kansas, Septem- 
ber 22, 1871, son of Joseph Lindsay and Mary Ann 
(Mitchell) Shellabarger. He received his early 
education at the high school in Topeka, Kansas, 
and was prepared for College in Kansas State Uni- 
versity at Lawrence. He graduated from Prince- 
ton in the Class of 1892, then entered the New 
York Law School, from which he graduated with 
honor in May 1S94. He received the degree of 
Master of Arts from Princeton in 1894, and having 
been admitted to the Bar formed a law partnership 
with Charles J. Hardy, and continues to practise 
under the firm name of Hardy & Shellabarger, in 
New York City. Mr. Shellabarger is a member of 
the Princeton Club of New York City, the West 
End Republican Club of New York City, and while 




SHELLABARGER, Joseph Mitchell 

Princeton A.B. 1893, A.M. 1894. 
Born in Topeka, Kan., 1871 ; fitted for College at the 
Kansas State University in Lawrence, Kansas; grad- 



JOSEFH iM. SHELUBARGER 

at Princeton was a member of tlie Pi Phi Club, the 
Mandolin and Banjo Clubs, and Whig Hall. He 
was married, October 5, 1897, to Belle Van Huesen 
Davis. 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



39 



BATES, William Graves 

Columbia B.A. 1880, LL.B. 1882. 
Born in New York City, i860 ; educated at Colum- 
bia Grammar School and by private tutors; graduated 
Columbia, 1880; Columbia Law School, 1882; in mer- 
cantile business, 1882-84; practising law in New York 
City, since 1884; Colonel Seventy-first Regiment, 
N. G. S. N. Y. since i8gg ; served with distinction in 
the Spanish war. 

WILLIAM GRAVES BATES, Lawyer, was 
born in New York City, July 14, 1S60, 
the son of Levi M. and Martha A. (Tucker) Bates. 
He was prepared for College at the Coliunbia Gram- 




W. G. B.1TES 

mar School and under private tutors, and graduated 
from Columbia with the degree of Bachelor of Arts 
in 18S0. He then studied law at Columbia, gradu- 
ating in the Class of 1SS2 of the Law School of that 
University. For two years thereafter he was engaged 
in mercantile pursuits, entering upon the practice of 
law in New York City in 1S84. Mr. Bates travelled 
extensively in Europe during the years 1S80 and 
1 88 1, and in 1884 he again crossed the Atlantic. In 
1877 he enlisted in Company K, Seventh Regiment, 
National Guards State of New York, and was Ser- 
geant-Major in 1 891-1892. He was made Kegi- 
mental Adjutant of the Seventy-first Regiment in 
May 1892, Major in May 1899, and Colonel of the 
Regiment in November of the same year, which 
position he still occupies. At the outbreak of the 



War with Spain, he volunteered with his regiment 
and entered the service, May 10, 1898, as Regi- 
mental Adjutant of the Seventy-first Regiment, 
New York Volunteers. June 3, he was promoted to 
be Captain and Assistant Adjutant-General United 
States Volunteers and ordered to the Philippines. 
He left San Francisco with the Second Expedition, 
and was Assistant Adjutant-General for General 
Francis V. Greene, Second Brigade, Second Divi- 
sion, Eighth Corps, during the entire Manila Cam- 
paign, was present in all the battles before the City 
of Manila, and was one of the first officers to enter 
the city on the day of its capture. To him was 
accorded the honor of hauling down one of the 
three Spanish flags in the city of Manila, and this 
flag is now in the Memorial Hall at West Point. At 
the close of the campaign he was recommended for 
promotion for services rendered. He resigned from 
the Volunteer service October 15, 1899. Colonel 
Bates is a life member of the New England Society, 
a member of the Sons of the Revolution, the 
Seventh Regiment Veterans' Association, the Coun- 
cil Military Order of Foreign Wars, the Society of 
American Wars, and the Psi Upsilon Fraternity, and 
of the Union League, Psi Upsilon and New York 
Athletic Clubs and the Bar Association. In politics 
he acts with the Republican party. 



BLANCHARD, James Armstrong 

Columbia LL.B. 1873. 
Born in Henderson, N. Y., 1845; educated district 
schools, Ripon, Wis. Preparatory School and College ; 
served in the Civil War 1864-65 ; graduated Columbia 
Law School 1873 and admitted to the Bar in New York 
City; Judge of the Court of General Sessions 1899; one 
of the founders of the Republican League of the U. S. 

JAMES ARMSTRONG BLANCHARD, Judge 
of the Court of General Sessions, of New 
York City, was born in Henderson, Jefferson 
county, New York, August i6, 1845, the son of 
Philip and Catharine (Drummond) Blanchard. 
His father was of Huguenot descent from refugees 
in England from religious persecutions in France. 
His maternal great-grandfather was a Scotch emi- 
grant and his grandmother on the same side was 
also a native of Scotland. When nine years old 
his parents moved from New York State to a farm 
in Fond du Lac county, Wisconsin, where his 
father died some five years later, leaving but little 
means for the support of a widow and six children, 
of whom James was the youngest. Handicapped by 
the lack of resources he worked hard on the farm 



40 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



summers and attended the district school winters 
until the summer of 1864, when without consulting 
his family, he enlisted as private in Company I, 
Second Regiment, Wisconsin Volunteer Cavalry, 
with which he served until November 1865, after 
the close of the Civil War. After recovering his 
health, which had been impaired by exposure in 
the army, he determined to provide himself with 
a good education, and having taken the prepara- 
tory course for Ripon College in two years, he 
worked his way through the Academic Depart- 
ment of that institution by teaching district school. 




JAMES A. BLWCHARD 

and was graduated with high honors in the Class 
of 1 87 1, with the degree of B.achelor of Arts, re- 
ceiving his Master's degree in course from that 
institution three years later. His expenses at the 
Columbia I^iw School were defrayed with means 
acquircil by teaching in the public schools of New 
York City, and he was graduated in 1873 with tlie 
degree of B.ichelor of I^aws. Admitted to the 
Bar the same year, he built up an excellent prac- 
tice in New York and in 1881 formed the partner- 
ship of lilanchard. Gay & Phelps, of which he was 
the senior member. This firm had a prosperous 
career, figuring in numerous cases involving large 
interests, and was dissolved in 1896, since which 
time Mr. Blanchard has continued his practice 



alone. In January 1S99, Mr. Blanchard was ap- 
pointed by Governor Roosevelt a Justice of the 
Court of General Sessions to fill the unexpired 
term of Judge Fitzgerald, who had been elevated 
to tiie Supreme Bench, and was a candidate for 
election to the same Bench in November of that 
year, but met defeat at the polls. For many 
years Judge Blanchard has been a leading spirit 
in the Republican jiarty of New York City, and also 
of the Republican Club, having been its President 
in 1S92. From 1890 to 1895 he w.is Chairnmn 
of the Sub-Executive Committee of the Republican 
League of the United States, which he assisted in 
organizing, and was one of the five members of 
the Republican Club selected to organize the 
National Convention of Republican Clubs, held at 
Chickering Hall, New York, in December 18S7. 
He is a member of the City and State Bar ."Asso- 
ciations, the .\merican Geographical Society, .Arts 
Club, Metropolitan Museum of .Art, Lafayette Post, 
Grand Army of the Republic, and several other 
bodies, including the LTnion League Club, being 
at present a member of the Committee on Politi- 
cal Reform in the last mentioned organization. 
In May 18S1, he married Sallie Medbery, a lineal 
descendant on her father's side of Roger Williams 
and on her mother's side of Joseph Jencks, one of 
the Colonial (lovernors of Rhode Island. Of this 
union there is one son : Medbery Blanchard, who 
is now attending Phillips- Exeter Academy. 



FISHEL, Frederick Eugene 

Columbia LL.B. 1882. 
Born in Patchogue, N. Y., i860; attended in youth 
the public schools of Patchogue, N. Y., and prepared 
for College at the school of Professors Wait and 
McKoon at Ithaca; A.B. Cornell University, 1880; 
LL.B. Columbia Law School, 1882; spent several 
years in the law offices of W. A. Purrington and George 
V. N. Baldwin; in general practice in New York City 
since 1885. 

FREDERICK EUGENE FISHEL, Lawyer, was 
born in Patchogue, Suffolk county. New 
York, June 12, 1S60, son of .Andrew and Julia 
(Ketcham) Fishel. His father was a native of 
Vienna, .Austria, and his mother's family for some 
years have been domiciled in Riverhead, New 
York. He attended in youth the public schools 
of Patchogue, New York, and prepared for College 
at the private school of Professors Wait & McKoon 
at Ithaca. He then entered Cornell LTniversity in 
1876, taking a four years' course in literature, and 



UNIVERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



41 



graduating in, 1880. In the fall of that year he 
matriculated at Columbia Law School, graduating 
in 1882 with the degree of Bachelor of Laws. He 
served a clerkship of several years in the law offices 
of W. A. Purrington and George V. N. Baldwin, 
and in 1885 was admitted to the New York Bar, 
since which time he has been actively engaged in 
the practice of his profession in New York City. 
Mr. Fishel is a member of the Juanita Club of 
Brooklyn. He was a stanch Democrat until the 
campaign of 1896, since which time he has been 
an Independent, not being willing to follow the 
party on the silver and other questions. 



GILBERT, Frederick Lawrence 

Columbia LL.B. 1887. 
Born in Dudswell, Can., 1864; educated in public 
schools ; graduated Columbia Law School, 1887 ; ad- 
mitted to New York Bar and practising in that city 
since 1887. 

FREDERICK LAWRENCE GILBERT, Law- 
yer, was born in Dudswell, Province of 
Quebec, December 27, 1864, son of \Vesley and 
Josephine Amelia (Cot^) Gilbert. Reared upon 
a farm and educated in the Canadian public 
schools, he was engaged in agricultural pursuits 
until taking up the study of law at Columbia, 
where he received the degree of Bachelor of Laws 
in 1887 and was admitted to the New York Bar 
the same year. Deciding to locate permanently 
in New York City, he established himself there in 
practice and has since transacted a profitable gen- 
eral law business. Mr. Gilbert is a member of the 
New York State Bar Association and the Royal 
Arcanum. In politics he is a Republican. Octo- 
ber II, 1894, he married Helen Alice McAleer. 
They have one daughter : Elaine Josephine Helen 
Gilbert. 



HEWLETT, James Monroe 

Columbia Ph.B. 1890. 
Born in Lawrence, L. L, 1868; educated at Brooklyn 
Polytechnic Institute; graduated Ph.B. Columbia 
School of Architecture, 1890; studied in Europe, 1891- 
93 ; practising profession as member of firm of Lord, 
Hewlett & Hull, New York City since 1894. 

JAMES MONROE HEWLETT, Architect, was 
born in Lawrence, Long Island (New York), 
August I, 1868, the son of Jnmes Augustus and 
Mary Elizabeth (Sanderson) Hewlett. For eight 
years he attended the Brooklyn Polytechnic Insti- 
tute, graduating there in 18S5. and entering the 



Columbia School of Mines in the Department of 
Architecture he took the degree of Bachelor of 
Philosophy with the Class of 1890, of which he 
was President for two years. He continued his 
studies in New York under Messrs. McKira, Mead 
& White for a year, at the expiration of which time 
he went abroad. In Paris he was a student under 
Pierre Victor Gallaud, supplementing his studio 
work by travel and study in France, Italy and Spain. 
Returning to New York in 1893, he completed his 
practical training by two years of service under his 
former employers and then formed a partnership 




J. MONROE HEWLETT 

with A. W. Lord and W. Hull in 1894, under the 
firm name of Lord, Hewlett & Hull. This firm has 
already achieved prominence among the architects 
of New York. Their designs have been among the 
prize winners in competitions for the New York 
Public Library, the Philadelphia Museum of Fine 
Arts, the University of California and several other 
important buildings, and the commodious residence 
now in course of construction at the corner of Fifth 
Avenue and Seventy-seventh Street, New York, for 
Senator \\. A. Clark is from their designs. At 
Columbia, Mr. Hewlett was chosen Editor-in-Chief 
of The Miner in 1888, was a member of the Fresh- 
men Crew that defeated the Harvard Freshmen at 
New London in 1887, Captain of the University 



42 



UNlVERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



Foot Ball Eleven in 1S89 and member of the 
Inter-Collegiate Championship Tiig-of-War team in 
1890. He was elected ^•icc- President of Brooklyn 
Chapter American Institute of Architects and Gradu- 
ate President of the Columbia Foot Ball Association 
in 1899, is a member of the Board of Governors of 
the Columbia Schools of Science Alumni Associa- 
tion, and member of the Alpha Delta Phi Club of 
New York, the Dyker Meadow and Garden City 
Golf Clubs. March 29, 1894, he married Anna 
Willets. Their children are : Anne, James Augustus 
and Anglesea Hewlett. 



STRONG, Pascal Nelson 

Columbia A.B. iSio — Princeton A.M. (Hon.) 1818. 
Born in Setauket, N. Y., 1793; graduated Columbia, 
1810; studied theology and ordained Pastor of the 
Collegiate Dutch Reformed Church, 1816; A.M. ihon.) 
Princeton, 1818 ; Trustee of Columbia, 1822-25; <^'^d 
1825. 

PASCAL NELSON Sl'RONG, D.D., Clergy- 
man, was born in Setauket, Long Island, 
New York,. February i6, 1793, and graduated at 
Columbia, at the head of his class in 1810. He 
then studied theology under Dr. John M. Mason 
(Columbia 1789) and was ordained one of the 
Pastors of the Collegiate Dutch Reformed Church 
in New York City, July 14, 18 16. In this service he 
continued until in 1824 a pulmonary affection com- 
pelled him to give up all active labor and seek 
health in a warmer climate. During his short minis- 
try he attained high reputation as a pulpit orator, 
and his standing as a scholar was recognized by the 
conferment of the degree of Doctor of Divinity and 
by Princeton which made him an honorary Master of 
Arts in 1818. From 1822 to the time of his death 
he served as a Trustee of Columbia. Dr. Strong 
went to the West Indies in search of health, but 
the advance of the disease was rapid, and he died 
there, on the island of St. Croix, April 7, 1825. 



FLAMMER, John George 

Columbia l^L.B. 1877. 
Born in New York City, 1857; acquired his early 
education in New York City public schools, and later 
attended the College of the City of New York for a 
time ; LL.B. Columbia Law School, 1877 and admitted 
to the New York Bar ; served as Police Court Clerk 
and subsequently as Managing Clerk with John L. 
4 William Lindsay ; practised law in New York 
City until April 15, 1897; has been Commissioner on 
Board of Street Openings in New York City, and 
School Trustee, and is now Arbitrator in the Brewers' 



Board of Trade ; engaged in brewing business as 
President of M. Groh's Sons, incorporated, since 1897. 

JOHN GEORGE FLAMMER, a practising law- 
yer in New York City for many years and at 
present the President of a large brewing company, 
was born in New York City, March iS, 1857, son 
of John G. and .\ugusta W'. (Cramer) Flammer, 
both from Wurtemburg, Germany. He received 
his early education in the public schools of New 
York City, and later attended for a time the Col- 
lege of the City of New York, entering Columbia 
Law School before graduation and taking the 




JOHN G. FLAMMER 

degree of Bachelor of Laws in 1877. He served 
for a time as a clerk in one of the New York City 
Police Courts and subsequently as managing clerk 
in the law office of John L. & William Lindsay, 
and later practised law on his own account in New 
York City until 1897. On .April 15, of that year 
he was tendered and accepted the position of Presi- 
dent of the M. Groh's Sons, incorporated, a large 
brewing concern, and was shortly after appointed 
.\rbitrator in the Brewers' Board of Trade. Mr. 
Flammer is of Republican tendencies in national 
politics, but an Independent in local affairs. He 
has ser^'ed as Commissioner on the Board of Street 
Openings in New York City and was a School 
Trustee of the Twentieth Ward during i8go. He 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



43 



is a member of the West Side Republican and the 
Riverside Clubs, the Dvvight Alumni Association 
and the Dauntless Club. He married November 
17, 1 88 1, Charlotte B. Holzderber. They have 
two children : William H. and Harold Flammer. 



STAFFORD, Charles Morton 

Columbia LL.B. 1872. 
Born in Rush, N. Y., 1851 ; educated in common 
schools; graduated Columbia Law School, 1872; ad- 
mitted to New York Bar at age of twenty-one years; 
practised law in New York City since 1872; U. S. 
Marshal Eastern District N. Y., 1887-91. 

CHARLES MORTON STAFFORD, Lawyer, 
was born in Rush, Monroe county, New 
York, January 8, 1851, tlie son of Charles Cook and 
Almaritta (Sherwood) Stafford. He is of English 
origin on both sides, and the first of his paternal 
ancestors in America settled in Rhode Island prior 
to 1635. Having acquired a common school and 
good business education he was for a time engaged 
in mercantile business, but deciding to enter the 
profession of law he became a student at the 
Columbia College Law School, graduating there in 
1872, when he was twenty-one years old. LIpon 
his admission to the Bar in the same year he estab- 
lished himself in practice in New York City, where 
he rapidly built up and has since maintained a large 
and lucrative practice. He has attained distinction 
as a jury advocate in the State and United States 
Courts, and also deservedly won high commenda- 
tion for the ability displayed in many important and 
stubbornly contested legal battles in the higher 
courts, the most recent and perhaps the most nota- 
ble of which is the case of the people ex rel. Howell 
et al. vs. Nathan G. Jessup, decided in his favor by 
the New York Court of Appeals in October 1899. 
The case in question involved a number of impor- 
tant questions concerning the validity of royal 
patents during the Colonial period and the powers 
acquired by individuals under these patents as 
related to the authority of the state and general 
governments. The court decided that " the land 
and the waters (Great South Ray) and the land 
under the waters within the limits of the Town of 
Soutliampton (Long Island) were not vested in the 
English Government in trust for the people at the 
time of the Revolution, but instead were vested in 
the 'Town of Southampton by charters granted 
nearly one hundred years before the War of the 
Revolution." "'That the town of Southampton 
has a distinct political existence created long before 



the creation of the State Government." It can exer- 
cise all the powers which, previous to the Revolu- 
tion, could have been exercised, either by King 
James II. (who granted the original Royal Patent 
in 1676) alone, or by him in conjunction with his 
Parliament. "That the charter of the King had 
never been interfered with, but had been protected 
by the constitution of this state, so that the sove- 
reignty conferred by the charters has been con- 
tinued down to the present time ; that the charter 
was an instrument upon which was to be founded 
the institutions of a great political community." 




C. M. STAFFORD 

The action was originally brought to determine the 
rights in and to public waters under State and 
Federal Government control, but in reaching a con- 
clusion it was necessary to enter directly into the 
political aspect of the case as raised by the plead- 
ings and proof, and the Court of .'Appeals not only 
reversed the decisions of two lower courts but 
assumed original jurisdiction, something it very 
seldom does, and insteail of ordering a new trial 
dismissed the complaint, thus rewarding with victory 
Mr. Stafford's persistent contention and demonstrat- 
ing the correctness of his opinion of the law involved. 
In politics Mr. Stafford is a Democrat, and in 1887 
he was appointed by President Cleveland United 
States Marshal for the Eastern District of New York, 



44 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



sening as such until 1 89 1 . He is ex-President of the 
Rockiantl County Fair Association, a Director of the 
Mattiwock Democratic Club, Brooklyn, formerly a 
C.overnor of the Oaks' Bluff Club, Cottage City, 
Massiichusetts, and was for a number of years Coun- 
sel and Trustee of the Brooklyn labernacle, of which 
the Rev. T. DeWitt Talmage, D.D. was Pastor. 
Mr. Stafford is a Thirty-second degree Mason, Scot- 
tish Rite, also a Past Master of Brooklyn Lodge No. 
288, Free and Accepted Masons, Past High Priest 
of Nassau Chapter, No. 109, Royal Arch Masons, 
member of Clinton Conimandcry, No. 14, Knights 
Templar, and Kismet Temple, Order of the Mystic 
Shrine. He also belongs to the Brooklyn Club, 
Aurora Clrata and King's County Wheelmen's Clubs, 
and the Ixiw Library of King's county. He resides 
and has his offices in the Borough of Brooklyn. 
April 14, 1888, he married Josephine Norris 
Simonds. Their children are : Earl, Carolyn and 
Charles \\.. Stafford, Jr. 



missioned Acting Assistant Surgeon in tlie United 
States Marine Hospital service in 1883; served 
upon the visiting staff of the Charity Hospital from 
the latter year to 1888; is a member of the 
Louisiana State Board of Health and Chairman of 
its Quarantine Committee, and Surgeon in the 
Louisiana National Guard with rank of Captain. 
He is also a member of the Parish and State Medi- 
cal Societies. In politics he is a Democrat. Nov- 



NOLTE, Arthur 

Columbia M.D. 1881. 
Born in Seguin, Tex., i860 ; educated in private 
schools and high schools; M.D. Univ. of Va., 1880, 
and Columbia, 1881 ; practising medicine in New 
Orleans, La., since 1882 ; commissioned Acting Assis- 
tant Surgeon U. S. Marine Hosp. Service, 1883; Visit- 
ing Staff Surgeon, Charity Hosp., 1883-88 ; Surgeon La. 
Nat. Guard ; member of State Board of Health. 

AR THUR NOLTK, M.D., Physician, was born 
in Seguin, Guadalupe county, Te.xas, Sep- 
tember 16, i860, the son of Edward and Dorothea 
(Suchart) Nolte. His father was a native of Thule, 
Westphalia, born in 182 1, and his mother was born 
in Hanover, Germany, daughter of George Fred- 
erick Suchart, a Waterloo veteran who emigrated 
with his family to America, settling in the then Re- 
public of Texas. From the high school of his na- 
tive town, .Arthur Nolte entered the University of 
Virginia, studying in the .Academic and subsequently 
in the Medical Department, and graduating from 
the latter in 1880. He next attended the College 
of Physicians and Surgeons, the Medical Depart- 
ment of Columbia, receiving his degree from that 
University in 1881, and completed his professional 
preparations under the direction of Dr. John A. 
Wyeth, of New York, with whom he studied pri- 
vately for some time. In 1882 he located in New- 
Orleans, Louisiana, where he has ever since resided, 
and during the past seventeen years has found ample 
opportunity for professional advancement both in 
private practice and hospital work. He was com- 




> 




.ARTHITR NOLTE 



ember 26, 1891, Dr. Nolte married Nellie Walker, 
of Bolivar, Tennessee, and has two children : Walker 
and Dorothea Nolte. 



PRIME, Frederick 

Columbia A.B. 1865. 
Born in Philadelphia, Pa., 1846; graduated Columbia, 
1865; studied in Freiburg, Saxony, i866-6g ; Asst. in 
Assaying. Columbia School of Mines, 1869-70; Prof. 
Mining and Metallurgy, Lafayette, 1870-79; Asst. in 
Geological Surveys of Ohio and Pa.; Judge at World's 
Fair of 1876; Ph.D. Lafayette, 1880 ; Pres. Allentown 
Iron Co. since 1881. 

FREDERICK PRIME, Ph.D., Geologist, was 
born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, March i, 
1846, and graduated at Columbia with the degree 
of Bachelor of Arts in 1865. After a year in the 
Columbia School of Mines he went abroad for the 
study of his specialty, attending for three years 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



45 



the Royal Mining School at Freiburg, Saxony, and 
on his return in 1869 became Assistant in Assaying 
at Columbia and also associated in the Geological 
Survey of the State of Ohio. He left Columbia in 
1870 to become Professor of Mining and Metal- 
lurgy at Lafayette College, where he remained until 
1879, also serving for five years of that period as 
Assistant Geologist on the Geological Survey of 
Pennsylvania, and in 1876 as a judge of the grou]5 
on mining and metallurgy at the Centennial Ex- 
hibition at Philadelphia. Since 1879 he has been 
engaged in professional practice as consulting 
geologist and mining expert, and in 1881 became 
President of the Allentown Iron Company. He 
received the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy from 
Lafayette in 1880, and has been active in the 
management of the American Institute of Mining 
Engineers. 



LAWRENCE, Robert Bowne 

Columbia LL.B. 1878. 
Born in Flushing, L. I., 1852; educated in Flushing 
Institute and Churchill's Military Academy, Sing 
Sing, N. Y.; student in Columbia School of Mines, 
Class of 1874; Berlin (Ger.) University, 1875-76; gradu- 
ated Columbia Law School, 1878 ; practising in New 
York City since 1878. 

ROBERT BOWNE LAWRENCE, Lawyer, was 
born in Flushing (Long Island) New York, 
December i, 1S52, the son of John Watson and 
Mary King (Bowne) Lawrence. The Lawrence 
family has resided in Flushing for over two hundred 
and fifty years, its original American ancestors hav- 
ing settled there in 1636. His paternal grandfather 
was Effingham Lawrence and on his mother's side 
he is a grandson of Walter Bowne, who was Mayor 
of New York City in the early part of the nineteenth 
century. As a boy he attended the Flushing Insti- 
tute and at the age of thirteen went to Churchill's 
Military Academy, Sing Sing, New York, remaining 
there four years, after which he entered the Colum- 
bia School of Mines with the Class of 1874. He 
did not graduate owing to the breaking down of his 
health in March preceding the conclusion of the 
course, but in 1875 he went abroad for further 
study, spending a year in Germany at the LTniversity 
of Berlin. Upon his return he became a law student 
at Columbia, graduating a Bachelor of Laws in 1878. 
Admitted to the Bar the same year, lie entered the 
office of Joseph K. Murray in New York City, and 
has since continued in the practice of his profession 
in that city. Mr. Lawrence is a member of the New 



York Association for the Protection of Game, the 
Blooming Grove Park Association, and the Lmiver- 
sity Club. April 24, 1884, he married EHza Hyde 
Clements, and has one son : Robert Rutherfurd 
Lawrence. 



MATTOCKS, Frederick Wallace 

Columbia LL.B. 1894. 
Born in Toledo, O., 1868 ; educated in the public 
schools of Cleveland, at Hiram College, and at Oberlin 
College until the close of his Sophomore year ; in busi- 
ness, 1889-91; graduated Columbia Law School, 1894; 
practised law in New York City since graduation as 
a member of the firm of McKelvey & Mattocks. 

FREDERICK WALLACE MATTOCKS, Law- 
yer, was born in Toledo, Ohio, February 6, 
1868, the son of Daniel Jasper and Laura Sophia 




FREDERICK \V. ll.VI TOCKS 

(Clark) Mattocks. His grandfother, Daniel John 
Mattocks, came from Connecticut, about 1815, and 
settled in the Western Reserve, and his maternal 
grandfather, Ralsa Clark, came from the same State 
to Ohio about 1820. The subject of this sketch 
attended in youth the public schools of Cleveland. 
Ohio, and Hiram College, entered Oberlin College 
and was with the Class of 1S91 for two years. Leav- 
ing College at the end of his Sophomore year, he en- 
gaged in business as a bookkeeper for the Cleveland 
Faucet Company and the Cleveland Woollen .Mills 



46 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



Company from 18S9 to 1891, when he took up the 
study of law at the Columbia Law School. Dunng 
his \aw School course, he was Secretary and Treas- 
urer of a Towing and rransportation Company, and 
was also serving a clerkship in the office of John |. 
McK.elvey, with whom he became associated shortly 
after his graduation uniler the firm name of McKel- 
vey & Mattocks, and has so continued ever since. 
Me is a member of the Bar .Association of New 
York. 



STANSBURY, Arthur J. 

Columbia A.B. 1799. 
Born in New York City, 1781 ; graduated Columbia, 
1799; studied theology and licensed to preach, 1810 ; 
published sermons and addresses ; also reports of 
debates in Congress for twenty years ; died 1845. 

ARTHUR J. Sr.VNSBURY, Author, was born 
in New York City, in 1781 and graduated 
at Columbia in 1799. He studied for the ministry 
and received license to preach in 18 10. While en- 
gaged in pastoral work he devoted a considerable 
time to literature, contributing frequently to periodi- 
cal publications, and finally adopted that as his 
career. Besides a number of sermons and addresses, 
he wrote an Elementary Catechism on the Constitu- 
tion of the United States, which was jjublished in 
Boston in 1828, and also a number of books for 
children, with illustrations of his own designing. 
His more important works were his reports of the 
debates in Congress for twenty years, which are 
embodied in Gale's and Seaton's Register. He also 
published a Report of the Trial of Judge James H. 
Peck, or an Impeachment by the House of Repre- 
sentatives of the United States, which appeared in 
1833. Mr. Stansbury died in 1845. 



and afterwards attended the New York City public 
schools, entering the College of the City of New 
York in 1885 and graduating as Bachelor of Science 
in 1S90. A year in the School of Political Science 
of Columbia gave him the degree of Master of Arts, 
and after a course at the Columbia Law School he 
received the degree of Bachelor of Laws in 1893, 
and was admitted to the Bar in the same year. 
Since that date he lias been engaged in the ])ractice 
of his profession in New York City. During the 
period of the war with Spain, Mr. Roeser served as 
First Lieutenant in the One Hundred and Twelfth 




JOHN E. ROESER 



ROESER, John Edward 

Columbia A.M. 1892, LL.B. 1893. 
Born in New York City, 1870; educated in private 
and public schools ; B.S. College of the City of New 
York, 1890; A.M. School of Political Science of Colum- 
bia, 1892; LL.B. Columbia Law School, 1893, and 
admitted to New York Bar; has since practised in 
New York City; First Lieutenant, 112th Regiment, 
N. G. N. Y., i8g8-99 ; on supernumerary list with same 
rank since that date. 

JOHN LDWARD ROESER, A.M., Lawyer, was 
born in New York City, April ii, 1870, the 
son of Stephen and Wilhelmina Margraetha (Ziifle) 
Roeser, both of German ancestry. He received his 
education in childhood at Moeller's Kindergarten, 



Regiment, National Guard of the State of New 
York, one of the provisional volunteer regiments 
formed to meet an anticipated call. In February 
1 899 he was placed on the supernumerary list with 
the same rank. He is a member of the Bar Asso- 
ciation of the City of New York, the American 
Geographical Society, Academy of Political Science, 
Phi Delta Theta Fraternity, Phi Delta Phi Club, 
and was for some years a member of Company B, 
Seventh Regiment, National Guard of New York, 
and its Recording Secretary. Mr. Roeser is and 
has been for some years an officer of the Church of 
the Puritans, in New York City. He is a Repub- 
lican by political conviction, but has never taken 
an active part in politics. 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



47 



BABBITT, Angell Boss 

Harvard A.B. 1883. 
Born in Burrillville, R. I., 1859; prepared for College 
in Worcester, Mass., High School ; graduated Harvard, 
1883; Instructor Media, Pa., Academy, 1883-gi; Classi- 
cal Master, De Lancy School, Philadelphia, since 1891. 

ANGELL BOSS BABBriT, Educator, was born 
in Burrillville, Rhode Island, August 21, 
1859, the son of Thomas Hathaway and Mary Smith 
(Boss) Babbitt. His grandfather, Seth Babbitt was 
born in Killingly, Connecticut, in 1804, and his 
great-grandfather, Edward Babbitt, was a Revolu- 
tionary soldier. His maternal grandfather, Stephen 




A. B. BABBITT 

Boss, was born in Scituate, Rhode Island, in i 794, 
the son of Benjamin Boss, who was born in 1757 
and attained the rank of Captain in the Continental 
Army during the war for Independence. On ac- 
count of ill health Mr. Babbitt did not attend school 
before the age of thirteen, but made rapid progress 
in the graded schools of Worcester, Massachusetts, 
entering Harvard from the high school of that city 
and receiving the degree of Bachelor of Arts 1:1/111 
laiidi in 1883. .At College he gave his special 
attention to Latin, Greek and German, and took 
honors in both his Sophomore and Senior years. In 
the autumn following his graduation he accepted the 
part of Instructor in Greek and Latin at the Media 
.■\cademy. Media, Pennsylvania, which he retained 



for eight years. From 1S91 to the present time he 
has held the Classical I\Listership of the De Lancey 
School, Philadelphia, one of the largest and best 
equipped private schools in this part of the country. 
Having devoted sixteen years to this special branch 
of educational work, the preparation of youth for 
advanced study, Mr. Babbitt has every reason to be 
proud of the fact that he has been largely instru- 
mental in opening College doors to so many de- 
serving young men. In politics Mr. Babbitt acts 
independently. He is a member of the Harvard 
Club of Philadelphia. At Worcester, Massachusetts, 
September 2, 1884, he married Ida L. Adams, and 
has five children : Louis Angell, P^thel Adams, Earle 
Oramel, \Valter Hathaway and Clarence Stephen 
Babbitt. 



EMERY, Henry Crosby 

Harvard A.M. 1893 — Columbia, Ph.D. 1894. 
Born in Ellsworth, Me., 1872; graduated Bowdoin, 
1892; Harvard A.M., 1893; Columbia, Ph.D., 1896; 
Instructor in Political Economy, Bowdoin, 1894-96, and 
Professor, 1897-1900 ; succeeded Pres. Hadley in Chair 
of Political Economy at Yale, August i, igoo. 

HENRV CROSBY EMERV, Ph.D., Political 
Economist, was born in Ellsworth, Maine, 
December 21, 1872. His father, the Hon. L. A. 
Emery, is Associate Justice of the Supreme Court 
of that state. Henry C. Emery was graduated at 
Bowdoin College in 1892, took a post-graduate 
course at Harvard in the following year, where he 
received the degree of Master of Arts in 1893, ^"^ 
pursued his studies further at Columbia, being made 
a Doctor of Philosophy by that University in 1896. 
From 1894 to 1896 Mr. Emery taught at Bowdoin 
as Instructor in Political Economy and was advanced 
to a Professorship there in 1897, upon his return 
from Germany, where he had gone to complete his 
studies in that branch at the University of Berlin. 
Professor Emery has attained and holds a place 
among the political economists of this country of 
unusual distinction for one of his years. His con- 
tributions to econotnic literature, published in 
periodicals devoted to that science, have attracted 
wide attention, especially those dealing with modern 
methods of speculative business. His studies have 
been largely directed to this specialty, his Doctor's 
thesis covering in detail the subject of stock and 
produce speculation on the exchanges in this coun- 
try, and at the Convention of the .-Vmerican Eco- 
nomic Association at Ithaca in 1S99 the subject of 
his address was The Place of the Speculator in Dis- 
tribution. The election of Professor .Arthur T. 



48 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



Hadley to be President of Yale making a vacancy in 
tiie rrofcssorship of Political Economy in that Uni- 
versity, Professor Emery was appointed to that 
Chair to assume its duties August i, 1900. 



ROLLINS, Daniel Gustavus 

Harvard Law School, Class of 1863. 
Born in Great Falls, N. H., 1843; graduated Dart- 
mouth, i860; student at Harvard Law School, 1862-63; 
Asst. U. S. Atty., Southern Dist. of New York, 1866-69; 
Asst. Dist. Atty., New York Co., 1873-80; Dist. Atty., 
1880-82; Surrogate, 1882-88; Lecturer Columbia Law 
School, 1890-91; died 1897. 

D\\Ii:i. tlL'Sl'.WlS ROLLINS, Lawyer, was 
bom in Great Falls, New Hampshire, 
October i8, 1843, and graduated at Dartmoutli 
with the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1S60. He 
read law in Great Falls and attended lectures at 
the Harvard Law School in 1862-1S63, practising 
in Portland, Maine, for a time after his admission to 
the Bar, but soon removing to New York City, 
where he ever afterwards resided. For four years, 
1866-1869, he held the position of Assistant United 
States Attorney for the Southern District of New 
York, was .Assistant District .Attorney for New York 
county, 1873-18S0, District .Attorney, 1880-1S82, 
and then Surrogate of the county until 1888. Mr. 
Rollins was for some time associated in practice 
with James C. Carter, and won a high reputation as 
a lawyer. In 1887 he w.as a Republican candidate 
for Justice of the Supreme Court of New York. 
He was a member of the Harvard T^aw School 
Association, and in 1 890-1 89 1 was Lecturer on 
the Law of Wills in Columbia Law School. His 
death took place August 30, 1897. 



FIELDS, James Thomas 

Harvard A.M. (Hon.) 1858. 
Born in Portsmouth, N. H., 1817; educated in the 
public schools of Portsmouth ; went to Boston as clerk 
in a bookstore, 1834; member of publishing firm of 
Ticknor, Reed & Fields, 1845-70; Editor of Atlantic 
Monthly, 1862-70; A. M. (Hon.) Harvard, 1858; LL.D. 
Dartmouth, 1874; died 1881. 

JAMLS THO.MAS FIELDS, LL.D., Publisher, 
was born in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 
December 31, 181 7. He was educated at the 
high school in his native place and went to Boston 
in 1834 as a clerk in a bookstore in that city. His 
literary taste was rapidly developed and in his 
eighteenth year he read the anniversary poem before 
the Boston Mercantile Library Association. Not 
long after reaching his majority he entered the 
publishing business, and in 1845 became a mem- 



ber of the firm of Ticknor, Reed & Fields. On 
the retirement of Mr. Reed in 1854, the style 
became Ticknor & Fields, and subsequently Fields, 
Osgood & Company. It was during their occu- 
pancy that the ■' Old Corner Bookstore " became 
the resort of the litterateurs of that day — Emerson, 
Dickens, Hawthorne, Holmes, Longfellow, Lowell, 
Sumner, Whittier, Whipple — contributors to the 
.Atlantic Monthly, of which periodical Mr. Fields 
was Editor 1862-1870. Mr. Fields retired from 
the publishing business in 1870 and entered upon 
a highly successful career as a public lecturer. 




J.A.MES T. FIELDS 

He had already appeared in this capacity before 
Harvard and Dartmouth, and in 1858 received the 
honorary degree of Master of -Arts from the former 
and in 1874 that of Doctor of Laws from the latter 
institution. He had also made four visits to Eu- 
rope, the last in 1869, had seen much of the literary 
life of both continents and formed intimate friend- 
ships with a large number of eminent men. This 
wealth of personal experience was drawn upon in 
his lectures and several of his published works, 
Yesterdays with Authors, In and Out of Doors with 
Charles Dickens, etc. Mrs. Fields (Annie Adams) 
also published a volume of poems of recognized 
merit, Under the Olive, and a memoir of her hus- 
band. Mr. Fields died in Boston, April 24, i88t. 



UNIFERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



49 



MITCHELL, Edgar Ormsby 

Harvard M.D. 1892, 
Born in New York City, 1864 ; educated at Phillips- 
Exeter Academy and Harvard ; graduated Harvard 
Medical School, 1892 ; practised his profession in asso- 
ciation with his father, Dr. John James Mitchell ; mem- 
ber of the Newburgh City Club, the Blooming Grove 
Park Association, the Powelton Club of Newburgh 
and other organizations. 

EDG.XR ORMSBY INHTCHELL, M.D., Physi- 
cian, was born in New York City, October 
25, 1S64, son of John James and Phiiena Baker 
(Rose) Mitchell. His ancestry is recorded back 




EDG.AR O. MITCHELL 

to Experience Mitchell, who came over in 1623 in 
the Ann, the third ship to arrive in the Plymouth 
Colony. Thomas, the oldest son of IC.vperience, 
went to Block Island, Rhode Island, and there this 
branch of the family remained until 1805, when Dr. 
Mitchell's grandfather, Rev. John Sheffield Mitchell, 
removed to New York State. His great-grand- 
mother was Ruth Sheffield, a lineal de.scendant of 
John Sheffield, Duke of Mulgrave. After passing 
through Siglar's Preparatory School at Newburgh 
and Phillips- Exeter Academy, Mr. Mitchell entered 
the Collegiate Department of Harvard in the Class 
of 1SS9, and after two years there turned to the 
Harvard Medical School. Two years later he took 
a course of one year at the College of Physicians 
vor.. V. — 4 



and Surgeons in New York and then returned for 
another year at Harvard, where he graduated with 
the degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1892. His 
training for active life was obtained by work in the 
dispensaries of Boston and New York and in substi- 
tuting during the summer of 1890 as Interne at the 
Sloane Maternity Hospital in New York and in St. 
Luke's, Newburgh, for two years as Visiting Surgeon. 
In 1892 he entered in business with his father, and 
has continued with him ever since. In Newburgh, 
Dr. Mitchell is a member of the Blooming Grove 
Park Association, the Newburgh City Club, the 
Powelton Club, the Glenwood Gun Club, the West 
Newburgh Gun and Rifle Association and the Orange 
Lake Ice Yacht Club. He is also a member of tlie 
Massachusetts Yacht Club. In politics he is a 
Republican. 



HART, John Goddard 

Harvard A.B. 1893, A.M. 1894. 
Born in Newport, R. I., 1870; graduated Harvard, 
1893; Instructor in English at Harvard. 

JOHN GODDARD HART, Instructor in English 
at Harvard, was born in Newport, Rhode 
Island, February 12, 1S70. His parents were 
James Nicholas and Annie Frances (Goddard) 
Hart. After passing through Harvard in the Class 
of 1893, Mr. Hart was appointed Instructor in 
English and has held that position since then. 



SIMMONS, John Franklin 

Harvard A.B. 1873. 
Born in Hanover, Mass., 1851 ; prepared for College 
at Phillips-Exeter Academy ; graduated Harvard, 1873; 
student in Harvard Law School, 1873-75 ; practised 
law in Abington, Mass., 1875-90, with office in Boston, 
since i8go. 

JOHN FRANKLIN SIMMONS, Lawyer, was 
born ill Hanover, Massachusetts, June 26, 
185 1, the son of Perez and Adeline (Jones) Sim- 
mons. He traces his descent through his paternal 
grandmother from six of the Mayflower passengers, 
among them John and Priscilla Alden, and in the 
direct male line from Moyses Simmons who came 
over in the ship Fortune to Plymouth in 1623. 
Through his mother he is also descended from 
Elder P.rewstcr of the Mayflower. Colonel Benja- 
min Church, the oUl Indian fighter who had a 
grandson at Bimker Hill, is also among his ances- 
try. John 1''. Simmons was educated in the public 
schools of Hanover and in the Assinippi Institute, a 



5° 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



private school no longer in existence, and prepared 
for College at Phillips Academy, Exeter, New 
Hampshire. He was graduated at Harvard in 
the Class of 1873, being elected by his class to 
be the Class Day Orator, and after two years in 
the \m\' School of that University was admitted 
to the Bar at I'lymouth, and established himself in 
practice in the town of Abington, Massachusetts. 
From 1S75 to 1883, Mr. Simmons was in partner- 
ship with Judge Jesse E. Keith, under the style of 
Keith & Simmons, subsequently witli Harvey H. Pratt 
as Simmons & Pratt, until 1894, when this firm was 




Williams and Mary (Folger) .\llen. Their chil- 
dren are : Henry Franklin, Mary Folger, Perez and 
Elizabeth .Allen Simmons. 



JOHN F. SIMMONS 

dissolved. Mr. Simmons opened an office in Bos- 
ton in 1890 and is now practising there. Among 
the important litigations in which he has appeared 
is the McNulty will case, involving about $60,000. 
While in partnership with Mr. Pratt, Mr. Simmons 
served for six months as Receiver of the .\bington 
National P.ank, and for a long time he was on the 
School Committee of the town of Hanover. During 
Governor Russell's administration he was strongly 
urged for a seat upon the Supreme Court Bench. In 
Masonry, Mr. Simmons is a Knight Templar and 
member of the Old Colony Commandery, and in 
politics he was a Gold Democrat, but now votes the 
Republican ticket. January 10, 1877, he married 
Fanny Florence, daughter of the Rev. Cyrus 



TREADWELL, John Goodhue 

Harvard A B. 1825, M.D. i8i8 
Born in Salem, Mass., 1805; graduated Harvard, 
1825; Harvard Medical School, 1828; practised medi- 
cine in Salem; benefactor of the Essex Co. Agricul- 
tural Society, and of Harvard; died 1856. 

JOHN GOODHUE TREADWELL, ^LD., Phy- 
sician, Benefactor of Harvard, was born in 
Salem, Massachusetts, August i, 1805. He was 
graduated at Harvard in the Class of 1825 and 
pursued his professional studies in the Medical 
School of that University, receiving the degree of 
Doctor of Medicine there in 1828 and at the same 
time taking his Master's degree in course. From his 
father, a physician of Salem, Dr. Treadwell inherited 
a large property as well as an extensive practice, 
and while settling in his native town in the work of 
his profession he was actively interested in educa- 
tional matters as well and contributed liberally to 
public enterprises of this nature. By his will he 
bequeatlied his farm at Topsfield to the Essex 
County Agricultural Society to be used for scientific 
experiments in agriculture, and to Harvard he left 
his large medical library and an estate valued at 
Si 00,000 to be applied to the establishment and 
maintenance of a Professorship of Physiology and 
Anatomy. Dr. Treadwell died in Salem, August 6, 
1856. 

WINTHROP, Thomas Lindall 

Harvard A.B. 1780. 
Born in New London, Conn., 1760; graduated Har- 
vard, 1780; member of Massachusetts Senate ; Lieut.- 
Gov. of Massachusetts, 1826-32; LL.D. Trinity Coll., 
Hartford, Conn., 1836 ; Overseer Harvard, 1828-41 ; 
Pres. Massachusetts Historical Society, Massachusetts 
Agricultural Society, American Antiquarian Society; 
died 1841. 

THOMAS LINDALL WINTHROP, LL.D., 
Merchant, was born in New London, Con- 
necticut, March 6, 1760, a lineal descendant of 
Governor John Winthrop of the Massachusetts Bay 
Colony and great-grandson of John Winthrop the 
younger, first Governor of Connecticut under the 
charter of Charles II. He was graduated at Har- 
vard in 1780 and took up his residence in Boston 
where he engaged in commerce. His entrance 
upon public life was made as a Federalist, with 
which party he associated himself actively until the 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



51 



War of 1 81 2, when he joined the RepubUcans, later 
known as Democrats. As such he was elected to 
the State Senate, as Lieutenant-Governor for six 
successive terms, 1826-1832, and as Presidential 
Elector. Mr. Winthrop was widely known and 
esteemed for his public spirit and hospitality, and 
was a leader in enterprises of higher education. 
He served as an Overseer of Harvard from 1828 
until his death, was a fellow of the American Acad- 
emy and member of learned societies in this country 
and Europe, and President of the Massachusetts 
Historical Society, the Massachusetts Agricultural 
Society and the American Antiquarian Society. In 
1786 he married Elizabeth Bowdoin Temple, a 
granddaughter of Governor James Bowdoin (Har- 
vard 1745) and the daughter of Sir John Temple, 
British Consul General in tlie United States. His 
youngest son, Robert Cliarles Winthrop (Harvard 
182S), became Speaker of the House of Represen- 
tatives at Washington and succeeded Daniel Webster 
as United States Senator from Massachusetts. In 
1836 Mr. Winthrop received the degree of Doctor 
of Laws from Trinity College, Hartford, Connecti- 
cut. He died in Boston, February 22, 1841. 



WOODMAN, Edward 

Harvard A.B. 1877, A.M. 1879, LL.B. 1881. 
Born in Mineral Point, Wis., 1855 ; educated in pub- 
lic schools at Cambridge, Mass., in Paris, France, and 
at Robert College, Constantinople, Turkey ; graduated 
Harvard, 1877 ; Harvard Law School, 1881 ; practising 
law in Portland, Me., since i88i. 

EDWARD WOODMAN, Lawyer, was born at 
Mineral Point, Wisconsin, October 5, 1855, 
the son of Cyrus and Charlotte (Flint) Woodman. 
He received his primary education in the public 
schools of Cambridge, Massachusetts, and when 
eleven years old was placed for a time in a boarding 
school in Paris, France. In 1S72 and 1873 he was 
a student at Robert College, Constantinople, Turkey, 
after which he returned to the United States, pur- 
sued the regular Academic course at Harvard and 
was graduated with the Class of 1S77, receiving the 
degree of Master of .-Xrts two years later. He was 
also a law student at that University, taking the 
degree of Bachelor of Laws at the Harvard Law 
School in 18S1, and was admitted to the Cumber- 
land County Bar at Portland, Maine, in the same 
year. Settling permanently in that city, he has 
practised his profession there to the present time. 
October 24, 1883, Mr. Woodman married Caroline 



daughter of Wilder T. Bowers of Lynn, Massa- 
chusetts. Their children are : Hannah, born July 
31, 18S4; Paul, born September 19, 1885; and 
Edward Woodman, Jr., born December 31, 
1888. 



E 



SEARS, Edmund Hamilton 

Harvard A.B. 1874. 
Born in Wayland, Mass., 1852; fitted for College at 
Boston Latin School ; graduated Harvard, 1874 ; taught 
in Hampton Normal and Agricultural School, 1874-75; 
Instructor California State University, 1875-83; Princi- 
pal of a school for girls in Boston, 1885-91 ; Principal 
Mary Institute, St. Louis, Mo., since 1891 ; A.M. Wash- 
ington University, 1897. 

DMUND HAMILTON SEARS, Educator, 
was born in Wayland, Massachusetts, April 
20, 1852, the son of iMlmund Hamilton and Ellen 
(Bacon) Sears. He is of Colonial ancestry, a de- 
scendant of Richard Sears, who arrived at Plymouth, 
Massachusetts, in 1630. A four years' course at 
the Boston Latin School prepared him for Harvard, 
where he gave special attention to the languages, 
history and philosophy, and was graduated a 
-Bachelor of Arts with tlie Class of 1874. Im- 
mediately adopting the profession of teaching, he 
engaged as Instructor in miscellaneous branches in 
the Hampton, Virginia, Normal and Agricultural 
School for a year, and from 1875 to 1883 was In- 
structor in Latin and Greek at the State University, 
Berkeley, California. He established a school for 
girls at Boston, in 1S85, and conducted it until 
1 89 1, when he was called to St. Louis, as Principal 
of the Mary Institute, a branch of Washington Uni- 
versity, and is still serving in that capacity. For 
some time past, Mr. Sears has been engaged upon 
a literary work of more than ordinary moment, 
entitled Political Growtli in the Nineteenth Century, 
which is published by the Macmillan Company. 
He is a member of the University, Round Table 
and Contemporary Clubs of St. Louis. In politics 
he is a Jeffersonian Democrat, but takes no active 
part in political affiiirs, beyond voting, which he 
does as an Independent. June 19, 1895, he 
married Helen Clark Swazey, of Springfield, 
Massachusetts. They have no children. 



STEWART, William Galbraith 

Harvard Law School, Class of 1879. 
Born in West Middletown, Pa.. 1856 ; educated in 
public schools and at Pleasant Hill Academy, West 



52 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



MidJletown; graduated Washington and Jefferson 
College, 1877; student at Harvard Law School, 1878- 
79 ; member of law firm of Brown & Stewart, Pitts- 
burg, Pa., since 1881. 

WlI.l.IAM GALHRAITH STEWART, Law- 
yer, was bom in West Mitldletown, Wash- 
ington county, Pennsylvania, January 5, i<S56, the 
son of Galbraith and Phcebe (McKeever) Stewart. 
He is a great-ijranilson of Wilham Stewart, Lieuten- 
ant an<i Adjutant in General Ilazen's regiment 
during the Revolutionary \Var. His maternal grand- 
parents were Thomas and jane McKeever. He 
attended the public schools of West iMiddletown, 
and after completing the preparatory course at the 
Pleasant Hill Academy in his native town, he en- 
tered Washington and Jefierson College, from which 
he was graduated in 1S77. His legal studies, begun 
in the office of J. W. & A. Donnan, of Washington, 
Pennsylvania, were continued at the Harvard Law 
School during the College year 1878-1879, and he 
was admitted to the Bar of Washington county in 
September 1880. In the following January he 
located in Pittsburg, where he became associated 
in practice with Thomas Ste|)hen Brown under the 
firm name of Brown & Stewart, a connection which 
he still retains. In politics Mr. Stewart is a Repub- 
lican, and he served as School Director in the 
Borough of Wiikinsburg from 1891 to 1895. He 
is a member of the Presbyterian Church. October 
16, 1S90, he married Josephine, daughter of Andrew 
Howard. Their children are : Margaret Elizabeth, 
Andrew Howard, Pha'be, \\"illiam Galbraith and 
Garrett Kerr Stewart. 



WADSWORTH, Marshman Edward 

Harvard A.M 1874, Ph.D. 1879 
Born in Livermore Falls, Me., 1847; graduated 
Bowdoin, 1869; Prof. Chemistry, Boston Dental Col- 
lege, 1873; A.M. Harvard, 1874; Instructor in Mathe- 
matics, Harvard, 1874-77; Assistant in Geology, Har- 
vard, 1877-78; Assistant in Lithology, Museum Com- 
parative Zoology, Harvard, 1877-87; Prof. Colby Univ., 
1885-87; Director, Michigan Mining School, 1887-97; 
President Michigan College of Mines, 1897- ; State 
Geologist of Michigan, 1888-93; Ph.D., Harvard, 1879; 
M.D. National Medical College, 1894. 

M.\RSH.\I.\X EDWARD WADSWORTH, 
Ph.D., was born in Livermore Falls, 
M.iine, May 6, 1847, and graduated at Bowdoin in 
the Class of 1869. For several years he taught in 
Minnesota and Wisconsin, and in 1873 was Pro- 
fessor in Chemistry in the Boston Dental College. 
He held this position only one year, being called to 



Harvard in 1874 as Instructor in Mathematics, con- 
tin\iing as such until 1S77 when he was appointed 
Assistant in Geology. In this place, and as Assistant 
in Lithology in the Museum of Comparative Zoology, 
he remained until, in 1885, he was offered and ac- 
cepted the Professorship of Mineralogy and Geology 
at Colby University. In 1 884-1 885 he studied in 
Germany. In 1886 he was also Assistant State 
Geologist of Minnesota. He occupied his chair at 
Colby University for two years, when he was called 
to the Directorship of the Michigan Mining School 
and to fill the position of Professor of Mineralogy, 




M. E. W.-\DS\VORTH 

Petrography and Geology in that institution. In 
1897 the name of the school was changed by the 
Legislature to Michigan College of Mines and Dr. 
Wadsworth's title changed to that of President. 
From 1888 to 1893 he held the position of State 
Geologist of Michigan. Dr. Wadsworth took the 
degree of Master of Arts in course at Bowdoin in 
1872 and received the same for post-graduate 
studies from Har^'ard in 1874 and that of Doctor of 
Philosophy in natural history from the same L'niver- 
sity in 1879. Dr. Wadsworth is a member of the 
American Association for the Advancement of 
Science, of the Boston Society of Natural History, 
the Geological Society of London, the Geological 
Society of America, and other learned bodies, and 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



53 



has contributed largely to the literature of education 
and of science in the departments of mineralogy, 
geology and lithology. 



Club. April 26, 1893, he was united in marriage 
with Helen Stettheimer. They have two daughters : 
Stella May, born May 25, 1895 ; and Mabel Helen 
Sondheim, born August 23, 1897. 



SONDHEIM, Eugene 

Harvard A.B. 1888. 
Born in New York City, i86g; graduated University 
City of New York, 1887 ; Harvard, 1888 ; studied law at 
Columbia and admitted to the Bar 1891 ; now of firm 
of Sondheim & Sondheim, New York City. 

EUGENE SONDHEIM, Lawyer, was born in 
New York City, October 25, 1869, son of 
Bernhard and Rachel (Edesheimer) Sondheim. He 




EUGENE SONDHEIM 

was educated in the public schools, received his 
liachelor's degree at the University of the City of 
New York in 1887 and at Harvard in 1888, and 
was made a Master of Arts by Harvard in 1889. 
His legal studies were completed in the Law Depart- 
ment of Columbia, and in 1891 he was admitted to 
the New York Bar, and immediately entered the 
law firm of Nathan, Sondheim & Rothschild. That 
firm was subsequently succeeded by Nathan, Sond- 
heim & Sondheim, and upon the retirement of Mr. 
Nathan in January 1895, it adopted its jiresent title 
of Sondheim & Sondheim, occupying offices in New 
York City. Mr. Sondheim is a member of the 
New York City Bar Association and the Harvard 



WHYTE, William Pinkney 

Harvard Law School. Class of 1845. 
Born in Baltimore, Md., 1824 ; educated by private 
tutor and at Baltimore College; student in Harvard 
Law School, 1844-45 '< began practice of law in Balti- 
more, 1846; President Baltimore Copper Works some 
years; member Maryland Legislature, 1847-48; Comp- 
troller State Treasury, 1853-55 ! U. S. Senator, 1868-69 
and 1874-81 ; elected Governor of Maryland, 1871 ; 
LL.D. Univ. of Maryland, 1874; Mayor of Baltimore, 
i88i ; Attorney-Genera! of Maryland, 1887-91 ; and 
Chairman of Commission to frame new Charter for 
Baltimore, 1897-98. 

WILLIAM ITNKNEY WHVTE, LL.D., 
Statesman, was born in Baltimore, Mary- 
land, August 9, 1824. He is a son of Joseph and 
Isabella (Pinkney) White, who used the customary 
spelling of the name, and his grandfather was John 
Campbell White, a native of Ireland and one of the 
United Irishmen of 1798. His maternal grand- 
father was Maryland's distinguished soldier, orator, 
and diplomatist, William Pinkney, LL.D., who was 
a member of the Constitutional Convention of i 7S8, 
United States Minister to Great Britain, Naples and 
St. Petersburg, and United States Attorney-General 
181 1-1814, and died, while a United States Senator, 
in 1822. William Pinkney Whyte was educated at 
home under the direction of M. R. McNally, a 
distinguished scholar of his day, who trained him 
in the classics as well as in the English branches. 
It was therefore not considered necessary for him 
to pursue a regular Academic course, although he 
was for some time a student at Baltimore College. 
From 1842 to 1844 he was engaged in the mercantile 
house of Peabody, Riggs & Company, Baltimore, of 
which George Peabody was the founder, and tliun 
he studied in Baltimore and completed his legal 
education at the Harvard Law School in the Class 
of 1 844-1 845, and in 1846, was admitted to the Bar 
and began the practice of law in Baltimore city. He 
subsequently acquired prominence in both legal and 
business circles, becoming Counsel for and a Direc- 
tor of various railroad and other corporations, and 
for some years was President of the Gunpowder, 
now FJaltimore Copper Works. He is, however, 
better known, both locally and otherwise, for his 
eminent public services, which began in the Mary- 
land Legislature, where he was a Representative for 



54 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



the years 1847 and 1S48, and continued as Comp- 
troller of the State Treasury from 1853 to 1855. 
He was a Delegate to the Democratic National 
Convention that nominated Horatio Seymour for 
President in 1868, and the same year he entered 
the United States Senate to fill the vacancy caused 
by Reverdy Johnson's appointment as Minister to 
I'.ngland. In 1S71 he was elected Governor of 
Maryland and in 1874 was again returned to the 
National Senate, where he remained a full term, or 
until March iSSi, in which year he was elected 
Mayor of Baltimore without opposition. From 1 88 7 




\VS\. PrS'KXEV WIlVTIi 

to 1 89 1 he ser\'ed as Attorney-General of Maryland ; 
was appointed by President Harrison a Delegate to 
the Congress of South American Republics, but 
declined; and during the years 1897 and 1898 he 
was Chairman of a commission established to frame 
a new charter for the City of Baltimore. In the 
boundary ilispute between Maryland and Virginia 
he appeared by appointment of the Governor as 
counsel for his state before the .Arbitration Board, 
composed of Judge Black, Governor Jenkins of 
Georgia and Senator Beck of Kentucky. In 1874 
he was honored with the degree of Doctor of Laws 
by the University of Maryland. Governor Whyte 
has always adhered to the principles of the Demo- 
cratic party and gave his support to Palmer and 



Buckner in 1896. In 1S47 he married Louisa D. 
Hollingsworth, who bore him three children : \\\\- 
liam Hollingsworth (deceased), Joseph and Clymer 
Whyte. In 1892 he married for his second wife 
Mary McDonald Thomas, daughter of ^\'illiam 
McDonald of I'.altimore. 



POWERS, George Herman 

Harvard A.B 1861, A.M. and M.D. 1865. 
Born in Boston, Mass., 1840 ; educated in public 
schools of Chelsea, Mass.; graduated Harvard, 1861 ; 
Harvard Medical School, 1865; practising medicine in 
California, since 1866; Prof, of Ophthalmology and 
Otology, University of California. 

Gi:ORGE HERMAN POWERS, M.D., Spe- 
cialist, Professor in the University of Cali- 
fornia, son of Herman and Caroline Hayward 
(Carter) Powers, was born in Boston, Massachu- 
setts, June 13, 1840. On the paternal side he is 
descended from the Le Poer family of Normandy, 
some of whom accompanied William the Conqueror 
to England, where the name became anglicized into 
its present form. His first ancestors in America 
were Walter and Trial Powers who came from Essex, 
England to Concord, Massachusetts, in 1660. From 
the public schools of Chelsea, Massachusetts, he went 
to Harvard, graduating from the .Academic Depart- 
ment with the Class of 1S61. His College expenses 
were defrayed with funds earned by teaching music, 
and officiating as organist and choir master at the 
Mt. Vernon and Park Street churches in Boston. 
During his second year in the Harvard Medi- 
cal School he ser\ed as Interne at the Rains- 
ford Island Hospital, Boston Harbor. He was 
Assistant Surgeon of the Sixtieth Massachusetts 
Volunteers (a hundred days regiment) in T864, 
and in 1868 served as Ophthalmic Interne at the 
Boston City Hospital. Believing that the Pacific 
Coast offered extraordinary inducements to a young 
and ambitious practitioner, he went to California, 
in 1866, where he has since given his entire atten- 
tion to ophthalmic, aural, laryngeal and nasal sur- 
gery, and has long been recognized as one of the 
leading specialists in San Francisco. For the past 
thirteen years he has held the Chair of Ophthal- 
mology and Otology in the Medical Department of 
the University of California. Dr. Powers is a mem- 
ber of the State and County Medical Societies, 
the California .Academy of Medicine and American 
Medical Association. He belongs to the Masonic 
Order, the Military Order of the Loyal Legion and 
the Grand Army of the Republic, the Boston City 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



5S 



Hospital and Harvard Medical Alumni Associations, 
and the Bohemian, University, Pacific-Union and 
Harvard clubs of San Francisco. He was for- 
merly clerk of St. Paul's (Episcopal) church, at 
San Rafael, and is now a Vestryman of St. Luke's 
church, San Francisco. July 30, 1872, he married 
Cornelia Janet Chapman of New Haven, Connec- 
ticut. Their children are : Elsie (who died in in- 
fancy), Katharine, George Herman, Jr., (University 
of California 1898), Allan Raymond (University of 
California igoi) and Ruth Powers. 



in that section and some time Representative of 
Petersham in the Massachusetts Legislature. His 
early education was gained in the public schools 
and at the .Academy at Leicester, Massachusetts, in 
which institution he received his preparation for 
College. He entered Harvard in 1S38, at the 
early age of fourteen years, and taking the regular 
Academic course was graduated with the Class of 
1842. LTpon graduation he began at once the 
study of law under the preceptorship of his father, 
also attending lectures in the Harvard Law School, 
and on reaching his majority, in 1845, he was ad- 



FOLSOM, Richard 

Harvard Law School, Class of 1859. 
Born in Chester, N. H., 1835; educated Pinkerton 
Academy, Derry, N. H. ; Amherst College and Harvard 
Law School; admitted to Ohio Bar, i860; to U. S. 
Courts, 1863; Treasurer Lane Theological and of Laura 
Memorial Medical College and Presbyterian Hospital. 

RICHARD FOLSOM, Lawyer, was born in 
Chester, now Auburn, New Hampshire, 
March 5, 1835, son of John and Dorothy (Johnson) 
Folsom. His grandfather was Major David Folsom 
of Newmarket, and his great-grandfather was Col- 
onel John Folsom, of Stratham, New Hampshire. 
Prepared for College at Pinkerton .'\cadeniy, Derry, 
New Hampshire, and graduated from Amherst College 
with the Class of 1857, he was a law student at 
Harvard in 1858-1859, and his legal preparations 
were completed in a law office in Cincinnati, Ohio. 
He was admitted to the Ohio Bar in i860, and to 
the United States Courts in 1863. Mr. Folsom is 
Treasurer of Lane Theological Seminary, and also 
of the Laura Memorial Women's Medical College 
and Presbyterian Hospital, Cincinnati. He is a 
member of the L'niversity, Literary and the U C D 
clubs. His marriage took place June 15, 1884, 
with Anna Hurd ; they have had two children : 
Howard and Alice Folsom, neither of whom are 
living. 



BROOKS, Francis Augustus 

Harvard A.B. 1842. 
Born in Petersham, Mass., 1824 ; prepared for College 
at the Leicester Academy; graduated Harvard, 1842; 
studied at Harvard Law School and admitted to the 
Bar, 1845; practised in Petersham, 1845-48; in Boston 
since 1848; distinguished in railroad and corporation 
cases. 

FRANCIS .VUGUSTUS BROOKS, Lawyer, was 
born in Petersham, Massachusetts, May 23, 
1824, the son of .\aron Brooks, Jr., a lawyer of note 




FRANCIS A. BROOKS 

niitted to practice at the Worcester County Bar. 
He remained in Petersham, in the practice of his 
profession, for three years, then removing to Boston, 
where he has since resided and conducted his busi- 
ness. Mr. Brooks gave his attention especially to 
litigation under the patent laws of the United States 
for a number of years, until, in 1875, he was en- 
gaged in certain railroad and corporation cases 
which served to turn his practice in the direction of 
this specialty. In this line he has gained distinction, 
one of the notable causes which he conducted being 
against the Vermont Central Railroad, which lasted 
more than ten years. In politics Mr. Brooks is an 
old-school Democrat, but has not held office or 
become prominent in lii.U party. 



56 



UNIFERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



CLARK, Perkins Kirkland 

Yale B.A. 1838. 
Bom in Westfield. Mass.. 1811; educated in the 
public schools and prepared for College at Westfield 
Academy; graduated Yale, 1838; taught school in 
Savannah, Ga., and Tutor at Yale, 1842-45; Principal 
of Normal School at Westfield, 1845-46; entered the 
ministry, 1846, and continued in that service to the 
time of his death; died 1872. 

PKRKINS K1RK.1..\NI) CL.VRK, Clergyman, 
was born in Westfield, Massachusetts, Decem- 
ber S, iSii, the son of Knoch and Abigail (Kirk- 
land) Clark. The Clark family traces its origin in 
this country to seven brothers of that name who 




PERKINS K. CLARK 

came from Kngland and were among the earliest 
settlers of Northampton, Massachusetts. Their 
descendants include many ministers of the Gospel, 
as well as men prominent in science, literature, law 
and commerce, .\bigail Kirkland, the mother, was 
of the same ancestry as Dr. John Thornton Kirkland, 
President of Harvard 1810-1825. Perkins K. Clark 
received his early education in the public schools 
of his native town and was fitted for College at the 
Westfield .Academy under the instruction of Dr. 
Emerson Davis. He was graduated at Yale in 
1 838 and at once entered upon the work of teach- 
ing, for one year in Savannah, Georgia, and for 
more than four years, 1840-1845, as Tutor at Yale. 
Meantime he was engaged in study for the ministry. 



and after one year's service as Principal of the 
Normal School at Westfield, following the resig- 
nation of his Tutorship at Yale, he entered upon 
that work at Chester, Massachusetts, in 1846. Mr. 
Clark held successful Pastorates in that town and in 
Hinsdale, South Deerfield, West Springfield and 
Charlemont, Massachusetts, covering a ministry of 
twenty-five years. In spite of a chronic affection 
dating from his youth, which caused him great 
suffering at times, his energy and perseverance 
enabled him to take rank for high scholarship at 
College, to make himself beloved and respected as 
an instructor, and to produce abundant results 
through his self-denying labors as a Pastor. Mr. 
Clark married Hannah Avery, November 20, 1845, 
who survives him at the age of eighty-four years. 
Their children are : Mary Avery (deceased), Edward 
Perkins, Emma Kirkland and Martha Clark. Mrs. 
Clark has connection with three generations of Yale 
graduates : her late husband, Perkins K. Clark ; her 
son, Edward Perkins Clark (Yale 1870) ; and her 
grandsons Charles Upson Clark (Yale 1897), John 
Kirkland Clark (Yale 1899), George Maxwell Clark 
(Yale 1900) and Hugh Rankin (Yale 1901), the 
son of Martha Clark and the Rev. J. O. Rankin. 
The Rev. Perkins Kirkland Clark died at Charle- 
mont, Massachusetts, January 4, 1S72. 



CLARK, Edward Perkins 

Yale B.A. 1870. 
Born in Huntington, Mass., 1847 ; graduated Yale, 
1870; prominent as a writer and Lit. Editor in College; 
became a journalist ; has been a leading editorial 
writer on the New York Evening Post since 1885. 

EDWARD PERKINS CLARK, son of Perkins 
Kirkland (Yale 1S38) and Hannah Avery 
Clark, was born in Huntington, Massachusetts, 
October 21, 1847. His father, who had been a 
Tutor at Yale after his graduation in 1838, became 
a Congregational clergyman, preaching all his life in 
Western Massachusetts. Mr. Clark fitted for Col- 
lege at the high school in Deerfield, Massachusetts, 
and at Phillips-Andover Academy, graduating from 
the latter in 1866, at the head of his class. Enter- 
ing the Class of 1870 at Yale, he became prominent 
as a writer, taking prizes in English composition 
and becoming one of the Editors for his class of 
the Yale Literary Magazine. He began newspaper 
work immediately after leaving College, upon the 
Springfield, Massachusetts, Republican, and was 
rapidly promoted, until he became Managing Edi- 
tor in 1872, and continued in that position until 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



57 



1879. Afterwards he was the Washington Corre- 
spondent of the RepubHcan, and Editor of the 
Milwaukee Sentinel. In 1885 he became a lead- 
ing editorial writer on the New York Evening Post, 




EDWARD r. CLARK 

where he still continues, devoting himself largely to 
political and social topics, like the Southern ques- 
tion, the race issue, and various aspects of educa- 
tion. He became the leader in the movement 
against the bill for the education of the southern 
negroes by the Federal Government (the lllair 
Bill), which was zealously pushed between 1888 
and 1S90, and its final defeat by the Senate in the 
latter year was ascribed by members of that body 
and by the press to his efforts, through the Evening 
Post and through private correspondence. Mr. 
Clark has contributed many articles to the Forum, 
Century, Independent and other periodicals. 



CLARK, Charles Upson 

Yale B.A. 1897. 
Born in Springfield, Mass., 1875 ; fitted for College 
at Brooklyn, Polytechnic Inst.; graduated Yale, 1897; 
valedictorian of his Class ; completed education abroad ; 
spent some time in foreign travel ; Tutor at Yale since 
1899. 

GIL\RLES UPSON CL.VRK, Tutor at Yale, 
was born in Springfield, Massachusetts, 
January 14, 1875, the son of Edward Perkins 



(Yale 1870) and Kate Upson Clark. In 1882 he 
removed with his parents to Brooklyn, New York, 
where he fitted for College at the Polytechnic In- 
stitute, graduating in 1893, as President and first 
scholar in his class. He entered the Yale Class of 
1897. His already marked aptitude for study be- 
came steadily more pronounced, and he graduated 
the valedictorian of his class and with honors in 
various studies. He won many prizes during his 
course, among them a special Berkeley premium 
and twice a first Robinson prize in Latin, the first 
Winthrop prize in Greek and Latin, the Scott prize 
in French, and the Betts and Ten Eyck prizes in 
English. He soon became prominent as a debater, 
was elected President of the Yale Union, won the 
Thacher prize for public speaking, and was a mem- 
ber of Yale " teams " which defeated Harvard and 
Princeton in debate. He was elected President of 
the Phi Beta Kappa Society in his Senior year, and 
was voted by his classmates " the brightest man in 
his class," and " the one who had done the most 
for Yale." Mr. Clark spent the first year after his 
graduation in study at Yale, and the next two 




CHARLES UPSON CIJVRK 



abroad, chiefly in the American School for Classical 
Studies at Rome, where he won a fellowship, and in 
the University of Paris. He also devoted some 
time to travel, particularly in Greece. He gave 



58 



UNIVERSITIES JND THEIR SONS 



special attention to Latin, and in March 1899, 
while still in Europe, was appointed a Tutor in that 
language upon his return in the fail of 1900. 



CLARK, John Kirkland 

Yale B A. 1899. 

Born in Springfield, Mass., 1877; prepared for Col- 
lege at Brooklyn, N. Y., Polytechnic Inst.; graduated 
Yale, 1899; student in Harvard Law School. 

JOHN KIRKL.ANI) CLARK, son of Edvvnrd 
Perkins (Vale 1870) and Kate Upson Clarl<, 
was born in Springfield, Massachusetts, Janu- 




JOHN K. CI..\RK 

ary 21, 1877, and removed with his family to 
Brooklyn, New York, in 1882. He fitted for Col- 
lege at the Polytechnic Institute, from which he 
graduated as President of his Class in 1895, enter- 
ing the Yale Class of 1899 the following autumn. 
He took a high rank in scholarship from the start, 
attaining a " philosophical " stand at the end of his 
course. He won a Berkeley premium in Latin in 
his Freshman year, and the first Robinson prize in 
Latin in his Sophomore year. In his Junior year, 
and again as a Senior, he was awarded the Water- 
man Scholarship of S800 a year, the most valuable 
and honorable scholarship in the University. Mr. 
Clark took a most active part in debating through- 
out his entire course, speaking in four intercollegiate 



debates and sharing in victories over botli Harvard 
and Princeton. He won the Thacher prize in 
public speaking, and was elected President of the 
Yale Union. At his graduation he was voted by his 
classmates " the brightest man in his class," and 
" the one who had done the most for Yale." Mr. 
Clark will become a lawyer. He entered the Har- 
vard Law School in the Fall of 1899, and at once 
took high rank in his class. 



FLANDERS, John Couch 

Yale B.A. 1885. 
Born in Portland, Or., 1865; fitted for College at 
Bishop Scott Academy; graduated Yale, 1885; read 
law in Portland; admitted to Bar in 1887; has since 
practised in Portland ; member Port of Portland Com- 
mission since iSgi. 

JOHN COUCH FLANDLRS, Lawyer, was born 
in the city of Portland, Oregon, January 15, 
1865, the son of George Hall and Maria Louise 
(Foster) Flanders. Through both parents he comes 
of old New England Puritan stock, dating back to 
early Colonial times. He received his early educa- 
tion in the schools of Portland, and fitted for College 
at the Bishop Scott Academy there, entering Yale 
in 1 88 1 and graduating as Bachelor of Arts in 1S85. 
.After the completion of his College course, Mr. 
Flanders read law in the office of William H. 
Effinger in his native city, and was admitted to the 
Bar of the Supreme Court of the State of Oregon in 
October 1S87. Since that time he has been ac- 
tively engaged in the practice of his profession, and 
since iSgi has been a member of the firm of Wil- 
liams, Wood & Linthicum. In the latter year, also, 
he became a member of the Port of Portland Com- 
mission, having charge of the improvement of the 
Willamette and Columbia Rivers from Portland to 
the sea. Mr. Flanders has always been a stanch 
Democrat in politics, was a delegate to the State 
Conventions of the party in 1892 and 1896 and 
Chairman of the County Committee in the latter 
year. Since 1896 he has supported the wing of the 
party opposed to the theories of Mr. Bryan and his 
friends. He is a member of the Reform Club of 
New York and the Arlington, Lhiiversity, Yale and 
Waverly Golf Clubs of Portland. 



HEALEY, John James 

Yale LL.B. 1892. 
Born in Boston, Mass., 1872; educated in Boston 
public schools and at Saratoga Springs high school; 
entered Yale Law School, graduating in 1892 as LL.B., 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



59 



"cum laude " ; has practised law in Saratoga Springs 
since 1893; admitted to Bar of the United States Cir- 
cuit and District Courts, i8g8. 

JOHN JAMES HKALEY, Lawyer, was bom in 
Boston, Massachusetts, July 18, 1872, the son 
of John J., and Margaret (Hackett) Healey. He 
received his early education in the public schools 
of Boston, and afterwards, his parents having mean- 
while removed to Saratoga Springs, New York, at- 
tended the High School there, graduating in 1888 
and taking the oratorical prize. After a year's post- 
graduate course he entered the Yale Law School 



dent of the Saratoga High School Alumni Associa- 
tion, and a member of the Yale Law Journal 
Corporation. 




JNO. J. HEALEY, JR. 

and was graduated in 1892 with the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws trio/i laude. In College he re- 
ceived a special diploma as one of eight for excel- 
lency in debate ; was a member of the Kent Club, 
Phi Delta Phi Fraternity and Corbey Court, and was 
one of the original Board of Editors of the Yale 
Law Journal. After graduation Mr. Healey entered 
the law office of Henning & McCall of Saratoga 
Springs, was admitted to the Bar of the State of 
New York in 1893, and since the death of Mr. 
McCall in 1895 has been associated with Mr. Hen- 
ning. He was admitted to the Bar of the United 
States Circuit and District Courts in January 1898. 
His practice has occupied all his time, and although 
a Democrat, he has taken no active part in political 
life. He is a member of the Saratoga Club, Prcsi- 



GOODRICH, Chauncey Allen 

Yale B A. 1810. 
Born in New Haven, Conn., 1790; graduated Yale, 
1810; Tutor, 1812-14; studied theology and Pastor Con- 
gregational Church at Middletown, Conn., 1816-17 ; 
Prof. Rhetoric and English Literature, Yale, 1817-39; 
Prof. Pastoral Theology, 1817-39; D.D. Brown, 1835; 
died i860. 

CHAUNCEY ALLEN GOODRICH, D.D., 
Lexicographer, was born in New Haven. 
Connecticut, October 23, 1790, the second son of 
the Hon. Elizur Goodrich, LL.D. (Yale 1779) and 
Anne Willard (Allen) Goodrich. He was a descend- 
ant in the sixth generation from Ensign William 
Goodrich, settler at Wethersfield, Connecticut, in 
1634. His grandfather was the Rev. Dr. Elizur 
Goodrich, (Yale 1752) for many years a Fellow of 
the Yale Corporation, a sketch of whose life appears 
in this volume. Chauncey Allen Goodrich was 
graduated at Yale in 18 10, receiving his Master's 
degree in course, served there as Tutor, 181 2-1 814, 
and afterwards studied theology. The burdens of 
Pastoral work, however, which he undertook in 
connection with the Congregational Church at 
Middletown, Connecticut, proved too exacting for 
his health, and he accepted, in 181 7, the Chair of 
Rhetoric and English Literature at Yale. The con- 
nection thus formed continued without interruption 
throughout his life, a period of forty-three years. 
He held the Professorship of Rhetoric and Litera- 
ture until 1839, and thereafter that of the Pastoral 
Charge, receiving the degree of Doctor of Divinity 
from Brown University in 1S35. Dr. Goodrich was 
elected President of Williams College in 1820, but 
declined the office, preferring to remain in New 
Haven where he was engaged in literary work in 
addition to his Academic duties. He established 
and conducted for a good many years the Christian 
Quarterly Spectator, published several text-books on 
Greek and contributed extensively to periodical 
literature. His most extensive work was in the 
field of lexicography, in the revision and abriilg- 
ment of tlie .\merican Dictionary of his fitther-in- 
law, Noah Webster. This edition, in the preparation 
of which Dr. Goodrich labored a number of years 
with the assistance of Benjamin Silliman, Davison 
Olrastead and others, was published in 1S47. He 
brought out the LTniversal edition in 1856 and a 
Supiilement in 1859, and at the time of his death 



6o 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



was engaged on a radical revision of the Dictionary 
which was later issued under the super\'ision of Dr. 
Xoah Porter in 1S64. Hr. Goodrich married 
October i, 1816, Julia Frances, daughter of Noah 
Webster, by whom he had four children. He diet! 
in Xew Haven, February 25, i860. 



HOYT, Henry Martyn 

Yale B.A. 1878. 
Born in Wilkesbarre, Pa., 1856; educated in the 
public schools and under private instruction ; graduated 
Yale, 1878; LL.B. Univ. of Pa., 1881 ; admitted to 
Bar 1881 and practised law in Pittsburg, Pa.; Asst. 
Cashier U. S. National Bank, New York City, 1883-86; 
Treas. Investment Co. of Philadelphia, 1886-90; Presi- 
dent, 1890-94; practised law in Philadelphia, 1894-97; 
Asst. Attorney-General U. S. since 1897. " 

HI;NRV M.\R TVN HOVT, .Assistant .Attorney- 
General of the United States, was born in 
Wilkesbarre, Pennsylvania, Derenibcr 5, 1856, the 
son of Henry Martyn and Mary Elizabeth (Love- 
land) Hoyt. He is of New England ancestry 
through all lines of descent. Simon Hoyt arrived 
at Charlestown, Massachusetts, from England in 
1629, and his son Walter Hoyt was one of the 
founders of Fairfield, Connecticut. The first of the 
Hurlbuts, another line, of whom there is any authen- 
tic knowledge, was Thomas, who was among the 
original settlers of Saybrook, Connecticut, and was 
subsequently wounded in one of the engagements 
with the Pequot Indians. Christopher Hurlbiit, 
great-grandfather of the subject of this sketch, was 
in the battles of Monmouth and Trenton ; and his 
great-grandfather, Daniel Hoyt, also served in the 
Revolutionary War, with the rank of Lieutenant in 
the Connecticut forces. Ziba Hoyt, his grandfather, 
was Lieutenant of a troop of Pennsylvania artillery 
in the War of 18 12, and was commended for bravery 
in action during the Lake Erie Campaign. Henry 
Martyn Hoyt, his father, a graduate of Williams 
College in 1849, was a lawyer in Wilkesbarre until 
the breaking out of the Civil War, which he entered 
as Lieutenant-Colonel of the Fifty-second Regiment, 
Pennsylvania Volunteers, was subsequently promoted 
to be Colonel and in 1865 was brevetted Brigadier- 
General for gallant and meritorious conduct in the 
field. He was afterward Judge of the Court of 
Common Pleas for Luzerne county, Pennsylvania, 
and Governor of that state from 1879 to 1883. On 
his mother's side, — the Lovelands are descended 
from John Loveland an English emigrant to Con- 
necticut, in 1635, who settled in Wethersfield ; and 



the Buckinghams are the descendants of Rev. 
Thomas, who arrived in the New Haven Colony at 
about the same time and was the father of Rev. 
Thomas Buckingham, one of the founders of Vale 
under the original charter. Henry M. Hoyt re- 
ceived his early education in the public schools of 
Wilkesbarre, and under private instruction and was 
graduated at Vale, in the Class of 187S. He then 
read law in the office of Messrs. IMcVeagh & Bispham 
of Philadelphia, and received the degree of Bachelor 
of Laws from the University of Pennsylvania in 
1S81. .After his admission to the Bar he located 




HENRY M. HOYT 

for practice in Pittsburg, in the office of George 
Shiras, Jr., now a Justice of the Lhiited States 
Supreme Court, but in 1SS3 he gave up the law 
to become .Assistant Cashier of the L^nited States 
National Bank of New Vork. In 1886 he became 
Treasurer of the Investment Company of Phila- 
delphia, and was its President from 1S90 to 1894, 
retiring from that post in the latter year to resume 
the practice of law. He was appointed Assistant 
.Attorney-General of the L'nited States in 1S97 and 
still holds that office. At Vale Mr. Hoyt joined the 
Delta Kappa, Phi Theta Psi, 'H /JouXtJ, D K E and 
Scroll and Key. He is a member of the Sons of 
the Revolution, the Society of the War of 1S12, and 
the Military Order of the Loyal Legion. January 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



6i 



31, 1883, he married Anne, daughter of Morton 
McMichael of Philadelphia, and a granddaughter of 
the former Mayor of that city, of the same name, 
who served on the Centennial Commission and was 
Editor of the North American. Their children 
are: Elinor ATorton, born September 7, 1885; 
Henry Martyn, Jr., born May 8, 1887 ; Anne Con- 
stance, born May, 20, 1889 ; and Morton McMichael, 
bom April 4, 1899. 



KEATOR, John Frisbee 

Yale B.A. 1877. 
Born in Roxbury, N. Y., 1850; prepared for College 
at Williston Seminary, Easthampton, Mass.; gradu- 
ated Yale, 1877 ; Univ. of Pa., Law School and ad- 
mitted to Philadelphia Bar, 1879; to Bar of U. S. 
Supreme Court, 1890; practised law in Philadelphia 
since 18791 Member of Legislature, 1897-98; Re- 
elected and served session 1899-1900. 

JOSEPH FRISBEE KEATOR, Lawyer, was 
born in Roxbury, Delaware county. New York, 
April 16, 1850, the son of Abram Johnson and Ruth 
(Frisbee) Keator. His paternal ancestors came 
originally from Holland and those on his mother's side 
were Scotch. His grandfather, Cornelius Keator, was 
a son of John Keator, Jr., whose father John Keator 
was killed by the Indian allies of the British while 
serving as a soldier in the Revolutionary NN'ar ; his 
maternal grandparents were John and Anna (Smith) 
Frisbee, the former of whom served in the Me.xican 
War in 181 2. Reared upon a farm and educated in 
the common branches of study taught in the public 
schools of his neighborhood, he began at the age 
of seventeen the task of securing the means for 
a more liberal education, by teaching a country 
school. He was thus able in 187 1, to enter Willis- 
ton Seminary, Easthampton, Massachusetts, from 
which he went to Yale, entering and graduating with 
the Class of 1877. Joining the Class of 1879 in 
the Law Department of the University of Pennsyl- 
vania, he took the degree of Bachelor of Laws at 
the conclusion of his course and was admitted to the 
Philadelphia Bar in 1879. In 1890 he was admitted 
to the United States Supreme Court in Washington, 
District of Columbia, and for some years has been 
a member of the law firm of Keator & Perkins, 
Philadelphia, which has an extensive general prac- 
tice. Mr. Keator resides in Germantown. He is 
Manager and Trustee in various Hospitals, Orphan- 
ages and other charitable institutions in Philadel- 
phia, principally of the Methodist persuasion, and 
represents them as their attorney. He is a Repub- 



lican of the "anti-Quay" wing, and in 1896 was 
elected by his party Representative to the Legisla- 
ture for two years and re-elected in 189S. In 
Masonry he is a Past Worshipful Master of Har- 
mony Lodge Free and .'\ccepted Masons, also a 
member of Harmony Chapter Royal Arch Masons 
and Corinthian Commandery Knights Templar. 
He is a charter member of the Young Republican 
Club of Philadelphia, and also holds membership in 
the University, Colonial, Lawyer's, Psi Upsilon, 
Wissahickon Wheelmen's and other clubs. Febru- 
ary 10, 1885, he married Anna W. Sweatman, and 




JOHN F. KE.4T0R 

has three children living : Rachel, John Frisbee 
Jr., and Clement G. Keator, aged respectively eight, 
four and one years. 



GOODRICH, Elizur 

Yale B.A. 175: - Princeton D D. :783. 
Born in Wethersfield, Conn., 1734; graduated Yale, 
1752; Tutor, 1755-56; Pastor of Congregational Church 
in Durham, Conn., 1757-97; Candidate for President 
of Yale, 1777 ; Fellow of the Corporation, 1776-97, 
and Sec'y, 1777-88; D.D. Princeton, 1783; died 1797. 

ELIZUR GOODRICH. D.D., Clergyman, was 
born in Wethersfield, now Rocky Hill, Con- 
necticut, October 6, 1734, the son of David and 
Hepzibah (Boardman) Goodrich. The family is of 



62 



UNJyERSJJlES AND THEIR SONS 



Saxon origin, many of its members appearing in 
the Doomsday Book as small holders under Nor- 
man lords, and the American branch traces its 
descent through Dr. Thomas Goodrich who was 
Bishop of Kly in 1534. Knsign William Goodrich 
came from lleilgessett, Suffolk county, England, and 
settled in WethersfieKl in 1643, married Sarah Mar- 
vin there in 1648, was made a freeman of the town 
in 1656, and in 1662 and thereafter represented 
Wethersfielil in the General Court of the Colony. 
Elizur Goodrich, fourth in direct descent from the 
original settler, was graduated at Yale in 1752, and 
upon taking his Master's degree was engaged for 
two years as Tutor in lliat College, meantime pre- 
paring for the ministiy by the study of theology. 
His first and only I'astorate was over the Congrega- 
tional Church at Durham, Connecticut, which he 
retained until his death, a period of forty years, 
receiving the degree of Doctor of Divinity from 
Princeton in 1783. Dr. Goodrich attained promi- 
nence in the ministry, and was frequently sent by 
the General .Association of Connecticut as a dele- 
gate to conventions and synods in New York 
and Philadelphia, but he was even more widely 
known as a scholar and an educator. He began 
teaching early in his ministry, preparing young men 
for College in order to supplement his slender 
income, and for twenty years continued this work 
with great success, more than three hundred stu- 
dents passing under his instruction. The library 
which he collected was the largest and most com- 
plete ever brought into the Colonies at that time on 
private account. He was for many years officially 
connected with Yale, becoming a Fellow of the Cor- 
poration in 1776 and retaining a seat on that Board 
until his death, sen-ing as Secretary from 1777 to 
1788, and was a member of its presidential com- 
mittee for many years. During the aj interim 
administration of Dr. Daggett, following the retire- 
ment of President Clap, Dr. Goodrich was a prom- 
inent candidate for the Presidency of Yale, Dr. 
Stiles receiving the election by a small majority of 
the votes of the Corporation. .Mong with his min- 
isterial duties and those in connection with the 
administration of Yale, he also devoted much time 
to mathematical studies. He calculated the eclipses 
each year, and his account of the remarkable dis- 
play of the Aurora Borealis in 1780 remains the 
fullest and most accurate ever published. At one 
time Dr. Goodrich was a candidate for Governor of 
Connecticut, but was not elected. He married, 
February i, 1759, Katherine, daughter of the Hon. 



Klihu and Mary (Griswold) Chauncey, by whom he 
had seven children. His eldest son, Chauncey 
(Yale 1776), was a member of Congress, United 
States Senator and Lieutenant-Governor of Connec- 
ticut; and his second son, Elizur (Yale 1779), was 
Professor of Law in that College, Fellow and Secre- 
tary of the Corporation for thirty years and Repre- 
sentative in Congress. Dr. Elizur Goodrich died in 
Norfolk, Connecticut, November 22, 1797. 



GOODRICH, Elizur 

Yale B.A. 1779, t-I-D. 1830. 
Born in Durham, Conn., 1761 ; graduated Yale, 1779; 
Tutor, 1781-83; studied law and admitted to the Bar, 
1783 ; Presidential Elector, 1797 ; member of Congress, 
1799-1801; Collector of Customs, New Haven, 1801 ; 
Prof, of Law, Yale, 1801-10; Judge of Probate seven- 
teen years and of the County Court twelve years; 
Mayor, City of New Haven, 1803-22 ; Sec. of Yale Cor- 
poration, 1816-46, and ex-officio Fellow; LL.D. Yale, 
1830; died 1849. 

ELIZUR GOODRICH, LL.D., Jurist, was born 
in Durham, Connecticut, March 24, 1761, 
the second son of the Rev. Dr. Elizur Goodrich 
(Yale 1752) and Mary Griswold Chauncey. He 
was the younger brother of the Hon. Chauncey 
Goodrich (Yale 1776), whose descent from Ensign 
William Goodrich, settler in Wethersfield, Connec- 
ticut, in 1643, is given in the sketches of these 
members of the family elsewhere in this volume. 
Elizur Goodrich, the son, was prepared for College 
by his father, who was one of the most noted 
scholars and instructors in the Colony at that time, 
and was graduated at Yale in 1779. He then took 
up the study of law, and at the completion of a 
term of two years' service as Tutor at Yale in i 783 
was admitted to the Bar and began practice in New 
Haven. There he rose steadily in his profession, 
displaying judicial qualities of mind which later 
brought about his elevation to the Bench, on which 
he served seventeen years as Judge of Probate and 
twelve years as Judge of the County Court. .As a 
young man he took an active interest in public 
affairs, associating himself with the Federalist party, 
and was chosen a Presidential Elector in 1797. He 
was elected to Congress by his party in the follow- 
ing year, serving for one term, i 799-1801, when he 
was appointed Collector of Customs at New Haven 
as one of the last acts of President John Adams 
before retiring from office. On the accession of 
President Jefferson, in March of the same year, he 
was promptly removed, this act giving rise to the 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



'3 



discussion of the question of the propriety of the 
removal on account of political opinion whicli brought 
out the notable letter of Jeflerson defending his 
course and approving the practice. Judge Goodrich 
held the ofifice of Mayor of New Haven for nineteen 
years, 1S03-1822, and was long connected with 
Yale in an official capacity, being Professor of Law 
there from 1801 to 18 10, Secretary of the Corpora- 
tion for thirty years, 1816-1S46, and ex officio Fel- 
low, and receiving the degree of Doctor of Laws in 
1830. He married, September i, i 7S5, Anne Wil- 
lard Allen, of Great Barrington, Massachusetts, and 
had three children : Elizur Chauncy, Chauncey 
Allen and Nancy Goodrich. Judge Goodrich died 
in New Haven, November i, 1849. 



LEARNED, William Law 

Yale B.A. 1841, LL.D 1878. 
Born in New London, Conn., 1821 ; educated at the 
Union School, New London ; graduated Yale, 1841 ; 
studied law and admitted to Bar, 1844; practised in 
Albany, N. Y., until 1870; Justice New York Supreme 
Court, 1870-gi ; and Presiding Justice, 1875-91; Presi- 
dent Albany Law School, Albany Medical College, 
Board of Public Instruction, and Trustee of other 
educational institutions. 

WILLLAM LAW LEARNED, Jurist, was 
born in New London, Connecticut, July 
24, 1821, the son of Ebenezer and Lydia (^Coit) 
Learned. He is a descendant in the sixtli genera- 
tion of William Learned, who came over from Eng- 
land about the year 1630, and on his mother's side 
from John Coit, who was residing in Salem, ALissa- 
chusetts, as early as 1630 or 1631. From the 
Union School, New London, he went to Yale, grad- 
uating with the Class of 1841, after which he began 
the study of law in his native town and continued it 
at Troy, New York, in the office of George Gould, 
who was afterwards elevated to the Supreme Bench. 
Admitted to the Bar in 1844, he practised law suc- 
cessfully in .-\lbany for over twenty-five years, or 
until he was appointed a Justice of the Supreme 
Court by Governor Hoffman in the summer of 1870. 
In the following November he was elected to that 
position for a term of fourteen years and in 1875 
was appointed by Governor 'I'ilden Presiding Justice. 
L^pon his re-election in 1884, Governor Cleveland 
re-appointed him to the Chief-Justiceship which he 
retained until December 31, 1891, when he retired 
by reason of age in conformity with the constitu- 
tional restriction. After retirement from the l!ench 
he resumed his profession and is still in active prac- 



tice. Judge Learned is or has been President of 
the Albany Law School, the .Albany Medical College, 
the Sewall Academy, .\lbany, and the Board of Pub- 
lic Listruction, (Jovernor of the Albany Hospital, 
and a Trustee of the Boy's Academy and of Rural 
Cemetery. He is a member of the .Albany Insti- 
tute, the Albany Historical Society and the New 
York Geographical Society, the Reform and Yale 
Clubs of New York City, and the Fort Orange, 
Country and Camera Clubs of .Mbany. Besides com- 
piling and issuing a family genealogy, he has edited 
new editions of Madam Knight's Journal, and 




\VM. L. LEARNED 

Earle's Micro-Cosmograjihy. May 29, 1855, Judge 
Learned married Phebe Rowland Marvin, of Albany, 
who died March 31, 1864, and on January 15, 1S68, 
he married Katharine De Witt, also of that city. 
His children were : Mary Marvin, who married 
John DeWitt Peltz of Albany and died in 1S88, 
Grace Hallam, who married General John Henry 
Patterson, U. S. A., and Mabel Lamed, who died in 
1S9S. 

KNOX, Lewis Taylor 

Yale B A 1891. 

Born in New Castle, Pa . 1868 ; graduated Yale, 1891 ; 

at the New York Law School, 1893 ; admitted to the 

New York Supreme Court and to the U. S. Circuit Court 

the same year ; practised law in New York City for two 



64 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



years as member of the firm of Knox & Davis, and since 
May igoo independently. 

LKWIS I'AVLOK KNOX, Lawyer, was born 
in New Castle, IVniisylvania, March 21, 
1868, son of John aiul Caroline (Sheafer) Knox. 
He was educated in the public schools of his native 
town, at Trinity Hall, Washington, Pennsylvania, 
I'pson Seminary, New Preston, Connecticut, and 
Yale, taking his liachelor's degree with the Class of 
1 89 1. He was a law student in the office of Messrs. 
Esselstyn, Ketcham & SafTord, New York City, ami 
also at the New York Law School, graduating with 



.•Mumni .Association and the Yale Club. \i Holy 
Trinity Church in New York City, January 27, 
1.S98, he married Florence Tilden, daughter of 
William lilotlgett Lynch. 




LEWIS T. KNOX 

the degree of Bachelor of Laws in 1893, and was 
admitted the same year to the New York Supreme 
Court and United States Circuit Court. In January 
1894 he entered the ofifice of Messrs. Piatt .V 
Bowers, afterward Bowers & Sands, a well-known 
New York law firm of which he subsequently be- 
came managing clerk, but relinquished that position 
in January 1S96 to open an office on his own 
account in the I^quitable Building, and in the follow- 
ing year he formed a partnership with Seward Davis, 
a Yale classmate, under the firm name of Knox & 
Davis. This partnership expired May i, 1900, and 
he continues the practice of law independently, 
with offices in Nassau street. Mr. Knox is a mem- 
ber of the New York Bar Association, the Yale 



STRONG, Simeon 

Yale B.A. 1756 — Harvard LL.D. 1805. 
Born in Northampton, Mass., 1736; graduated Yale, 
1756 ; studied theology and preached for several years ; 
studied law and admitted to the Bar, 1761 ; representa- 
tive to the General Court, 1767-69; State Senator, 
'793 1 Justice Massachusetts Supreme Court, 1801-05; 
died 1805. 

SIMEON STRONG, Jurist, was born in North- 
ampton, Massachusetts, March 6, 1736. He 
was the younger brother of the Rev. Nehemiah 
Strong, first Professor of Matliematics and Natural 
Philosophy at Yale. Simeon Strong was graduated 
at Yale in 1756, studied theology and jneached for 
a year or two but declined calls to permanent set- 
tlement on account of the unsatisfactory condition 
of his health. For the same reason he finally gave 
up ministerial labors, studied law in Springfield, 
Massachusetts, and was admitted to the Bar in 
I 761. In this profession he soon attained eminence 
and also in public life, being chosen a Representa- 
tive to the General Court in i 767-1769, and to the 
State Senate in 1793. His legal attainments were 
recognized by his appointment to the Supreme 
Bench in 1800, which position he retained to the 
time of his death in Amherst, Massachusetts, De- 
cember 14, 1S05. In that year Harvard conferred 
upon him the degree of Doctor of Laws. 



McMillan, James Howard 

Yale B.A. 1888. 
Born in Detroit, Mich., 1866; educated in Detroit 
public schools and under private tutors ; graduated 
Yale, 1888; studied law for a year at Yale Law School 
and for one year in the office of a law firm ; admitted 
to Michigan Bar, 1890; member of Village Council, 
Grosse Pointe Farms, since organization ; Captain 
and Asst. Quartermaster, U. S. Vols, during Spanish- 
American War; at present practising law in Detroit. 

JAMKS HOWARD McMILLAN, Lawyer, was 
born in Detroit, Michigan, September 19, 
1 866, son of James and Mary Lucy (Wetmore) 
McMillan. His father is the senior LTnited States 
Senator from Michigan. The subject of this sketch 
attended in boyhood the public schools of Detroit, 
and after a preparatory course under the guidance 
of private tutors, entered Yale, graduating with the 
Class of 1888 as Bachelor of .Arts. He spent one 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



65 



year at the Yale Law School and one year in a law 
office, and was admitted to the Michigan JJar in 
March 1890. He practised his profession in De- 
troit until the outbreak of the Spanish-American 
War in 189S, when he was appointed Captain and 
Assistant Quartermaster United States Volunteers. 
He served through the Santiago Campaign and was 
nominated by the President as Major by brevet for 
gallantry and meritorious conduct in the face of the 
enemy at Aguadores. After the proclamation of 
the Peace Protocol, Major McMillan was honorably 
mustered out of service. On October i, 1S99, he 




JAMES H. McMillan 

withdrew from the active practice of the law to 
accept the Vice-Presidency and Treasurership of 
the Detroit & Cleveland Navigation Company. 
He has been a member of the Village Council, 
Grosse Pointe Farms, since its organization, and is 
a member of the Naval and Military Order of the 
Spanish War, Society of the .^rmy of Santiago, the 
University Club of New York, the Army and Navy 
Club of Washington, the Detroit Club ami a niun- 
ber of other organizations ; and while at t'ollege 
became a member of Delta Kappa Epsilon,'H Boi'Xj; 
and Skull and Bones. Mr. McMillan has always 
been a Republican in politics. He married, June 
18, 1S90, Julie V. T,ewis. 'I'hey have two children : 
Gladys V. and James McMillan, 2d. 
VOL. V. — 5 



GOWANS, Theodore Meech 

Yale A.B. 1896. 
Born in Buffalo, N. Y., 1874; graduated Yale, 1896; 
now a student at the Buffalo (N. Y.) Law School, Class 
of igoo. 

THEODORE MEECII GOWANS, Law Stu- 
dent, was born in Buffalo, New York, July 
19, 1S74, son of John and Emily Fitch (Hoyt) 
Gowans. He is of Scotch and English ancestry. 
Having concluded his attendance at the grammar 
and high schools of his native city, he continued 
his studies under a private tutor, who prepared him 
for College, and he took his Bachelor's degree at 
Yale with the Class of i8g6. For two years after 
graduating he was in the employ of Messrs. Gowans 
& Sons, soap manufiicturers, Buffalo, and deciding 
to prepare for the legal profession he joined the 
Class of 1900 at tlie Buffiilo Law School, at the 
same time entering as a student the office of 
Messrs. Moot, Spraguc, Brownell & Marcy. Mr. 
Gowans is a member of Psi L^psilon and I'hi Beta 
Kappa at Yale and of Phi Delta Phi at Piuffalo Law 
School, the University Clubs of Yale and of Buffalo, 
and the Yale Buffalo Club, of which he was Presi- 
dent for the College year of 1 895-1 896. 



LONGENECKER, Ralph 

Yale B.A. 1894. 
Born in Bedford, Pa., 1873 ; educated in Bedford 
public schools and at Blair Presbyterian Academy ; 
graduated Yale, 1894; studied law at Pittsburg Law 
School ; admitted to Allegheny Co. Bar, 1897 ; In- 
structor in Pittsburg Law School since 1898. 

RALPH LONGENECKER, Lawyer, Listructor 
in the Pittsburg Law School, was born in 
Bedford, Pennsylvania, October 6, 1S73, son of 
Jacob H., and Nannie Rebecca (Russell) Longe- 
necker. He was educated in the public schools of 
his native town until thirteen years of age, and after 
a preparatory course at Blair Presbyterian Academy 
of Blairstown, New Jersey, entered the Academic 
Department of Yale, graduating as Bachelor of -Arts 
in 1894. He studied law at the Pittsburg Law 
School and was admitted to tlie liar of .-Mlegheny 
county in March 1897, three months before his 
graduation, which occurred in Jime of that year, 
when he took first honors. In June of the follow- 
ing year Mr. Longenecker was made Instructor in 
the Pittsburg Law School, which position he still 
holds. He is a Republican in politics, is Secretary 
and Treasurer of the University Intension Society 
of Pittsburg, and is a member of the L'niversity 
Club of that city. 



66 



UNIFERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



BAKER, Benjamin May 

Columbia M.D. 18S9. 
Born in Petersburg, Va., 1865; educated at the 
Episcopal High School of Virginia and the University 
of Virginia; M.D. College of Physicians and Surgeons 
of Columbia, i88g ; engaged in the practice of his pro- 
fession in Norfolk since 1890; Physician to Norfolk 
City Prison since 1890. 

B1;NJ.\MIN WAV BAKHR, M.D., Physician, 
was born in Petersburg, Virginia, August 8, 
1865, son of Richard Henry and Nannie May 
Baker. He received his early education in the 
Episcopal High School of Virginia, and afterwards 
took a course in the Academic Department of the 
University of Virginia, graduating in 1886. Decid- 
ing to take up the profession in which he has since 
achieved note, he came to New York and entered 
the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia, 
taking his degree in 1889. He began practice in 
Norfolk, Virginia, in 1890, and has since been en- 
gaged in active professional work there, serving in 
addition to his private practice as physician to the 
Norfolk City Prison. He is a member of the Nor- 
folk Medical Society, the Virginia State Medical 
Society, and the County Club of Norfolk, Mrginia. 
Dr. Baker has always been a firm supporter of the 
doctrines and principles of the Democratic party. 
He married, October 11, 1894, Theodosia P.urr 
Potts. They have two children : Helen May and 
Richard Henry Baker, Jr. 



COMSTOCK, George Foster 

Columbia M.D. 1883. 
Born in Moreau, N. Y., 1861 ; received his early edu- 
cation in public schools ; M.D. Medical Department of 
Columbia, 1883 ; spent some years in hospital work, and 
also took a post-graduate course at Johns Hopkins 
University in 1897; has been engaged in the general 
practice of medicine and surgery in Saratoga Springs 
since 1883; Examining Surgeon in the United States 
Pension Bureau and Secretary of the Board under 
President Harrison's administration. 

GEORCIK FOSTER CO.MSTOCK, M.D., Phy- 
sician, was born in Moreau, Saratoga county. 
New York, January i, 1861, son of Washington and 
Harriet Olivia Carr Comstock. He is descended 
from old New England stock, his ancestors having 
been among the early settlers of Rhode Island. He 
received his early education in the New York public 
schools, and studied medicine at the College of 
Physicians and Surgeons, taking his degree in 1883. 
Since graduation he has spent much time in the 
hospitals of New York City, and in 1897 took a 



post-graduate course at Johns Hopkins University. 
He took up the general practice of medicine and 
surgery in Saratoga Springs, New York, in 1883, 
and in a short time achieved a prominent place 
among the physicians of the town. By hard work 
and study he has made an enviable reputation both 
as physician and surgeon. During the administra- 
tion of President Harrison he was Pension Examin- 
ing Surgeon, and Secretary of the Board. He is a 
member of the United States Medical .Association, 
the New York State Medical Association and the 
Academy of Medicine of New York City. Dr. 




GEO. F. COMSTOCK 

Comstock has never been able to find time among 
his engrossing professional duties to take an active 
part in politics. He married, December 12, 1883, 
Ella Halstead .Andrews. They have one child : 
Carl Rodnev Comstock. 



GERARD, James Watson 

Columbia A.B. 1811, A.M. 1816, LL.D. 1863. 
Born in New York City, 1794; graduated Columbia, 
181 1 ; studied law and practised in New York City until 
1869; volunteer in War of 1812 ; prominent in philan- 
thropic and educational work; A.M. Columbia, 1816; 
LL.D. 1863; died 1874. 

JAMES \V.\TSON (iERARD, LL.D., Lawyer, 
was born in New York City in 1794 and 
graduated at Columbia in 181 1. On the outbreak 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



67 



of the war with Great Britain in 1S12, the year fol- 
lowing his graduation, he enlisted in a volunteer 
company called the Iron Greys, which was raised 
for the defence of New York Harbor, serving until 
the close of hostilities. After the war he studied 
law with George Griffin (Yale 1797) and was ad- 
mitted to the Bar of New York, at which he prac- 
tised until 1S69, attaining a distinguished position. 
Columbia made him a Doctor of Laws in 1S63. 
Early in his career Mr. Gerard became interested in 
philanthropic enterprises. In 1823 he became a 
member of the Society for the Prevention of Pauper- 
ism, and in 1824 procured, in connection with 
others, the incorporation of the House of Refuge 
for Juvenile Delinquents, the plan of which he had 
drawn up and urged upon the public. This was the 
first institution of its kind in the United States. Up 
to this time members of the municipal police force 
wore plain clothing with no distinguishing mark 
except the badge. Mr. Gerard advocated a uni- 
formed police, and by persistent agitation through 
letters in the press and public addresses he suc- 
ceeded in securing the adoption in New York of 
the system which has now become practically uni- 
versal. He was also active in the work of public 
education, serving as Trustee or School Inspector 
during the greater part of the last twenty years of 
his life. Mr. Gerard died in New York City, 
February 7, 1874. 



DIETERICH, Conrad Augustus 

Columbia LL.B. 1892. 
Born in New York City, 1871 ; educated in the New 
York public schools and under private tutors ; graduated 
Columbia Law School, 1892; also studied in various 
law offices, 1888-93 ; admitted to New York State Bar, 
1892 ; has practised as a patent attorney since 1893. 

C()NR.\D AUGUSTUS DIETKRICH, Patent 
.\ttorney in New York City, was born in 
that place August 20, 1S71, son of Gustave and 
Pauline Hagen Dieterich. His father's family hail 
been professional men in Germany for over a cen- 
tury before the grandfather of the subject of this 
sketch came to .\merica. His mother's family set- 
tled in .\merica in 1850. He received his early 
education in the public schools of New York City 
and under private tutors, and entered Columbia Law 
School in 1S89, taking the regular course and a 
special course in i)ublic international law, with a 
view to taking u|) the profession in which he has 
since won distinction. Before beginning the study 



of law he also spent two years in the office of his 
father, an e.xpert patent draughtsman, in order to 
obtain a more perfect knowledge of drawing and 
mechanics. From 1888 to 1893 Mr. Dieterich was 
engaged in work with various prominent patent 
attorneys. He was admitted to the Bar of the 
State of New York in 1892, and thereafter to prac- 
tice in the United States Circuit Court for the 
Northern District of New York. He has been en- 
gaged in practice for himself since February i, 1893. 
Mr. Dietericli has been a member of the Seventh 




C. ArOUSTUS DIF.TF.RICH 



Regiment, National Guard of tlie State of New York, 
since 1893, and the German Liederkranz of New 
York City. 



GILCHRIST, Charles Alexander 

Columbia M.D. l8g2. 
Born in West Charlton, N. Y., 1867; educated at 
public schools and at Newark (Del.) Academy; A.B., 
Lafayette College, 1889; A.M. 1892; M.D. Columbia, 
1892 ; House Physician and Surgeon, Christ Hospital, 
Jersey City, 1892-93 ; in private practice in Hoboken, 
N. J., since that time, and holds a number of important 
hospital appointments. 

GH.\RLES AI,1;XAND1:R GILCHRIST, 
M.D., Physician and Surgeon, was born in 
W est Charlton, Saratoga county. New York, August 



68 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



II, 1S67, the son of James Bell Gilchrist and Anna 
McKinley Donnan, both of Scotch ancestry. He 
received his early education in the public schools 
of Milford, Delaware, and afterwards attended the 
Academy at Newark in the same state, entering 
Lafayette College in 1S.S5. There he took the 
Classical course, and graduated with the degree 
of Bachelor of Arts in 18.S9. He immediately 
began the study of medicine in the Medical De- 
partment of Columbia, graduating in 1892 and 
receiving at the same time the degree of Master of 
Arts from I^afayette. During the ensuing year Dr. 




ClIAS. A. (;II.(11KIST 

Cilchrist was engaged in hospital service as House 
Physician and Surgeon in Christ Hospital, Jersey 
City, and since October 1893, has been engaged in 
private practice in Hoboken. Since 1894 he has 
been Visiting Physician to the Old Ladies Home 
and the Memorial Day Nursery, and Assistant Sur- 
geon to St. Mary's Hospital, and since 1896 Ortho- 
pedic .Surgeon in the Out- Patient Department of 
Christ Hospital, Jersey City. He is a member of 
the Hudson County Medical Society, the Practi- 
tioners Club of Jersey City and the Columbia Club 
of Hoboken, and is a Republican in politics. Dr. 
Gilchrist married, .August 22, 1S94, Margaret Louisa 
Bannister. They have two children : Ciiarles Douglas 
and Dorothy Margaret Gilchrist. 



MOORE, David 

Columbia A.B. 1806. 
Born in New York City, 1787; graduated Columbia, 
1806 ; studied theology ar.d ordained, 1808 ; Rector of 
St. Andrew's, Staten Island, 1809-56; D.D. Union 
Col., 1841 ; died 1856. 

DAVID MOORE, D.D., Clergyman, was born 
in New York City, June 3, 1787. He was a 
direct descendant of Sir John Moore, knighted by 
Charles H. in 1627, whose son. Sir Francis Moore 
was the father of John Moore, one of the settlers of 
South Carolina about 1680. John Moore subse- 
quently removed to Pennsylvania and became one 
of the most prominent lawyers of the Colony and a 
member of tlie judiciary. The father of David 
Moore was the Rt. Rev. Richard Channing Moore, 
D.D., Protestant Episcopal Bishop of Virginia from 
1814 to 1841, one of the most distinguished divines 
of his day. David was graduated at Columbia in 
1806, studied theology and was ordained to the 
ministry of the Protestant Episcopal Church in 
May 1808. His father at that time was Rector of 
the Church of St. Andrew's, at Richmond, Staten 
Island, New York, where he had been for twenty- 
one years, and in 1809, when he accepted the Rec- 
torship of St. Stephen's, in New York City, the son 
was called to succeed him in the place thus left 
vacant. .As Rector of St. Andrew's, Dr. Moore con- 
tinued for the rest of his life. He received the 
degree of Doctor of Divinity from Union College in 
1 84 1, and died at his residence on Staten Island, 
September 30, 1856. 



LA FETRA, Linnaeus Edford 

Columbia M.D 1894. 
Born in Washington, D. C, 1868; educated in Wash- 
ington public schools and high school, and Columbian 
University; A.B. Wesleyan University, 1891 ; M.D., 
College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia, 
1894 ; House Surgeon, New York Hospital, 1895-96 ; 
Sloane Maternity Hospital, 1896; Nursery & Children's 
Hospital, 1897 ; Lecturer on Diseases of Children, New 
Polyclinic, 1897 ; Asst. Physician, Infants Hospital, 
Randall's Island, 1898 ; Medical Inspector of Schools, 
1898 ; Lecturer on Physiological Pedagogics, N. Y., 
University School of Pedagogy, 1899. 

LINN.^iUS EDFORD LA FETRA, M.D., Phy- 
sician and Surgeon, was born in Washington, 
District of Columbia, October 12, 1S68, the son of 
George H. and Sarah (Doan) La Fetra. On his 
father's side he is of Huguenot and Dutch descent, 
going back to the French Colonists that settled in 
New Jersey in 1647, and to Annetje Jans of New 
Amsterdam. On the maternal side, he is of Eug- 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



69 



lish stock, his grandmother being Mary Custis of 
the famous Virginia feimily. He received his early 
education in the public and high schools of Wash- 
ington and in the Columbian University, and grad- 
uated from Wesleyan University with the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts in 1891. He was the first Seney 
scholar for the College course, taking prizes aggre- 
gating i?700 with special honors in biology, and 
became a member of Psi Upsilon and Phi IJeta 
Kappa. Dr. La F(5tra received his medical training 
at the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Co- 
lumbia, graduating in 1894 with highest rank for the 




LINN^US EDFORD LA F^TRA 

course and with the first Harsen prize of ^500 on 
competitive examination. He was House Surgeon 
at the New York Hospital during 1895-1896, at the 
Sloane Maternity Hospital during 1S96 and at the 
Nursery and Children's Hospital during 1S97, begin- 
ning private practice in October of that year. He 
has been a Lecturer on Diseases of Children in the 
New York Polyclinic since 1897, and was Assistant 
Physician to the Infant's Hospital on Randall's 
Island during 1898. He was also appointed Med- 
ical Inspector in the New York City schools during 
1898 and Lecturer on Physiological Pedagogics in 
the New York University School of Pedagogy in 
1S99. He is a fellow of the New York Academy 
of Medicine, and a member of the New York County 



Medical Society, of the Society of the Alumni of the 
New York Hospital, and of the Society of the Alumni 
of the Sloane Maternity Hospital. He belongs also 
to the Psi Upsilon Club of New York. Dr. La 
F(5tra married, June 8, 1S99, Annie Edith, daughter 
of Charles Parsons of Toronto, Canada. 



VAN SICLEN, George West 

Columbia LL.B. 1867. 
Born in Hudson, Columbia Co., N. Y., 1840; educated 
in New York City public schools; B.S., College of the 
City of New York, 1857; M.S., i860; taught school for 
some years and also practised as Civil Engineer; 
LL.B., Columbia Law School, 1867, and admitted to 
Bar; originator, founder and first Secretary of the 
Title Guarantee & Trust Co., of New York City, 1883 ; 
School Trustee for a number of years ; Lecturer on 
Law, University Extension, University of the State of 
New York, 1898; author of several works on legal and 
other subjects; Law Editor of the Real Estate Record 
and Guide, i88o-gi. 

Gl':ORGI': WEST VAN SICLEN, Lawyer, was 
born in Hudson, Columbia county, New 
York, August 13, 1840, son of Mathew and I'^llen 
(Clark West) Van Siclen. George West Van Siclen's 
family were living in Ghent, Pielgium, in 1338 and 
prior thereto, and often served as echevins, or 
members of the city council. The house of the 
Van Siclen family which was standing there in 1338 
known as " De Groote Zickele," is standing there 
to-day. George Van Siclen was Abbot of St. llavon 
in 1405. The fomily was prominent in the Low 
Countries for several hundred years. Anthony Van 
Sicklen signed the Pacification of Ghent in 1576, in 
behalf of Zeeland. Ferdinand, the first representa- 
tive in .'\merica, came to Gravesend, Long Island, 
and in 1642 married Eve, daughter of Anthony van 
Fez, who received a grant of land near Bensonhurst, 
Long Island, in 1639. On his mother's side Mr. 
Van Siclen also comes of old New England Colonial 
flimilies (Clark, Younglove, West, Swain, Coffin). 
He received his early education in New York City 
Grammar Schools and graduated from the College 
of the City of New ^ork with the degree of 
Bachelor of Science in 1857, taking his Master's 
Degree in i860. He had begun practice as a civil 
engineer, but the business crash of 1857 sent him 
to teaching, and he taught ten years in the New 
York City schools, studying law while teaching. 
He was graduated from Columbia Law .School with 
the degree of Bachelor of Laws in 1S67 and admitted 
to the New \'c)rk Bar in the same year. In 1883 
Mr. Van Siclen was the originator, founder and first 



■JO 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



Secretar)' of the Title Guarantee & Trust Company 
of New York, the first, and now tlie largest corpora- 
tion of its kind in the world. Another idea of his 
was the formation of the Holland Society of New 
York in 1S85, of which lie was for six years Secre- 
tary : and in 18.S8 he originated, founded, and was for 
the first three successful years of its business career 
Secretary of the Holland Trust Comjjany of New 
York. He has a large practice at the Bar, especially 
in real estate and cori)oration law, and in 1898 was 
appointed Lecturer on Law in University Extension 
work in the University of the State of New York. 




GEO. W. VAN SICLEN 

He also served for ten years as Chairman of School 
Trustees of the Sixteenth Ward of New York. He 
is the author of Guide to Buyers and Sellers of Real 
Estate ; Notes of the Real Property Law of New 
York ; The Negotiable Instruments Law of New 
York ; Bearing of the Charter of Greater New York 
u])on Real Estate Interests ; Year Book of the Hol- 
land Society, and a number of other notable works. 
Mr. Van Siclen is a consistent Republican in politics, 
but has always declined public office. He was 
President of the Manhattan Union Club in the 
campaign of 1864, and is now a member of the 
order of Founders and Patriots, Sons of the .Ameri- 
can Revolution, .American Historical Society, Hol- 
land Society, Twilight Club, 3 October Vereeneging 



to Leiden, Holland, Nederlandsche Setterkunderg, 
Zeeurvsche Genootschaf der Weteisschappen to 
Middelburg, and others. He married, May 15, 
1862, Sarah Jane Gregory, who died June 18, 189S. 
The surviving children are : Arthur and Matthtw 
Van Siclen. 



LISPENARD, Leonard 

Columbia A.B. 1762. 
Born in New York City, 1743; graduated Columbia, 
1762; Delegate to Provincial Congress of N. Y., 1775; 
Regent of Columbia, 1784-87; Trustee, 1787-90; died 
1790. 

LEONARD LISPENARD, Merchant, was born 
in New York City in 1743, the son of 
Leonard and Alice ( Rutgers) Lispenard. He was 
the descendant of Anthony Lispenard, a Huguenot 
refugee who came to New York about the middle 
of the seventeenth century. His father, who was 
active in the organized movements for indepen- 
dence, was one of the (Governors of King's College 
(now Columbia) under the Royal Charter of 1754, 
an<l was Treasurer of the College from 1775 to 
1784. His mother was the daughter of Anthony 
Rutgers and inherited one-third of the extensive 
grant made by George II. to her father, which 
formed a part of the noted Lispenard estate. Leo- 
nard Lispenard, the son, was graduated at Columbia 
in 1762, and turned his attention to commerce and 
the care of his estates. Like his father he inter- 
ested himself in the stirring public affairs of that 
day and was sent as a Delegate to the first Provin- 
cial C(;ngress in 1775. ''^'s° '"^^ ^^^ father he gave 
his services freely to Columbia, taking office as one 
of the Regents of the University named in the .Act 
of 1784 and serving in that capacity until 1787, 
when he was made a Trustee and occupied a seat 
on tiiat Board until his death, which occurred in 
1790. 



ROSENTHAL, Alexander 

Columbia LL.B. i88g. 
Born in Williamsburgh, N. Y., 1865 ; educated in pub- 
lic schools and at the College of the City of New York ; 
LL.B. Columbia Law School, 1889 ; since graduation 
has practised law in association with Morris H. Hay- 
man in New York City, having been counsel in many 
important and interesting cases. 

ALEXANDER ROSENTHAL, Lawyer, was 
born in what is now the Borough of Brook- 
lyn, New York City, November 3, 1865, son of 
William S. and Bertha Lazarus Rosenthal, who came 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



71 



from Germany to America about i860. He was 
educated in New York City Public Schools and at 
tlie College of the City of New York, and after 
graduation from the latter institution spent several 
years in business with various wholesale houses. 
He entered Columbia Law School in 1887, and 
served a clerkship in the office of Samuel \\. Weiss. 
He graduated from Columbia with the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws in 18S9, was admitted to the New 
York Bar the same year, and immediately began the 
practice of his profession with Morris H. Hayman, 
which partnership still continues. The firm has 




ALEX. ROSENTHAL 

been counsel in many important cases, both civil 
and criminal, and represents numerous important 
commercial houses, real estate concerns and corpo- 
rations. Mr. Rosenthal was furthermore counsel in 
the Lowitz murder trial, in the Kramer Election 
case, in the Ganns Forgery case, and in numerous 
other civil and criminal cases of importance at that 
time. He was chielly instrumental in securing the 
passage of the bill (Chap. 165, Laws of New York 
189S) making mandatory the registration of attorneys 
in New York State and preventing unauthorized per- 
sons from practising law, and was tlic author of the 
principal part thereof. He is a stanch Democrat in 
politics and has served as delegate to a number of 
conventions and at the Syracuse Convention of 



1897 was one of the State Committee on Resolu- 
tions. He is also at present one of the Commis- 
sioners of Street Openings in New York City. He 
is a member of the Knights of Pythias, Free Masons, 
Odd F"ellows, and other fraternal societies. He 
married June 17, 1891, Regina Hast. They have 
one child : William J. Rosenthal. 



WILKINS, Isaac 

Columbia A.B. 1760, S.T.D. 1811. 
Born in Jamaica, W. I., 1742; graduated Columbia, 
1760; member of Colonial Legislature of New York, 
1772-75 ; compelled to leave the country as a Tory. 
1775; resident of Nova Scotia, 1784-94; returned to 
New York 1794, and became an Episcopal clergyman; 
S.T.D. Columbia, 1811 ; died 1830. 

IS.AAC WILKINS, S.T.D., Clergyman, was born 
in W ithywood, Jamaica, West Indies, Decem- 
ber 17, 1742, the son of Martin Wilkins, a resident 
of that island and a member of its judiciary. The 
son was brought to New York at an early age for 
his education, and was graduated at Columbia in 
1760, soon taking an active part in public affairs 
and being chosen in 1772 to represent the Borough 
of Westchester in the Colonial Legislature of New 
York. Owing to his pronounced loyalty to Great 
Britain in the conflict which was rapidly approach- 
ing a crisis at that time, his political career was 
short. He made himself peculiarly offensive as a 
Tory by the vivacity of his political pamphlets, and 
in 1775 he was warned by the Sons of Liberty to 
leave the country. The British Government re- 
warded his loyalty by the grant of a life annuity, 
and after a short absence he returned to New York 
and resided quietly on Long Island until the war 
was over. Subsequently, in 1784, he went to Nova 
Scotia, where he bought a farm, married a daughter 
of Louis Morris and took an active part in jiolitical 
affairs, remaining there ten years. Both his son 
and his granilson. each bearing the name of Louis 
Morris Wilkins, attained seats on the Supreme 
Bench of that province. Mr. AN'ilkins returned 
finally to New Vork in 1 794, studied theology 
and was ordained to the ministry of the Protestant 
Episcopal Church in Westchester, New York, as 
Deacon in 1798 and Priest in 1801, the officiating 
Bishop being the Rt. Rev. Dr. Samuel Provost 
(Colimibia 1758). He continued in the ministry 
until his death in Westchester, February 5, 1S30, 
having received from Columbia in 181 1 the degree 
of Doctor of Divinity. 



72 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



BRIDGHAM, Charles Burr 

Harvard Medical School, 1862-1863. 
Born in Buckfield, Me., 1841 ; educated at public 
schools; studied medicine with preceptor at Buckfield, 
and at Harvard Medical School, 1862-63 ; Asst. -Sur- 
geon, U. S. V. in Civil War; M.D. Bowdoin Medical 
Coll., 1863; practising physician in Buckfield and 
Livermore, Me., 1864-87; in Cohasset, Mass., since 
1887. 

CHARLES BURR HRinCH.AM, M.D., Physi- 
cian, was born in Uuckfield, Oxford count)', 
Maine, May i, 1S41, the son of Sydenham and 
Lucretia (Shepard) Bridgham. He comes of pro- 
fessional ancestry, being a great-grandson of Dr. 




CH.\KLE-S H. liKllHlHAM 

William Bridgham, a surgeon in the Revolutionary 
army, and grandson of Dr. William Bridgham, Jr., 
who practised medicine in Buckfield for more than 
sixty years. Dr. William Pinkney Bridgham, son of 
Dr. William Bridgham, Jr., an uncle of the subject 
of this sketch, was a graduate of the Bowdoin Med- 
ical School at Brunswick, Maine, in 1S44, and is 
still practising medicine in Buckfield at the age of 
eighty-four years. Charles B. Bridgham received 
his early education in the public schools of his 
native town, and after studying medicine under the 
instruction of his uncle, Dr. W. P. Bridgham, in 
Buckfield, pursued his professional training at the 
Medical School of Har\'ard. Before completing 
his course there, the Civil War broke out, and 



he offered his services to the Government, enter- 
ing the United States ser\'ice as Hospital Steward 
in the Second Regiment of Berdan Sharpshooters. 
Subsequently he became acting .Assistant-Surgeon of 
that regiment, and while serving in that capacity at 
the second battle of Bull Run was taken prisoner. 
He was paroled, and returning home resumed his 
studies in medicine and was graduated at the Bow- 
doin Medical College in the Class of 1863. .About 
that time he was exchanged and consequently 
released from his parole, and at once re-entered the 
army, receiving a commission as .\ssistant-Surgeon 
in the Fifty-Fourth Massachusetts Regiment. He 
resumed active duty and remained in the service 
until July 1864, when he was compelled to resign 
because of disability and returned to Maine to enter 
upon practice in his native town. In the fall of 
1868 he removed to Brettun's Mills, Livermore, 
Maine, where he practised for ten years, until 1878, 
when he returned to Buckfield and resumed practice 
in that town. In the spring of 1S87 he removed to 
Cohasset, Massachusetts, where he has since prac- 
tised and resided. Dr. Bridgham is a member of 
the Massachusetts Medical Society and of the Amer- 
ican Medical Association, and is Surgeon of Henry 
Bryant Post, Grand .Army of the Republic. He is 
also a member of the Masonic, Odd Fellows and 
Golden Cross Fraternities. In politics he is a 
Democrat. He married, March 22, 1864, Addie 
^\"illiams of Buckfield, and has three children : 
Mary Frances, wife of H. T. P. Bates of the Boston 
Herald, .Addie Ellen, wife of H. H. Withington of 
the Boston Journal, and Paul C. Bridgham, a student 
in the Harvard Medical School. 



LEA, Arthur Henry 

Harvard A.B. i88o. 
Born in Philadelphia, Pa., 1859; educated at private 
schools in Philadelphia ; prepared for College at St. 
Mark's School, Southboro, Mass. ; graduated Harvard, 
1880; student in Jefferson Medical College, 1880-81; 
clerk in Henry C. Lea's Son & Co., medical publishers, 
Philadelphia, 1880-85 ; and member of firm of Lea Bros. 
& Co., since 1885. 

ARTHUR HENRY LEA, Publisher, was born 
in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, September 
'7; 1859, the son of Henry Charles and Anna Car- 
oline f Jaudon) Lea. He is a descendant of John 
Lea, the founder of the .American branch of the 
family, who emigrated from England in 1699. 
His early education was received in Philadelphia 
private schools and he was prepared for College at 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



73 



St. Mark's School, Southboro, Massachusetts, from 
which he went to Harvard, entering and graduating 
with the Class of 1880. The greater part of the 
ensuing year was devoted to study at the Jefferson 
Medical College, Philadelphia, for the special pur- 
pose of preparing himself for the medical publishing 
business with which the Leas of that city have so 
long been identified. He was in 1S85 admitted 
to partnership under the firm name of Lea Brothers 
& Company. Mr. Lea is a member of the Ameri- 
can Academy of Political and Social Science, the 
Franklin Institute and the Zoological Society. He 
is one of the Board of Managers of the Trades 
League, a charter member of the Philadelphia 
Bourse, and a Trustee of the First Unitarian 
Church, and also holds membership in the Ritten- 
house and Unitarian clubs and the Germantown 
and Philadelphia Cricket clubs. Politically he is 
independent, and from 1888 to 1898 he served 
upon the Executive Committee of the Citizen's 
Municipal Association. March 2, 1897 he married 
Caroline Tyler Brown. 



HOLT, Daniel Burton 

Harvard A.B. l8go. 
Born in Woodsville, N. H., 1866; educated in public 
schools in Woodsville, at Plainfield, Vt., and at Metho- 
dist Seminary in Montpelier; prepared for College at 
Academy in St. Johnsbury, Vt. ; graduated Harvard, 
1890; bank clerk at Wells River, Vt., i8go-gi ; Mana- 
ger Red River Valley Banking Co., Fargo, N. D., 1893- 
99, and Treas. since 1899; Vice-President Moorhead 
National Bank, 1895 ; Receiver National Bank of North 
Dakota since 1897; U. S. Commissioner, 1897-98; 
Referee in Bankruptcy since 1898; was Treasurer, now 
Secretary, Democratic State Central Committee, and 
as Secretary of the E.xecutive Committee had charge of 
the State campaign of 1884; admitted to No. Dakota 
Bar, 1899, and member of law firm of Benton & Lovell, 
in Fargo. 

DANIEL BURTON HOLT, Lawyer, was born 
in Woodsville, New Hampshire, October 
21, 1866, the son of Henry and Hannah (Wood- 
man) Holt. His paternal ancestors were originally 
from England and his maternal grandmother was 
descended from the ancient Wallace family of Scot- 
land. H.aving acquired rudimentary instruction in 
his native village, and in Plainfield, Vermont, he 
advanced by attending the Montpelier Methodist 
Seminary and the St. Johnsbury Academy, from 
which latter he entered Harvard with the Class of 
1890, graduating with the degree of Bachelor of 
.Arts at the conclusion of the regular Academic 
course. Immediately after leaving College he ac- 



cepted a clerkship in the Newbury National IJank, 
Wells River, Vermont, where he remained about a 
year, at the expiration of which time he entered the 
employ of the Red River Valley Banking Company 
of Fargo, North Dakota, as a bookkeeper, and 
June I, 1892, became Secretary of that corporation. 
A year later he was again promoted, receiving the 
appointment of Manager, and as such conducted 
the affairs of that concern continuously to May i, 
1899, when he resigned and was elected Treasurer 
of the company. In 1895 he was Vice President 
of the Moorhead National Bank, was in 1897 ap- 




D-iVNIEL B. HOLT 

pointed Receiver of the National Bank of North 
Dakota, and is still performing the duties incum- 
bent upon that trust. For some time he devoted 
his leisure hours to the study of law and w-as ad- 
mitted to the Bar of North Dakota in September 
1899, becoming a member of the law firm of 
Benton & Lovell. in Fargo. ICarly in 1897 he was 
ap])ointed United States Commissioner but resigned 
that office in July of the following year and was 
subsequently selected by Judge .\midon of the 
Federal Court as Referee in Bankruptcy for the 
Southern Jurisdiction of North Dakota. In politics 
Mr. Holt is a Democrat and was formerly a leading 
member of the party organization in his State, 
having served as Secretary and 'IVeasurer of the 



74 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



State Central Committee and Secretary of its Exe- 
cutive body, by virtue of wiiich latter office he had 
charge of the state campaign of 1894 ; but as he is 
a firm supporter of the gold standard he withdrew 
from political activity after the adoption of the 
Chicago Platform of 1896. He is a Past Chan- 
cellor of Fargo l-odge, Knights of Pythias, and at 
the present time is occupying the Chair of Grand 
Prelate in the Grand Lodge of Dakota. June 7, 
1S94, he married Annie Stephens, and has one son : 
Harold Stephens Holt, born January 17, 1897. 



LAPEYRE, George Fortune 

Harvard A.B. 1886 Columbia LL.B. 1889. 
Born in New Orleans, La., 1864 ; educated in private 
schools in New Orleans ; graduated Spring Hill Col- 
lege, Mobile, Alabama, 1882; A.B. Harvard, 1886; 
studied at Harvard Law School and at Columbia Law 
School, receiving degree of LL B. from the latter in 
18S9; has spent much time in travel. 

Gr.ORGK FORTUNE h.VPEVRE, Lawyer, 
was born in New Orleans, Louisiana, Octo- 
ber 1 8, 1864. His mother, .\ngeline Avegno, was 
of Italian-French ancestry, and his father, Jean 
Martial Lapeyre, was a native of Ascain, in the 
I^wer Pyrenees, France, who came to .America in 
1831 and setded in New Orleans in 1835, engaging 
in the brokerage and banking business. When 
New Orleans fell into the hands of the Federals in 
1862, he was President of the Louisiana State Bank, 
and was one of the committee appointed to confer 
with General Benjamin I". Butler in reference to 
the banking interests of the city. The subject of 
this sketch received his early education in private 
schools in New Orleans, among them the Jesuit 
College there. In 1882 he took the degree of 
Bachelor of .Arts at Spring Hill College, Mobile, 
Alabama, also a Jesuit institution, and later, after 
an attendance of two terms at Harvard, received 
the degree of Bachelor of .Arts from that Universit)'. 
He subsequently studied law at the Har\ard Law 
School for two terms, and completed his course 
at Columbia Law School, receiving the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws in 1889. He married, .\pril 23, 
1890, Jeannette Waugh of New Orleans. They 
have no children. Mr. Lapeyre is passionately 
fond of travel, and he has indulged this desire to 
a considerable extent, having visited all sections 
of the United States and the republics south of it, 
together with the greater part of Europe and the 
Orient. He is a member of the Boston Club of 
New Orleans. 



POTTER, Henry Codman 

Harvard S.T.D. 1890. 
Born in Schenectady, N. Y., 1835, educated at the 
Episcopal Academy in Philadelphia; graduated Theo- 
logical Seminary of Virginia, 1857 ; served in the min- 
istry at Greensburgh, Pa., Troy, N. Y., and Boston, 
Mass., 1857-68; Rector of Grace Church, New York 
City, 1868-84; Asst. Bishop of New York, 1883-1E87, 
and Bishop since 1887; received degree of A.M. (Hon.) 
from Union, 1863; S.T.D. from Theological Seminary 
of Virginia, 1857, Union 1865, Trinity 1884, Harvard 1890, 
Oxford 1892; LL.D. from Union 1877, Cambridge 1888; 
D.C.L. from Bishop's College, Canada. 1894 ; Trustee 
of Columbia since 1887. 

HENRV CODMAN POITER, S.T.D., LL.D., 
D.C.L., Protestant Episcopal Bishop of 
New York, was born in Schenectady, New York, 




HEXRY C. POITER 

RLny 25, 1835. His family, which has produced 
many members distinguished in the church, in the 
higher education, in literature, and in public life, is 
of Rhode Island Quaker extraction, his grandfather, 
Joseph Potter, a farmer, removing from Cranston in 
that state to Dutchess county, New York, in the 
latter part of the last century. His father, the Rt. 
Rev. .Monso Potter, D.D., LL.D. was Bishop of 
Pennsylvania, 1 845-1 S65. Henry C. Potter re- 
ceived his education at the Episcopal .Academy 
in Philadelphia and was graduated at the Theo- 
logical Seminary of Virginia in 1857, entering at 
once upon the work of the ministry. He was Rec- 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



7S 



tor of Christ Church, Greensburgh, Pennsylvania, 
1857-1859, of St. John's, Troy, New York, 1859- 
1866, and Assistant Minister of Trinity Church, 
Boston, Massachusetts, 1 866-1 868, when he was 
called to the Rectorship of Grace Church, New 
York City, remaining in that charge until his elec- 
tion to the Bishopric. In 1863 he was elected 
President of Kenyon College, Ohio, and in 1875 
he was chosen I'jishop of Iowa, declining both 
offices, but in 1SS3, when his uncle, Bishop Hor- 
atio Potter of New York asked for an Assistant, he 
accepted the unanimous election by the convention 
of that year and was consecrated October 20, 1883, 
at Grace Church, New York. Dr. Potter was for- 
mally placed in charge of the work of the diocese at 
that time, and on the death of his uncle four years 
later he was made his successor. He has received 
the highest Academic degrees from Universities in 
this country and from O.xford and Cambridge in 
England, and has been a member of the Board of 
Trustees of Columbia since 18S7. 



MARTIN, Wisner Bell 

Harvard SB. 1890. 
Born in Virginia, Nev., i858; educated at Massachu- 
setts Institute of Technology and Lawrence Scientific 
School, Harvard ; engaged in private practice as civil 
engineer and surveyor at Woodbridge, N. J., 1890-gi ; 
transitman, Corps of Engineers, U. S. A., i8gi ; rod- 
man, Engineering Corps Pa. R.R., 1891-92; Engineer 
in charge of Construction Pa. R.R., 1892-94; Division 
Engineer Metropolitan Street Railway, 1894-95 ; Assis- 
tant General-Inspector. Department of Public Works, 
New York, 1895-96 ; Asst. Water Purveyor, Depart- 
ment of Public Works, 1896-97; Engineer, Department 
of Highways, since 1897, and Acting Chief Engineer, 
i8g8-gg. 

WISNER BELL MARTIN, Engineer, De- 
partment of Highways of The City of 
New York, was born in Virginia, Nevada, December 
17, 1868, and is the son of James Parmenter and 
Holdena White (Bell) Martin. He is descended 
from John Martin who came from Devonshire, 
England, to the plantation of Dover on the Piscata- 
qua River in that part of the Massachusetts Bay 
Colony which is now New Hampshire, in 1634, 
under the patronage of Gorges and Mason of the 
Plymouth Colony. John Martin, later, in 1668, 
went from Dover to Woodbridge township, in New 
Jersey, where he received a large share of land and 
became one of the most prominent men in the 
settlement. Mr. Martin's grandmother on his 
father's side was .^nne Elizabeth Parmenter, 



daughter of James Parmenter and Maria Haskell 
Thayer, respectively of Cambridge and Boston, 
Massachusetts. On his mother's side he is de- 
scended from Captain James Avery of New Lon- 
don, Connecticut, commander of the allied forces in 
King Philip's War, and from John Humfrey, Dep- 
uty Governor of the Massachusetts Bay Company 
ancl first Major-General of the Colony, who married 
the daughter of the Earl of Lincoln. Five of iiis 
ancestors fought in the Revolution and one was a 
Captain in the Navy in the War of 1812. His 
grandfather was Chaplain in the Army during the 




WISNER p. MARTIN 

Civil War. His grandf.ithcr, William Mulford 
Martin, was a student for two years at Princeton 
and subsequently at New York University, grailuat- 
ing at the latter in 1837 and also at L'nion Theo- 
logical Seminary. James Parmenter Martin, the 
father of Wisner, entered Yale in 1861 but left his 
studies to go to the war. His uncle, the Rev. 
William \\'isner Martin, was S.ilutatorian in the Yale 
Class of i860, of which William Walter Phelps was 
Valedictorian. Wisner Bell Martin was educated at 
Charlier Institute, New York City, and the I,incoln 
Grammar School and Boys' High School, San Fran- 
cisco. For a year Mr. Martin was Engineer's as- 
sistant in the Bridge Department of the Risdon 
Iron Works, San Francisco, gaining a practical 



76 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



knowledge of mechanical engineering and at the 
same time preparing for College by home study. 
He then came to Boston to take a civil engineering 
course in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
and later at Harvard, entering the Lawrence Scien- 
tific School in 1887 and graduating there in 1S90 
with high standing in engineering and mathematics. 
In College Mr. Martin was a member of the Pi Eta 
Society and had the leading part in the Senior Fare- 
well Theatricals. After some time spent abroad in 
the study of engineering works in Great Britain and 
on the Continent, he returned to the United States 
and engaged in private practice as civil engineer 
and surx-eyor in Woodbridge, New Jersey, and was 
also Iransitman in the Corps of Engineers, United 
States .Army on surveys, soundings and current work. 
In 1 89 1 he was appointed rodmanon the Engineer- 
ing Corps of the Pennsylvania Railroad, obtaining a 
valuable experience in the design and construction 
of tracks, wharf, ferry-slips, and bridges, and a year 
later was promoted to be Assistant Engineer. .'\s 
such he was in charge of the construction of the 
bridge over the Hackensack River, a work which 
occupied eighteen months ; and of the South .Amboy 
coal-storage plant, ninety thousand tons capacity, 
which occupied one year. During the year 1894- 
1895 Mr. Martin was Division Engineer of the 
Metropolitan Street Railway Company, New York 
City, and in charge of the Twenty-fifth Street Power 
Station and plant under Chief Engineer McNulty. 
This station and the power plant cost §1,250,000. 
After a competitive civil service examination he was 
appointed in 1895 .Assistant General-Inspector in the 
Department of Public Works, but resigned in a few 
months in order to go into private practice as Con- 
sulting Engineer. In the latter capacity he was 
engaged among other works, in the following : 
water supply for the Erie Railroad, Jersey City, 
as Consulting Engineer, for the Hydraulic Construc- 
tion Company, as Consulting Engineer on various 
contracts for tall building foundations. Engineer for 
the Mining & Dredging Power Company, Consult- 
ing Engineer to the President of the Union & 
Middlesex Electric Street Railway on the construc- 
tion of that road in New Jerse)', Consulting Engi- 
neer to G. F. Swift Construction Company for laying 
mains under the East River, etc. In August 1896, 
Mr. Martin was reappointed, as Assistant Water 
Purveyor, in the Public Works department and had 
charge of all new pavement construction. He was 
also Assistant Engineer to the Water Purveyor in 
charge of the draughting room and the entire engi- 



neering force and held that office until the following 
.April, when he was promoted to be General-Inspec- 
tor in the same department. The title of the office 
was afterwards changed to that of Engineer, he 
having charge of the Office of Subsurface Construc- 
tion. This position Mr. Martin now holds, but from 
October 1898 to February 1899 he was Acting Chief 
Engineer of the Department of Highways in charge 
of regulating, grading and paving. As Engineer, he 
has entire control and supervision of the location, 
design, construction and maintenance of all railways 
in the Greater New York, including elevated rail- 
ways, electric trolley and conduit electric street 
railways and steam railroads and as an expert in 
these subjects his counsel and advice, as consulting 
engineer, are in frequent demand as well as upon 
the general subject of rapid transit facilities for 
large cities. Mr. Martin also has control and 
supervision of the laying and maintaining in the 
highways of electrical cable ducts for all purposes 
and of pneumatic, gas, steam and other pipe lines. 
He is also well known as a member of the .Ameri- 
can Society of Civil Engineers, the Engineers' Club 
and the Harvard Club. Mr. Martin married, June 
6, 1894, Grace, daughter of Robert Moore, of 
New York, and has one child : Dorothy Bell, born 
May 31, 1 89 7. He is a member of the Presbyterian 
Church. 



FOSS, George Edmund 

Harvard A.B. 1885. 
Born in Berkshire, Vt., 1863; educated St. Albans 
(Vt.l Academy, Franklin Co. (Vt.) Grammar School; 
graduated Harvard, 1885; student at Columbia, 1887; 
LL.B. Northwestern University, 1889; admitted to 
Bar and began practice of law in Chicago same year ; 
one of the founders of the Lincoln Club, Chicago ; 
member of Congress since 1895. 

GEORGE EDMUND FOSS, Member of Con- 
gress, was born in Berkshire, Franklin 
county, Vermont, July 2, 1863. Courses at the 
St. Albans Academy and the Franklin County (Ver- 
mont) Grammar School prepared him for Han-ard, 
from which he was graduated with the Class of 1 885 . 
During his College course he gave his particular 
attention to American History and Political Econ- 
omy, also studying carefully the principles of Roman 
Law and English Jurisprudence, and was active in 
the debating societies and oratorical contests. Hav- 
ing devoted two years to the study of law at St. 
Albans, Vermont, under the direction of Guy C. Noble 
and Edward C. Smith, the latter of whom afterward 



UNIVERSmES AND THEIR SONS 



77 



became Governor of that state, he continued his 
studies at the Columbia La\y School and also en- 
tered the School of Political Science connected with 
that University with the intention of obtaining the 
degree of Doctor of Philosophy. Failing health, 
resulting from overwork, caused him to suspend his 
studies the following winter, and after a rest of 
several months' duration he resumed his legal pre- 
parations in the Law Department of the North- 
western University, where he took the Junior and 
Senior courses in one year and received the degree 
of Bachelor of Laws in 1889. A legal thesis gained 
for him honorable mention at commencement, and 
he also secured the prize as the best orator of his 
class. Some three months prior to his graduation 
he was admitted to the Bar, and establishing him- 
self permanently in Chicago, he entered upon the 
.practice of his profession with an activity entirely 
characteristic of his personal temperament. On 
May 31, 1887, Mr. Foss appeared for the first time 
as a public speaker, delivering the Memorial Day 
address in Berkshire, his native town. His active 
interest in politics dates from the establishment of 
that well-known Chicago Republican organization of 
the West Side, the Lincoln Club, of which he was one 
of the founders. In August 1894 he was nominated 
by the Republicans of the seventh Illinois District 
for the National House of Representatives, and 
elected in November of that year by a majority of 
eight thousand votes. In the Fifty-fourth Congress 
he was assigned by Speaker Reed to the Com- 
mittee on Naval Affairs. As a supporter of William 
McKinley for the Presidency, he delivered many 
effective speeches in Maine, New York and Illinois 
during the campaign of 1896, and not only had the 
satisfaction of aiding in the Republican victory, but 
was himself re-elected to Congress by a majority of 
over twenty thousand votes. He was elected again 
in 1898 and is now a member of the Fifty-sixth 
Congress. As a legislator his ability and capacity 
for hard work have been appreciated by the people 
at large as well as those of iiis own state. On the 
floor of the House he has become recognized as an 
able speaker and debater, anil he also has influence 
in the Committee room, being frequently called 
upon to preside over the Committee on Naval 
Affairs during the absence of its Chairman, and 
chosen Chairman of its Sub-committee on Organi- 
zation, Rank and Pay of the Navy, introducing the 
bill reorganizing its personnel. Besides the Lincoln 
Club, Mr. Foss is a member of the Hamilton, Mar- 
quette University and Union League Clubs, Chicago. 



He is now (1900) the acting Chairman of the Na- 
tional Committee on Naval Affairs in the House of 
Representatives. 



LITTIG, Marq D. 

Harvard D.M.D. 1895. 
Born in Davenport, la., 1871 ; D.D.S. Univ. of Penn- 
sylvania, 1894; D.M.D. Harvard, 1895; M.D. Tufts, 
1895 ; engaged in practice in Boston since 1896. 

MARQ D. LllTIG, M.D., D.M.D., Dentist, 
was born in Davenport, Iowa, October i6, 
1 87 1, the son of John and Louise (Rogge) Littig. 




M. D. UlTIG 

His mother is a native of Southern Germany. On 
his father's side he is of French ancestry, John 
Littig having been born in Lorraine when that 
province was a part of France. His grandfather, 
Peter Littig, was a Parisian by birth, a soldier of 
the armies of the First Empire, a survivor of the 
batdes of Leipzig and Waterloo. Dr. Littig was 
educated at St. Ambrose College, Iowa, completing 
a four years' course in 1S90. He then entered the 
University of Pennsylvania for professional study, 
receiving the degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery 
in 1894, subsequently taking that of Doctor of 
Dental Medicine at the Harvard Dental School, 
and that of Doctor of Medicine from Tufts. With 
this professional equipment. Dr. Littig entered upon 



78 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



the practice of dentistry in Boston, Massachusetts. 
September 14, 1S98, he married Isabel Page 
Seaman of Boston. 



PEARSONS, William Barron Chapin 

Harvard LL.B. 1849. 
Born in Fairlee, Vt., 1824 ; educated at public schools 
at Bradferd, Vt., at Bradford Academy and at New- 
bury Seminary; graduated Harvard Law School, 1849, 
and admitted to Bar; began practice in Holyoke, 
Mass. ; served as Trial Justice, Selectman, Assessor 
and School Committeeman ; member of State Legisla- 
ture, 1859-60 ; Senator, 1862-63; Paymaster, U. S. V., 
1862-66; first Mayor of Holyoke city, 1873-76 ; Judge of 
the Holyoke Police Court, 1877-98; died 1898. 

WllI.l.UI B.\RRON CHAPIN PE.\RSONS, 
lawyer, was born in Fairlee, near Brad- 
ford, Vermont, in 1824, the son of John and Hannah 
(Putnam) Pearsons. His ancestry in all lines was 
from sturdy New England stock, the Pearsons' side 
representing many names prominent in Reading, 
and eastern Massachusetts, and in Lyndborough, 
New Hampshire, where the families lived before 
their settlement in Vermont. Through his mother's 
family, which was related to General Israel Putnam 
of Revolutionary fame, he was descended from 
Nathaniel Putnam of ^anvers and other fixmilies 
well known in Salem, Massachusetts, and in Lynd- 
borough, New Hampshire, in the early days. His 
parents moved when he was quite young to Brad- 
ford, Vermontj and there his early education was 
received in the public schools and in Bradford 
.•\cademy. He then studied at Newbury Seminary, 
filling the winters by teaching in Vermont and also 
in Chicopee, Massachusetts. Later he read law with 
Tracy & Converse in Woodstock, Vermont, and then 
took the law course at Harvard where he was grad- 
uated and received the degree of Bachelor of Laws 
in 1849. Some study in the law office of Judge 
Henry Morris of Springfield, Massachusetts, pre- 
ceded his admission to the Hampden County Bar, 
and in June, 1849, he removed to Holyoke, Massa- 
chusetts, to begin his practice of the law. Holyoke 
was then in its infancy, and " a history of Judge 
Pearsons' professional civic and social life is indeed 
a history of that place." Taking an interest in all 
the affairs of the town he was chosen to every im- 
portant office in the gift of his fellow townsmen, being 
Trial Justice in the early days. Selectman for several 
years, and Assessor and School Committeeman. 
He was sent as a Representative to the Legislature 
in 1S59-1860, and served on the State Valuation 



Committee in 1S60. In 1S62 he was elected Sena- 
tor for the Western Hampden district. In 1863 he 
entered the Civil War and was appointed Paymaster 
with the rank of Major, serving through the war in 
that capacity in tiie Army of the James. After the 
close of the war, Mr. Pearsons returned to the prac- 
tice of law in Holyoke. When the time came in 
1872, for Holyoke to become a city. Judge Pear- 
sons was elected Chairman of the Committee to 
draw up the City Charter, his legal training and 
wise foresight serving the city well. In Decem- 
ber 187,3, he was elected to be the first Mayor of 




W. B. C. PEARSONS 

Holyoke, and with his good judgment and charac- 
teristic zeal he served the city with great ability for 
three years. In 1877 he was appointed by dov- 
ernor Rice, Judge of the Holyoke Police Court, a 
position which he accepted for a short time, but 
which he retained for the remainder of his life. 
Two associate judges, Judge E. W. Chapin and 
Judge H. L. Sherman, were later connected with 
him in the administration of the Court. " In his 
political views Judge Pearsons always carried his 
sovereignty under his own hat, and was far sighted, 
patriotic and honestly independent." In 18S0 he 
was Holyoke's candidate for the Republican nomi- 
nation to Congress in the old Tenth District of 
Massachusetts. He was also made Presidential 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



79 



Elector on the Republican ticket. Judge Pear- 
sons was for several years President of the Board 
of Directors of the Holyoke & Westfield Railroad 
and was a power in the management of its affairs. 
He was also for many years Secretary of the Direc- 
tors' Board for the Holyoke National Bank. He 
was a Mason of higli degree ; indeed, the local 
lodge of Masons began its history with him. He 
was a member of the Grand Army. The Bay State 
Club had his name on its rolls, as well as various 
fishing clubs and musical organizations. From 
1850 to 1870 Judge Pearsons was the Chorister at 
the Second Congregational Church, and in those 
days was one of the centres of the musical life of the 
Connecticut Valley. Throughout his life he re- 
tained his interest in musical affairs. February 25, 
1857, Judge Pearsons was married to Sarah E. 
daughter of Major George Taylor and Pamelia 
(Root) Taylor of Westfield, Massachusetts. There 
are three children : S. Elizabeth, wife of James 
Macnaughtan of New York City ; Frances T., wife 
of George A. Plimpton of New York City ; and 
George T. Pearsons, who married Edith Richards 
of Hartford and is now living in Holyoke. Judge 
Pearsons died at his home, in Holyoke, March 3, 
1898, at the age of seventy-three years. Extracts 
from articles in the Springfield Republican and the 
Holyoke papers at the time of his death in i8g8 
give a picture of the man as he was known to his 
fellow townsmen : " Mentally Judge Pearsons was 
markedly strong and there are but few men in the 
Connecticut Valley who are better educated or riper 
in mental development. Personally he was a 
charming man. He was dignified but simple and 
approachable, a thorough New Englander in genu- 
ineness of character, and frankness of speech. He 
had a good memory and his fund of good stories 
was limitless." — " Judge Pearsons as the head of 
local courts had the regulation of so much of the 
life of the city that he was a tremendous influence 
touching all Holyoke affairs. As a Judge he was 
most lenient, allowing much for natural weaknesses, 
and it is but fair to say that his course with criminals 
tended to encourage them to better things. .Xn- 
other point was the soundness of his judgments, 
always right in close cases, due to his fine legal 
knowledge and broad interpretation of the law. 
There was no branch of Holyoke's vast interest 
with which Judge Pearsons was not acquainted in- 
timately. He was a gentleman of the old school 
in every sense of the word, who retained that simple 
dignity of the life of fifty years ago. His death 



breaks almost the last link which connected early 
Holyoke with the modern municipality of to-day. 
Judge W. B. C. Pearsons is gone but his memory 
will always be a living spark in Holyoke life, and he 
will always live in its history." 



LYMAN, Arthur Theodore 

Harvard A.B. 1853. 
Born in Boston, Mass., 1832; educated under private 
tuition; graduated Harvard, 1853; travelled abroad, 
1855-56; engaged in East India trade, 1856-59; in sale 
of cotton goods 1862-64 ^s member of firm of J. W. 
Paige & Co.; Treasurer of Hadley Co., 1866-89; 
Treas. Lowell Mfg. Co. since 1881 and Director in 
many other mills ; Colonel on staff of Gov. Rice, 1876- 
78; Pres. Boston Athenaeum, 1899; member of Corpo- 
ration of Massachusetts Institute of Technology ; 
Overseer of Harvard, 1892-99. 

ARTHUR THEODORE LYMAN, Manufac- 
turer, was born in Boston, Massachusetts, 
December 8, 1832, the son of George Williams and 
Anne (Pratt) Lyman, of a family prominent in 
public affairs and in the industrial and educational 
development of the community. He was educated 
at private schools in Boston and prepared for Col- 
lege under tutors, graduating at Harvard in the 
Class of 1853 and receiving his Master's degree in 
1857. For a year and a half after graduation he 
was in the office of Samuel & Edward Austin, a 
Boston house engaged in the East India trade and 
then travelled e.xtensively in Europe, following 
various lines of reading and study. He returned 
to Boston in 1856, and after a few years more 
passed in the East India trade directed his atten- 
tion to the industry of cotton manufacturing. In 
i860 he took the position of Treasurer of the 
Appleton Company and the Hamilton Manufactur- 
ing Company of Lowell, subsequently became a 
partner in the house of J. W. Paige & Company, 
selling agents for various cotton mills, and from 
1866 to 1889 was Treasurer of the Hadley Com- 
pany of Holyoke, Massachusetts. Mr. Lyman is a 
Director in a nutnber of cotton mill corporations 
and in the Massachusetts Hospital Life Insurance 
Company, in the Massachusetts National Bank, 
1862-1898, Trustee of the Provident Institution 
for Savings in Boston, and since 18S1 has been 
Treasurer of the Lowell Manufacturing Company 
of Lowell, Massachusetts. During the three terms 
of the administration of Governor .Mexander H. 
Rice, 1876-1S78, he held the position of Colonel 
and Aide-de-Cainp upon his military staff. He was 
elected President of the Boston Atheureum in 1S99, 



8o 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



is a member of the corporation of the Massachu- 
setts Institute of Technology, and from 1892 to 
1899 was an Overseer of Harvaril College. Mr. 
Lyman married Ella Lowell, April S, 1S58, and has 
six children living: Julia, Arthur (Harvard 1883), 
Herbert (Harvard 1SS6), Ella, Mabel and Ronald 
Theodore Lvman. 



WOOD, Robert Colgate 

Harvard A. B 1892. 
Born in New York City, i86g ; educated in Lawrence- 
ville, N. J., graduated Harvard. 1892 ; member of brok- 
erage firm of Wood & Havemeyer, New York City, 
since 1894. 

ROHERT COLGATE WOOD, Stock Broker, 
was born in New York City, December 7, 
1S69, the son of John Dunn and Alice Riggs (Col- 
gate) Wood. He was prepared for College at Law- 
renceville. New Jersey, and entering Harvard was 
graduated a Bachelor of Arts with the Class of 1892. 
His business training begun in the office of H. T. 
Carey v^ Company, stock brokers. New Vork, was 
continued in the employ of the Manhattan Trust 
Company, with which he remained as clerk until 
the fall of 1894, when he formed a partnership with 
J. Craig Havemeyer under the firm name of Wood 
& Havemeyer, and is now transacting a brokerage 
business in New York City. Mr. Wood is a mem- 
ber of the Democratic, Calumet, New York Athletic 
and Luncheon Clubs. 



PEIRCE, George 

Harvard Law School. Class of 1871. 
Born in Philadelphia, Pa., 1847 ; educated at Friends' 
Central School. Philadelphia and privately ; cadet in 
United States Naval Academy. 1862-66 ; student in Law 
Dept., Univ. of Pennsylvania, and admitted to the Bar, 
1868; attended lectures at Harvard Law School with 
Class of 1871 ; practising law in Philadelphia since 
1871 ; Manager of Rush Hospital ; Trustee and Treas- 
urer of the Berean Manual Training and Industrial 
School; member of Presbyterian Board of Education. 

GEORGE PEIRCE, Lawyer, was born in 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, October 6, 
1S47. His father was William Shannon Peirce, a 
Judge of the Court of Common Pleas, descendant 
of early settlers of Delaware holding grants from 
Sir Edmund .Andros in 1680. His mother, Eliza- 
beth Irwin Baldwin, was the great-granddaughter of 
Andrew Irwin, sometime Royal Governor of the 
island of Grenada, West Indies. George Peirce 
was educated at the Friends' Central School in 



Philadelphia, read the classics with the Rev. Dr. 
David Malin of tiiat city, and entered the United 
States Naval Academy, then at Newport, Rhode 
Island, in 1862, continuing his course in that insti- 
tution after its return to Annapolis, at the close of 
the war, but resigned in 1866, at the desire of his 
father, to take up the study of law. He read law 
in the office of I'^dward Hopper in Philadelphia, 
attended the lectures of Judge Sharswood at the 
University of Pennsylvania, and was admitted to the 
Bar in November 1S68. Before settling down to 
practice he passed some time in foreign travel and 




GEORGE PEIRCE 

in residence at Cambridge, Massachusetts, where he 
attended lectures at the Harvard Law School with 
the Class of 1871, returning to Philadelphia in 
September of that year and establishing himself 
there in his profession. Mr. Peirce has held no 
political office, but is Manager of the Pennsylvania 
Industrial Home for Blind Women and of the Rush 
Hospital, and is Trustee and Treasurer of the 
Berean Manual Training and Industrial School. 
While a student at the University of Pennsylvania 
he became a member of the Zeta Psi Society, and 
he is now a member of the Historical Society of 
Pennsylvania, the Numismatic and .Antiquarian 
Society, the Welsh Society, Harvard Club, Univer- 
sity Club, Penn Club and the Law .Association all of 



UNIFERSITIES AND rUEIli SONS 



8i 



Philadelphia and the Harvard Law Association of 
Harvard University. For some years he has served 
on the Board of Education of the Presbyterian 
Church in the United States of America. Mr. 
Peirce married, December lo, 1874, Lucy, daugh- 
ter of the Rev. John B. and Sarah Peters Willing 
Spotswood. He has no children. 



SEWALL, Joseph 

Harvard A.B. 1707. 
Born in Boston, Mass., 1688; graduated Harvard, 
1707; studied theology and ordained Colleague in 
Pastorate of Old South Church, Boston, 1713 ; D.D. 
Univ. of Glasgow, 1731 ; Fellow of Harvard, 1728-65; 
died 1769. 

JOSEPH SEWALL, D.D., Clergyman, was born 
in Boston, Massachusetts, August 26, 16S8, the 
son of Samuel and Hannah (Hull) Sewall. His 
father, Judge Samuel Sewall (Harvard 167 1), was 
the only one of the judges taking part in the Salem 
witchcraft trials who publicly confessed his error. 
His mother, Hantiah Hull, was the only child of 
John Hull, Mint-Master of the Massachusetts Colony 
in 1652 and later Treasurer. Joseph Sewall was 
graduated at Harvard in 1707, studied theology, and 
in 1 713 was ordained to the Pastorate of the Old 
South Church in Boston as Colleague of the Rev. 
Ebenezer Pemberton (Harvard 1691), who died 
four years later. He early attained distinction as a 
preacher and a scholar and upon the death of Presi- 
dent John Leverett, of Harvard, in 1724, he was 
elected to that position but declined it. The Lon- 
don Corporation for Propagating the Gospel in New 
England appointed him one of its Commissioners, 
and he also served as Corresponding Member of the 
Scottish Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge. 
The LTnivcrsity of Glasgow made him a Doctor of 
Divinity in 1731. Dr. Sewall maintained an active 
interest in Harvartl throughout his life, serving as 
Fellow from 1728 to 1765, contributing to the sup- 
port of indigent students, and in 1764, when the 
library was burned, giving many books to re-establish 
it. He died in Pjoston, June 27, 1769. 



SAULSBURY. William 

Harvard A.B. 1887. 
Born in Dover, Del., 1862; educated at public schools 
and \A/ilmington Conference Academy : graduated 
Harvard, 1887; member of Legislature, 1893; propri- 
etor of The Delaware, newspaper, since 1894 ; member 
ot Constitutional Convention, 1896-97; Pres. Board 
VOL. V. — 6 



of Trustees Wilmington Conference Academy since 
1896; President Robbins Hose Co. of Dover. 

WILLIAM S.\ULSBURV, Publisher, was 
burn in Dover, Delaware, November 
26, 1862, the son of Gove and Rosina Jane 
(Smith) Saulsbury. His family for many genera- 
tions has been prominent in th- public affairs of 
Delaware. His grandfather, Willliam Saulsbury, 
h^ld important offices. His father, Gove Sauls- 
bury, was a well-known physician, served in the 
Upper House of the Legislature and was {Governor 
of the State for six years. His uncles, Willard and 




\VM. SAULSUURV 

Eli Saulsbury, represented Delaware in the United 
States Senate for a period of thirty years, one suc- 
ceeding the other, the former being made Chancel- 
lor of the State after his retirement from service at 
Washington. William Saulsbury was prepared for 
College at the Wilmington Conference .Academy, in 
Dover, and graduated at Harvard in the Class of 
1887. He was elected a Representative in the 
Legislature of 1893, and in the following year pur- 
chased The Delawarcan, a semi-weekly newspaper 
of Dover, together with the jirinting establishment, 
and has since been engaged in the publishing busi- 
ness. Mr. Saulsbury served as a member of the 
Constitutional Convention of 1S96-1S07. h-'is been 
President of the Board of Trustees of the W ilming- 



82 



UNIVERSITIES JND THEIR SONS 



ton Conference Academy since 1896, and is Presi- 
dent of the Robbins Hose Company of Dover. 
December 6, 1S99, he married Annie lOrnestine 
Miles. 

WINSTON, Frederick Hampden 

Harvard LL.B. 1833. 
Born in Liberty Co., Ga , 1830; educated at private 
schools; graduated Harvard Law School 1853, and 
admitted to New York Bar; admitted to Illinois Bar. 
1854. and practised in Chicago 1854-83; U. S. Minister 
to Persia, 1883 ; Brig. Gen. Illinois Nat. Guards, 
1883 ; Commissioner of Lincoln Park nearly twenty 
years and Pres. of Board over twelve years. 

FRIIDKRICK HAMPDEN WINSTON, law- 
yer, was born in Liberty county, Georgia, 
November 20, 1S30. His parents were Rev. Dennis 
Mervyn and Mary (Mcintosh) Winston, the former 
a grandson of Stephen Winston, of Stephentown, 
New York, and Roxana Coggswell of Massachusetts, 
and son of Frederick Winston of New York, and 
Susan Seymour of Connecticut. His mother was a 
daughter of Hampden and Caroline Clifford 
(Nephens) Mcintosh, of Mcintosh county, Georgia, 
and a granddaughter of Major-Gcneral Lacklan 
Mcintosh of the Army of the Revolution and great- 
granddaughter of Captain John Mohr Mcintosh, who 
sen-ed in the Colonial .Army under General Ogle- 
thorpe. Frederick H. Winston was educated at 
private schools in Kentucky, and when eighteen 
years old went to work in a cotton manufactory at 
Greensboro, Georgia. Two years later he began 
the study of law in the office of United States 
Senator William C. Dawson, and after completing 
his course at the Harvard Law School, where he re- 
ceived the degree of Bachelor of Laws in 1853, he 
was for six months a student in the ofifice of Hon. 
William H. Evarts, of New York. .Admitted to the 
New York Bar early in 1853, he removed to Chicago 
in .April in that year, establishing himself there per- 
manently in the practice of his profession, which he 
followed continuously for a period of thirty years. 
Mr. Winston has been eminently successful both in 
the legal profession and in his outside business enter- 
prises, and since his retirement in 1883 his time has 
been occupied in caring for his property interests. 
For over twelve years he has been President of the 
Lincoln Park Commission, to which he was appointed 
nearly twenty years ago, and in 18S3 he was com- 
missioned Brigadier- General in the Illinois National 
Guards. He has attended as a delegate four Dem- 
'ocratic National Conventions, was United States 
Minister to Persia during the first Cleveland admin- 



istration, and continued to act wiili that party until 
1896. He is a member of the Society of Colonial 
Wars, Sons of the American Revolution, Society 
of the Cincinnati and the Order of Runnymede, 
and a life member of the Illinois Historical Society. 
He belongs to the Chicago Club, the L^nion, Saddle 
and Cycle and Chicago Golf Clubs. In 1854 Mr. 
Winston married Maria G. Dudley of Frankfort, 
Kentucky, and of that union there are six children : 
Frederic Seymour (Yale 1877); Dudley (Yale 
1886) now deceased ; Bertram Mcintosh; Ralph; 
Eliza Talbot, widow of Thomas W. Grover (Yale 




F. H. WINSTON 



1874) ; and Marie, wife of \\irt I). Walker (Yale 
1880). His present wife, whom he married in 
1S96, was Sallie Reeves Hews, of New Orleans, 
Louisiana. 



WYMAN, Morrill 

Harvard A.B. 1833, M.D. jS37. LL.D. 1885. 
Born in Chelmsford, Mass., 1812; graduated Har- 
vard, 1833; Harvard Medical School, 1837; House 
Physician, Massachusetts General Hospital, 1836; 
practising physician Cambridge, Mass.; Adj. Prof. 
Theory and Practice, Harvard, 1853-56; Overseer, 
1875-87. 

MORRILL WYMAN, M.D., LL.D., Physician, 
was born in Chelmsford, Massachusetts, 
July 25, 1S12, and graduated at Harvard in 1833, 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



83 



in tlie same Class with his brother, Dr. Jeffries 
Wyman. The brothers also pursued together their 
studies ill tlie Harvard Medical School, graduating 
in 1837. Morrill Wyman had meantime served as 
Assistant- Engineer on the Boston & Worcester Rail- 
road, then in process of construction, and in 1836 
he was engaged as House Physician at the Massa- 
chusetts (General Hospital. On receiving his degree 
from the Harvard Medical School, Dr. Wyman es- 
tablished himself in Cambridge, Massachusetts, where 
he has since practised his profession. Dr. Wyman 
distinguished himself by independent research, and 
among other things invented an instrument for re- 
moving fluids from cavities of the body, whereby an 
operation previously considered dangerous has been 
rendered safe and almost painless. In 1853 he was 
called to the Hersey Professorship of Theory and 
Practice of Physics at Harvard, occupying this Chair 
for three years, when he retired to resume his 
private practice. He was an Overseer of Harvard 
from 1875 to 1887, and received the degree of 
Doctor of Laws from that University in 1885. He 
was President of the Board of Trustees of the Cam- 
bridge Hospital from 1881 to 1898, while its build- 
ings were being planned and constructed. Dr. 
Wyman is a fellow of the American Academy of 
Arts and Sciences and a member of the Massachu- 
setts Medical Society. He has published a work on 
Ventilation, also The History and Geographical Re- 
lations of Autumnal Catarrh (Hay Fever), and The 
Early History of the McLean Asylum. 



years. Mr. Gage was uniteil in marriage, April 26, 
1 886, with Ida M. Bailey. Their children are: 
John Bailey, born February 24, 1887, and Marian 
Mansur Gage, born March 14, 1889. 



GAGE, John Cutter 

Harvard A.B. 1856. 
Born in Pelham, N. H. 1835; educated in the com- 
mon schools, and prepared for College at Phillips 
(Exeter) Academy; student at Dartmouth, and gradu- 
ated at Harvard, 1856; read law in Lowell, Mass.; 
practised in Kansas City, Mo., 1859 to present time. 

JOHN CUTTER GA(;i:, Law)rr, was born in 
Pelham, New Hampshire, April 20, 1835, son 
of Frye and Keziah (Cutter) Gage. He attended 
the common schools and academies in liis native 
State, including I'hillips-l'^xeter, and his C'ollcgc 
training, begun at Dartmouth, was completed at 
Harvard, from which he was graduated with the 
Class of 1S56. His legal studies were pursued in 
the office of Afessrs. .Xbbott & Brown at Lowell, 
Massachusetts, and in March 1859, he began the 
practice of his profession in Kansas City, Missouri, 
where he has transacted a profitable general law 
business williiiut inlcrruptiim fir the ])ast forty-one 



EUBANK, George 

Harvard D.IVI D. 1882. 
Born in Birmingham, Ala., 1861 ; graduated Harvard 
Dental School, 1882; practised dentistry in Birming- 
ham, Ala., since graduation ; President Alabama Board 
of Dental Examiners since 1894. 

L0R(;E KUBANK, D.^LD., Demist, was 
born in Birmingham, .Mabama, August 17, 
1 86 1, son of \\'illiam Carroll and Eliza (Hickman) 



G 




Eubank. His boyhood and youth were spent in 
study at a country school, and his professional prep- 
arations were completed at the Harvard Dental 
School in 1882, where he took the degree of Doctor 
of Dental Medicine. Returning to Birmingham 
immediately after graduation, he established himself 
in tlie practice of his profession, and up to the 
present time has found no reason to remove from 
that fiekl. Dr. Eubank was elected President of 
tlie .Alabama Dental Association in 1888, and has 
held the Presidency of the State Board of Dental 
l<",xaminers continuously since 1S94. .April 29,1885, 
he was united in marriage with Cainmie Blackwood. 



84 



UNJFERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



HOWARD, Guy 

Yale B.A. 1875. 
Born in Augusta, Me., 1855 ; prepared for College at 
Phillips-Andover Academy; entered U. S. Army as 
ad Lieut. Inf., 1876; saw service in Indian Wars, 1876- 
80; at the Artillery School, Fortress Munroe, graduat- 
ing 1882, and promoted to 1st Lieut. ; staff appointment 
Asst. Quartermaster with rank of Lieut.-Col. in Span- 
ish War; Chief Quartermaster Lawton's Div. in 
Philippine Islands; killed near Arayat, Luzon, 1899. 

GUV HOWARD, Soldier, was born at Kenne- 
bec .Arsenal, Augusta, Maine, where his 
father, (Jeneral Oliver O. Howard, was stationed, 
December i6, 1855. Ho was descended from a 
military ancestry as far as records show. The origi- 
nal emigrant to this country was Ensign John How- 
ard, at first in Miles Standish's family and able to 
bear arms in 1643 ! promoted Lieutenant in the 
West Hridgewater, Massachusetts, Company, and its 
Commander in King Philip's War; receiving men- 
tion in the Plymouth records for his service. His 
son, Jonathan Howard, bore the title of Major, and 
the grandson of the latter. Captain Jesse Howard, 
fought as a Lieutenant throughout the Revolutionary 
War. Captain Jesse's son, Captain Selh Howartl, 
was a soldier as a boy, in the Revolution, and was 
grandfather of Major-General Oliver O. Howard. 
Colonel Guy Howard's mother was Elizabeth .Ann, 
daughter of Alexander B. Waite, of Portland, Maine. 
He was prepared for College at the Phillips Acad- 
emy in Andover, Massachusetts, and graduated at 
Yale in the Class of 1S75. By heredity and associ- 
ation he had a predilection for the military life, and 
in the year following his graduation he received, 
after the usual examination, a commission in the 
regul.ir army as Second Lieutenant in the Twelfth 
Infantry. General Howard was at that time in 
command of the Department of the Columbia, and 
his son's regiment a year later formed part of the 
force with which he made his successful campaign 
against the Nez Percys Indians in 1877 and against 
the Bannocks and Piutes in 1878. Lieutenant 
Howartl was also in command of a company of 
Indian scouts on the Mexican frontier in 1879 and 
1880, and in the latter year was made Aide-de- 
Camp on the staff of his father, being transferred 
to the Department of West Point in 1881 when 
General Howard was made Superintendent of the 
Military Academy there. During the time his 
father held this position, Lieutenant Howard was 
a student at the Artillery School at Fortress Munroe, 
graduating there in 1882, when he was promoted to 
a First Lieutenancy in his old regiment, with which 



he served in that grade for more than ten years 
some part of the time on his father's staff. His 
next step came in 1893 when he was appointed 
Assistant Quartermaster with the rank of Captain, 
and it was in this capacity that he was ordered to 
the Department of the Gulf at the opening of the 
Spanish War, and later promoted to Major of Volun- 
teers and assigned to duty as Acting Chief Quarter- 
master of the Second Army Corps, June i, 1898. 
He was promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel and Chief 
Quartermaster in August of that year and performed 
the duties of that position in the several camps 




GLTV HOW.AKD 

occupied by his Corps which was only in part sent 
out of the country. When the first volunteer army 
was mustered out he was made the ranking Major 
of Volunteers in the Quartermaster Department in 
honor of his service during the w-ar. It was while 
on service in the Philippines that Colonel Howard 
met his death near Arayat, October 22, 1899, while 
conducting a convoy of supplies to his General. 
The insurgents from the shore attacked him and his 
escort upon the steam launch Oceania, while draw- 
ing loaded barges. Colonel Howard when a Second 
Lieutenant received the brevet rank of First Lieu- 
tenant for gallantry in action against Indians at the 
battle of Camas Meadows, .August 1877. He was a 
fine soldier, an ideal Quartermaster and a brave man. 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



85 



greatly esteemed and beloved by his classmates in 
College, and by his comrades in arms. General 
Joseph Wheeler, writing under date of December 2, 
1899, from Panique, Luzon, says of Colonel Howard : 
" By his great efforts and administrative ability he 
had organized a line of transportation which had at 
last enabled General Lawton to move forward his 
column. ... In his death the army loses an orna- 
ment and if he had lived he woukl have risen to the 
highest distinction. ... He had often been to the 
Hosjiital to visit men of his command and all were 
touched with his devotion and great care for them." 
Colonel Howard was a member of the Omaha Club, 
of the Union League Club of New York, the Algon- 
quin Club of Burlington, Vermont, and the Vermont 
Conimandery and the Loyal Legion, as well as an 
enthusiastic member of the Lake Champlain Yacht 
Club and the U'anbanakee Golf Club of Burlington. 
During the five years, 1 893-1 898, in which he was 
engaged in directing the construction of Fort Ethan 
Allen, he made his residence at Burlington, 
Vermont, where he became identified w'ith the 
social and business interests of that place. He 
connected himself with St. Paul's Episcopal Church 
there as a member and communicant, and when the 
city in 1894 voted the expenditure of $20,000 
annually for five years in making permanent improve- 
ments in its streets, Colonel Howard was elected a 
member of the advisory board for the direction of 
this important work. The value of his services was 
recognized in the official reports of the munici- 
pality. He was also a writer of force and literary 
ability, among his publications being an authoritative 
treatise on Military Tactics and a pamphlet en- 
titled The Situation in Cuba in 1S97. Colonel 
Howard married Jeanie Woolworth in Omaha, Ne- 
braska, February 14, 18S4, and had two children : 
Helen and Otis W'oohvorth Howard, who survive 
him. 

KITCHEL, Courtney Smith 

Yale B.A. 1865. 
Born in Plymouth Hollow, Conn., 1843; prepared for 
College at Phillips-Andover Academy; graduated 
Yale, 1865 ; Albany Law School, 1866 ; practised law in 
Milwaukee, Wis., 1866-69; journalist, 1869-74 ; resumed 
practice, 1874 ; Examiner of Titles Northwestern Mutual 
Life Insurance Co., Milwaukee since 1876. 

COl'RTNEY Sl\nTH KPrCHEL, Lawyer, 
was born in Plymoutli Hollow, (now Thomas- 
ton ) Litchfield county, Connecticut, June 19, 1843, 
third scm of the Rev. Harvey Denison Kitchel, D.D. 
(Yale M.A. Hon., 1S65), and Ann (Sheldon) 



Kitchel. The Kitchel family, which traces its 
English origin as far back as the year 1422, was 
founded in America by Robert Kitchel, who, in 
1639, accompanied a band of Puritan refugees 
under the leadership of Rev. Henry Whitfield to 
Guilford, Connecticut, where he became a leading 
spirit in the community and acquired a comfortable 
estate. In 1666 he removed to New Jersey and 
was one of the founders of Newark. Phineas 
Kitchel, a descendant of Robert in the fifth genera- 
tion, moved to Vermont in 1798, and the latter's 
son Jonatlian, grandfather of the subject of this 




C. S. KITCHEL 

sketch, was a Congregational minister who held 
Pastorates in that state and also in Northern New 
York. Rev. Harvey Denison Kitchel, only son of 
Jonathan, was graduateil from Middlebury College 
in 1835, and completed his theological studies in 
New Haven, Connecticut, two years later. He was 
Pastor of the Congregational Church in Plynunith 
Hollow from 1838 to 1848, when he was called to 
Detroit, Michigan, where he labored imtil 1864, 
and for the succeeding two years occupieil the 
pulpit of Plymouth Church, Chicago, Illinois. 
Called to the Presidency of Middlebury College 
in 1866, he retained it iniiil his retirement in 1874. 
He died September 11, 1895. .\ ripe scholar, 
able writer, forcible speaker and profound theo- 



86 



UNiyERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



logian, he was largely instrumental in planting 
Congregationalism in the rapidly growing West of 
fifty years ago, and was long recognized as one 
of the leading exponents of that faith. President 
Kitchel reared six sons, all of whom are living and 
four are Vale graduates, incluiling Courtney S., who 
entered from Phillips Academy, Andover, Massachu- 
setts, and took his Bachelor's degree with the Class 
of 1S65. From Vale he went to the Albany, \ew 
Vork, Law School, from which he was graduated in 
1866, and in November of that year began the 
practice of law in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. .-Xbandon- 
ing the legal profession for journalism in 1869, he 
was City Editor of the Milwaukee Daily News until 
1872, and was subsequently connected with the 
Evening Journal anil the Democrat, both of St. 
Louis, Missouri. In June 1S74, he resumed the 
practice of law in Milwaukee, and in November 
1S76, entered the service of the Northwestern 
Mutual Life Insurance Company as Examiner of 
Titles, which since has been his exclusive occupa- 
tion. At present he is chief of that department. 
Mr. Kitchel is a member of Independence Lodge, 
Free and .Accepted Masons, and the University 
Club, Milwaukee. November 24, 1866, he mar- 
ried Charlotte A. Sayre, who died November 26, 
1868, leaving one son, Hart Sayre Kitchel. July 
II, 1877, he married Virginia Maria West, who 
died Febniary 5, 1887, leaving three children: 
Helen West, .\nna Theresa and Stanley Kitchel. 
1 1 is present wife, whom he married October 21, 
1897, was Mrs. Fannie (Mason) Marchant. His 
children are all living and his daughters are attend- 
ing Smith College, Northampton, Massachusetts, 
and his son Stanley is at Shattuck Military School, 
Fairbault, Minnesota. 



took the regular course at the Wheeling Business 
College, graduating in 18S2, and entering the em- 
ploy of the Peabody Insurance Company, Wheeling, 
he rapidly advanced to the assistant secretaryship, 
which he retained for three years. Resigning his 
position in 18S7, he subsequently entered the L-ni- 
versity of West ^'irginia, where he took his Bach- 
elor's degree in 1S93, after which he attended 
the Yale Law School and w-as graduated two years 
later with that of Bachelor of Laws. In August 
1895, he was admitted to the Bar in his native 
state, and immediately engaging in practice in 




W. C. MEYER 



MEYER, William Charles 

Yale LL.B. 1895. 
Born in Wheeling, W. Va., 1865; graduated at the 
University of West Virginia, 1893 J a* ^^^ Yale Law 
School, 1895 ; admitted to the Bar the same year and 
now practising in Wheeling, W. Va. 

WILLIAM CHARLES .MEYER, Lawyer, 
was born in Wheeling, West Virginia, 
June 23, 1865, son of William P. and Louise 
(Helmbrecht) Meyer. He is of German par- 
entage, his father having emigrated from the 
Duchy of Brunswick in 1852. and his mother 
from the City of Hanover in 1856. Having at- 
tended the Wheeling public schools and received 
instruction in German under a private tutor, he 



W^heeling, has already attained high rank in the 
legal profession. On reaching his majority he 
took an active interest in politics, entering the 
ranks of the Republican party and serving as 
President of the West Virginia Republican Club, 
an organization composed of students of the Uni- 
versity, and was a Delegate to the State League 
Convention. He has also been chosen a delegate 
to several State and District Conventions, and his 
political popularity was amply demonstrated in 
1896, when as a candidate for Prosecuting .At- 
torney of Ohio county, he was triumphantly elected 
in a contest in whicli lie had tliree opponents. 
Mr. Meyer is a member of the Masonic Order, 
the Knights of Pythias, the Junior Order of .Am- 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



87 



erican Mechanics, the Benevolent an<l Pr(;tective 
Order of Elks, the Phi Kappa Psi Fraternity, and 
the State and County Par Associations. He for- 
merly ranked as Major in the West Virginia Cadet 
Corps, which belongs to the National Guard of that 
state. At Morgantown, West \'irginia, December 
22, 1S9S, he married Margaret Mortis Donley. 



LELAND, Lorenzo 

Yale B.A. 1874. 
Born in Ottawa, 111., 1852; educated in public and 
high schools of Ottawa ; prepared for College at 
Philips-Andover Academy; graduated Yale, 1874; 
studied law and admitted to Illinois Bar, 1S76 ; practised 
in Kansas and Nebraska, 1876-80 ; in Illinois, 1880-94 J 
President ist National Bank Ottawa, 111., since 1894. 

LORENZO LELAND, Banker, was born in 
Ottawa, Illinois, October 17, 1852, the son 
of Lorenzo and ALartha (Holbrook) Leiand. Both 
families are of English descent, dating their Ameri- 
can origin from an early period in the history of 
Massachusetts. The first public mention in England 
of the Lelands appears in the public service records 
during the reign of Henry VHL, when one of that 
name held the post of Antiquarian to that monarch. 
Lorenzo Leiand was educated in the common and 
high schools of his native town, and prepared for 
College at Phillips Academy, Andover, Massachu- 
setts. He was graduated from Yale with the Class 
of 1874, and having studied law in the office of 
practising attorneys, he was admitted to the Illinois 
Bar in 1876 on examination before the Supreme 
Court. The first four years of his professional labors 
were spent in Kansas and Nebraska. Returning to 
Illinois, he practised law in that state until 1894, 
when he was elected President of the First National 
Bank of Ottawa, a position which he still retains, 
and is closely identified with the financial interests 
of that town. October 9, 1878, Mr. Leiand mar- 
ried Fannie C. Hamilton, and has one son : Hugh 
H. Leiand. 



McCALL, James St. Clair 

Yale LL.B. 1893. 
Born in York, Pa., 1872 ; educated in public schools, 
high school and Collegiate School at York ; graduated 
Yale Law School, 1893, and admitted to Bar in York 
Co., Pa. ; admitted to Bar of Superior Court, 1898, and 
Supreme Court, 1899; has practised his profession in 
York, and is prominent in the public life of the city. 

JAMES ST. CLAIR McCALL, Lawyer, was 
born in York, Pennsylvania, .\ugust 15, 1872, 
son of Hugh W. and Rachel IC. (Kell) McCall. He 



is of Scotch- Irish ancestry on the paternal side, and 
his mother was of Scotch-Irish and luiglish descent. 
He received his early education in the public schools 
of his native city, graduated from York High School 
at the head of the Class of 1889, and was for a time 
a special student in the York Collegiate Institute, 
entering the Yale Law School in the Class of 1S93. 
In June 1892, he was awarded the Frederick H. 
Betts prize for the highest marks at the annual ex- 
aminations, his standing being the highest in the 
history of the school to that time. In June 1893. 
he took the I\Iarshall Jewell prize for the highest 




J.\.MES ST. CI.AIU McCALL 

marks at graduation, and received his degree wagiia 
cum hxiidc. He became a member of Corbey Court 
at Vale. Mr. McCall was admitted to the Bar of 
York county, Pennsylvania, in September 1893, and 
to practice in the Superior and Supreme Courts in 
1898 and 1899, respectively. He was permanent 
Chairman of the last Republican County Convention, 
and was the candidate of his party for District 
Attorney in 1898, reducing the normal Democratic 
majority by over one third. When but twenty- 
seven years of age he came within three votes of 
receiving the Republican nomination for Mayor of 
York, a city of thirty-two thousand people. He is a 
member of the Pickwick, Bachelor, Out-door and 
Utile Cum DuKi Clubs. 



88 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



McCLUNG, Robert Gardner 

Yale B.A. 1891 - Harvard LL.B. 18^. 
Born at Knoxville, Tenn., 1868 ; attended private and 
public schools at Knoxville, and fitted for College at 
Phillips Academy, Andover ; graduated Yale, 1891, 
Harvard Law School, 1894; admitted to Suffolk Co. 
(Mass.) Bar, 1893 ; entered law office of Hon. John D. 
Long & Alfred Hemenway, Boston, 1894; practised 
alone since 1896. 

ROBERT G.ARDNER McCLUNG, Lawyer, was 
born at Knoxville, Tennessee, July 3, 1868, 
the son of Franklin Henry and Eliza Ann (Mills) 
McClung. The family in this country dates back 




ROBERT G. McCLUNG 

to A[atthew McClung, who was of Scotch-Irish 
descent, and settled in Lancaster county, Pennsyl- 
vania, about 1746. His son Charles McClung 
later removed to Tennessee, where the family has 
ever since occupied a prominent place. The sub- 
ject of this sketch received his early education in 
private and public schools at Knoxville, and pre- 
pared for College at Phillips Academy, Andover, 
Massachusetts, entering Yale in 1886. After a year 
spent at Yale, he left, owing to ill health, and spent 
the year from 1SS7 to 18S8 in out-door life in the 
Indian Territory, Texas and Tennessee. He re- 
turned to College in the fall of the latter year and 
graduated with the degree of Bachelor of .Arts in 
1891. He then studied law at the Harvard Law 



School, taking the degree of Bachelor of Laws in 
1894. Having been admitted to the Massachusetts 
Bar a year before his graduation, he now entered 
the office of Hon. John D. Ixing & Alfred Hemen- 
way in Boston. He remained with them until 1896, 
when he commenced practice alone. He has taken 
no active part in politics, but has applied himself 
closely to his profession, in which he has established 
a reputation for learning and ability, being fre- 
quently consulted and retained by other members 
of the Bar, both younger and older. .'\t Yale 
Mr. McClung was a member of the Psi L^psilon 
Society. 

SMITH, Cotton Mather 

Yale B.A. 1751. 
Born in Suffield, Conn., 1731 ; graduated Yale, 1751 ; 
studied theology and licensed to preach, 1753 ; Pastor 
of Congregational Church in Sharon, Conn., 1755-1806; 
Chaplain in America in the Revolutionary War; died 
1806. 

COTTON M.ATHER SMITH, Clergyman, was 
born in Suffield, Connecticut, October 26, 
1 731, a descendant of the Rev. Henry Smith who 
came from England in 1636 and settled as the first 
Pastor of the church at Wethersfield, Connecticut. 
His mother was a granddaughter of Increase Mather. 
Cotton Mather Smith was graduated at Yale in 175 i, 
and while studying theology engaged in teaching 
the Stockbridge Indians, continuing this missionary 
work after he was licensed to preach in 1753. He 
was called to the Congregational Church at Sharon, 
Connecticut, in 1755 ''^"'^' continued in that charge 
throughout his life, a period of more than fifty 
years. In the course of this long ministry he de- 
livered more than four thousand sermons, some of 
which were published and have been preserved, at- 
testing his fine scholarship and force of argument. 
.\t the outbreak of the Revolutionary War, Mr. 
Smith offered his services to the patriot cause as 
Chaplain and officiated in that capacity with the 
troops under General Philip Schuyler in 17 75-1 776. 
He died in Sharon, November 27, 1S06. His son, 
John Cotton Smith (Yale 17S3) was Justice of the 
Supreme Court of Connecticut, and Governor of 
that state for five years, i Si 3-18 18. 



MEDLER, Edward Lewis 

Yale LL.B. 1895. 

Born in Washington, D. C, 1873 ; educated in public 

schools in Washington and New Mexico and at Los 

Angeles High School ; graduated Yale Law School 

1895; admitted to Bar, 1894; since 1895 practised law 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



89 



in Albuquerque, N. M. ; Clerk to U. S. Attorney for 
New Mexico. 

EDWARD LEWIS MEDLER, Lawyer, was born 
in Washington, District of Columbia, Octo- 
ber 4, 1873, the son of Edward and Sophia (Gard- 
ner) Medler. He is of English- Irish ancestry, and 
members of both fiimilies have resided in New York 
State for several generations. In early boyhood he 
attended the public schools of Washington, but 
while he was still quite young his parents removed 
to New Mexico, anil he attended school there for 
a time, and later the High School at Los Angeles, 




EDVV.\RD L. MEDLER 

California. He served as clerk to the School Board 
of Albuquerque, in 1892, and also acted for a year 
as court stenographer in the Second Judicial District 
Court of New Mexico. Mr. Meiiler studied law 
at the Yale Law School, taking his degree of 
Bachelor of Laws ciiiii laudf in 1895. He had 
been admitted to the New Mexico Bar in the previ- 
ous year, and on the completion of his law course 
he took up the practice of his profession in Albu- 
querque. In July 1899, he was made Clerk to 
the United States Attorney for the Territory. He 
is a Democrat in politics, was Secretary of the Ter- 
ritorial Convention in 1892, and at present affiliates 
with the Gold Democrats. He also holds the rank 
of Adjutant and First Lieutenant in the First Regi- 



ment of Infantry in the National Guard of New 
Mexico. Mr. Medler's residence in the 'I'erritory 
has been almost continuous since 1891. He has 
been actively identified with the progress of that 
part of the country and is the owner of large real 
estate and mining interests. He is a member of 
the Masonic Order, of the Mystic Shrine, the Odd 
Fellows, and several other fraternal and beneficiary 
orders. 



STODDARD, David Tappan 

Yale B.A 1838. 
Born in Northampton, Mass., 1818; student at Wil- 
liams College, 1834-35 ; graduated Yale, 1838 , student at 
Andover Theological Seminary, 1839 ; Tutor at Yale, 
1840-42 ; ordained minister and engaged in missionary 
work, 1843 ; died 1857. 

DAVID TAPPAN STODDARD, Missionary, 
was born in Northampton, Massachusetts, 
December 2, 1818, a descendant of Anthony Stod- 
dard who came from England to Boston in 1630, 
became prominent in public affairs and married a 
daughter of Sir George Downing (Harvard 1642). 
The line of descent runs through the Rev. .Solomon 
Stoddard (Harvard 1662), son of Anthony, who 
was Pastor of the Congregational Church at North- 
ampton for fifty-six years. David T. Stoddard 
began his .Academic education at Williams College 
in 1S34, removing to Yale in his Sophomore year 
and graduating there in 1838. While an under- 
graduate he constructed with his own hands two 
telescopes, with which he subsequently made several 
astronomical discoveries. Following his graduation, 
he taught for a time in Marshall College, Pennsyl- 
vania, and declining the Professorship of Natural 
History in Marietta College, Ohio, in 1839, entered 
the .-Andover Theological Seminary. He served as 
Tutor at Yale in 184 2-1 843, continuing his theo- 
logical studies, and in 1843 was ordained at New 
Haven, sailing at once as a missionary to the Nes- 
torians at Oroomiah, Persia. With the exception 
of three years following the death of his wife, which 
he passed in the service of the Board of Missions 
in this country Mr. Stoddard passed the rest of 
his life in missionary work in Persia. His labors 
were highly successful, many of his pupils becoming 
teachers and preachers of the Gospel. In 1853 he 
completed a Grammar of the Modern Syrian Lan- 
guage which has been published by the .American 
Oriental Society, and he also published a number 
of educational and religious works in Syrian. Mr. 
Stoddard died at Oroomiah, January 22, 1857. 



90 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



SWAYNE, Noah Haynes 

Vale LL.D. 1865. 
Born in Culpepper Co., Va., 1804; studied law and 
was admitted to the Bar, 1823; removed to Ohio, 1825; 
Prosecuting Attorney for the county, 1826-29; member 
of the Ohio Legislature, 1830; U. S. District Attorney 
for Ohio, 1830-41 ; Justice of United States Supreme 
Court, 1862-81 ; L,L.D. Dartmouth and Marietta, 1863, 
Yale 1865; died 1884. 

NOAH HAVXiiS SWAYNE, LL.D., Jurist, 
Justice of the Supreme Court of the United 
St.ites, was born in Culpepper county, Virginia, 
December 7, 1S04, a descendant of Francis Swayne 
who came to this country in the ilays of William 




Penn and settled near Philadelphia on a farm which 
is still in possession of the family. His father re- 
moved to Virginia, and Noah H. Swayne, after 
receiving a good education, in \\'ateiford, in that 
state, studied law at Warrenton, and was admitted 
to the Bar in 1823. He removed immediately to 
Coshocton, Ohio, where he established himself in 
practice, became Prosecuting Attorney of the county 
and was elected to the I.egislature. In 1830, when 
he was appointed United States District Attorney 
for Ohio, he removed to Columbus, where he held 
that office until 1841, declining appointment to the 
State Bench, but serving on several important com- 
missions, among them the funding commission to 
establish the credit of the state, and that which 



was charged with the settlement of the boundary 
between Ohio and Michigan. Judge Swayne was 
originally a Jefferson Democrat, but through his 
symjiathy with the anti-slavery cause he joined the 
Republican party on its formation. In 1S32, at 
Harper's Ferry, Virginia, he was married to 
Sarah Ann Wager, of that place. \\'itli his cordial 
approval, a large number of slaves, which were her 
property, were set free on the occasion of their mar- 
riage. Although upholding the constitutionality of 
the Fugitive Slave Law, he appeared frequently as 
counsel for fugitive slaves. In 1862 he was ap- 
pointed by President Lincoln to the Sui)renie 
Court of the United States, upon the practically 
unanimous recommendation of the Bar and Legis- 
lature of Ohio. He filled that position with marked 
usefulness and learning, until his resignation in 1881. 
He received the degree of Doctor of Laws from 
Dartmouth College in 1863, from Marietta College 
in the same year, and from Yale in 1865. He died 
in New York City, June 8, 1884. 



SWAYNE, Wager 

Yale B.A. 1856. 
Born in Columbus, O., 1834; graduated Yale, 1856; 
Cincinnati Law School, 1859; appointed Major 43d 
Ohio Vols., 1861 ; served through the Civil War, reach- 
ing the grade of Major-General in 1865 ; Colonel in 
regular army, 1866; brevet Brig. -Gen., for gallant 
services, 1867, and mustered out First Maj.-Gen. ; Com- 
missioner of the Freedmen's Bureau, 1867-70 ; practised 
law in Toledo, O., 1870-80; LL.D., Kenyon, 1879; 
counsellor at law in New York City since 1880. 

WAGER SWAYNE, LL.D., Soldier and Law- 
yer, was born in Columbus, Ohio, Novem- 
ber 10, 1834, at the time when his father, the Hon. 
Noah Haynes Swayne, for twenty years Justice of 
the United States Supreme Court, was residing in 
that city engaged in the practice of law. He was 
graduated at Yale in the Class of 1856, and at once 
entered the Cincinnati Law School for professional 
study, taking his degree at that institution in 1859 
and being admitted to the Bar at Columbus. He 
practised in that city until the outbreak of the Civil 
War, when he offered his services to his country and 
was commissioned Major in the Forty-third Ohio 
Regiment, August 31, 1861. His promotion was 
rapid. He became Lieutenant-Colonel in Decem- 
ber of that year, and Colonel in 1862 ; and he saw 
severe service. .As Colonel he went through all the 
marches and battles of the Atlanta Campaign, Sher- 
man's " March to the Sea," and received a serious 
wound at Salkahatchie, South Carolina, resulting in 
the loss of a leg. For gallantry in action and meri- 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



91 



torious conduct he was brevetted Brigadier-Gen- 
eral of Volunteers, in February 1865, being full 
Brigadier-General in March, and Major-General in 
June of that year. He was then, in 1S66, trans- 
ferred to the regular army as Colonel of the Forty- 
fifth Infantry, and in the following year was brevetted 
Brigadier-General for gallant services in the action 
of Rines Bridges, South Carolina, and Major-Gen- 
eral for services during the war. General Swayne 
was mustered out of the volunteer service, Septem- 
ber I, 1867, and subsequently served as Commis- 
sioner of the Freedmen's Bureau in Alabama and 




WAGER SWAYNE 

was active in organizing a common school system 
there, establishing also high schools in the more 
important cities, and 'I'alladega College. In this 
work he was engaged until July i, 1870, when, at 
his own request, he was placed on the retired list of 
the Army, and engaged in the ])ractice of law in 
Toledo, Ohio. Kenyon College conferred upon 
him the degree of Doctor of Laws in 1879. In 
1880 he removed to New York City where he was 
for ten years General C'ounsel of the Western Union 
Telegraph Company, and has a large business as 
counsel for various corporations. Since his removal 
to New York he has been nt different times Presi- 
dent of the Ohio Society, President of tlie Delta 
Kappa l''psilon Club, antl Commander of the Mili- 



tary Order of the Loyal Legion. He is at this time 
President of the .•\merican Church Missionary Soci- 
ety. Since 1895 his son, Noah Haynes Swayne, 2d, 
(Yale 1S93) has been associated with him in the 
law firm of Swayne & Swayne. 



SWAYNE, Alfred Harris 

Yale B.A. 1892. 
Born in Washington, D. C, 1870; prepared for Col- 
lege at St. Paul's School, Concord, N. H. ; graduated 
Yale, 1892 ; New York Law School, 1894 ; practised law in 
New York City, 1894-98; Asst. Manager N. A. Trust 
Co.'s Bank in Havana, Cuba, 1898-99 ; Sec'y Bankers 
Trust Co., New York City, since 1899. 

ALFRED HARRIS SWAYNE, Banker, was 
born in Washington, District of Columbia, 
April 5, 1870, the son of (General Wager and Ellen 
(Harris) Swayne. He comes of distinguished an- 
cestry which is more fully set forth in the biographi- 
cal sketches of his father, General Wager Swayne, 
and his grandfather, the late Hon. Noah Haynes 
Swayne, Justice of the Supreme Court of the United 
States, which appear in this volume. Alfred H. 
Swayne received his preparation for College in a 
course of three years at St. Paul's School, Concord, 
New Hampshire, from which he entered Yale in 
1888 and was graduated with the Class of 1892. 
Immediately upon graduation he began the study of 
law in the New York Law School, from which he 
was graduated with the degree of Bachelor of Laws 
in 1894. He was admitted to practice at the Bar 
of New York the same year. Mr. Swayne followed 
his profession in New York City for four years, and 
in the fall of 1898 retired from practice and be- 
came Assistant Manager of the North American 
Trust Company's Bank in Havana, Cuba. He re- 
mained in that position one year, resigning, Novem- 
ber I, 1899, to accept the office of Secretary of the 
Bankers Trust Company of New York City, which he 
now holds. While at Yale, Mr. Swayne became a 
member of Eta Phi and I) K E and he is now a mem- 
ber of the University and the Yale clubs of New 
York City. He is a Republican in politics. 



SWAYNE, Noah Haynes, 2d 

Yale A.B. 1893. 
Born in Toledo, O., 1871 ; student at St. Paul's 
School. Concord, N. H., 1885-89; graduated Yale, 1893; 
LL.B. New York Law School, 1895; admitted to the 
New York Bar, 1895; and practising in New York City 
as member of the law firm of Swayne & Swayne. 

NOAH HAYNl'lS SWAYNE, 2(1, I.awyer, was 
born in Toledo, Ohio, December 29, 1871, 

the son of Wager and Ellen (Harris) Swayne. The 



92 



UNIFERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



family is of the old Quaker stock of Pennsylvania 
and especially in its later generations is prominent 
in the history of the Republic. The father of the 
subject of this sketch, General Wager Swayne, served 
with great distinction throughout the Civil War, 
which he entered as Major in a regiment of Ohio 
Volunteers and was mustered out, after four years of 
service, as Colonel and Brevet Major-Gcneral of the 
regular army. His grandfather, the Hon. Noah 
Haynes Swayne, was one of the foremost jurists of 
the country, appointed by President Lincoln Justice 
of the Supreme Court of the United States and 




NOAII EI. SWAVNF. 

serving twenty years on that bench. His mother 
was a daughter of .Mfrcd Harris of Louisville, Ken- 
tucky. Noah Haynes Swayne, 2d, was for four years 
a student at St. Paul's School, Concord, New Hamp- 
shire, where he prepared for College, entering Yale 
in 1889 and graduating with the Class of 1893. 
Immediately upon taking his Bachelor's degree at 
Yale he entered the New York Law School, was 
graduated from that institution with the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws in 1895, admitted to the New 
York Bar the same year, and has since been in 
practice in New York City in company with his 
father under the firm name of Swayne & Swayne. 
Mr. Swayne was a member of the 1) K E at 
Yale and during his Senior year was President 



of the Yale Base Ball .Association. He found exer- 
cise for his literary talent as Editor of the Yale 
News, a position which he held for three years while 
an unilergraduatc, and as Chief Editor of the Coun- 
sellor, the law journal of the New York Law School, 
during his connection with that institution. He is 
a member and Director of the Yale Club of New 
York, of which he was one of the incorporators, and 
is President of the University Glee Club of New 
York City. In jjolitics he is a Republican. Mr. 
Swayne married, September 28, 1S98, Christine, 
daughter of Joseph G. Siebeneck, of Pittsburg, 
Pennsylvania. 



STRONG, Thomas Shepard 

Yale B A. 1855. 
Born in Setauket, N. Y., 1834 ; prepared for College 
under private tutor; graduated Yale, 1855 ; student at 
Albany Law School, and member New York Bar since 
1855- 

THOM.AS SHKP.ARl) .STRONG, Lawyer, was 
born at St. (Jeorge's Manor, Setauket, New 
York, .August lo, 1834, the son of Selah Brewster 
and Cornelia (LTdall) Strong. He attended the 
Marlborough Churchill Military School at Sing 
Sing and was prepared for College under the 
direction of the Rev. Dr. James S. Evans, grad- 
uating from Yale with the Class of 1855. He was 
admitted to the New York Bar in the following 
December after having completed his studies at 
the .Mbany Law School, and immediately entering 
the legal profession, has continued in active prac- 
tice ever since. Mr. Strong occupies a prominent 
position among the leading lawyers of the metrop- 
olis. His marriage took place September 29, 1870, 
with Emily Boorman. They have had nine chil- 
dren : Selah Brewster, Thomas Shepard, Jr., (Yale 
1896), James Boorman, (Yale Ph.D. 1896) Henry 
Tunstall, Mary (deceased), David H. (deceased), 
Benjamin R. (deceased), Seymour Robinson and 
Grenville Temple Strong. 



BEADLESTON, Henry Colwell 

Yale B.A. 1893. 
Born in New York City, 1871 ; graduated, Yale, 
1893; at the New York Law School, 1895; admitted 
to New York Bar, June 1S95; "°^ '" practice in New 
York City. 

H1:NRY COLWELL BE.ADLESTON, Lawyer, 
was born in New York City, May 31, 1871, 
son of William Henry and .Annie (('ohvell) Bea- 



UNIFERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



93 



dleston. Both of his parental fomilies are of English 
origin. He was prepared for College at St. Paul's 
School, Concord, New Hampshire, and under the 
instruction of a private tutor, and took his Bachelor's 
degree at Yale with the Class of 1S93. He read 
law in the office of Judge Henry E. Howland, at 
the same time attending lectures at the New York 
University Law School, and was awarded the degree 
of ]]achelor of Laws iiiin laiide in 1895. Ad- 
mitted to the Bar the same year he engaged in 
practice in the metropolis, and is now transacting 
a general law business but gives his special atten- 




HF.NRV C. liEAULESTON 

tion to real estate and corporation law. Mr. Bea- 
dleston is a member of the Wolf's Head, and 'H V>ov\-!] 
societies at Yale, the Psi Upsilon, the Bar Associa- 
tion, the University, Riding, Yale and New York 
Athletic clubs, New York City, and the Graduates' 
Club, New Haven. On December 22, 1896 he 
married ,'\licc Lee Post. 



RUGGLES, Samuel Bulkley 

Yale B.A. 1814, LL.D. 1859. 
Born in New Milford, Conn., 1800; graduated Yale, 
1814 ; studied law and admitted to the Bar, 1821 ; mem- 
ber of the New York Legislature, 1838; delegate to 
International Statistical Congress at Berlin, 1863, and 
The Hague, 1869; U. S. Commissioner to Paris Ex- 



position, 1867; Canal Commissioner, 1840-42, and 1858; 
Trustee of Columbia, 1836-81 ; LL.D. Yale, 1859; died 
1881. 

SAMUEL BULKLEY RUGGLES, LL.D., law- 
yer, was born in New Milford, Connecticut, 
April II, 1800. While he was yet a child, his 
father, Philo Ruggles, subsequently Surrogate and 
District .Attorney of I'uughkeepsie, New York, 
removed to that cit)-, and it was there that Samuel 
received his education and was prepared for College. 
After graduating from Yale in the Class of 1814, he 
studied law in his father's office and was admitted 
to the New York Bar upon coming of age. His 
entrance into public life was made in 1838 as a 
member of the Lower House of the Legislature, and 
there he at once made his mark by a report upon 
the finances and internal imijrovemcnts of the State 
of New York which he presented in his capacity as 
Chairman of the Legislative Committee on \\'ays 
and Means. This report, which dealt principally 
with the enlargement of the Erie Canal, led the 
state to enter upon a new policy in its commercial 
development. It was in connection with this great 
work of internal improvement that Mr. Ruggles 
attained his chief distinction. He hekl the posi- 
tion of Canal Commissioner in 1 840-1 84 2 and 
again in 1858, and his most important published 
papers relate to the problems involved in canal 
construction and operation, viewed from the posi- 
tion of economics and finance. Mr. Ruggles was 
also interested in the Bank of Commerce, a Com- 
missioner of the Croton .Aqueduct in 1842, delegate 
from the United States to the International Statisti- 
cal Congresses at Berlin and The Hague, and Com- 
missioner to the Paris Exposition of 1S67. In the 
City of New York he was identified with many 
large enterprises of public advantage. He laid out 
Grammercy Park and jjresentcd it to the surround- 
ing property-holders, hatl a considerable influence 
in shaping Union Square and gave the name 
to Lexington .Avenue. For many years he was a 
Trustee of the .Astor Library, and he served as 
a Trustee of Columbia from 1836 to the time of his 
death, a period of forty-five years. Yale conferred 
upon him the degree of Doctor of Laws in 1859. 
He died on Fire Island, New York, .August 28, 
1881. 



SALTONSTALL, Gurdon 

V.ili! B A. 17:5. 
Born in New London, Conn., 1708; graduated Yale, 
1725; Colonel of Militia, 1739; served at siege of Louis- 



94 



UNUERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



burg, 1745; member of General Assembly of Connecti- 
cut, 1744-48; of House of Assistants, 1748-54 ; Judge 
of Probate, 1751-85; Brigadier-General of Militia, 1776; 
died 1785. 

GUKDON SAL'IOXST.M.L, Soldier, was born 
in New Ix)ndon, Connecticut, December 
22, 1708. He was a direct descendant of Sir 
Richard Saltonstall, one of the grantees of the Mas- 
sachusetts Company under the charter that was 
obtained from Charles I., who came to America in 
1630. His father was the Rev. Gurdon Saltonstall 
(Harvard 1684), Governor of Connecticut from 
1708 to 1724, who set up the first printing press in 
the Colony, was active in establishing Vale College 
and took a leading part in the administration of its 
affairs during the early years of its existence. Gur- 
don Saltonstall the younger was graduateti at Vale 
in 1725 and early showed a predilection for military 
affairs, and a public life. He was appointed Colonel 
of .\[ilitia in 1739, served at the siege of Louisburg 
six years later, and was one of the Commissioners 
for fitting out expeditions against Canada. He was 
frequently elected a member of the General Assem- 
bly and held a seat in the House of Assistants from 
1748 to 1754. From 1751 until his death he was 
Judge of Probate at New London. In 1776, fol- 
lowing the Declaration of Independence, he was 
appointed IJrigadier-General of Militia and re- 
ported to General Washington at Westchester with 
nine regiments. He lived to see independence 
achieved, but not the establishment of the Republic, 
his death occurring in Norwich, Connecticut, Sep- 
tember 19, 1785. 



WARE, Edward Young 

Yale Ph.B. 1891. 
Born in St. Louis, Mo., 1869 ; educated in the pre- 
paratory department of Washington Univ., Smith 
Academy, St. Louis, Mo., and the Hill School, Potts- 
town, Pa. ; graduated Sheffield Scientific School of 
Yale University, i8gi ; post-graduate course at Cor- 
nell, i8gi-g2; with various electric concerns, 1893-96; 
with Edison Electric Co. of Los Angeles since 1896. 

EDWARD VOUNG WARE, Electrical Expert, 
was born in St. Louis, Missouri, January 1 2, 
1869, son of William Eliot and Martha Ellen 
(Voung) Ware. He is of direct descent in the 
male line from Robert Ware, a native of England, 
who came to Dedham, Massachusetts, in 1642. The 
ntmily has a remarkable record of military service. 
The second Robert Ware was a settler of Wrenthani, 
Massachusetts, and fought and defeated the Pequot 
Indians there ; Elias Ware was a soldier in the Revo- 



lutionary War ; l^lias Ware, 2d, served in the War 
of 1 81 2; and William ]•;. Ware was an officer in 
the Civil War. Edward V. Ware received his early 
education in the preparatory department of Wash- 
ington University, Smith Academy in St. Louis, and 
the Hill School at Pottstown, Pennsylvania, and 
graduated from the Sheffield Scientific School of 
Vale with the degree of Bachelor of Philosophy in 
1 89 1. After a post-graduate course at Cornell 
during 1S91 and 1892, Mr. Ware entered the fac- 
tory of the General Electric Company at Lynn, 
Massachusetts. He went to Denver in 1893, and 




EDW. V. WAKE 

remained in the employ of the Denver Consolidated 
Electric Company until 1896. Since that date he 
has been associated with the Edison Electric Com- 
pany of Los Angeles, California, and its predecessor, 
the W'est Side Lighting Company, and is now in 
charge of the company's new substation in Los 
Angeles. He is a member of the Theta Delta Chi 
Fraternity and the Military Order of the Loyal 
Legion. He married, July 14, 1897, Nellie Luticia 
McGuire. They have no children. 



BAUMAN, Alvin Louis 

Yale LL.B. 1895. 
Born in St. Louis, Mo., 1875; graduated Yale Law 
School, 1895; admitted to the Missouri Bar, 1896; 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



95 



elected Secretary and Treasurer of the L. Bauman public schools of that city. He fitted for College 

Jewelry Co., St. Louis, 1898. ^^ [l,g phinjps Academy at K.xeter, New Hampshire, 

Jt LVIN LOUIS I;AUM.\N, Lawyer, was born spending two years there, and matriculated at Vale 



in St. Louis, Missouri, January 21, 1875 
son of Meyer ami ^liriam (Rosenblatt) ISauman 




A. I.. B.-iUM.'iN 

He was educated in the public schools of his native 
city and under a private tutor, and his legal studies 
were pursued at the Yale Law School, from which 
he was graduated in 1895. In February of the 
following year he was admitted to the Missouri Bar, 
and having previously engaged in commercial pur- 
suits in St. Louis, was in January 1899 elected 
Treasurer of the L. Bauman Jewelry Company, of 
that city. Mr. Bauman is a member of the Colum- 
bia Club of St. Louis, also of the local Republican 
clubs. 



RHODES, William Castle 

Yale B.A. 1891. 
Born in Cleveland, O., 1869; educated in the Cleve- 
land public schools and at Phillips-Exeter Academy; 
graduated Yale, 1891. 

WILLIAM CASTLL: RIlODiCS is a native 
of the City of Cleveland, Ohio, born July 
5, 1869. His jiarents, Robert R. and Kate Newell 
(Castle) Rliodes, were both natives of Cleveland, 
and he received his early education in the excellent 



in 1887, taking the .Academic course and gradu- 
ating with the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1S91. 
He has resided in his native city since graduation, 
and has devoted himself to active business life. He 
takes no interest in the political struggles of the 
moment, and is not an active partisan of any 
P'irty- 

WOOLNER, Alfred Charles 

Yale B.A. 1893, LI^.B. 1895. 
Born in Louisville, Ky., 1872 ; educated in public 
and high schools at Peoria, 111. ; graduated Yale, 1893 ; 
Yale Law School, 1895 ; has practised law in New 
York City since 1896. 

ALFRED CHARLi:S WOOLNER, Lawyer, 
was born in Louisville, Kentucky, March 
14, 1872, the son of .Adolph and .Antonia (Black) 
W'oolner. He comes of Hungarian ancestry, the 
first member of the family in America having left 
Hungary after the revolution of 184S and settled in 




WlFOl.M K 



Kentucky. His parents remo\ed to IVoria, Illinois, 
when he was quite young, and he received his early 
education in the public schools of that place, after- 
wards attending the High School. He entered 



96 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



Yale in iSSg, graduating with the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts in i S93, and immediately entered upon the 
study of law at the Vale Law School, taking his 
degree two years later. In 1896 Mr. \Voolner 
began the practice of his profession in the city uf 
New York. He became a member of Phi Beta 
Kappa at College ; and Corbey Court and \\'aite 
Chapter of Phi Delta Plii at Law School, and is also 
a member of the Yale Club. 



ROGERS, William Augustus 

Yale M.A. (Hon ) 1880. 
Born in Waterford, Conn., 1832; graduated Brown, 
1857; student in Sheffield Scientific School, Yale, and 
Harvard Observatory ; Prof, of Mathematics and 
Astronomy, Alfred Univ., 1858-70 ; Asst. in Harvard 
Observatory, 1870-77; Asst. Prof. Astronomy, Har- 
vard, 1877-86 ; Prof. Astronomy and Physics, Colby 
Univ., 1886-98; M.A. Yale, 1880; Ph.D. Alfred Univ., 
1886; LL.D. Colby, 1891 ; Brown, 1892; died 1898. 

Wll.I.I.VM AUGUSTUS ROGERS, Ph.D., 
LL.D., Astronomer, was born in Water- 
ford, Connecticut, November 13, 1832. He was 
fitted for College at the preparatory school of 
.\lfred University, Alfred, New York, and graduated 
at Brown in 1857, subsequently returning to Alfred 
as Professor in Mathematics and Astronomy, which 
chair he held for thirteen years. Meantime he pur- 
sued his studies at the Sheffield Scientific School of 
Vale and as a special student in astronomy at the 
Harvard Observatory, and superintended the build- 
ing and equipment of the observatory at .Alfred. In 
1870 he was appointed .Assistant in the Harvard 
(Observatory, serving seven years in that capacity, 
and in 1877 was appointed .Assistant Professor in 
that branch. Professor Rogers continued at Har- 
vard until called to the Chair of Astronomy and 
Physics at Colby University in 1886. His special 
work at Harvard was the mapping of stars in a 
specified belt in the heavens, the observations 
requiring eleven years and their reduction fifteen 
years more. To overcome the difficulties of micro- 
meter measurements in this work, Professor Rogers 
invented methods of ruling on glass and metal which 
have m.nde possible the production of instruments of 
great accuracy. In practical mechanical work the 
Rogers-Bond universal comparator is one of the 
fruits of his study and inventive genius. In 1880, 
Professor Rogers was elected a fellow of the Royal 
Society of London, in 1885 he was made a member 
of the National Academy of Sciences, was Vice- 
Pre-ident of the American .Association for the 



Advancement of Science, 1882-1883, and in 1886 
was President of the American Society of Micro- 
scopists. Yale made him an honorary Master of 
.Arts in 1880, .Alfred L'niversity a Doctor of Philoso- 
phy in 1886, and Colby anil Brown a Doctor of 
Laws in 1891 and 1892 respectively. His con- 
tributions to the literature of science number some 
fifty papers upon his specialties. He died March i, 
1S98. 



DICKERMAN, Robert Kerr 

Yale B.A. 1893— Harvard LL.B. 1895. 
Born in Foxborough, Mass., 1870; graduated at Yale, 
1893; at the Harvard Law School, 1875; admitted to 
the Suffolk Bar in Boston, 1896; now practising in 
that city. 

ROBERT KERR DICKERMAN, Lawyer, was 
born in Foxborough, Massachusetts, June 
29, 1870, son of Lemuel and Maria (Knapp) 




ROBERT K. DICKERMAN 

Dickerman. He was educated in the public schools 
of his native town, at the Boston Latin School, 
Phillips (Andover) .Academy and at Yale, taking 
his Bachelor's degree with the Class of 1893. 
Entering the Harvard Law School at tlie beginning 
of the next College year he took tlie regular two 
years' course, and after spending another year in 
study with W. B. French, of Boston, he was ad- 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



97 



mitted to the Suffolk Bar in October 1896. Mr. 
Dickerman established himself as a practitioner in 
Boston, and is now practising in that city. 



PICKANDS, Henry Sparks 

Yale Ph.B. 1897. 
Born in Marquette, Mich., 1875; educated at public 
schools and University School of Cleveland, O.; grad- 
uated Yale Scientific School, 1897; has since been 
connected with the ore firm of Pickands, Mather & Co. 

HENRY SPARKS PICK.\NI)S was born in 
Marquette, Michigan, October 4, 1875, 
son of James and Caroline (Outhwaite) Pickands. 




HENRY S. PICK.\NDS 

He is of Irish-English ancestry, and his grandfather, 
the Rev. James Dinsmore Pickands, was a graduate 
of Princeton in the Class of 1825. Mr. Pickands 
received his early education in the public schools of 
Cleveland, Ohio, whither his parents removed when 
he was quite young, and after a preparatory course 
in the University .School of Cleveland entered the 
Sheffield Scientific School of Vale in 1S94, taking 
the three-year course in tlie civil engineering de- 
partment and graduating in 1897. In July of that 
year he entered the office of Pickands, Mather & 
Company, one of the largest handlers of iron ore, 
pig iron and coal, where he has since continued. 
He has never taken an active interest in the politi- 

VOL. V. — 7 



cal struggles of the day. Mr. Pickands is a mem- 
ber of the Yale University Club, of New Haven 
Connecticut, of the Cleveland Chamber of Com- 
merce, and the Union, University and Country 
Clubs of that city. 



McKIM, Winthrop 

Yale B.A. 1894. 
Born in New Windsor, N. Y.. 1872; graduated, Yale, 
1894; New York Law School, 1896; now practising in 
New York. 

WlNl'lIROP McKIM, Lawyer, was born in 
New Windsor, New York, July 31, 1S72, 
son of Haslett and Harriet Rogers (Winthrop) 
McKini. He is a representative on the paternal 
side of the McKinis of Baltimore, and on the ma- 
ternal side a direct descendant of Oovernor John 
Winthrop, of Massaclnisetts P>ay, and of Thomas 
Hicks, the last Mayor of New \'ork under British 
rule. He was prepared for his collegiate course at 
the Hopkins (Grammar School, New Haven, Con- 
necticut, and entering Yale with tlie Class of 1894, 
was graduated from that I'niversity with the degree 
of Bachelor of Arts. Having decided to enter the 




WINTHROP MoKIM 



legal profession, he attended the New York Law 
School, where he completed his studies two years 
later ; was admitted to the P.ar, and is now engaged 
in practice in the metropolis. 



98 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



ALEXANDER, William Cowper 

Princeton A.B. 1824. 
Born in Virginia, 1806; graduated Princeton, 1824; 
studied law, and admitted to the Bar, 1827 ; member 
of New Jersey Legislature and President of Senate ; 
Pres. Equitable Life Insurance Co., 1859-74; LL.D. 
Lafayette Coll., i860; member and presiding officer of 
Peace Congress, 1861 ; died 1874. 

WILLIAM COWPER ALEXANDER, LL.D., 
Lawyer, was born in Virginia in 1806, the 
son of Archibald and Janetta (Waddell) Alexander. 
He was of Scotch-Irish descent, his great-grand- 
fatiier having come to this country in 1736 and 
settled in Pennsylvania. His father, the Rev. 
Archibald Alexander, received the degree of Doctor 
of Divinity from Princeton in 18 10, and on the 
organization of the Theological Seminary at Prince- 
ton in 1812 was inianimoiisly chosen the leading 
Professor in that school. His mother was a daugh- 
ter of the Rev. Dr. Waddell, the celebrated blind 
preacher. William C. Alexander was graduated at 
Princeton in 1824, studied law, and was admitted to 
the Bar in 1827. He rose rapidly in his profession, 
acquiring a reputation for legal knowledge and for 
eloquence as a pleader, and also took an active part 
in political affairs. In the Legislature of New 
Jersey, to which he was elected for a number 
of terms, he held an influential position, and for 
several years he was President of the Senate. 
He was also nominated for Governor of the state 
and came within a few votes of election. In i860 
he received the degree of Doctor of Laws from 
Lafayette College in Pennsylvania, and in 1861 he 
was sent as a delegate to the Peace Congress and 
presided over its deliberations. On the organization 
of the Equitable Life Insurance Company in 1859, 
Mr. Alexander was made its President, and held 
that position throughout his life, withdrawing from 
politics in 1861 and devoting himself entirely to 
the business of insurance. He died in New York 
City, August 23, 1874. 



ANDERSON, Charles Thomas 

Princeton A.B. 1869. 
Born in Canaan, Pa., 1849 ; educated at Basking 
Ridge, Mendham, and Chester, N.J. ; graduated Prince- 
ton, 1869; Princeton Theological Seminary, 1873; held 
Pastorates in Port Kennedy, Pa., Peapack, Hacken- 
sack, and Rockaway, N. J. ; Pastor Reformed Church, 
Bound Brook, since 1896. 

CHARLES THOMAS ANDERSON, Clergy- 
man, was born in Canaan, Wayne county, 
Pennsylvania, September 26, 1849, the son of 



Alexander Gordon and Eliza Hoadley (Ames) 
Anderson. His father was a native of Scotland. 
His maternal grandmother was a daughter of Colonel 
John 11. Sclienck, a prominent patriot leader in the 
Revolution, with his brothers-in-law, (General Fre- 
linghuysen and Elias Vanderveer. His maternal 
great-grandfather Ames of Connecticut, also served 
in the war for Independence. His father was a 
soldier in the Mexican War. Charles T. Anderson 
began the study of Latin at IJasking Ridge, New 
Jersey, and also attended schools in Mendham and 
Chester, in the same state, from which latter place 




CHARLES T. ANDERSON 

he went to Princeton, where he took first prize in 
Freshman and Sophomore oratorical contest in Clio 
Hall during his Freshman year, was for two years 
President of his class, and took his Bachelor's degree 
in 1869. After teaching a select school in Scarsdale, 
Westchester county. New York, for a year he entered 
Princeton Theological Seminary, from which he was 
graduated in 1873. Having been licensed to preach 
by the Presbytery of Elizabeth the previous year, he 
was immediately, upon completing his divinity 
studies, ordained and installed Pastor of the Presby- 
terian Church at Port Kennedy, Pennsylvania. He 
was called to the Reformed Church at Peapack, 
New Jersey, in 1874, and remained there until 1883, 
when he went to Hackensack, in the same state, 



UNIl'ERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



99 



and in 1887 to Rockaway, where he officiated for 
the next six years. He spent the next three years 
in rest and travel. In 1896 he took charge of the 
Reformed Church in Bound Brook, and still retains 
that Pastorate. In 1879 he completed a religious 
work entitled : All Tilings Pertaining to Life, 
which was favorably received by the public. Mr. 
Anderson is President of the South Bound Brook 
Board of Education, and a member of the Cliosophic 
Society of Princeton, the American .Academy of 
Social and Political Science of Philadelphia, the 
Raritan Ministerial Association, the Princeton and 
Monday clubs and the Middlebrook Country Club. 
May 14, 1873, he married Joanna Bergen Van Liew, 
of Somerville, New Jersey, who died September 24, 
1S96, leaving him three children : Edna Van Liew, 
William Alexander and George Edwyu Anderson. 
His present wife, whom he married October 12, 
1898, was Isabella Van Syckel of Bound Brook, 
New Jersey. 



BACHE, Benjamin Franklin 

Princeton A.B. i8ig. 
Born in Monticello, Va., lEoi ; graduated Princeton, 
i8ig ; M.D. Univ. of Pennsylvania, 1823 ; Asst. -Surgeon 
U.S.N. 1824 ; Surgeon, 1828 ; Prof, of Natural Science, 
Kenyon Coll., 1838-41 ; Director Naval Laboratory at 
New York, 1853-71 ; retired with rank of Commodore, 
1871 ; died 1881. 

BENJAMIN FRANKLIN BACHE, M.D., Sur- 
geon, was born in Monticello, Virginia, Feb- 
ruary 7, 1801. He was the great-great-grandson of 
Richard Bache, Postmaster-General of the United 
States, who married Sarah the only daughter of Ben- 
jamin Franklin in 1767. I le was graduated at Prince- 
ton in 1S19, and at the Medical Department of the 
University of Pennsylvania in 1S23, receiving the 
degree of Doctor of IMedicine from that LTniversity 
and entering the United States Navy as Assistant- 
Surgeon in the following year. Dr. Bache continued 
in the Naval service throughout his life, with the 
exception of the period 1838-1.S41, when on leave 
of absence he filled the Chair of Natural Science 
and Natural Religion at Kenyon College, Ohio. 
He was promoted Surgeon in 1828, and from 1S32 
to 1836 was stationed at Pensacola Navy Yard; he 
served as Fleet Surgeon of the Mediterranean 
Sqtiadron in 1841-1844, and of the Brazil Squadron 
in 1 847-1850. In the latter year he was placed in 
charge of the Naval Hospital at New York, where 
he organized the laboratory which furnishes all. 
medical su])plies to the Navy. Of this he was 



made Director in 1853, and at the outbreak of the 
Civil War performed a notable service to the gov- 
ernment by restocking the laboratory on his own 
responsibility without awaiting orders. Dr. Bache 
reached the age of retirement in 1863, but was 
continued in his position at the laboratory until 
1 87 1, when he was a|)pointed Medical Director and 
retired from active service with the rank of Com- 
modore. After his retirement, he continued to 
reside in New York City, and died there, November 
2, 1881. 

BAYARD, Richard Henry 

Princeton A.B. 1814. 
Born in Wilmington, Del., 1796; graduated Prince- 
ton, 1814 ; studied law and practised in Wilmington ; 
U. S. Senator, 1836-39 ; Chief-Justice of Delaware, 1839 ; 
U. S. Senator, 1839-45; Charge d'Affaires at Brussels, 
1850-53; died 1868. 

RICHARD HENRY BAYARD, Statesman, was 
born in Wilmington, Delaware, in 1796, the 
eldest son of James A. Bayard (Princeton 1784), 
the Federalist leader, United States Minister to 
France and to Russia, and one of the Commissioners 
negotiating the Treaty of Ghent. His mother was 
the daughter of Governor Richard Bassett, of Dela- 
ware. Richard H. Bayard was graduated at Prince- 
ton in 1814, studied law and established himself in 
practice in his native city. His entrance into public 
life was in the exalted position of L^nited States 
Senator, to which he was chosen in 1836 to fill a 
vacancy caused by the resignation of Senator .Arnold 
Naudani. This seat he held until 1839, when he 
resigned to accept appointment to the Supreme 
Bench of Delaware as Chief-Justice. He was per- 
suaded, however, to return to service in the Senate 
when, in the same year, the Legislature elected him 
for the full term following, and took his seat again 
in that body at the opening of Congress in Decem- 
ber 1839. In 1845, at the expiration of his term 
in the Senate, Mr. Bayard returned to his law prac- 
tice in Wilmington, but in 1S50 was sent abroad to 
represent the United States at Brussels as Charge 
d'.Affaires. He remained at this post until 1853, re- 
turning to take up his residence in Philadel[ihia, 
where he died, ^L^rch 4, 1S68. Mr. Bayard married 
a granddatighter of Charles Carroll of Carriillton. a 
celebrated beauty. His younger brother, James A. 
Bayard, Jr., was United States Senator from Dela- 
ware, 185 I -1 869 ; a nephew was Thomas F. Bayard, 
who succeeded his father in the Senate and became 
Secretary of State in the Cabinet of President 
Cleveland. 



lOO 



UNIVERSITIES JND THEIR SONS 



BUSHNELL, John Ludlow 

Princeton A.B. 1894. 
Born in Springfield, O., 1872 ; attended school in his 
early youth at Springfield, and also at Golden Hill 
School in Kingston, N. Y.; graduated Princeton, 1894; 
went into business as clerk with the Warder, Bushnell 
& Clessner Co. of Springfield, O., and Chicago, 111., and 
is at the present time Assistant-Secretary of that 
company, also a stockholder. 

JOHN LUDLOW HUSHNKI.L, Hiisiness Han, 
w.is born in Springfield, Ohio, February 14, 
1S72, son of ex-Governor Asa Smith Bushnell ami 
ICllen (Ludlow) Bushnell. His maternal grand- 



of the Revolution. October 14, 1896, he married 
Jessie Manton Harwood. 




JOHN L. BUSHNELL 

father's family, the Ludlows, were natives of Ohio, 
coming there from New Jersey, while his father's 
ancestors, the Bushnells, were originally from Con- 
necticut. He received his College preparation in 
schools at Springfield, Ohio, and later at the Golden 
Hill School in Kingston, New York. He took the 
Academic course at Princeton and graduated in the 
Class of 1894. Immediately after graduation he 
went into business, becoming clerk with the Warder, 
Bushnell & Glessner Company of Springfield, Ohio, 
and Chicago, Illinois, manufacturers of the " Cham- 
pion " agricultural implements, and is now their 
Assistant-Secretary, also a stockholder in the com- 
pany. He is a member of the Ivy Club of Prince- 
ton and a member of the Ohio Society of the Sons 



BURNET, William 

Princeton A.B. 1749. 
Born in Elizabeth, N. J., 1730; graduated Princeton, 
1749 ; studied medicine and practised in Elizabeth and 
Newark, N. J.; delegate to Continental Congress, 1776; 
Surgeon-General, 1776 to the end of Revolutionary 
War ; member of Congress, 1780-81 ; died 1791. 

WILl.l.VM BURNET, M.D., Physician, was 
born in Elizabeth, New Jersey, December 
13, 1730, the son of a physician who came to this 
country from Scotland and settled in practice in 
that place. He was graduated at Princeton in 1749, 
a member of the second class sent out from tliat 
institution, and received his Master's degree in 
course. After studying medicine with his father he 
entered upon the practice of his profession in 
Elizabeth and subsequently in Newark, New Jersey, 
taking part also in public affiiirs anil holding from 
time to time, by appointment and election, various 
offices under the state government. At the opening 
of the Revolutionary War, he was sent as a delegate 
to the Continental Congress, and from 1776 until 
the close of the war he served as Surgeon-General of 
the .American Army for the Eastern District of the 
United States. During that struggle he suffered 
much loss of property through the depredations of 
the British troops, who carried off among other 
things his entire library, one of the most valuable 
collections in the Colonies at lliat time. He was 
also sent as a Representative to Congress from 
New Jersey in 1780-1781. Dr. Burnet died in 
Newark, October 7, 1791. One of his sons, Jacob, 
a graduate of Princeton in 1791, was among the 
leaders in the settlement of Cincinnati, Ohio, and 
became a Judge of the Supreme Court and United 
States Senator from that state. Another son, 
David G., was prominently concerned in wresting 
the territory of Texas from Mexico and was made 
Provisional President of the Lone Star Republic 
upon the declaration of independence in 1S36, 
pending the election of Houston. 



BARKLEY, William John 

Princeton C.E. 1893. 

Born in New Orleans, La., 1872; attended private 

schools in New Orleans, also at Lawrenceville, N. J. ; 

graduated Princeton, 1893, with C.E. degree; went into 

business in the fall of 1894, and is now a member of the 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



lOI 



firm of John Barkley & Co. ; also Secretary and Treas- 
urer of the Elhngton Plantin Co., sugar manufacturers. 

WlLLl.V.M JOHN B.ARKLKY, Merchant ami 
Manufacturer, was born in New Orleans, 
Louisiana, May 22, 1872, son of John and Josepliine 
(Henderson) Barkley. He received his early edu- 
cation in private schools in New Orleans, graduating 
also from a school in Lawrenceville, New Jersey. 
He entered the Scientific Department of Princeton 
and was graduated with the degree of Civil Engineer 
ill the Class of 1S93. In the fall of 1S94 he began 
his business life, and is at the present time an active 




W. J. BARKLEY 

member of the firm of John Barkley & Company, 
dealers in sugar, molasses, and rice, and is also Sec- 
retary and Treasurer of the Ellington Planting Com- 
pany, Limited, sugar manufacturers. Mr. Barkley 
is a member of various social clubs of New Orleans. 
He was married to Minnie Buckncr of New Orleans, 
January 24, 1899. 



CLINTON, Alexander 

Princeton A.B. 1750. 
Born in Ulster Co., N. Y., 1731 ; graduated Prince- 
ton, 1750; studied medicine and practised in Ulster and 
Orange counties, N. Y., 1753-92; died 1792. 

ALEX.VNDER CLINTON, M.l)., Physician, 
was born in Ulster county, New York, in 
I 78 1, the son of Cliarles Clinton who came to this 



country with a company of emigrants in 1729. The' 
grandfather of Charles Clinton, ^\■illiam, was an 
adherent of Charles I. of England, and fled to Ire- 
land after the defeat of the Royalists. His mater- 
nal grandfather was a Captain in the Parliamentary 
army. Charles was born in County Longford, Ire- 
land, where he lived until his twenty-ninth year, 
when he formed a company of relatives and friends 
to migrate and settle in America. The captain of 
the ship which they chartered to bring them to this 
country developed a piratical character on the 
voyage, first trying to starve them to death and at 
last consenting to land them on Cape Cod only 
upon the payment of a large ransom. A number of 
the party succumbed to the hardships of the voyage, 
among them a son and a daughter of Charles Clin- 
ton, but the survivors after landing on the Cape 
proceeded together to the Hudson River, about 
sixty miles north of New York, where they estab- 
lished their settlement in LHster county in 1731. 
The same year Alexander Clinton was born. His 
father, who held a professional position in the com- 
munity as land surveyor, and also in the judiciary 
and military service, sent the son to Princeton for 
his education, where he was graduated in 1750, 
among the third class to receive the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts from tliat institution. He subse- 
quently studied inedicine and returned to practise 
in his native place and that vicinity, where he 
gained a wide professional reputation. He died in 
Little Britain, Orange county. New York, in 1792. 
One of Alexander's brothers, (jcorge Clinton, became 
Governor of the State of New York and Vice-Presi- 
dent of the United States. His nephew DeW'itt 
Clinton was also Governor of New York and L'nited 
States Senator and is known in history as the 
creator of the great canal system of that state. 



CASSELBERRY, William Winfield 

Princeton A.B. i8gl, A.M. 1894. 
Born in Spring City, Pa., 1861 ; educated in public 
schools ; prepared for College at York, Pa., Collegiate 
Inst. ; graduated Princeton, 1891 ; Theological Semi- 
nary, 1894; Pastor Presbyterian Church Haddonfield, 
N. J., since 1894; Moderator West Jersey Presbytery, 
1897-98. 

WILLIAM WINFIELD CASSELl'.ERRV, 
Clergyman, was born in Spring City, 
Chester county, Pennsylvania, August 31, 1861, the 
son of Josiah Bean and Mary Ann (Landis) Cassel- 
berry. He attended the public schools of Potts- 
town, Pennsylvania, including the high school, after 
which he engaged in mechanical employment with 



I02 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



his father in support of the family. Uniting with 
the Presbyterian Church of Pottstown when fifteen 
years old, he entered zealously into church work as 
a Sunday-school teacher, then as a missionary, first 
in the local field and later in Philadelphia ; and 
when at length he felt called upon to enter the min- 
istry, he fitted for College at the York (Pennsyl- 
vania) Collegiate Institute, pursued the Academic 
course at Princeton and was graduated with the 
Class of 1 89 1. He completed his preparation for 
the ministry at the Princeton Theological Seminary 
in 1S94. As a student he was laborious, devoting 



in 1890-1S91. Moderator of the West Jersey Pres- 
bytery from September 1S97 to April 1898, and 
Commissioner to the (ieneral Assembly of Presbyte- 
rian Churches of the United States in the latter year. 
At Princeton he was a member of the American 
Whig Society and a leading spirit in its literary 
exercises. In Haddonfield he is popular both as 
Clergyman and citizen, and is a member of tlie 
Country Club. October 20, 1896, he married Mary 
Hoagland Hurd, of Dover, New Jersey, who died 
May 3 of the following year. 




WM. W. CASSELBERRY 

every moment that could be spared from study to 
the sen'ice of the church, continuing his missionary 
labors in Philadelphia, supplying vacant pulpits and 
spending one summer at Trenton as General Secre- 
tary of the Young Men's Christian .Association. The 
seven years devoted to his classical and theological 
training may be said to have been the busiest period 
of his life. .April i 7, 1 894, he was licensed to preach 
by the Presbytery of West Jersey, and on May 31 
of that year he was ordained to the ministr)' and 
installed P.astor of the Presbyterian Church at Had- 
donfield, New Jersey, which up to the present time 
has been the scene of his pastoral labors. Mr. Cas- 
selberry was President of the Philadelphian Society 
(Young Men's Christian Association) of Princeton 



DALLAS, George MifHin 

Princeton A.B. iSio. LL.D. 1854. 
Born in Philadelphia, Pa., 1792; graduated Princeton, 
1810 ; studied law and admitted to the Bar, 1813 ; Mayor 
of Philadelphia, 1829 ; U. S. Dist. Atty., 1829-31 ; U. S. 
Senator, 1831-33 ; Atty .-Gen. of Pennsylvania, 1833-35; 
U. S. Minister to Russia, 1837-39; Vice-Pres. of U. S., 
1845-49 ;. LL.D. Princeton, 1854 ; U. S. Minister to Great 
Britain, 1856-61 ; died 1864. 

GEORGE MIFFLIN DALLAS, LL.D., States- 
man, Vice-President of the United States, 
was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, July lo, 
1792, the son of Alexander James Dallas, Secretary 
of the Treasury in the administration of President 
Madison. He was graduated with tiie first honors 
at Princeton, in 1810, studied law in his father's 
office and was admitted to the Bar in 1813. In 
the same year he received appointment as private 
Secretary to Albert Gallatin on the mission to Russia 
for the negotiation of a treaty of peace with Great 
Britain, and on his return he was engaged for a 
short time in assisting his fiither in tlie Treasury 
Department at Washington. Mr. Dallas began the 
practice of law in New York City in 181 5, where he 
was Solicitor for the United States Bank, but in 
181 7 he accepted appointment as Deputy Attorney- 
General for Philadelphia county and thereafter gave 
his attention largely to politics and public affairs. 
He was active in the Jackson campaigns, in 1829 
was elected Mayor of Philadelphia, and on the ele- 
vation of General Jackson to the Presidency he was 
appointed United States Attorney for that District. 
This office he held for two years, resigning in 1831 
to take a seat in the United States Senate to fill the 
unexpired term of Isaac D. Barnard. Mr. Dallas 
declined re-election as Senator in 1833 and was 
made .Attorney-General of Pennsylvania in that year, 
applying himself to the duties of that office and to 
his private practice. In 1837 President Van Buren 
appointed him United States Minister to Russia, 



UNIVERSITIES ANB THEIR SONS 



lo- 



from which he was recalled at his own request after 
two years of service at St. Petersburg, when he 
resumed his law business in Philadelphia and his 
contest with James Buchanan for the leadership of 
the Democratic party in Pennsylvania and for nom- 
ination to the Presidency. In 1844, the conven- 
tion of the party at Baltimore nominated Mr. Dallas 
for Vice-President on the ticket with James K. Polk 
which was successful in the election of that year. 
Witli his rival, Buchanan, holding the office of Sec- 
retary of State, Vice-President Dallas had little 
influence on the policy of the administration ; but 
as presiding officer of the Senate he decided for 
many years the economic policy of the nation by 
giving his casting vote for the passage of the rev- 
enue tariff of 1846. This bill, which set aside the 
protection theory and levied customs duties for 
revenue only, passed the house of Representatives 
but was met by a tie vote in the Senate. The Vice- 
President broke the tie by his vote in favor of the 
measure. This he did continuously for the public 
good, although in violation of the pledges made to 
the protectionists of Pennsylvania by which the 
vote of that state had been secured for his party. 
In 1854 Princeton conferred upon him the degree 
of Doctor of Laws. In 1856, upon the election 
of James Buchanan to the Presidency, Mr. Dallas 
succeeded him as United States Minister to Great 
Britain and held that office until the appointment 
of Charles Francis Adams by President Lincoln in 
1 86 1. At the close of his diplomatic service, Mr. 
Dallas retired to private life and died in Philadel- 
phia, December 31, 1864. 



DALSIMER, Leon 

Princeton A.B. 1864. 
Born in New Orleans, La., 1844 ; educated Baltimore 
public schools, Prof. Newell's Private Institute, Prince- 
ton, and Maryland State Normal School ; shoe manu- 
facturer in Philadelphia since 1871 ; for over thirty-five 
years engaged in promoting reforms in Judaism, and 
closely identified with various Jewish educational, 
charitable and religious institutions. 

LEON DALSIMKR, Business Man and Philan- 
thropist, was born in Now Orleans, Louisi- 
ana, .April 2, 1S44, son of David and Caroline 
(Levy) Dalsimcr. His father was born in .Msace, 
Cicrmany, in October iSio, and his mollier was 
born in Nancy, France. David Dalsimer, who is 
now residing in Baltimore, emigrated to the United 
States in 1838, locating in New Orleans, and in 
1841 he visited Europe, was married and returned 



with his bride to that city in October of the same 
year. 'I'hey subsequently moved to Natchez, Mis- 
sissippi, and about the year 1856 removed to Balti- 
more, Maryland. Caroline (Levy) Dalsimer, who 
was born in December 1816, and died in June 
1896, was the mother of nine children: six sons 
and three daughters, eight of whom are living and 
Leon, the subject of tliis sketch, is the second son. 
Educated primarily in the common and high schools 
of Baltimore, he prepared for College at the private 
Institute of Professor M. .V. Newell, Superintendent 
of Public Education and Principal of the Maryland 




LEON DALSIMER 

State Normal School ; entering Princeton as an ad- 
vanced Soiihoniore, he took liis liaclu-lor's degree with 
the Class of 1 864. After reading law for a time, fail- 
ing iiealth caused him to relinciuish his legal prepara- 
tions, and with a view of adopting educational pursuits 
he took a course at tlie newly established Maryland 
State Normal School, from which he was graduated 
in 1 866, being one of the first four students to re- 
ceive the grammar school teachers' certificates from 
that institution. Continued ill health at length 
compelled the substitution of a more active career, 
and he therefore in 1867 became associated with 
his father and brothers in the manufacture and sale 
of shoes, first as Manager of one of the firm's retail 
departments and later connecting himself with the 



I04 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



manufactory. A prolonged labor agitation, resulting 
from its endeavor to introduce machinery into its 
fictory, caused tlie firm's removal to Philadelphia 
in 1 87 1, and he continued the shoe business in the 
Quaker City until 1898, when he retired from active 
mercantile work. .As early as 1S64 Mr. Dalsimer 
became active in promoting reform movements in 
Judaism, which he felt would have the effect of 
keeping that faith more closely in touch with the 
times and draw to it more securely the younger 
generation of .\merican Israelites, and in 1865 he 
made strenuous efforts to create a sentiment in favor 
of establishing a Hebrew National College, tlie chief 
aim of which should be to inculcate the spirit of 
reform among his people. He is a Trustee of the 
Reformed Jewish Temple of Keneseth Israel, pre- 
sided over by Rabbis Dr. Joseph Krauskopf and 
J. Leonard Levy ; is Chairman of the School Board 
ami the Lyceum connected with the Temple ; and 
a Director of the Jewish Immigration Society, 
and the Orphans' Guardians. On January 24, 
1872, he married Fannie Freidenrich of Baltimore ; 
they have two daughters : Blanche and Florence 
Dalsimer. 



J 



EDWARDS, Jonathan, Jr. 

Princeton A.B. 1765. D.D. 1785— Yale MA. (Hon.) 1769. 
Born in Northampton, Mass., 1745; graduated 
Princeton, 1765; studied theology and licensed to 
preach, 1765; Tutor at Princeton, 1767-69; Pastor at 
White Haven, Conn., 1769-95; D.D. Princeton, 1785; 
Pastor in Colebrook, Conn., 1796-99 ; Pres. of Union 
College, Schenectady, N. Y., 1799-1801; died 1801. 

'{)N.VrH.\N EDWARDS, Jr., D.D., Theologian, 
was born in Northampton, Massachusetts, 
.May 26, 1745, the second son of the Rev. Jonathan 
Edwards, President of Princeton, 1757-1758; and 
of Sarah Pierrepont, daughter of the Rev. James 
Pierrepont (Harvard 16S1) who was one of the 
founders of Vale. Jonathan, the younger, was born 
while his father was Pastor of the church in North- 
ampton, and when as the result of parish troubles 
that clergyman removed to Stockbridge and en- 
gaged in missionary work among the Housatonnuck 
Indians, the boy was but six years of age. The 
readiness with which he acquired the Indian lan- 
guage inspired his father with the purpose of 
making him a missionary to the aborigines, and to 
this end he sent him, in 1755, into the Susquehanna 
country in the care of a missionary laboring in that 
field to learn the Oneida dialect. The French and 
Indian War broke up this plan, and the removal of 



the family to Princeton and the death of his father 
soon followed by that of his mother, left the lad 
on his own resources. With the aid of friends he 
was prepared for College at the Grammar School in 
Princeton, and at the College there in 1761 and 
was graduated in 1765. .After graduation he studied 
theology under the Rev. Joseph Bellamy, served 
as Tutor for two years at Princeton, and in 1769 
was ordained Pastor of the Church at White Haven, 
Connecticut, receiving in that year the honorary 
degree of Master of Arts from Yale. His Pas- 
torate here was rendered unpleasant by doctrinal 
dissensions, and although it continued until 1795, it 
ended in his dismissal upon the pretext that the 
society was unable to support a minister. Dr. 
Edwards was at once called to the church in Cole- 
brook, Litchfield county, Connecticut, entering upon 
his ministry there in 1796. But meantime his repu- 
tation as a theologian and scholar had spreaii widely. 
Princeton had made him a Doctor of Diviuily in 
1785, and when a President was wanted for the 
newly established College at Schenectady, New Vork, 
he was selected for that position. He entered upon 
his duties as President of I'nion in 1799, and dis- 
played in that office during the short time that 
remained of his life a rare talent for administration 
as well as for instruction. He died there, August i, 
1801. 



T 



HENDERSON, Thomas 

Princeton A.B. 1761. 
Born in Freehold, N. J., 1743; graduated Princeton, 
1761 ; studied medicine and practised. 1766-76 ; Major, 
Lieut. -Col. and Brigade-Major in Revolutionary War; 
member of Provincial Council, 1777 ; Vice-Pres. Coun- 
cil of New Jersey, 1794, and acting Governor at time 
of Shays' Rebellion; member of Congress, judge and 
member of New Jersey Legislature ; died 1824. 

UIOMAS HENDERSON, M.D., Physician, 
Soldier and Statesman, was born in Free- 
hold, New Jersey, in 1743. He was graduated at 
Princeton in 1761, taking his ^L^ster's degree in 
course, studied medicine with Dr. Nathaniel Scud- 
der (Princeton 1751), became a member of the 
New Jersey Medical Society in 1766 and practised 
his profession in Freehold until the outbreak of the 
Revolutionary War. From that time Dr. Hender- 
son devoted himself entirely to the public service. 
He entered the army in 1776 as Second Major in 
Colonel Stewart's battalion of minute men and was 
shortly promoted to the full grade of Major, subse- 
quently becoming Lieutenant-Colonel of a battalion 



UNIFERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



105 



in Heard's Brigade and at the battle of Monmouth 
was made Brigade-Major. It was he who brought 
in person the news of Oeneral Lee's retreat to Gen- 
eral Washington at Freehold Court House. Dr. 
Henderson was appointed a member of the Provin- 
cial Council in 1777, and after the war, while 
practising his profession as occasion offered, was 
continuously in public life. He was Vice-President 
of the Council of New Jersey in 1794, and in the 
absence of Governor Howell he served as acting 
Governor of that state during Shays' Rebellion. In 
Washington's administration he was a Representa- 
tive in Congress, and after his retirement from that 
position he served as a member of the New Jersey 
Legislature, as Surrogate, as Judge of the Common 
Pleas, and as a Commissioner to determine the 
boundary between New Jersey and Pennsylvania. 
Dr. Henderson died in Freehold, December 15, 
1824. 



Fellows he was for many years a member, made 
him a Doctor of Divinity in 1797. Dr. Smith died 
in Haverhill, January 22, 1805. 



SMITH, Hezekiah 

Princeton A. B. 1762 — M.A. (Hon.) Yale 1772. 
Born on Long Island, N. Y., 1737; graduated Prince- 
ton, 1762; ordained to the ministry in Charleston, 
S. C; Pastor in Haverhill, Mass., 1 764-1 805 ; Chaplain 
in American Army, 1776-80; A.M. (Hon.) Brown, 1769, 
Yale 1772; D.D. Brown, 1797, and Fellow of the Uni- 
versity for many years ; died 1805. 

Hi;/EKL\H SMITH, D.D., Clergyman, was 
born on Long Island, New York, April 21, 
1737, and graduated at Princeton in 1762, there- 
after studying for the ministry to which he was 
ordained in Charleston, South Carolina. While on 
a visit to New England, in 1764, he became inter- 
ested in the organization of a Baptist church, at 
Haverhill, Massachusetts, where he was temporarily 
preaching, and settled tliere permanently as its 
Pastor, remaining in this relation to the end of his 
life. 'I'hrough his exertions the cluirch grew largely 
in numbers and inlluence and performed extensive 
mission work in New Hampshire and Maine. Dur- 
ing the War of Independence, from i 776 to i 780, he 
served as Chaplain in the patriot army, winning the 
esteem of (^leneral Washington and the confidence ami 
affection of the troops to wliose material as well as 
spiritu.al needs he ministered, frequently exposing his 
life in battle and in the care of tlie wounded. His 
7,eal in the cause of education was widely recognized. 
Brown gave him the honorary degree of ^L^ster of 
Arts in 1769 and Yale in 1772, ami the former 
University which he was especially active in estab- 
lishing and maintaining and of whose Board of 



BLACK, Jeremiah Sullivan 

Princeton A.B. i8gi. 
Born in Fayette Co., Pa., 1869 ; graduated at Prince- 
ton, 1891 ; studied law and is now practising in York, Pa. 

JEREMIAH SULLIVAN BL.U.'K, Lawyer, was 
born in Fayette county, Pennsylvania, Octo- 
ber 20, 1869, son of Chauncey Forward and Mary 




J. s. i;i,.\CK 

(Dawson) Black. His paternal grandfather was 
Jeremiali Sullivan Black, and his maternal grand- 
father was John L. Dawson, both of whom were 
natives of the Keystone State. He was fitted for 
College at St. Paul's School, Concord, New Hamp- 
shire, took his Bachelor's degree at Princeton with 
the Class of 1891, after which he studied law in 
York, Pennsylvania, and has practised his pro- 
fession in that town from December 1S94, to the 
present time. Mr. Black is a member of the Ivy 
Club at Princeton. Politically he is a Democrat. 
On February 7, 1891 he married Isabel C. Church; 
they have three daughters : Mary Dawson, Isabel 
Church, and Louise Dawson Black. 



io6 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



HENDERSON. John 

Princeton A.B. 1812. 
Born in New Jersey. 1795 ; graduated Princeton, 1812 ; 
studied law, removed to the West, and settled in prac- 
tice at Woodville, Miss., 1820; member of Mississippi 
Legislature, 1833; U. S. Senator, 1843-49; retired from 
public life, 1851 ; died 1857. 

JUlIN HI;NM)L:RS0\, Lawyer, was born in 
New Jersey in 1795 ^"'^ graduatcil at Prince- 
ton in 181 2. Following his graduation he studied 
law, was admitted to tiie Bar upon reaching his 
majority, and at once removed to the West, finally 
settling for the practice of his profession in Wood- 
ville, Mississippi. Here he concerned himself 
actively in public affairs, and in 1835 was elected to 
the Legislature, serving in that body for a number 
of years and distinguishing himself by his strenuous 
opposition to the policy of admitting members to 
the Legislature from counties newly formed out of 
Indian cessions. He was the author of the resolu- 
tions impeaching the validity of these laws. In 
1843 he was sent to the L^nited States Senate as a 
Whig, and at the end of his term allied himself 
with the expansionists of those days, favoring not 
only the annexation of Texas but the conquest of 
Cuba and Mexico. He went so far in this direction 
as to get himself into trouble through alleged com- 
plicity with the Lopez expedition. On the charge 
of violating the neutr.dity laws in this respect he 
was arrested with General John .\. Quitman in 1851 
and tried before the L^nited States District Court 
at New Orleans. He was acquitted but retired 
from public life and died in 1857 at Pass Christian, 
Mississippi. 



tion for the last year before entering College from 
his brother. He took the Academic course at 
I'rinccton with elective tendency toward medicine, 
and graduated with the degree of Bachelor of Arts 
in the Class of 1892. He pursued his medical 
studies at the University of Pennsylvania, graduating 
with honors in 1895. The same year he received 
the degree of Master of .Arts from Princeton. He 
began his professional career as Resident Physician 
at the Pittston Hospital, Pittston, Pennsylvania, in 
July 1895, and in .August of the following year 
opened an office for private practice in Pittston, 



GIBBY, Herbert Budd 

Princeton A.B. 1892, A.M. 1895. 
Born in Princeton, N. J., 1871 ; fitted for College at 
Princeton Preparatory School ; graduated Princeton, 
1892; M.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1895; Resident 
Physician at the Pittston Hospital, 1895 ; Physician and 
Surgeon, Pittston Hospital, 1896; Division Surgeon for 
the Lehigh Valley R.R., 1897. 

HLRIUIKI' liUDD GHiBY, M.D., Physician, 
was born in Princeton, New Jersey, Sep- 
tember 12, 1871, son of William J. and Helen Day 
(Budd) Gibby. He is of English and Scotch-Irish 
ancestry. His paternal grandfather was a Judge ; 
his father, William J. Gibby, a lawyer, was l^Iayor of 
Princeton for two terms and County School Super- 
intendent of Mercer county. He studied in the 
public schools and was prepared for College at 
Princeton Preparatory School, also receiving instruc- 




HKRnF.RT H. CIBBY 

and was appointed Attending Physician and Sur- 
geon to the Pittston Hospital in November 1896, 
a position he still retains. Since May 1897, he 
has been Division Surgeon for the Lehigh Valley 
Railroad. While at Princeton, Dr. Gibby was a 
member of the Cliosophic Society, and was a mem- 
ber of the D. Hayes .Agnew Surgical Society while 
at the University of Pennsylvania. The winter of 
1899 he spent at Vienna, pursuing his medical 
studies. 

HARRIS, John Morgan 

Princeton A.B. 1885. 
Born in Glamorganshire, Wales, 1861, and removed 
with his parents to Pottsville, Pa., the same year ; fitted 
for College at Wyoming Seminary and Scranton High 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



107 



School in Pa., graduating from the latter in 1881 ; 
graduated Princeton, 1885; A.M. 1888; studied law in 
Philadelphia and occupied a position in the Protho- 
notary's office in Lackawanna Co., 1885-88 ; admitted 
to the Bar of Lackawanna Co., 1887; Corporation Clerk 
at Harrisburg, Pa., 1889-91 ; First Asst. Dist. Attorney 
of Lackawanna Co., 1894; practising law since 1897. 

JOHN MORGAN HARRIS, Lawyer, was born 
in Glamorganshire, Wales, August 14, 1861, 
tlie son of Morgan J. ami .'\nn (Price) Harries. 
The original form of his name was " Harries " but 
Mr. Harris ilropped the "e" while at Princeton. 
He removed with his parents to Pottsville, Pennsyl- 
vania, in 1 86 1. His great-great-grandfather, John 
Harries, a farmer, was the first of the name to 
settle in Glamorganshire, Wales. He married 
Elizabeth, daughter of Rev. William (Iriffith, a 
Nonconformist minister. A branch of the Harries 
family emigrated from Glamorganshire to Philadel- 
phia in 1709. His mother's ancestors, the Prices 
and Reeses, were originally from Caermarthenshire, 
Wales. His maternal great-grandfather, William 
Price, was a subaltern officer in the British Navy. 
John Morgan Harris received his early education in 
the public schools of Lackawanna county, Pennsyl- 
vania, at Wyoming Seminary and the Scranton High 
School, graduating from the latter as Class Orator, 
in the Class of 1881. He entered Princeton 
that fall and graduated as Bachelor of Arts with 
the Class of 1885, receiving the degree of Master of 
Arts three years later. He began the study of law 
in Philadelpliia in 1885, and in the early part of the 
next year received an appointment in the Prothono- 
tary's office in Lackawanna county, filling this posi- 
tion for two years. .Vt the same time he pursued 
the study of law in the office of Hon. Henry i\L 
Edwards, and was admitted to the Bar of Lacka- 
wanna county in June 1887, on motion of Hon. W. 
H. Jessup, at once beginning active practice. He 
was afterwards admitted to practice in the Sujierior 
and Supreme Courts of Pennsyl\-ania, and in the 
Circuit and District Courts of the United States. 
In 1889 he received ap|)ointment in the state 
service as Corporation Clerk at Harrisburg, Penn- 
sylvania, where he remained until 1891, and in 
1894, he was made First Assistant District .Attorney 
of Lackawanna county, serving in that capacity most 
successfully for three years, and resigning in 1897 
to resume the i)rivate i)ractice of law at Scranton. 
Mr. Harris is Chairman of the Board of E.^aminers 
for admission to the I5ar of the Scranton, Pennsyl- 
vania, Judicial District, and is also a member of the 
Committee on Legal Education of the State Bar 



Association and has been one of the most active 
members of the Bar in the effort to raise the stand- 
ard of legal education in that state. He is Presi- 
dent of the Alumni Association of Scranton High 
School, President Princeton University .Mumni 
Association of Northeastern Pennsylvania, \'ice- 
President of the Scranton Civics Club, and a mem- 
ber of several Masonic orders. Mr. Harris is an 
active member of the Republican party, and has 
been frequently called upon to represent it as delegate 
in nominating conventions. He is prominent among 
public speakers as a man of recognized ability, and 




JOHN M. HARRIS 

is often requested to deliver literary and historical 
addresses, by Caledonian societies, by Welsh-.\nieri- 
cans for their celebration of St. David's Day, and 
by others. Mr. Harris has been a noted worker in 
the interest of his ii/i/ni mahr since his graduation. 



LEWIS, Edwin Augustus Stevens 

Princeton A.B. 1891. 
Born in Paris, France, 1870 ; received his early edu- 
cation at St. John's School, Sing Sing, N. Y. ; gradu- 
ated Princeton, 189 ; New York Law School, 1893; 
admitted to the New Jersey Bar as an Attorney, 1894, 
and as a Counsellcr-at-Law in 1897. 

aiWIX Al-GUSTUS STEVENS LEWIS, 
Lawyer, was born in Paris, France, March 
15, 1S70, the sun of Edward Parke Custis and Mary 



E 



[o8 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



Picton (Stevens) Lewis. His paternal great-grand- 
father was Lawrence Lewis, son of General Fielding 
Lewis and Betty (Washington) Lewis, the latter 
being a sister of George Washington. His pa- 
ternal great-grandmother was Nellie Custis, grand- 
daughter of Martha Washington. On his mother's 
side he is a grandson of Ivlwin A. Stevens of Castle 
Point, Hoboken, New Jersey. He received his pre- 
liminary education at St. John's School, in Sing Sing, 
New York, where he was a student from 1S82 until 
1887. He graduated from Princeton with the Class 
of 1891, and studied law in the New York Law 




LUWIX A. S. LEWIS 

School, graduating from that school in June 1893, 
and being admitted to the New York Bar in the 
spring of 1893, and the next year to the Bar of 
New Jersey as an attorney, 'i'hree years later he 
was admitted to the New Jersey Bar as a counsellor- 
at-law, and has since been engaged in the practice 
of his profession at Hoboken, New Jersey. Mr. 
Lewis was appointed .\ttorney to the Hoboken 
Board of Health in May 189S, a position he still 
holds. He is Referee in Bankruptcy for the Coun- 
ties of Hudson and Bergen in the District of New 
Jersey under the Bankruptcy .Act of 1898. In the 
spring of 1 899 he was appointed by Governor Voor- 
hees a member of the commission to advise on the 
question of amalgamating all municipalities of Hud- 



son county. New Jersey, into one city. He is one 
of the Standing Committee of the Diocese of New- 
ark, New Jersey, and a member of the Princeton 
and L'niversity clubs of New York, the Association 
of the Bar of New York City and the Ivy Club of 
Princeton, New Jersey. In 1894 he received the 
degree of Master of .\rts from his a///iti mater. In 
politics he is a Gold Democrat. Mr. Lewis was 
married, January 7, 1899, to .\lice Stuart, daughter 
of General H. H. Walker, of Morristown, New 
Jersey, formerly of Virginia. 



HARPER, Robert Goodloe 

Princeton A.B. 1785, LL.D. 1820. 
Born in Fredericksburg, Va., 1765; served as a youth 
in the Revolutionary War; graduated Princeton, 1785; 
admitted to South Carolina Bar, 1786 ; member of South 
Carolina Legislature ; member of Congress, 1795-1801 ; 
Col. and Maj.-Gen. in the War of 1812 ; removed to 
Maryland, 1813, and elected U. S. Senator from that 
state, 1816 ; died 1825. 

ROBERT GOODLOE HARPER, LL.D., Law- 
yer, was born in Fredericksburg, Virginia, in 
I 765, the son of poor parents who removed to Gran- 
ville, South Carolina, during his childhood. While he 
was yet a youth, he joined a troop of cavalry under 
General Greene, and served during the closing cam- 
paign of the Revolutionary War in the South. He 
then entered Princeton, where he was graduated in 
17S5, taking his Master's degree in course, and 
studied law in Charleston, South Carolina. In i 786 
he was admitted to the Bar, and soon made his 
mark in his profession and in public affairs, being 
elected to the Legislature, and subsequently, in 
1795, to Congress, where he served three terras, a 
warm supporter of the administration of Washing- 
ton and John .Adams. In the War of 181 2, he 
entered with the commission of Colonel and won 
promotion to Major-General, and shortly after the 
declaration of peace, married the daughter of 
Charles Carroll of Carrollton and removed to Mary- 
land, establishing himself in the practice of law in 
Baltimore where he attained eminence at the Bar. 
.Among the noted cases in which he appeared was 
that of the impeachment in 1804 of Judge Samuel 
Chase, of the United States Supreme Court, in 
which he was of counsel for the defence. General 
Harper was elected United States Senator from 
Maryland in 1 8 1 6, but resigned to take the position 
of candidate for Vice-President on the Federalist 
ticket in that year. He later made a prolonged 
visit in Europe with his family, and on his return in 



UNIVERSITIES JND THEIR SONS 



109 



1820 did not resume his connection with party poli- 
tics but gave much attention to the promotion of 
internal improvements. He was an active member 
of the American Colonization Society, and the town 



preme Court, also to practice in the courts of the 
Kighth Judicial District of Maryland and the Bar of 
the Supreme IJench of Baltimore. In 1893 he was 
admitted as a counsellor in the United States Courts. 



of Harper, near Cape Palmas, Africa, was named in Mr. Loucks is at the present time actively engaged 
his honor. General Harper died in Baltimore, Jan- in the practice of his profession in Philadelphia, and 
nary 15, 1825. is alsoamember of the firm of Z. K. & H.J. Loucks' 

Sons of York, manufacturer of high grade (lours and 

LOUCKS, Zachariah Kepner dealers in grain, and has, besides, real estate inter- 

Princeton A.B. 1881, A.M. 1888. ^sts iu Philadelphia and York, and is connected with 

Born in Spring Garden Township, York Co., Pa., the management of various Other enterprises. Mr. 
1861 ; attended York County Academy and Franklin and I.oucks has been counsel in many important cases 
Marshall College; graduated Princeton, 1881 : M.A. 
1888; studied law and admitted to the Philadelphia 
Bar, 1887, to the Pennsylvania Supreme Court, 1889, 
and as a Counsellor in the U. S. Courts, June 1893; is 
engaged in practice in Philadelphia at the present 
time. 

ZACHARIAH KEPNER LOUCKS, M.A., 
Lawyer, was born in Spring Garden 
Township, York county, Pennsylvania, December 
28, 1 86 1, the son of Zachariah Kalbaugh and .Sarah 
Ann (Ebert) Loucks. The first member of the 
Loucks family to settle in .\merica was his paternal 
great-grandfather, John George Loucks, who emi- 
grated from a village near the Alsace-Lorraine 
frontier to the L^nited States in 1780. His grand- 
father was George Loucks, commonly known in 
his native state and to the trade as miller George. 
His father was a noted pioneer in the manufacture 
of high grade flours and prominent in the develop- 
ment of York county, being at the time of his death 
President of the First National Bank of York. His 
maternal grandfather was Colonel Michael Ebert of 
Spring Garden Township, whose ancestors caine 
from Wurtemberg, Germany, and settled in York 
county in 1742. Zachariah Kepner Loucks re- 
ceived his preliminary education at the township 
schools and the private school of Rev. William 
Vaughn at York, also attended the York Cotmty 
Academy, and Franklin and Marshall College. He 
entered Princeton in 1878, graduating with thedegree 
of Bachelor of ,'\rts in the Class of 1 881, and receiv- 
ing the degree of Master of Arts in the same Col- 
lege in 1888. He studied law with John Gibson, 
afterwartls Judge of tlie Nineteenth Judicial Dis- 
trict, later with Hon. Robert J. Fislier, an ex-Judge 
of the same district, and upon his removal to Phila- 
delphia continued his studies tmder the direction 

of Hon. George Junkin, also attending law. lectures ,,„, r r^r^r^ r^-L. , t^ 
, ,, . \. „ , „ , . , KELLOGG, Charles Dor 

at the I niversity of Pennsylvania. He was admitted „. . o .c 

-' ^ Princeton A.B. 1861. 

to the Philadel|>hia Bar in 18S7, and two years later g^^^ -^ ^nn Arbor. Mich.. 1842 ; prepared for College 

was admitted to the Bar of the Pennsylvania Su- at Peekskill, N. Y., Academy; graduated Princeton, 




Z. K. LOUCKS 

tried in the Pennsylvania Supreme Court, before the 
Baltimore Circuit Court, and in the United .States 
Circuit Court of the Eastern District of Pennsyl- 
vania, and his legal abilities have won t"or him a 
prominent position among the successful members 
of the Philadelphia Bar. In politics he is a Repub- 
lican, but has never cared to enter public life. He 
is a graduate member of the .American Whig So( ioty 
of Princeton, and an active member of the Law .Acad- 
emy, and of the Law Association, of Philadelphia. 



I lO 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



1861 ; Princeton Theological Seminary, 1863 ; entered 
the Presbyterian ministry, and Pastor of church in 
Sandy Hill, N. Y., since 1879. 

CHARLES DOR KKLLOGG, Clergyman, was 
born in Ann Arbor, Michigan, July 3, 1S42. 
His parents were Dan \V. and Esther Almira (Ijull) 
Kellogg, and he traces his descent in the ninth gen- 
eration from John and Priscilla Alden. Charles 1). 
Kellogg was fitted for College at the rcekskill, New 
Vork, Academy, from which he went to Princeton, 
graduating witii the Class of 1 861, and was jirepared 
for the Presbyterian ministry at the Princeton Theo- 
logical Seminary. His ordination and first installa- 



ward, in the same state. Mr. Kellogg married 

.Mary J. liaiicus, and has four cliildren : Joseph 

.Augustus, Florence Grace, Charles Withrow and 
Kate Kellogg. 




CHARLES UOK KELLOGG 

tion took place in 1863 at the First Presbyterian 
church of Wilmington, Delaware, where he labored 
for four years, at the expiration of which time he 
became Pastor of the Reformed church at Bacon 
Hill, New York, and in 1868 took charge of the 
Reformed church in the neighboring village of Fort 
Miller, retaining both until 1872. Called to the 
North Reformed Church, Passaic, New Jersey, in 
the latter year, he retained that Pastorate until 
1879, when he assumed his pastoral duties at Sandy 
Hill, New Vork. There he has labored continu- 
ously and with excellent results for the past twenty 
years, and in conjunction with that charge has 
officiated at the Presbyterian church at Fort Ed- 



McCULLOCH, Hugh 

Princeton LL. D. 1866. 
Born in Kennebunk, Me., 1808; student at Bowdoin, 
Class of 1828, leaving College 1826; taught school, 1826- 
29; studied law and removed to Fort Wayne, Ind., 1833 ; 
Cashier and Manager, Fort Wayne branch of State 
Bank of Indiana, 1835-56; President, 1856-63; U. S. 
Comptroller of the Currency, 1863-65 ; Sec'y of the 
Treasury, 1865-69 ; engaged in banking in London, 
Eng., 1871-78; U. S. Sec'y of the Treasury, 1884-85; 
died 1895. 

HUGH Mcculloch, LL.D., Financier, Sec- 
retary of the Treasury of the L^nited States, 
was born in Kennebunk, Maine, December 7, 1808. 
He entered ISowdoin College with the Class of 1828 
and pursued the Academic course through the 
Sophomore year, but was compelled by illness to 
leave College in 1826. .After teaching school for 
three years he studied law for a time in Kennebunk 
and in Boston, Massacliusetts, and then removed to 
the \\'est, settling in Fort Wayne, Indiana, in 183^^. 
It was there that he discovered his bent for finance 
and engaged as Cashier and Manager of the Fort 
\\'ayne branch of the State Bank of Indiana. In 
this position he continued for twenty-one years, 
mitil, in 1856, he was made President of the Bank 
of the State of Indiana. In 1863, when the Gov- 
ernment was concerned in putting into operation 
tlie national banking system. Secretary Chase called 
Mr. McCulloch to Washington to undertake the orga- 
nization of the newly created bureau of Comptroller 
of the Currency. In this work Mr. McCulloch was 
highly successful, his rei)utation as a conservative 
financier having great weight with the managers of 
large state banks in influencing thera to reorganize 
under the national law. When Secretary Fessenden 
resigned the Treasury portfolio in 1865, President 
Lincoln appointed Mr. McCulloch his successor, 
and he held that seat in the Cabinet until the acces- 
sion of President Grant in 1869. He entered upon 
the duties of Secretary of the Treasury at a time 
of great embarrassment for the Government, with 
heavy and pressing demands and an empty Treas- 
ury. Through his skill and energy, the finances of 
the nation were extricated from difficulty and the 
reduction of the great war debt was begun before 
the close of his first year in office. After leaving 
Washington, Mr. McCulloch engaged in the banking 



UNIVERSiriES ANB THEIR SONS 



I 1 1 



business in London, England, from 1871 to 1878, 
then returning to the United States, and in October 
1S84, upon the resignation of Secretary (jresham 
from the Treasury Department, he was called upon 
by President Arthur to fill that position until the 
close of his administration on March 4 following. 
This service closed the public labors of Mr. McCul- 
loch, who then retired to private life, residing in 
Washington and on his farm in Maryland and occu- 
pying his leisure with the literature of finance, con- 
tributing frequent articles on financial and economical 
questions to the magazines and reviews. Princeton 




Lloyd. His grandfathers were John Lloyd, son 
of Abraham and W. S. Hendrie, son of Joseph 
John Hendrie. The maiden name of his maternal 
grandmother was Ann Shewell and among his 
ancestors of that name were Julia, Robert, and 
Walter Shewell. From Sanders Military Insti- 
tute in Philadelphia, he went to Myers Military 
.•\cademy. West Chester, Pennsylvania, entering 
Princeton from the latter as a Sophomore and 
graduating in 1869. He studied law and \ii)on 
his admission to the Philadelphia Bar in 1871 
he located for practice in that city. In March 
1884, lie accepted the post of .Assistant (Gen- 
eral Claim .Agent of the Missouri Pacific Railway, 
but left the service of that company in July of 
that year to become General Claim .\gcnt of the 
Wabash Railroad, and was later made .Assistant 
Secretary of that company. He held both of 
these positions, with headquarters in St. Louis, 
Missouri, until March i, 1899, when he removed 
to the City of New York, and is now President of 
the Atlantic Export Company. In politics Mr. 
Lloyd is a Republican and was formerly active in 
campaign work. He is a member of the .Sons of 
the .American Revolution and of the Mercantile and 
St. Louis clubs. At Detroit, Michigan, November 
8, 187 1, he married Cornelia P., daughter of 
Martin and Elizabeth Oklen V'oorhees, formerly 
of Princeton, New Jersey. He has five chiUlren : 
Martin Van Voorhees, born Sei)tember 20, 1872 ; 
Julia Hendrie, born .April 12, 1876; Henry Dun- 
lap, born January 4, 1878; Ernest Morris, born in 
February 18S0; and .Archibald Talmage Lloyd, 
born in September 1885, and died July 5, 1S86. 



HUGH Mcculloch 



conferred upon him the degree of Doctor of Laws 
in 1866. He died in Washington, District of 
Columbia, May 1895. 



LLOYD, Henry Albert 

Princeton A.B. 1869. 
Born in Doylestown, Pa., 1849; educated at military 
schools in Philadelphia and West Chester, Pa. ; grad- 
uated Princeton, i86g ; admitted to Bar, 1871 ; practised 
law, 1871-84 ; Asst. Secy, and General Claim Agent 
Wabash Railroad, with headquarters in St. Louis, Mo., 
1884-99. 

HENRY ALBERT LLOYD, Prcbident of the 
.Atlantic Export Company, was born in 
Doylestown, Pennsylvania, November 12, 1849, 
the son of I'.. Morris and Julia D. H. (Hendrie) 



NOEL, Henry Graves 

Princeton A.B. 1889. 
Born in St. Louis, Mo., 1868; fitted for College at 
St. Louis public and private schools ; spent Freshman 
year at Washington and Jefferson College in Pa., 
then entered Princeton and graduated in the Class of 
i88g; entered office of H. M. Noel & Co., dealers in 
municipal bonds and investment brokers, in 1889; since 
1897 has been Vice-President of the firm of Noel- 
Young Bond & Stock Company. 

HI;NR\' GRAVES NOEL, Broker, was born 
in St. Louis, Missouri, .August 18, 1S68, 
son of Henry .Martyn and Julia I'",dwards (Graves) 
Noel. His father has been engaged in the banking 
and brokerage business in St. Louis since his youth. 
His great-grandfather came from England to North 
Carolina in the latter half of the eighteenth century. 



I I 2 



UNIVERSITIES JND THEIR SONS 



He was in the Revolutionary Army and fought at 
the Battle of (}uilford Court House. His grand- 
father, who settled in Missouri early in life, was the 
first Presbyterian minister to preach South of the 
Osage River. Henry G. Noel was fitted for College 
at public and private schools in St. I-ouis, spent his 
Freshman year at Washington and Jefferson College 
in Pennsylvania, and then completed his College 
course at Princeton, entering in 1886 and gratlu- 
ating in the Class of 1889. Immediately after 
his graduation he entered the office of H. M. Noel 
& Company, dealers in municipal bonds and invest- 




HENRY GRAVES NOEL 

ment brokers, in St. Louis, and has continued in 
that business ever since, being at the present time 
Vice-President of the firm (incorporated in 1897) 
of Noel-Young Bond & Stock Company. He 
was married, June 3, 1890, to Lena Bird ^Vylie, 
of St. Louis and has four children : Lois Edwards, 
Henry Martyn, .Mice Rose and Lena Lovett Noel. 



Mcpherson, John Bayard 

Princeton A.B. 1866. LL.D. 1899. 
Born in Harrisburg, Pa., 1846; educated at private 
schools in Harrisburg and public schools in Sidney, 
O. ; graduated Princeton, i866: studied law and ad- 
mitted to the Bar, 1870; located for practice in Harris- 
burg ; District Attorney, 1875-77 ; Judge of Common 



Pleas from 1882 to 1899 ; appointed U. S. District 
Judge for Eastern District of Pennsylvania, March, 
1889; President Central Pa. Princeton Alumni Asso- 
ciation, 1890; LL.D. Princeton, 1899. 

JOHN B.\V.\R1> Mcl'HERSON, LL.D., United 
States District Judge in Philadelphia, Pennsyl- 
vania, was born in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, Novem- 
ber 5, 1S46, the son of William Carrick and Elizabeth 
(Wallace) McPherson. Besides the McPhersons 
and Wallaces (Scotch-Irish), he is descended from 
the Cumminses (also of tliat race), and through 
intermarriage from the Lenharts and Ilarbachs 
(German), and the Hoges and Evanses (Welsh). 
Having pursued his primary studies in Harrisburg 
])rivate schools he prepared for College in the pub- 
lic schools of Sidney, Ohio, and entering Princeton 
with the Class of 1866, was graduated prior to his 
twcntietli birthday. He read law in Harrisburg and 
Chicago commencing and completing his studies in 
the first-named city, where he located for practice 
after his admission to the Bar in 1S70. From 1874 
to 1 8 78 he served as District Attorney for Dauphin 
county, and was appointed Judge of the Court of 
Common Pleas in I'ebruary 1S82, to serve for the 
remainder of the year. He was elected to that 
jiost by popular vote in tiie following November for 
the full term of ten years without opposition, and 
re-elected in 1892 under the same circumstances. 
In March 1S99 he was appointed by President 
McKinley L^nited States District Judge for the 
Eastern District of Pennsylvania. Later in the 
year, he was appointed a Professor in tiie Law 
School of the University of Pennsylvania. In June 
I S99, he received the degree of Doctor of Laws 
from Princeton, from the L'^niversity of Pennsylvania 
and from Franklin and Marsliall College. Judge 
McPherson was President of the Central Pennsyl- 
vania Princeton .'Mumni .Association from 1S90 to 
1900, Vice-President of the Dauphin County His- 
torical Society from 1895 to 1900, and has been a 
Trustee of Wilson College for Women since 1893. 
He is a member of the Pennsylvania Bar, and Fores- 
try, Associations, of the Sons of the .Xmerican Revo- 
lution, the Pennsylvania Scotch-Irish and German 
societies, the League of .American Wheelmen and 
the University Club of Philadelphia. In politics 
he is a Republican. December 30, 1S79, he married 
.Annie Cochran, daugliter of Judge David Watson 
and Mary Reigart (Slaymaker), Patterson, of Lan- 
caster, Pennsylvania. His children are : Mary Pat- 
terson, born October 16, 18S0; and Elizabeth 
Wallace, McPherson, born October 13, 1SS2. 



UNirERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



113 



POST, Edward Rogers 

Princeton A.B. 1862 — Columbia M.D. 1867. 
Born in Sag Harbor, N. Y., 1842; received his early 
education in a private school, in the Academy at 
Southampton, and from a private Tutor; graduated 
Princeton, 1862; College Physicians and Surgeons of 
Columbia, 1867: in the retail drug business in New- 
burgh and Lancaster, N. Y., 1868-73; in the wholesale 
and retail drug business in Newburgh, N. Y., since 
>873- 

EDWARD ROGERS POST, .M.D., Mcrcliant, 
was born in Sag Harbor, Suffolk county, 
New Vork, May 2, 1842, son of William Rogers 



Jagger, August 10, 1865. They have four children : 
Ada Rogers, Frances, \Villiam Hampton and Lily 
Hampton Post. 




EDWARD R. POST 

and Charlotte (Parker) Post. He is of English 
origin, being a descendant of Richard Post who set- 
tleil in Southampton, Long Island, about 1640. In 
his early youth he attended a private school at Sag 
Harbor, then went to the Southampton Academy, 
where he remained from 1852 until 1857, and then 
spent four months with a private tutor at New 
Brunswick, New Jersey. After three years and a 
half at Princeton, he graduated in the Class of 1862. 
From 1863 to 1867 he studied medicine at Colum- 
bia in New York, and the following year engaged 
in the retail drug business in Newburgh, New York- 
From 1 87 1 to 1873 he was in the same business in 
Lancaster, New York, and since that time has been 
engaged in the wholesale and retail drug business in 
Newburgh. Mr. Post was married to Rosalie A. 
VOL. V. — 8 



VAN RENSSELAER, Jeremiah 

Princeton A.B. 1758. 

Born in New York City, 1741 ; graduated Princeton, 
1758 ; leader in the War of Independence ; member of 
1st Congress, 1789-91 ; Presidential Elector, 1800 ; 
Lieut. -Gov. of New York, 1800-04; died 1810. 

JERl'.MIAH VAX R1;NSSFLAER, Statesman, 
was born in New \'ork City in 1741, a mem- 
ber of the distinguished \'an Rensselaer family 
through General Stephen, the eighth Patroon. 
Through the same he was connected with the Liv- 
ingston family, Catherine Livingston, daughter of 
Philip, signer of the Declaration of Lidepen- 
dence, being the mother of General Stephen Van 
Rensselaer. Jeremiah also was of the Revolutionary 
generation of this numerous family. He was gradu- 
ated at Princeton in 1758 and look an active part 
in the movements looking towards independence, 
and was an earnest supporter of tlie patriot cause 
throughout that struggle. At the dose of the war, 
upon the adoption of the Federal constitution, he 
was elected a Representative from New Yoik to the 
first Congress, which sat 1789-1 791. He was a 
Presidential Elector in 1790, and the same year was 
chosen Lieutenant-Governor of the State of New 
York, holding that office until 1804. While at 
Albany as Lieutenant-Governor, he took a leading 
part in the promotion of enterprises of internal 
improvement, and was a member of the Inland Nav- 
igation Company, of which General Philip Schuyler, 
also a relative of his by marriage, was the first Pres- 
ident. .\fter retiring from office, Mr. Van Rensse- 
laer continued his residence at .Mbany and died 
there, February 22, 18 10. 



WEIDMAN, Grant, Jr. 

Princeton A.B. 1B90. 
Born in Lebanon, Pa., 1868; received his early edu- 
cation in the public schools and high schools at 
Lebanon, and at the Lawrenceville, N. J., School ; grad- 
uated Princeton, 1890 ; studied law with his father and 
was admitted to the Bar in 1893. 

GRANl" WITDMAN, Jr., Lawyer, w.as born 
in Lebanon, Pennsylvania, September 3, 
1868, the son of Grant and Elizabeth (Henry) 
Weidman. His father was a Princeton graduate. 
Class of 1859. He received his early education at 
public schools in his native town, graduating from 



114 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



the Lebanon High School in 1885, and then went 
to the school at Lawrenceville, New Jersey, from 
which he was graduated in 1S86. He was grad- 
uated from Princeton in the Class of 1890, studied 
law after graduation in his father's office, and was 
admitted to the ]?ar in 1S93. He is a past officer 
in Blue Lodge and Chapter and an officer in the 
Commandery, and is Treasurer of the Central 
Pennsylvania Alumni Association. Mr. Weidman 
is a member of several societies and clubs, among 
them being the Rittenhouse and University clubs 
of Philadelphia. He is a member of the Loyal 




GRANT WEIDMAN, JR. 

Legion in right of his father. Major Grant Weid- 
man, and a member of the Pennsylvania State 
Society of the Cincinnati in right of his great-great- 
grandfather, Captain John Weidman. He is a 
Democrat in his political views. 



JOHNSON, Robert Wilkinson 

Princeton A.B. 1876. 
Born at Rockland, Md., 1854; educated St. Paul's 
School, Concord, N. H., Princeton and Univ. of Penn- 
sylvania, physician and surgeon of Baltimore, Md. ; 
Professor Principles and Practice of Surgery, Baltimore 
Medical College ; ex-President Clinical Society, and 
Medical-Chirurgical Faculty, of Maryland ; Sup't Mary- 
land General Hospital; late Chief Surgeon ist Brigade 



Maryland National Guard ; ex-President Maryland 
Princeton Alumni Association. 

ROBERT WILKLXSON JOHNSON, M.D., 
Professor of Surgery at the Baltimore Medi- 
cal College, was born at Rockland, Baltimore county, 
Maryland, September 8, 1S54, son of \Villiam Fell 
and Ann Miflin (Barker) Johnson. He is of Eng- 
lish origin on both sides, the first of his ancestors 
having emigrated as early as 162S, and he is directly 
descended from Thomas Prince, who was Governor 
of the Plymouth Colony in Massachusetts. Pre- 
pared for College at St. Paul's School, Concord, 
New Hampshire, he was graduated from Princeton 
with the Class of 1876, after which he became a 
medical student at the L^niversity of Pennsylvania, 
and took his degree in 1879. .Adopting surgery as 
a specialty he located in Baltimore, wliere he soon 
acquired a high reputation in private practice, in 
connection with which he subsequently assumed 
duties of a more public nature and is now recog- 
nized as one of the leading surgeons of that city. 
For some years Dr. Johnson has been Professor of 
the Principles and Practice of Surgery at the Balti- 
more Medical College and Superintendent of the 
^Laryland General Hospital. He formerly presided 
over the Clinical Society of RLiryland ; is ex-Presi- 
dent of the Maryland Medico-Chirurgical Faculty 
and of the Princeton .Alumni Association of Mary- 
land ; is an ex-Governor of the L'niversity Club, 
Baltimore ; and was at one time Chief Surgeon of 
the First Brigade, ALiryland National Guard, with 
the rank of Colonel. On October i, 1879, he 
married Julia W. H. Brock ; their children are : 
Anna Julia, Ella Brock, ^Villiam Fell, Katharine 
Barker, Robert W. and J. P. Brock Johnson 
(deceased). 



POLLOCK, James 

Princeton A.B. 1831, LL.D. 1855. 
Born in Milton, Pa., 1810; graduated Princeton, 
1831 : studied law and admitted to the Bar, 1833; Dis- 
trict Attorney, 1835 ; member of Congress, 1844-49; Dis- 
trict Judge. 1850; elected Gov. of Pennsylvania, 1854; 
LL.D. Princeton, 1855, and Jefferson Coll., 1857; dele- 
gate to Peace Congress; 1861 ; Director of U. S. Mint 
in Philadelphia, 1861-66, and 1869-80: Naval Officer, 
Port of Philadelphia, 1880-84 ; died i8go. 

JAMES POLLOCK, LL.D., Lawyer, C.overnor of 
Pennsylvania, was born in Milton in that state, 
September 11, iSio, and graduated at Princeton in 
1 83 1. He then studied law, was admitted to the 
Bar in 1833 and opened an office in his native 
town. His qualifications for the public service were 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



115 



soon recognized, and he was made District Attorney 
for his county in 1835 and chosen to fill various 
minor offices of the town and county. In 1S44 he 
was sent to Congress as a Whig, and there made 
his mark by introducing, in 184S, a resolution call- 
ing for the appointment of a committee to inquire 
into the necessity and practicability of building a 
railroad to the Pacific coast. He was made ("hair- 
man of the committee and presented a report favor- 
ing the construction of such a road, which was the 
first favorable official act by Congress upon this 
subject. Mr. Pollock's service in Congress ended 
in 1849, and the following year he was appointed 
Presiding Justice of the Eighth Judicial District of 
Pennsylvania, holding that position until his election 
as Governor of the State in 1854. His administra- 
tion was marked by the transfer by the state to the 
Pennsylvania Railroad Company of the public works 
between Philadelphia and Pittsburg, thus reducing 
the state debt nearly §10,000,000 and soon remov- 
ing state taxation. He was a delegate to the Peace 
Congress of 1861, and in the same year was 
appointed by President Lincoln Director of the 
United States Mint in Philadelphia. The motto, 
" In God we trust," was placed on United States 
coins at his suggestion. Mr. Pollock held his place 
as Director of the Mint for many years, and in 1880 
was appointed Naval Officer of the Port of Philadel- 
phia, resigning in 18S4 to resume the practice of 
law. While he held the office of Governor, Prince- 
ton conferred upon him the degree of Doctor of 
Laws in 1S55 and Jefferson College, Pennsylvania, 
in 1857. He died in 1890. 



Princeton, with the degree of Bachelor of Science 
in the Class of 1896. From November of that year 
to January 1898, he was Chemist for the Michigan 
."Mkali Company, becoming on the latter date their 
Purchasing Agent, a position he still fills. He is 
also a Director in the J. B. Ford Company of Wyan- 
dotte, Michigan. He was a charter member. Sec- 
retary and Treasurer of Cannon Club of Princeton, 
1 895-1 896, and is a member of Wyandotte Masonic 
Lodge, Detroit Commandery, Knights Templar, 
Michigan Sovereign Consistory, and Moslem Temple 




E. LEVDEN FOKU 



FORD, Emory Leyden 

Princeton B.S. 1896. 
Born in New Albany, Ind., 1876; fitted for College at 
East Liberty Academy, Pittsburg; graduated from 
John C. Green School of Science, Princeton, with 
degree of B.S., in the Class of 1896 ; Chemist for 
Michigan Alkali Co., from 1896 to 1898 ; since then has 
been Purchasing Agent for the same Company. 

EMORY LEYDI';N ford. Purchasing Agent, 
Michigan Alkali Comixiny, was born in New 
Albany, Indiana, January 3, 1876, son of Emory 
Low and I*:ila I. (Neat) Ford. He received his 
preliminary education in public schools at Jefferson- 
ville, Indiana, and Creighton, Tarentum and .Mle- 
gheny, Pennsylvania, and was prepared for College 
at East Liberty Academy in Pittsburg. He gr.idu- 
ated from the John C. Green School of Science, 



Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He is also a member 
of the Detroit Boat Club. His political views are 
those of an independent Republican. 



REID, William James, Jr. 

Princeton A B. 1893. 
Born in Pittsburg, Pa., 1871 ; received his early 
education at the public schools in Pittsburg ; gradu- 
ated Princeton, 1893; also graduated from Allegheny 
Theological Seminary in 1896; ordained and installed 
Pastor of the United Presbyterian Church of Kittan- 
ning. Pa., 1896, his present charge. 

WILLIAM JAMi:s REID, Jr., Clergyman, 
was born in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, July 
10, 187 1, son of William James Reid, D.D., and 
Mary A. (Bowen) Reid. His paternal ancestors 



ii6 



UNIVERSITIES AND rHEIR SONS 



were natives of Scotland who came to America and 
settled in Argyle, Washington county, New York, 
about 1760. His mother's fomily were New Eng- 
landers of Quaker and Scotch descent. He re- 
ceived his early education in the public and the 
Central High Schools at I'ittsburg, Pennsylvania, 
and then took tiie Academic course at Princeton, 
graduating in the Class of 1S93. After graduating 
May 17, 1896, from the Theological Seminary of 
the United Presbyterian Church at Allegheny, he 
was ordained and installed Pastor of the United 
Presbyterian Church of Kittanning, Pennsylvania, 




WiM. J. KEIU, JR. 

June 23, 1896, and this pulpit he continues to fill. 
He married Margaret Morton Thompson, July 28, 
1896. They have two children : Elizabeth Thomp- 
son and Mary Bowne Reid. 



SCUDDER, John 

Princeton A B. 1811. 
Born in Freehold, N. J., 1793; graduated Princeton, 
1811; M.D. College Physicians and Surgeons, New 
York, 1816 ; went as missionary to India, 1819; in 
Ceylon, 1820-39; at the Madras station after 1847; <^^^^ 
1855- 

JOHN SCUDDER, M.D., Missionary, was born 
in Freehold, New Jersey, September 3, 1793, 
and graduated at Princeton in iSii. He took his 



Master's degree there in course, studied medicine 
at the College of Physicians and Surgeons in New 
York City, now the Medical Department of Colum- 
bia University, and was graduated a Doctor of Medi- 
cine in 1816. Dr. Scndtlcr settled in New York 
City for the practice of his ])rofession, in which he 
attained encouraging success, but moved by his con- 
viction of tiie need of skilled workers in the mission- 
ary field, he gave up his career in this country and 
in 1S19 went to India under the direction of the 
.\nierican Board. His first field of labor was Cey- 
lon, where he was ordained to the ministry of the 
Dutch Reformed Church in 1820 and served for 
nineteen years in the cajiacity of both clergyman 
and physician. He established a large hospital, in 
which he performed the duties of chief physician, 
and was especially successful in his treatment of 
cases of cholera and yellow fever. A number of 
native schools and churches were founded by him, 
and through his effective efforts the mission was 
greatly increased in influence. In 1S39 Dr. Scud- 
der was transferred to the Madras Station, where he 
remained for the rest of his life, with the exception 
of a visit to the United States in 1 842-1 846. All 
of his children, seven sons and two daughters, be- 
came missionaries in Southern Intlia. Dr. Scudder 
died at the Cape of Good Hope, Africa, January 13, 



iS 



3J> 

health. 



while on a visit there for the sake of his 



RAMSAY, Nathaniel 

Princeton A.B. 1767. 
Born in Lancaster Co., Pa., 1751 ; graduated Prince- 
ton, 1767; studied law and admitted to the Maryland 
Bar, 1771 ; delegate to Maryland Convention, 1775 ; 
officer in Revolutionary War and captured at Mon- 
mouth ; member of Congress, 1776-87 ; Marshal of 
Dist. of Maryland, 1790 and 1794; Naval officer. Port 
of Baltimore, 1794-1817; died 1817. 

NATHANIEL RAMSAY, Soldier, was born in 
Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, May i, 
1 75 1, and graduated at Princeton in 1767. He 
studied law and was admitted to the Maryland Bar in 
I 77 1, entering at once into the public life of those 
days and taking an active part in the movements 
looking toward independence for the Colonies. In 
r775 he was a delegate from his county to the 
Maryland Convention, assisted in the organization 
of the militia and was made Captain in the first 
battalion of troops raised for the war in 1776. His 
service was short but brilliant. He reached the 
grade of Lieutenant-Colonel commanding the Third 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



117 



Regiment of the Maryland line, taking part in the 
Battle of Long Island, and at Monmouth, when 
General Lee's command was driven back. Colonel 
Ramsay's regiment was one of the two designated 
by Washington for the desperate duty of checking 
the advance of the victorious Kritisii until the Com- 
mander-in-Chief could bring up the main army. 
Colonel Ramsay held the ground until all his men 
were killed or dispersed, and was at last himself cut 
down in single combat with British dragoons and 
left for dead on the field. He fell into the hands 
of the enemy and was for a long time a prisoner, 
and when at last exchanged, he returned to the 
practice of law. Colonel Ramsay represented Mary- 
land in Congress, 1 786-1 787, was Marshal of the 
District in 1790 and again in 1794, and in the lat- 
ter year was appointed by President John Adams 
Naval Officer of the Port of Baltimore, retaining that 
office more than twenty years, through the admin- 
istrations of Jefferson and Madison. He died in 
Baltimore, October 23, 1S17. 



ROGERS, James Slocum 

Princeton A.B. 1893. 
Born in Philadelphia, Pa., 1871 ; fitted for College at 
The Hamilton School, West Philadelphia ; graduated 
Princeton, 1893 ; studied law in office of MacVeigh & 
Bispham ; took three years' course in law school of 
University of Pennsylvania and graduated L.L.B. in 
1896; admitted to the Bar, June 1896, and has been in 
active practice in Philadelphia ever since. 

J.\MES SLOCUM ROGERS, Lawyer, was born 
in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, November 21, 
1871, son of Talbot Mercer and Elizabeth (Slocum) 
Rogers. His ancestry is New England Puritan, 
Virginian, Pennsylvanian, and Scotch-Irish. Many 
of his ancestors were noted men, among them being 
John Greene, Governor of Rhode Island, 1 690-1 700, 
Governor Thomas Welles of Connecticut, Governor 
John Webster of Connecticut, 1656; Joseph Marsh, 
Lieutenant-Governor of Vermont, i 778-1 790; and 
Major-Gcneral John Mason of Connecticut. He 
received iiis preliminary education at The Hamilton 
Sciiool, in Philadelphia, and grad\iated from Prince- 
ton in 1S93. He then studied law in the office of 
Wayne MacVeigh & George T. Bisi^ham, also took 
a three years' course at the Law School of the Ifni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, and graduated with the 
degree of P.achulor of Laws in 1S96. He was ad- 
mitted to the Bar of Philailclpiiia county in June 
1896, and has been in active practice since then in 



Philadelphia. Mr. Rogers is strongly Republican in 
state and national politics, but believes in city issues 
in city elections. As the candidate of The Muni- 
cipal League, a reform organization, he was elected 
Magistrate of the City and County of Philadelphia 
in 1898 for a term of five years. He is a member 
and officer in a large number of clubs and societies, 
both of a social and educational nature, among them 
being the Cliosophic Society of Princeton, Cap and 
Gown Club of Princeton, the Princeton Alumni As- 
sociation of Philadelphia, Princeton Club of Phila- 




JAME.S S. ROGERS 

delphia. Society of Colonial Wars, Sharswood Law 
Club, the American .\cademy of Political and Social 
Science, and the University Club of Philadelphia. 



SHIELDS, John Larimore 

Princeton Class 0(1879. 
Born in Salem Township, Westmoreland Co., Pa., 
1857 ; fitted for College at Salem Academy and the 
Academy at Chambersburg, Pa. ; entered Sopho- 
more Class at Princeton in 1876 and left as a Junior; 
the local Editor of Journal at Mount Pleasant, Pa., 
1882-85 ; Editor and publisher of that paper since 1885. 

JOHN' LARIMORE SllIi'.LDS, Journalist, was 
born in Salem Township, Westmoreland 
county, Pennsylvania, June 6, 1857, the son of Mat- 



ii8 



UNiyRRSITIES JND THEIR SONS 



thexv and Sarah (Larimore) Shields, of Scotch-Irish 
ancestry. He attended the township public school, 
Salem Academy and the Academy at Chambersburg, 
Pennsylvania, where he received his preparatory 
education, and entered the Sophomore Class at 
Princeton in 1S76, but did not graduate, leaving 
when in his Junior year, l-'rom 1882 to 18S5 he 
was local Editor of the Journal at ^[ount Pleasant, 
Pennsylvania, and in the latter year bought out the 
paper, and has been its Editor and publisher ever 
since. Mr. Shields is a member of the Xenodochy 
Club of Mount Pleasant, and has been for three 




JOHN L. SHIELDS 

years the Superintendent of the Mutual Telephone 
Company. In politics he is a Republican, but edits 
an independent paper. 



SHIPPEN, Joseph 

Princeton A.B. 1753. 
Bom in Philadelphia, Pa., 1732; graduated Princeton, 
1753; A.M. 1756: Col. in Provincial Army in expedi- 
tion against Fort DuQuesne ; Secretary of Province 
of Pennsylvania, 1762-76 ; Judge Lancaster, Pa., County 
Court, 1789; died iSto. 

JOSEPH SHIPPEN, Soldier, was born in Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania, October 30, 1732, the 
son of Edward Shippen, a large merchant of Lan- 
caster, in that state. Judge of the Court of Common 



Pleas, one of the founders of the College of New 
Jersey, and for many years a member of its first 
Hoard of Trustees. He was a descendant of Edward 
Shippen who came from luigland to Boston, Massa- 
chusetts, in 1668 and accumulated wealth there in 
mercantile pursuits, married a member of the 
Society of Friends and took refuge with his wife in 
Philadelphia at the time of the persecution of the 
Quakers, subsequently becoming Mayor of that city. 
Joseph Shippen was graduated at Princeton in 1753 
and shortly thereafter entered the Provincial army. 
In this service he rose to the rank of Colonel, took 
part in the expedition which captured Fort Du- 
Quesne and acquired distinction as a military man. 
Upon the disbandment of the troops he went abroad 
for travel, incidentally conducting a mercantile ven- 
ture in which he was interested, and passed some 
time in Europe. Returning to .'\merica in 1761, 
he was chosen, the following year. Secretary of the 
Province of Pennsylvania, succeeding the Rev. 
Richard Peters in that office, where he served until 
the Provincial Council went out of existence with 
the Revolution. Colonel Shippen subsequently 
removed to Lancaster, Pennsylvania, where he be- 
came a Judge of the County Court after the Rev- 
olution, and died February 10, 18 10. He was a 
member of the American Philosophical Society for 
more than forty years and a patron of the fine arts, 
aiding the painter Benjamin West with means to 
pursue his artistic studies. His brother, Edward, 
was Chief-Justice of the Supreme Court of Pennsyl- 
vania, 1 799-1805, and one of his nieces was the 
second wife of Benedict .Arnold. 



RUSH, Benjamin 

Princeton A.B. 1829. 
Born in Philadelphia, Pa.. 1811 ; graduated Prince- 
ton, 1829; A.M. 1832; studied law and admitted to 
Philadelphia Bar, 1833 ; U. S. Secy, of Legation at 
London, 1837; subsequently Charge d'Affaires; died 
1877. 

BENJAMIN RUSH, Diplomat, was born in 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, January 23, 181 1. 
He was of an old Pennsylvania family, many of whose 
members were distinguished in public life. His an- 
cestor John Rush, was a Captain of Horse in Crom- 
well's army, who came to America in 1683 and left 
many descendants. His grandfather was Dr. Ben- 
jamin Rush, signer of the Declaration of Indepen- 
dence, an eminent physician and scientist, Treasurer 
of the United States Mint, 1 799-1 8 13, and his 
grandmother was a daughter of Richard Stockton 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



119 



(Princeton 1748), also a signer of tlie Declara- 
tion. His great-grandmother was a daughter of 
the Rev. Samuel Finley, D.D., President of Prince- 
ton I 761-1766. His fiitlier, Richard Rush (Prince- 
ton 1797) was United States Attorney-General in 
Madison's Cabinet, Secretary of State and Minister 
to England in Monroe's administration, and Secre- 
tary of the Treasury under President John Quincy 
Adams. Benjamin was graduated at Princeton in 
1 8 29, studied law and was admitted to the Bar at 
Philadelphia in 1833. He established himself in 
that city in the practice of his profession, but was 
soon called to public service by appointment as 
Secretary of the United States Legation at London 
on the accession of Martin Van Buren to the Presi- 
dency in 1837. Mr. Rush held this position for a 
number of years, .serving for a time as Chargi 
d'Affaires of the United States in Great Britain. 
On his return to the LTnited States he resumed his 
residence in I^hiladelphia, and in the agitation pre- 
ceding the Civil \Var wrote and published a strong 
appeal for the LTnion. His Letters on the Rebellion 
are also published. Mr. Rush died while abroad, 
at Paris, France, June 30, 1877. 



SCHLEY, Charles 

Princeton A.B. 1842. 
Born in Frederick, Md., 1821 ; fitted for College at 
the Frederick Academy and by private tuition ; entered 
Princeton as a Sophomore and graduated, 1842; A.M. 
1845 ; studied law in Frederick and admitted to the 
Bar of that city and of Milwaukee, Wis. ; since 1851 
engaged in real estate and investment brokerage 
business in Milwaukee. 

CHARLES SCHLEY, Business Man, was born 
in Frederick, Maryland, Septernber i, 1821, 
son of Major Henry and Sarah Maria (Worrell) 
Schley. His father, Henry Schley, was Major in a 
Maryland regiment during the war of 181 2. He is 
a lineal descendant of Thomas Schley, born in the 
Rhenish Palatinate in 171 2, who emigrated to 
America in 1745 and colonized one hundred fami- 
lies in western Maryland, building the first house 
in Frederick, Maryland, where his descendants 
have since resided. His great-grandfather, John 
Thomas Schley of Frederick, was a member of 
the Committee of Safety and Observation and 
Captain of the l'"iiurth Maryland Battalion dur- 
ing the war of the Revolution. Charles Schley 
was fitted for College at the .Xcadeniy in Fred- 
erick, and also received private instruction. He 
entered Princeton as a Sophomore ami gradu- 



ated in the Class of 1842, receiving later the 
degree of Master of Arts in course. After study- 
ing law in the office of Frederick A. Schley, of 
Frederick, he was admitted to the Bar of that city 
and of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, where he took up his 
residence. Since 185 i he has been engaged in the 
real estate and investment brokerage business, being 
at the present time the head of the oldest firm of 
the kind in the State of Wisconsin and jirobably in 
the Northwest. Mr. Schley's political opinions are 
those of a (lold Democrat. He was married at 
South River, Arundel county, Maryland, December 




CH.\S. SCHLEY 



5, 1848, to Harriet Johnson. They liave had five 
children: Lucy (Mrs. T. R. Mercein). I-^eanor .A., 
Jessie, Sybil M. and Bradley George Schley. 



TOTTEN, Robert Duncan 

Princeton A.B. 1886. 
Born in Pittsburg, Pa., 1866 ; fitted for College at 
the Western University of Pennsylvania ; graduated 
Princeton, 1886 ; studied law and admitted to the Bar 
of Allegheny Co., 1889; since then engaged in law 
practice in Pittsburg. 

ROBERT Dl'N'CAN TOITEN, Attorney-at- 
l.aw. was born in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, 
.August I, 1 806, son of Robert Christy and ^Larie 



I 20 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



Louise (Mellier) Totten. On the paternal side he 
is of English ancestry ; through his mother he is of 
French Swiss descent. His preliminary education 
was received at the Western University of Pennsyl- 
vania in his native town, and he graduated from 
Princeton, after taking the Academic course, in the 
Class of 1886. He took up the study of law and 
was admitted to the Bar of Allegheny county at 
Pittsburg, September 18S9. He has since been 
engaged in the practice of law at that place, making 
a specialty of Patent Law. Mr. Totten is a mem- 
ber of the University Club and the Princeton Club 




himself for the ministry, he engaged in preaching 
for several years following his graduation, then 
studied law and was admitted to the Connecticut 
Bar in 1763, settling for practice in Hartford in 
that state. .-Vt the outbreak of the Revolutionary 
War he raised a company of troops, and in 1777 
joined Washington's army at Peekskill and received 
commission as Lieutenant-Colonel. \n the follow- 
ing year he was sent as delegate from Connecticut 
to the Continental Congress and sat as a member 
of that body until 1883. After the war he was ap- 
pointed to the Bench of the Superior Court of 
Connecticut and in 1 796 was made Chief-Justice 
of the state, serving in that capacity until his resig- 
nation in 1S07. While occupying this seat he re- 
ceived the degree of Doctor of Laws from Yale. 
Subsequent to his retirement from the Bench, Judge 
Root was a member of the State Legislature and 
published several volumes of Reports of Cases 
agitated in the Connecticut Court of Errors. For 
many years he was a member of the American .As- 
sociation of .\rts and Sciences and of the Connecti- 
cut association of the same name. He died in 
Coventry, ]\Larch 29, 1822. 



ROBT. D. TOTTEN 



of Western Pennsylvania. He married Elisabeth 
Reymer, December 20, 1892, and has one child: 
Elisabeth Riter Totten. 



ROOT, Jesse 

Princeton A.B. 1756 — Yale M.A. (Hon.) 1766, LL.D. 1800. 
Born in Coventry. Conn., 1736; graduated Princeton, 
1756; minister of the Gospel, 1758-63; admitted to the 
Bar 1763, and settled in Hartford, Conn. ; M.A. (Hon.) 
Yale, 1766; Lieut. -Col. in Continental Army, 1777; 
delegate to Continental Congress, 1778-83 ; Judge of 
Superior Court of Connecticut, 1789; Chief-Justice of 
Connecticut, 1796-1807; LL.D. Yale, 1800; member of 
Legislature; died 1822. 

JESSE ROO T, LL.D., Jurist, was born in Coven- 
try, Connecticut, December 28, 1736, and 
graduated at Princeton in 1756. Having prepared 



SERGEANT, John 

Princeton A.B. 1795 — Harvard LL.D. 1S44. 
Born in Philadelphia, Pa., 1779 ; graduated Prince- 
ton, 1795 ; studied law and admitted to Philadelphia 
Bar, 1799; U. S. Commissioner of Bankruptcy, 1801 ; 
member Philadelphia Legislature, 1808-10 ; member of 
Congress, 1815-23, 1827-29, 1837-42; Envoy to Panama 
Congress, 1826; Whig candidate for Vice-President, 
1832; LL.D. Union 1822, Dickinson 1826, Harvard 
1844; Trustee of Princeton, 1821-26; died 1852. 

JOHN SERGEANT, LL.D., Statesman, was born 
in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, December 5, 
1779, the son of Jonathan Dickinson Sergeant, 
member of the Continental Congress and some 
time Attorney-General of Pennsylvania. He was 
the great-grandson of Jonathan Dickinson, first 
President of Princeton, and a lineal descendant of 
Jonathan Sergeant, one of the founders of Newark, 
New Jersey, in 1667. John Sergeant was gradu- 
ated at Princeton in 1795, studied law and was 
admitted to the Philadelphia Bar in 1799, where 
for more than half a century he stood at the head 
of his profession. He entered public life in 1801, 
when he was appointed by President Jefferson a 
Commissioner in Bankruptcy for Pennsylvania, and 
was a Member of Congress from 18 15 to 1823, 
t<aking an active part in securing the passage of the 
" Missouri Compromise " in 1820. Subsequently 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



I 21 



he was elected to Congress for a single term in 
1827, and he again served in that body from 1837 
to 1842. Among other public services to which he 
was called was that of envoy to the Panama Con- 
gress in 1826 and President of the Pennsylvania 
Constitutional Convention of 1830. In politics 
Mr. Sergeant actively associated with the Whig 
party, and was its candidate for Vice-President in 
1832 on the ticket with Henry Clay. In 1S41 he 
was offered the post of United States Minister to 
Great Britain, but declined it. He served as 
Trustee of Princeton, 1S21-1826, and received the 
degree of Doctor of Laws from Union ("ollege in 
1822, from Dickinson in 1826, and from Harvard 
in 1844. He died in Philatlelphia, November 25, 
1S52. 

FINNEY, John Miller Turpin 

Princeton A.B. 1884 — Harvard M.D. 1889. 
Born in Natchez, Miss., 1863 ; graduated Princeton, 
1884, Harvard Medical School 1889; Resident Surgeon 
at Mass. General Hospital ; Associate in Surgery at 
Johns Hopkins Hospital 1889-97, Associate Prof, since 
1897. 

JOHN MILLER TURPIN FINNEY, M.D., 
Associate Professor of Surgery at Johns Hop- 
kins Hospital, Baltimore, was born in Natchez, 
Mississipjii, June 20, 1863. He comes of an old 
Pennsylvania family, his father, Ebenezer Dickey 
Finney, being the grandson of Walter Finney, who 
served as a Captain in the Revolutionary Army 
until wounded at the battle of Brandy wine. His 
mother, Annie Louise (Parker) Finney, was the 
daughter of a prominent New Hampshire educator. 
Dr. Finney was fitted for College at the Academy in 
Bel .Mr, Maryland, and under the instruction of a 
private tutor. He entered Princeton at the age of 
seventeen, and graduated in 1SS4 with the degree 
of Bachelor of .\rls. His next Collegiate training 
was at the Harvard Medical School, where he grad- 
uated in 1889. While in College he took an active 
part in athletics, playing on the football teams of 
both Princeton and Harvard, anil rowing on the 
Princeton crew. The first few months after gradu- 
ation from the Medical School were spent as Resi- 
dent Surgeon at the Massachusetts Ceneral Hospital, 
in I'.oston. He resigned to go to Johns Hopkins 
Hospital in Baltimore, where he lias remained up 
to the present time, from 18S9 to 1897 as Associate 
in Surgery and since 1897 in the office of .Associate 
Professor of Surgery. Dr. I'inney is a member 
of the Massachusetts Meilical Society, the Medico- 
Chirurgical Society of Maryland and the University 



Club of Baltimore. In politics he is an Independ- 
ent, or Reform Democrat. He was married, April 
20, 1892, to Mary Elizabeth Gross, of Harrisburg, 
Pennsylvania. His children are John M. T. Jr., born 
July 26, 1894, and Eben D. Finney, born June 15, 
1897- 

WEISS, John Fox 

Princeton A B 1895. 
Born in Harrisburg, Pa., 1873 ; fitted for College at 
Pennsylvania Military Academy in Chester, Pa. ; 
graduated from Princeton. Class of 1895; read law in 
Harrisburg and was admitted to practice in the Courts 
of Dauphin Co., Pa., in 1898. 

JOHN FOX WEISS, Attorney-at-Law, was born 
in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, January 4, 1873, 
son of John H. and Mary Virginia (Fox) Weiss. 




JOHN FOX WEISS 

Until his sixteenth year he was a student' at the 
Misses Tompkinson's School in Harrisburg, and 
was fitted for College at the Pennsylvania Mili- 
tary .Academy in Chester, Pennsylvania, entering 
Princeton in 1S91 and graduating with the Class of 
1895. He then read law with the Hon. Samuel J. 
M. McCarrcll in Harrisburg until March 1898, 
when he was admitted to jjractice in the Courts of 
Dauphin county, Pennsylvania. He was historian 
of his class in Princeton, and a member of the Cap 
and Gown Club. His political beliefs are those of 
a Republican. 



122 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



BUSHNELL, William 

Columbia M.D. 1893. 
Born in Mansfield, O., 1868 ; educated in the Mans- 
field public schools and under private tutors ; gradu- 
ated College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia, 
1893; practised in New York City, 1893-96, and since 
then in Mansfield ; Coroner of Richland county, Ohio. 

WILLIAM BUSHNELL, W.U., Physician, 
was born in Mansfield, Oiiio, October 9, 
1868, son of Martin Ualdw in, and Elverda (Snyder) 
Bushnell. Tlie first member of the family in this 
country came from England in 1624. Dr. Bush- 
nell was educated in the Mansfield public schools 



married, .April 18, 1894, Katharine Le Clerc Lewis. 
They have two children : Katherine Bentley and 
Martin Finkney Bushnell. 




WM. BL'SHNELL 

and under the guidance of private tutors. Coming 
to New York he studied medicine at the College of 
Physicians and Surgeons, the Medical Department 
of Columbia, graduating in 1893. The first three 
years after his graduation were spent in New York 
City, and in 1896 he removed to Mansfield, Ohio, 
where he has since practised his profession. In 
1899 he was nominated by the Democratic party 
for Coroner of Richland county and was trium- 
phantly elected. He is a member of the New Y'ork 
County Medical Association, the North Central 
Medical Society of Ohio and the Mansfield Academy 
of Medicine, of which he was Secretary in 1898. 
He is also Medical Examiner for the Young Men's 
Christian Association of Mansfield. Mr. Bushnell 



DE PEYSTER, Frederick, Jr. 

Columbia A.B. 1816. LL.D. 1867 
Born in New York City, 1796; graduated Columbia, 
1816 ; studied law and admitted to the Bar, 1819 ; Mas- 
ter in Chancery, 1820-37; Trustee of the Bible Society; 
LL.D. Columbia, 1867; died 1882. 

FREDERICK DE PEYSTER, Jr., LL.D., 
Lawyer, was born in New York City, Novem- 
ber II, 1796, a descendant in direct line from 
Johannes De Peyster, who came from Holland to ' 
New Amsterdam, took a prominent part in public 
affairs during the Dutch possession of New Nether- 
land, and at the time of his death was accounted 
one of the wealthiest citizens of the province. His 
fiither, wliose name also was Frederick, was a Cap- 
tain of loyal volunteers in the Revolutionary \Var 
and for a time after independence was achieved 
resided in St. John, New Brunswick, where he had 
received a grant of land in recognition of his ser- 
vices to the British Crown. Frederick, the son, 
born after the return of his father to the United 
States, was graduated at Columbia in iSi6, studied 
law and was admitted to the Bar of 1819. He 
promptly won recognition in his profession, and in 
1S20 was appointed Master in Chancery, holding 
that office seventeen years. Meantime his inherited 
fortune had increased so largely through judicious 
investments that he was compelled to give his entire 
time to the management of his estate, and he 
resigned from the public service. His activity in 
enterprises of general advantage, however, was from 
this time increased rather than diminished. He 
was a Trustee of the Bible Society and served on the 
Boards of Management of many charitable and 
educational institutions, contributing liberally to 
their support. He was a founder and Director of 
the Home for Incurables, Vice-President of the 
Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, 
a founder of the Soldiers' Home erected by the 
Grand Army of the Republic, a Trustee of the New 
York Society Library and President of the New 
York Historical Society. In 1867 he received the 
degree of Doctor of Laws from Columbia, and in 
1877 he was elected an honorary fellow of the 
Royal Historical Society of Great Britain. Mr. 
De Peyster died in Tivoli, New York, August 
17, 1882. 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



123 



DILLON, John Milton 

Columbia LL.B. l88g. 
Born in Davenport, la., 1867; educated in the public 
schools of the West and private schools in New York 
City; LL.B. Columbia Law School, 1889; admitted to 
the New York Bar, 1892 ; admitted to the Bar of the 
United States Supreme Court, 1896 ; has since been 
engaged in the active practice of his profession in New 
York City. 

JOHN MILTON DILLON, Lawyer, was born 
in Davenport, Iowa, April 28, 1867, son of 
John Forest and .Anna Marjery (Price) Dillon. He 
was educated in the public schools of the West and 




JOHN M. DILLON 

at private schools in New York City, and entered 
the Law School of Coliinilna, taking the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws with the Class of 1889. He was 
admitted to the New York Bar in 1892, and 
admitted to practice in the United States Supreme 
Court in 1896. He has been retained in a number 
of important cases, and has achieved distinguished 
success in solving involved legal problems. He 
became a member of Delta Kappa Kpsilon at 
College, and is also a member of the Lawyers' and 
the New York Athletic clubs. He is a Republican 
in politics, but has never held or souglit public 
office. He married, November 10, 1S91, Lucy 
Sistare Downing. They have three chiklren : Made- 
leine, Dorothy and Mihcju Sands Dillon. 



DRAPER, William Henry 

Columbia A.B. 1851. 
Born in Brattleboro, Vt., 1830 ; graduated Columbia, 
1851 ; College of Physicians & Surgeons, 1855; studied 
abroad and practising physician in New York City 
since 1857 ; Lecturer, Columbia Medical School, 1867- 
70; Prof, of Diseases of the Skin, 1871-79; Prof, of 
Clinical Medicine since 1880; Trustee of Columbia 
since 1889. 

WILLIAM HENRY DRAPER, M.D., Phy- 
sician, was born in Brattleboro, Vermont, 
October 14, 1830, and graduated at Columbia in 
1 85 I. He pursued his professional studies at the 
College of Physicians and Surgeons, taking the De- 
gree of Doctor of Medicine in 1855,10 which year he 
also was made a Master of .Arts by the University. 
After a course of study abroad in London and Paris, 
Dr. Draper returned to New York City, where he 
established a large general practice. In 1867 he 
entered the Medical Department of Columbia as 
Lecturer on Diseases of the Kidneys, subsequently 
becoming Professor of Diseases of the Skin, hold- 
ing this position until 1879. Since 1880 he has 
occupied the Chair of Clinical Medicine at Colum- 
bia. He was for several years President of the 
Alumni Association of the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons, is Consulting Physician of the New York 
and Roosevelt, St. Luke's and Presbyterian Hospitals. 
He was chosen a member of the Board of Trustees 
of Columbia in 1889 and now holds that position. 



DONNELL, Gustavus Trask 

Columbia A.B 1889, A.M. 1890, LL.B. 1892. 
Born in Portland, Me., 1868; fitted for College at the 
Berkeley School; graduated Columbia, 1889; A.M. 
1890; Fellow in Mathematics at Columbia, 1889-92; 
LL.B. Columbia Law School, 1892; admitted to New 
York Bar, 1893, and has practised law in New York 
City. 

GUSTAVUS TRASK DONNELL, Lawyer, 
was born in Portland, Maine, December 
11, 1 868, son of William ElHngwood and Marianna 
(Woodman) Donnell. Tiie family, originally of 
English extraction, has been settled in this country 
since 1635, when Henry Donnell came to York, 
Maine. The subject of this sketch was educated in 
the public schools of Portland until 1S7S and in 
the public schools of New York from 1S7S to 1882, 
and fitted for Harvard and Columbia Colleges at 
the Berkeley School in New York City from 1882 
to 1885. He passed the entrance examinations for 
both Harvard and Columbia, and graduated from 
the School of .Arts of Columbia in 1889. He took 



I 24 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



a graduate course in philosophy and mathematics, 
receiving the degree of Master of Arts in 1S90, and 
held a Fellowship in Mathematics from 18S9 to 1892. 
He was graduated from the Columbia Law School 




GUSTAVUS T. DONNELL 

in the latter year, and in June of the following year 
was admitted to the New York Bar, since which 
time he has practised liis profession in New York 
City. He is a member of the Alpha Delta Phi 
Club and the Society of Medical Jurisprudence of 
New York City, and theStaten Island. Mr. Donnell 
takes no active interest in politics. 



DUNHAM, Carroll 

Columbia A.B. 1847. 
Born in New York City, 1828; graduated Columbia. 
1847; College of Physicians and Surgeons, 1850; Pres. 
American Institute of Homoeopathy; Dean of New 
York Homoeopathic Medical College; died 1877. 

CARROLL DUNHAM, M.D., Physician, was 
born in New York City, October 29, 1828, 
and graduated at Columbia in 1847, subsequently 
studying medicine at the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons now the Medical School of Columbia 
University, where he received the degree of Doc- 
tor of Medicine in 1850. Dr. Dunham began the 
practice of his profession in Brooklyn, New York, 
in 1S52, removing in 1858 to Newburgh and in 



1863 to Irvington,where he permanently established 
himself. He was a leader in the homteopathic 
school, being chosen President of the American 
Institute of Honueopathy, and for many years was 
Dean of the New York Homoiopathic Medical Col- 
lege. He was active in promoting the World's 
Homceopathic Convention held in Philadclj)hia, 
Pennsylvania, and subsequently compiled its i)ro- 
ceedings for publication. His contributions to the 
literature of the profession include Lectures on 
Materia Medica, Homoeopathy the Science of Thera- 
peutics, and numerous articles in medical periodi- 
cals. Dr. Dunham died at Irvington-on-the-Hudson, 
February 18, 1877. 



FERRY, Dexter Mason, Jr. 

Columbia A.B. 1898. 
Born in Detroit, Mich., 1873 ; educated at Lawrence- 
ville, N. J.. School and Detroit High School; three 
years at University of Michigan; graduated Columbia, 
1898. 

DEXTER MASON FERRY, Jr., was born in 
Detroit, Michigan, November 22, 1873, 
the son of De.xter Mason and .^ddie (Miller) Ferry. 




U. M. FF.RRV, JK. 



His father's family, originally of French-English ex- 
traction, settled in Cheshire, Massachusetts, before the 
Revolution, in which they took part, and his father 
came to Detroit about fifty years ago. .Addie Miller 



UNIVERSITIES AND TlIEIIi SONS 



125 



came of English-Irish stock, long resident in this 
country — for the last two generations in Otsego 
county, New York. Dexter M. Ferry, Jr., received 
his early education at the Lawrenceville, New Jer- 
sey, School, where he remained a year, and grad- 
uated from the Detroit High .School in 1892. 
Kntering the University of Michigan with the Class 
of i8<j(), he continued there to the end of his Junior 
year, when he left College, remaining away two 
years, and then resuming his Academic studies at 
Columbia, where he \yas graduated with the degree 
of Bachelor of Arts in 1898. Since graduating he 
has been connected with his father in business and 
with tlie National Pin Company of Detroit as Treas- 
urer. He is a member of the College fraternity 
Delta Kappa Epsilon, and the University, Detroit 
Boat and Detroit Country clubs. He is a Republi- 
can in politics. 



FOSTER, Jacob Post Giraud 

Columbia A.B. 1844 ~ Harvard LL.B. 1847. 
Born in New York City, 1827; graduated Columbia, 
1844 ; Harvard Law School, 1847; admitted to the Bar, 
1848; practised in New York City, 1848-86; died 1886. 

JACOB POST GIRAUD FOSTER, Lawyer, was 
born in New York City, April 8, 1S27. His 
early education was received in the public schools 
of that city and he was prepared for College under 
private tuition. As a boy he was remarkable for the 
readiness with which he acquired a knowledge of 
his studies, and he was able to pass the matriculat- 
ing examinations at Columbia at the early age of 
tliirteen years. At that University he displayed the 
same qualities as a student, attaining the highest 
honors in the Academic Department and graduat- 
ing at the head of his Class in 1844. He passed 
the year following his graduation in travel and in the 
study of law in a private office, and atteniled lec- 
tures at the Harvard Law School in 1846-184 7, 
graduating there with the degree of Bachelor of 
Laws in the latter year and being admitted to the 
Bar when he reached his majority in 1848. Mr. 
Foster practised law in New York City for many 
years, giving his attention especially to the law of 
insurance and gaining a high reptitation in his 
profession. He died, March 26, 18S6. 



studied also with various eminent lawyers ; admitted 
to New York Bar in 1873, and has practised in New 
York City since that time. 

SAMUEL B. HA^UiURGER, Lawyer, was born 
in Albany, New York, January 21, 1852, son 
of Bernhard and Rebekah (Strauss) Hamburger. 
He fitted for College at New Haven, and afterwards 
studied law at the Law School of Columbia, gradu- 
ating with the degree of Bachelor of Laws in 1872. 
He also studied at different times with Hon. Robert 
S. Hale of Elizabethtown, New York, Churchill & 
Woodbury, Solomon F. Higgins and Treman iS: 
Tyler, was admitted to the New York liar in 1873, 




HAMBURGER, Samuel B. 

Columbia LL B 1872. 
Born in Albany, N. Y., 1852; fitted for College at 
New Haven ; graduated Columbia Law School, 1872; 



S.4ML'i:i, li. IIA.MHCKGER 

and immediately entered upon the practice of his 
profession in New York City. He has become 
widely known for his ability and skill. Mr. Ham- 
burger is actively interested in numerous clubs and 
societies, among them the National Museum of .Xrt, 
the Geographical Society, Manuscriin Society, the 
Lambs, Manhasset Bay Yacht, and Commercial 
Clubs, and is a Director and Trustee of the Educa- 
tional .\lliance and tlie Jewish Prison .Aid Society. 
Much of his time is devoted to philanthropic work. 
He has always been a Republican in politics, has 
been for many years a member of the County Com- 
mittee of the party, and frequently a delegate to 
state conventions. Mr. Hamburger in politics is 
known as the original Harrison Man, having months 



126 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



before the National Republican Convention pre- 
dicted this nomination of General Harrison for the 
Presidency. 

IRVING, Washington 

Columbia A.M. (Hon.) 1821. LL.D. 1829 — Harvard LL.D. 1831. 
Born in New York City, 1783 ; studied law and 
travelled abroad for his health ; published his history 
of New York by Diedrich Knickerbocker, 1809; entered 
commercial life, 1810; began publication of his Sketch 
Book, 1819; A.M. (Hon.) Columbia, 1821 ; attach^ of 
U. S. Legation at Madrid, 1826; published Conquest of 
Granada and received LL.D. from Columbia, 1829; 
Secy, of Legation at London, 1829; D.C.L. Oxford, 
1831 ; LL.D. Harvard, 1832; Regent Univ. of New 
York, 1835-42; U. S. Minister to Spain, 1842-46; en- 
gaged in literary work at Sunnyside, Irvington, N. Y., 
after 1846; died 1859. 

W.\SHI\CiTON IRVING, LL.D., D.C.L., 
Author, was born in New York City, April 
3, 1783, the son of William and Sarah (Sanders) 
Irving. His early schooling was not of a thorough 
sort, and he was not, like his two elder brothers, 
sent to Columbia, but entered a law office where he 
varied study with occasional writing for the news- 
papers until the condition of his health, threatening 
pulmonary trouble, determined him to travel. He 
passed two years, 1804- 1806, in pleasure abroad, 
and returned established in health to resume nom- 
inally the study of law and actually the production 
of literature. It was in 1809 that he brought out 
his Knickerbocker's History of New Vork, which 
had a great and immediate success, and in the fol- 
lowing year he became a partner in a commercial 
house established by his brothers. 'i"he income 
from this business permitted him to continue his 
literary work, and the establishment of a branch of 
the house in London gave him a pretext, if any were 
needed, for further visits abroad, where he became 
one of the notabilities of London society. For 
three years, 1815-1818, Irving dallied with liter- 
ature and enjoyed himself in social pleasures, and 
then the bankruptcy of the commercial venture in 
which he was associated supplied the incentive to 
take up the literary life in earnest. In 1S19 he 
sent on to New York for publication the first num- 
ber of the Sketch Book, containing the immortal 
story of Rip Van Winkle. This was followed quickly 
by others, and the applause with which they were 
received in the United States was echoed in London. 
What was even more necessary at that time, they 
produced immediate and satisHictory income, as did 
Bracebridge Hall and Tales of a Traveller, and 
Ir\ing was able to give himself the enjoyment of 



travel. When in Madrid there came to him the 
idea of his Life of Columbus, and. this he finished 
in 1827, publishing it in London and New York. 
Then followed his Conquest of Granada and his 
;\lhambra, and with the latter, in 1829, the appoint- 
ment to the post of Secretary of Legation at Lon- 
don. This position he filled for three years, during 
which time O.xford made him a Doctor of Civil 
Laws and the Royal Society of Literature gave him 
its medal. Irving had been seventeen years absent 
from his native land when he returned in 1832 and 
was received with enthusiasm and a public dinner 




WASHINGTON IRVING 

in his honor. Harvard also honored him with the 
degree of Doctor of Laws in this year. He bought 
the place at Irvington which he named Sunnyside, 
and made his home there with his brother and 
nieces, and wrote his Astoria and some other books. 
Irving lived on a generous and hospitable scale, 
although without pretence, and his expenses were 
large ; so that as his earlier books went out of print 
and his income decreased he was willing to accept 
the appointment of United States Minister to Spain 
which was given him by President Tyler in 1842 
at the instance of Daniel Webster, who was then 
Secretary of State. He remained at Madrid through 
the Tyler administration, returning to the United 
States in 1846, where, at Sunnyside, he wrote his 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



127 



Life of Washington. A revised edition of his works 
huid such an immediate commercial success when 
brought out in 1848 that he was encouraged to add 
a Life of Mahomet and a Life of Goldsmith. The 
last volume of his Washington was published in 
1859, only a few months before his death, its com- 
pletion having been delayed by the infirmities of his 
advancing years. He died at Sunnyside, Irvington, 
November 28, 1859. 



JACOBS, Myer 

Columbia LL.B- 1879. 
Born in San Francisco, Cal., 1856; educated in the 
San Francisco public schools; Ph.B., University of 
California, 1876; A.M., University of California, 1879; 
LL.B., Columbia Law School, 1879; has practised law 
in San Francisco since that date; First Assistant City 
and County Attorney, 1891-93. 

MVER J.VCOHS, A.1\L, Lawyer, was born in 
San Francisco, California, November 12. 
1856, son of Solomon and Pauline (Margulinski) 




MVKK J.ACOBS 

Jacobs. His parents were both natives of Poland, 
and of tlie Jewish faith and race. He received his 
education as a boy in the common schools of his 
native city, and afterwards attended the University 
of California, taking the Literary course and receiv- 
ing the degree of Uachelor of Philosophy in 1S76. 
The University conferred upon him llie honorary 



degree of ^Laster of Arts in 1879. Mr. Jacobs 
received his legal training at Columbia Law School, 
from which he was graduated in 1879, ^^^ ^'so 
studied for a year in a law office at San Francisco. 
He was admitted to the Bar of the State of Califor- 
nia in 1879, and has since practised his profession 
in San Francisco. From 1891 to 1893 he served as 
First .Assistant City and County Attorney. He is a 
stanch Republican in politics, and has always taken 
an active part in party work. Mr. Jacobs is a 
member of the ^L^sonic fraternity. He married, 
February 28, 1891, Adelaide (Skinner) Darling. 



KEARNY, Philip 

Columbia A.B, 1833 
Born in New York City, 1815 ; graduated Columbia, 
1833; studied law but did not practise, entering the 
U. S. Army, 1837; served as volunteer in French con- 
quest of Algiers, 1839-40; on staff of General Winfield 
Scott, 1841-45 ; served in Mexican War and promoted 
Captain, 1846 ; in Indian Campaign in California, 1851 ; 
with French army in war in Italy, 1859-60; Brig.-Gen. 
Vols, in Civil War, 1861 ; Maj.-Gen., 1862; died in the 
field, 1862. 

PHIIJP KEARNY, Soldier, was born in New 
York City, June 2, 1815, of a family of Irish 
extraction, resident in the United States from Revo- 
lutionary days. He inherited figliting blood. His 
uncle was General Stephen Watts Kearny, a leader 
in the Mexican War, and in the preceding genera- 
tion one of his ancestors was Commodore Lawrence 
Kearny of the United States Navy, at one time com- 
mander of the frigate Constitution. Philip Kearny 
was graduated at Columbia in 1S33 and studied law 
witli Peter :\. Jay, but without entering upon the 
practice of his profession he accepted in 1837 a 
commission in the United States Cavalry and ser\-ed 
for several years on the stall' of General Henry 
Atkinson at Jefferson Barracks, Missouri, which at 
that time was the " Far West." The War Depart- 
ment sent him abroad in 1839 to study the tactics 
of the French cavalry ser\'ice, and after attending 
the cavalry school at Saumur for some months he 
pursued his studies in the field as a volunteer with 
tlie Chasseurs d'.\frique in the campaign of the 
French in .Algiers. He took part in all the notable 
engagements of that war and became distinguished 
for his daring exploits. Upon his return to the 
United States in 1840 he was given a staff position 
and for several years served in this capacity with 
General Winfield Scott at Washington. In 1.S45 he 
accompanied his uncle, General Stephen W. Kearny, 
on his famous march to South Pass in the Indian 



28 



UNTVERSiriES ANB THEIR SONS 



country, and at the outbreak of the Mexican War 
was engaged as a cavalry leader in the Rio Grande 
territory, later joining General Scott on his march 
to Mexico, his company serving as body-guard of 
the Commander-in-Chief. He there received pro- 
motion to a Captaincy, took part in the battles of 
Contreras and Churubusco, and in a daring charge 
with his cavalry at the close of the latter engage- 
ment followed the retreating enemy into the city of 
Mexico itself. For this act of gallantry, being the 
first man to enter the city sword in hand, he re- 
ceived the brevet of Major. It was in this affair 
that he received the wound which required the am- 
putation of his left arm. At the close of the Mexi- 
can War he was for some time in the campaigns 
against the Rogue River Indians in California, sub- 
sequently resigning his commission and making a 
tour of the world by way of China and Ceylon and 
settling down to the life of a civilian at Belle Grove, 
opposite Newark, New Jersey. But the spirit of 
battle would not lie dormant, and at the opening 
of the war between France and Italy, in 1859, he 
joined his old comrades of the Chasseurs d'Afrique 
and went with them to the front. At Solferino he 
was in the famous cavalry charge which penetrated 
the .Austrian centre and decided the battle, " hold- 
ing his bridle in his teeth, with his characteristic 
impetuosity." For this he received the cross of 
the Legion of Honor, being the first American thus 
decorated for military service. General Kearny 
returned to the United States soon after the out- 
break of the Civil War and tendered his services to 
the Government. They were at first rejected by the 
National authorities, and later by those of New York 
State, but were then successfully pressed by New 
Jersey, and he was made a Brigadier-General 
of Volunteers in 1861 and assigned to the command 
of a brigade in the Army of the Potomac. .\t the 
battle of Williamsburg, his timely arrival changed 
defeat into victory and his service continued bril- 
liant through all the engagements in the Peninsula 
and with the Army of Virginia from the Rapidan to 
\Varrenton. He was raised to the command of a 
division in May 1862, but before his commission 
as Major-General reached him he was killed while 
reconnoitering within the Confederate lines near 
Chantilly, Virginia, September i, 1862. His body 
was sent in under a flag of truce and conveyed 
North. The burial place is in Trinity Churchyard, 
New York City. General Scott referred to Kearny 
as " the bravest man I ever knew and the most 
perfect soldier." 



MITCHELL, John Murray 

Columbia A.B. 1877, LL.B. 1879. 
Born in New York City, 1858 ; graduated Columbia, 
1877; Columbia Law School, 1879; A.M. 1880; travelled 
abroad for study of European languages ; practising 
law in New York City since 1889 ; Representative in 
Congress, 1895-99. 

JOHN MLRR.VY .NHTCHELI,, Lawyer, was 
born in New York City, March 18, 1858, the 
son of the Hon. William Mitchell (Columbia 1820) 
and Mary 1'. P.errin. Mr. Mitchell's f;nher was a 
very learned and distinguished jurist. President of 
the Bar .'\ssociation of the City of New York, Chief- 




JOHN M. MITCHELL 

Justice of what is now known as the Appellate 
Division of the Supreme Court in the City of New 
York, and Judge of the Court of .Appeals. His 
grandfather was the Rev. Edward Mitchell, a native 
of Coleraine, Ireland, who came to this country in 
1 791 and after a short residence in Philadelphia 
came to New York, where for many years and to 
the time of his death he was Pastor of the Society 
of the United Christians. His grandmother was 
Cornelia Anderson, a native of the City of New 
York, a descendant of Peter Andresson to whom a 
grant of land in the city of New .Amsterdam was 
made in 1645 by the Dutch West Indian Company. 
On his mother's side Mr. Mitchell is of Huguenot 
descent, his maternal grandfather having been born 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



I 29 



on Long Island where his ancestor, Cornelius Janson 
Berrien, settled about 1670 when driven from home 
at Berrien Finistere by persecution for his religious 
belief. John Murray Mitchell was graduated at 
Columbia in 1877, the valedictorian of his class, 
receiving his Master's degree in course, and entering 
Columbia Law School was graduated Bachelor of 
Laws in 1 879. He then made an extended luiropean 
tour, studying the French, German and Italian lan- 
guages, and on his return entered upon the practice 
of law in New York City. In 1889 he formed a 
partnership with his brothers Edward (Columbia 
1861) and William (Columbia 1S68), which con- 
tinued until May 1894, when he associated himself 
with John R. & Benjamin F. Dos Bassos. During 
this period he was engaged in many important 
cases, in one patent case the Hon. Roscoe Conkling 
being the opposing counsel, and in another case 
representing the Judges of the Circuit Court of 
Appeals in the matter of a petition for a mandamus 
before the United States Supreme Court. In this 
latter case, although twenty-four of the most promi- 
nent law firms in New York City took opposite 
views with Mr. Mitchell, the Supreme Court de- 
cided in his favor, denying the petition for a man- 
damus against his clients. Mr. Mitchell has served 
two terms in Congress as Representative from the 
Eighth New York District, being elected in 1894 to 
the Fifty-fourth Congress and re-elected in 1896. 
He has been Rear Commodore and is now Vice- 
Commodore of the American Yacht Club, and holds 
membership in the Seawanhaka Corinthian and the 
New York Yacht clubs. He is also a member of 
the Bar Association, the Down-Town Association, 
the Republican, Fencers, Riding, New York Athletic 
and Riding clubs, the Prison Association, the Delta 
Psi and the Association of the Alumni of Columbia 
College, the American Numismatic and Archaeo- 
logical Society, is Treasurer of the Church Choral 
Society and President of the Choral Club, and 
member of the Metropolitan, Chevy Chase and 
.Army and Navy clubs of Washington, District of 
Columbia. Mr. Mitchell is an active Republican in 
politics. lie married, .April 15, 1S96, Lillian Tal- 
niage, of Brooklyn, and has one son : John Murray 
Mitchell, Jr. 



71 ; Prof. Mining and Metallurgy, \A/ashington Univ., 
St. Louis, 1871 to 1893 ; Consulting Mining Engineer 
and Metallurgist, St. Louis, Mo. 

WII.LIA.M BLEECKER PO'lTER, Mining 
IJigineer, was born in Schenectady, New 
York, March 23, 1846, the son of the Rt. Rev. 
Horatio Potter, D.D., LL.D., for many years Protes- 
tant Episcoi)al Bishop of the diocese of New York. 
He was graduated at Columbia in the Class of 1866 
and then entered the .School of Mines in that 
University, taking the course in .Mining l^ngineer- 
ing and receiving that degree in 1869. For two 




POTTER, William Bleecker 

Columbia A.B. 1866, A.M. .ind E.M. l86q. 
Born in Schenectady, N. Y., 1846; graduated Colum- 
bia, 1866 ; School of Mines, 1869 ; Asst. in Geology, i86g- 
VOI.. v. —9 



WII.I.IA.M H. POITER 

years he continued at the School as .Assistant in 
Oeology, also serving with Dr. John S. Newberry 
upon the Geological Survey of Ohio, and in 1871 
was called to the Chair of Mining and Metallurgy 
at Washington LTniversity, St. Louis, Missouri. Pro- 
fessor Potter held this Professorship until 1893, 
wlicn he resigned to engage in the active jiractice of 
his profession as Consulting Mining Engineer and 
Metallurgist and in the management of the St. Louis 
Sampling and Testing Works, a notable establish- 
ment and the first of its kind, which he had founded 
and built up for scientific investigations and the 
practical testing of ores and metallurgical processes 
on a large scale. He was elected President of the 
.\merican Institute of Mining Engineers in 1888, 



I30 



UNIFERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



is a member of various scientific societies and has dren : Edith Schieffelin, Elizabeth H., William T., 
contributed extensively to their published pro- Jr., Philip S., Alice \V., G. Arthur, Julia H. T., 
ceedings. Samuel S. and Mary T. S. Sabine. 



SABINE, William Tufnell 

Columbia A.B. 1859 
Born in New York City, 1838; educated under private 
tutor, at the University Grammar School and Nathan- 
iel Thayer's School ; graduated Columbia, 1859 ; General 
Theological Seminary, New York, 1862 ; engaged in 
the work of the Episcopal ministry in New York and 
Philadelphia, 1863-74 '• Pastor First Reformed Episcopal 
Church, New York City, since 1874; D.D. New York 
University, i8go. 

WILLIAM lUFNELL SAIUNE, D.D., 
Clergyman, was born in New York City, 
October i6, 1838, the son of Gustavus A. and 
Julia W. (Tufnell) Sabine. His ancestry is English 
on both sides, his father, a practising physician, 
having served in the Middlesex Hospital, London, 
and with the East India Company, and his grand- 
father on his mother's side having been a Captain in 
the British Army. William T. Sabine received his 
early education under private tutors, at Nathaniel 
Thayer's School and the University Grammar 
School, and was graduated at Columbia in the Class 
of 1859, receiving his Master's degree in course. 
He then studied theology at the General Theologi- 
cal Seminary in New York, graduating there in 1862, 
and entered the work of the ministry as Assistant 
to the Rector of St. George's Church in that city 
the following year. In 1863 he was called to the 
Church of the Covenant in Philadelphia, Penn- 
sylvania, where he remained as Rector for three 
years, removing in 1866 to New York to become 
Rector of the Church of the Atonement. He con- 
tinued in charge of this parish until 1874, when he 
severed the relation to accept the duties of Pastor 
of the First Reformed Episcopal Church in New 
York, with which he has remained to the present 
time. New York University conferred upon liim 
the degree of Doctor of Divinity in 1890. Dr. 
Sabine is a member of the College literary societies 
and of a number of associations engaged in church 
work, among them the American Bible and Tract 
Societies, the American Sunday School Union, 
American and Foreign Christian Union, the Lati- 
mer Society, National Temperance Society, Medical 
Missionary Society, and the Presbyterian Ministers' 
Association of New York. In politics he is inde- 
pendent, voting usually the Prohibition ticket, and 
is "anti-Imperialist." October 6, 1868, he married 
Maria Theresa Schieffelin and has nine living chil- 



SCHLOEDER, Nicholas 

Columbia LL.B. 1888. 
Born in New York City, 1867; educated in public and 
private schools ; graduated Columbia Law School, 1888 ; 
admitted to Bar, 1888; since 1888 a member of the firm 
of Straley, Hasbrouch & Schloeder. 

NICHOLAS SCHLOEDER, Lawyer, was born 
in New York City, April i, 1867, the son 
of Jacob Herman and Elizabeth (Nauert) Schloe- 




NICH0L.4S SCHLOEDER 

der, both of German ancestry. He attended as a 
boy a German school in New York City and after- 
wards the public schools there, and in 1885, after 
passing the Regent's Examination, he entered 
Columbia Law School, from which he was graduated 
in 1888 as Bachelor of Laws. He was admitted to 
the New York Bar in June of the latter year, and 
spent some time in the office of Henry Bischoff, Jr., 
now a Justice of the Supreme Court of the State of 
New York. In 1S88 Mr. Schloeder became a mem- 
ber of the firm of Straley, Hasbrouch & Schloeder, 
with which his connection still continues. The firm 
has achieved a wide success as general practitioners. 
He has never taken an active interest in politics. 



UNJFERSiriES JND THEIR SONS 



13' 



He is a member of the Arion and Commercial 
clubs, and was married in Germany, May 30, 1891, 
to Agnes Streit. They have three children : Agnes 
Streit, Nicholas Streit and I'.lsa Streit Schloeder. 



MITCHELL, William Anderson 

Columbia A.B. 1863 — Yale M.D. 1865. 
Born in Harrison, N. Y., 1842; prepared for College 
at private school in White Plains, N.Y.; graduated 
Columbia, 1863; Yale Medical School, 1865. 

WILLIAM ANDERSON MITCHELL, M.D., 
Physician, was born in Harrison, West- 
chester county, New V'ork, December 13, 1842, the 
son of Josiah Sherman and Elizabeth (.\nderson) 
Mitchell. He is a direct descendant of Matthew 
Mitchell of Halifax, ICngland, who came to Boston, 
August 14, 1635, and was one of the founders of 
U'ethersfield and Saybrook, Connecticut, and Spring- 
field, Massachusetts, one of the largest land owners 
in Connecticut and prominent in the affairs of that 
Colony. Among his ancestors he counts Elder 
George Minott, one of the first settlers of Dorches- 
ter, NLassachusetts, in 1634, and Colonel James 
Minott, of Concord in the same State. Through his 
father also he traces his lineage from John Sherman 
of Watertown, Massachusetts, Captain of Militia and 
Representative to the General Court in 165 1, and 
from the Rev. Josiah Sherman of Woburn, a brother 
of Roger Sherman, signer of the Declaration of 
Independence, who was Chaplain of a Connecticut 
regiment in the Revolution. William i\. Mitchell 
was prepared for College at Dr. Harris' School in 
White Plains, New York, and graduated at Colum- 
bia in 1S63. He pursued his professional studies 
at the Yale Medical School, receiving the degree of 
Doctor of Medicine there in 1S65. While an under- 
graduate at Columbia he enrolled himself as a private 
in the ranks of the Seventh Regiment New York State 
Militia in the service of the United States, the Civil 
War being then in progress, and in 1864 he served 
as Medical Cadet. He is thus eligible to member- 
ship in the Grand .\rmy of the Rejiublic, with wliich 
he is now connected. Dr. Mitchell is also Registrar 
General of the Order of Founders and Patriots of 
America, an<l a member of the Sons of the Revolu- 
tion, Society of Colonial Wars, .Alpha Delta Phi and 
New England Society of New York City. He mar- 
ried, June 7, 1866, Natalie Madeline Saycn of Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania, and has five chiklren : Harry 
Sayen, Marguerite Sayen, Josiah Sherman, Chauncey 
Leeds anil Natalie Laura Mitchell. 



SUTTON, Frank 

Columbia E.E. 1895. 
Born in New York City, 1874 ; received his early 
education under the guidance of tutors and at private 
schools ; entered the School of Mines of Columbia, 
graduating with the degree of E.E. in 1895 ; in the 
steamship business with his father for a year ; since 
1896 in partnership with Max Osterberg as consulting 
engineers. 

FRANK SUrrON, Electrical Engineer, was 
born in New York City, December 28, 
1874, son of Woodruff and Fannie (Steele) Sutton. 
I lis great-great-grandfather on his father's side came 
from England to this country in the early i)art of 




FRANK SUITOX 

the present century. His grandfather, Effingham 
B. Sutton, established in 1 S49 Sutton & Company's 
line of Clipper Ships, running from New York to 
San I'Vancisco, in which business his father suc- 
ceeded him as head of the firm. His father was 
also President of the Cromwell Steamshi]) Company 
of New York. Through his mother he is descended 
from Captain John l'"alconer, who sensed in General 
Washington's .Army during the Revt)lulion. The 
subject of this sketch receiveil his early education 
under the guidance of private tutors and at private 
schools. He then entered the School of Mines of 
Columbia, graduating in 1895 as Electrical Engi- 
neer. .After graduation he was engaged in the 
steamship business with his father for a year, and 



132 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



in 1896 formed a partnership with Max Osterberg 
under the firm name of Osterberg & Sutton, Con- 
sulting Kiectrical Engineers. Although still a very 
young man, Mr. Sutton promises to make a success 
of the profession he has chosen. He is a member 
of the Sons of the Revolution, and of the Alpha 
Delta Phi Club of New \ork City. 



WINTERS, Byram Lee 

Columbia LL.B. 1888. 
Born in Smithboro, N. Y., 1862 ; fitted for College at 
Phillips-Andover Academy; graduated Columbia Law 
School, 1888; has since practised his profession in New 
York City. 

B^•RAM I.KF. WINTERS, Lawyer, was born 
in Smithboro, Tioga county. New York. 
September 30, 1862, the son of Joseph and Sarah 




BVRAM L. WINTERS 

E. (Carpenter) Winters. He received his early 
education in the public schools of his native place, 
and afterwards attended the Seminary at Doylestown 
and Peddle Institute where he received the degree 
of Bachelor of Philosophy in 1883. He fitted for 
College at Phillips-Andover Academy, and on 
graduating from that institution entered Columbia 
Law School, where he received the degree of Bach- 
elor of Laws in 1888, and was admitted to the Bar 



of the State of New York in the same year. Since 
that time Mr. Winters has been engaged in the 
active and successful practice of the law in New 
York City, and is the attorney for a number of 
large corporations. He is a Republican in jjolitics, 
but has never found time nor been inclined to take 
part in political contests. Mr. Winters is a mem- 
ber of the Bar Association of the City of New York, 
the Loyal Legion, the West Side Republican Club, 
the Pelham Country Club, the Manor Club, the 
Baptist Social Union and the American Geographi- 
cal Society. Mr. Winters also conducts one of the 
largest and most successful farms in Tioga county. 



SMITH, Erasmus Peshine 

Columbia A.B. 1832. 
Born in New York City, 1814 ; graduated Columbia, 
1832 ; student at Harvard Law School, 1832-33 ; prac- 
tised law in Rochester, N. Y., and engaged in journal- 
ism, 1833-50; Prof. Mathematics, Univ. of Rochester, 
1850-52; Supt. of Education, State of New York, 1852- 
57; Reporter, New York Court of Appeals, 1857-64; 
U.S. Commissioner of Immigration, 1864, and Examiner 
of Claims in State Dept., until 1871 ; Secy, of Foreign 
Affairs of Empire of Japan, 1871-76; died 1882. 

ERASMUS PESHINE SMITH, Jurist, was 
born in New York City, March 2, 18 14, and 
received his early education in the public schools of 
Rochester, New York, where his parents removed 
while he was yet a child. After graduation at 
Columbia in the Class of 1S32, he pursued the study 
of law, attending lectures at the Harvard Law School 
during the year 1 832-1 S33, and upon atlmission to 
the Bar established himself in Rochester in the 
practice of his profession. In addition to his law 
business, Mr. Smith was engaged as editorial writer 
on the Rochester Democrat, and this connection 
led to his Editorship of the Buffalo Commercial and 
later to a similar association with the Washington 
Intelligencer. The latter position he held when 
called in 1S50, to the Chair of Mathematics in 
Rochester University, where he remained two years. 
He was appointed Superintendent of Education for 
the State of New York in 1852, and in 1857 was 
made Reporter of Decisions in the Court of Appeals, 
in which position he introduced the system of con- 
secutive numbering which has since been followed 
in that state and generally elsewhere. In 1864 he 
was called to Washington as Commissioner of Im- 
migration, which post, however, he soon relinquished 
for that of E.xaminer of Claims in the Department 
of State, where his knowledge of international law 



UNiyERSiriES AND rilEUi SONS 



133 



was of great value to the Government. When the 
Jajianese Government, in 1S71, apphed to Secretary 
Fish to recommend an American as adviser to the 
Mikado in International Law, the clioice was unhesi- 
tatingly made of Mr. Smith, who went to Japan and 
served there for five years, in a capacity similar to 
that of the Secretary of State in the United States. 
While liolding this position Mr. Smith perfornieil a 
service for humanity and the world by breaking up 
the trade in Chinese coolies through a decision 
which he procured, the Czar of Russia being arbi- 
trator, in the case of a cargo of coolies wrecked on 
the coast of Jai)an. In another field than that of 
law or diplomacy Mr. Smith made his mark upon his 
age by contributing to the language the word " tele- 
gram." This was first suggested by him in the 
Albany Evening Journal, and though at first resisted 
was finally adopted in general use. After his return 
from Japan, Mr. Smith resided in Rochester, where 
he died, October 21, 1882. 



EMERY, Livingston 

Columbia A.B. 1886, LL.B. 1888. 
Born in Brooklyn, N. Y. ; educated at Adelphi 
Academy, Brooklyn; graduated Columbia, 1886; 
Columbia Law School, 1888; also studied law with 
various firms; has practised as a patent attorney in 
New York since 1892. 

LlVIN(;STOX KMl'IRV, Lawyer, was born in 
Brooklyn, New Voik. 'I'hrough his father, 
Charles Kdward Emery, he is descended from Cap- 
tain William Emery, well known in the Revolution- 
ary liistory of New England, antl through his 
mother, he is descended from William Livingston, 
one of the Colonial Governors of New Jersey. He 
received his early education at the Adelphi Acad- 
emy (now .Adelphi ("ollege) in Brooklyn, New York, 
graduated from Columbia with the degree of Bache- 
lor of .Arts in i<S,S6, and from Columbia Law School 
with the degree of Bachelor of Laws in 1888. Mr. 
Livingston also studie<l for a time in the offices of 
various attorneys in New York City, among tlicm 
Betts, Attcrbury, Hyde iS: Belts, Francis Forbes and 
others. He began practice for himself as a special- 
ist in patent litigation in 1S92, and has since con- 
tinued it with marked success. He is a member of 
the Sons of the Revolution and the Loyal Legion, 
and takes no active interest in politics. He married, 
June 6, 1S94, I'oUyClapp, daughter of Hon. Calvin 
E. I'ratt, for many years a Justice of the S'lprenie 
Court of the State of New York, 'i'hey have two 
children : Calvine and Charles Edward Emery. 



THOMPSON, Robert William, Jr. 

Columbia A.M. 1894, LL.B. 1896. 
Born in New York City, 1874 ; educated in the public 
schools ; graduated College of the City of New York, 
1893; A.M. Columbia. 1894; LL.B. Columbia Law 
School, 1896; practising lawyer in N. Y. City. 

ROBERT WILLIAM THO.MI'SON, Jr., Law- 
yer, was born in New York City, May 20, 
1 8 75. His father, Robert William Thompson, was 
of Irish-Scotch ancestry and related to the Sher- 
wood and Morris families. His mother, Martha 
Macfarlan, was of Scotch origin, being a descendant 
of the Macfarlan Clan and the Duke of Montrose. 




ROBERT \V. THOMPSON JR. 

The subject of this sketch was educated in the 
public schools of New York City, and later at the 
College of the City of New York, taking the degree 
of Baclielor of .Arts in the latter institution in 1S93. 
He then took uji tlie study of law at Columbia Law 
School, receiving the degree of Master of .Arts from 
the University in 1874 and that of Bachelor of Laws 
in 1896. He began the practice of law in New 
York City in the office of Cravath iv: Houston, and 
in 1897 became a member of the firm of Hill, 
Thompson & Stiircke, which was dissolved in Sep- 
tember 1899, since which date he has practised 
alone. Mr. Thompson is a member of the .Alpha 
Delta I'hi anil Phi Delta I'hi fraternities, the River- 
side and West Side Republican clubs. 



^4 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



BROWN, Julius L. 

Harvard LL.B. 1870. 
Born in Canton, Ga., 1848 ; served with the Cadets of 
the Georgia Military Institute in the Civil War, 1864- 
65; prepared for College under tuition of Richard Mal- 
colm Johnston; graduated Univ. of Georgia, 1868; 
Harvard Law School 1870; practising law in Atlanta, 
Ga., since 1870; Asst. U. S. Atty., Northern Dist. of 
Georgia, 1870-71 ; Master in Chancery, U. S. Circuit 
Court; admitted to U. S. Supreme Court, i83o; Grand 
Commander of Knights Templar of Georgia, 1899. 

JULIUS I.. BROWN, Lawyer, was born in Can- 
ton, Cherokee county, Georgia, May 31, 
1848, the son of Jo.seph Emerson and Elizabeth 
(Grisham) Brown. The family is of Scotch- Irish 
descent. North of Ireland Protestants, in the civil 
wars of the seventeenth century, fighting against 
King James. William Brown, who was born in 
Ireland in 1701 and married Margaret Fleming, 
came to America in the early i)art of the eighteenth 
century and settled at Philadelphia, where he died 
December 28, 1757. His grandson, Joseph Brown, 
born in 1 760, fought under Captain Moore of 
Colonel Sevier's regiment in the War of Independ- 
ence, and his great-grandson, Mackey Brown, 
grandfather of Julius L. was a soldier in the War 
of 1 81 2, and fought in General Carroll's Brigade at 
the battle of New Orleans. Joseph Emerson Brown 
(Vale LL.B., 1846) was one of the foremost leaders 
of the South during the great crisis in the e.\istence of 
the Republic. He took his seat as Governor of 
Georgia in 1857 and held that office throughout the 
Civil War, winning the admiration of the people of 
that state and of the entire Confederacy by the energy 
with which he entered into the conflict and the 
indomitable courage with which he continued it 
to the end, and commanding the respect of both 
North and South by his wise statesmanship in 
accepting the situation when the end came and 
devoting his energies to the rehabilitation of his 
state and section. For some years after the war 
he was Chief-Justice of the Supreme Court of 
Georgia, and from 1880 to 1891 he represented 
that state in the United States Senate. His son, 
Julius L. Brown, a youth at school in Milledgeville, 
Georgia, at the outbreak of the War, entered the 
ranks of the cadets of the Georgia, Military Insti- 
tute, and saw active ser\'ice with the troops called 
out by his father when Governor Brown made his 
courageous but ineffective stand against Sherman's 
army on the " march to the sea." The war over, 
Mr. Brown, who had been a student in the Univer- 
sity High School at .Athens, Georgia, was prepared 
for College under the tuition of the late Richard 



Malcolm Johnston, the distinguished scholar and 
author, and entered the L'niversity of Georgia, in the 
Junior class, graduating with high honors in 186S. 
He then studied law with his father, and after admis- 
sion to the Georgia Bar in 1S69 came to Har\'ard 
for further study. In 1870 he received the degree 
of Bachelor of Laws at the l.aw School of that 
University and returned to .-Xtlanta where he has 
since continued the practice of his profession. Mr. 
Brown, while importuned by his party to stand as 
candidate for Mayor of .Atlanta, for State Senator 
and for other public positions, has steadfastly 




JULIUS L. BROW.V 

declined elective office. He served for a time as 
.Assistant United States .Attorney with his partner, 
the Hon. John D. Pope, and he has been for some 
time Master in Chancery of the United States 
Circuit Court of the Northern District of Georgia ; 
but he has attained wide recognition as a force in 
public affairs through his active interest in the 
reform of legislation and enterprises looking to tlie 
development of the industries and the commerce 
of the South. The charter of the Cincinnati & 
Georgia Railroad Company, which he drew in 1881, 
became the foundation of the general railroad law of 
the state ; the Metropolitan Street Railway in .Atlanta 
was organized and built by him ; he was President of 
tiie Georgia Mining, Manufacturing & Investment 



UNIVERSITIES ANB THEIR SONS 



35 



Company ; the Young Men's Library building was 
erected during his Presidency of that association. 
It afterwards became the Carnegie Library i', Atlanta. 
In local politics, Mr. Brown has been the leader 
of the op[)osition to the prohibition system, and 
nationally he is an enthusiastic advocate of free 
silver coinage. In Masonry he is one of the most 
prominent members of that order in the state, and 
in 1899 was promoted to the high position 
of Grand Commander of the Knights Templar of 
Georgia, Deputy Grand Master of the (Jrand Coun- 
cil and Vice-President of the High Priesthood of 
that state. Mr. Brown has always been deeply 
interested in the study of the Fine Arts, and for 
years has devoted much effort and money to the col- 
lection of rare and valuable books, etchings, engrav- 
ings, coins, porcelains, fans, and autograph documents. 
His collection of etchings and old engravings is 
without equal in the Southern States and the porce- 
lain collection is said to be one of the finest in the 
country. In his library are two especially valuable 
volumes, the original composition of Lalla Rookh, 
also the Order book of Governor Tryon, and the 
Aide-de-Camp's book on the Husband's Rebellion of 
North Carolina of i 77 i, formerly the property of Sir 
Henry Clinton. His house, which is a veritable mu- 
seum, is a most interesting place to visit. November 
8, 187 1, he married Fannie G., daughter of Dr. 
Tomlinson Fort and granddaughter of Arthur Fort, 
one of the Council of Safety for Georgia during the 
Revolution of 1776. They have had two daughters, 
one of whom, ^L^rtha Fort Brown, is living. 



CURTIS, George William 

Harvard LL.D, 1881 —Columbia L.H.D. 1887. 
Born in Providence, R. I., 1824; clerk in mercantile 
house in New York, 1839-42 ; member of Brook Farm 
Community, 1842; travelled abroad, 1846-50; engaged 
in journalism and magazine work with the New York 
Tribune, Putnam's Magazine, Harper's Magazine, 
Weekly and Bazaar ; A.M. (Hon.) Brown, 1854 ; dele- 
gate to Republican National Convention, i860, 1864, 
1876; Pres. Elector, 1868; Civil Service Commissioner, 
1871-73; LL.D. Madison 1864, Harvard 1881, Brown 
1882; L.H.D. Columbia, 1887; Regent Univ. of the 
State of New York, 1864-92 ; and Chancellor, 1890-92 ; 
died 1892. 

Gi:ORC,K WILLIAM CURTIS, LL.D., L.II.D., 
.Xullior, was born in Providence, Rhode 
Island, February 24, 1824. He attended school in 
Jamaica Plain, now a part of Boston, Massachusetts, 
and in 1S39 removed with his father to New York 
City, wliere for a lime he was engaged as a clerk in 
a mercantile hmisc. In 1S42 he joined, with liis 



elder brothers, the Brook Farm Community at \Vest 
Roxbury, Massachusetts, and upon the failure of 
that notable experiment the brothers together under- 
took farming on their own account in a small way in 
Concord, Massachusetts. Mr. Curtis went abroad 
in 1846 and passed several years in residence in 
Europe and in travel in the East, returning in 1850 
to engage in the work of journalism and literature in 
which he made his subsequent career. His first 
connection was with the New York Tribune, on the 
editorial staff of which journal he held a place for 
many years. He also was associated in the publica- 
tion of Putnam's Monthly, sinking his private for- 




C.EO. W. CURTIS 

tunc in the enterprise, and in 1853 formed the 
connection with Harper Brothers which continued 
throughout his life. His first regular contributions 
were the papers published in Harper's Magazine 
inider the title of the Editor's Easy Chair. When 
the Monthly was established, he was made its Editor, 
and he was a regular writer in the Bazaar. Mr. 
Curtis' work as an author appeared mainly during 
the early period of his career. His Nile Notes of a 
Howadji was prepared immediately upon his leturn 
from his eastern journeyings, together with other 
volumes in which he set forth his experiences as a 
traveller. The Potiphar Papers, a social satire, 
appeared two years later, in 1 85 3, and his last book, 
Trumps, a novel, was not later than i860. He 



136 



UNIVERSITIES ANB THEIR SONS 



maintained his connection with periodical literature 
and with the lecture platform, but from that time gave 
much of his effort to the promotion of political reform, 
which he sought at first witliin the lines of the Repub- 
lican party, and later through independent action. 
He was a Delegate to several of the National Con- 
ventions of the Republican party and a Presidential 
Klcctor, but declined offers of recognition in the 
form of appointment to diplomatic positions abroad. 
He did, however, accept the Chairmanship of the 
Civil Ser\'ice Commission in 1871, being greatly 
interested in that reform. This office he resigned 
in 1873, disheartened at the negligence of the ad- 
ministration in enforcing the rules of the merit sys- 
tem, and from that time to the end of his life gave 
his efforts as the head of the National Civil Service 
Reform League to the work of advancing the reform. 
He was strongly opposed to the nomination of 
James G. Blaine for the Presidency in 1884, and 
was a leader of the Mugwumps in support of Grover 
Cleveland. Mr. Curtis was the recipient of numer- 
ous honorary academic degrees. Brown made him 
Master of .-Vrts in 1854, Madison in 1861 and Ro- 
chester in 1862; he received the degree of Doctor 
of Laws from Madison in 1864, Harvard in 1881, 
and Brown in 1882, and that of Doctor of Litera- 
ture from Columbia in 1887. From 1S64 until the 
time of his death he was a Regent of the Lhiiversity 
of the State of New York and Ciiancellor after 1890, 
and also heUl the position of Non-Resident Professor 
of Modern Literature at Cornell. Mr. Curtis died 
1892. 

GALLIVAN, James Ambrose 

Harvard A.B i88«. 
Born in So. Boston, Mass., 1866; educated in Boston 
public schools ; graduated Harvard, 1888 ; chief clerk in 
Boston City Architect's office, 1889; member Mass. 
House of Representatives, 1895-96; Massachusetts 
Senate, 1897-98 ; engaged in newspaper work in Boston. 

JAMES .\MBROSE GALLIVAN, ex-Member of 
the ^L^ssachusetts Senate, was born in South 
Boston, where he now resides, October 22, 1S66, 
son of James Stephen and Mary (Flynn) Gallivan. 
His parents were born in Ireland and came to the 
United States early in the fifties. He was a pupil 
of the Lawrence Grammar School, South Boston, 
and of the Boston Latin School, completing the 
regular course at the latter in 1884 and receiving 
the Franklin Medal, and entering Harvard at the 
beginning of the next College year, was graduated 
with the Class of 188S. For a short time after leav- 
ing College, he was chief clerk in the Boston City 



.Architect's office, but for the past ten years he has 
been actively engagetl in newspaper work and prom- 
inently identified with local politics. In 1895 and 
1896 he represented his district in the Lower House 
of the Massachusetts legislature, and the two suc- 
ceeding years was a member of the Slate Senate, 
zealously striving in both bodies to protect and 
forward the interests of the City of Boston, and ren- 
dered valuable aid in securing the passage of numer- 
ous acts beneficial to that municipality. The Mas- 
sachusetts State Hospital for Consumptives and 
Tubercular Patients at Rutland, which is the first 




JAS. A. GALLIV.iN 

institution of the kind in this country to be estab- 
lished under state auspices, stands as a monument 
to the legislative career of Mr. Gallivan, he having 
conceived the idea of such an institution and 
secured the passage of a bill by the Legislature es- 
tablishing the hospital. Its career has been remark- 
able and its success unqualified. Politically he is a 
Democrat. Mr. Gallivan is a well known figure in 
Boston newspaper circles and a frequent contribu- 
tor to magazine literature. 



GALLIVAN, William Joseph 

Harvard A.B. 1888, M D. 1892. 
Born in Boston, Mass., 1865; educated in Boston 
public schools; graduated Harvard, 1888; Harvard 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



I 



37 



Medical School, 1892; practising Physician in So. 
Boston; member Boston School Committee since 
1894. 

WILLIAM JOSEPH GALLIVAN, M.l)., 
Physician, was born in Boston, Massa- 
chusetts, February 2, 1S65, the son of James and 
Mary (Flynn) Gallivan. His parents were natives of 
IreLand and came to Boston nearly fifty years ago. 
Graduating from the Lawrence Grammar School, 
Boston, in ICS79, and from the Boston Latin School 
in 1884, he pursued his collegiate and medical 
studies at Harvard, where he took his Bachelor's 




WM. J. GAI.T.IVAN 

degree with the Class of i.SSS, and that of Doctor 
of Medicine in 1892. His professional preparations 
were augmented by the practical observation and 
experience obtainable in the various Boston Hos- 
pitals and dispensaries, and when ready to engage 
in practice, he located in South Boston, where he 
has since resided. Dr. Gallivan was chosen a 
member (if the Boston School Committee at the 
annual municipal election of 1S93, and has occu- 
pied a scat upon the Board from January 1894 to 
the present time thniugh successive re-elections. 
In January 1900, he was elected to the Presidency 
of the Board. He married, June 27, 1894, Cliar- 
lotte Louise Gilfether, and has one daughter: Agnes 
Gallivan. 



DUDLEY, Joseph 

Harvard A.B. 1665. 
Born in Roxbury, Mass., 1647; graduated Harvard, 
1665 ; studied theology but entered political life ; Repre- 
sentative in General Court, 1673; Commissioner for 
the United Colonies, 1677-81 ; President of New Eng- 
land, 1685 ; Chief-Justice, Supreme Court, Province of 
New England, 1687; Chief-Justice, Province of New 
York, 1690-93; Gov. of Isle of \A^ight, 1693; member of 
British Parliament, 1701 ; Gov. of Massachusetts, 1702- 
15 ; died 1720. 

JOSKl'H DUDLKV, Jurist, Statesman, Colonial 
Governor of Massachusetts, was born in Rox- 
bury, now a part of Boston, Massachusetts, Septem- 
ber 23, 1647. He was the son of Thomas Dudley, 
who came to Boston in 1630 with the commission 
of Deputy-Governor, subsequently became Governor 
and founded the family which bore such a large part 
in the establishment and development of New Eng- 
land. Joseph Dudley was graduated at Harvard 
in 1665 and studied theology but preferred a po- 
litical career and became a Representative in the 
General Court and a Magistrate in his native town 
in 1673. He fought in the Narragansett War in 
1675, was one of the Commissioners to negotiate 
the treaty of peace with that tribe, and from 1677 
to 1 68 1 served as a Commissioner of the L'nited 
Colonies of New England. Going to England in 
16S2 as agent of the Colony to procure a renewal 
of the charter, he returned in 16S5 with his own 
apjiointment as President of New England from 
James 11. and became Chief-Justice of the Supreme 
Court two years later. The successful revolution 
against the tyranny of .Xndros brought about the 
expulsion of Dudley also, but he was in high favor 
at Court, and returned with the commission as 
Chief-Justice of New York in 1690, and upon his 
visit to England in 1693 was made a Deputy Gov- 
ernor of the Isle of Wight and later, in 1701, was 
elected to Parliament there. He rctuined to New 
England in i 702 witli appointment by the Crown as 
Captain-General and Governor of Massachusetts 
under the second charter. This office he held until 
I 715, when he retired to his estates in Roxbury and 
died there, April 2, 1720. His son Paul (Har- 
vard 1690) was Chief- Justice of Massachusetts in 
1 745, an eminent naturalist and a benefactor of 
Har\ard. 



HAYNES, Joseph 

Harvard A.B. 1658. 
Born in Hartford, Conn., 1638 ; graduated Harvard, 
1658 ; studied theology and entered upon the work of 



38 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



the ministry at Wethersfield, Conn. ; Pastor of First 
Church in Hartford, 1664-79; died 1679. 

JOSEPH HAYNliS, Clergyman, was born in 
Hartford, Connecticut, in 163S. His father 
Jolin Haynes, a native of England, came to this 
coimtry with the Rev. Edward Hooker in 1633 and 
immediately took a prominent position in the Mas- 
sachusetts Bay Colony, becoming its Governor in 
1635. John Haynes soon thereafter removed to 
Connecticut, where he became the first Governor 
of that Colony and served as such every alternate 
year until his death in 1654. His son Joseph was 
sent to Harvard for education and graduated there 
in 1658, subsequently studying theology and serving 
as pulpit supply for the church at Wethersfield, 
Connecticut, a neighboring town to Hartford. In 
1664 he was called to the First Church in Hart- 
ford as colleague of the Rev. John Whiting, where 
a liifTerence in ecclesiastical views held by the Pas- 
tor and his associate soon caused friction. Mr. 
Whiting held the Congregationalist doctrine while 
Mr. Haynes represented the Presbyterian element, 
and the disputes which arose resulted in the divi- 
sion of the congregation into parties so bitterly 
opposed that Mr. Whiting and his followers refused 
to hold communion with Mr. Haynes and his par- 
tisans. The colleague, however, commanded the 
strongest battalions, and in February 1670, Mr. 
Whiting withdrew from the contest and with thirty- 
one members founded the Second Church of Hart- 
ford, leaving Mr. Haynes in possession. Mr. 
Haynes remained Pastor of that church until his 
death, May 24, 1679. 



of 1863. After teaching the Groton (Massachu- 
setts) High School for a year he became Second 
Assistant Librarian of the Mercantile Library of 
New York City, and was subsequently advanced to 
the position of Librarian. His legal studies were 
pursued in the office of ICvarts, Southniayd & Choate, 
New York, with whom he remained about four 
years, at the expiration of which time he located 
for practice in Chicago. For some years he was 
associated with the late Hon. William C. Goudy, 
was later senior member of the firm of Green, 
\Villets & Robbins, and is now of the firm of 




GREEN, Adolphus Williamson 

Harvard A.B. 1863. 
Born in Boston, Mass., 1843 ; fitted for College at 
Boston Latin School; graduated Harvard, 1863 ; taught 
school one year; Librarian New York Mercantile 
Library ; read law with Evarts, Southmayd & Choate, 
New York ; engaged in legal practice in Chicago ; 
organized several large commercial corporations ; for- 
merly Attorney for village of Hyde Park, 111., South 
Park Commission, and Chicago Board of Trade ; Gen- 
eral Counsel of National Biscuit Co., and American 
Radiator Co. 

ADOLPHUS WILLIAMSON GREEN, Lawyer, 
was born in Boston, Massachusetts, January 
14, 1843, son of John Henry and Jane (Ryan) Green. 
He is a graduate of the Tyler Grammar School, 
Boston, and was prepared for College at the Boston 
Latin School, from which he entered Harvard, 
where he took his Bachelor's degree with the Class 



A. W. GREIiN 

Green, Honord (Har\'ard 1888) & Peters. For 
some years Mr. Green's time has been exclusively 
occupied with the organization and legal affairs 
of commercial corporations. He figured promi- 
nently in establishing a number of well-known 
enterprises, including the National Biscuit Com- 
pany, and the American Radiator Company, for 
botii of which he is General Counsel, and although 
his general practice was both profitable and pleas- 
ant, he reluctantly relinquished it on account of the 
extent and exacting character of his corporation 
duties. Mr. Green was Attorney for the village of 
Hyde Park prior to its annexation to Chicago, and 
for a number of years he served in a similar capac- 
ity for the South Park Commissioners and the 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



39 



Chicago Board of Trade. Politically he is a Dem- 
ocrat, but oi^poses any legislative act embodying 
the free coinage of silver. He has frequently been 
chosen to preside at city, county and state conven- 
tions, and as delegate-at-large from the State of 
Illinois to the National Democratic Convention held 
at Chicago in 1892, he seconded in behalf of that 
state the nomination of Grover Cleveland. He is 
a member of the Kenwood, Kenwood Country, Mid- 
lothian, Harvanl and Chicago clubs. .•Xt Chicago, 
July 3, 1879, he married Esther Walsh. Their 
children are : Jane, Mary, Esther Margaret, Eliza- 
beth Lawrence, John Russell and Josephine Green 
living ; and Charles Francis and Arthur \\'illiamson 
Green, deceased. 

HAYWARD, Lemuel 

Harvard A.B. 1768, M.D. 1 Hon ) 1808. 
Born in Braintree, Mass., 1749 ; graduated Harvard, 
1768 ; studied medicine under Dr. Joseph Warren and 
began practice in Jamaica Plain, Mass., 1770 ; Surgeon 
in the Continental Army during the Revolution ; Coun- 
sellor in the Massachusetts Medical Society ; corre- 
sponding member of the London, England, Medical 
Society; Harvard M.D. (Hon.) 1808; died 1821. 

LEMUEL H.'^YW.ARD, ]\LD., Physician, was 
born in Braintree, Massachusetts, March 22, 
1749, and graduated at Harvard in 1768. He 
studied medicine with Dr. Joseph Warren (Harvard 
1759), who fell at the battle of Bunker Hill, and 
in 1770 established himself in the practice of his 
profession in Jamaica Plain, now a part of Boston, 
Massachusetts. There he soon acquired a lucrative 
connection, but on the outbreak of hostilities he 
offered his services to the patriot cause and per- 
formed the duties of Surgeon in the Continental 
.^rmy throughout the Revolutionary \\'ar. Until 
the British evacuated Boston and the Continental 
troops removed south he was engaged in the (}en- 
eral Hospital of that army. h.\. the close of the 
war. Dr. ILayward established his practice in l?oston, 
where he became distinguished in his profession. 
He was a strong advocate of inoculation for sm.all- 
pox antl was associated with Dr. Rand of Charles- 
town, Dr. Davies of Ro.xbury, Dr. .Aspinwall of 
Brookline and Dr. Warren of Boston in ])romoting 
the practice. He held the office of Counsellor 
in the ISLissachusetts Medical Society and otiier 
important professional positions, and was made 
corresponding member of the London, I-'.nglnnd, 
Medical Society in 1791. Harvanl conferral upon 
him tlie honorary degree of Doctor of Medicine in 
iSoS. In 179^, Dr. llayward retired to his resi- 



dence in Jamaica Plain, where he died March 20, 
1 82 1. His son. Dr. George Hayward (Harvard 
1809) became President of the Massachusetts Med- 
ical Society, and was Professor in the Harvard Med- 
ical School 1S35-1S49, and Overseer 1 85 2-1 863. 



KIMBALL, Charles Warren 

Harvard A.B 1871. 
Born in Chester, N. H., 1847 ; educated common 
schools, Pinkerton Academy, Derry, N. H., Harvard, 
and Law Dept. Univ. City of New York ; admitted to 
Bar, 1874 ; practising lawyer in Penn Yan, N. Y. ; Dis- 
trict Attorney Yates Co., since 1897. 

ARRKN KIMBALL, Lauyer, 
m Chester, New Hampshire, 
October 26, 1847, son of Lewis and Eleanor 



CHARLES WA 
was born ir 




aURLES W. KIMr..\II. 

(Elkins) Kimball. Having pursued the primary 
branches of study taught in the common schools he 
prepared for College at Pinkerton .Academy, Derry, 
New Hampshire, and was graduated from Harvard 
in 187 I. His professional studies were completed 
in the Law Department of the L^niversity of the City 
of New York, and subsequent to his admission to 
the Bar (1S74) he practised in New York City until 
1886, when he withdrew temporarily from the legal 
profession. Resuming practice in 1891, at Penn 



140 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



Yan, New York, he has built up a large general law- 
business, and is at the present time serving as Dis- 
trict Attorney for Yates county, to which office he 
was elected in 1897. In 1876 Mr. Kimball was 
united in marriage with Mary C'lark Coffin, of CJlens 
Falls, New York ; their children are : Charles W'ar- 
ren Jr., Irwin Paine and Leigh Wadsworth Kimball. 



GREENHALGE, Frederic Thomas 

Harvard A.B. 1863. 
Born in England, 1843 ; graduated Harvard, 1863 ; 
admitted to Bar, 1865; practised in Lowell, Mass.; 
member of Common Council, i868-6g, of School Board, 
1872-73; Mayor, 1879; member 51st Congress; Gov- 
ernor of Massachusetts, 1894-96; died i8g6. 

FREDKRIC THOM.AS GRKENHALGE, 
LL.l)., Governor of Massachusetts, was born 
in Clithcroe, Lancashire, England, July 19, 1843, 
and at the age of twelve years came to .America 
with his parents, who settled in Lowell, Massa- 
chusetts. His father, William Greenhalgh, who 
changed the spelling of the name to its present 
form after his arrival, was for many years cinploycil 
as a print engraver by the Merrimack .Munutactur- 
ing Company, and died in October 1862. As a 
pupil of the Lowell public schools, Frederic T. 
Greenhalge was noted for his precocity, winning 
special distinction in the declamatory exercises at 
the high school ; and as a student at Harvard, 
which he entered in 1859 and remained until the 
close of his Junior year, he was conspicuous as an 
able writer and debater. In 1870 he was enrolled 
as a graduate of the Class of 1863 with the degree 
of Bachelor of .Arts. Prevented by his father's 
death from completing his College course with the 
class in which he had entered, he turned his atten- 
tion to teaching and also to the study of law. He 
was admitted to the Middlesex County Bar in 1865, 
and established himself in practice in the City of 
Lowell, where he achieved success in his profession 
and was early called to take part in public afliiirs. 
The Republican party, of which he was an earnest 
supporter, elected him to the Lowell Common 
Council for the years 1868— 1869, in 1872-1873 he 
ser\'ed upon the School Board, and in 1879 he was 
elected Mayor of that city. Four years later he 
was elected to the Fifty-first Congress, in which his 
career soon won for him especial distinction. In 
1893 he was elected Governor of Massachusetts to 
succeed William E. Russell, and his first year's 
administration of the office created such general 
satisfaction that he was twice re-elected. His ad- 



ministration was far from being a cordial support 
of the Legislature, but was instead one of fearless 
opposition to every act which he considered danger- 
ous or ine.vpedient, a jjolicy that added much to 
his popularity. His unselfish devotion to his offi- 
cial duties, together with an earnest desire to con- 
tribute toward the success of every public meeting 
or gathering wherein his presence would be benefi- 
cial, atlength caused the amiable and accommodating 
Chief-Magistrate to be looked upon as an over- 
worked man, which was, unfortunately, too true, 
although the Governor himself tlid not consider 




TREDERIC v. (iREF.NHALGE 



the depression which preceded his final break-down 
as anything serious. He was, however, unable to 
rally from the severe illness with wliich he was 
stricken shortly after the delivery of his third inau- 
gural address to the Legislature, and the an.xious 
period of suspense, which was shared by every loyal 
citizen of the Commonwealth irrespective of party, 
was at length terminated by his death on March 5, 
1896. Eminent as a lawyer, distinguished as an 
orator, honored as a statesman and a citizen, it has 
been aptly asserted that every public-spirited citizen 
of Massachusetts took more than an ordinary inter- 
est in his public career, which was unquestionably 
the result of his own personal exertions ; and, 
although an Englishman by birth, his character was 



UNIFERSiriES JND THEIR SONS 



141 



moulded through the influence of Republican insti- 
tutions, and he became both in thought and 
ambition a true American. In 1872, Governor 
Greenhalgc married Isabel Nesmith, of Lowell. 



KING, Rockwell 

Harvard Class of 1874. 
Born in Chicago, 111., 1853 ; educated Chicago, Phil- 
lips (Andover) Academy and Harvard; business train- 
ing with the Adams & Westlake Co., Chicago ; Sec'y 
of that corporation, 1878-80; chosen Pres. of the King 
& Andrews Co., 1880, and of the Western Cold Storage 
Co., Chicago, since 1896. 

ROCKWKI.L KING, Business Man, was born 
in Chicago, Illinois, February 7, 1853, son 
of Charles Bohan and Jane (Rockwell) King. His 
primary education was obtained in Chicago and his 
preparatory studies were pursued at Phillips Acad- 
emy, Andover, Massachusetts, from which school 
he entered Harvard and followed the Academic 
course with the Class of 1874. His business train- 
ing was begun as Timekeeper for the .*\dams & 
Westlake Company, Chicago, of which he became 
Secretary in 1878, and two years later he was made 
President of the King & Andrews Comjiany of that 
city. In 1896 he took the Presidency of the West- 
ern Cold Storage Company, of Chicago. Mr. King 
is a member of the Chicago, Merchants, University, 
Union, Edgewater and Harvard clubs. January 6, 
1881, he married Lucy Wolcott .Andrews and has 
four children : Ethel Rockwell, Majorie McGregor 
Adams and John Andrews King. 



OPPENHEIM, Nathan 

Harvard A.B. 1888-Columbia M.D. iSqi. 
Born in Albany, N. Y., 1865; educated public schools, 
at Harvard, Columbia and abroad ; formerly House 
Physician City Hospital, N. Y. ; Attending Physician 
Children's Department Mt. Sinai Hospital Dispensary 
1892 to present time ; medical lecturer and writer. 

N.-VrHAN OPPENHEl.M, M.D., Physician, 
was born in .\lbany, New York, October 
17, 1865, son of Gerson and Theresa (Stein) 
Oppenheim. He is descended from both sides 
from fomilies of South Germany, where the Oppen- 
heims located a century and a half ago, and a 
branch became identified with the banking interests 
of Germany. The Steins were mostly educators 
and clergymen. Entering Harvard from the .\lbany 
High School, he pursued a number of extra studies 
in connecticm with the regular academic course, and 
was graduated with the Class of 1888. He took his 



medical degree at the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons (Columbia) in 1891, and having acquired 
much valuable experience and observation as House 
Physician at the City (formerly Charity) Hospital, 
New York, in which capacity he served for some 
time, he greatly increased the knowledge thus ob- 
tained by a season of study in Europe, attending 
courses at the Universities of Frankfort, Munich, 
llerlin and Vienna, and upon his return to the 
LInited States he located permanently in the metro- 
polis. Since 1S92 Dr. Oppenheim has been Attend-, 
ing Physician to the Cliildren's Department of Mt. 




N.\TH.\N OPPENHEIM 

Sinai Hospital Dispensary, and Iiis private practice 
is both extensive and profitable. Besides contribut- 
ing frequently to the scientific and medical maga- 
zines, he is the author of The Development of the 
Child, which has achieved a most gratifying success 
in the United .States and England, and is about to 
issue an extended treatise on the Diseases of Ciiil- 
dren. He has also gained considerable prominence 
as a lecturer on Paediatrics and allied subjects. He 
is a member of the New York .Academy of Medicine, 
County Medical Association, County and Metropoli- 
tan Medical Societies, the Deutsche Medicinische 
Gesellschaft of Germany, and the Har\ard Club, 
New York. On June 15. 1S97, he married Bertha 
Elsverg of New York. 



142 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



CHILD, Linus Mason 

Yale B.A 1855. 
Born in Southbridge, Mass., 1835; graduated Yale, 
1855; admitted to Bar, 1859; prominent lawyer of Bos- 
ton; member Boston City Council, Boston School 
Board and Massachusetts Legislature ; died 1898. 

LINUS MASOX CHILD, Lawyer, was born in 
Southbridge, ^L^ssachusetts, March 14, 
1S35. Entering Yale he was one of the most pop- 
ular members of the Class of 1855, and after the 
completion of his College course he studied law and 
was admitted to the Bar in 1859. His professional 
career was begun in the office of Judge Wni. 




L. .M. CHILD 

Richardson of Lowell, Massachusetts, but a desire 
for a wider field of action soon induced him to es- 
tablish himself in Boston, where his legal ability was 
rapidly developed and his industrious application to 
his professional duties was subsequently rewarded 
with a numerous and lucrative clientage. For some 
years he was a member of the law firm of Child & 
Powers. Prior to the consolidation of the Boston 
Street Railway lines he was Counsel for the Middle- 
sex Company and he ably contested in behalf of the 
city a large number of drainage suits resulting from 
the utilization of the Sudbury River by the Water 
Board. Mr. Child served in the Boston city Coun- 
cil, upon the School Board and in the Massachusetts 
Legislature, of which he was a member for the years 



1868 and I1S69, and in politics he was a Repub- 
lican. His death occurred suddenly on January 24, 
1898, and was caused by apoj^lexy. A widow (his 
second wife) and three daughters survive him, his 
only sun having died several years ago. 



H 



DIMOCK, Henry Farnam 

Vale B.A. 1863. M.A. 1866 Harvard Law School, Class of 1864. 

Born in So. Coventry, Conn., 1842; graduated Yale, 

1863 ; practised law in New York City some years ; now 

Manager Metropolitan S.S. Co. and Director of several 

S.S. and R.R. lines; elected to Yale Corporation, 1899. 

I;NRV farnam UIMOCK, Business Man, 
and Fellow of the Yale Corporation, was 
born in South Coventry, ^L^rch 28, 1842. He was a 
student at Yale, taking prizes in all of the Soph- 
omore literary competitions and graduating with a 
high oration stand in 1863, Studying law at the 
Harvard Law School, he applied himself diligently 
and successfully to that profession in New York 
City for some years, or until his practice was super- 
seded by business interest, including the manage- 
ment of the Metropolitan Steamship Line, with 
which he is still connected. Besides being a Direc- 
tor of the Metropolitan Steamship Company, he 
holds Directorships in the Knickerbocker Trust 
Company, the Cronnvell Steamship Line, the Boston 
& Maine and other railroad corporations, and is 
therefore closely identified with the shipping and 
transportation interests. He is also a Director of 
the National Bank of North America, the Domin- 
ion Coal Company, the Dominion Iron & Steel Co. 
and several other Corporations. As Dock Commis- 
sioner of New York, Mr. Dimock drafted and success- 
fully advocated through the Assembly an Act regu- 
lating the use of the docks, which Governor Tilden 
considered a most important measure. In 1875, 
Governor Tilden appointed him a member of a com- 
mission to endorse a plan for the government of the 
cities of the State of New York. His wide experi- 
ence in legal and business affairs has enabled him to 
give valuable advice to those who were formerly his 
instructors, and whenever occasion has demanded 
he has proved a dutiful son of Yale. In 1899 he 
was selected to fill a vacancy in the University Cor- 
poration caused by the retirement of Hon. Frede- 
rick J. Kingsbury. 



EATON, Richard Gardner 

Yale B A. 1892 — Harvard M.D. 1896. 
Born in Wakefield, Mass., 1869; educated in Wake- 
field public schools, Wakefield High School and fitted 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



H3 



for College at Phillips-Andover Academy ; graduated 
Yale, 1892; M.D., Harvard Medical School, i8g5 ; at 
Boston City Hospital, 1895-96; Medical and Surgical 
Interne, Worcester City Hospital, 1896-97; practising 
medicine in Holyoke, Massachusetts since 1897 ; Resi- 
dent Physician Holyoke City Hospital, 1898-99. At 
present practising medicine in Holyoke. 

RICH.ARD G.ARDNKR IC.VION, .M.n., Phy- 
sician, was born in Wakefiekl, Massachu- 
setts, September 8, 1869, the son of Chester \\'., 
and iMiima Giles (Leach) Eaton. His grandfather, 
the Hon. Lilley Eaton, was one of the most promi- 
nent men of Eastern Massachusetts, and tlie fitmily 




RICHARD G. E.\rON 

is descended from Jonas Eaton, one of the early 
settlers of the Colony. His father's family, of 
F^nglish and Scotch descent, may be traced back to 
the year 1 200. He received his early education in 
the public schools and the High School of Wake- 
fielil, and after a preparatory course at Phillips-.\n- 
dover .Academy, entered Yale, graduating in 1892 
as Bachelor of Arts. He then studied medicine at 
the Harvard Medical School, graduating in 1S96, 
and during part of his Senior year served on the 
staff of the Boston City Hospital. After graduation 
he served for a year as Medical and .Surgical Interne 
in the Worcester City Hospital, and began the prac. 
tice of his profession in Holyoke, Massachusetts, in 
1 89 7. He served as Resident Physician at the 



Holyoke City Hospital from March 1898 to 
March 1899. Dr. Eaton is a member of the Mas- 
sachusetts Medical Society. 

HOLLIDAY, Frederick William Mackey 

Yale B.A. 1847. 
Born in Winchester, Va., 1828; educated at Yale; 
studied law at Univ. of Virginia ; practised in Winches- 
ter, Va.; served in the Confederate Army during the Civil 
War; member of Confederate Congress ; Presidential 
Elector-at-large, 1876; Commissioner for Virginia of 
Centennial Exposition ; Governor of Virginia, 1878 ; 
died 1899. 

FREDERICK WILLIAM M.VCKEV HOLLI- 
DAY, Governor of Virginia in 1878, was born 
in Winchester that state, in 1828. He was a stu- 
dent at Yale, entering as a Junior and graduating 
with the Class of 1847, ^^c which he prepared for 
the legal profession at the University of Virginia, 
taking the degree of Bachelor of Laws at the con- 
clusion of his course. At the outbreak of the Civil 
\Var he was conducting an extensive general law 
])ractice in Winchester, but abandoned it to enter 
the Confederate Army at the head of a volunteer 
company, and was shortly afterward made Colonel 
of the Thirty-third Virginia Regiment, which was 
attached to the Brigade commanded by " Stonewall " 
Jackson. The loss of his right arm at the battle of 
Cedar Run incapacitated him from further military 
service and during the remainder of the struggle he 
served with ability in the Confederate Congress. 
Resuming his law practice after the close of the war, 
he once more built up a large and profitable busi- 
ness, still retaining his residence in Winchester, and 
he finally retired from active pursuits. His latter 
years were devoted to foreign travel, during which he 
visited nearly every point of interest on the globe, and 
his death which was caused by paralysis, occurred at 
Winchester, May 29, 1899. He was the Virginia 
Commissioner of the Centennial Exposition held at 
Philadelphia in 1S76, and the same year was chosen 
a Presidential Elector-at-large by the Democratic 
party, which also elected him Governor of V'irginia 
for the year 1878, and his political sen-ices ended 
at the expiration of his term. In January 1868, 
Governor Holliday married Hannah Taylor McCor- 
mack, who died in the following December. His 
second wife, Carrie Calvert Stewart, whom he mar- 
ried in October 1871, died in 1S72. 

OTIS, Charles Augustus, Jr. 

Yale SB. iSqo. 
Born in Cleveland, O., 1868; graduated at the Shef- 
field Scientific School (Yale), 1890; attended the Colum- 



144 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



bia Law School one year ; bank clerk some length of 
time ; now in the iron and steel commission business 
in Cleveland, O. 

CHARLES AUGUSTUS OTIS, Jr., Business 
Man, was born in Cleveland, Ohio, July 9, 
1868, son of Charles A. and Ann Eliza (Shepherd) 
Otis. He attended Brooks Military Academy, 
the Cleveland public schools, Phillips (Andover) 
Academy, and the Sheffield Scientific School, Yale, 
in which latter he took the regular course in 
chemistry, graduating in 1S90. He subsequently 
studied a year at the Columbia Law School. He 




CH.AS. A. OTIS, JR. 

began his business career as an employ^ in the 
Commercial National Bank, Cleveland, where he 
remained about a year, and in October 1S96 he 
became a member of the firm of Otis, Hough & 
Company, commission agents for iron and steel 
products, Cuyahoga Building, that city. Mr. Otis 
is a member of the University and St. Anthony 
clubs, New York; the Union, Roadside, Tavern, 
and Cleveland Golf clubs, Cleveland ; the Delta 
Psi at Yale, and the K O A Society at Andover. 
On July II, 1S95 he married Lucia Ransome 
Edwards. 



Bar, 1844; in practice at Portsmouth, 1844-80; Presi- 
dent Portsmouth Savings Bank 1880-94; Secretary and 
Treasurer Portsmouth Athenaeum. 

WILLIAM HENRY ROLLINS, Lawyer, was 
born in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 
September 7, 1822, the son of Ichabod and Mary 
Ann (Hooker) Rollins. The Rollins family dates 
its .\merican origin from the year 1640. On the 
maternal side he is a descendant of Michael and 
Mary (Brown) Hooker. William H. Rollins took 
his Bachelor's degree at Harvard with the Class 
of 1 84 1, and during the following year attended 
lectures at the Dane Law School of that University. 
He completed his legal preparations in the office of 
Ichabod Bartlett, of Portsmouth in 1844, and was 
admitted to the Bar in October of that year. Mr. 
Rollins practised law in Portsmouth from 1S44 
until 1880, when he was chosen President of the 
Portsmouth Savings Bank, the duties of which 
j)osition occupied his attention for the succeeding 
fourteen years, or until 1894, when he tendered 
his resignation and resumed the practice of his 
profession. Although well advanced in years, Mr. 
Rollins retains his physical and mental powers to 
a remarkable degree and still displays a business 
energy which would do credit to a much younger 
man. He was Secretary and Treasurer of the 
Portsmouth Athenreum from 1S50 to 1869, and 
in 1 89 1 again assumed the duties of those offices, 
which he still holds. In the mean time he was 
President of the .Athenaeum in 1874 and was 
chosen a Director in 1886. He was formerly 
quite active in political affairs and has represented 
Portsmouth in the Legislature of New Hampshire. 
At Harvard he was a member of the Institute of 
1770 and of the Phi Beta Kappa. January 2, 1869, 
he married Elizabeth Brown Ball, now deceased. 
They had no children. 



ROLLINS, William Henry 

Harvard A.B. 1841. 
Born in Portsmouth, N. H., 1822 ; graduated Har- 
vard, 1841 ; law student there one year ; admitted to the 



CHARNLEY, Douglas 

Yale B.A. 1896. 
Born in Chicago, 111., 1874; educated and prepared 
for College at St. Paul's School, Concord, N. H. ; grad- 
uated Yale, 1896. 

DOUGLAS CHARNLEY was born in Chicago, 
Illinois, January 27, 1874, the son of James 
Charnley, a merchant of that city, and Helen Doug- 
las. His paternal ancestry is English, his grand- 
father having come to this country about 1820. 
Douglas Charnley received his early education in 
the schools of Chicago and was later for some years 
sent as a student to St. Paul's School, at Concord, 
New Hampshire, where he was prepared for Col- 



UNIFERSiriES JND THEIR SONS 



145 



lege. He entered Yale in 1S92 and was graduated 
with tiie Class of 1896 from the Academic Depart- 
ment of that University. 



WARNER, Charles Dudley 

Yale M.A. (Hon ) 1872 Princeton L.H.D. 1896. 
Born in Plainfield, Mass., 1829 ; prepared for College 
at Cazenovia, N. Y. ; graduated Hamilton College, 1851 ; 
studied law at the Univ. of Pennsylvania, and admitted 
to Philadelphia Bar; practised in Chicago; entered 
journalism in Hartford, Conn., 1861 ; connected as an 
Editor and proprietor with Hartford Courant since 
1867; published My Summer in a Garden, 1870; con- 
nected editorially with Harper's Magazine since 1884 
and author of numerous books; M.A. Yale 1872, and 
Hamilton and Dartmouth, 1884; L.H.D. Hamilton, 
1886 and Princeton, 1896; D.C.L. Univ. of the South, 
1889. 

CHARLES nUDLF.V WARNER, M.A., 
L.H.D., D.C.L., .\uthor and Editor, was 
born in Plainfiekl, Connecticut, September 1 2, 
1829, a descendant of .\ndrew \Varner who came 
from England to Cambridge, Massachusetts in 
1632. Through his paternal grandmother, Sally 
Cook, he traces direct descent from Francis Cook 
of the Mayflower company. Charles Dudley \\'ar- 
ner received his early education in the ])ublic 
schools of Plainfield and was prepared for College 
at Cazenovia, New York. He was graduated at 
Hamilton College in 185 1, and after studying law 
at tlic University of Pennsylvania, was admitted to 
the Bar in Philadelphia. For a few years he prac- 
tised his profession there and at Chicago, but being 
disposed both by taste and by talent for journalism 
and literature he came ICast and, following his 
inclinations, connected himself with the Press, 
an evening paper published in Hartford, Con- 
necticut, of which a College classmate of his, (Gen- 
eral Joseph R. Hawley, was Editor and Proprietor. 
Mr. Warner in 1861 became associated in the 
ownership of the Press, and later, in 1S67, with 
General Hawley and others, bought the Hartford 
Courant, in which he has retained a proprietary 
interest. For some years, Mr. Warner, devoted his 
energies to journalism, with such good result that 
both the Press and subsequently the Courant, tinder 
his influence, acquired high repute for literary excel- 
lence. The incident which directed him into the 
broader field of general literature was the popular 
favor accorded a series of sketches published in the 
Courant, giving a fanciful account of his experiences 
as an amateur gardener. These sketches, collected 
and published under the title of My Summer in 
a Ciarden, with an introduction by Henry Ward 
VOL. V. — 10 



Reccher, proved in some sort the literary event of 
the year 1870, introducing a new writer of delicate 
humor, gentle satire and cheerful philosophy. From 
this time Mr. Warner devoted himself mainly to 
authorship, although still retaining his active connec- 
tion with journalism. The promise of his first book 
was well fulfilled, and the reading public gave a 
warm welcome to the volumes of essays, travels 
and fiction which came from his pen, all pervaded 
by the charm of thought as well as of literary style 
which had proved so captivating. Mr. Warner 
formed an editorial connection with Harper's Maga- 




CH.A.RLES DUDLEY W.ARNER 

zine in 1SS4 and in 1892 succeeded William Dean 
Howells in charge of the department of that periodi- 
cal styled The Study. He is also recognized as a 
high authority in literary criticism and has attained 
repute as a lecturer. Outside the field of letters, he 
has made a study of penology and is one of the 
leaders in tlie movement for prison refonn. Mr. 
Warner received the degree of Master of Arts from 
Yale in 1S72 and from Hamilton and Dartmouth in 
1884 ; that of Doctor of Humanities from Hamilton 
in 1886 and Princeton in 1896 ; and that of Doctor 
of Civil Law from the University of the South in 
1 889. He married, October 8, 1856, Susan Sophia, 
daughter of the late William i:iiot Lee, of New 
York. 



146 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



BESSON, Leonidas H. 

Princeton A B. 1893, A.M. 1894. 
Born in Hoboken, N. J., 1869; fitted for College at 
Stevens High School, by private tutor, and at Prince- 
ton Preparatory School ; entered Princeton, School of 
Arts, and graduated in 1892, receiving degree of A.B., 
and obtaining degree of A.M. two years later; gradu- 
ated from New York Law School with LL.B. degree, 
June 1894; admitted to the Bar in July of that year; 
was office clerk with a New York firm from 1893 to 
1895; since Nov. 1895 has been engaged in the practice 
of his profession in New York. 

Li:ONIDAS H. BESSON, A.M., LL.B., Attor- 
ney at law, son of John C. ami Hasseltine 
J. (^Nicc) Besson, was born at Hoboken, New Jer- 




LEONTDAS H. BESSON 

sey, June 5, 1869. He is of French-Huguenot 
descent. His first American ancestor, Francois 
Besson, came to this country about 1700 and was 
one of the first settlers of Hunterdon county. New 
Jersey. His great-great grandfather, Jean Besson, 
was a commissioned officer in the Continental army. 
Leonidas H. Besson spent his boyhood school-days, 
first in a private school then in Stevens High School, 
was taught by a private tutor, the Rev. J. J. Rowan 
Spong, NL .\., LL.B., for four years, and was also a 
student at Princeton Preparatory School. He en- 
tered Princeton, School of .^rts, and graduated with 
the degree of Bachelor of .\rts in the t'lass of 1S92, 
receiving his Master of .Arts degree in 1894. He 



graduated from the New York Law School with 
Bachelor of I^aws degree, June 1894, and was ad- 
mitted to the Bar of the State of New York in July 
uf that year. From 1S93 to 1S95 he was a clerk 
in the office of Lee & Lee of New York City, but 
in the fall of 1895 began the practice of law for 
himself, and is still practising in that city. He was 
a member of the Advisory Board of the University 
Cottage Club of Princeton, New Jersey, from 1892 
to 1898, and is a member of the University .Vthletic 
Club of New York City, the Princeton Club of the 
same city, and the Jersey City Golf Club. In poli- 
tics he is a believer in tariff for revenue, in limited 
protection for infant industries, favors reciprocity, 
sound money and is an expansionist. 



BIDDLE, Nicholas 

Princeton A.B. 1801, LL.D. 1R35. 
Born in Philadelphia, Pa., 1786; student at Univ. of 
Pennsylvania ; graduated Princeton, 1801 ; Secretary to 
U. S. Minister Armstrong at Paris, 1804, and later to 
Minister Monroe at London; engaged in practice of 
law and in literary work in Philadelphia, 1807-ig; mem- 
ber of Legislature and State Senator; Government 
Director in U. S. Bank, 1819, and subsequently Presi- 
dent until 1839; LL.D. Princeton, 1835; died 1844. 

NICHOLAS BIDDLE, LL.D., Financier, w.is 
born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Janu- 
ary 8, 17S6, the son of Charles Biddle, of a family 
that came over with William Penn and held a 
prominent place in the history of the Colonies and 
in the war for Independence. Nicholas was a 
precocious boy, advancing so rapidly in his educa- 
tion that he would have taken his degree at the 
University of Pennsylvania in 1799 at the age of 
thirteen had he not been removed and entered 
with the Freshman Class at Princeton for the es- 
pecial purpose of keeping him longer at his books. 
He was only in his sixteenth year when he was 
graduated at Princeton with the rank of valedic- 
torian of the Class of 180 1. Before he had finished 
his law studies he was offered the position of Secre- 
tary to John Armstrong, United States Minister to 
France, with whom he went abroad in 1804, taking 
the opportunity to travel through Europe and re- 
turning to England to serve as Secretary to James 
Monroe, at that time United States Minister to 
Great Britain. Mr. Biddle came back to the United 
States in 1807 and began the practice of law in 
Philadelphia, at the same time doing a good deal 
of literary work, among other things conducting a 
monthly magazine called the Port-folio and edit- 



UNiyERSiriES AND TUFAR SONS 



'47 



ing Lewis and Clarke's report of their expedition 
to the mouth of the Columbia River. As a mem- 
ber of the Pennsylvania Legislature Mr. Biddle 
introduced and advocated a bill establishing tlie 
system of public education whicii was adopted a 
quarter of a century later. In the State .Senate, 



the New York Law School, from which he received 
the degree of Bachelor of Laws upon his graduation 
in 189S. Since his admission to the Bar, he has 
been actively engaged in the practice of law in New 
York City. Mr. Brokaw is a strong Republican, 
and as such has been actively engaged in the poli- 



Mr. Biddle attracted attention by his advocacy of tics of the twenty-ninth assembly district. He is a 
the rechartering of the United States Bank, and member of the Sons of the Revolution, the Hugue- 
when this was brought about, in 1819, President 
Monroe ajipointed him a Government Director of 
that institution. He became President of the Bank 
upon the resignation of Mr. Cheves, and held that 
position through all the political and financial storms 
that followed until liis resignation in 1839, two years 
before the Hank went out of existence. Mr. Biddle 
was regarded by his contemjioraries as " the hand- 
somest man in Philadelphia." He received the 
degree of Doctor of Laws from Princeton in 1S35, 
and died February 27, 1844. 



BROKAW, Irving 

Princeton A.B. 1893. 
Born in New York City, 1871 ; fitted for College at 
Cutler's School in New York, graduating in 1898; 
graduated Princeton, 1893; travelled abroad exten- 
sively, and upon his return took up the study of law 
in the New York Law School, from which he gradu- 
ated i8g8; admitted to the New York Bar and actively 
engaged in the practice of his profession in New York 
City since i8g8. 

IRVING BROKAW, Lawyer, was born in New 
York City, March 29, 187 i, the son of Isaac 
Vail and I'Uvira (Gould) Brokaw. On the paternal 
side he is descended from Bourgon Broucard, a 
French Huguenot who came from France to this 
country in 1675 and settleil on Long Island. He 
is of English ancestry on his mother's side, being 
a descendant of William 'I'uttle, who came from 
England in 1640 and settled in New Haven on the 
site now occupied by Yale University, and Captain 
Timothy 'i'uttle, who served witli distinction in the 
American Revolution. He received his College 
preparation at Cutler's School in New York, where 
he was graduated in 1889; then took the Acade- 
mic Course at Princeton, graduating in the Class of 
1893 with the degree of Bachelor of .Arts. He was 
a member of the University Musical Clubs and was 
prominent in atliletics during his College course. 
He was a brother of Frederick Brokaw. Soon after 
graduation he went abroail, passing some time in 
travel and the study of art in Julian's Sludio in 
Paris. Upon his return he took a law course at 




IRVINO HROK.WV 



not Society, Princeton, Ivy, Union League, Amateur 
Comedy and Strollers Club, and is a Director in 
several railroads. 



CLAGGETT, Thomas John 

Princeton A.B. 1764, D.D. 1787. 
Born in Prince George Co., Md., 1742; graduated 
Princeton, 1762 ; studied theology and ordained to the 
ministry of the Protestant Episcopal Church, 1767; 
Rector All Saints Church, Calvert Co., Md., 1768-76 ; St. 
Paul's Church. 1779-92 : D.D. Princeton, 1787; Bishop 
of Maryland, 1792-1816 ; Chaplain to U. S. Senate, 1800 ; 
died 1816. 

THO.MAS JOHN CL.AGGF.rr, D.D., Bishop 
of Maryland, was born in Prince George 
county, in that state, October 2, 1742, graduated 
at Princeton in 1764, and studied theology. In 
those days there were no Bisho|)s in .America of the 
Protestant Episcop.al Church, and to take orders 
for that ministry he was obliged to make the voyage 



148 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



to England. There he was orilained Deacon in 
September 1787, and Priest in October of the same 
year, returning at once to this country and enter- 
ing upon ministerial work as Rector of All Saints 
Church, in Calvert county, Maryland. He remained 
with this parish until the disturbances incident to 
the war of the Revolution made it desirable that he 
should retire to his own estate in Prince George 
county. In 1779, however, he resumed his work, 
beginning in that year services in St. Paul's parish, 
of which he subsequently became Rector, and in 
1787 received the degree of Doctor of Divinity 
from Princeton. .After the war in recognition of his 
manifest fitness for the office, and as he was pos- 
sessed of large private means, he was elected the 
first Bishop of Maryland. His consecration took 
place in New York city, September 17, 1792, the 
date being notable as that of the first occasion on 
which this ceremony was performed in the United 
States. Bishop Seabury (Yale 1748) and Bishop 
Provoost (Columbia 1758) joined in the consecra- 
tion. Bishop Claggett acted as Chaplain to the 
United States Senate in 1800, at the first session of 
Congress held in the City of Washington. During 
the last eight years of his life he also performed the 
duties of Rector of Trinity Church, Upper Marl- 
borough. He died at his residence at Crooni, 
Maryland, .August 2, 18 16. 



FOX, Herman Christian 

Princeton Graduate Department 1885. 
Born in Philadelphia, Pa., i860; educated public 
schools, Bryant & Stratton's Business College, Phila- 
delphia ; Dickinson Seminary, Muhlenberg College 
and Princeton ; Pastor Emmanuel Presbyterian Church, 
Philadelphia, 1887-92 ; and Harper Memorial Church, 
that city, latter year to present time. 

HICRM.W CHRIsri.AN FOX, D.D., Pastor 
of the Harper Memorial (Presbyterian) 
Church, Philadephia, was born in that city, March 
9, i860, son of Herman and Catharine (Walz) Fo.x. 
His fixther, who died June 12, 1899, was born in 
Eisenach, Germany, in 1828, and his mother, who 
died May 10, 1897, was born in Klineinchtigen, 
South Germany, in 1834. Both emigrated in 1854. 
His early education was obtained in the public 
schools of Philadelphia and after pursuing a six 
months' commercial course at Bryant & Stratton's 
Business College, that city, he took a clerkship in 
a Philadelphia business house. He subsequently 
attended Dickinson Seminary, Williamsport, Penn- 
sylvania, from which he entered Muhlenberg College 



(.Mlentown, same state) as a Sophomore, taking his 
Bachelor's degree in 1884 ; pursued a post-graduate 
course in philosophy at Princeton under the late 
Dr. McCosh, and was graduated from the Princeton 
Theological Seminary in 1887. Ordained a Pres- 
byterian minister the same year and installed Pastor 
of the Clinton Street (Emmanuel) Church, Philadel- 
phia, he labored with that church for five years, or 
until called to the Pastorate of the Harper Memorial 
Church, same city, in 1892, and is still occupying 
that pulpit. He received the degree of Master of 
.Arts from Muhlenberg in course (1887), and that 




HERMAN C. FOX 

of Doctor of Divinity was conferred upon him by 
Rutherford College, North Carolina, in 1896. Ur- 
gent calls to several Presbyterian churches have 
been extended to him, but he has declined them all, 
preferring to remain in his present field of labor. 
.At Dickinson Seminary, Dr. Fox belonged to the 
Belles-lettres Literary Society ; at Muhlenberg, was 
a member of the Eutopian Literary Society and the 
Chi Phi Fraternity, and he is now an honorary 
member of the Union League of Philadelphia. 
While in College he won the Junior oratorical con- 
test prize for the best speech in both matter and 
delivery, and was also selected by the Faculty to 
represent the College at the unveiling of the Luther 
Monument in .AUentown, and deliver the oration, in 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



149 



W":«-' 



1884. He has been a frequent contributor to relig- 
ious and secular periodicals, and many of his ser- 
mons have had a wide circulation. On October 24, 
1894, he married Blanche Kramer, of Philadelphia, 
and has one daughter : Beatrice Fox, born Novem- 
ber 8, 1896. 

GASTON, William 

Princeton A.B. 1796, LL.D. 1835— Harvard LL.D. 1826 — Colum- 
bia LL.D. 1835. 

Born in Newbern, N. C, 1778; educated at George- 
town College, D.C. ; graduated Princeton, 1796; studied 
law and admitted to the North Carolina Bar, 1798; 
member of State Senate, 1799; Speaker of House of 
Delegates, 1808; member of Congress, 1813-15; Judge 
of Supreme Court of North Carolina, 1834-44 ; member 
of State Const. Convention, 1835; LL.D. Univ. of 
Pennsylvania 1819, Harvard 1826, Univ. City of New 
York 1834, Princeton and Columbia 1835; died 1844. 

LLI.AM GASTON, I.L.I)., Jurist, was born 
Newbern, North Carolina, September 
19, 1778. He was of Huguenot descent, the son 
of an eminent physician, a patriot leader in the 
Revolution, who was murdered at his home in the 
presence of his wife and children by Tories in 17S1. 
William was sent to Georgetown College, District of 
Columbia, for his education, and later transferred to 
Princeton, where he was graduated in 1796. He 
studied law in his native town and was admitted to 
practice at the Bar of North Carolina in 1798, 
speedily gaining distinction and being elected to 
the State Senate at the early age of twenty-one. 
Later, in 1808, he was sent to the House of Dele- 
gates, where he was chosen the presiding officer of 
that body. In 1S13 he served as Representative 
in Congress for one term, during which he made 
his mark by the force and eloquence with which he 
opposed the so-called Loan Bill, proposing to place 
$25,000,000 in the hands of the President for the 
conquest of Canada during the war with Great 
Britain. He was made a Justice of the Supreme 
Court of North Carolina in 1834 and occupied a 
seat on that Bench for the rest of his life, accom- 
plishing a notable work in the organization of the 
judiciary of the state. As a member of the com- 
mittee of 1S35 for revising and amending the con- 
stitution of North Carolina, he was successful in 
securing the adoption of many reforms. He was 
an earnest speaker and consistent voter against the 
proposition to deprive free colored men of the fran- 
chise. Judge Gaston declineil the offer of a seat 
in the ITnited States Senate in 1S40, and remained 
upon the Supreme Bench until his death, January 
23, 1844. 



MARSHALL, Albertus McLaren 

Princeton A.B. 1892. 
Born in Wapakoneta, O., 1870 ; fitted for College at 
the Deaver Collegiate Institute, Dayton, O. ; gradu- 
ated Princeton, 1892; studied law with his father, and 
at the New York Law School ; admitted to the Bar of 
Ohio in 1894; practising la a- at Dayton, since 1894. 

LBERTUS .\I. I.ARF.N MARSHALL, Law- 
yer, was born in Wapakoneta, Ohio, Janu- 
'iry 3> 1870, the son of Robert Dickson and Klizabeth 
(Ralston) Marshall, both parents being of Scotch- 
Irish descent. His maternal grandfather migrated 



A' 




A. Mol.. M.ARSH.VLL 

from Irelaml to .Vmerica when a young man. .Alber- 
tus McL. Marshall .■studied for two years in the pub- 
lic schools of his native town, and five years at the 
public schools in Dayton, Ohio, and was fitted for 
College at the Deaver Collegiate Institute in Day- 
ton, where he remained for four years. He was 
graduated from I'rinceton in the Class of 1S92. 
.Vfter studying law for one year in his father's office 
at Dayton, he went to New York City and jiassed a 
year in study at the New York Law School. In 
tune 1S94, he was .admitted to the Ohio Bar and 
soon after began to practise law at Dayton, where 
he is still engaged in practice. Mr. Marshall is a 
member of the Democratic party. Member of The 
Princeton Club of New York. 



I50 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



HOWARD, Benjamin Chew 

Princeton A.B. 1809. LL.D. 1869. 

Born in Baltimore Co., Md., 1791 ; graduated Prince- 
ton, 1809; studied law and practised in Baltimore; 
commanded troops in battle of North Point, 1814; 
member of Congress, 1829-33. 1835-39; Reporter of 
Decisions U. S. Supreme Court, 1843-62; LL.D. 
Princeton, 1869 ; died 1872. 

Bl'.NjAMlN CHEW HOWARD, Statesman, 
was bom in Baltimore county, Marj-land, 
November 5, 1791. He was graduated at Prince- 
ton in 1 809, studied law and settled in Baltimore in 
tiie practice of his profession. In the war of 1812 
he was active in the organization of troops for the 
defence of Baltimore and himself commanded a 
company of volunteers at the battle of North Point, 
September 12, 18 14. After the war he entered 
public life and was elected to Congress as a Demo- 
crat, serving two terms, 1 829-1 833, and after one 
defeat for re-election was again chosen for two 
terms, 1 835-1 S39. In Congress he took a promi- 
nent part and was made Chairman of the House 
Committee on Foreign Relations during his last 
term of ser\ice. In that capacity he drew up the 
report on the boundary question. On retiring from 
Congress, Mr. Howard resumed the practice of law, 
and in 1843 was made Reporter of Decisions of the 
Supreme Court of the United States continuing in 
this position until 1S62. His published reports 
cover the period from 1843 to 1855. In 1861 
Mr. Howard was a delegate to the Peace Congress, 
the conference by which it was vainly sought to 
avert the impending Civil W^ar. Princeton made 
him a Doctor of Laws in 1869, and he died in 
Baltimore, March 6, 1872. 



McGRANN, Richard Philip 

Princeton Class of 1896. 
Born in Lancaster, Pa., 1875 ; received his early edu. 
cation at Fordham College, N. Y., and at Mercersburg 
College, Pa.; graduated Princeton, 1896; student for 
one year in Columbia Law School ; is engaged in 
stock farming. 

RICHARD PHILIP .McGRANN, Stock Farmer, 
w-ts born in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, Octo- 
ber 13, 1875, the son of Bernard J. and Mary 
Frances (Dougherty) McCJrann. His paternal 
grandfather was a native of Cavan, Ireland, and his 
mother's father was Philip Dougherty of Harris- 
burg, Pennsylvania. Richard P. McGrann received 
his education at Fordham College in New York and 
Mercersburg College in Mercersburg, Pennsylvania, 
and at Princeton, where he entered the Academic 



Department as a Junior and followed the course 
there during the Junior and Senior years, with the 
Class of 1896. After a year of study at Columbia 
Law School he engaged in the business of stock 
farming, and has charge of the Grand View stock 
farm at I.ancasterat the present time. Mr. McGrann 
is a member of the University and Princeton clubs 
of Philadelphia, Princeton Club of New York, the 




RICHARD I". McGRANN 



Hamilton Club of Lancaster, Pennsylvania, and the 
Cap and Gown Club of Princeton. He is a Gold 
Democrat. 



HUGHES, Christopher 

Princeton A.B. 1805, 
Born in Baltimore, Md., 1786; graduated Princeton, 
1805; U. S. Secy, of Legation at London, 1814; Charge 
d'Affaires at Stockholm, Sweden, 1819-25. and 1830-45 ; 
at The Hague, 1825-30 ; died 1849. 

CHRISIOPHER HUGHES, Diplomatist, was 
born in Baltimore, Maryland, in 1 786, and 
graduated at Princeton in 1805, receiving his Mas- 
ter's degree there in course. He studied law but 
did not establish himself in practice, being soon 
called to the diplomatic service of the L'niled States 
and commissioned Secretary of the Legation at 
London in 1S14. He was transferred to Stock- 
holm in 1 81 6, and when Minister Russell retired 



UNIFERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



M' 



Mr. Hughes was left in charge. He received his 
commission as Charge d'Affaires the following year 
and served in that capacity throughout his long con- 
nection with the Department of State. While asso- 
ciated with the Legation in London, Mr. Hughes 
was made the bearer to this country of the treaty of 
peace signed at Cihent by the Commissioners on the 
part of the United States and Great Britain con- 
cluding the war of 1812. As no Minister Plenipo- 
tentiary of the United States was sent to Sweden for 
thirty-five years following the retirement of Minister 



one month in 1898 he was United States Examin- 
ing Surgeon of Volunteers; on May i, 1898, was 
commissioned Surgeon- ^Lijor of Colonel Buckland's 
Regiment, First S.V.G. ; and in September of that 
year was commissioned .Assistant Surgeon and 
Captain by brevet, Grand .\rmy of the Republic, 
Cincinnati, Ohio, Medical Corps. He is at present 
Corporation Health Officer at Hyde Park, Ohio. 
He takes an active part in politics, having been 
from 1888 to 1890 Vice-President of the Stamina 
Republican League of Cincinnati, of which league 



Russell, the duty of diplomatic representation of he was also the founiler. He was President of the 



this Government rested upon Mr. Hughes. He 
performed these functions until 1825, when he was 
sent in the same cajiacity to the Netherlands with 
special instructions, but returned to Sweden in 1830 
anil remained there until his final retirement from 
the service in 1845. Mr. Hughes was an intimate 
friend of President John Quincy .\dams and Henry 
Clay and a great favorite in society. He married, 
in 181 1, Laura Sophia, a daughter of General 
Samuel Smith. On his return to tlie United States 
he resumed his residence in Baltimore, where he 
died, September 18, 1849. 



Conner Surgical Society from 1896 to 1897 ; for 



McLEISH, John Lewin 

Princeton A.B. 1894, A.M. 1897. 
Born in Chicago, III., 1871 ; elementary education in 
public schools and Hughes High School at Cincinnati, 
Ohio ; graduated Princeton, with degree of B.A., 1894 ; 
graduated from Medical College of Ohio receiving 
M.D. degree, 1897 ; awarded degree of A.M. by Prince- 
ton same year ; is engaged in the practice of his pro- 
fession in Cincinnati. 

JOHN LEWIN McLEISH, A.M., M.D., Physi- 
cian, was born in Chicago, Illinois, February 
17, 1871, son of Dr. John Stafford and Enuna 
Elizabetli (Cochran) McLeish. On the paternal 
side he is of Scotch ancestry ; both his grandfither 
and his great-grand flither were clergymen and natives 
of (Glasgow, Scotland. On his mother's siile he is 
descended from John (Cochran, a native of London- 
derry, Ireland, lie received his College prepara- 




JOHN LF.WIN iMcl.KISH 

two years, 1895 to 1897, Medical Editor of The 
Burnet Woods Echo, and is a member of several 
other ])rominent clubs and societies, among them 
being tiie Lincoln Club of Cincinnati, the Princeton 
.\lunini Association of Cincinnati, the .American Whig 



tion in the public and Hughes High School of Society (while in College), anil was the foimder of 



Cincinnati Ohio, and was graduated from Princeton 
as Bachelor of .\rts, in the Class of 1S94. He 
studied medicine in the Medical College of Ohio, at 
Cincinnati, and received his degree of Doctor of 
Medicine from tliat College, .April 9, 1897, the 
same year receiving degree of Master of .Arts from 
Princeton. He is engaged in the practice of his 
profession at Cincinnati at the present time. For 



the Delta' Beta Fraternity in iSSS. Dr. McLeish 
has published eight volumes in the years 1894 to 
1S98 ; The Princeton of the Revolution, and The 
Princeton of the Present ; James Madison at Prince- 
ton, Psychopathia Sexualis. a Medical Study ; 
Urethritis, — .Etiology, Pathology and Treatment; 
Iturbide, an Historical Romance; The Rector, a 
Domestic Drama of Old New York ; Cavite, a Ro- 



'52 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



mantic Drama in Five Acts ; and The Stiletto of 
General S;inta Anna, a Romance of the first Mexican 
Republic. 



IREDELL, James 

Princeton A.B. 1806. 
Born in Edenton, N. C, 1788; graduated Princeton, 
1806; studied law and admitted to the North Carolina 
Bar, 1809; member of the Legislature, 1816-19 ; Judge 
of Superior Court, 1819 ; of North Carolina, 1827; U.S. 
Senator, 1828-31 ; practised law in Raleigh, N. C, 
1831-53; died 1853. 

JAMES IREDELL, Jurist, Governor of North 
Carolina, was born in Edenton in that state, 
November 2, 1 788. His father, of the same name, 
was the son of a merchant of Bristol, England, where 
he was born, coming to North Carolina when seven- 
teen years old and attaining high distinction in this 
cotintry. James Iredell, senior, was among the 
Jtistices of the United States Supreme Court ap- 
pointed by President Washington. The son was 
graduated at Princeton in 1806 and studied law, 
establishing himself in practice in Raleigh, North 
Carolina. In the war of 181 2 he raised a company 
of volunteers and took part in the defence of Craney 
Island. When peace was declared he returned to 
his profession, and entering public life was sent to 
the Legislature in 1816, serving in that body for a 
number of years and being chosen Speaker of the 
House in 1817 and 1818. He was appointed Judge 
of the Superior Court in 1819, but soon resigned 
from the Bench. In 1827 he was elected Governor 
of North Carolina, and in the following year, on the 
resignation of Senator Nathaniel Mason, he was ap- 
pointed United States Senator to fill the unexpired 
term. After leaving the Senate he was for many 
years Reporter of Decisions of the Supreme Court 
at Raleigh, and was one of the three commissioners 
appointed to collate and revise the laws in force in 
the state. Among his publications is a digest of 
all the reported cases in the courts of North Caro- 
lina from 1778 to 1S45. Judge Iredell died in 
Edenton, .Vpril 13, 1853. 



NYCE, Benjamin Markley 

Princeton A.B. 1891. 
Born in Cleveland, O., 1869; fitted for College at 
Oberlin Preparatory School ; graduated Princeton, 
1891 ; student at McCormick Theological Sem., 
Chicago, 1891-94 ; at Berlin Univ., 1894-95 '• ^"d trav- 
elled for a year as Tutor in Europe and Africa; 
ordained to the ministry, 1895; Pastor of First Presby- 



terian Church, Warsaw, Ind. 1895, and of First Presby- 
terian Church at Lockport, N. Y., since 1896. 

BK\J.\,M1.\ .MARKLKV NVCH, Clergyman, 
was born in Cleveland, Ohio, December 5, 
1S69, the son of Benjamin Markley and Melissa 
(Hamilton) Nyce. On the paternal side he is de- 
scended froin Hans de Neus who came to .America 
from Germany in 1683. On his mother's side he 
is of Scotch- Irish descent. He received his early 
education in the common schools of Cleveland, 
Ohio, and Decatur county, Indiana, was fitted for 
College at the Oberlin Preparatory School, and 




BEN'J. iM. MCE 

graduated from Princeton in the Class of 1891. 
After leaving Princeton he studied Theology at Mc- 
Cormick Theological Seminary in Chicago and was 
licensed to preach by the Presbytery of White Water, 
May 23, 1893, and ordained to the Gospel Ministry 
by the same Presbytery, January 9, 1895. He 
studied at Berlin University, Germany, in 1894 and 
travelled for a year as Tutor in Europe and Africa. 
In 1894-1S95 he was Pastor of the First Presbyte- 
rian Church at Warsaw, Indiana, and since April 
1896 has been Pastor of the First Presbyterian 
Church at Lockport, New York. Mr. Nyce was 
married to Ursule Strong, December 1894. They 
have two children : Benjamin Markley Nyce, Jr., 
and Norman Strong Nyce. 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



153 



ROSS, Thomas 

Princeton A.B, 1895. 
Born in Doylestown, Pa., 1873; fitted for College at 
LawrenceviUe, N. J., School; graduated Princeton, 
1895; read law and was admitted to the Bar of Bucks 
Co., i8g6; since then has been practising law in 
partnership with J. Ferdinand Long, at Doyles- 
town, Pa. 

THOM.VS ROSS, Attorney-at-law, was horn in 
Doylestown, Pennsylvania, September i6, 
1873, son of George and Ellen S. L. (Pliipps) 
Ross. He is of Scotch-Irish ancestry, through 




•nios. ROSS 

Thomas Ross who came to this country in 1729. 
His family have always been prominent in politics. 
His great-grandfather. John Ross, was Judge of 
Courts in a circuit comprising several counties in 
Pennsylvania, and Justice of the Supreme Court of 
Pennsylvania, 1 830-1 834, while his grandfather, 
Thomas Ross, a Princeton graduate in 1825, was 
a lawyer of ability who gained a wide reputation 
while a member of Congress for his speech on the 
admission of California. His (;tther, George Ross 
(Princeton 1861), was also a prominent lawyer, 
taking an active part in Democratic politics and 
was his party's nominee for Ignited States Senator in 
1893. Thomas Ross received his preliminary edu- 
cation in private schools at Doylestown, and at I^w- 
rencevillc, New Jersey, and was graduated from 



Princeton in the Class of 1895. .After graduating 
he read law in the office and under the instruction 
of his father's partner, J. Ferdinand Long, and 
with the Hon. Harman Yerkcs, President-Judge of 
Seventh Judicial District. He was admitted to the 
Bar of Bucks county, December 26, 1896, and has 
since then been engaged in the practice of his 
l)rofession in partnership with J. Ferdinand Ixjng. 
He is a member and Secretary of the Board of 
Examiners of the Bar, a member of Board of 
Directors of Doylestown Pul>lishing Company, and 
a member of the Princeton Alumni Association of 
Philadelphia and of the Princeton Club. He is a 
Democrat and takes an active interest in politics. 



ROSS, Walter Willard 

Princeton A.B. 1888. 
Born in Pulaski, 111.. 1866; fitted for College in Illi- 
nois College at Jacksonville; graduated Princeton, 
1888; M.A. 1891 ; student in the Northwestern Law 
School 1888, and in the Harvard Law School, i88g-go; 
admitted to the Bar in Illinois in i8go; Asst. Corpora- 
tion Counsel of the City of Chicago, 1894 ; later one of 
the attorneys for the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific 
Ry. Co. at Chicago, now engaged in general practice 
in Chicago, as member of the firm of Wall. Ross & 
Kirkman. 

WALTER WILLARD ROSS, A.M., Lawyer, 
was born in Pulaski, Illinois, March 29, 
1866, son of Edward T. and Ellen M. (Wall) Ross. 
His father and paternal grandmother were natives 
of Vermont ; his mother's ancestors settled in 
Rhode Island early in the seventeenth century. 
Both of his grandfathers (Wall and Ross) settled in 
Southern Illinois in the thirties. The Hon. George 
W. Wall, for the past twenty years a Judge of the 
Appellate Court of Illinois, is his uncle on his 
mother's side, and the Hon. R. S. Tuthill, Judge 
of the Circuit Court of Chicago, is his cousin on 
his father's side of the family. The subject of this 
sketch received his early education in the common 
schools and later attended Whipple Academy and 
Illinois College at Jacksonville. He graduated from 
Princeton with the degree of Bachelor of .\rts in 
the Class of 188S, and was awarded the degree of 
Master of .Arts in course by the same College in 
1 89 1. He attended lectures at the Northwestern 
Law School in the fall of 1888, studying in the 
office of Lyman & Jackson, and in 1 889-1 890 was 
a student at the Harvard I-aw School. He was 
admitted to the Bar in Illinois in 1S90 and at once 
began the practice of his profession. In 1894 he 
was appointed .Assistant Corporation Counsel of the 



154 



UNIFERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



City of Chicago, but resigned in 1895 to accept 
a position as one of the attorneys for the Chicago, 
Rock Island & Pacific Railway Company, with 
headquarters at Chicago. In February 1S99 he 
formed a partnership for the general practice of law 
with Hon. George W. Wall, late of the .Appellate 
Court of Illinois, under the title of Wall & Ross. 
Later, on the admission of a third partner, the firm 
name became Wall, Ross & Kirkman. Previous 
to the campaign of 1896 Mr. Ross voted the 
Democratic ticket, but on the money question 
he supported McKinley. He is a member of the 




WALTER W. ROSS 

Country Club at Evanston, also the Glen View Golf 
and Polo clubs. In addition to his business as 
a practising lawyer, Mr. Ross is also interested 
financially in coal mining and brick and tile and 
general merchandizing at Minonk, Illinois. He 
was married to Jane Rose .Ames of Chicago, May 
14, 1891, and had two children : .Ames Wolcott and 
Walter W. Ross, Jr. The latter died November 
24, 1899. 

SEELEY, William Belcher 

Princeton A.B. 1879, Ph.D. 189I. 
Born in Mt. Kisco, N. Y., 1858 ; prepared for College 
at 'Williston Seminary, Easthampton. Mass. ; gradu- 
ated Princeton, 1879; Mathematical Master Blair 
Academy, N. J., 1879-80; Classical Master Newark 
Academy 1880-84; founded San Antonio, Texas, Acad- 



emy, 1886, and Principal of that institution at the 
present time; Ph.D. Princeton, 1891. 

WII.1,I.\M IlKLCHER SKELEY, Ph.D., 
Educator, the son of Rev. .Augustus H. 
and Mary E. (FJelcher) Seeley, was born in Mt. 
Kisco, New York, February 18, 1858. He is a 
descendant of Nathaniel Seeley, who came from 
England early in the seventeenth century, settling first 
in Massachusetts, later on Long Island and then in 
Elizabeth, New Jersey. His paternal grandfather 
was a prosperous farmer of Saratoga, New A'ork, 
and his father, who is a Presbyterian clergyman of 
Dutchess county in that state, now residing in 
Poughkeepsie, was formerly a missionary in India. 
William R. Seeley's early education was received at 
home under the direction of his father, and he was 
prepared for College at the ^Villiston Seminary, East- 
hampton, Massachusetts. He took his Bachelor's 
degree at Princeton with the Class of 1879, re- 
ceived that of ^Lister of .Arts in course and was 
made a Doctor of Philosophy by that University in 
1 89 1. Turning his attention to educational pursuits 
immediately after graduating, he was for a year 
Mathematical Master at Blair .Academy, Blairstown, 
New Jersey, and for the succeeding four years was 
Classical Master at the Newark .Academy in the 
same state. Going South in 1S84 for the pur[)ose 
of recuperating his health, he found in San .Antonio, 
Texas, an excellent field for education.al work, and 
established the San Antonio .Academy there in 1886, 
with wliich he is still connected as Principal and 
Director. 



CRITCHLOW, Edward Benjamin 

Princeton A.B. 1882. 
Born in Redbone, Miss., 1858; received his prelim- 
inary education in the common schools of Erie Co., 
N. Y. ; graduated from Princeton. 1882; studied law at 
Columbia; is engaged in law practice in Salt Lake 
City, Utah. 

EDW.VRD BENJ.AMIX CRITCHLOW, .Attor- 
ney, was born in Redbone, Mississippi, 
October 2, 1858. He received his early education 
in the common schools of Erie county. New York, 
and graduated from Princeton in the Class of 1882. 
.After leaving College he took up the study of law 
in the Columbia Law School, was admitted to the 
Bar, and is at present engaged in the practice of 
his profession at Salt Lake City, Utah. Mr. Critch- 
low held the office of .Assistant United States .Attor- 
ney in 1885 and again in 1890-1891. He is a 
member of the .Alta and University clubs, and in 
politics is a Republican. 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



^55 



DAVIDSON, William Cyrus 

Columbia LL.B. 1879. 
Born in New York City, 1856; educated in public 
schools; graduated College of the City of New York, 
1877; Columbia Law School, 1879; practising law in 
New York City since 1879. 

WILLIAM CYRUS DAVIDSON, Lawyer, was 
born in New York City, June 17, 1856, 
the son of John and Mary Matilda (Hutchinson) 
Davidson. He is of Scotch-Irish ancestry. From 
the public schools he entered the College of the 
City of New York, graduating as Bachelor of Arts 
in 1877, and then took the professional course at 
tlie Columbia Law School where he was graduated 
Bachelor of Laws in the Class of 1879. He was 
also a student in the office of ex-Senator Luke 1". 
Cozans, New York, and upon admission to the Bar 
he entered upon the practice of law in that city, 
where he still resides. Mr. Davidson is Secretary 
of the Forest Lake .•\ssociation and a member of the 
Arion Society. Politically he acts with the Repub- 
lican party. 



HOUGHTON, Clarence Sherrill 

Columbia Law School, Class of i8go. 
Born in Piermont, N. V., 1864; prepared for College 
at Philips-Andover Academy; graduated Amherst, 
1888; student at Columbia Law School, 1888-90; Ad- 
mitted to Bar and practising law in New York City 
since 1890. 

CLARENCE SHERRILL HOUGHTON, Law- 
yer, was born in Piermont, New York, April 
28, 1S64, the son of Matthew H. and Sarali (Sey- 
mour) Houghton. He is descended in a direct line 
from two Colonial Governors of New England States, 
and related to the 1 loiightons of Pioston, Massachu- 
setts, publishers, and to the ship-buiUlers of the 
same name of Bath, Maine, two of whose ancestors 
were officers of high rank in the Revolution, and the 
war of 18 1 2. Through his mother, who is a daugh- 
ter of the Hon. H. C. Seymour, of New York, he is 
connected witli the Seymour family of Utica and 
Litchfield, Connecticut, wliicli includes Hon. .Augus- 
tus Sherrill Seymour, United .States District Judge. 
and he is also related to Hon. Charles C. 1 )wight, .As- 
sociate Justice of the New York Supreme Court. 
He was prepared for College at Phillips .\radeniy, 
Andover, Massachusetts, and was graduated from 
Amherst in 18SS. Mr. Houghton studied law at 
Columbia and in the office of Professor Charles M. 
Bostwick, and in October 1S90, was admitted to 
the New York Bar. Entering into |)artnership with 
his cousin under the firm name of Houghton & 



Houghton, he has been in practice since that time 
in New York City. From April i, 1S98, to the 
present time, Mr. Houghton has been Assistant 
United States District .Attorney for the Southern 
District of New York. He is a member of the 
Amherst Alumni Association and the Chi Psi Fra- 
ternity. December 19, 1895, he married Suzanne 
Clark, of Louisville, Kentucky, granddaughter of 
General William Clark, the explorer, a niece of 
General (Jeorge Rogers Clark, and related mater- 
nally to the families of Henry Clay and General 
Richard M. Johnson, the latter of whom represented 




CLARENCE S. HOUGHTON 



Kentucky in the National Senate for ten years, and 
was Vice-President of the United States from 1837 
to 1 84 1. They have two daughters: Evelyn Clare 
and Edwina Sherrill Houghton. 



ELLIOT, George Thompson 

Columbia A.B. 1845. 
Born in New York City, 1827; graduated Columbia, 
1845; New York Univ. Medical School, 1849; studied 
abroad; Visiting Physician, New York Lying-in 
Hospital, 1857-61 ; Prof. Obstetrics and Diseases of 
Women and Children, Bellevuc Medical College, 1861- 
71 ; died 1871. 

I'.ORGE THOMPSON ELLIOT, M.D., 
Physician, was born in New York City, 
May II, 1S27. He was graduated at Columbia in 



G 



156 



UNiyERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



1S45, taking the Academical course, and from the 
Medical School of the New York University with 
the degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1849. He 
subsequently passed some years abroad in tiie study 
of his profession in the medical schools and hospi- 
tals of Paris, Ixsndon and Dublin, giving especial at- 
tention to clinical work in which he attained great 
skill under Doctor Shekelton. After his return to 
the United States he established himself in practice 
in New York City, and in 1857 was chosen Yisiting 
Physician of the Lying-in Hospital in that city, per- 
forming the duties of this position for sev-eral years. 
He was called in 1861 to the Professorship of Ob- 
stetrics and Diseases of Women and Children and 
of Clinical Midwifery in the Hellevue Hospital Medi- 
cal College. Professor Elliot occupied this chair 
until his death, which occurred January 29, 1871. 



WALLACH, Leopold 

Columbia LL.B. 1872. 
Born in Hartford. Conn., 1853 ; educated in private 
schools at Hartford and in College of the City of New 
York; graduated Columbia Law School, 1872; attended 
Harvard Law School, 1873; Atty. and Counsellor-at- 
law in New York City since 1873. 

LKOPOLD WALLACH, Lawyer, was born in 
the city of Hartford, Connecticut, Novem- 
ber 6, 1853, son of Samson and Adelaide (.Arnstein) 
Wallach. He is of (ierman ancestry through both 
parents. Mr. Wallach received his education in 
boyhood at private schools in his native city, and 
afterwards, his parents having meanwhile removed 
to New York City, attended the College of the 
City of New York. He took up the study of law at 
the Columbia Law School, where he received the 
degree of Bachelor of Laws in 1872, and subse- 
quently attended lectures at the Law School of 
Harvard. Mr. Wallach then settled down to the 
practice of his profession in New York City, where 
he has achieved marked success, and is kept very 
busy attending to the demands of a large practice, 
both office and court. He is a member of the 
Manhattan, Criterion and Democratic clubs in New 
York City, and though a Democrat in his political 
views, has never found time or inclination to take an 
active part in the ])olitical struggles of the day. 
He was married October 23, 1878. 



A.M. 1883; LL.B. Columbia Law School, 1883; has 
since practised his profession in New York City. 

JAMES WILLIAM HYDE, Lawyer, was born in 
New York City, December 30, 1861, the son 
of John and Jane Hyde. He received his early 
education in (Irammar School No. 35, and after- 
wards attended the College of the City of New 
York, graduating in 1S81 with the degree of Bach- 
elor of .Arts, and receiving the degree of Master of 
.Arts in course. .After the completion of his studies 
at the College of the City of New York, he took up 
the study of law at the Law School of Columbia, 




J.\S. W. HYDE 

receiving his degree in 1 883, and immediately began 
the practice of his profession, which he has since 
continued with marked success. He is a member 
of the Phi Gamma Delta Society, the New York 
-Athletic Club, Harlem and Democratic clubs, and 
is an earnest Democrat in politics, but has never 
held or sought public office. He married, October 
23, 1S95, Louisa Florence Barker of New York City, 
and has one child : John Barker Hyde. 



HYDE, James William 

Columbia Lt^.B. 1883. 
Born in New York City, 1861 ; educated in public 
schools; A.B. College of the City of New York, 1881 ; 



MURPHY, Henry Cruse 

Columbia A.B. 1830. 
Born in Brooklyn, N. Y., 1810 ; graduated Columbia, 
1830 ; studied law and admitted to the Bar, 1833 ; Mayor 
of Brooklyn, 1842; member of Congress, 1843-45 and 



UNIFERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



157 



1847-49; U. S. Minister at The Hague, 1857-61 ; State 
Senator, 1862-73; LL.D. Rutgers, 1864; died 1882. 

HENRY CRUSE iMURPHY, LL.D., Lawyer, 
was born in Brooklyn, New York, July 5, 
1810, and graduated at Columbia in 1830. He 
wrote for the press while studying law, was admitted 
to the New York Bar, in 1833 was appointed Assist- 
ant Corporation Counsel in 1834 and soon rose to 
the position of City .Attorney. While acquiring a 
large practice, he was also able to devote time to 
literature and to politics, taking an active part in 
the work of the Democratic party and contributing 
to the North American and other reviews. In 1841 
he purchased an interest in the Brooklyn Daily 
Eagle and became one of its Editors, and in the 
following year was elected Mayor of that city. His 
administration was distinguished by retrenchment 
in expenses and by the introduction of substantial 
improvements, and before the end of his term he 
was elected a Representative to Congress. In this 
capacity Mr. Murphy served one term, 1843-45 
and in the following year was sent as a delegate to 
the Constitutional Convention of New York State. 
He was a member of Congress again in 184 7-1849, 
was mentioned as a candidate for President in the 
Democratic Convention in 1852 and took an active 
part in the canvass for Pierce's election in that year 
and in the Buchanan campaign of 1856. When 
President Buchanan came into office he appointed 
Mr. Murphy United States Minister to The Hague, 
where he remained until recalled by the Lincoln 
administration in 1861. During the Civil War, Mr. 
Murjihy, was a zealous supporter of the Union cause, 
by public speeches, writings and activity in promot- 
ing enlistments. From 1862 to 1873 he also served 
as a member of the State Senate, and in 1867 again 
took part in the revision of the constitution of New 
York, being elected a delegate-at-large to the Con- 
vention. He was greatly interested in history and 
literature, was one of the founders of the Long 
Island Historical Society, and of the Brooklyn City 
Library, and accjuircd a valuable and extensive col- 
lection of his own. His published writings were 
largely on subjects connected with the period of 
Dutch domination in New York. Mr. Murj^hy re- 
ceived the degree of Doctor of Laws from Rutgers 
in 1864, and died in Brooklyn, December i, 1882. 



turer, 1892-93; in Business as chemical and mining 
engineer and analyst in New York City since 1894. 

FRANCIS .^L\V .SI.MOXDS, i:.M., Ph.D., 
Chemical and Mining Engineer and Analyst, 
was born in College Point, Long Island, New York, 
August 7, 1 866, the son of Frederick William and 
Sophie Elizabeth de Luze Simonds. He is de- 
scended on the paternal side from a long line 
of l-jiglish gentlemen, and his motlier, a daughter 
of the Swiss Consul in New York City, came of an 
aristocratic Swiss family. Francis May Simonds re- 




SIMONDS, Francis May 

Columbi.T E.M. 1887, Ph.D. 1889. 
Born in College Point, N. Y., 1866; educated in pri- 
vate schools; graduated Columbia School of Mines, 
1887; Ph.D. 1889; Assistant in Assaying, 1887-92; Lec- 



FR.4NCIS M. SIMONDS 

ceived his early education in |)rivate schools in the 
vicinity of New York City, and entered the Colum- 
bia .School of Mines in 1883, graduating with the 
degree of Mining Engineer in 18S7. On graduat- 
ing he was appointed Assistant in Assaying at the 
School, and also took a post-graduate course lead- 
ing up to the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in 
1S89. In 1892 Mr. Simonds was made Lecturer in 
.Assaying, resigning in the following year to become 
connected with a street railway company. In 1894 
he opened a laboratory for general chemical work 
in Piatt Street, New York City, and since 1S95 has 
been associated with }. H. Wainwright (Columbia 
1882). The firm at present located at 159 Front 
Street has a large clientele and many imjiorlant con- 
nections. Mr. Simonds is a member of the .Ameri- 
can Institute of .Mining Engineers and the Society 



158 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



of Chemic;il Iiulustry. In politics he is an Intle- 
pendent, supporting always the best men for office, 
irrespective of party affiliations. He married, June 
15, 1892, Edith Vernon Mann, and has three 
children: Eleanor Hearn, Francis May, jr. and 
Samuel Vernon Mann. 



WERNER, Harold Hallowell 

Columbia School of Mines, Class of iSgs. 
Born in New York City, 1871 ; educated at Normal 
College Training School, College of the City of New 
York, and Columbia School of Mines; architect in 
New York City since 1894. 

AROLD H.-\LLOWELL WERNER, Arclii- 

tect, was born in New York City, March 

1871, the son of Henry C. and Susan Watts 



H 



25. 




H.AROLU H. WERXER 

(Hallowell) Werner. On his father's side he is 
descended from natives of tiie Kingdom of Bavaria, 
who came to this country at the beginning of the 
nineteenth century. His maternal ancestors, the 
Wight and Linn families, settled in Massachusetts 
early in the seventeenth century, and his mother is 
a daughter of Emily Linn Hallowell, of Thomaston, 
Maine. He pursued his preliminary studies at the 
Normal College Training School of New York, then 
taking a four years' course at the College of the 
City of New York, from which he entered the 



Columbia School of Mines as a student of architec- 
ture. .After finishing his course at Columbia he 
studied one year with R. C. Fisher and completed 
his practical training with Messrs. Kafka & Mott. 
In 1894 he entered into partncrsiiip with .\. P. 
Windolph, a classmate, and together they are carry- 
ing on business in New York City as general archi- 
tects. Mr. Werner is a member of the Union 
Republican Club, of New York, and the Bayswater 
Yacht Club, of Long Island. 



SWORDS, Thomas 

Columbia A.B. 1826. 
Born in New York City, 1806; graduated Columbia, 
1826; U. S. Military Academy, 1829; Lieutenant, 
U.S.A., 1833-37; Captain, 1837-48; served in Mexican 
War and brevet Lieut.-Col.. 1848; served in Civil War 
and brevet Brig. -Gen., 1863; brevet Maj.-Gen., 1865; 
retired, i86g; died 1886. 

THONL\S SWORDS, Soldier, was born in New 
York City, November i, 1S06, the son of 
I'liomas Swords, a publisher in that city, and grand- 
son of Captain Thomas Swords, a British officer who 
died in New York in 1780. Thomas Swords, Jr., 
entered Columbia in 1822, taking the Academic 
course, but withdrew before graduation to accept 
an appointment to the United States Military Acad- 
emy at West Point, the University later, in 1831, 
conferring upon him the degree of Bachelor of Arts 
and enrolling him with the Class of 1826. He was 
graduated at West Point in 1S29 and assigned to 
the Fourth LTnited States Infantry with the com- 
mission of Second Lieutenant, receiving his first 
step to a full Lieutenancy in the First Dragoons in 
1833. Promotion as Captain followed in 1837. 
His service for the next twelve years was on the 
frontier, with General Leavenworth against the 
Indians in the Southwest and with General Stephen 
Kearney in the conquest of New Mexico and Cali- 
fornia. He raised the first American flag over 
Santa F^. In 1846 he attained the rank of Major 
and was engaged in the Mexican War receiving the 
brevet of Lieutenant-Colonel for gallantry at Vera 
Cruz. At the outbreak of the Civil War, he held 
the rank of Lieutenant- Colonel, and served as Chief- 
Quartermaster of the Departments of the Cumber- 
land and the Ohio, was engaged in the battle of 
Chickamauga and won successively the brevets of 
Colonel and Brigadier-General in 1863, and that 
of Major-General in 1865. General Swords was 
retired from active service by the age limit in 1869 
and thereafter resided in New York City, where he 
died, March 20, 1886. 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



159 



BARNES, William, Jr. 

Harvard A.B. 1888. 
Born in Albany, N. Y., 1866; attended Albany 
Academy; graduated at Harvard, 1888; owner of 
Albany Evening Journal ; member of the Republican 
State Com. since 1892; Delegate to Republican 
National Convention, 1896; Chairman of Executive 
Com. 1898; U. S. Surveyor of Customs since Feb. i8gg. 

W'I1,I,I.\.M BARNKS, Jr., United States Sur- 
veyor of Customs, was born in Albany, 
New VorI<, November 17, 1866. Througli liis fallier, 
William, anil his mother Emily Peck (W'ecil) Barnes, 
he is descended from English, Dutch and French 
families. The more imi)ortant part of his early 
education was received at the Albany Acatlemy, 
where he remained until ready for College. He en- 
tered Harvaril in 18S4, electing the course of study 
in the Academic Department, and in 18S8 he grailu- 
ated with the Bachelor of Arts degree. His first 
work after College was in the newspaper business, 
which he took up with much enthusiasm, purchasing 
in tlie winter of 18SS the Albany Morning Express. 
Continuing in this enterprise, Mr. Barnes purchased 
the Albany Evening Journal, April 2, 1S89. His 
interest in the Express he sold January 7, 1899. In 
connection with his newspaper work he has been 
actively identified with political interests. Since 
1892 he lias been a member of the Republican 
State Committee representing the Twentieth New 
York Congressional District. He was appointed 
Chairman of tiie Executive Committee in 1898, 
and he was a Delegate to the Republican National 
Convention in 1896. On February 3, 1899 he was 
appointed United States Surveyor of Customs at 
.•\lbany, which office he now occupies. Mr. Barnes 
is a member of the .Albany Club, the Fort Orange 
Club, the Albany Country Club and the Republican 
Club, of New York. He was married June i 2, 1888, 
to Orace Davis. Their children are : 'I'hurlow Weed, 
and Landon Barnes. 



BREHAUT, James William 

Harvard A.B. i8g2. 
Born in Murray Harbor, South P. E. I., 1863; grad- 
uated Dalhousie University, Halifax, i8gi ; Harvard, 
1892; Vice-Principal of High School, Westerly, R. I., 
1892-94; Principal of High School, North Attleboro, 
Mass., 1894 to present time; now Superintendent of 
Schools. 

JAMICS WILLIAM BREHAUT, Educator, was 
born at Murray Harbor, Prince Edward Isl- 
and, Canada, July 7, 1863, the son of Thomas 
Smith, and Janet (Clow) Brehaut. The name of 
Brehaut is I''rcnch, which indicates the origin of the 



fiunily. Mr. Brehaut's great-grandfather emigrated 
from the Island of Guernsey in 1805. His grand- 
father who arrived in .America at the age of twelve 
years was a native of Guernsey ; his paternal grand- 
mother's family originally came from Somersetshire, 
England. The Clows came originally from Scotland, 
his maternal grandfather having resided in the 
county of Dumfries. Mr. Brehaut's early studies 
were pursued in the village school at Murray Har- 
bor South, and when sixteen years old he entered 
Prince of Wales College, a normal school in Char- 
lotlelown, but withdrew five months later to engage 




J.VMES W. 15REHAUT 

in teaching, which he followed for two years. Re- 
turning to the College in 18S2, he completed his 
preparatory studies, receiving in 18S3 the Governor- 
General's silver and bronze medals, the former for 
proficiency in scholarship, and the latter for excel- 
lence as a teacher, tiie donor being the Marquis of 
Lome. Prevented by imi«ircil eyesight from im- 
mediately entering tipon a College course, he con- 
tinued to teach until sufficiently recovered to resume 
his education. Then finding it necessary to assist 
a friend, who was in financial distress, with the funds 
he had saved for his fiiture needs, he won at a com- 
petitive examination at Dalhousie University, Halifax, 
a prize amounting to S400 given by the late George 
Munro, of New \ ork. This, together with another 



i6o 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



money prize of $400, which he secured two years 
later, and the stipends he gained by tutoring, paid 
his way through Dalhousie, where he was graduated 
in 1 89 1, taking high honors in Latin and Greek. 
He then entered Harvard as a Senior and took his 
Bachelor's degree with the Class of 1892. His edu- 
cational work was once more taken up in September 
following his graduation, when he began his duties 
as Vice-Principal of the Westerly, Rhode Island, 
High School. In 1894 he accepted the Principal- 
ship of the High School at North Attleboro, Massa- 
chusetts, and in 1898 was appointed Superintendent 
of Schools of the same town and is now filling both 
positions. At Dalhousie, Mr. Brehaut devoted some 
of his leisure lime to literary work, being connected 
with the College paper, first as Associate Editor and 
later as Editor-in-Chief. Politically he is indepen- 
dent. On December 27, 1892, he married Anna- 
bell Hawkins, of Halifax, Nova Scotia. Their 
children are: Wilfred Hawkins, born October 22, 
1895; and Ellerton James, bom .April 6, 1S97. 



Si 500 to Harvard for founding a Professorship of 
Natural History in that College. He died in Ports- 
mouth, July 17, 1802. 



BRACKETT, Joshua 

Harvard A.B. 1752, M.D. Hon.) 1791. 
Born in Greenland, N. H., 1733; graduated Harvard, 
1752; studied theology and afterwards medicine; 
member of Committee of Safety in Revolution ; Judge 
of N. H. Maritime Court; founder of New Hampshire 
Medical Soc. and its President 1793-99; M.D. (Hon.) 
Harvard, 1792; benefactor of Harvard: died 1802. 

JOSHUA BR.VCKETT, M.D., Physician, was 
born in Greenland, New Hampshire, May 5, 
1733, and graduated at Harvard in 1752. He was 
destined for the ministry by his parents and pre- 
pared himself for that work by the study of theology, 
and for a time preached but without settling over 
any church. His own preference was for the pro- 
fession of medicine, and after studying with Dr. 
Jackson of Portsmouth, New Hampshire, he estab- 
lished himself in practice as a physician in that town, 
where he gained success and reputation. During 
the Revolutionary period he was active in the patriot 
cause, serving as a member of the New Hampshire 
Committee of Safety and also as Judge of the Mari- 
time Court. In 1792 he received the honorary 
degree of Doctor of Medicine from Harvard. Dr. 
Brackett was the founder of the New Hampshire 
Medical Society, to which he gave a valuable library 
of medical books upon its establishment, and was its 
President from 1793 to 1799. His wife, Hannah 
Whipple, of Kittery, Maine, left a bequest of ;?5oo 
to the society in her will. Dr. Brackett bequeathed 



BROWN, Harry Fletcher 

Harvard A.B. i8go, A.M. i8g2. 
Born in Natick, Mass., 1867; educated at Harvard 
(1890) and at the Harvard Graduate School ; has been 
Assistant in Elementary Chemistry at Harvard and 
Instructor in the Harvard Summer School; Chemist 
at the United States Naval Torpedo Station, Newport, 
R. I. ; author of many important confidential reports to 
the Government ; member of the American Chemical 
Society. 

HARRY FLETCHER BROWN, Chemist at 
the United States Naval Torpedo Station, 
Newport, Rhode Island, was born in Natick, Massa- 




H.\RRV F. PROWN 

chusetts, July 10, 1867, son of William Henry and 
Maria Frances (Osgood) Brown. After pursuing a 
course at the public schools of Natick and Newton, 
Massachusetts, he studied the classics and modern 
languages for one year and then took a three years' 
course in the sciences at Har\ard, receiving the 
degree of Bachelor of .-^rts in 1890. .\ complete 
undergraduate course in chemistry laid the founda- 
tion for progress and research during the residence 
of two and a half years in the Graduate School. 
During this period he received a careful training in 



UNIVERSITIES JND rilEIR SONS 



i6i 



the investigation of inorganic chemistry and was 
given the degree of Master of Arts in 1892. He 
was also an Assistant in Klementary Chemistry 
during the Academic year and an Instructor in the 
Summer School. In November 1892 he was ap- 
l)ointed to tiie position which he now holds at 
Newport. He is engaged in the investigation and 
the experimental manufacture of smokeless powder 
and high explosives and has written a number of 
confidential reports on these subjects to the Navy 
Department. Mr. Hrown is a member of the 
American Chemical Society. .\t Harvard he was 
President of the Boylston Chemical Club, and Secre- 
tary of Pierian Sodality. He married, October 26, 
1897, Florence M. Hammett of Newport. 



BYLES, Mather 

Harvard A.B. 1725. 
Born in Boston, Mass., 1707; graduated Harvard, 
1725 ; studied theology and ordained Pastor of Mollis 
Street Church, Boston, 1733; D.D., Aberdeen, Scot- 
land, 1765 ; loyalist in the Revolution and deposed from 
his charge in 1776; resided in Boston but did not after- 
wards serve as Pastor; died 1788. 

MA rHi:R P.YLES, D.l)., Clergyman, was born 
in Boston, Massachusetts, March 15, 1707, 
and graduated at Harvard in 1725. He studied for 
the ministry, engaged in the supply of pulpits for 
several years, and in 1733 was ordained over the 
Congregational Church in HoUis Street, Boston. He 
continued in this charge until the outbreak of the 
Revolutionary War, receiving in 1765 the degree of 
Doctor of Divinity from the University of Aber- 
deen, Scotlaml. His strong loyalist opinions, stoutly 
maintained during the period of patriotic ferment 
preceding the Revolution, led finally to an open 
breach between the Pastor and his congregation, 
and in .\ugust 1776, at the age of seventy, the con- 
nection was severed. Dr. Byles was denounced in 
town-meeting as an enemy of the country, and in 
1777 was tried on that charge, convicted and con- 
demned to imprisonment in a guard-ship and de- 
ported with his family to England. This sentence 
was not carried out, being commuted to confine- 
ment in his own house, and even this was shortly 
relaxed to give him his freedom. Dr. Byles held 
no further pastoral charge, although continuing to 
reside in Boston, and maintained his Tory opinions 
to the last. He was a man of learning an<l of liter- 
ary taste, a correspondent of Pope and Swift and 
himself a poet to the extent of several volumes. 
Among the clergymen i>f his day he held tiie un- 

VOL. V. — II 



usual position of a recognized wit, and it was 
undoubtedly due in some degree to the caustic 
quality of his loyalist utterances that he was so 
sharply dealt with. His son, Mather, a graduate of 
Harvard in 1751, was made a Doctor of Divinity by 
Oxford and for many years was an Episcopal clergy- 
man in Boston. Dr. Byles died July 5, 1788. 



BRADSTREET, Simon 

Harvard A.B. 1693. 
Born in New London, Conn., 1671 ; graduated Har- 
vard, 1693; A.M. 1696; studied theology and ordained 
minister at Charlestown, Mass., 1698; died 1741. 

SIMON BRADSIREET, Clergyman, was born 
in New London, Connecticut, March 7, 167 1, 
where his father, the Rev. Simon Bradstreet (Har- 
vard 1660), was at that time settled over a con- 
gregation as Pastor. His grandfather, Governor 
Simon Bradstreet, of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, 
came from England in 1630, was one of the foun- 
ders of Cambridge, Massachusetts, in 1631, and had 
a hand in making a great deal of the history of the 
Colony. Governor Bradstreet was one of the promi- 
nent opponents of the witchcraft delusion of 1692. 
His wife, Anne, a daughter of Governor Thomas 
Dudley, was a poet and prose writer whose work 
received extravagant praise from her contempora- 
ries. The grandson, Simon Bradstreet, third of the 
name, was graduated at Harvard in 1693 and re- 
ceived his Master's degree in course in 1696, stud- 
ied theology and at once entered the work of the 
ministry. In 1698 he was ordained to succeed the 
Rev. Charles Morton of the church at Charlestown, 
Massachusetts, in which charge he remained through- 
out his life. Mr. Bradstreet was a learned man, a 
fine classical scholar and was held to be one of the 
first literary characters and best preachers in the 
country. He had a lively imagination, though some- 
what morbid in some of its manifestations. To this 
may perhaps be attributed his reluctance, for some 
years before his death, to preach from the pulpit of 
his church ; he delivered his sermons from the 
Deacon's seat, speaking without notes. He died in 
Charlestown, December 31, 1741, shortly after his 
son Simon, fourth of the name and a graduate of 
Harvard in 1728, had entered upon the work of the 
ministry as Pastor of the Church at Marblehead, 
Massachusetts. 

BULL, Jerome Case 

Harvard, (Special) Class of 189a. 
Born in Racine, Wis., 1867; educated in public 
schools of Racine, Normal School in San Jose, Cal., 



l62 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



and Special course at Harvard with the Class of 1892 ; 
engaged in newspaper work. 1890-95 ; editorial staff of 
Munsey's Magazine, since 1895. 

JEROMK CASE BULL, Litterateur, was born in 
Racine, Wisconsin, November 11, 1867, son 
of Cleorge and Roxilana (Pettengill) Bull. He 
attended the public schools of his native town, also 
the public and normal schools of San Jos^, Cali- 
fornia, and was a special student at Harvard with 
the Class of 1892, remaining through his Sopho- 
more year or until completing the English and His- 
torical courses as originally intended. His initial 



Munsey's Magazine, with which he is still con- 
nected. Mr. Hull is a member of the Harvard 
Club, New York. .\i San Francisco, February 6, 
1896, he married Kathryn Tarboe of that city. 




JEROME CASE BULL 

training in journalism was obtained as a reporter for 
the San Francisco Call, and while in College he 
acted as regular Cambridge Correspondent of the 
Boston Daily .Advertiser and Evening Record, the 
New York Evening Post and Sun, and was also 
Editor of the Harvard Advocate in 1 889-1 890. 
After leaving Harvard he joined the reportorial 
staff of the New York World, on which he remained 
until ^Lly i, 1891, when he took the Editorial Chair 
of the Flushing Evening Journal, retaining it until 
March 1893. During the succeeding two years he 
reported for the New York Tribune, and was special 
staff Correspondent at the San Francisco Midwinter 
Fair for the New York Mail and Express. June i, 
1895 he accepted a position on the Editorial staff of 



CONRAD, Henry Clay 

Harvard LL.B 1873. 
Born in Bridesburg, Pa., 1852 ; educated public 
schools of Wilmington, Del., and Reynolds Classical 
Academy; studied law at Harvard and with Senator 
Higgins of Del. ; admitted to Bar, 1873, and since 
practised law in \A^ilmington ; Editor Wilmington 
Morning News two years; U. S. Supervisor of Elec- 
tions. i88o-go; Pres. Board of Public Education, 
1881-83; Pres. Wilmington City Council, 1883-85; Re- 
publican Candidate for Mayor latter year; elected City 
Solicitor 1897 for two years. 

HENRY CLAY CONRAD, Lawyer, was born 
in Bridesburg, Pennsylvania, .April 25, 
1852, son of .Aaron and Sarah Walker (Penny- 
packer) Conrad. He is of German ancestry on 
botli sides, being a descendant of Thones Kunders, 
who was a contemporary settler with \\'illiain Penn 
and one of the founders of Gcrmantown, I'ennsyl- 
vania, and of Henry Pennypacker, who also emi- 
grated about the same time, settling in the same 
locality. He was educated in tiie public schools of 
^Vilmington and at the Reynolds Classical .Academy, 
and his legal studies were pursued at the Harvard 
Law School, Class of 1873, and in the office of 
.Anthony Higgins, afterwards L'nited States Senator 
from Delaware. Admitted to the Delaware Bar in 
November 1873, he has practised law in Wilming- 
ton continuously to the present time, with the ex- 
ception of two years spent as Editor of the Morning 
News, and in 1897 he was elected City Solicitor for 
a term of two years. F'rom 1880 to 1890 he sensed 
as Chief United States Supervisor of Elections ; was 
President of the Board of Public Education froin 
1881 to 1883; President of the City Council for 
the succeeding two years ; was a candidate for 
Mayor in 1885 and for Comptroller of New Castle 
county in 1892. In politics he is a Republican. 
I\Ir. Conrad is a member of the local lodge of 
Knights of Pythias, and of the local tribe Improved 
Order of Red Men. On February 20, 1884, he 
married Sarah J. Longaker ; they have two daugh- 
ters : Edith L. and Rachel L. Conrad. 



CUMMINGS. Charles Kimball 

Harvard A.B. 1893. 
Born in Boston, Mass., 1870 ; prepared for College 
at Roxbury Latin School; graduated Harvard, 1893; 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



I 6 



student at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and 
with Andrews, Jaques & Rantoul, architects, Boston; 
practising architect in Boston since 1894. 

CHARLES KIMBALL CU.NLMIXGS, Archi- 
tect, was born in Boston, Massachusetts, 
.September 25, 1870. He is of New England an- 
cestry, the son of Charles Amos and Margaret 
(Kimball) Cummings. His father holds a distin- 
guished place in his profession and is President of 
the Boston Society of Architects. Charles K. 
Cummings attended the Prince School in Boston, 




CH.AKLES K. CUMMINGS 

was fitted for College at the Roxbury Latin School, 
and graduated from Harvard with the Class of 1893. 
His professional training was had at the Massachu- 
setts Institute of Technology and in the office of the 
well-known Boston architects, Andrews, Jaques & 
Rantoul. Since 1894 Mr. Cummings has practised 
his profession in Boston and is regarded as one of 
the most promising among the younger generation 
of architects in that city. Mr. Cummings is Director 
of the Magnolia Public Library, Magnolia, Massa- 
chusetts, and holds the rank of gunner corporal in 
Battery A, Light Artillery, Massachusetts ^'olunteer 
Militia. He is a member of the Boston Society of 
.Vrchitects, the Tavern and the Union clubs, and 
the Union Boat Club, of Boston. 



DANFORTH, Samuel 

Harvard A.B. 1715. 
Bom in Dorchester, Mass., 1696 ; graduated Har- 
vard, 1715; President of the Colonial Council; Judge 
of Probate, Middlesex Co.; Mandamus Councillor, 
1774; died 1777. 

SAMUEL DANFORTH, Jurist, was born in 
Dorchester, now a part of Boston, Massa- 
chusetts, in 1696, and graduated at Harvard in 
I 715. He was a descendant of Nicholas Danforth 
of England, who came to New England with his 
two sons, Thomas and Samuel, in 1634. Thomas 
Danforth rose to great prominence in the Colony 
and was Deputy Governor under the first charter, 
1 6 78-1 686. His brother, Samuel, grandfather of 
the subject of this sketch, was graduated at Harvard 
in 1643 ^"'1 became colleague of the Rev. John 
Eliot over the church in Roxbury ; and Samuel's 
son John (Harvard 1677) was a clergyman in 
Dorchester, where the younger Samuel was born. 
After his graduation from Har\ard, Samuel Dan- 
forth studied law and gave much attention to 
public affairs. For several years he was President 
of the Colonial Council and held the office of 
Judge of Probate for Mitldlesex county. He was 
also a Justice of the Court of Common Pleas ; 
and when in 1774 he became a "Mandamus Coun- 
cillor," the County Convention adopted a resolution 
setting forth the opinion lliat he and his a.ssociate, 
Joseph Lee, being " acce])ted commissioners under 
the new Act, by being sworn members of His 
Majesty's Council, appointed by said .Vet, we there- 
fore look upon them as utterly incapable of holding 
any office whatever." Judge Danforth died in 
Cambridge, Massachusetts, in 1777. 



DICKINSON, Marquis Fayette, Jr. 

Harvard Law School, Class of 1867. 
Born in Amherst, Mass., 1840; educated in public 
schools and Amherst and Monson Academies; pre- 
pared for College at Williston Seminary; graduated 
Amherst, 1862; student. Harvard Law School, 1866-67; 
Asst. U. S. Attorney for Massachusetts, 1868-71 ; prac- 
tising law in Boston since 1871. 

MARQUIS FAYE'lTE DICKINSON, Jr., 
Lawyer, was born in .Ainherst, Massachu- 
setts, June 16, 1840. the son of Marquis Fayette 
and Hannah Shejipard (Williams) Dickinson. He 
is a descendant of Nathaniel Dickinson, one of the 
original settlers of Hadley, Massachusetts, in 1658, 
who came from Ely, England, about 1630 to Water- 



164 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



town, tlien with others settled Wethersfield, Connec- 
ticut, in 1636, and two years later established him- 
self definitely at Hadley. Mr. Dickinson's maternal 
grandfather, Asa Williams, served under Washington 
in the Revolution, and participated in the capture 
of the Hessians at Trenton. His great-grandfather. 
John Dickinson of .\mherst, fought at Bunker Hill 
and was the last sur\'iving Revolutionary soldier of 
Eastern Hampshire County, dying at Amherst in 
1852 at the age of ninety-two years. Mr. Dickinson 
received his early etlucation in the public schools of 
his native town and the Academies of Amherst and 
Monson, and was prepared for College at Williston 
Seminary, thence entering Amherst College, where 
he was graduated in 1.S62 with the degree of Bach- 
elor of Arts. He read law in Springfield, Massa- 
chusetts, in the office of the late John Wells and 
Augustus L. Soule, both afterwards on the Supreme 
Bench of Massachusetts, attended lectures at the 
Harvard Law School, 1S66-1867, and was for a 
time in the office of the Hon. George S. Hillard in 
Boston. Shortly after his admission to the Bar he 
was appointed Assistant United States .Attorney for 
Massachusetts, holding that position from 1868 to 
1S71, since which time he has been engaged in the 
practice of law in Boston. He was first associated 
in the firm of Hillard, Hyde & Dickinson, 1871- 
1878, then with Hyde, Dickinson & Howe, 1880- 
1S97, and now has associated with him in business 
Walter Bates Farr (Harvard LL.B 1893), and his 
son Charles Dickinson (Harvard 1896). Mr. 
Dickinson has served as a member of the Boston 
School Committee, the Common Council, of which 
body he was President in 1872, and of the Board of 
Trustees of the Boston Public Library. He is Pres- 
ident of the Board of Trustees of Williston Seminary, 
a member of the Board of Overseers of the Charity 
Funds of -Amherst College, and is on the Board of 
Directors of several manuflicturing corporations. 
In his profession he is largely engaged as barrister 
in the trial of causes in court, especially as Counsel 
for the Boston Elevated Railway Company. His 
town house is in Brookline and his summer residence 
on Jerusalem Road, Cohasset, and in Boston he 
holds membership in the University, .Algonquin 
and Art Clubs. November 24, 1S64, he married 
Cecilia Risk Williston, the adopted daughter of the 
Hon. Samuel Williston of Easthampton, Massachu- 
setts, benefactor of Amherst College and founder of 
the Williston Seminary at Easthampton. They have 
had three children, of whom Charles, now associated 
with his father in the law, alone survives. 



FISKE, Amos Kidder 

Harvard A.B. 1866. 
Born in Whitefield, N. H., 1842; educated Appleton 
Academy, New Ipswich, N. H., and Harvard; studied 
law in New York City and admitted to Bar, 1868 ; aban- 
doned law for journalism, 1869; connected with New 
York Times, 1869-71 ; New York Mail, 1872-74; Boston 
Globe, 1874-78 ; again on the New York Times, 1878-97 ; 
since engaged exclusively in literary pursuits. 

AM(JS KIDDER FISKE, Author, was born 
in Whitefield, New Hampshire, May 12, 
1842, son of Henry and Lucinda (Kyes) Fiske. 
Nathaniel Fiske, a descendant of Simon, Lord of 
the Manor of Stadhaugh, Laxfield, England, in the 




.4M0S K. FISKE 

fourteenth century, emigrated in 1638, settling at 
Watertown, Massachusetts, and his posterity became 
distributed throughout the Connecticut Valley, some 
of them being early settlers of New Hampshire and 
Vermont. Having attended the district schools and 
.Appleton Academy, New Ipswich, New Hampshire, 
the subject of this sketch went to Har\ard, where 
he took his Bachelor's degree summa cum laude 
in 1866, and was class poet. He studied law in 
the office of George Ticknor Curtis, New York City, 
where he was admitted to the Bar in 1S6S, but in 
the following year abandoned the legal profession to 
enter journalism as a writer on the New York Times. 
In 1872 he entered the service of the New York 
Evening Mail in which he remained until 1S74, 



UNIl-RRSiriES JXD THEIR SONS 



165 



when he joined the staff of the Boston Daily Globe. 
From 1878 to 1S97 he was again in the employ of 
the New York Times, and since his withdrawal from 
that paper his time has been exclusively occupied 
with literary pursuits. Mr. Fiske is the author of 
Midnight Talks at the Club, Beyond the Bourn, 
The Jewish Scriptures, the Myths of Israel, The 
Story of the Philippines, and The West Indies, the 
latter published in iSgg in the Story of the 
Nations series. He is a member of the New 
England Society of New York, The American Social 
Science Association, and of the University, Century, 
and Harvard clubs. His marriage took place 
October 27, 1870, with Caroline Child, sister of 
the late Prof F. [. Child, and their children are : 
Philip Sidney, Annette and Marguerite Fiske. 



FOXCROFT, Thomas 

Harvard A.B. 1714. 

Born in Cambridge, Mass., 1697; graduated Har- 
vard, 1714: studied theology and ordained minister, 
1717 ; Pastor First Congregational Church in Boston, 
1717-69; died 1769. 

THOMAS FOXCROFT, Clergyman, was born 
in Cambridge, Massachusetts, February 26, 
1697, and graduated at Harvard in 1714. In the 
arrangement of the class by the College authorities, 
in the rank of the accepted social position of its 
members, as was the custom during the first tliirty 
years, his name heads the list. He studied for 
the ministry after graduation and was licensed to 
l)reach in the year in which he received his Master's 
degree from Harvard. Although not then twenty- 
one years of age, Mr. Foxcroft was calU'd to the 
First Congregational Church in Boston, and was 
ordained Pastor there, November 20, 1717. In 
this charge he continued throughout his life, a 
ministry of more than half a century, during which 
he made himself admired and beloved. He was 
noted for the elegance of his manners, for the 
logical power of his discourses and for his schdlar- 
ship and devotion. When thirty-three years of age 
he preached a sermon in celebration of the centen- 
nial of the settlement of Boston, which was entitled. 
Observations, Historical and Practical, on the Rise 
and Primitive State of New England. This, to- 
gether with other of his discourses in a considerable 
nimibcr, are publisheil. His son Samuel (Harvard 
•754) ^^''"^s Pastor of the church at New Cloucester, 
Maine, for twenty-eight years. Thomas Foxcroft 
died in Boston, June 18, 1769. 



GARDNER, Henry Alansin 

Harvard LL.B. 1870. 
Born in Lisbon, 111., 1845; educated in common 
schools and preparatory school in Chicago ; graduated 
University of Chicago, 1868 ; Harvard Law School, 
1870; practising lawyer in Chicago. 

H1:NRV ALAXSIN C.ARDXKR, Lawyer, was 
born in Lisbon, Kendall county, Illinois, 
September 7, 1845, the son of Henry Alansin 
and Sarah Price (Morgan) Gardner. He is of 
English origin on the paternal side, the Gardners 
having been early Puritan Colonists in New Eng- 
land. On the maternal side he is of English and 







HKNRV A. GARDNER 

Welsh ancestry, being a descendant of Richard 
Price Morgan, who came from London, in 1S08. 
He attended the common schools of Joliet and 
Dwight, Illinois, was fitted for College at the pre- 
paratory .school connected with the University of 
Chicago, from which latter he was graduated in 
1 868, and was a law student at Harvard I„aw 
School, gradu-iting there two years later. .Admitted 
to practice by the Illinois Supreme Court in May 
1870, he located permanently in Chicago the same 
year, and has ever since been identified with the 
legal profession of that city. Mr. Gardner was one 
of the original members of the Cniversily Club, 
Chicago, an<l still affiliates with that organization. 
June 20, 1S7S, he married Heborah Chandler, 



1 66 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



daughter of Hon. Samuel C. Fessenden. Their 
children are : Mary Abbe, Sarah Morgan, Henry 
A., Jr., Grace Fessenden and Robert Abbe Gardner. 
His law practice has for many years been lucrative 
and all of his undertakings have been successfully 
accomplished. 



GEE, Joshua 

Harvard A.B. 1717. 
Born in Boston, Mass., 1698; graduated Harvard, 
1717; Librarian of the College, 1721-22; studied the- 
ology and ordained colleague of Cotton Mather, 1723 ; 
Pastor of the Old North Church, Boston, 1728-48 ; died 
1748. 

Jt^SHU.A GKK, Clergyman, was born in Boston, 
Massachusetts, June 29, 1698, and graduated 
at Harvard in 1717. Following his graduation he 
studied for the ministry, received his Master's de- 
gree in 1720, and for the two years succeeding held 
the position of Librarian of the College. He en- 
tered upon the active work of the ministry in 1723, 
in which year he was ordained colleague of Cotton 
Mather over the Old North Church in Boston. On 
the death of Dr. Mather in 1728, Mr. Gee became 
Pastor of that church, continuing in charge until his 
death. His sermon on the Death of Cotton Mather 
was published, as well as other of his discourses. 
He was known as a ilivine of great learning, strong 
intellect and a powerful reasoner. In the White- 
fieldian controversy he upheld the methods of the 
great revivalist, and although a member of the 
assembly of clergymen that met at Boston in i 743 
to discuss the progress of religion in a spirit of 
hostility to Whitefield, he refused to approve the 
tone and temper of tlie proceedings of the con- 
ference and published a strong letter of protest 
and condemnation. Mr. Gee died in Boston, May 
22, 1748. 



Douglas Grammar School of Chicago, St. Mar)''s 
College in Montreal, the Chicago High School and 
the Harvard School in Chicago. His collegiate 
training was acquired at Harvard, where his industry 
and capacity for study enabled him to practically 
master the entire .Academic course in three years, 
and being granted leave of absence he spent the 
major part of his Senior year abroad, attending the 
University of Berlin and visiting the principal cities 
of Europe, returning in time to graduate with the 
Class of 1S93. Entering the Chicago College of 
Law, and at the same time becoming a clerk in the 



GUERIN, Michael Henry 

Harvard A.B. 1893. 
Born in Chicago, 111., 1871 ; educated at grammar, 
high and Harvard schools, Chicago, and St. Mary's 
College, Montreal; graduated Harvard, 1893; LL.B. 
Chicago College of Law, 1895 '• Instructor in last 
named institution, and practising lawyer of Chicago. 

MICHAEL HENRY GUERIN, Lawyer, was 
born in Chicago, Illinois, December 27, 
1 87 1, son of John and Mary (Jackson) Guerin. 
He is of Irish ancestry on the paternal side. Some 
of his mother's people were Irish and the rest 
.\merican. His early education was obtained at the 




M. H. GUERIN 

office of one of the leading law firms of Chicago, he 
thus acquired at one and the same time the theoret- 
ical and practical knowledge of his profession. Ex- 
Judge Thomas A. Moran of the Illinois Court of 
.■\pi)eals, an old friend of his father, took a special 
interest in him and gave him every favorable oppor- 
tunity for professional advancement. Having re- 
ceived the degree of Bachelor of Laws in 1895, '" 
February of the following year he established himself 
as a law practitioner in his native city. In 1898 Mr. 
Guerin was appointed by the Lake Forest University 
Corporation an Instructor in its I-aw Department 
(the Chicago College of Law). He continues to 
serve in that capacity, while at the same time engag- 
ing in the active pnictice of his profession. At Oak- 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



167 



land, California, April 8, 1896, he married Esther 
Glenn. Their children are ; John Glenn and Mary 
Carmelita Guerin. 



HILDRETH, Hosea 

Harvard A.B. 1805 
Born in Chelmsford, Mass., 1782 ; graduated Harvard, 
1805; engaged in teaching 1805-11; Prof, of Mathe- 
matics, Phillips-Exeter Academy, 1811-25; A.M. 
(Hon.) Dartmouth, 1817; Pastor of Church in Glouces- 
ter, Mass., 1825-34; in Westborough, 1834-35; '^'^^ 1835. 
H()SK.\ HIl,DRI':ril, ,\.M., Clergyman, was 
born in Chelmsford, Massachusetts, Janu- 
ary 2, 1782, a descendant of Richard Hildreth, who 
came from England, in 1643. While he was yet a 
child, his father removed to Sterling, Vermont, 
where he bought a farm, and the son was fitted for 
College, with such advantages as that community 
afforiled. He was graduated at Harvard in 1S05 
and studied theology with the purpose of entering 
upon the work of the ministry. The opportunity 
for engaging in teaching, however, presented itself 
so favorably that he followed that occupation for 
several years, with such success that in iSii he was 
offered the position of Professor of Mathematics in 
the I'iiillips .Vcademy at E.xeter, New Hampshire. 
In this position he remained until 1825, when he 
carried out his original intention and entered the 
ministry as Pastor of the Congregational Church at 
Gloucester, Massachusetts. 'l"he Unitarian move- 
ment of that day caused division in his congregation, 
and upon the establishment of a new Orthodox 
Church within his parish he transferred to this his 
connection as Pastor. In this charge he remained 
until 1833, when he resigned and subsequently 
became Pastor of a small church in Westborough, 
Massachusetts. Mr. Hildreth was an ardent advo- 
cate of tem[)erance reform and was agent of the 
Massachusetts Temperance Society. Dartmouth 
gave him the honorary degree of Master of .Arts in 
1 81 7, and lie was Duilleian Lecturer at Harvard 
in 1S29. He died in Sterling, Vermont, July 10, 

1835- 

RAWLE, Francis 

Harvard A.B. 1869, LL.B. 1871- 
Born in Mifflin Co., Pa., 1846; graduated Harvard 
1869 and Harvard Law School, 1871 ; practising lawyer 
in Philadelphia since 1871 ; Treasurer American Bar 
Association since 1878; Overseer of Harvard since 
i8go. 

FK.VNCIS R.\Wl.i:, Lawyer, and Overseer of 
Harvard, though he has passed most of his 
hie in Philadelphia, was born .\ugust 7, 1846, at 



The Freedom Forge in Mifflin county, Pennsyl- 
vania, on the headwaters of the historic Juniata. 
His grandfather, William Rawle, the elder (LL.D. 
Princeton and Dartmouth), was a distinguished 
member of the Philadelphia Bar from the close of 
the Revolution until 1836, and his maternal grand- 
father, Charles Hall, was also a prominent lawyer of 
Sunbury, Pennsylvania. His father was Francis 
\\'illiam Rawle, a soldier in the war of 181 2, and in 
later life an engineer and ironmaster. His mother 
was Louisa Hall. Mr. Rawle fitted for Harvard 
at Phillips .\cademy at E.xeter, New Hampshire. 




FRANCIS RAWLE 

Upon his graduation in 1869, he studied law in the 
office of \Villiam Henry Rawle of the Philadelphia 
Bar and continued his studies at the Harvard Law 
School, where he graduated with the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws in 187 1, and was admitted to the 
Philadelphia Bar on November 4, 1871. His prac- 
tice has been of a very general kind, but of late 
years has been more particularly in the Federal 
Courts in the Eastern District of Pennsylvania and 
other districts. In 1878, at the first Conference, 
held at Saratoga Springs, for the organization of 
the .American Bar .Association, he was elected Tem- 
porary Secretary and afterwards Treasurer of the 
Association ; the latter position he has held by suc- 
cessive elections ever since, having served under all 



i68 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



the great lawyers who have been Presidents of tlie 
Association: — James O. Broadhead, Benjamin H. 
Bristow, Kdward J. Phelps, Thomas J. Semmes, 
David Dudley Field, John F. Dillon, Thomas M. 
Cooley, James C. Carter, Joseph H. Choate and 
Charles F. Manderson. In 1S83 he published a 
new edition of Bouvier's Law Dictionary, and in 
189S he revised and largely re-wrote this work, 
which has now become one of the standard works of 
the profession. He has in other respects paid the 
debt which every lawyer is said to owe to his profes- 
sion by preparing various papers in periodical legal 
journals and a paper on Car Trust Securities, which 
he read before the American Bar Association in 
1885. Mr. Rawle was elected one of the Board of 
Overseers of Harvard in iSyo and re-elected in 
1896. 

REYNOLDS, Edward 

Harvard A.B. 1811. 
Born in Boston, Mass., 1793; pupil in the Boston 
Latin School; graduated Harvard, 1811 ; studied medi- 
cine in Boston, 1811-14; studied in London and at 
Paris, 1814-16; practised in Boston, 1816-62, with 
specialty in affections of the eye; M.D. (Hon.) Brown 
and Bowdoin, 1825; died 1881. 

EDWARD REYNOLDS, M.D., born in Boston, 
Massachusetts, in 1793, the son of Edward 
Reynolds, a flour merchant of that city. He was 
educated in the public schools of Boston and was a 
pupil in the Latin School until the discipline as en- 
forced by Master Hunt with a ruler, breaking the 
boy's thumb, became in the opinion of his parents 
too severe, when he was withdrawn and prepared for 
College elsewhere. After graduating at Harvard in 
181 1, he studied medicine in the office of Dr. Warren 
in Boston and went abroad in 1814 to complete his 
professional course in England. There and in Paris 
he studied for two years under the most famous 
teachers of that day, receiving also special instruction 
in diseases of the eye. While at London he passed 
the examination of the Royal College of Surgeons. 
On his return to Boston he was brought at once 
into notice by a successful double operation for 
cataract performed upon his father ; his first cata- 
ract operation and also the first done by any one in 
Boston. The prestige which this case gave him 
was the foundation of an extended employment in 
this branch of surgery. Dr. Reynolds was one of 
the founders of the Boston Eye and Ear Infirmary 
and he remained till late in life its senior Surgeon. 
He received the honorary degree of Doctor of 
Medicine from Brown and Bowdoin in 1825 and 



continued the practice of his profession until the age 
of seventy. He married Adeline Ellen, daughter of 
William Pratt, of Liverpool, England, and second, 
Margaret Wendell Phillips of Boston. By the second 
wife he had one son (Harvard 1845) and five 
daughters. Dr. luiward Reynolds died in iSSi. 



THORNTON, Charles Solon 

Harvard A.B, 187a. 
Born in Boston, Mass., 1851 ; prepared for College 
at the Boston Latin School; graduated Harvard, 1872; 
studied law at Harvard and in Chicago ; admitted to 
the Bar of Illinois, 1873; practising lawyer in Chicago 
since 1873; author of the Teachers' Pension Bill; Cor- 
poration Counsel for Chicago. 

CHARLES SOLON THORNTON, Lawyer, 
was born in Boston, Massachusetts, .Xpril 12, 
1S51, the son of Solon and Cordelia A. (Tilden) 




CH.i\S. S. THOKNl'ON 

Thornton. He attended the public schools of that 
city, preparing for College in the Boston Latin 
School, and graduated from Harvard in 1872. 
While in College, in addition to the regular course 
of studies, he pursued a course of legal study. In 
March 1873 he went to Chicago and continued his 
law studies in the offices of Lyman & Jackson and 
Isham & Lincoln, in September of the same year 
passing the examination for admittance to the Bar 
before the Supreme Court of Illinois and receiving 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



169 



a license to practise. Later he was admitted to the 
United States District and Circuit Courts and the 
Supreme Court of the United States. From 1873 
until the present time he has been engaged continu- 
ously in the practice of his profession in the city of 
Chicago. He has been senior member for many 
years of the firm of Tiiornton & Chancellor, in 
point of volume and importance of its business one 
of the largest law firms in the country. Mr. Thorn- 
ton has been engaged in the trial of many impor- 
tant cases, meeting with a great measure of success, 
and is regarded as one of the leaders of the Chicago 
Bar. In addition to his law practice, Mr. Thornton 
has at times assumed public obligations. In 1SS8 
he was elected President of his local Board of Edu- 
cation at Auburn Park. The next year he served as 
Corporation Counsel for the Town of Lake, at that 
time one of the large suburbs but now a part of the 
City of Chicago. Since that time he has been 
elected a member of the Illinois State, Cook County 
and the City of Chicago Boards of Education. From 
April 1897 until May i, 1899 he served as Corpora- 
tion Counsel for the City of Chicago and in this 
capacity was called upon to decide many novel and 
important questions relating to the Civil Service 
Law and by his opinions extending the operation 
of that law to all departments of the municipal 
government. Out of three thousand five hundred 
and fifty three opinions rendered during his term of 
office, but three were ever successfully attacked, and 
in the other work tjf his office an unprecedented 
recortl was made, out of tiiree thousand thirty-nine 
cases tried two thousand nine hundred and seventy- 
nine being won. As counsel for the city he was 
called upon to adjust an immense number of claims, 
but he never hesitated to oppose those which he 
considered unjust, and during his term of office he 
refused to permit payment of over Si 5, 000,000 of 
claims which he thought illegal. In his capacity as 
School Trustee upon the several Boards of Educa- 
tion, to which he was elected, he made many im- 
provements in the curricula of the state, county and 
city schools, enriching the courses of study in the 
grammar grades and making the high schools more 
efficient. He is the author of wliat is known as the 
Teachers' Pension Bill, the first legislative enact- 
ment of this character in the country. He is a 
member of many fraternal organizations and for the 
Odd Fellows has prepared an extensive Code for 
Illinois. The parents of Mr. Thornton are still liv- 
ing, and in 1899 celebrated tlie golden anniversary 
of their wediling. His father was born in l.cmpster. 



New Hampshire, and his mother in Marshfield, 
Massachusetts. In September 18S3 Mr. Thornton 
married Jessie F. Benton of Normal Park, Illinois. 
He has four children : Mabel Jessie, Pearl Esther, 
Hattie May and Chancellor Benton Thornton. 



TREAT, Samuel 

Harvard A.B. 1669. 
Born in Milford, Conn., 1648 ; graduated Harvard, 
i66g; studied for the ministry and became Pastor at 
Eastham, Mass., 1672; translator of the Confession of 
Faith into the Nauset dialect for use of the Indians ; 
died 1717. 

SAMUEL TRE.\T, Clergyman, was born in 
Milford, Connecticut, in 1648, the son of 
Robert Treat, one of the patentees of the charter 
which was granted to Connecticut by Charles II. in 
1662 and Governor of that Colony for more than 
twenty years. Governor Treat was one of the 
settlers of Wethersficld, Connecticut, where he had 
a large estate, but removed to Milford a few years 
before the birth of his son. Samuel was sent to 
Harvard for his education and graduated there in 
1669, then studied theology and in 1672 received a 
call to preach at Eastham on Cape Cod, Massachu- 
setts. He was ordained minister at that place three 
years later, with a stated salary of X50 a year. 
This, however, was afterwards increased and was 
supplemented by liberal grants of land. A large 
part of his ministry was concerned with the evange- 
lization of the Indians, of whom he had some five 
hundred under his pastoral care, and in this he was 
highly successful, gaining their confidence by visit- 
ing their wigwams and joining in their festivities, 
and earning the title of their father by his charitable 
attentions. F'or their use he translated the Confes- 
sion of F'aith into the Nauset dialect. Mr. Treat's 
reputation was not confined to the locality in which 
his pastoral labors were performed, and he appears 
on two occasions as the preacher of the election 
sermon, in 16 78, at Plymouth and in 17 13 at Bos- 
ton. He was the grandfather of Robert Treat 
Paine, signer of the Declaration of Independence, 
and grcat-grandf;ither of the Rev. James Freeman, 
the first I'nitarian clergyman of Boston. Mr. Treat 
died in Eastham, March iS, 1717. 



WATERHOUSE, Sylvester 

Harvard A.B. 1853, LL.B. 1857 
Born in Harrington, N. H., 1830; educated at Phil- 
lips-Exeter Acad. ; graduated Harvard, 1853; Harvard 
Law School. 1857; Prof, of Latin at Antioch Coll., O.; 
Prof, of Greek at Wash. Univ., St. Louis; author of 



170 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



numerous addresses and articles on economic and edu- 
cational topics; member of the Missouri State Bureau 
of Geology and Mines ; Sec. St. Louis Board of Trade ; 
U. S. Commissioner to the Paris Exposition and to the 
World's Fair proposed to be held in New York in 1883 ; 
Honorary Commissioner to the World's Fair in New 
Orleans, 1884; Commissioner from Missouri to the 
American Exposition in London, 1887; Sec. of Amer- 
ican Nal'l Tariff League of the State of Missouri; 
Delegate to the Nicaragua Canal Conventions in St. 
Louis and New Orleans ; Commissioner to the Trans- 
Mississippi Exposition at Omaha ; delegate to Nat. 
Assn. of Am Manufacturers, Chicago, 1896 ; to Missis- 
sippi Commercial Cong., Wichita, i88g; to Trans-Mis- 
sissippi Commercial Congress, Houston, Tex., 1900. 

SVr.VF.STHR W.\TERHOUSE, Professor of 
(ireek at Washington University, St. Louis, 
since 1857, was born in Harrington, New Hamp- 
shire, September 15, 1830. His family is of Eng- 
lish origin and its lineage runs back to the reign of 
Henry VHI., while the American branch is traced to 
early Colonial times. His parents were Samuel II. 
and Dolia (Kingman) Waterhouse. After preparing 
for College at Phillips-Exeter Academy, Mr. Water- 
house spent one term at Dartmouth, and then in 
1851 entered Harvard where he was graduated in 
1853. He pursued his professional studies at the 
Harvard Law School, receiving the degree of Doctor 
of Laws there in 1857, and acce])ted the position of 
Professor of the Latin I.anguage and Literature in 
Antioch College, Yellow Springs, Ohio. This chair 
he occupied but a very short time, being called to 
Washington University, St. Louis, where he has 
remained ever since as Professor of Greek. .Ap- 
pointed to his position two months and a half after 
the formal inauguration, he has been connected with 
the University its entire life. .After a term of ser- 
vice longer than that of any other man in its history, 
he is now its Senior Professor. Not only has he 
been a prominent officer of that institution, but he 
has also won the afifection and regard of the students 
under his care, as was strikingly illustrated by the 
donation of §25,000 which in 1868 four of his for- 
mer pupils gave to the University "in grateful 
recognition of the fidelity, learning and ability with 
which Professor Waterhouse has for years discharged 
his duties." In public life. Professor Waterhouse 
has shown great ability and energy. During the 
Civil War he assisted in arousing patriotic sentiment, 
and since then he has been active in the promotion 
of the industrial interests of the country. His writ- 
ings show the vast field he has covered in his work, 
bearing as they do upon such subjects as the advan- 
tages of educated labor, the culture of jute in the 



United States, the improvement of the Mississippi 
River, the culture of flax, the relations of capital and 
labor, the influence of northern forests on the Mis- 
sissippi, the benefits of the Nicaragua Canal, the best 
methods of teaching Greek, etc. For more than a 
quarter of a century he has urged the culture of 
ramie in the Gulf States as a new source of textile 
prosperity and a fruitful means of diversifying South- 
ern agriculture. Professor Waterhouse was ap- 
pointed in 1 87 1 a member of the Missouri State 
Bureau of Geology and Mines, and the next year 
was elected Secretary of the St. Louis Board of 




SYLVESTER WATERHOUSE 

Trade. Then after returning from a trip around 
the world in 1872-1873, he was made a member of 
the National Railroad Convention in St. Louis in 
1875 and of the Missis.sippi River Improvement 
Convention at St. Paul in 1S77. He was selected 
by this Convention to draw up the Memorial to 
Congress in favor of the improvement of the Mis- 
sissippi River. A year later he was appointed United 
States Commissioner to the Paris Exposition and 
also to the World's Fair which it was proposed to 
hold in New York in 1883. In the latter year, he 
was appointed delegate to the National Cotton 
Planters' Convention at Vicksburg, and in 1884 was 
made an honorary Commissioner to the World's 
Fair in New Orleans. .Among succeeding offices 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



171 



were those of Commissioner from Missouri to the 
American Ex|)osition in London in 1887 ; Secretary 
of the American Tariff League of the State of Mis- 
souri ; delegate to the Nicaragua Canal Conventions 
in St. Louis and New Orleans in 1892 ; Deputy ap- 
pointed both by the Mayor and the President of the 
Merchants' Exchange to represent the municipal 
and mercantile interests of St. Louis at the Trans- 
Mississippi Commercial Congress at Salt Lake City 
in 1897, and Commissioner to the Trans-Mississippi 
Exposition at Omaha in 1898. From the State 
University of Missouri, he received in 1883 the de- 
gree of Doctor of Laws, and from Dartmouth Col- 
lege in 1S84 the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. 
All this work has been done and these honors won 
in spite of physical disadvantages. When only ten 
years of age, Mr. \\'aterhouse lost his right leg by an 
accident, which disqualified him for the career indi- 
cated by his natural taste, that of architect and civil 
engineer, and in 1867 he was thrown from a car- 
riage and so badly hurt that he has never since been 
free from pain. Yet these severe and ceaseless suf- 
ferings have not prevented his success as author, 
teacher and public citizen. Dr. Waterhouse has 
been a voluminous writer, and his publications have 
had a remarkable and perhaps unprecedentedly 
wide circulation, many of them being translated into 
French, Spanish and German. His works relative 
to the Nicaragua Canal arc the most important and 
authoritative that have been issued. In March 1900 
he was appointeil,both by the Mayor and by the Presi- 
dent of the Merchants' I'lxchangc, as a delegate to 
represent the municipal and mercantile interests of 
St. Louis at the Trans-Mississippi Commercial Con- 
gress, which met in Houston, Texas, in April 1900. 



WIGGLESWORTH, Michael 

Harvard A.B. 1651. 
Born in England, 1631 ; arrived in America, 1638; 
graduated Harvard, 1651 ; Tutor, 1652-54; studied 
theology and served as Pastor of church in Maiden, 
Mass., 1655-63; studied medicine and practised as 
physician until 1686, when he resumed his pastoral 
work; Fellow of Harvard, 1652-54 and 1697-1705; died 
1705. 

MICHAEL WlCC.LlvSWORTII, Clergyman, 
was born in luigland, October iS, 1631, 
and was brought to this country wiien a chilil of 
seven years by his father, Edward W'igglesworth, 
who settled with his family in New Haven, Connec- 
ticut. Michael was graduated at HarvanI in 1651 
and in the following year received appointment as 



Tutor and Fellow. While serving in this capacity 
he studied theology and sujjplied the pulpit of 
Charlestown. In 1655 he resigned his Tutorship 
and went to Maiden, Massachusetts, to preach, where 
he was settled as Pastor in 1657 and remained 
throughout his life. He was obligeil to leave his 
pulpit for a time in 1663 on account of his health, 
which he sougiit to re-establish by a voyage to Ber- 
muda, and during his absence an associate was or- 
dained to ])erform the duties of minister. It was 
not until 1686 that his health was sufficiently re- 
stored to permit the resumption of pastoral work, 
and in the mean time he studied medicine and be- 
came a skilful physician. He continued his medi- 
cal practice after returning to his pulpit. Cotton 
Mather, who preached his funeral sermon, spoke of 
him as a "little, feeble shadow of a man, beyond 
seventy, preaching usually twice or thrice in a week, 
visiting and comforting the afflicted, encouraging 
the private meetings, catechising the children of the 
flock, managing the government of tlie church, and 
attending the sick, not only in his own town, but 
also in all those of the vicinity." Mr. Wigglesworlli 
wrote several remarkable poems, the most notable 
bearing the title of The Day of Doom ; or a 1 )escrip- 
tion of the Great and Last Judgment, whic ii was so 
fascinating in its terrors as to retain its popularity 
for more than a century in New England, passing 
through ten editions in this country and two edi- 
tions in London. Mr. Wigglesworth was a Fellow 
of Harvard from 1697 to the time of his death, 
which occurred in Maiden, June 10, 1705. 



G 



WILLIAMS, Gibson Tenney 

Harvard A.B. 1891. 
Born in Buffalo, N. Y., 1870 ; educated at home, in 
private schools and Phillips-Exeter Academy; gradu- 
ated Harvard, i8gi ; studied law one year; in whole- 
sale boot and shoe house three years ; and now in the 
fire insurance business in Buffalo, N. Y. 

lilSON TEN MA' WILLIAMS, Business 
Man, was born in Buffalo, New York, Jan- 
nary 30, 1S70, the son of George L. and .Vnnie 
(Atldicks) Williams. Some of his ancestors were 
Irish, others were English, and one branch came 
originally from Wales. His rudimentary studies, 
pursued at home, were followed by courses at a 
lirivate school and Phillii)s Academy, Exeter, New 
Hampshire, from which he went to Harvard and 
was graduateil with the Class of 1S91. .\ year's 
study in a law office served to convince him that his 
palli in life would be more congenial if diverted to 



\-]1 



UNIVERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



another direction, and he accordingly relinquished 
the law for mercantile pursuits, entering the employ 
of a wholesale boot and shoe house, where he re- 
mained for three years. About the year 1895 he 
became associated with others in the fire insurance 
business in HufTalo, which through energy and per- 
severance has been developed into a large business. 
Mr. \\ illianis is highly esteemed in the business and 




GIBSON 1. WILLIAMS 

social circles of Buffalo, and is a member of several 
local clubs. April 21, 1897, he married Alice 
Perew of Buffalo. 



WISE, John 

Harvard A.B. 1673. 
Born in Roxbury, Mass., 1652; prepared for College 
at the Roxbury Free School ; graduated Harvard, 
1673 ; studied theology and ordained Pastor of Church 
at Ipswich, Mass., 1683; deprived of ministerial office 
by Andros, 1688, for remonstrating against arbitrary 
taxation ; Chaplain in expedition against Canada, 
1690 ; leader in the opposition to the Mathers' plan of 
ministers' associations ; died 1725. 

JOHN WISE, Clergyman, was born in Roxbury, 
now a part of Boston, Massachusetts, in 
August 1652, the son of Joseph Wise who had been 
a servant in his younger days. His preparation to 
College was obtained in the Roxbury Free School, 
and he was graduated at Harvard in 1673, subse- 



quently studying theology and receiving his Master's 
degree in course. His first and only charge was 
that of the church at Chebacco, a parish of Ipswich, 
Massachusetts, over which he was ordained in 16S3, 
remaining there throughout his life. There was a 
time, however, in which the attempt was made to 
deprive him of his ministerial office for the offence 
of leading the citizens of Ipswich in their protest 
against arbitrary taxation by Sir Edmund Andros. 
He was imprisoned, fined ;^50 and costs and 
ordered removed from the ministry. This was 
in 16SS, and the revolution of the following year 
which deposed .'\ndros, relieved him from the sen- 
tence. The town of Ipswich, which had paid his 
fine and costs, sent Mr. \Vise as its representative 
to Boston, where he not only took an active part in 
re-organizing the government but brought action 
against Chief-Justice Dudley for refusing him the 
benefit of the habeas corpus act when in trouble 
the year before, and recovered damages. Mr. \\'ise 
went as Chaplain with the troops on the abortive 
expedition against Canada in 1690; and later, wlicn 
the Mathers proposed their scheme for the establish- 
ment of associations of ministers to exercise author- 
ity before pertaining to the churches, he attacked 
the scheme with such vigor as to signally defeat it. 
His essay in this controversy, entitled Vindication 
of the Government of New England Churches, has 
been described as " the text-book of liberty for our 
Revolutionary f;Uhers, containing some of the 
notable e.vpressions that were used in the Declara- 
tion of Independence." Mr. Wise died in Ipswich, 
April 8, 1725. 



LEATHERBEE, George Henry 

Harvard A.B. 1882. 
Bom in Boston, Mass., 1859; early education in 
Boston public schools and at Adams Academy, Quincy. 
Mass. ; graduated Harvard. 1882 ; in business in Boston 
since 1882. 

GEORGE HEXRV LE.VrHERBi:E, Business 
Man, was born in IJoston, May i, 1S59, 
the son of William H. and Mary J. (Millard) 
Leatherbee. He received his early education in 
the public schools of Boston and was prepared for 
College at the .Adams Academy in Quincy, Massa- 
chusetts. Entering Harvard, he pursued the .Aca- 
demic course, taking his degree of Bachelor of .Arts 
with the Class of 1882, since which time he has 
engaged in mercantile business in Boston. October 
24, 1894, Mr. Leatherbee married Ella D. Smith, 
of Boston. They have no children. 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



173 



ADAMS, John Lanson 

Yale B.A. 1883 Columbia M.D. 1886 
Born in Westport, Conn., i860; prepared for College 
at the Selleck School, Norwalk, Conn. ; graduated 
Yale, 1883 ; College of Physicians and Surgeons, 
Columbia, 1886; Interne, New York Hospital, 1886-87; 
on the house staff New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, 
1887-89 ; studied abroad, and on his return became Sur- 
geon at the Eye and Ear Infirmary, holding that position 
to the present time; founder of the St. Bartholomew 
Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat Dispensary, 1897, and Sur- 
geon in charge. 

JOHN L.\NSON AD,\MS, M.D., Medical and 
Surgical Specialist, New York, was born in 
Westport, Fairfield county, Connecticut, .August g, 
i860, the son of George Sherwood and Polly More- 
house (Coley) Adams. His father was for thirty 
years a successful hardware merchant and subse- 
quently a lumber merchant in Westport. On both 
sides the ancestors of Dr. Adams were members 
of families prominent in the Colonial history of 
New England. He is the grandson of Jabcz Adams 
and Annie Bennett and the great-grandson of 
Aaron Adams, and his wife, Rhoda, daughter of 
Captain Phineas Hanford, Sr., of Norwalk, Connecti- 
cut. Aaron Adams was a private in the Patriot 
Army in the Revolution in 1776, being a member 
of Captain Marvin's Company. Captain Phineas 
Hanford, Sr., in 1761 was appointed Captain of the 
Third Company or " Trained Band " in the first 
society of the town of Norwalk, Connecticut. 
Lieutenant Nathan Adams, great-great-grandfiither 
of Dr. Adams, was appointed Lieutenant in 1782, 
at the same time being placed in command of 
the garrison stationed to defend Black Rock, Fair- 
field county, Connecticut. The wife of Lieutenant 
Nathan Adams, I\Lary Burr, was the daughter of one 
of the most eminent men of Fairfield county, the 
family being one of note throughout New England. 
The line goes back to Baldwin de Bares of Suffolk, 
England, who was living in 1193, a. u. From him 
was descended Sir Robert de Bures of Acton Hall, 
who was a Knight Templar of Jerusalem and one 
of the potent Barons who in 1327 deposed Edward 
H. of England. John liurr came to .\merica with 
Governor Winthrop in 1630. He originally settled 
at Roxbury, subsequently becoming one of the 
eight founders and proprietors of Springfield, Mas- 
sachusetts. Still later he removed to Fairfield, 
Connecticut, and in 1645 and 1646 was a member 
of the General Court. His grandson. Colonel John 
Burr, was one of the notable figures of Colonial 
Connecticut. Born in 1673, he acquired great 
tracts of land from the Indians; during Queen 



Anne's war was Commissary of the Fairfield county 
forces ; served as Major of Connecticut troops, and 
was sent to the General Court almost continuously 
from 1704 to 1724, serving several terms as Speaker 
and Auditor; from 1729 to 1734 was Assistant 
Member of the Upper House and became in turn 
Judge of the County Court, Judge of the Probate 
Court, and Judge of the Court of Chancery. 
Lieutenant Nathan Adams was the son of Nathaniel 
Adams, while his mother, Rebecca Clapham, was 
the daughter of the largest land-owner of his day 
in New England. Edward Adams, father of Na- 




JOHN L. AD.AMS 

thaniel and great-great-great-great-grandf;tther of 
Dr. Adams, with his wife, Margaret, emigrated from 
England to New Haven, Connecticut, in 1640. 
He was of the same family as Henry .\dams of 
Braintree, Massachusetts, ancestors of two Presi- 
dents of the United States and of many others, 
prominent in American public life. 1 )r. .\<l:inis's 
great-great-grandfather on the maternal side. Cap- 
tarn Ebenezer Coley, w.as in 1770 appointed by the 
Connecticut .Assembly Captain of a Comijany in 
Norfield, Connecticut. John I^anson Adams was 
prepared for College in the Selleck School at Nor- 
walk, Connecticut, and in 1883 was graduated from 
Yale, taking his degree of Doctor of Medicine in 
1886 from the College of Physicians and Surgeons 



174 



UNirERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



of Columbia. While a medical student he was for 
six months connected with the staff of the Old 
Chambers Street Hospital, antl immediately after 
his graduation he was appointed Interne of the 
New York Hospital, a position wliich he held for 
eighteen months. Subsequently for two years he 
was a member of the House StalT of the New York 
Eye and Kar Infirmary, in which institution his 
interest and study in diseases of the eye and ear 
commenced, and the following year he went to 
Europe to complete his preparation for the practice 
of the specialty to whicli he had decided to devote 
himself. His studies abroad were in famous insti- 
tutions, at Heidelberg, Vienna, Berlin, Paris and 
I>ondon. Returning to New York, Ur. Adams en- 
gaged in the active practice of his profession, in 
which he rapidly won success and recognition, 
steadily advancing to the distinguished position 
which he now holds among specialists in the 
diseases of the eye, ear, nose and throat. He 
resumed his connection with the Eye and Ear 
Infirmary, serving for a year as Assistant Surgeon 
and then becoming full Surgeon, in which capacity 
he still continues. He founded in 1892 the St. 
Bartholomew Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat Dispen- 
sary of which he is at present the Surgeon in charge. 
For the past four years he has been Ophthalmolo- 
gist to the Society of the New York Lying-in Asylum 
and recently has been appointed Ophthalmologist 
to the Manhattan State Hospital, Ward's Island, 
New York City. His practice, scientific investiga- 
tions and writings, have always been devoted ex- 
clusively to his specialty. He has published at 
various times, in the medical periodicals, valuable 
articles on the results of his work. Dr. Adams is 
a member of the New York County Medical Society, 
a charter member of the New York Otological 
Society, and a member of the American Otological 
Society, the American Rhinological, Otological and 
Laryngological Society, the Medico- Surgical Society, 
the New York Hospital Alumni Association, the 
Hospital Graduates Club, and the Physicians Mu- 
tual Aid Association. He is also a member of the 
Manhattan, University, Yale, Lotos, Indian Harbor 
Yacht, New York .Vthletic, and Knickerbocker 
Athletic clubs. A younger brother of Dr. Adams, 
Charles Francis, is associated with him in prac- 
tice. .\nother younger brother, Henry Frederick, 
is a physician in Brooklyn. Dr. Adams was 
married June 4, 1895, to Elizabeth E., daughter 
of F. B. Wallace of New York City, and has one 
child. 



w 



BARNUM, William Mile 

Vale B.A. 1877— Columbia LL.B. 1879. 
Born at Lime Rock, Conn., 1856; prepared for Col- 
lege at Lime Rock; graduated Yale, 1877; Columbia 
Law School, 1879; practising lawyer in New York 
City. 

I.IAM MILO BARNUM, Lawyer, was 
horn in Lime Rock, Connecticut, January 
25, 1856. His father, William Henry Barnuni. 
sprung from tliat family of Barnums who at an early 
date settled near Danbury, Connecticut. Through 
his mother, Charlotte Ann (Burrall) Barnum, he 
traces his ancestry to Governor Bradford, of Ply- 
mouth, Massachusetts. Mr. Barnum's youthful 
education and his entire preparation for College 
were received in tlie schools of his native town. 
At the age of seventeen he entered Yale as a 
candidate for the Bachelor of .Arts degree. .After 
graduation at Vale in 1S77, he took a course of 
two years study at the Law School of Columbia 
University, where he graduated in 1879. His pro- 
fessional career commenced at once with a position 
in the office of the New York lawyers Alexander & 
Green. He continued his work with this firm 
until January 1884, when he became associated 
with John W. Simpson and Thomas Thacher under 
the firm name of Simpson, Thacher & liarnum. 
An additional jjartner was taken May i, 1899, and 
the name of the concern became Reed, Simpson, 
Thacher & Barnum. Their offices are in Wall 
Street, New York City. Mr. Barnum is a member 
of the Century, Yale, University, Lawyers' and 
l.archmont clubs of New York, and also has mem- 
bership in the American Historical .Association. 
He married June 2, 1S79, .Anne Theresa Phelps. 
Their children are: Laura, William Henry, Walter 
and Phelps liarnum. Their residence is at Scars- 
dale, New York. 



CRANE, Augustin Averill 

Vale B.A. :885. M.D. 1887. 
Born in Waterbury, Conn., 1864; prepared for Col- 
lege in New Haven: graduated Yale. B.A. 1885, 
M.D. 1887; House Surgeon in New Haven Hospital, 
1887-88; Government Physician in the Hawaiian 
Islands, 1888-91 ; House Surgeon in German Hospital, 
New York City, 1891-92; has practised in Waterbury, 
Conn., since 1892. 

AUGUSTIN AVERILL CRANE, M.D., Phy- 
sician, was born in Waterbury, Connecticut, 
January 9, 1864. His father, Robert Crane, grad- 
uated in medicine at Yale in 1843. Through his 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



^7S 



mother, Eunice Maria (Averill) Crane, he is de- 
scended from Perry Averill, a Colonel in the Revo- 
lutionary Army. Dr. Crane's early education was 
obtained in the public schools of New Haven, his 
preparation for College being received at the New 
Haven High School. After taking the Bachelor of 
Arts degree in 1S85 he continued his studies at the 
Yale Medical School, where he took his Doctor of 
Medicine degree in 1SS7, and was appointed the 
same year House Surgeon at the New Haven Hos- 
pital. The following year, 1SS8, he went to the 
Hawaiian Islands, at that time a region of much 



of the Connecticut Medical Association, and nearly 
all of the prominent fraternities. He married Cor- 
delia Ida Corbett, in New Haven August 28, 1888. 
They have three children : Eunice L., Robert C. and 
George Averill Crane. 




AUGUSTIN A. CR.\NE 

interest to America, and for three years he filled 
there the position of Government Physician. Dur- 
ing i8gi he served as House Surgeon at the New 
York German Hospital, in the service of Drs. A. (}. 
Gerster and Willy Myci'. In 1892 he entered upon 
a practice at Waterbury, Connecticut, which he con- 
tinues at the present time. From 1892 to 1895 
Dr. Crane served the Yale Medical .Mumni Associa- 
tion as Secretary, and he was its President in 1897- 
1S98. He was a member of the Waterbury Board 
of Iklucation from 1896 to 1899, acting as Chair- 
man of that Board during the last two years of that 
period. He was Secretary to the Waterbury Med- 
ical Association from 1S94 to 1897. He is also a 
member of the Sons of the .\nierican Revolution, 



COLLINS, Charles Farnham 

Yale B.A. 1883 - Columbia M.D. 1886. 
Born in New York City, 1859 ; educated New York, 
Hanover in Germany, Geneva in Switzerland, Hopkins 
Grammar School in New Haven, Newport (R. I.) High 
School, Yale, Columbia and in Vienna ; served on 
House staff St. Luke's Hospital, New York City, 
1886-88; Asst. Physician, Out-patients Dept. Roose- 
velt Hospital, 1889-96 ; Attending Physician Phthisical 
Dept. St. Luke's Hospital. 

CHARLKS FARNHAM COLLINS, M.D., 
Physician, was born in New York City, in 
December 1859, son of George and Anna (Taft) 
Collins. He is of New England colonial origin, 
the first of his American ancestors having arrived 
in Massachusetts in 1662. His preliminary education 
begun in New York was continued at the State 
Schools in Hanover, Germany, and at the Geneva 
(Switzerland) University, after which he attended 
the Hopkins Grammar School, New Haven, Con- 
necticut, and the Newport (Rhode Island) High 
School, entering Yale from the latter and graduating 
in 1883. He took his Medical degree at the Col- 
lege of Physicians and Surgeons (the Medical De- 
partment of Columbia) in 1886, and after serving 
upon the House Medical Staff at St. Luke's Hos- 
jiital, New York, from December of that year until 
July 18S8, he again visited Europe and was for some 
time a regular attendant at the hospitals in Vienna. 
Upon his return to New York in 1889 he was ap- 
pointed .\ssistant Attending Physician to the Roose- 
velt Hospital, Out-Patient Department, in which 
capacity he served until 1896, when he returned to 
St. Luke's Hospital as Attending Physician to the 
Phthisical Department and still retains that post. 
He is also an assisting Attending Physician of The 
Society of the Lying-in Hospital of the City of New 
York. Dr. Collins is a member of the Medical 
Society of the County of New York, the Physicians' 
Mutual Aid .Association, Sons of the .American Rev- 
olution, Scroll and Key Society of Yale anil the 
Psi Upsilon Fraternity, also the University and 
Therapeutic clubs of New York. He is interested 
in politics to some extent and holds the office 
of School Inspector of the Fourteenth District of 
New York Citv. 



\j6 



UNiyERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



CRISTY, James Crapo 

Yale Ph.B. 1897. 
Born in Flint, Mich., 1874; graduated at Sheffield 
Scientific School, Yale, 1897; now employed by a large 
wholesale lumber concern of Detroit, Mich. 

JAMES CRAPO CRlSrV, was born in Flint, 
Michigan, February 8, 1S74, son of Harlan 
Page and Emma (Crapo) Cristy. He is a repre- 
sentative on the maternal side of the well-known 
Crapo family of Bristol county, Massachusetts, 
being a nephew of the Hon. William W. Crapo, of 
New Bedford, that state, and his grandfather was 
Hon. Henry H. Crapo, Governor of Michigan, 1864 




J. C. CRISTY 

to 1868. His great-grandparents were Jesse and 
Phebe (Howland) Crapo, the former a son of Peter 
Crapo, who married Saraii \\'est, and who served as 
a minute man in 1775 to 1776; and Peter was a 
son of John Crapo, of Freetown, Massachusetts, 
whose father, Pierre Crapaud, a Frenchman as the 
original spelling of the name would indicate, married 
Penelope White, a great-granddaughter of William 
White, one of the original Mayflower Pilgrims, and 
father of Peregrine White, the first white male child 
born in New England. The subject of this sketch 
began his education in the public schools of Flint, 
studied for a time under the guidance of a private 
tutor, after which he attended the Detroit High 
School, and from the latter went to the Sheffield 



Scientific School of Yale, where he took the regular 
course in civil engineering and was graduated in 
1897. In the following September he accepted a 
position with George .Morley & Comi)any, whole- 
sale lumber dealers, Detroit, and is still in the 
employ of that concern. Mr. Cristy is a member of 
the Michigan Society Sons of the .American Revolu- 
tion, and the Detroit Boat and the Hoo IIoo clubs, 
the latter a lumbermen's social organization. He 
is also a member of the Young People's Society of 
Christian Endeavor connected with the Jefferson 
.■\venue Presbyterian Church, and in March i S98, 
was elected Vice-President of the F^astern District, 
Detroit Christian Endeavor Union. 



DWIGHT, James McLaren Breed 

Yale B.A. 1846. 
Born in Norwich, Conn., 1825; prepared for College 
in Norwich and New Haven ; graduated Yale, 1846 ; 
taught at Brainard Academy; Tutor at Yale, 1849-53; 
studied theology in Andover, Mass., and in New 
Haven ; removed to New York for study of law ; for 
three years Instructor in Municipal Law in Columbia ; 
lived in New Haven after 1886; died 1897. 

J.\Mi:S McLaren breed DWIGHT, Edu- 
cator ami Student, was born in Norwich, Con- 
necticut, .August II, 1825. He was the son of 
James Dwight, whose father was the first President 
Dwight of Yale. His mother was Susan (Breed) 
Dwight : his brother, Timothy Dwight, has recently 
resigned after a long term of service as President of 
Vale. James M. IS. Dwight received early educa- 
tion in the schools of Norwich and New Haven, 
after which he entered Vale and graduated in 1S46. 
F'or a year after graduation he was a teacher at 
Brainard .Academy, Haddam, Connecticut. He 
also taught for four years, 1 849-1 853, at Vale with 
the position of tutor. He then took a course of 
study at the Theological Seminary at .Andover, 
Massachusetts, after which he preached for a time, 
though having no definite appointment as Pastor. 
In 1859 he went to New York City and commenced 
a study of law, which later led to his appointment 
as Instructor in Municipal Law at the Columbia 
Law School. This lasted for three years, at the end 
of which time he made an extended trip abroad, 
finally returning to New Haven, where at his home 
he lived the quiet life of a student devoted to his 
books. Mr. Dwight always took a lively interest in 
all current matters of importance, and his extensive 
study on many subjects and travel in different coun- 
tries made his conversation singularly impressive. 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



177 



He was married June 6, 1866, to Cora C, daughter 
of the late Major C. B. 'lalhuadge of the United 
States Army. 'I'liey had no children. Mis death, 
which was the result of an injury due to a fall, oc- 
curred at his home in New Haven, June 28, 1897. 



EWING, Auguste Berthold, Jr. 

Yale Ph.B. 1895. 
Born in St. Louis, Mo., iSy-f ; educated in public 
schools, Christian Brothers College, and Phillips- 
Exeter Academy ; graduated Yale Scientific School, 
1895 ; employed in the National Bank of Commerce, 
St. Louis, 1895-99; with the Ferguson-McKinney Dry 
Goods Co. since 1899. 

AUGUSTK BERTHOLD EWING, Jr., is a 
nati\'e of St. Louis, Mo., born .August 13, 
1873. His [larents were Auguste Berthold and 




A. I!. r.wiNi;, JR. 

Mary Scott (McCausland) Ewing, and he is of 
Scotch-Irish and American ancestry. He attended 
in boyhood the public schools of St. Louis, and 
spent the three years from 18S5 to 1888 at the 
Christian lirotlu-rs College. .After a i)reparatory 
course at Fhillips-I''xetcr .Academy, 188S-1892, he 
entered llie Shrffuld Scientific School of Yale, tak- 
ing a select course and griduating as Bachelor of 
I'hilosophy in 1S95. .After November of that year 
he was employed in the National Bank of Com- 

VCU.. V. — 12 



merce, St. Louis, until in December 1899, he 
entered the Ferguson-. \Ic Kinney Dry Goods Com- 
pany, which opened its doors for business on the 
I St day of January 1900. Mr Ewing was a member 
of Book and Snake at Sheffield Scientific School and 
of Phi Epsilon Kappa at Exeter. He is also a 
member of the University Clubs of New Haven and 
St. Louis. He has never taken an active interest 
in politics. 



HALL, Charles Horace 

Yale B A. 1864. 
Born in Columbus, O., 1844; prepared for College at 
Easthampton, Mass.; graduated Yale, 1864; entered 
manufacturing business with his father in Jefferson- 
ville, Ind., and later took charge of a branch in Michi- 
gan City in the same state ; in business at Columbus, 
O., 1871-98 ; died 1898. 

CHARLES HOR.ACE HALL, Business Man, 
was born in Columbus, Ohio, March 21, 
1S44, the son of John Smith and Harriet .Angeline 
(Walker) Hall. His father, who was a native of 
Massachusetts and of English origin, became an ex- 
tensive manufacturer in Indiana, and his mother 
was also a native of the Bay State, where several 
generations of her ancestors had resided. His early 
studies were pursued in the public schools of 
Columbus, and after completing his preparation for 
College at Easthampton, Massachusetts, he entered 
A'ale, from which he was graduated with the Class 
of 1864. Immediately upon taking his degree, Mr. 
Hall entered upon mercantile life, for a year with 
the firm of Nock, Hall & Company, of Louisville, 
Kentucky, and from 1865 to 1869 as a member of 
the firm of Hall, Sumph & Company, manufacturers 
of agricultural implements, at JelTersonville, Iniliana. 
He then established a branch house, under the style 
of Charles H. Hall & Company, at Michigan City 
in the same state, and in 1871 returned to his 
native ])lare where he interested himself in several 
successful business enterprises. In the later years 
of his life he was managing partner of Sitt, Price & 
Company, dealers in building materials and of T. J. 
Price & Company, shippers of flux and building 
stone, and the minor p.irtner of Hall, Carlisle & 
r.ingham. He also held tlie (losition of Secretary 
and Treasmer and Manager of the Nock Plaster 
Manufacturing Company. While a student at Vale 
he joined the I'rothers in Unity, the Kappa Sigma 
I';psilon and the Nixie Boat Club. lie afterwards 
became a member of the Masonic fraternity and the 
Inile[)endenl Order of Odd Eellows. Mr. Hall pos- 



178 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



sessed in a high degree those sterling principles of 
morality and integrity which gained for him the 
confidence and esteem of his business associates 
as well as of all others with whom he came in con- 
tact. He was deeply interested in religious subjects 
and during his leisure hours translated large por- 
tions of the Hible from both the Greek and Latin 
texts. Mr. Hall died at his home in Arlington, a 
suburb of Columbus, April 20, 1898. January 31, 
1867, he married Anna daughter of '1'. J. Price, 
of Columbus, who survives him together with their 
four children : Harriet Louise, Frank Price, Herman 
Horace and Frederic Timothy Hall. 



JOHNSTON, William Preston 

Yale B.A. 185J. 
Born in Louisville, Ky., 1831 ; attended Center Col- 
lege, Danville, Ky., and Western Military Institute, 
Georgetown, Ky. ; graduated Yale, 1852 ; graduated 
in law at the University of Louisville, 1853; during 
Civil \A^ar served on staff of Jefferson Davis with rank 
of Colonel ; Prof, of History and English Literature at 
Washington and Lee Univ., 1867-77 ; President of 
Louisiana State University, 1880-83; President of 
Tulane University, 1883-99 ; received degree of LL.D. 
from Washington and Lee, 1875 ; died 1899. 

Wll.IJAM PRESTON JOHNSTON, LL.D., 
President of Tulane University, New Or- 
leans, Louisiana, was born in Louisville, Kentucky, 
January 5, 1831, the eldest son of Oeneral Albert 
Sydney and Henrietta (Preston) Johnston. His 
mother died when he was four years old, and soon 
after her death his father cast in his fortunes with the 
young republic of Texas; hence the boy was reared 
by his maternal uncle, General William Preston, and 
his wife. After attending Center College in Dan- 
ville, Kentucky, and the Western Military Institute 
in Georgetown, Kentucky, he entered Yale in 1851, 
at the end of the Junior year of the Class of 1852 
with which he graduated a year later, with the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Arts, the possession of several 
prizes which he had won and the honor of an ora- 
tion stand. Going thence to the Law Department 
of the University of Louisville he graduated there 
Bachelor of Laws in March 1853, and soon after 
settled in Louisville in the practice of law, in which 
he continued until the outbreak of the Civil War. 
He was among the first in his state to support the 
Southern cause, and in the summer of 1861 was 
appointed Major of the Second Kentucky Regiment, 
being transferred soon after to the First Kentucky 
Regiment with the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel. In 
May 1862 he accepted the invitation of President 



Davis to join his personal staff as .Aide-de-Camp, 
with the rank of Colonel of Cavalry, which position 
he held until the close of the war. He was captured 
with Mr. Davis in May 1S65, near Irwinsville, 
Georgia, and was imprisoned for several months at 
Fort Delaware, after which he resided for a year in 
Canada. Returning to Louisville, Colonel Johnston 
resumed his law practice until, in 1867, when 
General Robert E. Lee became President of Wash- 
ington and Lee University, he accepted an appoint- 
ment as Professor of History and English Literature 
in that institution. lie held this position for ten 




WM. PRESTON JOHNSTON 

years. During this period he wrote a biography of 
General Albert Sydney Johnston (.Appleton 1878) 
a work whose judicial character has been attested 
by many of the most distinguished generals and 
fairest critics on both sides, North and South. In 
1880 Colonel Johnston was called to the Presidency 
of the Louisiana State University at Baton Rouge, 
which then had less than forty students. He re- 
organized and developed this school, and when 
in 1883 Paul Tulane made to Louisiana his princely 
gift, Colonel Johnston was chosen by the .'\dminis- 
trators to take charge of the institutions to be 
founded. The result was the merging of the L^ni- 
versity of Louisiana into Tulane University at New 
Orleans, and his assumption of the Presidency of 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



179 



the new University which is now the leading insti- 
tution of learning in the Southwest. 'I'his position 
he held until his death which occurred July iC, 
1899, in Lexington, \irginia. For many years 
Colonel Johnston was a Regent of the Smithsonian 
Institute in Washington. He was made Doctor of 
Laws by Washington and I.ee University in 1S75. 
Colonel Johnston's first wife, Rosa Klizabcth (Dun- 
can) Johnston, whom he married July 6, 1853, 
died October 19, 18S5. On April 25, 1888, he 
was married to iMargarct Henshaw .Avery of Baton 
Rouge. His only son, Albert Sydney Johnston, 
died at the age of twenty- five in 1885 ; three of 
five daughters survive. 



DYER, Eliphalet 

Yale B.A. 1740, LL-D., 1787 — Harvard A M. (Hon.) 1744. 
Born in Windham, Conn., 1721 ; graduated Yale, 
1740; studied law and admitted to the Bar, 1746; mem- 
ber of Connecticut Legislature, 1747-62 ; Lieut.-Col., 
1755 and Col. 1758, in French and Indian War; dele- 
gate to Continental Congress; member of Committee 
of Safety in Revolution ; Justice of the Superior Court, 
1766-93, and Chief-Justice, 1789-93; LL.D. Yale, 1787; 
died 1807. 

ELIPHALET DVLR, LL.D., Jurist, was born in 
Windham, Connecticut, September 28, 172 i, 
and graduated at Vale in 1740, receiving his Master's 
degree there in course and the same from Harvard, 
honoris causa, in i 744. He studied law and began 
practice in his native town, where he also served as 
Justice of the Peace and Town Clerk. Between 
1747 and 1762 he was fretjuently sent to the Legis- 
lature as Representative, and was especially prom- 
inent in the enterprise of establishing a Connecticut 
Colony in the valley of tlie Susquehanna at Wyom- 
ing. At the outbreak of the French and Indian 
Wars, he entered the military service of the Colony, 
was Lieutenant-Colonel of a regiment sent to reduce 
Crown Point in 1755, and Colonel of a regiment 
sent against Canada three years later. Colonel 
Dyer held the position of Assistant by annual elec- 
tion from 1762 to 1784 and in this capacity was 
zealous in resistance to the Stamp .\ct, being the 
first of the Commissioners to the Stamji .Act Con- 
gress from Connecticut, and later withdrawing from 
the Ciovernor's house, with a m.ijority of iiis fellow 
.Assistants, to emphasize his refiisal to take the oath 
to carry out the provisions of that .Act. He was a 
delegate to the first Continental Congress and re- 
elected to most of the following sessions of that 
body, and became a member of tlie Committee of 
Safety upon its formation in 1775. In 1766 he was 



elevated to the bench of the Superior Court and 
held a seat there until 1 793, during the last four 
years being Chief-Justice. Vale made him a Doctor 
of Laws in i 787, and for some years he was a Fellow 
of the Corporation. He died in ^Vindham, May 13, 
1S07. 

MEIGS, Return Jonathan 

Yale B.A. 1785. 
Born in Middletown, Conn., 1765; graduated Yale, 
1785; studied law and settled in Marietta, O., 1788; 
Chief-Justice Ohio Supreme Court, 1803-04; Judge of 
Supreme Court, Louisiana, 1805-06; Judge U. S. Dist. 
Court, Michigan, 1807-08; U. S. Senator, 1809-10; Gov. 
of Ohio, 1810-14; U. S. Postmaster-General, 1814-23; 
died 1825. 

RirrURN JONATHAN .MKICIS, Lawyer, was 
born in Middletown, Connecticut, in No- 
vember 1765, the son of ("olonel Return Jonathan 
Meigs, Revolutionary soldier and early settler of 
Ohio. The origin of the unusual name borne by 
father and son was a romance of Colonel Meigs' 
father, Jonathan, who after rejieated rejections of 
his suit for the hand of a fair Quakeress of Middle- 
town had mounted his horse to ride away, when he 
was recalled by the relenting maiilen with the words, 
" Return, Jonathan, return ! " So he named his 
first-born with the happiest words he had ever 
heard. Return Jonathan, second of that name, was 
graduated at Vale in 17S5, studied law, and in 17S8 
went with his father to Ohio and settled at Marietta 
with the young colony. He took part in the Indian 
fights of those early days, served on public commis- 
sions and in 1803 was made Chief- Justice of the 
Ohio Supreme Court. In 1 805 he was sent with a 
military commission under the L'nited States C.ov- 
ernment to take charge of the St. Charles district in 
Louisiana, and for two years performed the duties 
of ('hief-Justice there. He was then appointed 
Judge of the L'nited States District Court of Michi- 
gan, serving in that capacity until in 1S09 lie was 
elected L^nited States Senator from Ohio. This 
seat he occupied for one year only, being chosen 
Covernor of Ohio in 1810 and hokling that ofl^ce 
until 1814. During the War of 1S12, Governor 
Meigs was of great service to the Government in 
garrisoning the forts and protecting the settlements 
along the Canadian border. President Madison 
made him Postmaster-General in 1814, upon the 
resignation of Gideon Granger, and he hekl that 
ofiice through the succeeding administration of 
President Monroe, retiring in 1823 to Marietta, 
where he died March 29, 1825. 



i8o 



UNIFERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



ARMSTRONG, William Hepburn 

Princeton A B. 1847. 
Born in Williamsporl. Pa., 1824 ; graduated Prince- 
ton, 1S47 ; studied law and admitted to the Bar, 1849; 
Clerk of U. S. Courts at Williamsport until 1854, when 
he removed to Philadelphia and began the practice of 
law ; in 1856 went abroad, and on return entered into a 
law partnership with his father in Williamsport ; mem- 
ber Legislature of Pennsylvania, i860, and again in 1861 
— when he was the Republican candidate for Speaker 
of the House — Chairman of Committee on Ways and 
Means; member 41st Congress, 1871-73 ; delegate-at- 
large in the Convention of 1873 to reform the Consti- 
tution of Pennsylvania and Chairman of the Judiciary 
Committee ; delegate to Republican Convention of 1880 
at Chicago; U. S. Commissioner of Railroads during 
Pres. Arthur's administration ; now retired and resid- 
ing in Philadelphia. 

WILLI.\M HEPBURN ARMSTRONG was 
born in Williamsport, Lycoming county, 
Pennsylvania, September 7, 1824, the son of James 
and Sarah Hopewell (Hepburn) Armstrong. His 
father was a prominent lawyer in Williamsport, 
where he was engaged in the practice of law for 
over forty-four years, and served for a time on the 
bench of the Supreme Court of the state. William 
H. .\rmstrong graduated from Princeton at the Cen- 
tennial Commencement in June 1S47. He was 
one of the Junior Orators of his Class in 1846 and 
one of the Senior Orators of the Class in 1S47. 
After leaving College he studied law under the 
direction of his father and was admitted to the Bar 
in 1849. While studying law he was appointed 
Clerk of the United States Courts at Williamsport, 
an office he resigned in 1854, when he removed to 
Philadelphia and began the practice of his profes- 
sion in that city. Owing to ill-health he was obliged 
to relinquish his practice in 1856, and going abroad, 
he spent some time in travel in Europe and Egypt. 
On his return he entered into law partnership with 
his father at Williamsport. In i860 and again in 
1 86 1 he was elected as a Republican to the Legis- 
lature of the state, in a strongly Democratic district. 
In the latter year he was the Republican candidate 
for Speaker of the House and Chairman of the Com- 
mittee on Ways and Means. In January of the same 
year he was appointed one of the Committee of the 
Legislature to meet President-elect Lincoln at Pitts- 
burg and invite him to Harrisburg, and to accom- 
pany him from Harrisburg to Washington. The 
following year Mr. .Armstrong declined a commission 
as President Judge of the Sixteenth Judicial District 
of Pennsylvania. In 1870 he was elected as a Re- 
publican to the Forty-first Congress from the Eigh- 
teenth Congressional District, and in that Congress 



he served on the Committee on Indian .MTairs, and 
upon the Select Committee on the reorganization of 
the Civil Service of the Government. The resolu- 
tion offered by Mr. Armstrong in January 1871, 
which was adopted by both House and Senate, 
marked the beginning of the Civil Service legisla- 
tion and regulation. In 1872 he was elected a 
delcgate-at-large to the Convention to revise and 
amend the Constitution of the State, and served 
during the Convention as Chairman of the Com- 
mittee on the Judiciary. He was the author of 
that section of tlie constitution which provides that. 




W.M. H. AKMSTRONG 

" In every county wherein the population shall ex- 
ceed one hundred and fifty thousand, the General 
Assembly shall, and in any other county may, estab- 
lish a separate Orphans Court, to consist of one or 
more judges who shall be learned in the law . . . 
and shall audit all accounts filed witli the Registrar 
of Wills without expense to parties." In 1878, 
the state being about to erect a new penitentiary, 
he was appointed by Go\ernoi Hartranft as one of 
a select committee under a special law to investi- 
gate and rejiort upon the system of imprisonment 
and discipline in force in other states. The new 
prison, soon after erected at Huntingdon, as an 
" Industrial Reformatory " was upon the general 
lines of their recommendation. Mr. .\rmstrong 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



l8l 



was a delegate from the state at large to the Re- 
publican Presidential Convention of 1880 at Chicago. 
I'^arly in the administration of President Arthur he 
was appointed without solicitation by the President 
to be United States Commissioner of Railroads, an 
ofifice he resigned shortly after the inauguration of 
President Cleveland. Mr. Armstrong has now re- 
tired from active professional life and resides in 
Philadelphia. His career has been an imusually 
successful one, and he has always taken an active 
interest in the welfare of his native town. While at 
Williamsport,. he drew the charter, purchased the 
water-right, and organized the Williamsport Water 
Company. He also organized the Williamsport 
Library Association, built the first market-house, 
and laid the first block of stone pavement in that 
city. He was married June 3, 185 1, in Philadel- 
phia, to Annie Earp and has had four children : 
James, Annie Earp, intermarried with Henry S. A. 
Stewart, Hannah Earp, intermarried with Willard 
Hall Porter, and William Hepburn Armstrong. 



BROOKS, John Hubert 

Princeton B.S. 1895. 
Born in Scranton, Pa., 1872; fitted for College at the 
School of the Lackawanna in Scranton, graduating in 
i8gi ; graduated Princeton, 1895; employed in the City 
Treasurer's office at Scranton from fall of 1895 u"til 
spring of 1896; then engaged in the coal business, and 
also became interested in the powder and oil business 
in Pennsylvania ; in 1898 purchased controlling interest 
in a sporting goods store. 

JOHN HUBERT BROOKS, Merchant, was born 
in Scranton, Pennsylvania, September i6, 
1872, son of Reese G. and Mary A. (Morgan) 
Brooks. Until sixteen years of age he attended the 
public schools of his native city, then entered the 
School of the Lackawanna, also in Scranton, where he 
was prepared for College, and from which he gradu- 
ated in 1 89 1. He took the Scientific course in 
Princeton and graduated in tlie Class of 1895. He 
was a member of the University base-ball team for 
four years and was its Captain in 1895. On leaving 
College he was first employed as a clerk in the 
City Treasmer's office, but in 1896 entered the 
coal business ami is still active in that business. 
The same year he also became interested in the 
powder and oil business of the .Anthracite Coal 
region of Pennsylvania, and in 1898 purchased the 
controlling interest in a sporting goods store and 
continues connected with all these interests. From 
1896 to 1897 he was Deputy City Treasurer for liis 



father, who held the office of City Treasurer for six 
years. He is an active member of the Republican 
party, but has as yet held no office. He is a mem- 
ber of several clubs and societies, among them 
being : the Tiger Inn Club of Princeton, Phi Alpha 




J. H. BROOKS 

Society, Country Club of Scranton, and the Scranton 
City Club, Scranton Bicycle Club and The Princeton 
Club of New York. 



EARLY, Peter 

Princeton A.B. 1792. 
Born in Madison Co., Va.. 1773 ; graduated Prince- 
ton, 1792 ; studied law and admitted to the Georgia Bar, 
1795; member of Congress. 1803-07 ; Judge of Supreme 
Court of Georgia, 1807-13; Gov. of Georgia, 1813-15; 
died 1817. 

PETER E.\R1.V. jurist, Covernor of the State 
of Ceorgia, was born in Madison county, 
Virginia, in June 1773, and graduated at I'rinceton 
in 1792, receiving in course the degree of Master 
of .Arts. Following iiis graduation, he went to 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where he prepared him- 
self by study for the profession of l.iw, and in 1795 
removed with his father to Georgia and was admitted 
to practice at the Bar of that state. Mr. Early was 
highly successful in his iirofession, and also attained 
prominence in public life. He was elected a Repre- 



l82 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



sentative to Congress in 1 803 and held his seat there 
through two terms, gaining prominence through his 
strong opposition, although the representatives of a 
slavchoUling constituency, to the toleration of the 
African slave trade. In the impeachment trial of 
Justice Samuel Chase of the United States Supreme 
Court, which John Randolph and others brought 
about in 1804, Mr. Karly appeared as counsel for 
the prosecution. At the close of his second term 
in Congress, Mr. Early received appointment as 
Judge of the Supreme Court of Georgia, occupying 
a seat on that bench for six years, and resigning in 
181 3 when he was elected Governor of the state. 
Governor Early served two years, and subsequently 
was elected to the State Senate. He died at his 
residence in Greene county, Georgia, August 15, 
181 7. 

DAVIS, Samuel McClellan 

Princeton A.B. 1883, A.M. 
Born near Indiana, Pa., 1861 ; educated State Normal 
School, Indiana, Pa., and Princeton; engaged in teach- 
ing ; studied law in Pennsylvania ; admitted to Minne- 
sota Bar, 1888, to the U. S. Circuit Court, 1894, to 'he 
Pennsylvania Supreme Court, i8g6; practising lawyer 
in Minneapolis since 1888; prolific writer upon a varied 
line of subjects. 

SAMUEL McCLELLAN DAVIS, A.M., Lawyer, 
and Author, was born near Indiana, Pennsyl- 
vania, August 8, 1861, son of McLain and Caroline 
Isabelle (Mahan) Davis. He w"as prepared for 
College at the State Normal School located in his 
native town, graduating a Bachelor of the Elements 
in 1 8 79, and entering Princeton as a Sophomore in 
1880 he took the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 
1883; was one of the Lynde Debaters in his Senior 
year; was Editor of the Nassau Literary Maga- 
zine ; a member of the American Whig Society, 
and of the Class Day Committee ; and received the 
degree of Master of .\rts in course. Immediately 
after graduation taught in Collegiate Institute, York, 
Pennsylvania, one year. Returning to the State Nor- 
mal School as a teacher of Latin and Greek, he re- 
mained there a year, at the expiration of which time 
he returned to the York, Pennsylvania, Collegiate 
Institute, where he taught for two years. Having 
completed his legal studies, he went to Minnesota, 
where he was admitted to the Bar in 1888, and 
locating permanently in Minneapolis, has ever since 
practised law in that city. He was admitted to 
practice in the United States Circuit Court in 1894, 
and two years later became a member of the Penn- 
sylvania Bar. In addition to his professional duties 



he has written much interesting and instroctive 
matter for various periodicals, including the Educa- 
tional News, Northern Presbyterian, National Maga- 
zine of American History, The Chautauquan and the 
American Journal of Politics, and his contributions, 
which number some twenty-four in all, consist of 
timely articles upon political, scientific, educational, 
religious, historical and social subjects. Mr. Davis 
was one of the Vice-Presidents of the Good Citizen- 
ship League of Minneapolis in 1896, was in 1897- 
1898 President of the Westminster C'lub connected 
with the Westminster Presbyterian Church, and is 




SAMUEL M. DAVIS 

at the present time a Director of the Young Men's 
Christian Association and Minneapolis Board of 
Trade. He is also a member of the Bar Associa- 
tion and Board of Trade of Minneapolis ; the Min- 
nesota Historical Society of St. Paul, the American 
Historical Association and the Geographical Society 
of Philadelphia ; and is a corresponding member of 
the Missouri Historical Society and honorary mem- 
ber of the Historical Society of Western Pennsyl- 
vania. Politically he is a Republican and takes an 
active interest in the welflire of that party, having 
stumped the State of Minnesota for Harrison in 1888, 
and for McKinley in 1896. On June 24, 1891, 
Mr. Davis married Frances B. Wagner, who died 
November 12, 1894, and on September 30, 1896, 



UNiyERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



183 



he married Mabel Keith. He has one son, Samuel 
Keith Davis, born December 26, 1897, and one 
daughter, Laura Maud Davis, born July 28, 1899. 



FORSYTH, John 

Princeton A.B. 1799. 
Born in Frederick Co., Va., 1780 ; graduated Prince- 
ton, 1799; studied law and admitted to the Georgia Bar, 
1802 ; Atty.-Gen. of Georgia, 1808 ; member of Congress, 
1813-18; U. S. Senator, 1818-19 ; U. S. Minister to 
Spain, 1819-22; member of Congress, 1823-27; Gov. of 
Georgia, 1827-29; U. S. Senator, 1829-34; U. S. Secy, of 
State, 1834-41 ; died 1841. 

JOHN FORSYTH, Statesman, was born in Fred- 
erick county, Virginia, October 22, 17 So, of 
English parentage, his father serving in the Ameri- 
can Army during the Revolutionary War. The 
family removed to Georgia while John was yet a 
child, and he was sent to Princeton for his educa- 
tion, graduating there in 1799 ''"''cl receiving his 
Master's degree in course. He studied law, was 
admitted to the Bar at Augusta in 1802, and entered 
upon a successful career in his profession and in 
public life. In 1808 he was elected Attorney- 
General of the state and in 18 13 was sent to Con- 
gress as a Democrat, retaining his seat by succes- 
sive re-elections until 1818, when he was made 
United States Senator. This position he resigned 
in the following year to go to Madrid, by appoint- 
ment of President Monroe, as United States Minister 
to Spain. In this capacity he conducted the nego- 
tiations which resulted in the cession of Florida to 
the United States. On his return from his mission 
Mr. Forsyth was again sent to Congress, serving 
from 1823 to 1827, when he was elected Governor 
of Georgia, and in 1829 was made United States 
Senator in the place of J. M. Berrien, who had 
resigned. During the five years that he held this 
seat, he distinguished himself by his opposition to 
nullification and his support of President Jackson in 
his policy relative to the United States Bank. Mr. 
Forsyth resigned his Senatorship in 1834 to accept 
the Portfolio of State in the cabinet of Presitlent 
Jackson and was continued in that position by 
President Monroe, retiring upon the entrance of 
the Harrison administration in 1841. He died in 
Washington, October 21 of that year. 



ing College has been studying law at the Harvard Law 
School, and expects to receive his LL.B. degree in 
1900. 

JOHN MUSSER FRAME was born in Reading, 
Pennsylvania, August 6, 1875, the son of 
William James and Lizzie Alice (Musser) Frame. 
His maternal ancestors, the Mussers, were of Swiss 
origin and of the same stock as the Mercers of New 
Jersey. He is a direct descendant of Richard 
Musser, who served as a Captain in the Revolution- 
ary Army. He is also a descendant of William 
Adams, the founder of Adamstown, Pennsylvania, in 




FRAME, John Musser 

Princeton A.B. 1897. 
Born in Reading, Pa., 1875; fitted for College by 
private tutor; graduated Princeton, 1897; since leav- 



JNO. M. FRAME 

I 761, and who was of the same stock as the New 
ICngland Adams family. His maternal grandfather, 
John Musser, was the senior member of the Musser 
Lumber Company, one of the largest on the Missis- 
sippi River. John M. Frame received his early 
education in the public schools of .Adamstown and 
Reading, Pennsylvania, and was fitted for College 
by Martin E. Schcibner. He was graduated from 
Princeton as Bachelor of .Arts in the Class of 1897, 
and is at the present time stuiiying law at the Har- 
vard Law School, from which he expects to gradu- 
ate with his Bachelor of I«aws degree in the Class 
of 1900. While in Princeton, Mr. Frame was 
Chairman of the Inter-Collegiate Debating Com- 
mittee during 1896-189 7, was Editor of the Nassau 



1 84 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



Lit. the same year, and in 1 895-1 896 was one of office of Julicn T. l).ivies. He also pursued his 



the Managing Board of the Modern Language Club. 
He was also a member of the .Monday Night Club, 
a member and for 1896-189 7 the President of the 
Triangle Club, and took an active part in amateur 
theatricals. 



HAMILTON, George Porter 

Princeton A.B. 1880. A.M. 1883. 
Born in Pittsburg, Pa., 1859; fitted for College at the 
Newell Institute in Pittsburg ; graduated Princeton, 
1880; is engaged in the practice of law. 

GEORCIC rORTliR H.VMILTON, Lawyer, 
was born in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, May 
21, 1859, son of George Porter and Hadessa (Irons) 
Hamilton. He is of Scotch-Irish ancestry. He 
received his preliminary education at the Newell 
Institute in his native place, and was graduated from 
Princeton in the Class of i S8o. He afterwards 
studied law, and is engaged in the practice of his 
profession at Pittsburg at the present time. His 
political beliefs are those of a Democrat. March 
18, 1886, he was married to Letitia C. Holmes. 
They have one child : I'^lizabeth Caldwell Hamilton. 



McWILLIAMS, Howard 

Princeton A.B. 1888, A.M. 1892. 
Born in Brooklyn, N. Y., 1868; fitted for College at 
the Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute ; graduated Prince- 
ton, 1888; engaged in mercantile business in New York 
City, 1888-89 '. studied law with Julien T. Davies and in 
Columbia Law School and admitted to the Bar in 
spring of 1891 ; has been engaged in practice in New 
York City ever since that date. 

HOW.ARD McWILLI.AMS, Lawyer, was born 
in Brooklyn, New York, April 19, 1868, 
son of Daniel W. and Helen Frances (Marquand) 
McWilliams. His father was born in Orange 
county. New York, and was of Scotch ancestry. One 
of his ancestors served in the Revolutionary Army. 
His mother's family, the Marquands, were originally 
Huguenots, from the Island of Guernsey. His 
mother is a niece of Henry T. and Frederick Mar- 
quand of New York. The subject of this sketch 
graduated from the Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute 
in 1883, and although he passed examinations for 
the Class of 1887 at Princeton, did not enter Col 
lege until the fall of 1884, graduating from that 
University in the Class of 1888. For a year after 
graduating he was engaged in mercantile business 
with a wholesale house in New York City, and at 
the end of the year, having decided to adopt law as 
a profession, he entered as a student in the law 



stuilies in Columbia Law School and was admitted 
to the Bar in the spring of 1891, since which time 
he has been engaged in the active practice of his 
profession in New York City. Mr. McWilliams is a 
member of the liar .Associations of New York and 




HOWARD lIcWII.I.IAMS 



Brooklyn, the Princeton Club of New York and 
the Crescent Athletic Club of Brooklyn. In politics, 
he is a Republican. 



MHOON, John Bell 

Princeton A.B. 1859. 
Born in Tuscumbia, Ala., 1840; fitted for College at 
Tutwiler's Boarding School at Green Springs, Ala. ; 
graduated Princeton. 1859; was a soldier in the Con- 
federate Army ; since 1871 has been practising law in 
San Francisco. 

JOHN B1:LL MHOON, Lawyer, was born in 
Tuscumbia, Alabama, February lo, 1840, son 
of William S. and Lucinda .\. (Bell) Mhoon. He is 
of English ancestry. He received his College prep- 
aration in Tutwiler's Boarding School at Green 
Springs, Alabama, and graduated from Princeton in 
the Class of 1859. He served in the Confederate 
.Army during the Civil War. Since 187 1 he has 
been engaged in the practice of law at San Fran- 
cisco. He has three children living : Bell, Mae and 
Marjorie Mhoon. 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



181 



BISCHOFF, Henry, Jr. 

Columbia LL B. 1871. 
Born in New York City, 1852; educated New York 
City public schools, Bloomfield Academy, Hoboken, 
N. J., private tutors and Columbia Law School ; ad- 
mitted to Bar, 1873 ; practised in New York City seven- 
teen years; Judge of Common Pleas, 1889-95; Justice 
New York Supreme Court latter year to present time ; 
Director Union Square Bank. 

HENRY BISCHOFF, Jr., Associate Justice of 
the New York Supreme Court, was born in 
New York City, August 16, 1852, son of Henry 
and Amalic (Bolte) Bischoff. The senior Bischoff, 
who is a son of Bruno Bischoff, a merchant of Amt 
Aciiim, Hanover, Germany, came to New York in 
1846 and founded the present banking house of 
Henry Bischoff & Company. The younger Bischoff 
was educated in the New York City pubUc schools, 
and at Bloomfield .Academy, Hoboken, New Jersey, 
and under private tutors with whom he studied 
English, French and German literature. He was a 
student in the Law and Political Science Depart- 
ment of Columbia, receiving honorable mention for 
work in the latter, and taking the degree of Bachelor 
of Laws in 187 1, and he also studied law in the 
offices of Messrs. J. H. & S. Riker, New York City. 
Admitted to the Bar in 1873, lie practised law in the 
metropolis until January i, 1S90, when he began 
his duties as Judge of the Court of Common Pleas, 
to which office he had been elected the preceding 
November, and in 1894, upon the consolidation of 
the courts, he became a member of the State 
Supreme Bench, which office he still occupies. In 
1889 he was attorney for the collection of arrears of 
personal taxes, and for the past thirty years has been 
quite actively interested in financial affairs, having 
managed the elder Bischoffs business during the 
latter's absence from the city, and he is at the 
present time a Director of the Union Square Bank. 
Judge Bischoff is a member of numerous social, 
musical and other bodies including the Oratorio 
Society, of which he is also a Director, the Lieder- 
kranz, Arion, Beethoven and German Societies ; the 
Isabellcn Hciniath, and the Colonial, Lotos, Man- 
hattan and Democratic clubs. On October 29, 
1873, he married .Annie Louise Moshier, and their 
only cliiki ; Loula .Vmalie, is now the wife of James 
Shelton Meng, of New York City. 



for College at Columbia Grammar School ; Columbia 
College, Class of 1855 ; admitted to the Bar, 1857 ; Jus- 
tice of the City Court for several years ; Presidential 
Elector, i860; has been in active practice in New York 
City since the expiration of his term as Justice. 

A. J. DirrENHOEFER, Lawyer, was born 
in South Carolina, in .March 1836. His 
parents having become resident in New York, he 
received his early education in the public schools of 
that city, was fitted for College at the Columbia 
Grammar School, and attended Columbia College 
as a member of the Class of 1855. .At the age of 
twenty-one he was admitted to the Bar, and the 




'^»?::: 




DITTENHOEFER, A. J. 

Columbia, Class of iSss 
Born in South Carolina, 1836; received his early edu- 
cation in the public schools of New York City; fitted 



A. J. DITTF.XHOK.l'KR 

following year was appointed a Justice of the City 
Court on the Republican ticket. At the expiration 
of his term he declined a renomination. While 
on the Bench he donated his entire salary to the 
widow of his predecessor, who had been left in 
destitute circumstances. He was one of the Presi- 
dential Electors who cast the vote of the State of 
New York for Abraham Lincoln in 1864. The 
latter offered him the position of United States 
Judge for the District of South Carolina, which he 
declined, being unwilling to relinquish his large 
practice in New York. Judge Dittenhoefer has 
always been a Republican in politics ; was a dele- 
gate to the Cincinnati Convention which nominated 
President Hayes, and for twelve terms was Chair- 



i86 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



man of the General Republican Central Committee. 
While he has had a large practice in every brancli 
of his profession, including corporation business, he 
has been especiallyprominent in litigations arising out 
of matters relating to the drama and literature, and 
has been retained as counsel on one side or another 
in most of the important dramatic litigations of the 
last three decades. Judge Dittenhoefer's practice 
has not only been before the State Courts, but he 
has been equally prominent in the Federal Courts. 
Perhaps one of the best known of his recent legal 
successes was his defence of the persons indicted 
for contempt of the Committee of the United States 
Senate, appointed to investigate the alleged specu- 
lation in sugar stock by members of that body. He 
is one of the best known of metropolitan attorneys. 



FULLER, Horace Smith 

Columbia M.D. 1865. 
Born in Suffield, Conn., 1835; educated in common 
schools and the Literary Institute at Suffield ; A.B. 
Amherst, 1858 ; A.M. 1861 ; taught school for a time ; 
one year at Harvard Medical School; M.D. College of 
Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia, 1865; acting 
Assistant Surgeon, U.S.A., 1865; practised in Hart- 
ford, Conn., since that time ; Coroner and Chairman of 
Health Committee, 1877-84; Medical Examiner since 
1884. 

HOR.\CK SMITH FULLER, :\1.1)., Physician 
and Surgeon, was born in Suffield, Con- 
necticut, .April 10, 1835, the son of Joseph and 
Cordelia (Smitii) Fuller. Through his father he is 
a direct descendant of John Fuller, wlio came to 
.\merica from England witli his brother William in 
1634 and settled in Ipswich, Massachusetts, the 
name appearing in the recortls of the town for that 
year. The family prospered, and in 1696 Joseph 
Fuller, grandson of the original settler at Ipswich, 
purchased proprietary grants in Suffield, Connecti- 
cut, where his son Joseph, the great-great-grand- 
father of Dr. Fuller, removed and settled in 1714. 
In the maternal line. Dr. Fuller is descended from 
William King of Uxborough, in Devonshire, Eng- 
land, whose son James settled in Ipswich in 1672 and 
removed to Suffield in 1678, and whose grandson. 
Ensign William King, Dr. Fuller's great-grandfather, 
was a patriot who figured in the Lexington alarm. 
Cordelia Smith, his mother, was a daughter of 
Colonel Horace Smith, of .Amherst, Massachusetts, 
an early abolitionist, descendant of Samuel Smith 
and his wife Elizabeth who settled at Watertown, 
Massachusetts, in 1634, afterward went to Wethers- 
field, Connecticut and removed to Hadley at the 



time of the " Hartford Controversy." From his 
early youth, Horace S. Fuller gave evidence of 
inlicrited and native strength of intellect and will. 
In the Suffield Literary Institute, where he was pre- 
pared for College, after leaving the connnon schools 
of that town, he took a leading place among liis 
fellow students, graduating witli the rank of Saluta- 
torian of his Class in 1S54. .\t .Amherst College, 
which he entered in that year, he reached the grade 
of scholarsliip which entitled him to membership in 
the Phi Beta Kappa, and on his graduation in 1858, 
his Commencement rank was tliat of First Class 




HORACE S. FULLER 

Oration. After leaving .Amherst, he devoted him- 
self for some years to the work of education, teach- 
ing in Williamsburg, Massachusetts, in Kentucky 
and in the Suffield Institute, of which he was a 
graduate, meantime receiving his Master's degree 
from Amherst in 1861. His preference, however, 
was for the profession of medicine, and for this he 
began his preparations by attending lectures for one 
year at the Harvard Medical School and supple- 
mented this study with a course at the College of 
Physicians and Surgeons, at Columbia. From this 
L'niversity he received the degree of Doctor of 
Medicine in 1S65 and at once entered the army as 
Acting .Assistant Surgeon, stationed at Fort Schuyler, 
New York Harbor, in which capacity he gained 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



87 



valuable experience. Upon his discharge from the 
army at the close of the war, Dr. Fuller established 
himself in Hartford, Connecticut, where he has 
since resided, building w\) a large and successful 
practice and taking a [jrominent part in public 
affairs and social activities. From 1877 to 1S84 he 
served as Coroner and Chairman of the Health 
Committee of the city, and since the latter year has 
acted as Medical F.vaminer. For over twenty years 
Dr. Fuller was a member of the Board of Visiting 
Physicians and Surgeons of the Hartford Hospital, 
and he is now Consulting Physician and Lecturer 
on Physiology in the Training School for Nurses of 
the same institution. He also served on the United 
States Hoard of Pension Examiners from 1873 to 
1885, and during (lovernor Andrew's administration 
was Surgeon-General on his staff Dr. F'uUer is 
President of the Hartford Medical Society, and a 
member of the State and County Medical Societies, 
the American .Medical Association, and the Hartford 
Archaeological Society. He is also President of the 
State Board of Medical Examiners, and is connected 
with numerous other organizations. 



GOULD, Edwin 

Columbia C.E. 1888. 
Born in New York City, 1866; graduated Columbia 
School of Mines, 1888; received his business training 
in the office of his father, and as a Director or officer of 
companies with which the elder Gould was connected; 
engaged in active business life since graduation, and 
since the death of his father has been prominent in 
the financial world ; officer and Director in numerous 
corporations; member of Squad A, N. G. N. Y. five 
years, and in the Seventy-first Regiment, N.G. N. Y. 
as Captain and Inspector of Rifle Practice. 

EDWIN (iOULD, C.E., Banker, was born in 
New York City, February 25, 1866, son of 
Jay (iould, probably the most notable figure in the 
financial history of America, and Helen Day Miller. 
The Gould fomily setded in Fairfield, Connecticut, 
about 1649, and several of its members served in 
the Revolutionary War ; Colonel .Vbraham Gould 
was killed in the Danbury Raid by the British, 
April 25, 1777. 'l"he subject of this sketch received 
his early education in private schools, and later 
attended the School of Mines of Columbia, graduat- 
ing as Civil Engineer in 18S8. He received his 
business training under the supervision of his father, 
and as a Director or officer of the numerous com- 
panies in which Jay Gould was interested, or which 
he controlled. On the death of his fither the man- 
agement of a large share of the va^t Could interests 



fell to him, and he has shown that he possesses in a 
large measure the acumen and business ability which 
made his father f:imous. He is an ofificer and 
Director of many corporations, being President of 
the St. Louis Southwestern Railroad Company, the 
Ricli Hill Coal Company, Western Coal Ctimpany 
and the Produce Exchange Trust Company ; and is 
a Director of the Western L'nion Telegraph Com- 
pany, KLmhattan Railway Company, Missouri Pacific 
Railroad, Wabash Railroad, Westchester Trust Com- 
pany, Traders' Fire Insurance Company, Diainond 
Match Company, Bankers' Trust Company and other 
corporations. Mr. Gould served five years in Squad- 
ron .A of tlie National Guard of the State of New 
Vork, as a private, and also in the Seventy-first Reg- 
iment as Inspector of Rifle Practice with the rank 
and commission of Captain. He was one of the 
original members mustered in with Troop A, now 
known as Squadron \. He belongs to numerous 
clubs and societies, among them the Union League, 
New York Yacht, .Atlantic Yacht, .American Y.acht, 
.Ardsley, New \'oik .\thletic, Manhattan .Athletic, 
Knollwood Country, Westchester Country, Essex 
County Country, Chicago, St. Louis Country and the 
St. .Andrews Golf clubs, also the Sons of tlie Revolu- 
tion and the Society of Colonial Wars. He married, 
October 26, 1892, Sarali Cantine Shrady. They 
have two children : ICdwin Gould, Jr., and Frank 
Miller Gould. 



FORSTER, William 

Columbia Ph.B. 1881, LL.B. 1883. 
Born in New York City, 1858; prepared for College 
at Easthampton, Mass.; graduated Ph.B. Colutribia 
1881, LL.B. 1883; active in promoting various enter- 
prises; Asst. Dist. Atty., 1885 ; Director of Nineteenth 
Ward Bank, the New York & Brooklyn Malting Co., 
and other corporations ; practising lawyer in New York 
City since 1883. 

Wll.l.lAM I'ORSTER, Lawyer, was born in 
New York City, July 16, 185S, the son of 
German parents, Charles and Catherine (Schroe- 
der) Forster. On the paternal side his ancestors 
for several generations were officers in the Bavarian 
.Army, his father h.iving refiised a commission 
to come to this country in 1848. He was for 
a short time a student in I'ackard's Business College 
of New Vork ("ity, but left to go to the Williston 
Seminary at Easthamjiton, Mass.ichusetts. for Col- 
lege preparation. .At Columbia he pursued a s]iecial 
line of study in the Department of Political Science 
whidi brought him at graduation in iSSi the degree 
of Bachelor of Philosophy. Continuing his studies 



i88 



UNIVERSiriES AND ^HEIR SONS 



in the I^iw School of Columbia, he received the 
degree of Bachelor of Laws and was admitted to 
the Bar in 1S83. Shortly after he organized the 
present law firm of Forster, Hotaling & Klenke, of 
which he is senior member, and which does a large 
corporation and real estate business, with offices in 
Wall Street and 5 4th Street. Mr. Forster has been, 
ever since the start of his active career, profession- 
ally and financially interested in many large corpora- 
tions, and holds at present several offices, the most 
important being those of President of the John 
Kress Brewing Company and Director of the Nine- 




WILLIAM FORSTER 

teenth Ward Bank, the New York & Brooklyn 
Malting Company, the Globe Electrical Supply 
Construction Company, and the West Gallatin Irri- 
gation Company. He has been closely associated 
with the electric lighting interests of New York City, 
holding the position of Director of the Mount 
Morris Electric Light Company before its absorp- 
tion. During the past ten years Mr. Forster has 
been active in promoting the plan for the construc- 
tion of the New York and New Jersey Bridge, and 
has been influential in procuring much of the legis- 
lation which has been passed on that question. He 
has also been instrumental in organizing railway, 
irrigation and other companies, and has been ex- 
tensively interested in various brewing enterprises, 



being recently the chief mover of a plan to consoli- 
date all the breweries of New York City and vicinity, 
for which purpose §150,000,000 have been raised. 
In politics he has always been a Democrat, and after 
the Cleveland campaigns, in which he was very 
active, he was appointed .Assistant District .Attorney 
in 1885. He is a member of the Manhattan and 
New York Athletic clubs, the Metropolitan Museum 
of .Vrt, the .American Museum of Natural History, 
the German Liederkranz, the .Arion, the .Academy of 
Political Science, the German Hospital, the Deutsche 
Gesellschaft, and the .Alumni .Association of Colum- 
bia. Mr. Forster was married, April 25, 18S5, to 
Anna M. Kress. He has three children : William 
Washington, Vera and Herbert Webster Forster. 



GREENBAUM, Samuel 

Columbia LL.B. 1875. 
Born in London, Eng., 1854; educated in New York 
City public schools; B.A. College of the City of New 
York, 1872; M.A.. in course; taught school in New 
York City, 1872-77; LL.B. Columbia Law School, 
1875 ; began to practise in 1877, first alone and then in 
partnership with Daniel P. Hays, and since 1898 doing 
business under the firm name of Hays, Greenbaum & 
Hirschfield. 

SAMUEL GREENBAUM, Lawyer, was born in 
London, England, January 23, 1854, son of 
Louis and Rachel Deborah (Schlesinger) Green- 
baum. His parents coming to this country when 
Samuel was a boy, he attended the New York City 
public schools and in 1872 graduated from the Col- 
lege of the City of New York, taking the degree of 
Bachelor of .Arts and that of Master of Arts in course. 
On graduation he became a teacher in one of the 
city grammar schools and served in that capacity 
until 1877. In 1873, in conjunction with his teach- 
ing, he began the study of law at Columbia Law 
School, and graduated from that institution with the 
degree of Bachelor of Laws in 1875. He did not 
commence to practise his profession until two years 
later, when he opened an office for himself in New 
York City. In 1S82 he formed a partnership with 
Daniel P. Hays, and since 1S98 has been doing 
business under the firm name of Hays, Greenbaum 
& Hirschfield. Mr. Greenbaum takes an active in- 
terest in charitable and eleemosynary undertakings ; 
has been President of the Young Men's Hebrew As- 
sociation ; is President of the .Aguilar Free Library 
Society of New York ; and has been First Vice- 
President of the Educational .Alliance of New York 
since its foundation. He is also a member of the 



UNIVERSITIES JND THEIR SONS 



8( 



Bar Association of (he City ami State, tlic Reform, 
Lawyers' and Democratic clubs, Hebrew Technical 
Institute, Tariff Reform (.'lub and other organiza- 
tions. He is an independent Democrat and op- 
posed to the silver platform of the party. He 
married, March 14, 1S8S, Selina I'Uman. They 
have four children : Lawrence Samuel, Edward 
Samuel, Grace R. and Isabel Greenbauni. 



OLCOTT, Jacob Van Vechten 

Columbia LL.B. 1877. 
Born in New York City, 1856 ; educated in the public 
schools and the College of the City of New York ; 
graduated Columbia Law School, 1877, ^"^ admitted to 
New York Bar; practised law in New York City since 
that time; Civil Service Commissioner, 1895-98. 

J.\COB VAN VECHTEN OLCOTT, Lawyer, 
was born in New York City, May 17, 1856, 
son of John Nathaniel and Eupheniia Helen (Knox) 




J. VAN \irlllt;N (ILCO'IT 

Olcott. His mother was a ilaughter of the Rev. 
John Knox, 1 ).!)., Senior I'astor of the Collegiate 
Reformed Dutch Ciuirch for many years, and the 
grantldauglitcr of the Rev. John Mitchell Mason, 
D.D., I'rovost of Columbia College 1S10-1.S16. 
The subject of this sketch attended in boyhood the 
public schools of New \'ork City, and entered the 
College of the City of New York with the Class of 



1875 but did not graduate. He took up the study 
of law at Columbia Law School, graduating as 
Bachelor of Laws in 1S77, and was admitted to the 
Bar of New York in May of that year. Until 1881 
Mr. Olcott was in the office of .Anderson & Man in 
New York City, and during the ensuing seven years 
was a member of the firm of Livingston & Olcott. 
He then practised alone until 1891, and in that 
year became a member of the firm of Olcott & 
Olcott, and later became a member of the firm of 
Olcott & Messibor which still exists and which has 
become widely known in the general practice of law. 
He has always been a Republican in jiolitics, and 
during the administration of William L. Strong as 
Mayor of New York City was Municipal Civil Service 
Commissioner. He was President of the Colonial 
Club during 1S95 and is a member of the Manhattan 
Chapter of .Mpha Delta I'hi, the Union League and 
the Merchants Club. He married, April 19, 1882, 
Laura I. Hoffman. 



PROUDFIT, Alexander 

Columbia A.B. 1792. 
Born in Pequea, Pa., 1770; graduated Columbia, 
1792; studied theology and was established minister in 
Salem, N. Y., 1794-1835; Secy. New York Colonization 
Society, 1835-41; D.D. Middlebury Coll., 1811, Wil- 
liams, 1812; Trustee Union Coll., 1798-1843; died in 
New Brunswick, N. J., 1843. 

ALEXANDER PROUDFIT, D.D., Clergyman, 
was born in Pequea, Pennsylvania, Novem- 
ber 10, 1770. After his graduation at Columbia in 
1792, he studied theology with the Rev. John H. Liv- 
ingston, D.D., and entered the ministry of the .Asso- 
ciate Reformed Church as Pastor of a congregation at 
Salem, New York. He remained in this charge from 
1794 to 1835, and in the latter year accepted the 
position of Secretary of the New York Colonization 
Society. For a time during his Pastorate at Salem, 
Dr Proud fit occupied the chair of Professor of Pas- 
toral Theology in the Associate Reformed Seminary 
at Newburgh, New York, and published numerous 
sermons and addresses, together with a work on the 
Parables. Middlebury College conferred upon him 
the degree of Doctor of Divinity in iSi i, and Wil- 
liams College in the following year, and from 1798 
continuously until the time of his death he served 
as a Trustee of Union College, Schenectady, New 
York. Dr. Proudfit resigned the Secretaryship of 
the Colonization Society in 1S41, and two years 
later. November 23, 1843, died at his residence in 
New Brunswick. New Jersey. 



190 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



WOODWORTH, Newell Bertram 

Columbia A.B. 1882, AM. 1885. 
Born in Rome, N. Y., i860; educated in private 
schools at Syracuse, and fitted for College at Columbia 
Grammar School; graduated Columbia, 1882; student 
in Columbia Law School, 1882-84 ; post-graduate 
course, Columbia School of Political Science, 1885 ; 
admitted to Bar, 1884; Asst. to Corporation Counsel, 
New York City, 1884-89; practised in New York, 1889- 
92 ; since latter date in Syracuse. 

NKWELL BERTRAM WOODWOR TH, Law- 
yer, was born in Rome, New York, April 
12, i860, the son of Andrew Joslin and Mary E. 




NEWEI.L B. \VO<:)DWORTH 

(Bertram) Woodworth. He comes of old New 
England ancestry, the first member of the family in 
this country being Walter ^\"oodworth, who came 
from Kent, England, to the Plymouth Colony before 
1633, and settle<l in Scituate, Massachusetts. Many 
of his descendants became noted in the history of 
the Colonies. Newell Bertram Woodworth received 
his early education at a private classical school in 
Syracuse, New York, and fitted for College at the 
Columbia Grammar School in New York City. He 
entered Columbia in 1S78, graduating with the de- 
gree of Bachelor of .Arts in 18S2, subsequently study- 
ing in the Law School, and was admitted to the New 
York Bar in 1884. After a post-graduate course in 
the School of Political Science at Columbia from 
which he graduated with the degree of Master of 



.\rts, he commenced active practice in October 1885, 
as assistant in the office of the Corporation Counsel 
of the City of New York. This position he resigned 
in the spring of 1889, and formed a partnership with 
ex-Judge Ernest Hall, which continued until 1892, 
when he returned to his former home in Syracuse 
and took up practice there. He lias made a spe- 
cialty of fire insurance law, and is now also associated 
with .\. J. Woodworth & Company, managing fire 
underwriters. Mr. Woodworth is an Independent in 
political opinions. He has several times been active 
in politics, and has several times been a candidate 
for office. While in College he was a member of 
the Psi LTpsilon Society. He is a member of the 
Psi Upsilon Club and St. Nicholas Society of New 
York City, the Sons of the American Revolution, 
tlie Society of Colonial Wars and the Syracuse and 
Citizens clubs of Syracuse. 



CRANE, Frederick Evan 

Columbia LL.B. 1889. 
Born in Brooklyn, N. Y., 1869; attended Adelphi 
Academy. Brooklyn ; graduated Columbia Law School, 
1889; admitted to Bar, 1890; Asst. Dist. Atty., Kings 
Co., N. Y., 1896; practising lawyer in Brooklyn, N. Y. 

FR1:L)ERICK EVAN CRANE, Lawyer, was 
born in Brooklyn, New York, March 2, 1869, 
the son of Frederick William Hotchkiss and Mary 
P'Jizabeth (Jones) Crane. His grandfather was the 
Rev. Ethan B. Crane ; his great-grandfather Jonathan 
Crane of Schenectady, New York. At the Adelphi 
.\cadeiny in his native city he completed his prelim- 
inary education in preparation for College, and at 
the age of eighteen entered the Columbia Law 
School. .After graduating Bachelor of Laws in 1889, 
he entered the law office of Lamb & Petty as a clerk, 
and remained there until admitteil to the Bar in 
February 1890. He then entered the present firm 
of Dailey, Bell & Crane, in which connection he has 
continued to practise his profession with much suc- 
cess in Brooklyn. Mr. Crane's high ability as a 
lawyer found recognition in his appointment to the 
office of Assistant District Attorney for Kings county, 
New York, in 1896. He is a member of the Cres- 
cent .Athletic, Brooklyn, Invincible and .Apollo clubs, 
the Brooklyn Institute of .Arts and Sciences and the 
Bar .Association of Kings county. He votes with the 
Republican party. Mr. Crane was married, Decem- 
ber 13, 1893, to Certrude Craven, of Montreal, 
Canada ; their children are : Dorothy and Ralph 
Crane. 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



191 



w 



BATTLE, William James 

Harvard A.M. i8gi, Ph.D. 1893 
Born in Raleigh, N. C, 1870; attended schools in 
Raleigh, in Edgecombe Co. and Chapel Hill, N. C. ; 
graduated at Univ. of North Carolina, 1888, Ph.D. 1890; 
Harvard A.M., 1891 ; Ph.D. in Classical Philology, 1893 ; 
held Morgan Fellowship at Harvard ; Tutor in Latin 
at Univ. of Chicago, 1893 ; Assoc. Prof, of Greek at 
Univ. of Texas, 1893-98, Prof, since 1898. 

'II.LIAiM JAMES B.Vri'LE, Ph.D., I'ro- 
fessor of Cireek in the University of Texas, 
was born in Raleigh, Nortli CaroUna, November 30, 
1870. His father, Kemp Phnnmer Battle, Presi- 
dent of the University of North Carolina from i(S76 
to 1 89 1 and now Professor of History in the same 
institution, is a son of William II. Battle who was 
for many years a Judge of the Supreme Court in 
North CaroUna. Many generations of the family, 
as far back as the time of the Revolution, have fur- 
nished prominent men of the State. His mother 
was Martha .'\nn Battle (nd-e Battle). His early edu- 
cation was received at private and public schools in 
Raleigh, in Edgecombe county, and in Chapel Hill. 
His first College training was at the University of 
North Carolina, where he graduated with the Bach- 
elor of Arts degree in 1S88. Continuing his studies 
there, and having taken the Master of Arts degree 
in i88g, he received the degree of Doctor of Phi- 
losophy in 1890. Witli a profound interest in the 
study of language and philology and resolved to 
have the best advantages for further study in that 
line, he went to Harvard in 1890 and took up there 
the higher courses offered to candidates for the 
highest of the University's degrees. After one 
year of work he received the Harvard Master of 
Arts degree in course, and in 1893, having shown 
notable ability in research work, he was given the 
Doctor of Philosophy degree in Classical Philology. 
While in Harvard Professor Battle was for one year 
a Thayer Scholar, and for the next two years he 
held a Morgan Fellowship. His first teaching ex- 
perience was in 18S9-1890, when he was Instructor 
in Latin at the University of North Carolina. In 1893 
he was elected Tutor in Latin at the I'niversity of 
Chicago. This position he held but a few months, 
however, being called to the University of Texas to 
fill the position of .Associate Professor of Greek. He 
was made Professor of Greek in 1898, and occupies 
that office at the present time, making his home in 
.Austin, Texas. Professor Battle is Vice-President of 
the Texas Society of the Sons of the Revolution, and 
a member of the .American Philological Association 
and of the .Archaeological Institute of .America. 



BIRGE, Edward Asahel 

Harvard Ph.D. 1878. 
Born in Troy, N. Y., 1851 ; graduated Williams Coll., 
1873; Ph.D. Harvard, 1878; Instructor in Zoology at 
Univ. of Wisconsm, 1875; Prof, since 1879; Dean of Coll. 
of Letters and Science since 1891 ; Director of Wiscon- 
sin Geological and Natural History Survey since 1897. 

EDWARD ASAHEL BIRGE, Ph.D., Sc.D., 
Professor of Zoology in the University of 
\\isconsin, was born in Troy, New York, September 
7, 1 85 I. He is the son of Edward White Birge, a 
descendant of the family of that name which settled 
in Windsor, Connecticut, in 1639, and Ann (Stevens) 




E. A. BIRGE 

Birge. He was traincil in the public schools of his 
native city until graduation from the high school in 
1869, when he entered Williams College. He 
graduated there in 1873 and then entered the 
Museum of Comparative Zoology at Harvard as a 
student of Zoology. He remained at Harvard until 
1S75, when he was appointed Instructor in Natural 
History at the University of Wisconsin. He has 
continued in the service of that I'niversity until the 
present time, having been promoted to the position 
of Professor of Zoology in 1S79 and appointed Dean 
of the College of Letters and Science in 1891. In 
1S78 he passed his examinations at Harvard ami 
received the degree of Doctor of Philosophy from 
that University. The College year 1SS0-1S81 he 



192 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



spent in study at the University of Leipzig. In 1897 
he received the honorary degree of Doctor of Science, 
from the Western University of Pennsylvania. He 
published a paper on the number of cells in the 
spinal cord of the frog in the .-Vrchiv fiir Anatomic in 
1 88 1. His later papers have been on Cladocera 
and on limnological subjects, chiefly in the Trans- 
actions of the Wisconsin .\cademy. Professor Birge 
has serA-ed as one of the Commissioners of Fisheries 
of Wisconsin since 1895, and has been Director of 
the Wisconsin Geological and Natural History Sur- 
vey since its organization in 1897. He is also a 
Director of the Madison Free Library, having served 
in that capacity since 1890. He married, July 15, 
18S0, .\nna Wilhelmina tlrant, of Troy, New York. 
Their children are : Edward Grant Birge and Anna 
Grant Birge. 

BRADBURY, Theophilus 

Harvard A.B. 1757. 
Born in Newbury, Mass., 1739; graduated Harvard, 
1757; studied law while teaching at Falmouth (now 
Portland) Me., and practised law there, 1761-79; re- 
turned to Newbury, 1779. and served in Massachusetts 
House and Senate ; member of Congress, 1795-97 ; Jus- 
tice of Supreme Court, 1797-1803 ; died 1803. 

THKOPHHA'S BRADBURY, Jurist, was born 
in Newbury, ^L^ssachusetts, November 13, 
1739, and graduated at Harvard in 1757, receiving 
his Master's degree in course. Following his grad- 
uation he engaged in teaching in Falmouth, now 
Portland, Maine, studying law at the same time, and 
was admitted to the Bar there in 1761. He prac- 
tised his profession in Falmouth for eighteen years 
with much success, but in 1779 returned to his na- 
tive place, where he filled several local offices and 
for a number of years represented Newbury in the 
Legislature, in the House and the Senate. Mr. 
Bradbury was elected a member of the Fourth Con- 
gress, 1795-1797. and re-elected to the Fifth, but 
resigned his seat to accept appointment as Justice 
of the Supreme Court of Massachusetts. He occu- 
pied a seat on this bench from 1797 until the year 
of his death, and in 1801 also served as a Presiden- 
tial Elector. Judge Bradbury was a Fellow of the 
.•\merican Academy of .Arts and Sciences. He died 
in Newburyport, Massachusetts, September 6, 1803. 



ton Merchant in New York City since 1866; member 
New Jersey Assembly, 1898-99; died 1899. 

JOHN LINCOLN BULLARD, Merchant, was 
born in Clinton, Louisiana, in 1S40; son of 
John P. anil Lucy Forbes (Brigham) ISullard. His 
father was a graduate of Harvanl, Class of 1829, 
and his grandfather, John Bullard, also took his 
Bachelor's degree at that L'niversity in 1775. Hav- 
ing prepared for College at the Boston Latin School, 
he entered Harvard, where he was graduated witli 
the Class of 1861. Shortly after leaving College, 
he accepted a Captain's Commission in the Sub- 




BULLARD, John Lincoln 

Harvard A.B 1861. 
Born in Clinton, La., 1840; prepared for College at 
Boston Latin School ; graduated Harvard, 1861 ; officer 
in Subsistence Dept. U. S. A. during Civil War; Cot- 



JOHN' L. BULLARD 

sistence Department, United States .Army, in which 
he served until 1S65, attaining the rank of ALijor. 
Locating in New York City in 1S66, he established 
himself in business as a cotton merchant, and be- 
came prominently identified with that line of trade 
in the metropolis. Mr. Bullard took up his resi- 
dence in New Jersey, and as a Republican in poli- 
tics was a Representative to the State .Assembly from 
Flssex county for the years 189S and 1899. .\t 
Han-ard he belonged to the Institute of 1770, the 
Hasty Pudding Club and the .\lpha Delta. June i, 
1863, he married Sarah S. Spooner, who died May 
10, 1866, leaving two children, John T. and Sarah 
S. Bullard, the latter of whom is now Mrs. Delano. 
His second wife, who was before marriage Char- 



UNIFERSiriES AND TiiEIR SONS 



193 



Ibtte H. Haskell, died February 20, 1898, and of 
that union there is one daughter, now Mrs. Lucy V. 
Bayard. 

BULLARD, John Thornton 

Harvard A.B. 1884, M.D. 1887. 
Born in Boston, Mass., 1864; educated Friends' 
Academy, New Bedford, Mass., Harvar'l and abroad; 
practised medicine in New Bedford, 1889 to present 
time; Physician to Poor Department, 1891-92; Surgeon 
to St. Luke's Hospital; Acting Asst. Surgeon U. S. 
Marine Hospital ; member Board of Health ; Quaran- 
tine Physician and Assistant Medical Examiner. 

JOHN THORNTON BUl.L.ARD, M.U., Physi- 
cian and Surgeon, was born in lioston. Massa- 
chusetts, March 31, 1864, son of John Lincoln and 




JOHN T. in'I.L.'VKI) 

Sarah Walter (Spooner) liullard. His father was 
graduated from FLarvard in 1S60 and his grandfather, 
John Parker Bullard, was also a Harvard graduate, 
Class of 1829. He was prepared for College at the 
Friends' Academy, New Bedford, Massachusetts, 
was graduated from the Academic Department of 
Harvard in 18S4 and from the Medical School three 
years later, and his professional studies were com- 
pleted in Heidelberg and Vienna. Locating in New 
Hedford in 1SS9, he has ever since resided in that 
city, where he has since practised as a jihysician 
and surgeon. He has been Surgeon to St. Luke's 
vol.. V. — 13 



Hospital, New Bedford, continuously since 1890; 
was Physician to the Poor Department for the years 
1891-1892 ; has been .Acting Assistant Surgeon to 
the United States Marine Hospital from 1892 to 
the present time ; and for the past two years has 
been a member of the liuanl of Health, Quarantine 
Physician and .Assistant Medical E.\aminer. Dr. 
Bullard is a member of the ^Lissachusetts Medical 
Society, the University Club, New \'ork, the Somer- 
set Club, Boston, and the W'amsulta Club, New 
Bedford. In politics he is a Republican. On June 
18, 1889, he married l-'.mily Morgan, daughter of 
the late Hon. William J. Rotch, of New Beilford ; 
their children are : John Morgan, born June 7, 
1S90; Helen Rotch, born September 25, 1S92 ; 
William Rotch, born (Jctobcr 16, 1893 ; Kmily, born 
July 20, 1895 ; an<l Lydia tlardner Pjullard, born 
jMarch 3, 1S96. 



CHANDLER, Thomas Bradbury 

Yale B.A. 1745 Columbia AM. 1758, D.D 1767. 

Born in NWoodstock, Conn., 1726; graduated Yale, 
1745; studied theology and ordained in England, 1751 ; 
engaged in the work of the ministry at Elizabethtown. 
N. J., 1751-75; in England, 1775-85; M.A. O.xford, 1753 
and Columbia, 1758; D.D. Oxford, 1766 and Columbia, 
1767 ; died 1790. 

THO^L\S BRADliURV CHAXD1,I;K, D.D., 
Clergyiiian, was born in Woodstock, Con- 
necticut, .April 26, 1726, and graduated at Vale in 
1745, receiving his Master's degree in course. 
\Vhile teaching school, in which he engaged after 
graduation, he studied for the ministry and was ap- 
jiointed catechist and lay reader at Klizabethtown, 
New Jersey, by the F^nglish Society for Propagating 
the Gospel in Foreign Parts. As there was no 
Bishop of the Protestant Kpiscopal Church in this 
country at that time, Mr. Chandler went to England 
to take orders, which he received at the hands of 
the Bishop of Lonilon in 1751, returning to his 
missionary labors in Klizabeth the same year. His 
scholarship and devotion were recognized by the 
conferring upon him of the tlegree of Master of Arts 
by the University of O.xford, England, in 1753 and 
by Columbia in 1758, the first year in which degrees 
were given by the latter institution. Later, Oxford 
made him a Doctor of Divinity in 1 766 and Colum- 
bia in 1767. Dr. Chandler was strict in his ecclesi- 
astical views, and refused the use of his pulpit to the 
revivalist Whitefield when he visited Elizabethtown 
in the winter of 1 763-1 764. He also conducted a 
notable controversy with Dr. Charles Chaiincy of 



194 



UNIf^ERSiriES JND THEIR SONS 



the First Church of Boston on the subject of the 
establishment of the Church of England in the 
Colonies through the appointment of Bishops there. 
During the Revolution Dr. Chandler lived in Eng- 
land, going there in 1775, before the actual outbreak 
of the war, because of his lack of sympathy with the 
cause of independence. He returned, however, in 
1785, and resumed his connection with the church 
in Elizabethtown, where he died, June 17, 1790. 



CHASE, George Thorndike 

Harvard A.B. 1880, M.D. 1883- 
Born in San Francisco. Cal., 1857; prepared for Col- 
lege at the High School, Salem, Mass. ; graduated Har- 
vard, 1880; Harvard Medical School, 1885 ; practising 
physician in New York City since 1885 ; Surgeon at 
J. Hood Wright Hospital since 1886. 

GEORGE THORXDIKE CH.ASE, M.D., 
Physician, was born in S;in Francisco, Cali- 
fornia, October 9, 1857, the son of George and 



I \ -.iZrVt-jfifiS 



i 




J "'< T^'''---m i ^c^ 



GEORGE T. CHASE 



Ji 



Charlotte Augusta (Fabens) Chase, of Salem, Mas- 
sachusetts, and a descendant of William Chase who 
came to America with Governor Winthrop of Massa- 
chusetts, in 1630. On his mother's side he is a 
lineal descendant of John Endicott, the Puritan 
Governor. Much of his early education was received 
in the public schools of the City of Salem, Massa- 



chusetts, where in the high school he was prepared 
to enter Harvard. His Bachelor of .•Xrts degree was 
received with the Class of 18S0, and he immedi- 
ately commenced the study of medicine in the Har- 
vard Medical School where he graduated in 1885. 
Since that time Dr. Chase has continuously practised 
his profession in New York City, serving on the 
Medical Staff of the J. Hood ^Vright Hospital as 
Surgeon since 1886. He is a member of the Har- 
vard and Men's clubs and the Har\-ard Medical 
Society, of New York City, the County Medical 
Society of New York, the New York Medico-Surgi- 
cal Society and the Physicians' Mutual Aid .Associa- 
tion. Dr. Chase was married, June 12, 1895, to 
Lauretta .X. Hanford, of New York City. 



DERBY, Elias Hasket 

Harvard A B. 1824. 
Born in Salem. Mass., 1803; graduated Harvard, 
1824 ; studied law and admitted to the Bar in Boston, 
1827; Special Commissioner of U. S. and Atlantic 
Fisheries, 1867; died 1880. 

ELIAS HASKET DERBY, Lawyer, was born in 
Salem, Massachusetts, September 24, 1803, 
of a family most noted in the commerce of that 
ancient seaport during the century of its greatest im- 
portance. His great-grandfather, Richard Derby, a 
shipmaster, retired from the sea in 1757 and founded 
the commercial house. His son. Elias Hasket, ex- 
tended the trade to cover the entire world, owning 
merchant vessels on every sea, and accumulated a 
large fortune ; and his son, of the same name, who 
received the honorary degree of Master of Arts from 
Harvard in 1803, maintained and increased the 
prestige of the business of the house. He made 
the first importation of Spanish merino sheep into 
this country in t8ii, and established the first 
broadcloth loom in ALissachusetts. The third F^lias 
Hasket Derby, the subject of this sketch, was gradu- 
ated with high honors at Harvard in 1824, stutlied 
law with Daniel Webster and began practice in 
Boston in 1827. He acquired wide reputation as 
a railroad attorney, and is accredited with the chief 
influence in securing the construction of the Hoosac 
Tunnel by the State of Massachusetts. He was 
active in promoting the commercial interests of 
Boston, and during the Civil ^Var concerned him- 
self zealously in the construction of iron-clad vessels 
for the Navy. Li 1867 he was appointed a com- 
missioner on the part of the United States to exam- 
ine and report upon the relations of this country 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



95 



with the British Provinces in respect to the fisheries 
question, and his report on this subject, made to 
Secretary Seward in that year, has been the basis of 
subsequent negotiations. Mr. Derby was the author 
of several books of travel and a frequent contributor 
to periodical literature. He died in Uoston, March 
30, 1880. 

DURFEE, Randall Nelson 

Harvard A.B 1889. 
Born in Fall River, Mass., 1867; educated at Fall 
River public schools, Phillips-Exeter Academy and at 
Harvard; A.B. 1889; engaged in mill manufacturing 
business, later in cotton and yarn brokerage ; member 
of the Common Council of Fall River and President of 
that body; city Alderman; Treasurer Republican City 
Committee; Treasurer of the Church of the Ascen- 
sion ; Treasurer of the Harvard Club. 

R,\NI).\IJ, NKLSON DURFEE, Business 
Man, was born in Fall River, Massachu- 
setts, October 13, 1S67, and is the son of Walter 




RANDAI.I. N. nURKKK 

Chaloncr ami Jane I'Vances (Alden) Durfoc. On 
liis father's side his descent conies in line from 
Samuel, 'I'homas, Benjamin and 'I'honias Durfee, the 
last named coming to this country in 1660. On 
his mother's side he is descended in line from 
Cyrus, Joseph, Seth, Joseph, Joseph and John .Mden, 
the latter being the famous John .-Mden wiio came 



to America on the Mayflower. After passing through 
the public schools of Fall River, Randall N. Durfee 
entered Phillips- Exeter .\cademy in the fall of 1884 
and there graduated in the following June. He 
then pursued his College course at Harvard, where 
he received his Bachelor's degree in 1889. In 
December of the latter year he entered the office 
of the Waurapanoag Mills, Fall River, as second 
clerk, and remained in that position until .August 
1892, when he became head clerk of the Stafford 
Mills, both mills being engaged in the manufacture 
of coarse cotton cloth. In 1894 he entered the 
office of .Vndrews & Horton to learn the cotton 
brokerage business, and in 1895 formed a partner- 
ship with Arthur D. Lown and Frank S. Wilcox, 
under the name of Durfee, Wilcox & Lown, in 
general brokerage in cotton and yarn. Mr. Wil- 
cox has since retired, but the business is still carried 
on under the name of Durfee & Lown, with main 
office in Fall River and a branch at New Bedford. 
Mr. Durfee was a member of the Fall River Com- 
mon Council 1892-1894, and President of that body 
the last named year. He was elected .Mderman in 
1895 and served one year. He has also been 
Treasurer of the Republican City Committee for 
two years, Treasurer of the Church of the .Ascension, 
and Treasurer of the Harvard Club of Fall River 
since graduation. On June 12, 1895, he married 
Abby Slade Brayton, and lias one son : Randall 
Nelson Durfee, Jr. 



ELLERY, William 

Harvard A.B. 1747. 
Born in Newport, R. 1., 1727; graduated Harvard, 
1747; engaged in business and in practice of the law at 
Newport; delegate to Continental Congress, 1776; and 
signer of the Declaration ; member of Congress until 
1786; Chief-Justice Superior Court of Rhode Island; 
Collector of Customs at Newport, 1790-1820; died 1820. 

WI1.I.I.\M 1:1. 1,1:RV, Signer of the Declara- 
tion of Independence, was born in New- 
port, Rhode Island, December 22, 1727, the son 
of William F'liery (Hansard 1722), a merch.ant of 
Newport and Judge, Senator and Lieutenant-Oov- 
ernor of the Colony. William I^Uery, the younger, 
was prepared for College inider the instruction of 
his father and graduated at Harvard in 1747. He 
studied law but did not engage in practice until 
1770, occupying himself meantime in commercial 
business with his father. In the troubles preceding 
the Revolutionary \\'ar, Mr. EUery showed himself an 
ardent patriot, and he was chosen in 1776 as dele- 



196 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



gate, with Stephens Hopkins, to the ContinL-ntal 
Congress. In that boily, he became an influential 
member, serving continuously with the exception of 
two years until 1786. In the first year he signed 
with the others the Declaration of Independence; 
and he left it on record that, wishing to see how 
men looked when signing what might be their 
death-warrant, he placed himself beside the Secre- 
tary and " eyed each closely as he affixed his name- 
to the document," noting that " untlaunted rcsulu- 
*tion was displayed in every countenance." .\fter 
the peace, Mr. EUery was for a time Chief-Justice 
of the Superior Court of Rhode Island, and filled 
other public offices, and in 1790 was apitointed by 
Washington, Collector of Customs at Newport, re- 
taining this position under the four succeeding 
administrations to the time of his death, February 
15, 1820. He was a scholarly man, and died hold- 
ing in his hand a copy of Cicero's l)e Officiis which 
he had been reading. 



for a period of four years, 1 749-1 753, and again 
in 1 756-1 757. Ciovernor Phips died in lioston, 
Massachusetts, April 4, 1757. 



PHIPS, Spencer 

Harvard A.B. 1703. 
Born in Rawley, Mass., 1685; graduated Harvard, 
1703; member of the Council, 1722; Lieut. -Gov. of 
Massachusetts, 1733-57; acting-Gov., 1749-53 and 1756- 
57 ; "i'ed 1757- 

SPENCER PHIPS, Colonial Governor of Mas- 
sachusetts, was born in Rawley, in that state, 
June 6, 1685. His maternal uncle. Sir William 
Phips, a native of Maine, knighted by James II. in 
recognition of his success in recovering a large 
amount of treasure from a Spanish vessel wrecked 
near the Bahamas, was a notable figure in Colonial 
history. He commanded the expedition which 
captured Port Royal, and also that which was 
beaten off from Quebec, and was the first of the 
Royal Governors of Massachusetts appointed under 
the second charter. His nephew, Spencer, was 
the son of Dr. David P.ennet of Rawley, and on 
being adopted by Sir Wiljiam took the name of the 
latter by statute. He was graduated at Harvard 
in I 703 and given a further education in the law, 
but turned his attention to public affairs and attained 
prominence in the Colony. He became a member 
of the Council in 1722, under the administration 
of (Governor Dummer, and ten years later suc- 
ceeded William Tailer as Lieutenant-Governor. 
This office he held from 1733 to the time of his 
death, being twice called to the administration of 
the affairs of the Colony as acting-Governor, once 



PHILLIPS, James Lee 

Harvard M.D. 1892. 
Born in Foster, R. I., 1864; educated East Green- 
wich Academy and Harvard Medical School ; practised 
medicine in Foster and in Providence, R. I. ; member 
of the West Side and University clubs of Providence. 

JAMES LEE PHILLIPS, M.D., Physician, was 
born in Foster, Rhode Island, .-Xugust 24, 
1S64, and is the son of Harley A. and Waity \. 




J.AMES L. PHILLIPS 

(Cole) Phillips. He was educated in the public 
schools of Foster and at East Greenwich Academy, 
and tlien at the Harvard Medical School, where he 
graduated in 1892. From July 1892 to October 
1893 be ]jractised in his native town, but since then 
has carried on his profession in Providence. Dr. 
Phillips is a member of the West Side and the 
L'niversitv clubs of Providence. 



PRINCE, Frederick Octavus 

Harvard A.B 1836. 

Born in Boston. Mass., 1818; educated at Boston 

Latin School; graduated Harvard, 1836; studied law 

and was admitted to the Bar, 1840 ; represented town of 

^A^inchester in Massachusetts Legislature, 1851-53; 



UNIFERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



197 



member of Constitutional Convention, 1853; State Sen- 
ator, 1855; Secretary, national Democratic Committee, 
1860-88 ; Mayor of Boston, 1877, and 1879-81 ; member 
of Board of Trustees of Public Library, Boston, and 
President, 1888-1899; died 1899. 

FREDERICK OCTAVUS PRINCE, Lawyer, 
Mayor of the City of Boston, was born in 
that city, January 18, 18 18, of iMiglish descent 
from a family prominent in Shrewsbury in the 
sixteenth century. Elder Joliii I'rince, son of the 
Rector of East Sheffield, England, came to this 
country in 1633 and settled in Hull, Massachusetts. 
His grandson, the Rev. Thomas Prince (Harvard 




FREDERICK O. I'KIN'CE 

1707;, was the colleague of Dr. Joseph Sewall of 
the Old South Church in Poston and a noted 
historian and collector of manuscripts and docu- 
ments relating to New England. James Prince, 
grandfather of the subject of this sketch, was a 
prominent merchant in P.oston, Naval Officer of 
that port mider the Jefferson administration and 
afterwards United States Marshal for the District 
of Massachusetts. Frederick O. Prince was fitted 
for College at the Boston I.alin School and was grad- 
uated at Harvard as Class i'oet and Secretary of the 
Class of 1836. He received the degree of Master 
of .Arts in course, studied law in the offices of Erank- 
lin Dexter and William H. (lanliner in Boston, 
and was admitlrd to the liar in i S40. Taking up 



his residence in the suburban town of Winchester, 
he was elected a Representative in the Legislature, 
1S51-1853, chosen a member of the Convention 
to revise the Constitution of the State in 1853, and 
in 1855 elected to the -State Senate. Mr. Prince 
was a \Vhig in politics, and on the dissolution of 
that party he allied iiimself with the Democrats, 
was sent as a Delegate from ^L^ssachusetts to the 
National Democratic Convention of i S60, at which 
he was made a member of the National Committee. 
/\s Secretary of this body he served for twenty-eight 
years, resigning in 1888 after a longer official con- 
nection with the National 1 )emocratic organization 
than had been held by any other in the history of 
the party. Mr. Prince was four times electeil 
Mayor of the City of lioston, holding that office 
in 1877 and in 1879-1881. He was a man of 
rare scholarship and of artistic and literary culture, 
and his influence upon the progress of the city 
on these lines during the years of his administration 
was marked. His public addresses are models of 
literary composition. After his retirement — he 
declined re-election as ^L^yor in 1882 — his ser- 
vices were retained for the city by his appoint- 
ment as a member of the Board of Trustees of the 
Public Library, then charged with the erection of 
a new library building. He was shortly made 
President of this Board and continued in this posi- 
tion throughout the period of construction of the 
Public Library, in which work his artistic judgment 
as well as his experience in the conduct of large 
affairs was of great advantage to the city. He was 
also a member of the .Art Connnission for the City 
of Boston, a body charged with the duty of passing 
upon the merits of proposed public statues anti 
monuments and assigning their location. Mr. 
Prince remained at the heatl of the Public Library 
Board until within a few months of his death, when 
failing health compelled him to retire. Mr. Prince 
married, in 1S4S, Helen, d.iughterof llarnard Henry, 
of Philadelphia, by whom he had five children : 
ffelen. who died in 1880; Ciordon, Charles .Albert 
(Harvard 1873), Morton (Harvard 1875, NLD. 
1S79) and Frederick Henry Prince. .Mr. I'rince 
married, as his second wife, November 27, 1S89, at 
Cambridge, Kate IL Blanc. He died June 6, 1899. 



ROBIE, Thomas 

Harvard A.B. 1708. 
Born in Boston, Mass., 1689; graduated Harvard, 
1708 ; A. M., 1711 ; studied theology and also medicine, 



198 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



receiving the degree of M.D.; Librarian of Harvard, 
1712-13 ; Tutor, 1714-23; Fellow, 1722-23; died 1729. 

THOMAS ROBIE, M.D., Educator, was born 
ill Boston, Massachusetts, March 20, 1689, 
and graduated at Harvard in 1 70S, receiving his 
Master's degree there in course. He studied for 
the ministry but was not ordained over any church, 
being called to the service of Harvard as Librarian 
in 1 712, later receiving appointment as Tutor. 
The fruit of his theological studies appeared in a 
volume entitled The Knowledge of Christ, which 
was published in Boston in 1721. During his con- 
nection with Harvard as Tutor, which extended 
from 1 7 14 to 1723, he took up the study of medi- 
cine and obtained the degree of Doctor of Medicine. 
To the literature of this branch of science he also 
made contributions, papers by him on Alkaline 
Salts and on The Venom of the Spider being pub- 
lished in the Transactions of the Philosophical 
Society in 1720 and 1724 respectively. Dr. Robie 
enjoyed the reputation of an accomplished scholar 
and a man of widely varied learning, and in his 
service of nine years as Tutor at Harvard he won 
respect for his abilities as an instructor. He was 
a Fellow of the College in 1722-1723. Dr. Robie 
did not live long after resigning his Tutorship, his 
death taking place in Boston, August 22, 1729. 



RUSSELL, William Eustis 

Harvard A.B. 1877. 
Born in Cambridge, Mass., 1857; prepared for Col- 
lege in the public schools of Cambridge ; graduated 
Harvard, 1877; LL.B. Boston University, 1879; ad- 
mitted to the Suffolk Bar and began practice in Bos- 
ton, 1880; member of Cambridge City Council, 1882; 
Alderman, 1883-84; Mayor, 1884-88; nominated for 
Governor of Massachusetts, 1888 and 1889, and elected 
1890; served as Governor, 1891-93; LL.D. Williams, 
1891 : died 1896. 

WILLL^M EUSTIS RUSSELL, LL.D., Gov- 
ernor of ALissachusetts, was born in Cam- 
bridge, ^Llssachusetts, January 6, 1857, the young- 
est son of Charles Theodore and Sarah Elizabeth 
(Ballister) Russell. He was of Puritan ancestry, 
William Russell coming to America from England 
about 1640, and settling in Cambridge in 1645. 
Through his paternal grandmother he traced his de- 
scent from the Hastings family, the earliest settlers 
of Princeton, Massachusetts. His grandfather on 
his mother's side, Joseph Ballister, was an old- 
time Boston merchant. William E. Russell received 
his early education and was prepared for College in 
the public schools of Cambridge and entered Har- 



vard at the age of si.xteen, where he made a good 
record as a student, took an active interest in ath- 
letic sports and was graduated in the Class of 1S77. 
He then entered the Law School of Boston L'niversity, 
where he was graduated in 1S79 at the head of his 
Class, with the first siimma iian lijidle ever given by 
that institution, with the William Beach Lawrence 
prize for the best essay, and as Class orator at Com- 
mencement. After another year of study under the 
direction of his father, lie was admitted to the Suf- 
folk Bar in 1880, and began practice in Boston as 
a member of his father's firm C. T. & T. H. Russell. 




WILLIA.M E. RUSSELL 

His public career began with his election to the 
City Council of Cambridge in 1S81, which was fol- 
lowed by his election to the Board of Aldermen of 
that city in 1882, and after sen'iiig two terms in 
that body, by his election as Mayor at the head of a 
ticket representing municipal reform. Mr. Russell 
served as Mayor for four successive terms, through 
re-elections, displaying a degree of executive ability 
which strongly recommended him for higher office. 
During his first term as Mayor of Cambridge he was 
urged to become a candidate for Governor, and 
subsequently for Representative in Congress, but he 
declined until in 1888 he was nominated in the 
Democratic convention by acclamation as the can- 
didate of that party for Governor of Massachusetts. 



UNIFERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



199 



His canvass was pcrhayis the most remarkable ever 
made in the state, not even excepting the whirlwind 
campaign of (ieneral Butler in 1882. He devoted 
seven weeks to the work, speaking almost every night 
and delivering addresses appealing to the thoughtful 
convictions of the people. He failed of election, 
although largely increasing the Democratic vote. 
Nominated again the following year, he made another 
vigorous canvass, reducing the op])osing majority to 
a very narrow margin ; and on his third nomination 
in 1890 he was elected, winning the reward of per- 
severance and energy. Governor Russell was twice 
re-elected, holding the ofifice of Governor for three 
years, 1891-1S93. He won a national reputation 
through the brilliancy of his oratory, the intellectual 
force of his address and the admirable character of 
his administration. .Although unable to carry out 
many of the reforms whicii he proposed, owing to 
the fact that the Legislature was opposed to him 
politically, his record was distinguished for integrity 
and ability. Before Governor Russell's first election 
there arose a question of his eligibility under that 
provision of the Constitution requiring that the Gov- 
ernor must be " seized in his own right of a freehold 
within the Commonwealth of the value of _;^iooo," 
and to meet this condition he was obliged to acquire 
real property to this amount. The incongruity of 
this ancient provision was made so apparent by this 
incident as to lead to the immediate amendment of 
the Constitution in this respect. Governor Russell 
declined nomination for a fourth term in 1S94 and 
retmned to the practice of law, entering into part- 
nership with his elder brother, Charles 'I'heodore 
Russell, Jr. (Harvard 1873). In 1891, during his 
first term as Governor, Williams College conferred 
upon him the degree of Doctor of Laws. June 3, 
1885, he married Margaret Manning, daughter of 
Rev. Joshua and Sarah \. (Hodges) Swan, of Cam- 
bridge, by whom he had three children : William 
Eustis, Richard Manning and Margaret Russell, 
."^fter retiring from public office, Clovernor Russell 
retained his interest in the fortunes of the Demo- 
cratic party, in whose councils he held an honored 
place, and was especially earnest in his endeavors to 
avert the change in its traditional attitude towards 
the currency which was made by the National Con- 
vention at Chicago in 1S96. On his return from 
that convention, he sought rest and recuperation on 
a fishing irij) in the Province of Quebec, wiiere he 
died suddenly, July 16, 1896, passing away (luictly 
in his sleep after retiring in apparent health without 
tile alum or the knowledge of his companions. 



Governor Russell was the youngest but one in the 
history of .NLissachusetts to reach the high position 
of Chief Magistrate of that Commonwealth. 



RICHARDS, William Whitlock 

Harvard A.B. 1668, A.M. 1871. 
Born in Brooklyn, N. Y., 1845; educated Phillips- 
Exeter Academy and Harvard; A.B., 1868; Comp- 
troller of the Mutual Life Insurance Co. of New York. 



w 



1 LLL\M WHITLOCK RICH.ARDS, 
Comptroller of the Mutual Life Insur- 
ance Company of New York, was born in Brooklyn. 




W. W. RICHARDS 

New York, December 17, 1845. His father was 
Benjamin Richards and his mother Jane Haight 
(Scott) Richards. .After receiving an early edu- 
cation at jirivate schools and at Phillips-Exeter 
Academy, he entered Harwird, where he received 
his degree of Bachelor of .Arts in 1868, and that of 
Master of .Arts in 1872. Engaging in the insurance 
business, he ])assed through the grades in several 
Departments of the Mutu.al Life Insurance Company 
of New \oxV, and in May 18S4 was appointed 
Comptroller of that company, the position which 
he has now held for more than fifteen years. On 
Luiuary 25, 1888, Mr. Richards married Kate Ward 
of Newport, Kentucky. 



200 



UNIFERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



HINES, James Kollock 

Harvard Law School, Class of 1873. 
Born in Burke Co., Ga., 1852; educated in private 
schools; graduated Emory College, Oxford, Ga., 1872; 
student at Harvard Law School, 1872-73; admitted to 
Bar. 1873 ; settled in Atlanta, Ga., Solicitor-General, 
Middle Circuit, 1876-81 ; member of Georgia House of 
Representatives, 1884-85; Circuit Judge, 1886-91. 

JA.MI.S KOLLOCK IIINKS, L;nvyer, was born 
in IJiirkc county, CJeorgia, November i8, 
1S52, tlie son of Joseph Henry and Susan Elizabeth 
(Harrison) Hines. His paternal grandfather was 
Howell Hines, son of Cajjlain David Hines, a 



resided in that city, ]iractising his profession with 
success. From 1876 to 1881 he served as Solicitor- 
("icneral for the Middle Judicial Circuit, under an 
api)ointnient issued by Governor Colquitt, and was 
Judi^e of the same circuit from 1886 to 1891. For 
tlie years 18S4 and 1885, Judge Hines was a mem- 
ber of the Georgia House of Representatives, being 
elected as a Democrat, and he continued to act with 
that party until 1892, since which time he has voted 
independently. January 9, 1879, he married Belle 
Kvans, who died in 1884, leaving two daughters: 
Lucy Belle and Susan Hines. December 28, 1885, 
he married Cora Lawson McBride, and of this union 
there are three daughters : Elizabeth ILmnah, Mary 
and Cora I.awsun Hines. 




W\ '^Ap?r^ 



J.AMES K. HINES 

Revolutionary soldier from North Carolina ; and his 
maternal grandflither was Colonel William S. Harri- 
son, who married Mary, daughter of George Keller, 
a native of Germany and a pioneer settler in 
Georgia. After completing his preparatory studies 
which were directed by Professor J. J. Jenkins, he 
attended Emory College, Oxford, Georgia, graduat- 
ing in 1872. .^ year's course at the Han-ard Law 
School and a few months of study in the office of 
Hon. R. E. Lester, of Savannah, were followed by 
his admission to the Georgia Bar in 1S73 and to 
the Federal Courts in 1874. In 1875 he located in 
Sandersville, Georgia, where he practised law, except 
when officially engaged, till 1891. Establishing him- 
self in the latter year in Atlanta, he has ever since 



HOPKINS, Evan Henry 

Harvard LL.B. i8g2. 
Born in Johnstown, Pa., 1864; educated in public 
schools and Western Reserve Academy; graduated 
Adelbert College, 1889; Harvard Law School, 1892; 
practised in Cleveland since 1892; Registrar, Professor 
and Dean, Western Reserve Law School ; formerly 
Secretary Cleveland Public Library Board. 

EV.\N HENRY HOPKINS, Lawyer, was born 
in Johnstown, Pennsylvania, November 4, 
1SO4, the son of David J. and Mary (Jeffreys) 
Hopkins. He is of English origin and his first 
.American ancestor came from Monmouthshire. 
Having attended the Cleveland, Ohio, public 
schools, the Western Reserve Academy, and Adel- 
bert College, from which latter he was graduated in 
1S89, he studied law at Harvard and took the degree 
of Bachelor of Laws in 1892. He was admitted to 
the Ohio Bar in October 1891, and after the com- 
pletion of his law course he located in Cleveland, 
where he has ever since been identified with the 
legal profession both as a practitioner and professor. 
Joining the Law Faculty of Western Reserve Uni- 
versity as Registrar and Professor of the Law of Torts 
in 1892, he was chosen its Dean in 1895 ^"'' '^ 
still serving in that capacity. He was also elected 
to a seat upon the Cleveland Public Library Board 
in 1892, retaining it until 1898, and served as its 
Secretary the last three years of his membership. 
Professor Hopkins is a member of the Cleveland 
Chamber of Commerce, and of the University Club 
in that city. His marriage took place, December 
27, 1892, with Frances P. M. Shain. Their 
children are : Percie Trowbridge and Frances 
Shain Hopkins. 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



20I 



ANDERSON, Wilbert Lee 

Yale B.D. 1882 
Born in East Berkshire, Vt., 1857; studied at St. 
Albans Academy and in Oberlin Preparatory Depart- 
ment; graduated Oberlin Coll., 1879; Yale Divinity 
School, i88z ; Pastor Congregational Church, Stowe, 
Vt., 1882-90; Pastor Congregational Church, Muskegon, 
Mich., 1890-92 ; Pastor First Congregational Church, 
E.xeter, N. H., since 1893. 

WILBKRT I.Kl': .WDKRSON, Clergyman, 
was born in l'',ast licrkshire, Vermont, 
July 21, 1X57. He is the son of Ira Stone and 
Klvina (I'erley) .\nilerson. At the district school 
of his native town he received liis first education. 
W'itli a view then to entering Oberlin College, he 
took a course of preparatory study in the Oberlin 
Preparatory Department and at the Acadeiiiy at 
St. .Albans, Vermont. This fitted him for the Col- 
lege, which he entered in 1S74. HisC'ollege course 
was interrupted by a year of teaching. After receiv- 
ing the Bachelor of Arts degree from Oberlin in 
1879, he went to Yale to take up the studies offered 
by the Divinity School. Here he completed the 
entire Theological Course, and graduated a Bache- 
lor of Divinity with the Class of 1882. Mr. Ander- 
son's professional work commenced at once with 
the acceptance of an appointment as Pastor of the 
Congregational Church at Stowe, Vermont, which 
he filled successfully from June 1882 to August 
1890. Resigning to accept a call to Muskegon, 
Michigan, where he occupied the pulpit of the 
Congregational Church until September 1892. In 
June 1893 Mr. Anderson assumed his present charge 
as Pastor of the First Congregational Church at 
Exeter, New Hampshire. He was married, August 
14, 1883, to Dorinda Ann Beattic, of Sandusky, 
Ohio. 



in College Mr. Archbald was a member of the 
Delta Kappa, Phi Theta Psi, Psi Upsilon, and 
Scroll and Key societies ; and during the last year 
of its existence was one of the Wooden Spoon 
Committee. After graduating with the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts in 187 i, determined upon a legal 
career, he commenced to read law in the office of 
Hand & Post, at Scranton, Pennsylvania. Two 
years later, September 17, 1873, he was admittecl 
to the Bar, and entered u])on its practice in .Scran- 
ton, in which he continued until elected to the 
Bench in November 1884. On the fifth of January 




R. \V. .\RCHIULD 



ARCHBALD, Robert Wodrow 

Yale B.A. 1871, 
Born in Carbondale, Pa., 1848; attended Flushing 
(L. 1.) Institute ; graduated Yale, 1871 ; studied in law 
office of Hand & Post, Scranton, Pa.; admitted to 
Pennsylvania Bar, 1873; elected additional Law Judge 
of 45th Judicial Dist. of Pennsylvania, 1884; President 
Judge of same Dist. since 1888. 

ROBICRT WODROW ARCHIULl), Judge, was 
born in Carbondale, Pennsylvania, Septem- 
ber 10, 1848. His father, James Archbald, was a 
native Scotchman ; his mother, .Augusta T. (Froth- 
ingham) Archbald, a descendant of a New England 
family. He was prepared for College at the Flush- 
ing Institute, of Flushing, Long Island. He entered 
Yale in 1867, in the Academic Department. While 



1885, when thirty-six years old, Mr. .Archbald be- 
came additional Law Judge of the I'orty-fifih Judi- 
cial District of Pennsylvania, his commission being 
for the term of ten years. By the resignation of 
Judge Hand, .August i, 1888. the itosition of Presi- 
dent Judge of this district was left vacant, and 
by operation of law Judge .Archbald became the 
President Judge in his stead. In 1894 he was 
again re-elected for a term of ten years. In 1S99 
he was prominently mentioned for the vacancy on 
the Supreme Bench caused by the death of one of 
the members of that court, but the honor was 
accorded to J. 11. Brown of Lancaster. He was 
married, January 21, 1875, to Elizabeth Baldwin 
Cannon, of Oxford, New York. Their chililren are 



202 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



Robert Wodrow, Jr. (Vale 1898), born January 10, 
1876; Anna (Bryn Mawr 1901), born August 22, 
1878 ; and Hugh Archbald (Yale 1903), born Octo- 
ber 30, 1S80. 

BACKUS. Azel 

Yale B.A. 1787 — Princeton D.D. 1810. 
Born in Norwich, Conn., 1765 ; graduated Yale, 1787; 
studied theology and licensed to preach, 1789 ; Pastor 
at Bethlehem, Conn., 1791-1812 ; President Hamilton 
College, 1812-17; D.D. Princeton, iSio; died 1817. 

AZEL B.\CKUS, D.D., Educator, was born in 
Norwich, Connecticut, October 13, 1765, 
and graduated at Vale in 1787. While in College 
he attained high rank in scholarship and demon- 
strated his possession of rare talent. He also 
developed opinions on religious matters out of har- 
mony with his early training, which had been in a 
family whose members were Orthodox Congrega- 
tionalists, and in consequence he selected the army 
instead of the church as the field of his career. 
The influence of his uncle, the Rev. Charles Backus 
(Vale 1769), availed to turn him from this purpose 
and to convert him to the religious belief of his 
parents, and he studied theology under the precep- 
torship of that clergyman and entered the work of 
the ministry as a preacher in 1 7S9. Two years 
later, he was called to the church at Bethlehem, 
Connecticut, as the successor of the Rev. Dr. Bel- 
lamy, where in connection with his pastoral work 
he established and successfully conducted a private 
school. He was engaged in this work when, at the 
foundation of Hamilton College, at Clinton, New 
York, in 181 2, he was chosen the first President of 
that institution and inaugurated December 3 of that 
year. Princeton conferred upon him the degree 
of Doctor of Divinity in iSio, and he remained 
President of Hamilton until his death, December 
9, 1 81 7. Dr. Backus took great interest in public 
affairs and in 1 798 delivered the election sermon 
before the Legislature of Connecticut. 



BARBOUR, Erwin Hinckley 

Yale B.A. 1882. 
Born in Springfield, Ind. ; studied at Miami Univ., 
Oxford, Ohio; graduated Yale, 1882; Ph.D. from 
Yale, 1887 ; on U. S. Geological Survey, 1882-88; Stone 
Prof, of Geology and Natural History, Iowa Coll., 1889- 
91; Prof, of Geology, Univ. of Nebraska, since 1891 ; 
acting State Geologist ; Geologist of State Board of 
Agriculture ; Creator of State Museum. 

ERWIX HINCKLEY BARBOUR, Ph.D., Pro- 
fessor of Geology at the University of Ne- 
braska, was born in Springfield, Indiana. He is 



the son of Samuel Williamson and .Vdeline (Hinck- 
ley) Barbour. .After an early training at the 
high school in O.xford, Ohio, he entered Miami 
University in the same town, and there finished his 
preparation for work in a larger institution. Vale 
was his choice of the Eastern Colleges, and he 
commenced study there in 1S7S. His work at 
Vale, though chiefly in the special lines of geology 
and kindred sciences, was in the .Academic Depart- 
ment of the University and the degree which he 
received in 1882 was that of Bachelor of Arts. 
After graduation he received an appointment as 




ERWIX HINX'KLEV B.^RBOUR 

Assistant Paleontologist in the United States Geo- 
logical Suney. This work, which was under the 
direction of Professor O. C. Marsh, of Vale, was 
carried on at New Haven, and it was while thus 
engaged that Mr. Barbour won the degree of 
Doctor of Philosophy from the University in 1S87. 
In 1889 he accepted the appointment to the Stone 
Professorship of Geology and Natural History at 
Iowa College. There he remained until 1891, 
when he was elected Professor of Geology at the 
University of Nebraska, an office which he has con- 
tinued to occupy. Professor Barbour holds several 
public positions, the more important of which are 
those of acting State Geologist, Geologist of the 
State Board of Agriculture, and Curator of the 



UNIVERSITIES JND THEIR SONS 



203 



Nebraska State Museum at Lincoln. He is a mem- 
ber of the Union Commercial Club of Lincoln, the 
Nebraska Ornithologists' Union, the Nebraska Acad- 
emy of Science, the Ornithologists' Union, the 
National Geographical Society, the American Asso- 
ciation for the Advancement of Science, the Geo- 
logical Society of America ami other scientific 
societies and organizations. He has contributed 
more than eighty papers to scientific magazines, 
including also reports to the State Board of Agri- 
culture, State Board of Irrigation, State Geological 
Survey, United States Agricultural Experiment Sta- 
tion and United States Geological Survey. Pro- 
fessor Barbour was married, December 6, 1887, to 
Margaret Roxana Lamson, of New Haven, Con- 
necticut. They have a daughter : Eleanor Barbour, 
born February 22, 1889. 



to practise law, and write magazine articles until his 
death, which occurred suddenly, from heart failure, 
January i, 1900. 



BISSELL, Champion 

Yale B.A. 1850. 
Born in Rochester, N. Y., 1830; attended high school 
in Rochester; graduated Yale, 1850; admitted to New 
York Bar, 1861 ; gave Phi Beta Kappa Poem at New 
Haven, 1861 ; author of works of prose and poetry ; 
died igoo. 

CHAMPION BISSELL, Lawyer, was born in 
Rochester, New York, January 11, 1830. 
His father, josiah Bissell, was of that branch of the 
Bissell family which settled at Windsor, Connecti- 
cut. John Bissell is the earliest American represen- 
tative of the line. His mother was Henrietta 
(Perkins) Bissell, also of Connecticut family. At a 
private school at Hartford, Connecticut, and at the 
high school in Rochester he received preparation 
for College. He took a four years' course at Yale, 
and graduated Bachelor of .Arts with the Class of 
1850. Mr. Bissell's active life was at first in news- 
paper work in New York City, but he soon left this 
for the study of law, and was admitted to the Bar 
in New York in 1.S61. During the period of the 
Draft Riots in New York City lie was doing military 
service as Lieutenant in a Cavalry Battalion of the 
Eighth Regiment. Mr. Bissell has written exten- 
sively and upon a variety of subjects, frequently 
contributing literary matter to the press and maga- 
zines. In 1861 he was poet at the meeting of the 
Phi Beta Kappa in New Haven. He published a 
book of poems in 1858, and volumes of fiction in 
1895 and 1S96. He was one of the organizers of 
the Yale Alunmi .Association, which started its exist- 
ence March 4, 1S68, and until 1892 was a member 
of its Executive Committee. Mr. Hi>scll (ontinued 



CREHORE, William Williams 

Yale B.A. 1886, Ph.B. 1888. 
Born in Cleveland, O., 1864; graduated Yale (Aca- 
demic Department), 1886; Scientific Department, 1888; 
Principal Norfolk, Va., High School two years ; de- 
signer and constructor of bridges and steel structures ; 
and consulting structural engineer, New York City. 

WILLIAM WILLIAMS CREHORE, Struct- 
ural Engineer, was born in Cleveland, 
Ohio, February 3, 1864, son of John Davenport and 




W.M. W. CRKHORE 

Lucy (Williams) Crehore. He is of New England 
Colonial ancestry on the paternal side, and there 
were eight generations between his father and the 
original American ancestor, who it is supposed 
emigrated from Scotland, although the parent 
country of the Crehores has not as yet been accu- 
rately determined. From the public schools of 
Cleveland he entered Yale, graduating from the Aca- 
demic Department in 1 886, and from the Sheffield 
Scientific School two years later. During the suc- 
ceeding two years he was Principal of the Norfolk 
(Yirginia) High School, meanwhile devoting his 
summer vacations to the inspection and erection of 



204 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



bridges for the Pennsylvania Railroad Company, ami 
from July 1S90, to August 1S92, he was with diflfLrcnt 
bridge and railroad companies, thus obtaining tlie 
practical knowledge and experience in structural 
engineering which has in no small measure con- 
tributed to his success in his special line of work. 
Seven years ago he established himself in New York 
City as consulting structural engineer and designer 
and constructor of bridges and steel structures, an 
undertaking in which he has been deservedly suc- 
cessful, having thus far designed or superintended 
the construction of the steel portion of over twenty- 
five bridges and buiUlings in the metropolis and its 
environments. His consulting business has grown 
equally in |)roportion, and he has testified as an 
expert engineer in several lawsuits. In 1896 he 
established in partnership with Frank Miller the 
Structural lingineering Company, the object of 
which is to furnish purely engineering service in 
this comparatively new field. Mr. Creliore is a 
member of the .American Society of Civil luigineers, 
the Delta Kappa I'.psilon Fraternity, and the Yale 
Club and University CJlee Club, of New York. On 
July II, 1SS8, he married Anna Ballard; they have 
six children : Edith Mayes, born September 29, 
1889; John Davcnjiort, born May 14, 1891; 
Austen Ballard, born January 9, 1893 ; William 
Williams, Jr., born June 13,1895; Frank Halsted, 
born May 23, 1897 ; and Lucy Filch Crehore, born 
July 27, 1898. 

FOSTER, Eleazar K. 

Yale B A. 1863. 
Born in New Haven, Conn., 1841 ; attended the 
Collegiate and Commercial Institute ; graduated Yale, 
1863; admitted to the Bar, 1865; Collector of the Port 
of St. Augustine, Fla., i868 ; State's Atty. for 4th 
Judicial Circuit of Florida ; Supt. of Public Instruction 
in Cabinet of Gov. Bloxham, of Florida; appointed 
Judge of the Circuit Court for 7th Judicial Dist. of 
Florida in 1885; died 1899. 

ELEAZAR K. FOSTER, Judge, was born in 
New Haven, Connecticut, October 31, 1841. 
His father, whose name he bore, was a graduate of 
Yale in the Class of 1834. Judge Foster prepared 
for College at the Collegiate and Commercial Insti- 
tute. He graduated from Yale in 1863, and taking 
up the study of law was admitted to the Bar of New 
Haven in the spring of 1865. He was a life-long 
sufferer from ill health, and this made necessary 
many changes of residence, St. .Augustine, Jackson- 
ville, Sanford and Tallahassee having been, in turn, 
his home. His first active office was that of Col- 



lector of the I'ort of St. Augustine, after which he 
served as State's .Attorney for the Fourth Judicial 
Circuit of Florida. In 1871 he entered upon prac- 
tice in Jacksonville. His next public office was 
tliat of Superintendent of Public Instruction in the 
Cabinet of tiovernor Bloxham, of Florida. In 1885 
he received the appointment as Judge of the Circuit 
Court for the Seventh Judicial District of Florida. 
In addition to this work he served about ten years 
as attorney for several of the Plant System Railroads. 
He died from the effects of a surgical operation at 
the New Haven Hospital, December 8, 1899. He 
was married, November 10, 1874, to Mary G. Ben- 
edict, of St. .Augustine, who survives him with three 
children. 



HOLDEN, Daniel Judson 

Yale B.A. 1864 - Columbia LL.B. 1866. 
Born in New York City, 1844 ; educated private 
school, Yale and Columbia; admitted to Bar, 1866; 
located for practice in New York City; member law 
firm of Coudert Brothers. 

^ANIEL JUDSON HOLDEN, Lawyer, son of 
Horace and Catharine Plant (Judson) IIol- 
dcn, was born in New York City, January 15, 184.1. 



D 




D.IXIFI. J. HOLDEN 

He is a descendant of Justinian Hoklen, who emi- 
grated from England in 1634, settling in Massachu- 
setts, and, on the maternal side, of William Judson, 



UNIl'ERSJTIES AND THEIR SONS 



205 



also an Englishman, who came over about the year 
1632, locating in Connecticut. He was prepared 
for College at M. W". Lyon's private school New 
York City ; was grailuated from Yale in 1864; and 
from the Columbia Law School in 1866. After his 
admission to the Bar he opened an office in the 
metropolis, where he practised alone until 1890, and 
from the latter year to the present time he has been 
a member of the eminent law firm of Coudert 
Brothers. Mr. Holden is a member of the Down- 
town Association, and of the City and University 
clubs. On September i, iiScS5, he married Kath- 
erine Veghte Knox ; their children are : Daniel 
Judson (born September 13, 1886, died February 
7, 1 888) ; antl I'.dith Holden, born September 17, 
18S7. 

HOWELL, George Rogers 

Yale B.A. 1854. 
Born in Southampton, L. I., 1833 ; graduated Yale, 
1854, Princeton Theological Seminary, 1E64 ; published 
history of Southampton, 1867; Principal of Boys' School, 
Mt. Morris, N. Y., 1869-72 ; Asst. Librarian of New 
York State Library, at Albany, 1872-99; State Archaist 
for New York since 1889; died 1899. 

GEORGE ROGERS HOWELL, Librarian of 
the New York State Library, was born June 
15, 1833, in Southampton, Long Lsland, the first 
town of New York State to be settled by tlie Eng- 
lish. The family of his father, Charles Howell, was 
descended from Edward Howell, the leader of 
the Southampton Colony. His mother was Mary 
(Rogers) Howell. .\fter graduating at Yale in 
1854 he was for six or seven years engaged in 
teaching, pursuing at the same time the study of 
language, particularly French and German. In the 
fall of 1 86 1 he commenced a course of theological 
■study at the Princeton Theological Seminary, where 
he graduated in 1864. He followed the minister's 
profession but a siiort tiuH-, one year and a half, in 
the Presbyterian pulpit at Moscow, New Yoik. In 
1865 he returned to Southampton to deliver the 
address at the two hundred and twentN-fiUh anni- 
versary of the settlement of tlie town, antl to pre- 
pare a history of the town. This book which was 
published in 1S67, contains the genealogies of the old 
families of the place. For three years, 1869-1S72, 
he was again engaged in teaching, having a position 
as Principal of the Boys' School at Mount Morris, 
New York. In the meantime his reputation as an 
exjiert linguist had been steadily increasing, and in 
1872 it won him the appointnent as Assistant 
Librarian uf the New York State Library, at Albany, 



where he remained for twenty-seven years, until his 
death, performing the duties of that office success- 
fully and creditably. He was an author of con- 
siderable note, having written many articles on 
historical, philological and scientific subjects. He 
published a Genealogy of the Parsons Family, and 
edited several works of various natures. From 1889 
to the time of his death he servc-d as State Archaist. 
Mr. Howell died at his home in .-Mbany, April 5, 
1899. His widow, Mary .Seymour Howell, is a well- 
known leader in the woman's rights movement. 



ROGERS, Henry Treat 

Yale B.A. 1866. 
Born in East Hartford, Conn., 1846 ; educated in 
New Haven public schools, and filled for College at 
Hopkins Grammar School ; graduated Yale, i856 ; M.A. 
in course ; studied lav/ in Chicago Law School ; ad- 
mitted to Bar, 1869; practised in Chicago, 1869-80; in 
Denver since 1882. 

H1;NRY TRMVr ROGI^RS, Lawyer, was born 
in Ivist Hartford, Connecticut, October 10, 
1864, the son of Martin Lorenzo Rogers (Yale 




HKNUV T. KOGEKS 



1836) and Jane Spes Treat. He received his early 
education in the public schools of New Haven and 
fitted for College at the Hopkins Grammar School, 
entering Yale in 1862 and graduating with the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Arts in 1866. He took his 



2o6 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



Master's degree three years later. Mr. Rogers 
reccivetl his legal training in the Chicago Law 
School and in the office of a Chicago firm, and was 
admitted to the Bar early in 1869, after which lie 
practised in Chicago until 1880, when because of 
poor health he removed to Colorado. He has been 
in active practice in the State and Federal courts in 
Denver since 1S82, and has been the general coun- 
sel of The Colorado Midland Railway Coni]jany 
since its organization in 1883, besides attending to 
a large general practice. He is a Director in the 
National Hank of Commerce of Denver, in the 
Colorado Midland Railway Company and in othei 
corporations. Mr. Rogers is a member of the Uni- 
versity and the Vale clubs of New York, and the 
University, Denver, Overland Park and Cun and 
Rod clubs of Denver. He is a Republican in poli- 
tics, though not a blind follower of party. He mar- 
ried, September 10, 1873, Kate Secord. They have 
no children. 



ROBBINS, Asher 

Vale B.A 178J. 
Born in Wethersfield, Conn., 1757 ; graduated Yale, 
1782; Tutor at College of Rhode Island (Brown), 1783- 
88; studied law and admitted to the Rhode Island 
Bar, 1789; U. S. Dist. Atty., 1795; member of Rhode 
Island Legislature, 1818-25; U. S. Senator, 1825-39; 
LL.D. Brown, 1835 ; died 1845. 

ASHER ROBBINS, LL.D., Lawyer, was born 
in Wethersfield, Connecticut, October 26, 
1757, and graduated at Yale in 1782. In the year 
following his graduation he took a position as Tutor 
in the College of Rhode Island, now Brown Univer- 
sity, where he taught for five years, meantime study- 
ing law and preparing himself for admission to the 
Bar in 1 789. For a number of years Mr. Robbins 
practised his profession in Providence, Rhode Is- 
land, removing to Newport in 1795 upon receiving 
the appointment of United States District Attorney 
for that state. Later he was sent as a Representa- 
tive from Newport to the Legislature, and served 
in that capacity from 1818 to 1825, when he was 
chosen United States Senator from Rhode Island. 
He was elected to the Senate as a ^Vhig in the 
place of James D'Wolf, and occupied a seat in that 
body from December 5, 1825 to March 3, 1839. 
On his return from Washington he was again sent 
to the Legislature. Mr. Robbins was an accom- 
plished classical scholar and an effective orator. 
Several of his addresses and orations were published, 
and in 1835 he received the degree of Doctor of 



Laws from Brown. He died in Newport February 
25. 1845. 

WARREN, Charles Hyde 

Yale Ph.B. 1896. 
Born in Watertown, Conn., 1876; graduated Yale 
Scientific School, 1896; Assistant in Analytical Chem- 
istry at Yale, 1896; at present Assistant in Mineralogy. 

CH.ARLES HYDE WARREN, Assistant in 
Mineralogy in the Sheffield Scientific 
School of Yale, was born in Watertown, Connecticut, 
September 27, 1S76. His parents are Charles .\lan- 




C. H. WARREN 

son and Francis Maria (Hyde) Warren, and through 
them he traces his lineage to earliest New England 
families and thence to Norman and later English 
families. His College preparation was received at 
the public schools of his native town, and at the 
High School of Waterbury, Connecticut, where he 
graduated in 1893. He then entered the Yale 
Scientific School, electing a special course in chem- 
istry, and graduated with the degree of Bachelor of 
Philosophy in 1896. He has held two positions at 
Yale since graduation, namely. Assistant in Analyti- 
cal Chemistry 1896-1897, and .Assistant in Mineral- 
ogy since 1897. His work is in the Sheffield School. 
He is a member of the Sigma Xi Fraternity. He is 
a Republican voter. 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



207 



BAILEY, Thomas Fisher 

Princeton A.B. 1894. 
Born in Huntingdon, Pa., 1870; received College 
preparation at Blair Hall, Blairstown, N. J., and at 
Lawrenceville, N. J.; graduated Princeton, 1894; 
studied law with his father and admitted to the Bar, 
1896 and has been in active practice ever since. 

TI1(JM.\S FISHKR B.AILFA', .\ttorney-at- 
Lavv, was born in Huntingdon, Pennsyl- 
vania, November 15, i-Syo, son of John M. and 
Letitia (Fisher) Bailey. His paternal great-grand- 
father was a native of Ireland, while his mother 
was of Scotch and (lerman descent, from John 



don, and in August of that year was commissioned 
Second Lieutenant, Twenty-first Regiment National 
Guard of Pennsylvania. He is a member of the 
Tiger Inn Club of Princeton. 




THOM.-^.S ¥. H.AILEY 

Borland, who came to this country from the 
Netherlands in 1680. Thomas Fisher Bailey at- 
tended the public schools at Huntingdon, and was 
also a student at Blair Hall in Blairstown, New 
Jersey, and at Lawrenceville, New Jersey. He 
graduated from Princeton in the Class of 1894. 
.After graduating, he studied law in his father's 
office and was admitted to the Bar, June 22, 1896, 
and has been in active practice ever since at 
Huntingdon. In January 1896 his father was 
elected Judge of the Twenty-second Judicial Dis- 
trict of Pennsylvania, and since then a large part 
of his practice has devolved upon his son, the 
subject of this sketch. In 1898 he was elected 
a Director of the First National Bank of Hunting- 



BRYAN, John P. Kennedy 

Princeton A.B. 1873. 
Born in Charleston, S. C, 1852; fitted for College in 
Newton Collegiate Institute, N. J. ; graduated Prince- 
ton, 1873 ; received Fellowship in mental science and 
studied in Universities of Berlin and Leipzig, 1873-75; 
studied and travelled in France, Italy and England, 
1875-76; studied law with his father in Charleston, 
S. C, and admitted to the Bar in 1877; practising law 
in Charleston as member of the firm of Bryan & Bryan 
since 1877. 

JOHN P. KENNEDY BRYAN, so named to 
perpetuate the friendship between his father 
and John P. Kennedy the eminent novelist and 
statesman of Maryland, was born in Charleston, 
South Carolina, September lo, 1852, the son of the 
Hon. George S. Bryan, United States District Judge 
for South Carolina, 1 866-1 886, and Rebecca L. 
Dwight. Mr. Bryan is of distinguished lineage on 
both sides. His father, one of the old leaders of the 
Whig party in South Carolina, was not only an 
eminent lawyer, who filled with honor the post of 
United States Judge during the storm and stress of 
the reconstruction period, when matters of the 
greatest moment to his people and to the Federal 
Government had to be adjudicated, but was a man 
of letters and the devoted friend and benefactor of 
Henry Timrod the Southern poet. Judge Bryan 
was the grandson of George Bryan, \'ice-President 
of Pennsylvania, Judge of the Supreme Court of that 
state and a delegate to the Continental Congress. 
The mother of Mr. Bryan was descended from the 
Rev. Daniel Dwight of the Puritan stock of Dwights 
of Dedham, Massachusetts, who took his degree at 
O.xford, England, and came to the Colony of 
South Carolina early in the eighteenth century and 
founded the family of Dwights in that state. He 
married the daughter of Governor Broughton, who 
had married the daughter of Governor Sir Nathaniel 
Johnson. Rebecca L. Dwight was also descendeil 
from the Huguenot, Isaac Marion of the Revolution, 
the brother of General Francis Marion, and she is 
to-day one of the two nearest surviving relatives of 
the great partisan leader. Mr. Bryan's early educa- 
tion was had in the private and public schools of 
Charleston, whence he was sent to Newton Collegi- 
ate Institute, Newton, New Jersey, where he was in 
great part prepared for College. He entered 



2o8 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



I'rinceton in 1S69 and graduated in 1S73 with llic 
first honors of the class. Among his other Collegi- 
ate distinctions at Princeton were, junior orator ; 
Junior honor scholarship ; Senior prize debate 
medallist (Clio Hall) ; Senior prize essayist; vale- 
dictorian anil mental science fellow. He was ac- 
credited as mental science fellow of I'rinceton to 
the University of Berlin in 1S73-1874 and afterward, 
1874-1S75 to the University of Leipzig, where he 
continued the study of philosophy so auspiciously 
begun at Princeton. In addition to metaphysics, 
psychology, logic and ethics, the fellowship course 






J. p. KENNEDY BRYAN 

embraced international law, civil law and the social 
sciences, which were important factors in Mr. 
Bryan's training for active life. To this he added a 
year of residence and travel in England, France and 
Italy. In 1876 he studied law under his father 
Judge Bryan in Charleston, and in 1877 was ad- 
mitted to practice in all the courts. Since 1877 he 
has practised law most successfully at Charleston as 
a member of the firm of Bryan & Bryan, and has 
taken a commanding position at the Bar which suc- 
cessfully endeavors to sustain the high moral and 
professional standard, set by the Rutledges, Pinck- 
neys and Draytons, who before the Revolution were 
educated in the law at the London Inns of Court. 
.^mong the many notable and historic cases in which 



Mr. Bryan has taken conspicuous part may be 
nientioncil tlic jiolitical trials in South Carolina, 
1877 to 1 88 5, in which he was counsel for the 
defence ; special counsel for the United States in 
prize cases in the Spanish war ; and in " conspiracy 
cases" ; special counsel for the City of Charleston, 
particularly in the fight for her commerce against all 
the railroads of the South, 1898-1899. Mr. Bryan 
has argued all the constitutional questions in the 
Sujireme Court of the United States against the 
South Carolina Dispensary Law, and the many 
amendments to that law since made by the State 
Legislature and the concessions to the personal and 
private rights of a citizen are unquestionably due to 
Mr. Bryan's arguments against state monopolv and 
his exposure of the bad administration of that law. 
Mr. Bryan's career has been successful from the 
start. He has declined public office and been 
devoted to his profession, and his knowleilge of man 
and knowledge of law make him equally powerful 
before a Judge or a Jury. .After his return from 
Europe in 1876 he ardently devoted himself by pen 
and voice to the political rescue of his native state 
in the Hampton movement. In 1895, as delegate 
to the Constitutional Convention and member of the 
Suffrage Committee, he successfully led the debates 
resulting in the establishment of the suffrage on a 
basis of property and educational qualifications. He 
is a Trustee of the L'niversity of the South (Se- 
wanee) ; of the College of Charleston ; of the High 
School of Charleston ; of the William Enston Home ; 
and has been a delegate from St. Michael's Church, 
Charleston, to Diocesan Councils, and to the Gen- 
eral Convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church 
of the United States. He is a member of Clio 
Hall (Princeton), the Charleston Club, Carolina 
Yacht Club, Historical Society of South Carolina, 
South Carolina Art, St. Cecilia, New England, 
Huguenot, St. Andrews and the Hibernian societies. 
August 12, 1880, he married Henrietta C. King of 
Charleston. Their children are : Elizabeth Middle- 
ton, Henrietta King, and Kate Hampton Bryan. 



HOUSE, William 

Princeton A.B. 1854. 
Born in Houseville, N. Y., 1826; received his early 
education at Lowville Academy and by private tuition ; 
graduated Princeton, 1854 ; Princeton Theological Sem- 
inary, 1857 ; Pastor of the Presbyterian Church at Lon- 
donderry, N. H., 1857, when he accepted a call to the 
Congregational Church at Barrington, R. I. ; removed 
to Providence, R. I., i885, where he remained as Pastor 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



209 



of various churches until about 1898, when he retired 
because of failing health ; died i8g8. 

WILLIAM HOUSE, Clergyman, was born in 
Hoiiseville, Lewis county. New York, 
December 24, 1826, the son of Joseph and Amanda 
(Cadwell) House. The Houses and Cad wells were 
natives of Connecticut, but originally of English ex- 
traction. In his early youth he attended school at 
the .Vcademy in Lowville, New York, antl after 
some years spent in mercantile life in Utica, in that 
state, during which time he was privately preparing 
himself to enter College, he became a student at 
Princeton, graduating from that institution in 1854, 




W.M. HOUSE 

in the last of the thirty-one classes under the Presi- 
dency of Rev. James Carnahan, !).!). He was 
graduated from the Princeton Theological Seminary 
in 1857, the interim of his College and Seminary 
courses having been spent in the work of the 
American Sunday-School Union. After graduating 
from the seminary, he was licensed to preach, and 
in October 1857, was ordained Pastor of the Pres- 
byterian Church at Londonderry, New Hampshire, 
a charge he held until 1873 when he removed to 
Harrington, Rhode Island, and was installed in the 
Congregational Church of that ])lace, in 1S74. 
Here he labored diligently and with great success 
for twelve years, and then he resigned to become 
Assistant Pastor of the Union Congregational Church 
VOL. V. — 14 



at Providence. After two years with this church and 
two more years with the Plymouth Church of Provi- 
dence, he accepted a call to the IJeneficent Church 
as .Assistant Pastor to engage more particularly in 
city missionary work. This charge he held for six 
years, when his f;iiling health compelled him to 
resign active labors. Mr. House was a member of 
the Republican party, and always a conscientious 
voter. During 1896- 1898 he occupied the office of 
Statistical Secretary for Rhode Island. June i, 
1859, he was married to Frances, daughter of Rev. 
Thomas Savage. They have had four children : 
James Savage, Morris William, Lucy Woodruff and 
Eliot Vose House. Mr. House died on April 3, 
189S. 

NORCROSS, George 

Princeton D.D. 1879. 
Born in Erie, Pa., 1838 ; received his early education 
in schools in Monmouth and Macomb, 111.; graduated 
Monmouth College, 1E61 ; student in McCormick Theo- 
logical Seminary at Chicago, 1861, at the United Pres- 
byterian Theological Seminary at Monmouth in 1862, and 
at Princeton Theological Seminary, 1864; licensed to 
preach, 1863, and ordained Pastor of No. Henderson 
Presbyterian Church in Illinois, 1865; also held a Pro- 
fessorship in Monmouth College for a year ; Pastor of 
the Presbyterian Church at No. Henderson, 1865, and 
at Galesburg, 111., 1866-69 J Pastor of the 2nd Presbyte- 
rian Church at Carlisle, Pa. , since 1869 ; D.D. Princeton, 
1879. 

GEORGE NORCROSS, D.D., Clergyman, was 
born in Erie, Pennsylvania, April 8, 1S38, 
the son of Hiram and Elizabeth (McClelland) Nor- 
cross. On the paternal side he is of English 
and Scotch-Irish descent, and on the maternal side, 
of Scotch-Irish. He received his early etlucation 
at schools in Monmouth and Macomb, Illinois, and 
graduated from Monmouth College in the Class of 
1 86 1. He devoted a year to study in the McCor- 
mick Theological Seminary at Chicago, another year 
in the United Presbyterian Theological Seminary at 
Monmouth, and then preached for seventeen months, 
after which he went to the Theological Seminary at 
Princeton for a third year of study. He was 
licensed to preach by the Presbytery of Warren, 
Illinois, in 1863, and immediately commenced 
preaching at North Henderson, in Mercer county, 
Illinois. He also held a Professorship in .Monmouth 
College about this time, where he taught for more 
than a year. On his return from Princeton in 1S65 
he was ordained and instalknl Pastor of the church 
at North Henderson, where he remained until April 
1 866, when he took charge of the Presbyterian Church 



2IO 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



(O. S.) at Galesburg, Illinois. Here he served as 
Pastor until he was called to his present charge, the 
Second Presbyterian Church of Carlisle, Pennsyl- 
vania, January 1869, where he has faithfully labored 
for over thirty years. On New Year's Day (Sun- 
day) and the Monday following, 1899, were held 
interesting anniversary exercises in the Carlisle 
Church in connection with the celebration of the 
thirty-years Pastorate of Dr. Norcross. The ac- 
count of this ovation was printed in a book of two 
hundred and seventy-six pages, entitled The Story 
of a Thirtieth Anniversary. Dr. Norcross is a 



he married Mrs. Louise (Jackson) Ciale of Galesburg, 
Illinois, who is still the faithful partner of all his 
labors. 




GEORGE NORCROSS 

member of the American Historical Association, of 
the Scotch-Irish Society of America and of the Har- 
risburg Presbyterian Cleric. He was unanimously 
elected Moderator of the Synod of Pennsylvania, 
October 19, 1899, in his native place, Erie, Penn- 
sylvania. He was an associate member of the first 
Pan- Presbyterian Council, Edinburgh, Scotland, 
1877 ; and a member of the last Council, which met 
in Washington, District of Columbia, September 27, 
1899. He has been four times a commissioner to 
the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church. 
Princeton conferred upon him the degree of Doctor 
of Divinity in 1879. He was married for the first 
time, on October i, 1863, to Mary S. Tracy, who 
died about two years later. On April 22, 1867, 



STEVENSON, Alexander Russell 

Princeton A. B. 1876 
Born in Baltimore, Md., 1856; fitted for College at 
Chambersburg Academy in Pennsylvania; graduated 
Princeton, 1876; taught school, 1876-77; studied at 
Union Theological Seminary, New York, 1878-79; 
graduated Princeton Theological Seminary, 1880; Pas- 
tor Brainerd Presbyterian Church of Easton, Pa., 1880- 
88; Pastor ist Presbyterian Church at Schenectady, 
N. Y., since 1888. 

AL1':.XANDER RUSSELL STEVENSON, Cler- 
gyman, was born in Baltimore, Maryland, 
December 29, 1856, the son of John McPherson 
and Margaretta Eliza (Paxton) Stevenson. His an- 
cestors on both sides of the family were Scotch-Irish 
Presbyterians who settled in Southern Pennsylvania 
between 1700 and 1740. Several of them took 
part in the struggle for independence at the time 
of the Revolutionary War. He was fitted for Col- 
lege at Chambersburg Academy in Pennsylvania, 
entered the Sophomore class at Princeton in 1873 
and was graduated in 1876. For a year after 
graduation he taught school, when, having decided 
to study for the ministry, he entered the Union 
Theological Seminary in New York City, wliere he 
remained from 187S to 1879, then went to Prince- 
ton Theological Seminary, and was graduated from 
there in the Class of iSSo. In .\pril of that 
year he was licensed to preach by the Presby- 
tery of New York, and was ordained to the ministry 
by the Presbytery of Lehigh the following I )ecem- 
ber. He became Pastor of the Brainerd Presby- 
terian Church of Easton, Pennsylvania, where he 
labored for seven and one half years, and on April 
I, 1888, accepted a call to the First Presbyterian 
Church at Schenectady, New York, a pulpit he fills 
at the present time. Mr. Stevenson married Mary 
Margaret, daughter of Thomas B. Kennedy of 
Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, .Vpril 11, 1882. They 
have four children : Thomas Kennedy, Caroline 
Paxton, .Alexander Russell, Jr., and Stuart Riddle 
Stevenson. In 1S99 the Fleming H. Re\ille Com- 
pany published a booklet by Mr. Stevenson, entitled 
The Gates of Death and Their Keys. 



SMOCK, Ledru Pierson 

Princeton A.B. 1879. 
Born in Matawan, N. J., 1857; fitted for College at 
Van Rensselaer Institute at Hightstown ; graduated 



UI^IFERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



21 I 



Princeton, 1879; Medical Department, Univ. of Penn- 
sylvania, 1882; Asst. Laryngologist to the Univ. of 
Pennsylvania Hosp. ; Laryngologist and Otologist to 
St. Agnes' Hosp., and to St. Mary's Hospital; since 
1884 a Specialist on Diseases of the Ear, Throat and 
Nose, and now Consulting Laryngologist and Aurist 
at St. Agnes' Hospital, Philadelphia. 

LEDRU PIERSON SMOCK, M.l)., Physician, 
was born in Matawan, New Jersey, July 18, 
1S57, the son of William Thompson and Lida (\'an 
Nortwick) Smock. His paternal ancestors wore 
German-Americans ; on his mother's side he is of 



and Aurist at St. Agnes' Hospital, in Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania. Dr. Smock is a member of the 
Philadelphia County Medical Society, the Pennsyl- 
vania State Medical Society, the American Academy 
of Medicine, American Medical Society, and the 
I'ouelton Club. In politics he is a Republican. 
He was married January 6, 1883, to Jessie Virginia 
Rradfield. They have had four children, two of 
whom are living : Irwin I5radfield and Elsie Brad- 
fiekl Smock. 





LEDKU p. S.MOCK 



Scotch descent. He was fitted for College at Van 
Rensselaer Institute at Ilightstown, and graduated 
from Princeton witli the degree of Bachelor of Arts 
in the Class of 1879. .After leaving Princeton he 
took up the study of Medicine in the University of 
Pennsylvania, graduating from the Medical Depart- 
ment in 1882, also receiving the degree of Master 
of Arts from Princeton the same year. For six 
years Dr. Smock was Assistant Laryngologist to 
the University of Pennsylvania Hospital, for ten 
years Laryngologist and Otologist to St. Agnes' 
Hospital, being for part of the time also connected 
with St. Mary's Hospital. For the past fifteen years 
he has been a specialist on Diseases of the Ear. 
Throat and Nose, and is Consulting Laryngologist 



VENABLE, Abraham B. 

Princeton A.B. 1780. 
Born in Prince Edward Co., Va., 1760; graduated 
Princeton, 1780; settled as a planter in Virginia; mem- 
ber of Congress, 1791-99; U. S. Senator, 1803-04; Pres. 
of Bank of Virginia under Jefferson's administration ; 
died 1811. 

AiiRAH.XM B. VENABLE, Statesman, was 
born in Prince Ivlward county, Virginia, 
in 1760, a descendant of the earliest settlers of 
that state. His ancestors received a grant of land 
at the Manikin town on James River from Charles 
II. His grandfather was Surgeon in the first regi- 
ment of troops sent to Jamestown under command 
of Sir John Harvie. Abraham B. Venable was gradu- 
ated at Princeton in T780, and received his degree 
of Master of .Arts there in course, returning to Vir- 
ginia, where he followed the life of a planter upon 
his estates in his native county. .At the age of 
thirty-one he was elected a Representative to Con- 
gress from Virginia, and served in that capacity four 
terms, from 1791 to 1799. .A few years later he 
was chosen United States Senator, but occupied the 
seat only a short time, resigning in 1804 and return- 
ing to private life. Mr. Venable continued, however, 
to e.xercise a controlling influence in public affairs. 
He was the intimate friend and one of the most 
valued political advisers of Thomas Jefferson, and 
during the Presidency of that statesman, he was 
appointed the head of the Bank of Virginia. Mr. 
Venable was among the \ictims of the burning of 
the Richmond Theatre, perishing in that terrible 
disaster on the niglit of December 26, 181 1. 



WORK, George Renick 

Princeton Class of 1896- 
Born in Topeka, Kans., 1872 ; fitted for College in 
Ogden School and Univ. School, Chicago, 111.; student 
at Princeton, Class of 1896; since 1894 has been con- 
nected with the firm of Work Bros. & Co., wholesale 



21 2 



UNIVERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



clothiers, and since 1899 has had charge of the retail 
department of the business. 

Gl'lORGl-: RKMCK WORK wns born in 
Topeka, Kansas, March 29, 1S72, the son 
of George Z. and Dorothy (Renick) Work. His 




read law in Newark, 1862-63 ; student in Harvard Law 
School, 1863-64 ; admitted to practice as attorney by 
the Supreme Court of New Jersey 1865, and as coun- 
sellor in 1868, and has been in active practice ever 
since. 

Hi:XRV VOUNG, .\ttorney and Counselor, 
was born in Newark, New Jersey, October 
24, 1S44, the son of Charles Edgerton and Charlotte 
Denman (Wilbur) Voting. He is of Scotch descent 
on the paternal side ; on his mother's, of English 
ancestry. The ancestors of both families settled 
in New Jersey more than one hundred and fifty 
years ago, where most of their descendants have 
continued to live and have been prominent in pro- 
fessional and business life. Representatives of both 
families served as officers in the War of the Revolu- 
tion. He received his preliminary education in a 
private school in Newark, entered Princeton in 
1859 in the Sophomore class, and graduated 1S62, 
ranking third in a class distinguished for high aver- 
age of scholarship. Immediately after leaving Col- 
lege, he entered the law office of Frederick T. 
Frelinghuysen at Newark, reading law there for a 
year, and pursuing his law studies in Harvard Law 



father's family, the Works, were natives of Pennsyl- 
vania ; his mother WMS born in Ohio. He received 
his College preparation at the Ogden and University 
Schools in Chicago, Illinois, and entered Princeton 
in the Class of 1896. In 1894 he left College and 
entered the house of Work Brothers & Company, 
wholesale clothiers, of which his father and uncle 
are the principals, remaining in the store for one 
year, and spending the following two years in 
travelling in the interests of that firm. Since 1899 
he has had charge of the retail department of the 
business. Mr. Work is a member of the Republican 
party, but takes no active part in political affairs. 
He is a member of the University Club of Chicago. 
On February 12, 1896, he married Elsie Gould of 
Evanston, Illinois, and has one child : Dorothy 
Renick Work. 




HENRY VOUXG 



YOUNG, Henry 

Princeton A.B. i86?. 
Born in Newark, N. J., 1844; fitted for College in a 
private school in Newark ; graduated Princeton, 1862 ; 



School during 1 863 and 1 864. In June i S65 he was 
admitted to practice as an attorney by the Supreme 
Court of New Jersey, and three years later became 
a counsellor. Since his admission to the Bar he has 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



21 



been engaged in active practice and has been em- 
ployed in many important cases involving large 
interests, especially relating to constitutional law 
and the law of public and private corporations. 
Mr. Young is a member of the Republican party. 
He was appointed Assistant United States District 
Attorney for New Jersey in 1867 and served in that 
capacity for six years, and from 1876 to 1884 he 
was Corporation Counsel of the City of Newark. 
He is a member of the Princeton Club of New 
York, of the Essex County Country Club, and a 
charter member of the Essex Club of Newark. 
He was married in 1872 to Margaret Anna Hitch- 
cock of New York. They have three children ; 
Henry, a Princeton graduate of the Class of 1893, 
and engaged in law practice in Newark ; Stuart 
Adams, Princeton 1902; and Roger \oung. 



McGILL. Alexander Taggart 

Princeton A.B. 1864, A.M. 1867, LL.D. 1891. Columbia LL.B. 1866. 
Born in Allegheny City, Pa., 1843 ; received his early 
education at Princeton, N. J. ; graduated Princeton, 
1864 ; graduated also from Columbia Law School, i865; 
admitted to the New Jersey Bar, 1867 ; moved from 
Princeton to Jersey City in 1868 and has practised law 
there ever since ; has held various public offices, and is at 
the present time Chancellor of the State of New Jersey. 

ALEXANDER TAGGART McC.lLL, Chan- 
cellor of New Jersey, was born in .Allegheny 
City, Pennsylvania, October 20, 1843, son of \\t\- 
ander Taggart and Eleanor Acheson (McCulloch) 
McGill. He is of Scotch-Irish descent through 
ancestors who settled in America in 1780. He 
received his early education at Princeton, New 
Jersey, and was graduated from Princeton in the 
Class of 1864. He then took up the study of law 
in the Law School of Columbia in New York City 
and graduated with the Class of 1866. He was 
admitted to practice in New Jersey in 1867, and 
the following year mo\ed from Princeton to Jersey 
City and formed a law partnership with the Hon. 
Robert (lilchrist, Attorney-General of the state. 
.At the expiration of eight years this partnership was 
dissolved, Mr. McGill continuing in practice alone 
for two years, when he associated in partnershiji 
with Isaac S. Taylor under tlie firm name of McCill 
& Taylor. In politics, Mr. McC.ill is a Democrat 
and served two terms (1S74-1875) as a member of 
the House of Assembly of the New Jersey Legisla- 
ture. In 1878 he was appointed by C.o\ernor 
McClcllan District .\ttorncy for Hudson county. 
New Jersey, for a term of five years. In 1883 he 



was appointed by Governor Ludlow County Judge 
of the Court of Common Pleas for a term of five 
years. Mr. McGill received the appointment of 
Chancellor of the State of New Jersey from (iov- 
ernor Green in 1 88 7, for a term of seven years, and 
upon the expiration of that term was reappointed 
Chancellor by Governor George T. Werts, ami fills 




ALEX. T. .Mci;ll.l. 

this office at the present time. .Mr. McGill was 
marrieil in 1875 to Caroline Stockton Olmsted, of 
Princeton, New Jersey. 

VAN VLIET, John Jewell 

Princeton C.tl. l8g4. 
Born in Goshen, Orange Co., N. Y.. 1871 ; graduated 
from the John C. Green School of Science of Princeton 
as a Civil Engineer in 1894. 

JOHN JEWELL VAN Vl.li;r, Civil Engineer, 
was born in Goshen, Orange coimty, New 
York, September 17, 1871, the son of William 
Downs and Julia (Smith) Van Vliet. On the 
paternal side he is of IL>lland-Dutch ancestry, on 
his mother's side of English extraction, througli tlie 
Smiths of Elizabethtown. Mr. Van Vliet entered the 
John C. Green School of Science at Princeton and 
studied civil engineering with the Class of 1894. 
Since leaving Princeton he has been engaged in 
business in C.oshen. He is a member of the 
Holland Society of New York. 



214 



UNIVERSITIES JND THEIR SONS 



GARLOCK, William Delano 

Columbia M.D. l88:. 
Born in Manheim, N. Y., 1855; prepared for College 
at the Collegiate Institute, Adams, N. Y. ; student at 
Cornell two years ; graduated College of Physicians 
and Surgeons, Columbia, 1882; now practising in Little 
Falls, N. Y. 

WILLIAM DELANO GARLOCK, M.D., 
Physician, was born in Maniieim, New 
York, April 2, 1855, the son of Nelson and Cath- 
erine (Voran) (iarlock. He is of (lerman Palati- 
nate origin. His early education was at first in the 
common schools of his birthplace, and subsequently 




WILLIAM D. GARLOCK 

he entered the Hungerford Collegiate Institute in 
Adams, New York, where he was prepared for 
College. He studied at Cornell for two years in 
preparation for a medical course, and was graduated 
at the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Colum- 
bia, in 1882. He at once engaged in general medi- 
cal practice at Little Falls, New York, where he 
has ever since resided. Dr. Garlock is ex-President 
of the Herkimer County Medical Society and a 
member of the New York State Medical Society, 
and of the State and American Medical Associations. 
In politics he is Independent. November 22, 18S1, 
he was united in marriage with Mary Gertrude 
Bidleman, and has three children : Morgan B., 
Louise and Gertrude K. Garlock. 



HAMERSLEY, James Hooker 

Columbia A.B. 1865, LL.B. 1867. 
Born in New York City, 1844; received his early edu- 
cation in Paris, France; prepared for College at the 
Poughkeepsie, N. Y., Collegiate School ; graduated 
Columbia, 1865; Columbia Law School, 1867 ; practised 
law in New York City, 1867-77; retired from active 
practice to the management of the family estate. 

JAMES HOOKER HAMERSLEY, Lawyer, was 
born in New York City, January 26, 1844, the 
only son of John William and Catherine Livingston 
(Hooker) Hamersley. He is of a family long 
prominent in New York, tracing its origin to Hugo 
le Kinge who removed from Provence, France, to 
England about 1366 and there acquired the estate 
of Hamersley from which the family name is derived. 
The American branch descends direct from Sir 
Hugh Hamersley, Lord Mayor of London in 1627, 
whose great-grandson, William, came to New York 
about I 716, as an officer in the British Navy, became 
a successful merchant there and founded the family 
fortune in this country. His descendants have con- 
tinued wealthy and prominent members of New 
York society. On his mother's side he is descended 
from the Re\'. Tiiomas Hooker, who removed with 
his congregation from Cambridge, Massachusetts, in 
1636, and founded the town of Hartford, Connecti- 
cut. His grandfather, the Hon. James Hooker of 
Poughkeepsie, New York, was a distinguished jurist, 
Surrogate of Dutchess county, and one of the pro- 
moters of the building of the Hudson River Rail- 
road. Through his mother's family he is connected 
witli nearly all the distinguished families of the 
state. He is the fifth in descent from William 
Hamersley, an officer of the British Navy stationed 
at New York in 1716, and from Joseph Reade, a 
member of the Provincial Council of New York in 
1 764. Among his earlier ancestors are, in the 
eighth generation, Brant .\rentse Van Schlichten- 
horst, who was Governor or Director of the Colony 
of Rensselaerwick in 1648; and Henry Beekman, 
who obtained from Queen Anne by letters patent a 
large tract of land, part of which is now embraced 
in Dutchess county. Mr. Hamersley still owns a 
portion of this land, which has never been out of 
the possession of his family since the time of Queen 
.•Xnne. James Hooker Hamersley was at school in 
Paris, France, as a child, and was prepared for Col- 
lege at the Collegiate School in Poughkeepsie, New 
York. He was graduated at Columbia in the Class 
of 1865, taking his Master's degree in course and 
that of Bachelor of Laws at the Law School of that 
University in 1S67, and received his practical ex- 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



215 



perience in the office of James W. Gerard, at that 
time a leader of the New York liar. Mr. Hamers- 
ley practiseil law with good success in New York 
for about ten years, and then retired from the 
active work of his profession to give his time to the 
management of his own and his family's property. 
He is a strong Republican in jjolitics and has taken 
much interest in the movements of that party. In 
1877 he was sent by the Independent element as a 
delegate to the State Republican Convention at 
Rochester, and in the same year was nominated for 
the Legislature but withdrew in favor of his friend 




JAS. HOOKER HAMKRSLEV 

William Waldorf ,\stor, in whose canvass he was an 
earnest worker. Mr. Hamersley inherits the histori- 
cal and literary tastes of his father, is a classical 
scholar, reading his favorite ancient authors with 
satisfaction in the original, and a graceful writer. 
His occasional articles on important topics of the 
day have brought him into notice as a thinker and 
rcasoner, and his poems, of which a volume has 
recently been published under the title of The 
Seven Voices, have been warmly welcomed by the 
public and the critics. Among his most popular 
poems are Yellow Roses, Ronkonkoma, The Coun- 
tersign, and Mabconomo. Mr. Hamersley is a 
member of numerous clubs and societies, includ- 
ing the University and Melropolit.m clubs, the St. 



Nicholas Society, Sons of the Revolution, Society 
of Colonial Wars, the City and Badminton clubs, the 
New York Historical Society, the New York Law 
Institute, and other social and literary organizations. 
He is President of the Knickerbocker Bowling Club, 
a member of the .American (Geographical Society, 
and for many years served as Director of the 
Knickerbocker Fire Insurance Com])any, one of 
the oldest of its class in this country. He is one 
of the Board of Managers of the Young Men's 
Christian .'\ssociation and of its li^xecutive Commit- 
tee, an honorary member of the Society for Seamen 
of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the Port and 
Harbor of New York, and President of the Babies 
Hospital. In 1888 Mr. Hamersley married .Margaret 
Willing, daughter of William E. Chisholm, of an old 
South Carolina family, and has had three children, 
two of whom, Catherine Livingston and Louis Gor- 
don Hamersley, are living. The eldest child, a 
daughter, died in infancy. 



HAMERSLEY, John William 

Columbia A.B. i8:6. 
Born in New York City, 1808; graduated Columbia, 
1826; studied law and practised with success in New 
York ; retired from active professional work to manage 
the family property ; died 1889. 

JOHN WILLLA.M HAMERSLEY, Lawyer, was 
born in New York City, May 24, 1808, the 
son of Louis Carr(5 and Elizabeth (Finney) Hamers- 
ley. The family, which has long been prominent 
in New York society, traces its origin to Hugo le 
Kinge, who removed from Pro\'ence to England 
about 1366 and there acquired the estate of Hamers- 
ley from which the name is deriveii. The American 
branch comes direct from Sir Hugh Hamersley, 
Lord ISIayor of London in 1627, whose great-grand- 
son, William, an officer in the British Navy, came to 
New York about 1 7 1 6 and became a successful 
merchant there. John W. Hamersley was graduated 
at Columbia in 1S26, received his Master's degree 
in course, studied law ami practised his profession 
with success in New York City for a number of 
years. The management of the large family prop- 
erty, however, made such demands ujion his time 
and attention that he was obliged to withdraw from 
active practice and devote himself altogether to 
private affairs. He had excellent business qualifi- 
cations, strong common sense and untiring energy 
and these qualities, combined with keen foresight 
and admirable judgment, i:n.il)led him to make wise 



2l6 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



investments which greatly increased the family prop- 
erty. At his residence in New York he dispensed 
an elegant hospitality, attracting about him men 
eminent in art, science and literature as well as 
representatives of every branch of commerce and 
all walks of professional life. Mayne Reid was one 
of his intimate friends and made him the hero of 
his novel, The I.one Ranch. Mr. Hamersley was 
not only a patron of literature but himself an author, 
among his publications being a volume of reminis- 
cences of I.ady Hester Stanhope and a translation 
of the curious work of Jacques Abbadie, ,\ Chemical 




JOHN \V. HAMERSLEY 

Change in the Eucharist. He was an extensive 
traveller, making a dozen or more trips to Europe 
and the East, and as learned as he was accomplished. 
Mr. Hamersley was a War Democrat during the 
time of the Civil conflict, but was governed at all 
times in his political course by principle and not by 
party. He never would accept public office and 
always avoided positions of trust. For many years 
he was a member of Grace Church, New York, and 
after his death his children presented a massive 
brass lectern to that church, in his memory. When 
a young man Mr. Hamersley was Colonel of one of 
the New York regiments and always retained that 
title among his military friends. He was one of the 
founders of the Union Club and of the Patriarchs, 



a member of the Century Club, the St. Nicholas, 
New York Historical and Geographical societies, and 
the New York Law Institute. He was also a friend 
and patron of many benevolent institutions, notably 
of the Children's Aid Society, for which charity and 
in memory of his father James Hooker Hamersley 
has built a library and reading-room at its summer 
home at Bath Beach, Long Island. Mr. Hamersley 
married Catherine Livingston Hooker, the daughter 
of Judge James Hooker of Poughkeepsie, New 
\'ork. Their children are : Helen Mary, who died 
in infancy ; Virginia, who married Cortlandt dePeyster 
Field of New York ; Helen Reade, who married 
Charles D. Stickney of New Bedford, Massachusetts; 
Catherine Livingston, who married John Henry Liv- 
ingston of Clermont, New York ; James Hooker, who 
married Margaret Willing Chisholm. Mr. Hamers- 
ley died, June 7, 1S89. 



HOFFMAN, Burrall 

Columbia A.B. 1862, LL B. 1864, LL.M. 1865. 

Born in New York City, 1S42 ; educated private 
schools and Columbia ; member New York Bar nearly 
forty years ; still practising in the metropolis. 

BURRALL HOFFMAN, A.M., LL.M., Lawyer, 
son of Murray and Mary M. (Ogden) HofT- 
man, was born in New York City, March 6, 1842. 
On the paternal side he is of Swedish descent and 
his mother's ancestors came originally from Eng- 
land. He attended private schools in New York 
City, and Bridgeport, Connecticut, and was a 
student in the School of Arts and Law Department 
of Columbia, graduating from the former in 1862 
and subsequently receiving the degrees of Master 
of ."^rts. Bachelor of Laws and Master of Laws. 
His entire life has, collectively speaking, been spent 
in his native city, where from the time of his ad- 
mission to the Bar he has practised his profession 
continuously to the present time, a period of nearly 
forty years, and he is therefore one of the best 
known lawyers in the metropolis. Mr. Hoffman is 
a member of the St. Nicholas Society and the LTni- 
versity Club. On September 30, 1896, he was 
united in marriage with i\Lary W. Bradley. 



HOSMER, James Ray 

Columbia A.B. 1855. A.M. 1858. 
Born in New York City, 1834; graduated Columbia, 
1855; received A.M. degree, 1858; studied law, and 
admitted to the Bar of Illinois 1856, of Baltimore 1859 



UNIVERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



217 



and of New York in 1869; engaged in editorial work, 
1865-69; Secretary and 2d Vice-President of Globe 
Mutual Life Ins. Co., 1871-76; President Vermont Life 
Ins. Co., 1876-81 ; was Secretary of Legation and Con- 
sul General of U. S. in Central America, 1887-90; mili- 
■tary career commenced with appointment as 2d Lieut, 
of 8th Maryland Vols., 1862 ; commissioned Capt. and 
Asst. Quartermaster, 1863; served on Gen. Sheridan's 
staff, 1864; served as Capt. and Depot Quartermaster 
at Matanzas, Cuba, during the Spanish War. 

J.\MES R.VV HOSMKR, Lawyer and .\rmy Offi- 
cer, was born in New York City, December 
4, 1834. Through his father. Oliver Ellsworth 
Hosmer, he is descended from Thomas Hosmer, 




JA.MES R. HOSMER 

one of the founders of the Hartford Colony in i();;6, 
and from a line of early Colonists of much promi- 
nence ; among them being Ciovernors Griswold and 
VVolcott of Connecticut, (lovernors Mather and 
Winslow of Massachusetts, Major-General Samuel 
Holden Parsons of the Continental .Xrmy, and Hon. 
Titus Hosmer, signer of the Articles of Confedera- 
tion in the Continental Congress and a Judge 
of the Maritime Court of .\ppeals. He is the 
grandson of the late Chief-Justice Stephen T. Hos- 
mer of Connecticut. His mother was Nancy Post 
(Hawes) Hosmer, of New York City. James Ray 
Hosmer was educated for College in private and 
boarding schools. He graduated from Columbia 
with the Class of iSSs, and continuing his study 



received the degree of Master of Arts in 1858. 
Immediately after graduating from College he en- 
tered upon a course of law study in the office of 
Hon. Charles O'Conor in Wall Street, New York 
City. He first practised in Chicago, Illinois, where 
he was admitted to the Bar December 4, 1856. 
Three years later he entered the Bar of Baltimore, 
Maryland, and continued to practise in that city 
until the outbreak of the Civil War when he entered 
the United States Army as Second Lieutenant of 
the Eighth Regiment of Maryland Volunteers, the 
beginning of a long and valuable military service. 
On May 12, 1863, he was commissioned Captain 
and Assistant Quartermaster. From May 3 to De- 
cember 13, 1864, he served on the staff of General 
Philip H. Sheridan. From 1865, after leaving the 
army, initil 1869 he was engaged in editorial work, 
at the end of that time entering the Bar of New 
York and resuming his law practice. In June 1S71 
he was elected Secretary of the Globe Mutual Life 
Insurance Company, which position he resigned in 
1876 to accept the office of President of the Ver- 
mont Life Insurance Company. He continued in 
this work until 1881. P'rom that time until 1886, 
he lived chiefly in London, engaged with various 
financial affairs. In 1887 Mr. Hosmer was com- 
missioned as Secretary of Legation and Consul 
General of the United States in Central .America, 
and served the Government in that capacity until 
October 1890 when he resigned. During six 
months of that service he acted as Charge d'.Vffaires. 
When war with Spain was declared he volunteered, 
obtaining his former rank of Captain and Assistant 
Quartermaster. He was in Matanzas, Cuba, as 
Depot Quartermaster until .April 1S99. He is a 
member of the Peithologian and Delta Psi societies 
of Columbia, the Sons of the Revolution and of the 
Hanover Square Club, of London, England. He 
was married, December 21, 1858,10 .Martha Jane 
Albert, of Baltimore, who died January 3, 1S67. 
By her he had one daughter : Fannie Albert, now 
Mrs. 11. C. Winchester of Baltimore. His second 
wife was Esther R. Bayard, who died in March 
1888, leaving two children: Ethel Bayard, now 
Mrs. R. W. Candler, and Cecil Fairfax Hosmer. 



OGDEN, Thomas Ludlow 

Columbia A.B. 1791. 
Born in Morristown. N. J., 1773: graduated Colum- 
bia. 1791 ; studied law and admitted to New York Bar, 
1796 ; associated in business with Alexander Hamilton; 



2l8 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



Law Officer, Clerk and Senior Warden of Trinity 
Church; Trustee of Columbia, 1817-44; died 1844. 

THOMAS LUDL(J\\' U(;i)EN, Lawyer, Trus- 
tee of Columbia, was born in Morristown, 
New Jersey, December 12, 1773. He was a grand- 
son of David Ogden (Yale 1728), Justice of tiie 
Supreme Court of New Jersey before the Revolu- 
tion and tiie most distinguished jurist in the Colony 
at that time. His father, whose name also was 
David, was a friend of Washington, who made his 
house the army headquarters while in Morristown. 
Thomas L. Ogden was graduated at Columbia in 
1791 and studied law with his father and in the 
office of Richard Harison. He was admitted to 
the Bar of New York in 1796 and for a consider- 
able time was associated with Alexander Hamilton, 
having charge of the latter's law business during 
his absence on public service elsewhere. The pro- 
fessional connections of Mr. Ogden were mainly 
with large corporate enterprises, such as the Hol- 
land Land Company, which held three million acres 
of land in western New York, and he was one of 
the Trustees of the Indian reservation lands and 
sole Trustee of Sackett's Harbor. For thirty-five 
years he was Clerk of the Corporation of Trinity 
Church, its Law Officer, and at the time of his 
death Senior Warden. He was also actively in- 
terested in the cause of education, being one of 
the original Trustees of the General Theological 
Seminary, a founder and Vice-President of the 
Protestant Episcopal Society for promoting Religion 
and Learning in the State of New York, and from 
181 7 to the time of his death a Trustee of Colum- 
bia. Mr. Ogden died in New York City, Decem- 
ber 17, 1S44. 



JONES, William Alfred 

Columbia A.B. 1836, A.M. 1839 

Born in New York City, 1817; attended Grammar 
School of Columbia College ; graduated Columbia, 
1836, A.M. 1839 ; studied law, but never practised ; 
Librarian of Columbia, 1851-65: while Librarian pub- 
lished three important pamphlets, Columbia College 
Library, Report of the Librarian and First Century of 
Columbia College ; has written extensively as editor, 
critic and author of essays. 

W1LLL-\M ALFRED JONES, .'\uthor, was 
born in New York City, June 26, 181 7, 
the son of David S. and Margaret Jones, a grand- 
daughter of Philip Livingston, the signer of the Dec- 
laration of Independence and niece of Dr. John 
Jones of Revolutionary celebrity. On the paternal 
side he comes of a family distinguished in the 



Colony, State and City of New York for several 
generations in legal annals ; his original American 
ancestor being a British officer born at Strabane, 
Ireland, but of an ancient Welsh family, engaged in 
the Battle of the Boyne, after which he emigrated 
to America. .Mr. Jones had early education in 
private schools, and was fitted for College at the 
(irammar School of Columbia College, entering in 
1832 Columbia, with which College his family had 
been connected as Trustees, officers of instruction 
and graduates for over a century. Taking the 
Bachelor of .Arts degree in course with the Class of 




W. A. JONES 

1S36, he graduated Master of .Arts in 1S39, reading 
law in the meantime in company with his classmate, 
John Jay, in the office of Daniel Lord. He never 
practised law, however, preferring to devote himself 
to a literary career which he commenced immedi- 
ately after graduation by the preparation of a book 
entitled The .Analyst, which he published in 1840. 
He continued to write extensively as critic, assistant 
editor and essayist, contributing many articles to 
the Press and the magazines until the year 1851 
when he was appointed Librarian of the Columbia 
College Library, a post which he held for fourteen 
years, rendering efficient and faithful service in the 
discharge of the duties of that office and in the 
preparation of three elaborate pamphlets containing 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



219 



important critical and historical material of the 
Library and the College. These are The Columbia 
College Library, t86i, and The Report of the Li- 
brarian to the Library Committee, both published 
by authority of tiie Trustees in 1862, and The First 
Century of Columbia College, i<S63. Some years 
after resigning his office, Mr. Jones sold to the Col- 
lege five hundred and twenty-five volumes from his 
own e.\tensive personal library. The greater portion 
of his general literary work was done previous to his 
appointment as Librarian, the books which he had 
published (1S40-1S57) being The .Analyst, 1840; 
Literary Studies, 1847; Memorial of 1). S. Jones, 
his Father, 1849; Essays upon .\uthors and Books, 
1849; Characters and Criticisms, 2 vols., 1857; 
leaving uncollected, contributions to reviews, maga- 
zines and weekly journals that would fill at least two 
volumes — chiefly collections of essays on topics of 
literary criticism. Since liis resignation in 1865, 
he has infrequently contributed to the Press various 
articles of an historical and biographical character. 
He is a member of the Wisconsin and Long Island 
Historical Societies and the Genealogical and Bio- 
graphical .Society of New York. In politics, he was 
a Whig and Republican until the second administra- 
tion of Grover Cleveland, since then being inde- 
pendent. Mr. Jones has been married twice : 
December 15, 1841, to Mary Elizabeth Bill, and 
September 4, 1873, to Mary Davison. He has 
no children. 



ONDERDONK, Henry Ustick 

Columbia A.B. 1805. M.D. 1810, S T.D. 1827. 

Born in New York City, 1789; graduated Columbia, 
1805; studied medicine abroad and received M.D. at 
College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia, 1810 ; 
studied theology and ordained to ministry of Protestant 
Episcopal Church, 1815 ; Rector of St. Ann's, Brooklyn, 
N. Y., 1820-27; S.T.D. Columbia, 1827; Asst. Bishop 
of Pennsylvania, 1827-36; Bishop, 1836-45; died 1858. 

Hi;\RY USnCK ONDERDONK, S.T.D., 
Bishop of Pennsylvania, was born in New 
Vork City, March iC, 1789. After graduating at 
Columbia in 1805 he went abroad and studied med- 
icine in London and Edinburgh, taking his degree 
of Doctor of Medicine at the University of the 
latter city, and upon his return to this country re- 
ceiving the same from the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons of Columbia in 1810. For a few years he 
practised his profession in New York City and was 
associated with Dr. \'alentine Mott in editing the 
New York Medical Journal. He then studied the- 
ology under Bishop 1 lobart and took orders in the 



Protestant Episcopal Church in 1815. His ordina- 
tion as Priest took place in Trinity Church, New 
York City, .April 11, 1816, after which for several 
years he was engaged in missionary work in the 
vicinity of Canandaigua, New York. In 1S20 he 
accepted a call to St. Ann's Church, Brooklyn, and 
remained in that charge until his election as As- 
sistant liishop of Pennsylvania in 1827. Columbia 
conferred upon him the degree of Doctor of Divin- 
ity in the same year. Upon the death of Bishop 
White in 1836, Dr. Onderdonk became Bishop of 
Pennsylvania, occupying that position until his resig- 
nation in 1844 under circumstances which called 
forth from the House of Piishops a sentence of sus- 
pension from all public e.\ercises of the offices and 
functions of the ministry. This suspension was re- 
moved two years before his death. Dr. Onderdonk 
contributed numerous papers to medical as well as 
theological periodicals, was the author of a number 
of devotional hymns included in the collection of 
the Protestant Episcopal Church, and published 
volumes of sermons and essays. He died in Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania, December 6, 1858. 



PELL, Philip 

Columbia A.B. 1770. 
Born in Westchester Co., N. Y., 1752: graduated 
Columbia, 1770 ; Lieut, of Volunteers in Continental 
Army. 1776; Deputy Judge-Advocate Gen., 1777; mem- 
ber New York Assembly, 1779 86; Judge Advocate- 
Gen. U. S. A., 1781-83; Regent, Univ. of New York, 
1784-87; Surrogate Westchester Co., 1787-1800; died 
1803. 

PHILIP PELL, Jurist, was born in Westchester 
county. New York, in 1752, and graduated 
at Columbia in 1770. He studied for the Bar and 
was admitted to practice in due course, but on the 
uprising of the Colonies in 1776 entered the military 
service as a Lieutenant in the New York \'olunteers. 
In the following year he was made Deputy Judge 
.Advocate-General of the Continental .Army, holding 
this position until in 1779 he was elected a member 
of the New York Assembly, where he ser\'ed two 
years as a legislator. He was again with the army 
in 1 781-1 783, as Judge .Advocate-General, and 
again called to the Legislature in 1784. In that 
year the .Act was passed confirming the royal charter 
but changing the name of the corporation to Co- 
lumbia College, and General Pell was among the 
Regents of the University named untier this .Act. 
He held this office until the .Act of 1787 established 
the Board of 'I'rustees in the form in which it still 



220 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



exists. General Pell was made Surrogate of West- 
chester county in 1787 and occupied that seat 
until 1800. He died in 1803. 



RHINELANDER, Charles Edward 

Columbia A.B. 1849 
Born in New York City, 1830; prepared for College 
under Dr. Francis L. Hawks ; graduated Columbia, 
1849 ; merchant in New York City. 

CII.ARLES EDWARD RHINHL.ANDER, Busi- 
ness Man, was born in New York City, July 
6, 1S30, the son of Bernard and Nancy E. M. (Post) 




Michigan Southern R. R., 1887-92; Acting Asst. Sur- 
geon, U. S. Marine Hospital Service, 1889 ; Attending 
Surgeon, Hamot Hospital, Erie, Pa., since 1888; prac- 
tising physician in Erie, Pa., since 1886. 

JAMES HENRY MONTGOMERY, M.D., Phy- 
sician, was born in Buffalo, New York, Febru- 
ary 24, 1S59. Dr. Montgomery was pre[)ared for 
College at two private institutions, the Park Insti- 
tute at Rye, New York, and the private school of 
D. S. F>erson in Forty-second Street, New York 
City. He graduated at Columbia with the Class of 
1 88 1 and at once entered the Medical Department, 
from which he graduated with the degree of Doctor 
of Medicine in 1884. For two years after gradua- 
tion he was Interne on the Surgical Staff of the 
Roosevelt Hospital in New York City, and then 
removed in January 1886, to I'>rie, Pennsylvania, 
where he remains at the present time, having won 
gratifying success in the practice of his profession 
in that city. He has been, since 1S88, .Attending 
Surgeon to the Hamot Hospital in Erie, and for 
five years, 1 887-1 892, he was Surgeon for the Lake 
Shore & Miciiigan Southern Railway. In 1889, was 
Actins; .Assistant Surgeon in the United States 



CH.ARI.ES EDWARD RH1NEL.\NDF.R 

Rhinelander. His early education was received in 
private schools in New York City, and under the 
tutorship of Dr. Francis L. Hawks. He graduated 
Bachelor of Arts from Columbia with the Class of 
1849, and has been actively engaged in mercantile 
pursuits since that time. Mr. Rhinelander is a 
member of the St. Nicholas Club, the American 
Geographical Society and the American Museum of 
Art. He was married, June 6, 1878, to Matilda 
Francis Cotheal. 



MONTGOMERY, James Henry 

Columbia A.B. igSi, M.D. 1884. 

Born in Buffalo, N. Y., 1859; educated in New York 

schools; graduated Columbia, 1881 ; received M.D. 

1884; Interne on Surgical Staff of Roosevelt Hospital, 

New York City, 1884-85; Surgeon of Lake Shore & 




JAMES H. MONTGOMERY 

M;irine Hospital Service. Dr. Montgomery was 
married, May 5, 1886, to Caroline Skiles of Minne- 
apolis, Minnesota; their children are: Katherine 
Eglinton and James Henry Montgomery, Jr. 



UNIVERSITIES JND THEIR SONS 



221 



ALLEN, James Morrill 

Harvard A.B. 1849. 
Born in Boston, Mass., 1831 ; educated at Chauncey 
Hall School, Harvard and Columbia ; served as Act- 
ing Asst. Surgeon U. S. Army and Navy ; practising 
physician, in Milwaukee, Wis., and still in the Govern- 
ment service. 

J.\Mi;s MUKRIl.L ALLEN, M.D., Acting 
Assistant Surgeon United States Marine Hos- 
pital Service, was born in Boston, Massaciiusetts, 
February 22, 1831, son of James M. and Mary 1). 
(Robins) .\ilen. Educated preliminarily at Chauncey 
Hall School, Boston, lie entered Harvard and 
was graduated with the Class of 1849. He subse- 
quently took up the study of medicine, which he 
completed at the College of Physicians and Surgeons 
(tiie Medical Department of Columbia) in 1856, 
and has ever since followed his profession success- 
fully, both as Government Surgeon and private prac- 
titioner, being at the present time a well-known 
physician of Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Dr. Allen 
entered the United States service as Acting Assist- 
ant Surgeon in the Navy, subsequently held the 
same rank in the Army, and is now .\cting Assistant 
Surgeon in the United States Marine Hospital Ser- 
vice. On April 9, 1858, he married P'liza J. Stan- 
ton ; their children are : Stanton, Julia F., luiiily 
K., John R. and Mary O. Allen. 



BAKER, John Freeman 

Harvard LL.B. 1863. 
Born in Yarmouth, Mass., 1839 ; educated in Boston 
schools ; graduated Harvard Law School, 1863 ; ad- 
mitted to Bar in Boston, 1863 ; practising lawyer in 
New York City since 1864; author of several notable 
law books : one of the original members of the Bar 
Association of New York. 

JOHN FREEMAN I!.\KER, Lawyer, was born 
ill \'armoulh, Massachusetts, October 19, 
1S39, the son of ]''reeraan and I'alience Nickerson 
(Baker) Baker. He comes of Puritan ancestry in 
which the families of Nickerson, Shaw and Otis have 
been prominent in the juilicial and political annals 
of Massachusetts. Mr. liaker was educated and 
fitted for College in the jjublic schools of Boston, 
and after studying law in the office of a Boston 
lawyer he entered the Harvard Law School in 1861. 
Graduating with high honor in 1863, he was ail- 
mitted to the liar in Boston, but soon after removed 
to New Vork City, where he has been in active 
practice ever since. Mr. Baker has written several 
important law books which have given him a wide 



reputation as an analytical, careful and capable 
lawyer, among them being A Treatise on the Law 
of Sales of Goods, Wares and Merchandise, as 
Affected by the Statute of Frauds ; Treatise on 
Manuf;icturing Corporations ; Supplementary Pro- 
ceedings, and The Federal Constitution ; he is 
also the author of a large number of essays contrib- 
uted to the .Albany Law Journal, the Central Law 
Journal and other legal publications. In politics he 
is a stanch Republican, having taken an active 
part in many campaigns since 1870, and having 
been one of the founders of the Republican Club of 




JOHN FREKM.W lUKKR 

the City of New Vork in 1879, wliich at present is a 
potent power in politics. For this club he drafted 
the original constitution and by-laws which still con- 
stitute the larger part of the club's organic law. 
He is an active member of the club. He is promi- 
nent among die men of his profession in New Vork 
City, not only on account of his writings on law 
subjects, but also from his success as counsel in 
several eminently important cases and for his signal 
ability and eloquence. He was one of the original 
members of the Bar .Association of New Vork at the 
time of its organization in 1S68. Mr. Baker was 
married in 1871, to Julia llliler, of lirooklyn, whose 
f;tther was an l'".i)iscopal minister, having graduated 
at Gambia College with Edwin M. Stanton. 



222 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



CILLEY, Bradbury Longfellow 

Harvard A.B. 1858, A.M. 1862. 
Born in Nottingham, N. H., 1838; educated at the 
Phillips-Exeter Academy and Harvard; Instructor in 
Albany Academy, Albany, N. Y. ; Professor of Ancient 
Languages in the Phillips-Exeter Academy, Exeter, 
N. H., from 1859 till his death, i8gg. 

BR.M)1!LRV I.ONGKKI.I.OW CII.LHV, tor 
forty years a teacher in the Phillips-Exeter 
Academy, was the son of Joseph Longfellow Cilley 
and I.avinia Bayley Kelly. When he was four years 
old, his parents removed from Nottingham, his 
birthplace, to Exeter. He entered the Academy in 




BR.ADP.URY I,. CII.LEY 



left his impress on two generations of pupils, — an 
impress of sound learning, broad and exact scholar- 
ship, deep sympathy. Though he gave his best 
])Owers to his profession, he found time for other 
interests both at home and abroad. He was, at 
one time or another, Vice-President of the Harvard 
.\hmini Association, a Trustee of the Kensington 
Social Library, a member of the New Hampshire 
Historical Society, and President of the Pascata- 
qua Congregational Club. In politics he was a 
stanch Republican. He served the town on all 
the important committees, was a Trustee of the 
Public Library and of the L^nion Five Cent Savings 
Bank. As a public speaker he was clear and con- 
vincing, and was frequently able to conciliate hostile 
factions. He was President of the day at the two 
hundred and fiftieth anniversary of the town in 
1883, and at the laying of the corner-stone of the 
Phillips Church, in the building of which he was 
most active. He was simple in his tastes, courteous, 
affable, frank, sagacious, — in short, a fine type of 
the public-spirited citizen. His colleagues in the 
Academy spread on the records this expression of 
their sympathy : " The members of the Faculty 
of the Phillips-Exeter .\cademy desire to express 
something of their grief at the loss they have sus- 
tained as a body and as individuals in the death of 
their colleague, Bradbury Longfellow Cilley, who 
during a service of forty years never faltered in liis 
devotion to the highest interests of the school he 
ardently loved and cherished. His uprightness and 
honesty of purpose compelled our respect ; his long 
experience, his wise and helpfiil counsels inspired 
our confidence and added weight to our delibera- 
tions ; his goodness of heart and warm sympathy 
won our love." 



185 1, remained four years, entered Harvard as a 
Sophomore in 1855, and was graduated with high 
rank in 1858. For a few months after graduating 
he taught in Albany, New York, but came to Exeter 
in February 1859, and served the .'\cademy most 
faithfully through changing administrations till his 
death, March 3r, 1899. He and his classmate and 
colleague, Professor G. A. Wentworth, were called 
the Aaron and the Hur who upheld the hands of 
Dr. G. L. Soule, then the Principal of the Academy. 
While Mr. Cilley was connected with the .\cademy, 
the number of students and of buildings quadrupled, 
and the school developed into one of the best 
equipped preparatory institutions in the United 
States. Mr. Cilley was a great educator. He has 



DAVENPORT, Addington 

Harvard A.B. 1689. .^. M. 1712. 
Born in Boston, Mass., 1670; graduated Harvard, 
1689; Register of Deeds for Suffolk Co., Mass.; a 
founder of Brattle St. Church, 1698; Clerk of House of 
Representatives and judicial courts ; member of Ex- 
ecutive Council ; Representative in Legislature, 1711- 
13; Justice of Massachusetts Supreme Court, 1715-36; 
died 1736. 

ADDINGTON D.WENPORT, A.M., Jurist, 
was born in Boston, Mass.ichusetts, August 
3, 1C70. He was the grandson of Richard Daven- 
port who came over with John Endicott in the ship 
.Abigail in 1628, from Weymouth, England. Richard 
Davenport was an Ensign in Endicott's army, and 



UNIVERSITIES AND tHEIR SONS 



22- 



it was he who, at the coinmaml of that fiery anti- of Germans, who, landing in America friendless 
papist cut out with his sword the red cross of St. and ignorant of our language and customs, are too 
George from the King's colors whicli hung before often the unfortunate victims of dishonest employers. 



the Governor's gate. Addington, the grandson, 
was graduated at Harvartl in 1689 and travelled 
widely after taking his degree, visiting England, 
Spain and the \Vest Indies. ' On his return to 
Boston he became Register of Deeds for Suffolk 
county and entered actively into public life. He 
was one of the founders of the Brattle Street Church 
in 1698, and served successively as Clerk of the 
House of Representatives, of the Supreme Court 



As the chief moving spirit in this society and as its 
Counsel for fourteen years, Mr. Lexow has done in- 
valuable service in behalf of his countrymen. He 
entered political life in 1881 when he was chosen 
as the Republican candidate for the Assembly in 
Rockland county, nearly winning election in a dis- 
trict which was Democratic by a large majority. 
Since then he has been active in many campaigns, 
and has run as a candidate for City Court Judge 



and of the Court of Common Pleas. He was also and for other offices, being chosen in 1896 the 

for some time a member of the Executive Council 
and was chosen a Representative of Boston in the 
General Court, 1711-171-5. Harvard gave him his 
Master's degree in 1712, and in 1715 he was ap- 
pointed a Judge of the Supreme Court, holding a seat 
on that bench to the time of his ileath, April 2, i 736. 
His son, of the same name, a graduate of Harvard 

in 1 719, was Attorney-General of Massachusetts for ^^F' ' J«3I 

some years, and then entering the ministry be- 
came the first Rector of Trinity Church in Boston. 



LEXOW, Charles King 

Harvard A.B. 1873 — Columbia LL B, 1875 
Born in New York City, 1849 ; studied in the Univer- 
sity of Bonn, Germany ; graduated Harvard, 1873 ; 
Columbia Law School, 1875; organized German Legal 
Aid Society, 1876; has been active in politics since 
1881 ; practising lawyer in New York City since 1875 ; 
Counsel for New York Cab Co. 

CHARLES KING LI'.XOW, Lawyer, was born 
in New York City, January 21, 1S49, the 
son of Rudolph and Caroline Lexow. After early 
education in a private school in Brooklyn, New 
York, he went abroad to pursue studies at the 
University of Bonn, Germany, but returning to this 
country at the outbreak of the Franco-Prussian 
War in 1870 he entered Harvard, where he gradu- 
ated in 1873. He then entered the Law School 
of Columbia, receiving the degree of Bachelor 
of Laws and was admittetl to the Bar in 1875, 
and commenced practice in New York City in the 
office of Sigismund Kaufinann. Mr. Lexow has 
attained a prominent position in his profession and 
has been active in several public movements of 
much importance ; lie is particularly well known 
as being, with Mr. Kaufmann, the organizer of the 
German Legal Aid Society now known as the Legal 
Aid Society. This society which is composed of 
German citizens, aims to protect the poorer class 




CHARLES K. I.EXOW 

leader in the Twenty-second Assembly District 
which he has since controlled. His practice deals 
extensively with general corporation business, several 
of the largest organizations of the city being among 
his clients. Since 1890 he has had charge of the 
legal affairs of the New York Cab Company. He 
is a member of the Har\ard, Republican and 
Knickerbocker Athletic clubs of New York City 
and of the Psi Upsilon Society. 



HOLYOKE. Edward Augustus 

Harvard A.B. 1746. M.D. (Hon.) 1783. LL.D 1815 
Born in Boston, Mass., 1728; graduated Harvard, 
1746; studied medicine and practised in Salem, Mass., 
1749-1829; founder and first Prcs. of Massachusetts 



224 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



Medical Society; M.D. I Hon.) Harvard, 1783; Pres. 
American Acad, of Arts and Sciences; LL.D. Har- 
vard, 1815; died 1829. 

EDWARD AUGUSTUS HOLYOKE, M.D., 
LL.D., Physician, was born in Boston, !\Lis- 
sachusetts, August i, 1728, the son of Edward 
Holyoke, President of Harxard for thirty-two years, 
1 737-1 769. He was graduated at Harvard in 
I 746 and studied medicine, settling for practice in 
Salem, Massachusetts, in 1749, in wliicli year he 
also received his Master's degree from Harvard. 
In that town he continued his residence and the 
practice of his profession throughout his life, a 
period of eighty years. Harvard conferred upon 
him the honorary degree of Doctor of Medicine in 
1783, and on his one hundredth birthday, in 1.S28, 
fifty physicians of Salem and Boston gave him a 
public dinner in his honor, at which he appeared in 
vigorous condition, physically and mentally, smoked 
his pipe and offered an api)roiiriate toast. He 
preserved his faculties unimpaired to an advanced 
age, and at ninety-two performed a difficult surgical 
operation with entire success. In his hundredth 
year he began a historical and reminiscent work 
upon " the changes in the manners, dress, dwellings 
and emiiloyments of the inhabitants of Salem." 
Apart from his profession Dr. Holyoke was well 
versed in science and literature, and an accomplished 
classical scholar. Harvard made him a Doctor 
of Laws in 181 5, and he was a President of the 
American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Dr. 
Holyoke was a founder of the Massachusetts Med- 
ical Society and its first President. He died in 
Salem in his one hundred and first year, March 21, 
1829. 

FISSE, William Edmund 

Harvard Law School 1879-80. 
Born in St. Louis, Mo., 1857; educated in public 
schools of St. Louis ; graduated at St. Louis Law 
School, 1879 ; post graduate student at Harvard Law 
School, 1879-80; practising lawyer in St. Louis since 
1881. 

WILLIAM EDMUND FISSE, Lawyer, was 
bom in St. Louis, Missouri, .Vugust 20, 
1857, the son of John Henry and Emma Monroe 
(Brison) Fisse. He received early education in 
the public schools of his birthplace and at the age 
of eighteen entered the St. Louis Law School, the 
Law Department of \Vashington University, where 
he graduated, Bachelor of Laws, in 1878. In 1879 
he went to Harvard and pursued for one year a 
course of post-graduate study in law, returning then 



to St. Louis and engaging in a practice which he 
has continued ever since with notable success. 
For ten years his practice was in partnership with 
Jacob Klien, a graduate of the Harvard Law School. 
Although Mr. Fisse has been active in political 
affairs, he has never sought or held any public office 
except that of member of the Board of Public 
Schools of St. Louis, in which ca])acity he served 
for two years, 189 1-1893. He is a member of the 
Harvard, Mercantile and Union clubs of St. Louis. 




\V. E. FISSE 



Mr. Fisse was married, October 15, 1883, to Mar- 
garet Dietrich ; their children are : Kate, Edna 
and Irene Fisse. 



LOWELL, Charles Russell 

Harvard A.B. 1854. 
Born in Boston, Mass., 1835; graduated Harvard, 
1854; in travel and manufacturing business until 1861 ; 
entered Army as Capt. U. S. Cavalry, 1861 ; Brevet 
Maj. of Volunteers, 1862; Col. 2d Massachusetts 
Cavalry, 1863-64; engaged in campaigns of Peninsula 
and Shenandoah, and promoted Brig. -Gen. of Volun- 
teers, 1864; died of wounds received at Cedar Creek, 
1864. 

CHARLES RUSSELL LOWELL, Soldier, was 
born in Boston. January 2, 1835, the son of 
Charles Russell and .Anna Jackson (Cabot) Lowell. 
His ancestor, Percival Lowell, a merchant, came 



UNTVERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



225 



from Bristol, England, to Newbury, Massachusetts, in 
1639, and the family from the early Colonial days has 
held a leading place in the political, industrial and 
intellectual history of New England. Mis great- 
great-grandfother was a graduate of Harvard in 
1721 and the first minister of Newburyport, Massa- 
chusetts. His great-grandfather, John (Harvard 
1760), was a Revolutionary statesman, a Chief- 
Justice of the United States Circuit Court, and one 
of the founders of the American Academy of Arts 
and Sciences. His grandfather, Charles (Harvard 
1800), was a Fellow of that College for many 
years. His mother was distinguished as an author. 
Charles Russell, the younger, was graduated with the 
first honors at Harvard in 1854 and for some years 
travelled abroad, returning to engage in the manufac- 
ture of iron and steel and in railroad construction. 
He was Superintendent of some iron-works in Cum- 
berland Valley, Maryland, when the Civil War broke 
out, and at once offered his services to the Secretary 
of War at Washington. In May 1861, he was given 
a commission as Captain in the Sixth United States 
Cavalry and served in the Peninsular Campaign in 
General Stoneman's command and for a time on the 
staff of General George B. McClellan. In recogni- 
tion of his bravery he was chosen to carry to Wash- 
ington the Confederate flags taken at Antietam and 
was brevetted Major of Volunteers. The following 
year he organized the Second Massachusetts Cavalry 
regiment and was made its Colonel, April 15, 1863, 
going at once to the front. In command of a 
brigade of cavalry of which his regiment formed 
a part. Colonel Lowell was engaged actively with 
Mosby's guerillas and other bands operating in the 
territory about Washington, and later in the raids 
of Sheridan in the Shenandoah Valley, becoming 
conspicuous for gallantry and receiving promotion 
as Hrigadier-General of Volunteers on the recom- 
mendation of the General commanding. In the 
operations in Virginia, General Lowell had thirteen 
horses shot under him, but escaped himself without 
injury until the battle of Cedar Creek, when he was 
wounded while leading the advance of (iencral 
Getty's division. He refused to leave his command, 
but in the moment of victory he rcceivcfl additional 
wounds, of which he died, near Middleton, Virginia, 
on the following day, October 20, 1864. His com- 
mission as Brigadier-General bears date of one day 
before his deatli. In 1863, General Lowell married 
Josephine, a daughter of Francis George Shaw, of 
Boston, a woman of rare accomplishments and 
widely known as a jihilanthropist. 
VOL. v. — 1 5 



McNAIR, Antoine de Reilhe 

Harvard Graduate School, i8So 1883 
Born in New Orleans, La., 1839; graduated U. S- 
Naval Academy, i860 ; in active service in the Navy 
continuously during the Civil War, promoted to rank 
of Lieut. -Commander ; Inst, in Seamanship, Naval 
Tactics and Naval Architecture at Naval Academy, 
1866-67 ; retired from the service, 1872 ; graduate stu- 
dent at Harvard, 1880-84; member of Board of Educa- 
tion at Saratoga Springs, N. Y., since 1889. 

rOINE DE RICH. HI'; .McNAIR, Naval 
Officer, was born in New Orleans, Louisi- 
ana, September 15, 1839, the son of Lieutenant 
Antoine de Reilhe and Elvina (Johnson) McNair. 







.WTOIXF. DF, R. McNAIR 

For three generations before him the McNairs have 
been in the military service of the United States, 
the great-grandfather, David McNair, having been 
a Lieutenant in the Pennsylvania Line who crossed 
the Delaware with Washington on Christmas night, 
1776, and fell mortally wounded in the attack upon 
the Hessians. The fither of the subject of this 
sketch, a Lieutenant in the .Army, w.as crippled for 
life by wounds received in tlic Bl.ick ILiwk War of 
1.S32. With complete military tratlition before him, 
therefore, .\ntoine de Reilhe McNair at the age of 
sixteen entered the United States Naval .Academy at 
Annapolis, Maryland, as Midshipman, on Probation 
iov Instruction from Missouri in the same class with 
such men as Schley, Watson, Mahan and Philip. On 



226 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



graduation in i860 he was sent to South America on 
the cruiser Seminole, but returned to the United 
States at the outbreak of the Civil War and immedi- 
ately went into active service in which he continued 
until the end of .the war, serving under Farragut, 
Oupoht, Porter, Rowan, Dahlgren and Godon and 
fighting in many of the more important naval battles. 
Participating in the capture of Norfolk, Virginia, and 
in the fighting which ended with the destruction of 
the Confederate ram Merrimac he received the grade 
of Master, and in July 1862 was promoted to the rank 
of Lieutenant for " gallant and meritorious services 
at Port Royal, Fort Pulaski, the Capture of Norfolk 
and the Destruction of the Merrimac." Later he 
engaged in general and blockade service partici- 
pating in the fights at Fort Sumpter and Charleston 
in .April 1863, Morris Island, where he was wounded, 
in July 1S63, and again at Charleston in September 
1863. From October 1S63 to June 1S64 he was in 
command of the United States ship Gerasbok en- 
gaged in the West Indies convoying mail steamers, 
and in subsequent service in the West Indies re- 
ceived the injury which finally made necessary his 
retirement from the service. He saw further ser- 
vice in several battles during the last year of the 
war, was present at the final collapse of the Confed- 
eracy in front of Richmond, Virginia, and in July 
1S66 was promoted to the rank of Lieutenant- 
Commander. During the year of 1866-1867 
Lieutenant McNair held a position as Instructor in 
Seamanship, Naval Tactics and Naval Architecture 
at the Naval .\cademy, and then served in different 
commands until 1872 when he was placed on the 
retired list. He spent four years in post-graduate 
study of science at Harvard, from i88o to 1883 as 
a resident and the following year as a non-resident. 
He has been since 1889 a member of the Board of 
Education in Saratoga Springs, New York, his place 
of residence, serving that Board as President in 
1894. He is a member of the Loyal Legion, Order 
of the Grand Army of the Republic, the Society of 
the Army of the Potomac, the Signet Society of 
Harvard and a fellow of the American Association 
for the .'Advancement of Science. In politics he is 
a Jeffersonian Democrat. Lieutenant McNair was 
married December 13, 1871, to Frances Clark; 
their only child living is Jessie McNair. A son, 
Frederick Park McNair, a member of the Class of 
1898 at West Point, lost his life in the recent war 
with Spain, being the last of three of that name who 
have died in the military service of the United 
States. 



MILTON, Henry Slade 

Harvard A.B. 1875. 
Born in Boston, Mass., 1855; graduate of the Boston 
Latin School; graduated Harvard, 1875, Boston Univ. 
Law School, 1876; has practised law in Boston since 
1876; Special Justice zd Dist. Court of Middlesex Co., 
1884-94; Representative in Massachusetts Legislature 
1889-90, Senator 1893-94 ; Mayor of Waltham, Mass., 
1895- 

H]:N'RV SLADE MILTON, Lawyer, was born 
in Boston, Massachusetts, September 28, 
1S55. He was educated in the Boston public 
schools, receiving preparation for College in the 
Boston Latin School where he was a Franklin 
Medal Scholar. After graduating Bachelor of Arts 
at Harvard in 1875, he entered the Boston Univer- 
sity Law School, where he received the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws in 1876, being admitted in that 
year to the Suffolk Bar. Since that day Mr. Milton 
has been engaged in practice in Boston, holding 
many offices in the service of the state and local 
affairs. From 18 78 to 18S1 he was a member of 
the School Committee of the town of Weston, and 
of the Waltham Committee from 1885 to 1889. 
He was appointed Special Justice of the Second 
District Court of Middlesex county in 1884, and 
remained in that office until 1894. From 1885 to 
1 895 he was Civil Service Examiner for the City of 
Waltham, and in 1895 Mayor of that city. He sat 
as Representative in the Massachusetts Legislature 
in 1889 and 1S90, and as Senator during the years 
1893 and 1894. He is a member of the Society of 
Free Masons and the Order of Odd Fellows, and 
has always been a Republican in politics. He was 
married, November 7, 1S77, to Lilias Constance 
Haynes. His children are : .\lice and Cliffordier 
Eva Milton. 



OSGOOD, Howard 

Harvard, Class of 1850 — Princeton LL.D. 1894. 

Born Plaquemines Parish, La., 1831 ; Class of 1850 
Harvard; sugar planter, 1849-53; Baptist minister. 
Flushing, L. I., and New York City, 1856-68; Prof, 
of Hebrew, Crozer Theological Seminary, 1868-74, 
Rochester Theological Seminary, 1875-1900; D.D. 
Brown, 1868; LL.D. Princeton, 1894. 

HOWARD OSGOOD, LL.D., D.D., Professor 
of Hebrew at the Rochester Theological 
Seminary, was born in the Parish of Plaquemines, 
Louisiana, January 4, 1831, the son of Isaac and 
Jane Rebecca (Hall) Osgood. It is an interesting 
fact that an ancestor, John Osgood, lived on the 
same farm in North .Andover, Massachusetts, occu- 
pied by his descendants from 1642 to 1875. Dr. 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



227 



Osgood was prepared for College at schools in New 
York and Flushing, Long Island, going to Harvard 
in 1846 and entering the course of general studies 
in the Academic Department. He was obliged to 
leave College at the end of his Junior year to assume 
the care of a plantation in Louisiana. Until 1853 
he was engaged in the cultivation of sugar. In 
1858 he received his degree of Bachelor of Arts 
from Harvard as of the Class of 1850, receiving 
the Master of Arts degree in course in i86i. 
After holding Pastorates in Baptist churches in 
Flushing, Long Island, antl in New York City 
for twelve years, he accepted an appointment 
as Professor of Hebrew in the Crozcr Theological 




HOWARD OSCOOU 

Seminary in Chester, Pennsylvania, where he re- 
mained until 1874. In 1875 he was called to the 
same chair, his present position at the seminary in 
Rochester, New York. Dr. Osgood's valuable re- 
search work in Hebrew subjects has found expres- 
sion in several notable magazine articles. He holds 
two honorary degrees. Doctor of Divinity, conferred 
by Brown in 1868, and Doctor of Laws, conferred 
by Princeton in 1894. Dr. Osgood married, April 
14, 1853, Caroline Townsend Lawrence; their chil- 
dren are : Ella, Howard Lawrence, Bradish, Carrie, 
Florence, Henry, \Villiam Hicks, Jeannic, .Mfred 
Townsend and Helen Osgood. 



PALFREY, John Carver 

Harvard A.B. 1853, A.M. 1857. 
Born in Cambridge, Mass., 1833; graduated Har- 
vard, 1853; at West Point, 1857; served in U. S. Army 
Engineer Corps, 1857-65; engaged in business in 
Lowell, Mass., 1865-74, 3"<^ >" Boston, Mass., since 
1874. 

JOHN CARVER PALFREY, Business Man, was 
born in Cambridge, Massachusetts, December 
25, 1833. His father, John Gorham Palfrey, author, 
historian and Professor of Sacred Literature at 
Harvard, was the grandson of Colonel William Pal- 
frey, who was prominent in the movements preced- 
ing the Revolution and during that war sen-ed on 
the staff of General Washington and as Paymaster 
General of the Continental Army. His mother was 
Mary Ann (Hammond) Palfrey. As a boy Mr. 
Palfrey attended the Adams Common School, and 
the Boston Latin School, receiving at the Hopkins 
Classical School of Cambridge, his final preparation 
for College. He entered Harvard at the age of 
fifteen and after graduating as Bachelor of Arts in 
1 85 3, went to the United States Military Academy 
at West Point as a member of the Class of 1857. 
After finishing his course at the .Academy at the 
head of his class he entered the service of the 
United States Army as an officer of the Engineer 
Corps, in which service he continued until 1865. 
attaining in the War of Secession the ranks of 
Assistant Inspector-General and Captain of Engi- 
neers, and being brevetted Major, Lieutenant-Colo- 
nel Colonel and Brigadier-General of the United 
States Army. He performed valuable service in 
the construction of various defences and partici- 
pated in the siege and capture of Mobile, .Alabama, 
and other places. Mr. Palfrey entered upon a 
business career as Superintendent of the Merrimack 
Manuficturing Conijiany of Lowell, Massachusetts, 
and continued in that position until 1S74, when he 
became Treasurer of the Manchester Mills in Man- 
chester, New Hampshire. His work in this capacity 
continued for seventeen years, until 1S91, and in 
1 894 he was appointed to his present ])osition, that 
of Treasurer of the Boston Pier or Long Wharf 
Company. He is a member of the <h H K So- 
ciety, the Society of the Cincinnati, and the lAjyal 
Legion, serving the latter as Senior Vice-Com- 
mander in 1895. Dartmouth conferred on him 
the degree of Master of .\rts in 1S73. He was 
married, October Ji, 1874, to .Adelaide l-^li/a Pay- 
son. Their children are : John Gorham, born 1S75 ; 
Francis Winslow, born 1S77 ; and Hannah Gilbert 
Palfrcv, born 18S1. 



228 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



PECK, Hiram David 

Harvard LL.B. 1865. 
Born in Harrison Co., Ky., 1844; graduated Miami 
Univ. 1862, Harvard Law School, 1865 ; LL.D. Miami 
and Univ. of Cincinnati, 1891 ; admitted to Ohio Bar, 
1867; City Solicitor of Cincinnati, O., 1876; Judge of 
Superior Court of Cincinnati, 1883-89 ; practising lawyer 
in Cincinnati since i88g. 

HIRAM DAVID PECK, LL.D., Lawyer, was 
born in Harrison county, Kentucky, ^Lirch 
23, 1.S44, the son of John Wellington and Nancy 
(Veach) Peck. He is the seventh generation in 
direct lineal descent from Joseph Peck who came 




H1R.A.M DAVID PECK 

from England to Hingham, Massachusetts, in 1638. 
On his mother's side the Veaches and Broadwells 
are prominent families of Kentucky. He was pre- 
pared for College at a private school where he was 
under the instruction of Rev. Carter Page, an Epis- 
copal clergyman. At the early age of eighteen Mr. 
Peck was graduated with the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts at Miami University, and immediately com- 
menced the study of law. This was interrupted, 
however, by his enlistment as a private in a regi- 
ment of Ohio infantry at the outbreak of the Civil 
War. After one year he resumed his legal studies 
with W. Trimble of Cynthian.i, Kentucky, going 
later to the Harvard Law School, where he graduated 
Bachelor Laws in 1865. The following year he re- 



moved to Cincinnati, Ohio, was admitted to the 
P.ar there and has been in active practice in that 
city ever since. Mr. Peck was appointed Assistant 
City Solicitor in 1873 and City Solicitor in 1876, 
occupying the latter office for one year. His last 
public office was that of Judge of the Superior Court 
of Cincinnati, a position which he held from 1S83 
to 18S9, since that time having been engaged in 
practice in Cincinnati in partnership with his son 
John W. Peck and Frank H. Shaffer under the firm 
name of Peck, Shaffer & Peck. He was a Director 
of the L^niversity of Cincinnati for five years, from 
1S78 to 1883, and in 1891 he was made a Doctor of 
Laws by that institution, receiving the same degree 
the same year from Miami. He is a member of the 
Alpha Delta Phi Society, the Cincinnati Literary 
and the Queen City clubs. Mr. Peck was married, 
November 18, 1868, to Harriet Emily Weld, of 
Boston, Massachusetts, and has three children liv- 
ing : John Weld, Edith Mary and .Arthur Minot 
Peck. 



ROBBINS. Philemon 

Harvard A.B 1729 — Yale MA (Hon.) 1733. 
Born in Boston, Mass., 1710 ; graduated Harvard 
1729; A.M. 1732; studied theology and ordained minis- 
ter of church at Bramford, Conn., 1732; M.A. (Hon.) 
Yale, 1733 ; Pastor in Bramford throughout his life ; 
died 1781. 

PHIL1;M0N ROBBINS, M.A., Clergyman, was 
born in Boston, Massachusetts, in 1710, 
and graduated at Harvard in i 729, receiving there 
his Master's degree in course. Meantime he con- 
tinued in residence at Cambridge as a student of 
theology, receiving license to preach in 1732 and 
entering at once upon the work of the ministry. 
The call which he received was to the church at 
Bramford, Connecticut, over which he was installed 
in the year last named and with which he remained 
throughout his life, a continuous ministry of forty- 
nine years. Shortly after his settlement in Bram- 
ford, Vale conferred upon him the honorary degree 
of ^L^ster of Arts. He died in 1781. Mr. Robbins 
was the progenitor of a long line of distinguished 
clergymen. His eldest son. Chandler (Yale 1756), 
was for many years Pastor of the Congregational 
Church at Plymouth, ^Lissachusetts, a Doctor of 
Divinity of Dartmouth and of the University of 
Edinburgh, Scotland. His second son, Ammi Ru- 
hamah (Yale 1760), was a Chaplain in the Revolu- 
tionary .Army and for more than half a century 
Pastor of the church in Norfolk, Connecticut. His 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



229 



grandson, Thomas, who received the degree of 
Doctor of Divinity from Harvard in 183S, was a 
founder of the Connecticut Historical Society, to 
which he left his valuable library. His great-grand- 
son, Chandler (Harvard 1829), succeeded Ralph 
Waldo Emerson as Pastor of the Second Church in 
Boston, and at the time of his resignation in 1S74 
was the oldest settled minister in that city. 



ROMBAUER, Roderick Emile 

Harvard LL.B. 1858 
Born in Hungary, 1833 ; educated in Hungary ; came 
to the U. S. in 1851; engaged in civil engineering, 1853- 
56; admitted to the Bar in Boston, Mass., 1857; grad- 
uated Harvard Law School, 1858 ; practised law in St. 
Louis, Mo., 1858-61 ; attained rank of Capt. in Civil 
War; Judge of Law Commissioner's Court, St. Louis, 
1863; Judge of Circuit Court, 1867-71 ; Presiding Judge, 
Missouri Court of Appeals, 1884-97. 

RODERICK E.MILE RO.Mli.\CER, Jurist, was 
born in Seleszto, Hungary, May 9, 1833, 
the son of Theodore and Bertha Rombauer, whose 
maiden name was also Rombauer, his father and 
mother being relatives. It is probable that the 
Hungarian founders of the family went to Upper 
Hungary from Germany during the latter part of 
the .\ri)ad Dynasty, which ended in the year 1301, 
as traditionary evidence locates them there in that 
period, but owing to the destruction of all records 
during the Hungarian Wars of the fifteenth and six- 
teenth centuries, there exists no authentic history of 
the family prior to the beginning of the seventeenth 
century. The archives of the city of Loose contain 
a report to his constituency of a member of Con- 
gress named Romppauer which appears to be an 
ancient way of spelling the name, and for centuries 
the Rombauers have been recognized as of the 
nobility. This Romppauer is the earliest authen- 
ticated ancestor of Roderick E. Theodore Rom- 
bauer, Judge Rombauer's fiither, wlio was a member 
of the Department of Industry, chief of a division 
national Hungarian cabinet 1S4S-1S49 and hail 
charge of a factory for producing arms and other mili- 
tary supplies during the Hungarian Revolution imiler 
Kossuth, sought refuge in the I'nited States in 1S50. 
He died in Davenport, Iowa, in 1855, and his widow 
died in Alameda, California, in 1SS7, at the age of 
eighty-seven years. Roderick V.. Rombauer ac- 
quired a classical education in his native country 
and for some time resided in Buda-1'esih. Coming 
to .America in 1S51, he resided in Iowa until 1853, 
assisting his father in tlie cultivation of a f.irm when 



he went to St. Louis, Missouri, and in the latter year 
became .Assistant Civil Engineer of the Northern 
Cross Railroad (now a part of the Chicago, Bur- 
lington & Quincy system), with headquarters in 
Avon, Illinois. In 1856 he began the study of law 
under the direction of Judge Lawrence (afterward 
Chief-Justice of Illinois), and then entered the 
Dane Law School of Harvard, where he was gradu- 
ated with the Class of 1858. .Admitted to the 
Massachusetts Bar in December 1857, and to that 
of Missouri in May 1858, he practised in St. Louis 
until the outbreak of the Civil War, when he was 




■ ■&>^J^S>x>.1^U 



R. K. ROJrBAUF.R 

enlisted as a i)rivate in the First Regiment, Missouri 
Volunteers, and subsequently was commissioned 
Captain in the I'irst Kii,'iuKiit. L'nited States Re- 
serve Corps of tliat slate. He was at one time a 
member of the firm of Rombauer & Finkelnburg, 
St. Louis, and from 18S1 till 18S4 w.is associated 
with David Goldsmith, but the greater portion of 
his practice has been conducted without a jiartner. 
In 1863 he was elected Judge of the St. Ix)uis Ijw 
Conniiissioners' Court, and in 1867 was a]>pointed a 
Circuit Judge, to which jiost he was elected by pop- 
ular vote for the full term in the following year and 
retained it until 1S71. In 1884 he was elected to 
the .Ajipellatc Bench and was Presiding Judge of 
tiiat Court for twelve years, during which time many 



230 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



important cases were disposed of by that tribunal. 
Judge Rombauer has several times declined to be- 
come a candidate for the Supreme Bench. Both as 
lawyer and jurist he has displayed eminent legal 
attainments, and his analytic powers, strict impar- 
tiality and unimpeachable integrity amply demon- 
strate his fitness for the highest judicial functions. 
In politics he has consistently upheld the principles 
of the Republican party from the time of becoming 
a voter, although prevented by his judicial duties 
from active participation in its affairs. His religious 
affiliations are with the Unitarian church. In 1865 
Judge Rombauer married .Augusta Koerner, of 
Belleville, Illinois, the second daughter of Governor 
Gustavus Koerner, of that state, one of the most 
prominent German- .American citizens of the middle 
west. Of this union there are six children living : 
Theodore G., born in October, 1866, and Edgar R., 
born July 3, 186S, both of whom are members of 
the St. Louis Bar ; Alfred B., born September 1 7, 
1869, now a mining engineer of Butte, Montana; 
Bertha S., born .August 11, 1872 ; Sophie M., born 
October 13, 1874; and Irma Rombauer, born 
.August 30, 1884. 



STEINER, Robert Eugene 

Harvard LL.B. 1884. 
Born near Greenville, Ala., 1862 ; educated at Univ. 
of Alabama ; practised law at Greenville and later at 
Montgomery ; carried on banking for a time ; Major of 
the Second Alabama National Guard; member of the 
Alabama Legislature ; Senator in the Alabama General 
Assembly; Corporation Counsel for City of Mont- 
gomery. 

ROBERT EUGENE STEINER, Lawyer, was 
born near Greenville, Alabama, May 9, 
1862. His father, Joseph Steiner, was born in 
Austria and came to .America in 1840. His mother, 
Margaret Matilda (Camp) Steiner, was born in 
Alabama and traces her descent from .American 
ancestry as far back as the beginning of the cen- 
tury. After receiving in 1880 the degree of Bache- 
lor of Arts at the Lfniversity of .Alabama and in i88r 
the degree of Master of Arts, he graduated at 
Harvard Law School with the degree of Bachelor 
of Laws in 1 884, and spent five years succeeding in 
the practice of law at Greenville. He then went 
into the banking house of his father as a member 
of the firm, remaining there until 1892, when he 
removed to Montgomery to resume his profession 
of law. As a member of the firm of Graham & 
Steiner, with business largely of commercial and 



corporation character, he has won a high position, 
holding various offices including that of Corporation 
Counsel to the City of Montgomery. From 1887 
to 1890 Mr. Steiner was Major of the Second Ala- 
bama National Guard. In 1886-1887 lie was a 
member of the .Alabama Legislature and in 1S92- 




ROBT. E. STEINER 

1893 was Senator in the .Alabama General Assem- 
bly. He married, December 16, 1884, May 
Flowers. 



SHARPLESS, Isaac 

Harvard B S. 1873. 
Born in Chester Co., Pa., 1848; attended Westtown 
Boarding School, Pa. ; graduated Harvard Scientific 
School, 1873; taught in Westtown School, 1873-75; 
Asst. in Haverford College, 1875 ; Prof, of Mathe- 
matics and Astronomy, 1879. Dean of the College, 1885 
and Pres. since 1887; received Sc.D. from Univ. of 
Pennsylvania in 1883 and LL.D. from Swarthmore 
College, 1889; author of text-books and other writings. 

ISAAC SHARPLESS, LL.D., President of Haver- 
ford College, was born in Chester county, 
Pennsylvania, December i6, 1S48, the son of Aaron 
and Susanna (Forsythe) Sharpless. The first Amer- 
ican ancestor of the name was John Sharpless, who 
came from England and settled in Chester, Pennsyl- 
vania, in 1682. Mr. Sharpless received much of 
his early education and his preparation for College 



UNIVERSITIES ANT) THEIR SONS 



231 



at the Westtown Boarding School in Chester county, 
Pennsylvania, entering Harvard from that school in 
1872. While in Harvard he pursued studies in the 
Lawrence Scientific School, paying particular atten- 
tion to the subject of civil engineering, and in 1873 
he graduated with tlie degree of Bachelor of Science. 
His first position after graduation was that of teacher 
in the Westtown School, where he had previously 
been a student. Here he remained for two years 
until called to a position as .\ssistant in Haverford 
College in 1875, which was the beginning of the 
progressive career which resulted in his appoint- 
ment to the Presidency of the College in 1887. 
He was successively Professor of Mathematics and 
Astronomy and Dean of the Faculty previous to his 
appointment as President. Mr. Sharpless has writ- 
ten extensively upon scientific, educational and 
other subjects, publishing his work in book form and 
in magazine articles. Among the more important 
of his books are : Text Books on Geometry and .As- 
tronomy ; English Education in Elementary and 
Secondary Schools ; and .\ Quaker Experiment in 
Government. He was made a Doctor of Science 
by the University of Pennsylvania in 1883 and a 
Doctor of Laws by Swarthmore College in 1889. 
Mr. Sharpless was married August 10, 1876, to 
Lydia Trimble Cojie ; his children are : Helen, 
Amy C, Frederic C, Edith F., Lydia T. and 
Katharine T. Sharpless. 



WILLIAMS, Stephen 

Harvard A.B. 1713. 
Born in Deerfield, Mass., 1693; taken captive by 
Indians, 1704, and ransomed and returned to Boston, 
1705; graduated Harvard, 1713; studied theology and 
ordained to the ministry, 1716 ; Pastor at Longmeadow, 
Mass., 1716-82; Chaplain with the Colonial troops in 
campaigns against the French and Indians ; estab- 
lished mission to the Stockbridge Indians, 1734; D.D. 
Dartmouth, 1773; died 1782. 

S'l'l'.PHEN WILLI.\MS, D.D., Clergyman, was 
born in Deerficld, Massachusetts, May 14, 
1693. His great-grandfatiier, Robert Williams, 
came to this country about 163S, settling in Rox- 
bury, Massachusetts. His father, the Rev. John 
Williams (Harvard 1683), was Pastor of the 
church at Deerfield, at that time a frontier town 
and exposed to attacks by the Indians. Stephen 
was a lad of eleven years when the " Deerfield 
Massacre" occurred, in 1704, and was among the 
three hundred captives spared from death, and 
marched on foot to Canaila. On tiie way his 



mother, who fell from exhaustion, was killed with 
a tomahawk. He was ransomed by the Governor 
of Canada after more than a year's detention as 
prisoner and sent back to Boston, where his father 
soon followed him. He was prepared for College 
under his father's tuition and graduated at Hanard 
in 1 7 13, studying for the ministry and being or- 
dained Pastor of the church at Ix)ngmeadow, Mas- 
sachusetts, in I 7 16. In this charge he continued 
throughout his life, serving also as Chaplain with 
the Colonial troops engaged in three campaigns 
against the French and Indians accompanying Sir 
U'iiliam Pepperell to Cape Breton and Sir William 
Johnson to Lake George. He also established the 
mission to the Stockbridge Indians in 1734. Dart- 
mouth College gave him the degree of Doctor of 
Laws in 1773. He died in Longmeadow, June 10, 
1782. 



RICHARDSON, John 

Harvard A.B. 1666. 
Born in Boston, Mass., 1647 1 graduated Harvard, 
1666 ; Tutor and Resident Fellow of College ; ordained 
Pastor of the Church at Newbury, Mass., 1675, and con- 
tinued in that charge until his death in i6g6. 

JOHN RICHARDSON, Clergyman, was born in 
Boston, ISfassachusetts, in 1647, 'he eldest son 
of Amos Richardson, a merchant tailor of th.at town 
who subsequently removed to Stonington, Connecti- 
cut. He was graduated at Harvard in 1666, studied 
theology and served there as Tutor and Resident 
Fellow for a number of years. In the proposed 
College Charter of 1672 he was named as Fellow. 
Mr. Richardson resigned his Fellowship at the time 
of the difficulties in which President Hoar was con- 
cerned, in 1673, although it does not appear that he 
was bitterly opposed to the President. It was his 
resignation together with that of his associates, how- 
ever, that left the Corporation without a legal gov- 
ernor and the President without support. He began 
his ministry at Newbury as early as 1673, 'inf* ^^'^s 
probably preaching there at the time he closed his 
official connection with Hanard, although he was 
not ordained over the church until 1675. His salary 
was ^100 annually, paid in produce at current rates. 
In 1693 Mr. Richardson received assistance in his 
work from John Clark (Harvard 1690), and in 1695 
Christopher Toppan was called as his colleague in 
consequence of his rapidly failing health. For 
nearly two years before his death he was incapaci- 
tated by illness for the performance of his ministerial 
duties. He died in Newbury, April 27, 1696. 



232 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



ADAMS, Andrew 

Yale B.A. 1760, LL.D. 1796 
Born in Stratford, Conn., 1736; graduated Yale, 
1760; studied law and admitted to the Bar, 1762; mem- 
ber of Provincial Council, 1771 ; member of Connecticut 
Legislature, 1776-81 ; delegate to Continental Con- 
gress, 1777-82; Justice of Supreme Court of Connecti- 
cut, 1789, and Chief-Justice, 1793 ; LL.D. Yale, 1796; 
died 1797. 

ANDREW ADAMS, LL.D., Jurist, was born 
in Stratforil, Connecticut, in January 1736, 
and graduated at Vale in 1760, receiving his 
Master's degree there in course. Following his 
graduation he studied law and was admitted to 
the Fairfield County Bar in 1762, practising law 
for a time in Stamford and in 1764 removing to 
Litchfield. There he attained distinction as a 
lawyer, and when the relations between the Colo- 
nies and Great Britain grew more strained he took 
part in public affairs with zeal. He entered the 
Connecticut Legislature, in 1776, serving for several 
years, and represented the state in the Continental 
Congress throughout practically the entire period 
of the War of the Revolution. He also served for 
a time as a member of the Executive Council. At 
the close of the war he was made a Justice of the 
Supreme Court of the State and became its Chief- 
Justice in 1793, holding that position to the time 
of his death, November 26, 1797. Y.ale gave him 
the degree of Doctor of Laws in 1 796. He left 
the reputation of a skilful lawyer and a learned 
judge. 



of Bentley & Blodgett, who were Counsel for the 
Thomson-Houston Electric Company, and subse- 
quently for the General Electric Company, \\heii 
the latter firm moved its headquarters to Schenec- 
tady, New York, Mr. Blodgett took charge there 
of the patent department of the business. Both in 
his connection with the Electric Company and in 
his private practice he won an unusually brilliant 
success. Ills thorough knowledge of patent law 
and electrical mechanism, together with much 
sound judgment and executive ability, won him the 
place of an influential and trusted adviser of the 



BLODGETT, George Reddington 

Yale B.A. 1884. 
Born in Bangor, Me., 1862 ; prepared for College at 
Phillips Academy, Andover, Mass. ; graduated Yale, 
1884; Examiner in U. S. Patent office; admitted to 
the Bar, 1888; became member of firm Bentley & 
Blodgett, Boston, Council for the Thomson-Houston 
Electric Co. and later for the General Electric Co. ; 
died 1898. 

GEORGE REDDINGTON BLODGETT, Law- 
yer, was born in Bangor, Maine, Septem- 
ber 17, 1862. He was the son of George and Mary 
(Pond) Blodgett. Mr. Blodgett was prepared for 
College at Phillips Academy, in .Andover, Massachu- 
setts, and from that school entered Yale in 1880. 
.\fter graduation he became Examiner in the United 
States Patent Office, pursuing at the same time the 
study of patent law and electrical science. In i88S 
he was admitted to the Bar, and began practice 
in New York City. He soon removed, however, 
to Boston, where he became a member of the firm 




GEORGE R. BLODGETT 

Electric Company. His untimely and tragic death, 
which occurred at his home in Schenectady, De- 
cember 4, 1898, was a shock to a host of friends 
and business associates. He was shot in his bed- 
room by a burglar, and died from the effects of the 
wound. He was married, April 11, 1893, to Katha- 
rine Buch.anan Burr, who survives him, with a son, 
George Reddington, and a daughter, Katharine 
Burr Blodgett. 



HASKELL, Robert Chandler 

Yale B.A. 1858, M.A. 1861. 

Born in Weathersfield, Vt. ; graduated Yale, 1858; 
appointed Prof, of Mathematics in Oahu Coll., Hono- 
lulu ; engaged in manufacture of oil clothing in Lan- 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



233 



singburg, N. Y., since i860; received M.A. degree 
from Yale, 1861 ; was influential in educational matters 
in Lansingburg; died 1897. 

ROBERT CHANDLER HASKELL, Business 
Man and Educator, was born in Weathers- 
field, Vermont, September 6, 1S34, the son of John 
Chandler and Randilla (Whipple) Haskell. Mr. 
Haskell entered Vale with the Class of 1858, and 
immediately after graduation was appointed to a 
Professorship in NLathematics at Oahu College in 
Honolulu, .\mong the pupils who studied under 
him was David Kalakaua, who was subsequently 
King of the Hawaiian Islands. .Xfter two years of 
that work he returned to America to engage in 
business, and fvum 1S60 until the time of his 
death he was occupied in the manufacture of oil 
clothing at Lansingburg, New York. He received 
the degree of Master of Arts from Vale in 1861. 
Mr. Haskell had always a deep interest in educa- 
tional matters, and the school system at Lansing- 
burg was developed chiefly through his influence. 
He was the founder of the Kindergarten there. 
As active Trustee he served three important in- 
stitutions, the Lansingburg Academy, the Emma 
Willard Seminary, and the Hampton Institute in 
Virginia. He died at his home in Lansingburg, 
May 12, 1897, from paralysis with which he had 
been first stricken in 1895. He was married in 
1863 to Sarah H. Parmelee. 



KIRTLAND, Edwin Leander 

Yale B.A. 1859. 
Born in Westbrook, Conn., 1832 ; educated in public 
schools and in Westbrook Academy ; graduated Yale, 
1859; studied in Yale Law School, 1859-60; employed 
in U. S. Pension Office, 1861-65 ; in business in Phila- 
delphia, 1865-67; member of Connecticut Legislature, 
1869; half owner and Editor of Holyoke (Mass.) Trans- 
cript, 1870-75 ; member of Massachusetts House of 
Representatives, 1876; engaged in paper business 
1876-78; Supt. of Schools in Holyoke, 1878-96; Deputy 
Collector of Internal Revenue since 1898. 

EDWIN LEANDER KIRILAND, Business 
Man and I-'.ducator, was born in Westbrook, 
Connecticut, I)eceml)cr 27, 1832, the son of Philip 
Marvin Kirtland and Lucy Ann Kelscy. The first 
.\merican ancestor of the fiimily, Philip Kirtland, 
settled in Lymi, Massachusetts, in 1635. Mr. Kirt- 
land at an early age attended the public schools of 
Westbrook, receiving preparation for College at 
the academy in that town. After graduating at 
Vale iu 1859 lie spent one year in the Law School, 



but abandoned the plan of legal study to enter a 
position at the United States Pension Office in 
Washington in 1861, where he remained until 1865, 
when he engaged in a carpet business in Philadel- 
phia, Pennsylvania, with Joseph Blackwood. .After 
two years he returneil to Westbrook. which town he 
represented in the Connecticut Legislature in 1869, 
removing the same year to Holyoke, Massachusetts, 
where he became half owner and Editor of the 
Holyoke Transcript. In 1876 having sold his in- 
terest in the Transcript, Mr. Kirtland was elected to 
the Massachusetts House of Representatives where 
he remained for one year, declining a renoniination 




EDWIN' I,. KIRTL.'VXD 

to assume connection with the National Paper Com- 
pany. He sold his interest in this concern in 
1 8 78 and was elected Superintendent of Schools in 
Holyoke, an office which he held for eighteen years 
— the most pleasant occupation, he says, of any in 
a singularly varied career. From 1896 until 1S98 
study and literary work occupied his attention, and 
in that period he published several historical writ- 
ings of much interest. He has been, since 1S9S, 
Deputy Collector of Internal Revenue. In politics 
his views arc those of the Rejiublican party. Mr. 
Kirtland was married in November, 1864,10 Edwina 
Magna, who died in October 1884, by whom he 
had two children ; I'.dwina Magna, now Mrs. L. E. 



234 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



Bellows and Maria Lucy, now Mrs. I. E. Saw)'er. 
He was married again, July 6, 1892, to Laura Maria 
(Newton) Whiting, who died April 9, 1898. 



LINTON, William James 

Yale (Hon.) M.A. 189J. 
Born in London, Eng., 1812 ; became noted as an 
engraver; was one of the leaders in the Chartist 
movement in England ; received honorary M.A. degree 
from Yale in 1891 ; died 1897. 

W11.LI.\M J.\MES LINTON, Engraver and 
Author, was born in London, England, in 
iSij. .\t an early age he served an apprenticeship 
in the engraving trade. He became very famous 
through the remarkable engravings which he pro- 
duced, and he was probably the greatest master of 
the art living in modern times. His book entitled 
Masters of Engraving is said to be the only authori- 
tative treatise on the subject extant. Mr. Linton was 
the author of several poetical works and of certain 
political articles written during the Chartist move- 
ment in London, of which he was one of the 
leaders, constantly advocating the proposed reforms. 
He was given an honorary degree of Master of .Arts 
by Yale in 1891. He was a member of the National 
Academy of Arts, and the Century and Grolier clubs, 
of New York City, and had a place of prominence 
among the first literary men and artists of the 
country. He died in New Haven, Connecticut, 
December 29, 1897. 



MERRITT, Oliver Hazard Perry 

Yale LL.B. 1894. 
Born at Sing Sing, N. Y., 1873; educated at public 
schools, Danbury (Conn.) High School, and privately; 
special courses at Yale ; graduated Yale Law School, 
1894 ; in office of City Attorney, New Haven, 1894-95, 
and also in New York City for a time ; engaged on 
preparation of uniform code of commercial law with 
Judge Brewster for American Bar Association ; in 
practice with Henry C. Griffin, Tarrytown, New York. 

OLIVER HAZARD PERRY MERRIIT, Law- 
yer, was born in Sing Sing, New York, July 
20, 1873, son of Charles .Avery and Juliet Dobbs 
(Bedient) Merritt. He is descended in the pater- 
nal line from one of three brothers Merritt, who set- 
tled in New .Amsterdam uniler the Governorship of 
Peter Stuyvesant in 1650; and his mother was 
directly descended from Captain William Dobbs, 
Paymaster-General of the Continental .Army and 
Chief of Staff to General Washington. She was also 
collaterally related to Commodore Perry. Mr. 



Merritt received his early education in the public 
schools of Danbury, Connecticut, and under private 
tutors, and fitted for College at the Danbury High 
School and privately. He took special courses in 
political science, law, philosophy, political economy 
and kindred subjects at Yale, and the full course in 
the Law Department, graduating in 1894. During 
his residence in New Haven, Mr. Merritt served in 
the Connecticut National Guard, enlisting in Com- 
pany G, Fourth Regiment, and from 1S91 until he 
resigned in 1S94 upon his removal to New York, he 
was a member of the staff of Colonel Russell Frost 




OLIVER H. p. .MERRITT 

of that regiment. LTpon his admission to the Bar 
in 1894, he became associated with Tyler, IngersoU 
& Moran, City .Attorneys of New Haven, for a year, 
going from there to Morse, Livermore & Griffin in 
New York City, with whom he practised law in 1896. 
He was later connected with Murray, Bennett, 
& IngersoU as Managing .Attorney until the middle 
of 1896, when ill health compelled his retirement 
from active practice for a year. In the summer of 
1897 the American Bar .Association undertook the 
preparation of a uniform code of commercial law, 
which work was placed in charge of a committee 
with Hon. Lyman D. Brewster as Chairman. Mr. 
Merritt was associated with Judge Brewster in the 
undertaking until its completion and adoption by 



UNIVERSITIES AND rilEIR SONS 



■35 



the association. It has been adopted by a large 
number of states, but with slight modifications in 
any case. Since the completion of this work Mr. 
Merritt has been associated in practice with Henry 
C. Griffin at Tarrytown. He is a Democrat in 
politics, affiliated with the wing of the party opposed 
to Mr. Bryan and his theories, but has taken no 
active part in partisan struggles. 



MYERS, Philip Van Ness 

Yale LL.B. 1874. 
Born at Tribe's Hill, N. Y., 1846; attended Gilmore 
Academy, Ballston Spa, N. Y. ; graduated at Williams 
College, 1871 ; studied at Yale Law School, 1873-74; 
President of Belmont Coll., 1879-91 ; Professor of 
History and Political Economy at Univ. of Cincinnati, 
1891-1900. 

PHILIP VAN NKSS MYKRS, L.H.D., was 
born at Tribe's Hill, New York, .August lo, 
1846, the son of Jacob ami Catherine (Morris) 
Myers. He was prepared for College at the Gil- 
more .Academy, Ballston Spa, New York, and 
entering Williams College in 1867 graduated, Bach- 
elor of Arts, in 1871. The following year he spent 
in travel in Europe and Asia, and upon his return 
to America entered the Yale Law School. Professor 
Myers was appointed President of Belmont College 
in 1879, and remained in that office until 1891, 
when he resigned to accept the position of Pro- 
fessor of History and Political Economy at the 
University of Cincinnati. He is a member of the 
American Historical Society, the Society of Colonial 
Wars, and the Ohio Philosophical and Historical 
Society. He was married, in 1S75, to Ida Cornelia 
Miller. 



RATTLE, William James 

Yale, Sheffield School, 1870-1874. 
Born in Cuyahoga Falls, O., 1852 ; educated in dis- 
trict and public schools and at the Kenyon Preparatory 
School, Gambler, O. ; Sheffield Scientific School, Yale, 
1870-74; Chief Chemist, Cleveland Rolling Mill Com- 
pany, 1874-82; Mining Engineer and Analytical Chem- 
ist in Cleveland since 1882; Consulting Engineer for 
several large corporations. 

WILLIA.M JAMES R.Vri'LE, Consulting 
Engineer and Chemist, was born in Cuya- 
hoga Falls, Ohio, September 6, 1852, the son of 
William and Elizabeth Goodman (Gaylord) Rattle. 
His father was a native of Bath, Ivngland, descended 
from an old Quaker family, and his mother came of 
old Connecticut stock. He received his early educa- 
tion in country schools in the vicinity of his native 
place, and in the public schools of ("lovehuKl, ami 



after a preparatory course at the Kenyon Prepar- 
atory School at Gambler, Ohio, entered the Sheffield 
Scientific School of Yale in 1870, pursuing his stud- 
ies there for four years. On leaving the University 
in 1874, Mr. Rattle was engaged as Chief Chemist 
for the Cleveland Rolling Mill Company, remaining 
in that position for eight years. Since 1882 he has 
been engaged in general practice as a Consulting 
Mining Engineer and .Analytical Chemist in Cleve- 
land. He is retained as Consulting luigineer for a 
number of large concerns, among them the Pioneer 
Iron Company of Ely, Minnesota, the Montreal 




w. I. R.vn'LE 

River Mining Company of Cleveland, and the Colo- 
rado Mining Company of Aniica, .Mexico. Mr. 
Rattle is a fellow of the .\merican Institute of Mining 
Engineers, and a member of the Union Club and 
the Yale .Mumni Association of Cleveland. Though 
a Republican by political conviction, he has not 
been able to find time to take an active part in pol- 
itics. He married, .Vugust 9, 1877, Julia Cary. 
They have three children : William, Mary Stockly 
and Elizabeth Goodwin Rattle. 



SILLIMAN, Ebenezer 

Yolc B.A. 17J7. 
Born in Fairfield. Conn., 1707 ; graduated Yale, 1727; 
Deputy to Gen. Assembly of Connecticut, 1730-38; 



236 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



member of House of Assistants, 1739-66 ; Speaker of 
Gen. Assembly, 1767-74; Judge of Superior Court, 
1743-66 ; died 1775. 

EBENEZER SILLIMAN, Lawyer, was born in 
Fairfield, Connecticut, in i 707, and gradu- 
ated at Yale in 1727, receiving his Master's degree 
there in course in 1 730. His intention was to en- 
ter the ministry, and to this end he studied theology 
in New Haven, but subsequently turned his atten- 
tion to law. Public affairs also claimed his services 
at an early age. In 1 730 he was sent as Deputy to 
the General Assembly of the Province, filling that 
representative position for a number of years and 
for the period 1 739 to i 766 he was a member of 
the House of Assistants. He afterwards returned to 
the Lower House, of which he was made Speaker, 
ser\'ing as such until within a year of his death. In 
the Militia of the Province he held the rank of 
Major, and by annual election he was Judge of the 
Superior Courts from 1743 to 1766. Judge Silli- 
man died in 1775. His son, Gold Selleck Sillinian 
(Yale 1752), was a Brigadier-General in the Revolu- 
tionary War, charged with the defence of the south- 
western portion of Connecticut. His grandson, 
Benjamin Silliman (Yale 1796), was the eminent 
scientist. Professor at Yale for more than sixty years, 
whose statue was erected on the grounds in front of 
Farnum in 18S4. 



STURGES, Jonathan 

Yale B.A. 1759, LL.D. 1806. 
Born in Fairfield, Conn., 1740; graduated Yale, 1759; 
studied law and practised in Fairfield ; active in the 
movement for independence, member of Congress, 
1789-93; Judge of Connecticut Supreme Court, 1793- 
1805; LL.D. Yale, 1806; died i8ig. 

JON-VIHAN STURGES, LL.D., Jurist, was born 
in Fairfield, Connecticut, .August 23, 1740, 
and was graduated at Yale in 1759. Following his 
graduation he studied law, was admitted to the Bar, 
and settled in his native town in the practice of his 
profession. In the movements of resistance to the 
oppressive government of Great Britain which pre- 
ceded the Revolution, Mr. Sturgis took an active 
and leading part, and throughout the struggle for 
independence his support of the patriot cause was 
indefatigable. He was a member of the Conti- 
nental Congress, and in recognition of the value of 
his services, the people of Connecticut chose him 
one of their Representatives in the Congress of the 
United States upon the adoption of the Federal 
Constitution. He sers^ed in the first and second 
Congresses, 1 789-1 793, and at the end of his 



second term was made a Justice of the Supreme 
Court of Connecticut. He occupied a seat on this 
Bench for twelve years, 1 793-1805, and served as 
Presidential l'",lector in 1797 and 1S05. Judge 
Sturges received his Master's degree from Yale two 
years after graduation, and in 1806 was made Doc- 
tor of Laws. He ilieil in Fairchild, 0<tober 4, 
1819. One of his grandsons, bearing the same 
name, attained distinction in New York City as a 
successful merchant, a leader of municipal reform, 
a philanthropist and a patron of art. 



TOWNSEND, John Barnes 

Yale B.A. iSgi. 

Born in Memphis. Tenn., 1867 ; prepared for College 
at Phillips Academy, Exeter, N. H.; graduated Yale, 
i8gi ; Business Manager of the Philadelphia Press. 

JOHN BARNES TOWNSEND, Newspaper 
Manager, was born in Memphis, Tennessee, 
February 9, 1867, the son of Hosea and Ann 




JNO. B. TOWNSEND 

Augusta (Barnes) Townsend. He comes of New 
England family, the first of the American members 
having settled in America in 1638. He was pre- 
pared for College at Phillips Academj', in E.xeter, 
New Hampshire, and from that school entered Yale 
and was graduated in the Class of 1891. After 
graduation he entered the newspaper business by 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



237 



accepting a position in the business department of 
the Philadelphia Press, in which connection he con- 
tinues at present, having been elected Business Man- 
ager of the paper. Mr. Townsend is a member of 
the Union League, the University, the Bachelors' 
Barge, the Merion Cricket and the Pen and Pencil 
clubs of Philadelphia and the- L'niversity Club uf 
New York City. 



TWEEDY, Samuel 

Yale B.A. 1868. 
Born in Danbury, Conn., 1846; educated in private 
schools ; graduated Yale, 1868 ; studied law at Colum- 
bia ; admitted to Bar, 1871 ; practising lawyer in Dan- 
bury since 1871. 

SAMUEL TWEEDY, Lawyer, was born in Dan- 
bury, Connecticut, April 21, 1S46, the son of 
Edgar .S. and Elizabeth Sarah (Belden) Tweedy. 




SAMUEL TWEEDY 

He is a descendant in the fifth generation from Joim 
Tweedy, the first .Xmcrican ancestor of the family 
who came from Irelaml in 173.S. His early educa- 
tion was received chiefly in two private schools : 
Jackson's School in Danbury and Professor Olm- 
stead's Preparatory School in Wilton, Connecticut. 
He graduated at Yale in 1868 and took up the study 
of law at Coluitibia i)rior to his admission to the Bar 
in 1871. Since thai time he has been engaged in 



a very active professional life in Danbury, practising 
during the period in connection with three different 
firms, from 1871 to 1878 with Brewster & Tweedy, 
later Brewster, Tweedy & Scott and since 1892 
under the firm name of Tweedy, Scott & Whittlesey. 
He is a member of Union Lodge Xo. 40 of the Free 
and Accepted Masons, f^ureka Chapter No. 23 of 
the Royal .^rch Masons, Crusader Commandery No. 
10 of the Knights Templar and Wooster Council 
No. 28 of the Royal and Select Masters. Mr. Tweedy 
was married, July r6, 1879, to Carrie ^L Kram ; 
and they have one daughter : Maude E. D. Tweedy. 



OAKEY, John 

Yale B.A. 1849. 
Born in Brooklyn, N. Y., 1829; prepared for College 
at Flatbush, N. Y. ; graduated Yale, 1849; read law in 
an office and was admitted to the Bar of New York 
in 1851 ; practised in Brooklyn 1854-74, and in New 
York City after 1874; member of the House of Repre- 
sentatives, N. Y., 1866-67; ^- S. Assessor, 1872-78; 
Dist. Atty. for Brooklyn, 1878-86; appointed Asst. 
U. S. Dist. Atty. for the Eastern Dist. of New York, 
1889, Dist. Atty. 1893-96 ; served during the Civil War 
in the 7th Kegt. N. Y.; Judge Advocate with rank of 
Colonel, 1868-73; <i''^'i 1899. 

JOHN U.VKEY, Lawyer, was born in Brooklyn, 
New York, September 12, 1829. He was a 
lineal descendant of the historic John Oakey who 
was commander of a regiment in the army of Oliver 
Cromwell. His own military record is worthy of 
such ancestry, for he served in the Civil War as a 
Member of the fliraous Seventh Regiment of New 
York State National Guards, and later, 1868-1873, 
he was Judge .Vdvocate with the rank of Colonel on 
the Staff of jSLnjor-Oeneral Shaler of the First r>ivi- 
sion of the State Guards. Colonel Oakey was pre- 
pared for College at the Erasmus Hall Academy 
in Flatbush, New York, and graduated Bachelor of 
.\rts at Yale in ; S49. .After graduation he took up 
the study of law, being connocteil with the otVice of 
James Humphrey, of Brooklyn. He was admitted 
to the New York Bar in 1851 and entered the office 
of C. T. Crowell as managing clerk, where he re- 
mained for two years, imtil ( )ctolKT 1854 when he 
engaged in independent practice in Brooklyn. In 
1 86 1 Colonel Oakey was apjwinted Justice of the 
Peace for King's county, Long Island, and Commis- 
sioner of Excise for the same county in 1S65, the 
latter position being retained for six years. He 
occupied a seat in the House of Re|-.resentntives of 
New York in 1 866-1 86 7, ami in 1S72 he w.as 
elected L'nited States .Assessor, which office he held 



238 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



until 1S78 when he received the appointment as 
District Attorney for Brooklyn, a position in which 
he continued for eight years. In September 1SS9, 
he was appointed Assistant United States District At- 
torney for the Eastern District of New York under 
General Isaac S. Catlin. Five years later he became 
District Attorney for the same district, and in 1S96 
he resigned to resume his law i)ractice in New York 
City which he continued up to the time of his death, 
which occurred at his liome in Brooklyn, March 24, 
1S99. Colonel Oakey was twice married: June 3, 
1S57, to Sarah Spofford, who died August 26, 1862, 
and November 9, 1871, to Fanny Wallach Allen. 
One daughter, Fanny Wallach Oakey, survives. 



dren. The Rev. D. FUis Willes (Yale 1850) is one 
of his direct descendants. 



WILLES, Henry 

Yale B.A. 1715. 
Born in Windsor, Conn., i6go ; graduated Yale, 1715; 
studied theology and began to preach, 1717 ; Pastor of 
church in Norwich, Conn., 1718-50; died 1758. 

Hl.XRY WILLES, Clergyman, was born in 
Windsor, Connecticut, October 14, 1690, 
the son of Lieutenant Joshua and Hannah (Buch- 
land) Willes. He was graduated at Yale in 1715, 
studied theology and began to preach in 17 17, ap- 
pearing as a candidate before a congregation of 
about fifty families in the part of Norwich, Connec- 
ticut, known at that time as Norwich West Farms 
and later incorporated as the town of Franklin. 
When liberty was granted by the General Assembly 
to form a religious society, Mr. Willes was called as 
Pastor and ordained there in 17 18, over a church of 
eight members. In this charge he led a quiet and 
successful ministry, until with the growth of the 
town there came the formation of another society, 
bringing consequent disaffection and jealousies. 
The " Great .\wakening " of i 740 also introduced 
elements of discord, Mr. Willes siding with the 
Pastor of the Parish Church in Norwich, the Rev. 
Benjamin Lord (Yale 1714), in welcoming the re- 
vival. By taking .advantage of the antagonisms in 
the congregation, a separate society was formed in 
I 746, and in the following year the General Court 
was obliged to interfere to prevent the summary dis- 
missal of Mr. Willes. In 1749 the court gave him 
a final decree for the payment of his dues but ad- 
vised him to resign. This he did in January of the 
following year, but continued to reside in the parish, 
where he died September 5, 1758. Mr. Willes 
married Martha Kirtland, a sister of the Rev. 
Daniel Kirtland (Yale 1720) and had eleven chil- 



WALLER, James Alexander 

Yale B.A. 1894. 
Born in Chicago. 111., 1871 ; educated at private 
schools in Chicago, and fitted for College at University 
School ; graduated Yale. 1894 ; has been engaged in 
business in Chicago since graduation. 

JAMES ALEX.WDER WALLER, Business Man, 
is a native of Chicago, Illinois, born February 
I, 187 I. Both his father, Edward Waller, and his 




J. ALEXANDER WALLER 

mother, Mary Rawson, were of English descent. 
On his father's side he counts among his ancestors 
Sir William Waller, and on his mother's side he 
traces his descent from Sir Richard Rawson. James 
A. Waller received his early education at private 
schools in Chicago, and after a preparatory course 
at the University School in that City, entered Yale 
in 1890. He became a member of the Psi L^psi- 
lon Fraternity at Yale, and was graduated with the 
degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1894. For a year 
and a half after his graduation Mr. Waller was en- 
gaged in the warehouse business in Chicago with 
his brother, and has since then been in the real 
estate business, now agent for the Ashland Block 
in that city. He is a member of the University 
Club of Chicago. On .April 12, 1899, he married 
Louise Hamill, of Chicago. 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



■2,9 



BALDWIN, William Woodward 

Harvard A.B. 1886 
Born in Baltimore, Md., 1862; attended Phillips 
Academy, Exeter, N. H.; graduated Harvard, 1886; 
Maryland Univ. Law School, 1888; admitted to Mary- 
land Bar, 1888; entered office of William B. Horn- 
blower, New York City, i88g ; admitted to New York 
Bar, 1890; practising lawyer in New York City since 
1890; Third Asst. Sec'y of State under President 
Cleveland, 1896. 

WILLIAM WOODWARD BALDWIN, Law- 
yer, was born in Baltimore, Maryland, 
June 23, 1862, the son of Summerfield BaUlwin, a 
descendant of Lieutenant Henry Baldwin of the 




WM. WHODWAUI) BALDWIN 

"Maryland Line," and Frances (Cugle) Baldwin. 
After the customary course in the public grammar 
school of Baltimore he had two years in the City 
College of that city and two years at Stewart Hall. 
In iSSo he went for final College preparation to 
Phillips Academy at L.xcter, New Hampshire, where 
he graduated two years later. From 1882 to 1886 
he followed a course of general stuily in the Aca- 
demic Department of Har\ard, which brought him 
the degree of Bachelor of Arts. The law was his 
chosen profession and he at once entered upon the 
study at the Maryland University, in his native city. 
While pursuing his studies at the Law School Mr. 
Baldwin was employed in the offices of Marshall & 
Hall, and of R. W. Baldwin, with whom he was later 



associated in practice. In 1S88 he received the 
degree of Bachelor of Laws and was admitted to the 
Maryland Bar. The following year he left Balti- 
more, and went to New York City, entering the law 
office of Hornblower & Byrne. In 1890 he was 
admitted to the New York Bar, and in 1892 com- 
menced practice for himself. The following year 
Mr. Baldwin formed, with Charles A. Boston, the 
firm known as Baldwin & Boston, which is to-day 
one of the notably successful law concerns of New 
York. In 1896 he was appointed Third .Assistant 
Secretary of State by President Cleveland, and he 
held that office until the end of the administration. 
Mr. Baldwin has been President of the Maryland 
Society of New York since 1898. He is also 
member of the Knickerbocker, Manhattan and 
Harvard clubs of New York, and of the L'niversity 
Club of Baltimore. He is also connected with the 
Maryland Historical Society. In politics he is a 
Democrat, and a firm believer in the ])olicy of that 
party as enunciated by Grover Cleveland. He was 
married in Berlin, Germany, May 15, 1895, to 
Kathcrine Willard, of I'".vanston, Illinois. Their 
son, Summerfield Baldwin, was born in Washington, 
District of Columbia, September 4, 1896. 



DUDLEY, Sanford Harrison 

Harvard A.B. 1867, LL.B. 1871. 

Born in China, Me., 1842 ; prepared for College in 

high school, Fairhaven, Mass., and at private school 

in New Bedford; graduated Harvard, 1867; Harvard 

Law School, 1871 ; practising law in Boston since 1867. 

SANFORD HARRISON DUDLEY, Liwyer, 
born in China, Kennebec county, Maine, Jan- 
uary 14, 1842, the son of Harrison and Elizabeth 
( Prentiss) Dudley, is a direct descendant of Governor 
'I'homas Dudley of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. 
Thomas Dudley, who was an officer in the service of 
{,)ueen Elizabeth before joining the Puritans, and 
who afterwards h.ad shown his possession of extra- 
ordinary administrative talent in rehabilitating the 
fortunes of the Earl of Lincoln by the skilful manage- 
ment of the estates of that nobleman, was selected 
as a desirable leader of the enterprise of the Massa- 
chusetts Bay Company in New luigland. The royal 
charter of 1629 confirmed the choice, already made, 
of Matthew Cradock as Governor of the proposed 
Colony and Thomas GofTe as Deputy Governor, but 
neither of these ever crossed the sea. Liter in that 
year, before the despatch of Winthrop's company, 
John Humphrey was chosen, in London, to be 



240 



UNIFERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



Deputy Governor ; but he declined to leave Eng- 
land, and 'I'honias Dudley consenting to accept the 
office of Deputy, with John Winthrop as Governor, 
he was the first to actually hold that position in per- 
son on New England soil. Thomas Dudley suc- 
ceeded Winthrop as Governor in 1634 and was 
several times elected Governor and Deputy, serving 
ill the latter office at the time of Iiis death. Governor 
Thomas Dudley's son Joseph (Harvard 16C5) re- 
ceived the royal appointment of Governor of Massa- 
chusetts under the second charter. His eldest son, 
Samuel, chose the ministry as his life-work, and 




>., 



SANFORn H. DUDLEY 

finally settled in Exeter, New Hampshire, remaining 
there to the close of his life. It is from the Rev. 
Samuel Dudley that Mr. Sanford H. Dudley traces 
his descent. He is in the ninth generation of his 
family in America, the line running from the Rev. 
Samuel, son of Governor Thomas Dudley, through 
Stephen of Exeter, James of the same town, Samuel 
of Raymond, New Hampshire, Micajah of Durham, 
Maine, Micajah of China, Maine, and Harrison, the 
father of Sanford H., who died in Cambridge, Mas- 
sachusetts, in 1880. As Governor Dudley built the 
first house in Cambridge, and his son Samuel also 
built a house there on the same street at about the 
same time, it is seen that the latest generation has 
returned to the place of its ancestral origin. In his 



early infancy, the iiarcnts of Sanford II. Dudley re- 
moved to St. Albans, in Somerset county, Maine, 
where they occupied a fitrm for a number of years, 
going to Auburn, in the same state, when the son 
was a lad of ten years. The father was engaged as 
a mechanic in the construction of the mills which 
now constitute the chief industry of the thriving 
cities of Lewiston and .Auburn ; anil there as at 
Richmond, Maine, where the family removed in a few 
years, Sanford made the most of the opportunities 
afforded for education in the public schools and 
such private schools as their means permitted him 
to attend. It was not until, at the age of fifteen, his 
parents removed to Massachusetts, establishing their 
residence in Fairhaven, that he was able to avail 
himself of the attention of teachers of higher ability. 
He then began his studies preparatory for College 
at the high school in that town, completing them 
under a private teacher in New Bedford wiiile he 
himself was employed in teaching a country school 
in that vicinity. He entered Harvard in 1863 and 
was graduated in the Class of 1867, and at once 
found engagement as teacher of the classics and 
mathematics in the New Bedford High School 
where he remained three years, at the same time 
reading law as a student in the office of l'".liot & 
Stetson in that city. Mr. Dudley received his Mas- 
ter's degree from Harvard in 1870 and in the same 
year entered the Law School of that University, 
graduating there as a Bachelor of Laws in 1871. 
He was admitted to the Bar upon graduating and at 
once began practice, opening an office in Boston, as 
well as in Cambridge, his place of residence. After 
a few years, however, he confined himself to his 
Boston office, where he has since been engaged in 
the general practice of his profession. In politics 
Mr. Dudley was originally a Republican and has 
steadfastly adhered to the principles of that party 
while of late years exercising the liberty of indivi- 
dual judgment through independent action. He 
was for many years actively engaged in political 
work as a member of the Republican party organi- 
zation in Cambridge, but has never sought political 
office or preferment, choosing rather the more sat- 
isfiictory emoluments accompanying the successful 
practice of his profession. He has served in the 
City Government of Cambridge, and his influence 
has been steadily exerted to preserve and increase 
the reputation which that city has gained for clean 
and efficient administration of municipal affairs. 
Mr. Dudley is a member of the Universalist Church 
in North Cambridge and has been active in religious 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



241 



work, l)oth ill the church and the Sunday Schonl. 
lie has long been a member of the Universalist 
Club, the representative lay organization of that 
denomination in Massachusetts, and for a time was 
its President. He has also served as President of 
the Universalist Sunday School Union, an associa- 
tion which includes and represents all the Sunday 
Schools of the chunhes of that denomination in 
P)OSton and vicinity. Mr. Dudley was the first 
President of the (lovernor Thomas Dudley Family 
Association, and is a leading spirit in the work of 
this society, a cor[)oration establishcti not only for 
social purposes but for the preservation of the facts 
of early New luigland history of whi( h the descen- 
dants of (Governor Dudley have had so large a part 
in the making. The annual reunions of this asso- 
ciation are largely attended and are always occasions 
of great interest. Mr. Dudley is a member of the 
New luigland Historic- Genealogical Society, an<l of 
the Sons of Maine Association in Cambridge, and 
has held tlie office of President of the latter. In the 
city of his residence, he is one of the original mem- 
bers of the Cambridge Club, the principal social 
organization there. He is an occasional contributor 
to the press and to periodical literature, and from 
time to time has prepared and deli\'ercd public 
addresses on historical and other topics. .April 2, 
1869, Mr. Dudley married Laura Nye, daughter of 
John M. Howlaud of Fairhaven, Massachusetts, and 
has three children : Laura llowland, Howland and 
Llizabeth Prentiss Dudley. 



DANIELS, Charles Augustus 

Harvard A.B 1859, A.M. 1862. 
Born in Worcester, Mass., 1834; attended Holliston 
(Mass.) Academy; graduated Harvard, 1859; Princi- 
pal of Dean Academy, Franklin, Mass., 1871-72 ; Prin- 
cipal High School, Maiden, Mass., 1862-71 and 1^73- 
83; Supt. of Schools at Maiden, 1883-95; Special 
Instructor in Civics, History and Political Economy 
in Maiden High School since 1896. 

ClIARLLS AUGUSTUS DANHiL.S, ICducator, 
w.is born in Worcester, Massachusetts, 
March 14, i.S^_(. In both the family of his father, 
Obed Daniels, and th.it of his mother. Harriet l'>li/,- 
abeth (Chapiu) Daniels, he traces an ancestry 
dating back to Colonial days. Robert Daniels, the 
first American representative of the family, settled 
in Watertown, Massachusetts, in 1634 or 1635. 
His maternal ancestor, Samuel Chapin, was one of 
the founders of Springfield, Massachusetts. There 
is a .statue erected to his inemory in Stearns Square 
vol.. V. — 16 



in that city. .\lr. Daniels had early training in the 
public schools at Milford, Massachusetts, at the 
Academy at Holliston, Massachusetts, and under 
the tutorship of Elbridge J. Cutler. He entered 
Harvard for an Academic course in 1855, and grad- 
uated four years later with the degree of Bachelor 
of .Arts, receiving the Master of Arts degree in 
1 862. His teaching career had coninienced when 
he was but nineteen years old, when he taught a 
district school, at the same time pursuing studies at 
the high schocjl at Milford. .Again in College he 
taught during the winter. His first position after 




L. \. I'WII'l.S 

graduation from Harvard was that of Principal of 
the academy at Troy, Pennsylvania. Two years 
later he became Principal of the grammar school 
in ^[alden, Massachusetts, rising almost at once to 
the position of Principal of the high school, which 
he held nine years, 1S62-1S71. After one yearns 
Principal of Dean Academy, at Franklin, Massachu- 
setts, and one year in business at Worcester, he 
returned to Maiden to his former position of Prin- 
cipal of the high school, which he held for ten 
years, iS73-iS83, taking then the office of .Superin- 
tendent of the schools of the city, which he held 
thirteen years, 18S3-1896. Ho is now Special 
Instructor in Civics, History and Political I'.cononiy 
in the Maiden High School. Mr. Daniels is a 



242 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



member of the Maiden Historical Society, of which 
he was, 1893-1895, Vice-President. In politics he 
is Independent with Republican leaning. He mar- 
ried rhebe Stimson W'hitmorc, August 3, 1S59. 
Their children are : Cirace, now Mrs. Frank E. 
Fowle ; Laura, now Mrs. J. Horace Smith ; Charles 
Herbert, Roy Adelbert and Zelma Daniels. 



FISHER, Nathaniel 

Harvard A.B. 1763. 
Born in Dedham, Mass., 1742; graduated Harvard, 
1763; teacher in Nova Scotia, and ordained over 
churches there, 1777; rector of St. Peter's Church, 
Salem, Mass., 1782-1812 ; died 1812. 

N.VTHANIEL FISHER, Clergyman, was born 
in Dedhain, Massachusetts, July 8, 1742, 
the son of a farmer t)f that town. He was gradu- 
ated at Harvard in i 763 and for a number of years 
was employed as a missionary teacher in Nova 
Scotia. In 1777 he was ordained by Dr. Robert 
Levett, Bishop of London, and placed in charge of 
the churches at Annapolis and Granville, in that 
province, where he continued his labors until 1782. 
Upon his return to Massachusetts in that year, he 
was immediately called to the Rectorship of St. 
Peter's Church in Salem, where he was installed 
after taking the oath of allegiance. Mr. Fisher 
remained in Salem for the rest of his life and took 
a leading part in the organization of the Protestant 
Episcopal Church in New England. He died 
December 20, 1812. 



DARLINGTON, Richard 

Harvard, Lawrence Scientific School, 1859. 
Born in West Marlborough, Pa., 1834; educated at 
Gause's Academy and Ecildoun Seminary, Pa. ; student 
at Harvard Scientific School until 1859 ; attended Wash- 
ington and Jefferson College, and received honorary 
Ph.D. from that College, 1880; has taught school in 
New Jersey and Pennsylvania for nearly forty years; 
Principal of Seminary for Young Ladies at West 
Chester, Pa. 

RICHARD DARLINGTON, Ph.D., Principal 
of the Darlington Seminary for Young 
Ladies, was born in West Marlborough, Pennsyl- 
vania, .August 14, 1834, the son of Richard and 
Edith (Smedley) Darlington. His early life was 
spent in the town where he was born and his educa- 
tion was received in schools in that vicinity, partic- 
ularly the Ecildoun Seminary and Jonathan Gause's 
Academy at Greenwood Dell, Pennsylvania. Later 
he went to Harvard and pursued studies there in 



the Lawrence Scientific School until 1859, when he 
took up a course of study as pursued in Washington 
and Jeflerson College, Washington, Pennsylvania : 
from this institution he received the honorary 
degree of Doctor of Philosophy in 1880. After 
some experience as a teacher in the public schools 
of Pennsylvania Dr. Darlington purchased, in 1861, 
the Ecildoun Seminary at Ecildoun, Chester county, 
Pennsylvania, and for seventeen years was Princijial 
of that institution. On July i, 1877, the Seminary 
was destroyed by a tornado which swept over that re- 
gion, and property for a new school was purchased 




RICHARD D.ARLINGTON 

near West Chester, Pennsylvania, where the present 
institution, the Darlington Seminary for Young 
Ladies, was founded. Dr. Darlington continues in 
the office of Principal of this school after a long period 
of experience in the teacher's profession in which 
he has met wdth great success. In politics he has 
always been a Republican, taking active interest as 
a public speaker. He is a member of the Society 
of Friends, the ^^'est Chester Philosophical Society, 
the West Chester Club and the Harvard Club of 
Philadelphia. Dr. Darlington was married, Febru- 
ary 7, 1 86 1, to Elizabetii F. Alexander, of Bucks 
county, Pennsylvania ; their children are : Alice E. 
and Grace .\. Darlington, both of whom graduated 
in their fiither's school, the Darlington Seminary for 
Young Ladies. The older daughter is a musician 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



243 



and pianist of much prominence, and the younger 
is a singer having a voice of wide range and unusual 
power. 



FISHER, Sydney George 

Harvard Law School, Class of 1882, 
Born in Philadelphia, Pa., 1856; graduated Trinity 
Colleg 1879; spent two years at Harvard Law 
School; admitted to Pennsylvania Bar, 1883; well- 
known lawyer in Philadelphia ; one of the founders of 
Civil Service Reform ; and an able writer upon histori- 
cal, social and political topics. 

SVDNFA' GEORGE FISHER, Lawyer and 
ICssayist, son of Sidney (Jeorge and Eliza- 
beth (IngersoII) Fisher, was born in Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania, September ii, 1S56. His father, 
who was born in the same city, March 2, 1809, and 
died there July 25, 1871, was a graduate of Dickin- 
son College, Class of 1827, practised law in the 
Quaker City for the greater portion of his active 
period and acquired a national reputation as a 
political essayist under the nom dc plume of Cecil, 
condemning slavery and upholding the North for its 
prosecution of the Civil War. The younger Fisher 
was graduated from Trinity College, Hartford, Con- 
necticut, in 1S79, and was admitted to the Phila- 
delphia Bar in 1883, having spent two years as a 
law student at Harvard. Although recognized in 
the Quaker City as a lawyer of unusual ability, it is 
to his scholarly erudition and intelligent conception 
of important social economic and political problems, 
rather than to the legal profession, that he owes his 
widely diffused reputation, and in the field of litera- 
ture pertaining to political and social science he has 
continued the work so long and ably prosecuted by 
his father, seemingly accepting it as a sacred heri- 
tage and devoting his concentrated energies to its 
propagation. While still a student he began his 
labors as a reformer by publishing in the New York 
Nation under the signature of F. G. S. a letter which 
was largely instrumental in establishing various Civil 
Service Reform Societies throughout the country, 
and which together with other letters from his pen 
distributed through the medium of the press, proved 
effective in bringing about the adoption of the pres- 
ent Civil Service Laws. During the past ten years 
Mr. Fisher has used his pen with f;ir reaching 
influence in promoting, organizing and extending 
various reform movements of a helpful and pro- 
gressive nature. .\n article written by him for the 
F'orum entitled .Mien Degradation of .\merican 
Character; together witli another, Has Ininiigration 



Dried up our Literature, in which he takes the 
ground that nationality and a homogeneous native 
stock are mainly responsible for a distinct national 
literature, proved an important incentive to the 
formation of the Immigration Restriction league. 
Other articles, including The Causes of the Increase 
of Divorce, afterward rewritten and amplified, 
appeared in rapid succession. He is also the 
author of The Making of Pennsylvania ; Pennsyl- 
vania : Colony and Commonwealth ; The Evolution 
of the Constitution, and .Men, Women and Manners 
in Colonial Times, in each of which he has dis- 




SVDXF.V O. FISHF.R 

played to a high degree his industry in historical 
research, and his ability to place the results before 
the public in an interesting and entertaining man- 
ner. His most recent books are The True ]5cn- 
jamin Franklin anil The True William Penn. 
The former of these has attracted much attention 
and had a very wide circulation. Mr. F'isher is a 
Trustee of 'i'rinity College, having been elected 
to that office for two successive terms by the 
.Mumni. 



HALL, Charles Cuthbert 

Harvard D.D. (Hon). 1897 
Born in New York City, 1852; graduated Williams, 
1872 ; member of Class of 1875 at Union Theological 
Sem.; went abroad to attend lectures at Presbyterian 



244 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



Coll., in London, and at Free Church Coll., in Edin- 
burgh ; ordained and installed as Pastor of the Union 
Presbyterian Church at Newburgh, N. Y., 1875; went 
to First Presbyterian Church of Brooklyn, N. Y., 1877; 
received honorary degree of D.D. from New York 
Univ. 1890, and from Harvard 1897; President of 
Union Theological Seminary. 

GH.\RLES CUTHBKRT H.M.L, D.D., Presi- 
dent of the Union Theological Seminary, was 
born in New V'ork City, September 3, 1852. After 
early instruction umler a private tutor he entered 
Williams College, where he graduated with the Class 
of 1S72. The same year he entered the institution 




CH. CLTHBERT H.ALL 

of which he is now President for the study of 
theology. He was there a member of the Class of 
1875, but he left in the autumn of 1874 and went 
abroad for a course of lectures at the Presbyterian 
College, in London, and at the Free Church Col- 
lege, in Edinburgh. Upon his return to .America in 
the summer of 1875 he was called to the Pastorate 
of the Union Presbyterian Church of Xewburgh, 
New York, where he was duly ordained and installed 
the following December. Here he remained for 
two years until called in the spring of 1877 to the 
First Presbyterian Church of Brooklyn, New York, 
where he was installed May 10 of that year. In 
1890 New York University conferred upon him the 
honorary degree of Doctor of Divinity, and he 



enjoyed the same honor again in 1S97 when Har- 
vard conferred the Doctor's degree. President KUut 
happily describing him as " elotjuent divine, judi- 
cious hymnologist, lover of sacred music. President 
of the great Seminary auspiciously named tlie Union 
i'heological Seminary." He has been a permanent 
Trustee of Williams College for the past ten years, 
and is also a Trustee of Atlanta University, in 
deorgia. In 1S99 Dr. Hall was apjiointed by 
Chicago University, Barrows Lecturer to India on 
the Haskell Foundation, in succession to the Rev. 
Principal Fairbairn, of Mansfield College, Oxford. 
This appointment matures in the autumn of 1901, 
when it is expected that Dr. Hall will visit India 
and the Far East in the fulfilment of this duty. Dr. 
Hall has published several volumes, among them a 
volume of sermons, Into His Marvellous Light, The 
Gospel of the Divine Sacrifice, and Qualifications 
for Ministerial Power, being the Carew Lectures at 
Hartford Theological Seminary. 



HOMANS, John 

Harvard A.B. 1772. 
Born in Dorchester, Mass., 1753 ; prepared for Col- 
lege at Boston Latin School ; graduated Harvard, 
1772; studied medicine and entered the Continental 
Army as Surgeon, 1776 ; resigned, 1781, in consequence 
of broken health, and resumed, practice in Boston; 
died 1800. 

JOHN HOMANS, M.D., Surgeon in the Revolu- 
tionary Array, was born in Dorchester, now a 
part of Boston, Massachusetts, .April 8, 1753, the 
son of Captain John Homans, ship-owner and 
master, of Boston. He was prepared for College at 
the Boston Latin School and graduated at Harvard 
in 1772, subsequently studying medicine under the 
jireceptorship of Dr. Joseph Gardner. As he was 
about to enter u]ion practice, having completed his 
preparatory studies, the trouble between the Colonies 
and Great Britain reached its crisis and he promptly 
offered his services to the patriot cause. On the 
evening following the battle of Bunker Hill he aided 
in dressing the wounds of the injured and at once 
attached himself to the Continental .Army, receiving 
a commission as Surgeon of the Sixteenth Regiment 
early in 1776. His longest connection was with the 
famous Second Regiment, known as Sheldon's Light 
Dragoons, with which he served for nearly five years 
from December 1776, sharing the hardshijjs of 
Valley Forge and the honors of the victory which 
compelled the surrender of Burgoyne, and acting 
for a time as Commissary of that regiment. His 



UNIlKRsrriES AND THEIR SONS 



245 



health broke down under th(! strain of ihis long and in 1S60, after which he spent two years at the 
hard service, and in the summer of I 78 1 he resigned Andover (Massachusetts) Theological Seminary 
his commission and returned to lioston and there he and completed his studies abroad, chiefly in Leipzig 
continued the practice of his profession until his and Erlangen, Germany. He was prejjarcd for 
death. This occurred at sea, on the third day out Deacon's orders under the direction of kev. Fred- 
from Boston, on a voyage which he had undertaken erick Dan Huntington, now Protestant Episcopal 
for his healtli. Dr. Homans was one of the original Bishop of Central New York, and his first Rectorship 
nienilxrs of the Society of the Cincinnati. He was th.it of Christ Church, Exeter, New Hampshire, 
married Sally, daughter of James Daiton, a merchant which he held from 1866 to 1869, going from the 
of Boston, and was the progenitor of a line of dis- latter place to St. 'Ihomas' Church, Hanover, same 
tinguished physicians all graduated at Harvard, to state, where he remained seven years. From 1876 
the present day. His only son, John (Harvard to 1879 he was Dean of All Saints' Cathedral, 
18 1 2), President of the Massachusetts Medical 
Society for a number of years, married Caroline 
Walker and had two sons who also attained eminence 
in the profession: Charles Dudley (Ilarvartl 1S46), 
who was Surgeon of the Boston City Hospital from 
its foundation and President of the Massachusetts 
Medical Society, and John Homans, who was gradu- 
ated from Harvard in 1858, and who served through- 
out the \Var of the Rebellion from 1861 to 1865, in 
the regular Navy and .^rmy, as an .Assistant Surgeon 
U. S. N. and an .Assistant Surgeon U. S. A. in charge 
of Hospitals, and on the staff of Major-General 
Philip H. Sheridan. He has been Surgeon of the 
Massachusetts General Hospital from 1881 to 
1900. 



HAUGHTON, James 

Harvard A.B. i860. 
Born in Boston, Mass., 1839 ; educated at schools in 
Boston and vicinity, Harvard, Andover Theological 
Seminary and abroad; took orders in Protestant Epis- 
copal Church ; held two Rectorates in New Hampshire ; 
Dean of All Saints Cathedral, Albany, N. Y., 1876-79; 
Rector St. John's Church, Yonkers, N. Y., to 1887; of 
Church of the Redeemer, Bryn Mawr, Pa., since 1887. 

JAMI':S HAUGHTON, Clergyman, was born in 
Boston, Massachusetts, .April 14, 1839, son of 
James and Eliza (Richards) Haughton. On the 
paternal side he is descended from John Alden and 
PrisciUa MuUins, (Jovernor Bradford and fn-e other 
Mayflower Pilgrims and through his mother from the 
Connecticut Huntingtons. His ancestor General 
Jedidiah Huntington, who graduated from Harvard 
in 1763 and is said to have been the first to deliver 
an English oration at the Commencement exercises 
there, was a personal friend of General Washington 
as well as one of his military aids during the Rev- 
olutionary War, and assisted in organizing the 
Society of the Cincinnati. The subject of this sketch 
was ediUMted i)rcliminarily at schools in Boston 
and Jam.iica Plain, he was graduated from ll.irvard 




J.\Mi:.S H.AITGHTON 

Alb.iny, New York, was Rector of St. John's Church, 
Yonkers-on- Hudson, for the succeeding eight years, 
at the exiiiration of which time he was called to the 
Church of the Redeemer, liryn M;iwr. Pennsylvania, 
and still retains that charge. Mr. Haughton was a 
delegate from New Hampshire to the General Con- 
vention of Protestant Episcopal Churches in 1874, 
has for the past four years ser\-ed upon the Standing 
Committee of the Diocese of Pennsylvania, and is a 
member of various clerical bodies in New York, 
Philadelphia and Boston. In politics he was for- 
merly a Republican, having voted for Abraham Lincoln 
in i860, but supported the camiidacy of Grovcr 
Cleveland in 1884, 1888 and 1892. On February 
7, 1 866, he married .Augustine Mellct, of Lausanne, 



246 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



Switzerland ; their children are : Rev. Victor jSIellet, 
Marguerite, Marie, John Paul, Adele, Richard and 
Augustine Haughton. 



HUBBARD, Gardiner Greene 

Harvard LL.B. 1843. 
Born in Boston, Mass., 1822 ; graduated Dartmouth, 
1841 ; LL.B. Harvard Law School, 1843; engaged in 
practice in Boston, Mass., 1843-73; removed to Wash- 
ington, D. C, 1873; ceased practice to give his entire 
attention to the business of the Bell Telephone Co., 
1878; negotiated control of the Berliner patent ; founder 
of the first American school for deaf mutes; interested 
in Postal Telegraph System ; instituted reforms in 
railway service; died 1897. 

GARDINER GREENE HUBBARD, Lawyer, 
and chief promoter of the Bell Telephone 
Company, was born in Boston, Massachusetts, 
August 25, 1822. He was a son of Samuel Hubbard, 
who married Mary Green, of Boston. The first 
American ancestor of the family, William Hubbard, 
was born in England, and graduatetl from Harvard 
in 1642. Gardiner Greene Hubbard, after early 
education in the best schools of Boston, was admitted 
to Dartmouth, where he graduated in 1S41. He 
then enteieil at once upon the study of law at the 
Harvard Law School, and at the completion of his 
course there was admitted to the Bar, and entered 
the office of Judge Benjamin R. Curtis, of Boston, 
as junior partner. In 1848 he opened an office for 
himself, and soon gained a large and valuable prac- 
tice. He was compelled to leave this, however, in 
1873, when he went to Washington, District of 
Columbia, to escape the harshness of the Boston 
climate. His practice in Washington continued 
until 1 8 78, when he retired from the law to devote 
himself entirely to the business of the Bell Telephone 
Company, of which he had been the chief projector 
and one of the largest stockholders. Then com- 
menced, in the interests of that company, an active 
and invaluable service which brought him much of 
the credit for the enormous success of this great 
American invention. For five years he managed 
the finances of the company. He then travelled 
abroad introducing the telephone, organizing foreign 
companies, and securing concessions from govern- 
ments in the interests of his company. He also 
negotiated a control of the celebrated Berliner 
patent, thus removing a powerful competition, and 
gready adding to the value of the Bell patent. ^Ir. 
Hubbard retained his position as Director in the 
Company until his death. He was identified with 



many movements for the public welfare. While in 
practice in Boston he was President of a horse rail- 
way company, of the Cambridge \\'ater Works, and 
of the Cambridge Gas Light Company. In 1S60 he 
founded the first .American school for deaf mutes, and 
in connection with this work was ai)]iointed Presi- 
dent of the .American .Association to promote oral 
instruction of the deaf. He was for ten years a 
member of the Board of Education of Massachu- 
setts. He was, under President Grant, appointed 
Special Commissioner to report on railway trans- 
portation, and in this service he instituted many 
railway reforms. He was very active as a promoter 
of the issue of government control of the ])ostal 
telegraph system, and devoted much effort to bring- 
ing the question before the iniblic. He died at 
Twin Oaks, his residence in Washington, District of 
Columbia, December 11, 1897. 



D 



JEWETT, Daniel Tarbox 

Harvard Law School, 1833. 
Born in Pittston, Me., 1807; attended Waterville 
College, Me., 1826-27, and Columbian College, Wash- 
ington, D. C, 1828-30 ; taught school in Virginia three 
years; studied at Harvard Law School, 1833; admitted 
to Bar of Bangor, Me., 1834 ; City Atty. in Bangor, 
1849-50 ; was interested in a steamboat plan in Panama, 
1850-53 ; was member of a water company in San Fran- 
cisco, 1853-55; removed to St. Louis, Mo., 1857, and has 
been in practice there ever since ; member of Missouri 
House of Representatives, 1867-68; U. S. Senator from 
Missouri, i86g. 

ANTEL TARBOX JEWEIT, Lawyer, was 
born in Pittston, Maine, September 14, 
1 807, the son of Daniel and Betsy (Tarbox) Jewett. 
Tlie family is descended from two cousins of the 
name who came from England in 1640 and settled 
in Rowley, Massachusetts. Mr. Jewett's early edu- 
cation was received in the country schools of his 
native town and in the College at \Vaterville, Maine, 
after which he entered Columbian College in Wash- 
ington, District of Columbia, as a Junior and graduated 
in 1830. .After graduation he taught school in Vir- 
ginia for three years, studying law at the same time. 
He then had one year of study at the Harvard Law 
School, and one in Bangor, Maine, after which he 
was admitted to the Bar in 1S34. He continued in 
practice in Bangor until 1850, holding for one year, 
1849-1S50, the office of City .Attorney, and then 
went to Panama, South America, where his brother 
was engaged in an enterprise for conveying passen- 
gers by steamboat up the Chagres River. Here 
Mr. Jewett remained fur three years, leaving then 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



247 



or San Francisco, where he purchased an interest in 
a water-su[)[)ly company. In 1857 he removed with 
his family to St. l^ouis, Missouri, having concluded 
after a journey through the Western states to settle 
in that city, and since that date he has been in 
active practice there. He served in the Missouri 
House of Representatives in 1867 and 1868, and in 
I .S69 he was appointed to the United States Senate 
from Missouri, continuing in that office until the 
change to a Democratic state government occurred 
in 1870. He has always been a Republican. Mr. 
Jewett is now in his ninety-thiid year and retains 




D.^MEL 'r. JEWEIT 

active faculties and perfect health. Mr. Jewett was 
married in December, 1848, to Sarah Wilson, of 
Belfast, Maine ; his children are : ICliot C. and Mary 
Jewett. 



KILBRETH, James Truesdell 

Harvard A.B. 1863. 
Born in Cincinnati, O., 1838; graduated Harvard, 
1863 ; entered practice of law in New York City ; 
served on New York Police Court Bench nearly 20 
years; Collector of the Port of New York, 1893-97; 
died at Southampton, L. I., 1897. 

JAMIvS rRUi:Sl)i;i,L Kil.l'.Rinil, Municipal 
Justice, was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1838. 
Prepared for College in the Cincinnati schools, he 



entered Harvard in 1S59 and graduated with the 
Class of 1863. He then studied law until admitted 
to the Bar of New Vork, entering then u])on a prac- 
tice of law in the same office with U. P. C. Uillings, 
who was in 1873 a Republican Alderman. Though 
Mr. Kilbreth had always been a declared Democrat, 
his name was suggested by Mr. Billings in 1S73 for 
the position of Police Justice, and he was at once 
elected to the position. His appointment, which 
was originally made by Mayor Havemeyer, was re- 
newed in 18S3 by Mayor Kdson. He served the 
city in this office for nearly twenty years, resigning 
in 1S93 to take up the duties of Collector of the 
Port of New York City. He was engageil in that 
position until June 23, 1897, when he died at his 
home in Southampton, Long Island. Mr. Killjrelh 
was always an Anti-'l'animany Democrat, and from 
1 88 1 to 1 89 1 he was Vice-President of the County 
Democracy. He was also a member of the New 
Amsterdam Club, the social organization of the 
County Democracy, from its organization. He 
married the widow of laicien Oudin. 



NEWMAN, Samuel Phillips 

Harvard A.B. 1816. 
Born in Andover, Mass., 1796; graduated Harvard, 
1816 ; Prof, of Greek, Bowdoin Coll.. 1820-24 ; of Rheto- 
ric and Oratory, 1824-39 ; Principal Massachusetts State 
Normal School, 1839-42 ; died 1842. 

SAMUKi, PHILLIPS NKW.MAN, Kducator, was 
born in Andover, Massachusetts, in i 796, the 
son of Mark H. Newman a book publisher. He 
was graduated at Harvard in 1816 and received his 
Master's degree in course from that University, en- 
gaging at once in the work of a teacher. His suc- 
cess as an educator was so conspicuous that in 
1820, at the age of twenty-four years, he received 
appointment as Professor of the Latin and Greek 
Languages and Literature in Bowtloin College, 
Brunswick, Maine. 'I'his chair he filled until 1824, 
when he was made Professor of Rhetoric and Ora- 
tory in the same College. In 1S39 the State of 
Massachusetts having founded a Normal school in 
connection with its system of public instruction, 
called upon Professor Newman to become head of 
the new enterprise. He accepted the responsibility, 
resigning his Professorship at Bowdoin anil remov- 
ing to Barre, Mass.ichusctts, where he remained as 
Princip.al of the State Normal School until his death. 
Professor Newman was the author of standard text- 
books on political economy and rhetoric, his tre t- 



248 



UNIFERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



tisc on the latter subject passing through more than during the Zulu War in South Africa. Dr. McMcckin 
fifty editions in this country and numerous editions was married in 1886 to Louisa Hebb ; tiuii chihlrcn 
in England. He died in Barre, February 10, 1842. are : Gladys, Illeanor and Mary Louise McMeekin. 



McMEEKIN, Robert John 

Harvard D M D. 1896. 
Born in Dairy, Ayrshire, Scotland, i86r ; attended 
public schools in Scotland ; graduated Harvard Dental 
School, 1896; Asst. Dem. Mechanical Dentistry, 1896- 
99; Dem. Operative Dentistry since 1899; practising 
dentist in Boston. 

ROBERT JOHN M.MKKKIX, D.M.D.. De- 
monstrator of Operative Dentistry at Har- 
vard, was born in Dairy, Ayrshire, Scotland, 




ROBERT J. Mi.MEF.KIN' 

November 6, iS6i, the son of James and Jane Xib- 
lock (McKenzie) McMeekin. He was educated in 
public schools in Scotland and commenced the 
study of dentistry in 1892. He entered the Har- 
vard Dental School in 1893 and after graduating 
Doctor of Dental Medicine, in 1896, was at once 
appointed Assistant Demonstrator of Mechanical 
Dentistry, which position he held until 1S99, when 
he received his present office, that of Demonstrator 
of Operative Dentistry. Since 1896 Dr. McMee- 
kin has been engaged in successful practice in Bos- 
ton, Massachusetts, with offices in Warren Chambers. 
In 1879 he dill military duty with the English army 



TRUMBULL, Jonathan 

Harvard A.B. 1759 — Yale LL.D. 1797. 
Born in Lebanon, Conn., 1740; graduated Harvard, 
1759; member of Connecticut Legislature and Speaker 
of the House ; Paymaster in Continental Army, 1776-80 ; 
Aide-de-Camp to Gen. Washington, 1780; member ol 
Congress, 1789-95, and Speaker, 1791-93; U. S. Senator, 
1795; Lieut. -Governor of Connecticut, 1796-98; LL.D. 
Yale, 1797 ; Gov. of Connecticut, 1798-1809; died 1809. 

JON.'VriL\N ■IKUMI'.ri.L, LL.D.. Statesman, 
Ciovcrnor of Connecticut, was born in Leba- 
non in that state, March 26, 1740, and graduated at 
Harvard in 1759. His father, of tlie same name, 
was a graduate of Harvard in 1727, a patriot of the 
Revolution, an intimate friend of General ^\■ashing- 
ton — whose familiar designation of him as " Mroiher 
Jonathan " is thought to be the origin of that name 
as the personification of the L'nited States — and 
Governor of Connecticut from 1769 to 17S3. Jon- 
athan Trumbull the younger entered public life 
shortly after leaving College and served for a 
number of years as a member of the Provincial 
Legislature, part of the time as Speaker of the 
House. At the opening of the war, he joined the 
patriot army, holding the position of Paymaster un- 
til 1780, when he was attached as Aide-de-Cami) 
to the staff of the Commander-in-Chief, (leneral 
Washington. In this position he served imtil tlie 
end of the war, when he was chosen by the Fed- 
eralist party to be a member of Congress. He rep- 
resented Connecticut in the first three Congresses, 
I 789-1 795, and in the second, i 791-1793, he was 
Speaker of the House. .At the end of the last term 
he was sent to the l'nited States Senate to take the 
place of Stephen ^L Mitchell, resigned, but himself 
resigned the seat in the ne.\t year to become Lieu- 
tenant-Governor of Connecticut. Vale gave him 
the degree of Doctor of Laws in 1797. In 179.S 
he was elected (lovernor of the state and held this 
office by re-election until his ileath, .\ugust 7, 1S09. 
Governor Trumbull's son, John (Harvard 1773), 
was the celebrated historical painter. 



STURGEON, John Calvin 

Harvard LL B. 1868. 
Born in Girard Township, Pa., 1841 ; prepared for 
College at Girard Academy; entered Allegheny Coll. 
but left at end of Junior year to serve in the navy 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



249 



during Civil War; graduated Harvard Law School, 
1868; received honorary A.M. from Allegheny Coll., 
1876; District Atty. for Erie Co., Pa., 1869-72; practis- 
ing lawyer in Erie, Pa., since 1868. 

JOHN CALVIN SmRGEON, Lawyer, was bom 
in Girard Township, Erie county, Pennsyl- 
vania, October 5, 1841, the eldest son of Andrew 
and Eliza Jane (Caughey) Sturgeon. The family 
originally emigrated from England to Uerry in 
North Ireland, the first .\merican representative, 
Jeremiah Sturgeon, having come from Derry to 
Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, in 1720. Mr. Stur- 
geon's early education was aciiuircil in the public 




J. C. STURGEON 

schools in the vicinity of his birthplace, and later he 
attended the Girard Academy, where he was pre- 
pared for College. He entered .Mlegheny College, 
Meadville, Pennsylvania, in 1861, leaving at the end 
of his Junior year in 1864 to enter the service of 
the United States Navy, in which he continued until 
the end of the Civil War. .Vfter studying law under 
private instruction he was admitted to the Bar of 
Erie county, Pennsylvania, but before commen- 
cing practice he entered the Harvard Law School, 
where he remained one year, graduating P.achelor 
of Laws in 1S6S. .\fter which he commenced a 
practice in I'.rie, which he has continued witli suc- 
cess ever since, until 1SS4 doing a general law busi- 
ness, and since tliat time confining his practice to 



special work involving patent law. In 1869 he was 
elected District Attorney for Erie county, Pennsyl- 
vania, and held that office for three years. He re- 
ceived the honorary degree of Master of Arts from 
Allegheny College in 1876. He is a member of the 
Keystone Masonic Lodge ; Temple Chapter ; Jeru- 
salem Council, Royal and Select Masters ; the 
Mount Olivet Commandery of Knights 'J'emplar, of 
Erie ; the Lincoln Club ; tlie Erie Board of Trade 
and the Grand .Army of the Republic, in which or- 
ganization he was Commander of Post 67 for two 
years. In politics he is a Republican, having taken 
an active part as a public s])eaker and in other 
capacities. Mr. Sturgeon was married, December 
26, 1878, to Eda E. Blakeslee ; his children are: 
Ralph Andrew, born March 13, 1880; and Berry 
Albert Sturgeon, born October 24, 1881. 



TYNG, Stephen Higginson 

Harvard A.B. 1817, D.D. 1851. 
Born in Newburyport, Mass., 1800; prepared for 
College at Phillips Academy, Andover, Mass. ; grad- 
uated Harvard, 1817 ; engaged in business for two 
years, then studied theology in Bristol, R. I., under 
Bishop Griswold, 1819-21 ; Pastor in Georgetown, D. C, 
1821-23, in Prince George's county, Md., 1823-29, in St. 
Paul's Church, Philadelphia, 1829-34, in Church of the 
Epiphany, Philadelphia, 1834-45 ^"'^ '" St. George's 
Church, New York City, 1845-78 ; received degree of 
D.D. from Harvard, 1851 ; author of numerous books; 
died 1885. 

STEPHEN HIGGINSON TVNG, D.D., Clergy- 
man, was born in Newburyport, Massachu- 
setts, March i, iSoo, the son of Dudley Atkins and 
Sarah (Higginson) Tyng. His father was a son of 
Dudley Atkins, who changed his name upon inherit- 
ing the estates of James Tyng, of Tyngsborough, 
Massachusetts. He was prepared for College at 
Phillips .\cademy, in .\ndover, Massachusetts, and 
from there entered Harvard, where he graduated, 
Bachelor of Arts in 1817, in the same class with 
Caleb Gushing and George Bancroft. For two 
years he engaged in business, but abandoned the 
idea of a commercial life in iS 19, when he com- 
menced the study of theology in Bristol, Rhode 
Island, under the Rt. Rev. .Alexander V. Griswold, 
then Bishop of Rhode Island. Dr. Tyng w.as or- 
ilained to the ministry of the Protestant Episcopal 
Church on March 4, 1S21, and at once accepted a 
(-all to a church in Georgetown, District of Colum- 
bia, where he remained two years, becoming then 
Rector of Queen .\nne parish, Prince George's 



250 



UNIVERSITIES JND THEIR SONS 



county, Maryland. In 1829 he was called to the 
Rectorship of St. Paul's Church, Philadelphia, and 
then to the Church of the Mpiphany in that city in 
1S34, where he remained eleven years. He was in- 
vited to St. George's Church, of New York City, in 
1845, where he continued for more than thirty years, 
being retired in 1878 as Rector ICmeritus. He was 
made a Doctor of Laws by Jefferson College, Penn- 
sylvania, in 1832, and Doctor of Divinity by Har- 
vard in 1 85 1. Dr. Tyng was distinguished for 
eloquence and patriotism, for his effective work as 
a leader of that part of the clergy known as low 




STEPHEN H. n^NG 

churchmen, for his activity in missionary and evan- 
gelical education work and for his literary labors 
which produced a large number of books on sub- 
jects connected with the church. For several years 
he was Editor of the Episcopal Recorder and the 
Protestant Churchman. He died in Irvington, New 
York, September 3, 1885. Dr. Tyng was married, 
.\ugust 5, 182 1, to .-Vnne De Wolfe CJriswold, by 
whom he had four children : .Anna Elizabeth, Dud- 
ley .\tkins, .Alexander Griswold and Julia Griswold 
Tyng; he was married a second time, July 18, 1S33, 
to Susan Wilson Mitchell ; tlieir children are : 
Thomas Mitchell, Susan, Matilda, Stephen Hig- 
ginson, \rorris .Ashurst, Charles Rockland and 
Benjamin Mitchell Tyng. 



BOHLEN, Charles 

Harvard A.B. 1888. 
Born in Philadelphia, Pa., 1866; attended St. Paul's 
School, Concord, N. H. ; graduated Harvard, 1888. 

CH.ARLES 150HLEX was born in Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania, in 1866, the son of John and 
Priscilla (Murray) Bohlen. After early education 
in a private school in Philadelphia he had excellent 
preparation for College at St. Paul's School in Con- 
cord, New Hampshire, and entered Harvard where 
he graduated Bachelor of .Arts in 1S88. In College 
he was a member of the Institute of 1770, tiie Delta 
Kappa Epsilon, the Zeta Psi, the Hasty Pudding 
and tlie Porcellian Societies ; he is now a member 
of the Knickerbocker and Racquet and Tennis clubs 
of New York City, the Philadelphia Cricket and the 
Germantown Cricket clubs. 



OTIS, George Edmund 

Harvard LL B 1869. 
Born in Boston, Mass., 1846; educated in Boston 
Latin School and Norwich University, Vt. ; graduated 
Harvard Law School, i86g ; Judge of Superior Court, 
San Bernardino Co., Cal,, 1891-97; practising lawyer in 
San Bernardino. 

Gi:OR(;i'; I'.DMUND oris. Lawyer, was born 
in Boston, Massachusetts, November 6, 
1846, the son of Edmund 1!. Otis and Maria Sewell 
(Gunn) Otis. He received his early education at 
the Boston Latin School and at Norwich I'niversity, 
Norwich, Vermont. He then entered tiie law office 
of Richard H. Dana, of Boston, and remained there 
until he entered the University. .At the age of 
seventeen, he enlisted in Company H of the Sixth 
Regiment Massachusetts A'olunteers and served in 
the war until honorably discharged. After leaving 
the ofiice of Mr. Dana he entered the Harvard Law 
School and graduated Bachelor of Laws in 1869. 
Removing to California, he entered a practice there 
which he has continued almost without interruption 
ever since, at first in the City of San Francisco, 
and during the past fifteen years in San Bernar- 
dino county. He formed his present partnership 
with F. W. Gregg under the firm name of Otis & 
Gregg, in 1897. For a term of six years, 1891 to 
1897, he was Judge of the Superior Court of the 
State of California in and for San Bernardino county. 
He is a Republican in politics, and a member of 
the California Club in Los .Angeles. Mr. Otis was 
married, June iS, 1 886, to Katherine M, C, daugh- 
ter of the late Hon. .Alexander S. Johnson of New 
York. 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



251 



BLISS, John 

Yale B.A. 1710. 
Born in Norwich, Conn., 1690; graduated Yale, 1710; 
studied theology and began to preach, 1714; Pastor of 
church at Hebron, Conn., 1717-34; established an Epis- 
copal congregation there, 1735; died 1742. 

JOHN BLISS, Clergyman, was bom in Norwich, 
Connecticut, October 23, 1690, the son of 
Samuel and Ann (Eklerkin) Bliss, of that town. 
He was graduated at Yale in 17 10, studied theology, 
and later in the year 17 14 began to preach in the 
town of Hebron, Connecticut. When the organiza- 
tion of a church there was authorized by the General 
Assembly, Mr. Bliss was invited to become the 
Pastor and was ordained as such in November 1717. 
Disaffection arose in his congregation after some 
years of his ministry, and in i 731 the Hartford South 
Consociation was called to meet at Hebron to inves- 
tigate charges of habitual intemperance brought 
against him by some of his parishioners. The 
charges were not sustained, but dissensions con- 
tinued, becoming so unpleasant that a council called 
in 1734 voted his dismissal in order to avoid a 
division of the church. Mr. Bliss soon after de- 
clared himself an Episcopalian and was followed by 
a number of his former congregation who built a 
house of worship in 1735, where he officiated for 
the remainder of his life, although never crossing 
the ocean to take Episcopal orders. He was twice 
married and died in Hebron, Eebruary i, 1742. 
His youngest son was graduated at Vale in i 760. 



COLLIN, Henry Park 

Yale B.A. 1865. 
Born in Benton, N. Y., 1843; prepared for College in 
Penn Van Academy, N. Y. ; spent two years in Gene- 
see College, Lima, N. Y., and graduated Yale, 1865; 
engaged in teaching, 1865-66; graduated Union Theo- 
logical Seminary, New York City, 1869 ; travelled and 
studied abroad, 1871-73 ; Pastor of Congregational 
Church at Oxford, N. Y., 1873-78; Pastor of First 
Presbyterian Church, Coldwater, Mich., since 1878. 

H1;NRY park COl.l.IN, clergyman, was 
born in Benton Township, Yates comity, 
New York, July 26, 1843, the son of Henry Clark 
and Maria (Park) Collin. The Collin line is de- 
rived from John Collin, a French Huguenot, who 
came to .America early in the eighteenth century 
and settled at Milford, Connecticut. The Park 
family are of iMiglish descent, some of the line hav- 
ing gone to Connecticut early in the history of the 
Colony. Mr. Collin's early education commenced 



in the district school in Benton and was continued 
in the Academy at Penn Van, New York, where he 
was prepared for College. The first two years of 
his College training were in Genesee College, Lima, 
New York ; he left at the end of the Sophomore 
year to go to Yale, where he entered the Junior 
Class and graduated in 1865. .After one year of 
teaching in a private school in Chicago he entered 
the Union Theological Seminary in New York City, 
graduating three years later, i S69. His first pro- 
fessional position was in the Congregational Church 
in Seymour, Connecticut, and then after a year of 




HKNRV p. COLLIN 



travel and study in Europe he was called to the 
Congregational Church of Oxford, New York, where 
he remained until appointed in 1S7S to his present 
position, that of Pastor of the First Presbyterian 
Church of Coldwater, Michigan. Mr. Collin served 
on the Coldwater Board of Education from 1893 
until 1897, acting as President of that Board for 
two years. He is a member of the Twentieth 
Century Club of Coldwater and of the American 
Association for the .Advancement of Science, and 
was one of the contributors to McClintock and 
Strong's Cyclopredia of Biblical, Theological and 
Ecclesiastical Literature. Mr. Collin was married, 
December i, 1887, to Eli/abeth Pnidcn, of Cold- 
water, Michigan. 



VNIFERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



LAWBAUGH. Elmer Arthur 

Yale Ph.B. l8<)3, M.D 1895. 
Born in Phoenix, Mich., 1873; educated at Calumet 
(Mich.) High School, Racine ^Wis.l College, Univer- 
sity of Michigan and Peekskill (N. Y.) Military Acad- 
emy ; graduated Yale Scientific School, 1893; Yale 
Medical School, 1895 ; special courses in medicine at 
Harvard and in New York, 1893-95 ; has practised 
medicine in Chicago since 1895, making a specialty 
of ophthalmology since 1896; Associate in Ophthal- 
mology at Rush Medical College, and holds other 
important professional positions. 

ELMKR .\KrHLR LAWB.M'C.H, Physician, 
w.is born in I'huinix, Michigan, October 2, 
1873, the son of Albert I. and Margaret (Smith) 




ELMER .\. LkWVi.WCM 

Lawbaugh. He graduated from the High School at 
Calumet, Michigan, in 1S88, spent the ensuing year 
at Racine College and the University of Michigan, 
and graduated from the Military Academy at Peeks- 
kill, New York, in 1890, entering the Sheffield Sci- 
entific School of Yale immediately thereafter. On 
the completion of his course at Sheffield in 1S93. 
he studied medicine at the Yale Medical School, 
taking at the saine time special courses in medicine 
in New York and later at Harvard, and received his 
degree at Yale in 1895. Since 1896 Dr. Lawbaugh 
has made a specialty of ophthalmology, and now 
holds the position of Associate in the same subject 
at the Rush Medical College, in afiiliation with the 



University of Ciiicago. He is also attending sur- 
geon in the I-'.ye 1 'epartment of the Central T'ree 
Dispensary, attending oculist and aurist to the 
Provident Free Dispensary, and holds the same 
position at the Chicago Orphan Asylum, etc. He is fi 
member of the Chicago Medical Society, the Chi- 
cago Ophtlialmological and Otological Society and 
the American Medical Association. Dr. Lawbaugh 
is a Republican in politics when national issues are 
at stake, but an huiependent in local affairs. 



HART, John 

Yale B.A. 1703. 
Born in Farmington, Conn.. 1683; student at Har- 
vard, 1700-02 ; Senior at Yale, and graduated there, 
1703; Tutor, 1703-05; Pastor of church at East Guil- 
ford, Conn., 1707-31 ; died 1731. 

JOHX HART, Clergyman, was the first actual 
student in Yale College advanced to the 
Bachelor's degree, Nathaniel Chauncy, wiio received 
that degree in the preceding year, having been 
privately educated. He was born in Farmington, 
Connecticut, .\\n\\ 12, 1682, the son of Captain 
Thomas Hart, a ])romincnt citizen of that ])lace and 
four times Speaker of the House. His grandfather, 
Stephen Hart, came from P)raintree, Essex county, 
England, to Massachusetts, in or before 1632, re- 
moved to Hartford, Connecticut, in 1635, ^'"^'^ ^^'^^ 
a leader in the settlement of Farmington. John 
was sent to Harvard in 1700 and continued there 
two years, but in 1702 was transferred to Yale, tlien 
at Killingwortli, Connecticut, where he was received 
in the Senior class and completed his Academic 
studies, graduating alone at Saybrook in 1703. On 
the day of his graduation he was, by vote of the 
Trustees, " requested to be an Assistant to the 
Rector in the place of a Tutor pro tempore." In 
the February following he was thanked for his ser- 
vices and offered a salary of ^50 per annum " for 
his encouragement." Mr. Hart was thus the first 
Tutor at Yale. While hoUling this position he 
studied theology with Rector Pierson, and in 1705 
resigned his Tutorship and entered the ministry in 
East Ciuilford, Connecticut, a church set off from 
Rector Pierson's parish, over which he was formally 
installed, November 25, 1707. In this charge he 
continued to the time of his death, March 4, 1731. 
He left an estate valued at _;^i9O0, mostly in lands, 
the town of East Guilford having made him a grant 
upon settlement as minister. Mr. Hart was thrice 
married. His first wife was Rebecca, daughter of 
John Hubbard, an eminent merchant of Boston, and 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



253 



granddaughter of the Rev. William Hubbard, the 
historian ; liis second wife was Sarah, daughter uf 
Captain Jonathan Bull of Hartford ; his third wife 
was Mary, daughter of Juilge Jaincs Hooker of 
Guilford and granddaughter of the Rev. Samuel 
Hooker (Harvard 1653). His eldest son, the Rev. 
William Hart, graduated at Vale in 1732. 



PHELPS, Elisha 

Yale B.A. 1800. 
Born in Simsbury, Conn., 1779 ; graduated Yale, 1800 ; 
studied law and admitted to the Bar, 1803 ; member of 
Connecticut Legislature and Speaker of the House, 
1821 and 1829 ; member of Congress, i8ig-2o and 1825- 
29 ; State Comptroller, 1830-34 ; Commissioner to codify 
the statutes, 1835 ; died 1847. 

ELISHA PHELPS, Lawyer, Member of Con- 
gress, was born in Simsbury, Connecticut, 
November 7, 1779, a descendant in the seventh 
generation o{ William Phelps, who came from 
Tewksbury, England, in 1630 and founded the 
town of Windsor, Connecticut, in 1635. His father 
was Captain Noah Phelps, of the patriot army in the 
Revolutionary War, who took a leading part in the 
capture of Fort I'iconderoga in April 1775, entering 
the fort alone in disguise and procuring information 
of its defences and garrison. Elisha was graduated 
at Yale in 1800 and after a course of study in the 
celebrated law school at Litchfield, Connecticut, 
was admitted to the Bar of Hartford county in 
1803. He entered public life as a Representative 
in the Legislature, serving in that capacity for a 
number of terms and for two years, in 1S21 and 
again in 1829, presiding over the deliberations of 
that body as Speaker. He was also elected to the 
State Senate from Hartford. In 1819 he was sent 
to Congress, and again in 1825-1828, following 
which he was elected State Comptroller, and held 
that office from 1830 to 1834. He subsequently 
was appointed Commissioner to revise and codify 
the statutes of Connecticut. Mr. Phelps died in 
Simsbury, April iS, 1847. His son, John, who 
went to Missouri to live, represented that state in 
Congress from iS.)4 to 1863, and was a Brigadier- 
Ceneral of \'oluiUcers in the Civil War. 



1874; engaged in business in Cincinnati, Ohio, and 
Buffalo, N. v., since 1874. 

WILLIAM ARTHCR ROGERS, Business 
.Man, was born in Berkshire, New York, 
September 8, 185 1, the son of Melancthon and 
Mary (Leonard) Rogers. He received his early 
education in the public schools and in the Chicker- 
ing Classical Institute of Cincinnati, Ohio, being 
prepared for College in the latter institution. .At 
Yale he elected the studies of the Sheffield Scientific 
School and graduated Bachelor of Philosophy, with 
the Class of 1874. Immediately after graduation 




ROGERS, William Arthur 

Yale Ph.B. 1874. 
Born in Berkshire, N. Y., 1851 ; educated in the 
public schools and Chickening Classical Institute. 
Cincinnati, Ohio; graduated Sheffield Scientific School, 



WILLIAM A. KOc;EKS 

he entered tlie employ of L. R. 1 lull cS: Company, 
l>ig iron commission mcichaiUs, of Cincinnati, Oliio, 
and has been acti\-ely engaged in the iron business 
since. .\t the end of tlie third year of his employ- 
ment with Hull iS: Com[)an\', Mr. Rogers was taken 
into the firm as Junior partner, but continued in 
that connection onlv until iSSo, when he organized 
the lirni of Rogers \' 'rriNiU, pig iron merchants. 
At Mr. Trivett's death, which occurred soon after, 
Mr. Archer Brown took the position left vacant, and 
the firm became Rogers, Brown \: Company, which 
it remains at present although three other partners 
have been addeil. In 1S90 he removed to Buffalo 
to take charge of the branch oflice at that point and 
the firm's manufacturing and vessel interests which 
are locateil about the Great Lakes. In addition to 



254 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



his duties in this business Mr. Rogers is President 
of the Tonawanda Iron & Steel Company, of North 
Tonawanda, New York, President of the Punxsutaw- 
ney Iron Company, of Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania, 
Vice-President of the Iroquois Iron Company, of 
South Chicago, Illinois, and Tnistee of the Erie 
County Savings Bank, of Buffalo. He is a member 
of the Buffalo and University clubs of Buffalo, and 
the Century Club of New York City. In politics he 
is a Republican. In 1S99 Mr. Rogers founded the 
Rogers Scholarship in Biology and Chemistry, in the 
Sheffield Scientific School of Vale. He was married, 
May 14, 18S4, to Eleanor Root, daughter of Profes- 
sor Sillinian of Yale ; their children are : William 
Silliman, Alice Leonard and Alden Rogers. 



ten children six survive : Mrs. Jane H. Meruim, 
Mrs. Josiah Cilbert, .Mice B., Marian H., Chester 
R. and Hawlev Olmstead. 



OLMSTEAD, Edward 

Yak B.A. 1845. 
Born in Wilton. Conn., 1324 ; graduated Yale, 1845 ; 
studied Hebrew for one year ; Rector of the Hopkins 
Grammar School, New Haven, 1849-55 I removed to 
Wilton, Conn., and took charge of the Wilton Acad- 
emy, 1855; was Secretary of his class for nine years; 
died 1898. 

EDWARD OLMSTE.VD, Educator, was born in 
\Vilton, Connecticut, November 24, 1S24, 
the son of Hawley Olmstead, a lineal descendant of 
Richard Olmstead who was one of the first settlers of 
Norwalk, Connecticut, and the first Representative 
of that town in the Colonial Legislature. His mother, 
Harriet (Smith) Olmstead, came from a Connecti- 
cut family. Mr. Olmstead fitted for College under 
the instruction of his father, who was connected with 
the academy at Wilton and later with the Hopkins 
Grammar School in New Haven. After graduation 
at Vale in 1845 ^^ spent one year in the study of 
Hebrew and New Testament Greek at the Yale 
Theological Seminary, becoming then the assistant 
of his father at the Grammar School and succeeding 
him as Rector in 1849. After four years and a half 
he was forced, on account of ill health, to leave New 
Haven, and removing to Wilton he assumed charge 
of the academy there which his father had founded 
in 181 7 and where he had received early education. 
Here he remained until his death, which occurred in 
1898, performing with much effectiveness the duties 
of his place as teacher and winning unusual devotion 
and gratitude from his many pupils. For nine 
years he was Secretary to the Class of 1845, prepar- 
ing during that time the first history of the class. 
Mr. Olmstead was married, December 30, 1854, to 
NLirian Hyde, of Norwich, Connecticut. Of his 



WHEELOCK, Eleazur 

Yale B A. 1733. 
Born in Windham, Conn., 1711 ; graduated Yale, 
1733; studied theology and Pastor of church at Leba- 
non, Conn., 1735-70 ; established an Indian missionary 
school, 1754; D.D. Edinburgh, Scotland, 1767; founded 
Dartmouth College, 1769, and Pres. until the time of 
his death ; died 1779. 

ELEAZL'R WHEELOCK, D.D., Educator, 
founder of Dartmouth College, was born in 
Windham, Connecticut, .April 22, 17 11, a great- 
grandson of Rev. Ralph Wheelock, a non-conformist 
clerg)'man, who came to New England in 1637 and 
founded the First Church in Dedham, Massachu- 
setts. Eleazur was educated at Yale with the pro- 
ceeds of a legacy left for that purpose by his 
grandfather. Captain Eleazur Wheelock, for whom 
he was named, and graduated there in 1733. He 
studied theology and in 1735 was ordained over the 
Second Church in Lebanon, Connecticut, where he 
ministered for thirty-five years. His educational 
work began by his taking pupils into his house for 
the purpose of eking out his meagre salary as 
Pastor, .\mong these pupils was a Mohican Indian, 
Samson Occom, who later interested himself with 
Dr. Wheelock in the establishment of an Indian 
School and subsequently Dartmouth College. The 
school was called Moor's Indian Charity School, 
from Joshua Moor, a farmer of Mansfield, who gave 
it a house and land. Out of this enterprise came 
Dartmouth College, named in honor of Lord Dart- 
mouth, who was a large benefactor and President of 
the Board of Trustees, holding the endowment of 
^10,000 which was procured in England in 1766. 
The charter, obtained from George III. in 1769, 
named Dr. Wheelock as founder and President with 
the privilege of appointing his successor, and in 
1770 he accepted the offer of land from the town 
of Dresden, now Hudson, New Hampshire, and 
cleared a place in the wilderness for the new College 
and school. Four students were graduated at the 
first Commencement, in 1771, among them Dr. 
Wheelock's son, John, who succeeded him in the 
Presidency of Dartmouth and administered the affairs 
of the College for thirty-six years. Dr. Wheelock 
received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from the 
University of Edinburgh, Scotland, in 1767. and 
died in Hanom, April 24, 1779. 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



^SS 



ALLEN, Charles Claflin 

Princeton A.B. 1875. 

Born in St. Louis, Mo., 1855 ; early education in 
public schools and Washington Univ. in St. Louis ; 
graduated Princeton, 1875; St. Louis Law School, 
1877; A.M. Princeton, 1878; engaged in law practice 
since 1877; member of Missouri Legislature, 1881-82; 
Associate City Counsellor of St. Louis since 1895. 

CH.\RLES CL.\FLIN ALLEN, Lawyer, was 
horn in St. Louis, Missouri, July 25, 1855. 
Through his father, John Arthur .\llen, he is de- 
scended from a Massachusetts family whose first 
American representatives came to Cape Ann with 




CH.-\S. CUFLIX .\LLEN 

the Dorchester Company in 1624. The family of 
his mother, Jane Elizabeth (White) Allen, is of 
North Carolina origin. Mr. Allen's early education 
and preparation for College were obtained in the 
public schools of St. Louis, and at Washington I'ni- 
versity in that city. .After four years of study in 
the Academic Department of Princeton he was 
graduated from that Institution with the degree of 
iiachelor of .Arts in 1.S75. He then returned 
to St. Louis and entered the Law Department of 
Washington University, whore but two years of work 
enabled him to receive the ii.ichelor of Laws degree 
and admission to the Missouri W.w. He received 
the degree of Master of .\rts from i'rinceton in 
1878. Since 1877 Mr. .Mien has continuously 



practised law in St. Louis. He was a member 
of the Missouri Legislature, 1 881-1882. He was 
appointed .Associate City Coimsellor of St Louis in 
1895, and reappointed in 1899 for a term end- 
ing 1903. Mr. .Mien has been connected with vari- 
ous associations, professional, political and social. 
.Among the more important of Iiis positions held in 
such organizations are those of Secretary of the 
Missouri Bar .Association, 1889; President of the 
Bar Association of St. Louis, 1894; President of 
the Civil Service Reform Association of Missouri for 
several years ; Supreme Chancellor of the Legion of 
Honor of Missouri, 1895, and member of the E.xec- 
utive Committee of the American Bar association, 
1S95-1S99. He is also a member of the Prince- 
ton Club of St. Louis, of which he was President in 
189S. Mr. .Allen was one of the organizers of the 
Civil Service Reform .Association of Missouri, and 
has been one of the most active promoters of the 
Reform Legislation proposed by that Association. 
It was in connection with this society that he wrote 
the original draft of the Corrupt Practices .Act of 
Missouri, which, together with the Australian Ballot 
Law, he brought before the State Legislature. His 
knowledge of legal and economic questions • has 
found partial expression in various articles appearing 
from time to time in the Law Magazines, and in a 
paper read before the American Bar .Association, 
in 1894, on Injunction and Organized Labor. In 
January 1900, upon the invitation of the United 
States Industrial Commission, he made an argument 
before that Commission at Washington on the sub- 
ject of " Trusts." He married, March 27, 1890, 
Carrie Louisa Richards of St. Louis. . Their children 
are : Grace and Claflin .Mien. 



BLAIR, John Albert 

Princeton A.B. 1866. 
Born in Knowlton Township, Warren Co., N. J., 
1842 ; fitted for College at Blairstown Presbyteral 
Academy; graduated from Princeton, i865 ; studied 
law and was admitted to the New Jersey Bar, 1869; 
since 1870 has been in practice in Jersey City, N. J.; 
since 1898 has been Judge of the Court of Common 
Pleas, General Sessions, and Orphans Court of 
Hudson. 

JOHN ALBERT BLAIR, Lawyer, was born in 
Knowlton Township, Warren county, New 
Jersey, July 8, 1842. He belongs to the well- 
known family of that name whose ancestors were 
connected with the early history of Princeton. He 
was fitted for College at Blairstown Presbyteral 



256 



UNIVERSITIES /IND THEIR SOXS 



Academy, afterwards entering Princeton, from which 
he graihiated with honors in the Class of 1866. 
After leaving College he began the study of law in 
the office of J. G. Shipman, at Belvidere, New 




JOHN A. BL.*1R 

Jersey, and was admitted to the New Jersey Bar as 
an attorney in June 1S69, and as a counsellor-at- 
law three years later. In 1870 he moved to 
Jersey City and formed a law partnership with 
Stephen B. Ransom, an old and eminent lawyer of 
that city, and has continued in active practice there 
ever since. In 1877 Judge Blair was appointed by 
Governor Bedle one of llie Judges of the District 
Courts, then just established. In 1885 he received 
the apjiointment of Corporation Counsel of Jersey 
City, an office he held until 1S89, when he resigned, 
accepting the position again in 1894, and holding 
it until 189S, when he resigned to accept his pres- 
ent office as Judge of the Court of Common Pleas, 
General Sessions, and Orphans Court of Hudson 
county. He received this appointment from Gov- 
ernor Griggs just before the latter became Attorney- 
General of the United States. Judge Biair is a 
Presbyterian in religious belief, and in politics is an 
uncompromising Republican. He is unmarried, 
and lives at the Union I.eagueClub, of which organ- 
ization he is a prominent member, and was for several 
years its President. 



FISHER. William Alexander 

Princeton A.B. 1855, A.M 1858. 
Born in Baltimore, Md., 1837; attended private 
schools in Baltimore, also studied in St. Mary's Col- 
lege ; graduated Princeton after a two years' course. 
1855 ; studied law and was admitted to the Bar of Mary- 
land. 1858; received the degree of A.M. from Princeton 
the same year; has been in active practice ever since 
with the exception of five years, when he served on the 
Supreme Bench of Baltimore; served in the State 
Senate. 1880. 

WILLIAM Al.K.XAXDKR FISIIKR, Lawyer, 
was born in Baltimore, Maryland, Janu- 
ary 8, 1837, son of William and Jane (.Alricks) 
Fisher. He received his early education at private 
schools in Baltimore, among them being the school 
of Professor Topping, formerly a tutor at Princeton. 
He also spent some time at St. Mary's College, then 
entered Princeton in 1853 and graduated with the 
Class of 1S55. Three years later the degree of 
Master of .\rts was conferred on him by Prince- 
ton. He read law in Baltimore under the direction 
of William Schley, and being admitted to the Bar of 
Maryland in 1S58, at once entered into active 
practice. He represented Baltimore in the State 




WILLIAM .A. FISHER 



Senate during the session of 1880, and the next 
year was elected a member of the Supreme Bench 
of Baltimore City. .At the time of his nomination 
to the Judgeship, he was President of the Bar Associ- 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



^S7 



ation anil was nominated by all parties ihrongli the 
influence of the members of the Bar. Mr. Fisher 
is a Democrat with Independent proclivities. After 
serving on the Bench for five years, he resigned his 
office and returned to private practice. He was the 
first President of the Charity ( )rganization Society 
of Baltimore, and served in that capacity for about 
ten years, during which the society ' was firmly 
established. He is at the present time President 
of the Thomas Wilson Sanitarium for children, and 
is connected with other charitable associations of 
Baltimore. He is also a member of the University 
Club, and President of the Ahuiini Association of 
Princeton University in Maryland. Mr. Fisher was 
married, May 4, 1859, to Louise, daughter of Judge 
David Kirkpatrick p;ste of Cincinnati, who at the 
time of his death was one of the oldest living gradu- 
ates of Princeton. 



HILLEGASS, Jacob Benner 

Princeton A.B. 1890, A.M. 1893. 
Born in Hillegass, Pa., 1866 ; fitted for College at 
Keystone State Normal School in Kutztown, Pa.; 
graduated Princeton, 1890; A.M., 1893; read law at 
Norristown, Pa., and attended the Law Department of 
the Univ. of Pennsylvania; admitted to the Mont- 
gomery Co. Bar at Norristown, June 1893, and has 
been in active practice there ever since. 

JACOB BENNER HH-LKCJASS, Lawyer, was 
born in Hillegass, Montgomery county, Penn- 
sylvania, December 22, 1866, the son of Jonathan 
P. and Hannah (Benner) Hillegass. He is a 
descendant of Michael Hillegass, who resided in 
Philadelphia and was the first Treasurer of the 
Thirteen Original Colonies. He attended schools 
in Pennsburg and West Chester, Pennsylvania, was 
fitted for College at the Keystone State Normal 
School at Kutztown, Pennsylvania, and graduated 
from Princeton in the Class of 1890. The degree 
of ^L^ster of Arts was conferred on him by Prince- 
ton in 1893. After graduating he read law under 
the direction of John W. Bickcl, of Norristown, 
Pennsylvania, and also attended the Law De- 
partment of the University of Pennsylvania. He 
was admitted to the Montgomery County Bar at 
Norristown in June 1S93, and still resides and prac- 
tises his profession in that city. From the begin- 
ning of his professional life, Mr. Hillegass has met 
with great success, has been connected with many 
important cases, and enjoys a very lucrative practice. 
He is especially successful in his conduct of crim- 
inal cases, but prefers to devote his attention 
VOL. v. — 17 



mostly to civil practice. In 1897 he was elected 
a Director of the Norristown Title Trust & Safe 
Deposit Company. He is also a Director of the 
Perkiomen Railroad Company, the Stony Creek 
Railroad Company, Pennsburg Water Company, 
McMichael & Wildman Manufacturing Company, 
Hatboro Electric Light Company, and Hatboro 
Water Company. Two social organizations, the 




JACOB B. HII.I.EG.ASS 

Ersine Tennis Club and the .\ceola Tennis Club, 
claim him as an active member. In politics he is 
a Democrat. 



LLOYD, Samuel 

Princeton B.S. 1882 — Columbia M.D 1886. 
Born in Jersey City, N. J., i860; fitted for College in 
private schools ; graduated Princeton Scientific School, 
1882 ; M.D. .Univ. of Vermont, 1884 ; member of House 
Staff of New York Post-Graduate Hosp., 1884-85 ; M.D. 
Coll. Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia, 1885; In- 
structor in Clinical and Operative Surgery, New York 
Post-Graduate Medical School and Hospital, 1885-91 ; 
Attend. Surgeon Randall's Island Hospitals, 1892-96 ; 
Surgeon-in-Chief Lebanon Hosp., 1893-95 ; Instructor 
in Clinical Surgery, 1889-98; Adjunct Prof, of Sur- 
gery, 1898-99 ; Prof, of Surgery, since 1899 ; Attend. 
Surgeon to the New York Post-Graduate Hospital 
since 1886; Attend. Surgeon Babies' Wards since 1898. 

SAMUEL LLOYD, M.D., Physician and Surgeon, 
was born in Jersey City, New Jersey, .August 
4, i860, tiie son of Gardner Potts and Emma 



.58 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



(Oisbrow) Lloyd. He is of Welsh descent; his 
ancestors, who were Quakers, being among the orig- 
inal settlers of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He re- 
ceived his early education in private schools, and 




SAMUEL LLOYD 

was graduated from the John C. Green School of 
Science, Princeton, in the Class of 1882, receiving 
the degree of Bachelor of Science. He studied 
medicine in the University of Vermont and in the 
College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia, New 
York, receiving the degree of Doctor of Medicine 
from the University of Vermont in 1884 and from 
the latter University in 1885. For one year, 1S84- 
1885, he was a member of the House Staff of the 
New York Post-Graduate Hospital. He was In- 
structor in Clinical and Operative Surgery at the 
New York Post-Graduate Medical School and Hos- 
pital from 1885 to 1 89 1, from 1889 to 1898 was 
Instructor in Clinical Surgery, and for the year 1898 
to 1899 was Adjunct Professor of Surgery. During 
the years 1892-1896 he was Attending Surgeon to 
Randall's Island Hospitals, and from 1893 to 1895 
was .Surgeon-in-Chief of Lebanon Hospital. Dr. 
Lloyd is also .\ttending Surgeon to the New York 
Post-Graduate Hospital and to the Babies' Wards. 
He is a member of the Princeton Club, the New 
York Academy of Medicine, the Leno.\ Medical and 
Surgical Society, the New York County Medical 



Society, the Physicians' Mutual .\itl Society, the 
Post-Graduate Hospital .\lumni Association, and a 
permanent member of the New York State Medi- 
cal Society. In politics he is a Republican. June 
II, 1888, Dr. Lloyd married Adfele Ferrier Peck, of 
Brooklyn, New York. They have three children : 
F^lizabeth .Armstrong, Adcle Augustine and Samuel 
Raymond Lloyd. 



PEW, Arthur Edmund 

Princeton B.S. 1896. 
Born in Parker, Pa., 1875 ; attended Shady Side 
Academy in Pittsburg, 1885-92; graduated Princeton 
Scientific School, 1896; went into business with his 
father and became general purchasing agent of several 
of the companies in which his father was interested, 
principally the Sun Oil Co. of Toledo and Pittsburg and 
the People's Natural Gas Co. of Pittsburg; is at pres- 
ent time the Vice-Pres. of the latter and holds secre- 
taryship of the Pittsburg Iron & Steel Co. and the 
Beaver Valley R. R. Company. 

ARTHUR EDMUND PEW, Business Man, 
was born in Parker, Pennsylvania, December 
26, 1875, the son of Joseph N. and Mary Catherine 
(Anderson) Pew. His paternal ancestors came 




ARTHUR E. PF.W 



from England and Holland in early times and pur- 
chased land from the Indians in Pennsylvania, an 
original tract of about four hundred acres being still 
in possession of his family and used as a country- 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



259 



seat. Flis maternal great-grandfather, Colonel 
Enoch L. Anderson, was a direct descendant of King 
James I. of England, and was distinguished for his 
bravery in the Revolutionary War. .Another mater- 
nal ancestor, Joseph Anderson, became the first 
Comptroller of the Treasury of the United States, 
iS 15-1836. .Arthur E. Pew passed seven years in 
study at Shady Side Academy in Pittsbiirg, and then 
entered Princeton, where he took the scientific 
course and graduated with the degree of Bachelor 
of Science in the Class of 1896. He then went into 
business with his father, soon being made general 
purchasing agent for the companies in which his 
father was interested, especially the Sun Oil Com- 
pany of Toledo and Pittsburg and the Peojile's Natu- 
ral Gas Company of Pittsburg. He now holds the 
office of Vice-President of the latter company and 
Secretaryship of the Pittsburg Iron & Steel Com- 
pany and the Beaver Valley Railroad Company. 
Mr. Pew's father was the first man to bring natural 
gas into Pittsburg and to demonstrate its practical 
use in Pittsburg's great steel mills and for domestic 
purposes. Mr. Pew is a member of the University 
Club of Pittsburg, the Princeton clubs of Philadel- 
phia and New York, and others. In politics he is a 
Republican. He was married in New York City, 
November 30, 1898, to Helene, daughter of Frank 
Walter Crocker, and has one child : Arthur Edmund 
Pew, Jr. 

REEDER, Frank 

Princeton A.B. and A.M. 1863. 
Born in Easton, Pa., 1845 ; fitted for College at Law- 
renceville, N. J., and in Edge-Hill School at Princeton, 
N. J.; entered Princeton in 1859, but did not graduate, 
leaving in his Senior year to enter the Army ; subse- 
quently received the degrees of A.B. and A.M. from 
Princeton ; graduated from Albany Law School in 1868 
and began the practice of law in New York City; was 
associated with Hon. Chester A. Arthur, 1869-70; in 
practice in Easton, Pa., since 1870; Collector of Inter- 
nal Revenues, 1873-76; Secretary of State for Pennsyl- 
vania, 1895-97. 

FR.XNK. REEDER, Lawyer, was born in F^as- 
ton, Pennsylvania, May 22, 1845, son uf .An- 
drew H. and Fredcricka Amalia (Hutter) Reeder. 
On his father's side, his original .American ancestor 
came from England to Newtown, Long Island, in 
1648, removing to New Jersey, near Trenton, toward 
the end of the seventeenth century. His grand- 
father settled in Easton, Pennsylvania, near the close 
of the eighteenth century. The father of the subject 
of this sketch was Governor of Kansas Territory from 
1854 to 1856. On his mother's side he is of German 



stock, the original .American ancestor coming to this 
country and settling in Easton, Pennsylvania, toward 
the end of the eighteenth century. His maternal 
grandfather was a Colonel in the War of 181 2. 
He received his early education by private tuition 
and in private schools at Allentown, Pennsylvania, 
and was fitted for College in Lawrenceville, New 
Jersey, and at the Edge-Hill School in Princeton, 
New Jersey. He entered Princeton to graduate 
with the Class of 1S63, but left in his Senior year to 
enter the army. He subsequently received the de- 
grees of Bachelor of Arts and Master of Arts from 



f . 




^^^^^^^^^^7t ° ^ ^^^^^^^^^^^^Km 



FRANK KKI'.DKK 



Princeton as of the Class of 1S63. In the early part 
of the Civil War he was Adjutant of a Pennsylvania 
Regiment, afterwards becoming Captain, and finally 
Lieutenant-Colonel of the Nineteenth Regiment, 
Pennsylvania Volunteers Cavalry. From July 1S74 
to lune 1 88 1 he was Brigadier-General of the Penn- 
sylvania National Guards. For three years, from 
1873 until 1876, he held the oflice of Collector of 
Internal Revenues, and from 1895 to 1897 was Sec- 
retary of State for Pennsylvania. Mr. Reeder is 
a member of the University Club of Philadelphia, 
the Harrisburg Club of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, 
the Ponifret Club of Easton, Pennsylvania, and the 
Country Club of the same place. .As an active mem- 
ber of the Republican party he was a delegate 



26o 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



to the Republican .National Conventions of 1888, 
1892 and 1896, and State Chairman in 1891, 1892 
and 1899. He was married to Grace E. Thompson, 
of Boston, Massaclmsetts, October 21, 1868. They 
have three children: Andrew IL, Frank, Jr. and 
Douglass W. Reeder. 



PERSHING, Theodore 

Princeton A.B. 1885. 
Born in Johnstown, Pa., 1861 ; prepared for College 
in public schools of Pennsylvania; graduated Prince- 
ton, 1885; teacher in Harrisburg, Pa., Academy. 1886- 
8g ; with Allyn & Bacon, publishers, Boston, Mass., 
I88g-gi ; associated with Ginn & Co., publishers of 
school and College books, since 1891. 

THKODORE PERSHING, Business Man, was 
born in Johnstown, Pennsylvania, July 2, 
1S61, the son of Cyrus Long and Mary Letitia 
(Royer) Pershing, being descended from French 
Huguenot and Scotch-Irish families who came to 
America early in the last century. In the elemen- 
tary schools of Johnstown and in the high school of 
Pottsville, Pennsylvania, he was educated for Col- 
lege and entering Princeton in 1881 graduated 
Bachelor of .\rts with the Class of 1885. For three 
years after graduation Mr. Pershing taught in the 
Academy at Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, resigning his 
position there in 1889 to enter his present business, 
the publication of school and College text-books. 
He was first connected with the firm of .Mlyn & 
Bacon of Boston, Massachusetts, representing them 
in the Middle States, and since 1891 he has been 
associated with Ginn & Company of Boston, in the 
same business. He is a member of the University 
Club of Philadelphia. Mr. Pershing was married, 
in July 1890, to Elizabeth Helfenstein and has one 
child : Elizabeth Helfenstein Pershing. 



WRIGHT, Edward Henry 

Princeton A.B. 1844. A.M. 
Born in Newark, N. J., 1824; fitted for College at St. 
Paul's School, College Point ; graduated Princeton, 
1844; studied law in New York City, Newark, N. J., 
and in Harvard Law School, and was admitted to 
the Bar of New Jersey; travelled abroad, 1848 and 
1849 ; appointed by President Taylor Secretary of the 
U. S. Legation at St. Petersburg, Russia, 1850; ap- 
pointed in May 1861 Major in the 6th Cavalry, U.S.A., 
and Aide-de-Camp on the staff of Lieut. -Gen. \A^in- 
field Scott, U. S. A., with the rank of Col., and served 
throughout the Civil War. 

EDWARD HENRY WRIGHT, Lawyer, was 
born in Newark, New Jersey, .April 5, 1824, 
son of Hon. William Wright, a well-known and 



respected United States Senator, and Minerva 
(Peet) Wright. He was fitted for College at St. 
Paul's School at College Point, Long Island, New 
York, and was graduated Bachelor of .Arts from 
Princeton with the Class of 1844, subsequently 
receiving the degree of Master of .Arts from his 
.Alma Mater. He began the study of law in the 
offices of Alexander Hamilton of New York and 
Archer GifTord of Newark, and later went to the 
Harvard Law Sciiool, from which institution he was 
admitted to the Bar of New Jersey. The greater 
jKirt of the years 1848 and 1849 he spent in travel 




EDWARD H. WRIGHT 

in Europe, and on his return to the United States, 
in 1850 was appointed, by President Taylor, Secre- 
tary of the United Slates Legation at St. Petersburg, 
Russia, an office which he held for nearly four years. 
.At the outbreak of the Civil War, he volunteered 
his services, and was appointed in 1861 Major in 
the Sixth Cavalry, United States -Army, and Aide-de- 
Camp on the staff of Lieutenant-General Winfield 
Scott with the rank of Colonel. He also served on 
the staff of Major-General George B. McClellan with 
the rank of Colonel, and was recommended for two 
brevets for gallant and meritorious ser\'ice. Colonel 
Wright is a member of the Military Order of the 
Loyal Legion, and a Past Post Commander of the 
Grand .Army of the Republic. He has been con- 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



261 



nected for more than twenty years with the New 
Jersey Home for Disabled Soldiers, and is President 
of its Board of Managers. He is also a Director in 
the Mutual Benefit Life Insurance Company, and the 
Fireman's Insurance Company, and President of 
the Board of Trustees of the Episcopal Fund of the 
Diocese of Newark. His political affiliations are 
with the Democratic party. He is a member of the 
Union Club of New York, and of the Essex Club of 
Newark, having been for many years Vice-President 
of the latter. In 1S60 he was married to Dorathea, 
daughter of Hon. Stevens Thompson Mason, first 
Governor of the State of Michigan and founder of 
the Universitv of .Michigan. 



STRYKER, William Scudder 

Princeton A.B. 1858, A M. 1861, LL.D. 1899. 
Born in Trenlon, N. J., 1838; fitted for College at 
Trenton Academy ; graduated Princeton, 1858; studied 
law in Trenton, N. J., and was admitted to Bar of 
Ohio, 1865 ; served during the Civil War, was brevetted 
Lieut. -Col., and resigned June 1866; LL.D. Princeton, 
1899. 

W11,1,I.\M SCUDDER STRYKER, LL.D., 
Lawyer, was born in Trenton, New Jersey, 
June 6, 1838, son of Thomas J. and Hannah 
(Scudder) Stryker. The Strycker family left Hol- 
land in 1652, and settled in New Amsterdam, where, 
in the Colonial affairs of early New York, the name 
became prominent. His progenitor was one of the 
great burghers of that old Dutch town, and a mem- 
ber of the Landtdag, the great assembly of the 
province. General Stryker was graduated from 
Princeton in the Class of 1858. He immediately 
commenced the study of law, entering the office of 
the late Hon. Barker Gummere, at Trenton. In 
response to the first call for troops he enlisted as a 
private, .April 16, 1S61, latter assisting in organizing 
the Fourteenth Regiment, New Jersey Volunteers. 
In February 1S63 he was ordered to Hilton Head, 
South Carolina, and made Major and Aide-de-Camp 
to Major-Gencral Gillmore, then in command of the 
Tenth .\rmy Corps. He participated in the capture 
of Morris Island, the bloody night attack on Fort 
Wagner, and the operations in the siege of Charles- 
ton. Subsequently he was transferred to the North 
on account of illness, and placed in charge of the 
Pay Department, United States .Army, at Parole 
Camp, Coliunbus, Oliio, where he remained until 
one year previous to his resignation in 1 866, having 
been brevetted Lieutenant-Colonel for meritorious 
services during the war. Immediately after his 



resignation from the army. General Stryker was 
admitted to the Bar of Ohio, and soon removed to 
New Jersey, where he was placed on the military 
staff of the Governor. Since April 12, 1867, he has 
been Adjutant-General of New Jersey. In Feb- 
ruary 1874 he was brevetted Major-General by the 
State of New Jersey. General Stryker was elected 
President of the Trenton Battle Monument Associa- 
tion at its organization in 1884, which society has 
erected a beautiful structure in Trenton to com- 
memorate the victory gained in that town during the 
Revolutionary struggle and has placed a bronze bust 




W. S. STRYKER 

of General Stryker in the reliquary room in the 
base of the monument, with this inscription : " Done 
by his associates as a memorial to the unceasing 
efforts of their President to make this monument a 
fiict." He has acted as President of the Trenton 
Banking Company and has been for many years 
President of the Trenton Saving Fund Society. He 
is the President of the Society of the Cincinnati in 
the State of New Jersey, President of the New Jersey 
Historical Society, a member of the Royal Historical 
Society of London, a fellow of the .American Geo- 
graphical Society, and a member of a large number 
of state and county historical societies in the United 
States. To him New Jersey is indebted for some of 
the most comprehensive monographs which have 



262 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



yet been issued in this country. From informa- 
tion drawn from his hbrary and from the state 
archives, General Stryker has compiled a Register 
of Officers and Men of New Jersey in the Revolu- 
tionary War (Trenton 1872), the initial work of its 
kind in America. A new and revised edition of 
this book is about to be published. He also com- 
piled a Record of Officers and Men of New Jersey 
in the Civil War (iS76),and wrote the following 
historical studies : Washington's Reception by the 
People of New Jersey in i 789 ; The Princeton Sur- 
prise ; New Jersey Continental Line in the Virginia 
Campaign of 1 781 ; The Massacre near old Tappan ; 
The Capture of the Block House at Toms River, 
New Jersey; The New Jersey Continental Line in 
the Indian Campaign of 1779; The Old Barracks 
at Trenton, New Jersey ; The Reed Controversy ; 
The New Jersey Volunteers — Loyalists ; Trenton 
One Hundred Vears Ago ; The Affair at Egg Har- 
bor, New Jersey ; The Battle of Trenton ; The 
Continental .Army at the Crossing of the Delaware, 
Christmas, 1776; .\ Study of George \\ashington ; 
The Heroes of the Revolution. Within tlic last 
year General Stryker has iniblished a work entitled 
The Battles of Trenton and Princeton, which is an 
exhaustive narrative of these two battles in the light 
of facts derived from the German records. He has 
also in active preparation a similar work with regard 
to the Battle of Monmouth, New Jersey. In June 
1S99 Princeton conferred upon him the degree 
of Doctor of Laws. General Stryker was married 
to Helen Boudinot Atterbury, of New York City, 
September 14, 1S70. They have three children: 
Helen Boudinot (wife of John .-\. Montgomery, a 
Princeton graduate of the Class of 1886), Kathlyn 
Berrien and William Bradford Stryker. 



BAKER, Alfred Thornton 

Princeton A.B. 1885. 
Born in Camden, N. J., 1863 ; early education in 
Philadelphia, Pa. ; graduated Princeton, 1885 ; with 
Thomas Dolan & Co.. 1886-88 ; now head of firm A. T. 
Baker & Co., manufacturers' upholstery goods, Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 

ALFREDTHORXTON BAKER, ALmunicturer, 
was born in Camden, New Jersey, October 
30, 1 863, son of Lewis C. and Mary Racheal (Con- 
over) Baker. He was prepared for College in the 
private school of Dr. Faire in Philadelphia, Penn- 
sylvania, and entered Princeton at the age of eight- 
een. In College he was a member of the Glee 
Club for three years and for three seasons occupied 



a position on the '\"arsity foot-ball team. Mr. Baker 
graduated Bachelor of .\rts in 1885, and com- 
menced his commercial career in the office of 
Thomas Dolan & Company. Here he remained 
for two years, at the end of that time, 188S, 
entering business for himself. He is now the 
head of the firm A. T. Baker & Company, engaged 
in a successful business in the manufiicture of 
upholstery goods at ^L^naylmk Station in Phila- 
delphia. In Philadelphia he is a member of the 
Orpheus, Rittenhouse, Racquet, Princeton, University 
and Philadelphia Country clubs, being a member of 
the Committee on .Admissions of the L'niversity Club 
and of the Committee of the Princeton Alumni As- 
sociation. In politics he is affiliated with the Repub- 
lican party. Mr. Baker married, April 22, 1889, 
Mary Augusta Pemberton ; their children are : 
Hobart .\mory Hare and Alfred Thornton Baker, Jr. 



BURR, James Edward 

Princeton A.B. 1875, A.M. 1878. 
Born in Carbondale, Pa., 1853; early education in 
public and private schools of Pennsylvania ; graduated 
Princeton, 1875, A.M. in course; studied law in offices, 
and admitted to the Pennsylvania Bar, 1877; practising 
lawyer in Scranton, Pa. 

JAMi;S EDWARD BURR, Lawyer, was born in 
Carbondale, Pennsylvania, July 8, 1853, the 
son of Washington and Lucinda (Bradley) Burr. 
He is of one of the oldest American families, whose 
members have lived in Connecticut, New York and 
Pennsylvania ; the earliest representative in this 
country was Jehue Burre who was born in England 
in 1600 and died in Connecticut in 1670. Mr. 
Burr as a boy was educated at public and private 
schools in the vicinity of his birthplace, at his home 
and at a boarding-school from his sixteenth to his 
eighteenth year, and graduated Bachelor of Arts at 
Princeton in 1875. After two years of study in 
law offices he was admitted to the Bar of Pennsyl- 
vania in June, 1877, at once established himself in 
jiractice in Scranton and has continued to follow his 
profession with much success. He is allied with 
the Republican party and in that connection has 
held several local public offices, but generally pre- 
fers to avoid political matters and devote himself to 
his practice which demands his entire time. He 
is a member of three local clubs. Mr. Burr was 
married, September 6, 1882, to Matilda Parsons 
Bryan ; their children are : Sarah Bryan, Edward 
Bryan, Lily Paxton and Kathryn Meigs Burr. 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



263 



CROSBY, William Bedlow 

Columbia LL.B. 1867. 
Born in New York City, 1842; graduated A.B. at 
College of the City of New York in 1861 ; Acting Ass't 
Paymaster in U. S. Navy, 1863-65; graduated Colum- 
bia Law School, 1867; U. S. Consul General to Rome, 
1872-73; practising lawyer in New York City since 
1867. 

WILLIAM BEDL(J\V CROSBY, Lawyer, was 
born in New York City, June 19, 1842. 
Through his fivther, John Player Crosby, he is 
descended from the family of Ebenezer Crosby, of 
Washington's (iuards. His mother, Margaret Barker 
(Butler) Crosby, was the daughter of Attorney- 
General Benjamin F. Butler. Mr. Crosby's entire 
Academic training was received in his native city, 
where, after early attendance in the public schools, 
he took the course offered by the College of the 
City of New York. After graduating there in 1861, 
his first active office was that of .Acting .Assistant 
Paymaster in the .Mississi[)pi squadron of the Navy, 
which office he held from 1853 to December 1S64. 
In 1865 he went to Columbia for the study of law. 
He took the Bachelor of Laws' degree there in 1S67, 
and was admitted to the New York Bar the same 
year. While at Columbia, he had practical training 
in the law office of Crosby, Ostrander & Jones. 
Since the time of his admission to the Bar, lie has 
practised in .New York, both in the local and United 
States courts. He has made several trips abroad. 
In 1872 he was United States Consul (ieneral to 
Rome, Italy. Mr. Crosby is a member of the New 
York Bar .Association, the New York State .Associa- 
tion, and the Lawyers' Club. He is also a Director 
in the Manhattan Eye and Ear Hospital, which he 
served at one time .as Vice-President. He is a 
Republican, but acts independent of party in local 
politics. He was married, June 28, 1877, to Maria 
Theresa, daughter of Hon. Oakey Hall. Their son 
is Franklin B. Crosby. 



EMBURY, Aymar 

Columbia A.B. 1876, LL.B. 1878, AM. 1879. 
Born in New York City, 1856; educated in private 
schools; graduated Columbia, 1876, LL.B. 1878; A.M. 
in course, 1879; practising lawyer in New York City. 

AYMAR ICMBLTRY, Lawyer, was born in New 
York City, .August 17, 1856, the son of 
.\braham Biningor Embury and Susan (Pindar) 
I'jiibury. He was educated at an carlv ago in tin- 
private schools of l^lincnilorf, Hull iS: Connv.ill in 
New York City, and graduated from the .Academic 
Department of Columbia in 1876, receiving the 



degree of Master of .Arts in course three years later. 
He then entered the Columbia Law School, where 
he graduated in 1878. During his course in the 
Law School and for some time afterward he studied 
law in the law offices of Kissam & Embury and 
Norwood & Coggeshal. Since 1882 he has been 
engaged in practice without partnership association 
in New York City. He is a member of the Psi Phi 
and Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternities, the St. Nich- 
olas, Huguenot, New York Historical and .American 
Geographical societies, the New York Law Institute, 




AVM.VR 1Ml;URY 

the Columbia .Alumni .Association, and the Housa- 
tonic and Strollers clubs. Mr. LJnbury was married, 
September 10, 1879, to Fannie U. Bates; their 
children are : Aymar, Lucy B., Susan P. and Alfred 
B. Embury. 



NAZRO, Hiram Hunt 

Columbia A.B. 1863. A.M. 1866. 
Born in Troy, N. Y., 1844; attended private schools 
in Troy and New York City ; graduated at Columbia, 
1863; Tutor in Mathematics after course; engaged in 
Banking Business in New York City since 1864. 

HIK.\M lU'NT NAZRO. Banker, w.as born 
in Troy, New York, August 29. 1S44. the 
son of John Paine Xazro, whose French Huguenot 
ancestors came to .America about the year 1689, anil 



264 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



lulia Ann (Hunt) Nazro, who was of English family. 
.N[r. Nazro received early instruction in private 
schools in Troy, and in New York City under Dr. 
CJeorge P. Quackenbos, after which he entered 
Columbia. He took the full course in the Academic 
Department, graduating Bachelor of Arts with the 
Class of 1863 and taking the degree of Master of 
.\rts in 1866. For one year after graduation he 
attended lectures in the Medical School of Columbia, 
but abandoned the idea of medical study in 1864 
to enter the banking business, in which he has since 
been engaged, from 1S73 as Cashier of the Ninth 
National Hank of New York City, and from 1882 as 
Cashier and Director in the same institution. 



RICE, Isaac Leopold 

Columbia LL.B. 1880. 
Born in Warhenheim, Rhenish Bavaria, 1850; pre- 
pared for College at Central High School, Philadel- 
phia; graduated at Columbia Law School, 1880; 
Lecturer on Political Science and Law at Columbia, 
1884-86 ; President and Director of many electric and 
other corporations. 

IS.\AC I.KOPOLD RICE, Lawyer and Business 
zMan, was born in Warhenheim, Rhenish IJava- 
ria, February 22, 1850, the son of Maier and Fanny 
Rice. His family are small landed proprietors in 
Rhenish Bavaria and Baden. He came to Amer- 
ica at an early age and was prepared for College at 
the Central High School at Philadelphia, Pennsyl- 
vania. .After graduating with lienor from tlie Co- 
lumbia Law School in 1880, Mr. Rice entered a 
practice in New York City, and in addition to his 
legal work acted as Lecturer in the Law School and 
the School of Political Science at Columbia from 
1 884-1 886. His practice continued until his con- 
nection with various corporations devoted to elec- 
trical enterprises became so extensive as to demand 
all of his attention. At present he is President and 
Director of the Consolidated Railway Electric Light- 
ing & Equipment Company, the Consolidated Rub- 
ber Tire Company, the Chicago Electric Traction 
Company, the Electric Boat Company, the Electro- 
Dynamic Company of Philadelphia and the Lactroiil 
Company, Director in the Electric Storage Battery 
Company, the Electric Vehicle Company, Siemens- 
Halshe Electric Company of .\merica, the Pennsyl- 
vania Electric Vehicle Company, and the Columbia 
& Electric Vehicle Company, Vice-President of the 
Guggenheim Exploration Coinpany and Chairman 
of the Electric Axle, Light & Power Company. 
He was at one time Counsel and Director for the 



Southern Railroad and Foreign Representative of 
the Philadelphia & Reading Railway. Mr. Rice is 
prominently known as a chess-player, having in- 
vented the Rice Gambit. Me presented a trophy 
to be i)layed for in the annual contest between the 
Universities of Great Britain and .America. He is 
the author of a volume entitled What is Music? 
and has contributed various articles to Harpers', 
The Forum, and other magazines. He is a mem- 
ber of the Manhattan Chess, Lotos, Harmonic, 
Lawyers', Press and Columbia Yacht clubs in New- 
York and the Union League of Chicago, the St. 




ISAAC I.. RICE 

George's Chess Club of London and the Associa- 
tion of the Bar of New York. Mr. Rice was mar- 
ried, in 1 884, to Julia Hyneman Barnett ; their 
children are : Muriel, Dorothy, Marion, Isaac L. 
Rice, Jr., Marjory and Julian. 



OPPENHEIM, Myron H. 

Columbia LL.B. 1881. 
Born in Albany, N. Y., 1859; educated in Albany 
public schools ; graduated Columbia Law School, 1881 ; 
took up the practice of law in New York City, and has 
various other business interests; is an active member 
of the Democratic party and is also in charitable work. 

MYRON H. OPPENHEIM, Lawyer, was born 
in .Albany, New York, in 1859. He was 
educated in the public and normal schools of his 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



265 



native city and afterwards altende(l Columbia. He Association, the Albany Society, and the West End 
had long had a bent for the law. ami after a course Association. He is also President of the Rapid 
at Colmiibia Law School, he received the degree of Safety Filter Company, one of the largest concerns 
Bachelor of Laws in 1 88 1, and was admitted to the engaged in the filtration of Croton water. His 

country-seat is in the Borough of Elberon, New 
Jersey, where he maintains a fine stable of trotters 
and thoroughbreds. 




MYROX H. OPPENHEIM 

New York Bar. Immediately afterward he showed 
characteristic energy and keenness of legal sight by 
going to San Francisco, being ad