(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Children's Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "University calendar"

m: 



BOMBAY 



UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 



KOR THE YEAR 

1878-79. 




BOMBAY : 
TRACKER & Co. 

1878. 



THE 



BOMBAY 



UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 



FOR THE YEAR 



1878-79. 




BOMBAY: 
TH ACKER & Co. 

1878. 



A/7 



/) I 



■ 



CONTENTS 



PAGE; 

1. Almanac, April 1, 1878, to March 31, 1879..; 1 

II. SCHEDULB OF EXAMINATIONS FOK 1878-79 ... 14 

III. Notifications ;-— 
List of Books for a Cycle of five years :. 

L English. First Examination in Arts ... 15 

B.A. Examination ... ... 16 

M.A. Examination ... ... 17 

II. Sanskrit. First Examination in Arts ... 18 

B.A. Examination ... ... 19 

M.A. Examination ... ... 20 

III. Greek. First Examination in Arts ... 21 

B.A. Examination ... ... 21 

M,A. Examination ... ... 21 

IV. Latin. First Examination in Arts ... 22 

B.A. Examination 23 

M.A. Examination 23 

V. Hebrew. First Examination in Arts ... 24 

B.A. Examination ... ... 25 

M.A. Examination ... ... 26 

VI. Arabic. First Examination in Arts ... 27 

B.A. Examination ... ... 27 

M.A. Examination 28 

VII. Persian. First Examination ill Arts ... 28 

B. A Examination ... ... 29 

M.A. Examination 30 

b 713— A 



IV CONTENTS. 

PACK 

Periods of History for a Cycle of five 
years : 

First Examination in Arts ... ... ... 31 

M.A. Examination ... ... ... ,.. 32 

Books recommended in Law : 

LL.B. Examination ... ... 32 

Honours in Law Examination ... 33 

Academic Costume 34 

IV. Actsj— 

Act XXII. of 1857, incorporating the University... 37 
Act XLYII. of 1860, for conferring additional 
Degrees ••• .... ... ••• 46 



V. Bye-Laws :•— 

Senate 

Faculties ... 
Syndicate ... 
Registrar ... 
Board of Accounts... 
University Terms ... 
Endowments 



47 
47 
48 
49 
50 
51 
51 



VI- Regulations:— 

I. Arts :— 

Matriculation Examination 52 

Eirst Examination in Arts ... ... ... 54 

B.A. Examination 56 

M.A- Examination 60 



CONTENTS. 



V 



II. Law t — 



PAGE 



LL.B. Examination ... ... «•• 


63 


Honours in Law Examination 


64 


III. Medicine : — 




First Examination in Medicine ... 


65 


Examination for the Degree of L.M. & S. 


67 


M.D. Examination 


69 


IY, Civil Engineering : — 




First Examination in Civil Engineer- 




ing 


70 


L.C.E. Examination 


73 


M.C.E. Examination 


79 


General 


so 


Admission to Degrees ... ... 


81 


II. FOBSSi— 




I. Arts 


82 


11. Law 


89 


III, Medicine ... 


91 


IV. Civil Engineering ... 


99 


The Mnnguldass Nathoobhoy Travelling 




Fellowship... 


104 


The Bhugwandass Purshotnmdass Sanskrit 




Scholarship... 


105 


The Jam Shri Vibhaji Scholarship 


105 


The Hebbert and LaTouche Scholarship 


106 


The Kao Sir Pragmalji Scholarships ... 


106 


The Kahandas Mancharam Scholarship 


106 



"1 CONTENTS, 

PAGE 
VI II. ESDOWliBSTS :— 

I. The Munguldass Nathoobhoy Travelling 

Fellowship 107 

II. The Manockjee Limjee Gold Medal ... 108 

III. Jhe Bhugwandass Purshotumdass Sanski-it 

Scholarship ... ... ... ...Ill 

IV. The Homejee Cursetjee Prize 112 

V. The Jugonnath Sunkersett Sanskrit Scho- 
larships ... ... - ... ... ... 114 

VI. The Jam Shri Vibhaji Scholarship ... 116 
VII. The Cowasjee Jehanghier Latin Scholar- 
ship 117 

VIII. The Kinloch Forbes Gold Medal 119 

IX. The David Sassoon Hebrew Scholarship ... 120 
X. The James Berkley Gold Medal ... ...122 

XI. The Ellis Prize 123 

XII. The Hebbert and LaTonche Scholarship ... 124 

XIII. The Wilson Philological Lectureship ... 126 

XIV. The Ellis Scholarship ... 128 

XV. The Chancellor's Medal 129 

XVI. The Arnould Scholarship 130 

XVII. The Duke of Edinburgh Fellowship ... 131 
XVIII. The Bai Maneckbai Byramjee Jeejeebhoy 

Prize 132 

XIX, The Rao Sir Pragmalji Scholarships ... 133 
XX. The Sir Jasvantsingji Scholarships ... 135 

XXI. The Karsandas Mulji Prize 136 

XXII. The Dossabhoy Hormusjee Cama Prize ... 137 

XXIII. The Hughlings Prize 139 

XXIV. The James Taylor Prize 139 



CONTENTS. Vll 

PAGE 

XXV. The Bhau Daji Prize 140 

XXVI. The Venayekrao Jugonnathji Sankersett 

Prize 141 

XXVII. The Merwanjee Framjee Panday Scholar- 
ship " .~ 142 

XXVIII. The Kahandas Mancharam Scholarship . 143 
XXIX. The Dhirajlal Mathuradas Scholarship... 144 
XXX. The Sinclair Prize 145 

|)(. Benefactions :— 

I. The Sir Cowasjee Jehanghier Hall of the 

University of Bombay ... ... T.. 147 

II. University Arms and Common Seal ... 149 

III. University Library ... ... ... 149 

IV. The Rajabai Tower 150 

V. University Mace... ... ... ^... 151 

Y The UNivEBfliTT :— 



Senate ... 

Deans 

Syndicate 

Board of Accounts 

Registrar 



152 

163 
163 
164 

164 



Assistant Registrar and Librarian ... ... 164 

Succession Lists : — 

Chancellors ... 164 

Vice- Chancellors ... ... ... ... 164 

Deans : — 

I. Deans in Arts ... ... ... ... 165 

II. „ Law ... ... ... ... 165 

III. „ Medicine ... ... ... 166 

IV. „ Civil Engineering 
6 713— a* 



Vlll 



XI. 





CONTENTS. 


pice 


Registrars 


... 


... 166 


Deceased and retired Fellows 


... 167 


Graduates 


M.A 


... 174 


3> 


B.A, 


... 177 


?> 


LL.B 


... 202 


jj 


M.D 


... 204 


>? 


L.M 


... 204 


3} 


L.M. &S 


... 206 


•> 


L.C.E. ... 


... 207 



TJnder-graduates and others who have passed the 
First Examination in Arts ... ... ... 210 

First Examination in Medicine ... ... 217 

First Examination in Civil Engineering ... 219 
Matriculation Examination 1878 223 



Rec 


OGNITION AND RECOGNIZED INSTITUTIONS :- 






Recognition 


229 


I. 


Elphinstone College 


230 


II. 


Deccan College ... 


238 


III. 


Free General Assembly's Institution, 






Bombay 


242 


IV. 


Bombay St. Xavier's College ... 


245 


V, 


Government Law School 


247 


VI. 


Grant Medical College ... 


251 


ra. 


Poona Civil Engineering College 


258 



XII* Accounts of Endowments and Bbnepaciions :■— 

Endowments 263 

► Benefaction ... ... ... ... ... 264 

I. The Munguldass Nathoobhoy Travelling 

Fellowship ' 265 

IL The Manockjee Limjee Gold Medal ... 268 



CONTENTS. 



IX 



III. The Bhugwandass Purshoturudass San- 

skrit Scholarship 

IV. The Homejee Cursetjee Prize Fund 

V. The Jugonnath Sunkersett Sanskrit 
Scholarships 

VI. The Jam Shri Vibhaji Scholarship 

VII. The Cowasjee Jehanghier Latin Scholar- 
ship 

VIII. The Kinloch Forbes Gold Medal 

IX. The David Sassoon Hebrew Scholarship 

X. The James Berkley Gold Medal 

XL The Ellis Prize... 

XII. The Hebbert and LaTouche Scholarship 

XIII. The Wilson Philological Lectureship ... 

XIV. The Ellis Scholarship 
XV. The Arnould Scholarship ... 

XVI. The Duke of Edinburgh Fellowship . . . 

XVII. The Bai Maneckbai Byramjee Jeejeebhoy 
Prize 

XVIII. The Rao Sir Pragmalji Scholarships 

XIX. The Sir Jasvantsingji Scholarships 

XX. The Karsandas Mulji Prize 

XXI. The Dossabhoy Hormusjee Caraa Prize... 

XXII. The Hughlings Prize 

XXIII. The James Taylor Prize ... 

XXIV. The Bhau Daji Prize 

XXV. The Venayekrao Jugonnath ji Sunkersett 
Prize 

XXVI. The Merwanjee Framjee Panday Scholar- 
ship 



PAGE 

270 
272 

274 

278 

280 
282 
284 
280 
288 
290 
292 
294 
296 
298' 

300 
302 
305 
308 
310 
311 
313 
315 

317 
319 



X CONTENTS, 

PAGE 

XXVII. The Kahandas Mancharam Scholarship. 321 

XXVIII. The Dhirajlal Mathuradas Scholarship . 323 

XXIX. The Sinclair Prize ... ... 324 

I. University Mace 

XIII. Convocation for conferring Degrees, 

1877-78. 



Convocation Report ... .... 


326 


Result of the Examinations of the University of 






Bombay for 1877-78 


3G2 


Examination Papers, 1877-78: — 




Directions to Candidates 


ii 


I. 


Matriculation Examination 


iii 


II. 


B.A. Examination 


Ixiv 


III. 


M.A. Examination ... ... 


cxix 


IV. 


LL.B. Examination 


clxiv 


V. 


First Examination in Medicine 


clxxi 


VI. 


Examination for L.M. & S. 


clxxvi 


VII. 


First Examination in Civil Engineer- 






ing 


clxxx 


VIII. 


L.C.E. Examination 


cxci 


IX. 


First Examination in Arts for 1878-79, 


ccxi 



ALPHABETICAL INDEX OP NAMES- 



Abadan, S. N., 255 
Abdulalli, M. J., 214 
Abdullatif, K. A. , 196 
Abhyankar, P. V., 223, 262 
Abhyankar, V.T., 212 
Abhyankar, V. V.,262 
Acharya, D. R., 126 
Achutaram, P. S. , 257 
Acquino, T. H., 257 
Adarkar, A. N., 207 
Adval, S. C, 224, 241 
Aga, R. M., 244 
Agarkar, G. G., 216, 240 
Agase, D. H., 110, 112, 115, 

132, 195, 233 
Agase, G. J., 112, 115, 191 
Agase, K. J., 241 
Agase, N. B.» 115 
Agnihotri, P. B., 241 
Ahmadi, F. M. F. A., 134 
Ahmadi, I. S. D., 223, 261 
Ahmed, A. H., 249 
Aikin, J. C.,225, 241 
Aitken, B., 210 
Aitken, E. H., 113, 184 
Aitken, The Rev. J., 170 
Ajgavkar, A. N., 183 
Ajinkia, S. G., 191 
Akhund, A. H., 216, 233 
Akotkar, G. S., 241 
Alekar, R. K., 261 
Alimchandani,D. J., 215 
Allbless, N. K. , 246 
Alpaivala, D. J., 188 



Alvares, E. M. , 256 

Alvares, N. S., 217 

Ambardekar, G. K., 211 

Amlia, F. M., 257 

Amor, M., 260 
f Ananta C., 160 

Anderson, Col. G. S. A, 171 

Anderson, J., 160 

Anderson, Lieut. -Col. W. W., 
172 

Anderson, Sir H. L., 39, 16S 

Anderson, The Hon. Col. W. 

C, 162 
Anderson, The Rev. P., 39, 

167 
Andrade, A. P. De, 160 
Angal, R. G., 183 
Angria, J. E., 210 
Anikhindikar, S. C.,212 
Anklesaria, B. K., 234 
Anstey, T. C, 170 
Antao, J. A., 206 
Antia, H. J., 235 
Antia, J. M., 244 
Appu, H. J., 207 
Apte, G. B., 224, 262 
Apte, G. K., 188, 220 
Apte, G. S., 216, 237 
Apte, K. B., 212 
Apte, M. C, 180, 202 
Apte, M. S., 213 
Apte, S. K, 212 
Apte, V. G., 218, 254 
Apte, V.S., 115, 141,198,240 
Arbuthnot, F. F., 154 
Aria, A. D., 234 



f Surname not known. 



211 



INDEX. 



Arjani, M. D., 213 
Arnold, E., 239 
Arnott, F. S., 166, 171 
Arnott, J,. 161, 253 
Arnold, E., 239 
Arnould, The Hon. Sir J., 

164, 168 
Arthur, J. R., 169 
Ashburner, L. R., 152, 160 
Asirkar, L. M., 261 
Asirkar, V. M., 212 
Askhedkar, L.,Y., 179 
Athale, B. V., 211 
Athale, P. D., 216 
Athale, S. V., 257 
Athale, Y. V., 112, 115, 131, 

163, 175, 203 
Athavale, R, S., 225, 237, 

250 
Athvankar, A. M., 225, 238 
Atkinson, G., 159 
t Atmaram P., 157 
Atre, A. P., 193 
Atre, P. B.,213 



BV 

Babre, S. P., 255 
Badrudin, T., 161 
Badshah, B. R., 244 
Badshah, K. J., 214 
Bahadurji, R. K., 173 
Baker, Lieut. -Col. W. A., 156 
Bakhle, B.V., 211 
Bakshi, K. J., 223 . 
Bakshi, P. J., 228 
Bal, K. B., 178 
Bal, Krishnaji B., 210 
Ballard, Maj.-Genl. J. A,, 153 
Ballingall, G. P., 169 
Bamboatvala, D. A,, 226, 237 
Bamboatvala, S. A., 211 
Bamji, M. K., 261 
Bamji, S. D., 209 
Banaji, D. R., 255 



Banat, H. E., 255 

Bangali, S. K., 226, 241 

Bangali, T. G., 241 

Banshah, N. F., 225, 257 

Bapat, D. S., 224, 241 

Bapat, J. V., 174 

Bapat, K. 8., 241 

Bapat, S.B., 215 

Bapat, V. S., 213 

Bapat, VishvanathS., 224 

Baptista, P, M., 204 

Baria, D. H., 255 

Baria, K. E., 244 

Barker, Capt. W. C, 170 

Borr, Maj.-Genl. H. J., 169 

BarVe, A. S., 183 

Barve, H. M., 216, 235, 248 

Barve, N. V., 221 

Barve, P. S., 221 

Barve, S. S„ 227, 257 
+ BarzorjiB., 204 
fBarzorjiK., 210 

Batlivala, E. S., 211 

Batlivala, R. S., 244, 250 

Bayley, The Hon. L. H., 153 
f Bechardas A., Rao Bahadur, 
161 

Bedarkar, K. C, 157,177,202 

Bedford, R., 205 

Belani, K R., 262 

Bellairs, H, S., 171 

Bellasis, A. F., 172 

Belsare, G. V., 227 

Belsare, M. B.,213 

Bengali, The Hon. S. S. , 159 

Bengeri, R. P., 199, 248 

Bennett, B. P., 217 

Bennett, H. P., 179 

Berkley, J. J., 39, 16S 

Best, K. T., 159 

Betigeri, R. B., 240 

Bevur, R. H., 124 

Beynon, The Rev. VV. , 170 

Bhabha, H. J., 162, 175 

Bhada, N. D. , 208 

Bhadbhade, L. G., 241 



t Surname not known. 



INDEX. 



Xlll 



Bhadbhade, R. G., 199, 233, 

247 
Bhadkamkar, D. H., 226 
Bhagat, K. B., 226, 244 
Bhagvat, B. A., 240 
Bhagvat, B. H., 115 
Bhagvat, D. V., 199, 249 
Bhagvat, G. R., 112, 174 
Bhagvat, R. G., 221 
Bhagvat, R. R., 246 
Bhagvat, S. R., 209 
tBhairavnathM., 173 
Bhajivala, P. K., 212 
Bhalerao, B. P., 160 
Bhanap, G. V., 185,203 
Bhandare, R. B., 222, 261 
Bhandare, S. T., 216, 235 
Bhandarkar, K P., 209 
Bhandarkar, R. G., 127, 156, 

163, 174, 232 
Bhandarkar, Raoji G., 220 
Bhandarkar, S. R., 115, 234 
Bhandarkar, S. V., 186 
Bhandarkar, V. G., 119, 137, 

195, 232. 248 
Bhandivad, V. B„ 214 
Bhandupvald, D. H., 191 
Bhangavkar, K.'N., 211 
Bharucha, H. K., 215, 233, 

249 
Bharucha, J. K., 224, 241 
Bharucha, K. P., 255 
Bharucha, M. K., 256 
Bharucha, M. S.. 260 
Bharucha, P. B., 207 " 
Bharucha, R. P., 205 
Bharucha, S. D., 213 
fBhaskar D., Rao Bahadur, 

168 
Bhat, B. G.,205 
Bhat. C, N., 184, 203 
Bhat, D. D., 193 
Bhat, G. A., 175, 207 
Bhat, H. U., 112, 115, 190, 

203, 236 
Bhat, M. K, 220 



Bhat, M.U., 256 
Bhat,N. N., 211 
Bhat, P. M., 235,250 
Bhat, P. K, 235 
Bhat, S. B., 240 
Bhatavadekar, B. K., 205 
Bhatavadekar, G. K., 181, 

202 
Bhatavadekar, V. K„ 220 
Bhatavadekar, Vishnu K., 

196, 248 
Bhatavadekar, V. R., 185 
Bhate, B. G„ 205 
Bhate, G. C, 225 
Bhate, S. B., 213 
f Bhau D., 39, 167 
Bhavdlkar, M. V., 261 
Bhave, P. M., 244 
Bhavnani, D. S., 212 
Bhedvar, K. P., 143, 209 
Bhedvar, N. D., 255 
Bhedvar, P. D., 181 
Bhende, K. K., 218, 253 
Bhide, B. V., 212 
Bhide, K. N., 225, 262 
Bhide, L. V., 211 
Bhide, P. G., 208, 260 
Bhide, S. P., 112, 175 
Bhide, V. V., 223, 240 
Bhojvani, A. T., 180 
Bhosekar, L. P., 221 
+ Bhugwdndass P., 154 
Bickersteth, J. P., 170 
Bidi, K. H.,225 
Bidi,S. J., 213 
Bijapurkar, R. K., 224 
Bilagi, R. V., 222, 260 
Bilimoria, J. M. , 225, 246 
Birdwood, G. C. M., 166, 

167, 169 
Birdwood, H. M , 153, 165 
Blake, The Rev. B., 243 
Blakeman, W. A., 215 
Blanc, H. J., 253 
Bocarro, A., 218, 253 
Bocarro, J., 257 



t Surname not known. 



XIV 



INDEX. 



Bochum, The Rev. H., 245 
Bod, D.D., 255 
Bodas, K. S., 223, 261 
Bodas, R. G., 232 
Bodoano, The Rev. L., 172 
Boga, D. R., 225, 262 
| Bomanjee JBL, 39, 167 
t Bomanji S., Khan Bahadur, 
123, 162, 208 
Bonesetter, F.R., 256 
Boyce, M. R., 227, 244 
Boyce, P. E., 210 
Boyce, S. R., 256 
Boyd, The Rev. D. C, 167, 

171 
Boyton, W. G., 227 
Braganza, B., 207 
Brebner, Lieut. J., 162 
Brereton, R. M., 172 
Britto, J. L., 210 
Broker, R. C., 235 
Broker, V. M., 218, 254 
Broughton, F., 171 
Brown, A., 171 
Brown, E. H., 224, 257 
Browning, C, 158 
Bryan, J., 119 
Buch, B. D., 126, 234 
Budbhati,K. S., 134, 225,262 
Budrug, G. N., 229 
Buhler, J. G., 154 
Burgess, J., 157 
f Byramjee J., 157 
Bythell, J. K., 160 



Cabral, W., 226 
Cama, A. P., 206 
Cama, C. N., 158 
Cama, J. K., 246 
Cama, K. R., 155 
Cama, M. M., 187 
Cama, R. H.,'218 
Cama, R. K. R., 246 
Cama, R. M., 255 



Cameron, The Rev. C. 3., 171 
Campbell, A. H , 172 
Campbell, J. M., 160 
Candy, F. J., 170 
Candy, Major T., 169, 239 
Captain, M. K., 262 
Carss, The Rev. T., 158 
Carter, H. J., 168 
Carter, H. V., 154, 164 
Carvalho, R., 226, 237 
Carvalho, S. A. De, 172 
Cassels, W. R. , 168 
Chakrabatti, B., 260 
Chakradev, H. R., 262 
Chambers, C, 159 
Chandanani, P. P., 123, 208 
Chandavadkar, N. G., 140, 

195, 248 
Chapman, C. E., 157 
Chapman, The Hon. F. S., 

172 
Chatfield, K. M., 152, 155, 

165, 232 
Chatpat, J. K., 226 

Chavbal, K. D., 220 

Chavbal, M. B., 216, 240 

Chavbal, M.S., 235 

Chavbal, R. S., 196 

Chavkar, V. B., 214 

Chela, C. K., 222, 261 

Chela S. P., 227 

Chemburkar, K. A., 181 

Chhatrapati, N. D., 255 

Chhatre, A. M„ 211 

Chhatre,N.V., 193, 209, 249, 

Chhatre, Narayan V., 191 
255 

Chhatre, Rao Bahadur K. L., 
155, 240 

Chhatre, V. V., 241 

Chichgar, H.M., 210 

Chinai, B. S.,214 

Chinai, E. S.. 254 

Chinai, F. J., 235 

Chintamanipethkar, P. V. , 
115, 212 



t Surname not known. 



INDEX. 



XV 



Chiplunkar, K. S., 156 
Chiplunkar, L. K., 128, 193 
Chiplunkar, M. T., 209 212 
Chiplunkar, 'S. H., 212 
Chiplunkar, V. K.. 185 
Chitale, G. V., 244, 250 
Chitale, M. B., 211 
Chitnis, D. B., 238 
Chitnis, S. C, 183 
Chobe, B. A., 157, 253 
Chokhavala, T. K.235 
Choksi, D. A.. 219, 254 
Clerk, Major G., 171 
Clerk, Sir George Russell, 

164 
Close, Captain G., 259 
Coachman, S. R., 256 
Coke, H., 170, 259 
Cola, M. B., 155 
Coles, W. C, 169 
Collaco, J.. 256 
Colluni, W„ 171 
Connon, J., 172 
Contractor, B. P., 185 
Contractor, B. R , 124 
Contractor, H. N/,' 218, 254 
Contractor, K. D.;130, 176, 

233, 248, 257 
Contractor, K. X, 200, 249 
Conway, S. A., 223 
Cook, H., 152, 159, 164, 252 
Cooke, S., 159, 260 
Cooke, T., 153, 164, 259, 260 
Cooke, The Rev. C, 162 
Cooper, D. H., 212 
Cooper, J. B., 227, 245 
Cooper, K. B., 206 
Cooper, N. H., 235 
Cooper, P. B., 255 
Cooper, The Rev. J. G, 15S 
Corkery, W. A, 213, 256 
Couch, The Hon. Sir R., 169 
Cousens. H., 221 
Coutinho, A. M C, 162 
Coutinho, J. V., 217 
+ Cowasjee H., 163 



Cowsar, M. It, 243, 246 
Crawford, A. T., 156 
• Crawford, Major, J. H. G., 
168 
Cruickshank, J., 155 
Currey, C, 173 
Curtis, T. B., 171 

Dabir, B. N., 223, 234, 250 
DaCosta, K S., 206 
DaCunha, J. G., 217 
+ Dadabhoy X., 154 
Dadachanji, E. R,, 255 
Daddchanji, K. E., 219, 254 
Dadachanji, K. R., 175, 202 
Dadachanji, P. H., 219, 254 
Dadarkar, B. B., 256 
f DadiBarjorna F. N , 187 
Dadina, R. R., 207,242 
Badisett, K, H., - 246 
+ Dadoba, P., Rao Bahadur, 
. 155 

Dady, H. C, 159 
DaGama, J. A., 205 
Daji, J. K., 219, 254 
Dalai, A. M., 193 
Daldl, C. T., 208 
Dalai, D. V., 211 
Dalai, H. N., 189 
Dalai, J. A., 162, 175, 202 
. Dalai, J. J., 222 
Dalai, M. K, 213 
Dalai, P. P., 222, 261 
Dalai, R. M., 200, 233, 249 
Dalai, T. K., 207 
Daldl, T. L., 193, 248 
Daldl, V. I., 226 
Dalgado, D. G., 206 
Dali, R. S., 216, 235 
Dallas, R. A., 171 
Dalvi. D. A., 174, 202 
Dalvi, M. S., 224, 246, 250 
Dalvi, S. Y., 200 
Dalzell, N. A.. 171 



b 713— b 



f Surname not known. 



in 



INDEX. 



Damla, E. M.,218, 253 

Damle, G. R., 223 

Damle, J. V., 209 

Damnia, B. J., 218, 254 

Damnia, G. M., 200 

Damin4, P. J , 206 

Dande, K. G„ 213 

Dange, G. V., 235 

Dantra,B. H., 255 

Daphtare, G. R., 108, 205 

Darbari, D. K., 227,257 

Daru, H. T.. 235 

Daruvala, B., F., 207 

Daruvala, H. S., 256 

Daruvala, J. E. , 216, 233 

Daruvala\ R. R., 244 

Das, D., 201, 261 

DaSilva, R-M.,217 

Dastane, V. G., 225 

Dastur, D. H., 235 

I)astur,.I). P., 235 

Dastur, F: M., 130, 132, 176, 
232, 248 

Dastur, Khan Bahadur H. J., 
155, 240 • 

Dastur, J. S., 218 

Dastur, P. B„ 156 

Dastur, P. H., 176 

Dastur, P. Hormasji, 225, 262 

Datar, H. R,, 226 

Datar, N. G., 219 

Datar, 8. R., 214 

Datar, S. S., 242 

Date, K. S., 241 

Date, N- V., 208 

Datiya, M. R., 178 

Davar, A. P., 249 

Davar, J. E., 211 

Davar, N. F., 249 

Dave,.B. N., 211 

Dave, K. M., 215,236 

Dav6, M. D.. 228, 237, 250 

Dave, R, D„ 216, 235, 248 

IW, R. T., 210 

Dave. 8. T., 236 

Dave, V. K., 134, 216, 233 

.David, A. J., 122 

Davidson, Lieut.-Col. A., 157 



Davison, Sir H., 164 
Davlatjada. C. M., 181, 202 
Davlatjada, S. M., 255 
DeAlvares, N;, 253 
Deane, Lieut.-Col. B., 173 
•DeConceicao, P., 206 
DeCunha, J. T., 207 
DeGama, P. J. G.,223 
PeGama, S., 124 
DeLima, J. T., 218, 254 
DeLisle, Col. A., 166. 169 
DeMonte, D. A. , 256 
DeMonte, T. A., 119, 187 
D'Monte, B., 226, 246 
DeNazareth, J. V., 219 
Denison-Mackenzie, J, T., 

171; 253 
Depelchin, The Rev. H„ 162 
DeQuadros, M., 256 
DeHozario, L. P., 162, 204 
DeSa, H., 255 
DeSa., L , 119, 190 
Desai, A. S., 175, 202 
Des^i, C. G., 219, 254 
Desai, D. N., 227 
Desai, D. S., 213 
Desai, F P., 196 
Desai, G. G., 227, 237 
Desai, G. K., 221, 261 
Desai, G. L., 227, 244 
Desai. G. R., 205 
Desai, G. V., 2^5, 237, 250 
Desai, H. C, 224 
Desai, I. S., 225 
Desai, K.G., 206 

Desai, K. I., 194 

Desai, K. K., 215 

Desai, K. K. L., 226 

Desai, K. M., 227 

Desai, K. R. , 228, 245 

Desai, K. L., 227 

Desai,. M. D.. 226,238 

Desai, M. G., 207 

Desai. M. H., 195 

Desai. M. S., 216, 235, 249 

Desai. M. V.. 209 

Desai. N. A., 144, 224 

Desai, N. M., 211 



INDEX. 



rvn 



Desd 
Desd 
Desd 
Desd 
Desd 
Desa 
Desd 
Desd 



Desdi, N. P., 191 
Desdi, N.V., 262 
Desdi, R, R., 244 

, R. V., 241 

, S. C, 136 

, SadgunD., 244 

, S.D., 196, 249 

S. G. f 117, 211 

, U. A. , 244, 250 

, V. K., 209 

, V. S.>225, 237 
V. T.> 222,261 
Deshmukh, G> D., 211 
Deshmukh, K G., ISO 
Deshmukh, L. G., 196 
Deslmmkli, M. G., 218,254 
Deshmukh, Rdo Bahddur G. 

H., 163 
Deshmukh, R. G., 131, 183, 

203 
Desmukh, Ragundth G., 189 
Deshpdnde, B. A., 214, 235, 

248 
Deshpdnde, L. M., 214 
Deshpdnde, R. M„ 236 
Deshpdnde, R. N., 216, 250 
Deshpdnde, S. K., 221 
Desphdnde, S.T.,226 
DeSilva, J. B., 244 
De Souza, A. M. , 206 
De Souza, C. J., 227 
De Souza, F. V. A., 227,257 
De Souza, J. A., 206 
De Souza, L., 119, 191 
De Souza, P. C, 163, 204 
De Souza, P. J. L., 204 
De Souza, The Rev. D. A. F., 

158. ' 
Deuskar, R. G., 241 
Dev, K.S.,211 
Dev, V. N., 223, 262 
Devbhankar, N. V., 210 
Devitte, H., 223, 262 
Devnalkar, B. R., 213 
De Vos, The Rev. V., 245 
Dhairyavdn, G. K., 246 



Dhairvavdn, K. V., 210 
Dhairyavan, R. D., 213 
Dhairyavan. R. V. A., 260 
Dhairyavan, V. K., 108, 131, 
186, 203 

f Dhanjibhai, The Rev. N., 154 
Dharddhar, V. L., 214 
Dharamshi, A. M., 199, 233 
Dhdrap, N. K., 191, 248 
Dhargalkar, L. B., 256 
Dharmddhikdri, B. G., 209 
Dhavle, G. M., 214, 244 

t Dhirajldl M., 171 

f Dhirajrdm D., 157, 253 
Dhond, J. K., 214 
Dhru, H. M., 257 
Dhruva, H. H., 199, 233, 248 
Dhruva, K, H., 234 
Dhul^kar, D. B., 211 
Dhumatkar, P. G., 207 
Dhume, D. R., 255 
Dhurandhar, It. V., 218, 253 
Dhufandhar, S. V., 181, 202 
Dias, D. B., 227 
Dias, V., 207 

f Digdmbar D., 215 
Dike, R. C, 212 
Dikshit, C. D., 211 
Divdtid, N. B., 236 
Divecha, F. D., 256 
Divecha, F. R,, 207 
Divecha, K. R., 256 
Divekar, B. A., 216, 233, 249 
Divigikar, R. V., 216 
Dixon, G. M., 257 
Dixon, R. M., 244 
Doctor, B. P., 246 
Doctor, D. B., 218, 254 
Doctor, H. B., 218, 254 
Doctor, J. B., 224, 246 
Doctor, K. E., 255 
Doctor, N. B., 214 
Doctor, P.P., 207 
Doctor, R. D., 234, 249 
Doctor; R. L., 207 
. Dole, M. Y., 240 



f Surname not known. 



XV311 



INDEX. 



D'Oliveira, B. A., 207 
+ Dosabhoy F., The Hon., 155 
Douglas, The Right Rev. H., 

172 
Dowden, Major T., 160 
Draper, W., 171 
Dravid, V. B., 225 
Dravid, V. K., 216, 240 
Dravid, V. S., 224 
Dreckmann, The Rev. F., 245 
Dubash, J. B., 256 
Dubash, J. K., 181 
Dubash, K. D., 236 
Ducat, Major W. M., 157 
Dudley, C. W-, 221, 260 
Dugal, B. R., 225, 237, 250 
Dunbar, J., 171 
Duncan, T., 128, 130, 132, 176, 

248 
Dungaji, D. J., 250 
Dunn, M., 216, 246 
Dunsterville, Col. J. B., 

170 
DuPort, The Rev. C. D., 

169 
+ Dvarkan&th R., 210 
Dvigikar, R. V., 246 
Dvivedi, M. N., 234 
Dymock, W., 155, 253 



East, W. A., 155 
Eccles, W. S., 172 
Edal-Behramna, D. J., 257 

•f- Edalji N., 159, 253 
Eggar, The Rev. J., 245 
Ellis, The Hon. B. H., 168 
Elphinstone, John, Lord, 38, 
164, 167 

' Engineer, K. N., 236 
Engineer, K. S., 219,254 
Engineer, R. M., 222, 261 
Enti, B. A., 196 
Erskine, H. N. B., 153 



Erskine, The Hon. C. J., 39, 

167 
Erulkar, S. A., 256 

F. 

Fairbank; The Rev. S. B., 

157 
Farran, C. F., 158 
Faulkner, A., 156 
Fergusson, Lieut. E. F. T., 

39, 167 
Fernandes, A. F., 256 
Fernandes, E. E., 211 
Fernandes, N., 170 
Fife, Col. J. G., 154 
Filgate, T. P. H. M.. 158 
Finch, Captain C. W., 171 
FitzGerald, G. S. V., 171 
FitzGerald, The Right Ho- 
nourable Sir W. R. S. V., 

164 
Fletcher, The Rev. W. K. } 

168 
Flynn, J., 159 
Foggo, G., 170 
Fonseca, C, 207, 
Forbes, E. B., 218, 254 
Forbes, J. A., 159 
Forbes, The Hon. A. K. } 

165, 169 
Forbes, The Rev. A., 171 
Forde, A„ 160 
Fox, C. K, 157 
Fox, S. N., 162 
Frenchman, E. P., 207 
Frer-e, Sir H. BartleE., 39, 

164, 167 
Frere, W. E., 39, 167 
Fuller, Col. J. A., 157 

G. 

Gadgil, A. R., 261 
Gadgil, J. S., 179, 203 
Gadgil, K. P., 212 
Gadgil, P. D., 189 



f Surname not known. 



INDEX. 



, X 



Gadre, G. P., 212 
Gadre, R. V., 212 
Gandevia, M. N-, 219, 254 
Gandevia, N. B., 256 
Gandhe, L. G., 200 
Gandhi, A. M., 226 
Gandhi, D. D., 218 
Gandhi, J. D., 194, 248 
Gandhi, R. D., 255 
Gandhi, S. G., 236 
t Ganpatrao B., Rao Bahadur, 

159 
Ganpule, D. B., 223 
Ganpule, N. V., 212 
Ganu, K. H., 261 
Garde, G. K., 218, 254 
Gardner, The Rev. J. W., 

172 
Garud, D. S., 179 
Gavankar, L. R., 216, 235, 

249 
Gavankar, R. R., 122, 227, 

237, 250 
Gayatonde, G. V., 222, 260 
Gazdar, J. J., 174 
Gazdar, S. R, 218, 254 
Gell, The Rev. R, 169 
Ghadiali, P. M., 235 
Ghadiali, R. S., 215 
Ghaisas, K. V., 214 
Ghandi, D. B., 236 
Gharpure^ D. G., 187 
Gharpure, N. H., 221 
Gharpure, R, G., 222, 261 
Ghasvala, A. F., 178, 203 
Ghasvala, S. D., 235 
Ghodi, C M., 235, 250 
Ghogavald, A. R., 117 
+ GhoolamM., 161 
Gibbs, The Hon. J., 152, 156, 

163, 164, 165 
Gidha, V. G., 256 
Gidvani, A. J., 262 
Gidvani, M. C, 225 
Gilder, D, D., 223 
Gilder, The Rev. C, 156 



Giles, E., 162, 232 
Gimi, D. E., 110, 180 
Gimi, M. M., 206 
Gimi, R. M., 196, 248 
Giraud, H. J., 166, 168, 252 
Glasgow, The Rev. J., 169 
Godambe, Y. P., 206 
Godbole", H. G., 197 
Godbole, K. R., 123, 161, 180, 

208 
Godbole, N. B., 115, 189 
Godbole, N.K., 241 
Godbole, N.T., 225, 244 
Godbole, P. V., 214 
Godbole, R. B., 225, 241 
Godbole, R. P., 241 
Godbole, S. M., 115, 223, 

234, 250 
Gokhale, B. V., 260 
Gokhale, G. K., 212 
Gokhale, G. R., 200 
Gokhale, Gopal R., 115, 221 
Gokhale, G. S., 241 
Gokhale, K. R., 224 
Gokhale, K. 8., 241 
Gokhale, K. V., 115, 195, 248 
Gokhale, R. V., 112, 187, 203 
Gokhale, V. B., 235 
Gokhale, V. H., 221 
Gokhale, V. M.,214, 22l 
Gokhale, V. N., 213 
Gokhale, V. V., 176, 219, 254 
t Gokuldas T., 169 

Goldsmid, Major-Genl. Sir 

R J., 169 
Gole, H. V.,226 
Gole, M. S., 240 
Gole, S. B., 197 
Gole, V. V., 261 
Golvala,C. K., 226 
Gomes, A. S.,217 
Gomes, D. A. , 206 
Gomes, L., 246 
Gondhalekar, R. M., 214 
Gonne, C, 154 
Gonsalves, J. R, 205 



£ 713-b* 



t Surname nob known. 



XX 



INDEX. 



Goratela, V. H., 134, 204 
Gordon, A., 171 
Gordon, R. L., 213 
Gore, B. K., 225 
Gore, D. K, 244 
Gore", N. S., 213 
Gothoskar S. P., 212 
f Govinddas V,, 210 
Gracias, P. , 246 
Graham, E. E., 224 
Graham, R. W., 167 
Grant, Sir A. , Bart. , 165, 168, 

262 
Grant, Andrew, 170 
Gray, J. T., 160 
Gray, W., 157, 253 
Green, The Hon. J. P., 154, 

165 
Grierson, D., 169 
Grieve, The Rev. A. C, 243 
Gunderia, C. G., 218, 253 
Gunderia, M. C, 226 
Gunderia, M. G., 210 
Gunjikar, G. B., 191, 248 
Gupte, P. G., 220 
Gupte, V. S., 228 
Gurjari, P. G., 220 



Haig, Major C. T., 156 
Haines, R., 38, 166, 167, 252 
Hairat, M., 162, 232 
Hajrah, D., 221 
Hakim, A. G., 206 
Hakim, A. R., 205 
Hakim, H. M., 218, 254 
Hakim, M. H., 212 
Hakim, P. M., 219, 254 
Hakim, S. S., 204 
Hall, W. D., 221 
Hall, W. G., 159 
Hamilton, R., 171 
Hamilton, The Rev. J. M., 
162, 245 



Hamilton, W. W., 173 
Hanbury, W., 170 
Hancock, Col. H. F., 157 
Hannah, F., 256 
Hanny, R., 170 
Harding, The Right Rev. J., 

38, 167 
Hargrave, H. I. B-, 162 
+ Harichand S., 158 

Harkness, J., 38, 165, 167, 

232 
Hart, J, H. E., 159 
Hart, W., 169 
Hart, W. E., 160 
Harzheim, The Rev., 245 
Hasabnis, G. M., 191 
Hatiram, K. B., 256 
Hathornthwaite, J. T., 160, 

232 
Hatvalne, P. R., 261 
Hatvalne, S. R., 211 
Hatyanclikar, S. S., 223, 261 
Haug, M., 169 
Havelock, W. H., 173 
Hayllar, T. C, 170 
Hazen, The Rev. A., 158 
Hazra, D., 260 
Hearn, R. V., 158 
Heblikar, B. R., 213 
Hemson, R. J., 222 
Henriques, F., 256 
Hewlett, T. G., 159 
Hindia, D. G., 209 
Hirana, D. M., 214 
Hodivala, E. B., 234 
Hogan, D. F., 119, 194 
Hojel, A. N., 155, 253 
Holland, Captain E. B., 169 
Holmested, F., 160 
Hope, The Hon. T. C, 155 
Hore, J. F., 165, 168 
Howard, E. I., 38, 167 
Howell, J. A., 204 
Hughes, A. H., 253 
Hughlings, J. P., 166, 169 
Huligolkar, K. M., 192 



f Surname not known. 



INDEX. 



XXI 



Hunter, A. J., 171 
Hunter, W. G., 154, 163, 166, 

252 
Hayam, S., 224, 240 



Imam, S. A. S., 257 
Imimdar, V. R,, 131, 187, 

203 
Indapurkar, V. G., 192 
Inverarity, G., 170 
Inverarity, The Hon. J. D., 

169 
Isenberg, The Rev. C. M., 

169 
Izon, C. B., 156 



J. 

Jacob, Major G. A., 155 
Jacob, H. P., 157 
Jacomb, H. E., 154 
Jahagirdar, D. M., 183 
Jalgavkar, K. S., 215 
Jamadar, Y. Y., 234, 249 
Jamaspasa, F. M., 186 
Jani&sp&s&nd, J. M., 162 
Ja-mbhekar, B. G., 220 
Jambhekar, G. B., 195 
Jdmbhekar, H. B., 226, 241 
J&mbusaria, B.M., 187, 248 
James, H. E. M., 161 
Jamsetjee, K. K., 213 

f Jamsetjee, Sir J., Bart., 169 
Jamsetjee, Sir J., Bart., 161 

f Jamsetjee, Sir J., Knight, 
38, 167 

t Jamshedji N., 249 

t Janardan V., R&o Bah&dur, 
161 
Jardine, J., 159 
Jardine, James, 162, 247 
Jatar, B. Y., 216, 240 



Jatar, D. B., 182 

Jatar, S. B., 178 

Javeri, B. M., 216, 235, 249 

Javeri, H. K., 257 

Javeri, N. G., 211 

Javeri, P. D., 236 

Jayakar, A. S. G., 108, 158, 

204 
Jayakar, S.G., 236 
Jayakar, V. B., 218, 254 
Jayavant, R. B., 224, 234, 

250 
Jefferson, W. J., 171 
Jervis, A. S., 214 
Jervis, H., 206 
Jhdbvala, P. J., 236 
Jinsivale, S. G., 176 
Jivanpurvabi, C. J., 227 
Jog, P. N., 189 
Jog, R. M., 224, 234 
Jog, S. H., 226 
Jog, S. N., 227, 241 
Joglekar, K. M., 214, 235 
Joglekar, K. R., 226, 241 
Joglekar, L. B., 226 
Joglekar, R. R., 216, 233, 248 
Joglekar, V. D., 225, 241 
Joglekar, V. K., 212 
Joklekar, V. R. 214, 237 
Johnston, The Rev. C. F. H. 3 

163 
Johnstone, T. B„ 170 
Jokagar, J. R., 234 
Jones, Col. J., 159 
Jones, J. H., 214 
Jones, M., 256 
Joshi, A. A., 221 
Joshi, B. N., 189, 211 
Joshi, B. S., 189 
Joshi, D. N., 236 
Joshi, G. K„ 214 
Joshi, G. P., 183 
Joshi, G. V., 187 
Joshi, J. R., 226 
Joshi, K. V., 223, 262 
Joshi, L. J., 115, 214 



t Surname not known. 



XXll 



INDEX. 



Joshi, N. B., 208 
Joshi, N. D.,223, 234, 250 
Joshi, N. G. 224 
Joshi, N. J., 225, 262 
Joshi, N. S., 224 
Joshi, P. B., 225, 262 
Joshi, R. P., 244 
Joshi, S. N., 228 
Joshi, S. V., 200 
Joshi, V. B., 255 
Joshi, V. R., 213 
Joshipara, P. K., 117, 234 
Joynt, F. G., 157 
Judge, A. J., 224 
Judge, J. N., 236 
f Jugonnath S., The Hon., 39, 
167 

K. 

Kate, G. V., 185 
+ Kahandas, M., 173 

Kaji, B. B., 213 

Kaji, C. G., 124, 256 

Kaji, L. B., 207 

Kaka, N. B., 216, 237, 249 

Kaka, S. M., 256 

Kalamkar, V. N., 227 

Kalburgi, V. R., 241 

Kale, G. H., 213 

Kale, N. R., 213 

Kale, N. S., 212 

Kalghatgi, K. G., 222, 262 

Kamat, D. G., 206 

Kamlapurkar, S. S„ 213 

Kamle, K. G., 256 
+ Kamrudin T., 162 

Kandavala, D. B., 206 

Kane, M. V., 179 

Kane, S. V., 219, 254 

Kanga, D.P., 124, 128, 176, 
203 

Kanga, F. M., 128, 195, 249 

Kanga, H. A., 208 

Kanga, J. B., 189, 248 



Kanga J. K., 218, 253 
Kanga, K. D., 227, 261 
Kanga, M. D., 236, 250 
Kanga, N. K., 246 
Kanga, S. M., 246, 250 
Kanga, S. R., 255 
Kanitkar, B. G., 209 
Kanitkar, B. H., 124 
Kanitkar, G. V., 197, 248 
Kanitkar, S. H., 227 
Kanitkar, Rao Bahadur V. 

B., 161 
Kantak, S. V„ 205 
Kanugrahi Dhruva, H. M., 
- 225 

Kapadia, B. D., 205 
Kapadia, D. M., 214 
Kapadia, D. P., 227, 244 
Kapadia, J. B.\ 212 
Kapadia, J. P., 159 
Kapadia. K. F., 226, 244 
Kapadia, K. K., 200 
Kapadia, R. J., 214, 219, 254 
Kapadia, S. A., 255 
Kapadia, S. F., 225, 237 
Kapse, V. T., 241 
Karandikar, B. P., 216, 235, 

250 
Karandikar, R. B., 192 
Karandikar, V. T., 241 
Karandikar, V. V., 226 
Karanjia, M. D., 218, 254 
Karmarkar, G. G., 234 
Karmarkar, H. G., 215, 250 
Karmarkar, N. D., 226 
Karmarkar, V. B., 187 
f Karsandas M., 155 
f Karsandas Mulji, 172 
Karve, V. H., 208 
Kateli, M. D., 228 
Kdth, M. D., 262 
Kath, M. V., 226, 244 
Kathavate, A. V., 112, 181 
Kathavate, M. V., 195, 248 
Kathavate, N. V., 221 
Katrak, D. H., 224, 257 



t guraame not known. 



INDEX, 



Katrak, H. S., 216, 243 
Katrak, M. 3., 244 
Katrak, N. N., 224, 257 
Kavishvar, L. D., 209 ' 
Kavmudia, M. S., 214 
Kavthekar, M. A., 223 
Kavthekar, V. L., 192 
Kazi Shahabudin, 1G1 ■ 
Keily, R., 213 
Kelavdla, D. K., 227 
Kelavala, M. J., 218, 254 
Kelkar, D. G., 176, 240 
Kelkar, G. N., 200, 240, 

249 
Kelkar, G. P., 216, 238,250 
Kelkar, H. G., 241 
Kelkar, H. V., 225, 238 
Kelkar, K. G., 189 
Kelkar, P. G., 213 
Kelkar, S. G., 216 
Kelkar, V. B., 225, 237 
Kelkar, V. R., 213, 221 
Kelly, 0. F., 171 
Kemball, The Hon. C. G., 

159 
Kemp, 0. S., 158 
Kendall, Col. W., 171 
Kennedy, The Hon. Major- 

General, M. K., 154, 163, 

166 
Kennelly, D. J., 170 
Kerur, B. Y., 214 
Keshkamat, R. A., 209 
Keskar, H. B., 183 
Ketkar, V. B., 133 
Khadepav, G. K., 257 
Khambata, D. D., 213 
Khambata, H. J., 217 
Khambata, J. D., 206 
Khambata, J, K., 187 
Khambata, N. N:, 206, 210 
Khambata, P. A„ 212 
Khambati, R. L., 214 
Khandalavala, N. D., 183, 

203 
Khandalavala, P. D., 208 
Khandvala, T. C., 257 
Khandekar, G. R., J 89 



Khandekar, Gopal R., 236 
Khandekar, K. G., 222 
Khandekar, R. G., 238 
Khanderia, P. 1)., 225 
Khaparde, G. S., 199, 233 
Kharas, A. B., 236 
Khare, D. A., 199, 240, 249 
Kharegat, M. P., 192, 219, 

254 
Kharkar, B. M., 187 
Kher, K. N., 181, 203 
Kher, S. N., 213 
Khimjiani, F. M., 134, 197 
Khori, R. N., 162, 204 
Khot, A. V., 213, 249 
Khot, G; V., 218, 254 
Khot, N. V., 213, 243 
Khote, D. R., 224, 246 
Khote, R. N., 158 
Kielhorn, F., 155, 240 
Kibe, G. G., 225 
Kikani, M,^S„ 226 
King, J., 154 
Kipling. J. L., Ul 
Kirane, G. R., 208 
Kirk, The Rev. C, 155 
Kirkham, T. B., 155, 232 
Kirloskar, G. R., 128, 176, 

203 
Kirloskar, S. R., 187 
Kirtane, K. V., 186 
Kirtane, M. V., 199 
Kirtikar, G. P., 246 
Kirtikar, J. S., 186 
Kirtikar, K. R., 211 
Kirtikar, V. K., 192 
Knapp, W. F., 158, 253 - 
Kohiyar, J. E., 113 
Kohiyar, R. K, 178, 202, 212 
Kola, B. J., 183 
Kola, J. S., 236 
Kolapurvala, J. F., 207 
Kolatkar, L. S-, 185 
Kolatkar, S. V., 220 
Kolatkar, V. M., 210 
Kopar, N. V., 241 
Koparkar, G. B., 194 
Kothare, A. K., 131, 183, 203 



sxiv 



INDEX. 



Kothare, G. B., 197, 248 
Kothare, G. D., 177, 202 
Kothare, S. J., 204 
Kothdre, V^G.,236 
Kotval, E. B., 226 
Koyaji, B. N., 217 
Kshirsagar< G. N., 191 
Kuknur, R. J., 124, 223 
Kulkarni, B. H.,'115, 216, 

234, 249 
Kumpthekar, M. Y., 216, 

233 
Kumthekar, M. K., 249 
Kunte, A. M., 162, 180, 204, 

253 
Kunte, M. M., 157, 177 
Kunte, V. K., 124, 187, 262 
Kunte, Vishnu K., 227 
Kurlavala, N. K., 255 
Kurandvadkar, V. Appa Sa- 

heb, 172 . 
Kurkaray, G. V., 157, 232 
Kurlevala, K. K. , 249 
Kutar, K..R., 212 
Kutar, R. P., 225, 257 



Lad, D. B., 228, 257 
Lad, V. B., 176 
Laivala, E. S., 209 
Laivala, G. M., 183 
Lala, K. R., 261 
Lalkaka, S. J., 236, 250 
Lalvani,*L. V., 214 
Lam, E. D., 227, 237 
Lamna, N. J., 204 
Larken, M., 38, 167 
Larpent, Baron De H., 173 
Laskari, R. N., 256 
Lite, V. P., 221 
Latham, F. L., 160, 164 
Lavji, A. R., 214 
Lee- Warner, W., 160 
LeGeyt, The Hon. P. W., 
38, 167 



Leigh-Lye, The Venerable 

C. H., 156 
Leith, A. H., 168 
Leith, E. T., 158, 247 
Lele, K. K., 213 
Lele, M. V., 222, 261 
Lele, T. B., 221 
Lele, V. K., 225, 241 
Lele, V. V,, 225 
LeMestirier, H. P., 172 
Lewis, The Hon. A. J., 165, 

168 
Liebschwager, K W. , 227 
Lilavvala, J. J., 255 
Limji, C. M., 162 
Limaye, G. V., 186 
Limaye, H. V., 115, 192 
Limayd, N.B., 162 
Lindmann, The Rev. C, 245 
Lisboa, J. C, 162 
Lisboa, P. P., 219, 254 
Lloyd, The Hon. F., 172 
Lobo, B., 207 
Lohar, M. H., 261 
Lokurkar, S. R., 213 
Loudon, W., 153, 165 
Lowndes, J. J., 168 
Luis, D. C, 255 
Lumsdaine, J., 158 
Lumsden, The Hon. J. G., 

38, 167 
Lyon, A., 173 
Lyon, I. B., 156, 164, 232, 

253 
Lyons, W. R., 213 

M. 

Macdonald, D., 243 
Mackichan, The Rev. D., 

162, 243 
Maclean, J. M., 162 
Macnaghten, C, 159 
Macnee, H. C, 220 
Maconachie, G. A., 162, 253 
Macpherson, The Rev. D., 

15j6 
Macpherson, G. M., 154 



INDEX. 



XXV 



Macpherson; J., 157 
Madan, E. H., 262 
Madan, F. E., 255 
Madan, F. S., 244 
Madan, J. F., 211 

t Madhavarao, Raja Sir T., 161 
Madgavkar, D. V., 181 
Madgavkar, R. V., 177 
Madkholkar, S. V., 227, 237 

f Maganbhai K., 169 
Mahajan, V. K., 224 
Mahajane, V. M., 176 

t Mahipatram R., Rao Saheb, 
155 
Mahisalkar, V. R., 189 
Maidment, F. G., 256 
Majinudar, C. L., 236 
Majmudar, D. K, 222, 261 
Majmudar, K 0., 224, 234 
Majmundar, G. B., 236 
Majamundar, I. L., 185 
Majaniundar, N. R., 213 
Makuna, M.D., 206 

t Makund R., Rao Bahadur, 
161 
Malet, The Hon. A., 38, 166, 

167 
Malkani, S. P., 215 
Malpekar, N. R., 212 
Malvi, T. N., 246, 250 
Mande, V. B., 221 
Mandevali, H. V., 235 
Mandlik, D. G., 213 
Mandlik, The Hon. R&o 
Saheb V. N., 153, 164 . 
Manerikar, G. S., 216, 233, 

250 
Manerikar, Y. P., 215 
Manehirmalanj, H. H., 21-3 
Mankar, G. A., 174, 203 
Mankar, N. L., 216, 246, 250 

f ManockjeeC, 154 
Mansfield, The Hon. S., 169 
Mansfield, Lieut. -Genl. Sir 

W., 168 
Mansukhani, H. T., 262 



Mantri, J. J., 236 
Marathe,' K. B., 112, 180, 

203 
Marathe, K. S., 194, 249 
Marathe, T. M., 241 
Margenont, G., 257 
Mdrphatia, N. T-, 158, 177, 

202 
Marriott^ The Hon. J., 155, 

163, 165 
Marriott, Major-Genl. W.T.. 

168 
Marryat, Captain, E. W., 163 
Martin, The Rev. J., 245 
Martin, T. E. P., 172 
Marzbau, M. M., 236 
Masalavala, J. N., 236 
Masalavala, M. A., 236 
Masani, H. D., 205" 
Masdni, N. K., 213, 243 
Master, D. B., 255 
Master, F. B., 200, 249 
Master, S. B., 200 
Master, S. P., 225 
Masurkar, K. S., 241 
Mathew, F., 161 
Maule, The Rev. W., 153 
Mavlankar, D. K., 226 
Mavlankar, K. N., 211 
Mavlankar, V. K., 212 
Mayadev, T. B., 210 
Mayhew, C. J., 160 
Maxwell, H., 163, 164 
McAfee, F., 197 
McDerraott, M., 119, 176 
McDougal, The Rev. J., 38, 

167, 259 
Mclnerny, J , 214 
Mehd, V. A., 216, 233, 248 
Mehendale", P. K., 221 
Mehta, A. N., 225, 257 
Mehta, B. H., 136 
Mehta, B. P., 226, 262 ' 
Mehta, B. S., 207 
Mehta, C. J., 227, 237 
Mehta, D. B., 246 



t Surname not known, 



TX.V1 



INDEX, 



Mehta, H. M., 209 
Mehta, K. D., 262 
Mehta, K. K., 236 
Mehta, M. G., 236 
Mehta, Mahipatram G. , 136, 

225, 257 
Mehta, N. B., 237 
Mehta, N. D., 244 
Mehta, Nagindas D., 226, 

238, 250 
Mehta, P. G., 136 
Mehjba, P. M., 156, 175 
Mehta, B. M., 227, 237 
Mehta, S. B., 226, 237 
Mehta," S. C, 136, 236 
Mehta, S. K, 224, 237 
Mehta, T. A., 178,202 
Mehta, T. D., 175 
Mehta; ' V. C, 221 
Mehta, V. G., 219 
Mehta, V. M., 216, 235 
Mehta, V. K., 136, 224, 237, 

250 
Mehta, V. V., 211 
Melvill, The Hon. M., 153 
Merchant, M. D., 257 
Merchant, P. D., 133, 234, 
Merewether, Major G. L. C, 

159 
Merewether, Sir W. L., 169 
Meurin, The Bight Be v. 

Leo., 157 
Mhaiskar, G. B., 220 
Mhaskar, S. V., 221 
Mhatre, V. P., 255 
Mills, J., 172 
Mirja, N. F., 246 
Mirajkar, B. S., 240, 215 
Mirza, A. A. B., 197, 248 
.Mirza, J. F., 223. 257 
Mirza, K. F., 213 ' 
Mirza, S.F., 186 
Mistri, B. D., 207 
Mistri, J. P., 246 
Mistri, K. H,, 207 
Mistri, K, M., 211 
Mistri, M. D., 255 
Mistri, P. A., 210 



Mitchell. The Rev. J. M. r 

168 
Mitra, H., 222, 260 
Modak, A. B., 209 
Modak, B. P., 211 
Modak, G. B., 228, 233 
Modak, G. T., 223, 240 
Modak, J. B., 185 
Modak, V. A., 160, 177 
Modi, A. D., 256 
Modi, A. K., 208 
Modi, Barzorji E., 113, 131, 

175, 203 
Modi. B. E., 175 
Modi, B.R., 210 
Modi, C. T., 216,235 
Modi, D. P., 227 
Modi, D. S., 211 
Modi, G. B., 216 
Modi, H. B., 255 
Modi, J. E., 128, 191, 215 
Modi, J. J., 197. 248 
Modi, K. E., 178 
Modi, KavasjiE., 211 
Modi, M. P., 236, 250 
Modi, M. T., 262 
Modi, N. K., 219, 254 
Modi, R. E., 237 
Moghe, K. B., 224 
Moharir, B. G., 260 
Mohile, H. A., 228, 245 
Mokashi, S. S., 224 
Molecey, G. T., 161 
Montgomery, The Bev. R., 

172. 
Morehead, C.,38, 167, 252 
Moore, J. G ., 156 
Moore, W. J., 153 
Moorgay, M. Y., Cazee. 39, 

168 
Morland, Capt. H. } 160, 

164 
Moos, A. F., 160 
Motivate, D. H., 256 
Mudholkar. B. N., 199, 233. 

248 
Mudholkar, S. K, 212 
Mudle, K. S., 192 



IMfDEX. 



xxvu 



Mudiiar, D. V., 213 
Mudliar, N. V., 218, 254 
Mukhi, M. J. A., 228 
Mulla, F, K., 210 
Mulla, F. L., 133, 134, 195 
Mulan, S. P., 217 
Mulan, P. P., 256 
Mulligan, W. G. T., 119, 

262 
Mute, K. S., 201, 248 
Mule, K. B„ 209 
Mulekar, V. S., 220 
Mulgavkar, V. N., 213 
Mundale, R. G., 226, 241 
f MunguldassN., Sir, 154, 164 
Munshi, D. K., 213, 222, 

261 
Munshi, K. A., 246, 249 
Munshi, M. M , 178, 202 
Munshi, Motilal M., 201, 

250 
Munshi, N. K., 249 
Munshif, B. S., 207 
Munsif, E. S., 225, 244 
Murdeshvarkar, P. M., 224, 

244 
Murzban, M. K., 161 
Mus, F. A., 255 
Mus, N. A., 222, 261 
Muzumdar, M. N., 221, 261 
Mylne, The Right Rev. L. G., 

152 



N. 

Nabar, B. N., 189 
Nabar, V. S., 213 
Nabar, Vaman S., 226 
Nadirshah, A. N, 261 
Nadirshah, J. D., 222 
Nadirshah, R, J., 173, 204 
Nadirshah, S.D., 218, 253 
Nadkarni, G. N., 181, 202 
Nadkarni, M. S., 236 
Nadkarni, S. S., 215, 235 



Nagarkar, Rdo Bahadur, D. 

N., 157, 260 
Nagarkar, R. D., 216, 235, 

250 
Nagarkar, V. D., 221 
Nagarset, V. N., 209 
Nagavkar, A. S., 208 
Naik, B. S., 179 
Naik, K. R., 227, 261 
Naik, N. D., 226, 237, 250 
Naik, T. V., 262 
Namjosht, V. M., 228, 257 

+ Nana M., Rao Bahddur, 158 
Nanabhoy, B. J., 159 

f Nanabhai H., 160 
Nanavati, B. H., 257 
Ndnav-ati, B. M., 207 
Nanavati, D. H;., 183 
Nanavati, D. M., 209 
Nanavati, D. N., 210 
Nanavati, H. A., 227, 237 
Nanavati, J. P., 218, 254 
Na D avati, M. N., 110, 181, 

203 
Nanavati, N. N., 181, 203 
Nanavati, R. H., 206 
Nanji, R. S., 256 
Nanjiani, K. R., 134, 216, 
235, 249 

t Narayan D., 168 

+ Narayan I)aji, 172 

f Nidrdyan V., The Hon., 171 
Nargir, S. B., 220 
Nariman, D. K., 214 
Nariman, G. D., 220 
Nariman, K. S., 206 
Nariman, M.E., 214 
Nariman, P. B., 256 
Nariman, T. B., 205 
Nasmyth, Lieut.-Col. D,, 170 
Native-Agent, L. G., 221 
Natu, K. G., 215, 233, 249 
Natu, R, R,, 225, 242 
Natu, S. A., 241 
Natu, T.G., 115, 142, 216, 
233, 249 



b 713— c 



t Surname not known. 



XXY111 



INDEX. 



Navalkar, B. V., 228 
Nazareth, J. V. De., 254 
Nazareth, V. E., 226 

■ Nerurkar, G. N., 213 
Newnham, W. H., 153 
Newton, The Hon. H., 169 
Nichhure\ G. A., 214 
Nilkanth, A. M., 256 
Nimmo, E. H., 209 

+ NowrojiF., 158 
Nugent, J., 159 
Nunes, I. D., 206 



o. 

Oka, K. G., 115, 214 
Oka, R. G., 180, 208 
Oka, V. A., 221 
Oka, V. D., 115 
Oldham, Capt. G, W., 161 
O'Leary, J., 172 
Oltikar, H. JR., 236 
Ormiston, T., 158 
Osborn, Capt. S., 170 
O'Shanahan, H.F., 119, 139, 

246. 
O'Shaughnessy, S., 186 
O'SuUivan, J. J., 216, 262 
Ovans, C. R., 169 
Ovalekar, M. N., 194, 248 
Oxenham, R. G., 152, 104, 

239 
Oza, D. M., 136 
Oza, K. M., 136, 236 



P. 

Padamji, G. D., 197 
Padamjee P. , Khan Bahadur, 

154 
Padamji, S. P., 216 
Padhaye, H. G., 181 
Padvekar, V. S., 214 
Pagani, The Rev. N., 163 



Page, H. M., 220, 260 
Pai, N. V., 216, 246 
Paithankar, K. M., 214 
Pajnigara, N. M., 197, 

248 
Palekar, B. R., 241 
Panandhikar, G. V., 212 
Pandia, C. H., 236 
Pandia, C. M., 249 
Pandia, D. K., 214 
Pandia, K.H., 216 
Pandit, D. M., 223, 242 
Pandit, G. G., 197 
Pandit, G. N., 198, 248 
-Pandit, H, M„ 212 
Pandit, HarilalM., 227, 237 
Pandit, N. B., 216 
Pandit, P. V., 261 
Pandit, R. M., 207 
Pandit, S. N., 211 
Pandit, V. N., 223, 234, 250 
Pandit, S, P., 156, 174 
Pandit, V. M., 187, 203 
Panhajkar, R. A., 214 
Panjabi, C. K., 178 
Panshe, M. G., 260 
Paradkar, V- A., 216, 243 
Paranjapye, B. R., 215, 250 
Paranjapye, G. V., 226 
Paranjapye, H. R., 223, 241 
Paranjapye, M. Y., 205 
Paranjapye, N. B., 242 
Pardnjapye, S. B., 179 
Paranjapye, S. G., 262 
Parchure, V. B., 215 
Parekh. G. K., 179, 203 
Parikh,' C. D., 214 
Parikh, K. M., 224 
Parikh, J. B., 220 
Parikh, L. P., 211 
Parkhe, E. Y., 222 
Parmanand, N. M., 210 
Parulekar, D. V., 134 
Parulekar, S. H., 215 
Paskol, S. K., 256 
Patel, B. B., 212 



t Surname not known. 



INDEX. 



Patel, B. F.. 184 
Patel, D. F., 155 
Patel, D. H., 256 
Patel, D. S., 174 
Patel, E. D , 255 
Patel, F. N., 156 
Patel, H. V., 134 
Patel, J. M., 236 
Patel, K. V., 205 
Patel, M. F., 184 
Patel, N. H., 210 
Patel, R. D., 213 
Patel, R. M., 110, 174, 203 
Patel, S. V., 262 
Pathak, A. N., 211 
Pathak, K. B., 201 
Pathak, K. G., 206 
Pathak, L. D., 224 
Pathak, N. H., 215 
Pathak, P. D , 222, 261 
Pathak, P. H., 189, 209 
Pathak, P. 8., 216, 235, 248 
Pathak, S. H., 174, 202 
Pathak, S. K., 215 
Pathak, S. S., 240 
Pathak, V. B., 244 
Pathak, V. N., 156, 174 
Pathankar, V. V., 257 
Patkare, K. J., 215 
Paton, The Rev. J., 173 
Patvardhan, D. A., 256 
Patvardhan, H. R., 215 
Patvardhan, K. V., 188 
Patvardhan, M. V., 214 
Patvardhan, R. V., 212 
Patvardhan, S. V., 185 
Patvardhan, V. A, 242 
Patvardhan, V. G., 210 
Patvardhan, V. N., 262 
Patvardhan, V. R., 184, 

217 
Paudval, D. S., 192 
Pavgi, N. B., 215 
Pavgi, R. B., 141, 195, 248 
Pavri, B„ M., 227 
Pavri, D. T., 223, 261 
Pavri, F. P., 217, 235 
Pavri, K. K, 221 



Pavri, S. N., 262 
Pedder, W. G., 153 
Pednekar, K. S., 257 
Peet, J., 166, 168, 252 
Peile, J. B., 153 
Pendharkar, A. S., 240 
Pendharkar, B. G., 262 
Pendse, K. B., 112, 115, 175 
Pendse, N. V., 236 
Penti, J. M., 255 
Perciyal, E. H., 155 
Pereira, C, 119, 133, 215 
Pereira, F. C, 246 
Pereira, J., 206 
Pereira, M. F., 205 
Peres, F. G., 245 
Pesikaka, H. D., 219, 254 
Peterson, P., 127, 103, 164, 

167, 232 
Petit, B. D., 224, 246 
Phadke, L. C, 209 
Phadke, N. G., 182 
Phadke, R. D., 115, 241 
Phadke, V. V., 190 
Phaltankar, R. B., 236 
Phansalkar, R. B., 225, 242 
Phatak, N.G.,236 
Phatak, S. B., 211 
Phatak, ShripatB., 242 
Phatarpekar, S. R., 217, 235, 

249 
Pigot, J. Q., 161 
Pille, B. N„ 208 
Pinhey, The Hon. R. H., 155 
Pinkerton, J., 157 
Pinto, D. J., 256 
Pinto, J. A., 257 
Pinto, L. J., 206 
Pinto, P. M., 215 
Pires, G. F., 226 
Pitale, Rao Saheb G. M., 164 
Pitke, G. R., 115, 223, 234, 

250 
Pocha, J. P., 256 
Postvala, M. S., 206 
Pottinger, Col. J., 169 
Poyntz, J. W. W., 223, 257 
Prabhakar, A. S., 190 



XXX 



INDEX. 



Prabhakar, G. B., 219, 254 
Pradhan, S. A., 244 
Pradhan, V. H., 228, 237. 
+ Premchund R,, 155 
Prideaux, Capt. W. F., 161 
Purandare, G. M., 240 
Purandare, K. V, 214, 250 
Punavala, E. S., 219 
Puntambekar, V. D., 242 
Purani, B. N., 217, 235 



R. 



Rahurkar, V. N., 216, 233, 

250 
Rajavade, G. V„ 115 
Raji, N. G., 236 
f Ramchandra-Rao Appa Sa- 

heb, 157 
Rana, R. S. r 126, 209 
Ranade, G. B., 236, 250 
Ranade, G. K., 185. 
Ranade, M. G., 155, 174, 

202 
Ranade, S. M., 188 
Ranade, V. B., 227 
Banade, Y. N., 227, 242 
Rangnekar, N. A., 234 
Ranina, N. R., 161 
Rao, G. S., 176, 248 
Rao, K. H.., 261 
tRastamjee J. J., 170 
f Rastamji M., 167 
Ratnagar, N. J., 211 
Ravenscroft, The Hon. E. W., 

157 
Ravitna, D. K., 254 
Rdvut, S. A., 161,204,253 
Readymoney, Sir C. J., 153 
Readymoney, J. K., 236 
Reeves, The Hon. H. W., 

168 
Rehatsek, E., 160 
Reid, G. B., 158 
Reid, R. T., 165, 169 



Rele, G. R, 198, 248 
Renavikar, A. A., 214 
Reporter, M. E., 206 
Revitna, D. K., 219 
Reynell, The Rev. G. C, 157 
Ribeiro, C. A., 143, 209 
Ribeiro, F. P..V., 221, 260 
Richey, J. B., 153 
Rishi, G.B., 261 
Rive, The Rev. R., 163, 

246 
Rivers. Major-Genl. H., 166, 

168 
Rivett-Carnac, J. H., 157 
Robertson, E. P., 161 
Robertson, The Rev. J. S. S., 

158 
Robinson, Commander G. T., 

158 
Rodrigues, C. J., 257 
Rodrigues, J.. 209, 
Rogay, N.M.A., 160 
Rogers The Hon. A., 172 
Rogers, A. M., 156 
Rohankhedkar, H. R., 198 
Romanini, R., 194 
Rooke, B. P., 166, 168 
Rowe, P. V., 198, 248 
Rowe, W. F., 261 
Royal, R., 260 
Rozario^ M. A., 219, 254 » 
Rukha, V. K., 134, 224, 

244 
Rushton, J. R., 171 
Russell, C.W., 171 
Russell, W. A., 155, 239 
Ryan, P., 161 



Sabne, N.A., 227 
Sabnis, D. G., 206 
Sabnis, R. V., 201 
San, M. C., 244 
Safre, V. V., 224, 234 



"'"Surname not known. 



IffDEX. 



XXXI 



Sahasrabudne, B. R., 190 
Sahasrabudhe, G. B., 241 
Sahasrabudhe, N. G., 242 
Sahasrabudhe, V. G., 244 
Sahiar, K. N., 256 
Samant, H. R., 234 
Samarth, V. M., 215 
Sambre, G. R., 211 
Samshi, A. V., 215, 235 
Sane, B. B., 184, 208, 260 
Sane, B. R., 215, 242 
Sane, G. G., 188 
Sane, K. N., 188 
Saugle, D. M., 255 
Sanjana, J. B., 225, 244 
Sanjana, K. J., 195, 240 
Sanjana, K. K., 207 
Sanjana, M. K., 217, 243 
Sanjana, T. N., 246 
Santuk, K S., 257 
Sanzgire, S. V., 150, 204, 

253 
Sanzgiri, D. M., 236 
Saraf, V. A., 209 
Sarangpani, K. V., 201, 

248 
Saranjame, S. J., 227, 242 
Saraiya, R. G., 206 
Sariya, G. V., 224, 237 
Sargent, The Hon. Sir C, 

156 
Sassoon, Sir A. D., 157 
Sathe, D. S.,209* 
Sathe, G. M., 192 
Sathe, M. A., 212, 242 
Sathe, N. V., 180 
Satpute, N.R., 215 
Sattavala, M, T., 244 
Sausse, Sir M. R., 38, 167 
Savage, T., 221, 261 
Sayani, I. M., 128, 185 
Sayani, R. M., 159, 174, 

202 
Scoble, A. R„ 170 
Scorgie, J., 158, 260 
Scott, G., 170 



Scott, M. H., 171 

Scott, Lieut. -Genl. W., 166, 

168 
Selby, F. G., 240 
Seth, T. M., 249 
Sethna,A. H., 257 
Sethna, A. K., 236, 249 
Sethna, E. F., 207 
Sethna, K. B., 199, 233, 

247 
Sethnd, K.G., 237 
Sethna, P. K., 217, 235 
Sethna, R. D., 199, 257 
Sett, M. U., 117, 214 
Sh4h, T.M , 126, 205, 246 
Shahani, D. G., 128, 139,14a, 

199, 233 
Shaik, A. J., 224 
+ Shamrao V., 161 
t ShantaramN., 157 
Sh&stri, V. A., 257 
Shaw-Stewart, M. J. M., 169 
t Sheik A. K., 204 
t Sheik Y. I., 133 
+ Sheshadri, The Rev. N., 160 
Sheth, B. I., 222 
Shikhare, G. S., 115 
Shirgavkar, B. N., 219 
Shirgavkar, R -R., 226, 237, 

250 
Shirg4vkar, V.J., 219, 254 
Shirvalkar, T. S., 205 
Shribastam, S. B., 205 
Shroff, B. S., 256 
Shroff, D. S., 256 
Shroff, E. S., 211 
Shroff, H. R, 178 
Shroff, M. K., 244 
Shukla, D. D., 215 
Shukla, N. G., 223, 241 
Sidhe, D. N., 222, 261 
Simoens, J. A., 211, 254 
Sinclair, R. S., 166, 170 
Singh, K., 223, 234 
Sirurkar, S. A., 262 
Sirvai, H. J., 255 



t Surname not known. 



SXX11 



INDEX. 



Sirvi'i, H. X., 255 
Smith, C, 224 
Smith, S., 159 
Soda, T. D., 210 
Sohoni, V. A., 223, 241 
Sohoni, V. S., 220 
Soman, D. B., 134, 237 
Soman, G. N., 290 
Soman, S. G., 211 
Soman, V. G., 182 
Somerset, Lieut.-Genl.SirH., 

38, 167 
Soneji, G. S., 255 
t SorabjeeJ. J., 153 
f Sorabjee P. F., 154 
Souter, Sir F, H., 161 
Sovani, G. K., 194, 2l5 
Sovani, V. K., 237 
Spencer, H. N., 261 
Staveley, His Excellency 

Major-Genl. the Hon. Sir 

Charles W. D., 152 
Stedman, F. S., 166, 170 
Steins, The Most Rev. W., 

170 
Stewart, G. M., 159 
Stothert, The Rev. R., 154, 

243 
Stovell, M., 39, 167 
SukhiaJ. K., 255 
Sukhia, N. H., 227, 257 
Sukthankar, S. V., 214, 262 
Sule B. E., 223, 234, 250 
Sule, S. B., 212 
Sulemani, S. J., 206 
Sulkar, N. V., 215 
Surveyor, M. R., 228, 262 
Sutaria, J. G., 244 
Sutaria, L. M., 217 
Suvarnapatke, D. R,, 225 
Sylvester, J. H., 172 

1. 

Tadivala, A. H., 225, 262 
)re, S., 156 



Tiki, R. S, 215 
Talati, D. D., 226 
Talati, E. D., 184 
Tahiti, H. P., 226 
Talati, M. M., 227, 244 
Talpade, S. A., 255 
Talvalkar, R. B., 185 
Talvalkar, R. G„ 218, 253 
Talyarkhan, M. J., 182, 203 
Talyarkhan, P. J., 223, 234 
Talyarkhan, P.P., 249 
Tambe, A. S., 262 
Tambe, N. R., 226 
Tambe, R. B., 220 
Tambe, Y. B., 201 
Tarapurvala, F. K., 123, 188, 

209 
Tarapurvs&la, S. S., 219, 254 
Tarkhad, M. A., 159 
Tarkhad, S. D., 214 
Tarkhadkar, V. R., 220 
Taskar,P. B., 223, 234, 250 
Taskar, P. K., 227, 237 
Tatd, J. R., 237 
Tdvernvala, S. M., 210 
Taylor, J., 167, 171 
Taylor, The Rev. J. V. &, 

155 
Telang, K. T., 112, 162, 175, 

202 
Temple, His Excellency the 

Hon. Sir R,, 152, 164 
Thakar, G. P., 186 
Thakar, H. B., 134, 244 
Thakore, J. H., 144,261 
Thdkore, K. G., 227 
TMkur, A. S., 221 
Thakur, B. B,, 179 
Thakur, S. B., 108, 182 
Thatte, C. S., 240 
Thorn, W., 166, 173 
Tilak, B. G., 196, 248 
Tilak, G.R., 158,207 
Tilak, N. P., 210 
Tipnis, G. K., 225, 262 
Tipnis, R. S., 193, 203 



t Surname not known. 



INDEX. - 



XXX111 



Tote, S. M.„ 262 
Tolmatti, S. A., 223 
Tremenheere, Major-Genl. C. 

W., 168, 170 
Trevor, Lieut. -Col. J. S., 

166, 172 
Tripathi, G. M., 137, 194, 

248 
Tripathi, M. S., 163 
Trivedi, K. P., 216, 234 
Trivedi, T. D., 244 
Tucker, The Hon. H. P. St. 

G., 165, 169 
Tukina, E. K., 219,254 
Tullu, G. V., 176 
Tullu, R. V., 112, 175, 203 
Turner, Col. H. B.,' 166, 168 

U. 

Udas, Y. A., 179 
Ugrankar, V.L., 246 
Umerigar, N. R., 256 
Unvala, H. F., 237 
Unvala, J. B., 257 
Unvala, J. N., 163, 174 
Upasani, L. R., 242 
Upasani, R. R., 243 
Upasani, S. B., 194, 248 

v. 

Vacha, J. B., 162 
Vachha, M. S., 198 
Vachha, R, K., 256 
Vad, G. C, 201, 249 
Vad, V. A., 214 
Vaidya, B. N-, 217, 235 
Vaidya, C. N., 133 
Vaidya, C. V., 223, 234 
Vaidya, G. S., 161, 204, 253 
Vaidya, K. K., 207 
Vaidya, Rao Saheb N. 'J., 173 
Vaidya, R. J., 212 
Vaidya, R. M., 223, 234,250 
Vaidya, S. V., 198 



Vaidya, V, H., 210 
Vaigankar, V. V., 237 
Vajifdar, M. H., 208 
Vakh^rkar, B. B., 110, 180 
Vakil, C. J., 227 
Vakil, M. J., 211, 235, 250 
Vakil, R. B., 119, 223, 234 
Vakil, S. J., 244 
Vakilna, P. R., 246 
Valles, D. B., 205 
Vania, H. B., 217, 234, 249 
Vanvale, S. R., 242 

t Varjivandas M., 163 
Varlikar, M. J., 220 
Varlikar, M. R., 227, 237 
Vaslekar, N. K, 108, 208 

t Vasudev, P., 156 
Vasvani,T. U., 193 
Vaze, D. J., 262 
Ved, D. D., 117, 212 
Velkar, A. V, 257 

+ Venayakrao V. , 154 
Viegas, A. G., 255 
Vijayakar, N. H., 237 
Vijayakar, N. M., 234 
Vijayakar, Y. K., 237 
Vikaji, F. R., 113, 160, 182, 

202 
Vikaji, K. R., 160, 204, 253 
Vimavala, M. K., 211 
Vinayekrao, J. S., 170 
Vohora, K. L., 117 
Vyas, D. V, 198 
Vyas. H. H., 217 
Vy4s, S. R., 207 

W. 

Waddington, Major-Genl. C, 

39, 167 
Waddington, Lieut. -Col. T., 

152, 154 
Wadia, B. F., 249 
Wadia, B. 8., 237 
Wadid, D. N., 175 
Wadia, D. R., 219, 254 



t Sui'aame not known, 



XXXIV 



INDEX. 



Wadia, F. E., 217, 235, 248 
Wadia, H. D., 228 
Wadia, H. P., 215, 246, 250 
Wadia, J. D., 160 
Wadia, J. P., 219, 254 
Wadia, M. N., 193 
Wagle, BalM., 156,174,202 
Wagle, Bh. M., 190 
Wagle, H. B., 211 
Wagle, M. G., 214 
Wagle, S. S., 198, 248 
Wallace, The Rev. J., 172 
Ward, A. V., 171 
Ward, T. W., 166, 172 
Warden, The Hon. A. B.. 

m 

Waters, G., 163 

Watson, The Rev. G. A. F., 

171 
Watson, Major J. W., 161 
Weatherhead, The Rev. T. 

K., 156 
Webb, W. C., 247 
Webbe, G. T., 255 
Wedderburn, W., 154 
Wells, D. B., 244, 250 
West, Capt.E. W., 156 
West, The Hon. R., 153, 

163, 165 
Westropp, The Hon. Sir M. 

R,, 152, 153 
White, Lieut. -Col. J. H., 

159 
White, J. S., 165, 170 
Wliittel, C., 220 



Whitworth, G. C, 163 
Wilkins, Col. H. St. Clair, 

154, 166, 259 
Williams, A. H., 209 
Williamson, A. J., 222, 261 
W T illy, The Rev. J. A., 157, 

246 
Wilmot, E., 173 
Wilson, The Rev. Dr. J., 39, 

166, 167, 243 
Wilson, The Rev. C. T., 172 
Wingate, A., 163 
Wodehouse, Sir P. E., 164 
Wodehouse, Captain C, 163 
Wood, W. M., 162 
Wordsworth, W., 152, 163, 

165, 232, 239 
Wright, A., 166, 172 
Wyllie, F. R. S., 172 
Wyllie, J. W. 6., 169 



y. 

Yajnik, J. II, 160 
Yardley, The Hon. Sir W. ? 

38, 164, 167 
Young, D., 172 



Zalkikar, B. B., 232 
Zuzarte, A. A., 217 24$ 



ABBREVIATIONS. 



A; Ahmed abad High School. 

Ah. Ahmednagar High School. 

Ah, M. Ahmedabad Mission High School. 

Ak- Akola High School. 

AL P. Alfred and Parsi High School, Bombay. 

B. Belgaum Sirdars' High School. 

B- M. Belgaum Mission School. 

Bh. Bhavnagar High School. 

Bis. Bishop's High School, Poona. • 

B. P. Bombay Private English School. 

B. Pro. Bombay Proprietary School. 

Br. Broach High School. 

B. S. Baroda High School. 

Ch. Chandanvadi High School, Bombay, 

D. Deccan College. 

Dh. Dharvad High School. 

Dhu. Dhulia High School. 

B. Elphinstone College. 

E. S- Elphinstone High School. 

F.Gr.A Free General Assembly's Institution, Bombay. 

P. Fort High School. 

G- A. General Assembly's Institution, Bombay. 

L. Government Law School. 

G. Grant Medical College. 

H. Haidarabad High School. 

Kat. Kattiawar High School, Bajkote. 

N. Nariad High School. 

P. E. Poona Civil Engineering College. 

P-M. Poona Free Church Mission Institution. 

P. Poona High School. 

P. T. Private Tuition. 

R. Bajarani High School, Kolhapur. 

Rat. Eatnagiri High School. 

R.M. Bobert Money Institution, Bombay. 

S. Satara High School. 

Sc. Scottish High School, Byculla. 

Ba. Baba Gokhale School, Poona. 

J. John Connon Scottish High School, 



ABBREVIATIONS. 

Pa- Panchgany High School. 

P. N. Poona Native Institution. 

N. J. Narayan Jagonnath High School, Karachi. 

In. Indore English School. 

Sir C. Sir Cowasji Jehanghier Navsari Madresa. 

N-S. Nasik High School 

Sa- Sangli English School. 

Sir J. Sir Jamsetjee Jejeebhoy's Parsi Benevolent Institu- 
tion. 

Su. Surat High School. 

St. M. St. Mary's Institution, 

St X. St. Xavier's College. 



APRIL 1, 1878, to MARCH 31, 1879. 



» l?3— a 



BOMBAY UNIVERSITY ALMANAC. 



APRIL, 1878. 


u v Meeting of the Board of Accounts 


■6 


Wed. 


at 4$ p.m. 


4 


Thurs. 




5 


Fri, 




6 


Sat. 




7 


SttK- 




8 


Mon. 


Examination for F.A. begins. 


9 


Tues. 




10 


Wed. 




11 


Thurs. 




12 


Fri. 




13 


Sat. 




14 
15 
16 


Moa 
Tues. 


&M ®tm m &rta & €Ml fatfmti&t otto. 


17 


Wed. 




18 


Thurs. 




19 


Fri. 




20 


Sat. 




21 


Am* 




22 


Mon. 




23 


Tues. 




24 


Wed. 




25 


Thurs. 


F.A. Results declared. 


26 


Fri. 




27 
28 


Sat. 






29 


Mon. 




30 Tues. 

1 c 


txxat ®zxm in IfcMjto #&*. 



BOMBAY UNIVERSITY ALMANAC. 



MAY, 1878. 


1 


Wed. 




2 


Thurs. 




3 


Fri. 




4 
5 


Sat.. 






6 


Mon. 




7 


Tues.. 




8 


Wed. 




9 


Thurs. 




10 


Fri. 




11 
12 


Sat. 




£mj. 




13 


Mon. 




14 


Tues. 




15 


Wed. 




16 


Thurs. 




17 


Fri. 




18 


Sat. 




19 


fmr. 




20 


Mon. 




21 


Tues. 




22 


Wed. 




23 


Thurs. 




24 


Fri. 


tejea WirtMix hatn t 1819. 


25 
26 


Sat. 




£u». 




27 


Mon. 




28 


Tues. 




29 


Wed. 




30 


Thurs. 




31 


Fri. 


1 



BOMBAY UNIVERSITY ALMANAC. 



JUNE, 1878. 


1 


Sat. 




2 
3 


Mon. 


1 


4 


Tues. 




5 


Wed. 




6 


Thurs. 




7 
,8 


Fri. 

Sat. 


[Cursetjee Prize. 
Last day of sending in Poems for the Homejee 


9 
10 
11 


Mon. 

Tues. 


[IttflOW. 


12 


Wed. 




13 


Thurs. 




14 


Fri. 




15 

16 
17 


Sat. 
Mon. 


$mtib few m ISkMow* Jsttftm. 




18 


Tues. 




19 
20 


Wed. 
Thurs. 


®\mn Wxrtatix'n &mmm t 1837. 


21 


Fri. 




22 

23 

24 


Sat. 
Mon. 






25 


Tues. 




26 


Wed. 




27 


Thurs. 




28 
29 


Fri. 
Sat. 


Monthly Meeting of the Syndicate at 5| p.m. 


30 


$tm. 





BOMBAY UMVtUSl'lT ALMA.NAt, 



JULY, 1878. 


1 


Mon. 




2 


Tues. 


Quarterly Meeting of the Board of Accounts 


3 


Wed. 


at 4£ p.m. 


4 


Thurs. 




5 


Pri. 




6 


Sat. 




7 


Sfutt, 




8 


Mon. 




9 


Tues. 




10 


Wed, 




11 


Thurs. 




12 


Fri. 




13 


Sat. 




14 


JfK*. 




15 


Mon. 




16 


Tues. 


Last day for application for F.M. Examination. 


17 


Wed. 




18 


Thurs. 


University of Bombay incorporated, 1857, 


19 


Fri. 




20 


Sat. 




21 






22 

23 
24 


Mon. 
Tues. 
Wed. 


Last day of sending in Essays for the Karsandas 
Mulji Prize and the Dossabhoy Hormusjee 
Cama Prize, and for notifying new subjects. 


25 


Thurs. 




26 


Fri. 


Monthly Meeting of the Syndicate at b\ p.m. 


27 


Sat. 




28 


ftnr. 




29 


Mon. 




30 


Tues. i 


31 | Wed. | 



b 713— a* 



BOMBAY UNIVIRSITT ALMANAC. 



AUGUST, 1878. 


1 


Thurs. 




2 


Fri. 




3 


Sat. 




4 


Statu 




5 


Mon. 




6 


Tues. 




7 


Wed. 


~ 


8 


Thurs. 




9 


Fri. 




10 
11 


Sat. 




»t». 




12 


Mon. 




13 


Tues. 




14 


Wed. 




15 


Thurs, 




16 


Fri. 




17 


Sat. 




18 


8m> 




19 


Mon. 


Last day of Application for M. A. Examination. 


20 


Tues. 




21 


Wed. 




22 


Thurs. 




23 


Fri. 




24 
25 


Sat. 




9mu 




26 


Mon. 


/ 


27 


Tues. 




28 


Wed. 




29 


Thurs. 




30 


Fri. 


Monthly Meeting of the Syndicate at 5| p.m. 


31 


Sat. 





BOMBAY UNIVERSITY ALMANAC. 



SEPTEMBER, 1878. 


1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 

8 
9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 

15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 


Mon. 
Tues. 
Wed. 
Thurs. 
Fri, 
Sat. 


[ from Examiners. 
Question Papers for F. M. Examination due 

University of Madras incorporated, 1857. 


Mm. 

Mon. 
Tues. 
Wed. 
Thurs. 
Fri. 
Sat. 


£*jC0itf> Wttm m fflsMfiat jen&s. 


Mon. 
Tues. 
Wed. 

Thurs. 
Fri. 

Sat. 


Stttarib ®tm in &rt* awir ©ifril &ugiuwkjj 
«*&*• Examination for F.M. begins. 

Last day of Application for Matriculation, 
LL.B., and LL.B. Honours Examinations, and 
for the Rao Sir Pragmalji Scholarships. 


22 
23 
24 

25 
26 

27 
28 


2mt. 

Mon. 
Tues. 
Wed. 

Thurs. 
Fri. 
Sat. 


Last day of sending in Essays for the Manockjee Limjce Gold 
Medal, and for notifying new subject. Karsandas Mulji 
Prize and Dossabhoy Hormasji Cama Prize awarded. 

Last day of Application for B. A., F.C.E., L.C.E. 
and M.C.E. Examinations. 

Monthly Meeting of the Syndicate at 5\ p.m. 


29 
30 


£UUL 

Mon. 


F. M. Results declared. Last day of awarding 
the Homejee Cuisetjee Prize. 



BOMBAY UMVJDRSITV ALMANAC. 





OCTOBER, 1878. 


1 


Tues. 


Quarterly Meeting of the Board of Accounts. 


2 


Wed. 


Last day of Application for L.M. & S. and 


3 


Thurs. 


M.D. Examinations. 


4 


Fri. 




5 
6 


Sat. 




%mx. 




7 


Mon. 




8 


Tues. 




9 


Wed. 


i 


10 


Thurs. 




11 


Fri. 




12 
13 


Sat. 




#sm« 




14 


Mon. 




15 


Tues. 


x 


16 


Wed. 




17 


Thurs. 




18 


Fri. 




19 


Sat. 




20 


£»»• 




21 


Mon. 




22 


Tues. 




23 


Wed. 




24 


Thurs. 




25 


Fri. 


Monthly Meeting of the Syndicate at 5£ p.m. 


26 


Sat. 




27 


£»». 




28 


Mon. 




29 


Tues. 




30 


Wed. 




31 


Thurs. I 



BOMBAY UNIVERSITY ALMANAC. 



NOVEMBER, 1878. 


1 

2 


Fri. 

Sat. 


.first $sm m IJfcMrijw htQlm. 


3 
4 
5 

6 

7' 

8 

9 


Mon. 
Tues. 
Wed. 

Thurs, 
Fri. 

Sat. 


Question Papers for M. A. , LL.B., LL.B. Honours, 
and Matriculation Examinations due from Exa- 
miners, 


10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 

17 

18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 

24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 


Mon. 
Tues. 
Wed. 
Thurs. 
Fri. 
Sat. 


Question Papers for B.A., F.C.E., L.C.E., and 
M.C.E. Examinations due from Examiners. 


Mon. 
Tues. 
Wed. 
Thurs. 
Fri. 
Sat. 


gxnt ftrnxx in &rt« anfr ©M fagjixttmnQ 
frfflina. Examinations for M.A.,LL.B., 
LL. B. Honours, and Matriculation begin. 

Question Papers for L.M. & S. andM.D. Exami- 
nations due from Examiners. 


Mon. 
Tues. 
Wed. 
Thurs. 
Fri. 
Sat. 


Examinations for B.A., P.C.E., L.C.E., and 
M.C.E. begin; Manockjee Limjee Gold Medal 
awarded. 

LL.B. Honours Results declared. 

Monthly Meeting of the Syndicate at 5| p.m.— 

M.A. Results declared. 



10 



BOMBAY UNIVERSITY ALMANAC. 



Ill- 





DECEMBER, 1878. 


1 


Sta. 




2 
3 
4 
5 

6 

7 
8 


j Mon. 
Tues. 
Wed. 
Thurs 
Fri. 
Sat. 


Examinations for L.M. and M.D. begin; 
LL.B. Results declared. Last day of announcing 
the Jam Shri Vibhaji and Hebbert and LaTouche 
Scholarships, when vacant . 




9 


Mon. 


M.C.E. Results declared. 


10 


Tues. 




11 


Wed. 




12 


Thurs. 


B.A., F.C.E., and L.C.E. Results declared. 


13 


Fri. 


♦ 


14 


Sat. 




15 


£«ff. 




16 
17 


Mon. 
Tues. 


Matriculation, L.M., &. S. and M.D. Results de- 
clared. 


18 


Wed. 




19 


Thurs. 




20 
21 

22 


Fri. 

Sat. 


SMamal Ufwlfarg of ffre gltmtto. 


£tttt. 




23 


Mon. 


- 


24 
25 


Tues. 
Wed. 


Cfcratmaa §3j. 


26 


Thurs. 




27 
28 

29 


Fri. 
Sat. 


Monthly Meeting of the Syndicate at 5| p. m. 




30 


Mon 




31 


Tues. 

1 


Last day of application for the Jam Shri Vibhaji 
and Hebbert and LaTouche Scholarships. 



BOMBAY UNIVERSITY ALMANAC. 

* ' 



11 



JANUARY, 1879. 


1 
2 
3 
4 


Wed. 
Thurs. 
Fri. 
Sat. 




5 
6 
7 
8 
9 

10 
11 


' Mon. 

TTues. 

Wed. 
Thurs. 

Fri. 

Sat. 


Quarterly Meeting of the Board of Accounts 

at 4£ p.m. 
Last day of appli/cation for Degrees. 


12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 


Tues. 
Wed. 
Thurs. 
Fri. 
Sat. 




19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 


Mon. 
Tues. 
Wed. 
Thurs. 
Fri. 
Sat. 


University op Calcutta incorporated, 1857. 


26 
27 
28 
29 
30 


Mon. 

Tues. 

Wed. 

Thurs. 

Fri. 


Last day for notifying Subject for the Homejee 

Cursetjee Prize. 
Monthly Meeting of the Syndicate at 5J P.M. Jam Shri Vibhaji 

and Hebbert and LaTouche Scholarships adjudged. 



12 



BOMBAY UNIVERSITY ALMANAC. 



FEBBUAHY, 1879, 


1 


Sat. 




3 


Sftttt* 

Mon. 




4 


Tues. 




5 


Wed. 




6 


Thurs. 




7 Fri. 




8 


Sat. 




9 

10 


JSttflf. 
Mon. 




11 


Tues. 




12 


Wed. 




13 


Thurs. 




; u 


Fri. 


! 


15 


Sat. 


Last day of application for F. A. Examination. 


16 
17 


Mon. 




18 


Tues. 




19 


Wed. 




20 


Thurs. 




21 


Fri, 




22 

23 

|24 


Sat. 




Sfttfl. 
Mon. 


\ 


25 


Tues, 




26 


Wed. 




27 


Thurs. 




28 


Fri. 


Monthly Meeting of the Syndicate at 5| P.M. 



BOMBAY UNIVERSITY ALMANAC. 



13 



MARCH, 1879. 


l 


Sat. 




2 


9m* 




3 


Mon. 




4 


Tues. 




5 


Wed. 




6 


Thurs. 




7 


Fri. 




8 
9 


Sat. 




£m. 




10 


Mon. 




11 


Tues. 




12 


Wed. 




13 


Thurs. 




14 


Fri. 




15 


Sat. 




16 


JfttJU 




17 


Mon. 




18 


Tues. 




19 


Wed. 




20 


Thurs, 




21 


Fri. 




22 
*23 


Sat, 






24 


Mon. 




25 


Tues. 


Question Papers for F.A. Examination due from 


26 


Wed. 


Examiners. 


27 


Thurs. 




28 


Fri. 


Monthly Meeting of the Syndicate at 5J p.m. 


29 
30 


Sat. 




$nn* 




31 


Mon. 


.- , » — __ 



b 713—6 



u 



I 

00 






vt 



o 



-2- *-»• 
■■■ ♦ *-* 






-2 2 






« S3 » 






w 



2a§ 
a © © 



w 



J8 43 

5 ft 
o<5 



P r)r^rd-a_ (r d r cj P £H r r3 r CH r n r XH 



^o> ► 

»^o o 

WK000iO(M0i0505(X)01(M 

c<i d cq oi <ro r-i t-it-h 



o 



0,^-0 



o 



P r Hr 3 r 3 r d r ri--a r q-q; r d r a r 2 r o 

OOCOOCCOOOOOiOiOiOiOClCQ 
HHHHhOJ(MN(M 



2 O- ^ 

^ca£ 

-+-S ^i-(J^3^,-tJ-^-43-M-W P P 
JOWTfl^l^^lrHHHr-KMOJ 
<M ^ H H H CJ (M 






C5 pi P a 2 " £ ! 

rH r-i rH T—t rH (M Ol (M (M 



!§M 



U 
P 

o 

p 

Q 

w 

WOQ 



p 

o 



do 



CO 



fe^^^H?^«feH3^l4S 



III. 



LIST OF BOOKS FOR A CYCLE OF FIVE 
YEARS 



I.— ENGLISH. 
FOR THE FIRST EXAMINATION IN ARTS. 

1876 

1. Johnson — Lives of Cowley and Addison. 

2. Scott — Quentin Durward. 

3. Milton — Paradise Lost : Books I and IL 

4. Cowper— The Task : Books I, II, and III. * 

1877- 

1. Johnson — Lives of Swift, Pope, Thompson, and Gray. 

2. Austen — Pride and Prejudice. 

3. Milton — Paradise Lost : Books III and IV. 

4. Tennyson — Idylls of the King : Enid. 

1878- 

1. Johnson — Life of Dry den. 

2. Austen — Mansfield Park. 

3. Milton — Paradise Lost : Books V and VI. 

4. Thomson — Seasons : Spring and Summer. 

1879. 

1. Johnson — Lives of Milton and Addison. 

2. Austen — Emma. 

Milton — Paradise Lost : Books VII and VIII. 
4. Cqwper — Table Talk : Conversation and Retirement. 



16 NOTIFICATIONS. 



1880- 

1. Johnson — Lives of Swift and Pope. 

2. Austen — Pride and Prejudice. 

3. Milton — Paradise Lost : Books IX and X. 

4. Thomson — Seasons : Autumn and Winter. 



FOR THE B.A. EXAMINATION. 
1876- 

1. Macaulay — Essays : Milton and Sir James Mackintosh. 

2. Addison — Papers in the " Spectator," 1 — 99. 

3. Shakespeare — Antony and Cleopatra. 

4. Wordsworth — The Prelude. 

1877- 

1 . Bacon — The Advancement of Learning. 

2. Burke — Reflections on the French Revolution. 

3. Shakespeare — Othello. 

4. Spenser — The Faerie Queene : Book I. 

1878. 

1. Bacon — Essays, and Table of the Colours of Good and 

Evil. 

2. Addison — Papers in the " Spectator," 101 — 219. 

3. Shakespeare — King Lear. 

4. Tennyson — The Princess. 

1879. 

1. Bacon — The Advancement of Learning. 

2. Burke — Letters on a Regicide Peace. 
8. Shakespeare — Macbeth. 

4. Byron — Childe Harold. 



LIST OP BOOKS FOR A CYCLE OP FIVE YEARS. 17 



1880- 

1. Mac aula y — Introductory Chapter of the History of 

England. 

2. Addison — Papers in the " Spectator," 221 — 291. 

3. Shakespeare — Hamlet. 

4. Wordsworth — The Prelude. 



FOR THE M.A. EXAMINATION. 
1876. 

1. Burke — Speeches. 

2. Locke — On Toleration. 

3. Chaucer — Selections from the Canterbury Tales : — The 

Prologue. The Knighte's Tale. Prologues and Tales 
of the Man of La we ; The Clerke ; The Squyer ; 
The Frankeleyn ; The Second Nonne ; The Chanones 
Yemanne ; The Doctoure ; The Pardonere ; The 
Prioresse ; Sire Thopas ; Melibeus : The Monk ; The 
Nonnes Preeste ; and The Persoune. 
I. Shakespeare — Henry IV, Parts I and II ; Henry V. 

1877. 

1. Milton — Areopagitica. . 

2. Coleridge — The Friend. 

3. Chaucer — Selections from the Canterbury Tales (same 

as for 1876). 

4. Shakespeare — King John ; Richard II; and Richard III. 

1878. 

1. Burke — Speeches. 

1 jOCKE — On Toleration. 

3. Chaucer — Selections from the Canterbury Tales (same 

as for 1876). 

4. Shakespeare — Julius Caesar ; Coriolanus ; Troilus and 

Cressida. 

B 713—6* 



■■■ 



18 NOTIFICATIONS. 

1879. 

1. Milton — Areopagitica. 

2. Coleridge — The Friend. 

3. Chaucer — Selections from the Canterbury Tales (same 

as for 1876). 

4. Shakespeare — The Winter's Tale ; Twelfth Night ; As 

You Like It ; Midsummer Night's Dream. 

1880. 

1 . Burke — Speeches. 

2. Locke — On Toleration. 

3. Chaucer — Selections from the Canterbury Tales (same 

as for 1876). 

4. Shakespeare — The Merchant of Venice; The Taming 

of the Shrew ; Measure for Measure ; Much Ado 
about Nothing. 



IL— SANSKRIT. 

N.B.— The Sanskrit renderings of the Prakrit passages may 
be examined in, but not the Prakrit itself. 

FOR THE FIRST EXAMINATION IN ARTS. 
1876- 

1. Kalidasa — S'akuntala, Acts I — IV. 

2. Kalidasa — Raghuvans'a, Cantos I — V. 

3. Valmiki — Ramayana Balakanda. Chapters I — XXXV. 

(Schlegel's Edition, reprinted by Dr. Haug.) 

4. Annambhatta — Tarkasangraha. 

1877. 

1. Kalidasa— S'akuntala, Acts V — VII. 

2. Kalidasa — Raghuvans'a, Cantos VI — X. 

3. Vishnu Sarman — Panchatantra, I. 

4. Annambhatta — Tarkasangraha. 



LIST OF BOOKS FOR A CYCLE OF FIVE TEARS. 19 



1878- 

1. Kalidasa — Vikramorvas'i. 

2. Bhartrihari — Niti and Vairgaya. 

3. Valmiki— Bamayana, Balakanda, Chapters XXXVI. — 

LXXVII. (Schlegel's Edition, reprinted by Dr. 
Haug.) 

4. Annambhatta — Tarkasangraha. 

1879- 

1 . Kalidasa — Malavikagnimitra. 

2. Kalidasa — Kumara-sambhava, Cantos I- 

3. Vishnu "Sarman — Panchatantra II and 111. 

4. Annambhatta — Tarkasangraha. 

1880- 

1. S'ri-Harsha — Ratnavali. 

2. Kalidasa — Raghuvans'a, Cantos XI— XV. 

3. Valmiki — Ramayana, Balakanda, Chapters I — XXXY. 

(Schlegel's Edition, reprinted by Dr. Hang.) 

4. Annambhatta — Tarkasangraha. 



FOR XHE B.A-. EXAMINATION 
1876. 

1. Bhavabhuti — Malati-Madhava. 

2. Bharavi — Kiratarjnniya, Cantos I — IV. 

3. Dandin — Das'akumaracharitra, first half. 

4. Dandin — Kavyadars'a Parichchheda land II (the text 

only of the Edition in the Bibl. Ind.) 

1877- 

1. Vis'akhadatta — Mudrarakshasa. 

2. Bharavi — Kiratarjuniya, Cantos V — VIII. 

3. Dandin — Das'akumaracharitra, second half. 

4. Mammata — Kavyaprakas'a, Ullasa I, VIII, and X. 



20 



1878 

1. Bhavabhuti — Uttan* 

2. Magna Uavadha, I fV. 

3. Banabhatta — Kadambarf. (From the b 

return of Chandrapida to his fathei 
liing hie education.) 

4. Dandin — Kavyadars'a, Parichchheda I and f 

only of the Edition in the Bibl. I 

1879- 

1. Bhavabhuti — Malati-Madhava. 

2. Magna— Sis'upalavadha, Cantos V— V III 

I ianabhatta — fcadambarl. (From Chandraj, 
to his father's palace to his setting out for Hen 
along with ManasVetit) 
4. Mammata — Kavyaprakas'a, Ullasa I, VIII, and X. 

1880 

1 . Bhavabhuti — Uttararamacharita. 

2. Magna— Sis upalavadha, Cantos IX— X 1 1 

3. Banabhatta and his Son — Kadambari. 

pida's journey to Hemakuta, to his return 
after seeing his father at Ujjayi 

4. Dandin — Kavyadars'a, Parichchheda I a 

only of the Edition in the Bibl I 



FOE THE M.A. EXAMINA I f< 

(a.) — Bigveda Hymns. 
Mandala I.— Hymns 1, 6, 19, 32, 37, 38, 

II. „ 12. 

III. „ 30, 33. 

IV. „ 26,27. 
VI. „ 51 

VII. „ 76, 86, 89. 

Vni. „ 3, 25, 20 

X 10,14,15,16,39,81 

(h.j Yaska's Nirukta- 



CLE OF FIVE YEARS. 

i the following four 
ra. 
Tarkasangraha with Dfpika. 

;kt avail. 
(<•.) — Gautamasutra with Yatsvavan's Hhash va . 
2. Dharma 

{<i.)— M it akshani 

Lvahara-M.avuklia. 
bramitrodaya Vyavaharakanadi 
ra. 
(a.) — Siddh&nta Kanmudf and Pantanjalte 

dhik&ra of the Mahabhasln 
(b). — Paribhashenns'ekhara. 

•i. Vcdanta-snsira. 

•Vedantas&Ta. 
(Ik) — Vedantaparibhasha. 
(c.) — S'ankaraoharya's S'arirabhai I 



III.— GREEK. 
FOR THE FIRST EXAMINATION IN ARTS. 

1. Xrnophon -Anabasis, L 

uon Memorabilia, T. 

:'. Homkk Qiad, 1. 
i uii'iDES — Hecuba. 

FOR THE B.A. EXAMINATION. 

J. Eerodoti 8 I, II. 

2. Demosthenes — De Corona. 
•''». Aristophanes Etanae. 

4. Sophocles (Edipns TyrannnB. 

FOR THE M.A. EXAMINATION, 

1. Thuctdidbs — I — IV. 

2. Plato De Repnblioa. 
EHndar Olympic Od 

4. Mi memnon. 



22 NOTIFICATIONS. 

IV.— LATIN. 

FOR THE FIRST EXAMINATION IN ARTS 

1876. 

1. Cesar — De Bello Gallico, I. 

2. Cicero — Pro Sex. Roscio Amerino. 

3. Virgil— ^Eneid, VI. 

4. Ovid— Fasti* I. 

1877. 

1. Cesar — De Bello Gallico, II. 

2. Cicero — Oratio Philippica, II, 

3. Virgil — iEneid, I. 

4. Ovid— Fasti, II. 

1878- 

1. Caesar — De Bello Gallico, III. 

2. Cicero — Pro Milone. 

3. Virgil iEneid, II. 

4. Ovid— Fasti, III. 

1879. 

1. CAESAR — De Bello Gallico, IV. 

2. Cicero — Orationes in Catilinam. 

3. Virgil— Mneid, III. 

4. Ovid— Fasti, IV. 



1880. 

1. Cesar — De Bello Gallico, V. 

2. Cicero — Pro Lege Manilia, with Pro Archia. 

3. Virgil— ^neid, IV. 

4. Ovid— Fasti V. 



LIST OP BOOKS FOR A CYCLE OF FIVE YEARS. 23 

FOR THE B.A. EXAMINATION, 

1876- 

J. Livy— XXI. 

2. Cicero — De Natura Deorum. 

3. Horace — Odes, 1 ; Satires, I. 

4. Virgil — Eclogues. 

1877. 

1. Livy— XXII. 

2. Cicero — De Officiis. 

3. Horace— Odes, II ; Satires, II. 

4. Virgil — Georgics, I, II. 

1878. 

1. Livy— XXIII. 

2. Cicero — De Natura Deorum. 

3. Horace — Odes, III ; Epistles, I. 

4. Virgil — Georgics, III, IV. 

1879. 

1. Livy— XXIV. 

2. Cicero — De Officiis. 

3. Horace — Odes, IV, Carmen Seculare, Epodes, Ars 

Poetica. 

4. Virgil — Georgics, I, II. 

1880 

1. Livy— XXV. 

2- Cicero — De Natura Deorum. 

3- Horace — Odes, I ; Satires, I. 

4- Virgil— Georgics, III, IV. 

FOR THE M.A. EXAMINATION, 
1876. 

1. Tacitus — Historiae. 

I .icero— Epistolas ad Atticum, I— III. 



24 NOTIFICATIONS. 

3. Plautus — Captivi. 

4. Juvenal— Satires, I, III, IV, V, VII. 

1877. 

1. Tacitus — Annales, I — VI. 

2. Cicero — Epistolse ad Atticum, IV — VI 

3. Terence — Heautontimorumenos. 

4. Lucretius — I — III. 

1878- 

1. Tacitus— Annales, XI— XVI. 

2. Cicero-— Epistolas ad Atticum, VII — IX. 

3. Plautus — Miles Gloriosus. 

4. Juvenal— Satires, VIII, X, XII, XIII, XIV. 

1879. 

1 . Tacitus — Annales , I — VI. 

2. Cicero — Epistolae ad Atticum, X — XII, 

3. Terence — Andria. 

4. Lucretius — IV — VI. 

1880. 

1; Tacitus— Annales, XI— XVI. 

2. Cicero— Epistolae ad Atticum, XIII —XVI. 

3. Plautus — Trinummus. 

4. Juvenal— Satires, I, III, IV, V, VII. 



V.— HEBREW. 
FOR THE FIRST EXAMINATION IN ARTS. 

1876. 

1. Genesis — I — X. 

2. Esther. 

3. Psalms— I— XXX. 

4. Job-1— V. 



LIST OF BOOKS FOR A CYCLE OF FIYE YEARS. 25 

1877- 

1. GenesIs— XI— XX. 

2. Exodus— I— X. 

3. Psalms— XXXI— LX. 

4. Job— XI— XX. 

• 

1878 

1. GENEsis— XXI— XXX. 

2. Exodus— XI— XX. 

3. Psalms— LXI— LXXIL 

4. Job— XXI— XXX. 

1879. 

1. GENEsis— XXXI— XL. 

% Exodus— XXI— XXX. 

3. Psalms— LXXIII—XC. 

4. Job— XXXI- XLII. 

1880- 

1. GENEsis — XL — L. 

2. Joshua — I — X. 

3. Proverbs— I— XII. 

4. Psalms— XCI—CXX, 



FOR THE B.A. EXAMINATION. 
187a 

1. CrENESis. 

2. Ruth. 

3. Isaiah— I— XXXIX. 

4. Ezra— With the Chaldee 



1877. 

1. Exodus. 

2. Nehemiah. 

3. Jeremiah — I —XXV. 

4. Hosba and Joel, 

b 713— c 



NOTIFICATIONS, 



1878. 

1. Deuteronomy — I — XVII. 

2. Judges — I — XXI. 

3. Jeremiah— XXVI— L. 
4 Amos and Obadiah, . 

1879* 

1. Deuteronomy— XVIII— XXXIV. 

2. Joshua. 

3. Lamentations op Jeremiah. 
4 Ezekiel— I— XV. 



1880 



1. I. Samuel. 

2. Nehemiah. 

3. Ezekiel— XVI— XXIV. 
4 Zechariah. 



FOR THE M.A. EXAMINATION, 

1876. 1878. 

1. Proverbs. 

2. Daniel — Including the Chaldee passages, 

3. Isaiah— XL— LXVI. 

4. Song or Solomon. 

1877. 1879, 

1. Ecclesiastes. 

2, I. Kings. 

3 Nahum and Habakkur. 
4, Ezekiel— XXV-XLVIIL 

1880. 

1. Job. 

2. I. Chronicles. 

3. 4 Minor Prophets (from Hosea to Malachi, inclusive). 



LIST OP BOOKS FOE A CYCLE OP FIVE YEARS. 27 

VL— ARABIC. 

FOR THE FIRST EXAMINATION IN ARTS. 

1876, 187a 

L Ralilah-wa-Demnak — Introduction {Abdullah Ben 

Almukaffa). 
SL Alp Lailah-wa-Lailat — Nights I — X 

3. Nafhat-ul-Yamin— Bab L 
4c: Moallaeat — Amrulkais. 

1877, 1879. 

L Kalilah-wa-Demnah — Chap. I., The Lion and the Bull. 

% Alf Lailah-wa-Lailat — Nights XI — XX 

3- Nafhat-ul-Yamin — Bab IL 

4, Moallakat — Tarafa. 

188& 

L Kalilah-wa-Demnah — Chapter II., The Ring Dove. 

± Alf Lailah-wa-Lailat— Nights XXI— XXX 

3. Nafhat-ul-Yamin — Bab III* 

4. Moallakat — Zohair, 



FOR THE B.A. EXAMINATION. 
187a 187a 

1. Makamat Hariri — Sessions I — X. 

2. Alf Lailah-wa-Lailat — Nights XXX — IL. 

3. Shahrastani — Pages 1—50, (London Edition, Ctireton). 

4. Moallakat— Lebid, 

1877,187a 

1. Makamat Hariri — Sessions XI — XX. 

2. Alf Lailah-wa-Lailat — Nights LI— LXX. 

3. Shahrastani— Pages 51—100. 

4. Moallakat— Antara. 



28 NOTIFICATIONS. 



188a 



1. Makamat Hariri — Sessions XXI— XXX. 

2. Alf Lailah-wa-Lailat— Nights LXXI— LXXX. 

3. Shahrastani— Pages 101—151, 

4. Moallakat— Amru* 



FOR THE M.A. EXAMINATION. 

1876. 1878. 

1. Koran— Surah I— V. 

2. Alf Lailah-wa-Lailat— Nights C — CC. 

3. Hamasah— Pages 1—151 (Freytag's Edition)* 

4. Moallakat — Amrulkais and Tarafa. 

1877. 1879. 

1 . Koran— Surah VI— Xn. 

2. Alf Lailah-wa-Lailat— Nights CCI— CCC. 

3. Hamasah— Pages 150—301 (Freytag's Edition). 

4. Moallakat— Zohair and Lobaid> 

1880. 

1. KORAN-Surah XIII-XX. 

2. Alf Lailah-wa-Lailat— Nights CCCI— CCCCL 

3. Hamasah— Pages 301—450 (Freytag's Edition), 

4. Moallakat— Antara and Amru. 



VIL— PERSIAN. 
FOR THE FIRST EXAMINATION IN ARTS. 
1876, 1878- 

1. Firhatjsi — Shahnamah, from the death of Eraj till the 

birth of Rustum. 

2. Sadi's G-ulistan — Book III. 

3. Diwan-i-Hafiz— Odes I to XXX. 

4. Anwar-i-Suhaili — I and IL 



LIST OF BOOKS FOR 1 CYCLE OF FIVE TEARS. 29 



1877, 1879- 

1.. Shahnamah — From the birth of Eustum till the letter 
of Kavus to the Shah of Mazanderan, 

2. Sadi's Gulistan — Book IV. 

3. Diwan-i-Hafiz— Odes XXXI— LX, 

4. Anwar-i-Suhaili — III and IV- 

1880. 

1. Shahnamah — From the letter of Kavus to the Shah of 

Mazanderan, till the fight of Rustum with Sohrab, 

2. Sadi's Gulistan — Book V. 

3. Diwan-i-Hafiz— Odes LXI— XC. 

4. Anwar-i-Suhaili— V and VI. 



FOR THE B.A. EXAMINATION. 
1876, 1878. 

1. Firdausi. — Shahnamah, from Sikandar's ascent of the 

Throne till his death. 

2. Anwar-i-Suhaili — VII and VIII. 

3. Diwan-i-Hafiz— Odes XCI— CXX, 

4. Ferishtah — Babar, 

1877, 1879. 

1. Firdausi— Shahnamah, from Sikandar's death till the 

arrival of the Painter Mani at the Court of Shapur. 

2. Anwar-i-Suhaili— IX and X. 

3.. Diwan-i-Hafiz-- Odes OXXI—CL. 
4. Ferishtah— Humayun, 

1880. 

1. Firdausi— Shahnamah, from the arrival of the Painter 

Mani at the Court of Shapur till the visit . of 
Behram to Shankal, the Padshah of Hind, 

2. Anwar-i-Suhaili— XI and XII. 

3. Diwan-i-Hafiz— Odes CLI— CLXXX. 

4. Ferishtah— Akbar. 

B 713— c* 



30 



NOTIFICATIONS. 



B.A. 

Group A. 
English 1. 



Sanskrit 



Greek 1. 

2. 
Latin 1. 

2. 
Hebrew 1. 

Arabic 1. 

2. 
Persian 1. 



3. 



EXAMINATION 1878. 
(Language and Literature.) 

Clarendon's (Edw., Earl of), Histoiy 
of the Rebellion and Civil Wars in 
England. 

Pope's Poetical Works, Globe Edition. 

Kavya Prakasa.' 

Mrichchakatika and Malati Madhava. 
The Candidates will be examined in 
the Prakrits of these plays. 

Herodotus, I — IV. 

Homer's Iliad, I— XII. 

Cicero, Select Letters. Watson's Edi- 
tion in the Clarendon Press Series. 

Horace. 

Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus. 

Psalms, 1—72. 

Fotoohat-ush-sham, by Wakedi. 

Divan-el-Motenebi. 

Rauzat Ussafa of Mirkhond, Vols. V 
and VI. 

Atashkhadah of Lutfaly, or Antho- 
logy of Persian Poetry : the section 
containing the ancient Poets : pp ; 
23-346 in the Bombay Edition. 



FOR THE M.A. EXAMINATION. 
1876, 1878. 

Firdausi— Shahnamah, from the visit of Behram to 

Shankal, the Padshah of Hind, till the birth of 

Nushzadp son of Nushirvan. 
Mirza Berkhordar Turkman— Shamshah-wa-Quhq u- 

hah, Bab I. 
Rauzat Ussafa — Sassanian Dynasty (last part of 

Vol. I.) 
Mesnavi of Jellal-Uddin Rumi— Daftar I. 

1877,1879. 

Firdausi— Shahnamah, from the birth of Nushzad, son 
of Nushirvan, till the sending of Berzuyah, the 
Physician, to India. 

Mirza Berkhordar Turkman— Shamshah-wa-Quh- 
quhah, Bab II. 

Rauzat Ussafa— Chengiz Khan (beginning of 5th vol.). 

Mesnavi of Jellal- Uddin Rumi— Daftar IL 



PERIODS OF HISTORY FOR A CYCLE OF FIVE YEARS. '; 31 

1880. 

1. Firdausi — Shahnamah, from the sending of the Physi- 

cian Berzuyah to India till the beginning of the 
reign of Khosru Parviz. 

2. Mirza Berkhordar Turkman— Shamshah-wa-Quh- 

quhah, Bab III. 

3. Rauzat Ussafa.— Amir Taymur (from the 6th vol.) 

4. Mesnavi of Jellal-Uddin Rumi.— Daftar TIT. 



PERIODS OF HISTORY FOR A CYCLE OF 
FIVE YEARS. 

FOR THE FIRST EXAMINATION IN ARTS. 
1876. 

1. Rome-To the death of Pyrrbus. 

2. The Crusades. • 

1877. fc 

1. Greece— To 431 b.c. 

2. England— From the Conquest to Edwai'd III. 

1878 

1, Rome— Punic Wars. 

2. Reign of Charles V. 

1879. 

1. Greece— Peloponnesian War. 

2. England— From Richard II. to the accession of Henry 

VII, 

1880. 

1. Rome— From the close of the Punic Wars to the death 

of Antony. 

2. Europe— 1789-1815. 



32 NOTIFICATIONS. 

FOR THE M.A. EXAMINATION. 

1876- 

Western Europe — From the capture of Rome by Alaric 
to the close of the Carlovingian dynasty. 

1877- 

Western Europe— From the advent of the Capetian dynasty 
in France to the close of the reign of Henry III. of 
England. 

1878 , 

Western Europe — From the accession of Edward I. to 1519. 

1879. 

Western Europe — From the accession of Charles V. of 
Germany to the Peace of Westphalia. 

1880. 

Western Europe — From the Peace of Westphalia to the 
Meeting of the States General at Versailles, 1789. 

BOOKS RECOMMENDED IN LAW. 

I.— FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF LAWS, 

1. The Institutes of Justinian, with Introduction and 

Notes, by Sandars ; omitting Bk. III. tit. I— XII. 

2. Broom's Commentaries on the Common Law. Bk. L, 

Chaps. 1—3 ; and Bks. II— III. 

3. Joshua Williams on Personal Property. 

4. Smith's Lectures on Contracts. 

5. Smith's Manual of Equity Jurisprudence* 

6. The Indian Penal Code. 

7. The Code of Civil Procedure. 

8. The Code of Criminal Procedure. 



LIST OF BOOKS FOR LAW EXAMINATIONS. 33 

9. Sir T. Strange's Hindu Law. 

10. Macnagh ten's Mahomadan Law. 

11. William on Real Property Law. 

12. Addison on Contracts. 

13. Addison on Torts. 

14. Smith on Mercantile Law. 

15. Best on Evidence. 



II.— ADDITIONAL FOR HONOURS. 

1. Austin's Lectures in Jurisprudence, Vol. 1. Outline 

of Course of Lectures. 

2. Bowyer's Commentaries on the Modern Civil Law. 

3. Maine's Ancient Laws. 

4. Story's Conflict of Laws. 

5. Wheaton's International Law. 

6. Story's Equity Jurisprudence. 

7. Lindley's Introduction to the Study of Jurisprudence, 

being a Translation of the General Fart of Thibaut's 
System des Pandekten B-echts. 

8. Von Savigny's Treatise on Possession, translated by 

Perry, Latest Edition. 

9. Do'mat's Civil Law, translated by Strahan, edited by 

Cushing, Latest Edition. 



34 NOTIFICATIONS, 



ACADEMIC COSTUME. 



1. Academic Costume will be worn at Convocations 
for conferring Degrees. 

2. Such of the Fellows of the University of Bombay 
as are Graduates of other Universities, or as are entitled 
to wear official* costume or uniform, may appear in the 
academic dress of their own Universities, or in such cos- 
tume or uniform, wearing in addition the Fellow's Scarf 
of the University of Bombay. 

3. Other Fellows will wear the Fellow's Gown and 
Scarf of the University of Bombay. The head-dress of 
the European Fellows is a College Cap. 

4. Gowns and Scarfs of the University will be given 
for use on the Degree Days to Fellows entitled to 
receive them, according to*the order in which their names 
occur in the list of subscriptions for the use of Costume. 

5. Messrs. Watson & Co., Robe-makers to the Uni- 
versity, will provide the Academic Costume of any Uni- 
versity which Fellows of the University of Bombay are 
entitled to wear. 

6. A Candidate for a Degree may have the use of a 
Gown and Hood for one occasion on payment of Rs. 10. 

7. A Fellow may have the use of a Gown or Scarf (if 
available) for one occasion on payment of Rs. 5. 

8. A Graduate may have the use of a Gown and 
Hood for one occasion on payment of Rs. 5, 

*ex. ffr. Judges, Bishops, Barristers, Military and Naval Officers, &o. 



ACADEMIC COSTUME, 35 



■ 

of the University of Bombay. 

Chancellor. 

Gown. — Black Damask silk with gold lace and tufts 

similar to the Chancellor of Oxford. 
Qa.?. — Black velvet Academic Cap with gold tassel. 

Vice-Chancellor. 

Gown. — The same, but with silver lace and tufts. 
Cap. — The same^ but with silver tassel, 

Registrar. 

Gown. — The same, but with black silk lace and tufts. 
Cap. — Black cloth Academic Cap with black silk tasseL 

Fellows. 

Gown. — Bishop's purp^ 6 silk with full sleeves, 
Scarp.— Of the same colour with gold fringed ends. 

Graduates. 

B.A, 

Gown, — Black silk or stuff, shape as Oxford B.A. 
Hood. — Black stuff, bound with garter blue silk, on© 
inch wide. 

M.A. 

Gown. — Black silk or stuff, as Oxford M.A, 
Hood. — Garter blue silk, lined the same. 



36 NOTIFICATIONS. 

LL.B. 

Gown. — Black silk or stuff, as M.A. 
Hood. — Black silk with scarlet cloth band inside, two 
inches wide, shape as Cambridge M,A. 

L.M. 

Gown. — Black silk or stuff, as B.A. 
Hood, — Black stuff, bound with crimson silk, one inch 
wide. 



M.D. 

Gown. — Undress, Black silk or stuff, as M.A, 

Full dress, crimson silk, garter blue facings, 
shape as M.A. 
Hood. — Crimson silk, lined garter blue. 

L.C.E. 

Gown. — Black silk or stuff, shape as B.A, 
Hood. — Black stuff, bound with brown silk, one inch 
wide. 



M.C.E. 

Gown. — Black silk or stuff, as M.A. 
Hood — Brown silk, lined garter blue. 



Cap — For all European Fellows or Graduates — 

Black cloth Academic Cap with black silk 
tassel. 



IV. 



%sin. 



ACT OF INCORPORATION. 

Act No. XXII. of 1857. 

PASSED BY THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL OP INDIA. 

(Received the Assent of the Governor General on the 
ISth July 1857.; 



An Act to establish and incorporate a University 
at Bombay, 

Whereas, for the better encouragement of Her 
, Majesty's subjects of all classes and 

denominations within the Presidency 
of Bombay and other parts of India in the pursuit of a 
regular and liberal course of education, it has been 
determined to establish a University at Bombay for the 
purpose of ascertaining, by means of examination, the 
persons who have acquired proficiency in different 
branches of Literature, Science, and Art ; and of reward- 
ing them by Academical Degrees as evidence of their 
.respective attainments, and marks of honour propor- 
I tioned thereunto ; and whereas, for effectuating the 
purposes aforesaid, it is expedient that such University 
b713— d 



38 ACTS, 

should be incorporated : It is enacted as follows : 
(that is to say) — 

1. The following persons, namely, The Right Honour- 
able John, Lord Elphinstone, Gov- 
Incorporation. ern()r of Bomba}r> 

The Honourable Sir William Yardley, Knight, Chief 
Justice of the Supreme Court of Judicature at Bombay, 

The Right Reverend John Harding, Doctor of Divinity, 
Bishop of Bombay, Ex officio. 

The Honourable Sir Henry Somerset, Lieutenant- 
General, Knight Companion of the Most Honourable 
Order of the Bath, Commander-in-Chief of the Forces 
in Bombay, Ex officio. 

The Honourable James Grant Ltjmsden, Member of 
the Council of Bombay, Ex officio. 

The Honourable Arthur Malet, Member of the Council 
of Bombay, Ex officio. 

Edward Irvine Howard, Esquire, Director of Public 
Instruction, Presidency Division, Ex officio. 

Robert Haines, Esquire, M.B., Acting Educational 
Inspector, Presidency Division, Ex officio. 

C. Morehead, Esquire, M.D., Principal of the Grant 
Medical College, Ex officio. 

John Harkness, Esquire, LL.D., Principal of the 

Elphinstone College, Ex officio. 
The Reverend James McDougall, Acting Principal of 

the Poona College, Ex officio. 

Philip William LeGett, Esquire, Member of the 
Legislative Council of India. 

The Honourable Sir Matthew Richard Sausse, Knight, 
Puisne Judge of the Supreme Court of Judicature at. 
Bombay. 

Sir Jamsetjee Jeejeebhoy, Knight. 

Metcalf Larken, Esquire, Judge of the Sudder Court in 
Bombay, and President of the late Board of Education, 



ACT OF INCORPORATION. SO 

Jugonnath Sunkersett, Esquire, Member of the lata 

Board of Education, 
Bomanjee Hormusjee, Esquire, Member of the late 

Board of Education, 

Bhao Dajee, Esquire, Graduate of the Grant Medical 
College, Member of the late Board of Education, 

Matthew Stovell, Esquire, Surgeon in the Bombay 
Army, Secretary to the late Board of Education, 

Claudius James Erskine, Esquire, Civil Service, late 
Director of Public Instruction, 

William Edward Frere, Esquire, Member of the Royal 
Asiatic Society, and President of the Bombay Branch 
of the Royal Asiatic Society, Judge of the Sudder 
Court in Bombay, 

Major-General Charles Waddington, Companion of the 
Most Honourable Order of the Bath, Chief Engineer 
of Public Works, 

The Reverend John Wilson, Doctor of Divinity, Fellow 
of the Royal Society, Honorary President of the 
Bombay Branch of the Royal Asiatic Society, 

The Reverend Philip Anderson, Master of Arts, Chap- 
lain on the Bombay Establishment, 

Henry Bartle Edward Frere, Esquire, Commissioner 
in Sind, 

Lieutenant Edward Frederick Tierney Fergusson, 
Indian Navy, 

Mahomed Yusoop Moorgay, Cazee of Bombay, 

James John Berkley, Esquire, Fellow of the Geogra- 
phical Society, M.I.C.E., President of the Bombay 
Mechanics' Institute, and Chief Resident Engineer of 
the Great Indian Peninsula Railway Company, 

Henry Lacon Anderson, Esquire, Secretary to Govern- 
ment, 

Being the first Chancellor, Vice-Chancellor, and 
Fellows of the said University, and all the persons who 



40 ACTS. 

may hereafter become or be appointed to be Chancellor, 
Vice -Chancellor, or Fellows as 'hereinafter mentioned, 
80 long as they shall continue to be such Chancellor, 
Vice- Chancellor, or Fellows, are hereby constituted and 
declared to be one Body Politic and Corporate by the 
name of the University of Bombay ; and such Body 
Politic shall, by snch name, have perpetual succession 
and shall have a common Seal, and by such name shall 
sue and be sued, implead and be impleaded, and answer 
and be answered unto, in every Court of Justice within 
the territories in the possession and under the Govern- 
ment of the East India Company. 

II. The said Body Corporate shall be able and capa- 

t. x i. ia n »A ble in law to take, purchase, and 
Power to hold and , .. w • 

disposeof property, hold any property, moveable or im- 
moveable, which may become vested 
in it for the purposes of the said University, by virtue 
of any purchase, grant, testamentary disposition, or 
otherwise ; and shall be able and capable in law to grant, 
demise, alien, or otherwise dispose of all or any of the 
property, moveable or immoveable, belonging to the said 
University ; and also to do all other matters incidental 
or appertaining to a Body Corporate. 

III. The said Body Corporate shall consist of one 

r< „„+-4.„+;,vr, ,vf Chancellor, one Vice -Chancellor, and 
Constitution of , ' . m . , » 

Body Corporate. such number of ex-officw and other 
Fellows as the Governor of Bombay 
in Council hath already appointed, or shall from time to 
time, by any order published in the Bombay Gazette, 
hereafter appoint : and the Chancellor, Vice- Chancellor, 
and Fellows for the time being shall 
benate. constitute the Senate of the said 

University. Provided, that if any person being Chan- 
cellor, Vice- Chancellor, or Fellow of the said University, 
Office vacated bv sna ^ l eave India without the intention 
leaving India. °^ returning thereto, his office shall 

thereupon become vacant. 



ACT OP INCORPORATION. 41 

IV. The Governor of Bombay for the time being 

shall be the Chancellor of the said 

Chancellor. University, and the first Chancellor 

shall be the Right Honourable John, Lord Elphinstone. 

V. The first Vice- Chancellor of the said University 
v . c shall be Sir William Yardlet, 

Knight. The office of Vice -Chancellor 
shall be held for two years only ; and the Vice- Chancellor 
hereinbefore nominated shall go out of office on the 
1st day of January 1859. Whenever a vacancy shall 
occur in the office of Vice-Chancellor of the said Uni- 
versity by death, resignation, departure from India, 
effluxion of time, or otherwise, the Governor of Bombay 
in Council shall, by notification in the Bonwhaij Gazette, 
nominate a fit and. proper person, being one of the Fel- 
lows of the said University, to be Vice-Chancellor in the 
room of the person occasioning such vacancy. Provided 
that, on any vacancy in the said office which shall occur 
by effluxion of time, the Governor of Bombay in Coun- 
cil shall have power to re-appoint the Vice- Chancellor 
hereinbefore nominated, or any future Vice-Chancellor 
to such office. 



VI. The Chief Justice of Her Majesty's Supreme 
„ .. Court of Judicature, the Bishop of 

Bombay, the Members of the Council 
of Bombay, the Director or Acting Director of Public 
Instruction, the Educational Inspector o$ Acting Educa- 
tional Inspector of the Presidency Division, the Princi- 
pals and Acting Principals of Government Colleges, all 
tor the time being, shall, while filling such Offices, be 
e#-ojjicio Fellows of the said University. The whole num- 
ber of the Fellows of the said University, exclusive of 
the Chancellor and Vice-Chancellor for the time being, 
shall never be less than twenty- six ; and whenever the 
number of the said Fellows, exclusive as aforesaid, shall 
by death, resignation, departure from India, or otherwise, 
be reduced below twenty-six, the Governor of Bombay 
b 713-d * 



4-2 ACTS. 

in Council shall forthwith, by notification in the Bombay 
Gazette, nominate so many fit and proper persons to be 
Fellows of the said University, as with the then Fellows 
of the said University shall make the number of snch 
Fellows, exclusive as aforesaid, twenty-six. But nothing 
herein contained shall prevent the Governor of Bom- 
bay in Council from nominating more than twenty -six 
persons to be Fellows of the said University, if he shall 
see fit. 

VII. The Governor of Bombay in Council may can- 

cel the appointment of any person 
of I^elkwmr^e alrea . d y appointed or hereafter to be 
cancelled W "^ ' appointed a Fellow of the University ; 

and as soon as such order is notified 
in the Gazette, the person so appointed shall cease to be 
a Fellow. 

VIII. The Chancellor, Vice-chancellor, and Fellows 

for the time being shall have the en- 
Chancetyor, Vice- tire management of and superintend- 

FeUc'ws 110 ^ 8u"SJ GnCe ° Ver the affairS ' concerns > and 
intend the afiSo'f P ro perty of the said University ; and 
the University. in all cases unprovided for by this 

Act, it shall be lawful for the Chan- 
cellor, Vice-Chancellor, and Fellows to act in such man- 
ner as shall appear to them best calculated to promote 
the purposes intended by the said University. The said 
Chancellor, Vice- Chancellor, and Fellows shall have full 
-n , power from time to time to make and 

alter any bye-laws and regulations (so 
as the same be not repugnant to law, or to the general 
objects and provisions of this Act) touching the examina- 
tion for degrees and the granting of the same ; and 
touching the examination for honours, and the granting 
of marks of honour for a higher proficiency in the different 
branches of Literature, Science, and Art ; and touching 
the qualifications of the candidates for degrees, and the 
previous course of instruction to be followed by them 
and the preliminary examinations to be submitted to by 



ACT OF INCORPORATION, 43 

them ; and touching the mode and time of convening the 
meetings of the Chancellor, Vice-Chancellor, and Fel- 
lows ; and in general touching all other matters whatever 
regarding the said University. And all such bye-laws 
and regulations, when reduced into writing, and after 
the common Seal of the said University shall have been 
affixed thereto, shall be binding upon all persons, mem- 
bers of the said University, and all candidates for degrees 
to be conferred by the same, provided such bye-laws and 
regulations shall have been first submitted to and shall 
have received the approval of the Governor of Bombay 
in Council. 

IX. All questions which shall come before the Chan- 

cellor, Vice- Chancellor, and Fellows, 

Senate sha11 be decided at a meeting of the 

Senate by the majority of the mem- 
bers present ; and the Chairman at any such meeting 
shall have a vote, and, in case of an equality of votes, a 
second or casting vote. No question shall be decided at 
any meeting, unless the Chancellor, or Vice-Chancellor 
and five Fellows, or, in the absence of the Chancellor 
and Vice-Chancellor, unless six Fellows at the least shall 
be present at the time of the decision. At every meeting 
of the Senate, the Chancellor, or in his absence the 
Vice-Chancellor, shall preside as Chairman ; and, in the 
absence of both, a Chairman shall be chosen by the 
Fellows present, or the major part of them, 

X. The said Chancellor, Vice-Chancellor and Fel- 

lows for the time being shall have full 
Appointment and p 0W er from time to time to appoint, 

nera'and^fficere! 1 " aild ' ^ tlie ^ slian aee occasion > *° 
remove all Examiners, Officers, and 

servants of the said University. 

XI. The said Chancellor, Vice-Chancellor, and Fel- 

lows shall have power, after exami- 
d e™e7 *° confer nation, to confer the several degrees , 
of Bachelor of Arts, Master of Arts, 



44 ACTS. 

Bachelor of Laws, Licentiate of Medicine, Doctor of Me- 
dicine, and Master of Civil Engineering ; they shall also 
have power, after examination, to confer upon the candi- 
dates for the said several degrees marks of honour for a 
high degree of proficiency in the different branches 
of Literature, Science, and Art, according to rules to be 
determined by the bye-laws to be from time to time made 
by them under the power in that behalf given to them 
by this Act. 

XII. Except by special order of the Senate, no person 

shall be admitted as a candidate for 

Qualification for tlie degree of Bachelor of Arts, Master 

fatTCde^r of A?*. Bailor of Laws Licentiate 

of Medicme, Doctor of Medicine, or 
Master of Civil Engineering, unless he shall present to 
the said Chancellor, Vice- Chancellor, and Fellows a cer- 
tificate from one of the Institutions authorized in that 
behalf by the Governor of Bombay in Council, to the 
effect that he has completed the course of instruction 
prescribed by the Chancellor, Vice-Chancellor, and Fel- 
lows of the said University, in the bye-laws to be made 
by them under the power in that behalf given by this Act. 

XIII. The said Chancellor, Vice- Chancellor, .and 

Fellows shall cause an examination for 
t]e ^ matlon for degrees to be held at least once in 

every year ; on every such examination 
the candidates shall be examined either by Examiners 
appointed for the purpose from among the Fellows by 
the said Chancellor, Vice-Chancellor, and Fellows or by 
other Examiners so to be appointed ; and on every such 
examination the candidates, whether candidates for an 
ordinary degree or for a degree with honours, shall be 
examined on as many subjects and in such manner as 
the said Chancellor, Vice-Chancellor, and Fellows shall 
appoint. 

XIV. At the conclusion of any examination of the 
' Grant of degrees. candidates, the Examiners shall de- 
clare the name of every candidate 



ACT OF INCORPORATION. 45 

whom they shall have deemed entitled to any of the said 
degrees, and his proficiency in relation to other candi- 
dates ; and also the honours which he may have gained 
in respect of his proficiency in that department of 
knowledge in which he is about to graduate ; and he 
•shall receive from the said Chancellor a certificate, under 
the seal of the said University of Bombay, and signed, 
by the said Chancellor or Vice- Chancellor, in which the 
particulars so stated shall be declared. 

XV. The said Chancellor, Vice-Chancellor, and Fel- 
p lows shall have power to charge such 

reasonable fees for the degrees to be 
conferred by them, and upon admission into the said 
University, and for continuance therein, as they, with 
the approbation of the Governor of Bombay in Coun- 
cil, shall from time to time see fit to impose. Such fees 

. , shall be carried to one General Fee 

Annual Accounts. -^^ fop ^ payment of expenses 

of the said University, under the directions and regula- 
tions of the Governor of Bombay in Council, to whom 
the accounts of income and expenditure of the said Uni- 
versity shall, once in every year, be submitted for such 
examination and audit as the said Governor of Bombay 
in Council may direct. 



ACT FOR CONFERRING ADDITIONAL 
DEGREES 



Act fro. XLVII. of i860. 

An Act for giving to the Universities of Caloilttdi 
Madras, and Bombay, the 'power of conferring Degrees 
in addition to those mentioned' in Acts II., XXII. , and 
XXVII. of 1857. 

Whereas it is expedient to give to the Universities 

of Calcutta, Madras, and Bombay, 

Preamble. established under Acts II., XXII., 

and XXVII. of 1857, the power of conferring Degrees 

other than the Degrees in that Act expressly provided 

for ; it is enacted as follows : — 

I. It shall be competent to the Chancellor, Vice- 

Chancellor, and Fellows of the 
sitieTt^confeTDe- Universities of Calcutta, Madras, or 
grees. Bombay, respectively, to confer such 

Degrees, and to grant such Diploma 
or Licences in respect of Degrees, as the said Chancellor, 
Vice-Chanceilor, and Fellows of any such University 
shall have appointed or shall appoint by any Bye-laws 
or Regulations made and passed, or to be made or passed 
by them in the manner provided in the said Acts, and 
submitted to and approved by the Governor General in 
Council as far as regards the University of Calcutta, or 
by the Governor in Council of Madras or Bombay as 
regards the Universities of Madras and Bombay respec- 
tively. 

II. All the provisions contained in the said Acts, II., 

XXII, and XXVII, of 1857, with 
Construction. ^^t to the Degrees therein men- 

tioned, and to the examinations for those Degrees, shall 
apply to any Degrees which may be conferred under 
this .Act and to the examinations for such Degrees. 




THE SENATE, 

1. . The Senate shall meet ordinarily once a year, on the 
Fifth Saturday in the First Term in Arts, and at other times 
when convened by the Vice-Chancellor, or, in his absence 
from the Presidency, by the Syndicate. 

2. A meeting of the Senate shall be convened on the 
requisition of any six of the Members. 

3. Fourteen days before the day fixed for a meeting of 
the Senate, the Registrar shall forward to each member of 
the Senate a statement of the motions to be brought 
forward. Notice of proposed amendments must be for- 
warded so as to reach the Registrar four clear days before 
the day of meeting. The Registrar shall three clear days 
before the day of meeting forward to each member of the 
Senate a statement of all the motions and amendments ; 
and no motion or amendment other than a motion for ad- 
journment or for directing the Syndicate t<? review their deci- 
sion, or an amendment which shall be accepted by the Chair- 
man as merely formal, of which such notice has not been 
given, shall be put to the Meeting. 

N.B. — Six Members of the Senate constitute a quorum ; 
and all questions are decided by a majority of the votes of 
the Members present, the Chairman, when the numbers are 
equal, having a second or casting vote. (Act XXII. of 1857, 
Section JX). 

THE FACULTIES. 

4. There shall be four Faculties, namely, Arts, Law, Me- 
dcine, and Civil Engineering. Every Member of the Senate 
shall be a Member of one Faculty at least, and any Member 
of the Senate may be a Member of more than one Faculty. 

5. The Faculties shall be appointed by the Senate at its 
Annual Meeting. 

6 Each Faculty shall elect its own Dean. Every Meet- 
ing of a Faculty shall be convened by its Dean, or, in his 



48 BYE- LAWS. 

absence, by the Senior* Fellow belonging to that Faculty. 
A meeting of any Faculty shall also be convened by the 
Dean on the requisition of any three of its Members. 

7. Whenever the office of Dean in any one of the Facul- 
ties may have remained vacant for one calendar month, the 
Vice-Chancellor shall appoint a Dean from the Members 
of such Faculty. 

8. Three Members of any Faculty shall constitute a 
quorum of that Faculty. 

THE SYNDICATE. 

9. The Executive Government of the University shall be 
vested in a Syndicate, consisting of the Vice-Chancellor and 
eight of the Fellows, who shall be elected for one year by 
the several Faculties in the following proportions : — 

Three by the Faculty of Arts, 

Two „ „ Law. 

Two „ „ Medicine. 

One „ „ Civil Engineering. 

10. It will be the duty of the Syndicate to appoint, and, 
if necessary, to remove the Examiners and all other Officers 
of the University, except the Registrar ; to order Examina- 
tions in conformity with the Regulations and declare the 
results as they bear on Degrees, Honours, and Rewards ; to 
keep the accounts of the University, and to correspond on 
the business of the University with the Government and 
all other authorities and persons ; and the Syndicate will, 
from time to time, frame such Byerlaws and Regulations 
as may be necessary, subject to the approval of the Senate, 

11. The elections of Syndics shall take place within one 
month before the Annual Meeting of the Senate, and the 
names of the persons so elected shall be declared at that 
Meeting. 

12. The Syndicate shall meet ordinarily once a month ? 
and at other times when convened by the Vice-Chancellor. 

13. On the temporary absence of a Syndic, the Faculty 
which he represents may elect one of its Members to officiate 
during such absence. 

* The ex-officio Fellows of the University are always the Senior 
Fellows in order of official precedence. The seniority of the 
other Fellows, mentioned in the Act of Incorporation, is accord- 
ing to the order in which their names appear there. The senior- 
ity of all other Fellows is according to the date and order of 
their appointment. 



THE REGISTRAR. 49 

14. By a temporary absence shall be understood an 
absence of not more than three months from the Town of 
Bombay. Any Syndic who is absent from Bombay for a 
period of more than three months, or who leaves the Presi- 
dency of Bombay without giving notice to the Registrar of 
his intention to return within three months, shall be held 
to have permanently vacated his office. 

15. t)n a permanent vacancy in the Syndicate, the 
Faculty represented by the late Syndic shall proceed to 
elect another for the remainder of the current year. 

16. In the event of any Faculty omitting to elect a Syn- 
dic under the preceding Bye-law within one calendar month 
from the date of the vacancy, the Vice-Chancellor shall 
appoint one from among the Members of that Faculty. 

17. Four Syndics shall constitute a quorum, and all 
questions shall be decided by a majority. 

18. The Vice-Chancellor, or, in his absence, the Senior 
Fellow present, shall preside at all Meetings of the Syndi- 
cate, and if the votes, including that of the President, are 
equally divided, the President shall have a casting vote. 

19. During the year between the Annual Meetings of 
the Senate, the Syndicate may appoint any Member of the 
Senate to any one or more of the Faculties. 

20. Each Faculty shall report on any subject that may 
be referred to it by the Syndicate. 

21. Any Faculty, or any Member of the Senate, may 
make any recommendation to the Syndicate, and may pro- 
pose any bye-law or regulation for the consideration of the 
Syndicate. 

22. The decision of the Syndicate on any such recom- 
mendation may be brought before the Senate by any Mem- 
ber of the Senate. at one of its Meetings, and the Senate 
may approve, revise, or modify any such decision, or may 
direct the Syndicate to review it, 

23. No question shall be decided by the Senate that has 
not, in the nrst instance, been considered and decided by 
the Syndicate. 

THE REGISTRAR. 

24. The Registrar shall be appointed by the election of 
the Senate. The election shall be by means of ballot, and 
shall take place at the Annual Meeting of the Senate. The 

b713— « 



50 BYE -LAWS. 

Registrar's term of office shall commence on the First day 
of January next following after such Annual Meeting of 
the Senate, and shall continue for two years only ; but the 
Registrar may be re-elected. If a vacancy should occur in 
the office of Registrar between two Annual Meetings of the 
Senate, the Syndicate shall appoint a person to officiate aa 
Registrar until the next First day of January. 

25. The Registrar shall be the Custodian of the Records, 
Library, Common Seal, and such other property of the 
University as the Syndicate shall commit to his charge. . 

26. All Meetings of the Senate, the Syndicate and the 
faculties shall be convened through the Registrar, who 
shall keep a record of the proceedings of such Meetings. 

27. Leave of absence may be granted to the Registrar 
by the Syndicate for a period not exceeding three months. 
During the absence of the Registrar on leave, an Acting 
Registrar may be appointed by the Syndicate ; but if the 
Registrar shall be absent for a period of more than three 
months, his appointment shall become vacant. 

BOARD OF ACCOUNTS, 

28. A Board of Accounts, consisting of three Fellows of 
the University not being members of the Syndicate, shall 
be appointed by the Senate at its Annual Meeting. The 
Vice- Chancellor and Registrar shall be ex-ojjicio Chairman 
and Secretary of the Board, 

29. The Board shall meet ordinarily once every three 
months, and at other times when convened by the Vice- 
Chancellor. 

30. The Board shall examine and audit the University 
Accounts ; prepare the University Budget, and the account 
of Endowment and Trust Funds ; consider ways and means; 
and make recommendations where necessary to the Syn-. 
dicate. 

31. Members of the Board shall hold office for one year 
from the 1st of January next after the Annual Meeting afc 
which they were appointed. They shall be eligible for 
re-appointment at the expiration of their office. All vacan- 
cies in the Board occurring between two Annual Meetings 
of the Senate shall be temporarily filled up by person* 
appointed by the Syndicate. 



ENDOWMENTS. 51 

UNIVERSITY TERMS. 

32. The University year for the Faculties of Arts, Civil 
Engineering, and Medicine shall be divided into two terms. 
En the Faculties of Arts and Civil Engineering, the First 
Term shall commence on the Third Monday in November, 
and shall end on the Third Monday in April. In the 
Faculty of Medicine the First Term shall commence on the 
First of November and shall end on the Thirtieth of April. 
In the Faculties of Arts and Civil Engineering, the Second 
Term shall commence on the Second Monday in June and 
shall end on the Third Monday in September. In the Fa- 
culty of Medicine, the Second Term shall commence on the 
Fifteenth of June and end on the Fifteenth of September. 

33. Terms can only be kept by matriculated students 
who shall attend for a prescribed number of days at one or 
more of the Colleges or Institutions recognized by the 
University. 

34. The following shall be the number of days' attend- 
ance necessary for keeping terms : — For the First Term 
ninety days ; and for the Second Term in the Faculties of 
Arts and Civil Engineering eighty days, and for the Second 
Term in that of Medicine seventy days. But if an Under - 

fraduate shall, after his Matriculation, attend sixty days 
uring that same term in which he has matriculated, he 
shall be held to have kept that term. 

35. The Principals and Heads of Colleges and Institu- 
tions will be requested to register the daily attendance of 
matriculated students, with a view to being able to certify 
their having kept term. 

36. Days during which Undergraduates or Graduates 
are engaged in University Examinations may count towards 
the keeping of their terms. 

37. To keep term at a College or Recognized Institu- 
tion it is implied that an Undergraduate shall go through 
the full course of study at that College or Institution, and 
shall not at the same time be holding any appointment 
which, in the judgment of the Syndicate, interferes with 
his position as a bond fide student By this is not meant; 
that a student may not also be employed for a short time 
in teaching in a Recognized Institution. 

ENDOWMENTS. 

38. An account of all endowments and Trust Funds held 
by the University shall be published annually in the Uni- 
versity Calendar. 



VI. 

I. ARTS. 

MATRICULATION. 

1. The Examination will be held once a year at Bombay 
and at such other places as shall, from time to time, be ap- 
pointed by the Syndicate,* commencing on the First Monday 
in the First Term in Arts. 

2. Candidates for Matriculation must have completed 
their sixteenth year. 

3. Candidates must forward an application to the Regis- 
trar two months before the Examination. (Vide Form A.) 

4. Two months before the commencement of the Exami- 
nation, each Candidate must pay or cause to be paid to the 
Registrar at Bombay, or to such person as he may appoint 
in the Mofussil, a fee of Rs. 10, for which a receipt will be 
given. (Vide Form B.) 

5. Failure to pass the Examination will not disqualify 
the Candidate for again presenting himself at any subse- 
quent Matriculation Examination on a new application 
being forwarded, and a fresh fee paid. 

6. Candidates will be examined in Languages, Mathe- 
matics, and General Knowledge. 

I. — Languages. — Three papers. 

1. English. 

2. One of the following : — 



Sanskrit. 


French. 


Hindustani 


Greek. 


Portuguese. 


Persian. 


Latin. 


Marathi. 


Sindhi. 


Hebrew. 


Gujarathi. 




Arabic. 


Canarese. 





(Any other language may at any time be added to this 
list by the Syndicate.) 

In English there will be one paper containing one or more 
passages for paraphrase, and questions in grammar, idiom, 
etymology and prosody. 

* The following places have been appointed by the Syndicate 
for the year 1878 :— 

Poona, Belgaum, Ahmedabad, and Karachi. 



MATRICULATION EXAMINATION. 53 

In the second Language there will be one paper contain- 
ing prose passages for translation from English, and into 
English ; and one paper of questions in grammar, idiom, 
and etymology. 

Oral examination in the English language. 

The Candidate will be called upon to read and to explain. 
extempore a prose passage from a standard author to be 
selected by the Examiners. 

N.B. — It is essential that the Candidate should not know 
beforehand from what books he will have to read. 

II. — Mathematics. — Three papers. 

1st. — Arithmetic. The examples to be worked from first 
principles, and not merely by rules. 

2nd. — Algebra to Simple Equations inclusive. Problems 
•will be set involving Simple Equations. 

'3rd. — First four books of Euclid, with deductions. 

III. — General Knowledge. — Two papers. 

1st. — Elementary History of England and India, and 
Elementary Geography. 

2nd. — Elementary knowledge of 

(a.) — The mechanical powers. 

(b.) — The laws of chemical combination, the chemistry of 
air and water, and the phenomena of combustion. 

(c) — The solar system. 

N.B. — Candidates must satisfy the Examiners in each 
branch of the Examination. 

7. The Examination will be conducted by means of 
printed questions to be answered in English, except when 
otherwise specified. The Candidates will also be examined 
viva voce in English. 

8. On the Fourth Monday after the commencement of 
the Examination, the Examiners will publish a list of suc- 
cessful Candidates in the order of merit, with the total 
number of marks obtained by each Candidate, and the name 
of his school. 

9. Each passed Candidate will receive a Certificate signed 
by the Registrar. (Vide Form C.) 

BACHELOR OF ARTS. 

10. Candidates for the Degree of Bachelor of Arts must 
have passed the Matriculation Examination, and will be 
required to pass two subsequent examinations, the one to 
be called the First Examination in Arts, and the other the 
Examination for the Degree of B.A. 

B 713— e* 



54 REGULATIONS. 

FIRST EXAMINATION IN ARTS. 

11. The First Examination in Arts will be held once a year 
in Bombay, commencing on the Second Monday in April. 

12. No Undergraduate will be admitted to this Exami- 
nation unless he shall have kept three terms at a College 
or Institution recognized in Arts ; and unless he produce 
satisfactory testimonials under Form D. 

N.B. — If a Graduate in Medicine or Civil Engineering is 

desirous of appearing at the First Examination in 

Arts, he may be admitted to the Examination after 

keeping two terms only in a College or Institution 

recognized in Arts by the University of Bombay. 

Any Undergraduate of a University recognized by the 

I ; niversity of Bombay may be admitted to this Examina- 

i ion, provided his testimonials of good conduct and length 

of study from his own University be satisfactory. 

13. Candidates must forward an application to the 
Registrar at least two months before the Examination. 
( Vide Form D). 

14. Each Candidate must pay to the Registrar a fee of 
Ks. 20, for which a receipt will be given. (Vide Form E). 

15. Candidates will be examined in the following sub- 
jects : — 

I. Languages. 

II. Mathematics. 

III. Logic. 

IV. History. 

V. Natural Science. 

I. — Languages — Four papers. 

1. English. 

2. One of the following : — 

Sanskrit. Latin. Arabic. 

Greek. Hebrew. Persian. 

Candidates will be examined in two books of Prose and 
two of Poetry in each language. These books will be noti- 
ced by the Syndicate two years before the Examination. 

In each language there will be two papers and a viva voce 
examination. Each paper in English will contain a passage 
to be paraphrased. The papers on the second language will 
contain passages for translation both out of that language 
into English and vice versa. The papers on each language 
will contain questions in grammar, idiom, and etymology, 



FIRST EXAMINATION IN ARTS. 55 

as well as in the matter of the books taken up by the 
Candidates. 

II.— Mathematics — Two papers. 

(Algebra to Quadratic Equations inclusive with 
J Proportion and Variation, Permutations, and 
j Combinations, the Progressions, the Binomial 
' Theorem, and the nature and use of Logarithms. 
C Euclid, Books I to VI, with deductions; 
2. \ Trigonometry, Solutions of Plane Triangles, with 
(. expressions for the Area, 

III. — Logic — One paper. 

Logic (Whately and Fowler). The Examination will 
comprise easy questions in Logical Analysis. 

IV. — History— One paper. 

1. Ancient History. 

2. Modern History. 

A definite period of each will be notified by the Syndi- 
cate two years before the Examination. 

V. — Natural Science. — One paper. 

1. Elementary Physics (except Light and Electricity), 

viz., Laws of Motion — Forces of Nature considered 
generally — Energy considered generally — Visible 
Energy — Heat. 

Or 

2. Vegetable Anatomy and Physiology and Systematic 

Botany : — 
Flowering Plants — Their parts — The Leaf — Stem — Buds 
and branches — The various forms and the dura- 
tion of Plants — The root and underground stem — 
Inflorescence — The Flower— Calyx — Corolla — Sta- 
mens and Pistil — The Fruit and seed — Plant 
description — Cells and their contents — Chemical 
constituents of Plants — The structure and vital 
processes of the Stem, Boot and Leaf — Surface 
coverings and appendages of Plants — Kecognition 
and description of Microscopic preparations — Food 
of Plants — Principles of Classification. A general 
knowledge of the characters, distribution, pro- 
perties and uses of the following natural orders — 
Cruciferce, Mdkacecd, Ampelidce, Leguminosae, Urn- 



56 REGULATIONS. 

belliferce Cowvpositce, Apocynece, Convolvulacece, La- 
biatce, Urticacece, AmarylUdece Aroidece, and Gra- 
minece — Description and recognition of species—- 
The collection and drying of Botanical Specimens 

Text book recommended in Elementary Physics ; Balfour 
Stewart : Lessons in Elementary Physics. 

16. The Examination will be conducted by means of 
printed questions to be answered in English, except when 
otherwise specified. The Candidates will also be examined 
viva voce in languages. 

17. On the Third Thursday after the commencement of 
the Examination, the Examiners will publish a list of suc- 
cessful Candidates in two Classes and Pass, the names in 
each Class and Pass being arranged in alphabetical order. 

EXAMINATION FOR THE DEGREE OF B.A. 

18. The Examination for the Degree of Bachelor of Arts 
will be held annually at Bombay, commencing on the 
Second Monday in the First Term in Arts. 

19. No Undergraduate will be admitted to this Exami- 
nation unless he shall have kept six terms in the University 
of Bombay, and unless he produce satisfactory testimonials 
under Form F. 

N.B. — If a Graduate in Medicine or Civil Engineering is 
desirous of appearing at the B.A. Examination, he 
may be admitted to the Examination after keeping 
four terms only in a College or Institution recog- 
nized in Arts by the University of Bombay. 

20. Candidates must forward an application to the 
Registrar at least two months before the Examination. 
{Vide Form F.) 

21. Each Candidate must pay to the Registrar a fee of 
Rs. 30, for which a receipt will be given. (Vide Form G.) 

22. Failure to pass the Examination will not disqualify 
the Candidate for presenting himself at any subsequent 
Examination for Bachelor of Arts, on a new application 
being forwarded, and a fresh fee paid. 



EXAMINATION FOR B.A. 57 

23. Candidates will be examined in the following sub- 
jects : — 

I. Languages. 
II. Mathematics. 
III. One of the following groups to be selected by the 
Candidate : — 

A. Language and Literature. 

B. History and Political Economy. 

C. Logic and Moral Philosophy. 

D. Mathematics. 

E. Natural Science. 

I. — Languages — Four papers. 

1. English. 

2. One of the following : — 

Sanskrit. I Latin. J Arabic. 

Greek. J Hebrew. | Persian. 

Candidates will be examined in four books (two Prose 
and two Poetry) in each language, notified by the Syndi- 
cate two years before the Examination. 

In each language there will be two papers and a viva 
voce examination. The papers on English will contain pass- 
ages to be paraphrased. The papers on the second lan- 
guage will contain passages for translation both out of that 
language into English and vice versa. The papers on eac h 
language will contain questions in grammar, idiom, and 
etymology, as well as in the matter of the books taken up 
by the Candidates. 

II. — Mathematics — Two papers. 

1. Euclid, Book XI to Proposition XXI, with deductions. 
Geometrical Conic Sections. 

2. Statics — Composition and Resolution of Forces, 
Centre of Gravity, and the Mechanical Powers. 

III. One of the following groups : the books named are 
recommended : — 

A. — Language and Literature — Four papers. 

(a.) English — Two papers (one on a book of Prose, and 
the other on a book of Poetry, to be prescribed from time 
to time by the Syndicate). 



58 REGULATIONS. 

(b.) Second Language — Two papers (one on a book of 
Prose, and the other on a book of Poetry, to be prescribed 
from time to time by the Syndicate). 

B. — History and Political Economy — Four papers. 

{a.) Political Economy — One paper : Smith : Wealth of 
Nations ; Fawcett : Manual of Political Economy. 

(6.) History of India in the 16th, 17th, and 18th Centu- 
ries, down to the overthrow of the Peshwa. One paper : 
Ehphinstone: History of India; Mill: History of British 
India. 

Or, 

(c.) History of the Jews, from the first king to the taking 
of Jerusalem by Titus. — Milman. 

III. — One of the following : — ■ 

(d.) History of Rome, from the earliest times to the 
close of the Republic. Two papers : one on the Political 
History, and one on the History of Institutions, Literature, 
and Religion. 

(e.) History of Greece, from the Persian invasion to the 
taking of Corynth. — Two papers, as above. 

(/.) History of England, from the Restoration to the pass- 
ing of the Reform Bill in 1832. Two papers : one on the 
Political History, and one on the History of Institutions, 
Literature, and Science. 

C. — Logic and Moral Philosophy — Four papers. 
(a.) Logic — Two papers : Fowler : Deductive and Induc- 
tive Logic ; Mill : Books I, II, and III. 

(6.) Moral Philosophy. — Two papers : Sidgwick : Methods 
of Ethics ; Butler: First part of the Analogy, and Sermons. 
D. — Mathematics — Four papers. 
I. — Pure Mathematics. 
(a.) — Analytical Geometry of Two Dimensions: One 
paper — Analytical Geometry of the Straight Line, 
Circle, Parabola, Ellipse and Hyperbola, by Rec- 
tangular, Oblique and Polar Co-ordinates, not in- 
cluding abridged notation. 
(b.) — Differential Calculus: One paper— Differentiation 
of Functions of one variable — Successive Differen- 
tiation — Taylor's Theorem— Evaluation of Inde- 
terminate Functions — Maxima and Minima of 
Functions of one variable. 



EXAMINATION FOB B.A. 59 

Integral Calculus — Integration of Functions of one 
variable. 

II. — Applied Mathematics. 

The student may select either (a) and (6) or (c) and (d.)] 
(a.) — Dynamics: Onepaper — Laws of motion — Uniform 
and uniformly accelerated motion — Falling Bo- 
dies — Projectiles — Collision — The Pendulum. 

(b.) — Hydrostatics ; One paper — Pressure of non-elastic 
and elastic Fluids — Specific gravity — Floating Bo- 
dies — Rotating Liquid — Tension of vessels con- 
taining Fluids — Construction and use of the more 
simple Instruments and Machines. 

(c.) — Optics: One paper — Reflection and Befraction of 
rays at Plane and Spherical Surfaces, not includ- 
ing Aberrations — Refraction through Prisms, 
Plates and Lenses — The Eye — Telescopes. 

(d.) — Astronomy: One paper — The more elementary 
parts, so far as they are necessary for the explana- 
tion of the more simple phenomena without cal- 
culation. 

E. — Natural Science — Four papers. 

In the following (a) and (&) or (c) and (d) to be taken up 
by each Candidate selecting this Group : 

(a.) — Elementary Physics: Two papers: Laws of mo- 
tion — Forces of Nature considered generally — En- 
ergy considered generally — Visible energy — Heat, 
Light and Electricity — Oral examination on the 
use of apparatus. 

(6.) — Inorganic Chemistry : Two papers : The chemistry 
of the non-metallic elements and their more im- 
portant compounds — The Chemistry of the prin- 
cipal metallic elements and their more important 
compounds — General principles of Chemical Phi- 
losophy — The practical recognition of simple salts . 

(c.) — Vegetable Anatomy and Physiology, and Systematic 
Botany : Two papers : — The whole of the subject 
laid down for F. A., together with — The Struc- 



60 REGULATIONS, 

tare of the Ovule— Fertilization — Germination — a. 
general knowledge of the structure and functions 
of the different parts of Cryptogamic Plants. The 
following additional natural orders — Anonacece, 
Myrtacece, Cucurbitacece, Rubiacece, Euphorbiacece, 
Scitaminece Orchidece, Palmece, and a general 
knowledge of the two Cryptogamic orders, Filices 
and Fungi. 

(d.) — Comparative Anatomy and Physiology : Two pa- 
pers : Structure of a Mammalian animal, with the 
minute structure and chemical constituents of 
the more important tissues — Its elementary Phy- 
siology — The Blood — Vascular System and Circu- 
lation — Respiration — Digestion — The sources of 
loss and gain to the Blood — Motion and Locomo- 
tion — Voice and Speech — Nervous System — In- 
nervation— Sensation— Organs of sight, sound, 
smell, taste and touch — Reproduction — Life and 
Death — Elementary Anatomy and Physiology of 
a Bird, Lizard, Frog, Fish, Oyster, Insect, Lobster, 
Earthworm, Starfish, Jellyfish, and Sponge. Prin- 
ciples of Zoological Classification — Distribution 
of Species — Animal — Embryology — Recognition 
and Description of Preparations. 

24. The Examination will be conducted by means of 
printed questions to be answered in English, except when 
otherwise specified The Candidates will also be examined 
viva voce in Languages. 

25. On the Third Thursday after the commencement of 
the Examination, the Examiners will publish a list of suc- 
cessful Candidates in two Classes and Pass, the names in 
each Class and Pass being arranged in alphabetical order. 

26. A Certificate will be given to those who pass the 
Examination. ( Vide Form H. ) 

MASTER OF ARTS. 

27. The Examination for the Degree of Master of Arts 
will be held annually in Bombay, commencing on the First 
Monday in the First Term in Arte. 



EXAMINATION FOR M.A. 61 



28. Any person, being a Bachelor of Arts in the Univer- 
sity of Bombay, may be admitted to the Examination for 
the Degree of Master of Arts; and should he pass the 
Examination in any one of the above branches, he will b^ 
admitted to the degree of M.A., on the expiration of five 
years from the date of his Matriculation. 

29. Candidates must forward an application to the Re- 
gistrar at lea st three months before the Examination. ( Vide 
Form J.) 

30. Each Candidate must pay to the Registrar a fee o£ 
Us. 50, for which a receipt will be given. {Vide Form K.) 

31. Failure to pass the Examination will not disqualify 
the Candidate for presenting himself at any subsequent 
M. A. Examination, on anew application being forwarded, 
and a fresh fee paid. 

32. The Examination will comprise the following 
branches : — 

I. — Languages. 
II. — History and Philosophy. 
III. — Mathematics. 
IV. — Natural Sciences. 

I. — Languages. (Six papers.) 

Candidates must take up English, with one or more of 
the following : — Latin, Greek, Sanskrit, Hebrew, Arabic, and 
Persian. 

The subjects in each Language will be announced by the 
Syndicate two years before the Examination. 

The following papers will be set : — 

1st and 2nd. Questions on the English books taken up 
by the Candidates, including points of Scholarship, Com- 
parative Philology, Criticism, and the History of Literature. 

3rd and 4<(h. Similar questions on the Latin, Greek, 
Sanskrit, Hebrew, Arabic, or Persian books taken up by 
the Candidates. 

hth. Translation from English into the second language, 
and vice versd. 

§th. Original English Composition in Prose or Verse. 

IL— History and Philosophy. (Six papers.) 
1st and 2nd. Questions on a period to be announced by 
the Syndicate two years before the examination, including 

b 713-/ 



62 REGULATIONS. 

Constitutional Law, Manners, Literature, Political Geogra- 
phy, and Etymology. 

3rd. Politics as a Science, including Political Economy. 

Uh. Logic, including the Philosophy of the Inductive 
Sciences. 

Uh. The History of Greek Philosophy. 

6th. The History of Modern Philosophy, from the time 
of Charlemagne to the end of the 18th century. 

In lieu of the 5th and 6th papers, a Candidate may bring 
up— 

(a.) Historical or external Evidences of Christianity. 

(b.) Moral or internal Evidences of Christianity. 
III. — Mathematics. (Six papers.) 

1st. Euclid and Geometrical Conic Sections. 

2nd. Algebra and Trigonometry. 

3rd. Newton's Principia, Book I., §§ I.*— III., and 
Astronomy. 

4th. Analytical Geometry and Differential and Integral 
Calculus. 

hth. Statics and Dynamics, 

6th. Hydrostatics and Optics. 

IV.— Natural Sciences. (Six papers.) 

( Zoology, Comparative Anatomy, and Physiology. 
(a.) i Botany and Vegetable Physiology. 
( Geology. 

{Chemical Physics. 
Inorganic Chemistry. 
Meteorology and Physical Geography. 

The Candidate will be required to select for examination 
one of the sub-sections a and b, and to be acquainted with 
the history of the sciences therein enumerated. 

33. In the week following the Examination, the Exa- 
miners in each branch will publish a list of successful 
Candidates in two Classes and Pass, the names in each Class 
and Pass being arranged in alphabetical order. 

34. A Certificate will be given to those who pass the 
Examination. {Vide Form L.) 



63 

II. LAW. 



BACHELOR OF LAWS. 
!;, The Examination for the Degree of Bachelor of Laws 
will be held annually at Bombay, commencing on the First 
Monday in the First Term in Arts. 

2. No Candidate shall be admitted to the Examination 
unless he be a Bachelor of Arts of at least two years' stand- 
ing in the University of Bombay, or some University recog- 
nized by it, and unless he produce certificates to the effect 
that he has attended, for periods amounting to at least 
three years, three-fourths of the Lectures proper to his 
class, in some School or Schools of Law recognized by the 
University. 

3. Application must be made to the Registrar two 
months before the Examination. (Vide Form M.) 

4. Each Candidate must pay to the Registrar a fee of 
Rs. 30, for which a receipt will be given. (Vide Form N.) 

5. Failure to pass the Examination will not disqualify 
the Candidate for presenting himself at any subsequent 
Examination, on a new application being forwarded and a 
fresh fee paid. 

6. Candidates for the Degree of Bachelor of Laws will 
be examined in the principles of Jurisprudence and in the 
several systems of Municipal Law administered by the 
High Court of Bombay. 

There will be four papers, namely : — 

1. Jurisprudence and the Roman Civil Law. 

2. Personal Rights and Status and the Law of Suc- 
cession. 

3. The Law of Property, Contracts, and Torts. 

4. The Law of Evidence of Crimes, and of Procedure, 

Civil and Criminal. 

7. The Examination will be conducted by means of 
printed papers. 

8. On the morning of the Second Monday after the com- 
mencement of the Examination, the Examiners will arrange 
and publish in two Divisions, each in alphabetical order, 
the names of such of the Candidates as may have passed. 



64 REGULATIONS. 

9. A Certificate will be given to those who pa-f-s 
Examination. {Vide Form 0.) 

HONOURS. 

10. The Examination for Honours in Law will comn. 
on the First Monday in the First Term in Arts. 

11. The Examination will be open to any Candidate 
who has passed the Examination for the Degree of Bachelor 
of Laws held in one of the three years next preceding such 
Honours Examination. 

12. Candidates must forward an application to the Re- 
gistrar at least two months before the Examination. (Vide 
Form OA.) 

13. Each Candidate must pay to the Registrar a fee of 
Rs. 50, for which a receipt will be given. (Vide Form 
OB.) 

14. Each Candidate for Honours will be examined in 
each of the following subjects : — 

(a.) Roman Civil Law. 

(6.) General Jurisprudence, including International 

Law. 
(c.) The several systems of Municipal Law which 

obtain in India. 

Three papers will be set, one in each subject (a), (b), and 
(c) : each paper may be divided into two parts, three hours 
being allowed to each part. 

15. The Examination will be conducted by means of 
printed papers. 

16. The Examiners will publish, on the Friday in the 
ensuing week, lists of the successful Candidates in two 
classes, the names in each class being arranged in alphabe- 
tical order. No Candidate shall be placed in the First 
Class unless the Examiners are of opinion that he has 
exhibited considerable original ability as well as great 
industry. 



65 

III. MEDICINE 



LICENTIATE OF MEDICINE AND SURGERY. 

L A Candidate for the Degree of Licentiate of Medicine 
and Surgery must have passed the Matriculation Examina- 
tion of the University of Bombay, or of some University 
recognized by it. He must have been engaged during 
four University years in professional study at a School of 
Medicine. 

2. The Candidate will be required to pass two Exami- 
nations. 

FIRST EXAMINATION IN MEDICINE. 

3. The First Examination in Medicine will be held 
annually at Bombay, commencing on the First Monday 
after 12th September. 

4. No Candidate shall be admitted to the Examination 
unless he have produced Certificates to the following 
effect : — 

{a.) Of having completed his nineteenth year. 

(b.) Of having been engaged in Medical studies for afr 
least two University years. 

(g.) Of having attended the following Courses : — 

T t^ . , . A , C 2 Courses, each of at least 

In Descriptive Anatomy. ^ 7Q lec ' tureg 

In Physiology and Gene- 7 2 Courses, each of at least 

ral Anatomy. ) 70 lectures. 

t ni. • a (2 Courses, each of at least 

In Chemistry J 70 lectures. 

-, t, , ( 2 Courses, each of at least 

botany 301ectur 

In Materia Medica 

In Practical Chemistry,") 
including General and 
Pharmaceutical Che- i 2 Courses of instruction, 
mistry and the Detec- \ each oi three months- 

tion of the Adultera- J 
tion of Drugs. j 

b 713—/* 



f 2 Courses, each of at least 
\ 60 lectures. 



66 REGULATIONS. 

f 1 Course of instruction of at least 

In Practical Phar- ] f + T" T? hS ; P roducin f a certi f fi " 
-{ tate or having acquired a practi- 

^' cal knowledge of the preparation 

I and compounding of Medicines. 

(d). Of having been engaged in Dissection for two First 
Terms in Medicine, in the course of which he must have 
dissected the whole human body twice. 

5. Candidates must apply to the Registrar two months 
before the Examination. (Vide Iform P.) 

6. Each Candidate must pay to the Registrar a fee of 
Rs. 20, for which a receipt will be given. (Vide Form Q.) 

7. Failure to pass the Examination will not ' disqualify 
the Candidate for presenting himself at any subsequent 
First Examination in Medicine, on a new application being 
forwarded and a fresh fee paid. 

8. Candidates will be examined in the following sub- 
jects : — 

1. Anatomy, Descriptive and Practical. 

2. Physiology and Histology. 

3. Chemistry, including Practical Chemistry, General 
and Pharmaceutical Chemistry, and Detection of 
the adulteration of Drugs. 

4. Botany,* Materia Medica, and Pharmacy. 

9. The Examination will be written and practical. Oral 
Examination of Candidates will be left to the discretion of 
Examiners. 



* In Systematic Botany the Candidate will be required to 
possess a competent acquaintance with the following Natural 
Orders (excepting those printed in italics, in which only a gene- 
ral knowledge will be expected) : — 

Anonaceae, Menispermeae, Nymphasaceae, Nelumbiacece, Papa- 
veraceae, Cruciferae, Capparidece, Malvaceae, Sterculiacea, Au- 
rantiaceae, Guttiferae, Sapindaceas, Meliaceae, Vitaceae, Anacar- 
diaceae, Leguminosae, Rosaceae, Myrtaceae, Cucurbitaceae, Umbel - 
liferae, Cinchonaceae, Compositae, Asclepiadiaoeae, Apocynaceae, 
Bignoniaceae, Convolvulaceae, Scrophulariacae, Solanaceae, Atro- 
pacece, Labiatae, Verbenaceae, Acanthacese, Lauraoeae, Euphor- 
biaceae, Urticacece, Artocarpaceae, Coniferae, Orchidaeeae, Zingi- 
beraceae, Cannacece, Amaryllidacea>, Liliaceas, Melanthacea, Pal- 
xnaceae, Araceos, Gramineaej and with the structure oJ 
Cryptogamic orders. 



LICENTIATE OF MEDICINE. 67 

10. . On the Second Monday after the commencement of 
the Examination, the Examiners will publish a list of the 
successful Candidates, arranged in two divisions, in alpha- 
beticaJ order. 

11. A Certificate will be given to those who pass the 
Examination. (Vide Form B.) 

EXAMINATION FOB, THE DEGREE OF 
L.M. AND S. 

12. The Examination for the Degree of Licentiate of 
Medicine and Surgery will be held annually in Bombay, 
commencing on the Third Monday in the First Term in 
Arts. 

13. No Candidate will be admitted to this Examination 
within two years of the time of his passing the First Exa- 
mination. 

14. Each Candidate must, subsequently to passing the 
First Examination, have attended the following courses : — 

i Af ,!•„•„« I 2 Courses, each of at least 

In Medicine } 7o i ectures . 

T a nmr S 2 Courses, each of at least 

Surgery 70 lectures. 

On Diseases of the Eye... j 2 ^^^f * 1 ^ " ^ 

On Midwifery and Diseases J 2 Courses, each of at least 

of Women and Children... ! 60 lectures. 

In Medical Jurisprudence j 2 Courses, of at least 60 lec- 

and Practical Toxicology. ( tures in the aggregate. 

r D , i i { 1 Course, of at least 30 lee- 

In Pathology j ^ 

In Hygiene { X Co ^ of at least 20 lec " 

and have dissected the surgical regions, and performed 
operations on the dead subject, during two terms in Medi- 
cine, and have attended a Lying-in Hospital for nine months, 
and have conducted Midwifery cases, and have attended 
Hospital practice during a period of at least two University 
years, in the following manner, viz. : — 

(a.) Eighteen months at the Medical practice of a recog- 
nized Hospital or Hospitals (during at least nine of which 
he must have officiated as Clinical Cerk) with lectures on 
Clinical Medicine during such attendance. 



68 REGULATIONS. 

(b.) Eighteen months at the Surgical Practice of a 
recognized Hospital or Hospitals (during at least nine of 
which he must have officiated as Surgical Dresser), with 
lectures on Clinical Surgery during such attendance ; and 

(c.) Six months at the Practice of an Eye Infirmary. 

15. Each Candidate will be required to produce reports of 
six Medical and of six Surgical cases, drawn up and written 
by 'himself, during the periods of service as Clinical Clerk 
and Surgical Dresser, respectively, the said reports to be 
duly authenticated by the Professors of Clinical Medicine 
and Surgery ; and must produce a certificate of good moral 
conduct from the Head of the College in which he has 
studied. 

16. Candidates must apply to the Eegistrar two months 
before the Examination. {Vide Form S.) 

17. Each Candidate must pay to the Registrar a fee of 
"Rs. 30, for which a receipt will be given. (Vide Form T.) 

18. Failure to pass the Examination will not disqualify 
the Candidate for presenting himself at any subsequent 
Examination for the degree of Licentiate of Medicine and 
Surgery, on a new application being forwarded and a fresh 
fee paid. 

19. Candidates will be examined in the following sub- 
jects : — 

1. Principles and Practice of Medicine, including 

Pathology. 

2. Principles and Practice of Surgery, including Sur- 

gical Anatomy, and Ophthalmic Surgery. 

3. Midwifery, and Diseases of Women and Children. 

4. Medical Jurisprudence, including practical Toxico- 

logy and Hygiene. 

20. The Examination will be written and practical. Oral 
Examination will be left to the discretion of the Examiners 

21. The Clinical Examination in Medicine and Surgery 
will be conducted in the Wards of a Hospital, and will be of 
a nature faithfully and fully to test the Candidate's practi- 
cal ability in taking, recording and treating cases of disease^ 
investigating the pathology of disease, microscopically, 
chemically, and otherwise, and in surgical manipulati 



DOCTOR OF MEDICINE. 69 

22. The Examination in Surgery will include the per- 
formance of surgical operations on the dead body. 

23. On the Second Monday after the commencement of 
the Examination, the Examiners will publish a list of the 
successful Candidates in two Classes, the names in each 
Class being arranged in alphabetical order. 

24. A Certificate will be given to those who pass the 
Examination, (Vide Form U.) 

DOCTOR OF MEDICINE. 

25. The Examination for the Degree of Doctor of Medi- 
cine will be held annually at Bombay, commencing on the 
Third Monday in the First Term in Arts. 

26. Each Candidate must have obtained the Degree, at 
least, of Bachelor of Arts in the University of Bombay, or 
some University recognized by it, and must have regularly 
attended the Medical and Surgical practice of a recognized 
Hospital or Hospitals for a period of two years subsequent 
to his having taken a Degree in Medicine and Surgery at 
the University of Bombay or some University recognized 
by it ; and must produce a certificate of his having attend- 
ed a course of 30 Lectures in Comparative Anatomy. 

27. Each Candidate must produce testimonials, signed 
by at least two Doctors of Medicine, that he is, in habits 
and character, a fit and proper person for the degree of 
Doctor of Medicine. 

28. Candidates must apply to the Registrar two months 
before the Examination. (Vide Form Y.) 

29. Each Candidate must pay to the Registrar a fee of 
Rs. 100, for which a receipt will be given. (Vide Form W.) 

30. Candidates will be examined in Medicine, includ- 
ing— 

1. Practice of Physic. 

2. Surgery. 

3. Midwifery. 

4. Comparative Anatomy. 

31 . The Examination will be (a) written (one paper being 
set in each of the above subjects), (b) oral, (c) clinical, in the 
wards of a hospital, and (d) practical, in a dissecting-room. 

32. On the second Monday after the commencement of 
the Examination, the Examiners will publish a list of the 
successful Candidates, arranged in alphabetical order. 

33. A Certificate will be given to those who pass the 
Examination. (Vide Form X.) 



70 REGULATIONS. 

IV. CIVIL ENGINEERING. 



LICENTIATE OF CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

1. A Candidate for the Degree of Licentiate of Civil 
Engineering must have passed the Matriculation Examina- 
tion of the University of Bombay, or of some University 
recognized by it. 

2. A Candidate will be required to pass two Examina- 
tions ; the one to be called " The First Examination in Civil 
Engineering/' and the other "The Examination for the 
Degree of Licentiate of Civil Engineering." 

FIRST EXAMINATION IN CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

3. The First Examination will be held annually in Bom* 
bay, commencing on the Fourth Monday in November. 

4. No Candidate will be admitted to this Examination 
unless he produce satisfactory testimonials of having kept 
four terms in a School or College of Civil Engineering 
recognized by the University of Bombay. 

N.B. — If an Undergraduate has kept two or more terms 
in a College or Institution in Arts recognized by the Uni- 
versity of Bombay, and has passed an Examination in the 
subjects of the first year of a School or College of Civil 
Engineering in a manner satisfactory to the Head of such 
School or College, this will be considered an equivalent for 
having kept two terms in a School or College of Civil 
Engineering. 

5. Candidates must apply to the Registrar two mo 
before the Examination. (Vide Form Y.) 

6. Each Candidate must pay to the Registrar a fee of. 
Rs. 20, for which a receipt will be given. (Vide Form Z.) 

7. Failure to pass the Examination will not disqualify 
the Candidate for presenting himself at any subsequent 
First Examination, on a new application being forws 
and a fresh fee paid. 



FIRST EXAMINATION IN CIVIL ENGINEERING. 71 

Candidates will be examined in the following sub- 

T. — Mathematics and Natural Philosophy. 
[Four Papers.] 

(a.) Arithmetic, with the nature and use of Logar- 
ithms , 

(/>.) Algebra — to Quadratic Equations, inclusive, 
with the Progressions and the Binomial Theo- 
rem. 

(a.) Euclid. — The first four and the sixth Books 
with the Definitions of the fifth Book, and the 
eleventh Book to Proposition XXI. 

(b.) Trigonometry. — Solution of Plane Triangles 
with expressions for the area. 

3rd. Statics. — Composition and Resolution of Forces. 
Centre of Gravity. The Mechanical Powers. 

Uh. (a.) Dynamics. — Laws of Motion. Falling Bodies. 
Circular Motion. Projectiles. Impact. 

(6.) Hydrostatics. — Fluid Pressures. Equilibrium of 
Gases under varying pressures and tempera- 
tures. Specific Gravity. Hydrostatic Balance. 
Barometer. Pumps. Hydraulic Earn. Syphon. 
Bramah's Press. Steam Engine. 

II. — Experimental and Natural Science. 
[Two papers.] 

1st. (a.) Heat. — Measurement of Temperature. Ther- 
mometers and Pyrometers. Effects of Heat, 
Dilatation. Apparent and B-eal Expansion. Ex- 
pansion of Gases. Boyle and Mariotte's Law. 
Maximum Density of Water. Compensating 
Pendulum and Balance. Barometric Correc- 
tions. Change of State. Specific and Latent 
Heat. Regelation. Vaporization. Ebullition. 
Elastic Force of Vapour. Formation of Dew. 
Hygrometers. Spheroidal Condition. 

( b . ) Frictional Electricity. 

\nd. Inorganic Chemistry. — Metric System of Weights and 
Measures. Physical Properties of Matter. Simple 
and Compound Bodies. Conditions necessary 



72 REGULATIONS. 

for Combination. Molecules. Molecular Attrac- 
tion. Affinity. Mechanical and Chemical Solu- 
tion. Laws of Combination. Atomic Theory. 
Equivalents. Law of Atomic Heat. Nomen- 
clature. Symbolic Notation and Formulae. Clas- 
sification of Compound Bodies. Law of Gaseous 
Volumes. Vapour Densities. Methods adopted 
in the Determination of Atomic Weights. 
Calculation of Volume Weights. Diffusion of 
Gases. Quantivalence of Atoms. Phenomena 
of Crystallization. Isomorphism. Isomerism. 

Occurrence, Preparation, and Properties of the Non- 
Metallic Elements and of their more important 
Compounds. 

III. — En GINEERIN G. 

[Four Papers, Examination of Drawings, and Oral.] 
1st. Engineering Field Work. — Surveying with the Chain 
only. Surveying with the Compass and Chain. 
The Theodolite and its adjustment. Levelling 
with the Dumpy and Y Level, and the adjust- 
ment of the same. 

N.B, — A plotted Survey and Section, with the Survey 
and Level Books (certified as the work of the 
student by the Head of an Institution recogniz- 
ed in Civil Engineering), should be submitted 
to the Examiners by each Candidate. 

2nd. Materials used m Construction, — Stone. Quarrying 
and Blasting. Manufacture and mode of testing 
the quality of Bricks and Tiles, Limes, Mortar, 
Cements, Concrete, Plaster. Timber. Methods 
of seasoning Timber. Preservation of Timber. 
Wrought and Cast Iron. Preservation of Iron. 
Steel. Bessemer Process. Paints and Varnishes. 

2>rd. Masonry. — Stone Masonry. Brickwork. Precaution 
against Settlement. Plain Arching, Different 
Forms of Arches and modes of describing them. 
Foundations. Pile and Iron Tubular Founda- 
tions. Well Foundations. 

Uh. (a). Roads. — Earth, Moorum, and Metalled Roads. 
Gradient and Cross Section. Traction. Survey. 



the 



LICENTIATE OF CIVIL ENGINEERING. 73 

Lining out and Construction. Laying out 
Curves without an angular instrument. Tracing 
and Survey of Hill Roads. Maintenance and 
Repair. 

(6). Earthwork. Mensuration and setting out. Tools 
and Execution. Cuttings. Embanking and 
Puddling. 

hth. Engineering Drawing. — Each Candidate "will be re- 
quired to exhibit three drawings, executed by 
him during his course of study at an affiliated 
Institution. 

Each drawing to bear the following Certificate : — 

Certified that this drawing was executed within the walls 
*by and completed on 



(Signed) 



Principal of tlie 

Date , ~ 

* Enter the name of the School or College of Engineering. 

N.B.— Each Candidate will also be required to execute in the presence of 
the Examiners a pen and ink sketch of a simple object to show proficiency ia 
free hand sketching. For this sketch two hours will be allowed. 

Text-Book in CivIl Engineering. 
Such portions of the Roorkee Treatise on Civil Engineer- 
ing as treat of the subjects above specified. 

9. The Examination will be written and oral. 

10. On the Third Thursday after the commencement of 
the Examination, the Examiners will publish a list of tho 
successful Candidates in two Classes and Pass, the names in 
each Class and Pass being arranged in alphabetical order. 

EXAMINATION FOR THE DEGREE OF L.C.E. 

11. The Examination for the Degree of Licentiate of 
Civil Engineering will be held annually in Bombay, com 
mencing on the Fourth Monday in Novex 

12. No Undergraduate will be admitted to the Exami- 
nation unless he shall have kept two terms in a School or 
College of Civil Engineering recog ized by the University 
of Bombay subsequently to passing the First Examination, 

B 713 — ^7 



74 REGULATIONS. 

13. Candidates must apply to the Registrar two months 
before the Examination. (Vide Form AA.) 

14. Each Candidate must pay to the Registrar a fee oi 
Rs. 30, for which a receipt will be given, (Vide Form AB.) 

15. Failure to pass the Examination will not disqualify 
the Candidate for presenting himself at any subsequent 
examination for the Degree of Licentiate of Civil Engineer- 
ing, on a new application being forwarded and a fresh fee 

paid. 

16. Candidates will be examined in the following sub- 
jects : — 

I, Mathematics and Natural Philosophy. 
IT, Experimental and Natural Science, 

III. Civil Engineering. 

IV. One of the following to be selected by the Candi- 
date : — 

A. Analytical Geometry and Differential and 

Integral Calculus. 

B. Optics and Astronomy. 

C. Mining and Metallurgy. 

D. Architecture. 

E. Mechanical Engineering. 

F. Chemical Analysis, Meteorology, and Ter 

restrial Magnetism. 

1,— Mathematics and Natural Philosophy. 
[Four papers.] 

1st. Mensuration of Surfaces and Solids. 

2nd. (a.) Geometric Conic Sections. 

(h.) Analytical Geometry of Two Dimensions. — Ana- 
lytical Geometry of the right line and circle by 
Rectangular, Oblique, and Polar Coordinates, 

3rd. Statics and Dynamics. 

Uh. Hydrostatics. 

II. — Experimental and Natural Science. 
[Three Papers— Oral and Practical.] 

1st. Inorganic Chemistry. — The Chemistry of the prin- 
cipal Metals and their Salts. Qualitative Analy- 
sis of simple Salts. 

2nd. (a). Heat. — Propagation of Heat by Conduction 
Radiation, and Convection. Absorption, Reftec- 



LICENTIATE OF CIVIL ENGINEERING. 75 

tion, and Refraction of Heat. Diathermacy, 
Theory of Exchanges. Mechanical Theories of 
Heat? Mechanical and Chemical Equivalents, 
Different forms of Energy. Sources of Heat. 

(b.) Voltaic Electricity and Magnetism, 
Geology. — Definition of Geological terms. The prin- 
cipal Rocks and their Component Minerals. Trans- 
lation and Consolidation of Materials. Fossiliza- 
tion. Central Heat, Volcanoes. Earthquakes 
and other movements of the Earth's crust. Suc- 
cession of Strata, Formation of Coal. Metamor- 
phism of Rocks. Igneous Rocks. Geographical 
Distribution of the Stratified and Igneous Rocks 
in India* Mode of constructing Geological maps 
and Sections. 

Uh. Practical. — (1) Qualitative Analysis, and (2) Recog- 
nition of the more important Rocks and Minerals. 
5th> Oral. 

Text Books in Geology. 
Page's Introductory Text Book of Geology. 

Elementary Manual of Geology (published by the Educa- 
tional Department.) 

IIL— Civil Engineering. 

[Six Papers — Examination of Drawings, and Oral.] 

1st. — Engineering Field and Office Work. 

(a). Triangulation and Traversing. Azimuth, Lati- 
tude and Longitude. Contouring. The adjust- 
ment and use of Surveying Instruments. 

(b). Geometrical Drawing. 

N.B. — A plotted Triangulation, Traverse and Contour, to- 
gether with the Field books of the same (certified 
by the Head of a recognized Institution as the 
actual work of the Student), should be submitted 
to the Examiners by each Candidate. 
2nd. Strength of Materials. — Pressure. Tension. Torsion. 
Transverse strain. Factor of Safety. Deflection. 
Stability of Retaining-walls. Roofs. 



76 REGULATIONS. 

3rd Bridges — Masonry Bridges. Centering. 

Wooden Bridges. — Trussed and Girder Bridges 

Scarfs, Joints, and Straps. Built Beams. 
Iron Bridges. — Girder and Suspension. 

Ath. (a). Irrigation. — Canals for Irrigation and Naviga- 
tion. Sources of Supply. Quantity of Water re- 
quired. Slope of bed and section of channel. 
Alignment of Canal. Falls, Eapids, and Locks. 
Drainage. Aqueducts. Inlets. Dams. Super-, 
passages. Head Works. Regulators. Irrigational 
Tanks. Motion of Water through Pipes, in open 
Canals, and over Weirs. 
(6). Harbours. — Groins. Breakwaters. Quays. Basins. 
Docks and Jetties. 

5th. Specification and Estimating. — A Specification and 
Estimate of a simple structure to be drawn up 
from data. 
N.B. — Multiplication of dimensions will not be required. 

6th. Railways.— Location. Gauges. Curves. Gradients. 
Formation. Tunnels. Level Crossings. Ballasting. 
Fencing. Permanent Way. Stations. Signals. 
Turn-tables and Triangles. Engine Sheds. Loco- 
motive Engines. Traction. 

7th. Engineering Drawing. — Each Candidate will be re- 
quired to exhibit three Drawings, executed by him 
in an affiliated Institution subsequent to his pass- 
ing the First Examination in Civil Engineering. 

Each Drawing to bear the following certificate : — 

Certified that this drawing was executed within the walls 

of * by and completed 

on the 

( Signed) 



Principal of the 
Date 



* Enter the name of the School or College of Engineering. 

N.B.— Each Candidate will also be required to execute in the presence of 
the Examiners a pen and ink sketch of a simple object to show proficiency in 
tree hand-sketching. For this sketch two hours will be allowed. 

Text Books. 

The Roorkee Treatise of Civil Engineering. 
The Roorkee Manual of Surveying. 



LICENTIATE OP CIVIL ENGINEERING. 77 

Rankine's Civil Engineering (omitting Part IT., Chap. T., 
ad Section I. of Chap. II.) 
IV. One of the following) to be selected by the Can- 

idate : — 

V Analytical Geometry op Two Dimensions and 

Differential and Integral Calculus, 

[Two Papers,] 

Analytical Geometry, — Equation to the Parabola, 
Polar Equation to the Parabola. Properties of the 
Parabola. 
Equation to the Ellipse. Eccentric angle, Connection 
between Ellipse and Parabola* Polar Equation 
to the Ellipse. Properties of the Ellipse, 
Equation to the Hyperbola, Asymptotes, Polar Equation 

to the Hyperbola. Properties of the Hyperbola. 
2nd (a,) Differential and Integral Calculus. — Differentia- 
tion of functions of one variable, Successive 
differentiation, Evaluation of indeterminate 
functions. Taylor's Theorem. Maxima and 
Minima, 
(b). [Integral Calculus. — Elementary Examples in 
Integration. 

B, — Optics and Astronomy, 
[Two Papers.] 

Eeflection and Refraction at Plane and Spherical 
Surfaces, Dispersion of Light, The Rainbow, 
The Sextant^ Lenses > the Telescope, the Eye. 

2nd, Apparent motions of the Heavenly Bodies. Instru- 
ments, Phenomena depending on change of 
place, Atmospheric Refraction, Comparison 
of Diameters of Earth, Sun, Moon, and Planets. 
Ptolemaic and Copernican Systems, Eclipses. 
Sidereal, Solar, Mean) and Apparent Time. 
Latitude, Longitude, and Variation of the 
Compass. 

C. — Mining and Metallurgy. 
[Two Papers.] 

1st. Physical Characters of Metals. Alloys. Crystal- 
line Systems, Cleavage. Goniometers. Mineral 
Veins. Lodes and Beds. Mining Excavations, 

B 713—0° 



78 REGULATIONS. 

Ventilation of Mines. Lighting of Workings. 
Driving of Levels, Drifts, and Windroads. 

Means of Security to be adopted in Shafts. 
Pillar and Stall and Long wall system 
extracting Coal. Varieties of Coal. Compara- 
tive value of Fuels. 

' 2nd. Mode of dressing Ores. Furnace Materials. Plays. 
# Crucibles. The more important ores of the 

following metals, viz : — Iron, Copper, Lead, 
Tin, Zinc, and Mercury. Iron smelting. . Manu- 
facture of Steel. Copper smelting. Refining 
and toughening crude Copper. Zinc smelting. 
Treatment of Mercurial ores. English and 
German methods of extracting Lead from its 
ores. Extraction of Silver from Lead ores. 
Pattinson's process. 

Text Book. 

Bloxains Metals ; their Properties and Treatment. 

D. — Architecture. 

[Two Papers.] 

1st. The Classic Orders. Gothic Architecture. 

2nd. Characteristics of the Saracenic and Hindu Archi- 
tecture. 

Text Books. 
Parker's Introduction to the study of Gothic Architecture. 
Fergusson's History of Architecture, Part III., Books I. 
to V. inclusive. 

E. — Mechanical Engineering. 
[One Paper and Practical.] 

1st. Machinery. The Steam Engine, including Land, 
Marine, and Locomotive Engines. Workshop 
machinery. 

2nd. Practical. Candidates will be examined practically 
in one of the following, to be selected by the 
Candidate : — 

1. Fitting. 

2. Smithes Work. 

3. Carpentry. 



MASTER OP CIVIL ENGINEERING. 79 

Text Books. 

Bourne's Catechism of the Steam Engine. 
Carapin's Principles and Practice of Machinery. 

P. — Chemical Analysis, Meteorology and 

Terrestrial Magnetism. 

[Two Papers.] 

] . Chemical Analysis. — Methods usually employed in the 
Quantitative determination of the more com- 
monly occurring Elements. Analysis of Lime- 
stones. Analysis of Felspars. Assay of the ores 
of Iron, Lead, Copper, Zinc, Tin, and Silver. 
Analysis of the common Alloys. General prin- 
ciples of Volumetric Analysis. Water Analysis. 

2nd. Meteorology and Terrestrial Magnetism. — Atmosphe- 
ric variation. Instruments used in determin- 
ing the Thermometric, Barometric, Hygrome- 
tric and Electrical condition of the Atmosphere. 
Clouds, their appearance and classification. 
Anemometers. Ozone. Ozonometer. Methods 
employed for the determination of the Magnetic 
Elements. Instruments used in Magnetic Obser- 
vatories. 

1 7. The Examination will be written, oral, and practical. 

18. The practical Examination for the Degree of Licen- 
tiate of Civil Engineering will be conducted in a place 
appointed by the Examiners, and be of a nature to test 
fully the Candidate's practical ability in Subject II. and in 
B of Subject IV. of Regulation 17. 

19. On the Third Thursday after the commencement of 
the Examination, the Examiners will publish a list of the 
successful Candidates in two Classes and Pass, the names in 
*ach Class and Pass being arranged in alphabetical order. 

20.. A Certificate will be given to those who pass the 
Examination. (Vide Form AC.) 

MASTER OF CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

21. The Examination for the Degree of Master of Civil 
Engineering will be held annually at Bombay, commencing 
on the Second Monday in the First Term in Arts and Civil 
Engineering. 



80 KEGULATIONS. 

22. Each Candidate must have obtained the Degree at 
least of Bachelor of Arts in the University of Bombay, or 
some University recognized by it* and must have practised 
as a Civil Engineer for at least three years after receiving 
the Degree of Licentiate of Civil Engineering in the Uni- 
versity of Bombay, or some University recognized by it. 

23. Candidates must apply to the Eegistrar two months 
before the Examination. (Vide Form AD.) 

24. Each Candidate must pay to the Eegistrar a fee of 
Us. 50, for which a receipt will be given* (Vide Form AE.) 

25. In the Examination, each Candidate will be required 
to submit, with due authentication, the working-drawings 
and specifications of such engineering works as may have 
been designed and executed by himself during the two 
previous years. 

26. On the Second Monday after the commencement ot 
the Examination, the Examiners will publish a list of the 
successful Candidates, arranged in alphabetical order. 

27. A certificate will be given to those who pass the 
Examination . ( Vide Form AF.) 



GENEKAL, 

No question shall be put, at any University Examination, 
calling for a declaration of religious belief on the part of 
the Candidate ; and no answer or translation given by any 
Candidate shall be objected to on the ground of its express- 
ing any peculiarity of religious belief. 



81 
ADMISSION TO DEGREES. 



1. Degrees will be conferred on the Third Tuesday in 
January, and on such other Graduation days as may be 
appointed by the Chancellor or Vice-Chancellor, 

2. Persons entitled to Degrees, and desirous of being 
admitted, must apply in writing ten days previously to the 
Registrar, who will communicate their names, together with 
the necessary certificates, to the respective Deans of Faculty, 
for submission to the Senate on the next Graduation day. 

3. The Senate will, on the motion of the Deans of Fa- 
culty, respectively, pass the necessary graces in that behalf, 
and the Dean of Faculty will then present the persons so 
approved of to the Chancellor or Vice-Chancellor succes- 
sively in the following order: — Licentiate of Civil Engi- 
neering, Licentiate of Medicine and Surgery, Bachelor of 
Arts, Bachelor of Laws, Master of Civil Engineering, Mas- 
ter of Arts, and Doctor of Medicine. 

4. As he presents each Candidate, the Dean of Faculty 
will address the Chancellor or Vice- Chancellor in the fol- 
lowing words : — 

Mr. Chancellor (or Mr. Vice-Chancellor, or my Lord, if 
he be a nobleman), I present to you (name and College), 
who has been examined and found qualified for the Degree 
of to which I pray he may be admitted : 

and the Chancellor will answer : — 

By the authority given me as Chancellor of this Univer- 
sity, I admit you (name) to the Degree of 

and I charge you that ever in your life and conversation 
you show yourself worthy of the same. 

The Chancellor will at the same time present each 
< rraduate, successively, with the Certificate of the Degree 
f-onferred on him. 

5. Nothing in the foregoing Bye-laws is to be held to 
prevent the Chancellor admitting to the Degree of M.D.or 
M.A. any person who may be presented to him by the 
Senate with a certificate that he has been examined and 
judged worthy of such special distinction. 



To 



VII, 
L ARTS- 

MATRICULATION. 
FORM A. 

The Registrar of the University of Bombay. 
Sir, 



I request permission to present myself at the ensuing 
Matriculation Examination of the University of Bombay. 

I wish to be examined in the English and the 

languages. 

I wish to be examined in the English Paper at* 

I am, Sir, 
Your obedient Servant, 

(Name, with surname, 
in the English and 
Vernacular characters) , 

f Village. 
Birth-place < Taluka. 

(Zillah: 
„. ,, , (According to Christian or Native 

Birth-day | Chronology. 

t, ,1 » C Name. 

Fathers ;--i Occupation. 

(Race and Religion).. 

( Where educated) . . . 

(Date) 

* Please insert one of the following centres of Examina- 
tion : — 

1. Bombay. I 3. Ahmedabad. 5. Karachi. 

2. Poona. | 4. Belgaum. 



MATRICULATION EXAMINATION. 83 

i certify that has been (in my School) 

or (under my tuition) from ( to 

and that I assent to the above application. 

Signature of Applicant's last ( 

Schoolmaster or Teacher. \ 

j, . C {Enter post-office address,) ( 

\ (Enter day and year.) \ 

N.B. — If the period of School attendance or tuition named 
in the certificate be less than eight months, the applicant 
must also forward another certificate or other certificates, 
signed by his last previous Instructor or Instructors, so as to 
cover altogether a period of not less than eight months. 

When a student has been attending both a Public School 
and a private Teacher at the same time, the certificate of 
the Master of the former will be required. 

(I). Certificate of Moral Character, to be signed by a person 
of known respectability. 

r certify that I have known 

tor years, ancl believe him to be a person 01 

good moral character. 

(Signature) 

(Date) 

(2.) Certificate of Age, to be signed by a person of known 
respectability. 

I certify that I have known the family of the above 

for years, and that, to the best of my knowledge and 

belief, he has completed his sixteenth year, or will have 
completed his sixteenth year before the commencement of 
the ensuing Matriculation Examination. 

• (Signature) 

(Date) 



FORM B- 

University op Bombay. 

Received from Rs. 10, being the fee for per- 
mission to attend the ensuing Matriculation Examination. 

' (Signature) 

Registrar, 
i Date) 



84 FORMS. 

FORM C- 

University of Bombay. 

T certify that the undersigned duly passed the 

Matriculation Examination held in the month of 18 . 



(Signature of the holder) 

(Signature) 



(Date) 



Registrar 



BACHELOR OF ARTS. 
FIRST EXAMINATION IN ARTS 

FORM D- 

To 

The Registrar of the University of Bombay. 

Sir. 

I request permission to present myself at the ensuing 
First Examination in Arts. I wish to be examined in the 
English and languages. 

I am, &c. 
• 

(Name) 

(Race and Religion) 

(College) ; _^_ 

(Date of Matriculation) w _. 

(Date) _____________ 

Certificate to be signed by the Head of the College or Institution 
at which the Candidate may have attended. 

I certify that t has attended since his 

Matriculation the number of days under specified, at the 
of which I am 



EXAMINATION FOB B.A. 



85 



No. of days. 


Remarks. 


187 


First Term 
-7 . 






Second Term 




187 


First Term 
-7 . 






Second Term 




187 


First Term 
-7 . 






Second Term 





I farther certify that, to the best of my knowledge and 

'belief, the said is a person of good 

conduct, and that he has my permission to present himself 
at the ensuing First Examination in Arts at the University 
of Bombay. 

(Date) (Signature) 



FORM E. 

University of Bombay. 



Received from 



Rs. 20, being the fee for 



permission to attend the ensuing First Examination in Arts. 

(Signature) 

(Date) Registrar. 



EXAMINATION FOR B.A. 
FORM F- 



To 



The Registrar of the University of Bombay. 

Sir, 
I request permission to present myself at the ens uing 
Examination for the Degree of Bachelor of Arts. 
b 713—^ 



$6 



FORMS. 



In addition to the necessary subjects, I offer to be examin 
ed in the languages, and in* 

I am, &c, 



(Name) 

(Race and Religion) 

(College) 

(Date of First Examination in Arts) 
(Date) 



Certificate to be signed by the Head of the College or Institution 
at which the Candidate may have attended. 



I certify that 



has attended since 

his passing the First Examination in Arts the number of 

days under specified, at the of 

which I am 



No. of days. 


Remarks 


187 


First Term 

-7 . 






Second Term 




187 


First Term 

-7 . 






Second Term 




187 


First Term 

-7 . 






Second Term 





I further certify that, to the best of my knowledge and 
belief, the said is a person of 



* Insert one of the following Groups :— A. Language and Literature.— B. 
History and Political Economy.— C. Logic and Moral Philosophy — D. Mathe 
Katies.— E. Natural Science. 



MASTER OP AETS. 87 

good conduct ; and that he has my permission to present 
himself at the ensuing Examination for the Degree of 
Bachelor of Arts at the University of Bombay. 

(Date) (Signature) 



FORM G- 

University op Bombay. 

Received from , Rb. 30, being the 

fee for permission to attend the ensuing Examination for 
the Degree of Bachelor of Arts. 

(Signature) 

(Date) Registrar, 



FORM H. 

University op Bombay. 

I certify that the undersigned satisfied 

the Examiners at the Examination for the Degree of 

Bachelor of 4-*k s > held in the month of , and 

was placed in the Class. 

(Signature of the holder) . 

(Signature) 

(Date) Registrar. 



MASTER OF ARTS. 

FORM J. 

To 

The Registrar of the University of Bombay. 

Sir, 

I request permission to present myself for Examination 
for the Degree of Master of Arts in the University of Bombay, 



88 FORMS. 

I offer to be examined in* 



(Name and Degree).., 
(Race and Eeligion) 

(College) 

(Date of Graduation) 
(Date) i 



I am, &c., 



FORM K 

University op Bombay. 

Beceivedfrom Es. 50, being the 

fee for permission to attend the ensuing Examination for 
the Degree of Master of Arts. 

(Signature) 

(Date)_ Registrar. 



FORM L. 

University op Bombay. 

I certify that the undersigned satisfied the 

Examiners inf at the Examination for the 

Degree of Master of Arts held in the month of 

(Signature of the holder) 

(Signature), 



(Date) Registrar. 

* Insert one or more of the following : — 

1. The English and ! languages. 

2. History and Philosophy. 

3. Mathematics. 

4. Natural Sciences. 

■f- Specify the branch or branches of Examination. 



89 

II. LAW. 



BACHELOR OF LAWS 



FORM M. 



The Registrar of the University of Bombay. 

Sir, 

I request permission to present myself at the ensuing 
Examination for the Degree of Bachelor of Laws. 

I am, &c, 



(Name) 

(Race and Religion) 

(College) 

(Date of Graduation in Arts) 

(Date) 

Certificate to be si/jned by the Head of the School of Law 
in which the Candidate may have studied. 

I certify that_ has 

studied in the 



as under specified : — 



(Date) 



of which I am 



Period of Study. 




From 


To 











(Signature) 



b 713— A* 



90 • FORMS. 

N.B.—li the Candidate has not studied for the requisite 
period in one School of Law, he must furnish supple- 
mentary Certificates in the above tabular form. 

N.B. — If the applicant is not a graduate of the University 
of Bombay, he must append a certificate of graduation; 
and testimonials of moral character, satisfactory to the 
Syndicate, 



FORM N- 

University of Bombay. 
Received from Es. 30, being the fee for per- 
mission to attend the ensuing Examination for the Degree 
©f Bachelor of Laws. 

(Signature) 

(Date) Registrar. 

FORM 0. 

University of Bombay. 

I certify that the undersigned satisfied the 

Examiners at the Examination for the Degree of Bachelor 

of Laws held in the month of , and was placed 

in the Division. 

(Signature of the holder) 

( Signature) 

(Date) Registrar. 

FORM 0A 
To 

The Registrar of the University of Bombay. 
Sir, 
I request permission to present myself at the ensuing 
Examination for Honours in Law. 

I am, &c., 

(Name, with surname) 

(Date of graduation in Law) 

(Enter Post Office address) 

(Enter day and year) 



FORM OR 

University of Bombay. 

Received from Rs. 50, being the 

fee for permission to attend the ensuing Examination for 
Honours in Law. 

(Signature). _. 

Registrar, 
(Date) 



91 

HI- MEDICINE- 



LICENTIATE OF MEDICINE AND 
SURGERY. 

FIRST EXAMINATION IN MEDICINE. 

FORM P. 

To 

The Registrar of the University of Bombay. 
Sir, 
I request permission to present myself at the ensuing 
First Examination in Medicine in the University of Bombay, 

I am, &c., 

(Name) 

(Race and Religion) 

(College) 

(Date of Graduation, or Matriculation, ") 

as the case may be) ) 

(Date) 

Certificates. 

(1) I certify that , to the best of my know- 
ledge and belief , has completed his nineteenth year. 

(Signature of some person of known ") 

respectability) ) 

(Date) 



(2) I certify that , to the best of my know- 
ledge and belief, is a person of good moral conduct ; and 
that he has my permission to present himself at the ensu- 
ing First Examination in Medicine. 

(Signature of Head of School of Medicine) 

(Date) 



(3) I certify that has been engaged in 

medical study in the School of Medicine for 

two University years. 

(Signature of Head of School of Medicine) 

(Date) 



92 



K< JBMS. 



(4) I certify that has attended 

two Courses of Lectures in Descriptive Anatomy, each 
of Lectures. 

(Date) (Signature) 



(5) I certify that has attended 

two Courses of Lectures in Physiology and General Ana- 
tomy, each of Lectures. 

(Date) (Signature) 



(6) I certify that has attended 

two Courses of Lectures in Chemistry, each of 

Lectnres. 

(Date) (Signature) 



(7) I certify that has attended 

two Courses of Lectures in Botany, each of 

Lectures., 

(Date) '_ ( Signature) 



(8) . I certify that has attended 

two Courses of Lectures in Materia Medica, each of 
Lectures . 

(Date) (Signature) 



(9) I certify that has attended 

two Courses in Practical Chemistry, including General 
and Pharmaceutical Chemistry, and the Detection of the 
Adulteration of Drugs, each of 

(Date) (Signature). 



FIRST EXAMINATION IN MEDICINE. 93 



First Examination in Medicine. 

(10) I certify that has attended 

one Course of Practical Pharmacy of 

months ; and that he has acquired a practical knowledge 
of the preparation and compounding of medicines. 

(Date) (Signature) 



(11) I certify that has been engaged 

in Dissection for two Eirst Terms in Medicine, in the course 
of which he has dissected the whole human body twice. 



FORM Q. 

University op Bombay. 

Received from „Rs. 20, being the fee for per- 
mission to attend the ensuing First Examination in Medi- 
cine. 

(Date) (Signature). 



Registrar. 



FORM R. 

University op Bombay. 

I certify that the undersigned satisfied the 

Examiners at the First Examination in Medicine, held 



94 



FOEMS. 



in the month of , and was placed in the 

Division. 

(Signature of the holder) 



(Date) , (Signature) 



EXAMINATION FOR THE DEGREE OF L.M. AND S. 

FORM S. 

To 

The Registeae of the Univeesity of Bombay. 
Sie, 

I request permission to present myself at the ensuing 
Examination for the Degree of Licentiate of Medicine and 
Surgery. 

I am. &c.; 

(Name with Surname) 

(Race and Religion) 

(College) 

(Date of passing the First Exa-*) 

mination) ) 

(Date) 



Ceetificates. 

(1) I certify that _ , to the best of 

my knowledge and belief, is a person of good moral con- 
duct ; and that he has my permission to present himself at 
the ensuing Examination for the Degree of Licentiate of 
Medicine and Surgery. 

(Signature of Head of School of Medicine) 

(Date) 



(2) I certify that has attended 

two Courses of Lectures in Medicine, each of 

Lectures. 

(Date) (Signature) 



LICENTIATE Of MEDICINE. 95 

(3) I certify that has attended two 

Courses of Lectures in Surgery, each of 

Lectures. 

(Date) (Signature) 



(4) I certify that has attended 

two Courses of Lectures on Diseases of the Eye, each of 
Lectures. 

(Date) (Signature) 



(5) I certify that_ has attended 

two Courses of Lectures on Midwifery and Diseases of 
Women and Children, each of Lectures. 

(Date) (Signature) 



(6) I certify that has attended 

two Courses of Lectures in Medical Jurisprudence and 

Practical Toxicology, of Lectures in 

the aggregate. 

(Date) (Signature) . 



(7) I certify that has attended 

one Course in Pathology, of Lectures. 

(Date) (Signature) 



(8) I certify that has attended 

one Course in Hygiene, of Lectures. 

(Date) (Signature) , 



96 *ORMS. 

(9) I certify that has dissected 

the surgical regions, and performed operations on the dead 
subject during two Terms in Medicine. 

(Date (Signature) 



(10) I certify that has attended 

a Lying-in Hospital for nine months, and has conducted 
Midwifery cases. 

(Date) (Signature) 



(11) I certify that has attended 

at the Medical Practice of Hospital for 

eighteen months, during nine of which he has officiated as 
Clinical Clerk, and that during that time he has attended 
Lectures on Clinical Medicine. 

(Date) .. ( Signature) 



(12) I certify that has attended 

at the Surgical Practice of Hospital 

for eighteen months, during nine of which he has officiated 
as Surgical Dresser, and that during that time he has 
attended ; Lectures on Clinical Surgery. 

(Date) (Signature). 



(13) I certify that has attended 

the Practice at , Ophthalmic Hospital 

for six months. 

(Date) (Signature) 



I FORM T 

University op Bombay. 

Received froin_ . Rs. 30, being the 

fee for permission to attend the ensuing Examination for 
the Degree of Licentiate of Medicine and Surgery. 

(Signature) 

(Date-) Registrar. 



I 



DOCTOR OF MBDIC[NB. 97 

FORM U. 

Univeksity op Bombay. 

I certify that the undersigned satisfied the 

Examiners at the Examination for the Degree of Licentiate 

of Medicine and Surgery held in the month of 

and was placed in the Class. 

(Signature of the holder) 

(Signature) 



Registrar. 



(Date). 



DOCTOR OF MEDICINE. 
FORM V- 

To 

The Registrar of the University of Bombay. 

Sir, 

I request permission to present myself at the ensuing 
Examination for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine. 

I enclose testimonials signed by Doctors 



and and of my 

having obtained the Degree of in the 

University of , and the Degree of 

in Medicine in the University of 



I am, &c., 



(Name) 

(Race and Religion) 
(Date) 



L certify that has attended the Medical 

and Surgical Practice of Hospital during 

the years and 

(Signature) 

(Date) b ; 

" 71 ^ — i 



FORMS. 

FORM W 

University of Bombay. 

Received from Rs. 100, being the fee for 

permission to attend the ensuing Examination for the 
Begree of Doctor of Medicine, 

(Signature) 

Registr 

(Date) 



FORM X 

University of Bombay. 

I certify that the undersigned satisfied the 

Examiners at the Examination for the Degree of Doc * 
Medicine held in the month of 

(Signature of the holder) 



(Signature) 

Beeristrai 



(Date) 



99 



IV. CIVIL ENGINEERING- 



riRST EXAMINATION IN CIVIL 
ENGINEERING. 

FORM Y 

To 

The Registrar of the University of Bombay. 
Sir. 

I request permission to present myself at the ensuing 
First Examination in Civil Engineering. 

I am, &c, 

(Name) 

(Race and Religion) 

(College) 

(Date of Matriculation) __ 

{(Enter place) 
(Enter time) 



• 



(Signature) 



Certificate to be signed by the Mead of the College or Institu- 
tion in Arts at which the Candidate may have attended. 

I certify that __has attended since his 

Matriculation the number of days under specified, at the 
, of which I am 

(Signature) 

(Date) 



100 



FORMS 



Number of Days. 


Remarks. 




187 


-7 


First Term 






Second Terra 






187 


-7 


First Term 






Second Term 






187 


-7 


First Term 






Second Term 





Certificates to he signed by the Head of School or College of 
Civil Engineering at which the Candidate may have studied. 

(1) I certify that has attended 

since his Matriculation the number of days under specified. 

at the , of which 

I am 



Number of Days. 


Remarks. 


187 


First Term 
-7 . 






Second Term 




187 


First Term 
-7 . 






Second Term 




187 


First Term 
-7 . 






Second Term 





(2) I further certify that, to the best of my knowledge 
and belief, the said 



LICENTIATE OF CIVIL ENGINEERING. 101 

is a person of good conduct, and that he has my permission 
to present himself at the ensuing First Examination in 
Civil Engineering. 

(Date) (Signature) 



FORM Z. 

University of Bombay. 

Received from Rupees 20, being the 

fee for permission to attend the ensuing First Examination, 
in Civil Engineering. • 

(Signature) 

(Date) _____ Registrar. 



LICENTIATE OF CIVIL ENGINE WRING. 
FORM AA. 
To 

The Registrar of the University of Bombay. 
Sir, 
I request permission to present myself at the ensuing 
Examination for the Degree of Licentiate of Civil Engi- 
neering. 

I am, &e., 

( Name) 

(Race and Religion) 

(College) 

(Date of passing the First Examina- 
tion in Civil Engineering) 

(Signature) 
(Date) 

Certificates to be signed by the Head of School or College 
of Civil Engineering. 

I certify that has attended, 

subsequently to his passing the First Examination in Civil 
Engineering, the number of days under specified, at the 

, of which I am 

"(Date) (Signature) 

d 713— i* 



102 



FORMS. 



Number of Days. 



Remarks. 



187 -7 



187 -7 



187 -7 



First Term 



Second Term 



First Term 



Second Term 



First Term 



Second Term 



(2) I further certify that, to the best of my knowledge 

and belief, the said is a person of 

good conduct, and that he has my permission to present 
himself at the ensuing Examination for the Degree of 
Licentiate of Civil Engineering at the University of Bom- 
bay. 

(Signature) 



FORM AB. 

University op Bombay. 

Received from Rupees 30 

being the fee for permission to attend the ensuing Exami- 
nation for the Degree of Licentiate of Civil Engineering. 



(Signature) 



(Date), 



Registrar. 



FORM AC 

University of Bombay. 



I certify that the undersigned 



satisfied 



the Examiners at the Examination for the Degree of Licen- 



MASTER OF CIVIL ENGINEERING, 103 

ate of Civil Engineering held in the month of 

ud was placed in the , Class. 

(Signature) 



Registrar. 
(Date) 



MASTER OF CIVIL ENGINEERING. 
FORM AD- 

To 

The Registrar of the University of Bombay. 

Sir, 

1 request permission to present •myself at the ensuing 
Examination for the Degree of Master of Civil Engineering. 

1 am, fyc, 

■ S ame) 

( Race and Religion) 

(College) 

( Date of Graduation in Arts) _ 

(Ditto ditto in Civil Engineering) ... 
(Date) 



Certificates. 

1. I certify that_ has passed a period extend- 
ing from ' to in 

actual practice on works under me. 

(Signature of Engineer in charge of) 
(Date) 

2. T certify that has passed a period extend- 
ing from to in 

actual practice as a Civil Engineer, during which period he 
has been engaged on the following works. 

(Signature of Engineer) __ 

(Date)_ 



104 FOEMS. 

FORM AE- 

University of Bombay. 

Received from Rg. 50, being the 

fee for permission to attend the ensuing Examination for 
the Degree of Master of Civil Engineering. 

( Signature) 



(Date). 



Registrar. 



FORM AF. 

University of Bombay. 

I certify that the undersigned satisfied 

the Examiners at the Examination for the Degree of Master 

of Civil Engineering held in the month of 

(Signature of the holder) 

(Signature) 



Registrar. 
(Date) 



THE MUNGULDASS NATHOOBHOY 
TRAVELLING FELLOWSHIP. 

FORM AG- 

To 

The Registrar of the University of Bombay. 

Sir, 

I beg to present myself as a Candidate for the Munguldass 
Nathoobhoy Travelling Fellowship. 

If I am elected, I pledge myself to accept the Fellowship, 
and to comply with its conditions. 

I enclo se herewith testimonials of my fitness for election 

I am, &c, 

(Name and Degree) , 

(Race) , 

(College) 

(Date of Graduation) 

(Date) 



BHUG. PUR. AND JAM S. VI B. SCHOLARSHIPS. 105 



THE BHUGWANDASS PURSHOTUMDASS 
SANSKRIT SCHOLARSHIP, 



FORM AH. 



To 



The Registrar of the University of Bombay. 

Sir, 

I request permission to present myself at the ensuing 
Bhugwandass Purshotumdass Sanskrit Scholarship Exa- 
mination. 

I am, &c., 

(Name with Surname) 

Date \ ^ nter P lace ) — 



(Enter time) 



To 



THE JAM SHRI VIBHAJI SCHOLARSHIP, 
FORM AI 

The Registrar of the University of Bombay. 
Sir, 

1 beg to offer myself as a Candidate for the Jam Shri 
Yibhaji Scholarship. 

I enclose a copy of my Matriculation Certificate (Form 
C), and also a Certificate that I was born in the village of 

in the Province of Katty war, signed by 

(here enter the name of some person holding an official 
appointment in Katty war), 

I am, &c, 
(Signature) 



106 FORMS. 

THE HEBBERT AND LATOUCHE SCHOLARSHIP. 

FORM AJ. 
To 

The Registrar of the University of Bombay. 
Sir, 

I beg to offer myself as a Candidate for the Hebbert and 
LaTouche Scholarship. 

I enclose a copy of my Matriculation Certificate (Form 
C), and also a Certificate that I was born in Soreth, in 
Kattywar, signed by (here enter the name of some person 
holding an official appointment hi Kattywar.) 

I am, &c., 
( Signature) ___ 



THE RAO SIR PRAGMALJI SCHOLARSHIP. 

FORM AX. 
To 

The Registrar of the University of Bombay. 

Sir, 
I beg to offer myself as a Candidate for one of the Rao 
Sir Pragmalji Scholarships. 

I enclose a Certificate signed by 

that I (or my father, as the case may be,) was born in 
Cutch. 

I am, &c., 
(Signature) 



THE KAHANDASS MANCHARAM SCHO- 
LARSHIP. 

FORM AL. 
To 

The Registrar of the University of Bombay. 
Sir, 
I beg to offer myself as a Candidate for the Kahandass 
Mancharam Scholarship. 

I am, &c, 

(Signature) 

Date 



VIII 




THE MUNGULDASS NATHQOBHOY 
TRAVELLING FELLOWSHIP. 
Munguldass Nathoobhoy, Esq., Justice of the Peace, in a 
letter to Government, dated the 19th August 1862, offered 
the sum of Rs. 20,000 in 4 per cent. Government Securities, 
for the purpose of endowing a Travelling Fellowship for 
Hindu Graduates of the University of Bombay. This offer 
was accepted by a Convocation of the Senate on the 26tb 
March 18(53, and the following Regulations were passed for 
the awarding and tenure of the Fellowship : — 

1. ''The Munguldass Nathoobhoy Travelling Fel? 
lowship" shall be open to all Graduates of the University 
of Bombay being Hindus who shall not be of more than five 
years' standing from the date of their graduation. By the 
term Graduates is to be understood Masters and Bachelors 
of Arts, Bachelors of Law, Doctors and Licentiates of Me- 
dicine, and Masters and Licentiates of Civil Engineering ; 
and by the term date of graduation is to be understood the 
dates of the Candidates receiving the Degree of Bachelor 
of Arts or Licentiate of Medicine or Licentiate of Civil 
Engineering. 

2. Candidates for the Followship must forward an appli- 
cation to the Registrar und^r Form AG. one week before 
the day of election. 

3. The election shall take place without Examination by 
the votes of the Syndicate, the Vice-Chancellor or Senior 
Fellow present having a casting vote. 

4. Whenever there is a vacancy in the Fellowship, a 
convenient day for holding an election shall be appointed 
by the Syndicate, who shall give due notice of the same in 
the Government Gazette, 



108 



ENDOWMENTS. 



5. The Munguldass Nathoobhoy Fellowship shall be 
tenable by any one Fellow for a space of three years. The 
conditions of tenure are that the Fellow must leave Bombay 
and proceed to Europe within two months after his elec- 
tion; that he shall spend the whole of the three years 
subsequent to the date of his leaving India for Europe, out 
of India, and six months at least out of each year in Great 
Britain or Ireland ; and that he shall report twice a year to 
the University Registrar as to the mode in which his time 
has been spent. 

6. Any violation of the above conditions shall ipso facto 
cause the Fellowship to be vacated ; and the Syndicate shall 
be empowered, for any just cause, to recall and deprive of 
his Fellowship any one who may have been elected. 

7. The Munguldass Nathoobhoy Travelling Fellow shall 
receive through the University Registrar, in half-yearly in- 
stalments, payable in advance, from the day of his leaving 
India, the interest due upon the endowment, together with 
any accumulations that may have taken place during pre^ 
vious vacancies. 



Yeah. 



1867 March 

1868 Sept. 
1871 Nov. 

1874 April. 

1877 April. 



Fellow. 



Jayakar, Atmaram Sadashiv, L.M 
Thakur, Shripad Babaji, B.A ... 
Daphtare, Girdharlal Ratanlal, 

L.M., M.D 

Vaslekar, Nanaji Narayan,L,C.E. 

Dhairyavan, Vasudev Krishna- 
rao, B.A., LL.B. 



College. 



Grant. 
Elphinstone. 

Grant. 
Poona Civil 

Engineering. 
Elph. & Govt, 

Law School. 



IL 
THE MANOCKJEE LIMJEE GOLD MEDAL. 
Limjee Manockjee and Cowasjee Manockjee, Esquires, 
in a letter to the Vice-Chancellor of the University, Sir 
Alexander Grant, Bart., dated the 27th May 1863, offered 
the sum of Rs. 5,000 in 4 per cent. Government Securities 
for the purpose of founding an annual Gold Medal, to bear 
the name of their father, the late Manockjee Limjee, Esquire, 
and to be awarded each year to the best Essay by a Uni- 
versity student, on certain prescribed subjects. This offer 
was accepted by a Convocation of the Senate on the 3rd 
September 1863, and the following Regulations were passed 
for the awarding of the Medal : — 



THE MANOCKJEB LIMJEE GOLD MEDAL. 109 

1. "The Manockjee Limjee Gold Medal" shall be 
a.warded annually for the best Essay by a University Stu- 
dent, in accordance with the subjoined conditions. 

2. Competitors shall be Graduates in the University of 
Bombay who shall not be of more than five years' standing 
from the date of their graduation, on the day prescribed for 
the sending in of the Essays. By the term Graduates is to 
be understood Masters and Bachelors of Arts, Bachelors of 
Laws, Doctors and Licentiates of Medicine, and Masters 
and Licentiates of Civil Engineering ; and by the term date 
of graduation is to be understood the date of the Candidates' 
receiving the Degree of Bachelor of Arts, or Licentiate of 
Medicine, or Licentiate of Civil Engineering. 

3. Competitive Essays shall be written in the English 
Language on the subject appointed for the current year, and 
shall be sent in to the University Registrar on or before 
the fourth Monday in September. Each Essay shall be 
designated by a motto instead of the writer's name, and 
shall be accompanied by a sealed cover, containing the 
name of the competitor, and a declaration that the Essay 
sent in by him is bond fide his own composition. 

4. The subject of the Essay shall be in alternate years : 
(a) some question of Indian History or Antiquities; (b) 
some question connected with the introduction into India 
of European Science and Art. 

5. The subject for the competition is to be selected by 
the Syndicate, and notified not less than twelve months 
before the day for sending in the Essays. 

6. The Judges shall be two in number, and shall be no- 
minated annually by the Syndicate. Their decision shall 
be announced on the fourth Monday in November. 

7. The Medal shall be presented to the successful Can- 
didate at the Convocation for conferring Degrees next 
ensuing after the Judges' decision. The Medallist shall on 
the same occasion read aloud selected portions of his Essay. 

8. The successful Essay shall be printed at the expense 
of the University. 

9. The Medal shall not be awarded to any Essay which, in 
the opinion of the Judges, would not, when printed, be credit- 
able to the University. But if only one Essay be sent in, no- 
thing shall hinder the Judges from awarding to it the Medal 
if it appears to them to come up to the proper standard. 

10. Whenever a year passes without the Medal beingaward- 
ed,the interest of the Endowment shall go towards the print- 
ing of Essays and other expenses connected with the Prize 

b 713— j 



110 



ENDOWMENTS. 



11, On all occasions of Academical costume, Medallist; 
shall be entitled to wear their Medals. 



Year. 
18657 
1866.. 

1867.. 
1868.. 

3869.. 
1870.. 
1871.. 

1872.. 



1873. 

1874. 



1875. 
1876. 

1877. 

1878. 



Subject. 



The Rise and Spread of Buddhism 
in India. 



The Advantages and Means o/Medal not 



Diffusing a Scientific Practice 
of Medicine in India 

The Unprinted Literature of the 
Mardthds, 

The Comparison of different Styles 
of Architecture in respect of their 
suitability for Public and Do- 
mestic Buildings in India. 

The Connection between the Phy- 
sical Geography of India and 
the History of the Country. 

The Social and Economic Effects 
of the Introduction of Railways 
into India. 

The Revenue Survey and Settle 
ment of the Bombay Presidency 
as contrasted with the Laivd 
Systems of Lord Cornwallis and 
of the North- Western Provinces 

The Economic Results and Proba- 
ble Development of Botanical and 
Geological Researches in India, 

The Demonology of Western India 

The Electric Telegraph as it a/ 
fects India in its Social, Com 
mercial, and Political Aspects. 

Gleanings of the History of In- 
dian Medicine from its Ancient 
Literature. 

The A ^plication of Modern Dis 
coveries in Chemistry to Indian 
Farming. 

A short A bstract of the Political 
History of Gujarath and Maha 
rashtrafrom the first Century of 
the Christian Era to the Inroads 
of the Mahomedans as arrived 
at from an examination of Coins 
and Inscriptions. 

The Advantages and Means of 
Diffusing a Knowledge of Na- 
tural Science in India, 



Prizeman. 



No 
ceived 



awarded. 

Ditto. 

Rastamji Mer 
vanji Patelj 
M.A. 

Balvant Bhikaji 
Vakharkar, 
B.A. 

Sorabji Edalj 
Gimi, B.A. 

Manikji Nasar 
vanji Nana 
vati, B.A. 



No Essay re 

ceived. 

[awarded 
Medal not 
No Essay 

ceived, 

Medal not 
awarded. 

Ditto. 



Dhondu Hari 
Agase, B. A. 



CoLLEGR. 



Elphitt- 
stone. 



Deccan. 



Elphin- 

stone. 

Elphin 
stone. 



Elphin. 

stone, 



THE BHUG. PUR. SANSKRIT SCHOLARSHIP. Ill 



IIL 



THE BHUGWANDASS PURSHOTUMDASS 
SANSKRIT SCHOLARSHIP. 



Bhugwandass Purshotumdass, Esq., Justice of the Peace, 
in a letter to the address of the Registrar of the University 
Dr. R. S. Sinclair, under date the 10th August 1863, offered 
the sum of Rs. 10,000 for the encouragement of the study 
of Sanskrit in the University of Bombay. This offer was 
accepted by a Convocation of the Senate on the 24th Sep- 
tember 1863, and the following Regulations for the award- 
ing of the proceeds of the endowment were passed : — 

1. A Scholarship, to be called "The Bhugwandass 
Porshotumdass Sanskrii Scholarship," of the value of 
Rupees four hundred, tenable for one year, and payable half- 
yearly, shall be awarded every year to the Candidate who 
passes the M. A. Examination with the highest marks for 
proficiency in Sanskrit, provided that the Scholarship shall, 
not be awarded except to a Candidate whom the Examiners 
consider deserving of reward for his special knowledge and 
ability as a Sanskrit Scholar. 

2. The name of the Candidate to whom the Scholarship 
may be awarded, shall be published with the list of the 
successful Candidates. 

3. Whenever the Scholarship is not awarded, the money 
shall be reserved to be applied by the Syndicate in such 
manner as they shall think best fitted for f urthering the 
object of the endowment. 



112 



ENDOWMENTS- 



Year. 


Scholar. 


College. 


1866 Mar. 


Bhagvat, Govind Eamchandra ... 


Poona (now 
Deccan). 
. Do. 


1867 „ 


Marathe, Kashinath Balkrishna ... 


1868 „ 


Kathavate, Abaji Vishnu 


Do. 


1869 ,, 


Telang, Kashinath Trimbak 


Elphinstone. 


3870 „ 


Athal6, Yashvant Vasudev 


Do. 


1870 Dec. 


Athal^, Yashvant Vasudev 


Do. 


1871 „ 


Tulu, Raoji Vasudev 


Do. 


1872 „ 


Pendse, Kashinath Balvant 


Deccan. 


1873 „ 


Bhid£, Shivram Parshuram 


Dd. 


1874 „ 


Gokhale, Ramchandra Vishnu ... 


Elphinstone. 


1875 „ 


Bhat, Hariram Uttamram 


Do. 


1876 „ 


Agase, Ganesh Janardan 


Deccan. 


1877 „ 


Agase, Dhondu Hari 


Elphinstone. 



IV. 
THE HOMEJEE CURSETJEE PRIZE. 

Homejee Cursetjee Dady Sett,Esq., Justice of the Peace, in 
a letter to the address of the Vice-Chancellor, Sir Alexander 
Grant, Bart., dated 10th September 1863, wrote as follows : — 

'* It has been suggested to me that the establishment of 
an Annual Prize or Medal for the best English Poem by a 
University Student would afford a useful stimulus to the 
cultivation of literature and to the development of good 
taste and refinement in this Presidency. Concurring in this 
view, I hereby beg to offer to the University of Bombay the 
sum of Rs. 5,000 in Government 4 per cent. Securities, and 
hope that the University may be pleased to accept this sum, 
and apply it to the carrying out of the above object, under 
such Regulations as they may think best." 

This offer was accepted by a Convocation of the Senate 
on the 21st December 1863, and the following Regulations 
were passed for the awarding of the prize : — 

1. "The Homejee Cursetjee Prize," consisting of 
books to the value of Rs. 200, shall be awarded annually 
for the best English poem by a University Student in 
accordance with the subjoined conditions. 

2. Competitors shall be Matriculated Students of the 
University of Bombay, who shall not be of more than four 
years' standing from the date of their Matriculation on the 
day prescribed for the sending in of the poems. 

3. Competitive poems shall be written in the Heroic 
metre or in the Spenserian stanza, and shall not exceed 150 



THE HOMEJEE CURSETJEE PRIZE. 



113 



lines in length. Each poem shall be designated by a motto 
instead of the writer's name, and shall be accompanied by 
a sealed cover containing the name of the competitor, his 
University standing, and his Post Office address, and a 
declaration that the poem sent in by him is bond fide his 
own composition. 

4. The subject for the competition shall be annually an- 
nounced by the Syndicate during the month of January. 
The competitive poems shall be sent in to the Registrar on 
or before the 2nd Saturday in June. The prize shall be 
decided by the votes of the Vice- Chancellor and Syndicate at 
a meeting to be held for the purpose on or before the 30thSep- 
tember. The Chairman of the meeting to have a casting vote. 

5. The successful poem shall be published in the local 
newspapers. 

6. The prize shall be awarded to the successful Candi- 
date at the Convocation for conferring degrees next after 
the decision of the Syndicate. 

7. The prize shall not be awarded to any poem which, 
in the opinion of the Syndicate, would not, when printed, 
be creditable to the University. 

8. On the occasions when the prize is not awarded, the 
money shall be reserved to be applied by the Syndicate in 
such a way as they shall think most expedient to the fur- 
therance of the purposes of the endowment. 



Year. 


Subject. 


Prizeman. 


1864... 


The Himalaya Mountains 


VikajijFramji Rastamji. 


1865 .. 


The Indian Seasons 


Prize not awarded. 


1866... 


Alexandria 


Ditto. 


1867... 


The Solar System 


Modi, Barzorji Edalji. 


1868... 


India three thousand years ago . . 


Prize not awarded. 


1869... 


Tlie Indus 


Kohiyar, Jehangiershah 
Erachshah. 


1870.. 


Vasco de Gama ... 


Kohiyar, Jehangiershah 
Erachshah. [ton. 


1871... 


Suttee 


Aitken, Edward Hamil* 


1872... 


The Suez Canal 


Prize not awarded. 


1873... 


Akbar ... 


Ditto. 


1874... 


Shivaji ... 


Ditto. 


1875... 


Athens 


Ditto. 


1876... 


The Visit of H. R. H. the Prince 






of Wales to India 


Ditto. 


1877... 


The Malabar Coast 


Ditto. 


1878 .. 


An Indian Pilgrimage ... 


Ditto. 



b 713— i* 



114 




THE JUGONNATH SUNKERSETT SANSKRIT 
SCHOLARSHIPS. 

Venayekrow Jugonnathjee Sunkersett, Esq., Justice of the 
Peace, " wishing to perpetuate in the University the memory 
of the interest taken by his revered father during the last 
42 years in the cause of education in the Presidency, and of 
his attachment to the sacred language of India," offered, in 
letters of the 16th September and 4th December 1865, to the 
address of the Registrar, Dr. R.S. Sinclair, for the acceptance 
of the Senate, six Sanskrit Scholarships, three of Rs. 25 each 
and three of Rs. 20 each per mensem ; one of each kind to be 
awarded annually at the Matriculation Examination, and to 
be tenable for three years in a College or Institution in Arts 
recognized by the University. At the annual meeting of 
the Senate, held on the 18th December 1865, it was unani- 
mously resolved — " That the liberal benefaction of Venayek- 
row Jugonnathjee Sunkersett, Esq,, be accepted with the 
expression of the grateful remembrance by the University 
of the many and important services rendered by his honour- 
ed father to the cause of both elementary and advanced 
education in Western India, during his long and useful 
career as a citizen of Bombay." The Scholarships will be 
awarded in accordance with the following Regulations : — 

1. Two Scholarships, to be called "The Jugonnatii Sun- 
kersett Sanskrit Scholarships," one of Rs. 25 and one of 
Rs. 20 per mensem, shall be awarded every year to the two 
Candidates who shall have passed the Matriculation Exami- 
nation with the highest marks for proficiency in the San- 
skrit Language. The Scholarships will be tenable for three 
years at any of the Colleges or Institutions in Arts recogniz- 
ed by the University of Bombay, provided that the Scholar 
produce a certificate from the Head of the College or Insti- 
tution that he is prosecuting his studies in Sanskrit. 



THE JUGGONNATH SUNKERSETT SANSKRIT SCHOLARSHIPS. 115 



2. The names of the successful Candidates will be pub' 
lished along with the list of the Candidates who may have 
passed the Matriculation Examination. 

3. The Candidates elected must satisfy the Registrar, 
within six weeks from the date of election, that he has duly 
joined a recognized College or Institution. 

4. In case of the Scholarships lapsing, through forfeiture 
or otherwise, during the course of the three years for which 
r,hey are tenable, the money shall be reserved to be applied 
by the Syndicate in such a way as they shall think most ex. 
pedient to the furtherance of the purposes of the endowment- 



Year. 



1866. 
1867- 

1868. 

1869. 
1870. 
1871. 

1872. 

1873. 
1874. 

187?. 

1876. 

1877. 



Scholar. 



Athale, Yasbvant Vasudev 
Shikhar^, Govind Shripat , 
Pendse, Kashinath Balvant 



Godbole, Narayan Balkrishna. 
Chintamanipetkar, Pandurang 

Venkatesh. 
Agase, Narayan Bhikaji 
Agase, Ganesh Janardan 
Rajavade, Gopal Vishnu 
Limaye, Hari Vaman... 
Oka, Vaman Daji 
Bhat, Hariram Uttamram 
Oka, Krishna ji Govind 
Agase, Dhondu Hari ... 
Joshi, Lakshuinan Janardan. . 

Apte, Vaman Shivram 

Gokhale, Krishnaji Vishnu ... 
Natu, Trimbak Gangadhar ... 
Gokhale, Gopal Rainchandra. . 

Bhandarkar, S'ridhar Rdm- 

krishna. 
Kulkarni, Balaji Hari 

Phadke, Ramchandra Dinkar. 
Bhagvat, Balaji Abaji 
Godbole, Sadashiv Mahadev . 
Pitke, Gopal Rdmchandra ... 



8CHOOI.. 



Ratnagiri High School. 

Dhulia High School. 

Poona High School, 
formerly Elphin- 

stone High School. 

ElphiustoneHighSchool 

Poona High School. 

Ratnagiri High School. 
Poona High School. 
Ratnagiri High School. 
Ditto. 
Ditto. 
Surat High School. 
Poona High School. 
Ratnagiri High School. 
Free GeneralAssembly's 

Institution, Bombay. 
Rajaram High School, 

Kolhapur. 
Ratnagiri High School. 
Surat High School. 
Rajaram High School, 

Kolhapur. 
ElphinstoneHigh School 

Rajaram High School, 

Kolhapur. 
Ratnagiri High School. 
Poona High School. 
Ratnagiri High School, 
Rajardm High School, 

Kolhapur. 



116 ENDOWMENTS. 

VI. 

THE JAM SHEI VIBHAJI SCHOLAESHIP. 

His Highness the Jam Shri Vibhaji of Nowanagar, being 
desirous of encouraging English education in Kattiawar, 
offered in a letter to the Vice- Chancellor, Sir Alexander 
Grant, Bart., dated 25th February 1866, the sum of Bs. 4,500 
for the founding of a Scholarship tenable by a Native of 
Kattiawar for two years in an institution recognized by the 
University. At a meeting of the Senate, held on the 5tb 
April 1866, it was resolved : — " That'the handsome benefac- 
tion of His Highness the Jam Shri Vibhaji of Nowanagar 
be accepted with the best thanks of the University." The 
Scholarship will be awarded in accordance with the follow- 
ing Begulations : — 

1. A Scholarship, to be entitled " The Jam Shri Vibhaji 
Scholarship," of the value of Es. 15 per mensem, tenable 
for two years, shall be biennially, or whenever vacant, 
announced for competition. 

2. The object of the Jam Shri Vibhaji Scholarship is to 
assist in maintaining Natives of Kattiawar while studying 
in the University of Bombay. 

3. Persons to be eligible for competition must be bond 
fide Natives of Kattiawar who have passed the Matricula- 
tion Examination. 

4. Should there be more Candidates than one, the Scholar- 
ship shall be awarded to that Candidate who shall appear 
from the University records to have obtained the highest 
marks for proficiency in English at the Matriculation Exa- 
mination. Provided always that no Candidate who has once 
held the Scholarship is to be considered eligible for re-elec- 
tion. 

5. The Scholarship shall be announced for competition 
in the first week of December. Applications of Candidates, 
under Form AI, must be sent in to the Eegistrar on or 
before the 31st December. 

6. The Syndicate will thereupon proceed to adjudge the 
Scholarship on some day during the month of January. 

7. The Candidate elected must satisfy the Eegistrar, 
within six weeks from the date of election, that he has duly 
joined a recognized College or Institution. 

8. The stipend of the Scholarship shall be payable 
monthly on a bill drawn by the Head of some recognized 
College of Institution ; which bill shall certify, under the 



THE COWASJEE JEHANGHIER LATIN SCHOLARSHIP. 



117 



signature of the head, that the Scholar is in regular attend- 
ance at the College or Institution, that his conduct is good, 
and his progress in University studies is satisfactory. 

9. Should the Scholar discontinue his University studies, 
or be unfavourably reported of by the Head of his College or 
Institution, the Syndicate shall declare the Scholarship to be 
forfeited. 

10. Any surplus which may arise from the vacancy of the 
Scholarship, during any year or part of a year, shall be added 
to next year's Scholarship, so as to increase the monthly 
stipend payable. 



Year. 



1867... 
1868... 

1871... 

1873. 

1875... 

1877... 



Scholar 



Vohord, Kallianrai Lakshumi- 

shankar. 
Desai, Savailal Govindram . . 

Ved, Dulabji Dharamshi 
Sett, Motichand Udhavji 

Ghogavala, Adarji Rastamji... 

.Toshipara, Pranlal Kahandas. . 



School. 



Surat High School. 

Elphinstone High 

School. 

Ditto. 
Kattiawar High School, 

Rajkot. 
Chandanvadi High 

School, Bombay. 
Bahadurkhanji High 

School, Junagad. 



VII. 




THE 



vmim&mP 



COWASJEE JEHANGHIER LATIN 
SCHOLARSHIP. 



Cowasjee Jehanghier Readymoney, Esq., Justice of the 
Peace, being desirous of marking his interest in the Bombay 
University, offered, on the occasion of the Convocation for 
conferring Degrees which was held on the 14th of January 
1868, in a letter to the Vice-Chancellor, Sir Alexander Grant, 



118 ENDOWMENTS. 

Bart., of the same date, the sum of Rs. 5,000 in 4 per cent, 
Government Paper, for the founding of a Latin Scholarship* 
to be awarded each year to the best Candidate in Latin at 
the Matriculation Examination. The offer was accepted by 
the Senate on the 31st of March 1868, with their best thanks, 
and the following Regulations were passed for the award- 
ing of the Scholarship : — 

1. A Scholarship, to be entitled rt The Cowasjee Jehan- 
ghier Latin Scholarship," of the value of Rs. 200 per 
annum, shall be awarded every year to that Candidate who 
shall have passed the Matriculation Examination, and who 
shall have obtained the highest marks for proficiency in 
Latin at such Examination, provided that the Scholar 
produce a certificate from the Head of his College or Insti- 
tution that he is prosecuting his studies in Latin. 

2. The stipend of the Scholarship shall be payable half- 
yearly on a bill drawn by the Head of some recognized Col- 
lege or Institution ; which bill shall certify, under the signa- 
ture of the Head, that the Scholar is in regular attendance 
at the College or Institution, that his conduct is good, and 
that his progress in University studies is satisfactory. 

3. Should the Scholar discontinue his University studies, 
or be unfavourably reported of by the Head of his Colle ge 
or Institution, the Syndicate shall declare the Scholarship 
to be forfeited. 

4. The Scholarship shall be awarded at the final meeting 
of the Matriculation Examiners, and the name of the Cowas- 
jee Jehanghier Scholar for the ensuing year shall be pub- 
lished by the Examiners together with their list of Matri- 
culated Students. 

5. The Candidate elected must satisfy the Registrar, 
within six weeks from the date of election, that he has 
duly joined a recognized College or Institution. 

6. In case of the Student who is elected declining to pro- 
ceed to College, the stipend of the Scholarship for the 
ensuing year may be conferred on the Candidate who shall 
have obtained the second place in the Examination in Latin. 

7. In case of the Scholarship lapsing through forfeiture 
or otherwise, during the course of the year, any savings 
which may result may be added to next year's Scholarship, 
so as to increase the half-yearly stipends payable ; or may 
be used, at the discretion of the Syndicate, to create a 
second Scholarship for the ensuing year. 



THE KINLOCH FORBES GOLD MEDAL, 



119 



Year. 


Scholar. 


School. 


1868... 


MeDermott, Michael 


St, Marv's Institution. 


1869 ... 


DeMonte, Thomas Antouio 


Ditto. 


1870... 


BryaD, James 


Ditto, 


i 


DeSa, Luis 


Ditto. 


1871 j 


Bhandarkar, Vasudev Gopal 


Ditto. 


1872... 


Hogan, Daniel ... 


Ditto. 


1873... 


Pereira, Conrad ... ... 


Ditto, 


1874... 


DeSouza., Lazarus Diogo 


Ditto, 


1875... 


O'Shanahan, Henry Frank 


Ditto. 


1876... 


Mulligan, William George Tobias 


Bishop' sHighSchool.Poona 


1877... 


Vakil, Rastamji Bamanshah 


Elphinstone Eigh School. 



VIII, 
THE KINLOCH FOKBES GOLD MEDAL, 

The Trustees to the Kinloch Forbes Memorial Fund, in a 
letter to the address of the Vice -Chancellor, the Rev. Dr. 
Wilson, dated the 19th December 1868, offered to the Uni- 
versity, in behalf of themselves and other subscribers to the 
Fund, a sum of Eupees 5,000 in Government 5* per cent. 
Paper, for the purpose of awarding a yearly Gold Medal for 
proficiency in General Jurisprudence and the Roman Civil 
Law, to be called (( The Kinloch Fokbes Gold Medal," 
and for Law Books to accompany the Medal, should the 
fund allow . At the annual meeting of the Senate, held on 
the same date, the following Resolution was unanimously 
agreed to :— 

** That the Senate accept with thanks this endowment, 
in honour of its late accomplished Vice-Chancellor, the 
Honourable Mr. Justice Kinloch Forbes." 

The Medal will be awarded in accordance with the follow, 
ing Regulations : — 

1. A Gold Medal, to be called " The Kinloch Forbes 
Gold Medal," of the value of Rupees two hundred, with a 
Prize of Law Books of the value of Rupees fifty, will be 
awarded annually to the Candidate who obtains the highest 
number of marks in the subjects of Roman Civil Law and 
General Jurisprudence, including International Law, at the 
Examination for Honours in Law, provided always that in no 
case shall the Medal be awarded to a Candidate who is not 
placed by the Examiners in the first class of successful 
Candidates at such Examination. 

* Now transferred to 4£ per cent. Govern meat stock. 



120 ENDOWMENTS. 

2. The name of the Candidate to whom the Medal and 
Prize of Books are awarded shall be published with the list 
of successful Candidates at the Examination for Honours in 
Law. 

3. Whenever the Medal and Books are not awarded, the 
money which would have been expended in purchasing them 
shall be applied by the Syndicate in such manner as they 
shall think best fitted for furthering the object and purposes 
of the endowment. 




***o.»&* 



IX. 
THE DAVID SASSOON HEBREW SCHOLARSHIP. 

The Honourable A. D. Sassoon, C.S.I., being desirous of 
encouraging the study of the Hebrew Language, offered, in 
a letter, dated the 11th January 1869, to the address of the 
Vice-Chancellor, the Rev. Dr. Wilson, the sum of Rs. 5,000 
in Government 5* per cent. Paper for the foundation of a 
Scholarship (to be dedicated to the memory of his late 
father, David Sassoon, Esq.,) of Rs. 250 per annum, tenable 
for two years, in any Institution recognized by the Univer- 
sity for Degrees in Arts. 

The offer was accepted by the Senate at a meeting held 
on the 20th January 1869 ; and the Scholarship will be 
awarded in accordance with the following Regulations : — 

1. A Scholarship of Rs. 250 per annum, to be denomi- 
nated " The David Sassoon Hebrew Scholarship," to be 
held for two years, shall, on the first occasion of its being 
bestowed, be awarded to the Candidate who shall pass the 
Matriculation Examination with the highest marks for pro- 
ficiency in the Hebrew Language, or, failing such a Candi- 

* Now transferred to 4£ per cent. Government stock. 



THE DAVID SASSOON HEBREW SCHOLARSHIP. 121 

date, to the Under-graduate who shall pass the First Exa- 
mination in Arts with the highest marks in the same lan- 
guage, provided that the Scholar produce a certificate from 
the Head of his College or Institution that he is prosecut- 
ing his studies in Hebrew. 

2. The Scholarship shall be afterwards awarded every 
alternate year to the Candidate who shall, since the time of 
the last awarding of the Scholarship, have passed the Ma- 
triculation Examination with the highest marks for profici- 
ency in the Hebrew Language, or, failing such a Candidate, 
to the Under-graduate who shall, since the time of the last 
awarding of the Scholarship, have passed the First Exami- 
nation in Arts with the highest marks for proficiency in the 
same language. 

3. The Scholarship shall be payable half-yearly, in equal 
proportions, to its allottee, on his producing a bill, counter- 
signed by the Head of someCollege or Institution, recognized, 
in Arts, accompanied by a certificate, from the same source, 
of regular attendance at that College or Institution, of good 
conduct, and of satisfactory progress in University studies. 

4. Failing the production of such a certificate as that now 
indicated, the Syndicate may declare the Scholarship for- 
feited. 

5. The Scholarship shall be awarded at the final meeting 
of the Matriculation (or First Arts) Examiners, and the name 
of the David Sassoon Scholar for the ensuing two years 
shall be published along with the list of the successful 
Candidates for Matriculation (or First Examination in 
Arts). 

6. The Candidate elected must satisfy the Registrar, 
within six weeks from the date of election, that he has duly 
joined a recognized College or Institution. 

7. In case of the Matriculating Student who is elected 
declining to proceed to College, the Scholarship for the 
ensuing two years may be conferred on the Under-graduate 
who shall have obtained the second place in Hebrew in the 
Matriculation Examination, or, failing such a Candidate, to 
the passed Candidate who has obtained the highest marks 
in Hebrew in the First Examination in Arts, and is willing 
to continue at College. 

8. In case of the Scholarship not being adjudged, or 
lapsing before it has been held two years, the Scholarship 

b 713— & 



122 ENDOWMENTS. 

may be awarded under the same rules at the next University 
Examinations ; and any savings resulting from non-adju- 
dication or lapse may be added to the next Scholarship's 
allotment, or used, at the discretion of the Syndicate, to- 
wards creating a second Scholarship. 



Year. 


Scholar. 


School. 


1872.. 




Scottish High School, Fort. 
Fort High School. 


1878.. 


Gavankar, Rajaram Raghoba.. .. .' 







X. 

THE JAMES BERKLEY GOLD MEDAL. 

Mr. R. M. Brereton, Chief Engineer, G. I. P. Railway, 
N.E.D., in a letter to the address of the Yice-Chancellor, 
the Rev. Dr. Wilson, dated 18th June 1869, offered in 
behalf of himself and the other admirers and friends of the 
late Mr. James J. Berkley, Chief Resident Engineer, G. I. 
P. Railway, the sum of Rs. 8,000 in Government 5* per cent. 
Promissory Notes, for the purpose of founding a " James 
Berkley Gold Medal " for Civil Engineering, of the value 
of Rs. 250, to be given annually, and a Prize of Books of a 
scientific nature to accompany the Medal. At a meeting of 
the Senate, held on the 13th August, the following Resolu- 
tion was unanimously adopted : — 

" That this handsome endowment, in honour of Mr. James 
John Berkley, one of the original Fellows mentioned in the 
Act of Incorporation, be accepted with the best thanks of 
the Senate," 

The medal and books will be awarded in accordance with 
the following Regulations : — 

1. A Gold Medal, to be entitled "The James Berkley 
Gold Medal," of the value of Rupees two hundred and fifty, 
with a Prize of Books on Civil and Mechanical Engineering 
of the value of Rupees one hundred and fifty, will be 
awarded annually to the Candidate who obtains the highest 
number of marks in the Examination for the Degree of 
L.C.E., provided that in no case shall the Medal be 



Now transferred to 4£ per cent. Government stock. 



THE ELLIS PRIZE. 123 

Awarded if such Candidate be not specially recommended 
by the Examiners in Engineering and Engineering Draw* 
ing. 

2. The name of the successful Candidate shall be pub- 
lished with the list of Candidates who have passed the 
Examination for the Degree of L.C.E. 

8. Whenever the Medal and Books are not awarded, the 
money which would have been expended in purchasing 
them shall be applied by the Syndicate in such manner as 
they shall think best fitted for furthering the object and 
purposes of the endowment. 



Year. 


Medallist. 


College. 


1872.. 




Poona Civil Engi- 
neering. 


1873.. 




1874.. 




Ditto. 


1875.. 




Ditto. 









XI. 

THE ELLIS PRIZE. 

The Honourable B. H. Ellis, Member of the Council of 
S. E. the Viceroy and Governor- General of India, offered, 
on the 26th August 1869, Promissory Notes of the value of 
Rs. 1,500, bearing interest at 4 per cent., for an annual prize 
of books of the value of Rs. 60, to be given to the Scholar 
who on Matriculation passes the best examination in any 
Oriental Language. 

At a meeting of the Senate, held on the 13th October 
1869, it was unanimously resolved : — 

" That this endowment be accepted with the best thanks 
of the Senate as a token from the Honourable B. H. Ellis 
of his appreciation of the University, and regard for the 
people of Bombay." 

The prize will be awarded in accordance with the follow- 
ing Regulations : — 

1. A Prize, to be entitled " The Ellis Prize," consisting 
of books of the value of Rupees sixty, shall be awarded 



124 



ENDOWMENTS. 



every year to the Candidate who shall have passed the 
Matriculation Examination with the highest marks for 
proficiency in an Oriental Language. 

2. The prize shall be awarded in connection with such 
one or other of the following languages as the Syndicate 
from time to time may determine : — 



1. Marathi. 

2. Gujarathi. 

3. Canarese. 

4. Hindustani. 



5. Sindhi. 

6. Arabic. 

7. Persian. 



3. The language for which the prize will be given each 
year shall be notified by the Syndicate not less than twelve 
months before each Matriculation Examination. 

4. The books shall be presented to the successful Can- 
didate by the Chancellor or Vice-Chancellor at the Convo- 
cation for Conferring Degrees. 



Year 



1870... 
1871.. 

3872.. 

1873.. 

1874.. 

1875.. 

1876.. 
1877.. 

1878.. 



Language. 



Marathi , 

Gujarathi .... 
Canarese ...... 

Sindhi 

Persian , 

Hindustani 
Arabic or Mara 

thi 
Gujarathi .... 

Canarese ...... 

Sindhi , 



Prizeman. 



Kunte, Vishnu Keshav.. 

Kanga, Dinshah Pestanji 
Bevur, Ramchandra Ha- 

numantrao. 
Mirza, Kalichkhan 

Fraidunbeg. 
Contractor, Behramji 

Rastamji. 
DeGama, Samuel ...... 

Kanitkar, Balkrishna 

Hari (in Marathi), 
Kaji, Chhaganlal Gulab- 

das. 
Kuknur, Raghavendra 

Jayacharya 



School. 



His Highness the Maharaja 
of Indore Madressa. 

Bombay Proprietary School . 

Belgaum Sirdars' High 
School. 

Haidarabad High 8chool. 

Poona High 8chool. 

Karachi High School. 
Private Tuition. 

Surat High School. 

Dharvad High School. 



XII. 

THE HEBBERT AND LATOUCHE SCHOLARSHIP. 

The Chiefs of Junagarh and Nowanagar, in the Province 
of Kattiawar, offered, through the Right Honourable the 
Governor in Council, on the 22nd October 1869, Govern- 
ment 5 per cent. Promissory Notes of the value of Rs, 
5,000, for the foundation of a Scholarship of Rs. 20* per 

* In consequence of tbe transfer of the Securi ties from Stopper oe«t. 
Government stock, the value is reduced to Rs. J8 a month 



THE HEBBERT AND LATOUCHE SCHOLARSHIP 126 

mensem in the University of Bombay, as a Memorial to 
Captains Hebbert and LaTouche, the Officers who fell at 
the Tobar Hill in 1867 in fight with a band of outlawed 
Waghirs. At the annual meeting of the Senate, held on 
the 18th December 1869, it was unanimously resolved : — 

"That the offer of Rs. 5,000 in Government 5 per cent. 
Promissory Notes, from the Chiefs of Junagarh and Nowa- 
nagar, in Kattiawar, for the foundation of a Scholarship 
in memory of Captains Hebbert and LaTouche, who fell 
nobly in the discharge of public duty at Tobar Hill in 1867, 
be accepted with the best thanks of the Senate." 

The Scholarship will be awarded in accordance with the 
following Regulations ; — 

1. A Scholarship, to be entitled " The Hebbert anj> 
LaTouche Scholarship," of the value of Rupees eighteen 
per mensem, tenable for two years, shall be awarded bien- 
nially, or whenever vacant. 

2. The object of the Scholarship is to assist Natives of 
Soreth, in Kattiawar, desirous of prosecuting their studies 
in any one of the recognized Colleges or Institutions of the 
University of Bombay. 

3. Persons to be eligible for competition must be bond 
fide Natives of Soreth who have passed the Matriculation 
Examination, 

4. In the event of there being more than one Candidate 
for the Scholarship on the occasion of a vacancy, who shall 
fulfil the foregoing conditions, the Scholarship shall be 
awarded by the Syndicate to the Candidate who shall appear 
from the University records to have obtained the highest 
number of marks at the Matriculation Examination, provid- 
ed always that no Candidate who has once held the Scholar- 
ship be eligible for re-election. 

5. The Scholarship shall be announced for competition 
in the first week of December. Applications of Candidates 
under Form AJ must be sent in to the Registrar on or 
before the 31st December. 

6. The Syndicate shall thereupon proceed to adjudge 
the Scholarship on some day during the month of January. 

7. The Candidate elected must satisfy the Registrar, 
within slx weeks from the date of election, that he has duly 
joined a recognized College or Institution. 

B 713-&* 



"126 ENDOWMENTS. 

8. The stipend of the Scholarship shall be payable 
monthly, on a bill drawn by the Head of some recognized 
College or Institution, who shall certify under his signature 
on such bill, that the Scholar is in regular attendance at 
the College or Institution, that his conduct is good, and 
that his progress in University studies satisfactory. 

9. Should the Scholar discontinue his University studies-, 
or be unfavourably reported on by the Head of the College 
or Institution, the Syndicate shall declare the Scholarship 
to be forfeited. 

10. Any surplus which may arise from the vacancy of 
the Scholarship during any year, or part of a year, shall be 
added to next year's Scholarship so as to increase the 
monthly stipends payable. 



1871.. 
1873.. 
1875.. 

1877 . 



Shah, Tribhuvandaa Motichand I Rajkot High School 

Acbarya, Devishankar Ravishankar Kattiawar High Sc* 

Rana, Rudarji Sundarji , Ditto, 

Bach, Bhupatrai Dayalji Ditto. 



XIIL 

THE WILSON PHILOLOGICAL LECTURESHIP 

The Honorary Secretary to the Committee of Manage- 
ment for the Subscribers to the Wilson Testimonial Fund 
offered, in a letter dated March 2nd, 1870, to the address of 
the Registrar, James Taylor, Esq., the sum of (Els. 23,500) 
twenty-three thousand and five hundred Rupees in Govern- 
ment five* per cent. Promissory Notes, for the endowment 
of a Philological Lectureship in honour of the Rev. John. 
Wilson, D.D., P.R.S V Vice-Chancellor of the University, 
with the following conditions : 

1. That the Lectureship be called "The Wilson Philo- 
logical Lectureship," in connection with which, in conse- 
cutive years, a short series of Lectures should be delivered 
by a competent European or Native Scholar, annually 
selected for the purpose, on either of the following clawnes 

* Now traoaterred to 4$ per cent Government- 3toc-k 



THE WILSON PHILOLOGICAL LECTURESHIP. 127 

of languages and the literature in which they are em- 
bodied : 

I. Sanskrit and Prakrit languages derived from it. 
II. Hebrew and the other Semitic languages . 
III. Latin and Greek. 

f V. English viewed in connection with Anglo-Saxon and 
its other sources. 

2. That the interest of the Fund for this endowment be 
at the entire disposal of Dr. Wilson during his lifetime, and 
that the University undertake the duty of receiving the in- 
terest, and paying the same to Dr. Wilson, or to his order, 
at stated half-yearly periods, as the interest becomes due. 

At a meeting of the Senate, held on the 2nd April 1870, 
" the endowment in honour of the late Vice-Chancellor of 
the University, the Rev. John Wilson, D.D., F.R.S., was 
accepted with the best thanks of the Senate." 

Dr. Wilson died on the 1st December 1875, and on the 
12th February 1876 the Senate passed the following Regula- 
tions for the Lectureship : — 

1. Each Series of Lectures shall consist of not fewer 
than six Lectures. 

2. The Lectures shall be delivered in Bombay in the 
First or cold- weather Term in each year. 

:{. In the month of January in each year the Syndicate 
shall publish a Notification in which the subject of the en- 
suing Series of Lectures shall be announced, and shall 
take such steps in each year as they may think best for 
obtaining a Lecturer. 



1 877 

1878. 
1879.. 



Sanskrit and Prakrit Languages derived 
from it. 

Latin and Greek 

Hebrew and the other Semitic Langua- 
ges. 



Ramkrishna Gop&l. Shan- 
darkar, M.A. 



Peter Peterson, M.A. 



1^8 ENDOWMENTS. 

XIV. 

THE ELLIS SCHOLARSHIP. 

The President and Secretary to the Ellis Testimonial 
Committee, in a letter dated* 19th April 1870, to the ad- 
dress of the Registrar, James Taylor, Esq., offered the sum 
of Rs. 7,206 for investment in 4 per cent. Government 
Promissory Notes for awarding annually, from the interest 
thereof, a monthly Scholarship of the value of Rs. 25, 
bearing the name of the Honourable B. H. Ellis, to the most 
successful Scholar in the English Language and Literature 
at the BA, Examination* 

At a meeting of the Senate, held on the 16th June 1870, 
the following Resolution was unanimously adopted : — 

11 That this endowment, in honour of the Honourable B. 
H. Ellis, Member of the Council of H. E. the Viceroy and 
Governor General of India, be accepted with the best thanks 
of the Senate." 

The Scholarship will be awarded in accordance with the 
following Regulations : — 

1. A Scholarship, to be entitled " The Ellis Scholar- 
ship," of the value of Rupees twenty-five a month, shall be 
awarded annually at the Examination for the Degree of B.A, 
to the Candidate who passes the Examination with the 
highest marks in English. 

2. The name of the successful Candidate shall be pub- 
lished with the list of Candidates who have passed the 
Examination for the Degree of B.A. 

3. In case of the Scholarship lapsing during the course 
of the year for which it is tenable, any balance that may 
remain shall be added to the next year's Scholarship. 



Ybar. 


Scholar. 


CoLlbgk. 


1870.. 




Elphinstone. 


1871.. 




1872 






1873.. 




Elphinstone. 


1874.. 




1875.. 
1876 


Chiplunkar, Lakshnman Krishna 


Deccan, formerly Fre« 

General Assembly's. 
St. Xavier's. 
Elphinstone. 


1877. 









129 
XV. 

THE CHANCELLOR'S MEDAL, 

At a Convocation for Conferring Degrees held on the 12th 
January 1869, His Excellency the Right Honourable Sir 
Seymour FitzGerald, G.C.S.L, D.C.L., Governor of Bombay, 
Chancellor of the University, founded a Gold Medal, to be 
called the " Chancellor's Medal," with a view to encourage 
the Graduates of the University of Bombay to aspire after 
the highest honours the University can bestow. At a meet- 
ing of the Senate, held on the 23rd March 1871, the follow- 
ing Regulations for awarding the Medal were passed : — 

1. A Gold Medal, to be called " The Chancellor's 
Medal," will be awarded annually in connection with the 
Examination for the Degree of Master of Arts. 

2. The Syndicate will determine and notify each year, in 
December, the rotation in which the Medal shall be assign- 
ed in connection with each branch of study prescribed for 
the M.A. Examination. 

3. The Medal shall be awarded to the Candidate who 
passes the Examination in the First Class, and obtains the 
highest number of marks in the branch of study notified 
for that year. 

4. Provided that if no Candidate qualifies for the Medal 
in the specified subject of the year, the Syndicate shall be 
authorized to award it to the Candidate who, on a review of 
the Examination in the various subjects, passes in the 
First Class with the highest number of marks, 

5. The name of the Candidate to whom the Medal is 
awarded, will be published with the list of successful Can- 
didates. 

6. The Medal will be presented at the Convocation for 
Conferring Degrees. 

The Chancellor's Medal has been assigned in connection 
with the branches of study prescribed for the M.A. Exami- 
nation in the following rotation : — 
In 1876 to History and Philosophy. 
„ 1877 to Mathematics and Natural Philosophy. 
„ 1878 to Natural Sciences. 
„ 1879 to Languages, 



130 



ENDOWMENTS. 



Yeab. 


Subject. 


Medallist. 


College 


1874.. 


Languages .. 


Duncan, Thomas, B.A 


8t. Xavier's. 


1876.. 


Mathematics and 
Natural Philoso- 
phy. 


Dastur, Fardunji Mancherji, 
B.A. 


Elphinstooe 


1877.. 


Natural Sciences .. 


Contractor, Kavasji Dadabhai. 


Ditto. 



XVI. 
THE ARNOULD SCHOLARSHIP. 

The President and Secretary to the Arnould Testimonial 
J'und, in a letter dated 9th January 1871, to the address of 
the Registrar, James Taylor, Esq., offered to the Univer- 
sity on behalf of the Native friends and admirers of Sir 
Joseph Arnonld, Knight, a Judge of the High Court of 
Judicature, Bombay, a sum of Rupees 6,000 in Government 
5 per cent Securities for awarding annually, from the 
interest thereof, a Scholarship of Rs. 25* a month to the 
Candidate who passes the Examination for the Degree of 
LL.B. with the highest number of marks in the paper com* 
prising the Hindu and Muhammadan Law. 

At a meeting, held on the 23rd March 1871, the endow- 
ment was accepted with the best thanks of the Senate, and 
the following ^Regulations were passed for awarding the 
Scholarship : — 

1. A Scholarship, to be called "The Arnould Scholar- 
ship," of the value of Rupees twenty-two a month, shall be 
awarded annually at the Examination for the Degree of 
LL.B. to the Candidate who passes the Examination with 
the highest number of marks in the paper on u Personal 
Rights and Status and the Law of Succession."t 

2. The name of the successful Candidate shall be pub- 
lished with the list of Candidates who have passed the 
Examination for the Degree of LL.B. 



* In consequence of the transfer from 5 to 4$ per cent. Government stock, 
the value is reduced to Rs. 23 a month. 

t Hindu and Muhammadan Law being include'! in this Division of tuo 
Examination. 



THE DUKE OP EDINBURGH FELLOWSHIP. 131 

3. In case of the Scholarship lapsing during the course 
of the year for which it is tenable, any balance that may 
remain shall be added to the next year's Scholarship. 



Ybar. 


Scholars. 


COLLEGE. 


1872.. 
1873.. 
1874.. 
1875.. 
1876.. 
1877.. 


Modi, Barzorji Edalji, M. A 

Deshmukh, Ramchandra Gopalrao.B. A. 
Kothare, Anandrao Krishnarao, B.A. . . 

Athate, Yashvanfc Vasudev, M.A 

Dhairyavan, Vasudev Krishnarao, B.A. 
Inamdar, Venkatrao Rukhamangad, 
B.A. 


Government Law School. 
Ditto. 
Ditto. 
Ditto. 
Ditto. 
Ditto. 



XVII. 
THE DUKE OF EDINBURGH FELLOWSHIP. 

The Chiefs and Sirdars of the Deccan and the Southern 
JVIahratta Country offered to the University, through Gov- 
ernment, on the 24th July 1871, in commemoration of the 
visit of His Royal Highness the Duke of Edinburgh to the 
Presidency of Bombay, the sum of Rs. 10,000 for the estab- 
lishment of a Fellowship of the value of the interest of the 
sum when invested in Government Securities, tenable for 
two years, and to be awarded every alternate year to the 
Under-graduate who passes wjith the highest marks in 
Honours at the B.A. Examination, on condition that he 
continue his studies at one of the recognized Colleges, and 
present himself at the MA. Examination within such time 
as may be fixed by the University. 

At a meeting of the Senate, held on the 29th September 
1871, the offer of the Chiefs and Sirdars of the Deccan and 
the Southern Mahratta Country was accepted with the 
best thanks of the Senate. 

The Fellowship will be awarded in accordance with the 
following Regulations ; — 

1. A Fellowship, to be called the "Duke of Edinburgh 
Fellowship," of the value of Rupees four hundred per 
annum and tenable for two years, shall be awarded every 
alternate year, or whenever vacant, to the Candidate who 
passes with the highest number of marks in the First Class 
at the B.A. Examination, on condition that he continues 



132 ENDOWMENTS. 

his studies at one of the Colleges or Institutions recog- 
nized by the University of Bombay, and presents himself at 
the M. A. Examination within the time of his Fellowship. 

2. The Candidate elected must satisfy the Registrar, 
within six weeks from the date of election, that he has duly 
joined a recognized College or Institution. 

3. The stipend of the Fellowship shall be paid half- 
yearly on a bill drawn by the Head of some recognized 
College or Institution, who shall certify under his signature 
on such bill that the Fellow is in regular attendance at the 
College or Institution, and that his conduct is good. 

4>. Should the Fellow discontinue his University studies, 
or be unfavourably reported on by the Head of his College 
or Institution, the Syndicate shall declare the Fellowship 
to be forfeited. 

5. Any surplus which may arise from the vacancy of 
the Fellowship during any year, or a part of a year, shall 
be applied by the Syndicate in such manner as they shall 
think best fitted for furthering the object and purposes of 
the endowment. 



YEAH. 


Fellow. 


Collbgb. 


1872.. 






1874.. 




Elphinstone. 
Ditto. 


J876.. 











XVIII. 

THE BAI MANECKBAI BYBAMJEE JEEJEEBHOY 
PRIZE, 

The Honourable Byramjee Jeejeebhoy, in a letter dated 
10th August 1871, to the address of the Registrar, offered 
to the University "a4 per cent. Government Promissory 
Note of Rs. 2,000, that the interest thereof may be devoted* 
to the giving of a Prize or Prizes annually to the successful 
Student or Students in any branch of learning the Senate 
may think proper, in the name of Bai Maneckbai Byramjee 
Jeejeebhoy." 

At a meeting of the Senate, held on the 29th September 
1871, this offer was accepted with the thanks of the Senate. 



THE RAO SIR PRAGMALJI SCHOLARSHIPS. 



133 



The prize will be awarded in accordance with the follow- 
ing Regulations : — 

1. A Prize, to be entitled "The Bai Maneckbai Byram- 
jee Jeejeebhoy Prize," consisting of books of the value of 
Rupees eighty, shall be awarded every year to the Candi- 
date who passes the Matriculation Examination with the 
highest marks for proficiency in " General Knowledge." 

2. The name of the successful Candidate will be pub- 
lished with the list of the Candidates who may pass the 
Matriculation Examination. 



Year. 


Prizeman. 


SCHOOIi. 


1872.. 
1873,. 


Mulla, Faizullabhai Lnkmanji .... 


Surat High School. 
8t Mary's Institution. 
Belgaum Sirdars' High School. 
Haidarabad High School. 
Parsi Boarding School, Bandora 
Elphinstone High School. 


1874.. 
1875.. 
1876.. 
1877.. 


Ketkar, Venkatesh Bapuji 

Sheik, Yakub Ismael 

Merchant, Pestanji Dadabhai 

Vaidya, Chintaman Vinayak 



XIX. 
THE RAO SIR PRAGMALJI SCHOLARSHIPS. 

The Kutchi inhabitants of Bombay, desiring to comme- 
morate the visit of His Highness the Maharaja Sir Prag- 
malji Bahadur, G.Q,S.L, Rao of Kutch, to the city of Bom- 
bay, when he came to meet His Royal Highness the Duke 
of Edinburgh in 1870, raised a sum of Rs. 20,000, to which 
His Highness added a sum of Rs. 25,C00, making an aggre- 
gate amount of Rs. 45,000. Of this sum, Rs. 30,000, in Gov- 
ernment 4 per cent, paper, were offered to the University, 
through the Government of Bombay, on the 2nd January 
1872, to found Scholarships, to be called "The Rao Sir 
Pragmalji Scholarships," and to be awarded to Kutchi 
Students to enable them to prosecute University studies, or, 
failing such Students, to other Native Students who may 
be qualified for the same. 

At a meeting of the Senate, held on the 9th March 1872, 
the offer was accepted with the best thanks of the Senate. 

The Scholarships will be awarded in accordance with the 
following Regulations : — 

B 713—2 



134 ENDOWMENTS, 

1. Two Scholarships, to be called " The Eao Sir Prag- 
malji Scholarships," one of Rupees 20 and one of Rupees 15 
per mensem, shall be awarded every year to the two Kutchi* 
Candidates who shall have passed the Matriculation Exami- 
nation with the highest number of marks. 

2. The Scholarships will be tenable for three years at any 
of the Colleges or Institutions recognized by the University 
of Bombay. 

3. Kutchi Candidates must forward their applications to 
the Registrar (vide Form AK) with their applications for 
permission to attend the Matriculation Examination of the 
same year. 

4. The Syndicate shall adjudge the Scholarships soon 
after the result of the Matriculation Examination shall be 
declared by the Examiners, 

5. In the event of there being no Kutchi Candidates 
entitled to receive the Scholarships, the Syndicate shall 
award them to the two Native Candidates who get the 
highest number of marks at the Matriculation Examination, 
and who may not have received any other University Scho- 
larship of equal or higher value. 

6. The Candidate elected must satisfy the Registrar, 
within six weeks from the date of election, that he has duly 
joined a recognized College or Institution. 

7. In case of the Scholarships lapsing through forfeiture 
or otherwise, during the course of the three years for which 
they are tenable, the money shall be reserved to be applied 
by the Syndicate in such manner as they shall think best fit. 
ted for rurthering the object and purposes of the endowment 



YSAR. 

1872 

1873 

1874 j 

1875 J 

1876 j 
1877 



Scholar. 



Khimjiani, Fazal Manji 

Mulla, Faizallabhai Lukmanji 

Nanjiani, Karimalli Rahim 

Goratela, Visanji Hansraj 

Dav6, Vithalji Keshavji , 

Patel, Hasam Virji 

Thakar, Hirji Bhagvanji 

Parulekar, Dattatraya Vishvanath . . 

Soman, Dinkar Bhaskar, 

Ahmadi, Faiz Muhammad Fathe All 

Rukha, Visanji Kallianji 

Budbhati, Keahavji Shamji 



School. 



Elphinstone High School. 
Surat High School. 
Elphinstone High School. 

Ditto. 
Alfred High School, Kutch. 
General Assembly's Institution 
Alfred High School, Kutch. 
Ratnagiri High School. 
Ratnagiri High School. 
Elphinstone High School. 
Bombay Proprietary School 
Narayan Jagonnath High School, 
Karachi. 



* By Kutchi is intended youths born in Kutch, or youths whose fathers 
were born in Kutch. 



THE SIR JASVANTSINGJI SCHOLARSHIPS. 135 

XX. 

THE SIR JASVANTSINGJI SCHOLARSHIPS. 

His Highness Sir Jasvantsingji, K.C.S.I., the late Thakur 
of Bhawnagar, having set apart a sum of money to commemo- 
rate the visit of His Royal Highness the Duke of Edinburgh 
to Bombay in 1870, a sum of Rs„ 25,000 was invested in Gov- 
ernment 4 per cent, paper, which the Joint Administrators 
of the Bhawnagar State offered to the University, in July 
1873, to found six Scholarships, to be called the " Sib, Jas- 
vantsingji Scholarships," two to be awarded every year to 
the Candidates who pass the Matriculation Examination 
after having studied for two years continuously before 
Matriculation in the Bhawnagar Alfred High School. 

At a meeting of the Senate, held on the 11th November 
1873, this offer was accepted by the Senate with their best 
thanks. 

The Scholarships will be awarded in accordance with the 
following Regulations : — 

1. Two Scholarships, to be called " The Sir Jasvantsingji 
Scholarships," one of Rupees fifteen and one of Rupees 
twelve per mensem, shall be awarded every year to the two 
Candidates who shall have passed the Matriculation Exa- 
mination with the highest number of marks after having 
studied for two years continuously before Matriculation in 
the Bhawnagar Alfred High School. 

2. The Scholarships shall be tenable for three years at 
any College recognized by the University of Bombay. 

3. The Candidate elected must satisfy the Registrar, 
within six weeks from the date of election, that he has duly 
joined a recognized College or Institution. 

•4. The stipend of the Scholarship shall be payable month- 
ly on a bill drawn by the Head of the College, who shall 
certify, under his signature on such bill, that the Scholar is 
in regular attendance (except in case of sickness) at the 
College, that his conduct is good, and that his progress in 
University studies is satisfactory. 

5. In the event of a Scholar failing to pass the University 
Examinations in the course in which he is studying at the 
earliest opportunity in each case, his Scholarship shall be 
forfeited. Provided always that it shall be in the option of 
the Syndicate to continue his Scholarship to such Scholar 
if they think fit. 



136 



ENDOWMENTS. 



6. In the event of there being no Candidates entitled to 
receive the Scholarships, or in case of their lapsing during 
the course of the three years for which they are tenable, the 
money shall be reserved to be applied by the Syndicate in 
such manner as they shall think best fitted for furthering 
the object of the endowment. 



Year. 


Scholar. 


School. 


1874 1 

1875 { 

1876 | 

1877 [ 




Bhavnagar High School. 
Ditto. 




Mehta, Balvantrai Harjivandas >. 

Mehtd, Partabrai Govindrai 


Ditto. 
Ditto. 
Ditto. 




Ditth. 




Ditto 


Metha , Mahipatram Govindram 


Ditto- 



XXI. 



THE KAESANDAS MULJI PEIZE. 



Mr. Sorabji Shapurji Bengali, Honorary Secretary to the 
Karsandas Mulji Memorial Fund, in a letter dated the 11th 
November 1873, to the address of the Eegistrar, offered to 
the University the sum of Es. 3,000 in Government 4 per 
cent, paper for the purpose of founding an annual prize, to 
be called the "Karsandas Mttui Prize," of Rs. 100, to be 
awarded to the best Essay in English on any moral or social 
subject selected by the Syndicate, by any Graduate or 
Under-graduate of the University. 

At a meeting of the Senate, held on the 20th December 
1873, this endowment was accepted with the best thanks of 
the Senate. » 

The prize will be awarded in accordance with the follow- 
ing Eegulations :-— 

1. The Karsandas Mulji Prize, consisting of books of the 
value of Rupees one hundred, shall be awarded annually for 
the best English Essay on some moral or social subject in 
accordance with the subjoined conditions : — 

2. Competitors shall be Graduates or Under-graduates of 
the University of Bombay of not more than six years' stand- 
ing from the date of their Matriculation on the day pre- 
scribed for the sending in of the Essays. 



THE DOSSABHOY HORMUSJEE CAMA PRIZE. 



137 



3. The subject for the Essay shall be selected by the 
Syndicate, and notified not less than twelve months before 
the day for sending in the Essay. 

4. The Essays shall be sent in to the University Regis- 
trar on or before the fourth Monday in July. Each Essay 
shall be designated by a motto instead of the writer's name, 
and shall be accompanied by a sealed cover containing the 
name of the competitor, his University standing, his post 
office address, and a declaration that the Essay sent in by 
him is bond fide his own composition. 

5. The Judges shall be three in number, and shall be 
nominated annually by the Syndicate. Their decision shall 
be announced on the fourth Monday in September. 

6. The prize shall not be awarded to any Essay which, 
in the opinion of the Judges, would not, when printed, be 
creditable to the University. 

7. On the occasions when the prize is not awarded the 
money shall be reserved to be applied by the Syndicate in 
such manner as they shall think best fitted for furthering 
the object of the endowment. 



Year. 


Subject. 


Prizeman. 


College. 


1875 
1876 

1877 

1878 


The Connection of Social Morality 
with National Prosperity. 

The Effect of Early Marriages on the 
Educational Progress of the Na- 
tives of this Country. 

The Influence of Asceticism on the 
Social Morality of the Hindus. 

The Use and Abuse of Religious and 
Educational Endowments. 


No Essay receiv- 
ed. 

Tripathi, Govar- 
dhan Madha- 
varam, B.A. 

Bhandarkar,Va- 
sudev Gopal, 
B.A. 


Elphinstone. 
Ditto. 



XXII. 

THE DOSSABHOY HORMUSJEE CAMA PRIZE. 

Mr. Kharshedji Rastamji Cama, in a letter dated the 28th 
November 1874, to the address of the officiating Registrar, 
offered to the University, on behalf of the heirs of the late 
Dossabhoy Hormusjee Cama, the sun of Kupees (5,000) five 
thousand in 4 per cent. Grovernmeafc Promissory Notes for 
the purpose of founding an annual prize under certain con- 
ditions mentioned therein. 
B 713— I* 



138 



ENDOWMENTS, 



At a meeting of the Senate, held on the 19th December 
1 874, the endowment was accepted with the best thanks of 
the Senate. 

The prize will be awarded in accordance with the follow - 
i ng Regulations : — 

1. A Prize, to be called the "Dossabhoy Hormusjee 
(Jama Prize," consisting of books of the value of Rupees 
(200) two hundred, shall be awarded annually for the best 
Fmglish Essay on a medical subject. 

2. Competitors shall be Licentiates of Medicine of the 
University of Bombay, or Graduates of Grant Medical 
( College. 

3. The subject for the Essay shall be selected by the 
^Syndicate, and notified not less than twelve months before 
t he day for sending in the Essay. 

4. The Essays shall be sent in to the University Regis- 
trar on or before the fourth Monday in July. Each Essay 
«hall be designated by a motto instead of the writer's name, 
and shall be accompanied by a sealed cover containing the 
name of the competitor, his University or College standing, 
his post office address, and a declaration that the Essay 
sent in by him is bond fide his own composition. 

5. The Judges shall be three in number, and shall be 
nominated annually by the Syndicate. Their decision shall 
be announced on the fourth Monday in September. 

6. The prize shall not be awarded to any Essay which, 
in the opinion of the Judges, would not, when printed, be 
creditable to the University. 

7. On the occasions when the prize is not awarded the 
money shall be reserved to be applied by the Syndicate in 
such manner as they shall think best fitted for furthering 
the object of the endowment. 



1876 

1877 
1878 



Subject. 



Causes of the more dangerous forms 
of Malarial Fevers in the Town and 
Island of Bomhay, with sugges- 
tions for their prevention. 

The Telluric and Climatic Influences 
on the Production and Modification 
of Diseases as witnessed in Bombay. 

The Origin and Spread of Zymotic 
Diseases in India, and Suggestions 
for their eradication. 



Prizeman. 



Prize not award- 



No Essay receiV' 



College. 



THE HUGHLINGS AND JAMES TAYLOR PRIZES. 139 

XXIII. 

THE HUGHLINGS PRIZE. 

In April 1875, the Honorary Secretary to the Hughlings 
Testimonial Fund offered to the University, by the direction 
of the Committee of that Fund, the sum of Rs. 2,500 in 4 
per cent. Government Promissory Notes for the purpose of 
founding an annual prize in memory of the late Professor 
Hughlings. 

At a meeting of the Senate, held on the 18th September 
1875, the offer was accepted with the best thanks of the 
Senate. 

The prize will be awarded in aqpordance with the follow- 
ing Regulations : — 

1. A Prize, to be called " The Hughlings Prize," consist- 
ing of books of the value of Rupees one hundred, shall 
be awarded every year to the Candidate who passes the 
First Examination in Arts with the highest marks for pro- 
ficiency in English. 

2. The name of the successful Candidate will be publish- 
ed along with the list of the Candidates who may pass the 
First Examination in Arts. 



Year. 


Prizemen. 


College. 


1876 
1877 


Shahani, Dayaram Gidumal 


Elphinstone. 
St. Xavier'8. 









xxiy, 

THE JAMES TAYLOR PRIZE. 

In December 1875 the Honorary Secretaries to the Taylor 
Memorial Fund offered to the University, by direction of 
the Committee of that Fund, the sum of Rupees 2,500 in 4> 
per cent. Government Promissory Notes, for the purpose of 
founding an annual prize in memory of the late Mr. James 
Taylor, for six years Registrar of this University. 

At a meeting of the Senate, held on the 18th December 
1875, this offer was accepted with the best thanks of the 
Senate. 



140 , ENDOWMENTS. 

The prize will be awarded in accordance with the follow- 
ing Regulations : — 

1. A prize, to be called " The James Taylor Prize," con- 
sisting of books of the value of Rupees one hundred, shall 
be awarded annually in connection with the B.A. Examina- 
tion, on the following conditions : — 

2. The prize shall be awarded to the Candidate who 
passes the Examination in the First Class with the highest 
marks in 

(1) Political Economy ; and 

(2) History or Logic and Moral Philosophy. 
Provided that no Candidate obtains the prize who has not 

satisfied the Examiners of his due proficiency in these sub- 
jects. • 

3. The name of the Candidate to whom the prize may 
be awarded shall be published with the list of successful 
Candidates. 

4. Whenever the Prize is not awarded, the money will 
be reserved to be applied by the Syndicate in such manner 
as they shall think best fitted for furthering the object of 
the endowment. 



Ykar. 


Prizeman. 


College. 


1876 




Elphinstone. 
Ditto. 


1877 











XXV. 
THE BHAU DAJI PRIZE. 

In March 1876 the Honorary Secretaries to the Bhau 
Daji Memorial Fund offered to the University, by direction 
of the Committee of that Fund, the sum of Rupees 5,000 in 
4 per cent. Government Promissory Notes, for the purpose 
of founding an annual prize in memory of the late Dr. Bhau 
Daji, G.G.M.C., Hon. M.R.A.S., one of the Fellows men- 
tioned in the Act of Incorporation, and for many years 
. Syndic in the Faculty of Arts. 

At a meeting of the Senate, held on the 31st March 1876, 
this offer was accepted with the best thanks of the Senate. 

The prize will be awarded in accordance with the follow- 
ing Regulations : — 

1. A prize, to be called " The Bhau Daji Prize," consist- 
ing of books of the value of Rupees two hundred, shall be 



THE VENATEKRAO JUGGONNATHJI SUNKERSETT PRIZE 141 

• 

awarded every year to the Candidate who passes the B.A. 
Examination with the highest marks for proficiency in 
Sanskrit : provided chat the prize shall not be awarded, 
except to a Candidate whom the Examiners consider deserv- 
ing of reward for his special knowledge and ability as a 
Sanskrit Scholar. 

2. The name of the Candidate to whom the prize may 
be awarded shall be published with the list of successful 
Candidates, 

3. Whenever the Prize is not awarded, the money will 
be reserved to be applied by the Syndicate in such manner 
as they shall think best fitted for furthering the object of 
the endowment. 



Year. 


— — , 

Prizeman. 


College. 


1876 


Pavgi, Ravji Bhavanrao 


Elphinstone. 


1877 











XXVI. 




THE VENAYEKRAO JUGONNATHJI 
SUNKEESETT PEIZE. 

Mr. Nanabhoy Byramjee Jeejeebhoy, Honorary Secretary 
to the Venayekrao Jugonnathji Sunkersett Memorial Fund, 
in a letter dated 1st April 1876, to the address of the Vice- 
Chancellor, offered to the University the sum of Rs. 4,500 
in Government 4 per cent, paper for the purpose of found- 
ing an annual prize of books, of the value of Rs. 180, to be 
called " The Venayekrao Jugonnathji Sunkersett Prize." 

At a meeting of the Senate, held on the 6th October 1876, 
the offer was accepted with the best thanks of the Senate, 



142 ENDOWMENTS. 

The Prize will be awarded in accordance with the follow • 
ing Regulations : — 

1. A Prize, to be called w The Venayekrao Jugonnathji 
Sunkersett Prize," consisting of books of the value of Ru- 
pees one hundred and eighty, shall be awarded every year 
to the Candidate who passes the First Examination in Arts 
with the highest marks for proficiency in Sanskrit. 

2. The name of the Candidate to whom the Prize may 
be awarded shall be published with the list of successful 
Candidates. 



Year. 


Prizeman. 


College. 


1877... 


Natu, Trimbak G-angadhar 


Elphinstone. 







XXVII. 

THE MERWANJEE FRAMJEE PANDAY 
SCHOLARSHIP. 
Mr. Nusserwanjee Maneckjee Petit, President of the 
Oriental Spinning and Weaving Company, Limited, in a 
letter dated the 14th August 1876 to the address of the Vice- 
Chancellor, offered to the University, on behalf of theCom- 
pany, the sum of Rs. 6,000 in Government 4 per cent, 
paper for the purpose of founding an annual Scholarship, 
of the value of Rs. 20 a month, to be called " The Merwanjee 
Framjee Panday Scholarship," in memory of the late Mr. 
Merwanjee Framjee Panday, to be awarded at the Examina- 
tion for the Degree of L.C.E. to the Candidate who passes 
with the highest number of marks in Mechanical Engi- 
neering. 

At a meeting of the Senate, held on the 6th October 1876, 
this offer was accepted with the best thanks of the Senate. 

The Scholarship will be awarded in accordance with the 
following Regulations : — 

1. A Scholarship, to be called " The Merwanjee Framjee 
Panday Scholarship," of the value of Rupees twenty a 
month, shall be awarded annually at the Examination for 
the Degree of L. C. E. to the Candidate who passes with 
the highest number of marks in "Mechanical Engineering." 



THE KAHANDAS MUNCHABAM SCHOLARSHIP. 143 

2. The name of the Candidate to whom the Scholarship 
may be awarded shall be published with the list of success- 
ful Candidates, 

3. Whenever the Scholarship is not awarded, the money 
will be reserved to be applied by the Syndicate in such 
manner as they shall think best fitted for furthering the 
object of the endowment. 



Year. 


Scholar. 


College. 


1876... 




Pookr Civil Engineering. 
Ditto 


1877 











XXVIII. 

THE KAHANDAS MUNCHARAM SCHOLARSHIP. 

In August 1876 the widow of the late Mr. Kahandas 
Muncharam, Executive Engineer, PresidencyDivision, offers 
ed to the University the sum of Rs. 6,000 for investment in 
Government 4 per cent, paper, in accordance with the will 
made by him, for the purpose of founding an annual Scho- 
larship of the value of Rs. 20 a month, to be awarded at 
the Matriculation Examination to the Gujarathi Hindu 
Candidate who passes with the highest number of marks, 
on condition that he prosecutes his studies, during the time 
that he holds the Scholarship, in an Engineering College, 
recognized by the University. 

At a meeting of the Senate, held on the 6th October 1876, 
this offer was accepted with the best thanks of the- Senate, 

The Scholarship will be awarded in accordance with the 
following Regulations : — ■ 

1 ? A Scholarship, to be called " The Kahandas Muncharam 
Scholarship," of the value of Rupees twenty a month, shall 
be awarded annually at the Matriculation Examination to 
the Gujarathi Hindu Candidate who passes with the highest 
number of marks, on condition that he prosecutes his 
studies, during the time that he holds the Scholarship, in 
an Engineering College recognized by the University of 
Bombay. 



144 ENDOWMENTS. 

2 Candidatea must forward their applications to the 
Registrar (vide Form AL.) with their applications for per- 
mission to attend the Matriculation Examination of the 
same year. 

3. The Candidate elected must satisfy the Registrar, 
within six weeks from the date of election, that he has duly 
joined a recognized College or Institution. 

4. The stipend of the Scholarship shall be payable half- 
yearly on a bill drawn by the Head of the College, which 
bill shall certify, under his signature, that the Scholar is in 
regular attendance at the College, that his conduct is good, 
and that his progress in University studies is satisfactory. 

5. Should the Scholar discontinue his University studies , 
or be unfavourably reported on by the Head of his Col- 
lege, the Syndicate shall declare the Scholarship to be for- 
feited, 

6. In case of the Student who is elected declining to 
proceed to College, the stipend of the Scholarship for the 
ensuing year may be conferred on the Candidate who shall 
have obtained the second place in the examination. 

7r In case of the Scholarship lapsing through forfeiture 
or otherwise, during the course of the year, the money shall 
be reserved to be applied by the Syndicate in such manner 
as they shall think best fitted for furthering the object of 
the endowment. 



Yrar. 


Scholar. 


School. 


1876... 


Thakore, Jadavrai Hakumatrai 


Surat High School. 


1877... 


Desai, Nathabhai Avichaldas 


Nariad High Schooi. 







XXIX. 



THE DHIRAJLAL MATHURADAS SCHOLARSHIP. 

In July last, Ati Lakshumibai, widow of the late Mr. 
Dhirajlal Mathuradas, Government Pleader, High Court, 
Bombay, offered to the University the sum of Rs. 6,000 in 



THE SINCLAIR PRIZE. J 45 

Government 4 per cent. Promissory Notes for the founda- 
tion of an annual Scholarship, to be called the '* Dhirajlal 
Mathuradas Scholarship," and to be awarded to a Gujarathi 
Hindu who passes the B.A. Examination with the highest 
number of marks, and who prosecutes his studies in a 
School of Law recognized by the University of Bombay. 

At the last annual meeting of the Senate, held on the 
19th December 1877, the offer was accepted with the best 
thanks of the Senate. 

The Scholarship will be awarded in accordance with the 
following Regulations : — 

1. A Scholarship, to be called " The Dhirajlal Mathu- 
radas Scholarship," of the value of Rs. 240 per annum, 
tenable for two years, shall be awarded every alternate year 
to the Gujarathi Hindu who passes the Examination for 
the Degree of B.A. with the highest number of marks, and. 
elects to prosecute his studies in a School of Law recog- 
nized by the University of Bombay. 

2. In case of the Student who is elected, declining to 
proceed to a School of Law, or failing to satisfy the Univer- 
sity Registrar, within six weeks from the date of election, 
that he has duly joined a recognized School of Law, the 
Scholarship may be conferred on similar conditions on the 
Gujarathi Hindu who shall have obtained the second place 
in the examination. 

3. In case of vacancy occurring between the fixed dates 
of election, the interest of the endowment shall be applied 
by the Syndicate in such way as may appear to them best 
fitted for furthering the purposes of the endowment. 

XXX. 

THE SINCLAIR PRIZE. 

The President of the " Sinclair Memorial Committee " 
offered to the University the sum of Rs. 1,500 in Govern- 
ment 4 per cent. Promissory Notes for the foundation of an 
annual Prize in memory of the late Robert Sharpe Sin- 
clair, LL.D., the first Director of Public Instruction, Berar, 
and for several years previously the Registrar of this Uni- 
versity, to be awarded to the Candidate who at Matricula- 
tion passes the best examination in Sanskrit or Persian, 
from a High School in Berar. 
b 713 — m 



146 ENDOWMENTS. 

At the last annual meeting of the Senate, held on the 
19th December 1877, the offer was accepted with the best 
thanks of the Senate. 

The Prize will be awarded in accordance with the follow- 
ing Eegulations : — 

1. A Prize, to be called " The Sinclair Prize, " of the 
value of Es. 60, shall be awarded annually at the Matricu- 
lation Examination to the Candidate from a High School 
in Berar who passes with the highest number of marks in 
Sanskrit or Persian. 

2. The name of the successful Candidate will be pub- 
lished with the list of the Candidates who pass the Matri- 
culation Examination. 

3. Whenever the Prize is not awarded, the interest of 
the endowment shall be applied by the Syndicate in such 
way as may appear to them best fitted for furthering the 
purposes of the endowment. 



IX. 

JBtittfapctions. 




THE SIR COWASJEE JEHANGHIER HALL OF 
THE UNIVERSITY OF BOMBAY. 

Cowasjee Jehanghier Readymoney, Esquire, Justice of the 
Peace, ^n a letter to the Vice- Chancellor, Sir Alexander 
Grant, Bart., dated the 27th April 1863, offered the sum of 
Rs. 1,00,000 for the erection of University Buildings, under 
the following conditions : — That Government contribute the 
remainder of the sum necessary for the buildings, and grant 
a site on the Esplanade, and that no subscription from any 
other private person be received for this object. 

This offer was accepted by Government and referred to the 
University, and at a Convocation of the Senate, held on the 
18th July 1863, the following Resolution was passed : — 

" That the Senate accept the noble gift of Cowasjee Jehan- 
ghier, Esquire, with the liberal augmentation offered by Gov- 
ernment, and with the recognition of the liabilities imposed 



148 BENEFACTIONS. 



on this University by its holding the University Buildings, 
when completed, according to the Act of Incorporation ; 
but on the understanding that Mr. Cowasjee concurs in the 
interpretation which Government puts upon his conditions 
in the third and fourth paragraphs of its letter, No. 260, 
dated 29th May 1863, to the address of Sir Alexander Grant, 
Bart., Vice- Chancellor." 

Note. — The interpretation of Government referred to was 
as follows : — 

" His Excellency in Council understands the third condi- 
tion specified in Mr. Cowasjee Jehanghier's letter as imply- 
ing that a building for the University is to be completed at 
the joint expense of that gentleman and of Government, 
without accepting contributions from any other source, so 
that it may form in itself a separate and permanent monu- 
ment of Mr. Cowasjee Jehanghier's desire to provide the 
University with a local habitation. 

" As, however, the duties and wants of the University 
increase, His Excellency the Governor in Council hopes that 
the example so worthily set by Mr. Cowasjee Jehanghier 
will be followed by other University benefactors, and Gov- 
ernment feel assured that that gentleman would be the last 
to exclude those who may wish to follow his noble example 
from adding to or adorning the edifice which he has been 
the first to raise." 

This interpretation was formally accepted by Mr. Cowas- 
jee Jehanghier in a letter to Government, dated the 8th 
August 1873. 

At a meeting of the Senate, held on the 4th March 1875, 
the following Eesolution was unanimously passed : — 

That, in recognition of Sir Cowasjee Jehanghier Ready- 
money's noble gift of Es. 1,00,000 for the erection of Uni- 
versity Buildings, the Hall, now handed over by Govern- 
ment to the University, be named " The Sir Cowasjee Jehan- 
ghier Hall of the University of Bombay." 



DIVERSITY ARMS AND COMMON SEAL— LIBRARY. 149 

II. 

UNIVERSITY ARMS AND COMMON SEAL, 

Cowasjee Jehanghier Readymoney, Esquire, Justice of 
the Peace, in a letter to G. C. M. Birdwood, Esq., M.D., 
Fellow of the University, dated 24th September 1863, for- 
warded a donation of Rupees 1,200 to meet the expense of a 
Grant of Arms to the University, and the engraving of a 
University seal. This donation was accepted at a meeting 
of the Senate held on the same day, with a vote of thanks 
to the donor for his timely and liberal benefaction. 



HI. 



UNIVERSITY LIBRARY. 

Premchund Roychund, Esquire, in a letter to Government, 
dated the 27th August 1864, made the following request s — 

" I have the honour to request that Government will have 
the goodness to communicate to the University of Bombay 
my desire to offer most respectfully to that learned body the 
sum of Rupees (2,00,000) two lacs towards the erection of a 
University Library, which may be an ornament to this city, 
and, by becoming a storehouse of the learned works, not 
only of the past but of many generations to come, may be a 
means of promoting the high ends of the University," 
b 713— m* 



150 BENEFACTIONS. 

At a meeting of the Senate, held on the 10th September 
1864, it was resolved " that the Senate cordially and unani- 
mously accept, with their best thanks, Mr. Premchund 
Roychund's noble gift." 



IV. 

THE KA'JA'BAT TOWER. 

Premchund Roychund, Esquire, in a letter to Govern- 
ment, dated 6th October 1864, made the following request: — 

" I have the honour to request that Government will do 
me the favour to offer to the University of Bombay, in the 
name of my good mother, Rajabai, (2,00,000) two lacs of 
Rupees for the erection, of a Tower to contain a large 
clock and a set of joy-bells. 

" If there be no architectural objections, I should like the 
Tower to be in connection with the University Library." 

At a meeting of the Senate, held on the 10th December 
1864, it was unanimously resolved "that the Senate do 
accept the noble gift of Mr. Premchund Roychund of two 
lacs of Rupees for the erection of a Tower to contain a large 
clock and a set of joy-bells ; and that the grateful thanks of 
the Senate be conveyed to Mr. Premchund Roychund." 

It was further unanimously resolved " that the Tower be 
named ' The Rajabai Tower ' in commemoration of Mr. 
Premchund Roychund's mother." 



UNIVERSITY MACE. 

V. 



151 




UNIVERSITY MACE. 



Munguldass Nathoobhoy, Esquire, Justice of the Peace, 
in a letter to the Registrar, Dr. R. S. Sinclair, dated the 
18th November 1864, offered Rs. 1,200 for the purpose of 
providing the University with a Mace. 

At a meeting of the Senate, held on the 10th December 
1864, it was unanimously resolved " that Mr. Munguldass 
Nathoobhoy's handsome offer of Rs. 1,200 for a Mace for 
the University be accepted with thanks." 



% ffliteulff' 1878-79. 



SENATE. 
Chancellor, 
His Excellency the Honourable Sir Richard Temple, 
Bart., G.C.S.L, CLE. 

Vice-Chancellor. 
The Honourable James Gibbs, C,S,, C,SJ f , F.R.G.S. 
Fellows. 
Ex-officio,. 



1. His Excellency Lieut.-General the 

Honourable Sir Charles William 
Dunbar Staveley, K.C.B., Comman 
der-in-Chief* 

2. The Honourable Sir Michael Ro- 

berts Westropp, Knight, B. A., Chief 
Justice, 1860. 

3. The Right Reverend Louis George 
Mylne, M.A.,D.D., Bishop of Bombay' 

4. The Honourable James Gibbs, g ^ 

C.S., C.S.I., F.R.G.S., 1867. J ^ s 

5. The Honourable L. R. Ash- * 
burner, C.S., C.S.L, 1873. 

6. K. M. Chatfield, B.A., Director 

Public Instruction, 1866. 

7. Lieut. -Colonel Thomas Waddington 

Educational Inspector, Central Divi- 
sion, 1863. 

8. William Wordsworth, B.A., Prin- 
cipal, Elphinstone College.* Dean 
Arts. 

9. R. G. Oxenham, M.A., Principal, 
Deccan College, 1864. 

10. Henry Cook, M.D., F.R.G.S., F.G.S., 
F.M.S., Principal, Grant Medical 
College, 1872. 



in? 

of 



A 



A 



A 



A 



Faculty. 



M 



tE 



B 



M 



* Not gazetted, + A stands for Arts, L for Laws, M for 

Medicine, and E for Civil Engineering. 



SENATE. 



153 





Faculty. 


11. Theodore Cooke, M.A. M.I., LL.D., 










Mem. Inst. C.E.I., Principal, Poona 










Civil Engineering College.* 


A 


L 


... 


E 


1860. 










The Honourable Sir Michael Eo- 










berts Westropp, Knight, B.A. 


A 


L 




• .. 


12. William Loudon. 


A 


L 




E 


13. Sorabjee Jamsetjee Jeejeebhoy. 


A 




... 


... 


1862. 










14. Major-General John Archibald Bal- 










lard, R.E., C.B. 


A 


. . . 


• • . 


E 


15. The Honourable Lyttelton Holy- 










oake Bayley. 


A 


L 


... 


... 


16. Sir Cowasjee Jehanghier Beady- 










money, Knight, C.S.I. 




... 




E 


17. The Reverend Ward Maule, LL.D. 


... 


L 




... 


18. William James Moore, M.D., L.R. 










C.P. Edin. 


..• 


. . • 


M 


... 


19. The Honourable Eao Saheb Vish- 










vanath ISTarayan Mandlik, C.S.I. 


A 


L 


... 


E 


1863. 










20. Henry Napier Bruce Erskine, C.S. 


A 


. . . 


. < . 


. .. 


21. The Honourable Maxwell Melvill, 










C.S. 


A 


L 


• . ■ 


• • . 


22. James Braithwaite Peile, C.S., M.A. 


A 


L 


... 




23. William George Pedder, C.S..B.A. 


A 


... 


... 


... 


24. The Honourable RaymondWest,C.S., 










M.A., F.R.G.S. 


A 


L 




... 


25. William Heurtley Newnham, C.S., 










B.A. 


A 


L 


... 




26. James Bellot Richey, C.S., C.S.I., B.A. 


A 


... 


... 


... 


27. Herbert Mills Birdwood, S.O., M.A. 


A 


L 




E 



*Not gazetted. 



154 



UNIVERSITY, 



Faculty. 



Lieut.-Col. Thomas Waddington. 

28. Henry Vandyke Carter, M.D. 

29. Johann Georg Biihler, Ph.D. 

30. The Honourable John Philip Green, 

LL.B. 

31. Sir Munguldass Nathoobhoy, 

Knight, C.S.I, 
32.'Manockjee Cursetjee. 



1854. 



33. Foster Fitzgerald Arbuthnot, C.S. 

34. Bhungwandass Purshotamdass. 

35. Dadabhoy Nowrojee. 

36. The Eeverend Dhanjibhoy Nauroji. 

37. Colonel James George Fife, R.E. 

38. Charles Gonne, C.S. 

39. William Guyer Hunter, M.D., F.R. 

C.P., Bean in Medicine. 

40. Herbert Edward Jacomb, C.S. 

41. The Honourable Major- General Sir 

Michael Kavanagh Kennedy, R.E. 
K.C.S.I., R.E., Dean in Civil Engi 
neering. 

42. Joshua King, C.S., M.A. 

43. George Morison Macpherson, C.S. 

M.A. 
Robert George Oxenham, M.A. 

44. Khan Bahadur Padamjee Pestonjee. 

45. Sorabjee Pestonjee Framjee. 

46. The Reverend Richard Stothert, 

M.A. 

47. Venayakrao Vasudevji. 

48. William Wedderburn, C.S. 

49. Major-General Henry St. Clair Wil 

kins, R.E. 



M 



M 



E 



E 



SENATE. 



155 



50. 

51. 
52. 

53. 
54. 

55. 

56. 

57. 
58. 

59. 
60. 

61. 



62. 
63. 
64. 

65. 
66. 

67. 



Kao Bahadur Dadoba Pandurang. 
1865. 

Dhunjeebhoy Framjee Patel. 

The Honourable Theodore Cracraft 

Hope, C.S. 
Karsandas Madhavdas. 
Eao Bahadur Keropant Laxuman 

Chhatre. 
Muncherjee Byramjee Cola, M.D. 
The Honourable John Marriott, B. A., 

Dean in Law. 
Eao Saheb Mahipatram Rupram 
Mahadev Govind Ranade, M.A. 

LL.B. 
Premchund Roychund. 
The Reverend J. V. S. Taylor, B.A 

1866 (February). 
William Allan Russell, M.A. 

1866 (April). 
Kyrle Mitford Chatfield, B.A. 
John Cruikshank, M.D. 
William Dymock, B.A. 
The Honourable Dosabhoy Framjee, 

C.S.I. 
William Albert East, C.S., B.A. 
Abraham Nickson Hoi el, L.K., and 

Q.C.P.I. 
Khan Bahadur Dastur Hoshang 

Jamasp. 
Major George Adolphus Jacob, 
Frank Kielhorn, Ph.D. 
T. B. Kirkham. 

The Reverend Charles Kirk, M.A. 
Kharshedji Rustomji Cama. 
The Honourable Robert Hill Pinhey, 

C.S. 
Edward Hope Percival, C.S. 



Faculty. 



A 


L 






A 


L 






A 








A 


... 




E 


A 


L 






A 


... 






A 










L 




E 


A 








A 


... 






A 


L 










M 




A 


L 


M 




A 








... 


... 


M 




A 








A 


... 






A 








A 








A 


... 


... 


... 


A 






... 


A 


L 






A 


... 


... 


..« 



156 



UNIVERSITY. 



75. Dastur Peshutan Byramji. 

76. Ramkrishna Gopal Bhandarkar, 

M.A., Hon. M.R.A.S. 

77. Vithal Narayan Pathak, M.A. 

78. Vasudev Pandurang. 

79. The Reverend Trenham King Wea- 

therhead, LL.B. 

80. The Reverend Charles Gilder. 

1867. 

The Honourable James Gibbs, C.S., 
C.S.I., F.R.G.S. 

81. The Honourable Sir Charles Sar 

gent, Knight, M.A. 

82. The Venerable C. H. Leigh-Lye, 

M.A. 

83. Krishna Skastri Chiplunkar. 

84. Arthur Travers Crawford, C.S. 

85. Alexander Faulkner. 

86. Major Charles Thomas Haig,R.E. 

87. Clarence Bovill Izon, C.S. 

88. Isadore Bernadotte Lyon, F.C.S. 

89. Pherozshah Mervanji Mehta, M.A 

90. John George Moore, C.S. 

91. Shankar Pandurang Pandit, M.A. 

92. Adam Macdougal Rogers. 

93. Satyendra Nath Tagore, C.S. 

94. Bal Mangesh Wagle, M.A., LL.B. 

95. Major Edward William West. 

96. Framjee ISTasserwanjee Patel. 

97. The Reverend Duncan* Macpher- 

son, M.A. 

1868 (January) 

98. Lieut.-Colonel W. A. Baker, R.E. 



Faculty. 



M 



M 



M 



SENATE. 



157 



99. Lieut.-Col. A. Davidson, RE. 

100. Dhirajram Dalpatram, G. G. M. 

101. Major W. M. Ducat, R.E. 

102. C. E. Fox. M.A. 

103. Colonel J. A. Fuller, R.E. 

104. W. Gray, M.B. 

105. Colonel. H. F. Hancock, R.E. 

106. F. G. Joynt, M.D. 

107. Khanderao Chimanrao Bedarkar, 

B.A,, LL.B. 

108. J.Macpherson, B.A 

109. The Right Rev. Leo. Meurin, S.J., 

D.D. 

110. Ramchandra Rao Appa Saheb, 

Chief of Jamkhandi. 

111. The Honourable E.W. Ravenscroft 

C S C S I 

112. The Reverend G. C. Reynell, M.A. 

113. Sir A. D. Sassoon, Knight, C.S.I. 

114. Shantaram Narayan, 

115. The Reverend J. A. Willy, S.J. 

D.D, 



1868 (December). 



116. Atmaram Pandurang, G.G.M.C. 

117. Bhikaji Amrit Chobe, G.G.M.C. 

118. Byramjee Jeejeebhoy, C.S.I. 

119. James Burgess, M.R.A.S. 

120. C. E. Chapman, Ben. C.S. 

121. J. Harry Rivett-Carnac, Ben. C.S. 

122. Rao Bahadur Daji Nilkant Nagar- 

123. The Reverend S.B. Fairbank, M.A. 

124. Govind Yithal Kurkaray, B.A. 

125. H. P. Jacob. 

126. Mahadev Moreshvar Kunte, B.A. 

127. John Pinkerton, M,D, 



Faculty. 


A 






E 






M 






... 




B 


A 


L 


... 






... 


, 


E 


A 




M 


E 




... 




E 


A 


... 


M 


... 


A 


L 






A 


L 


... 


... 


A 


L 


... 


... 


A 








A 


ii 




... 


A 


L 




... 


A 






... 


A 




M 




... 


L 


M 


••• 


A 






E 


A 


L 






A 


L 




E 


A ■ 






... 


A 


L 


... 


E 


A 








A 


... 


. 




A 




M 


... 



B 713—71 



158 



UNIVERSITY. 



128. G. B.Reid, C.S., B.A. 

129. Commander G. T. Robinson, I.N 

130. James Scorgie, F.C.S. 

131. The Eeverend D. A. F. de Rozario 

deSouza. 

132. Nowroji Fardunji. 

1869 

133. The Reverend Thomas Carss, M.A. 

1870 

134. Atmaram Sadashiv G. Jayakar 

L.M., M.R.C.S., L.R.C.P. 

135. Colin Browning, M.A. 

136. Cursetjee Nasserwanjee Cama. 

137. The Reverend J. G. Cooper. 

138. C. F. Farran, B.A. 

139. T. P. H. Macartney Filgate 

140. Gopal Raoji Tilak, L.C.E. 

141. Harichand Sadashivii, Assoc. Inst. 

C.E. 

142. The Reverend A. Hazen, M.A. 

143. Risley V. Hearn. 

144. D. S. Kemp, F.C.S. 

145. W.F. Knapp, M.R.C.S. 

146. E. Tyrrell Leith, LL.M. 

147. John Lumsdaine. 

148. Nagindas Tulsidas Marphatia, B.A., 

LL.B. 

149. Rao Bahadur Nana Moroji. 

150. Thomas Ormiston, Mem. Inst. C.E. 

151. Raghunath Narayan Khote. 

152. The Reverend J. S. S. Robertson, 

F.R.G.S., M.R.A.S. 



Faculty. 



M 



M 

M 

M 



E 



SENATE. 



159 



153. Eahimtulah Muhammad Sayani, 

M.A., LL.B. 

154. The Honourable Sorabji Shapurji 

Bengali. 

155. Lieut.-Col. J. H. White, R.E. 

1871. 

156. The Honourable Charles Gurdon 

Kemball, C.S. 

157. G. M. Stewart. 

158. G. Atkinson, B.A., Sergeant-at 

Law. 

159. Samuel Cooke, M.A., Assoc. Inst. 

C.E. 

160. Homejee Cursetjee Dady. 

161. Edaljee Nasserwanjee, G.G.M.C. 

162. J. Flynn. 

163. J. H. E. Hart, C.E. 

164. T. G. Hewlett. 

165. Chester Macnaghten, M.A. 

166. Major G. L. C. Merewether, R.E. 

167. John Nugent, C.S. 

168. Sidney Smith, M.D. 

169. Moreshvar Atmaram Tarkhad. 

1872. 

170. K. T. Best, M.A. 

171. Charles Chambers, F.R.S. 

H. Cook, M.D., F.R.G.S., F.G.S. 
F.M.S. 

172. J. A. Forbes. 

173. Rao Bahadur Ganpatrao Bhaskar. 

174. W. G. Hall. 

175. John Jardine, C.S. 

176. Nanabhoy Byramjee Jeejeebhoy. 

177. Colonel Jenkin Jones, R!E. 

178. Jamsetji Palanji Kapadia. 



Faculty. 



"H 



M 
M 

M 



E 

9 
9 



M 



B 



Ml 



3 



160 



UNIVERSITY. 



179. W. Lee-Warner, C.S., M.A. 

180. Vaman Abaji Modak, B.A. 

181. Ardesir Framji Moos. 

182. Captain H. Morland, late I. N. 

F.R.A.S., F.R.G.S. 

183. Nanabhai Haridas, LL.B. 

184. Nacoda Mahomed Ally Rogay. 

185. Shantaram Vithal Sanzgire, L.M. 

186. Jamsetji Dhanjibhai Wadia. 

1873. 

The Honourable L. R. Ashburner, 
C.S., O.S.I. 

187. Balaji Pandurang Bhalerao. 

188. Ananta Chandroba, G.G.M.C. 

189. F. L. Latham, M.A. 

190. C. J. Mayhew. 

191. E. Rehatsek, M.C.E. 

192. The Reverend Narayan Sheshadri. 

193. Framji Rastamji Vikaji,B.A.,LL.B. 

194. Kaikhosru Rastamji Vikaji, L.M. 

195. Javerilal Umiashankar Yajnik. 

1874. 

196. J. Anderson, K.L.S. 

197. Andrew Paul deAndrade, G.G.M.C. 

198. J. K. Bythell. 

199. James Macnabb Campbell, C.S. 

200. J. Gerson Da Cunha, M.R.C.S., 

L.R.C.P. 

201. Major T. F. Dowden, R.E. 

202. A. Forde, Mem. Inst. C.E. 

203. J. Temperley Gray, L.R.C. P.Lond., 

A.K.6. 

204. W. E. Hart, B.A. 

205. J. T. Hathornthwaite, M.A. 

206. T. Holmested. 



Faculty 



M 



M 



M 



E 



E 



SENATE. 



161 



207. H. E. M. James, C.S. 

208. Rao Bahadur Vasudev Bapuji 

Kanitkar. 

209. F. Mathew, C.E. 

210. G. T. Molecy. 

21 1. Rao Bahadur Makund Ramchandra. 

212. Captain G. W. Oldham, R.E. 

213. J. Q. Pigot, B.A. 

214. Captain W. F. Prideaux. 

215. Sakharam Arjun Ravut, L.M. 

216. P. Ryan. 

217. Kazi Shahabudin. 

218. Rao Bahadur Janardan Vasudevji. 

219. Major J. W. Watson. 

220. Sir F. H. Souter, Knight, O.S.I. 

1874 (June). 

221. E, P. Robertson, C. S. 

1875. 

222. James Arnott, M.D., CM. 

223. Badrudin Tyabji. 

224. Ghoolam Mohidin. 

225. Kashinath Ramchandra Godbole? 

B.A., L.C.E. 

226. Gopal Shivram Vaidya, L.M. 

227. Sir Jamsetjee Jeejeebhoy, Bart. 

228. Khan Bahadur Mancharji Kavasji 

Murzban, Assoc. Inst. C.E. 

229. Nanabhai Rastamji Ranina. 

230. Rastamji Mervanji, G.G.M.C. 

231. Shamrao Vithal. 

232. J. L. Kipling. 

1876. 

233. Rao Bahadur Bechardas Ambaidas, 

C.S.I. 

234. Raja Sir T. Madhavrao, K.C.S.I. 
b 713-n* 



Faculty. 



A 



M 



M 



M 



M 



B 



B 



E 



162 



UNIVERSITY, 



Faculty. 



235. Khan Bahadur Bamanji Sorabji 

L.C.E. 

236. The Reverend Charles Cooke., S.J., 

B.A. 

237. Cowasji Manockji Limji. 

238. The Reverend H. Depelchin, S J., 

D.D. 

239. James Jardine, M.A. 

240. James M. Maclean. 

241. G. A. Maconachie, M.D. 

242. Mirza Hairat. 

243. Narayan Ballal Limaye. 

244. L. P. de Rozario, L.M. 

245. Eastamji Nasarvanji Khori, L.M. 

M.D., L.R.C.P. Lond., F.M.C.S. 
Lond. 

246. W. Martin Wood. 

1877. 

247. The Honourable Col. W.C. Ander- 

son. 

248. Anna Moreshvar Kunte, B.A., M.D. 

249. Lieut. James Brebner, I.N., Assoc 

Inst. C.E. 

250. A. M. C. Coutinho, G.G.M.C. 

251. Dastur Jamaspji Minocherji Ja- 

maspasana. 

252. S. Newcome Fox, B.A. 

253. Edward Giles, B.A. 

254. The Reverend J. M. Hamilton, S.J. 

255. H. I. B. Hargrave, B.A., C.E. 

256. Jamsetji Ardesir Dalai, M.A. 

257. Jehangier Barjorji Yacha. 

258. Hormasji Jehangier Bhabha, M.A. 

259. Kashinath Trimbak Telang, M.A., 

LL.B. 

260. Kamrudin Tyabji. 

261. J. C. Lisboa, G.G.M.C. 

262. The Reverend D. Mackichan, M.A., 

B.D. 



A 







A 


... 


■•• 


... 


A 




A 


L 


A 


... 


A 




A 


... 


A 


... 


A 




A 


... 


A 


L 


... 


L 


A 


• . • 



M 
M 
M 

M 
M 



E 



M 



E 



SENATE. 



163 



263. Manasukharam Suryaram Tripathi. 

264. Captain E. C. Marryat, R.E. 

265. Hamilton Maxwell. 

266. Peter Peterson, M.A. 

267. Varjivandas Madhavdas. 

268. G. C. Whitworth, C.S. 

269. A. Wingate, C.S. 

270. Captain C. Wodehouse. 

1878. 

271. Cowasjee Hormasjee, G.G.M.C. 

272. Philip Clement DeSouza, L.M. 

273. Rao Bahadur Gopalrao Hari Desh 

mukh. 

274. Jamshedji Navroji Unvala, M.A. 

275. The Reverend F. C. H. Johnston, 

M.A. 

276. The Very Reverend N. Pagani, S.J 

277. The Reverend R. Rive, S.J. 

278. Yashvant Yasudev Athale, M.A., 

LL.B. 

279. GeorgeWaters,L.R.C.S., L.R.C.P.E. 



Faculty. 


A 


... 




E 


A 


• •• 






A 






... 


A 


... 




..* 


A 








A 


••• 




... 


A 




M 






... 


M 


... 




L 


... 




A 


... 


... 


... 


A 




... 




A 


... 




... 


A 






. «• 


A 


L 


M 


. . i 



Deans. 

William Wordsworth, B. A. In Arts, 

The Honourable John Marriott, B. A. In Law. 

Surgeon- General W. G. Hunter, M.D., F.R.C.P. ...InMedicine. 
The Honourable Major- General 

Sir M. K. Kennedy, K,C.S.I., R.E... .Ira Civil Engineering. 



SYNDICATE. 

The Honourable James Gibbs, O.S., C.S.I., F.R.G.S., Vice- 
Chancellor, President. 

William Wordsworth, B.A 

The Honourable Mr. Justice West, C.S. 

M.A, F.R.G.S. } Syndics in Arts. 

Ramkrishna Gopal Bhandarkar, MA., 

Hon, M.RA.S. 



164 UNIVERSITY. 

The Honourable Rao Saheb Vishvanath ) 

Narayan Mandlik, C.S.I. S Syndics in Law. 

F. L. Latham, M.A. ) 

H. V. Carter, M.D. \ Syndics in Medi- 

I. B. Lyon, F.C.S j cine. 

T. Cooke, M.A., M.I., LL.D \ B V^. in Civil 

(_ Engineering. 
Peter Peterson, M.A., Registrar... ...Secretary. 



BOARD OF ACCOUNTS. 

The Honourable James Gibbs, C.S., C.S.I., F.R.G.S., Vice- 

Ohancellor, Chairman. 
Sir Munguldass Nathoobhoy, Knight, C.S.I. 
Captain H. Morland, late I.N., F.R.A.S., F.R.G.S. 
Hamilton Maxwell. 
Peter Peterson, M.A., Registrar, Secretary. 



REGISTRAR. 
Peter Peterson, M.A. 



ASSISTANT REGISTRAR AND LIBRARIAN. 

Rao Saheb Ganpatrao Moroba Fitale. 



Succession Lists- 

CHANCELLORS. 
1857. John Lord Elphinstbne, G.C.B., G.C.H. 
1860. Sir George Russel Clerk, G.C.S.I., K.C.B. 
1862. Sir Henry Bartle Edward Frere, G.C.S.I., K.C.B. 
1867. The Right Honourable Sir "William Robert Seymour 

Vesey FitzGerald, M.A., D.C.L., G.C.S.I. 
1872. Sir Phiiip Edmond Wodehouse, G.C.S.I.,K.C.B.,C.I.E. 
1877. Sir Richard Temple, Bart., G.C.S.I., CJ.E. 



VICE-CHANCELLORS. 

1857. Sir William Yardley, Knight, Chief Justice. 

1858. Sir Henry Davison, Knight, Chief Justice. 

1860. Sir Joseph Arnould, Knight, M.A., Puisne Justice. 



SUCCESSION LISTS. 165 

1863. Sir Alexander Grant, Bart., M.A. 

1865. The Honourable Alexander Kinloch ForbeB, C.S., 

Judge of the High Court. 
1865. Sir Alexander Grant, Bart., M.A., LL.D. 

1867. Sir Alexander Grant, Bart., M.A., LL.D. 

1868. The Eev. John Wilson, D.D., F.R.S. 

1870. The Honourable James Gibbs, C.S., Judge of the High 
Court. 

1872. The Honourable James Gibbs, C.S., Judge of the High 
Court* 

1874. The Honourable James Gibbs, C.S., F.R.G.S., Member 
of Council. 

1876. The Honourable James Gibbs, C.S., F.R.G.S., Mem- 
ber of Council. 

1878. The Honourable James Gibbs, C.S., C.S.I., F.R.G.S., 
Member of Council. 

DEANS. 
I. — Deans in Arts. 

1859 Aug., John Harkness, M.A., LL.D. 

1862 July, Sir Alexander Grant, Bart., M.A. 

1863 Feb., The Rev. John Wilson, D.D., F.R.S. 

1868 Oct., Herbert Mills Birdwood, C.S., M.A. 

1869 Jan., Kyrle Mitford Chatfield, B.A. 

1873 Jan., The Rev. John Wilson, D.D., F.R.S. 

1876 Jan., The Honourable Raymond West., O.S., M.A., 

F.R.G.S. 
1876 June, William Wordsworth, B.A. 

II. — Deans in Law. 

1860 July, Arthur James Lewis, Advocate General. 

1861 Jan., William Loudon, Administrator General. 

1862 Jan., James Fraser Hore, M.A. 
1866 Jan., Richard Tuohill Reid, LL.D. 

1868 Jan., The Honourable Henry Pendock St. George 
Tucker, C.S. 

1871 Jan., The Honourable Andrew Richard Scoble. 

1872 Jan., The Honourable James Sewell White. 
1872 Jan., The Honourable J. P. Green, LL.B. 

1874 Jan., The Honourable Andrew Richard Scoble. 
1876 Mar., The Honourable John Marriott, B.A. 



166 UNIVERSITY. 

III.— Deans in Medicine. 

1858 Mar., B. P. Rooke, M.D. 

1860 Oct., John Peet, M.D. 

1865 Jan., Herbert John Giraud, M.D. 

1865 Oct., Robert Haines, M,B. 

1866 June, William Guyer Hunter, F.R.C.S.E. 

1867 April, Frank Savignac Stedman. 

1868 Jan., Francis Shortt Arnott, M.D., O.B. 

1869 Jan., T. W. Ward, F.R.C.S. 

1870 Jan., Alexander Wright. 

1871 Jan., William Guyer Hunter, M.D., M.R.C.P. 

1872 Jan., Alexander Wright. 
1874 Jan., William Thorn. 

1877 Jan i? William Guyer Hunter, M.D., F.R.C.P. 

IV. — Deans in Civil Engineering. 

1858 Feb., The Honourable Arthur Malet, O.S. 
1860 Aug., Lieut.-Geheral Waltei Scott, Bombay Engi- 
neers. 
1862 Jan., Colonel H. B. Turner, Bombay Engineers. 

1862 Sept., Lieut.- General Walter Scott, Bombay Engi- 

neers. 

1863 June, Colonel Harry Rivers* Bombay Engineers. 
1865 April, Captain H. St. Clair Wilkins, R.E. 

1865 Oct., Lieut.-Col. Alfred DeLisle, R.E. 

1867 Jan., Major- General C. W. Tremenheere, R.E., C.B. 

1868 Jan., Lieut.-Col. Alfred DeLisle, R.E. 

1868 April, Lieut.-Col. J. S. Trevor, R.E. 

1869 Jan., The Honourable Major-General Sir Michael 

Kavanagh Kennedy, K.C.S.I., R.E. 



REGISTRARS. 

1858 Jan., Robert Sharpe Sinclair, M.A., LL.D. 

1862 Nov., Robert Haines, M. B., Officiating. 

1863 Nov., Robert Sharpe Sinclair, M.A., LL.D. 

1866 July, George Christopher Molesworth Birdwood, M.D. 

1867 April, John Powell Hughlings, B.A., Officiating. 

1868 Jan., George Christopher Molesworth Birdwood, M.D. 



DECEASED AND RETIRED FELLOWS. 167 

1868 Sept., James Taylor. 

1874 May, Peter Peterson, M.A., Edin. ; B.A. Ball. Coll., 

Oxon., Officiating. 
1874 Sept., The Rev. D. C. Boyd, M.A. 
1877 Jan., Peter Petebson, M.A., Edin. ; B.A. Ball. Coll,, 

Oxon. 

DECEASED AND RETIRED FELLOWS 

Named m the Act of Incorporation. 

* The Right Honourable John Lord Elphinstone, 

G.C.B., G.C.H. 
Sir William Yardley, Knight. 

* The Right Reverend John Harding, D.D. 

* Lieut-General Sir Henry Somerset, K.C.B. • 

* The Honourable James Grant Lnmsden, C.S. 
The Honourable Arthur Malet, C.S. 

* Edward Irvine Howard, M.A. 

* Robert Haines,' M.B. 
Charles Morehead, M.D. 
John Harkness, M.A., LL.D. 

* The Reverend James McDougall. 

* The Honourable Philip William LeGeyt, C.S. 

* Sir Matthew Richard Sausse, Knight. 

* Sir'Jamsetjee Jeejeebhoy, Bart. 

* Metcalfe Larken, C.S. 

* The Honourable Jugonnath Sunkersett. 

* Bomanjee Hormasjee. 

* Bhau Daji, G.G.M.C., Hon. M.R.A.S. 

* Matthew Stovell, M.D., M.R.C.S.E., C.S.I. 
The Honourable Claudius James Erskine, C.S. 

The Honourable William Edward Frere, C.S., C.M.G, 

* Major-General Charles Waddington, C.B. 

* The Reverend John Wilson, D.D., F.R.S. 

* The Reverend Philip Anderson, M.A. 

The Right Honourable Sir Henry Bartle Edward 

Frere, G.C.B., G.C.S.I., 
Lieut. Edward Frederick Tierney Fergusson, I.N. 

* Deceased. 






168 UNIVERSITY. 



* Mahomed Yusoof Moorgay, Cazee of Bombay. 

* James John Berkley, M.I.C.E., F.G.S. 
Sir Henry Lacon Anderson, K. C.S.I. 

1857. 

* The Honourable H. W. Reeves, O.S. 

1858 

* The Honourable A. J. Lewis. 

* J. J. Lowndes. 

TheHonourable Sir Barrow HelbertEllis,C.S.,K.C.S.I. 

Colonel H. B. Turner, R.E. 

Major-General William Frederick Marriott, C.S.I. 

Major J. H. G. Crawford, R.E. 

Major-General Harry Rivers, R.E. 

* The Reverend William Kew Fletcher, M.A. 
The Reverend John Murray Mitchell, LL.D. 

* Rao Bahadur Bhaskar Damodar. 
B. P. Rooke, M.D. 

Herbert John Giraud, M.D. 

The Honourable Sir Joseph Arnould, Knight, M.A. 

1860. 

* Lieut.-GeneralSirWilliamMansfield, G.C.B,, G.C.S.L 

* John Peet, M.D. 

» A. H. Leith, M.D. 
H. J. Carter, F.R.S. 
Lieut. -General W. Scott. 
W. R. Cassels. 

* Narayan Dinanathji. 

James Fraser Hore, M.A. (July). 

Sir Alexander Grant, Bart., M.A., LL.D. (December). 

* Deceased, 



DECEASED AND RETIRED FELLOWS. 169 

1862. 

* The Honourable A. Kinloch Forbes, C.S. 
Major- General Henry James Barr. 

George Christopher Molesworth Birdwood,M.D.,C,S.I. 

* Major Thomas Candy, C.S.I. 
Lieut.-Col. Alfred DeLisle, R.E. 
The Reverend Francis Gell, B.A. 
The Reverend J. Glasgow, D.D. 

Major-General Sir Frederick John Goldsmid, C.B,, 
K.C.S.I. 

* Gokuldass Tejpal. 

R. W. Graham, M.I.C.E. 

* D. Grierson, M.D. 
W. Hart, C.S. 

* Martin Hang, Ph.D. 

* John Powell Hughlings, B.A. 

* The Reverend C. M. Isenberg. 

* Sir Jamsetjee Jeejeebhoy, (second) Bart., C.S.I. 

f The Honourable Jonathan Duncan Inverarity, C.S. 
The Honourable Samuel Mansfield, C.S., C.S.I. 

* Rao Bahadur Maganbhai Karamchand. 
The Honourable Henry Newton, C.S. 

* Colonel J. Pottinger, C.B. 
Richard Tuohill Reid, LL.D. 

Michael John Maxwell Shaw- Stewart, C.S. 

1863. 

The Honourable Sir Richard Couch, Knight. 

The Honourable Henry Pendock St. George Tucker, 

C.S. 
John Raynor Arthur, C.S. 

* C. R. Ovans, C.S. 

* John William Shaw Wyllie, C.S., C.S.I. 

Sir William Lockyer Merewether, K.C.S.I., C.B. 
Captain Edward Burnes Thomas Holland, R.E. 
The Reverend Charles Durell DuPort, M.A. 
W. C. Coles, M.D. 

* Deceased. + Ex-officio ; not gazetted, 

B 713— a 



170 TOIVEKSITY. 

* G. R. Ballingall, M.D. 
Francis James Candy, M.A. 
Captain W. C. Barker, I.N. 
D. J. Kennelly, I.N., F.R.A.S. 
Andrew Richard S coble, Q.C. 
John Pares Bickersteth, M.A. 
Robert Hannay. 

1864. 

* The Reverend James Aitken,. 

* T. C. Anstey. 

* Colonel J. Barnes Dnnsterville, C.S.I. 

* Nicholas Fernandes. 

* William Hanbury, B.A. 
Thomas Child Hayllar. 
T. B, Johnstone, M.D. 

* Lieut-Col. D. Nasmyth, R.E. 
George Scott, C.S. 

* Robert Sharpe Sinclair, M.A., LL.D. 

The Most Reverend Walter Steins, S.J., D.D. 
Major- General Charles William Trenienheere, R.E. 
C.B. 

* Venayekrao Jngonnathji Sunkersett. 
The Honourable James Sewell White. 
Andrew Grant. 

George Inverarity, C.S. 

1865. 

* The Reverend William Beynon. 
Henry Coke, M.A. 

* Captain Sherard Osborn, C.B., R.N. 
F. S. Stedman. 

1866 

Rastamjee Jamsetjee Jeejeebhoy. 
George Foggo. 



* 



Deceased. 



DECEASED AND RETIRED FELLOWS. 171 

Alexander John Hunter. 

F. Broughton, F.R.C.S. 

H. S. Bellairs, M.A. 

R. A. Dallas, LL.D. 

W. J. Jefferson, M.A. 

Colonel William Kendall, R.E. 

J. T. Denison-Mackenzie, M.B., F.R.C.S. 

J. R. Rushton, MJ.C.E. 

1867. 

The Honourable A. B. Warden, C.S. 

Colonel George Sligo A. Anderson. 

The Reverend Dugald Cameron Boyd, M.A. 

Major Godfrey Clerk. 

T. B. Curtis. 

The Reverend A. Forbes, B.A. 

R. Hamilton. 

C. F. Kelly, M.A. 

C. Watts Russell, B.A. 

James Taylor. 

A. V. Ward. 

The Reverend G. A. F. Watson, M,A, 

M. H. Scott. 

Francis Shortt Arnott, M.D., C.B. 

N. A. Dalzell, M.A. 

The Honourable Narayan Vasudevji 

1868 (January). 

A. Brown. 

The Reverend C. I. Cameron, M.A. 
W. Collum, M.D. 
Dhirajlal Mathuradas. 
William Draper, M.A, 
J. Dunbar, M.A. 
! Captain C. W. Finch, R.E. 
A. Gordon, M.D., C.B. 
G. S. Vesey FitzGerald. 

* Deceased. 



172 UNIVERSITY. 

* Narayan Daji, G.G.M.C. 

* J. O'Leary, B.A., S.C.L. 

J. H. Sylvester, F.G.S., A.K.G 
Colonel J, S. Trevor, R.E. 

1868 (December). 

* S. A. DeCarvalho, G.G.M.C. 

* John Connon, M.A, 
W. S. Eccles. 

The Reverend J. W. Gardner. 

* Karsandas Mnlji. 
John Mills. 

The Reverend Robert Montgomery. 

T. W. Ward, F.R C.S. 

The Reverend C. T. Wilson, M.A, 

A. Wright. 

The Honourable F. S. Chapman, C.S. 

* A. F. Bellasis, C.S. 

1869. 

*f The Right Reverend Henry Douglas, D.D. 
A. Campbell. 

1870. 

Lieut. -Col. W. W. Anderson. 

The Reverend L. Bodoano. 

R. M. Brereton, Mem. Inst. C,E. 

The Honourable Francis Lloyd. 

H. P. LeMesurier, Mem. Inst. C.E., C.SJ.,F.R.G.S, 

T. E. P. Martin. 

The Honourable Alexander Rogers, C.S. 

* Venayekrao Appa Saheb Kurandwadkar. 

* The Reverend James Wallace. 
F. R. S. Wyllie, C.S. 
David Young, M.D. 

* Deceased. + Ex-qfficio ; not gazetted. 



DECEASED AND RETIKED FELLOWS. 173 

1871, 

* W. H. Havelock, C.S. 

1872. 

* Rastamji Kavasji Bahadurji, G.G.M.C, M.R.C.S. 

* Kahandas Mancharam, 

1873. 

Lieut.- Col. Bonar Deane. 

* W. W. Hamilton. 

The Reverend J. Paton. 
E. Wilmot, M.A., LL.D. 
C. Currey (July). 
W. Thorn (Nov.). 

1874. 

* Rao Saheb Narayan Jagannath Vaidya. 

1876 

* Bhairavnath Mangesh. 

Baron deHochepied Larpent, C.S. 

* Rastamji Jamshedji Nadirshah, L.M. 

* Andrew Lyon, M.A. 

* Deceased. 



b 713-0* 



174 UNIVERSITY. 

GRADUATES* 

MA 

1865. 

College.i Branch. 

Rdndde , Mahddev Govind E. History. J 

Wdgle, Bdl Mangesh E. History and Political 

Economy. 

1866. 

Bapat, Jandrdan Vinayak E. History and Philosophy. 

Bhdgvat, Govind Rdmchandra.D. Mathematics and Natural 

Philosophy. 
Bhandarkar, Rdmkrishna Gopdl.E. & D. English and Sanskrit. 
Dalvi, Dindndth Atmdram E. Mathematicd and Natural 

Philosophy. § 
Pdthak, Vithal Ndrdyan F.G. A. History and Philosophy. 

1867. 

Gazdar, Jamshedji Jivanji E. Mathematics and Natural 

Philosopy. II 

1868. 

Pathak, Shdpurji Hormasji ...E. Mathematics and Natural 

Philosophy. I! 

Second Class. 

Mdnkar, Ganpatrdo Amritrdo.D. History and Philosophy. 

Pandit, Shankar Pdndurang ..E. English and Latin. 

Patel, Ddddbhdi Sordbj i E. History and Philosophy. 

Patel, Rastamji Mervdnji E. Ditto. 

Saydni,RahimtuldhMuh6mmadE. English and Latin. 
Unvdld, Jamshedji Navroji ...E. Ditto. 

* The names are arranged alphabetically according to the surname, in order 

of time. 
■f For the names of Colleges and Schools, see List of Abbreviations. 
% With Honours and Gold Medal. 
§ "With Honours, Class III. 
jj With Honours, Class II. 



GRADUATES. 175 

1869 

First Class. 

College. Branch. 

Bhat, Gangadhar Anant D. Mathematics and Natural 

Philosophy. 

Second Class. 

Dadachanji, Kershasji RastamjiE. History and Philosophy. 

Modi, Bamanji Edalji E. English and Latin. 

Mehta, Phirozshah Mervanji ...E. History and Philosophy. 

1870. 

First Class. 

Dalai, Jamshedji Ardesir E. Mathematics and Natural 

Philosophy. 
Desai, Ambal al Sakarlal E. English and Sanskrit . 

* 

Second Class. 

Mehta, Tapidaa Dayaram E. Mathematics and Natura 

Philosophy. 
Telang, Kashinath Trimbak ...E. English and Sanskrit. 

1871. 

Second Class. 
Bhabha, Hormasji Jehangierji.E. English and Latin. 

1872, 

Second Class. 

Athale, Yashvant Vasudev ...E. English and Sanskrit. 

Modi, Barzorji Edalji E. English and Latin. 

Tullu, Rdoji Vasudev E. English and Sanskrit. 

1873 

Second Class. 

Pendse, Kashinath Balvaut ...E. English and Sanskrit. 
Wadia, Dosabhai Nasarvanji .E. English and Latin. 



176 UNIVERSITY. 

1874. 

Second Class. 

College. Branch. 

Bhide, Shivram Parshuram ...D. English and Sanskrit. 
Kirloskar, Ganesh flamchandraD. Ditto, 

Lad, Vithal Bhau E. Natural Sciences. 

Mahajan£, Vishnu Moreshvar...D. English and Sanskrit. \ 

1875. 

First Class. 

Duncan, Thomas St. X. English and Latin. 

Second Class. 

McDermott, Michael St. X. English and Latin . 

1876. 
Second Class. 

3 insi vale, Shridhar Ganesh ...D. History and Philosophy. 

Kanga, Dinshah Pestanji „.E. English and Latin. 

Kelkar, Damodar Ganesh D. Ditto. 

Tullu, Govind Vasudev E. Natural Sciences. 

1877. 

First Class. 

Dastur, Fardunji Mancherji...E. Mathematics and Natural 

Philosophy. 
Gokhale, Vithal Vishnu E. Natural Sciences. 

Second Class. 

Kao, Ganpat Sadashiv E. English and Latin. 

1878, 

First Class. 
Contractor, K&vasji Dadabhai. E. Natural Sciences. 

Second Class. 
Dastur, Phiroze Hoshang D. English and Persian. 



GRADUATES. 



177 



w sa 



p -< 
<*3 d 



QQ 



P 



CO 



OJ 



G £ . •' : 
.2 r| P P 



^ ^ a a 
•a ph-s^ 



Q O 






alsr& 



S 

Ijtt 

III? 

6 q : 
Oc^ • 

.d « 

Oh 




3 

O *<5 



P s 



N 


5 




CO 


K> 


5 




ID 


(X) 




r* 


00 


»HI 


< 


fH 




5 


a 






$ 


«3 






CQ 


s 





ca 



o 


s : 










«ci 


fl • 










3 

1 

Id 


£3 




si 


02 

•3 

>> 


5 
> 


o 

o 

«C5 


§48 


to 


?> 

§ 


P 


o 


Si 
© 


^1 


00 


ts 


-<3 


S 




a J 


*■« 


e 


£ 


> 


.d 


4s &o 
to ~ 






-d 

o 


o 
•a 




■*a 

^3, 








— > 

d 














3 vs 









r; 


fP 


SP^ 






W 


M 



178 



UNIVERSITY, 



43 42 43 43 43 ^ 



1 - 












bo 












© 












3 


H f4p4 


H 


w p4 


HW H* 


H 






1& 












d 43 










CO i : : 


II 


.2 b 

if 


00 
43 -^ 43 



43 








• rt ^> 


43 43 43 


43 


za 

-*3 






ll 


.s 


OO O 


Q 




£0 








03 

2* 


2 


43.2 

.2 -^ 


IS : 

s ° 


00 





© 
43 




M \3 05 43 43 

•§ 3 Q ft 


B 


S§4| 

.2:93 

O Cu 


43 43 43 

4»+5 43 

00 


43 

43 

O 


© 
'© 
CO 


O 


ow 


H^ W 






• 


GO 


6 6 


6 • K> w 






© ->} „ <i> 


«3 . 

to O 

.2 * 

u 

o 43 


cM ■«« o) 






2 £ ^ w 

•2 Pali's -^ -s 


iiii.fi ill 


i^o 

u 


1* 

1 §> 


1 -^ 


a 

.2 


.J '£ 

1 3 


-Si ? 


.s 


© f 

02 i 


•g- OP 


© 


J "3 


O 3 -5* 


'43 

a 


Hi ■ 


O 


Pw 


s 


§ O 


h3 




rg . 






: : 






: : : 


13 










.s ^ 

43 43 




. T3 


: : .d 


a 




: to* 


§ « .2 


: *<« 


•p* : 


»oS 


O 


it It | 

.2 W 2 Dh CO 

^ w S*§" 

11 II 

<T3 C5 O 


1 « 1 




Is « 


1 


1 
£ 


215 

•=0 r ~ 
O 

3f 


=§. 1 

& 

PQ 3 

> '-+3 

Q 
<— r '-+3 


fa -^ rd 
© PI 

^ a j 

ra 

4?2 a 


< 

00 
C 

S 

-eg 
H 

43 

-a 






J 8 

Ph 


PQ O 


SI il 






GRADUATES. 179 



HHPfiHH W P H 



"3 ^ °='"£ <»"S 

fr til I ££ 11 as I b 

-g ^gP P Q-g g^ ^ P -g 

a <5 w fiw pa w 



P h^ w Q^P w O P^ 



49 
P 
"3 & 



*3 

o o o P o 5 ■§ 



bP « -s p ^h p 



as.-s i £J&5 -&a s .1* 

ss.sa^fi p p^ap -3 § p .-* a 

>* a £ >» >» o § 5 o o2 

o w OM p <i^ p c 



I s I as a £ § 5 



§ <g M S 



2 






rt || l|Sl|i M ||l3I 

O W £ Pe-i P P < M 



180 



UNIVERSITY, 















"o 


W H P* 


H ft 


P 


PP 


P PW 


O 














«« S : 








«« § : : 




n >» +5 








"+3 




cS £* oo eg ^ 

C3 -+3 O 43 O 


o o 


o 


o o 


<« * ^ - 


m 
•** 


flti* 


43 43 
P P 


43 

A 




g O 43 +3 












C 


*£ : 


. c3 >. • 


< 


O ^3 


<5 . ' • 


3 
EG 




B% IS 


05 


g\°^o 




43 




o.2 rri o 


43 


§ fi -ll 


•JS«P 


CO 


s* <*: 


* 


§ ^ 


iT43 


o : : 












_ o o 


O o 


43 O 


o o 


§^3 O O 




jg sp p 


43 .2 










■a l 




ftp 


"t 3 s .-s .-s 


O 


.- 41 •§ 


43 

2 5 


43 


o o 


4*3 O O 


qj a 








g 43 43 


CO c3 

i-3 


g 5 s c3 
CO C5 ^ 


§ q 




pp 


s «« 




: ; | 


'■ eS 




. . 


4-» 














i 


•S I 

| : o 

1 .- a 

— . * s 

2 H | 
<ri ,-Q *<* 

|'P. j 


2 

a 1 

> CO 
<a 43 

1 I 

-2 -8 

5 ^ 


T5 

> 

c 
O 

c3 

d 

c3 
"o 
3 


3? 

P s 

-f*3 


? i SI 

* ! l! 

•ssJ - - 

1 II 




■a ** 




* f3 


®" M I 




2 S ^ 

moo 


* 5 

W S 


c8 
O 


33 


if sn X. 

<J PPL 



GRADUATES. 181 



WQWWW HOWHHHH-A 





^ s 






i 


<3 g 


6 


■6 S 


o 


















„ a> 








o 










>> 


C CO 

d o 


o 

45 


>> 


'Si 


CO cS 


c=3 

o b- 


y -+3 

"d <n 

a g 


"^ . o 
o t^43 


o 

43 


O 
43 



43 


o 

1 


o3 ^ 

d^ 


3 


O 


"43 g 
'd ° 

Pn h 


J^d 


*3 

a 


p 


P 


43 
D 




























§Jtf . 




f 8 bl : 


CO 
<3 


o^3 












^ o w o 
2 rd ° 3 
'5b>5 43 2 


Q 

43 

-t-> 

5 


'Sb'-dp 
5* 


cc o 

.2 d 
43 o 


.III 


O 

43 
43 

p 


o 

43 

P 


.2 

43 

p 


O 

43 

p 



43 

-*3 

P 


O CLi ftJ3 




ft- 


3^ 














o 






6 
o 


! 


•3 6 






'S 


S-H 




. « b 












O 43 








o 






O *3 


o3 
o 

o 




o 

+3 
4= 

P 


o3 

43 


. 43 

l« 

d 


'II 


4^ 

P 


o 

s 


o 

43 

+3 
P 


43 

a 


O O 

<U 43 

W 




43 

43 

p 






3 


: 






"rd 












: 




•c 

on 


•08 

13 


3 

43 


d 


3 

-o3 


3 


M 


o 

43 


o 

43 


o 

43 


d 





CO 


i 

GO 


a 


3 


+3 

o3 
P 


3 


d 


d 


p 


p 


P 


43 

P 


43 

P 


d 
a. 






-rt 


• OQ 


+3 


















<S 




A 




-os 














-OS 




1 
I « 

3 § 
i a 

O o3 

8 a 

'U 
o3 

s 


•3 

• P 
-03 

-d 

JO 

S3 

o 
u 

ft 
s-T 


c 

43 

d 

o 
•eS 

s- 
ed 

d 

A 

m 

■£ 
M 
»J 

08 

?- 

s 


d 
,d 

■s 

"3 

§ 

-d 

-S 
*& 

~o3 


d 

o3 
b> 
,£3 

► 
o3 

m 

i 

A 


,S 

an 

1 

N 

A 

a 

es 

1-3 


d 
d 

m 
> 


d 
43 

^? 

8 

-d 

CO 


3 
d 

CO 

til 

G 

d 
P 

U 

> 


-A3 

d 

1 

5 

•«8 

a: 
03 

C3 


'5 s 
> 

g 

03 

d 

•<8 

'43 
o3 

t» 
-03 


i 

43 

O 

13 

00 

N?3 

i 

-1° 

43 
o3 
> 

-OS 


O 
c8 

w 

03" 


««3 


<u 


a> 


> 


d 


rO 




o 


T3 


nH 


d 


a 


'T 


,d 


rd 


cd 


o3 


pd 


P 


53 


^3 


c3 


-- - 


-cS 


-o3 


w 


ft 


a 


P 


P 


P. 


M 


M 


S 


|Z3 


fc 


K 


(S 


B 


713- 


P 























182 



UNIVERSITY. 



O W W" &3 



CO 



M 



<£3 09 

.2 ' 
.sis 



o 
o 
W 

13 . 
.2 ^ 

si 









0JO^'OMOf <5 O 



o 

73 &f8 73 £ bB 

• h o e3 . .3 o ,2 

f§:l KH 
5 






<# 05 



O e8 

si 



43 



<1 
2 

05 O 



73b 
.2-8 

1* 



eg •>> 

If 



bfcX 



*-* ^ O 



03 US 



c s 

o o 



1 

tcl 


7s 


•4 


'2 


0) 


CO 

e 
55 


^5* 







O 

> 


•3 


i 

M 


to 

00 


i 


1 


02 

i3 


a 

1 
ft 

- 1 ? 


1 




'1 
•3 




^0 


•a 



2 

Q 


i 

^1 




2 
§ 


3 

-3 








43^ 
1 


43 
I 4 


ft 


m 


H 


[> 






ha 


H 



GRADUATES. 183 

ft' ft" o H ft P4 ft W ft W' H W W 
i . • i ^8 Tl I i ■<* 2 i f ■ g ~ 

'iS.1 fr litis i - i?.* S i I* 

js^ b Sftj* -a &£ §_§ 

•* 8 •©■::::: : 6 ' : 

Sjo 2 o o o o o o S-SS S£ 

•||| g^| | | J | I ti^^'ti-S 

g^fi ggft « p p p ft ^ISiiiS 

Qfl eu " . _ _ < Ph „fl_ 

,§I|H 1 1 ill y| j in I 



o 






d -S ^ 






x 



S. a S 6 c5 "43 a -o S. 3 .2; 



& 



p 1 1 <§ 1 1 1 5 1 1 ■ 1 1 .a I 



A § "i« .13 .§ ^ f^ ffl ^. " ^ -5 



CQ 



B 


a 


eg 

a 

«<3 




"1 


a 




> 
O 


43 


13 


1 


a 


-c3 


-P 


O 


,a 




• rH 


B 





r*5 


A 


% 


NS 


^3 


rt 


<s 


s 


o 


,B 


oe 


> 


»©• 

B 

o 

I 

3 


O 

IS 

§ 

B 

f 

eS 
ft 


o 

I 

CO 

'3 

"rB 


A 
o 

a 

ft 

A 

a 

B 

a 

03 
O 


A 

>> 

-cS 
ft 

H 

eg 

*-5 


Ph 

^3 

03 
O 

B 
eS 
O 

13 

OS 

O 

1-3 


a 



Q -^ r« 



^ PC 



J -i 1 & 3 

w w w ^ ^ 



184 



UNIVERSITY. 



q w w e4 w 



£ 



w 



6 , • o 

liltlli 1 

<1 w Cl. <1 w Q_i 



I a 



N 



» .a 



ft ft 



1*« 

^ O O 
d3 32 ■*» 

"Sb',3 ft 

O Qj 



£- 



^3 

O 4f 
gft 






ftffl 



il 



£ :§s£ 



o 
o 

•2 £» 



•72 W 

£ 


43 
*Sh 


.3 


,d 

1 


1 


.a 






.a 









3 


V 



u 

a 








5 

■J 






1 






/ 














d 


. 


. 




i 








. 




3 




















,3 




















I 














s 







-«3 














43 


8 


1 


! 

•a 

.a 
1 


•r-» 

1 
i 

1 

m 


I 

1 


'5 s 

Oh 

PQ 


t 

M 

O 

ft 
f 


IS 

00 


00 



50 


r3 

1 
M 

1 

a 


9 

1 




1 

u 


« 


s 


1 


H 






c 


^3 





t 


"aJ 


'© 





43 






* 


tf 




■8 


43 

<8 


■5 


| 


"3 






3 


a 




Ph 


Ph 


pm 


02 


H 






* 


PQ 



GRADUATES. 



.185 



ft ft 


ft 


H 


ft 


w 


ft 


p4 h 


ft 


ft ft 


* g : 


'S 


>» : 




<£ 


o : 


«e 


so : 




2 -^ 


o 


,fl 


o 


n 


43 

43 O 


*3 b» 

O 43 O 


3 o 




a m o 


^ 


^ 


-+3 


a 


03 43 

o .12 


alyti 
some 
nami 


fl 


b o 


Dyna 

Hydr 

Dit 


.grgg 


ft 




£« 


£ft 


O +3 
43 +3 


o 


£h 




ftW 


**&B 


a o 


Analytical 
Geometry. 
Ditto ... 


o 

CO 

s 


Analytical 
Geometry. 
Ditto ... 


o 

ft 


o 

43 
43 

ft 


Logic & Moral 
Philosophy. 
Ditto 


■afr 

O 43 

£° 

4 a 


Logic & Moral 

Philosophy. 

Ditto ... 


O 50 


o 
















£ « 

-* ..«« 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o o 


O 


o 
IS 


Politica 
nomy 
Optics 


• 43 




43 


43 


43 43 


43 


OS . 43 


§1 


fl 


+3 

ft 


ft 


ft 


ft ft 


ft 


Politic 

nomy 

Dit 


43 .i-i 






43 








43 




B 1 


fl 


o 


2 


o 

43 


-8 


3 

5 fl 


5 


^ 43 














Mar 
Lati 






* 1 


e3 

h3 


ft 


3 

02 


ft 


ft 


§ 


1 s 





















fl 

cS 
.4 
53 

s 

a 



M 

fl 

> 
S3 
& 



•a 

a 
a 
S 



L> 



3 



b 713— p^ 



•I 

32 



J 



fl 

fl 

•a 

J4 



00 



eg 



Ah 
O 

O 

o 

a. 






186 



UNIVERSITY. 













• 














8 

; 1 


c4 


H 


P 


X 


P 


W 


X 


p 






w 


i Q 

1 








43 

03 






43 

OS 












^ 










c@ W 












Eg 


* IS 03 « 




c 
pa 

a 


o 
43 

P 


_, £, .2 

•r-( (T) -r* 43 ^ 


-a 8 
1° 






II 


1 t> 

03 




5 

o? '■*" 


g ►» : 


o 


O 


O 


"e3"e3 

03 -|S 


d 




— «3 
«J g 


i 0£ 


C*l «8§ 


1 s 


« 


o£ 


•+3 


43 


43 


3 




.2*8 


! ^ 

i ^ 


0r 3 

"Sold 
P^ 


a Hi'Sb-d ft 


P 


P 


p 






9 J? 


6 

o 






i 














o 




W 




















U 




cS . 


o 





o 


3 


£ 


o 

3 


1 






03 . 
2 >• 




S 6 

r=3 O 


P 


P 


p 


P 


P 


p 


o 






| s 




P fl 




















© c 




Ps 




















P- 


"3 tJO 


-P 














43 








d e3 


,9 


o 


o 

45 


o 

2 


o 

43- 




s 


aa 






c 

rltj 

■ 


P 


1 


p 


s 


p 


p 


4 


% 

p 








3 

00 « 




c 

1 

05 

•a 


'(7 




s 


rd 
03 




■ • 


1 




s 


3 


03 

s 

1 


M 


V 

OS 

•a 

P* 


¥ 
IS 




> 

eg 


d 
d 

S-c 
*«8 


■8 


C 

'2 


d 
o 

1 


S 

nd 

03 


00 


1 

5 

*4 


> 

•a 

^d 






R 


OB 




d 


rM 




& 










•9 


•a 

to 


M 


h» 


03 




03 

3, 








^ 




eS 


& 


1 


C3 


ND 

b 


•<£ 


d 


4 








- 


"c3 

ft 


1 


h 


.a 


c3 

a 

P 




00 

b 


1 






5 
S 



GRADUATES. 187 



WW ft w " ^ w w p4 w w ft ft ft 






■«§ ! 'g . i : : "g ►. : : : •■:• 

.3 4 _ £1L ft rt ^ .2^ oo © o o o © 

a §3 ^gs 3 3 .2 ^ gs J s | s £ 

6 lift So^ft ft ft §Sob^ W R R M H M 

ft W ^a^ o ^ 

o • 6 ; ; • : • • • : : : 



£j 2 c3 fli /-s •-" r 
Pm <! 



flgr* Q; 32APAAA fiQ ftftft 



1 >»f2 



ei i- »ts *rt o> <« -r; ffi M S !h 

*s*|& |js lib gllfr gl-ifa^ 



M -§ CO rM 



+J -4J +3 fS 

J ft ft en 



& 2 2 

-W> -t 3 .'_<" «!■*-» . r-l 43 "•' -+3 -M 

ft ft * J ft "8 £ J ft ft 



:£, ^ t»o S3 fl 

o 2 a o ea 

£ -a .a £ I I A § 1 s j -5 

f s J s t •sr s -a sp ^ I ^ £ 



1ft^!> ^^ * § 






•c 






ea -f 3 *-" (D >-* ro ri^ 






188 



UNIVERSITY. 



fcJO 
© 



W' P 



ft ft p 



•e go 



tf <& « 



►» 



CO 



o * ' 



S 8 



fl.S 1st I 






,2 « £ .2 -^ © 



© 

la 

°8Q 



W 



-h o 



o o o 

-w +3 •+■» 

-K> -+3 +a 

ft p s 



"■Rig 

I 5 



O 43 
'J § 

3° 



< . 

oo O 

.2 « 

■3 2 



8 o 

ex 



r3 >» 



-1 

<s3 &0 - 

© r-H 



> 



.2 8 

° IS 




03 -u 



P P 



2 

o 


NTS 

t 

5 




'5 s 


In 

00 


| 


43 


4 




53 


f 


3 

03 








o 


*c« 


> 




■s 
1 


©~ 
a 




3 
1 






-3 


•C8 


V73 




Ph 


oo 


SU 


H 





5- 



CQ 



GRADUATES, 189 



•+3 

W ft W H W ft «a H ft W* ft w w 
H 

T~ — 1 • : ■ i •« 8 ; ^ = T 

5 83-33 I lib a lis gJS-sl I •§■■&! 

«g*o g^g ft ££ £*0 g^«o 



9 k. .2 "S o 



3 5 

-p -M 



R I : : : 



.2 -Jl-a o 

£ £>§£ £ I >>£ sis aso^ 
5 1 -gso ft s|S ft S S lislfi 
^ g g owg § 

O -^ * tifi • O-S-^ >i O-Stffco 

y ft "43 « 2 ^J a Sf i3 ^ ^"43 v 



ft ft ft ft 



jj 43 o«aj Sc! r rJ'J 02 43 2-M 4j « w £ d ""a 



S 00000 S 

43 -P -+3 -JJ -M 



ft 02 



ftftftftft * 3 ft ft ft 73 

M DO >-J 



l| I I : : ffll 

d^- 5 d C * -: ** ^2S d 



d 



I 5 I 3 3 1 I | "J * ► 5 J 

SH ^ «r -g a a ^ * iS 2 w * 

3 Ja 3) I w -" -h" ifc J d -a 3 * 

ftp a o £ £ £ w w tf S^.g 



190 



UNIVRESITY, 



o 




























X" 














X 


'o 




Q 


^ 


ft 


W 






si 




43 


O 






xn 














m 








<H m 




Is >, 








c5 


** t>4 








o 




If 








H 


5- r- 






o -+3 


2 43 








'•+3 

fi 

o 


to • 

+3 tS 


^ » 
S ® 




CO 






L 

O 


\A ID 
«© O 








o ID 


00 

43 

o 
9 




C3 Q 




+3 

so 

a 


I 5 






s 


15 






6 
















i 


'£? 




O 


o 


o 






""3 


'S 







ca 


^ .• 


43 
43 


s 


43 

•+3 






© 


o 


o 

43 


$ 

43 




S a 

t— i o 


S 


s 


s 






"c5 


£ 
o 

9 


43 

P 


O 




<S fi 












■§ 







"o 






















m 








~ £ 


• 






O 












O +» 












o 

4^ 

ft 




»-* 


b 

o 
43 
n 




4° 


o 






<3 
o 

43 


i 

o 






3 


CdH 










fl 








43 


• : 


43 








43 










OB 


_fl 


•a 

a 


o 

43 
43 










.s 




S3 
eg 

CO 


"43 

►3 


§ 


s 






02 














<s 






















S 






















n5 


















J 


j 


Q 


J 










" 











e3 

a 

•S3 


















> 


-fc3 


CD 




«0 


Ef 






5 




to 

m 

> 

a 

,3 

za 

> 
O 


O 

i 
< 
$ 

M 
-d 
,3 


43 



•I 

• ** 


&0 

a 

43 

q 

| 
,4 

o 


if) 
IN 

00 


02 

e 


S3 

B 

43 

£ 

E 

s 




1 






n3 
«3 


1 


3 

,3 


3 






tf 

_fi 




xn 



a 




?i 




!>> 




>«8 








-.-j 
J2 


•Jn 




eS 


i — 


Ti 


a 


W 


> 


4 




o 


3 


•& 




a 


t- 


•3 


# 


£ 






c 


._r 


ijj 


o 


* 


s 



GRADUATES. 191 






lb : = i .!£ 






.2 g .2 ~ P S S ja 2 § .2 « a .2 § ~ o .-S 

O P^ Q Q P* O <3 

6 : : : : : : •& ~ : '• 

|ss a a s -S a io|^| p Q 



<S S : : : <#^ *j 



p ffl a w ^p^«part w p^f2 






Q 



Jj .3 -8 



45 



g 3 a 3 3 3 S a I a 



"H © ^ : : g — ja 



-2 rf 

"S H O ""a 



© ^ .a o 

41 ft 



►-: 



5Q 



i 5 ^ | 

| 02 *> £ 

< <1 ffl © 





Jd 


-cS 


-a, 






Jrf 






"I 




5 

2 




S3 


r^ 


id 










'J 


•41 

43 




g 
o 




£ 






OS 






• S 




s 3 




O 










-5 


a 

a 


i 


P 


P 


O 


a 



192 



UNIVERSITY, 



<D 


























p 


P 


p 


p 


H 


w 


w 


w 


K 


W 


O 




























43 


00 - 


-3 




: 


o 












CO 


so 
o 

1 


c8 
■** 

05 O 

O 43 


Is & 

"•+3 v. 


02 

3 o 


o 


o 

"3 


>sO 


o 


o 


o 








&ttd3oP 


. p 


■+2 


§P 


3 


P 


P 


o 
9 




cPW 


P 






Clh 












^ £ : 


-fc 


d8 


03 . 


•a 


■3 c8 eS 




: 




W 

o 

o 

CO 


€4 


Logic &M 
Philosop 
History 


•43 B 

go 

3 


Dynamics 

Hydrostal 

Ditto 


Logic &M 
Philosop 

Different! 
& Integi 
Calculus 

Chemical 


53 >> 


U3 ^ 

>-. £ 




6 

O 


O 


o 


o 


^ 




O 


1 

O 


o o 


o 




IH 


'o 


SQ 
o 


q 


P 


'43 £43 

1* 


P 


43 
o 

'So 

o 


&3 +=» 

o if 
1h 


P 






P-t 








< 






a 






6 
*& go 




■+3 

"C 


9 


■+3 


a 


o 


4 


O 


o 


o 


o 


a> P 

CO <S 

H 




q 


E 


I 


■+* 




a 


43 


-^ 


-n 


-M 




c3 
02 


P-i 


cS 

co 


h-3 


p 


eS 
CO 


P 


p 


p 


p 






& 
















f 


. 






J 






fl 


•ftf 
















T3 

9 


^3 
p< 




s 




i 

05 


3 


: 


13 


-3J 




0* 




5 


o 


sg 


w 
M 


Ph 


CI 




«c8 


CO 


ci 


ft 




eS 

a 

$ 


1 

s 


m 

KB 

r±4 


e3 

"3 

•+3 

o3 


'5* 
•a 

E 

s3 


cS 

M 
"3 

53 


3 

s 

•a 

t> 

"S 


«3 
C<2 

•s 


a 

1 

P 


m 
o 

P- 










T3 


<o 


&D 


CO 


•« 




NS 








3 


a, 


a 

s 


> 






r 


0) 

S3 


g 


of 






js 




F4 


W 


P< 


M 


s 


3 


A< 


W 



GKADUATES. 



193 



H H 



H 



ft P? ft 



«8 



3 -a * 8 i 

5" qSb 



O <D 

go 

<3 



■o o a m 



s 3^° a s 



ft ^ 

O r3 

°8 §.12 

" 5ft 



5 a 






.2 -2 



1* 


c3 *- 


B"a 


>>L^» 


fiW 


*■* 


'SO 


'■g'Z 


ffere 
nteg 
ulus. 


^ M «. 



2P4 ft 



■a w 



o 
o 

2 .o 

g&§ 



. o 

a 



2^ * 

31 "i 



w 



S ^a"| § sir 






<y (3 



ft ft S 






£ € 



-a 

*o3 

a 

a 

-a 



5 a 






8 



» 713—2 



IN 

CO 





8 
















a 
















j 










B 




. 


zn 


CO 


es 


_a 


i4 


W 


: 


^5 


•a 

1 

a 


J3 
O 

8 


a 

c3 
1 

a 

•58 
Ph 


3 

a 

a 
ft 

c3 


a 

4? 

a 

a 

e3 


i 

a 

I 

>3 



J* 


a 




3 




^c? 


O 

a 


fc 


*r 


S 




£ 




53 


-a 

ft 


?r 


^5 

a 


*3 
< 














a 






a 






-8 


? 


A 


^05 








•*» 


,a 






<rt 




w 




< 


Pft 





O 


ft 



194 



UNIVERSITY. 



o 
S 

o 
O 



H W ^ W ft 



H 



H ft 



« 



M 



►3 rt o w S 



rs ® ft 
<1 



S 5 



o . • o 

o >> o 

rt ni^ "3 -£ ^ 

O fe <1 Pn 



*J1| 

o ^ ^ o 

a o^ oS 

§ M .2 fl « 



_, 03 02 eg 

•3.g.2-g 

•2 £ g g 

5 ps 



>>3 

2ft 






ft ft ft 



o 03 O 

o •+» 



feO 02 -o O 

(II rl [)iH 



ft" 



S .3 .2 ~ ■» 



c a- 




3 s 



o -* « 

.2 »2 .p-< 

£ 5 ■£ 

ft CO V-3 



45 a 

ft O? 



o o 

£ £ 

ft ft 



p 
13 


Us 


"3 


a 


> 


a 






e3 


5 


»-* 


ft 


„ 


3 


a 




•d 


£ 






60 


a 


•3 




- 


O 


ft 



J 

■S 
I 

o 
O 



c3 

a. 
o 



S 2 W 

ill 

I M | 



6 f§ 



GRADUATES. 






H W H H 







: 








o 








: 


: 














g 




d 


•i— » 

a 










3 














MS 






IS 
IS 


O-r* 


o 
O 


*«8 


3 

1 




A 


© 
1 


^3 
> 


S 
M 
d 


© 

nS 

u 

d 


►5 
© 

-d 

02 

a 


00 


•b — < 

O 
P 


2 

as 
■08 
> 

s 

1 

■a 


NJ3 

> 

MS 




3 s 

1 

©" 


t3 

i 


'5* 
g 


I 

1 

(8 

MS 


S3 

•1- 


1 
'©* 

P 


'57 

2 




© 
2 

so 


-3 

d 

-a 


S 

3 

M 


02 

© 


e8 


s 


£3 


~c5 
P 

d 


'So 

> 


a 

'a 




<1 


m 


o 


P 


« 


-. 


« 


« 


Ph 


m 



196 



UNIVERSITY. 



H H Q H 



W W W H 





** 


'eS 


eA i 


=3 3 


o • 






w 


Differential 
Integrals 
cuius. 


Chemical 
Physics. 

Logic&Mor 
Philosoph 
Ditto 


u 


Political Ec 
nomy. 
Ditto 


o 


Chemical 
Physics. 






o : 

o 


o 


if 


Moral 
aphy. 
o ... 


>> 

SO 

o 


2^ 

'■S'3 


N 


Kg 

go 


Politica 

nomy. 

Ditto 


+3 
ft 


fl 

<3 


Logic & 

Philos 

Ditt 


>» 

.fl 


a 2 . 

& o " 




^S 






2^ 






6 




-u 






'rtQ 






wW 


iH 


S 02 


& o 


o 




• >» A 




Or-* . 




§ 2 


1 | 


15 


h fl) s o -t 3 

^ fl 5» 2 S 






OK 


n 




Q 


ffl 


o 


Oh 




: 




q 


3 


e3 


: 




13 






t3 




rfl 






*C3 






fl 




h3 






& 


e3 
fl 

© 


CO 
CO 

o 

•S 

CO 


1 

fl 

c 

I 


rT 


GO 

c8 
E 

e8 

.fl 

o 

a 


J 

Ph 

•i— » 

fl 

53 


2 

3 

g> 

fl 

o 

j3 


o 
© 

a 

rfl 

02 

rtf 

■4 


-c3 

pq 




"fl 


! 


1 


■a 


3 


fl 

S 

rfl 


<S 






«cS 


e8 






02 






►a 


,2} 


,fl 


CJ 


<u 


<U 


H 




«« 


W 


5 


Q 


ft 


« 



3 



cq W 

••s .§ 



GRADUATES. 



197 



ft a h a 



H 



H 



W P. 



<! 



W p 



■a *»■? a 



o O 
d 



orSp 



ale 

•a c 



s >> 



o 



BO 

_o 
o w O0h 



5 -s 



O _H 



I! 



O &, 

«3-2 b 
.23.3 

tJ0Q_i W2 

3 s 



2^ 

sag 



■a .2 

O 03 

'3 >» 

o 



P p 



"3 bi 



eg 02 



2 -3 

'r- M 
G O 



4 



S3 r C' 



ox* 

© Cj 



P P 



M 



o o 



1 a 



713—2* 






u 



a :£ 



1 s 



198 



UNIVERSITY. 



X 



W H ft 



H H is w 

CO 



CO 
-1-3 

o 


CO 


""5 

o 

1 

o 


<3 

O 

2c8 
Oh o 


Philosophy. 
Dynamics & 
Hydrostatics 
Inorganic 

Chemistry. 
Political Eco- 


o 

. 43 

o 

a 


"-(3 

Is 

CI 

31 


Geometry. 
Differential & 
Integral Cal- 
culus. 


Optics & As- 
tronomy. 




6 






'S 


>» • 






* -i 


2° 



W 

-a 

o 

43 

o 
a> 
"a> 

CO 


N 


o 


O 

S3 


o 

43 

43 

s 


bemical 
Physics, 
ogic &Moi 


a. 

O o 
Oh 


o 

43 

ft 


If 

<3 0) 


ISO. 




cu 




O J 






<l 


G^ ° 
















<£ g 


















so* 
o 




C .+3 




|Mf 


o 

43 

CO 

s 


O 

43 
43 


o 

1 

ft 


'■sjfr 

■381 


J 


ruft 


S O 
<3 J* 

&8 


•_3 o 

4^ 


6 

o s 

O S>0 




43 








43 




43 






J3 


o 


o 


« 1 




s 


3 


8 

rid 


0) -cj 






43 




.a to 








CO 


►3 




(3 


ft 


fi 


■§ 3 


j 


■y 


1 


I 




co 






H? Pm 


CO 


M 


co 


CO 























d 




£ 






43 


>> 
2 

•a 

1 


sS 

rO 

o 
so 

& 

N3 

PQ 
S 

n3 


o 

1 
i 

<3 


o 

"8 
> 


si 
& 

CO 

J? 


S3 

> 

CO 

► 

s 


3 
,3 


to 


« 


'd 


S3 
n3 


S 




-3 


1 


0) 

i 


(fi 


o 


ft 
-OS 




P3 


o 


3 


n3 


£ 



a £ 



„ aj 



p- 


00 


rS fi 


o 
■oa 


CO 




f* 


8? ^3 


-S3 




^ CO 


^ 




a 






<3 


r=5 

CO 




-C3 


cS 




> 


>. 




w 


■T3 




cp 








« 




&. 


t> 




<5 



GRADUATES. 



199 





















41 












ft 




W 




d 


_H 


W 


w 


ft 




ft 


w. 


W 


w 


H 








'a 


£ 

€ 


v, 




'a 


>> 

43 

2 ^ 


°4i 



3 


>» 






O 


>» 




: 




3 

c 


a 

d 


s 

— ) 
go 

s 


o 
ft 


o 
a 


2-2 

a as 


o 

ft 




o 

43 
43 

■ft 




43 

ft 


3 

0Q 




43 
ft 




•a .§ 


alytical 
eometry 
Ditto ... 


"3 

o 

S 

0) 


rhysics. 
gic &Moral 
bilosophy. 
namics & 


off 
O 

■P 

C 

M 
-3 


6 

W 

Is 
o 

]-+3 


. o 

si 

oft 

a 


o 

"3 


S-2 

X5 M 




43 


a 





4^ 

ft 








*o 






o 

Ph 


a 


c 


fi 


a 








































> 

c 

a 

c 
o 

3 


Q 


o 


o 


o 


Is 


Ph 

fc 


■ 

<5 


>> 

o o 


"ej 


O 


O 


ft 

p 


03 '-5 

.2 * 




eB 

'o 
Ph 


43 

43 




43 
43 

s 


43 

ft 


43 
+3 

ft 


•4t 

a 




a 

o 
8 




lift 


a 

o 


>543 


0. 

'5b 





On 


a 

«3 in 

fi-C 

OS 












+3 










43 














o 
43 






40 


f3 


,3 


o 


o 

4-3 




• ri 




o 


o 

43 


eg 




•a 

,9 
















43 
















03 




ft 




ft 


Ph 


a 

cS 

02 


s 


Q 




h3 


1 


o 


ft 


V 

CL, 




'i 




cS 




























CJO 




Ti 




























a 


s 
p 

>*> 


s 

43 
a 






> 

et 

| 

43 

P 
45" 


M 

5 

3 

"3 

< 

OQ 


| 

03 

E 

w 


g3 

'C 
"C 

m 

X3 

»3 
<U 

of 


ft 




d 

1 

> 

O 

u 

o 


|d 

e<5 

to 

43 

i 
1 

i3 


I 

PQ 

f 

> 

N33 


^8 

f 

ft 
'1—5 

43 

! 


13 
| 



s 

h 

& 

.ft 


•s 

d 
II 

O 
,XJ 








•A 


1 


























^2 
c8 






> 


OS 






S3 

43 


o 
■3 


^5 


*<8 

^3 


•ca 

43 






a 




*a 




- 


pfl 


,a 


,4 


,d 






p 


43 

02 


43 








W 




P5 


ft 


ft 


w 






w 


s 


CO 


02 




PQ 



200 



UNIVERSITY. 



H B? 



SQ pq 






H 






<o b 



e« g p 



o s o P 



o 45 






11:32 



^ 8 .i 

a o a p co o 

S ■§ ff 8 .2 « 



o 
o 

5 ^ S 
-S p g >» 

P Q 



I 



o 
o 

9 



Pn S Q P ~ 



o o 

pp 



Si § 

5 § P 



3.2.2 o 

6 ^ 



2£«e.2 

^ c P § 

ors 3 '-* 

O P >i -^ 

P CS 



»4 

# g 

.2ra 

P^ 



o o 



1 1 « 

^ p p 
P M ° 



,p 

P 



2-51 

cSQ 



2 6UC 
Si « 

5P"S 
P~ 



b • ° 



s.-S 

pP 



S<3 



2 5 
S 5b 

o P 

xn e« 

p 



POJ 



P «« 

M p 



15 B 
*-5 C- 



























P 

<3 






"S, : 








: 








> 






P 














cj 


3 

OS 

• 1— » 
"3 
a> 
,| 

1 

rP 

M 







■p 

g 

2 

'OS 
E 
«cS 
-*3 


So 




> 



P 


'S7 


S 


¥ 


•1—5 

p 

£8 
■iS 

1 



m 


1 
ft 


I 


p 1 
p 

,CpP 

Sp 3 


1 

p 





4^ 
!> 

2 

h 

rP 

3 


£0 

O 
,P 

••2 


*2 

.2 
> 




2 
1 







M 


0Q 


^ 



,p 

M 




f» 


«C5 




w 






1 
p 





1$ 


1=9 

2 p 


5 

HI 



1-5 


^3 


a 









O 


p 


P 


PO 


O 


M 


tf 


<-< 


■P. 



GRADUATES. 



201 













d 






A* 








ft" 


< 






og 


H 


Pi 


H 


«e 


fr* 




A 


H 








H* 


•8 
















*8 


02 










si 




02 
O 


1 




>> 


o 


o 


Jo 


t 


I 


02 
O 


O 

43 


l 

^ 


43 


4a 

s 


o 

43 

so 

w 




s 


6 
















o 










73 


£ ' 














# g 






«8 . 




O 
43 
4» 


3 

43 


o 

43 


43 


G 

a 

o 


o 


^ § 

£* 


s 


Q 


fl 


s 


4 


G 


s 


le >> 




Is >» 




'tf >, 


2 


_4 






to 

o 




02 




[2 

43 


e8 




eg _o 


*o 


S g 


o » 


<£ § 


P 
G 





|| 




g rs 

'Sbs? 


g{X| 




to 


I! 


43 


h^ 


s 


m 


o 


J 


Q 




>p 


• : 


«a 












•a 

U4 


.3 




o 


o 

43 


o 

43 




o 

43 


w 


CD 


43 


43 


43 




43 


1 


3 


i 

XJl 


Q 


s 


s 




Q 










-id 
a 








> 






3 1 


v d 








g 
""2 




i* 


g \ 
> 


> 


3 






> 


c8 

WD 

1 


n 

rd 

53 


d 
-1 


1 

43 




-5* 
d 


•Si 


, 


s8 


-flS 


. 


d 




'd 


«e8 

S3 
.9 

M 
»©' 

1 


"-2 
o 

1 

d 




d 

d 

I 

P3 

| 

w 


M 

DO 

I 

00 


c3 
>■ 
£| 

a 
>< 

G 

a 

H 




O 

G 

i 

o 



202 UNIVERSITY, 

LL.B. 

1866. 

First Division. 

* Ranade, Mahadev Govind, M, A L. 

t Wagle, Bal Mangesh, M.A L. 

1867. 

Second Division. 

Bedarkar, Khanderao Chimanr&o, B.A. ... L. 

Kothare, Girdharlal Day aldas, B. A. L. 

1868. 

Second Division. 

Dalvi, Dinanath Atmaram, M.A L. 

Marphatia, Nagindas Tulsidds, B.A. L. 

Mehta, Thakurdas Atmaram, B.A ... L. 

1869. 

Second Division. 

Kohiyar, Ratanshah Erachshah, B.A L. 

P&thak, Shapurji Hormasji, M.A L. 

Say ani, Rahimtulah Muhammad, M.A L. 

1870. 

Second Division. 

Dadachanji, Karshasji Rastamji, M.A ... L. 

Desai, Ambalal Sakarlal, M.A L. 

Munshi, Mansukhlal Mugatlal, B.A. ... L. 

Nadkarni, Ghanasham Nilkant, B.A. ... L. 

Telang, Kashinath Trimbak, M. A L. 

Vikaji, Framji Bastamji, B.A. L. 

1871. 

First Division. 

Apte, Mahadev Chimnaji, B.A L. 

Dalai, Jamshedji Ardesir, M. A L. 

Dhurandhar, Sadashiv Vishvanath, B. A L. 

Second Division. 

Bhatavadekar, Gajanan Krishna, B.A L. 

Davlatjada, Chandulal Mathuradas, B.A L. 

* Passed also Honours in Law Examination, Class I. 
t Passed also Honours in Law Examination, Class II. 



GEADUATES. 203 

Gddgil, Jandrdan Sakhardm, B.A. • ... L. 

Ghdsvdla, Ardesir Framji, B.A L. 

Mdnkar, Ganpatrdo Amritrdo, M.A ... L. 

Nauavati, Manekji Nasarvdnji, B.A L. 

Nandvati, Nagardds Narottamdas, B.A L. 

Pdrekh, Gokuldds Kdhdndds, B.A L. 

Patel, Rastamji Mervanji, M.A L. 

Taleydrkhdn, Mdnekshdh Jehdngiershdh, B.A L. 

1873. 

Second Division. 
Modi, Bar jorji Edalji, M.A. L. 

1874, 

Second Division. 

Bhat, Chintdman Nardyan. B.A L. 

Deshmukh, Rdmchandra Gopdlrdo, T5.A. L. 

Khandaldvdla, Na\TOJi Dordbji, B.A L. 

1875- 

Second Division. 

Kothdre, Anandrdo Krishnardo, B.A L. 

Marathe, Kashinath Bdlkrishna, B.A .. L, 

1876. 

Second Division. 

Athale, Yashvant Vdsudev, M.A L. 

Bhdnap, Gopal Vindyak, B.A L. 

Gokhale, Rdmchandra Vishnu, B.A. .. L. 

Kher, Krishndji Narayan, B.A L. 

Pandit, Vindyak Mahadev, B.A L. 

1877. 

Second Division. 

Dhairyavdn, Vdsudev Krishnardo, B.A L. 

Kir loskar, Ganesh Rdmchandra, M.A L. 

Tipnis, Raghundth Shivrdm, B.A. L. 

1878. 

Bhat, Harirdm Uttamrdm, B.A L. 

Indmddr, Venkatrdo Rukhmangad, B.A. L. 

Kangd, Dinshdh Pestonji, M.A L. 

Tullu, Rdoji Vdsudev, M.A L, 



204 UNIVERSITY. 

M.D. 
1876. 

Kunte, Anna Moreshvar, B.A., L.M G. 

LM. 
1862. 

Second Division. 

Lamna, Nasarvanji Jehangierji 1 ... G. 

Sanzgire, Shantaram Vithal G. 

Vikaji, Kaikhosru Rastamji G, 

* Barzorji Behramji ... , , G. 

1863. 

Second Division. 

DeRozario, Luis Philippe G. 

Ravut, Sakharam Arjun * G. 

* Sheik Abdul Karim G. 

1864- 

Second Division. 

DeSouza, Philip Clement ... G. 

Khori, Rastamji Nasarvanji ... G. 

Vaidya, Gopal Shivram G. 

1865. 

First Division. 

Howell, John Alexander G. 

Nadirshah, Rastamji Jamshedji ... ,.. Q. 

Second Division. 

DeSouza, Pedro Jose Lucio G. 

Hakim, Sheik Sultan G. 

Kothare, Shamrao Jagannath ... G. 

1866- 

First Class. 
Baptista, Paulo Maria G. 

1867- 

First Class. 

Goradya, Amidas Manji ... Z*. ... G. 

Jayakar, Atmaram Sadashiv G. 

* Surname not known. 



graduates: 205 

1868. 

First Class. 

Gonsalves, Joao Francisco 77. ... G. 

Hakim, Abdul Rahim G. 

Second Class. 

Daphtare, Girdharlal Ratanlal G. 



First Class. 
Pereira, Mathias Francisco G. 

1871- 

First Class. 
Shribastam, Saruplal Balakram G. 

Second Class. 
Bhate, Balvant Gopal G. 

1872. 

First Class. 

Bedford, Robert G. 

Shah, Tribhuvandas Motichand G. 

Second Class. 

DaGama, Jeronimo Accacio G. 

Kantak, Shantaram Vinayak G. 

Patel, Kasam Virji G. 

Valles, Domingos Braz G. 

1873. 

First Class. 

Masani, Hormasji Dadabhai G. 

Second Class. 

Nariman, Temulji Bhikaji G. 

Paranjapy6, Mahadev Yashvant ... G. 

Shirvalkar, Trimbak Sakharam G. 

1874. 

First Class. 

Bhatavadekar, Bhalchandra Krishna G. 

Desai, Ganesh Ramchandra G. 

b 713— r 



206 UNIVERSITY. 

Second Class. 

DaCosta, Nicolao Salvador G. 

DeSouza, Antonio Manoel G. 

Godam.be, Yashvant Pandurang G. 

Kamat, Dharmaji Ganesh G. 

Khambata, Nasarvanji Navroji G. 

Pereira, Joseph ... G. 

1875. 

First Class. 

Nariman, Kaikhosru Sorabji - G. 

Second Class. 

Antao, John, Alcantara G, 

Hakim, Abdul Ghani G. 

Nanavati, Rastamji Hormasji G. 

Nunes, Ignacio Domingos „ ... ... G. 

Saraiya, Ram das Gangadas... ... ... ... ... G. 

Sulemani, Shamsudin Jivabhai G. 

1876. 

First Class. 

Bharucha, Rastamji Pestanji G. 

Cooper, Kaikhosru Barj or ji G. 

Dalgado, Daniel G ... G. 

De Conceicao, Philip G, 

Makuna, Manekji Dosabhai G. 

Sabnis, Dattu Ganesh G. 

Second Class. 

Damnia, Phirozshah Jamshedji GJ 

Gimi, Manekji Mancherji ... ... G. 

Gomes, Dominic Anthony ... ... ... G\. 

Kandavala, Dosabhai Barj or ji 

Kapadia, Bejanji Dadabhai ... ... G^ 

Khambata, Jamshedji Dinshah ... ... ... ... Gi 

Pathak, Krishnarao Gopal ... ... GJ 

Pinto, Luis Jose ... ... ... ... G. \ 

Postvala, Mancherji Sorabji ... ... G. 

Reporter, ManekjiEdalji G. 

L- M. & S. 
1877. 

First Class. 

Cama, Ardesir Pestanji G. 

DeSouza, Joseph A <>. 

Jervis, Henry G 



GRADUATES. 207 

Second Class. 

DeCunha, John Thomas G. 

Divecha, Framji Ilatanji G. 

D'Oliveira, Braz A G. 

Lobo, Bellarrnino ... G. 

Mehta, Batukram Sobharam ... G. 

Mistri, Dinshah Dorabji ... ... ... G. 

Mistri, Kavasji Hormasji G. 

1878- 

First Class. 

Braganza, Billarmino ... G. 

Dadina, Ratanji Rastamji ... ... ... G. 

Dalai, Thakurdas Kikabhai G. 

Desai, Manilal Gangadas G. 

Doctor, Phirozshah Palanji G. 

Frenchman, Edah'i Palanji G. 

Kaji, Lallubhai Bhagvandas G. 

Vaidya, Kuvarji Kavasji G. 

Vyas, Shivnath Ramnath G. 

Munshif, Barjorji Sordbshah G. 

Second Class. 

Appu, Hirjibhai Jamshedji G. 

Bharucha, Phirozshdh Behrdmji G. 

Daruvala, Bamanji Frdmji — G. 

Dias, Victorino G. 

Doctor, Ramlal Lallubhai G. 

Fonseca, Caetano G. 

Kolapurvala, Jamshedji Framji G. 

Nanavati, Balabhai Maganlal G. 

Pandit, Ratanbhadra Manibhadra G. 

Sanjana, Kavasji Kharshedji G. 

Sethna, Erachshah Framji ... G. 

L C E- 



Second Class. 
Tilak, Gopal Raoji P.E. 

1870. 

Second Class. 

Adarkar, Anant Narayan P.E. 

Bhat, Gangadhar Anant, M.A P.E. 

Desai, Khandubhai Gulabbhdi ... P.E. 



208 UNIVERSITY. 

1871. 

Second Class. 

Nagavkar, Abraham Samuel P.E. 

Oka, Ramchandra Govind, B.A. P.E. 

1872. 

Second Class. 

Joshi, Narayan Babaji P.E. 

Kirane, Gangadhar Ramkrishna ' P.E. 

1873. 

First Class. 

Date, Narayan Vinayak , ... P.E. 

Godbole, Kashinath Ramchandra, B.A. P.E. 

Second Class. 

Sane, Balaji Bapuji, B.A P.E. 

Vajifdar, Manekji Hormasji , P.E. 



1874. 




First Class, 




*Bamanji Sorabji 


... P.E. 


Second Class. 




Bhada, Nasarvanj i Dorabji 


... P.E. 


Bhide^ Prabhakar Gangadhar 


... P.E. 


Dhumatkar, Pundlik Ganesh 


... P.E. 


Kanga, Hormasji Adarji 


... P.E. 


Karve, Vasudev Hari 


... P.E. 


Khandalavala, Pestanji Dordbji 


... P.E. 


Vaslekar, Nanaji Nardyan 


... P.E. 


1875. 




First Class. 




Chandanani, Pritamdas Parsumal 


... P.E. 


Daldl, Chunilal Tarachand 


... P.E. 


Second Class. 




Modi, Ardesir Kavasji 


... P.E. 


Pile, Balkrishna Narayan 


... P.E. 


* Surname not known. 


! 



GRADUATES. 209 

1876. 

First Class. 

N"immo, Edward Hope P.E. 

Tarapurvala, Fardunji Kuvarji, B.A P.E. 

Williams, Arthur Henry P.E. 

Second Class. 

Damle, Jagannath Vishnu P.E. 

Hindia, Durgaram Ghelabhai P.E. 

Kavishvar, Lallubhai Dalpatram P. E. 

Mule, Ramchandra Ballal P.E. 

Nanavati, Dayabhai Maganlal P.E. 

Sathe, Dhondo Sakharam P.E. 

1877- 

First Class. 

Pathak, Pestanji Hormasji, B.A P.E. 

Second Class. 

Bhandarkar, Narayan Pandurang ... P. E. 

Bhedvar, Kaikhosru Pestanji P.E. 

Desai, Motibhai Vaghjibhai P.E. 

Dharmadhikari, Balkrishna Gangadhar P. E. 

Lavanival, Eknath Sakharam P.E. 

Modak, Anant Raghunath ... ... ... ... P.E. 

Nagarset, Vithaldds Narottamdas ... ... ... P.E. 

Phadke, Lakshuman Chintaman P.E. 

Rana, Rudarji Sundarji P.E. 

1878. 

First Class. 

Bhagvat, Sadashiv Ramchandra P.E. 

Chhatre, Nilkanth Vinayak P.E. 

Chiplunkar, MahAdev Trimbak P.E. 

Desai, Vasanji Kallianji ... ... ... ... ... P.E. 

Keshkamat, Ramchandra Anant ... ... ... P.E. 

Ribeiro, C. Antonio ... ... ... P.E. 

Rodrigues, Joaquim -P.E. 

Pass. 

Bamji, Shapurji Dadabhai P.E. 

Kanitkar, B41krishna Ganesh P.E. 

Mehta, Harivadanram Maniram... P.E. 

Saraf, Venkatrdo Anant P.E, 

B 713—r * 



210 UNIVERSITY. 

UNDER-GRADUATES. 

Under-Graduates and others who have passed the 
First Examination in Arts. 

* 1861. 



Bal, Krishnaji Bapuji 


E. 


Parmanand, Narayan Mahadev 


E. 


1862. 




Mayadev, Trimbakrao Bapuji 


E. 


186a 




Barzorji Kharshedji 


D. 


1864. 




Devbhankar, Narayan Vaman 


D. 


Dhairyavan, Keshav Vinayak 


D. 


Mistri, Palanji Adarji 


E. 


Soda, Tulsidas Devidas 


E. 


Tavernvala, Sorabji Mancherji 


... , ... E. 


1865, March; 




Govindas, Varjivandas 


... E. 


1865, December. 




Angria, Jaisingr&o Esji 


T>. 


Chichgar, Hormasji Mancherji 


E. 


Dav6, Revashankar Tripurashankar 


E. 


Khambata, Nasarvanji Navroji 


F. G. A. & E. 


Dvdrkanath Raghoba 


D. 


1866. 




Aitken, Benjamin ... ... 


F.G.A. 


Boyce, Pestanji Edalji 


E. 


Britto, Julius Lucas... ... 


F.G-A. 


Gunderia, Maniklal Gordhandas 


E. 


Patvardhan, Vishnu Gopal 


D. 


1867. 




Kolatkar, Vaman Mahadev 


E. 


Modi, Barzorji Rastamji 


E. 


Mula, Fardunji Kavasji 

Nanavati, Dadabhai Nasarvanji 


E. 


E. 


Patel, Nasarvanji Hirjibhai 


E. 


Tilak, Narhar Purshottam 


m 


Vaidya, Vasudev Hari 


E. 


* Surname not known. 






UNDER-GRADUATES. 



1868- 



211 



Bhid6, Lakshuman Vishnu 

Chitale, Mahddev Balkrishna 

Davar, Jehangier Edalji 

Dave, Bhdnushankar Ndrdyanshaakar 

Desai, Nitchdbhai Murarji ,' 

Deshmukh, Ganesh Ddddji 

Dikshit, Chhabilrdm Dolatram 

Fernandez, Edward Elias 

Jav6ri, Navanidhlal Govindlal 
Kirtikar, Kdnobd Ranchhoddds ... 
Madan, Jamshedji Fardunji 
Mavlankar, Krishnarao Narsopant 

Mistri, Kavasji Mancherji 

Modak, Balaji Prabhakar 

Modi, Dinshdh Sordbji 

Modi, Kavasji Edalji 
Pandit, Sitdrdm Ndrdyan ... 

Phatak, Shrikrishna Bapu 

Ratndgar, Nasarvdnji Jamshedji ... 
Sdmbre, Ganesh Raghundth 
Soman, Sitdrdm Gopdl 
Vimavala, Maganbhai Kasturchand 
Wagle, Hari Bhikdji 

1869. 

Ambardekar, Govind Krishna 

Athale, Bhikdev Vasudev 

Bakhle, Rdmchandra Ganesh 
Bhdngdvkar, Kdshindth Ndrdyan ... 
Bhat, Nilkanth Ndrdyan ... 
Chhatre, Atmdram Moreshvar 
Dalai, Dalpatram Vithaldds 
Desai, Savdildl Govindrdm... 
Dev, Krishndji Sidhheshvar 
Dhutekar, Ddmodar Bdlkrishna . . . 
Hdtvalne, Shankar Rdmchandra ... 
Joshi, Baldji Ndrdyan 
Mehtd, Valabhrdm Vajerdm 
Pdrikh, Lallubhdi Prdnvalabh 

Pdthak, Anant Ndrdyan 

Shroff, Edalji Sordbji 



1870. 



Bamboatvald, Sordbji Adarji 
Bdtlivald, Edalji Sordbji ... 





. . 


. D. 




. ... ,., : 






E. 




... .. 


E. 






E. 




D. 




E. 




D. 




E. 




...E. &I 


\G.A 
E. 
E. 
E. 
D. 
E. 
E. 
E. 
D. 
E. 
D, 
E, 
E. 
E. 


... E. 




E. 




D. 




E. 




D. 




E. 


M 


... E. 




E. 




D. 




D. 




D. 




E. 




E. ■ 




E. 




E. 


•• 


.:. ... E. 


... ... E. 






E. 



212 UNIVERSITY. 

*Chintdmanipethkar, Pdndurang Venkatesh D. 

Dike^ Rdmchandra Chintdman D. 

Gadgil, Krishnaji Parshurdm ... ... ... ••• E\ 

Ganpule, Ndrayan Vindyak D- 

Gokhale, Ganesh Kdshindth D- 

Kanga, Sorabji Pestanji ... E. 

Kapadia, Jagjivan Bhavdnishankar ... E. 

Koniyar, Jehdngiershah Erachshah ... E. 

Kutdr, Kharshedji Rastamji E. 

Pdnandikar, Gopdl Venkatesh F.G.A. &E. 

Pandit, Hari Madhav ' E. 

Patel, Behramji Bamanji E. 

Sathe, Mahadev Anant E. 

Vaidya, Rdmchandra Jandrdan E. 

Ved, Dulabji Dharamshi E. 

1871. 

Bhdjivald, Pestanji Kharshedji E. 

Chiplunkar, Sitaram Hari ... ... D. 

Cooper, Dadabhai Hormasji E. 

* Ddmle, Krishnaji Hari E. 

Gadre, Rdmchandra Venkatesh D, 

Hakim, Muhammad Hussein E. 

Joglekar, Vishnu Krishna ... ... ... D. 

Kale, Nanabhai Saddnand .. E. 

Khambdta, Pestanji Aspandidrji E. 

Malpekar, Nariyan Bamchandra E. 

Mudholkar, Shrinivas Narsinh ... ... ... ... D* 

Sul6, Sitdram Bhagvant ... ... ... E. 

1872. 

Abhyankar, Vithal Trimbak D. 

Asirkar, Vishnu Mahipat ... E. 

Bhavandni, Dolatrdm Suratsing ... ... E. 

Bhide, Balkrishna Vishnu D. 

Chiplunkar, Mahadev Trimbak D. 

Gadre, Gangddhar Pandurang ... . . .. ... D. 

Gothoskar, Sakhdrdm Pandurang ... E. 

Mdvlankar, Vdman Keshav ... E, 

Patvardhan, Ramchandra Vishvanath D. 

1873. 

Anikhindikar, Sambhu Chandappd D. 

Apte, Krishndji Balldl ... F.G.A. 

Apte, Shankar Rdoji D. 

* Passed the B.A. Examination of 1875. 



UNDER-GRADUATES. 213 

• 

Arjani, Manekji Dadabhii E. 

Atre, Rango Balkrishna D. 

Bapat, Vasudev Sadashiv E. 

Belsar6, Malhari Bhikaji E. 

Bhate, Sadashiv Balkrishna . . . E. 

Daldl, Manekji Nasarvanji E. 

Dande, Keshav Govind D. 

Desai, Dolatrdi Surbhai E. 

Devnalkar, Bhiku Rdghoba F.G.A. 

Gore, Ndrayan Shivram D. 

Kale, Gangadhar Hari D. 

Keily, Robert St. X. 

Kelkar, Purshottam Gopal ... ... ... ... ... E. 

Kelkar, Vishnu Raghunath B. 

Lokurkar, Svamirao Raghvendra ... ... D. 

Lyons, William Robert ... ... ... ... ...St. X. 

Masani, Nasarvanji Kavasji ... ... ... ... ...St. X. 

Nerurkar, GoAand Nilkanth E. 

Patel, Rastamji Dhanjibhai E. 

1874. 

Apte, Mahddev Shivram ... ... ... D. 

Bharucha, Sheriarji Dadabhai E. 

Bidi, Shrinivds Jivaji D. 

Corkery, William Alfred E. 

Dhairyavan, Raghunath Dvarkanath ... ... ... St. X. 

Gokhale, Vishnu Narayan F.G.A. 

Gordon, Robert Lish... ... ... ... ... ... E. 

Heblikar, Bhaskarrao Ramchandra D. 

Jamsetjee, Kavasji Kharshedji E. & St. X 

Jervis, Alfred Samuel E. 

Joshi, Vishnu Raoji ... . r ... ... D. 

Kaji, Balkisandas Brijbhukandds ... E. 

Kale, Narayan Ramchandra ,. ... E. 

Kamlapurkar, Shrinivds Svdmirao D. 

Khambdta, Dinshdh Dosabhai E. 

Kher, Sitdram Narayan I>. 

Khot, Anant Venkaji . ...F.G.A. 

Khot, Ndrayan Venkaji F.G.A. 

Lele, Kashinath Krishna D. 

Majmunddr, Nandkrishnaldl Ratanlal E. 

Mandlik, Dhondo Gangadhar E. & F.G.A, 

Manghirmallani, Hasram Hotchand .. E. 

Mirza, Kalichkhdn Fraidunbeg E. 

Mudliar, Damodar Viziarangam I>. 

Mulgavkar, Vinayak Ndrdyan E. & St. X. 

Munshi, Dddabhai Kharshedji E. 

Nabar, Vasudev Shivdji E. 



214 UNIVERSITY. 



Narimdn, Dordbji Kharshedji E. 

Nichhure, Ganesh Anant D. 

Oka, Krishna] i Govind ... ... ... D. 

Padvekar, Vishnu Sakharam ... ... ... ... St. X. 

Panhalkar, Rdmehandra Abaji E. 

Parikh, Chhotalal Durgaram E. 

Patvardhan, Mahadev Vithal D. 

Purandare, Khanderao Vithal D. 

Rend vikar, Anant Apdji D. 

Sett, Motichand Udhavji E. 

Sukthankar, Sitaram Vishnu St. X, 

Tarkhad, Shrinivas Dadoba... ' St. X. 

Wdgle, Mahadev Govind E. 

*Abdulali Moizuddin Jivabhai ... E. 

1875. 

Badshah, Kdvasji Jdmdsji E. 

Bhandivdd, Venkatesh Bhimrao D. 

Chavkar, Vindyak Balvant D. 

Chinai, Bejanji Sorabji ... ... ... D. 

Ddtar, Sitaram Rdoji E. 

Deshpande, Bhikdji Anandrao E. & F.G.A. 

Deshpande, Lakshuman More-shvar B. 

Dharddhar, Vasant Lakshuman ... ... ... ... St. X. 

Dhavle, Govind More,shvar D. 

Dhond, Jaganndth Krishna E. 

Doctor, Ndndbhdi Behrdmji E. 

Godbole, Purshottam Vishnu E. 

Gokhale, Vithal Mahddev E. 

Gondhalekar, Rdmehandra Mahddev ... ... ... D. 

Hirdna, Dosdbhai Mervdnji F.G.A.& E. 

Joglekar, Krishndji Mddhavrdo ... ... E. 

Joglekar, Vdsudev Rdmehandra E. 

Jones, John Hugh E. 

Joshi, Ganesh Krishna E. 

Joshi, Lakshuman Jandrdan ... ... ... F.G.A. $ E. 

Kdpadid, Ddmodar Manji E. 

Kavmudid, Manildl Sevakram ... ... ... ... E. 

Kerur, Babdji Yalgurd ... ... ... ... ... D. 

Khambdti, Ranchhoddas Lallubhdi ... ... E. 

Ldlvani, Lildram Vatanmal ... ... ... ... ... E. 

Lavji, Ardesir Ratanji E. 

Mclnery, James ... St. X. 

Narimdn, Mdnekji Kharshedji ... ... ... ... E. 

Paithankar, Krishndji Malhdr ... ... ... ... D. 

Pandid, Dolatram Kirpdrdm ... ... / ... E. 

* Surname not known, 



B 



UNDER-GRADUATES. 215 

Parulekar, Shivram Hari .'. E. 

Patak, Navroji Hormasji E. 

Patak, Sorabji Kaikhosru E. 

Pathare, Kashinath Janardan E. 

Pat vardhan, Hari Ramchandra E. 

Pavge, Nar&yan Bhovanrao E. 

Pereira, Conrad R. ... ... ... • ■• ... ... St. X. 

Samarth, Vasudevrao Madhavrao E. 

Samshi, Anant Venkatesh E. 

Sane , Balkrishna Ramchandra D. 

Satpute\ Narayan Raghunath E. 

Sovani, Ganesh Krishna E. 

Taki, Ramchandra Shankar E. 

Vad, Vithal Apaji D. 

Digambar, Dalaya" F.G.A. 



1876. 



limchandani, Davlatram Jethmal E. 

lakeman, William Alfred ,. ... E. 

Dave", Ratiram Durgaram ... ... E. 

Gadialli, Pestan j i Mancher j i E . 

Ghaisas, Kesh a v Vishnu E. 

Jalga vkar, Khando Shamrao D. 

Karmarkar, Hari Ganesh ... ... ... ... ' ... D, 

Malkani, Shasanmal Pribdas E. 

Manerikar, Yashvant Purshottam... .. ... ... E. 

Mirajkar, Raghavendra Shrinivas... ... ... ... D. 

Modi, Jijibhai Edalji St, X. 

Nadkarni, Shivram Sadashiv ... ... ... ... E. 

Natu, Kashinath Gangadhar • E. 

Paranjapy<§, Balaji Ramchandra E. 

Parchurd, Vaman Bhikaji ... ... ... E. 

Pinto, Peter Manuel... D. 

Shukla, Devdat Dhaneshvar E. 

Wadia, Hirji Pestanji St. X 

1877- 

First Class, 

O'Shanahan, Henry Frank ... ... St.X. 

Second Class. 

Bapat, Shankar Bhdlchandra D. 

Bharucha, Hormasji Kerbadji E. 

Desai, Kanthadji Kallianji ... .. D. & E. 

* Surname not known, 



216 UNIVERSITY. 



Divelcar, Balvant Abdji '. E. 

Dravid, Venkat6sh Krishna D. 

Dunn, Michael.. St. X. 

Jatdr, Bhaskar Yashvant D. 

Manerikar, Ganpat Saddshiv E. 

Natu, Trimbak Gangadhar E. 

Pai, Nagesh Vishvandth _ St. X. 

Pandid, Krishnashankar Hirashankar ... ... ... E. 

Rahurkar, Vaman Ndrdyan ... ... D. 

Trivedi, Kamblashankar Prdnshankar E. 

Pass. 

Agarkar, Gopal Ganesh D. 

Akhund, Ali Muhdmmad Husenali E. 

Apte, Govind Shridhar ... E. 

Athale , Padmakar Ddmodar E. 

Barve, Hari Mahadev E. 

Bhandare, Sadan and Trimbak E. 

Chavbal, Mahadev Bhaskar D. 

Dali, Raghunath Sakharam ... E. 

Daru valla, Jamshedji Edalji F. G. A. 

Dave, Vithalji Keshavji E. 

Desai, Maniklal Sakarlal E. 

Deshpande, Rdmchandra Narayan D. 

Divigikar, Ramrao Venkdji St. X, 

Gavdnkar, Lakshuman Raghobd E. 

Javeri, Bdldbhai Manchdrdm ,. E. 

Joglekar, Rdmchandra Rdoji... ... ... ... ... E. 

Kdkd, Navroji Behrdmji ... ... ... E. 

Karandikar, Bdlkrishna Parshurdm E. 

Katrak, Hormasji Shdpurji F. G. A, 

Kelkar, Ganesh Pdndurang ^ E. 

Kelkar, Saddshiv Ganesh E. 

Kulkarni, Bdldji Hari E. 

Kumpthekar, Mahadev Keshav ... ... E. 

Mdnkar, Ndrdyan Lakshuman St. X. 

Mehd, Vaikunthrdi Anandrdi ... « ... E. 

Methd, Vaikunthrdm Manmathrdm E. 

Modi, Chhaganldl Thdkordds E. 

Modi, Girdharlal Bhdndbhai E. 

Nagarkar, Rdmchandra Ddji... ... ... D. 

Ndnjidni, Karamdli Rahim E. 

O'Sullivan, James John St. X. 

Padamji, Sordbji Pestanji ... ... ... ... ... D. 

Pandit, Ndrdyan Bhaskar E , 

Parddkar, Vishnu Anant F. G. A. 

Pdthak, Pdndurang Shridhar E. 



UNDER-GRADUATES. 217 

Pavri, Fardunji Palanji 7.7 ... E. 

Phatarpekar, Shankar Ramchandra E. 

Purani, Balkrishna Narabheram E. 

Sanjana, Mancherji Kharshedji F. G. A. 

Sethna, Pestanji Kuvarji E. 

Sutaria, Lallubhai Mathurbhai E. 

Vakil, Manchhashankar Jivanram F. G. A. 

Vania, Hoshangji Barjorji E. 

Vaidya, Balkrishna Narayan St. X, 

Vyas, Hargovind Harinardyan E. 

Wadia, Framji Rastamji E. 

£uzarte, Amaro Andre E. & St. X. 



UNDER-GRADUATES. 

Under- Graduates and others who have passed the First 
Examination in Medicine. 

1864. 

Second Division. 

DaCunha, Joseph Gerson G. 

Gomes, Antonio Sinrplicio G. 

1872. 

Second Class. 

Bennett, Bejanji Pestanji Q r 

Continho, Joaquim Vicente G. 

Patvardhan, Vinayak Ramchandra G. 

1873. 

Second Division, 
Khambata, Hiraji Jehangier G. 

1874. 

Second Division. 

Alvares, Nicolao Santanna G a 

DaSilva, Pascoal Manoel ... '.. ].. q] 

Koyaji, Behramji Nasarvanji ... ... ... '" q\ 

Mulan, Sorabj i Palanj i g' 

B 713— s 



218 UNIVERSITY. 

1875. 

First Division, 

Deshmukh, Mor^shvar Gopdlrdo G, 

Gunderid, Chunildl Govardhandds G. 

Mudliar, Ndrdyan Venkatchelam G. 

Second Division. 

Bhende, Kdshindth Krishna G. 

Bocarro, Amador G. 

Ddmld, Edalji Mdnekji G. 

DeLima, Jose Tertulliano G. 

Dhurandhar, Krishnarao Vishvandth G. 

Doctor, Hormasji Behrdmji ... ... ... G. 

Gandhi, Damodardds Dharamdds ... ... G. 

Jayakar, Vishvasrao Balaji ... ... G. 

Kanga, Jamshedji Kharshedji ... G. 

Khot, Govind Venkdji G*. 

Nddirshdh, Sordbji Dosabhai... ... G. 

Talvalkar, Rdmchandra Gangddhar ... ... ... G. 

1876. 

♦ 

First Division. 

Camd, Rastamji Hormasji G. 

Second Division. 

Apte, Vishnu Gopal ; q 

Broker, Vithaldas Manordds q.' 

Contractor, Hormasji Navroji ... "... (; 

Damnia, Bhikdji Jivdji ... q 

Dastur, Jamasji Sorabji q 

Doctor, Dhanjibhai Barjorji ... p q' 

Forbes, Edalji Behramji ... Or. 

Garde, Ganesh Krishna 

Gazdar, Sorabji Fardunji ... ... ... fa 

Hakim, Hormasji Mervdnji q 

Kardnjid, Mervdnji Dhanjibhdi ' Q 

Keldvdld, Mdnekshdh Jamshedji G 

Ndndvati, Jamnddds Premchand . G 



G. 



UNDER-GRADUATES. 2i9 

Pesikaka, Hormasji Dosabhai G. 

Punavala, Edalji Sorabji .. G. 

Revitna, Dadabhai Kharshedji ... ... ... ... G. 

Simoens, Jose Auspicio . , ... G. 

Tarapurvala, Shavakshah Sorabji G. 

1877. 

First Division. 

Choksi, Dosabhai Ardesir ... ... G. 

Engineer, Kaikhosru Sorabji ... ... ... G. 

Gokhale, Vithal Vishnu G. 

Rozario, Michael Arthur G. 

Second Division. 

Dadachandji, Kavasji Edalji G. 

Dadachandji, Palanji Hormasji G, 

Daji, Jehangier Kharshedji ... ... G. 

DeNazarethu Joaquim Vincent ... ... G. 

Desai, Chunildl Ghelabhai G. 

Gandevia, Mervanji Navroji G. 

Hakim, Phirozeshah Mervanji ... G. 

Kane, Sadashiv Vaman ... G. 

Kapadid, Rastamji Jamshedji ... ... ... ... G. 

Khar6ghat, Mervanji Pestanji G. 

Lisboa, Patrocinio P. ... ... ... ... ... ••• G. 

Modi, Nanabhai Kuvarji ... ... ... ... ... G. 

Prabhakar, Govindrao Bhau... ... ... ... ... G. 

Shirgavkar, Vishnu Jagannath ... ... G. 

Tukina, Edalji Kavasji ... G. 

Wadia, Dhanjibhai Rastamji ... ... ... ... G. 

Wadia, Jehangier Pestanji G. 

UnDER-G RADUATES AND OTHERS WHO HAVE PASSED THE FlRST 

Examination in Civil Engineering. 

1866. 

Second Division. 
Datar, Naro Govind P.E. 

1868. 

Second Division. 

Metha„Venishankar Govindram ... ...P.E. 

Shirgavkar, Balaji Narayan ...P.E. 



220 UNIVEKSITY. 



Second Division. 

Bhat, More^hv-ar Narayan PE. 

Soman, Ganesh Narayan P.E. 

1870. 

Second Division, 

Gupte, Pandurang Gopal ... - P.E. 

Jambhekar, Balvant Govind P.E. 

Nariman, Gustadji Dorabji P.E. 

Tambe, Ramchandra Balvant P.E . 

1871- 

Second Division. 

Bhatavad^kar, Vinayak Krishna P.E. 

Chavbal, Kashinath Damodar P.E. 

Mhaiskar, Gopal Raghunath P.E. 

Mul6kar, Vishnu Sadashiv ... ' P.E. 

Varlikar, Mahadev Janardan , P.E, 

1872. 

First Division, 

Macnee, Henry Charles P.E. 

Second Division, 

Bhandarkar, Raoji Ganesh P.E. 

Nargir, Shankar Bisto P.E. 

"Whittell, Charles P,E. 

1873. 

First Division. 

P?ige, Hastings Montague P.E. 

Parikh, Javerdas Bhogidas P.E. 

Sohoni, Vasudev Sadashiv P.E. 

Second Division. 

Gur jar, Pandurang Gopinath ... P.E. 

Kolatkar, Sitaram Vasudev ....P.E. 

Tarkhadkar, Vithal Raghoba P.K 



1 

Bi 



UNDER-GRADUATES 221 

1874, 

First Division. 
pt<3, Ganesh Krishna, B. A. P.E. 

Second Division. 



! 



arve, Pandurang Sakharam P.E. 

Bhosekar, Lakshuman Pandurang ... ... ... ...P.E. 

Gharpur6, Narayan Hari ... ...P.E. 

Maude, Venkatesh Bapurao P.E. 

Meheudal6, Pandurang Kashinath P.E. 

Mhaskar, Shripat Vishnu P.E. 

" ka, Vinayak Anant P.E. 

hakur, Atmaram Sadashiv ...P.E. 



1875. 

First Division. 



Barve, Narayan Vishnu P.E. 

Dudley, Charles Wiltshire P.E. 

Lele, Trimbak Balvant P.E. 

Savage, Thomas P.E. 

Second Division. 

Bhagvat, Ramchandra Ganesh ... ... ... ...P.E. 

Hall, William Draper , P.E. 

Joshi, Anaji Anant ... ... ... ...P.E. 

Kathavate, Narhar Vishnu P. E. 

Late, Vasudev Pandurang ... ... ... ... ...P.E. 

Nagarkar, Vaman Daji ... ... ... .. ...P.E. 

Xative-AgBnt, Lallubhai Govandas... ... ... ...P.E. 

1876- 

First Division. 

Cousens, Henry P.E. 

Das, Dharnidhar P.E. 

Desai, Gulabbhai Kanthadji P. E. 

Deshpande, Sitaram Keshav ... ... ... ...P.E. 

Gohkale, Vinayak Hari P.E. 

Hajrah, Dinanath P.E. 

Kelkar, Vishnu Raghunath P.E. 

Muzumdar, Maniklal Narbheram P.E. 

Mehta, Vithaldas Chimanlal P.E. 

Pa vri, Khar shed ji Navroji ... ... ... P.E. 

Kibeiro, F. P. V P.E. 

B 713— s* 



222 UNIVERSITY. 



Second Division. 

Bhandare, Ramchandra Bhikaji P.E. 

Dalai, Jamshedji Jehangier ... ... ... ... ...P.E. 

Hemson, Reginald John ... ... ..: ... ...P.E. 

Khandekar, Keshav Ganesh ... ... ... ... ...P.E. 

N^darshah, Jamshedji Dadabhai P.E. 

Parkhe, Eknath Yashvant .. P.E. 

Sheth, Bhukandas Itcharam P.E. 

1877., 

Second Class. 

Bilgi, Rudrappa . Virbasappa . . P. E. 

Gayatonde, Gopal VishvambKar P.E. 

Gokhale, Vithal Mahadev P.E. 

Mitra, Haripad P.E. 

Pass. 

Chela, Chunilal Khubchand P.E. 

Dalai, Pranjivan Parbhudas P.E. 

Desai, Vithal Tatia P.E. 

Engineer, Raghunath Makund P.E. 

Gharpure, Ramchandra Go vind ... ...P.E. 

Kalghatgi, Krishuaji Gururao P.E. 

Lele, Mahadev Venkatesh P.E. 

Majmudar, Dipakram Navnitram P.E. 

Munshi, Dadabhai Kharshedji P.E. 

Mus, Nanabhai Ardesir P.E. 

Pathak, Pranshankar Dayashankar P.E. 

Sidhe, Dinkar Narayan ' P.E. 

Williamson, Alexander John P.E. 



MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1878. 223 

MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1878. 



Rank. 


Names of Candidates. 


Schools. 


~ 


Vaidya, Chintaman Vinayak 


E. S. 


2 


Pandit, Vishvanath Nilkanth 


Dhu. 


3 


Devitte, Henry 


Bis. 


4 


Pitke, Gopal Ramchandra 


R. 


5 


Godbole, Sadashiv Mahadev 


Rat. 


6 


Conway, Septa A 


J. 


7 


Poyntz, John William Walter 


Bis. 


8 


Hatyangdikar, Santappa Santay a 


F.G.A. 
&P. T. 


9 


Kavthekar, Mahadev Anant 


R. 


10 


Vakil, Rastamji Bamanshah 


E. S. 


11 


Dabir, Balvant Narayan 


Dhu. 


12 


Pandit, Dattatray a Moreshvar 


R. 


13 


Taskar, Parshuram Balkrishna 


Rat. 


14 


Shukla, Narayan Gangadhar 


P. 


15 


DeGama, Pinto J. 0. ... 


E. S. & 
P. T. 

St. M. 


16 


Vaidya, Rastamji Manekji 


17 


Bhide, Vidyadhar Vaman 


P. 


18 


Joshi, Narayan, Damodar ... 


Rat. 


19 


Abhydnkar, Pandurang Vishnu 


P. N. 


Gilder, Dhanjibhai Dorabji 


E. S. 


20 


Dev, Vaman Narayan 


S. 


21 


Mirza, Jafarkuli Fredunbeg 


N. J. 


22 


Talyarkhan, Phirozshdh Jehangiershdh 


E. S. 


23 


Singh, Kirthee ... ... 


Se. 


24 


Bodas, Kdshinath Shivram* 


P. 


25 


Damle, Govind Ramchandra 


P. T. 


Sule, Bdlkrishna Balvant 


Ak. 


26 


Pavri, Dorabji Temulji ... 


E. S. 


27 


Joshi, Krishnaji Vishnu 


S. 


28 


Bakshi, Kallianrai Jetha... 


Kat. 


29 


Ahmadi, Ibrahim Shaik Daud 


E. S. 


30 


Sohoni, Venkatesh Abaji 


P. 


31 


Modak, Gopal Trimbak 


P. 


32 


Kuknur, Raghavendra Jayachdrya 


Dh. 


Paranjapy6, Hari Rdmchandra 


Rat. 


33 


Tolmatti, Svdmi Appaji ... 


Dh. 


34 


Ganpule, Damodar Bapu 


P. T. 



224 



UNIVERSITY. 



Rank. 



35 
36 
37 
38 
39 
40 
41 
42 
43 

44 

45 

46 



47 



4S 



49 
50 
51 
52 
53 

54 

55 
56 
57 
58 
59 

60 

61 

62 
63 
64 

65 



Names of Candidates. 



Gokhale, Krishnaji Ramchandra 

Safre, Vishnu Vinayak ... 

Khote, Dvarkanath Ramnath 

Jog, Ramchandra Moreshvar ... 
Murdeshvarkar, Padmanabh Munjuna thaya. 

Shaik, Ahmad Imam 

Moghe, Krishnaji Balvant 

Mahajan, Venkatesh Krishna ... 

Katrak, Dosabhai Hormasji 
Joshi, Narso Govind 
Joshi,.Nilkanth Shankar 
Desai, Nathabhai Avichaldas ... 

Bijapurkar, Ragbavendra Krishnarao 

Katrak, Nanabhai Navroji ... 

Mehta, Sadashivram Narsiram ... 
Mehta, Vamanram Kapilram ... 
Desai, Harilal Chandraprasad ... 
Parikh, Keshavlal Motilal 

Sariya, Gokaldas Vithaldas 

Bharucha, Jivaji Kavasji 

Samuel, Hyam ... ... ... 

Dravid, Vishnu Shankar 

Petit, Bamanji Dinshaji ... 

Adval, Sayenna Chinnu 

Pathak, Lakshuman Dadaji 
Bapat, Vishvanath Sadashiv 

Smith, Clarence 

Judge, Albert John . 

Apte, Gangadhar Ballal 

Graham, Ellen Elizabeth 

Doctor, Jamshedji Barjorji 

Rukha, Visanji Kallianji 

Bapat, Dattatraya Sakhar am 

Jayavant, Ramchandra Bhaskar 

Brown, E. H 

Mokashi, Sitaram Shripat 

Majmudar, Navnitram Ochhavrarn 

Dalvi, Mangesh Sadashiv 



MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1878. 



225 



Rank. 


.Names of Candidates. 


Schools. 


66 


Kapadia, Sorabji Framji 


Br. 


67 


Godbole, Ramchandra Ballal 


R. 


68 


Dastur, Peshutan Hormasji 


St.M. 


69 


Budhbhati, Keshavji Shamji 


,N.J. 




Athvankar, Anandrao Mangesh 


E.S. 


70 


Bhate, Ganesh Chintaman ... 


R. 




Joshi, Prabhakar Ballal ... ... 


Rat. 


71 


Kutar, Rastamji Palanji 


E. S. 


72 


Athavale, Ramkrishna Sakharam 


B. S. 


73 


Mehta, Mahipatrain Go vindram 


Bh. 


7t 


Bilimoria, Jehangier Mancherji 


B. Pro. 


75 


Mehta, Anantrai Nathji 


Bh. 


76 


Boga, Dhanjibhai Rastamji 


Sir J. 


Dravid, Vithal Bal vant 


R. 


77 


Phansalkar, Ramchandra Ballal 


E. S. 


78 


Kelkar, Vasudev Balkrishna 


Dh. 


79 


Dastane, Vjthal Govind... 


Dhu. 


80 


Desai, Varajrai Santokrai 


B. S. 


81 


Kanugrahi-Dhruva, Hiralal Manilal 


A. 


82 


Joshi, Narayan Janardan ... 


B. S. 


83 


Tipnis, Ganesh Khanderao ... 


Ba. 


84 


Bidi, Krishnaji Hanamant 


B.M. 


85 


Aikin, John Charles .. 


Pa. 


Banshah, Nasarvanji Framji 


Sir J, 


86 


Kelkar, Hari Vaman ... ... 


P. T. 


87 


Bhide, Krishnaji Narayan 


P. 


88 


Natu, Ramchandra Raghundth 


B. 




Desai, Gopaldas Veharidas 


N. 


89 


Gidvani, Murijmal Chandirdm ... 


H. 




Khanderia, Popat Dungarshi ... 


P. E. 


90 


Sanjand, Jehangier Barjorji 


Ch. 


91 


Suvamapatke, Damodar Rdoji 


Ah. 




Desai, Ishvarbhai Shankarbhai 


P. T. 


92 


Dugal, Bhaskar Ramchandra ... 


Dhu. 




Lele, Vishnu Kashinath ... ... 


Dh. 




Munsif, Edalji Sorabshah 


B. 


93 


Tadivala, Ardesir Hormasji 


P. 


94 


Godbole, Nilkanth Trimbak 


Rat. 


95 


Gore, Bapuji Keshav ... ... 


Rat. 


96 


Master, Sorabji Pestanji 


Ch. 


97 


Joglekar, Vasudev Daji 


Dh. 


Kibe, Gopalrao Ganpatrdo 


In. 



226 



UNIVERSITY. 



Kank. 


Names of Candidates. 


Schools, 


98 


Bhagat, Kanji Bhagvan ... 


E. S. 


Kapadia, Kharshedji Framji 


F. 


99 


Bangali, Shrikrishna Khanderao 


Dhu. 


Talati, Hormasji Pestanji 


E, S. 


100 


tTog, Sakharam Hari 


P. N. 


101 


Nazareth, Vincent Edward 


St. M. 


102 


Chatpat, Jekisandas Kasandas ... 


Su. 


Desai, Krishnaji Lakshunian 


R. 


103 


Bamboatvala, Dadabhai Adarji... 


B. Pro. 


104 


Desai, Motilal Dalpatram 


E. S. 


Deshpande, Somu Timaji 


X. J. 


105 


Shirgavkar, Bamchandra Baghunath ... 


106 


Nabar, Vaman Shivaji ... 


Rat. 


107 


Jambhekar, Hari Bhimrao 


B. 


108 


Datar, Hanmant Bamrao 


B. 


109 


Goh4, Hari Vishnu 


P. 


110 


Carvalho, Budolph 


F. G. A, 


111 


Karmarkar, Narayan Divakar ... 


H. 


112 


Dalai, Varajdas Ichhdram 


Su. 




D'Monte, Braz 


St. M. 


113 


Kdth, Mulji Vasanji 


B. Pro. 




Mehta, Nagindas Ddmodardas ... 


Su. 


114 


Kikani, Maganldl Sundarji 


Kat. 


115 


Mundal^, Bamchandra Ganesh ... 


P. 


116 


Lele, Vaman Vishnu 


P. 


117 


Tambe, Nagesh Ramchandra 


B. 


118 


Bhadkamkar, Dhondo Hari 


S. 


119 


Paranjapye, Gangadhar Vithal 


P. T, 


120 


Kotvdl, Edalji Barjorji ... ... 


SirC. 


121 


Cabral, William ... 


St. M. 


122 


Gunderia, Motilal Chunilal 


Br. 


123 


Pires, George Francis 


R. M. 


124 


Mavlankar, Damodar Keshav ... 


St. M. 


Naik, Nagarji Dayabhai ... .... 


Su. 


125 


Golvala, Chunilal Keshav] al 


Ah.M. 


126 


Desai, Khushal Revadas ... ... 


Kat. 


127 


Mehta, Bhagvandas Pranjivandas 


Su.&P.T 


128 


Talati, Dadabhai Dinshah 


Su. 


129 


Karandikar, Vasudev Vishnu ..'. 


B. 


130 


Gandhi, Ardesir Mervanji 


Br. 


131 


Mehta, Samaldas Bhagvandas 


A. 


132 


Joglekar, Keshav Ramchandra 


P. 



MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1878. 



227 



Names of Candidates. 



Vakil, Chunilal Jivandas 
Varlikar, Moreshvar Raoji 
Meh.ta, Rajabhai Manishankar... 
Jivanpurv&la, Chhotalal Jivanlal 
Pavri, Bamanji Mervdnji 
Desdi, Gopalji Guldbbhai 
DeSouza, Francis Vincent Albino 
Ndndvati, Hormasji Adarji 
Boyce, Mervanji Rastamji 
Kanga, Kavasji Ddddbhdi 
Desdi, Keshavldl Mansukhram... 

Sdbne, Narayan Abaji 

Modi, Dhanjibhai Pestanji 
Tdskar, Pestanji Kuvarji 

Talati, Makanji Murarji 

Randde, Vishvandth Balvant ... 
Naik, Kasanji Ranchhodji 
Kunte, Vdsudev Keshav 
Pandit, Harilal Mulshankar ... 
Cooper, Jehangierji Barjorji ... 
Jog, Saddshiv Narhar ... 
Randde, Yashvant Nagesh 
Kalamkar, Vdsudev Narayan . . . 

Lam, Edalji Dinshdh 

Sukhia, Nddirshdh Hormasji ... 
Desai, Khushdlbhdi Ransordji... 
Desai, Devkaran Nanji ... 
Boyt on, William George 
Keldvala, Dosibhai Kavasji 
Madkholkar, Shivrdm Venkatesh 
Desai, Guldbbhai Lailubhdi 
Liebschwager, Richard W. 
Kapadid, Dhanjishah Phirozshah 

Belsar^, Govind Vinayak 
Gavdnkar, Rajaram Rdghobd ... 
Thakore, Kallianrai Govindram 
Kanitkar, Sakhdrdm Hari „. 
Barve, Shridhar Sakhardm 
Saranjame', Shridhar Jaganndth 
DeSouza, Cayetan Joseph 
Chela, Shivshankar Pitdmbarsing 
Mehta, Chunilal Jamnadas 



Schools. 



E. S. 
E. S. 
Su. 

A. M, 
E, S. 
Su. 

St. M, 
Br. 

F. 

E. S. 
N. 

P. T. 
E. S. 
Al. P. 
P. T. 
P. 
Su. 
In. 
A. 

E. S. 
P. 
P. 

B. S. 
F. 

E. S. 
Su. 
E. S. 
J. 
Br. 
B. P, 
Su. 
J. 
Ch,&P. 

T. 

N. S. 
F. 

P. T. 
Sa. 
P. T. 
P. T. 
St. M. 
N.J. 
E, S, 



228 



UNIVERSITY. 



Rank. 


Names of Candidates. 


Schools. 


168 


Lad, Dvarkanath Bhau 


E. S. 


169 


Modak , Ganesh Bal vant ... 


Ah. 


170 


Bakshi, Premshankar Jetha ... ... ... 


Kat. 


Gupte, Vinayak Shivram 


B. P. 


171 


Dias, D. Braz 


P. T. 


172 


Darbari, Dadabhai Kavasji' 


Su. 


Pradhan, Vinayak Harishankar 


E. S. 


. .173 


Mukhi, Muhammad Jaffer Allarakhia 


E. S. 


174 


Mohil6, Hari Atmaram 


E. S. 


175 


Surveyor, Manekji Ratanji ... 


E. S. 


176 


W&dia, Harishankar Damodar ... 


F. 


177 


Navalkar, Balkrishaa Vasudev 


St. M, 


178 


Joshi, Sadashiv Narayan 


P. M. 


179 


Dave, Mulshankar Dayaram 


P. T. 


180 


Kateli, Mancherji Dinshah 


Sir J. 


181 


Namjoshi, Vishnu Mahadev 


E.S. 



XL 



REGULATIONS FOR THE RECOGNITION OF 
INSTITUTIONS IN THE DIFFERENT FACULTIES,, 

1. Any College or other Institution desirous of being re- 
cognized in any Faculty by the University of Bombay must 
forward, with its application, the following documents, 
signed in each case by the responsible authority, and 
countersigned by two members of the Senate : — 

(a.) A statement showing the present staff of Instructors 
and the course of study in the Faculty in which re- 
cognition is desired during the last two years, pro- 
vided the Institution has existed for such a period. 

(6.) A declaration that the Institution has the means of 
educating up to the standard of the highest degree 
in the Faculty in which recognition is desired. 

2. By the term Responsible Authority is to be under- 
stood the Managing Board in the case of an Institution 
under such a Board, and the Director of Public Instruction 
in the case of Government Institutions. 

The fact of an Institution having been once recognized 
in any Faculty by the University, is not to prevent the 
Senate withdrawing their recognition in that Faculty, in 
the case of the Institution changing its course of instruct 
tion or ceasing to educate up to the University standard. 



RECOGNIZED INSTITUTIONS-UNIVERSITIES. 

The Universities of Great Britain and Ireland, and of 
India, in all the Faculties in which Degrees are granted by 
them respectively. 
b 713— £ . 



230 RECOGNIZED INSTITUTIONS. 

IL— COLLEGES AND COLLEGIATE INSTITUTIONS 
RECOGNIZED IN THE DIFFERENT FACULTIES. 

I. Elphinstone College, Bombay"! 
II. Deccan College | 

III. Free General Assembly's In- Y In Arts. 

stitution, Bombay ... . . . j 

IV. St. Xavier's College, Bombay, J ' 

V. Government Law School, Bombay. In Law. 
YI. Grant Medical College, Bombay. In Medicine. 
VII. Poona Civil Engineering College. In Civil Engineering. 



I,— ELPHINSTONE COLLEGE. 
(Recognized, 1860.) 

Elphinstone College arose by a separation in the year 
1856 of the Professorial element from the " Elphinstone 
Institution," which henceforth became a High School. 

The Elphinstone Institution had its origin in a meeting of 
the Bombay Native Education Society on the 22nd August 
1827, to consider the most appropriate method of testifying 
the affectionate and respectful sentiments of the inhabitants 
of Bombay to the Honourable Mountstuart Elphinstone, on 
his resignation of the Government of Bombay. The result 
of this meeting was that a sum of money, amounting to 
Rs. 2,29,656, was collected by public subscription, towards 
the endowment of Professorships for teaching the English 
Language, and the Arts, Sciences, and Literature of Europe, 
to be denominated the Elphinstone Professorships. This 
sum afterwards accumulated to Rs. 4,43,901, and the interest 
of it is augmented by an annual subscription from Govern- 
ment of Rs. 22,000, 

In 1863, Cowasjee Jehanghier Readymoney, Esq., Justice 
of the Peace, Bombay, presented Government with one 
hundred thousand rupees towards erecting suitable College 
Buildings for Elphinstone College, to be called the <( Cowas- 
jee Jehanghier Buildings." 

In 1864, on account of the rise in the prices of building- 
materials and labour, Mr. Cowasjee Jehanghier added a 
second sum of one hundred thousand rupees to his former 



ELPHINSTONE COLLEGE. 231 

munificent donation* The Elphinstone College was remov- 
ed on the 20th of February 1871 to the Building on the 
Parel Road. 

The property and endowments of the Elphinstone College 
are under the guardianship of the Trustees of the Elphin- 
stone Funds. Present Trustees are Sir Mungaldass Nathoo- 
bhoy, Knight, C.S.I. , the Honourable Rao Saheb Vishva* 
nath Narayan Mandlik, C.S.I., and the Honourable Sorabji 
Shapurji Bengali. 

The following endowments are connected with the Elphin- 
stone College : — 

The West Scholarship Fund, subscribed in 1828, in honour 
of Chief Justice Sir Edward West. 

The Clare Scholarship Fund, subscribed in 1835, in honour 
of the Earl of Clare, Governor of Bombay. 

The Gaikavad Scholarship, established by His High- 
ness the Gaikavad in 1850. 

The Bell Prize Fund, subscribed in 1 848, as a testimonial 
to Professor John Bell of the Elphinstone Institution. 

The Sundarji Jivaji Prize Fund, established in 1842 by 
Bab&ji Sundarji in memory of his father. 

The Raja of Dhar's Prize Fund, given by the Raja of 
Dhar in 1853. 

The Ganpatrao Vithal Prize Fund, given in 1854 by 
Ganpatrao Vithal of Indore. 

The Nawab of Sacheen Prize Fund, given in April 1871 
by His Highness the Kawab of Sacheen in memory of his 
fourth son, Sidi Abdul Karim Khan. 

The Mountstuart Elphinstone Prize, founded 1874. 
Scholarships. 

The following Scholarships, each tenable for one year, 
are annually open for competition in the College : — 
Scholarships. 
A. — Senior Scholarships. 

For Languages 10 of Rs. 20 per mensem. 

For Mathematics 4 of Rs. 20 per mensem. 

For Natural Sciences 2 of Rs. 20 per mensem. 



232 EECOGNIZED INSTITUTIONS. 

B. — Junior Scholarships. 

1st Class 10 of Us. 15 per mensem. 

2nd Class 19 of Ks. 10 permensern. 

A certain number of Under-graduates who are unable to 
pay the College fee are admitted free. 

List of Principals, 

1845. John Harkness, M.A., LL.D. 
1862. Sir Alexander Grant, Bart., M.A. 
1866. Kyrle Mitford Chatfield, B.A. 
1874 William Wordsworth, B,A. 



1878. 

Principal. 

William Wordsworth, B. A., Oxon., Professor of Logic and Moral 
Philosophy. 

Professors. 

James Thomas Hathornthwaite, M.A., Cantab., Professor of 
Mathematics. 

Peter Peterson, M.A., Edin., B.A., Oxon., Professor of Oriental 
Languages. 

Edward Giles, B.A., Oxon., Professor of History and Political 
Economy (Acting Educational Inspector, Northern Division). 

Thomas Brown Kirkham, Professor of English Literature, 

Ramkrishna Gopal Bhandarkar, M.A., Bomb., Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Sanskrit. 

Mirza Hairat, Professor of Persian. 

Govind Vithal Kurkaray, B.A., Cantab., A cting Professor of 
History and Political Economy. 

Isadore Barnadotte Lyon, F.C.S., Professor of Chemistry. 



Bhimacharya bin Rambhat Zalakikar. 
Rajaram Shastri bin Ganesh Shastri Bodas. 

Dakshina Fellows. 
Seniors. 
(1) Dastur, Fardunji Mancherji, M.A. 

(1) Chancellor's Gold Medallist of 1876. 



ELPHINSTONE COLLEGE. 23e 

(2) Contractor, Kavasji Dadabhai, M.A. 

Juniors. 

(3) Agase, Dhondu Hari, B.A. (Librarian and Superintend- 

ent of Resident Students). 

(4) Bh andarkar, Vasudev Gopal, B.A. 

Honorary Fellows, 

Khaparde, Ganesh Shrikrishna, B.A. 

(5) Mudholkar, Rangnath Narsinh, B.A. 

Senior Scholars. 

Bhadbhade, Raghunath Gangadhar, B.A. ... Elph. Fund, 

(6) Dalai, Ratanji Mancherji, B.A Clare Fund. 

Dharamshi, Abdul Merali, B.A Elph. Fund. 

Dhruva, Harilal Harsadrai, B.A ,, 

Mudholkar, Rangnath Narsinh, B.A ,, 

(7) * Natu, Kashinath Gangadhar „ 

Sethna, Kavasji Bezanji, B.A Clare Fund. 

(8) Shahani, Dayaram Gidunial, B.A Elph, Fund. 

Junior Scholars. 

* Akhund, Alimuhammad Husain West Fund. 

* Bharucha, Hormasji Kerbadji Clare Fund. 

* Dave, Vithalji Keshavji West Fund. 

(9) * Divekar, Balvant Abaji Clare Fund. 

* Joglekar, Ramchandra Raoji West Fund. 

* Kumthekar, Mahadev Keshav ,, 

* Manerikar, Ganpat Sadashiv Clare Fund. 

* Mehd, Vaikunthrai Anandrai ,, 

* Modi, Girdharlal Bhanabhai West Fund. 

(10) * Natu, Trimbak Gangadhar Clare Fund. 

* Pandia, Krishnashankar Harishankar ,, 

* Rahurkar, Vaman Narayan ,, 

(2) Chancellor's Gold Medallist of 1877. 

(3) Duke of Edinburgh Fellow of 1876 ; Nawab of Sacheen Prizeman, 1876 ; 

Sundarji Jivaji Prizeman, 1876 ; Bhugwandass Purshotumdass Sanskrit 
Scholar, 1877 ; and Manockjee Limjee Gold Medallist, 1877. 

(4) Raja of Dhar Prizeman, 1876; Bell Prizeman, 1876; and Karsandas 

Mulji Prizeman, 1877. 

(5) Ganpatrao Vithal Prizeman, 1877. 

(6) Bell Prizeman, 1877. 

(7) Sunderji Jivaji Prizeman, 1877. 

(8) Mountstuart Elphinstone Prizeman, 1876 ; Hughlings Prizemen, 1876; 

Ellis Scholar, 1877 ; James Taylor Prizeman, 1877 ; and the Raja of 
Dhar Prizeman, 1877. 

(9) Berar Scholar. 

(10) Venayekrao Jugonnathji Sunskersett Sanskrit Scholar. 
* Passed P. A. Examination, 



234 RECOGNIZED INSTITUTIONS. 

(11) * Trivedi, Kamalashankar Pranshankar ...... Clare Fund. 

* Vania, Hoshaugji Barzorji West Fund. 

Anklesaria, Bamanji Kharshedji ,, 

Aria, Ardesir Dadabhai ,, 

(12) Bhandarkar, Shridhar Ramkrishna „ 

(13) Bucha, Bhupatrai Dayalji ,, 

Dhruva, Keshav Harsad ,, 

Doctor, Rastamji Dosabhai •,, 

Dvivedi, Manilal Nabhubhai ,, 

Hodivala, Edalji Behramji Clare Fund. 

(14) Jamadar, Yusafali Yakubkhan West Fund. 

Jokagar, Jametram Raghuram ,, 

Karmarkar, Govind Gopal ,, 

Merchant, Pestanji Dadabhai Gaekwar. 

(15) Samant, Hari Bamkrishna ,, 

Kangnekar, Naray an Atmaram West Fund. 

Vijayakar, Narayan Moroji ,, 

Dabir, Balvant Narayan Elph. Fund. 

Godbole, Sadashiv Mahadev ,, 

Jay avant, Ramchandra Bhaskar Clare Fund. 

Jog, Ramchandra Moreshvar , , 

Joshi, Narayan Damodar ,, 

Majmundar, Navnitram Ochhavram ,, 

Pandit, Vishvanath Nilkanth Elph. Fund. 

(12) Pitke, Gopal Ramchandra ,, 

Safre, Vishnu Vinayak Clare Fund. 

Singh, Kirthi ,, 

(16) Sule, Balkrishna Balvant ,, 

Taskar, Parshuram Balkrishna Elph. Fund. 

Taleyarkhan, Phirozshah Jehdngier Clare Fund. 

(17) Vakil, Rastamji Bamanshah ;.. Elph. Fund. 

(18) Vaidya, Chintaman Vindyak ,, 

Vaidya, Rastamji Manekji ,, 

University Scholar. 
Jugonnath Sunkersett Sanskrit Scholar. 
* Kulkarni, Balaji Hari. 

Jam Shri Vibhaji Scholar. 
Joshipara, Pranlal Kahandas. t 

(11) Mountstuart Elphinstone Prizeman, 1877. 

(12) Jugonnath Sunkersett Scholar. 

(13) Hehbert and LaTouche Scholar. 

(14) Baroda Scholar. 

(15) Alfred Scholar. 

(16) Berar Scholar. 

(17) Cowasjee Jehanghier Scholar. 

(18) Bai Maneckbai Byramjee Jeejeehhoy Prizeman, 1877. 
* Passed P. A. Examination. 



ELPHINSTONE COLLEGE, 235 

Government Exhibitioner. 
From Berar. 
Mandevdli, Hanmant Vireshvar. 

From Rdjdrdm High School, 
Gokhale, Vishvanath Ballal, 
Commoners. 

* Barve, Hari Mahddev. 

* Bhandare, Sadanand Trimbak. 

* Dali, Raghunath Sakhdrdm. 

* Dave, Ratirdm Durgdrdm. 

* Desaij Maneklal Sakarlal. 

(19) * Deshpande, Rdmchandra Anandrao. 

* Gbadidlli, Pestanji Mancherji. 

* Gavankar, Lakshuman Rdghobd. 

* Javeri, Bdldbhai Manchdram. 

* Joglekar, Krisbndji Mahddev. 

* Karandikar, Bdlkrishna Parshurdm, 

* Mebta, Vaikunthrdi Manmathrdm. 

* Modi, Chhaganldl Thakordas. 

* Nddkarni, Shivrdm Sadashiv. 

* Nagarkar, Rdmcbandra Ddji 

* Ndnjiani, Karamdli Rabim. 

* Pdtbak, Pandurang Shridhar. 

* Pdvri, Fardunji Palanji. 

* Phdtarpekar, Sbankar Rdmchandra. 

* Purani, Bdlkrishna Narbherdm. 

* Samsbi, Anant Venkatesh. 

* Sethnd, Pestanji Kuvarji. 

* Vakil, Mancbdsbankar Jivanram. 

* Vaidya, Bdlkrishna Ndrdyan. 

* Wadid, Frdmji Rastamji. 
Antid, Hormasji Jamshedji. 
Bhat, Parmdnand Mahdnand. 
Bhat, Pranshankar Narottam. 
Broker, Rdmdds Chhabildds. 
Chavbal, Mahddev Sitdrdm. 
Cbindi, Frdmroz Jehdngier. 
Chokhdvdld, Tbdkurdds Narottamdds. 
Cooper, Ndvroji Hormasji. 

Dange, Ganesh Visbnu. 
Daru, Harildl Tuljdrdm. 
Dastur, Dbanjisbdb Hormasji. 

* Passed F. A. Examination. 
(19) Berar Scholar. 



236 RECOGNIZED INSTITUTIONS. 

Dastur, Dorabji Pestanji. 
Dave, Kevalram Mavji. 
Dave, Shivshankar Tuljdshankar. 
Deshpdnde, Rdmchandra Malhar. 
Divatia, Narsinh Bholandth. 
Dubdsh, Kdvasji Dadabhai. 
Engineer, Kaikhosru Nasarvanji. 
Gandhi, Sakharam Govind. 
Gandhi, Dosabhai Behrdmjr 
Ghasvala, Sordbji Edalji. 
Ghodi, Chhaganldl Murlidhar. 
Jdbvdld, Pestanji Jivanji. 
Jayakar, Sundarrao Gajanan. 
Javeri, Pranlal Dvdrkddds. 
Joshi, Dattatraya Nilkanth. 
Judge, Jametram Ndndbhdi. 
Kangd, Manekji Dorabji. 
Khandekar, Gopdl Rdmchandra. 
Kharas, Ardesir Bezanji. 
Kola, Jamshedji Sorabji. 
Kothdre, Vindyak Ganpatrao. 
Lalkaka, Sorabji Jamshedji. 
Majamundar, Girdharlal Bapalal. 
Majamunddr, Chhaganlal Lallubhdi. 
Mantri, Jayaram Janardan. 
Marzban, Marzbdn Mancherji. 
Masalavala, Jamshedji Nanabhai. 
Masalavala, Mervanji Adarji, 
Mehta, Mugatldl Gokuldas. 
(18) Mehta, Samaldas Chhaganldl. 
Mehtd, Keshavlal Kashildl. 
Modi, Mdnekji Pestanji. 
Nddkarni, Mangesh Shantdppa, 

(18) Oza, Kalianrai Mahipatrdi. 
Oltikar, Hari Rdmchandra. 
Pandia, Chhaganlal Harilal. 
Patel, Jamshedji Manekji. 
Pendse, Narayan Vasudev. 

(19) Phaltankar, Rdmchandra Balvant. 
Phatak, Narayan Gopal. 

Rdje, Ndrdyan Gopal. 
Rdndde, Govind Balkrishna. 
Readymoney, Jehdngier Kdvasji. 
Sanzgire, Dhondu Morobd. 
Sethnd, Ardesir Kdvasji. 



(18) Sir Jasvantsingji Scholar. 

(19) Devas Scholar. 



ELPHINSTONE COLLEGE, 237 



Sethnd, Karsandas Gopaldas. 

(20) Soman, Dinkar Bhdskar. 
Sovani, Vinayak Krishna. 
Unvdld, Hormasji Frdrnji. 
Tata, Jamshedji Rastamji. 
Vaigankar, Vdman Vishrdm. 
Vijayakar, Nanaji Harichandra. 
Vijayakar, Yashvant Khanderdo. 
Wadia, Bamanji Sorabji. 

(21) Athavale, Rdmchandra Sakhdrdm. 
Bomboatvala, Dadabhai Adarji. 
Carvalho, Rudolph. 

Dave, Mulshankar Daydrdm. 
Desai, Gopaldas Gulabbhai. 
Desai, Vrajrdi Santukrai. 
Desai, Gopaldas Viharidds. 
Dugal, Bhdskar Rdmchandra. 

(22) Gavankar, Rdjdrdm Raghobd. 
Kapadia, Sorabji Frarnji. 

(23) Kelkar, Vasudev Balkrishna. 
Lam, Edalji Dinshdh, 
Madholkar, Shivram Venkatesh, 
Mehtd, Chunilal Jamnddds. 
Mehtd, Ndndbhdi Bhagubhdi. 
Mehta, Rastamji Mervanji. 
Mehta, Sdmaldds Bhagvdndds. 
Mehta, Sadashivram Narsirdm. 
Mehta, Vamanrdm Kapilrdm. 
Modi, Ratanji Edalji. 

Naik, Nagarji Ddydbhai. 
Nandvati, Hormasji Adarji. 
Pandit, Hariram Mulshankar. 
Pradhan, Vinayak Harishankar. 
Sariyd, Gokaldds Vithaldds. 
Shirgavkar, Rdmchandra Rdghobd. 
Taskar, Pestanji Kuvarji. 
Varlikar, Moreshvar Raoji. 

Tree Students. 

* Apte, Govind Shridhar. 

* Joglekar, Vasudev Rdmchandra. 

* Kaka, Navroji Behramji. 



(20) Eao Sir Pragmalji Scholar. 

(21) Berar Scholar. 

(22) David Sassoon Hebrew Scholar. 
123) Dharvad Scholar. 

^ * Passed P. A. Examination. 



238 RECOGNIZED INSTITUTIONS. 

Kelkar, Ganesh Pandurang. 
Chitnis, Dattaram Balvant. 
Khandekar* Kaghunath Gopal. 
Mehta, Naroshankar Devshankar. 
Athavankar, Anandrao Maugesh. 
Desai, Motilal Dalpatram. 
Kelkar, Hari Vaman. 



II.— DECCAN COLLEGE. 
(Recognized 1860. ) 

On the occupation of the Deccan by the British Govern- 
ment in 1818 it was found that a certain portion of the re- 
venue of the Maratha State had been yearly set apart for 
pensions and presents to Brahmans (Dakshina). To pre- 
vent hardship and disappointment, and to fulfil the im- 
plied obligations of the new rulers* the British Government 
continued these payments ; but as the pensions and allow- 
ances fell in, they resolved, while maintaining the same 
total expenditure, under the name of the Dakshina Fund, 
to devote a portion of it to a more permanently useful 
end, in the encouragement of such kind of learning as the 
Brahmans were willing to cultivate. With this view the 
Poona College was founded in 1821, as a Sanskrit College, 
exclusively for Brahmans. 

In 1837 some branches of Hindu learning were dropped; 
the study of the Vernacular and of English was introduced, 
and the College was opened to all classes, and after having 
been amalgamated with the English Schools in 1851 it 
arose in its present form in 1857, by a separation of the 
College division from the School division. From another 
portion of the Dakshina Fund, Dakshina Fellowships have 
been founded, of which three, viz., one Latin Readership, 
one Senior Fellowship, and one Junior Fellowship, are 
attached to this College. 

In 1863 Sir Jamsetjee Jeejeebhoy, Bart., offered to Gov- 
ernment the sum of one hundred thousand rupees to pro- 
vide suitable College Buildings for the Deccan College. 

In March 1868 the new Buildings were occupied, and the 
Government directed that the name, which had been Poona 
College, should henceforth be Deccan College. 

The following endowments are connected with the Dec- 
can College : — 



DECCAN COLLEGE. 239 

I. — Government. 

One Latin Readersnip, of Rs. 150 per mensem. 
One Senior Fellowship, of Rs. 100 per mensem. 
One. Junior Fellowship, of Rs. 75 per mensem. 

Scholarships. 
A. — Senior Scholarship. 
For Languages, 6, tenable for 1 Rg 2Q mensem> 

one year ) r 

For Mathematics, 2, tenable for") Eg 2Q mensemi 

one year ) r 

B. — Junior Scholarships' 

Eleven Junior Scholarships of the value of Rupees 10, 
and one of the value of Rupees 5 per mensem, tenable for 
one year. 

Junior Scholars further pay a reduced College fee of 
Rupees 3 per mensem, but Senior Scholars pay the full fee 
of Rupees 5 per mensem. 

II.— Private. 

Two Candy Scholarships of the value of Rupees 4 each : 
one for Marathi and one for Sanskrit. These Scholarships 
were founded in 1857 by some Native friends of Major 
Candy, some time Principal of this College, in memorial of 
his long services in the cause of Native literature and 
education. 

In the year 1877 a fund was raised by subscription 
among Bombay Civil Servants to perpetuate the memory 
of William Henry Havelock, some time Revenue Commis- 
sioner, S.D. The interest upon this fund is devoted to an 
annual prize awarded in September of each year. The 
prize is open to all students of the College of not more 
than three years' standing. 

List of Principals. 

1851. Major Thomas Candy. 
1857. Edwin Arnold, M.A. 
1860. William Allan Russell, M.A. 
1862. William Wordsworth, B.A. 
1874. R. G. Oxenham, M.A. 

1878. 

Principal. 
It. G. Oxenham, M.A., Oxon., Professor of English Literature, 



240 RECOGNIZED INSTITUTIONS. 

Professors. 

F. Kielhorn, Ph.D.,Leipsic, Professor of Oriental Languages. 

Rao Bahadur Kero Laxuman Chhatre, Professor of Mathematics. 

F. G. Selby, B.A., Oxon., Professor of Logic and Moral Philoso- 
phy. 

Khan Bahadur Dastur Hoshang Jamasp, Assistant Professor of 
Oriental Languages. 

Fellows. 
Kelkar, Damodar Ganesh M.A., Latin Reader. 
San j ana, Kavasji Jamshedji, B.A., Senior Dakshina Fellow. 
(1.) Apte, Vaman Shivram, B.A., Junior Dakshina Fellow. 
Superintendent of Resident Students. 
* (1) Gopal Ganesh Agarkar. 
Librarian. 
Gopal Malhar Purandhare. 
Sanskrit Teachers attached. 
Anant Shastri Pendharkar. 1st Assistant. 
Chintaman Shaatri Thathe, 2nd Assistant. 

Students. 
1, — Graduates. 

(1) Kelkar. Govind Narayan. 
(1) Khare, Daji Abaji. 

2. — Under-gruduates. 

(a) Senior Scholars. 

* Bhat, Shankar Bhalchandra. 

* Chavbal, Mahadev Bhaskar. 

* Dravid, Venkatesh Krishna. 

* Jatar, Bhaskar Yashvant. 

* Mirajkar, Raghavendra Shrinivas. 

(b) Junior Scholars. 

(4) Bhagvat, Balaji Abaji. 
Bhide, Vidiadhar Vaman. 
Betigiri, Raghavendra Bhojo. 
Dole", Mahadev Yashvant. 
Gole, Mahadev Shivram 
Hyam, Samuel. 
Modak, Gopal Trimbak. 
Pathak, Shripat Sitaram. 



(1) Candy Sanskrit Scholar, Senior Scholar, Caudy Marathi Scholar. 
(4) Jugonnath Sunkersett Sanskrit Scholars. 
* Passed F„ A. Examination. 



DECCAN COLLEGE. 241 



(4) Phadke, Ramchandra Dinkar. 
Sahasrabudhe? Gopal Balaji. 
Shukla, Narayan Gangadhar. 
Sohoni, Venkatesh Abaji . 

(c) Commoners. 

Adval, Saenna Chinnu. 
Agase, Keshav Janardan. 

(5) Agnihotri, Pandurang Sakharam. 
Aikin, John Charles. 

(5) Akotkar, Gopal Bapuji. 
Bapat, Dattatraya Sakharam. 
Bapat, Keshav Sakharam. 
Bengali, Shrikrishna Khanderao. 
Bengali, Trimbak Ganesh. 
Bhadbhade, Lakshuman Gangadhar, 
Barucha, Jivaji Kavasji 

Bhide, Krishnaji Narayan. 
Chhatre, Vasudev Vinayak. 

(6) Date, Krishnaji Siddeshvar. 
Desai, Ramchandra Vyasrao. 
Deuskar, Ramchandra Govind. 
Godbole, Nagnath Keshav. 
Godbole, Ramchandra Parshuram, 

(7) Godbole, Ramchandra Ballal- 
Gokhale, Gangadhar Sadashiv. 
Gokhale, Krishnaji Shivram. 
Jambhekar, Hari Bhimrao. 
Jog, Sadashiv Narhar. 
Joglekar, Keshav Ramchandra. 
Joglekar, Vasudev Daji. 

(8) Kalburgi, Virappa Rachappa. 
Kapse, Vasudev Trimbak. 
Karandikar, Venkatesh Trimbak. 
Kelkar, Hari Ganesh. 

Kopar, Narayan Venkatesh. 
(8) Lele, Vishnu Kashinath. 
j(7) Marathe, Trimbak Moreshvar 

Masurkar, Krishnaji Shrinivas, 

Mundle, Ramchandra Ganeah. 

Natu, Shank ar Anant. 

Palekar, Balkrishna Raghunath, 



(4) Jugonnath Sunkersett Sanskrit Scholar. 

(5) Berar Scholar. 

(6) Holkar Scholar. 

(7) Alfred Scholar for English, Kolhapur, 

(8) Hnbli Scholar. 



B 713— * 



242 RECOGNIZED INSTITUTIONS* 

(7) Pandit, Dattatraya Moreshvar. 

Paranjapye, Narhar Balkrishna, 

Patvardhan, Vishnu Anant. 

Phansalkar, Ramchandra Ballal, 

Phatak, Shripat Balkrishna. 

Ranade, Yashvant Nagesh. 

Sahasrabudhe, Narayan Ganesh, 
(3) Sane, Balkrishna Ramchandra. 

Saranjame, Shridhar Jagannath. 

Sathe, Moreshvar Anant. 

Vanvale, Sadashiv Rangnath. 

{d) Free Students. 
Datar, Shambhu Shankar. 
Natu, R&mchandra Raghunath. 
Puntambekar, Venkatesh Damodar. 
Upaaani, Lakshimikant Ramchandra. 



III. FREE GENERAL ASSEMBLY'S INSTITUTION", 
BOMBAY. 

(Recognized 1861.') 

This Institution arose out of an English School for 
Native youths, founded by the Bev. Dr. Wilson in 1832, and 
was originally dependent on local contributions. It was 
afterwards recognized in 1835 by the Church of Scotland, 
and in 1843 by the Free Church of Scotland, from which 
body it receives the greater part of its funds. The follow- 
ing endowments are attached to the Institution ; — 

Endowed Scholarships. 

One Fleming Scholarship Rs. 100 per annum. 

Nesbit (R.) Memorial Theological Scho- 
larship „ 120 per annum. 

Smyttan (G.) Memorial Scholarship . . . „ 60 per annum. 

Lang (W.) Scholarship „ 180 per annum. 

Miller (H.) do. ,, 100 per annum. 

Nesbit (R.) Memorial Literary Scholar- 
ship „ 60 per annum. 

St. Clair Jameson Memorial Scholarship,, 40 per annum. 

Four Fleming (Jas. N.) Nomination 

Scholarships, each „ 40 per annum. 



(7) Alfred Scholar for English, Kolhapur. 
(3) Passed F. E. A. 



FREE GENERAL ASSEMBLY'S INSTITUTION. 243 

Purvis (Col.) Scholarship ^ Rs. 62 per annum. 

Molesworth (J. T.) Scholarship „ 40 per annum. 

Davidson (D.) do. ,> 40 per annum, 

Endowed Prizes. 
The Wilson Prize (Gold Medal or Books). 

The Raja of Dhar Prize, 

The Campbell (A) Prize; ) ™ „ „*„. r 
The Murray Mitchell Prize, ( For P re P a ™tory 
The Bala Gopal Joshi Prize, j Classes, 

List of Principals. 

1832. The Rev. John Wilson, D.D., F.R,S. 

1876. The Rev. R. Stothert, M.A* 

1878. 
Principal. 

The Rev. R. Stothert, M.A., Professor of Logic and Moral 
Philosophy. 

Professors. 

The Rev. D. Mackichan, M.A., B.D., Professor of Mathematics 

and Natural Philosophy. 
The Rev. Buchanan Blake, M.A., B.D., Professor of History and 

Political Economy. 
The Rev. A. C. Grieve, Professor of English Literature. 
D Macdonald, M.B., CM., B. Sc, Professor of Physical Science. 
Narayan Venkaji Khot, Assistant Professor of Mathematics and 

Sanskrit. 

Teachers, attached. 

Mirza Musa Kowsar, Persian. 
Upasani Raoji Ramchandra, Sanskrit. 

Third-year Students. 

Sanjana, Mancherji Kharshedji. 
Paradkar, Vishnu Anant. 
Katrak, Hormasji Shapurji. 
Masani, Nasarvanji Kavasji. 
Daruvala, Jamshedji Edalji. 



244 RECOGNIZED INSTITUTIONS. 

Second-year Students. 

Chitald, Govind Venkatesh. 
Pradhdn, Sitaram Abajirao. 
Katrak, Mdnekji Shdpurji. 
Vakil, Shapurji Jehdngier. 
Mddan, Fardunji Shapurji. ' 
Sahasrabudhe, Vasudev Ganesh, 
Bddshdh, Barjorji Rastamji, 
DeSilva, J. B. 

Bhave, Purshottam Mor6shvar. 
Desdi, Rancchordji Rudarji, 
Agd, Rastam Meherbdn. 
Shroff, Maganldl Kahandas. 
Dhavle, Govind Mor^shvar. 
Ddruvdld, Ratanji Bastamji. 
Sattdvdld, Motildl Tribhuvandds. 
Desdi, Sadgun Desaibhai. 
Bdtlivdld, Rastamji Sorabji. 
Antia, Jamshedji Mervdnji. 
Wells, Devji Brijldl. 
Gore, Dhondu Narayan. 
Desai, Upkar Ajubhai. 
Joshi, Rdmchandra Pranshankar. 
Safi, Mangal Chhaganlal. 
Thakar, Hirji Bhagvanji. 
Sutdrid, Javerbhai Garbadbhai. 
Trivedi, Trikamlal Damodar. 

First year Students. 

Phatak, Vishnu Bhaskar. 

Dixon, Rama Mulji. 

Baria, Kavasji Edalji. 

Kath, Mulji Vasanji. 

Bhagat, Kanji Bhagvan. 

Mehta, Nagindds Damodardas. 

San j ana, Jehangier Barjorji. 

Taldti, Makanji Murdrji. 

Kapadia, Kharshedji Frdmji. 

Murdeshvarkar, Padmandth Manjundth, 

Kdpadid, Dhanjishdh Phirozshdh. 

Desdi, Guldbbhdi Lallubhdi. 

Rukha, Vasanji Kallidnji. 

Pardnjapy6, Hari Rdmchandra. 

Godbole, Nilkanth Trimbak, 

Munsif, Edalji Sordbshdh. 

Boyce, Mervdnji Rastamji. 



st. xavier's college, 245 



Mohil6, Hari Atmaram. 
Desai, Khushalbhai Ranchordji. 
Cooper, Jehangier Barjorji 
Peres, Francis George. 



IV. BOMBAY ST. XAVIER'S COLLEGE. 

(Recognized 1869.) 

St. Xavier's College owes its origin to the development 
and growth of St. Mary's Institution and of the European 
Roman Catholic Orphanage. In it Under-graduates may 
continue their University studies under the same advantages 
as those enjoyed at St Mary's High School. 

The site of the College was, granted by Government in 
1867. The funds were supplied chiefly from private sources, 
Government contributing a grant of Rs. 61,368. 

There are two endowed Scholarships connected with the 
College : — 

(a). The Mission Scholarship, of Rs. 25 per mensem, in 
favour of that boarder of St. Mary's Institution who 
passes Matriculation with the highest number of marks 
and continues his studies at St. Xavier's College, if he 
be not otherwise provided for. 

(6) The Cowasjee Jehanghier Scholarship for Portu- 
guese Under-graduates, of the annual value of Rs, 125, 
tenable for two years. It is awarded by competition 
in an English Essay. The competition takes place in 
the month of January. 



1878. 
Rector. 
The Rev. E, de Vos, S. J., Professor of Latin. 

Professors. 
The Rev. H. Bochum, S.J., Professor of Philosophy. 
The Rev. F. Dreckmann, S. J., Professor of Mathematics and 

Natural Philosophy. 
The Rev. J. Egger, S. J., Professor of History. 
The Rev, J. Hamilton, S.J., Professor of English Literature. 
The Rev. C. Harzheim, S.J., Professor of Latin. 
The Rev. C. Lindmann, S. J., Professor of Mathematics, Che- 

mistry, History, and Persian. 
The Rev. J. Martin, S. J., Professor of Sanskrit. 

B 713— w* 



246 KECOGNIZED INSTITUTIONS. 

The Rev. R. Rive, S.J. , Professor of Mathematics. 
The Rev. J. Willy, S. J., D.D., Professor of Latin. 
Mirza Musa Kowsar, Professor of Persian. 
Rajaram Ramkrishna Bhagvat, Professor of Sanskrit 

Students. 

Under-graduates, 

Seniors^ 

f 

* Am. Andrew Zuzarte. 

*+ Henry Frank O'Shanahan, - 

* Hirji PestaniWadia. 

* Michael Dunn. 

* Nagesh Vishvanath Pai. 

* Narayan Lakshuman Mankar. 

* Ramrao Venkaji Dvigikar. 
Bapuji Palanji Doctor. 
Dosabhai Behramji jMehta. 
Pharashram Ratanram Vakilna. 
Gajanan Purshottam Kirtikar. 
Ganpatrao Kashinath Dhairyavan. 
Jijibhai Pestanji Mistri. 
Kaikhosru Ardesir Munshi, 

(1) Lewis Gomes. 

Nasarvanji Kavasji Kanga. 

Nasarvanji Framji Mirjd. 
(1) Pascoal Gracias. 

Rastam Kharshedji Cama. 

Sorabji Manekji Kanga. 

Temulji Navroji Sanjana. 

Tribhuvandas Mangaldas Setna. 

Tribhuvandas Narottamdas Malvi, 

Venkatesh Lakshuman Ugrankar, 
i 

Juniors. 

Bamanji Dinshahji Petit. 
Braz de Monte. 

Kharshedji Hormasji Dadisett. 
Dvarkanath Rughunath Khote\ 
Frank Charles Pereira. 
Jamshedji Barjorji Doctor. 
Jehangier Kharshedji Cama. 
Jehangier Mancherji Bilimoria. 
Mangeah Sadashiv Dalvi. 
Navroji Kharshedji Allbless. 

* Passed E. A. Examination. 

+ The JIughlings Prize. 

( ) sir Cowasjee Jehanghier Portuguese Scholar, 



GOVERNMENT LAW SCHOOL. 247 

V. GOVERNMENT LAW SCHOOL. 

(Recognized 1860.) 

The foundation of this institution is due to a subscription 
which was raised by the inhabitants of Bombay in the 
month of November 1852, on the eve of the departure from 
India of Sir Thomas Erskine Perry, Knight, Chief Justice, 
who had been for nearly nine years President of the Board 
of Education, to found a Professorship of Jurisprudence, as 
a memorial of his long connection with both law and educa- 
tion in India. 

This endowment yields a monthly income of Rs. 169, to 
which Government contribute a subsidy, which was fixed 
in 1856 at Rs. 100 per mensem, the aggregate being the 
stipend of the Perry Professor of Jurisprudence. Govern- 
ment also contributes Rs. 600 per mensem for the mainte- 
nance of two Professorships of Law. 

Lectures are delivered on the following subjects : — 
I. Jurisprudence and the Roman Civil Law. 
II. Personal Rights and Status and the Law of Succession. 

III. The Law of Property, Contracts, and Torts. 

IV. The Law of Evidence, of Crimes, and of Procedure, 

Civil and Criminal. 



1878. 

Professors. 

Edward Tyrrell Leith, LL.M., Barrister-at-Law, Government 
Professor of Law. 

William C. Webb, Esq., Barrister-at-Law, Government Pro- 
fessor of Law. 

James Jardine, M.A., Barrister-at-Law, Perry Professor of 
Jurisprudence. 

Senior Law Students. 

(1) Sethna, Kavasji Bezanji, B.A. 

Bhadbhade, Raghunath Gangadhar, B.A. 



(1) free Student. 



248 RECOGNIZED INSTITUTIONS. 



Dhruva, Harildl Harsadrdi, B.A. 

Gandhi, Jivaji Dinshdhji, B.A. 

Jambusaria, Bezanji Manekji, B.A. 

Dhdrap, Ndrdyan Krishna, B.A. 

Tripdthi, Govardhandds Mahadevdas, B.A. 

Dalai, Tribhuvandds Lakshumandas, B.A. 

Upasani, Shridhar Balkrishna, B.A. 

Rao, Ganpat Saddshiv, M.A. 

Mirza, Abbas Allibeg, B.A. 

Ovlekar Moreshvar Narayan, B.A. 

Bhandarkar Vdsudev Gopal, B.A. 

Kothdre Gajanan Bdpuji, B.A. 

Gunjikar Ganesh Bhikdji, B.A. 

Tilak, Bal Gangddhar, B.A. 

Kathavate, Manohar Vishnu, B.A. 

Mule, Krishnaji Sadashiv, B.A. 

Contractor, Kavasji Dadabhai, M.A. 

Sarangpani, Krishnaji Vindyak, B.A. 

Gokhale, Krishnaji Vishnu, B.A. 

Duncan, Thomas, M.A. 

Kanga, Jamshedji Behrdmji, B.A. 

Wadia, Frdmji Rastamji, B.A. 

Deshpande, Bhikaji Anandrao. 

Mehd, Vaikunthrai Anandrai. 
(1) Dave\ Ratiram Durgaram. 
(1) Joglekar, Rdmchandra Raoji. 

( 1 ) Pathak, Pandurang Shridhar. 

II. — Junior Law Students. 

(2) * Dastur, Fardunji Mancherji, M.A. 

* Rowe, Paul Valentine, B.A. 

* Pajnigara, Navroji Mervanji, B.A. 

* Modi, Jivaji Jamshedji, B.A. 

* Rele, Gangaram Bapsoba, B.A. 

* Chanddvadkar, Ndrdyan Ganesh, B. A. 

* Wagle, Shivram Sitaram, B.A. 

* Pandit, Ghanashdm Narayan, B.A. 

* Gimi, Ratanji Mancherji, B.A. 

* Pavgi, Raoji Bhavdnrdo. 

* Kdnitkar, Govind Vdsudev, B.A. 

* Bhdtavadekar, Vishnu Krishna, B.A. 

* Mudholkar, Rangndth Narsinh, B.A. 

* Bengeri, Raghvaendra Pdndurang, B.A. 

* Barve, Hari Mahddev. 



* Passed the Jurisprudence Ex aminatiozi. 

(1) Free Student. 

(2) Perry Professor's Prizeman. 



GOVERNMENT LAW SCHOOL. 249 

) * Natu, Kashinath Gangadhar. 

) * Natu, Trimbak Gangadhar. 

) * Kumthekar, Mahadev Keshav. 

) * Phatarpekar, Shankar Ramchandra. 

) * Kulkarni, Balaji Hari. 

* Pandia, Chhaganlal Murlidhar. 

* Jamadar, Yusafalli Yakubkhan. 

* Gavankar, Lakshuman Raghoba. 

* Divekar, Balvant Abaji. 

* Desai, Sakarlal Durgaram. 

* Ahmed, Alimuhammad Husainali. 

* Setna, Ardesir Kavasji. 

* Desai, Maneklal Sakarlal. 

* Davar, Nanabhai Framji. 

* Munshi, Nasarvanji Kavasji. 

* Kaka, Navroji Behramji. 

* Javeri, Balabhai Mancnaram. 

* Nanjiani, Karimali Rahim. 

* Khot, Anant Venkatesh. 

(3) * Kanga, Fardunji Mancherji. 

III. — Candidates for the Pleaders' Examination. 

Wadia, Bamanji Framji. 
Davar, Ardesir Pestaiiji. 
Munshi, Kaikhosru Ardesir. 
Seth, Tulsidas Manmohandas. 
Talayarkhan, Phirozshah Pestanji. 
+ Jamshedji Nasarvanji. 
Kurlavala, H. K. 

IV. — Candidates, Law Students. 

Contractor, Kharshedji Nasarvanji, B.A. 
Dalai, Ratanji Mancherji, B.A. 
Master, Framji Bamanji, B.A. 
Kelkar, Govind Narayan, B.A. 
Khare, Daji Abaji, B.A. 
Vad, Ganesh Chimnaji, B.A. 
Bhagvat, Dattatraya Vishnu, B.A. 
Marathe, Krishnaji Sadashiv, B.A. 
Chhatre, Nilkanth Vinayak, B.A., L.C.E. 
Doctor, Rastamji Dosabhai. 
(1) Bharucha, Hormasji Kharshedji. 
Vania, Hoshangji Barzorji. 



* Passed the Jurisprudence Examination of 1877. 

t 8urname not known. 

(1) Free Student 

(.i) Prize awarded for proficiency in Jurisprudence Examination of 1877, 



250 RECOGNIZED INSTITUTIONS- 



Vakil, Manchhdshankar Jivanrdm. 

Bativala, Rastamji Sordbji. 

Malvi, Tribhuvandas Narottamdds. 

Kdngd, Sordbji Mdnekji. 

Wadia, Hirji Pestanji, 

Kdngd, Mdnekji Dorabji. 

Dungdji, Ddrdshdh Jamshedji. 

Mdnkar, Narayan Lakshuman. 

Nagarkar, Rdmchandra Daji, 

Modi, Manekji Pestanji. 

Vaidya, Rastamji Manekji. 

Ghodi, Chhaganlal Murlidhar. 

Wells, Devji Brijlal. 

Desdi, Upkar Ajubhdi. 

Dabir, Balvant Narayan. 

Ranade, Govind Bdlkrishna. 

Bhat, Purnanand Mahanand. 

Jayvant, Ramchandra Bhaskar. 

Munshi, Motilal Mugatlal. 

Dave. Mulshankar Daydrdm. 
(1) Manerikar, Ganpat Sadashiv. 
(1) Rahurkar, Vaman Narayan. 

Athale, Rdmkrishna Sakhdram, 

Shirgavkar, Ramchandra Raghunath. 

Purandhare, Khanderdo Vithal. 

Naik, Nagarji Ddydbhdi. 

Karmarkar, Hari Ganesh. 

Paranjapye, Baldji Rdmchandra. 
(1) Deshpande, Rdmchandra Ndrdyan. 
(1) Kelkar, Ganesh Pandurang. 

Dugal, Bhaskar Ramchandra. 

Chitale, Govind Venkatesh. 
(1) Karandikar, Balkrishna Parshurdm. 

Gavankar, Rdjdrdm Rdghobd. 

Dalvi, Mangesh Sadashiv. 

Desdi, Gopdldds Viharidas. 

Mehtd, Narushankar Devshankar. 

Pandit, Vishvanath Nilkant. 

Sule, Bdlkrishna Balvant. 

Godbole, Sadashiv Mahddev. 

Joshi, Ndrdyan Ddmodar. 

Mehtd, Vdmanrdm Kapilrdm. 

Pitke, Gopdl Rdmchandra. 

Taskar, Parashrdm Bdlkrishna. 

Ldlkdkd, Sordbji Jamshedji. 



(1) Free Student. 



GRANT MEDICAL COLLEGE. 251 

VI. GRANT MEDICAL COLLEGE. 

(Recognized 1860.) 

This College was established in the year 1845, under the 
name of the Grant Medical College, as a tribute to the 
memory of the late Sir Robert Grant, Governor of Bombay, 
with whom the system of instruction pursued in it origi- 
nated. The object of its establishment is " to impart, 
through a scientific system, the benefit of medical instruc- 
tion to the Natives of Western India." A moiety of the 
cost of the building was defrayed by Sir Robert Grant's 
friends, the remainder by Government. The funds for the 
support of the College, with the exception of certain en- 
dowments for the encouragement of deserving students, 
are contributed by Government. 

The College is under the immediate control of a Principal, 
who is subordinate to the Director of Public Instruction. 
Lectures are delivered in the English language on every 
branch of Medical Science by Professors, who are generally 
officers on the Bombay Medical Establishment. 

There is also attached to the College a Secondary School 
for the instruction of young men in Medical Science through 
the Marathi and Gujarathi languages. The Teachers are 
Graduates of the College and Licentiates of Medicine of the 
University of Bombay. Clinical and practical instruction 
is imparted in the Jamsetjee Jeejeebhoy Hospital, which 
contains 350 beds, and has attached (a) an Obstetric Insti- 
tution with 30 beds ; (&) an Ophthalmic Hospital (Cowasjee 
Jehanghier Ophthalmic Hospital) with 60 beds ; (c) a Hos- 
pital for incurables, built by the Sir Jamsetjee Jeejeebhoy 
family, containing 40 beds. There are also two detached 
buildings, each with 20 beds, for the treatment of persons 
suffering from Contagious Diseases. 

The students are arranged in three classes : — 

1. Graduates and Under-graduates of the University of 
Bombay, who are educated through the English language 
for Medical Degrees. 

2. Members of the European Branch of the Government 
Medical Subordinate Department, who are educated through 
$he English language for the grade of Apothecary. 



252 RECOGNIZED INSTITUTIONS. 

3. Members of the Native Branch of the Government 
Medical Subordinate Department, and candidates from va- 
rious Anglo- Vernacular Schools of the Presidency and 
Mofussil, who are educated through the Marathi and Guja- 
rathi languages for the grade of Hospital Assistant. 

The College possesses the following endowments : — 

The Farish, Carnac, Anderson, Eeid, McLennan, Jam- 
khandy, Cowasjee Jehanghier Readymoney, Mungaldas 
Nathoobhoy, Byramjee Jeejeebhoy, and Keshavji Naik 
Scholarships and Medal Funds ; the Sir Jamsetjee Jejee- 
bhoy Medical Book Fund, Prize Fund, and Gold Medal 
Fund ; Sir J. P. Willoughby, His Highness the Gaikavad 
of Baroda, andDinshah Manekji Petit Book Funds ; Hema- 
bhoy Vakatchand Medal Fund, and Heerjeebhoy Nursingjee 
Prize Fund ; the Burnes and Arnott Medals. 

The aggregate sum on account of these endowments, 
amounting to Rs. 1,17,800, is lodged in the Government 
Treasury 

Formerly the College conferred upon its students a Dip- 
loma or License to practice Medicine, and the designation 
" Graduate of Grant Medical College." There are at the 
present time fifty such Graduates, who either are engaged 
in the private practice of their profession or are in the 
service of Government. Upon the establishment of the 
University of Bombay, the College ceased to grant diplomas, 
and became affiliated to the University as a College for 
medical education. 



List of Principals. 

1845. Charles Morehead, M.D., F.R.C.P. 
1860. John Peet. M.D., F.R.C.P. 
1865. Herbert John Giraud, M.D. 

1865. Robert Haines, M.B. 

1866. William Guyer Hunter, M.D., F.R.C.P. 
1876. H. Cook, M.D., F.R.G.S., F.G.S., F.M.S. 



1878. 
Principal 
H. Cook, M.D.,F.R.G.S., F.G.S., F.M.S., Professor of Medi 
cine and Clinical Medicine and Hygiene. 



GRANT MEDICAL COLLEGE. 253 

Professors. 

A. N. Hojel, L.K. and Q.C.P.I., Professor of Physiology. 

J. T. Denison-Mackenzie, M.B., Professor of Surgery and Clinical 
Surgery. {Europe.) 

H. J. Blanc, M.D., Acting Professor of Surgery and Clinical 
Surgery. 

W. Dymock, B.A., Professor of Materia Medica. 

I. B. Lyon, F.C.S., Professor of Chemistry and Medical Juris- 
prudence . 

W. Gray, M.B., Professor of Botany. 

J. Arnott, M.D., CM., Professor of Pathology. 

W- F. Knapp, M.R.C.S., Professor of Anatomy and Curator of 
the Museum. 

G. A. Maconachie, M.D., Professor of Ophthalmic Medicine and 
Surgery and Comparative Anatomy. 

A. H. Hughes, M.D., Professor of Midwifery and Diseases of 
Women and Children. 

Anna Mor6shvar Kunte, B.A., M.D., Demonstrator of Anatomy. 

Teachers to the Mardthi Vernacular Class. 

Bhikaji Amrit ChobS, G.G.M.C., Teacher of Anatomy and Phy- 
siology. 

Sakharam Arjun Ravut, L.M ., Teacher of Medicine and Mid- 
wifery. 

Gopal Shivram Vaidya, L.M., Teacher of Surgery and Medical 
Jurisprudence. 

Shantaram Vithal Sanzgir<§, L.M., Teacher of Chemistry and 
Materia Medica. 

TeacJiers to the Oujardthi Vernacular Class. 

Dhirajram Dalpatram, G.G.M.C, Teacher of Medicine and 

Materia Medica. 
Kaikhosru Rastamji Vikaji, L.M., Teacher of Chemistry and 

Medical Jurisprudence. 
Edalji Nasarvanji, G.G.M.C, Teacher of Surgery and Midwifery. 

Senior Scholars. 

*t Nicholas DeAlvares Foundations. 

*t Chunilal Govardhandas Gunderia 

*t Amador Bocarro 

*+ Krishnarao Vishvandth Dhurandhar 

* Sorabji Dosabhai Nadarshah 

*t Edalji Manekji Damla 

*f Ramchandra Gangddhar Talvalkar 

*f Jamshedji Kharshedji Kdnga 

*t Kashinath Krishna Bhende 



* Passed F. M. & S. Examination, 
t Free Student. 



b713-v 



254 



RECOGNIZED INSTITUTIONS, 



*f Hormasji Behramji Doctor 
Vishvasrao Bdldji Jayakar 

*+ Jose Tertulliano De Lima ... 

■ Narayan Venkatchelam Mudliar . . 
More"sh var Gopalrao Deshmukh . . 

* Govind Venkaji Khot 

Dhanjibhai Barjorji Doctor 

* Ganesh Krishna Garde 

' Rastamji Hormasji Cama 

J. A. Simoens 

*t Sorabji Fardunji Gazdar 

*t Dadabhai Kharshedji Ravitna 

* Manekshah Jamshedji Kelavala .. 

* Vishnu Gopal Apte 

* Shavakshah Sorabji Tarapurvala.. 

* Bhikaji Jivaji Damnia 

* Edalji Sorabji Chinai 

* Mervanji Dhanjibhai Karanjia .. 

* Jamnadas Premchand Nanavati .. 
*t Vithaldas Manordas Broker 

* Hormasji Mervanji Hakim 
Edalji Behramji Forbes 

* Hormasji Navroji Contractor 
Hormasji Dosabhai Pesikaka 

* Dosabhai Ardesir Choksi 

*+ Vithal Vishnu Gokhale, M.A. .. 

* Michael A. Rozario... 

* Kaikhosru Sorabji Engineer 

* Dhanjibhai Rastamji Wadia 

Sadashiv Vaman Kane 

Mervanji Pestanji Kharegat, B. A. 

* Palanji Hormasji Dadachanji 
*t Jehangier Kharshedji Daji 

Nanabhai Kuvarji Modi 

* Jehangier Pestanji Wadia 

* Mervanji Navroji Gandevia 

* Rastamji Jamshedji Kapadia 

* Vishnu Jagannath Shirgavkar 

* J. V. Nazareth 

* Edalji Kavasji Tukina 

* Govindrao Bhau Prabhakar 

* Phirozshah Mervanji Hakim 

* Kavasji Edalji Dadachanji 

* Pedro Lisboa 

* Chunilal Ghelabhai Desai 



.Farish. 

Farish and Govern- 
ment Exhibition, 
. Carnac. 
.Reid. 
.Anderson, 



...Alfred. 



.Farish. 

.Carnac. 

.Farish. 

,.Reid. 

.Anderson. 



* Passed F. M. & S, Examination. 



t Free Student. 



GRANT MEDICAL COLLEGE- 



255 



Junior Sckolars. 

$■ Hermenegildo DeSa 

Edalji Dorabji Patel 

George Thomas Webb 

Edalji Eastamji Dadachanji ... , 

Damodar Raghunath Dhume 

Dadabhai Pestanji Banaji 

Nadarshah Dadabhai Bhedvar 
Phirozshak Barj or ji Cooper... 
Surajlal Mathuradas Davlatjada ... 
Kaikhosru Edalji Doctor ... 

t Shapurji Eastamji Kanga 

f Nasarvanji Kharshedji Kurlavala ... 
f Jehangier Manekji Penti 

Hormas ji Nasarvan j i Servai 

Jehangier Kharshedji Sukhia 

Hormasji Eastamji Modi 

Hormasji Jamshedji Servai 

Framroz Ardesir Mus 

Daniel Conceigao Luis 

Vithalrao Pandurang Mh&tre 

Sundar Atmaram Talpade 

Nilkanth Dayabhai Chhatrapati ... 

Sorabji Nasarvanji Abadan 

Sakharam Baghoba Babre 

t Mervanji Dadabhai Mistri 

+ Acaeio Gabriel Viegas 

Barjorji Hormasji Dantra 

Vithal Balkrishna Joshi 

Kavasji Pestanji Bharucha 

i Shapurji Aspandiarji Kapadia 

Dadabhai Dinshah Bod 

Kharshedji Behramji Hatiram 

Ganpatrao Sadashiv Soneji 

Narayan Vinayak Chhatre, B.A. ... 



.Sind Exhibition. 

.Government Exhibi- 
tion, 



.Government Exhibi- 
tion,, 



Hormasji Edalji Banat 
aruti Single 



Davlat Marl 



Jehangier Jamshedji Lilawala 
Dinshah Bamanji Master . . . 
Eastamji Dinshah Gandi ... 
Framji Edalji Madan 
Dorabji Hormasji Baria 



.Government Exhibi- 
tion. 
..Anderson. 
..Farish & Govern- 
ment Exhibition. 
..Anderson. 
..Carnac. 
..Carnac 



t Free Student. 



256 



RECOGNIZED INSTITUTIONS. 



+ Nanabhai Rastamji Umrigar 

t Sorabji Kavasji Paskol 

Dhondu Apaj i Patvardhan 

+ Sorabji Rastamji Boyce 

+ Vinayak Govind Gidha 

t Michael De Quadros 

Rastamji Nasarvanji Laskari 
Keshav Gopal Kamle 

Phirozshah Palanji Mulan ... 

Ratanji Sorabji Nanji 

Hormasji Sorabji Daruvala 

Frederick Maidment 

Dadabhai Sorabji Shroff 

Dhanjibhai Hirjibhai Patel. . . 

Joseph Collaco 

Diago J. Pinto 

E. M. Alvares 

Frederick Hannah 

* William Corkery 

Solomon Abraham Erulkar . 
Rastamji Kharshedji Vacha 

A. F. Fernandes 

Framji Dorabji Divechd 

Jehangier Bamanji Dubash 

Kaikhosru Ratan j i Divecha 

Jamshedji Pochaji Pocha 

Mervanji Kuvarji BharucM 
Kharshedji Navroji Sahiyar 

F. Henriques. 

f Dinshah Hormasji Motiv&la 

Pestanji Bhikaj i Narim an . . . 
Anubhai Mahipatram Nilkanth 
Maganlal Umiashankar Bhat 

Maurice Jones 

f Sorabji Manekji Kaka 

Ardesir Dosabhai Modi 

Chhaganlal Gulabdas Kaji 

Fakir ji Ratan ji Bonesetter ... 

Navroji Bamanji Gandevia 

Lakshuman Bachaji Dhargalkar ... 
Bhovanishankar Balkrishna Dadarkar 

Barjorji Sorabji Shroff 

D. A. De Monte 

Sorabj i Ratanj i Coachman 



.Government Exhi- 
bition. 



.Indore State Scho- 
larship. 






...Government. 

Do. 

...Govt. Exhibition. 
...Government. 
...Government. 

..Government. 



Passed the F.M. & S. Examination + Free Student. 



GRANT MEDICAL COLLEGE. 



257 



Atmaram Vasudev Velkar 

Dinshah Jivaji Edalbehramnd 

Ardesir Hormasji Sethna 

Mervanji Dadabhai Merchant 

f Govind Mulji Dixon 

Jamshedji Bhikaji Unvald 

Thomas H. Acquino... 

Govindas Kalliandas Khadepav 
Tuljaram Ghunilal Khandvala 
Shriram Vasudev Athale" 

C. J. Rodrigues 

Framji Manekji Amlia 

Behramji Hormasji Nanavati 

G. Margenont 

T Kharshedji Santukji Santuk 

Hirachand Khushalchand Javeri . . . 

Vythmatha Anantram Shastri, B.A. 
T P. S. Achutaram 

Vithalrao Vishvanath Pathankar . . . 
T Krishna Sakharam Pednekar 

John Bocarro ... 

John Poyntz 

E. H. Brown 

Anantrai Nathji Mehta , 

Mahipatram Govindram Mehtd 

Dosabhai Hormasji Katrak... 
Nadarshah Hormasji Sukhia 
J. F. Mirza 



Vishnu Mahadev Namjoshi 

Nanabhai Navroji Katrak 

JLastamji Palanji Kutar 

BLastamji Dhanjibhai Sethna, B.A. 

Shaik Ahmed Shaik Imam 

Nasarvanji Framji Bansha 

Kavasji Dadabhai Contractor, M. A, 

J. A. Pinto 

F. V. Albino DeSouza 

Dvarkanath Bhau Lad 

Hiralal Manilal Dhru 

Shridhar Sakharam Barve 

Dadabhai Kavasji Darbari ... 



.Government Exhi- 
bition. 



..Government. 

.Government Exhi- 
bition. 

, . Government. 

..Jamkhandi. 

..Sir C. Jehanghier & 
Sir Jasvantsingji, 

..Government. 

..Government Exhi- 
bition and Sind 
Exhibition. 

.Government. 
Sir C. Jehangbier. 



.Government. 



t Free Student, 



713 — v* 



258 EECOGNIZED INSTITUTIONS. 

VII. POONA CIVIL ENGINEERING COLLEGE. 

(Recognized 1865.) 

The Poona Civil Engineering College arose out of a 
school established in Poona in 1854 by Government, at the 
suggestion of Lieut. -Colonel (now Major-General) Walter 
Scott, Bombay Engineers, for the purpose of educating 
Subordinates for the Public Works Department. 

The College is under the control of the Principal, who is 
subordinate to the Director of Public Instruction. 

The College is divided into three Departments : — 

1. Matriculated Students of the University of Bombay, 
who are educated through the English language for Uni- 
versity Degrees in Civil Engineering. 

2. Students, who are educated through the medium of 
the English language up to the standard required for quali- 
fication as Overseers. 

3. Vernacular students, who prosecute their studies in 
the College and the Workshops, attached to it, with the 
object of becoming educated Maistries. 

Attached to the College are workshops where practical 
instruction is conveyed to the students, and where work of 
various kinds is executed for Government and the Public. 

In July 1863, Cowasjee Jehanghier Readymoney, Esquire, 
offered to Government the sum of Rupees 50,000 to assist 
in the erection of suitable Buildings for the College. The 
foundation-stone was laid by His Excellency Sir Bartle 
Frere on the 5th August 1865. 

Fellowships. 

Four Fellowships of Rs. 25, each tenablejf or one year, are 
attached to the College. 

Scholarships. 

The following Scholarships, each tenable for one year, are 
annually open for competition : — 

1 of Rs. 15 per mensem. 
1 » 12 
3 „ 10 



POONA CIVIL ENGINEERING COLLEGE. 259 

5 of Rs. 8 per mensem. 

3 5J ' » 

4 „ 6 „ 
10 „ 5 
2 „ 4 
2 5 j 3 „ 

1 McDougall Scholarship of Rs. 6 per mensem. 
1 Frere Scholarship of „ 25 „ 

McDougall Scholarship. 

On the retirement from India of the Rev. James McDougall 
in 1862, a subscription was raised by the ex- Students of the 
Poona Civil Engineering College for the purpose of perpetu- 
ating in the then school the name of its former Principal. 
A sum of Rupees 1,300 was subscribed, and from the inter- 
est accruing from this sum the amount of Rupees 72 is placed 
annually at the disposal of the Principal, to be awarded as 
a Scholarship to the most deserving student. 

Frere Scholarship. 

At a meeting of the Native inhabitants of Poona held on 
11th November 1866, Khan Bahadur Padamji Pestanji pre- 
siding, it was resolved — That, in order to perpetuate in 
Poona the memory of His Excellency Sir Bartle H.E. Frere, 
a fund be raised, and a Scholarship in connection with His 
Excellency's name be established in the Poona Civil Engi- 
neering College. This Scholarship, value Rupees 25 per 
mensem, is tenable for one year, and will be conferred on 
that student who shall have obtained most marks in the 
preceding First Examination in Civil Engineering, provided 
that he shall not at the same time hold a Fellowship or 
Scholarship in any College affiliated to the University. 

List of Principals. 

1854. The Rev. James McDougall. 

1857. Henry Coke, M.A. 

1859. Captain G. Close, R. E. 

1864. Captain H. Wilkins, R.E. 

1864. Theodore Cooke, M.A., M.I., LL.D., F.G.S. 



260 RECOGNIZED INSTITUTIONS. 

1878. 
Principal. 
Theodore Cooke, M.A., M.I., LL.D., F.G.S. 

Professors and Teachers. 

Samuel Cooke, M.A.,L.C.E„ F.R.G.SJ., Professor of Chemis- 
try and Geology {on Furlough). 

James Scorgie, F.C.S., Professor of Mechanism and Applied 
Sciences. 

Rao Bahadur Daji Nilkanth Nagarkar, Acting Professor of 
Chemistry and Geology. 

Balaji Bapuji Sane, B.A., L.C.E., Acting Professor of Mathe- 
matics and Civil Engineering. 

H. M. Page, Acting Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

R. V. A. Dhairyavan, Drawing Master. 

Prabhakar Gangadhar Bhide", L.C.E., Head Teacher of the 
Maistry Class. 

Martand Ganesh Panshe, Senior Assistant Teacher of Maistry 
Class. 

Martin Amor, Junior Assistant Teacher of Maistry Class. 

Robert Royal, Superintendent of Mechanical School. 

Fellows. 

* C. W. Dudley. 

* Gopal Vishvambhar Gayatonde. 

* F. P. Ribeiro. 

* Dinanath Hazra. 

Frere Scholar. 
Rudrapa Virbasappa Bilgi. 
Librarian. 
Balvant Vin&yak Gokhale. 

Under-graduates holding Scholarships. 
Third-year Students. 

* Vithal Mahadev Gokhale. 

* Haripada Mitra. 

Second-year Students. 

Bhatnath Chakrabati. 
Manekji Sheriarji Barocha. 
Balaji Gangadhar Moharir. 

* Passed the F. C. E. Examination. 



POONA CIVIL ENGINEERING COLLEGE. 261 

Hiraji Ndnabhai Spencer. 
Kekobad Hormasji Rdo. 

First-year Students. 

Keshav Hari Gdnu. 
Ibrahim Shaikddud Ahmadi. 
Kdshindth Shriram Bodas. 
Santappd Santayd Hatyangdikar. 
Dorabji Temulji Pavri. 
Kavasji Dddabhdi Kanga. 
Kasanji Ranchhodji Naik. 

Under-graduates not holding Scholarships, 
Third-year Students. 

* Gulabbhai Kanthadji Desdi. 

* T. A. Savage. 

* Rdmchandra Govind Gharpure. 

* Chunildl Khubchand Chella. 

* Vithal Tatia Desai. 

* Dharnidhar Dds. 

* Ddddbhdi Kharshedji Munshi. 

* Pranjivandds Parbhudas Dalai. 

* Mahadev Venkatesh Lele. 

* Raghundth Makund Engineer. 

* Ndndbhdi Ardesir Frdmji Mus. 

* Dinkar Nardyan Shidhe. 

* Prdnshankar Daydshankar Pdtak. 

* A. J. Williamson. 

* Dipakrdm Navnitrdm Muzumddr. 

* Manikram Narbheram Muzumddr. 

* Rdmchandra Bhikdji Bhdnddre. 

Second-year Students. 

Parshuram Vithal Pandit. 

Mdnekji Kdvasji Bdmji. 

W. Rowe. 

Rdmchandra Keshav Alekar. 

Vishnu Vithal Gole\ 

Purshottam Rdmchandra Hatvalne. 

J ddavrai Hukumatrdi Thdkor. 

Anant Rdmchandra Gddgil. 

Lakshuman Mahipat Asirkar. 

Adesir Navroji Nddirsh dh. 

Khidsing Ramsing Ldld. 

Gopdl Bdlkrishna Rishi. 

Maruti Hari Lohar. 

Martand Vdman Bhavalkar. 

* Passed the F.CE. Examiuation. 



262 RECOGNIZED INSTITUTIONS. 

Kikdbhdi Dayardm Mehta. 
Maganlal Thakurdas Modi. 
Aidas Izatrdm Gidvani. 
Venkatesh Ndrdyan Patvardhan. 
Saddshiv Ganesh Pardnjapye. 
Anant Saddshiv Tambe. 
Edalji Hormasji Madan. 
Manekji Kharshedji Captain. 
Sitaram Vishnu Sukthankar. 
Hasam Virji Patel. 

First-year Students. 

Sitdram Mohaniraj Tole. 
Tamdji Venkdji Naik. 
Hemandds Tejumal Mansukhani. 
J. J. Sullivan. 
H. DeVette. 
W. Mulligan. 

Ardesir Hormasji Tddivdla. 
Peshutan Hormasji Dastur. 
Mancherji Dinshdh Kdth. 
Pdndurang Vishnu Abhydnkar. 
Keshavji Shamji Budhbhati. 
Vdsudev Keshav Kunte. 
Prabhakar Balldl Joshi. 
Vindyak Bhikaji Bhide. 
Vdman Vishnu Abhydnkar. 
Manekji Ratanji Surveyor. 
Ganesh Khanderao Tipnis. 
Bamanji Mervdnji Pdvri. 
Gangadhar Ballal Apte. 
Ndrdyan Janardan J oshi. 
Dhanjibhdi Rastamji Bogd. 
Ndthdbhdi Avichaldds Desdi. 
Hari Rdmchandra Chakradev. 
Krishndji Vishnu Joshi. 
Divakar Jandrdan Vaze. 
Balvant Govind Pendharkar. 
Vdman Ndrdyan Dev. 

Students paying Half -Fee. 

Bhagvandds Prdnjivandds Mehta. 
Khemchand BJtvji Beldni. 
Shdntmurti Annapd Sirurkar. 

Free Students. 

* Krishndji Gururdo Kalghdtgi. 

* Passed the F. C. E. Examination. 



r 



XII. 

§mtfatixam* 

ENDOWMENTS. 

| The Munguldass Nathoo- ) 

bhoy Travelling Pel- [ Rs. 20,000 

lowship ) 

II. The Manockiee Limiee) ertAA 

Gold Medal ....j •' 5 > 000 

|||. The Bhugwandass Pur-S 10 000 

shotumdass Sanskrit > " ' 

Scholarship ) 

|y. The Homejee Cursetjee ") - AAA 

Prize , ) »» ^' UUU 

V- TheJugonnathSunkersett ") 0A AAA 

Sanskrit Scholarships., j » ^ U ' UUU 

V|- The Jam Shri Vibhajil . - AA 

Scholarship j » 4 ' 5UU 

V| |. The Cowasjee Jehanghier ") K AAA 

Latin Scholarship ) » °' uuu 

VIII* The Kinloch Forbes Gold 5 . AAA 

Medal 5 » & ' UUU 

JX- The David Sassoon He- ) K AAA 

brew Scholarship j " ^ UUU 

X- The Janies J. Berkley ) Q AAA 

Gold Medal j » b ' 000 

XI- TheEllis Prize „ 1,500 

X| |« The Hebbert and La- ") K AAA 

Tonche Scholarship... j » D,UUU 

XI 1 1 The Wilson Philological ) oq , m 

Lectureship ... $ » * Jt5 ' 6UU 

jy : The Elhs Scholarship... „ 7,500 

The Chancellor's Medal. „ 

Carried forward... Es. 1,25,000 



264 



XVII 

XVIII 

XIX 

XX 

m 

i 

XXVII 

XXVIII 

XXIX 

XXX 

.1. 

Ill 

IV 



ACCOUNTS, &C 

Brought over Rs. 1,25,000 

The Arnould Scholarship. „ 6,000 
The Duke of Edinburgh) 1Qfi00 

Scholarship ) " 

The Bai Maneckbai By- ) o 000 

ramjee Jeejeebhoy Prize ) " 
The Rao Sir Pragmalji I oa qqq 

Scholarships J " 

The Sir Jasvantsingjij 2g 00Q 

Scholarships ) " 

The Karsandas Mulji Prize „ 3,000 
The Dossabhoy Hor- j g 000 

musjee Cama Prize... ) " 

The Hughlings Prize ... „ 2,500 

The James Taylor Prize „ 2,500 

The Bhau Daji Prize ... „ 5,000 
The Venayekrao Jugon- ~) . ?qq 

nathji Sunkersett Prize ) " 
The Merwanjee Framjee ) n aaa 

Panday Scholarship ... ) " 
The Kahandas Mancha- \ ~ aaa 

ram Scholarship ) " 

The Dhirajlal Mathura- \ * qqa 

dass Scholarship J " 

The Sinclair Prize „ 1,500 

2,40,0( 

BENEFACTIONS. 

University Hall Rs. 1,00,000 

University Arms and 7 -, oaq 

Common Seal ) " 

University Library I 2 QQ m 

Building Fund ) " ' ' 

The Rajabai Tower 'j 

with Clock and Peal y ,, 2,00,000 

of Bells J 

Mace for the University. „ 1,200 

J^?I 

Total Rs. 7,42,^ 



ENDOWMENTS. 



265 



CO 05 



In- 

in, 

oo 



o 


<<* 


© 


O 


o 


o 


^ 


d 


xn 




H 


m 


fc 


m 


W 




a 




H 




CQ 




W 




P 




« 




CO 








P 




*« 












^ 




OS 




H 




£h 








w 




G 




w 




C3 




> 



55 
1° 



b 713— w 





d« 




o 










o 




© 


+3 


c£ 




CO 








«-H 


© 


5 

1 
•9 


02 




01 








o 


C* 


H 




















S 


Itf 








02 - 

oo • : 
«3 ~s 


03 

S 








■ 

B 
1 


315 








d S 
° 1 

i : s 






- 


s| 








s ^ 


s 

02 







1 S 
- 2 








50 '2 


d 

,2 




4^> 

Bl 










o : 






2 










tM 


s 




O 

i 
< 


© 3 

.2 d 
3 3 








11 


d 


t-^ 














-^ 


t>» 














■ 


00 

















-H 
















A 












* 


1 © 


-+3 

d 


cS 












© 


O 


3 


















o 














CO 


CO 




02 












CM 


23 


£ 












©^ 


© 
















© 


©" 
















cs 


CM 




&4 




o 






C 




tj 




CS 




9 






a 




3 




m 




© 






5 




o 




K 




o 












m 

.9" 




. 


31 * 


_3 









© 


o 




B 
o 

o 



St ; 


© 

a 

3 




> 


cS 






s 




m 


* 








> 

Q 




4 


| 


E 

c 

(2 








J 












d 


t^ 


CO 












3 


ir- 














00 


a 
















3 



















266 



ACCOUNTS, &C, 





A 


o 






o 






O 


43 


eS 


O 






o 






o 


o 




<N 






o 






<N 


2 
< 


CO 








§ 






o 












i © 














3 c5 © £ O 


o 


© *w rr> 












5h" 

© 


a? >> M © _ 


c 












S> 


>'S 2 J g 


+3 


r © T3 ""* 








43 




o 

■+3 


. ,£! 43 ?§ O 

£ft * « 
^ M sea © 

o o .s ^ 

43 «C3 <D -E? rt 

3 g^ S ° 

cS fl ~ © £ 

^is pa ^ 3 


h Je-3 

.si 

1*2 








© 
© 




so 
p 

o 


■ 
r. 








3 






5 


£ © r5 








| 

ft 






g*ft^° 

I > S 1 2 

^■w > ©'d 
CQ 


I 

2 

43 


£2* 

ft. » 5 

"5 rS •§ 














o 












a; 


t-i 




r— 1 












4-3 

ft 


g 




43 

5 














PH 


© 


© 






© 


© 




43 


es 


o 


o 






© 


o 






2 


OS 

Pn 


1 


§ 

•* 






$ 


2 








o 


















1* 

a 

> 
o 


o © O 1 " 1 

co p^-5 2 




.S if S" 

o w 

© »o 

o §3 22 


o : 

43 . 

Q0 










43 






f-" ^ 


rjT^ass : 








2 


02-;* ^Is 




Sr-i 

8 fr. 


H>(|l OH 
43 JD t>j 








O 


o o © g 






8ifc|S 

-*? O jd -P £? 

filil 




"© 

© 
© 










? Ci? © 

■S o £h © 

-ggJls 

I— I 43 Ph cC CO 










H 




^ 




2 




© 


t"i 
















49 

ft 


00 

















2KD0WMEKTS. 



267 



o 


© 


t* 


O 


rt 


<r> 


9 


CO 






o 


o 


<M 


<N 



c^ 



4* >* 



o 2 





CO 


» . 

M 

O 


Ba- 

in the 
)f Bom- 


32 

B 
c 


Cash 

lance 
Bank ( 
bay .. 



o 'I 




268 



ACCOUNTS, &C. 



a 

p 

o 

o 






CO 



*^ O s 

CO 
CO 

p 

PQ 
m 



R is 

M 
o 
o 
to 

-5 



B 



o 



-§ Q 



a 

o 

S A 



I a s 



M^ 



-p o 2 



2 £ o 
SOK 



o 
."So 



£^ 



A g 



M 



© © 

> "S 
o o 

OK 



05 



S a sh : 

o £ K 

o & * g 

o S u o 

o S^K 






• 8 



S s o 



> <2 a DO 

° 8 .°S 
o §<c M 

a ^ — - o 

Sip 

• . *< £!* 

a «* o S . 



S 



ENDOWMENTS. 



269 



A > 






*« 



~ So 



i! 1 *^ 



o o 



S2 



S l-H 



J I * a 



3 ~£ 



Jl 



Sis g 



O o 






h o b t^.S 



3 3 



OT)l h O H o 
.5 -w .-. -^ 02 T* i 



oO 



sS&<& s 



r- O 

am 



fc.f 

53 a 
2 g 

H 

m 




b 713— w * 



270 



ACCOUNTS, &C. 



H-I 




GO 

i— i 


pq 

-1 




f 


-J 




.« 


O 




* 


w 






o 






GO 




CO 


H 






>— 
Oh 






no 




CO 

— 4 


&j 




~£ 


5 
dq 




1 


no 




•M 


: X> 




BO 


< 


^s 


CO 


p 


o 
© 
© 
© 


1 


H 


l-H 


m 


O 




ft 


i — i 

— H 


ti 


SI 


CO 


v —' 


— 1 




ax 


p 







p* 




pq 

-/,■ 


DQ 
no 




Q 


<1 




s 


Q 




^ 




K 


5 




H 


£ 






3 




U 

H 


p 




« 


W 




■fci 


pq 




h 


1 






s 




O 


H 




o 



O 



K^ 





ft 


c 


C 


o 


o 


-e 


o3 


C- 


c 


<n 


00 


p 












o 

1 




c 


p- 




3 

—4 




a 




fi 15 




-' a J, 2h 3 




o 




.2 § 




~2 53 ii rG 53 - 




xn 




2 3 




S so 2 2 , : 




s 




II 
'111 




,c 3 c<*-< ; 


-*3 


03 






03,2 >,^J _ 




•J3 






® .4. ^ G : 


o 

g 

o 

00 


GO 

o 

P 

o 

«9 


J* 
c 

r. 

- 


g 03 U 

d O O 
CD ^ m 

si! 


itto to Mr. Gau 
m Agase, B.A. 
aid half-yeai 
ent of the S 
varded to hii 
sar 1877 




fe 


Ph 


Q oft. 




q-^s a s >, 




n 




. * 




5 







|5 




0) 




t- 




-m 




t- 0) 




03 




CO a 




ft 




f-H 3 






&i 


T* 


© 


43 


03' 


HZ 


o 


8 




CI 


o 


0Q 




o 


^ 


M 


© 


c^ 



S-g >> : 
% w o ; 

rk Sh 03 J 

ft* * 

CD t* O 
© SPh£ 



CO CH • 

o o : 

§-* • 

-S3 S 







ENDOWMENTS. 



271 




g (5 <n -H 

^^^■^ o 

Wl 3 

*"* (ri <*-* ^3 "73 

•« <U 3 jj f^, 



11 Ml 



5 <\ 



5 1 — gr 




1 ia 




r- 1 


c 


S^ 


i 


00 




© 




>~l 


-S-g^S 




-~ flrt< 




O » - ' £" 







£3 
"e8 


d-p o 2i> 




ctj a ie ? oc 


O 







< 


^ J 






s 


rH 


„ 


>, 


s 


f 


V 


:< 


£ 


"3 


h a 


w 




a. 




B 




H 




W 




On 





8 W r^ 



1-8S 

53 P 3 

8 






272 



ACCOUNTS, &C. 







IN. 






00 






1— 1 






P-S? 






o 












W 






*SS 






•^ 






•(«» 






CO 












CO 


& 




o 


N 




r^ 


e- 1 




r^ 


Sft 




00 


g 






P 
h? 




$ 


H 




•♦* 


H 




r-4 


p 


o 
o 


CO 

g 


o 


© 


< 


H 


o 


g 




CO 




S 


>^z 


t3 






to 


^ 




D3 


O 




P 


H 




P5 
02 


w 




P 


H-l 






hH 




3 


1 




<3 
in 


^ 






t-H 




H 

P 
O 

o 

< 





ft 




O 






O 




O 


O 










a 


4 




- 






90 







O 










Q 

B 

< 






b 






O 




co 


CO 














c 




£ 


L 




pj 


>s : ^ 








O 






c 

ft 


• 


_2 




> 


o 



o 


Si • » 

: 
02 : ^ 








2. 


m 

4* 

3 
S 

P 

JQ 

as 
Q 




1 

43 

CO 

d 



c 


J4 



a 


i 



O 

m 

M 
| 






3 
oe 

d 


■•* 

P 

43 


-4- 1 

1 

£•- 

C 
50 

.2 

p 


© • o os d 

© 4= ' rd ? 

1-1 o : .d *-« 9 
^ 9 : SS^ 


3 


09 


M 

BO 
09 


C5 






s 


99 


c 

43 
43 


d 




1 


o 
4a 
4a 







4=> 


*-■ 


4a 

3 



u 


11 






>, 


ft 


Q 


Sf=X 


o5 




Sfe 


ftS 






ft 




^ 






; 




j 










- 


















id 










6 
















OD^ 










+3 

Q 
















^ 5 




























Ha 












^4 














rj^ - 1 











+3* 

g 


<s 
















l-t 











9 




























o 




























a 


oa 
















~ 








§ 


^ 


« 





























C3 








© 
C 

8 

o 








-J 



.3 


43 

5 
■■J 


CO 
— 


f^ : 
t- - 


os 


ft 










i©7 




1— 1 









3 




-J 


a co 
























10 




43 




'3 






d 


4^ 
PI 


> 






d t,_| 
.S c 




ED 


«* 


1 


o 






0) 


e 


o 















■si 


o 






> 


o 















43 




« 






o 
© 


o 




Pi 
o 

WW 




1* 


? 


P 
O 
49 

i 

d 


O 


>- 

as 


d © 

aft 








d -p 

O Pi 

o 




ft 


c 

49 

o 

ft 




•SI 1 


5 

1 


C 


'd «£S i2 

d 03 
O ^<-« 

i- 1 co 

ft TtH 4? 








H 










5 




- 














,—" 






















6 

43 




t* 


co 






















c3 




t- 
























ft 




00 


rf 




























a 

























ENDOWMENTS. 



273 




< to 

. o 

a « 

O g 

U a 

Eh & 

a 



1 


1 








¥ 






T*H 






«N 






"W 






t^ 












CO 






ZD 






o 






o 






p* 






* 






ti 












r3 






-^> 






5 






H 





O 


















ffl 













— 


H 


<3 


> 


> 


3 


ft 


5 


5 


CO 
DO 




o 

(M 

o 


3 

Q 


ft 

o 






J 


t^ 


J5 







ft 


s 


- 


5 






GO 






t» 






QO 



- 



274 



ACCOUNTS, &C. 





t^ 


a 


on 


w 


i-H 


P 


r^ 


1— 1 




M 




i^H 


ri 


to 

8 


» 


<1 


<*> 


t-3 
O 


CO 


»— ' 


o 


M-3 


■** 


O 


r^ 


(77 


i>. 




00 


H 


r— 1 


h-H 


rt? 


P 


o 


w 


,« 


OJ 


^ 


& 


so 


< 


56 

r— 1 


C/J 


CO 


Eh 


g 


Eh 


O 


P 


^ 


C/J 


GO 


tf 


H 


H 


14 


M 


n 


J25 


N 

02 


p 


« 


GO 


P 

cq 


HH 


CQ 


1— < 

H 


P 


< 


-« 


* 


~ 
g 


£ 


w 


O 
P 


£ 


P 


f=? 


Ha 


H 


H 


« 


1— 1 


> 



^ P 
O 



a 
9 
o 

a 
-3 


»< © c 
* WW 

OB 


© 
04 


© 

© © 

^ © 


■+» 

C5 

s 

9 

■ 
E 
S 

| 


scft ph ^ ^ ^ ■% a g a a 

° o g °Q 5 ac Oco - a j| 

till S| 5| JAJSSgl 

cq ~ : 


o 

ft 




R 

S3 
O 
I 

•9 


04 © 

CO © 

co © 

oq CO »■* 

el 




ft ° °" 

a ° w 

© CO 

d 1 1 

g or 

«w2i g ° 

Sia • : 3 3^ 
© a -e t>. • PQM >» 


CO S ^ o 

.5 ^ ic go 

■— ^ © cc — i 

. g •§ > 3 

© a S 2 -d 
■g © g o as 

h-l 4jft vS CC 


6 


3 







ENDOWMENTS. 



275 



X, <° fe 

3.2*2 

III 

Q ^ <u 






in 

i « 

3.8 ■§ 






IP 






tfgg 

+3 ri ^ 
43 J 

i£ >> >>+3 

r 5s a & 

*- 2 2 ° 

o s S a 

£5 J-l t- G 



•<3 o 

<-H *4-l 

o*3 ° 



© 2r2 






Ml 



-s^ ft 



cop4 



S «ecj a 



a* 18 *. 






so 

r.-^2 

ea 



;« qqo2 






is? 



276 



ACCOUNTS, &C. 



J +3 • > -l^> +3 



8 ^ ..CO U c3 

o o a ^ 



-do ^5 



^3 : C0 



^o£ 



^ o 

o 3 a 
^3S 



.a 






Si +3 O -+3 

■5 5 h' £ t- t- 

co 3 o : ^^ g 

^ ft 43 *Ci ^ J- 



lS^l£ljg : 

-o oo' J§ •? <+., S^"~^ ej 
a 



^llllllslll 



eg CO 

oo 

oo 22 

CO 

SL 






5 
PQ 



I 



ENDOWMENTS. 



277 













co 


o 




u 












CO 


CO 


. 


3 

- 












CO 

1 


CO 
CO 

CO 


<* 
8 


be 
2 

P. 












<M 


(M 


o 


^. 


£ 


o 






CO 








'3 


<s 


o 






CO 






1 


m 


0) 

•a 


to 


p* 






CO 
CO 







*e8 


& 




CI 

9 o a >» • 


go 






o 
H 








C^, O £ * 




a 








H 






a « 9 o 


c3 

PQ 


PQ 


£ 






pu 






11 |l 


a 


4^> 


.O 

a 

o 












GO £ Oh(^^5 


o 


.2 












5 


s 















ao«> 




- 
1 



b 713-?; 



278 



ACCOUNTS, &C. 



CO -J 
CO O 





r< 




O 








£ 




•« 




CO 


1— 1 


CO 


m 


O 


P5 




<! 
O 


CO 

7-4 


W 


6. 


o 
r/? 


* 






HH 


<*> 


»-5 


CO 




d s 

o p 


PQ 


"i c, 


i— i 
> 


""* CQ 




G§ feq 


t—i 


P3 w 


pi 


"v.^ *3 


tc 


5« 


CG 




B 


C3 


^ 


Q 


•-a 






">? 


P3 


?: 


W 


C 


H 


En 




a. 




i— i 




H 


►H 


o 



tf 



P 

o 
o 





ft< o o o 


© 












1 


(j 00 N © 


o 

r— ( 












n 


oo O O ©J 


Ci 












<: 


Ph 
















Com- 
Gov- 

Note 
Pass 

iQ on 
ssory 












© 

CI 




at S >>o i^'a : 


gl 












-(J 

s 

i 
1 

3 

Xi 

m 

s 


y Amount of Bank 
mission on Interest 
ernment Promissoi 

Ditto for Stamps 
Book 

Ditto for Deposit 
Government Pro 
Note 




o 

CM 

o 

■■»-> 

4a 

s 


purchase of two 
Government 4 
per cent. Pro- 
missory Notes 
ofRs. 600at94g 56 
Interest on Rs. 
500 from 1st 
November 1877 
to 15th Januarv 




pa • 




- 








r 



ft 2 



- 





&. 


© "• 








© 1^ 






e3 












© 








C 


04 






xn 


uc 


o 






« 


Tt 






£ 






o o • 












n> 




S^£ 


§J< : 






a 


<3« : 






t> a 


-. >. 






o one G 
4 per c 
missor 
for 


, Cash 
in the 
Bomba 






H 








ENDOWMENTS. 



279 




£ l "" 1 LO l>. 

"-^■g GO ,-h 

»o • «g rfj s 

.ft <y in 

© B sec co 
"S ©•= Po 



-s o 
§ W 

o pq 
8 O ^ 

^ 2 d 

o H > 
1? ^ £ 

$ * < 

m K 5! 

lis 

" o >-* 



280 



ACCOUNTS, &C 



00 ^ 



w 




■^ 


« 




•si 


^ 




I— 1 


1-3 




CO 


O 




o 


W 




J>» 


o 




JN. 


W2 




00 . 

T— 1 


JZ5 




i«Si 


»— i 






H 




53 


-^ 




S 


>-J 




§ 


PS 
£3 


/~\ 


i— t 
CO 


»— i 


O 


p^ 




o 
o 




fc 


xn 
Eh 






N 
£3 


w 




W 


1-5 




PS 


w 




to 


w 




CO 


•-* 




s 


-^ 




•B 


£ 






O 




02 


o 




Ph 


s 




6P 


w 




H 


1 






»— i 




H 


»— i 




5Z5 


> 




P 
O 

o 

o OS 





&* 








o o 


o o o 


-*i 














(3 
O 


eS 








CO <N 


o ~< m 












!"• fH p— » 


3 


D5 








o o 


o • O C5 


<3 


M 










C5 O 






s 
Ik 


3 


Q 
£ 
1 

s 

ft 


: <g : 

' cS ' 


EH^-S :|.g j 


w 

a 

9 




1 

pq 




as 

o 

1 


ft 

. a . 
: ° : 

73 

ft 


co „, a -^ ^'- , 


2 




If 


•s 


a 




9 




-*J 


.2 

"v. 


9 




■S a'S.S "^S-^ 


• 2 




5 


.2 






^^ ° 5 


Q 




o 


s 
§ 

o 


B 


to O 


o.^P . >» :o»» 




2 

< 




£ s co TJ J if a 






« 






"■ 


*> 


aJ 




i< 










"8 

ft 




co 












ft 










cn <5 


+3 












ua 


3 


c8 












o 












P5 


i 


, 










ca O 


09 














ft 








O CN 


1 -H§ 2 ! 




c3 








o »c 


s| a l 




w 








8 £ 


1 § S -' s2 : 




M 








O «N 


W _„ « 
^S^^ 


go 
ft 




a 


d 


>> 


: o o 

p 

73 a 

O w fQ > 


1 £ a-e goo 






a 

> 

o 

o 


3 

Sh 

O 
ft 




03 


S © a a <z 






S2 S^^=! 2-S 






H 






■ 


•^ 






j 














ro 










a> 


t>." 


























*q 











ENDOWMENTS. 








o 








<M | M 




M 








O 1 lO 




— < 














O 








CO 1 CO 




03 








O 1 C5> 


























to | id 


cJo^ 




d 


O 


(N 










c3 


o 


o 




s 

o 

3 


w o » a 




ao" 


iO~ 


a 




"3 


O to 












■4J 



."Bcq 



.9 * 



.>,g 






a? S « o : -. 

h rj O J] ^5 

,Tj £ s-, ao . « 

Ho o'2 i! ^ 



r3 >> 

-C! O 



<1 


an 




u 


s 


« 




> 


fc 




o 


-< 


Q 






3 






3 




H 




W 




- 





CO lM 

f— < W 

55 








H 



B 713— SB* 



282 



ACCOUNTS, &C. 



H5 



p 
o 

f-n: 

w 

o 



o 

g 

»— I 

B 
w 



00 C3 

oo w 



OS 

CO 

o 
oo 



Cd 



2 H 






O 

<1 Q 





A 


-u 




a 


c« 


a 




o 




a 


M 


<i 






„ w s 




^ o 




s 43 




(S M 




w 2 




Ld « 


S3 


B-S 


ID 


M 


a 


ra a 


s 


rt o 


e 


& « 


a 


43 O 


rQ 


S=! "» 




tfi 


ft 


11 




■*! 




>,° 




ta 



© © o 

O <N o 



A' 

. a 

«2 



2 I 



~ a 



M 



:«■ 



o 

a o ** s 

^ « ~ «. B 

« <a o ^4 c o 

O-h o 



o © 



op, 



O^QMAolz; 



r« o p o a ■ 

„ 5 « >>-< 
.13 2 > n.£p3«» 

Q S o o g^ ^ 




S3S SS 



GO lH 

l-H 3 



ENDOWMFNTS. 



283 



9 



fag 



o 

I 



s 






CJCJ-J 

14 



00 o <? • » 
P © > ° >, ° 


5* 




C5 -+3 

> P 


55 ,_, ph Hj jg m 


S&I « 



^ p£ pqpq >, 

I 3f 5.a£ 





3 


r 


a 


< 


99 


a 


M 




> 


^ 


4a 


( ) 


L 


DC 


> 



g 
p 

i 



CO M 
OO s-i 





H c3 












f5 




© 




tp 


o 




*8 


co 






8 6 a-s i 






§£ S~ 




02 
C5 


p ^ o 




Q 


00 (i 
cent. 
865) 
76 t 






^ U "* CO 




"«3 

•+3 


** 05 ££ 




H 



S ^ 55 © 

-P 5 5. >^5 

°2 P r* O P 

£ 3 9Z © 

© > 5 > 

p - - a « ►*- 

M G5 P >-< ^H 



O 

s 2 ^ 
§ £g 

<i 5: £ 

~*% 
12 & ^ 

03 § 
^ 5 tJ 

i, Oh 
£ ^ S 



a, 
1 



284 



ACCOUNTS, &C. 



00 







L ^ 


c* 




X 








w 




r-H 


to 




CO 


tt 




© 


<J 




«♦* 


o 




1^ 

on 


w 






o 

CO 






£ 




^ 


H 




-so 


P3 




CO 


PQ 


^ >v 

© 


CO 
g 




o 
o 


O 


JZJ 


u5T 


*fcl 


o 




m 


o 

to 

CO 


DO 


E-i 

3 


<! 






CO 






Q 






l-H 




t— i 


> 




« 


^ 




r>» 


P 






w 










H 


( 






W 

w 




P3 

H 

P 
O 

o 
o 

<3 



© o o 

© <N © 

»-4 O >"* 



© 3 






: o _g 
Co 

• & 



: 



o o o 
0£ 



.go ©^ 



II 
o o 

ft, 

© f 

fl frill! 



M 



la g 2 ~ -g 8 





~i 


•+3 


d 


3 




e 




i 


£ 


< 






SPh 



© 
© >> 

a&a 



b 



Or5 

o . 

it 

OS 



© PR 

Eh «4H 

c8 O . 

«J 

2 © >> 

O •+= ^J 



© o -^ i 



s 



ENDOWMENTS. 



285 




8nto,- 



§lls. 









286 



ACCOUNTS, &C. 



00 

I 



CO 



p 




5*. 


o 




4 


o 






h 


^"> 


rH 
CO 




© 


§ 




o 
00 




pq 


OT 

tf 


5° 

en 


J7) 


■>_• 


W 




02 


IS 




p 


< 




M 


►■» 




72 






M 





ft o 






o 


O 


o 


4* 














d 
3 


& •— • 






cr 


o 


!>. 


o 














£ 


02 <=> 






r— 1 


i— i 


CN 


■51 


£1 














& : 


i 


O 


fl >» 




d >> : 






£ • 

02 


°c3 

02 *3 




o u . 

J I 

*| - 

* 2 : 




CO 

d 
o 


es : 

u 

o 














a 

pq 


ft 




o 

d 

© : 




E 




o a 




«■§ ' 




1 


•g pq 
g » 


fa 
5 


w o 




.2 a 




s 


51 


ft so 


3 

o 


~ u : 

.H O O 

fiO& 






pq 


* 






~ 




o* 


t^ 










• 


c8 


l> 












Q 


oo 














ft 








CO d 


d 










rH O 


3 


c3 












o 

a 










lO o 


< 


a5 












& 


o 


o 


O 


o 


.d <x> o cd : 




«3 

CO 

P3 


o 


o 

o 

s 


o 

s 

c 


2! 

10 


og5 


CO 

ft 

*s 

o 
o 

cq 


H« CO 

o . 

I! 

-M - 


CO i-« 

urn ; 

•2 | 
o ."2 

m d -d 

»/Vd o 
oft ft 
so . 


cr 


* d«w • 

.d o : 



o 

11 ■ 

a** 

III 


•d b 3 

H g M » > 

'ill* 

CD ^-r^> 

3 +»oo 

a £ 3 GO CO 
I— I o o ^^ ~* 




_; 












o5 


r^ W 












a 


!>• . 












Q 


CO U 
— C5 

3 
















ENDOWMENTS. 



28; 



ft 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


03 

9 

a> 
ft 


ei 


o 


o 


o 


t-» 




co" 


o 

8 


© 
8 


CO 

o> 





■e >> 



o S o £ 2 . 
8 |L'3 So § 

E-^ftfcQ ft 



03 

o : 

a ^) • 

w a 

O.S O 



PQ 



^ pd 



O > 

H 

Pw 

H 

p* 





6 ' 


;o 




o 


r— * 




o 


lO 




CO 


55 




CO 


05 

cT 


.S © o 


t- : 




— ft 


CO 


m 


O w 

§*■§ 


=3 : 


CD 


°°^^i 


a co 


tf 




3 t>» 




d § b* : 











<U HH t*_ ^ 

a %< a t^^ 






283 



ACCOUNTS, &C, 



M 



Q 
!>■ 

00 



w 




8 


N 




a 


i— ( 




^ 


P-. 




CO 

rH 


r/> 


/-~S 


CO 


►J 
(J 


8 

iO 


g 

5 


f=J 


rH 


r ^ 








H 


GO 




W 


N»/ 


M 


Eh 
1 




OQ 


»— i 




P 



^ 



o 
M 







A 


o 






o 


o 


o 




■♦^ 
















r 


a 

3 


ci 


r-t 






00 


cr 


O 


cs 


O 


03 














o 


S 

<5 


« 


o 






o 


O 






43 






03 fl 

IE 

$2 


o 




prize 
Mr. 
Kdji 




03 

s 

1 


02 

eS 






o 
15 




•S3| : 

43 ^2 • 










03 O 


f 




5^3 




B 

03 


'3 


4 






03 
03 




g'S^ . . 




B 

m 


-gPQ 

5 03 

5 w 
en 88 




o o 

M 


I 

S 




Ditto on a 
books awa 
Chhaganlal 
in 187C . 






K 






• 






» 






00 






f& 












S ■ 




43 














* 




5 


c£ 
















o 














o 




1 














i—i 




< 


03 


















& 






o 






°! 






aS 






o 






^1* « 












o 






<£> 








a? 






o 














« 






o 






•"* 








4S 


















to 


a 


















*> 


5 




a 




CJ 








o 


S n 2 

e a- 

E 

a> . 

o fl 

rH <D 


+3 . 

O 


o o 

03 


£ 






03 




o 

■: 
•r. 






33 


i0 

9 






o 


& 




h 


3 




o 






o 


■* 


i 


o 


c 


,g 


r 


« 




H 






























r~\ 


















W 


aJ 


t^ M 
















■g 


r*» 
















e3 


00 J-> 
















Q 


^J 


















s 

















ENDOWMENTS, 
o o 



289 











«* 






""< 








o 


O 








t>. 






o 


o 














PN 


^ 




O 


o 




""* 










o 


r_l 


s 


e3 




M 


& 


BO 


s 


ia 




P2 












•** 




. ^ -co 


2 a ; 




H 



o|ojo a-g 



< 


"fib 


s 


« 




►» 


fc 







mi 


-; 


u 


« 


>■ 


w 


X 


H 


- : 


H 




- 




- 




H 




H 





00 






,-*~ <U -£ GO 

O QJ Jh 5 

*j S ^ « £ 

e © £ o « 



O0 «h 







- 



290 



ACCOUNTS, &C 













d 






o 


o 


© © 


© 










1 


cS 






CO 


CM 


o © 


© 






00 


« 


o 


. 






e 


O 


© <x» 









00 

I— 1 


O 


3 


50 










I— 1 
CM 


CM 






1 

CO 

1— f 

CO 




















m 


05 
*> 

a 




33 

M 

1 


° 8 

ll 




on • 

05 : *es 02 pQ <x> : 

fe t? fe 
o : jg o £ - : 

02 ffl^g as 




■^ 




o 




a 




•t) 


d 




g £,£5^ 




O 




IN. 

00 




B 

02 

E 

1 






o 
.2 & 

3 s 




O ■*■■ ^ r— CO 




Q 
fe3 

K 
o 

c 




J—. 

1 




s 




O 

i 
< 


go© 

s &■§ 

O O o 


o c ^^ . j 

.13 © S fea si 

A<8 PpSgS 




/^»\ 


T— 1 

CO 




1 














o 

o 
°~ 

10" 


g 






CO 










v^ 




ft 








t- ■ © 




O 


02 


m 

E 

H 

CO 

pa 

CQ 

Q 




-*3 

S3 


e3 








o o 




m 

P3 




1 

1 


02 

M 








CM cm 






pi 




o 
o 




© 


5JN . 




W 




e 










g 




s 


© %,t~ - 

•^ Cl> 




w 








en 




ift 




CN 




w 

EH 

* 

H 




CO 

Pm 

« 
o 




CD 

5 

o 

Q 
& 




+3 I 

S P S 

o> §> o 

S QjO) 


Mi 

§ £ 

el^O 

21 

en *** 

c3 <y > 


o o 

(D Sh S3 p-MI 

16 lit 








i 

o 








o ^2 
©3"g 


©•SJ5 *§£2£ 








o 


cs 






• 














«4 c 


© 


r- 


S3 


















■8 

p 

















ENDOWMENTS, 



291 




< 


t a 


s 


M 


^ 


>, 


to 


— 


o 




-/.) 


_> 


3 


| 


H 


1; 


W 




fc 




g 




N 




y 




S 






•'<■ 

^ 



292 



ACCOUNTS, &C. 



GO 03 

00 w 



PM 3| 



n 




CO 

CO 


w 






tf 




>** 


p 




00 


O 




r- 1 


W 




r< 


H-l 










1 


o 




«o 


HH 




I— 1 


o 


.»— * 


CO 


o 

h3 


© 

c 
1- 


o 


C 


CO 


*£> 


J 


!M 


CO 






H 


T 1 


a 


Eg 


ftl 


« 


in 


& 




CO 

P 


o 




r/? 




03 


J 






H- 1 




P 


£ 




*S 


3 






H 




CO 


1 




3 


►H 




H 


M 




« 


X 




P 

O 





ft 






o 


O 


i° 







O 


| 


e3 






o 


CJ 


L 





N 


g 








F— 1 




-H 






1 








<M 


o 


I" 


! 1 


1 


03 


JO 

1 

ft 


1 
— < 


o 


• 8 

A 

: o 






6 '■ n." 6 "• 

1 :sl; 




i 


tJ 


8 


ft 
4" 


.00. 




O 


V 4 






E 

1 


no 


| 


: eS 
• 43 

m 




o H 

43 






B 

ft 


3.3 3 

Ml 


ll 


14 

o 
o 

5 


ill Mil 

<J JVC 43 ft ft _£ 






ft 










C; 


~ 




c5 


t>l 
















5 
Q 


So 


















A 










3 









eS 










!>• 


CO 




5 


















o 












00 


l>» 




§ 


in 










"<»< 


i5 




< 


ft 



















ft 






o 




CO 




.9^5 ! 






C? 






© 




t» 




iO ^ 00 




ft 


09 

ft 






8 

CM 




CO 

1 




co*ft , S' H • 

(21IP 




o 




a 

E 

S 

► 

o 

O 


U 

O 

-« 

<* 


1 

o 

ft 


© 
15 


go : 

'a ^ 


|1 II 






► 

O 


43 

i 


+3 

8 


>> 

Si 




03 

^ S3 

— O 

•2 ft 


|Pi3 

HH > !h P £ 

'-CftCj^ 






H 








~ 




* 






_- 
















aJ 


i>:co 
















•P 


t> 
















eS 


00 Sh" 
















ft 


-h aS 


















2 



















ENDOWMENTS- 



293 









o 


© 


s 








o 


CO 


.£> 












* V2 








C5 


<M 


^ ^ 








% 


«© 


S « 








CO 


to 


- >5 








•M 


iM 


£ S 


c- ° 






© 






o 2 


© 






o 




3 


at 


1 






gj 




g 3 & 8 '• 


8 

1 


4 
1 

9 


S 


o 
H 


H 

m 


v -*j . 


-d 


A 


o 






> d-g >> 
S § 3 o g 


90 

o 


49 


3 

«4H 






a o ob«4h 






O 


















* 


* 














5 w w 

O 02 ° 

©-a § 
ill 'g 

S 2 3:3 d 

■^ >> <£ 

5 d Q o 




&< 
^ 



o 
b 713— 2/^ 



294 



ACCOUNTS, &C. 



00 tt 
oo w 



S 







CO 






O 






-*>* 






Jt>. 


a 




J>» 


u. 




00 


M 




rH 


W 




r< 


&Q 




g 


P3 




5 


<1 




S| 


J 






O 




CO 

t— 1 


a 




CO 


o 


Q 


§ 


(/J 


O 


O 


rr, 


U5 


^ 


i—i 


In. 


OD 


J 




B 




l3 


(5 

3 


g 




02 


w 




8 

P 


H 
I 




n 

CO 


> 




p 


HH 




t8 


M 




5 

CQ 

H 

a. 

o 

K 

P 
O 

8 « 

<1 P 





& 

























© 




eS 




rn 






n 








CM 


CO 


s 
























5 


aJ 




p-i 















O 


© 


4 


« 


















1 


1 




J 8 a 


►> 






03 






i 


- 








^ ° 









a 






*i 






11 


72 






pk 






fe 


c6 


£S 




09 

1 


o a 


I 







9 






t4 f 


.5 . 

CO l>» 

.— CO 




S 

© 


ts g 








B 








M 


^ *"* fr» 




*i 


49 






<3 
■+3 
02 






p. 


5 




w it co 

si'-' 




■I 


13*1 


a 






■s 






-*3 


£ 


^Js 




s 


O g C oa 

fl 3 S? o 




„y 

si 




O — 


all 

n3 »— • ft 






w 








J 






2 








© 


t-i 






















ft 


CO 
l-H 
























&. 














IB 






© 


3 


C3 














i-< 









a 
























i 
















O 









03 














t~- 






CM 


«j 


tf 































O 

O 








FN 


















fi 















•S ^jcoco 




03 












!>. 












£ 






O 














03 








t>^ 














0^ -H 


ft 

3 




+3 






© 










03 ^ S »H 


© 


9 


O 

O 

© 

i 




«, 80 Sh 

^ a 03 

S Ji 


*-< : 
PPM £ 

rt ©rO 

l£ a 

^.3« 






m o a^w 




H 








~ 










* 






_; 






















© 
| 

ft 


-1 








- 
















3 

























ENDOWMENTS, 



295 



o 2 o 

> I * 

^ O o 



,fl © H H 

Hi o o 
SOU) 



11 ; 
■3*1 

o.s*s 



04 



a? 

U 



00 

QO ^ 





S3 



„ o 

G PQ 

s « 3 

« <l 2 
o a -h 

§ 3 



a p o s 



$ 



296 



ACCOUNTS, &C, 



00 


« 


JO 


D 


1-i 




Ptt 




■~> 








4 








m 


00 


02 


rH 


rt 


-S> 


«4 


O 

!< 


1-3 

o 


£ 


w 


CO 




1— ( 

CO 


„ o 


£ 




o 

.5* 


P ** 


H 


O <a 


K 


* £ 
« 


(=3 


<i 


CO 




p 


H 


ra 




5 


1 


*^ 






fc» 


« 


M 


s 








-J 




o 




UJ 




tf 



«1 Q 






d 


O 


o 


o 


4i 

a 

5 


eS 


o 


01 




o 


03 


o 


o 


o 


a 


« 








3 











a 



O fl *- 



c3 c 

■§1 
11 



o - 



1 






3 

35 



35 



a 8 




» 



cj 3 ot o 

£ is 

O-^P-i o 

SB 

>H rt <» O 

a o os 



■•Sa 8 ^ 



13 ' 

"II 

o 



..2 5 



•So 



> o o o 

1° _5 
- 5 Sxco 



GO 



oo u 

mi eS 







297 



^ ■§ 

1 
Ph 




298 



AGCOTJNTS, &C. 



00 



* 



C4 

o 







80 

CO 


oq 




o 


£ 




t>. 


o 




I>» 


hq 




00 


^ 




i— 1 


H 




*£ 


fe 




1 


w 




SJ 


a 




-to 


P3 




i—l 


P 


£) 


CO 


m 


5 


g 


p 


o 
o 

1—1 


CO 


w 


. 


H 




CO 


H 


o 


g, 


CO 


w 




« 


M 




9 


p 




CO 


p 




P 


3 




*53 


a 




§ 


H 




CO 

H 


1 




Oh 


HH 




O 


> 




a 


X 




Account of R 
De. 



& ° ° 



a 



mil 

' o 



&=! 



S. 



co 



'■3 






ilS-8 



S .d d M » § .3 

^* SP-3 Q 5 S «« b 
2.5 c8 '«> i3 o 

© >» d 43 Q 'S ^ 
S -^ S q tP S © d 

Q<1 >,2^gS 



£ 



> O Q 

0*0,0 

O +3 . " 

o a © M 

H 



-I 



^*», 



Q.3 



ENODWMENTS. 



299 







IO 


o 






l» 


C5 






w 


lO 






<M 


c* 






Tf 


00 














o 


o 






r ~* 




d, 


© 


ua 




i 


e3 


o 


t* 






o 


Ifl 







« 


© 






pes 

•3 



fill «2 
& ? 2 

Jg"S b 



© : 

lit 

.CS.8 3 

3.3 "S 



< 


•a 
s 


£ 


H 




>> 


fe 




O 


E 


DC 


O) 




•3 


H 




e 




tf 




w 




H 




H 




ft 





CO*" 

co 5s 

i— i C3 



8 



8 



© CO o 

o 2 © : 
J2 4J ^ goo 

§I7JJ 

£o £| £ 



P3 



^ 



300 



ACCOUNTS, &C. 



fa 
N 

V-H 
P3 
P-< 

O 

w 

ca 
pa 

►-5 

pa 
pa 
*•* 

a 

fr 
>- 

P2 

< 

PP 
M 
Q 

^5 

i— i 

< 

w 






06 

00 
I 


| 

3 
o 

< 


Rs. a. p. 

8 
2 


© 

o 
o 


OS 

CO 
O 

r>. 

00 

i— . 

1 


so 

a 
<» 

2 

4) 

■ 


00 
P 


By Amount paid for Bank's 
Commission on Interest on 
Government Promissory 
Note ... * 

„ Ditto of Stamps on Pass 
Book 


CO 

1—1 
CO 

■A 

© 

m 
fr* 

55 
H 

i 

N 
3 


P 


r— 1 


•+3 
§ 

o 

s 


Rs. a. p. 

2,154 4 
80 


nt o/ Receipts and Disbu 


i 


Rs. a. p. 
To one Govern- 
ment 4 per cent. 
Promissory 
Note for ... 2,000 

„ Cash Balance 
in the Bank of 
Bombay ... 154 4 

,, Interest on Rs. 2,000 (in 
one Government 4 per cent. 
Promissory Note of 18C5) 
from 1st November 1870 to 
1st November 1877 


a 




3 





ENDOWMENTS. 



301 




o 






H 


T* 








3 


-i .2 
^ 5b 

k_; a) 


<N 


fc .-a 




m 


co S 


9 


m £ 


Ph 


B a 


3 


H j=> 


Ph 


w 


•a 


On 


•+3 

o 


# 


H 


W 




H 




W 




Ph 



o 

i a 
i ° 
! g 

!| 

! S 

1 s 

IB 

, o 



b713- 



302 



ACCOUNTS, &C. 



00 
00 



O 

o 

o 

© 

CO 
DO 

P3 



S 



o 

GO 



r«8 

I 



CO 
g 

S 



"8 



H 



M 



EH 

gp 

O 
o 
o 



« 



o i o 



K 



ert 03 



ft g-g 

5h -+3 O 

o 

-1 



ft . . 

II 

ft 



:ft 



; ft 

il 



D 



s 

a> o 



8 g o^ 



^3 ■+* jS 

"O •>* 2J 

9ft ° 

ft > ^ 

e3 J§ 



^3*2 



Pi 

03 , 

^ 0) 

.+3 +S 






43 03 ^ 

Si23 



"Hfl O 

0> V 2 Q «S 

fe^3 a H P4 



I— • P2 +3 

= 11 

S u a 

2 ® r 

*** * 

CO ^J — « 



ft 



ft 


O 


© 




c3 


o 


10 


© "ft 5 © : 




§ 


eo 

3 


o^o-h ! 


« 


1— 1 
00 


l-H 


-f3 03 tr> £_* 

en ID'S s^ 



> cy oj . 

O S<2 

^ 2 » 

ft v 

L fl fl tn 

^ i- 0) o 

o 0) « 02 



§ 2 



a 



M 2^ g 1 

oj O O ^ 

l9.il 

"g OJ g o 

I— I aj ft «£ 






ENDOWMENTS. 



30S 



• o B 
is** ? 

eg t- 

P > GO. 



a 5 



o 

CO CO 



j § £ £ 4 I 

*2 'S co co » A 
^ c? o g^!(N 



um 



43 °£ 



-s^£ 



i 



^^A 






w 



s pj^4£a 



43 _ 2 O 
C © ? 03 

c3 






C 



: r-» O S 






^ ° ? 

^•r! 43 a ^ 

S O 18 • 

P^ QJ^CO 



^ a cc 71 : 

©Sot- : 

© , co co : 

^S2 H * 

. Tf< O-C GO 

Ps a -g <a sm 

o a s. r/5 a 



b 50 © 



.2 W a a - 

t-i a > P o 

C — tS CO 



304 



ACCOUNTS, &C. 






A 


o» 


a 


43 


4 


IO 


no 


3 








o 




CO 


CO 


i 


09 


o 


o 

CD 






co 


CO 







CO 






o 




> 


9 




o 


ft 










60 


_^ 


m 


§ 


s 


.S 4 

"3 


m 


© 


o 






« 






i 






c« 






Q 


. 








o 

a 

PQ 

O . 
O A 

™ S 



ENDOWMENTS. 



305 



I 



o 



Ph 
t— i 

a 

o 

W 
o 

GO 



I 






A 



O ^ co 

5 © g 

eg w i 

*-} « 



CO 
Eh 

w 

M 

o 
o 

<1 



43 

d 

a 
<3 


CO <* 


C 

c 




o 

o 

CO 






o 

CO 


co 

-4-3 

d 

a 

JO 

h 
,5 

CO 

s 


w d >> 

111 

w s a 

■« d 

43.2 k 

d M - 

2 'a S a 

<3 o o c 

^^ 

PQ 


02 

c3 

d 



35 

a 

3 

C/2 
«+-( 

o 

Sj 

ft PC 


: a 2 12 

es CO 1 CO 

A S3 

C4 co co 

43 "03 •> O *^ CO ** 'r* 


A 


CO % CO Jh 

"1 "1 


43 

a 
p 

o 

a 
-5 


CO £• ^ 


O 

>— t 

•"• 

t» 

i— t 

o 

co" 
01 


CO 

43 

.£■ 


a ° c 

(8 © ~ 

50 O t> 

g-g* j So 

J-i t? •* ■ d k>< 

£ So :M 

O h « . c5 r3 

fl "* d co 2 5 

S12|a«J 




g 6 S-§ 
.S :**"* © 

1 8 H& 
§p|s 

43 d ,. > ,£ 

" 1 g£ g 

£o a^£ 




1 

< 

i 

t 

e 


! 

* 

J 
) 

! 
> 


q> 

I 


CO tH 















B 713—s* 



30G 



ACCOUNTS, &C 



i 
3 

o 

a 
«3 


« ° 




03 

a 

| 

OB 

s 


Rs. a. p. 
Brought over.., 361 8 10 

By Amount paid 
to Mr. S&mal- 
das Chhaganlal 
Mehta, the se- 
cond Scholar of 
1876, from 5th 
January 1877 
to 18th March 
1878, at Rs. 22 
per month 318 3 2 

,, Ditto to Mr. 
V&manr&m Ka- 
pilram Mehta, 
the first Scholar 
of 1877, from 
lstto 17 th Jan- 
uary and from 
17th January 
to 17th March 
1878, at Rs. 15 
per month 38 3 7 


i 




■+3 
g 

o 

a 
■3 


p, ° ° 

. ^H O 

!>. © 

w oo 


I 

s 

a 


Brought over... 

To Interest on Rs. 24,000 (in 
five Government 4 per cent. 
Promissory Notes of 1842-43) 
from 1st February 1877 to 1st 
Februarv 187S 


» 


| 

P 


i— t 

GO & 

~2 





ENDOWMENTS. 



307 




< 


Ml 


^ 




>» 


£ 




© 


E 


r 


V 


tf 




H 


p 


H 


u 


W 




n< 












w 




- 




y 





o 



O 

o O ^ 

<j H £ 

«*« < £*■ 

Sh SO *h 



a, 



308 



ACCOUNTS, &C 










M 




GQ 


O 


•^ 


Q 


P 


O 


s 


co 


- 


GO 


QQ 


ptf 



P3 w 






CO O 



CO 



CO 
o 

*> 

H 

CO 

A 

o 



H 
M 

o 



5 
o 

o 
"o 





d 






o o 




© | © 


o 


■+3 








GO O 




M 1 CO 


o 


2 


cS 












1 




o 
g 


w 






c 


i-t 




© J <N 


s 


< 


M 












| 


r-i 






05 fl 

it 


>> 

u 

o 

05 
05 


►d 05 

cq Ph 




IJH • 


05 
1 

a 

3 




PQ 
a 

'a 


6 

c 


o 


o 
Q 


a 

c 
8 
3 




> J5 : 
o °i : 

S6 : 


2 

!=! 

-O 

m 

ft 




■S.2 <3 

2 m c 
s a s 

fl g ^ M 

s a o u 
^ o o o 


P if 

O CO 

S o 

p 5f 


o 
5 


^ o a : 






w 






~ 


; 




* 


















IO 


6 




I- 












— < 


■i 




I- 












-»^ 


p 




CO 












O 




& 










a 


5 


c 


*£ 

A 


. 










>' 


a 


o 




G 
















o 

a 














a 

! 


8 


CO 













S 


*H 


tf 










» 


f 






d 






O 


o 


^c 












o 


iO 


o 


o co co • 




c8 









>r 




s 


a 2 • 

otj H • 




Ph 






© 


i 




pj 


■p ©-So 










CO 








o 
o 

K 




i! 


>> : 

u '. 
o : 

02 o 


"-• o 




03 

Ph 

S3 

O 


c •+? g co 

fl O 0> 

> & a 






8'*' 


i-i ^ 


rOpa 




05 

5 


O.S^ o 






.a si -s 

o aPnft 


i 


1 


OSg H 






H 






^ 












i — i 














© 


t-i 


M 














-If 


tr- 
















i? 


ee 


in 














ft 


i— i 


e3 















ENDOWMENTS. 



309 




310 



ACCOUNTS, &G. 



CO 5 --' 



N 

M 

< 

< 

o 

H 

CO 

£5 o 
cs o 

w 

PQ 

to 

CO 

o 

Q 

W 
Eh 

I 



S 



eft 



c«a 



«s 



H 
BBS 

8 03 



a 



£ 



i- 



15 



S-g i 

5 a * 

«4H I— I (Xl 



il 



3 

a 

E 

© o 

> -s 

o o 
0£ 



o 

■+3 O 



£ © M o <S S d 



M 



8 

o 

cj +3 -p : 

© ©tz; o 



o SPm o 



o o 

11 



§6^3 i 

a ^ t- : 

S § on 

- fc, 1-1 ,£ N 

io © ° £<*> 
o © ^ ., S 



a 



CcCQ 



c3 - 

D.9 



'C fl 



Pi2 



CO 3 



SI 



O 

go . 
© o^ 

8 Ha 

■gcoS 

I ^ 



ENDOWMENTS. 



311 













29 as 






00 O 






f— 1 






i-^: 






o 






% 






,« 






* 






-«o 






OS 






T—l 






CO 






g 






r^ 






tN, 


w 




00 


N 




r—i 


M 




r<£ 


rt 




O 






1 


o 




CO 


to 


<«-> 


CO 


^ 


o 


§s 


H 


o 

o 


o 


o 
p 


N 




m 


tf 


25 





^w 


jg 


w 




W 


B 




CO 

M 


T 




P 


HH 




Q 


S 




Account o/ Receipts am? 
Dk, 





a 


O 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 




c5 


© 


o 


<N 


<M 


<M 


■* 












>-H 


r— ( 


f 


*j 


rH 


CM 


O 


CO 




o 


<l 














rH 



& 



d 

^ ° 3 

<« S « 
1,-P o 

&g« 



d 
p 

PQ 



q 

E 

o o 



d >> 



■^ s 

£Ph 

s 

^^ 

o S 

*«- d 

o bi w 
43 » a) 
43 > +? 

SSI 



P* 

i 



££ 



'54 <3 ^ 

ft 22 

^ o a 

es &* g 

ftg 3 

Sod 

d 6 

i^ 

S o . 



I 

u 

5 




l-H « 

3 



312 



ACCOUNTS, &C 





A* 


© 


© 


o 


*S 


i-H 


. <N CO 


VO 


S 
< 


ro © Ci 


C5 




to 

of 




: A Q o o 






ii 


03 






B 




o 


04 




O (NO 


a 


of 

s 


S 0* O OS 


•a 


s 

E 

1 

xn 


Brd 

eeGovern- 
t 4 per 
. Promis- 
Notes for 

h Balance 
;he Bank 
ombay ... 

h in hand 


-+3 

o 
H 




M%t? a~« § 








M * 




,_; 


aJ 


CO* 5 


43 


l>- . 


c3 


CO fn 


P 


H cS 




a 




^ 


© 


4^ 


rfjg © o 


lO 




rH 


3 






o 


.»o © © 


£ 


i 


t» OS 00 CM 


05 


«*1 
el 


c<r 




'• .s +j » "5 


1 i 4J 

> w oa : : 




Sh '-'fllOo 


i one Go 
. Promi 
) from 1 
ay 1877 

Rupees 




ht ove 

2,000 
per ce 
f 1854- 
6 to 3' 




3 „-^?£ 


.5 "£ ^ ^ »a 


03 
4» 

.3* 

o 

G> 


Bro 

st on Re 
ernment 
>ry Notes 
h June 1 

7 


Rs. 500 
4 per ce 
te of 18 
6 to 1st 

Tot 




3 Interes 
two Gov 
Promissc 
from 30t 
June 187 

Ditto on 
ernment 
sory No 
May 187 




H s 




• 


oJ 


t^co 


43 


t— -• 


e3 


GO *2 


Q 


"1 









«i 


'Si 






a 


M 


„ 


e»» 


fc 


43 


o 


B 


7 


0) 


c^ 


> 


w 


a 


H 


& 


H 




Pm 




pd 




w 




H 




w 




s- 






ENDOWMENTS. 



313 



oo « 



K 


IN. 


N 


IN. 


1—4 


00 


PC? 


r-J 


a. 




P3 




o 


* 



£ 3 

<J /— s CO 

Hog 

o S 

CQ "3 Jt- 

H 

E- 
I 



Eh 

D 
O 





A ° 






o 












o 


4J 


el <=> 






<N 












w 


3 






















2 


oi* rH 






O 












T-t 


4 


W 






















»c>> : 






m • 












• 


S3 


Sis • 

t, <u n 
o-g g 






d '• 

o 

o» : 

a, • 












t 

o 


s 


S d 


















1> 


0> 


cj O 




















2 


A «"S : 
S- 2 § • 






w : 

*H . 

o : 












1 


s 


sis" 

PQ 






£4 
















^ 




















a> 


t^w 




















■e 


t— . 




















e8 


oo *■" 




















Q 


- £ 






















d, 






t^. 








o 


t^» 


d 
p 

o 

2 


e« 






o 








00 


<» 








8 








N 
(N 


o* 


< 


05 
















to 




A ° 




o 


t» 


a 


£ 


2 


-»j 




: 




o 




e 


o 


o 


A 


1 






TS 

h 




off 

o 
o 




8 


C5 
OS 


s 


3 






ft 




£» O 




35 




o 


OO !>. 




02 


tf rf 








03 


F ~' 


00 




rr) 


o 
a> 


o s P ' 

Ph o 
© 2 *m 

o SPh£ 


Sri ■ 

o) : 

HN O 


Sp? . 


d 


d 


O 
•1) 
1 


r-t 

>5Q0 

2 oo 


1 


Ph 


09 

d 

o 


^3 


c3 O 


o 
IS 

9 






d 

1 








o 

s 


4S 




o 

q 

Hi 


0) 
> 


3 




■n 

s 


4 

so 

iH 


1 






H 






R 


s 














»-* 




















4) 


t^ w 




















"S 


S^" 











































B 713 — aa 



314 



ACCOUNTS, &C. 



A 



S 

CO 

of 



Bra" 



•« 



111*. 

PQ 



04 



o B 

2 « 



pj <u .52 *h o 






o H © o 



id's : 
PQPQ >. 



o 

Ou 
PC 

- 

PC 
H 

P* 



ft 



^ 



PC «> 



> O B O 

-* P* .H **• 



O S o o 
O Oco-P ; 

pc^ 3 g 

43 ££ c 00 
p g >>> *. 
- o <u 



1 N^ 






« © 



O 

■T W 

4? PP 

2 o 



J 

si 



5C *H 

<! I. 

s s 



ENDOWMENTS. 



315 



CO « 



CO 



55 

o 
<3 Q 





A 






o oo 


o 


o 


o 


4-> 

C3 


c* 






CO «ffl 


CO 


o 


CO 



















o 
£ 


02 
P3 






o o^ 


CM 


8 

CM 


©1 

o 




in 


d 

5 


c 


• 03 • . 

: w :4d 

n 3 2 




09 < 

•* S : 


n£ 


03 
43 


9 

cq 

fa 


43 
BO 

9 
C 

S3 
43 


SO 

1 

o 


Ph o 

d w 




Jcq 

• S^GO 


3 

I 

o 

a 

cS 


S3 
<D 

a 

6 

ra 

3 

a? 


P< 


q 

c 
d 
o 
S 

■ 


s 

d 

d 


tc cr 1 

S3 ■ — i 

• § -O 
:-m : _ 




, Ditto paid for pr 
awarded to Mr. R 
vanrao Pavgi in 1 


« 


o 
S 

■31 


§ 

i 

o 




Gover 
Notes 

, Ditto 
Boo 

, Ditto 








« 






* 




• 






^ 














d 


!>. CO 














-f3 


!>• . 














eS 


00 u 














ft 


















Ph 






© 


o 


o 


43 


eS 






•<* 


o 


TJ4 



















O 








© 


o 


© 


a 


On 






CO 


o 

CM 


8 




Qt 






o © 


.S 








S3 






O Tt< 

© © 


© 


82£ 


3 




P3 

- £ 
S 

> 
o 
O 


4^ 


>> 


O QO 

: ©t! • 


id 

CO 

Pi 


p*° : 


S 


"3 
o 
O 


d 

o 
o 
h 
O 


u 

o 

■ 


: o © : 

J -a 


C 

O 

4? 

CO 


O * M > 




© 
> 

o 


ment 4 
Prom 
Notes f 
, Cash 
in the 
Bomba 


4? 

q 

Hi 


3 * ™Ji 
a s ^ 






H 






* 










^ 














© 


QO is 















316 



ACCOUNTS, &C. 





ft 


o 


© 


o 


•*3 

i 


(i 


CO 


- 1 


* 




<M 


f» 




a 


02 


O 


oo 


© 


« 


<N 


«r 


00 

CO 










id* 






:A ° 


o 








& 




■ 






►> re w 


rl 


S 






o 




P4 


3 
d 

9 

s 




-♦=> • © 


t> 


d 




Jin O 

1*Ph © 
to 


00 


3 


9 




W g |.a • 




CO 






48 « >> 


ft 




<« a o o 








„ ° ° 






m 


" 






rH 




<U 




coco 




-£ 




t- . 




c5 
P 










ft 


© 




© 


d 


e3 


TH 




* 


S - 










O 




Ci 




© 


i 


4 


00 




oo 


CO 




CO 






u 


05 






a 


S 






> 


<x> 






o 


Ph 






| 




P4 






to 


_ — 


03 




o 


2 


"8 




1 


£ 


o 








© 








w 








o5 








•+3 








« 








Q 













<3 .2 

§ a> 

* Ph 

s 1 

H 

P* 



o 

- w 

O 



•s 02 S 



s* <^ i-h 






ENDOWMENTS. 



;i7 




B 713— aa* 



318 



ACCOUNTS, &C. 



S3 

o 
u 

m 



o 

ft 



«j 


^> 








bn 


pa 


35 


c 




05 




p2 


m 


H 


> 


H 


'2 




P4 




H 




H 




y 




- 





© 




























eS 














ft 












O 




ft 


d> 








ss 


s 


C3 


1— 1 

Ci 











w 

pq 


<1 


« 


I>» 




!>• 





B w 






<* 




•^ 


< 










Rs. 500 (in 
nt 4 per cent, 
te of 1835-36) 
h 1877 to 31st 




ft 




u 





2 


O 

9 

ft 

a 

■+» 




1 



e 


Is 

O 1— 1 







w 


To Interest on 
one Governme 
Promissory No 
from 31st Marc 
March 1878 .. 


H 


O 


5 sj 
a w 



ENDOWMENTS. 



319 



00 vJ 





i^ 




^ 




00 




r-{ 








s 




Ik 




ffl 




^ 




"^ 




cc 




^> 


/— s 


CO 


o 


£ 


o 


o 


q 




CO 


1=1 


-^^ 


S 




W 




CO 




« 




& 




ca 




W 



p 

o 
p : 



4 O O rn 



P4 



o o 






03 



t. ^ 3 
o-S g 
£^ft. 

8 ° 

ft _, -u 
+» o g 

III 

lis* 

m 



= 8 id 

03 O 
O Q O 
«> +3 CO 



<D O « 

S3 w O 

. 0) K JV 

Q o -S 
Oft 



••3 *■* 

w > 



pa 



ftft. 



-a -11 : n" 2 

.—I ,fi -*> ^ • 

r«: 3 <^ £ 



CO ft 

oo * 
oo~ 






S-s.; o^*fi 



^^p^^^fi^ a 



ft 

rs 

ED 



o.§£ 
-^ ft ^ 

Eh 



ff-JC^to 



'■Z- Gzc 



CO 



•s a 

o W 

Pa 

rd cq 



Soo£ 

"^ 93 B — • 

2 Mil 



5 5 



o 

O 

p o 



o S- 



320 



ACCOUNTS, &C. 





(& 


O 










e 


o 


+> 














r- 


<N 


a 


eS 
















a 


















o 














-* 


ee 


a 
< 


CO 












©^ 

CO 


© 








d 






O 


o 


■ 






Q 
> 


rt 






o 


l> 


4> 






o 














1 




i 


gj 






8 

© 


1Q - 


tf 


s 




1 




§ 


3 

Pi 


CO 

to 

ii 


lance 
Bank 

ay... 

Tota 


B 








> 

o 
G3 


•<*• 


S<3 -2 

X O 


& 








c 


3 

s 


a £ 


^ ■*= W 










It 


S§ 












>i 
















PQ 






•> 







00 w 



M 



3 « 

o £ 

tf > 
pa 5 

H 



. * o 

IS 
13 

£ zn 

O 02 






* 



ENDOWMENTS. 



321 







00 


+3 


p. 






O 


© o 


© 


© 






00 


d 








o 


© ^H 


© 


^ 






^ « 


d 

o 


ctf 
















Ah' 




1o 

r- 1 
CO 

O 
IN. 


a 
■3 


03 

Ph 






o 


CN © 


i-H 


•^H 


w 
o 




02 

I 

O 

a 

o> 

03 




H 

1 

fa 

& 


4= 

■/.' 

V 

U 

o 


02 • 

1 

o 
fa 
Ph : 

43 

a 

0) 


o.2 

© a 

<o 3 
11 

pa 


: d : 
o • 

p4 

• 43 • 

m 

<8 . 


0) ; 

a* 
rd 

s . 

o 
d 
o 

5* = 


fa 

o 

•fi 

fa 


O 




CO 

1— 1 


1 




fl 


d 

o 


Is 


<+4 > 43 O 


£ 




a 




i<2 

1 

HO 


03 

s 




o d S 

>>Qo§ 
M 


O O ^ o 

SOfr 3Ph 

51s BJ 

^43 03 „Ph 


o 

■4-> 

t"H o 






«0 




















o 
5zj 


o 
o 


i-H 
CO 

§ 


1 




00 














^ 

a 


o 

50 
























& 








© 




© 


P 


m 
£ 




1 

d 
o 

4 


c3 

oa 
Ph 








f-H 

s 

©* 


© 

© 


CO 

© 


52J 
























<1 




&4 






© 


© 


.S-gSVS 


* 


H 




go 










o 


. 


*— ' d |>. 


t— 


1 

o 


<! 




P 




c3 








^ 


© ° r-i 


CO 


M 




*S 




. 






© 
o 


CO 
CO 


© S<« 

B "fto 


i-h : 






^» 




CD 






© 


i-H 


-*« », 


>>J> 




W 
Eh 

1 




w 

El 

o 
w 

g d 


03 

'3 
o 
a> 

Ph 


Ph 


43 i 

d o 

© fa 

1 . 

> a> 


° i.Sg : 

3 §P? 

2 . c8 O . 


03 _,, 43 

Ph d£ 

d a 

43 03 O 


S CO 

d -< 
^ S» 
-d d 


T5 
JO 

fa 


t— 1 

M 








© O 

O u 


6 2^3.2 


03 > 05 

(DO 03 

« i 2 


© cS 

a^ 

«*-( i-H 




























so 

o 

<4 




r-lco 

!>• . 

CO u 
i-h cS 















322 



ACCOUNTS, &C. 



M 



O <D 



3 aT ©05 



bD O 

PQ i § 

& © 



*2 I Ǥ id. 

> .*■> eo 

S^- 1 » is 

of* 



I" 



«8 fc. ,£5 

w ^ £ "£ 

o s S-g i 



^2 



Q 

I! 



go o o 

i S „.5 PQ 



ti 



< 


bo 




5 


a 


« 


„ 


>• 


fc 


*a 


c 


'.'■ 





9 


PS 


> 


w 


•2 


H 


P 


w 




Pm 












w 




p 




ta 




£ 





oo *• 



. CO 
co O 



:- 

to 

1 



o 
K 



tf 



o 
a a 

■g cq 

I 8 ^ 

«* H £ 

^ S <: 



ENDOWMENTS. 



323 







00 






r^ 






oo # 






Vh o 






r< 


fc 




g 


>— 1 




4 


GO 






pci 




CO 

1—* 


<i 




CO 


-3 
o 




3 


w 




r^ 


n 




IN. 


GO 




00 


GO 




5^ 


<^ 




r-o 


a 




^> 


<1 




*§ 


pd 






P 
W 


d 


CM 


H 


o 


o 

«2 


< 

M 


© 


►a 




P 


j 




S 


^> 






«l 




M 


^ 






*-— 




CO 







Q 



K 



*e 





rf o 




© 








-*i 


e3 


o 


o 


O 


o 


A 


O 


o 


< 


to O 

P3 o" 


o 




Jh «*■* " 






O O 








A « 




w" 




CO 













B< 


4 


** 






Pd 


a 

a 

3 


I* 

c « 
8.9 




1 


a 

,2 










c^S 




Q 






i^a'i* 












>> v ~ 






PQ 






_; 












A o 


o 




© 


o 




OS 




o 


A 


o 


a 


iS 1 


s 




II^Mfi 


ou 




o ■** ^4 i-h <t5 b3 • 









3 


"3 
o 
u 
M 


Hi lull 






o4 • 




6 

45 


t^* 1 




e3 


£; >» 




ft 


21 






»-? 




. 



< 


•5*0 




u 


2 


« 


SZ5 




O 


DO 


X 


a 


m 


> 


H 


j3 


H 


P 


W 




Ph 




tf 




w 




H 




w 




p- 





s o 

1 £ 

§ « h4 

^ a s 

,2 S x 

© m ** 

« <J K, 

a> ft !$ 

I 3 2 

o O i-i 

^ £ a 



* 



324 



ACCOUNTS, &C. 



00 

So 







« 






» 






to 






GO 






t— 1 






CO 






O 






HO 






l-N. 






r^ 






00 


P2 




i— i 


N 




f— i 




iO 


P* 






Pw 




•to 


r—t 




J 3 ^ 


«4 


/-N 


^ 


J 


O 


J-O 


: ) 


c 


^ 


fe 


*C 


s 


i— 
17) 


^ 


< 


pa 
W 

i 


OB 


w 
H 

PS 

a 

w 

EG 






« 


M 




P 


HH 




to 






Q 

Pu 

o 

Eh 

P 
O 

o 

< 





A ° 


O 


H-3 


es ° 


o 


3 






o 
S 

•S3 


05 O 


8 


W » 






Sm «*H • 






<d o : 






&* ~ • 


03' 




03 


s 






CD 

p. 


03 

43 


S3 


d 


JJfrS • 


'rt 


i 

2 
3 


d OQ0 

IIS 


1 


o g ° 




03 

ft 


^ CD 00 

Oh 






-tJ 






■ 




o3 


°° £ 




-^ 


t^cc 




cS 


00 li 




P 


F-H CS 






A ° 





«l 


eS O 





3 






o 







g 


03 O 





< 


l-H 


l£ i- 




^1gJ« 






3 s^S 


m 




cu 00 P c3 


fi 




A 




3 




&'-H<+H r 3 


Ph* 




^'S'g.a 


Q 


ill 12 i 

1 Nil 
■ Hill 

O S 00 92 m F 


"73 




0} 






£ 2£ £ § 






"£Ph oPh S 






H 






J 






43 




a? 


t^o 




@ 






• 


02 





<: 


0> 


S 


Oh 




t»» 


fc 







2 


on 


1> 


Oh 




F 


3 


w 




ph 




pd 




W 




H 




W 




Ph 





CO «2 












BENEFACTION. 






325 






00 


| 

a 

1 


C4 o 


O 

t> 

CO 

i-H 




5 >> 






1 










.+» 




J *o • 




CO 'as 






^i 




M 


s 




H .£ 






00 






0> 




h a 






CO 
O 


00 

d 

a 

0Q 


9 

cq : 

•S : 


O 




H 

SI 




Eh 


00 


P 

to 









s 




i— i 


r< 




c3 «3 












J 


Q 


cog 










H 


s 




£> w 








fc 


H 


"oo 




PQ 










» 






o 


53 — 


i-H 

CO 


_g 


CO« 








t— 1 


P o 


1 




CO f- 
»-H eS 









o 


P3 tf 


m 

CQ 




3 




-♦J 

c 

8 



w 


P2 


i 
4 


& ° 


O 


PQ 
O . 

It 


^ 
W 


o w 


00 CO 

P3 * 


CO 


«3 

CM 
O 




PQ 


o 


M 
P 

PQ 








c6 






*o • 


1 




^ 


CD 




M 




O 


s S 

d 




1 






e 
a 



A 
-m 




h4 


CO 




| 


Is 













E-i 


'53 


.2 : 


H 




^ s 






P-i 


o 
















V 
















£ 







-# 










P3 




if 






cd 
co 






> 




c 














oPQ 






"S 






Ei 




H 






r-i 






g 
















• 




'S 






£ « 


o 


t^co 






l< 






S Q 


5 


CO *-. 






^ 






<4 


A 


r-H 85 
2 









713- bb 



XIII. 



€anbamthrt fax €animmQ 
§z$xm> 1877-78. 



The Seventeenth Convocation of the University of 
Bombay for Conferring Degrees was held on Saturday, the 
2nd February 1878, at 5 o'clock p.m., in the Sir Cowasjee 
Jehanghier Hall of the University of Bombay. The Mem- 
bers of the Senate present on this occasion and forming 
the Procession were :— 

His Excellency the Honourable Sir Richard Temple, Bart, 
G.C.S.I., CLE. 

Wit Wm-ftiixmllot. 

The Honourable James Gibbs, C.S., F.R.G.S. 

William Wordsworth, B.A. 
. The Honourable John Marriott, B.A. 

Surgeon-General W. G. Hunter, M.D„ F.R.C.P. 

The Honourable Raymond West, C.S., M.A., F.R.G.S. 

Ramkrishna Gopal Bhandarkar, M.A., Hon. M.R.A.S. 

The Honourable Rao Saheb Vishvanath Narayan Mandlik, C.S.L 

F. L. Latham, M.A. 

Henry Cook, M.D., F.R.G.S., F.G.S., F.M.S, 

I. B. Lyon, F.C.S. 

Theodore Cooke, M.A., M.I., LL.D. 



CONVOCATION FOR CONFERRING DEGREES, 1877-78. 327 

§jwpste. 

Peter Peterson, M.A„ 

guatft of &ttfMftU. 

Sir Munguldasa Nathoobhoy, Knight, C.S.I. 
Captain H. Morland, F.R.A.S., F.P..G.S. 

His Excellency Lieut. -General the Honourable Sir Charles W, 
D. Staveley, K.C.B. 

The Honourable Sir M. R, Westropp, Kt., B.A. 

ILtafcxr of taaril 

The Honourable L. R. Ashburner, C.S., C.S.I. 

gnfrgts of % figlr fei. 

The Honourable Sir Charles Sargent, Kt., M.A. 

The Honourable L. H. Bayley. 

The Honourable M. Melvill, C.S. 

The Honourable R. H. Pinhey, C.S. 

t&mtetoU$z$£Qhldxfa tanxfl. 

The Honourable Mahomed Ally Rogay. 

K. M. Chatfield, B.A. 
Colonel Thomas Waddington. 

The Rev. W. Maule, LL. D. 

W. J. Moore, M.D., L.R.C.P., Edin. 

Manockjee Cursetjee. 

Bhugwandass Purshotumdass. 

C. Gonne, C.S. 

Sorabjee Pestonjee Framjee. 

Venayakrao Vasudevji 

Rao Bahadur Dadoba Pandurang. 

A. N. Hojel, L.K., andQ.C.P.I. 

Dastur Hoshang Jamasp. 



328 CONVOCATION FOE 



T. B. Kirkham. 

Kharshedji Rustomji Cdm£. 

Dastur Peshuton Byramji. 

Vdsudev Pdndurang. 

BdlMangesh Wagle, M.A., LL.B. 

The Rev. D. Maepheraon, M.A. 

Colonel W. A. Baker, R.E. 

Dhiraj ram Dalpatram, G. G. M. C. 

Colonel J. A. Fuller, R.E. 

W. Gray, M.B. 

Lieut. -Colonel H. F. Hancock, R.E. 

Khanderao Chimanrao Bedarkar, LL.B, 

The Rev. G. C. Reynell, M.A. 

Shantdrdm Ndrdyan. 

The Rev. J. A. Willy, S. J., D.D. 

Atmaram Pandurang, G. G. M. C. 

Byramjee Jeejeebhoy, C.S.I. 

Govind Vithal Kurkaray, B.A. 

John Pinkerton, M.I). 

Newroji Fardunji. 

Cursetjee Nasserwanjee Camd. 

Harichand Sadashivji, Assoc. Inst. C.E. 

D. S. Kemp, F.C.S. 

W. F. Knapp, M.R.C.S. 

Rao Bahadur Nana Moroji. 

Raghunath Nardyan. Khote. 

Rahimtuldh Muhammad Sayani, M.A., LL.R. 

G. M. Stewart. 

G. Atkinson, B.A., Serjeant-at-Law. 

Homejee Cursetjee Dady. 

Edaljee Nasserwanjee, G.G.M.C. 

J. Flynn. 

K. T. Best, M.A. 

Rdo Bahadur Ganpatrao Bhaskar, 

John Jardine, C.S. 

Nanabhoy Byramjee Jeejeebhoy, 

Ardesir Framji Moos. 

Ndndbhdi Haridds, LL.B. 

Jamsetji Dhanjibhai Wddia. 

Baldji Pdndurang Bhalerdo. 

Kaikhosru Rastamji Vikdji^ L.M. 

Javerildl Umidshankar Ydjnik. 

J. Anderson, K.L.S. 

A. P. DeAndrade, G.G.M.C. 

J. Gerson DaCunha, M.R.C.S., L.R.C.P. 

A. Forde, Mem.Inst.C.E. 
Rdo Bahddur Vdsudev Bdpuji Kdnitkar. 
F. Mathew, C.E. 



CONFERRING DEGREES, 1877-78. 329 

Rio Saheb Makund Ramchandra. 

P. Ryan. 

SirF. H. Souter, Kt, C.S.I. 

James Arnott, M.D., CM. 

Badrudin Tyabji. 

Khan Bahadur Mancharji Kavasji Murzban, Assoc. Inst. C,E. 

Nanabhai Rastamji Ranina. 

Rastamji Mervanji, G.G.M.C. 

Cowasji Manockji Limji. 

J. M. Maclean. 

G. A. Maconachie, M.D. 

L. P. DeRozario, L.M. 

Rastamji Nasarvanji Khori, L.M., M.D., L.R.C.P. Lon., P.M. 

C.S. Lon. - 

W. Martin Wood. 

Anna Mor<§shvar Kunte, B.A., M.D. 

Lieut. James Brebner, I.N., Assoc. Inst. C.E. 

A. M. C. Coutinho, G.G.M.C. 

Dastur Jamaspji Minocherji Jamaspasana. 

S. Newcome Fox, B.A. 

The Rev. J. M. Hamilton, S.J. 

Jehanghier Barjorji Vacha. 

Kashinath Trimbak Telang, M.A., LL.B. 

Kamrudin Tyabji. 

J. C. Lisboa, G.G.M.C. 

The Rev. D. Mackichan, M.A., B.D. 

Manasukharam Suryaram Tripathi. 

Varjivandas Madhavdas. 

G. C. Whitworth, C.S. 

Cowasji Hormusji, G.G.M.C. 

P. C. DeSouza, L.M. 

Rao Bahadur Gopalrao Hari Deshmukh. 

The Very Rev. N. Pagani, S.J. 

The Rev. R. Rive, S.J. 

Yashvant Vasudev Athale, M.A., LL.B. 

G. Waters, L.RC.S., L.R.C.P.E. 

Rao Saheb Ganpatrao Moroba Pitale carried the Mace. 



The Members of the Senate having taken their seats, the 
Honourable the Vice-Chancellor, in the absence of the 
Dean of the Faculty of Civil Engineering, rising, supplicated 
a Grace of the Senate as follows : — 

" Mr. Chancellor, — On behalf of Sadashiv Ramchandra 
Bhagvat, Nilkanth Yinayak Chhatre, Mahadev Trimbak 
Chiplunkar Vasanji Kailianji Desai, Ramchandra Anant 
b 713-66* 



330 CONVOCATION FOE 

Keshkamat, C. Antonio Ribeiro, Joaquim Rodrigues, Sha- 
purji Dadabhai Bamji, Balkrishna Ganesh Kanitkar, Hari- 
vadanram Maniram Mehta, Venkatrao Anant Saraf , of Poona 
Civil Engineering College, I submit the Certificates required 
by this University, and move that the Senate do pass a Grace 
for their admission to the Degree of Licentiate of Civil 
Engineering." 

Whereupon His Excellency the Chancellor put the ques- 
tion u Doth it please you that this Grace be passed ?" and 
the Senate assenting, the Chancellor said " This Grace is 
passed." 

The same words, mutatis mutandis, were used successively 
on behalf of the Candidates for the Degree of Licentiate of 
Medicine and Surgery, Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Laws, 
and Master of Arts : Surgeon- General Hunter, M.D., 
F.R.C.P., the Dean in Medicine, supplicating for the Can- 
didates in Medicine and Surgery ; Principal Wordsworth, 
B. A., Dean in Arts, supplicating for the Candidates in 
Arts ; and the Honourable J. Marriott, B.A., Dean in Law, 
supplicating for the Candidates in Law. 

When all the Graces were passed, the Honourable the 
Vice- Chancellor and the Deans of the Faculties presented 
the Candidates in the following words : — 

" Mr. Chancellor, I present to you (naming the Candi- 
dates and their Colleges) who have been examined and 
found qualified for the Degree (stating the particular 
Degree) to which I pray they may be admitted." 

And His Excellency the Chancellor answered in the 
following form of words : — 

" By the authority given me as Chancellor of this Uni- 
versity, I admit you (mentioning the names of the Candi- 
dates and their Colleges) to the Degree Of (mentioning the 
particular Degree), and charge you that ever in your life 
and conversation you show yourselves worthy of the same." 

The Chancellor at the same time presented the Candi- 
dates with the Certificates of their Degrees. 

His Excellency the Chancellor presented the a Chancel- 
lor's Medal" to Kavasji Dadabhai Contractor, M.A., of 
Elphinstone College. 

The Registrar then made declaration of the degrees con- 
ferred as follows :— 



CONFERRING DEGREES, 1877-78. 



331 



I hereby declare the following Degrees this day con= 
f erred : — 

LICENTIATE OF CIVIL ENGINEERING. 



Second Class. 



Civil Engineering College!. 
Civil Engineering College. 
Civil Engineering College, 
Civil Engineering College. 
Civil Engineering College. 
Civil Engineering College. 
Civil Engineering College. 



Sadashiv Ramchandra Bhagvat. Poona 
Nilkanth Vinayak Chhatre . . Poona 
Mahadev Trimbak Chiplunkar. Poona 
Vasanji Kalliairji Desai ... Poona 

Ramchandra Anant Keshkamat Poona 

C. Antonio Ribeiro Poona 

Joaqnim Rodrigues ... .. Poona 

Pass. 

Shapurji Dadabhai Bamji ... Poona Civil Engineering College. 
Balkrishna Ganesh Kanitkar .. Poona Civil Engineering College. 
H^arivadanram Maniram Mehta. Poona Civil Engineering College. 
Venkatrao Anant Saraf . . , Poona Civil Engineering College. 

LICENTIATE OF MEDICINE AND SURGERY. 

First Class. 



Bellarmin Braganza 
Ratanji Rastamji Dadina 
Thakurdas Kikabhai Dalai 
Manilal Gangadas Desai 
Phirozshah Palanji Doctor 
Edalji Palanji Frenchman 
Lallubhai Bhagvandas Kaji 
Kuvarji Kavasji Vaidya 
Shivnath Ramnath Vyas 



Grant Medical 
Grant Medical 
Grant Medical 
Grant Medical 
Grant Medical 
Grant Medical 
Grant Medical 
Grant Medical 
Grant Medical 



College, 
College. 
College. 
College. 
College. 
College. 
College. 
College. 
College, 



Second Class. 

Hirjibhai Jamshedji Appu Grant Medical College. 

Phirozshah Behramji Bharucha . . . Grant Medical College. 
Bamanji Framji Daruvala ... ... Grant Medical College. 

Viccorino Dias Grant Medical College. 

Ramlal Lallubhai Doctor Grant Medical College. 

Caetano Fonseca Grant Medical College. 

Jamshedji Framji Kolapurvala ... Grant Medical College. 

Balabhai Maganlal Nanavati ... ... Grant Medical College. 

Ratanbhadra Manibhadra Pandit . . . Grant Medical College. 

Kavasji Kharshedji Sanjana Grant Medical College* 

Erachshah Framji Sethn& Grant Medical College. 



332 



CONVOCATION FOR 



BACHELOR OF ARTS. 

First Class. 

Vdman Shivrdm Apte... Deccan College. 

Second Class. 



Raghunath Gangadhar Bhadbhade 
Dattdtraya Vishnu Bhagvat ... 
Abdula Meralli Dharamshi . . . 
Harildl Harsadrdi Dhruva ... 
Ganesh Shrikrishna Khdparde 

Daji Abaji Khare 

Moro Vaman Kirtane ... 
Rangndth Narsinh Mudholkar 
Kavasji Bejanji Sethna 
Rastamji Dhanjibhai Sethna ... 
Dayaram Gidumal Shahani ... 

Pass. 
Rdghavendra Pdndurang Bengeri 

Kharshedji Nasarvanji Contractor 
Ratanji Mancherji Daldl 
Sitaram Yashvant Dalvi 



Guldbchand Motichand Damnia 
Lakshuman Ganesh Gandhi ... 
Gopal Ramchandra Gokhale . . . 
Sakharam Vdsudev Joshi 

Kaikhosru Kuvarji Kapadia . . . 
Govind Narayan Kelkar 
Framji Bamanji Master 
Sorabji Ratanji Master 
Krishndji Vdsudev Mule" 

Motildl Mugatldl Munshi 
Kashindth Bdpu Pathak 
Raghundth Venkdji Sabnis . . . 
Krishndji Vindyak Sdrangpdni 

Yashvant Balldl Tambe 



Ganesh Chimndji Vdd, 



. Elphinstone College. 
. Deccan College. 
, Elphinstone College. 
, Elphinstone College.- 
. Elphinstone College. 

Deccan College. 

Deccan College. 

Elphinstone College. 
. Elphinstone College. 

Elphinstone College. 
. Elphinstone College. 

Elphinstone College, for- 
merly Deccan College. 
. Elphinstone College. 
. Elphinstone College. 
. Deccan College, formerly 
Free General Assembly's 
Institution, Bombay. 
. Elphinstone College. 
. Deccan College. 
. Elphinstone College. 
. Free General Assembly's 

Institution, Bombay. 
. Elphinstone College. 
. Deccan College. 
. Elphinstone College. ' 
. Elphinstone College. 
Elphinstone College, for- 
merly Deccan College. 
Elphinstone College. 
Deccan College. 
. Elphinstone College . 
Elphinstone College, for- 
merly Deccan College. 
. Elphinstone College, for- 
Ttierly Free General 
Assembly's Institution, 
Bombay. 
, Deccan College, 



CONFERRING DEGREES, 1877-78. 333 

BACHELOR OF LAWS. 

Second Division. 

Hariram Uttamram Bhat, B.A Government Law School. 

Venkatrao Rukmangad Inamdar, B.A. Government Law School. 
Dinshah Pestanji;Kanga, M.A. ... Government Law School. 
Raoji Vasudev Tulu, M.A Government Law School. 

MASTER OF ARTS. 
First Class. 

Kavasji Dadabhai Contractor Elphinstone College. 

Pass. 

Phiroze Hoshang Dastur Deccan College. 

The Registrar then read the following Report : — 

Mr. Chancellor, 

I have the honour , by direction of the Syndicate, to lay 
before Your Excellency and the Senate a Report of the 
Proceedings of the University since the last Convocation 
for Conferring Degrees, held on the 16th January 1877. 

The Report mentions the principal results of the Uni- 
versity Examinations, Endowments to the University, and 
the more important Academical events of the past year. 

EXAMINATIONS. 

Matriculation Examination. — One thousand and thirty 
(1,030) Candidates presented themselves for this exami- 
nation at different centres of examination, viz., Bombay, 
Poona, Nasik, Belgaum, Ahmedabad, and Karachi. 437 
having obtained the prescribed number of marks in Eng- 
lish, were further examined in Bombay, of whom 217 passed 
the examination. The Syndicate desire to note that on 
this occasion the University for the first time admitted 
female Candidates to the Matriculation Examination. 
Three girls were sent up by the Scottish High Schools, 
two of whom passed. 

The successful Candidates were sent up by the following 
Schools : — 



334 CONVOCATION FOR 



33 by Elphinstone High School. 
20 „ Poona High School. 
14 ,, Surat High School. 

13 ,, St. Mary s Institution, Bombay. 
9 ,, Rajaram High School Kolhapur. 
9 ,, Eatnagiri High School. 

6 , , Belgaum Sirdars' High School. 

6 „ Broach High School. 

5 ,, Dhulia High School. 

5 „ Dharvad High School. 

5 „ Fort High School. 

4 „ Satara High School. 

4 ,, Narayan Jagannath High School, Karachi, 

4 ,, Kattiawar High School. 

4 ,, Ahmednagar High School. 

4 ,, Bombay Proprietary High School. 

4 ,, Scottish High School, Byculla. 

4 „ Baroda High School. 

3 ,, Ahmedabad High School. 

3 ,, Free General Assembly's Institution, Bombay. 

3 „ Akola High School. 

3 „ Nariad High School. 

3 ,, Bhavnagar High School. 

3 ,, John Connon Scottish High School. 

3 „ Bishop's High School, Poona. 

3 „ Sir J. J. Parsi Benevolent Institution, Bombay, 

3 ,, Chandanvadi High School. 

2 „ Haidarabad High School. 

2 „ Indore English School. 

2 ,, Ahmedabad Mission High School. 

2 ,, Poona Mission Institution. 

2 „ Panchgany High School. 

2 , , Poona Native Institution. 

2 „ Bombay Private English School. 

Poona Civil Engineering College. 

Nasik High School. 

Sangli English School. 

Alfred and Parsi High School. 

Baba Gokhale's School. 

Belgaum Mission School. 

General Assembly's Institution, Bombay. 

Sir Cowasjee Jehanghier N. Z. Madresa. 

Robert Money Institution, Bombay ; and the remaining. 

14 had been under Private Tuition. 



217 



CONFERRING DEGREES, 1877*78. 335 

Of these 79 took Sanskrit as their second language, 30 
Latin, 1 Hebrew, 2 French, 2 Portuguese, 26 Marathi, 55 
Gujarathi, 8 Canarese, and 14 Persian. 153 were Hindus, 
40 Parsis, 10 Europeans and Indo-Europeans, 9 Portu- 
guese, 4 Muhammadans, and 1 a Jew. 

First Examination in Arts. — At this examination there 
were 145 Candidates, of whom 61 passed. Of these 1 passed 
in the First and 13 in the Second Class. 38 of the success- 
"ful Candidates were from Elphin stone College, 9 from Deccan 
College, 7 from St. Xavier's College, 5 from Free General As- 
sembly's Institution, Bombay, 1 from Elphinstone College, 
formerly St. Xavier's College, and 1 from Deccan College, 
formerly Elphinstone College. 46 were Hindus, 9 Parsis, 
3 Europeans and Indo-Europeans, 1 a Muhammadan, 1 a 
Portuguese, and 1 a Sindhi. Of the 61 Candidates, 41 select- 
ed Sanskrit as their second language, 10 Latin, and ,10 
Persian. In the selected subjects or the examination, 36 
were examined in Butler's Sermons, 21 in Analytical Geo- 
metry, and 4 in Chemical Physics. 

Examination for the Degree of B.A. — At this examina- 
tion 83 Candidates were examined, of whom 30 passed. Of 
these 1 was placed in the First Class and 11 in the Second 
Class. 21 were Hindus, 7 Parsis, 1 a Muhammadan, and 1 
a Sindhi. Of the 30 Candidates 17 were from Elphinstone 
College, 8 from Deccan College, 3 from Elphinstone College, 
formerly Deccan College, 1 from Elphinstone College, for- 
merly Free General Assembly's Institution, Bombay, and 
1 from Deccan College, formerly Free General Assembly's 
Institution, Bombay. 20 selected Sanskrit as their second 
language, 6 Latin, and 4 Persian. In the selected subjects 
15 passed in History, 11 in Logic and Moral Philosophy, 
19 in Political Economy, 2 in Optics and Astronomy, 5 in 
Dynamics and Hydrostatics, 9 in Analytical Geometry, 8 iii 
Differential and Integral Calculus, 8 in Chemical Physics, 
7 in Inorganic Chemistry, and 6 in Physiology. 

Examination for the Degree of M. A. in Languages. — There 
were 4 Candidates, of whom 1 passed. His second lan- 
guage was Persian, He was a Parsi from Deccan College, 

Examination for the Degree of M.A. in History and Philo- 
sophy—There was only 1 Candidate. He was from Dec- 
can College, and he passed the examination in the Second 
.Class. He was a Hindu, 



336 CONVOCATION FOB 



Examination for the Degree of M.A. in Natural Sciences. — 
There was only 1 Candidate. He was from Elphinstone 
College, and he passed the examination in the First Class. 
He was a Parsi. 

Examination for the Degree of LL.B. — There were 13 
Candidates from the Government Law School, of whom 4 
passed the examination in the Second Division. Three 
were Hindus, and 1 a Parsi. 

First Examination in Medicme. — There were 42 Candi- 
dates from Grant Medical College, of whom 21 passed the 
examination— 4 passed in the First Division and 17 in the 
Second Division. Five were Hindus, 13 Parsis, and 3 Por- 
tuguese. 

Examination for the Degree of DM. and 8.— There were 28 
Candidates from Grant Medical College, of whom 20 passed 
the examination — 10 in the First Class and 10 in the Second 
Class. Seven were Hindus, 11 Parsis, and 2 Portuguese. 

First Examination in Civil Engineering — There were 
29 Candidates from Poona Civil Engineering College, of 
whom 17 passed the examination. Four were placed in 
the First Division and 13 in the Second Division. 14 were 
Hindus, 2 Parsis, and 1 a European. 

Examination for the Degree of L.CE. — There were 15 
Candidates from Poona Civil Engineering College, of 
whom 11 passed the examination, 7 of whom were placed 
in the Second Class. Eight were Hindus, 2 Portuguese, 
and 1 a Parsi. In the selected subjects 3 passed in Ana- 
lytical Geometry and Differential and Integral Calculus, 5 
in Mining and Metallurgy, and 3 in Mechanical Engineer- 
ing. 

UNIVERSITY PRIZES, 

The Munguldass Nathoobhoy Travelling Fellowship. — Mr. 
Vasudev Krishnarao Dhairyavan, B.A., LL.B., who was 
elected to the Fellowship last year, left Bombay for England 
on the 12th March last, and is now preparing for the Bar. 

The Bhugwanddss Purshotumddss SansTcrit Scholarship, of 
the value of Rs. 400 and tenable for one year, was awarded 
to Dhondu Hari Agase, B.A., of Elphinstone College. 



CONFERRING DEGREES, 1877-78, 337 

The Homejee Gursetjee Prize. — Three competitive poems on 
the subject prescribed for the year, " The Malabar Coast," 
were sent in, but none of them was found worthy of the 
prize. 

The Jugonnath Sunkersett Sanskrit Scholarships. — The 
two Jugonnath Sunkersett Sanskrit Scholarships, one of 
Rs. 25 a month and one of Us. 20 a month* each tenable 
for three years, were awarded, respectively, to Sadashiv 
Mahadev Godbole, of Ratnagiri High School, and Gopal 
Ramchandra Pitke, of Rajaram High School, Kolhapur. 

The Gowasjee Jehanghier Latin Scholarship, of the value 
of Rs. 200, and tenable for one year, was awarded to Ras- 
tamji Bamanshah Vakil, of Elphinstone High School. 

TJie David Sassoon Hebrew Scholarship. — A scholarship 
of Rs. 250 per annum, and tenable for two years, has been 
awarded to Rajaram Raghoba Gavankar, of Fort High 
School, for his passing the Matriculation Examination with 
the highest number of marks for proficiency in the Hebrew 
Language. 

The James Berkley Gold' Medal.— This prize was not 
awarded, as of the Candidates who passed the L.C.E. 
Examination no one was specially recommended by the 
Examiners in Engineering and Engineering Drawing, a 
.condition specially attached to the endowment. The prize 
of books, of the value of Rs. 150, was, however, on the re- 
commendation of the Examiners, awarded from this endow- 
ment to Sadashiv Ramchandra Bhagvat, of Poona Civil 
Engineering College. 

The Ellis [Prize, consisting of books of the value of Rs, 
60, was assigned by the Syndicate, during the year under 
report, to the Canarese language ; and the prize was award- 
ed to Raghavendra Jayaeharya Kuknur, of Dharvad High 
School, for having obtained the highest marks in that 
language at the Matriculation Examination, 

Tke Ellis Scholarship, of the value of Rs. 25 a month, and 
tenable for one year, was awarded to Dayaram Gidumal 
£>hahani, of Elphinstone College, for having passed the 
JB.A. Examination with the highest number of marks in 
^English. 

S 713-cc 



338 CONVOCATION FOE 

The Chancellor's Medal was assigned for the year 1877 
to Mathematics and Natural Philosophy at the M,A. Exa- 
mination ; but there being no Candidate in that branch, 
the medal was awarded by the Syndicate to Kavasji Dada- 
bhai Contractor, B.A., of Elphinstone College ; he having 
passed the M.A. Examination in Natural Sciences in the 
First Class. 

The Arnould Scholarship, of the value of Rs. 22 a month, 
and tenable for one year, was awarded to Yenkatrao Ruk- 
mangad Inamdar, B,A., of Government Law School. 

The Bai Maneckbai Byramjee Jeejeebhoy Prize, consisting 
of books of the value of Rs. 80, was awarded to Chintaman 
Yinayak Yaidya, of Elphinstone High School, for having 
passed the Matriculation Examination with the highest 
number of marks for proficiency in " General Knowledge." 

The Bao Sir Pragmalji Scholarships. — The two Rao Sir 
Pragmalji Scholarships, one of Rs. 20 a month and one of 
Rs. 15 a month, each tenable for three years, were awarded, 
respectively, to Yisanji Kallianji Rukha, of Bombay Pro- 
prietary School, andKeshavji Shamji Budhbhatti, of Nara- 
yan Jagannath High School, Karachi. 

The Sir Jasvantsingji Scholarships. — The two Sir Jasvant- 
singji Scholarships, one of Rs. 15 a month and one of Rs„ 
12 a month, each tenable for three years, were awarded, 
respectively, to two students from the Bhavnagar Alfred 
High School, Yamanram Kapilram Mehta and Mahipatram 
Govindram Mehta, in accordance with the special condition 
attached to the endowment. 

The Karsandas Mulji Prize. — There were two essays sent 
in on " The Influence of Asceticism on the Social Morality 
of the Hindus ; ? ' and the prize, consisting of books of the 
value of Rs. 100, was awarded to Yasudev Gopal Bhandarkar, 
B.A., of Elphinstone College. 

The JDossabhoy Hormusjee Gdmd Prize. — The subject an- 
nounced for this prize for 1877 was " The Telluric and Cli- 
matic Influences on the Production and Modification of 
Diseases as witnessed in Bombay." But the Syndicate re- 
ceived no essay on this subject. 

The Hughlings Prize, consisting of books of the value of 
Rs. 100, was awarded to Henry Frank O'Shanahan, of St. 
Xavier's College, for having passed the First Examination 
in Arts with the highest marks for proficiency in English , 



CONFERRING DEGREES, 1877-78. 339 

The James Taylor Prize. — ~Nb Candidate, who had taken 
Political Economy and History or Logic and Moral Philo- 
sophy at the B.A. Examination, having been placed in the 
First Class under the new Rules, the Examiners were un- 
able to award the prize. But the Syndicate, at the recom- 
mendation of the Board of Examiners, awarded the prize 
(consisting of books of the value of Rs. 100), under Section 
4 of this endowment* to Dayaram Gidumal Shahani, of 
Elphinstone College, for having passed the B.A. Examina- 
tion in the Second Class with the highest marks in Politic 
cal Economy and History. 

The Bhau Daji Prize, consisting of books of the value of 
Rs. 200, was awarded to Vaman Shivram Apte, of Deccan 
College, for having passed the B.A. Examination with the 
highest marks for proficiency in Sanskrit. 

TJie Venayehrdo Jagonnathji Sunkersett Prize. — The prize, 
consisting of books of the value of Rs. 180, was awarded 
to Trimbak Gangadhar Natu, of Elphinstone College, for 
having psssed the First Examination in Arts with the 
highest marks for proficiency in Sanskrit. 

Tlie Merwanjee Framjee Panday Scholarship, of the value 
of Rs. 20 a month, and tenable for one year, was awarded 
to C. Antonio Riberio, of Poona Civil Engineering College, 
for having passed the L.C.E; Examination with the highest 
number of marks in Mechanical Engineering. 

The Kahandas Mancharam Scholarship, of the value of 
lis. 20 a month, and tenable for one year, was awarded to 
JSTathabhai Avichaldas Desai, of Nariad High School, for 
having passed the Matriculation Examination with the 
highest number of marks among the Gujar&thi Hindu Can- 
didates. 

The Wilson Philological Lectureship, — During the year 
under report, Professor Bhandarkar delivered the first 
Series of Lectures in connection with this endowment, the 
subject being " Sanskrit and Prakrit Languages derived 
from it, including the modern Vernaculars." The Syndicate 
have elected Professor Peterson to deliver the Second 
Series of Lectures, 

REGULATIONS. 

Since the last Convocation for Conferring Degrees the 
Senate have passed Regulations for awarding the Dhirajlal 



25 


„ 30 


10 


„ 20 


25 


„ 30 


25 


„ 30 




„ 50 



340 CONVOCATION FOB 

Mathuradas Prize and the Sinclair Prize. They have also 
made some alterations in existing Regulations for endow- 
ments. 

The Senate, at the recommendation of the. Syndicate, 
have raised the fees for admission to the Examinations as 
follows : — 

F.C.E. ... ... from Rs. 10 to Rs. 20 

L.C.E 

F.M. 

L.M. & S. ... ' 

LL.B 

Honours in Law Examination 
In the Regulations for the First Examination in Arts 
" Natural Science " has been added to the list of prescribed 
subjects, and the optional subjects have been removed. 

In the Regulations for the B. A. Examination, the follow- 
ing scheme has been substituted for the one hitherto in 
force : — 

I. Languages. 
II. Mathematics. 

III. One of the following groups to be selected by the 
Candidate : — 

A. Language and Literature. 

B. History and Political Economy. 

C. Logic and Moral Philosophy. 

D. Mathematics. 

E. Natural Science. 

ENDOWMENTS. 

The Dhirajlal Mathurddds Scholarship- — In July last, Ati 
Lakshumibai, widow of the late Mr. Dhirajlal Mathuradas, 
Government Pleader, High Court, Bombay, offered to the 
University the sum of Rs. 6,000 in Government 4 per cent. 
Promissory Notes for the foundation of an annual scholar- 
ship to be called the " Dhirajlal Mathuradas Scholarship," 
and to be awarded to a Gujarathi Hindu who passes the 
B.A. Examination with the highest number of marks, and 
who prosecutes his studies in a School of Law recognized 
by the University of Bombay. 

At the last annual meeting of the Senate, held on the 19th 
December 1877, the offer was accepted with the best thanks 
of the Senate. 



CONFERRING DEGREES, 1877-78. 341 

The Sinclair Prize. — The President of the " Sinclair Me- 
morial Committee" offered to the University the sum 
of Rs, 1,500 in Government 4 per cent. Promissory Notes 
for the foundation of an annual prize in memory of the 
late Robert Sharpe Sinclair, LL.D., the first Director of 
Public Instruction, Berar, and for several years previously 
the Registrar of this University, to be awarded to the Can- 
didate who at Matriculation passes the best examination 
in Sanskrit or Persian, from a High School in Berar. 

At the last annual meeting of the Senate, held on the 
19th December 1877, the offer was accepted with the best 
thanks of the Senate. 

THE CHANCELLOR'S SPEECH. 

His Excellency the Chancellor then addressed the Senate 
as follows : — 

Mr. Vice- Chancellor and members of the Senate of the 
University of Bombay, — You will, I am sure, prefer that 
the observations, which occur to me as suitable on this oc- 
casion, should be addressed to those who are the objects of 
our solicitude, namely, the Graduates and Under-graduates 
of the University, and through them to the Native public 
throughout this Presidency, who are interested in the pro- 
gress of education. Though speaking now as Chancellor, 
I cannot divest myself of my capacity of Governor, and my 
colleagues in the Government have been consulted as to 
the principles to which your consideration is now to be 
invited. 

You, then, Graduates and Under-graduates, and all our 
Native fellow-subjects of Western India whom my words 
may reach— I would ask you to consider our system of 
State education as a whole. You may have sometimes 
heard in some quarters an advocacy of efforts by Govern- 
ment on behalf of primary or elementary education for the 
masses of the people, in apparent opposition to high edu- 
cation for a limited number ; and, again, of high or superior 
education for the few, irrespective of lower education, in 
the hope that they, once enlightened, will scatter the light 
among the nation, just as the rays of the rising sun must 
first touch the tops of the mountain, and rest there for a 
while before they can penetrate to the dark valleys below, 
b 713— cc* 



342 CONVOCATION FOR 

The Government of Bombay, however, does not fix its re- 
gards exclusively on either one side or the other. We de- 
sire to foster all kinds of education alike ; whether high, or 
elementary, or intermediate — encouraging each kind ac- 
cording to its needs. Though we long for the day when 
the people will undertake the task of national instruction 
by private resources and private organization, subject only 
to a general control by the State— still, we see that at pre- 
sent in Western India this task has to be performed mainly 
by the State, and we consider ourselves answerable for 
holding the balance between the claims of the several bran- 
ches of education. We cannot say that any one of them 
is more important than the others ; all are conducive to the 
good of the people. Nor can any one be treated separately 
from the others. They are co-operative one with the other, 
and are almost interdependent. If the nation under our 
charge be regarded in its corporate existence, we shall find 
that primary education supplies material for secondary 
education ; that advancement of secondary or intermediate 
education reflects back energy upon primary education ; 
that secondary education leads up to high education, which, 
again, elevates the tone of everything below it, and supplies 
the fittest instruments for all other sorts of instruction. 

National education in its totality may be likened to the 
beautiful structure in which we are now assembled. Pri- 
mary education is as the plinth with the foundation broad 
and deep ; secondary education is as the superstructure 
with its walls and pillars ; high education is as the roof 
with the domes and towers. No part of the structure can 
be injured or neglected without affecting the safety, or the 
usefulness, or the beauty of the whole. And as the archi- 
tects have bestowed care on all parts alike, so is the Gov- 
ernment bound to attend equally and simultaneously to the 
three departments of education — high, elementary or inter- 
mediate, preferring none to the others, but meting even- 
handed measure to all. 

Our first duty is to determine the curriculum, the stand- 
ard or standards, for each of these branches, in conformity 
with the wants of the several sections of Native society 
affected by each. In order that this may be well done, 
discriminative knowledge of the people, and sympathetic 
appreciation oi their condition and prospects, are absolutely 
necessary. 



CONFERRING DEGREES, 1877-78. 343 

Fortunately we can, by the method known as payment 
by results, induce both masters and scholars to follow what- 
standards may be prescribed. If the master be a 
salaried servant of the State, he receives more or less re- 
muneration according as more or fewer scholars pass exa- 
minations according to the standard. If private schools 
apply for grants-in-aid from the State, the aid is allowed, 
more or less, according as the scholars pass the examina- 
tion. 

Another method of ensuring, on the part of the scholars, 
adherence to the standards, is the granting of scholarships. 
For each class of schools, scholarships can be offered for 
open competition among the scholars at examinations to be 
held annually according to the standard. The scholarship 
is, of course, a stipend ; the holder virtually obtains a free 
education; he is the honourable possessor, not from patron- 
age or favouritism, but from victory over his fellows in 
the contest of mind with mind. Consequently, all the ac- 
tive-minded boys work for proficiency according to that 
standard, in the hope of winning the scholarship, and the 
master has every inducement to teach them accordingly. 
Thus the grant of scholarships is not a mere act of charity 
or of grace, but is an engine for compelling by the force of 
emulation the observance of standards. 

So the method of scholarships by competition stimulates 
the spontaneous efforts of the good scholars ; the method 
of payment by results ensures attention on the part of the 
masters to the scholars of moderate or indifferent ability, 
so that the best average possible may be preserved. And 
thus the State promotes the welfare of the weak scholars 
as well as that of the strong. 

• 

The moral power thus wielded by the State rivets on us 
a responsibility for seeing that the several standards are 
the most appropriate that can be devised. 

You, doubtless, bear' in mind that primary education is 
conducted in the vernacular languages only ; secondary or 
middle education partly in the vernacular and partly in 
English ; superior education mainly in English, partly also 
in the classical languages of the East. 

Now, primary education in its humblest form cannot be 
too low or too simple. Indeed, its first characteristic should 



344 CONVOCATION FOR 

be adaptability to the poorest persons and to the rudest 
minds, Its object is to ultimately embrace all the boys 
and girls of the lower classes throughout the country — the 
farm labourers, the small artisans, the village servants. It 
cannot* alas, attain so great an object within this generation 
of living men. Meanwhile, it strives to gather into its fold 
as many hundreds of thousands as it can. It already rec- 
kons 210*000 pupils ; but even that number forms a small 
part only of the children of a school-going age in this Pre- 
sidency, and leaves a sadly vast residue of children growing 
up in ignorance. Its system should, therefore, in the first 
instance, be as cheap, its standard as easy as possible, con- 
sisting of a little reading and writing and some elementaiy 
arithmetic. When it takes root and grows, then a some- 
what better standard may be cautiously introduced, just 
enough to enable the children to move happily in the lowly 
sphere to which their destiny confines them, — and no more. 
These poor children have but a short time during their 
tender age, say from their fifth to their thirteenth year, 
within which must be learnt what they are ever to learn 
from books, before the inevitable day when they must go 
forth to the field, to the grazing ground, to the road, to the 
workshop, to help their parents in the daily toil. With but 
too many of them, also, the time that can be devoted to 
learning, is even less than this. Still, if this much of time 
be obtained, within it there can be taught something more 
than elementary reading, writing, and arithmetic; some- 
thing of morality, so that these children, often belonging 
to the lowest castes in the social scale, may be instructed 
to speak truth, to love virtue, to despise falseness ; some- 
thing of the vegetable kingdom which rewards plenteously 
those who labour conscientiously ; something of those won- 
ders which Nature Teveals to the perception of all those 
who are trained to perceive ; something of the universe, 
of the orbs which rule the day and night, and of the stars 
which have from the most primeval periods attracted the 
gaze of man in his most savage state. If any of these pea- 
sant boys be gifted with genius, he will, I hope, be able 
whiL in a primary school to win a scholarship tenable in a 
midc'ie school, and there again win a scholarship tenable 
in a superior institution, ascending the educational lad- 
der s ep by step. Thus ability and industry wheresoever 
found, even in the lowest social state, will have their chan- 
ces. 



CONFERRING DEGREES, 1877-78. 345 

But if this teaching is to be given within so short a 
space of time to young children of lowly capacity, there 
must be good schoolmasters, men much better than any 
which can ordinarily be found in the villages of India ; 
men specially trained in pedagogy, that is, the art of im- 
parting knowledge to the young, The best salary which 
can be allowed is small : therefore we must obtain the 
utmost qualification which can be obtained for scanty re- 
muneration. Again, as the children have their being 
among rough, ignorant people, it is important that in 
school they should come in contact with masters possess- 
ing some traits of culture and refinement. For all these 
reasons it is necessary for the State to undertake the train- 
ing and supervision of the village schoolmasters, and to 
see that they all possess certificates of competent qualifi- 
cation. The village schoolmaster represented an ancient 
institution, but he was dull and unlettered. Now-a-days 
his office is filled by men of a new stamp ; and the produc- 
tion of such men is among the first fruits of our educa- 
tional efforts. 

It is remarkable that there are in this Presidency more 
than 7,000 girls in the lower class schools ; a circumstance 
exciting hopefulness, and showing that even the peasantry 
are awaking to a sense of the benefits of female education. 

Next, our consideration must be turned to the middle or 
secondary education relating to those middle classes which 
in many countries form one of the mainstays of the social 
fabric, which, indeed, in this country are not so strong 
in numbers as we could wish, but which are growing and 
will grow more and more, relatively to other classes, as the 
country advances in prosperity. There are about 16,000 
boys in this Presidency receiving this secondary education, 
out of whom about 5,000 are at private institutions. This 
total number is comparatively small. In the middle classes 
are included the peasant proprietor of the better sort, the 
small landholder, who should learn mensuration and village 
accounts, the money-lender ,the trader who should be practis- 
ed in arithmetical calculation ; the clerk who should qualify 
himself for subordinate employment in a private or a public 
office ; the artisan, the skilled workman, the manufacturer, 
who should acquire the technical knowledge necessary for 
success in his craft. For the secondary or middle class 
schools the standard must be so arranged as to suit, firstly, 



346 CONVOCATION FOR 



the general wants which are common to all the above-men- 
tioned sections of society, and, secondly, the special wants 
of each section. 

The instruction will, indeed, be partly given in English, 
but mainly in the vernacular. The merits or the defects in 
this instruction will show the manner in which we sustain 
the acknowledged principle that, while English instruction 
is offered to the Natives, they should be thoroughly ground- 
ed in their own language. We duly perceive that, while 
many Natives leam English— the more the better — still 
many Natives, if they are to be educated at all, can obtain 
their education only through the medium of their own ver- 
nacular. Hence, a new vernacular literature has to be 
created ; and such a creation, if it be fully completed under 
our auspices, will be among the most enduring monuments 
of British rule in Western India. Already a good begin- 
ning has been made by several highly- qualified Native 
gentlemen. On various branches of useful knowledge, 
books will be written in the vernacular languages of this 
Presidency, and in a plain, practical style, some of which 
will be abstracts, others translations, in extenso, of English 
works. Some of these books, too, will be original works 
by Native authors who, having mastered for themselves 
the subject in hand, will expound it in their own Oriental 
mode of thought and expression for the benefit of their 
countrymen. We should afford the utmost incitement to 
Natives to attempt this original composition, as affording 
the best scope for that sort of independent self-sufficing 
ability which we most desire to evoke among them. Such 
labours do as much good to the writers as to those for whose 
instruction the books are written, and will raise up a class 
of Native thinkers whose mental achievements will be 
among the most substantial results of our educational 
system. 

The several normal schools or training institutions for 
vernacular schoolmasters form an integral part of this 
secondary division of our system. They really are our 
vernacular colleges. Through them the resources of the 
ancient languages of India — languages unsurpassed in 
copiousness, in precision, in flexibility — are adapted to 
the diffusion of modern knowledge among the Natives. 
Through them the dead languages of elder times are used 
to preserve purity and expressive vigour in the living 



CONFERRING DEGREES, 1877-78. 347 

dialects. Through them the Natives are taught that no 
man can speak or write his mother-tongue competently 
well, unless he knows something of the classic tongue of 
his ancestors. 

To the students of these vernacular colleges an example 
has been set by European scholars, such as Haug, Biihler, 
and Kielhorn, members of this University. Some Native 
scholars of this Presidency, such as Bhau Daji and Bhan- 
darkar, have made additions to our knowledge of the an- 
cient language of India, which are appreciated at such 
seats of learning as Oxford and Berlin. 

One of the first objects to be set before Native authors 
in the vernacular, is the preparation of text books in the 
several physical sciences, especially chemistry, botany, phy- 
sics, and physiology, which are the sciences most prac- 
tically useful in the circumstances of Western India. Some 
such writers have already appeared, and many more are 
appearing. Those of them who may be content with mak- 
ing translations, can take the various science primers now 
being brought out in England, under the authority of some 
of the greatest names in science. The fact that such emi- 
nent men write such elementary books, is an acknowledg- 
ment of the value set upon educating the people in these 
subjects. 

Time does not permit me to summarize the instances 
which might be adduced to show how popular ignorance 
of practical science is retarding the material progress of 
the country, and is even in some respects causing retro- 
gression. 

The impoverishment of the cultivated soil in most parts 
of India is a result of that indifference to agricultural che- 
mistry which pervades the middle classes and the peasantry. 
The botanist shows us that the plants of the crops take 
up certain elements from the soil, which elements are 
necessary for the growth of the plants, and that if the soil 
becomes gradually deprived of these elements, its fertility 
is injured. The chemist shows us that these elements 
must be artificially replaced in the soil by means of manure 
or equivalent substances. The landholders and cultivators 
have these substances to a large extent ready on or near 



348 CONVOCATION *FOE 

the land, but neglect to use them. And yet some Asiatic 
nations, such as the Chinese and the Japanese, understand 
and act upon these principles. 

The wasteful destruction of the trees and brushwood in 
India is another example of that sort of carelessness which 
is caused by ignorance. The physicist shows us that the 
moisture drawn from the ocean by solar evaporation is 
gathered into clouds which pass over the land ; that if the 
surface of the ground be cool, then the clouds become con- 
densed, and Jheir moisture descends as rain; that such 
coolness cannot exist, unless the ground be covered with 
vegetation ; that if the surface be bare, arid, and heated, 
the clouds move onward, and the ground remains rainless. 
Yet the people destroy the forests, and leave the ground 
denuded, without thought of the drought and famine which 
must ensue sooner or later. 

In all these sciences the instruction should be practical, 
that is, it should be imparted in immediate contact with the 
objects concerned ; not only in the class room, but in the 
very presence of the things to which the lectures refer. 
Botany should be taught in the garden or in the field ; 
chemistry, in the laboratory ; physiology, in the midst of 
animal life. 

Connected with these topics there is the subject of phy-« 
sical geography. It nearly concerns the history of human 
progress. The Native youth should be taught how the 
mountains attract the clouds which drop moisture, produce 
vegetation, and supply the sources of streams ; how the 
streams cause that fertility of the lands which enables the 
human race to rapidly multiply, to constitute society and 
to found cities ; how the rivers, formed from the union of 
streams, become the highways of commerce. 

Under the head of secondary instruction come all the 
technical schools which we have established or may yet 
establish. Those Natives who reflect on the improvements 
which are advancing in Western India,, — such as the intro- 
duction of mechanical appliances, the new manufacturing 
industries, the development of artificial needs, the applica- 
tion of arts and sciences to the practical affairs of the 
national life, — will see how many fresh lines of employment 
are being opened out. The aim of technical instruction is 
to help Native youths to qualify themselves for earning a 



1877-78. 349 

k 
livelihood as medical practitioners, as chemists, as foresters, 
as scientific gardeners, as land-surveyors, as civil engineers, 
as trained mechanics, as engravers. 

But, although practical knowledge must occupy a larger 
part than heretofore in our middle class education, we must 
continue to bestow care as much as ever, or more than ever, 
on ethical instruction and moral culture. Happily, Native 
opinion is alive to the value of such instruction and cul- 
ture, and will cordially support the efforts of the educational 
authorities. 

In the middle class schools there are about 5,000 girls 
under instruction. These girls' schools are managed en- 
tirely by private effort. The fact may be hailed as the 
beginning of female education. The gradual augmentation 
of the number of girls at school should be cordially desired 
by every influential Native who cares for the good of his 
countrymen. 

The fact that English ladies are becoming Under-gra- 
duates of this University, affords a notable example to the 
people of Western India. 

I now approach the topic which is the last in the order 
we have been following, but which is one most nearly 
concerning you, Graduates and Under-graduates, — namely, 
high education or superior instruction. 

In the colleges there are about 900 students and in the 
high schools about 8,000. Of the 8,000, more than half be- 
long to those private institutions which flourish in our 
midst, and are doing a most beneficent work. The total 
number is comparatively small, and even from it a consider- 
able abatement must be made for those students who do 
not stay long enough to receive the higher parts of the in- 
struction. • 

The day may come, indeed ought to come, and we should 
all strive to hasten its coming, when the cost of high edu- 
cation will fall upon the State only in a slight degree, and 
will be defrayed partly by the munificence of the wealthy, 
and partly by those who seek for such instruction and who 
are to earn their living by it; and when every Native 
gentleman of rank and wealth in Western India will think 
it essential, that his son should be a member of the Univer- 
sity of Bombay. You know, gentlemen, that the upper 
b 713— eta 



350 CONVOCATION FOR 

ranks of Native society are as yet but little represented in 
the rolls of our University calendars ; that although the 
rich men of Bombay do often present their sons for our 
University examinations, yet such is not the general prac- 
tice (as it ought to be) with the Native nobility and gentle- 
men of Western India ; that for those who matriculate in this 
University the share borne by the State in the cost of 
their education is great, and that for those who take degrees 
this share of the State is greater still. It can hardly be 
denied that when the responsibility of educating the people 
has been accepted by the State, some considerable portion 
of the educational resources must be devoted to high edu- 
cation. To institute public education without providing 
for superior instruction, would be to make a spear without 
a spear-head, or a sword without a sharp edge. "Without 
superior instruction we could not diffuse those thoughts, 
ideas, and aspirations,* the diffusion of which forms the 
noblest part of the mission of England in the East. Without 
it, also, we could not find the agency for competently afford- 
ing secondary instruction, or even primary instruction. 
The only point open to discussion relates to the proportion 
out of the whole educational fund which is devoted to the 
superior instruction. In the Bombay Presidency this pro- 
portion amounts to about one-fifth of the whole. At pre- 
sent our care is to fix for the high schools and the colleges 
such a scale of fees as the students can reasonably afford 
in the existing circumstances of Native society. These fees 
are high, relatively, to the means of ordinary students and 
to the fees of the other schools ; so that our superior instruc- 
tion is very much more costly to the students than instruc- 
tion of any lower kind. We take into consideration the 
expense incurred by the students on account of their being 
obliged to live at capital cities like Bombay or Poona. And 
• this is one of the reasons why we have lately assented to 
the inauguration of a college at Ahmedabad, for the Guzerat 
province (as soon as may be financially practicable), for the 
founding of which institution a sum of money has been 
raised by Native gentlemen. Another reason is this, that 
we sympathize with the trouble which the parents must 
have in placing their sons under proper supervision while 
studying in capital cities distant from home. 

By establishing one or two additional colleges in this 
Presidency we hope to augment the number of those re- 



CONFERRING DEGREES, 1877-78. 351 

ceiving high education, which number is at present seen to 
be so small. But we cannot do more than this without un- 
duly weakening the limited resources available for the exist- 
ing colleges. Manifestly a college is of little use unless it 
enables students to take University degrees. Unless the 
teaching staff be strong enough for this, it must fail to 
perform its proper functions. Native professors are com- 
paratively inexpensive, and can competently teach many 
subjects. But there is one great subject for which you 
must have Englishmen and graduates of the British Uni- 
versities, who are necessarily expensive, and that is English 
literature. We have given you English professors worthy 
of your respect and confidence in the highest degree. But 
the number of such valuable men must unavoidably be 
limited. And this circumstance alone would preclude the 
founding of many colleges in this Presidency. At all events, 
we must take care that the English education does not de- 
teriorate : such deterioration is apprehended by many even 
among the Natives. Certainly there is not enough attention 
paid to English elocution and caligraphy. Much as we 
may employ Native professors in various subjects, we must 
endeavour in our superior institutions to maintain English 
professors for English literature. 

With all the efforts which we may have made, or may yet 
make, the quantity of high education in Western India is, 
and will long continue to be, extremely small for a population 
of 22 millions. There are not more than 800 students in 
the Government colleges in the Bombay Presidency and not 
more than 100 in the private colleges ; or 900 in all. From 
among the students at the high schools about 1,200 present 
themselves yearly for the University entrance examination, 
of whom about 300 pass on the average. But of those who 
thus enter the University only a few study for degrees. 
Now, I must remind you that this circumstance is opposed 
to the principle of those European Universities on the 
model of which this University has been established. In 
Europe, young men enter Universities, not merely for the 
sake of entering, but for the purpose of taking degrees. In 
this Presidency, as elsewhere in India, younepNatives gene- 
rally enter the University for the sake of entering merely, 
and without any thought of taking degrees. We must 
strive to correct this tendency which has arisen, contrary, 
indeed, to our wish and intention, but still under our own 



352 CONVOCATION FOR 

system. We must more and more make the possession of 
a University degree a necessary qualification for admission 
to the higher posts in the public service. Again, if students 
persist in regarding the entrance to the University as the goal 
of their ambition and the end of their studies, we must ren- 
der the entrance examination gradually harder and harder. 

Then there comes the question as to what is, and what 
ought to be, the subject-matter of our high education. 

In this University the utmost attention has been, and I 
hope ever will be, given to mental and moral .philosophy ; 
relating to those duties of man towards God which are 
acknowledged by all mankind ; to those abstract principles 
of right and wrong which always assert themselves in the 
conscience ; to the power and functions of the moral 3ense ; 
to the constitution of our mental faculties ; to the domain 
of practical ethics ; to the relations between man and man 
in the body politic ; to the foundations of rights and of true 
liberty in the social state. These principles have not only 
been inculcated in the abstract with the strongest sanction 
and the highest authority, but have further been illustrated 
in the concrete, and have been applied to history, to law, 
to literature, to society, and to government. Without this 
teaching you could never become really better or wiser from 
instruction in physical science. But I will show you pre- 
sently that physical science, so far from being opposed to 
mental and moral philosophy (as may have been sometimes 
believed), does, if rightly taught and truly understood, con- 
duce to the loftiest conceptions of philosophical thought. 
At this moment I have to remind you that those sacred 
lamps of faith, virtue, morality, and philosophy, preserved 
to us by the best traditions of the world — those holy fires 
unextinguished through so many ages, and as we believe 
inextinguishable — have been reverently and faithfully hand- 
ed down to you by this University. Whatever changes may 
be gradually introduced into other parts of our teaching, 
this part will, we trust, remain unchanged and unchange- 
able. 

This ethical and philosophical teaching has greatly affect- 
ed already, and will still more affect in future, the conduct, 
throughout life, of those who pass through the University. 
Allowing for failures and disappointments, we still see that 
there is a greatly improved standard of conduct, a higher 



CONFERRING DEGREES, 1877-78. 353 

ideal of rectitude, among those Natives who have received 
our ethical instruction, and have been in daily contact with 
the European professors. In the higher branches of the 
public service, both executive and judicial — more especially 
in the judicial — the Natives evince an integrity and a trust- 
worthiness for which we are heartily thankful. The im- 
provement which has occurred in these respects is remark- 
able, and can be best appreciated by us who remember 
the tone and standard which prevailed in times past, before 
the introduction of a system of State education into India. 
And the Natives themselves, as I understand, attribute it 
mainly to English education, to the moral instruction which 
is included in that education, and to companionship and 
association with European teachers. 

For the theoretical part of philosophy the Native youth 
in our Universities have always evinced an excellent apti- 
tude. This, indeed, is to be expected, inasmuch as philoso- 
phy has been cultivated by the races of India from the time 
of a remote antiquity, in all respects with wonderful dili- 
gence and in many respects with much success. The high 
mental qualities thus engendered, have been transmitted 
through many generations of men to you, the representa- 
tives of the present time. 

But, gentlemen, the exclusive devotion to mental and 
moral philosophy as contradistinguished from physical sci- 
ence, and without sufficient subjection to the discipline of 
severer studies, such as logic, mathematics and science — is 
apt to develope the very faults to which your mental con- 
stitution is prone. The imaginative faculties rise and spread 
so as to overshadow the reason ; the idealistic power flour- 
ishes so excessively as to draw the vigour away from the 
realistic faculties. Consequently, our University students 
are but too often addicted to rhetorical phraseology, not 
exactly applicable to the subject in hand, and without a 
sufficient basis of thought. This mental habit of theirs is 
unfavourable to original or independent thinking, and in- 
duces them to borrow ideas from others instead of forming 
their own ideas, or to reproduce simpliciter what they have 
learnt, whether it bear strictly upon the topic in question 
or not, to reiterate the formulae of thought as acquired in 
books instead of reasoning out matters for themselves. 
Much allowance should, in justice, be made for such faults 
b 71 3-dd* 



354 CONVOCATION.FOR 

existing in youths who have to obtain their education 
through a foreign language and literature. Similar faults, 
too, are common, in a greater or a less degree, to us all. 
The professors at our higher institutions would, I think, 
affirm the consequence to be that immaturity of thought so 
frequently noticed by the critics of our educated youth. 

The defect will, doubtless, be remedied gradually as the 
people become imbued with our education. It demands, 
and is sure to receive, the utmost attention on the part of 
our educational authorities, as it is very generally found in 
many classes of the people. Ask any judge who has to take 
Native evidence — any traveller who has to gather informa- 
tion in this country — any savant who has to investigate 
facts locally — and he will lament the inaccuracy which pre- 
vails among the people. Again, the indifference of the Na- 
tives to correct generalization has always been remarked 
with regret. The difficulty of obtaining from them general 
opinions deduced from verified data, or based on well-defined 
considerations, has been felt probably by every administrator 
and every economist who is concerned in solving the social 
problems of the nation. Yet, surely, these faults can be 
cured by education, for the people are endowed by Nature 
with shrewdness and sagacity. 

You will forgive me, gentlemen, for dwelling on these 
points so frankly, as I do so with the most friendly senti- 
ments. 

Your retentive power of memory, your aptitude for in- 
tense mental application, your aspiration to excel in what- 
ever may be prescribed, have always won the regard of your 
European teachers. These qualities supply something, but 
not all, of the foundation of success. 

Our students must bend themselves more than heretofore 
to those sciences which are severe and exact, as compared 
with those to which I have been just adverting. The pro- 
ficiency which Natives attain in mathematics ; the success 
they win in the law ; the public confidence they command 
when on the judicial bench; the progress they make in the 
practice of surgery and medicine, — afford an earnest of 
their future achievements in any science to which they 
may devote themselves. 

You are probably aware that deductive reasoning, whe- 
ther derived from mathematics or from logic— in both of 



CONFERRING DEGREES, 1877-78. 355 

of which the people of India have always evinced much 
aptitude — will never by itself supply the needs of the Na- 
tivaintellect. This may truly be said of us alj, but more 
particularly is it to be said of you. The thing most wanted 
for you all, is instruction in inductive reasoning. As you 
will recollect, deductive reasoning is the drawing of con- 
clusions from given premises, But induction is the reverse 
process. It consists of reasoning from particulars to gene- 
ral propositions. By it various phenomena have to be 
observed ; their complex combinations have to be separated 
by analytical processes, the relations of their different qua- 
lities have to be determined. In deduction the law is given, 
and the effects are required to be found ; that is a compa- 
ratively easy task in which you will readily excel. But in 
induction, on the contrary, the effects are given and the law 
is required to be found ; that is a hard task, in which you 
often fail, but in which you must, and will, learn to excel. 
A recent writer (Stanley Jevons) has given an illustration 
of the difference between deduction and induction, which is ' 
peculiarly applicable to you. When you enter a labyrinth, 
you move about hither and thither easily. This is like de- 
duction. But when you wish to return and make your exit 
from the labyrinth, then doubt and difficulty begin ; then 
you must trust to the accuracy of your observation of the 
way by which you entered, or make an exhaustive trial of 
all possible ways. This is like induction. _ Hence it is that 
inductive reasoning is the all-important subject to be pressed 
upon the Native mind. Our students should be drilled by 
its procedure and disciplined by its system. They should 
be exercised in it backwards and forwards, so that they 
cannot answer its question by exertion of memory, but must 
solve its problems by their self-acting reason alone. They 
will immediately find that they cannot succeed in this, un- 
less their observations are correct. And the necessity, thus 
imposed upon them, of observing correctly, will remedy 
some of the mental faults to which I have been alluding. 

Mill's work on Logic prescribed for you by the Univer- 
sity as a text book, has been regarded as a landmark in the 
progress of general studies, and especially of scientific 
inquiry. Take up his chapters on induction and causation, 
In his work on Political Economy, read the opening chapter 
explaining the origin of wealth, the fundamental structure 
of society, and the principles on which the science is based. 



356 CONVOCATION FOB 

Follow up these principles in the economic works of tho 
late Professor Cairnes. Note the introductory part of Buc- 
kle's work on Civilization, and observe the method of exa- 
mining the circumstances which make history and mould 
the fate of nations. Study especially the works of Sir Henry 
Maine* namely, Ancient Law, Village Communities, and 
the Early History of Institutions ; these shew you the origin 
of rights, the foundation of law, the progress of jurispru- 
dence. All such works teach you how to reach the pith, 
the kernel, the root of every matter. They are to several 
branches of study what the protoplasm is to living sub- 
stances. 

The practical study of the physical sciences, being itself 
the most cardinal instance of inductive reasoning, will emi- 
nently conduce to the same object, and will supply to the 
Native mind, as it were, that fibre and sinew, that solid 
strength, which it so much needs. Take Whewell's history 
of the absorbing labours of Newton ; or the account of the 
German astronomer Schwabe, who day by day for thirty-one 
years watched for the recurring spots in the sun ; or the 
story of Sir Humphrey Davy's enquiries into the composi- 
tion of water ; or Tyndall's narrative of Faraday's experi- 
ments in electricity ; or Darwin's observations of the habits 
of insectivorous and climbing plants ; and you will derive 
benefit, not only from knowing the grand conclusions ob- 
tained from their labours, but from noting the processes by 
which they laboured. 

As a preparation for such scientific study there is needed 
that general culture, that gymnastic mental training (as it 
is technically termed from physical analogy) which you have 
all received. 

The relative proportions which should be allotted in our 
University curriculum to general learning and to physical 
science have of late demanded, and will still demand, speci- 
al consideration. 

Of the students in this University some will follow pro- 
fessions, such as the public service, for which general edu- 
cation alone is needed ; others will follow professions, such 
as the scientific branches, for which special education must 
be superadded. Up to a certain point general education 
must be given to both classes of students. But after- 
wards such education will be prosecuted to the end of the 



CONFERRING DEGREES, 1877-78. 357 

college- course by those who are to live by the learned pro- 
fessions, while it will be relinquished by those who are i$> 
live by the scientific professions, each one of whom must 
thenceforth devote himself to his particular science. He 
must, therefore, not be unduly burdened with general edu- 
cation, lest he should be prevented from learning, during his 
collegiate course, the science which is to be his means of live- 
lihood. There are but five years within which a young man 
must learn all that is to be learnt at college for the purpose 
of his profession. If he is to be a chemist or a botanist, or 
a professor of art or science, or a medical man, or a forester, 
or a civil engineer, he ought to have as large a part, as 
possible, of the five years for acquiring his technical and 
special knowledge. For all such cases endeavour has been, 
and will be, made to lighten the weight of general education 
so as to give time and opportunity for the scientific pur- 
suits. 

We rejoice to see so many promising students qualifying 
themselves by general education for the public service, which 
offers an ever-widening field to your reasonable ambition, 
and in which you are likely to rise to higher spheres ; for 
the judicial bench where Natives acquit themselves so ho- 
nourably, also for the Native bar which is everywhere rising 
in repute and usefulness. But we hope that these profes- 
sions may not become overstocked. Though the danger of 
such over-crowding does not seem to be so imminent here 
as elsewhere, yet even here it exists. On this account, as 
well as for other reasons, we are anxious that many of you 
should choose the other professions which the sciences so 
abundantly offer. Looking to the vigorous growth of Eu- 
ropean manufactures at this capital city and at other places 
in the Presidency ; to the extension of railways ; to the 
hydraulic engineering needed for works of irrigation ; to the 
establishment of professional forestry; to the increasing 
demand for surgery and medicine ; to the incorporation of 
scientific teaching in our national education ; — looking to 
all these things, we hope that students will be attracted 
more and more in such directions. And the Senate and 
Syndicate of the University will be moved from time to time 
to consider amendments of the University standards of exa- 
mination with this view. * 

I beg you to read the general evidence given in 1862 be- 
fore the Royal. Commission on the Public Schools in England, 



358 CONVOCATION FOR 

by such witnesses as Hooker, Faraday, Owen,- Lyell, 
Roland, Carpenter. They declared that scientific pursuits 
by themselves afford an excellent general education, as train- 
ing the mind to habits of method, order, observation, and 
classification, and that in the words of Faraday himself " the 
study of natural science is a glorious school for the mind." 

All the arts and sciences which have helped to make Eng- 
land what she is by land and by sea, which have contributed 
so much to our national greatness and prosperity, these we 
are offering to you without stint or reserve; nay, more, we 
are urging them upon you for your acceptance, in the hope 
that they may do good to you as they have done to us. 

We hope, too, that many of you will become imbued with 
artistic and aesthetic ideas, and that some of you will follow 
art as a profession. India must deplore the loss, during 
wars and revolutions, of so many of those arts which flour- 
ished in the days when Asoka graved on the rocks the 
edicts of duty ; when the Boodhists hewed sacred chambers 
out of the strata on the mountain sides ; when the Brah- 
manists covered their fanes with carvings which seem to 
make ancient races of men live again before our eyes ; when 
the Mahomedans reared the tall minarets for prayer, and 
the domes in memory of the dead. You can hardly do 
better than fix your gaze on the antique remains of your 
own national art, which remains will hardly be surpassed 
by anything that European art can teach you. But under 
the guidance of Sir Bartle Frere — whom you so well remem- 
ber as Chancellor of this University — an artistic revival 
arose some years ago in Western India, a movement which 
is worthily sustained by our School of Art and Design at 
Bombay, and by the group of edifices where we are at this 
moment standing. 

Most of you must win knowledge for the purpose of 
fighting the battle of life, yet some of you may be able to 
pursue knowledge for her own sake. You have read Ma- 
caulay's stanzas, in which the goddess of literature ad- 
jures him to love her for herself alone. You may recall 
the passage in which Buckle declares that he who under- 
takes to write history, must relinquish all other ambition, — 
not for him are the riches and the honours of the world. 
.Remember that the man who can compose a book that 



CONFERRING DEGREES, 1877-78. 359 

shall live, or enlarge the bounds of human knowledge, or 
make a discovery in science, or produce a valuable invention, 
is as great as the successful statesman or warrior. 

Though I refrain from dwelling upon poetry, its impor- 
tance is not forgotten by us. However successful our train- 
ing may be in other subjects, it is beyond our power to 
train you to be poets. But we never cease to set before 
you the best examples of English poetry : and, fortunately, 
the British nation is as great in poetry as it is in sterner 
subjects. National poetry is in some degree the outcome 
of the history and the condition of a nation. Whether 
such poetry will arise in the India of to-day, we know not. 
You will, doubtless, cherish affection for the poetry of 
ancient India. If you consult the recent works of Griffiths, 
of Talboys Wheeler, of Monier Williams, you will observe 
how greatly that poetry is admired by modern readers. 
You will have seen how many of the finest verses of Ten- 
nyson have sprung from contemplation of the British 
Empire. You may claim a share in the pride inspired by 
the widespread rule of the British Sovereign for whom so 
many Native soldiers have fought and bled, and under 
whose colours the Native armies are serving. 

Lastly, whether hereafter you mix in the turmoil of 
active life, or be immersed in business, or tread the hard 
paths of practical science, you must not forget the moral 
philosophy you have learnt in this University. 

The pursuit of physical science, if undertaken with sin- 
gleness of purpose and humility of spirit, leads us to the 
contemplation of the first creative power, of Him whom the 
ancient Arabians figured to themselves as the Causer of 
Causes, of that impassable gulf which philosophers describe 
as separating the knowable from the unknowable. It would 
be unjust to physical science to regard it as hostile to na- 
tural religion. On the contrary, a strong presumption in 
favour of religion is supplied by science. Equally Unjust 
would it be to science to regard it as failing to quicken 
faith or to strengthen the moral sense. Few things can be 
more ennobling to the soul of man than honest effort to 
penetrate the mysteries of the material universe, and to 
understand the laws which the Creator has ordained for 
its existence. You probably have read that some modern 
authors divide knowledge into two main categories : one 



3G0 CONVOCATION FOR CONFERRING DEGREES, 1877-78. 

" humanistic," which may be broadly described as Uterce 
humaniores, metaphysical philosophy, aesthetics, law, his- 
tory ; the other " realistic," which may be broadly de- 
scribed as mathematics and physical science. It is to the 
humanistic division that all the noblest flights of eloquence, 
the most refined sentiments, the most exalted thoughts, 
have belonged until recent times. But within this century 
passages of consummate eloquence, of the purest beauty, 
are to be found in the writings of realistic authors. Take 
some of the finest or grandest passages by modern humanis- 
tic authors with whom you are acquainted, say those of 
Burke, Canning, Coleridge, Macaulay, Euskin, Buckle. 
Then on comparison you will find very fine and grand pas- 
sages by realistic authors, say Lyell, Brewster, Herschel, 
Tyndall, Balfour- Stewart, Josiah Cooke. 

All these studies will raise your thoughts towards prin- 
ciples which can be felt by faith, though they cannot be 
proved by our finite senses ; towards glories not to be be- 
held by the eye of man, and harmonies not to be heard by 
mortal ear. Fix your hopes on that better life in the future 
which is beyond this poor troublous sinful existence of ours 
here below ; remembering that " the things which are seen 
are temporal, but the things which are not seen are eternal." 

His Excellency the Chancellor having resumed his seat 
after a short pause again rose, and declared the Convoca- 
tion dissolved. 



3C1 



THE UNIVERSITY OF BOMBAY 



The total annual value of Endowments is Rs. 10,769. 
The total amount of Benefactions received is as follows : — 



For University Buildings 


... 


..Es. 


1,00.000 


For University Arms and Common Seal 


... 


" V 


1,200 


For University Library Building . . . 




.. }1 


2,00,000 


For the R&jabai Tower 




• • » 


2,00,000 


For University Mace 


Total. 


... •» 


1,200 




..Rs. 


5,02,400 



Seven Institutions are recognized by the University of Bom- 
bay. 

3,304 the total number of Matriculated Students. 



B 713— -ee 



362 



RESULT OP EXAMINATIONS. 






00 



9k 



5»i 



iS 



S3 



«3 



• 

1 


•ss-bj 


• eo«H eo>*«l 


3 


•puooeg 




•**M 


,,-lrHr* . . T|T© - ••;]*• 


la 

£1 

oS 

Si 

SfiO 

3 


•sireado.rna 


©co j j ; ; ::: r * 1 : : ! J5 


•sjaqqo 


FIHH . ; • ; ; • ...'!« 


•snBptjrampqnj^ 


■« <-> ** ; ; ; : : : : : : j • 


•s;8Jt?a 




•snpmH 


w«osH«Heo • *ct- • ^ao • 1 eg 


•su'BTfisuqo 


OiHI • » • ; »N • ;C« ; 1 J» 


£ 


■s^uap 
-n;g 8?bauj 


*::::: :«: ::;L 




t-C» • • • • 

lOi-H 


© 


•SaiTJ^g 9AIJ 

-tb^ tn sipoqog 


«o : 1 <o 

I 


'suopwn^s 

-Ul !}U3UinJ9A0{) 


•^flTflOO • « CM J i-(t-< J 




8 
1 
•6 

1 


•s^aap 
-aig oibaijj 


§::::: ::: ::: 


8 


•SU0II1 


1« : : : : : : : : : I 


•saws baici 
-«K ui sjpoqos 


08 : : ; : : i '. i i • " 1 


'saorin'iBis 
-ui ^uauiiiiaAo-o 


ov «* •* «o tj< ■<* e<» a® 

CO -M CO r-l • «OC0 • MH • 


CO 

OS 


•sa^pipntjo jo jequinR 


Cs©t-«D*a< ->SCJ C5 «© 1 £• 
■«* Ui 00 r-l • »* 00 • NH • W 

o i-< • • * 1 t!c 






Matriculation Examination . . 

First Examination in Arts . . 

B.A. Examination 

M. A. Examination .. 

IiL.B. Examination 

Honours in Law Examination. 

First Examination in Medicine 
and Surgery 

L.M. & S. Examination 

M.D. Examination 

First Examination in Civil En- 
gineering 

L.C.E. Examination .. 

M.C.E. Examination .. 


m 
& 

OS 

s 

•3 

a 

O 

'o 
u 
1 

a 

1 



<£*RminKtt0tt papers. 

1877-78. 



b 713—1 



(gxatmaatiofl gaper*. 



[A copy of the following Directions is laid on the Table of each 
Candidate at the beginning of each examination.] 

1 . Write your number on the list and your name, beginning 
with your surname, at the top of each sheet of foolscap. 

2. Make a margin (as in this paper), and write in the margin, 
at the top of each page, the number of the answer. 

3. Write upon one side only of the paper, and do not write 
any part of your answer upon the margin. 

4. Begin each answer at the top of a new page. 

5. Arrange your papers with care in the order of the ques- 
tion, and tie them together with the piece of string provided. 

6. Write on the back of the last sheet 

1st. Your number on the List, 

2nd. Your Name, beginning with your Surname. 

7. Candidates in want of anything are to apply to the Exami- 
ner or other officials in charge, but are not to leave their seats on 
thi3 or on any other account, except to deliver up their answers. 

8. If any Candidate bring any book or paper into the Exmina- 
tion Hall, or speak to, or communicate in any other way with an- 
other Candidate while the Paper Examination is going on. he 
will be instantly expelled, and his name reported to the Board of 
Examiners. 

9. Candidates, when they have given up their answers, are on 
no account to return to their seats. They must at once leave the 
Hall without loitering. 

10. Candidates should be careful not to waste the paper sup- 
plied for Writing their answers, and they should not carry any 
blank paper from the Examination Hall. 

P. PETERSON, M.A., 

University Registrar. 



MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1877-78. ii) 

I. 

MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 187^-78. 

EXAMINERS. 



R. G. OXENHAM, M.A. ... 

Professor T. B. Kirkham. 

P. Peterson, M.A 

J. T. Hathornthwaite, M.A. 

The Rev. A. C. Grieve 

The Rev. J. M. Hamilton, S. J. 

P. Peterson, M.A. 

The Rev. C. H. F. Johnston, M.A... 

Joseph Ezekiel, Esq, 

The Rev. A. Bottrquin 

A. P. de Andrade, G.G.M.Gr 

Rao Bahadur Dadoba Pandurang . . . 

The Rev, R. Gillespie, B.A 

Jayasatyabodhrav Tirmalrav Inam- 
dar, Esq 

Rahimtttlah Muhammad Sayani, 
M.A., LL.B 

Mirza Hairat, Esq 

Krishna Shastri Godbole, Esq. ... 

J. T. Hathornthwaite, M.A. 
Govind Vithal Kurkaray, B.A. ... 
Rao Bahadur Daji Nile ant Nagar- 

KAR 



In English. 



In Sanskrit. 
In Latin. 
In Hebrew. 
In French. 
In Portuguese. 
In Marathi. 
In Gujarathi. 

In Canarese. 

In Hindustani. 

In Persian. 
In Sindhi. 



F. G. Selby, B.A. .. 
James Scobqib, F.C.S. 



i 



In Arithmetic, Algebra, 
and Euclid. 

In Elementary History 
and Geography. 

| In Elementary Natural 
( Science. 



IV MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1877-78. 

Monday, 1st October. 
[10-30 a.m. to 1-30 P.M.] 



ENGLISH. 
R. G. Oxenham, M.A. ; Professor T. B. Kirkham ; 
J. T. Hathornthwaite, M.A. ; P. Peterson, M.A. ; 
The Rev. J. M. Hamilton, S.J. ; The Rev. A. C. Grieve. 

[The figures to be right indicate full marks. ] 

^iP N.B. — Questiom 1, 2, 3 and i must be ansioered by every 
candidate. 

1. Paraphrase, punctuating with care : — 30 

How weak is man to Reason's judging eye ! 
Born in this moment, in the next we die ; 
Part mortal clay, and. part ethereal fire, 
Too proud to creep, too humble to aspire. 
In vain our plans of happiness we raise, 
Pain is our lot, and patience is our praise ; 
Wealth, lineage, honours, conquest, or a throne, 
Are what the wise would fear to call their own. 
Health is at best a vain precarious thing, 
And fair-fac'd youth is ever on the wing ; 
'Tis like the stream, aside whose wat'ry bed 
Some blooming plant exalts his flow'ry head, 
Nurs'd by the wave the spreading branches rise 
Shade all the ground and flourish to the skies ; 
The'waves the while beneath in secret flow, 
And undermine the hollow bank below ; 
Wide and more wide the waters urge their way, 
Bare all the roots, and on the fibres prey. 
Too late the plant bewails his foolish pride, 
And sinks, untimely, in the whelming tide. 

2. Paraphrase the following idiomatic expressions so as to 20 
show that you understand their precise meaning : — 

(a). You had better now have your wits about you. 

(6). The question is whether the rule holds good in this 

case, 
(c). Pray do not beat about the bush, but come to the 

point at once. 

(d). It may be true for aught I know. 

(e). You may take my word for it that this cannot be 
put up with. 



MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1877-78. V 

3. Point out what is wrong in the following sentences, and 20 
re-write them correctly : — 

(a). I asked to him that what harm is there if we will 
copy. 

(6). That province feels scarcity of corns, and rice has 
risen to such enormous price as the poorer men are 
obliged to eat breads of grass. 

(c). I was wondered to see a fainted man in the street 
with his legs stretched : it was dreadful sight. 

(d). We have had a strong weather since two days attend- 
ed with thunders and lightning having forks. 

(e). The trees now display a pleasing scenery, being 
clean by reason of rain-showers, and the people 
are too much happy. 

4. Write about 15 lines of original composition, in the 20 
form of a letter to a friend, stating what profession or occu- 
pation you would prefer to follow, and your reasons for pre- 
ferring it. 

5. Write down the following grammatical forms : — 10 

(a). The comparative and superlative of : — 
bad, thin, holy, wise, perfect. 

(6). The diminutive of : — 

hill, stream, dear, maid, lamb, 

(c). The plural of :— 

leaf, index, canto, penny, brother-in-law. 
(d). The past tense and past-part, of : — 

drink, shoot, lie, cleave, hang. 

6. What is meant by the sequence of tenses ? State and 10 
exemplify the rule on the subject. Criticize the sequence in 
the following couplet : — 

Friend to my life, which did you not prolong, 
The world had wanted many an idle song. 

7. Parse fully the word sleeping in the following sen- 10 
tences : — 

(1). Now sleeping flocks on their soft fleeces lie. 

(2). Then gave I her a sleeping potion. 

(3). ? Tis given out that sleeping in my orchard a ser- 
pent stung me. 

(4). You ever have wished the sleeping of this business. 

b 713-1* 



Vi MATKICULATION EXAMINATION, 1877-78. 

Write four sentences in which the word stock is used re- 
spectively as a verb, a noun, an adjective and an adverb ; 
and three sentences in which the word after is used respec- 
tively as an adverb, a prepositon, and a conjunction. 

8. Apply your knowledge of etymology to distinguish be- 
tween an arrogant, an insolent, an impudent, an impertinent, 
a rude and a saucy person. 

Give the roots and primary meanings. 

"Re-write the following sentence of Dr. Johnson's, using 
chiefly words of Teutonic origin : — 

' ' The connection is supplied With great perspicuity and 
the thoughts are concatenated without any abruption." 

9. What is a subordinate sentence ? How may they be 
classified ? Give an example of each class. Distinguish be- 
tween the different kinds of adverbial sentence. 

10. Distinguish between rhythm and rhyme. 

Explain the terms 'accent,' 'emphasis,' 'blank verse,' 
* hypermetrical,' ' pentameter,' giving examples. 

"0 argument blasphemous, false, and proud." — Milton. 
Scan this line and comment upon anything noteworthy. 



Monday, 19th November, 
[10 a.m. to 2 P.M.] 



SANSKRIT— Paper I. 
Peter Peterson, M.A. 

[The figures to be right indicate full marks.] 
1. (a) Combine, according to the rules of Sandhi, the 15 
following :— 



MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1877-78. VU 

Also the following compounds : — 3"^f + S5TTr 

irw + ipr jk*z + arte and itt + anr. 

(6) State the rule about the change of dental ^T into 
lingual UT and give examples. 

(c) Write the following sentences correctly : — 

^T Hpr?r; ^rfq- rrc*i rfr: ^^g; »Trr:. 

2. Give the first case — singular, dual, and plural — of the 10 
following : — 

r^=r. arrrepr. far. **&% ^jf?^. *•> *•> *i 

TrfhnT. m., n.; 9RT^\ sJWT. m., n.; 3lfq\ 

&%VT. ^T. ST^Tf £• ar^. and q-fa^. 

3. Give the third case singular of the following : — 10 

nr^Tr ^rra*. srrcr snV rar^ ^-t. 

and g-r^T. 

4. How is the feminine case of the present participle 10 
(Par.) formed ? Give an example from each of the ten classes. 

5. Decline :— ^"^TJT 3 

6. Decline in the feminine : — ^rpr. Give the optional 4 
forms, and say when they are used. 



viii MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1877-78. 

7. What is the Sanskrit for eight, sixteen, twenty-nine, 5 
forty-two, fifty, ninety-nine, and four hundred, 

8. Decline :— ^trfT? m., f., n. 

9. Give the 3rd pers. sing. (Parasm. or Atman., or both, 10 
if both are used,) of the pres. and perf. of sfTXT, SIT* T^T^ 
(to find), ^JT, 7ft, 3TT<T^nd 3T*§. 

10. Give the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd' pers. sing. (Parasm. or 10 
Atman. j or both, if both are used,) of the imperfect and 

simple future of 3T2". O^. 33T. $pR\ and f^T (to know). 

11. Dissolve the following compounds, and state to which 10 
class each belongs : — 

5:Grnflr?r rrsrren:. f^rthr. srfnm. *m*%- 

12. Give four nouns which undergo change at the end of 10 
a Bahuvrihi compound. State the rule, and give an example 

for each. 



Monday, 19th November. 
[2 p.m. to 5 P.M.] 



SANSKRIT. -Paper II. 
Peter Peterson, M.A. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Translate : — 26 



MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1877-78. ix 

rtw ^xr^rrrrqrr^frr | qf *rfrqf ?^# ># 
fWf&rra^' jtcst tnrnrar l w *nrprt 

argfir*:: ftsrre^flr Tarnr^ r^rrfir l ^ 

f grrajTrrr f*r f rfr ^rfrr l 
=r T?r?rcrnT waipTPrT n 

-Si 

tFJ t^t sfa n 



X MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1877-78. 

2. Transiate :— 24 

(•) Srrirr qrpnrFrr ^tt^t 3rr nrr*: I 
*fk: &m 5rr qFrar*rr5r*r> srra: | 

3. Translate into Sanskrit : — 50 

A certain goblin used to keep watch over a rich treasure 
buried underground. Suddenly, he was ordered by the ru- 
ler of the demons to fly away and remain for many years in 
another country. Wondering how his treasure might be safe 
in his absence, he at last hit upon a plan. In that city there 
lived a miser. To him the goblin, having dug up the treasure, 
gave it, saying, "I give you this from my great love for you. 
With its help you must eat, drink and be merry. " Then the 
goblin, flew away. Ten — twenty years went by. Having com- 
pleted his service, the goblin flies home to his native land. 
What does he see ? rapturous sight ! The miser, dead 
from starvation, lies stretched on the treasure -chest, and the 
treasure is all there, untouched. So the goblin gets his trea- 
sure back again, and rejoices greatly to think that it has had 
a guardian who did not cost him anything. 



MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1877-78.. 

Monday, 19th November. 
[10 a.m. to 1 P.M.] 



LATIN.— Pater I. 
The Rev. 0." F. H. Johnston, M.A. 
[The figures to the right indicate full marks. ] 

1. What is an adverb, and what is a conjunction ? 
Which are adverbs and which are conjunctions in the fol- 
lowing : — 

non : necnon : procul : inde : ut : velut : nsquam : enim : 
quoque : usque. 

2. Give the Latin words for husband, wife, bull, cow, 
Bon-in-law, daughter-in-law, old man, old woman, god, 



3. What nouns are generally masculine ? Give the genders 
of : — Notus, laurus, Cyprus, ovis, socrus, avis, parens, 
sacerdos. 

4. Decline, in singular and plural : — deus, dea, cancer, 
gener, judex, messis, os (bone), os (mouth). 

5. State the peculiarities of declension in : — jocus, Tartarus, 
domus, bos, vulgus, coelicola, vis, opem, 

6. Explain the meanings of : — aedes (s.), aedes (pi.), copia, 
copiae, finis, fines, gratia, gratiae, littera, litterae, sal, sales. 

7. Give the comparative and superlative of : — liber, niger, 
similis, providus, benevolus, juvenis, constanter, male, prope, 
diu. 

8. What are the meanings of the comparative and super- 
lative forms of adjectives ? 

9. Distinguish between : — aliquis, quisquam, and quidam ; 
and between quisque and quisquis. 

10. Express in Latin : — one, first, one by one, once, four, 
fourth, by fours, four times, eighty, eightieth, by eighties, 
eighty times, fifteen, fifteenth, by fifteens, fifteen times. 

11. What are Transitive Verbs, and what are Intransi- 
tive ? 

12. What are Moods and Tenses of the Verb ? How many 
Moods are there, and how many Tenses ? 

13. Give the Gerunds and Gerundive of A mo, with the 
English meaning of each. 



Xli MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1877-78. 

14. Give the 2nd pers. plur. pres. Indie., the 3rd pers. 
sing, future Indie., 1st pers. sing, imperf. Conjunc. of : — 
rego, audio, vereor, partior, patior, possum, volo, crepo, 
%o, pendeo, pendo, sancio, vincio, vinco. 

15. Explain the meanings of in and sub with the Accusa- 
tive, and with the Ablative. . 

16. Explain : — Num miseri sumus ? 

Nonne miseri sumus ? 
Nosne miseri sumus ? 
Utinam possim. 
Utinam possem. 
Utinam potuissem. 

17. Correct the bad grammar in : — 

(1) Quereris quod tibi non succurrerem. 

(2) Questus eras quod tibi non succurram. 

18. Change the following Active sentences into a passive 
construction with the same meaning : — 

Mater alit pullos. 
Deus mundum creavit. 
Rogas me sententiam. 
Gaium amicum habeo. 

19. Explain the following Accusative constructions : — 

Ire viam. 

Dulce loqui. 

Quinque et viginti annos natus. 

Domuni reditionis spe sublata. 

Orationes me duas postulas. 

Neminem pecunia divitem fecit. 

20. Translate : — Cedere patria, cedere fortunae, cedere 
aliquid ; si me consulis,ego tibi consulam. 

21. Translate the following, and explain the dative con- 
struction : — 

Antonius leges civitati per vim imposuit. 

Cui bono est ? 

Quid vobis vultis ? 

Non solum nobis divites esse volumus, sed liberis, 

propinquis, amicis. 
Vitam rusticam tu probro et crimini putas esse. 

22. What are the more usual meanings of the Ablative 
absolute ? 



MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1877-78. Xlii 

23. Translate the following and explain the genitive con- 7 
tions : — 

Petulantia magis est adulescentium, quam senum ; 

nee tamen omnium adulescentium, sed non proborum. 
Tune trium litterarum homo me vituperas ? 
Equitum centum quinquaginta interfecti. 
Gallia frugum hominumqUe fertilis fuit. 
Omnes immemorem beneficii oderunt. 

24. * Distinguish between a consecutive clause and a 4 
final clause. 

25. Explain the use of the moods in the following : — 3 

Cum ver esse cceperat, dabat se labori. 

Cum in ius duci debitorem vidissent, undique 

convolabant. 
Quae cum ita sint, quid est quod dubitetis ? 

26. Translate, explaining the reflexive pronouns in each 6 
.case : — 

Marcus putat nos sibi et suis commodis obesse. 

Caesar reperit_Dumnorigem his rebus suam rem familiarem 
auxisse. 

Ariovistus respondit, neminem secum sine sua pernicie 
contendisse. 

Caesar quaesivit cur de sua virtute aut de ipsius diligentia 
desperarent. 



Monday, 19th November, 
[2 p.m. to 5 P.M.] 



LATIN.— Paper II. 
The Rev. C. P. H. Johnston, M.A. 
([The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 
1. Translate into Latin prose : — 50 

The English had entered the Scottish border, and advan- 
ced beyond the small river Sark,* when the armies came in 
presence of each other. The English began the battle, as 
usual, with a fatal discharge of arrows. But William of 
Craigiei called out to the left wing of the Scots, which he 
commanded, " Why stand ye still, to be shot from a distance ? 

* Sarraca. T Gulielmus Durus. 
b 713—2 



xiv MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1877-78. 

Follow me, and we shall soon come to handstrokes. " Accordr 
ingly they rushed furiously against the right wing of the 
English, who advanced boldly to meet them. 

2. Translate : — 

Vercingetorix, ubi de Caesaris adventu cognovit, oppugna- 
tione destitit atque obviam Caesari proficiscitur. Ille oppi- 
dum Biturigum positum in via Noviodunum oppugnare insti- 
tuerat. Quo ex oppidc cum legati ad eum venissent oratum, 
ut sibi ignosceret suaeque vitae consuleret, ut celeritate reli- 
quas res conficeret, qua pleraque erat consecutus, arma 
conferri, equos produci, obsides dari iubet. Parte iam obsi- 
dum tradita, cum reliqua administrarentur, centurionibus et 
paucis militibus intromissis, qui arma iumentaque conquire- 
rent, equitatus hostium procul visus est, qui agmen Vercinge- 
torigis antecesserat. Quern simul atque oppidani conspexe- 
runt atque in spem auxilii venerunt, clamore sublato arma 
capere, portas claudere, murum complere coeperunt. Centur- 
iones in oppido cum ex significatione Gallorum novi aliquid 
ab iis iniri consilii intellexissent, gladiis destrictis portas 
occupaverunt suosque omnes incolumes receperunt. Caesar 
ex castris equitatum educi iubet, proelium equestre com- 
mittit : laborantibus iam suis Germanos equites circiter CCOC 
submittit, quos ab ' initio habere secum instituerat. Eorum 
iarpetum Galli sustinere non potuerunt atque in fugam 
coniecti multis amissis se ad agmen receperunt. Quibus 
profligatis rursus oppidani perterriti comprehensos eos, quo- 
rum opera plebem concitatam existimabant, ^d Caesarem 
perduxerunt seseque ei dediderunt. 



Monday,. 19th November, 
[10 a.m. to 1 P.M.] 



HEBREW— Paper I. 

Joseph Ezekiel, Esq. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. What peculiarities belong to the guttural letters of 
the Hebrew Alphabet ? 

2. What is Furtive Pathah ? Why does it receive that 
name ? 



Matriculation examination, 1877-78. 

1 Account for the vocal Sheva in the words nyib } tfftSVQ, 
rtorro, iVprr . 

4. What are the significations and uses of Mappik, 
Makkaph, and Metheg? 

5. Give the absolute, and construct pluralu of qv, «fy twn 
$Q and "W3 • 

6. Decline n?| (a house), and n;an (the house). 



.7 



7. Attach the pronominal affixes to the particles "V* and 5 

8. Give the Kal conjugation of the verb ^p? . 

9. Distinguish between 1? and |% E$ an d 0*?, HOM and 5 
™tf, ^ and ^ rrn and rrn . 

10. Give the Niphal future and Hithpael past of the 10 
verb -up (to shut). 

11. Give the infinitive and participle of ^ and &ll . 

12. Correct the errors in the following sentences : — 10 

. rjisn H2i»rr nsti tft) (&♦ ) 

. m \nin« n: -ton («•) 

. -von ntf an to (4 ) 

. wnn D'o^a yina rrn cfiBsn (e- ) 

T • T" I VT T -T • • : - 

13. Translate the following phrases into Hebrew : — 10 

(a. ) I am not a man of words. 

(b. ) Do to her as it pleaseth thee. 

(c. ) Get you out of this place 

(d. ) Appoint me thy wages. 

(e. ) Shalt thou indeed reign over us ? 



XVI MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1877-78 

14, Translate the following phrases into English : — M> 

.-ts>2n n« *«to nap ( a -) 
. tond ib ton V» (&•) 

T i ... 

. *nab man n'vn aira «b ( c -) 

- : TTT f. 

.*) pnsrt tfb nob ■ W 
, rrgrq »nri «: bN ( e -) 

15. Parse the following sentence : — 10 

{ nana rrrn ?jm> rfm#\ spnaw Vila *i3b ?jto»m 



Monday, 19th November. 
[2 p.m. to 5 P.M.] 



HEBREW— Paper II. 
Joseph Ezekiel, Esq. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks. ] 
1. Translate the following passage into English : — 30 

: jy:3 ntaH? rwk npn & ib ntasto ffrcn ink pap apy b« prrs? *opM 
tt« jab nisata rr©i* D"©n *f? npi ?jq« »a« bwm nrva d™ nrrs ?jb Dip 

rwi *£ $rc •• d 1 ?? ^d$ rr/Tl in!] f*?, *p< ^n?; *?*>' ^i * ^n - 

DTtbN jre ittfc s^m ftH n« sjpn^nb TjnN sjjnjto ?jb ottom nana 
ipTNn ^wna }a }ab b« djm n^s ^b$ ap_?: rw pre? nbti»i : DrrpNb 
ink nVoft ap»: n« pgy ^ *? Mp? N ?.l J "W ^PT. D -^ ^1 TV 
rrcfri npn «b TtoH& vb» isji Srk to;iaa tt$n q^d ib nnpb a™ n:^B 
ito? tfvi ; d;m n^s ^3 ioN bw ton b« ajB£ »tm5*j j ]S33 nisan 
n« np.»T kcpottJ; bp lto tjJq s raw prre> wa ^:s ni3a rtan >a 
t rwhjb ib vtia b» rrt>ij nin« onnaN ja b*tt>ptf ' na nbrro 



MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1877-78. Xvil 

2. Translate the following passage into English : — 20 

*D3 onwosrn rrartea tfwptern? rnn wiarra $ Vwti n«^ -ii&o »rn 
•m Tjba^i :wn Da new rrbs te*j ta^n na r^rn obanj irnb tJ>» 
nns> rap Tejfc rrarfara teTM mpjro tft tobpn n^pin^ ^j« vnnn 
Vra natoa naVoan nrrn Ttttooi : torop ng nn$ vn "u£m tonfcr 
* Ttt$ TO tot i m , 13;i jna b« nog tidei vriM tap ft iran »j 
D'sn dw ^ »m$ nja nain Mb hpim » -una jna ft tq»<«j j tonto Tftjj 
ttj rrn »3 pp\. : natib n;i n»» wn *pnnn *jbD». "itiM tjaa t|m na&tf 
: nwn itfh mot hni tan ; s : irns ■«$» bb) rotfri nrrrbM wr wta 

3. Translate the following passage into Hebrew : — 50 

And they blessed Rebekah, and said unto her, Thou art 
our sister, be thou the mother of thousands of millions, and 
let thy seed possess the gate of those which hate them. 
And Rebekah arose, and her damsels, and they rode upon 
the camels, and followed the man : and the servant took 
Rebekah, and went his way. And Isaac came from the way 
of the well Lahai-roi : for he dwelt in the south country. 
And Isaac went out to meditate in the field at the eventide : 
and he lifted up his eyes, and saw, and, behold, the camels 
were coming. And Rebekah lifted up her eyes, and when 
she saw Isaac she lighted off the camel. For she hzd said 
unto the servant, What man is this that walketh in the field 
to meet us ? And the servant had said, It is my master : 
therefore she took a veil, and covered herself. And the ser- 
vant told Isaac all things that he had done. And Isaac 
brought her into his mother Sarah's tent, and took Rebekah, 
and she became his wife ; and he loved her : and Isaac was 
comforted after his mother's death. 



b 713—2* 



XVlii MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1877-78 

Monday, 19th November. 
[10 a.m. to 1 p-m.] 



FRENCH.— Paper I. 
French Grammar, Idiom and Etymology. 

The Rev. A. Bourquin. 
[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Translate into English : — 48 

Bien que je soi3 malade, j'irai le voir sur le 

champ. 
II me faut de 1' argent. 
J'irai a trois heures moins un quart. 
Tout 6tait en confusion il y a un an. 
Tant soit peu de sympathie rejouit le malheureux. 
Les chemins sont-ils sales ? 
J'ai chaud. 

Avez-vous jamais 6t6 a Paris ? 
J'y ai 6te deux fois. 
II est a peu pres quatre heures. 
Quant a moi je ne le ferai pas. 
Ce qui m'attire dans ce pays, c'est vous. 
A peine eut-elle prononc6 ces paroles quelle 

s'en repentit. 
Je le vis l'ann6e derniere a Rome. 
C'est un brave homme. 
C'est un homme brave. 
Ce malheureux ne sait-il ni lire ni 6crire. 
Est-il encore en vie ? 
J'ai plus de dix francs. 
Je n'ai plus que dix francs. 
J'ai pris cette fievre en voyageant trop. 
Qui est-ce qui laboure ce champ ? 
Que faut-il que je fasse des livres que vous 

m'avez pretes ? 
Rendez-les-moi. 
Je venais de lui faire finir son theme quand 

vous vintes. 

2. Translate into French, using the past indefinite in the 22" 
first five sentences : — 

I have bought two horses. 

The nails which I have bought this morning are 
too long. 



MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1877-78. 



The roses which you have sent me are pretty. 
He has kindled the lamps. 
They have defended themselves with courage. 
Fieldworks are heavy [translate " field " by " cam- 

pagne "]. 
She has many jewels. 
There is the man who did it. 
The man whom we saw yesterday is gone. 

3. What is in French the gender — 6 

(i) of words ending in 

(a. ) — xion ? 
(&.)— sion? 
( c. ) — tion ? 

(ii) of the names of 

(a.) — metals? 
(6.)— trees? 
(c. ) — days ? 
(d. ) — months ? 
(e.) — seasons ? 

4. What are the three persons, both in the singular and 24 
plural, of the present indicative, past definite indicative, 
future, and imperfect subjunctive of the following verbs ; — 

(a.)— aller? 
(&.)— etre? 
(c.) — recevoir ? 
(d. ) — faire ? 



Monbay, 19th November. 
[2 p.m. to 5 p.m.] 



FRENCH.— Paper II. 

Translation. 

The Rev. A. Bourquin. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks. ] 

I . Translate into English : — 52 

(a). Les Italiens ont de la fidelite et de la sincerity dans lea 
relations privies. L'interet et 1'ambition exercent un grand 
empire sur eux, mais non l'orgueil et la vanity. Les distinc- 
tions de rang y font tres-peu d'impression. lis ont une 



XX MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1877-78. 

paresse Orientale dans l'habitude de la vie, mais il n'y a point 
d'hommes plus perseV6rants ni plus actifs quand une fois leurs 
passions sont exciters. Ces m£mes femmes que vous avez 
vues si indolentes sont capables tout-a-coup des actions les 
plus devours. II y a des mysteres dans le caractere et dans . 
l'imagination des Italiens et vous y rencontrez tour-a-tour des 
traits inattendus de g6n6rosite et d'amitie ou des preuves 
sombres de haine et de vengeance. Cependant il est vrai que 
les gouvernements font le caractere des nations et que dans 
cette meme Italie vous voyez des differences remarquables 
entre les divers etats qui la composent. Les Piemontais ont 
l'esprit plus militaire que le reste de, l'ltalie, les Florentins 
sont 6clair6s et doux, les Venitiens et les Genois se montrent 
capables d'ide"es politiques, les Napolitains pourraient ais£- 
ment devenir belliqueux et les Milanais sont sinceres par- 
ceque les habitants du Nord y ont apporte^ ce caractere. 

(b). A dix heures du matin nous mont&mes a cheval et 21 
sortimes de Bethlehem. Six Arabes bien arme's nous accom- 
pagnaient. lis marchaient trois en avant et trois en arriere 
de nos chevaux. Une lieue plus loin nous decouvrimes deux 
hautes tours qui s'Clevaient dans une valine profonde. C'^tait 
le couvent de St Sabat. Comme nous approchions une troupe 
d' Arabes, cached au fond d'un ravin, se jeta sur notre escorte 
en jetant des hurlements affreux. 

2. Translate into French : — 27 

Philippe Auguste and Richard the First are the only kings 
of France and England who have fought under the same 
banners, but the holy service in which they were enlisted 
was incessantly disturbed by their national jealousy. In the 
eyes of the Orientals the French monarch was superior in 
dignity and in power to Richard, and in the Emperor's 
absence they revered him as their temporal chief. The King 
of England surpassed his rival in wealth and military renown ; 
his memory was long dear and glorious to his English subjects, 
and was celebrated by the sons of the Turks against whom he 
had fought. 



MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1877-78. XXi 

Monday, 19th November, 
[10 a.m. to 1 P.M.] 



PORTUGUESE.— Papek I, 

A. P. De Andrade, G.G.M.C. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks. ] 

What is the difference, in meaning, between : — 

*(a) * Muito, ' ' Assaz, ' and ' Bastante ; ' 

(b) ' Pouco ' and ' Um pouco ; ' 

(c) ' Bom ' and ' Bello ; ' 

(d) ' Excellente ' and ' Magnifico ; ' 

(e) ' Lindo ' and ' Bonito ; ' 

(/) ' Magestoso ' and ' Imponente.' 

Analyse the following sentences : — 

(a) " Nem tudo o que brilha he ouro." 
\b) " Amae vos uns aos outros, 



3 

pronoun, an 



•J A1.1I1WV VUO lLJ.i.0 C\i\J*3 UUU1VO. 

Distinguish between a relative pronoun and a personal 
un, and decline fully the pronouns Eu and Que. 



4. Que cousa he ablativo absoluto ? Explique-o com um 10 
ou mais exemplos ; e diga jne se algumas vezes elle he regido 
por lima parte da grammatica clara ou occulta. Esclareca a 
resposta com um exemplo. 

5. Corrija a seguintes frases se extiverem erradas ; ou diga 6 
se sao correctas : — 

Elle fugiu com meu medo. 

Joao expirou de fome. 

Municipio taixou uma casa com 8 rupias, avaliando 

cada quarto pelas 3 rupias. 
Tenho tuas saudades. 
Tens saudades de mim ? 

6. Explique grammaticalmente os verbos que se achao nos 10 

seguintes versiculos : — 

Archanjo da poesia ! Vem e pousa 
Na lyra ao trovador. Vibra lhe as cordas 
Cos roseos dedos ; poe lhe os sons divinos 
D'essa Etherea mansao por onde libras 
Nas cambiantes azas d'oiro e prata, 
Com ceruleos listoes de puro esmalte. 



XXU MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1877-78. 

• 7. A que genero pertencem os nomes: — Propheta, No, Ndo, 
Cat, Martyr, Capital, Tribu, Collier, Tdlher, Sobrepeliz, 
Index, e Verniz ? 

8. Que se entende por verbo Auxiliar, Impessoal, e Irre- 6 
gular ? De me exemplos, trea de cada um. 

9. Corrija as segiiintes senten9as se estiverem erradaa ; 7 
ou diga se sao correctas : — 

Na noite assoprao muitos ventos. 

Pela meia noite cantao os passaros. 

Pedro carece para trabalhar visto porque separou os • 

seos parentes que a despojarao a partilha que Ihe per- 

tencia. 

10. Que se entende pot periodo e oracao na grammatica 7 
Portuguesa, e quaes sao os elementos essenciaes d'uma oracao ? 
Explique com exemplos o que he uma ora9ao principal, sub- 
ordinada, integrante, e restricta ? 

11. Que cousa he Construcc&o ? De quantos qualidades 6 
ha ella ? Explique o que se entende por construccao inter- 
rupta, dando um ou mais exemplos. 

12. Paraphrasee o seguinte : — 20 
Mas um velho d'aspeito venerando, 

Que ficava nas praias entre a gente, 
Postos em nds os olhos, meneando 
Tres vezes a cabeca, descontente 
A voz pezada um pouco alevantando, 
Que n<5s no mar ou\dmos claramente, 
Cum saber so de experiencias feito, 
Taes palavras tirou do experto peito : 
Oh gloria de mandar ! Oh va cobica ! 
Desta vaidade, a quern chamamos fama ! 
Oh fraudulento gosto, que se atica 
C'uma aura popular, que honra se chama ! 
Que castigo tamanho e que justica 
Fazes no peito vao que muito te ama ! 
Que mortes, que perigos, que tormentas, 
Que crueldades nelles experimentas ! 
Dura inquietacao d'alma, e da vida, 
Fonte de desamparos e adulterios, 
Sagaz consumidora conhecida 
De fazendas, de reinos, e de imperios ! 
Chamao-te illustre, chamao-te subida, 
Sendo digna de infames vituperios ; 
Chamao-te fama, e gloria soberana, 
Nomes com que se o povo nescio engana. 



MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1877-78. 

Monday, 19th November. 
[2 p.m. to 5 p.m.] 



PORTUGUESE— Paper II. 

A. P. De Andrade, G.G.M.C. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks. ] 

1 . Verta em Portuguez o seguinte : — 50 

We look back with astonishment and admiration at the 
stupendous achievement effected a whole life-time later by the 
immortal Columbus, an achievement which formed the con- 
necting link between the old world and the new ; yet the 
explorations instituted by Prince Henry of Portugal were in 
truth the anvil upon which that link was forged ; and yet 
how many are there in England, the land of sailors, who even 
know the name of the illustrious man who was the very ini- 
tiator of continuous Atlantic exploration ? If the final suc- 
cess of a bold and comprehensive idea outstep the life of its 
author, the world, which always prefers success to merit, will 
forget the originator of the very result which it applauds. 
This injustice is specially, manifest in the case of Prince 
Henry, for the vastness of his conception on the one hand, 
and the imperfection of his appliances on the other, made the 
probabilities of success during his own life-time infinitely 
the more remote. It is in such cases that Fame needs to be 
awakened to her task. Thus slept for centuries the fame of 
Christopher Columbus ; thus sleeps the fame of Richard 
Hakluyt, the pioneer of the prosperity of his country. 

If it be the glory of England that by means of her mari- 
time explorations the sun never sets on her dominions, she 
may recall with satisfaction that he who opened the way to 
that glory was the son of a royal English lady and of the 
greatest king that ever sat on the throne of Portugal. 

Ve*rta em Inglez o seguinte : — 50 

No mundo e entre os homens, isto que vulgarmente se 
chama amor nao he amor, 6 ignorancia. Pintarao os antigos 
ao amor menino ; e a razao, dizia eu o anno passado, que era 
porque nenhum amor dura tanto que chegue a ser velho. 
Mas esta interpretacao tern contra si o exemplo de Jacob com 
Rachel, e o de Jonathas com David e outros grandes, ainda- 
que poucos. Pois se ha tambem amor que dure muitos annog, 
porque nol-o pintarao os sabios sempre menino ? Desta vez 
cuido que heide acertar a causa. Pinta-se o amor sempre 



MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1877-78. 



menino ; porque ainda que passe de sette annos, como de 
Jacob, nunca chega a idade do uso da razao. Usar da razao 
e amar sao duas couzas que nao se ajuntao. A alma de urn 
menino que veio a ser ? Uma vontade com affectos, e um en- 
tendimento sem uso. Tal 6 o amor vulgar. Tudo conquista 
o amor, quando conquista lima alma ; porem o prhneiro ren- 
dido e o entendimento. Ninguem teve a vontade febricitante 
que nao tivesse o entendimento phrenetico. O amor deixara 
de variar, se for firme ; e nao deixara" de tresvariar se 6 
amor. Nunca o fogo abrazou a vontade que o fumo nao 
cegasse o entendimento. Nunca houve enfermidade no cora- 
cao que nao houvesse fraqueza no juizo. Por isso os mesmos 
pintores do amor lhe vendarao os olhos. E como o primeiro 
effeito e a ultima disposicao do amor, 6 cegar o entendimento, 
d'aqui veio que, isto que vulgarmente se chama amor tern 
mais partes de ignorancia, e quantas partes tern de ignorancia 
tantas lhe faltao de amor. 



Monday, 19th November, 
[10 A.M, to 1 P.M.] 



MARATHL— Paper I. 
Rao Bahadur Dadoba Pandurang, 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks. ] 

1. Which of the vowels are foreign to pure Marathi 
words ? 

2. Substitute the anunasika letters for the anuswara in 
the following words : — 

fir?r, xrar, r^r, *nn\ vzt, *3", ^f^=r, 
sr*r, 6rr, ikz, ar^nr, jqrr. 

3. Separate the component parts in the following com- 
pounds : — 



tutst 


w&r& 


ursr 


*Y 


wWV 


sn%?nfe 



MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1877-78. XXV 

4. Decline the words — 8 

singular and plural, as far as the 3rd case. 

r>g * St 

5. What forms do the personal pronouns JJT, ^T^l^l, 9 
and ^T^fTf assume when these are identified with nouns ex- 
pressed, and in inflected forms, in a sentence ? Give 
examples. 

6. Shew the aggregate forms of the numerals ^|Jf 

rft^T, and ^TTj wnen qualifying persons, and also when 
qualifying animals or things. 

7. What are the causal forma in the potential mood 10 

(f^p^rsrr,) 3rd p ers - a * n g' ° f the verbs fir%, o^w> 
j^Tj ?rr5r ? Phdul, and 'Jr^St. 

8. Mention the Samas of the following compound words :— 15 

3TO7rf^r§T. 

9. Correct the orthography and grammar of the following 15 
sentences, if you consider them incorrect : — 

b 713—3 



XXVI MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1877-78. 

(t) <H&3T HTRTrr qrer ztrk&r <Tr zffk&h 
*rr^r snrsr ara>. 

10. Translate or explain in English, the meaning of the 15 
following idiomatical phrases : — 

(a) mm mm gf ra itfx qrersft. 

(0 rHNrq* ^ srr*r1r mwn Ts^rnr qrrra\ 

(c) mwft Tr^T vm q^rrr^-. 



Monday, 19th November. 
[2 p.m. to 5 P.M.] 



MARATHL— Paper II. 
Eao Bahadur Dadoba Pandurang. 
[The figures to the right indicate full marks. ] 
1. Translate into Marathi the following passage : — 50 

Prallhad Niraji, with that ascendancy which superior 
minds acquire in times of real difficulty, took the lead in the 
consultations of this important assembly. They planned their 
measures with wisdom, unanimity, and firmness. They took 
a full view of the power and the preparations of Aurungzebe. 
They calculated their means of resistance, and saw, without 
dismay, a public treasury exhausted, the laxity of all disci- 
pline, the unprovided state of the forts, and even the pro- 
bability of their being reduced. Their first endeavours, there- 
fore, were directed to lay in provisions in the forts, and to 
keep the garrisons as complete as possible. The regulation 






MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1877-78. XXvii 

of Sivaji, which gave the troops composing the garrisons a 
perpetual and hereditary subsistence from lands dependent 
on the forts, was of infinite importance at this period. 



2. Translate into English the following passages : — 20 



*^w fN-sff £pjft <r*r stpt*: afcrtf m- 

m (cM%^r f skst) Jrnprr st^r" stot^t. 
#i ^rfT Tn^m ^ni^far <rc<r zm *r eft snrr- 

*hr wl*; wro qrrwir aWNr <p>3T ht- 

srnrsff, wnrr ^r^ ^sror srr^- ^t sft sr- 
wqr arnrarr arrNir *raT qrsfh rqf^Y snr- 

l^rfr snrlre sir? infr ftrsrr. ^rtfr fr£re 



30 



XXViii MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1877-78. 

sfi^r^i fsrar arcrsrt srw w(i% fqrqr^qr 



Monday, 19th Novembers 
[10 a,m. tol P.M.] 

GUJARATHL— Paper I. 
The Rev. R. Gillespie, B.A. 
[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Give both the grammatical and etymological significa- 
tion of the following terms : — "a*^"^, *H%<$ 5 ^w^^. 

(^l^fc, §"4^, ^3^*^ J and classify according to their 
Allans the **iVH«y letters and the vowels. 

2. Write out and illustrate by examples the rules of "**{. 
3^11 ^ ^kvAj and state under what conditions the l^^t 
in combination is represented (a) by ?, (b) by *t } {c) by a* 

Mention exceptions. 

3. Resolve ^4;*.^, **&[% -IIM*, <Hcfl^, ^l- 
£}, andt(^>ll^; also combine >t£l and y^J, ^ia and 
SH, @H v and ^|^^fi: and a^ ; and rewrite \f*\ and £$, 

changing the anuswaras into the nasal consonants which 
they represent. 

4. What are the sub-divisions of primitive and derivative 
words ? What parts of speech are termed V|tyl*i -y^S, and 
what H^HM •Sj "^, and why are they so termed ? Do you 
consider this division exhaustive ? 



MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1877-78. XXIX 

6. 0/ what genders are §HU:Q, *l€l, ft fa, *tR, <1- 5 

^1$, fat-UMft, "^l^l, *Ucft 1 Give examples of nouns 

that have only the masculine, of those that have only the 
feminine, and of those that have only the neuter form. 

6. What tenses of transitive verbs are put in the Karmani 1 
jyrayoga, and what in the Kartri ? Mention exceptions to 
your answer. Give the prayogas of the verbs in the follow- 

ing sentences:-^ *\% *i\\ *&$, *lttl*fl hW, 

MUl*fl %<*W, | JU^S °tl<:*U, Give a list of at least 

eight verbs that are peculiar in the formation of the G\f[- 

. 7. What do you understand by bheda ? Of what bhedas 9 
are ^«l, "HI, ^1<HI% i\H\ H§* 9 >1U ? Give also their 
mula bhedas. Explain the terms ^l^J I ^ ^"H^S an(i (^(H 
"^(^Wlj^j and explain and illustrate the expression f; **\>ti 

8. Give the meaning and derivation of: — ^^SH, C { : H- *~ 

*iu, <m, **U**, i<*xi, *u*c-u>i, ^fau, w^w, 

ft*, «il^(r|, §MH "M^Ul, *tl*ft, *Ul* a 

9. Why is one part of a ^t^i<1 sentence called ^^M 5 
H[ iM, and the other § WfM, while the different parts of a 
^t«-^^ sentence are designated 3i& 3 l<1 <HliMl ] Illustrate 

by examples. 

10. Write fifteen lines of Gujarathi composition, attend- IS 
ing to orthography, punctuation and handwriting, on the 
following: — " The man of letters is, in various regpects, a 
very singular phenomenon. He is new ; he has hardly lasted 
above a century in the world yet." 

b 713—3* 



*XX 



MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1877-78. 



II. Translate idiomatically the following sentences :— 

"i^fo," ^ft (wu *wn *ifo *<h ri«(i. 

You may have it all to yourself for me. 

" Would he were fatter!" "Rest in heaven's determina- 
tion." I have just returned from seeing my friend off. 



Monday, 19th November; 
[2 p.m. to 5 P.M.] 



GUJARATHI— Paper II. 

The Rev. R. Gillespie, B. A. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks. J 

I. Translate into Gujarathi : — .",(■ 

Yet the name of that city was still pronounced with res- 
pect ; the frequent and capricious tumults of its inhabitants 
were indulged with impunity; and the successors of Constan- 
tine, instead of crushing the last remains of the democracy, 
by the strong hand of military power, embraced the mild 
policy of Augustus, and studied to relieve the poverty and 
to amuse the idleness of an innumerable people. 

The anxiety of Augustus to provide the metropolis with 
sufficient plenty of corn was not extended beyond that neces- 
sary article of human subsistence ; and when the popular 
clamour accused the dearness and scarcity of wine, a pro- 
clamation was issued by the grave reformer to remind his 
subjects that no man could reasonably complain of thirst 
since the aqueducts of Agrippa had introduced into the city 
so many copious streams of pure and salubrious water. 

The administration of the public cellars was delegated to a 
magistrate^ honorable rank; and a considerable part of the 
vintage of Campania was reserved for the fortunate inhabi- 
tants of Rome. 



MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1877-78. XXXI 

2. Translate into English :— 50 

AIM H*\[ f <\*i[ *i*M\ Hqii "*^U&$1 *t*4 

"fl*n WIN \Vu*l hVu<Mi §m* <h*u*u3{ 

"Mim^l H'«U. *te 3*l>l 'H'ttl** **M yWM ^151 

flt%U *m GtVHU $. Mil 'IW ^tq®^ S. § ^il 
c\<\H^ ^ m$ **i[yf\ ^[^ sty ^ | Nl J^ 

\\**$m\ eft mh \\f ^uml y^tSi g»$, 
*^£R @m &i\ " M^niv *tn ^h ^i s (j 

*TH 8, Vfl ^<S *l«vH<*GFrt §, Vh *l% ^«|lfa- 
*1H & "^ IslW ^ M«fl 1 4!^ *HWl,"i *USl*t*{l 

**UW,*S fi^lWlfl *\ «<Hlrft *HlM<A *H«Vtq«U 



XXXii MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1877-78. 

*PQ rt^ ^ rl^f. £ "HUl <*U*i «Vl^ ^lll 



Monday, 19th November. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 



CANARESE.— Paper I. 

Jayasatyabodhrav Ttrmalrav Inamdar, Esq. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. (a)— State the different meanings of the following words 4 
in Canarese : — 

2b3^, S^tfj, 20^, ©tf«0, 

30, jaOoO., S#, rftftiO. 



MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1877-78. XXxiii 

(b) — Classify the following words according to their res- 6 
pective sources (oo\eoJ, &c.,) as well as the parts 
of speech they belong to respectively : — 



&083, 


•SjSSJe^, 


&o3, 


7f3J , 


rl^j,,, 


as' 


SotfS&f, 


S&J^O, 


Jb^?rt, 


%?&, 


&0^, 


56tf<a, 


55oon, 


«tato, 


S57fl3J, 


tSd®rt. 



2. (a) — Combine into sandhis the following words, men- 

tioning, in each instance, the rule by which the 
combination is regulated : — 

(6) — Analyze the following sandhis into their compo- 
nents, stating the rules they illustrate in each 
case : — 

Sorted, fa @ £©3o5$ 5 

3. (a) — Enumerate the affixes, by which the cases of words 

are denoted, according to the first rule of declen- 
sion. Illustrate your answer with an example. 
(b) — Mention, with examples, the different rules by 
which the comparisons of adjectives may be ex- 
pressed in Canarese. 

4. (a) — State, in each instance, what should be the num- 

ber, gender, and person of the verb, to agree with 
its nominative or nominatives : — 

(i) when the nominative is a collective neuter noun, in 
the singular number ; 

(ii) when the same is in the plural number ; 



XXXIV MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1877-78. 

(iii) when there are several nominatives of different 
genders ; 

(iv) when the nominative consists of two or more per- 
sonal pronouns. 

(6)— What significations do the words l §Je>S0 \ 1 £>Z&\ 

C 2JC j' , 'SoJe^rfo convey when added to gerunds ? 

Illustrate your answers with examples. 

5. (a) — What does repetition of an adjective or a gerund 

denote in the following cases : — 

(6) — Mention as many adverbs as you may remember 
in Canarese to stand for each of the following expres- 
sions : — 

This is like that, 

At all events, 

Besides that, 

In Order to. 

(c) — Enumerate, with examples, the purposes for which 
the conjunction ' t3 j3^J5)' is made use of in the 
Canarese language. 

6. Parse fully the following sentence :— 

7. Paraphrase into prose in Canarese the following piece : — 



MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1877-78. XXXV 

sc/jtfoc3tf £^©3 ^osj^j sS^fo || a || 

8. Give, in pure Canarese style, a short account of the 12 
famine. 

9. Translate the following into idiomatic Canarese: — 10 

(a) Honour and ease are seldom bedfellows. 

(b) Idle fellows are the devil's playfellows. 

(c) Much bruit, little fruit. 

(d) No cross, no crown. 

(e) Talk much, err much. 

(/") When the soul is bitter, nothing is sweet. 

10. Translate the following into idiomatic English ; — 10 

(a) 3ocb£d e ^ocb&e) , 

(b) STOPS* 7>J© &I3PC* &$ *$ 

(c) $z<sxd &<& mz&^e) ^zz&ptf 

\ y — ° n CD 

(/) «0e>#0 S3JJ3)^ Sp^&J. 



XXXyi MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1877-78. 

Monday, 19th November. 
[2 p. m. to 5 A. M.] 



CANARESE. —Paper II. 

Jayasatyabodhb^v Tirmalrav Inamdar, Esq. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Translate into Canarese the following passage : — $0 

There is not in the world a more useless, idle animal, than 
he who contents himself with being merely a gentleman. He 
has an estate, therefore he will not endeavour to acquire 
knowledge ; he is not to labour in any vocation, therefore he 
will do nothing. But the misfortune is, that there is no such 
thing in nature as negative virtue, and that absolute idleness 
is impracticable. He who does no good, will certainly do mis- 
chief; and the mind, if it is not stored with useful know- 
ledge, will necessarily become a magazine of nonsense and 
trifles. Wherefore a gentleman, though he is not obliged to 
rise to open his shop or work at his trade, should always 
find some ways of employing his time to advantage. If he 
makes no advances in wisdom, he will become more and 
more a slave to folly ; and he that does nothing, because he 
has nothing to do, will become vicious and abandoned, or at 
best ridiculous and contemptible. 

I do not know a more melancholy object than a man of an 
honest heart and fine natural abilities, whose good qualities 
are thus destroyed by indolence. Such a person is a constant 
plague to all his friends and acquaintances, with all the 
means in his power of adding to their happiness; and suffers 
himself to take rank among the lowest characters, when he 
might render himself conspicuous among the highest. 

2. Translate into English the following passage : — 50 



MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1877-78. XXXvii 

oj; assise) tfj3 jS^db, sSrfo^ sjaoojofc sSj^d 

5oJ3&Ofc© eDOGfc, ^"3^® 6odb^ §JC$rtS?OCte)JS 2*J3>- 

W ^0^(205$ ^Ck, Lck£i33 SSSrf itfg rfjStf 
5oJ3^©0; eOelj^, ^JOObJ SoC&^d; 80&0&©! 5oJ3- 

dioabo! £<2>cdbO! eOodj sjjjS ft §js>tfj s&5& sotfoj": 

— ° v d 

c63jt&o£&) 6co80ft &3ock, ^js^tf^ri ^oaftte^ 

eOOS^aOo £J3<£tf SJOOCD 03^ Rjtfsfoj Sl&cS^SJ^rf 20^- 

o&sl)3 sSj^ &O80&, essFfc&teJj; ^0200 £jse2- 
odbj sSjs8£) ©do, srf eafc ssoc* sjtf&&dp erud <&& 

so 7 O s sd 

;3j^? ©doeo sostf tf js^otsS^ ocbos^n 5jo3&o5* 

aOCk, 20CC^J 5c£>0,£&OC3 &02JJ SSJS^Ctib^J, 5oJ35§- 

^ #j3©<3ogS 3#cdb©.);5o;&s&o33j ©8^ £js>Qscra- 
b 713—4 



XXXVlii MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1877-78. 
Monday, 19th November. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 



L# 



bt> £ £\ j^ 3^ ^JLtolo^. I 

V y? J^ ^V L^h £jjr\ 



J<) 



HINDUSTANI— Papeb I. 
Rahimtulah Muhammad Sayani, M.A., LL.B. 
[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Explain the meaning of CU ***» and UZJ *& 

2. Decline the nouns u** s J ±J LJ^ 

3. Give the transitive and causal forms of IjL * b y*> 

— 13 S — Uy*** — ^^ — ^ y° — ^0 — ^*^ 

0*a> \iyU 

4. Translate into Hindustani : — 2S 

(a) He wrote to inquire about the health of his son. 

(6) He took great interest in me. 

(c) It is too good to be true. 

{d) The more you read, the more you learn. 

(e) He was proclaimed king. 

(/) He was found guilty. 

(g) He was banished the realm. 

{h) He tempers justice with mercy. 

(i) It is never too late to mend. 

(j) Honesty is the best policy. 

5. Parse the following sentences : — 15 



MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1877*78, XXX& 
6. Paraphrase : — 36 

u - d j*-'' ^ b Y ^ <c* 

*♦ a •* 



MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1877-78. 

^ oU ^ ^ Uc> } ^„* ft & 

uTd y; r d»b ^/^ ij/» 



Monday, 19th November. 
[2 p.m. to 5 P.M.] 



HINDUSTANI— Paper II. 
Rahimtulah Muhammad Sayani, M.A., LL.B. 
[The figures to the right indicate full marks. ] 
1. Translate into English : — 50 

»J^jj JUT t^U ^ (j^' *S>J 

CL>jL\ j)\ d ^j **jA ^o Uj ^o ^ 

k u y L-> u^' jy ^ ij*° ^ u^° 



MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, l877 fa 78. xli 

%jr\ u? <sf v \o^ £ *£f it> i jus 
j^' u^r J^>H J^ ^ <£l { ^^.x' J 

^0\ ^y£ &\£^y«± jj\ U b^y ^ 

^ ^1 *v** ^-^ VJ^s~*| ^_ jWKU 

fc'cW J-?' ^ ^k ^f^*" c^° J° £i' £*f 

e^° J J <^ ! J 5 ^1 J^ 1 ob l^ !o ^ 

^Jr ^ 'y ^ Ci;* c^U 
♦♦ 

2. Translate into Hindustani : — 50 

" The exercise of arms and horsemanship they were in a 
manner obliged to practise and encourage, by reason of the 
independence of their tribes, whose frequent jarrings made 
war almost continual ; and they chiefly ended their disputes 
in field battles, it being a usual saying among them, that 

b 713—4* 



Xlii MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1877-78. 

God had bestowed four peculiar things on the Arabs, — that 
their turbans should be to them instead of diadems, their 
tents instead of walls and houses, their swords instead of 
entrenchments, and their poems instead of written laws. 

Hospitality was so habitual to them, and so much esteemed, 
that the examples of this kind among them exceed whatever 
can be produced from other nations. Hatim of the tribe of 
Tay, and Hasn of that of Fezarah, were particularly famous 
on this account ; and the contrary vice was so much in con- 
tempt, that a certain poet upbraids the inhabitants of Waset, 
as with the greatest reproach, that none of their men had 
the heart to give, or their women to deny." 



Monday, 19th Novembee. 
[10 A.M. to 1 P.M.] 

PERSIAN— Paper I. 
Mirza Haieat, Esq. 
[The figures to the right indicate full marks. ] 
1. (a) Give the following forms of the verbs 10 

t *A^j|^and .la* J v5 (in both senses) :— 

Present Participle. 

Future Tense, Second Person, Plural, 

Perfect Tense, Passive, Second Person, Singular. 

(b) Write down the infinitives of the following aorists, 
with their meanings : — 

— & U —&y — &l)J — &x) — &f* — ^x 

& I — t>j iy i 

2. How is the {*• ^ JU> placed in a sentence with 10 
respect to its C-3^y° ? How are the comparative and 

superlative degrees formed of adjectives of Persian or Arabic 
origin? Mention the changes effected in nouns by their 
qualifying adjectives. 



MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1877-78. xliii 

3. (a) Derive or analyse the following words. Write 15 

down other words (one for each) derived from 
the same roots or similarly formed : — 

{b) Form words from the roots iLo and a ij on 
the following measures : — 

4. What do you understand by t/'^J L^] ? When is it 5 

used ? Notice the changes it undergoes in some cases, and 
give the technical terms for the words connected by it in 
Persian. 

5. What is meant by : — 5 
— loi cJJ| — e^tJ {^b — ***~J (^U 

6. Explain :— 15 

— ^Ut^^^o^— ^y^J^jt* 

7. Translate : — 20 
A collision was inevitable. 

Life is but a dream. 

The criminals, who were condemned to death, took 
advantage of the negligence of the sentinels and 
escaped. 

The fierce conquerors left no vestige of life in" the 
kingdom. 



*Kv MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1877-78. 

There were ten horses in the stable. 

It is a fruitless attempt, nay, it may cost his life. 

8. Translate :— 20 

^jUJL ^J^jA da$U. Cy Cb6&J J I («) 

jL3 ^vo l-joI st>Uw J! ^<tf ^1 (<*) 
osj^MU aj jU* jtfl ^^ ^ ^Mi' 

Monday, 19th November. 

[2 p.m. to 5 P.M.] 

PERSIAN— Paper II. 



Mirza Hairat, Esq. 

[The figures to the right indicate full mark%] 

1. Translate into Persian : — 50 

Marius fled to Ostia, and there embarked on board a vessel 
which was provided for him by one of his partisans in the 
late troubles, Having put to sea, he was forced by stress of 
weather to Circisi, there landed in want of every necessity, 
and made himself known to some herdsmen, of whom he im- 
plored relief. Being informed of the parties that were in 
pursuit of him, he took refuge in a cottage, afterwards under 
a hollow bank of the river, and, last of all, on hearing the 
tread of horsemen; who still pursued him, he plunged himself 



MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1877-78. xlv 

to the chin in the marsh ; but, though concealed by the reeds 
and the depth of water, he was discovered and dragged thence 
all covered with mud. He was carried to Minturnae, and 
doomed by the magistrates of the place to suffer the execution 
of the sentence which had been denounced against himself and 
his partisans. He was, however, by some connivance, al- 
lowed to escape hence, again put to sea and, at an island, 
joined some associates of his flight. Being afterwards obliged 
to land in Sicily for a supply of water, and, being known, he 
narrowly escaped with the loss of some of the crew that 
navigated his vessel. 

2. Translate :— 30 

l—fj C^«T(jl£j>l U 8t>*ii> \j ejtj^lj |y>| 

*bj*J *^ iifJ** J Li J /v^ i^«j 

<>~*j U^b »Udb (j^^ t>L*jb ^Ijv^»j3 

*yy L U*L^ J 1 L^i dbyAy *y> (U£ 

^U* CjU*! 8t>^o3 c^JaiU^ I jj 5^0 ^ 

cj!a^ j! Jo jyJl J j ojU L^| 



xlvi MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1877-78. 

oy diLs fjy^ Cl^l<3 c-J^ \j fj^fi^, 

c>^oST J <3^3 JJ2JU ob*jfj*^ \$J *j*> 
<ya^> e^*>V cj'^ d^°J J I^M^ 

3. Translate :— 20 



MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1877-78. xlvii 



Monday, 19th November. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

SINDHI— Paper I. 

Krishna Shastri Godbole, Esq. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. How are diminutives derived from substantives and 7 
adjectives ? Illustrate your answer by examples. 

2. (a.) Name the negative particles which are prefixed to 10 
nouns and. adjectives to form compounds. 



(6.) 



Explain the compounds : •§. \ J J J — JO y4$ 

9 9 9 9 9 



9 9,9 9 9 9 o + 



and 



v— &*► c^o^U 



xlviii MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1877-78. 

3. Which nouns are alike in the singular and plural, and 5 

which take « j j in their plural ? Give examples. 

4. How are the Genitive, Accusative, and Locative ex- 10 
pressed in Sindhi ? Give the rules for the formation of the 
Oblique. Illustrate your answer by. examples. 

5. Mention the adjectives that have no change for gender, 10 
singular number, or case ; and point out the difference in 
use between ordinal and cardinal numbers. 

6. Give the pronominal suffixes which are added to nouns, 8 
and describe the ways in which they are attached to them. 

7. How are the causal and passive verbs formed ? and 10 
how are the present and past participles ? Give examples. 

9 , 

8. Conjugate (,*a. j (active form) in compound tenses, and 15 

give the terminations of the Imperative for all persons, sin- 
gular and plural. 

9. Correct the following sentences, and give reasons for 7 
your correction : — 

° 9 9 o o o ' 

^j^f^% vJ ii*A U ^4* ^ftUl (I ) 

9 

j*£=* u^Jbjt) c^*» js*. u% ^ (f) 

9 o o 



MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1877-78. xliz 

10. Paraphrase and translate into English : — 18 

p n P 






^f^ ^^h** 9 ^/f ^^ It* 









o 



Parse the words in the above marked with an asterisk. 

The candidate for Hindu-Sindhi Character, who, of course, 
knows the character used in Stocjc's Grammar of Sindhi, may 
substitute the following for Arabic-Sindhi in the above Paper : 
b 713—5 



I MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1877-78. 

2 (b) Trnrgrr, Jrrsmfr, ^rrrf , g^Tr, 
^t^t, ^fifnrirf > and srar^TTsfg;. 

3 t. 

8 aregr. 

(^) amr^ QTurfl- jfrfrr rmvr t-rt ^r%. 
(a) ^rr^r sfr strst pt % qrw 3rrur *ft 

*<rar 5T5t; 5Trfnr ^3^ & *r <a- far 

♦ v3 ♦ 

**f|- *^T3T *TR" =T rT m*glk T oTR 

* 
t *rr f^rr *r*r 3?r gr^rr frqr tf arc a - . 



MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1877-78. H 

. Monday, 19th November, 
[2 p.m. to 5 P.M.] 
• SINDHI-Paper II, 
Krishna Shastri Godrole, Esq. 
[The figures to the right indicate full marks. ] 

1. Translate into Sindhi :— 22 

I have entered into the particulars of my voyage, and shall 
in like manner describe my first entrance into this place, 
that you may be able to compare beginnings so unlikely with, 
the figure I have since made. I was in my working dress, 
my best clothes being to come by sea. I was covered with 
dirt ; my pockets were filled with shirts and stockings ; I 
was unacquainted with a single soul in the place, and knew 
not where to seek a lodging. Fatigued with walking, 
rowing, and having passed the night without sleep, I was 
extremely hungry, and all my money consisted of a Dutch 
dollar, and about a shilling in copper, which I gave to the 
boatmen for my passage. At first they refused it, because 
I had rowed, but I insisted on them taking it. A man is 
sometimes more generous when he has little than when he 
has much money, probably because he is, in the first place, 
desirous of concealing his poverty. 

2. Translate into Sindhi :— 28 

At length, my dear marquis, I have become a private 
citizen on the banks of the Potomac, and under the shadow 
of my own vine and my own fig-tree. Free from the bustle 
of a camp, and the busy scenes of public life, I am solacing 
myself with those tranquil enjoyments, of which the soldier, 
who is ever in pursuit of fame— the statesman, whose watchful 
days and sleepless nights are spent in devising schemes to 
promote the welfare of his own, or the ruin of other countries, 
as if this globe was insufficient for us all ; and the courtier, 
who is always watching the countenance of his prince, in 
the hope of catching a gracious smile — can have very little 
conception. I have not only retired from all public employ- 
ments, but am retiring within myself, and I shall be able to 
view the solitary walk, and tread the paths of private life, 
with heartfelt satisfaction. Envious of none, I am deter- 
mined to be pleased with all, and move gently down the 
stream of life, until I sleep with my fathers, 



lii MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1877-78. 

3. Translate into English : — 30 

o 9 9 9^ 9, 

mi * s ♦* • 
99 ^ ° ** 

* L£ ♦,♦ „ ° ° * ° 

9 o 9 ° ^ M o ^^ 

— ^JldJbUI J^!y uyj]^ ^G 

« s «♦ /* O x ^ 

o o M o 

j4 s *>— ^ i^^ i^* ^ ^^ ^1 



MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1877-78. liii 

sU^b *\y*\ «^ljj ^/^ J^f d^ iJi t 

9r> 9 M ° V * yS ^ 

m ' s ♦♦ X 

•* •♦/•«♦ ♦♦ . 

--" ° V ° ' ° - « ' ° ' L 



r!3— 5* 



liv MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1877-78. 

x w m *• * ' + 

4. Translate into English :— 20 

*** x ' « x % -^ x X x (L X 

•* 9 ' ^ j r, ^ 

« s X X c. <E " X 

ffra ^ ^j^ 6+* (j? ys* ^yjU | *m> — 

♦* X ** ^ ' X •* X 

r' ° .*■? ° V ° n 9 o 

x x x ct «0' 

o o ^ 

U -" V w ° ° " V - 9 



O 1 



•♦ (L • ,- - x x * x 

~£ o 9 9 j> r> 9 



<i 9 r, x 



•j*4 'j^ u>y -"^^ &W irt 1 u*^ 

x «« x- 

° ?i £ ° v - o o o o M > 



MAfftlCUtATION EXAMINATION, 1877-78. 1* 

«♦ • ^ ^ ^ * • 

— jiMj v 

The Candidate for 1 Hindu-Sindhi character may substitute 
the following for Arabic-Sindhi in the above paper, 

%$ afr qtr frnpr^fr $jt f. ^rf^wHi^Mi <rnr 
tfra ^ firit 5fr| srrf «rff ^t wif sr*r 

fa* ^frfr, sr ffasnifr grnrr an^ - err 
?nt ^ ^ <lr tst ^fa arrf . sn ct sfrwr 



IVl MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1877-78. 

ffr t?> qfe <r*r gft it. «fh- ^<rrlfir 
?t art f & ^rar imfR*"^ ?r srr irtarnft *ref; 
rTff# ff r% jt^tr 1 ^t ^w fsnf . <rr 
sir** fffa w ^nxr srq- fNr ?r sr> tvz <nra*- 

3T% m art sra *fr grrf tptt nrkik wfc 

*nf f%3^ srtit fear aronr, st st<jt g qr 

Trfasrnr irrrr <r fr?fp--% frflr art ^srNnr. 

3T$ ^ft* srnft ^n % srff rf r?r ?r t 
tf *;rer srriT Trfasns* sir qrHr t^t g-arr 5 
^r. or sfqrc flrfi" i^r sfr qr 3?% srjfir; 
*fkw *fk ^r qTRJnrrr^r a?nrr Crst- 

rare ffe g-^r ^r% st ^rr f m ^rrnrr ffrr- 



MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1877-78. Ivil 

ffff %5T TTGT =^qr rT SRT T TOT JT Sf ; 

j^& ar ^ar fct" mzw gorg- q-gfr t^farr 

ff^rr stot urs |^t aft ^f wl^wr ir *rrrw 
*mr resrr intfr af? grrr fertfr arc 



Wednesday, 21st November. 
[2 p. m. to 5 p. m. ] 



ELEMENTARY HISTORY and GEOGRAPHY. 

F. G. Selby, B.A. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. What foreign enemies had the English to encounter 6 
previous to the Norman Conquest ? 

2. Write a short life of Thomas a Becket. 5 
3 What is " Magna Charta " ? Mention any other occa- 7 

sions on which the English people have exacted guarantees 
of good government from the sovereign. 

4. Give, with dates, the principal battles fought against 4 
the French during the reigns of the Plantagenets. 



Iviil MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1877-78. 

5. What attempts have been made since the accession oJ 
William and Mary to reinstate the Stuarts, and with what 
results ? 

6. On what occasions, and for what reasons, has the sue- 7 
cession to the English throne been disputed ? 

7. Explain the following terms : — Heptarchy, Curfew, 6 
Feudalism, Attainder, Cabinet, Civil List. 

8. The principal sieges of the Second Punic War. 5 

9. Write a short account of the Persian invasion of Greece 5 
in 480 B.C. 

10. Draw a'map showing the course of the Loire, and the 5 
situation of the chief towns upon its banks. 

11. Describe the situation of the following places, and 10 
mention any remarkable event connected with any of 
them : — Platsea, Leuctra, Chaeroneia, Cannae, Pharsalia, 
Hastings, Nevilles' Cross, Austerlitz, Trafalgar, Plassy, 
Washington. 

12. When and how was the Mahometan power first 10 
established in the Deccan ? 



Thursday, 22nd November. 
[10 A.M. to 1 P.M.] 



ELEMENTARY NATURAL SCIENCE. 

James Scorgie, F.C.S. 
[The figures to the right indicate full marks. ] 

1. Enumerate the essential properties of matter, giving 
any illustration you please for the sake of explanation. 

2. Define force. If a force act upon a body, what must 
be given concerning it, in order that its effect upon the body 
may be wholly determined ? 

3. If there be a combination of levers of the first kind 
with long arms of 14, 10, and 16 inches, respectively, and 
short arms of 3, 4, and 3 inches, respectively, what weight 
will be balanced by a power of 20 lbs. ? 

4. What is the ratio between the power and the weight in 
a screw which has eight threads to the inch and is moved by 
a power acting perpendicularly to an arm at a distance of 
two feet from the centre ? 



MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1877-78. lix 

5. State the laws according to which chemical combina- 8 
tion takes place. 

6. Describe the method employed for obtaining oxygen 10 
from potassic chlorate. How much of the salt is necessary 

to make 10 ozs. of oxygen ? 

7. Why does not a star always rise at the same time ? 8 
Explain how the time of a star's rising and that of its setting 
alter in the course of the year. 

8. Of what does the Solar System consist ? Name the 8 
planets in the order of their distance from the sun. 

9. Describe Foucault's pendulum experiment to prove that 8 
the earth rotates on its axis. 

10. When it is noon in Bombay, what time will it be to 7 
a place 37° 26' 40" E., and to another 47° 30' 20' W. of Bom- 
bay? 



Tuesday, 20th November, 
[10 a.m. to 1 P.M.] 



ARITHMETIC. 
J. T. Hathornthwaite, M.A. ; 

GOVIND VlTHAL KURKARAY, B.A. ; 

Rao Bahadur Daji Nilkanth Nagarkar. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

N.B. — Candidates are warned that, in order to pass the 
Examination, they must obtain one-fourth of the full marks 
(75) on each Mathematical Paper. 

1. Define the arithmetical terms : — notation, numeration, 
unit, integer, fraction, abstract, concrete. Can you (1) multi- 
ply concrete numbers together, (2) divide a concrete number 
by a concrete number ? Give examples to illustrate the 
nature of such operations. 

2. Two men A and B start together, and when A has gone 
a mile B has gone 

5 + 1 + JL 

11 2,1 1 1 ^ 3 ^ 1 

T fo of If of g of Hi of 71* of 



of a mile; which is in advance of the other ? 



Ix MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1877-78. 

3. Express the difference between '378 of 13s. 10£d. and 
" 378 of 16s. 6d. as a fraction of 

426 of 3| .l^rfJ^X** ■ 

08 .735 11 1 

4. A lb. of tea and 3 lbs. of sugar cost Rs. 3, but if sugar 6 
rose 50 per cent, and tea 10 per cent., they would cost Rs. 3 

8 as. ; find the prices per lb. of tea and sugar. 

5. The circumferences of the wheels of a carriage are 6 T 3 T 11 
ft. and 8-yq ft. ; what is the least distance in which both 
wheels will simultaneously complete an integral number of 
revolutions ? How often will the lowest points of the two 
wheels at starting touch the ground together in 10 miles ? 

6. A, B and C rent a field for Rs. 2,878. A puts in 12 10 
horses for 5 months and 45 sheep for 3 months ; B puts in 15 
oxen for 6 months and 54 sheep for 2 months ; C puts in 6 
horses and 48 oxen for 3 months. Now, 4 horses and 3 sheep 
together eat as much as 5 oxenand 1 horse, and 2 oxen eat 

as much as 7 sheep ; how much of the rent should A, B, C, 
pay respectively ? 

7. What sum of money will amount to £699 13s. 2 4d. 6 
in 2 years, reckoning compound interest for the first year at 

4 per cent., and for the second at 3£ per cent, per annum ? 

8. A person finds that if he invest a certain sum in rail- 7 
way shares paying £6 per share when the £100 share is at 
132, he will obtain £10 16s. a year more for his money than 

if he invest in 3 per cent, consols at 93. What sum has he to 
invest ? 



9. Find the value of </ '00139876 — ^'000030664297. 

10. A man near the sea-shore sees the flash of a gun fired 
from a vessel steaming directly towards him, and hears the 
report in 15". He then walks towards the ship at the rate of 
3 miles an hour, and sees a second flash 5 minutes after the 
first, and immediately stops ; the report follows in 10 5" 
Find the rate of the ship, the velocity of sound being 1,200 
ft. per second. 



MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1877-78. lxi 

Tuesday, 20th November. 
[2 p. m. to 5 P. M.] 



ALGEBRA. 
J. T. Hathornthwaite, M.A. ; 

, GoVIND VlTHAL KURKARAY, B.A. ; 

Rao Bahadur Daji Nilkanth Nagarkar. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

N.B. — Candidates are warned that, in order to pass tlie 
Mcamination, they must obtain one-fourth of the full marks (75) 
■m each Mathematical Paper. 

1. Find the value of — 



,.. ^3- 2a* 2 -a; . . 

(ii) l-[l- jl-(l-T="l)J] 

What is the use of brackets ? What is the rule for re- 
moving brackets which are preceded by a minus sign ? 

2. Simplify the expressions : — 

9a 2 6 2 . r 3a{x-y) . j ±(c-d) . c 2 -<* 2 { ~1 
(1) W(x+y) ' L7{c + d) • I VI ah* ' 4(x*-ys\ J 

a{a+x)- 
3 What is meant by a coefficient ? 

Find the coefficient of x in the quotient obtained by dividing 
&r 4 + xy z — y 4 by x - -|-. 

4. Separate into their simplest factors — 

(i) xt — xy — 6y 2 (ii) as 3 — 4xy 2 — x*y + 4y 3 , 

and find the highest common divisor of 

1 - x% + x + a# and 2x + 2x* -f 3* 2 + Zx% . 

5. I = ab (a + b), and x^-xy + y* = a 3 + 6 3 , 

she. that (^--f-)(i-X) = C, 
e 71H— to 



Ixii MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1877-78. 

6. State and prove the rule for finding the L.C.M. of 
two or more algebraical expressions. 

Find by inspection the L. C. M. of 2x 2 — 8, 3a 2 — 9a + 6, 
and 6a 2 + 18a + 12. 

7. Extract the square root of — 

4a*— 12a + 25a~ 2 — 24a~ 5 + 16x~ 8 
and the cube root of 
8x 9 — 12a 8 + 6x 7 — 37a 6 + 36a 5 — 9a 4 + 54a s — 27a* —27. 

8. Distinguish between an equation and an identity, and 
give an example of each. 

What value of c makes 

(;B_2)2 — (x— l)(x — 3) *=c 

an identity ? Can any value of c make it an equation ? 

9. If the telegraph posts by the side of a railway be 
60 yards apart, shew that twice the number passed by a 
train in a minute gives roughly the number of miles per hour 
at which the train is moving. If 11 posts be passed in a 
minute, in what time would the distance traversed, estimated 
by this rule, be 1 mile in error ? 

10. A boy receives a fixed sum as pocket-money at the 
beginning of every week, and in each week he spends 
half of all that he had at its beginning. He had no money 
before the first pocket-money was given him, and at the end 
of the third week he has Is. 2d. What was his weekly 
allowance ? 



Wednesday, 21st November. 

[10 A, M. TO 1 P. M.] 



EUCLID. 
J. T. Hathornthwaite, M.A. ; 

GOVIND VlTHAL KlJRKARAY, B.A. ; 

Rao Bahadur Daji Nilkanth Nagarkar. 
[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

N.B. — Candidates are warned that, in order to pass the 
Examination, they must obtain one-fourth of the full marks (75) on 
each Mathematical Paper. 

1. Any two sides of a triangle are together greater than 5 
the third side. 



MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1877-78. lxiii 

One triangle lies entirely within another ; prove that its 
perimeter is less than that of the outer triangle. 

2. All the exterior angles of any rectilineal figure are 5 
together equal to four right angles, 

3. If the square described on one of the sides of a triangle 5 
be equal to the square described on the other two sides of 

it, the angle contained by these two sides is aright angle. 

4. Trisect a right angle. 9 

5. If a straight line be divided into two equal and also 6 
into two unequal parts, the squares on the two unequal parts 
are together double of the square on half the line and of the 
square on the line between the points of section. 

6. One circle cannot touch another at more points than 6 
one, whether it touches it on the inside or outside. 

7. The opposite angles of a quadrilateral figure are 9 
together equal to two right angles ; shew that it may be 
inscribed in a circle. 

8. If a straight line touch a circle, and from the point 12 
of contact a straight line be drawn cutting the circle, the 
angles which this line makes with the line touching the 
circle shall be equal to the angles which are in the alternate 
segments of the circle. 

AB, AC, are two chords of a circle, and BD is drawn 
parallel to the tangent at A to meet AC in D ; prove that the 
circle described round the triangle BCD touches AB. 

9. Inscribe a circle in a given triangle. 11 

Shew that the diameter of the circle inscribed in a right- 
angled isosceles triangle is equal to the difference between 
the hypotenuse and sum of the other two sides. 

10. Inscribe an equilateral and equiangular hexagon in a 7 
given circle. 



Ixiv EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B.A., 1877-78. 
II. 



EXAMINATION FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF ARTS, 1877-78. 



EXAMINERS, 



W. Wordsworth, B.A. ... ... 

John Nugent, C.S 

Ramkrishna Gopal Bhandarkar, 
M.A., Hon. Mem., R.A.S. 

Kashinath Trimbak Telang, M.A., 
LL.B. 

The Rev. C. F. H. Johnston, M.A .. 

.Joseph Ezekiel, Esq 

E. Rehatsek, M.C.E 



T. Cooke, M.A., M.I., LL.D. 
James Jardine, M.A. 



The Rev. W. Wallace Brown, M.A. 

The Rev. S. Stead, M.A 

W. Martin Wood, Esq 

I. B. Lyon, F. C.S- 



W. Gray, M.B. 



In English. 



In Sanskrit, 



In Latin. 

In Hebrew. 

In Persian. 

f In Mathematics and 
Natural Philosophy, 
Dynamics and Hydro- 
statics, Analytical Geo- 
metry of Two Dimen- 
sions, Differential and 
Integral Calculus, Op- 
tics and Astronomy. 

In Logic and Moral 

Philosophy. 
In History. 

In Political Economy. 

In Chemical Physics and 
in Inorganic Chemis- 
try. 

In Physiology (Vegeta- 
ble and Animal). 



EIAM. FOE THE DEGREE OF B.A., 1877-78. lxy 

Monday, 26th November. 
[10 a.m. to 1 P.M.] 



ENGLISH.— Paper I. 

W. Wordsworth, B.A. ; John Nugejst, 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks. ] 

Othello. Reflections on the French Revolution 

1 . Paraphrase : — 24 

Des. Most gracious duke, 

To my unfolding lend your prosperous ear ; 
And let me find a charter in your voice, 
To assist my simpleness. 

Duke. What would you, Desdemona ? 

Des. That I did love the Moor to live with him, 
My downright violence and storm of fortunes 
May trumpet to the world : my heart's subdud 
Even to the very quality of my lord : 
I saw Othello's visage in his mind, 
And to his honours and his valiant parts 
Did I my soul and fortunes consecrate. 
So that, dear lords, if I be left behind, 
A moth of peace, and he go to the war, 
The rites for which I love him are bereft me, 
And I a heavy interim shall support 
By his dear absence. Let me go with him. 

Oth. Let her have your voice. 

Vouch with me, heaven, I therefore beg it not, 

To please the palate of my appetite ; 

Nor to comply with heat (the young affects 

In me defunct) and proper satisfaction ; 

But to be free and bounteous to her mind : 

And heaven defend your good souls, that you think 

I will your serious and great business scant 

For she is with me : no, when light-wing'd toys 

Of feather'd Cupid seel with wanton dulness 

My speculative and offic'd instruments, . 

That my disports corrupt and taint my business, 

Let housewives make a skillet of my helm, 

And all indign and base adversities 

Make head against my estimation. 

B 713—6* 



Ixvi EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OP B.A., 1877-78. 



2. Give the derivations of the following words, and state 8 
the sense in which they are employed by Shakespeare in 
Othello and the meaning now attached to them : — 

Practice, critical, voluble, condition, conceit, pioneer, 
warrior, companion, visage, extravagant. 

3. What motives are assigned by Iago for his hatred of 8 
Othello ? 

Describe fully the various arguments and artifices by means 
of which he succeeded in persuading Othello of the infidelity 
of Desdemona. 

4. Explain the following passages : — 

(a). I have rubbed this young quat almost to the sense, 

(b). The magnifico is much beloved, 

And hath, in his effect, a voice potential 
As double as the duke's. 

(c). For since these arms of mine had seven years pith 
Till now some nine moons wasted, they have us'd 
Their dearest actions in the tented field. 

(d). He hath achiev'd a maid 

That paragons description and wild fame ; 
One that excels the quirks of blazoning pens, 
And in the essential vesture of creation 
Does tire the ingener. 

(c). He'll watch the horologe a double set, 
If drink rock not his cradle. 

(/). And spend your rich opinion for the name 
Of a night brawler. 

(g). I look down towards his feet : — but that's a fable. 

5. What were the bases of representation on which, as 1 2 
Burke states, it was proposed " to rest the whole local and 
general legislature " of France, and sketch briefly his objec- 
tions to the scheme ? 

6. What are Burke's views on the union of church and 1 1 
state, and the connection between religion and policy ? 

7. Enumerate the results which Burke anticipated would 12 
follow from the adoption in France ' ' of the rights of men. " 
How far were his predictions on this subject ultimately 
fulfilled ? 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B.A., 1877-78. llVll 

8. Explain the allusions in the following passages : — 6 

(a) Our constitution knows nothing of a magistrate like 

the Justicia of Arragon. 

(b) They have made no sacrifices to their projects of 

greater consequence than their shoe-buckles. 

(c) They have ordained that the provision of this estab- 

lishment might be as stable as the earth on which 
it stands and should not fluctuate with the Euripus 
of funds and actions. 

(d) The vast undertaking of the Encyclopaedia. 

9. State shortly Burke's criticisms on, and objections to, 9 
the composition of the Tiers Mat in the National Assembly. 



Monday, 26th November. 
[2 p.m. to 5 P.M.] 



ENGLISH— Paper II. 

W. Wordsworth, B.A. ; John Nugent, C.S. 

Spenser's Faery Queen. — Bacon's Advancement of 
Learning. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks. ] 

1. Explain and justify the following judgments of a 15 
modern critic of Spenser : — 

(a). "The ideal of chivalry, rather derived from its 
didactic theory than from the precedents of romance, is 
always before him." 

(6). "An allegory requires a covert sense, beneath an 
apparent fable, such as the first book contains." 

(c). " The language of Spenser is an instrument manufac- 
trued for the sake of the work it was to perform." 

2. Paraphrase the following stanza :— 10 

With gentle words he can her fairly greet, 
And bade say on the secret of her heart : 



Ixviii EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B.A., 1877-78. 

Then sighing soft ; " I learn that little sweet 

Oft temper'd is, " quoth she, ' ' with muchell smart : 

For since my breast was launcht with lovely dart 

Of dear Sansfoy, I never joyed hour, 

But in eternal woes my weaker heart 

Have wasted, loving him with all my power, 

And for his sake have felt full many an heavy stowre. "' 

3. Give the meaning and derivation of the following 5 
words : — faytor, prowest, wight, darrayne, scath. 

4. Enumerate the principal writings of Bacon in the order 1 5 
of their publication (with dates), and indicate the relation of 
these writings to the author's primary philosophical aim. 

< 5. The claim to be the " founder of modern philosophy " 15 
is vindicated for Bacon, and also for Descartes. State the 
grounds on which either claim may be based, and compare 
the positive contributions to human knowledge made by 
these two men. 

6. Give in summary Bacon's classification of human ] 5 
knowledge, and explain the grounds on which his treatment 

of " metaphysics " and ' ' theology " is founded. 

7. To which school of 'ancient philosophy does Bacon 10 
award the premium, and on what grounds ? What is his 
judgment on Plato, Aristotle, and the Schoolmen ? 

8. Explain exactly what is meant by the doctrine of S 
" final causes," and state what the influence of this doctrine 
has been in physics and ethics. 

9. Give in your own words the substance of the following 7 
passage : — 

4 ' Many controversies do merely pertain to that which is 
either not revealed or positive ; and that many others do 
grow upon weak and obscure inferences or derivations : 
which latter sort, if men would revive the blessed style of 
that great Doctor of the Gentiles, would be carried thus, ego, 
non dominus : and again, secundum meum consilium, in 
opinions and counsels, and not in positions and oppositions. ; ' 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGRE8 OP B.A., 1877-78- lxii 
Tuesday, 21st November. 

[ 10 A. M. TO 1 P. M. ] 



SANSKRIT.— Paper I. 

Ramkrishna Gopal Bhandarkar, M.A., Hon. Mem. R. A. S.J 

Kashinath Trimbak Telang, M.A., LL.B. 

Translation. 
[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1 . Translate :— 10 

srRTsrrT n 

2. Translate the following passages, and name and explain 15 
the alankdras in them : — 

jrr*r: tffrfor ^mm: || 



Ill EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B.A., 1877-78. 

sfrwiritjrf 

fq-^^rftmrerr fonrej ^rf fen 

3. (A.) Do you suspect any mislection in the following ? 13 
If you do, state why, suggesting the proper reading. If the 
sense is clear as the passages stand, give it. 

(a.) &&&&£ &&n ^ , ?T^or r?*n #rra- 

r*rr# sT^^^s^firrqT^TqT^r: wraT 

5r^r5TqFrqT5refr^Txrrnru-rr?T: sfl^r- 

f*sr?rr 

*tffa> II 

^•j^r^Tf ^ vw. tf jitt m f^-qrr 11 






EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OP B.A., 1877-78. lxxi 

(B. ) Of the two readings in the following, which is cor* 4 
rect or better, and why ?— 

(a) flRJT«TT| g-nir^qTTT^^T ^sTJ 

(b) tffa-: %=*• ^gFTT^nr^rr ?rwir sn?r 

4. (a.) ^nffT^wrfr rT^r-fa r^^rr^r h 
fNrrrrfir^g; ^frsrr^f mJTrrnrr 

ffrrcf reft irsnrentSr 3T n 

Name the several stages in the development of the plot o 
a play mentioned by writers on Dramaturgy and indicated in 
this s'loka. Analyse the plot of the Mudra-rakshasa, and 
point out these stages in it. Translate the s'loka. 

(B. ) What are^the logical fallacies alluded to in the follow- 
ing, and why ? — 

5. Translate : — 12 



Ixxii EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OP B.A., 1877-78. 

Write notes on the expressions underlined. 

6. (A.) Explain the following words and expressions : — 10 

arsrsrrN^ rrrrirur ggirq- ^rsnrf:, qftmfcft 
fkwn ik%&<\m* fsrer^cft, z&^rv, 

(B.) Explain the grammar of the following, and state if 
any of the forms are incorrect, giving the corresponding 
correct ones : — 

7. Translate into English :— 21 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B.A., 1877-78. lxxiii 



snror 






B713— 7 



kxiv EXAM. FOE THE DEGREE OF B.A., 1877-78. 

Tuesday, 27th November. 
[2 p.m. to 5 P.M.] 



SANSKRIT.— Paper II. 

Ramkrishna Gopal Bhandarkar, M.A., Hon. Mem. R.A.S.; 
Kashinath Trimbak Telang, M.A., LL.B. 

[TWe figures to the right indicate full marks. ] 

Kdvya Prakash, Kirdtdrjuniya, and Translation. 

1. (a) Translate closely : — 11 

srfrrarfrnft f^wu'iuW fa^?*^: snrsf- 
<3T3ranr: II 






firoiSf *r few: II 
mwifT II 

(b). Write down the meanings of : (1 3Tfi| ^ ^ Uf 

( 2 ) QTirnr (3) iprira" w s^ (5) stor^ ( 6 > 

2. (a) Explain : (1) ^frT |% RT^ J^IT ^ 3^- 

fr l (2) animi&f fnfrmfor: toriik *r?r*r 

ipri^^:| and (3) 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OP B.A., 1877-78. IxXV 

■rnr: *rf : II 
wpn *rt: mikv rrrfa^rrr snifter *rrr% 
5rn"rfr snrrfr li 

(b) What are the Alank&ras in these passages 1 

(c) Quote verses from Kirata of similar purport to : (1) 

raffrr ft Trvtwu in^f TT^fRT^r (2) to ft 
^rfr irarmq-T^r f=nn^rfr^: f^cnrfc^^: 

3. (a) What is a Kavya ? Explain Mammata's distinction 14 
between its several classes. 

(b) What is Mammata's view about the distinction 
between Gunas and Alankaras ? What views does he contro- 
vert ? State fully his objections to them. 

(c) State the substance of Mammata's criticism on the 
stanza: — 

ft^^fa^rarnrji 
§fsrfr §r=f srruf jr<ra* mnw f |-: fsrorf 
*$m II 

4. (a) Define and give examples of the tnT=fiT« ^T~ ^3 

sTir^TTj ST^T'ft^rj ^ Jpffa Alankdras. What ob- 
jection may be taken to the recognition of the QTOb^ltA- 
cpHT" an d how is it obviated ? 

(b) Distinguish between ^f STI^T an ^ ^T^T an d 

een ^fo^f^lT and ^PJ^rT^mfT 

(c) What Alankaras correspond to the English Irony, 
ph or and Climax ? 



lxxvi EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B.A., 1877-78. 

5. Translate into idiomatic Sanskrit : — 40 

The structure of the Kosmos he supposed to have been 
effected by portions of the infinite air taking upon them new 
qualities and undergoing various transformations. Some air, 
becoming cold, dense, and heavy, sunk down to the centre 
and there remained stationary ass earth and water ; while the 
hotter, rarer, and lighter air ascended and formed the hea- 
vens, assuming through the intelligence included in it a rapid 
rotatory movement, round the earth, and shaping itself into 
sun, moon, and stars. The heat of this celestial matter acted 
continually upon the earth and water beneath, so that the 
earth became comparatively drier, and the water was more 
and more drawn up as vapour, to serve for nourishment to the 
heavenly bodies. The stars also acted as breathing holes to 
the Kosmos supplying the heated celestial mass with fresh air 
from the infinite mass without. — (Grote's Plato) 



Tuesday, 27th November. 
[10 a.m. to 1 P.M.] 



LATIN.— Paper I. 

The Rev. C. F. H. Johnston, M.A. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Translate into Latin Prose :— 50 

To explain the too frequent neglect of the claims of society, 
we must look to the undue respect which is felt for wealth. 
If a man is well off, and passes through life without doing 
much harm to his fellow- creatures, he is thought rather well 
of than otherwise. A gentleman is often explained to be one 
who lives on his own means. This might be excusable in 
those times, when the first in wealth and power were also 
first in the battle-field ; or in the Greek cities, where the 
rich equipped ships and gave public exhibitions at their own 
expense, and served in person in the ranks ; but it is inexcu- 
sable now. Do-nothings have no place in a properly organiz- 
ed state. There is no room for a torpid member in a sound 
body. It is not necessary that all the members should have 
the same work. There is need of the brain and heart as well 
as the hand and foot. But every member must do some 
work. 



EXAM* FOR THE DEGREE OP B.A., 1877-78. lxXVU 

2. (a) Translate;— 27 

Septimi, Gades aditure mecum et 
Cantabrum indoctum iuga ferre nostra et 
Barbaras Syrtes, ubi Maura semper 

Aestuat unda, 
Tibur Argeo positum colono 
Sit meae sedes utinam senectae, 
Sit modus lasso maris et viarum 

Militiaeque ! 
Unde si Parcae prohibent iniquae, 
Dulce pellitis ovibus Galaesi 
Flumen et regnata petam Laconi 

Rura Phalantho. 
Ille terrarum mihi praeter omnes 
Angulus ridet, ubi non Hymetto 
Mella decedunt viridiqae certat 

Baca Venafro ; 
Ver ubi longum tepidasque praebet 
Jupiter brumas, et amicus Aulon 
Fertili Baccho minimum Falernis 

Invidet uvis. 
Ille te mecum locus et beatae 
Postulant arces; ibitu calentem 
Debita sparges lacrima favillan? 

Vatis amicL 

lain the etymology of :— aestus , iugum s lassus, miles, 
pellitus. flumen, regnum, angulus, bruma, arx, favilla. 

Explain the datives: — colono, senectae, Phalantho, mihi, 
Hymetto, Venafro, Baccho, uvis, 

(b). Translate :— 

Difficilem et morosum offendet garrulus; ultro 

Non etiam sileas. Davus sis comicus atque 

Stes capite obstipo, multum similis metuenti. 

Obsequio grassare ; mone; si increbruit aura, 

Cautus uti velet carum caput; extrahe turba 

Oppositis humeris; aurem substringe loquaci. 

Importunus amat laudari; donee Ohe iam! 

Ad caelum manibus sublatis dixerit, urge, 

Crescentem tumidis infia sermonibus utrem. 

Cum te servitio longo curaque levarit, 

Et certum vigilans, Quartae sit partis Ulixes, 

Audieria, heres: Ergo nunc Dama sodalis 

Nusquam est ? Unde mihi tarn f ortem tamque fidelem ? 

b 713—7* 



lxxviii EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B.A., 1877-78. 

Sparge subinde et, si paulum potes, illacrimare ; est 
Gaudia prodentem voltum celeare. Sepulcrum 
Permissum arbitrio sine sordibus exstrue; funus 
Egregie factum laudet vicinia. Si quis 
Forte coheredum senior male tussiet, huic tu 
Die, ex parte tua seu fundi sive domus sit 
Emptor, gaudentem nummo te addicere. Sed me 
Imperiosa trahit Proserpina ; vive valeque. 

3. (a) "The headlong fall of the Roman power was owing 23 
not to the fault of Quintus Fabius or Marcus Varro, but to 
the distrust between the Government and the governed." 
Explain this assertion by the circumstances mentioned in 
Livy, Book XXII. 

(b) Translate :— 

Caeterum temeritati consulis ac praepropero ingenio mate- 
riam etiam fortuna dedit, quod in prohibendis praedatoribus 
tumultuario proelio ac procursu magis militum quam ex 
praeparato aut iussu imperatorum orto haudquaquam par 
Poenis dimicatio fait : ad mille et septingenti caesi non plus 
centum Romanorum sociorumque occisis. Caeterum victorious 
effuse sequentibus metu insidiarum obstitit Paulus consul, 
cuius eo die — nam alternis imperitabant— imperium erat, 
Varrone indignante ac vociferante emissum hostem e mani- 
bus debellarique, ni cessatum foret, potuisse. Hannibal id 
damnum baud aegerrime pati ; quin potius credere velut 
inescatam temeritatem ferocioris consulis ac novorum maxi- 
me militum esse. Et omnia ei hostium haud secus quam sua 
nota erant : dissimiles discordesque imperitare, duas prope 
partes tironum militum in exercitu esse. Itaque locum et 
tempus insidiis aptum se habere ratus nocte proxima nihil 
praeter anna ferentes secum milites ducit, castra plena omnis 
fortunae publicae privataeque relinquit, transque proximos 
montes laeva pedites instructos condit, dextra equites, impe- 
dimenta per convallem medium agmen traducit, ut diripien- 
dis velut desertis fuga dominorum castris occupatum impedi- 
tumque hostem opprimeret, Crebri relicti in castris ignes 
ut fides fieret dum ipse longius spatium fuga praeciperet, 
falsa imagine castrorum, sicut Fabium priore anno frustratus 
esset, tenere in locis consules voluisse . 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B.A., 1877-78. kxix. 

Tuesday 27th November. 
[2 p.m. to 5 P.M.] 

LATIN.— Paper II. 
The Kev. C. F. H. Johnston, M.A. 
[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 
Translate :— 65 

(a). Praetermittendae autem defensionis deserendique 
officii plures solent esse causae. Nam aut inimi- 
citias aut laborem aut sumptus suscipere nolunt 
aut etiam neglegentia pigritia inertia aut suis 
studiis quibusdam occupationibusve sic impedi- 
untur, ut eos quos tutari debeant desertors esse 
patiantur. Itaque videndum est ne non satis sit 
id quod apud Platonem est in philosophos dictum, 
quod in veri investigatione versentur quodque 
ea quae plerique vehementer expetunt, de quibus 
inter se digladiari solent, contemnant et pro 
nihilo putent, propterea iustos esse. Nam alteram 
iustitiae genus assequuntur, in inferenda ne cui 
noceant iniuria, in altero delinquunt ; discendi 
enim studio impediti quos tueri depend deserunt. 
Itaque eos ne ad rem publicam quidem accessuros 
putat nisi coactos. Aequius autem erat id volun- 
tate fieri ; nam hoc ipsum ita iustum est, quod 
recte fit, si est voluntarium. 

(b). Nee vero umquam bellorum civilium semen et 
causa deerit, dum homines perditi hastam illam 
cruentam et meminerint et sperabunt, quam P. 
Sulla cum vibrasset dictatore propinquo suo, 
idem sexto tricensimo anno post a sceleratiore 
hasta non recessit, alter autem, qui in ilia dicta- 
tura scriba fuerat, in hac fuit quaestor urbanus. 
Ex quo debet intellegi talibus praemiis propositi^ 
nunquam defutura bella civilia. Itaque parietes 
niodo urbis stant et manent, iique ipsi iam ex- 
trema scelera metuentes, rem vero publicam 
penitus amisimus. Atque in has clades incidi- 
mus — redeumdum est enim ad propositus — dum 
metui quam cari esse et diligi maluimus. 

(c). Hunc igitur ipsum anulum si habeat sapiens, nihil 
plus sibilicere putet peccare quam si non haberet : 
honesta enim bonis viris, non occulta quaeruntur. 



IxXX EXAM. FOE THE DEGREE OP B.A., 1877-78. 

Atque hoc loco philosophi qnidam, minime mali 
illi quidem sed non satis acuti, fictam et commen- 
ticiain fabulam prolatam dicunt a Platone, quasi 
vero ille aut factum id esse aut fieri potuisse 
defendat. Haec est vis huius anuli et huius exem- 
pli : si nemo sciturus, nemo ne suspieaturus qui- 
dem sit, cum aliqnid divitiarum potentiae, domina- 
tionis libidinis causa f eceris, si id dis hominibusque 
futurum sit semper ignotum, sisne facturus ? 
Negant id fieri posse. Neqnaquam potest id 
quidem : sed quaero, quod negant posss, id si 
possent, quidnam facerent? Urguent rustice sane. 
Negant enim posse et in, eo perstant, hoc verbum 
quid valeat non vident. Cum enim quaerimus, si 
celare possint, quid facturi sint, non puaerimus, 
possintne celare, sed tamquam tormenta quaedam 
adhibemus, ut si responderint se impunitate pro- 
posita facturos quod expediat, facinorosos se esse 
fateantur ; si negent, omnia turpia per se ipsa 
fugienda esse concedant. 

{d. ) What, according to Cicero, are the duties prescrib- 
ed by the Propriety (Decorum) ? 

(e). What trades and professions are, in Cicero's opinion, 
unbecoming a gentleman, and what are liberal 
pursuits t 

(/). By what conduct does Cicero direct young men to 

aim at glory ? 
(g). How does Cicero treat the questions — 

(i). Whether a wrong action may be done, if it 

can never be found out ? 
(ii). How to prevent love of friends from causing 
us to swerve from our duty ? 
(h). What objections to the conduct of Pwegulus are 
quoted by Cicero, and how does he reply to them ? 

2. Translate, with marginal notes on the words in 35 
italics : — 

(a). Nee minus ex imbri soles et aperta serena 

Prospicere et certis poteris cognoscere signis : 
Nam neque turn stellis acies obtunsa videtur, 
Nee/ra^m radiis obnoxia surgere Luna, 
Tenuia nee lanae per caelum vellera f erri ; 
Non tepidum ad solem pinnas in litore pandunt 
Dilectae Thetidi alcyones, non ore solutos 
Immundi meminere sues iactare maniplos. 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OP B.A., 1877-78. Ixxxi 

(6). Ergo inter sese paribus concurrere telis 
Romanas acies Uerum videre Philipipi ; 
Nee fuit indignum superis, bis sanguine nostro 
Emathiam et latos Haemi pinguescere campos. 

(c). Di patrii, Indigetes, et Romule, Vestaque mater, 
Quae Tuscum Tiberim et Romana Palatia servas, 
Hunc saltern everso iuvenem succurrere saeclo 
Ne prohibete : satis iam pridem sanguine nostro 
Laomedonteae luimus periuria Troiae. 
Iam pridem nobis caeli te regia, Caesar, 
Invidet, atque hominum queritur curare triumphos ; 
Quippe ubi fas versum atque nefas. 

{d\, Sponte sua quae se tollunt in luminis oras, 

Infecunda quidem, sed laeta e fortia surgunt ; 
Quippe solo natura subest. Tamen haec quoque, 

siquis 
Inserat, aut scrobibus mandet mutata subactis. 
Exuerint silvestrem animum, cultuque frequenti 
In quascunque voces artis haut tarda sequantur. 
Necnon et sterilis quae stirpibus exit abimis, 
Hoc faciat, vacuos si sit digesta per agros ; 
Nunc altae frondes et rami matris opacant, 
Crescentique adimunt fetus uruntque ferentem. 
Discuss the fitness of the various readings : — 
Sequentur , faciei. 

(e). Est etiam ille labor curandis vitibus alter, 

Cui numquam exhausti satis est : numque omne ' 

quotannis 
Terque quaterqua solum scindendum, glaebaque 

versis 
sternum frangenda bidentibus omne levandum 
Fronde nemus. Redit agricolis labor actus in 

orbem, 
Atque in se sua per vestigia volvitur annus. 
Ac iam olim, seras posuit cum vinea frondes 
Frigidus et silvis aquilo decussit honorem, 
Iam turn acer curas venientem extendit in annum 
Rusticus, et curvo Saturni dente relictam 
Persequitur vitem attondens fingitque putando. 
Primus humum fodito, primus devecta cremato 
Sarmenta, et vallos primus sub tecta referto ; 
Postremus metito. Bis vitibus ingruit umbra ; 
Bis segetem densis obducunt sentibus herhae ; 
Durus uterque labor : laudato ingentia rura, 
Exiguum colito. 



lxxxii EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B.A., 1877-78. 
Tuesday, 27th November. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

HEBREW.— Paper I. 

Joseph Ezekiel, Esq. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. (a). To what tribe of Israel did Jeremiah belong ? 

Where did he live ? During the reigns of what 
kings of Judah did he prophecy ? 

(6). Is there any other book written by Jeremiah ? 
On what subject is it written ? 

(c). By whom, and in the days of what King of 
Judah, was Jerusalem destroyed ? 

2. Translate the following passage into English : — 

1*2 rnrr ]pi isn] ntoa Dto owa rnpjj ■«*? "uan nn« rrtrr npw rra 
yw *&f&3 envy ptzn nito «ia» ^ rory «Vi rnwa isnsa rrm : ia 8 ? 
: irraio rnrr rrrn rnrra rraa? t_4* "ran Tpa : atin rito rmVp 
into nrrn on tfa* ^ ht *fo vtfrtg nVc* fer 'an D)p to 'nntf yjs rrrn 
tnw fen ^n aps : ns rriwp tew rib 3nt & msa natia* fasn 
: rjtoo np3 mra sjw nnVi ni^a jni a) npn rnrr »3M t i»r na wn 
rrrr innn«ai iiaara; w ^na "OEttJpa riVj "«& rricj? -r> rib *wi Nnj? 
to rnrr bxcfo\ rnpp s E«J$?e> Dipp ptftop Di"ra "riaa «pa : toa 
*awn : nftr ns n ,:, n ona nipo taw »a lana' inaa nio* 'way irifa 
: twn >nVnn *3 rwcwn 'aytftn NEn*n rnnj 

3. (a). Correct the errors in the fourth and the sixth 

sentence of the above passage. Give your 
reasons for it. 

{b). Which is the only sentence within the prescrib- 
ed chapters of Jeremiah written in a different 
language ? In what language is it written ? What 
is the cause of its insertion in that language ? 

(c). Give the roots of nnb, afon, rnrr trp; an d *»;. 
To what classes of verbs do they belong ? 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGEEE OF B.A., 1877-78, lxxxiii 

(d. ) Give with their derivations the different Hebrew 
words for man. 

4. (a. ) What office did Nehemiah hold in the Persian 10 

Court? 
(b. ) What was the capital of the Persian Empire in 
the days of Nehemiah ? Where was it situated ? 
What stands now on its site ? 

(c.) Name the persons who headed the enemies of 
the Jews and opposed the re -building of Jeru- 
salem. 

(d.) Give a brief account of Nehemiah's career. 

5. Translate the following passage into English : — 25 
vyrta) lorn rran tod* «fi\t) bnan ^ntt tyotfn Tfra n;rr nsn Tout 

nten to vtovlh rrirnnp spysi ratJg ?|3|m »a *nn s vgiisnp 'todVi 
rrnrrcn spro banto; *fl to nVVj pr)i , DiTi spjob "jVsnn ^:« nxp'« ?rray 
Ijtan bin : «wpn *a» rrcn »wi ■qjj ««on "reft* tontoj *a m«Bn to 
7tod n« rro tbH DTDBtf tan ran Dvnn nw rflsan m wxati kVi rb 

* t •■ y-i -t : • - v: ■■•..- v : : •- v :- T . |t 

itorpn on» -it**"? ?pia» rror> n» rm -raft* nrrn dm nj nai : ^as 
on □!>* orripsi 'rnap QRTOB& >to Dmtfli : m»| opn« y>DN \:« 
>rnn^ w Dip?n to Drtrqrri rj^a^ o^n pjp^n nspa Dam: rrrr 
sjtoi fron sprite rnB tbSh sym *f$$ ury\ : Dtf n?ti rw jwfr 
rtan toi ?piay rta to ro«Sg srjw m vrn tfw «3m : np T "tnn 
cnprnb mans Di*n 'irqsh aa nrrtorn stptf rw nxnh nraprrn ?rns> 
j Tjbftb npreto ff^n *2ni njn sran >a$ 

6. (a.) Give the past Kal of «?n and the future Niphal 5 

of nnQ 
(6.) Show the difference in the particles *fy^* and ' ^ 

7. Translate and explain the allusion contained m the 8 
allowing sentence : — 

VVgl °r^?^ iJyn tb5m ?prito m np^i ttjdo bas on*? ri» 1 rj» 

s ni'na niSN: 



lxxxiv EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B.A., 1877*78 



8. Translate the following phrases into English :— 

: ^ nn« dw \tyn ( a - ) 

TTTN IS DTO "iwak N 1 ? (M 
•£»"«» W$ DTS «hg ( c «) 

: M^aa b>n DDnnb vsr$ («?• ) 
: nfts$ « bnan >3 trratoi ^a («• ) 

9. Give the dates of the following events : 

(a). Birth of Moses. 

(&). Delivery of the Law on Mount Sinai. 

(c). Overthrow of the Kingdom of Israel by the As- 
syrians. 

(d). Nehemiah's Commission to rebuild Jerusalem. 



Tuesday, 27th November. 
[2 p.m. to 5 P.M.] 



HEBREW.— Paper II. 

Joseph Ezekiel, Esq. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

(a. ) What is the Hebrew name of the book of Exo- 
dus ? How does it receive that name ? 

(6. ) A history of how many years does the book of 
Exodus comprehend ? Give the dates. 

(c). Relate briefly the history of Moses from his 
flight to his return from Midian. 

(d) . Give the ten plagues brought upon the Egyptians, 
in their order. 

(e). What feast is appointed to commemorate the 
exodus of the Israelites from Egypt, Give its 
Hebrew name. 



EXAM. FOE THE DEGREE OP B.A., 1877-78- lxXXV 

2. Translate the following passage into Hebrew : — 30 

And there went a man of the house of Levi, and took to 
wife a daughter of Levi. And the woman conceived, and 
bare a son : and when she saw him that he was a goodly 
child) she hid him three months. And when she could not 
longer hide him, she took for him an ark of bulrushes, and 
daubed it with slime and with pitch, and put the child 
therein ; and she laid it in the flags by the river's brink. 
And his sister stood afar off, to wit what would be done to 
him. And the daughter of Pharaoh came down to wash 
herself at the river ; and her maidens walked along by the 
river's side ; and when she saw the ark among the flags, she 
sent her maid to fetch it. And when she had opened it, she 
saw the child : and, behold, the babe wept. And she had 
compassion on him,, and said, This is one of the Hebrews' 
children. Then said his sister to Pharaoh's daughter, Shall 
I go and call to thee a nurse of the Hebrew women, that she 
may nurse the child for thee ? And Pharaoh's daughter said 
to her, Go. And the maid went and called the child's 
mother. 

3. Translate the following passage and comment on it :~ 10 
wag *pBN rmp ', xt^s tota# spin nton sfvp Dnnn ^tim jrty 

i n; aVa nonn ind;? c^p i: to? «» on? 

4. (a). Describe the route of the Israelites from Egypt 8 

to Mount Sinai, mentioning the important 
events that occurred on that portion of their 
journey. 

<&). Give the Hebrew and English names of the 
twelve precious stones set in the breast-plate 
of the Jewish high priest. 

(c). What folly in Israel does Hoshea condemn ? 
Explain the figure he uses in condemning it. 

(d). In the days of what kings of Israel did Hoshea 
prephecy. 

5. (a). Translate the following passage into English : — 25 

d$i* ra -ina rw ng?i rjg\ $ rnrr nrwp ywn rmn no) »s> tnut 
*F\Tp& rara -to »a Scnr toti top vb« nirp -iq«*i j p V? "fcm inro 

• :'-t - : • v ::• ; -j*; t •• t : v I" v - • -• 

b 713—8 



IxXXYl EXAM. FOE THE DEGREE OF B.A., 1877-78. 

Ota nrrri : forty rva rroboa ^stirri nit? in 'w forir *ct nw 
io>**i ra ijpn ii» inrn t fosnr pc»3 foity r^j? n « ^l?^ N,nr 7 
«te« vita *a foity n$ rw Drnx lis? ^pi» «V >3 nam Vh rraxb tr$> Si 
byxtft* nVi nrrnfo Tvrri Dwtfirn dittm rnirr its rwi : crr> 
inrn rrom *fr n« Vfcam : D>nhB3i ctoids rmn'TrDai 3*roi ntips 

- - - t t :. :■ : • • • tt : • : t t : • : v v . •-• C ! 

\ xsA rvryvt vb >3iKi >q» vb ons* '3 yes$ vh V?ti wry? TCftfri : js "ten 

(6). What do the symbolical names *Q? & P^T\ ^ 

and D.^ H? "*P literally signify ? 
(c). Translate into English : — 

" fo «itfi d^37 Dpo? irij? ; ?|3i3?n nVsto r? srrrfo £ i? foity nsirc 
: »»r©to n^Q rraVtttoi sitq toi rty «*n te r 1 ** not* 

-t : -t t: " : <- : I T t • t -it-- : • 

(d). Explain the phrases : — 

; nnsn \c& rfrei and &n "tos °fc* j^T®*? D ^ noVfai 

6. Translate the following into idiomatic Hebrew : — 
(a). Turn ye to me with all your heart, 
(6). He shall be to thee instead of a mouth. 
(c). I bear you on eagles' wings. 
(d). I am of uncircumcised lips, 
(e). Ye shall be a peculiar treasure unto me above all 



7. Analyse the following words, giving the meanings of 
their roots and of their prefixes and affixes : — 

jrranD? jPVbSsm ,D*gnno ,Q , ?>?tf'? ,rt$m Jfi&ft >T^^ 

: 9m*jn ,o?;r&n ,to»^>rn 

8 Attach vowel points to the words in the following 

sentence ; — 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B.A., 1877-78. 1 SXXVli 
/ 

Tuesday, 27th November. 
[10 a.m. to 1 p.m.] 



PERSIAN.— Paper I. 

E. Rehatsek, M.C.E. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks. ] 

Shahnamah and Anvari-Sohaili. 

1. By what name do European authors call Ashek the 7 
bunder of the Ashkanian dynasty, and how many years did 

it last according to the Shahnamah ? 

(a) Mention the Persian names of Artaxerxes, Arta- 3 
banus and Sapores. 

2. Translate the following passage, and mention the 40 
European name of the Emperor whom Shapiir captures :— 

^liy f* o*\ j&\ y b 
is\j* u?o-^> j jy d<*£ y jf 



lxxxviii EXAM. FOE THE DEGREE OF B.A., 1877-78. 

°^vji l?*j! ^J^ ^Jj^ J 

jLr l^ ^ *^ *J ,t>51 yJ 

O0t>J j oil ^f ^^ j4* 

<y£ jljrf <*& y^l jjj 

3. What is the difference between f$ S *\[j and 

yJO ^ U . the one being taken in a general and the other 
in a Zoroaatrian sense ? 



EXAM. FOE THE DEGREE OF B.A., 1877-78. 1XXX1X 

4. Give the roots of ?US*» | i^ ] U^*» | 10 

i^Abj^o d&JL/O 4$+* and translate :— 

J!\ &jfj ci^iLo J^o\/\ JJ sdjj'l ^^ 

5. Translate into English : — 25 

I 63 Lo J*i c^" I SjT^^a. ^ ! (6) 

jb <oU (jljl (^^ dJvTjb 
'^J j&*> ij^j* C^w*0^ VJ^**4J (c) 

b 713—8* 



XC EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B.A., 1877-78. 

6. Distinguish the meaning of the words jSAc and isda 10 
- 1 early in the phrase :— 

/*^ ,J L^° S^*^ Mjlaj Isle. jj^L X^a. U 
and state of what Persian expression the word <^>i 
is the Arabized form. 



Tuesday, 27th November, 
[2 p. m. to 5 P. M.] 



PERSIAN.— Paper II. 

& PvEHATSEK, M.C.E. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 
Divan-i- Hafez and Ferishtah. 
Translate' into English : — 

4>^Co yJ»o J U|>s* jc> JuL^ ^y ^Uac \j 



<■> J^ ^t &i*»y* CL^lss' ^ 






EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OP B.A., 1877-78. XC1 

^Uj (jU, j^l jL. ji Iyb)jjj5^i vj'i 

p 

^u*^ ^ aTi ju a&u ^ic^r ^i 

<>**£* ^ \j> \j UJ <3 aT ^ f oj^ j ^ 

2. Mention the names of the sovereigns who reigned after 10 
the flight and during the absence of Humayun from his domi- 
nions. 

3. Translate into English*: — 20 
»lo JO 5cN£ V^M'l ^^ C^^ 

J'***"' I (^ L-^U^t 5 Lw. ^| o | 8 Li J L> 

(ju^>^ ^u^* ^^ ^j^ &y *fjp\#*j 

aj&o ^ *jj(x* y U?| jj SU CUw*^ 

^^ "*"? **" ****** I 4 * 2 "** "^ ^— ^ <" <****- v 
Jl a} ^Ij^ljJ b <*JjL» ^^ af *4>j*j» 



Xcii EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OP B.A., 1877-78. 

L^& I t> cV b fjy^ I j 

4. Convert the date given above into years of the Chris- 10 
tian era. 

5. Mention the year in which Humayun died, by what 18 
accident, and where he was buried. 

6. Translate into Persian : — 30 

If we remove the glare of eulogy thrown over the actions 
of all Asiatic sovereigns by the historians who wrote in their 
own time, or in that of their immediate descendants, we 
shall find that Humayun, though a prince of lively parts and 
elegant accomplishments, brave, and, on the whole, of 
humane temper, was volatile, fond of pleasure, and defici- 
ent in those enlarged views so necessary for conducting the 
affairs of an extensive Empire ; as well as in that decision 
and spirit of command, without whiclTno prince can secure 
the respect and confidence of his subjects. 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B.A., 1877-78. XClii 

Wednesday, 28th November. 
[10 a.m. to 1 P.M.] 



EUCLID and GEOMETRICAL CONIC SECTIONS. 

T. Cooke, M.A., M.I., LL.D. ; James Jardine, M.A. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks. ] 

1. If three straight lines meet in one point, and a straight 5 
ine stands at right angles to each of them in that point, 
~iese three straight lines are in one and the same plane. 

2. Draw a straight line perpendicular to a plane from a 10 
Iven point above it. 

Draw a perpendicular to two given lines not in the same 
plane. 

3. If two straight lines meeting one another be parallel 12 
to two other straight lines which meet one another but are 
not in the same plane with the first two, the plane which 
passes through these is parallel to the plane passing through 
the others. 

If three lines not in the same plane be equal and parallel, 
shew that the triangles formed by joining their adjacent 
extremities are equal and their planes parallel. 

4. If a straight line be at right angles to a plane, every 7 
plane which passes through it shall be at right angles to that 
plane. 

5. If two planes which cut one another be each of them 1 1 
perpendicular to a third plane, their common section shall 

be perpendicular to the same plane. 

If two lines are parallel, the common section of any two 
planes passing through them will be parallel to either. 

6. Draw a pair of tangents to a parabola from a point 13 
without it. 

If two tangents be drawn to a parabola from a point with- 
out it, the squares of these tangents are to one another as 
their focal distances. 

7. If from a point 0, a pair of tangents OP, OF be drawn 10 
to an ellipse, then OP and OF will subtend equal angles at 
cither focus. 



xciv EXAM, FOR THE DEGREE OF B,A,, 1877-78/ 

8. The perpendiculars from the foci of an ellipse on the 1 
tangent intersect in the circumference of a circle having the 
major axis as diameter. 

9. If two chords of a hyperbola intersect one another, the 10 
rectangles contained by their segments are proportional to 
the squares of the diameters parallel to them. 

10. If an ellipse, a parabola and a hyperbola have a com- 1 2 
mon tangent and the same curvature at the vertex, the ellipse 
will be entirely within the parabola and the parabola entirely 
within the hyperbola. 



Wednesday, 28th November. 
[2 p. m. to 5 p. M.] 



to 



STATICS. 
T. Cooke, M.A., M.I., LL.D.; James Jardine, M.A. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1 . Enunciate and prove as regards direction and magnitude 
the theorem called the Parallelogram of Forces. 

2. Find the ratio of the Power to the Weight when there 8 
is equilibrium in a system of pullies in which each pully hangs 

by a separate string. 

3. Describe the Screw, and find the ratio of the Power to S 
the Weight when there is equilibrium. 

4. Define " Centre of Gravity," and find the centre of 8 
gravity of any number of particles in the same plane. 

5. Find the centre of gravity of the frustrum of a pyramid 9 
on a triangular base formed by two parallel planes. 

6. A sphere is inscribed in a right cone ; find the centre 1 
of gravity of the remaining portions of the cone. 

7. Define the moment of a force ; shew that in a system 9 
of forces acting in the same plane the algebraic sum of their 
moments about any point in the line of action of the resultant 

is zero. 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B.A., 1877-78. XCV 

8. Find the resultant of a system of parallel forces acting 8 
upon a rigid body. 

9. A uniform lever in the form of the arc of a circle 10 
having two weights P and Q suspended from its extremities 
rests with its convexity downwards upon a horizontal plane ; 
determine the position of equilibrium. 

10. Find the resultant of two couples not acting in the 10 
same plane. 

11. Three spheres are suspended from a point by strings 10 
of equal length, and rest against one another ; find the ten- 
sions of the strings. 



Thursday, 29th November. 
[10 A. m. to 1 P. M.] 



LOGIC. 
The Rev. W. Wallace Brown, M.A. 
[The figures to the right indicate full marks. ] 

1. Enumerate and define the several steps in the forma- 9 
tion of Conceptions. 

2. What is Division ? State and explain its rules. What 10 
kind o f Division is alone purely logical, and why ? 

3. Give Sir W. Hamilton's table of Judgments with their 14 
quantity, quality and relation, and state your reasons for 

or against rejecting any of them. 

Or, 

Discuss the propriety of accepting the Fourth Figure and 
the Numerically Definite Syllogism. What is the unfigured 
Syllogism ? 

4. Define and fully exemplify the Sorites and Dilemma. 12 

Or, 

State and illustrate the Joint Method of Agreement and 
Difference, and the Method of Concomitant Variations. 

5. Give Mr. Mill's definition of Induction, and distin- 12 
guish it from other processes to which the term has been 
frequently applied. 



XCVi EXAM, FOR THE DEGREE OF B.A,, 1877-78. 



6. Enumerate the several modes of the Explanation of 12 
Laws of Nature, and state what such explanation amounts to. 

7. Show in what figures the following modes are legiti- 9 
mate or the reverse : — 

AUA, IYI, OUO, YEE. 

8. State and examine the various theories of the Import 12 
of Propositions. 

9. Put in syllogistic form, and test by logical method , JO 
three of the following : — 

(a). If ignorance is bliss, 'tis folly to be wise. 

(b). He can't be wrong whose life is in the right, 

(c). The world is not perfect, for there is evil in it. 

(d) . How can man be responsible when he is not free ? 

(e) ? God is in everything, therefore everything is God, 



Thursday, 29th November. 
[2 p. m. to 5 P. M.] 

MORAL PHILOSOPHY. 

The Rev. W. Wallace Brown, M,A. 
[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Show that probable evidence is relative only to beings 9 
of limited capacities. 

2. How does a preponderant presumption on one side 11 
affect us in matters of speculation, and how in matters of 
practice ? Prove the truth of your answer. 

3. What, according to Butler, does the fact of the divine 10 
government of the world, as implied in the notion of religion 

in general, involve ? 

4. Show that there is nothing incredible in the doctrine 8 
that God will reward and punish men for their actions here- 
after. 



EXAM, FOR THE DEGREE OF B,A., 1877-78, XCVli 

5. What is comprehended under the doctrine that our 8 
present life is a state of probation for a future one ? 

6. Prove that the present world is at once intended and 12 
peculiarly fit to be a state of moral discipline and improve- 
ment. 

7. Show how the credibility of the doctrines of religion 10 
is not destroyed by any notions of necessity. 

8. Virtue and religion require that every action be direct- 10 
ed by some other rule than the strength or prevalency of 
any principle or passion. Show that, agreeably to this prin- 
ciple, man was made for virtue. 

9. Explain how. the nature of man leads him as much to 10 
right behaviour in society as to the attainment of the greatest 
happiness %e can for himself. 

10. Discuss the question of the existence in man of 12 
disinterested principles of action. 



Thursday, 29th November. 
[10 A. m. to 1 P, M.] 



INORGANIC CHEMISTRY,— Paper I. 

I. B. Lyon, F.C.S. 
[The figures to the right indicate full marks. ] 



! . What do you understand by the terms temporary and IS 
permanent hardness, as applied to water ? How is the hard- 
ness of water ascertained and expressed ? 

2. What are the principal properties of ammonia gas ? 16 
What relation does ammonia gas bear to the ammonium 
I salts ? 

Compare the quantities of oxygen required for the 16 
oustion of equal volumes of light and heavy carbonetted 
rogen, giving the volume of the products of combustion 
formed in each case, 

b 713—9 



XCVlii EXAM. FOE THE DEGREE OF B.A., 1877-78, 

4. A salt has the following percentage composition ; cal- 10 
eulate its formula, and name the salt : — 

Nitrogen 22 '58 

Hydrogen ... ... ... 6*45 

Carbon 19*35 

Oxygen ... ...51*61 

99 99 

5. How is phosphorus obtained ? What are its principal 16 
properties ? 

6. Describe the principal commercial varieties of sulphur. 16 

7. How would you distinguish boracic from other acids? 10 



Thursday, 29th November, 
[2 p.m. to 5 P.M.] 



INORGANIC CHEMISTRY.— Paper II. 

I. B. Lyon, F.C.S. 

[The figures to tbe right indicate full marks. ] 

1. How is nitre manufactured artificially ? What are its 
principal properties ? 

2. Describe at least two ways of making iodide of potas- 
sium, and mention the principal properties of the salt. 

3. Give an account of the method of preparation, proper- 
ties, &c, of any three compounds of calcium which are em- 
ployed for useful purposes in the Arts. 

4. Describe any three compounds of iron with oxygen. 

5. What are the principal ores of copper ? 

6. How would you distinguish between a mercurous and 
a mercuric salt ? 

7. What is the chemical composition of the principal 
varieties of glass ? 

8. Describe the principal compounds of lead which are 
us pigments, and state how each may be prepared ? 






EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B.A., 1877-8. XGIX 

Thursday, 29th November. 
[10 a.m. to 1 P.M.] 

OPTICS. 
' ooke, M.A., M.L, LL.D. ; James Jarbp 
[The figures to the right indicate full marks. J 

1. State the laws which govern the reflected and refracted 
portions»of an incident pencil. 

2. A stick is partly immersed in water, being inclined to 9 

4 
the horizon at an angle whose tangent is £ x — : — ■ 

what angle will the immersed portion of the stick appear 
inclined to the horizon to an eye placed at some distan 
vertically above the stick ? 

3. A pencil of rays after reflection converge to a pojnr 1 5 K» 
inches in front of a concave mirror of 30 inches radius ; rind 
the position of the incident focus. 

4. What is meant by total reflection of light ? Find the 9 
sine of the angle of total reflection of diamond, its refractive 
index being 2*439. 

5. At what angle must two mirrors be inclined, so that 
r&y incident parallel to one of them may after reflection at 
e ach be parallel to the other. 

6. If D be the minimum deviation in a prism whose r< 
f ractive index is \i and angle i, prove that — 

. i . D D 

cot — -j- cot ~— - = u, cosec -_. . 
2 ^ 2 r 2 

7- Prove that the distance of the incident focus from 
lens is a mean proportional between the distances of the in- 
cident focus from the conjugate focus and from the principal 
focus of rays coming in an opposite direction. 

8. What single lens is equivalent to a combination of a 1 
double convex lens of focal length 2 inches with a dou 
concave lens of focal length 4 inches ? 

9. Describe Gregory's reflecting telescope. Why are larg - 
■ropes seldom constructed according to Gregory's prim 

pie? 



C EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OP B.A., 1877-78. 

Given the object speculum of a Gregorian telescope of 3 ft. 
focal length ; find the focal length of the secondary concave 
mirror which will render the telescope capable of magnifying 
distant objects 700 times. 

10. If a page of print be brought close to the eye, the 
letters are blurred and indistinct ; but if a piece of paper 
with a pin-hole be interposed, the print becomes legible. 
Why is this ? 



Thursday, 29th November. 
[2 p.m. to 5 P.M.] 



ASTRONOMY. 

T. Cooke, M.A., M.I., LL.D. ; James Jardine, M.A. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Define : Great Circle, Pole, Hour-Angle, Azimuth, 8 
Ecliptic, and Solstices. 

State Kepler's Laws and the inferences drawn therefrom. 

2. Describe the Equatorial and its uses. 8 

What are the conditions which must be satisfied for per- 
fect adjustment ? 

3. Explain the reason of the difference of weight of a 10 
body in different latitudes. 

Compare the weights in any two latitudes. 

4. Explain the phenomenon of the Tides. 9 

5. What is the difference between a Mean Solar and a 10 
Sidereal Day ? 

Describe the variations of the Equation of Time in the 
course of a year. 

6. Define parallax, and show how the Sun's parallax is 10 
determined by a transit of Venus. 

7. When does the motion of a planet appear to be direct, 8 
stationary, or retrograde, respectively ? 

8. Describe and explain the Moon's Librations. 8 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OP B.A., 1877-78, CI 

^bow that in Winter the full moon is longer above the 9 
orizon than in Summer. 

10. Enumerate the principal methods of determining the 10 
mgitude of any place, and explain the method of determina- 

ion by means of eclipses of the satellites of Jupiter. 

11. Explain the phenomenon of a Solar Eclipse, and 10 
ietermine the limits of their annual number. 






Friday, 30th November. 
[10 A.M. to 1 P.M.] 



ANALYTICAL GEOMETRY of TWO DIMENSIONS.- 
Paper I. 

T. Cooke, M.A., M.I., LL.D. ; James Jardine, MA. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks. ] 

Find the co-ordinates of a point which divides in a given tf 
ratio the straight line joining two given points. 

2. If Ax -f By + C=0 be the equation to a straight line, 10 
prove that the perpendicular let fall from (hTc) is 
Ah + Bh + C 



s/ A* + B* 
Hence find the length of the perpendicular let fall from 
(ab) on a{x — b) + b(y — a) = 0. 

3. Find the lengths of the perpendiculars on the line 10 
x y 

y— 5=*1 (a) from the origin, (&) from the point ( — 1,2). 

What will be the area of the trapezoid formed by the given 
line, the perpendiculars and the line joining the points {0,0, ) 
(-1,2)? 

4. If the three sides of a triangle be bisected and pet 
pendiculars drawn through the points of bisection, these per- 
pendiculars will meet in a point. 

5. The length of a perpendicular let fall from the origin 10 
on a right line is 6, and the perpendicular makes an angle of 
60° with the axis of x ; write down the equation of the line. 
Draw a line parallel to the above line and passing through a 
point (2, 1). 

B 713—9* 



cil EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B.A., 1877-78. 

6. Connect the polar and rectangular co-ordinates of a 9 
point, and change the equation r 2 = a 2 cos 2 6 into one be- 
tween x and y. 

7. Define radical axis and centres of similitude. The 10 
three radical axes belonging to three given circles meet at a 
point. 

8. Define " Normal at any point of a curve," and find the 9 
equation to the normal at any point of a circle. 

^ 9. Construct the circle ±x* + 4y 2 — 48x — 36y + 69 = 0. \'2 
Find where the circle cuts the axes of co-ordinates, and draw 
a tangent to it from the origin. 

10. Discuss the conditions necessary among the constants 1 6 
that the circles 

cc 2 + ?/ 2 + ex + by = 

as 2 + 2/ 2 = c 

may (1) cut one another. 

(2) touch one another. 

(3) have no point in common. 



Friday, 30th November, 
[2 p.m. to 5 P.M.] 



ANALYTICAL GEOMETRY or TWO DIMENSIONS— 
Paper II. 

T. Cooke, M.A., If. I., LL.D.; James Jardine, M.A. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks. ] 

1 . Define a conic. 8 
Find the equation to the parabola referred to oblique axes. 

2. From any external points two tangents can be drawn 7 
to a parabola. 

3. If two tangents be drawn, find the length of the chord 10 
of contact. 

4. Find the polai equation to the normal at any point of 8 
a parabola. 



Exam, for the degree of b.a., 1877-78. 



an ellipse. 

6. Show that if from any point in a straight line a pair 7 
of tangents be drawn to an ellipse, the chords of contact will 

all pass through a fixed point. 

7. Define conjugate diameters and supplemental chords. 8 
li a chord and diameter of an ellipse are parallel, the supple- 
mental chord is parallel to the conjugate diameter. 

8. Find the equation to the locus of the middle points of 10 
all the chords of a given length in an ellipse. 

9. Find the locus of the intersection of the tangent at any 7 
point of an hyperbola with the perpendicular on it from the 
focus. 

10. Define .conjugate hyperbola, equilateral hyperbola, 8 
and asymptote. 

Find the equation to the hyperbola referred to its asymp- 
totes as axes. 

11. Trace the form of the hyperbola from its polar equa- 8 
tion, and adapt your results to the equilateral hyperbola. 

12. Show that the locus of the centre of an equilateral 1 1 
hyperbola described about a given equilateral triangle is the 
circle inscribed in the triangle. 



Saturday, 1st December. 
[10 a.m. to 1 p.m] 



DYNAMICS. 

T. Cooke, M.A., M.I., LL.D. j James Jar dine, M.A. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Enunciate and discuss the Laws of Motion. Define 
Angular Velocity, Momentum, and Vis Viva, and explain 
how velocity is measured when variable. 

2. If two circles touch each other at their highest or 
lowest point and a straight line be drawn through this point, 
the time of falling from rest down a straight line intercepted 
between the circumferences is constant. 



civ EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OP B.A„ 1877-78. 

3. A shell is fired vertically upwards and explodes in the 9 
air, the sound of the explosion being heard after three seconds 
from time of firing. Find the height at which explosion takes , 
place, supposing velocity of sound to be 1, 100 feet per second. 

4. A ball weighing 2 lbs. attached to a string the length 8 
of which is 4 feet, makes a revolution in 5 seconds ; find the 
tension of the string. 

5. Prove that the path of a projectile in vacuo is a para- 10 
bola. 

A heavy particle is projected from a given point with a 
given velocity so as to pass through another given point ; 
prove that in general there will be two parabolic paths which 
the particle may describe, and give a,geometrical construction 
to determine their foci. 

6. Projectiles are projected at different angles from a 3 
fixed point : find the envelope of all the trajectories. 

7. Two smooth spheres moving in given directions and 9 
ith given velocities impinge ; determine the impact and 
subsequent motion. 

8. A ball is projected from any point on the circumference 10 
of a circular billiard table, and after two rebounds comes 
back to its starting place : show that if 6 be the angle which 

its direction makes with radius of circle at point of projection 
and e the modulus of elasticity, 



9. Show that when a body moves under the action of a 10 
central force the areas described by the radius drawn to the 
centre of force are in one plane and are proportional to the 
times of describing them. 

10. If a body describe a parabola under the action of a 10 
force in the focus, determine the force. 

11. Find the time of a very small oscillation of the simple 10 
pendulum. 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B.A., 1877-78, 

Saturday, 1st December. 
[2 p.m. To 5 P.M.] 



HYDROSTATICS. 

T. Cooke, M.A., M.I., LL.D. ; James Jardine, M.A. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks. ] 

1 . Two fluids that do not mix are contained in a vessel ; f> 
find the pressure at a given depth in the lower fluid. 

2. A cubical vessel is filled with equal volumes of two 7 
liquids of different densities ; compare the pressures on the 
base and On one of the sides of the vessel. 

3. A cylinder placed with its axis vertical in a fluid rests 12 
with — th part immersed ; when placed in another fluid it 

711 

rests with — th part immersed ; to what depth would it sink 
in a mixture composed of equal quantities of these fluids ? 

4. How would you find the specific gravity of a solid 9 
(\ ) which is lighter than water, (2) which is soluble in water ? 

5. An ounce of lead and an ounce of wood together weigh 9 
I an ounce in water ; if the specific gravity of the lead be 11, 
find that of the wood. 

6. The volume of a mass of gas at one temperature and 13 
pressure being known, its volume at another pressure and 
temperature may be calculated. Deduce the formula. 

7. If a block of metal be weighed by a delicate spring 9 
balance in dry air, will its weight be the same if the air be 
saturated with moisture ? Explain fully your answer. 

8. Describe the common lifting pump. If a pump be used 1 2 
to raise a fluid whose specific gravity is 1 *5, find the limit- 
ing height of the barrel when the barometer stands at 29 "5 
inches. 

9. A cylindrical vessel closed at one end is immersed 12 
mouth downwards to a given depth in water ; determine the 
height to which the water will rise within it. 

10. Describe the single barrel air-pump, and show how to 11 
find the density of the air in the receiver after any number 

of strokes of the piston. 



CV1 EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B.A,, 1877-78. 

Saturday, 1st December. 
[10 a.m. to 1 P.M.] 



PHYSIOLOGY, -Paper I. 

W. Gray, M.A. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. What is the normal temperature of the human body ? 16 
Explain fully why this temperature is not increased when the 

air is hotter, or lowered when the air is colder than the body. 

2. How does the air you breathe out differ from the air 18 
you take into your lungs, and what would be the effect pro- 
duced were you to go on breathing the same air again and 
again ? 

3. State exactly what happens to a piece of wheaten 24 
bread from the time it enters your mouth till the process of 
digesting it is completed. 

4. Where in the body, and how, is venous blood changed 24 
into arterial blood, and where and how is arterial changed 
into venous blood ? 

5. In what part of the nose does the sense of smell reside, 18 
and what nerves are concerned with it ? Why is the sense 

of smell lost when a person suffers from a " cold in the 
head "? Explain the occurrence of sneezing when you look 
at the sun. 



Saturday, 1st December. 
[2 p.m. to 5 p.m.] 



PHYSIOLOGY.— Paper II. 
W. Gray, M,B. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks:] 

1. What are the effects which a tree in full leaf produces 15 
on the air which surrounds it ? 

2. What are the various forms in which plants receive 24 
their nutriment, and by what parts or organs do they take it 

up, and how ? Inside the hollow stem of a bamboo, and also 
on its outer surface, solid silicious matter is found. Where 
does this come from ? Can you account for the presence of 
sugar in a sugarcane ? 



EXAM, FOR THF1 DEGREE OF B.A., 1877-78. Cvii * 

o, If the branch of a tree is cut off, why do the leaves of 15 
the branch wither, while those of the tree remain fresh ? 

4. What conditions are essential to the germination of 24 
seeds ? Give an exact account of what occurs when a pea 

or a bean is made to germinate, and state what office is fulfilled 
by each organ and constituent of the seed. Describe the 
parts of the young plant as they appear when it is three or 
tour days old. 

5. What do you mean by rotation of crops ? State and 22 
explain the facts on which the practice is based. 



Monday, 3rd December. 
[10 a.m. to 1 P.M.] 

POLITICAL ECONOMY.— Paper I. 

W. Martin Wood, Esq. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Mention at least four of the principal writers on eco- 10 
nomic science, stating also that division of the subject to 
which each of them gave special attention, or in respect of 
which his services in elucidating it have been of peculiar 
value. 

2. Sketch concisely, but as completely as you can. the 15 
scope and functions of political economy as an applied 
science : frame your survey of the subject, as near as possible, 

in its natural or synthetical order. 

3. State the essential conditions of a sound and efficient 15 
carrency system, giving any illustrations that occur to 
you either of specially advantageous expedients or of mis- 
chievous devices that are or have been advocated or tried in 

uling the medium of internal exchanges. 

4. In a speech recently delivered at Manchester by Mr. 16 
John Bright occurs the following passage : — 

" We are here to-night standing in the centre of a district 
more wonderful in some respects than is to be traced 
out on the map in any other kingdom of the world. 
The population is extraordinary. It is extraordinary 
for its interests, and its industries, for the amount 
of its wealth, for the amount of its wages, and for 
the power which it exercises on its public opinion, 
and over the public opinion of the nation." 



CVlii EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B.A., 1877-78. 

State, in your own way, in what respects the districts and 
people of Lancashire and West Yorkshire are wonderful and 
extraordinary ; tracing the chief causes and influences that 
have contributed, to the wealth and consequence of those 
districts. Mention one result of the rapid industrial progress 
of those districts not indicated in the above passage, but 
which forms a large portion or evidence of the wealth created 
therein during the last half century. 

5. In the same speech occurs this remark : — S 

" Every half -hour you diminish the time of labour, and 
every farthing you raise - the payment of labour, 
which is not raised by the ordinary economic and 
proper causes, has exactly the same effect upon us 
as the increase of the tariffs of foreign countries." 

Explain what are these "ordinary economic and proper 
' causes," and what is the " effect " thus spoken of. 

6. The following passage from a news-letter expresses po- 14 
pular opinions in regard to regulation of prices of food grains 

by authority in times of dearth : — 

ft The body of the people ask the pertinent question, is 
it free trade to permit several wealthy men to com- 
bine, and, by buying up all the grain they can lay 
their hands on, create an artificial famine by thus 
having and keeping the monopoly of food grains in 
their hands ? These men having purchased, keep 
back their stock, till the prices rising still higher 
will give them still greater profits and thus add to 
the distress and utter ruin of the poor. * # „ 
And yet the authorities in their wisdom see no ne- 
cessity for interfering. " 

If you approve of the opinions implied by this writer, 
state by what methods or how far you would apply 
them. If you disapprove, point out what fallacies you con- 
sider underlie the extract, and also how you vindicate the 
" wisdom " of the authorities in abstaining from interfering 
to regulate the prices of grain. 

7. In a London money article is this remark : — " The reduc- 10 
tion in our bank rate to five per cent, has turned the 
exchanges against us." 

Put into plain untechnical language what is meant by 
this statement : then show the way in which the effect spoken 
of is brought about. 



EXAM. FOE THE DEGREE OP B.A., 1877-78. C1X 

Do you consider the following description of material 12 
iditions in India correct and full ? If not, explain wherein 
lacking : — 

' ' Her soil is rich, her people are simple in their habits, 
bound by religion as well as immemorial usage to 
live frugally ; the returns to labour are therefore 
great while its cost is small. There could not be 
conditions more favourable to production than these : 
and with them the country has an almost limitless 
scope before it. " 



Monday, 3rd December. 
[2 p.m. to 5 p.m.] 

POLITICAL ECONOMY.— Paper II. 

W. Martin Wood, Esq. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks. ] 

1. The totals of the foreign trade of the British Isles for 15 
;he two years 1875-76 may thus be stated from the official 
returns : — 

1875. 1876. 

Imports. £ £ 

Merchandise 373,941,125 374,003,771 * 

Treasure 33,264,789 37,057,353 



Total Imports ... 407,205,914 411,061,124 

Exports. 

Home produce and ma- 
nufactures ... .... 223,465,963 200,575,856 

Foreign products {i.e., 
re-exports) 46,556,423 44,296,143 

Treasure 27,628,042 29,464,082 



Total Exports ... 297,650,428 274,336,081 

Excess of Imports over 

Exports ... £109,555,486 136,725,043 



B 713— 10 



ex 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B.A., 1877-78. 



The corresponding figures for France for the year 1875 are 
i follows : — 



Imports. 

Merchandise .. 
Treasure 



178,000,000 
35,262,560 

213,262,560 



Exports. 



Merchandise 
Treasure 



192,944,000 
9,345,320 

202,289,320 



Excesss of Imports over 
Exports 



£ 10,973,240 



(a). Describe carefully of what this excess of import 
values consists : 

(6). Explain how that excess becomes so large in the 
case of the United Kingdom ; and 

(c). Why the proportion of excess is so much larger than 
in that of France and of many other countries. 

2. Why has it been said that "■ the subject of value is of 
so much importance in Political Economy that it may be 
considered as constituting the very essence of the science " ? 

Do you accept this proposition ? If so, give one or more 
definite illustrations to show why a right conception of the 
term "value" is essential in applying the principles of the 
science : also state your own definition of value, 



ia 



3. Supposing that owing to a long succession of favour- 
able seasons, accompanied by the general extension of irriga- 
tion and cheap means of communication, India were to 
become highly prosperous, do you apprehend that chfficulties 
would arise from overpopulation, and in what shape ? 
What methods would you suggest to avert such difficulties 
or counterbalance them ? 



n 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B,A,, 1877-78. CXI 

4. Do you adopt the affirmative of the two following 14 
propositions as bearing on the general and permanent in- 
terests of the Indian populations ? — 

" The currency question should be looked at from an Im- 
perial point of view, and the general interests of the 
British Empire call for the maintenance of the Indian 
currency at its old sterling valv£." 

" The disturbance of values occasioned by fluctuations in 
the sterling exchanges is more injurious to the whole 
body politic Hian a fall in prices." 

Can you accept the latter as applicable to all countries 
in a tolerably civilized condition ; and, if so, why ? 

5. State the substance of the passage (following its terms 14 
as nearly as you can) in which J. S. Mill is supposed to give 
quasi-sanction to the policy of fostering native industries by 
protective customs duties : then state the more special consi- 
derations which conflict with that policy, and suggest some 
test, based either on results or lapse of time, which should 
prescribe the firm application of these principles and the 
abandonment of " protective " expedients. 

6. In one of the journals of the day we find this remark : — 9 

u Against the famine bill may be fairly set the nett 
famine earnings of the Indian railways, of which pro- 
bably £750,000 will be clear gain to the treasury. " 

If the famine outlay on food grain represents a dead loss 
to the national resources, how far, or in what sense, can these 
75 lakhs be regarded as national gain ? 

7. Since 1843 the Italian Government has received 881 12 
millions of lire (about 34 millions sterling) from public 
lotteries, and returned in prizes 51 6^ millions, leaving a 
profit to the State of 365 millions of lire, L&. about fourteen 
millions" sterling in these fourteen years : 

The average revenue of Italy is about £29,000,000 : 

Now, having regard to the mischief of badly-devised taxa- 
tion on one hand, and on the other the salutary working of 
an equitable fiscal system : taking into account, also, what you 
may know of the recent financial condition of Italy, do you 
consider it judicious to have raised that amount of revenue 
by lottery ? If not, why not ? 

8. Writing about a century ago, a certain great autho- 12 
rity (mention whom, if you recognize him,) made this observa- 



Cxii EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OP B.A., 1877-78. 



" Through the greater part of Europe the commerce 
and manufactures of cities, instead of being the 
effect, have been the cause and occasion of the im- 
provement and cultivation of the country. " 

Point out why this should be so ; consider whether similar 
relations of cause and effect obtain in India ; and state how 
the large ports and urban communities of this country pro- 
mote, and may be made to contribute still more to the im- 
provement of rural India. 



Tuesday, 4th December. 
[10 a.m. to 1 P. M.] 

HISTORY.-Paper I, 



The Rev. S. Stead, M.A. 
[The figures to the right indicate full marks,] 

English History. 

1. " Her memory is inseparably connected with the inde- 10 
pendence and power of England." Illustrate the truth of 
this statement from the events of Elizabeth's reign. 

2. On what grounds might the succession of James I. to 10 
the English throne have been disputed ? 

3. The motives and changes of the foreign policy of 15 
James I. and Charles I. How did the relations of crown and 
parliament affect that policy ? 

4. Mention some of the leading statesmen, scholars, 15 
divines, poets, painters who may have met in the court of 
Charles I. about a. d. 1636. 

5. What great works of English literature were written 15 
• during the forty years from the defeat of the Armada to the 

outbreak of Parliamentary conflict ? 

6. The immediate causes of the Civil War. Summarize 15 
th e campaigns of 1642 — 44. 

7. The policy and influence of Lord Falkland, John Pym, 8 
George Monk, William Penn. 

8. What theories of Government were held by Richard 12 
Hooker, Thomas Wentworth, Thomas Hobbes, James 
Harrington, Robert Filmer, John Locke. 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OP E.A., 1877-78. cxiii 

Ancient History. 

1. What institutions favoured the religious, intellectual 10 
and social union of the Greek cities, and what was the main 
cause of their political disunion ? 

2. Mention the resources and comparative strength of 10 
Athens and Sparta at the outbreak of the Peloponnesian War. 

3 How was the Empire of Athens acquired, and how main- ] 
tained ? Its duration. 

4. Contrast the characters and politics of Themistocles 10 

and Aristides. 

5. Show on a rough map of Italy the direction of the 15 
JEmilian, Plaminian and Appian roads : mark on each the 
chief fortresses and colonies. 

6. Compare Carthage and Rome in government, resources, 15 
military system, treatment of their subjects. 

7 When, between whom, with what results were these 14 
battles fought : — 

Plataea, (Egospotami, Leuctra, Zama, Cynoscephala?, 
Pydna, Issus. 

8 Mention the masterpieces of dramatic poetry and of 6 
history in Greece during the fifth century B. C. 

9 The leading characteristics of the life of Socrates, with 10 
some account of his method. 



Tuesday, 4th DEbEMBER. 
[2 p. m. to 5 P.M.] 



HISTORY.— Paper II. 

The Rev. S. Stead, M.A. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

On Jewish History. 

1. Draw a map of Palestine with the divisions of the 15 
velve tribes. Mark the cities of refuge. 

2. Write a brief summary of the events of Jewish history 15 
the days of Uzziah, Jotham, Ahaz and Hezekiah. 

3. Give an account of the subject-matter of the book of 12 
b. What theories have been held concerning itsauthor- 

ip? 

b 713—10* 



Cxiv BXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B.A„ 1877-78. 



4. Mention the three chief dispersions of the Jews ; and 10 
the results of those dispersions upon other nations and upon 
the Jews themselves. 

5. What great religious and political office did the pro- 10 
phets discharge ? Name the chief prophets of Israel. 

6. Describe the rise to power of the Asmonsean dynasty. 10 
With what places is their history connected ? 

7. When and why did the Jews first come into contact 10 
with Rome ? For what events in Jewish and Roman history 

is the year 63 B. C. remarkable ? 

8. Into what schools and factions were the Jews divided 8 
during the New Testament period ? State concisely the 
tenets or politics of each. 

9. Give some account of Jewish literature in the period 10 
between the Old and New Testaments. 



History of India. 

1. When and by whom was the Bahmini dynasty found- 10 
ed ? On its extinction into what kingdoms was the Dekkan 
divided ? 

2. Draw a map of the Mahratta country. Mark the 15 
places most famous in Mahratta history. 

3. A list with dates of the Mogul Emperors from Baber 10 
to Aurungzib. 

4. Under what circumstances did the Peishwas obtain 10 
chief power in the Mahratta Confederation ? Name the four 
first Peishwas from Balaji Vishwanath. 

5. Some causes of the downfall of the Mahratta Confeder- 10 
ation. 

6. Between whom, when, and with what results were 15 
these battles fought : — Panipat (1st and 2wd), Kurdla, Assay e, 
Mehidpur. 

7. Contrast the characters and policy of Akber and 6 
Aurungzib. 

8. Some account of Raja Todar Mai, Malik Ambar, 14 
Nana Furnavis. 

9. India has been called the Italy of Asia. Show the 10 
truth, of the comparison. 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B,A., 1877-78. CXT 

Wednesday, 5th December. 
[10 a. m. to 1 p. m.] 



CHEMICAL PHYSICS-Paper I. 

I.B. Lyon, F. C. S. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. How would you ascertain the specific gravity of a 10 
powder insoluble in water ? 

2. Mention any effects produced by the adhesion of gases 15 
to solids. 

3. How much ice at 0° C. will be melted by the heat given 1 5 
out by a mass of iron weighing 100 lbs. in cooling from 400°G y . 

to 0°C. ? 

4. Suppose the heat evolved from the complete com- 15 
bustion of one pound of carbon with oxygen to be entirely 
converted into mechanical force, and the force produced 
expended in raising a weight, say, of 10,000 lbs., to what 
height will the weight be raised ? 

5. Define the terms : (1) Diathermanous, (2) Fluorescent. 15 

6. Explain the effect produced when you look at a dot 15 
on a piece of paper, through a crystal of Iceland spar, rotating 
the crystal. 

7. Explain carefully how iridescence is produced. 15 



Wednesday, 5th December, 
[2 p.m. to 5 P.M.] 



CHEMICAL PHYSICS.— Paper II. 

I. B. Lyon, F.C.S. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks. ] 

1. Enumerate the various classes into which salts may 15 
be divided, giving examples of each class. 

2. What volume of nitrogen monoxide will 10 grammes 10 
of ammonium nitrate yield ? 

3. What is the vapor density of each of the following 15 
elements : — Oxygen, mercury, phosphorus. Explain how 
your answer is arrived at ? 



CXvi EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B.A., 1877-78. 

4. Why is the formula of Ferric Chloride usually written 10 
Fe 2 Cl 6 , not Fe Cl 3 ? 

5. Suppose a battery, &c., is being employed in deposit- l<> 
ing silver on articles immersed in a decomposing cell ; how 
would you, without removing the articles, ascertain the rate 

at which silver is being deposited on them ? 

6. How can you demonstrate the part which respectively 1 5 
the glass and the coatings of a Leyden jar take in retaining 

a charge of electricity ? 

7. Under what circumstances wpuld you get an electric 10 
shock from a telegraph cable ? 

8. Describe (1) an electric bell, (2) a Smee's battery. 15 



Tuesday, 6th December. 
[10 a.m. to 1 p.m.] 



DIFFERENTIAL CALCULUS. 

T Cooke, M.A., M.I., LL.D.; James Jardine, M.A. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. When a increases indefinitely, shew that the limit of 12 
I 1+ -J lies between 2 and 3. 

2. Prove the formulas for finding the differential coeffi- J 3 
cients of an exponential and a logarithm. Hence find the 
differential coefficients of — 



x ' 



log(/ + e - X );xx and 

3. Differentiate:— 10 

(1) u = 3x — 3 tan x -f tan 3 x. 

(2) u — ^(1-z 2 ) . sin -1 x. 

4. If u z — Zaux + x 3 = ; find ~r- : 

5. Evaluate . ' . """ when x = 1. 

1 + log X— X 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B.A., 1877-78. CXvii 

6. Establish Taylor's theorem, and deduce Maclaurin's 12 
from it. 

7. Expand log (x + h) by Taylor's theorem to 5 terms. 12 

a 2 6 2 

8. If u — — - + , find what values of x will render 1L 

x a-x 

u a maximum or a minimum. 

9. Prove that the greatest rectangle that can be described 15 
about a given rectangle (ab) is a square of which the side is 

a + b 
equal to -?-== • 



Thursday, 6th December, 
[2 p.m. to 5 P.M.] 



INTEGRAL CALCULUS, 

T. Cooke, M.A., M.I., LL.D. ; James Jardine, M.A. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks. ] 

1. Explain fully what is meant by Integration. 6 

2. Explain the method of integration by parts. 14 
Integrate Jlc n log x dx. 

3. Explain the method of integration by partial fractions, 14 
md find the partial fractions corresponding to a pair of non- 
recurring imaginary roots. 

1 

14 



J a; 4 + £ 2 + 1 






Show that — 






fx^X V dx 






m + np + n p 


■l -A. dx — 


x m X p - l 


an(p + 1) J xm ~ 


an (p -i- I) 


IT 

Evaluate /» T i og tan x dx, 







CXviii EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B.A., 1877-78. 

6. Enunciate and prove " Bernoulli's Series. " To what 14 
uses is this applied ? 

7. How do you integrate generally an expression of 14 



form i(f> (sin x cos x) dx. 
Integrate J sin 5 6 cos 6 6 dB. 



8. Integrate the following : — 16 

dx 

V (a—bx + ex' 2 ) 



/ dx 
(a 2 + a 2 )! 
f 1 log (1 4- x ) d 

/ x* dx 
~x«^T 



EXAM. FOR THS DEGREE OF M.A. 7 1877-78- CXIX! 






III. 



EXAMINATION FOR THE DEGREE OF Ml. 

1877-78. 



BRANCH I— LANGUAGES (ENGLISH, SAN- 
SKRIT, AND PERSIAN). 

EXAMINERS. 

The Rev. D. Macpherson, M.A ) T „ ... 

R. G. Oxenham, MA j In English. 

P. Peterson, M.A ) 

Ramkrishna Gopal Bhandarkar, M. A., Hon. > In Sanskrit. 

Mem., R.A.S } 

Lieut.- Colonel H. F. Disbrowe ) T _ . 

Mirza Hairat, Esq j In Persian. 

BRANCH IL— HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY. 

EXAMINERS. 

W. Wordsworth, R.A ) T „. . , T> .. i , 

F. G. Selby, B.A t Hlstor y and Phllos °P*^ 

BRANCH IV.— NATURAL SCIENCES. 

EXAMINERS. 

T.Cooke, M.A., M.I., LL.D ) T Vi . a . 

W. Gray M.B. ... i Natural Sciences. 



CXX EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF M,A., 1877-78, 

Monday, 19th November. 

[10 a.m. to 1 P.M.] 

ENGLISH.— Paper I. 

The Rev. D. Macpherson, M.A. ; R. G. Oxenham, M.A. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks. ] 

1. Sketch shortly, giving dates, the history of the Cen- 10 
sorship of the Press in England. , State the circumstances 
that led to the composition of the Areopagitica and to the 
choice of this name for the discourse. 

2. Explain :— 12 

(a) To sequester out of the world into Atlantick and 

Eutopian polities which never can be drawn into use 
will not mend our Condition. 

(b) What advantage is it, if we have only scapt the ferula, 

to come under the fescu of an imprimatur ? 

(c) Certain Publicans that have the tunaging and poun- . 

daging of all free spoken truth. 

(d) A man may be a heretick in the truth. 

3. State in your own words that part of Milton's argu- 5 
ment which is illustrated by the Egyptian legend of Osiris. 

4. What exception does Milton make to his theory of 1 
toleration as argued in the Areopagitica ? How do you ex- 
plain this inconsistency ? Quote any parallel inconsistencies 

in other English writers of classical repute. 

5. It has been observed that " we are compelled to accept 10 
another moral law and another moral standard for history 
than that relating to private life." Illustrate this from 
Shakespeare's historical dramas. 

6. With what other plays would you connect Richard 11. 10 
and Richard III. , respectively, and which of the two do you 
consider the earlier in date ? Give reasons for your answer. 

7. Explain, adding any critical notes suggested by the 18 
words or allusions : — 

(a) Woe doth the heavier sit 

Where it perceives it is but faintly borne. 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF M.A., 1877-78, CXXl 

(6) Landlord of England art thou now, not King. 

(c) Grace me no Grace, nor uncle me no uncle : 
I am no traitor's uncle, and that word grace 
In an ungracious mouth is but profane. 

(d) — My face so thin 
That in mine ear I dare not stick a rose 

Lest men should say look where three farthings goes. 

(e) From whom hast thou this great commission, France, 
To draw my answer from thy articles ? 

(/ ) Commodity, the bias of the world. 

8. Explain :— absey-book, scatch, scroyle, bastinado, chur- 5 
lish, canonize, canker, sorrow, Dauphin. 

9. Paraphrase : — 

(a) It is the curse of kings to be attended 20 

By slaves that take their humours for a warrant 
To break within the bloody house of life, 
And on the winking of authority 
To understand a law, to know the meaning 
Of dangerous majesty, when perchance it frowns 
More upon humour than advised respect. 

(&) My brain I'll prove the female to my soul. 
My soul the father ; and these two beget 
A generation of still breeding thoughts, 
And these same thoughts people this little world 
In humours like the people of this world, 
For no thought is contented. The better sort 
As thoughts of things divine, are intermixed 
With scruples and do set the word itself 
Against the word ; 

As thus, ' Come little ones, ' and then again, 
1 It is as hard to come as for a camel 
1 To thread the postern of a small needle's eye.' 
Thoughts tending to ambition they do plot 
Unlikely wonders ; how these vain weak nails 
May tear a passage through the flinty ribs 
Of this hard world, my ragged prison walls 
And, for they cannot, die in their own pride. 



b 713—11 



Cxxii EXAM, FOR THE DEGREE OF M.A., 1877-78. 

Monday, 19th November. 

[2 p. if. to 5 p.m.] 

ENGLISH.— Paper II. 

The Rev. D. Macpherson, M.A. ; R. G. Oxenham, M.A. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

Chaucer's Canterbury Tales ; Coleridge's Friend. 

1. Paraphrase :— - 19 

(a) Who shall me yiven teres to complain 

The deeth of gentillesse and of fraunchyse, 
That al the world welded in his demeyne 
^ And yit him thoughte it myghte nat suffyse ? 
So ful was his corage of hye empryse 
Alas ! who shall me helpe to endyte 
False fortune and poison to despyse 
The whiche two of al this wo I wyte ? 

(b) Yet in the brest of hir virginitee 

Ther was enclosed rype and sad corage ; 
A fewe sheep spinning on feeld she kepte, 
She wolde nought been ydel til she slepte. 

(c) And in the peples eres alle and some 

Was couth eek that a newe markisesse 
He with him broughte. 

(d) Her maistresse clepeth wommen a gret route 
And up they rysen, wel a ten or twelve ; 
Up ryseth Canace hir-selve, 

And forth she walketh esily a pas, 
Arrayed after the lusty seson sote 
Lyghtly, for to pleye and walke on f ote ; 
Nat but with fyve or six of his meynee 
- And in a trench, forth in the park, goth she 
The vapour, which fro the erthe glood 
Made the sonne to seme rody and brood. 

Give two meanings of nat. 

2. Explain :— 6 

(a) Al so mot I thee. 

(b) I recche nought a bene 

Though I come after him with hawe bake. 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OP M.A., 1877-78. CXxiii 

c) Al had hir lever have born a knave child. 
{d) But it be falle of newe. 
(e) Withouten wepen save his hondes tweye 
The slow and al to-rente the leoun. 

3. How has the use of quaint, man, thing, heap,»smith 15 
changed in the course of time ? Also state and illustrate the 
change which we find as regards ' strong' verbs. Is sent to 

be reckoned a strong or a weak preterite ? Give a reason for 
your answer. 

Write notes on the derivation or uses of : — self, other, 
every, wanton, forward (noun). 

4. What was Coleridge's purpose in writing The Friend ? 24 
Describe the influence which Coleridge has exercised on (1) 
philosophical, (2) religious, and (3) political thought in Eng- 
land. Show by reference to the theories which he contro- 
verted the importance of this influence. 

5. On what grounds did Coleridge oppose the system of 9 
ethics then popular ? 

6. Explain his views as to toleration, and as to the ques- 9 
tion of the indifference of religious opinions except as regards 
the sincerity with which they are held. 

7. Paraphrase : — 18 

" They will see, indeed, that the knowledge of the one was 
solid through its whole extent, and that of the other exten- 
sive at a cheap rate by its superficiality : that the wit cf the 
one is always bottomed on sound sense, peoples and enriches 
the mind of the reader with an endless variety of distinct 
images and living interests ; and that his broadest laughter 
is every where translatable into grave and weighty truth : 
while the wit of the Frenchman, without imagery, without 
character, and without that pathos which gives the magic 
charm to genuine humour, consists, when it is most perfect, in 
happy turns of phrase, but far too often in fantastic incidents, 
outrages of the pure imagination, and the poor low trick of 
combining the ridiculous with the venerable, where he who 
does not laugh abhors. Neither will they have forgotten that 
the object of the one was to drive the thieves and mummers 
out of the temple, while the other was propelling a worse 
banditti first to profane and pillage and ultimately to raze it. 
In both instances the circumstances were supplied by an age 
of hopes and promises — the age of Erasmus restless from 
the first vernal influences of real knowledge, that of Voltaire 
from the hectic of imagined superiority . 



CXxiv EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF M.A., 1877-78. 

Wednesday, 21st November. 

[2 p.m. to 5 p.m.] 

ENGLISH COMPOSITION. 

The Rev. D. Macpherson, M.A ) t, 

R. G. Oxenham, M.A | Examiners. 

Original Composition. 
The Study of the Physical Sciences ; the advantages to be 
derived from it, and any modes of thought possibly resulting 
which have to "be guarded against. 



Tuesday, 20th November. 
[10 a.m. to 1p.m.] 

SANSKRIT.— Paper I. 

Peter Peterson, M.A. • 
Ramkrishna Gopal Bhandarkar, M.A. 

I. — Rig Veda. 
[The figures to the right indicate full marks .] 

(«) qt STpf <F* JTW *pkTT?Ht 20 

(6) *t: <rr«nrr aranrranrp^r: <nr- 






SXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF M.A., 1877-78. CXXV 

jng- sr snrw rs 1 : II 

id) VRUT fk*U ^*T &rU\k $T 

(e) Yam smd prichanti kiiha seti ghoram 

utem ahur naish6 astity enam 

So aryah pushti'r vija iva' minati 

s'rad asmai dhatta sa janasa Inclrah. 

(i). Explain the system of accentual marks, and write 
out with the accents v. 5 (in which '= udatta) in the 
Devanagari character, giving both Pada and Samhita" 
texts. Do you see any mistake in the 4th verse ? 
When does the verb lose, and when does it retain 
its accent ? 

(ii). Write out all Vedic forms and Sandhis, and give the 
classical forms or equivalents. 

(iii). Parse carefully CTq'lTqPT v * *' ^TTOT v - 3, and 
F^sT v - 5. What explanation does Sayana offer 
of these forms ? 

(iv). Translate the passage, and add notes wherever your 
translation deviates from that of Sayana. 

2 Write a short philological essay on the Vedic Infinitive, 
E 713—11* * 



CXXvi EXAM. FOR THE DEGEEE OF M.A., 1877-78. 

3. In what metre is the above passage ? Give the metrical 
scheme of the other two chief metres used in the Rig Veda. 

4. Translate : — 



(«•) 



<ftr snfr flf nrfrf i 
«rnnr**fcft ^5jr anfaf frit 
f r%rrr igthrcr <rtfr II 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF M.A., 3.877-78. CXXVli 

5. Give an account of mhas as represented in the hymns. 6 
What are her standing epithets ? What arie her functions? 
With what deities is she generally associated ? What is 
her position in the later mythology ? And ' what light does 
comparative mythology throw upon the V.edic conception ? 

. 6 What do you suppose to have been Jthe view held as 6 
to the nature of their hymns by the autjhors themselves ? 
Illustrate your answer by quotations. 

i 

NlRUKTA. t 

1. Translate and explain :— 25 



(a 



(b). 
(c). 












fi 



(e). 



*< e *v 






grauTT' 






CXXviii EXAM. .FOR THE DEGREE OF M.A., 1877-78. 

(h). are qrr^r^rarinFrrH" sjrFrn' *nnr- 




Who is the S'akalya ajlluded to in (/), and what trace have 
we got of the fact mentioned with regard to him ? 

2. State and criticize the principles of etymology laid 6 
down by Yaska in the Ibeginning of the second chapter of the 
Nirukta. 

3. A good many of t/he grammatical terms used by Y&ska 5 
and some found in Palnini also are constructed upon one 
obvious principle. Stai|e that principle, and give all such 
terms, whether found in Y&ska or elsewhere. 

4. Compare the stylA of Yaska with that of any later 6 
writer, such as Patanjalli. Give as many ordinary (not 
technical) words as you d:an,used by Yaska, which have either 
gone out of use or are ljised by him in a sense which has 
become obsolete in later 'Sanskrit. 

5. Write a short essay, on the state and extent of Sanskrit 8 
literature, sacred and profj'ane, in the time of Yaska. 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF M.A., 1877-78. CXXix 



Tuesday, 20th November. 
[2 p.m. to 5 p.m.] i 



1. 
(a.) 



SANSKRIT.— Paper IK. 

i 
Peter Peterson, M.A. ; 

PcAMKRISHNA GOPAL BHANDARR AR, M.A. 

[The figures to the right indicate. 
VYA'KARANA. 
Translate and explain : — 



full marks.] 



£< J -s 



^5frrT%frr% to? I s*rofr ^^^rrfr *:- 

ib.) aft: ^q^sfrm^ q*njmftr% St^* 
^rTJTrqrrrnrsr ^ri'r rW faring- jlarfefhr =r wr- 

f^rtfrfrr rt^-j^ | y 

Give instances of the restriction laid dUown in the first sen- 
tence of (b). t 

2. Explain: JTOrfgrmqT, 3TCTO? plwm> 7*T1- 

fe^T^T, and PT^nr, with instances] 



CJLXX EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF M.A., 1877-78. 

3. Make up the I>esiderative of HT3" ( to sew), and the 10 
Aorist 3rd pers. sin*, and dual of ^?^T> quoting all the 
necessary Sutras, and (giving reasons why, when more than one 
are applicable at the tame time, one of them is to be used 
first and then the oth^r or others. 

4. Explain :— 8 

st: I QTflrrr *wwm <rcxrR"=ri flFrsr^rsrq-g; I 
^Rmrgr^g; i ^^.^ Tsfest ^ir^r^rsjfarri 

m : | q- QTrTr^tr^ q-frrrsujrj ^flT^^r^r ST^rl 

^3" I &k srs^fr l[ rrf #r vwfk affaT?pr- 
^jw qrwr% ti^iw simr I 

5. Give four instanced of the purpose of the STnTITT^"* 10 
cJTPC ? and show how Patj ; *injali explains them without such an 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF M.A., 3.877-78. CXXX1 

6. Explain :— 14 

L 



e>) 



srarfRTrer ?w f ^wroT?r ^tt: 









g 

^ 



r-rrr^rr: II 

you find the dicta 
ition of these. 



7. Of how many different authors do 
n the Mahabhashya ? Determine the rel, 

(a.) Explain and illustrate this ParibhMsha. 
{b.) Translate the following passages."!, and solve the 
difficulties raised :— I 



15 



CXXxii EXAM. £0R THE DEGKEE OF M.A., 1877 78. 

QT3T Wtt %&<^K<*l%£ti 3TW Jjtf rT- 

rTf3r??rrg: | ?nr *&% q-tfjpfr irrg ?r rr% l ?$ 

(ii) q- ^ gpr4r ?r% sr% prnrrrnr^r r%- 
?TTwq"rr t^ nrTJrfrr^rlr ^n^ <r£ ^ qrr 
stppcpt ?r% nfin|nr*4 qTornrnrf r%rcnt 

(c.) What is the view r of Antarangatva Nagojibhatta adopts ? 

State the view or views ,he refutes. 
i: 

9. Explain and illust rate the following Paribhashas :— 10 

10. Where does the Nfclannipata Paribhasha fail, and in what 6 
instances is it applicable Jt^ 

11. What instances area usually explained by the Akritav- 4 
yuha Paribhasha, and hofwdoes Nagojibhatta explain these 
when he reject3 that Paril) )hasha ? 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF M.A., 1877-78. 



cxxxui 



VEDANTA. 



N.B. — Ansvjer Question 4 in Sjanskrit. 

1. To what branch of learning would you rfefer theVedanta, 
and why ? What is the Prasthanatraya ? [ Name the prin- 
cipal Vedantic schools, and state what the cajcdinal differences 
between them are. 



2. Distinguish between 
sTrTTrriTfl^rrW, and 



State the process by which these several k* inds of perception 
are produced according to the Vedanta Pari, bh&sha, and give 
their definitions as based upon these proces: ses. 

3. State in general terms the contends of the several 6 

chapters of the S'ariraka Bhashya. 






What school professes these doctrines 
of the controversy between this school a^ilid S'ankaracharya 
on the point laid down in the quotation. 

5. Name the several Buddhistic schdfols mentioned by 12 
S'ankaracharya, and give their doctrines a |s detailed by him 
as well as the manner in which they are reJfuted. 



Give a summary 



6. Distinguish between the parin&ma vc 
vdda. Which of these does S'aiikarach 
explanation of the world, and show how h 
said that there is nothing in the Bhashya ' 
the m&ydvdda attributed to the Vedanj 
Give references to the Bhashya in answeri J 

7. How does S'ankaracharya remove t' 
against his system on the score of pai 
(Jg-q- jq^^-crq") I Would not that san 
in favour of the Tarkikas, whose doctrir 
bringing forward that same objection ? 

m 713—12 



10 



da and the Vivart a, 
jarya adopt in his 
is led to it ? It is 
diich countenances 
;ins. Is this true? 
this question. 

e objection brought 
iality and cruelty 
e explanation do as 

e] he condemns by 
If not, why ? 



CXXXIV EXAM. F 



OR THE DEGREE OF M.A., 1877-78. 



8 ariTR is t 

What is meant by 
considered ? 



poken of as 

the phrase, and why is 3f sffT so 



9- Translate :— 

^i^Jfr sNrfNr^ftg- #^W5T^-- 



20 






nrsnjrefcrinfl' tiff- 



in 



(c) 



fir 



^^TrrirrrJr 



**^ #^ ^v 



JTffnJnrqpr r^r^^rrri^r^qr 






EXASL FOR THE DEGREE OF SLA 



., 1877-7 



1XXXY 






«nt l * %? stfi farr 



T2p 



rtf ^fir^rT 1 



10. Is mokslia a condition not possessed . by the individual 
soul, and to be obtained gradually, in the g ystem of S'ankara- 
eharya ? If not, how does he represent it r Does this system 
really recognize a God whom we have to 1<, )ok up to and rise 
into an equality with ? Or is it true to say, that the union of 
the individual soul with the supreme soui is S'ankarachar- 
ya's moksha ? Give your reasons and references. 

11. Give the names of the several thejistic schools whose 
views S'ankaracharya considers adverse to his own or to 
Badarayana's ; and state their doctrines a s to the relation of 
God to man and the world, and point out '{wherein these differ 
from those of the author of the Bhashya. 



DHAEMA. 

1. Enumerate and describe the various kinds of marriage. 

2. Explain fully the terms Dvyamusl Wayana, apratiban- 
dhadaya, niyama> pari*sankhya, Gotrajai sapinda, Gotr3]'r 
samanodaka, putrika. -putra 



> 



3, Translate and discuss fully :— 



(«) 



(b) 



*r g^ T**r% stirrer, 



sr srrsrr re? JT. I 



cxxxvi 



exam, ny?* THE DEGREE 0F M - A -> 1877-78. 



AVhat is charitra-bAy 

4. WhatisBhuktfi 
it admitted as proof ? 



ndhakam ? 



? When and under what conditions is 5 



*s 



5. (a) 



i#r *ff :FIT ^ rq?n:r wrwror I 



J4 



. How are the following texts severally- 
Complete tins text. W&res'vara, and what is the conclusion 
reconciled with it oy j in ^ Mitakshara and the Viramitro- 
with regard to each 
daya? 

f<mr ^rf 5rw ft*** ^^ w * I 

r^fl-fa far ^^ "^W ^ ^ ' 

» • ^4i^lp«cjHdow. B and C are the half bro- 
(ft) A is a childless dece ased husband. What 

thers, by the same f athel , 

a'» rights as agamsi? * uu ^ 

r nt that rises out of the word PITTf. 



(iii) 

(iv) 
(v) 



are A's rights as ag£ 



(c) Sketch the argui 



What is 



., lAO+r iT,p (1 down here ? Quote the text from 
the doctrine r ^ 



Manu which is supposec 



be in conflict with it. How is the 



Manu wnicu « ™rv-zft exception is there to the general 
difficulty got over ? W^ t 
doctrine ? t 

7. Translate :— \ 

(Kraut 5r>T'f ^*t* 3 strawy H 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF M.A., 
To what doctrine is this an exception ? 



1877- 78. cxxxvii 



What are the texts contrary to the doctrin^ here laid down ? 
How are they disposed of in the Mitaksharf* ? Explain the 
term niyoga-dharma. \ 

In how many ways may this be translated, and with what 
results ? In particular show how it is sought to establish 
that the gifts enumerated and the like are < exempt from par- 
tition though obtained at the expense of the ! patrimony. 

10. (a.) What provision is made for tMB discharge of the 3 
mother's debts ? 

(b. ) A died leaving a childless widow,- Is she liable for 
A's debts ? If she is, to what extent is sh< I liable ? 

n^r^rrqrrT^Tf srSRrsFrnr 1 ^JJ*r *tpt- 
ft?> sjrrqfqr f> *r^qra*rc Tm rr^T- 

srnrfri mw&g: 1 ^r ttsifq qprnjrr: arn"- 

b 713—12* 



O^xxvill EXAM, FO? 



C'R THE DEGREE OP M.A., 1877-78. 



Ift — .. ] various kinds of S'raddhas. Describe 

12. Enumerate the I, ^ ve ur inion on the following 

any one S rMdha, and ' & J r 

case : — I 

A . , , . , . lifetime made division among his sons 
A had during his lij ow are his s/rMdhag to be perform . 

by different wives. II«, 
ed? ' 

^ , . , , . „ , i iat argument is it a refutation ? State 

«, Exp r 1 1 n th . ls ' ? f w j giving the conclusion and illustrating 

the whole dicussion, |J- ons * f law# 

its bearings upon questi-i- N 

^.^q. g srtw t rTrrr =r r<T?njrT : il 

r ,. ., ,. , ents in support of the position that 

Give the chief argum. ^ H ^ is ^ ^ text uged 

property arises from par the conclusion ? 

on both sides ? What is 



What are the limitatid 



16 



i)ns to this ? 




Translate and discuss Eg* ^I^Ttt 5 attri + buted J 
When may a woman adc ^ pt ' Com P are the Hmdu svstem of 
adoption with the Eomafl y 

1 7, Discuss (in Sanskl" it) ^ the f ollowin g theme * =~ 



14 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF M.A.I 1877-78. C2XX1X 



Wednesday, 21st November. 
[10 a.m. to 1 P.M.]j 

— 1 

SANSKRIT.-Papep| HI. 

Peter Peterson, Mj.A.j 
Ramkrishna Gopal Bhanda/Mkar, M.A, 

Translation. I 

[The figures to the right indicat T full marks.] 

1. Translate into English: — 

*mNra?NftsprT %*r??rr ill 



20 



kh THE DEGREE OF M.A., 1877-78. 



cxl 



EXAM. FOR' 






rc^ snfrrn:. 









3TgnR*r^r1rv l 




f^rm^c: 



2. Translate into Engli 



snfri«TOTTr- 



sh:- 



Wmw I ^r^rflTrr i •rqrsrsqr- 



^^nrrirrTTT 






;friTJTr^Tfjrr^?T 



feraronft I^f*^ ^f^^ * 
*rs^ ftroiT £% ^ff^rffa. , ^w- 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OP M.A.,1 1877-78. Cxll 

ik *: w fcaw*: i *rer qTri^hnmg; I nnrr- 
5Tr%qTW^ srrwrpmr^nr: [I T ^ mw- 

3. Translate into Sanskrit: — • 25 

But if I grant, thou might'st defend 
' The thesis which thy words intend — \ 
That to begin implies to end j 

Yet how should I for certain hold 

Because my memory is so cold, 

That I first was in human mould ? Jj 

I cannot make this matter plain, 
But I would shoot, howe'er in vain, 
A random arrow from my brain. j 

It may be that no life is found, 
Which only to one engine bound 
Falls off, but cycles always round. 

As old mythologies relate, 
Some draught of Lethe might await} 
The slipping thro' from state to stat- 

As here we find in trances, men 
Forget the dream that happens the: 
Until they fall in trance again. 

So might we, if our state were sue. 

As one before, remember much, 

For those two likes might meet an< fa touch. 



Cilil EXAM. &fi THE DEGREE OF M.A., 1877-78. 

4. Translate intip pnskrit : — 25 

But then, my ' .. mds, he said, if the soul is really im- 
mortal, what can. Ihould be taken of her, not only in 
respect of the por a of time which is called life, but of 
eternity ? And the ,/iger of neglecting her from this point 
of view does indeed ''pear to be awful. If death had only 
been the end of all,,^ ,ie wicked would have had a good bar- 
gain in dying, for th" would have been happily quit, not 
only of their body, Y? r of their own evil together with their 
souls. But now, as **j soul plainly appears to be immortal, 
there is no release o^alvation from evil except the attain- 
ment of the highest V*tue and wisdom. For the soul when 
on her progress to the'jvorld below takes nothing With her 
but nurture and educf "on, which are indeed said greatly to 
benefit or injure the d-,(»arted, at the very beginning of his 
pilgrimage in the otho » >vorld. For after death, as they say, 
the genius of each inc I'dual, to whom he belonged in life, 
leads him to a certain Pace in which the dead are gathered 
together for judgment 'whence they go into the world below 
following the guide wiC is appointed to Conduct them from 
this world to the other; • and when they have there received 
their due and remainec- their time, another guide brings 
them back after many < evolutions of ages. 



Tue" pay, 20th November. 
I a.m. to 1 P.M.] 



PERSIAN— Paper I. 
Lietjt.-Col. H. V. Disbrowe; Mirza Hairat, Esq. 
[The figures l^the right indicate full marks.] 
1. Translate:— " 25 

»lj »<^) c^J" y$**J** lyU!c>Uj (^U*t^ 

03^> 8 0-oUj^U ^l:;U. 4*& J I <y*9 y>L. <$\j 

j I dS *^ t jf { j ijtSfl &\±jj **> Ic^f ^Uy 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF M.A. ,1877-78- Cxliii 

O^'d jj&o ^^) OiSltjl «^*o c-TjUo jo fjUcJI 

CjUd* ^^ C^JaU ^)Uj jt); ^5tfc4| 

2. (a) Give the meanings of the following Turkish 30 
words :— 1 ^ 

iJ^^~ ^.)f~ Wjl- ^-;;— U?— ^6" 



cxliv 



exam F f0R THE DEGREE 0F M - A -' 1877-78. 



(&) What is jffi'J&»> > and what do y° u know 
of the ca)* endar y ears °^ *ke Tartar Turks as 

— JJ ^U^ -1- J* 5 e^y — J*5 «HJ I 

&c, and explain the ab[' ove words 
(c) Give the da 



his accessi 
ing to the 
Translate :— 



te of the birth of Changuz Khan, 
on to the throne, and hisdeath, accord- 
'Mahomedan $ra. 









lJ U. (j| ; fJ^sS 






•20 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF M,A,' 18 ''"' 8 ' CxIv 

4. (a) Give the history of C-ftJ H ^ I and * 

(6) Whoare J U!~^^l r ^"^ U| ^4r^ 
(c) Give the meanings of the folio ng "~ 

(d) Who are the following person/ *'~ 



5b 



V*°lj 



b 713—13 



cxlvi exam, for r* E DEGREB 0F M - A '' 1877-78. 

mJ^DAY, 20th November, 
| [2 p.m. to 5 P.M.] 

p'ERSIAN-Paper II. 
Lieut. -Col H r ' ^isbrowe > Mirza Hairat, Esq. 
[The figures i° the right indicate ful1 marks.] 
3. Translate : — 



20 



^ji ^j c&t b? * ^ ^y* & ' ^ ] 

bk & f&i^ [&y. sow* Ui. I 



d^ j^ l^V 



°^ y J 1 ^ j $* *^ j &^ j f^ °*^ 






i j o*»j 






EXAM. FOE THE DEGREE OP M. 



\^\jS & ! U O0jUt» ij***^ J*Uf <&&I«J &£ | j 



2. Translate : — 



., 1877-78. exlvii 



r* 



J'u* 



fcr! 



3. {a) Name the poets of these verses : — 



vO 



5U3 



8t> ^ ^ ] J^ ^ JZ (li) 



(6) Explain :— I 

(c) Give the singulars of the foU>wing plurals : 
■ — u**l ' >« — <>£ I *? — L-i t% — 8 U I 

4. Translate : — 

u^j &jW »^*i U> >* ^^5 

^^Jj 4>iU o^b a. ^ jfj 



10 



10 



20 



exJyiii exam, foe : 



• f 'i"HE dbgbee of m.a., 1877-78. 
> Id 



.l^a.b ^Ua. <>jUj 






J 



liib 



>.jir 



rjt 



,'ub* 



8 J b 



1} 



♦ 
J 



Sd yAp 



^U; ^b 



b *v;,^; > 

> i.V . * 









^jbk b e^*^ 









EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OP M.A., 1877-78. cxhx 



5. (a)' Give the etymology of the following words :— 
(b) Translate :— 

°j? u»G*f s j^ J' j- (i) 

J^° ur* J^ ^ u?^ jr (il) 

{c) Give the history of the invention of Chess and 
Backgammon according to the Author of Shah- 
namah. 

'6. State the circumstances under which Shahnamah w« 
first thought to be written and afterwards brought to its 
poetical order and finish. 



Wednesday, 21st November. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 



PERSIAN TRANSLATION. 

Lieut. -Col. H. F. Disbrowe ; Mirza Hairat, Esq, 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks. ] 

1. Translate :— 50 

The allied governments, tired of remonstrating, made final 
and formal demands upon the Greek Government, in terms 
not identical, but substantially the same. King O — took 
time to deliberate ; the French Emperor deemed it desirable 
to hasten his deliberation, and addressed to him with his own . 
hand a sort of ultimatum and despatched it by M — . The let- 
ter intimated that the ports of Greece would be blockaded and 
the capital occupied by French troops, if his Majesty did not 

b 713—13* 



cl 'exam, for the degree op m.a., 1877-78- 

immediately protect the frontier of Turkey from his lawless 
subjects. The Greek King threatened to abandon Athens 
and throw himself for protection upon Russia and the German 
Powers ; when, however, he learned that the ships of the allies 
prepared to blockade his ports and French troops were or- 
dered to Greece, he and his subjects became panic-struck, and 
he professed his willingness to do all that was demanded of 
him. 

2. Translate :— 20 

j&Jj oil *t>jT ^U j\ j x \ j ^jU &)&*. 

r*j\ &\*f ^i j* ^ ^ ?*y 6y>» 

J <L^ ■f j> j&J A»U ^ \^l°jko Alto ^ 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OP M«A., 1877-78. 
3. Translate : — 3Q 

jW^t j^ J 1 **\ y. vf^'jf j*i 
j'i^j^Ji j^y" yy* ^ J> ^ ^i 

^ ig? *±*«j 15 ** I j* b/^j £j I 

jb ^ IJjj \j± fjo ^ ^y, j_/&\j 

U^i' * j*?* J J& *j\& \*jy> £ ^\ 

jQ m)j>jt > ^j *?& «*>>> & &\j 



Clil EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF M.A., 1877-78 



jj;J ±S&> ^j) 0j\6 <o s jj £ ^i 

BRANCH II.-HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY. 

Monday, 19th November. 

(10 a.m. to 1 P.M.) 



HISTORY. -Part I. 
W. Wordsworth, B.A. ; F. G. Selby, B.A. 
[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. What were the causes of the increase of the royal 15 
power in England in the century preceding the Norman 
Conquest ? Describe the personal character and government 

of Edward the Confessor, and the composition and aims of 
the different parties which were competitors for power under 
his rule. 

2. Sketch briefly the history of the Norman Duchy, and 8 
the personal characteristics of the Norman race. 

3. Narrate in detail the English campaigns of William 10 
between 1068 and the end of 1071. 

4. Describe fully the administrative and judicial reforms 1 5 
of Henry II, and his relations to the Church and the feudal 
party m England and France. To what causes do you 
attribute the personal humiliations and political failure of his 
declining years ? 

5. Compare the position of the Kings of England and 7 
France in the 12th century. 



EXAM. FOE THE DEGREE OF M.A., 1877-78, cliii 

What was the nature, extent, and origin of the power t 
claimed or exercised by -the Popes in the 12th and 13th 
centuries ? 

7. What was the origin of the Scottish kingdom, and the 12 
political relations of its kings to the English king ? Sketch 
briefly the ethnology of the Scottish kingdom, and show its 
connection with the languages still spoken in Scotland. 

8. Describe the events which brought about the final 10 
separation of England and Normandy, and estimate the influ- 
ence of that separation on English history. 

9. What is the constitutional importance of the reign of 6 
Henry III.? Into what three epochs does Professor Stubbs 
divide this reign ? 

10. What was the political and social condition of Ireland 10 
at the date of the Anglo-Norman invasion, and the principal 
social consequences of that invasion ? 



Monday, 19th November. 
[2 p.m. to 5 P.M.] 



HISTORY.— Part II. 
W. Wordsworth, B.A. ; F. G. Selby, B.A. 
[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1 . What was the origin of the Capetian house, and the sources 15 
of its power ? Enumerate the principal feudatories of the French 
Crown in the 11th century, and point out the steps by which 
the French kings established or recovered the supremacy of the 
royal authority. 

2. Narrate in detail the pontificate of Leo IX., and show 15 
how his relations (1) to the empire, (2) to the monastic refor- 
mers, and (3) to the new secular power in Southern Italy, pro- 
moted the development of the papal power. 

3. What were the most important intellectual and social eon- 10 
sequences of the Norman Conquest? 

4, Write a short life of Archbishop Anselm. 



dlV EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF M.A., 1877"78. 

5. What was the origin and tendency of the intellectual revi- 
val of the 11th century ? Illustrate your answer by references to 
the career and aims of (1) Bernard, (2) Abelard, and (3) Arnold 
of Brescia. 

6. From what elements was the system of thought called 
Scholasticism developed ? 

7. Write a summary of the pontificate of Innocent III., and 
point out the consequences of the relations of this pontiff to the 
English King. 

8. A history of the fourth Crusade, - and an estimate of its 
influence on the after history of Eastern Europe. 

9. Describe the political condition of Italy in the first half 
of the thirteenth century, and the relations of the different 
powers to the Emperor. 



Tuesday, 20th November. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 



POLITICS and POLITICAL ECONOMY. 
W. Wordsworth, B,A. ; F. G. Selby, B.A. 
[The figures to the right indicate full marks. ] 

1. Into what four departments has the Science of Politics 12 
been divided by modern English writers ? Describe fully each 

of these, and the methods of investigation which seem proper 
to each. 

2. Distinguish the exact and the popular application of the 8 
terms "monarchy," " republic," "aristocracy," "sovereignty." 

3. What is the foundation of the assertion of a modern 8 
writer that the term " limited monarchy" involves a contradic- 
tion of terms 1 

4. Enumerate the marks of an independent political com- 12 
munity, and discuss the principal classirications which are com- 
monly proposed of political powers. 

5. " The Principle of Utility," the 'greatest happiness of W 
the greatesf number,' has furnished a connecting link in modern 
times between Politics and Ethics. 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF M.A., 1877-78. civ 



Illustrate this position by a comparison of ancient and modern 
theories in respect to slavery and the law of war. 

6. Describe shortly the politic system of Thomas Hobbes and 10 
its present importance in reference to ecclesiastical pretensions. 

7. On what grounds may the support and control of educa- 12 
lion by the State be vindicated or disputed ? 

8. What opinion does Adam Smith pronounce on educational 8 
endowments, and their economical consequences ? 

9. Compare the colonial policy of England and Spain in the 8 
seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. 

10 What merits and defects have been attributed by historians 7 
to the Government of the East India Company ? 



Tuesday, 20th November. 
[2 p.m. to 5 p.m.] 



LOGIC. 
W. Wordsworth, B.A. ; F. G. Sej.by, B.A. 
[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. What is the value of the major premiss in a syllogism ? 15 

2. What are the functions of language in relation to thought. 20 

3. " Definition is of names and of names only." 10 

Explain and criticize this statement. 

4. Explain and illustrate by reference to some instance 15 
with which you are acquainted, the tendency of* sciencesjis they 
advance to become deductive. 

5. State the points at issue between Whewell and Mill 10 
in the view which they respectively take of Induction. 

6. The growth and influence of the Comparative method, 25 

7. How far has a Chapter on Fallacies its proper place 5 
in a Logical treatise? 



I 



clvi EXAM, FOR THE DEGREE OF M.A., 1877-78, 

Wednesday, 21st November. 
[10 a.m. to 1 P.M.] 



HISTORY op GREEK PHILOSOPHY. 
W. Wordsworth, B. A. ; F. G. Selbf, B. A. 
[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. " Man is the measure of all things, of things that are that 1 5 
they are, of things that are not that they are not." 

Who was the author of this doctrine ? Consider its impor- 
tance as affecting the development of Greek philosophy. 

2. The different meanings of the word " dialectic." 10 

3. How far was the philosophy of Plato and Aristotle affect- 10 
ed by their ideas with regard to a future world ? 

4. What was the origin of the Platonic theory of ideas ? Is 20 
it correct to call Plato a realist, and Aristotle a nominalist ? 

5. On what points does Aristotle join issue (1) with the 15 
position of Eudoxus that pleasure is the chief good, (2) with the 
Cynic conception of self-sufficiency. 

6. What share in the formation of moral character do Plato 15 
and Aristotle respectively assign to nature, habit, and instruc- 
tion ? 

7. What were the causes which produced the sceptical school la 
of philosophy ? Give a brief account of the teaching of Pyrrho, 



Wednesday, 21st Novemrer. 
[2 p.m. to 5 P.M.] 



HISTORY of MODERN PHILOSOPHY. 
W. Wordsworth, B.A. ; F. G. Selby, B.A. 
[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Trace historically the meaning of the word philosophy. IS 

2. The origin of the connection between the Church and 1Q 
philosophy, and the benefits which philosophy derived from it 

3. The influence of Arabian thought upon the philosophy o 
of the Middle Ages. 

4. What is the supreme rule of human action according 16 
to Hobbes, Hume, Butler, and Kant ? 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF M.A., 1877-78. civil 

5 Criticize the method of Locke. 

H. Mention any parts of the Kantian philosophy which 15 
seem to you to have been suggested by the reasonings of 
Leibnitz. 

7 What do you mean by the doctrine of Final Causes? 10 
What was Bacon's position with regard to it ? 

8. "I ought, therefore I can." Explain the doctrine of 10 
which this is the formula, 

9. G-ive a brief history of the theory of Mental Associa- 15 
f ion. or an account of Berkley's Theory of Vision, 



B EANCH IV.— NATURAL SCIENCES. 

Monday, 19th November. 

[10 a.m. to 1 P.M.] 



CHEMICAL PHYSICS.— Paper I. 

T. Cooke, M.A., M.I., LL.D. ; W. Gray, MB. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Describe any methods employed for the determination 8 
of "coefficients cf expansion," and shew how the coefficients 

of superficial and cubical expansion may be calculated when 
those of linear expansion are known. 

2. Describe the Mercurial Compensating pendulum known 8 
as "Graham's Pendulum," and deduce an expression for the 
height of the mercury in the cylinder which forms the pen- 
dulum bob. 

3. State Regnault's formula for the total heat of steam 10 
in terms of its temperature, and find the latent heat of steam 

at 205° F. 

4. Assuming that the specific heat of methyllic alcohol is 12 
0-671 and its specific gravity 0*818, and further assuming that 
when into a quart of such alcohol at 50° F. nine ounces of 
metallic filings at 200° F. are thrown, the temperature of the 
mixture become^ 61° F. Calculate the specific heat of the 
metal. 

b 713 — 14 



elviii EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF M.A., 1877-78. 

5. Equal volumes of alcohol and water cool under the 10 
eame circumstances in 4 minutes 54 seconds and 10 minutes 
respectively ; find the specific heat of the alcohol, its specific 
gravity being '8 and assumed to be constant throughout the 
cooling, 

6. What is the ratio of the specific heat of ajr under a con- 12 
stant pressure to its specific heat under a constant volume ? 

How did Mayer employ this ratio to deduce the mechanical 
equivalent of heat ? Work out the calculation as given by Pro- 
fessor Tyndall, 

7. Mention some of the theories which have been advanced 8 
to account for solar heat and light. 

8 V Newton's Emission or Corpuscular Theory of Light is 9 
untenable for several reasons. Give some of the most impor- 
tant. 

9.' According to the undulatory hypothesis, what is meant 10 
by the polarization of a ray of light ? 

When light is polarized by reflexion, how is the polarizing 
angle connected with the index of refraction ? What is rota- 
tory polarization ? 

10. Describe M. Fizeau's method of determining the velocity 15, 
of light. 

If the wheel in M. Fizeau's apparatus have 720 teeth and 
make 21| turns in a second when the first eclipse takes place, 
find the velocity of light, the distance between the stations 
/being three miles. 



Monday, 19th November. 
(2 p. m. to 5 p. m. ) 



CHEMICAL PHYSICS— Paper II. 

T. Cooke, M.A., M.L, LL.D. ; W. Gray, M.B, 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Give a careful description of the galvanometer, and ex- 11 
plain the principles on which it is constructed. 

2. In the older forms of battery the currents produced 12 
rapidly diminished in intensity. To what was this due, and 
how haa the difficulty been overcome ? Describe any form of 
constant battery with which you are practically acquainted. 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF M.A., 1877-78. 

.3. How is local attraction in iron Ihips produced? How 12 
•rtoes it affect the magnetic needle ? What means are taken to 
remedy its disturbing influence on the compass ? 

4. Describe one or two of the forms of gravity battery in 10 
What particular advantages do they possess ? 

5. Compare electric with magnetic induction. How do II I 
ihey differ ? 

6. What do you mean by the residual charge of electri- 2 
city ? What circumstances influence its amount ? 

7. Mention the principal laws of electrolysis. What 12 
effects are produced when the current is passed through, acidu- 
lated water and through a solution of sulphate of copper ? 
What is Faraday's voltameter ? 

8. What hypotheses have been propounded to etplain 12 
the origin of atmospheric electricity ? How are the clouds 
supposed to become electrified ? What kinds of lightning have 
been described ? Explain the occurrence of the ' ' return 
shock." 

9. Describe the electrophorus and the gold leaf electro- 11 
5£ope, and explain their uses. 



Tuesday 20th November. 
[10 A. m. to 1 P. M.] 

CHEMISTRY, INORGANIC— Paper I. 

t. Cooke, M.A., M.I., LL.D. ; W. Gray, M.B. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Into what classes are oxides divided, and what are the 11 
characteristic properties of each ? Give at least two examples 

of each class, writing their formula. Is there any element of 
which no oxide is known ? 

2. Describe the process for the preparation of Iodine, and 12 
illustrate your answer by equations. How is commercial 
Iodine purified? Mention the properties of Iodine, also its 
specific gravity and atomic weight. What elements does it 
most resemble in chemical properties? By what tests would 
you determine its presence — alone, and in combination ? 
What is the visible result if nitric acid be added to a solution 

of iodide of potassium? 



clx EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OP M.A., 1877-78. 

3. What is Marsh's teit for Arsenic? Write down the II 
decompositions which take place during the process. 

4. Where does free carbonic acid exist in nature? What 1H 
proportion of it does the atmosphere ordinarily contain, and 
from whence is this derived ? What are the commonest na- 
tural sources of carbonic acid in combination ? How is it 
prepared artificially, and for what purpose ? Mention its pro- 
perties, and state its density, 

5. How is Ammonia prepared? What are its properties ? \'l 
What is its solubility in water? How is its composition de- 
termined ? If a mixture of Ammonia and Oxygen be ignited, 
show by an equation what occurs. 

6. What are the usual ways of preparing sulphur dioxide, 13 
and how and for what purpose is it made on the largest 6cale ? 
State its properties and the various uses to which it is put. 
What occurs when a beam of sunlight is passed through a 
long tube filled with the gas ? How would you detect its 
presence, and how determine its amount if present in solu- 
tion ? Explain its action on -vegetable colouring matters. 

7. What takes place when sulphuretted hydrogen is 9 
passed into a watery solution of bromine, into sulphuric 
and nitric acids, and when it is brought into contact with 
chlorine gas ? 

8. What is meant by water of crystallization ? By what II 
circumstance is its quantity affected ? What occurs when it 

is driven off by heat ? Explain the ternjs efforescence and 
deliquescense, and give examples illustrative of each. What 
is a cryohydrate ? 

9. According to theory, how many parts of pure sulphuric S 
acid should be yielded by 100 parts of sulphur ? Is the 
theoretical yield ever attained in practice ? 



Tuesday, 20th November. 

[2 P.M. to 5 P.M.] 



CHEMISTRY, INORGANIC. -Paper II. 
T. Cooke, M.A., M.I., LL.D. ; W. Gray. M.B. 
[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

I. How is potassium prepared ? How would you volu- 
metrically determine the amount of pure potassic carbonate 
in a sample of pearlash ? 



EXAM. FOR THE DECREE OF M.A., 1877-78. chd 

2. What is the composition of gunpowder, and what 8 
changes take place when it is fired ? How would you proceed 

to determine its constituents quantitatively ? 

3. How may barium chloride be prepared from heavy 8 
spar ? How may the salts of barium be distinguished from 
those of strontium ? 

4. Write the formula for ordinary crystallized alum. How 9 
is alum prepared commercially, and for what purpose is it 
•extensively employed in the Arts ? 

5. How is potassic permanganate prepared ? Write the 15 
reaction which takes place when a solution . of this salt is 
mixed with one of ferrous chloride acidulated with Hydro 
chloric acid. 

To a solution of ferrous chloride acidulated with Hydro 
chloric acid 50 measures of a standard solution of potassic 
permanganate (containing 158 grains in 100 measures) were 
added before a purple coloration appeared. How much iron 
did the solution contain ? 

6. On adding Hydrochloric acid to a solution of a metallic 30 
<alt a white precipitate falls. — Of one of what three metafs is 
the presence indicated, and by -what single reagent is it possi- 
ble to distinguish between these metals ? 

7. What is white lead, and how is it prepared by the 10 
method known as the Dutch method ? Give equations which 
will represent the reactions which occur during the process of 
manufacture. 

8. According to the experiments of Dumas, 100 parts of .10 
pure tin when oxidized yield 127*105 parts of Stannic oxide 
What is the atomic weight of tin ? 

9. Describe Pattinson's process for the extraction of silver JI0 
from argentiferous galena. 

10. When a solution of potassic dichromate supersatura 
ed with sulphuric acid is boiled with oxalic acid, all the 
chromic acid is reduced to the condition of a chromic salt and 
an equivalent amount of C0 2 is set free. — Write the reaction, 
and shew how it may be employed to determine the quantity 
of O0 3 in the dichromate. 



B 713-14* 



clxii EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OE M.A., 1877-78. 

Wednesday, 21st November. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 



METEOROLOGY Am> PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY-Paper I 

T. Cooke, M.A., M.I., LL,D. ; W. Gray, M.B. 
[The figures to the right indicate fulls marks.] 

1. What do you mean by the diathermancy of the air, 14 
and how does the invisible atmospheric moisture affect it ? 

If the air in a tropical region were absolutely dry, day and 
night, what would be the effect on the earth's surface ? How 
do you explain the scorching heat of the midday sun often 
felt by persons on a high mountain ? 

2. Where do fogs prevail most, and under what circum- 9 
stances are they produced ? 

3. What is the cause of the S.W Monsoon ; from whence 14 
does it obtain its moisture ; where does it part with this 
moisture ; and what are the physical conditions of the regions 

it passes over which influence the amount of rain that falls 
from it ? 

4. What are the chief rainless districts of the earth, and 1 1 
how are they caused ? 

5. Define and explain the term cyclone or cyclonic storm, 14 
and point out in what way such storms differ from ordinary 
wind storms. In what parts of the world are they most 
frequently met with ? 

6. Describe the wet and dry bulb thermometers and the 14 
manner of using them. What precaution is required in 
taking observations when the temperature of the air is below 

32° F. ? How are they employed to determine the dew 
point ? 

7. Contrast the climates of the Konkan, the Deccan, and 1 5 
Upper Sind, noting carefully all the circumstances by which 
aach is influenced. 

8. Explain the fact of a cloud appearing to remain at rest £ 
on the summit of a mountain on a windy day, 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OP M.A., 1877-78. clxiH 

Wednesday, 21st November. 
[2 p.m. to 5 P.M.] 



METEOROLOGY and PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY.- Paper II. 
T. Cooke, M.A., M.I., LL.D.; W. Gray, M.B. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. What is the probable explanation of the verious pheno- 
mena of coral reefs ? What are atolls, fringing reefs, and 10 
barrier reefs ? 

2. What are the chief volcanic islands in the Indian S 
Ocean ? 

3. What is the mean elevation of the principal range of 1 
the Himalayas ? How is the Himalayan chain separated 
from the mountain chains of Central Asia ? What is the 
name and height of the loftiest peak of the Himalayas ? 

4. What change takes place when snow is converted into 10 
glacier ice ? How does Professor Tyndall account for glacier 
motion ? 

5. Describe the pseudo -volcanic phenomena known as 10 
fumaroles, suffiones, and sokes. 

6. Explain the terms "vertical and horizontal distribu- 10 
tion " and "distribution in time " as applied in Physical Geo- 
graphy to animals and plants. 

7. Name the three distinct typical groups of men. What 10 
is meant by the " facial angle" ? What is the facial angle of 
the European, the Negro, and the gorilla ? 

8. Give examples of the effect of cutting down forests 1 1 
taken from Northern Italy, and also mention some known 
instance in which a spring which had disappeared on the 
cutting down of a forest reappeared after replanting. 

9. Show by a sketch the course of the rivers Ganges and 1.0 
Bramaputra, and describe their joint delta. 

10. What are the principal food plants in use in Europe, 1 1 
which of them are indigenous, and what is supposed to be 
the home of the others ? 



ihiv EXAM. FUK THE DEGREE OF LL.B., 1877-78. 



IV. 



EXAMINATION FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF LAWS, 1877-78. 

EXAMINERS. 

The Honourable Rao Saheb VlSHVANATH NaRay.as M 

C.S.L 
W, E. Hart. Barrister-at-Law. 
S. Newcomr Fox, B.A., Barrister-at-Law. 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF LL.E,, 1877-78 clxV 

Monday, 19th November. 
[10 a.m. to 1 P.M.] 



JURISPRUDENCE and the ROMAN CIVIL LAW. 

The Hon'ble Rao Saheb Vishvanath Narayan Mandlik, C.S.I, j 

W. E. Hart, Barrister-at-Law ; 

S. Newcome Fox, B.A., Barrister-at-Law. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks. ] 

1. Distinguish between "equity" in the legal sense of 9 
the word, and "natural justice," stating generally how far 
positive law can undertake to give effect to ideas of " natural 
justice." 

2. What is the true nature of the distinction between 8 
Public and Private Law f 

3. State and examine the objections that may be made to 8 
the definition of a law as a command. 

4. State the different uses of the term "obligation" 7 
among ancient and modern jurists. 

5. Mention cases in which the paterfamilias or master 8 
was bound by the contract of his son or slave. 

How did the old law differ from the later law of Rome in 
this matter ? 

ti. Explain the legal nature of the system of " bonorum 8 
possessiones " introduced by the Praetors. What practical 
inconveniences did it involve ? 

7. Enumerate and describe the various forms of aequisi- 7 
tion " per universitatem. " 

8. Classify the servitudes known to Roman Law. In 9 
what ways may a servitude be extinguished ? 

9. Upon whom does the loss of the object fall in the fol- 8 
lowing cases ? — 

(1.) A bag of money left by Sempronius with Titius to 
be kept till his return from a voyage, is stolen. 

(2. ) A watch given by Seius to Nicevius to be repaired, 
is consumed by an accidental fire. 



dxvi EXAM. FOE THE DEGREE OF LL.B., 1877-78." 

(3. ) A horse bought by Cornelius from Quinctilius dies 
in Quinctilius's stable before it has been sent for by the 
buyer. 

State the principles applicable in each case. 

10. Give a brief methodical classification of the modes of 6 
acquiring property recognized by Roman Law. 

11. Explain novation. 7 

12. Give a short account of the judicial machinery of 8 
Rome during the Republic. 

13. What are the different rights and liabilities created 7 
in Roman Law when a loan is made and an object is given 

as a pledge for its repayment ? 



Monday, 19th November, 
[2 p.m. to 5 P.M.] 



PERSONAL RIGHTS and STATUS, and the LAW 
of SUCCESSION. 

The Hon'ble Rao Sabeb Vishvanath Narayan Mandlikj C. S. I. ; 

W. E. Hart, Barrister-at Law ; 

S. Newcome Fox, B.A., Barrister-at Law. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks. ] 

1. What was the law of India in regard to slaves? 
What changes, if any, has it undergone ; and what position 
does a slave occupy in regard to succession ? 

2. Discuss the legal position of a ddsi and a ddsipUtrd as I 2 
defined by writers on Hindu Law, and decided upon by 
British Courts. 

3. Who are competent to give, and competent to adopt ? 1 
Discuss the subject fully. 

4. State who are entitled to maintenance under the 14 
English, Hindu, and Mahomedan laws, and under what limi- 
tations. Can a Hindu widow exact a separate maintenance 
from her nephew, who has inherited no ancestral property ? 
Discuss the question fully. 

5. What charges will bind ancestral property inherited 8 
by a Hindu, and in his own hands or in the hands of a bond 
fide purchaser ? 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OP LL.B., 1877-78. clxrit 

f>. What is the criterion of legal cruelty which will justify 8 
a wife's desertion of her husband in British India ? Will a 
suit lie for any injunction against a stranger harbouring such 
a wife, and under what circumstances ? 

7 . What share do half-brothers and sisters by the same 10 
mother only get under the Mahomedan law, and under what 
eircumstanees ? Is there any such case of succession under 

the Hindu Law ? If so, discuss and compare it. 

8. State what was the old law in India in regard to 8 
interest ? How far has it now been altered by statute ? 

What is the law of marriage under the different 10 
ins of law in India ? How far does it affect the devolu- 
tion of property ? 

10. What is a will ? State the present law of India in 12 
regard to the execution of wills ? Can a Mofussil Hindu 
bequeath the whole of his undivided moveable ancestral pro- 
perty to one son to the exclusion of another son ? Can another 
such Hindu, if separated, make a verbal bequest of his pro? 
perty in Salsette ? 



Tuesday, 20th November, 
[10 a.m. to 1 P.M.] 



The LAW of PROPERTY, CONTRACTS, and TORTS. 

the Hon'ble Rao Saheb Vjshvanath Narayan Mandlik, C.S.I. ; 

W. E. Hart, Barrister-at-Law ; 

S. Newcome Fox, B.A., Barrister-at-Law. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

I. .State shortly the principal points in the case of Rogers 10 
>»roji Behramji (4 Bom. H. C. Rep. 1 O.C.J.) 

'2. {a.) A, having leased his land to B, subsequently 12 
mortgages it to C, who thereupon, there then 
being half a year's rent due from B to A, gives B 
notice of the mortgage. 

(/>.) A, having mortgaged his land to C, subsequently 
leases it to B, who pays rent for half a year to A, 
but when the second half year's rent is due re- 
ceives notice of the mortgage from C. 



clxviii EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF LL.B., 1877-78. 

Discuss fully the positions of all parties in each of the cases 
above stated. 

3. What is the general rule as to the right of a tenant to $ 
remove an erection placed by him on his landlord's land ? 

4. How is a proposal affected by the death of the proposer 6 
(a) under English law, (6) under the Indian Contract Act ? 

5. A, while drunk, contracts for the sale of his house to 8 
B. Afterwards, when sober, A signs a paper purporting to 
ratify the contract for sale. Is it a valid contract under the 
Indian Law ? How does the Indian differ from the English 
Law on this point ? 

6. Why will the law not enforce a contract made without 3 
consideration ? Distinguish between a valuable and a good 
consideration. For what purposes will a person be allowed 

to show the inadequacy of the consideration received by him? 

7. "An agreement made without consideration is not 10 
void, if it be a promise, made in writing and signed by the 
person to be charged therewith, to pay a debt of which the 
^creditor might have enforced payment but for the law for the 
limitation of suits." (Act IX. of 1872, s. 25, subs. 3.) 

" No promise in respect of a debt shall take the case out of 
the operation of this Act unless such promise is contained in 
some writing signed before the expiration of the prescribed 
period? by the party to be charged therewith." (Act IX. of 
1871, s. 20, a.) 

How do you reconcile the two provisions of the law above 

stated ? 

8. Explain the maxim : Ex damno sine injuria non oritur 6 
actio. 

9. To what actions in tort is infancy a good plea, and on 6 
what principle? 

10. What is meant by a common carrier? Distinguish 10 
between the liability of a common carrier and that of an or- 
dinary bailee for the goods entrusted to them, and explain 
the principle on which the distinction is based. 

11. A patented machine belonging to the plaintiff consists 12 
of two parts A and B, which are used together in the produc- 
tion of a manufactured article. The plaintiff sues the de- 
fendant for damages for the infringecxerit pi his patent, in 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF LL.B., 1877-78. clxiX. 

having used part A of the plaintiffs machine in combination 
with part C of the defendant's machine in the production of 
a similar manufactured article. How would you assess the 
damages ? Has the plaintiff any other remedy besides an 
action for damages, and what difficulty is there in the way of 
his availing himself of it in the particular case stated ? 

12. Define the terms : — easement, prerogative, prescrip- 6 
tion, fraud, negligence, nuisance. 



Tuesday, 20th November. 
[2 p.m. to 5 p.m.] 



The LAW of EVIDENCE, of CRIMES, and of 
PROCEDURE, CIVIL and CRIMINAL. 

The Hon'ble Rao Saheb Vishvanath Nak\yan Mandlik, C.S.I, ; 

W. E. Hart, Barrister-at-Law ; 

S. Newcome Fox, B.A., Barrister-at-Law. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Distinguish a patent from a latent ambiguity in a 6 
document, giving an instance of each, and state which may 
and which may not be explained by evidence, and why. 

2. Discuss carefully how far the following are proofs of 12 
the facts in evidence of which they are adduced : — 

(a). The decree of a Matrimonial Court declaring a mar 
riage between A and B null on the ground of the 
incompetence of A. which is sought to be used 
against an alleged son of A, by a subsequent 
marriage with C, claiming to succeed to A's property 
as his heir. 

(b). A notification in the Gazette of India that all the 
land on the south bank of the River A in British 
territory has been ceded to Scindia, which is sought 
to be used, in an objection to the jurisdiction, by a 
land-owner on the south bank, when sued in eject- 
ment by a land-owner on the north bank in a Bri- 
tish Court. 

b 713-45 



clxx. EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF LL.B., 1877-78. 



(c)„ A decree obtained by A against B on 'a promissory 
note (No. 1), which is sought to be used by A in 
his defence, when charged with having forged B's 
name to a promissory note (No. 2), B having denied 
that he ever signed a promissory note at all. 

3. State shortly the provisions of the Indian Evidence 10 
Act, 1872, regarding the evidence of married persons, and 
point out any difference between the Indian and the English 
Law on the subject. 

4. What is meant by the terms : — leading-question, cross- .6 
examination, secondary evidence, proof, admission, estop- 
pel ? 

5. What was the ruling in Semayne's case, and is such 9 
ruling applicable to this country ? 

6. Compare the conception of " furtum " under Roman 10 
Law with that of theft under the Penal Code. Distinguish 
between theft and robbery under the latter Code. 

7. Define — " injury ;" " stolen property ;" " mischief ;" 8 
"wrongful loss;" "lurking house-trespass," according to 
the Penal Code. 

8. How far does intoxication prevent any act or omission 6 
from being an offence under the Penal Code ? How is this 
question dealt with by other systems of law of which you 
are cognizant ? 

9. A and B are placed on their trial along with C, D, 12 
and E before a Magistrate. While in that state, they are 
given pardons by the Magistrate under the provisions of 
Section 349 of the Code of Criminal Procedure and convert- 
ed into witnesses. Discuss the question of the admissibility 

or otherwise of their evidence : (a) in cases triable exclu- 
sively by the Court of Session ; and (b) in cases not so exclu- 
sively triable. 

10. Describe the different steps in the procedure of a 6 " 
case triable by a jury. 

11. What confessions will be admitted in evidence under 7 
the Code of Criminal Procedure ? What conditions must be 
fulfilled in order to make them admissible ? If some of the 
necessary conditions be wanting, can oral evidence be given 

to supply the deficiency ? 

12. What are the conditions under which a review of a 8 
decree can be successfully applied for, in the Court of first 
instance or in a Court of appeal. State the changes, if any, 
which the Procedure Act of 1877 has introduced in this 

matter. 



FIRST EXAMINATION IN MEDICINE, 1877-78. clxxi 



FIRST EXAMINATION IN MEDICINE. 



EXAMINERS. 



W. F. Knapp, M.R.C.S ) In Anatomy, Descriptive and 

W. Gray, M.B \ Practical. 

A. N.Hojel, L.K., &Q.C.P.I. ) 

J. T. Gray, L.R.C.P., Lond., >In Physiology and Histology. 

iln Chemistry, including Praeti- 
cal Chemistry General and 
Pharmaceutical Chemistry, 
and Detection of the Adulter- 
ation of Drugs . 

G. A. Maconachie, M.D I In Botany, Materia Medica, and 

Sakhara3. Arjun Ravut, L.M. J Pharmacy. 



Clxxii FIRST EXAMINATION IN MEDICINE, 1877-78. 

Monday, 17th September. 
[10 A.M. to 1 P.M.] 



ANATOMY. 

W. F. Knapp, M.R.CS. ; W. Gray, M.B. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks]. 

1. Name the boundaries of the 3rd ventricle of the Brain. 10 

2. How are the Otic and Meckel's ganglia formed ? [0 

3. Give the course and relations of the epigastric branch 10 
of the external Iliac artery. 

4. What is seen upon the anterior surface of the petrous 10 
portion of the Temporal Bone ? 

5. Name the various coverings of the Testis from with- 15 
out inwards, and describe the secreting portions of this gland. 

6. Describe the ossification of the femur. 10 

7. The origin, insertion, action, and nervous supply of 15 
the Flexor profundus digitorum, Stylo hyoid, Obturator in- 
ternus, and Peroneus longus. 

8. Give in their order the branches which arise from the 5 
abdominal aorta. 

9. Mention the boundaries of the femoral ring and canal, 10 
and enumerate from without inwards the coverings of 
femoral hernia. 

10. Give the relations of the pancreas. 5 



Monday, 17th September. 
[2 p.m. to 5 P.M.] 



PHYSIOLOGY and HISTOLOGY. 

A. N. Hojel, L.K. and Q. C.P.I. ; 
J. T. Gray, L.R.C.P. Lond., A.K.C. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] • 

1. What is the composition of the gastric juice ? From 25 
what source is it derived, and what action has it on the 
different constituents of food ? 




FIRST EXAMINATION IN MEDICINE, 1877-78. clxxiii. 



2. Describe the nervous supply of the heart ; and state 
hat special influence the branches derived from the S 
•cercise over its action. 

•3, Describe the microscopical appearance • 

(a). Temporary cartilage. 

(b). Permanent cartilage. 

4, What is meant by the terms — 
(a). Vital capacity of the chest. 
(6). Tidal air. 

(c). Reserve air. 
(d). Residual air. 
(e). Complemental air. 

5. Name and describe briefly the microscopical prepare 
ions numbered 1, 2, and 3. 



Tuesday, 18th September. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 



CHEMISTRY, &e. 

L B. Lyon, F.C.S. ; D. S. Kemp, F 
[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1 . How much Ice at 32° F. will be melted by the cooling 
to that temperature of 1,000 grammes of each of the following 
substances at 200° F, ?— 

Water, 

Mercury, 

Iron. 

2. 166 gramme of Potassium Iodide was decomposed 
in the circuit of a Smee's couple. How much of each of the 
following, which the circuit also separately embraced, were 
decomposed, and metal in the cell necessarily dissolved, 
, luring the same period? — 

Water, 

Plumbic Iodide, 
Oupric Sulphate. 
Distinguish between equivalent and atomic weight, 
s 713—15* 



clxxiv FIRST EXAMINATION IN MEDICINE, 1877-78. 

2. What are the principal pentad elements ? Describe a 20 
compound of each in which its powers are saturated. 

4. Explain the action of Sulphuric Acid onGold, Copper, 12 
Oxalic Acid, and Alcohol, respectively, 

5. Mention any substitution compound of Ammonia, and 6 
calculate the specific gravity of its vapour. 

6. How may the following substances be prepared ?— 25 

Calcic Phosphide, 
Cupric Oxide, 
Hydriodic Acid, 
Hydrogen Peroxide, 
Potassic Chlorate. 

7. Give an outline of the process for estimating Carbon 10 
in organic analysis, 

8. The formula of Quinine is C20 H24 N2 O2 . Write 9 
those of any three of its neutral anhydrous salts. 



Tuesday, 18th September. 
[2 p.m. to 5 P.M.] 



BOTANY, MATERIA MEDIC A, and PHARMACY. 
G. A. Macon achie, M.D.; Sakharam Arjun Ravut, L.M. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks. ] 

1. Describe a vegetable cell with its contents ; mention 15 
the different forms which the cell presents in the vegetable 
kingdom, and the tissues formed by a number of the cells 
grouping together. 

2. Define and illustrate the following terms : — 10 

1. Thyrsus. Of what form is this a modification ? State 
a good example. 

2. Tetradynamous. To what order is this restricted ? 

3. Raphides. Mention any order in which they are 
prevalent. Of what materials are some of them 

composed ? 



FIRST EXAMINATION IN MEDICINE, 1877-78. clxXV 

4. Polyadelphous. Mention an order in which such 
organs are found. 

5. Caryopsis. Distinguish this from Achenium. 

6. Raphe. State an example in which it is conspi- 

cuous. 

3. Give the Botanical characters of the Natural Order 15 
Myrtaceae. Give Botanical names of the plants producing 
officinal drugs in the British Pharmacopoeia, and of such 
other plants of this Order as grow in Bombay producing 
edible fruits. 

4. Enumerate the Salts of Antimony contained in the 20 
British Pharmacopoeia, describe the processes recommended to 
obtain them, and the decompositions which take place during 
their formation. 

5. Describe the medicinal properties, uses, doses and 20 
modes of administration of — 

Perchloride of Mercury, 
Arsenious Acid, 
Hydrocyanic Acid, 
Iodide of Iron. 

6. Give the composition and doses of the following Gale- 20 
nical preparations : — 

1. Spiritus Ammonias Aromaticus, 

2. Tinctura Opii, 

3. Liquor Arsenicalis, 

4. Pulvis Cretse Aromaticus c. Opio, 

5. Liquor Potassse, 

6. Pilula Plumbi c. Opio, 

7. Suppositoria Morphias Hydroch,, 

8. Tinctura Guaiaci Ammoniata. 



clxxvi EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF L.M, & S., 187776, 



VI. 



EXAMINATION FOR THE DEGREE OF 
L.M.& S. 



EXAMINERS. 



H. Cook, M.D., 
F.G.S., F.M.S. 
H. V. Carter, M.D. 



F.R.G.S., ; In Principles and Practice of 
> Medicine, including Patholo- 



H. J. Blanc, M.D 

W. F. Knafp, M.R.C.S. 

A. H. Hughes, M.D.. M.R.C.S. 

Eng., L.R.C.P.E.,L.M.E. 
K. H. R. Langley, B,A. 

W. Gray, M.B 

I. B. Lyon, F.C-S. ... 



gy. 

In Principles and Practice of 
Surgery, including Surgical 
Anatomy and Ophthalmic 
Surgery. 

In Midwifery and Diseases of 
Women and Children. 

( In Medical Jurisprudence, in- 
< eluding Practical Toxicology 
( and Hygiene. 



,1. FOE THE DEGREE OP L.M. & S., 1877-78. clxXVli 

Monday, 3rd December. 
[10 A.M. to 1 P.M.J 



MEDICINE and PATHOLOGY. 

H. Cook, M.D. ; H. V. Carter, M.D. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1 . State concisely what you know regarding the symp- 25 
toras, course, duration, and. termination of remittent fever : 
first describing the simple form, and next the complicated, as 
usually met with here. Give the data for prognosis and the 
main rules of treatment. 

2. Mention the varieties of valvular disease of the heart, 20 
in the order in which they are commonly met with ; state 
the symptoms peculiar to each and the chief indications to 

be kept in view in the treatment. 

3. Enumerate the forms of kidney disease included under 20 
the common term. Albuminuria ; briefly describe the condi- 
tion of the urine in both acute and chronic varieties, and 
supply the prognosis and general treatment in each instance. 

4. Sketch the pathology of tubercle : describe what you 20 
have seen of the beginning, course, and terminations of tuber- 
cular deposit in the lungs. State the mal-hygienic conditions 
which are found to favour the increase of phthisis, with the 
sanitary indications therefrom resulting. 

5. What is meant by the terms syncope and coma ? 15 
Sketch the pathology of these two 'forms of failing vital 
action, adding the practical indications for averting fatal 
consequences. 



Monday, 3rd December. 
[2 p.m. to 5 P.M.] 

SURGERY, SURGICAL ANATOMY, and OPHTHALMIC 
SURGERY. 

H. J. Blanc, M.D. ; W. F. Knapp, M.R.C.S. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1 . On the value of the thermometer as a means of diag- 20 
nosis and prognosis in surgical diseases. 

2. What is meant by the expression " Leucocyte " ? Fully 20 
explain their origin and the part they play in the process of 
repair. 



Clxxviii EXAM. FOE THE DEGREE OF L.M. & S-, 1877-78. 

3. Give in detail the post-mortem appearance of a fatal 20 
case of acute pyaemia. 

4. The symptoms and diagnosis of hematocele. 15 

5. Describe Pott's fracture ; naming in order the tendons 15 
and ligaments which may be injured. 

6. What are the causes of the protrusion of the eye-ball ? 10 



Tuesday, 4th December, 
[10 a.m. to 1 P.M.] 



MIDWIFERY, DISEASES op WOMEN and CHILDREN, 

A. H. Hughes, M.D., M.R.C.S., Eng., L.R.C.P.E., L.M. P. • 
E. H. R. Langley, B.A. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks. ] 

1. State the conditions justifying the induction of pre 20 
mature labour ; also the several methods which have beei 
adopted. 

2. What are the causes and treatment of retained placent ? 20 

3. What affections of the breast are women subject 1 20 
during lactation, and the treatment of each ? 

4. Describe the causes, symptoms, and treatment of n 20 
troversion of the uterus. 

5. What rules are to be observed in the selection of 20 
wet nurse ? 



Tuesday, 4th December. 
[2 p.m. to 5 P.M.] 



MEDICAL JURISPRUDENCE and HYGIENE. 

W. Gray, M.B. ; I. B. Lyon, F.C.S. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Describe the symptoms, post-mortem appearances, and 
treatment in case3 of acute poisoning by mercurial salts. 
Describe the symptoms of chronic poisoning by mercury. 



EXAM. FOE THE DEGREE OP L.M & S., 1877-78. clxxix 

2. Answer shortly the following questions in regard to 12 
wounds : — (a) How would you distinguish self-inflicted from 
other wounds ? (b) How would you distinguish wounds in- 
flicted during life from wounds made after death ? (c) How 
would you classify wounds according to their gravity and 
danger ? 

3. What are the principal general points of diagnosis 18 
between real and feigned insanity ? Suppose two prisoners 
waiting trial are suspected of feigning, the one dementia and 
the other acute mania, — what points would you specially 
look to in each case in order to determine whether the in- 
sanity was real or feigned ? 

4. Supposing you wished to disinfect a house in which 22 
small-pox had occurred, describe accurately the measures you 
would take for the thorough purification of the bed-rooms, 
the furniture, the bedding, and clothes. Mention also what 
disinfectants you would select and the most approved man- 
ner of using them ; and give fully, at the same time, your 
reasons for preferring these particular disinfectants rather 
than others. 

5. What are the conditions with regard to occupation, 14 
dwellings, and locality and soil, at present existing in Bom- 
bay, which favour an increase of phthisis among the lower 
classes ? 

6. What diseases are produced by the use of drinking 14 
water rendered impure by (a) mineral substances, (b) vege- 
table matter, and (c) by animal organic matter ? Illustrate 
your answer, as far as possible, by instances which have 
occurred in this country. 



C'lxxx FIRST EXAM. IN CIVIL ENGINEERING; 1877-78. 



VII. 



FIRST EXAMINATION IN CIVIL 
ENGINEERING. 



EXAMINER8. 

The Rev. D. Mackichan M.A, I In Mathematics and Natural 
B.D ) Philosophy. 

r ^ r ^. /-. o \ In Experimental and Natural 

I. B. Lyon, F.C.S j ^J^ 

H. I. B. Harorave, B.A., O.E. ) Tti t^^ •„„ 
Captain W. H. Haydon, R.E. j In Engineering. . 



MtINE eking, 18 

Monday, 28th November. 
[10 a.m. to 1 P.M.] 



ARITHMETIC and ALGEBRA. 

The Rev. D. Mackichan, M.A., B.D. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks] 

1 . Define a Fraction. Distinguish and give examples of 
the different kinds. 

Simplify 3 ^ + t ~ If 



e T 

2. Show that if a vulgar fraction when being convert* 
into a decimal does not terminate it must recur. 

Reduce 8*02083 to a vulgar fraction. 
Divide '857142 by "56 

3. Arrange */% &% and \ in the order of magnitude. \ 

4. Which would be the more profitable investment for a 6 
sum of money, Government Paper at 102^ yielding 5 per cent. , 

or Government Paper at 98| yielding 4£ per cent. ? 

5. Given Log 10 2 = '301030 and Log 10 3 = 477121, find 12 
the logarithms of "05 and 5*4. 

6. Resolve a? — b 2 — c* + d 2 — 2 (ad -~ be) into factors 
and divide (ay — bx)' 2 — {ax + by)* by (a — b) y + (a — b) x. 

7. A starts from Bombay for Poona, and B at the same ) (• 
time from Poona for Bombay. Each travels at a uniform 
rate. A reaches Poona 16 hours and B reaches Bombay 36 
hours after passing each other on the road. Find in what 
time each has performed the journey. 

8. Solve the equations : x 2 y + xy % = 30, 

x y 6 

9. Four numbers are in Arithmetical Progression. Their 13 
common difference is 3, and their product 280. What are 
the numbers ? 

10. Write down the middle term of the binomial expan- 10 
sion (x + y) i2 and the coefficient of cc 2 in the expansion 



J 
b ri3— 16 



(** + ~) 



Clxxxii FIRST EXAM. IN CIVIL ENGINEERING, 1877-78. 

Monday, 26th November. 
[2 p.m. to 5 p.m.] 



EUCLID and TRIGONOMETRY. 

The Rev. D. Mackichan, M.A., B.D. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks. ] 

1. Divide a straight line into two parts such that the 8 
square on one of them may be double the square on the other. 

2. Prove that if two circles touch each other externally, 4 
the straight line which joins their centres shall i>ass through 
the point of contact. 

If two circles touch one another externally, and paral- 8 
lei diameters be drawn, the straight lines which join the 
opposite extremities of these diameters will pass through the 
point of contact. 

3. Inscribe a circle in a given triangle. Shew that if 10 
three circles be described, each touching one side of the tri- 
angle and the other two produced, the lines joining the 
centres will pass through the angular points of the triangle. 

4. State Euclid's definition of Proportion. Prove that 10 
in equal circles angles whether at the centre or circum- 
ference have the same ratio which the arcs on which they 
stand have to one another. 

5. Prove that if two straight lines be parallel, and one of 10 
them be at right angles to a plane, the other also shall be at 
right angles to the same plane. 

6. Obtain an expression for all the angles which have the 6 
same cosine. Explain why two values are obtained for 

cos _ in terms of cos 8. 

■ ^ . , , , 8 sin 6 f 

7 Prove that tan — = -z 

2 1 + cosff. 

Shew the same geometrically. 6 

8. Divide a given angle into two parts so that their sines 12 
may have a given ratio. 

V). What is meant by the ambiguous case in the solution 10 
of triangles ? 

Given A m 30° a = 12, b = 10 ; shew whether there is 
any ambiguity. 

10. The elevation of the top of a spire observed from the 10 
top of a tower 100 feet high is 30° and the elevation observed 
from the foot of the tower is 60°. Find the height of the spire, 



FIRST EXAM. IN CIVIL ENGINEERING, 1877-78. clxxxiii 

Wednesday, 28th November. 
[10 a.m. to 1 P.M.] 



HEAT and FRICTIONAL ELECTRICITY. 

I. B. Lyon, F.C.S. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks. ] 

Paper I., F.C.E. — Experimental and Natural Science. 

1. How would you test the accuracy of a mercurial 15 
thermometer ? Describe the instrument you would employ in 
order to register the lowest temperature of the air during a 
given space of time. 

2. When the corrected height of the mercurial Barometer 15 
is 750 mm. , what is the pressure of the atmosphere in grammes 
per square centimeter, and in pounds per square inch ? 

3. How many degrees of heat will be required in order to 15 
expand an iron bar a square centimeter in section and 100 
centimeters long to a length of 101 2 centimeters ? 

4. What circumstances affect rapidity of evaporation ? 15 
What circumstances affect temperature of ebullition ? 

5. How is it that electricity while at rest is distributed 15 
over the surface of a charged object ? Describe an experiment 

in proof of the explanation you advance. 

6. When the leaves of an electroscope are diverging un- 15 
der the influence of an excited glass rod held near to it, 
what effect is produced by interposing a plate of resin 
between the glass rod and the electroscope ? Explain the effect 
produced. 

7. What are the principal points to be attended to in 10 
attaching lightning conductors to buildings ? 



Thursday, 29th November. 
(10 a.m. to 1 P.M.) 

ENGINEERING FIELD WORK. 

H. I. B. Hargrave, B.A., C.E. ; Captain W. H. Haydon, R.E. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Describe the process of chaining a straight line over 10 
undulating ground. State what precautions you would take 
with respect to the commencement and end of the ope- 



clxXxiv FIRST EXAM. IN CIVIL ENGINEERING, 1877-78. 

ration, and how you would satisfy yourself as to the fitness of 
your chain for the work. 

2. Given a large irregular plot of level ground. State how 10 
you would undertake to make a survey of it with a chain only. 
Oive a hand sketch showing how you would keep your 
field book. 

3. The accuracy of measurements in the field for survey 10 
purposes has a certain relation to the scale on which the sur- 
vey is to be plotted. Explain how this happens. 

4. Describe the Prismatic Compass and its adjustments. 15 
Accompany your answer with a sketch of the instrument. 

5. Give an imaginary sketch of a plot of ground to be 15 
surveyed, and show how you would proceed to survey it with 

a Prismatic Compass and the necessary notes you would 
make in your field book. 

6. Explain the principle of the Vernier. Illustrate your 10 
answer with a neat sketch of the graduated arc and Vernier 

of a six-inch Theodolite. 

7. Describe the adjustments of the Y and Everest's Theo- 20 
dolites, and the method of taking angles with them. 

8. Describe the Dumpy and Y Levels, and their adjust- 25 
ments. Accompany your answer with sketches of each. 

9. Define what is meant by compound and simple level- 10 
tag. Give an example of each. 

N.B. — Candidates are not to attempt more questions than toil I 
score in the aggregate 100 marks. 



Tuesday, 27th November, 
[10 a.m. to 1 p.m.] 

STATICS. 

The Rev. D. Mackichan, M.A., B.D, 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Explain what is meant by the Triangle of Forces, and 12 
3hew that if three forces act at the middle points of the sides 
of a triangle at right angles to the sides and respectively 
proportional to the sides, they are in equilibrium if they all 
act inwards or outwards. 



FIRST EXAM. IN CIYIL ENGINEERING, 1877-78. clxxxv 

2. The resultant of two forces P and Q is equal to Q *J 3 10 
and makes an angle of 30° with P ; find P in terms of Q and 
the angle between the directions of P and Q. 

3. Shew how to find the resultant in magnitude and posi- 8 
tion of two unlike parallel forces acting on a rigid body. 

4. Two weights P and Q, of which P is the greater 10 
balance on a weightless lever ; if the weights be interchanged, 

by how much must Q be increased that equilibrium may be 
maintained ? 

5. Define Centre of Gravity. Shew that the centre of 8 
gravity of a triangle is the same as that of three equal par- 
ticles placed at its angular points. 

6. Shew that if a quadrilateral be divided by one of its 10 
diagonals into two equal triangles it will balance about that 
diagonal. 

7. A uniform heavy rod is placed across a smooth hori- 14 
zontal support. One of the ends of the rod presses against a 
vertical wall to which the rod is inclined at an angle of 30° 

At what distance from the wall must the support be placed 
that the rod may rest in equilibrium ? 

8. A heavy circular table stands on three legs attached 10 
to its circumference at equal distances from each other. 
What is the least weight which will disturb its equilibrium ? 

9. In a system of pulleys in which each pulley hangs by 8 
a separate string there are three pulleys of equal weight. 
The weight attached to the lowest is 32 lbs. and the power 

1 1 lbs. Find the weight of each pulley. 

10. Find the inclination of a plane to the horizon when 10 
the power acting along the plane required to support a given 
weight is half that required to support it acting horizontally, 
there being no friction. 



Tuesday, 27th November. 
[2 p.m. to 5 P.M.] 



DYNAMICS and HYDROSTATICS, 

The Rev. D. Mackichan, M.A., B.D. 

[The figures to the right indicate full mark.] 

1. Enunciate Newton's three Laws of Motion. Give an 8 
illustration of each. 

b 713—16* 



ClXXXvi FIRST EXAM. IN CIYIL ENGINEERING, 1877-78. 

2. A person travelling eastward at the rate of four miles 10 
an hour observes that the wind seems to blow directly from 
the north, and that on doubling his speed it appears to come 
from the north-east. Kequired the direction of the wind and 

its velocity. 

3. A body falling in a vacuum under the action of gravity 10 
is observed to describe 144*9 feet and 177*1 feet in two suc- 
cessive seconds. Determine the accelerating force of gravity 
and the time which has elapsed from the beginning of the 
motion. 

4. An arrow shot vertically upwards attains a height of 12 
200 feet : find the greatest horizontal distance the arrow may 

be shot with the same force. 

5. Shew that when two imperfectly elastic bodies im- 10 
pinge upon each other, thft relative velocity after impact 
bears a constant ratio to the relative velocity before impact. 

6. Explaiu each of the terms in the equation W=g p V. 8 
With water as the standard substance and one foot as the 
unit of length, determine the 4 unit of time so that the unit 

of weight may be one ounce. 

A-ssumiug that the surface of a liquid at rest is a 6 
horizontal plane, prove that the common surface of two 
liquids that do not mix, is also a horizontal plane. 

8. Define Centre of Pressure. Find the centre'of pressure 8 
of a triangle immersed in water with its base in the surface. 

9. A square is immersed in a fluid with its plane per- 10 
pendicular to the surface of the fluid. Compare the pressures 

oa the two halves of the square made by drawing its diagonal. 

10. A given piece of gold of specific gravity 18 is balanced 8 
by its weight in Brass of specific gravity 5 "4. What addition 
must be made to the brass in order that they may balance 
each other when weighed in water. 

11. State Boyle's law. The air in a spherical globe one 10 
foot in diameter is compressed into another globe 6 inches in 
diameter. Compare the pressures of the air in the two globes 

(1) when the temperature is unaltered, (2) when it is raised 
5° 0. during the process of compression 



FIRST EXAM* IN CIVIL ENGINEERING, 1877-78. clxXXVU 

Wednesday, 28th November. 
[2 p.m. to 5 P.M.] 



INORGANIC CHEMISTRY. 

I. B. Lyon, F.C.S. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1 . A vessel which has a capacity of exactly two litres is 1 5 
found to hold at standard temperature and pressure 3 '923 
grammes of a gas. What is the specific gravity of this gas 

as compared with air ? Name any gas which you think likely 
under these circumstances to form the contents of the vessel, 
and state how you would proceed to verify your supposition. 

2. A salt on analysis is found to have the following com- 15 
position : Calculate its formula, name it, and state to what 
class of salts it belongs : — 

Sodium ..207 

Phosphorus 27*9 

Hydrogen ... ... 9 

Oxygen 50*4 



99 9 



Atomic weight of Sodium = 23. 



3. A vessel contains a mixture of the following gases, 15 
N.H.O. and CO^. Indicate how you would proceed in order 

to determine the quantity present of each gas. 

4. Name any three non-metallic elements which are 15 
known to exist in allotropic forms, and compare shortly the 
properties of each in the form it is usually obtained with the 
properties of one of its allotropic modifications. 

5. Describe any three neutral compounds of Hydrogen 15 
with non-metallic elements. 

6. Two bottles are placed before you containing, respec- 10 
tively, nitric acid and sulphuric acid ; how would you dis- 
tinguish between them ? 

7. Compare the oxygen compounds of chlorine with the 15 
oxygen compounds of nitrogen. 



clxxxviii FIRST. EXAM IN CIVIL ENGINEERING, 1877-78- 

Thursday, 29th November. 
[2 p.m. to 5 p.m.] 



MATERIALS USED IN CONSTRUCTION. 
H. I. B. Hargrave, B.A., C.E. ; Captain W. H. Haydon, R.E. 
[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. By what constituent part of themselves are the prin- 10 
cipal classes of building stones distinguished ? Name these 
classes, and give concisely a few of their principal points of 
difference. 

2. In opening a quarry, by what considerations is an 15 
Engineer guided ! Describe the modes of quarrying stones of 
different geological formations. 

3. In selecting bricks for a work, what qualities would 7 
you look for, and what tests should you apply ? 

4. Name the principal sorts of roofing tile in use in India 7 
as named in the text book. What clay is best for tile-making, 
and where is it usually found ? 

5. What is lime, and with what other materials is it 11 
usually found combined ? Describe the changes that a piece 

of carbonate of lime undergoes from the time of calcination to 
the time of becoming set as mortar in a piece of masonry. 

6. Describe the properties of hydraulic and eminently 10 
hydraulic limes and hydraulic cements. Name the different 
ingredients which are mixed with pure limes to form hydrau- 
lic mortars. 

7. Describe the mode of manufacturing Portland cement. 10 
What are the advantages and disdavantages attending its 
use? 

8. When is timber said to be seasoned? Mention what 10 
you know about natural seasoning, water seasoning, and 
seasoning by smoking and charring. 

9. State the best indication of the quality of— 

1st. Cast-iron, 
2nd. Wrought-iron. 
What effect is salt water said to have upoft cast-iron which 10 
is long exposed to its action ? 

10. Describe Bessemer's process of making malleable 10 
cast-iron. 



AM. IN CIVIL ENGINEERING, 1877-78. clxxxix 

Friday, 30th November. 
[10 a.m. to 1 P.M.] 



MASONRY. 
H. I. B. Hargrave, B.A., C.E. ; Captain W. Haydon, R.E. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1 . How is masonry classed in your text book ? Give an 11 
accurate description of each kind, and its weight per cubic 
foot. 

2. Describe some of the methods for lifting large blocks 10 
of masonry. Accompany your answer with sketches. 

3. Describe and give neat sketches of the different kinds 10 
of bond in use for brick masonry. State their relative ad- 
vantages or otherwise. 

4. The walls of a square house built of brick are four 12 
bricks in thickness. Give a neat sketch of two consecutive 
courses at the angle, showing the arrangement of the bricks 

for each kind of bond. 

5. What are the usual precautions taken against settle- 10 
ment in masonry, and how are repairs effected when dealing 
with old work ? 

6. Give neat sketches of the several ways for forming 12 
arch rings composed of brickwork. State the advantages or 
otherwise of each method. 

7. Draw a set of centering for a 20 foot semicircular arch, 11 
and show how to find the point up to which it is advisable 

to carry the backing, 

8. With respect to foundations, into what classes are soils 9 
divided, and how are they prepared to receive the superstruc- 
ture ? 

9. Give, as far as your text book is concerned, a full de- 15 
scription of the various kinds of tubular and well foundations 

jn use for supporting structures. 



CXC FIRST EXAM. IN CIVIL ENGINEERING, 1877 

Friday, 30th November. 
[2 p.m. to 5 P.M.] 

ROADS and EARTHWORK. 

H. I. B. Hargrave, B.A., C.E. ; Captain W. H. Havtdon. K.K, 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks. ] 

1 . What conditions should a perfectly laid metalled road 1 2 
fulfil, and how should the metal be laid ? Enumerate the 
principal materials available in India for metalling, and state 
where each is principally employed. 

2. State the proportional loads which can respectively be 8 
drawn upon kuchcha roads, macadamized roads, kunkur roads 

in perfect repair, and railroads. What proportional part of 
a horse's labour is usefully employed in dragging loads up 

slopes of y-^-gf, ^ ^y, 2^? 

3. Give (freehand) cross sections with figured dimensions 9 
of :— 

1st., a 1st class embanked road on ground of ordinary value. 

2nd., 2nd class do. do. do. 

3rd., a 2nd class road in cutting on a hill side sloping at 
about -*-. 

4. What slopes are most frequently given to earthwork 9 
in cutting ? Mention exceptions. If the cutting is full of 
water-springs, what has to be done, and for what reason ? 

5. What implements are principally used in India for J 2 
doing earthwork ? Which are generally most economical ? 
Upon what consideration does the price of earthwork de- 
pend? 

6. Name the various tools used in boring to ascertain 10 
the depth of foundations, &c. ; and describe how they are 
used. 

7. What are the best materials to use in raising embank- 8 
ments ? By what procedure may embankments be formed ? 

8. In the case of the underlying ground of an embank- 14 
ment being very soft, what expedients are employed ? State 
what was done at Chatmos. 

9. What is puddle ? In pudding a tank, what precautions 10 
should be taken to make the work effective ? 

10. Draw a section (freehand) of a canal partly embanked 8 
on one side and figure the dimensions of the puddle gutter, 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF L.C.E., 1877-78- CXci 



VIII. 



MINATION FOR THE DEGREE OF 
L.C.E. 



EXAMINERS. 

fin Mathematics and Natural 

Rao Bahadur Kero Laxuman N Philosophy, and in Analytical 

ChHATRE ... ... ... 1 Geometry and Differential 

(. and Integral Calculus. 

{In Experimental and Natural 
Science, and in Mining and 
Metallurgy. 

H. 1. B. Hargrave, B.A., C.E. ) t „ 

Captain W. H- Haydon, R.E. j In ^S^ering. 

James Scorgie, F.C.S. ... ) T ,, . . , „ . 

A. F. E. Morfis, Esq, ... \ In Mechanical Engineering. 



CXCii EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF L.C.E., 1877-78. 

Monday, 26th November. 
[10 a.m. to 1 P.M.] 



MENSURATION of SURFACES and SOLIDS. 
Rao Bahadur Kero Laxuman Chhatre. 
[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 
i. The common chord of two circles which intersect. 8 
subtends an angle of 60° at the centre of one circle and an 
angle of 120° at the centre of the other, and the length of 
the chord is 15 inches : find the radii of the circles and the 
areas of the lunes. 

2. Two equal segments of a circle form a pointed arch, 8 
whose clear span is 50 feet, rise 30 feet, and the length 85 
feet ; find the area of the head- way, 

3. Shew that the area of an ellipse is a geometric mean (.* 
between areas of circles on its major and minor axes. 

4. The clear span of a semi-elliptic arch is 96 feet and 10 
the clear height 32 feet ; the thickness of the arch at the 
crown is 4 feet, and at the springing 5 feet 6 inches : find 
the area of the face. 

5. A cubic foot 
diameter : find its length. 

6- A hollow circular cylinder of cast-iron is 31*43 feet in 10 
circumference, 9' 9" in diameter inside, and 10 feet in length : 
find its thickness and its weight, if one cubic foot of iron 
weigh 441 lbs. 

7. The circumference of the base of a conic-frustum is 1 
49*3 feet, the diameter of the top 12 5 feet > and the altitude 
16*7 feet : find its surface and volume. 

8. Supposing the earth a sphere of 7,912 miles in dia- 8 
meter : find the number of square miles in its surface and the 
number of cubic miles in its volume. 

9. A zone of a sphere is 4 inches in thickness, the diame- 8 
ter of the base is 12 inches, and that of the top 9 inches : 
find the convex surface and the volume. 

10. What weight of powder will fill a shell whose dia- 10 
meter is 13 inches outside and the thickness 2 inches, if 30 
cubic inches of powder weigh 11 lbs. ? 

11. Compare the weight of two solid circular rings, S 
which have the same transverse section, and one of which 
just passes through the other. 

12 Find the 'area of the segment of a parabola cut off S 
by its latus-rectum, the length of which is 34 inches. 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF L.C.E,, 1877-78. CXClii 

Monday, 26th November. 
[2 p.m. to 5 P.M.] 



GEOMETRIC CONIC SECTIONS AND ANALYTICAL 
GEOMETRY. 

Rao Bahadur Kero Laxuman Chhatre. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. In a parabola if QV be an ordinate to the diameter 8 
PV, then Q F 2 = 4 &P. PV. 

2. Through any point on the axis of a parabola a chord 6 
POQ is drawn and PM and QN are the ordinates of the 
points P and Q ; prove that AM. AN = AO*. 

3. Shew that the chord of the circle of curvature at the 8 
point P of a parabola drawn parallel to the axis = 4. SP. 

4. OAP is the sector of a circle whose centre is 0. If 8 
the radius remain fixed while the angle AOP changes, the 
centre of the circle inscribed in the sector A OP will trace 
out a parabola. 

5. The area of a parallelogram formed by drawing tan- 10 
gents to an ellipse at the extremities of a pair of conjugate 
diameters is equal to the rectangle contained by the axes of 
the ellipse. 

6. If a circle be described touching the axis-major in 6 
one focus and passing through one extremity of the axis- 
minor, A C will be a mean proportional between the diameter 

of this circle and BC. 

7. If through any point R on either of the diagonals 10 
of the parallelogram formed by drawing tangents to the 
hyperbola and its conjugate at the vertices A, A', B,B', two 
ordinates RPN, RDM be drawn at right angles to A A' and 
BB' and meeting either the hyperbola or its conjugate in 
the points P and D ; then shew that 

/W^PN^BC 2 

RM* ^ DM 2 = AC 2 

8. A and B are two points and the origin ; express the 8 
area of the triangle AOB in terms of the co-ordinates of A 
and B, and also in terms of the polar co-ordinates of A and B. 

9. Form the equation for determining the abscissa of 10 
a point in the straight line, of which the equation is 

— 4-— ~ =1, whose distance from a given point (a, (3) shall 

be equal to a given line c. Shew that there are in general 

b 713—17 



CXCiv EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF L.C.E., 1877-78. 

two such points and in the particular case in which these 
points coincide 

c 2 (a 2 4 6 2 ) = (aj3-&a-a&) 2 . 

10. Determine the angle between the lines — 

— = 4 cos + 3 sin 6 and = 3 cos 0—4 sin 8, 
r r 

11. Find the equation to the tangent at the origin to the 
circle whose equation is 

x 2 + ?/2 _ 2y — Sx = 0. 

12. Find the polar equation to' the circle, the origin 
being on the circumference, and the initial line a tangent. 

Shew that with this origin and initial line, the polar 
equation to the tangent at the point & is 

r sin {26' -B) = 2c siW. 



Tuesday, 27th November. 
[10 a.m. to 1 P.M.] 



STATICS and DYNAMICS. 

Rao Bahadur Kero Laxuman Chhatre. 
[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. The lower end B of a rigid rod without weight, 10 10 
feet long, is hinged to an upright post, and its other end A 

is fastened by a string 8 feet long to a point C vertically- 
above B, so that ACB is a right angle. If a weight of one 
ton be suspended from A, find the tension of the string. 

2. Shew that the sum of the moments of two forces 10 
round any point in the plane containing the two forces is 
equal to the moment of their resultant. 

3. A system of forces acting in one plane on a rigid body 8 
will be in equilibrium if the algebraical sum of the moments 

of the forces vanishes round three points in the plane which 
are not in a straight line. 

4. A force of 3 lbs. can, when acting along a rough in- 8 
clined plane, just support a weight of 10 lbs. , while a force 

of 6 lbs. would be sufficient if the plane were smooth ; find 
the resultant pressure of the rough plane on the weight. 

5. The angle of a screw is 30°, and the length of the 8 
power arms is n times the radius of the cylinders ; find the 
mechanical a4vantage, 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OP L.C.E., 1877-78. CXCV 

6. Find the measure of the force of gravity when the 8 
unit of time is \ of a second and the unit of space half a 
yard. 

7. Find the latus-rectum and the range on a horizontal 12 
plane of the parabola described by a projectile. 

8. A ball fired at an inclination a to the horizon just 10 
clears a vertical wall which subtends an angle B at the point 

of projection. Determine the instant at which the ball just 
clears the wall. 

9. A ball is projected from a point in a smooth billiard 10 
table, and after striking the four sides in order returns to 
the starting point ; shew that the sides of the parallelogram 
described are parallel to the diagonals of the table, the 
elasticity being perfect. 

10. Two balls are dropped from two points not in the 10 
same vertical line, and strike against a horizontal plane, the 
elasticity being perfect ; shew that the centre of gravity of 
the balls will never re-ascend to its original height unless the 
initial heights of the balls are in the ratio of two square 
numbers. 

11. A second's pendulum is carried to the top of a moun- 6 
tain m miles high : assuming that the force of gravity varies 
inversely as the square of the distance from the centre of 
the earth, find the time of a small oscillation. 



Tuesday, 27th November. 
[2 p.m. to 5 P.M.] 



HYDROSTATICS. 

Rao Bahadur Kero Laxuman Chhatre. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. The common surface of two fluids which do not mix 6 
is a horizontal plane. 

2. Shew that if two liquids that do not mix meet in a 6 
bent tube, the heights of their upper surfaces above their 
common surface will be inversely proj>ortional to their den- 
sities. 

3. A hollow cone filled with water is held with its vertex 12 
downwards ; determine the resultant pressure on either of 
the portions into which it is divided by a vertical plane pass- 
ing through its axis. 



CXCV1 EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OP L.C.E., 1877-78. 

4. A cubical box, the volume of which is one cubic foot, 12 
is three-fourths filled with water, and a leaden ball, the 
volume of which is 72 cubic inches, is lowered into the water 

by a string : it is required to find the increase of pressure on 
the base and on a side of the box. 

5. A piece of wood which weighs 57 lbs. in vacuo, is at- 10 
tached to a bar of silver weighing 42 lbs. , and the two toge- 
ther weigh 38 lbs. in water : find the specific gravity of the 
wood, that of water being 1, and that of silver 10*5. 

6. Distinguish between a lifting pump and a forcing 10 
pump, and state the principle of the construction of the fire- 
engine. 

7. A fine tube of glass closed at the upper end is inVert- 10 
ed, and its end is immersed in a basin of mercury within the 
receiver of a condenser ; the length of the tube is 15 inches, 
and it is observed that after three descents of the piston, the 
mercury has risen 5 inches ; how far will it have risen after 

4 descents ? Take 30 inches as the height of the barometer 
in the open air. 

8. A cylindrical diving-bell, height 5 feet, is let down, 12 
till the depth of its top is 55 feet ; find the space occupied 

by air, the water barometer standing at 33 feet. 

Find how much air must be forced in to expel the water 
completely. 

9. Find an expression for determining the difference of 10 
the altitudes of two stations, by means of a barometer. 

10. Describe the difference between the atmospheric 12 
steam-engine and Watts' double-acting-engine. 



Wednesday, 28th November. 
[10 a.m. to 1 P.M.] 

INORGANIC CHEMISTRY. 
W. Gray, M.B. 
[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. What are the principal compounds which sulphur 12 
forms with hydrogen, with chlorine, and with carbon. De- 
scribe how they may be prepared, giving illustrative equations. 

Do any of them exist free in nature ? State fully their pro- 
perties and uses, and write their formulae. 

2. What is the simplest mode of detecting sulphur in a S 
compound, and how may it be quantitatively determined ? 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF L.C.E., 1877-78. CXCvii 

3. How are the naturally occurring waters usually classed? 12 
State the principal characters by which each class can be 
•distinguished. What impurities may be found in water used 

for drinking and domestic purposes ? What are the sources 
of these, and how may they be detected and removed ? What 
gases are known to exist in natural waters ? 

4. Enumerate the more important compounds of chlorine 12 
with oxygen. Mention their properties and mode of prepara- 
tion, and write their formulas. Explain the action of chlorine 

as a bleaching agent. In what cases is it largely used as 
such, and in what form ? 

5- On what does the deodorising power of charcoal de- 8 
pend ? How do you explain the occurrence of nitrates in 
charcoal which has been used in sewer ventilators ? 

6. Mention the tests for nitric acid. What are the gene- 12 
ral characteristics of nitrates ? Enumerate the most impor- 
tant, write their formulas, and state how they are prepared, 
and their uses. Do any of the nitrates occur naturally ? If 

so, state where, and how their occurrence may be explained. 

7. Give the composition, and describe shortly the proper- 12 
ties and uses of hyposulphite of soda, Scheele's green, white 
lead, corrosive sublimate, and permanganate of potash. What 
occurs if to a solution of the latter a solution of ferrous sul- 
phate be added ? Write out the decomposition which takes 
place. 

8. Describe carefully the process for the conversion of 12 
common salt into carbonate of soda, giving the de composi- 
tions which occur. What other commercial products are 
obtained during the process as secondary products ? 

9. What is the ordinary process for the manufacture of 12 
common alum ? State whether you think it could be profit- 
ably made in this Presidency, and give the reasons for your 
conclusion. Write the formula for alum. What occurs 
when it is heated ? 



Wednesday, 28th November. 
[2 p.m. to 5 P.M.] 



HEAT and VOLTAIC ELECTRICITY and MAGNETISM. 
, W. Gray, M.B. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 
1. Contrast the day and night temperatures at Bombay 10 
in the hot weather with those of Poona at the same season. 

b 713—17* 



CXCviii EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF L.C.E., 1877-78. 

Give a full explanation of the causes to which the differ- 
ences are due. 

2. In his experimentson the absorption of heat by gases 1 
and powders, what facts were observed by Professor Tyndall, 
and to what conclusions did they lead him ? Explain the 
results of Franklin's experiment with coloured pieces of 
cloth laid on snow in the sunlight. Mention one or two 
practical applications of the principles which govern the 
absorption, radiation, and reflection of heat. 

3. A lump of ice with a thermometer inserted in it shows 1 
a temperature, say, of 25°F. If the ice is placed in a vessel 

on the fire it melts, the water becomes warmed, and at length 
boils. State [exactly what the indications of the thermo- 
meterare from first to last. 

4. Describe Carre's apparatus for freezing water, and give 1 
a full and careful explanation of the principles on which it 
works. 

5. What is the magnetic meridian of a place ? What are 1 
the regular variations in the declination of the needle, and 

to what are accidental variations due ? What do you mean 
by the aclinic line, and how is Bombay situated with regard 
to it ? Describe the inclination compass and the manner of 
using it. 

6. What circumstances influence the power of magnets ? 10 

7. Describe Sir William Thomson's marine galvanometer. 1 
How is its principle utilised in telegraphy ? 

8. Describe the working of an electric clock. 10 

9. Why has the application of electro-magnetism in place 10 
of steam, as a motive force for machinery, been hitherto a 
failure ? Give reasons for your answer. 

10. Describe the sulphate of mercury battery. What 10 
takes place when the elements are closed ? What are its ad- 
vantages and disadvantages as compared with other batteries ? 



Thursday, 29th November. 
[10 a.m. to 1 P.M.] 

GEOLOGY. 
W. Gray, M.B. 
[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 
1. Where is the place of the old red sandstone in the 17 
geological series ? In what parts of the world is the system 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF L.C.E., 1877-78. CXClX 

best developed ? Where does it occur in India ? By what 
fossils is it principally characterised, and how do these differ 
in its lower and upper strata? What indications does the 
system contain by which we are enabled to determine the 
nature of its origin ; What are its economic products ? 

2. In what deposits have the earliest traces of man been 10 
met with in this country, and what do these human remains 
indicate ? 

3. Mention the principal seats of volcanic action. What 14 
remarkable circumstance has been observed with regard to 
the situation of active valcanoes, and how is this supposed to 

be connected with eruptions ? What are the chief economic 
products obtained from volcanic districts ? 

4. Where are granitic rocks to be met with in this Presi- 16 
sidency ? State their chief characteristics. What are the 
components of ordinary granite ? What varieties of this rock 

are enumerated, and to what are the differences due ? How 
is the decomposition of granite brought about, and what are 
the mechanical and chemical changes which occur ? Mention 
also the products of this decomposition. 

5. What are steatite, bitumen, marl, flint, carbonado, 14 
kaolin, littoral concrete, and itacolumite ? Are any of these 

to be found in India ? If so, state where. 

6. In what formation are the infusorial and nummulitic 12 
strata found, and where ? Where does the latter exist in 
this country ? What are their characteristic fossils ? Do 
these strata furnish any useful product ? 

7. Give a short sketch of the geology of the northern 17 
half of the Deccan, noting also the physical features of the 
country. 



Thursday, 29th November. 
[2 p.m. to 5 P.M.] 



ENGINEERING FIELD and OFFICE WORK. 

H. 1. B. Hargrave, B.A., C.E. ; Captain W. H. Haydon, R.E, 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. The representative fraction of a plan is lfl o g ; draw 
one scale showing miles, and another showing metres, 



CC EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF L.C.B., 1877-78. 

2. A distance of ten miles on a map is represented by 1 "5 7 
inches ; construct a scale for this map showing leagues, one 
league =4262-84 yards. 

3. Describe the adjustments of a transit theodolite and 10 
the method of observing horizontal and vertical angles with it. 

4. Describe Gale's traverse system, and state what advan- 10 
tage it has over the ordinary method. 

5. State the principle on which the angles of a satellite 10 
station are reduced to the centre. 

6. Describe the process of making a sketch map of a 6' 
limited area of level country. 

7. Describe the pocket sextant, its adjustment, method 10 
of observing with it, and the principle on which its construc- 
tion depends. 

8. Give at least three different ways for tracing curves 10 
on the ground. 

9. Give a description of the levelling operations of the 10 
G. T. Survey and the means taken to ensure accuracy in 
their levels. 

10. Describe the different methods for finding the meri- 10 
dian. 

11. How do you find the error of a chronometer ? 10 



Friday, 30th November. 
[10 a.m* to 1 P.M.] 

STRENGTH or MATERIALS. 

H. I. B. Hargrave, B.A., C.E. ; Captain W. H. Haydon, R.E. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Define the following terms : — Breaking load, proof 7 
load, working load, actual load. State the relations that 
ought to exist between the* above for the following mate- 
rials : — 

Wrought iron, cast iron, timber. 

2. Prove the theorem that the work done by a suddenly 1*2 
applied load is twice that done by a gradually increasing 
load. What use is made of the above theorem in practical 
engineering ? 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF L.C.E., 1877-78. CCJ 

3. State Kirkaldy's conclusions on the strength of 10 
wrought iron and steel. 

4. Calculate by Gordon's formula the weight a timber 10 
pillar of the following dimensions will carry safely : — 17 feet 
long and 12 inches square, both ends firmly fixed, the 
coefficient being ¥ lo an d the resistance to crushing 7,000 
pounds per square inch. 

5. An elastic beam A B, 20 feet long between bearings, 10 
is supported freely at each end ; it carries a uniform load 

of one ton per foot run and two weights of one ton each 
suspended at 3 and 5 feet respectively from the ends A and 
B. Calculate the distance from the end B, where the strain 
is a maximum, and its amount. 

6. Explain the theory on which the deflexion of elastic 15 
beams is based. Apply it to a beam fixed at one end, with 

a weight at the other end ; and to a beam supported at both 
ends with a weight at the centre. 

7. What improvement has taken place of late years in 15 
the calculation of roof strains ? Apply it to a roof of the 
simple form shown underneath with the following data : — 

Interval between trusses, 10 feet. 
Vertical load = 40 lbs. per super, foot. 
Normal ,, = 26 ,, ,, „ ,, 

Accompany your answer with neat frame and stress 
diagrams : — 




8. In designing retaining walls of large size to support 
earth, what conditions should be secured so as to ensure 
stability ? 

9. Explain the theory given in your text book by which 
the thrust of earth and the mean thickness of a wall to 
retain it is calculated. 



CCli EXAM. FOR THE DEGEEE OF L.C.E., 1877-78. 

Saturday, 1st December. 
[10 a.m. to 1 P.M.] 



BRIDGES. 
H. I. B. HargravE, B.A., C.E. ; Captain W. H. Haydon, R.E\ 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Explain the terms ' ' Hydraulic mean depth, " ' ' afHux. " 7 
Why is it necessary to calculate the afflux ? 

2. The position of a bridge being given, explain how you 12 
would determine the necessary amount of water-way. 

3. Explain the terms " approaches," " abutments," 7 
" piers" " head walls," " starlings," " spandrils," "blocking- 
course." 

4. In masonry bridges of more than one span, how is the 7 
theoretical thickness of the piers determined ? In practice 
what allowances have to be made, and what are the ordinary 
dimensions of brick piers ? 

5. Of what does a wooden centering consist ? Describe 7 
the method of lowering the centerings of bridges by means 

of sand boxes. 

6. What special provision must be made in bridge trusses 7 
which is not made in roof trusses ? What is the effect of a 
swiftly rolling load ? 

7. In woodwork, what principles should be adhered to in 10 
executing all Sorts of joints and fastenings ? Give hand 
sketches illustrating the terms "fishing," "scarfing," "jog- 
gling." 

8. In a plain fished joint give the rules for the area of the 7 
fish pieces and bolts. How should the bolt holes be arranged 

so as to produce the best effect ? 

9. Calculate the dimensions and give sketches showing 14 
the necessary proportions of a pair of plate girders to carry a 
swiftly rolling load of 1| tons per running foot over a clear 
span of 20' on a 5' *6' ' gauge railway. 

10. What is the primary object of bracing? How is this 6 
object usually obtained ? What do you mean by " counter- 
bracing" ' 

11. Give a skeleton sketch and table of strains of a lattice 16 
girder under the following conditions : — 

Span 80', depth 5'. Bracing two systems of right-angled 
triangles. Load which traverses upper flange to be for 
permanent load 4 ton per foot run, moving load 1 ton per 
foot run. 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF L.C.E., 1877-78. cciii 

Saturday, 1st December. 
[2 p.m. to 5 P.M.] 

IRRIGATION and HARBOURS, 

H. I. B. Hargbave. B.A., O.E. ; Captain W. H. Haydon, R.E 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks] 

1. Describe the conditions necessary to develope success- 9 
fully- 

{a) An irrigational canal ; 
(b) A navigable canal. 

2. What considerations should guide an engineer in locat- 9 
ing the head of an irrigational canal ? 

3. Detail the reasons which determine the maximum and 10 
minimum velocity to be given to the flow of water in a canal. 
What influence has the depth of water on the slope of a canal 
bed? 

4. Explain, as concisely as possible, the uses of an aque- 9 
duct, inlet, and superpassage. 

5. What circumstances indicate the most favourable loca- 10 
lity for the construction of a tank embankment ? What 
arrangements are usually made for the escape of the surplus 
water which may find its way into a tank ? 

6. Describe how the foundation for a dam is prepared, 9 
and the culvert for the outlet pipes constructed. 

7. What is a groin ? State its advantages and disadvan- 10 
tages when applied for training a channel or protecting a 
bank, cliff, sea-wall, &c. 

8. What is the use of a break-water ? In what does it differ 8 
from a sea-wall ? How are the break-waters at Plymouth 
and Cherbourg situated as regards the harbour they protect? 
What is the best position for the junction of a single break- 
water with the land ? 

9. How are break-waters usually constructed ? Give sec- 10 
tions of Plymouth and Cherbourg break-waters. 

10. What is a scouring basin, and how should it be con- 8, 
structed ? 

11. Distinguish between a deep water basin and a dock. 8 
What direction should be given to the entrances to dock ? 



CC1V EXAM, FOR THE DEGREE OF L,C,E., 1877-78. 

Monday, 3rd December. 
[10 a.m. to 1 P.M.] 



SPECIFICATION and ESTIMATING. 
H. I. B. Hargrave, B.A., C,E. ; Captain W. H. Haydon, R.E. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 
The accompanying sketch to scale represents a 20 feet 100 
culvert. You are required to draw up a neat bill of 
quantities and a specification for same. 

The arch ring is to be of brick ; keystone and key course 
cf stone ; the remainder of the work to be of coursed rubble 
backed with ordinary rubble. The roadway over top to be 
oovered with broken stone according to the usual plan. 



Monday, 3rd December. 
[2 p.m. to 5 P.M.] 

RAILWAYS. 

H. LB. Hargrave, B. A, C.E. ; Captain W. H. Haydon, BE, 
[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. The general principles involved in the survey and 9 
direction of a line of railroad are similar to those which affect 
ordinary roads; there are, however, certain notable differences 

of detail. Explain these differences. 

2. State the various considerations which determine the 8 
gradients of railways. 

3. What is the use of ballasting ? How is it laid, and of 7 
what materials is it composed ? 

4. Describe how the ranging and setting out of tunnels 10 
js performed. 

' 5. What width of roadway and headway should be given 6 
to underbridges, and to what points should attention be paid 
in their construction ? 

,6. As a general rule, what should be the weight of a yard 8 
of rail ? Give the weights of rails and chairs, and the dis- 
tance apart of sleepers as used on the E.I. Railway and the 
Madras Line. What allowance is made for the contraction 
and expansion of rails ? 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF L.C.E., 1877-78- CCY 

7. Calculate the rail cant required on a curve of 500 yards 9 
radius : the speed of train being 40 miles an hour and gauge 

of line 5 '6." 
Why are the tires of wheels made conical ? 

8. Give the arguments in favor of inside and outside cylin- 9 
ders, respectively. 

On what three dimensions of an engine does its power and 
speed depend ? 

9. Why is there necessarily a difference of detail in the 8 
construction of passenger and goods engines, and in what does 
this difference mainly consist ? 

10. Give the weights of ordinary passenger and goods 9 
locomotives for a 5-6 ' gauge ; also dimensions of cylinders, 
length of piston stroke, and diameter of driving wheel of 
each class of engine. What should be the maximum load on 
each driving wheel, and why ? 

Explain the action of a brake on a train. Calculate in 9 
what distance on a level a van brake will stop a train of 350 
tons moving at a speed of 20 miles per hour, the proportion 
of brake resistance to weight of train being '023. 

12. Give approximately the area of ground for a first and 8 
second class intermediate station ; also for a terminal goods 
station, and a terminal passenger station, both being on a first 
class railway. 

In what way do the positions of stations affect the question 
of curves and gradients ? 



Tuesday, 4 th December. 
[10 a.m. to 1 P.M.] 



ANALYTICAL GEOMETRY. 
Rao Bahadur Kero Laxuman Chhatre. 
[The figures to the right indicate full marks. ] 

1. Find the equation to the diameter of a given system of 10 
parallel chords in a parabola. 

Shew that all diameters of a parabola are parallel to its axis. 

2. If through any point, within or without a parabola, 1 
two lines be drawn parallel to two given straight lines to 
meet the curve, the rectangles of the segments mil be to one 
another in an invariable ratio. 

b 713—18 



CCvi EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF L.C.E., 1877-78. 

3. Trace the curve y = x—x*, and determine whether the 10 
straight line x + y = 1 is a tangent to it. 

4. In a parabola find the point where the tangent is 8 
inclined at an angle of 30° to the axis of x. 

5. Write down the equation to the normal at the extre- 12 
mity of the latus-rectum in an ellipse. 

What is the eccentricity of the ellipse when this normal 
passes through the extremity (B,) of the minor axis ? 

6. Shew that in an ellipse the sum of the squares of the 10 
two conjugate semi-diameters is equal to the sum of the 
squares of the semi-axes. 

7. In an ellipse the rectangle contained by the perpendi- 1 
cular from the centre upon the tangent and the part of the 
corresponding normal intercepted between the axes is equal 

to the difference of the squares of the semi-axes. 

8. Find the equation to the hyperbola referred to rectan- iC 
gular axes. 

9. Show that every equation of the form y — mx 10 
+ \/m 2 a 2 — 6 2 is a tangent to the hyperbola. 

10. Show that from any external point two tangents can 1 
be drawn to an hyperbola. 

State when the two tangents meet the same branch or 
the different branches of the hyperbola. 



Tuesday, 4th December, 
[2 p.m. to 5 P.M.] 

DIFFERENTIAL and INTEGRAL CALCULUS 

Rao Bahadur Kero Laxuman Chhatre. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Illustrate what is meant by the limiting value of a 
function of a variable. Explain the nature of the limit indi- 
cated by -iL . 

dx 

2, Differentiate : — 



u = log (2x — 1) + 2 Vx* — x—h 
If u = a . cos (log x) + b sin (log x), shew that 
» d 2 u du , „ 

dx % dx 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF L.C.E., 1877-78. CCVli 

4. State Maclaurin's theorem for the expansion of functions 1 2 
and expand sin x into a series in terms of the ascending 
powers of x. 

5. Explain the terms maxima and minima. Investigate 12 
the method of finding out these by means of differential 
calculus. 

Find when 3a 2 ar 3 -6 4 x + c 5 is a maximum or a minimum. 

6. A quantity of water of known bulk is to be put into 30 
a cylindrical vessel : required the dimensions of the vessel 

so that its internal surface may be the least possible. 

7. Integrate the following :— 

w/rrsr 



<"» A 



dx 



Tuesday, 4th December. 
[10 a.m. to 1 P.M.] 



LO 



x 2 (x + bx)- 

8. How do you integrate by parts ? Integrate (a 2 - x*k dx ' i0 

9. Decompose and integrate the following fraction : — 12 

x dx 
(x + 2) (x + 3) 2 * 

10. Shew that if (j) x = (f> {a + x) 10 

-Cna Pa 

J (f>xdxz=: n I <f>xdx. 
o ° 



MINING and METALLURGY.— Paper I 

W. Gray, M.B. 
[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Arrange antimony, zinc, silver, copper, aluminum, and 
lead in the order, (a) of their lustre, (b) their ductility, (c) 
their tenacity, (d) their conducting power for heat, (e) their 
fusibility, and (/) their specific gravities. 

2. Mention the physical and chemical peculiarities of 
mercury. AVhat are its principal uses ? What is the chief 
impurity found in commercial mercury, and how is this de- 
tected and removed ? Can you preserve mercury in copper or 
iron vessels ? 



Ccviii EXAM, FOR THE DEGREE OF L.C.E., 1877-78, 

3. Describe how brass is made, and state its composition. 12 
What evidence is there to show that it is a chemical com- 
pound ? How is the union of its components facilitated ? 
Mention its properties and uses. What is the effect on brass 

of continued vibration ? 

4. Describe the common process for the manufacture of 12 
charcoal. What is the usual percentage of charcoal obtain- 
ed ? What is the most economical process for preparing it ! 
What do you mean by the destructive distillation of wood ? 
What are the products of the process, and how may they be 
utilised in the manufacture of charcoal ? 

5. For all practical purposes, on what does the amount of 1 2 
heat generated by the combustion of a given weight of fuel 
depend ? Indicate shortly the general formula for calculating 
the calorific value of a fuel like bituminous coal. 

6. What are the accidents to which coal mines are pecu- 16 
liarly liable ? Give a full explanation of how they are caused, 
and describe carefully the means which are taken to prevent 
them. 

7. Give a short account of the art of electro-plating and 12 
of the principles on which it is based. 

8. How is the regular system of crystallography distin- 12 
guished ? What are the more important crystalline forms 
which belong to it ? Give illustrative examples of each. 



Tuesday, 4th December. 
[2 p.m. to 5 p.m.] 

MINING and METALLURGY.— Paper II. 

W. Gray, M.B. 
[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Enumerate and describe the principal ores of zinc. . 11 
State their chemical composition, the localities in which they 
are found, and the percentage of pure zinc contained in 
each. 

2. Describe the Belgian process for smelting zinc. What 13 
are the usual impurities of commercial zinc, and how are 
they removed ? Mention the commonest use to which zinc 

is applied, and for what particular reasons. 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF L.C.E., 1877-78. CC1X 



3. Give a careful description of the various processes for 13 
hardening steel. What are the changes which take place in 
the metal ? How is the process of tempering conducted, and 
how is the correct temperature for any particular purpose 
determined ? 

4. Write a short account of the different stages of the 15 
process for the extraction of blistered copper from copper 
pyrites, 

5. Describe fully the process for the manufacture of 12 
galvanised iron. State exactly what takes place when it 
undergoes corrosion. 

6. What is the composition of mosaic gold, German silver, J 3 
fine solder, cold-short iron, phosphor bronze, grey copper ore, 
spathic iron ore, silver glance, and spiegel-eisen ? How is 
the latter obtained, and what is it used for ? 

7. Describe the Catalan process for extracting iron. What 1 1 
kind of iron does it produce, and from what ores ? What 
are the advantages and. disadvantages of the process ? 

8. What varieties of rock are used for lining furnace- 
What properties should a good furnace lining possess ? If a 
stratified rock is used in the construction of the furnace wall, 
what precaution should be observed, and why ? 



Tuesday, 4th December. 
[10 a.m. to 1 p.m.] 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING. 

James Scorgie, F.C.S. ; A. F. E. Morris, Esq. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks. ] 

1. Write a short note on case hardening. 6 

2. A boiler has three furnaces 3 ft. wide by 6 ft. long ; find 6 
the diameter of the safety-valve, the Board of Trade allow- 
ance being \ square inch of safety-valve surface to one foot 

of grate surface. 

3. Describe the contrivance by means of which the 10 
internal condition of the boiler is rendered manifest to 

the engineer. 

4. Describe any of the fast couplings used in connecting 8 
two lengths of shafting. 

B 713—18 * 



CCX EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF L.C.E., 1877-78. 

5. A geared engine has 63 teeth in the driving wheel and 7 
22 teeth on the shaft ; the engines make 42 revolutions per 
minute ; what are the revolutions of the propeller per hour ? 

6. How is the valve made to cut the steam off at any part 1 
of the stroke ? How is lead given to the valve ? 

7. If the maximum strain be taken at 50,000 lbs. per 10 
square inch, what pressure may be applied at the end of a 
crank 14 inches long to be transmitted by a shaft 6 inches in 
diameter ? 

8. A packing ring for a cylinder 59 inches diameter, be- 6 
fore being cut is 61| inches ; how much should be cut out of 
the circumference so that it may just fit the cylinder when 
sprung in ? 

9. What is the horse power of an engine, the diameter of 1 
the cylinder being 60 inches, length of stroke 7 feet, revolu- 
tions per minute 16, and the effective pressure per square inch 

on the piston 25 lbs. ? 

10. The vertical height from plane of revolution to point 10 
of suspension of a steam engine governor is 36 inches : find 
the number of revolutions. 

11. In a high pressure engine the area of the piston is 17 
120 square inches, length of stroke 2*4 ft., the effective eva- 
poration of the boiler 5 cub. ft. a minute, the pressure of the 
r,team in the cylinder is 64 lbs,, making the usual allowance 

for the loss due to friction ; required the useful horse power. 



FIRST EXAM. IN ARTS, 1878-79. 



IX. 



FIRST EXAMINATION IN ARTS, 1878-79. 



EXAMINERS. 



W. Wordsworth, B.A 

Pkter Peterson, M,A 

Ramkrishna Gopal Bhandarkar, M,A. 
Shankar Pandurang Pandit, M.A. ... 

F. G. Selby, B.A 

Joseph Ezekiel, Esq 

E. Rehatsek, M.C.E 

t. Cooke, M.A., ML, LL.D 

The Rev. C. F. H. Johnston, M.A, ... 

The Rev. R. Rive, S.J 

vS. Newcome Fox, B.A 

W. Gray, M.B 



In English. 

In Sanskrit. 

In Latin. 

In Hebrew. 

In Persian. 

In Mathematics and in 
Analytical Geome- 
try, &c. 

In Logic and in But- 
ler's Sermons. 

In History. 

In Chemical Phyi 



CCXii FIRST EXAM. IN ARTS, 1878-79. 

Monday, 8th April. 

[10 A.M. to 1 P.M.J 
W. Wordsworth, B.A.; Peter Peterson, M.A. 



ENGLISH— Paper I. 
Milton's Paradise Lost.— Books V. and V], 
Johnson's Life of Dryden. 
[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 
It Paraphrase — 20 

Deliverer from new Lords, leader to free 

Enjoyment of our right as Gods ! yet hard 

For Gods, and too unequal work, we find 

Against unequal arms to fight in pain 

Against unpained, impassive : from which evil 

Ruin must needs ensue. For what avails 

Valour or strength, though matchless, quelled with pain 

Which all subdues, and makes remiss the hands 

Of mightiest ? Sense of pleasure we may well 

Spare out of life perhaps, and not repine, 

But live content — which is the calmest life . 

But pain is perfect misery, the worst 

Of evils, and excessive, overturns 

All patience. He who, therefore, can invent 

With what more forcible we may offend 

Our yet unwounded enemies or arm 

Ourselves with like defence, to me deserves 

No less than for deliverance what we owe. 

2. Give briefly the argument of the fifth book, and point 10 
out the connection between the discourse of Raphael and the 
principal action of the poem. What end does Milton propose 

to himself in the opening verses of the first book ? 

3. What feet does the " English heroic verse "of 10 
Paradise Lost admit ? and on what grounds may its superiority 

to the blank verse of Thompson or Couper be vindicated ? 

4. Write short notes, grammatical and explanatory, on 1 tl 
the following :— 



FIRST EXAM. IN ARTS, 1878-79. 

(«). — "ye Elements, the eldest birth 

Of Nature's womb, that in quaternion run 
Perpetual circle." 

(6).— " fruit of all kinds, in coat 

Eough or smooth rined, or bearded husk or shell, 

(c).— War he perceived, war in procinct, and found 
Already known what he for news had thought 
To have reported. 

(d).— though brutish that contest and foul 

When reason hath to deal with force, yet so 
Most reason is that reason overcome. 

(*)• — Before the cloudly van, 

On the rough edge of battle ere it joined. 

(/).— but Eve 

Undecked save with herself, more lovely fair 
Than wood-nymph or the fairest goddess feigned 
Of three that in mount Ida naked strove. 

(g)- — one first matter all, 

Indued with various forms, various degrees 
Of substance, and in things that live, of life : 

(h. )— New laws from him who reigns new minds may 
raise. 

In us who serve. 

5. What was Johnson's conception of poetry, and what 12 
qualities of Dryden's verse particularly attracted him ? Has 
modern criticism modified in any measure the judgment 
passed on Dry den by Johnson ? 

6. Give the story of Absalom and Achitophel, and de 12 
scribe shortly the political events and parties to which it 
refers. 

7. Quote examples of Dryden's earlier and later mannt - 
and enquire whether the latter was an improvement on the 
former. 

8. What merits does Johnson claim for Dryden as (1) 12 
a translator, (2) a dramatist, (3) a satirist, and (4) a reasoner 

in verse. Enumerate and estimate his principal perform- 
ances in each of these branches of poetic art. 



CCX1V FIRBT EXAM. IN ARTS, 1878-79, 

Monday, 8th April. 

[2 p.m. to 5 P.M.] 

W. Wordsworth, B.A. ; Peter Peterson , M.A. 



ENGLISH— Paper II. 

Thomsons Seasons, Spring and Summer. Miss Austen's Manxfiek 
Park. 
[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Paraphrase — 

But yonder comes the powerful king of Day, 

Rejoicing in the east. The lessening cloud, 

The kindling azure, and the mountain's brow 

Illum'd with fluid gold, his near approach 

Betoken glad. Lo, now, apparent all, 

Aslant the dew-bright earth, and coloured air. 

He looks in boundless majesty abroad ; 

And sheds the shining day, that burnish'd plays 

On rocks, and hills, and towers, and wandering stream 

High-gleaming from afar. Prime cheerer Light ! 

Of all material beings first, and best ! 

Efflux divine ! Nature's resplendent robe ! 

Without whose vesting beauty all were wrapt 

In unessential gloom ; and thou, Sun ! 

Soul of surrounding worlds ! in whom best seen 

Shines out thy Maker ! may I sing of thee ! 

2. Quote or refer to any parallel passages in English 
poetry which Thompson may have been influenced by in 
writing this passage. 

3. Write notes, grammatical and explanatory , on the 
following passages : — 

{a). — But who can hold the shade, while Heaven 
descends. 
In universal bounty ? 

(b). — full as the summer- rose 

Blown by prevailing suns. 

(c). — he flounces round the pool 

Indignant of the guile. 

(d). — from every chink, 

And secret corner, where they slept away 
• The wintry storms. 



FIRST EXAM. IN ARTS, 1878-79. CCXV 

4. What are Thomson's chief merits as a poet, What his 12 
most conspicuous faults ? Illustrate your criticism by quota- 
tions. 

5. Analyse the characters of Mrs. Norris and Fanny 14 
Price. Of the following passages who are the speakers in 
(a) and (b) ; and of whom is (c) said ? 

(a), — I only wish I could be more useful ; but you see 
I do all in my power. I am not one of those 
that spare their own trouble. 

(/>).— What shall I do ? Whist and speculation ; 
which will amuse me most ? 

(V*).— She felt that she had arranged everything ex- 
tremely well, and that any alteration must be for 
the worse. 

6. Kxplain the following passages : — 14 

(«). — The living was hereafter for Edmund ; and had 
his uncle died a few years sooner, it would 
have been duly given to some friend to hold 
till he were old enough for orders. 

(h). — Miss Frances married, in the common phrase, to 
disoblige her family. 

(c). — If I had known this before, I would have spoken 
of the cloth with more respect. 

{d). —Henry Crawford had trifled with her feelings ; 
but she had very long allowed and even sought 
his attentions, with a jealousy of her sister so 
reasonable as ought to have been their cure : 
and now that the conviction of his preference 
for Maria had been forced upon her, she sub 
mitted to it without any alarm for Maria's 
situation, or any endeavour at rational tran- 
quillity for herself. 

-But I am not fishing ; don't compliment me. 

( / ). — Though Miss Crawford is in a manner at home, 
at the Parsonage, you are not to be taking 
place of her, 

[a). -Describe briefly the consequences of Sir Thomas' 14, 
return. 

(b). —In what light did the proposed visit of Fanny 
Price to her home appear to Sir Thomas, Wil • 
liam Price, Lady Bertram, and to Fanny herself ? 

io).— Describe briefly Fanny's first evening at home. 



1 FIRST EXAM. IN ARTS, 1878-79. 

(a). —Explain— 14 

All this is beside the question. 

Such a course is out of the question. 

That is a leading question. 

You will find that out to your cost. 

He was cast in costs. 

Show him the cold shoulder. 

(b). — Give the meaning and etymology of the following 
words. In what sense do the first four occur in 
Thomson ? 

dreadless. irriguous. unnumbered, tedded, 
copse. succeed. pilgrim. publican, 

crivalry, uncouth. soldier. college. 



Tuesday, 9th April. 
[10 a.m. to 1 P.M.] 



SANSKRIT— Paper I. 

Ramkrishna Gopal Bhanparkar, M.A., Hon. M.R-.A.S. 
Shanhar Pandurang Pandit, M.A. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks. J 
1. Translate into English :— 



^prre3^nri3ra*ai srairar &;$( gRRf 



nm: II 

Name and dissolve the compounds underlined. 



FIRST EXAM. IN ARTS, 1878-79. CCXV1L 

1 Translate and explain fully :— 25 

(a.) flnrmr sfr *rc*?*nrft qr strr ^rf^r 

sterner ^wrr: I 
srsrfarii 



{9) m^r.m&&Tfii&:*ftiiTTT*t:&wwTT I 

Explain the the osophie doctrines alluded to in &., c, e., and 
/. State, why the S'abala was Visvamitra's tjlTR" I 

3. («)— Give the etymology of the following names as 7 
explained in the Bala Kanda :— 

**r*r, wtrffiku ^npr, 3T c arg\ imrrr, 

b 713—19 



CCXviii FIRST EXAM. IN ARTS, 1878-79. 

(c.) w fk sot Jr^rj^r: jpnw *w- 

Give the Sanskrit name of that Des'a and its limits. 

4 Narrate the story of S'unahs'epha, and compare it with 7 
another version of it that you may happen to know. 

5 fe?*rfNr * *r!rirrR?iir*. Why so - 

6. What are the Icaranas and vy&pdras oianumdna, upa- 
mdna, and s'abda, and why ? 

Explain this fully, dissolving the compound. Of which of 
the terms is rsjrrrr an attribute ? 

■8. State the exact distinction between svdrthdnumana 5 
and pardrthdnumdna, and between viruddha and bddhita. 

9. Which of the conditions necessary for inference is 7 
tit in a, sddhdrana, hetvdbhdsa ? Give a definition of that 

condition with reference to the definition of that hetvd bkdsa, 
and explain them. 

10. All men are rational animals. 
Horses are not rational animals. 

.'. Horses are not men. 

What* are the paksha, s'ddhya,' and hetu in this in- 
stance ; and give the pardmars'a, all in the Sanskrit 
form. State also the sapaksha and vipaksha in the 
case. 

11. Translate into English : — 14 









FIRST EXAM. IN ARTS, 1878-79. CC3HX 



Tuesday, 9th April. 
£2 p.m. to 5 P.M.] 

SANSKRIT— Paper IL 

Kamkrishna Gopal Bhandarkar, M.A., Hon. M.R.A.S. ; 

Shankar Pandurang Pandit, M. A. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 
1. Translate into English :— 25 

(a.) rmx I snrei qwrfcfarf re^nm- 
*tot: | Jnrreniw sit m 

?# .1 gr*r STrrf Jrrfnsrrrr r?r: tf- 



CCXX FIRST EXAM, IN ARTS, 1878-79. 

rrsrr arc r^rr ^rffrwrwr fqr<fr- 

Write a note on ^"^1^ in JTO" ^ JT^T I 

What is the object of 5TW in Chitralekh&'s speech ? 

(&.) aniir*y\ rrir f^rri": 

iHl^fwr ^ HTTrrqflr^- 1 1 

*% sr^rfr vcm? r flrfrfa STf r*ps: 1 



FIRST fiXAM. IN ARTS, 1878-79. 

e a note on the double use of tT in the abov< 
iges. 

Sanskrit prose the following : — 

^^■^qrrfq-irrf otto?;; \ 
srjrflT nmf qtfsnrc 

Explain the allusions in the following : — 10 

(n.) OTfRP=sPT#r to irmmwvwmii \ 
(&.) fa flTfirt^^r a# irfrgw^ l 
(c.) snrfifcr totw nrrf srnt 

Kxplain the words underlined in the following 

passages : — 

*ftfrl 
( A ) zr^rr qmr nr<r to ?wnf *rg£r$r> 

b 713—19* 



CCXXil FIRST EXAM. IN ARTS, 1878-79, 

are : I 
(/.) ffrgf&Tr ^ovrflwrar : ftpr: I 

5. Criticise the manner in which Pururavas reconciles 10 
Auslnari to his making love to Urvas'i. 

6. Translate into Sanskrit :— 30 

Jayadeva was an inhabitant of a village called Kinduvilva, 
where he led an ascetic life and was distinguished for his 
poetical powers, and the fervour of his devotion to Vishnu. 
He at first adopted a life of continence, but was subsequently 
induced to marry. A Brahman had dedicated his daughter 
to Jagannath, but on his way to the shrine of that deity was 
addressed by him, and desired to give the maiden to Jayadeva, 
who was one with himself. The saint, who it should appear 
had no other shelter than the shade of a tree, was very un- 
willing to burthen himself with a bride ; but her father dis- 
regarded his refusal, and, leaving his daughter with him, 
departed. 



FIRST EXAM. IN ARTS, 1878-/9. CCXxii- 

TUESDAY, 9TH APRIL. 
[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 



HEBREW.— Paper I. 

Joseph Ezekiel, Esq. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. (a.) What are the proper adjectives derived from 6 

DT», tr$Q and JM3 ? 
(b.) Shew the difference in the meaning and etymology 

of "«?»5 and "Vgl ' 
(c.) What do you mean by local n • Give an example. 

2. Translate the following passage into English : — 25 
: Kb dm w? \32 ni nnarr •» *|ip£)i>n k3 n£3 3pr S» pn!T io***2 

: ita? nj o;Trn aj»j bip bpn "inNM iranyi V3« prcr bw np£ tfrj 
\33 m hfin -\d^'i : in^yi rnsip rrwt w *ya vr vn ^ i-vprr »fri 

: ^ ^ n^tti S3 nro V2N prcr vVm -wosln : mj?_ £ Sb »a* %jtf* iV 

|« sir yn«rt ^ptiw ora^D ^P o^wj *£ |*3 * n^j ^73 itfM 
^b wt?«Sn ?rnsb tm rnn oisvh *f? jnwa^| tres; *mxp : to^ni 

3. (a.) Correct the error in the last sentence of the above 8 

passage, and state your reason for it* 

(&») Give a brief account of the life of Isaac. 

4. (a.) Dissolve the word! &&% R#$ and kg giving the 6 

significations both of the whole words and of 
their component parts. 

(&.> Explain the titles niyap, tateo and CPWftaJ un( i er 
which some of the psalms are written. 

b 713—19** 



CCXxii-~& FIRST EXAM. IN ARTS, 1878-/9. 

5. (a.) Translate the following sentence into English :— 10 

: rnrnrr ru «npj v$ DDbs «wti nr* by inninn n:st -iy 

(6.) To what conjugation does the word in^nn in the 

above sentence belong ? What is its Piel ? 
What would be the rendering of the sentence 
taking the word in the Piel form, as some think 
• it should be ? 

6. Translate the following psalm into English : — 25 
s\) rn#?s *r?n*p« tw« >)m D'nbw : rrnrr t&toi invrn tvA "rnio 

?jw r&nb *jmn ©ijn p : o;n $i rpn n;s j>a ntoa ?p nps *tfta 

Tpp-rs ^ni ???"£» )3 : itynpfr 'rcip c\TjQ Ti^on ato »a : ^"tin^ 
en : "B bbrr rttoji Ticta »cci raton pani abrr toa s *B3 «te» 
?pK3 to ^ nrnw rrn «3 : ?ja nan« niwa wsj by ^woi 
ttfr ngiBj iter nNircb rrarri Tjrp^ ropn »a ?jnn» nfe? np^T : jrw 
rrate^ -qbrprn : vrr cbrp n;p rjrr »t by CTyr : yn«n niTinna 
: njjti naVr *b "O^ "3 in yatifn ba bbnrv trnbw 

7. (a.) What peculiarity do you find in the word ^3 that 10 

occurs in the second sentence of the above 
psalm ? 

{h) Give the third person, singular masculine imperfect 

of all the conjugations of the verb P?7 

(c.) Give the active and the passive participle of the 

Kal conjugation of the verb ™ 

8. Translate the following phrases into English :— 10 

: Tjb vm nn« rn-ort (a.) 

: DDnx cw« ipo: TpD (J.) 

: ntagfoj jjn CTCfaT n« ( c< ) 

nw; ntea bs *pw nbcn ypto (^.) 

t-tf» nog waii byi ( e .) 



FIRST EXAM. IN ARTS, 1878-79. CCXXii— C 

Tuesday, 9th April. 
[2 p.m. to 5 P.M.] 



HEBREW.— Paper II. 

Joseph Ezekiel, Esq. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks. ] 

J . (a.) Give nouns derived from the verbs rt ^ and cr fl 5> 
with their significations. 

(b. ) What does the affix to signify ? What other affix 
is its equivalent ? How are these affixes used ? 

2. Translate the followipg passage into English : — 15> 
roft nn irraii nob ttangj crtifoa 0*55 pa ^ann- mot) ■?» vsjih 
crooa *fj|« v^ai to** "\xm rn xbn : crtapcs antfrA oj w 

nirr raw n« *r* catkin unm !?« espt ■?« rwfi iDtfi «" 1 ^? 
D3j on¥ nirr s dVis "to lis BEfrf* VOb & Otej caj T&& "hJh 

3. («.) Under what dynasty of Egyptian kings is the 8 

Exodus of the Israelites said to have taken 
place ? 

(b.) Give a short account of the battle of Rephidim, 

(c.) Name the aboriginal tribes of the land of Canaan. 

(d.) What name is given to the Red Sea in Hebrew ? 
How does it receive that name ? 

4. (a.) Give the literal and the idiomatic translation of 10 

the following sentence : — 

: -n tkj pbora nSrr) rrcrra w no to *r <a ig#* 

(b.) Quote the sixth, seventh, eighth, and ninth com- 
mandments in Hebrew. 

5. Translate the following passage into English : — 12 
NHon nVi ?\T\y laftaH vv tih : nya Dipp m w N^nn £no noanm 



ccxxii — cl FIKST EXAM. IN ARTS, 1878-79. 

j twi T3J Drron YDta nrm rfon xb ; smro *jp:p b^ tfVi rvnnn 

■sj^im -i>v sb &g\ nin*n : id $a arraorn rroia'p am njytp *6 

: rr)pn «b linn DTDS uto rrrap rop'tP Kb : tfy?Bo rrcon 

6. (a.) What question is discussed in the chapters of Job 5 

you have read ? 

(b. ) What theory of the form and the position of the 
earth was held by Job ? 

(c. ) Give the Hebrew names of the four cardinal points 
in geography. 

{d.) Give the situations of D"^ )T®, vb, j'ran an a -na 

7. (a. ) Translate the following sentence into English : — 5 

: onjj pehm binrn vtm *sp us ink? 

(b. ) How do the Jewish interpreters render the word 
binp 1 ] in the above sentence ? 

8. Translate the following passages into Hebrew : — 40 

{a. ) And Isaac went out to meditate in the field at the 
eventide : and he lifted up his eyes, and saw ; 
and, behold, the camels were coming. And 
Rebekah lifted up her eyes, and when she saw 
Isaac, she lighted off the camel. For she had 
said unto the servant, What man is this that 
walketh in the field to meet us ? And the 
servant had said, It is my master : therefore she 
took a veil, and covered herself. And the ser- 
vant told Isaac all things that he had done. 

(b.) To the chief musician on Neginoth, a psalm or 
song. God be merciful unto us, and bless us ; 
and cause His face to shine upon us. Selah. 
That Thy way may be known upon earth, Thy 
saving health among all nations. Let the 
people praise Thee, God ; let all the people 
praise Thee. let the nations be glad and 
sing for joy : for Thou shalt judge the people 
righteously, and govern the nations upon 
earth. Selah. Let the people praise Thee, O 
God ; let all the people praise Thee. Then shall 
the earth yield her increase ; and God, even 
our own God, shall bless us. God shall bless us, 
and all the ends of the earth shall fear Him. 



FIRST EXAM. IN ARTS, 1878-79. ccxxiii 

Tuesday, 9th April. 

[10 A.M. to 1 P.M.] 



LATIN-Papbr I. 
Ovid's Fasti, Bh III., and Vergil's Jfineid, Bh II. 
IF. G. Selby, B.A. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks. J 

1. Translate :— 30 

Bacche levis, leviorque tuis quae tempora cingunt 

Frondibus, in lacrimas cognite Bacche meas : 
Ausus es ante oculos adducta pellice nostros 

Tarn bene compositum sollicitare torum. 
Heu ubi pacta fides ? ubi quae iurare solebas ? 

Me miserum, quoties hsec ego verba loquor ! 
Thesea culpabas, fallacemque ipse vocabas : 

Iudicio peccas turpius ipse tuo. 
Ne sciat hoc quisquam, tacitisque doloribus urar : 

Ne toties f alii digna fuisse puter. 
Praecipue cupiam celari Thesea : ne te 

Consortem culpae gaudeat esse suae. 



Nominis in dubio causa est. Capitale vocamus 

Ingenium sollers : ingeniosa dea est. 
An quia de capitis fertur sine matre paterni 

Vertice cum clipeo prosihiisse suo ? 
An quia perdomitis ad nos captiva Faliscis 

Venit ? et hoc ipsum littera prisca docet. 
An quod habet legem, capitis quae pendere posnas 

Ex illo jubeat furta reperta loco ? 
A qua cunque trahis ratione vocabula, Pallas, 

Pro ducibus nostris aegida semper habe. 



2. Explain — Laurentilia, Ramnes, Salii, Esquiliae, Consus, 
Anna Perenna : — 



L'CXxiv FIRST EXAM. IN ARTS, 1878-79. 



3. Translate : — 

Ssepe fugam Danai Troia cupiere relicta 
Moliri, et longo fessi discedere bello. 
Fecissent que utinam ! saepe illos aspera ponti 
Interclusit hiems, et terruit Auster euntes. 
Praecipue, cum jam hie trabibus contextus aeernis 
Staret equus, toto sonuerunt aethere nimbi. 
Suspensi Eurypylum scitatum oracula Phoebi 
Mittimus > is que adytis haec tristia dicta reportat : 
Sanguine placastis ventos, et virgine csesa, 
Cum primum Iliacas Danai venistis ad oras, 
Sanguine quserendi reditus, animaque litandum 
Argolica. 



Dixerat ille, et iam per maenia clarior ignis 
Auditur, propiusque aestus-incendia volvunt. 
Ergo age, care pater, cervici imponere nostras : 
Ipse subibo humeris, nee me labor iste gravabit; 
Quo res canque cadent unum et commune periclum 
Una salus ambobus erit. Mini parvus lulus 
Sit comes et longe serVet vestigia coniux . 
Vos, famuli, quae dicam animis advertite vestris. 
Est urbe egressis tumulus, templumque vetustum 
Desertae Cereris, iuxtaque antiqua cupressus, 
Relligione patrum multos servata per annos 
Hanc ex diverso sedem veniemus in unam. 

4. Translate and explain the construction of— 30 

(i). Nee referam Semelen, ad quam nisi fulmina secum 
Jupiter adferret, parvus inermis eras. 

(ii). Hoc quoque cur ita sit dicere nulla mora est. 

(iii). Caussa, quod est ilia nata Minerva die. 

(iv). Romulus ut saxo lucum circumdedit alto. 

(v). Mamurius, morumfabrce ne exactior artis, 
Difficile est, illud, dicere, clausit opus. 

(vi). Constitit, atque caput niveo velatus amictic 
Iam bene dis notas sustulit ille manus. 

(vii). Fessa resedit hvmi, ventos que accepit aperto 
Pectore, turbatas restituit que comas. 

(viii). Hinc mihi prima mali labes : hinc semper Ulixes 
Criminibus terrere novis : hinc spargere voces 
In vulgum ambiguas, et quazrere conscius arma. 



FIRST EXAM. IN ARTS, 1878-79. CCXXV 

(ix). Accinguni omnes operi, pedibus que rotarum 

Subieiunt lapsus. 
(x). Fuimus Troes,fuit Ilium et ingens 

Gloria Teucrorum. 

(xi). Stat casus renovare omnes, omnem que reverti 
Per Troiam : et rursus caput obiectare periclis 

(xii). Lacrimas dilectse pelle Creusoe. 

5. How do adverbs form their comparative and superlative 5 
in Latin ? 



Tuesday, 9th April. 
[2 p.m. to 5 P M.] 



LATIN— Paper IL 

F. G. Selby, B A. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

Cicero pro Milone and Ccesar de Bello Gallico, Bk. III. 

1. Si id iure fieri non potuit, nihil habeo quod defendant. 20 
Sin hoc et ratio doctis, et necessitas barbaris, et mos gentibus, 

et feris natura ipsa prsescripsit, ut omnem semper vim, qua- 
cunque ope possent, a corpore, a capite, a vita sua propul- 
sarent, non potestis hoc facinus improbum iudicare, quin 
simul iudicetis omnibus, qui in latrones inciderint, aut illorum 
telis aut vestris sententiis esse pereundum. Quod si ita 
putasset, certe optalilius Miloni fait dare iugulum P. Clodio, 
non semel ab illo neque turn primum petitum, quam iugulari 
a vobis, quia se illi non iugulandum tradidisset. Sin hoc 
nemo vestrum ita sentit, non illud iam in iudicium venit, 
occisus ne sit, quod fatemur, sed iure an iniuria, quod multis 
in causis iam saepe qusesitum est. 

Explain the moods of the verbs italicised, and give rules 
for the use of ut with different moods. 

2. In what senses does Cicero use the following words : — 5 

Prasire, variare, Salutaris litera, Derivare, Postulare, An- 
testari, Sacramenta, Exterminari. 

3. Translate :— 20 
Atque in ea re omnium nostrorum intentis animis alia ex 

parte oppidi Adiatunnus, qui summam imperii tenebat, cum 
dc devotis, quos illi soldurios appellant, quorum haec est 



CCXXvi FIRST EXAM. IN ARTS, 1878-79. 



condicio, uti omnibus in vita commodis una cum iis fruantur, 
quorum se amicitiae dediderint, si quid his per vim accidat, 
aut eundem casum una ferant aut sibi mortem consciscant : 
neque adhuc hominum memoria repertus est quisquam qui eo 
interfeeto, cuius se amicitiae devovisset, mori recusaret : cum 
his -Adiatunnuseruptionem facere conatus, clamore ab ea parte 
munitionis sublato, cum ad arma milites concurrissent vehe- 
menterque ibi pugnatum esset, repulsus in oppidum tamen, 
uti eadem deditionis conditione uteretur, a Crasso impetravit. 

4. Explain — Sub corona vendere, novis rebus studere, 
eertior fieri, vineas agere, res frumentaria, primi pili centurio, 
porta decumana. 

5. Translate into Latin : — 

Titus, after entering the ruins of the City, and admiring the 
impregnable strength of the towers, declared that he indeed 
was the leader of the army, but God was the author of the 
victory. He commanded his soldiers, wearied with slaughter, 
to cease from carnage, except where any still chanced to resist : 
that the leaders, concealed in the subterranean passages, 
should be sought after : that the youths, distinguished by 
their beauty and stature, should be reserved for his triumph : 
the more advanced in years be sent into Egypt to the mines. 
A vast number also were selected to perish in the theatres by 
the sword and wild beasts : all under seventeen were sold by 
auction. 



Tuesday, 9th April. 
[10 a.m to 1 P.M.] 



PERSIAN-Paper I. 

E. Rehatsek, M.C.E. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

JSnahnamah, from the death of Eraj till the birth of Rustun 
Gulistan, Book III. 



3. 


Translate into English 


:— 






jb L->\j4+J 




J| ° u^t 




Jljc> &£> J< 


^ j&\ 


<*&»o3l iS 



FIRST EXAM. IN ARTS, 1878-79. CCXXVli 

^Ijl d 1 ^ 1 L?jtf ^Jj 

^k^j ^t j obi c^vsji Jl 
c^jj <^~* ^ft^ ^jj 

d J** Oob db U Jj d^jt 

Substitute pure Persian words for «J ^ J 3 

phrasea :!! ^ ^^ ° f the folI °™S *<»** and 14 



ccxxviii FIRST EXAM. IN ARTS, 1878-79- 

4. Mention the name of Menutcheher's father, and also 10 
the names of his mother's father and mother. 

5. Translate into English : — 15 

<C*^| jl syut; 5t>lii3 .0 ^«Vc>5 ^^J lo! 

6. What do you know about Abu Harira and the Cow- 10 
panioDs of the cave ? 

7. Scan the distich : — 

**j\ yj£ \J& f+ t}*> 

s 00 ^1-So I jj Oj t jjSj U^ <o 

8. Give ten compound adjectives, each consisting of a 20 
noun and a participle ; and ten, each consisting of two nouns, 
The former on the model of dil-azdr, and the latter according 

to shir-dil. 



FIRST EXAM. IN ARTS, 1878-79. CCXxix 

Tuesday, 9th April. 
[2 p.m. to 5 p.m. ] 



PERSIAN— Paper II. 

E. Rehatsek, M.C.E. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

Divani-Hafiz, Odes I, to XXX. j Anvari-Suhaili, Book I. and II. 

1. Translate into English :— jrj 

^j! <*l> Oy ULJJAJ j ^jjU* (_fj 

B* J J* j c^ij ^JU ^^ y> Ju > ^b 

2. Translate into English :— 35 



h\f uljl ^v; *>^ a- Cj^J'cr** 

b 713-20 ' 



CCXXX FIRST EXAM. IN ARTS, 1878-79. 

r' *** 

^l^j J.^t>j| o*j^ # oJ! 80%fi J^o eJ^I 
^ J l*>*$> tif** f*j» £ o&k ^° \J*) $ 

j>4 fOy> ^jpj &jb& ^ J^° \j y&\ 

jjb^o jkjo ejUjc> ^bj jjc> j ^jj 
^l&l U^jA y v&o o^lj <*>Li| cz^J 

Ji4>) (jl*^ t>U^c! 

3, Give both the Persian and the Arabic plurals of yj*3 10 

4. Translate into Persian : — 4<X 

The various histories of India that have been published 
have been written with various objects. The volumes of 
Mill, a3 might be expected from any man of his talents, 
are full of valuable materials, and, in spite of the disadvan- 
tage of being devoted to a particular system, evince an extra- 
ordinary union of acuteness, industry, and ingenuity. But 
his narrative of early events is brief, and hurried over with 
rapidity. The later productions of different able writers, 
however useful, and however well adapted to their object as 
popular compilations, have added little to the amount of what 



FIRST EXAM. IN ARTS, 1878-79. CCXXXi 

was previously known. The History of India by the Honour- 
able Mountstuart Elphinstone is indeed a work of a very 
different and much higher class. The rapid sketch of the 
early and Hindu state of India, contained in the first volume, 
exhibits such a concentration of a vast mass of reading and 
observation into a small compass, enriched by a perfect 
personal knowledge of the present state of the country, its 
inhabitants, and their habits of thought, as is hardly to be 
equalled in the whole range of literature. 



Wednesday, 10th .April,, 
[10 a.m. to 1 P.M.] 

ALGEBRA. 

T. Cooke, M.A., M.L, LL.D.; 
The Rev. C. F. H. Johnston, M.A. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 
1. Obtain the numerical value of — 

«3 + &3 + c 3 „ 3 a J )Cf 

when a = \, b = I, c = f. 

% Reduce to its lowest dimensions the fraction — 
3a7 — 7ic 3 + 4 









4x 7 - 


-7a 


4 + 3' 








Solve 


the 


equations — 












(a). 


X 


+ 3 
3 


x + 4 
4 


+ 


1 

x— 12 


- 


X 


+ 1 

12 


03)- 


6» 

X 


_0» + 

— a 


c 2 — 

x — 


a" 
b 


x — 


IP 

c 




0. 



(y). {x — 2) Vx* — 2x + 9 » (x + 2) (3 — x). 

4. The value of two sets of diamonds is such, that if a 
thousand rupees be added to the price of the first, it will be 
double that of the second ; but if a thousand rupees be 
added to the price of the second, it will be two-thirds that 
of the first. Find the price of each set. 

5. A stands in a line with 12 equidistant balls, and B 
leaving A, picks up the balls in succession, returning with 
each to A, and when he has given him the last, finds that he 



16 



CCXXXii FIRST EXAM. IN ARTS, 1878-79. 

has walked exactly three-fourths of a mile. Had A and the 
balls all been equidistant, and the last ball been just as far 
from A as before, B would have had to walk 176 yards less. 
Find the distance of the balls from one another. 

6. Give y + z + u = ax 6 

z + u + x = by 

u + x + y = cz 

x + y + z = du 

. , . , 1 . 1 , 1 1 

prove that 1 = = + = — ; — -, + + ; 

1 1 + a 1 + b 1 + c 1 + d' 

7. If a, 6, c, d are in continued proportion, then 5 

a : d '.: a 3 : & 3 . 
Ham: bf ::c n : dgi: eo : fm, prove that 
amdg : bcnf:: eob : am 2 . 

8. In a geometrical progression show that 10 

a (r» — 1) 

s = — i r- 

r — 1 

Find the value of the recurring decimal -428571. 

9. If a, b f c are in geometrical progression, and a + x, 7 
6 + x, c + x, in harmonical progression, find the value of x. 

10. Given that the number of permutations of n things 9 
taken r at a time is— 

n{n- 1)(%— 2) [n~r + 1) 

show that the number of combinations of n things taken r at 
a time is — 

I n 



| r \ n — r 

Hence deduce the value of J_9« 

11. Apply the Binomial Theorem to find the cube VI 
root of 9 to five places of decimals. 

12. Prove that— 10 

log2=7Iog^ + 51og | + Slog |. 



FIRST EXAM. IN ARTS, 1878-79. CCXXXlil 

Wednesday, 10th April. 
[2 p.m. to 5 P.M.] 



EUCLID AND TRIGONOMETRY . 

T. Cooke, M.A., M.I„ LL.D.; 
The Rev, C. F. H. Johnston, M,A. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. The opposite angles of any quadrilateral figure in- 6 
eribed in a circle are together equal to two right angles. 

2. Similar triangles are to one another in the duplicate 7 
ratio of their homologous sides. 

3. The straight lines drawn from the angles of a triangle 8 
o the points of bisection of the opposite sides meet at the 

same point. 

4. A B, A C, A D are three fixed straight lines in one 8 
plane drawn from the same point ; it is required tp draw a 
straight line meeting them all, which shall be divided by 
them into two equal portions. 

5. In a right-angled triangle B A C, A being the right 5 
angle, A D is drawn to D the middle point of B C ; show that 

B C = 2 A D. 

6. Through a vertex of an equilateral triangle a circle is € 
described touching the opposite side at its middle point ; 
show that it cuts off from the remaining sides one-fourth of 
their length. 

7. Trace the sign of (sin 6 + cos 6) while 6 changes from 6 
to 2 jr. 

8. Define circular measure, and find the angle in degrees, 7 
minutes, and seconds, of which the circular measure is '256. 

9. Express cos 6 in terms of cosec 0, and if versin 6= ,}, 8 
calculate tan 6. 

10. Reduce !^L~1_J^ — to a single Trigonometrical 12 

cos 6 + cos 3 B 

si n(fl4-<ft) sin(#- ) 
function, and prove that tan 2 6 — tan 8 = cos 2 # - eos^d) 

b 713—20* 



CCXXxiv FIRST EXAM. IN ARTS, 1878-79. 

11. Deduce expressions for the sines of the angles of a 12 
triangle in terms of its sides. 

12. Given the area, perimeter, and an angle of a triangle ; 15 
solve the triangle. 



Thursday, 11th April. 
[10 a.m. to 1 P.M.] 



LOGIC. 
The Rev. R. RIVE, S.J. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. What is the difference between the analytical outline f? 
and synthetical compendium of Logic as given by Whateley ? 

Is Fowler's omission of the former a defect or not ? Give 
reasons. 

2. Why is in the division of Propositions the quantity 1 
of the predicate usually not taken into account ? State the 
extensive and intensive capacity of the predicate in an A, E, 

I and O proposition. 

3. Why are some terms incapable of Definition ? Define : • 12 
consul, municipality, human soul, lunar eclipse, horse ; to 
which of the six classes of Definition given by Fowler do 
your definitions belong ? 

4. a. — Convert the following propositions : — 16 

All the counties of England are forty in number. 
What I have written, I have written. 
Few who were present were in the secret. 
It would be disgraceful to oppress the poor. 
All his acts are not defensible. 
Before the discovery of Columbus there were 
only pagans in America. 

b. — If the six foregoing propositions be true, what true or 
false propositions may be inferred from them by the laws of 
Opposition ? 

5. .If either of the premises be negative or particular, the 8 
conclusion must be negative or particular ; derive these rules 
from the definition of a syllogism. 

6. Construct a syllogism in Bramantip to prove that 8 
slavery degrades the nobility of human nature, and reduce it 

to the first figure. 



FIRST EXAM, IN ARTS, 1878-79. CCXXXV 

- 7. Why can the Sorites have but one p rtioular and one 6 
negative premise ? 

8. a.— What kind of fallacies are contained in the follow- 13 
ing :— 

By printing, seditious doctrines are rapidly spread « 
therefore printing should be prohibited. 

I failed indeed in the examination, but the papers 
were not fair. 

Mr. N. N., an old gentleman, must be talkative, as 
old men are subject to this fault. 

b.— Why is it owing to Irrelevancy that disputants seldom 
agree, and that guilty persons are sometimes acquitted before 
a jury? 

9. State in logical form the following arguments, giving IS 
mood and figure : — 

a. — Let us change hands, tor the box is heavy. 

b. — The monsoon will soon set in, because^ the wind blows 

from the south-west. 
c. — Seven and eight, as well as nine and six, make fifteen ; 

hence they are equal. 

d. — I am afraid that the greatest part of Dryden's life 
was passed in exigencies. For such outcries against 
poverty were surely never uttered but in severe 
pain. Of his supplies or his expenses no probable 
estimate can now be made. Except the salary of 
the laureat, his whole revenue seems to have been 
casual ; and it is well known that he seldom lives 
frugally who lives by chance. Hope is always libe - 
ral ; and they that trust her promises make little 
scruple of revelling to-day on the profits of the mor- 
row. 



CXXXV1 FIRST EXAM. IN ARTS. 1878-79, 

Thursday, 11th April. 
[2 p,m. to 5 p.m.] 



HISTORY. 



S. Newcome Fox, B.A. 

[Dates to be given throughout. The figures to the right indicate 
full marks.'] 

The Punic Wars. 

1. Draw a map showing the position of the following places, 10 
and state briefly what part they played during the Punic 
Wars :— 

Panormus ; Lilybseum ; Leontini ; Agrigentum. 

2. Trace the events that led to the second war between 10 
Rome and Carthage. 

3. Where was the first important engagement between 10 
Hannibal and the Romans ? Give details of the battle and of 

ts locality. 

4. What was the conduct of Capua Nola and Nuceria, 10 
respectively, after the battle of Cannae ? 

5. Give a sketch of the campaign in the year B.C. 209. 10 
What was the attitude of the Latin colonies at that period ? 

(Instead of any one of the foregoing). 

6. Write short lives of two of the following persons : — 10 
P. Cornelius Scipio; Massinissa; Q, Fabius Maximus; P. 
Scipio iEmilianus. 



The reign of Charles V. 

1. What were the circumstances that led to the Treaty 10 
of Noyon ? Give the terms of that Treaty. 

2. Write a brief account of the origin of the Holy Junta, 10 
with a sketch of the proceedings of that confederacy in the 
year 1522. 

3. Describe shortly the campaign that terminated in the 10 
capture of Rome by the army of Bourbon. 



FIRST EXAM- IN ARTS, 1878-79. CCXXXVli 

4. What was the result, of the Diet of Augsburg in 1530 ? 10 
« ontrast Charles the Fifth's attitude on that occasion with his 
conduct at the Diet held at Ratisbon in 1531. 

5. Give an outline of the war that ended in the Treaty of 10 
Passau, and examine the effect of that Treaty. 

(Instead of any one of the foregoing) . 

6. Cambray ; Tunis; Aigues-Mortes ; Crespy. Mention 10 
briefly for what events, during the period of history under 

view, the above places are memorable. 



Friday, 12th April. 
[10 a.m. to 1 p.m] 

ANALYTICAL GEOMETRY, &c. 

T. Cooke, M.A., M.I., LL.D. ; 
The Rev. C. F.H. Johnston, M.A. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks. ] 

1. Express the area of a triangle in terms of the co- 6 
ordinates of its angular points- 

2. Show that any equation of the first degree with two 7 
variables represents a straight line. 

3. Find the equation to a straight line which bisects the 10 
angle between the lines 5y — 2x = and Zy + 4x = 12. 

4. Find the equation to <a straight line which passes 9 
through a given point and is perpendicular to a given straight 
line. 

5. Find the length of the perpendicular from the point 10 
x = 3, y — 5 on the line 1x — 3y = 9. 

6. The following equation represents two lines at right 12 
angles to each other — 

2y 2 - 3xy - 2z 2 — y + 2x = 0. 

7. Show how the origin of co-ordinates may be changed 10 
without changing the direction of the axes, the axes being 
rectangular or oblique. 



CCXXXViii FIEST EXAM. IN ARTS, 1878-79. 

8. Find the equation to the circle referred to rectangular 10 
co-ordinates, the origin being on the circumference, and the 
diameter which passes through the origin being taken for the 
axis of x. 

9. Define "chord of contact" — 1J 

Tangents are drawn to a circle from a given external 
point ; to find the equation to the chord of contact. 

10. Find the points of intersection of the circle y" + x 15 
= 25 with the lines y + x= — l } y-\-x=z — 5 and 3y +- 4x 

- -25. . 



Friday, 12th April. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 



BUTLER'S SERMONS. 
The Rev. R. RIVE, S.J. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks]. 

1. Give the Epicurean system of Ethics as explained by 8 
Butler. 

2. " Every work, both of nature and of art, is a system ;" 12 
" every particular thing, both natural and artificial, is for 
some use or purpose out of, and beyond itself. " How is this 
truth established ? Would the denial of it affect Butler's 
argumentation in the third Sermon ? 

3. " Man is a social being. " 18 

a. — State what is meant by society, 

b. — Adduce one or two proofs,' that man is made for such 
a society. 

c. — Refute the objection : Society places man under re- 
straints and curtails his liberty ; hence it is not 
natural to man to be a social being. 

4. Distinguish between speculative and moral truths ; 10 
both kinds admit cf convincing proofs, but the latter truths 
are liable to greater mistakes ; why so ? 

5. In refuting Hobbes' account of benevolence, how does 12 
Butler come to conclude, that cruelty would be benevolence ? 
"Why must this cruelty be distinct from envy and resent- 
ment ? 



FIRST EXAM. IN ARTS, 1878-79. CCXXxix 

6. What is Butler's idea of conscience ? Can this idea 10 
be reconciled with the assertion that conscience may be 
erroneous ? 

7- Prove the natural supremacy of conscience by that 12 
argument which you think to be the most convincing. 

8. What general rule does Butler recommend, by which 9 
men could distinguish good and bad actions ? In which way 
does superstition make men deviate from this rule ? 

9. Why would men, ignorant of, or disbelieving any ex- 9 
tramundane authority to punish the violation of law as ex- 
pressed in human nature, be really liable to punishment ? 
Which error is refuted by thi3 argument ? 



Friday, 12th April. 
[10 a.m. to 1 P.M.] 



CHEMICAL PHYSICS 

W. Gray, M.B. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. What do you mean by the polarity of a magnet ? 12 

2. A piece of dry, white cotton cloth is opaque when held 14 
between the eye and a light ; wet it, and it becomes semi- 
transparent. Explain this. 

3. A gallon of air, that is 277*25 cubic inches, is heated 12 
under constant pressure from 0°C. to 60°C. : calculate the 
volume of the air at the latter temperature. 

4. Describe the Leyden jar, and the mode of charging and 12 
discharging it. 

5. What is meant by a volatile liquid ? If you drop a 12 
volatile liquid, slightly warmed, on your hand, you feel your 
hand intensely chilled ; what is the cause of this ? 

6. Find the degrees in Centigrade which correspond to 12 
4- 113° F, to + 14° F, and to — 31° F. 

7. What do you understand by chemical combination 14 
and chemical decomposition? Illustrate your answer by 
reference to the formation and decomposition of water. 

8. A rod of platinum may be held in the hand while 12 
one end is red-hot ; but a rod of copper of the same length 
will, under such circumstances, speedily burn the fingers. 
Explain this.