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THE 



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BOMBAY 



Sni^jerstt^ Calentiar. 



1865-66. 



Corrected to November 1865. 




BOMBA.Y: 
THACKER, VINING, & Co. 

18G5. 






,.1''' 



BOMBAY: 

PRINTED AT THE EDUCATION SOCIKTY's PRESS, BYCULLA 



ADDENDA. 

Page 37, after line 1 1, and page 38, after line 3, insert 
For those only who matriculated before the close of 
1863. 



Page 38, after line / insert 

XIII. SINDHI. 
For the First Examination in Arts and for B. A. 
For those only who matriculated before the close of 
1863. 

1. Hikayat-us-Salehin. 

2. Sassa Punhn. 

3. History of India. 

4. iEsop's Fables. 



Page 114, at the bottom insert 



Year. 


Subject. 


Prizeman. 


1865. . 
1866.. 


The Rise and Spread of Buddhism 
in India. 

The Advantages and Means of Dif- 
fusing a Scientific Practice of 
Medicine in India. 


No Essay received. 



Page 118, under Prizeman in the last line, insert 
{Prize not awarded). 



\ 



Page 143, after hne 12, insert the Hon'ble Arthur James 
Lewis. 



^ 



^ 



CONTENTS. 



PAGE 

|. Almanack, May 1, 1864 to April 30, 

1865 1 

||. Notifications :■ — 

Days and Hours of Examination : 

Arts 14 

Law . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 7 

Medicine . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 

Subjects for Examination : 

Languages, First Examination in Arts, 1865-66. 19 

History, ditto .. .. 21 

Languages, B. A. Examination, 1865-66. .. 21 

Languages, Honours, and M. A., 1865. . . . 23 

History, ditto . . . . 24 

List of Books for a Cycle of five years : 

I. English. First Examination in Arts . . 25 

B. A. Examination . . . . 26 

Honours and M. A. , . . . 27 

IL Sanskrit. First Examination in Arts . . 28 

B. A. Examination . . . . *j\p 

Honours and M. A. . . . . 2i\ 

in. Greek. First Examination in Arts .. 30 

B. A. Examination .. .. 31 j^ 

Honours and M. A 3| 

\ 



( 

I 



Vl CONTENTS. 

PAGE 

IV. Latin. First Examination in Arts ., 31 

B. A. Examination . . . . 32 

Honours and M. A. .. .. 33 

V. Hebrew. First Examination, B. A., and 

xM. A 34 

VI. Arabic. First Examination, B. A., and 

M. A. .... .. 35 

VII- Portuguese. First Examination and B. A. 3.5 

VIII. Marathi. Do. do. .. 36 

IX. Gujarati' Do. do. .. 3G 

X. Canarese. Do. do. . . 37 

XI. Hindustani. Do. do. . . 37 

XII. Persian. Do. do. . . 38 

Periods of History for a Cycle of five 
years : 

First Examination in Arts .. ,. ,, 38 

Honours and M. A. . . . . . . . . 39 

Books recommended in Law: 

Bachelor of Laws . . . . . . . . 39 

Additional for Honours in Subject («) . . 40 

Do. do. {b) .. 40 

Academic Costume 41 

|||. Acts: — 

Act XXII. of 1857, incorporating the University. 43 
Act XLVII. of I860, for conferring additional De- 

/grees . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 

IV- Bye-Laws : — 

( Senate . . . . . . . . . . .'> 4 

Faculties . . . . . . . . . . 51 



V. 



CONTENTS. 


VII 




PAGE 


Syndicate. . 


55 


Registrar . . 


57 


Board of Accounts 


58 


University Terms. . 


59 


Endowments 


60 


Regulations : — 




I, Arts:— 




Matriculation 


01 


First Examination in 


Arts .. .. 63 


B. A. Examination . 


66 


Honours 


70 


Master of Arts 


73 


II. Law: 




Bachelor of Laws . 


74 


Honours 


75 


III. Medicine : — 




First Examination of L. M. . . 17 


Second ditto 


79 


Doctor of Medicine . 


82 


IV. Civil Engineering . 


84 


General 


87 


Admission to Degrees 


88 


Recognition . . 


90 


Forms : — 




I. Arts 


91 


II. Law 


^ 


Ill, Medicine 


100 


IV. Civil Engineering 


108 


V. Mmiguldass Nathoob 


boy's Travelling 


Fellowship 


"7 






Vni CONTENTS. 



7 



PAGE 

VI- Endowments : — 

Munguldass Nathoobhoy's Travelling 

Fellowship Ill 

Manockjee Limjee Gold Medal .. 113 

Bhugwandass Purshotumdass Sanskrit 

Scholarship.. .. .. .. 115 

The Homejee Cursetjee Prize. . . . 116 

VI I . Benefactions: — 

University Building . . . . . . 119 

University Arms and Seal . . 121 

University Library . . . . , . 121 

The Rajabai Tower . . . . . . 1 22 

University Mace , . . . . . 1 23 

VIM' Recognized Institutions : — 

Elphinstone College .. .. .. 124 

Poona College . . . . . . 130 

Free General Assembly's Institution, 

Bombay .. .. .. .. 134 

Government Law School . . . . 136 

Grant Medical College .. .. 138 

IX" The University — 

Senate .. .... .. ,. 142 

Faculty of Arts .. .. .. .. 14G 

Ditto Law .. .. .. .. i4g 

I Ditto Medicine 150 

f Ditto Civil Engineering .. .. 150 

Syndicate ,. .. .. ,. .. \^\ 

Registrar .. _ 151 

Board of Accounts . . . . . . . . 15] 



CONTENTS. 


IX 




PAGE 


Succession Lists : 




Chancellor . . 


152 


Vice-Choncellor . . 


152 


Deans. 




I. Dean in Arts 


152 


U. „ Law 


152 


III. „ Medicine 


152 


IV. „ Civil Engineering 


153 


Kegistrar 


153 


Graduates, M. A. 


154 


Graduates, B. A. 


1.54 


Graduates, L. M, 


155 


Undergraduates who hfivc passed the 




First Examination in Arts 


156 


First Examination for L.. M. . . 


157 


Matriculation Examination only 


157 


Examiners and Lists, 1864-65 : 




M. A. in History and Philosophy 


170 


Matriculation 


170 


First Examination in Arts . . . . 


171 


Examination for B. A. . . 


172 


First L. M. Examination 


173 


Second do. 


174 


Degrees conferred, April 18th, 1865 


175 


X- Accounts of Endowments and Bene- 


i;;^ 


factions. . 


Munguldass Nathoohhoy TravelHng Fel- 




lowship 


178 


Manockjee Limjee Gold Medal. . 


180 



CONTENTS. 



PAGE 

Bhugwandass Purshotumdass Sanskrit 

Scliolarship .. .. .. .. 181 

Homejee Cursetjeee Prize Fund . . 1 82 

University Hall . . . . • . . . 183 

University Arms and Seal .. .. 184 

University Library Building .. .. 185 

The Rajabai Tower 186 

University Mace . . . . . . 187 

XI- Convocation for Conferring 

Degrees, 1864-65 188 

Examination Papers : — 

I. Honours in Hist, and Phil., 1864. . . ii 

II. Matriculation, 1864-65 .. .. ix 

III. First Examination in Arts, 1864-65 . . xlix 

IV. B. A. Examination, 1864-65 .. .. xcvii 

V. First Examination for L. M., 1 864-65. . clx 

VI. Second Examination for L. M., 1864-65 clxiv 



/ 



/ 



1. 

MAY 1, 1865, TO APRIL 30, 1866. 



le 



BOMBAY UNIVERSITY ALMANAC. 



MAY, 1865. 


1 


Mon. 




2 


Tiies. 




3 


Wed. 




4 


Thurs 




5 


Fri. 




6 


Sat. 






ZUtti 




8 


Mon. 




9 


Tues. 




10 


Wed. 




11 


Thurs 




12 


Fri. 




13 


Sat. 




14 


Sttn* 




15 


Mon. 




16 


^ues. 




17 


Wed. 




18 


Thurs 




19 


Fri. 




20 


Sat. 




21 


Sttn. 




22 


Mon. 




23 


Tues. 




24 


Wed. 


(i^uttn ¥ittovia "boxn, isi9. 


25 


Thurs 




26 


Fri. 




27 


Sat. 




28 


Suit. 




29 


Mon. 




30 


Tues. 




31 


Wed. 





BOMBAY UNIVERSITY ALMANAC. 



JUNE, 1865. 


1 


Thurs 




2 


Fri. 




3 


Sat. 




4 


Swn. 




5 


Mon. 




6 


Tues. 




7 


Wed. 




8 


Thurs 




9 


Fri. 




10 


Sat. 




n 


s?um 




12 


Mon. 


dFitrgt Ettm in mt^ htm^^ 


13 


Tues. 




U 


Wed. 




15 


Thurs 


^econti €txm in JHetlicine ficginji. 


16 


Fri. 




17 


Sat. 




18 


%nn* 




19 


Mo a. 




20 


Tues. 


(Suctn 'Fictovia'^ ^cctgjJion, 1837. 


21 


Wed. 




22 


Thurs 




23 


Fri. 




24 
25 


Sat. 




S?unt 




26 


Mon. 




27 


Tues. 




28 


Wed. 




29 


Thurs 




30 


Fri. 





BOMBAY UNIVERSITY ALMANAC. 



JULY, 1866/ 


1 
2 


Sat. 


1 


Sttm 




3 


Mon. 




4 


Tues. 




5 


Wed. 




6 


Thurs 




7 


Fri. 




8 


Sat. 




9 


Sun. 




10 


Mon. 




11 


Tues. 




12 


Wed. 




13 


Thurs 




14 


Fri. 




15 

16 


Sat. 




%utt* 




17 


Mon. 


♦ 


18 


Tues. 


University of Bombay Incorporated,^ 1857 


19 


Wed. 




20 


Thurs 




21 


Fri. 




22 


Sat. 




23 


Stin* 




24 


Mon. 




25 


Tues. 




26 


Wed. 




27 


Thurs 




28 


Fri. 




29 
30 


Sat. 




Ssun. 




31 


Men. 


1 



BOMBAY UNIVERSITY ALMANAC. 



AUGUST, 18G5 


1 


Tues. 






o 


Wed. 






:3 


Thurs 






4 


Fri. 






5 


Sat. 






6 

7 


Bxtn 

Mon. 




i 


8 


Tues. 






9 


Wed. 






10 


Thurs 






11 


Fri. 






12 


Sat. 






13 
14 


Mon. 






15 


Tues. 






16 


Wed. 






17 


Thurs 






18 


Fri. 






19 

20 
21 

22 


Sat. 






.ett4u 

Mon. 
Tues. 


Last day of Application for Honours in 
M. A. Examination. 


Arts and 


23 


Wed. 






24 


Thurs 






25 


Fri. 






26 

27 
28 


Sat. 






&VAU 
Mon. 






29 


Tues. 






30 


Wed. 






31 


Thurs 







Ic* 



BOMBAY UNIVERSITY ALMANAC. 



SEPTEMBER, 1865. 


1 


Fri. 




2 


Sat. 




3 


Bm. 




4 


Mon. 




5 
6 


Tues. 
Wed. 


University of Madras incorporated, 

1857. 


7 


Thurs 




8 


Fri. 




9 


Sat. 




10 


Sttn^ 




11 


Mon, 




12 


Tues. 




13 


Wed. 




14 


Thurs 




15 


Fri. 




16 
17 


Sat. 




Sttn. 


* 


18 


Mon. 




19 


Tues. 




20 
21 


Wed. 
Thurs 


Last day of Application for Matriculation Exami- 
nation. 


22 


Fri. 




23 


Sat. 




24 
. 25 


Mon. 


driest ^nm in mi& tntf^. Last day of 


26 

27 


Tues. 
Wed. 


sending in Essays for the Manoekjee Limjee 
Gold Medal, and for notifying new Subject. 


28 


Thurs. 




29 


Fri. 




30 


Sat. 





BOMBAV VNIVERSITY ALMANAC. 



OCTOBER. 18G5,. 


1 
2 


Bun 

Mon. 




3 


Tues. 


« 


4 
5 


Wed. 

Thurs 


Last day of Application for First Examination in 

Arts. 


6 


Fri. 




7 


Sat. 




8 
9 


Butt. 

Mon. 




10 


Tues. 




11 


Wed. 




12 


Thurs 




13 


Fri. 




14 


Sat. 




15 
16 


Mon. 




17 


Tues. 




18 


Wed. 




19 


Thurs 




20 


Fri. 




21 


Sat. 




22 
23 


Bu% 

Mon. 




24 


Tues. 




25 


Wed. 




26 


Thurs 




27 


Fri. 




28 


Sat. 




29 
30 


Bun. 

Mon. 




31 


Tues. 





BOMBA,Y UNIVERSITY ALMANAC. 



NOVEMBER, 1865. 


1 


Wed. 




2 


Thurs 




3 

4 

5 

G 


Fri. 

Sat. 


[for L. ]\L and LL.B. Examination. 
Last day of Application for First Examination 


Mon. 




i 


Tues. 




S 


Wed. 




9 


Thurs 




10 
11 


Fri. 
Sat. 


[M. D. Examinations- 
Last day of Application for Second L. M. and 


12 

13 


Mon. 




14 


Tues. 




15 


Wed. 




16 


Thurs 




17 


Fri. 




18 


Sat. 




19 


B%n* 




20 
21 
22 


Mon. 
Tues. 
Wed. 


and for Matriculation begin. 


23 


Thurs 




24 


Fri. 




25 

26 

27 


Sat. 




Mon. 


Manoekjee Limjee Gold Medal awarded. 


28 


Tues. 




29 


Wed. 




30 


Thurs 





BOMBAY UNIVERSITY ALMANAC. 



DECEMBETl, 1865. 


1 
2 


Fri. 
Sat. 


[M. A. declared. 

Results of Examination for Honours in Arts and 


3 
4 
5 


Mon. 
Tiies. 


First Examinations, in Arts and for L. M., 
and LL.B. Examination begin. 


G 


Wed. 




7 


Thms 




8 


Fri. 




9 


Sat. 




10 


Stttt. 




11 
12 


Mon. 
Tues. 


Second L. M. and M. D. Examinations 
begin. 


13 


Wed. 




14 


Thurs 




15 


Fri. 




16 


Sat. 




17 
18 
19 
20 


Suit* 

Mon. 

Tues. 

. Wed. 


Annual Meeting of the Senate.— Results 
of Matriculation and First Examinations in Arts 
and for L. M., and LL.B, Examination declared. 


21 


Thurs 




22 
23 

24 
25 
26 


Fri. 
Sat. 


^i^on^ E^tm ixi, Mm%\M t^niyg* 


Mon. 
Tues. 


©j^rtStmaS I3a^.— Results of Second L. M. 
and M. D. Examinations declared. 


"^1 


Wed. 




28 


Thurs 




29 


Fri. 




30 


Sat. 




31 


Stttt. 





10 



BOMBAY UNIVEUSITY ALMANAC. 



JANUARY, 18G6. 


1 

2 


Mon. 
Tues. 


jFmt Ettm in mttiiitim t$Qim, 


3 


Wed. 




4 


TImrs 


■ 


5 


Fri. 




6 

7 
8 


Sat. 




Mon. 




9 


Tues. 




10 


Wed. 




11 


Thurs 




12 


Fri. 




13 


Sat. 




14 
15 


Mon. 




16 


Tues. 




17 


Wed. 




IS 


Thurs 




19 


Fri. 




20 


Sat. 




21 
22 


Mon. 




23 
24 
25 


Tues. 
Wed. 
Thurs 


University of Calcutta incorporated, 
1857. 


26 


Fri. 




27 


Sat. 




28 
29 


Mttf 
Mon. 




30 

ol 

i 


Tues. 
Wed. 


[Cursetjee Prize. 
Last day for 7iotifying Subject tor the Homejee 



BOMBAY UNIVERSITY ALMANAC. 



11 



FEBRUARY, 1866, 


1 


Thurs 




2 


Fri. 




3 

4 


Sat. 




^UX^^ 







Mon. 




6 

7 


Tues. 
Wed. 


Last day of Application for the Bhugwandass 
Pursliotumdass Sanskrit Scholarship. 


8 


Thurs 




9 


Fri. 




10 


Sat 




11 


Sun 




12 


Mon. 




13 


Tues. 




14 


Wed. 




15 


Tlmrs 




16 


Fri. 




17 


Sat. 




18 


^m 




19 
20 


Mon. 
Tues. 


Last day of ApjiUcation for B. A. Examination. 


21 


Wed. 




22 


Thurs 




23 


Fri. 




24 


Sat. 




25 


SU« 




2& 


Mon. 




27 


Tues. 


V 


28 


Wed. 





12 



BOMBAY UNIVERSITY ALMAXAC. 





MARCH, iSGo.. 


1 


Thurs 




2 


Fri. 


- 


3 


Sat. 




4 


mn. 




5 


Mon. 




6 

7 
9 


Tiies. 
Wed. 
Thurs 


Examination for the Bbugwandass Pur- 
shotumdass Sanskrit Scholarship 
begins. 


8 


Fri. 




10 


Sat. 




11 


^ttn. 




12 


Mon. 




13 


Tiies. 




14 


Wed. 




15 


Thurs 




16 


Fri. 




17 
18 


Sat. 




&V;n. 




19 


Mon. 


B. A. Examination begins. 


20 


Tues. 




21 


Wed. 




22 


Thurs 




23 


Fri. 




24 


Sat. 




25 


i^uti^ 




26 


Mon. 




27 


Tues. 




28 


Wed. 




29 


Thurs 




30 
31 


Fri. 

Sat. 


CBfootr JftitsKU' 



BOMBAY UNIVERSITY ALMANAC. 



13 



APRIL, 1866. 


1 ^mt 




2 Mon. 


Results of B. A. Examination declared. 


3 Tues. 




4 


Wed. 




5 


Thurs 




6 


Fri. 




7 
8 


Sat. 




^mh 




9 


Mon. 


^mkiion to Btgicm, 


10 


Tues. 




11 


Wed. 




12 


Thurs 




13 


Fri. 




14 


Sat. 


dTir^t Ctrm m IHctlicinc cntis. 


15 


mn^ 




16 


Mon. 


^mxiti C£tm in Srtsf cntJg, 


17 


Tues. 




18 


Wed. 




19 


Thurs 




20 


Fri. 




21 
22 


Sat. 




^UVh 




23 


Mon. 




24 


Tues. 




25 


Wed. 




26 


Thurs 




27 


Fri. 




28 


Sat. 




29 


^nn> 




30 


Mon. 





2c 



n. 






DAYS AND HOURS OF EXAMINATION, 



I. AETS. 

Matriculation Examination, 1865-66. 

flO to 1, Grammar and 
n/i J nrk 7\T lo^" J Idiom, &c. (Enolish). 
Monday, 20 ^ov., 186o,^ 2 too, EleinentarfHistory 

L and Geography^ 
f 10 to 1, Grammar and 
Tuesday, 21st Nov., ^^ ^^^^^^ ^^ ^^nd Lan, 
V, 2 to 5, Translation. 

-ixr J J no J AT ClOtol, Arithmetic. 
Wednesday, 22nd Nov.,^ 2 ta s! Algebra. 

no to 1, Euclid. 
Thursday, 23rd Nov., < 2 to 5, Elementary Natu. 
t ral Science. 



notifications. 15 

First Examimation in Arts, 1865-66. 

< 10 to 1, English Language, 
Monday, 4th Dec, 1 865, ] 1 st Paper ; 

C. 2 to 5, Ditto, 2nd Paper. 

MO to 1, Second Language, 
Tuesday, 5th Dec, < 1 st Paper ; 

( 2 to 5, Ditto, 2nd Paper. 

rlO to 1, Arithmetic and 

Wednesday, m Dec, <( 2 to 5, Euclid and Tri- 

1^ gonometry. 

nursday,mnec., {l^'^^'^SVy. 
Friday, Sth Dec, 10 to 1, Selected Subjects. 

B. A. Examination, 1865-66. 

C 10 to 1, English Language, 
Jlonday, I9tk Mar., '66. ] 1st Paper ; 

i 2 to 5, Ditto, 2nd Paper. 

r 10 to 1, Second Language, 
Tuesday, 20th Mar., < 1st Paper; 

C 2 to 5, Ditto, 2nd Paper. 

flO to 1, Arithmetic and 

Wednesday, 2\st Mar., J^ o^.^^'f"^*- . a 

^' ' i 2 to 5, 1 rigonometry and 

(, Conic Sections. 

Thursday, 22nd March, j ^^ *° 1, Euclid and Mecha- 
"' ' t nics. 



16 NOTIFICATIONS. 

flOto 1, 
Friday, 23rd March, '66-< Selected Subjects. 

I 2 too, 

f 10 to 1, ^ 
Saturday, 24ith Mar*, <^ Selected Subjects. 

l^ 2 to 5, 

flOto 1, 
Monday, 26th 3Iarch, <^ Selected Subjects. 

L 2 to 5. 

f 10 to 1, 
Tuesday, 21th March, «< Selected Subjects. 

l^ 2 to 5, (if necessary.) 

Honours and M. A. Examinations, 1865. 

(1). Languages, 

flO to 1, English Books, 
Monday, 2Qth Nov» 'Qb. ^ 1st Paper ; 

{2 to 5, Ditto, 2nd Paper. 

f 10 to 1, Second Language, 
Tuesday, 2\st Nov., -< 1st Paper; 

1^ 2 to 5, Ditto, 2nd Paper. 

TTr J J n-i J 717 OO to 1, Translation. 
Wednesday, 22nd Nov., | g ^^ 5^ Composition. 

(2). History and Philosojyhy. 

Monda,,20tkNo..'65,{'ll'^^^ZXfvZV. 

rr y 01 . 7vr 5 10 to 1, Politics. 

Tuesday, 2lst Nov,, j 2 to 5, Logic. 

f 10 to 1, History of Greek 
Wednesday, 22nd Nov., -{ Philosophy. 

l^ 2 to 5, Do., Modern do. 



NOTIFICATIONS. 1 7 

(3). Mathematics and Natural Philosophy. 

f 10 to 1, Euclid and Geom. 
Monday, 20th Nov, '65.'{ Conies. 

L 2 to 5, Algebra and Trig. 

f 10 to 1, Statics and Dy- 

' ^' '* ] 2 to 5, Hydrostatics and 

l^ Optics. 

f 10 to 1, Anal. Conies, and 

Wednesday, 22nd Nov. A 2tot'N;wton and As- 
L tronomy. 

(4). Natural Sciences, 
Monday, 20th Nov., '65, ^ ^^ *^ ^' 
Tuesday, 2] St Nov., { ^2 to 5^ 
Wednesday, 22nd Nov., j ^^ ^^ ^' 



II. LAW. 

LL.B. Examination. 
Monday,m Dec, 1865. {^J ^ ^ ^Xtuights. 
Tuesday, m Dee., { ^? [^ J; ESl 

Wednesday, 6tk Dec, { '? 1° J; ^^Tlaw. 



2c* 



*>/ 



18 



NOTIFICATIONS. 



III. MEDICINE. 

First Examination for L. M., 1865-66. 

Mon,ay,^tnBec., 1865. { '^ I J- JSJ X'). 
f 10 to 1, Materia Medica 
< (Paper). 

1^ 2 to 5, Chemistry (Paper), 
f 10 to 1, Botany (Oral). 
<; 2 to 5, Materia Medica 
L (Oral). 

ylO to 1, Chemistry(Oral). 
i 2 to 5, Anatomy (Oral). 
C 2 to 5, Practical Chemis- 
l try. 

2 to 5, Practical Anatomy. 



Tuesday y 5th Dec, 

Wednesday J 6th Dec, 

^ Thursday, 7th Dec, 

Friday J Sih Dec, 

Saturday, 9th Dec, 

Second Examination for L. M,, 1864-65. 

nfj, J ^^u^ -Tk ran S 10 to 1, Medicine (Paper). 
Monday, Mth Dec,' Qb, I ^ v j ^ 



Tuesday, \2tft Dec, 

Wednesday, \Zth Dec, 
Thursday, \^th Dec, 

Friday, \5th Dec, 
Saturday, \6th Dec, 



to 5, Midwifery (Paper) 

to 1, Surgery (Paper). 

2 to 5, Medical Jurispru- 



rlO to 1, Surgery (Paper). 

1^ dence (Paper)- 
C 10 to 1 , Physiology (Paper) 
t 2 to 5, Medicine (Oral). 
5 10 to 1, Physiology (Oral). 
I 2 to 5, Midwifery (Oral). 

f 10 to 1, Surgery (Oral). 
<( 2 to 5, Medical Jurispru- 

1^ dence (Oral). 

f 10 to 1, Practical Surgery. 
<; 2 to 5, Practical Toxico- 

l- logy. 

The Clinical Examination will commence on a day 
to be appointed by the Examiners. 



SUBJECTS FOR EXAMINATION. 



Books for the First Examination in Arts, 
1865-66. 

In English. 

1. Johnson — Lives of Cowley, Dryden, and Pope- 

2. Wordsworth — Appendix and Prefaces, pp. 649 

to 690, double column edition- 

3. Gray — Poems. 

4. Milton — Paradise Regained. 

In Sanskrit 

h 2. Vikramorwashi — Prose and Poetry, com- 
plete. 

3. Manu — Institutes. Ghaps. I., II. 

4. Hitopadesha, Books L, II. 

In Greek. 

L Xenophon — Cyropaedeia, Books I., II. 

2. Herodotus — Book I. 

3. Homer— Iliad, Book IV. 

4. Euripides — Hecuba. 

In Latin, 

1. CiESAR — De Bello Gallico, Book I. 

2. Cicero — De Senectute. 

3. Horace — Odes, Book I. 

4. Virgil — iEneid, Book I. 

In Hebrew, 

1. Genesis, Chap. I. — X. 

2. Esther. 

3. Psalms, I.— XXX. 

4. Job, Chap. I.— X. 



20 SUBJECTS FOR EXAMINATION. 

In Arabic. 

1. Makamat-al-Hariri. First 50 pages. 

2. Alf Laila wa Laila. 25 pages. 

3. Tarikh Yamini. 

4. Poem of Antara in the Mu'allakat. 

In Portuguese. 

1. Life of Francisco de Laval, Part L (printed at 

Goa.) 

2. De Barros — History, Book IL 

3. Camoes — Lusiados. First half. 

4. De Matos — Tragedies. Penelope. 

In 31ardtht. 

1 . Life of Socrates, by Krishna Shastri Chiplunkar. 

2. Kavi Charitra. First half. 

3. Tukaram — Abhangs. The first 60 pages in the 

Sarva Sangraha. 

4. MOROPANT. 

I?i Gujarati> 

L Vishwanath Narayan's translation of Elphin- 
stone's History of India. Two first Khandas. 

2. Panchopakhyan. 

3. Samaldas — Abola Rani. 

4. Kavya Dohan. Pages 176 to 250. 

In Canarese. 

1. Katha Manjari. 

2. The Seventy Stories. 

3. Ravan Dig-Vij. 

4. Chambassapa Purana. 7th to 10th Cantos. 

In Hindustani. 

1 . Bagh-o-Bahar. 

2. Akhalak-i-Hindi. 



SUBJECTS FOR EXAMINATION. 21 

3. Masnavi. By Mir Hasan. 

4. Divan-i-Nasikh. 

In Persian, 

1. Ferishtah — History of the Emperor Babar. 

2. F1RDA.USI— Shah Namah, Book I. 

3. Sa'adi — Gulistan, Book f. 

4. Divan-i-Hafiz. 30 pages. 



Periods in History for the First Examina- 
tion IN Arts, 1865-66. 

1. The Peloponnesian War. 

2. Europe, from 1789 to 1815. 

Books for the Examination for the Degree 

OF Bachelor of Arts, 1865-66. 

In English, 

1. Hooker — Ecclesiastical Pohty, Book I. 

2. Adam Smith — Theory of Moral Sentiments. 

3. Shakespeare — Cymbehne. 

4. Wordsworth — Excursion, Books I., II. 

In Sanskrit. 

1.2. Uttara Rama Charitra. 

3. Brahma Sutras. The first 100 pages of the 

Calcutta Edition. 

4. Kirata Arjuniya, Cantos L, II., III. 

In Greek. 

1. Xenophon — Anabasis, Book II. 

2. Herodotus — Book I. 

3. Homer — IHad, Book I. 

4. Sophocles — (Edipus Rex. 



22 SUBJECTS FOR EXAMINATION. 

In Latin. 

1 . Sallust — Bellum Jugurthinum. 

2. CiCERO--De Officiis, Books I., II. 

3. Virgil — Eclogues. 

4. Ovid— Fasti, Books I., II. 

In Hebrew* 

1. Genesis. 

2. Esther. 

3. Psalms, I. to. L. 

4. Job, Chap. I. to X. 

In Arabic- 

1. Makamat-al-Hariri. First 50 pages. 

2. A If Laila wa Laila. 25 pages. 

3. Tarik Yamini. 

4. Poem of Antara in the Mu'allakat. 

In Portuguese* 

1. Life of Joao de Castro. 

2. De Barros— History. 

3. De Matos— Tragedies, Viriacia. 

4. Camoes— Lusiados. Second half. 

In Mardthl. 

1. Vishwanath Narayan's Translation of Elphin- 

^ stone's History of India, 3rd Khanda. 

2. Youth's Book of Natural Theology. 

3. Dnyaneshwari. Chap. I. to IX. 

4. Moropant.— Vana Parva. 

In Gvjerdtl. 

1. Vishwanath Narayan's Translation of Elphin- 

stone's History of India, 3rd Khanda. 

2. Youth's Book of Natural Theology. 



SUBJECTS FOR EXAMINATION. 23 

3. Samaldas — Bavas Kasturi. 

4. Kavya Dohan. Page 250 to the end* 

In Canarese. 

1. Katlia Manjari. 

2. The Seventy Stories. 

3. Ravan Dig-Vij. 

4. Chambassapa Purana, Cantos 7 to 10. 

In Hindustani. 

1 . Bagh-o-Bahfir. 

2. Akhalak-i-Hindi. 

3. Masnavi. By Mir Hasan. 

4. Divan-i-Nasikh. 

In Persian* 

1. Ferishtah — History of the Emperor Babar. 

2. FiRDAUSi — Shah Namah, Book 1, 

3. Sa'adi — GuUstan, Book I. 

4. Divan-i-Hafiz. 



Books for Honours and M. A. in Languages, 
November 1865, 

In English, 

1. Sir T. Browne — Religio Medici, 

2. Boswell — Life of Johnson. 

3. Chaucer — Prologue to Canterbury Tales, and 

Clerk's and Man-of-Law's Prologue and Tale. 

4. Shakespeare — Troilus and Cressida, Winter's 

Tale, and Midsummer Night's Dream. 

In Sanskrit, 

1. Panini^ — Grammatical Sutras, 2nd to 5th in- 
clusive. 



X- 



24 SUBJECTS FOR EXAMINATION. 

2. Commentary of Shankara Acliarya on the fol- 

lowing Upani shads- 

3. The Isha, Kena and Katha Upanishads. 

4. Rig Veda Sanhita, 3rd Mandala. 

In Greek. 

1. Thucydtdes — Book!. 

2. Demosthenes — De Corona. 

3. Homer — Odyssey, Books I. to VI. 

4. iEscHYLUS — Agamemnon. 

In Latin* 

1. Tacitus — Histories* 

2. Cicero— Letters to Atticus, Books XIV. to XVI. 

3. Virgil — Georgics, Books III., IV. 

4. Horace — Satires- 



9 



In Hebrew* 



1. Deuteronomy. 



Daniel, including the Chaldee passages. 

3. Isaiah, Chapters" XL to LXIV. 

4. Lamentations of Jeremiah. 

In Arabic* 

1. Makamat-al-Hariri. Pages 100 to 200. 

2. Alf Laila wa Laila. Nights 17 to 40. 

3. Koran. Five Chapters. 

4. Poems of Amru and Havetti. 



Period for Honours and M.A. in History, 

November 1865, 

The 18th Century. 



LIST OF BOOKS FOR A CYCLE OF 
FIVE YEARS 

I. ENGLISH. 

FOR THE FIRST EXAMINATION IN ARTS. 

A. (1866-67.) 

1. Johnson — Life of Addison. 

2. Sir Walter Scott — Kenilvvorth. 

3. Milton — Paradise Lost, Bk. L 

4. Gray — Posms. 

B. (1867-68.) 

1. Johnson — Life of Dryden. 

2. Sir Walter Scott — Quentin Duiward. 

3. Milton — Paradise Lost, Bk. IL 

4. Sir Walter Scott — Lady of the Lake. Bool 

I.— IIL 

C. (1868-69.) 

1. Johnson — Life of Swift and Pope. 

2. Sir Walter Scott — Ivanhoe. 

3. Milton — Paradise Lost, Bk. llL 

4. Cowper — Retirement. 

B. (1869-70.) 

1. Johnson — Life of Cowley. 

2. Sir Walter Scott— The Talisman. 

3. Milton — Paradise Regained, Bks. L, IL 

4. Byron— Childe Harold's l^ilm-ima^e. Cantos 

III., IV. 

E. (1870-7!.) 

1. Johnson — Lives of Milton and Gray. 

2. Sir Walter Scott — Woodstock. 
3 c 



26 NOTIFICATIONS. 

3. Milton — Paradise Regained, Bks. Ill . iV 

4. Thomson — Seasons. 



FOR the B. a. examination. 

A. (1866-67.) 

1. Bacon — Essays. 

2. Friends in Council — 1st Series, 1st Vol. 

3. Shakespeare — Antony and Cleopatra. 

4. Wordsworth — The Prelude. 

B. (1867-68.) 

1 . Bacon — Advancement of Learning. 

2. Lamb — Essays of Elia. 

3. Shakespeare — Othello. 

4. Southey — Thalaba. 

C. (1868-69.) 

1. Bacon — Essays. 

2. Arnold — Lectures on Modern History. 

3. Shakespeare — King Lear. 

4. Wordsworth — The Prelude. 

D. (1869-70.) 

1 . Bacon — Advancement of Learning. 

2. Fiiends in Council, 1st Series, Ut V^ol. 

3. Shakespeare — Macbeth. 

4. Tennyson — The Princess. 

E. (1870-71.) 

1. Hooker — Ecclesiastical Polity, Hook I. 

2. Washington Irving — Sketch Book. 

3. Shakespeare — Hamlet. 

4. W'ordsworth — The Excursion. 



LIST OF BOOKS FOR A CYCLE OF FIVE YEARS. 27 
FOR HONOURS AND M. A. 

A. (1866.) 

1. Burke — Speeches. 

2. Locke — On Toleration. 

3. Chaucer — Canterbury Pilgrims. 

4. Shakespeare — Henry IV. and V. 

B. (1867.) 

1. Addison — Papers in the " Spectator." 

2. Hobbes — Leviathan. 

3. Chaucer — Canterbury Pilgrims. 

4. Shakespeare — King John, Richard II., Ri- 

chard IH. 

C. (1868.) 

L Milton — Areopagitica. 

2. DuGALD Stewart — Lives of Smith, Robertson, 

and Reid. 

3. CnAucER^-Canterbury Pilgrims. 

4. Shakespeare — Julius Caesar, Coriolanus, Troi- 

lus and Cressida. 

D. (1869.) 

1. Locke — On the Human Understanding. 

2. RusKiN — Lectures on Architecture, Painting, 

and Sculpture. 

3. Chaucer — Canterbury Pilgrims. 

4. Shakespeare — Winter's Tale, Twelfth Night, 

As you like it, Midsummer's Nights* Dream. 

E. (1870.) 

1 . Coleridge— Aids to Reflection. 

2. Burke — On the Sublime and Beautiful, Reflec- 

tions on the French Revolution. 

3. Chaucer — Canterbury Pilgrims. 



28 NOTIFICATIONS. 

4. Shakespeare — Merchant of Venice, Taming of 
the Shrew, Measure for Measure, Much Ado 
about Nothing^. 



II.— SANSKRIT. 

FOR THE FIRST EXAMINATION IN ARTS. 

N. B. The 'Prakrit pubsages will not be examined in. 

A. (186667.) 

o' J Kalidasa — Shakuntala, I. — IV. 

3. Kalidasa — Raghuvamsha, II. — V. 

4. Panchatantra — First Tantra. 

B. (1867-68.) 

^" > Kalidasa — Shakuntala, V. — VI I . 

3. Kalidasa — Raghuvamsha, VI. — XI. 

4. Panchatantra — Second and Third Tantras. 

C. (1868-69.) 
^* > Kalidasa — Vikramovasiu. 

3. Bhartrihari — Nitishataka. 

4. Panchatantra — Fourth and Fifth Tantras. 

D. (1869-78) 

o' ^ Kalidasa — Malavikagnimitra. 

3. Bhartrihari — Vairagyashataka. 

4. Hitopadesha. — I., II. 

E. (1870-71) 
2* V Nagananda. 

3. Kalidasa — Nalodaya. 

4. Hitopadesha— III., IV. 



LIST OP BOOKS FOR A CYCLE OF FIVE YEARS. 
FOR THE B. A. EXAMINATION. 

A. (1866-67.) 

2 I VisHAKHADATTA — Mudrarakshasa. 

3. Kalidasa — Meghaduta. 

4. Dandi — Dashakuoiaracharita, First half. 

B. (1867-68.) 

^' i Bhavabhuti — Uttararamacharitra. 

3. Kalidasa — Ritusafhhara. 

4. Dandi— Dashakumaracharita, Second half. 

C. (1868-69.) 

1. Harsh A — Ratnavali. 

2. Valmike — Ramayana, Ayodhyakhanda. 

3. Harsha — Naishadhiya. 

4. Tarkasaihgraha. 

D. (1869-70.) 

^' i Bhavabhuti — Malatimadhava. 

3. Kalidasa — Kumarasambhava, I — VII. 

4. Bana Bhatta — Kadambari, Frist half. 

E. (1870-71) 

^* i Venisainhara. 

3. Kalidasa. — Kumarasambhava, IX. — XVII. 

4. Bana Bhatta— Kadambari, Second half. 



FOR HONOURS AND M. A. 

A. (1866.) 

1. Rigveda, 1 Ashtaka, 1—120 Suktas. 

2 > 

^* J Krishna Mishra— Prabodhachandrodaya» 

4. Gautama Sutra. 
3 c* 



30 NOTIFICATIONS. 

B. (1867.) 

1. Rigveda, 1 Ashtaka, 121—192 Suktas, and 

Mandala II. 

2. Kavikarnapura. — Chaitanya Chandrodaya. 

3. SuBANDHu — Vasavadatta. 

4. Vedanta Sutra and Sharirakabhashya, I., II. 

C (1868.) 

1. Rigveda, Mandalas III., IV. 

2. Bhagavadgita. 

3. Vedantasutra, III., IV. 

4. jNyayakusumanjali. 

D. (1869.) 

1. Rigveda, Mandalas V., VI. 

2. Mallinatha. — Kirtarjuniya. 

3. Panini, I. — IV (To be studied with regard to the 

system of Hindu Grammar.) 

4. VoPADEVA — Bhagavata, V. and XI. Skandas. 

E (1870.) 

1. Rigveda, Mandalas VII., VIII. 

2. Magha — Shishupalavadha. 

3. Panini, V. — VIII. (To be studied with regard to 

the system of Hindu Grammar.) 

4. Madhavacharya — Sarvadarshana Sangraha. 



III.— GREEK. 

FOR THE FIRST EXAMINATION IN ARTS. 

1. Xenophon — Cyropaedeia, Bks. I., II. 

2. Herodotus — Bk. I. 

3. Homer— Iliad, Bk. IV. 

4. Euripides — Hecuba. 



LIST OF BOOKS FOR A CYCLE OF FIVE YEARS. 31 



FOR THE B. A. EXAMINATION. 



1. Xenophon — Anabasis, Bk. IT. 

2. Herodotus — Bk. I. 

3. HoMER—Iliad, Bk. I. 

4,^ Sophocles — OEdipus Rex. 



FOR HONOURS AND M. A. 

1. Thucydides — Bk. I. 

2. Demosthenes — De Corona. 

3. Homer — Odyssey, Bks. I. to VI. 

4. ^schylus — Agamemnon. 



IV.— LATIN. 

for the first examination in arts. 

A. (1866-67-) 

1 . CiESAR— De Bello Gallico, Bk. I. 

2. Cicero — Pro Muren^. 

3. ViRGiL—^neid, Bk. I. 

4. Ovid— Fasti, Bk. I. 

B. (1867-68.) 

1 . C^sAR— De Bello Gallico, Bk. II. 

2. Cicero — Pro Archia. 

3. Virgil— ^neid, Bk. IL 

4. Ovid— Fasti, Bk. 11. 

C. (1868-69.) 

1. CiESAR— De Bello Gallico, Bk. III. 

2. Cicero — Pro Lege Manilia. 

3. Virgil— TEneid, Bk. III. 

4. Ovid— Fasti, Bk. IIL 



32 NOTIFICATIONS. 

B. (1869-70.) 

1. C^sAR—De Bello Gallico, Bk. IV. 

2. Cicero — In Catalinam, I., II. 

3. Virgil— iEneid, Bk. IV. 

4. Ovid— Fasti, Bk. IV. 

E. (1870-71.) 

1. C^SAR— De Bello Gallico, Bk. V. 

2. Cicero — In Catalinam, III., IV. 

3. Virgil— iEneid, Bk. V. 

4. Ovid— Fasti, Bk. V. 



FOR THE B. A. EXAMINATION- 

A. (1866-67.) 

1. Livy— Bk. I. 

2. Cicero — De Officiis. 

3. Horace— Satires. 

4. Virgil — Eclogues. 

B. (1867-68.) 

1. Livy— Bk. 11. 

2. Cicero — Tusculanae Disputationes. 

3. Horace— Odes, Bks. HI, IV. 

4. Virgil— Georgics, I., II. 

C. (1868-69.) 

1. Livy— Bk. III. 

2. Cicero— De Finibus Bonorum et Malorum. 

3. Horace — Odes, Bks. I., II. 

4. Virgil— Georgics, HI., IV. 



LIST OF BOOKS FOR A CYCLE OF FIVE YEARS. 33 

D. (1869-70.) 

1. LivY— Bk. IV. 

2. Cicero — De Natura Deomm. 

3. Horace — Epistles. 

4. Catullus. 

E. (1870-71.) 

1. LivY— Bk. V. 

2. Cicero — De Oratore. 

3. Horace — Epodes, Carmen Seculare, and Ais 

Poetica. 

4. TiBULLUS. 



FOR HONOURS AND M, A. 

A. (1866) 

1. Tacitus — Annals, Bks. I. — VI. 

2. Cicero — Epistolee ad Atticum, Bks. I. — III. 

3. Plautus — Trinumnus. 

4. Lucretius, Bks. I., II. 

B. (1867) 

1 . Tacitus— Annals, Bks. XL XVL 

2. Cicero — Epistolae ad Atticum, Bks. IV. — VI. 

3. Plautus — Bacchse. 

4. Lucretius — Bks. IV., V. 

D. (1868.) 

1. Tacitus — Annals, Bks. I.— VI. 

2. Cicero — Epistolsead Atticum, Bks. VII. — IX. 

3. Terence — Andria. 

4. Juvenal— Satires, I., III., IV., V., VII. 



34 NOTIFICATIONS. 

D. (1869.) 

1. Tacitus— Annals, Bks. XL— XVI. 

2. Cicero EpistolaB ad Atticum, Bks. X — XII. 

3. Terence — Heautontiraorumenus. 

4. Juvenal— Satires, Vlll., X., XIL, XIII., XIV. 

E. (1870.) 

1. Tacitus — Histories. 

2. Cicero— Epistolae ad Atticum, Bks. XI II.— 

XVI. 

3. Terence — Eunuchus. 

4. Persius. 



9 



v.— HEBREW. 

FOR THE FIRST EXAMINATION IN ARTS- 

1. Genesis — Chaps. I. — X. 

2. Esther. 

3. Psalms— I.— XXX. 

4. Job— Chaps. I — V. 



FOR THE B. A. EXAMINATION. 

1 . Genesis. 

2. Ruth. 

3. Psalms— XXXI.— LXXX. 

4. Job— Chaps, VI— X. 



FOR HONOURS AND M. A. 

1. Deuteronomy. 

2. Daniel, including the Chaldee passages. 

3. Isaiah— Chaps. XL.— LXIV. 

4. Lamentations of Jeremiah. 



LIST OF BOOKS FOR A CYCLR OF FIVE YEARS. 3.^ 

VI.— ARABIC. 
FOR THE FIRST EXAMINATION IN ARTS. 

1. Makamat-al-Hariri. First 5 J pagen. 

2. Alf Ivdila vva Laila. 25 pages of Cairo edition. 

3. Tarikh Yamini. 

4. Poem of Antara in the Mu'allakat. 



FOR THE B. A. EXAMINATION. 



1. Makamat-al-Harri. Pages 51—100. 

2. Alf Laik wa Laila. Pages 26—100. 

3. Sharistani. First 50 pages. 

4. Poem of Tarafa. 



FOR HONOURS AND M. A. 

1. Makamat-al-Hariri. Pages 101—200. 

2. Alf Laila wa Laila. Nights 17 to 40. 

3. Koran. Five Chapters. 

4. Poems of Aniru and Hareth. 



VII.— PORTUGUESE. 
FOR THE FIRST EXAMINATION IN ARTS. 

1. Life of Francisco de Laval. Part I (printed at 

Goa). 

2. De i^RROs — History, Bk. II. 

3. Camoes — Lusiados. First half. 

4. De Matos — Tragedies. Penelope. 



FOR THE B. A. EXAMINATION. 

1. LifeofJoao de Castro. 

2. De Barros — History. 

3. De Matos — Tragedies. Viriacia. 

4. Camoes — Lusiados. Second half. 



36 NOTIFICATIONS. 

VIII.-MARATHr. 

FOR THE FIRST EXAMINATION IN ARTS. 

For those only who have matriculaied before the 

close o/1863. 

(1866-67.) 

1. Kavi Charitra. Second half. 

2. Kavmchen Varnana, as in Navanita. 

'S. Dnyanoba and Namadeva, as in Navanita. 
A. Mahipati — Bhakta Vijaya, Adli. I VIII. 



FOR THE B. A. EXAMINATION. 

For those onhj who have matriculated before the 

close of 1863. 

(1866-67.) 

1. Klphinstone's History of India, by Wishwanath 

Nanivan Mandalik, Vol. II., pp, 1—295. 

2. Vidya Uddesh Labha ani Santosh.* 

3. MuKTESHVAR — Adi Parva, VII.— X. 

4. MowoPANT — Udyoga Parva, X— XIV. 



IX.— GUJARATI. 

FOR THE FIST EXAMINATION IN ARTS. 

For those only ivhn have matriculated before the 

close of 1863. 

(1866-67.) 

1. Elphinstone's History of India, by Visbwanath 

rs'arayan Mandalik, Kbandas I., U. 

2. Alankura F^-avesha. 

3. Kavya Dobana, pp. 1 — 77. 

4. Nalakhayana, pp. 51. 



LIST OF BOOKS FOR A CYCLE OF FIVE YEARS. 37 

FOR THE B. A. EXAMINATION. 

For those only who have matriculated before the 
close of \S63. 

(1866-67.) 

1. Shristijanya Ishvari Jnyan. 

2. Hhuta Nibandh. 

3. Kavya Dohana, pp. 177 — 250. 

4. Samaldas — Vikrama Charitra. 



X.— CANARESE. 

FOR THE FIRST EXAMINxiTION IN ARTS AND 
FOR B. A. 

J. Katha Manjari. 

2. The Seventy Stories. 

3. Ravan Dig-Vij. 

4. Chambassapa Parana, Cantos 7 to 10. 



XL— HINDUSTiiNI. 

M)R THE FIRST EXAMINATION IN ARTS AND 
FOR B. A. 

For those only who matriculated hefore the 
close o/1863. 

(1866-67.) 

1 . Bagh-o-Bahar. First half. 

2. Aklialak-i-Hindi. First half. 

3. Masnavi. By Mir Hasan. First half. 
I, Divan-i-Nasikh. First half. 

4 c 



38 NOTIFICATION'S. 

XIL— PERSIAN. 

FOR THE FIRST EXAMINATION IN ARTS AND 
FOR B. A. 

h Ferishtah — History of the Emperor Babar 

2. FiRDAusi — Shah Namah, Book I. 

3. . Sa'adi— Gulistan, Book I. 

4. Divan-i-Hafiz. 30 Das:es. 



PERIODS OF HISTORY FOR A CYCLE OF FIVE 
YEARS. 

FOR THE FIRST EXAMINATION IN ARTS. 

A. (1866-67.) 

1. Punic Wars. 

2. Reign of Elizabeth. 

B. (1867-68.) 

1. Grecian History to 431 b.c. 

2. The Saracens. • (The period embraced in the 

History by Ockley, a.d. 632 to a.d. 705.) 

C. (1868-69.) 

1. Roman History to the end of the Pyrrhic War. 

2. Em-ope, from 1789 to 1815. 

D. (1869-70.) 

1. Peloponnesian War. 

2. History of England, from the Accession of 

Charles I. to the landing of Charles II. in 
England. 



PERIODS OF HISTORY — BOOKS IN LAW. 39 

E. (1870-71). 

1 . Rome, from the death of Hannibal to the death 

of Antony. 

2. Reign of Charles V. ' 



HONOURS AND M. A. 

A. (1866.) 
Europe in the Middle Ages. 

B. (1867.) 
England, to the death of Richard IIL 

C. (1868.) 
Europe, from 1688 to 1789. 

D. (1869.) 
England, from Henry VII. to William ill. 

E. (1870.) 
Europe in the 16th Century. 



BOOKS RECOMMENDED IN LAW. 
I. FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF LAWS. 

1. The Institutes of Justinian; with introduction^ 

and Notes by Sandars ; omitting Bk. III.., 
tit. I. -XII. 

2. Broom's Commentaries on the Common Law,. 

Bk. I. Chaps. 1—3 ; and Bks. II., III. 

3. Joshua Williams on Personal Property. 



40 NOTIFICATIONS. 

4. Smith's Lectures on Contracts. 

5. Smith's Manual of Equity Jurisprudence. 

6. The Indian Penal Code. 

7. The Code of Civil Procedure. 

8. The Code of Criminal Procedure. 

9. Sir T. Strange's Hindu Law. 

10. Macnagh ten's Mahomedan Law. 

11. Goodeve on Evidence. 



11. ADDITIONAL FOR HONOURS IN SUBJECTS (a> 

1. Williams on Real Property. 

2. Addison on Contracts. 

3. Addison on Torts. 

4. Smith on IVfercantile Law. 

5. Best on Evidence. 



ADDITIONAL FOR HONOURS IN SUBJECT (b). 

1. Austin's Lectures in Jurisprudence, Vol. L Out- 

line of Course of Lectures. 

2. Bowyer's Commentaries on the Modern Civil 

Law. 

3. Maine's Ancient Law. 

4. Story's Conflict of Laws. 

5. Wheaton's International Law. 



ACADEMIC COSTUME. 

i. Academic Costume will be worn at Convoca- 
tions for confemno- Deorees. 

2. Such of the Fellows of the University of Bombay 
>as are Graduates of other Universities, or as are 
entitled to wear Official*' costume or uniform, may 
appear in the academic dress of their own Univer- 
'sities or in such costume or uniform., wearing in 
.addition the Fellow's Scarf of the University of 
Bombay. 

3. Other Fellaws \will wear the Fellow's Gown 
and Scarf of the University of Bombay. 

4. Fellows may purchase Gavms and Scarfs or 
Scarfs only (as the case may be), at the prices they 
;have cost the University (viz. Rs. 70 for a gown and 
lis. 20 for a scarf), 

5. By contributing to the Robe Fund Rs. 25, a 
Fellow will be entitled to the use of a Gown and 
Scarf at all University Meetings at which such may 
be worn.,- or by contributing Rs. 10, to the use of a 
Scarf on all such occasions. 

6. Graduates or Candidates for Degrees <may 
purchase Gov/ns at the prices they have cost the 
University (viz. Rs. 70). 

7. By contributing Rs. 10 to the Robe Fund, a 
Graduate will be entitled to the use of a Gown of any 
one degree at all University Meetings at which such 
may be worn (including the occasion of his taking his 

* Ex. Gr. Judges, Bishops, Barristers, Military and Navati 
vOffieers, &c. 

4 c* 



42 ACACEMiC COSTUME^ 

degree). A fresh charge of Rs. 10 to be paid, should 
the Graduate inquire the Gown of another degree. 

<S. Fellows, and Graduates, and Candidates for 
Degrees, intending to be present at a Convocation 
for conferring degrees, are requested to apply to the 
Registrar, as early as possible beforehand, for a Gown 
and Scarf, or Gown, or Scarf merely, as they may 
require ; and at the same time to forwaixl to him the 
necessary payment,* according as they wish to pur- 
chase such, or to become Contributors to the Robe 
Fund. 

* Memo. 

Cost of a Fellow's or Graduate^s Gown . . , . Rs. 70 

Cost of Scarf „ "20 

For use of a Fellow's Gown and Scarf at all 
University Meetings at which such may be 

■worn „ "25 

For use of Scarf only at ditto >, 10 

For use of a Graduate's Gown at ditto .. ,, 10 



iir 



ACT OF INCORPORATION. 

Act No. XXIL of 1857. 
Passed by the Legislative Council of India. 

{Received the Assent of the Governaur General on 
the ]SthJubj 1857.) 



A N Act to establish and incorporate a Universi:y 
at Bombay, 

Whereas for the better f^ncourageraent of Her 
Majesty's .subjects of all classes 
and denominations within the Pre- 
:4dency of Bombay and other parts of India in the 
])ursuit of a regular and liberal course of education, 
it has been determined to establish a University at 
Bombay for the purpose of ascertaining, by means of 
examination, the persons who have acquired profi- 



44 ACT OF mCORPOHATlO?;. 

ciency in different branches of Literature, Science, 
and Art, and of rewarding them by Academical 
Degrees as evidence of their re9,pective attainments, 
and marks of honour proportioned thereunto ; and 
whereas, for effectuating the purposes aforesaid, it is 
expedient that such University should be incorporat- 
ed ; It is enacted as followns : (that is to say) — 

J ^. I. The folio vvino' persons, namely. 

Incorporation. m o • i ^ ij* ^ i i t ' 

Ine Uight Honourable John, 

Lord Elpiijnstone, Governour of Bombay, 

The Honourable Sir Wililiam YARoaLEy, Knioht, 
Chief Justice of the Suprc^ie Court of Judicature 
at Bombay, 

The Right Reverend John Harding., Doctor of 
Divinity, Bishop of Bombay, JEx-offioio^ 

The Honourable Sir Henry Someuset, Lieutenant- 
General, Kniiiht Companion of the Most Honour- 
able Order of the Bath, Commander-^in-Chief of 
the Forces in Bombay, jEr-o/'^cio, 

The Honourable James Grant Lumsden, Member 
of the Council of Bombay, Ex-officiOf 

The Honourable Arthur Malet, M^ember of the 
Council of Bombay, Ex-officw, 

Edward Irvine Howard, Esquire, Director of 
Public Instruction, Ex-officio, 

Robert Haines, Esquire, M. B., Acting Educa- 
tional Inspector, Presidency Division, Ex-officio^ 

C. jMorehead, lisquire, M. D., Principal of the 
Grant Medical 'College, Ex-officio, 

John Harkness, Esquire, LL. D., Principal of the 
Elphinstone College, Ex-officio , 

The Reverend James McDougall, Acting Principal 
of the Poona College, Ex-ojficio, 

Philip William LeGeyt, Esquire, Member of the 
Legislative Council of India, 

TJie Honourable Sir Mathew Richard Saus&e, 



ACT OF INCORPORATION. 45 

Kniolit, Puisne Judge of the Supreme Court of 
Judicature at Bombay, 

Sir Jamsetjee Jejeebhoy, Knight, 

Metcalf Lakken, Esquire, Judge of the Sudder 
Court in Bombay, and President of the late Board 
of Education, 

JuGONNATH SuNKERSETT, Esquire, Member of the 
late Board of Education, 

BoMANjEE HoRMusjEE, Esquire, Member of the late 
Board of Education, 

Bhao Dajee, Esquire, Graduate of the Grant Medi- 
cal Colleoe, Member of the late Board of Education, 

Matthew Stovell, Esquire, Surgeon in the Bombay 
Army, Secretary to the late Board of Education. 

Claudius James Erskine, Esquire, Civil Service, 
late Director of Public Instruction, 

William Edward Frere, Esquire, Member of the 
Royal Asiatic Society, and President of tl^e Bom- 
bay Branch of the Royal Asiatic Society, Judge 
of the Sudder Court in Bombay, 

Major General Charles Waddington, Companion 
of the Most Honourable Order of the Bath, Chief 
Engineer of Public Works, 

The Reverend John Wilson, Doctor of Divinity, Fel- 
low of the Royal Society, Honorary President of 
the Bombay Branch of the Royal Asiatic Society, 

The Reverend Philip Anderson, Master of Arts, 
Chaplain on the Bombay Establishment, 

Henry Bartle Edward Frere, Esquire, Commis- 
sioner in Sind, 

Lieutenant Edward Frederick Tierney Fergus- 
son, Indian Navy, 

Mahomed Yusoof Moorgay, Cazee of Bombay, 

James John Berkley, Esquire, Fellow of the Geo- 
graphical Society, M.I C.E., President of the 
Bombay Mechanics' Institution, and Chief Resi- 



46 ACT OF INCORPORATION. 

deiit Engineer of the Great Indian Peninsula 
Railway Company, 

Henry Lacon Anderson, Esquire, Secretary to Go* 
vernment. 

Being the first Chancellor, Vice-Chancellor and 
Fellows of the said University, and all the persons 
who may hereafter become or be appointed to 
be Chancellor, Vice Chancellor, or Fellows as 
hereinafter mentioned, so long as they shall con- 
tinue to be such Chancellor, Vice-Chancellor or 
Fellows, are hereby constituted and declared to 
be one Body Politic and Corporate by the name 
of the University of Bombay ; and such Body 
Politic shall by such name, have perpetual suc- 
cession, and shall have a common Seal, and by 
such name shall sue and be sued, implead and be 
impleaded, and answer and be answered unto, in 
every .Court of Justice within the territories in the 
possession and under the Government of the East 
India Company. 

II. The said Body Corporate shall be able and 
^ , , , , capable in law to take, purchase, 

di';o:rot;™" Lt;' -d hdd any property, ..ovable 
or immovable, which may become 
vested in it for the purposes of the said University, 
by virtue of any purchase, grant, testamentary dispo- 
sition, or otherwise ; and shall be able and capable in 
law to grant, demise, alien, or otherwise dispose of 
all or any of the property, movable or immovable, 
belonging to the said University ; and also to do all 
other matters incidenttil or appertaining to a Body 
Corporate. 

III. The said Body Corporate shall consist of one 

Chancellor, one Vice-Chancellor^ 
Constitution of ^^^j ^^^^^ number of ex-officio and 
0} orpoiae. other Fellow^s as the Governour of 



ACT OF INCORPORATION. 4/ 

Bombay in Council hath already appointed, or shall 
from time to time, by any order published in the 
Bombay Gazette, hereafter appoint ; and the Chan- 
cellor, Vice-Cbancellor, and Fellows for the time 
being shall constitute the Senate 
Senate. ^^ ^^^ ^^-^ University. Provided, 

that if any person being Chancellor, Vice-Chancellor 
or Fellovv of the said University, shall leave India 

without the intention of returning 
Office vacated by ^i^^^eto, his office shall thereupon 
leaving India. , ' ^ ^ 

become vacant. 

IV. The Governour of Bombay for the time being 

shall be the Chancellor of the said 
Chancellor. University, and the first Chan- 

cellor shall be the Right Honourable John, Lori> 
Elphinstone. 

V. The first Vice -Chancellor of the said Universi- 
,,. ^, ,, try shall be Sir William Yardley 
\ ice-Chancellor. ^^^^^^^ .^j^^ ^^^^ of Vice-Chan- 

cellor shall be held for two years only; and the 
Vice-Chancellor hereinbefore nominated shall go out 
of Office on the First day of January 1859* When- 
ever a vacancy shall occur in the Office of Vice- 
Chancellor of the said University by death, resigna- 
tion, departure from India, effluxion of time, or 
otherwise, the Governour of Bombay in Council shall, 
by notification in the Bombay Gazette, nominate a fit 
and proper person, being one of the Fellows of the said 
University to be Vice-Chancellor in the room of the 
person occasioning such vacancy. Provided that, on 
any vacancy in the said Office which shall occur by 
effluxion of time, the Governour of Bombay in Council 
shall have power to re-appoint the Vice-Chancellor 
hereinbefore nominated, or any future Vice-Chancel- 
lor, to such Office, 



48 ACT OF INCORPORATIO?i. 

VI. The Chief Justice of Her Majesty's Supreme 
P ,, ^ Court of Judicature, the Bishop of 

Bombay, the Members of the 
Council of Bombay, the Director or Acting Director 
of Public Instruction, the Educational Inspector or 
Acting Educational Inspector of the Presidency Di- 
vision, the Principals and Acting Principals oi" Go- 
vernment Colleges, all for the time being, shall, while 
fining such Offices, be ex-officio Fellows of the said 
University. The whole number of the Fellows of the 
said University, exclusive of the Chancellor and Vice- 
Chancellor for the time being, shall never be less 
than twenty-six ; and whenever the number of the 
said Fellows, exclusive as aforesaid, shall, by death, 
resignation, departure from India, or otherwise, be 
reduced below twenty-six, the Governour of Bombay 
in Council ^\\d\\ forthwith^ by notification in the Bom- 
bay GasettCf nominate so many fit and proper persons 
to be Fellows of the said University as, with the 
Fellows of the said University, shall make the num- 
ber of such Fellows, exclusive as aforesaid, twenty- 
six. But nothing herein contained shall prevent the 
Governour of Bombay in Council from nominating 
more than twenty-six persons to be Fellows of the 
said University if he shall see fit. 

VII. The Governour of Bombay in Council may 

cancel the appointment of any 
The appointment person alreadv appointed or here- 
of a Fellow mav be i-. 4. u " • ; j -en c 
cancelled " ^^^^^ *^ "^ appomted a rellow or 

the University ; and as soon as 
such order is notified in the Gazette^ the person so 
appointed shall cease to be a Fellow. 

VIII. The Chancellor, Vice- Chancellor, and Fel- 

Chancellor, Vice- ^?^^ ^""^ ^^^ ^^^^^ ^^'^^g shall have 
Chancellor, and Fel- the entire management ot and 
lows, to superintend superintendence over the affairs, 



ACT OF INCORPORATION. 49 

the affairs of the concerns, and property of the said 
University. University ; and in all cases un- 

provided for by this Act, it shall 
be lawful for the Chancellor, Vice-Chancellor, and 
Fellows to act in such manner as shall appear to them 
best calculated to promote the purposes intended by 
the said University. The said Chancellor, Vice- 
„ . Chancellor, and Fellows shall have 

y - aws. |.^jj power from time to time to 

make and alter any bye-laws and regulations (so as 
the same be not repugnant to law, or to the general 
objects and provisions of this Act) touching the exa- 
mination for degrees and the granting of the same; 
and touching the examination for honours, and the 
granting of marks of honour for a higher proficiency in 
the difterent branches of Literature, Science, and Art ; 
and touching the qualifications of the candidates for 
degrees, and the previous course of instruction to be 
followed by them, and the preliminary examinations 
to be submitted to by them ; and touching the mode 
and time of convening the meetings of the Chancel- 
lor, Vice-Chancellor, and Fellows; and in general 
touching all other matters whatever regarding the 
said University. And all such bye-laws and regula- 
tions, when reduced into writing, and after the com- 
mon Seal of the said University shall have been 
affixed thereto, shall be binding upon all persons, 
members of the said University, and all candidates 
for degrees to be conferred by the same, provided 
such bye- laws and regulations shall have been first 
submitted to and shall have received the approval of 
the Governour of Bombay in Council. 

IX. All questions which shall come before the 

Chancellor, Vice-Chancellor, and 

^Seiate °^ ^^^ Fellows, shall be decided at a 

meeting of the Senate by the ma- 

5e 



50 ACT OF INCORPORATION. 

jority of the members present; and the Chairman at 
any such meeting shall have a vote, and in case of 
an equality of votes, a second or casting vote. No 
question shall be decided at any meeting, unless the 
Chancellor, or Vice-Chancellor, and five Fellows, or 
in the absence of the Chancellor and Vice-Chancellor 
unless six Fellows at the least shall be present at the 
time of the decision. At every meeting of the 
Senate, the Chancellor, or in his absence, the Vice- 
Chancellor, shall preside as Chairman ; and, in the 
absence of both, a Chairman shall be chosen by the 
Fellows present, or the major part of them. 

X. The said Chancellor, Vice-Chancellor, and 

Fellows for the time being shall 
Appointment and jj^yg f^n power from time "to time 

r:,Id Offiir"" *" '^PPO-'' -"d, as they shall see 
occasion, to remove all hxammers, 
Officers, and servants of the said University. 

XI. The said Chancellor, Vice-Chancellor, and 

Fellows, shall have power, after 
Power- to confer examination, to confer the several 
degrees. degrees of Bachelor of Arts, Mas- 

ter of Arts, Bachelor of Laws, Licentiate of Medicine, 
Doctor of M edicine, and Master of Civil Engineering ; 
they shall also have power, after examination, to confer 
upon the candidates for the said several degrees marks 
of honour for a hi^h degree of proficiency in the differ- 
ent branches of Literature, Science, and Art, according 
to rules to be determined by the bye-laws to be from 
time to time made by them under the power in that 
behalf given to them by this Act, 

XIL Except by special order ofthe Senate, no per- 
son shall be admitted as a candidate 
Qualification for £^j, ^j^g ^j^ ^^ ^f Bachelor of A rts, 

farerfoTdegrref " ^^ster of Arts, Bachelor of Laws, 
Licentiate of Medicine, Doctor of 



ACT OF INCORPORATrON. 51 

Medicine, or Master of Civil Engineering, unless he 
shall present to the said Chancellor, Vice-Chancellor, 
and Fellows, a certificate from one of the Institutions 
authorized in that behalf by the Governour of Bombay 
in Council, to the effect that he has completed the 
course of instruction prescribed by the Chancellor, 
Vice-Chancellor, and Fellows of the said University, 
in the bye-laws to be made by them under the power 
in that behalf given by this Act. 

XIII. The said Chancellor, Vice-Chancellor, and 

Fellows shall cause an examina- 
Examination for ^[^^ f^j. degrees to be held at least 
deerees. • ^ i 

* once in every year ; on every such 

examination the Candidates shall be examined either 
by examiners appointed for the purpose from among 
the Fellows by the said Chancellor, Vice-Chancellor, 
and Fellows, or by other examiners so to be appoint- 
ed ; and on every such examination the candidates, 
whether candidates for an ordinary degree or for a 
degree with honours, shall be examined on as many 
subjects, and in such manner as the said Chancellor, 
Vice-Chancellor, and Fellows shall appoint. 

XIV. At the conclusion of any examination of 

^ , - the candidates, the Examiners 

Grant of degrees. r n j i ^/ r 

^ shall declare the name of every 

candidate whom they shall have deemed entitled to 
any of the said degrees, and his proficiency in rela- 
tion to other candidates ; and also the honours which 
he may have gained in respect of his proficiency in 
that department of knowledge in which he is about 
to graduate; and he shall receive from the said 
Chancellor a certificate, under the seal of the said 
University of Bombay, and signed by the said Chan- 
cellor or Vice-Chancellor, in which the particulars so 
stated shall be declared. 



52 ACT FOR CONFERRING ADDITIONAL DEGREES. 

XV. The said Chancellor, Vice-Chancellor, and 
,, Fellows shall have power to charge 

such reasonable fees for the de- 
grees to be conferred by them, and upon admission 
into the said University, and for continuance therein, 
as they, with the approbation of the Governour of 
Bombay in Council, shall from time to time see fit to 

. , ^ impose, such fees shall be carried 

Annual accounts. ^ ^ '^ , ^ t? j r ^i. 

to one Oeneral r ee r una lor the 

payment of expenses of the said University, under 
the directions and regulations of the Governour of 
Bombay in Council, to whom the accounts of in- 
come and expenditure of the said University shall, 
once in every year, be submitted for such examina- 
tion and audit as the said Governour of Bombay in 
Council may direct. 



Act No. XLVII. of 1860. 

An Act for giving to the Universities of Calcutta^ 
Madras J and Bombag, the power of conferring De - 
grees in addition to those mentioned in Acts II, ^ 
XXII, and XXVII of 1857. 

Whereas it is expedient to give to the Universities 
of Calcutta, Madras, and Bombay, 
1 reamble. estabhshed under Acts II., XXIL, 

and XXVII. of 1857, the power of conferring De- 
grees other than the Degrees in that Act expressly 
provided for; It is enacted as follows : — 

I. It shall be competent to the Chancellor, Vice- 

Chancellor, and Fellows of the 

Power of Univer- Universities of Calcutta, Madras, 

sities to confer t> u i.- i * r 

Degrees. *^^' Bombay respectively, to confer 

such Degrees, and to grant such 



ACT FOR CONFERRING ADDITIONAL DEGREES. Oo 

Diplomas or Licences in respect of Degrees, as the 
said Chnncellor, Vice- Chancellor, and Fellows of any 
such University shall have appointed or shall appoint 
by any Bye-laws or Regulations made and passed, or 
to be made or passed, by them in the manner provided 
in the said Acts, and submitted to and approved by 
the Governour General in Council as far as regards 
the University of Calcutta, or by the Governour in 
Council of Madras or Bombay as regards the Univer- 
sities of Madras and Bombay respectively. 

II. All the provisions contained in the said Acts 
Construction. "•, XXII., and XXVIf. of 1857 

with respect to the Degrees there- 
in mentioned, and to the examinations for those 
Degrees, shall apply to any Degrees which may be 
(Conferred under this Act, and to the examinations for 
fjuch Degrees. 



6 c* 



IV. 



THE SENATE. 

1. The Senate shall meet ordinarily once a year, 
on the Third Monday in December, and at other 
times when convened by the Vice- Chancellor. 

2. A meeting of the Senate shall be convened on 
the requisition of any six of the Members. 

N.B. — Six Members of the Senate constitute a 
quorum ; and all questions are decided by a majority 
of the votes of the "Members present, the Chairman, 
when the numbers are equal, having a second or 
casting vote. (Act XXII. of 1857, Section IX.) 

THE FOUR FACULTIES. 

3. There shall be four Faculties, namely, Arts, 
Law, Medicine, and Civil Engineering. Every Mem- 
ber of the Senate shall be a Member of one Faculty 
at least, and any Member of the Senate may be a 
Member of more than one Faculty. 

4. The Faculties shall be appointed by the Senate 
at its Annual Meeting. 



THE SYNDICATE. 55 

5. Each Faculty shall elect its own Dean. Every 
Meeting of a Faculty shall be convened by its Dean ; 
or in his absence, by the Senior* Fellow belonging 
to that Faculty. 

6. Whenever the Office of Dean in any one of the 
Faculties may have remained vacant for one Calendar 
month, the Vice-Chancellor shall appoint a Dean 
from the Members of such Faculty. 

7. Three Members of any Faculty shall constitute 
a quorum of that Faculty. 

THE SYNDICATE. 

8. The Executive Government of the University 
shall be vested in a Syndicate, consisting of the Vice- 
Chancellor and seven of the Fellows, who shall be 
elected for one year by the several Faculties in the 
following proportion : — 

Three by the Faculty of Arts. 

Two „ „ Law. 

One „ „ Medicine. 

One „ „ Civil Engineering. 

9. It will be the duty of the Syndicate to appoint, 
and, if necessary, to remove the Examiners and all 
other Officers of the University, except the Registrar; 
to order Examinations in conformity with the Regu- 
lations; to grant Degrees, Honours, and Rewards ; 
to keep the Accounts of the University, and to cor- 
respond on the business of the University with the 
Government and all other authorities and persons ; 

* The ex-officio Fellows of the University are always the 
Senior Fellows in order of official precedence. The seniority 
of the other Fellows, mentioned in the Act of Incorporation, is 
according to the order in which their names appear there. The 
seniority of all other Fellows is according to the date and order 
of their appointment. 



56 THE SYNDICATE. 

and the Syndicate will, from time to time, frame such 
Bye-laws and Regulations as may be necessary, 
subject to the approval of the Senate. 

10. The election of Syndics shall take place with- 
in one month before the Annual Meeting of the 
Senate, and the names of the persons so elected shall 
be declared at that Meeting. 

11. The Syndicate shall meet ordinarily once a 
month, and at other times when convened by the 
Vice-Chancellor. 

12. On the temporary absence of a Syndic, the 
Faculty which he represents may elect one of its 
Members to officiate during such absence. 

13. By a temporary absence shall be understood 
an absence of not more than three months from the 
Town of Bombay. Any Syndic, who is absent from 
Bombay for a period of more than three months, or 
who leaves the Presidency of Bombay without giving 
notice to the Registrar of his intention to return 
within three months, shall be held to have perma- 
nently vacated his office. 

14. On a permanent vacancy in the Syndicate, the 
Faculty represented by the hte Syndic shall proceed 
to elect another for the remainder of the current year. 

15. In the event of any Faculty omitting to elect 
a Syndic under the preceding Bye-law within one 
Calendar month from the date of the vacancy, the 
Vice-Chancellor shall appoint one from among the 
Members of that Faculty. 

16. Four Syndics shall constitute a quorum, and 
all questions shall be decided by majority. 

17. The Vice-Chancellor, or, in his absence, the 
Senior Fellow present, shall preside at all Meetings 
of the Syndicate ; and if the votes, including that of 






THE REGISTRAR. ^ 57 




the President, are equally divided, t^'rresident shall 
have a casting vote. ;.v^ 

18. Duiing the year, betv^n the Annual M^t- 
ings of the Senate, the Syndicate may appoint any 
Member of the Senate to any one or more of the 
Faculties. 

19. Each Faculty shall report on any subject that 
may be referred to it by the Syndicate. 

20. Any Faculty, or any Member of the Senate, 
may make any recommendation to the Syndicate, and 
may propose any Bye-law or regulation for the con- 
sideration of the Syndicate. 

21. The decision of the Syndicate on any sucli 
recommendation may be brought before the Senate 
by any Member of the Senate at one of its Meetings, 
and the Senate may approve, revise, or modify, any 
such decision, or may direct the Syndicate to 
review it. 

22. No question shall be decided by the Senate 
that has not, in the first instance, been considered and 
decided by the Syndicate. 

THE REGISTRAR. 

23. The Registrar shall be appointed by the 
election of the Senate. The election shall be by 
means of ballot, and shall take place at the Annual 
Meeting of the Senate. The Registrar's term of 
office shall commence on the first day of January 
next following after such Annual Meeting of the 
Senate, and shall continue for two years only ; but 
the Registrar may be re-elected. If a vacancy 
should occur in the office of Registrar between two 
Annual Meetings of the Senate, the Syndicate shall 
appoint a person to officiate as Registrar until the 
next first day of January. 



58 BOARD OF ACCOUNTS. 

24. The Registrar shall be the Custodian of the 
Records, Library, Common Seal, and such other 
property of the University as the Syndicate shall 
commit to his charge. 

25. All Meetings of the Senate, the Syndicate, 
and the Faculties shall be convened through the 
Registrar, who shall keep a record of the proceedings 
of such Meetings. 

26. Leave of absence may be granted to the 
Registrar by the Syndicate for a period not exceeding 
three months. During the absence of the Registrar 
on leave, an Acting R egistrar may be appointed by 
the Syndicate; but if the Registrar shall be absent for 
a period of more than three months, his appointment 
shall become vacant. 

BOARD OF ACCOUNTS. 

27. A Board of Accounts, consisting of three 
Fellows of the University, not being members of the 
Syndicate, shall be appointed by the Senate at its 
Annual Meeting. The Vice-Chancellor and Regis- 
trar shall be ex-officio Chairman and Secretary of the 
Board. 

28. The Board shall meet ordinarily once every 
three months and at other times when convened by 
the Vice-Chancellor. 

29. The Board shall examine and audit the Uni- 
versity Accounts; prepare the University Budget, 
and the account of Endowment and Trust Funds ; 
consider ways and means ; and make recommenda- 
tions where necessary to the Syndicate. 

30. Members of the Board shall hold office for 
one year, from the 1st of January next after the 
Annual Meeting, at which they were appointed. 



UNIVERSITY TERMS. 59 

They shall be eligible for re-appointment at the ex- 
piration of their office. All vacancies in the Board 
occurring between two Annual Meetings of the Senate 
shall be temporarily filled up by persons appointed 
by the Syndicate. 

UNIVERSITY TERMS. 

31. The University year for the Faculty of Arts 
shall be divided into two Terms. The first Term shall 
commence on the second Monday in June, and shall 
end on the last Monday in September. The Second 
Term shall commence on the third Monday in No- 
vember, and shall end on the Third Monday in April, 

32. Terms can only be kept by matriculated 
students who shall attend for a prescribed number of 
days at one or more of the Colleges or Institutions 
recognized by the University. 

33. The following shall be the number of days' 
attendance necessary for keeping Terms: — For the 
First Term eighty days ; and for the Second Term 
ninety days. But if an Undergraduate shall, after 
his Matriculation, attend sixty days during that same 
Term in which he has matriculated, he shall be held 
to have kept that Term, 

34. The Principals and Heads of Colleges and 
Institutions will be requested to register the daily 
attendance of matriculated students, with a view to 
being able to certify their having kept Term. 

35. Days during which Undergraduates are en- 
gaged in University Examinations may count towards 
the keeping of their Terms. 

36. To keep term at a College or Recognized 
Institution, it is implied that an Undergraduate shall 
go through the full course of study at that College 
or Institution, and shall not at the same time be 



60 ENDOWMENTS. 

holding any appointment which, in the judgment of 
the Syndicate interferes with his position as a bond 
fide student. By this is not meant that a student 
may not also be employed for a short time in teach- 
ing in a Recognized Institution. 

ENDOWMENTS. 

37. An account of all Endowments and Trust 
Funds held by the University shall be pubhshed 
annually in the University Calendar. 



V. 

I. ARTS. 

MATRICULATION. 

1 . The^ Examination will be held once a year, 
commencing on the Third Monday in November, 

2. Examinations will be held at Bombay and 
any other place hereafter appointed by the Syndicate. 

3. Candidates for Matriculation must have com- 
pleted their sixteenth year. 

4. Candidates must forward an application to 
the Registrar two months before the Examination. 
( Vide Form A.) 

5. Two months before the commencement of the 
Examination, each Candidate must pay or cause to 
be paid to the Registrar at Bombay, or to such person 
as he may appoint in the Mofussil, a fee of Rupees 5, 
for which a receipt will be given. (Vide Form B.) 

6. Failure to pass the Examination will not dis- 
qualify the Candidates for again presentinsr himself at 
any subsequent Matriculation Examination on a new 
application being forwarded, and a fresh fee paid. 

7. Candidates will be examined in Languages, 
Mathematics, and General Knowledge. 

6 c • 



ti2 


REGULATIONS. 




I. Languages. — Three papers. 

1. English. 

2. One of the following : — 


Sanskrit. 
Greek. 
Latin. 
Hebrew. 


Arabic. 
Portuguese. 
Marathi. 
Gujarati. 


Canarese. 
Hindustani 
Persian. 
Sindhi. 



(Any other language ma)'^ at any time be added to this list by 
the Syndicate.) 

In English there will be one paper containing one or more 
passages for paraphrase, and questions in grammar, idiom, 
etymology and prosody. 

In the second Language there will be one paper containing 
prose passages for translation from English and into Engl ish, 
and one paper of questions in grammar, idiom, and etymology. 

Oral Examination in each Language : — 

The Candidate will be called upon to read and to explain 
extempore in English, a prose passage from a standard author 
to be selected by the Examiners. 

N.B. — It is essential that the Candidate should not know 
beforehand from what books he will have to read or translate. 

II. Mathematics. — Three papers. 

\st. — Arithmetic. The examples to be worked from first 
principles and not merely by rules. 

2nd. — Algebra, to Simple Equations inclusive. Problems 
will be set involving Simple Equations. 

'Srd. — First four books of Euclid with deductions. 

III. General Knowledge. — Two papers. 

1 St. — Elementary History and Geography. 
2nd. — Elementary knowledge of 

a. The mechanical powers. 

b. The laws of chemical combination, the chemistry of air 

and water, and the phenomena of combustion. 

c. The solar system. 

8. All answers in each branch must be given in 
Ens^lish, except when otherwise specified ; and Can- 



FIRST EXAMINATION IN ARTS. 63 

didates must write their papers in a plain, legible 
hand. 

9. Candidates must satisfy the Examiners in each 
branch of the Examination. 

10. On the morning of the Fourth Monday after 
the Examination, the Syndicate will publish a list of 
passed Candidates, arranged in alphabetical order. 

11. Each passed Candidate will receive a Certifi- 
cate signed by the Registrar. {Vide Form C) 

BACHELOR OF ARTS. 

12. Candidates for the Degree of Bachelor of Arts 
must have passed the Matriculation Examination, and 
will be required to pass two subsequent examinations, 
the one to be called the First Examination in Arts, 
and the other the Examination for the Degree of B. A. 

FIRST EXAMINATION IN ARTS. 

13. The First Examination in Arts will be held 
once a year in Bombay, commencing on the First 
Monday in December. 

Note. — Until 1865-66, the examination will commence, as 
under the former Regulations, in the third week in February. 

14. No Undergraduate will be admitted to this 
Examination unless he shall have kept four Terms ; 
and unless he produce satisfactory testimonials under 
Form D. 

K. B.—ln the case of persons who matriculated before 
November 1S63, it shall be held sufficient if they shall have 
kept three Terms; and tvventy-five days of the Term in which 
the Examination is to be held. 

15. Any Undergraduate of a University recogniz- 
ed by the University of Bombay may be admitted to 
this Examination, provided his testimonials of good 
conduct and length of study from his own University 
be satisfactory. 



64 REGULATIONS. 

16. Candidates must forward an application to the 
Registrar at least two months before the Examination. 
(Vide Form D.) 

17. Each applicant must pay a fee of Rupees 10, 
for which a receipt will be given. (Vide Form E.) 

18. The Examination will be conducted by means 
of printed questions, to be answered in English, ex- 
cept when otherwise specified. The Candidates will 
also be examined viva voce in Languages and Ma- 
thematics. 

19. Candidates will be examined in the following 
subjects : — 

I. Languages. 

n. Mathematics. 

III. Logic. 

IV. History. 

V, One of the following to be selected by 
the Candidate : 

A. Butler's Sermons L, IL, III., with 

Preface. 

B. Analytical Geometry of the Right 

Line and Circle by rectangular 
coordinates. 

C. Chemistry, Heat, and Electricity. 

I. Languages. — Four papers. 

1. English. 

2. One of the following : — 

Sanskrit. I Latin. I Arabic. 

Greek- | Hebrew. j 

N, B. — Persons who matriculated before the close of 1863 
may be examined in Portuguese, Marathi, Gujarati, Canarese, 
Hindustani or Sindhi. 



FIRST EXAMINATION IN ARTS. 65 

Candidates will be examined in two books of Prose and two 
of Poetry in each language. These books will be notified by 
the Syndicate two years before the Examination. 

In each language there will be two papers and a viva voce 
examination. Each paper on English will contain a passage to 
be paraphrased. The papers on the second language will 
contain passages for translation both out of that language into 
English and vice versa. The papers on each language will 
contain questions in grammar, idiom and etymology, as well as 
in the matter of the books taken up by the Candidates. 

II. Mathematics. — Two papers and viva voce, 

J / Arithmetic, with the nature and use of Logarithms. 
* \ Algebra, to Quadratic Equations inclusive. 

JEuchd, Books I. to VI., with deductions. 
Trigonometry, Solutions of Plane Triangles and expres- 
sions for the area. 

III. Logic. — One paper. 

Logic (in any ordinary Compendium). The Examination 
will comprise easy questions in Logical Analysis. 

IV. History. — One paper. 

1. Ancient History. 

2. Modern History. 

A definite period of each will be notified by the Syndicate two 
years before the Examination. 

V. One of the following to be selected by the 
Candidate : 

A. Butler's Sermons, I., II., TIL, with Preface. 

B. Analytical Geometry of the Right Line and Circle by 

rectangular coordinates. 

C. Chemistry, Heat, and Electricity. 
(a) Chemistry : — 

Matters : hypothesis of its ultimate composition. 
Material forms : solid, liquid, gaseous. 
Chemical affinity. 

The laws of combination by weight and volume. 
The atomic hypothesis of Dalton. 



6(5 REGULATIONS. 

ib)Heat:— 
The natural and artificial sources of heat. 
Expansion of solids, liquids, and gases. 
Thermometers and pyrometers. 
Conduction and convection. 

(c) Electricity: — 
Frictional and atmospheric electricity. 

20. On the morning of the Second Monday after 
the Examination, the Examiners will arrange in 
alphabetical order such of the Candidates as have 
passed. 

EXAMINATION FOR THE DEGREE OF B. A. 

21. The Examination for the Degree of Bachelor 
of Arts will be held annually at Bombay, commenc- 
ing on the Second Monday in December. 

Note. — Until 1866-67 the Examination will commence, as 
under the former Regulations, on the Third Monday in March. 

22. No undergraduate will be admitted to this 
Examination, unless he shall have kept six Terms in 
the University of Bombay ; and unless he produce 
satisfactory testimonials under Form F. 

N- E. — In the case of Persons who matriculated before 
November 1 863, it shall be held sufficient if they have kept 
fiVe Terms, and fifty days of the ^erm m which the Examination 
is to be held. 

23. Candidates must forward an application to 
the Registrar at least one month before the Exami- 
nation. {Vide Form ¥,) 

24. Each applicant must pay to the Registrar a 
fee of Rupees 20, for which a receipt will be given. 
(Vide Form G.) 

25. Failure to pass the Examination will not dis 
qualify the Candidate for presenting himself at an\ 
subsequent Examination for Bachelor of Arts, on a 



EXAMINATION FOR B. A. 07 

new application under Form F. being forwarded, and 
a fresh fee paid. 

26. The Examination will be conducted by means 
of printed questions, to be answered on paper in Eng- 
lish, except when otherwise specified. The Can- 
didate will also be examined viva voce in all subjects 
except Mathematics. 

27. Candidates will be examined in the following; 
subjects : •— 

I. Languages. 
II. Mathematics and Natural Philosophy. 
III., IV. and V. Three of the following, to be 
selected by the Candidate : — 

A. History. 

B. Loo:ic and Moral Philosophy. 

C. Political Economy. 

D. Dynamics and Hydrostatics. 

E. Optics and Astronomy. 

F. Analytical Geometry of two dimensions, 

G. Chemistry, Heat, and Electricity. 
H. Physiology, vegetable and animal. 

I. Languages. — Four papers. 

i. English 

2. One of the following : — 

Sanskrit. I Latin. I Arabic. 

Greek. j Hebrew. | 

Is . B. Persons who matriculated before the close of 1863, 
may be examined in Portuguese, Marathi, Gujarati Canarese, 
Hindustani, Persian or Sindhi. 

Candidates will be examined in four books (two Prose and 
two Poetry) in each language, notified by the Syndicate two 
years before the Examination. 

In each language there will be two papers and a viva voce 
examination. The papers on Enghsh will contain passages to 
be paraphrased. The papers on the second language will 



^38 REGULATIONS. 

contain passages for translation both out of that language into 
English and vice versd. The papers on each language will 
contain questions in grammar, idiom, and etymology, as well as 
in the matter of the books taken up by the Candidates. 

II. Mathematics and Natural Philosophy — 
Three Papers. 

1st. Arithmetic, from first principles, with the nature and 
use of Logarithms. 

Algebra, to Quadratic Equations inclusive, with Proportion 
and Variation, Permutations and Combinations, the Progres- 
sions, and the Binomial Theorem. 

2nd. Trigonometry, solution of plane triangles, with expres- 
sions, for the area. 

Conic Sections, geometrically. 

3rd. Euclid, the first six books, and the eleventh bcok to 
Prop. XXI., with deductions. 

Mechanics, Composition and Resolution of Forces, Centre of 
Gravit}-, and the Mechanical Powers. 

III., IV. and V. Three of the following subjects 
(Two papers in each and viva voce.) 

A. HlSTORV. 

Candidates will be required to take up two of the following 
subjects: — 

a. England: particularly the 16th, 17th, and 18th Centuries. 

h. India. 

c. Ancient History : particularly Greece, from the invasion by 
Darius to the death of Alexander; Rome, from the Gallic 
invasion to the death of Augustus; and the history of the Jews. 

The Examination will comprise questions on Geography, 
Physical as well as Political, connected with the subjects taken uj). 

B. Logic and Moral Philosophy. 

\st, — Logic (Whately, Thomson's Outlines of the Laws of 
Thought, Books I. and II., of Mill's Logic), with questions in 
Losical Analysis, 



EXAMINATION FOR B. A. 69 

2nd — Moral Philosophy. First Part of Butler's Analogy 
■with the Sermons and the Dissertation on the Nature of Virtue 

or (at the option of the Candidate), Whewell's Elements of 
Morality. 

C. Political Economy. 

Smith's Wealth of Nations ; 
J. S. Mill's Political Economy, Books, I., III. ; 
Application of the Science to the Economic History of 
England. 

D. Dynamics and Hydrostatics. 

a. Laws of Motion, Bodies falling in vacuo and down 

inclined planes. Circular and Parabolic Motions, the 

Pendulum, and Impact. 

h. Equilibrium of Liquids. Equilibrium of Gases under 

varying pressures and temperatures. Specific Gravity, 

The Hydrostatic Balance, Barometer, Suction-pump, 

Forcing-pump, Air-pump, Siphon, Hydraulic Press, and 

Steam-engine. 

E. Optics and Astronomy. 

a. Reflection and Refraction at plane and spherical surfaces. 
Dispersion of Light. The Rainbow. The Sextant, 
Lenses, the Telescopes, the Eye. 

h. Apparent Motions of the Heavenly Bodies. Instruments. 
Phenomena depending on change of place. Atmos- 
pheric Refraction. Comparison of Diameters of 
Earth, Sun, Moon, and Planets, Ptolemaic and Cop- 
ernican Systems. Eclipses. Sidereal, Solar, and Mean 
Time, Apparent Time, Latitude, Longitude, and 
Variation of the Compass. 

F. Analytical Geometry of two dimensions 
Chemistry, Heat, and Electricity. 

a. Matter: Hypothesis of its ultimate constitution. 

Material Forms. Solid, Liquid, Gaseous. 

Chemical Affinity. The Laws of Combination by weight and 
volume. The Atomic Hypothesis of Dalton. 

The Natural History of the following elements and com- 
pounds : — 



w 



70 REGULATIONS. 

Oxygen, Hydrogen, Nitrogen, Carbon; Water, Atmospheric 
Air; Olefiant and Light-Carburetted Hydrogen Gases. 

(Combustion, its nature and phenomena.) 

The Oxides of Nitrogen. 

Sulphur. Sulphuric Acid. Sulphuretted-Hydrogen. 

Phosphorus. Phosphoric Acid. 

Chlorine. Iodine. Bromine. Fluorine. 

The Constitution of Salts. Isomorphism. Crystallization. 

The Alkalies and Alkaline Earths, and the Earth Alumina. 

The Metals : Iron, Zinc, Tin, Copper, Lead, Arsenic, 
Mercury, Silver, Gold, Platinum. 

b. Heat : Natural and artificial sources. Expansion of 

Sohds, Liquids and Gases. Conduction and Convec- 
tion of Heat. Latent Heat. Specific Heat. Radiation. 
Equilibrium of Temperature. 

c. Electricity. Frictional, Atmospheric, Voltaic, Electro- 

Magnetism. Magneto-Electricity. Thermo-Electricity. 

H. Physiology, Vegetable and Animal. 

Cell-life. Vegetable Respiration. Assimilation and Cir- 
culation, Vegetable Embryology. Germination. Cir- 
culation of the blood. Respiration. Animal Heat. Di- 
gestion. Absorption. Secretion. Nervous Functions. 
Sight. Smell. Hearing. Taste. Reproduction. 

28. On the morning of the Second Monday after 
the commencement of the Examination, the Exa- 
miners will arrange in two divisions, each in alpha- 
betical order, such of the Candidates as have passed. 
Those placed in the first division will be permitted, 
subject to conditions hereafter specified, to compete 
for Honours. 

29. A certificate will be given to those who pass 
the Examination. {Vide Form H.) 

HONOURS. 

30. The Examinations for Honours and for the 
Degree of Master of Arts will be held in Bombay, 
commencing on the Third Monday in November. 



HONOURS IN ARTS. 71 

31. No one shall be examined for Honours after 
the twenty-third year of his age, or the fifth from 
his Matriculation. 

32. No candidate shall present himself more than 
once at the examination for Honours. 

33. Candidates must forward an application to the 
Registrar at least three months before the examina- 
tion. {Vide Form I.) 

34. The Examinations will comprise the following 
branches : — 

1 . Languages. 

II. History and Philosophy. 

III. Mathematics and Natural Philosophy. 

IV. Natural Sciences. 

I. Languages. — Six papers. 

Candidates must take up English, with one or more of the 
following : — Latin, Greek, Sanskrit, Arabic, and Hebrew. 

The subjects in each Language will be announced by the 
Syndicate two years before the Examination. 

The following papers will be set: — 

\st and 2nd. Questions on the English books taken up by 
the Candidate, including points of Scholarship, Comparative 
Philology, Criticism, and the History of Literature. 

3rd and 4th. Similar questions on the Latin, Greek, Sans- 
krit, Arabic, or Hebrew books taken up by the Candidate. 

oth. Translation from English into the second language, and 
cice versa. 

Gik. Original English composition in Prose and Verse. 

II. History and Philosophy. — Six papers. 

\st and 2nd. Questions on a period to be announced by the 
Syndicate two years before the examination, including Consti- 
tutional Law, Manners, Literature, Political Geography, and 
Ethnology. 

drd. Pohtics as a Science, includiog PoUtical Economy. 



72 REGULATIONS. 

4th. Logic, including the Philosophy of the Inctuctive 
Sciences. 

5th. The History of Greek Philosophy. 
(^th. The History of Modern Philosophy, from the time of 
Charlemagne to the end of the 18th Century. 

In lieu of the 5th and 6th papers, a Candidate nray bring up — 
(a.) Historical or external Evidences of Christianity. 
(6.) Moral or internal Evidences of Christianity. 

III. Mathematics and Natural Philosophy. — 
Six papers. 

Is/. Euclid and Geometric Conic Sections. 

2rtrf. Algebra and Trigonometry. 

3rd. Statics and Dynamics. 

4th. Hydrostatics and Optics. 

5th. Analytical Conies and Differential and Integral Calculus. 

6th. Newton's Principia, Book I. §§. I. to III., and Astronomy. 

IV. Natural Sciences. — Six papers. 

i Zoology, Comparative Anatomy, and Physiology. . 

a. < Botany and Vegetable Physiology. 
C Geology. 

i Light, Heat, and Electricity. 

b. < Chemistry, Inorganic and Organic. 

C Meteorology and Physical Geography. 
The Candidate will be required to select for examination one 
of the sub-sections a and 6, and to be acquainted with the 
history of the sciences, therein enumerated. 

35. There shall be three classes in Honours, and 
in the week followingtheExamination the Examiners 
shall publish the names of the successful Candidates, 
alphabetically arranged in the classes to which they 
may have been respectively assigned. 

36. In each branch of Honours, a gold medal 
with books worth Rs. 100, and a silver medal with 
books worth Rs. 100, will be awarded to two Students 
who may have exhibited such superior attainments as 



MASTER OF ARTS. 73 

to induce the Examiners to recommend them for this 
distinction. 

MASTER OF ARTS. 

37. Every successful Candidate for Honours will 
be entitled, as of course, on the expiration of five 
years from his Matriculation, to the Degree of Master 
of Arts. 

38. Any other person, being a Bachelor of Arts 
in the University of Bombay, may be admitted to the 
Examination for the Degree of Master of Arts, and 
should he pass the Examination, he will be admitted 
to the Degree of M.A., on the expiration of five years 
from the date of his Matriculation. 

39. Candidates must forward an application to 
the Registrar at least tlu^ee months before the Ex- 
amination. (Vide Form J.) 

40. A fee of Rupees 50 must be paid to the Re- 
gistrar, for which a receipt will be given. (Vide 
Form K.) 

41. Failure to pass the Examination wil! not dis- 
qualify the Candidate for presenting himself at any 
subsequent M.A. Examination, on a new application 
being forwarded, and a fresh fee paid. 

42. The Examination will be held at the same 
time, and will be in all respects the same as that for 
Honours, the standard for passing being that of the 
third class in Honours. 

43. A Certificate will be given to those who pass 
the Examination {Vide Form L,), and their names 
will be published by the Syndicate in alphabetical 
order. 



vc 



II LAW- 



BACHELOR OF LAWS. 

1 . The Examination for the Degree of Bachelor 
of Laws will be held annually at Bombay, commenc- 
ing on the First Monday in December. 

2. Candidates must be Bachelors of Arts of at 
least two years' standing in the University of Bom- 
bay, or some University recognised by it. 

3. Candidates must have studied for periods 
amounting to at least three years in some School of 
Law recognized by the University of Bombay. 

4. Application must be made to the Registrar one 
month before the Examination. (Vide Form M.) 

5. Each applicant must pay to the Registrar a fee 
of Rupees 25, for which a receipt will be given. 
{Vide FormN.) 

6. Failure to pass the Examination will not dis- 
qualify the Candidate for presenting himself at any 
subsequent Examination, on a new application being 
forwarded, and a fresh fee paid. 

7. The Examination will be conducted by means 
of printed papers. 

8. Candidates for the Degree of Bachelor of Laws 
will be examined in the following subjects : — 

I. The General Principles of Jurisprudence. 
II. The several systems of Municipal Law which 
obtain in Western India, as they concern — 

a. Personal rights and status. 

b. The rights of property, the modes of its acqui- 

sition, and herein the Law of Contracts and 
Laws of Succession, as well testamentary as 
ah intestato* 



HONOURS. 75 

c. The Sanctions of Law, and herein the General 
Principles of Procedure, the Law of Evi- 
dence, and the Criminal Law. 

9. There will be six papers, namely : — 

\st. — One paper on the general principles of Juris- 
prudence. 

2nd. — One paper on personal rights and status, 
and the infringement of such rights. 

2rd. — One paper on the rights of property and the 
infringement of them, the modes of its 
acquisition, and the Laws of Succession, 
as well testamentary as ah intestato* 

4:th. — One paper on the Law of Contracts. 

5th. — One paper on Procedure and the Law of 
Evidence. 

6th. — One paper on the Criminal Law. 

10. On the morning of the Second Monday after 
the commencement of the Examination the Exami- 
ners will arrange in two divisions, each in alphabe- 
tical order, the names of such of the Candidates as 
may have passed. 

11. A certificate will be given to those who pass 
the Examination. {Vide Form O.) 

HONOURS. 

L2. Any Candidate who has been placed in the 
first division will be allowed to compete for Honours. 

1 3. The Examination will commence on the morn- 
ing of the Third Monday after the commencement of 
the Examination for the Degree of Bachelor of Laws. 

1^. The Examination will be conducted by means 
of printed papers. 

15. Each Candidate for Honours will be examin- 
ed in one of the following subjects to be chosen by 
himself: — 



76 REGULATIONS. 

«. The Laws of all races administered by the High 

Court ill all its jurisdictions. 
h. Roman Civil Law and International Law. 

16. Papers will be set on the subject chosen by 
the Candidate.. 

17. The Examiners will publish in the ensuing 
week lists of the successful Candidates in two classes, 
the names in each class being arranged in alphabe- 
tical order. No Candidate shall be placed in the 
First Class unless the Examiners are of opinion that 
he has exhibited considerable original ability as well 
as great industry. 



77 



III MEDICINE. 



LICENTIATE OF MEDICINE- 

1. A Candidate for the Degree of Licentiate of 
Medicine must be a Bachelor of Arts of the Uni- 
versity of Bombay, or of some University recognized 
by it ; or he must have passed the Matriculation 
Examination of the University of Bombay. He 
must have been engaged during four years in pro- 
fessional study at a School of Medicine. 

N.B. — Candidates who passed the Entrance Examination of 
Grant Colles:e in or before April 1859, are allowed to count 
that exnmination as eqnivalent to the Matriculation Examination 
of the University for the Degree of Licentiate of Medicine. 

2. The Candidate will be required to pass two 
Examinations. 

First Examination. 

o. The First Examination will be held annually 
at Bombay, commencing on the First Monday in 
December. 

A. No Candidate shall be admitted to the Exa- 
mination unless he have produced Certificates to the 
following; effect : — 

«. Of having completed his nineteenth year. 

b. Of having been engaged in Medical studies 
for at least two Sessions of nine months each. 

c. Of having attended the following courses : — 

In Descriptive Anatomy./ ^ Courses, each of at least 70 

^ -^ ' Lectures. 

In Physiology and Ge-f 1 Course of at least 70 Lec- 
nerai Anatomy. X tures. 

7 c"^ 



78 REGULATIONS. 

r n\, • . S 2 Courses, each of at least 70 

In Chemistry J Lectnves. 

T -o , r 2 Courses, each of at least 40 

I°'*°'''"y i Lectures. 

In Materia Medica . . . . > ^ Courses.^ jach of at least 70 

In Practical Chemistry,"! 
including General and | 

Pharmaceutical Che- I 2 Courses of instruction, each 
mistry and the Detec- j of nine months, 

tion of the Adultera- j 
tion of Drugs. J 

In Practical Pharmacy,* 1 course of Instruction of at least 
four months ; producing a certificate of having acquired a 
practical knowledge of the preparation and compounding of 
Medicines. 
d. Of having been engaged in Dissection for two 
Seasons, in the course of which he must have dis- 
sected the whole human body twice. 

5. Candidates must ap[)ly to the Registrar one 
month before the Examination. {^Vide Form P.) 

6. Each applicant must pay to the Registrar a 
fee of Rupees 5, for which a receipt will be given. 
( Vide Form Q.) 

7. Failure to pass the Examination will not dis- 
qualify the Candidate for presenting himself at any 
^^ubsequent First Examination, on a new application 
being forwarded under Form P, and a fresh fee paid. 

8. The Examination will be written, oral, and 
practical. 

9. Candidates will be examined in the following 
subjects :— 

1. Descriptive Anatomy. 

2. Chemistry. 

3. Botany.* 

* In Systematic Botany the Candidate will be lequired to 
possess a competent acquaintance with the following Natural 
Orders : — 

Anonaceae, Menispermacese, Nymphseaceae, Papaveraceae, 



LICENTIATE OF MEDICINE. 79 

4. Materia Medica and Pharmacy. 

o. Practical Anatomy. 

6 Practical Chemistry, including General and 
Pharmaceutical Chemistry and the Detection of the 
Adulteration of Drugs. 

(^ne paper will be set in each of the four first subjects. 

10. On the Second Monday after the Examina- 
tion, the Examiners will publish a hst of the success- 
ful Candidates, arranged in two divisions, in alpha- 
betical order. 

11. A certificate will be eiven to those who pass 
the Examination. {Vide Form R.) 

Second Examination. 

12. The Second Examination will be held annu- 
ally in Bombay, commencing on the Second Monday 
in December. 

13. No Candidate will be admitted to this Exa- 
mination within two years of tije time of his passing 
the First Examination. 

N.B. — Candidates, who in or before March 185.9 passed the 
First Certificate Examination in Grant College for the Diploma 
of the College, are allow^ed to count that Examination as equi- 
valent to the First Examination of the University for the Degree 
of Licentiate of Medicine. 

14. Each Candidate must subsequently to pass- 
ing the First Examination, have attended the follow- 
in sr Courses : — 



Cruciferae, Malvaceae, Sterculiaceae, Aurantiacese, Vitaceae, 
Anacardiaeeae, Legurainosa;, Rosaceae, Myrtaceae, Cucurbitaeeae, 
Umbelliferae, Cinchonaceae, Compositae, Asclepiadaceae, Apocy- 
naceao, Convolvulaceae, Scrophulariaceae, Solanaceae, Atropaceae, 
Labiatffi, Acanthaceae, Lauraceae, Euphorbiaceae, Urticaccae, 
Artocarpaceae, Coniferae, Orchidaceae, Zinziberaceae, Cannaceae, 
Liliaceae, Melanthaceae, Palmaceae, Araceae, Graminaceae; and 
with the general structure of the Cryptogamic orders. 



80 REGULATIONS. 



In Physiology and/ 1 Course, of at least 7^ Lee- 
General Anatomy. \ tures, 



In Medicine / ^ ^T'"'' '^""^ ""^ ""* ^'""'^ ^^ 

t Lectures, 

In Sureerv . . . . -[ ^ Courses, each of at least 90 

° ^ L Lectures, 

On Diseases of the Eve. I ^ Courses, each of at least 20 

L Lectures, 

On Midwifery and ) „ /->! i r i. i ^ "n 

Diseases of Women < ^ ^T'''' '^'^' "^^ ^*^ ^'"'^ ''^ 



and Children. 



Lectures, 



In Medical Jurispru- / 2 Courses, each of at least 50 
dence. \ Lectures, 

In Practical Toxicology./ 2 Courses of instruction, each 
^■^ L or at least tour months ; 

and have dissected the surgical regions, and performed opera- 
tions on the dead siibject during two Sessions ; and have 
attended a Lying-in-Hospital for one year, and have conducted 
Midwifery cases ; and have attended Hospital Practice during 
a period of at least two years, in the following manner, viz : — 

(o) Eighteen months at the Surgical Practice of a recognized 
Hospital or Hospitals (during at least nine of which 
he must have officiated as Surgical Dresser), with 
Lectures on Chnical Surgery during such attendance ; 

(6) Eighteen months at the Medical Practice of a recognized 
Hospital or Hospitals (during at least nine of which 
he must have officiated as Clinical Clerk), with Lectures 
on Clinical Medicine during such attendance ; and 

(c) Six months at the practice of an Eye Infirmary. 

15. Each Candidate will be required to produce 
Reports of six iVledical and of six Surgical Cases, 
drawn up and written by himself, durino;the periods of 
service as CUnical Clerk and Surgical Dresser re- 
spectively, the said Reports to be duly authenticated 
by the Professors of Clinical Medicine and Surgery ; 
and must produce a certificate of good moral con- 
duct from the head of the College in which he has 
studied. 



LICENTIATE OF MEDICINE. / 

16. Candidates must apply to the Registrar one 
mouth before the Examination. {Vide Form S.) 

17. Each applicant must pay to the Registrar a 
fee of Rupees 25, for which a receipt will be ^iven. 
{Vide Form T.) 

18. Failure to pass the Examination will not 
disqualify the Candidate for presenting himself at 
any subsequent Second Examination, on a new appli- 
cation being forwarded and a fresh fee paid. 

19. The Examination will be written, oral, and 
practical. 

20. Candidates will be examined in the following 
subjects :— 

1. Physiology and General ^Anatomy. 

2. Principles and Practice of Medicine. 

3. Principles and Practice of Surgery, including 

Diseases of the Eye. 

4. Midwifery and Diseases of Women and 

Children. 

5. Medical Jurisprudence. 
(). Surgical Anatomy. 

7. Practical Toxicology. 

One paper will be set in each of the first five 
subjects. 

21. The Clinical Examination in Medicine and 
Suro:ery will be conducted in the Wards of a Hos- 
pital, and will be of a nature faithfully and fully to 
test the Candidate's practical ability in takinof, 
recording, and treating cases of disease, in investi- 
gatino- the pathology of disease, microscopically, 
chemically, and otherwise, and in surgical manipula- 
tions. 

22. The Examination in Surgery will include 
the performance of Surgical operations on the dead 
body. 



b2 REGULATIONS, 

''23. On the second Monday after tlie conclusion 
of the Examination, the Examiners will publish a list 
oi the successful Candidates in two Classes, the 
names in each class being arranged in alphabetical 
order. 

24. A Certificate will be given to those who pass 
the Examination. (Vide Form U.) 

DOCTOR OF MEDICINE. 

25. The Examination for the Degree of Doctor 
of Medicine will be held annually at Bombay, com- 
mencing on the Second Monday in December. 

26. Each Candidate must have obtained the 
Degree, at least, of Bachelor of Arts in the University 
of Bombay or some University recognized by it, and 
must have regularly attended the Medical and Sur- 
gical practice of a recognized Hospital or Hospitals for 
a period of two years subsequent to his having taken 
a Degree in Medicine and JSurgery at the University 
of Bombay, or some University recognized by it. 

27. Each Candidate must produce testimonials 
signed by at least two Doctors of Medicine, that he 
is, in habits and character, a fit and proper person 
for the Degree of Doctor of Mediciile. 

28. Candidates must apply to the Registrar one 
month before the Examination. (Vide Form V.) 

29. Each applicant must pay to the Registrar a 
fee of Rupees 100, for which a receipt will be given. 
(FzVi^ Form W.) 

30. Candidates will be examined in Medicine, 
including — 

1 . Practice of Physic. 

2. Suroery. 

3. Midvvi'ferv, 



DOCTOR OF MEDICINE. 83 

31. The Examination will be (a) written (one 
paper being set in each of the above subjects), (b) 
oral, (c) clinical in the wards of a hospital, and (d) 
practical in a dissecting-room. 

32. On the second Monday after the commence-- 
ment of the Examination, the Examiners will publish 
a list of the successful Candidates, arranged in alpha- 
betical order. 

33. A Certificate will be given to those who pass 
the Examination. {Vide Form X.) 



84 



IV. CIYIL ENGINEERING. 



MASTER OF CIVIL ENGINEERING- 

1. The Examination for the Degree of Master of 
Civil Engineering will be held annually at Bombay, 
commencing on the Fourth Monday in November. 

2. Candidates must be at least Bachelors of Arts 
of the University of Bombay, or of some University 
recognized by it ; and must have passed four years in 
the study and practice of Civil Eno'ineering, of which 
two at least must have been passed in actual practice 
under an Engineer in charge of works. 

3. Candidates must apply to the Registrar, at 
least one month before the Examination. (Vide 
Form Y.) 

4. Each applicant must pay to the Registrar a 
fee of Rupees 25, for which a receipt will be given 
(Vide Form Z») 

5. Failure to pass the Examination will not dis- 
qualify the Candidate for presenting himself at any 
subsequent Examination, on a new application being 
forwarded, and a fresh fee paid. 



MASTER OF CIVIL ENGliNEERING. 85 

6. The Examination will be written, oral, and 
'lactical. 

7. Candidates will be examined in the following 
•ubjects : — 

I. Mathematics. (One Paper.) 

Spherical Trigonometry, as applied to Geodesy 
and Practical Astronomy. 

n. Mechanical Philosophy. (One Paper-) 

(a) Statics and Dynamics. 

(b) Equilibrium of Arches. 

(c) F^roperties and Strength of Material. 

((/) Plydrostatics, Hydraulics, and Pneumatics. 
(e) Steam, its power, properties, and various 
applications. 

(/) Fuel of various kinds, estimation of calo- 
rific power. 

III. Natural Science. (One Paper.) 

(a) Chemistry : as applicable to Cements and 
other materials; conditions and effects of 
fermentation ; causes of decay, and pre- 
servatory processes. 

{b) Electricity, and its economical apphcations. 

The nature of soils and 

earths, the selection of 

( \ C ] cr ' d * building and road mate- 

nii' ^-'x -^ rials, influence of geologi- 

Mmeralogy.^ i x x i • ^ 

"•^ cai structure on dramage, 

cuttings, embankments, or 
other works. 

8c 



86 REGULATIONS. 

(d) Physical Geography, especially that of 

India. 

IV. Architecture. (One Paper.) 

The Classic orders. 

The characteristics of the Gothic, Saracenic, and 
Hindu Architecture. 

V. Practical Science. 

(a) Drawing : (1) geometrical; (2) topographi- 
cal and landscape ; (3) perspective, na- 
tural and isometrical. 

(h) Surveying, levelling, and the adjustment 
and use of instruments. 

(c) Machinery. 
{d) Animal power. 

(e) Carpenter's, smith's, mason's and stone- 

cutter's work ; iron and brass founding. 

(/) Preparation of material. 
(g) Brick and Tile making, 
(/i) Conversion of Timber. 

(i) Design and construction of Buildings and 
Works. 

( j) Specifications, Measurements, Estimates and 
Contracts. 

8. On the second Monday after the conclusion of 
the Examination, the Examiners will publish a list 
of the successful Candidates in three Classes, the 
names in each Class being arranged in alphabetical 



GENERAL. 87 

order. No Candidate shall be placed in the First 
Class unless the Examiners are of opinion that he 
has exhibited considerable original ability as well as 
great industry. 

9. A Certificate will be given to those who pass 
the Examination. (Vide Form AA.) 



GENERAL- 



No question shall be put at any University Exa- 
mination, calling for a declaration of religious belief 
on the part of the Candidate, and no answer or 
translation given by any Candidate shall be objected 
to on the ground of its expressing any peculiarity of 
religious belief. 



AMISSION TO DEGREES. 



1. Degrees will be conferred on the Second Tues- 
day in January, and such other Graduation days, as 
may be appointed by the Chancellor or Vice-Chan- 
cellor, 

2. Persons entitled to Degrees, and desirous of 
being admitted, must apply three days previously to 
the Registrar, who will communicate their names, 
together with the necessary certificates, to the respec- 
tive Deans of Faculty, for submission to the Senate 
on the next Graduation day. 

3. The Senate will, on the motion of the Deans 
of Faculty respectively, pass the necessary graces in 
that behalf, and the Deans of Faculty will then pre- 
sent the persons so approved of to the Chancellor 
or Vice-Chancellor successively in the following order 
of precedence : — Doctor of Medicine, Bachelor of 
Laws, Master of Civil Engineering, Master of Arts, 
Bachelor of Arts, and Licentiate of Medicine. 

4. As he presents each Candidate, the Dean of 
Faculty wiil address the Chancellor or Vice-Chancel- 
lor in the following words : — 

Mr. Chancellor (or Mr. Vice-Chancellor, or my 
Lord, if he be a nobleman), I present to you (name 
and College) who has been examined and found qua- 
lified for the Degree of to 

which I pray he may be admitted : 
and the Chancellor will answer : — 

By the authority given me as Chancellor of this 
University, I admit you (name) to the Degree of 

; and I charge you that ever in you 

life and conversation you show yourself worthy of 
the same. 



ADMISSION TO DEGREES. 89 

The Chancellor will at the same time present each 
Graduate successively with the Certificate of the De- 
gree conferred on him. 

5. Nothing in the foregoing Bye-laws is to be 
held to prevent the Chancellor admitting to the 
Degree of M. D. or M. A. any person who may be 
presented to him by the Senate with a certificate 
that he has been examined and judged worthy of 
«uch special distinction. 



8c^ 



90 



RECOGNITION 



Colleges or other Institutions, desirous of beint: 
recognized by the University of Bombay, must for 
ward, with their appHcation, the following docu- 
ments : — 

1. A statement showing the present staff of In- 
structors, and the course of study in all branches 
during the last two years at least, provided the Insti- 
tution have existed for such a period. 

2. A declaration from the Managers, Principal 
or Head Master, that the Institution has the means 

of educating up to the standard of the 

degree ; and such declaration, before being sent to th 
Registrar for the ratification of the Senate, must b 
countersigned by at least two members of the Senate 



FORMS — MATRICULATION. 91 

FORMS. 

I ARTS 

MATRICULATION. 

FORM A. 

To the 

Registrar of the University of Bombay. 
Sir, 
I request permission to present myself at the 
ensuing Matriculation Examination of the University 
of Bombay. 

1 wish to be examined in the English and the 
languages. 

I am, Sir, 
Your obedient Servant, 

(Name with Surname) .. 

i Village. 

Birth place < Talooka. 

( Zilla. 
T>. ,, J C According to Christian 

^ t or Native chronology. 

p ,, , C Name. 

J:<ather s ? ^ 

I Occupation. 

(Race and Religion) .... 

(Where educated) 

(Date) 

I assent to this Application. 
(Signature of applicant's last 7 

Schoolmaster or Teacher.) J 
(Date) 



92 FORMS — FIRST EXA.MINATION IN ARTS. 

(1). Certificate of Moral Character to be signed 
by a person of known respectability. 

I certify that I have known 

for__ years, and believe him to be a persoa of 

good moral character. 

(Signed) 

(Date) 

(2.) Certificate of age to be signed by a person of 
known respectability. 

I certify that I have known the family of the above 

for years, and that to the best of my knowledge and 

belief he has completed his sixteenth year. 

(Signed) _^ 

(Date) 



FORM B- 

University of Bombay. 

Received from Rs. 5, being the fee for per- 
mission to attend the ensuing Matriculation Examination. 

(Signed) 

(Date) Registrar. 



FORM C- 

University of Bombay. 

1 certify that the undersigned .duly passed the 

Matriculation Examination held in the month of^ 18 

(Signature of the holder) 

( Signed) ^ 

(Date) Registrar. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS. 
first examination in arts. 
FORM I>. 
To the 

Registrar of the University of Bombay. 
Sir, 
I request permission to present myself at the ensu- 



FORMS — FIRST EXAMINATION IN AHTS. 



93 



ing First Examination in Arts. I wish to be exa- 
mined in the English and languages, and in* 

I am, &c. 

(Name) 

(Race and Rehgion) 

(College) 

(Date of Matriculation) 

(Date) 

Certificate to be signed by the Heads of Colleges or Insti- 
tutions at which the Candidate may have attended. 

I certify that ^has attended since his 



matriculation the number of days under 
of which I am 


specified, at the 




Number of days. 


Remarks. 


First Term 

186 




Second Term 




First Term 
186 




Second Term 




First Term 
186 




Second Term 





I further certify that to the best of my knowledge and belief 

the said is a person of good conduct, 

and that he has ray permission to present himself at the ensuing 
First Examination in Arts at the University of Bombay. 

(Date) (Signed) . 



* Insert one of the following : 

A. Butler's Sermons L, II., Ill, 

B. Analytical Geometry. 



with Preface. 



C. Chemistry, Heat, and Electricity. 



94 FORMS — EXAMINATION FOR B. A. 

FORM E. 

University of Bombay. 

Received from Rupees 10, being the fee 

for permission to attend the ensuing First Examination in Arts. 

(Signed'' .___ 

(Date) 



FORM F- 

To the 

Registrar of the University of Bombay. 

Sir, 

1 request permission to present myself at the en- 
suing Examination for the Degree of Bachelor of 
Arts. 

In addition to the necessary subjects, I offer to be 
examined in the language, and in* 

I am &c. 

(Name) 

(Race and Religion) 

(College) 

(Date of Matriculation) . . . .___ 

(Date) 

Certificate to he signed by the Heads of Colleges or Insti- 
tutions at which the Candidate may have attended. 

I certify that has attended since his 

matriculation the number of days under specified, at the 
of which I am 

* Insert three of the following : — A. History. — B. Logic 
and Moral Philosophy.— C. Political Economy. — D. Dynamics 
nnd Hydrostatics. — E. Optics and Astronomy — F. Analytical 
Geometry of two dimensions. — G. Chemistry, Heat and Elec- 
tricity. — H. Physiology, vegetable and animal. 



FORMS — EXAMINATION FOR B. A. 



95 



18f> 



m 



1S6 



Number of days. 



First Term 



Second Term 



First Term 



Second Term 



First Terra 



Second Term 



Remarks. 



I further certify that to the best of my knowledge and belief, 

the said is a person of 

good conduct; and that he has my permission to present 
himself at the ensuing Examination for the Degree of Bachelor 
of Arts at the University of Bombay. 



(Date) 



(Signed), 



FORM G- 

University of Bombay. 



Received from 



Rupees 20, being 



the fee for permission to attend the ensuing Examination for 
the Degree of Bachelor of Arts. 

(Signed). 



(Date] 



Registrar. 



FORM he- 
University OF Bombay. 
I certify that the undersigned 



satisfied 



the Examiners at the Examination for the Degree of Bacheloi 



96 FORMS MASTER OF ARTS. 

of Arts, held in the month of , and was placed 

in the Division. 

(Signature of the holder.) 

(Signed) 

Registrar. 

(Date) 

FORM I. 

To the Registrar of the University of Bombay. 
Sir, 

I request permission to present myself at the 
ensuing: examination for Honours in Arts. 

To the best of my knowledge and belief, 1 was 

born on the , and therefore I 

am now in the year of my age. 

I offer to be examined in* 

1 am, &:c. 

(Name and Degree) 

(Race and Religion) 

(College) 

(Date of Graduation) 

(Date) 

MASTER OF ARTS. 
FORM J. 

To the Registrar of the University of Bombay. 
Sir, 
I request permission to present myself for exami 



* Insert one or more of the following : — 

1 . The English and languages. 

2. History and Philosophy. 

.3. Mathematics and Natural Philosophy. 
4. Natural Sciences. 



i 



FORMS MASTER OF ARTS. 97 

nation for the Degree of Master of Arts in the 
University of Bombay. 

I offer to be examined in* 
I am, &:c. 

(Name and Degree) 

(Race and Religion) 

(College) 

(Date of Graduation) 

(Date). 



FORM K- 

University of Bombay. 

Received from Rupees 50, being the 

fee for permission to attend the ensuing Examination for the 
Degree of Master of Arts. 

(Signed) 



(Date) 



Registrar. 



FORM L. 

University of Bombay. 

I certify that the undersigned satisfied the 

Examiners in t at the Examination for the 

Degree of Master of Arts, heUl in the month of^ 

(Signature of the holder) 

(!^igned; 



Registrar. 

(Date) 



* Insert one or more of the following : — 

1. The Enghsh and languages. — 2. History and 

Philosophy. — 3. Mathematics and Natural Philosophy. — 4. 
Natural Sciences. 

t Specify the branch or branches of exa mination. 
9c 



98 



FORMS — BACHELOR OF LAWS, 



II. LAW. 



BACHELOR OF LAWS. 

FORM M- 
To the 

Registrar of the University of Bombay. 

Sir, 

I request permission to present myself at the en- 
suing Examination for the Degree of Bachelor of 
Laws. 

I am, &c. 

(Name) 

(Race and Religion) 

(College) 

(Date of Graduation in Arts). 

(Date) 

Certificate. 

To he signed ly the Head of the School of Law in 



which the Candidate may have studied. 



I certify that, 
studied in the 



has 



of which I am 



as under specified : — 




Period of Study. 


Remarks. 


From 


To 









(Date) 



(Signed), 



FORMS— BACHELOR OF LAWS. 99 

N.B. — If the Candidate has not studied for the 
requisite period in one School of Law, he must 
furnish supplementary Certificates in the above 
tabular form. 

N.B. — If the applicant is not a graduate of the Uni- 
versity of Bombay, he must append a certificate of 
graduation, and testimonials of moral character, 
satisfactory to the Syndicate. 



FORM Jf. 

University of Bombay. 

Received from Rupees 25, being the fee for 

permission to attend the ensuing Examination for the Degree of 
Bachelor of Laws. 

(Signed) 



(Date) 



Registrar. 



FORM O- 
University of Bombay. 

I certify that the undersigned satisfied the 

Examiners at the Examination for the Degree of Bachelor of 

Laws, held in the month of , and was placed 

in the Division. 

(Signature of the holder) 

(Signed) 

(Date) 



Registrar. 



100 FORMS — LICENTIATE OF MEDICINE. 

III. MEDICINE. 

LICENTIATE OF MEDICINE. 
First Examination. 

FORM p. 

To the 

Registrar of the University of Bombay. 

Sir, 

I request permission to present myself at the en- 
suing First Examination for the Degree of Licentiate 
of Medicine in the University of Bombay. 

I am, &;c. 

(Name) 

(Race and Rehgion) 

(College) 

(Date of Graduation, or Matri- 7 

culation, as the case may be) 3 
(Date) 

Certificates. 

(1) I certify that , to the best of my knowledge 

and belief, has completed his nineteenth year. 

(Signature of some person of known "I 

respectability). J 

(Date) 

(2) I certify that has been engaged in 

Medical study in the School of Medicine for 

Sessions of nine months each. 

(Signature of Head of School of Medicine). 
(Date) 



FORMS — LICENTIATE OF MEDICINE. 101 

(3) I certify that has attended 

. — - Courses of Lectures in Descriptive 

Anatomy, of Lectures re- 
spectively. 

.J, , , (Signed) 

(Date) 



(4) I certify that_ _has attended 

Courses of Lectures in Physiology and 

General Anatomy, of .Lectures respectively. 

,j. , , (Signed) 

(Date) 



(5) I certify that . has attended 

.Courses of Lectures in Chemistry, of 



(Date) 



.Lectures respectively. 

(Signed). 



(6) I certify that has attended 

. Courses of Lectures in Botany, 

of__ Lectures respectively. 

,j, , , (Signed) 

(Date) 



(7) I certify that has attended 

^Courses of Lectures in Materia 

Medica, of .Lectures respectively. 

(Signed) 

(Date) ^ 



(8) I certify that has attended 

^ Courses in Practical Chemistry, 

including General and Pharmaceutical Chemistry, and the 

Detection of the Adulteration of Drugs, of 

months respectively. 

(Signed) 

(Date) ^ ^ 

9c* 



102 FORMS — LICENTIATE OF MEDICINE. 

(9) I certify that has attended 

Courses of Practical Pharmacy of 

months, and that he has acquired 

a practical knowledge of the preparation and compounding 
of medicines. 

,^ , (Signed) 

(Date) 



(10) I certify that has been engaged in 

Dissection for two Seasons, in the course of which he has 
dissected the whole human body twice. 

(Signed ) 

(Date) 



FORM Q. 

University of Bombay. 

Received from Rupees 5, being the fee for per- 
mission to attend the ensuing First Examination for the Degree 
of Licentiate of Medicine. 

(Signed) 



Registrar. 



(Date) 



FORM 15,. 

University of Bombay. 

I certify that the undersigned ^satisfied 

the Examiners at the First Examination for the degree of Licen- 
tiate of Medicine, held in the month of , and was 

placed in the Division. 

(Signature of the holder) 

(Signed) 



Registrar. 
(Date) 



forms— licentiate of medicine. 103 

Second Examination. 

FORM S. 

To the 

Registrar of the University of Bombay. 
Sir, 

I request permission to present myself at the 
ensuing Second Examination for the Degree of Li- 
centiate of Medicine. 

I have, &;c. 

(Signed) 

(Name) 

(Race and Religion) 

(College) ZZHZZIIIZZ 

(Date of passing the First ^ __^ 

Examination) 5 

(Date) 



n 



Certificates, 



1) I certify that to the best of 

my knowledge and belief, is a person of good moral conduct, 
(Signature of Head of School of Medicine.) 
(Date) 

(2) I certify that has attended 

Courses of Lectures in Physiology 

and General Anatomy of Lectures respec- 
tively during the year 

,^ , (Signed) 

(Date) 

(3) I certify that has attended 

— - Courses of Lectures in Medicine, of 

__Lectures respectively, during the years 

_and 

(Signed)_ 

(Date) ^ 



104 



FORMS — LICENTIATE OF MEDICINE. 



(4) I certify that 



(Date) 
(5) I certify that 



has attended 

Courses of Lectures in Surgery of 

.Lectures respectively, during the years 

and 

(Signed) 



Eye of, 
years 



and 



has attended 

Courses of Lectures on Diseases of the 
Lectures respectively, during the 



(Date) 

(6) I certify that 



"(Signed)_ 



has attended 



Courses of Lectures on Midwifery and 

Diseases of Women and Children, of_ Lectures 



respectively, during the years 
(Date) 
(7) I certify that 



and 



(Signed), 



has attended 



prudence, of_ 



Courses of Lectures in Medical Juris- 
Lectures respectively. 



during the years_ 
(Date) 
(8) I certify that _ 



and 



(Signed), 



Toxicology, ot 



has attended 

Courses of Instruction in Practical 
.months respectively. 



during the years, 
(Date) 



and 



(Signed). 



(9) I certify that_ 



.has dissected the surgical 



regions, and performed operations on the dead subject 

during Sessions in the years. 

and 

(Signed) 

(Date) 



FORMS- — LICENTIATE OF MEDICINE. 105 

(10) I certify that has attended 

Lying in Hospital, and has conducted 



(Date) 



midwifery cases, during the year 
(Signed), 



(11) I certify that ^has attended 

at the Surgical Practice of Hospital 

for months, during of which 

he has officiated as Surgical Dresser, and that he has 

attended Lectures on Clinical Surgery, 

during the year and 



(Signed). 
(Date) 



(12) I certify that has attended 

at the Medical Practice of ^Hospital, 

for months, during 

of which he has officiated as Clinical Clerk, and that he 

has attended Lectures on Clinical Medicine, 

during the years and 



(Date) 



(Signed). 



(13) I certify that has attended 

the practice at__ Eye Infirmary 

for_ months, during the 

year 



(Date) 



(Signed). 



FORM X 

University of Bombay. 

Received from Rupees 25, being 

the fee for permission to attend the ensuing Second Examination 
for the Degree of Licentiate of Medicine. 

(Signed) 

Registrar. 
(Date) 



106 FORMS — DOCTOR OF MEDICINE. 

FORM U- 

University of Bombay. 

I certify that the undersigned ^satisfied the 

Examiners at the Second Examination for the Degree of Licen- 
tiate of Medicine held in the month of , and was 

placed in the class. 

(Signature of the holder) 

(Signed) 

Registrar. 
(Date) 



DOCTOR OF MEDICINE. 

FORM V. 
To the 

Registrar of the University of Bombay. 

Sir, 

I request permission to present myself at the ensu- 
ing Examination for the Degree of Doctor of 
Medicine. 

I enclose testimonials signed by Doctors 

and ; and of my 

having obtained the Degree of^ in the 

University of ; and the Degree of 

in Medicine in the University of_ 

I am, &c. 



(Name) _ 

(Race and Religion) 
(Date) 



I certify that ^has attended the Medical 

and Surgical practice of Hospital during 

the years and 



(Date) 



(Signed). 



FORMS — DOCTOR OF MEDICINE. 107 

FORM W- 

University of Bombay. 

Received from Rupees TOO, being the fee 

for permission to attend the ensuing Examination for the 
Degree of Doctor of Medicine. 

(Signed) 



(Date) 



Registrar. 



FORM X- 

University of Bombay. 

I certify that the undersigned satisfied the 

Examiners at the Examination for the Degree of Doctor of 

Medicine, held in the month of 

(Signature of the holder) 

(Signed) 



Registrar. 
(Date) 



108 FORMS — MASTER OF CIVIL ENGINEERING. 



IV. CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

MASTER OF CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

FORM Y- 
To the 

Registrar of the University of Bombay. 
Sir, 

I request permission to present myself at the en- 
suing Examination for the Degree of Master of Civil 
Engineering. 

I have, &c. 

(Signed) 

(Name) 

(Race and Religion) 

(College) 

(Date of Graduation in Arts) . . 

(Date) 



Certificates. 

(1) I certify that has passed 

years in the study of Civil Engineering. 

(Signed )* 

(2) I certify that__ has passed 

years in actual practice on works 

under me. 

Signature of Engineer in "1 

charge of works. J 

* To be signed by Head of College or Institutioni or bj Professiooal Teacher. 



FORMS — MASTER OF CIVIL ENGINEERING. 109 

N. B. — If applicant is not a graduate of the Uni- 
versity of Bombay, he must produce proof of gradua- 
tion, and testimonials of moral character, satisfactory 
to the Syndicate. 

N. B. — If applicant has studied in more than one 
(College or Institution, or under more than one pro- 
fessional Teacher, or under more than one Engineer 
in charge of works, he must furnish Supplementary 
Certificates, showing that he has passed the whole 
of the required period in the study and practice of 
Civil Engineering. 



FORM Z- 

University of Bombay. 

Received from^ Rupees 25, being the fee 

for permission to attend the ensuing Examination for the 
Degree of Master of Civil Engineernig. 

(Signed) 

Registrar. 

(Date) 



FORM AA. 
University of Bombay. 

1 certify that the undersigned satisfied the 

Examiners at the Examination for the Degree of Master of Civil 

Engineering, held in the month of , aud was 

placed in the Class. 

(Signature of the holder) 



(Signed). 



(Date) 
lOe 



Registrar. 



110 FORMS — TRAVELLING FELLOWSHIP. 

MUNGULDASS NATHOOBHOY'S TRAVEL- 
LING FELLOWSHIP. 

FORM AB. 

To the Registrar of the University of Bombay. 
Sir, 

I beg to present myself as candidate for the Mun- 
guldass Nathoobhoy Travelling Fellowship. 

If I am elected, I pledgee myself to accept the 
Fellowship, and to comply with its conditions. 

1 enclose herewith testimonials of my fitness for 
election. 

I am, &:c. 

(Name and Degree.) 

(Race.) 

(College.) ' 

(Date of Graduation.) 



VI. 



I. 



MUNGULDASS NATHOOBHOY'S 
TRAVELLING FELLOWSHIP. 

Munguldass Nathoobhoy, Esq., Justice of the Peace, in 
a letter to Government, dated the 19th August 1862, 
offered the sum of Rs. 20,000 in 4 per cent. Government 
Securities, for the purpose of endowing a Travelling Fel- 
lowship for Hindoo Graduates of the University of Bombay. 
This offer was accepted by a Convocation of the Senate 
on the 26tli March 1863, and the following regulations 
were passed for the awarding and tenure of the Fellow- 
ship : — 

1. The Munguldass Nathoobhoy's Travelling 
Fellowship shall be open to all Graduates of the 
University of Bombay being Hindoos, who shall not 
be of more than five years' standing from the date 
of their graduation. By the term Graduates is to be 
understood Masters and Bachelors of Arts, Bachelors 
of Laws, Doctors and Licentiates of Medicine, and 



112 MUNGULDASS NATHOOBHOY FELLOWSHIP. 

Masters of Civil Engineering ; and by the term date 
of graduation is to be understood the date of the 
candidate's receiving the degree of Bachelor of Arts, 
or Licentiate of Medicine. 

2. Candidates for the Fellowship must forward 
an application to the Registrar under Form AB.* one 
week before the day of election. 

3. The election shall take place without examina- 
tion, by the votes of the Syndicate, the Vice-Chan- 
cellor or Senior Fellow present having a casting vote. 

4. Whenever there is a vacancy in the Fellow- 
ship, a convenient day for holding an election shall 
be appointed by the Syndicate, who shall give due 
notice of the same in the Government Gazette. 

5. The Munguldass Nathoobhoy Fellowship shall 
be tenable by any one Fellow for a space of three 
years. The conditions of tenure are that the Fellow 
must leave Bombay and proceed to Europe within 
two months after his election ; that he shall spend at 
least six months out of each year in England ; and 
that he shall report twice a year to the University 
Registrar as to the mode in which his time has been 
spent. 

6. Any violation of the above conditions shall 
ipso facto cause the Fellowship to be vacated ; and 
the Syndicate shall be empowered, for any just cause, 
to recall and deprive of his Fellowship any one who 
may have been elected, 

7. The Munguldass Nathoobhoy TravelHng Fel- 
low shall receive through the University Registrar, in 
half-yearly instalments, payable in advance from the 
day of his leaving India, the interest due upon the 
endowment, together with any accumulations that 
may have taken place during previous vacancies. 

* See page 110. 



MANOCKJEE LIMJEE GOLD-MEDAL. 113 



IL 



THE MANOCKJEE LIMJEE GOLD-MEDAL. 

Limjee Manockjee and Cowasjee Manockjee, Esquires, 
iu a letter to the Vice-Chancellor of the University, dated 
the 27th May 1863, offered the sum of Rs. 5,000 in 4 per 
cent. Government Securities, for the purpose of founding 
an annual Gold Medal, to bear the name of their father, 
the late Manockjee Limjee, Esquire, and to be awarded 
each year to the best Essay by a University Student, on 
certain prescribed subjects. This offer was accepted by a 
Convocation of the Senate on the 3rd September 1863, 
and the following regulations were passed for the awarding 
of the Medal : — 

1. The Manockjee Limjee Gold Medal shall be 
awarded annually for the best Essay by a University 
iStiident, in accordance with the subjoined conditions, 

2. Competitors shall be Bachelors of Arts in the 
University of Bombay, who shall not be of more 
than two years' standing from the date of their gra- 
duation, on the day prescribed for the sending in of 
the Essays. 

3. Competitive Essays shall be written in the 
English language on the subject appointed for the 
current year, and shall be sent in to the University 
Registrar on or before the fourth Monday in Sep- 
tember. Each Essay shall be designated by a motto 
instead of the writer's name, and shall be accompa- 
nied by a sealed cover, containing the name of the 
competitor, and a declaration that the Essay sent in 
by him is bond fide his own composition. 

10 c* 



114 MANOCKJEE LIMJEE GOLD-MEDAL. 

4. The subject of the Essay shall be in alternate 
years, (a) some question of Indian History or Anti- 
quities ; (b) some question connected with the intro- 
duction into India of European Science and Art. 

5. The subject for the competition is to be se- 
lected by the Syndicate, and notified not less than 
twelve months before the day for sending in the 
Essays. 

6. The Judges shall be two in number, and shall 
be nominated annually by the Syndicate. Their 
decision shall be announced on the fourth Monday 
in November. 

7. The Medal shall be presented to the success- 
ful candidate on the Convocation for conferring 
degrees next ensuing after the Judges' decision. 
The Medalist shall on the same occasion read aloud 
selected portions of his Essay. 

8. The successful Essay shall be printed at the 
expense of the University. 

9. The Medal shall not be awarded to any 
Essay which, in the opinion of the Judges, would 
not, when printed, be creditable to the University* 
But if only one Essay be sent in, nothing shall 
hinder the Judges from awarding to it the Medal, if 
it appears to them to come up to the proper standard. 

10» Whenever a year passes without the Medal 
being awarded, the interest of the Endowment shall 
go towards the printing of Essays and other ex- 
penses connected with the prize. 

11. On all occasions of Academical costume, 
Medalists shall be entitled to wear their Medals. 



BHUGWANDASS P. SANSKRIT SCHOLARSHIP. 115 
III. 

THE BHUGWANDASS PURSHOTUMDASS 
SANSKRIT SCHOLARSHIP. 

Bhugwandass Purshotumdas, Esq., Justice of the Peace, 
in a letter to the address of the Registrar of the University 
uiider date the 10th August 1863, offered the sum of 
Rs. 10,000 for the encouragement of the study of Sanskrit, 
in the University of Bombay. This ofFer was accepted by 
a Convocation of the Senate on the 24th September 1863, 
and the following Regulations for the awarding of the pro- 
ceeds of the endowment were passed. 

1. A Scholarship, to be called the Bhugwandass 
Purshotumdass Sanskrit Scholarship, of the value of 
four hundred Rupees, tenable for one year, and pay- 
able half-yearly, shall be annually competed for. 

2. Persons eligible to be candidates shall be 
Bachelors of Arts of the University of Bombay, of 
not more than two years' standing. 

3. The Examination shall commence on the first 
Tuesday in March. Candidates must send in their 
names to the Registrar one month before. 

4. There shall be two Examiners appointed by 
the Syndicate. They shall announce the result of 
the Examination to the Syndicate on or before the 
third Tuesday in March. The result will be publish- 
ed by the Syndicate in the Government Gazette. 

5. The Examination shall consist of four papers, 
which shall be of such kind as the Examiners may 
think best fitted to test the Candidate's knowledge of 
the Sanskrit language and literature, and his power 
of translating Sanskrit into English, and English 



116 MOMEJEE CURSETJEE PRIZE. 

into Sanskiit. Four hours shall be allowed for each 
paper. No books shall be prescribed beforeliand as 
subjects of Examination. 

6. The Scholarship shall not be assigned, except 
to a Candidate, whom the Examiners consider de- 
serving of reward for his special knowledge and 
ability as a Sanskrit Scholar. 

7. Whenever the Scholarship is not awarded, the 
interest of the endowment shall go to the general 
expenses of the Scholarship. 



IV. 

THE HOMEJEE CURSETJEE PRIZE. 

llomejee Cursetjee Dady Sett, Esq., Justice of the 
Peace, in a letter to the address of the Vice-Chaneellor, 
dated 10th September 1863, wrote as follows : — 

"It has been suggested to me that the establishment 
of an Annual Prize or Medal for the best English Poem by 
a University student would afiford a useful stimulus to the 
cultivation of Literature and to the development of good 
taste and refinement in this Presidency. Concurring iu 
this view, I hereby beg to offer to the University of Bom- 
bay the sum of Rupees 5,000 in Government 4 per-cent. 
Securities, and hope that the University may be pleased to 
accept this sum, and apply it to the carrying out of the 
above object, under such Regulations as they may think 
best.*' 



HOMEJEE CURSETJEE PRIZE. 117 

This offer was accepted by a Convocation of the Senate 
on the 21st December 1863, and the following Regulations 
were passed for the awarding of the prize : — 

1 . The Homejee Cursetjee Prize, consisting of 
Books to the value of Rupees 200, shall be awarded 
annually for the best English Poem by a Utiiversity 
student, in accordance with the subjoined conditions. 

2. Competitors shall be Matriculated students 
of the University of Bombay, who shall not be of 
more than four years' standing from the date of their 
Matriculation on the day prescribed for the sending 
in of the Poems. 

3. Competitive poems shall be written in the 
Heroic metre, or in the Spenserian stanza, and shall 
not exceed 150 lines in length. Each poem shall be 
designated by a motto instead of the writer's names, 
and shall be accompanied by a sealed cover contain- 
ing the name of the competitor, and a declaration 
that the poem sent in by him is bond fide his own 
composition. 

4. The subject for the competition shall be an 
nually announced by the Syndicate during the month 
of January. The competitive poems shall be sent in 
to the Registrar on or before the 2nd Saturday in 
June. The prize shall be decided by the votes of the 
Vice-Chancellor and Syndicate at a meetino: to be 
held for the purpose during ihe month of September. 
The Chairman of the meeting to have a casting vote. 

5. The successful poem shall be pubhshed in 
the local newspapers. 

6. The Prize shall be awarded to the successful 
candidate at the Convocation for conferring Degrees 
next after the decision of the Syndicate. 



118 



HOMEJEE CURSETJEE PRIZE. 



7. The Prize shall not be awarded to any poem 
whicli, in the opinion of the Syndicate, would not, 
when printed, be creditable to the University. 

8. On the occasions when the prize is not award- 
ed, the money shall be reserved to be applied by the 
Syndicate in such a way as they shall think most 
expedient to the furtherance of the purposes of the 
endowment. 



Year. 


Subject. 


Prizeman. 


1864.. 
1865.. 


The Himalaya Mountains . . 
The Indian Seasons 


Framjee Rustomjee 
Vikajee. 



VII. 



^gmthttmuB. 



UNIVERSITY BUILDINGS. 

Cowasjee Jehangier ReadymoneVi Esquire, Justice oftlie 
Peace, in a letter to the Vice Chancellor, dated the 27th 
April 1863, offered the sum of Rupees 1,00,000 for the 
erection of University Buildings, under the following 
conditions : — That Government contribute the remainder 
of the sum necessary for the buildings, and grant a site on 
the Esplanade, and that no subscription from any other 
private jiersons be received for this object. 

This offer was accepted by Government, and referred to 
the University, and at a Convocation of the Senate held on 
the 18th July 1863, the following Resolution was passed : — 



120 UNIVERSITY BUILDINGS. 

"That the Senate accept the nohle gift of Cowasjee 
Jehangier, Esquire, with the hberal augmentation offered 
by Government, and with the recognition of the liabihties 
imposed on this University by its holding the University 
Buildings when completed, according to the Act of Incor- 
poration ; but on the understanding that Mr. €owasjee 
concurs in the interpretation which Government puts 
upon his conditions in the third and fourth paragraphs of 
its letter No. 260, dated 29th May 1863, to the address 
of Sir Alexander Grant, Bart., Vice Chancellor." 

Note. — The interpretation of Government referred to 
was as follows : — 



i 



*' His Excellency in Council understands the third coni 
dition specified in Mr. Cowasjee Jehangier's letter as impl 
ing that a building for the University is to be completed at 
the joint expense of that gentleman and of Government 
without accepting contributions from any other source, so 
that it may form in itself a separate and permanent monu- 
ment of Mr. Cowasjee Jehangier's desire to provide the 
University with a local habitation. 

** As however, the duties and wants of the University 
increase. His Excellency the Governor in Council hopes 
that the example so worthily set by Mr. Cowasjee Jehan- 
gier will be followed by other University Benefactors, and 
Government feel assured that that gentleman would be th 
last to exclude those who may wish to follow his noble 



UNIVERSITY ARMS AND SEAL — LIBRARY. 121 

example from adding to or adorning the edifice which he 
has been the first to raise." 

This interpretation was formally accepted by Mr. 
Cowasjee Jehangier in a letter to Government, dated the 
8th August 1863. 



11. 

UNIVERSITY ARMS AND COMMON SEAL. 

Cowasjee Jehangier Ready money, Esquire, Justice of 
the Peace, in a letter to G. M. Birdwood, Esq., M. D., 
Fellow of the University, dated 24th September 1863, 
forwarded a donation of Rupees 1,200 to meet the expenses 
of a Grant of Arms to the University and the engraving of 
a University Seal. This donation was accepted at a Con- 
vocation of the Senate held on the same day with a vote of 
thanks to the donor for his timely and liberal benefaction. 



III. 

UNIVERSITY LIBRARY. 

Premchund Roychund, Esquire, in a letter to Govern- 
ment, dated the 27th August 1864, made the following 
request : — 

*' I have the honour to request, that Government will 
have the goodness to communicate to the University of 
Bombay my desire to offer most respectfully to that learn- 
ed body the sum of Rupees (2,00,000) two lacs, towards 
the erection of a University Library, which may be an 
ornament to this City, and by becoming a storehouse of 
the learned works, not only of the past but of many gene- 
lie 



122 THE RAJABAI TOWER. 

rations to come, may be a means of promoting the high 
ends of the University." 

At a Meeting of the Senate, held on the 10th September 
1864, it was resolved "that the Senate cordially and 
unanimously accept, with their best thanks, Mr. Prem- 
chund Roychund's noble gift." 



IV. 

THE RAJABAI TOWER. 

Premchmid Roychund, Esquire, in a letter to Govern- 
ment, dated the 6th October 1864, made the following 
request : — 

" I have the honour to request, that Government will do 
me the favour to offer to the University of Bombay, in the 
name of my good Mother Rajabai, two (2,00,000) lacs of 
Rupees for the erection of a Tower to contain a large clock 
and a set of joybells. 

*' If there be no architectural objections, I should like 
the tower to be in connexion with the University Library." 

At a Meeting of the Senate held on the 10th December 
1864, it was unanimously resolved ** that the Senate do 
accept the noble gift of Mr. Premchund Roychund of two 
lacs of Rupees for the erection of a Tower to contain a large 
clock and a set of joybells ; and that the grateful thanks of 
the Senate be conveyed to Mr. Premchund Roychund " 

It was further unanimously resolved ** that the Tower 
be named The Rajabai Tower, in commemoration of 
l^r. Premchund Roychund's mother." 



UNIVERSITY MACE. 123 



UNIVERSITY MACE. 

Mungulda ss Nathooblioy, Esquire, Justice of the Peace, 
in a letter to the Registrar, dated the 18th November 1864, 
offered Rs. 1,200, for the purpose of providing the Univer- 
sity with a Mftce. 

At a Meeting of the Senate held on the 10th December 
I8G4, it was unanimously resolved "that Mr. Munguldass 
Nathoobhoy's handsome offer of Rs. 1,200 for a Mace for 
the University be accepted with thanks," 



vni. 



I. UNIVERSITIES. 

The Universities of Great Britain and Ireland and 
of India. 

II. COLLEGES AND COLLEGIATE 
INSTITUTIONS. 

I. Elphinstone College, Bombay, 
II. Poona College, K ^-fc 

III. Free General Assembly's Institution, f "^' 

Bombay. 

IV. Government Law School, Bombay, in Law. 
V. Grant Medical College, Bombay, in Medicine. 



L ELPHINSTONE COLLEGE. 
(Recognized 1860.) 

Elphinstone College arose by a separation in the year 
1856 of the Professorial element from the "Elphinstone 
Institution," which henceforth became a high school. 

The Elphinstone Institution had its origin in a meeting 
of the Bombay Native Education Society on the 22nd 
August 1827, to consider the most appropriate method 
of testifying the affectionate and respectful sentiments of] 
the inhabitants of Bombay to the Honourable Mountgtuartj 



ELPHINSTONE COLLEGE. 125 

Elphinstone, on his resignation of the Government of 
Bombay. The result of this meeting was that a sum of 
money amounting to Rs. 2,29,G56 was collected by public 
subscription, towards the endowment of Professorships for , 
teaching the English language, and the Arts, Sciences, and 
Literature of Europe, to be denominated the Elphinstone 
Professorships. This sum afterwards accumulated to 
lis. 443,901, and the interest of it is augmented by an 
annual subscription from Government of Rs. 22,000. 

In 1863 Cowasjee Jehangeer Readymoney, Esq., Justice 
of the Peace, Bombay, presented Government with one 
hundred thousand rupees towards erecting suitable Col- 
lege Buildings for Elphinstone College, to be called the 
" Cowasjee Jehangeer Buildings." 

In 18G4, on account of the rise in the prices of building 
materials and labour, jMr. Cowasjee Jehangeer added a 
second sum of one hundred thousand rupees to his former 
munificent donation. 

The property and endowments of the Elphinstone College 
are under the guardianship of the Trustees of the El- 
phinstone Funds. Present Trustees are Sir Jamsetjee 
Jejeebhoy, Bart., Bhao Dajee, Esq., G. G. M, C, and 
Venayeckrao Juggonathje Sunkersett, Esq. 

The following endowments are connected with the 
Elphinstone College : — 

The West Scholarship Fund, subscribed in 1828, in 
honour of Chief Justice Sir Edward West. 

The Clare Scholarship Fund, subscribed in 1835, in 
honour of the Earl of Clare, Governor of Bombay. 

The Gaekwar Scholarship, established by his Highness 
the Gaekwar in 1850. 
11 c* 



126 RECOGNIZED INSTITUTIONS. 

The Bell Prize Fund, subscribed in 1 848, as a testimo- 
nial to Professor John Bell of the Elphinstone Institution. 

The Soonderjee Jivajee Prize Fund, established in .1842 
by Babajee Soonderjee, in memory of his father. 

The Rajah of Dhar's Prize Fund, given by the Rajah ot 
Dharin 1853. 

The Gunputrow Vitthul Prize Fund, given in 1854 In- 
Gunputrow Vitthul of Indore. 

There are five Dakshina Fellowships attached to the 
College, two of Rs. 120 each per mensem, and three of 
Rs. C2 each per mensem. 

Scholarship. 

The following scholarships, each tenable for two years, 
are annually open for competition in the College : — 

A' Senior Scholarships. 

Vox Languages f 2 of Rs. 25 per mensem. 

L 3 ,, 20 ,, „ 
For Mathematics. . . . / 2 of Rs. 25 per mensem. 
I 1 „ 20 „ 

For Natural Sciences. ( ^ ^^ ^^- ^'^ P^^ mensem. , 
I 1 „ 10 „ 

B. Junior Scholarships. 
Ten of Rs. 10 per mensem. 



List of Principals. 

1845, John Harkness, LL.D. 

1862, Sir Alexander Grant, Bart., M. A. 



ELPHINSTONE COLLEGE. 



127 



1865-66. 

Principah 

Sir Alexander Grant, Bart., LL.T)., Professor of 
Logic and Moral Philosophi/. Director of Public ■ 
Instructionj at Poona JvLy 1865. 

Professors. 

John Powell Hughlings, B. A., Professor of English 
Literature and History. Acting Principal and in 
charge of the Professorship of Logic and Moral 
Philosophy. 

Francis James Candy, M. A., Professor of Mathe- 
matics and Natural Philosophy. 

Robert Haines, M. B., Professor of Chemistry and 

Botany. 
Johann George Buhler, Ph. D., Professor of Oriental 

Languages. 

Robert George Oxenham, B. A., Acting Professor of 
English Literature and History. 

BakshinA Fellows. 



Mahadeo Goyind Ranade, (^) M. A. 

Bala Mangesh Wagle, M. A 

Shankar Pandurang Pandit, B. A. 
Jamshedjee Jivanjee Gazdar, B. A. 

Vasudeva Gopai Soman 

Shapurjee Hormaxji Patak, B. A. 

Senior Scholars. 



\ Seniors. 
> Juniors. 



Foundations. 
Dinanath iVtmaram Dalvi, B. A Elphinstone. 

(1) Honours in History and Gold Medal, November 18G2. 
* Persons whose names are marked with an asterisk have passed 
the First Examination in Arts. 



128 RECOGNIZED INSTITUTIONS. 

Foundations. 

Thakurclass Atmaram Mehta, B. A Elphinstone. 

*"'* Balaji Bapuji Sane „ 

* Rahimtoola Mahomed „ 

* Eshwant Aiiandrao Udas „ 

* Mahadeo Vishnu Kane ,, 

* Govinddas Varjiwandas „ 

* Jamshedji Naorozji Unwala „ 

•'^ Balaji Babaji Thakiir Clare. 

* Anna Moreshwar Kunte „ 

* Sitaram Vishwanath Patvardhan „ 

* Krishnaji Narayan Kher „ 

Khershasji Rustamji Dadachayina .... „ 

Bahmanji Edalji Modi * „ 

Gokuldas Kahaudas Parekh ,, 

Lakshman Yadov Askhedkar ,, 

Shripat Babaji Thakur „ 

Junior Scholars. 

Foundations. 

Ambalal Sakharlal Clare. 

Chandul'il Maihuradas Davlutjada .... „ 

Ghanasham Nilkant Nadacarine „ 

Gajanan Krishna Bhatavadekur West. 

Dorabji Edalji Girni „ 

Jamshedji Ardesar Dalai „ 

Dinanath Vishnu Madgaokar ,, 

Hormazji Mancharji Chesgar „ 

Revashankar Tripurashankar Gaekwar. 



* Persons whose names are marked with an asterisk have passed 
the First Examination in Arts. 



i 



ELPHINSTONE COLLEGE. 129 

Foundations, 

Nagardas Narotaindas Gaekwar. 

! Raoji Vasudeva Tiilu West 

Ghelabhai Maneklal Laewala 

1^ Kashinath Trimbak Telang 

W Nanabhai Harichandra Hateli 

Bhagwant Mangesh Wagle 

Hormazji Pestanji Bennett 

Manekji Nasanvanji Nanawati 

Kashinath Balcrishna Marathi 

Krishnarao Antoba Chemboorkur 

Dhondii Shamrao Gariid 

Uuder-Graduates not holding Scholarships. 

* Dadabhai Sorabji Patel. 

* Rastamji Merwanji Patel. 
Vasudeo Ilari Waidiya. 
Jamshedji Kharshedji Dubash. 
Alumal Trikamdas Luhana, 
Edalji Jamshedji Khoii. 
Sadashiva Vishwanath Dhurandhar. 
Framji Mancharji Patel. 
Bhagwandas Manmohandas. 
Bhanushankar Narayanshankar Davey. 
Bamchandra Bhikaji Ganjikar. 
Bahmanji Edalji Punagar. 

Tapidas Dayaram. 
Kalianrai Lakshmishankar. 
Motinarayan Gaorinarayan. 
Nitehabhai Murarji. 

* Persons whose names are marked with an asterisk }javc passed 
the First Examination in Arts. 



130 RECOGNIZED INSTITUTIONS. 

Pestanji Edalji Boyce. 
Ganpat Krislina Tivarekar. 
Maneklal Gardhandas Gunderia. 
Rustamji Ardesar Daruwala. 
Krishnarao Narsopant Mavalankar. 
Pestanji Aspaniarji Khambata. 
Phirozsha Ratamji Cama. 
Nanabliai Sadanand Kale. 
Joseph Philip- de Menezes. 
Jamshedji Rustamji Settna. 



II. POONA COLLEGE. 
(Recognized 1860.) 

On the occupation of the Deccan by the British Go- 
vernment in 1818, it was found that a certain portion of 
the revenues of the Maratha State had been yearly set 
apart for pension and presents to Brahmans (Dakshina) 
To prevent hardship and disappointment, and to fulfil the 
implied obligations of the new rulers, the British Govern- 
ment continued these payments ; but as the pensions and 
allowances fell in, they resolved, while maintaining the 
same total expenditure, under the name of the Dakshina 
Fund, to devote a portion of it to a more permanently 
useful end, in the encouragement of such kind of learning 
as the Brahmans were willing to cultivate. With this view 
the Pjona College was founded in 1821, as a Sanskrit 
College, exclusively for Brahmans. 

In 1837 some branches of Hindoo learning were dropped ; 
the study of the vernacular and of English was introduced, 
and the College was opened to all classes ; and after having 
been amalgamated with the English School in 1851, it 



POOXA COLLEGE. 131 

arose in its present form in 1857, by a separation of the 
College division from the School division. From another 
portion of the Dakshina Fund Dakshina Fellowships have 
been founded, of which four, viz. one Senior Fellowship of 
Ks. 100 per mensem, and three Junior Fellowships each of 
lis. 50 per mensem, are attached to the College. 

In 1863 Sir Jamsetjee Jejeebhoy, Bart., offered to 
Governmeut the sum of one hundred thousand Rupees to 
provide suitable College buildings for the Poona College- 

Scholarships. 

The following scholarships, all tenable for two years, are 
annually open for competitions : — 

A' Senior Scholarships. 

For Languages f 2 of Rs. 10 per mensem. 

{2 „ 7 „ 
For Mathematics ( ^ of Rs. 10 per mensem, 

I 1 ,. 7 „ 

For Natural Sciences . . (-^ ^^ ^'- ^^ ^'' ^^"«^"^- 
«- 1 „ 7 

JS. Junior Scholarships. 
Eight of Rs. 5 per mensem. 

There are also seven Sanskrit scholarships attached to 
the College, of the aggregate value of Rs. 50 per mensem. 



List of Principals. 

1851 Major Thomas Candy. 

1857 Edwin Arnold, M.A. 

1860 William Alexander Russell, M.A. 

1862 William Wordsworth, B.A» 



132 RECOGNIZED INSTITUTIONS. 

1864-65. 
Principal. 
William Wordsworth, B.A., Professor of Logic and 
Moral Philosophy and History. 

P7'ofessors. 

Robert George. Oxenham^ B.A., Professor of English 
Literature {at Bombay). 

Kero Lakshman Chhatrey, Esq., Professor of Mathe- 
matics and Natural Philosophy. 

Henry Spencer Bellairs, B.A., Acting Professor of 
English Literature; 

Martin Haug, Ph. D., Superintendent of Sanskrit 
Studies. 

Dakshina Fellows. 

1. Govind Ramchundra Bhagwut, B.A. 

2. * Bulwunt Sitaram Naik. 

3. * Giinputrovv Amrutrow Mankur. 

4. * Mahadeo Chimnajee Aptey. 

5. * Shivram Bapujee Parajpey. 

XJnder-Graduates. 
Senior Scholars. 
Abajee A-'ishnu Kathvatey. 
Cashinath Ramchundra Gorboley. 
Crishnajee Cashinath Joshi. 
Dwarkanath Raghoba Turkhudkur. 
Gungadhur Annunt Bhutt. 
Ganesh Dadaji Deshmookh. 
Huri Gopal Padhey. 
Jaysing Esjee Angrey. 
Ramchundra Govind Angul. 

* Persons whose names ate marked with an asterisk have passed 
the First Examination in Arts. 



POONA COLLEGE. 133 

Ramchundra Govind Ok. 

Vinayek Kamchundra Bhatwadekur. 

Junior Scholars- 

Acbiit Narayen Asgavkur. 
Balajee Vinayek Gokhley. 
Cliintamun Narayen Bhutt. 
Crishiiarow Gopal Deshmookh. 
Crishnajee Raghunath Kelkur. 
Crishnajee Narayen Patunkur. 
Gungadhur Huri Kaley. 
Ganesh Govind Dhekney. 
Jugunnath Narayen Datey. 
Narayen Vinayek Sathey. 
Nurhur Purshotum Tiluk. 
Nurhur Gadadhur Fudkey. 
Shunkur Ramchandra Bhagwut. 
Vishnu Gopal Putwurdhun. 
Vinayek Ramchandra Putwurdhun. 
Wasudeo Narayen Asgaokur. 

JJnder-Graduatts not holding Scholarships, 

Bhikajee Ramchandra Bhiday. 
Crishnajee Keshow Sathey. 
Coopoo Swami Moodliar. 
Dinkur Bulal Gokhley. 
Nowrojee Dorabjee Fouzdar. 
Narayen Vinayek Gunpuley. 
Perosha Dadabhoy. 
Ramchandra Gopal Deshmookh. 
Trimbuk Gungadhur Khandekur. 
Vittul Mahadeo Goley. 
Wamun Prabhakur Sarunjamey. 
12c 



134 RECOGNIZED INSTITUTIONS. 

III. FREE GENERAL ASSEMBLY'S INSTITU- 
TION, BOMBAY. 

(Recognized 1861.) 

This Institution arose out of an English School for 
Native youths, founded by the Rev. Dr. Wilson in 1832, 
and originally dependent on local contributions. It was 
afterwards recognized in 1835 by the Church of Scotland, 
and in 1843 by the Free Church of Scotland, from which 
body it received the greater part of its funds. The following 
endowments are attached to the Institution : — 

Endowed Scholarships. 
Two Fleming Scholarships, each of Rs. 15 per mensem. 
Nesbit Memorial Theological Scholarship, of Rs. 12 per 

mensem. 
Smyttan Memorial Scholarship, of Rs. 10 per mensem 

Lang Scholarship „ 1 ,, 

Miller (H.) do „ 10 

Nesbit Memorial Literary Scholarship „ 6 „ 

St. Clair Jameson Memorial Scholarship „ 6 „ 

Four Fleming Nomination Scholarships, 

each „ 5 „ 

Purvis Scholarship „ 5 „ 

Molesworth Scholarship „ 5 „ 

Davidson ditto „ 4 



j» 



Endowed Prizes. 



The Wilson Prize. 

The Raja of Dhar Prize. 

The Campbell Prize. 



FREE GENERAL ASSEMBLY'S INSTITUTION. 133 

The following Subscription Scholarships are also pro- 
vided : — 
Three by the Trustees of the late 

W. Wh\ te, Esq Rs. 150 per annum. 

One Douglas Scholarship .... Rs. 100 per annum. 
One Gillespie Mitchell Scholarship. Rs. 100 per annum. 



1865-66. 

Convener, 

Rev. John Wilson, D.D., F.R.S., Instructor in Theo- 
logy, Indian Languages and History, and Physical 
Geography and Elementary Natural History. 

Other Instructors, 

Rev. James Aitken, English Literature, and Elemen- 
tary Chemistry. 

Rev. Richard Stothert, M.A«, General History, Logic, 

and Moral Philosophy, and Greek. 
Edward Rehatsek,, M.C.E., Mathematics, Natural 

Philosophy and Physical Science, and Latin. 

Graduates. 

Vithal Narayan Pathak, B. A., Fleming Scholar and In- 
structor. 

Tinder- Graduates. 

Jayasatyabodh Rao Tirmal Rao Inamdar, 

Moro Sadashiva Marathe Smyttan Scholar. 

Sheikh Hayat Fleming Scholar. 

Anaudrao Sakharam Barve Lang Scholar. 

Juhus L. Britto. 
Motabhai Sadanand Kale. 



136 RECOGNIZED INSTITUTIONS. 

Narayaa Ramchandra Bhatta. 
Nasarwanji Nauroji Khambata, 

Balaji Sitaram Kothare Nesbit Lit. Scholar. 

Benjamin Aitken. 

Dattu Narsinha Josbi Subscription Scholar. 

Nanu Narayan Kothare Purvis Scholar. 

Krishnaji Narayan Karmarkar .... Subscription Scholar. 
Raoji Ganesha Bhandarkar. 



IV. GOVERNMENT LAW SCHOOL. 
(Recognized 1860.) 

The foundation of this Institution is due to a subscrip- 
tion which was raised by the inhabitants of Bombay in the 
month of November 1852, on the eve of the departure 
from India of Chief Justice Sir Thomas Erskine Perry, 
who had been for nearly nine years President of the 
Board of Education, to found a Professorship of Jurispru- 
dence as a memorial of his long connection with both law 
and education in India. 

This endowment yields a monthly income of Rs. 169, to 
which Government contribute a subsidy, which was fixed in 
1856 at Rs. 100 per mensem, the aggregate being the 
stipend of the Perry Professor of Jurisprudence. Govern- 
ment also contributes Rs. 600 per mensem for the mainte- 
nance of two Professorships of Law. 

Lectures are delivered on the following subjects : — General 
and Comparative Jurisprudence ; Contracts and Mercantile 
Law ; Torts and Criminal Law ; Evidence and Procedure ; 
and the Principles of Equity. 



GOVERNMENT LAW SCHOOL. 137 

Professors. 

Richard Tuohill Reid, LL.D., Perry Professor of 
Jurisprudence, and Government Professor of Law. 

James Fraser Hore, M.A., Government Professor 
of Law. 

1. Senior Law Students* 

1. Bala Mungesh Wagle, M.A. 

2. Mahadeo Govind Ranade, M.A. 

3. Ramchundra Vishnu Madgarakar, B.A. 

4. Nagindas Tulsidas Marphatia, B.A. 

5. Girdhailal Dayaldas Kothari, B.A. 

6. Khanderao Chimanrao Bedarkar, B.A. 

7. Vithal Narayan Pathak, B.A. 

8. Bhaskar Huri Bhagwut. 

9. Hormusji Shapurji Chowtia. 
10. Virabhadra Madiwalaya. 

//. — Junior Law Students. 

1. Thakurdass Atmaram Mehta, B.A. 

2. Jamshedji Jivanji Gazdar, B.A, 

3. Janardun Venayak Baput, B.A. 

4. Bhuo:wandas M. Devidas. 

5. Sorabji Muncherji. 

6. Narayan Ramchundra Bhut. 

7. Palonji Aderji Mestry. 

8. Govind Krishna Ranade. 

9. Sudashiv Vishwanath Dhurundhar. 
10. Jayasutyabhudrao Tirmulrao. 

ILL— Candidate Law Students, 

1. Shriram Bhikaji Jatar, B.A, 

2. Govindas Vurjiwundas. 

3. Gokuldas Kahandas, 
12c* 



138 RECOGNIZED INSTITUTIONS, 

4. Kashinath Balkrishna. 

5. Jamsetji Naorozji Unwala, 

6. Kershasji Rustamji Dadachangy. 

7. Bahraanji Edulji Mody. 

8. Edulji Jamsetji Khori. 

9. Rustamji Merwanji Patel. 

10. Rahimtula Mahomed. 

11. Shaik Hayat. 

12. Julius Lucas Brito. 

13. Mothabhai Sudanund Kaley. 

14. Balaji Sitaram Kothare. 

15. Nanu Narayan Kothare. 

16. Gunpatrao Nanabhai. 

17. Ramchundra Luximan Gorakshkur. 

18. Shamrao Kashinath Jaikur. 

19. Narayan Madhava Purajpay. 

20. Ramkrishna Dewshunkur. 

21. Dosabhai Bezonji Motiwala. 

22. Pestonji Kawasji Sungama. 

23. Dorabji Temulji Kapadia. 



GRANT COLLEGE. 

(Recognized 1860). 

Grant College was established in the year 1 845, under 
the name of the Grant Medical College as a tribute to the 
memory of the late Sir Robert Grant, Governor of Bom- 
hay, with whom the system of instruction pursued in it 
originated. The object of its estabhshment is " to impart, 
through a scientific system, the benefit of medical instruc- 
tion to the Natives of Western India." A moiety of the 
cost of the building was defrayed by Sir Robert Grant's 
friends, the remainder by Government. The funds for the 
support of the College, with the exception of certain en- 



GRANT MEDICAL COLLEGE. 139 

dowments for the encouragement of deserving students, are 
contributed by Government. 

The College is under the immediate control of a Principal, 
who is subordinate to the Director of Public Instruction. 
Lectures are delivered in the English language, on every 
branch of Medical Science, by Professors, who are officers 
in the Bombay Medical Establishment. 

There is also attached to the College a secondary School 
for the instruction of young men in Medical Science 
through the Marathi language. The Teachers are Graduates 
of the College and Licentiates of the University of Bombay. 
Clinical and practical instruction is imparted in the Jam- 
setjee Jejeebhoy Hospital, which contains 300 beds, and 
has detached wards for lying-in-women and for persons 
with diseases of the eye. 

The students are arranged in three classes : — 

1 . Matriculated students of the University of Bombay, 
who are educated through the EngHsh language for Medical 
Degrees. 

2. Members of the European Branch of the Govern- 
ment Medical Subordinate Department, who are educated 
through the Enghsh language for the grade of Apothecary. 

3. Members of the Native Branch of the Government 
Medical Subordinate Department, who are educated through 
the Marathi language for the grade of Hospital Assistant. 

The College possesses the following endowments : — 
The Parish, Carnac, Anderson, Reid, McLennan, and 
Jumkhundee Scholarship and Medal Funds ; the Sir Jam- 
setjee Jejeebhoy Medical Book Fund, Prize Fund, and 



140 RECOGNIZED INSTITUTIONS. 

Gold Medal Fund, and Hemabhoy Vukutchund Medical 
Fund ; the Burnes Medal. 

The aggregate sum on account of these endowments, 
amounting to Rupees 91,200, is lodged in the Government 
Treasury. 

Formerly the College conferred upon its students a 
Diploma or licence to practice Medicine, and the desig- 
nation "Graduate of Grant College." There are at the 
present time fifty-five such Graduates, who are either 
engaged in the private practice of their profession or are in 
the service of Government. Upon the establishment of 
the University of Bombay, the College ceased to grant 
diplomas, and became affihated to the University as a 
College for Medical Education. 

List of Principals. 

1845 Charles Morehead, M. D., F. R. C- P. 
1860 John Peet, M. D., F. R. C P. 
1865 Herbert John Giraud, M.D. 

1865-66. 

Principal. 

Herbert John Giraud^ M. D., Professor of Chemistry 
and Botany » (Europe.) 

Professors. 

R. Haines, M- B., Acting Principal, and Officiating 

Professor of Medical Jurisprudence. 
W. G. Hunter, Esq., Professor of Ophthalmic Sur- 

J. T. Mackenzie, M. B., Professor of Surgery and 
Clinical Surgery. 



GRANT COLLEGE. 141 

F. S. Stedman, Esq., Professor of Medicine and 
Clinical Medicine. 

C. Joynt, M. D., L. K. Q. C. P. Dub., Professor of 
Midwifery. 

A. N. Hojel, Esq., Professor of Anatomy and Phy- 
siology, and Curator of the Museum. 

V/. Dymock, B. A., Officiating Professor of Materia 
Medica. 

Undergraduates . 

* Baptista, Paulo Maria. 

* Goradya, Amidas Manji. 

* Cunha, Joseph Gerson da. 

* Gomes, Antonio Simplicio. 

* Jayakar, Atmaram Sadashiva. 
Kamalakar, Ganpat Pandurung. 
Hakim, Abdul Rahim. 
Pereira, Mathias Francisco. 
Gonsalves, Joao Francisco. 
Girdharlal Ratanlal. 

Bhate, Balwant Gopal. 
Shribastam, Suruplal Balakram. 
Gama, Jeronimo Accacio. 
Banaji, Eraksha Mankji. 

* Has passed the First Examination for L. M. 



IX. 

'^\k llmkrsitjT, 1865-66. 



SENATE. 

Chancellor. 



His Excellency the Honourable Sir Henry Bartle 
Edward Frere, K.C.B. 

Vice Chancellor. 

Sir Alexander Grant, Bart., LL.D. 

Fellows. 

1. The Honourable Sir Matthew Richard 

Sausse, Chief Justice, 

2. The Right Rev. John Harding, D.D., 

Lord Bishop of Bombay, 

3. His Excellency Major General Sir") 

Robert Napier, K.C.B., ] '^^. 1 -g 

4. The Honourable Barrow Helbert' ^1 {jB 

5. The Honourable Claudius James | ^^ 

Erskine, J 

6. Sir Alexander Grant, Bart., LL.D., Direc- 

tor of Public Instruction, 

7. Captain Thomas Waddington, Educational 

Inspector, Central Division, J 



SENATE. 143 

8. Robert Haines, M.B.j Acting Principal of~] 

Grant College j \ 

9. John Powell Hughlings, B.A., Acting Prin- \ .2 



cipalf Elphinstone College. 



>. 



10. William Wordsworth, B.A., Principal of fO 

Poona College, \ ^ 

11. Theodore Cooke, B.A., C.E., Principal [^ 

Poona Engineering College, J 

12. BhaoDajee, G. G. M. C, 

13. Matthew Stovell, M. D., F. R. C. P., 

14. Reverend John Wilson, D.D., F. R. S., 

15. Mahomed Yusoof Moorgay, Cazee, 

16. The Honourable Sir Joseph Arnould, M. A., 
The Honourable Barrow Helbert Ellis, 

17. Lieut. Colonel William Frederick Marriott, 

18. Colonel Harry Rivers, R. E., 

19. Reverend WilHam Kew Fletcher, M. A., 

20. Rao Saheb Bhasker Damodar, 

21. Herbert John Giraud, M. D., 

22. The Honourable Michael Robert Westropp, B.A., 
Robert Haines, M. B., 

23. Walter Richard Cassels, Esq., 

24. WiUiam Loudon, Esq., 

25. Sorabjee Jamsetjee Jejeebhoy, Esq., 

26. Narayen Dinanathjee, Esq., 

27. James Eraser Hore, M. A., 

Sir Alexander Grant, Bart., M. A., 

28. Lieut.-Col. John Archibald Ballard, R. E., 

C. jB., 

29. Lieut-Colonel Henry James Barr, 

30. Lyttleton Holyoake Bayley, Barrister-at-Law, 

31. Georo;e Christopher Moles worth Bird wood, 

M.b., 

32. Major Thomas Candy, 

33. Cowasjee Jehangier, Esq., 

34. Lieut.-Colonel Alfred DeLisle, R. E., 

35. Reverend Francis Gell, B. A., 



144 UNIVERSITY. 

36. Reverend James Glasgovt^ D. D., 

37. Major Frederick John Goldsmid, 

38. Gokuldass Tejpal, Esq., 

39. Robert Wilfred Graham, G. E., 

40. William Hart, C. S., 

41. Martin Haug, Ph. D., 

John Powell Hui^hlings, B. A., 

42. Sir Jamsetjee Jejeebhoy, Bart., 

43. Samuel Mansfield, C. S., 

44. Reverend Ward Maule, S. C. L., 

45. William James Moore, M. D., L. R. C. P., 

46. Rao Bahadoor Muggunbhae Kurrumchund, 

47. The Honourable Henry Newton, 

48. Richard TuohiU Reid, LL.D., 

49. Michael John Maxwell Shaw Stewart, G. S., 
oO. Rao Saheb Vishwanath Narayen Mundlik, 

51. The Honourable Richard Couch, 

52. The Hon. Henry Pendock St. George Tucker, 

53. John Raynor Arthur, C. S., 

54. Henry Napier Bruce Erskine, C. S., 

55. Maxwell Melvill,C. S., 

56. Charles Robertson Dvans, C, S., 

57. James Braithwaite Peile, B. A., 

58. Wilham George Pedder, B. A., 

59. Raymond West, B. A., 

60. William Heurtley Newnham, B. A., 

61. John William Shaw Wyllie, C. S., 

62. James Bellot Richey, C. S., 

63. Herbert Mills Birdwood, M. A., 

64. Major William Lockyer Merewether, C. B., 

65. Captain Edward Burnes Holland, R. E., 
G6. Captain Thomas Waddington, 

t)7. Reverend Charles Durell DuPort, M. A., 

68. William Carey Coles, M. D., M. R. C P., 

69. George Robert Ballingall, M. D., 

70. Henry Vandyke Carter, M. D., 

71. Francis James Candy, M. A., 



SENATE. 146 

72. .Tohann George Biihler, Ph. D., 

73. Captain William Charles Barker, I. N., 

74. David Joseph Kennelly, F. R. A. S., 

75. Andrew Richard Scoble, Barrister-at-Law, 

76. John Philip Green, LL. B., 

77. John Pares Bickersteth, M. A., 

78. Robert Hannay, Esq., 

79. Mungulclass Nathoobhoy, Esq., 

80. Manockjee Cursetjee, Esq., 
Hi. R.everend James Aitken, 

82. The Hon'ble Thomas Chisholm Anstey, 

83. Forster Fitzgerald Arbuthnot, C. S., 

84. Bhugwandass Purshotumdass, Esq., 

85. Dadablioy Novvrojee, Esq., 

86. Reverend Dlmnjeebhoy Nowrojee, 

87. Colonel J. Barnes Dunsterville, 

88. Nicholas Fernandes, Esq., 

89. Lieut. Col. J. G.Fife, R.E., 

90. Charles (^onne, C S., 

91. William Hanbury, B. A., 

92. Thomas Child Hayllar, Barrister-at Law, 

93. W. G. Hunter, F. R. C. S. E., 

94. Herbert Edward Jacomb, C. S., 

95. Thomas Blackadder Johnstone, M. D., 

96. Colonel M. K. Kennedy, R. E., 

97. Joshua Kin?, M. A., C. S., 

98. George Morison Macpherson, M. A., C. S., 

99. Captain J. Nasmyth, H. E., 
TOO. Robert George Oxenham, B. A., 

101. Khan Bahadoor Pudumjee Pestonjee, 

102. George Scott, C S., 

103. Robert Sharpe Sinclair, LL. D., 

104. Sorabjee Pestonjee Framjee, Esq., 

105. The Right Reverend Doctor Steins, 

106. Reverend Richard Stothert, M. A., 

107. Colonel C. W. Tremenheere, R. E., 
13c 



146 UNIVERSITY. 

108. Venayek Wassoodew, Esq , 

109. V. Juggonatlijee, Sunkersett, Esq., 

110. William Wedderburn, C. S., 

111. The Honourable James Sewell White, Barris- 

ter-at-Law, 

112. Captain Henry St. Clair Wilkins, R. E., 

113. Andrew Grant, Esq., 

114. George Inverarity, C. S., 

115. Dadoba Pandoorung, Esq., 

116. Reverend William Beynon, 

117. Henry Coke, M. A., 

118. Dhunjeeblioy Framjee Nusservvanjee, Esq., 

119. T. C.Hope, C. S., 

120. Km'sandass Madhowdass, Esq., 

121. Kerroopunt Luxumon Chhatrey, Esq., 

122. Muncherjee Byramjee Cola, M. D., 

123. John Marriott, B. A., 

124. Rao Saheb Mahipatram Roopram, 

125. Mahadevrao Govind Ranade, M. A., 

126. Captain Sherard Osborn, C. B., R. N., 

127. Premchund Roychund, Esq., 

128. F. S. Stedman, Esq., and 

129. Reverend J. V. S. Taylor, B. A. 



FACULTY OF ARTS. 

1. Reverend John Wilson, D. D., F. R. S., Bean. 

2. Sir Alex. Grant, Bart., LL. D., Vice- Chancellor, 

3. Right Reverend John Harding, D.D. 

4. The Honourable B. H. Ellis. 

5. The Honourable C. J. Erskine. 

6. Captain T. Waddington. 

7. H. J. Giraud, M. D. 

8. J. P. Hughlings, B. A. 



SENATE. 147 

9. W. Wordsworth, B. A. 

10. The Honourable Henry Lacon Anderson. 

11. The Honourable Sir J. Arnold, M. A. 

12. Lieutenant Colonel W. F. Marriott. 

13. Colonel H. Rivers, R. E. 

14. Reverend W. K. Fletcher, M. A. 

15. Reverend J. M.. Mitchell, LL. D. 

16. Rao Saheb Bhasker Damodar. 

17. R. Haines, M. B. 

18. W. Loudon, Esq. 

19. Sorabjee Jemsetjee Jejeebhoy, Esq. 

20. Lieut. Colonel J. A. Ballard, R. E., C,B. 

21. L. H. Bayley, Barrister-at-Law. 

22. Major T. Candy. 

23. G. C. M. Birdwood, M. D. 

24. Reverend F. Gell, B. A. 

25. Reverend J. Glasgow, D.D. 

26. Major J. Goldsmid. 

27. Gokuldass Tejpal, Esq. 

28. WilHam Hart, C. S. 

29. M. Haug, Ph. D. 

30. Rao Bahadoor Muggunbhaee Kurrumchund. 

31. R. T. Reid, LL.D. 

32. Rao S. Vishwanath N. Mundlik. 

33. The Honourable R. Couch. 

34. J. R. Arthur, C. S. 

35. M. Melville, C S. 

36. C. R. Ovans, C. S. 

37. J. B. Peile, B.A. 

38. W. G. Pedder, B.A. 

39. R. West, B.A. 

40. W. H. Newnbara, B.A. 

41. J. W. S. VVyllie, C.S. 
^2. J. B. Richey, B.A. 

43. H- M. Birdwood, M.A. 

44. Reverend C D. DuPort, M.A. 



148 UNIVERSITY. 

45. F.J. Candy, M.A. 

46. J. G. BUhler, Ph. D. 

47. R. Hannay, Esq. 

48. Munguldass Nathoobhoy, Esq. 

49. Reverend J. Aitken, 

50. F. F. Arbuthnot, C. S. 

51. Dadabhoy Nowmjee, Esq. 

52. Reverend Dhunjeebhoy Nowrojee. 

53. N. Fernandes, Esq. 

54. C. Gonne, C S. 

55. H. E. Jacomb, C. S. 

56. J. King, C. S. 

57. G. M. Macpherson, C. S. 

58. R. G. Oxenham, B. A. 

59. G. Scott, C. S. 

60. R. S. Sinclair, LL. D. 

61. Sorabjee Pestonjee Framjee, Esq. 

62. Right Reverend Doctor Steins. 

63. Reverend R. Stothert, M.A. 

64. Venayek Wassoodew, Esq. 

65. W. Wedderburn, C. S. 

66. Andrew Grant, Esq. 

67. George Inverarity, Esq. 

68. Dadoba Pandoorung, Esq. 

69. Reverend William Beynon. 

70. Dhunjeebhoy Framjee Nusserwanjee, Esq. 

71. Kursondass Madhowdass, Esq. 

72. Rao Saheb Mahipafram Roopram. 

73. Reverend J. V. S. Taylor, B. A. 



FACULTY OF LAW. 

1. James Eraser Hore, M.A., Dean. 

2. Sir Alex. Grant, Bart., LL-D., Vice- Chancellor. 

3. The Honourable Sir M. R. Sausse. 



FACULTY OF LAW. 149 

4. His Excellency Major General Sir Robert Na- 

pier, K. C. B. 

5. The Honourable B. H. Ellis. 

6. The Honourable C. J. Erskine. 

7. Mahomrned Yusoof iVloorgay, Cazee. 

8. The Honourable H. L. Anderson. 

9. The Honourable A. J. Lewis. 

10. The Honourable Sir Joseph Arnould, M.A. 

11. The Honourable Michael liobert Westropp, B.A. 

12. W. Loudon, Esq. 

13. Narayen Dhianathjee, Esq. 

14. L. H. Bayley/ Barrister-at-Law. 

15. W. Hart, C. S. 

16. S. Mansfield, C. S. 

17. Reverend W. M^ule, S. C. L., 

18. The Honourable H. Newton. 

19. R. T. Heid, LL. L). 

20. M. J. M. Shaw Stewart, C. S. 

21. The Honourable R. Couch. 

22. The Honourable H. P. St. G. Tucker. 

23. J. B. Peile, B.A. 

24. R. West, B.A. 

25. A. R. Scoble, Barrister-at-Law. 

26. J, P. Green, LL. D. 

27. J. P. Bickotetli. M.A. 

28. Manockjee Cursetjee, l^^sq. 

29. T. Chisholm Anstey, Barrister-at-Law. 

30. C. Gonne, C. S. 

31. T- C. MavllHr, Barrister-at-Law. 

32. R. S. Sinclair, LL.D. 

33. The Honourable J. S. White. 

34. T. C. Hope, C. S. 

35. John Marriott, B.A. 

3d. Mahadeorao Guvind Ranade, M.A. 



13 c* 



150 UNIVERSITY. 

FACULTY OF MEDICINE. 

1. Robert Haines, MB., Dean. 

2. Bhao Dnjee, G.G.M.C. 

3. Matthew Siovell, M.D.,F.R.C.P. 

4. Reverend J. Wilson, D.D., F.R.S. 

5. Rao S. Bhasker Damodar. 

6. R. Haines, M.B. 

7. G. C. M. Birdwood, M.D. 

8. Sir Jamsetjee Jejeebhoy, Bart. 

9. W.J. Moore. M.D., L.R.C.P. 

10. W. C. Coles, M.D., M.R.C.P. 

11. G. R. Ballingall, M.D. 

12. H. V. Carter, M.D. 

13. W. Hanhurv, B.A. 

14. W. G. Hunter, F.R.CS.E. 

15. T. B. Johnstone, M.D. 

16. Muncherjee Byramjee Cola, M.D. 

17. F. S. Stedman, Esq. 



FACULTY OF CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

1. Lieut. Col. Alfred DeLisle, R. E., Dean. 

2. Theodore Cooke, B.A., CE. 

3. The Honourable Lieut. Col. VV. F. Marriott. 

4. Lieut. Col. J. A. Ballard, R. E., C.B. 
6. Lieut Col. H. Barr. 

6. Cowasjee Jehanfreer, Esq. 

7. R. W. Graham, C.E. 

8. Major W. L. Merewether, C.B. 

9. Captain E. B. Holland, R. E. 
10. F. J. Candy, M.A. 

11 Captain VV. E. Barker, L N. 
\2. D.J. Kennelly, F.R.A.S. 

13. Bhugwandass Pinshotumdass, Esq. 

14, Col. J. Barnes Dunsterville. 



FACULTY OF CIVIL ENGINEERING, (fec. 151 

15. Lieut. Col. J. G. Fife, R. E. 

16. Col. M. K.Kennedy, R. E. 

17. Capt. L. Nasmyth, R. E. 

18. Khan Babadoor Pudumjee Pestonjee. 

19. Col. C. W. Tremenhere, R. E. 

20. V. Jugonnathjee Sunkersett, Esq. 

21. Captain St. Clair Wilkins, R. E. 

22. Henry Coke, M.A. 

23. Kerupant Luxumun Chhatrey, Esq. 

24. Captain Sherard Osborn, C.i3.,R..N. 

25. Premchund Roychund, Esq. 



SYNDICATE. 

Sir A. Grant, Bart., LL.D., V.C., President. 
The Rev. J Wilson, D.D. F.R.S. ..") <. ,. 

The Rev. C- D. DuPort, M. A y'^'jnclic.'i 

J. P. Hnghlings, B.A J '"^ ^''^'' 

R. T. Reid, LL.D I Sijndics 

K. West, B. A 5 in Law. 

R. Haines, M. B., Syndic in Medicine. 

Lieut. Col. J. A.Baliard, R. E., C.B., Syndic in Civil 

Engineering. 
R. S. Sinclair, LL.D., Registrar, Secretary. 



REGISTRAR. 
Robert Sharpe Sinclair, LL.D. 



BOARD OF ACCOUNTS. 

Sir A. Grant, Bart., LL.D., V. C, Chairman. 

G. C. M. Birdwood, M. D. 

Andrew Grant, Esq. 

Kursandas Madhavadas, Esq. 

R. S. Sinclair, LL. D., Regi.'itrar, Secretary* 



152 SUCCESSION LISTS. 

Succession Lists. 
CHANCELLOR. 

1857 John, Lord Elphinstone, G. C. H. 
1860 Sir George Russell Clerk, K. C B. 

1862 Sir Henky Hartle P^dward Frere, K.C.B. 

VICE-CHANCELLOR. 

1857 Sir William Yardley, Knight, Chief Justice. 

1858 Sir Henry Davison, Knight, Chief Justice 
1860 Sir Joseph Arnould, Knight, M. A., Puisne 

Justice. 

1863 Sir Alexander Grant, Bart., M. A. 

1865 The Hon. Alexander Kinloch Forbes, Judge 

of the High Court. 
1865 Sir Alexander Grant, Bart., LL.D. 



DEANS. 
L — Dean in Arts. 

1859 Aug., John Harkness, LL.D. 

1862 July, Sir Alexander Grant, Bart, M.A. 

1863 Feb., Rev. John Wilson, D.D., F.R.S. 

II. — Dean in Law. 

1860 July, Arthur James Lewis, Esq., Advocate Ge- 

neral. 

1861 Jan., William Loudon, Esq., Administrator 

General. 

1862 Jan., James Eraser Hore, M.A. 

III. — Dean in Medicine. 

1858 March, B. P. Rooke, M.D. 
1860 Oct., John Peet, M.D. 
1865 Jan., Herbert .John (;iraud, M.D. 
1865 Oct., Robert Haines, M.B. 



REGISTRAR. 153 

IV. — Dean in Civil Engineering- 

1858 Feb., The Hon. Arthur Malet. 

1^60 Aug., Col. Walter Scott, Bombay Engineers. 

1862 Jan., Col. H. B. Turner, Bombay Engineers. 

1862 Sept., Major Genl. Walter Scott, Bomb. Eng. 

1863 June, Col. Harry Rivers, Bombay Engineers. 
1865 April, Capt. H. St. Clair Wilkins, R.E. 
1865 Oct., Lieut. Col. Alfred DeLisle, R.E. 



REGISTRAR. 
1858 Jan., Robert Sharpe Sinclair, LL.D. 



154 



UNIVERSITY. 



GRADUATES.* 
M. A. 



Colleges. 
1865, Elphinstone. 
„ Ditto. 



1. Ranade, Mahadeva Govind,-}* 

2. Wagle, Bala Mungesh, 

B. A. 

1. Bal, Keshawa Bapuji, 

2. Bapat, Janardan Vinayak, 

3. Bedarkar, Khanderao Chimanrao, 

4. Bhagwat, Govind Ramchundra, 

5. Bhandarkar, RamkrislinaGopal,!]:^ 1862, ElpliinstDne 

and Poona. 

6. Dalvi, Dinanath Atmarain,lj 
7- Datiya, Motilal Ramprasad, 

8. Gaswalla, Ardesir Framjee, 

9. Gazdar, Jamshedji Jivanji, 

10. Jatar, Shriram Bhikaji, 

11. Kohiarjee, Ratanshah Eruckshah, 

12. Kothari, Girdharlal Dayaldass, 1864, 



1865, Elphinstone. 

1864, Ditto. 
1863, Ditto. 

1865, Poona. 



1865 



Elphinstone. 

Ditto. 

Ditto. 

Ditto. 
Poona. 
Elphinstone. 

Ditto and 
Poona. 

13. Kunte, Mahadeva Moreshwar, 1864, Free Genl. As. 

Inst., Bom. 

14. Madgarakar, Ramchundra Vishnu, 1863, Elphinstone. 

15. Marphatiya, Nagindass Tulsidas, „ Ditto. 

16. Mehta, Phirozshaw Merwanji,§ 1864, Ditto. 



* The names are arvang-ed alphabetically according to the surnames. 

t Honours in History, and Gold Medal. 

X Passed M. A. Examination in Sanskrit and English in 18G3. 

M. A. Degree not yet conferred. 
II First Division. 
§ Passed M. A. Examination in History and Philosophy in 1864. 

W. A. Degree not y^ conferred. 



GRADUATES. 155 

Colleges. 

17. Mehta, Thakurdass Atmaram, 1865, Elpliinstone. 

18. Modak, Wamoii Abaji, 1862, Ditto. 

19. Modi, Kaikhosro Edulji, 1864, Ditto. 

20. Mmislii, Mansuklal Mugatlal, „ Ditto. 

21. Pandit, Sliankar Pan duruiig, 1865, Ditto. 

22. Pathak, Vithal Narayen, 1864, Free Genl. As. 

Inst., Bombay. 

23. Patuck, Shapurjee Hormusjee,l| 1865, Elpliinstone. 

24. Punjabee, ChoohermuU Koonder- 

mulljjl „ Ditto. 

25. Shroff, Hormusjee Ilatanjee,§ 1864, Ditto. 





L. M. 




College. 


1. 


De Rozario, Luis Phillippe, 


1863, ( 


Grrant Medical. 


9. 


DeSouza, Philip Clement, 


18G4, 


Ditto. 


3. 


DeSouza, Pedro Jose Lucis, 


1865, 


Ditto. 


4. 


Hakeem, Shaik Sultan, 


1865, 


Ditto. 


5. 


Howell, John Alexander, J J 


5J 


Ditto. 


6. 


Khody, Rustamji Nusserwanji, 


1864, 


Ditto. 


7. 


Kothare, Shamrao Jugganath, 


1865, 


Ditto. 


8, 


Lamna, Nashirwanji Jahangir, 


18G2, 


Ditto. 


9. 


Nadurshaw, Rastumjee Jamsed- 








jee^l 


1865, 


Ditto. 


10. 


Vaidh, Gopal Shivram, 


1864, 


Ditto. 


11 


Vikaji, Kaikhosru Eustomji, 


1862, 


Ditto. 



Ij First Division. 

§ Passed M. A. Examination in History and Philosophy in 1864. 

M .A, Degree not yet conferred. 
X X First Class. 



156 UNIVERSITY. 

Colleges. 

12. Barjorji Beramji,* 1862, Grant Medical. 

13. Sakharam Arjun,* 18G3, Ditto. 

14. Shantaram Vitthal,* 1862, Ditto- 

15. Shekh Abdul Karim,* 1863, Ditto. 



UNDERGRADUATES. 

Undergraduates and others who have passed 
THE First Examination in Arts. 

Colleges. 

1 . Aptay, Maliadev Chimnajee, 1855, Poona. 

2. Bal, Krisbnaji Bapuji, 1861, Elphinstone. 

3. Deobhankar, Narayen Waman, 1864, Poona. 

4. Dbairyawan, Keshawa Vinayak, „ Elpbinstone. 

5. Gadgil, Janardan Sakharam, 1861, Ditto. 

6. Kane, Mabadev Visbnii, 1865, Ditto. 

7. Keskar, Ilari Bhagwant, 1863, Ditto. 

8. Kher, Krislinajee Narayen, 1865, Ditto. 

9. Kunte, Anna Moresvara, „ Ditto. 

10. Mayadev, Trimbakrao Bapuji, 1862, Ditto. 

11. Mistri, Pallanji Aderji, 1864, Ditto. 

12. Naik, Bal want Sitaram, „ Poona. 

13. Paranjpay, Shivram Bapooji, 1865, Ditto. 

14. Parmanand, Narayan Mabadeva, 1861, Ditto. 

15. Patel, Dadabhai Sorabji, 1865, Ditto. 

16. Patel, Rastamjee Merwanjee, „ Ditto. 

17. Putiwurthan, Sitaram Vishwanatb, „ Ditto. 

18. Ranade, Govind Krishna, 1864, Ditto. 

19. Sane, Balaji Bapuji, 1865, Ditto. 

20. Soda, Tulsidas Devidas, 1864, Ditto. 

* Surname not known. 



UNDERGRADUATES. 



157 



21. Soman, Wasudeva Gopal, 

22. Tavernwalla, Sorabji Muncherji, 

23. Thakura, Ballaji Babaji, 

24. Udasa, Yashwanta Anandrawa, 

25. Unwala, Jamsetji Navaroji, 

26. Vikaji, Framji Rastamji, 
27- t Balwant Bbikaji, 

28. t Barjorji Kharshedji, 

29. t Ganpat Amrootrao, 

30. t Govindas Varjivandas, 

31. t Bahimtoola Mohammed, 



Colleges. 
1865, Elphinstone. 

1864, Ditto. 

1865, Ditto. 
„ Ditto. 

Ditto. 

1863, Ditto. 
„ Poona. 

Ditto. 

1864, Ditto. 

1865, Elphinstone. 

Ditto. 



Undergraduates and others who have passed 
THE First Examination for l. m. 



1. Baptista, Paulo Maria, 

2. Da Cunha, Joseph Gerson, 

3. Gomes, x\ntonio Simplicio, 

4. Gonidia, Amidass Munjee, * 

5. Joyakar, Atmaram Sadashiwa, 



College. 

1864, Grant Medical. 

1865, Ditto. 
„ Ditto. 
„ Ditto. 

Ditto. 



Undergraduates and others who have passed 
the Matriculation Examination only. 

Colleges and Schools- 

1. Abbyanker, Gopal Balkrishna, 1865, Poona Free 

Ch. Mis. Ins. 

2. Aitken, Benjamin, „ Private Tuition. 



t Surname not known. 
14 c 



• First Division. 



158 



UNIVERSITY. 



3. Ajgowker, Achoot Narayen, 

4. Ajgowker, Wassudeo Narayen, 

5. Ali, Abdool Ali Akhbar, 

6. Angal, Ranrichandra Govind, 

7. Angre, Jaysingrao Esji, 

8. Askedkar, Lakshman Yadav, 

9. Bakle, Waman Ganesb, 

10. Banajee, Errucbsba Maneckjee, 

1 1 . Bapat, Wamon Narryen, 

1 2. Bapat, Ramcrushna Chimnajee, 

13. Barve, Anandrao Sukharam, 

14. Bennett, Hormusji Pestonjee, 



Colleges ^ Schools. 

1865 Rutnagberry & 

Poona Higb S. 

„ Poona College. 

1863, Elpb. Central 

Sebool. 

„ Poona College. 

Ditto. 

„ Elpb. College. 

1865, Poona College. 

„ Surat Higb 

Sebool. 

1863, Poona College. 

1865, Ditto. 

1863, Pri. Tuition. 

„ Elpb. College. 



15. Bbagwat, Sbankara Ramebandra, 1865, Poona HighS. 



16. Bhandarkar, Raoji Ganesb, 

17. Bbat, Narayan Ramebandra, 

18. Bhat, Gungadbar Anunt, 

19. Bbat, Ramkrisbna Devsbanker, 

20. Bbatawadekur, Vinayak Ram- 

ebandra, 



„ Free Genl. As. 

Inst., Bombay. 

1863, Elpb. College. 

„ Poona College. 

,, Elpb. College. 

,, Poona College. 



21. 
22. 
23. 



Bbatawadekar, GujananaCrisbna, 1865, Elpb. Inst. 



Bhate, Balwant Gopal, 
Bbatkbanday, Sbreepata Waija- 
natb, 



24. Bbatkbande, Gopal Jpnardan, 



Ditto. 

Belgaum Sir- 
dars' Higb S. 
Poona College 
& Sirdars' Higb 
S. Belgaum. 



UNDERGRADUATES. 159 

Colleges ^ Schools. 

25. Bhawey, Raojee Prubhakar, 1865, Poona High 

School & Poona 
Vernacular College. 

26. Bhiday, Bhicajee Ramchunder, 1865, Poona High S. 

27. Bhudkuracur, Wassoodeo Nil- 

kant, 1865, Sattara Govt. 

English S. and 
Poona College. 

28. Bhut, Chintamon Narayen, „ Poona High S. 

29. Bottliboe, Framjee Jamshedjee, 1863, Elph. College. 

30. Bottliwala, Dhanjibhai Shapurji, 1861, Ditto. 

31. Boyce, Pestonji Edalji, 1865, Elph. Inst. & 

College. 

32. Britto, Julius Lucas, 1863, Elph. & Cent. 

School. 

33. Brumhay, Narayen Balkrishna, 1865, Poona College. 

34. Bulsara, Ratanji Shapurji, „ Elph. Inst. & 

College. 

35. Burde, Dadabhai Shapurji, 1862, Elph. College. 

36. Callay, Gungadher Harry, 1865, Poona High 

School . 
d7. Cama, Peroshaw Ratanjee, „ Elph. College. 

38. Capadia, Dorabjee Temooljee, 1863, Ditto. 
39- Cheechgar, Hormusjee Mancharjee, „ Ditto. 

40. Chembuj-kar, Krishnarao Antoba, „ Ditto. 

41. Christie, Albert D. S., 1862, Poona Semin. 

42. Contractor, Framjee Rastamjee, 1865, Sir J. J. P. B. 

Inst. 

43. Cooper, Sorabji Navaroji, „ Elph. College. 

44. Cooper, Maneckji Bejanji, „ Sir J. J. P. B. 

Inst. 



160 UNIVERSITY. 

Colleges ^ Schools. 

45. Dadachanjee, Kershasjee Rastam- 

jee, 1863, Elph. College. 

46. Dalai, Jamshetjee Ardeshir, 1865, Elph. Inst. 

47. Daruwalla, Rastamjee Ardersher, „ Ditto. 

48. Dattey, Jaggonnath Narayen, 1863, Poona College. 

49. Datar, Naro GoTind, 1863, Poona Engi- 

neering College. 

50. Daye, Revashankar Tripurashan- 

ker, ,, Poona College. 

51. Dave, Bhanushankara Narana- 

shunkara, „ Elph. College. 

52. De Gama, Jeronymo Accacio, 1865, Free Genl. As. 

Inst., Bombay. 

53. Desai, Manilal Govindram, 1863, Ditto. 

54. Deshmookh, Gunesh Dadajee, „ Poona College. 

55. Deshmookh, Krishnarao Gopal, „ Ahmedabad 

High School. 

56. Deshmookh, Ramchandra Gopal, 1865, Ditto & Poona 

High School. 

57. Devidas, Bhagwandas Manmo- 

handas, 1863, Elph. College. 

58. Dheckney, Ganesh Goyind, „ Poona High S. 

59. Dhond, Saja Krishna, „ Poona College. 

60. Dhurandhar, Sadashiv Vishwa- 

natb, „ Ditto. 

61. Dixit, Balnarayan Govrinnarayan, 1 862, Ditto. 

62. Dubash, Jamshedji Kharshedji, 1863, Elph. Cent- S. 

63. Duvey, Atmashanker Tripura- 

shanker, 1865, Surat High S. 

64. Engineer, Rastamjee Manockjee, 1863, Elph. College. 

65. Gambhir, Sorabji Merwanji, 1865, Ditto. 



UNDERGRADUATES. 



66. Gandhi, Shanker Raojee, 



^7. 
68. 
69. 
70. 

71. 
72. 
73- 

74. 

7^. 

77. 

78. 



79. 
80. 

81. 

82. 
83. 
84. 

85. 



Garud, Dhondu Shamrao, 
Ghate, Narayen Sukhram, 
Godbolay, Vitbul Bapuji, 
Godbole, Keshow Paiidurang, 

Gokhle, Gunnesh Narayan, 
Gokhle, Balaji Vinayak, 
Gokhlay, Narayan Krishna, 



161 

Colleges ^ Schools. 



1865, Poona Free 

Chur. Mis. Inst. 
1863, Elph. College. 
1863, Poona College. 
1865, Elph. Inst. 
„ Poona Free 
Chur. Mis. Inst. 
1863, Poona College. 

„ Ditto. 

1865, Ditto and 
Poona High S. 
„ Poona College. 
,, Poona High S- 



Gokhlay, Dinker Ballal, 

Golay, Vithal Mahadeo, 

Gonsalves, Francisco Jeronymo, 1863, Poona College. 

Gorakshkar, Ramchandra Lak- 

shuman, 
Goonderia, Maneklal Gordhan 

das, 



1865, Elph. College. 



Gooplay, Rajaram Chimnajee, 
Guna, Harjivandas Waliram, 



1865, Broach Govt. 
Eng. School & 
Elph. Inst. 
„ Poona Free 

Ch. Mis. Inst. 
„ Free Genl. As. 
Inst., Bombay. 
Gunjikar, Ramchandra Bhickajee, „ Elph- Inst. 

Cent. School. 
Gunpoolay Narayen Vinayek, „ Poona High S. 

Hatch, Nanabhoy Harry chandra, 1863, Elph. College. 
Herpatak, Gopal Babaji, 1865, Poona Free 

Ch. Mis. Inst. 
Jatar, Damodhur Bhikajee, 1863, Poona College. 



162 UNIVERSITY. 

Colleges ^ Schools. 

86. Jaykar, Shamrao Kashinath, 1863, Poona College. 

87. Joshi, Krishnaji Kashinath, „ Ditto. 

88. Joshi, Nana Bapu, 1862, Grant College. 

89. Joshi, Dattu Narsingh, 1865, Free Genl. As. 

Inst-, Bomhay. 

90. Joshi, Vishwanath Raghnnath, „ Poona College 

& Poona High S. 

91. Kaley, Krishnajee Govind, 1863, Elph. College. 

92. Kaley, Mottabhai Sadananji, „ Ditto 

93. Kaley, Nanabbai Sadananji, 1865, Elph. Cent. S. 

94. Kamalaker, GanpatPandurang, 1863, Elph. College. 

95. Karmarkar, Krisnaji Narayen, 1865, Robert Money 

Inst. 

96. Kathavti, Abaji Vishnu, 1863, Poona Cent. S. 

97. Kelkara, Krishnajee Raghu- 

natha, 1865, Poona High S. 

98. Khambatta, Pestonji Aspandi- 

arjee, „ Elph Inst. 

99. Khambatta, Nasarwanji Jehan- 

geerji, „ Ditto. 

100. Khambate, Nasherwanji Nao- 

rojee, 1863, Elph. College. 

101. Khandeker, Trimbuck Gunga- 

dher, 1865, Poona College. 

102. Kher, Wassudeo Ballal, 1862, Elph. College. 

103. Khisty, Eshwant Hurry, 1863, Ditto & Genl. 

As. Inst. 

104. Kertane, Vinayek Janardan, 1859, Elph. College. 

105. Khory, Edulji Jamshedji, 1865, Ditto. 

106. Kothare, Rangaya, 1863, Elph. College. 

107. Kothare, Balaji Sitaram, 1865, Free Genl. As. 

Inst., Bombay, 



UNDERGRADUATES. 163 

Colleges ^ Schools. 
lOS. Kothare, Nanu Narayen, 1865, Prubhoo Semi- 

nary,Elph. Inst- 

109. Kuranee, Peroshaw Nusserwanjee, ,, Elph. College- 

110. Lalkaka, Ratamjee Jamsetjee, „ Ahmedabad S. 

&Elph.S. 
HI. Limaya, Bhasker Balkrishna, 1861, Elph. College. 

112. Limaya, Mahadji Lakshman, 1863, Poona College- 

113. Mahadthalker, Trimbuck Aba- 

jee, 1865, Elpb Inst- 

il 4. Marathi, Narayen Sadashiva, „ Poona Free 

Chur. Mis. Inst. 

115. Mawlankara, Krishnarawa Nar- 

sopunta, „ Ahmedabad 

High School & Elph. 
I. Cent. School. 

116. Mehta, Ferozshah Rustomji, 1863, Elph. College. 

117. Mody, Edaiji Ratanji, „ Ditto 

118. Moodhalkur, Balaji Narsinha, 1865, Elph. Inst. 

119. Moodliar, Coopooswamy Vizi- 

arungum, „ Poona College. 

120. Motivalla, Dossabhoy Bejanji, „ Sir J- J. P- B- 

Inst- 

121. Mutalick, Narayen Anant, „ Poona College- 

122. Nadkarni, Ghanasham Nilkant, „ Elph- Inst- 

123. Natoo, Cashinath Govind, „ Poona Free 

Chur. Mis. Inst. 

124. Navalkar, Dinnanath Hurry- 

chundra, 1863, Elph. College- 

125. Navalkara, Ganapata Srikrish- 

na, 1865, Ditto. 

126. Nazar, Kuvarji Sorabji, 1863, Ditto- 



164 



UNIVERSITY. 



Colleges ^ Schools- 

127. Nene, Gopal Balwant, 1863, Poona College. 

128. Oka, Ramcbandra Govind, „ Poona High S. 

129. Oza, Lakshmishankar Hariprasad, „ Ditto. 

130. Oomerigur, Hormosji Rastam- 

jee, 



131. Padhey, Hari Gopal, 

132. Paradee, Mulkoo Sayajee, 

133. Parajpe, Narayen Madhva, 



134. Parajpe, Wamon Ganesh, 



135. Parkhee, Ganesh Yeshwant, 

136. Patel, Rustumjee Merwanjee, 
137- Patel, Merwanjee Edaljee, 

138. Patel, Mancharjee Framjee, 

139. Patunkar, Krishnajee, 

140. Patwardhan, Bapuji Ramchan- 

dra, 

141. Patwardhan, Vishnu Gopal, 

142. Patwardhan, Venayek Ram- 

chandra, 

143. Pereira, Matthias Francisco, 

144. Phadke, Narhar Gudadhur, 

145. Phadkey, Shreedhur Bapujee, 

146. Phatak, Atmaram Bapu, 



1865, Sir J. J. P. B. 

Inst. 

1863, Poona College. 

1865, Poona Free 

Chur. Mis. Inst 

„ Dhoolia High 

School & Poona 

College. 

„ Elph. College 

and Ahmed- 



rgur 



Govt. 



English School. 

1863, Poona College. 

„ Bom. Pro. S. 

1862, Elph. College. 

1863, Ditto. 

„ Poona High S. 

1861, Elph. College. 
1863, Poona College. 

1865, Poona High S. 
1863, Elph. Cent. S. 
„ Poona College. 
„ Elph. College. 
1865, Poona Engi- 
neering College. 



UNDERGRADUATES. 165 

Colleges ^ Schools. 
147- Pilli, Armogun Narayanswami, 1863, Poona College. 

148. Prudhan, Bajaba Rainchandra, „ Ditto & Poona 

High School. 

149. Punegar, Bahmanjee Edalji, 1865, Sir. J. J. P. B. 

Inst. 

150. Puro, Ramchundra Huri, 1863, Elph. College. 

151. Ranadiway, Dwarkanath Nara- 

yen, „ Poona College. 

152. Ranaday, Wamon Govind, 1865, Poona Vernacu- 

lar College. 

153. Rishee, Luxumon Govind, „ Ditto & Poona 

High School. 

154. Rodrigues, Vincent, 1862, Elph. Cent. S. 

155. Sabde, Govind Keshav, 1863, Elph. College. 

156. Samarth, Balkrishna Martund, „ Ditto. 

157. Sanjana, Pestonji Cowasji, „ Ditto. 

158. Sahasrabudhi, Hari Kondeo, 1865, Poona College. 

159. Saranjame, Waman Prabhakar, 1863, Ditto. 

160. Sate, Narayan Vinayak, „ Poona C. Sch. 

161. Sate, Krishnaj i Kesheo, 1 8 6 5, Poona High S . 

162. Sattana, Bomanji Sorabji, 1861, Elph. College. 

163. Settna, Jamsetjee Rastamjee, 1865, Elph. Inst. & 

Private Tuition. 

164. Shirgaokar, Madhava Narayan, 1859, Elph. College. 

165. Surti, Nashirwanji Sorabji, „ Ditto. 

166. Shribastum, Lala Surooplal, 1865, Poona College. 

167. Sohoni, Anant Vinayak, „ Poona Free 

Church Mis- 
sion Inst. 

168. Tailang, Cashinath Trimbuk, „ Elph. Inst. 

169. Thakur, Shripad Babaji, „ Elph. College. 



166 



UNIVERSITY. 



170. Tilaka, Gopala Rawajee, 

171. Tiluck, Narhar Poorshotum, 

172. Tivarekar, Ganpat Krishna, 

173. Toolloo, Rawjee Wassodeo, 

174. Vakeel, Ratanram Jayanand, 

175. Varde, Vishnu Sadashiv, 

176. W'adiya, Hormasji Ardesar, 

177. Wadiya, Govind Vishnu, 

178. "Wagle, Bhagwant Mungesh, 

179. t AbdoolGhani, 

180. t Abdul Rahim, 

181. f Alumal Trickumdas, 

182. t Ambalal Sakerlal, 

183. t Ardesar Pestonji, 

184. t Baba Gokle, 

185. f Babaji Lakshman, 

186. f Bamanji Edalji, 

187. "t Bhai Ramchandra, 

188. t Bhaskar Hari, 

189. t Bhikaji Ramchandra, 

190. t Chandulal Mathuradas, 

191. t Chhagonlal Bhudharfee, 

192. t Dadabhai Dosabhai, 

193. f Dayabhai Hurjeevandass, 



Colleges ^ Schools. 
1865 Poona Engi- 
neering College. 
„ Poona High S. 
„ Elph. Inst. 
„ Ditto. 

„ Surat High S. 
1860, Elph. College. 
1863, Ditto. 
1865, Elph. Inst. 
Ditto. 
„ Ditto. 

1863, Elph. College. 

1862, Kurrachee S. 
& Elph. C. S. 

1865, Ahmedabad 

High School. 
1860, Elph. College. 
1859, Poona College. 
„ Ditto. 

1863, Surat High S- 
1859, Elph. CoUege. 

„ Ditto 

„ Poona College. 

1863, Elph. Inst. 

1865, Broach Govt. 

English S. 

1861, Elph. College. 

1865, Surat High S. 

& Elph. College. 



t Surname not known. 



UNDERGRADUATES. 



167 







Colleges ^ Schools. 


194. 


t Dinanath Vishnu, 


1863, Elph. Inst. 


195. 


t Dinsha Edalji, 


1861, Elph. College. 


196. 


t Dorabji Edalji, 


1863, Elph. Inst. 


197. 


t Dorabji Padamji, 


„ Poona College. 


198. 


t Dvvarkanath Raghoba, 


Ditto. 


199. 


t Eshwant Ambaji, 


1859, Poona College. 


200, 


f Firozsbah Dadabhai, 


1863, Ditto. 


201. 


t Framji Bomanji, 


1861, Elph. Cent. S. 


202. 


t Framji Sorabji, 


1860, Elph. College. 


203. 


f Ganpatrao Nnnabbai, 


1863, Elph. C. Seh. 


204. 


t Ghelabhai Manecklal, 


„ Surat High S. 


205. 


t Ghelabhai Thakordas, 


1865, Surat High S. 


206. 


t Girdharlal Ratanlal, 


1863, Elph. C. Sch. 


207. 


t Gokuldas Kahandas, 


„ Elph. College. 


208. 


f Govind Balwant, 


1865, Poona College. 


209. 


-} Govind Lakshman, 


1860, Ditto. 


210. 


f Harjibbai xispendiarji. 


1861, Elph. College. 


211. 


f Harilal Chaganlal, 


1865, Ahmedabad 

High School. 


212. 


t Hormazji Jahangir, 


1861, Elph, College. 


213. 


-j* Hormazji Shapurji, 


1862, Ditto. 


214. 


t Jugjiwan Atmaram, 


1863, Elph. Inst. 


215. 


f Jamshedji Manakji, 


1861, Elph. College. 


216 


t Javerilal Umiashankar, 


1859, Ditto. 


217 


t Jaya Satyabodhrao Tirmal 


- 




rao, 


1863, Free Genl. As. 
Inst., Bombay. 


218 


t Kalianrnye Luxmishunker, 


1865, Surat High S. 




t Surname not known. 



168 


UNIVERSITY. 


Colleges ^ Schools. 


219. 


, f Kashinath Ramchundra, 


1863, PoonaHighS. 


220. 


f Kashinatli Marathe, 


„ Poona College. 


221- 


• t Kavasji Edalji, 


1861, Elph. College. 


222. 


f Keshewlall Nerbherara, 


1865, Private Tui. 


223. 


f Krishnajl Bhikaji, 


1863, Poona College. 


224. 


t Khundoobhoy Goolabhoy, 


1865, Surat High S. 


225. 


f Lalubhai Gordhandass, 


1863, Elph. College. 


226. 


f Madhwachram Balwacharani 


, „ Surat High S. 


227. 


f Madliowrao Bhaskerjee, 


1865, Elph. College. 
& Govt. Law S. 


228. 


t Mahadaji Vishnu, 


I860, Elph. College. 


229. 


t Maneckji Nassarwanji, 


1863, Surat High S. 


230. 


f Maneklal Jugjivan, 


1865, Ahmedabad 

High School. 


231. 


f Manidharprasad Tapiprasad, 


1863, Ditto. 


232. 


f Moroo Sadashiva, 


„ Poona Mission 
Institution. 


233. 


f Motilal Runchordas, 


1865, Surat High S. 


234. 


f Motinaram Guvinaram, 


Ditto. 


235. 


f Nagaradas Narotumadas, 


„ Elpb. Inst. 
Central School. 


236. 


t Ndnabhai IlRridas, 


1859, Law School. 


237. 


t Nana Thosar, 


1862, Poona College. 


238. 


t Naorozji Padamji, 


1861, Ditto. 


239. 


f Nasserwanji Kharshedji, 


1863, Elph. C. Sch. 


240. 


f Nitcbabhai Morarji, 


1865, Surat High S. 


241. 


f Nowroji Dorabji, 


1863, Poona College. 


242. 


f Pandurang Balaji, 


1859, Ditto. 


243. 


f Parashram Vishnu, 


1860, Elph. College. 




t Surname not known. 





UNDERGRADUATES. 



169 



-44. t Raghonath Naavan, 
'-'45. f Ramakant Krishna, 
216. f Ramchandra Anandrao, 

247. f Ramchandra Bhairao, 

248. t Raoji Ganesh, 
219. t Sadashiva Hari, 

2.50. f Samookhram Navindhrai, 

251. t Shaikh Ilayat, 

252. t Thakurdas Keshavljil, 

253. t Tapidas Dayaram, 

254. t Utamram Narbiiiram, 

255. f Venkatrao Ramchandra, 

256. t yinaynk Balwantrao, 
2h1 . f Vinayak Janardan, 

258. t Vinayak Krishna, 

259. t Virbhadra Madiwalaya, 

260. t Virprasad Tapiprasad, 

261. t Vishnu Balkrishna, 

262. t Vishnu Sadashiv, 



Colleges $- Schools 

1S60 Elph. College. 

„ Poona College. 

„ Elph. College. 

18GI, Poona College. 

18)2, Poona College. 

1863, Elph. Inst. & 

Private Tuition. 

„ Snrat High S. 

„ Poona Mission 

School. 

1851, Elph. C. Sch. 

1855, Surat High S. 

1860, Elph. College. 

1859, Poona College. 

1560, Elph. College. 
1859, Ditto. 

18 il, Poona College. 
„ Belg. Sirdar S. 
18G3, Ahmedahad 

High School^ 
1859, Poona College." 

1561, Ditto. 



t Surname not known. 



15c 



170^ 



EXAMINERS AND LISTS, 1861-65. 
I. ARTS. 

1. EXAMINATION FOR M. A. 

History and Pfilgsophy. 

EXAMINERS. 

W. Wordsworth, B. A. 7 t tt- ^ p t^i -i i 
Rev. R. Stotheit, M. A.] ^° history & Philosophy. 

Passed the Examination. 

College. 

Mehta, Phirozsliaw Merwanji Elphinstone. 

Shroff, Ilormusjee Ratanjee Ditto. 



2. MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 

November 1864. 

EXAMINERS. 

Rev. R. Stothert, M.A. ( ^" English and in Ele- 
R. G. OxENHAM, B.A. .r\ ^entary History and 

|_ ueography. 

R. S. Sinclair, LL. D . . ? In Mathematics,^and in 
Rev. C. 



liNCLAiR, LL. D .. >^" M'^thematics and in 
. D. DuPoBT, M.A. C ^'^"^"^ta^y Natural 



Rev. J. Wilson, D.D., ) 

F.R.S Mn Sanskrit. 

G. BUHLER, Ph. D > 

Major T. Candy i 

Bala Mangesh Waglf, J^In Marathi, 
B.A ) 



FIRST EXAMINATION IN ARTS. 171 



WILSON, U.U.,^ 

F.R.S. ""Un Gujarathi. 

^AGINDAS lULSIDAS ' -^ 



lev. J. Wilson, D.D., 

Marphatia, B.A ^ 

N. Fernandes, Esq .... ) 

^. A. De Carvalho, > In Portuguese. 

G.G.M.C. > 

Rev. J. Wilson, D.D., ^ 

F.R S > In Hindustani. 

A. Faulkner, Esq ) 

Rev. William Beynon.. 1 

Mr. Virabhadra Madi- > In Canarese. 

valaya ) 

109 Candidates passed. 



3. FIRST EXAMINATION IN ARTS. 

February 1865. 

EXAMINERS. 

Raymond West, B.A. . . ") In English History and 
W. J. Jeaffreson, B.A. . > Logic. 
Rev. John Wilson, D. D.,"^ 

F.R.S Sin Sanscrit. 

J. G. Buhler, Ph.D. ..J 
Major Thomas Candy. . . ^ 
Vithal Narayan Pa- )>ln Marathi. 

THAK, B.A J 

Rev. John Wilson, D.D.,-v 

NawndIsV TDLsiDAsr ' ' ( ^^ Guzerathi. 

Marphatia, B.A ^ 

J. P. IIughlings, B.A. . . ^ t t .. 
Rev. R. Stothert, M.A. . . j ^^^ ^^^'^- 



172 EXAMINATION FOR B. A. 

Rev. W. K. Fletcher,"^ In Butler's Scnuons I., 

M.A... ......> >- 11., 111., uiih Pre- 

Raymond West, B.A. ..J face. 

H. iM. BiRDwooD, M.A... ^ In Mathematics and 

Rev. C. D. DuPoRT, M.A. S Geop;raphy. 

H. J. GiRAUD, M.D ;^ In Chemistry, Heat, and 

R. Haines, M. B ] Electricity. 

15 Candidates passed. 

4. EXAMINATION FOR B.A., 
March 1865. 
EXAMINERS. 

J. P. HuGHLiNGs, B.A ..7 In English and in His- 
W. Wordsworth, B.A..5 tory. 

E. S. SiNCLAin, LL. D . . S ^"p,^°8'<= .""""^ ^^'J'' 

Rev.R. Stoxhert, M.A.) ?A .""f I?'' '" 

' C Political Economy. 

Rev. John Wilson, D.D.,*^ 

F.R.S ' ,, .. 

Mahadeo Govind r^. ,^In Marathi. 

nade, B.A .... J 

Rev. John Wilson, D.D.,~^ 

F.R.S ' p ,. 

Nagindass Tulsidass >^'' ^'^^z^rathi. 

Marphatia, B.A j 

Rev. John Wilson, D.D.,"^ 

F.U.S )>In Persian. 

Moossa Khan, Esq I 

J. G. BuHLIiR, Ph.D. ,.} J ^ . 

E. K. Lidderdale, LL.B.5 ^" ^^^'"• 

H. M. Birdwood, M.A.. S ^'' ^atliematics, Natu- 

Rev. C. D. DuPouT, M.A.) ^1 ^^^^^,^5??^^^^' ^ 

C Physical (jreooraphy. 

H. J. GiRAUD, M.D 7 [n Chemistry, Heat, aiid 

R. Maines, M.B 5 Electricity. 



IPIRST L. M. EXAMINATION. 173 

First Division. 

College. 

1 , Dalvi, Dinanatli Atmaram Elpliinstone. 

2. Patuck, Shapurjee Hormusjee Ditto- 

'. Punjabee, Choohermull Koondermull .. Ditto. 

Second Division. 

: . Bal, Keshawa Bapuji Elphinstone. 

2. Bhagwat, Govind Ramchundra Poona. 

3. Datiya, Motilal Ramprasad Elphinstone. 

4. Gaswalla, Ardesir Framjee Ditto. 

o. Gazdar, Jamshedji Jevanji. Ditto. 

€. Jatar, Shriram Bhikaji Poona. 

7. Kohiarjee, Ratanshah Eruckshah Elphinstone-, 

8- Mehta, Thakurdass Atmaram Ditto. 

9. Pandit, Shankar Pandurung Ditto. 



11. MEDICINE. 

1. FIRST L. M. EXAMINATIOiY, 
December 1864. 

EXAMINERS. 

II. J. Giraud, M.D. } In Materia Medica and 

G. G. M. Birdvvood, IM.D.i Botany. 

R. Haines, M.B. > In Anatomy and Che- 

W. G. Hunter, F.R.C.S.E. 5 mistry. 

I. Division. 

Collegit^, 

Goriidia, Amidass Munjee Grant. 

15c* 



174 



SECOND EXAMINATIOM. 



II. Divisio: 



1. Da Cunlia, Joseph Gerson Grant College- 

2. Gomes, Antonio Simplicio Ditto. 

3. Jayakar, Atmaram Sadashiva Ditto. 



2. SECOND L. M. EXAMINATION. 
March 1864. 

EXAMINEPxS. 

R. Haines, M.B ^ In Physiology and 

W.G Hunter, F.R.CS.E. ^ General Anatomy. 

W.G.HuNTER,F.R.C.S.E.^ , c 

F. S. Stedman, Esquire. . 5 ^^ ^"'Sery. 

C. JoYNT, M.D 7 T A/r V • 

W.Dymock,B.A I In Medicine. 

H. J. GiRAUD, M.D ^ In Medical Jurispru- 

II. Haines, M.B j dence. 

F. S. Stedman, Esquire. . / t ^,tj t 
C.JoyNT,M.D. ..! V In M'dvv.fery. 

First Class. 

College- 

1. Howell, John Alexander Grant, 

2. Nadiershaw, Rastumjee Jamsedjee Ditto. 

Second Class. 

1 . Dc Souza, Pedro Jose Lucis Ditto. 

2. Hakeem, Shaik Sultan Ditto. 

3. Kothare, Shamrao Jugganath Ditto 



DEGREES CONFERRED. 175 

DEGREES CONFERRED. 

Apiul 8th, 1865. 

M. A. 

College. 

lianade, ]Maliadev Goviiid Elphinstone. 

Wagle, Bala Mungesh Do. 

B. A. 
First Division. 

College. 

1 . Dalvi, Dinanatli Atmarara Elphinstone. 

2. Patuck, Sbapurjee Hormusjee Ditto. 

3. Piuijabee, Choohermull Koondermull . . Ditto. 

Second Division. 

1. Bal, Keshawa Bapuji Elphinstone. 

2. Bhagwat, Govind. Ramchundra Poona. 

3. Datiya, Moiilal Ramprasad Elphinstone. 

4. Gaswalla, Ardesir Framjee Ditto. 

f). Gazdar, Jamshedjee Jevanji Ditto 

G. Jatar, Shriram Bhikaji '. Poona. 

7. Kohiavjee, Ratanshah Eruckshah Elphinstone. 

5. Mehta, Thakurdass Atmaram Ditto. 

!). Pandit, Shankar Pandurung . . , Ditto. 

L. M. 

First Class. 

College, 

1 . Howell, John Alexander . . . , Grant. 

2. Nadiershaw, Rastumjee Jamshedjee . . Ditto. 

Second Class. 

1. De Souza, Pedro Jose Lucis Grant. 

2. Hakeem, Shaik Sultan Ditto. 

3. Kothare, Shamrao Jugganath Ditto. 






ENDOWMENTS. 



The Munguldass Natlioo- 
bhoy Travelling Fellow- 
ship 

The Maiiockjee Limjee 1 
Gold Medal f 

The Bhugwandass Pur 



Irs. 



ass Pur- "1 
Sanskrit > „ 



shotumdass 

Scholarship 

IV- 'I'he Ilomejee Cursetjee 1 

Prize / 



20,000 
5,000 

10,000 
5,000 



I 

I! 
HI 
IV 
V 



BENEFACTIONS. 

University Hall Rs. 1,00,000 

University Arms and ] , j,„^ 

Common Seal J " ^'^"" 

University Library Build- I ^^ 9,00 000 



The Rajabai Tower with "I 
Clock and Peal of Bells J 
Mace for the University.. 



2,00,000 
1,200 



40,000 



lotal. 



5,02,400 

Rs. 5.4,?,40() 



R. S. SINCLAIR, LL. D.. 

University Registrar. 



Octoher 2>\st, 18G5. 



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188 



XI. 



€anbat^m fax €mfmmc^ 
gjegms, 1864-65. 



The Fourth Convocation of the University of 
Bombay for Conferring Degrees was held in the 
Town Hall on the 8th April 1865, at 5 p. m. 

The Candidates for Degrees and Graduates 
were requested to be in the Durbar Room at 3 p. m., 
to sign their certificates. 

The Senate assembled in the Durbar Room to 
form the Procession. 

Visitors began to arrive shortly after four o'clock, 

■fc.T i» some having alighted from their 

^trlcel carriages at the large steps on the 

west side of the Town Hall, and 

others under the north porch. 

The Corinthian pilasters of the apse at the South, 
and the four Corinthian pillars 

and two on the west, — within 
which the dais of the University Semicircle was 
erected, — were adorned with colours significative of 
the Degrees to be conferred. Round the shafts of the 
pillars were spirally wreathed bands of blue (for Arts) 
and of red (for Medicine), while vertical stripes of the 
same hues alternated effectively with the white of the 
pilasters. On the dais, which was covered with red 
cloth edged with blue, was set the Chancellor's Chair, 



CONVOC FOR CONFERRING DEGREES, 1864-65. 189 

beneath the statue of Mountstuart Elphinstone, 
which served as the keystone to a double semicircular 
row of seats for the Fellows of the University. 
Within the semicircle, C(mveniently near the right 
hnnd of the Chancellor, were placed the Registrar's 
table and chair, the former being covered with a blue 
cloth which rested on the red ground of the dais. 
The certificates of the Degrees lay on the table. 
On the east and west of the dais, raised seats were 
constructed in the aisles, which 

cSTdidSlr ^^"^ ^^^"^ occupied by the Graduates 
of the University and the former 
eleves of the Recognized Colleges, and by the Candi- 
dates for Degrees. The Bachelors of Arts and the 
Licentiates of Medicine, and the Candidates for the 
Degrees of Master of Arts, Bachelor of Arts, and 
Licentiate of Medicine, wore the gowns proper to 
their respective Degrees. 

From the University Semicircle a straight path 

extended down the middle of the hall to the central 

door under the orchestra; and the large oblong 

spaces on the east and west of the path were filled 

, _ ^ with sofas and chairs for visitors. 

Visitors Seats. ^^^^ ^^^^^ ^^^^^^^ ^^^ University 

Semicircle being reserved for ladies. Seats were also 
placed in the aisles. 

At a quarter past five o'clock the south-east door 

of the hall opened to admit the 

Order of the procession, when all present arose 

and remained standing, while the 

procession moved in the following order : — 

Fellows. (In pairs.) 

Captain Sherard Osborn, C.B., R.N., Keroopunt Luxuman, Esq. ;, 

Kursondass Madhowdass, Esq., H. Coke, M.A. ; 

Dadoba Pandoorung, Esq., Andrew Grant, Esq. ; 



190 CONVOCATION FOR 

Venayekrao Juggonnathjee, Esq., Venayekrao Wassoodewjee, Esq. : 
Sorabjee Pestonjee Frarajee, Esq., Khan Bahadoor Pudumjee Pestonjee 
Robert George Oxenham, B.A., Charles Gonne, C.S. ; 
Nicholas Fercandes, Esq., Rev. Dhunjeebhoy Nowrojee j 
Bhugwandass Purshotumdass, Esq., Rev. James Aitken j 
Manockjee Cursetjee, Esq., Mungiildass Nathoobhoy, Esq. ; 
Robert Haimay, Esq., D. J. Kennelly, F.R.A.S; 
J. G. Buhler, Ph. D., F. J. Candy, M.A ; 
The Rev. W. Maule, S.C.L., Rao Saheb Wisswanath Narayan Mundlik 
Sir Jamsetjee Jejeebhoy, Bart., R.W. Graham,. C.E. j 
Gokuldass Tejpal, Esq., L.H. Bayley, Barrister at-Law; 
Narayan Dinanathjee, Esq., Sorabjee Jamsetjee Jejeebhoy, Esq. ; 
William Loudon, Esq., Robert Haines, M.B. ; 
The Rev. W.K.Fletcher, M.A., Mathew Stovell, M.D. ; 
Bhawoo Dajee, G.G.M.C. 
Ex-Officio Fellows, Members op the Legislative Council, 
Judges of the High Court, and Bishops. 
E. I. Howard, M.A., The Honorable G. Foggo; 
The Honorable J. S. White, The Honorable B. H. Ellis; 
The Honorable Juggonnath Suukersett, The Honorable A. B. Wardeuiji 
Sir Joseph Arnould, Knight, The Right Rev. Walter Steins, D.D. ; | 

University Officers. 

Registrar. 

R. S. Sinclair, LL.D. 

Syndics. (In pairs.) 

Lieut. Col. J.A.. Ballard, R.E.,C.B., R. West, B.A.; 

R. T. Reid, LL.D., The Rev. CD. DuPort, M.A.; 

J.P. Hughlings, B.A.; 

Deans. {In pairs.) 

Captain H. St Clair WUkins, R.E., The Honorable J.F. Hore, M.A.; 

H. J. Giraud, M. D., The Reverend John Wilson, D.D.,F.R.S.; 

Vice Chancellor. 

The Honorable Alexander Kinloch Forbes. 

CHANCELLOR. 
His Excellency the Honorable Sir H. B. E. Frere. 

K.CB. 



CONFERRING DEGREES, 1864-65.* 191 

The procession, entering by the south-east door, 
moved alon*^ the east aisle to 

P^cessio^ *^^ *^^^ "^^^^ ^"^' ^^^^ ^^^^^' turning to 
the west, proceeded as far as the 
central north door, when turnin<j south, and passing 
round the statue of Lord Elphinstone, it advanced 
through the central path to the University semi- 
circle ; on reaching which the fellows separated, and 
stood in two rows facing inwards, and saluted the 
Chancellor as he passed on between them to his seat, 
followed by the officers of the University and the 
other Fellows in the order of precedence, who as 
they reached the semicircle filed off to their seats on 
the right and left of the Chancellor. 

The Chancellor, Vice-Chancellor, and Fellows 
wore their robes. Some of the 
Costumes of pillows, who were Graduates of 
the Senate. . tt • •.• ,i 

other Universities, wore the aca- 
demic costumes of their own Degrees, with the 
addition of the Fellow's scarf of the Bombay Uni- 
versity ; and some, who were military officers, wore 
the Fellow's scarf only, as a sash over their uniforms. 
The Judges of the High Court wore their robes of 
office, with the addition of the Fellow's scarf. 

After the Senate were seated, the Reverend John 
SuTJ-Dlication Wilson, Doctor of Divinity, and 
Fellow of the Royal Society, as 
Dean of the Faculty of Arts, rising, supphcated the 
first Grace of the Senate as follows : " Mr, Chan- 
cellor,— On behalf of Mahadev Govind Ranade of 
Elphinstone College I submit the certificate required 
by this University, and move that the Senate do pass 
a Grace for his admission to the Degree of Master 
of Arts." 



192 CONVOCATION FOR 

Whereupon the Chancellor put the question 

^ ^ ^' Doth it please you that this 

Grace be passed ?," and the Senate 

assenting the Chancellor said " This Grace is 

passed." 

The same words, mutatis mutandis, were used 
successively on behalf of the other candidates for 
the Degrees of Master of Arts, of Bachelor of Arts, 
and of licentiate of Medicine, the Dean in Medicine, 
Herbert John Giraud, Doctor of Medicine, perform- 
inir the office for the candidates in Medicine. 

When all the Graces were passed, the Dean of 
Faculty, taking the first candidate in Arts by the risjht 
hand, addressed the Chancellor in the following- 
words : — 

*^ Mr. Chancellor, — T present to you Mahadev 

^ ^ ^. Govind Ranade, of Elphinstone < 

Presentation. ^ „ i i. u • j 

College, who has been examined 

and found qualified for the Degree of Master of 

Arts, to which I pray he may be admitted." 

And the Chancellor answered : '* By the authority 
. . given me as Chancellor of this 

University, I admit you, Mahadev 
Govind Ranade, of Elphinstone College, to the Degree 
of Master of Arts ; and I charge you that ever in 
your life and conversation you show yourself worthy 
of the same." The Chancellor at the same time pre- 
sented the Graduate with the Certificate of the Degree 
conferred on him. 

When all the Degrees were similarly conferred, 
^ , . Robert Sharpe Sinclair, Doctor of 

Declaration. j^^^^,^^ ^^^ Registrar, rising, said 



CONFERRING DEGREES, 1864-65. 193 

— ** I hereby declare the following Degrees this day- 
conferred — 

Masters of Arts. 

College. 

1. Maliadev Govind Raiiade, B. A Elphinstone* 

2. Bala Mangesh Wagle, B. A Ditto, 

Bachelors of Arts. 
First Division. 

1 . Dalvi, Dinanath Atmnram Elphinstone, 

2. Patuck, Shapurjee Ilormusjee Ditto. 

3. Piuijabee, Choohermull KoondermuU. . Ditto. 

Second Division. 

1. Bal, Keshawa Bapuji Elphinstone. 

2. Bhagwat, Govind Ilamchundra Poona. 

3. Datiya, Motilal Rampursad Elphinstone. 

4. Gasvvalla, Ardesir Framjee Ditto. 

5. Gazdar, Jamshedji Jevanji Ditto. 

G. Jatar, Shriram Bhikaji Poona. 

7. Kohiarjee, Ratanshah Eruckshah .... Elphinstone. 

8. Mehta, Tliakurdass Atmaram Ditto. 

y. Pundit, Sbankar Pandurung Ditto. 

Licentiates of Medicine. 

First Class. 

College. 

1 . Howell, John Alexander Grant. 

2. Nadirshaw, Rustumjee Jamsedjee. , . , Ditto 

Second Class. 

1. DeSouza, Pedro Jose Lucis Grant. 

2. Hakeem, Shaik Sultan Ditto. 

3. Kothare, Shamrao Jugganath Ditto.. 

17 c 



194 CONVOCATION FOR 

The Chancellor then awarded to Framjee Rastam- 
jee Viccajee the Homejee Cuesetjee Pi<ize, consist- 
ing of the following books : — 
Shakespear's Poetical Works, with the best notes. 
Sir Egerton's Brydges' Milton, 
Tennyson's Complete Works. 
Sir Walter Scott's PoenrtS. 
Spenser's Poetical Works. 
Burns' Poetical Works. 
Pope's Poetical Works. 

The Registrar then read the following Report : — 
Mr. Chancellor, — I have the honour, by direction 
of the Syiidicate, to lay befn-e your Excellency a 
report of the proceedings of the University since the 
last Convocation for conferring Degrees. It states 
the principal results of the examinations held during 
the year, the number of meetings of the Syndicate 
and Senate, the chief alterations introduced in the 
courses of the examination in Arts and Law% and the 
munificent benefactions which have been bestowed 
on the University since the last Degree day. 

Examinations. 

At the matriculation examination held in November 
1864 241 candidates Were examined, of whom 109 
])assed the examination. Of these 86 were Hindoos, 

19 Parsees, 2 Portuguese, 1 European, and 1 
Mussulman. 

The following information as to their places of edu- 
cation is collected from the candidates' own letters of 
application fur permission to attend the examination, 
in all 109 : — 

20 from Elphinstone Institution. 
10 from Poona High School. 

iO from Surat High School. 



'yNFERRINa DEGREES; 1864-()0. 195 

./ from Elplnnstone College. 

9 from l^oona Colle^ie. 

1) from Poona Free Church Mission Institution. 

.; from Free General Assembly's Institution, Bom- 
bay. 

5 from Sir Jamsetjee Jejeebhoy's Parsee Benevolent 
Institution. 

3 from Poona College and Poona High School. 

:> from Ahmedabad High School. 

2 from Klphinstone Institution and College. 

2 from Poona Engineering School. 

2 from Poona High School and Poona Vernacular 
College. 

2 from Private Tuition. 

1 from Ahmedabad School and Elphinstone College. 

1 from Surat High School and Elphinstone College. 

1 from Elphinstone College and General Assembly's 
Institution. 

1 from Robert Money Institution. 

1 from Branch Government School and Elphinstone 
Institution. 

1 from Purbhu Seminary and Elphinstone Institu- 
tion. 

1 from Belgaum Sirdars' High School. 

1 from Poona College and Belgaum Sirdars' High 
School. 

1 from Elphinstone College and Ahmedabad Go- 
vernment English School. 

1 from Dhoolia High School and Poona College. 

I from Sattara Government English School and 
Poona College. 

1 from Elphinstone Institution and Private Tuition. 

1 from Elphinstone College and Government Law 
School. 

1 from Ahmedabad and Poona High Schools. 

1 from liutnagherry and Poona High Schools. 



I 



196 CONVOCATION FOR 

1 from Poona Vernacular College. 

1 from Broach Government English School. 

First Examination in Arts. — There were 32 candi- 
dates, of whom 15 passed the examination. Of these 
13 were from Elphinstone College, and 2 from Poona 
College, 11 being Hindoos, 3 Parsees, and 1 Mussul- 
man. 

Examination for the Degree of JB,A. — There were 
20 candidates, of whom 12 passed the examination, I 
3 being placed in the first division, and tlie remaining " 
9 in the second division. Of the successful candi- 
dates 10 v/ere from Elphinstone College, and 2 from 
Poona College, 7 being Hindoos, 4 Parsees, and 1 a 
Sindee. 

Master of Arts. — There were 2 candidates from « 
Elphinstone College, both of whom passed the exa- '| 
mination in ihe branch of History and Philosophy. 
They are both Parsees. 

First Examination for L. M. — There were six can- 
didates, of whom 4 were Hindoos, 2 Portuguese, and 
I a Jew. Of these 4 passed the examination. One 
of the passed candidates, who was a Hindoo, was 
placed in the 1st class, and 2 Portuguese and 1 Hin- 
doo were placed in the 2nd class. 

Examination for the Degree of L. M. — There were | 
5 candidates, 1 an East Indian, 1 a Hindoo, 1 a Par- "1 
see, 1 a Mussulman, and 1 a Portuguese, all of whom 
passed the examination, 2 being placed in the 1st and 
3 in the 2nd class. 

All the candidates for both the medical examinations 
were from Grant Medical College. 

Meetirigs of the Syndicate and Senate. — In the year 
1864-65 there have been held thirteen meetings of the 
Syndicate and eight meetings of the Senate. 



CONFERRING DEGREES, 1864-65. 197 

Alterations in the Regulations and Courses in Arts 
and in Law. — Alterations have been intioducedin the 
courses of both the First Examinalicn in Arts and of 
the Examinatirm for the Degree of Bachelor of Arts, 
whereby, in addition to certain subjects demanded of 
all candidates, each candidate has the option of select- 
inf^ for more special study either the subject of Men- 
tal and Moral Philosophy, or that of more advanced 
Mathematics and Natural Philosophy, or that of 
Physical Science. 

2. The Syndicate have published lists of books in 
Languages and periods of History for a cycle of five 
years. 

3. Lists of books recommended both for the Ordi- 
nary Degree of Bachelor of Laws and for each of the 
two brandies that may be taken up for Honours have 
been made out, and published. 

Benefactions and Endowments. 

1. The most munificent benefactions as yet receiv- 
ed by the University have been bestowed during the 
past year by Mr. Premchund Roychund, who has pre- 
sented, in the words of the donor, " the sum of Rupees 
(2,00,000) two lacs towards the erection of a Univer- 
sity Library which may be an ornament to this city, 
and by becoming a store-house of the learned works, 
not only of the past, but of many generations to come, 
may be a means of promoting the high ends of the 
University." 

At a meeting]; of the Senate held on the 10th Sep- 
tember 1864 it was resolved " that the Senate cordi- 
ally and unanimously accept, with their best thanks, 
Mr. Premchund Roychund's noble gift." 

Mr. Premchund Roychund further presented, in 
the name of his mother, two lacs (2,00,000) of 
17 c* 



198 CONVOCATION FOR 

rupees for the erection of a tower to contain a large 
clock and a peal of bells. 

At a meeting of the Senate held on the 10th De- 
cember 1864 it was unanimously resolved '' that the 
Senate do accept tlie noble gift of Mr. Premchund 
iioychund of two lacs of rupees for the erection of a 
tower to contain a large clock and a set of joy bells, 
and that the grateful thanks of the Senate be conveyed 
to Mr. Premchund Roychund." 

It was further unanimously resolved " that the 
Tower be named ^The Rajabai Tower'in commemora- 
tion of Mr. Premchund Roychund's mother." 

The designing of the Universit}^ Library and the 
Rajabai Tower has been entrusted to Mr. G. Gilbert i 
Scotf, R. A., F. S. A., who had undertaken to design I 
the University Hall. 

2. Mr. Munguldass Nathoobhoy, Justice of the 
Peace, in a letter to the Registrar dated the lOth 
Nov. 1864, offered Rs. 1,200 for the purpose of 
providing the University with a Mace. 

At a meeting of the Senate held on the 1 8th De- 
cember 1864 it was unanimously resolved 'Uhat 
Mr. Munguldass TS^athoobhoy's handsome offer of 
Rs. 1,200 for a Mace for the University be accepted 
with thanks." 

3. The acceptance by the Senate of the munifi- 
cent offers, referred to in last yeai's Report, of 

1 . ^' The Cursetjee Furdoonjee Professorship of 

Economic Science," 

2. ''The Framjee Cowasjee Fellowshi|)," 

3. "The Canning Fellowship," is still deferred,, 
pending the sanction by Government of cer- 
tain conditions which accompanied these 
offers. 



CONFERRING DCCnEES, 1864-65. 199 

4. "The Homejee Cursetjee Prize," consisting 
of books to the value of Rg. 200, for the 
best poem by a university student on the 
subject of '^ The Himalaya Mountains, has 
been awarded during tlie past year to Mr* 
Framjee 1-vustomjee Viccujee. 
The Chancellor then addressed the assembly. Hi» 
Excellency said : — 

" Mr. Vice-Chancellor and Gentlemen of the 
Senate, — Before offeruig any remark on the proceed- 
ings of the past year I would wish to say a few words 
on the constitution of our own governing body — the 
Senate. You are ;nvare that up to the present time 
there has been no limit to the number of Fellows save 
the minimum limit of 26 fixed by the Act of Incorpo- 
rntion. This is far too small a body if the Fellows are 
expected to take an active part in the work of the 
university. Many deductions mustbe made on account 
of absence and pre-occupation ; and the working 
residue of a body limited to twenty-six Fellows, which 
could be present at any one time in l^ombay, would 
be very small indeed. On the other hand, there are 
obvious disadvantages in throwing the important 
work of the university, especially that of examina- 
tions, on men who have no special connection with 
the university. It is a noteworthy fact that at the 
first institution of the university much difficulty was- 
found in selecting fit and proper persons to fill the 
office of Fellows, but now our difficulty is of the oppo- 
site character, and we are forced to select from among 
those who Avould be elioible and useful as Fellov/s, 
and the necessity has become apparent for fixing 
some maximum limit to the number of such appoint- 
ments. The present number on the rolls is 127 
Fellows, including those who are Fellows ex-officio^ 
but a large proportion of the whole number is non- 



200 CONVOCATION FOR 

resident in Bombay. There are or will shortly be ten 
or twelve vacancies caused by the death or departure 
of Fellows. We have thought it well not at present 
to make any crrent addition to the numbers on the 
present roll. I will briefly state, for the information 
of the Senate, the claims which seem to us to entitle 
the gentlemen selected to their high honour. The 
Rev. Mr. Beynon is a distinguished Canarese 
scholar, one of the few who is able to assist the uni- 
versity in deeding with that great section of the people 
of this presidency who speak the Canarese tongue. 
1 trust he will remember that we cannot yet boast a 
sin2;le Canarese graduate. Mr. Coke is a graduate 
of Cambridge who has long occupied a prominent 
and most important post in the educational depart- 
ment of this Government, and 1 feel assured that, 
whatever his future pursuits in life, he will always 
retain a deep interest in the cause of education in 
this country, to which many of the best years of his 
life have been devoted. Mr. Dhunjeebhoy Framjee 
Nusserwanjee has, as 1 am assured, turned his special 
attention to the study of the ancient languages of his 
race. This is a branch of learning in which the univer- 
sity of Bombay ought to excel every other university 
in the world, and 1 trust the day is not far distant 
when we may find the Zend and Pel h vie learning of 
our great German scholars at least equalled by that 
of the Pai sees of British India. Few men have done 
more for the cause of education in Guzerat than 
Mr. Hope. His claims to a seat in our Senate are 
so well known that I will only bid him welcome 
am(mg us. Mr. Kursondass Madhowdass has, by a 
long and consistent course of self-sacrifice, inseparably 
connected his name with the cause of truth, enlighten- 
ment, and civilization in India. I feel assured that 
the spirit which has actuated him will give a life and 



CONFERRING DEGREES, 1864-65, 201 

vigour to the action of the university, and to its 
connection with a most important section of the 
Hindoo community, which cannot but produce impor- 
tatit results. We welcome Kerupunt Luximon as 
the most eminent of native mathematicians in Western 
India. (Applause.) Dr. Muncherjee Byramjee Cola 
and Rao Sahib Maiiiputram Koopram have both 
established similar claims to a seat in your Senate. 
They have visited the great universities of Europe, 
and have thence brought back something of those 
Western views of true learning nod mental disci- 
pline on which we nmst act in this university if we 
hope to attain that position which centuries of well 
directed labour and study have o;iven to the universi- 
ties of Europe. To Mr. Mudhovvrow Govind Ranade 
I would offer an especial welcome, as the first of 
what I trust will be a long and distinguished roll of 
Fellows, who will look to this university as their ow^n 
mother in learning. The first of our graduates vviio 
hus attained the honours of a iVlaster in Arts, he has 
well earned the distinction of being the first indige- 
nous Fellow of this university. Captain Sherard 
Osborn has already earned for himself a name equally 
honoured in literature and in the service of his 
country as a distinguished naval officer and traveller. 
1 feel assured he will not be a passive member of an 
institution on which the intellectual development of 
Western India so largely depends. There are many 
gentlemen here who have witnessed the architectural 
glories of our great universities in Europe. It is, I 
believe, a fact which we should all do w^ell to bear in 
mind that there is not, solar as I am aware, to be seen 
in them a single building of any kind erected by the 
Government. All is the work of private munificence, 
and we owe to a similar source the promise that this 
university will one day pussess a had of its own suit- 



202 CONVOCATION FOR 

able in every way to such a body as this university 
is destined to become. Asa founder, a bent factor, 
to whose princely munificence the university aheady 
owes so much, Mr. Premchmid Roychund will h^ 
ren-arded by the Senate as a most worthy addition to 
the list of Fellows. M r. Stedman represents the body 
of professors oi'the Grant Medical C(»llege. Possibly 
further additions may hereafter be needed to fill the 
vacancies caused by the departure of Drs. Feet, Bal- 
lingall, and Coles, whom we have this year lost from 
our list of Fellows. The Rev. J. V". S. Taylor is 
distinguished for his accurate^ knowledge of tiie dia- 
lects of Guzerat. 1 know of no province in India 
which afford^ a fairer field for the action of those 
powers which will be evoked by this \miversity than 
Guzerat, which combines in so remarkable a degree 
so much that remains of the civilization of ancient 
India and so much of the promise of the future. The 
report which we have just heard read aoain speaks of 
steady, assured progress as compared with ftn'mer 
years. There are two features in it which seem to 
me especially noteworthy. First, there is the greatly 
iiicreast'd area from whicii matriculated students have 
been drawn. Not only is the number of such students 
greater than in former years, but in the enumeration 
of more than thirty institutions from which stu- 
dents have been drawn I observe the names of many 
schools from which no student has ever before been 
matriculated. This speaks well for the extended in- 
fluence of the university, and for the hold it is estab- 
lishing over our schools as the standard of education 
in this part of India. The other fact which I v/ould 
notice i>5 that we find among the graduates this day, 
and holding a very honourable place among them, the 
first Sindee scholar who has been educated at this 
university. I notice this not merely on account of 



CONFERRING DEGREES, J 864-65. 203 

tlie great personal interest I shall ever feel in a pro- 
vince where- so many years of my life were spent, but 
because it illustiates, in a very remarkable de<i;ree, 
t4)e iiifiiience which an institution like this university 
cannot but exercise over all education down to the 
most elementary. Probably there is no province in 
India where there was, previous to tiie British rule, 
such an entire absence of education of any kind as in 
Sind. There were indeed a few traces of the learn- 
ino' of former davs. Philoloo;ists investigated the 
language, and discovered that it had once held a 
high place among the most cultivated and copious 
dialects of India, and there were yet traces of what 
ill foimer days had been famous seminaries of Persian 
and Arabic learning, but all was of the {)ast. There 
were no public schools to teach even the very ele- 
ments of learning. Schools, scholars, teachers, pro- 
fessors, had alike to be created, [t might be said, and 
it was said by many most influential educationists, 
" This is a case where nothing can be done but to 
provide elementary schools — schools for primary or 
popular education, on which in futuj-e generations 
may be grafted schools of a higher character, as 
colleges." These primary branches of education were 
not neglected, but it was decided, and I think most 
wisely decided, not to rest content with these first 
steps in education, but to endeavour to train a few of 
the most promising scholars to join at once the higher 
institutions for national education which have their 
seat in this island. We have now the results of this 
exj^eriment. The young Sindee, who has this day 
taken his degree will leiurn to his own house well 
instructed in most branches of secular English edu- 
cation, such as most EngUsh gentlemen would desire 
for their sons, and we may now ask what will be the 
influence he will there be able to exert in the matter 



204 CONVOCATION FOR 

of education ? 1st, ns to the higher classes. To jtidge 
of" v^ hat he may do we must, I tlu'iik, as has been 
often suggested by a learned friend of mine, to whom 
this university owes so much, and who, I am sorry to 
think, is shortly to leave us — we must, I say, look 
back to the time when the young scholars of mediaeval 
. Euro(je visited the courts of the great princes and 
nobles who in those days thought it scarcely less 
glory to found a college than a kingdom. The history 
of that pel iod paints to our imagination many pic- 
turesque scenes in which the youn^ and travelled 
scliolar who can\e laden with the riches of Jtoman 
and Grecian learning displayed his treasures before 
princes and peers, ecclesiastics and warriors, and by 
translation placed many of the gems of ancient lore 
within the reach of those who knew none but the 
vulgar tongue. May not something of the same kind 
await him who in these days will carry to the court 
of Rajpoot Chiefs or Pathan Ameers the stores of 
Western learning which he has here acquired ? The 
Moiilvie who can repeat the Koran v/ith half its 
commentaries by heart, the Shastree who is a living 
library of Hindoo literature, men who had long- 
passed in their own court as miracles of erudition, 
may find in the young scholar who comes fresh from 
tlie teaching of Germany or England more pro- 
found knowledge of their own sacred books than 
they themselves even dreamed of. He will bring, 
too, learning in many branches of science never 
before heard of in those regions, all the wonders of 
physical science, and all the varied history, philo- 
sophy, and literature of the great race who govern 
India. And, withal, prince and peasant, priest and 
warrior, will, I trust, marvel to find in him that 
modesty which they rarely find in the narrow minds 
which hold all the knowledge of those who have 



CO.NFEKRING DEGREES, 1864-65. 205 

been used to style themselves the " learned men " 
of that contracted circle. The y^ung stranger knows 
what they have never learnt, how varied are the 
aspects, how many-sided the forms, of truth, how 
unlimited is the field of possible knowledge, how 
little is the sum of all human science and learning 
when compared to that which is still unrevealed. 
All this he has felt, and it has given him that true 
humiUty of spii it which learned and unlearned alike 
instinctively feel is the true stamp of wisdom. But, 
great as may be the effect of one such scholar upon 
tlie upper classes, how will it fare with the poor, 
with those who can neither read nor write, who seem 
condemned to perpetual ignorance, because it is hardly 
possible for t'hem to hear a teacher's voice, and the 
written word is to them sealed by ignorance of the 
first elements of learning ? "Would it not be better," 
. it may be asked, "that all cost and pains which have 
been spent in equipping this one scholar with so 
many costly gifts had been divided so as to instruct 
hundreds of poor peasants in the simple arts of read- 
ing and writing ?" I believe that to such questioner 
the true answer would be that experience shows that 
one such scholar accomplished, as I have supposed, 
will do more to promote the primary education of all 
around him than could possibly be effected by almost 
any sum of money simply spent in teaching the illite- 
rate to read and write. We are too apt to forget that 
this work of primary education is not simply a matter 
of arithmetical calculation, or of the expenditure of a 
given sum of money. Were it so, a single 
decree of any parliamentary grant would solve the 
question of popular education, and banish ignorance 
of at least the elements of learning for ever, but we 
know that it is not, and never can be so. We know 
how for years every civilized country in the Western 
18 c 



206 CONVOCATION FOR 

world has laboured, not wholly in vain, but with at 
best imperfect success, to give to the mass of the people 
the first elements of education. It is not the want of 
money, but the want of human hearts and heads 
capable of applying that money intelligently to the 
work of teaching, which so long has kept, and will 
keep, so large a proportion of the poorer class in every 
country unable to write or read. Let us consider 
where in England or in Germany would popular 
education be were it not for those who have them- 
selves been educated at a university, or at schools 
which take their tone from the university ? The land- 
lords, the clergy of all denominations, the school- 
masters, the authors and editors, these classes are 
surely not unimportant agents in spre^ing primary 
or popular education. No man of refined education 
can stand unmoved the spectacle of a people wholly 
in darkness. Unless he shut himself up within a 
barrier of entirely selfish enjoyment, he must go forth 
and act the part of a teacher, and he will teach with 
an intelHgent power a thousand fold greater than can 
be applied by him who, however zealous in the cause, 
has himself no more than a perfect knowledge of the 
bare elements of learning. These are the reasons why 
it seems to me that it is a very superficial view of the 
effects of this university education to suppose that it 
is in any way antagonistic to the great cause of primary 
education. On the contrary, 1 believe that such an 
education as this university would seal with its 
approval is the most powerful of levers to move the 
great mass of popular ignorance, and that every gra- 
duate going forth from this university will, in one 
way or another, prove a valuable recruit in that army 
of teachers which is needed to act effectually on the 
millions in this country who are still destitute of the 
first elements of knowledo-e." 



CONFERRING DEGREES, 1864-65. 207 

The Chancellor having finished his address, 

Convocation resumed his seat, and after a short 

dissolved. pause, rose and pronounced the 

Convocation dissolved ; when the Chancellor and 

Process! n ^^enate retraced in procession the 

route by which they had entered, 

(the assembly remaining standing in their places,) 

and, having passed along the eastern aisle, withdrew 

from the 11 all through the south-east door. 



(Bnmxmim '§npxB 



I. 

EXAMINATION FOR THE DEGREE OF M.A,, 
IN HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY, 1864-65. 

Monday — 2lst November, 1864. 

« 

[10 A. M. TO 1 P. M.] 

HISTORY, No. I. 
W. Wordsworth, B.A. ; Rev. R. Stothert, M.A. 
[The black figures on the right indicate full marks.] 

I. Narrate the career of Octavius from his 15 
first appearance on the political stage to the 
battle of Actium. 

II. Describe the origin, nature, and limits 15 
of the different powers of a Roman Imperator. 

III. Give some accomit of the principal mi- 10 
litary transactions of the reign of Trajan. 

IV". Give the order of the employments of 10 
a civil officer under the Empire, beginning 
with the lov^est and mounting upwards to the 
highest. 

V. Briefly review t^e history of Britain from 15 
the reign of Claudius to Severus. 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF M. A., 1864-65. 



Ill 



VI. Describe the functions of the Praetor 10 
Urbanus, of a proconsul, and consul under the 
Emperors. 

VII. Give an outline of the history of the 10 
Goths from the middle of the third century to 

the end of the fifth. 

VIII. What changes in society, literature, 10 
and law may be attributed to Christianity ? 

IX. Write short biographies of Julian and 5 
Stihcho. 



Monday — 21st November, 1864. 

[2 p. M. TO 5 P.M.] 

HISTORY, No. II. 
W. Wordsworth, B.A.; Rev. R. Stothert, M.A. 
[The black figures on the right indicate full marks.] 

1 . What are the most noticeable features in 5 
the Physical Geography of Italy ? 

2. Give a concise summary (with dates) of 10 
the history of J udea in its relations to Rome, 
from B. c. 44 to the destruction of Jerusalem by 
Titus. 

3. What gain did the provinces in general 15 
derive from the establishment of the Empire ? 
Review the internal history of Gaul from its con- 
quest by Julius Csesar to the death of Claudius. 

4. What light is thrown by the writings of 8 
Virgil, Ovid, and Horace on the moral, political, 

and religious behefs of Roman Society in the 
ao;e of Augustus ^ 



iv EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF M. A., 1864-65. 

5. What changes in the government and the 12 
army were introduced by Constantine ? 

6. Give some account of the great writers 15 
on Jurisprudence under the empire, of the laws 
relating to marriage, and the power of parents 
over their offspring. 

7. Describe the position and resources of 12 
llie principal barbarian nations in the reian of 
Decius. 

8. Enumemte the principal writings of B 
S. Augustine; and review the course and issue 

of the Pelagian controversy. 

9. Describe the political geography of the 10 
empire under Arcadius and Honorius. 

10. What traces are found in Britain of the 5 
early inhabitants ? 



Tuesday — 22nd November, 1864. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

POLITICS AND POLITICAL ECONOMY. 

W. Wordsworth, B.A.; Rev. R. Stothert, M.A. 

[The black figures on the right denote full marks.] 

1. What are the principal points of contrast 10 
between the ancient and modern conception of 
politics ? 

2. Compare the Greek notion of a tyranny, 8 
an oligarchy, and a democracy with the views 

on monarchy, despotism, and repubhcanism 
which have been made popular by Montesquieu. 

3. Describe the Athenian ostracism in its 5 
method and objects. Wkat supplies its place 

in modern political arrangements ? 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OP M. A., 1864-65^. V 

4. What theory has principally obtained in 15 
modern times regarding the intrinsic end of 
civil government ? State any objections which 
may appear to follow logically from the assump- 
tions on which that theory rests. 

5. What conditions are necessary for the 12 
successfal working of Federal Institutions ? and 
how far were such conditions present in the 
Achaian League, the Lombard League, the old 
Swiss Confederation, and the Federal Union 

of the American States ? 

6. By what test may it definitely be deter- 4 
mined whether a given country is suffering or 

not from a redundancy of population ? Are low 
wages really such a test ? 

7. Give a brief sketch of the past and present I4r 
colonial pohcy of England, pointing out the 
misconceptions as to the real nature of Foreign 
Commerce which determined the earlier policy. 

8. When agricultural necessaries are cheap- 3 
ened, the price of agricultural luxuries is enhanc- 
ed. What advantage then or disadvantage may 

the producers of food expect to derive from a 
law that artificially sustains the price of the 
former kind of food ? 

9. State concisely the Ricardo theory of Rent. 9* 

10. What is Credit ? To what causes is its 9 
sudden destruction generally to be attributed ? 
Give examples. 

] 1. Criticise the following statement : " In 6 
general we may observe that the dearness of 
every thing, from plenty of money, is a disad- 
vantage, which attends on established commerce 
and sets bounds to it in every country, by enab- 
ing the poorer states to undersell the richer 
in all foreign countries." 



vi EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF M. A., 1864-65. 

Tuesday — 22nd November 1864. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

LOGIC. 
Rev. R. Stothert M.A.; W. Wordsworth, B. A. 

[The black figures on the right indicate full marks,] 

I. Distinguish Logic from Metaphysics. 10 

II. What is meant by quantification of the 8 
Predicate ? 

III. What is immediate inference ? Give 8 
examples. 

IV. Show by an example that the same IQ 
argument may be constructed in all the three 
Syllogistic Figures. 

V. Give the laws of Hypothetical and Dis- 10 
junctive Syllogisms. 

VI. Explain ^Defective Syllogisms/ 'Fallacy 10 
of Ambiguous Middle', Tallacy of Division and 
Composition.' Give examples. 

VII. Distinguish Logic from Rhetoric. 10 
VIIL What is Applied Logic ? What is 12 

the relation of the Syllogism to Modern Induc- 
tion ? 

IX. Explain ' Empirical Law, ' ' Crucial IQ 
Instance,' ' Residual Phenomenon.' 

X. Illustrate the importance of classification 12 
in the discovery of truth. 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF M. A., 1864-65. vil 

Wednesday — 23rd November 1864. 

[10 AM. TO .5 P.M.] 

GREEK PHILOSOPHY. 
Rev. R. Stothert, M.A. ; W. Wordsworth, B.A. 

[The black figures on the right indicate full marks.] 

I. In what points is the system of Pythago- 10' 
ras allied to the Vedanta? 

IL Where was the distinction between the 10' 
pnmary and secondary qualities of bodies first 
made? 

III. Compare the systems of Parmenides 10 
and Democrilus. 

IV. Where did Plato find the ground of 8 
certainty in knowledge ? 

V. By what arguments is the doctrine of 12 
the immortahty of the soul supported in the 
Phaedo of Plato ? 

VI. What is Aristotle's definition of the 10 
soul ? How may he be said to give two defini- 
tions ? 

VII.^ Who was Aristotle's most distinguish- B 
ed pupil ? What was his peculiar doctrine ? 

VIII. Give historical notices of Epicurus, 12 
Chrysippus, Carneades. What doctrine did 
Epicurus borrow from Democritus ? What, 
according to Epicurus, is the source of know- 
ledge ? 

IX. What was the stoical doctrine regard- 10 
ing the relation of matter and mind ? 

X. What were the chief doctrines of the 10^ 
New Academy? 



viii EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF M. A., 1864-65. 

Wednesday — 23rd November 1864. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

MODERN PHILOSOPHY. 
Rev. R. Stothert M.A. ; W. Wortsworth, B.A. 
[The black figures on the right indicate full marks.] 

I. What was the period of the Arabian 10 
Philosophy? What was its character? What 
Arabian Philosopher was called the Interpreter ? 

and why ? 

II. Give a short account of Abelard and jo 
Thomas Aquinas. 

III. Describe the method of Descartes. 10 

IV. Compare the schools of Bacon, Descar- 12 
tes, and Leibnitz. 

V. Examine Bacon's claim to be regarded 8 
as the Founder of Experimental Philosophy. 

VL What faults did Reid find with the 10 
system of Locke ? What followers had Locke 
in France ? 

VII. Give some account of the English 10 
RationaHsts of last century, and of the weapons 
with which they were met by Berkeley and 
Butler. 

VI IT. What use does Kant make of the 10 
distinction between the Speculative and the 
Practical Reason ? 

IX. What are a priori ideas ? How may 10 
the doctrine of a priori truths be used in oppo- 
sition to scepticism ? 

X. What is Cousin's doctrine of the know- 10 
ledge of the absolute ? What is the Philosophy 

of the conditioned ? 



MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1864-65. ix 

II. 

MATRICULATlOxN EXAMINATION, 1864-65. 

EXAMINERS. 

It r> c^^ ,T^,.m TVT A fl'^ Enolish, and in 

Kev. R. Stothert, M.A. . . I ,-,, ^ , ' tj. ^ 
o r^ r\.^.r...,, n \ ^ Elementary Historv 

i.. G. OxENHAM, B. A -|^ ^^^ Geography. " 

J{. S. Sinclair, LL. D /!« Mathematics, a.id 

Rev. C. D. DuPoRT, M. A. i f Elementary ^a- 

(^ tural Science. 

Kev J. Wilson D.D., F.R.S. J j„ s^„^krit. 

G. BUHLER, Ph. D S 

Major T. Candy "l 

Bala Mangesh Wagle, ;>In Marathi. 

B. A J 

Rev. J. Wilson, D.D., F.R.S.'l 

Nagindas TuLsiDAs Mar- )>In Gujarathi. 

PHATIA, B.A J 

N. Fernanoes, Esq "^ 

S. A. De Carvalho, G. G. )^In Portuguese. 

M.C J 

Rev. J. Wilson, D.D.,"^ 

F.R.S. . . . ; >-In Hindustani. 

A. Faulkner, Esq J 

Rev. William Beynon...."^ 

Mr. Virabhadra Madiva- )>-In Canarese- 

LAYYA J 



X MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1864-65. 

Monday — 2lst November 1864. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

ENGLISH GRAMMAR AND IDIOM. 
R. G. OxENHAM, B. A. ; Rev. R. Stothert, M. A. 

[The black figures on the right indicate full marks.] 

I. How many sounds have a, aUj ie, oo] 8 
Give examples. 

I I. Explain the use of ' will ' and * shall.' 10 
Decline ' he,' ' she,' ' it.' 

III. Give the various ways in which adjec- 10 
tives are derived from nouns. Write a sentence 

in which an adjective is used as a noun. 

IV. What is a verb ? What are transitive 12 
and intransitive verbs? What is conjugation? 
What are weak and strong conjugations ? Clas- 
sify conjugations according to the vowel changes. 
Explain * voice,' ^ mood/ * tense.' 

V. Paraphrase, — 10 

Knowledge and wisdom far from being one, 
Have oft-times no connexion ; knowledge dwells 
In heads replete with thoughts of other men. 
Wisdom in minds attentive to their own. 
Knowledge i a rude unprofitable mass. 
The mere materials with which wisdom builds. 
Till smoothed, and squared, and fitted to its place. 
Does hut encumber whom it seems to enrich. 
Knowledge is proud that he has learned so much, 
Wisdom is humble that he knows no more. 

VI. Parse the words in Itahcs. Divide the 8 
lines into feet. 

VII. What words in this passage are derived 10 
from Latin ? Give Latin equivalents for * boyish,' 

' friendly/ * evil-doer/ ^ foretaste.' 



MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1864-65. xi 

Ylll. Make sentences illustrating the differ- 10 
ence in the use of ' such' and ' so/ ^ each other ' 
and * one another/ * few' and ' a few/ * run out' 
and ' outrun/ * carry' and * carry on.' 

IX. Correct : — (1) When the boys went in 12 
school the master told that I will let them go to 
home. — (2) The boy said to the master, I hope 
you will be kind to leave me. — (3) He was told 

to ^et milk which he humbly told he could not. 
— (4) It was not quite quarter of an hour since 
he landed, before he was arrested. — (5) A 
charge of theft was trumpeted up against him. 

X. What is the tendency in EngUsh as regards 10 
t he position of the accent ? Give three words 
which have different meanings as they are differ- 
ently accented. 



Monday — 21 5^ November 1864. 

2 P M. TO 5 P.M. 

ELEMENTARY HISTORY AND GEOGRAPHY. 

[The black figures on the right indicate full m arks ] 

N.B. — Candidates are required to pass both in the 
History and Geography portion of this paper. 

I. For what are the following places memora- 10 
ble:— 

Saguntum, Plassy, Arbela, Runnymead, Assaye, 
Naseby, Oudenarde ? Give dates. 

II. Where did the following sovereign fami- 15 
lies reign : — • 

Plantagenets, Paleologi, Ghaznevides, Merovingians? 
In each case say when the family was at the height of its 
i: ower, how it lost power, and by whom it was succeeded. 



>:ii MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1864-63. 

ill. Write a short account of the chief events 
in the reign of any Enghsh Sovereign between 
Edward III. and WilHam III. 

'IV. What do you know about the Lollards, 
ilie Helots, the Huguenots, the Moguls? 

V. Explain with dates — 

(a) *' The Thirty Years' War." 

i^) " The Servile War." 

(y) " The Reisn of Terror." 

(a) " The Dark Ages." 

VI. Name the chief towns on — 

(a) Any European river with a course chiefly on 

a parallel of longitude. 
((3) Any European river with a course chiefly on 

a parallel of latitude. 

\ [[. Draw a map of Spain, marking the chief 
rivers, cities, and ranges of mountains. 

VIII. What do you know of the connexion 
between the physical geography of a country and 
the character of its inhabitants ? Give instances. 

IX. Taking Paris as a centre, in what direc- 
tion do the following places lie ? 

Madrid, London, Rome, Copenhagen, 
Vienna, St. Petersburg. 

X. Explain the terms — ^ watershed,' * lagoon,' 
Materal valley,' ^ table land,' Mimit of perpetual 
snow,' and state the chief causes of the variation 
of the limit of perpetual snow in different coun- 
tries, giving examples. 



MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1864-65. xiii 

Tuesday — 22nd November 1864. 

10 A.M. TO 1 P.M. 

SANSKRIT. 
GRAMMAR, IDIOM AND ETYMOLOGY. 

■ John Wilson, D.D. ; G. Buhler, Ph. D. 
[The black figures on the right indicate full marks.] 

1. How many kinds of affixes (pratyayas) 5 
are there in Sanskrit ? Give instances of each 
class. 

2. Give the accusative and instrumental 5 
casesoff?^, ^^r^, cT^, ^T^3T, and ^^^, in the 
three numbers. 

3. Translate into English : 15 

(«) m ^\ ITT w^f • 1 ^ cT^rr ^^ejrr^^JT i 

4. Write out the following passage, correct- 10 
incr the faults a^jainst the Sanhi rules : — 

^iii arilci I 5pf;: ^^ ^ ^^ ^m'* ^m ^w\^ 



Xiv MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1864-65. 

6. Conjugate the verbs ^^^,f,5; ?. in the 
present indicative ( ^^). 

6. Decline q3^;T,'Tr,m'^^, and ^j. 

7. Translate into idiomatic Sanskrit ; — 
(a) Has he come ? 

{b)- Has he not come? 

(c) The gratification of our desires and the 
fulfilment of duty are often incompatible. 

Which of the two ought we to prefer ? 

Between the Vindhya and the Himavat 
lies the country called Aryavarta, 
stretching from the eastern to the 
western ocean, 

8. Dissolve the following compounds and 
istate to which class each belongs : ^f^r^^f^if 1 

?^q#^*. I ^rfcrifcfrq^T^cTJT i m^^^' i ^T^it- 1 

9. {a) Give the synonyms of j^^^ | ^]^ \ 

\^ I ijf^ 1 

{b) State the differences of meaning be- 
tween : ^ I 3Tq^ I ^TC=r 1 r^JTR I as well as be- 
tween : ^^ I ^f^f^ I fcT? 1 ^jm^l^ I 

10. Give the third person singular of the 
present l^Z) perfect (fc^^") future (^2r) and 
aorist ( 5^ ) of 3J- I jjir 1 ;^t I q3^ I %g I T^g- I 



AtATRICULATTON tlXAMINATlON, 1864-65. XV 

Tuesday — 22nd November 1864. 

2 P.M. TO 5 P.M. 

SANSKRIT. 
John Wilson, D.D. ; G. Buiiler, Ph. D. 

[The black figures on tlie right indicate full marks.] 

1. Translate the followmg passage into Eng- 
lish :— 

If carr hc^ jT^rtr Pt^^ct : i ^ ^ jn : i ^^m 



Xvi MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1864-65. 

2. Translate the following passage into Sans- 
krit :— 

In a country called Vidyodyana lived a king 50 
called Vidavan : from his time till now a thoo- 
sand years have elapsed. Many learned men who 
w^ere honoured by that king, who were friendly 
to learning, constantly frequented his royal as- 
sembly. Among these there was a Pandit named 
Mangala, adorned with various good quahties, 
and an eminent astronomer. He having examin- 
ed the circle of the sky by the application of 
various instruments, composed a new work called 
Siddhantarka. This book having speedily at- 
tained celebrity in the whole of India was read 
by all the best astronomers of that time. When 
thirty years had elapsed after the composition 
of his book, that renowned learned man Mangala 
became an inhabitant of another world. In that 
very year a certain very intelligent child, named 
Shukra, was born in the house of another Pandit. 
AVhen Shukra had attained to youth, being desi- 
rous to understand the science of astronomy, he 
read the Siddh^nta of Mangala with his teacher. 
And having attained proficiency in science, when 
he was of middle age he wrote a Siddhanta named 
the Shukra Siddhanta. 

{Dr. John Muir.) 



MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1864-65. XVU 

Tuesday — 2'2nd November 1864. 

10 A.M. TO 1 P.M. 

MARATHI. 

PAPER OF QUESTIONS ON GRAMMAR, IDIOM, 
ETYMOLOGY, &c. 

Major Thomas Candv; B. M. Wagle, B. A. 

1. Decline the nouns ^\^\ and q^. 2 

2. Define a ^^\ and give the principal rules 8 

for the combinations of consonants. Give six 
examples. 

3. Define ^^?3T^ and apRffg"^ • and state 6 

what changes a consonant undergoes when fol- 
lowed by a nasal. 

4. Give definitions of the three i\^m or con- 6 

structions ^^^ ^jf^oj and ^iffff. Give three 

examples of each. 

5. To which 1{^[T[ do the following sentences 8 
belong ? 

( 1 ) ^{ CT^ %^r. (2) ct^ ^TicT \^m^^. (3) <^r 
mf{' (^) cq-f^ ^r^ m^ mil' c^) ^m^\ 

If you think any sentence wrong, point it out. 

6. What is the power and general meaning 5 
of reduplicated formations like [^sr;2"fffsr^ 3"f oST* 



Xviii MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1864-65. 

7. Give eight instances of formations in M a- 10 
rathi that correspond in character (not necessarily 

in meaning) with the following formations in 
English, — wear and tear J rays and tatter Sf toil and 
trouble^ health and wealth, hurry and flurry, thorns 
and thistles, briars and brambles, ^"c. ^c. 

8. Give eight instances of formations by re- 10 
duplication in Marathi that correspond in charac- 
ter with the English formations tittletattle, fiddle- 
faddle, chitchat, wishwash, slipslop, shillyshally' 
ing, dillidallying , Sfc. ^"c, 

9. What is the meaning of 5^ in the senten- 2 
f^es -^i ^er, q- ^^r, %^ ^m, ^^' ■ ^^'hat is 
indicated by the word ? 

10. To what language originally do the fol- 6 
lowing words respectively belong ? 

^OT, ^m^, ^cr, ^Ml ^^^ ^rf^iK, mTrs-, 

11. Give the etymology of the following 5 

words, Tj5ri%qr, ^m^i, mzm \^m^, T^^^^i, 

rfTclf^^^r-. Crive also the correct form of the last 

uord. 

12. Analyze and give the meanings of the 6 
following words and phrases : — |^fx|% $*f %|^|% 

13. Translate the following sentences into 6 
idiomatic English. 



MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1864-65. xix 

0) i] ^m^m JT^TTR ^^\ ^itl (2) im^^ 

14. Translate the following, and analyze or 15 

explain the words underlined : — 

(1) ^51 ^ ff ^1 Tf sr^ft 11 qu ^R^?f w'arf'f ii 
(^) flffr iir^?r'^8ni fn it?t iijts: ^?rii ^m 



l-v •-* -s 



15. VV'rite the three sentences of No. 13 in 
Koman characters according to the Jonesian sys- 
tem. 



XX MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1864-65. 

Tuesday — 22nd November 1864. 

2 P.M. TO 5 P.M. 

TRxiNSLATION FROM MARATHI. 
Major Thomas Candy; B. M. Wagle, B.A. 

[The black figures on the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Translate the following passage into idio- 50 
matic English : — 

TO \n^^K =T(f fcT, i^m RTcJ^r ^T^ mz^', cRfrrcr 

\^^\k^ tfrtr JTRiTr-^rcfr ^T^^rfccf mm\ 
sTr<^^ ^rc m\^ ^ R^r m\K ^^r q-^fr^rxq-cpf 

^% r^% JOT ^ ^^4\ f^fr f^^f ^q-fEfq^t c^r^fcT 



MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1864-65. XXI 

TO^ir^r "^oj ^> ^r^ ^zrr-sTr ^r^ m^ ^^^i^- 

2. Translate into idiomotic Maratbi the fol- 50 
lowing- : — • 

The most usual way among* younj? men who 
have no resolution of their own, is first to ask 
one friend's advice, and follow it for some time ; 
then to ask advice of another, and turn to that ; 
so of a third, still unsteady, always changing. 
However, every change of this nature is for the 
worse ; people may tell you of your being unfit 
for some peculiar occupations in life ; but heed 
them not ; whatever employment you follow 
with perseverance and assiduity, will be found fit 
for you ; it will be your support in youth and 
comfort in age. In learning the useful part of 
every profession, very moderate abilities will 
suffice : great abilities are generally obnoxious 
to the possessors. Life has been compared to a 
race ; but the allusion still improves by observ- 
ing, that the most swift are ever the most apt to 
stray from the course. 

To know one profession only, is enough for 
one man to know ; and this, whatever the pro- 
fessors may tell you to the contrary, is soon 
learned. Be contented therefore with one good 
employment ; for if you understand two at a 
time people will give you business in neither. 



Xxii MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1864-65. 

There are no obstructions more fatal to for- 
tune than pride and resentment. If you must 
resent injuries at all, at least suppress your 
indignation till you become rich, and then show 
away. The resentment of a poor man is like 
the efforts of a harmless insect to sting ; it 
may get him crushed but cannot defend him. 
Who values that anger which is consumed only 
in empty menaces? 

Tttesday — 22nd November 1864. 

10 A.M. TO 5 P.M. 

GUJARATI. 
Grammar, Idiom, and Etymology. 
[The black figures on the right indicate full marks.] 
John Wilson, D.D., F.R.S; Nagindas 

TULSIDAS, B.A. 

I. {a) Decline the Pronouns t|>i and ^ImI^I 10 
fully, and explain the difference between them. 

{b) How many Participles are there in Guja- 
rati? Give examples. 

(c) What are the characteristics and peculia- 
rities of Gujarat! verbs ? 

{d) Mention some (not fewer than three) Gu- 
jaratl Intransitive verbs whicli are regular in 
the formation of their Transitive, Passive, and 
Causal forms. 

II. {a) How many kinds of Samas are 10 
theie ? Give examples. 

(A) What are the requisites of a Samasl 

(c) Distinguish between «^tisfl(i ^^^^ ^sMHRH- 



MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1834-65. XxHi 

III. ('/) Separate the following Compounds $ 
and give their meanings: — 

(b) Combine the following sets of words, 
f^iving the meanings of the Compounds : — 

IV. Translate and explain the following sen- 10 
tences : — 

\. ^tTn-Hii ^ii^a ^\n ^li ? 

V. Translate the following proverbs, giving 10 
their applications : — 

'1. C-ihl <^n ^'^l MH, ^ >U <{t Mt!?l Mi?l ^IH.' 

3. <nW*ti MsSHi ij'/<niH'\'i|T5^ ? 

VI. Give the different meanings of the fol- 10 
lowing words : — 

^lA. h^\[. ^^3. \^. MM. <1*1. ^^.. :^^. ^{^. 

4\^ 



Xxiv MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1864-65. 

Vn. (a) How are following words deriv- 10 
ed ?— 

(h) Mention some other words derived from 
the same roots. 

VIII. Paraphrase and fully explain the fol- 10 
lowing- passage : — 

H^Rcti mRhr, R^MiiSl ^H H\^ ; 

{Sdmaldds) , 

iX. Write out the following passage in Roman 10 
characters : — 

RlR-H ^!^ ^ <ni>. <H^ <HW ^ ^i^ ; 

RiH ^^^i Rr, met, PictRi^ni h^ y^ ; 

^l^ ^iQct (3>ilH, M^l ^IMI S^ >tlXl, 

^UM'A sj";! 5i^l ^^, ^i-^n ^m^ ^1>ii Hi^Q ; 

X. Translate the following sentences into 10 
Gujarat!. 

(a) Had he been more expeditious he might 
.have succeeded in his pur. uit of the criminal. 



MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1864-65. XXV 

(h) I am much inclined to drop all further 
legal proceedings in the case, and to rely entirely 
on his sense of equity. 

(c) Could he have entered the house without 
your hearing some noise. 

(d) Depend upon it he will get off if more 
evidence is not forthcoming. 

{e) He went nearly to the end of the road ; 
but he did not meet his friend as he expected. 



Tuesday — 22nd November 1864. 

2 P.M. TO 5 P.M. 

GUJARATI TRANSLATION. 
John Wilson, D.D, F.R.S. ; Nagindas 

Tu LSI DAS, B.A. 

[The black figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Translate into English the following pas- 50 
sage : — 

M*t ^IhI <1l^ ^5j ^iisv, Hl^jlUni ^:^ 

n<^A ^i^l ^M <n\n 'H'Xi "5, a *ti>i a^ hpm 5. li 

Hini hmH\ Hi^\[Hn ^^'-^ (icO, ^Mi^i^ n ^©- 
Hi>'^4i^ ^i^i. ni^ini ^iH^^ ^li ^?j<r/ <nmi«^i ' 



XXvi MATHICULATION EXAMINATION, 1864-65. 

HP\ chVi ^i'-^ ^i^ ^MKni :i*^io^i ; "^ii <?voii ';|n 
'j'^ic-ii q-u^n^i ^i^ 'm^u ^i'{l^ ^ 'cpj ^Mi. ^-ni 
THi^i y^ ^^ ?ji'/ ^u5i M^ «i^X "a^in «vHR ^ 

R^ <H4'*ll ^Hl cMK ^n ^.^oooo, ct?4l (l>ll>i ^KH 
^^Hm ^l^\ mi? ^^\ M'.^'Hi ^IH ^M 55 V 

2. Translate into Gujavati the following pas- 
sage : — 

Plato was born 340 b.c. in ^Egina, an island 
in the Saronic Gulf, between Attica and Argolis ; 
or in Athens, for there is a diversity of opinion. 
His father's name was Ariston, his mother's Pe- 
rictione, and his own Aristocles. He obtained a 
Greek education. This is saying much. It 
implies that every faculty of the intellect, every 
emotion of the heart, and every capacity of the 
physical frame, was duly exercised. He excelled 
in gymnastics ; he wrote poetry in his youth, of 
which some fragments yet remain ; and he is 
reported to have composed an epic, which he 
committed to the flames on seeing its inferiority 
to the work of Homer. He studied rhetoric and 



MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1864-65. XXvii 

music. For ten years, between the age of 
twenty and thirty, he sat at the feet of Socrates ; 
for what may, speaking roundly, be called 
other ten years, he walked over the world, seek- 
ing knowledge wherever it was to be found ; and 
then, with a majesty becoming one to whom all 
generations were to listen, he returned to Athens, 
and opened his mouth under the plane-trees of 
the grove of Academus. This power of waiting, 
this silent dauntless search, not after originality, 
but after truth, showed the intrinsic soundness 
and strength of the soul of Plato. 

(P. Bayne:) 

Tuesday — 22nd November 1864. 

[10 AM. TO 1 P.M.] 

HINDUSTANI. 
Grammar and Idiom. 

John Wilson, D.D.; A. Faulkner, Esq. 
[The black figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. {(i) What are the sources of the Urdu 10 
language ? 

{h) From what languages are its principal 
technical words derived ? 

(c) In what provinces, and by what classes 
of people in India, is it principally spoken.^ 

{d) What are the principal works of the 
language known in Western India? 

2. (a) What modifications of, or additions 10 
to, the Arabic alphabet have been made to ac- 
commodate it to the Hindustani ? 



XXViii MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1864-65. 

(b) Give the names of the long and short 
vowel marks, and of the marks affecting 
consonants, and illustrate them by an" ex- 
ample. 

3. Write the following passage in Roman 10 
characters, putting a mark over the long vowels. 

t5r J^ l^J^I ^)^z U^J^ t^ J^' Jt e^ 

4. Translate the following sentence, and 15 
parse the first two lines of it — 

sS ^ jj\ ^^A^ J^ ^>J ^1 ij: ^\j jL »:>^ ^ 
^w C^-r ^^^ ^ ^J^ ^ -^^f -^^ Jjl U^ it^ 

5. (a) Give the causal forms of the follow- 10 
ing verbs :— 

U^Juj U*ojJ UJLaj Ixs:^ IJa'i li^^j l.ia:5i. Gl^ G^a« Ujj 

(5) Translate the causal forms of the 
above verbs into English. 

6. Give the Hindustani renderings and 10 
synonyms of the following words, mentioning 

the languages from which they are derived : — 
'father,' * fountain,' 'news,' 'noise,' 'quarrel/ 
* usage/ ' advice,' ' heart/ * hand,' ' heaven.' 



MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1864-65. Xxix 

7. Translate the following sentences into 10 
Hindustani : — 

(a) Wait below till I am ready to see you. 
(J)) If I buy a horse, I shall require a 

saddle, bridle, and whip. I wish them 

to be of a good quality. 

(c) Well, I shall see if these articles can 
be found in the bazar. If I cannot get 
them there I shall request a friend to 
purchase them fcrr me in Bombay. 

(d) I do not think it necessary to take 
daily exercise, when I have so much 
public business pressing upon me. 

{e) A wise son niaketh a glad father : 
but a foolish son is the heaviness of his 
mother. 

8. Translate the following sentences into 10 
English : — 

JLs^ ^ Ij c^jY' sS ^^ \jj J^ i:^ (a) 

C^*^y C^J^JJ^ iJ^.^Jj^ iS-^'^ C)^J U^ ^ L5r 

t/ y^ ^^^ ^ U^J yr ^ t5r *-^=^J<i Ql) 

e5r J^^=^ ^J^ «->J^ oli^^^^i ^* ^J^. 

9. Write the following sentence in the Nagari 5 
if you are acquainted with that character : — • 
Khudawand ka sliukar haro ; uska nam lo ; logon 
lie darmiydn uskc kdmon baydn karo. 



XXX MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1864-65. 

10. (a) What is added to the root of a verb 10 
to fonii the infinitive ? 

(6) How is the past participle in the two 
t^enders and numbers formed from the root ? 
Give examples. 

(c) Give an example of each form of the pre- 
sent and future tenses. 



Tuesday — 22nd NQvernber 1864. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

HINDUSTANI. 
John Wilson, D.D.; A. Faulkner, Esq. 
[The black figures on the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Translate into English the following pas- 50 
sage :— 

fj^^jj\ ^^ iDjj^:^ u^ d^ jL t^i^. u^1 

4J-1 u^j| e;^ ^<^ *«^ V"**» <^ "^Ll^ ^\jf Ly 
t5^^ t:^^ t5^ <D^j\ t5t- ^'i *^ ^"^ ^ J^^ <;-^JtA4^l 



MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1864-65. XXXi 

iLo (J^J I ^J^ ci j^^ ^^^ V-^ eHi^ V-i^ ^^ ' >^ <:— J"^ 
(^ ^JJdLwo (^ ( J J I (*G l^yJi^ ^ <:_i ^^ Lift^ Ua^ 

(j( jUJ (^A/O Js^ Cr-^i^ (J^ U<Jt (^ j! tf^ uv- 

o> ^/ ^'f j^jk^^j ^ ^ J *Ajj <^^% yy 

^jy ^b ^j\ i^^ (^j^ C, ^'^ u"IJ^' ^^ ^^-y- 

^ ^id ^j1 ij«--ji t^'y cjU^i ju (jU A^ ^f 

{Bac/h-0'Bahdu) 

2. Translate into Hindustani the following 5G 
passage : — 

On a general review of the long administration 
of Hastings, it is impossible to deny that, against 
the. great crimes by which it is blemished, we 



I 



XXxii MATRICULATION EXAMINATIOJ*, 1864-65. 

have to set off great public services. His internal 
administration, with all its blemishes, gives him 
a title to be considered as one of the most re- 
markable men in our history. He dissolved the 
double government. He transferred the direction 
of affairs to English hands. Out of a frightful 
anarchy, he educed at least a rude and imperfect 
order. The whole organization by which justice 
was dispensed, revenue collected, peace maintain- 
ed throughout a territory not inferior in popula- 
tion to the dominions of Lewis the Sixteenth or 
the Emperor Joseph, was formed and superin- 
tended l3y him. He boasted that every public 
office, without exception, which existed when he 
left Bengal, was his creation. It is quite true that 
this system, after all the improvements suggested 
by the experience of sixty years, still needs 
improvement, and that it was at first far more 
defective than it now is. But whoever seriously 
considers what it is to construct from the begin- 
ning the whole of a machine so vast and complex 
as a government, will allow that what Hastings 
effected deserves high admiration. To compare 
the most celebrated European ministers to him 
seems to us as unjust as it would be to compare 
the best baker in London with Robinson Crusoe, 
who, before he could bake a single loaf, had to 
make his plough and his harrow, his fences and 
his scarecrows, his sickle and his flail, his mill 
and his oven. 

{Macaulay,) 



MATRICULA.TION EXAMINATION, 1864-65. XXxiii 

Tuesday — 22nd November 1864. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

PORTUGUESE. 

Grammar, Idiom, and Etymology. 

N. Fernandes, Esq.; S. A. De Carvalho, 
G.G.M.C. 

[The black figures on the right indicate full marks. ] 

1. Que se entende por oraQao nagrammatica 7 
Portugueza, e oque ella comprehende. De nos 

um exemplo illustrando-o. 

2. Que he o nome collectivo — de nos dous 5 
exemplos ? 

3. 'A que especies pertencem os seguintes 6 
pronomes Meu, Este, Aquelle, e Se. 

4. Quaes sao os superlativos de Sagrado, 6 
Frio, Mao, Aspero, Pobre, Salubre, DifHcil, Hu- 
milde e Semilhante ? 

5. 'Aque genero pertencem os nomes Espia, 5 
Homicida, Interprete, Lagarto, Rouxinol, Cobra 

e Aguia ? 

6. De nos exemplos dos verbos Auxiliares, 7 
Regulares e Irregulares — tres de cada um ? 

7. 'Aquaes conjugacoens dos verbos, e aque 12 
tempos delles, pertencem o seguinte : — 

Louvaria — Tivesse amado — Quizera, Receber- 
mos — Definirei — Tiver vestido — e Ferindo ? 

8. De que preposicao e regido todo o dativo 7 
na oragao Portugueza ? 

9. Que se entende pelas figuras Ellypse, \Z 
Pleonasmo, e Hyperbaton ? 



XXxiv MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1 864-65* 

10. Ponlia em lingoagem mais clara o se- 
guinte : — 

"Verdades nao ha tantas, quantas das illu- 15 
soens o numero e : inesgotaveis estas ultimas sao, e 
das primeiras limitado e o circulo : joven e sem- 
pre a poezia, por que o erro nunca envelhece, e 
aos olhos do homem e isto, oque sua graca Ihe 
da. Em moral, porera e em historia, da verdade, 
no estreito campo, outra couza se nao faz que 
voltear, e por mais que se trabalhe em observa- 
^oens conhecidas cair-se vai. Qual estrada hist- 
orica, nao percorrida amda, aos modevnos, por 
tanto resta a seguir ? Imitar so podiam ; e nessas 
imilacoens dos sens modelos alcancar a altura, 
(liversas causas obstaram." 

11. Parafrasee o segumte : — 18 
" Ja a mesa os convidados se a vizinhao : 

Eis da nova a Lasthenes uma serva, 
Que, igual no gesto, ao Sposo de Maria, 
Vira um Anciao, dos cedros.na alameda, 
Jumento humilde cavalgando apasso. 
Entra o Varao de face veneranda, 
Pastor no traj e, em bedem branco envolto. 
A idade o calvejou; pasto das chammas 
Gran parte foi das cans ; inda as costuras 
Ts'a fronte, assinallavao seu martyrio, 
Padecido, nas iras Valerianas." 



MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1864-65. XXXV 

Tuesday — 22nd November 1S64. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

PORTUGUESE TRANSLATION. 

N. Fernandes, Esq. ; S. A. De Carvalho, 

G. G. M. C. 

[The black figures on the right indicate full marks. ] 
12. Translate into English :— 50 

Quando se esta sobre um navio agitado pelas 
ultimas rajadas da tempestade, parece que os 
astros se elevao e se abaixao ; todavia, sabe-se, 
([ue elles estao immoveis, e que a bussola, que 
se ve vacillar, dirije-se constautemente ao polo. 
Assim o liomem honesto, cujas ideias estao a 
prova de contradiccao, renuncia a gloria se o 
prego della e o despotismo, como ao repouso, se 
elle e sem diguidade : elle tem examinado as 
obras dos homems illustres com um reconheci- 
mento, que o nao fez lizonjeiro e com uma vera- 
cidade, que nao o torna ingrato. Forte com essa 
constancia, nao cahe do alto d'orgulhosas illu- 
soens, n'uma desesperagao credula ; mas sabe 
que as grandes obras se execuiao lentamente, 
que o futuro se basea nos costumes e sentimen- 
tos da epocha, elle nao quer separar o bem do 
bello e do verdadeiro nem o effeito da sua cauza. 
Conhece o que e mau, sem vociferar a injuria. 
Nao se deixa atterrar pelos inconvenientes, que 
derivao dos bens mais dezejados, persuadido que 
aquillo mesmo que hade fazer a forga e a honra 
de uma epocha, comega por fazer a sua desgra^a. 

Verta em Portuguez o seguinte : — 50 

'* The opportunity of doing public good, of 
performing actions of extensive utility or univer- 



XXXvi MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1864-65. 

sal benevolence, is confined to a few characterg. 
But how many private virtues are there which 
every man has it in his power to perform, without 
quitting his chamber ! Pie who can contentedly 
employ himself at home, may continue there 
the whole year, and yet, in every day of that 
year, may contribute to the felicity of other men : 
he may listen to their complaints, relieve their 
distress, render services to those about him, and 
extend his benevolence in various ways without 
being seen by the world or known by those on 
whom his favours are conferred." 



Tuesday — 22nd November 1864. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

KANARESE GRAMMAR AND IDIOM. 
Rev. W. Beynon; Mr. Virbhadra Madiwalaya. 

[The black figures on the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Are there any relative pronouns in the 10 
Kanarese language? If so, name them. If not, 
state by what class of words this want is suppli- 
ed, and illustrate the same by examples. 

2. Can Sir W. Jones' or Dr. Gilchrist's sys- 15 
tem of writing Sanskrit words and sentences in 

the Roman characters be adapted without change 
to the Kanarese language ? If not, state what 
the difficulty consists in. Write in English 
characters, either according to the system of 
Professor H. H. Wilson, or Rev. Daniel San- 
derson, the following Kanarese hnes : — 



MATRICULATION- EXAMINATION, 1864-65. XXXvH 

3. Make a list of the principal masculine and 3 
feminine affixes in the Kanarese language, and 
illustrate the use of each by examples. 

4. Parse fully the following words ; — 15 

<^ o 

■). Give the etymology of the following 10 
words : — 






^w? 



• ^5^. ;5ccooqj. ^^st. 



©^ 



XXXviii MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1864-65. 

6. Combine the following words according to 5 



the rules of Gandhi : — 




(bo 


co'D^ + 3^©. 


ZjDa' + 5c!ejj). 


Hpn' + 6D^J. , 


5T)d' + ^})T\&:. 


^^j-' + &^^S. 


ei/vs' + 7YJ5J. 


ZB' + q:::^jr, 



7. Rewrite the following, substituting 12 

^mucli as possible Kanarese terms foras the 
Sanskrit : — ^ 

8. Correct any errors that you may observe 5 
in the following sentences : — 



Ct'-'l'VJ 



CO i'^} TO^J^SJ. 



(c) t5ojO 8oiD 03JCJJ zz^arS). 



MATRICULATION EXAMINATION', 1864-65. XXxix 






( e ) gjDcoD? ^Jd^7)^^5 o5:;^j ^a 



9. Translate the following sentence into 10 
Enolish : — 

10. Translate the following sentences into 10 
idiomatic Kanarese : — 

(a) Akbar was always satisfied with very 
little sleep, and frequently spent whole 
nights in those philosophical discus- 
sions of which he was so fond. 

(6) Nations inhabiting low-lying plains have 
a tendency to become effeminate. 

[c) Thou grievest for those who are unwor- 
thy to be lamented. 



si MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1864-65. 

Tuesday — 22nd November 1864. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

KANARESE TRANSLATION. 
Kev. W. Beynon; Mr.Virabhadra Madivalaya. 

[The black figures on the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Translate the following passage into Ka- 50 
narese ; — 

The progress of a boy from youth to maturity, 
and the advance of a nation from barbarism to 
civilization and liberty, follow the same law. 
A certain amount of restraint in boyhood, for 
the education of the intellect, the heart, and the 
conscience, generally leads to a manhood more 
glorious than would otherwise have been attained. 
And when a nation, very partially enlightened, 
and with little moral power, is conquered by one 
more advanced, the seeming calamity is often a 
blessing in disguise. By the law of God, it is 
well-nigh impossible for a nation permanently to 
subdue another one, equal to itself in intelligence 
and moral energy; and*we can see the reason 
why the All-wise and Infinitely-good God has 
ordered that it should be so, — it is that the one 
power has little or nothing to impart to the other, 
and therefore the subjugation of the one by 
the other would be almost an unmitigated curse. 

2. Translate the following passage into Eng- 
lish :— 

eo «"> — - J ^ 



MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1864-65. xlt 

eJTt^o^ej^- t^S^^, 307VJ, SJ^)^ i^JSd 



Xlii MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1864-65. 

Wednesday — 23rcl November 1864- 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

ARITHMETIC. 

R. S. Sinclair, LL.D.} Rev. C. D. DuPort, M.A, 

[The black figures on the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Express in figures the following distances 7 
in miles of some of the planets from the Sun : — 

Thirty-seven millions (for Mercury). 
Sixty-nine miUions (for Venus). 
Four hundred and ninety -four millions 
(for Jupiter). 

Write down in words the numbers signified 
by the following figures : — 

900300804, 60660608008. 

2. Find the greatest common measure of 9 
the numbers 12129 and 30081. 

Investigate whether the numbers 3714 
and 1815 have a common measure or not. 

3. Express in the scale of 8 the number seven 13 
hundred and eighty-four millions three thousand 
and forty-two. 

4. To the sum, difference, and product of I 9 
and YT ^^^ ^ fourth proportional. 

5. Find the sum, difference, product, and 10 
ratio of the decimal numbers. 

4075-32, and 186'4215. 
Demonstrate the rule for pointing the quo- 
tient in the division of decimal fractions. 

6. The proportions used in making English 11 
gunpowder are, saltpetre 75 parts, gulphuf 10 



MATRICULATION EXA>nNAT10N, 1864-65. xUil 

parts, and charcoal 15 parts. How many 
pounds weight of each material are there in 10 
cwt. of gunpowder ? 

7. Extract the square root of 115'297356. : 7 

8. A, By and C form a joint stock of Rs. I4r 
750000, uf which Rs. 36000 are contributed by 

A, Rs. 300U0 by B, and the remainder by C 
At the end of the year, the profit is found to be 
Rs. 16791. Required the shares of this which 
each is to receive, Rs. 800 a month being 
allovved as salary to C as acting partner. 

9. Calculate the interest on 4 lacs of rupees 8 
from the 23rd November 1864 to the 25th May 
1865 at 8 per cent, per annum. 

1 0. If 1 2 iron burs, each 4 feet long, 3 inches 12 
broad, and 2 inches thick, weigh 576 lbs., how 
much will 1 1 weigh, each 6 feet long, 4 inches 
broad, and 3 inches thick. 



Wednesday — 23r^ November 1864. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

ALGEBRA. 

R. S. Sinclair, LL. D. ; Rev. CD. DlPout, M.A. 

(The black figures on the right indicate full marks.) 

1. In what respect are the sciences of Arith- lO 
metic and Algebra identical, and in what respect 

do they differ ? 

Explain the following : — Simple quantities^ 
Similar quantities. Irrational quantities* 

2. If « = ], Z> = 2, c = 3, d = 4, find the 
mimerical value of the expression. 



I 



xliv MATRICULA.TIOX EXAMIJ^ATION, 1864-65. 

ah he ac cd ad da 

he cd cd da da ah' 

3. From {a-{-b)x^{h+c)y. 7 
take (a — h ) x — { b — c ) y. 

4. What is the value of « x 0? 9 
Multiply a^ 4- a b -h a^ b^ + ah^ -i- b by {a—b). 

5. State the riile for finding the G. G. M. of 10 
two algebraical expressions. 

Find the G, €. M. of a — a:' and 

3 2 2,3 

a — a X — ax -r^ x . 

6. Prove that the value of a fraction is not 13 
altered by multiplying its numerator and deno- 
minator by the same quantity. Reduce to their 
simplest forms. 

a — b a — c h — c 



a 



ab ac be 

{ct'-.h^)x a{a'-'h'')x\ 



b f/' ^ b^{b-^ax) 

7. If a: 4-- =J9, prove that 10 

8. Solve the following equations : — 



(a) /*' + '^ 



J 



a: — 2 



m n 

— + — == a 

^ y \ 9, 

i^) n m , 
--h ^^b 

X V 



MATRICULATION FXAMINATION, 1864-()0. xlv 

iK Find a number such that whether divided 10 
into two equal parts or into three equal parts, 
the product of the pnrts shall be the same. 

10. A labourer is engaged for 10 days, on 12 
condition that he shall receive H annas for every 
day's work done, and that he shall pay 1 anna 
for every day on which he is absent from work 
— at the end of the 10 days he receives 8 annas ; 
on how many days did he work^ and on how 
many was he absent ? 



Thursday— 24^A November 1864. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

EUCLID I.— IV. 
II. S. Sinclair LL.D.; Key. C D. DuPort, M. A. 

[The black figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Define parallel straight lines, a straight 6 
line tauching a circle^ a sector of a circle, and an 
angle in a segment of a circle. 

2. From a given point draw a straight equal 5 
line to a u^iven straioht line. 

From the point A on the line BC (and 8 
beween the extremities JB and C), draw 
the line AD through -S equal to jBC 

3. Demonstrate the following theorem : — 7 
If two triangles have two sides ot the one equal 

to two sides of the other, each to each, but the 
angle contained by two sides of one of them 
greater than the angle contained by the two sides 
equal to them, of the other; then the base of that 
which has the greater angle shall be greater than 
the base of the other. 



Xlvi MATRTQUIiATfON EXAMIffATION, 1864>65tf 

4. Parallel og:rams upon the same base and 5 
between the same parallels, are equal to one 
another. 

If from a point ^ outsifle a parallelogram 8 
BCBE, the ri^^ht lines AB.AC, AD, and 
AE be drawn, then the difference between 
the triangles ^sBCand ADE \9^ equal to 
half the parallelogram. 
5/ If a straight line be l>isected and produced 5 
to any point, the rectangle contained by the 
whole line thus produced and the part produced, 
t^>gether with the square of half the line bisected, 
is equal the square of the line made up of the 
half and the part produced. 

Give the algehraical theorem analogous 7 
to this proposition; and state what the al- 
gebraical letters really signify. 
6. . Prov« that the angles in the same segment 4 
of a circle are equal to one another. . 

Given the base, the altitude, and the 7 
vertical angle of a triangle^ construct it. 
7. Prove the theorem, that : — If two straight 6 
hues cut one ^noi\\Q\' within a circle, the rectangle 
contained by the segments of one of them, is 
equal to the rectangle contained by the segments 
of the other. 

Enunciate the analogous theorem, if the 4 
point of cutting were outside the circle ? 
8. . Prove that the bisectors of the three an- 9 
illes of a triangle meet in a point. 

9. Describe an isosceles triangle having each 10 
of the angles at the base double of the third 
angle. 

10. Inscribe an equilateral and , equiangular 9 
quindecagou in a circle. 



•WATRICULATION -EXAMINATION, 1864-65. xlvii 

Thursday — 2Ath November ]864. 

[2 P.M. to 5 P.M.] 

ELEMENTARY NATURAL SCIENCE. 
R. S. Sinclair, LL.D.; Rev. C. D. DuPort, M.A. 

[The black figures on the right indicate full marks.] 

1. How is statical force measured ? 7 

In considenng the action of a force what 
particulars are to be attended to ? and show 
that forces may be represented by straight 
lines. 
% Distinguish between the three classes of 4 
Levers. 

Two weights of 3 lbs. and 7 lbs. respec- 5 
lively hung from the extremities of a lever 
1 yard iono- equilibi ate each other ; find the 
position of the fulcrum. 

3. Find the ratio of the power acting horizon- 4 
tally to the weight when there is equilibrium 

on the Inclined Plane. 

Find what force is necessary to support 7 
a weight of 50 lbs. upon a plane inclined at 
30° to the horizon; the force acting parallel 
to the plane. 

4. In the wheel and axle, if the radius of the 7 
wlieel be 12 feet and that of the axle 1 foot, 
what power will be required to sustain a weight 

of 108 lbs. 

5. What is Chemical Synthesis ? and what 3 
Chemical Analysis ? 

How may water be analyzed into its 6 
chemical constituents ? what are those con- 



I 



Xlviii MATRICUL:^TTON EXAMINATION, 1864-G5. 

stituents ? and what are the chief points of 
difference between them ? 

6. Explain the terms Absolute Weight, Spe- 8 
cihc Weight, and Atomic Weight. 

7. If a bottle of hydrogen be inverted over 7 
a bottle of carbonic acid, the bottles being con- 
nected by means of a gla^s tube open at both 
ends passed through their stoppers, wdiat result 
will follow ? 

8. Explain and illustrate by examples the 5 
difference between the conduction and conviction 

of heat.. 

Show how the latetit hfut of water may 
be experimentally proved to exist. 

9. Describe the motions of the l^art!). 5 

Explain the fact that in all places on the 7 
earth's surface lying in North Latitude the 
day is longer than the night when the sun is 
in the summer solstice. 

10. Explain the nature and cause of the 9 
moon's chaniiies of phase. 

1 J. What is a Lunation ? 4 

Why does the Mooii always present ap- 7 
proximately the same face to the earth ? 



FIRST EXAMINATION IN ARTS, 1854-65. \lix 

III. 

FIRST EXAMINATION IN ARTS, 1864-65. 

EXAMINERS. 

Raymond West, B.A. . . 1 In English, History 
\V. Jeaffreson, B.A. .. J and Logic. 

The Rev. John Wilson,"^ 

D.D., F.R.S ,.. ^ In Sanscrit. 

J. G. BuHLER, Fh. D. ..J 

Major Thomas Candy . ."^ 
ViTHAL Narayan Pa- )> In Marathi. 
THAK, B.A J 

The Rev. John Wilson,*^ 

Nagindass Tulsidass > ^^ Guzerathi. 
Marphatia, B.A J 

,1. p. HUGHLINGS, B. A..."^ 

The Rev. R. iStothert, )>• In Latin. 
M.A, J 

The Rev. W. K. Fletch-"^ t d *i ^ o t 

fr M a y Butler s Sermons I., 

Raymond WestVb.A* ".\ J ^^'^ "^'^ ^"^ P^'^^^^^- 

n. M. Birdwood, M.A .."It t.. ^. 
The Rev. C D. DuPort, > ^^ Mathematics and 
M.A J CJeography. 

H. J. GiRAUD, M.D .... 1 In Chemistry, Heat, 
R. Haines, M.B j and Electricity. 



1 FIRST EXAMINATION IN ARTS, 1864-65. 

Monday — 20th Fehmary 1865. 

[10 A. M. TO 1 p. M.] 

ENGLISH. Paper I. 

Johnson's Lives of Cowley, Dryden, and Pope, 
Milton's Paradise Regained. 

W. J. Jeaffreson, B.A.; P. West, B.A. 

[The black figures to the right indicate full marks. J 

1. Paraphrase the following, and give the 14r 
necessary explanations : — 

The Scotch treaty is the only thing now in 
which we are vitally concerned ; I am one of 
the last hopers, and yet cannot now abstain from 
believing, that an agreement will be made ; all 
people upon the place incline to that of union. 
The Scotch will moderate something of the rigour 
of their demands ; the mutual necessity of an 
accord is visible, the king is persuaded of it. 
And to tell you the truth (which 1 take to be an 
argument above all the rest), Virgil has told the 
same thing to that purpose. 

'' It is possible," says Hookar, " that by long 
circumduction, from any one truth all truth may 
be inferred." Of all homogeneous truths, at least 
of all truths respecting the same general end, in 
whatever series they may be produced, a conca- 
tenation by intermediate ideas may be formed, 
such as, when it is once shown shall appear 
natural ; but if this order be reversed, another 
mode of connection equally specious may be 
found or made. 



FIRST EXAMINATION IN ARTS, 1864-65. li 

Here lies a she sun, and a he moon here, 

She ^ives the best light to his sphere. 

Or each is both, and all, and so 
They unto one another nothing owe. 
The utmost malice of the stars is past, — 

Now frequent trines the happier lights among, 
And high-raised Jove, from his dark prison freed. 

Those weights took off that on his planet hung, 
Will gloriously the new laid works succeed. 

2. Give some account of Dryden's labours, 8 
abilities, and success, as a dramatist. 

3. To what school of poetry does Johnson 8 
assign Cowley ? What are the chief characteris- 
tics, and who the most remarkable supporters 

of that school ? 

4. Mention the more important of those who 10 
by their works or personal influence contributed 

to form the mind or style of Pope. Estimate 
the effect produced by each. 

5. Distinguish the true subjunctive of the 8 
English verb from forms hkely, because of their 
shape or meaning, to be confounded with it. 
Give a system of rules for the use of the mood 

in English, and note the allowances to be made 
for modern laxity. 

Illustrate your answer with examples. 

6. Paraphrase the following : — 12 

I Extol not riches, then, the toil of fools. 
The wise man's cumbrance, if not snare*; more apt 
To slacken virtue, and abate her edge. 
Than prompt her to do aught may merit praise. 
What if w^ith like aversion I reject 
Riches and realms ? yet not, for that a crown, 
Golden in show, is but a wreath of thorns. 



lii FIRST EXAMINATION IN ARTS, 1864-65. 

Brings dangers, troubles, cares, and sleepless nights, 

To him who wears the regal diadem. 

When on his shoulders each man's burden lies ; 

For therein lies the merit of a king. 

His honour, virtue, merit, and chief praise. 

That for the publick all this weight he bears. 

And either tropick now 
'Gan thunder, and both ends of Heaven j the clouds, 
From many a horrid rift, abortive poured 
Fierce rain with lightning mixed, water with fire 
In ruin reconciled : nor slept the winds 
Within their stony caves, but rushed abroad 
From the four hinges of the world, and fell 
On the vexed wilderness, whose tallest pines. 
Though rooted deep as high, and sturdiest oaks. 
Bowed their stiff necks, loaden with stormy blasts. 
Or torn up sheer. 

7. Elucidate the sentences below by stating 5 
their context or the subjects to which they 
allude, — 

(o) He never opened a shop of condolence or congra- 
tulation. 

(b) " Merum Sal" 

(c) It haunts me worse than a pewter-buttoned Ser- 

jeant does a decayed cit. 
(rf) With prosperous wing full summed, 
(e) On citron tables or Atlantic stone. 
(/) When Agrican, with all his Northern powers, 
Besieged Albracca, as romances tell. 
The city of Gallaphrone. 
(ff) The first and wisest of them all professed 
To know this only, that he nothing knew ; 
The next to fabling fell, and smooth conceits ; 
The third sort doubted all things, though plai:> 
sense. 



FIRST EXAMINATION IN ARTS, 1864-65. liii 

8. Comment upon the grammatical difficul- 8 
ties of the following |)assages, showing more 
especially the construction of the words in 
italics . — 

(fit) Thy life hath yet been private, most part spent 
At home, scarce viewed the Galilean tow?is, 
And once a year Jerusalem, few days 
Short sojourn. 

{b) Here again 

Satan had not to answer. 

(c) I was acquainted with that behaviour of his. 

(d) Had all been like this. — But every part 
Cannot be best. 

(e) Him thought he by the brook of Cherish stood. 
(/) Prediction else will fail me of my throne. 

9. {a) Give the meaning and derivation of 7 

'Panegyric/ 'quincunx,' 'dunce,' 
' mint,' ' maugre,' ' eremite,' ' gris- 
amber-steamed,' 'rubric' 
(^) Quote any peculiar usages of 

' To peel,' ' to divert,' ' statists/ 
' globe,' ' frequence,' ' indorsed.' 

10. {a) What is meant by "representative 7 

verses ?" Give examples. What 
opinion does Johnson express re- 
specting them ? 

(J)) What does Johnson say of Pindarism, 
Alexandrines, Quatrains, Hemistichs ? 

[c) Scan the following lines : — 

From that placid aspect and meek regard. 
That heard the adversary who roving still — 
The city of Gallaphrone from whence to win- 
But to vanquish by wisdom hellish files. 



liv FIRST EXAMINATION IN ARTS, 1864-65. 

11, What characteristic peculiarities can you 6 

point out in Milton's use of past parti- 
ciples, auxiliary verbs, demonstrative 
or personal pronouns, antecedents and 
relatives ? 

12. Answer one of the following questions :— 6 

{a) Quote passages which have been clearly 
borrowed by Milton from ancient au- 
thors. 

(b) Show how the narrative of Milton in 
Paradise Regained differs from that 
of the Bible. 



Monday— 20^^ Fehrnary 1865. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

ENGLISH. Paper II. 

Wordsworth's Prefaces anp Appendices, 
Gray's Poems. 

R. West, B.A.; W. J. Jeaffreson, B.A. 

[The black figures to the right indicate full marks] 

1. Paraphrase and annotate where neces- 12 

sary : — 

Oh sovereign of the wilhng soul. 
Parent of sweet and solemn breathing airs. 
Enchanting shell ! the sullen Cares 
And frantic Passions hear thy soft control. 
On Thracia's hills the Lord of War 
Has curbed the fury of his car, 



FIRST EXAMINATION IN ARTS, 1864-65. U 

And dropped his thirsty lance at thy command. 

Perching on the sceptred hand 

Of Jove, thy magic lulls the feathered king ; 

With ruffled plumes and flagging wing, 

Quenched in dark clouds of slumber lie 

The terror of his beak and lightning of his eye. 

2. Explain the following : — 

(a) Gay hope is theirs by fancy fed, % 
Less pleasing when possessed. 

(b) To thee he gave the heavenly birth, 1 
And bade to form her infant mind. 

(c) Not in thy Gorgon terrors clad. 1 

(d) The secrets of the abyss to spy 3^ 
He passed the flaming bounds of space and 

time, 
The living throne, the sapphire blaze. 
Where angels tremble as they gaze. 
He saw. 
(<?) In buskined measures move X 

Pale Grief and pleasing Pain. 
(/) Nor in these consecrated bowers. 1 

Let painted Flattery hide her serpent train in 
flowers. 

3. Sketch the argument of "The Bard." 8 

4. Give the etymology of the following 8 
words, — ' retrieve,' * ambush,' ' mien,' * homage,' 

* sovereign,' ' squadron,' ' tester,' ' capuchin ;' 

* anthem,' ' frailty.' 

5. («) Write brief notes on the historical 1(^' 
allusions in the following passage : — 

But hark ! the portals sound, and pacing forth, 
With solemn steps and slow, 
High potentates and dames of royal birth 
And mitred fathers in long order go. 



>Vi FIRST EXAMINATION IN ARTS, 1864-65. 

Great Edward with the liHes on his brow 

From haughty Gallia torn, 

And sad Chatillon on her bridal morn 

That wept her bleeding love, and princely Clare, 

And Anjou's heroine and the paler Rose 

The rival of her crown and of her woes. 

And either Henry there. 

The murdered saint and the majestic lord 

That broke the bonds of Rome. 

(b) Parse the words " either" and^" there" 4 
in the last line but two, and the words 
*' saint" and *' lord" in the last but one. 

6. (a) Paraphrase the following : — lO 

" .... in these poems 

humble and rustic life was generally chosen, 
because in that condition the essential pa^-sions 
of the heart find a better soil in which they can 
atttiin their maturity, are less under restraint, and 
speak a plainer and more emphatic language ; 
because in that condition of life our elementary 
feelings co-exist in a state of greater simplicity, 
and consequently may be more accurately con- 
templated and more forcibly communicated ; 
because the manners of rural life germinate from 
those elementary feelings, and from the necessary 
character of rural occupations are more easily 
comprehended and are more durable ; and, lastly, 
because in that condition the passions of men 
are incorporated with the beautiful and perma- 
nent forms of nature." 

{b) Criticize the relation of the clause fol- g 
lowing the first semicolon to the one 
preceding it. 



FIRST EXAMINATION IN ARTS, 1864-65. IviJ 

(c) Mention the names of some of the poems 12 
referred to, and quote two or three 
passages in illustration of the author's 
meaning. 

7. How does Wordsworth classify the powers 12 
requisite for the production of poetry and the 
diflerent forms into which the materials of poetry 

are cast ? 

8. How^ does he distinguish the province of 10 
imagination from that of fancy in poetry ? 



Tttesday — 'list February 1865. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

SANSKRIT. 

Grammar, Idiom, and Questions on Manu, 
hitopadesha, and vikramorvashi. 

John Wilson, D.D.; G. Buhler, Ph.D. 

[The black figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1 . {a) On what pri nciple do 3^^4-3^*^^ when 10 
combined become rj^q^cf^. Illustrate the principle 

by a few other examples, embracing the combina- 
tion of other simple vowels and consonants. 
Give a few exceptions and alternatives. 

(b) What is meant by the prolation of a letter 
named ^^? How is the viaarga affected by the 

usages of Sand hi ? Give an example of each form 
of its treatment. 

2. (a) What affixes are generally used in the 10 
formation of the instrumeutal and dative cases 



Iviii FIRST EXAMINATION IN ARTS, 1864-65. 

singular of nouns ? What modifications do they 
undergo ? 

(b) Give the singular instrumental cases of 
^Rr, ^T\, irfcf*, ^[1f, '^^^ T^; and the dative of 

(c) What are the nominatives (singular, dual, 
and plural) of ^^-^ ^f^ r^f^ qrEfcf and qf^^l 

{(i) Give the genitive plural of ^sj^ q-q^ ^ 

3. (a) Give the crude forms of the demon- 
strative, relative, interrogative, and personal 
pronouns. 

{b) What are the terminations marking the 
comparative and superlative degrees ? What is 
their effect when added (a) to participles, (b) to 
substantive nouns ? 

(c) What are the comparatives and superla- 
tives of ^5", n^, 5^, 5r, and jj J 

(c?) Give any example that may occur to you 
of a double comparative, or double superlative, 
actually in use in Sanskrit. 

4. (a) Give the meaning of the folio wing: roots 
with instances of their cognates in English or 
in some other European language : ^f^ ^^ ^f ^ 

^^,, f^^, f , m% m, ^g, ^\, q^r , ^^, ^jr , 

(/>) In what forms of the verb do reduplica- 
tions occur ? What changes occur in aspirate 
and guttural letters in the process of redupHca- 
tion ! Give examples. 



FIRST E5CAMINATI0N IN ARTS, 1864-65. lix 

">. (a) What are the desiderative forms of 5- 10 
fT'F .'f^ ^»9^ and g:^ J When they have 
more forms than one, give them. 

(b) How are the causal verbs formed ? 
Give examples of the rules regulating their for- 
mation. 

(c) What is the general difference of the 
atmatippadaj and the parasmaipada. Illustrate 
by a few examples your definition of them. 

6. (a) How many conjugations are there in J.5 
Sanskrit, and how are they generally denomi- 
nated in native grammars ? 

(b) How many preterite and how many 
future tenses are there in Sanskrit? Give the 
distinctions in time on which their usage is 
founded. 

(c) Mention the conjugations of the following 
verbs : f , Hf, ??r^^ , f , ?T, PtST, , J^. , f? , H 

(d) Translate the following sentences, using 
for each of them one of the preceding verbs : — 
He goes quickly. He measures the road with 
a chain. The cat sees in the dark. He may 
sacrifice to-day, if he is inclined to do so. Let 
him give me the book, that I may prepare my 
lesson. He touched my hand, and then anoint- 
ed my body with oil. Let him ask forgiveness 
of God. If he steal the horse, he may expect 
punishment Bind the accused with a rope. 
The nurse nourished the child for two months. 

7. (a) Give the meaning of the following pre- 10 
fixes, illustrating each of your renderings by a sin- 



Ix FIRST EXAMINATION IN ARTS, ] 864-65. 

gle example:— 8T, 3?^, g-cT , ^\y\, Wi, ^, ^J, 

(b) Give a list of particles often used as 
expletives in Manu's Institutes, &:c. 

(c) Write both in Naojan and Roman letters 
the names of the different kinds of Samasa and 
translate {not define) them. Give an example of 
each kind of Samasa. 

8. {a) What account does Manu give of 
the four Yugas ? What may have been the origi- 
nal idea attached to the name Yvga'l Give 
reasons for your opinion. 

{b) What, according to Manu, are the founda- 
tions of instituted Lavv^ ? What are his principal 
injunctions respecting the Sanskaras applicable 
to a Brahman. 

(c) What inferences do you draw from Manu 
about the seat of the Aryas at the time at 
which the Code was made ? 

{d) What distinctions does Manu recognize 
between hutttj ahuta, prahuta, hrdhwya, and 
prashita ? 

9. What are the opinions expressed in the 
Hitopadesha respecting woman ? 

10. (a) To what class of writings does the 
Vikramorvashi belong? Mention the pecuhari- 
ties of the class, and of the sub-division in which 
it is found. 

(6) On what natural phenomena are the le- 
gends of the Vikramorvashi founded ? 

(c) Give a brief outline of that play. 

(d) Give a list of the works of Kalidasa. 



FIRST EXAMINATION IN ARTS, 1864-65. Ixi 

Tuesday — 215/ February 1865. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

SANSKRIT. 

TRANSLATIONS FROM THE BOOKS TAKEN UP AND 
FROM ENGLISH. 

John Wilson, D.D.j G. Buhler, Ph.D. 

[The black figures to the right indicate full marks.] 
I. Translate into English : — 

II ^^.^z\ II 
II BTm-^t^^f^ir II 

BT^ ^rcf^- ^f tt: I ^^^ i 

^4 II 
i %m^\^ I 



Ixii FIRST EXAMINATION IN ARTS, 1864-65. 

mrm ^^\W\ ^^^^^l ^n cr>^ ^^r 
^:^^m^^^^ ii qR^^^rr^c^i^^^ li ^^^-Ji^tr^f^; i 

%=n-r7 sifi^q ^^4 7#2:cTr ^-m'* ^w^ I irr'^ 
^ ^ jlf^^r T^2T['^3Tvjqi'Gr ^v;^r»^R=r^fe'2orRg-nqqi- 

(c) ^rr^jJ^^Rxr ^\ sfn% r^i'^??t^?7TJ i 
^^ m ^5 ^r ^^^ ^cR3f:q^?rr% ^^ I 



864-65. Ixiii 

II. Translate into Sanskrit : — 50 

Lohajangha, in the meanwhile spent his time 
agreeably in converj^ation with Vibhishana, who 
related to him this legend, explaining to him, 
how it chanced that Lanka was made of wood. 
*' Desirous of liberating his mother from the 
state of servitude to the parent of the Nagas, 
and to pay the fixed price of her liberation, the 
ambrosia of the immortals, Garuda prepared to 
carry off the celestial beverage by fraud or force. 
To collect sufficient strength for his enterprize, 
he applied to his father K agyapa for invigorating 
food. The seer directed him to go to the ocean, 
where he would find a large elephant and tor- 
toise, whom he might seize and devour. Garuda 
did as he was instructed, and after his meal rested 
on a branch of the Kalpa tree, or tree of heaven. 
The branch gave way with his weight. In fear 
of its falling upon the holy Balakhilyas, who 
prosecuted their devotions at the foot of the tree, 
he laid hold of it and bore it away in his beak. 
Kagyapa, out of regard to the security of mankind, 
commanded Garuda to carry it to some lonely 
spot, where he might let it fall without doing mis- 
chief. He accordingly deposited it in the ocean, 
and it served as a base on which the wooden fabric 
of the island, Lank^, was subsequently reared." 



Ixiv FIRST EXAMINATION IN ARTS, 1864-65. 

Tuesday — 2lst February 1865. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

MARATHI. 

TRANSLATION, GRAMMAR, IDIOM, &c. 

Major Thomas Candy ; Vithal Narayan 
Path A K, B.A.; 

[The black figures to the right indicate full marks .] 

1. Translate closely into idiomatic English: — 

^tr^ qrjf^; Wf ^^tr ^q^ ^i^ ^r qpr^^f^ §Tf - 



FIRST EXAMINATION IN ARTS, 1864-65. IxV 

cTc^pf^rr^r ^i\\^\' jf ^r ^f rf ^ ^rrqc^ er^^Er g. 
rf^ sm ^ffl nrf r ^rc^ ^r^^ ^^ir^r tof ^n^r^ 

2. Translate the following sentences into idio- 12 
matic English : — 

(2) q:5|5;^f^r q?:^r qr^ ir^r ^^^ ?Tr^- 

(4) ^r ifrcfr ^r Rtr^JTRrrfr srr%. 3%^ ^ttct 

(5) JTjsq-r^r 5PPT cJTf^r ^^ ^fc ^H =rrcr. * 

(6) crer r^^^^j-^^ T^; eff^ pqf^'^'cr^^q-sr^r 

[^. 

(7) :??T[^2^ ^^f ^^f cfr qrrtr. 

(8) ^f^^^q qr^;f qr^T ^^^1^. 

3. Analyse the words underlined, and say also 5 
what parts of speech they are as they stand. 1" 

4. Analyse the following formations, and ren- 7 
der them into English. 

qrqiT^ d''^ ), #W5^ ( ^^^^ ), 3lt^^ 
/* 



Ixvi FIRST EXAMINATION IN ARTS, 1864-65. 

(f^^), mjm (^^^^ ),mi\w (jp^r jj^^rrw^r 
(3Tjs?T),^5rrcri?-j (h^^). 

5. Give the nouns that are formed, without 10 
affixing ^ or ^ quj or ^ujj from ^^ ^ s^r^cT, 

^^^i ^53% r^^^, ^^m, r^^^, r^^^, ^j, ^^5, 

6. Say to what language originally the follow- 8 
ing words respectively belong : — 

7. Write in English letters sentences 2nd, 6 
4th, and 6tli of No. 2. Use the Jonesian system. 
Say what is the other system, and what are the 
merits of each. 

8. Give the intensive forms of (afoS'^oS" ^ 
^d^S!^^ ^^^, ^3-|T5y, Wl'^^, ^^^^^, ^^^, 

9. Give some instances of Marathi adjectives 5 
that are commonly used adverbially with continu- 
ing agreement in gender and number with the 
noun. 

10. Give the caM5aZ/orw5 of '5^0} ^q- fqoj- 8 

W, qs^, qt^of, m^y m^, W^. 

11. In what 5^^ (or person) must the verb be 8 
in a Karmani Prayog, in a Kartari Prayog and in 

a Bhawe Prayog respectively ? Illustrate by two 



FIRST EXAMINATION IN ARTS, 1864-65. IxVlf 

examples of each Prayog, and name the Pra- 
yogs of each of the following sentences : — 

(1) Ken: ^fc^'fir^f ti^^^ ^r^q^rtr h^^ 



^Km- 



."^-V 



(4) c^r 3i"f3^r ^^\ ^Ji f^d^'n^^^rr ^^ft qrrc?^. 

12. Give some instances of common Marathi 
constructions which are in breach of the rules of 
the above Prayogs. J)o you know of analogous 
constructions in other languages ? 



Ixviii FIRST EXAMINATION IN ARTS, 1864-65. 

Tuesday — 2\st February 1865. 

[2 p. M. TO 5 P.M.] 

MARATHI. 

TRANSLATION,— MORO PANT'S SABHA PARVA, TUKA- 
RAM'S ABHANGS, KAVI CHARITRA, ,AND LIFE 
OF SOCRATES. 

Major Thomas Candy ; Vithal Narayan 
Pathak, B.A., 

[The black figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

I. Translate the following into idiomatic 
Marathi .— 

There has been considerable difference of opi- 21 
nion iii regard to the effects produced upon the 
mind by fictitious narrative. Without entering 
minutely upon the merits of this controversy, 
I think it may he contended that two evils are 
likely to arise from much indulgence in works 
of fiction. The one is a tendency to give way to 
the wild play of the imagination, a practice most 
deleterious both to the intellectual and to the 
moral habits. The other is a disruption of the 
harmony which ought to exist between the moral J 

emotions and the conduct — a principle of exten- ' 

sive and important influence. In the healthy state 
of the moral feelings, for example, the emotion 
of sympathy excited by a tale of sorrow ought 
to be followed by some efforts for the relief of 
the sufferer. When sucii relations in real life are 
listened to from time to time without any such 
effects,the emotion gradually becomes weakened, 
and that moral condition is produced which we call 



FIRST EXAMINATION IN ARTS, 1864-65. Ixix 

selfishness or hardness of heart. Fiction appears 
to have the same tendency. 

{Ahercromhie,) 

II. Translate the following passages, and 12 
explain fully the allusions that may be contained 

ill them : — 

(^) g"5q4r?cf qf^cT II tr^-crq^CR3T ^Fc^^-rqcrr 
(c) ^rnr-sq-^'^ ^q^rr 1 1 ^ qR ^ ^rfcr % w^ 

III. What prince is killed before the com- 7 
mencement of the ^fsf^xf q"5r which HR^fsT '^ 
celebrating; what noticeable event, showing the 
manners of the times, takes place at its celebration, 
what aggravates the ill-feeling of the jealous 
^4f^ towards his cousins on this occasion ; and 

what mode of revenge does he adopt ? 

^V^ ^& n^^\ II ^€^^\ cr P^^^rn: ^j ^?-. 

To whom is ij[?ii[ speaking here ? What is 
meant by "^ q^JT ^^q"'' ? What is the point to 
be decided here ? What gave rise to it ? 



IXX yiRST EXAMINATION IN ARTS, 1864-65. 

Translate these lines, and show how they are 
connected with lines (a) 

V. Give a short account of the following per- 5 
sons, and of the part each plays in this Parva : — 

VI. Why is this Parva so called ? Give its 6 
chief incidents. 

VII. Translate the following passages : — 7 

cr^c^r ^ET^sr omq^ ^r. \ 
crt tr§^ Itm ^sl rr ^4cr II 

5Err^q^iir^cr^riTK-\ 
5^ ^'^ irr^ iTRT c ^K^ II 

(c) Give the meaning of the following 
words : — 

VIIL What are the writings of Tukarama a 6 
protest against ? What does he insist upon, as 



FIRST EXAMINATION IN ARTS, 1864-65. Ixxi 

necessary to man's salvation? Illustrate your 
answer by quotations from his Abhangs. 

IX. Give briefly the legendary account of 8 
the lives of Shankaracharya, Vishnusharma, 
Vallabhacharya, Bbartrihari and Jngannatha 
Raya, as given in Kavi Charitra. What sects 

did Shankaracharya attempt to put down, and 
what system of worship did he establish as his 
own ? 

X. Name the authors and subject-matter of 9 
the following works : — 

Vedanta Paribasha, Gita Govinda, Prakrita 
Prakasha, Lilavati, Siddhanta Sliiromani, Nais- 
hadha Kavya, Nidana Madhava, Malati Mad- 
hava Bhagavata. 

What Sanskrit authors have written grammars 
of the Prakrita dialects of India ? 

XI. Give the substance of the charges 7 
brought against Socrates, and of his own defence 

as detailed in Chapter VI. By whom was So- 
crates brought, and ridiculed on the stage, and 
in what piece ? 

XII. What was the subject of Socrates's last 6 
discourse ? Give a short analysis of the argu- 
ments employed in it. 



Ixxii FIRST EXAMINATION IN ARTS, 1864-65. 

Tuesday — 2lst February 1865. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

GUJARATI. 

QUESTIONS ON GRAMMAR, IDIOM, AND VISHVA- 
NATH'S TRANSLATION OF ELPIIINSTONE'S HIS- 
TORY OF INDIA, THE PANCHOPAKHYAN, AND 
ABOLA RANI. 

John Wilson, D.D.; Nagindas Tulsidas, B.A. 
[The black figures to the right indicate full marks .] 

I. (a) Mention, some of the most remarkable 20 
works of the author of Aboli Rani. 

(6) Has this poet left us any materials for 
his life ? Give a brief sketch of it. 

II. (a) Why is the heroine of the poem 10 
called Abold Rani. 

(b) At the beginning of the poem " Abola 
Hani" there occurs the expression 
'*TO<11 ^<fl." What is its meaning ? 

III. (a) Fully relate the circumstances under 10 
which the fairy abodes of Abola Rani were 
created. 

(h) Fully relate one of the stories made 
use of by Vikrama in order to make 
the curtain fall. 

IV. (a) Paraphrase and explain the following 10 

passage : — 

a ^i'n'-d iji^iill, Ri^mn m^h^. 



FIRST EXAMINATION IN ARTS, 1864-65. Ixxiu 

(b) Explain the following words, quoting, 
if you can, the lines in which they 
occur : — 

V. (a) Give and criticise Manu's classifica- 10 

tion of cases. 
(b) What are the merits and defects of 
the Law of Evidence as treated by 
Manu. 

VI. (tt) What are the rates of interest which 10 

were considered legal in different 
transactions in Manu's code ? 
(b) What does Manu say about creation? 

VII. {a) What do you know about the 10 

(b) Give a comment on the following 
passage : — 

nm IHI^S *af^ '^mi'-fl ^''^ ^l^-tHi *l<r*'? MvScU <- 

^K acfl ;|iM &." 

VIII. (a) When was the Panchopakhyana 10 
first translated into Gujarati ? 

(b) Relate the circumstances under which 
this book is said to have been origi- 
nally composed ? 

IX. (a) Does this book lose or gain by the 10 
introduction of irrational creatures '? Why so ? 



Ixxiv FIRST EXAMINATION IN ARTS, 1864-65. 

(h) Which of the two characters drawn 
up in this book is preferable, that of 
Damanaka or that of Kartaka ? 
Mention the grounds of your judg- 
ment. 
X. Comment on the following texts : — 10 

R. %'^ ^ ^ Vl^C:i ^M M^l "Ml^ ^, M^l <^l 

oiu ^i^B^ a ^-^ <M^}4i. ^rs (a^m jjMi "^i Rir§ 



Tuesday — 21 5^ February 1865. 

[2 P M. TO 5 P.M.] 

GUJARATI. 

THE KAVYA DOHANA AND TRANSLATIONS. 

John Wilson, D.D.; Nagindas Tulsidas, B.A, 

[The black figures to the right indicate fiill marks.] 

I. Give some account of Muktananda, Ma- 10 
nohard^sa, Brah^mananda, Krishnar^ma, Maha- 
raja, Dugarbharota, Bapu, Dayarama, Devanan- 

da, Narbhayarama, Mirabai, and Muladas, and 
of their poetical writings. 

II. {a) What are the ragas used in the por- 10 
lion of the Kavya Dohana which you have 
studied ? 



1 



tlRST EXAMINATION IN ARTS, 1 864-65. IxXV 

(b) Give the metrical schemes employed in 
these portions, noting the feet and 
syllables. 

III. Translate the following passage into 10 
English : — 

^^^ica ^m^\ %Am\ ^-^ A\{ii(^^'^ni^ 

^^ iml^^i ^Rcl, ^^K ^<r/^lca Jj^cllMi C-t^Hii; 

M^j ri>i«^ ^-iii^.ft>ii M^^a Him ^Hincft <n2(l, >ifj 
a^i »Hl<rvt HHii sjRHi>ii ^naimSt. 

IV. Translate the following passage attributed 20 
to Mirabel :— 

m"^ Mi^i ^mt^ n'^X 41^1 MiR <n<r/^ ^i^^; 



Ixxvi FIRST EXAMINATION IN ARTS, 1864-65* 

4Hi ^<5ti >lqu ^, Pt^i n(/MR4>iMiH; 

^\H ^^iXl (h\\ 4l^Hl ^h,, "HlMl^ii nAi n hH 

W^ ^Hia ^"^(i Hi^l MC-ll, Rc-1 JfMil^d 1^. 

V. Translate into Gujarati the following 20 
passage : — 

{a) It is saying much for the moral charac- 
ter of God, that he has placed a conscience 
within us, which administers painful rebuke 
on every indulgence of a wrong affection. But 
it is saying still more for such being the cha- 
racter of our Maker — so to have framed our 
mental constitution, that, in the very working of 
these bad affections there should be the painful- 
ness of a felt discomfort and discordancy. Such 
is the make or mechanism of our nature, that it 
is thwarted and put out of sorts, by rage and 
envy, and hatred ; and this, irrespective of the 
adverse moral judgments which conscience 
passes upon them. Of themselves, they are 
unsavoury ; and no sooner do they enter the 
heart, than they shed upon it an immediate dis- 
tillation of bitterness. Just as the placid smile 
of benevolence,bespeaks the felt comfort of bene- 
volence ; so, in the frown and tempest of an 
angry countenance, do we read the unhappiness 
of that man who is vexed and agitated by his 



FIRST EXAMINATION IN ARTS, 1864-65. Ixxvii 

own malignant affections — eating inwardly as 
they do on the vitals of his enjoyment. It is, 
therefore, that he is often styled, and truly, a 
self-tormentor ; or, his own worst enemy. 

{Dr. Chalmers.) 

(6) In infancy, my vernal prime, 20 

When life itself was new, 
Amusement pluck'd the wings of time. 
Yet swifter still he flew. 

Summer, my youth succeeded soon. 

My sun ascended high, 
And pleasure held the reins till noon, 

But grief drove down the sky. 

Like autumn, rich in ripening corn, 

Came manhood'^j sober reign ; 
My harvest moon scarce fill'd her horn, 

When she began to wane. 

Close foUow'd age, infirm old age. 

The winter of ray year ; 
When shall I fall before his rage. 

To rise beyond the sphere? 

{James Montgomery.) 

(c) The Queen of Isles behold, 10 

Sitting sublime upon her rocky throne, 
The region of the storms ! She stretches forth 
In her right hand the sceptre of the sea. 
And in her left the balance of the earth. 



Above the Grecian or the Roman name. 

Unlike the great destroyers of the globe. 

She fights and conquers in fair Freedom's cause. 

Her song of victory the nations sing : 

Her triumphs are the triumphs of mankind. 



{Logan.) 



ff* 



Ixxviii FIRST EXAMINATION IN ARTS, 1864-65, 

Tuesday — 21 st February 1865. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

LA.TIN. Paper I. 

C^sAR, — De Bello Gallico, Book I. Cicero, — 
De Senectute. Horace, — Odes, Book I 
Virgil, — ^neid, Book I. 

J. P. HuGHLiNGs, B.A. ; Rev. R* Stothert, M.A. 

[The black figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

I. Give a short account of the person to whom 5 
the oration De Senectute is addressed : also 
of Cato Major, Laelius, and Scipio. 

Mention in Latin the four complaints against 
old age which Cicero answers. 

IT. *Multa in nostro collegio praeclara.' lo 
Explain ' collegium.' 

* In scena intelligi potest ex iis fratribus qui 
in Adelphis sunt.' What is the allusion ? 

' Avum tuum L. Paullum qui morte luit collegae 
in Cannensi ignominia temeritatem. iVJ. Mar- 
cellum, cujus interitum ne crudelissimus quideni 
hostis honore sepulturae carere passus est.' 
What events are referred to ? 

III. Translate: ' Rehgione civitatem obstrin- 15 
gere. Ex alterius oratione aliud excipere atque 
ille vult. Vacare studiis.' 

I doubt not that you will conquer. I fear 
that my discourse will displease you. 

Give examples illustrating the force of ' per,' 
*sub/ 'in,' when prefixed to verbs. 



FIRST LXAMINATION IN ARTS, 1864-65. IXXlX 

IV. At what point in the narrative does the 10 
/Eneid open? 

Explain (a) Cytherea. {b) Lavini moenia. 

(e) Domus Assaraci Phthiam clarasque My- 

cenas servitio preraet. (d) Sic volvere Parcas. 
(e) Abolere Sichseum. 

V. Translate the following passages : — 15 

(a) Neu promptse modus amphorae 

Neu morem in Salium sit requies pedum. 

(b) Precibus non linquar inultis. 

(c) Quamvis, clypeo Trojano refixo 

Tempora testatus, nihil ultra 

Nervos atque cutera Morti concesserat 
atrse. 

(d) Quod ego ipse testa 
Conditum levi. 

(e) Interfusa nitentes 
Vites aequora Cycladas. 

VI. What are the ordinary prose forms of 15 
the following constructions : — 

(a) Qu8e tibi virginum 

* ^ barbara serviet ? 

(b) Frui paratis [et] valido mihi, 
Latoe, dones. 

(c) Sedulus curae. 

(d) Non lenis precibus fata recludere. 

(e) Scriberis Vario fortis et hostium 
Victor Maeonii carminis alite. 

VII. Describe three of the principal metres 5 
used by Horace in the first book of his Odes. 



IXXX FIRST EXAMINATION IN ARTS, 1864-65. 

VIII. Parse syntactically and individually 10 
the italicized words in the following sentences 
and phrases : — 

(a) Antiquissimum quodque tempus. 

(b) Dido audientes* 

(c) Petierunt, uti sibi concilium totius Galliae 

in diem certam indicere, idque Caesaris 
voluntate facere liceret. 
{d) Summa omnium fuerunt ad millia 
CCCLXVIII. 

(e) Boii et Tulingi qui * * * novissimis 
praesidio erant ex itinere nostros latere aperto 
aggressi circumvenere. 

IX. Translate : 'Securus amorum germanae.' 15 
Give examples of adjectives governing 

the genitive. 
Translate *flocci facere. Utinam afForet 

iEneas.' Parse 'afForet.' 
Translate : *liceat subducere classem.' 

What is the opposite of 'subducere ?' 
Explain the allusion in, 'polus dum sidera 

pascet/ Conjugate 'pasco.' 



FIRST EXAMINATION IN ARTS, 1864-65. Ixxxi 

Tuesday — 2lst February 1865. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

LATIN. Part II. 
TRANSLATION. 

J. P. HuGHLiNGs, B.A. ; Rev. R. Stothert, M.A. 
[The black figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Translate into English : — 

{a) Hoc responso dato, discessit. Postero 50 
die castra ex eo loco movent : idem Caesar facit, 
cquitatumque omnem, ad numerum, quatuor 
millium, quem ex omni Provincia et ^duis atque 
corum sociis coactum habebat, praemittit, qui 
Tideant, quas in partes hostes iter faciant. Qui 
cupidius novissimum a^men insecuti, alieno loco 
cum equitatu Helvetiorum proelium comraittunt : 
et pauci de nostris cadunt. Qui prcelio sublati 
Ilelvetii, quod quingentis equitibus tantam mul- 
titudinem equitum propulerant, audacius subsis- 
tere, nonnunquam et novissimo agmine prcelio 
nostros lacessere cceperunt. Caesar suos a prcelio 
continebat, ac satis habebat in praesentia hostem 
rapinis, pabulationibus, populationibusque pro- 
hibere. Itadies circiter quindecim iter fecerunt, 
uti inter novissimum hcstium agmen et nostrum 
primum non amplius quinis aut senis millibus 
passuum interesset. 

(6) Vitas hinnuleo me similis, Chloe, 
Quaerenti pavidam montibus aviis. 
Matrem non sine vano 

Aurarum et siluse metu. 



Ixxxii FIRST EXAMINATION IN ARTS 1864-65. 

Nam seu mobilibus veris inhorruit 
Adventus foliis seu virides rubum 
Dimovere lacertae, 

Et corde et genibus tremit. 

Atqui non ego te tigris ut aspera 
Gaetulusve leo frangere persequor : 
Tandem desine matrera 

Tempestiva sequi viro. 

II. Meanwhile King Tarquinius set out with 
speed to Rome to put down the tumult. But 
Lucius turned aside from the road, that he might 
not meet him, and came to the camp ; and the 
soldiers joyfully received him, and they drove 
out the sons of Tarquinius. King Tarquinius 
came to Rome, but the gates were shut, and they 
declared to him, from the walls, the sentence of 
banishment which had been passed against him 
and his family. So he yielded to his fortune, 
and went to live at Caere with his sons Titus and 
A runs. His other son, Sextus, went to Gabii, 
and the people there, remembering how he had 
betrayed them to his father, slew him. 



FIRST EXAMINATION IN ARTS, 1864-65. Ixxxiii 

Wednesday — 22nd February 1865. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

ARITHMETIC AND ALGEBRA. 
H. M. BiRDWooD, M.A.; Rev. C. D. DuPort, M.A 

[The black figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1 . 356 and 34 are two numbers, the base of 7 
whose system of notation is 7 ; multiply them 
together in that system of notation, and transfer 

the product to the system of notation whose base 
is 10. 

2. How many teak planks, 14 feet 6 inches 6 
Jong, and 9 J inches broad, will be required to 
floor a room 70 feet long and 30 feet broad ? 

3. A Legacy of 3205 Rs. was left to a boy 7 
of 13 years of age ; to come into his possession 

at the age of 17. The money was invested at 5 
per cent, per annum, compound interest; what 
sum will the boy receive ? 

4. A merchant shipped to Bombay from 7 
Liverpool 300 pieces of linen, each piece being 
25J yards in length ; it was sold by his Agent 

at 1 Rupee 12 annas per yard ; the prime cost 
of the linen was 25. 7kd. per yard ; the freight 
3 J c?. per piece ; the Agent's commission 5 per 
cent.; what was the merchant's gain on the 
transaction ? 

5. Explain the advantase of using 10 as 5 
the base of a system of logarithms. 

Given log^^ 2=-301O3 4 

and logj^ l-976=-29579, 

find X from the equation 2 =1976. 



Ixxxiv FIRST EXAMINATION IN ARTS, 1864-65« 

6. Explain clearly the difference between the 5 
sciences of Arithmetic and Algebra. 

7. Find the difference between 4 

a{h + c) + 5 (a + c) + c{a -h b)" and 
(a H- b) («— c) i,b—c) 4- (a—b) (a—c) {b + c) 
— («— 6) (6—0 (a + c). 

Divide a — b hy yj a — ^ b. 5 

8. Prove that if a measures b and c, it will 4 
also measure mb±nc. 

Find the H. C. M. of 

3 2 2 3 4 

^wy-f3nj5 (7 — 2npq — S?!^' and 6 

2 2 4 3 3 

2mp q — A^m'p — mip g -^ 3 mpq. 

9. If two fractions are together equal to 1, 5 
show that their difference is equal to the difference 

of their squares. 





bimf 


)iity 


1 










X — 1 "I" 


1 + 




JJ 






" 










4- 


-X 


10. 


Solv 


^e the following Equations : 
/ 


— 




(°) 


x+\/ l + x + sTT' 


— x = 


Vl 


X. 




3 

X 


■4-T='» 








0) 


1 

3i^ 
4 
bx 


1 2 

1 4 
'2y'^'z ~" ^^iV« 









EXAM. FOR THE DEGEEE OF B. A., 1864-65. IxXXV 

11. Divide a line, 20 inches in length, into 8 
two such parts that the rectangle contained by 

the whole and one part may be equl to the 
square of the other part. 

12. Two messengers, A and /^ were dispatch- 9 
ed to the same phice, 90 miles distant; A start- 
ed one hour after JB ; and, by riding one mile 

per hour faster than JB, arrived at his destination 
at the same time as B ; at what rate did A 
travel ? 



Wednesday — 22nd February/ 1865. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

EUCLID AND PLANE TRIGONOMETRY. 
Rev. C. D. DuPort, M.A. ; H. M. Birdwood, M.A. 

[The black figures on the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Define a righf: angle ^ a circle, a square, and 4 
paralkl siraiykt lines. 

2. Triangles upon equal bases and between 4 
the same parallels are equal to one anotlier. 

From two given points draw two straight 8 
lines meeting in a given straigiit line, and 
which shall together be shorter than any 
two other lines drawn from the same points 
and meeting in the same line. 

3. In any right-angled triangle, the square 6 
which is described upon the side subtending the 
right angle is equal to the squares described 
upon the sides which contain the right angle. 

4. To describe a square that shall be equal 6 
to a given rectiliueal figure. 

h 



JxXXvi EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B. A., 1864-65. 

5. If a straight line touches a circle, the 4 
straight line drawn from the centre to the point 

of contact shall be perpendicular to the line 
touching the circle. 

6. About a given circle to describe a triangle 6 
equiangular to a given triangle. 

7. If a straight line be drawn parallel to one 8 
of the sides of a triangle, it shall cut the other 
sides or these produced proportionally. 

If the middle points of the sides of any 6 
quadrilateral are joined by four straight 
lines, the figure so formed will be a 
parallelogram. 

8. Explain the different units of angular 8 
measure that have been adopted. What is the 
number of degrees in the angle whose circular 
measure is 1 . 

9. Define the tangent of an angle ; and prove, 10 

n xi X X / ^ E>\ tan A — tan B, 

from a figure, that tan ( A-B)^ i+tan^tanS 

10. Find sin 18°. 10 

11. Given two sides of a triangle and the 10 
angle included by them, solve the triangle. 

12. Find an expression for the area of a 10 
triangle in terms of two sides and the included 
angle. 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B. A., 1864-65. IxXXVU 

Thursday — 23rd February 1865. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

LOGIC. 
R. West, B.A.; W. J. Jeaffreson, B.A. 
[The black figures on the right indicate full marks.] 

1. What is meant by the "material" and 7 
what by the " formal" relation of terms to each 
other ? Illustrate your answer by examples, and 
show that this usage of the words " material" 
and " formal" accords with the ordinary distinc- 
tion between " matter" and " form." 

2. Give the rules for the correct performance 10 
of the logical process of Division. What relation 
does Division bear to Definition ? Distinguish 
Logical from Physical Division. 

3. What purpose does the conversion of pro- 5 
positions serve ? Illustrate your answer by an 
example. 

Convert the following propositions and state 6 
the mode of conversion adopted in each case. 
Some students fail in nothing. 
But few men are either Timons or Timoleons. 
The air is composed of oxygen and nitrogen. 
The animal world includes numerous genera. 

4. It has been proposed to reduce conver- 10 
sion to a mere transformation of terms by " the 
quantification of the predicate." What does 
this mean, and how far would it effect any real 
simplification of the process ? 

5. " Logic is entirely conversant about Ian- 8 
guage." Criticize this assertion. 



IxXXviii EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B. A., 1864-65. 

6. What is the nature of the arg;ument from 8 
analogy, and what is its principal scientific use ? 
Give some account of the origin of the term 
analogy and its various significations. 

7. (a) Show that A can be proved only by 6 
the first figure. 

(b) Discuss Whately's objection to the use 5 
of the fourth figure. 

(c) State and illustrate the " Dictum de 5 
diverso" and the " Dictum de exemplo." 

8. What opinions have been held as to the 8 
apphcability of syllogistic formulae to the process 

of Induction ? 

9. (a) Examine the following : — 

While the depth of the Mediterranean inside 5 
of the Straits of GibraUar is upwards of 900 
fathoms, yet in the straits themselves tlie depth 
across the shallowest section is not more than 
160 fathoms. " Such being the case ; we can 
now prove," exclaims Sir Charles Lyell, " that 
the vast amount of salt brougiit into the Mediter- 
ranean does not pass out again by the straits. 
For it is evident that if water sinks in certain 
parts of the Mediterranean in consequence of 
the increase of its specific gravity to greater 
depths than 220 fathoms it can never flow out 
again into the Atlantic, since it must be stopped 
by the submarine barrier which crosses the 
shallowest part of the straits." 

Alexander was the son of Philip, therefore 5 
Phihp was the father of Alexander. 

(b) If five out of six of the wealthy are 5 
charitable, and two Parsees out of seven are 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B. A., 1864-65. Ixxxlx 

wealthy, what is the measurable probability of 
every Parsee being charitable ? 

10. What is the nature of the Fallacy of 7 
which Aristotle says that it gives an unfair 
advantage to the respondent, and how is this 
frequently illustrated in the Courts of Law ? 



Thursday — 23rd February 1865. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

MODERN HISTORY. 

R. West, B.A. ; W. J. Jeaffreson, B.A. 

[The black figures on the right indicate full marks.] 

1. What were the chief sources of revenue 10 
under the French monarchy in the period im- 
mediately preceding the Revolution, and what 
defects in the financial system were most instru- 
mental in bringing about that event ? 

2. Describe the Constitution of the year III., 10 
and the means by which the Directory was 
established. 

3. Sketch the history of the Confederation 10 
of the Rhine. 

4. What were the chief provisions of the 10 
Charter of 1815? 

5. " Such was the inauspicious manner in 
which Pitt entered on his second administration. 
The whole history of that administration was of 
a piece with its commencement." 

Illustrate this passage by a sketch of the for- 
mation and subsequent history of the ministry 
referred to. 
^* 



XC EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OE B. A., 1864-654 

6. Instead of avy one of the above, sketch the 
literary history of England in the period between 
1790 and 1815. 



ANCIENT HISTORY. 

(Dates must le given even when it is not so specified 

in the Question*) 

6. State the causes, proximate and remote, 8 
of the P eloponnesian War. 
7. What do you know of — 

Eurylochus, Thucydides son of Olorus, 8 
Aristeus, Pasitelidas, Pagondas, Tima- 
goras* 
Lepreum, Thyrea, Rhium, Minoa. 

8. What events led to the conclusion of the 7 
Fifty Years' Peace ? State its terms. Show the 
consequences which followed from it. When 
was it first formally violated ? 

9. Give a short narrative of the Sicilian ex- 10 
pedition with dates and a map. 

10. Enumerate the allies on either side dur- 7 
ing the war, the neutral states, and any changes 

of alliance which may have been made. How 
did the systems of federation pursued by Athens 
and Sparta respectively differ ? 

1 1 . Write an account of the great Corcyreean 10 
Revolution, the rise and fall of the Four Hundred, 

the closing campaign of the war. 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B. A., 1864-65. XCl 

Friday— 24«^ February 1865. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

PREFACE TO BUTLER'S SERMONS, AND SERMONS 
I., IL, III. 

Rev. W. K. Fletcher, M.A. ; Raymond West, B.A. 
[The black figures on the right indicate full marks.] 

1. State anything you know of the opinions 8 
on Human Nature and Man's Moral responsibi- 
lity, current amongst European philosophers, 
about the time when Bishop Butler lived. 

2. To what purpose is Christian Revelation 6 
applied in these discourses ? 

3. There are two methods by which man's 8 
obligation to be virtuous may be shown. In 
what does the method of Butler differ from that 

of the Greek philosophers ? 

4. Explain the argument of the three Sermons 12 
considered as one entire work. 

5. Trace the similarity in the inward Nature 10 
of Man and other animals, and explain clearly 
that in which the difterence of the two natures 
consists. 

6. " Goodness makes" men afraid of doing 8 
evil." Prove this, and explain whether it has 
any, and if any, what relation to conscience. 

7. Explain and illustrate the different 15 
meanings of the word " Nature," as used in these 
Sermons. 

8. What is the popular meaning of the word 7 
" Conscience" ? Give Butler's definition of it, 
and prove that all men have a conscience. 



Xcii EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B. A., 1864-65. 

9. Reconcile self-love with the love of other 10 
men. 

10. •* Self-deceit is a cause of much wicked- 
ness in the world," Explain this fully. 

1 1 . From what considerations do you prove 8 
the authority of Conscience over every part of 
human nature ? 

12. What is the relation of Resentment to 8 
Forgiveness of injuries. 

Friday — Uth February 1865. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

ANALYTICAL GEOMETRY OF THE STRAIGHT LINE 
AND CIRCLE. 

H. M. BiRDwooD, M.A.; Rev, C D. DuPort, M.A. 

[The black figures on the right indicate full marks.] 

1. What are the co-ordinates of a point ? 2 
Explain the terms : — origin, axes, abscissa* 5 

2. Indicate in a figure the position of the 6 
three points whose co-ordinates are respectively 
(1,1), (-1,2), and (-1,1). 

3. Find an expression for the length of the 6 
line joining the two points whose co-ordinates 

are respectively {xi yi ) and (a^g ?/2 ). 

J. IS a point on the axis of x and B a point 6 
on the axis of?/ ; show that the distance of 
the middle point of ^ ^ from the ori2:in 
is J AL\ 

4. Express the area of a triangle in terms of 8 
the co-ordinates of its angular points. 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B. A., 1864-65. Xciii 

5. Explain clearly the meaning of the locus 4 

of an equation. Xie^n^ihQ equation to a 4 
curve. 

6. Find the equation to a straight line not 7 
parallel to either axis and not passing through 3 
the origin ; and from it deduce the equation to 

a straight line parallel to the axis ofiuo:. 

7. When may the position of a straight hne 2 
be said to be determined ? 

Draw the straight line whose equation is 6 
^+ ^ = -^ 2. 

8. Find the equation to a straight line 7 
passing through the point (0, — o), and inclined 

at an angle of 45° to the axis of x. 

Write down the equation to a hne 3 
parallel to the above straight line. 

How many such parallel lines may be 2 
drawn ? 

9. Find (he equation to the circle referred 7 
to rectanguliir axes, the origin being on the 
circumference. 

10. Draw the circle x'^ + y^ =25 ; and find 4 
its points of intersection with the lines 5 
y ^x = — 5 and 3?/+ Ax = — 25. 5 

11. Define the tangent to a curve at any 4 
point. 

Given that xxi + yyi = c^ is the equa- 5 
tion to the tangent to a circle at the point 
( Xx yi ), the centre of the circle being the 
origin ; find the equation to the normal at 
the point {xi yi ). 



XCiv EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B. A., 1864-65. 

Friday — 24:th February 1865> 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

GEOGRAPHY. 

Rev. C D. DuPort, M.A.; H. M. Birdwood, M.A. 

[The black figures on the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Give a general description of the form, 6 
size, and motion of the earth. 

Mention some of the proofs of the spheri- 
cal form of the earth. 

2. State some of the comparisons that have 6 
been drawn by geographers between the two 
great Continents (the Old and New Worlds) in 
respect to their forms of contour and elevation. 

3. What is meant by the climate of a country, 8 
and to what causes are the peculiarities of the 
climate of a country attributable ? 

4. What is the estimated population of the 6 
globe, and what j)roportions do the different races 
bear to each other ? 

5. What religions are professed in Europe, 6 
and by what nations are they professed ? 

6. Draw a map of Denmark, indicating the 18 
political divisions, the islands off the coast, the 
bays, straits, rivers, and principal towns. 

7. Describe in general terms the geology of 10 
India. 

8. Describe in words the course of the river 8 
Nile, and name the chief towns on its banks. 

9. Draw a map showing the positions of 8 
Lakes Superior, Michigan, Huron, Erie, and 
Ontario, and of the lalls of Niagara. 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B. A., 1864-65. XCV 

] 0. What is the form of Government in Bra- 8 
zil? 

11. Name the British Colonies in Australia, 8 
and the chief towns in each of these Colonies. 

12. Indicate the positions of the following 8 
mountains, and state as nearly as you can their 
respective heights: — 

Hecla, Vesuvius, Etna, Erebus, Sinai, 
Kunchiiijunga, Ararat, Chimborazo, and 
Aconcagua. 



Friday — 24th February 1865. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

CHEMISTRY, HEA.T AND ELECTRICITY. 
H. J. GiRAUD, M.D.; R. Haines, M.B. 

[The black figures on the right indicate full marks.] 

1. What circumstances modify the force of 10 
chemical a(Hnity ? Give illustrations. 

2. State the construction of the air tbermo- 12 
meter. What circumstances render its indica- 
tions liable to error, and how far does the differ- 
ential thermometer overcome these objections ? 

3. If 500 grains of hydrate of sulphuric acid 10 
be poured upon nitrate of potash, and supposing 

all the sulphuric acid to form bisulphate of 
potash, how much nitric acid will be set free ? 

4. What corrections are required in barome- 12 
trie observations ? 

5. On what principle is Montgolfier's or the 12 
fire balloon constructed ? What weight, includ- 
ing its own materials, should a balloon of the 



XCVl EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B. A-^ 1864-65. 

capacity of 10,000 cubic inches sustain in an 
atmosphere of 85° F. at the sea level, the air 
within being at 200° F., supposing 100 cubic 
inches of air at 60° F. to weigh 31 grains ? 

6. Explain the production of draught' in a 10 
wind furnace. How may the force of the cur- 
rent be estimated ? Is anything gained by 
prolonging the ashpit downw^ards, and closing 

all the openings into it except at the bottom ? 

7. Supposing the prime conductor of an elec- 12 
trical machine in the form of a hollow cylinder 

to be charged, what would be the effect, first of 
touching the inner surface ; secondly, of placing 
it in a vacuum ? 

8. What liquids are selected for filling ther- 12 
mometers, and why ? Are their indications 
correct throughout the scale ? 

9. A gold-leaf electroscope shows signs of 10 
electricity. How would you ascertain which kind 

of electricity it indicates ? 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B. A., 1864-65. XCvii 

IV. 

EXAMINATION FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF ARTS, 1864-65. 

EXAMINERS. 

J. P. HuGHLiNGS, B.A... 1 In English and in His- 
W. Wordsworth, B.A.. . J tory. 

Rev. John Wilson, D.D.,"^! 

Mahadeo Govind Ra- , 
NADE, B.A J 

Rev. John Wilson, D.D.,~] 

Nagindass Tulsidass ^'^ Gujarathi. 
Marphatia, B.A J 

Rev. John Wilson, D.D.,"^ 

F.R.S yin Persian. 

MoossA Khan, Esq J 

J. G. Buhler, Ph.D. .,\j J .. 
E. K. Lidderdale, LL.B./ ^^ ^^^'"• 

H. M. BiRDwooD, M.A.\^" Mathematics Natu- 
Rev.C.D.DuPoRT,M.A. r '^} Philosophy, and 

J Physical Geography. 

R. S. Sinclair, LL.D. . . 1 ^"ov,'^"S''= , ^"'^ ^ °''.='' 

Rev. R. SroTHERT, M.A. ]- P^^'°'°l''',^ '^'^'^ '" 
' J Pohtical Economy. 

H. J. GiRAUD, M.D l In Chemistry, Heat, and 

R. Haines, M.B / Electricity. 



XCviii EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B. A., 1864-65. 

Monday— 20if7i March 1865. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

ENGLISH.— Paper I. 

HOOKER'S ECCLESIASTICAL POLITY (BOOK I.) AND 
ADAM SMITH'S THEORY OF MORAL SENTIMENTS. 

J. P. HuGHLTNGS, B.A. ; W. WoRDSWORTH, B.A. 
[The black figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. How does Hooker establish the necessity 10 
of a supernatural law ? 

2. What are Hooker's opinions on the origin 15 
of civil society, on the nature of moral distinc- 
tions, and the freedom of the will ? 

3. Fix the sense in which the words 'soul,' 5 
' spirit,' ' fancy' (phancie), * sense' are used in 

the first book of the Ecclesiastical Law. 

4. Quote the various definitions or descrip- 10 
lions of Law given by Hooker, and compare them 
with those generally given at the present day. 

5. How does Hooker distinguish between 10 
education and instruction.^ What has he to say 

in praise of the logic of Ramus ? 

6. What is the fundamental principle of Adam 5 
Smith's Theory of Moral Sentiments ? 

7. With what other Theories is the Theory 10 
of Moral Sentiments most directly at variance ? 

8. What account does Adam Smith give of 10 
the system of Dr. Mandeville ? 

9. What is Aristotle's account of the nature 10 
of Virtue, as given in the Theory of Moral Sen- 
timents ? 






EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B. A., 1864-65. Xcix 

10. Quote the substance of passages in the 5 
Theory of Moral Sentiments which you may think 
recommended by their practical value. 

11. How far does Adam Smith make Beauty 10 
depend upon Utility ? 



Monday— 20/(/i March 1865. 

[2 P.M. to 5 P.M.] 

ENGLISH.— Paper II. 

SHAKESPEARE'S CYMBELINE, AND WORDSWORTH'S 
EXCURSION, BOOKS I. AND II. 

J. P. HuGHLiNGs, B.A; W. Wordsworth, B.A. 

[The black figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Explain the following phrases, quoting 15 
parallel passages where possible : — ' to bar your 
offence herein' — * lost as offered mercy is' — 

* whom she bore in hand to love' — * to go even 
with what I heard' — ' a glass that feated them' — 
' if I should get ground of your fair mistress.' 

2. Explain the use of the following words in 10 
Cymbeline — 'pen,' 'atone,' 'note' 'conclu- 
sions,' ' approbation,' * utterance.' 

3. Paraphrase — 10 

You are most bound to the king, 
Who lets go by no vantages that may 
Prefer you to his daughter. Frame yourself 
To orderly solicits ; and, befriended 
With aptness of the season, make denials 
Increase your services : so seem, as if 
You were inspired to do those duties which 
You tender to her, that you in all obey her. 
Save when command to your dismission tends. 
And therein you are senseless. 



C EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B. A., 1864-65. 

4. Illustrate from other plays of Shakespeare 15 
the following passages : — 

From every one 
The best she hath, and she, of all compounded. 
Outsells them all. 

I the truer 
So to be false with her. 

The Chimney-piece 
Chaste Dian bathing : never saw I figures 
So likely to report themselves : the cutter 
"Was as another nature, dumb : outwent her. 
Motion and breath left out. 

It is I 
That all the abhorred things o' the earth amend, 
By being worse than they. 

Some griefs are mediciuable. That is one of them : 
For it doth physic love. 

Then was I as a tree 
"Whose boughs did bend with fruit : but, in one night 
A storm, or robbery, call it what you will. 
Shook down my mellow hangings, nay, my leaves, 
And left me bare to weather. 

Against self-slaughter 
There is a prohibition so divine 
That cravens my weak hand. 

5. Explain the meaning of the words and 8 
phrases to each question in italics, with illustra- 
tions from Wordsworth and other poets : — * a 
nice backwardness afraid of shame' — * to take 
unto the height the measure of themselves' — 

* some peak that shows, inscribed upon its vision- 
ary sides' — * caught the trick of grief — *and 
other melodies. . . peopled the milder air' — 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OP B. A., 1864-65. ci 

* no dearer reliqne, and no better stay' — ^ that 
mighty orb, of song.' 

6. Paraphrase — 10 

(1) Time had compressed the freshness of his cheek 
Into a narrower circle of deep red 

But had not tamed his eye ; that under brows 
Shaggy and grey had meanings which it brought 
From years of youth ; which, hke a Being made 
Of many Beings, he had wondrous skill 
To blend with knowledge of the years to come. 
Human, or such as lie beyond the grave. 

(2) From the dazzling conquests gained 
By their united efforts, there arose 

A proud and most presumptuous confidence 
In the transcendent wisdom of the age. 
And her discernment : not alone in rights. 
And in the origin and bounds of power 
Social and temporal ; but in law divine 
Deduced by reason or to faith revealed. 

7. Explain and illustrate the doctrine which 12 
seems to be hinted at in the first of the above 
extracts : and comment historically upon the 
statements put forth in the second. 

8. What light is thrown by the following 7 
passage on the purpose for which the Story of 
Margaret is introduced : — 

I stood, and leaning o'er the garden wall 

Reviewed that woman's sufferings: and it seemed 

To comfort me while with a brother's love 

I blessed her in the impotence of grief, 

Then towards the cottage I returned ; and traced 

Fondly, though with an interest more mild. 

That secret spirit of humanity. 

Which mid the calm oblivious tendencies 

Of nature, mid her plants and w^eeds and flowers 

And silent overgrowings still survived. 



cil EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B. A., 1864-65. 

9. Thus informed 
He had small need of books. 

What information is here spoken of? 

10. Give the etymology of the following 
words and fix the sense in which they are u«ed 
in this poem : * vision,' ' faculty^' * enthusiast,' 
' itinerant,' ' ministry,' * optimist,' imagination.' 



Tuesday— 21 s< March 1865. 

[10 AM. TO 1 P.M.] 

MARATHI— Paper I. 

QUESTIONS ON THE BOOKS— MOROPANT'S VANPARVA 
— DNYANESHWARI, CHAPTERS I.— IX.— YOUTH'S 

book of natural theology. 
John Wilson, D. D. ; Mahadev G. Ranade, B.A. 

[The black figures to the right indicate full marks'] 
I. Translate the following passage : — 15 

^ ^^l^\ mm- ^n'^^rr g^^^^r^ifr IR ii 
^^rr ^%^f ^f iT3- \m ^\[^^\ B?t \^\\\^ ii 
^=rr ^^fr^oir^r qiwfr ^r ^rt =r ^\z\^ ii y ii 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B. A., 1864'65. ciii 

sTT^r ^r c^r^r^r tr^r ^r ^f^rqrg" q^ ^fe l K 11 

II. State the context, and explain fully the 8 
following passages : — 

(«) ST^^ ^mPccT ^r?f ^qr m^\ nwmxi ^\m, 

III. Give the substance of the answer which 5 
^rr^gave to the query of ?f^q-. Who was ^^^l 

State the story of his fall. 

IV. Give in briefthe argument of the chapters 5 
which relate to the story of ^^2["q3f3^r ^^^ ^^ 

V. Give the meanina: of the followino; 7 
words — 

VI. What is the precise philosophical mean- 8 
ing of the following terms : — 



civ EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B. A., 1864-65. 

^WRJT, 3nW?ft"^, ^i^iTcT (as applied to the 
person of God) iTjf^, T^q-rr^JT^TfR-^TR P^R, 

VII. What is the ^f^oif^jj ^^^j described 6 
at the end of the second chapter ? Distinguish 
between ^qrij and ^:zf[^3frJ]J 

VIII. Explain fully the following, and add 16 
short notes in illustration of the words under - 
lined : — 

(^) ^^r% ^^^^^^ rr^r^, crff q^ ^ ^B^^, 
^ri^ Pim^^ ^rcrjR, f^^i^qf- 

if) ^fi% ^w ^[FT w-^i^\ 5f%, c cr^^r 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B. A., 1864-65. CV 

IX. What is the answer to the question : — 6 

X. What is the relation of the fifth chapter 6 
of Dnyaneshwari to the third and the fourth, 
and how does it reconcile the two opposite 
modes of emancipation ? 

XI. What is the u^|%gT ?:r5frr^ which is 8 

revealed in the 9th chapter ? Examine the follow- 
ing statement : — 

XII. Explain the structure of the ^lffRf3"f 10 

(«) What is meant by ^^r^Trf^ ^f f^? ^"^ 
Xf^rr^F^ qf^JTI^ \ Show the marks of design in 
them. 



Cvi EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B. A., 1864-65. 

Tuesday— 2 l5i^ March 1865. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

MARATHI.— Paper II. 
TRANSLATIONS, QUESTIONS ON GRAMMAR, IDIOM, &c. 

John Wilson, D.D.; Mahadev G. Ranade, B.A. 

[The black figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

I. Translate into Marathi the following 20 
passages • — ■ 

(a) If the legendary history of India may be 
trusted, two dynasties were originally dominant 
in the north, called Solar and Lunar, under whom 
numerous petty princes held authority, and to 
whom they acknowledged fealty. The most 
celebrated of the Solar line, which commenced 
in Ikshwaku and reigned in Oude, was the 
Rama of the Ramayana. Under this dynasty 
the Brahmanical system gained ascendancy more 
rapidly and completely than under the Lunar 
kings in the more northern districts, where fresh 
arrivals of martial tribes preserved an independent 
spirit among the population already settled in 
that district. The most famous of the lunar race 
who reigned in the neighbourhood of Hastinapur 
or ancient Delhi, was Bharata, whose authority 
is said to have extended over a great part of 
India, and from whom India is to this day called 
by the natives, Bharata varsha. 

This Bharata, then, was an ancestor of Kuru,the 
twenty-third in descent, from whom was Vyasa 
(the supposed author of ihe Mahabharata), who 
had two sons, Dhritarashtra and Pandu. The 
former, though blind, consented to assume the 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B. A., 1864-65. CVU 

government when resisfned by his younger 
brother Pandu, and undertook ito educate with 
his own hundred sons the five reputed sons of his 

brother The characters of the 

five Pandavas are drawn with much artistic 
dehcacy of touch, and maintained consistently 
throughout the poem. 

{Professor Williams.) 

(b) To sit on rocks, to muse o'er flood and fell, 20 
To slowly trace the forest's shady scene, 
Where things that own not man's dominion dwell. 
And mortal foot hath ne'er or rarely been ; 
To climb the trackless mountain all unseen, 
With the wild flock that never needs a fold ; 
Alone o'er steeps and foaming falls to lean ; 
This is not sohtude ; 'tis but to hold 
Converse with Nature's charms, and view her 

stores unrolled. 
But midst the crowd, the hum, the shock of men, 
To hear, to see, to feel, and to possess. 
And roam along, the world's tired denizen. 
With none who bless us, none whom we can bless. 
Minions of splendour, shrinking from distress ! 
None that, with kindred consciousness endued, 
If we were not, would seem to smile the less. 
Of all that flatter' d, follow' d, sought and sued ; 
This is to be alone ; this, this is solitude. 

(Byron.) 

II. Translate into English the following 20 
passage from the Jnaneshvari : — 

wfT ^r^f r 1 1 1 1 1 cTr ^l^ ^% wi^ i ^m^ T^^^m 
^Rir^ I w ^m m %\i z^ ^pti \\\\\ ^m- 



Cviii EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B. A., 1864-65. 

y 11 q^ ^^tfJi 5frq 1 5I2T mms{^ Fij'^ I cr3^R- 
^Tf Wr"^ 1 ^^?r>^ 11 Ml i- mn crfr fra i gfr 

cr^ 11 K^\ 'T5fq^ ^n:crr I rt^ K^?r ^r^crr i im 
rlf^ R5^r q:^?Tcfr l mm w ll ^^ n %^f crr% 
€r fit I ^^tr cr^r ^r^^rt l ^rfr ^mfi^ % ^Fqr 
% I mR ^%\\^ \\^^ ^i^^^^\ bMi I qtr 
^s^rr% ^fi %^r I ^r =T^%rf %m i qr^^irriKil 

^3- 1 rT-^ct ?[Ri ll \o ii%^ \i^q\ \^^^^ ^^ | 

"^ m^\^ m^mt 1 f¥fc^f% Pr^rr^K I fFkr ^^^- 
¥ I m^ im II \X 11 ^ftfK ^RitiT 3-r^cr 1 q 

^RcTf ra-^^cf I ^HKR\ Rf^cf 1 f[fiR[ |1 U II # 

5Tr trr^% I ^m^ \\ \y n m^ ^^^rn srrf i ^t 

=f %rfir r^cr ^h II \^ ^;^ r^m ^\ \ ^^ o^i- 

m^ m ^\il i nn mfi^j z\m 1 1 j ^c^ n \^ij 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B. A., 1864-65. cix 

III. (a) Extract the obsolete forms of the 15 
verbs here employed and give them in their mod- 
ern form, keeping to their proper moods and 
tenses. 

(b) What is the etymological and exact meaning 
here of pfqpTf? How is the word formed ? How 

was it used by the Buddhists ? 

(c) Give the syllabic marks and names of the 
feet of the first of the above Ovis. 

IV. (a) Translate into English the folio wino- 10 
idiomatic proverbs : — 

(6) #^rf Trr^ ^^ ^r^^^r^ ^rfr ^ix- 

(7) ^R ?rm q^ ^r ^ ^r"^- 

(8) ^]o^\^ ii^^m ^ rr^rrt %^^f . 

J 



ex EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B. A., 1864-65. 

{h) Translate into Marathl the following idi- 
omatic sentences : — 

(1) I would not tiifle merely, though the world 
Be loudest in their praise, who do no more. 

(2) Not errors haunt the well-concerted mind. 

(3) Murder will out. 

(4) Constant application overcomes the 

greatest diifit ulties. 

(5) The proper fimction of law is to defend 

the lights of justice, or to defen,d against 
the violation of them. 

(6) Manifest kindness should awaken grati- 

tude. 

(7) Go back one step farther in the series of 

causation. 

(8) The phenomena of nature are palpable to 

all, but understood by few. 

(9) The adaptation of means to an end 

reveals intelligence. 

(10) 111 is fiequi^ntly the precursor of good. 

V. (a) Give a brief account in English of 
Jnanoba and of the legends associated with his 
menioiy. 

(b) (live, in about fifteen or twenty lines of 
Marathl prose, an exact statement of the argu- 
ment pursued in the ^fg"^-if |;^WR. 

(c) What sovereign-^ are treated of in the 
Third Division of Vishvanath's Translation of 
the History of India ? 

(c?) Decline ^1^^ (singular and plural) using all 
the postpositions for each case which are employ- 
ed by Jnanoba, casting what light you can on 
the formation of these postpositions. 



I 



EJfAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B. A., 1864-65. CXI 

Tuesday— 2l5jJ Marck 1865. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

GUJARATr.— Paper I. 
QUESTIONS ON THE BOOKS TAKEN UP. 

John Wilson, D.D. ; Nagindas Tulsidas, B.A. 
[The black figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

I. Give a brief sketch of Manohardas's 5 
observations on "f^^'-t'^H "all^.'' 

II. Explain and paraphrase what follows : — 7 

Mi jjii<l'5, M^<1^ ^ny-^ ^m\\ 

^i^i ^^a "^o ^<^[ '^i\ HiH ^"^li^. 
^"^n <i<f^h\ ^'\i^ >in'a «vt^i. 

'^n\ ^iin'<, c-ii^i ^Pi 4^ ^^l-^-Hi. 

II [. Write briefly what you know about 4 

\. Ml^l '-ti^ni Pl^Hl^. 

IV. (a) Oive the Hindu view of the fol- 10 
lowing statement : — 



CXii EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B. A., 1864-65. 

(1) Anjani is a virgin, yet the mother 

of Hanuman. 

(2) Anjani is a virgin, but Hunuman 

is called the son of V^yu and the 
brother of Gane^ha. 

(b) Fully explain the following : — 

(c) What are the subjects treated of in the 
third Khandaof the Translations of Elphinstone's 
History of India. 

V. Fully relate the circnmstances that led 
to the separation of Kasturavati and Barasase- 
hana. 

VI. (a) Explain with illustrations the dif- 
ference between the construction of the following 
metres :— 

(1) v;^ and ^"^'^ q-rvi. 

(2) M\H\-ni '^nd ^ufc-ifH^lfirt. 

(3) ^l(5l^land (^<r/oi. 

(b) Explain and criticise the following 
lines : — 

(1) ijW^lin HliHi y^'S ^IM C-tc(^i ^? 

(2) mi «ii^ td^i n® ^l \%f{ m\ 

n «n' h^i Qi; 



EXAM, FOR THR DEGREE OF B. A., 1864-65. Cxiii 

VII. (a) Give the substance of the argu- 10 
ment pursued in the Srishtijanya Ishvarajnana 
to prove the existence of a God and to illustrate 
his perfections. 

(b) To what parts of the human body does 
its author principally refer in illustration of his 
argument ? 

VII. (a) Translate the following passage 10 
from the Baraskastuii of Samaldas : — 

>i5.r2^lij*tl <r/*l I "^l^j^i 'M^lKl ^(^i II 

<i Hi mi '^^w I <rvi^i <ivi^^ cti^i ^1^3 II 

^Hctl^ll 

^ (iRa^m Ht4 I ^^j'^^^H ci-ni ^ <n^ II 

«>> ijK-ll >ll2iini <r/n I'^Hl H^^l<sv 55:^ctl II 

^ hVA\ Mi^ini <r/<i In ^^^ n^ni II 
^ j{ic-ti Mi^ini <^n I Jji<fvc-i>ii ClHi <ni^ il 
J5IH1 >ii^ini <^n I K{>?i ^im'^Hli II 

Sjr^ll Ml^ini <sv*t I M^M^lMH, ^rVj/^^^l II 
M>1 ^1(^1 ^ ^^Qjj^^l IB ai M^cH A"^ 11 

VIII. (a) With which of the systems of 5 
Hindu philosophy are the view^s of Manohardas 
most consistent ? 

(b) What are the Mahavahjas to which he 
refers ? 

j* 



CXiv EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B. A., 1864-63. 

(c) Explain what he means by the -^ja^ |i:^i, 
the MR ^rt, the :w|^;^^ r(\?J »>^^ j^^i^^^ ^Qrl^l 
>iPl, the ^S; ^'i -^iSf <^IH^ =^cl-H, and ^uf^ai^lni 

IX. Translate into Gujarat! the following 10 
idiomatic sentences : — 

(1) There is no music in the life 

That sounds with idiot laughter selely ; 
There's not a sting attuned to mirth 
But has its chord in melancholy. 

(2) Look how the golden ocean shines above 
Its pebbly stones, atid magnifies its girth. 

(3) I hold our actual knowledge very cheap. 

(4) A poor old king with sorrow for my crown 
Throned upon straw and mantled with the wind. 

(5) 'Tis liberty alone that gives the flower 
Of fleeting life its lustre and perfume, 
And we are weeds without it. 

(6) Is there no place 
Left for repentance ? None for pardon left ? 
None left but by submission ; and that word 
Disdain forbids me. 



X. (a) Give the rules of Sandhi as far as 
they are applicable to the Gujarat! language. 

(b) Write the names of the Samdsas, in the 
Roman character, and give a translation of them, 
using corresponding grammatical terms. 

(c) Give specimens of the grammatical ar- 
chaisms which you have noticed in the Kavya 
Dohan. 



{ 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B. A., 1864-65. CXV 

Tuesday— 2 Is^ March 1865. 

[2 p. M. TO 5 p. M.] 

GUJARAT!.— Paper II. 

TRANSLATIONS. 

John Wilson, D.D.; Nagindas Tulsidas, B.A. 

[The black figures to the right indicate full marks,] 

I. Translate into Gujarati the following prose 25 
passage : — In studying the workings of the 
various parts of the plysical machinery that 
surrounds our planet, it is always refreshing and 
profitable to detect, even by glimmerings never 
so faint, the shghtest tracings of the purpose 
which the Omnipotent Architect of the universe 
designed to accomplish by any particular ar- 
rangement among its various parts. Thus it is in 
this instance : whether the train of reasoning 
which we have been endeavouring to follow, or 
whether the arguments which we have been ad- 
ducing to sustain it, be entirely correct or not, we 
may, from all the facts and circumstances that we 
have passed in review, find reasons sufficient for 
regarding in an instructive, if not in a new light, 
that vast waste of waters which surrounds the 
unexplored regions of the antartic circle. It is 
a reservoir of dynamical force for the winds, a 
regulator in the grand meteorological machinery 
of the earth. And this insight into the workings 
of the wonderful machinery of sea and air, we 
obtain from comparing together the relative 
speed of vessels as they sail to and fro upon 
intertropical seas. 

I{Cai)L Maury.) 



CXvi EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B. A., 1864-65. 

II. Translate into Gujarat! the following 25 
passage : — 

What constitutes a State ? 
Not high raised battlement or labour'd mound, 

Brick wall or moated gate ; 
Not cities proud with spires and turrets crown' d ; 

Not bays and broad-armed ports, 
Where, laughing at the storm, rich navies ride ; 

Not Starr' d and spangled courts. 
Where low, brow'd baseness wafts perfume to pride : 

No : MEN high-minded men. 
With powers as far above dull brutes endued 

In forest, brake, or den. 
As beasts excel cold rocks and brambles rude ; 

Men, who their duties know 
But know their rights, and knowing, dare maintain, 

Prevent the long aim'd blow. 
And crush the tyrant while they rend the chain : 

These constitute a State, 
And sov' reign law^ that state's collected will. 

O'er thrones and globes elate 
Sets Empress, crowning good, repressing ill. 

{Sir William Jones) 

41<^ aMi<l "HiS «ni "^iM ai ^ ^i ? xim ^ ^hi- 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B. A., 1864-65. CXvii 



^K M^^ JsV=^' "^^Tm PHMnM ! ciMi^i ^nc^Jf ^liHl 
'^MlMl^H'^l'crR'H^ 2{c|ir(i *t(iT; ^i*^ M^ *iK ^ 

Pl^crft flv^js;:^ Sc5c(lrft ^wtDi^q :^^ ^?(|. :>^i;() >|t^ 

jji^i ^, ani u§ ^[^'i dM^ Rati^ ?jV=^'^1' ^vl- 

1'^<HIH. •^'i! >ll<l Ml<l Ml ^l ^H^^ <5vr-ll^ ^<1 

( >ilfSl4l. ) 
^3l(r/<H ^^i^'nm SjP.^l'^^ T/3ll>^ ; 

•MM ^^-yV J5^.rn"^l^ ^[if[<T/ <r/t^. 



CXviii EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B. A., 1864-65. 

'rsw ^^i -^m (hA^ ^^4 <Hl\ 



Tuesday— 2l5^ Marc/i 1865. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

PERSIAN.— Paper II. 
TRANSLATIONS. 

John Wilson, D.D.; Musa Khan, Esq. 

[The black figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

I. Translate into Persian the following poeti- 
cal passage : — 

Scarce from the sky the Winter's blast had fled, 
When spring in smiles uprais'd her purple head, 
The russet earth was clad in grassy green, 
And on the budding shrubs new leaves were seen. 
The meadows laugh'd to hail the opening rose. 
And sipp'd the dew by which the sapling grows. 
Shrill pip'd the happy goatherd on the hills, 
And joyous o'er his flock forgot his ills. 
Wide seas the mariner now safely rides. 
And swelling sails to Zephyr's faith confides. 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B. A., 1864-65. cxix 

If then the naked trees, new-leaf d, rejoice, 
If earth, in verdure clad, exalt her voice ; 
If shepherds' time the rustic pipe, and share 
Their unbought pleasures with their fleecy care ; 
If on the sea li^dit vessels stem the tide. 
And o'er th' unbounded ocean fearless ride ; 
If the wing'd race, if lab' ring bees can sing, 
IIow shall a bard keep silence in the Spring ! 

{IVesiori's Fragments.) 

II. Translate into Persian the following 25 
prose passage: — 

This poem (the Shahiiamah of Firdausi ) is 
longer than the Iliad ; the characters in it are 
various and striking • the fii^ures bold and ani- 
mated ; nnd tlie diction evi rywhere sonorous, 
yet noble; polished, yet full of iire. A great 
profusion of learning has been thrown away by 
some critics, in comparing Homer with the 
heroic poets, who have succeeded him ; but it 
required very little judument to see, that no 
succeeding poet whatever can with any propriety 
be compared with Homer ; that great father of 
tlie Grecian poetry and literature, had a genius 
too fruitful and comprehensive to 1<4 any of the 
striking parts of nature escape his observation ; 
and' the poets, who have followed him, have 
done little more than transcribe his images, and 
give a new dress to his thoughts. VVhatever 
elegance and refinements, therefore may have 
been introduced into the vA^orks of the modems, 
the spirit and invention of Homer have ever 
continued without a rival : for which reasons I 
am far from pretending to assert that the poet 



CXX EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B. A., 1864-65. 

of Persia is equal to that of Greece ; but there is 
certainly a very great resemblance between 
the works of those extraordinary men : both 
drew their imaores from nature herself, without 
catching them only by reflection, and painting, 
in the manner of the modern poets, the likeness 
of a likeness ; and both possessed, in an eminent 
degree, that rich and creative inveniion, which 
is the very soul of poetry. 

{Sir William Jones.) 

III. Translate into English the following 25 
poetical passage : — 



jjy ci'.r- ci^^t^ J$^ jjj c^ 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B. A., 1864-65. CXxi 

j^J J ij^ J AiilS* J bo txio 
jb ^w ^;fj( ^jSljf tvof ^^J 

{^ij^l '^ l^j dj^ ^J*^ Ji^, IaJ 

^i^ aIaj; iji^f ji-jf ^^x^.^ 

^Jj^ X^ljj v-^ uT .^y e;-^^ ^H 
j(f ^b g<XM» j^jf 4iJLo ^i^^^j 

IV^. Translate the following prose pass- 25 
age: — 



CXxii EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B. A., 1864-65. 
C^^^^ t^^ LTJ^y J o^^^ <3Ub jjyo ^i;Lk ^_^jL^ 

•^y^ (^ *-^ '->^J *^^-? cJ^O ''^ CJ^^ ^ii '^^ J<i 
U^'^^ J^ ^HA»-^J^ ^? t5r^-^.iL) ^^Loj^lo e^f^^^ 

^^^^ ^IjO j^ ^j^ ^^;jf j*^^^ A*J-»jJ j^liJlpl^C 
icSLsi, Ai^^ Oj-«^ jjT OJ«i.iiJ f J-V** 1^1 ^-WJ ^ 

^^j^^i oJtVof^ <i*iijt c^vcil-^ u'-*^' J^j ^'j 
*"^"' J-r?'-^^J J^y^^ J^ ^ ^J e^j;«i J^-^a^ t/^ 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B. A., 1864-65. CXXiii 

(Ferishtah.) 



Tuesday— 2 1st March 1865. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

PERSIAN.— Paper I. 

GRAMMAR, IDIOM, AND THE BOOKS TAKEN UP— 
FERISHTAH, FIRDAUSI, S'AADI AND HAFIZ. 

John Wilson, D.D. ; Musa Khan, Esq. 

[The black figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

I. (a) Give a brief history of the Persian 10 
language, noticing the elements of which it is 
composed, and the modifications which they 
have undergone. 

(b) Give a list of its classical works, with the 
names of their authors. 

II. (a) Relate the circumstances in which 10 
the Shahnamah was composed, and the incidents 
which occurred on its publication. 

(b) Mention the sources of the legendary on 
which it is founded, and their bearings on the 
illustration of the ancient Persian mythology. 



CXXiv EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B. A., 1864-65. 

III. {a) Translate into English the following 15 
passage from the Gulistan : — 

O^ ,iwij ^^^K ^js^ (^^ J ii^. ui) f u^. j^^ 






^;«^ t5^c;>*-'^-^ 


:^r <W, c:,.| 


jl^J^Jt5tlr^'j^^^J 


c:.csrl 




^^ ^U ^i)l^j 


cj:jo 


r^ 


J 1 4>J b <^^Jji (• 'J <*J U- 


? ^ 





(6) Why is Alexander the Great here called 
Askander Riinii ? Give some explanation of the 
course here attributed to his conquests ? What 
is the difference of bait^ kifahy and masnavi ? 

IV. (a) What is Harun-ar-Rashad reported 
to have said when he conquered Egypt ? Who 
was Dhu-al-Nun ? Where is Zuzan ? Quote 
what Sheikh S'aadi says of tlie Gabars. How 
does he apply the remark which he makes upon 
them? 

{b) What prophet receives the name of 
Yahiya ? W hat is the etymological meaning ot 
Peigkambar. To whom this denomination 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B. A., 1864-65. CXXV 

jrenerally applied by Mubammadan authors ? 
What Persian kings are mentioned in the portions 
of the Gulistan which you have read ? 

v. (o) Give the course of the march of Babar 10 
to India. JVlention some of the more remarkable 
difficulties which he encountered and overcame. 

(^) To what class of poetical writings do those 
of Hafiz belong ? What may be gathered from 
them of his actual religious and philosophical 
opinions. By what Persian poets has he been 
imitated ? 

VI. {a) By what letters are the forms of the 10 
infinitive (or gerund) in u^ and ^:^> preceded ? 

(h) In what part of a Persian verb is the 
theme generally found in its simplest form ? Give 
examples, with some exceptions which may 
occur to you. 

(c) Render in Persian the infinitives of the 
following verbs, giving at the same time the 
second person singular of their imperative : — ' to 
weave,' ' to sleep,' * to live,' * to create,' * to cleave 
or split,' ' to praise,' * to bring,' * to eat,' ' to send.' 

(d) What are the auxiliary verbs used in 
Persian, and what are the precise differences of 
their meaning ? 

(e) What are the forms of the future tense in 
Persian, both simple and composite ? 

VII. (a) What are the feet and poetical 10 
measures used in Persian ? 

{b) What are the peculiarities of Persian 
rhyme ? On what kinds of nouns and on what 
parts of the verb does the rhyme most frequently 
fall ? 



CXXVi EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B- A., 1864-65. 

VIII. {a) What are the prepositions (Per- 5 
sian and Arabic) which are most commonly used 

by Persian authors? 

(h) What are the pronominal suffixes used 
in Persian ? 

IX. {a) In what circumstances is the Isafat 10 
used ? Give examples. 

(Jb) Translate the following compound words : — 

J ]y\j^ l^jfO* Jjl'^l^'* j'jTj^ u^l<-^ 

c^j^^j-i^^ J'^v^^ ^j$U ji'i'Ji cr^f j^Tu^'.^ 
C5U^^^ ^jj^li j^_^3|j^G jl<j(j c;U)|^^L) 

(c) Give the following sentences as they 
appear in the Gulistan : — 

" Although there may be two hundred 
virtues in each single hair, yet no profit will 
ensue if fortune be advese." 

" Six thousand horses were slain." 
What peculiarities of Persian grammar do you 
notice in the original ? 

X. {a) Translate the following Persian de- 10 
nominatives : — 

(b) What is meant by hal or term of cir- 
cumstance ? Give examples. 

(c) Give some examples of compound verbs, 
one member of which is Persian and the other 
Arabic. Try to give Persian substitutes for the 
Arabic members. 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B« A., 1864-65. CXXvii 

Tuesday — 2\st March. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

LATIN.— Paper I. 
QUESTIONS ON THE BOOKS, GRAMMAR, ETYMOLOGY, &c. 

J. G. BuHLER, Ph.D.; E. K. Lidderdale, Esq., C.S. 

1. Give an account of the life and works of 10 
Sallust. Describe the peculiarities of his style, 
and illustrate your answer by examples. What 
author does he imitate ? 

2. Translate into English — 15 

(a) Atque ego, patres conscripti, vellem po- 
tius ob mea, quam ob majorum beneficia posse 
auxilium petere ; ac maxime deberi mihi a popu- 
lo Romano, quibus non egerem ; secundum ea, 
si desideranda erant, uti debitis uterer. 

(b) Who spoke those words, and at what 
occasion ? 

(c) Ita cum potentia, avaritia, sine modo 
modestiaque, invadere polluere et vastare omnia : 
nihil pensi, neque sancti habere, quoad semetipsa 
praecipitavit. Nam ubi primum ex nobilitate 
reperti sunt, qui reram gloriam injustae potentiae 
anteponerent, moveri ci vitas, etpermixtio civiHs, 
quasi discessio terrae, oriri coepit. 

{d) To what events alludes the above pas- 
sage ? 

3. (a) Who are the philosophers whom 10 
Cicero follows in his treatise *' De Officiis" ? 
Give the names of those mentioned by Cicero. 



CXXviii EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B. A-, 1864-65. 

(b) What are the definitions according to 
Cicero of the following terms : — * fortitude,' 
*fides,' ' honestum,' * officium medium,' *justitia.' 

4. (a) Under what heads does Cicero ar- 7 
range the discussion of the * officia' ? 

(6) What is Cicero's opinion on the origin 
of Government and of laws ? 

(c) How far does Cicero approve * of 
largesses' to the people? 

5. (a.) Translate into English : — 8 
Eaque est summa ratio et sapientia boni 

civis, commoda civium non divellere atque omnes 
squitate eadem continere. Habitent gratis in 
alieno ? Quid ita? Ut cum ego emerim, aedi- 
ficarim, tuear, impendam, tu, me invito, fruare 
mea ? Quid est aliud aliis sua eripere, aliis dare 
ahena ? Tabula? vero novas quid habent argu- 
menti, nisi ut emas mea pecunia fundum ; eum 
tu habeas, ego non habeam pecuniam ? 

(b.) Explain the expression * tabulae novae.' 

6. 15 
(o) Mantua me genuit ; Calabri rapuere ; tenet nunc 

Parthenope: cecini pascua, rura, duces. 

Translate and expand the above into a brief 
notice of the life of Virgil. What poet, writing 
in what language, and what dialect of it, did he 
imitate in his Eclogues ? Is there any allusion 
to this in the Eclogues themselves ? 

(6) Mention any works of Ovid's besides the 
*' Fasti." 

7. Translate with such short explanatory IS 
notes as may be required, the following: — 

(a) Ante, pererratis amborum finibus, exul 

Aut Ararim Parthus bibet aut Germania Tigrim. 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B. A., 1864-65. CXxix 

(b) Una dies Fabios ad bellum miserat omiies 

Ad bellum missos perdidit una dies. 

(c) Satis est potuisse videri. 

(d) Mserin lupi videre priores. 

(e) lUe Nefastus erit per quem tria verba silentur 

Fastus erit per quem lege licebit agi. 

Explain the words ' Fasti,' * Ides,' ' Calendse,' 
' Nonse.' 

8. Distinguish between : — ' securus, tutus ;' 10 
' fructus, fruges ;' * imperium, potestas ;' * con- 
sors, comes, socius, sodalis ;' ^ ungula, unguis ;' 

* affinis, agnatus, cognatus ;' ' vivus, vivax ;' * fe- 
rus, ferax ;' ^ alvus, venter.' 

^ve a list of verbs requiring the Dative case 
after them. What is the term for and significa- 
tion of verbs ending in * urire and * escere' ? 

9. State the rule about questions beginning 10 
with ^ num/ * an/ nonne/ respectively. 

What is the difference in meaning be- 
tween the two supines ? 

What is the difference in the employment 
of * non ' and 'ne ' ? 

In all cases give examples of the applica- 
tion of the rules in question. 



CXXX EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B. A., 1864-65. 

Tuesday— 21 5J^ March 1865. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

LATIN.— Paper II. 

J. G. BuHLER, Ph.D.; E. K. Lidder- 
DALE, Esq., C.S. 

[The black figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1 . Translate into English : 25 

(«) Carmina quae vultis cognoscite : carmina vobis, 
Huic aliud mercedis erit. Simul incipit ipse. 
Turn vero in numerum Faunosque, ferasque videres 
Ludere, turn rigidas motare cacumina quercus. 
Nee tantum Phcebo gaudet Parnassia rupes, 
Nee tantum Rhodope mirantur et Ismarus Orphea. 
Naraque canebat, uti magnum per inane coacta 
Semina terrarumque animoeque marisque fuissent, 
Et liquidi simul ignis ; ut his exordia primis 
Omnia, et ipse tener mundi concreverit orbis, 
., Turn durare solum, et discludere Nerea ponto 
' Cceperit, et rerum paulatim sumere formas ; 
Jamque novum terrae stupeant luceseere solem, 
Altius atque cadant submotis nubibus imbres : 
Incipiant sylvse cum primum surgere, cumque 
Kara per ignotos errent animalia montes. 
Hinc lapides Pyrrhae jactos. Saturnia regna, 
Caucasiasque refert volucres, furtumque Promethei. 
His adjungit, Hylan nautse quo fonte relictum 
Clamassent, ut littus, Hyla, Ilyla, omne sonaret ; 
Et fortuuatam si nunquam armenta fuissent, 
Pasiphaen nivei solatur aniore juvenci. 

(b) At Marius ut supra diximus, cupientis- 25 
sima plebe consul factus, postquam ei provin- 
ciam Numidiam popuius jussit, anteajam infes- 
tus ; nobilitati, turn vero multus atque ferox 
instare : singuios modo, modo uni versos laedere : 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B. A., 1864-65. CXXxi 

dictitare, sese consulntum ex victis illis spolia 
cepisse : alia prseterea magnifica pro se, et ill»s 
dolentia. Interim, quae bello opus erant, prima 
habere ; postulare legionibus supplementum, 
auxilia a populis et regibus sociisque arcessere : 
prseterea ex Latio fortissimum quemque, pleros- 
que, militise, paucos fama cognitos, accire, et 
ambiendo cogere hommes emeritis stipendiis 
secum proficisci. JNequeilli senatus, quanquam 
adversus erat, de ullo negotio abnuere audebat: 
ceterum supplementum etiam Igetus decreverat : 
quia neque plebi militia volenti putabatur, et 
Marius aut belli usum, aut studia vulgi amissu- 
rus. Sed ea res frustr a sperata ; tanta libido cum 
Mario eundi plerosque invaserat. Sese quisque 
pn«^a locupletem, victorem, domum rediturum, 
alia hujuscemodi animis trahebant: et eos non 
paullum oratione sua Marius arrexerat. 

II. Translate into Latin :— / 

I cannot therefore conceive that this cons"*- 
course of the planets, this just agreement in such 
various motions, through all eternity can be 
preserved without a mind, reason, and considera- 
tion ; and since we may perceive these qualities 
in the stars, v^^e cannot but place in the rank of 
gods. Those which are called the fixed stars, 
have the same indications of reason and pru- 
dence. Their motion is daily, regular, and con- 
stant. They do not move with the sky, nor have 
they an adhesion to the firmament, as they who 
are ignorant of natural philosophy affirm. For 
the sky, which is thin and transparent, and 
suifused with an equal heat, does not seem by 
its nature to have power to whirl about the stars, 
or to be proper to contain them. The fixed stars, 




CXXXii EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B. A., 1864-65. 

therefore, have their own sphere, separate and 
free from any conjunction with the sky. Their 
perpetual courses, with that admirable and incre- 
dible regularity of theirs, so plainly declare a 
divine power and mind to be in them, that he 
who cannot perceive that they also are endowed 
with divine power, must be incapable of all per- 
ception whatever. 

(Cicero de Natura Deorum, L. ii. cap. xxi.) 



Wednesday — 22nd March 1865. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

AllITHMETIC AND ALGEBRA. 

B.M. BiRDwooD, M. A.; Rev. C. D. DuPort, M.A. 

[The black figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1 . Extract the square root of 9-06 1 30404. 4 

2. Find the amount of £50 in 5 years at 5 10 
per-cent. per annum compound interest, being 
payable quarterly. 

3. Define a Logarithm, and explain the ad- 6 
vantage of using 10 as the base of a system of 
logarithms. 

4. Given that log lo 2 = -30103 10 

find log 5 10. 

5. Show that 8 

{h + c — d){c + a — h) {a + h — c) 

-ha(b-^c — aY-hb {c + a~bf 

+ c(a + & — c)2=:4a3c 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B. A., 1864-65. CXXXUl 

6. Define the JT. C. M. of two algebraic ex- 8 
pressions, and find the //. C M. of 

(a — X ) and (a — x ). 

7. Solve the following equations :~ 3 

a;^ + 3a: — 6==ar (^ + |) + 2|. (1) 

m X n y m + n'^ 

m + X n + y m + n+\^ y ^2) 8 

X + y = \. J 

8. Show that if a and /3 are the two roots of 
a quadratic equation x^ + ax + b == o, 

then will x^ + ax -\- b = {x — a) {x — • 8) 

Qp^ A tailor bought some cloth for 120 Ru- 10 
pees. If he had bought 3 yards less for ihe 
same money, ihe cloth would have cost 2 Hupees 
a yard more than was actually paid for it. How 
many yards were bought ? 

10. Show that a ratio of greater inequality is 7 
diminished and of less inequalify increased by 
adding the same quantity to each of its terms. 

11. When are quantities said to be in geo- 8 
metrical progression ? 

Sum the series | — i + iV — ^^' ^^ ^ 
terms and ad infittiium. 

12. Investigate the Binomial 'I'heorem in the 10 
case of a positive integral index. Find the mid- 

1 ** 
die term of the expansion of A \ 



CXXXiv EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B. A., 1864-65. 

Wednesday— 227ZC? March 1865. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

TRIGONOMETRY AND CONIC SECTIONS. 
H. M. BiRDwooD, M.A.; Rev. C. D. DuPort, M.A. 

[The black figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Describe the three principal modes of 5 
angular measurement. 

2. Define the tangent of an an^le ; and trace 5 
the changes of sion and magnitude in tan -4 as -4 
increases from to 360 . 

Find ail the value of the angle e that 6 
satisfy the equation tan ^a. 

3. Prove by a geometrical construction that 7 
sin {A — B) = sin A cos B — cos A sin By 

when A lies between 180° and 270*', 

^between 90° and 180°, 

and ^—J3 between 90° and 180°. 

4. Find 6 and from the equations 7 
2 sin (^ -^ 0) = 1 and sin {0 — (^) = cos {6 + 0). 

5. In any triangle, two sides and an angle 4 
opposite to one of them being given, solve the 
triangle. 

Explain the circumstances under which 5 
the above solution wili be ambiguous. 

6. In any triangle ABC, find the value of 6 

A 

sin 7^ in terms of the sides. 

The sides of a triangle are in arithmetical 8 
progression, and its area is to that of an 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B. A. 1864-65. GXXXV 

equilateral triangle of tlie Fame perimeter as 
3 to 5; prove that its greatest angle is 60°. 

7. How must a right cone be cut for the 5 
section to be ( a ) a Parabola, (/3) an Ellipse, and 

(y) an Hyperbola ? 

What is a rectangular Hyperbola ? 1 

8. If a perpendicular be draw n from the focus 6 
of a parabola on the tangent, the point of inter- 
section lies on the tangent at the vertex, 

9. If from any point i'^ in the ordinatePi? 6 
of a parabola the line FQ is drawn parallel to 

the axis and meeting the parabola in Q then 
PF. FB=4: AS. QF. 

PP' is a chord of a parabola euch that 7 
-^^le circle described on PP' as diameter 
touches the axis of the parabola ; PP pro- 
duced cuts the axis of the parabola in i2; 
if PN is the semiordinate at P, prove that 
PN : RN :: Latus Rectum of parabola: 
diameter of circle. 

10. AB, CD are two terminated straight 8 
lines bisecting* each other at ri^ilit ano;les in the 
point O ; PQR is a straight line cutting AB in 

Q and CD m R; prove that if PQ=aC and 
PR = OAy then the point P lies on an ellipse 
whose axes are the straight lines AB, CD. 

11. The rectangle under the obcissae of the 7 
axis major of an eUipse is to the square of the 
semiordinate as the square of the axis major to 

the square of the axis minor. 

12. If from any point in a hyperbola straight <J 
lines are drawn parallel to and term.n.ned by the 
asymptotes, the rectangle contamed by those 
straight lines is invariable- 



ClXXVl 

Thursday— 23rc? March 1865. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

EUCLID AND MECHANICS. 

Rev. C. D. DuPort, M. A.; H. M. Birdwood, M. A. 

[The black figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. To describe a square upon a given 4 
straight line. 

2. Prove, without assuming any preposition 8 
not in the first Book of Euclid, that if the points 

of bisection oi the three sides of a tiiangle be 
joined, the four triangles into which the given 
triangle will be thus divided will be all equal t^ 
one another. 

3. If a straight line be divided into two 4 
equal parts, and also into two unequal parts, the 
rectangle contained by the unequal parts, toge- 
ther with the square of the line between the 
points of section, is equal to the square of half 

the line. 

One side of a rectangle being given, find 9 
the other, so that the rectangle may equal a 
given square. 

4. The angles in (he same segment of a cir- 4 
cle are equal to one another. 

One angle and the two diagonals of a 9 
parallelogram are given, construct the paral- 
lelogram . 

5. To inscribe an equilateral and equiangular 5 
hexagon in a given circle. 

6. If three straight lines be proportionals, 6 
the rectangle contained by the extremes is equal 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B. A., 1864-65. CXXXvii 

to the square of the mean ; and if the rectangle 
contained by the extremes be eqnal to the 
square of the mean, the three straight Hnes are 
proportionals. 

7. Define Force ; and explain why forces 4 
may be adequately represented by straii^ht lines. 

8. Enunciate and prove the proposition 4: 
known as the triangle of forces* 

A particle placed in the centre of a 5 
square is acted upon by forces of 1,2, 3, and 
4 lbs. respectively, tending to the angular 
points of the square ; find the niagnitude 
and direction of the resultant force. 

9. A B is a heavy uniform beam, of weight W 8 
an(U.^gth /, moveable in a vertical f>laiie about 

its lowest point A, and held at an inclination of 
45° to the horizon by a siring BC ; AC is hori- 
zontal and equal to AB ; find the tension of the 
string. 

10. Prove that every material system has 4 
only one centre of cjrnvity. 

1 1 . Find the ratio of the power to the weight 6 
in the screw when there is equilibrium. 

Determine the inclination to the horizon 7 
of the thread of a sciew which, with a force 
of 5 lbs. actin^^ at an arm of 2 feet, can sup- 
port a weight of 300 lbs. on a cylinder of 2 
inches radius. 

12. What are the laws of frhtion ? 2 
How may they be experiment dly proved '? 3 
Find the greatest angle of elevation <'f a 8 

rough inclined plane, for winch it is possi- 
ble for a weight W of a given substance to 
rest upon it. 



CXXXviii EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B. A., 1864-66. 

Thursday— 23rc^ March 1865. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

HISTORY— ENGLAND. 

J. P. HtJGHLiNGS, B.A. ; W. Wordsworth, B.A. 

[The black figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

I. Divide the constitutional history of Eng- 10 
land into stages. Biiefly define and characterize 
each stage. 

II. Give the history of the following Acts 10 
of Parliament : — The Acts of Supremacy, of 
Uniformity, Grand Remonstrance, Habeas Cor- 
pus, Bill of Rights. ^ 

III. A history of King Charles the First's 10 
third Parhament. 

IV. What is an Act of Attainder? What 10 
reasons have be^n given in favour of such an Act 

in the case of Lord Strafford ? When was the 
last Act of Attainder passed in England 

V. Write a short account of the Mihtary 10 
Expeditions planned by William Pitt (1758-60). 

HISTORY-INDIA. 

VI. Who were the great European contem- 10 
poraries of Anrungzebe ; and uhat was then the 
extent and character of European relations with 
India ? 

VIT. What principal writers of Indian history 10 
for the Mogul period, from Baber to Aurungzebe 
inclusive, were contemporary with the events 
they describe ? 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B. A., 1864-65. CXXxix 

VIII. Briefly characterize each of the writers 20 
enumerated in answer to the foregoing question. 

IX. Give a short account of the history of 10 
Rajpootana from the death of Aurungzebe to the 
defeat of the Maharathas at Paniput? 



HISTORY— ANCIENT. 

X. What were the relative positions of Rome 10 
and Macedon after the Battleof Zama, and what 
explanations have been offered of the Roman 
policy which led to the overthrow of Macedon 
and the temporary deliverance of Greece ? 

XI. Write a hfe of M. Porcius Cato. 10 

XII. Write a very short history of the rise 10 
almprogress of the principal Ionian States that 
were subjugated by Croesus and the Persians. 

XIII. Give some account of Greek naval 15 
architecture at the time of the Peloponnesian 
war, adding a particular description of one or 
other of the sea fights that took place in the 
course of that war. 

XIV. What do we know of the commercial 5 
policy of the kings of Judah and Israel.'* 



CXl EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B. A., 1864-65. | 

Friday— 24j5A March 1865. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

LOGIC. 

R. S. Sinclair, LL.D.; Rev. R. Stothert, M.A. 

[The black figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

I. How did the term ' Organon ' come to be 5 
applied to the analytics of Aristotle ? 

II. State the rules of Definition, of Division, 10 
of Induction, and of Analogy. Explain the 
Clearness and Distinctness of notions. 

III. Distint;uish between general and col-^ 8 
lective terms. What misuse of the word 

* abstract' is mentioned by Mill. In what sense 
does he use it ? 

IV. Give examples of immediate inference 5 
by means of privative conceptions, by added 
determinants, and by complex conceptions. 

V. The following examples are from Whately, 8 
and are to be treated in the itie'hod prescribed 

in his Appendix, {a) .** Few treatises of science 
convey important truths, without any intermix- 
ture of error, in a perspicuous and interesting 
form : and therefore, though a tieatise wculd 
deserve much attention which should possess 
such excellence, it is plain that few treatises of 
science do deserve much attention." (b) " What 
happens every day is not improbable : some 
things against which the chances are many 
thousands to one, happen every day : therefore 
some things against which the chances are many 
thousands to one are not improbable." 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B. A., 1864-65. Cxli 

VI. How many kinds of judo^ments are given 8 
by Thomson ? llluslrate the effect of this increase 

of the number of judgments upon the modes of 
syllogism. 

VII. Give MilFs analysis of the attributes 10 
of Quantity, Quality, and Relation. What rela- 
tions does he class under a separate head ? 

VIII. What does Mill give as the general 12 
formula of the syllogism ? What view does he 
take of the doctrine of the quantification of the 
predicate ? 

IX. What opinions are mentioned in Mill 12 
as held by other philosophers regarding the prin- 
ciples of contradiction and of excluded middle? 
A*«*ivhat does he give as his own opinion ? 

X. What, according to Mill, is deduction ? 7 

XI. " There are illusions of sense and tricks 15 
of memory, rash inferences from experience, 
imperfect inductions hastily formed from partial 
data, and erroneous conclusions deduced some- 
times from doubtful, at otiier times from true 
premises, and as these are not held sufficient to 
discredit the natural functions of sense, memory, 
and reason ; so any fallacies that may spring 
from the perception of resemblance, real or ap- 
parent, should not be allowed to diminish our 
confidence in the legitimate use of analogy." State 

the nature of the argument here employed, and 
test it by the appropriate rules. 



Cxlii EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B. A., 1864-65. 

Friday— 24iJA March 1865. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

MORAL PHILOSOPHY. 

R.S.Sinclair, LL.D.; Rev. R. Stothert, M.A. 

[The black figures to the right indicate full marks,] 

I. What is tlie difference between the seve- 8 
ral parts of our nature, and the constitution of it? 

II. What was the cliief defect in Shaftesbu- 16 
ry's Ethical system ? Give a short account of 
Lord Shaftesbury and his Philosophy. 

in. Assuming the authority implied in the 10 
idea of conscience, what inference may Ij^. 
drawn as regards hability of punishment ? 

IV. What applications may be made of the 12 
distinction between self-love and the particular 
affections ? 

V. What are we to understand by the cor- 8 
respondence of an action to the nature of the 
agent ? 

VI. Prove that the judgment that such and 12 
such actions deserve punishment does not mean 
that we conceive it for the tiood of society that 

the doer of such actions should be made to suffer. 

VII. Give Butler's analysis of resentment ; 9 
and state the ends of the passion. 

VIII. State some of the consequences of the 10 
doctrine that benevolence is the whole of virtue. 

IX. How may it be shown that our ignorance 10 
of God's government may be need as an answer 

to objections against religion, but not as in- 
validating its proof ? 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B. A., 1864-65. CxUii 

X. What circumstances particularly deserve 10 
our attention in those natural punishments where 
we see men bringini; misery upon themselves by 
their own behaviour ? 



Friday— 24^A March 1865. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

OPTICS. 
H.M. BiRDwooD, M.A. ; Rev. C. D. DuPort, M.A. 

[The black figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

TT What is a pencil of rays ? 2 

Distinguish between a divergent and a 3 
convergent pencil. 

2. Distinguish between the reflecUd, refract- 6 
edy scattered^ and absorbed light of a ray incident 

on any medium. 

3. State the laws of reflexion and refraction. 6 

4. What is the critical angle of a medium ? 6 

Explain the appearance which will be 8 
presented to an eye placed under water and 
looking upwards. 

5. Define conjugate foci ; and show that in 2,7 
the case of reflection at a spherical surface the 
conjugate foci lie on the same side of the princi- 
pal focus, move in opposite directions, and meet 

at the centre and surface of the reflector. 

6. Diverging rays are incident upon a concave 7 
spherical refracting surface ; find the geometrical 
focus. 



Cxliy EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B. A., 1864-65. 

A small pencil of rays is incident from a 9 
point 3 feet distant from a concave spherical 
surface of glass, (/x= 1*5), the radius of 
which is 2 feet ; find the geometrical focus 
of refracted rays. 

7. What is the centre of a lens ? 2 
Find the centre of a concavo-convex lens. 7 

8. Describe the human eye and the defects 12 
of lon^ sight and short sight ; explaining how 
these defects may be respectively remedied by 

tlie use of lenses. 

9. Describe respectively the construction of 12 
the common Astronoriiical Telescope and Gali- 
leo's Telescope ; showing in each case whether 

the image will be inverted or erect. ^"^ 

Explain why the former is preferable to 3 
the latter for astronomical purposes. 

10. Describe the appearance and explain the 8 
formation of the Rainbow. 



Friday— 24/A March 1835. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

ASTRCNOMY. 
H. M.BiRDWooD,M.A.; Rev. CD.DuPort, M.A. 

[The black figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Define *a sjihere,' 'a great chclcy * nn 9 
axis' and * pnlcs.' Prove that the angle 
which is subtended at tlie centre of a sphere 
by the arc joining the poles of two ^reat 
circles is the angle of incliuution of tlie 
planes of the circles. 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B. A., 1864-65. CXlv 

2. Describe the form of the Earth, and ex- 8 
plain the n)eaninu' of the terms ^ sensible horizon,' 

* rational horizon, *■ latitude' and * longitude.' 

3. Describe the diurnal and annual motions S 
of the Earth, and state some of the proofs of the 
rotation of the Earth about its axis. 

What is the cause of the Seasons ? 

Why is the Equator sometimes called the 
equinoctial line ? 

State some of the peculiarities of day 8 
and night in the frigid zone. 
5. Give a full description of the Transit In- 14 
strument, and explain the method of using it to 
ascertain the time of transit of a known star. 

^. Describe accurately a method of finding 10 
the latitude of a place. 

7. What is meant by the * refraction of hght' ? 21 
Determine the conditions under which twilight 
will endure all night at a place. 

8. Define parallax, and show how the hori- 12 
zontal parallax of a heavenly body can be found 

by observation. 

9. Enumerate the principal Planets, and 10 
state Kepler's laws regarding the motions of 

the planets. Are these laws rigidly true ? 

10. Discuss the phenomena of a Lunar 10 

Eclipse. 



m 



Cxlvi EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B. A., 1864-65. 

Friday— 24^/i March 1865. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

CHEMISTRY. 
H. J. GiRAUD, M.D ; R. Haines, M.B. 
[The black figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Explain generally the offices perfoi-med in 14 
the natural world by Oxygen. 

2. Explain the natural process of Nitrification. 14 

3. Trace the Phosphorus that exists in the 14 
bones of animals to its source in the mineral 
kingdom. 

4. A- specimen of bronze is given to you^S^ "^6 
determine the proportions of its constituent 
metals : how would you perform the analysis ? 

5. Point out the distinction in composition 14 
and properties between Olefiant Gas and Light 
Carburetted Hydrogen. 

6. Which of the Laws of Combination is 14 
illustrated by Isomorphism, and how is Isomor- 
phism explained by the Atomic Hypothesis of 
Dalton ? 

7. What are the differences in composition 14 
and properties between Wrought Iron, Cast 
Iron, and Steel ? 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF D. A., 1864-65. Cxlvii 

Friday— 24^A March 1865. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

HEAT AND ELECTRICITY. 
H. J. GiRAUD, M.D.; R. Haines, M.B. 

[The black figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Mention all the circumstances which in- 16 
fluence the boiling points of liquids, and give 
some practical deductions to which a knowledge 

of such circumstances may lead. 

2. By what means may the specific heats of 14 
bodies be determined ? 

3. 100 cubic inches of vapour at 300 F. and 14 
29'6 inches barometric pressure weigh 83 grains ; 
vv>^c'i*s the specific gravity of the vapour, if 100 
cubic inches of air at the standard temperature 
and pressure weigh 31 grains ? 

4. Describe the meteoric conditions under 14 
which a flash of Hghtning may occur. On what 
does the difference between sheet and forked 
lightning depend, and is the popular notion of 

the more dangerous character of the latter well 
founded ? 

5. Describe the distribution of the magnetic 14 
force in a steel magnet. Can any analogy to 
this be found in an electrically-excited body, and 
how far does the analogy extend ? 

6. What are magnetic inclination, dechnation, 14 
and intensity, and how are they determined? 
Where are these respectively greatest and least 

on the earth's surface? 

7. On what principles does the operation of 14 
the electric telegraph depend ? What are the 
chief difficulties to be overcome in working this 
invention ? 



CXlviii EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B. A., l864-()0. 

Saturday— 25^A March 1865. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

DYNAMICS. 
Rev.CD.DuPort, M.A.; H. M. Birdwood, M.A. 

[The black figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. How are velocity and accelerating force 2 
measured ? 

Prove that the space described from rest 6 
by a particle under the action of an uniform 
accelerating force varies as the square of 
the time. 

2. Distinguish between accelerating an? V3 
moving force. 

The distances through which a body is 7 
observed to move in successive seconds are 
in the proportion of the numbers 1, 3, 5, 7 

? Prove that the body is under the 

action of an uniform accelerating force. 

3. Enunciate the first and second Laws of 7 
motion, and mention experimental facts which 
lead to their assumption. 

4. Prove that the time of descent down all 8 
chords drawn from the highest point of a circle 

in a vertical plane, and considered as inclined 
planes, will be the same. 

5. A body falls through a feet at two places 8 
on the earth's surface ; and it is observed that 
the time of faUi ng is n seconds less, and the 
velocity acquire^:/ m feet greater at one place than 

at the other : compare the force of gravity at the 
two places. 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B. A., 1864-65. cxlix 

Cu A heavy partlrle P is drawn up an inclined 9 
plane by means of another heavy particle Q 
attached to it by a string passing over the upper 
edge of the plane, the particle Q descending 
vertically ; find the accelerating force and the 
tension of the string. 

7. Prove that a body projected obliquely, and 6 
acted on by gravity will describe a parabola. 

The velocity of a projectile at any point 6 
of its parabolic path is that w^hich would be 
acquired by a body falling from the directrix 
to that point. 

8. Given the direction of projection and the 10 
height through which the body must fall in order 

to ac^juire the velocity of projection, find by a 
geometrical construction the greatest height to 
which the projectile will rise, and the horizontal 
range. 

9. Define an inelastic body, and dii^ect impact. 2 
An elastic ball impinges upon a perfectly hard 9 

plane, the direction of the ball's motion before 
impact making an angle and with the normal to 
the plane ; required the motion after impact. 

10. A particle of mass M revolves uniformly 8 
with a velocity V in a circular tube ; find the 
pressure upon the tube. 

A string 3 feet long is capable of supporting 10 
a weight of 6 lbs ; how many revolutions per 
minute must be made by a weight of 1 lb., which 
is attached to it, in order that the string may 
break ? 



Cl EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B. A., 1864-65. 

SATURDAY--25?fA March 1865. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

HYDROSTATICS. 
Rev. C. D. DuPort, M.A. ; H. M. Birdwood, M.A. 

[The black figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. What is a fluid. Distinguish between an 4 
elastic and a non-elastic fluid. 

2. Find the pressure referred to a unit of sur- 8 
face at any depth below the surface of a fluid at 
rest. 

3. A regular hexagon is immersed vertically 10 
in a fluid, so that one side coincides with tlf^ * 
surface ; compare the pressures on the triaugles 
into which the hexagon is divided by lines drawn 
from its centre to the angular points. 

4. Determine the conditions of equilibrium 8 
of a floating body. 

5. A cube of wood floating in water descends lO 
4 inches when a weight of 50 oz. is placed on it ; 
find the size of the cube, supposing a cubic foot 

of water to weigh 1000 oz. 

6. Define specific gravity* Explain how the 10 
specific gravities of two fluids can be compared 

by means of Nicholson's hydrometer. 

7. Describe the common barometer. Why 10 
is mercury chosen as the fluid to be used in the 
Barometer. 

8. If the atmosphere be supposed to be di- 10 
vided into indefinitely thin strata of equal thick- 
ness, the densities of the air in those strata will 

be in geometrical progression. 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B. A., 1864-65. cU 

9. Show how the scales of two difiPerently 8 
graduated thermometers can be compared. 

The point at which mercury freezes is in- 8 
dicated by the same number on the centi- 
grade and on Fahrenheit's scale ; determine 
the number. 

10. Describe concisely the construction and 14 
working of the Steam Engine. 



Saturday— 25ifA Alarch 1865. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY.— Paper I. 
J^v.^. D. DuPoRT, M.A. ; H. M. Birdwood, M.A. 

[The black figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Descri'oe accurately ihe^ {oYm and dimen- 4 
sions of the earth. 

Mention the principal experimental proofs 4 
whereby the rotundity of the earth's surface 
has been established. 

2. Distinguish between the three methods 8 
of projection commonly known as the Orthogra- 
phic, the Stereographic, and Mercator's. 

3. Define carefully the extent of the geogra- U 
phical knowledge of Herodotus ; and mention 
some of his principal errors. 

4. Enumerate the several nations included 8 
in the Indo-European linguistic family. 

In what countries is the monosyllabic 7 
form of language to be found ? 

5. What are the relative proportions of land 3 
and water on the surface of the earth. 



Clii EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B. A., 1864-65. 

State approximately where on the earth's 3 
surface lies the centre of the greatest mass 
of land. 

6. Define the limits of latitude and longitude 8 
between which the Sahara Desert of Africa lies ; 
naming in order the several countries by which 

it is bounded. 

In what way may tlie geographical posi- 5 
lion of the inhabitants of countries border- 
ing the Niger have contributed to retard 
their civilization ? 

7. Describe the principal characteristics of 7 
the Steppes of Russia. 

8. Draw a mop of the world showing tJte JO 
IVorthern and Southern boundaries of the zones 

of palms and vines respectively ; marking off 
the several countries in which cotton is grown ; 
and tracing the position of the line of maximuut 
temperature for the earth's surface. 

Why do the Isothermals of the Southern 3 
Hemisphere coincide with the parallels of 
Latitude more nearly than those of the 
Northern Hemisphere ? 

9. Draw^ a map of North America ; showing 12 
the boundaries of Russian America, British 
America, the States, and Mexico : and mark the 
position of the following : — Mobile, Charleston, 
Nashville, Washington, Chicago, Boston, the 
Canadian Lakes, Quebec, Hudson's Strait, 
Davis's Strait, the Rocky Mountains, and the 
Alleghany Mountains. 

10. Distinguish between the nature and 7 
causes of the Oceanic Currents and the Tides. 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B. A., 1864-65. cHii 

Saturday— 2^ ^/i March 18G5. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY.—Paper II. 
Rev. C. D. DuPort, M.A.; H.M. Birdwood, M.A. 

[The black figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1 . What are the constituents of atmospheric 4 
air? 

2. State some of the causes of tlie periodical 8 
changes of temperature on the surface of the 
Earth. 

3. What is meant by the climate of a place ? 8 
J?r' ha? evidence is there of changes of climate 

during the geological periods ? 

4. Write a short geographical account of the 12 
physical features, climate, productions, and peo- 

pel of South America. 

5. Wliat are the causes of the trade winds ? 6 
In what direction do the several trade winds 
blow ? 

6. State the laws by which the movements 10 
of translation and gyration of cyclones are 
generally governed ? Why is the barometer 
lowest at the centre of a storm, and highest at 

its extremities ? 

7. Draw a rain-map of India, indicating the 15 
relative amounts of moisture at different places 

by different degrees of shading, and marking the 
amounts of rainfall at Agra, Bombay, Calcutta, 
Cherrapoongee, Darjeehng, Kurrachee, Madras, 
the Mahabieshwar Hills, Nagpoor, the Neil- 
gherry Hills, and Poona. 



Cliv EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B. A., 1864-65. 

8. Give a general description of the distribu- 10 
lion of plants in North America. 

9. Draw an ethnographic map showing the 15 
present distribution of man on the continents of 
Europe, Asia, and Africa. 

10. What is the magnetic meridian, and how 12 
can it be found ? What is the relation between 
magnetic and electric currents ? 



Monday— 27^/* March 1865. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

ANALYTICAL GEOMETRY.— Paper L 

H. M.BiRDwooD, M. A.; Rev. C. D DuPort, UX. 
[The black figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Explain how the position of a point may 5 
be determined, («) by rectangular co-ordinates, 
and ( /3 ) by polar co-ordinates. 

2. Find by oblique axes the co-ordinates of 6 
the point which divides in a given ratio the line 
joining two given points. 

ABC\^ a triangle the rectangular co- 7 
ordinates of whose angular points are x\ y\ , 
^2 3/2, ^3 3/3; the line CD, drawn to the 
middle point of ^^, is divided in Gso that 
CG is double of GD ] find the co-ordinates 
of (?. 

3. Find by oblique co-ordinates the equation 7 
to a straight line not parallel to either axis and 

not passing through the origin ; and from this 
equation deduce that to a straight line referred 
to rectangular axes. 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B. A., 1864-65. clv 

4. Draw the straight lines represented by the 
following equations : — 

(1) cos(^-;-) = l, 4 

(2) r/ + a; = — 2. 4 

5. Find the condition in order that three 8 
straight lines may meet in a point. 

6. Find by oblique co-ordinates the condi- 8 
tion that the lines y '=mi x -h Ci and y = TnihiX 

4- C2 may be at right angles to one another. 

Find the angle between the lines 6 

X + Vlj" ?/ = and x — Vay = 2 ; 
the axes being rectangular. 

7. Find the equation to the circle by rectan- 7 
gular^ co-ordinates, the origin being on the cir- 

>cumference of the circle. 

From this equation deduce the polar 4 
equation to the circle, the initial line being 
a diameter and the origin being on the cir- 
cumference. 

8. Prove that if from any points in a given 10 
straight line a pair of tangents be drawn to a 
circle, the chords of contact will all pass through 
one point. 

9. Define the tangent to a circle. 2 

Find the equation to the tangent at any 7 
point of a circle (rectangular axes). 

10. Find the condition in order that the line 9 

may touch the circle 
;^.2 + ^2 _ 2 a a: — 2 ^ y = . 
Discuss the points of intersection of the 6 
circle y^ -j- ^2 __ 25 

with the line 
3 y + 4 a; == — 25. 



clvi EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B. A., 1864-65. 

. Monday— 27^A March 1865. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

ANALYTICAL GEOMETRY.— Paper IL 
H. M. BiRDwooD, M.A.; Rev. C D. DuPort, M.A. 

[The black figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Define a conic section, and distinguish be- 4 
tween a Parabola, an Ellipse, and an Hyperbola. 

2. Find the equation to the tangent at any 8 
point of a parabola. 

3. Find the length of the perpendicular from 10 
the focus on the tangent at any point of a para- 
bola. 

4. A circle has its centre at the vertex ^ c*^ 15 
a parabola whose focus is S, and the diameter of "^^ 
the circle is 3 AS\ show that the common chord 
bisects AS' 

5. Find the Polar equation to the Ellipse, the 8 
focus being pole. 

6. Prove analytically that the tangents at the 10 
extremities of either axis of an ellipse are parallel 

to the other axis. 

7. What is the eccentricity of the ellipse 12 
4 a:2 H- 6 f = 25 ? 

8. P is a point on an elhpse, y its ordinate ; 15 
show that the tangent of the angle between the 

focal distance and the tang-ent at P is 

° a e y 

9. Prove that in the hyperbola the tangent at 8 
any point bisects the angle between the focal 
distances of that point. 

10. Prove that the area of the parallelogram 10 
formed by the tangents at the ends of the con- 
jugate diameters of an hyperbola is constant. 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B. A., 1864-G5. clvii 

Tuesday— 28^A March 1865. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

POLITICAL ECONOMY.— Paper I. 

R. S. Sinclair, LL.D. ; Rev. R. Stothert, M.A. 

[The black figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. State some of the different Definitions 12 
(with the names of their authors) that have been 
given of the Science of Political Economy. Exa- 
mine them, and give your reasons for preferring 
any of them to the others. 

2. State the primary requisites of f)roduc- HO 
tion, ajid enumerate the principal functions of 
isdbour as an agent of production. 

3. Define clearly what is meant by Capital, II 
exposing some erroneous notions on the sub- 
ject. Distinguish between Circulating and Fix- 
ed (Capital, and illustrate the importance of this, 
distinction. 

4. State at some length the chief causes of 10 
the superior productiveness of certain productive 
agents. 

5. Explain and illustrate the difference be- 10 
tween productive and unproductive consumption, 
and show the importance of the distinction. 

6. State and illustrate the law of the increase 10 
of production from land. 

7. How far do wages, profits, and rent enter 14 
into the value of commodities ? Illustrate your 
answer by examples of several commodities. 

8. State and illustrate the economical and 11 
social benefits of international trade. 



ciyiii EXAM, for the degree of b. a., 18(^4-65. 

9. Compare the views of the first English 12 
settlers in America with those of the Spanish 
colonists, and the results on the prosperity of 
their respective countries. 



Tuesday— 2 8i/i March 1865. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

POLITICAL ECONOMY.— Paper II. 

Fw. S. Sinclair, LL.D. ; Rev. R. Stothert, M.A. 

[The black figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Give a brief account of the principal 13 
contributions of Adam Smith to the Science of 
Pohtical Economy ; and mention some of the 
authors who anticipated him in certain truths "*' 
of the science. Also state, and explain the 
source of some of the principal defects or errors 

of his system, which have been removed by 
more recent economists. 

2. Explain the influence of middlemen on 8 
the fluctuation of prices. 

3. Discuss the question of gluts, or general 9 
over-production. 

4. What are the causes which govern the 12 
value of money ; and apply them to explain the 
present condition of Bombay. 

5. State the objections to a double standard ; 10 
and what measures seem to you best adapted 

for diffusing a gold coinage over India. 

6. What is the cause of the difference be- 9 
tween "natural value" and market value. And 
distinguish between the idea of a Measure of 
Value, and that of a Regulator of Value. 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B. A., 1864-65. clix 

7. What circumstances regulate the premium 9 
to be paid on a bill of exchange ? 

8. Explain what are the elements into which 9 
profits are resolvable ; and on what the rate of 
profit depends. 

9. State and illustrate the law of the values 10 
of such commodities as are susceptible of indefi- 
nite increase, but not v^ithout increase of cost. 
Give examples. 

10. Illustrate from the history of any British 11 
colony the best method of disposing of new 
land. 



Clx FIRST EXAMINATION FOR L. M., 1864-65. 

V. 

FIRST EXAMINATION, LICENTIATE OF 
MEDICINE, 1864-65. 

EXAMINERS. 

H. J. GiRAUD, M.D 1 In Materia Medica 

G.C. M. BiRDwooD, M.D . . j and in Botany. 

B. Haines, M.B i In Anatomy and 

W. G. Hunter, F. R. C.S. / in Chemistry. 



Monday— 5/A December 1864. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] '^^ 

BOTANY. 
H. J. Giraud, M.D.; G. C. M. Birdwood, M.D. 
[The black figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Define the following terms in inflores- 
cence ; — 

Head, Spike, Catkin, Spadix, Raceme, 20 
Corymb, Panicle, Thyrsus, Cyme, 
Umbel, Fascicle, Strobihis. 

2. How is the ovule developed ? Describe 20 
its first appearance, and mature structure; and 

its principal varieties. 

3. Give examples from the local flora, or the 25 
officinal Materia Medica of the following kinds of 
fruits : — Follicle, Legume, Drupe, Achene, Ca- 
ryopsis. Utricle, Hesperidium, Nut, Gourd, Ber- 
ry, Balausta, Apple, Samara, Cremocarp, Siliqua, 



FIRST EXAMINATION FOR L. M., 1864-65. clxi 

Silicula, Capsule, Pyxis, Lomentum, Cone, Gal- 
bulus, Sorosis, and Syconus. 

4. What are the characters of the natural 35 
orders 

(a) Asclepiadacese, 

(b) Orchidaceae ? 

Give illustrations of each from the local 
flora. 



X 



Monday — 5th December 1864. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

ANATOMY. 
R. 'Haines, M.B.; W. G. Hunter, F.R.C.S. 

[The black figures to the right indicate full marks,] 

1. A vertical section is made and carried 30 
transversely through the base of the skull. The 
pharynx and larynx are left attached. Describe 

the several structures exposed on looking from 
behind. 

2. Describe the Rectum and its relations in 25 
the male and female respectively. 

3. Describe the origin, course, distribution, 25 
and inosculations of the Transversalis Colli 
Artery. 

4. Describe the lenticular ganglion, its situ- 20 
ation, its branches of communication, and its 
branches of distribution. 



Clxii FIRST EXAMINATION FOR L. M., 1864-65. 

Tuesday — Qth December 1864. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

MATERIA MEDICA. 
H. J. GiRAUD, M.D. ; G. C. M. Birdwood, M.D. 

[The black figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. What are the actions and principal uses 20 
of Digitalis and Colchicum ? 

State their officinal preparations and the 
doses of these. 

2. What are the different modes in which 10 
purgatives act ? Classify the most important 
purgatives according to their modes of action. 

3. Enumerate the Officinal Atropacese. 2© 
State their action and uses ; and the doses of 
their Preparations. 

4. Explain the principles upon which the 20 
Volumetric Solutions of the British Pharmaco- 
poeia are employed ; and state the special uses of 

the Solutions of Hyposulphate of Soda and 
Iodine. 

5. What are the adulterations of Quiniae Sul- 10 
phas ; and how would you detect them ? 

6. Classify, according to their several pro- 20 
perties, the Officinal Umbelliferae ; and explain 
how those which are poisonous act upon the 
system. 



FIRST EXAMINATION FOR L. M., 1864-65. clxiii 

Tuesday — Qth December 1864. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

CHEMISTRY. 
R. HaixVes, M.B.; W. G. Hunter, F.R.CS. 
[The black figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Describe briefly the chief means in use 20 
for producing artificial cold, and state the prin- 
ciple on which they depend. Mention other 
modes that occur to you by which the temper- 
ature of a body may be lowered. 

2. What are the constituents of the diamond, 8 
ruby, sapphire, emerald, and amethyst. 

3. How may olefiant gas be made from alco- 10 
^hol, and alcohol from olefiant gas ? 

4. Under what conditions does electrolysis 16 
occur ? What takes place when dilute and 
when concentrated sulphuric acids respectively 

are submitted to the process ? 

5. Show in symbols the conversion of eel- 10 
lulose into starch, starch into sugar, sugar into 
alcohol, and alcohol into acetic acid. 

6. A salt is found to contain an acid having 10 
the following percentage composition : — 

Sulphur 61-54 

Oxygen 38-46 

100-00 



What is its name ; and constitution ? 

7. What is the composition of sea-water, 14r 
and what substances are extracted from it ? 

8. From what sources is boracic acid deriv- 12 
ed ; what are its uses ; and how may its pre- 
sence be detected ? 



clxiv SECOND EXAMINATION FOR L. M., 1864-65, 

VI. 

SliCOiND EXAMINATION, LICENTIATE OF 
MEDICLNE, 1864-65. 

EXAMINERS. 

R. Haines, M.B 7 In Physiology and 

W. G- Hi/NTER, F.R.CS.E 3 General Anatomy. 

W.G. Hunter, F.R.C.S.E> . c 

F. S. Stedman, Esquire. . 5 ^^ ^"'^^^y- 

C. JOYNT, M.D 7 J TVT J- • 

W.DyMocK,B.A j In Medicine. 

H. G. GiRAUD, M.D .,., ^ In Medical Juiispru- 
R. Haines, M.B 5 dence. \ 

F. S. Stedman, Esquire. . ^ t -mt-j t 
C.JoYNT,MD. i In Midwifery. 



Monday— 20^A March 1865. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

MEDICINE. 
C. JoYNT, M.D. ; W. Dymock, B. a 

[The black figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. State what you know of the morbid ana- 15 
tomy of hemiplegia. 

2. What are the symptoms, anatomical cha- 25 
racters, and terminations of pericarditis ? 

3. What are the symptoms of cancer of the 10 
stomach ? How would you distinguish disease 

of the pyloric from disease of the cardiac orifice ? 



SECOND EXAM IN A'l ION FOR L. M-, 1864-65. clxv 

4. Describe the symptoms and most usual 52 
excitino; causes of ascites. 

5. What symptoms would lead you to sus- 25 
pect the existence of fatty degeneration of the 
kidneys ? Describe the objects seen in the urine in 
that disease, and mention their diagnostic value. 



/ 



Monday— 20^A March 1865. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

MIDWIFERY AND DISEASES OF WOMEN AND 
CHILDREN. 

♦ F. S. Stedman, Esq.; C. Joynt, M.D. 

[The black figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Describe the conditions which render 20 
labour tedious in the first stage, and the treatment 
appropriate to each. 

2. How would you diagnose a breech pre- 20 
sentationl Having made your diagnosis, how 
would you conduct the labour to its termination ? 

3. Mention the distinguishing signs ofaccz- 30 
dental, and of unavoidable, hcemorrhage. De- 
scribe briefly the treatment proper to each. 

4. What are the causes of dysmenonhoea, 20 
and what are the Physiological characters of the 
dysmenorrhoeal membrane ? 

5. Write a prescription, containing ipecacuan 10 
in combination with an alkali, for a child 12 
months old, suffering from diarrhcea, in connec- 
tion with teething ; and state any additional 
treatment you might wish to adopt. 



Clxvi SECOND EXAMINATION FOR L. M., 1864-65. 

TvESBAY—2\5t March 1865. 

[10 A. M. TO 1 P. M.] 

MEDICAL JURISPRUDENCE. 
H. J. GiRAUD, M.D. ; R. Haines, M.B. 

[The black figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. A person is said by his friends to have 20 
died of Cholera, bat suspicions arise that his 
death has resulted from some irritant poison. 
How would you determine the nature of the 
case ? 

2. A woman is suspected of having been 20 
recently delivered ? How would you determine 

the question ? ^ 

3. A dead body is found in a tank. How 20 
would you determine whether death resulted from 
drowning or not ? 

4. How would yon distinguish a case of 20 
poisoning by Arsenious Acid from one by 
Corrosive Sublimate ? Describe the methods of 

the chemical investigation, supposing both cases 
to be fatal. 

5. Distinguish the symptoms and morbid 20 
appearances produced by Narcotic Poisoning 
from those which occur in certain diseases with 
which such poisoning may be confounded. 



SECOND EXAMINATION FOR L. M., 1864-65. clxvii 

Tuesday— 2l5^ March 1865. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

SURGERY. 
VV. G. Hunter, F.R.C.S.E.;F.S. Stedman, Esq. 

[The black figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Describe carefully the effects of the ap- 20 
plication of a ligature to an artery from the 
moment the vessel is tied to the separation of 

the ligature. 

2. Describe the structure of hflemorrhoids, 20 
and state briefly the treatment applicable to each 
form of the disease. 

J 3. Mention the various ways in which an 20 
Aneurism may prove fatal, and describe the 
principles on which the treatment of Aneurisms 
by compression is based. 

4. What are the characteristics of Epithelial 15 
Cancer as distinguishing it from other varieties 

of Cancer. 

5. Describe the signs of Iritis in general, 25 
and explain the meaning of the terms Exclusion 
and Occlusion of the pupil. Synechia Annularis 
and Synechia Totalis. 



Clxviii SECOND EXAMINATION FOR L. M., 1864-65. 

Wednesday — 22nd March 1865. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

PHYSIOLOGY. 
R. Haines, M.B. ; W. G. Hunter, F.R.C.S.E. 

[The black figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. What is the composition of Human Milk. 30 
Contrast roughly the proportion of its several 
constituents with those contained in the Milk of 

the Cow. 

2. In a perpendicular section of the Retina 30 
enumerate the several structures seen from with- 
out inwards, and describe the peculiar disposi- 
tion of its elements at the central spot. • 

3. Charactei ize the differences in the compo- 2(]^ 
sition of the blood contained in the Portal and 
Hepatic veins. 

4. What purposes do the elastic and muscu- 20 
lar coats of Arteries serve in the circulation of 
the blood ? 



.. : '.»:.