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■ ^ ...li.f; 






THE 



BOMBAY ^ 
UNWERSITY CALENDAR 



FOP*THE YEIE 



lbb4-8rj* 




BOMBAY: 
THACKER & Co. 

186i'. 



/ ^ 



THE 



BOMBAY 
U \ I \ ERSITY a^^LENDAR 



FOR THE VEAli 



1884-85. 




BOMBAY: 

THACKER & Co. 
1884. 



^H1'>^■ 



CONTENTS. 



PAGE 

|_ AxMAKAC, April 1, 1884, to April 30, ISSD . i 

II Schedule op Examinatioits foe 1884-85 . , 14^ 
1 1 1 Notification s ;— 

List of Books for 1884 and for a cycle 
of five years (1885-1889) : 

I. English. Previous Examination ... ... ]5 

First B. A. Examination ... ... 16 

Second B. A. Examination ... 17 

M.A. Examination ... ... 17 

II. Sanshrit. Prenous Examination ... ... 18 

First B.A. Examination... ... 19 

Second B.A. Examination ... 20 

M.A. Examination 20 

III. GreeJc. Previous Examination ... ... 21 

First B.A. Examination ... ... 22 

Second B.A. Examination ... 22 

IV. Latin. Previous Examination ... ... 23 

First B.A. Examination ... ... 23 

Second B.A. Examination ... 24 

M.A. Examination 25 

V. Hebreiv. Previous Examination ... ... 25 

First B.A. Examination 26 

Second B.A. Examination ... 26 

M.A. Examination „, «« 27 
B 1030— « 



IV CONTENTS. 

PAGE 

VI. Arabic. Previous Examination 

First B.A, Examination... 
Second B.A. Examination 
M.A. Examination 
VII. Persian. Previous Examination 

First B.A, Examination ... 
Second B.A. Examination 
M.A. Examination 

Periods of History : 

Previous Examination ... 
M.A. Examination 

Books recommended in Law: 

LL.B. Examination 

Honours in Law Examination ... 

Academic Costume 

lY^ Act? ;:--• 
Act XXII. of 1857, incorporating tlie University... 
Act XLVII. of 1860 for conferring additional 

Degrees ... 
Act I of 1884 for conferring Honorary Degrees ... 

I. Senate 

II. Faculties 

Ill, Syndicate ... 

iV. Board of Accounts 

V. Registrar ... 
VI. Meetings of the Senate ... 
VII. Order of Business... 
VIII. Rules of Debate 



COITTENTS. 



PAGE 

IX. Elections 65 

Endowments ... ... ••• ••• 65 

University Terms ... ... ... ... 65 

VI. ::J£.Atios3:«« 

I. Arts:— 

Matriculation ... ... ... ... 67 

The Previons Examination ... ... ''^' 

First Examination for the Degree of 

Bachelor of Arts ... ... ... • ... 71 

Second Examination for the Degree of 

Bachelor of Arts ... ... ... ... 73 

First Examination for the Degree of 

Bachelor of Science ... ... ... 77 

Second Examination for the Degree of 

Bachelor of Science ... ... •■• c3 

Master of Arts ... ... ... ... ''4 

II. La^:— 

Bachelor of Laws ... ... ... ..- 96 

Honours ... ... ... ... ... 97 

III. Mediciae : — 

First Examination in Medicine ... ... 9S 

Exam.ination for the Degree of L.M. & S. 100 

Doctor of Medicine... ... ... ... 102 

lY, Civil Engineering : — 

First Examination in Civil Engineer- 
ing lOJ; 

Examination for the Degree of L.C.E. ... 107 

Master of Civil Engineering ... ... 114 

Genei*al ... ... ... ... ... ... 114 



VI CONTENTS. 

PAGE 

VII. FoRiis:— ^ 

I. Arts ... ., 115 

IL Law 127 

III. Medicine 129 

IV. Civil Engineering ... ... ... ••• 137 

The Mnnguldass Nathoobhoy Travelling 

FeUowship 142 

The Bhngwandass Purshotumdass Sanskrit 

Scholarship 143 

The Jam Shri Vibhaji Scholarship ... ... 143 

The Hebbertand LaTouche Scholarship ... 144 

The Rao Sir Pragmalji Scholarships 144 

The Kahandas Mancharam Scholarship ... 144 

VIII, ESBQWMESTS:— 

I, The Munguldass Uathoobhoy Travelling 

Fellowship ... 145 

II. The Manockjee Limjee Gold Medal ... 146 

III. The Bhngwandass Purshotumdass Sanskrit 

Scholarship 149 

IV. The Homejee Cursetjee Dady Prize ... 151 

V. The Jugonnath Sunkersett Sanskrit Scho-. 

larships ... ... ... ... ... 153 

VI. The Jam Shri Vibhaji Scholarship ... 155 

VII. The Cowasjee Jehanghier Latin Scholar- 
ship ... ... ... ... ... 157 

VIII. The Kinloch Forbes Gold Medal 159 

IX. The David Bassoon Hebrew Scholarship ... 160 

X. The James Berkley Gold Medal 162 

XL The Ellis Prize 163 

XII. The Hebbert and LaTouche Scholarship ... 165 

XIII. The Wilson Philological Lectureship ... 166 



CONTENTS. Vn 

PAGE 

XIV. The Ellis Scholarship 168 

XV. The Chancellor's Medal 169 

XVI. The Arnould Scholarship 170 

XVIL The Duke of Edinburgh Fellowship ... 171 
XVIII. The Bai Maneckbai Byramjee Jeejee- 

bhoy Prize ... ... ... ... 173 

XIX. The Eao Sir Pragmalji Scholarships .. 173 
XX. The Sir Jasrantsingji Scholarships ... 175 

XXI. The Karsandas Mulji Prize 177 

XXII. The Dossabhoj Hormusjee Cama Prize. 179 

XXIII. The Hnghlings Prize 180 

XXIV. The James Taylor Prize 181 

XXV. The Bhau Daji Prize 182 

XXVI. The Venayeki-ao Jugonnathji Sankersett 

Prize ... ... ... ... ••• 183 

XXVII. The MerwanjeeFramjeePanday Scholar- 
ship ... ... ... ... ... 184 

XXVIII. The Kahandas Mancharam Scholarship. 185 

XXIX. The Dhirajlal Mathuradas Scholarship. 187 

XXX. The Sinclair Prize 188 

XXXI. The Gibbs Prize 188 

XXXII. The Narayan Vasudev Scholarship ... 189 

XXXIII. The Cobden Club Medal 191 

XXXIV. The Sir George LeGrand Jacob Scholar- 

ship 191 

XXXV. The Sir George LeGrand Jacob Prize . 192 

XXXVI. The Jairazbhoy Peerbhoy Scholarship . 194 

XXXVII. The Varjivandas Madhavdas Sanskrit 

Scholarship ... ... ... ... 195 

XXXVIII. The Jamshedji Dorabji Naegaumyala 

Prize 196 

B 1030— a* 



nil 



CONTENTS. 



PAGE 

XXXIX. The Melvill Memorial Scholarship ... 197 

XL. The Sir Frank Souter Scholarships ... 199 

XLI. The Charles Morehead Prize 201 

I. The Sir Cowasjee Jehanghier Hall of the 

University of Bombay... ... ... 202 

II, University Arms and Common Seal ... 204 

III. University Library ... ... ... 204 

IV. The Rajabai Tower 205 

V. University Mace 206 

X. Tee UiiWESSlTf ;—• 

Senate 207 

Deans 207 

Syndicate 222 

Board of Accounts ... ... ... ... 222 

Registrar 222 

Assistant Registrar and Librarian ... ... 222 

Succession Lists : — 

Chancellors ... ... ... ... ... 223 

Vice-Chancellors 223 

Deans : — 

L Deans in Arts 223 

IL „ Law 224 

in. „ Medicine 224 

IV. „ Civil Engineering ... ... 225 

Registrars ... ... ... ... ... 225 

Deceased and retired Fellows ... ... ... 226 

Graduates, M. A. 234 

„ B.A 238 

B.Sc 277 



CONTEXTS. 1^ 

PAGE 

Graduates, LL.B 277 

M.D 281 

L.M 282 

L.M.&S 285 

L.C.E 289 

Undergraduates and others who have passed the 

First Examination for the Degree of B.A. 294 
Ditto First Examination of B.Sc. ...297 

Ditto First Examination in Arts ... 297 

Ditto Previous Examination ... ... 304 

Ditto First Examination in Medicine . . . 310 
Ditto First Examination in Civil 

Engineering ... ... ... ... 314 

Matriculation Examination, 1883 ... ... 319 

XI. RECOGirmoii tm> Eecogsized Ibstttctious ^— 

Recognition ... ... ... ••• 334 

I. Elphinstone College 335 

XL Deccan College ... ... ... ... 345 

III, Free General Assembly's Institution, 

Bombay ..." ... ... ... 352 

IV. Bombay St. Xavier's College 355 

y. Gujarat College... ... ... ... 358 

VI. Rajaram College ,. ...361 

VII. Baroda College 364 

VIII, Government Law School ... ... 367 

IX. Grant Medical College 372 

X. Poona College of Science ... ... 381 

XII. ■' --iT— "T ■::■ A-:::-:-3 :•? ErxTr:-:r!r3 
Endowments 38S 



X CONTENTS. 

PAGE 

Benefactions ... ... ... ... ••• 390 

Results of Examinations of the University of 

Bombay for the year 1 883-84 ... ... 392 

XIII. CommkfiQ^ EOE coETESsrisQ Desseies^ 1833»&^. 

Convocation Report ... ... ■•• 893 

Examination Papees, 1883-84: — 

Directions to Candidates ... ... n 

I. Matriculation Examination ... iii 

II. Previous Examination ... ... xlvi 

III. First Examination for the Degree of 

Bachelor of Arts ... ... Ixix 

IV. Second Examination for the Degree 

of B.A. and B.A. Examination (Old 
System) ... ... ... cvii 

V. First Examination for the Degree 

of Bachelor of Science ... clxix 

VI. Second Examination for the Degree 

of Bachelor of Science ... clxxvi 

VII. Examination for the Degree of M.A. clxxxii 

VIII. Examination for the Degree of 

LL.B. ... ... ... ccxviii 

IX. Examination for Honours in Law... ccxxviii 

X. First Examination in Medicine ... ccxxxvi 

XI. Examination for the Degree of 

L.M. &S.... ... ... ccxli 

XII. Fii'st Examina tion in Civil Engineer- 
ing ... ... ... ccxlv 

XIII. Examination for the Degree of 

L.C.E. ... ... ... cclvii 



ABBREVIATIONS. 



A. Ahmedibdd High School. 
Ah. Ahmednagar High School. 

Ah. M-S. Ahmednagar Mission High School. 

Ah. m. Ahmeddbad Irish Presbyterian Mission High School. 

Alf. B. Alfred High School, Bhiij. 

Am. Amraoti High School, 

B. H. Bombay High School 

B.K. Bah^durkh^nji High School, Jundgad. 

B.C. Baroda CoUege. 

B.S. Baroda High School. 

B-M. Belgaum London Mission School. 

B. Belgaum SirdArs' High School. 
Bh- BhAvnagar High School. 
B.H. Bombay High School. 

Bis. Bishop's High School, Poona. 

B.Pro. Bombay Proprietary School. 

Br. Broach High School 

B.T. BjTamjee Jeejeebhoy High School, Thani. 

Ch. Chandanvddi High School, Bombay. 

C.S. Cathedral High School, Bombay. 

C.Sc. CoUege of Science, Poona. 

D. Deccan College. 

Dh. Dhdrvdd High School. 

Dhn. DhuUA High School. 

E. Elphinstone College. 
E.S. Elphinstone High School. 

A.V.M. Anglo-Vernacular School, Mirai. 

F. Fort High School. 

F.G. A. Free General Assembly's Institution, Bombay, 

S J ' I ^^® Church Mission School, Jalna. 

P .C. Fort Convent School. 

G-A. General Assembly's Institution, Bombay. 

L. Government Law School. 

Gr. Grant Medical College. 

G.C. Gujarat College, Ahmeddbad. 

G-K. Grammar School, Kardchi, 

H. Haidardbad High School. 

J. C. John Connon High School. 

K. Karwdr High School. 

K.II. Kardchi Mission High School. 

Kat. Kdthiawdr High School. 



ABBREVUTIONS. 

IT- Miraj English School. 

N.J. NarAyan Jaganndth High School, Karachi. 

N- Nariiid High School. 

N.S. Ndsik High School. 

N.W. Nawdnagar High School. 

N.E. New English School, Poona. 

N.E.B. New English School, Belgaum. 

N.ED. New English School, Dhdrvdd. 

P.E. Poona Civil Engineering College. 

p. M. Poona Free Church Mission Institelrioii. 

p. Poona High School. 

P.T. Private Tuition. 

R. Edjdram High School, Kolhdpur. 

E-C. Rajdrdm College. 

Rat. Ratndgiri High School. 

R.ll. Eobert Money Institution, Bombay. 

S. Sdtdra High School. 

S av. Savantvddi English School . 

S-E. Sdngli English School. 

Sc Scottish High School, Byculla. 

Sh. Shikarpur High School. 

Sho . A. Sholdpur Anglo- Vernacular English School. 

Sho. Sholapur High School. 

Sir C- Sir Cowasjee Jehdnghier Navsdri Zarthosti Madresd. 

Sir J- Sir Jamsetjee Jeejeebhoy Pdrsi Benevolent Institu- 
tion. 

St- J- St. John Anglo-Portuguese School, Mdhi'm. 

St-M. St. Mary's Institution, Bombay. 

St.M.P. St. Mary's School, Poona. 

St- MS- St. Mary's Seminary, Madras. 

St. p. St. Peter's School, Mazagon. 

St. P.G. St. Peter's Girls' School, Mazagon. 

six. St. Xa\ner's College. 

Su. . Surat High School. 

Sll- M- Surat Mission High School. 



I. 



L . 



APRIL 1, 1884, TO APRIL 30, 1885. 



BOMBAY UWIVEESITT ALMANAC. 



APRIL, 1384, 


1 


Tues. 




2 


Wed. 




3 


Thurs. 




4 


Fri. 




5 


Sat. 




6 


^•llll- 




7 


_Mon. 




8 


Tues. 




9 


Wed. 


Quarterly Meeting of the Board of Accounts 


10 


Thurs. 


at 4| P.M. 


11 


Fri. 




12 
13 


Sat. 




mn. 




14 


Mon. 




15 


Tues. 




16 


Wed. 




17 


Thurs. 




18 


Fri. 




19 


Sat. 




20 
21 


Mon. 


^itfit ^tm in gtrtis & €>UJil ©ttgiuiiricf 


22 


Tues. 


fttil/s. 


23 


Wed. 




24 


Thurs. 




25 


Fri. 




26 


Sat. 




27 


^lU' 




28 


Mon. 




29 
30 


Tues. 
Wed. 


i,it^\ JBsm Ifi ^jajaiciiK wife. 



BOMBAY UNIVERSnT ALMANAC. 



MAY, 1854. 


1 


Thurs. 




2 


Fri. 




3 
4 


Sat. 




^"n 




5 


Mon. 




6 


Tues. 




7 


Wed. 




8 


Thurs. 




9 


Fri. 




10 


Sat. 




11 


^U5. 




12 


Mon. 




13 


Tues. 




14 


Wed. 




15 


Thurs. 




16 


Fri. 




17 


Sat. 




18 


3nu- 




19 


Mon. 




20 


Tues. 




21 


Wed. 




22 


Thurs. 




23 


Fri. 




24 


Sat. 


^mtn ^irtorta bom, 1819. 


25 


Sua 




26 


Mon . 




27 


Tues. 




28 


Wed. 




29 iThurs. 




30 


Fri. 




31 


Sat. 





B 1030—1 BU 



BOMBAY UNIVERSITY ALMANAC. 



JUNE, 1884. 



Mon. 
Tues. 
Wed. 
Thurs. 

Fri. 

Sat. 



^mn& ^tm is ^trt^ and Cii- C^.bcgic? 



^ttan& S^erm is ^t&itin$ it^'m. 



(^tun ^nUm'd ze(t$$ia% 1837, 



Mon. 



Last day of sending in Essaj-s for the Homejee Curset jee Dady 
Prize, and notifying new subject. 



Monthly Meeting of the Syndicate at 5j p.m, 



BOMBAY CNIYERSrrr ALMANAC. 



JULY, 1684. 



1 


Tues. 


2 


Wed. 


3 1 


Thurs. 


4i 


Fri. 


5 


Sat. 


6 

7 


Mon. 


8 


Tues. 


9 


Wed. 


10 


Thurs. 


11 


Fri. 


12 


Sat. 


13 
14 


Mon. 


15 


Tues. 


16 


Wed. 


17 


Tturs. 


18 


Fri. 


19 


Sat. 


20 
21 


Mon. 


22 


Tues. 


23 


Wed. 


24 


Thurs. 


25 


Fri. 


26 


Sat. 


27 


! ^aa 


28 


Mon. 


29 


' Tues. 


' 30 


Wed. 


31 


Thurs. 



Quarterly Meeting of the Board of Accounts 
at 4| p.jL 



Last day of Applicaiion for F.M. Examination 



UXIVEESITY OF BoMBAY INCOKPCEATED, 1857- 



Monthly Meetiug of the Syndicate at 5j p.m, 



Laft day of sending in Essa^-s for the Karsandas 3Ialji Prize, 
the Dossabhoy Hormusjee Cama Prize, and the Sir George 
LeGrand Jacob Prize ; and for notifying new subjects. 



BOMBAY UNIVERSITY ALMANAC. 



AUGUST, 1884 


1 Fri. 1 




2 


Sat. 




3 

4 


3nn 
Mon. 




5 


Tues. 




6 


Wed. 




7 


Thurs. 




8 


Fri. 




9 
10 


Sat. 




,Sun, 




11 


Mon. 




12 


Tues. 




13 


Wed. 




14 


Thurs. 




15 


Fri. 




16 


Sat. 




17 


Sua, 




18 
19 


Mon. 
Tues. 


Last day of Applieaiion for M. A, Examination. 


20 


Wed. 




21 


Thurs. 




22 


Fri, 




23 


Sat. 




24 
25 
26 


Mon. 
Tues. 


Last day of awarding the Homejee Cursetjee 
Dady Prize. 


27 


Wed. 




28 


Thurs. 




29 

30 


Fri. 

Sat. 


Monthly Meeting of the Syndicate at 5^ p.m. 


31 


,Sttn. 





BOMBAY TTKIVERSITT ALMANAC. 





1 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 

7 
8 
9 
10 
11 
12 
13 


Mon. 
Tues. 
Wed. 
Thurs. 

Fri. 

Sat. 


Last day of Application for Previous, First B.A., 
First B.Sc. and F.C.E. Examinations. 

IJNivBKaiTT OP Madras ctcokporated, 1857. 


Mon. 
Tues. 
Wed. 
Thurs. 
Fri. 
Sat. 


Question Papers for F.M. Examination due/rom Examnen 

Last day of Application for Second B.A., Second 
B.Sc. and L.C,E. Examinations. 


14 

16 
' 17 
18 
19 
20 


Mon. 

Tues. 
Wed. 
Thurs. 

Fri. 

Sat. 


iicxm, in ^rtA" zu& (Civil (T-icmfmun riulj 
Examination for P.M. begins. 

Last day of Application for Matriculation, LL.B. and LL.B. 
Honours Examinations, and for the Kahandas Mancharam 
and Bao Sir Fragmalji Scholarshipe. 


21 
22 
23 
24 

25 
?6 

27 


Mon. 
Tues. 
Wed. 

Thurs. 
FrL 
Sat. 


Last day of sending in Essays for the Manockjee Limjee Gold 
Kedal, and for notifjing new subject. Karsandas Mulji, 
Dossabhoy Hormusjee Cama, and Sir George LeGrand Jacob 
Piizes awarded. 

Last day of Applications for L. M. & S. and 
M.C.E. Examinations. 

Monthly Meeting of the Syndicate at 5^ p.m. 


j 28 

29 

' 30 


Mon. 
Tues. 





B1030— 1 BC* 



BOMBAY GNITERSITT ALMANAC. 



f 


1 

2 


Wed. 
Thurs. 


Last day of Af plication for M.D. Examination. 


3 


Fri. 




4 
5 


Sat. 




<§»»' 




6 


Mon. 




7 


Tues. 




8 
9 


Wed. 
Thurs. 


Quarterly Meeting of the Board of Accounts ut il r.ii. 


10 


Fri. 




11 
12 


Sat. 






13 


Mon. 




14 


Tues. 




15 


Wed. 




16 


Thurs. 


.■ 


17 


Fri. 




18 

19 
20 


Sat. 
Mon. 




1 

i 


21 


Tues. 


! 


22 
23 
24 


Wed. 
Thurs. 
Fri. 


Question Papers for Matriculation, Previous. 
First B.A., First B.Sc, and F.C.E. due f-oni 
Examiners. 


25 

26 
27 


Sat. 




Mon. 


• i 


28 


Tues. 


I 


29 


Wed. 


• 


30 Thurs. 

31 Fri. 


Question Papers for Second B.A., Second B.Sc, and L.C.E, 
duo from Examiturg. 

Monthly Meeting of the Syndicate at 5| p.m. 



BOMBAY UNIVEESITT ALMANAC 



NOVEMBEE, iSSi. 



1 Sat i iinl Wsm is Wt^ism frf giss. 



2 ^23.1 ; 

3 I Mon. Examinations for Previous, First B.A.,J 
, ' rp First BSc., and F.CE. begin; Question 

I "■ Papers for M.A., LL.B., and LL.B. Honours 

5 , Wed. due from Examiners. , 



6 


ThuTs. 


7 


Fri. 


8 


Sat. 


9 


§fltt. • 


10 


Mon. 


11 


Toes. 


12 


Wed. 


13 


Thurs. 


U 


Fri. 


15 


Sat. 


16 


^«b' 


17 


Mon. 


18 


Tues. 


19 


Wed. 


•20 


Thurs. 


•21 


Fri. 


22 


Sat. 


23 


^BB. 


24 


Mon. 


25 


Tues. 


1-} 


Wed. 


' " 


Thurs. 


-S 


Fri. , 


.0 


Sat. ' 


■y 1 


"S88. 



Seconds A. and Second BSc. and L.O.E.. 
Examinations begin. ( 



Question Papers for M.C.E. and L.>L &S. due' 
from Examiners. 



6;niiis. Examinations for M.A., IiIi.B.» 
l£.B. Honoiirs-andMatriculationbegin. 

Question Papers for M.D. dMe from Examinen. 



Examinations forL.M.&S. andM.C.B. 

begin; Manockjee Limjee Gold Medal awarded. 



Monthly Meeting of the Syndicate at 5^ pjlJ 



10 



BOMBAY UNIVERSITY ALMANAC. 





DECEMBEB, l- i. 


1 

2 
3 


Mon. 
Tues. 
Wed. 


M.D. ■Rxamination begins. Last day of 
announcing the Jam Shri Vibhaji and Hebbert 
and LaTouche Scholarships, when vacant. 


4 


Thurs. 




6 


Fri. 




6 


Sat. 




7 






8 


Mon. 




9 


Tues. 




10 


Wed. 




11 


Thurs. 




12 
13 

14 


Fri. 
Sat. 


Annual ^tttivQ ef t^^ ^muU. 


.^i'i'mi. 




15 


Mon. 




16 


Tues. 




17 


Wed. 




18 


Thurs. 




19 

20 

21 


Fri. 
Sat. 


Monthly Meeting of the Syndicate at 5^ p.m. 


j;-'iV^ 




22 


Mon. 




23 


Tues. 




24 


Wed. 




25 
26 


Thurs. 
Fri. 


(J^risimsa isgt 


27 


Sat. 




/iEK*. 




29 


Mon. 




30 


Tues. 




31 


Wed. 


La8t day of Application for the Jam Shri Vibhaji 
and Hebbert and LaTouche Scholarships. 



BOMBAY UNIVERSITY ALMANAC. 



11 



JANUARY, 1885. 



1 


Thurs. 


2 


Fri. 


3 


Sat. 


4 


Stw. 


5 


Mon. 


6 


Tues. 


7 


Wed. 


8 


Thurs. 


9 


Fri- 


10 


Sat. 


11 


^WL, 


12 


Mon. 


13 


Tues. 


14 


Wed. 


15 


Thurs. 


16 


Fri. 


17 


Sat. 


T8 


■^uo. 


:} 


Mon, 


20 Tues. 


21 Wed. 


J Thurs. 


•l6 Fri- 


24 Sat. 


25 -^ii3 


-6 Mon. 


-7 Tues. 


:< Wed. 


:i Thiirs. 


) Fri. 


1 


Sat. 



Last day of Application for the Jam Shri Vibhaji and Heb- 
bert and LaTouche Scholarships. 



Last day of Application for Degrees. 



Quarterly Meeting of the Board Of Accounts 
at 4^ P.M. 



%tim5uoa \a ^tg^a. 



University op Calcutta incorporated, 1857. 



Monthly Meeting of the Syndicate at o\ p.m. 
Jam Shri Vibhaji and Hebbert and LaToncbe Scholarships 
adjudged. 



12 



BOMBAY UNIVERSITY ALMANAC. 



PEBEUABT, 1885. 


1 ' 
2 


Mon. 




3 


Tues. 




4 


Wed. 




5 


Thiirs. 




6 


Fri, 




7 


Sat. 




8 
9 


Mon. 




10 


Tues. 




11 


Wed. 




12 


Thurs. 




13 


Fri. 




14 

15 
16 


Sat. 




Mon. 




17 


Tues. 




18 


Wed. 




19 


Thurs. 




20 


Fri. 




21 

22 
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28 


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BOMBAY UNIVEESITT ALMA5AC. 



13 



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LIST OF BOOKS FOR 1884 AND FOR A 
CYCLE OF FIVE YEARS (1885-1889). 



I.— ENGLISH. 

FOR THE PREVIOUS EXA3IINATI0N. 

1884 

1. Macaulay — Essays : Hallam, and Two on Chatham. 

2. Goldsmith — The Good-natured man. She stoops to 

conquer. 

1885. 

1 . Goldsmith — Vicar of Wakefield. 
- Scott — Marmion. 

1886 and 1889- 

1 Austen — Pride and Prejudice. 

2. Goldsmith — The Good-natured man. She stoops to 

conquer. 

1887. 

1. SouTHEY — Life of Nelson. 
-. Scott— Lady of the Lake. 

1888- 

1. AcsTEX — Sense and Sensibility. 

2 Scott — Marmion. 



16 NOTIFICATIONS. 

FOR THE FIRST B.A. EXAMINATION. 

1884. 

1. Shakespeare — Henry VIII. 

2. Milton — Paradise Regained, Books III., IV. 

3. The Golden Tkeasuky, Book IV. 

4. BuEKE — Reflections on the French Revolution. 

1885. 

1. Shakespeare — Henry VIII. 

2. Milton — Samson Agonistes. 

3. Golden Treasuey, Book IV. 

4. Bueke — Reflections on the French Revolution. 

1886. 

1. Shakespeare— King John. 

2. Milton— Minor Poems (pp. 477—510 Globe Edition.) 

3. Golden Tbeasuey — Book IV. 

4. Burke— Reflections on the French Revolution. 

1887, 

1. Shakespeare— Richard III. 

2. Milton— Minor Poems (pp. 510 — 553 Globe Edition). 

3. Golden Treasury — Book IV. 

4. Bueke— Reflections on the French Revolution. 

1888. 

1. Shakespeare — H enry V.— Part I. 

2. Milton — Paradise Lost— Books I. and II. 

3. Golden Treasury — Book IV. 

4. Burke — Reflections on the French Revolution. 

1889. 

1. Shakespeare — Julius Caesar. 

2. Milton — Paradise Lost— Books III. and IV. 

3. The Golden Treasury — Book IV. 

4. Bueke — Reflections on the French Revolution. 



LIST OF BOOKS FOE 188-i, &C. 17 

FOR THE SECOND B.A. EXAMINATION. 

1884. 

(1.) — Necessary. 
Bacox — Adrancement of Learning. 

(2.) — Group A. (Language and Litebatuee). 

1. CoTTPER — The Letters of Cowper (the second and third 

Tolumes of Bohn's Edition). 

2. Pope— Moral Essays and Satires (Globe Edition). 

1885-1889. 

(1.) — Necessary. 
Bacox— Advancement of Learning. 

(2.) — Group A. (Language and Literature). 

1. Pope — Moral Essays and Satires. 

2. Matthew Ar>"old — Johnson's Lives of the Poets. 

FOE THE M.A. EXAMINATION. 
1884. 

1. Spzxser — Faery Queene, Book I. 

•2. Shakespeare — Jidius Ctesar ; The Tempest ; Hamlet. 

3. Wordsworth — Selections by Matthew Arnold. 

4. Carltle — French Revoliition. 

5. Sir Thomas Bbowxe — Keligio Medici 

1885, 1887 and 1889. 

1. Spenser — Faery Queene, Book I. 

2. Shakespeare— Eichard III. ; The Tempest ; Lear. 

3. Wordsworth — Selections by Matthew Arnold. 

4. Coleridge — Biographia Literaria, I. — XIII. 

5. Hooker — Ecclesiastical Polity, Book I. 

B 1030—2 Bu* 



18 NOTIFICATIONS. 

1886 and 1888. 

1. Spenser — Faery Queene, Book I. 

2. Shakespeabe— Julius Caesar; The Tempest; Hamlet, 

3. Wordsworth — Selections by Matthew Arnold. 

4. Carlyle — French Eevolution. 

5. Sir Thoms Browne — Religio Medici. 



II.— SANSKEIT. 

rOR THE PREVIOUS EXAMINATION. 
1884. 

1. Sakuntala, V.— VII. 

2. Eaghuvans'a, XI. — XV. 

1885. 

1. Malavikfignimitra. 

2. Bhartrihari — Niti and Vairfigya. 

1886. 

1 . Viddhas'dlabhanj ikS,. 

2. Meghadftta and Ritusamh§,ra. 

1887. 

1. Vikraniorvasi. 

2. Kumarasambhava, I. — VI. 



1888. 



1. S'akuntala,!.— IV. 

2. Eaghuvans'a, I. — V. 



1889. 



1. S'akuntala, V.— VII. 

2. Raghuvans'a> XI, — XV. 



LIST 0? BOOKS FOR 1884, &C. 1* 

FOR THE FIRST B.A. EXAMINATION. 

1884. 

1. Uttarraramacharita. 

2. Kadambari, pp. 1 — 124 of the Bombay Edition. 

3. Bigveda : — 
Mandala I.— Hymns 19, 25. 



11. 


12, 28. 


III. 


9, M, 42, 61. 


IV. 


46, U. 


V. 


1, 2.5, 26. 


VI. 


63, 54. 55, 56, 57, 58. 


VII. 


67, 68, 69, 86, 88, 89. 


X. y, 


10,18,81,90,121,129,168. 


Tarkasangraha. 





1885. 

1 Eigveda — Selection.* 

"2. Mudr&rakshasa. 

•3. Tarka Kaumudi by Langakshi BhSskara. 

4. Kadambari, pp. 125 — 237. 

1886. 

1. Rigveda — Selection.* 
■? Malati Madhava. 

Tarkasangraha . 
.. Kadambari — 124 pp. of tbe Second Part. 

1887. 

1. Eigveda — Selection.* 

2. Viracharita. 

3. Tarkakaumudi by LaugSkshi BMskara. 

4. Kadambari, pp. 1 — 124. 

1888. 

1. Eigveda— Selection.* 

2. Uttarraramacharita. 

3. Tarkasangraha. 

4. Kadambari, pp. 125—237. 

*The hj-mns selected will be announced later. 



20 NOTIFICATIONS. 

1889. 

1. TJttarrar§,macharita. 

2. Kadambari, pp. 1—124 of the Bombay Edition. 

3. Rigveda— Selection.* 

4. Tarkasangraha. 

FOR THE SECOND B.A. EXAMINATION". 

1884. 

(1.) — Necessary. 
Kavya Prakas'a, L, II. and X. 

(2.) — Group A. (Language and Literature). 

1. S'ankaracharya's Yedanta SAtra Bhashya, Chap. I.. 
Pada IV., and Chap. II., Pada I. 

2. Mvichchakatika and Mudr&rakshasa. 

1885-1889. 

(1.) — Necessary. 
K&vyaprakS,s'a, Chaps. I., II. and X. 

1885-1887-1889. 

(2.) — Group A. (Language and Literature). 

1. Mrichchakati. 
2. Mudrarakshasa. 

3. S'ankarach3,rya's BhSshva, Chap. I. Pilda IV. and 
Chap. II. pada I. 

1886 and 1888. 

1. Mfilati Madhava. 

2. Balarrim;lyana. 

3. S'ankarach^rya's Bh§,shya, Chap. II. Pcldas I and IT. 

FOR THE M.A. EXAMINATION. 
1884-1889. 

I. (a.)—TBigveda. The Seventh Mandala with the Com- 
mentaiy of S^yana. 
(Z).)— Yftska's Nirukta, I.— VII. 

* The hymns selected will be announced later. 



LIST OF BOOKS FOR 1884, &C. 21 

II. One of the following five :— 

1. Nyaya s'astra. 

viz.: (a.) — Tarkasangraha with DipikS. 
(b.) — Muktavafi. 
(c.) — Gautamasutra with VatsySyana's Bh4shya. 

■2. Dharma-s'astra. 

viz. : (a.) — MitaksharS. 

(b.) — Vyavahara-Mayukha. 

(c.) — Viramitrodaya — Vyavaharakanda. 

3. Vyakarana-s Sstra. 

viz.: (a.) — Siddhanta Kaumudi, Mahabhashya, Chap. 
I., Pada. I., Ahnikas I.— V. 
(b.) — Paribhashendus'ekhara. 

i. Vedanta-s'astra. 

viz. : (a.) — Vedantas'ara. 

(6.) — Vedantaparibhasha. 

(c.) — S'ankar^charya'a S'diirabhSshya. 

•5. Alankara-s'astra. 

viz. : (a.) — Dandin's Kavyadars'a. 

(&.) — Kavyaprakas'a by Manmata. 
(c.) — Kasagangadhara by Jagarm^tha. 



III.— GREEK. 

FOR THE PREVIOUS EXAMINATION, 
1884. 

1. XEXOPHoy — Anabasis I. 
•2. HoiiER — Iliad I. 

1885, 1887 and 1889. 

1. Xexophox — Anabasis, II. 

2. HoKER— Iliad, II. 

1886, 1888. 

1. Xexophox — Anabasis, I. 

2. HoiiEK — Iliad, I. 



22 NOTIFICATIONS. 

FOR THE FIRST B.A. EXAMINATION. 

1884. 

1. Hekodotus — v., YI. 

2. Euripides — Electra. 

3. Demosthenes — The Philippics. 

1885, 1887 and 1889. 

1. Herobotus — I., II. 

2. Euripides— Hecuba. 

3. Demosthenes— The Philippics. 

1886 and 1888. 

1. Herodotus— III., IV. 

2. Euripides — Electra. 

3. Demosthenes— The Philippics. 

FOR THE SECOND B.A. EXAMINATION. 

1884. 
(1.) — Necessary. 
Thucydides— I. — lY. 

(2.) — Group A. (Language and Literature). 

1. iEscHYLUS — Agamemnon. 

2. Sophocles — Antigone, Q5dipus Coloneus. 

1885-1889, 

(].) — Necessary. 
Thucydides— I.— IV. 
(2.) — Group A. (Language and Literature). 

1. iEscHYLUS — Agamemnon. 

2. Sophocles— Antigone, CEdipus Coloneus. 



LIST OF BOOKS FOR 1884, &C. 23 

lY.— LATIN. 

FOR THE PKEVIOUS EXAMINATION. 
1884. 

1. LiTT— Book m. 

2. Ovid — Metamorphoses, Book III. 

1885. 

1. LiTT— Book II. 

2. Otid — Metamorphoses, V, 1 — 571. 

1886, 

1. LivY— Book TL 

2. Ovid— Metamorphoses, Till. 1—588. 

1887. 

1. LiTT— Book IX. 

2. Ovid — Metamorphoses, XII. 1 — 628. 

1888, 

1. LivY— Book XXVn. 

2. OviD— Metamorphoses XIIL 1—622. 

1889. 

1. LivT— Book XXX^ail. 

2. OviD — Metamorphoses. ■! y^ ■, qoq' 

FOR THE FIRST BA. EXAMINATION. 
1884. 

1. CiCEKO— De Officiis. 

2. Virgil— ^neid, III.— lY. 

3. Tacitus— Annales, XI. 

1885. 

1. CiciBO— De Natttra Deorum. 



24 NOTIFICATlONSi 



2, Tacitus-- Annales, I. 

3. ViKGiL— ^neid, 1 



1886. 



1. Cicero— De Officiis. 

2. Tacitus — Annales, II. 

3. ViRGli^-^neid, II. 



1887, 



„ f In Catalinam, 1, 2, 3, 4. 

CiCEUO- 1 pg Senectute. 



2. Tacitus— Historias, I. 

3. Virgil— .ffineid, III. 

1888, 

1. Cicero— De Katura Deonim. 
2*. Tacitus— Historias, II. 
3. Virgil— ^neid, V. 

1889, 

1. Cicero— De Officiis. 
2*. Tacitus— Annales, I. 
3, ViBGiL— ^neid, VI. 

FOR THE SECOND B.A. EXAMINATION. 

1884. 

^\;^ — Necessary. 

HORACE-Epistlcs and Satires. 

(2.)— Group A. (Language and Literature). 
Horace— The works of. 

1885-1889. 
(1 .) — Necessary. 
Horace— Epistles. 



LIST OF BOOKS FOE 1884, &C. 

(2.) — Group A. (Language a^t) Liteeatube). 

FOR THE M.A. EXAMINATION. 

1884. 

1. Tacitus — Annales, I- — YI. 

2. Cicero — Epistolae ad Attictun, IV". — YL 

3. TzREXCE — Heantontimorumenos. 

4. LucfiETirs, I. — III. 

1885, 1887 and 1889, 

1. Tacitus — Historise. 

2. Cicero— Epis tolas ad Atticnm, I. — UI. 

3. Plautus — Captivi. 

4. JuTEXAL— Satires, L, HI., IV., V., YII. 

1886 and 1888- 

1. Tacitus — Annales I. — YI. 

2. Cicero — Epistolae ad Atticum IV. — YL 

3. Terexce — Heautontimorumeno8. 

4. LucBETius, I. — in. 



v.— HEBREW. 

FOR THE PREVIOUS EXAMINATION. 

1884- 

1. Gexesis — XI. — XX. 
-, Psalms— XXXT.—LX. 



1885, 1887 and 1889- 



1. Gekesis— I.— X. 

2. Psalms, I.— XXX. 
B 1030'-3 BC 



26 NOTIFICATIOKS. 

1886 and 1888, 

1. Genesis— XI.— XX. 

2. Psalms— XXXI.— LX 

FOR. THE FIEST B.A. EXAMINATION. 

1884, 

1. Genesis. 

O T?TTTTT 

3." Isaiah— I.— XXXIX. 



1. Exodus. 

2. RtTTH. 

3. Zechaeiah. 



1885, 1887 and 1889. 



1886 and 1888. 



1. Genesis. 

O T? TTTTT 

3! ISAIAH-I.— XXXIX 

FOR THE SECOND B.A. EXAMINATION. 
1884. 

(1.) — Necessaey. 
Ezra — With the Chaldee passages. 

(2.) — Group A. (Language and Literature). 

1. ExoDUR, Leviticus, Deuteronomy. 

2. Psalms— I.— LXXII. 

(1.) — Necessaey. 
1885, 1887 and 1889. 
1. Hosea and Joel. 



LIST OF BOOKS FOE 1884, &C, 27 

1886 and 1888. 

1. Ezra — Witli the Chaldee passages. 

(2.) — Group A. (Language and Litbeatuee). 

1885—1889. 

1, Exodus, Leviticus, Dbuteeoxomy. 
•2. PsALxs— I.— LXXII. 

FOR THE M.A. EXAMINATION. 

1884. 

1. ECCLESIASTES. 

2. I. KlXGS. 

3. Nahum axd Habukkuk. 

4. EzEKiEL-XXV.— XLVni. 

1885-1889. 

1. Ecclesiastes. 

•2. I. Kings. 

3. Nahum and Habukkuk. 

4- EzEKiEL— XXV.— XLVIII. 



VI.— ARABIC. 

FOR THE PREVIOUS EXAMINATION. 

1884. 

1. Alf Laila— Nights I. — X. 

2. Nahfat-ol-Yamax— Bab I. 

1885. 

1. Alf-Laila— Xights 11—20. 

2. XAHfAT-OL-YAlIAX— Bab II. 

1886. 

1. Alf-Laila— Nights 21—30. 

2. Nahfat-ol-Yama>— Bab III. 



28 . NOTinCATIONS. 

1887. 

1. Alf-Laila— Nights 31—40. 

2. Nahfat-ol-Yaman — Bab IV. 

1888. 

1. Alf-Laila— Nights 41—50. 

2. Nahfat-ol-Yaman — Bab V. 

1889. 

1. Alf-Laiia — Nights 1 — 10. 

2. Nahfat-ot--Yaman — Bab I, 

FOR THE FIRST B.A. EXAMINATION. 
1884. 

1. Alf Laila— Nights LI.— LXXX 

2. Shahrestani— (Egyptian Edition, Book I.), pages 1 — 50. 

3. MoALLAKAT — Amrolkais. 

1885. 

1. Alf-Laila— Nights 81—110. 

2. Shaheestani — Pages 51 — 100. 

0. MoALLAKAT — Tarafa. 

1886. 

1. Alf Laila— Nights 111-140. 

2. Shahrestani — Pages 101 — 150. 

0. Moallakax — Zohair. 

1887. 

1. Alf-Laila— Nights 141—170. 

2. Shahrestani — (Book II.), pages 1 — 50. 

3. MoALLAKAT — Labid. 

1888. 

1. Alf-Laila— Nights 171—220. 

2. Shahrestani— N(Book II.), pages 51—102. 

3. MoALLAKAT — Antara. 

1889. 

1. Alf-Laila— Nights 51—80. 

2. Shahrestani — (Egyptian Edition, Book I.), pages 1—50. 

3. MoALLAKAT —Amrolkais. 



LIST OP BOOKS FOR 1884, &c. 29 

FOR THE SECOND B.A. EXAMINATION. 

1884. 
(1.) — Necessaet. 
Masamat— Sessions L — XXV. 

(2.) — Group A. (Language and Literature). 

1. "Wakedi — Fotoohat-usli-Sham(Bombay Editioii),Book I, 

2. MoTANABBi — Pages 2—146 (Bombay Edition). 

1885-1887 and 1889. 

(1.) — Necessary. 
Makamat — Sessions 26 — 50. 

(2.)— Group A. (Languagb asd Literature). 

1. Wakedi — Book II. 

2. MoTASABBi— Pages 147—292 (Bombay Edition), 

1886. 

(1.) — Necessary. 
Makamat— Sessions 1—25. 

(2). — Group A. (Language and Literature). 

1. Wakedi— Fotoohat-usli-Sham (Bombay Edition),Book I. 

2. Motaxabbi — Pages 2—146 (Bombay Edition). 

1888. 
(1). — Necessary. 
Otbi — Book I. 

(2). — Group A. (Language and Literature). 

1. Wakedi— Book 11. 

2. Dhaki Moarki (Abol-Ala, Egyptian Edition), Book I. 

FOR THE M.A. EXAMINATION. 

1884. 

1. Otbi— Book II. 

2. Ebxi— Khalikan (Persian Edition), First Volume, 

pages 2—92 

B 1030—3 nv* 



3d NOTIFICA.TIONS. 

3. Hamasah (Freytag's Edition), pages 1—150. 

4, MoALLAKAT — Hareth and Amribni — Kolthoom. 

1885-1889. 

1, Otbi— Book II, 

2. Ebni— Khalikan — (Persian Edition) — First Volume, 

pages 9 — 92. 
8. Hamasah— (Freytag's Edition), pages 11—50, 
4. MoALLAKAT— Hareth and Amribni— Kolthoom, 



yiI.--PERSIAN. 

FOR THE PREVIOUS EXAMINATION. 

1884. 

1. DiVAN-i-HAriz— (Bombay Edition), Odes 251—300. 

2. Anvaei Sohaili— Chapter I. 

1885. 

1. Hafiz— Odes 801- 350. 

2. Anvaki Soiiaili — Chapters II. and III. 

1886. 

1, Hafiz— Odes 351— 4C0. 

2. Anvaki Sohaili— Chapters IV. and V, 

1887. 

1 . Hafiz - Odes 401 —450. 

2. A>^vaiu Sohaili— Chapters VI.— VII.— VIII. and IX. 

1888. 

1. Hafiz— Odes 451— 500, 

2. Anvaki Sohaili— Chapters X.— XI.— XII.— XIII. and 

XIV. 

1889. 

1. HAFiz-(Bombay Edition)-Odes 251—300. 

2. An YARi Sohaili — Chapter I. 



LIST OP BOOKS FOB 1834, &C. 31 

FOE THE FIRST B.A. EXAMINATION. 
1884. 

] . Sady— (Bombay Edition) Tayebat, Odes 1—50. 
■2. Ferishta— Preface with the First Chapter (Kings of 
Lahore), pages 1 — 91 (Goyemment Edition.) 

1885. 

1. Sady— Odes 51— 100, 

2. Ferishta — Chapter II. — (KingsofDelhi),pages 92 — 217. 

1886. 

1. Sady— Odes 101— 1.^0. 

3. Ferishta— Chapter II.— (Kings of Delhi), pages 29-3— 

396. 

1887. 

1. Sady— Odes 151— 200. 

2. Ferishta — Chapter III. — (Bahamany Kings), pages 518 

—61.5. 

1888. 

1. Sady— Odes 201— 2.50. 

2. Ferishta — Chapter III. — (Bahamany Kings), pages 

615—730. 

1889. 

1. Sady— (Bombay Edition)— Tayebat Odee, 1—50. 
•2. Ferishta— Frefftce with the Fji-st Chapter — (Kings of 
Lahore), pages 1—91 (Government Edition). 

FOR THE SECOND B.A. EXAMINATION. 

1884. 

(1.) — Necessary. 

1. Habeeb OS-Sear (Bombay Edition), History of Gazar- 
khan (First portion of the Second Volume), pages 
81-^1 41. 



S2 H0TIFICATI0N3. 

(2.) — Group A. (Language and Literature), 

1. Habeeb-os-Sear — History of Creation and the 

Patriarchs, pages 1 — 92. 

2. Ateshkada (Bombay Edition) from pages 25 till 

Sistan. 

1885. 

(1.)— Necessary. 

Habeeb-os-Sear— .(Bombay Edition)— History of Changiz 
Khan and his descendants down to Ghazan Khan- 
pages 4—81 (Second Vol.) 

(2.) — Group A. (Language and Literature). 

1. Habeeb-os-Sear— History of the Ancient Persian and 
Arab Kings down to the Mahommedan Era, pages 1 — 
60, 

2. Ateshkada — From the Life of Abol Fruj of Sistan to 

that of Musood-i'Sadi- Salman, inclusive, 

1886. 

(1.)— Necessary. 

HabeeB'OS-Sear — Life of Mahommed, pages 1 — 81. (Book 
III. of the First Vol.) 

(2.) Group A, (Language and Literature). 

1. Habeeb-os-Sear— -History of Bany Omaya, pages 1 — 54, 

2. Ateshkada— From Mazandran (page 155) to Shiraz. 

1887. 

(1.) — Necessary. 

Habeeb-os-Seae — History of Timoor (or Tamerlane), pages 
2-92. 

(2). — Group A. (Language and Literature). 

1. Habeeb-os-Sear, — History of Bany Abbas, pages 1—82. 
8. Ateshkada — From Shiran to India. 



LIST OF BOOKS FOR 1884, &C, 33 

1888. 

(1.) — Necessaey. 

Habeeb-os-Sear — History of the descendants of Timoor 
from Shahrokh Mirza to the death of Sultan Aboo 
Saeed (second volume), pages 93 — 191. 

(2). — Group A. (Language and Literatuee). 

1. Habeeb-os-Sear — History of the contemporary dynas- 
lies of Bany Abbas from the house of Taher to the ex- 
tinction of the house of Saljooh — pages 1 — 116 (second 
volume). 

2. Ateshkada — From the poets of India to the autobio* 

graphy of the author. 

1889. 

(1.) — Necessaey. 

Habeeb-os-Sear — History of Grazan Khan, (first portion of 
the second volume), pages 81 — lil. 

(2). — Group A. (Language and Literature). 

1. Habeeb-os-Sear — History of the Creation and the 

Patriarchs, pages 1 — 92. 
■2. Ateshkada — (Bombay Edition), from page 25 till 

Sistan 

FOR THE M.A EXAMINATION. 
1884. 

1. Shahxaxah — From the visit of Behram to Shankal the 

Padshah of Hind, till the birth of !Nushzad, son of 
Xoushiravan. 

2. Masxavi — Daft^r I. 

3. Eauzat-os-Safa (Bombay Edition) — Sassanian Dynasty. 

4. Akhlaki Jalau (Calcutta Edition), pages 1 — 111. 



O-i NOTIFICATIONS. 



1885, 1887 and 1889- 

1. Shahxamah — From the birth of Nushzad, son of Nou- 

shiravan. till the sending of Burzuya the Physician 
to India. 

2. Masnavi— Daftar II. 

3. Rauzat-os-Safa — Changiz Khan. 

4. Akhlaki Jalali — Pages 111 — 223. 

1886. 

1. Shahnamah — From the visit of Bahram to Shankal the 

Padshah of Hind till the birth of Nushzad son of 
Noushiravan. 

2. Masnavi — Daftar I. 

3. Rouzat-os-Sapa (Bombay Editioil) — Sassanian Dynasty. 

4. Akhlaki Jalali (Calcutta Edition), pages 1 — 111. 

1888. 

1. Shahnamah — From the accession of Khosro Perviz to 

the throne till the death of Bahram Choobina, 
inclusive. 

2. Masnavi — Daftar III. 

3. Rouzat-os-Safa — The conclusive portion regarding 

AVonders of the World, pages 1 — 45. 

4. Akhlaki Jalali — Pages 223 — 337. 



PERIODS OF HISTORY. 

FOR THE PREVIOUS EXAMINATION. 

1884. 

Grekk History— From the accession of Philip of Macedon 
to the death of Alexander. 

1885, 1887 and 1889. 

Geeek Historv— The Peloponnesian "War. 



LIST OF COOKS FOR 1884, &.C. 35 

1886 and 1888. 

Greek History — From the accession of Philip ofMacedon 
to the death of Alexander. 

FOR THE M.A. EXAMINATION. 

1884. 

Western ErROPE. — From the Meeting of the States General 
at Versailles in 1789 to the Fall of the Second Empire. 

1885, 1887 and 1889. 

Western Europe. — From the Peace of "Westphalia to the 
Meeting of the States General at Versailles, 1789. 

1886 and 1888. 

Western* Europe — From the Meeting of the States General 
at Versailles, 1789, to the fall of the Second Empire. 



36 NOTIFICATIONS. 

BOOKS RECOMMENDED IN LAW. 
I.— FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF LAWS. 

1. Markby's Elements of Law. 

2. Justinian (Sandar's edition recommended). 

3. Maine's Ajicient Law. 

4. Kent's International Law. 

5. Succession Act (Stokes' edition recommended). 

6. Parsi Succession Act, 

7. Hindu Wills Act. 

8. Indian Majority Act. 

9. Macnaghten's Principles of Mahomedan Law. 

10. Sir T. Strange's Hindu Law. 

11. Mayne's Hindu Law. 

12. Contract Act (Ounningham and Shepherd's edition 

recommended) . 

13. Eegistration Act. 

14. Pollock's Law of Contracts. 

15. Smith's Mercantile Law. 

16. Specific Relief Act. 

17. Snell's Equity. 

18. The following selection from White andTudor's Lead- 

ing Cases in Equity : — 

Cuddee vs. Putter. 

Elhson vs. Ellison. 

Fox vs. Mackreth. 

Glenorchy vs. Bosville. 

Keech vs. Sandford. 

Pusey vs. Pusey. 

Russell vs. Russell. 

Bassett vs. Nossworthy. 

Brice vs. Stokes. 

Howard vs. Harris. , ' 

Huguenin vs. Baseley. 

Robinson vs- Pett. 

Seton vs. Slade. 

Woollam vs. Heam. 

19. Penal Code (Mayne's edition recommended). 

20. Broom's Commentaries on the Common Law, Books 

III. and IV, 

21. Evidence Act (Cunningham's edition recommended). 



BOOKS EBCOMMIITDED IN LAW. 37 

22. Civil Procedure Code. 

23. Limitation Act. 

24. Criminal Procedure Code. 

II.— ADDITIONAL FOR HONOURS. 

1. Austin's Jurisprudence. 

2. Gains (Poste's edition recommended). 

3. Wheaton's International Law. 

4. Domat's Civil Law. 

5. Story's Conflict of Laws. 

6. Tagore Lectures on Mahomedan Law, and parts of 

Mitakshara and Majukha relating to Succession 
and Partition. 

7. Pollock's Law of Partnership. 

8. The following selection from Tudor's Leading Cases 

on Mercantile Law : — 

Birkley vs. Preograve. 
Chase vs. Westmore. 
Clayton's Case. 
Don vs. Lippmann. 
Dixon vs. Sadler. 
Forbes vs. Aspinall. 
Gratitudine, The. 
Hanson vs. Meyer. 
Harman vs. Fisher. 
Johnson vs. Sheddon. 
Croft vs. Day. 
Joy vs. CampbelL 
Market Overt Case. 
Koux vs. Salvador. 
Rowlandson, Expaiie. 
Tyrie vs. Fletcher. 
Whitehead vs. Anderson. 
Woolridge vs. Boydell. 
Worseley vs. DeMattos. 

9. The following selection from White and Tudor's Lead- 

ing Cases in Equity : — 

Aleyn vs. Belchier. 
Elliot vs. Merryman, 
Dyer vs. Dyer. 
Lake vs. Cradock. 
Mackreth vs. Symmons, 
B 1030—4 Bu 



•38 NOTIFICATIONS. 

Toilet vs. Toilet. 
Casborne vs. Scarfe. 
Harding vs. Glynn. 
Le Neve vs. Le Neve. 
Peachy vs. Duke of Somerset. 
Rees vs. Berrington. 
Ryall vs. Rowles. 
Stapilton vs, Stapilton. 
Townley vs. Sherborne. 
Penn vs. Lord Baltimore. 

10. Story's Equity Jurisprudence. 

11. Addison on Torts. 

12. Bentham's Principles of Morals and Legislation. 
1 '^. Best on Evidence. 



ACADEMIC COSTUME 



1. Academic Costume is worn at Convocations for 
conferring Degrees. 

2. Such of the Fellows of the University of Bombay 
as are Graduates of other Universities, or as are entitled 
to wear official* costume or uniform, may appear in the 
academic dress of their own Universities, or in such cos- 
tume or uniform, wearing in addition the Fellow's Scarf 
of the University of Bombay. 

3. Other Fellows wear the Fellow's Gown and Scarf 
of the University of Bombay. The head-dress of the 
European Fellows is a CoUege Cap. 

ademie Costume to be vjorn. by the Senate and Qraduc-. 
cf the University of Bombay: 

Chancellob. 

Gowk. — Black damask silk with gold lace and tufts. 
Cap. — Black velvet Academic Cap with gold tassel. 

Vice- Chancellor . 

Gowk. — The same, but with silver lace and tufts. 
Cap. — The same, but with silver tassel. 

Registrar. 

Gown. — The same, but with black silk lace and tufts. 
Cap. — Black cloth Academic Cap with black silk tassel. 



* £x.g. Judges, Bishops, Barristers Kilitary and Naval Officers, &c. 



40 notifications. 

Fellows. 

Gown.— Bisliop's purple silk witli full sleeves. 
Scarf. — Of the same colour with gold fringed ends. 

Graduates. 
B.A. & B.Sc. 

Gown. — Black silk or stuff, shape as Oxford B.A. 
Hood. — Black stuff, bound with garter blue silk, one 
inch wide. 

M.A. 

Gown. — Black silk or stuff, as Oxford M.A. 
Hood, — Garter blue silk, lined the same. 

LL.B. 

Gown. — Black silk or stuff, as M.A. 
Hood. — Black silk with scarlet cloth band inside, two 
inches wide, shape as Cambridge M.A. 

L.M. & S. 

Gown. — Black silk or stuff, as B.A. 
Hood, — Black stuff, bound with crimson silk, one inch 
wide. 

M.D. 

Gown. — Undress, black silk or stuff, as M.A. 

Full dress, crimson silk, garter blue facings, 
shape as M.A. 
Hood. — Crimson silk, lined garter blue. 



ACADEMIC COSTUMS, 41 

L.C.E. 

Gowk. — Black silk or stuS, shape as B.A. 
Hood. — Black stuff, bound with brown silk, one inch 
wide. 

M.C.E. 

Gown. — Black silk or stuff, as M.A. 
Hood. — Brown silk, lined garter blue. 



Cap. — For all European Fellows or Graduates- 
Black cloth Academic Cap with black silk 
tassel. 



B lOSO— 4 BC* 



IV 



%ttB. 



ACT OF INCORPORATION 

Act No. XXII. of 1857. 

Passed by the Legislative Council of Indu. 

(Received the Assent of the Governor General on the 
I8th July 1857.; 



An Act to establish and incorporate a University 
at Bombay. 

Whereas, for the better encouragement of Her 
Majesty's subjects of all classes and 
denominations within the Presidency 
of Bombay and other parts of India in the pursuit of a 
regular and liberal course of education, it has been 
determined to establish a University at Bombay for the 
purpose of ascertaining, by means of examination, the 
persons who have acquired proficiency in different 
branches of Literature, Science, and Art, and of reward- 
ing them by Academical Degrees as evidence of their 
respective attainments, and marks of honour propor- 
tioned thereunto ; and whereas, for effectuating the 
purposes aforesaid, it is expedient that such University 



ACT OF INCOEPOBATIOH. 43 

should be incorporated : It is enacted as follows : 

(that is to say) — 
1 . The following persons, namely, The Right Honour- 
able John, Lord Elphinstone, Go- 
Incorporation. ^^^^^ ^f Bombay, 

The Honourable Sir Willum Yaedlet, Elnight, Chief 
Justice of the Supreme Court of Judicature at Bombay, 
Ex officio, 

The Right Reverend John Harding, Doctor of Divinity, 
Bishop of Bombay, Ex officio. 

The Honourable Sir Henry Somerset, Lieutenant- 
General, Knight Companion of the Most Honourable 
Order of the Bath, Commander-in-Chief of the Forces 
in Bombay, Ex officio. 

The Honourable James Grant Lumsden, Member of 
the Council of Bombay, Ex officio. 

The Honourable Arthur Ma let. Member of the Council 
of Bombay, Ex officio, 

Edward Irvine Howard, Esquire, Director of Public 
Instruction, Presidency Division, Ex officio, 

Robert Haines, Esquire, M.B., Acting Educational 
Inspector, Presidency Division, Ex officio, 

C. Morehead, Esquire, M.D., Principal of the Grant 
Medical College, Ex officio, 

John Harkness, Esquire, LL.D., Principal of the 

Elphinstone College, Ex officio. 
The Reverend James Mc Doug all, Acting Principal of 

the Poona College, Ex officio, 
Philip William LeGett, Esquire, Member of the 

Legislative Council of India, 
The Honourable Sir ^L\tthew Richard Satjsse, Kjiight, 

Puisne Judge of the Supreme Court of Judicature at 

Bombay, 

Sir Jamsetjee Jeejeebhot, Knight, 
Metcalf Larken, Esquire, Judge of the Sudder Court in 
Bombay, and President of the late Board of Education, 



44 A.CTS. 

JuGONNATH SuNKERSETT, Esquire, Member of the late 
Board of Education, 

BoMANjEE HoRMusjEE, Esquiro, Member of the late 
Board of Education, 

Bhao Dajeb, Esquire, Graduate of the Grant Medical 
College, Member of the late Board of Education, 

Matthew Stovell, Esquire, Surgeon in the Bombay 
Army, Secretary to the late Board of Education, 

Claudius James Brskine, Esquire, Civil Service, late 
Director of Public Instruction, 

William Edward Frerb, Esquire, Member of the Koyal 
Asiatic Society, and President of the Bombay Branch 
of the Royal Asiatic Society, Judge of the Sudder 
Court in Bombay, 

Major-General Charles Waddington, Companion of the 
Most Honourable Order of the Bath, Chief Engineer 
of Public Works, 

The Reverend John Wilson, Doctor of Divinity, Fellow 
of the Royal Society, Honorary President of the 
Bombay Branch of the Royal Asiatic Society, 

The Reverend Philip Anderson, Master of Arts, Chap- 
lain on the Bombay Establishment, 

Henry Bartle Edward Frere, Esquire, Commissioner ; 
in Sind, 

Lieutenant Edward Frederick Tierney Fergusson,, 
Indian Navy, 

Mahomed Yusoof Moorgay, Cazee of Bombay, 

Jambs John Berkley, Esquire, Fellow of the Geogra- 
phical Society, M.I.C.E., President of the Bombay 
Mechanics' Institute, and Chief Resident Engineer of 
the Great Indian Peninsula Railway Company, 

Henry Lacon Anderson, Esquire, Secretary to Govern- 
ment, 

Being the first Chancellor, Vice-Chancellor, and 
Fellows of the said University, and all the persons who 



ACT OF rS'COBPORATION. 45 

may hereafter become or be appointed to be Chancellor, 
Vice-Chancellor, or Fellows as hereinafter mentioned, 
so long as they shall continue to be such Chancellor, 
Vice- Chancellor, or Fellows, are hereby constituted and 
declared to be one Body Politic and Corporate by the 
name of the University of Bombay ; and such Body 
Politic shall by such name have perpetual succession 
and shall have a common Seal, and by such name shall 
sue and be sued, implead and be impleaded, and answer 
and be answered unto, in every Court of Justice within 
the territories in the possession and under the Govern- 
ment of the East India. Company, 

II. The said Body Corporate shall be able and capa- 

ble in law to take, purchase, and 
dia^Ie o^pro^rty"' ^old any property, moveable or im. 

moveable, which may become vested 
in it for the purposes of the said University, by virtue 
of any purchase, grant, testamentary disposition, or 
otherwise ; and shall be able and capable in law to grant, 
demise, alien, or otherwise dispose of all or any of the 
property, moveable or immoveable, belonging to the said 
University ; and also to do all other matters incidental 
or appertaining to a Body Corporate. 

III. The said Body Corporate shaU consist of one 

^ ,.^ . . , Chancellor, one Vice-Chancellor,and 

Constitution of i i! c ^ ■ i ,i 

Body Corporate. ^^^ number of ex-oficio and other 

FeUows as the Governor of Bombay 
in Council hath already appointed, or shall from time to 
time, by any order published in the Bombay Gazette, 
hereafter appoint : and the Chancellor, Vice- Chancellor, 
^ and Fellows for the time being shall 

benate. constitute the Senate of the said 

University. Provided, that if any person being Chan- 
cellor, Vice- Chancellor, or Fellow of the said Univer- 
Office vacated by ?%> shall leave India without the 
leaving India. intention of returning thereto, his 

office shall thereupon become vacant. 



I 



46 ACTS. 

IV. The Governor of Bombay for the time Leing 

shall be the Chancellor of the said 

Chancellor. University, and the first Chancellor 

shall be the Right Honourable John, Lord Elphinstone. 

V. The first Vice- Chancellor of the said University 

shall be Sir William Yakdlet, 
Vice-chancellor. Yimgh.i. The office of Vice-ChanceUor 
shall be held for two years only ; and the Vice-Chancellor 
hereinbefore nominated shall go out of office on the 
1st day of January 1859. Whenever a vacancy shall 
occur in the office of Vice-Chancellor of the said Uni- 
versity by death, resignation, departure from India, 
effluxion of time, or otherwise, the Grovernor of Bombay, 
in Council shall, by notification in the Bombay Gazette, 
nominate a fit and proper person, being one of the Fel- 
lows of the said University, to be Vice-Chancellor in the 
room of the person occasioning such vacancy. Provided 
that, on any vacancy in the said office which shall occur 
by effluxion of time, the Governor of Bombay in Coun- 
cil shall have power to re-appoint the Vice-Chancellor 
hereinbefore nominated, or any future Vice-Chancellor 
to such office. 

VI. The Chief Justice of Her Majesty's Supreme 

Court of Judicature, the Bishop of 
Fellows. Bombay, the Members of the Council 

of Bombay, the Director or Acting Director of Public 
Instruction, the Educational Inspector or Acting Educa- 
tional Inspector of the Presidency Division, the Princi- 
pals and Acting Principals of Government Colleges, all 
for the time being, shall, while filling such Offices, be 
ex-officio Fellows of the said University. The whole num- 
ber of the Fellows of the said University, exclusive of 
the Chancellor and Vice-Chancellor for the time being, 
shall never be less than twenty- six ; and whenever the 
number of the said Fellows, exclusive as aforesaid, shall 
by death, resignation, departure from India, or otherwise, 
be reduced below twenty-six, the Governor of Bombay 



ACT OF rKCOBPORATION. 47 

in CounciWh&M forthmifh, by notification in the Bomhay 
Gazette, nominate so many fit and proper persons to be 
Fellows of the said University, as with the then Fellows 
of the said University shall make the number of snch 
Fellows, exclusive as aforesaid, twenty-six. But nothing 
herein contained shall prevent the Governor of Bom- 
bay in Council from nominating more than twenty-six 
persons to be Fellows of the said University, if he shall 
see fit. 

VII. The Governor of Bombay in Council may can- 

cel the appointment of any person 

The appointment already appointed or hereafter to be 

clncS"^ ""^y ^^ appointed a FeUow of the University 

and as soon as such order is notified 
in the Gazette, the person so appointed shall cease to be 
a FeUow. 

VIII. The Chancellor, Vice- Chancellor, and FeUows 

for the time being shall have the en- 
Chancellor, Vice- tire management of and superintend- 
Chancellor, and ence over the affairs, concerns, and 
SrtWtffirS P'oPf rty of the said Universi^- ; aj,d 
the University. i^ ^H cases unprovided tor by this 

Act, it shall be lawful for the Chan- 
cellor, Vice-Chancellor, and Fellows to act in such man- 
ner as shall appear to tnem best calculated to promote 
the purposes intended by the said University. The said 
Chancellor, Vice-Chancellor, and Fellows shall have full 
power from time to time to make and 
ye- aws, alter any bye-laws and regulations (so 

as the same be not repugnant to law, or to the general 
objects and provisions of this Act) touching the examina- 

Ition for degrees and the granting of the same ; and 
touching the examination for honours, and the granting 
of marks of honour for a higher proficiency in the different 
i branches of Literature, Science, and Art ; and touching 
the qualifications of the candidates for degrees, and the 
previous course of instruction to be followed by them 
and the preliminary examinations to be submitted to by 



48 ACTS. 

them ; and touching the mode and time of convening the 
meetings of the Chancellor, Vice-Chancellor, and Fel- 
lows ; and in general touching all other matters whatever 
regarding the said University. And all such bye-laws 
and regulations, when reduced into writing, and after 
the common seal of the said University shall have been 
affixed thereto, shall be binding upon all persons, mem- 
bers of the said University, and all candidates for degi-ees 
to be conferred by the same, provided such bye-laws and 
regulations shall have been first submitted to and shall 
have received the approval of the Governor of Bombay 
in Council. 

IX. All questions which shall come before the Chan- 

cellor, Vice-Chancellor, and Fellows, 
Meetings of the ^-^^^i be decided at a meeting of the 
^' Senate by the majority of the mem- 

bers present ; and the Chairman at any such meeting 
shall have a vote, and, in case of an equality of votes, a 
second or casting vote. No question shall be decided at 
any meeting, unless the Chancellor, or Vice-Chancellor 
and five Fellows, or, in the absence of the Chancellor 
and Vice-Chancellor, unless six Fellows at the least shall 
be present at the time of the decision. At every meeting 
of the Senate, the Chancellor, or in his absence the 
Vice-Chancellor, shall preside as Chairman ; and, in the 
absence of both, a Chairman shall be chosen by the 
Fellows present, or the major part of them, 

X. The said Chancellor, Vice-Chancellor and Fel- 

lows for the time being shall have full 

Appointment and power from time to time to appoint, 

removal of Exami- ^^^ ^^ ^^ gj^^jj see occasion, to 

ners and Oflfieers. ' .. i^ . ^^ ' , 

remove all Jiixammers, Officers, and 

servants of the said University. 

XI. The said Chancellor, Vice-Chancellor, and Fel- 

lows shall have power, after exami- 

Power to confer nation, to confer the several degi-ees 

degrees. ^^ Bachelor of Arts, Master of Arts, 



ACT OF IXCOEPOEATION. 49 

Bachelor of Liaws, Licentiate of Medicine, Doctor of Me- 
dicine, and Master of Civil EngineeriDg ; they shall also 
have power, after examination, to confer upon the candi- 
dates for the said several degrees marks of honour for a 
high degree of proficiency in the different branches 
of Literature, Science, and Art, according to rules to be 
determined by the bye-laws to be from time to time made 
by them under the power in that behalf given to them 
by this Act. 

XII. Except by special order of the Senate, no person 

shall be admitted as a candidate for 

Qualification for ^j^g degree of Bachelor of Arts, Master 

di^frde^TeJ' of ^^«' Bachelor of Laws, Licentiate 

of Medicine, Doctor of Medicine, or 
Master of Civil Engineering, unless he shall present to 
the said Chancellor, Vice-Chancellor, and Fellows a cer- 
tificate from one of the Listitutions authorized in that 
behalf by the Governor of Bombay in Council, to the 
effect that he has completed the course of instruction 
prescribed by the Chancellor, Vice-Chancellor, and Fel- 
lows of the said University, in the bye-laws to be made by 
them under the power in that behalf given by this Act. 

XIII. The said Chancellor, Vice-Chancellor, and 
. . Fellows shall cause an examination for 

every year ; on every such examination 
the candidates shall be examined either by Examiners 
appointed for the purpose from among the Fellows, by 
the said Chancellor, Vice-Chancellor, and Fellows, or by 
other Examiners so to be appointed ; and on every such 
examination the candidates, whether candidates for an 
ordinary degree or for a degree vrith honours, shall be 
examined on as many subjects and in such manner as 
the said Chancellor, Vice-Chancellor, and Fellows shall 
appoint. 

XIV. At the conclusion of any examination of the 
Grant of degrees. candidates, the Examiners shall de- 
clare the name of every candidate 

B 1030—5 Bu 



60 ACTS. 

whom they shall have deemed entitled to any of the said 
degrees, and his proficiency in relation to other candi- 
dates ; and also the honours which he may have gained 
in respect of his proficiency in that department of 
knowledge in which he is ahout to graduate ; and he 
shall receive from the said Chancellor a certificate, under 
the seal of the said University of Bombay, and signed 
by the said Chancellor or Vice- Chancellor, in which the 
particulars so stated shall be declared. 

XV. The said Chancellor, Vice-Chancellor, and Fel- 
Fees ^°^^ shall have power to charge such 

reasonable fees for the degrees to be 
conferred by them, and upon admission into the said 
University, and for continuance therein, as they, with 
the approbation of the Governor of Bombay in Coun- 
cil, shall from time to time see fit to impose. Such fees 
. , . shall be carried to one General Fee 

Annual Accounts, j,^^ f^^ ^^^ payment of expenses 

of the said University, under the directions and regula- 
tions of the Governor of Bombay in Council, to whom 
the accounts of income and expenditure of the said Uni- 
versity shall, once in every year, be submitted for such 
examination and audit as the said Governor of Bombay 
in Council may direct. 



ACT FOR CONFERRING ADDITIONAL 
DEGREES 



Act No. XLVII. of 1860. 

An Act for givitig to the Universities of Calcutta^ 
Madras, and Bombay, the power of conferring Degrees 
in addition to those mentioned in Acts II., XXII., and 
XXriL of 1857. 

Whereas it is expedient to give to the Universities 

of Calcutta, Madras, and Bombay, 

Preamble. established mider Acts II., XXII., 

and XXVII. of 1857, the power of conferring Degrees 

other than the Degrees in that Act expressly provided 

for ; it is enacted as follows : — 

I. It shall be competent to the Chancellor, Vice- 

Chancellor, and Fellows of the 
sitieTto'^^nfeTDe- Universities of Calcutta, Madras, or 
grees. Bombay, respectively, to confer such 

Degrees, and to grant such Diplomas 
or Licences in respect of Degrees, as the said Chancellor, 
Vice-Chancellor, and Fellows of any such University 
shall have appointed or shall appoint by any Bye-laws 
or Regulations made and passed, or to be made or passed 
by them in the manner provided in the said Acts, and 
submitted to and approved by the Governor Greneral in 
Council as far as ^gards the University of Calcutta, or 
by the Governor in Council of Madras or Bombay as 
regards the Universities of Madras and Bombay respec- 
tively. 

II. All the provisions contained in the said Acts II., 

^ ^ ^. XXII., and XXVII. of 1857, with 

Construction. j. j. i-u -n a-l • 

respect to the Degrees therein men- 
tioned, and to the examinations for those Degrees, shall 
apply to any Degrees which may be conferred under 
this Act and to the examinations for such Degrees. 



ACT FOR CONFERRING HONORARY 
DEGREES^ 



Act No. I. or 1884. 

An Act to amend the law relating to the granting of 
honorary degrees by the Universities at Calcutta, Madras 
and Bombay. 

WTiereas it is expedient to amend tlie law relating to 
the granting of honorary degrees, and to give to the Uni- 
versities at Calcutta, Madras and Bombay the power of 
granting the degree of Doctor in the faculty of Law to per- 
sons who have not undergone a previous examination; 
and whereas the executive government of each of the 
said Universities is, by bye-laws made under the Acts esta- 
blishing the same, vested in a Syndicate consisting of the 
Vice-Chancellor and certain of the Fellows ; 

It is hereby enacted as follows : — 

1. Act No. XXI. of 1875 {an Act to authorize the Univer- 

sity at Calcutta to grant honorary degrees) 
^Reiwal of Act XXI. jg repealed. 

2. If the Vice-Chancellor and not less than two-thirds 

of the other members of the Syndicate 
Power to confer of any of the Universities at Calcutta, 
^tor^in the^acul- Madras and Bombay recommend that an 
ty of Law. honorary degree be conferred on any per- 

son, on the ground that he is, in their opi- 
nion, by reason of eminent position and attainments, a fit 
and proper person to receive such a degree, and their re- 
commendation is supported by a majority of those present 
at a meeting of the Senate and is confirmed by the Chan- 
cellor, it shall be lawful for the Chancellor, Vice-Chancellor 
and Fellows to confer on that person the degree of Doctor 
in the faculty of Law, without requiring him to undergo 
any examination. 



Ii5e-kfo0. 



I.— CONSTITUTION OF THE SENATE AND OT 
THE FACULTIES. 

1. The Chancellor, Vice-Chancellor, the Deans of the 
Faculties of Arts, Law, Medicine and Engineering, the 
Syndics, and theFellows of the University, according to sec- 
tions III, IV, V, and VI of the Act of Incorporation, shall 
have seniority and precedence, first, in the order above 
specified down to the Syndics, and, secondly, according to 
their official precedence in the case of ex-officio Fellows, 
and, thirdly, in the case of other Fellows, according to the 
sequence of appointments. 

2. The Senate may, for gross misbehaviour unfitting a 
Fellow in its opinion for his office, and after hearing such 
Fellow or any other Fellow nominated by him on his be- 
half, request that his appointment be cancelled under the 
provisions of section VII of the Act of Incorporation. 

3. At a convenient time, soon after the appointment of 
any Fellow, the Syndicate shall, and at any subsequent 
time the Syndicate may, consider and recommend his ap- 
pointment to one or more of the Faculties. Such recom- 
mendation shall be considered and adopted or rejected at 
the next following meeting of the Senate. 

n.— THE FACULTIES. 

4. There shall be four Faculties, namely, of Arts, Law, Me- 
dicine, and Civil Engineering. Every member of the Senate 
shall be a member of one Faculty at least, and any member 
of the Senate may be a member of more than one Faculty. 

5. Each Faculty shall meet ordinarily once a year, 
within three weeks after the fixed date for the Aimual 
Convocation for Conferring Degrees, for the purpose of 
electing a Dean and Syndics for the year, and at other 
times when convened by the Dean, or as provided in 
Bye-law 8. 

B 1030—5 BU* 



54 BTB-LAWS. 

6. A meeting of any Faculty shall also be convened by 
the Dean on the requisition of any three of its members. 
The Dean, or Senior Fellow present, shall be chairman at 
Buch Meeting, and the chairman shall have a vote, and, in 
case of an equality of votes, a casting vote. 

7. The office of Dean shall be vacated by the Dean's 
ceasing to reside in the City of Bombay for a period of 
more than three calendar months, or by his leaving the 
IVesidency of Bombay without giving notice to the Eegis- 
trar of his intention to return within three calendar months. 

8. On the occurrence of such a vacancy the Vice-Chan- 
cellor shall direct the Senior Fellow in Bombay belonging 
to the Faculty in which the vacancy has occurred to convene 
a Meeting of the Faculty for the election of a new Dean. 

9. Three Members of any Faculty shall constitute a 
quorum of that Faculty. 

Ill— THE SYNDICATE. 

10. The Executive Government of the University shall be 
vested in a Syndicate, consisting of the Vice -Chancellor and 
ten of the Fellows, who shall be elected for one year by 
the several Faculties in the following proportions : — 

Four by the Faculty of Arts, one of whom shall 
be elected separately to represent the Physical 
and Experimental Sciences. 

Two by the Faculty of Law. 

Two „ „ Medicine. 

Two „ „ Civil Engineering. 

11. It will be the duty of the Syndicate, subject to the 
revision and control of the Senate, to appoint, and, if ne- 
cessary, to remove the Examiners and all other officers and 
servants of the University except the Eegistrar ; to fix 
their salaries and emoluments, save as provided by any 
Bye-law; to order Examinations in conformity with the 
Regulations, and declare the results as they bear on Degrees. 
Honours, and Rewards; to keep the accounts of the Uni- 
versity, and to cori'espond on the business of the Univer- 
sity with the Government and all other authorities and 
persons ; to consider proposals laid before it by members of 
the Senate, and from time to time to frame such Bye-laws 
and Regulations as may be necessary, subject to the 
approval of the Senate. 



BOARD OF ACC0T7XTS. 55 

12. The elections of Syndics shall take 'place within 
three weeks after the fixed date for the Annual Convocation 
for Conferring Degrees. 

13. The Syndicate shall meet ordinarily once a month, 
and at other times when convened by the Vice-Chancellor, 
or, in his absence, by the Senior Fellow in the Syndicate. 

14. The office of Syndic shall be vacated by the Syndic's 
being absent from three consecutive ordinary monthly 
meetings. 

15. On the occurrence of such a vacancy the Vice-Chan- 
cellor shall direct a Meeting of the Faculty in which the 
vacancy has occurred to be convened for the election of a 
new Syndic. 

16. Four members of the Syndicate shall constitute a 
quorum, and all questions shall be decided by a majority. 

17. The Vice-Chancellor, or, in his absence, the Senior 
Fellow present, shall preside at all Meetings of the Syn- 
dicate. The Chairman at such Meetings shall have a vote, 
and, in case of an equality of votes, a casting vote. 

18. Each Faculty shall report on any subject that may 
be referred to it by the Syndicate. 

19. Any Faculty, or any Member of the Senate, may 
make any recommendation to the Syndicate, and may 
propose any Bye-law or Regulation for the consideration 
of the Syndicate. 

20. Subject to Bye-law 40, the decision of the Syn- 
dicate on any such recommendation or proposal may be 
brought before the Senate by any member of the Senate 
by way of Resolution at one of its Meetings, and the Senate 
may approve, revise, modify or overrule any such decision, 
or may direct the Syndicate to review it. 

21. No proposal shall be entertained by the Senate that 
has not, in the first instance, been considered by the Syn- 
dicate, or submitted for a period of at least three months 
for consideration by the Syndicate. 

IV.— BOARD OF ACCOUNTS. 

22. A Board of Accounts, consisting of three Fellows 
of the University not being members of the Syndicate, shall 
be appointed annually by the Senate within three weeks 



56 BYE-LAWS. 

after the fixed date for the Annual Convocation for Con- 
ferring Degrees. 

23. The Board shall meet ordinarily once every three 
months, and at other times when convened by the Vice- 
Chancellor. 

24. The Board shall examine and audit the University 
Accounts ; prepare the University Budget, and the account 
of Endowment and Trust Funds ; consider ways and 
means; and make recommendations, where necessary, to 
the Syndicate on all matters relating to the finances of 
the University. 

25. Members of the Board shall hold ofl&ce until the next 
Annual Election. They shall be eligible for re-appoint- 
ment at the expiration of their office. All vacancies in the 
Board occurring between two Annual Elections shall be 
filled up by persons appointed by the Syndicate. 

v.— THE EEGISTRAR. 

26. The Registrar shall be appointed by the Senate at 
an Ordinary Annual Meeting. His term of office shall be 
two years, but the Registrar may be re-appointed. 

27. The duties of the Registrar shall be as follows : — 

(a) To be the custodian of the Records, Library, Com- 

mon Seal, and such other property of the Univer- 
sity as the Syndicate shall commit to his charge. 

(b) To act as Secretary to the Syndicate and to attend 

all Meetings of the Senate, Faculties, Syndicate, 
Board of Accounts and Examiners, and to keep 
Minutes thereof. 

(c) To conduct the official correspondence of the 

Syndicate. 

{dj To issue all notices convening meetings of the Se- 
nate, Faculties, Syndicate and Board of Accounts. 

(e) To perforin such other duties as may be from time to 
time prescribed by the Syndicate, and generally to 
render such assistance as may be desired by the 
Vice-Chancellor inperformauce'.of his official duties. 

28. The salary of the Registrar shall be Rs. 360 per 
month. 



MEETIITGS OF THE SENATE. 0/ 

29. Leave of absence may be granted to the Registrar by 
the Syndicate for a period not exceeding two months for any 
one term of office, or six months in all, on such terms as 
to salary as the Syndicate may think proper. During the 
absence of the Registrar on leave, an Acting Registrar may 
be appointed by the Syndicate, who shall be paid at such 
rate not exceeding the salary of the Registrar as the Syn- 
dicate may determine. If the Registrar shall overstay his 
leave, his appointment shall become vacant. 

30. In case of necessity the Vice-Chancellor is empower- 
ed to provide for the performance of the duties of the 
Begistrar. 

VI.— MEETINGS OF THE SENATE. 

31. Meetings of the Senate shall be held in the Sir Cowas- 
jee Jehan^hier Hall of the University, unless for special rea- 
sons the Chancellor or Vice-Chancellor otherwise directs. 

32. Such propos als and amendments only as are imme- 
diately connected with the University of Bombay, and are 
in accordance with the Act of Incorporation, shall be enter- 
tained and debated in the Senate. 

33. The Senate shall meet ordinarily once a year, on the 
Fourth Saturday in the First Term in Arts, and at other 
times when convened by the Vice-Chancellor, or, in his 
absence from the Presidency, by the Syndicate. 

34. A meeting of the Senate shall be convened on the re- 
quisition of any six of the Fellows to the Vice-Chancellor. 

35. A Convocation for Conferring Degrees shall be held 
on the Third Tuesday in January, and on such other gradua- 
tion days as may be appointed by the Chancellor or Vice- 
Chancellor. 

36. Persons entitled to Degrees, and desirous of being ad- 
mitted, must apply in writing ten days previously to the Re- 
gistrar, who will communicate their names, together with 
the necessary certificates, to the respective Deans of Faculty, 
for submission to the Senate on the next graduation day. 

37. The Senate will, on the motion of the Deans of Fa- 
culty, respectively pass the necessary graces in that behalf, 
and the Dean of Faculty will then present the persons so 
approved of to the Chancellor or Vice-Chancellor successively 
in the following order: — Licentiate of Civil Eugineering, 
Licentiate of Medicine and Surgery, Bachelor of Science, 



58 firE-LAWs, 



Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Laws, Master of Civil Engi' 
neering, Master of Arts, and Doctor of Medicine. 

38. Nothinj? in the forejj^oing is to be held to prevent the 
Chancellor admitting to the Degree of M. D. or M. A. any 
person who may be presented to him by the Senate with a 
certificate that he has been examined and judged worthy of 
such special distinction, 

39. In special cases and at the discretion of the Syndic- 
ate, Candidates who have passed the Examinations may be 
permitted to take their Degrees in absentia. 

40. Fourteen days before the day fixed for a Meeting of 
the Senate the Registrar shall forward to each member of 
the Senate a statement of all business to be brought before 
the Meeting and of the terras of all Resolutions to be then 
proposed, together with the name of the proposer of each, in- 
timation in writing of which has previously reached him. 
Notice in writing of proposed amendments and the terms there- 
of and of motions for any change in the order of business as 
set forth in the statement, must be forwarded so as to reach 
the Registrar four clear days* before the day of Meeting. 
The Registrar shall, two clear days before the day of Meeting, 
forward to each member of the Senate a statement of all the 
motions and amendments ; and no motion or amendment, of 
which such notice has not been given, shall be put to the 
Meeting, other than a motion for dissolution, adjournment, 
or suspension of the sitting, for passing to the next business 
on the statement, for directing the Syndicate to review their 
decision, or an amendment which shall be accepted by the 
Chairman as merely formal. 

N. B. — The Chancellor, or in his absence the Vice-Chan- 
cellor, or, in the absence of both, a Fellow elected by the 
MeetinsT, presides at the Meetings of the Senate. The 
Senior Fellow present shall take the chair for and until such 
election only. Six members of the Senate form a quorum, 
and all questions are decided by a majority of the votes of 
the members present, the Cbairman, in case of an equality of 
votes, having a second or casting vote (Act XXII. of 1867, 
section IX). 

* " Four clear days " moans four days exclusive of the day on which notice 
reaches tho Resr STiir and of the day of Meeting. Thus, if the meeting is fixed 
for Saturday, the notice mii>t reach the Registrar on Monday ; if for Friday, 
the notice must reach him on Saturday. 



RULES OF DEBATK. bd 

VIL— ORDER OF BUSINESS. 

41. Each Fellow, before he takes his place, shall write 
his name on a slip of paper which shall be provided for the 
purpose at the entrance of the place of Meeting, and which 
he shall then deliver to the door-keeper. 

42. At the expiration of half an hour from the time of 
Meeting, the Chairman shall take notice whether there are 
six Fellows present ; and if there are not, the Meeting shall 
forthwith be dissolved. Such dissolution shall be recorded 
by the Registrar under the signature of the Chairman. 

43. At every Meeting the business to be entertained 
shall, unless the Meeting shall by special vote otherwise 
determine, be taken in the following order : — 

(1.) The election, if it is part of the business to be enter- 
tained at the Meeting, of the Chairman. 

(2.) Tbe election, if it is part of the business to be enter- 
tained at the Meeting, of any official of the Univereity. 

(3.) Any motion for a change in the order of business. 

(4.) Any business and motions of which due notice has 
been given in the order in which such business and motions 
are entered in the statement of the business and motions to 
be brought forward subject to the provisions of this Bye- 
law and to Bye-law 49. 

Vin.— RULES OF DEBATE, 
(i.) Motions. 

44. Every motion shall be aflfirmative in form, and shaU 
begin with the word That. 

4.5. Every motion at a Meeting must be seconded ; other- 
wise it will drop. Any Fellow may second a motion, by 
saying " That motion is seconded by me," and may reserve 
his speech. 

46. AYhen a motion has been seconded, it shall be stated 
from the Chair, which shall be done by the Chairman say- 
ing " The proposal is," and concluding in the terms of the 
motioui 

47. When the proposal has been thus stated, it may be 
(Jiscttssed as a question to be resolved simply in the aflBrma^ 



60 BYE-LAWS. 

tive or negative, or as proposed to be vai'ied by way of 
amendment. When, before or after debate, no Fellow rises 
to speak to the motion, the Chairman shall proceed to put 
the question to the vote in the manner hereinafter men- 
tioned. 

48. Not more than one proposal and one amendment 
thereto shall be placed before the Meeting at the same time. 

49. A substantive proposal once brought forward shall 
not be proposed a second time at the same Meeting, or at 
any adjournment thereof. A proposal substantially iden- 
tical in part with one already brought forward may be 
brought forward with the omission of such part. 

(ii.) Amendments. 

50. Any proposal before the Meeting may be amended 
(1) by simply leaving out a word or words ; (2) by leaving 
out a word or words and adding or inserting a word or 
words ; (3) by simply adding or inserting a word or words. 

51. No amendment shall be proposed which would re- 
duce a proposal to a negative form, or would alter the first 
word. 

52. No amendment shall be proposed which substantial- 
ly raises a question already disposed of by the Meeting, or ,] 
is inconsistent with any resolution already passed by it. J 

53. The order in which amendments to a proposal are^ 
to be brought forward shall be determined by the Chairman 
with reference to their extent and mutual relation subject 
to Bye-law 43 (3) and (4)_ 

54. An amendment may be moved by any Fellow who 
has not already spoken in the debate, and must be seconded 
in the same way as a motion ; otherwise it will drop. An 
amendment, the substance of which has been disposed of 
in part, may be modified by its proposer so as to retain only 
the part not so disposed of. 

55. When an amendment has been moved and seconded, 
it shall be stated from the Chair, and then the debate may 
proceed on the original proposal and the amendment to- 
gether ; but, so far as the question raised by the amendment 
is one on which he has not yet spoken, any Fellow may 
speak to that question, though he has spoken to the original 
question, or a previous amendment 



RULES OF DEBATE. 61 

(iii). — Ptitting the Question ; Further Amendments. 

56. When the debate is concluded, the Chairman shall 
put question to the vote thus : — 

If there is no amendment, the Chairman shall say " The 
proposal is," and conclude in the terms of the motion. 

If there is an amendment he shall say " It has been 
moved," and state the motion ; then he shall say " Since 
which it has been moved by way of amendment," and 
state the amendment ; and then, if the amendment is 
one of the first two kinds, he shall put the question 
" Shall the words (or word) proposed to be left out be 
retained." 

If the amendment is of the second kind, and the last- 
mentioned question has been resolved in the affirmative, 
the amendment shall drop. If the last-mentioned ques- 
tion has been negatived, the ChairmHn shall then put 
the question " Shall the proposed words be added " 
[or " inserted"]. 

If the amendment is of the third kind, the first question 
put shall be " That those words be there added " [or 
" inserted "]. 

57. If an amendment is negatived, the original motion 
shall be again stated from the Chair, and, subject to the 
foregoing Bye-laws, any other amendment duly notified 
shall then be proposed thereto, 

58. If an amendment is carried, the proposal as amended 
shall be stated from the Chair, and may then be debated as 
a substantive question, to which the further amendments 
to the original proposal of which due notice has been given 
and so far as they shall be applicable, may be pi-oposed 
subject to the foregoing Bye-laws ; and such further amend- 
ments shall be disposed of in the same manner as the ori- 
ginal amendment. 

59. No question shall be withdrawn from the decision 
et the Meeting without its unanimous consent ; but thi.-t 
consent shall be presumed if the mover states his wish to 
withdraw the motion, and the Chairman, after an interval, 
announces that it is withdrawn. 

(iv.) Adjournments, <&c. 

60. A proposal "That this Meeting be now dissolved" or 
lie now adjourned to (some specified time)" may 

B 1030—6 Btr 



62 BYE-LAWS. 

be moved at any time as a distinct question, but not as an 
amendment, nor so as to interrupt a speech. If a motion 
for dissolution is carried, the business before tbe Meeting 
shall drop. 

61 . A proposal " That the debate be now adjourned " may 
be moved at the like time and in the like manner as the 
motion "That this Meeting be now adjourned," and if 
carried shall have the effect of postponing the debate till 
the next Meeting. If it be negatived, the debate shall be 
resumed. 

62. No amendment shall be moved to a proposal under 
either of the two last preceding Bye-laws, except one for 
substituting a different time for that for which it is pro- 
posed to adjourn the Meeting or debate. 

63. A Meeting or a debate renewed or continued after 
an adjournment is to be deemed one with that preceding 
the adjournment, 

64. The motion " That the Meeting pass to the next 
business on the statement " may be made at any time, in 
like manner and subject to the same rules as one for 
adjournment. If such a motion be carried, the proposal 
under consideration and the amendment thereto shall not 
be further dealt with at the Meeting. 

66. No motion for the dissolution or for the adjourn- 
ment of the Meeting, or for the adjournment of the debate, 
or for the suspension of the sitting, or to pass to the next 
business, shall be made or spoken to during a debate by 
any Fellow who has spoken in the debate or shall be spoken 
to by such Fellow. Any such motion shall take the place 
of any question that may be before the Meeting, and, if not 
withdrawn, must be disposed of before such question. 

66. When a motion of the class contemplated in the last 
preceding Bye -law has been brought forward and nega- 
tived, no other motion of that class shall be again brought 
forward until after the lapse of what the Chairman shall 
deem a reasonable time ; nor shall a debate be allowed on' 
such second or subsequent motion brought forward during 
u debate on the same proposal discussed alone, or the same 
proposal and amendment discussed together, according to 
xJye-law 43. 



BULBS OF DEBATE. 63 

(v.) MiseeUanemis . 

67- On each proposal, or proposal and amendment in 
debate, a Fellow may speak once, subject to the provisions 
of Bye-law3 64 and 65. 

68. The Fellow who is first up, at the conclnsion of a 
speech, has the right to be heard. In cases of competi- 
tion the Chairman shall decide. 

69. The mover of every original Resolution miy reply 
upon the whole debate. But the mover of an amsndmsnt 
or of a dissolution or adjournment, or of the suspension 
of the sitting, or that the Meeting pass to the next busi- 
ness on the statement, has no right to reply. 

70. No Fellow shall speak to the question after the 
mover has entered on his reply. 

71. The Chairman has the same right of moving or 
seconding a motion or amendmant and of addressing the 
Meeting as any other Fellow. But he shall vacate the 
chair whilst he is addressing the Meeting, and the chiir 
shall during such time be taken by the Senior Fellow pre- 
sent not being the Chairman. 

72. Any Fellow may call the Chairman's attention to a 

Siint of order even whilst another Fellow is addressing the 
eeting, but no speech shall be made on such point of 
order. Such a call pronounced by the Chairman to be vex- 
atious, and any interruption or obstruction to the progress 
of the business before the Senate so proioiinced to be un- 
seemly or unreasonable, shall be deemed a breach of order. 

73. The Chairman shall be the sole judge on any point 
of order, and may call any Fellow to order, and, if the Fel- 
low so called to order shall in speaking disregard such call, 
the Chairman may direct him to sit down and thereon an- 
other Fellow may speak. In the event of any contumacious 
disregard of a ruling or call to order by the Ciiairmau, he 
may request the Fellow so offending to leave the Meeting, 
^^\ on such requisition the Fellow named by the Chainnan 

11 be suspended from his functions as a Fellow duiing 
Meeting, and shall be bound immediately to withdraw. 

~ r. Any motion standing in the name of a Member who 
bsent from a Meeting may be brought forward by any 
• r Member. 



64 BTB-LAWS- 

(vi.) Voting. 

75. On putting any question to the vote, the Chairman 
shall call for an indication of the opinion of the Senate by a 
show of hands in the affirmative and negative, or by sitting 
and rising, and shall declare the result thereof according 
to his opinion. 

76. Any Fellow may then demand a Division, except 
on a motion of the kind contemplated in Bye-laws 60 and 
61. 

77. The Chairman shall thereupon appoint four Tellers, 
two on each side ; and shall give such directions for eflEect- 
ing the Division as he shall consider expedient. 

78. Upon the Chairman announcing the Division to be 
begun, every Fellow who was present at the putting of the 
question and desires to vote, shall signify his vote by giving 
to the Tellers for the side of the question upon which he 
intends to vote, a paper stating his name. 

79. Upon the Chairman announcing the Division to be 
closed, the Tellers shall state in writing the numbers on 
each side, sign the statement, and hand it to the Chairman, 
together with the papers (in two separate bundles) con- 
taining the names of the several voters on each side, where- 
upon the Chairman shall declare the result of the Division 
to the Meeting, and the Division Lists shall be recorded in 
the Minutes. 

80. If, after a Division has been taken, five Fellows pre- 
sent shall in writing demand a scrutiny, the Chairman 
shall appoint two or more Fellows to act with the Tellers 
as Scrutineers ; and such Scrutineers shall thereupon with- 
draw and compare the numbers with the names and such 
names with the list of the Senate for the time being, and 
shall report the facts found by them to the Chairman, who 
shall thereupon declare the result to the Meeting, and such 
declaration shall be conclusive. 

81. Pending the scrutiny, the Chairman may, in his dis- 
cretion, either suspend the sitting or call for such business 
as may, in his opinion, be most conveniently proceeded 
with. Business thus entered on, shall be proceeded with ; 
but on its disposal the regular order of subjects, if it have 
been departed from, shall be resumed. 



UNIVERSITY TBRMS. 



IX.— ELECTIONS. 



65 



82. Elections by the Senate shall be conducted accord- 
ing to the rules hereinbefore provided, subject to the modi- 
fication prescribed by the Bye-laws next following. 

83. No Candidate shall be put in nomination at any 
Meeting of the Senate for a seat on the Board of Accounts 
or as Registrar or at any Meeting of a Faculty for the 
oJSBce of Dean of such a Faculty, or Syndic, unless a proposi- 
tion for his nomination in writing, signed by the intending 
proposer and seconder, shall have been handed in to the 
University office at least four clear days previously. And 
the University Registrar shall, two clear days before the 
Meeting, forward to every Member of the Senate or Faculty, 
as the case may be, a list of the proposed nominations. 

84. In all cases of contested election, the election shall 
be by ballot by means of voting papers. In case of a con- 
tested election amongst more than two candidates for a 
single appointment, the candidate who has the smallest 
number of votes on a first ballot shall be withdrawn, and 
another ballot between the remaining candidates shall 
then be taken ; and so on until the number of candidates is 
reduced to two, when the final ballot between these two shall 
be taken. In case of a contested election for more than 
one appointment, each Fellow shall be entitled to give as 
many votes as there are appointments to be filled, but shall 
not give more than one vote for one person, 

ENDOWMENTS. 

85. A Statement of all Endowments and Trust Funds 
held by the University shall be published annually in the 
University Calendar. 

UNIVERSITY TERMS. 

86. The University year for the Faculties of Arts, Civil 
Engineering, and Medicine shall be divided into two terms. 
In the Faculties of Arts and Civil Engineering the First 
Term shall commence on the Third Monday in November, 
and shall end on the Third Monday in April. In the 
Faculty of Medicine the First Term shall commence on the 
First of November and shall end on the Thirtieth of April. 
In the Faculties of Arts and Civil Engineering the Second 

B 1030—6 BU? 



/ 

^^ / BYE- LAWS. 

/ 

Term shall commence on the Second Monday in June and 
shall end on the ygird Monday in September. In the Fa- 
culty of Medicin/ the Second Term shall commence on the 
Fifteenth of Ju^g and end on the Fifteenth of September. 

87. Terms/can be kept only by matriculated students 
who shall a^end for a prescribed number of days at one or 
more of thfe Colleges or Institutions recognized by the 
Universit 

ihe following shall be the number of days' attend- 
ance Veoessary for keeping terms : — For the First Temi 
^'ig^iy days ; for the Second Term in the Faculties of 
-^■^and Civil Engineering, sixty days ; and for the Second 
'^Jtrm in that of Medicine, seventy days. But if an Under- 
graduate shall, after his matriculation, attend sixty days 
ouring that same term in which he has matriculated, he 
shall be held to have kept that term. 

89. The Principals and Heads of Colleges and Institu- 
tions will be requested to register the daily attendance of 
nmtriculated students, with a view to being able to certify 
their having kept terms. 

90. Days during which Undergraduates or Graduates 
are engaged in University Examinations may count to- 
wards the keeping of their terms. 

91. To keep a term at a College or Recognized Institu- 
tion, an Undergraduate must go through the full course 
of study at that College or Ins titution prescribed for such 
term to the class to which such Undergraduate then 
belongs. 



VI 

I. ARTS. 

In the foV-Oicing Regulations the pronoun " A«" and its 

derivatives are used to denote either sex, the masculine 

or the feminine. 

MATRICULATION. 

1. The Examination will be held once a year at Bombay 
and at such other places as shall, from time to time, be ap- 
pointed by the Syndicate,* commencing on the Third Monday 
in November. 

2. Candidates must forward an application to the Regis- 
trar two months before the Examination. (Vide Form A.) 

3. Two months before the commencement of the Exami- 
nation, each Candidate must pay or cause to be paid to the 
Registrar at Bombay, or to such person as he may appoint 
in the Mofussil, a fee of Rs. 10, for which a receipt wiU be 
given. (Vide Form B.) 

4. Failure to pass the Examination will not disqualify 
the Candidate for again presenting himself at any subse- 
quent Matriculation Examination on a new application 
being forwarded, and a fresh fee paid. 

5. Candidates will be examined in Languages, Mathe- 
matics, and Greneral Knowledge. 

I. — Laxgcagzs. — Two papers. 

1. English. 

2. One of the foUowinor : — 



Sanskrit. 


French. 


Hindustani. 


Greek. 


Portuguese. 


Persian. 


Latin, t 


Marathi. 


Sindhi. 


Hebrew. 


Gujarathi. 




Arabic. 


Canarese. 





* The following places have been appointed by the Syndicate : — 
Poona, Belgaum, AJimedabad, and Karachi. 

t The attention of students intending to study Medicine is 
drawn to the fact that the Examining Bodies of the United 
King Jom which recognize the Matriculation Examination of the 
University of Bombay, require a certificate that the Candidate 
passed in Latiu. 



I 



f>8 EEGULA,TIONS. 

(Any other language may at any time be added to this 
list by the Syndicate.) 

In English there will be one paper containing (1) one or 
more passages for paraphrase, with, as an alteinative, one 
or more passages for trauslation into English in the following 
Ternacular languages, viz.: — Marathi, Gujarathi, Canarese, 
Hindustani, Sindhi and Portuguese ; (2) questions in gram- 
mar ; and (8) an exercise or exercises in composition. 

In the second Language there will be one paper contain- 
ing prose passages for translation from and into English, 
and questions in grammar. 

The Candidate will be called upon to read and to explain 
extempore a prose passage from a standard author to be 
selected by the Examiners. 

N.B. — It is essential that the Candidate should not know 
beforehand from what books he will have to read. 

II. — Mathematics. — Two papers. 

Ist. — Arithmetic. The examples to be worked from first 
principles, and not merely by rules. Algebra to Simple 
Equations inclusive. Problems will be set involving 
Simple Equations, 

2nd. — First four books of Euclid, with deductions. 

III. — General Knowledge. — Two papers. 

1st. — Elementary History of England and India, and 
Elementary Geography. 

2nd. — Elementary knowledge of — 

(a.) — The mechanical powers, 

(b.) — The laws of chemical combination, the chemistry 
of air and water, and the phenomena of combustion 

(c.)— The solar system. 

N.B. — Candidates m\ist satisfy the Examiners in each 
branch of the Examination. 

6. The Examination will be conducted by means of 
printed questions to be answered in English, except when 
otherwise specified. The Candidates will also be examined 
vivd voce in English, 



THB PBETIOUS EXAMINATION. 69 

7. On the Fourth Monday after the commencement of 
the Examination, the Examiners will publish a list of suc- 
cessful Candidates in the order of merit, with the total 
number of marks obtained by each Candidate, and the name 
of his school. 

8. A Certificate will be given to those who pass the 
Examination. (Fi'Je Form C.) 

BACHELOR OF ARTS. 

9. Candidates for the Degree of Bachelor of Arts must 
have passed the Matriculation Examination, and will be 
required to pass three subsequent examinations, the first 
to be called the Previous Examination, the second the 
First Examination for the Degree of Bachelor of Arts, and 
the third the Second Examination for the Degree of Bache- 
lor of Arts. 

N.B. — A Bachelor of Science of this University who has 
kept six terms therein, may obtain the Degree of 
Bachelor of Arts by passing the final examination only 
for that Degree. 

THE PREVIOUS EXAMINATION. 

10. The Previous Examination will be held once a year 
in Bombay, commencing on the First Monday in November. 

11. No Undergraduate will be admitted to this Exami- 
nation unless he shall have kept two terms at a College 
or Institution recognized in Arts, and unless he produce 
satisfactory testimonials under Form D. 

Any Undergraduate of a University recognized by the 
University of Bombay may lie admitted to this Examina- 
tion, provided his testimonials of good conduct and length 
of study from his own University be satisfactory. 

12. Candidates must forward an application to the 
Registrar at least two months before the Examination. 
{Vide Form D.) 

13. Each Candidate must pay to the Registrar a fee of 
Rs. 20, for which a receipt will be given. {Vide Form E.) 

14. Candidates will be examined in the following sub- 
jects : — 

I. Languages. 

II. Mathematics. 
III. Logic. 
rV. History. 

V. Natural Science. 



/O REGULATIONS. 

I. — Languages — Two papers. 

1. English, 

2. One of the following : — 

Sanskrit. I Latin. I Arabic. 

Greek. | Hebrew. | Persian. 

Candidates will be examined in books to be prescribed 
by the Syndicate one year before the Examination. 

In each language there will be one paper and a vivd voce 
Examination. The paper in English will contain passages 
to be paraphrased. The paper in the second language will 
contain passages for translation both out of that language 
into English and vice versd. The paper on each language 
will contain questions in grammar, as well as in the mat- 
ter of the books taken up by the Candidates. 

II. — Mathematics — Two papers. 

1. Algebra to Quadratic Equations, inclusive, with 
Proportion and Variation, Permutations and 
Combinations, the Progressions, and the Binomial 
Theorem. 

2. Euclid, Books I — IV and VI, with deductions, and 

Definitions of Book V. 

III. — Logic — One paper. 

Logic. — The subjects treated of in Fowler's Deductive Logic 
The Examination will comprise easy questions in Logical 
Analysis. 

IV.— History— One paper. . 
Ancient History. 

A definite period will be notified by the Syndicate one 
vear before the Examination. 

V. — Natural Science. — One paper. 

Elementary Physics (except Light and Electricity), 
viz., Laws of Motion — Forces of Nature considered 
generally — Energy considered generally— Visible 
Energy — Heat. 

Text book recommended in Elementary Physics ; Balfour 
Stewart -. Lessons in Elementary Physics. 



F1E31 EXAMIKATION FOR THE DEGREE OF B.A. 71 

15. The Examination will be conducted by means of 
printed questions to be answered in English, except when 
otherwise specified. The Candidates will also be examined 
viva voce in languages. 

16. On the Third Monday in November the Examiners 
will publish a list of successful Candidates in two Classes 
and Pass, the names in each Class and Pass being arranged 
in alphabetical order. 

FIRST EXAMINATION FOR THE DEGREE 
OF BACHELOR OF ARTS. 

17. The First Examination for the Degree of Bachelor 
of Arts will be held annually at Bombay, commencing on 
the First Monday in November. 

18. No Undergraduate will be admitted to this Examin- 
ation unless he shall have kept four terms in the University 
of Bombay, and unless he produce satisfactory testimonials 
under Form F. 

N.B. — An Undergraduate of a University recognized by 
the University of Bombay, who has passed at his own Uni- 
versity an Examination in Arts corresponding, ia the judg- 
ment of the Syndicate, to the Previous Examination at this 
University, may be admitted to this Examination, provided 
that he has studied in residence for such time at a recognized 
University or at this University, or partly at one and partly 
at the other, as may be considered by the Syndicate equi- 
valent, in the circumstances of each case, to the terms requir- 
ed for the aforesaid Examinations. 

19. Candidates must forward an application to rhe 
Registrar at least two months before the Examination. 
{Vide Form F.) 

20. Each Candidate must pay to the Registrar a fee of 
Rs. 20, for which a receipt will be given. {Vide Form G.) 

21. Failure to pass the Examination will not disqualify 
the Candidate for presenting himself on a subsequent 
occasion on a new application being forwarded and a 
fresh fee paid. 



72 EKGULATIONS. 

22. Candidates will be examined in the following sub- 
jects : — 

I. Languages. 
II. Mathematics. 

I. — Languages — Four papers. 

1. English. 

2. One of the following : — 

Sanskrit. I Latin. J Arabic. 

Greek. J Hebrew. | Persian. 

Candidates will be examined in books to be prescribed 
by the Syndicate one year before the Examination. 

In each language there will be two papers and a viva 
voce Examination. The papers on BnglLsh will contain pass- 
ages to be paraphrased. The papers on the second lan- 
guage will contam passages for translation both out of that 
language into English and vice versa. The papers on each 
language will contain questions in grammar, as well as 
ia the matter of the books taken up by the Candidates. 

II. — Mathematics — Two papers. 

1. Trigonometry. — Solution of Plane Triangles with 
expressions for the Area- The nature and use of 
Logarithms. 

2. Statics. — Composition and Besolution of Forces, 
Centre of Gravity, and the Mechanical Powers. 

23. The Examination will be conducted by means of 
printed questions to be answered in English, except when 
otherwise specified. The Candidates will also be examined 
•jivd voce in Languages. 

24. On the Third Monday in November the Examiners 
will publish a list of successful Candidates in two Classes 
and Pass, the names in each Class and Pass being arranged 
in alphabetical order. 

25. A Certificate will be given to those who paes ti»e 
Examination. {Vide Form K.) 



SECOND EXAMINATION FOR THi: DEGREE OF B.A. 73 

SECOND EXAMINATION FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF ARTS. 

26. The Second Examination for the Degree of Bachelor 
if Arts will be held annually at Bombay, commencing on 
he Second Monday in November. 

27. No Undergraduate will be admitted to this Examin- 
,tion unless he shall have kept six terms in the University 
if Bombay, or has been admitted to the First Examination 
or the Degree of B.A. under the N.B. to Regulation 18, and 
las thereafter kept two terms in the University of Bombay, 
md unless he produce satisfactory testimonials under 
^orm I. 

28. Candidates must forward an application to the 
Registrar at least two months before the Examination {vide 
Foi-m I). 

29. Each Candidate must pay to the Registrar a fee of 
Rs. 10, for which a receipt will be given (vide Form J). 

30. Failure to pass the Examination will not disqualify 
;he Candidate for presenting himself on a subsequent 
jccasion, on a new application being forwarded and a fresh 
tee paid. 

31. Candidates will be examined in the following sub- 
jects : — 

1. Languages. 

II. One of the following groups to be selected by the 
Candidate : — 

A. Language and Literature. 

B. History and Political Economy. 

C. Logic and Moral Philosophy. 

D. Mathematics. 

E. Natural Science. 

I. — Languages — Two papers, 
I 1. English. 

2. One of the following : — 

Sanskrit. J Latin. I Arabic. 

Greek, | Hebrew. | Persian. 

Candidates will be examined in books in each language 
j» be prescribed by the Syndicate two years before thd 
{Examination. 

B 1030—7 Btr 



74 RBGtJLATIONS. 

In each language there will be one paper. The paper 
on the second language will contain passages for trans- 
lation both out of that language into English and vice 
versa. The paper on each language will contain ques- 
tions in grammar, as well as in the matter of the books 
taken up by the Candidates. 

II. — Groups — Four papers, 

A. — Language and Literatube, 

(a.) English — Two papers on books to be prescribed from 
time to time by the Syndicate. 

(b.) Second Language — Two papers on books to be pre- 
scribed from time to time by the Syndicate. 

B. — History and Political Economy. 

(a.) Political Economy — One paper ; Smith : Wealth of 
Nations ; Fawcett : Manual of Political Economy. 

(5.) History of India in the 16th, 17th, and 18th Cen- 
turies down to the overthrow of the Peshwa. One 
paper : Elphinstone : Histoiy of India ; Mill : History 
of British India. 

(c.)— One of the following : — 

(1.) History of Rome, from the earliest times to the 
close of the Republic. Two papers : one on the 
Political History, and one on the History of 
Institutions, Literature, and Religion. 

(2.) History of Greece, from the Persian invasion to 
the taking of Corinth. Two papers, as above. 

(3.) History of England, from the Restoration to the 
passing of the Reform Bill in 1832. Two papers 
one on the Political History, and one on the 
History of Institutions, Literature, and Science. 

C. — Logic and Moral Philosophy. 
(a.) Logic — Two papers : Fowler : Deductive and In- 
ductive Logic ; Mill : Books I, II, and III. 

(6.) Moral Philosoiihy. — Two papers : Sidgwick : Method 
of Ethics ; Butler : First part of the Analogy, and 
Sermons. 



SSCOND EXAMINATION FOR THE DEGREE OP B.A. 75 

D. — Mathematics. 

(a) Fure Mathematics, 

a.) Conic Sections treated Geometrically and Analytteallyj 
not including abridged notation. One paper. 

h') Differential Calculus: One paper — Differentiation of 
Functions of one variable ; Successive Differentiation ; 
Taylor's Theorem ; Evaluation of Indeterminate Func- 
tions ; Maxima and Minima of Functions of one variable. 
Integral Calculus. — Integration of Functions of one vari- 
able. 

(b) Applied MathemaUcs. 

[The student may select either (1) and (2), or (3) and (4).] 

1) — Dynamics : One paper : Laws of motion ; Uniform 
and uniformly accelerated motion ; FaUing Bodies ; 
Projectiles ; Collision ; the Pendulum. 

2) — Hydrostaiics : One paper : Pressure of non-elastic and 
elastic Fluids ; Specific gravity ; Floating Bodies ; Ro- 
tating Liquid ; Tension of vessels containing Fluids ; 
Construction and use of the more simple Instruments 
and Machines. 

3) — Optics : One paper : Reflection and Refraction of Rays 
at Plane and Spherical Surfaces, not including Aber- 
rations ; Refraction through Prisms, Plates and Lenses ; 
the Eye ; Telescopes. 

[4) — Astronomy : One paper : The more elementary parts 
so far as they are necessary for the explanation of the 
more simple phenomena without calculation. 
E. — Natueal Science. 
[The student may select either (1) and (2), or (3) and (4). 
(1) — Elementary Physics : Two papers : Laws of motion ; 
Forces of Nature considered generally ; Energy con- 
sidered generally ; Visible energy ; Heat, Light and 
Electricity ; Oral examination on the use of apparatus. 

{2) — Inorganic Chemistry: Two papers: The Chemistry 
of the non-metallic elements and their more important 
compounds ; the Chemistry of the principal metallic 
elements and their more important oomponnds ; 
general principles of Chemical Philosophy ; the prac- 
tical recognition of simple Salts. 



7Q REGULATIONS. 

(3) — Vegetable Anatomy and Physiology, and Systematic 
Botany : Two papers : Flowering Plants ; their Parts ; 
the Leaf ; Stem ; Buds and branches ; the various 
forms and the duration of Plants ; the Root and un- 
derground stem ; Inflorescence ; the Flower ; Calyx ; 
Corolla ; Stamens and Pistil ; Structure of the 
Ovule ; the Fruit and Seed ; Fertilization ; Germina- 
tion ; Cells and their contents • Chemical constituents 
of Plants ; the structure and vital processes of the 
Stem, Root, and Leaf ; Surface covering and append- 
ages of Plants ; Food of Plants ; Principles of Classi- 
fication ; a general knowledge of the characters, dis- 
tribution, properties and uses of the following natural 
order : — Anonacece, Cruciferoe, Malvaceoe Ampelideos, Le- 
gt(,minos(e,Myrtaceoe, Cucurbitaceoe,UmbelUferce, Bitbiacece, 
Compositoe, Apocynece, Convolvulacece, Labiatce, Urticeoe, 
Eupliorbiacece, Scitamineoe, Orchidece, Amaryllidece, 
Fahnce, Aroidece and Graminece. 

A general knowledge of the two Cryptogamic orders 
Filices and Fungi. 

Practical Examination. — Description and recognition of 
species and of microscopic preparations, The collection 
and drying of Botanical Specimens. 

(4) — Comparative Anatomy and Physiology : Two papers : 
Structure of a Mammalian animal, with the minute 
structure and chemical constituents of the more 
important tissues ; its elementary Physiology ; the 
Blood ; Vascular System and Circulation ; Respira- 
tion ; Digestion ; the sources of loss and gain to the 
Blood ; Motion and Locomotion ; Voice and Speech ; 
Nervous System ; Innervation ; Sensation ; Organs of 
sight, sound, smell, taste and touch ; Reproduction ; 
Life and Death ; Elementary Anatomy and Physiology 
of a Bird, Lizard, Frog, Fish, Oyster, Insect, Lobster, 
Earthworaa, Starfish, Jellyfish, and Sponge ; Princi- 
ples of Zoological Classification ; Distribution of Spe- 
cies ; Animal Embryology ; Recognition and Descrip- 
tion of Preparations. 

'.>'2. The Examination will be conducted by means of 
printed questions to be answered in English, except when 
otherwise specified. 



FIRST KXAMINATION TOR THE DEGREE OF B.SC. 77 

33. On the Fourth Thursday in November, the Examiner? 
will publish a list of successful Candidates in two Classes 
and Pass, the names in each Class and Pass being arranged 
in alphabetical order. 

34. A Certificate will be given to those who pass the 
Examination {vide Form K). 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE. 

35. Candidates for the Degree of Bachelor of Science 
must have passed the Previous Examination, and will 
be required to pass two subsequent Examinations, the 
one to be called the First Examination for the Degree of 
Bachelor of Science, and the other the Second Examina- 
tion for the Degree of Bachelor of Science. 

K.B. (1)— Masters of Arts who shall have taken that 
Degree prior to the end of 1881, and who in the Examina- 
tion for B.A. have passed in Group C, D. or E., or tht- 
subjects in the opinion of the Syndicate equivalent thereto 
when the examination was passed, and who in the examina- 
tion for the Degree of M.A. have passed in Branch 3 or 4 
of that Examination, may obtain the Degi*ee of B.Sc. on 
passing an examination in such of the subjects prescribed 
for that Degree as in the opinion of the Syndicate shall be 
properly complementary to those in which the Candidates 
have already passed, regard being had to the rules pre- 
scribed for the Final Examination for the Degree of B.Sc. 
But Candidates passing under this provision shall not be 
classed or be eligible for prizes. 

N.B. (2)— A Bachelor of Arts who has taken up Group 
C, D., or E. in the B.A. Examination may obtain the Degree 
of Bachelor of Science on passing the final examination 
only for that Degree. 

I.— FIRST EXAMINATION FOR THE DEGREE 
OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE. 

36. The First Examination for the Degree of Bachelor of 
Science will be held annually at Bombay, eommencing on 
the First Monday in November. 

37. No Undergraduate will be admitted to this Examina- 
tion, unless he shall have kept four terms in the Univei*- 
sity of Bombay, and unless he produce satisfactory tesr 
timonials under Form L. 

B 1030—7 BU* 



78 REGULATIONS. 

N.B. — An Undergraduate of a University recognized by 
the University of Bombay, who has passed at his own 
University an examination in Arts corresponding, in the 
judgment of the Syndicate, to the Previous Examination at 
this University, may be admitted to this Examination, 
provided that he has studied in residence for such time at 
a recognized University or at this University or partly at 
one and partly at the other as may be considered by the 
Syndicate equivalent, in the circumstances of each case, to 
the terms required for the aforesaid examinations. 

38. Candidates must forward an application to the 
Registrar at least two months before the Examination 
{vide Form L). 

39. Each Candidate must pay to the Registrar a fee of 
Rs. 20, for which a receipt wUl be given {vide Form M). 

40. Failure to pass the Examination will not disqualify 
the Candidate for presenting himself on a subseqiient 
occasion, on a new application being forwarded and a fresh 
fee paid. 

41. Candidates will be examined in the following sub- 
jects : — 

1. Mathematics— Two Papers. 

Trigonometry. — Solution of Plane Triangles with 
expressions for the Area. The nature and use of 
Logarithms. 

Statics. — Composition and Resolution of Forces 
Centre of G-ravity- The Mechanical Powers. 

2. Inorganic Chemistry — Two Papers and 
a Practical Examination. 
Differences between Mechanical Mixture, Solution, and 
Chemical Combination. Outlines of Crystallo- 
graphy. Formation of Crystals. Dimorphism. 
Isomorphism. Conditions on which the Melting- 
point and the Boiling-point of a substance depend. 
Difference between Elementary and Compound 
Substances. Laws of Chemical Combination. 
Equivalent Weights of the Elements. Multiple 
Proportions. The Atomic Theory. Atomic Valm 
(Quantivalence). Molecules. Molecular Weights. 
Relation between the Density of a Gas and its 
Molecular Weight. Abnormal Densities. Avoga- 
dro's hypothesis. Combination of Gases by Vo- 
lume. Compound Radicals. Atomic and Mole- 
cular combiBation 



PIBST EXAMINATION FOB THB DEGBBE OF B.SC. 79 

Meaning o£ Chemical symbols, formulae, and equations. 
Calculation of quantities by veight and by volume. 
Chemical changes, and the conditions under which 
they occur. Combination. Decomposition. Double- 
decomposition. Xature of Acids, Bases, and Salts. 
Capacity of Saturation of Acids and Bases. Nomen- 
clature. 

Relation between Atomic "Weight and Specific Heat. 
Faraday's Electrolytic Law. Principles of Spec- 
trum-Analysis. DifEusion of Gases, 

Hifdrogen, Chliyriney Bromine, Iodine^ Fluorine. The 
combinations of the last four elements with Hy- 
drogen. 

Oxygen. Ozone. "Water and Peroxide of Hydrogen. 
The oxides and oxyacids of Chlorine. Chlorates, 
and Hypochlorates. 

Snljphxir. Sulphuretted Hydrogen. The oxides of Sul- 
phur. Sulphuric Acid and the Sulphates. Sul- 
phurous Acid and the Sulphites. Chlorosulphuric 
Acid 

Nitrogen. The Atmosphere, and its relations to animal 
and vegetable Life. Ammonia. Ammonium and 
its Salts. The oxides of Nitrogen. Xitric Acid 
and Xitrates. Nitrous Acid and Nitrites. 

Phosphorus. Phosphuretted Hydrogen. The oxides of 
Phosphorus. Phosphoric Acid and the Phosphates. 
Chloride and Oxychloride of Phosphorus. 

Arsenic and its oxides. Arseniuretted Hydrogen. 
Arsenious Acid and its Salts. Arsenic Acid and 
its Salts. The Sulphides of Arsenic. Detection 
of Arsenic. 

Antimony, its oxides and sulphides. Antimoniuretted 
Hydrogen. Chlorides of Antimony. Compounds 
of Antimonic Oxide. Detection of Antimony. 

Boron. Boracic acid and the Borates. 

Carbon. Carbonic oxide and Carbonic acid. The Car- 
bonates. Carbon Oxysulphide. Sulphocarbonic 
Acid. Marsh-gas. Ethylene. Combustion. Struc- 
ture of Flame. Coal-gas. Davy Lamp. Princi- 
ples of niumination. 

Silic<yn. Siliciuretted Hydrogen. Silicon Chloride, 
Silicon Chloroform. Silica and the Silicates. 

Potassium. Sodium. Silver. 

Calcium. Strontium. Barium. 



80 EEGULATIOKS. 

Aluminium. 

Magnesium. Zinc. Cadmium. 
Lead. 

Manganese. Iron. Cobalt. Nickel. Chromium. 
Bismuth. Copper. Mercury. Gold. Tin. 
Platinum. 

The chief Compounds of these Metals with the more 
important Acid radicals. The detection of these 
Metals, and their Compounds, in powder, or in 
solution. 
3. Experimental Physics — Two Papers. 
[^Candidates will be expected to slwiv a general acquaintance 
vdth the Metliods and Apparatus by which the leading 
principles of Physics, as enumerated below, can be ilhis- 
trated and applied.'] 
Units of Measurement. 

The Laws of Motion considered experimentally 
The chief Forces of Nature. 

The general properties of Solids, Liquids, and Gases. 
The nature, intensity, and transmission of Fluid Pres- 
sure in general. 
The Pressure of Liquids in Equilibrium under the 

action of Gravity. 
The Equilibrium of Solids floating or entirely immersed 
in gravitating Fluids. The Specific Gravities of 
substances, with the ordinary modes of determin- 
ing them. 
Ikleasureraent of the Pressure of the Atmosphere and 

of the Elastic Force of Gases. 
Diffusion of Liquids and Gases. 

Definition of Work and Energy ; Conservation and 
Transmutation of Energy, 
Acoustics. 

Production and mode of Propagation of Sound. 
Intensity, Pitch, and Quality. 
Telocity of Sound in Air. 
Influence of Temperature and Density. 
Velocity of Sound in other Media. 
Laws of Reflection and Refraction. 
Nature of Musical Sounds. 

Longitudinal Vibrations of Rods and of Columns of Air. 
Transverse Vibrations of Strings. Variation in their 
rate of vibration by changes in their tension, 
length, thickness, and substance. 



FIRST EXAMINATION FOB THE DEGREE OF B.SC. 81 

Heat. 

Definitions of Heat and Temperature. 

Construction of Instruments for the Measurement of 
Temperature. 

Expansion of Solids, Liquids, and Grases under Heat. 

Change of State ; Tension of Vapours ; Latent Heat. 

Radiant Heat, its reflection, refraction and absorption. 

Conduction ; definition of Thermal Conductivity. 

Convection. 

Specific Heat. Mechanical Equivalent of Heat. 
Magnetism. 

Properties of Magnets. Induction. Magnetic relations 
of Iron and Steel. 

Terrestrial Magnetism. 
Elrctricitt. 

Two Electrical States and their mutual relations. 

Conduction and Insulation. 

Induction. 

Electric Attraction and Eepulsion. 

Distribution and Accumulation of Electricity on Con- 
ductors. 

Electric Discharge. 

V^oltaic Electricity ; the various Batteries. 

Electromotive Force, Strength of currents, Resistance ; 
Ohm's Law. 

Heating and Chemical effects of Electric Currents. 

Action between Currents and Magnets ; Electro- 
Magnetism. 

Induced Currents ; Magneto-Electricity. 

Thermo-Electricity. 
Optics. 

Laws of Propagation of Light. Measurement of 
Velocity of Light. Photometry. 

Laws of Reflection and Refraction of Light. 

Reflection at Plane and at Spherical Surfaces. 

Refraction at Plane and at Spherical Surfaces. 

Refraction through Lenses, including the formation of 
Images. 

Chromatic Dispersion. 

4. General Biology— Two Papers and a Practical 
Examination. 

Structure, functions, and life-history of simple Unicel- 
lular Plants, such as Protococcus and Saccharomyces 
(Yeast) as types of Vegetable life. 



82 REGULATIONS. 

Structure, functions, and life-history of PenicilUum, 
Mucor, or some other simple Fungus. 

Structure, functions, and life-history of Chara or 
Nitella. 

Morphology, histology, and history of the reproduction 
of a Fern. 

Morphology and histology of a Flowering plant ; 
structure of a flower ; homologies of leaves and 
floral organs ; histology of ordinary vegetable 
tissues, such as epidermis, parenchyma, fibrovas- 
cular tissue, and their arrangement in the stem 
and leaves. 

Growth of a Flowering plant ; formation of wood and 
bark ; nature of cambium. 

Reproduction of a Flowering plant ; structure of ovule; 
methods of fertilization ; development of ovule 
into seed. 

General principles of Vegetable Nutrition ; food of 
plants ; action of green parts of plants ; nature and 
flow of sap. 

Structure, functions, and life-history of the following 
Animals, as types of some of the chief divisions 
of the Animal Kingdom : — Amceha, Vorticella, 
Hydra, Earthworm, Mussel, Snail, Lobster or 
Crayfish, Frog. 

General histology of chief animal tissues :— blood ; 
pavement, columnar, ciliated, and glandular 
epithelium ; connective tissue ; cartilage ; bone ; 
muscle ; nerve-fibres and nerve-cells. 

General physiology of Circulation, Respiration and 
Digestion in the Frog, together with the funda- 
mental properties of muscle, nerve, and the spinal 
cord. 

Reproduction of Frog, and chief phases in life of Tad- 
pole. 

42. On the Third Monday in November the Examin- 
ers will publish a list of successful Candidates in two 
Classes and Pass, the names in each Class and Pass being 
arranged in alphabetical order. 

43. A certificate will be given to those who pass the 
examination. 



SECOND EXAMINATION FOR THE DEGREE OF B.SC 83 

II.— SECOND EXAMINATION FOR THE DEGREE 
OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE. 
44-. The Second Examination for the Degree of Bache- 
lor of Science will be held annually at Bombay, commencing 
on the Second Monday in November. 

45. No Undergraduate will be admitted to this Exam- 
ination, unless he shall have kept six t€rms in the Uni- 
versity of Bombay, or has been admitted to the First 
Examination for the Degree of B.Sc. under the N. B. to 
Regulation 37, and has thereafter kept two terms in the 
University of Bombay, and unless he produce satisfactory 
testimonials under Form 0. 

46. Candidates must forward an application to the 
Registrar at least two months before the Examination {vids 
Form 0.) 

47. Each Candidate must pay to the Registrar a fee of 
Rs. 10, for which a receipt will be given (vule Form P.) 

48. Failure to pass the Examination will not disqualify 
the Candidate for presenting himself on a subsequent 
occasion, on a new application being forwarded and a 
fresh fee paid. 

49. Candidates will be examined in three of the follow- 
ing nine subjects, one at least of which must be chosen 
from among Nos. Ill— VIII : — 

I. PURE MATHEMATICS— Three Papers. 
(1) — Algebra: Binomial and Multinomial Theorems. 
Scales of Notation. Exponential and Logarithmic 
Series. Convergency and Divergency of Series. In- 
equalities. 

Plane Trigonometry. — Properties of Triangles. Asso- 
ciated Circles of a Triangle. Summation of Series 
which do not involve exponential functions. 

Spherical Trigonometry. — As far as Solution of Tri- 
angles. 

(2) — Conic Sections : Treated Greometrically and Analy- 
tically, not including abriged notation. 

'^)— Differential Calculus: Differentiation of Functions 
of one variable. Successive Differentiation. Taylor's 
Theorem. Evaluation of indeterminate Functions. 
Maxima and Minima of Functions of one variable. 
Tangents and Normals of Plane Curves. 



84 REGULATIONS. 

Integral Calculus: Integration of Functions of one 
variable. Rectification and Quadrature of Plane 
Curves. 

II. APPLIED MATHEMATICS— Three Papers. 

(1) — Analijtical Statics. — Composition and Resolution of 
Forces. Centre of Gravity. The Mechanical Powers. 

Elementary Hydrostatics. 

(2) — Elementary Dynamics, 

Dynamics of a Particle. — Rectilinear, Parabolic and 
Elliptic Motion. Central Forces. 

(3) — Elementary Geometrical Optics. 

Astronomy. — The more elementary parts, so far as they 
are necessary for the explanation of the more simple 
phenomena without calculation. 

III. EXPERIMENTAL PHYSICS— Three Papers. 

The subjects prescribed for the First B.Sc. Exa- 
mination with the addition of the following ; the 
whole being treated Mathematically, as well as 
Experimentally, so far as the Mathematics of the 
First B. Sc. Examination are applicable : — 

Friction. 

Elasticity of Solids, Liquids, and Gases ; methods of 

measurement. 
Capillarity. 
Connexion between Energy and Velocity. The various 

Energies and their Transmutations. 
Conservation and Dissipation of Enei'gy. 

Acoustics. 

Indirect methods of measuring Velocity of Sound. 

Transverse Vibrations of Rods. 

Tuning-forks. 

Vibrations of Plates and Membranes. 

Musical Intervals. 

Composition of Vibrations. Beats. 

Interference. 

Resonance. 



J 



SECOND EXAMINATION FOR THE DEGREE OP B.SC. 85 

Harmonics. 

Quality of Musical Sounds. 

Methods o£ analysing Complex Sounds. 

Heat. 

Methods of measuring Specific Heat, CoeflScients of 
Expansion, Tension of Vapours, and Latent Heat ; 
with the chief results that have been obtained. 

Relation between Emission and Absorption of Badiant 
Heat. Theory of Exchanges. Laws of Cooling. 
Variation with Temperature of Quality and Quantity 
of Radiation, 

Measurement of Coefficients of Conductivity and their 
variation with Temperature. 

Laws of Thermodynamics and their principal Applica- 
tions. 

Optics. 

Optical description of the Eye, and Theory of unaided 

Vision. 
Vision through Lenses, Microscopes, and Telescopes. 
Spectrum-Analysis. 
Conditions of Achromatism in thin Compound Prisms 

and Lenses. 
The Wave-Theory ; its explanation of Reflexion and 

Refraction. 
Interference, Double Refraction, and Polarization. 
Nicol's Prism. 
Interference of Polai*ized Light ; Rotatory Polarization. 

Magnetism. 

Magnetic Moments, and methods of comparing them. 
The methods of determining the Dip, Total Intensity 

and Magnetic Declination, at any place. 
Secular and Diurnal Variations. 
Disturbances and their Laws. 
Connexion between Magnetic Disturbances and other 

phenomena. 
Diamagnetism. 

Electricitt. 

Measurement of Electrical Density, Capacity, Quantity 

and Potential. 
Centimetre-gi-amme-second system of Units. 

K 1030—8 Bu 



86 REGULATIONS. 

Theory of Voltaic Battery. 

Measurement of Electromotive Force, Current, and 

Resistance. 
Action of Currents on Currents. 

IV. CHEMISTRY— Two Papers and a Practical Exa- 
mination. 

Inokganic Chemistry, treated more fully than at the 
First B.Sc. Examination. 

Organic Chemistry. 

Detection and estimation of Carbon, Hydrogen, Nitro- 
gen, and Sulphur in Organic Compounds. Calcula- 
tion of empirical formula from percentage composi- 
tion. Determination of molecular weight of organic 
bodies. Compound Radicals. Mode in which th<» 
atoms are supposed to be united in the molecule. 
Types. The Valency of Compound Radicals in Rela- 
tion to the Valency of the Constituent Atoms. 
Saturated and Non-saturated Compounds. 

Isomerism. Metamerism. Polymerism. Homologous 
series. Classification of the Carbon Compounds. 

The general action of Chlorine, Nitric acid, Sulphuric 
acid, Chromic acid, Nascent Hydrogen, Potash, and 
the Chlorides of Phosphorus, on the principal groups 
of Carbon Compounds. 

Fermentation. Decay. 

Synthesis of the following .---Urea. Ethyl Alcohol. 
Tartaric acid. Alizarine. 

Derivatives of the series Cn Hn+2. 

Marsh-gas. Ethyl hydride. A special knowledge of 
Methyl and Ethyl Alcohols and their chief deriva- 
tives, particularly Ethers, Acetic Aldehyde, Formic 
and Acetic acids, with Acetone and Isopropyl- 
alcohol, will be required : also a general acquaintance 
with the higher Alcohols and their chief derivatives. 

The Ethylamines. Tetraethylammonium. Cacodyl. 
Zinc methyl. Silicon ethyl. 

Ethylene and its chief derivatives. Glycol. Glycolic 
acid. Lactic acid. Glyoxal. Oxalic acid. Succinic 
acid. Malic acid. Tartaric acid. Citric acid. 

Cyanogen and its compounds. Prussic acid. Cyanide 
and double Cyanides. Cyanic and Cyanuric acids 
Sulphocyanides. Ureas. 



SECOXD EXAMINATION FOR THE DEGREE OF B.SC. tt 

Uric acid. Guanidine. Glycocyamine. Glycocyanidine. 
Sarkine. Creatine. Creatinine. Theobromine. Caffeine. 

Glycerine and Allyl Alcohol, their chief derivatives. 
Constitution of Fats and Oils. Erythrite. Mannite. 
Glucose and Levulose. Cane-sugar. Milk-sugar. 
Cellulose Starch. Glycogen. Dextrine. 

Aromatic compounds. Benzene. Toluene. Phenol. 
Cressol. Hydroquinone. Resorcin. Pyrocatechin. 
Pyrogallic acid. Oil of Bitter Almonds. Benzyl - 
alcohol. Benzoic acid. Benzophenone. Hippuric acid. 
Salicylic acid and Isomeric acids- Oxysalicylic acid. 
Gallic acid. Phtalic acid and Isomeric acids. Styrol 
(Cinnamic alcohol). Nitrobenzene. Aniline. Toluidine. 
Rosaniline. Diazobenzene and its compounds. Naph- 
thalene. Anthracene. Oxanthraquinene. Alizarine. 
Indigo and Indol. Cymene. Camphor and Terpencs. 

Glucosides. Amygdaline. Salicine. Tannine. 

Alkaloids. Conine. Nicotine. Morphine. Strychnine. 
Quinine. Cinchonine. 

Taurine. Lecithin. Choline, Albumen. Fibrin, Caseine. 

Practical Examinaiion. 

Qualitative Analysis. — Substances vrill be given for ana- 
lysis containing not more than two Acids and two 
Bases, Organic or Inorganic, but not more than oae 
organic acid and one organic base. The Inorganic acids 
and bases to be those embraced in the First B.Sc. 
Practical Examination ; the Organic acids and bases to 
be selected from the following list : — 
Oxalates, Acetates, Benzoates, Succinates, Tartrates, 
Urates, Grallates, Tannat«s, Cyanides, Double Cy- 
anides, Alcohol, Starch, Grape-sugar, Urea, Morphia, 
Quinine, Strychnine. 

V. BOTANY— Two Papers and a Practical Examination. 

Histology. 

The structure of the Cell. The Chemical and Physical 
properties of Protoplasm. The nature and mode of 
origin of the contents of the Cell. The Chemical 
and Physical properties of the Cell-wall, and the 
mode in which it is added to. The Formation and 
Growth of Plant tissues by Cell-division. The Deve- 
lopment of the Epidermal, Fibro-vascular, and Fun- 
damental tissues from Primitive tissue. 



«» REGULATIONS. 

MOEPHOLOGT. 

The distinguishing structural characters, geographical 
distribution, and the properties and uses of the fol- 
lowing Natural Orders : — 

AnonacecB, Cruciferoe, Malvaceae, Legumhiosce, Rosacea}; 
Myrtacece, CucurbitacecB, Umbelliferm, Bubiacem, Com- 
posiice ApocT/necBf ConvolvulacecB, Labiaice, TJrticea;, 
Ev/phorbiaeece, ScitaminecB, Orchidece, Jmaryllideo' , 
Palmce, Aroideoe, Gramineoe, Coniferce, Cycadece. 
Solanaceos. 

Filices, Marsiliacece, Lycopodiacece, Musci, Hymenoniy- 
cetes, Gasteromycetes, Physomyeetes, Fuca^ece, Saccha- 
romycetes, SeMzomycetes. 

The principles and practice of Classification. 

Phtsiologt. 

The ultimate constituents of Plants. Composition of 
the Plant in successive stages of growth. The Ma- 
terials of Plant-food ; their general nature ; the 
organs by which they are absorbed. Rotation of 
crops. Ascent of the Crude Sap. Eespiration. 
Transpiration. The Descending Sap. Assimilation 
or general nature of the changes by which the Food 
Materials are converted into the various vegetable 
Tissues. Infli^.ence of Light and Temperature upon 
Plants. Increase of the Plant. Movements and 
special directions in Plants and their different 
parts. Vegetable irritability and Movements of 
Climbing Plants. General Phenomena of Sexual Re- 
production ; various modes in which flowers are 
fertilized. The intercrossing of Plants and its effects. 
Dimorphism and Trimorphism ; Dichogamy. Germi- 
nation. Causes of Variation, Origin of Species. 

Practical Exammation. 

Each Candidate must be prepared to examine and 
dissect (microscopically when necessary) Plants or 
parts of Plants placed before him, selected with 
reference to their typical character as representing 
their respective natural orders ; and to write descrip- 
tions of them. 



SECOND EXAMINATION FOR THE DBGEBE OT B.BC. 89 



\'I. ZOOLOGY— Two Papers and a Practical Examination. 
The principal facts of Structure and Development in 
the following Genera and Orders : — 



Genera. 



Homo. 

Erinaceiis. 

Sus. 

Ovis. 

Columba. 

Gadus. 

Lepus. 

Caniis. 

Baca. 

Bucinum. 

Limax. 



Blaita. 

Scorpio. 

Tegenaria (or any spider). 

Oniscus, 

Cyclops. 

jSaiplmia. 

Znimbricus. 

Carcmus. 

Hirudo. 

Uraster. 

Echinus. 



Primates. 

Cheiroptera. 

Cetacea. 

Perissodncfyla . 

Proboseidea. 

Birenia. 

Edentata. 

Marsupialia, 

Monotremata. 

Struthionidce. 

Saururoe (ArchoeopteryxJ 

Lacertili<i. 

Opkidia. 

Gheloaia. 

Crocodilia, 

Pterosauria. 

Ichthyosauria. 

Urodela. 

Ganoidei. 

Dipnoi. 

Elasmobranchii. 

Marsipobranchii. 

Pharyngobranchii. 

Cephalopoda. 



Ordkbs. 



Brachiopoda. 

Polyzoa. 

Tunicaia. 

Coleoptera. 

Hemtptera. 

Symenoptera. 

Lepidoptera. 

Diptera. 

Myriapoda. 

Cirripeda. 

Annelida polychoeta- 

Tremaioda. 

Pteropoda. 

Gestodea. 

Nematoidea. 

Boiifera. 

TurbeUaria. 

Crinoidea. 

Ccelenterata. 

Porifera. 

Infusoria. 

JRadiolaria. 

Gregarinida. 

Foraminifera. 



The Affinities of these Groups, and their place in Clas- 
sification. Meaning of the terms Species, Variety, 
and Eace. Causes of Yariation. Origin of Species. 

B 1030—8 BU* 



yO EEGULATIONS- 

Practical Examination. 

Each Candidate must be prepared to examine, dissect, 
and describe such animals or such parts of animals 
as may be placed before him, selected from the pre- 
vious list of Genera ; and to examine prepared speci- 
mens illustrative of any of the Orders above enumer- 
ated, and to write descriptions of them. 

YII. ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY— Two Papers and a 
Practical Examination. 

Chemical Composition of food. The quantities and 
kinds of food required to balance the losses of the 
economy. 

The several processes to which the Food is subjected 
in Digestion. 

Absorption in general ; chyliferous and lymphatic 
Absorption. 

The Blood, its organic and chemical constitution ; 
phenomena and mechanism of Circulation. 

Respiration, its mechanical and chemical actions ; effects 
of its suppression. 

Temperature of the Body ; production and regulation 
of Animal Heat. 

Secretion and Excretion ; constraction and operation of 
Secreting Apparatus. Chemical composition and 
amount of the Urinary, Cutaneous and Pulmonary 
excretions. 

Muscular and other Contractile substance ; phenomena 
presented by acting Contractile substance. 

Nutrition, Growth, and Reparation. 

The Mechanism of Locomotion, Voice and Speech, 

Constitution and Functions of Nervous System. Dis- 
tinction of Motor and Sensory Nei-ves or Nerve- 
fibres. Phenomena presented by Nerves in action. 
Influence on Contractile Tissue. 

Functions of Brain, Spinal Cord, and Ganglia. Sen- 
sation, Voluntary Motion, Reflex Action. Inhibitory 
Action. Influence of Nervous System on Heart and 
Blood-vessels, and on Secreting Organs. 

Organs of the Senses and their functions. 

Reproductive Organs and their functions. 

Changes produced in the Ovum by impregnation. 
Outline of the Development of the Embryo and its 



SECOND EIAMIHATIOK FOB THE DEGREE OF B.SC- 91 

Envelopes. Nutrition of the Foetus. Changes which 

occur at Birth in the Foetus and in the Parent. 

Lactation. 
Changes which take place with Age in the Proportions 

of the Body ; in the Skeleton ; in the Dentition ; and 

in the Reproductive Apparatus. 
Diiferences between Man and Woman other than in the 

Reproductive Organs. 
Senile Decay. 
Somatic and Molecular death. 

Practical Examinaium, 

Each Candidate must be prepared (1) to examine and 
describn Microsco])ical specimens of Animal tissues 
and organs ; (2) to make Microscopical preparations 
of Animal tissues and organs ; (3) to prove his 
pnvticAl acquaintance with the chemistry of albumen 
and its allies, milk, the digestive juices and their 
actions, blood urine, and glycogen. Also to show his 
practical acquaintance with the most important 
Apparatus used in studyingthe Physiology of muscle, 
nerve, the circulatory and respiratory systems, and 
the organs of sense. 

VIII. PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY AXD GEOLOGY— 
Two Papers and a Practical Examination. 

The Gfeneral Distribution of Land and Water on the 

Surface of the Globe. 
The composition of Sea-Water. 
The boundaries, communications, depth, and general 

form of the floor of the Arctic, Pacific, and Atlantic 

Basins. 
The Chief Ocean Ctirrents. 
Marine Denudation. The formation of Cliffs and 

Beaches ; of Shingle, Sand, and Mud ; Transport and 

Deposit of the Products of Denudation by the Sea. 
The formation of Mineral Deposits by marine organisms. 
Inland Seas, the Peculiarities of the Mediterranean, the 

Baltic, the Black Sea, the Caspian, and the Dead Sea. 
Ice-floes and Shore-ice. 
The commoner materials of which the Crust of the 

Earth is made up : Clay ; Quartz ; Sandstone ; Lime> 

stone ; Slate ; Gneiss ; Granite ; Trap, 



REGULATIONS. 

Stratified and Unstratified Rocks ; Faults ; Dykes ; 
Metamorpliism ; Cleavage. 

Average height of Continents ; direction and general 
character of the principal Mountain-chains. Water^ 
sheds. River and Lake Basins. Special character- 
istics of particular River-basins. Area and general 
character of the North- American Lake-system. 

The great Plains ; Steppes ; Tundras ; Pampas ; Sahara ; 
Peatbogs. 

Rainfall ; Denudation and Transport of Materials effect- 
ed by Rain and Rivers ; Riverr valleys ; Canons ; 
Deltas ; Bars ; Lacustrine Deposits. The share taken 
by fresh-water organisms in the formation of Lacus- 
trine Deposits. 

Snow and Ice ; Glaciers and Icebergs as agents of 
denudation and transport. 

The Atmosphere and its Currents. Trade-winds and 
Monsoons. The Air as an agent of transport of 
organic and inorganic matters. 

The structure and mode of formation of Volcanoes. 
Volcanic products. Earthquakes. Elevation of land. 
Raised beaches. 

The conditions of Climate ; causes of differences be- 
tween the climate of localities equidistant from the 
Equator. 

Distribution of Terrestrial Plants and Animals. Bota- 
nical and Zoological Provinces. Distinctive charac- 
ters of Florae and Faunae of different regions. 

General distributions of Marine Plants and Animals. 
Fauna and Flora of the Deep Sea. 

The nature of the processes by which the remains of 
Animals and Plants are preserved and fossilized. 

The general features of the Quaternary epoch ; Rivei 
Gravels ; Drift ; Boulder-Clay. Characteristic Fos- 
sils. 

The general features of the Tertiary epoch : thi 
relations of the Miocene Fauna and Flora witl 
those of earlier and later epochs. 

The nummulitic formation : its extent, and the probabU 
physical conditions under which it was produced. 

The Cretaceous epoch. Extent of the Chalk formation ; 
the physical conditions under which it was produced. 

The relations of the Cretaceous Fauna and Flora with 
those of earlier and later epochs. 



SBCONT) EXAMINATION FOE THE DEGREE OF B.SC 93 

The Wealden and Purbeck formations ; the condition? 
under which they were deposited, and their most 
characteristic organic remains. 

General nature of the Oolitic and Liassic formations. 
Age of Reptiles. Distinctive features of Mammalian 
remains of Stonesfield slates. Invertebrata charac- 
teristic of Mesozoic epoch. 

Rhaetic and Trias sic formations ; conditions of deposi- 
tion- Distinctive Organic remains. Salt-beds- 
Permian formation. Its extent and relations. Palas- 
ozoic character of its Invertebrate Fauna. Charac- 
teristic Yertebrata. 

Carboniferous formation; conditions of depositions; 
formation of Coal ; characteristic Fauna and Flora. 

Devonian formation and the Old Red Sandstone ; con- 
ditions of deposition ; characteristic Fishes. 

Greneral characters of the Silurian, Cambrian, and 
Laurentian formations. 

The earliest known Forms of life and the Invertebrata 
characteristic of the Palaeozoic epoch. 

Mineral veins. The ordinary modes of occurrence of 
Lead, Tin, Iron, Copper, Silver, and Gold. 

Practical Examination. 

Candidates will be expected to identify and describe 
specimens of the principal Rocks, and of the Fossils charac- 
teristic of the Formations above enumerated. 

IX. LOGIC AND PSYCHOLOGY. 

Names, Notions, and Propositions, 

Syllogism. 

Induction and subsidiary operations. 

The Senses. 

The Intellect. 

The Emotions. 

The Will. 

The Theories of Ethics. 

50. On the Fourth Monday in November, the Examiners 
»ill publish a list of successful Candidates in two Classes 
aid Pass, the names in each Class and Pass being arranged 
Q alphabetical order. 

51. A certificate will be given to those who pass the 
Sxamination. {Vide Form Q.) 



94 REGULATIONS. 

MASTEE OF ARTS. 

52. The Examination for the Degree of Master of Arts 
will be held annually in Bombay, commencing on the Third 
Monday in November. 

53. Any person, being a Bachelor of Arts in the Univer- 
sity of Bombay, may be admitted to the Examination for 
the Degree of Master of Arts ; and should he pass the 
Examination in any one of the above branches, he will be 
admitted to the degree of M.A., on the expiration of five 
years from the date of his Matriculation. 

54. Candidates must fonvard an application to the 
Registrar at least three months before the Examination. 
{Vide Form R.) 

56. Each Candidate must pay to the Registrar a fee of 
Bs. 60, for which a receipt will be given. ( Vide Form S.) 

56. Failure to pass the Examination will not disqualify 
the Candidate for presenting himself at any subsequent 
M.A. Examination, on a new application being forwarded, 
and a fresh fee paid. 

57. The Examination will comprise the followiiitr 
branches : — 

I. — Languages. 

II. — History and Philosophy. 

III. — Mathematics. 

IV. — Natural Sciences. 

I. — Languages. — Six papers. 

Candidates must take up English, with one or more of 
the following : — Latin, Greek, Sanskrit, Hebrew, Arabic, and 
Persian. 

The subjects in each Language will be announced by tlif 
Syndicate two years before the Examination. 

The following papers will be set : — 

1st and 2nd. Questions on the English books taken up 
by the Candidates, including points of Scholarship, Com- 
parative Philology, Criticism, and theHistoiyof Litei-aturt . 

3rrf and 4th. Similar questions on the Latin and Greek. 
Sanskrit, Hebrew, Arabic, or Persian books taken up by 
the Candidates. 



EXAMIJfATIOS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF ARTS. 95 

■ '■k. Translation from English into the second lan- 
guage, and vice versa. 

(ith. Original English Composition in Prose or Yerse. 
n.— HisTORT AND PHILOSOPHY. — Sis papers. 
f and 2nd. Questions on a period to be announced by 
the Syndicate two years before the examination, including 
Constitutional Law, ^^Eanners, Literature, Political Geogra- 
phy, and Etymology. 

'ird. Politics as a Science, including Political Economy. 
4/A. Logic, including the Philosophy of the Inductive 
Sciences. 
oth. The History of Greek Philosophy. 
6tfi. The History of Modem Philosophy, from the time 
of Charlemagne to the end of the 18th century. 

In lieu of the 5th and 6th papers, a Candidate may bring 
up— 
(a.) Historical or external Evidences of Christianity. 
(b.) Moral or internal Evidences of Christianity. 

III. — Mathematics.— Six papers. 
Ut. Euclid and Geometrical Conic Sections. 
2nd. Algebra and Trigonometry. 

"-•d. Newton's Principia, Book I., §§ I. — III., and 
Astronomy. 
''.. Analytical Geometry and Differential and Integral 

Calculus. 
\. Statics and Dynamics. 
'!. Hydrostatics and Optics. 

IV. — Natural Sciences. — Six papers, 
f Zoology, Comparative Anatomy, and Physiology. 
.) •^ Botany and Vegetable Physiology. 
(. GtHilogy. 
r Chemical Physics. 
.) -< Inorganic Chemistry. 

(, Meteorology and Physical Geography. 
"ne Candidate will be required to select for examination 
of the sub-sections a and fc, and to be acquainted with 
t. ■• history of the sciences therein enumerated. 

^^3. In the week following the Examination, the Exa- 
miners in each branch will publish a list of successful 
Candidates in two Classes and Pass, the names in each 
-s and Pass being arranged in alphabetical order. 
'. A Certificate will be given to those who pass the 
lixamiuation. {Vide Form T.) 



96 

11. LAW. 



BACHELOR OF LAWS. 

1. The Examination for the Degree of Bachelor of Laws 
will be held annually at Bombay, commencing on the Third 
Monday in November. 

2. No Candidate shall be admitted to the Examination 
unless he be a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science of at 
least two years' standing in the University of Bombay, or 
some University recognized by it, and unless he produce 
certificates to the effect that he has attended, for periods 
amounting to at least three years, three-fourths of the Lec- 
tures proper to his class, in some School or Schools of Law 
recognized by the University. 

3. Application must be made to the Registrar two 
months before the Examination- ( Vide Form U.) 

4. Each Candidate must pay to the Registrar a fee of 
Rs. 30, for which a receipt will be given. ( Vide Form V.) 

5. Failure to pass the Examination will not disqualify 
the Candidate for presenting himself at any subsequent 
Examination, on a new application being forwarded and a 
fresh fee paid, 

6. Candidates for the Degree of Bachelor of Laws will 
be examined in the principles of Jurisprudence and in the 
several systems of Municipal Law administered by the 
High Court of Bombay. 

There will be six papers, namely : — 

1. Roman Civil Law. Elements of General Jurispru- 
dence and International Law. 

2. Succession and Family Rights, with special re- 
ference to Hindu and Mahomedan Law. 

3. The Law of Contracts, and of the Transfer and 
Lease of Immoveable Property. 

4. Equity with special reference to the Law of Trust, 
Mortgages and other securities for money, and Specific 
Relief. 

5. The Law of Torts and Crimes. 

6. The Law of Evidence, Civil Procedure, including 
Limitation and Criminal Procedure. 

7. The Examination will be conducted by means of 
printed papers. 



EXAMINATION FOR HONOUES IN LAW. 97 

8. On the morning of the Second Monday after the com- 
mencement of the Examination, the Examiners will arrange 
and publish in two Divisions, each in alphabetical order, 
the names of such of the Candidates as may have passed. 

9. A Certificate will be given to those who pass the 
Examination. [Vide Form W.) 

HONOURS. 

10. The Examination for Honours in Law will commence 
on the First Monday in the First Term in Arts. 

11. The Examination will be open to any Candidate 
who has passed the Examination for the Degree of Bachelor 
of Laws held in one of the three years next preceding such 
Hououi's Examination. 

12. Candidates must forward an application to the 
Registi-ar at least two months before the Examination. 
( Vide Form X.) 

13. Each Candidate must pay to the Registrar a fee 
of Rs. 50, for which a receipt will be given. (Vide 
Fonn Y.) 

14. Each Candidate for Honours will be examined in 
each of the following subjects : — 

(a.) Roman Civil Law. 

(b.) General Jurisprudence, including International 
Law. 

(c.) The several systems of Municipal Law which 
obtain in India. 

Three papers will be set, one in each subject (a), (b), and 
(c) : each paper may be divided into two parts, three hours 
being allowed to each part. 

15. The Examination Avill be conducted by means of 
printed papers. 

16. The Examiners will publish, on the Friday in the 
ensuing week, lists of the successful Candidates in two 

'lasses the names in each Class being arranged in alpha- 

'cal order. No Candidate shall be placed in the First 

ass unless the Examiners are of opinion that he ha.* 

exhibited considerable original ability as well as grea-t 

industry. 

B 1030—9 Bu 



98 



III. MEDICINE. 

LICENTIATE OF MEDICINE AND SUEGERY- 
1 A Candidate for the Degree of Licentiate of Medicine 
and Surgery must have passed the Matriculation Examma - 
ton of the University of Bombay, or of some University 
recSenized by it. He must have been engaged during 
foir^UnTverJty years in professional study at a School ot 

^^f '"^Th; Candidate will ba required to pass two Exami. 
nations^^^^^ EXAMINATION IN MEDICINE. 

'^ The First Examination in Medicine will be held 
.uinually at Bombay, commencing on the First Monday 

^T To'cantSr slTall be admitted to the Examiuation 
unless he have produced Certificates to the following 

""^(T ^ 'l)f having completed his nineteenth year^ 

(fei. Of havinS passed an Examination m Elementary 

Merhanics of Solids and Fluids. . .qtj 

NB-ln Examination in Elementary Mechanics of Solids 

mid Fluids will be held each year along with the Previ- 

o s Examination. A Candidate who has passed the 

Sevious Examination shall be exempted from this 

(,0^""/ Wug been engaged in Medical studies for at 

least two University years .. ^,- „ Cmirses — 

(d ) Of having attended the following bourses . 

\^a.) yji uu-> o 2 Courses, each of at least 

InDescriptive Anatomy. |^ ^q lectures. 

InPhy.iologyandGcne-| ^ Course, each of at least 

,.al Anatomy. 5 g Courts eS of at least. 

In Chemistry | 70 lectures. 

C 2 Courses, each of at least 

In Botany | 30 lectures. 

( 2 Courses, each of at least 

In Materia Medica | gO lectures. 

In Practical Chemistry, 1 

innludine General and I „ . ^ x- 

Pharmaceutical Che- [ 2 Courses of mstruction, 
mistrTand the Detec- \ each of three months. 

ti.xp ' the Adultera- | 



tion ''igs- 



FIRST EXAMINATION IN MEDICINE. 99 

f 1 Coui-se of instruction of at least 

1 four months ; producing a certifi- 

in Fractical rhar- ^ ^^^^ ^^ having acquired a practi- 

™**^5'* j cal knowledge of the preparation 

l^ and compounding of Medicines. 

(e). Of having been engaged in Dissection for two First 
Terms in Medicine, in the course of which he must have 
dissected the whole human body twice. 

5. Candidates must apply to the Registrar two months 
before the Examination. ( Vide Form AA.) 

6. Each Candidate must pay to the Registrar a fee of 
Rs. 20, for which a receipt will be given (Vide Form AB.) 

7. Failure to pass the Examination will not disqualify 
the Candidate for presenting himself at any subsequent; 
First Examination in Medicine, on a new application being 
forwarded and a fresh fee paid. 

8. Candidates will be examined in the following sub- 
jects : — 

1. Anatomy, Descriptive and Practical. 

2. Physiology and Histology. 

3. Chemistry, including Practical Chemistry, General 

and Pharmaceutic il Chemistry, and Detection of 
the adulteration of Drugs. 

4. Botany..* Materia Medica, and Pharmacy. 

N.B. — A Candidate who has passed the Examination for 
the Degree of B. Sc. in Chemistry and in Botany shall be 
exempted from the examination in these subjects at the First 
Examination in Medicine. 



In Systematic Botany the Candidate will be required to 
possess a competent acquaintance with the following Natural 
Orders (excepting those printed in italics, in which only a gene- 
ral knowledge will be expected : — 

Anonacea;, Menispermeae, Nymphaeaceae, Nelumbiaeece, Papa- 
veraceaj, Crueiferae, CapparUleoe, Malvaceae, Sterculiacece , Auran- 
biaceae, Guttiferas, Sapindaceae Meliaceae, Vitaceas, Anacardia- 
Jeae, Legiiminoste, Rosaceae, Myrtace<e, Cucurbitaoeae, Umbel- 
liferae, Cinchonaceas, Compositae, Asclepiadiaceae, Apocynaceae, 
Bignoniaceae, Convolvulaceae, Scrophulciriacae, Solanaceae, Atro- 
oacece, Labiatae, Verbenace^, Acanthaceae, Lauraceae, Euphor- 
i>iaceae, Urticicece, Artocarpaceae, Coniferje, Orchidaceae, Zingi- 
beraceae, Cannaceoe, AmarylUdacecx, Liliaceae, Melanthacece, Pal- 
naceae, Araceoe, Gramineae ; and with the structure of the 
Uryptogamic ordars. 



100 REGDLATIONS. 

9. The Examination will be written and practical. Oral 
Examination of Candidates will be left to the discretion of 
Examiners. 

10. On the Second Monday after the commencement of 
the Examination, the Examiners will publish a list of the 
successful Candidates, an^anged in two Diidsions, in alpha- 
betical order. 

11. A Certificate will be given to those who pass the 
Examination. (Vide Fonn AC.) 



EXAMINATION FOR THE DEGREE OF 
L.M.AND S. 

12. The Examination for the Degree of Licentiate of 
Medicine and Surgery will be held annually in Bombay, 
commencing on the Fourth Monday in November. 

13. No Candidate will be admitted to this Examination 
■within two years of the time of his passing the First Exa- 
mination. 

14. Each Candidate must, subsequently to passing the 
First Examination, have attended the following courses : — 

T Tir J- • (2 Courses, each of at least 

In Medicine | 70 lectures. 

TO f 2 Courses, each of at least 

In Surgery | 70 lectures. 

r\ T\- e J.-U ■n' C 2 Courses, each of at least 

On Diseases of the Eye... ^ ^^ ^^^^^^^^ 

On Midwifery and Diseases ( 2 Courses, each of at least 

of Womenand Childien... I 60 lectures. 

In Medical Jurisprudence \ 2 Courses, of at least 60 lec- 

and Practical Toxicology. I tures in the aggregate. 

In Pathology | ^ ^""^^^^^ ""^ *^ ^^^'* ^^^"^" 

T TT • (1 Course, of at least 20 leo- 

In Hygiene { ^^^^l 

and have dissected the surgical regions, and performed 
operations on the dead subject, during two terms in Medi- 
cine, and have attended a Lying-in Hospital for nine months 
and have conducted Midwifery cases, and have attended 
Hospital practice during a period of at least two University 
years, in the following manner, viz. : — 



EXAM. FOB THB DBQBIB 01" L. ST. AND S. 101 

(a.) Eighteen montlis at the Medical practice of a recog- 
nized Hospital or Hospitals (during at least nine of which 
he must have officiated as Clinical Clerk) with, lectures on 
Clinical Medicine during such attendance. 

(6.) Eighteen months at the Surgical Practice of » 
recognized Hospital or Hospitals (during at least nine of 
which he must have officiated as Surgical Dresser), with 
lectures on Clinical Surgery during such attendance ; and 

(c.) Six months at the Practice of an Eye Infirmary. 

15. Each Candidate will be required to produce reports of 
six Medical and of six Surgical cases, drawn iip and written 
by himself, during the periods of service as Clinical Clerk 
and Surgical Dresser, respectively, the said reports to be 
duly authenticated by the Professors of Clinical Medicine 
and Surgery ; and must produce a certificate of good moral 
conduct from the Head of the College in which he has 
studied. 

16. Candidates must apply to the Registrar two month.=< 
before the Examination. {Vide Form AD.) 

17. Each Candidate must pay to the Registrar a fee of 
Rs. 30, for which a receipt will be given. {Vide Form AE.) 

18. Failure to pass the Examination will not disqualify 
the Candidate for presenting himself at any subsequent 
Examination for the degree of Licentiate of Medicine and 
Surgery, on a new application being forwarded and a fresh 
fee paid. 

j 19. Candidates will be examined in the following sub- 
' jects : — 

1. Principles and Practice of Medicine, including 

Pathology. 

2. Principles and Pi-actice of Surgery, including 
Surgical Ajiatomy and Ophthalmic Surgery. 

3. Midwifery, and Diseases of Women and Children. 

4. Medical Jurisprudence, including practical Toxico- 
logy and Hygiene. 

20. The Examination will be written and practical. Oral 
[B'tftniination will be left to the discretion of the Examiners. 
B 1030—9 BU* 



102 EEGTJLATIONS. 

21. The Clinical Examination in Medicine and Surgery 
will be conducted in the Wards of a Hospital, and will be of 
a nature faithfully and fully to test the Candidate's practi- 
cal ability in taking, recording and treating cases of disease, 
investigating the pathology of disease, microscopically, 
chemically, and otherwise, and in surgical manipulations. 

22. The Examination in Surgery will include the per- 
formance of surgical operations on the dead body. 

23. On the Second Monday after the commencement of 
the Examination, the Examiners will publish a list of the 
successful Candidates, arranged in two divisions, in alpha- 
betical order. 

24 A Certificate will be given to those who pass the 
Examination. ( Vide Form AF,) 



DOCTOR OF MEDICINE. 

25. The Examination for the Degree of Doctor of Medi- 
cine will be held annually at Bombay, commencing on the 
Third Monday in the First Term in Arts. 

26. Each Candidate must have obtained the Degree, at 
least, of Bachelor of Arts orBachelor of Science in the Uni- 
versity of Bombay, or some University recognized by it, 
and must have regularly attended the Medical and Surgical 
practice of a recognized Hospital or Hospitals for a period 
of two years subsequent to his having taken a Degree in 
Medicine and Surgery at the University of Bombay or some 
University recognized by it ; and must produce a certificate 
of his having attended a course of 30 Lectures in Compar- 
ative Anatomy. 

27. Each Candidate must produce testimonials, signed 
by at least two Doctors of Medicine, that he is, in habit- 
and character, a fit and proper person for the degree ot 
Doctor of Medicine. 

28. Candidates must apply to the Eegistrar two months 
before the Examination. {Vide Form AG.) 

29. Each Candidate must pay to the Registrar a fee of 
Rs. 100, for which a receipt will be given. {Vide Form AH.} 



EXAMINATION FOE THE DKORBE OF DOCTOE OF MKDICINS. 103 

30. Candidates will be examined in Medicine, includ- 
ing — 

1. Practice of Physic. 

2. Surgery. 

3. Midwifery. 

4. Comparative Anatomy. 

X.B. — A. Candidate who has passed the Examination for 
the Degree of B.Sc. in Zoology, shall be exempted from 
the examination in Comparative Anatomy for the Degree 
of Doctor of Medicine. 

31 . The Examination will be (a) written (one paper being 
set in each of the above subjectB), {b) oral, (c) clinical, in the 
wards of a hospital, and [d) practical, in a dissecting-room. 

32. On the Second Monday aft«r the commencement of 
the Examination, the Examiners will publish a list of the 
successful Candidates, arranged in alphabetical order. 

•33. A Certificate will be given to those who pass the 
Kxamination. {Vide Form AI.) 



104 

IV. CIVIL ENGINEERING. 



LICENTIATE OF CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

1. A Candidate for the Degree of Licentiate of Civil 
Engineering must have passed the Matriculation Examina- 
tion of the University of Bombay, or of some University 
recognized by it. 

2. A Candidate will be required to pass two Examina- 
tions, the one to be called the First Examination in Civil 
Engineering, and the other the Examination for the 
Degree of Licentiate of Civil Engineering, 

FIRST EXAMINATION IN CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

3. The First Examination will be held annually in Bom- 
bay, commencing on the First Monday in November. 

4. No Candidate will be admitted to this Examination 
unless he produce satisfactory testimonials of having kept 
four terms in a School or College of Civil Engineering 
recognized by the University of Bombay. 

N.B. — Two of the required terms will be remitted in th( 
case of Candidates who have kept two or more terms in ». 
College or Institution in Arts recognized by the University 
of Bombay, and three in case of a Bachelor of Science. 

5. Candidates must apply to the Registrar two months 
before the Examination. {Vide Form AJ.) 

6. Each Candidate must pay to the Registi-ar a fee of 
Rs. 20, for which a receipt will be given. {Vide Form AK.) 

7. Failure to pass the Examination will not disqualify 
the Candidate for presenting himself at any subsequent 
First Examination, on a new application being forwarded 
and a fresh fee paid. 



riEST EXAMINATION IN CIVIL EXGINEERING. 105 

8. Candidates will be examined in the following sub- 
jects : — 

I. — Mathematics and Natural Philosopht. 
Four papers. 

Ist. (a.) Arithmetic, with the nature and use of Log- 
arithms. 

(6.) Alfjebra — to Quadratic Equations, inclusive, 
with the Progressions and the Binomial Theo- 
rem. 

2nd. (a.) Euclid. — The first four and the sixth Books 
with the Definitions of the fifth Book, and the 
eleventh Book to Proposition XXI. 

(6.) Trigonometry. — Solution of Plane Triangles 
with expressions for the area. 

^rd. Statics. — Composition and Resolution of Forces. 
Centre of Gravity. The Mechanical Powers. 

Mh. (a.) Dynamics. — Laws of Motion. Falling Bodies. 
Circular Motion. Projectiles. Impact. 

(b.) Hydrostatics. — Fluid Pressures. Fquilibrium of 
Grases under varying pressures and tempera- 
tures. Specific Gravity. Hydrostatic Balance. 
Barometer. Pumps. Hydraulic Bam. Syphon. 
Bramah's Press. Steam Engine. 

II. — EXPEKIMEXTAL AND jSTaTTIRAL SCIENCE. 

Two papers. 

Id. {a.) Heat. — Measurement of Temperature. Ther- 
mometers and Pyrometers. Effects of Heat, 
Dilatation. Apparent and Real Expansion. Ex- 
pansion of Gases. Boyle and Mariotte's Law. 
Maximum Density of Water. Compensating 
Pendulum and Balance. Barometric Correc- 
tions. Change of State. Specific and Latent 
Heat. Regelation. Vaporization. Ebullition. 
Elastic Force of Vapour. Formation of Dew. 
Hygrometers. Spheroidal Condition. 

(6.) Frictional Electricity. 

'2nd. Inorganic Chemistry. — Me+ric System of Weights and 
Measures. Physical Properties of Matter. Simple 
and Compound Bodies. Conditions necessary 



106 REGULATIONS. 

for Combination. Molecules. Molecular Attrac- 
tion. Affinity. Mechanical and Chemical Solu- 
tion. Laws of Combination. Atomic Theory. 
Equivalents. Law of Atomic Heat. Nomen- 
clature. Symbolic Notation and Formulae. Clas- 
sification of Compound Bodies. Law of Gaseous 
Volumes. Vapour Densities. Methods adopted 
in the Determination of Atomic Weights. 
Calculation of Volume "Weights. Diffusion of 
Gases. Quantivalence of Atoms. Phenomena 
of Crystallization. Isomorphism, Isomerism. 

Occurrence, Preparation, and Properties of the Non- 
Metallic Elements and of their more important 
Compounds. 

III. — Engineering. 

Four papers. Examination of Drawings, and Oral. 

1st. Encjineerlng Field Worh. — Surveying with the Chain 
only. Surveying with the Compass and Chain. 
The Theodolite and its adjustment. Levelling 
with the Dumpy and Y Level, and the adjust- 
ment of the same. 

N.B. — A plotted Survey and Section, with the Survey 
and Level Books (certified as the work of the 
student by the Head of an Institution recogniz- 
ed in Civil Engineering), should be submitted 
to the Examiners by each Candidate. 

2nc?. Materials losed in Construction. — Stone. Quarrying 
and Blasting. Manufacture and mode of testing 
the quality of Bricks and Tiles, Limes, Mortar, 
Cements, Concrete, Plaster. Timber. Methods 
of seasoning Timber. Preservation of Timber. 
Wrought and Cast Iron. Preservation of Iron. 
Steel. Bessemer Process. Paints and Varnishes. 

K>rd. Masonry. — Stone Masonry. Brickwork. Precaution 
against Settlement. Plain Arching. Different 
Forms of Arches and modes of describing them. 
Foundations. Pile and Iron Tubular Founda- 
tions. Well Foundations. 

Mh. (a). EoaAs. — Earth, Moorura, and Metalled Roads. 
Gradient and Cross Section. Traction. Survey. 



EXAMIXATIOX FOR THE DEGREE OF L.C.E. 107 

Lining out and Construction. Laying out 
Curves ■without an angular instrument. Tracing 
and Survey of Hill Koads. Maintenance and 
Repair. 

(I.) EaHliicorh. Mensuration and setting out. Tools 
and Execution. Cuttings. Embanking and Pud- 
dling. 

hth. Engineering D-ravring. — Each Candidate will be re- 
quired to exhibit three drawings, executed by 
him during his course of study at an affiliated 
Institution. 

Each drawing to bear the following Certificate : — 

Certified that this drawing was executed within the walls 

of ♦by^ and completed on 

the 

(Signed) , 



Principal of the 



Date 



* Enter the name of the School or College of Engineering. 

JV.JS.— Each Candidate will also be required to execute in the presence of 
the Kxaminers a pen and ink sketch of a simple objtct to show proficiency in 
free hand-sketching. For this sketch two hours will be allowed, 

Text-Book in Civil Exgixzebixg. 

Such portions of the Eoorkee Treatise on Civil Engineer- 
ing as treat of the subjects above specified. 

9. The Examination will be written and oral. 

10. On the Third Thursday after the commencement of 
the Examination, the Examiners will publish a list of the 
successful Candidates in two Classes and Pass, the names in 
each Class and Pass being arranged in alphabetical order. 

EXAMINATION FOR THE DEGREE OF L.C.E. 

11. The Examination for the Degree of Licentiate of 
Civil Engineering will be held annually in Bombay com- 
mencing on the Second Monday in November. 

12. No Undergraduate will be admitted to the Exam- 
inaton unless he shall have kept two terms in a School or 
College of Civil Engineering recognized by the University 
of Bombay subsequently to passing the Fii'st Examination. 



1 



108 REGULATIONS. 

13. Candidates must apply to the Registrar two months 
before the Examination. ( Vide Form AL.) 

14. Each Candidate must pay to the Registrar a fee of 
Rs. 30 for which a receipt will be given. {Vide Form AM.) 

15. Failure to pass the Examination will not disqualify 
the Candidate for presenting himself at any subsequent 
examination for the Degree of Licentiate of Civil Engineer- 
ing, on a new application being forwarded and a fresh fee 
paid. 

16. Candidates will be examined in the following sub- 
jects : — 

I. Mathematics and Natural Philosophy. 
II. Experimental and Natural Science. . 
Ill, Civil Engineering. 

lY. One of the following to be selected by the Candi- 
date :' — 

A. Analytical Geometry and Differential and 

Integral Calculus. 

B. Optics and Astronomy. 

C. Mining and Metallurgy. 

D. Architecture. 

E. Mechanical Engineering. 

F. ('hemical Analysis. 

G. Botany and Meteorology. 

I.— Mathematics and Natural Philosophy. 
Four "papers. 

1st. Mensuration of Surfaces- and Solids, 

2iid. {a.) Geometric Conic Sections. 

(fe.) Analytical Oeometry of Two- Dimensions. — Ana- 
lytical Geometry of the right line and circle by 
Rectangular, Oblique, and Polar Co-ordinates. 

Srd. Statics and Dynamics. 

Ath. Hydrostatics. 

II. — Experimental and Natural Science. 
Three papers — Oral and Practical. 

1st. Inorganic Chemistry. — The Chemistry of the prin- 
cipal Metals and their Salts. Qualitative Analy- 
sis of simple Salts. 

2nd. (a), ifeai— Propagation of Heat by Conduction, 
Radiation, and Convection, Absorption, Retiac- ' 



EXAMINATION FOE THE DEGREE OP L.C.E. 109 

tion, and Refraction of Heat. Diathermacy. 
Theory of Exchanges. Mechanical Theories of 
Heat, Mechanical and Chemical Equivalents. 
Different forms of Energy, Sources of Heat. 

{b.) Voltaic Electricity and MagnetisTti, 

d. Geologif. — Definitions of Greological terms. The prin- 
cipal Rocks and their Component Minerals. Trans- 
lation and Consolidation of Materials. Fossiliza- 
tion. Central Heat. Volcanoes. Earthquakes 
and other movements of the Earth's crust. Suc- 
cession of Strata. Formation of Coal. Aletamor- 
phism of Rocks. Igneous Rocks. Geographical 
Distribution of the Stratified and Igneous Rocks 
in India. Mode of constructing Greological Maps 
and Sections. 

A:th. Practical. — (1) Qualitative Analysis, and (2) Recog- 
nition of the more important Rocks and Minerals. 

otli. Oral. 

Text Books ix Geology. 
Page's Introductory Text Book of Geology. 

Elementary Manual of Geology (published by the Educa- 
tional Department). 

III. — Civil Engi^eeri^'g. 
Six papers — Examination of Drawings, and Oi-al. 

\st. — Enrfineerinq Eield and Office Work. 

(a.) Tr:aTi'_ru!:-iti.>n and Traversing. Azimuth, Lati- 
tude and Longitude. Contouring. Tlie adjust- 
ment and use of Surveying Instruments. 

{h.) Geometrical Dra":>iiij. 

^■B. — A plotted Triangiilation, Traverse and Contoui , 
together with the Field books of the same (certified 
by the Head of a recognized Institution as the 
actual work of the Student), should be submitted 
to the Examiners by each Candidate. 

-2nd. Strength of Materials. — Pressure. Tension. Tor- 
sion. Transverse strain. Factor of Safety. 
Deflection. Stability of Retaining- walls . Roofs. 
p. 1030— 10 BU 



110 EEGULATIONS. 

Zrd. Bridges — Masonry Bridges. Centering. 

Wooden Bridges. — Trussed and Girder Bridges, 

Scarfs, Joints, and Straps. Built Beams. 
Iron Bridges. — Girder and Suspension. 
■ith. {a.) Irri{jation.— Canals for Irrigation and Naviga- 
tion. Sources of Supply. Quantity of Water re- 
quired. Slope of bed ajid section of channel. 
Alignment of Canal. Falls, Rapids, and Locks. 
Drainage. Aqueducts. Inlets. Dams. Super- 
passages. Head Works. Regulators. Irrigational 
Tanks. Motion of Water through Pipes, in open 
Canals, and over Weirs. 
(6.) Harbours. — Groins. Breakwaters. Quays. Basins. 
Docks and Jetties. 
bth. Specification and Estimating. — A Specification and 
Estimate of a simple structure to be drawn up 
from data. 

JV.J3 — Multiplication of dimensions will not be required. . 

6ih. Eailways.—Ijocation. Gauges. Curves. Gradients 
Formation. Tunnels. Level Crossings. Ballasting. 
Fencing. Permanent Way. Stations. Signals. 
Turn-tables and Triangles. Engine Sheds. Loco- 
motive Engines. Traction. 

7th. Engineering Drawing. — Each Candidate will be re- 
quired to exhibit three Drawings, executed by him 
in an affiliated Institution subsequent to his pass- 
ing the First Examination in Civil Engineering. 

Each Drawing to bear the following certificate : — 

Certified that this drawing was executed within the walls 

of *by ' and completed 

on the 

(Signed) 



Principal of the 
Date 



* Enter the name of the School or College of Engineerinj 

^,5.__T!ach Canrtida'e will al.'^o be required to execute in the presence* 
tho Examiners a pen and ink sketch of a simple obiocf , to show proficiency I 
free hand-sketching. For this sketch two hours will be allowed. 

Trxt Books. 

The Koorkec Treatise of (Jivil Engineering. 
The Roorkee Manual of Surveying. 



EXAMINATION FOR THE DEGREE OF L.C.E, 111 

Rankine's Civil Engineering (omitting Part II., Chap. I., 
and Section I. of Chap. II.) 

rv. One of the following, to ee selected by the Can- 
didate : — 

A. — AitALYTiCAL Geometry of Two Dimensions and 
Differential and Integral Calculus. 

Two papers. 

1st. Analytical Geometry. — Equation to the Parabola. 

Polar Equation to the Parabola. Properties of the 
Parabola. 

Equation to the Ellipse. Eccentric angle. Connection 
between Ellipse and Parabola. Polar Equation 
to the Ellipse. Properties of the Ellipse. 

Equation to the Hyperbola. Asymptotes. Polar Equation 
to the Hyperbola. Properties of the Hyperbola. 

27id. (a.) Differential and Integral Calculus. — Differentia- 
tion of functions of one variable. Successive dif- 
ferentiation. Evaluation of indeterminate func- 
tions. Taylor's Theorem. Maxima and Minima. 
(6.) Integral Calculus. — Elementary Examples in 
Integration. 

B. — Optics and Asieoxomy. 
Two papers. 

Ist. Reflection and Refraction at Plane and Spherical 
Surfaces. Dispersion of Light. The Rainbow. 
The Sextant, Lenses, the Telescope, the Eye. 

2nd. Apparent motions of the Heavenly Bodies. Instru- 
ments. Phenomena depending on change of 
place. Atmospheric Refraction. Comparison of 
Diameters of Earth, Sun, Moon, and Planets. 
Ptolomaic and Copemican Systems. Eclipses. 
Sidereal, Solar, Mean, and Apparent Time. 
Latitude, Longitude, and Variation of the Com- 
pass. 

0. — Mining and Metallurgy. 
Two papers. 

1st. Physical Characters of Meta,ls. Alloys. Crystal- 
line Systems, Cleavage. Goniometers. Mineral 
Yeins. Lodes and Beds, Mining Excavations. 



k 



112 RKGULATI0N3- 

Ventilation of Mines. Lighting of Workings. 
Driving of Levels, Drifts, and Windroads. 
Means of Security to be adopted in Shafts. 
Pillar and Stall and Long wall systems of 
extracting Coal. Varieties of Coal. Compara- 
tive value of Fuels. 

2tic?, Mode of dressing Ores. Furnace Materials. Plays. 
Crucibles. The more important ores of the 
following metals, viz. : — Iron, Copper, Lead, 
Tin, Zinc, and Mercury. Iron smelting. Manu- 
facture of Steel. Copper smelting. Refining 
and toughening crude Copper. Zinc smelting. 
Treatment of Mercurial ores. English and 
German methods of extracting Lead from its 
ores. Extraction of Silver from Lead ores. 
Pattinson's process. 

Text Book. 

Bloxam's Metals ; their Properties and Treatment. 

D. — Architectuee. 

Two papers. 

1st. The Classic Orders. Gothic Architecture. 

2nd. Characteristics of the Saracenic and Hindu Archi- 
tecture. 

Text Books. 

Parker's Introduction to the study of Gothic Architecture, 
Fergusson's History of Architecture, Part III,, Books I. 
to V. inclusive. 

E. — Mechanical Engineeiiing. 
One paper and practical. 
1st. Machinery. The Steam Engine, including Land, : 
Marine, and Locomotive Engines. Workshops 
machinery. 

2nd. Practical. Candidates will be examined practically 
in one of the following, to be selected by the 
Candidate : — 

1. Fitting. 

2. Smithes Work. 

3. Carpentiy. 



bxamijiatlon foe thb digbbk of l.c.e. 113 

Text Books. 

Bourne's Catechism of the Steam Engine. 
Campin's Principles and Practice of Machinery 

F.— Chemical Axalysis. 

One paper and practical. 
Ghemical Analysis. — Qualitative and Quantitative. 

G. — BoTA>nr axd Meteobology. 

Two papers. 

1, — Botany, Structural and Systematic. 

In Systemtic Botany the characteristics, properties, uses 
and distribution of the following Natural Orders : — 

Anonaceae, Capparidaceae, Malvaceaa, Aurantiaceae, Sa- 
pindaceae, Meliacese, Ehamnaceae, Anacardiaceae, Legumi- 
nosee, Lythraceae, Myrtaceae. Cactaceae, Eubiaceae, Asclepia- 
daceae, Apocynaceae, Bigtioniaceae, Cordiacese, Boraginaceas, 
Labiaitae, Verbenacete, Acauthacese, Santalaceae, Euphor- 
biaceae, Urticacefe, Conifera?, Cycadaceae, Amaryllidacese, 
Palmae, Cyperace*, Gramineae. 

Recognition of Specimens. 

2. — Meteorology — Meteorologiced Instruments. 

Barometer, Thermometer, Hygrometer, Eain-gauge and 
Anemometer, General Distribution of Atmospheric Pres- 
sure, Temperature, Wind and Rain over the surface of the 
Globe, and the Special Meteorology of India. 

17. The Examination will be written, oral, and practical . 

18. The practical Examination for the Degree of Licen- 
nate of Civil Engineering will be conducted in a place 
ippointed by the Examiners, and be of a nature to test 
ully the Candidate's practical ability in Subject II. and in 
E of Subject lY. of Regulation 17. 

19. On the Third Thursday after the commencement of 
he Examination, the Examiners will publish a list of the 
successful Candidates in two Classes and Pass, the names in 
jach Class and Pass being arranged in alphabetical order. 

20. A Certificate will be given to those who pass the 
Examination. ( Vide Form A^,) 

B 1030—10 BU* 



114 KBGULATIONS. 

MASTER OF CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

21. The Examination for the Degree of Master of Civil 
Engineering will be held annually at Bombay, commencing 
on the Second Monday in the Fii'st Term in Arts and Civil 
Engineering. 

22. Each Candidate must- have obtained the Degree at 
least of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science in the 
University of Bombay, or some University recognized by it, 
and must have practised as a Civil Engineer for at least 
three years after receiving the Degree of Licentiate of Civil 
Engineering in the University of Bombay, or some Uni- 
versity recognized by it. 

23. Candidates must apply to the Registrar two months 
before the Examination. ( Vide Form AO.) 

24. Each Candidate must pay to the Registrar a fee of 
Rs. 50, for which a receipt will be given. ( Vide Form AP.) 

25. In the Examination, each Candidate will be required 
to submit, with due authentication, the working-drawings 
and speciiications of such engineering works as may have 
been desig led and executed by himself during the two 
previous years. 

26. On the Second Monday after the commencement of 
the Examination, the Examiners will publish a list of the 
successful Candidates, arranged in alphabetical order. 

27. A Certificate will be given to those who pass the 
Examination. {Vide Form AQ.) 



GENERAL. 

No question shall be put at any University Examination 
calling for a declaration of religious belief on the part of 
the Candidate ; and no answe:- or translation given by any 
Candidate shall be objected to on the ground of its express 
jng any peculiarity of religious belief. 



VII. 

I. ARTS. 

MATRICULATION. 
FORM A. 



To 



Thb Rbgistkab of the University of Bokbat. 

Sir, 
I request permission to present myself at the ensning 
.triculation Examination of the University of Bombay. 

I wish to be examined in the English and the 

languages. 

I wish to be examined at* 

I am, Sir, 
Your obedient Servant, 
Name, with surname, 
in the English and 

Vernacular characters) . 

r Village. 

Birth-place ] Taluka. 

(.Zillah. 
_. , , C According to Christian or Native 

Birth-day [ Chronology. 

„ ^. . C Kame. 

Fathers [occupation. 

(Race and Religion).. 

( Where educated) . . . .^ 

(Enter Post Office address) 

(Enter day and year) 

' Please insert one of the following centres of Examination :-- 

1. Bombay. | 3. Ahmedabad. I 5. Kartdii. 

2. Poona. I 4. Belgaum. [ 



116 FORMS. 

I certify that __has been (in my School) 

or (under my tuition) from^ to 

and that I assent to the above application. 

{Signature of Applicant's last ") 

Schoolmaster or Teacher) ) 

{Enter Post Office address) 

{Enter day and year) 

N.B.—\i the period of School attendance or tuition named 
in the certificate be less than eight months, the applicant 
must also forward another certificate or other certificates 
signed by his last previous Instructor or Instructors, so as to 
cover altogether a period of not less than eight months. 

When a student has been attending both a Public School 
and a Private Teacher at the same time, the certificate of 
the Master of the former will be required. 

(1). Certificate of Moral Character, to be signed by a person 
of known respectability. 

I certify that I have known _ 

for years, and believe him to be a person or 

good moral character. 

(Signature) 

(Enter Post Office address) ^ . — 

(Enter day and year) 

(2.) Certificate of Age, to be signed by a person of known 
respectability. 

I certify that I have known the family of the above 

for years, and that, to the best of my knowledge and 

belief, he has completed his sixteenth year, or will have 
completed his sixteenth year before the commencement of 
the ensuing Matriculation Examination. 

(Signature) ____^_____ 

(Enter Post Office address) ,- 

(Enter day and year) 

FORM B- 

University op Bombay. 
Received from Rs. 10, being the fee for per- 

mission to attend the ensuing Matriculation Bxammation. 

(Signature) ^ . 

Registrar. 
(Date) 



PREVIOCS EXAMINATION. 117 

FORM C- 

Univeksity of Bombay. 

I certify that the undersigned . duly passed the 

Matriculation Examination held in the month of 188 

(Signature of the holder) 

(Signature) 



Registrar. 
(Date) . 

PREVIOUS EXAMINATION 
FORM D. 
To 

The Registrak of the University of Bombay. 

Sir, 
I request permission to present myself at the ensuing 

Previous Examination. I wish to be examined in the 

English and_ languages. 

I am, &c., 

(Name) 

(Race and Religion) 

(College) 

(Date of Matriculation)* 

(Enter Post Office address) 

(Enter day and year) 

Certificate to he sigyied by the Head of the College or Institution 
at which the Candidate may have attended. 

I certify that has attended since his 

Matriculation the number of days under specified, at the 
of which I am 



No. of days. 



Remarks. 



First Term 



188 -8 



Second Term 



" If the Candidate has not pas^^ed the Matriculation Examination of this 
University, he must produce a certificate of his haying passed the Matricula- 
tion Examination of his own University. 



118 



FORMS. 



I further certify that, to the best of my knowledge and 

belief, the said is a person of good 

conduct, and that he has my permission to present himself 
at the ensuing Previous Examination at the University of 
Bombay. 

(Date) (Signature) 

FORM E. 

University of Bombay. 

Eeceived from Rs. 20, being the fee for 

permission to attend the ensuing Previous Examination. 

(Signature) 

(Date) Registrar. 



FIRST EXAMINATION FOR THE DEGREE OF B.A. 

FORM F. 
To 

The Registeab of the University of Bombay. 

Sir, 
I request permission to present myself at the ensuing 
First Examination for the Degree of Bachelor of Arts. I 
wish to be examined in the English and languages, 

I am, &c., 

(Name) 

(Race and Religion) 

(College) 

(Date of Previous Examination)* 

(Enter Post Office address) 

(Enter day and year) 

Certificate to be signed by the Head of the College or InsiUiiMoni 
at which the Candidate may have attended. 

1 certify that has attended sine 

his passing the Previous Examination the number 

days under specified, at the 

which I am 

* If the Candidate has not passed the Previous Examination of this University, 
special application for admission to this Exaininatioa must be made undjj 
N B. to Regulation 19 in Arts. 



riRST EXAMINATION FOB THE DEGREE OF B.A. 119 



No. of Days. 


Kemarks. 


188 


First Term 

-8 . 






Second Term 




188 


First Term 
-8 . 






Second Term 





I further certify that, to the best of my knowledge and 

belief, the said is a person of 

good conduct ; and that he has my permission to present 
himself at the ensuing First Examination for the Degreed 
Bachelor of Arts at the University of Bombay. 

(Date) (Signature) 



FORM a 

Univebsity op Bombay. 

Received from Rs. 20, being the 

fee for permission to attend the ensuing First Examination 
for the Degree of Bachelor of Aits. 

(Signature) 



(Date) Registrar. 



FORM H. 
University op Bombay. 

I certtfv that the under3igned_ 



satisfied the Examiners at the First Examination for the 

Decrree of Bachelor of Art?, held in the month of 

188 ; and was placed in the Class. 

(Signature of the holder) 

(Si gnatur e) 

(Date) Registrar. 



120 



FORMS. 



SECOND EXAMINATION FOR THE DEGREE OP B. A. 



To 



FORM I. 



Tlie Registrar of the University of Bombay. 
Sir, 
I request permission to present myself at the ensuing 
Second Examination for the Degree of Bachelor of Arts. 
In addition to the necessary subjects, I offer to be 

examined in the language, and in * 

I am, &c. 



(Name) 

(Race and Religion) 

(College) 

(Date of Previous Examination). 

(Enter Post OflSice address) 

(Enter day and year) 



Certificate to be signed hy tlie Head of the College or Institution 
at which the Candidate may have attended. 

T certify that_ has attended, 

since his passing the _^ , the number 

of days under specified, at thef 

of which I am 







Number of Days. 


Remarks. 




188 


First Term 

-8 . 






Second Terfn 






188 


First Term 
-8 . 






Second Term 






188 


First Term 
-8 . 






Second Term 





* Insert one of the following groups, with particulars as to the sub-divisioiis 
taken up • — 

A. Lanaruasrc and Literature.— B. Histor>- and Political Economy.— C. L<^if 
und Moral Philosophy.— I). Mathematics. -E. Natural Science. 

t Insert the words the I'revious Examination or the First Examination for 
the Degree of B. A., as the case may be. 



li 



FIRST EXAMINATION FOR THE DEGREE OF B,S,C. 121 

I further certify that, to the best of my knowledge and be- 
lief, the said is a person 

of good conduct ; and that he has my permission to present 
himself at the ensuing Second Examination for the Degree 
of Bachelor of Arts at the University of Bombay. 

(Signature). 

(Date) 



FORM J. 

Ukivxrsity of Bombay. 

Receivad from Rs. 10, 

being the fee for permission to attend the ensuing Second 
Examination for the Degree of Bachelor of Arts. 

(Signature) 



(Date) Begistrar. 



FORM K. 

Umvebsitt of Bombay. 

I certify that the undersigned satisfied 

the Examiners at the Second Examination for the Degree 

of Bachelor of Arts, held in the month of 

and was placed in the Class. 

(Signature of the holder). 



(Date)^ (Signature). 



Registrar. 



FIRST EXAMI:Js ATION FOR THE DEGREE OF B.Sc 
FORM L. 

To 

The Registrar of the Uxiversity of Bombay, 

Sir, 
I request permission to present myself at the euBuing 
B 1030—11 BU 



122 



FORMS. 



First Examination for the Degree of Baclielor of Science. 

I am, &c. 

(Name) 

(Race and Religion) 

(College) 

(Date of Previous Examination)* 

(Enter Post Oflfice address) 

(Enter day and year)__ ^____ 



Certificate to he signed hy the Head of the College or Institio- 
tion at which the Candidate may have attended. 

I certify that has attended, since his 

passing the Previous Examination, the number of days under 
specified, at the .of which I am 



Number of Days. 


Remarks. 


First Term 
188 -8 . 




Second Term 




First Term 
188 -8 . 




Second Term 





I further certify that, to the best of my knowledge and 

belief, the said^ is a person of 

good conduct ; and that he has my permission to present 
himself at the ensuing First Examination for the Degree of 
Bachelor of Science at the University of Bombay. 



(Date). 



(Signature), 



* If the Candidate ha« not passed the Previous Examination of this University, 
special application for admission to this Exsimination must be made under 
2f. £, to Regulation 38 in Arts. 



SECOND EXAMINATION FOR THE DEGREE OFB.SC. 12.^ 

FORM M. 

UXIVERSITT OF BoMBaY. 

Received from_ Rs. 20, being the fee 

for permission to attend the ensuing First Examination for 
the Degree of Bachelor of Science. 

(Signature) 

(Date) Eegistrar. 



FORM N. 

Ukiversity o¥ Bombay. 

I certify that the undersigned satisfied 

the Examiners at the First Examination for the Degree of 

Bachelor of Science, held in the month of 

and was placed in the Class. 

(Signature of the holder) ^ 

(Signature) 



(Date) Registrar. 



SECOND EXAMINATION FOR THE DEGREE 
OF B.Sc. 

FORM Q. 

To 

The Registrar of the Uxiveesity of Bombay. 
Sir, 

I request permission to present myself at the ensuing 
ond Examination for the Degree of Bachelor of Science. 
I ofier to be examined Ln* 

(1) 

(2)_ 



* Insert three of the following nine subjects, one at least of which must be 
chosen from among Xo. III. — VIII : — 

I, Pure Mathematics ; II, Applied Mathematics ; III, Experimental Phy» 
sics; IV, Chemistry ; V, Botany ; VI, Zoology; VII, Animal Physiology; 
VIII. Physical Geography and Geologj- ; IX, Logic andPsychologj-. _ 




124 FORMS. 
(3) 



I am, &c. 

(Name)... 

(Race and Religion) 

(College) 

(Date of First Examination for the 

Degree of B.Sc.) 

(Enter Post Office address) 

(Enter day and year)_ 



Certificate to he signed by the Head of the College or Instiiii- 
timv at which the Candidate may have aUended. 

I certify that , has 

attended, since his passing the First Examination for the 
Degree of Bachelor of Science, the number of days under 
specified, at th« of which I am 



Number of Days. 


Remarks. 


188 -8 First Term 




188 -8 Second Term 





I further certify that, to the best of my knowledge and 

belief, the said is a 

])erson of good conduct, and that he has my permission to 
present himself at the ensuing Second Examination for the 
Degree of Bachelor of Science at the University of Bombay. 
(Signature) 

(Date) ■ 



FORM p. 

Univeksity of Bombay. 

Received from Rs. 10 

being the fee for permission to attend the ensuing Second 
Examination for the Degree of Bachelor of Science. 

(Date) (Signature). 



Registrar. 



UASTER OF IBTS. 125 

FORM Q. 

UlOVEKSITY OP BOMBAT, 



I certify that the undersigned. 



satisfied the Examiners at the Second Examination for 
the Degree of Bachelor of Science, held in the month of 

, and -was placed in the ^Claeg 

(Signature of the holder) 



(Date) (Signature). 



Eegistrar. 



MASTER OF AETS. 

FORM E- 

To 

The Registrar of the University of Bombay. 

Sir, 

I request permission to present myself for Examination 
for the Degree of Master of Arts in the University of 
Bombay. 

I offer to be examined in* 



I am, &c., 



(Name and Degree) 

(Race and Religion) 

(College) 

(Date of Graduation) 

(Enter Post Office address) 
(Enter day and year) 



* Insert one or more of the following : — 

1. The English and laii£aag;e3. 

2. Historj' and Philosophy. 

3. Mathematics. 

4. Natural Sciences. 

B 1030— 11 BU* 



186 FORMS. 

FORM S, 

dNiVERsiTy OP Bombay. 

Eeceived from Rs. 50, being the 

fee for permission to attend the ensuing Examinatioix for 
the Degree of Master of Arts, 

( Signature) 

(Date) Registrar. 



FORM T. 

University of Bombay. 

I certify that the undersigned satisfied the 

Exanxiners in* _at the Examination for the 

Degree of Master of Arts held in the month of 

(Signature of the holder) 



(Signature) 



(Date) Registrar. 



* Specify the branch or branches of Examination. 



127 

II. LAW. 



EXAMINATION FOR THE DEGREE OF LL.B. 
FORM U. 

To 

The Registear of the Ukiteesitt of Boxbat. 
Sib, 
I request permission to present myself at the ensuing 
examination for the Degree of Bachelor of Laws. 

I am, &c. 

(Name) 

(Race and Religion) 

.College) 

(Date of Graduation in Arts or Science)^ 

(Enter Post Office address) 

(Enter day and year) 

Certificate to he »igned hy the Head of the School of Lara 
in tohich the Candidate may have studied. 

I certify that has 

studied in the ^of which I am 

as under specified : — 



Period of Study. 



From 



To 



Bemarks. 



(Date) 



(Signature) 



N.B. — If the Candidate has not studied for the requisite 
period in one School of Law, he must furnish supple- 
mentary Certificates in the above tabular form. 

K.B. — If the applicant is not a Graduate of the University 
of Bombay, he must append a certificate of graduation 



128 



FORMS. 



and testimonials of moral character, satisfactory to the 

Syndicate. 

FORM V. 
University of Bombay. 

Keceivedfrom Es. 30, being the fee for per- 

miasion to attend the ensuing Examination for the Degree 
of Bachelor of Laws. 

(Signature)____ 

(Date) Begistrar. 

FORM W. 

University of Bombay. 

I certify that the undersigned, satisfied the 

Examiners at the Examination for the Degree of Bachelor 

of Laws held in the month of . . and was placed 

in the Division. 

(Signature of the holder) 

(Signature)^ 

(Date) Registrar. 

EXAMINATION FOR HONOURS IN LAW. 
FORM X. 

To 

The Registrar of the University of Bombay. 
Sir, 
I request permission to present myself at the ensumg 
Examination for Honours in Law. 

I am, &c., 

(Name) _— 

(Date of Graduation in Law) — 

(Enter Post Office address) 

(Enter day and year) . 

FORM Y. 
University of Bombay. ^„ , . ,, 

Received from.^ ^s. 50, bemg the 

fee for permission to attend the ensuing Examination tor 

Honours in Law. ,„. . 

(Signature)____ 

Registrar. 

(Date) . 



129 

III. MEDICINE. 

LICENTIATE OF MEDICINE AND 
SURGERY. 

FIRST EXAMINATION IN MEDICINE, 
FORM AA. 
To 

The Registrar of the Usivebsitt of Bombay. 

Sir, 
I request permission to present myself at the ensning 
Fii-st Examination in Medicine in the University of Bombay 

I am, &c., 

(Name) 

(Race and Religion) 

(College) 

(Date of Graduation, or Matriculation, ") 

as the case may be) ) 

(Enter Post Office address) 

(Enter day and year) 

Certificates. 

(1) I certify that , to the best of my know- 
ledge and belief, has completed his nineteenth year. 

(Signatureof some person of known") 

respectability) ) 

(Date) 

(2) I certify that lias duly passed an Exa- 
mination in Elementary Mechanics of Solids and Fluids. 

(Signature of Head of School of Medicine) _^__ 

(Date) 

{?>) I certify that , to the best of my know- 
ledge and belief, is a person of good moral conduct ; and 
that he has my permission to present himself at the ensu- 
ing First Examination in Medicine. 

(Signature of Head of School of Medicine) 

(Date) 

(4) I certify that has been engaged in 

Medical Study in the School of Medicine for 

two University years. 

(Signature of Head of School of Medicine) 

(Date) 



130 FORMS. 

(5) I certify that has attended 

two Courses of Lectures in Descriptive Anatomy, each 
of Lectures. 

(Date) (Signature) 



(6) I certify that has attended 

two Courses of Lectures in Physiology and General Ana- 
tomy, each of _Lectures. 

(Date (Signature)_ 



(7 ) I certify that has attended 

two Courses of Lectures in Chemistry, each of 

Lectures. 

(Date (Signature) 



(8) I certify that has attended 

two Courses of Lectures in Botany, each of 

Lectures. 

(Date) (Signature) 



(9) I certify that has attended 

two Courses of Lectures in Materia Medica, each of 
Lectures . 

(Date) (Signature) 



(10) I certify that has attend- 
ed two Courses in Practical Chemistry, including General 
and Pharmaceutical Chemistry, and the detection of the 
Adulteration of Drugs, each of 

(Date) (Signature) 



FIBSTEXAMISATION IS MEDIClKE. 131 



(11) I certify that .has attended 

one Course of Practical Pharmacy of 

months ; and that he has acquired a practical knowledge 
of the preparation and compounding of Medicines. 

(Date) (Signature) 



(12) I certify that has been engaged 

in Dissection for two First Terms in Medicine, in the course 
of which he has dissected the whole human body twice. 

(Date; (Signature) 



FORM AB. 

Ukiversitt op Bombat. 

Received from^ Rs. 20, being the fee for 

permission to attend the ensuing First Examination in 
Medicine. 

(Date) (Signature^ 



Registrar. 



FORM AC 



TJsiTERSiTT OP Bombat. 



I certify that the undersigned satisfied the 

[Eiaminers ai the First Examination in Medicine, held 



132 FORMS. 

in the month of , and was placed in the 

Division. 

(Signature of the holder) 



(Signature) 



EXAMINATION FOR THE DEGREE OF L.M. AND S. 

FORM AD. 

To 

The Registrar of the University of Bombay, 

Sir, 

I request permission to present myself at the ensuing 
Examination for the Degree of Licentiate of Medicine and 
Surgery. 

I am, &c., 

(Name with Surname) ■ 

(Race and Religion) 

(College) 

(Date of passing the First Exam- 7 

ination in Medicine) ) 

(Enter Post Office address) 

(Enter day and year) _^ 



Certificates. 

(1) I certify that , to the best of 

my knowledge and belief, is a person of good moral con- 
duct; and that he has my permission to present himself at •* 
the ensuing Examination for the Degree of Licentiate of i 
Medicine and Surgery. 

(Signature of Head of School of Medicine) 

(Date) 



(2) I certify that has attended 

two Courses of Lectures in Medicine, each of 

Lectures. 

(Date) (Signature) 



EXAMIXATIOX FOE THE DEGSEfi OF L.M, AKD S. 133 

(3) I certify that^_^^ ^has attended two 

courses of JLiectures in Surgery, each of^ 

Lectures. ' 

t Date) (Signature) 



(4) I certify that__ has attended 

two Courses of Lectures on Diseases of the Eye, each of 



Lectures. 



(Date) (Signature) 



(o) I certify that . has attended 

two Courses of Lectures on Midwifery and Diseases of 
AVomeu and Children, each of .Lectures. 

Pate) (Signature) 



(6) I certify that__ ^has attended 

^o Courses of Lectures m Medical Jurisprudence and 

Pi-actical Toxicology, of l_Lectares in 

tne aggregate. 

(Date) (Signature)^ 



(7) I certify that^^ has attended 

one Course in Pathology, of Lectures. 

(Date) (Signature) 



(8) I certify that has attended 

one Course in Hygiene, of .Lectures. 

(Date) ^ (Signature). 

B 1030—12 JBU 



134 FORMS. 

(9) I certify that has dissected 

the surgical regions, and performed operations on the dead 
subject during two Terms in Medicine. 

(Date), (Signature) 



(10) I certify that has attended 

a Lying-in Hospital for nine months, and has conducted 
Midwifery cases. 

(Date) (Signature) ^_ 



(11) I certify that has attended 

at the Medical Practice of Hospital for 

eighteen months, during nine of which he has officiated as 
Clinical Clerk, and that during that time he has attended 
Lectures on Clinical Medicine. 

(Date) ( Signature) . 



(12) I certify that__ has attended 

at the Surgical Practice of ^ Hospital 

for eighteen months, during nine of which he has officiated 
as Surgical Dresser, and that during that time he had 
attended Lectures on Clinical Surgeiy. 

(Date) (Signature) 



(13) I certify that has attended 

the Practice at - Ophthalmic Hospital 

for six months. 

(Date) (Signature) 

FORM AE- 

IJNiVEasiTY OP Bombay. 

Received from Rs. 30, being tj 

fee for permission to attend the ensuing Examination 
the Degree of Licentiate of Medicine and Surgery. 

(Signature) 



(Date) , Kegistrarj 



DOCTOE OF MEDICDfE. 135 

rORM AF. 

UsrvEKSiTT OP Bombay. 

I certify that the undersigned^ satisfied the 

Examiners at the Examination for the Degree of Licentiate 

of Medicine and Surgery held in the month of 

and was placed in the Class. 

(Signature of the holder)^ 

(Signature) 



Registrar. 



(Date). 



DOCTOR OF MEDICDs'E. 

FORM AG. 
To 

The Registear of the Unitebsitt of Bombat. 

Sra, 
I request permission to present myself at the ensuing 
Examination for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine. 

I enclose testimonials signed by Doctors 



and .and_ of my 

having obtained the Degree of in the 

University of , and the Degree of 

in Medicine in the University of 

I am, &c., 

(Name) 

(Race and Religion) 



(Enter Post Office address). 
(Date) 



I certify that has attended the Medical 

wA. Surgical Practice of Hospital during 

:e years and 

( Signature) 

(Enter Post Office address) 

Enter day and year) 



136 



FOEMS. 



FORM AH. 

Universitt or Bombay. 



Received from 



Rs. 100, being the fee for 

permission to attend the ensuing Examination for the 
Degree of Doctor of Medicine. 

(Signature), 



(Date). 



Registrar. 



FORM AI. 

Univeesitt op Bombay. 
I certify that the undersigned 



satisfied the 

Examiners at the Examination for the Degree of Doctor of 
Medicine held in the month of 



(Signature of the holder) 
(Signature), 



(Date), 



Registrar. 



137 



IV. Cim ENGINEERING. 



FIRST EXAMINATION IN CIVIL 
ENGINEERING. 

FORM AJ. 
To 

The Registbab of the Univbbsitt of Bombat. 

Sib, 
I request permission to present myself at the ensuing 
Fii'st Examination in Ci\al Engineering. 

I am, &c., 

(Name) 

(Race and Religion) 

(College) 

(Date of Matinculation) 

(Enter Post Office address) 

(Enter day and year) 

(Signature)_ 

Certificate to he »igned by the Head of the College or Institu- 
tion in Arts at which the Candidate may have attended, 

I certify that __has attended since his 

Matriculation the number of days under specified at the 
. , of -which I am 

(Signature) ^__ 

(Date) 

B 1030—12 BtJ* 



138 



FOKMS. 



Number of Days. 


Remarks. 


First Term 
188 -8 . 




Second Term 




First Term 

188 -8 . 




Second Term 




First Term 
188 -8 . 




Second Term 





Certificates to be signed by the JSead of School or College of 
Civil Engineering at which the Candidate moAj have studied. 



(1) I certify that. 



has attended 



since his Matriculation the number of days under specified 

at the , of which 

I am 



Number of Days. 


Beraarks. 


First Term 

188 -8 . 




Second Term 




First Term 

188 -8 . 




Second Term 




First Term 
188 -8 . 




Second Term 





(2) I further certify that, to the best of my knowledge 
and belief, the said 



LICENTIATE OF CIVIL ENGINEERING. 139 

is a person of good conduct, and that he has my permission 
to present himself at the ensuing First Examination in 
Civil Engineering- 

('Date) (Signature) 



FORM AK. 

UXIVEESITY OF BOMBAT. 

Received from Rupees 20, being the 

fee for permission to attend the ensuing First Examination 
in Civil Engineering. 

(Signature) 

(Date) Registrar. 



LICEXTIATE OF CIVIL ENOmEERING. 

FORM AL, 

To 

The REGisTKAtt of the Unitebsity of Boxbat. 

SiK, 

I request permission to present myself at the ensu- 
ing Examination for the Degree of Licentiate of Civil 
Engineering. 

I am, &c., 

(Name) 

(Race and Religion) 

(College) , 

(Date of passing the First Examina- 
tion in Civil Engineering) 

(Signature) ■ 

(Enter Post OflBce address) 

(Enter day and year) 



Certificates to be sigyied by the Head of School or College 
of Civil Engineering. 

I certify that has attended, 

subsequently to his passing the First Examination in Civil 
Engineering, the number of days under specified, at the 

m . , of which I am 

TI (Date) (Signature) 



140 



FORMS. 



Number of Days. 



188 -8 



First Term 



Second Term 



188 -8 



First Term 



Second Term 



First Term 



188 -8 



Second Term 



Remarks. 



(2) I further certify that, to the best of my knowledg'- 

and belief, the said is a person of 

good conduct, and that he has my permission to present 
himself at the ensuing Examination for the Degree of 
Licentiate of Civil Engineering at the University of Bom- 
bay. 

(Signature) 

(Date) 



FORM AM, 

University or Bombay, 



Received from 



Rupees 3 



being the fee for permission to attend the ensuing Exam- 
ination for the Degree of Licentiate of Civil Engineering. 



(Signature), 



(Date), 



Registrar. 



FORM AN. 

University of Bombay. 
I certify that the undersigned 



satisfil 

the Examiner? at the Examination for the Degree of Lice 



MASTER OF CIVIL EXGES£EEIKG. 1-il 

tiate of Civil Engineering held in the month of 

and was placed in the , . Class. 

(Signature of the holder)- 



( Signature). 



Eegistrar. 
(Date) 



MASTER OF CIYIL ENGDsEERIXG. 

FORM AO. 

To 

The Registrak of the Unxvebsitt of Bokbat. 

Sm, 
I request permission to present myself at the ensuing 
Examination for the Degree of Master of Civil Engineering. 

I am, &c., 



(Name) 

(Race and Religion) 

(College) 

(Date of Graduation in Arts) 

(Ditto ditto in Civil Engineering) 

(Enter Post Office address) 

(Enter day and year) 



Ceetuicates. 

1. I certify that has passed a period extend- 

ngfrom^ to in 

ictual practice on works under me. 

(Signature of Engineer in charge of) 

(EnterPost Officeaddress) 

(Date) 

2. I certify that has passed a period extend- 

Qg from to in 

ctual practice as a Civil Engineer, during which period he 
as been engaged on the fallowing works. 

(Signature of Engineer) 

(Enter Post Office address) 

Date) 



142 FORMS. 

FORM AP. 

University or Bombay. 

Eeceiyed from Es. 50, being the 

fee for permission to attend the ensuing Examination for 
the Degree of Master of Civil Engineering. 

(Signature) 



(Date). 



Registrar, 



FORM AQ. 

University of Bombay. 

I certify that the undersigned __^ satisfied 

the Examiners at the Examination for the Degree of Master 

of Civil Engineering held in the month of 

(Signature of the holder) 

(Signature)_ 



Registrar. 
(Date) 



THE MUNGULDASS NATHOOBHOY 
TRAVELLING FELLOWSHIP. 

FORM AR. 
To 

The Registrar of the University of Bombay. 
Sir, 

I beg to present myself as a Candidate for the Mungul- 
dass Nathoobhoy Travelling Fellowship. 

If I am elected, I pledge myself to accept the Fellowship 
and to comply with its conditions. 

I enclose herewith testimonials of my fitness for election 

I am, &c., 

(Name and Degree) 

(Race) 

(College) 

(Date of Graduation) 

(Enter Post Office address) _, 

(Enter day and year)_ ^ 



THE JAM SHRI VIBHAJI SCHOLARSHIP. 143 

THE BHUGWAXDASS PUESHOTUMDASS 
SANSKRIT SCHOLAESHIP. 

FORM AS. 

To 

The Registrae of the University of Bohbat. 

Sir, 

I request permission to present myself at the ensu- 
ing Bhiigwandass Purshotumdass Sanskrit Scholarship 
Examination. 

I am, &c., 

( Name) 

(Enter Post OflBce address) 

(Date) 



THE JAM SHRI VIBHAJI SCHOLARSHIP. 

FORM AT. 

To 

The Registrar of the Untversitt of Bohbay. 

Sir, 

I beg to oSer myself as a Candidate for the Jam Shri 
Vibhaji Scholarship. 

I enclose a copy of my Matriculation Certificate (Form 
C), and also a Certificate that I was bom in the village of 

Ln the Province of Kathiawar, signed by 

(here enter the name of some 

person holding an official appointment in KCdhidwdr). 

I am, <fec , 

(Signature) 

(Enter Post OflBce address) 

(Date) 



£ . 



144 FOEMS, 

THE HEBBEET AND LATOUCHE SCHOLARSHIP. 

FORM AU. 
To 

The Registrar of the University of Bombay. 
Sir, 
I beg to offer myself as a Candidate for the Hebbert and 
LaTouche Scholarship. 

I enclose a copy of my Matriculation Certificate (Form 
C), and also a Certificate that I was bom in Soreth, in 

Kiithiawd,r, signed by {here enter the name of 

some person holding an opci'il appointment in Kdthidwdr). 

1 am, &c., 

(Signature) 

(Enter Post Office address) _ 

(Date) 

THE RAO SIR PRAGMALJI SCHOLARSHIP. 

FORM AV. 
To 

The Registrar of the University of Bombay. 
Sir, 
I beg to offer myself as a Candidate for one of the Rao 
Sir Pragmalji Scholarships. 

I enclose a Certificate signed by 

that I (or my father, as the case may be,) was bom in 
Cutch, 

I am, &c., 

( Signature) 

( Enter Post Office arldress) 

(Date) 



THE KAHANDASS MANCHARAM 
SCHOLARSHIP. 

FORM AW. 

To 

The Registeah of the University of Bombay. 

Sir, 
I beg to offer myself as a Candidate for the Kahandass 
Mancharam Scholarship. 

I am, &c., 

(Signature) 

(Enter Post OflBce address) 

(Date) 



Vlli 




THE MTJNGULDASS NATHOOBHOY 
TRAVELLING FELLOWSHIP. 

iEiinguIdass Nathoobhoy, Esq., Justice of the Peace, in a 
letter to Government, dated the 19th August 1862, offered 
the sum of Es. 20,000 in 4 per cent. Government Securities, 
for the purpose of endowing a Travelling Fellowship for 
Hindu Graduates of the University of Bombay. This offer 
was accepted at i meeting of the Senate held on the 26th 
March ISc-o, and the following Regulations were passed for 
the awai-ding and tenure of the Fellowship : — 

1. "The Muxgtjldass Nathoobhot Travellixg Fel- 
lowship" shall be open to all Graduates, of the University 
of Bombay being Hindus who shall not be of more than five 
years' standing from the date of their gi-aduation. By the 
term Graduates is to be understood Masters and Bachelors 
of Arts. Bachelors of Science, Bachelors of Laws, Doctors 
and Licentiates of Medicine, and Masters and Licentiates 
ot Civil Engineering ; and by the term date of graduation is 
". be understood the dates of the Candidates receiving 

..;• Degree of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science or 
; .icentiate of Medicine or Licentiate of Civil Engineering. 

•_'. Candidates for the Fellowship must forward an appli- 
ation to the Registrar under Form AR. one week before 
the day of election. 

3. The election shall take place without Examination by 
the votes of the Syndicate, the Vice-Chancellor or Senior 
Fellow present having a casting vote. 

4, Whenever there is a vacancy in the Fellowship, a 
convenient day for holding an election shall be appointed 
by the Syndicate, who shall give due notice of the same in 
the Government Gazette. 

B 1030—13 BTT 



140 



ENDOWMENTS. 



5. The MunguWass Nathoobhoy Fellowship shall ; 
tenable by any one Fellow for a space of three years. The 
conditions of tenure are that the Fellow must leave Bombay 
and proceed to Europe within two months after his elec^ 
tion; that he shall spend the whole of the three years 
subsequent to the date of his leaving India for Europe, out 
of India, and six mouths at least out of each year in Great 
Britain or Ireland ; and that he shall report tAvice a year to 
the University Registrar as to the mode in which his time 
has been spent. 

6; Any violation of the above conditions shall ipso facto 
cause the Fellowship to be vacated ; and the Syndicate shall 
be empowered, for any just cause, to recall and deprive of 
his Fellowship any one who may have been elected. 

7. The Mungtildass Nathoobhoy Travelling Fellow shall 
receive through the University Registrar, in half-yearly in-" 
.stalments, payable in advance, from the day of his leaving 
India, the interest due upon the endowment, together with 
any accumulations that may have taken place during pT'( 
vious vacancies. 



Year. 

1867Marcl 
1868 Sept 
1871 Nov 

1874 April 



1877 April. 
18S1 June. 



FelloWv 



Jayakar, Atmaram Sadashiv, L.M 
Phakur, Shripad Babaji, B,A. ... 
Daphtare, Girdharlal Ratanlal, 

L.M., M.D 

Vaslekar, Nanaji Naravan,L.C.E 



Dhairyavan, Vasudev Krishna- 

rao, B.A., LL.B. 
Prabhakar, Govindrao Bhau, 

L. M. & S. 



College. 

Grantv 
Elphinstont' 

Grant. 

Poona Civil 
Engineering 
(now College 
of Science). 

Elph. & Govt. 
Law School. 
Grant. 



IT. 

THE MANOCKJEE LIMJEE GOLD MEDAL. 

Limjee Manockjee and Cowasjee Manockjee, Esquires, 
ill a letter to the Vice-Chancellor of the University, Sir 
Alexander Grant, Bart., dated the 27th May 1863, offered 
the sum of Rs. 5,000 in 4 per cent. Government Securities 
foi" the purpose of founding an annual Gold Medal, to bear 
the name of their father, the late Manockjee Limjee, Esquire, 
and to be awarded each year to the best Essay by a Uci- 



THE MAXOCKJES LIMJEE GOLD MEDAL. i-i/ 

Tersity student, on certain prescribed subjects. This offer 
•was accepted at a meetinof of the Senate held on the 3rd 
September 1863, and the following Eegulations were passed 
for the awarding of the Medal : — 

1 " The Maxockjee Limjee Gold Medal" shall be 
awarded annually for the best Essay by a University 
Student, in accordance with the subjoined conditions. 

2. Competitors shall be Graduates in the University of 
Bombay who shall not be of more than five years' standing 
from the date of their graduation, on the day prescribed for 
the sending in of the Essays. By the term Graduates is to 
be understood Masters and Bachelors of Arts, Bachelors of 
Science, Bachelors of Laws, Doctors and Licentiates of 
Medicine, and Masters and Licentiates of Civil Engineer- 
ing ; and by the tenn date of graduation is to be understood 
the date of the Candidates' receiving the Degree of Bachelor 
of Arts, or Bachelor of Science, or Licentiate of Medicine, 
or Licentiate of Civil Engineering. 

3. Competitive Essays shall be written in the English 
Language on the subject appointed for the current year, and 
shall be sent in to the University Registrar on or before 
the fourth Monday in September. Each Essay shall be 
designated by a motto instead of the writer's name, and 
shall be accompanied by a sealed cover, containing the 
name of the competitor, and a declaration that the Essay 
sent in by him is hondf.de his own composition. 

4. The subject of the Essay shall be in alternate years : 
(a) some question of Lidian History or Antiquities ; (6) 
some question connected with the introduction into India 
.if European Science and Art. 

The subject for the competition is to be selected by 
llic Syndicate, and notified not less than twelve months 
before the day for sending in the Essays. 

o. The Judges shall be two in number, and shall be no- 
vated annually by the Syndicate. Their decision shall 
announced on the fourth Monday in Xovember. 
7. The Medal shall be presented to the- sfTscessful Can- 
<li*late at the Convocation for conf'erring Dtgrees nest 
-uing after the Judgas' decision. 

". The successful Essay shall be printed at the expense 
the University. 

' . The Medal shall not be awarded to any Essay which, in 
opinion of the Judges, would not, when printed, be crecit- 



148 



ENDOWMENTS. 



able to the University. Bvit if only one Essay be sent in, no^ 
thing shall hinder the Judges from awarding to it the Medal 
if it appears to them to come up to the proper standard, 

10. Whenever aycar passes without the Medal beingaward- 
ed,the interest of the Endowment shall go towards the print- 
ing of Essays and other expenses connected with the Prize, 

11. On all occasions of Academical costume. Medallists 
shall be entitled to wear their Medals. 



Yeae. 



1865.. 
1866.. 

1867.. 
1868.. 

1869. 

1870.. 
1871. 

1872. 

1873. 
1874. 

1875. 



Subject, 



The Rise and Spread of Buddhism 
in India. 

The Advantages and Means of 
Diffusing a Scientific Practice 
of Medicine in India. 

The Unprinted Literature of the 
Mardthds. 

The Comparison of different Styles 
of Architecture in re-ipect of their 
suitahility for Public and Do- 
mestic Buildings in India. 

The Connection between the Phy- 
sical Geography of India and 
the History of the Country. 

The Social and Economic Effects 
of the Introduction of Railways 
into India. 

The Revenue Survey and Settle 
ment of the Bombay Presidency 
as contrasted with the Land 
Systems of Lord Comwallis and 
of the North- Western Provinces 

The Economic Results and Proba- 
ble Development of Botanical and 
Geological Researches in India 

The Demonology of Weat&ii India 

The Electric Telegraph as it af- 
fects India in its Social, Com- 
ynercial, and Political Aspects. 

Gleanings of the History of In- 
dian Medicine from its Ancient 
Literature. 



Prizeman. 



No Essay re- 
ceived. 

Medal not 
awarded. 

Ditto. 

Raatamji Mer- 
vdnji Patel, 
M.A. 



COLLEGS 



Elphin- 
stone. 



Balvant Bhiidji Ueccan. 
VakhArkar, j 
B.A. 

Dordbji Edaljij Elphin- 
Gimi, B.A. I stone, 

MAnikji Nasar- Elphin, 
vdnji Nana- stone, 
vati, B.A. 



No Essay re- 
ceived. 

Medal not 

awarded. 
No Essay re 

ceived. 

Medal not 
awarded. 



THE BHDGWANDASS PDBSHOTUMDASS SANS. SCHOLARSHIP. 14? 



Ybar. 
1876.. 

1877... 



SCBJBCT. 



PRIZEVAK. 



Medalnot 
awarded. 



COI.LBGB. 



Dhondu Hari 
Agise, 6. A. 



Elphin- 
stoae. 



The Applicaiion of Modern Dis- 
coveries in Chemistry to Indian 
Farming. 
A short A bstract of the Political 
History of Gujarat and Mahd- 
rdshtrafrom the first Century oj 
i the Christian Era to the Inroads 
j of the Mahomedans as arrived 
' at from an eramination of Coins 
i and Inscriptions. 
1878...1 The Advantages and Means q/|M e d a 1 not 
; Diffusing a Knoickdge of Na-\ awarded. 
' tural Science in India. 
1879... I Tfie VnprintedLiteralureofthel'So E«say 

j Marathas. ceived. j 

1880-.. Meteorology in India in its Rela-\KT\shii&]i Md- Elphin- 
tions to Agriculture and the Me-\ dhavrio Jog-I stone. 
chardeal Arts. lekar, M.A. 

1881... 77t« Vernaculars peculiar to the^y>o 'E?a&y re- 
Konkanfrom the Southern con\ ceived. 
fineA of the Qoanese Territory to 
the Northern limits of the Thdnd 
Zilla and Khdndesh, investigat- 
ed and established by means of 
Comparative Philology applied iti 
aid of original Researchfu. j 

1882... The Advantage-? and Means o/JKAvasji Bejanji Do. 
j Diffusing a Knowledge of Na-\ Setlmd,B.A., 
j tural Science in India. j LL.B. 

1SS3...: Astronomy in India, its rise anrf Ganesh Balvant Do. 
progress in ancient and modem 
; times as affected by the progress 
i of that science in Arabia, Egypt, 
I Greece and Modern Europe. 
^4...j The Application of Modern Dis' 
I coreries in Chemistry to Indian 

Farming ' 

in. 

THE BHUGWANDASS PURSHOTUMDASS 
SANSKRIT SCHOLARSHIP. 

Jhusjwandas.s Purshotumdass, Esq., Justiceof the Peace • 
letter to the address of the Registrar of the University 
i 1030—13 BC* 



Joshi, B.A. 



150 



EKDOWMBNTS. 



Dr. R. S. Sinclair, under date the 10th August 1863, offered 
the sum of Rs. 10,000 for the encouragement of the study 
of Sanskrit in the University of Bombay. This offer was 
accepted at a meeting of the Senate held on the 24th Sep- 
tember 1863, and the following Regulations for the award- 
ing of the proceeds of the endowment were passed : — 

1. A Scholarship, to be called "The Bhugwandass 

PURSHOTUMDASS SANSKRIT SCHOLARSHIP," of the value of 

Rupees four hundred, tenable for one year, and payable half- 
yearly, shall be awarded every year to the Candidate who 
passes the M. A. Examination with the highest marks for 
proficiency in Sanskrit, provided that the Scholarship shall 
not be awarded except to a Candidate whom the Examiners 
consider deserving of reward for his special knowledge and 
ability as a Sanskrit Scholar. 

2. The name of the Candidate to whom the Scholarship 
may be awarded, shall be published with the list of the 
successful Candidates. 

3. Whenever the Scholarship is not awarded, the money 
shall be reserved to be applied by the Syndicate in suck 
manner as they shall think best fitted for furthering the 
object of the endowment. 



Year. 



1866 Mar. 



1867 


,, 


1868 




1869 


)} 


1870 




1870 Dec. 


1871 




1872 




1873 




1874 




1875 




1876 




1877 




1878 




1879 




1880 




1881 




1882 




1683 





Scholar. 



COLLBGE. 



Bhdgvat, Govind Eamchandra 

Mardthe, Kdshinath Bilkrishna 
KAthavate, AMji Vishnu... 
Telang, K^shindth Trimbak 
Athal6, Yashvant Vdsudev 
Athale, Yashvant Vi'sudev 
Tulu, Rooji Vasudev 
Pendse, Kashin^th Balvant 
Bhid^, Shivrflm Parshurdm 
Gokhale, Edmchandra Vishnu 
Bliat, Harirdra Uttamrdm 
Agdse, Ganesh .Tanardau... 
Agdse, Dhondu Hari 
Scholarship not awarded ... 
Apte, Vdman Shivriim 
Scholarship not awarded ... 
Bhdnddrkar, Shridhar Rdmkrishna 
No Candidate 
No Candidate 



Poona 
Deccan) 

Do. 

Do. 
Elphinstone. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
Deccan. 

Do. 
Elphinstone. 

Do. 
Deccan. 
Elphinstone, 



(now 



Deccan. 



Elphinstone. 



THE HOMEJEE CURSETJEE DADT PBIZE. 15l 

IV. 

THE HOMEJEE CHRSETJEE DADY PRIZE. 

Homejee Cursetjee Dady Sett,Esq., Justice of the Peace, in 
a letter to the address of the Vice-Chancellor, Sir Alexander 
Grant, Bart., dated 10th September 1863, wrote as follows : — 

• It has been suggested to me that the establishment of 
an Annual Prize or Medal for the best English Poem by a 
University Student would afford a useful stimulus to the 
cultivation of literature and to the development of good 
taste and refinement in this Presidency. Concurring in this 
view, I hereby beg to offer to the University of Bombay the 
sum of Rs. 5,000 in Government 4 per cent. Securities, and 
hope that the University may be pleased to accept this sum 
and apply it to the carrying out of the above object, under 
such Regulations as they may think best." 

This offer was accepted at a meeting of the Senate held 
on the 21st December 1863, and Regulations passed for the 
&wardingofthePrize,which were sub3equently(22nd November 
1879), at the instance of the donor, amended as follows : — 

1. " Thz Homejee CuKSETJBB Dadt Prize," consisting 
of books to the value of Rs. 200, shall be awarded annually 
for the best English Essay on some literary or historical 
subject or every alternate year on some scientific subject in 
accordance with the subjoined conditions. 

2. Competitors shall be Graduates or Undergraduates 
of the University of Bombay, of not more than six years' 
standing from the date of their Matriculation on the day 
'^'••^ scribed for the sending in of the Essays. 

The subject for the Essay shall be selected by the 
Syndicate and notified not less than twelve months before 
the day for sending in the Essay. 

4. The Essays shall be sent in to the University Regis- 
trar on or before the fourth Monday in June- Each Essay 
shall be designated by a motto instead of the writer's 
name and shall be accompanied by a sealed cover contain- 
ing the name of the competitor, his University standinsf, 
his Post Office address, and a declaration that' the Essay 
sent in by him is bond fide his own composition. 



1-52 



ENDOWMENTS. 



5. The Judges shall be three in Humber, and shall be 
nominated annually by the Syndicate. Their decision 
shall be announced on the fourth Monday in August. 

6. On the occasion when the prize is not awarded, the 
money shall be reserved to be applied by the Syndicate in 
such manner as they shall think best fitted for furthering: 
the object of the endowment. 



Year. 


Subject. 


Prizeman. 




Poems. 




1S64..- 


The Himalaya Motintain^ 


Vikdji, Frilinji Rastamji 


1865 .. 


The Indian Seasons 


Prize not awarded. 


1866... 


Alexandria 


Ditto. 


1867... 


The Solar System 


Modi, Barzorji Edalji. 


1868... 


India Three Thousand Years Ago 


Prize not awarded. 


1869... 


The Indux 


Kohiyar, Jehangiershili 
Erachshdh. 


1870.. 


Vasco de Gavia 


Kohiyar, JehangiershiU 
Erachshdh. 


1871.. 


Sidfee 


Aitken, Edward H. 


\6T2... 


The Suez Canal 


Prize not awarded. 


1873... 


Akbar 


Ditto. 


1874... 


Shivdji 


Ditto. 


1875... 


Athens 


Ditto. 


1876... 


The Visit of H. R. H. the Prince 






of Wales to India 


Ditto. 


1877... 


The Malabar Coast 


Ditto. 


1878 .. 


An Indian Pilrjrmnage ... 


Ditto, 


1879... 


The Ganges Valhy 


Ditto. 



ISSl. 



1882. 
1883. 



1884. 



Tlie Characteristics of English 

]Jterafure of the Times of Queens 

Elizabeth, Anne and Victoria 

Stated anil Compared. 
The Elephantas ... 
A comparison of the genius of NimachvaU, JehAugiev 



Prize not awarded. 



Ditto. 



Dickens with that of Scott as ma7d- 
fested in their principal works 
A Desrnptian of the Progress\^ 
made in India during the last\^ 
ten years in some branch oj 
Physical or Natural Science. 



Doiiibji. 



THB JUGGONNATH SUXKEESETT SANSKRIT SCHOLARSBIFS. 11 



H 







THE JUGGOJf^ATH SUNKERSETT SANSKRIT 
SCHOLARSHIPS. 

Venayekrow Juggonnathjee Sunkersett, Esq., Justice 
f the Peace and Fellow of the University of Bombay, 
'wishing to perpetuate in the University the memory 
of the interest taken by his revered father during the last 
42 years in the cause of education in the Presidency, and of 
his attachment to the sacred language of India," offered, in 
letters of the 16th September and 4th December 1865, to the 
address of the Registrar, Dr. R.S. Sinclair, for the acceptance 
of the Senate, six Sanskrit Scholarships, three of Rs. 25* each 
and three of Rs. 20* each per mensem ; one of each kind to be 
awarded annually at the Matriculation Exaniination, and to 
l)e tenable for three years in a College or Institution in Arts 
recognized by the University. At the annual meeting of 
the Senate, held on the 18th Deceml>er 1865, it was unani- 
mously resolved — " That the Ubei-al benefaction of Venayek- 
row Jugonnathjee Sunkersett, Esq., be accepted with the 
xpression of the grateful remembrance by the University 
I the many and important services rendered by his honour- 
i\ father to the cause of both elementary and advanced 
ducation in Western India, during his long and useful 
ireer as a citizen of Bombay." The Scholarships will be 
. warded in accordance with the following Regulations : — 

1. Two Scholarships, to be called *' The Jcgonxath Su>"- 
keSsett Sa>skkit Scholakships," one of Rs. 20 and one of 
Rs. 15 per mensem, shaU be awarded every year to the two 
Candidates who shall have passed the Matriculation Exami- 

* In consequence of the transfer of the securities frons H f o -H per cent, 
'rovemment stock, the vahie of these scholarships is reduced to Rs. 20 and 15 
respectively. 



154 



ENDOWMENTS. 



nation with the highest marks for proficiency in the San- 
skrit Language. The Scholarships will be tenable for two 
years at any of the Colleges or Institutions in Arts recog- 
nized by the University of Bombay, provided that the Scho- 
lar produce a certificate from the Head of the College or 
Institution that he is prosecuting his studies in Sanskrit. 

2. The names of the successful Candidates will be pub- 
lished along with the list of the Candidates who may have 
passed the Matriculation Examination. 

3. The Candidates elected must satisfy the Registrar, 
•within six weeks from the date of election, that he has duly 
joined a recognized College or Institution. 

4. In case of the Scholarships lapsing, through forfeiture 
or otherwise, during the course of the two years for which 
they are tenable, the money shall be reserved to be applied 
by the Syndicate in such a way as they shall think most ex- 
pedient to the furtherance of the purposes of the endowment 



Ybab. 



1866.. 
1867.. 

1868.. 

1869.. 
1870.. 
1871.. 
1872. 

1873. 
1874. 



Scholar. 



School. 



Athal^, Yasbvant Visudev 
Shikhar^, Govind Shripat 
Pendse, Kdshiuith Balvant 



Godbole, Ndrdyan Balkrishna. 

Chintamanipetkar, Pdndurang 

Venkatesh. 
Ag&se, NdTrdyan Bhikaji 
Agase, Ganesh Jandrdan 
Rdjavade, Gopal Vishnu 
Limaye, Hari Vdman... 
Oka, VAman D4ji 
Bhat.Haririim Uttamnim 
Oka, Krishndji Govind 
Agiise, Dhondu Hari 
Toshi, Lakshuman Jani'irdan 

Apte, Vdman Shivram 

Gokhale, KrishnAji Vislinu 
Ni'itu, Trimbak Gangadhar 
Gokbale, GopiiU'iamchand 



Ratnagiri High School. 

Dhulia High School. 

Poona High School, 
Jonnerhj Elphin- 

stone High School. 

ElphinstoneHighSchool 

Poona High School. 

Eatnilgiri High School. 
Poona High School. 
Ratnagiri High School. 
Ditto. 
Ditto. 
Surat High School, 
Poona High School. 
Ratnilgiri High School. 
Free General Assembly's 

Institution, Bombay. 
Rajiiram High School, 

Kolh;l})ar. 
Ratnilgiri High School. 
Surnt High School. 
RAjiirum High School, 
Kolhapur, 



THE JAM SHKI VISHAJl SCflOLlRSHIP. 



1-5.1 



187:.. . 

1S76... 
1S77... 

1878... 
1879... 

1880... 

1881... 

1882... 
>S3.. 



( ; Bhandarkar, S'ridhar Ram- 

J ' krishna. 

I Kulkami, Bal&ji Hari 

( Pbadke, Ramchandra Dinkar, 

I Bhagv-at, B^Iaji Abaji 

J : Godbole. SadAsMv Mahadev 
( ; Pitke, Gopal Ramchandra .. 

^ ! D^mle, Shridhar Keshav 

( I T>&te, Baldji Sadashiv 

) Vaidya,LakshmanRamchandra 

Chitnis, Malhar KhanderAo... 

Arte, Bh4skar Rdmchandra . . . 

( j Kirke, Krishndji Hari 

f Bodas, I^shuman Chintaman. 

\\ 

I I Joshi, Narhar Balkrishna 
I ! Joshij Chintaman Hari 

< I Dite, Ndriyan KashinAth ... 

I j _ 

\ Joshi, Bhiskar Vishnu 

) Panse, NslrAvan SakhdrAm ... 



School. 



ElphinstoneHighSchool 

Rdjdrim High School, 

Kolhapur. 
Ratnagiri High School. 
Poona High School. 
Ratndgiri High School. 
Raj dram High School, 

Kolhapur. 
Ratnagiri High SchooL 
Poona High School. 
Ratnagiri High School. 
Poona High School. 
New English School, 

Poona. 
ElphinstoneHighSchool, 
New English School, 

Poona. 
RobertMoney Institution 
Ratndgiri High School. 
New Elnglish School, 

Poona. 
Ditto. 
Ditto. 



VI. 



THE JAM SHEI VIBHAJI SCHOLARSHIP. 

His Highness the Jam Shri Vibhaji of Xowanagar, being 

^irous of encouraging English education in Kathiawar. 

tered in a letter to the Vice -Chancellor, Sir Alexander 

!-ant, Bart., dat«d •25th Febmary 1866, the sum of Es. 4,50C> 

r the founding of a Scholarship tenable bj a Native of 

Kathidwar for two years in an institution recognized by the 

rniversity. At a meeting of the Senate, held on the 5th 

\nril 1866, it was resolved : — " That the handsome beuefac- 

on of His Highness the Jam Shri Vibhaji of Xowanagar 

? accepted with the best thanks of the University." The 

scholarship will be awarded in accordance with the follow* 

■ig Regulations : — - 



loC eKdowjients. 

1. A Scholarship, to be entitled " The Jam Ssui Vibhaji 
ScHOLAKSHiP," of the value of E,s. 15 per mensem, tenable 
for two years, shall be biennially, or whenever vacant, 
announced for competition. 

2. • The object of the Jam Shri Vibhaji Scholarship is to 
assist in maintaining Natives of Kathiawdr while studying 
in the University of Bombay. 

3. Persons to be eligible for competition must be bond 
fide Natives of Kathiawar who have passed the Matricula- 
tion Examination. 

4. Should there be more Candidates than one, the Scholar- 
ship shall be awarded to that Candidate who shall appear 
from the University records to have obtained the highest 
marks for proficiency in English ^t the Matriculation Exa- 
mination. Provided always that no Candidate who has once 
held the Scholarship is to be considered eligible for re-elec- 
tion. 

5. The Scholarship shall be announced for competition 
in the first week of December. Applications of Candidates, 
under Form AT, must be sent in to the Registrar on or 
before the 31st December. 

6. The Syndicate will thereupon proceed to adjudge the 
Scholarship on some day during the month of January. 

7. The Candidate elected must satisfy the Registrar, 
wiiliin six weeks from the date of election, that he has duly 
joined a recognized College or Institution. 

8. The stipend of the Scholarship shall be payable 
monthly on a bill drawn by the Head of some recognized 
College or Institution ; which bill shall certify, under the 
signature of the head, that the Scholar is in regular attend- 
ance at the College or Institution, that his conduct is good, 
and his progress in University studies is satisfactory. 

9. Should the Scholar discontinue his University studies, 
or be unfavourably reported of by the Head of his College or 
Institution, the Syndicate shall declare the Scholarship to 
be forfeited. 

10. Any surplus which may arise from the vacancy of 
the Scholarship, during any year or part of a year, shall be 
added to next year's Scholarship, so as to increase the 
monthly stipend payable. 



THE COWASJEE JEHANGHIER LATIN SCHOLAESHIP. 157 



Year. 


SCHOLAB. 


School. 


1867... 


Vohord, Kallianrdi Lakshumi- 
shankar. 


Sarat High School. 


1868... 


Desai, Savdilal Govindriim . . . 


ElphinstoncHigh School. 


1871... 


Ved, Dnlabji Dharamahi 


Ditto. 


1873. 


Sett, Motichand Udhavji ... 


Kdthiawdr High School, 

Rajkot. 
Chandanvddi High 


1875... 


Ghogdvala, Adarji Rastamji... 






School, Bombay. 


1877... 


Joshipard, Prinlal Kahand^. 


Bahadurkhanji High 
School, Junagad. 


1879.. 


Mehta, Anantrai Nathji 


Bhamagar High School. 


1881... 


Chavdn, Odhavji Devji 


Elphinstone High School 


1883... 


Nulkar, AtmArdm Kriahndji... 


Poona High School. 



YII. 




THE COWASJEE JEHAXGHIER LATIN 
SCHOLAESHIP. 

Cowasjee Jehanghier Readymoney, Esq., Justice of the 
Peace, being desirous of marking his interest in the Bombay 
University, ofiered, on the occasion of the Convocation for 
conferring Degrees which was held on the 14th of January 
1868, in a lettertothe Vice-Chancellor,Sir Alexander Grant, 
Bart., of the same date, the sum of Rs. 5,000 in 4 per cent. 
Grovemment Paper, for the founding of a Latin Scholarship, 
to be awarded each year to the best Candidate ia Latin at 
B 1030—14 Br 



158 ENDOWMENTS. 

the Matriculation Examination. Tlie offer was accepted by 
the Senate on the 31st of March 1868, with their best thanks, 
and the following Eegulations were passed for the award- 
ing of the Scholarship : — 

1. A Scholarship, to be entitled " The Cowasjee Jehan- 
GHIEK Latin Scholakship," of the value of Es. 200 per 
annum, shall be awarded every year to that Candidate who 
shall have passed the Matriculation Examination, and who 
shall have obtained the highest marks for proficiency in 
Latin at such Examination, provided that the Scholar 
produce a certificate from the Head of his College or Insti- 
tution that he is prosecuting his studies in Latin. 

2. The stipend of the Scholarship shall be payable half- 
yearly on a bill drawn by the Head of some recognized Col- 
lege or Institution ; which bill shall certify, under the signa- 
ture of theHead, that the Scholar is in regular attendance 
at the College or Institution, that his conduct is good, and 
that his progress in University studies is satisfactory. 

3. Should the Scholar discontinue his University studies, 
or be unfavourably reported of by the Head of his College 
or Institution, the Syndicate shall declare the Scholarship 
to be forfeited. 

4. The Scholarship shall be awarded at the final meeting 
of the Matriculation Examiners, and the name of the Cowas- 
jee Jehanghier Scholar for the ensuing year shall be pub- 
lished by the Examiners together with their list of Matri- 
culated Students. 

.5. The Candidate elected must satisfy the Registrar, 
within six weeks from the date of election, that he has 
duly joined a recognized College or Institution. 

6. In case of the Student who is elected declining to 
proceed to College, the stipend of the Scholarship for the 
ensuing year may be conferred on the Candidate who shall 
have obtained the second place in the Examination in Latin. 

7. In case of the Scholarship lapsing through forfeiture, 
or otherwise, during the course of the year, any savin u 
which may result may be added to next year's Scholarshij 
so as to increase the half-yearly stipends payable ; or ma> 
be used, at the discretion of the Syndicate, to create a 
second Scholarship for the ensuing year. 



THE KIXLOCH FOBBES GOLD JIEDAL. 



lo9 



Teas.! 



School. 



1S<5S.. 
1869.. 
1870.. 

1871 I 
1872.. 
1873- 
1S74.. 
1875.. 
1976.. 
1877.. 

1878 I 

1879.. 
18S0. 
1S81.. 
1882.. 
18S3.. 



McDermott. Michael ... 
DeMonte, Thom&s Aoumlo 

Bryan , James 

D^a. Luis 

Bh&nd&rkar, Vasnder Gopa . 

Hogan. Daniel 

Pereira, Conrad 
DeSoaza, Lazarus Diogo 
O'Shanahan, Henry Frank . 
Malligao, William George Tobias . 
Vakil, Bastamji Bamansbsh 
Tool«, John Harris 
Modi, Kaikhosm Fr&mji 
Dias, Brasmo Xarier ... 
DeSilra, Mannel 
DeMello, Ignatius 
Hanson, Charles M. 
Maidmeat, Samael Gerald 



St Mary's Institution. 

'Ditto. 

Ditto. 

Ditto. 

Ditto. 

Ditto. 

Ditto, 

Ditta 

Ditto. 
Bishop's HighSchool, Poona. 
. Elphinstone High SchooL 
. Bi?h.>p'sHigh School, Poona. 
Elphinstone High SchooL 
St, Man's Instimtion. 
I "Ditto. 

! Ditto. 

Bishop's High School, Poona 
.ICathedral High School, 
I Bombay. 



VUL 

THE KTN'LOCH FORBES GOLD MEDAL. 
The Trustees to the Kinloch Forbes Memorial Ftmd, in a 
letter to the address of the Yice-Chancellor, the Rev. Dr. 
Wilson, dated the 19th December 1868, ofEered to the Uni- 
versity, in behalf of themselves and other subscribers to 
the Fund, a sum of Rs. 5,000 in Government 6* per cent. 
Paper, for the purpose of awarding a yearly Gold Medal for 
proficiency in General Jurisprudence and the Roman Civil 
Law, to be called " The Klsioch Forbes Gold Medal,' 
and for Law Books to accompany the Aledal, should the 
fund allow. At the annual meeting of the Senate, held on 
the same date, the following Resolution was unanimously 
agreed to :— 

" That the Senate accept with thanks this endowment, 
in honour of its late accomplished Yice-Chancellor, the 
Honourable Mr. Justice Kinloch Forbes." 

The Medal will be awarded in accordance with the follow- 
iug Regulations : — 

1. A Gold Medal, to be called " The Ktsloch Forbes 
Gold Medal," of the value of Rupees two hundred, with a 
Prize of Law Books of the value of Rupees fifty, will be 
awarded annually to the Candidate who obtains the highest 
number of marks in the subjects of Roman Civil Law and 

* Sow transfirrrfi to i per cent. GoTemment stock. 



160 ENDOWMENTS. 

General Jurisprudence, including International Law, at the 
Examination for Honours in Law, provided always that in no 
case shall the Medal be awarded to a Candidate who is not 
placed by the Examiners in the first class of successful 
Candidates at such Examination, 

2 . The name of the Candidate to whom the Medal and 
Prize of Books are awarded shall be published with the list 
of successful Candidates at the Examination for Honours in 
Law. 

3. Whenever the Medal and Books are not awarded, the 
money which would have been expended in purchasing them 
shall be applied by the Syndicate in such manner as they 
shall think best fitted for furthering the object and purposes 
of the endowment. 

IX. 



THE DAVID SASSOON HEBEEW SCHOLARSHIP. 

The Honourable A. D. Sassoon, C.S.I., being desirous of 
encouraging the study of the Hebrew Language, offered, in 
a letter, dated the 11th January 1869, to the address of the 
Vice- Chancellor, the Rev. Dr. Wilson, the sum of Rs. 6,000 
in Government 5* per cent. Paper for the foundation of a 
Scholarship (to be dedicated to the memory of his late 
father, David Sassoon, Esq.,) of Rs. 250 per annum, tenable 
for two years, in any Institution recognized by the Univer- 
sity for Degrees in Arts. 

The offer was accepted by the Senate at a meeting held 
on the 20th January 1869 ; and the Scholarship will be 
awarded in accordance with the following Eegulations : — 

1. A Scholarship of Rs. 250 per annum, to be denomi- 
nated " The David Sassqon Hebrew Scholarship," to be 

• Nqw trwsf erred to 4 per cent. Oovernmeni stock. 



THE DAYID SASSOON HEBEEW SCHOLAESHIP. 161 

held for two years, shall, on the first occasion of its being 

bestowed, be awarded to the Candidate who shall pass the 
Matriculation Examination with the highest marks for pro- 
ficiency in the Hebrew Language, or, failing such a Candi- 
date, to the Undergraduate who shall pass the Previous 
Examination with the highest marks in the same lan- 
guage, provided that the Scholar produce a certificate from 
the Head of his College or Institution that he is prose- 
cuting his studies in Hebrew. 

2. The Scholarship shall be afterwards awarded every 
alternate year to the Candidate who shall, since the time of 
the last awarding of the Scholarship, have passed the Ma- 
triculation Examination with the highest marks for profici- 
ency in the Hebrew Language, or, fading such a Candidate, 
to the Undergraduate who shall, since the time of the last 
awarding of the Scholarship, have passed the Previous 
Examination with the highest marks for proficiency in the 
same language. 

3. The Scholarship shall be payable half-yearly, in equal 
proportions, to its allottee, on his producing a bill, counter- 
signed by the Head of some College or Institution, recognized 
in Arts, accompanied by a certificate, from the same source, 
of regular attendance at that College or Institution, of good 
conduct, and of satisfactory progress in University studies. 

4. Failing the production of such a certificate as that now 
indicated, the Syndicate may declare the Scholarship for- 
feited. 

5. The Scholarship shall be awarded at the final meeting 
of the Matriculation (or Previous) Examination, and the 
name of the David SASSOoy Scholak for the ensuing 
two years shall be published along with the list of the 
successful Candidates for Matriculation (or Previoas) 
Examination. 

6. The Candidate elected must satisfy the Eegistrar, 
within six weeks from the dat« of election, that he has didy 
joined a recognized College or Institution. 

7. In case of the Matriculating Student who is elected 
declining to proceed to College, the Scholarship for the 
ensuing two years may be conferred on the Undergraduate 
who shall have obtained the second place in Hebrew in the 
Matriculation Examination, or, failing such a Candidate, to 
the passed Candidate who has obtained the highest marks 

B 1030— H Bc ♦ 



162 ENDOWMENTS. 

in Hebrew in the Previous Examination and is willing to 
continue at College. 

8. In case of the Scholarship not being adjudged, or 
lapsing before it has been held two years, the Scholarship 
may be awarded under the same rules at the next University 
Examinations ; and any savings resulting from non-adju- 
dication or lapse may be added to the next Scholarship's 
allotment, or used, at the discretion of the Syndicate, 
towards creating a second Scholarship. 



Year. 


Scholar. 


School. 


1872.. 

1878..' 


David, Abraham Jacob 


Scottish High School, Fort. 
Fort High School. 
Ditto. 


1879.. 




1881... 


Keuben Ezra 


Robert Money Institution. 


1883... 


Bhastekar, Isaac Aaron 


Free General Assembly's 
Institution, Bombay. 



X. 

THE JAMES BERKLEY GOLD MEDAL. 

R. M. Brereton, Esq., Chief Engineer, G. I. P. Railway, 
N.E.D., in a letter to the address of the Vice-Chancellor, 
the Rev. Dr. Wilson, dated 18th June 1869, offered in 
behalf of himself and the other admirers and friends of the 
late Mr. James J. Berkley, Chief Resident Engineer, G. I. P. 
Railway, the sum of Rs. 8,000 in Government 5* per cent. 
Promissory Notes, for the purpose of founding a " James 
Berkxey Gold Medal " for Civil Engineering, of the value 
of Rs. 250, to be given annually, and a Prize ^of Books of a 
scientific nature to accompany the Medal. At a meeting'of 
the Senate, held on the 13th August, the following Resolu- 
tion was unanimously adopted : — 

" That this handsome endowment, in honour of Mr. James 
John Berkley, one of the original Fellows mentioned in the 
Act of Incoqooration, be accepted with the best thanks of 
the Senate." 

The medal and books will be awarded in accordance with 
the following Regulations : — 

1. A Gold Medal, to be entitled " The J.ames Berkley 
Gold Medal," of the value of Rupees two hundred and fifty, 

* Now transferred to 4 per cent. Govcrument stock. 



THE ELLIS PRIZE. 1 69 

with a Prize of Books on Civil and Mechanical Engineering 
of the value of Rupees one hundred and fifty, will be 
awarded annually to the Candidate who obtains the highest 
number of marks in the Examination for the Degree of 
L.C.E,, provided that in no case shall the Medal be 
awarded if such Candidate be not specially recommended 
by the Examiners in Engineering and Engineering Drawing. 
2. The name of the successful Candidate shall be pub- 
lished with the list of Candidates who have passed the 
Examination for the Degree of L.C.E. 

8. "WTienever the Medal and Books are not awarded, the 
money which would have been expended in purchasing 
them shall be applied by the Syndicate in such manner as 
they shall think best fitted for furthering the object and 
purposes of the endowment. 



Medallist. 



1S73.. Godbol^, E^<:binath lUmcbandra, B.A 

1873. . Bamanji Sorabjl 

1874.. I Chandnani, Pritamdas Parsnmal 

1875 . . I TarapurvSIa, FarduDji Kuvarji 

1876. . ! Medal not aicarded. 
1877.. j mtto. 

1878.. Apte, Ganesh Krishna, B.A 

1S79.. Jtedal not awardtd. 

1880.. . Ditto. 

1881.. Ditto. 

1882 . . Ahmadi, Ibr&him Shaik D&ud Akhnnd 

1883. .' Medal not awarded, but Prize of Bookt omly given 
'. to ifokshaif^indum Vidtvigyardiyd, B.A. 



C0LLB6B. 



Poona Civil Engi- 
neering (now 
Colleee of Science.) 
Ditto. 
Ditto. 
Ditto. 



Ditto. 



College of Science, 
Poona. 

Ditto. 



XL 

THE ELLIS PRIZE. 

The Honourable B. H. Ellis, Member of the Council of 
H. E. the Viceroy and Gkjvemor-Greneral of India, offered, 
on the 26th August 1869, Promissory Xot^s of the value of 
Rs. 1,500, bearing interest at 4 per cent., for an annual prize 
of books of the value of Rs. 60, to be given to the Scholar 
who on Matriculation passes the best examination in any 
Oriental Language. 

At a meeting of the Senate, held on the 13th October 
1869, it was unanimously resolved : — 

" That this endowment be accepted with the best thanks 
of the Senate as a token from the Honourable B. H. Ellis 



164 



ENDOWMENTS. 



of his appreciation of the University, and regard for the 
people of Bombay." 

The prize will be awarded in accordance with the follow- 
ing Regulations : — 

1. A Prize, to be entitled " The Ellis Prize," consisting 
of books of the value of Rupees sixty, shall be awarded 
every year to the Candidate who shall have passed the 
Matriculation Examination with the highest marks for pro- 
ficiency in an Oriental Language. 

2. The prize shall be awarded in connection with such 
one or other of the following languages as the Syndicate 
from time to time may determine : — 

1. Marathi. 6. Sindhi. 

2. Gujarathi. 6. Arabic. 

3. Canarese. 7. Persian. 

4. Hindustani. 

3. The language for which the prize will be given each 
year shall be notified by the Syndicate not less than twelve 
months before each Matriculation Examination. 

4. The books shall be presented to the successful Can- 
didate by the Chancellor or Vice-Chancellor at the Convo- 
cation for Conferring Degrees. 



Tear. Language. 



1869.. 

1870.. 
1871.. 

1872.. 

1873.. 

1874.. 
1875.. 

1876.. 

1877.. 

1878.. 

1S79.. 

18S0.. 
1881 . . 

1882... 

1883.. 

1884... 



Marathi , 

Gujarfithi ... 
Canarese 

Sindhi , 

Persian 

Hindustani .... 
Arabic or Mard 

thi. 
Gujardthi . . . . 

Canarese 

Sindhi 

Marithi 

Persian. 
Hindustani 

Sindhi 

Gujarathi . . . . 
Caiiarose 



Prizeman. 



Kuute, Vishnu Keshav.. 

Kiingd, Dinshdh Pestan.ji 
Bevur, Hamchandra Ha- 

numantrao. 
Mirza, Kalichlihfin 

Fraidnnbeg. 
Contractor, Bebramji 

Rastamji. 

DeGama, Samuel 

Kdiiitkar, Bdllcrishna 

Hari {Marathi) 
Kaji, Chliaganial Guldb- 

das. 
Kuknur, Rdghavendra 

.1 aydchdrya 
Jui>:tifini, Eundanmal 

Mdnikrai. 
Patvardhan, Bdlkrishna 

Nardyan. 
M\nishi, Ghul/im Ahmad 
Mirzd, Najaflvuli Fredun- 

beg-. 
Oza, Dipcliand TeJbhS,n 

d(is. 
Melita, Cliuniiai Anuprim 



School. 



His Highness the Mahdrdja 
of Indore Madressa 

Bombay Proprietary School 

Belgdum Sirdars' High 
School. 

Haidardbdd High School. 

Poona Hiph School. 

Karachi High School. 
Private Tuition. 

Surat High School. 

DhdrvAd High School. 

Haidar^bAd Mission School. 

Private Tuition, Poona. 

Fort High School. 
Ndrdyaii .Iiuraniiath 
High School, Kardchi. 
Ditto. 

Naridd High School. 



THE HEDBEBT AND LATOUCHE SCHOLARSHIP. 165 



xn. 

THE HEBBERT AXD LATOUCHE SCHOLARSHIP. 

The Chiefs of Junagad and Xowanagar, in the Province 
of Kathiawar, offered, through the Right Honotirable the 
Gk)vemor in Council, on the 22nd October 1869, Govern- 
ment 5 per cent. Promissory Xotes of the value of 
Rs. 5,t300, for the foundation of a Scholarship of Rs. 20* per 
mensem in the University of Bombay, as a Memorial to 
Captains Hebbert and LaTouche, the ofiBcers who fell at 
the Tobar Hill in 1867 in fight ivith a band of outlawed 
Waghirs. At the annual meeting of the Senate, held on 
the 18th December 1869, it was unanimously resolved : — 

" That the offer of Rs. .5,000 in Goveminent 5 per cent. 
Promissory Xotes, from the Chiefs of Junagad and Xowa- 
nagar, in Kathiawar, for the foundation of a Scholarship in 
memory of Captains Hebbert and LaTouche, who fell nobly 
in the discharge of public duty at the Tobar Hill in 1867, be 
accepted with the best thanks of the Senate." 

The Scholarship will be awarded in accordance vrith the 
following Regulations : — 

1. A Scholarship, to be entitled " The Hebbert a>'D 
LaToxjche Scholarship," of the value of Rupees eighteen 
per mensem, tenable for two years, shall be awarded bien- 
nially, or whenever vacant. 

2. The object of the Scholarship is to assist JTatives of 
Soreth, in Kathiawar, desirous of prosecuting their studies 
in any one of the recognized Colleges or Listitutions of the 
University of Bombay. 

3. Persons to be eligible for competition must be biynd 
fide Natives of Soreth who have passed the Matriculation 
Examination. 

4. In the event of there being more than one Candidate 
for the Scholarship on the occasion of a vacancy, who shall 
fulfil the foregoing conditions, the Scholarship shall be 
aW&rded bv the Syndicate to the Candidate who shall appear 
from the University records to have obtained the highest 
number of marks at the Matriculation Examination, provid- 
ed always that no Candidate who has once held the Scho- 
larship be eligible for re-election. 

" In consequence of the transfer of the Securities ttoia 5 to 4 per cent. 
Government stock, the ralue is reduced to B& IS a month. 



166 ENDOWMENTS. 

5. The Scholarsliip shall be announced for competition 
in the first week of December. Applications of Candidates 
under Form AU must be sent in to the Registrar on or 
before the 31st December. 

6. The Syndicate shall thereupon proceed to adjudge 
the Scholarship on some day during the month of January. 

7. The Candidate elected must satisfy the Registrar, 
within six weeks from the date of eleci/ion, that he has duly 
joined a recognized College or Institution. 

8. The stipend of the Scholarship shall be payable 
monthly, on a bill drawn by the Head of some recognized 
College or Institution, who shall certify under his signature 
on such bill, that the Scholar is in regular attendance at 
the College or Institution, that his conduct is good, and 
that his progress in University studies is satisfactory. 

9- Should the Scholar discontinue his University studies 
or be unfavourably reported on by the Head of the College 
or Institution, the Syndicate shall declare the Scholarship 
to be forfeited. 

10. Any surplus which may arise from the vacancy of 
the Scholarship during any year, or part of a year, shall be 
added to next year's Scholarship so as to increase the 
monthly stipends payable. 



Year. 


SCIIOIiAR, 


School. 


1871.. 
1873.. 
1875 


Shdh, Tribhuvandas Motichand 

AchSn'a, Devishankar Ravishankar .... 


Rdjkot High School. 
Kathidwar High School. 
Ditto. 


1877 




Ditto. 


1879.. 

1881 


Josliipara, Pranlal Kahdndis 


Biihadurkhdnji High School, 

Juiiiigad. 
Private Tuition, Jnndjrad. 


1883 




Barodd High School, /(nnner- 






ly Private Tuition. 



XIII. 

THE WILSON PHILOLOGICAL LECTURESHIP. 

The Honorary Secretary to the Committee of Manage- 
ment for the Subscribers to the Wilson Testimonial Fund 
offered, in a letter dated March 2nd, 1870, to the address of 
the Registrar, James Taylor, Esq., the sum of (Rs. 23,500) 
twenty-three thousand and five hundred Rupees in Govern- 



THE WILSON PHILOLOGICAL LECTURESHIP. 167 

ment 5* per cent. Promissory Notes, for the endowment 
of a Philological Lectureship in honour of the Rev. John 
Wilson, D.D., F.E.S., Y ice-Chancellor of the University, 
with the following conditions : — 

1. That the Lectureship be called " The "Wllsox Philo- 
logical Lectureship," in connection with which, in conse- 
cutive years, a short series of Lectures should be delivered 
by a competent European or Native Scholar, annually 
selected for the purpose, on either of the followiug classes 
of languages and the literature ia which they are 
embodied : — 

I. Sanskrit and Prakrit languages derived from it. 
II. Hebrew and the other Semitic languages, 
III. Latin and Gi"eek. 

lY. English viewed in connection with Anglo-Saxon 
and its other som-ces. 

2. That the interest of the Fund for this endowment be 
at the entire disposal of Dr. Wilson during his lifetime, and 
that the University undertake the duty of receiving the 
interest, and paying the same to Dr. Wilson, or to his 
order, at stated half-yearly periods, as the interest becomes 
due. 

At a meeting of the Senate, held on the 2nd April 1870, 
the endowment, in honour of the late Vice-Chancellor of 
the University, the Rev. John Wilson, D.D., F.R S., was 
accepted with the best thanks of the Senate." 

Dr. Wilson died on the 1st December 1875, and on the 
12th February 1876 the Senate passed the following 
Regulations for the Lectureship : — 

1. Each Series of Lectures shall consist of not fewer 
than sis Lectures. 

2 The Lectures shall be delivered in Bombay in the 
First or cold-weather Term in each year, 

3. In the month of January in each year the Syndicate 
shall publish a Notification in which the subject of the en- 
suing Series of Lectures shall be announced, and shall 
take such steps in each year as they may think best for 
obtaining a Lecturer. 



*Sow transferred to 4 per cent Government stock. 



168 



ENDOWMENTS. 



Year. 



1877. 



1878. 
1379., 



1880.. 
1881.. 



1882.. 
1883 . . 



1B84., 
1885.. 



Subject. 



Sanskrit and Prakrit Languages derived 

from it. 
Latin and GS-reek 

Hebrew and tlie other Semitic Langua- 
ges. 

English viewed in connection with Anglo- 
Saxon and its other sources. 

Sanskrit and Prakrit Languages derived 
from it. 

Latin and Greek 

Sanskrit and Prakrit Languages derived 
from it. 

Hebrew and the other Semitic Languages. 

English viewed in connection wth Anglo- 
Saxon and its other sources. 



Lectubke. 



Ramkrishna GopS.1 Bhdn- 

darkar, M.A. 
Peter Peterson, M.A. 

E. Behatsek, M.C.E. 

F. G. Selby, B.A. 

No Lecturer. 

M. Macmillan, B.A. 
Shankar Pdndurang Pandit, 

M.A. 
A.Fuhrer, Ph.D. 
W. E. Hart, B.A. 



XIV. 

THE ELLIS SCHOLARSHIP. 

The President and Secretary to the Ellis Testimonial 
Committee, in a letter dated 19tli April 1870, to the ad- 
dress of the Registrar, James Taylor, Esq., offered the sum 
of Rs. 7,206 for investment in 4 per cent. Government 
Promissory Notes for awarding annually, from the interest 
thereof, a monthly Scholarship of the value of Rs. 25, 
bearing the name of the Honourable B. H. Ellis, to the most 
successful Scholar in the English Language and Literature 
at the BA. Examination. 

At a meeting of the Senate, held on the 16th June 1870, 
the following Resolution was unanimously adopted : — 

" That this endowment, in honour of the Honourable B. 
H. Ellis, Member of the Council of H. E. the Viceroy and 
Governor General of India, be accepted with the best thanks 
of the Senate." 

The Scholarship will be awarded in accordance with the 
following Regulations : — 

1. A Scholarship, to be entitled " The Ellis Scholak- 
snip," of the value of Rupees twenty-five a month, shall be 
awarded annually at the Examination for the Degree of B.A. 
to the Candidate who passes the Examination with the 
highest marks in English. 

2. The name of the successful Candidate shall be pub- 
lished with the list of Candidates who have passed the 
Examination for the Degree of B.A. 

3. In case of the Scholarship lapsing during the course 
of the year for which it is tenable, any balance that may 
remain shall be added to the next year's Scholarship. 



THE CHAXCELLOE's MEDAL. 



169 



Scholar. 



1870. 
1871. 
1872. 
1873. 
1874. 
1875. 

1876. 
1877. 
IS78. 
1879. 
18(<0. 
1«S1. 
1882. 
1*S.3. 



j Sa>ini, Ibrahim Mnhammad ..... 
j Kirloskar, Ganesh Bamcbandra... 
i Duncan, Thomas 

Raiiga, Din.=hah Pestanji 

Modi, Jehangier E 'alji 

Chiplnnkar, Lakshuinan Krishna . 



Ksnpa, Fardnnji Manikji 

Shahani, DavAram Gidumal . 

Shan»baii, Henry Frank 

Ksnga, SorAbii Manikji 

I Vaidya, Chint4nian Vinavak . 
j Nariman, Manikji Khar-he<iji , 
' Gokhale, MahadHV Vi-hnii. . . . 
' Pr-dahah, Barjorji JamAsji 



COLLEGX. 



Elphinstone. 
D<rccan. 
St. Xavier's. 
Elph in stone. 

Ditto. 
Deccan, formerly Free 

General Assembly's. 
."^t. Xavipr's. 
HphinstoBe. 
St. Xavier'8. 

Ditto. 
Elphinstone. 

Ditto. 

Ditto. 

Ditto. 



XY. 
THE CHANCELLOR'S MEDAL. 

At a Convocation for Conferring Degrees held on the 12th 
January 186P, His Excellency the Right Honourable Sir 
Seymour FitzGerald, G.C.S.L, D.C.L., Gk)vemor of Bombay, 
Chancellor of the University, founded a Gold Medal, to be 
called the " Chaxcellor's Medal," with a view to encourage 
the Graduates of the University of Bombay to aspire after 
the highest honours the University can bestow. At a meet- 
ing of "the Senate, held on the 23rd March 1871, the follow- 
ing Regulations for awarding the Medal were passed : — 

1. A Gold Medal, to be called " The Chaxcellok's 
Medal," will be awarded annually in connection with the 
Examination for the Degree of Master of Arts. 

2. The Syndicate will determine and notify each year, in 
December, the rotation in which the Medal shall be assign- 
ed in connection with each branch of study prescribed for 
the M.A. Examination. 

3. The Medal shall be awarded to the Candidate who 
passes the Examination in the First Class, and obtains the 
highest number of marks in the branch of study notified 
for that year. 

4. Provided that if no Candidate qualifies for the Medal 
in the specified subject of the year, the Syndicate shall be 
authorized to award it to the Candidate who, on a review of 
the Examination in the various subjects, passes in the 
First Class with the highest number of marks. 

B 1030—15 BU 



170 



ENDOWMENTS. 



5. The name of the Candidate to whom the Medal i 
awarded, will be published with the list of successful Car 
didates. 

6. The Medal will be presented at the Convocation fc 
Conferring Degrees. 

The Chancellor's Medal has been assigned in connectio 
with the branches of study prescribed for the M.A. Exam 
nation in the following rotation : — 

In 1884 to History and Philosophy. 
„ 1885 to Mathematics. 



Yeah. 



1874. 
1876. 



1877. 

1878. 

1879. 
1880. 

1881. 
1882. 
1883 



Subject. 



Languages .. 

Mathematics and 
Natural Philoso- 
phy. 

Natural Sciences .. 

Mathematics 

Languages .. 
History and Philo- 
sophy. 
Mathemntics 
Mathematics 
Mathematics 



Medallist. 



Duncan, Thomas, B.A 

Dastur, Pai'dunji Mancherji, 
B.A. 

N4egS,umv!ila, Kavasji Ddda- 

bhai, B.A. 
Sanj^nd, Kdvasji Jamshedji, 

B.A. 
Medal not awarded. 
Ditto. 

Ditto. 
Vaidya,CtiintamanVin!iyak,B.A. 
Wagle, Krishn&ji Balvant, B.A. 



College. 



St. Xavier's. 
Elphinstone. 



Ditto. 
Deccan . 



Elphinstone. 
Ditto. 



XVI. 

THE ARNOULD SCHOLARSHIP. 

The President and Secretary to the Arnould Testimonit 
Fund, in a letter dated 9th January 1871, to the address c 
the Registrar, James Taylor, Esq., offered to the Univei 
sity on behalf of the Native friends and admirers of Si 
Joseph Arnould, Knight, a Judge of the High Court ( 
Judicature, Bombay, a sum of Rupees 6,000 in Governmer 
5 per cent. Securities for awarding annually, from th 
interest thereof, a Scholarship of Rs. 25* a month to tb 
Candidate who passes the Examination for the Degree c 
LL.B. with the highest number of marks in the paper con 
prising the Hindu and Muhammadan Law. 

At a meeting held on the 23rd March 1871, the endoy 
meut was accepted with the best thanks of the Senate, an 



» In consequence of the transfer from 6 to 4 per cent. Government stof 
the value ia reduced to Bs. 22 a month. 



THE DCKE OF EDINBURGH TELLOWSHIP. 171 

the following Regulations were passed for awarding the 
Scholarship : — 

1. A Scholarship, to be called "The ARyotrLD Scholar- 
ship," of the value of Rupees twenty-two a month, shall be 
awarded annually at the Examination for the Degree of 
LL.B. to the Candidate who passes the Examination with 
the highest number of marks in the paper on " Saccession 
and Family Rights with special reference to Hindu and 
Mubammadan Law." 

2. The name of the successful Candidate shall be pub- 
lished with the list of Candidates who have passed the 
Examination for the Degree of LL.B. 

3. In case of the Scholarship lapsing during the course 
of the year for which it is tenable, any balance that may 
remain shall be added to the next year's Scholarship. 



Yrar. 


Scholar. 


COLLEOK. 


1872.. 
1873.. 
1874.. 
1875.. 
1876.. 
1877.. 
1878. 


Modi, Barzorji Edalji, M. A 

Deshmnkh, R6tnchandra GopAlrao.B. A 
KothSre, Anandrdo Krishnarao, B.A. .. 

AthaW, Yashvant Vasudev, M.A 

Dhairyavan, Vdsudev KrishnarAo, B.A. 
Inamd4r,Venkatrio Rukhamangad,B-A. 
Josbi, BhAskar Shiidhar, B A 


Government Law Bchool. 
Bitto. 
Ditto. 
Ditto. 
Ditto. 
Ditto. 
Ditto. 


1879.. 
1880.. 
1881 


Ovalekar, Moreshvar Nirayan, B.A. .... 
Chandivadkar, NAr&yan Ganesh, B.A. .. 


Ditto. 
Ditto. 
Ditto. 


188^ 


K&kS. \a\Toji Behr&mji BA 


Ditto 


1883. 


Joshi, More Vishvanath, B.A 


Ditto. 



XYII. 

THE DUKE OF EDIXBURGH FELLOWSHIP. 

The Chiefs and Sirdars of the Deccan and the Southern 
Mahratta Country offered to the University, through 
Grovemment,on the 24:th July 1871, in commemoration of the 
visit of His Royal Highness the Duke of Edinburgh to the 
Presidency of Bombay, the sum of Rs. 10,000 for the estab- 
lishment of a Fellowship of the value of the interest of the 
sum when invested in Government Securities, tenable for 
two years, and to be awarded every alternate year to the 
Undergraduate who passes with the highest marks in 
Honours at the B.A. Examination, on condition that he 



172 ENDOWMENTS. 

continues his studies at one of the recognized Colleges, and 
presents himself at the M A. Examination Avithin such time 
as may be fixed by the University. 

At a meeting of the Senate, held on the 29th September 
1871, the offer of the Chiefs and Sirdars of the Deccan and 
the Southern Mahratta Country was accepted with the 
best thanks of the Senate. 

The Fellowship will be awarded in accordance with the 
following Eegulations : — 

1. A Fellowship, to be called the "Duke of Edinburgh 
Fellowship," of the value of Eupees four hundred per 
annum and tenable for two years, shall be awarded every 
alternate year, or whenever vacant, to the Candidate who 
passes with the highest number of marks in the First Class 
at the B.A. Examination, on condition that he continues 
his studies at one of the Colleges or Institutions recog- 
nized by the University of Bombay, and presents himself at 
the M.A. Examination within the time of his Fellowship. 

2. The Candidate elected must satisfy the Registrar, 
within six weeks from the date of election, that he has duly 
joined a recognized College or Institution. 

3. The stipend of the Fellowship shall be paid half- 
yearly on a bill drawn by the Head of some recognized 
College or Institution, who shall certify under his signature 
on such bill that the Fellow is in regular attendance at the 
College or Institution, and that his conduct is good. 

4. Should the Fellow discontinue his University studies, 
or be unfavourably reported on by the Head of his College 
or Institution, the Syndicate shall declare the Fellowship 
to be forfeited. 

5. Any surplus which may arise from the vacancy of 
the Fellowship during any year, or part of a year, shall 
be applied by the Syndicate in such manner as they shall 
think best fitted for furthering the object and purposes of 
the endowment. 



Year. 


FELLOW. 


College. 


1872 . 

1874.. 

1876 

1878.. 

1880.. 

18S2.. 




St. Xavierg. 
KIphinstone. 

Ditto. 
St. Xavier's. 
Elphiiistone, 

Ditto. 


Dastiir, Fiirdiin.jl Mancherji 

Aedse, Dliondd Hari 

Sha'iahan, Henry Frank 

Vaidvn, ChintAninn Oanesh 

Gokhale, Muhiidev Vishnu 



THE RAO SIB PRAGMAUI SCHOLABSHIPS. 



173 



XYHI. 

THE BAI MAXECKBAI BYRAMJEE JEEJEEBHOY 
PRIZE. 

The Honourable Byramjee Jeejeebhoy, in a letter dated 
10th Auo^ist 1871, to the address of the Registrar, James 
Taylor, Esq., offered to the University " a 4 per cent. Gro- 
vemment Promissory Note of Rs. 2,000, that the interest 
thereof may be devoted to the giving of a Prize or Prizes 
annually to the successful Student or Students in any 
branch of learning the Senate may think proper, in the 
name of Bai Maneckbai Byramjee Jeejeebhoy." 

At a meeting of the Senate, held on the 29th vSeptember 
1871, this offer was accepted with the thanks of the Senate. 

The Prize will be awarded in accordance with the follow- 
ing Regulations : — 

1. A Prize, to be entitled " The Bai Ma>tckbai Byram- 
jee .Jeejeebhoy Prize," consisting of books of the value of 
Rupees eighty, shall be awarded every year to the Candi- 
date who passes the Matriculation Examination with tha 
highest marks for proficiency in " General Knowledge". 

2. The name of the successful Candidate will be pub- 
lished with the list of the Candidates who may pass the 
3Iatriculation Examination. 



1873., 
1873.. 

1S74.. 

is:6.. 

IS77. 

1S78.. 
13T!»., 

ISSO . 

isn. 

l-t*:i 



Prizem.xx. 



MaI1&, Faiznll^hhai Lnkmanji 

Pereira, Conrad 

Ketk:ir. Venka'esh Bapuji .... 

Sheik, Yatub Ismael 

Merctirtiit, Pescaiiji D^dabhai . 
VuMya, Ctiintamau VinAyak . 

•Toshi, Mi.iro VishvaDiith" 

Goklmle, .Vl.ihadev Vishnn 

Satton, Alexander Arthur .. . 

Millard, A'frt-d 

CiniS, M4nikji 1 MsabhSi . . . . 
Captain, Kbarahedji Hormasjl.. 



Snrat High School. 
8t Mary's Institution. 
Belganm Sirdars" High School. 
Haidariba.1 High School. 
Parsi Boarding School, Bandora. 
Elphinstnne High SchooL 
AmnSoti High *hooL 
Blphinstone High School. 
Scottish High School, Brculla. 

Ditto. 
Bombay Propiietary School. 
Fort High School. 



XIX. 

THE RAO SIR PRAGMA LJI SCHOLARSHIPS. 

The Kutchi inhabitants of Bombay, desiring to comme- 
morate the visit of His Highness the Maharaja Sir Prae- 
B 1030—15 Br * 



174 ENDOWMENTS. 

malji Bahadur, G.C.S.I., Rao of Kutch, to the city of Bom- 
bay, when he came to meet His Royal Highness the Duke 
of Edinburgh in 1870, raised a sum of Rs. 20,000, to which 
His Highness added a sum of Rs. 25,000, making an aggre- 
gate amount of Rs. 45,000. Of this sum, Rs. 30,000, in Go- 
vernment 4 per cent, paper, were offered to the University, 
through the Government of Bombay, on the 2nd January 
1872, to found Scholarships, to be called "TuE Rao Sir 
Pkagmaui Scholakships," and to be awarded to Kutchi 
Students to enable them to prosecute University studies, or, 
failing such Students, to other Native Students who may 
be qualified for the same. 

At a meeting of the Senate, held on the 9th Mai'ch 1872, 
the offer was accepted with the best thanks of the Senate. 

The Scholarships will be awarded in accordance with the 
following Regulations : — 

1. Two Scholarships, to be called " The Rao Sir Prag- 
MALji Scholarships," one of Rupees 20 and one of Rupees 15 

Ser mensem, shall be awarded every year to the two 
[^utchi* Candidates who shall have passed the Matricu- 
lation Examination with the highest number of marks. 

2. The Scholarships will be tenable for three years at any 
of the Colleges or Institutions recognized by the University 
of Bombay. 

3. Kutchi Candidates must forward their applications to 
the Registrar {vide Form AV) with their applications iov 
permission to attend the Matriculation Examination of the 
same year. 

4. The Syndicate shall adjudge the Scholarships soon 
after the result of the Matriculation Examination shall bo 
declared by the Examiners, 

5. In the event of there bein^ no Kutchi Candidates, 
entitled to receive the Scholarships, the Syndicate shall 
award them to the two Native Candidates who ^et the 
highest number of marks at the Matriculation Examination, 
and who may not have received any other University 
Scholarship of equal or higher value. 

* By Kutchi is intandeU youths born in Kutch, or youths whose father* 
M ere boni in Kutch. 



THE 8IR JASTAKTSINGJI SCHOLARSHIPS. 17o 

6. The Candidate elected must satisfy the Registrar, 
mthin six weeks from the dat« of election, that he has diilj 
joined a recognized College or Institution. 

7. In case of the Scholarships lapsing through forfeiture 
or other\rise, during the course of the three years for which 
they are tenable, the money shall be reserved to be applied 
by the Syndicate in such manner as they shall think best fit- 
ted for furthering the object and purposes of the endowment- 

Ykar,; Scholar. j School. 

j^-^ i '. Khimjiinu Fazal Manji ' Elphinstone High School. 

~-'- ) Mulla, Faizallabhai Lukin;\nji ; Surat High School. 

,c-.. ( K&njiani, Kariniilli Rahim : Elphinstone High School. 

I GoratcU. Visanji Hansraj j Ditto. 

16"-1 ' I>*^'^. Vithalji Keshavji • Alfred High School, Katch. 

' \ '■ Patel, Hasam Virji I Gener&l Assemblj-'s Institotion 

j^-- ( Thakar, Hirji Bhagvanji Alfred High School, Kutch. 

\ Parulekar, Dattatraya Vishvanath . . I Rataagiri High School. 

l£-a i Soman, Dinkar Bba«kar i Ditto. 

^ /, Ahmadi. Faiz Muhammad Pathe AIL Elphinstone High School. 

jg — i Rukha, Visanji KalUanji Bombay Proprietary School. 

*■ " I Budbhatti, Keshavji Sh&mji Xarayan Jaganuath High School. 

I Earichi. 

IS'S ' Rn^bi, Rimdas Ladhi ; Bomba/ Proprietary School. 

' ) . Sapat, Lak-ibmidas Ravji \ Ditto, 

,^-q( Aniiitini. Pra'i$iliank.vr Jat^bankar! Alfred High School, Kutch 

"' ( Tnakar, KalliAuJi RataD»i Ditto. 

jq^^C Karnmilli Do^t .Muliimmad : Fort High SchooL 

"~ i SaukbariA, Dimodar Ishvar Free General A&«n>bly^ Institu- 
tion, Bombay. 

18*1-' ^,f43. P'Sehavji Jayakrlshna j Kobert Money'lnstitution, 

" '( ' Parmdnarvi, .Ja.'aiinith Nirayan ' Elphinstone High School. 

,,-., I ', Merchant, Dhanji Kh-.mji ; Ditto, 

* ' "( Ad^■anj. Hirinand Kbemsing ' HaidarSbad High SchooL 

i Dave. Keshavji Gopilji .Alfred High School, Kutch. 

^ I Rupsimnkar Mi-rarii Dholkia Kathia<v4r High School,Rijkot»-, 

XX. 

THE SIR JASVAXTSINGJI SCHOLARSHIPS. 

His Highness Sir Jasvantsingji,K.C.S.I., the late Thakur 
of Bhawnagar, having set apart a sum of money to commemo- 
rate the visit of His Royal Highness the Duke of Edinburgh 
to Bombay in 1870, a sum of Us. 25,000 was invested iu Go- 
veniment -i per cent, paper, which the Joint Administ^ator^ 
of the Bhawnagar State offered to the University, in JuU 
lS73,to found six Scholai-ships, to be called " The Sib Ja.-^- 
YANTsiSGJi ScuoL.xBsuips," two to be awarded everv vear f 



176^ END0WMENT8. 

the Candidates \vho pass the Matriculation Examination 
after having studied for two years continuously before 
Matriculation in the Bhawnagar Alfred High School. 

At a meeting of the Senate, held on the 11th November 
1873, this ofEer was accepted by the Senate with their best 
thanks. 

The Scholarships will be awarded in accordance with the 
following Regulations : — 

1. Two Scholarships, to be called " The Sir J.vsvantsingji 
ScHOLAKSHiPs," One of Rupees fifteen and one of Rupees 
twelve per mensem, shall be awarded every year to the two 
Candidates who shall have passed the Matriculation Exa- 
mination with the highest number of marks after having 
studied for two years continuously before Matriculation in 
the Bhawnagar Alfred High School. 

2. The Scholarships shall be tenable for three years at 
any College recognized by the University of Bombay. 

3. The Candidate elected must satisfy the Registrar, 
within six weeks from the date of election, that he has duly 
joined a recognized College or Institution. 

4. The stipend of the Scholarship shall be payable month- 
ly on a bill drawn by the Head of the College, who shall 
certify, under his signature on such bill, that the Scholar is 
in regular attendance (except in case of sickness) at the 
College, that his conduct is good, and that his progress in 
University studies is satisfactory. 

5. In the event of a Scholar failing to pass the University 
Examinations in the course in which he is studying at the 
earliest opportunity in each case, his Scholarship shall be 
forfeited. Provided always that it shall be in the option of 
the Syndicate to continue his Scholarship to such Scholar 
if they think fit. 

6. In the event of tliere being no Candidates entitled to 
receive the Scholarships, or in case of their lapsing during 
the course of the three years for which they are tenable, the 
money shall be reserved to be applied by the Syndicate in 
such manner as they shall think best fitted for furthering 
the object of the endowment. 



THE KAESAXDAS MULJI PRIZE. 



177 



1S74; 
1S75 5 

:S76i 

1879 I 
1881 ( 

issaj 

18<!3{ 



SCHOLAK. 


SCHOOU 


Desiii Sakarlal Chhotamlal 


Jihawnagar High School 
Ditto. 






Ditto. 




Ditto. 




Ditto. 




Ditto. 






MehtS, Mahipatr^m Govindram 

i 0z8, Mansliankar Parm^naDd 


Ditto. 
Ditto. 
Ditto. 


• PareVh, B«;hard6~ ClihagauUl 


Ditto. 




Ditto 




Ditto 




Ditto. 




Ditto. 




Ditto 


Mehtd, Sakarlal MansukhrSm 


Ditto 


Takil, Chunilal Harilal 


Ditto. 


i Mebta, L'miSshankar Gavrishankar 


Ditto. 



XXI. 
THE KAESAXDAS MULJI PRIZE. 

SorabjiShapurji Bengali, Esq., Honorary Secretary to the 
Karsandas Mulji Memorial Fund, in a letter dated the 11th 
Xovember 1873, to the address of the Registrar, James 
Taylor, Esq., offered to the University the sum of Es. 3,000 
in Government 4 per cent, paper for the purpose of found- 
ing an annual prize, to be called " The Kaksa>«das Mrxji 
Prize," of Rs. 1<X), to be awarded to the best Essay in Eng- 
lish on any moral or social subject selected by the Syndi- 
cate, by any Graduate or Undergraduate of the University. 

At a meeting of the Senate, held on the 20th December 
1873, this endowment was accepted with the best thanks of 
the Senate. 

The Prize will be awarded in accordance with, the follow- 
ing Regulations : — 

1. The Karsandas Mulji Prize, consisting of books of the 
value of Rupees one hundred, shall be awarded annually for 
the best English Essay on some moral or social subject in 
accordance with the subjoined conditions. 

2. Competitors shall be Graduates or Undergraduates of 
the University of Bombay of not more than six years' stand- 
ing from the date of their Matriculation on the day pre- 
scribed for the sending in of the Essays. 

3. The subject for the Essay shall be selected by the 
Syndicate, and notified not less than twelve months before 
the day for sending ia the Essav. 



178 



BXDOWMENTS. 



4. The Essays shall be sent in to the University Regis- 
ti-ar on or before the fourth Monday in July. Each Essay 
shall be designated by a motto instead of the writer's name, 
and shall be accompanied by a sealed cover containing the 
name of the competitor, his University standing, his post 
office address, and a declaration that the Essay sent in by 
him is bond fide his own composition. 

6. The Judges shall be three in number, and shall be 
nominated annually by the Syndicate. Their decision shall 
be announced on the fourth Monday in September. 

6. The prize shall not be awarded to any Essay which, 
in the opinion of the Judges, would not, when printed, be 
creditable to the University. 

7. On the occasions when the prize is not awarded, the 
money shall be reserved to be applied by the Syndicate in 
such manner as they shall think best fitted for furthering 
the object of the endowment. 



Year. 
1875 
1876 

1877 

1878 

1870 

1880 



1882 
1883 



Subject. 



The Connection of Social Morality No Essay receiv- 

with National Prosperity. ed. 

The Effect of Early Marriages on the TripAthi, Govar- 



Educational Progress of the Na- 
tives of this Country. 
The Influence of Asceticism on the 
Social Morality of the Hindus, 

The Use and Abuse of Religious and 
Educational Endowments 

The Efifects (Present and Future) of 
English Education on the Social 
Condition of the Hindus 

Caste as it prevails in the various 
Province-! of India. The Influence 
of such an institution, good or evil, 
on the progress of a Nation ; if evil, 
in what way may Indian Societi, 
ho frccfi from it. 

The Effects (Present and Future) of 
English Education on the Mental 
and Moral Condition of the Hindus. 

The Connection of Social Morality 
with National Prosperity. 

The Influtnce of Caste hi-neflcial or 
injurious, on the progress of Indian 
Society. 

The Influence of Commerce 
wealiening International Prejudices. 
and producing Culture, 



COLLEQE. 



dhan MAdha- 
varam, B.A. 

BhAndarkar.Vd- 
sudev Gopdl, 
B.A. 

Mudholkar.Rang 
nath Narsinh, 
B.A. 

No Essay receiv- 
ed. 

NoEssay receiv- 
ed. 



Vaidya, Chintil' 
man Vinftyak, 



No Eatay receiv- 
ed. 



Elphiustone. 



Ditto. 



Ditto 



Elphinstone. 



THE DOSSABHOT HORMCSJEE CAMA PRIZE. 179 

XXII. 

THE DOSSABHOY HORMUSJEE CAMA PRIZE. 

Klarshedji Rastamji Cama, Esq., in a letter dated the 28th 
November 1874, to the address of the officiating Registrar, 
The Rev. D. C. Boyd, M.A., offered to the University, on 
behalf of the heirs of the late Dossabhoy Hormusjee Cama, 
the sum of Rupees (5,000) five thousand in 4 per cent. 
Government Promissoiy Notes for the purpose of founding 
an annual prize under certain conditions mentioned therein 

At a meeting of the Senate, held on the 19th December 
1874, the endowment was accepted with the best thanks of 
the Senate. 

The Prize will be awarded in accordance with the follow- 
ing Regulations : — 

1. A Prize, to be called " The Dossabhoy Hormusjee 
Cama Prize," consisting of books of the value of Rupees 
(200) two hundred, shall be awarded annually for the best 
English Essay on a medical subject. 

2. Competitors shall be Licentiates of Medicine of the 
University of Bombay, or Graduates of Grant Medical 
College. 

3. The subject for the Essay shall be selected by the 
Syndicate, and notified not less than twelve months before 
the day for sending in the Essay. 

4. The Essays shall be sent in to the University Regis- 
trar on or before the fourth Monday in July. Each Essay 
shall Ije designated by a motto instead of the writer's name 
and shall be accompanied by a sealed cover containing the 
name of the competitor, his University or College standing 
his post office address, and a declaration that the Essaj 
sent in by him is bond fide his own composition. 

5. The Judges shall be three in number, and shall b< 
nominated annually by the Syndicate. Their decision shal 
be announced on the Fourth Monday in September. 

6. The prize shall not be awarded to any Essay which 
in the opinion of the Judges, would not, when printed, b 
creditable to the University. 

7. On the occasions when the prize is not awarded, th 
money shall be reserved to be applied by the Syndicate h 
such manner as they shall think best fitted for f urtherinj 
the object of the endowment. 



130 



ENDOWMENTS. 



Year 

1876^ 



1S7" 
1878 
1879 
1880 

1S31 

18S2 

18 S3 
1884 



Subject. 



Causes of the more dangerous Form; 
of Malarial Fevers in the Town and 
Island of Bombay, with Sugges 
tions for their Prevention. 
Telluric and Climatic Influences 
on the Production and Modification 
of Diseases as witnessed in Bombay. 
The Origin and Spread of Zymotic 
Diseases In India, and Suggestions 
for their Eradication. 
The Effeeis of " Kjiuiine" upon the 
Public Health ; Remarks to be spe- 
cially applicable to In'lia. 
On recently recognized Forms of 
Diseases in India: their Methods 
of In'rodiiction,aiid Suggestions for 
their Limitation oi' Eradication. 
Telluric and Climatic Influences on 
the Production and Modification ofl 
Diseases as witnessed in Bombay. | 
On the Prevalence of Phthisis in the 
City of Bombay , the extent to which 
this is preventib'e, and the mea- 
sures wliich should be adopted to 
ensure that result. 
Midwifery practice in India among 
the Native Population, with sugges- 
tions for its improvement. 
On the Advantages and Risks attach- 
ing to a system of Water Carriage 
for Sewage in this City and the pro- 
per means for obviating the latter. 



Prizeman. 



Prize nutaicurd- 
ed. 



No Essay rcceiv 
ed. 



Ditto. 



Mehta, Kavasji 

Navroji, (i. G. 

M. C. 

Ditto. 



Prize not award- 
ed. 



Ditto. 



No Essay receiv-'. 
ed. I 



Grant Medical 
College. 

Ditto 



XXIII. 
THE HUGHLINGS PEIZE. 

In April 1875, tlie Honorary Secretary to the Hughlings 
Testimonial Fund offered to the University, by the direction 
of the Committee of that Fund, the sum of Rs. 2,500 in 4 
per cent. Grovernment Promissory iSTotes for the purpose of 
founding an annual prize in memory of the late Professor 
Hughlings. 

At a meeting of the Senate, held on the 18tli September 
1875, the offer was accepted with the best thanks of the 
Senate. 

The Prize will be awarded in accordance with the follow- 
ing Regulations : — 

1. A Prize, to be called " The Hughlings Prize," consist- 
ing of books of the value of Rupees one hundred, shall 
be awarded every year to the Candidate who passes the 
Previous Examination with the highest marks for profi- 
ciency in English. 



THE JAMES TAYLOR PBIZE. 



181 



2. The name of the successf al Candidate will be publish- 
ed along with the list of the Candidates who may pass the 
Previous Examination. 



Year, 



COLLEaS. 



1S76 .. 

isn .. 

1S78 .. 
1379 .. 
1880 
(April.) 
I3S0 
(Dec.) 

1581 .. 

1582 .. 

1583 . 



Shihani, Daydram Gidamal 

O'Shanahan, Henry Frank .... . 

Gomes, Lais Paul C 

Pereira, Frank Charles 

Kelkar, Vasudev Balkri.shna .... 

Ajrekar, Keshar (Tanesh 

Sabnis, B&mchandra Ghanash^m 
CoIumb^raU, Rastamji Karasji 
Lenahan, Robert 



Elphinstone 
St. Xavier's. 

Do. 

Do. 
Elphinstone. 

Do. 

St. Xavi^s; 
St. Xavier's. 
Elphinstone. 



XXIY. 

THE JAMES TAYLOR PRIZE. 

In December 1875 the Honorary Secretaries to the Taylor 
Memorial Fund offered to the U'niTersity, by direction of 
the Committee of that Fxmd, the sum of Rupees 2,o<X) in 4 
per cent. Government Promissory Notes, for the purpose of 
founding an annual prize in memory of the late Mr. James 
Taylor, for sis years Registrar of this University. 

At a meeting of the Senate, held on the 18th December 
1875, this offer was accepted with the best thanks of the 
Senate. 

The Prize will be awarded in accordance with the follow- 
ing Regulations : — 

1. A Prize, to be called " The James Tatlor Prize," con- 
sisting of books of the value of Rupees one hundred, shall 
be awarded annually in connection with the B A. Examina- 
tion, on the following conditions : — 

2. The Prize shall be awarded to the Candidate who 
passes the Examination in the First or Second Class with 
the highest marks in Political Economy and History, 
provided that no Candidate obtains the Prize who has not 
satisfied the Examiners of his due proficiency in these sub- 
iects. 

3. The name of the Candidate to whom the Prize maj 
be awarded shall be published with the list of successful 
Candidates. 

B 1030—16 iv 



182 ENDOWMENTS. 

4. Whenever the Prize is not awarded, the money will 
be reserved to be applied by the Syndicate in such manner 
as they shall think best fitted for furthering the object of 
the endowment. 



Year. 


Prizeman. 


COLLESE. 


1876.. 




Elphinstone. 
Ditto. 


1877 




1878 




Irttto 


1879. 




Ditto 


18S0 . 


FaiidiS, 'chhaganlal HarilS,! 


Ditto 


1881.. 




Ditto. 


1882 . . 




Ditto. 


1883.. 




Ditto. 









XXV. 

THE BHAU DAJI PEIZE. 

In March 1876 the Honorary Secretaries to the Bhau 
Daji Memorial Fund offered to the University, by direction 
of the Committee of that Fund, the sum of Rupees 6,000 in 
4 per cent. Government Promissory J^Totes, for the purpose 
of founding an annual prize in memory of the late Dr. Bhau 
Daji, G.G.M.C., Hon. M.R.A.S., one of the Fellows men- 
tioned in the Act of Incorporation, and for many years 
Syndic in the Faculty of Arts. 

At a meeting of the Senate, held on the 31st March 1876, 
this offer was accepted with the best thanks of the Senate. 

The Prize will be awarded in accordance with the follow- 
ing Regulations : — 

1. A Prize, to be called " The Bhatj Daji Prize," consist- 
ing of books of the value of Rupees two himdrod, shall be 
awarded every year to the Candidate who passes the B.A. 
Examination with the highest marks for proficiency in 
Sanskrit: provided that the prize shall not be awarded, 
except to a Candidate whom i he Examiners consider deserv- 
ing of reward for his spcv'.! knowledge and ability as a 
Sanskrit Scholar. 

2. The name of the Candidate to whom the Prize may 
be awarded, shall be published with the list of successful 
Candidates. 



THB TEHATEKEAO JUGOHNITHJI SUNKERSBTT PRIZE. 183 

3. Whenever the Prize is not awarded, the money will 
be reser\'ed to be applied by the Syndicate in such manner 
as they shall think best fitted for furthering the object of 
the endowment. 



1876.. 

1877.. 
1578.. 
l'*79.. 
ISSO.. 
1S81.. 
1*3-2.. 
1<S3.. 



Prizkmak. 



Pavgi, Raoji Bhavanrao 

Apt«^, Varuan Shi\Tam 

N'atu, Kashin&th Gangadhar, B.A. 
Bhandarkar, S'ridhar Ramkrislina 
Divati&, Xarsingrao Bholan^th .. 

Deshmukh, Ganesh Krishna 

Vaidya, Lakshuman Ramchandra 
Kirkire, Krishniji Hari 



Colics B. 



Elphin stone. 
Deccan. 
Ditto. 
Elphinstone. 

Ditto. 

Ditto. 

Ditto. 

Ditto. 



XXVI. 




THB VEXAYEKEAO JCGOXXATHH 

SUXKEESETT PKIZE. 

Nanabhoy Byramjee Jeejeebhoy, Esq., Honorary Secre- 
tary to the Venayekrao Jugonnathji Sunkersett Memorial 
Fund, in a letter dated 1st April 1876, to the address of 
the Vice-Chancellor, offered to the University the sum of 
Rs. 4,500 in Government 4 per cent, paper for the pur- 
pose of founding an annual prize of books, of the value of 
Rs. 180, to be called " The Vexayekxao Jugoxxathji 
Sl'xkehsext Pkize." 

At a meeting of the Senate, held on the 6th October 1876, 
:he offer was accepted Avith the best thanks of the Senate. 

The Prize will be awarded in accordance with the follow- 
ing Regulations : — 

^1. A Prize, to be called " The Venatekrao Jugonwathji 
Suskeksetx PaizE," consisting of books of the value of Ru- 



184 



ENDOWMENTS. 



pees one hundred and eighty, shall be awarded every year 
to the Candidate who passes the Previous Examination 
with the highest marks for proficiency in Sanskrit. 

2. The name of the Candidate to whom the Prize may 
be awarded shall be published with the list of successful 
Candidates. 



Yeae. 



1877 .. 

1878 . . 

1879 .. 

1880 . . 
(April.) 
1880 . . 

(Dec. ) 
1381 . . 
1882 . . 
1833 . . 



Natu, Trimbak Gang&dhar .. , 
Div^tid, Narsingrdo Bholdnath 
Vaidya, Chintaman Vinayak. . . 
Deshmukh, Ganesh Krishna.., 

Banh3.tti, NSriyan Daso 

Kirkire, KrishnSji Hari 

Bhanu, Chintaman Gangadliar 
Paranjapye, Hari Krishna . . , 



College. 



Elphinstone. 
Ditto. 
Ditto. 
Ditto. 

Ditto. 

Ditto. 
Deccan. 
Ditto. 



XXVII. 

THE MERWANJEB FRAMJEE PANDAY 

SCHOLARSHIP. 

Nusserwanjee Maneckjee Petit, Esq., President of the 
Oriental Spinning and Weaving Company, Limited, in a 
letter dated the 14th August 187(5 to the address of the Vice- 
Chancellor, offered to the University, on behalf of the Com- 
pany, the sum of Rs. 6,000 in Government 4 per cent, 
paper for the purpose of founding an annual Scholarship 
of the value of Rs. 20 a month, to be called " The Merwanjee 
Teamjee Panday Scholarship," in memory of the late Mr. 
Merwanjee Framjee Panday, to be awarded at the Examina- 
tion for the Degree of L.C.E. to the Candidate who passes 
with the highest number of marks in Mechanical Engi- 
neering. 

At a meeting of the Senate, held on the 6th October 1876 
this offer was accepted with the best thanks of the Senate 

The Scholarship will be awarded in accordance with the 
following Regulations : — 

1. A Scholarship, to be called " The Merwanjee Framjee 
Panday Scholarship," of the value of Rupees twenty a 
month, shall be awarded annually at the Examination for 
the Degree of L.C.E. to the Candidate who passes with 
the highest number of marks in " Mechanical Engineering". 



THE KAHA5DA3 MUKCHABAM SCHOLAESHIP. 



185 



2. The name of the Candidate to whom the Scholarship 
may be a-warded shall be published with the list of succesa- 
ful Candidates. 

3. Whenever the Scholarship is not awarded, the money 
will be reserved to be applied by the Syndicate in such 
manner as they shall think best fitted for furthering the 
object of the endowment. 



Vear 


Scholar. 


COLUBOB. 


- f76... 


Bhedvar, Kaikhosru Pestanji 


Poona Civil Engineering 


.~:7... 


Ribeiro, C. Antonio 


Ditto. 


:-:8... 


Majumdar M&Dt-kUl Karbheram 


Ditto. 


<9.. 


Dudley, C. W 


Ditto. 


-so... 


Bfiarucha, Miinikji Sheriarji 




-5l... 


Survevor, Manikji Katanji 


Ditto. 


^4-> 


Bhandare, Hari Bhikaji 


Ditto 


.--3... 


Vameshiyar, Sit&rdm Sambsiv 


Ditto. 









XXYIII. 

THE KAHAXDAS MUNCHAEAM SCHOLAESHIP. 

In Anoriist 1876 the widow of the late Kahandas Mun- 
charam, Esq., a Justice of the Peace, Fellow of the Uni- 
versity of Bombay, and Executive Engineer, Presidency 
Division, offered to the University the sum of Rs. 6,000 for 
investment in Government 4 per cent, paper, in accordance 
with the Will made by him, for the purpose of founding an 
annual Scholarship of the value of Rs. 20 a month, to be 
iwarded at the Matriculation Examination to the Gujarathi 
Hindu Candidate who passes with the highest number ot 
marks, on condition that he prosecutes his studies, during 
the time that he holds the Scholarship, in an Engineering 
College recognized by the University. 

At a meeting of the Senate, held on the 6th October 1876, 
offer was accepted with the best thanks of the Senate. 

The Scholarship will be awarded in accordance with the 
llowing Regulations : — 

1. A Scholarship, to be called "The Kahaxdas Mr>'CHABAK 
Scholarship," of the value of Rupees twenty a month, shall 
be awarded annually at the Matrictilation Examination to 
B 1030—16 Bu* 



HoUc 



186 



ENDOWMENTS. 



the Gujarathi Hindu Candidate who passes with the high- 
est number of inarks, on condition that he prosecutes his 
studies, during the time that he holds the Scholarship, in 
an Engineering College recognized by the University of 
Bombay. 

2. Candidates must forward their applications to the 
Registrar (vide Form AW.) with their applications for per- 
mission to attend the Matriculation Examination of the 
same year. 

3. The Candidate elected must satisfy the Registrar, 
within six weeks from the date of election, that be has duly 
joined a recognized College or Institution. 

4. The stipend of the Scholarship shall be payable half- 
yearly on a bill drawn by the Head of the College, which 
Ijill shall certify, under his signature, that the Scholar is in 
regular attendance at the College, that his conduct is good, 
and that his progress in University studies is satisfactory. 

5. Should the Scholar discontinue his University studies, 
or be unfavourably reported on by the Head of his Col- 
lege, the Syndicate shall declare the Scholarship to be for- 
feited. 

6. In case of the Student who is elected declining to 
|»roceed to College, the stipend of the Scholarship for the 
ensuing year may be conferred on the Candidate who shall 
have obtained the second place in the examination, 

7. In case of the Scholarship lapsing through forfeiture 
or otherwise, during the course of the year, the money shall 
be reserved to be applied by the Syndicate in such manner 
as they shall think best fitted for furthering the object of 
the endowment. 



Ykar. 


ScaOLAR. 


SCHOOI.. 


1876 . 


Thikore, .Tildavrdi HakumMtrii 


Surat Bi«h School. 


1877.. 


Desdi, NdtliabliAi Avichaldfis 




1878 


DivechA, Vaniiidli Mulji 


Homlxky High School. 

NariAd High School. 

Ditto. 


1870... 


Shroff, BhailAl Pursliottam 


1880 


Kora,Ii!il!ll)h!ii Giilrtbcliand 


1881 


MehtA, GokaldAH llAjpiil 


K!lthift\v4r Uijfh School, Raj- 

kot. 
Surat nigh school. 
KithiAwdr High School, Rfij. 

kot. 


1882.. 
1S83.. 


Daliil nhagvdnd.1s IlarkisandSa 

Sanghftnl, Kcshavd.ls SakhidSs 



THB DHreULAL MATHUBADA3 SCHOLARSHIP. 



187 



XXIX. 

THE DHIRAJLAL MATHUEADAS SCHOLARSHIP. 

In July 1877, Ati Lakshumibai, widow of the late 
Dhirajla] Mathuradas, Esq., a Justice of the Peace, Fellow 
of the University of Bombay, and Government Pleader, 
High Court, Bombay, offered to the University the sum of 
Bs. 6,000 in Government 4 per cent. Promissory Notes for 
the foundation of an annual Scholarship, to be called " The 
Dhirajlal MATHrRADAS ScHOLAKSHiP," and to be awardedto 
a Gujarathi Hindu who passes the B.A. Examination with 
the highest number of marks, and who prosecutes his 
studies in a School of Law recognized by the University 
of Bombay, 

At the annual meeting of the Senate, held on the 
19th December 1877, the offer was accepted with the best 
thanks of the Senate. 

The Scholarsliip will be awarded in accordance with the 
following RegxJations : — 

1. A Scholarship, to be called " TwE Dhikajlal Matht- 
RADAS ScHOLAKSHip," of the valuc of Rs. 240 per annum, 
tenable for two years, shall be awarded every alternate year 
to the Gujarathi Hindu who passes the Examination for 
the Degree of B.A. with the highest number of marks, and 
elects to prosecute his studies in a School of Law recog- 
nized by the University of Bombay. 

2. In case of the Student who is elected, declining to 
proceed to a School of Law, or failing to satisfy the Univer- 
sity Registrar, within six weeks from the date of election, 
that he has duly joined a recognized School of Law, the 
Scholarship may be conferred on similar conditions on the 
Gujarathi Hindu who shall have obtained the second place 
in the examination. 

3. In case of a vacancy occurring between the fixed dates 
of election, the interest of the endowment shall be applied 
by the Syndicate in such way as may appear to them best 
fitted for furthering the purposes of the endowment. 



Tkar. 


Scholar. 


COLLESB. 


1878.. 


Desal, MsnekMI SaUrldl 


Elphinstone. 

Ditto. 
Klphinstone Coll^e,ybna*r^ 

Free General Assemblj't 

Institution, 


1880.. 
1882.. 


DivatiJi, Narsinarao Bholinith 

Dikshit, Hari Sitaram 







188 ENDOWMENTS. 

XXX. 

THE SINCLAIR PRIZE, 

The President of the " Sinclair Memorial Committee " 
offered to the University the sum of Rs. 1,500 in Govern- 
ment 4 per cent. Promissory Notes for the foundation of 
an annual Prize in memory of the late Robert Sharpe 
Sinclair, M.A,,LL.D., the first Director of Public Instruction, 
Berar, and for several yearspreviously the Registrar of this 
University, to be awarded to the Candidate who at Matri- 
culation passes the best examination in Sanskrit or Persian 
from a High School in Berar. 

At the annual meeting of the Senate, held on the 19th 
December 1877, the offer was accepted with the best thanks 
of the Senate. 

The Prize will be awarded in accordance with the follow- 
ing Regulations : — 

1. A Prize, to be called " The Sinclair Prize," of the 
value of Rs. 60, shall be awarded annually at the Matricu- 
lation Examination to the Candidate from a High School 
in Berar who passes with the highest number of marks in 
Sanskrit or Persian. 

2. The name of the successful Candidate will be pub- 
lished with the list of the Candidates who pass the Matri- 
culation Examination. 

3. Whenever the Prize is not awarded, the interest of 
the endowment shall be applied by the Syndicate in such 
way as may appear to them best fitted for furthering the 
purposes of the endowment. 



Year. 


Prizeman. 


Language. ScnooL. 


1878.. 
1879.. 

1880.. 

1881.. 
1882.. 
1883.. 


Joshi, Moro Vislivanatli. 
Chavdn, Bastisioh Du- 

nidsinh. 
Abhyiiikar, Krishnfij 

Bhaskar. 
KhinztKie, AnibMds RS,vji 
Deslip&fide. Vainan Santu 
Pardnjapye, Visudev Ka 

shinfith. 


Sanskrit 

Ditto 

pitto 


AmrActi High School. 
Ditto. 

AkoU High School. 

Amrdoti High School. 
Ditto. 


Ditto 


Ditto 


Ditto 


Ditto, 







XXXI. 
THE GIBBS PRIZE. 

Jehanghier Cowasjee Jehanghier Readymoney, Esq., a 
Justice of the Peace, in a letter, dated the 17th November 
1878, offered to the University the sum of Rs. 2,000 for the 



THE NARATAN VASUDEV SCHOLARSHIP. 



189 



foundation of a Gibbs Prize as a memorial of the Honour- 
able Mr. (iibbs' friendship for his father, the late Sir 
Cowas j ee Jehanghier, to be awarded to the Candidate who 
passes the Previous Examination with the highest number 
of marks in Xatiiral Science. 

At the annual meeting of the Senate, held on the 
21st December 1878, the offer was accepted with the best 
thanks of the Senate. 

The Prize will be awarded in accordance with the follow- 
ing Regulations : — 

1- A Prize, to be called " The Gibbs Prize," consisting of 
books of the value of Rs. 80, shall be awarded every year to 
the Candidate who passes the Previous Examination with 
the highest number of marks in Natural Science. 

2. The name of the successful Candidate will be published 
with the list of Candidates who pass the Previous Exami- 
nation. 



Ybar. 



1879 

1880 

(April.) 

18-0 . 

(Dec.) 

ISSl . 

1p82 

1SS3 



Prizbuax. 



Sanjdna, Jehang^er Barjorji . 
Valdl, Ochhfir&m Nanabhii . . . 
Deshmukh, Moreshvar Gopal 



Padshah, Barjorji Jamisji 

. Darukhinivala, Men^inji Pestanji 
Bharda, Bhik^ji Doribji 



School, 



Free General Assembly's 

Institution, Bombay. 
Elphinstone C!ollege. 

Ditto. 

Ditto. 

St. Xavier's College. 
Elphinstone College. 



XXXII. 

THE NARAYAN VASUDEV SCHOLARSHIP. 

Nanabhoy Byramjee Jeejeebhoy, Esq., in a letter dated 
the •2nd December 1878, to the address of the Honour- 
able James Gibbs, C.S.I., Yice-Chancellor, offered to the 
University, on behalf of the subscribers to the " Narayan 
Vasudev Memorial," a sum of Rs. 5,000 in Government 
4 per cent. Promissory Note, for the foundation of an annual 
Scholarship to be called"THEXARAY AX Vasudev Scholarship," 
to be awarded under such rules and in such manner as the 
Senate may be pleased to decide. 

At the annual meetiug of the Senate, held on the 
2l8t December 1878, this offer was accepted with the best 
thanks of the Senate. 



190 



ENDOWMENTS, 



The Scholarship will be awarded in accordance with the 
following Regulations :— 

1. A Scholarship, to be called " The I^arayan Vasudev 
Scholarship," of the value of Rs. 200 per annum, shall be 
awarded every year to the Candidate who passes the B.A. 
Examination with the highest number of marks in Natural 
Science and is recommended for the Scholarship by the 
Examiner, on condition that he continues his studies 
during his tenure of the Scholarship at one of the Colleges 
or Institutions recognized by the University of Bombay. 

2. The Scholarship shall be awarded to Physical and 
Biological sciences in alternate years, provided that if no 
Candidate qualifies for the Scholarship in the branch of 
science to which it has been assigned for the year, the 
Scholarship shall be awarded to the Candidate who passes 
the B. A. Examination with the highest number of marks 
in the other branch of science in the same year, and is 
recommended as provided in Regulation I. 

3. The Candidate elected must satisfy the Registrar, 
within six weeks from the date of election, that he has duly 
joined a recognized College or Institution. 

4. The stipend of the Scholarship shall be paid half-yearly 
on a bill drawn by the Head of some recognized College or 
Institution, who shall certify under his signature on such 
bill that the Scholar is in regular attendance at the College 
or Institution, and that his conduct is good. 

b. Should the Scholar discontinue his University studies, 
or be unfavourably reported on by the Head of his College 
or Institution, the Syndicate shall declare the Scholarship 
to be forfeited. 

6. Any surplus which may arise from the vacancy of 
the Scholarship during any year, or a part of a year, snail 
be applied by the Syndicate in such manner as they shal 1 
thinK best fitted for furthering the objects and purposes of 
the endowment. 



Year. 


Scholar. 


COIXEOB. 


1879 




B)phin.«tone. 
St. Xavier's. 


1080 




1881 




Ditto. 






Free General Assembly's Iti 

stitution. 
Eli>hinstone CoUcjfe. 


1883.. 


Wadifi, Jamshedji Rastoniji 



THE SIB GEORGE LEGKAXD JACOB SCHOLAESHTP. 191 

xxxin. 

THE COBDEN CLUB MEDAL. 

In March 1879, the Cobden Club offered to award a Silver 
Medal annually to the Candidate who p>asse3 the B.A. 
Examination of this University with the highest number of 
marks in Political Economy. 

At a meeting of the Senate, held on the 22nd November 
1879, this offer of the Cobden Club was accepted with the 
best thanks of the Senate. This Medal will be awarded 
in accordance with the following Regulations : — 

1. A Silver Medal, to be called "The Cobdbx Club 
Medal," will be awarded annually to the Candidate who 
passes the B.A. Examination with the highest number of 
marks in Political Economy. 

2. The name of the Candidate to whom the Medal is 
awarded will be published with the list of successful 
Candidates. 

3. The Medal will be presented at the Convocation for 
conferring Degrees. 



COLLBGK. 



Is79..; Carn4, Rastam Kharshe^iji | S^. Xavier'e. 

18S0..i Panfi'a, Ctihagnnlal Hariiil \ Elphinstone. 

1881.. Ke^Var, VAsiulev Balkrishna j Dirt-i. 

1882. . Gokhale, Mah^dev Vishnu Ditto. 

1883..|P&d8hiih. Barjorji J&masji 1 Ditto. 



XXXTY. 

THE SIR GEORGE LkGRAND JACOB SCHOLARSHIP. 

In June 1879, Major-General ?ir George LeGrand Jacob 
offered to hand over to the University Government Paper 
realizing Rs. 120 a year for the foundation of a Scholarship of 
the value of Rupees 10 a month and tenable for one year, 
to be awarded to the Candidate who passes the Matri- 
culation Examination with the highest number of marks 
from among the Candidates from Savantvadi, Kutch, 
Kolhapur or Kathiawar. 

At a meeting of the Senate, held on the 22nd November 
1879, this offer was accepted with the beat thanks of the 
Senate. 



I 



192 ENDOWMENTS. 

The Scholarship will be awarded in accordance with the 
following Eegulations : — 

1. A Scholarship to be called the " Sir George Le Grand 
Jacob Scholarship," of the value of Ks. 10 a month and 
tenable for one year, shall be awarded annually to the Can- 
didate who passes the Matriculation Examination with the 
highest number of marks from among the Candidates from 
Savantvadi, Kutch, Kolhdpur, or Kdthiawar. 

2. The name of the Candidate to whom the Scholarship 
may be awarded shall be published with the list of the 
successful Candidates. 

3. The Candidate elected must satisfy the Registrar 
within six weeks from the date of election that he has duly 
joined a recognized College or Institution. 

4. The stipend of the Scholarship shall be payable 
monthly on a bill drawn by the Head of some recognized 
College or Institution, which bill shall certify, under the 
signature of the Head, that the Scholar is in regular attend- 
ance at the College or Institution, that his conduct is good, 
and his progress in University studies is satisfactory. 

6. Should the- Scholar discontinue his University studies, 
or be unfavourably reported of by the Head of his College 
or Institution, the Syndicate shall declare the Scholarship 
to be forfeited. 

6. Whenever the Scholarship is not awarded, the money 
shall be reserved to be applied by the Syndicate in such 
manner as they shall think best fitted for furthering the 
object of the endowment. 



Year. 


Scholar. 


SCUOOL. 


1882.. 
1883.. 


Kelkar, Vishnu Sad^shiv 

Apte, Hari SadSishiv . . : 


Rajiram High School, Kolhi 
pur. 

Ditto. 



XXXV. 
THE SIR GEORGE LeGRAND JACOB PRIZE. 

In June 1879, Major-Gencral Sir George LeGrand Jacob 
offered to create in favour of the University a trust of 
£1,000 Stock and one £100 ten per cent. Debenture Bond in 
the British India Tea Company, Limited, the proceeds there- 
of to be expended on an annual Prize for an Essay on some 
subject illustrating or relating to the advantages derived 
by India from the British rule. 



THE SIE GEORGE LEGBAKD JACOB PBIZE, 



193 



At a meeting of the Senate, held on the 22nd of Xovember 
1879, this offer was accepted with the best thanks of the 
Senate. 

The Prize will be awarded in accordance with the follow- 
ing Regulations : — 

1. A Pi-ize, to be called the "Sir George LeGraxd Jacob 
Prize," consisting of books, shall be awarded annually for 
the best Essay on some subject illustrating or relating to 
the advantages derived by India from British Rule. 

2. Competitors shall be Graduates or Undergraduates 
of the University of Bombay of not more than seven years' 
standing from the date of their Matriculation on the day 
prescribed for the sending in of the Essays. 

3. The subject shall be selected or notified by the 
Syndicate not less than twelve months before the day for 
sending in the Essay. 

4. The Essays shall be sent in to the University Regis- 
trar on or before the Fourth Monday in July. Each Essay 
shall be designated by a motto instead of the writer's name, 
and shall be accompanied by a sealed cover containing the 
name of the competitor, his University standing, bis post- 
office address, and a declaration that the Essay sent in by 
him is boiid fide his own composition. 

5. The Judges shall be three in number, and shall be 
nominated annually by the Syndicate. Their decision shall 
be announced on the Fourth Monday in September. 

6. On the occasions when the Prize is not awarded, the 
money shall be applied by the Syndicate in such manner as 
they shall think best fitted for furthering the object of the 
endowment. 



Year. 



SCBiBCT. 



1882 



18S3 



1884 



Travelling in India and Intercomma- Bhadbhade, 
nication betweeii the several Provinces: Lakshman 
before and after the Introduction of, Gangidhar. 
British Rule. 

The Revival and Development of Mnni-' No Essay re- 
cipal Institutions in the different Pn>- ceived. 
Tiiices of British India thr.iugh legisla- 
tion and the influence of the Government 
and the Locil Autiiorities. 

The Revival and Development of Muni- 
cip>al Institutions in the different Pro- 
vinces of British India through legisla- 
tion and the influence of the Govern- 
ment and the Local Authorities. 




B 1030—17 BU 



194 ENDOWMENTS. 

XXXYI. 

THE JAIRAZBHOY PEERBHOY SCHOLARSHIP. 

Jairazbhoy Peerbhoy, Esq., Justice of the Peace, in 
a letter dated 26tli January 1881, to the address of the Vice- 
Chancellor, the Honourable Mr. Justice West, ofifered to the 
University a sum of Rupees 5,000, in 4 per cent. Govern- 
ment paper, for the purpose of founding a Scholarship 
to be annually awarded to the Muhammadan Candidate 
who passes the Matriculation Examination with the high- 
est number of marks, and prosecutes his studies in this 
University, or proceeds to England with the same view. 

At a meeting of the Senate, held on the 1st October last, 
this offer was accepted with the best thanks of the Senate. 

The Scholarship will be awarded in accordance with the 
following Regulations : — 

1. A Scholarship, to be called " The Jairazbhoy Peer- 
bhoy Scholarship," of the value of Rs. 200 per annum, shall 
be awarded every year to the Muhammadan Candidate who 
passes the Matriculation Examination with the highest 
number of marks, on condition that he continues his studies 
during his tenure of the Scholarship at one of the Colleges 
or Institutions recognized by the University of Bombay 
or proceeds to Great Britain or Ireland to prosecute his 
studies. 

2. Candidates must forward their applications to the 
Registrar, with their applications for permission to attend 
the Matriculation Examination of the same year. 

3. The Candidate elected must satisfy the Registrar, 
within six weeks from the date of election, that he has duly 
joined a recognized College or Institution or has proceeded 
to Great Britain or Ireland for the purpose of prosecuting 
his studies. 

4. The stipend of the Scholarship shall be paid half" 
yearly on a bill drawn by the Head of some recognized 
College or InstituLion, who shall certify under his signa- 
ture on such bill, that the Scholar is in regular attendance 
at the College or Institution, and that his conduct is good. 

5 Should the Scholar discontinue his University studies 
or be unfavourably reported on by tlie Head of his College 
or Institution, the Syndicate shall declare the Scholarship to 
be forfeited. 






THE YABJIVAITDAS MADHAVDAS SAKSKEIT SCHOLAKSHIP. 195 

6. Any surplus, whicli may arise from the vacancy of the 
Scholarship or otherwise, shall be applied by the Syndicate 
in such manner as they shall think best fitted for furthering 
the object and purposes of the endowment. 



Tkax. 


Scholar. 


School 


issa 

18SS 


Akhnnd, Qhal&m MuMmmad Ghol&m 

AIL 
Haidari, HuMmmad Akbar Xazertlll . . 


K&iflyan Jagann&th High 

School, Kartchi. 
St. Mary's Institation, 

Bombay. 



XXXVIL 

THE VAEJTVANDAS MADHAYDAS SANSKRIT 

SCHOLAKSHIP. 

Varjivandas Madhavdas.Esq., Justice of the Peace and 
Fellow of the University, in a letter dated the 5th January 
1882, to the address of the Vice-Chancellor, the Honourable 
Mr. Justice West, offered to the University a sum of Ru- 
pees 5,000, in 4 per cent. Government paper, for the purpose 
of founding a Scholarship to be annually awarded to the Can- 
didate who passes the First Examination for the Degree of 
B.A. with the highest number of marks in Sanskrit. 

At a meeting of the Senate, held on the 7th March 1882, 
this oSer was accepted with the best thanks of the Senate. 

The Scholarship will be awarded in accordance with the 
following Regulations : — 

A Scholarship, to be called " The Varjiva^'das Madhav- 
DAS Sanskrit Scholarship," of the value of Rs. 180 per 
annum, shall be awarded every year to the Candidate who 
passes the First Examination for the Degree of B.A. with 
the highest number of marks in Sanskrit and is recommend- 
ed for the Scholarship by the Sanskrit Examiners, on con- 
dition that he continues his studies in Sanskrit for the 
Second Examination for the Degree of B.A. during his 
tenure of the Scholarship at one of the Colleges or Insti- 
tutions recognized by the University of Bombay. 

2. The Candidate elected must satisfy the Registrar, 
within six weeks from the date of election, that he has duly 
joined a recognized CoUege or Institution. 



196 ENDOWMENTS. 

3. The stipend o£ the Scholarship shall be paid half-yearly 
on a bill drawn by the Head of some recognized College or 
Institution, who shall certify, under his signature on siich 
bill, that the Scholar is in regular attendance at the College 
or Institution, and that his conduct is good. 

4. Should the Scholar discontinue his University studies 
or be unfavourably reported on by the Head of his College 
or Institution, the Syndicate shall declare the Scholarship 
to be forfeited. 

5. Any surplus which may arise from the vacancy of the 
Scholarship or otherwise shall be applied by the Syndicate 
in such manner as they shall think best fitted for further- 
ing the object and purposes of the endowment. 



Year. 


Scholar. 


COLIEOK. 


1882 .. Rijavade, VaijanSth Kdshinath 

1883 . . Bhagvat, Sakhardm Keshav . . 


Free General Assembly's 

Institution, Bombay. 
Elphinstone College. 



XXXYIII. 

THE JAMSHEDJI DORABJI NAEGAUMVALA 
PRIZE. 

Messrs. Dadabhai Jamshedji and Kavasji Dadabhai Xae- 
gaumvala, M. A., F. C. S., F. I. C, in a letter dated the 25th 
November 1882, to the address of the University Registrar, 
p. Peterson, Esq., M.A., offered to the University, on be- 
half of themselves and family, a sura of Rs. 3,000 in 4 per 
cent. Government Paper for the purpose of founding a 
Prize in memory of the late Jamshedji Dorabji Naegaum- 
vala, Esq., of the value of Rs. 120, to be awarded every year 
to the Candidate who passes the i-.. C. R Examination witli 
the highest number of marks in " Engineering Field iuid 
Office Work". 

At the annual meeting of the Senate, held on the 16th 
December 1882, this offer was accepted with the best 
thanks of the Senate. 

The Prize will be awarded in accordance with the follow- 
ing Regulations : — 



THE MELVILL MEMORUL SCHOLARSHIP. 197 

1. A Prize, to be called " The Jaxsheiui Dobabji Nae- 
GAUMTALA Prize," Consisting of books of the value of Ru- 
pees (120) one hundred and twenty, shall be awarded every 
year to the Candidate who passes the Examination for the 
Degree of L.C.E. to the satisfaction of the Examiners, with 
the highest number of marks in " Engineering Field and 
Office Work." 

2. The name of the successful Candidate will be pub- 
lished with the list of Candidates who pass the Examination 
for the Degree of L.C.E. 

3. If in any year the Prize be not awarded, the amount 
thus saved may be disposed of at the discretion of the 
Syndicate in futherance of the scientific study of Engineer- 



yK.\R. PlUZBJIAX. 


College. 


1SS3 .. ShSh, Bhdilal Piirshottamdils 


College of Science. 
Poona. 





XXXIX. 

THE MELYILL :MEM0RIAL SCHOLARSHIP. 

Khan Bahadur Pestanji Jehangier, CLE., Chairman, 
Melvill Memorial Fund, in a letter dated the 6th January 
1883 to the address of the University Registrar, P.Peterson, 
Esq,, M.A., offered to the University on behalf of a Com- 
mittee formed in Baroda, Rs.t?,OOOinGove]*nment 4per cent 
Paper, for the purpose of founding a Scholarship of Rs. 20 
a month, and tenable for two years, in memoiy of P. S. 
Melvill, Esq., C.S.I. , late Agent to the Governor General 
at Baroda ; to be awarded biennially, or whenever vacant, to 
a Candidate who passes the Previous Examination with 
the highest number of marks from any of the Colleges or 
Institutions in the territory of His Highness the Gaekwar 
of Baroda and joins any of the Colleges or Institutions 
recognized by the University of Bombay, with a view to 
prepare himself for the Examination for the Degree of B.A. 
or B.Sc. of this University. 

At a meeting of the Senate, held on the 14th April 1883, 
this offer was accepted with the best thanks of the Senate. 

B 1030-17 BC* 



] 98 ENDOWMENTS. 

The Scholarship will be awarded in accordance with the 
following Eegulations : — 

1. A Scholarship, to be called " The Melvill Memorial 
Scholarship," of the value of Eupees (20) twenty per mensem 
tenable for two years, shall be awarded biennially, or when-» 
ever vacant, at the Previous Examination of the University 
of Bombay. 

2. The Scholarship shall be awarded to the Candidate 
who passes the Previous Examination with the highest 
number of marks from any of the Colleges or Institutions 
in the territory of His Highness the Gaekwar of Baroda, 
and joins any of the recognized Colleges or Institutions 
with a view to prepare himself for the Examination for the 
Degree of B.A. or B.Sc, of this University, 

3. The Candidate elected must satisfy the Registrar, 
within six weeks from the date of election, that he has joined 
& recognized College or Institution, 

4. The stipend of the Scholarship shall be payable 
monthly on a bill drawn by the Head of such College or 
Institution, who shall certify under his signature on such 
bill that the Scholar is in regular attendance at the College 
or Institution, that his conduct is good, and that his prO" 
gress in University studies is satisfactory. 

5. Should the Scholar discontinue his University stu-- 
dies, or he unfavourably reported on by the Head of the 
College or Institution, it shall be in the discretion of the 
Syndicate to suspend the Scholar or to declare the Scholar-, 
ship forfeited. 

6. Any surplus which may arise from the vacancy of 
the Scholarship during any year or part of a year shall be 
applied by the Syndicate in such manner aa they shall 
think best fitted for furthering the object and purposes of 
the endowment. 



Year. 


Scholar. 


COLLEOB. 


188S .. 


Patel Chaturbhuj Valabbhii 


Baroda College, for-. 




merly Gujarat Col- 
lege, Ahmedabid. 



THE SIR FRANK SOUTER SCHOLARSHIPS. 190 

XL. 

THE SIR FRAXK SOUTER SCHOLARSHIPS. 

Aga Shahabudin Shah bin Aga AJi Shah Agakhan, Esq., 
and Khan Bahadur Shaik Hyder Cassim, President and 
Secretary to the Bombay Muhammadan National AsBocia- 
tion, in a letter dated the 22nd January 1883, to the address 
of the University Registrar, P. Peterson, Esq., M.A., offered 
on behalf of the Mvihammadan National Association a sum 
of Rs. 13,630 for the purpose of founding three Scholar- 
ships to be called " The Sih Fhask Soxtter Scholak-. 
SHIPS," each of the value of Rs, 15 a month, and tenable for 
one year, to be awarded every year to three Muhammadan 
Candidates who pass the Matriculation, Previous and First 
B. A. Examinations respectively and join any of the Col^ 
leges or Institutions recognized by the University of 
Bombay, 

At a meeting of the Senate held on the 14th April 1883 
the offer was accepted with the best thanks of the Senate. 

The Scholarships will be awarded in accordance with the 
following Regulations :- — 

1. A Scholarship, to be called *' The Sib Frank Socteh 
Scholarship ¥ob. the MAXRicrLATiox ExAMrsAXiox," of the 
value of Rupees (15) fifteen per mensem, tenable for one 
year, shall be awarded every year to the Muhammadan 
Candidate who passes the Matriculation Examination with 
the highest number of marks in Persian and who may not 
have received any other University Scholarship of equal or 
higher value, on condition that he continues his studies 
during hie tenure of the Scholarship at one of the Colleges 
or Institutions recognized by the University of Bombay. 

2. A Scholarship, to be called " The Sir Frank Sottteh 
Scholarship for the Previous Examixatiox." of the value 
of Rupees (15) fifteen per mensem, tenable for one year, 
shall be awarded every year to the Muhammadan Candi-. 
date who passes the Previous Examination with the highest 
number of marks, on condition that he continues his studies 
during his tenure of the Scholarship at one of the Coll^ea 
or lastittitions recognised by the Univergity of Bombay, 



200 ENDOWMENTS. 

^ 3. A Scholarshiij, to be called " The Sir Frank Souter 
Scholarship for the First B. A. Examination," of the 
value of Eupeeg (15) fifteen per mensem, tenable for one 
year, shall be awarded every year to the Mubammadan 
Candidate who passes the First B. A. Examination with 
the highest number of marks, on condition that he continues 
his studies during bis tenure of the Scholarship at one of 
the Colleges or Institutions recognized by the University of 
Bombay, 

4. If there should be no successful Mubammadan Can- 
didate in the Matriculation Examination in Persian or in 
the Previous Examination or First B. A., then the Scholar- 
ships shall be awarded in regular succession to the first 
three successful Mubammadan Candidates in the Matricu- 
lation Examination who may not have received any other 
University Scholarship of equal or higher value, on condi- 
tion that they continue to prosecute the studies at one of 
the Colleges or Institutions recognized by the University 
of Bombay. 

5. If there should be no successful Mubammadan Can- 
didates at the Matriculation Examination, then the Syndi- 
cate shall apply the amount intended for these Scholarships 
in such manner as they shall think best fitted for further- 
ing the cause of Mubammadan education. 

6. The Candidates elected must satisfy the Registrar, 
within six weeks from the date of election, that they have 
duly joined a recognized College or Institution, 

7. The stipend of the Scholarships shall be paid monthly 
on a bill drawn by the Head of some recognized College 
or Institution, who shall certify under his signature on 
such bill that the scholars are in regular attendance at the 
College or Institution, that their conduct is good, and that 
their progress in University studies is satisfactory. 

8. Should the Scholars discontinue their Universitj- 
studies or be unfavourably reported on by the Head of 
their College or Institution, it shall be in the discretion of 
the Syndicate to suspend the Scholar or to declare the 
Scholarship to be forfeited. 

9. Any surplus which may arise from the vacancy of 
the Scholarships or otherwise, shall be applied by the Syn- 
dicate in such manner as they shall think best fitted for 
furthering the objects and purposes of the endowment, 



THE CHARLES MOREHEAD PRIZE. 



201 



YbAR. EXAMISATIOS. 



18S3. 



Matriculation . 
Previous 
First B. A. . 



Scholars. 



College. 



Slacdi, Syed Taher . . St Mary'g Institu- 

tion, Bombay. 
Akhund, Ghulam Miihiimmad' Elphinstone College. 

Ghuliim AH. j 

Maulvi, Surijudin Abdul Ditto. 

FattA. I 



XLI. 

THE CHARLES MOREHEAD PRIZE. 

Dr. Henry Vandyke Carter on behalf of the Morehead 
Memorial Committee offered to the University the sum of 
Rs. 5,000 in Government 4 per cent, paper for the foundation 
of a Prize to be called " The Charles Morehead Prize " of 
the value of Rs. 200, to \)e awarded every year to the Candi- 
date who passes the L.M. and S. Examination with the 
highest number of marks in Clinical Medicine. 

At a meeting of the Senate held on the I7th September 
1883 this offer was accepted with the best thanks of the 
Senate. 

The Prize will be awarded in accordance with the follow- 
ing Regulations : — 

1. A Prize, to be called "The Charles Morehead 
Prize," consisting of Rs. (200) two hundred in money or 
of books of the like value, shall be awarded every year to 
the Candidate who passes the Examination for the Degree 
of L.M. & S. to the satisfaction of the Examiners, with the 
highest number of marks in " Clinical Medicine". 

2. The name of the successful Candidate will be published 
with the list of Candidates who pass the Examination for 
the Degree of L.M. & S. 

3. If in any year the Prize be not awarded, the amount 
thus saved may be disposed of at the discretion of the 
Syndicate in furtherance of the study of Clinical Medicine. 



IX. 




THE SIR COWASJBE JEHAlTaHIER HALL OF 
THE UNIVERSITY OF BOMBAY. 

Oowasjee Jehanghier Readymoney, Esquire, Justice of the 
Peace and Fellow of the University, in a letter to the Vice- 
Chancellor, Sir Alexander Grant, Bart., dated the 27th 
April 1863, offered the sum of Rs. 1,00,000 for the erection 
of University Buildings, under the following conditions : — 
That Crovernment contribute the remainder of the sum 
necessary for the buildings, and grant a site on the Espla- 
nade, and that no subscription from any other private per- 
son be received for this object. 

This offer was accepted by Government and referred to the 
University, and at a Convocation of the Senate, held on the 
18th July 1863, the following Resolution was passed : — 

" That the Senate accept the noble gift of Oowasjee Jehan- 
ffhier. Esquire, with the liberal augmentation offered by Go- 
vernment and with the recognition of the liabilities imposed 



SIE C. JEHAKGHIEE HALL OF THE UNTVEESITT OF BOMBAY. 203 

on this University by its holding the University buildings, 
when completed, according to the Act of Incorporation ; 
but on the undei-standing that Mr. Cowasjee concurs in the 
interpretation -which Government puts upon his conditions 
in the third and fourth paragraphs of its letter, Xo.260, 
dated 29th May 1863, to the address of Sir Alexander Grant, 
Bart., Vice-Chancellor.*' 

Note. — The interpretation of Gk)vemment, referred t-o, wao 
as follows : — 

" His Excellency in Council understands the third condi- 
tion specified iu Mi-. Cowasjee Jehanghier's letter as imply- 
ing that a building for the University is to be completed at 
the joint expense of that gentleman and of Government 
without accepting contributions from any other 80tU"ce, so 
that it may form in itself a separate and permanent monu- 
ment of Mr. Cowasjee Jehanghier's desire to provide the 
Cniversity with a local habitation. 

" As, however, the duties and wants of the University 
increase, His Excellency the Governor in Council hopes that 
the example so worthily set by Mr. Cowasjee Jehanghier 
will be followed by other University benefactors, and Go- 
vernment feel assured that that gentleman would be the last 
to exclude those who may wish to follow his noble example 
from adding to or adorning the edifice which he has been 
the first to raise." 

This interpretation was formally accepted by Mr. Cowas- 
jee Jehanghier in a letter to Government dated the 8th 
August 1873. 

At a meeting of the Senate, held on the 4th March 1875, 
the following Resolution was imanimously passed : — 

That, in recognition of Sir Cowasjee Jehanghier Ready- 
money's noble gift of Rs. 1,00,000 for the erection of Uni- 
versity Buildings, the Hall, now handed over by Grovem- 
ment to the University, be named "The Sib, Cowasjee Jeha^t • 
GHiER Hall of the University op Bombay." 



204 



ENDOWMENTS. 



II. 

UNIVERSITY ARMS AND COMMON SEAL. 

Cowasjee Jehanghier Rea-dymoney, Esquire, Justice of 
the Peace and Fellow of the University, iii a letter to 
G. C. M. Birdwood, Esq., M.D., Fellow of the University, 
dated 24th September 1863, forwarded a donation of Rupees 
1,200 to meet the expense of a Grant of Arms to the Uni- 
versity, and the engraving of a University seal. This 
donation was accepted at a meeting of the Senate held 
on the same day, with a vote of thanks to the donor for 
his timely and liberal benefaction. 



HI. 




UNIVERSITY LIBRARY. 

Premchund Roychund, Esquire, in a letter to Government 
dated the 27th August 1864, made the following request : — 

" I have the honour to request that Government will have 
the goodness to communicate to the University of Bombay 
my desire to offer most respectfully to that learned body the 
sum of Rupees (2,00,000) two lacs towards the erection of a 
University Library, which may be an ornament to this city, 
and, by becoming a storehouse of the learned works, not 
only of the past but of many generations to come, may be a 
means of promoting the high ends of the University. 



THE RIJABAI TOWIE. 20" 

At a meeting of the Senate, held on the 10th September 
1864, it was resolved " that the Senate cordially and unani- 
mously accept, with their best thanks, Mr. Premchund 
Eoychund's noble gift." 



IV. 
THE RA-JA-BAI TOWER. 

Premchund Roychtmd, Esquire, in a letter to Gfovem- 
ment, dated 6th October 1864, made the following request: — 

" I have the honour to request that Grovemment will do 
me the favour to offer to the University of Bombay, in the 
name of my good mother, Eajabai, (2,00,000) two lacs of 
Rupees for the erection of a Tower to contain a large clock 
and a set of joy -bells. 

" If there be no architectural objections, I should like the 
Tower to be in connection with the University Library." 

At a meeting of the Senate, held on the 10th December 
1864, it was unanimously resolved "that the Senate do 
accept the noble gift of Mr. Premchund Roychund of two 
lacs of Rupees for the erection of a Tower to contain a large 
clock and a set of joy-bells ; and that the grateful thanks 
of the Senate be conveyed to Mr. Premchund Roychund." 

It was further unanimously resolved " that the Tower 
be named ' The Ra'ja'ba i Tower' in commemoration of 
Mr. Premchund Roychund's mother." 



B 103O— IS BU 



206 BENIFACTIOKS. 

V. 




UNIVEESITY MACE. 

Munguldass Nathoobhoy, Esquire, Justice of the Peace 
and Fellow of the University, in a letter to the Eegistrar, 
Dr. E. S. Sinclair, dated the 18th November 1864, offered 
Es. 1,200 for the purpose of providing the TJniyersity with 

a Mace. 

At a meeting of the Senate, held on the 10th December 
1864, it was unanimously resolved " that Mr. Munguldass 
Natboobhoy's handsome offer of Es. 1,200 for a Mace for 
the University be accepted with thanks." 



, 1884-85. 



Faculty. 



SENATE. 
Chancellor. 

His Excellency the Right Honourable Sir Jamzs Fergussox, 
Bart., K.C.M,G.. CLE. 
Vice-Chancellor. 

1. The Honourable Ravmond West, 

C.S., M.A., LL.D., F.E.G.S. 
Deans. 

2. The Honourable James Braithwaite 
Peile, C.S., C.S.I., M.A,— 1» Arts. 

3. The Honourable C. F. Farran, B.A. 

— In Laio. 

4. A. X. Hojel, L. K and Q.C J*.I.— In 
Medicine. 

5. The Honourable Major-Grcneral C.J. 
Merriman, C.S.I.,R.E— 1?» Engineering 

Syndics. 
(5. WUliam "Wordsworth, B.A/ 

7. The Honourable H. M. Bird- 
wood, C.S., M.A„ LL.M. 

8. I. B. Lyon. M.R.C.S., F.C.S., f In 
F.LC. { Arts. 

9. The Honourable Kashinath 
TrimbakTelang,M,A.,LL.B., { 
CLE. J 

10. The Honourable Rao Sdheb^ 
Vishvanath Xarayan Mand- I In 
lik, C.S.L,iI.R.A.S. C Law. 

James Jardine, M.A. J 

G. A. Maconachie, M.D., > 

CM. In 

113. H J. Blanc, B.A., B.Sc, ( Medicine. 
M.D.) 

4. T. Cooke, M.A., M.L,"^ 

LL.D., F.R.G.S., Mem. In 

Inst. CE.I )- Engineer- A L ... E 

5. Lieut. -Colonel G. L. C | hig. 
Merewether, R.E. ...J 

* A stands for Arts, L for Laws, M for Medicine, and E for 
[Civil Engiaeering. 



L 
L 




L 


... 


... 


M 


L 


• •• 


L 


... 


... 


M 


L 


... 


L 




L 


... 


... 


M 


L 


M 



E 



208 



UNIVERSITY. 



so 



Faculty. 



Fellows. 
Ex-officio. 

16. His Excellency Lieut. -General tlie 
Honourable Arthur Edward Hard- 
inge, O.B., Commander-in-Chief.,* 

17. The Honourable Sir Charles 

Sargent, Knight, M.A,, Chief 
Justice, 1867- 

18. The Right Reverend Louis George 
Mylne,M. A.,D.D,, 5is7iop of Bombay* 

The Honourable J. B. Peile, 
C. S., CSX, M.A., 1863, 

19. The Honourable Maxwell 

Melvill, C.S., 1863. 

20. K. M. _Chatfield,_M.A., Bi/redor of 

Public Instruction, 1866. 

21. T. B. Kirkham, Educational In- 

spector, Central Division, 1866. 
William Wordsworth, B.A., Frin 
cipal, Elphinstone College.*' 

22 R. G. Oxenham, M.A., Principal, 

Deccan College, 1864. 

23 H.Cook, M.D.,F.R.C.P., F.R.G.S., 

F.G.S., F.M.S., Principal, Grant 
Medical College. 
Theodore Cooke, M.A., M.L, LL.D., 
F.G.S.,Mem.Inst. C.E.I., Princi 
pal. College of Science.* 

1858. 

24. The Reverend John Murray Mitchell, 

M.A., LL.D. 

1862. 

25. The Honourable Lyttelton 

Holyoake Bayley. 

*Not gazetted. 



A 

A 



M 



SENATE. 



209 



26. William James Moore, M.D., L.R 
C..P Edin., CLE. 
The Honourable Eao Siheb Yishva- 
nath Xarayan Mandlik, C.S.L, 
M.R.A.S. 



27, 



28. 



29. 
30. 

31. 



1863. 

Henrv IN'apier Bruce Erskine, C.S 
The Honourable Maxwell Melvill, 

C.S. 
The Honourable James Braithwaite 

Peile,C.S.,C.S.I., M.A. 
The Honourable Raymond West, 

C.S., M.A., LL.D., F.R.G.S. 
The Honourable James Bellot 

Richey, C.S.,C.SJ.. B.A. 
The Honourable Herbert Mills 

Birdwood, C.S.,M.A., LL.M. 
Henry Vandyke Carter, M.D, 
Sir MungTildass K^athoobhoy, 

Knight, C.S.I, 
Manockjee Cursetjee. 

1864. 

Dadabhoy Xowrojee. 

The Reverend Dhanjibhoy Xauroji. 

The Honourable Charles Gonne, C.S. 

C.S.L 
Joshua Bang, C.S., M.A. 
George Morison Macpherson, C-S., 

M.A. 
Robert George Oxenham, M.A. 
Kiian Bahadur Padamjee Pestonjee. 
Sorabjee Pestonjee Framjee. 
The Reverend Richard Stothert, 

M.A. 
Venavakrao Vasudevji. 
Sir WUliam Wedderbum,Bart.,C.S. 

B 1030—18 BU* 



A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 
A 

A 



Factdty. 



M 



E 



M 



E 
E 



E 



E 



210 



UNIVEESITy. 



1865. 

42. Dhunjeebhoy Framjee Patel. 

43. The Honourable Theodore Cracraft 

Hope, C.S., C.S.I., CLE. 

44. Karsandas Madhavdas. 

45. Mixncherjee Byramjee Cola, M.D. 

46. Rao Saheb Mahipatram Rupram. 

47. Mahadev Govind Ranade, M.A., 

LL.B. 

48. Premchund Roychund. 



1866 (February). 
49. "VVilUam Allan Russell, M.A. 



1866 (April). 



Kyrle Mitford Chatfield, M.A. 
50. John Cruikshank, M.D. 

61. William Dymock, B.A. 

62. Dosabhoy Framjee, C.S.I. 
£3. William Albert East, C.S., BA. 

Abraham Nickson Hojel, L.K. and 
Q.C.P.I. 

64. Khdn Bahddur Dastur Iloshang 
Jamasp. 

55. Colonel George Adolphus Jacob. 
T. B. Kirkham. 

56. The Reverend Charles Kirk, M.A. 

57. Kharshedji Rustomji Cama. 

58. The Honourable Robert Hill Pinhey, 

C.S. 

59. Dastur Peshutan Byramji. 



Faculty. 


A 


L 




... 


A 




M 


... 


A 




... 




A 


L 


... 


e' 


A 


... 


... 


... 


A 


L 


M 


... 


A 




M 


... 


A 




M 


•• • 


A 








A 




... 


. . . 


A 




... 


... 


A 






.«• 


A 






... 


A 


L 






A 


... 


... 


... 



i 



6EHATB. 



211 



60. Eamkrishna Gopal Bhandarkar, 

M.A., Hon. M.R.A.S. 

61. Vithal Xarayan Pathak, M.A. 

62. Rao Bahadur Yasudev Pandurang. 

63. The Reverend Charles Gilder. 



1867. 



64. The Honourable James Gibbs, C.S., 

C.S.I., C.I.E., F.R.G.S. 
The Honourable Sir Charles 
Sargent, Knight, M.A. 

65. Arthur Travers Crawford, C.S. 

66. Clarence Bovill Izon, C.S. 
Isadore Bemadotte Lyon, M.R.C.S., 

F.C.S., F.I.C. 

67. Pherozshah Mervanji Mehta, M.A. 

68. John George Moore, C.S. 

69. Shaukar Pandurang Pandit, M.A 

70. Satyendra Nath Tagore, C.S. 

71. Bal Mangesh Wagle, M.A., LL.B, 

72. Major Edward William West. 

73. Fi-amjee Nasserwanjee Patel. 



1868 (January). 

74. Major W. M. Ducat, R.E. 

75. C. E. Fox, M.A. 

76. W. Grav, M.B. 

77. ColonelH. F. Hancock, R.E. 

78. Khanderao Chimanrao Bedarkar, 

B.A., LL.B. 

79. The Right Rev. Leo Meurin, S.J., 

D.D. 

80. Ramchandra Rao Appa Saheb, 

Chief of Jamkhandi. 



Faculty. 



A L 

A L 

A '.'. 

A .. 

A L 

A .. 

A .. 

A L 

A L 

A .. 



M 



M 



E 
E 
E 



M 



212 



UNIVEP.SITT. 



81. Shantaram Narayan. 

82. The Reverend J. A. Willy, S.J., 

D.D. 



1868 (December). 



83, 

84, 
85. 
86. 
87. 



90, 
91. 
92. 
93. 
94. 
95. 

96. 

97. 



Atmaram Pandurang, G.G.M.C. 
Bhikaji Amrit Chobhe, G.G.M.C. 
Byramjee Jeejeebhoy, C.S.I. 
James Burgess, M.R.A.S., LL.D. 
J. Harry Kivett-Camac, Ben. C.S., 

C.S.I. 
Rdo Baliddur Daji Nilkant Nagar- 

kar. 
The Reverend S. B. Fairbank, M.A. 
Govind Vithal Kurkaray, B.A. 
H. P. Jacob. 

Mahadev Moreshvar Kunte, B.A. 
John Pinkerton, M.D. 
G. B. Raid, C.S., B.A. 
James Scorgie, F.C.S., Mem. Soc. 

Eng. 
The Reverend D. A. F. de Rozario 

de Souza. 
Nowroji Fardunji, C.I.E. 



Faculty. 



1869. 

98. The Reverend Thomas Carss, M.A. 

1870. 

99. Atmaram Sadashiv G. Jayakar, 

L.M., M.R.C.S., L.R.C.P. 
100. Coliu Browning, M.A. 



... L 

A ... 

A L 

A '.'.'. 

A L 

A ... 

A ... 

A ,,. 

A L 

A ... 

A ... 

A L 



SENATE. 



213 



101. Cursetjee Xasserwanjee Cama. 

102. The Reverend J. G. Cooper. 
The Honourable C. F. Farran, B.A. 

103. T. P. H. Macartney Filgate. 

104. Gk)pal Eaoji Tilak, L.C.E. 

105. Harichand Sadashivji, Assoc. M. 

Inst. C.E. 

106. D. S. Kemp, F.C.S. 

107. E. Tyrrell Leith, LL.M., F.R.G.S., 

M.R.A.S., M.A.I. 

108. Nagindas Tulsidasilarphatia, B.A, 

LL.B. 

109. Rao Bahadur Nana Moroji. 

110. Raghunath Xarayan Khote, CLE 

111. Rahimtulah Miihanmiad Sayani, 

M.A., LL.B. 

112. Sorabji Shapurji Bengali, CLE. 

113. Colonel J. H. White, R.E. 



isn. 



114. The Honourable Charles Gurdon 

Kemball, C.S. 
U5. G. M. Stewart. 
16. G. Atkinson, B.A., Serjeant-at- 

Law. 
[17. Samuel Cooke, M.A., F.I.C, F.G.S., 

Assoc. M. List. C.E. 
118. Homejee Cursetjee Dady. 
Jl9. Edaljee ZSTasserwanjee, G.G.M.C. 
120. J. Flynn. 
II. J. H. E. Hart, C.E. 



Faculty. 



E 
E 



M 



A 


L 


A 


L 




L 


A 


••• 


A 


L 


A 


• •< 


A 


• •• 



E 



M 



E 



E 



214 



UNIVERSITT. 



122. T. G. Hewlett, CLE. 

123. Chester Macuaghten, M.A. 
Lieut.-Colonel G. L. 0. Merewether, 

R T^' 
m. John Nugent, C.S. 

125. Sidney Smith, M.D. . 

126. MoreshvarAtmaramTarkhad,F.G.S 



1872. 



127. K. T. Best, M.A. 

128. Charles Chambers, F.E.S. 
H. Cook, M.D., P.R.C.P., F.R.G.S., 

F.G.S., F.M.S. 

129. J. A. Forbes. 

130. Rdo Bahadur Ganpatrao Bhaskar, 

131. John Jardine, C.S. 

132. Nanabhoy Byramjee Jeejeebhoy. 

133. Jamshedjee Pallonjee Kapadia. 

134. W. Lee-Warner, C.S., M.A. 
136. Vaman Abaji Modak, B.A. 

136. Ardesir Framji Moos. 

137. Captain H. Morland, late I. N., 

F.KG.S., F.R.A.S., Assoc. Inst. 
C.E. 

138. The Honourable Nanabhai Haridas, 

LL.B. 

139. Nacoda Mahomed Ally Eogay. 

140. Shantaram Vithal Sanzgire, L.M 

141. Khfln Bahadur Jamsetji Dhanjibhai 

Wadia. 



1873. 

142. Balaji Pandurang Bhalerao. 

143. Ananta Chaudroba, G.G.M.C. 



Faculty. 



A 




M 


A 


L 


M 


A 






A 






A 


... 




A 




M 


A 






A 


L 




A 


L 




A 


... 




A 


..• 




A 


L 




A 






A 


... 




A 


... 




A 


L 




A 




ivi 


A 


... 




A 


... 


M 



E 



E 



E 



SENATE. 



215 



144. The Honourable F.L. Latham, M. A. 

145. E. Rehatsek, M.C.E. 

146. Tlie Reverend Xarayan Sheshadri. 

147. "FramjiRastamji Yikaji, B.A.,LL.B. 

148. Kaikhosru Eastamji Vikaji, L.M., 

M.D. 

149. Javerilal Umiasliankar Yajnik. 



1874. 



150. J. Anderson, K.L.S. 

151. Andrew Paul deAndrade, G.G.M.C 

152. J. K. Bytliell. 

153. James Macnabb Campbell, C.S. 

154. J. Gerson Da Cunha, M.R.C.S., 

L.R.C.P. 

155. A. W. Forde, Mem. Inst. C.E. 

156. J. Temperley Gray, L.R.C.P. Lend., 

A.K.C. 

157. W. E. Hart, B.A. 

158. J. T. Hathomthwaite, M.A. 

159. H. E. M. James, C.S. 

160. Rao Bahadur Vasndev Bapuji 

Kanitkar. 

161. Rjio Bahadur MaknndRamchandra. 

162. The Honourable J. Q. Pigot, B.A..,. 

163. Captain W. F. Prideaux. 

164. Sakharam Arjun Ravut, L.M. 

165. P. Ryan. 

166. Khan Bahddur Kazi Shahabadin, 

CLE. 

167. Rao Bahadur Janardan Vasudeyji. 

168. Major J. W. Watson. 

169. Sir F. H. Souter, Knight, CSJ. 



Faculty. 



£ 



M 



M 
M 



M 
M 



L 
L 



E 



E 



M 



216 



UNIVERSITY. 



Faculty. 



1874 (June). 
170. E. P. Robertson, C.S. 

1875. 



171. James Arnott, M.D., CM. 

172. The Honourable Badrudin Tyabji. 

173. Kashinath Ramchandra Godbole, 

B.A., L.C.E. 

174. Gopal Sbivram Yaidya, L-M. 

175. The Honourable Sir Jamsetjee 

Jeejeebhoy, Bart., C.S.I. 

176. Khan Bahadur Mancharji Kavasji 

Murzban, Assoc. Inst. C.E. 

177. Nanabhai Rastamji Ranina. 

178. Shamrao Vithal. 

179. J. L. Kipling. 



1876. 

180. Rao Bahddur Bechardas Ambaidas, 

C.S.I. 
Raja Sir T. Madhavrao, K.C.S.I. 
Khdn Bahddur Bamanji Sorabji, 

L.C.E., A.M.I.C.E. 
The Reverend Charles Cooke, S.J., 

B.A. 
James Jardine, M.A. 
G. A. Maconachie, M.D., CM. 
Mirza Hairat. 

185. Narayan Ballal Limaye. 

186. L. P. de Rozario, L.M. 

187. Rastamji Nasarvanji Khori L.M., 

M.D., M.R.C.P. Lond., F.R.C.S, 
Lond., F.R.O.S. 



181. 
182. 

183. 



184 



M 



M 



E 
E 

E 



M 
M 
M 



E 
E 



SEXATE. 



217 



1877. 



188. Anna Moreshvar Kunte, B.A., M.D. 

189. Dastur Jamaspji Minocherji Ja- 

maspasana, Ph.D. 

190. S. Newcome Fox, B.A. 

191. Edward Giles, B.A. 

192. The Reverend J. M. Hamilton, S.J, 

193. H. I. B. Hargrave, B.A., C.E. 

194. Jamsetji Ardesir Dalai, M A.,LL.B, 

195. Jehangier Barjorji Vacha. 

196. Hormasji Jehangier Bhabha, MA. 
The Honourable KashinathTrimbak 

Telang, M.A., LL.B., CLE. 

197. Kamradin Tyabji. 

198. J. C. Lisboa, G.G.M.C. 

199. The Reverend D. Mackichan, M.A., 

D.D. 

200. Manasukharam Snrvaram Tripathi. 

201. Captain E. C. Marryat, R.E. 

202. Hamilton Maxwell. 

203. Peter Peterson, D.Sc. 

204. Varjivandas Madhavdas. j 

205. G. C. Whitworth, C.S. I 

206. A. Wmgate, C.S., C.I.K 

207. Captain C. Wodehouse. 



1878. 



208. Cowasjee Hormasjee, G.G.M.C. 

209. Philip Clement De Sonza, L.M, 

210. Eao Bahadur Gopalrao Biari Desh- 

mukh. 

211. Jamshedji Navroji Unvala, MA.. 

B 1030—19 BC 



A 
A 
A 
A 
A 
A 
A 
A 



A 

A 

A 
A 
A 
A 
A 
A 



Faculty. 



M 



M 



M 



E 

I 
E 



M 
M 



218 



UNIVERSITY. 



212. The Eeverend C. F. H. Johneton, 

M,A. 

213. The Very Reverend N. Pagani,S.J. 

214. The Reverend R. Rive, S.J. 

215. Yashvant Vasudev Athale, M.A., 

LL.B. 

216. GeorgeWaters,L.R.C.S.,L.R.C.P.E. 



1879. 



217. Ambalal Sakarlal Desai, M.A., 

LL.B. 

218. E. B. Carroll, Mem. Inst. C.E. 

219. Cowasji Pestonji, G.G.M.O. 

220. Joseph Ezekiel. 

221. The Reverend F. X. Fibus, S.J., 

S.T.P. 

222. Jehanghier Cowasjee Jehanghier 

Readymoney. 

223. F. G. Selby, B.A. 
224 The Reverend H. C. Squires, M.A. 

H. J. Blanc, B.A., B.Sc, M.D. 

225. Wilson Bell, C.E. 

226. F. Chambers. 
The Honourable Major-General 

C. J. Merriman, C.S.L, R.E. 

227. Rienzi G. Walton, M. Inst. C.E., 

F.R.G.S. 

228. Grattan Geary. 



1880. 



229. J. Griffiths. 

230. Rao Saheb Jayasatyabodhrao Tri- 

malrao Inaiudar. 



Faculty 



A 
A 
A 



A 
A 
A 



A 
A 

A 
A 



E 



M 



M 



M 



E 



E 

I 
... J 

E 
E 

E 

E 



E 



SENATE. 



219 



231. D. MacDonald, M.D. B.Sc^ CM. 

232. F.W. Stevens, p.r.i.b.a., a.m.i.c.e. 

233. T. S. Tait, M.A., B.Sc. 

234. Yishram Ramji Ghole. 



1881. 

235. Arthur Barrett, B.A. 

236. Surgeon-General T. B. Beatty, M.D., 

F.E.C.S. 

237. Cowasjee ISTowrojee, G.G.M.C. 

238. Dinanath Atmaram Dalvi, M.A., 

LL.B. 

239. Thomas Duncan, M.A., LL.B. 

240. Fardunji Mancherji Dastur, M.A. 

241. T. Hart-Davies, C.S. 

242. J. D. Inverarity, B.A., LL.B. 

243. C. Joynt, M.D., F.K.Q.C.P. 

244. Kavasii Dadabhai Naegaumvala, 

M.A., F.C.S., F.LC. 
24.5. H. C. Kirkpatrick, M.A. 

246. Michael Macmillan, BA.. 

247. Mancherji Navroji Banaji. 

248. J. W. Orr, M.A. 

249. Pestonii Mancherji, G.G.M.C. 

250. W. F. Sinclair, C.S. 

251. Matthew Starling, B.A., LL.B. 

252. Vithal Vishnu Gokhale, M.A., 

L.M. & S. 

253. E. H. E. Langley, B.A. 



1882. 

2.54. Pandit Bhagvanlal Indraji, Ph.D. 



Faculty. 



M 



M 



E 
B 
B 



M 
M 



M 



E 



M 



M 
M 



A 



220 



UNIVERSITY. 



255. The Eeverend B. Blake, M.A., B.D. 

256. H. Curwen. 

257. The Reverend F. Dreckmann, S.J. 

258. G. W. Forrest, B.A. 

259. Captain W. H. Haydon, R.E, Assoc, 

Inst. C.E. 

260. Kaikhosni Navroji Kabraji. 

261. Mancherji Mervanji Bhownagri. 

262. The Eeverend George Shirt, M.A 

263. Shivshanker Govindram. 

264. J. M. Sleater, Mem. Inst. C. E. 

265. Rdo Bahadur Trimabrao Venka- 

tesh Inamdar. 

266. Vasudev Krishnarao Dhairyavan, 

B.A., LL.B. 



1883. 



267. J. Adams. 

268. T. Blaney. 

269. R. M.Branson. 

270. Dosabhai Nasarvanii Wadia, 

M.A. 

271. E. McG. H. Fulton, C.S. 

272. Surgeon K. R. Kirtikar, M.R.C.S. 

(Eng.), L.R.O.P. (Lond.) 

273. H, Littledale, B.A. 

274. G. E. Ormiston, M.I.C.E. 

275. Rastamji Mei^anji Patel, M.A., 

LL.B. 

276. The Honourable John Scott. 

277. N. Spencer. 

278. Temulji Bhikaji Nariman, L.M. 

279. The Venerable Archdeacon S. 

Steady M.A. 



Faculty. 



A 

A 
A 
A 



A 
A 

A 

A 



A 
A 



E 
E 

e' 



M 



M 



E 



M 



I 



SENATE. 



221 





Faculty. 


1884 




1 






280. Mahadev Chimnaji Apte, B.A., 










LL.B. 


A 


L 


... 


... 


281. Kao Bahadur Mahadev Vasudev 










Barve. 


A 


... 


... 




282, Pritamdas Parstunal Chandanani. 










L.C.E. 


• •• 


... 




E 


283. Jagannath Sadashivji Hate, Assoc' 










Inst. C.E. 


• «. 


..« 




E 


284. Khan Bahadur Shekh Haidan 










Kasim. 


. •• 


... 


M 


... 


285. Dhaniishah Navrou Parakh, 










L.R.C.P. 


■ • * 


... 


M 


... 


286. Rao Saheb Sitaram Vishvanath 










Patvardhan, B.A. 


A 


... 


•<• 


... 


287. A. X. Pearson, F. R. Met. Soc, 










F.C.S., A.I.C. 


A 


... 


... 


... 


288. Kavasji Jamshedji Sanjana, M.A. 


A 


... 


... 




589. Willoughby Woodward, M.A. 


A 


L 


... 


... 




s 1030—19 BV* 



222 UNIVERSITY. 



SYNDICATE. 



The Honourable Mr. Justice West, C.S., M.A., LL.D., 
P.R.G.S., Vice-Chancellor, President. 

W. Wordsworth, B. A 1 

The Honourable Mr. Justice Birdwood, ', 

I. B.%^uf^"iLRas., F.c.s., Fj.c. :;: f^y'"^''' *^ ^'•^^'- 

The Honourable Kashinath Trimbak | 
Telang,M.A.,LL.B., CLE. ... ...J 

The Honourable Rao SAheb Vislivanath | 

Narayan Mandlik, C.S.I., M.K.A.S. > Syndics in Laiv. 

James Jardine, M.A ) 

G. A. Maconachie, M.D., CM \SyndiGS in Medi: 

H. J. Blanc, B.A., B.Sc, M.D. ... J cine. 

T.Cooke MA MJ., LL.D., F.R.G.S..| ^^ ^^^.^^ .^ civil 

Mem. lust. C.E.I ^ Ennineerinn 

Lieut-Col. G. L. C. Merewether, R.E. J J^ngmeerinri . 

Peter Peterson, D.Sc, Registrar ... Secretary}. 



BOARD OF ACCOUNTS. 

S]r Munguldass Nathoobhoy, Knight, C.S.I. 

Captain H. Morland, late I.N., F.R.G.S., P.R.A.S., Assoc. 

Inst, O.B. 
Nanabhoy Byramjee Jeejeebljtoy. 
Ppter Peterson, D.Sc,, Registrar, Secretary. 



REGISTRAR. 
Peter Peterson, D.Sc. 



ASSISTANT REGISTRAR AND LIBRARIAN. 
Rao Saheb Ganpatrao Moroba Pital6. 



SUCCESSION LISTS. 223 

Succession Lists- 

CHANCELLORS. 

18-57. John Lord Elphinstone, G.C.B., G.C.H. 

1860. Sir George Eussel Clerk, G.C.S.I., K.C.B'. 

1862. Sir Henry Bartle Edward Frere, Bart., G.C.S.L,G.C.B., 

D.C.L. 
1867. The Ri^^ht Honourable Sir William Robert Seymour 

Yesey FitzGerald, M.A., D.C.L., G.C.S.I. 
1872. Sir Philip EdmondWodeliouse.G.C.S.L.K.C.B., CLE. 
1877. Sir Richard Temple, Bart., G.C.S.L, CLE. 
1880. The Right Honourable Sir James FEBcrssoy, 

Bart., K.CM.G., CLE 



VICE-CHANCELLORS. 

18-57. Sir William Yardley, Knight, Chief Justice. 

1858. Sir Henry Da"vason, Elnight, Chief Justice. 

1860. Sir Joseph Arnould, Knight, M.A., Puisne Judge. 

1863. Sir Alexander Grant, Bart., M.A. 

1865. The Honourable Alexander Kinloch Forbes, C.S., 

Judge of the High Court. 
1865. Sir Alexander Grant, Bart., M.A., LL.D. 
1868. The Reverend John Wilson, D.D., F.R.S. 
1870. The Honourable James Gibbs, C,S., Judge of the High 

Coiul;. 
1874. The Honourable James Gibbs, C.S., C.S.L, F.R.G.S., 

Member of Council. 

1879. The Honourable Raymond West, CS., M.A., 

F.R.G.S., Judge of the High Court. 
„ Surgeon-General William Guyer Hunter, ^LD., 
F.R.C.P. 

1880. The Hoxocrable Raymond West, C.S., M.A.,LL.D., 

F.R.G.S., Judge of the High Court. 



DEANS. 
I. — Dea>-s IX Arts. 
i«59. Aug., John Harkness, M.A., LL.D. 

1862. July, Sir Alexander Grant, Bart., M.A. 

1863. Feb., The Rev. John Wilson, D.D., F.R.S. 
IB68. Oct., Herbert Mills Birdwood, CS., M.A. 
1869. Jan., Kyrle Mitford Chatfield, B.A. 



224 UNIVEESITT. 

1873. Jan., The Rev. John Wilson, D.D., F.RS. 

1876. Jan., The Honourable Eaymond "West, C.S., M.A., 

F.R.G.S. 
1876. June, William Wordsworth, B.A. 

1879. April, James Braithwaite Peile, C.S., C.S.I., M.A. 

1880. Jan., William Wordsworth, B.A. 

1881. Jan., Herbert Mills Birdwood, O.S., M.A., LL.M. 

1881. July, The Eev. John Murray Mitchell, M.A., LL.D. 

1882. Jan., The Honourable James Braithwaite Peile, '^C.S., 

as. I., M.A. 

1882. June, William Wordsworth, B.A. 

1883. Feb., The Honourable James Bkait?waite Peilp^ 

C.S., C.S.I., M.A. 

II. — Deans in Law. 

1860. July, Arthur James Lewis. 

1861. Jan., William Loudon. 

1862. Jan., James Fraser Here, M.A. 
1866. Jan., Richard Tuohill Reid, LL.D. 

1868, Jan., The Honourable Henry Pendock St. George 
Tucker, C.S. 

1871. Jan., The Honourable Andrew Richard Scoble. 

1872. Jan., The Honourable James Sewell White, B.A. 

1873. Jan., The Honourable J. P. Green, LL.B. 

1874. Jan., The Honourable Andrew Richard Scoble, Q.C. 

1876. Mar., The Honourable John Marriott, B.A. 
1882. Jan., The Honourable F. L. Latham, M.A. 

1884. July, The Honoubable C. Farran, B.A- 

III. — Deans in Medicine^ 
18.58. Mar., B. P. Rooke, M.D. 
1860. Oct., John Peet, M.D. 

1865. Jan., Herbert John Giraud, M.D. 
J.865. Oct., Robert Haines, M.B. 

1866. June, William Guyer Hunter, F.R.C.S.E. 

1867. April, Frank Savignac Stedman. 

1868. Jan., Francis Shortt Arnott, M.D., C.B. 

1869. Jan., T. W. Ward, F.R.G.S. 

1870. Jan., Alexander Wright. 

1871. Jan., William Guyer Hunter, M.D., M.R.C.P. 

1872. Jan., Alexander Wright. 
1874. Jan., William Thom. 

1877. Jan., William Guyer Hunter, M.D., F.R.C.P. 

J 880. Jan., Henry Cook, M.D., M.R.C.P,, F.R.G.S., F.G.S., 
F>M.S. 



STTCCESSIOS LISTS. 225 

1882. Jan., William James Moore, M.D., L.R.C.P., Edin., 

CLE. 
1882. June, Henry Vandyke Carter , M.T>. 
1884. Jan., A. N.Hojel, L.K., and Q.C.P.I. 

IV. — Deans in Civil ExGiXEEREfG. 

1858. Feb., The Honourable Arthur Malet, C.S. 

1860. Aug., Lieut.-Greneral Walter Scott, Bombay Engi- 
neers. 

1862. Jan., Colonel H. B. Turner, Bombay Engineers. 

1862. Sept., Lieut.-G^eneral Walter Scott, Bombay Engi- 
neers. 

186.3. June, Colonel Harry Rivers, Bombay Engineers. 

1865. April, Captain H. St. Clair Wilkins, E.E. 

1865. Oct., Lieut.-Colonel Alfred DeLisle, E.E. 

1867. Jan., Major-General C. W. Tremenheere, R.E., C.B. 

1868. Jan., Lieut.-Colonel Alfred DeLisle, R.E. 

1868. April, Lieut.-Colonel J. S. Trevor, C.S. I., R.E. 

1869. Jan., The Honourable Major-General Sir Michael 

Kavanagh Kennedy, K.C.S.L, R.E. 
1879. Jan., Major-General John Archibald Ballard, R.R^C.B^ 
1879. Feb., Thomas Ormiston, Mem. Inst. C.E. 

1881. Jan., F. Mathew, Mem. Inst. C.E. 

1882. June, Lieut.-General J. A. Fuller, CLE., R.E. 

1883. Jan., The HoNoriuBLE Major-Generai C. J^ 

Merrihan, C.S.L, R.E. 



REGISTRARS. 

1858. Jan., Robert Sharpe Sinclair, MA.., LL.D. 

1862. Nov., Robert Haines, M.B., Officiating. 

1863. Nov., Robert Sharpe Sinclair, MA.., LL.D. 

1866. July, George Christopher Moles worth Birdwood, M.D. 

1867. April, John Powell Hughlings, BA.., Officiating. 

1868. Jan., George Christopher Molesworth Birdwood, M.D. 
1868. Sept., James Taylor. 

1874. May, Peter Peterson, M.A., Edin. ; B.A. Ball. CoU., 

Oxen., Officiating. 
1874. Sept., The Rev. D. C Boyd, M.A. 
1877. June, Peter Peterson, M.A.^ Edin. ; B.A. Ball. Coll., 

Oxon, D.Sc. 



226 UNIVEESITT, 

DECEASED AND RETIRED FELLOWS 

Named in the Act of Incorporation. 

* The Right Honourable John Lord Elphinstone, 

G.C.B., G.C.H. 
Sir William Yardley, Knight, 

* The Right Reverend John Harding, D.D. 

* Lieut. -Greneral Sir Henry Somerset, K.C.B. 

* The Honourable James Grant Lumsden, C.S. 
The Honourable Arthur Malet, C.S. 

* Edward Irvine Howard, M.A, 

* Robert Haines, M.B. 

* Charles Morehead, M.D. 

* John Harkness, M.A., LL.D. 

* The Reverend James McDougall. 

* The Honourable Philip William LeGeyt, C.S. 

* Sir Matthew Richard Sausse, Knight. 

* Sir Jamsetjee Jeejeebhoy, (first) Bart. 

* Metcalfe Larken, C.S. 

* The Honourable Jtigonnath Sunkersett. 

* Bomanjee Hormasjee. 

* Bhau Daji, G.G.M.C, Hon. M.R.A.S. 

* Matthew Stove]], M.D., M.R.C.S.E. 

The Honourable Claudius James Erskine, C.S. 

* The Honourable William Edward Frere, C.S., C.M.G. 

* Major- General Charles Waddington, C.B. 

* The Reverend John Wilson, D.D., F.R.S. 

* The Reverend Philip Anderson, M.A. 

* The Right Honourable Sir Henry Bartle Edward 

Frere, Bart., G.C.B., G.C.S.I., D.C.L. 
Lieut. Edward Frederick Tierney Fergusson, I.N. 

* Mahomed Yusoof Moorgay, Cazee of Bombay. 

* James John Berkley, M.I.C.E., F.G.S. 

* Sir Henry Lacon Anderson, C.S., K.C.S.I. 

1857. 

* The Honourable H. W. Reeves, C.S. 

* Deceased. 



DECEASED AND RETIRED FELLOWS. 227 

1858. 

Tlie Honourable A. J. Lewis. 

J. J. Lowndes. 

The Honourable Sir Barrow HelbertEms,C.S.,K.C.S.L 

Colonel H. B. Turner, R.E. 

Major-General William Frederick Marriott, C.S.I. 

Major J. H. G. Crawford, R.E. ' 

Major-General Harry Rivers, R.E. 

The Reverend William Kew Fletcher, M.A. 

Rao Bahadur Bhaskar Damodar. 

B. P. Rooke, M.D. 

Herbert John Giraud, M.D. 

The Honourable Sir Joseph Arnould, Knight, M.A. 

1860. 

Lieut. -General Sir William Rose Mansfield, G.C.B., 

G.C.S.L 
John Feet, M.D. 
A.H. Leith, M.D. 
H. J. Carter, F.R.S. 
Lieut.-Greneral W. Scott. 
The Honourable Sir Michael Koberts Westropp, Knight, 

B.A. 
W. R. Cassels. 

Sorabjee Jamsetjee Jeejeebhoy. 
William Loudon. 
Narayan Dinanathji. 
James Fraser Hore, M.A. (July). 
Sir Alexander Grant, Bart., M.A., LL.D. (December)* 

1862. 

' The Honourable A. Kinloch Forbes, C.S. 

'■ Major-General John Archibald Ballard, R.E., C.B. 

Major-General Henry James Bair. 

George Christopher Molesworth Birdwood,M.D.,C,S.I. 
' Major Thomas Candy, C.S.I. 
* Sir Cowasjee Jahanghier Readymoney, Knight, C.S.L 

* Deceased, 



228 UNIVERSITY. 

LietLt.-Colonel Alfred DeLisle, R.E. 

* The Reverend Francis Gell, B.A. 

* The Reverend J. Glasgow, D.D. 

* Major-General Sir Frederick John Goldsmid, C.Bv 

K.C.S.I. 

* Gokuldas Tejpal. 

R. W. Graham, Mem. Inst. C.E. 

* D. Grierson, M.D. 
W. Hart, C.S. 

* Martin Hatig, Ph.D. 

* John Powell Hughlings, B.A. 

* The Reverend C. M. Isenberg. 

* Sir Jamsetjee Jeejeebhoy, (second) Bart., C.S.I. 

^ The Honourable Jonathan Duncan Inverarity, C.S. 
The Honourable Samuel Mansfield, C.S., C.S-I. 
The Reverend Ward Maule, LL.B. 

* Rao Bahddtlr Maganbhai Karamchand. 
The Honourable Henry Newton, C.S. 

* Colonel J. Pottinger, C.B. 

* Richard Tuohill Reid, LL.D. 

Michael John Maxwell Shaw- Stewart, C.S. 

1863. 

The Honourable Sir Richard Couch, Knight. 

The Honourable Henry Pendock St. George Tucker, 

C.S. 
John Raynor Arthur, C,S. 

* C. R. Ovans, C.S. 

* John William Shaw Wyllie, C.S., C.S.I. 

* Sir Wilham Lockyer Merewether, K.C.S.I., C.B. 

* Captain Edward Burnes Thomas Holland, R.E. 
Lieut.-Colonel Thomas Waddington. 

The Reverend Charles Durell DuPort, M.A. 
W. C. Coles, M.D. 

* G. R. Ballingall, M.D. 
Francis James Candy, M.A. 
Johann Georg Biihler, Ph.D. 

* Captain W. C. Barker, I.N. 

* Dectjased. 



DECEASED AKD RETIEED FELLOWS. 229 

D. J. Kennelly, I.N., r.R.A.S. 

The Honourable Andrew Ricliard Scoble, Q.C, 

* The Hononrable John Philip Green, LL.B. 
John Pares Bickersteth, M.A. 

Plobert Hannay. 

William George Pedder, C.S., BA. 
William Heui-tley Ncwnham, C.S., BA. 
1864. 

* The Reverend James Aitken. 

* T. C. Anstey. 

F. F. Arbnthnot, C.S. 

Bhngwandas Purshotnmdas, 

Colonel J. Barnes Dunsterville, C.S.I. 

Nicholas Femandes. 

Majnr-General J. G. Fife, R.E. 

"William Hanbury, B.A. 

Thomas Child Hayllar. 

William Guycr Hunter, M.D., F.R.C.P. 

Herbert Edward Jacomb, C.S. 

T. B. Johnstone, M.D. 

Maior-General Sir Michael Kavanagh Kennedy, Pi.E 

K.C.S.I. 
Lieut.-Colonel D. K"asmyth, R.E. 
George Scott, C.S. 

* Robert Sharpe Sinclair, M.A., LL.D. 

* The Most Reverend Walter Steins. S.J., D.D. 
^Major-General Charles William Tremenheere, R.P 

C.B. 

* Venayekrao Jngonnathji Snnkersett. 

The Honourable James Sewell White, B.A. 
Major General Henry St. Clair Wilkins, R.E. 
Andrew Grant. 
George Inverarity, C.S. 

* Rao Bahadur Dadoba Pandnrang. 

1865. 

* The Honourable John Mannott, B.A 

* The Reverend William Beynon. 
Henry Coke. M.A. 

* Deceased. 
B 1030—20 BTT 



230 UNIVEESITT. 

* Rao Bahadar Keropant Laxiiman Chhatre. 

* Captain Sherard Osborn, C.B., R.N. 
F. S. Stedman. 

* The Reverend J. V. S. Taylor, B.A. 

1866. 

* Rustomjee Jamsetjee Jeejeeblioy. 
George Foggo, 

Alexander John Hunter. 
F. Bronghton, F.R.C.S. 
H. S. Bellairs, M.A. 

* R. A. Dallas, LL.D. 
W. J. Jefferson, M.A. 

* Colonel William Kendall, R.E. 
Franz Kielhorn, Ph.D. 

J. T. Denison-Mackenzie, M.B., F.R.C.S. 
Edward Hope Percival, C.S. 

* J. R. Rnshton, Mem. Inst. C.E. 

The Rev. Trenliam King Weatherhead, LL.B. 
1867. 

* The Honourable A. B. Warden, C.S. 

* Colonel George Sligo A. Anderson. 

The Reverend Dugald Cameron Boyd, M.A. 

Major Godfrey Clerk. 

T. B. Curtis. 

The Reverend A. Forbes, B.A. 

Major Charles Thomas Haig, R.E. 

R. Hamilton. 

* C. F. Kelly, M.A. 

The Venerable C. H. Leigh-Lye, M.A. 

* Krishna Shastri Chiplunkar. 
Alexander Faulkner. 

* A. M. Rogers. 

C. Watts Russell, B.A. 

* James Taylor. 

* A. V. Ward. 

* The Reverend G. A. F. Watson, M.A, 

* M. H. Scott. 

Francis Shortt Arnott, M.D., C.B. 

* Deceased. 



DECEASED AND RETIRED FELLOWS. 231 

X. A. DalzeU, M.A. 

The Honourable Xarayan Vasudevji. 

The Rev. Duncan Macpherson, M.A., D.D. 

1868 (January). 
Lieut.-Colonel W. A. Baker, R.E. 
A. Brown. 

The Reverend C. I. Cameron, M.A. 
C. E. Chapman, Ben. C.S. 
W. Collum, M.D. 
Lieut.-Colonel A. Davidson, R.E. 
Dhiraji-am Dalpatram, G.Gr.M.C. 
Dhirajlal Mathuradas. 
William Draper, M.A. 
J. Dunbar, M.A. 
Captain C. W. Finch, R.E. 
Lieut.-General F. A. Fuller, R.E., CJ.E. 
A. Gordon, M.D., C.B. 

F. G. Joynt, M.D. 

G. S. Vesey FitzGerald. 
J. ^Macpherson, B.A. 
Nai-ayan Daji, G.G.M.C. 
J. O'Leary, B.A., S.C.L. 

The Honourable E. W. Ravenscroft, C. S., C.S.I. 
The Rev. G. C Revnell, M.A. 
Sii' A. D, Sassoon, Knight, C.S.I. 
J. H. Sylvester, F.G.S.', A.K.C. 
Colonel* J. S. Trevor, R.E., C.S.I. 

1868 (December). 
* S. A. DeCarvalho, G.G.M.C. 
John Connon, M.A, 
W. S. Eccles. 

The Reverend J. W. Gardner. 
Karsandaa Mulji. 
John Mills. 

The Reverend Robert Montgomery. 
Commander G. T. Robinson, I.N. 
T. W. Ward, F.R.C.S. 
The Reverend C. T. WHson, M.A, 

* Deceased. 



* 



232 UNIT'ERSITT. 

A. Wright. 

The Honourable F. S. Chapman, C.S. 

* A. F. BeUasis, C.S. 

1869. 

*tThe Right Reverend Henry Douglas, D.D^ 
A. Campbell. 

1870. 

Lieut. -Colonel W. W. Anderson. 

* The Reverend L. Bodoano. 

R. M. Brereton, Mem. Inst. C.B. 

The Reverend A. Hazen, M.A. 

Risley V. Hearn. 

The Honourable Francis Lloyd. 

John Lumsdaine. 

H. P. LeMesurier, Mem. Inst. C.E., C.S.I.,F.R.G.S. 

T. E. P. Martin. 

* Thomas Ormiston, Mem. Inst. C.E. 
The Honourable Alexander Rogers, C.S. 

The Reverend J. S. S. Robertson, F.R.G.S., M.R.A.S. 

* Venayekrao Appa Saheb Kurandwadkar. 

* The Reverend James Wallace. 
F. R. S. Wyllie, C.S. 
David Young, M.D. 

1871. 

* W. H. Havelock, C.S. 

1872. 

* Rastamji Kavasji Bahadurji, G.G.M.C, M.R.C.S. 
W. G. Hall. 

Major-General Jenkins Jones, R.E. 

* Kahandas Mancharam. 

1873. 

The Honourable L. R. Ashburner, C.S., C.S.I. 

* Lieut.-Colonel Bonar Deane. 
W. W. Hamilton. 

C. J. Mayhcw. 

The Reverend J. Paton. 

* E. Wilmot, M.A., LL.D. 

* Deceased. t Ex officio; not gazetted. 



DECEASED AUD RETIRBD FELLOWS. 233 

* C. Currey (July). 
W. Thorn (Nov.) 

1874. 

Major T. F. Dowden, R.E. 
T. Holmestead. 

F. Mathew, Mem. Inst. C.E. 

G. T. Molecy. 

Major G. W. Oldham, R.E. 

* Rao Saheb Narayan Jagannath Yaidya. 

1875. 

* Ghnlam Mohidin. 

* Rastamji Mervanji, G.GM.C. 

1876. 

' Cowasji Manockji Limji. 
The Rev. H. Depelchio, S.J., D.D. 

* Bhairavnath Mangesh. 

* Baron deHochepied Larpent, C.S. 

* Rastamji Jamshedji Nadirshah, L.M. 

* Andrew Lyon, M.A., C.S. 
James M. Maclean. 

W. Martin Wood. 

1877. 
The Honoorable Colonel TV. C. Anderson, G.S.I. 
James Brebner, I. X., Assoc. Inst. C E. 

* A. M. C. Coutinho, G.GM.C. 

1879. 

* The Honourable Morarji Gokaidas, CLE. 

* L. G. Hynes. 

* The Reverend E. deVos, S.J., S.T.P. 

* Major C. Mant, R.E. 

* H. F. Whyte, B.A. 

1880. 

* T. Codv, L.R.C.P. 

* A. H. 'Hughes, M.D., M.R.C.S., Enn.; L.R.C.P.E., 

L.M.E. 

1883. 

* Cursetji Framji Khory, MR-C,S. 

B 1030— 20 BU* *DecqasedL 



234 UNIVERSITY. 

GEADUATES.* 

MA. 
1865. 

College."^ Branch'. 

Kdn^de, Mahddev Govind E. History.* 

Wiigle, Bal Mangesh E. History and Political 

Economy. 

1866. 

Bapat, Jandrdan VinAyak E. History and Philosophy. 

Bhdgvat, Govind Rdnachandra. D. Mathematics and Natural 

Philosophy. 
BhdndArkar, RdmkrishnaGopAlE.&D. English and Sanskrit. 

Dalvi, Dindndth Atmdrdra E. Mathematics and Natural 

Philosophy. § 
Pathak, Vithal Ndrayan F.G.A. History and Philosophy. 

1867. 

Gazdar, Jamshedji Jivanji E. Mathematics and Natural 

Philosophy. |1 

1868. 

Pathak, Shdpurji Hennas ji E. Mathematics and Natural 

Philosophy. i| 

Second Ckiss, 

Mdnkar, Ganpatrdo Amritrao...D. History and Philosophy. 

Pandit, Shankar Pdndurang ...E. English and Latin. 

Patel, Daddbhdi Sordbji E. History and Philosophy, 

Pdtel, Rastam ji Mervdnji E. Ditto. 

Saydni,RahimtuldhMuhdmmad.E. English and Latin. 

Unvald, Jamshedji Navroji E. Ditto, 

1869. 

Fh'st Class. 

Bhat, Gangddhar Anant D. Mathematics and Natural 

Philosophy. 

The names are arranged alphabetically according to the surname, in order 
of time, 
t For the names of CoUeses and Schools, see List of Abbreviatioi^s. 
t With Honours and Gold Medal. 
§ With Honours, Class III. 
il With Houours, Class II 



I 



9BADUATES. 235 

Second Class. 

College. Branch. 

Did^chanji, Kersh^sji RastamjL ,E. History and Philosophy. 

Modi, Bamanji Edalji E. English and Latin. 

Mehtk, Fhirozsh^h Merv^ji E. History and PhUoeophy. 

1870. 

First Class. 

Dalai, .Jamshedji Ardesir E. Mathematics and Natural 

Philosophy. 
Desai, Ambdlal SdkarM R EngUah and Sanskrit? 

Second Class. 

Mehtd, Tdpid^s Dayaram E. Mathematics and Xatura 1 

Philosophy. 
Telang, Kdshinath Trimbak ...E, English and Sanskrit. 

1871. 

Second Class. 
BhAbhd, Honnasji Jeh^gierji E. English and Latin. 

1872. 

Second Class. 

Athale, Yashvant V^sndev E, English and Sanskrit. 

Modi , Barzor j i Edalji E. English and Latin. 

TuUu, RAoji Vdsudev E. English and Sanskrit. 

1873. 

Second Class. 

Pendse, KashinAth Balvant ...E. English and Sanskrit. 
Wddia, Dosabhdi Naaarvinji ...E. English and Latin. 

1874. 

Second Class. 

Bhide, ShivrAm Parshuram D. English and Sanskrit, 

Kirloskar, Ganesh EamchandraD. English and Latin. 

Lad, Vithal Bhdu R Natural Sciences. 

Mahdjane, Vishnu Moreshvar...D. English and Sanskrit. 

1875. 

First Clas«. 
Duncan, Thomas St X. English and Latin. 



236 tTNIVEESITY. 

Second Class. 
College. Branch. 

McDermott, Michael St. X. Epglish and Latin, 

1876. 

Second Class, 

Jinsivdle, Shridhar Ganesh D. History and Philosophy, 

KdngA, Dinshdh Pestanji E. English and Latin. 

Kelkar, Damodar Ganesh D, Ditto. 

TuUu, Govind Visudev E, Natural Sciences. 

1877. 

First Class. 

Dastur, Fardunji Mancherji ...E. Mathematics and Natural 

Philosophy. 
Gokhale, Vithal Vishnu E. Natural Sciences. 

Second Class. 

Rdo, Ganpat Saddshiv E. English and Latin. 

1878. 

First Class. 
NaegdumviU, K^vasjiDdddbhdi.E. Natural Sciences. 

Second Class. 
Dastur, Phiroze Hoshang D. English and Persian, 

1879. 

First Class. 

SAnjand, KAvasji Janishedji D. Mathematics. 

Second Class. 

Kdpadid, Kaikhosru Kuvarji ...E. Natural Sciences. 

Pass. 
Agdse, Dhondo Ilari E. Mathematics. 



GRADUITIS. 237 

1880. 

Second Class. 

Apte, Vdman Shivrdm D. Eaglish and SanakriL 

Desdi, MinekMl SiikarlAl E, Natural Sciences. 

1881. 

Second dois. 

WadiA, Frlmji Rastamji E. Natural Sciences. 

Pass. 
Joglekar, Krishniji Midhavrdo ...E. Natural Sciences. 

1882. 

Second Class. 

BMnddrkar, ShridharRimkrislinaE. English and Sanskrit. 

Dast-or, Dhanjishdh Hormasji E. Natural Sciences. 

Kingi, Soribji Manikji St. X. English and Persian. 

Pass. 

Agarkar, Gopil Ganesh D. History and Philosophy. 

Malvi.TribhuvandAsNarrottamdis St. X. English and Latin. 
Sanjdni, Mancherji Eharshedji . . . F. G, A, Ditto. 

1883. 

First Class. 

Vaidya, Chintlman Vin^yak E. Mathematics. 

Second Class. 

Jayakar, Sundarrdo Gajdnan F. G. A. Natural Sciences. 

Pass. 

Antid, Jamshedji Mervdnji P.G.A. English and Persian. 

Dole, Mahddev Yashvant D. Natural Sciences. 

Wells, DevjiBrijUl F.G.A. History and Philosophy. 

1884. 

I^rst Class.. 
Wdgle, Krishndji Balvant E. Mathematics. 

Pass. 
Mistri. Jijibhdi Pestanji St. X, English and Persian. 



238 



UNIVERSITY. 



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o -^ 


-w 




_o 


c.Sr3 


• l-( 


-u 


^ 






.2 c 








■bC43 
90- 


s 




+3 
O 




ft 


ft 


ft 






-5 6 


CD 

r/2 






)-H 


















C 








^ 


c 








§ 


: 










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11 


CO 

tl 


C 


o 

s 


o 
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ft 


ft 


o 

Pli 


ii 






IS 


aJ 




























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• rt 


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.^ 


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"C 




o 


+2 


"E 


O 


o 






rt 


S tc 






vr3 


r^ 




+3 


v:« 




+3 








•s 

o 


t-5 






^ 
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CO 




s 


S 
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a:- 


'p. 


♦a 

ft 












s 




















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c5 


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o 




s 


£ 


I 




1 

g 


00 
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s 
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00 


o 


c3 

43 


3 
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c 




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1 




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GEADUATES. 241 



Hss^sssao:::::; a Qs 



; : dg 00 : : : : : : : : : 

. o • - • 

^ u ^ ^ 

3 -« y 5 

O >>'^S"s52 O 3 O CO O OQ 

-*3 c ^^ *:5^-*J -*^ -*J -*^ -♦^-*i -*^ -*-»-»3 

5 .2 S.3 =-5^5 5 5 p ft3 ft 52 



?s >» 



>-. i. 






O ='>>0 O O O'^SSO CO O OO'S 

• - '-^ 5 - ."tf -tS -"S ~ c .-ti .12 .-S .12 -5 .-^ 1 J 



Q p:::;; ;= 



flO .^ 1-^ c3 rj 32 -.J 'S* .^ .♦a _ij ^ ^ "^ 

3 "§ .S 5" ^ 5 j£ - ■;£ 2 'X -^ -x a 

M H^ a: o «a X ^ ' ^ ~ : a 



•^ i S 



■^ ^ _ 

- ^ — 00 - 

CO 

00 



Q Sji.^._^S*-^o ^_ CO o g s - 
g -i? 5 s :i .S w? .3 '3 - > ^. T^ .2:3 



•3 S 5 '^ 13 S 



•2 g P^ 3 

'5 3 5-S 



fe. 



s- .-• 



is S "^ ^ UJ 5 t:^ " ' 



-S b ^ 



~ ^ 






c o 



1^ 



c;j.aos^^^-^ ji^ 



5'^ 



B 1030—21 BD 



:c> < pfi, 



242 



UNIVEESITT. 



a> 






























CO 






























-2 






























"o 




W 


« 




w 


f4 




W 


p4 




ft 




H - 


fd 


O 






































05 
O 












o 

e3 


o 










CO 


b 


■? 


1^ 


o 


>> 




05 ^' 


^ s 




"oS 




al 


"3 . 






^ 




O 




V( 




•^ -li 


O 


o 


>■ 


U !>, 






o 

CO 




-Ft 


o 

M 






Dyna 
Hydr 
Politi 


s 

o 

s 


Dyna 

Hydr 

Politi 

nom; 






























la" 




1 ^ 








1 >> • 


05 

< 










C« 




s 


o 


s 

^ 


1-4 
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■a 


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O 


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c 

+3 




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t— 1 


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6 






















o 

W 


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« 


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o 




>» 








•^ a 


>> 


s 


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o 


s 




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3 








1 


c 

HI 


Q 


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s 


s 






p 




m 


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: 








is. 
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a 
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3 

s 


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s 








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X! 


•<« 




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(3 

•a 






s 

a 


Is 






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3 

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6 

55 


1 


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ft 
i 

Ph 




o 
on 
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o 




> 

1 


a: 

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W 

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1 

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00 


a 

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a 

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c ■ 






1 


1" 

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c< 

1 






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s 




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n 


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o 


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ft 




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OEADnATES. 243 



»»»Qp)i^»;:=3 QH 



qoooc5ooes>» "SSq 

S S Q 5 ^,1p S ~ s ?>J3 
cs ^ qJ 



|3.'<^ = 'E. 



Q Q « ft l.|ls'i-"l^ %^'fi 

O -3 O ^ O -3 

'43 S ?» _ '-5 a _2 «i ^*3 s "3 ^ c .5 *3 i» 

< S <J fr^ < (Xi <j Q 



.M .4^ CO r"* OQ O 

■g .t2 S S 5 2 

^ Pi ^ 'S w ^ 






•3 fe; „ „ -5 e* 

•z; .— xs ^ c3 

§ :=• I S* ^ ^ 

a :2 i; o t- > 

ja -* ^ ._ ,s ~ 



« S ^ - ^ 



»^ 3 -S 



^. ^ ;= 5 



^ "3 -a 

!2: a ^ 



3 S S -^ j< 



•<a 


s 


Oi 


o 


"ci 


X4 




5 

ID 


CO 
GO 






at 




"s 




«« 




s 




■«3 






s 


a 




^ 








-<4 




'■5" 








^ 
^ 


H 


> 






H; 


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244 



UNIVBKSITT. 



CO 



Ol 



ft Q O W 



Q H ft H Q W 



-3 >. 

a t-i 



O 

"» c8 =« ^ 
•'i 17 •■- o < 



w 






<^ s 



■? 00 O 

c o .P 






W 



CO O C3 >s O 






§fi ft fi p R ft 



O Hi 



<J@ 






+= _-g C8 ^ *i ,0 ^ 4^ 



p fi 



pa 



wj^p 



c3 <a 



d3 S 
o 




















>PH 




1 


5 


s 


.•a 


o 


a 




•a 




fl 


1 




p 


CO 


.t; 
p 


3 




^ 
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3 






■ 


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; 


. 




. 


^ 



:zi 



O 
GO 



02 



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2 


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a 


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a 


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s 



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^ t^ M U) W 



GKADTJATB8. 245 



»PE)E^Qpi]P>qpq» 










2 ? o .2 -^3 S S' o J3 g> o S o - o 

^ 5-1 -^-.^ = P-t — i « 2., = a 





'S 




'tH 




•+i 


r'. 












o 


-« 


a 


^ 


g 




>c5 


a 






c 


o 
























-w 
























Q 


OS 


J!i 


c3 


s 


C 


s 


J3 






Q 


Q 








ct 


• 
















^ 




80 

■cS 


'a 


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: 














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3 




o 






. 


, 






a 
o 


a 


a 


o 




><4 
















ei 


•.- 


a 


e3 




,»* 


■r-t 






^ 


^ 


r^ 


>i 


i4 

1 


n3 

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s 


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^ 

& 


00 




1 


1 

a 


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1 


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i 


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a 


A 






% 


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% 




M 






4> 




s 


> 






o 


o 




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■g 


























w 


2 


;z; 


^ 


f2 


c3 




^ 






< 

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^ 



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a 



X 



Pi 



B 1030—21 BD* 



246 



UNIVEBSITT. 



O 


d o Q p4 q h q w e4 p 


07 
O 

o 


3 

Dynamics & 

Hydrostatics. 

Ditto ... 

Logic ct- Moral 

Philosophy. 

Ditto ... 

Ditto 

Dynamics & 
Hydrostatics. 
Ditto 

Analytical 
Geometry. 
Dynamics & 
Hydrostatics. 
Ditto 


2 

Analytical 
Geometry. 
Ditto ... 

History 

Analytical 
Geometry. 
Ditto ... 

Ditto ... 

Ditto 

Logic & Moral 
Philosophy . 
Ditto 

Analytical 
Geometry, 


1 

Political Eco- 
nomy. 

Optics & As- 
tronomy. 

Political Eco- 
nomy. 
Ditto 

Ditto 

Ditto 

Ditto ... 

Ditto 

Ditto ... 

Ditto ... 


4> 


.■t2 "^ ."S "" ."S 


S 


Bhat, Gopdl Anant • 

Bhdtavadekar, Vindyak Rdmchandra ... 
Contractor, Bamanji Phirozshdh 

Kabe, Gopdl Venkdji 

Kolatkar, Laksliuman Shivrdm 
Majdmunddr, Ishvarrdi Lakshraanrdi ... 

Modak, Jandrdan Bdldji 

Rdndde, Govind Krishna ... . ... 

Saydni, Ibrdhim Muhdmmad 

Talvalkar, Raghundth Bdlkrishna 



ttEADtrATSS. 247 



ft d ;4 H ft . Q K . ft B 







X 






j<: 


H 


ft 




ft 


K 





>> 



ft ft ft 



2 2 
J> ^ >J '^l > 



=^ 2 e 






•^ . : : -^ aj : 

rs ^ • >> • • h =J • ^ 

-S^— §2 So. 2^ 2" 

o s ?= V5 c >> "^a S "s 2 r*^ '■5 2 

a "^ ft <i a " <; err; < 

'M^ft ft >,%'5:^S ft a ft |=J3^ _»- 

1^ C: = o ft O 



oocooco _q 

ftftftftftfto (5 



i 

s 

> 


a 

J 
1 


S 


■3 


5 





CO 
00 

1-1 




> 

> 


» 


B 


^ 


m 









tS 


W 


-^ 


CJ 


•5 








^ 





d 




Oi 


iO 


tT 






-rt 










d 
^ 











248 



UNIVERSITY. 



9 












^" 












K 


K 


CO 


ft 


w 


d 


w 


W 


H 


WC^ 


O 










P^ 
















if 








If 






CO S g 


o 


<« o 


2 


3 


o 
-1^ 




=y o 


3 


33 






-►J 


t> a 


-t^ 




■+2 


o rs 








-S^ 


O P-l 


ft 


ft 


ft 


SPh 


¥ 


ft 


ftft 


m 
1 


Qffi 




J 








O 






o 






6 


































CO 


H 


■^-s 




W 














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o 


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o 


o 


o 


o 


o o 


'i? 


>,S 


i^ 


•^ f= 


£ 


-IJ 


V. 


^ 


•♦J 


■^ 4^ 
























CJ 


^§ 


gOP 


ft 


ft 


ft 


ft 


ft 


ftft 


CO 


Ph 


<1 




Ph 














c3 >, 


so 










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eS 




It 

1^ 2 








s| 




'3 Sc 


2 "rt ab" 




rH =8 § 


o 




o 

• i-H 

ft 


•■« a o 

gOft 


a § 


as 


ifferen 
& In 
Calcu 
istoiy 
ifferer 
& In 
Calcu 




^ 


O 


W 


< 




oww 


C 


KQ 










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d 
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a.^ 


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ft 


ft 


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tS 




1 

a 

o 

1 
1 

43" 

a 

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1 

ei 


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t 

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CB1DDATE3. 



249 



c; o a a a 



e a a 



a 




a Q ft Q « 



« ft o 



So 



Q 









J 3 -i^ 



Q .2 c 






Ill 



1^ 



Q Q Q P 



Q O 



W 



^ eS 



O S 



C3 ?■ |JL 

S 5 S 



5 W e; " '"' 



S 5S 



1= 5^ -P 



03 



^ 


a 


^ 


»^ 


eS 

J3 


T! 




^ 


S 


■^ 


•« 


02 




Ol 


■<i 






•<3 




^3 


a 


M 


«< 


•cS 


^ 


•^ 


&i 


-s 


-« 


>cS 


£h 


1 


02 





O 3 



•5 S 



CQ 






250 



UNIVERSITT. 



6 














H 










60 


p4 


Q 


w 


H 


p4 


P 


4^ 




W 


P 


w 


6 














<« 

W 












<« m 


^ 














■J3 CO 




c3 






-2 &. 




■ 














"S 60 - 


m 
o 


" ili"|s 


o 

p 


Is .2 
o (O 

o 


O 


o 

43 
43 

(5 






s 

43 


'HI 

sS Is 












O 












IS" 

j3 


■St 




-^b 
















CO 

n3 


« II 


b 


•J-S 


o 


S 


o 


>•- 




C 


5 


o 

43 


1 






':3 "^ 


p 


43 

p 


43 


Sp 




P 


P 


p 


o 








^^>.\ 














c2« 








o.a 




cS cS 




o ,a 


7? >> 




5 


o 
P 


o 

43 

p 


r^ O 


o 

43 

p 




"^t! p. 
3^ 


Si3 


o 

43 

p 


03 




-O 
















43 




O 3 






o 


o 


o 


o 


o 






o 


O to 


a 


,i^ 








43 


43 




d 


^ 


43 


" a 






















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^ 


a 

r/2 


Q 


p 


p 


P 


p 




3 


§ 

m 


p 












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-S : 




1 




> 








^ 






1 


1 






o 


-irf 














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s 


o 


a 


P 




>) 


U 
•<!t 

1 

1 
t-5 


2 

CO 

1 

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A 
La 

O 
1-3 




PQ 


O 


« 
T3 


15 


.a 
W 


t 

i 
t 

1 


60 

"Id 


d 

eS 
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O 

O 


1 

1 

60 
O 
1-3 




'5' 

cS 
1-5 

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a 


1 

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1 


.S 1 

> 

O 

o 

i 

1 



GEADrATES. 2ol 



Q 


r^* rv? 




r^ 


zc 




/*■" 




Ed 




H 








— ? "ri 


>> 




=5 

T. 


X 






"rt 


>» 


"3 

3^ 


n 


"s sf> 


c 




Ji 


i 


>~. 


X 

>. 








X 








— 


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r^ 




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c 




^^ 


a: 
o 

'i 

c 


II ^1 




o 


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P 




O 




o 




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o 

3 




g >i„ 


-3 


: 


"15 


>> 




■i 






6 


~ 






S c"-5 


tei 




s 

^ 


a, 


cj 


^ 






E^ 






4 


=^ = s 


- 3 


b 


30 


">» 


P 


$, 




.2 >> 




o 


c 


5r;F = ' 


^6 






^ 


C ■ 


o 


3 








p 










*s 








-u 




■^ 


-4J 


-u ." 




T. 


= 




X 












a 


C 


— "^ 




■z 


■tJ 




= 








- 






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— 




'X. 


- 




v: 








X 




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s I ^ 7 :: s- . 

<^-- ;; '^ -'- -4-3 -J- • 

^ S ^ 3 -^ - J^ t^ 

"S^^— ^^ — — -^ 00 



> i^; I 



X < 



"i -§ ^ "S -s 

S ;z; ^ S £ 



252 



UNIYEESITT. 



Q 






















tiC 






















r2 




















, 


'o 


P 


W 


ft 


Q 


M 




ft' 


f4 




X 


o 




















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00 


























CO 


g >, 










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c3 


>> : 




d8 s 


^t 






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<! 


as 






CO aJ fl 


OP-I 


o 
S 


o 
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s 






'-3 
Pi 


is M 

!\3 


to ' 


3m 


-2 
ft 




O 


tJ 






o 




O 




























o 
o 








: 






: 




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2* 


H 


















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a> 




02 


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o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


o 




•^ s 






-»2 


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-tj 




-»3 


+> 




>>o 


fO 


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■*j 




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•+3 




"m » 


1 


0-1 


« 


fi 


ft 


ft 




ft 


ft 




flC5 
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<«'■§ 








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o +3 








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o 


o 


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to >> 




Q 






3 

01 


ft 


ft 


ft^ 


s 


Dyna 
Hydr. 
Histo 




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ft 


'3 ^ 






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a ei 


C^ 




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CJ &) 


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M 


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5 




o 


5 







CO 3 

1-3 


Ph 


1 


a 


a 


ft 




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ft 


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ft 




ft 



43 

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> 

o 
C5 



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CQ 



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W 



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43 2 "3 



■GKADrATES. 253 



<1 

i d Q a fi o p H K a K s i^ 



o < aa o c- 



— < u 



p >3 a <: S^ ^ h o a <} 



^ § 



es >> : : !* >» 









_ = ~ >»o O o o o"t:go o ^5© 

-P OC.IJ .p *> ^J *3 >iO -t^ *a «CC«; 

?_^ •^C*J *> .ti .ii ^J ^ q) +» ^J :; -^S *i 

=^:3S3i5 0P P*CSp '5:-'^ 

£*a i, < ji"^ 



s -s 



.- ^ a: 
^q C .X 



a Q 



i4 — =^ ._. 

^ ^ i^' ^, •— J3 *» 



a> SI 



C3 O 1— I f^ ^ .u 1. 



J ^ > 

111 

._. — »-• 

•2, -rS O 

■ts ,:d »?: 

C !-i >< 

^ ■** »-< 



- a a ^ :i; i> u: u: -: S c: a 

E laSO— 22 BC 



254 



UNIVERSITT. 



oJ 














bo 














'o 




e4 


H W 


^ 


Q 


K 


















2'S 








2 ^ 




CO 


■-+3 tc 


amic. 
rosta 
ory 


^ 2 





=<3 


05 




SghH 






.2 


■5b?a 
1-3 


O 

IS" 






1^ : 
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<, JS X"^«Sx xx-w2 

;." •- — J2 ^ o o a s .- 

B 1030—22 Bu* 



258 



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260 



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262 



UNIVERSITY. 

























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264 



CNIVERSITT. 



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ft H P W (j^ W W 1^' H H ^t^ K H W W W «« W W C^ 

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GRADUATES. 265 



^^ 1 ^ . . M ^ . . M , 



H Sj^BS^S SS S 

o o>>oo2* o oo o 

o :cai:o:o &i -o :o:o: S 

K® fd § H &:^§ Kj WW w 

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c '^ c _ ■£ c « c -tj 3 "•♦J c '+3 3 '^ a 

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.— 00 X cc 'JT 'JC '.^ cc --• X .^ X '^ la --^ X X X .t^ » 
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W 



oSaQQQOdO^^-^WWSlzi^P^cncncn -< 



B 1030—23 BC 



266 



UNIVEESITY. 



O 



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a s a a a ^ a 

o o o o o £> o 

flflfl :: :ci -a 'S-s 

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^IS-rriilil^KiUsiiiJ 

3 §3-3 sb3 q q 5 « §:•- -« ^ S ^ 3 ft Q -S Q 3 




"C o o o o g'S o ^'ti o o fl'C o o o o S 'S 
03 .Th .t; rs . rt oj CO ^ 05 CO rs .Th to ao .T5 .t; . « . „ i» « • 3 

fiqqqqgcq§3flftqS3iqftqqSg1l 
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..:S9| g!^« 2¥> J|| |:3« frS ^-^.^^ 
•^j^ B-^ 3-^ 5; e-rH^ >>S 5-'^ s-^ ^-2 ?a3a< 



GKADUATES. 267 






>» ■ ^ 

g .-s . . .'3'3 . ^ • • • SIS 

o :g : : :.2 :-2 : : : Sg 

hJcs o-S ^ S"J«* 

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t« ceo 'C c *C o ® 'C c e a "n 

2 --.-■- .s X X I .- .- .~ X .t: .t: 55 «! 

-C Joraja: iJ y: doc 



v<-* ~* -^ -~ '^ 

^~1 1— 1 F-^ >^ I— I 



268 



UNIVERSITY. 



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GRADUATES. 277 

B. Sc 

1882. 

First C'lcu^. 

DdruvdU, Jamshedji Edalji F. G A 

Pass. 
Khot, Anant Venkiji E. 

1883. 

First Class. 

Deshmukh, Moreshvar Gopa] ... E. 

Gajjar, Tribhuvandiis Kalliandds E. 

Pass. 

Jayakar, Snndarrdo Gajdnan F. G. A, 

1884. 

Second Class. 

KdngA, Mancherji KAvasji E. 

Masani, Adarji Memosji ... ... ... ... F, G. A. 



LLB. 
1866. 

First Divisicm. 

* Edndde, Mahddev Govind, M.A L' 

t Wigle, Bdl Mangesh, M.A L. 

1867 

Second Division. 

Bedarkar, Khanderdo Chimanriio, B.A L. 

Kothdre, GirdharUl Dayaldas, B. A. ... L. 

1868. 

Second Division. 

Dalvi, Dindnath Atmardiu, M.A L. 

Mdrphatid, Nagind.13 Tulsidrs, B.A. L. 

Mehtd, Thdkurdds Atmaram, B.A L, 



* Passed also Honours in Law Examination, Class I. 
t Passed also Honours in Law Examination, Class II. 

B 1030—24 Ba 



278 UNIVEESITT. 

1869. 

Second Division. 

Kohiydr, Ratanshdli Erachshdh, B A. L. 

Pathak, Sh^purji Hormasji, M.A L. 

Saydni, Rahimtulah MuMuimad, M.A L 

1870. 

Second Division, 

Ddddchanji, Karshdsji Rastamji, M.A L. 

DesAi, AniMm SdkarMl, M.A L. ' 

Munshi, Mansukhldl Mugatldl, B.A,... L. 

NMkami, Ghanashdm Nilkant, B.A. ... ... ... L. 

Telang, Kdshin^th Trimbak, M.A L. 

Vik^ji, Frdmji Rastamji, B. A. L. 

1871. 

First Division. 

Apte, Mahddev Chimndji, B A L, 

DaMl, Jamshedji Ardesir, M A L. 

Lhurandhar, Sadashiv Vishvandth, B.A. ... 

Second Division. 

Bhdtavadekar, Gajdnan Krishna, B.A. L. 

Ddvlatjddd, ChandulAl Matimr^d^s, B.A L. 

Gddgil, Jandidan Sakhdram, B.A ... L. 

GMsvdU, Ardesir Frdmji, B.A L. 

Mankar, Ganpatrdo Amritrao, M.A L. 

Ndndvati, Mdnikji NasarvAnji, B.A L. 

Naiid.vati, Ndgardds Narottamdds,B.-A.. ... ... ... L. 

Pdrekh, Gokuldds KdMndds, B.A L. 

Patel, Rastamji MervAnji, M.A L. 

Taley^khdh, Mdueksh^h Jehdngiershdh, B.A L. 

1873. 

Second Division. 
Modi, Barjorji Edalji, M.A L. 

1874 

Second Division. 

Bhat, Chintdman Ndrslyan, B.A L. 

Deshmukb, Rdmchamlra Gop^llrdo, B.A. ... ... ... L. 

Khanddldviila, Navroji Dordbji, B.A, L. 



i-j 



GRADUATES . 279 

1875. 

Second DivlsloK. 

KothAre. Anandrao Krishnardo, B.A. L. 

Mar^the, Kashinath Bilkrishna, B.A. . . L. 

1876. 

Second Dlvinon. 

Athale, Yashvant VAsudev, M.A... . L. 

Bhinap, Gopiil Vinayak, B.A- L. 

Gokhale, Ramchandra Vishnn, B.A, ... ... ... L. 

Kher, Krishndji Niin-iyan, B.A. ... ... ... L. 

Pandit, V'inayak Mahkdev, B.A L, 

1877. 

Second Division. 

DhairyavAn, VAsudev KrishnarSo, B.A. ... ... ... L. 

Kirloskar, Ganesh Rdmchandra, iLA. ... L. 

Tipnis. Raghunith Shivram, R A ... ... I. 

1878. 

Second Division . 

Bhat, Hariram Uttamrim, B.A L. 

Inamdar, Venkatrtio Rnkhumangad, B.A. ... .. L. 

Kangi, Dinshah Pestanji, M.A. ... ... L. 

Tullu, iUoji Visudev, MA L. 

1879. 

Second Ditngiott. 



DeSa, Luis, B.A 

Toshi, Balvant Nirayan, B.A 

Toshi, Bhdskar Shridhar, B.A. 
Modi, Jehangier Edalji, B.A. 
Patvardhau, Viu^iyak Rdmchandra, B.A 



L. 

L. 
L. 
L. 

L. 



Paudval, Dvdrkan^th Sakharamji, B.A. ... . L. 

1880. 

Fir^ Division. 

Bhadbhade, Raghunath Gangildhar, B.A. ... ... L. 

Gadgil, Pdndorang Dhonddev, B.A. ... ... ... L. 



280 UNIVERSITY. 

Second Division, 

Ajinkya, Sitdndth Gopindth, B A. L. 

Bhdnddrkar, Shivrdm Vithal, B.A L. 

Bhdnddrkar, Vdsudev Gopdl, B.A. L. 

BhAtavadekar, Vishnu Krishna, B.A L. 

DalAl, TribhuvandAs Lakshmidds, B.A L. 

DeSouza, Luis J. E., B.A L. 

GAndhi, Jivdji Dinshdhji, B.A L. 

Huligol, Krishnardo MMhav, B. A. L. 

Jambusarvdla, Bejanji Mdnikji, B.A. ... L. 

Kdnitkar, Govind Vdsudev, B.A L. 

KAthavate, Manohar Vishnu, B.A. L. 

Kirtane, Keshav Vdman, B.A L. 

Ovalekar, MoreshvarNdrdyan, B.A. .,. ... ... L. 

Rdo, Ganpat Saddshiv, M.A L. 

Sdrangpdni, Krishndji Vindyak, BA. ... L. 

Tilak, BdlGangddhar, B.A. L. 

TuUu, GovindVdsudev, M.A L. 

Updsani, Shridhar Bdlkrishna, B.A L 

1881. 

First Division, 

Chanddvadkar, Ndrdyan Ganesh, B.A L. 

Khare, Ddji AMji, B.A ... L. 

Second Division, 

Dhruva, HariMl Harsadrdi, B.A L. 

Divekar, Balvant Abdji, B.A. ... ... L. 

Duncan, Thomas, M. A. ... L, 

Gimi, Rastamji Mancherji, B.A. ... ... ... ,.. L, 

Gole, Siddheshvar Bhdskar, B.A. ... ... ... ... L. 

Jog, Pralhdd Ndrdyan, B. A. L. 

Joshi, Sakhdrdin Vdsudev, B.A. ... ... ... ... L. 

Kangd, Fardunji Mdnikji, B.A L, 

Koparkar, Govind Bdlkrishna, B.A. ... ... ... L. 

Mudholkar, Rangndth Narsinha, B.A. ... ... ... L. 

Rdhurkar, Vdman Ndrdyan, B.A. ... ... ... ... L. 

Rele, Gangdrdm Bdpsoba, B. A ... ... L. 

Sethnd, Kavasji Bejanji, B.A L. 

Sethnd, Eastamji Dhanjibhai, B.A, ... ... ... L. 

Wdgle, Shivrdm Sitdram, B.A L. 



GBADUATIS. 



281 



1882. 

Second Dlvition. 

Bhigvat, Dattitraya Vishnu, B.A 
Dave, Kevalr^m Mdvji, B.A. 
Gokhale, Gopal Rdmchandra, B.A 
KdngJl, Sorabji M^nikji, M. A. 
Shahiiiii, Daydram Gidumal, B.A. 

1883. 

First Division. 
Dharamshi, Abdall^ Meher^i, B.A. 

Second Division. 
Cimi, Rustom K. E., B.A. 
Chavbal, Mahddev Bhaskar, B.A... 
Chitnis, Datt^traya Balvant, B.A. 
Gokhale, Vishvan^th Ballal, B.A. 
Kikii, Navroji Bebramji, B.A. 
Kdngd, Jamshedji Behrdmji, B.A. 
Mirajkar, R^ghavendra Shrinivas, B.A. 
Munshi, Motilal Mugatlal, B.A. ... 
Nagarkar, R^mchandra Ddji, B.A. 
Phdtak, Ndrayan Gopdl, B. A . 
Vakil, Rustam Bamanshih, B.A.... 
Vdnid, Hoshangji Barjorji, B.A. ... 
WadiAjFrdmji Rastamji, M.A. 

1884. 

Second Division. 

Akhund, AUiMuhimmad Hussanalli, B.A 

Dali, Raghunith Sakhardm, B.A. 

Joshi, Moro VishvanAth, B.A. 

Kdpadid, Ddmodar Manji, B.A 

Kirtikar, Jandrdan Sunderji, B.A. 
PAthak, PAndurang Shridhar, B. A. 

Sovani, Vindyak Krishna. B.A 

Tripdthi, Govardhanram Madhavrdm, B.A 
Vakil, Manchhashankar Jivanrdm, B.A... 



L. 
L, 

L. 
L. 
L 



L. 
L, 
L. 
L. 
L. 
L. 
L. 
L, 
L. 
L. 
L, 
L. 
L. 



L. 
L. 
L. 
L. 
L. 
L. 
L. 
L. 
L. 



M.D. 
1876- 

Kunte, Acnd Moreshvar, B.A., L.M. 
B1030-24BU* 



G. 



282 



UJJIYERSITT. 

LM. 
1862. 

Second Division. 

Ldmna, Nasarvdnji Jehdngierji G. 

Sanzgire, ShdntArdm Vithal G. 

Vikdji, Kaikhosru Rastamji ... ... G. 

*Barjorji Behrdmji G. 

1863. 

Second Division. 

DeRozario, Luis Philippe .. ... ... ... G. 

Rdvut, Sakhdrdm Arjun G. 

*Shiek, Abdul Karim G. 

1864. 

Second Division. 

DeSouza, Philip Clement G. 

Khori, Rastamji Nasarvdnji ... ,.. ... ... G. 

Vaidya, GopAl Shivrdm G. 

1865. 

First Division. 

Howell, John Alexander G. 

Nddirshdh, Rastamji Jamshedji G. 

Second Division, 

DeSouza, Pedro Jose Lucio ... G. 

Hakim, Sheik Sultdn ... ... ... ... G, 

Kothdre, Shdmrdo Jaganndth ... ... G. 

1866. 

First Class. 
Baptista, Paulo Maria ... G. 

1867. 

First Class. 

Goradya, Amidds Mauji G. 

Jayakar, Atmdrdm Saddshiv G . 

* Surname not known 



GRADUATES. 283 

186a 

First Class. 

Gonsalve^, Joao Francisco ... ... ... f^' 

Hakim, Abdxil Rahim .. < 

Second Clasg. 

Daphtare, Girdharlal Batanldl ... G. 

1869. 

First Class. 
Pereira, Mathias Francisco G. 

1871. 

First Class. 

Shribastam, Samplal Balakrdm ... (^, 

Second Class. 
Bhite, Balvant Gopdl <, 

1872. 

First Class. 

Be<lford,IEobert G. 

Shah.Tribhuvand^Motichand' G. 

Second Class. 

DaGama, Jeronimo Accacio... ... G. 

Kantak, Shant^rdm Viniyak .. G. 

Patel, Kisam Virji ... .„ ... ... . .. G. 

Valles, Domingos Braz ... ... ... G. 

1873. 

First Class. 

Masdni, Hormasji Diidibhdi G. 

Second Class. 

Xariman, TemuljiBhikdji ... . . G. 

Partojapye, MahMev Yashvant G. 

Shirvalkar, Trinibak Sakharim .. ... G. 



284 tJNIVKHSITT, 

1874. 

First Class. 

Bhdtavadekar, Bhdlchandra Krishna ... G. 

Desdi, Ganesh Rdmchandra . . . G. 

Second Class. 

DaCosta, Nicolao Salvador .. . G. 

DeSouza, Antonio Manoel ... ... ... ... ... G. 

Goddmbe, Yashvant Pdndurang _ ... G. 

Kdmat, Dharm4ji Ganesh ... ... ... ..." ... G. 

KhamMtd, Nasarvdnji Navroji G. 

Pereira, Joseph G. 

1875. 

First Class. 

Narimdn, Kaikhosru Sordbji G. 

Second Class, 

Antdo, John Alcantara ... G. 

Hakim, Abdul Ghdni G. 

N^ndvati, Rastamji Hormasji G. 

Nunes, Ignacio Domingos G. 

Saraiyd, Rdmdds Gang4dds G. 

Sulemini, Shainsudin Jivdbhdi G. 

1876. 

First Class, 

Bharuchd, Eastamji Pestanji G. 

Cooper, Kaikhosru Barjorji «•. G. 

Dalgado, Daniel G G. 

DeConceifao, Philip .. ^• 

M^kund, Mdnikji Dosdbhdi G. 

Sabnis, Dattu Ganesh "• 

Second Class. 

Damnid, Phirozshdh Jamshedji G. 

Gimi, Milnikji Mancherji G. 

Gomes, Dominic Anthony G. 

KAnddvALi, Dosdbhdi Barjorji G. 

Kdpadi.1, BejanjiDddAbhili G. 

Khambdtd, Jamshedji Dinshdh G. 

Pdthak, Krishnardo Gopdl G. 

Pinto, Luis Jose ^• 

PostvdU, Mancherji Sordbji G. 

Reporter, Mdnikji Edalji "• 



GRADUATES. 



oq; 



L.M. & S. 



1877. 

First Class. 



Cdmd, Ardesir Pestanji 
DeSouza . Joseph A. ... 
Jen-is, Henry... 



Second Class. 



DeCunha, John Thomas 
Devecha, Framji Ratanji 
D'Oliveira, Braz A. ... 
Lobo, Bellarmino 
Mehtd, Batukrdm Sobhdrdm 
Mistri, Dinshih Dorabji 
Miatri, Kdvasji Hormasji 



1878. 

First Class. 

Braganza, Bellarmino 
Dddina, Ratanji Rastamji ... 

DaUl, Thiikurdiis KikAbhai 

Desdi, Manildl Gangddds 
Doctor, Phirozshih Pilanji ... 
Frenchman, Edalji Palanji ... 
Kaji, Lallubhdi Bhag\-dndds 
Vaidya, Kuvarji Kivasji 
Vyds, Shivndth Rdmndth 
Munshif, Barjorji Sorabshdh 

Second Class. 

Appu, Hirjibhdi Jamshedji 

Bharucha, Phirozshdh Behr^mji .. 

Diruv^lii, Bamanji Frdmji 

Dias, Victorino 
Doctor, Ramldl Lallubhii ... 
Fonseca, Caetano 
Kolapurs'dlci, Jamshedji Frdmji 
Ndndvati, RUdbhdi MaganUl 
Pandit, Ratanbhadra ^lanibhadra.. 
SanjAnd, Kdvasji Kharshedji 
Sethnd, Erachshah Framji 



G. 

G. 
G. 
G. 
G. 
G, 
G. 
G. 
G. 



(t. 

G. 
G. 
G. 
G. 
G. 
G. 
G. 
G. 
G. 
G. 



286 



UNIVKRSlTr. 



1879. 



First Class. 

Cdmd, Rastamji Hormasji ... 
Deshmukh, MoreshvarGopdl 
Doctor, Dhanjibhili Barjorji 

Garde, Ganesh Krishna 

Gazdar, Sordbji Fardunji ... 
Jayakar, Vishvdsrdo Balaji ... 
Keldv^li, M^nikshdh Jamshedji ... 
Khot, Govind Venkaji 
Simoens, Joseph Auspicio ... 

Second Class. 

Bocarro, A. ... 

Damnia, Bhikiji Jivdji 
Dhurandhar, Krislinardo Vishvandth 
Gunderid, Chunildl Govardhandds ... 
Karanjid, Mervdnji Dhanjibhdi 
Mudliar, NdrAyan Vekatachelam ... 
Revitnd, Dddabhdi Kharshedji 
Talvalkar, Rdmchandra Gangddhar 
Tdrdpurvdld, Shdvakshdh Sordbji ... 

1880. 

First Class. 

Choksi, Dosdbhdi Ardesir ... 
Ddddchanji, Kdvasji Edalji ... 
Ddddchanji, Palanji Hormasji 
Ddji, Jehdngier Kharshedji ... 
Engineer, Kaikhosru Sordbji 
Gandevid, Mervdnji Navroji 
Gokhal6.Vithal Vishnu, M.A. 
Kharegdt, Mervdnji Pestanji 

Rozario, Michael Arthur 

Tukind, Edalji Kdvasji 
Wddid, Dhanjibhdi Rastamji 
Wddid, Jehdngier Pestanji 

Second Class. 

Broker, Vithaldds Manordds 
DeNazareth, Joaquim Vincent 
Lisboa, Patrociuio 
Prablidkar, Govindrao Bhdu 



G. 
G. 
G. 

(;. 
G. 
G. 
G. 
G. 
G. 



G. 
G. 
G. 
G. 
G. 
G. 
G. 
G. 
G. 



G. 
G. 
G. 

(i. 

(;. 

(;. 
(;. 



(;. 
(i. 



GEADOATES. 

1881. 

First Class. 

Banat, HormasjiEdalji ... ... ... ... ... G. 

BArii, Darashiih Honnasji It. 

Lildmvald, Jehangier Jamshedji ... . .. G. 

Master, Dinsbdh Bamanji .. G. 

Muldn, Phirozshah Pdlanji G. 

Patvardhan, Dhondo Appaji G, 

Umrigar, Nanabhai Rastamji ... . . ... ... G. 

Viegas, Accacio Gabriel ... . . G 

Second Class. 

Bhende, Kdshindth Krishna ... ... .. G. 

Boyce, Soi"^bji Riistamji ... ... ... ... . . G. 

ChhatraiJati, Xilkanth Davibliii G. 

Des4i, Chunildl Ghelabhdi' G. 

Dhume, Dtoiodar Raghundth ... .. G. 

Divechi, Framji Dorabji ... ... G. 

Gidha, Vindyakrdo Govind ... ... ... G. 

Joshi, Vithal Bdlkrishna ... ... ... G. 

KapadiA, Rastamji Jamshedji ... ... ... G. 

Matlan, Framji Edaiji ... ... ... . .. G. 

Mus, Framroz Ardesir ... ... ... . . ... G. 

>>'ddirshjih, Sorabji DosdbhAi ... ... ... G. 

K^nji, Ratanji Dor^bji ... ... ... G. 

Pascal, Sor^bji K^vasji ... ... .. G. 

Sirvai, Horinasji Jamshedji... ... ... ... ... G. 

Sirvai, HormasjiNasarvdnji ... ... . . .... G. 

1882. 

rir-it Class. 

Apte, Vishnu Gopdl ... ... ... ... G. 

Bonesetter, Fakirji Ratanji... G. 

Gandevi^, Navroji Bamanji... .. ... G. 

Kakd, Sor^bji Manikji ... ... ... ... ... G. 

Modi, Ardesir Dadabh^i G. 

Nan^vati, Behrdmji Honnasji G. 

Second Class. 

Coachman, Sor^bji Eatanji G. 

Dantra, Barjorji Honnasji ... ... ... .. ... G. 

DhArgalkar, Lakshuman Bachaji . ... G. 

Edal-Behrim, Dinshah Jivdji ... ... G, 



288 UNIVERSITY. 

Kdne, Saddshiv Vaman G. 

Motivdld, Dinshdh Hormasji G. 

ShirgAvkar, Vishnu Jaganndth ... ... ... ... G. 

Shrotf, Barjorji Sordbji ... ... ... G. 

V^chd, Eastamji Kharshedji G. 

1883. 

Second Division. 

Aquino, Thomas Hannibal ... G. 

Bharuchd, MervdnjiKuvarji G. 

Brown, Edwin Harold ... ... ... ... . . . G. 

Davlatjd.da, Surajldl Mathurddds G. 

DeMonte, Dominick A. ... ... ... G. 

Dixon, Govind Mulji... ... ... ... G. 

Kdji, ChhaganMl Gulabdds ... G. 

Kd,trak, Ndndbhdi Navroji G. 

Kutdr, Eastamji Pdlanji ... ... ... ... ... G. 

Mirzd, Jdf ar Kulibeg Fraidunbeg . . . ... G. 

Pinto, J. Orphino G. 

Pochd, Jamshedji Pochdji ... ... ... G. 

Poyntz, John William Walter ... ... G. 

Sukhid, N^darshdh Hormasji G. 

1884. 

First Division. 

Chokshi, Nasarvdnji Hormasji ... ... ... ... G. 

KhdndvdU, Tuljdrdm Chunirdm G. 

• Ldlkdkd, Kdvasji Kharshedji ... ... ... ... G. 

Nariman, Sorabji Kharshedji G. 

Shett, Meherjibhdi Rastamji G. 

Second Division. 

Achyutrdo, Pardkhi Shrinivds ... G. 

Banshdh, Nasarvdnji Frdmji ... G. 

Barve, Shridhar Sakhdram ... ... ... G. 

Bdtlivdld, Kdvasji Mothdbhdi G. 

Bhat, Maganldl Umidshankar ... ... ... ... G. 

Bhdtavadekar, Mahddev Hari G. 

Bocarro, John Eugene ... G. 

Bopardikar, Gangddhar Gopdl G. 

Dddarkar, Bhovdnishankar Bdlkrishna ... ... ... G. 

DeAttaides, Francis X G. 

Gordon, Herbert Leslie ... G. 

Kdmle, Keshav Gopdl G. 

Kdtrak, Dosdbhdi Hormasji G. 



GBADUATES. 289 



Laskari, Eastamji Xasarvinji ... G. 

Nariman, Pestanji Bhikdji G. 

Nicolson, Jijibhai Pestanji ... ... ... ... ... G. 

Nilkanth, AnubMi Mahipatr^m G. 

Patel, Dhanjibh^i Hirjibh^i G. 

Penti, Jehangier Hirjibh^i ... G. 

Santuk, Kharshedji Santukji G. 

Satpute, Narayan Raghnnath ... ... ... ... G. 

Spencer, Kaikhosru N^nabhdi G. 

Unvil^, Jamahedji Bhikiiji G. 

Velkar, Atm^ram Y^sudev G. 



LCE. 
1869- 

Second Class. 
Tilak, Gopdl Rdoji P.E. 

1870. 

Second Class. 

Adarkar, Anant Nar^iyan ... P.E. 

Bhat, Gangddhar Anant, M.A P.E. 

Desai, Khandubh^ Gul^bbhdi P.E. 

1871. 

Second Class. 

Ndgavkar, Abraham Samuel P.E, 

Oka, Ramchandra Govind, B^ P.E. 

1872. 

Second Class 

Joslii, NirSyan Babd ji P.E, 

Kirane, Gang^dhar R^mkrishna P.E. 

1873. 

First Classt 

Date, Ndr^yan Vindyak P.E. 

Godbole, Kashin^th Rdmchandra, B.A. P.E. 

B 1030—25 BV 



290 



UNIVERSITY. 



Second Class. 



Sine, B^l^ji Bdpuji, B.A. . 
Vajifddr, MdnikjiHormasji. 



^Bamanji Sordbji 



1874, 

First Class. 
Second Class. 



Bhadd, Nasarvdnji Dordbji ... 
Bhide, PrabhdJiar GangMhar 
Dhumatkar, Pundlik Ganesh 

Kingd, Hormasji Adarji 

Karve, Vdsudev Hard 

KhanddUvAU, Pestanji Dordbji ... 
VAslekar, Ndndji Ndrdy an 

1875. 

First Class. 

Chandanani, Pritamdds Parsumal... 
Daldl, Chunilil TarAchand .., 

Second Class. 

Modi, Ardesir K^vasji 

Pile, B^lkrishna Ndrdyan 

1876. 

I%rst Class. 

Nimmo, Edward Hope 

Tdrdpurv4U, Fardunji Kavarji, BJL. 

Williams, Arthur Henry 

Second CloM. 
D4mle, Jaganndth Vishnu ... 
Hindid, Durg&r^m GheUbhdi 
Kiiviahvar, Lallubhdi Dalpatriim . . . 

Mul6, EAmchandra BalUl 

Ndndvati. Ddyiibhdi Maganldl 
Sdthe, Dhondo SakhArdm 



Surname not known. 



GBADUATBS. 291 

1877. 

r%r8t Class. 

Pithak, Pestanji Hormaaji, B^. P.E 

Second Class, 

Bh^nddrkar, Ndrdyan Pdadurang P.E. 

Bhedvar, Kaikhosru Pestanji P.E. 

Desdi, Motibhai Vaghjibhdi P.E. 

Dhai-madhikdri, Bdlkrishna Gangddhar P.K 

Lavanival, Eknath Sakharam P.E. 

Modak, Anant Raghundth P.E, 

Nagarset, Vithaldas Narottamdas P.E- 

Phadke, Lakshuman Chintdman P.E. 

Bdnd, Rudarji Sundarji „. ...P.E, 

1878. 

Second Class. 

Bhdgvat, Sad^Mv Rimchandra P.E. 

Chhatre, Nilkanth Vinayak P.E, 

Chiplunkar, Mahddev Trimbak P.E. 

Desai, Vasanji Kallianji P.E. 

Keshkamat, Rdmchandra Anaut P.E. 

Eibeiro, C . Antonio P.E. 

Rodrigues, Joaquim P.E. 

Pass, 

Bamji, Shdpurji DMabhdi P.E. 

K^nitkar, Balkrishna Ganesh P.E. 

Mehta, Harivadanrdm Manirim P.E. 

Saraf, Venkatrdo Anant P.E. 

1879. 

First Class. 

Apte, Ganesh Krishna, B.A P.E, 

Second Class. 

Desai, Guldbbhdi Kanthadji P.E. 

Gurjar, Pindiirang Gopindth P.E. 

Kelkar, Vishnu Raghundth P.E. 

Muzumddr, Mdnekldl N arbherdm P.E. 



292 UNIVERSITY. 

Pass. 

Daldl, Jamshedji Jehdngier 

Dds, Dhamidhar 

Hajari, Dindndth ... 

Kalghatgi, Kxishnaji Gururdo ... 
Ldte, Vdsudev Pdndurang. . . 

Mehtd, Vithaldds ChimarSdl 

Mus, Ndndbhdi Ardesir ... 

Nddarshdh, Jamshedji Ddddbhdi 

Kagarkar, Vdman Ddji ... , 

Pdvri, Kharshedji Navroji 

Shetb, Bhukandds Itchhdrdm 

1880. 

First Class. 
Gdytonde, Gopdl Vishvambhar 

Second Class. 

Dudley , Charles Wiltshire 

Ghdrpure, Rdmchandra Govind 

Gokhale, Vithal Mahddev 

Hall, William 

Ribeiro, F. P. Victor 

Williamson, Alexander John 

Pass, 

Bhdnddre, Rdmchandra Bhikdji 

Ghdrpure, Ndrdyau Hari 

Pdthak, Prdnshankar Daydshankar ... 
Siddhe, Dinkar Ndrdyan 

1881. 

First Class. 

Bharuchd, Mdnikji Sheridrji 

Chakrabati, Bhutandth 

Second Class, 

Bilgi, Rudrdppd Virbasdppd 

Desdi, Vithal TAtid 

Gddgil, Anant Riimchandra 

Lele, Mahddev Vankatesh 

Moharir, Bdldji Gangddhar 

Spencer, Hirdji Ndndbhdi 

Sukthankar, Sitdrdm Vishnu 



GRADUATES. 293 

Pass. 

Kbandekar, Keshav Ganesh C.Sc. 

Engineer, Eaghnnjlth Makund ... ... C.Sc, 

Khandherid, Popatlal Dungarsi ... C.Sc. 

Ldlii, Kiasing Rdmsing ... C.Sc. 

Mehta, Vivdbhdi Haridds C.Sc- 

Modi, Maganlal Thdkordds C.Sc. 

Nadirshih, Ardesir Xavroji CSc. 

Bio, Kekob^d Honnasji C.Sc. 

1882. 

Second Class, 

Angal, Raoji Biburdo CSc 

Belani, Khimchand Ravji C.Sc 

Bogd, Dhanjibhai Eastamji C.Sc. 

Desai, Xdthdbhai Avichaldds C.Sc 

Ganu, Keshav Hari C.Sc 

Mhaakar, Shripat Vishnu C.Sc. 

Surveyor, Manikji Eatanji C.Sc, 

Pas*. 

Joshipard, Pranldl KahdndAs C.Sc 

Kdnga, Kdvasji Ddddbhdi C.Sc. 

Naik, Kasanji Eanchhodji C.Sc 

X4ik, Timdji Venkatesh C.Sc. 

Pandit, Paishurdm Vithal C.Sc 

Pavri, Bamanji Hormasji C.Sc 

Pavri, Dorabji Temulji ... C.Sc 

Trivedi, Bhagvdnji Ndgji C.Sc 

188a 

Iirst Class. 

Ahmadi, Ibrdhim Shaik Daud C.Sc, 

Second Class, 

Bhavalkar, Mdrtand Vdman C.Sc. 

Madan, Bastamji Hormasji C.Sc 

Pass. 

Alekar, Edmchandra Keshav C.Sc 

Bdmji, Mdnikji Kdvasji C.Sc 

Bhdnddre, Hari Bhikdji C.Sc. 

Daji, Sordbji Jamshedji C.Sc 

Daldl, Kilabhai Dulabhrdm C.Sc. 

Joshi, Ndrdyan Jandrdan C.Sc. 

Kdtrak Navroji Hormasji C.Sc. 

B 1030— 25 BU* 



294 UNIVEESITT. 

KAtre, Narsingi'^0 Krishnayd C.Sc. 

Kotvdl, Hormasji Jamshedji C.Sc. 

Mitra, Haripad C.Sc. 

Eishi, Gopdl Bdlkrishna C.Sc. 

Eowe, William F C.Sc. 

Mulligan, William George Tobias C.Sc. 

January, 1884' 
First Class. 

Viavesvaraiya, Mokshagundara C.Sc. 

Second Class. 

Dev, Yaman Ndrdyan C.Sc. 

Katre, Mangesh Eilo C.Sc. 

Shd,h, BhdiUl Purshottamdds C.Sc. 

Varneshiyiir, Sitdram Sambdsiv C.Sc. 

Pass. 

DaUl, Nasarvdnji Mancherji C.Sc. 

DAte, Vithal Bdlkrishna C.Sc. 

Garde, Ndr^yan Dattatraya C.Sc. 

Joshi, Moro Govind C.Sc. 

Sethnd, Kdvasji Bejanji C.Sc. 

Vyds, Gavrishankar Harjivandds C.Sc. 

March, 1884- 

Pass, 

Yatgiri, Subrdo Venkatesh C.Sc. 

UNDERGEADUATES. 

Ukdergraduates and others who have passed the 
First Examination for the Degree of B.A. 

1881. 

Pass. 

Mangalvedhekar, NArdyan Edghavendra T>. 

O'Grady, George Austin St-X. 

* Sahasrabudhe, Ndrdyan Ganesli D. 

Vajifddr, Jamshedji Merjibhdi St.X. 

1882. 

First Class. 
*Pddshdh, Barjorji Jdmdsji E. 

^ Passed the B. A. Examination of 1888. 



UJTDEP.GaADUiTES. 295 

Second Class. 

Edo, Paul Ganesh F.GA. 

Pass, 

Ddbholkar, GopAl Edmchpndra E. 

Devbhankar, Raghun^th Vdman D. 

Devdhar, MaheshvarXar^yan... St.X. 

Gobhdi, Manikji Kdvasji ... E. 

Gokhale, Rdmchandra Hari ... E. 

Joshi, Sakhiram Ganesh ... D. 

N4navati,Hormasji Adarji ... E. 

Pahl^jdni, Shivandas Ljilsing ... E. 

Patel, Biipuji Sorabji E. 

Randde, Tishvandth Balvant ... ... ... ••• ... D. 

Vakharkar, Bhdskar Lakshuman ... ... D. 

Yajnik, MMhavMlJaverilal ... ... E. 

188a 

Secotul Class. 

Angal, Balvant Edmchandra ... 

Bhagvat, Sakhdram Keshav ... 

Bhdnu, Chintdman Gangddhar ... 

Bhat, Mabddev Vdman 
Bhatavadekar, Ganpat Keshav... 

Ddrukhdndvdld, Mervdnji Pestanji 

Desdi, Guldbbbdi Vasanji 

Ezra, Reuben 

Gddgil, Sadashiv Bdpuji ... 

Gdndhi, Virchand Kaghavji 

Gokhale, Gopil Krishna ... 

Hardikar, Chintdman Krishna 

Kdnga, Pestanji Mdnikji ... 

Kan-e, Dhondo Keshav ... 

Mehtd, Dardshdh Bejanji ... 

Mehtd, Xaranji Kuvarji ... 

MouM, Sirdjudin Abdul Fattah 

Naik, Harichandra Sadashiv ... 

NimachvAla, Jehdngier Dordbji 

Padshdh, Pestanji Jamasji ... 

Pdtil, Go\'ind Appdji ... ... 

Sovani, Govind Krishndji .,. 

Thakore, Manilal Ajitrdi ... 

Warden, Behrdmji Hirjibhdi ... 

Pass. 

Adhyaru, Morirji Narayanji 

Apte, Chintdman Nardyan 



... D. 


... E. 


... D. 


... D. 


F.G.A. 


... K 


... E. 


... E. 


... D. 


... E. 


R.C.&D. 


... D. 


St-X. 


... E. 


St.X. 


... E. 


... E. 


St.X. 


... E. 


... E. 


... E. 


... E. 


... E. 


St.X. 


... E. 


... D. 



296 UNIVERSITY. 



Apte, MahMev Krishna 
B4kre, Vishnu Vin^yak 
B^lsekar, Manjdppd. Nilkanth . . . 
Betigiri, Svdmirdo Narhar 
Bhdte, Vithal Bdlkrishna 
Bodas, Lakshuman Chintdman... 
Chirmule, Vasudev Ganesh 
D4nge, Vishnu Ndrdyan 
Ddtdr, Hanumant Rdmrdo 
Desai, SdkarUl Chandulal 
Deshpdnde, Shankar Ganesh 
Dnydni, Harsukhrdi Trimbakrdi 
Dubdsh, Jehangier Phirozah^h 
Dugal, Bhdskar Rdmchandra 
GMgil, Vishnu Gangddhar 
Ghodd, Ganpatrai Mayashankar 
Gursing, Shivanmal Naumal . . . 
Hirdmdnek, Rastamji Mdnikji 
Jayakai', Anandrdo Ramchandra 
Joglekar, Ganesh Venkatesh ... 
Joshi, Narhar Bdlkrishna 
Kalsulkar, Trimbak Vithal 
Kamatnurkar, Ganesh Rdmchandra 
Kdnekar, Moreshvar Keshav . . . 
Kdnetkar, V^man Hari 
Karmarkar, Hari Bhikdji 
Kulkarni, Ekndth Subr^o 
Laskari, Hormasji Bdpuji 
Limaye, Purshottam Raghunath 
MAjgdvkar, Bdlkrishna Rango 
Majmuddr, Sardbhdi Villdbhdi 
Mandlik, Shivrdm Gangddhar 
Mangalvedhekar, Rdjerdo Vithal 
Mantri, Kdshindth Jandrdan 
Master, Manghershdh Bamanji 
Muvlankar, Vasudev Keshav ... 
Mehta, Dinshdh Fardunji 
Modak, Gopdl Trimbak ... 
Mule, Gangddhar Bdlkrishna ... 
Munshi, Kaikhosru Ardesir 
Nadgoudd, Nilkanth Anndrdo ... 
Kagarvdld, Jamshedji Navroji ... 
Ndtu, Vishnu Raghundth 
Nisdl, Shivrdm Ndrdyan 
Pandit, Rdoji Parshurdm 
Pardnjapye, Hari Rdmchandra... 
I'armdnand, Jaganndth Ndrdyan 
I'atvardhan, Gajanan Bhdskar 



... D. 


... E, 


F.G.A. 


... D. 


... E, 


... D. 


R.C. & D. 


... D. 


... D. 


... E. 


... D. 


... E. 


... E. 


... D. 


... D. 


... E. 


... E. 


... E, 


St. X. 


... D. 


... E. 


... D. 


... D. 


... D. 


B.C. &.E. 


R. C. 


R.C.&B. 


St. X. 


... D. 


... D. 


... D. 


... E. 


... E. 


... E. 


St. X. 


St. X. 


... E. 


... E. 


... E. 


St. X. 


... E. 


... D. 


... D. 


... D. 


... E. 


... D. 


... E. 


... P. 



XrSDEBGEADTJATES. 



•297 



Patvardhan, Ganesli Viniyak 
Patvardhan, Madhav Naraj'an 
Patvardhan, Raghun^th Krishna 
Patel, Dorabji Manikji 
Patel, Kharshedji Soribji 
Phadnis, Hanmant Sheshgir 
Pleader, Ardesir Nasarvinji 
Ran^, Fi4mji Ardesir 
Rdsinkar, Vishnu Krishna 
Rele, Shantaram Ganesh 
Sabnis, Nar^yan Ghanashdm 
Sethnd, Ddr^hdh Sh^pnrji 
Shengarpavdr, NJlr^yan Snbdji 
Surveyor, Nasarvtoji Fakirji 
Tand, Mordrji Anandji ... 
Valevelkar, Pandurang Bdbur^o 
Vargharkar, Jacob Bipuji 
Varlikar, Moreshvar R^oji 
Vijayakar, Dinkar Khanderdo 
Vy^s, Righavji Jayakrishna 
Z^te, Mah^dev Rangnith 



Undergraduates and others who have passed the 
First Examination for the Degree of B.Sc. 









D. 






D. 




; T.G.A. 




F.G.A. 






E. 






E. 




'. St 


X. 




St 


X. 

E. 




St. 


X. 

K 








D. 








D, 








E. 








E. 








E. 








E. 




; F.GJl. 




St. 


X. 

E. 




_ 


F.G.A. 



1880. 

Second Class. 



Marzban, Marzb^n Mancharji 
Pandit, Harilal Mulshankar 



E. 
E. 



1883. 

Second Class. 
Rao, Karpur Shrinivasrdo 

Pass. 
Parvati, Ramr^o K. .» 



... C. Sc. 



.. C. So. 



Undergraduates and others who have passed th« 
First Examination in Arts. 



1861. 



Bdl, Krishndji Bipnji ... 
Pami^and, Ndrdyan MahMev 



298 UNIVEKSITY, 

1862. 

Mayadev, TrimbakrJlo Bdpuji E. 

1863, 

* Barzorji, Kharshedji D. 

1864. 

Devbhdnkar, Ndrdyan Vdman ... D. 

Dhairyav^n, Keshav Vindyak D. 

Mistri, Pdlanji Adarji ... E. 

Sodd, TulsidAs Devidds E. 

Tdvernv^ld, Sordbji Mancherji E. 

1865, March. 

* Govind^s, Varjivandds E. 

1865, December. 

Angri^, Jaisingrdo Esji D. 

Chichgar, Hormasji Mancherji E. 

Dave, Revashankar Tripurashankar ... ... ... ... E. 

KhambAM, NasarvAiiji Navroji F.G.A. & E. 

*Dvirktodth Eighob^ D. 

1866. 

Aitken, Benjamin F.G.A. 

Boyce, Pestanji Edalji E. 

Britto, Julius Lucas ... ... F.G.A. 

Gunderid, M^nekldl Gordhandda E. 

Patvardhan, Vishnu GopJll D. 

1867. 

Kolatkar, Vdman Mahddev E. 

Modi, Barzorji Rastamji ... ... E. 

MuU, Fardunji Kavasji E. 

Ndnavati, DdddbhAi Nasarvduji E. 

Patel, Nasarvdnji Hirjibhai ... ... E. 

Tilak, Narhar Purshottam D, 

Vaidya, Vdsudev Hari E. 

1868. 

Bhide, Lakshuman Vishnu D. 

Chitale, Mahddev Bdlkrishua D. 

Ddvar, Jehdugier Edalji E. 

* Surname not known. 



i 



UNDEEGRADTJATE5. 299 

Dave, Bhamishankar NArdyanshankar E. 

Des^i, Nitchitbhdi Muntrji E. 

Deshmukh, Ganesh DadAji ... D. 

Dikshit, Chhabilram Dolatram E. 

Fernandez, Edward Elias J). 

Javeri, Navanidhlal Go\4ndlJll ... E. 

Kirtikar, KiuobA Ranchhoddds E. & F. G.A. 

M^dan, Jamshedji Fardunji ... ... E. 

Mavlankar, Krishnardo Narsopant ... ... E. 

Mistri, KAvasji Mancherji ... ... D. 

Modak, BalAji Prabhikar D. 

Modi, Dinshdh Sorabji E. 

Modi, Kdvasji Edalji E. 

Pandit, Sitdrdm NarJiyan ... E. 

Phatak, Shrikrishna Bdpu ... D. 

Katn^gar, Nasarvtoji Jamshedji ... ... E. 

Sambre, Ganesh Raghundth ... ... D. 

Soman, SitArim Gopdl ... ... ... ... ... ... E. 

Vimdvdld. Maganbhiii Kasturchand ... E. 

Wlgle, Hari Bhikaji E. 

1869. 

Athale, Bhikdev Vdsudev E. 

Bakhle, Ramchandra Ganesh ... D. 

Bhangdvkar, KashinAth Ndrdyan ... ... ... ... E, 

Bhat, Nilkanth Nardyan... ... D. 

Chhatre, Atmdrdm Moreshvar ... ... ... E. 

DaMl, Dalpatram Vithaldds ... E. 

Desdi, Savaildl GovindrJlm E. 

Dev, KrishnAji Siddheshvar .. ... ... ... ... D. 

Dhulekar, Damodar Bdlkrishna... ... ... ... ... D, 

Hatvahie, Shankar Ramchandra ... ... D. 

Joshi, BAMji Nflriiyan .. E. 

MehtA, Valabhram VajerJlm E. 

Pdrikh, Lallubbdi Priinvalabh E. 

Pdthak, Anant Ndrdyan ... ... E 

Shroff, Edalji Sordbji E. 

1870. 

BdmboatvdlA, Sordbji Adarji E 

Bdtlivdld, Edalji Sordbji e'. 

*Chintamanipethkar, Pdndurang Venkatesh ... D. 

Dik^, Rdmchandra Chintdman ... ... D, 

GMgil, Krishndji Parshurd,m D_ 

Ganpule, Ndrdyan Vindyak ... jy_ 

Gokhale, Ganesh Kdshindth D. 



♦Passed the B.A. Examination ol 1S75. 



300 UNIVERSITY, 

Kingd, Sor^bji Pestanji ... j; 

K^padid, Jagjivan Bhavdnishankar jj 

Kohiydr, JehdngiershAh ErachshAb ... '" g' 

Kutdr, Kharshedji Rastamji ... ... E, 

Pdnandikar, Gopdl Venkatesh ... .. ... F.G.A. & E. 

Pandit, Hari Mddha%' E. 

Patel, Behrdmji Bamanji E 

Sdthe, MaMdev Anant ... E. 

Vaidya, Rdmchandra Jandrdan . . E. 

Ved, Dulabji Dharamshi '] ^ 

1871, 

BhdjivdU, Pestanji Kharshedji E^ 

Chiplunkar, Sitdrdm Hari d' 

Cooper, Ddddbhdi Hormasji E^ 

*Ddmle, Krishndji Hari... E. 

Hakim, Muhammad Hussein E. 

J oglekar, Vishnu Krishna J). 

Kdle, Ndndbhdi Saddnand ... E. 

Khamb<itd, Pestanji Aspandidrji E. 

Mdlpekar, Ndrdyan Rdmchandra E. 

Mudholkar, Shrinivds Narsinh D. 

Sule, Sitdrdm Bhagvant E. 

1872. 

Abhyankar, Vithal Trimbak ., D, 

Asii'kar, Vishnu Mahipat E. 

Bhavandni, Dolatrdm Suratsing E. 

Chiplunkar, Mahddev Trimbak D. 

Gadre, Gangddhar Pdndurang D. 

Gothaskar, Sakhdrdm Pdndurang E. 

Mdvlankar, Vdman Keshav ... E. 

Pat vardhan, Kdmchandra Vishvandth D . 

1873. 

Anikhindikar, Sambhu Chanddppd D. 

Apte, Krishndji Balldl F.G.A. 

Apte, yhankar Rdoji ... D, 

Arjdni, Mdnikji Ddddbhdi E. 

Atre, Eango Bdlkrishna D. 

Bdpat, Vdsudev Saddshiv E. 

Belsare, Malhari Bhikdji E. 

Bhdte, Saddshiv Bdlkrishna E . 

Daldl, Mdnikji Nasarvdnji E. 

:* Passed the B.A. Examination of 1875. 



rXDERGBADUATES. 



301 



DAnde, Keshav Gorind 

DesAi, DolatrAi Sarbhai 

Devnalkar, Bhiku Raghob^ 

Gore, Nirdyan ShivrAm 

Kale, Gangddhar Hari 

Keily, Robert 

Kelkar, Pushottam Gopdl 
Kelkar, Vishnu Raghunath 
Lokurkar, Svamirdo Rdghavendra 

Lyons, "William Robert 

Kemrkar, Govind Xilkanth 
Patel, Rastamji Dhanjibh^ 

1874. 

Bhamchd, Sheriarji Daddbhdi 
Bidi, ShrinivAs Jivaji ... 
Corkery, William Alfred 
Dhairyavin, Raghundth DTdrkdnith 
Gokhale, Vishnu Narayan 
Gordon, Robert Lish 
Heblikar, Bh4skarrdo Rtoichandra 
Jamsetji, Kdvasji Kharshedji ... 

Jervis, Alfred tkimuel 

Kiji, BdlkisandAs Brijbhukandds 
Kdle, Xiriiyan Ramchandra ... 
Kamldpurkar, Shriniv^s Svdmirdo 
Khambata, DinshAh Do&ibhii 
Kher, Sitdrdm Ndrdyan ... 
Khot, Ndrdyan Venkdji ... 
Lele, Kdshindth Krishna 
Mandlik, Dhondo Gangadhar 
Manghirmalldni, Hasram Hotchand 
Mirzd, Kaliehkhdn Fraidunbeg 
Mudliar, Damodar Vizidrangam 
Mnlgavkar, Vinayak Ndrdyan .. 
Nabar, Vdsudev Shiv^ji ... 
Xichhure, Ganesh Anant 
Oka, Krishndji Govind ... 
Padvekar, Vishnu Sakhirdm 
Panhalkar, Rdmchandra Abdji 
PArikh, Chhotalal DurgArdm 
Patvardhan, Mahadev Vithal 
Purandhare, Khanderao Vithal 
Renavikar, .Anant Apdji ... 
Sett, Motichand Udhavji 
Snkathankar, Sitdrdm Vishnu , 

B 1030—26 BU 



D. 


E. 


F.G.A. 


D. 


D. 


stx. 


E. 


D. 


D. 


Stx. 


E. 


E. 


E. 


D. 


E. 


Stx. 


F.G.A. 


E. 


D. 


E. & St X. 


E. & St. X. 


E, 


E, 


D. 


E. 


D. 


E.G. A. 


D. 


E. & F. G. A. 


E, 


E. 


D. 


E. & St X. 


E. 


D. 


... D. 


Stx. 


E. 


E. 


D. 


D. 


D. 


E. 


Stx. 



302 



UNIVEESITT. 



Tarkhad, Shrinivds DMobA 


St.X. 


*Abdulali, Moizuddin Jivdbhdi 


E. 


1875. 




BMshdh, Kdvasji Jdmdsji 


E. 


Chavkar, Vin^yak Balvant 


D. 


Chindi, Bejanji Sordbji 


D. 


DAMr, Sitdrdm Rdoji 


E. 


Deshpdnde, BhikAji Anandrdo 


E. & F. G.A. 


Dharddhar, Vasant Lakshuman 


St.X. 


Dhavle, Govind Moreshvar 


D. 


Dhond, Jagamidth Krishna 


E. 


Gokhale, Vithal Mahadev 


E. 


Gondhal6kar, Rdmchandra Mahddev ... 


D. 


Hirdnd, Dosabhdi Mervdnji 


F.G.A. &.E. 


Jones, John Hugh 


E. 


Joshi, Lakshuman Jandrdan 


F.G.A. &E. 


Kavmudid, Manildl Sevakrdm ... 


E. 


Kerur, Bdbdji Yalgurd 


D. 


Ldlvdni, Lildrdm Vatanmal 


E. 


Lavji, Ardesir Eatanji 


... E. 


Mclnerny, James 


stx. 


Paithankar, Krishndji Malhdr 


D. 


Pandid, Dolatrdm Kirpdrdm 


E. 


Parulekar, Shivrdm Hari 


E. 


Pdthak, Navroji Hormasji 


E. 


Pdthak, Sordbji Kaikhosru 


E. 


Pathdre,Kdshmdth Jandrdan 


E. 


Pat vardhan, Hari Rdmchandra 


E. 


Pdvgi , Ndrdyan Bhavdnrdo 


E. 


Pereira, Conrad R. 


St.X. 


Samshi, Anant Venkatesh 


E. 


Sdtpute, Ndrdyan Kaghundth 


E. 


1876. 




Alimchanddni, Davlatrdm Jethmal 


E. 


Ghaisds, Keshav Vishnu 


E. 


Jalgdvkar, Khando Shdmrdo 


D. 


Karmarkar, Hari Ganesh 


D. 


Malkdni, Shdsanmal Pribdds 


E. 


Manerikar, Yashvant Purshottam 


E. 


Pardnjapye, Bdldji Rdmchandra 


E. 


Pinto, Peter Manuel 


D 



" Surname not known. 



U>T)ERGEADUATES. 



303 



1877. 

Pass. 

Athale, Padm4kar D^modar 
Bhandire, SadAnand Trimbak ... 
Gavdnkar, Lakshuman Righobi... 
Kdtrak, Hormasji Shdpurji 
Kelkar, Saddshiv Ganesh 

•Kiilkami, Baldji Hari , 

O'Sullivan, James John 

Padamji, Sordbji Pestanji 
Pandit, Nirdyan Bhdskar... 
Purdni, Balkrishna Narbheram ... 
Sntaria, Lallubhdi Mathurbhai ... 
Vyas, Hargorind Harindrdyan ... 
Zuzarte, Ajinaro Andre ... 

1878. 

Pass. 

Anklesarid, Bamanshah Kharshedji 
Buch, Bhupatrai Daydlji ... 
Chavbal, Mahddev Sitardm 
Datir, Shambhu Shankar 
*Ddte, Krishndji Siddheshvar ... 

Gracias, Pascal 

Joshipard, Prdnldl Kdhdndds 
Kdtrak, Mdnikji Shdpurji 
Majmudar, Govindlal Bdpdldl ... 
Rdngnekar, Ndrdyan Atmdram 

1879. 

Secoiul Class. 



... E. 
... E. 
... E. 
F.G.A. 
... E. 
... E. 
St.X. 
... D. 
... E. 
... E. 
... E. 
... E. 
E. &. St. X. 



... E. 
... E. 
... E. 
... D. 
... D. 
St.X. 
... E. 
F.G.A. 
... E. 
... E. 



Godbode, Saddshiv Mahdddji 


E. 


Pereira, Frank Charles 


St.X. 


Pa-iS. 




Aiken, John Charles 


D. 


Broker, Ramdas ChhabildAs 


E. 


Daru, Harildl Tuljaram 


E. 


Ghasvdld, Sordbji Edalji.. 


E. 


Jahagirddr, Hanumant Raghavendra 


D. 


Javeri, Prdnldl Dvdrkadds 


E 


Kdngd, Nasarvanji Kavasji 


St.X. 


Khambdtd, Sordbji Kdvasji 


E. 


Khdndekar, Gopdl Rdmchandra 


F.G.A. & E 


" Passc-d the B.A. Examination of 1533. 





804 



UNIVERSITY. 



Khare, Bdpu AMji ... 

Kirtikar, Sitdr^m Biilkrislina 

Mehtd., Sdmaldas ChhaganlAl 

Ndik, Ndgarji DdyflbhA 

Petit, Bamanji Dinshdhji... 

Philtak, Shripat Bdlkrishna 

Sdmant, Hari Rdrnkrishna 

Shiikla, Ndrdyaa Gangadhar ... 
Vijayakar, Yashvantrdo Khanderdo ... 

1880, April 

Second Class. 
Bahddurji, Kaikhorsu Nasarvdnji 

Pass. 

AUbless, Navroji DAddbhdi 

Bhdve, Purshottam Moreshvar 

DaMl, MotiMl Gangddds... 

Ddte, BdUji Saddshiv ... 

Desdi, Khushdlbhdi Kanchhodji ... 

Desdi, Sadgun Desdibhdi . . . 

Dhume, Anandrdo Eaghundth ... 
Doctor, Rustim Dosdbhdi 
Godbole, Rdmchandra Jaganndth 
.Jayakar, Ishvarchandra Rdmchandra 
Kalburgi, Virdppd Rachdppd 
Nddgir, Narsingrdo Ganesh 
Nddkarni, Mabddev Gangddhar 
Ndzar, Atmdrdm Hirdldl . . . 
Pai, Dattdrdm Vishvandth 
Sahasrabudhe, Vdsudev Ganesh 

Sdugle, Anant Mdruti ... 

Syed, Achartldl Jivanldl .. 

Trivedi, Trikamldl Ddmodar 

Vakil, Shdpurji Jehdngier 
Vdchd, Dordbji Hirjibhdi 
Vijayakar, Ndnuji Harischandra 



E 



... D. 
... E 
... E. 
... E. 
St.X. 
... D. 
RG.A. 
... D. 
... E. 



... St.X. 

E. & St.X. 
E.G. A. 
... E. 
... D. 

G.C. 
F.G.A. 
St. X. 
... E. 
... D. 

St.X. 
... D 
... D 
... E 
... E 

St.X 
F.G.A" 
F.G.A' 

G.C. 
& F.G.A. 
F.G.A. 
... E. 
... E. 



Undergraduates and others who have passed the 
Previous Examination. 

1880, December. 
Second Class. 



Arkdtkar, Shankar Balvantrdo 
Bhardi, Hanmant Rdmchandra 



rXDEBGBADUATES. 30' 

Bohor^, MansukiJ^ Devchand 

Dias, Erasmo Xavier 

Pandit, Dattatraya Moreshvar 

P^tankar, Parshuram Nikriyan 

Poredi, Sayaji ShivAji 

W%le, Bhau Mangesh 

Pass. 

AnandkaT, Yashvant Kilkanth ... 

Bakshi, Venkat R^ghavendra 

Bh^jiv^M, Manikji Limji 

Bhatkhande, Vishnu Nar^yan 

ChAndekar, Vdsndev Vithal ... 

Dharddhar, Ramchandra lUghobd 

Godbole, Rdmchandra Ball^ 

Jayavant, Eamchandra BhsUikar 

Joglekar, Keshav Etoichandra.. 

Joshi, Mahddev Dinkar .. 

Ktegk, Pestanji Kavasji 

Khand^vald, Bhnkand^ ChnniUl 

Khot, Krishnaji Venk^ji 

Modi, Kalliandjls Keshavd^ 

Moghe, Gangadhar Ndrfyan 

Ximonkar, Mahadev R^mchandra 

Panthaki, Kaikhosru Kekobiid 

Parchure. S^^hiv Gopdl 

Pochd, Ardesir Bdpaji 

Sanzgire, JagannAth Sundarr^ ... 

Sheth, Sarabhai Maganbhdi 

Sut^ri^, Javerbhcii Garbadbh^ 

Todankar, R^mchandra Bhigoji 

Vaidya, Mahadev Parshnrdra 

Vijayakar, Shripat Khanderto ... 

TV^le, GanpatrJlo Raghunith 

1881. 

Second Class. 

Arte, Bh^karEimchandra ... E.G. A. 

Sabnis, Rimchandra Ghanashim ... ... ... St. X. 

SakalitvAl^ Jamshedji Edalji ... ... E. 

Pass. 

BdmboatvAli, IWddbhAi Adarji E. 

Bandji, Sorabji Shjivakshdh ... F.G.A. 

BhataTadekar. Purehottam Hari ... ... D. 

DaUl, ChunildlJivandils ... F.G.A. 

B 1030—26 Btr* 



... G.C.&E. 


St.X. 


D. 


D. 


D. 


...St.X. &E. 


E. 


F.G.A. 


E. 


E. 


E. 


E. 


D 


E. 


D. 


D. 


St.X. 


E 


... F.G.A. 


E. 


F.G.A. 


E. 


E. 


D. 


E. 


E. 


G. C. & St. X. 


E. &. F. G.A. 


F.G.A. 


D. 


E. 


St. X. 



306 UNIVERSITY. 

DesAi, Amidhar Ranchhodji G.C. 

Dhurandhar, Gajdnan Vishvandth ... ... ... ...R.C. 

Fazhyder, Ali Asgar bin HAji Hassan E. 

GMgil, Parshurdm Hari.. ... ... ... ... ... D, 

Joshi, Purshottam Nilkanth F.G.A. 

Kdle, Vishnu Shripat ... ... ... ... D. 

Lele, Gangddhar Vdman ... ... ... ... D. 

Mehtd, Rastamji Mervdnji ... .. ... ... F.G.A. 

Ozd, Mdnshankar Parmdnandds E. 

Pddhye, Damodar Ganesh ... ... ... ... ... E. 

Pandit, Harisukhrdm Panditram E. 

Pandit, Atmdrdm Vishnu ... ... St. X . 

Parvatikar, Rdmchandra Krishna D. 

Pdthak, Rastamji Hormasji ... ... ... ... ... E. 

Patel, Dordbji Mdnikji F.G.A. 

Patvardhan, RAmchandra Trimbak E. 

Sapre, Vishnu Vinayak ... ... ... ... ... F.G.A. 

Shende, Ganesh Raghuuclth ... ... ... ... F.G.A, 

TejAni, Muhammad H^san ... E. 

1882. 

Second Class, 

Doctor, Shdpurji Barjorji E. 

Munshi, Guldm Muhdmmad Bdvdmid ... E. 

Parchure, Vindyak NArdyan D, 

Yaishnav, Anandr^O Dvdrkddda B.C. & G.C. 

Pass. 

Angal, Balvant Rdmchandra ... ... ... D. 

Atre, Bdlkrishna Narhar ... ... ... D. 

Bilpat, Dattdtraya SakhArdm D. 

Bharuchd, Behrdmji Phirozeshdh ... ... ... ... D. 

Cokimbavdld, Rastamji Kjlvasji ... ... ... St.X. 

Desdi, Naginbhdi Santukbhsii B.C. 

Devdhar, Sitdrdm Ganesh ... ... ... D, 

Devrukhakar, Ndrdyan Saddshiv St.X. 

Engineer, Hirjibhdi Dinshdhji ... St.X. 

Jagde, Ganesh Balvant ... ... ... ... ... ... D. 

Jdvadekar, Dattdtraya Jaganndth R.C. 

Javeri, Krishuadds Vishnudds D. 

Jayavant, Bhdskar Lakshuman E. 

Joglekar, Lakshuman Ndrdyan D. 

Khiinsode, Ambddds Ravji E. 

Madan, Sordbji Edalji St.X. 

Master, Sdvakshdh Rastamji E. 



rSDEEGBADUATES. 



307 



Mehtd, LallnbMi Samaldis 

MehtJl, Mancherji Fardunji 

Mehtd, Navanidhrai flarjivand^ 

Modi, Jekisandiis Murardds 

Moghe, Vishnu Balvant 

Mudivedkar, ShrinivAs Rajerdo 

Oka, Gopinath Vindyak 

Pandit, Bhagvantrdm Narbherdm 

Parvate, Shridhar Balvant 

PradhAn, Kilshinath BaMji 

Sahasrabndhe, Ganesh Balvant 
SJlmant, Namdev Vithal . . . 

Sathe, Shankar Keshav ... 

Sithaye, Shridhar Kara jan 

Shah, Mahdsukh Narsinhdiis 

Shdstri, Jametrdm Gavrishankar 

Sutdrid, Chhot^al Chunilal 

Tarkhad, R^mchandra Atm^Am 

T&t&, Edalji Pestanji 

Tikle, Natu Shrikrishna 

Trivedi, Tanmanshankar Ratanshankar 

Tnpe, Go^■ind Balvant 

Vdknis, Dinkar Hai-i 

Velankar, Rtaichandra Hari 

Wadia, Lavji Mervanji 



E. 
St. X. 
.. E. 

St.X, 

..R.C. 

..B.C. 

F.G.A. 

.B.C. 

. D. 

. E. 

. D. 

. E. 

. D. 

. D. 

G.C. 
B.C. & G.C. 

.B.C. 
St. X. 
.. E. 
.. D. 
..B.C. 
F.G.A, 
.. D. 

St.X. 
E. 



1883. 



Second Class, 



Advdni, Hirslnand Khemsing . 
Bakshi, Govind Bajaji 
Bandji, Frimji Kdvasji ... 
Bhadkanikar, Hari MahMev 
Bhardd, Bhikaji Dorabji ... 
Bhid^, Raoji Janardan ... 
Ddte, Nardyan Kashindth 
Desdi, GuUbrdi Govindram 
Hanson, Charles Maurice 
Javeri, Mathrddds Rdmchand .. 
Joshi, Chintiiman Hari ... 
Koydji, Koydji Nasarvanji 
Pdtkar, Diimodar Raghundth 
Purdnik, Shankar Vishnu 
Reporter, Edalji Darash^ 
Sdne, Venkdji Moreshvar... 
Surveyor, Kharshedi Nasarvdnji 



E. 

D. 

E. 

D. 

E. 

D. 

D. 

E. 

D. 

E, 

E. 

E. 

D. 

E. 

E. 
...R.C. 
F.G,A: 



308 UNIVERSITY. 



Pass. 



Abhy^nkar, Sakliardm Vishnu ... ... ... E. 

Advdni, Himatsing Gaj sing E. 

A khun d, GhiiUm Muhammad Ghuldm Alii E. 

Alekar, Gopdl Bapuji ... .. .. ...B.C. 

Argikar, Lakshuman Bhimrdo ...R,C. 

Athale, Ganesh Vishnu ... ... ... ... ... F.G.A. 

Atre, Hanumant Bdpurdo ... ... D. 

Bakshi, Chinubhai Madhubhdi G.C. 

Bdpat, Gopdl Vdman ... ... ... E. 

BApat, MahMev Sakhjlrdm ... ... D. 

Bendigiri, Krishnaji Balaji ...R.C- 

Bhagtdni, Revachand Edmrakhidmal ... ... E. 

Bharde, Shivram Ekn^th E. 

Bhide, Ndgesh PAndurjing R.C. 

Bokil, Amrit Mahddev D. 

Ch^ndorkar, Dinkar Trimbak ... .. ... ... F.G.A. 

Chavbal, Nilkanth Bh^skar ... ... ... ... ... D. 

Chilmulgund, Hanmant \'enkatesh ... . . D. 

Chitnis, Gangddharrao Madhav... ... .. E. 

Chohiin, Odhavji Devji F.G.A. 

Ddbholkar, Ganesh Krishna ... ... F. G. A, 

Daldl, Bdlkrishnad.is Pitambardds ... ... E. 

Ddnile, Anant IMahddev R.C. 

Ddmle, Bhdu Krishna ... ... ... ... D. 

Daphtari, Kisanlill Katanldl ... ... St. X. 

Desdi, Edalji Jdniflspji ... ...B.C. 

DesAi, HaribhAi Gopalji B.C. 

Desdi, Haridhar Ranchhodji G.C. 

Desiii, Hirdhll Motildl B.C. & G.C. 

Desdi, Pdndurang Anant ... ... ... ...R.C, 

Deshmukh, Vishnu Keshav ... ... ... ... ... D. 

Deshpdnde. Shi vrdm Ganesh ... ... ... D. 

Dhadphale, Krishudji Bahirav ... D. 

Dholkid, Alanishankar Saddshankar ... B.C. 

Dhond, Rilmchandra Sdjo St, X. 

Dikshit, Bahirav Vishnu... ... D. 

Diviln, UmedrAm Girdharldl St. X. 

Ezekiel, Ezekiel Moses F.G.A. 

Gdndhi, Dosdbhai Kharshedji ... ... .. E. 

Ghjlnekar, Lakshuinan Govind ... ... ...B.C- 

Gite, Cyril Milnkoji E. 

Gogte, Balvant RAinkrishna ... ... ... D. 

Gokhale Janilrdan Ganesh ... ... ... ... .. D. 

Gole, Gopdl Shivram ... ... ... ... D. 

HodivAlil, Sh^purshilh Hormasji E. 

Huilgolkar, Lakshuman Narsinha R.C. & D 



UNDERGRADUATES. 



509 



Kadri, Shanisudin Sayedmii 
K^e, Bdburao Narayan 

Kdle, Ganesh Bdpxiji 

K^le, Moreshvar Ramchanclra ... 
Kapadii, Sorabji Bamanshah ... 

Karnik, Babdji Abdji 

Kamik, Krishnario Balvant 
Kdzi, Gordhandds Nautamrdm ... 
Kelkar, Vislmu Sad^hiv 
Khindekar, Bdjirdo Vislmu 

Khare, Yishnu Vindyak 

KhaiAandikar, Ndrayan Ydman 
Konnur, Shesho Jan^rdan 
Koparkar, Ganesh Lakshuinan ... 
Korgdvkar, KdshinAth Ramkrishna 
Kotvil, Pestanji Soi4bji ... 
Koyaji, D^rashdh Kuvarji 
Koy^ji, Hormazydr Kuvarji 
Kuk^nil, Fi4mji Jamshedji 
KundanmaUni, Lalchand Hasmal 
Lilvdni, Dalpatrdi Rochirdm 
Lele, Rdmchandra Sadashiv 
Lenahan, Herbert Thomas 
Masand, Atmardm Gang^rdm ... 
Mehd, ChhaganlAl Anantrai 
Mehta, Motichand Javerchand . . . 
Mehta, Nagindas Gokaldds 
Mehta, Umedrdm Jametr^m 
Modak, Rdmchandra V.'lman 
Nilbar, Dattatraya Xdrayan 
Nene, Yithal Shankar 
Pidhye, DattAtraya Keshav 
Par^njapye, Hari Krislma 
Patel, ChaturbhAi ValabhbhAi ... 
Patel, Cbunilil KAkubhAi 
Patel, Dhanjishdh Edalji 
Patvardhan, Dimodar Ganesh ... 
Patvardhan, Vasudev Yithal ... 
Pense, Dattdtraya Rangndth 
Pethe, AnnAji Rdmchandra 
Risvadkar, Shivrdm Keshav 
Sahasrabudhe, Bdpu Ganesh 
Sahasrabudhe, Trimbak Sakhirdm 
Seth, Ldlbhdi Dalpatbhai 
Seth, Yithaldas Bhagvand^ 
Sethnd, Rastamji Aspandiarji ... 
Shendre, Yishnu Nar^yan 



G.C. 

D. 

R.C. 

F.G.A. 

E. 

B.C. 

G.C. 

B.C. 

R.C. 

R.C. 

D. 

D. 

D. 

... D. 
F.G.A. 

St. X. 

E. 

E. 

StX. 

E. 

E. 

D. 

E. 

E, 

B.C. 

E. 

B.C. 

B.C. 

D. 

F.G.A. 

.. D, 

R.C. 

D. 

B.C. & G.C. 
G.C. 

&B.C. 

... E. 

I .G.A. 

... D. 

... D. 

... D. 

...R.C. 

... D. 

"... G. 
X. 
D. 
D. 



E. 



St, 



310 UNIVERSITY. 

Shukla, Dalpatrdm Bhagvdnji E. 

Sohoni Krishnliji Vishnu ... ... ... ... ... D. 

Sule, Bdlkrishna Govind E. 

Surti, Hormasji Edalji ... E. 

TdrdpurvdU, Ratanji Jivanji ... E. 

Tripdthi, Tansukhrdm Mansukhrdm ... ... E. 

Vaishnav, Jayaprasdd Hariprasdd ... ...B.C. 

Vakil, Jametrdm Jivanrdm ... ... ... ... ... E. 

Valsdrd, Manchershdh Bamanji E. 

Vdngikar, Anndji Ganesh ,. ... ... D. 

Vasu, Lakhimal Aidds E. 

Vyds, Jatdshankar Daydrdm ... G.C. 

Wddid, Dosdbhdi Frdmji St. X, 

Wdgh, Venkat Vaikunth E. 

Undergraduates and others who have passed the 
First Examination in Medicine. 

1864. 

Second Division. 

DaCunha, Joseph Gerson G' 

Gomes, Antonio Simplicio ,.. G 

1872. 

Second Division. 

Bennet, Bejanji Pestanji G* 

Coutinho, .Joaquim Vicente ... ... ... ... ... G" 

Patvardhan, Vindyak Edmchandra ... ... G* 

1873. 

Second Division. 

Khdmbdtd, Hirdji Jehdngier .. G' 

1874. 

Second Division. 

Alvares, Nicolao Santanna ... ... ... .. ... G" 

DaSilva, Pascoal Manoel... ... ... ... ... ... G' 

Koyaji, Behrdmji Nasarvdnji ... . . ... G* 

Muldn, Sordbji Pdlanji G- 

1875. 

Second Division. 

Ddmld, Edalji Mdnikji G- 

DeLiina, Jose Turtulliano G- 



UXDEEGRADTJATES. 



311 



Doctor, Hormasji Behrdmji 

Ghdnclhi, DAmodardAs DharamdAs 
KAngA, Jamshedji Kharshedji 

1876. 

Second Division. 

Contractor, Hormaaji Navroji ... 
Dastur, Jdmiisji Sorabji ... 
Forbes, Edalji Behrdmji ... 
Hakim, Hormasji MervAnji 
Nanavati, Jatnn^dAs Premchand 

PesikAkd, Honnasji Dos^bhdi 

Pundviilii, Edalji Sordbji 

1877. 

Second Division. 

Hakim, Phirozeshdh Mervinji 

Modi, Nandbhiii Kuvarji 

1878- 

Second Division. 

Cola^o, Joseph 

Ddruvdla, Hormasji Sordbji 

Pinto, Diogo John 

Sukhid, Jehangier Kharshedji 



Sdngle, Davlat Mdruti 



1879. 

First Division. 
Second Division. 



AbidAn, Sorabji Nasarv-Anji 

Amarid, Frdmji MAnikji 

Bdbre, Sakhdrdm Rdghobd 
Dubdsh, Jehdngier Bamanji 
Fernandez, Ambrozio Feleciano... 
Jones, Maurice F. .. 

Luis, Daniel Concei^So 

Sethad, Ardesir Honnasji 



Cr. 

G. 
G. 



G. 
G. 
G. 
G. 
G. 
G. 
G. 



G. 
G. 



G. 
G. 
G. 

G. 



G. 



O. 
G. 
G. 
G. 
G. 
G. 
G. 
G, 



312 UNIVEKSITT. 

1880. 

Second Division. 
Sahidr, Kharshedji Navroji 

1881. 

Second Division. 

Doctor, Jehilngier Barjorji .. 
Hall, Robert John Draper .. 
Henriques, Felix 
Khards, Kdvasji Jehdngier .. 
Mehtd, Anantrdi Ndthji 



Mehta, Mahipatrdm Govindrdm G. 

Pednekar, Krishna Sakhdrdm G. 

1882. 

First Division. 

Dallas, Dlianjibhai Sordbji G. 

Masdni, Ardesir Behrdmji G. 

Masdni, Dhanjibhdi Sordbji G. 

Vakil, Mancherji Mothdbhdi ■ G. 

Second Division. 

Anklesarid, Bamanshdh Kharshedji G. 

Bhedvdr, Palanji Pestanji G. 

Brooks, John Charlton ... G. 

Chhatre, Vdsiidev Vindyak G. 

Dastur, Hormasji Behrdmji G. 

Ddvar, FrdmjiEdalji G. 

Dave, Sevakldl Mdnekldl G. 

DeSouza, F. V. Albino G. 

Dhru, Hirdldl Maneldl ., G. 

Dotivdld, Hormasji Kdvasji G. 

Faria, Franzoni Antonio G. 

Ghdsvdld, Bhikdji Edalji G. 

Gokhale, Krishndji Trimbakrdo ... . G. 

Gomes, Lewis Paul G. 

Grogan, Henry William G. 

Kcldvd.Id, Ardesir Jamshedji G. 

Kher, Govind BdJdji G. 

Mdndvivald, Fakirji Kdvasji G, 

?Vlantri, Dadobd Jandrdan G, 



rSDERGEADUATBS. 313 

Masini, Mervdnji DidAbhai , ... ... G. 

Nivisarkar, Krishnaji Govind G. 

Pereira, Nicholas Francis ... ... ... ••• .. O. 

Finto, P. Manuel G. 

Pinto, Viriato Joao ... G. 

Tv4val, Virji Jhina G. 

Sabji. Dinshih Edalji G. 

Trivedi, Mulshankar Damodardiis G. 

*Ardesir D4d4bh4i Navroji G. 

1883. 

Flr^ Division, 

Joshi, Khnshaldds Karsanji G- 

Karandikar, Venkat^sh Balvant G. 

Khoja, Ismlil Jan Muhammad G. 

Mistri, Mancherji Jimispji G, 

Modi, Maganldl Motiram G. 

Salgar, Vithal Anniji G. 

Saraiyi, Chunilil Dharamd^ ... ... G. 

Second Division, 

.Anklesaria, Dhanjishdh Edalji G. 

DaCosta, Francis Xavier G. 

Daruvdli, Sorlbji Jamshedji G. 

D^vadil, Po'shottam Naranji ... ... ... ... G. 

Davar, Frimroz Shavakshah G. 

DeCunha, George Frederick G. 

DaGama, Mirabeau Laplace Francis G. 

DePereira, Antonio Jervis G. 

DeSouza, Joseph G. 

Dias, K. X. G. 

Ganadrimani, Tirdchand Jair^md^ ... ... ... G. 

'""':".ale, Krishndji K^hinath G. 

-Ives, Gabrial F. Q- 

idin, Jamshedji Fardunji G. 

Kapadid, Fardunji Sorabji G. 

Kapadii, Soribji Frdmji G. 

Khambita, BApuji Navroji ... . . G. 

Kher, Ganesh Vishnu G. 

^iv4ld,Dor4bshdh Edalji G. 

r, ChhabilddsTiibhuvandis G. 

11. ..;u, Dhdnjibhdi Hormasji G. 

Mehtd, Sorabji Kharshedji G. 



* Surname not known. 
B 1030—27 BD 



314 UNIVERSITT. 



Mehtd, Vithaldds Narbherdm 

Modi, Ratanshdh Mdnikji 

MovddvAld, Ddrishdh Jamshedji ... 
Mudholkar, "Rdmchandra Narsinh 
Mudliar, Sanmukh Venkatdchelam 
Pandit, Kapilvantrdm Narbherdm 

Patel, Dosdbhdi Kdvasji 

Pochkhdndvd.ld, Behrdmji Sordbji ... 
Eichardson, Henry William Webbe 
Tdrdchand, Sordbji Kharshedji 
Tdtd, Dhanjibhai Kastamji 



G. 
G. 
G. 
G. 
G. 
G. 
G. 
G. 
G. 
G. 
G. 



Tolat, ChanduMlGuldbdds G. 

Undergraduates and others who hate passed the 
First Examination in Civil Engineering, 

1866. 

Second Division. 
D^tdr, N^ro Govind P.E. 

1868. 

Second Division. 

Mehti, Venishankar GovindrAm ... P.E. 

Shirgdvkar, BdMji Ndrdyan P.E. 

1869. 

Second Division. 

Bbat, Moreshvar Ndrdyan P.E. 

Soman, Ganesh Ndrdyan P.E. 

1870. 

Second Division. 

Gupte, PSndurang Gopdl P.E. 

Jambhekar, Balvant Govind P.E. 

Narimdn, GusUdji Dorabji P.E. 

Timbe, E^mchandra Balvant P.E. 

1871. 

Second Division, 

Bhdtavadekar, Vindyak Krishna P.E. 

Chavbal, Kdshindth Ddmodar P.E. 

Mhaiakar, Gopdl llaghunuth P.E. 

Mulekar, Vishnu Sad^lshiv P.E. 

Varlikar, Mahidev Janirdan P.E. 



UNDERGRADUATES. 315 

1872. 

First Divi^on. 

Macnee, Henry Charles P.E- 

Second Division. 

Bhdnddrkar, RAoji Ganesh P.E. 

Ndrgir, Shankar Bisto P.E. 

Whittell, Charles P.E. 

1873, 

First Divi'Sion. 

Page, Hastings Montague P.E, 

Pdrikh, Javerdds Bhogidis P.E. 

Sohoni, V^udev Sad^hiv P.E. 

Second Division, 

Kolatkar, Sitdrdm Vdsudev P.E. 

Tarkhadkar, Vithal Eighobi P.E. 

1874. 

Second Division, 

Barve, Pdndurang Sakhdr^m P.E, 

Bhosekar, Lakshuman Pdndurang P.E. 

Minde, Venkatesh Bdpurao ... ... P.E. 

Mehendale, Pandurang Kashinath P.E. 

Oka, Vin^yak Anant P.E. 

Th^kur, Atmdrdm Sadashiy P.E. 

1875, 

First Division. 

Barve, Nlrayan Vishnu P.E. 

Lele, Trimbak Balvant P.E. 

Savage, Thomas P.E. 

Second Division. 

Bhdgvat, Kdmchandra Ganesh ... P.E: 

Joshi, Andji Anant P.E. 

Kathavat^, Xarhar Yishnu P.E. 

Mehta, Lallubhai Govandas P.E. 

1876. 

First Division, 

Cousens, Henry P.E. 

Deshp^de, Sitdrdm Keshav P.E. 

Gokhale, VinayakHari P.E. 



316 UNIVERSITY. 

Second Division. 

Hemson, EeginaldJohn P.E. 

Pdrkhe, Ekn^th Yashvant P.E. 

1877 

Pass. 

Cheld, Chnnilal Khnbchand P.E. 

Daldl, Prdnjivan Parbhud^s P.E. 

Majmuddr, Dipakrdm Navnitrdm .. P.E. 

Munshi, DMibhai Kharshedji P.E. 

1878. 

Second Cidss. 
Chirmule, Vishnu Anant P,K 

Pasa^ 

Ashirkar, Lakshnman Mabipat P.E. 

Lohdr, Mdruti Hari P.E, 

MMan, Edalji Hormasji ... P.E. 

Thatte, Bhdlchandra Chintdman .. P.E. 

187&. 

First Class. 
Hatyangdikar, Santdppi Santdyd P.E, 

Second Class. 

Desdi, KJiushdldds Revdd^ P.E. 

Gidvtoi, Ayedds Izatrdm ... P.E. 

Gole, Vishnu Vithal P.E. 

O'Sullivan, JamesJohn P E. 

Pass. 

Bhavilkar, Balvant Keshav P.E, 

Dhurandhar, Rdmchandra Vishvanith P.E. 

Shirui-kar, Shdntmurti AnnippA P.E. 

TAdivdU, Ardesir Hormasji P.E, 

Tipnis, Ganesh Khanderdo P.E. 

1880. 

Second Class. 

Gokhale, Gangddhar Saddshiv C.Sc. 

Mansukhdni, Hemandda Tejumal C Sc. 

Patel, Ardesir Kdvasji ... C.Sc. 



UNDEBGRAOrTATKS. 317 



Past. 

Abhyinkar, Pindurang Vishnu C.Sc. 

Abhyinkar, Vamaai Vishnu ... ... . CSc. 

Apte, Gangddhar BalUl CSc. 

Carvalho, Rudolph ... ... ... ... ... ... CSc. 

iJaatui', Peshutaii Horma^ji ... ... ... ... CSc. 

Deshp^de, Balvant Ganeah ... ... CSc. 

Divechd, Vanmdli Mulji CSc. 

Kunte, Vasudev Keshav CSc. 

Mistri, KharshedjiHormasji CSc. 

1881. 

Second C'la*.^. 

Anandatirtha Rao, Mddhav Rio CSc. 

Chhapgar, Kharshedji Frimji CSc. 

Joshi. Xarso Govind CSc. 

ThanivaU, Ardeair Xasarvanji ... CSc. 

Pass. 

Billimorid. Jehdngier Mancherji CSc. 

•Toshi, Krishna ji Vishnu CSc. 

^itAravala, Kdnibhai Dadibhdi CSc. 

1882. 

Second Division. 

Chitale, Parshurim Kiishna CSc. 

Halagaiya Gowda, Basappd Chikki Magalur CSc. 

Pass. 

Ajarekar, Sitirdm Hari ... CSc. 

Budhbhatti, Keshavji Shdmji CSc. 

Dhekne, Kdshindth Ddmodar CSc. 

Khativ, Hari Balaji CSc. 

Kirtane, Bhagvant Sakh;iram CSc. 

Kord, BalabhAi Guldbchand CSc. 

Pdrekh, Bechardds Chhaganlal CSc. 

Vaidya. Dattu Balkrishna CSc, 

1883- 

Second Class. 

Chakravarti, C CSc. 

Dhume, Bdlkrishna Viman CSc. 

Dole, Mahadev Yashvant CSc. 

B 1030-27 BU * 



318 



UNIVEESITT. 



Mhaskar, Mdnkeshvar Gopdl 
Subbario, Basavapatna 



ChalUvdru, Rdmayd Sambhayd 
Jdlndpurkar, Vindyak Rdmchandra 
Kinkhdbvdld, ChhaganUl GovindUl 

MehM, ChunildlJethdbhdi 

Mehtd, Gokaldas RAjpdl 

Oza, Ratishankar Girjdshankar ... 
Vakil, Ardesir K^vasji 



— 


. 


. C.Sc. 


'.'.'. '... ... C.Sc. 




... C.Sc 






. C.Sc 






. C.Sc. 






. C.Sc 






. C.Sc 






. C.Sc. 






. C.Sc. 



MATRICULATION ESAMmATlOK, 1883. 319 

MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1883. 



Rank. 



Names of Candidates. 



Waite, Wilfred Elias 

Bast^vdU, Sordbji D^ddbhdi ... 

Maidment, Samuel Gerald ... 

Sethnii, Nasarvdnji Dhanjibhdi ... 

Haidari, Mahomad Akbar Nazzeralli 

Pdvri, Na\Toji Pdlanji ... 

Joshi, Bhiskar Vishnu 

Apte, Hari Saddshiv 

Hdte, Gajtoan Harichandra 

Mitchell, Charles Roderick 

Welinkar, Nilrdyan Gun4ji 

Pandit, Krishn^ji Nirdyan 

Ambegavkar, Ganesh Balvant ... 
J Limaye, Lakshuman Narayan ... 
( MMan, Ardesir Hormasji 

Mehta, Pestanji Fardunji 

Doctor, Kaikhosru Edalji . . 

Arankalle, Yishvan^th Anant .. 

Nilkanth, Ramanbhdi Mahipatrdm 
( Godbole, VinAyak Appdji 

) Robinson, Annie ... 

( Kehimkar, Abraham Aaron 

I Smith, Charles Blodwell 

( Bh^tekar, Isaac Aaron ... 

I Captain, Kharshedji Hormasji ... 

DeQuadros, Victor Alfred 
( Bharse, Krishnaraya Bjlpurio ... 
I Kotvdl, Dhanjishdh Pestanji 

Godbole, Dinkar Sad^hiv 

Lajmi, Venkat Anandrao 

Khards, Dosdbhdi Bejanji 
{ Broachd, Behrdmshdh Mancherahdh 
( Daldl, Hirjibhdi Kdvasji... 

j Gandhi, Bhdskar Rdoji 

j Vakil, Chunildl HariMl 

Dundas, Robert Thomas 

*Minnie Ratanji ... 

Javeri, Chhoteldl Guldbchand ... 



S'arname not known. 



3-20 



DHIVERSrTT. 



Eank. 



Kames of Candidates. 



Schools. 



Ellis, Edward William 

Jddhav, Rdmchandra Ndrdyan . . . 
^ Bad^, Rdtnkrishna Nilkanth 
( Dav6, Keahavji Gopdlji 

Mehtd, Manu Nandshankar 
( Bhore, Isabel 

< Trilokekar, Ganpat Sokar 

I Umr^, Ardesir ShApurji 

( Deshmukh, Govind Sakh^rdm ... 

\ Dallas, Barjorji SorAbji 

I BhAthend, Kharshedji Frilmji .. 

^ Elijah, Shaloam 

( Samuel, Mary 
Ferreira, Dominic Joseph 

{ Gilt, Ganesh Vdman 

I Joshi, Jandrdan Balvant 

[ B^thd, Jehdngier Dinshdh 

I Roberts, Alfred Goldie 

SAne, Ganesh Bh^skar ... 
Kelkar, Prabhdkar Lakshnman... 

j DaUl, Kd,shid^s Naraudds 

I Thad^ni, Mulchand Gang^rAm ... 
LAlvani, Kundanmal Manghirsing 
Hebal, Ganesh Anndrdo . 
Wdlvekar, Venkatesh Moreshvar 
Par^njapye, Keshav BAlkrishna 
Trivedi, ChhaganUl ShambhuUl 
Tarkhadkar, Dnyaneshvar Atmiirdm 
Kulhali, Hanmant Krishna 

I Kelsung, Parmeshvar Chinn^ppd 

I Koydji, Sordbji Nasarvinji 

( Bhdvnagri, Navroji Shdpurji ... 

< Kulkarni, Vishveshvar Mangesh 
( Padamji, Bamanji Dorilbji 

Thdkur, Ndrdyan Ganesh 

Vaidya, Vishvanilth Prabhurdm 
fD'Abreo, Felix Charles 
I Belgdmkar, Chinndppd Shiviyogdppd 
i Cosserat, Lewis Wilford 
I Patvardhan, NdrAyan Ganesh ... 
l^Trilokekar, VinAyak Sokar ji ... 

Kdle, Govind Vitlial 

Ghslrpure, Slirikrishna Saddshiv 



MATEICULATI05 EXAMIXATIOX, 1883. 



321 



Rank. 



Names of Candidates. 



Schools. 



Billimorii, Ndndbhdi Mancherji 
J Gopujkar, Pindurang Vishnu ... 
I Shah, Chunilil Ghel^bhai 

iBdlse, Mangesh Krishnayd 
Doctor, Jamshedji Pestanji 
Shukla, Hari Gangidhar 
Ekhe, Yddav Chimn^ji ... 

{ Cochi-ane, Charles 

I Sayed, Moinudin Hassan 
I Greengrass, Charles Joshua 
1 Vyds, Vithalrai Goverdhanprasid 
Buch, MidhavUl PrAnshankar ... 
BennettnA, Rastamji Ikidnikji ... 
Ghali, Satyappd Sankappd 
Kulkami, Rdghavendra -Appajipant 

!Deshp4nde, Vaman Ganesh 
Patani, Prabhdshankar Dalpatrlm 
Sathe, RdmkiishnaLakshuman... 

Bader, Fred. R. ... ... ' 

Raymond, Edward 
\ B^tliboi, Ardesir FrAmji ... 

) Sangh^i, KeshavlAl Sakhidds ... 

(Counsell, Joseph G. 

j KinAriviU, Bdlu Lallubhdi 
"^ Lawrence, Peter ... 
'v^Mehti, Umiashankar Govarishankar 

Dav6, Balvant Yashvant 

1 DalAl, Nagind^s Lakshumid^ ... 

< Master, Ardesir Nasarvdnji 

( Patel, Behrimji Ratanji 

j Doshi, Jivr^j Ghel^bhdi... 

I Kilekar, Lakahuman RaghunAth 

SMehtA, Fardunji Doribji 
WddiA, Didibhii MervAnji 
Chdndorkar, Ganesh R^mchandra 
fKani^, Jekisandis Jethdbhdi . . 
j ilerchant, Jagmohand^ Chhabild^ 

! Parmdnand Bdmkrishna Ndrajan 
LP^nse, N^r^j'an Sakh^r^m 

Akut, Jaganndth B^pu ... 

Cumming, James W. N. 



322 



tXIVERSlTt. 



Names of Candidates. 



Shirgdvkar, BdJkrishna Ravalnd.th 
Vakil, ManibMi Ranchhodji .. 

fChetham, Emily Jane 

I Mdnvartikar, Lakshuman Rdnanayd ... 

■{ Skinner, Frederick John 

I Sukhid, Jamshedji Dhanjibhdi . . 

( SutdriA, Kdvasji Mdnikji 

4 Lalit, Vishnu Narhar 

I Patki, Moreshvar Pdndurang 

I Advani, Pribdds Shevakrdm 

I Apte, Ganesh Shridhar 

iDesdi, Harihar Dhanshankar 
Gangd.samudra, Rdmchandra Edghavendra 
Pilcher, Emma Georgina 

C Hardikar, Datto Krishna 

-{ Sdne, Rdmchandra Balvant 

l^Sdthe, N^rdyan Nilkanth 

I Achdrya, Gajdnan Govind 

I Gokhale, Vithal Saddshiv 

\ Joshi, Keshav Rdmkrishna 

(Kdnitkar, Sakhdrdm Ganesh 

Masur, Govind Venkatesh 

I Desdi, Dhanjishdh Bdpuji 

1 Ghodgiri, AmMji DMdji 

J Naedu, Vardrdj Govind 

( Thdkor, Balvantrdi Kalliinrdi 

Engineer, Pestanji Ukarji 

Khunt^, Pd,ndurang Atmd,rAm 

LimMlkar, Gundjirdo RdjoM 

MulUn, Dinshiih Fardunji 

Sethnd, Hormasji Mei-vdnji 

Vdchd, Rastamji Fardunji 

iBandji, Mervdiiji Mancherji 
Wddid, Bamanji Ardesir 
Yardi, Saddnand Appdji 

J Manidr, Abhechand Vakhatchand 

I Patvardhan, Keshav Abdji ... _ ... 

rDhairyavdn, Krishnardo Saddnandji ... 

J. Mehtd, Motildl Manibhdi 

ISanghdvi, Ddyd Khetsi 

Tilak, Dinkar Vindyak 

Oza, Vasantrdi Mahipatrdi 



MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1833. 



323 



Rank. 



Names of Candidates. 



Schools. 



165 



172 



174 



17S 



182 
183 



186 



187 



195 



198 



202 



( Buml^ , Nasarvdn j i Pestanj i 

Collector, Navroji Adaxji 

I lAlx&m, Kishinchand Uttamchand ... 

-J Limaye, Vishnu Balvant 

1 Magol, Frdmji Pestanj i 

I PakvAsd, Yrajbhukhandds Manchhdrdra 

l^Shidhaye, Krishndji N^rayan 

J Apte, Vindyak Vishnu 

j Master, Ddmodar Jagjivan 

( Kololgi, Virupiksh Shivlingappd 

\ Kur, Badrudin AbduU 

1 Meht4, Manmukh Krishnamukh 

( Paymaster, Behrdmji Rastamji 

( Bueh, Vaikunthrdi Harishankar 

1 D^te, Moro Geuiesh 

1 DesAi, Venil^l Jivanrdm 

( Mhatre, Chint^man Pandurang 

Deshmukh, Rdoji Shrikrishna 

iKaUitopur, Ganpat Rdghavendrai4o ... 
Parchure, Mahjldev Bhikdji 
Reubens, M. J. 

Bakshi, Vrijbhukhan Chunildl ... 
fAthdvdld, Jekinsandas LaUubhdi 
I Bdrahifi, Varajdas Ddyabhii 

I Chandavar, Shankar Sheshgir 

j Ghinekar, Govind Vdsudev 

■{ DeSouza, Michael Antone 

1 Pimple, Balirdm Meghashdm 

Vakil, Chunilal Ddyabh^i 

l^Welkar, Vamanrao Shamr^ 

( Kamdin, Dosdbh^ Hormasji 

\ Kothdri, Morarji Dh^rshi 

( Umrigar, Phirozshdh Kuvarji 

,' Meht^, ChuniMl Anuprdm 

j Talpade, Ndr^jan B^puji 

jTilak, NArdyan Ganesh 

I Vakankar, Vishnu Gamesh 

[ DeSouza, Edward 

\ Fozddr, 3Iotildl Tribhuvand^ 

I Purveyor, Phirozshdh Barjorji 



P. 

Su. M. 

H.&P.T. 

P. T. 

N. 

E. S. 

N. E. 

Dhu. 

B. Pro. 

Dh. 

E.S. 

Su. 

P. 

N. W. 

P. M. 

Su. M. 

St. M. 

Am. 

E. S. 

B. T. 

P. T. 

A.&P.T. 

Su. 
Su. & A. 
K. 
P. 
Dh. 
Am. 

Su. M. at 

I p. T. 
,! St. M. 
,j B. Pro 
& P.T 
.| Kdt. 
P. T. 
N. 
E.S. 
P.T. 
P. T. 
Bis. 
E.S. 
P. 



324 



UKITERSITT. 



Kank. 



Names of Candidates. 



Schools. 



( Ruber, Dinkar Rtioji ... 

< M chile, Ganpat Bhilskar... 

( Mondkar, Trimbak Damodar ... 

r Bha.lerd.0, Govind Janardau 

I Cooke, Albert 

-{ Genge, JethAlAl Lallubhdi 
I Mistri, Pdlanji Kavasji ... 
IPanthaki, Fardunji Phirozsh^h 

Book-binder, Bhikdji Edalji 
f Jdll, Rastamji Hormasji ... 

Kulkarni, Hari Keshav ... 
I Major, Gev Friimji 
-| Mali, BdUji Gangdrdm 

Mobedjina, Dinshdh Mancherji... 
I Rdngnekar, Purshottam Vishnu 
lUgrankar, Ganpat Lakshuman... 

I Buch, Anantrdi NilniUl ... 

I Dev, Hari Shrikrishna 

fNAdkarni, Riimkrishna Anantrdo 

I Rdmchandani, Thilkurdds Vadhumal ... 

■{ Sethnd, Pestanji Kdvasji 

I Vachhnljdni, Dolatshankar Vajeshankar 
LViidavane, Pandharindth Chintiiman ... 

! Broker, Karsandds Chhabildds . . . 
Dalvi, SiindaiTdo Bhairavndth ... 
Ddtdr, Ganesh Maheshvar 

iLiigu, Yashvant Bdlkrishna 
Sabdvdlcl, Pestanji Kuvarji 
Tocque, Alice 
CGokdkkar, Venkatesh Satiashiv 
Joshi, Narbherdm Manchhdrdm 
I Kalddgi, Bhimdji Subrdo 
{ Kdngd, Edalji Rastamji... 

McKenzie, Alice Margaret 

I Raval, Kdlidds Ndthji 

ITrivedi, Umidshankar Mordrji 

Desdi, Ddvdbhdi Jivanji 

fBdpat, Niikanth Krishna 

J Chokshi, ManchhubhAi Narsidds 

I Kulkarni, Govind Apdji... 

LPardnjapye, Vdaudev Kdshindth 



MATBICULATION EXAMINATION, 1883. 



325 



Rank. 



Names of Candidates. 



i Schools. 



IArjdni, Na%TOJi J^mdspji 
Gadre, Dhondo Chintdman 
< MehU, Bapdlal Krishnal^l 

I SAthaye, Ganesh Vishnu. 

'Sii"ali, N^rayan Timippd 

j DesAi, Uttamram Vithald4s 

I Sonir, Tot^ram Edmchandra ... 

( Bakshi, Purshottamrdi KalliAnrai 

I Bhdrati, Bindu Balkrishna 

I Doshi, Harjivan Jhin^ ... 

j Gadagkar, Ramchandra Venkatesh 

] Pandit, Virmanishankar Nilmanishankar 

I Patki, Vdsudev Raghundth 

I Pethe, Hari Chintiman... 

IRanjit, Khanderjio Sundarrdo ... 
Pakv^i, Vithald^s ManchhAram 
Pitale, Vinayakrio Sadanandji ... 

fBelvauki, Tamaji Mahddev 

I Koppikar, PdndurangTimdppa... 
-{ Limaye, Anant Krishna ... 

I SivJlnur, Ramchandra Kashirdo 

I \ratunekar, Xardyan Ganesh 

fCamd, Homiashali Kdvashah ... 

1 Joshi, Shdpiirji Sordbji ... 
■{ Kangi, DosAbhdi Jdm^ji 

i K^rkhdnis, RajarAm Saddshiv ... 

LSovani, Vishnu Yashvant 

I Kh^rkar, Keshav Xdraj- an 

) Shukla, Lakshmishankar Mddhavji 

f Dddisett, Nasarvanji Jamshedji 

j Damle, Shankar X^gesh ... 

Dholkia, Eupshankar Murdrji 
J Javeri, Balubhdi Khiinchand 

] Kjlpadid, Sorabji Shapurji 
Pdthdre, Madan Morobd .. 

I Fatvardhan, Duigo Ramchandra 

LSheth, Dhanji Chaturbhuj 
Wadid, Hiijibhai Hormasji 

{ Dave, Krishnanim Joitdi-am 

1 Ksltvi, Krislmarao Dinandth 

J Maigar, Hanmant Shesho 

( Oka, Damodar Vinayak ... 

1030—28 BU 



326 



U5IVERSITT. 



IJames of Candidates. 



Schools. 



Bare , Ganesh V ishnu 
Dh^rv4dkar, Gopill Govind 
Penkar, Samuel AMji 
MAlvankar, NAr^yaii KdshinAth 
Mujurnddr, Fdndurang RAmchandra 
Pdrekh, Motirdm Tribhuvandds 
Apte, Hari Ndrdynn 

Desdi, Dorabji Jivanji 

Bevur, Venkatesh Hanmant 
Bhdtavadekar, MahAdev Rdmchandra 
Contractor, Ardesir Edalji 

DesAi, Venkaji Timdji 

Karnik, Shankar Vindyak 
Khdnsiheb, HirdUl KrishnaUl... 
Nagarmdthekar, Shant^ppA Niirdyan 
Pochkhdn^v^U, MAnikji 8ordbji 
Rajpithak, Gopiil Anant 

Joshi, Hari Bdpu . , 

Hale, Edward John 

Manerikar, BAlkrishna Rilmkrishna 

Patel, Ardesir Dhanjibhdi 

Patel , Rio j i MotiUl 

Patil, Vdman Vishvandth 
Poho, Erachshah Nasarvilnji ... 
Uraizee, Burhanudin Abdulldh ... 
Vora, Ranchhoddas ParmAnandds 
Halbe, Bhillchandra Kashindth.. 
Garag, Virdppa Neinbeppd 
Joshi, Ganesii Rdmehandra 
Master, Maneklal Aniritlal 
Mehtd, Narsinha Trikamji 
Nadkarni, Pandurang Maiigesh 
Setlmd, DhanjibhiU Radtamji ... 

Varur, Kuber GulAppa 

Wddid, Biipuji Rastamji 
Ddtdr, Ganesh Riimkrishna 
Deshpdnde, Shrikrishna ChimnAji 
KhdndvdU, Maganlal Govardhandiis 
Kulkarni, Rdnichandra Ndrdyan 
Daldl, KanayiUdl Janinddas 

Khole, Viudyak Rdoji 

Mehtd, Mansiikhbhdi Varajrdi ... 
Mua, Ndndbhdi Hormasji 



MATRICULITION EXAMINATION, 1883, 



327 



Names of Candidates. 



Schools. 



f Akhimd, Valimuhdmmad Hafizdlimuhdmmad 

! Deshpdnde, Gangddhar Venkateah 

■{ Meherji, Phirozshdh FrAmji 

I Melhvdni, Khiibchand Tekhchand 
LSanzgiri, Shankar Vindyak 

Majmunddr, SMmldl Hiraldl 

I Devdhar, Bdlkrishna Saddshiv 

I Enti, Edalji Bamauji 

') Gandhi, Kashidds Govandds 

( Shih, Chotiilal Dvdi-kadds _ 

1 Cama, Nasarsanji Honnasji 

) Desdi, HariMl Des.libhai 

< Hingne, Nilkanth Raghiin^th 

I Prdni, DattAtmya Pdndiirang 

( Randde, Rdmcliandra Ganeshpant 

\ Taleyarkhan, Erachshdh Jehdngier 

I Tdrdchand, Jehaugier Mervanji 

( Herlekar, Shdinrdo Ganesh 

■| Joshi, Vdsudev Ndrdyan 

/ Karandikar, Sitardm Ndrdyan 

( Kantak, Rdmchandra Ganesh ... 

I Kulkami, Hari Gundo ... 

Savadid, Lakshumishankar Dullabhji ... 

J Aindargi, Rdjdrdm Kdshindth 

iDdddchanji. Dordbji Sorabji 

j Khdnsdheb, VeniUl PrdnMl 

'\I^opp, R^mchandra Babdji 

/ Mardthe, Datto Bhdskar 

{ Pdnandikar, Dattardm Ddmodar 

CBhonde, Krishndji Ddmodar 

Ddnirkar, Pandurang Haninant 

I Godbole, Hari Krishna 

i Hdthivdld, Abasalli Allibhdi 

I Luktiike, Trimbak Rdmchandra „^ 

Mdtegdvkar, Trimbak Ramdkdnt 

; Pothivdld, Bamanji Edalji 

LSarmokddam, Nilkanth Bdlkrishna 

Naik, Ganpat Rdmchandra 

iKdnade, Bdpuji Narsinha , 
Sdne, Gopdl Rdmchandra , 
Tdmboli, Nasarvinji Navroji ... 



328 



UNIVERSITY. 



Names of Candidates. 



f Benjamin, A. E » ... 

I Bhanage, Kdshindth Bdlkrishna 
I Bhat, Jatiishankar Karundshankar 

■{ Ghdti, Pestanji Ddddbbdi 

I Gore, NArdyan Trimbak 

1 Rdjddhyaksha, Raghundth Bdlkrishna 

LUgale, Govind Balvant 

( Kdtkar, Vithal Shdmrdo 

} Macdi, Syed Taher 

( Rodrigues, Joseph 

Vaishnav, Anantrdi Bhupatrdi... 
fBarv6, Ndrdyan Rdmchandra 

BharucM, Rastamji Edalji 

D^ngrikar, Bdlkrishna R^oji 

DeMello, Polycarp 

Master, Ratanji Dosdbhdi 

Merchant, Imdadkli Muhdmmad Kdsini 

Nandvati, Purshottamrdi Bhagvatidas 

Parvatikar, Hanmant Krishnardo 

Sirvdi, Sordbji Rastamji 

Tadhal, Kallangavdd Kallangavdd 

l.WAdi4, Bamanji Hormasji 

I Bailie, George Fortunatus 

/ Bhende, Yash\'ant Ndrdyan 

IApte, Govind Jivdj ipant 
Jikar, GuMbshankar Narmaddshankar 
Kelkar, Vaman BalUl .. 
Lakshumeshvar, Sidrdm Nuranddppd... 
Mashhadi, Diiddmid Sharfudin 
Phdtak, Ganesh Bdlkrishna 

IBandji, Ndndbhdi Mancherji 
Kdnhere, Ganesh Raghiindth 
Patvdri, Ranchhoddds Vandrdvandds... 
Vaze, Saddshiv Ganesh 

Doshi, Ndnchand Bechar 

Jhdngidni, Premchand Avatrdi 

Mirchanddni, Ndrdyandds Udhdrdm ... 
Moghe, Vishvandth Anndji 

Pandit, Vishnu Bdlkrishna 

( Lele, Gangddhar Balldl 

< Nirokhekar, Dattdtraya Saddahiv 

{ Sapre, Jagunndth Anant 



MATEICULATION EXAaiiyATTOX, 1383. 



329^ 



Rank. 



Xames of Candidates. 



School. 



Adhye, Balkrishna Mah^dev ... 

Dracott, Charles Hammond 

Kiitrak, Kivaaji Jamshedji 

Khandval^, MotirAm Govardhandis 

Mule, Gajjlnan Vithal ... 

Sukathankar, Kerobji Pdndnrang 

Divin, Jametram Navnitram ... 

Satyavddi, Ddyabhdi ChhaganlAl 
f Dhdrvadkar, Righavendra Tamiji 

Haliyal, SvdmirJio B4liji 

Hodivak , Dortbji Edalji 

Kh^nis, Rdmchandrarao Yogendra 
I M^dan, Fardunji Bamanji 
I Moulvi, Rafiuddin Imdmuddin... 
LPAnse, KrishnAji Mdrtand 
f Haligeri, Mddhav Ndrdyan 

i Ldlkaka, Bipuji Palanji 

f Nene, V^udev NarAyan... 

; Sheshadri, Joseph 

1 

l^Vaidya, Moreshvar Dmkar 
J KorgAvkar, KamalnAth Shivrim 
I Shah, Gavtam Motichand 
I Bhatti, Ud^pir^o Shriniv^ 
< Pagdivala, Mohanbhii Maganbhai 
( Palkhiv^, Jehdngier Sortbji ... 
j Dubash, Kaikhosru Manikji 
'.Gardiner, Thomas 
) Mirchandani, Khemchand AmritrAi 
SPatvardhan, Balvant Rdmchandra 
/ Registrar, Mdnikji Behramji ... 
( Valladares, Philip Reginald 
fB^nkapur, Bdbur^ Bhdnr^o 
I Joshi, Bdlkji Udhav 
-{ Joshi, Trimbak Moreshvar 
I Kirloskar, VinAyak GopAl 
LPradh^, Dinkar Vjtman 

iDiidisett, Hirjibhdi JehAngier ... 
Desii, Nasarvtoj Mancherji 
Master, Kaikhosru Ekialji 
Sanzgiri, Yashvant Mangesh ... 
Vyas, Vajeram Harin^-^yan ... 

1030-2S BF * 



P. 

Bis. 
E. S. 

Su. 

P. 

F. 
ISU.&P.T. 
iA .&P.T. 

;n.e.d. 

1 Dh. 
I Sa. 
B.M.i P.T. 
I E.S. 
! P. 

' P.T. 
F. 
P. T, 
F-Ch. 
M. S. J. 
I N. E. 
i E.S. 
i Sho. 
Dh. fi p. T. 
' p. T. 
E.S. 
E. S. 
. Bis. 
I H. 
J E. S. 
B. Pro. 
St. M. 
X. E. D. 
Rat. 
R. 
.1 Dh. 

.! p. 

. F, 
.' SirC. 

P. T. 

K S. 
. Su.&Kit. 



330 



UNIVBESITT. 



Rank. 


Names of Candidates. 


Schools. 




f CakevdU, Frdmji DAddbhdi 


Sir J. 




iGMsvdld Kdvasji Frdmji 


E. S. 


455 


JHarshe, Raghun^th Moreslivar 


B. S. 


jMardthe, Vdsudev Krishna 

/Pochard, Bamanji Pestanji 

( Vichdre, Ddjirdo Amritrdo 


N. E. B. 




Sir J. 




P.T. 


461 


( Dastur, Nasarvdnji Aspandiarji 

I Kdtadare, Lakshuman Bachdji 


Sir J. 


R. 




{ Doctor, Krishnaldl Ndrdyan ... ... ... 


A.&P.T. 


463 


< Gad, Ndrdyan Aijant 


P.T. 




( Phadnis, Moreshvar Mahadev 


P. & P.T. 


466 


Doctor, Ardesir Dordbji 


E.S. 




f Bharuchd, Dosdbhdi Mdnikji ... 


Sir J. 




1 Joahi, Pdndurang Bdlkrishna 


Dh. 


467 


V Kaddppd, Rdmrdo Ndrdyan 


P. T. 




JMehtd, Jamnddds Bhagvdndds 


F. G. A. 




(Pradhdn, Rdmkrishna Vinayak 


P.T. 


472 


Desdi, Girdhardds Mangaldds ... 


P.T, 


473 


{ Bhdgvat, Ndrdyan Vindyak 


E, S. 


\ Mahdjan, Vdmanrdo Bhikobd 


P.T. 




^ Chube, Vdsudev Sitdrdm ... 


Sav. 


475 


1 Keni, Morobd Pdndurang 


P.T. 


j Mhdtre, Keshavrdo Yesobd 


P.T. 




( Morab, Gurundth Bdldji 


N. E. D. 


479 


Masurekar, Yashvant Shankar 


E.G. A. 




fCliokshi, Kaikhosru Barjorji ." 


Su. M. 




1 Khambdtd, Sordbji Dosdbhdi 


Sir J. 


480 


J Kirloskar, Gangddhar Rangndth 

} Moghe, Narhar Vithal 


Dh&N.E.D 


P.T. 




! Pinto, Anthony Augustine 


P.T, 




^.Shi'off, Kdvasji Behrdmji 


E. S. 


486 


Oka, Mddhav Kdshindth 


P.T. 


1 Vaidya, Popat PraWnirdm 


E. S. 




( Bdtlivdld, Hormasji Sordbji 


F. 


488 


< Dos, Remedios Thomas 


St.M. 




( Shah, Ndi-andds Ddmodardds 


P.T. 


491 


{ Kotbdge. Hari Raghundth 


R. 


1 Vyds, Ishvarldl Devsliankar 


A.&P.T 


493 


Patel, Mathurdds Ranchhoddds 


P.T. 




( Chindi.Sorabji Pestanji 


Su. M. 


494 


] Kdtarki, Venkdji Hanmantrdo 


B.M.&P.T. 




( Mhdtre, Harichandra Kdshindth 


P. 


#97 


Mehtd, Vithaldds Mordrji 


F- • 



MATRICULATION EXAMRJATIOH, 1883. 



331 



Rank.! 
1 


Names of Candidates. 


Scboola. 




fDeSouza, Frank Xa^-ier ...^ 


St.M. 




GadiAli, Hormasji Pestanji 


E. S. 




Jakate, Mahddev Nlr^yan 


P. T. 


498 


■ Milshet, Lakshtunan Govind 


N. E. B, 




Sagar, Hormasji Bejanji... _ 


SirC. 




Shahani, Sdhibsing ChandAsing 


H. 




l^Shringdrpure, KJianderao MMhavi4o 


SirC. 


505 


Buch, Revashankar Prinshankar 


N. W. 


506 


Gupta, Lakshuman Apaji 


B.S.iB.T. 


Sirnr, Mangesh Venkatraman 


K. 




1 Dalai, Purshottam Haricbandra 


F, 




j Khar^, Rastamji Frdmji 


E. S. 


508 


•((lavangiA, Kharshedji Navroji 


Sir J. 




Major, James FortvinatuB 

Phansalkar, Sakhiram Anant ... 


Bis. 




M. 




Dolakhlu, Sorabji Kharshedji 

Donvad, Anant Venkatrto 

Jayakar, BAlkrishna Rdmchandra 


P. T. 




B. 


513 


E. S. 


SModi, Mervanji Kuvarji 


B. Pro. 




i P^lekar, Tdsudev Shankar 

I Pande, Sad^shiv Venkatesh 


P.T. 




AJi. M.S. 




[ Donde, Trimbak Atm^rdm 

\Kh4nolkar, SAvM AtmilrAm ... 


E. S. 




B,M. 


519 


; Kshire, Viniiyak Jan^rdae 


Dbu. 


^ Kulkami, Keshav Abdji 


R. 




/MotivAkl, MaganlJll Vrajdis 

{ Pandit, Bh^skar MahMev 


B,H. 




Rat. 




[Gokhali, Ndrdyan Parasburdm 


R. M. 




Nimak, Bdlkrishna Atmiram 


P.T. 




Pardnjapye, NArayan Sakhdrlm 


P.T. 


525 


i Potnis, Moreshvar Mahddev 


Sav. 




Ruv^, Tribbuvandds Prdnjivandas 


Su.M. 




Sdgar, KrishnAji Sanjiv 


Dh. 




L SepdbirmaMni, Kundanmal Gurumuksing ... 


H. 


532 


Karmarkar, Vindyak Govind ... 


S.E. 


533 


'Sorabji, Mancherji 


B.Pro4P.T 




( Bharuchd, Hormasji Sheriirji 


F. 


534 


- Kelavdla, Pilanji Pestanji 


Su. M. 




( Mo<li, Hirjibbdi Dhanjibhai 


Sir J. 




1 Ghandl, Axdesir Ddddbhdi 


B.Pro. 


537 


< Karbadkar, Xslriyan RagbunAth 


S. 




/ Pavri, Na^Toji Bejanji .. 


F. 



* Surname not lino^v^, 



332 



UNIVERSITY, 




f Dhdrkar, Vin^yak Shivr^ 

I Joshi, Vindyak Kesljav 

( Ndtu, Datto Hari, . 

I Chavfln, BdburAo Rdojir^o 

I Chodri, Sheshgir Bhimdji 

•f Daru, IshvarM Harjivandds 

1 DMbliar, Dosdbhui E,astainji 

' Mistri, Ardesir Shdpurji 

{ Balikundi, Balkrishna Dattdtraya 

( Risvadkar, Govind Saddshiv ... 
Vepdri, BrijmohandJls Vijbhukhandds 
Meherhomji, Jeh^ngier Mancherji 
Chavbal, Anant Mahadev 

( DeCruz, William James Aloysious 

< Deshmukli, Hari Pjliidui-ang 

I Vadvdtharkar, Ndrdyan Rdjjlrdm 

iDeSouza, Joseph Gregory 

Ovalekar, Yashvantrao Makujid 
ShaMne, Bhdrgav Govind 

I Patvardhan, Vishnu D^modar 

) Phdtak, DatWtraya BhAskar .. 

\ Joshipaifl, JasvantrAm Nihdlchand .. 

I Pastdkitl, DosAbhjii Miinikji 

Nemdni, Lakshumindrdyan Jogeshvar 

Thiikor, MagauMl Umedrdm 

\ Desai, Chhotnbhdi Khandnbhai 

\ Kolatkar, Vishvan^th RaghuuAth 

j Gaitonde, Vithal Shamrdo 

I Hariilmarank, Tikamdds LAlmandds .. 

iBhdgvat, Balvant Riimchandra 
Bhat, Manishankar Nathdldl 
JatliAr, Divdkar Balvant 
Afinvdld, Vikaji Donibji 

iAmrolivdlil, Edalji KAvasji 
Bhagvandasdni, MulrAj Sujansing 
Deshpande, Gururdo Venkatesh 
Postmaster, ManikshAh Jamshedji 

IBhende, Mangesh Dharmrdo 
Godbole, Ddmodar Govind 
Pardnjapye, Govind Dinkar 
Bdthe, Vdman Ganesh 

J Deshi)ande, Trimbak Abdji 

I Lele, Vasudev Venkatesh 



MATRICrLATION EXAMIKATION, 1883. 



333 



Rank. 



Names of Candidates. 



Schools. 



583 

585 

586 

590 

591 

594 
595 
596 
597 
698 
599 



Kolhar, Bhimdji Rdmchandra ... 
Panthaki, Nddirshdh Phiro2shah 
Dias. Antony Richard _. 
Gadakari, Dattdtraya SitarAm . . . 
Kadi, Thakordas Navtamrdm ... 

I Mansukhdni, Vadhumal Udharam 

.Vakil, Shipurji Dinshih 
Tegur, Tukko Bhim^ji ... 
Bdndhnigar, KaMbhdi Mfineklal 
Sinir, Anand Rainkrishna 
Taleyarkhan, Fardunji Pestanji 
VaishampAyan, Ddmodar Krishna 
Shiirangpini, Ganesh Vishnu ... 
KatdrivaU, Nanumid Jam^lbhdi 
Kulkarni, Ganesh AppAji 
Belgaum, Rdmchandra Xarhar... 
Chiplunkar, Vaman Niriyan ... 



,X. E. D. 
E, S. 
St. J. 
E. S. 
Su.M.iP.T 
N.J, 

Ch. 

B. 
p. T. 

Dh. 
B. Pro. 
P. T. 
P. T. 
P. T. 
B.M. 
P. T. 

P. 



XL 



REGULATIONS FOR THE RECOGNITION OF 
INSTITUTIONS IN THE DIFFERENT FACULTIES. 

1. Any College or other Institution desirous of being 
recognized in any Faculty by the University of Bombay must 
forward, with its application, the followirig documents, 
signed in each case by the responsible authority, and 
countersigned by two members of the Senate : — 

(a.) A statement showing the present staff of Instructors 
and the course of study in the Faculty in which re- 
cognition is desired during the last two years, pro- 
vided the Institution has existed for such a period, 

(&.) A declaration that the Institution has the means of 
educating up to the standard of the highest degree 
in the Faculty in which recognition is desired. 

(c.) It shall be competent for the Senate, on the recom- 
mendation of the Syndicate, to recognize an Insti- 
tution in any Faculty for the purposes of a parti- 
cular Examination or Examinations only. 

2. By the term Responsible Authority is to be under- 
stood the Managing Board in the case of an Institution 
under such a Board, and the Director of Public Instruction 
in the case of Government Institutions. 

The fact of an Institution having been once recognized 
in any Faculty by the Universitjjr, is not to prevent the 
Senate withdrawing their recognition in that Faculty, in 
the case of the Institution changing its course of instruc- 
tion or ceasing to educate up to the University standard. 



KECOGNIZED INSTITUTIONS-UNIVERSITIES. 

The Universities of Great Britain and Ireland, and of 
India, in all the Faculties in which Degrees are granted by 
them respectively. 



ELPHISSTOXE COLLEGE. 335 

TI— COLLEGES AXD COLLEGIATE Ds'STITmOXS 
EECOGXIZED IN THE DIFFERENT FACULTIES. 
I. Elphinstone College, Bombay.") 
n. Deccan College, Poena ... | 

III. Free General Assembly's In- )-In Arts. 

stitution, Bombay I 

TV. St. Xa\'iers CoUege, Bombay .J 

fFor thepurpoges of the 

-r- Tr.».» ' /-I 11 T^ 11.' I Previous and First 

\ Bajaram Co lege, Kolhapur ^ £^armnation for the 

TI. Gajarat College, Ahmedabad.^l ^^^^ ^^ ^^A^or 

(^ of Arts. 

I For the ■purposes of 
TIL Barodd College \ the Previous Extv- 



] 



rniiiwiion. 



Tin. Government La\r School, Bombay. In Laic. 

IX. Grant Medical College, Bombay. In Medicine; and 
for the purposes of the Second Examination for the 
Degree of Bachelor of Science. 
X. College of Science, Poona. In Civil Frtffineering ; and 
for the purposes of the First and Second Examina- 
tions for the Degree of Bachelor of Science. 

I.— ELPHIXSTONE COLLEGE. 
(Recogxized 1860.) 

Elphinstone College arose by a separation in the year 
18.56 of the professorial element from the "' Elphinstone 
Institution," "which henceforth became a High School. 

The Elphinstone Institution had its origin in a meeting of 
the Bombay Natire Education Society on the 22nd August 
1827. to consider the most appropiiate method of testifying, 
the affectionate and respectful sentiments of the inhabitants 
of Bombay to the Honourable Mountstuart Elphinstone, on 
his resignation of the Government of Bombay. The result 
of this meeting "was that a sum of money, amounting to 
Rs. 2,29,656, vras collected by public subscription, towards 
the endowment of Professorships for teaching the English 
Language, and the Arts, Sciences, and Literature of Europe, 
to be denominated the Elphinstone Professorships. This 
sum afterwards accumulated to Rs. 4,43,901, and the interest 
of it is augmented bv an annual subscription from Govern- 
ment of Rs. 22,000. ' 

In 186-3, Cowasjee Jehanghier Readymoney, Esq., Justice 
of the Peace, Bombay, presented Government with one 



336 EECOGNIZED INSTITUTIONS. 

hundred thousand Kupees towards erecting suitable College 
Buildings for Elphinstone College, to be called the " Cowas- 
jee Jehanghier Buildings." 

In 1864, on account of the rise in the prices of building 
materials and labour, Mr. Cowasjee Jehanghier Ready money 
added a second sum of one hundred thousand Rupees to his 
former munificent donation. The Elphinstone College was 
removed on the 20th of February 1871 to the building on 
the Parel Road. 

The property and endowments of the Elphinstone College 
are under the guardianship of the Trustees of the Elphin- 
stone Funds. Present Trustees are Sir Mungaldass Nathoo- 
bhoy, Knight, C.S.I.; The Honourable Rao Saheb Vishvanath 
Narayan Maudlik, C.S.I.; and Sorabji Shapurji Bengalli, 
Esq., CLE. 

The following endo^vments are connected with the Elphin- 
stone College :— 

The West Scholarship Fund, subscribed in 1828, in honour 
of Chief Justice Sir Edward West. 

The Clare Scholarship Fund, subscribed in 1835, in honour 
of the Earl of Clare, Governor of Bombay. 

Tbe Gaikavad Scholarship, established by His Highness 
the Gaikavad in 1850. 

The Bell Prize Fund, subscribed in 1848, as a testimonial 
to Professor John Bell of the Elphinstone Institution. 

The Sundarji Jivaji Prize Fund, established in 1842 by 
Babiiji Snndarji in memory of his father. 

The Raj 4 of Dhar's Prize Fund, given by the Raja of 
Dhar in 1853. 

The Ganpatrao Vithal Prize Fund, given in 1854 by 
Ganpatrao Vithal of Indore. 

The Nawiib of Sachin Prize Fund, given in April 1871 
by His Highness the Nawi'ib of Sachin in memory of his 
fourth son, Sidi Abdul Karim Khan. 

The Mountstuart Elphinstone Prize, founded in 1874. 
This prize consists of Rs. 327-8-0 (the interest on Bs. 7,500 
in Government securities) and is annually awarded to the 
student who passes the Previous Examination with the 
highest aggregate number of marks and who is certified to 
be on the rolls of the College. 

Scholarships. 

The following Scholarships, each tenable for one year, 
are annually open for competition in the College : — 



ELPHINSTONE COLLEGE, 337 



A. — Senior ScJiolarships. 

For Languages 10 of Rs. 20 per mensem. 

For Mathematics ... 4 of Rs. 20 per mensem. 
For Natural Sciences... 2 of Rs. 20 per mensem. 

B. — Junior Scholarships, 

1st Class 10 of Ra. 15 per mensem. 

2nd Class 19 of Rs. 10 per mensem. 

A certain number of Undergraduates who are unable to pay 
the College fee are admitted free. 

List of PKiNcrPALS. 

1S45. John Harkness, M.A., LL.D. 
1862. Sir Alexander Grant, Bart., ^LA. 
1866. Kyrle Mitford Chatfield, B.A, 
1874. William Wokdsworth, B.A. 



1884 

Principal. 

William Wordsworth, B,A., Oxon., Professor of History and 
Political Economy. 

Professors, 

James Thomas Hathomthwaite, M.A., Cantab., Professor of 
Mathematics. 

Peter Peterson, M.A., Edin., B.A., Oxon,, Professor of Oriental 

Languages. 

Michael Macmillan, B.A., Oxon., Professor of Logic and Moral 

Philosophy. 

Arthur Barrett, B. A., Lampeter, Professor of English Literature. 

Mirza Hairat, Professor of Persian. 

Isadore Bemadotte Lyon, F.C.S., F.I.C., Professor of Chemistry, 

D. MacDonald, JLD., B.Sc, C.M., Professor of Biology. 

Kdvasji DdddbhAi N^egaumv^, M.A., F.C.S., F.LC,, Lecturer 
in Experimental Physics. 

SJidstris. 

Bhimdchdrjra bin R^mbhat, Zaiakikar. 
Rdj^rdm Bhat bin Ganesh Bhat, Sodas. 

B 1030—29 Bc 



333 



EECOGNIZED INSTITUTIONS. 



DAKSHINA FELLOWS. 

Senior. 

(1) Gokhale, JvTahddev Vishnu, B.A. 

(2) Vaidya, Lakshuman Ramchandra, B.A. 

Juniors, 

(3) Ajrekar, Keshav Ganesh, B.A. 

(4) Ndik, Bhimbhdi Jivanji, B.A. 

(5) P^dsh^h, Barjorji Jdmasji 

Honorary Felloics. 

Gajjar, Tribhuvandds Kallidndds, B.A., B.Sc 

(6) Wadid, Jamshedji Eastamji, B.A. 

Superintendent and Librarian. 
Vaidya, Chintdman Vindyak, M.A. 

Gymnastic Master. 
Hormasji Nasarvdnji. 

Senior Scholars. 

ApW, Eaghiindth N^rAyan, B.A Clare Fund. 

Barodid, Davlat Purshottam, B.A Elph. Fund. 

(7) BharucM, Frdmji Dordbji, B.A ,, 

Boyce, Bamanji Rastamji, B.A Clare Fund. 

Diimle, Mahadev Gangddhar, B.A Elph. Fund. 

(S) Dd,var, Mervdnji ShJivakshAh,^B,A Clare Fund. 

Deshpand^, Ddmodar Lakshuman, B.A. ... Clare Fund. 
Jagtidni, Bulchand Kodumal, B.A, ... Elph. Fund. 

(9) Kirkir6, Krishndji Hari, B.A. ,, 

Kulkarni, Mangesh Anant, B.A. ... ... ,, 

Pethe, Ndrdyan Chintiiman, B.A ,, 

SaklddvAU, Mervdnji NdnAbhAi, B.A. ... Clare Fund. 
Vazirdni, Tahilrdm Khemchand, B.A ... ,, 



(1) RijS of Dhdr Prizeman, Duke of Edinburgh Fellow, Ellis Scholar, 
James Taylor Prizeman and Cobden Club Medallist of 18S2. 

(2) Jugonnitli Sunkersett Scholar, Bhiu Diiji Prizeman of 1882. 

(3) Nab&b of Sachln Prizeman of 1S82. Hughling Prizeman. 

(4) Nabab of Sachin Prizeman of 1884. 

(5) EAja of Dhir Prizeman 1883, Ellis Scholar, James Taylor Prizeman, 

Cobden Club Medallist of 1883. Gibbs Prizeman. 

(6) NiirdTan V.^,sudev Scholar. 

(7) Ganpatrao Vithal Prizeman of 1883. 

(8) Bell Prizeman of 1883. 

(y) Jusonnath Sunkersett Scholar, V. J. S. Prizeman, Bhiu Ddji Prizeman 
of 1S83. 



ELPHINSTOSE COLLEGE. 339 

Junior Scholars. 

(10) * Bhigvat, Sakharam Keshav West Fund. 

(11) * D^rukhdnAvdla, Mervdnji Pestanji ... „ 

(12) * Gdndhi, Virchand Rdgha\-ji „ 

* Gursing, Shivanmal JJaumal ,, 

(13) * Mauhi, Shirdjudin Abdul Fattd „ 

(14) * Padshah, Pestanji Jdmdsji „ 

(15) * Parminand, JaganndthNdrayan ,, 

* Patel, Kharshedji Sordbji „ 

(16) * Pdtil, Govind Appdji „ 

(17) * Phadnis, Hamnant Sheshgir. 

(17) * Sovdni, Govind Krishna. _ 

* Vargharkar, Jacob Bdpuji. 
(15) * Vyas, Raghavji Jayakrishna. 

t Bagtiini, Revachand Ramrathidmal ... Clare Fund, 
t Banaji, Frdmji Kdvasji ,, 

(18) t Bhardd, Bhikdji Dordbji „ 

+ Daldl, Balkrisbna Pitambardds GdikdvAd. 

t Gite, Cyril Mankoji Clare Fund. 

t Hodivdli, Shdpurji Honnasji , 

+ Javeri, Mathuramal Rcimchandra ,, 

(19) t Joshi, Chintdman Hari , 

t Koydji, Hormasdydr Kdvasji Gdikdvdd, 

+ Purdnik, Shankar Vishnu Clare Fund, 

t Repori^r, Edalji Ddrdshdh , 

+ Valsard, Mancherji Ban^mji ,, 

t Wdgh, Venkatesh Vaikunth ,, 

B (17) Apte, Hari Sadashiy ... Elph. Fund. 

(20) Captain, Kharshedji Hormasji Clare Fund. 

Dalai, Hirjibhdi Kdvasji West Fund. 

Desdi, Govindbhii Hathibhdi Clare Fund. 

Kehimkar, Abrahim Aaron Elph. Fund. 

Kharas, Dosdbhdi Bejanji Chae Fund. 

Kotval, Dhanjibhdi Pestanji ,, 



* Passed the First Examination for the Degree of B.A. 

t Passed the Previous Examination. 

(B) Sir George LeGrand Jacob Scholar. 

(10) Varjivandas M&dhavdSs Sanskrit Scholar of 1833. 

Gl) Gibbs Prizeman of 1882. 

(12) Sir -Jasvantsinorji Scholar. 

(13) Sir Frank Souter Scholar. 

(14) Mountstuart Elphinstone Prizeman of 1SS3. 

(15) Rdo Sir Pr^gmalji Scholar. 

(16) Baroda Scholar. 

(17) Alfred Scholar. 

(IS) Gibbs Prizeman of 18S3. 

(19) Jugonn^th Sunkersett Scholar. 

(20) Bai MSLneckbSi ByrSim jee Jeejeebhoy Prizeman- 



340 RECOGNIZED INSTITUTIONS. 



MAdan, Ardesir Hormasji West Fund. 

MehtA, Manu Nandshankar „ 

(12) Vakil, ChuniUl HariUl Elph. Fund. 

Velankar, Ndrdyan Gundji „ 

Commoners. 

* Apt^, MahAdev Krishna. 

* Bhdte, Vithal Bdlkrishna. 
(17) * Chirmul^, Vdsudev Ganesh. 

* Desdi, GuUbbhdi Vasanji. 

* Desdi, SAkarldl ChanduUL 

* Doctor, Shdpurji Barjorji. 

* Dnydni, Harasukhrdi Trimbakrdi. 

* Dubdsh, Jehdngier Phirozeshdh. 

* Ezra, Reuben. 

* Gddgil, Vishnu Gangddhar. 

* Ghodd, Ganpatrdi Maydshankar. 
(17) * Gokhal^. Gopal Krishna. 

(16) * Gokhal^, Rdrachandra Hari. 

* Hirdmdnik, Rastamji Mdnikji, 

* Joglekar, Ganesh Venkatesh. 

* Kalsulkar, Trimbak Vithal. 

* Kdnitkar, Vdman Hari. 

* Mantri, Kdshindth Jandrdan. 

* Mandlik, Shivrdm Gangddhar, 

* Mehtd, Dinshdh Fardunji. 

* Mehtd, Ndrdyan Kuvarji, 

* Modak, Gopdl Trimbak, 

* Nddgand, Nilkanth Anndji. 
(21) * Nagarvdld, Jamshedji Navroji. 

* Ndtu, Vishnu Eaghundth. 

* Nimachvdld, Jehdngier Dordbji, 

* Nisal, Shivrdm Ndrdyan. 
Pddhye, Ddmodar Ganesh 

* Pandit, Rdoji Parshurdm. 

t Pdrvatikar, Rdmchandra Krishna, 

* Patvardhan, Mahddev Ndrdyan, 

* Rdsinkar, Vishnu Krishna. 

* Surveyor, Nasarvdnji Fakirji. 

* Tand, Mordrji Anandji. 

* Tdtd, Edalji Pestanji, 



* Passed the First Examination for the Degree of B. A. 
t Passed the First Examination for the Degree of B.Sc. 
(12) Sir Jasvftntsingji Scholar. 

(16) Baroda Scholar. 

(17) Alfred Scholar. 

(21) Hormasjl Kharshedji Drdy Prizeman of 1883. 



ElPHllfSTOXE COLLEGE. ^^ 

* Thikor, Manildl Ajitrdi. 
Vijayakar, Shripat Khanderdo, 

* yijnik, MadhavaUl JaveriML 
t Abhydnkar, Sakhardm Vishnu. 

(22) t Adv^ Hirdnand Khemsing. 

(13) + Akhund, GulAm Mnhtounad GuUmalli. 

(23) t Bapat, Gopdl Vdman. 

t Bhard^, Shivrdm Ekndth, 

t Chavin, Udhavji DeTJi. 

+ Chitnis, Gang^har Mahidev. 

t DesAi, Haribhdi Gopalji 
(16) t Desdi, Naginbhdi Santukbhii. 

t Dholkii, Manishankar Sadashankar, 

t Dhond, RAmchandra Sdjo. 

+ Ezekiel, Ezekiel Moses. 

t Jayavant, Bhaskar Lakshuman. 

t Kundanmaldni, Lildchand Hasmal. 

t Kdpadid, Sordbji Bamanshih, 
(23) t Khdnzode, Ambadds Rivji. 

t Khare, Vishnu Vinayak. 

t Koy^ji, Dardshah Kdvasji, 

t Koydji, Koydji Nasandnji. 

t Ldlvani, DaJpatrara Eochirdm. 
A Limay^, Hari Vithal. 

+ Masand, Atmdram Gangdrdm, 
(12) t Mehtd, Motichand Javerchand, 

t Mehtd, Nagindds Gokaldds. 

t Modak, R^chandra Vdman. 

t Nabar, Dattdtraya Nardyan, 

+ Oka, Gopindth Vindyak. 

+ Tatel, Dhanjishdh Edalji. 

(24) + Patel, Chaturbhdi ValabbhdL 
+ Sdmant, Namdev VithaL 

t ShukJa, Dalpatrdm BhagvdnjL 

t Surti, Honnasji Edalji. 

t Tarapurvdld, Ratanji Jivanji. 

t Tarkhad, Rdmchandra Atmdram. 

t Tripdthi, Tansukhrdm Mansnkhrdm. 

t Trivedi, Tanamanshankar Ratanshankar. 

(25) t Vaishnav, Jayaprasdd Hariprasdd. 

* Passed the First Examination for the Degree of BJL 

t Passed the Previous Examination. 

(A) Passed F.A. Examination of the Calcutta 'DniTersity. 

(12) Sir Jasvsntsingji Scholar. 

(13) Sir Frank Souter Scholar, 
(16) Baroda Scholar. 

(22) Sind Government Scholar and Bio Sir PHigmalji Scholar. 
(2:5) BerSr Scholar. 

(24) Meh-ill Scholar. 

(25) Eebbert and LaTouche ScboUr. 

B 1030—29 BU* 



342 RECOGNIZED INSTITUTION S. 

t Vakil, JametrAm Jivanrdm. 
Ach^rya, Gajtoan Govind. 
Acharya, Ildmrd,o Keshav. 
Adhikdri, Rdm Dattdtraya. 
Agaskar, Bdlkrishna Viniyak. 
Alimchanddni, Lildram Jethmal. 
Arjdni, Navroji Jdm^spji. 
Baniji, Ndndbhai MancherjL 
Bdrdhid, Varajdds DdyAbhdi. 
Bdtha, Jehdngier Dinshdh. 
(23) Bendre, Jairdm Atmdram. 

Bendur, Bhavdnishankar Subrao. 
Benettnd, Rastamji Mdnikji. 
Bhagvdnddsani, Mulrdj Sujansing, 
Bharuchd, Phirozeshdh Pestanji. 
Bharuchd, Rastamji Edalji. 
Blidtavadekar, Mahddev Rdmchandra. 
Bhedvar, Dhanjishdh Pestanji. 
Bhend6, Yashvant Ndrdyan. 
Bhdvnagri, Navroji Shdpurji. 
Billimorid, Ndndbhdi Mancherji, 
Bomboat, Ardesir Edalji. 
Bottlevdld, Hormasji Sordbji. 
Broker, Karsandds Chhabildds. 
Chandirdmani, Vadhumal Udhdrdm, 
Chindi, Pestanji Kavasji. 
Chokshi, Kaikhosru Barjorji. 
Chokshi, Manchhdbhdi Narsaidds. 
Chokshi, Nasarvdnji Hormasji. 
Collector, Navroji Adarji. 
Contractor, Ardesir Edalji. 
Dalvi, Anant Nardyan. 
Dallas, Barjorji Sordbji. 
Desdi, Chhotubhdi Khandubhdi. 
Deshmukh, Govind Sakhdrdm. 
23) Deshpdnd6, Vdman Santo. 

Dhairyavdn, Krishnardo Saddnandji, 
Dhurandhar, Bdbdji Krishnandth. 
Dholkid, Rupshankar Murdrji. 
Divechd, Jijibhdi Ardesir. 
Doctor, Jehdngier Frdmji. 
Doctor, Jamshedji Pestanji. 
Doshi, Ndnchand Bechar. 
Fouzd'ir, Motildl Tribhuvandds. 
Gadkari, Dattdtraya Sitdrdm. 



t Passed the Previous Examination. 
(23) Ber4r Scholar. 



ELPHIKSTONE COLLEGE. 

GAndhi, Ardesir Ddd^bhii. _ 
Gliadially, Hormasji PestanjL 
GhdavdU, Kavasji FrdmjL 
Gogt€, Raghundth Bhikaji. 
Hat^, Mothabhdi Gopinath, 
Jdll, Rastamji Hormasji. 
Joshi, Keshav Eldmkrishna. 
KalliAnpur, Ganpat RAghavendra. 
Kdmd, Hormashah Kdvashdh. 
King&, Dosdbhdi Jamisji, 
Kdngd, Edalji Rastamji. 
Kanid, JekisandAs JethdbhAi, 
Karandikar, Ramrdo Shivram. 
Karnik, Shankar Viniyak. 
Keldvdld, PAlanji Pestanji. ^ 
Khambata, Sonibji Dosdbhdi 
Khandvdla, Motiram Gordhand^. 
Koppikar, Pandurang TimJippd. 
Koregdvkar, KamUnath Shivrdm. 
Kotvdl, Ardesir Pestanji. 
Kshirsdgar, Bdpuji Kashindth. 
Koydji, Sorabji Nasarvdnji. 
Kur, Badrudin Abdulld. 
lAUi, Am AbdudUi Gdfur. 
Ldlld, Chandirdm Gidnchand. 
Ldlvdni, Kundanmal Manghirsing. 
(22) Ldlvani, Kisbinchand Uttamchand. 
Lord, Ardesir Navroji. 
Lukmdni, Muhdmmad Baker Abdul Karim. 
Madgdvkar, Krishnaji Rdmchandra. 
Manerikar, Balkrishna Rdmkrishna. 
Meherji, Phii-ozeshdh Frdmji. 
Mehtd, Anantrdi Ndthji. 
Mehta, Bdpuji Rastamji. 
Mehtd, Mamnukh Krishnamnkh. 
Mehta, Motilal Manibhdi. 
Mehti, Mdrkand Ndndshankar. 
Mehtd, Pratdbrai Vajeshankar. 
Mehtd, Rastamji Daddbhdi. 
Mehtaji, Kdvasji Nasarvdnji. 
Mistri, Dhanjibhdi Pdlanji. 
Modi, Annpchand Jagjivaiu 
Mobile, Ganpat Bhaskar. 
Mulldn, Dinshah Fardunji. 
Kagarkar, Ddmodar Ganesh. 
Ndzar, Mansukhldl Hirdldl. 
Ndndvati, Hoshangshdh Phirozeshdh. 

(22) Sind Government Scholar. 



313 



344 



RECOGNIZED INSTITUTIONS. 



NarimAn, Sordbji Kharshedji, 
(26) Nulkar, Atmdrdm Krishudji. 

Ojd, Asanmal Tejbhdndds. 

Umrigar, Phirozeshdh Kuvarji, 

Updddhya, KAshindth Vishnu. 

Ovalekar, Yashvantrdo Makund. 

PakvdsA, Brijbhukhandds Manchhirdm. 

PdlkhivdU, Jehdngier Sordbji. 

Pd,rikh, Purshottam Mdvji. 

Pardnjapye, Govind Dinkar, 

Patvdri, Ranchhoddds Vandrdvandda. 

Patel, Behrdmji Ratanji. 

Penkar, Samuel Abaji, 

Pital^, Vindyakrdo Saddnandji. 

Pothivdld, Bamanji Edalji, 

Redikar, Shivrdm Sitdrdm. 

Sdrangpani, Ganesh Vishnu. 

Saraiyd, Motildl Vithaldds. 

Shdhdni, Sdhebsing Chandusing. 

Shirdli, Rdmkrishna Manjundth. 

Shroff, Brijbhukandds Manekldl, 

Seth, Kdlidds Kallidndds. 
(23) Subnis, Gangdrdm Atmdrdm. 

Talvalkar, Hari Bdlkrishna. 

Talydrkhdn, Fardunji Pestanji. 

Tarkhadkar, Dnydneshvar Atmdrim. 

Thdkor, Balvantrdi KallidnrAi. 

Tipnis, Vdnian Ramchandra. 

Trivedi, ChhaganUl ShambhuMl. 

Vdchd, Jeh^ngier Mancherji. 

Vdchd, Rastamji Fardunji. 

Vdchdgdndhi, Rastamji Nasarvdnji, 

Vakil, Hardevrdm Ndndbhdi- 

Vaidya, Vishvandth Prabhurdm. 

Vyds, Vajerdm Harindrdyan. 

Wddid, Bamanji Hormasji. 

Wddid, Ddddbhdi Mervdnji. 

Free, Students, 

* Joshi, Narhar Bdlkrishna. 

* Karre, Ddmodar Keshav. 

* Subnis, Ndrdyan Ghanashdm. 
(22) t Advdni, Himatsing Gajsing. 

t Athalye, Ganesh Vishnu. 

* Passed the First Examination for the Degree of B.A. 
t Passed the Previous Examination. 

f22) Sind Government Scholar. 
2:i) BerAr Scholar. 
(26) Jam Shri Vibhiji Scholar. 



I 



DECCAN COLLEQB. 345 



+ Patvardhan, Ddmodar Ganesh. 
+ Sule, Bdlkrislina Govind, 
t Vasu, Lakhidmal Aid4s. 

Dald], Kdshidds N4rand4a. 

Kdle, Govind Vithal. 

Pardnjapye, Keshav Bdlkrishna. 

Patvardhan, Ndr^yan Ganesh, 

Sane, Ganesh Bhd.skar. 

V^vekar, Venkatesh Moreshvar, 



IL— DECCAN COLLEGE. 

(Recogxized 1860.) 

On the occupation of the Deccan by the British Govem- 
ment in 1818 it was found that a certain portion of the re- 
venue of the Maratha State had been yearly set apart for 
pensions and presents to Brahmans (Dakshina). To pre- 
vent hardship and disappointment, and to fulfil the im- 
plied obligations of the new rulers, the British Grovemment 
continued these payments ; but as the pensions and allow- 
ances fell in, they resolved, while maintaining the same 
total expenditure, under the name of the Dakshina Fund, 
to devote a portion of it to a more permanently useful 
end, in the encouragement of such kind of learning as the 
Brahmans were willing to cultivate. With this view the 
Poona College was founded in 1821, as a Sanskrit College, 
exclusively for Brahmans. 

In 1837 some branches of Hindu learning were dropped, 
the study of the Vernacular and of English was introduced, 
and the College was opened to all classes, and aft«r having 
been amalgamated with the English School in 1851 it 
arose in its present form in 1857, by a separation of the 
College Division from the School Division. From another 
portion of the Dakshina Fund, Dakshina Fellowships have 
been founded, of which four fellowships, one Senior and 
three Junior, are attached to this College. 

In 1863 Sir Jamsetjee Jeejeebhoy, Bart., offered to 
Government the sum of one hundred thousand Rupees to 
provide suitable College Buildings for the Deccan College. 

In March 1868 the new Buildings were occupied, and the 
Government directed that the name, which had been Poona 
College, should henceforth be Deccan College. 

t Passed the Pre\ious Examination. 



346 RECOGNIZED INSTITUTIONS. 

The following endowments are connected with, the 
Deccan College : — 

I. — Government. 

One Senior Fellowship, of Es. 100 per mensem. 
Three Junior Fellowships, of Rs. 75 per mensem. 

SCHOLAESHIPS. 

A. — Senior Scholarships. 

For Languages, 6, tenable for ") -n nn ™ 
one year j Es. 20 per mensem. 

^^Jne^ySr"?.!!^^^^^^ ^'- ^^ P^^ mensem. 

B. — Junior Scholarships' 

Eleven Junior Scholarships of the value of Eupees 10, 
ind one of the value of Eupees 5 per mensem, tenable for 
one year. 

Junior Scholars further pay a reduced College fee of 
Eupees 3 per mensem, but Senior Scholars pay the full fee 
of Eupees 5 per mensem. 

II. — Private. 

Two Candy Scholarships of the value of Eupees 4 each : 
one for Marathi and one for Sanskrit. These Scholarships 
were founded in 1857 by some Native friends of Major 
Candy, some time Principal of this College, in memoi'ial of 
his long services in the cause of Native literature and 
e ducation. 

In the year 1877 a fund was raised by subscription 
among Bombay Civil Servants to perpetuate the memory 
of William Henry Havelock, some time Eevenue Commis- 
sioner, S.D. The interest upon this fund is devoted to an 
annual prize awarded in September of each year. The 
prize is open to all students of the College of not more 
than three years' standing. 

In the year 1879 Mr. Vishnu Moreshvar Mahajani, M.A., 
some time a student and fellow of the College, presented 
the sura of one thousand rupees to found an annual Prize 
for that student who obtains the highest marks for 
Sanskrit in the annual Junior Scholarship Examination. 



DECCAN COLLEGE. 347 



LisT OF Principals. 



1S51. Major Thomas Candy. 
1S57. Edwin Arnold, M.A. 
1860. William Allan Russell, M.A. 
1862. William Wordsworth, B.A. 
187-4. R. G. OxEXHAM, M.A. 



1884. 

PrlncipaL 

R. G. Oxenham, M.A., Oxon., Professor of English Literature. 

Professors. 

F. G. Selby, B.A. , Oxon., Professor of Logic and Moral 
Philosophy. 

Edmkrisima Gopdl Bh^nddrkar, M.A., Professor of Oriental 
Languages. 

G. W. Forrest, B.A., Cambridge, Professor of Mathematics. 
Khdn Bahadur Dastur Hoshang Jamdsp, Assistant Professor of 

Oriental Languages. 
Dhanjishih Hormasji Dastur, M.A., Lecturer on Physics. 

Fellows. 

Bastisinh Duniasinh Chavdn, B.A., Senior Dakshina 

Fellow. 
Vaijanath Kashinath E^jvdde, B.A., Junior Dakshina 

Fellow. 
Bapu Nardyan Dhekne, B.A., Junior Dakshind Fellow. 
R^mchandra Malhar Deshpinde, B. A., Junior Dakshind 

Fellow. 

Superintendent of Resident Students. 

Bastisinh Duniasinh Chavdn, B.A. 

Librarian. 

Bastisinh Duniisinh Chavdn, B.A. 

Shastris. 

Chintaman Sh^stri Thatte. 
Vamanach^rya Jhalkikar. 

Students. 

1 — Graduates. 

(1) Dastur, Meherji Hoshang. 
(1) Khare, Ddmodar Nilkanth. 

(1) Senior Scholar. 



348 RECOGNIZED INSTITUTI05S. 

2. Undergraduates. 

(a)— Senior Scholars, 
m Ansal, Balvant Edmchandra. 

}; Gddgil, Sad^shiv Bdpuji. 
1 Hardikar, Chint^man Krishna. 
f2 ?atvirdhan, Ganesh Vm|yak 

(]))— Junior Scholars. 

(3) Bdpat, Mah^dev SakMrdm. 

U) Bakshi.GovindBaja]!. 

fs Bhadkamkar Hari Mahddev. 

3 Dhadphale, Krishnd]! Bahirav. 

3 Lele, WchandraSaddshiv. 
i'i^ ^ Par^niapye, Han Krishna. 
^^^ ? pttkir?I)imodarIlaghun4th. 

3I Sethnd Bastamji Aspanidrji. 

I Shendre, Vishnu N^rdyan. 

^^ Ambeg4vkar, Ganesh Balvant. 
irankalle, Vishvan^th Anant. 
Godbole, Vindyak Appaji. 

tR\ Tnshi Bhdskar Vishnu. 

^^^Saye,Lakshunianmrdyan. 

Commoners. 

io\ Ante Chintdman Ndrdyan. 

2 Xt'avadekar, Ganpat Keshav. 

9 BeshpAnde, Shankar G-anesh. 

2 Dull, Bh^skar Edmchandra. 

Ill Sekar, Moreshvar Keshav. 
9 Skarn,Ekn&thSubrdo 
9 nmave PurshottamEaghundth 
2 MTngalvedhekar, E^jerdo V.thal. 

B^A^s^iJrisr; 

iltSk^SM^Uan. 



■ ^^ TZr^vi^Examination for the Desrree of B,A. 
(2^ S'^'^^theSouB Examination. 
P.^^ ^rafakrL Jugonnathji Sankersett Pruemaa. 
6 JugSbSunUett scholar. 



DECCAS COLLEGE. 349 



Atre, Hanmant Bapuji. 
Bharucha, Behrdmji Phirozeshih. 
Bokil, Amrit Mahadev. 
Ch4ndorkar, Dinkar Trimbak. 
Chinmulgxind, Hanmant Venkatesh. 
Chavbal, Xilkanth Bh^skar. 
Date, N^rdyan Kdshindth. 
DesAi, GulAbrai Govindram. 
Deshpdnde, Shivrdm Ganesh. 
Dikshit, Bahirav Vishnu. 
Ghdnekar, Laks human Govind. 
Gogte, Balvant RAmkrishna. 
Gokhale, Janardan Ganesh, 
Gole, Gop4l Shivram. 
Hanson, Charles Maurice. 
Judge, Ganesh Balvant. 
Jdvdekar, Dattatraya Jagannlth. 
Joglekar, Lakshiunan Ndriyan. 
KSe, BJibut4o Xartyan. 
Kiile. Vishnu Shripad. 
Kamik, BAbiji Abaji. 
Kharvandikar, NarJiyan Vdman. 
Koparkar, Ganesh Lakshuman. 
Lele, Gangadhar Vdman. 
Lenahan, Herbert Thomas. 
Mehta Na^^lidh^ai Harjivandis. 
Nene, Vithal Shankar. 
Parchure, Viniyak Ndr^yan. 
Pense, Dattatraya Rangnath. 
Pethe, Anndji Ramchandra. 
Risvddkar, Shivram Keshav. 
S^thaye, Shridhar Xdrdyan. 
Sithe, Shankar Keshav. 
Sh^, Mahdsukh Narsidds. 
Sohoni, Krishnaji Vishnu. 
Sabnis, Rdmchandra Ghanashdm. 
Tikle, Ndtu Shrikrishna. 
Vdngikar, Anndji Ganesh. 
Velankar, Ramchandra Hari. 
Apte, Hari Xardyan. 
Apte, Vindyak Vishnu. 
Bahatti, Uddpi Shrinivds. 
Bdpat, Keshav Sakhdram. 
Bapat, Nilkanth Krishna. 



(3) Passed the Previons Examioatioa. 

(4) Hnghlings Prizemao. 

(6) Jogonn&th Sankenett ScholK. 



£ 1030—30 Bu 



350 RECOGNIZED INSTITCTIOXS. 



Bdpat, Edmchandra Vishnu. 
Barve, VAman Nar^yan. 
Bhade, Lakshuman Vithal. 
Bhdgvat, Balvant R^mchandra. 
(8) Bhdlerdo, Govind JanArdan. 
Bhanag^, K^shindth BAlkrishna. 
Bhide, Nardyan Vishnu. 
Bumla, Nasarvdnji Pestanji. 
Chavbal, Anant Mahddev. 
Cherikar, Daniel Ibrahim. 
Chiplunkar, Vdman Ndrdyan. 
Ddngrikar, Bdlkrishna Rdoji. 
Ddte, Moro Ganesh. 
Disdnd, Manchershdh Navroji. 
Deshmukh, Atmdram Sitdrdm. 
Deshmukh, Hari Pdndurang. 
Deshpdnde, Trimbak Abdji. 
Dev, Hari Shrikrishna. 
Dhekne, Shridhar Lakshuman. 
Ekhe, Yddav Chimndji. 
Gadre, Vishvandth Rdmchandra. 
Ghdnekar, Govind Vdsiidev. 
Ghdrpure, Chintdman Hari. 
Ghdte, GanpAdhar NArdyan. 
Godbole, Keshav Bioji. 
Gogte, Raghundth Bhikdji. 
Gokhale, Vishnu Saddshiv. 
Gupta, Lakshuman Appaji. 
Hardikar, Datto Krishna. 
Hinagunda, Krishndji Shrinivds. 
Jdni, Durlabhrdm Rdmji. 
Jathdr, Sambhu Bhikdji. 
Jejurikar,Narhar Raghundth. 
Joshi, Ganesh lUmchandra. 
Joshi, Narhar Bdpu. 
Karve, Goptil Krishna. 
Khdrkar, Keshav Ndrdyan. 
Killeddr, Vdman Lakshuman. 
Kuber, Dinkar RAoji. 
Kulkarni, Govind Appaji. 
Ldgu, Hari Lakshuman. 
Lele, Gangddhar BalUL 
Iiele, Raghundth Hari. 
Lele, Vdman Bdlkrishna. 
Lele, Vdsudev Venkatesh. 
Mahdjani, Vdman Bhikaji. 

(8) Ber&( Scholar. 



DECCAX COLLEGE. 351 



Mardthe, Rimchandra Nirayan. 
MAtegdvkar, Trimbak Ramakant. 
Kaearkar, Bhiskar N^r^yan. 
Nagarkar, Jandrdan KeshaT. 
Naik, Pandurang Bhikiji. 
Nene, Vdsudev Narayan. 
Nichure, Bilkrishna Rimchandra. 
Nimak, Bdlkrishna Atmdrdm. 
Nirokhekar, Dattatraya SadAshiv. 
Padamji, Bamanji Doribji. 
Pandit, Bhaskar MahAdev. 
P4nse, KiishnAji M;irtand. 

(6) Panse, Niirayan Sakhdrim. 
Panthaki, Fardunji PhirozeshAh. 

(8) Parinjapye, Vasudev Kdshindth. 
PaTTatikar, Hanmant Krishna. 
PAtU, Vasudev Divakar. 

(7) Patvardhan, Vinayak Sad^hiv. 
Pendse, Vishvandth Makund. 
Pethe, Hari Chintdman. 
Phdtak, Dattatraya Bh^kar. 
Phdtak, Ganesh Balkrishna. 

(8) Pimple, Balirdm Meghaahdm. 
Pradhan, Divdkar Vdman. 
Purveyor, Pestanji Barjorji. 
Rajddhyaksha, Raghundth Bdlkrishna. 
Kdjap4thak, Gopdl Anant. 

Raste, Lakshuman Shdmrdj. 
Risvddkar, Govind Sadashiv. 
Saranjdme, Ndrayan Balvant. 
Sathaye, Ganesh Vishnu. 
Sathaye, Shirrdm Trimbak. 
Sathe, Ndrdyan Nilkanth. 
Sidhaye, Krishna ji Ndrayan. 
Miss Sordbji Cornelia. 
Sovani, Vishnu Yashvant. 
Sukhid, Jamshedji Dhanjibhdi. 
Samarth, Ndrdyan Mahddev. 
Talkar, Reubin Daniel. 
Talkar, Daniel Moses. 
Tembe, Anant Ddmodar. 
Vdble, Krishndji Vindyak. 
Vaduvane, Pandhamdth Chintaman. 
Vadvdtharkar, Ndrdyan Rdjdrdm. 



(6) Jngonnath Sunkersett Scholar, 

(7) Xigpur Scholar. 
(S) Berir Scholar. 



352 RECOGNIZED INSTITUTIOSSw 

Vaidya, Moreshvar Dinkar. 
Vaze, SadAshiv Ganesh. 

Free, Students. 

(2) Betigiri, Svdmi Narhar. 

(2) Bodas, Lakshuman Chintdman. 

(2) Karmarkar, Hari Bhikdji. 

(3) Ddmle, Bhdu Krishna. 

(3) Deshmukh, Vishnu Krishna. 
Bade, Kdmkrishna Nilkanth. 
Gat, Ganesh Vdman. 
Godbole, Dinkar Saddshiv. 
Hebal, Ganesh AnndrAo. 
Kelkar, Prabh^kar Lakshuman. 



III.— FKEE GENERAL ASSEMBLY'S INSTITUTION, 

BOMBAY. 

(Recognized 1861.) 

This Institution arose out of an English School for 
Native youths, founded by the Rev. Dr. Wilson in 1832, and 
was originally dependent on local contributions. It was 
afterwards recognized in 1835 by the Church of Scotland 
and in 1843 by the Free Church of Scotland, from which 
body it receives the greater part of its funds. The follow- 
ing endowments are attached to the Institution : — 

Endowed Scliolarsliips. 

One Fleming Scholarship Rs. 100 per annum. 

Nesbit (R.) Memorial Theological Scho- 
larship „ 120 per annum. 

Smyttan (G.) Memoriar Scholarship... „ 60 per annum. 

Lang (W.) Scholarship „ 180 per annum. 

Miller (H.) do. „ 100 per annum. 

Nesbit (R.) Memorial Literary Scholar- 
ship , 60 per annum. 

St. Clair Jameson Memorial Scholarship. „ 40 per annum. 

Four Fleming (Jas. N.) Nomination 

Scholarships, each „ 40 per annum. 

Purvis (Col.) Scholarship „ 62 per annum. 

Molesworth (J. T.) Scholarship „ 40 per annum. 

Davidson (D.) do. „ 40 per annum. 

(2) Passed the First Examination for the Degree of B.A. 

(3) FasseU the Previous Examination. 



FBEE GESTESAI. ASSEMBLY'S IKSTITimON. 353 

Endowed Prizes, 
The Wilson Prize (Gold Medal or Books). 
The R^ja of Dhdr Prize. 
Vithal Ndrdyan Pathak Prize (value Es. 40 per annum). 

The Campbell (A.) Prize. ) p Preparatory 
The Murray Mitchell Prize. > pia^ir^ 
The B^la GopdlJoshi Prize. ) ^^a^ses. 

List of Principals, 

1832. The Rev. John Wilson, D.D., F.R.S. 
1876. The Ret. R. Stothert, M.A. 
1884. The Rev. D. Mackichan, M.A., D.D. 

1884 

PriiKipal. 

The Rev, D. Mackichan, M.A., D.D., Professor of Physics and 
Logic. 

Professors. 

The Rev. Buchanan Blake, M.A., B.D, Professor of History and 

Political Economy. 
The Rev. A, C. Grieve, Professor of English Literatore. 
„ ,, R. Scott, M.A., Professor of Mathematics and MonJ 

Philosophy. 
Shridhar Ganesh Jinsivile, M.A., Professor of Sanskrit. 
Kharshedji Mancherji Khateh, Professor of Persian. 

Shastri. 
Raoji Ramchandra Up^isani. 

Teacher attached. 

DMdbhdi Kharshedji Mnnshi, B.A. 

Students. 

Sapre, Dattdtraya Sadashiv. 
Khandekar, Shankar Dattatraya. 
Bhide, Vidyddhar V^man. 
Patel, Dordbji M^nikji, 

6 1030-30 BU* 



RECOGNIZED INSTITUTIONS. 

t VdUvalkar, Pdndurang Bdburdo. 
t ZAte, Mahddev Raghundth. 

BAlsekar, Manj^ppd Nilkanth. 

Ddnge, Vishnu N^dyan. 

Korgdvkar, Kdshinath Rdmkrishna. 
t Kdle, Moreshvar Rdmchandra, 
t Surveyor, Kharshedji Nasarvdnji. 

Alekar, GopAl Bdpu. 

Patvardhan, Vdsudev Vithal. 

Ddbholkar, Ganesh Krishna. 

Bdm, Govind Parshurdm. 
t Lajmi, Venkatrdo Anandrdo. 
+ Shukla, Hari Gangddhar. 
t Makavdnd, HirAldl Mulji. 
§ Bhdstekar, Isaac Aaron. 

Barve, Rdmchandra Ganesh. 

Phalke, Shivrdm Govind. 

Kaikini, Shankar Krishna. 

Belsare, Khandu Bhikdji. 

MehU, Edalji Kharshedji. 

Masurkar, Yashvant Shankar. 

Panthaki, Nadarshah Phirozeshdh- 

Mehervaid, Jehdngier Mdnikji. 

Talpade, Ndrayan Bdpuji. 

Pdnandikar, Dattdrdm Ddmodar. 

Modi, Hirjibhdi Dhanjibhdi. 

Talekar, Govind Anant. 

Ugrankar, Ganpat Lakshuman. 

Eanjit, Khander^o Sundarrdo. 

Chdndorkar, Ganesh Rdmchandra. 

Chavak, Govind Keshav. 

Agdse, Sakhdrdm Saddshiv. 

Sett, Dhanji Chaturbhuj. 

Vakil, Mansukhrdm Mdnikrdm. 

Patki, Vdsudev Raghundth. 

Keni, Morobd Pdndurang. 

Ddddchanji, Dordbji Sordbji. 

Khdndekar, Bhdskar Yadneshvar. 

Patel, Sordbji Rastamji. 

Mdlvankar, Ndrdyan Kdshindth. 

Lavangid, Kharshedji Navroji. 

Nildkarni, Pdndurang Mangesh. 

Daru, Ishvarldl Harjivandds. 

Kelkar, Ndrdyan Rdmchandra. 

A. Michagan. 



t College Scholars. 
S David SMSoon Hebrew Scholiur, 



ST. xayietr's college. 355 



S^ne, Rdmchandra Balvant. 
Timboli, Xasarv^Lnji Navroji. 
Kirloskar, Gang^dhar fiangnAth. 
Shrikhande, DattAtraya Keshav. 
Pitale, V^man D^modar. 



IV.— BOMBAY ST. XAVIER'S COLLEGE. 
(Recognized 1869.) 
St. Xavier's College owes its origin to the development 
and growth of St. Maiy s Institution and of the European 
Roman Catholic Orphanage. In it Undergraduates may 
continue their University studies under the same advantages 
as those enjoyed at St. Mary's High School. 

The site of the College was granted by Grovemment in 
1867. The funds were supplied chiefly from private sources, 
Government contributing a grant of Rs. 61,368. 

There are two endowed Scholarships connected with the 
College : — 
\a). The Mission Scholarship, of Rs. 25 per mensem, in 
favour of that boarder of St. Mary's Listitution who 
passes Matriculation with the highest number of marks 
and continues his studies at St. Xavier's College, if 
he be not otherwise provided for. 
(h). The Cowasjee Jehanghier Scholarship for Portu- 
guese Undergraduates, of the annual value of Rs. 125, 
tenable for two years. It is awarded by competition in 
an English Essay. The competition takes place in the 
month of January. 

1SS4. 
Eectar. 
The Rev. Th. Dalhoff, S.J. 

Professors, 

The Rev. F. Dreckmann.S.J., Professor of Natural Philosophy 
and Mathematics. 

J. M. Hamilton, S.J., Professor of English Literature. 

J. LeHalle, S.J., Professor of Mathematics and Latin. 

F. Mayr, S. J., Professor of Political Economy. 

A. Ilsteri, S.J., Professor of History. 

A, Walsh, S.J., Professor of Logic. 

Dr. A. Fiihrer, Professor of Sanskrit. 
Mr. R^jdrdm Rimkrishna BhAg^-at, Professor of Sanskrit. 
Mr. Mahomed Tuky Haji Medi, Professor of Persian. 



356 RECOGITIZED INSTITTJTIONS. 

Students. 
(a). — Undergraduates^ 

(1)* Columbdvdld, Rastamji Kdvasji, 

* Daphtare, KisanUl Eatanlal. 

* Devrukhakar, Ndrdyan Saddshiv. 

* Divdn, Umedrdm GirdharMl. 

* Engineer, Hirjibhdi Dinshdhji. 

* Ghdndi, Dosdbhdi Kharshedji. 

t Jayakar, Anandrdo Rdmchandra. 
t Kdngd, Pestanji Mdnikji. 

* Kotval, Pestanji Sordbji, 

* Kukdnd, Frdmji Jamshedji. 
+ Laskari, Hormasji Bdpuji. 

* Mddan, Sordbji Edalji. 

t Master, Manchershdh Bamanji. 
t Master, Shdvakshdh Rastamji. 
t Mdvlankar, Vdsudev Keshav. 
(2)t Mehtd, Ddrdshdh Bejanji. 
t Munshi, Kaikhosru Ardesir. 
t Ndik, Harichandra Saddshiv. 
+ Pleader, Ardesir Nasarvdnji, 
t Rdnd, Frdmji Ardesir, 
+ Rele, Shantdrdm Ganesh. 

* Shet, Vithaldds Bhagvdndds. 

t Vijayayakar, Dinkar KhanderAo. 

* Wddid, Dosdbhdi Frdmji. 

t Warden, Behrdmji Hirjibhdi. 

(6). — Juniors, 

Agdskar, Bdlkrishna Vindyak. 
Banaji, Rastamji Ratanji. 
Bdthend, Kharshedji Frdmji. 
Bdtliboi, Ardesir Frdmji. 
Bdtliboi, Rastamji Frdmji. 
Bookbinder, Bhikdji Edalji. 
Earve, Ndrdyan Rdmchandra. 
Pddisheth, Nasarvdnji Jamshedji. 
Ddlvi, Sundarrdo BhairavnAth. 
Ddrukhdndvdld, Ardesir Pestanji, 
Desdi, Dhanjishdh Bdpuji. 
Desdi, Dordbji Jivanji. 
Uesdi, Vinayak Venkobd. 



* Passed the Previous Examination. 

t Passed the First Examination for the Degree Of B.A, 
(J.) Hughling's Prizeman in 1882. 
(2) Ndjfpur Scholarship. 



ST. xavier's college. 357 



Doctor, Fr^mji Pestanji. 
DoUkh^u, Sorabji Kharshedji. 
Dos Remedios, Thomas. 
Dubdsh, Mervanji Pestanji. 
Enti, Edalji Hormasji. 
Enti, Kaikhosm Ardesir. 
Ferreira, Dominic. 
Fi4mji, Kaikhosru Dosibh^i. 
Hdte, Gaj^an Harichandra. 

(3) Hydari, Muhammad Akbar. 
Joshi, Pdndurang Ramchandra. 
Joshi, Shapurji Sordbji. 
KamMkar, ShdmrAo Ganpatr^o. 
E^padia, Pestanji Bejanji. 
Karkarii, Rastamji Pestanji. 
Kdtr^ik, DM^bhai Hormasji. 
Khote, Sundam^th Dindniith. 
Ldlkakd, Bapuji Pdlanji. 
Mddan, Fardunji Bamanji. 
Pithare, Madan Morobd. 
M^kar, Sh6mrao Dinanath. 
Master, Rdtanji Dosdbhai. 
Master, Shdvakshdh Ddddbhdi. 
Mehtd, Ardesir Frdmji. 

(5) Mehtd, Sdkarlal Mansukhrdm. 

(4) Misquitta, Gabriel Hyacinth. 
Mistri, Ardesir Shdpurji. 
Mistri, Bamanji Shdpurji. 
Mistri, Jamshedji Pestanji. 
Mhdtre, Chintdman Pdndurang. 
Modi, Ardesir Kdvasji. 

Mas, Ndndbhdi Hormasji. 
Nddkami, Rdmchandra Hamnant. 
Ndik, Ganpatrdo Rdmchandra. 
Ndgvekar, Mahadev Pdndurang. 
Basrurkar, Parmeshvar Subrao, 
Pdrekh, Rastamji Hormasji. 
Parekh, Fardunji Ardesir. 
Patel, Ardesir Dhanjibhdi. 
Patel, Jamshedji Pestanji, 
Pdvri, Hormasji P. 
Pingle, Mddhavrdo Morobd. 
Potnis, Moreshvar Mahddev. 
Quadros, Alfred. 
Raymond, Edward. 



(3) Jairazbhoy Peerbhoy Scholarship. 

(4) Cowasjee Jehanghier Readj-money Portuguese Scholarship. 

(5) Sir Jasvantsingji Scholarship. 



358 RECOGNIZED INSTITUTIONS. 

Reporter, Phirozshtlh Edalji. 
Sanzgiri, Shankar Vindyak. 
(6) Sayed, Taher Muhiimmad. 

Screwvald, Kharshedji Hormasji. 
SethnA, Hormasji Mervanji. 
Sethnd, Nasarvdnji Dhanjibhdi. 
Sethna, Pestanji Kdvasji. 
Sukathankar, Kerobd Pandurang. 
Sutdrid,, Kdvasji Manikji. 
TdrAchand, Jehangier Mer\'dnji, 
Telang, Saydji Ndguji. 
Vakil, Shdpurji Dinshdh. 
Valladares, Philip Reginald. 
Velkar, Vdmanrao Shdmrdo, 
Vohrd, Jayachand Mordrji, 
Wddid, Bamanji Ardesir, 



V.-GUJARA'T COLLEGE. 

(Recognized 1879.) 

In 1856 a subscription was set on foot for the establish- 
ment of a College at Ahmedabad. A sum of Rupees 50,000 
was collected, and by favourable investment and accumula- 
tion of interest this amount was afterwards raised to 
Rupees 70,000. In 1858 the sanction of Government Avas 
given to the " establishment of a professional School at Ah- 
medabad (to be called a College if thought desirable) in 
which English composition, translation, the elements of 
iurisprudence (as required by Deputy Magistrates and Police 
Officers), positive law in its most popular and useful branches, 
the elements of political economy, the revenue and ad- 
ministrative system of Government in India, drawing as 
a useful rather than a fine art, surveying and the most 
practically useful applications of natural science (especially 
agricultural chemistry) might be taught." The object of 
the College was the special preparation of youths *' for Go- 
vernment employment in the Revenue and Judicial lines and 
in the Public Works Department." Government promised 
a State contribution equal to the annual interest of the 
Endowment, and with the total sum thus available classes 
were sanctioned for the instruction of vouths in Law and 
Civil Engineering. But the insufficiency of the income for 
even a sciiool of this character, und tbe want of precise and 

(6) Sir Frank Souter Scholarship. 



gujaba't college. 359 

definite objects at which the institution might aim, were 
from the first apparent, and combined ■vrith other causes to 
prevent the development and growth of the College. The 
Engineering class was never opened, partly because of the 
difficulty of obtaining a competent teacher for the salary 
offered, partly l^ecause of the discouraging want of funds 
and opportunities for practical instruction. La the Law class, 
on the other hand, it was found that the general educa- 
tion of the pupils was not as high as was required for the 
effective study of jurisprudence ; and it was considered 
that instruction in Literature was necessary to liberal- 
ize their minds. Accordingly in 1863 the salary set 
apart for the Engineering lecturer was divided between 
three teachers in the subjects of (1) Logic, Moral Phi- 
losophy and History, (2) Applied Mathematics (Survey- 
ing, Mechanics, &c.), (3) Drawing. The two last subjects 
were intended for boys desirous of preparing for ad- 
mission to the new Civil Engineering College at Poona. 
These ari*angements continued in force until 1872, when 
the failure of the Law students to pass the test im- 
posed on candidates for the Pleaders' examination led 
to an enquiry whicb resulted in the closing of the 
Law class. The other classes were continued for a 
time nntil it could be decided how the funds might be 
applied to a less vague object than that assigned to the 
College " of keeping up a taste for literary pursuits in 
young men who had matriculated, and of extending the 
knowledge of those who were unmatriculated." The leading 
Native gentlemen of Ahmedabad acquiesced in this con- 
demnation of the old institution, but applied to Government 
for the establishment at Ahmedabad of an Arts College 
such as that given to Poona, and at once set themselves to 
the task of collecting additional subscriptions, which, with 
the old fund, might form a suflBcient endowment to justify 
compliance with their application. La September, a public 
meeting was held, and a Committee of management was 
appointed with the Collector as President. By these 
efEorts Ahmedabad has raised a fund which will yield a 
yearly income of Rupees 8,<X)0. This sum, met by a Gro- 
vemment grant of equal amount and supplemented by fees, 
has been considered sufficient for the establishment of class- 
es studying up to the First B..\, Examination. The Trustees 
for the College are the Collector of Ahmedabad, Bao 
Bahadur Bechardas Ambaidas, and Bao Bahadur Hemabhaj 



360 BECOGNIZBD INSTITUTIONS. 

Premdbhdi, the Collector being nominated by Government, 
while the two Native gentlemen were elected by the subi« 
scribers. 

The endowments connected with the Gujarat College are — 

The Rao Bahadur Maganbhai Karamchand Scholarships, 
eight in number, of the annual value of Rs. 588 per 
annum. 

The A. A. Borradaile Scholarship, of the value of Rs. 120 
per annum, from the Borradaile Fund entrusted to the 
Gujarat Vernacular Society. 



1884. 

Principal. 

K. T. Best, M.A„ Oxon., M.R.A.S., Professor of English 
Literature. 

Professors. 

Jamshedji Ardesir DaUI, M.A., LL.B., Professor of Mathe- 
matics and Natural Philosophy. {Acting Vice-Principal, 
Elphinstoue High School, Bombay.) 

Kdvasji Jamshedji SanjAn^, M.A., Acting Professor of Mathe. 
matics and Natural Philosophy. 

Abdji Vishnu Kathavate, B. A., Professor of Oriental Lan- 
guages. 

Dakshina Fellows. 

Nagarji DdydbhAi Ndik. 

Dolatrdm Purshottam Barodid, B.A. 

A. A. Boi-radaiU Scholar. 

Nilkanth, Ramanbhdi Mahipatrdm. 

Pdo Bahadur Maganbhai Karamchand ScJiolars. 

Shett, LAlbhili Dalpatbhdi. 
Desili, Hirdl^l MotiUl. 
Pandid, Bhagvantrai Narbherdm. 
Desdi, Haridhar Ranchhodji. 
Ndndvati, Bechar Kasturchand. 
Vyds, Vithalrdi Gordhanprasdd. 
Mehtd, Fardunji Dordbji. 
Vyds, Jatdshankar Daydrdm. 

Students paying half fee, 

Katdrivdld, Nannumid Jamdlbhdi. 
Genge, Jethdldl Lallubhdi. 



RAJAEAM COLLEGE. 361 

Commoners. 



Patel, ChunilAl Kdknbhjii. 
Karnik, Krishnrdo Balvant. 
Mehd, Chhaganlal Anantrdi. 
Mehtd, Umedrdm Jametrdm. 
Bakshi, Chinubhdi Macthubhdi . 
Thdkore, Kallidnrdi KeshavUl- 
Javeri, Chanduldl Chhotalal. 
Kasumbgar, Vadildl Nathubhdi. 
Javeri, Dalsnkhbhai Bhagubhdi. 
Chhdpkhdnavald, Vadilal Sdnkalchand. 
Anei'ao, Govind Balvant. 
Gharekhau, Rangndth Shambbundth. 
Manidr, Abhechand Vakhatchand. 
Desdi, Chunilal Lakshmildl. 
Talj-drkhdn, Eraehshah Jehdngierji. 
Lalkdkd, Kaikhosin: Kharshedji. 
Urezi, Burdnudin Abdulld. 
Mashadi, Ddddniid Sarfudia. 
Doctor, Krishualal Xarayan. 
Hodivdld, Dordbji Edalji. 
Sangdvi , Nagindds Pui-shottam. 
Desdi, Harilal Desdibhai. 
Chindi, Sordbji Pestanji. 
Shringdrpure, Khanderao Mddhavrdo. 
Desai, Ambdbhdi Kesurbhdi. 
Desai, Ambdlal Daj'dlji. 
Desdi, Dullabbji Ranchhodji, 
Mehtd, Chimanldl GirdharUU. 
Sayed, iluhammad Gydsudin. 



VL— RA'JA'RA'M COLLEGE. 

(Recogxized 1880.) 

The Eajaram College, -which is maintained by the 
Kolhapur State, owes its origin partly to the growth and 
development of the Rajaram High School, and partly to 
the degu'e of Government to make a suitable provision for 
the education of Cliiefs and Sardars in the Southern 
Marat hd Country. The British Government having 
assumed the administration of the State in 1844, laid the 
foundation of English education in 1851 by opening an 
English school in the town of Kolhapur. This in 1867 was 
raised to the status of a High School, called the Rajaram 
High School, after the lamented Rajaram Mahdraj of 
Kolhapur, who while travelling in Europe died at Florence 
in 1870. 

B 1030—31 BU 



362 EEC03NIZED INSTITUTIONS. 

In 1880 the Government, on the recommendation of the 
Political Agent, raised the School to an Arts College which 
was subsequently recognized in the Faculty in Arts of the 
University of Bombay for the purposes of the Previous 
Examination, and in 1883 it was further recognized for the 
purposes of the First Examination for the Degree of B. A. 

The College is provided with a substantial and ornamental 
building which cost the Kolhapur State nearly five lakhs of 
Rupees, the foundation stone being laid in 1869 by the late 
Raja and the building completed in 1874. 

Endowments. 

Government has sanctioned the transfer of the sum of 
Es. 760, being the annual interest on the so-called Sarddrs' 
Fund at Belgaum, where a Sardars' Class was opened some 
years ago. 

In 1883 the Raja of Mudhol on leaving the College pre- 
sented an endowment of Rs. 16,000 to be held in trust by 
the Political Agent, Southern Mardthd Country, and R4ja of 
Mudhol for the time being : the interest of this sum to be 
applied towards the support of a " Ghoi-pade Lectureship" 
in honour of the Raja's father. 

The late Rajaram Mahardj, to commemorate the visit of 
His Royal Highness the Duke of Edinburgh to this country, 
invested Rs. 45,000 in the four per cent. Promissory notes, 
the interest thereon being applied to the formation of 
Scholarships for the encouragement of higher education in 
the State. The following Scholarships are awarded every 
year : — 

{a). One Alfred Scholarship of Rs. 20 per mensem 
tenable for four years at the Grant Medical College, 
Bombay, wUl be awarded to a deserving freshman who 
shall have matriculated from the Riljdrdm High School 
after having attended that school for not less than 
three continuous years immediately previous. The 
stipend may be continued for a fifth year if funds are 
available and the Principal recommends it. If there 
be no freshman desirous of studying medicine, a 
scholarship of the same value to be held in Bombay 
and tenable for two years will be given to a deserving 
candidate who passes the Previous Examination from 
the Rdjardm College witb the highest number of marks. 



RA JA RA M COLLEGE. 363 

(h). Tvro Alfred Scholarships of Rs. 15 per mensem, 
each tenable for one year and to be held at any 
College, will be awarded to two deserving students who 
have passed the First B.A. Examination from the 
Eajaram College after having attended it for two full 
terms. 

(e.) Three Alfred Scholarships of Es. 10 per mensem, 
each tenable for one year and to be held at the Raiaram 
College, Kolhapur, will be awarded to three deserving 
students who have passed the Previous Examination, 
from the Rajaram College, after having attended it for 
two full terms. 

(d)- Four Alfred Scholarships of Es. 10 per mensem, to 
be held for one year at the Rajaram College, will be 
awarded to four deserving students who have passed 
the Matriculation Examination from the Rajaram High 
School after having attended it for not less than two 
continuous years immediately previous. 

1884. 
Principal. 

C. H. Candy, B.A, LL.il., Cantab., Principal and Professor of 

English Literature. 

Professors. 

Balvant Bhikaji Vakhdrkar, B.A., Vice-Principal and Professor 
of Mathematics and Natural Philosophy. 

Shivram Bdpuji Pardnjapye, B.A, Professor of Oriental Lan- 
guages. 

BdUji Prabhakar Modak, F.A., Lecturer in Physical Science 

and ex-qfficio Superintendent of the Rajkumirs. 

Ghorpade Lecturer. — Not yet appointed. 

Alfred Scholars, 

(1) Damle, Anant Mahidev. 
(1) Des4i, Pandurang Anant. 

Deshpande, Vdman Ganesh. 

Kalekar, Lakshuman Raghunith, 
(1) Kelkar, Vishnu Sadashiv. 

Kulkami, Raghavendra Appaji. 

Pandit, Krishnaii Ndrayan. 
n) Stoe, Venkdji Moreshvar. 



(1) Passed the Previoaa Examination. 



364 RECOGNIZED INSTITUTIONS. 

Free. Studeiits. 
(1) Bhide, N.lgesh Pandurang. 
Rdndde, fidmchandra Ganesh. 

Commoners. 

Ankle, Ruber Bharmjippcl. 
1) Argikar, Lakshuman Bliimrilo. 

Balikundri, Bdlkrishna Dattdtraya. 
1) Bendigiri, Krishndji BAlaji. 

Ddtdr, Rdghavendra B^mrdo. 

Divekar, Bhdu Narhar. 
1) Dhurandhar, Gajduan Vislivanath. 

Gdikavdd, Khanderdo AppAsaheb. 

Ghdli, Sattydppil Sankdppd. 
1) Huilgolkar, Lakshumau Narsinh. 
1) Kdle, Ganesh Bdpuji. 

Karmarkar, Vindyak Govind. 

Kdtdare, Lakshuman Bachdji. 
1) Khdndekar, Bdjirdo Vishnu. 

Kololgi, Virupdksh Shivlingdppd. 
1) Konur, Shesho Jandrdan. 

Kotbdge, Hari Eaghundth. 

Kulhalli, Hanmant Krishna. 

Kulkarni, Rdmchandra Ndrjlyan, 

Luktuke, Trimbak Rdmchandra. 

Mdlset, Lakshuman Govind. 

Mardthe, Datto Bhdskar, 

Marclthe, Vdsudev Krishna. 
(1) Mudvedkar, Shrinivds Edjerdo, 
(1) Pddhye, Dattdtraya Keshav. 

Pandit, Ndrdyan Bhdskar. 

Patvardhan, Keshav Abdji, 

Prdni, Dattatraya Pdndurang. 

VIL-BARODA COLLEGE. 
(Recognized 188L) 

The Baroda College was founded to complete the system 
of English education organized in the Baroda State by the 
Government of His Highness the Mahdrdjah Sayajirao 
Gaekwdr, and on the 1st of October 1881 was recognized in 
the Faculty of Arts of the University of Bombay for the 
purposes of the Previous Examination. The College building 
is one of the handsomest structures of the kind in India. 

(1) Passed the Previous Examination. 



BABODA COLLEGE. 365 

It is in the shape of an E, the centre being formed by a 
domed hall sixty feet square and one hundred and forty- 
four feet high. Each wing contains ten class rooms, five on 
the ground floor and five on the first floor, besides library, 
museum, chemical and physical laboratories, offices, and 
smaller ante-rooms. There is accommodation for about six 
hundred students, and College and High School classes 
are both carried on in the building. The style of archi- 
tecture is early Hindu ( Hemadapanti), and the design 
is by R. Chisholm, Esq.. E, E. I. B. A-, Architect to 
the iladras Government. The building has cost about 
Rs. 6 Idkhs. The number of students in the Previous class 
is at present limited to 40. 

E)idowments, 

Three scholarships of Rs. 20 per mensem tenable at any 
college are awarded under certain conditions to students 
passing the Previous Examination direct from the Baroda 
College. Two additional scholarships of Rs. 20 per mensem 
are reserved for students wishing to join the Poona College 
of Science or the Grant Medical College. Five scholarships 
of Rs. 5 per mensem to be held for one year at the Baroda 
College are awarded under certain conditions to deserving 
students who have passed the Matriculation Examination 
from the Baroda High School. In addition to the above the 
University awards the Melvill Memorial Scholarship to that 
student from this College who obtains the highest number of 
marks at the Previous Examination. 



1884. 

Principal. 

T. S. Tait, M.A., Camb., B.Sc, Lend., Professor of Mathe- 
matics and Natural Philosophy. 

Professors, 

Harold Littledale, B. A., Senior Moderator T. CD,, Vice-Prin- 
cipal, Professor of History and English Literature. 

Tdpidas Day^rdin Mehtd, M.A, Assistant Professor of Mathe- 
matics. 

Govind Moreshvar Hasabnis, B.A. )t . • o i •* 

Rdmchandra Dinkar Phadke, B.A. ( Lecturers m Sanskrit. 

Farid-ud-din Ahmed, B.A, Lecturer in Persian. 
B 1030—31 BU* 



S66 RECOGNIZED INSTITUTIONS. 

Scholars, 
Damle, Shankar Ndgesh. 
Harshe, Kaghundth Moreshvar. 
Kdrkhdnis, Rdjdrdm Saddshiv. 

* Limbdlkar, GunJljirdo Rdjobd. 
Sajore, Jaganndth Anant. 

Commoners. 
Apte, Ganesh Shridhar. 
Athd^'AlA, Jekisand^s Lallubh^i. 
Bakshi, Purshottamrdi Kalli^nrdi. 
Bhatt, Mancch^dm Maydrdm. 
Buch, Anantrdi Ndhdndldl, 
Buch, Mddhavlal Prdnshankar. 
Chavdn, Gangd,rdm Mahddev. 
Clerk, Ndndbhdi Haridd,s. 
Daldl, Kani^l^ Jamnadds. 
Dave, Krishnardm Joitdrdm. 
Desdi, AmbaMl Ndgarji. 
Desai, Khandubhdi Lallubhdi. 
Desdi, Lakshmidds Hargovind. 
Desdi, Ndndbhai Barjorji. 
Desdi, Venildl Jivanrdm. v 
Dongre, Purshottam Bhdskar. 
Ghodd,, Sadilshankar Maydshankar. 
Gupte, Nilkanth Kdshindth. 
Gupte, Shankar Keshav, 
Jayakar, Guldbshankar Narmaddshankar. 
Joshi, Narbherdm Manchhdrdm. 
Kdrlekar, Ganesh Dhondu. 
Kothdvdld, Rastamji Ratanji. 
Ndndvati, Purshottamrdi Bhagvatidds. 
Patel, Ambdldl Nathubhdi. 
Rinddni, Dolatrdm Motirdm. 
Ruvdld, Tribhuvandds Prdnjivandds. 
Shdh, Chunildl Gheldbhdi, 

* Shukia, Venishankar Revdshankar. 
Thadani, Vildyatrdi JethimaJ. 
Thdkor, MaganhU Umedrdm, 
Tolat, Vithaldds GokaJdds. 
Vaishnav, Anantrai Bhupatrdi. 
Vaishnav, Bhupatrdi Trikamji. 
Vord, Maganldl Lakshmishankar. 

* Half-free students. 



CiSVERNMENT LAW SCHOOL. 06/ 

VIII.-GOYEENMENT LAW SCHOOL. 

(Eecogxizzd 1860.) 

The foundation of this institution is due to a subscription 
which was raised by the inhabitants of Bombay in the 
month of November 1852, on the eve of the departure from 
India of Sir Thomas Erskine Perry, Knight, Chief Justice, 
who had been for nearly nine years President of the Board 
of Education, to found a Professorship of Jurisprudence, as 
a memorial of his long connection with both law and educa- 
tion in India. 

This endowment yields a monthly income of B.S. 169, to 
which Grovemment contribute a subsidy, which was fixed 
in I806 at Rs. 100 per mensem, the aggregate being the 
stipend of the Perry Professor of Jurisprudence. Grovem- 
ment also contributes Rs. 600 per mensem for the mainte- 
nance of two Professorships of Law. 

Lectures are delivered on the following subjects : — 

1 . Roman Civil Law. Elements of General Jurispru- 
dence and International Law. 

2. Succession and Family Rights, with special refer- 

ence to Hindu and Mahomedan Law. 

3. The Law of Contracts, and of the Transfer and 

Lease of Immoveable Property. 

4. Equity with special reference to the Law of Trust, 
Mortgages and other securities for money, and 
Specific Relief, 

5. The Law of Torts and Crimes. 

6. The Law of Evidence, Civil Procedure, including 

Limitation and Criminal Procedure. 



1884. 

Professors. 

Edward Tjrrell Leith, LL.M., Barrister-at-Law, Government 
Professor of Law. 

William C. Webb, Barrister-at-Law, Government Professor of 
Law. 

James Jardine, M.A., Barrister-at-Law, Perry Professor of Juris 
prudence. 



368 RECOGNIZED INSTITUTIONS. 

/. — Senior Law Students, 

Ajrekar, Keshav Ganesh, B.A. 
Bharucha, Jiv;tji Kavasji, B.A. 
Bhicle, Krishndji NArdyan, B.A. 
Chitale, Govind Venkatesh, B.A. 
Ddmle, Mahddev GangAdhar, B.A, 
Dav6, Yithalji Keshavji, B.A. 
Dikshit, Hari Sit^ram, B.A. 
Gokhale, Edmchandra Hari. 
Jayakar, Sundarrdo Gajdnan, M.A., B.Sc. 
Joglekar, Vdsudev D^ji, B.A. 
Kctng^, Mdnikji Kdvasji, B.A. 
Kelkar, DAmodar Ganesh, M.A. 
Mandlik, Shivrdm Gangddhar. 
Mehervaid, Rastamji Mdnikji, B.A. 
NAdgir, Malh.lr Mdrtand, B.A. 
Nulkar, Lakshuman Krishna, B.A. 
Oka, Ejlmchandra Govind, B.A., L.C.E. 
Pavri, Fardimji Pdlanji, B.A. 
Sanjdnd, Temulji Navroji, B.A. 
ShrofF, Kharshedji Dhanjibhdi, B.A. 
Sovdni, Venkatrdo Abdji, B.A. 
Tayabji, Hydar Kamrudin, B.A. 
Vakil, Ochhdriim Ntodbhdi, B.A. 
Vijayakar, N^rdyan Moroji, B.A. 

II. — Junior Law Students, 

Prizeman, 1883. 

Gokhale, Ndriyan Vishnu, B.A. 

Passed Jurisprudence Examination, 1883. 

(1) Abhyankar, SakhdrAm Vishnu. 
Adhikari, Rtlm Dattdtraya. 
Advani, Hirdnand Khemsing. 
Apt(5, Mahddcv Krishna. 
Athavankar, Anandrdo Mangesh, B.A. 
Bauhatti, Ndrdyan Ddso, B.A. 
Bdvdekar, Ganesh Krishna, B.A. 
Billimorid, Sordbji PVdmji 
Bhdrdd, Bhikdji Dordbji, 
Bharuchd, Frdmji Dordbji, B.A. 
Bhdte, Vithal Bdlkrishna. 
Ddbliolkar, Gopdl Rdmchandra. 

(1) Free. 



GOVEKSME>-T LAW SCHOOL. 

Dalvi, Anandnio Saclashiv, B.A. 

Dalvi, Sitaram Yashvant, B.A. 

Desdi, Siikarlal Chandulal. 

Deshpande, R^mchandra Hanmant, B.A. 

Divdcha, Navroji Rastaniji. 

Dnyani, Harsukhram Trimbakrii. 

Dubash, Jehangier Phirozshah. 

D\-ivedi, ManiUl Nabhubhai. 

Herlekar, Vishvanath Mahddev. 

Jdmbhekar, Hari Bhimrrio. 

Javeri, Mathurdmal Ednichandra. 

Kimdanmalldni, Lildchaud Hasmal. 

Khai'e, Yishnu VinAyak. 

Kirkiie, Krishndji Hari, B.A. 

Ldld, Chandirdm Gidnchand. 

Ldlvdni, Dalpatrdi Rochirdm. 

Majrd, Kdvasji Mervdnji. 
(1) Mehtd, Motichand Javerchand. 

Modak, Gopal Trimbak. 

Mobile, Hari Atmdram. B.A. 

More, Vindyak Mabddev, B.A. 

llundie, Rdmchandra Ganesh, B.A. 

Nadgund, Nilkanth Anandrao. 

Pddshah, Pestanji Jdmdsji. 
(1) Parvatlkar, Rdmchandra Krishna, 
(1) Patel, Chaturbhdi Vallabhbhai. 

Patel, Jamshedji Kdvasji. 

Patel, Go%"ind Appdji. 

Phadke, Ndrdyan Lakshuman, B^ 

Phadnis, Hanmant Sheshgir. 

Pradhdn, Vindyak Harishankar. 
(1) Purdnik, Shankar Vishnu. 

Rasinkar, Vishnu Krishna, 

Rebello, F. A. C. 

Rego, E. F. 

Risvadkar, Krishndji Saddshiv, B.A. 

Sddhale, Vdsudev Ndrdyan. 

Sakldtvdld, Mervdnji Xdndbhdi, B.A. 

Sapre, Dattatraya Saddshiv, B.A. 

Thakor, Manildl AjitrAm. 

Thdkor, Uttamrdm Dhirajrdm. 

Unvdld, Ardesir Fnimji, B.A. 

Vakil, Harde\'rdm Xanabhdi. 

Valvelkar, Pdndurang Bdburdo,B.A. 
Vaidya, I-akshuman Rdmchandra, B. A- 



(1) Free. 



369 



37a 



RECOGNIZED INSTITUTfOXS. 



///. — Candidate Law Students, 



Sanzgiri, Shankar Vindyak. 
Ag^skar, Bdlkrishna Vindyak. 
Mehtd, Nagindcls Gokaldds. 
Desdi, Chhotdbhdi Khandubhdi. 
Kalsulkar, Trimbak Vithal. 
Vdchdgdndhi , Rastamji Nasarvdnji. 
Vakil, Chunildl Harildl. 
Modak, Rdmchandra Vdman. 
Thdkor, Balvantrdi KalliAnrdi. 
Mehtd, Rastamji Ddddbhdi. 
Mistri, Dhanjibhdi Pdlanji. 
Pitale, Vdman Daraodar. 
Chandiramdni, Vadhumal Udhdrdm. 
Shdhdni, Sdhebsing Chandusing. 
Ldlvdni, Kundanmal Manghirsing. 
Mehtd, Motibhdi Manibhdi. 
Nisal, Shivram Nardyan. 
Wadid, Dosdbhdi Frdmji. 
Vdcha, Jehdngier Mancherji. 
Bandji, Frdmji Kdvasji. 
Vdgh, Venkatesh Vaikunth. 
Nagarvdld, Jamshedji Navroji. 
Bhide, Vidyddhar Vdman. 
Patvardhan, Mahddev Ndrdyan. 
Gddgil, Vishnu Gangddhar. 
Khare, Purshottam Parshurdm. 
Ketkar, Keshav Saddshiv, B.A, 
Jdl, Rastamji Hormasji. 
Khare, Ddmodar Nilkanth. 
Pleader, Phirozshdh Nasarvdnji. 
Damanid, Ranchhoddds Ldlbhdi. 
Advdni, HimatsiDg Gajsiiig. 
Masand, Atmdram Gangdrdm. 
Daldl, Bdlkrishna Pitdrobardds. 
Patel, Dhanjishdh Edalji. 
Bdrid, Varajdds Ddydbhdi. 
Desdi, Govindbhdi Hathibhdi. 
Vyas, Vajiram Harindrdyan. 
Mehtd, Manmukh Krishnamukh. 
Gokhale, Gopdl Krishna. 
Chirmule, Vdsudev Ganesh. 
(1) Bhdgvat, Sakhdrdm Keshav. 

Patvardhan, Pdndurang Ganpat. 
Bdlsekar, Mandppa Nilkanth. 



(1) Free. 



GO'^ERSMEyT LAW SCHOOL. 371 



Korgdvkar, Kiishindth Rdrnkrishna. 

Bomboat, Ardesir Edalji. 

Natu, Vishnu Raghunath. 

Kirtane, Kamchandra Trimbak. 

KMndekar, Shankar Datt^traya. 

Josbi, Keshav Kamkrishna. 

ChokBhi, Manchhabhai Narsidis. 

Vaishnar, Jayaprasad Hariprasdd. 

Dholkia, Mani«hankar Saddshankar. 

Patvardhan, Ddmodar Ganesh. 

Dhond, Kamchandra Sajo. 

Lukmani, Muhimmad Bakar Abdol Katim. 

S^e, Ganesh Bhaskar. 

Sovani, Govind Krishna. 

Sabnis, Ndrayan Ghanashim, 

Bhavandni, Motiraj Sujansing. 

Tardchand, Jehdngier Mervanji, 

Patvardhan, Narayan Ganesh. 

Kshirsagar, Bapnji Kashindth. 

Contractor, Ardesir Edalji. 

Doctor, Framji Pestanji. 

Trivedi, ChhaganUl Shambhuldl. 

Patel, Sordbji Rastamji. 

Collector, Navroji Anandji. 

D<»hi, Ndnchand Bechar. 

Apt«, Hari Sadashiv. 

Kaikini, Shankar Krishndji. 

Hodivdla, Shapurji Hormasji. 

Chavdn, Udhavji Devji. 

Bhat, Mahddev Vdman. 

Patvardhan, Vasadev Vithal. 

Yasu, Aidds Lakhimal. 

BoTce, Bamanji Rastamji, B.A- 

Dabholkar, Ganesh Krishna. 

Kapadia, Sordbji Bamanshiih. 

Gadkari, Dattatraya SitarAm. 

Bhaindur, Bhavanishankar Subrio. 

Bhatavadekar, Mahddev Ramchhandra. 

Bakshi, Aoantlal Ranchhoddds. 

Lalvani, Krishnachand Uttamchand. 

Gogte, Raghunath Bhikdji. 

B4m. Govind Parshuram. 

Ijmaye, Hari Yithal. 



37:. RECOGNIZED INSTITUTIONS. 

IX.— GRANT MEDICAL COLLEGE. 

(Recognized 1860.) 

This College was establislied in the year 1845, under the 
name of the Grant Medical College, as a tribute to the 
memory of the late Sir Robert Grant, Governor of Bombay, 
with whom the system of instruction pursued in it ori- 
ginated. The object of its establishment is to "impart, 
through a scientific system, the benefit of medical instruc- 
tion to the Natives of Westeni India." A moiety of the 
cost of the building was defrayed by Sir Robert Grant's 
friends, the remainder by Government. The funds for the 
support of the College, with the exception of certain 
endowments for the encouragement of deserving students, 
are contributed by Government. 

The College is under the immediate control of a Principal 
who is subordinate to the Director of Public Instruction. 
Lectures are delivered in the English language on every 
bi'anch of Medical Science by Professors, who are generally 
officers on the Bombay Medical Establishment. 

Clinical and practical instruction is imparted in the Jain- 
setjee Jeejeebhoy Hospital, which contains 350 beds, and 
has attached (a) an Obstetric Institution with 30 beds ; (b) 
an Ophthalmic Hospital (Cowasjee Jehanghicr Ophthalmic 
Hospital) with 60 beds ; (c) a Hospital for incurables, built 
by the Sir Jamsetjee Jeejeebhoy family, containing 40 beds. 
There are also two detached buildings, each with 20 beds, 
for the treatment of persons suffering from Contagious 
Diseases. 

The students are arranged in two classes : — 

1. Graduates and Undergraduates of the University of 
Bombay, who are educated through the English language 
for Medical Degrees. 

2. Members of the European Branch of the Government 
Medical Subordinate Department, who are educated through 
the English language for the grade of Apothecary. 

The College possesses the following endowments : — 

The Farish, Camac, Anderson, Rcid, McLennan, Lisboa, 
Jamkhandiand Cowasjee JehanghierReadymoney Scholar- 



GKA^"T MEDICAL COLLEGE, 3/3 

ship-s and Medal Funds ; the Sir Jamsetjee Jeejeeblioy 
Medical Book Fimd, Prize Ftmd, and Gold Medal Fund ; the 
Bumes, Amott and Hemabhoy Yakutchund Medal Funds ; 
and Sir J. P. "Willoughby, Sir Covrasjee Jehanghier Prize 
Funds, and Hunter Prize Funds. 



The aggregate sum on account of these endowments 
amounting to Rs. 1,08,700, is lodged in the Government 
Treasury. 

Formerly the College conferred upon its students a Dip- 
loma or License to practise medicine, and the designation 
" Graduate of Grant Medical College." There are at the 
present time forty-:eight such Graduates, who either are en- 
gaged in the private pi-actice of their profession or are in the 
ser\-ice of Government. Upon the establishment of the 
University of Bombay, the College ceased to grant diplomas, 
and became affiliated to the University as a College for 
medical education. 

List of Prikcipai^. 

l&4o. Charles Morehead, M.D., F.E.C.P. 

1860. JohnPeet, M.D.,F.R.C.P. 

1865. Herbert John Giraud, M.D. 

1865. Eobert Haines, M.B. (Lond.) 

1866. William Guyer Hunter, M J)., F. B.C.P. 

1S76. He>-ky Cook, MJ)., M.R.C.P., F.K.G.S., F.GJS., F.M.S 



1884. 

Principal. 

H. Cook, M.D., FJi.C.P., F.R.G.S., F.G.S., F.M.S., Professor 
of Medicine, Clinical Medicine and Hygiene. (Europe). 

Henry Vandyke Carter, M.D. (Lond.), Acting Principal, Pro- 
fessor of Medicine, Clinical Medicine and Hygiene, 

Professors. 

A. N. Hojel, L.K. and Q.C.P.I., Professor of Physiology {Acting 

Surgeon, Goknldas Tejpal Hospital.) 

G. Waters, L.R.C.S., L.E.C.P., Acting Professor of Physiolc^- 
W. Gray, M.B., Professor of Surgery and Clinical Surgery. 
B 1030— 32BTI 



374 EECOGNIZED INSTITUTIOIfS. 

I. B. Lyon, F.C.S., F.I.C., Professor of Chemistry and Medical 

Jurisprudence. 
G. A. Maconachie, M.D., Professor of Ophthalmic Medicine and 

Surgery and of Zoology and Comparative Anatomy. 

W. F. Knapp, M.R.C.S., Professor of Anatomy. (Europe), 

W. K. Hatch, M.B., Acting Professor of Anatomy. 

J. Arnott, M.D., Professor of Midwifery and Diseases of Women 
and Children. (Europe). 

D. N. Pdrakh, Acting Professor of Midwifery and Diseases of 
Women and Children. 

G. Waters, L.R.C.S,, L.E.C.P.E., Professor of Pathology and 
Curator of the Museum (Acting Professor of Physiology). 

E. Manser, Acting Professor of Pathology and Curator of the 
Museum. 

D. MacDonald, M.D., B.Sc, Professor of Practical Histology 
and Physiology. 

E. Manser, Professor of Materia Medica (Acting Professor of 
Pathologj' and Curator of t'he Museum.) 

F. F. MacCartie, B.A., M.B., B.Ch., Acting Professor of Materia 
Medica. 

Sakhdrslm Arjun Eavut, L. M., Professor of Botany. 

Demonstrator. 
Amid Moreshvar Kunte, B.A., M.D., Demonstrator of Anatomy. 

Tutors. 

Nasarvdnji Hormasji Chokshi, L.M. & S., Tutor in Anatomy, 

Materia Medica and Botany. 
Sordbji Kharshedji NarimAn, L. M. & S., Tutor in Chemistry 

and Medical Jurisprudence. 

Kasarvdnji Frdmji Banshdh, L. M. & S., Mayo Demonstrator in 
Practical Histology and Physiology. 

Senior Students. 



*+ Sakhdrdm EAghoM Bdbre 

* NdrAyan Vindyak Chhatre 

* Daniel Concei^ao Luis ... 

* Jehdngicr Barjorji Doctor 

* Lawrence Felix Henriques 



Foundation. 



* Passed the First Examination for the Degree of L.M. &, S. 
t Free students. 



GRANT MEDICAL COLLEGE. 



Anantrai Ndthji Mehta ... 

* Mahipatrdm Go^^ndrAm Mehtd 

* Krishna Sakhdrdm Peclnekar ... 

* Kharshedji NavTOJi Sahiydr 

* Manclierahah Mothdbhdi Vakil 

* Henry, William Grogan 

* Dhanjibhdi Sordbji Masani 
*l P. M. Pinto 

* Ardesir Behrdmji Masdni 

* Ardesir DaddbMi 

*t Hormasji K£ivasji Dotivdla 

* Govind Bdbdji Kher 

* Lewis Gomes, B.A. 

* Dhanjibh^ Sorabji Dallas 

* Krishna] i Trimbak Gokhale 

* John, Charlton Brooks 

* Framji Edalji Davar 

* Vdsudev Vinayak Chhatre 

* V. J. Pinto 

* Dinsh^h Edalji SabjA 

* Ardesir Jamshedji Keldvdld ... 

* FranzoneA. Faria 

* Virji Zina Raval ... 

* F. V. Albino DeSonza 

* Mervdnji DadabhJliilasdni 

* Palanji Pestanji BhedvAr 

*i Bamanshdh Kharshedji Anklesarid 

* Bhikdji Etlalji GhdsvaM 

* Hormasji Behrdmji Dastur 

* Fakirji Kdvasji Mdndviv^ 
*t Nicholas Francis Pereira 

*t Hh-dldl Manilal Dhru 

* Umidshankar Ddmodar Trivedi 

* Shevaklal Manekm Dave 

* MaganMl Motirdm Modi 

* Chunildl Damodardda Saraiyd... 

*t Mancherji Jamdsji Mistri 

* Vithal Ajmdji Salgar ... 
*^ IsmaelJanMohdmmad ... 



.Camac Scholarship. 
Farish Scholarship. 
.Farish Scholarship. 
.Govt. Exhibition. 
.Reid Scholarship. 
.Anderson Scholar- 
ship. 



.Govt. Exhibition. 



..Gondal State Scho- 
larship. 
..Gaikavdd Scholar- 
ship. 
. . Farish Scholarship. 
.Govt. Exhibition and 
Camac Scholarsliip. 
..Farish Scholarship. 
..Reid .Scholarship. 
...Anderson Scholar- 
ship. 



*Passed the First Examination for the Degree of L.ll. Jt S. 

t Free students. 

t Passed the F.A. Examination. 



376 



KECOGNIZED INSTITUTIONS. 



* VenkateshBalvantKarandikar, B.A. 



*t Khushdldds Karsanji Joshi 

* E. X. Bias 

* Sorabji Jamshedji DdruvdM 

* BehrAmji Sordbji PostvdlA 

* Frdmroz Shdvakshdh D4var 

*t DhanjibliAi Hormasji Mehtd, ... 

* Sorabji Frdinji Kdpadid... 

* Dhanjibhai Edalji Anklesarid ... 

* Chhaijildils Tribhuvand^ Master 

* Francis H. DeCosta 

'■' G. T. DeCunha ... _ 

*t Dhanjibhai Rasfcamji Tdtd 

* DorAbji Hormasji Pochkhdndvdld 

* Dosflbh^i Kavasji Patel ... 

*t TarAchand Jeyrdmdds Vadvdni 

* Fardunji Sordbji Kapadid, 

^t Ganesh Vishnu Kher 

* Jamshedji Fardunji Kdmdin ... 

* Sanmukh Venktachelam Mudliar 

* Purshottam Ndrayan Davdd ... 

* A. G. Percira 

•'■ D^rdshah Edalji KothdvAld ... 
•* Chandulal Gopaldds Tolat 

* H. W, Richardson 

*t Gabriel P. Gonsalves 

* Joseph DeSouza ... 

■*• KrishnAji Kdshindth Gokhale ... 

* Vithaklas Narbherdm Mehti ... 
"'t Bclpuji Navroji B. Khambdtd ... 

* Sordbji Kharshedji Mehtd 

* Kapilvantrdm Narbherdm Pandia 

* Ddrdshdh Dinshdh Writer 

* Ilamchandra Narsinh Mudholkar 
■'■ M. L. F. DeGama 

* Sordbji Kharshedji Tdrdchand ... 

* Ddrashah Jamshedji Movaddvdld 

* Eatanshdh Mdnikji Modi 

Junior Students. 

H. Azavedo 

Hari Vishnu Barve 



.Govt. Exhibition and 
Dhdrvdd Scholar- 
ship. 

.Sir Jasvantsingji. 
Scholarship. 



..Lisboa Scholarships 
..Govt. Exhibition. 



' Passed the First Examination for the Deg^ree of L.M. & S. 
t Free students. 



GEA5T MEDICAL COLLEGE. 37? 



Dorabji Hormas ji Bharuchd 

\ Kavasji Pestaiiji Bhamchd 
SMpurji Dosdbh^ Bharucha ... 

Mur^ji Ndranji Bhat 

Biji Balkrishna BMte 

Rastamji Hormasji Bhiya 

Bdpu Dhonsett Bhogte 

Fardunji Nasarvdnji Bisni 

Ardesir Dhanjishdh Contractor 

Gopinith ChiBtAman Chitnis 

Eastamji Ardesir Dddimister ... 

D. F. DeMeUo 

Y. P. DeSa 

Kaikhosru Dhanjishdli Doctor ... 
t Sorabji Kd\-asji Doctor ... 

Damodar Mddhavrao Dukle 

F. X. Ferreira 

Framji Ji van ji Gilder ... 

Kharshedji Batanji K^padii 

Manikji Bdpuji L^evaU 

t KJlvasji Mancherji Langr^d 

B. A, K. Lukmdnji 
t Lakshuman Ganpat Mdne 

t Bhdu Janardan Mantri 

Dhanjibhdi Sordbji Mehta 

Edalji Manikji Modi 

Kai5diosru Jamshedji Modi 

Ratanji Edalji Modi 
Sorabji Hormasji Modi ... 
Jamshedji Mancherji MnMn ... 

Madanldl Lallubhdi Munsiff 

Framroz Dordbji Mus ... 

Eastamji Nanabhdi Ranind 

Vindyak Anandrdo Ranjit 

M.L.Ray 

Vinayak Ddddji Satghare 

Karsandds Gopaldds Sethna 

Ganpat Annaji Sirur 

Ratanji Be j an ji SonevdlA 

P. J. Svami 

Rastamji Navroji Unvdld 
Mervdnji Temulji Vaid ... 
t Framroze Pestanji ... ... .. , i- 

Hormasji ildnikjiMdsicd Reid Scholarship, 



t Free students. 
B 1030—32 BU* 



378 



RECOGNIZED INSTITUTIONS. 



Manoherji Kdvasji Kdngd, B. A. 

Navroji Kdvasji Kallidnvdla ... 

Navroji Mancherji Ldkddvdld ... 

Chunildl Fakirbhiii Dal41 

Kashindth V.lman Kdne 
VajerJlm Sslkerrdm Divdn 
Thomas John Waite 
Guldbrdi Durgdrdm Dave 
Bdpuji Rastamji Wddid... 
Kharshedji Pestanji Boyce 

Abraham Hyams... ... j^ 

A. F. Ward ^> ., 

Shdvakshah Eatanji Sethn4 
Jehdngier Kharshedji Commissarivdla 

Prdnjivan Jagjivan Mehtd 

Shridhar Nitj-ardm Mehtd 

Jehdngier Ardesir Kohiydr 
Krishndji Ganesh Deshpdnde ... 
Vishnu Kdmchandra Kirloskar 
Ddydbhdi Narottamdds Patel ... 
Ratanji Shdpurji Gdndhi 
Dhanjibhdi Mervduji Munshi ... 
Ishvarchandra Edmchandra Jayakar .. 
Prabhakar Rdmkrishna Bhdnddrkar, 

B.A. 

Bamanji Behrdmji Doctor 

Fardunji Edalji Sherdivdld 

Babdji Bdpuji Vijayakar 

A. Britto 

Vdman Jandrdan Mdhtre 
Kharshedji Jamshedji Khenid ... 
Ardesir Frdmji Bahddurji 

E. G. R. Whitcombe 

Purshottam Rdmchandra Pilgavkar .. 
Jehdngier Edalji Doctor 
Damodardds Karsandds Mehtd... 
Hormasji Dhanjibhdi Bakshi 
Anandrdo Sundarji Dharadhar... 

P. S. DeSilva 

Moreshvar Ganesh Bodas 

D vdrkdndth Edmndth Khote , B, A. . . 
Hari Vaman Bhat 

Mansiikhldl Hirdhil Ndzar 

Phirozshah Dhanjislidh Bhdgalid 
Mahddev Krishna Pdnsare 



.Anderson Scholar- 
ship. 

..Anderson Scholar- 
ship. 

.Parish Scholarship. 

.Carnac Scholarship. 

.Caruac Scholarship. 



.Govt. Exhibition. 



Government Exhi- 
bition. 



X Passed the F.A. Examination. 



GBAKT MEDICAL COLLEGE. 



379 



Balvant Mahadev Purdnik, B.A. 
Chhaganprasdd Deviprasdd Divdnji 
Adarji Memosji Mas^ni, B.A. 
Bapuji Pdlanji Doctor, B.A- 
•Soribji Fardunji Gandhi 
Erachji Sheriarji BhamcM 
Kharshedji Edalji Surti... 
Manikji Dosdbhai Camd... 
Bajirdo Krishnar^o Dhairyavdn 
Kastamji Dorabji Cooper 
Ardesir Dosdbhdi Cooper 
Hormasji Pestanji D^diBarjor ... 

Fr^mji Shapurji Gdndki 

Bdlkrisbna Govind Thjikur 
Hormasji K^vasji Taveri^ 
Kharshedji Kdvasji Malegd^-^•dlii 
Kharshedji BehrJlmji Doctor ... 
Narottamd^ Indraji Vaishnav 

Louis G. Godinho 

Dhanjibh^i Xasarvdnji Divechd 
Eamji Xathu Mande\'i^... 
NardjandJis Pranjivandds Meht^ 
Hormasji Pestanji Kdmdkiikil ... 
Sorabji Kdvasji Doctor ... 
Dosabhai Homjibhdi Kobld 
Augustus DeQuadros 
Benjamin Reuben 
Mervanji Jamshedji Hakim 
Nasarvdnji Manikji Cimd 
Vdsudev Kishindth Kirloskar ... 

Kaikhosru Mancherji Gimi 
Kavroji Behrdmji Doctor 
Luis A. Valladares 
Manikji Bejanji LilamTdla 

Sordbji Edalji Dubdsh 

Behi-dmshdh Hormasji Cooper ... 
Brijlal JaveriUl Gujardthi 
Ka\Toji Jamshedji Billimorid ... 
Meridnji Erachji Pd^-^i ... 
N'avroji Merrdnji Tdrdchand ... 

Khojd Abdulld Adam 

Dinshdh Mervanji Surti ... 

ChhotaUl Hirdlal Desdi 

Ratanji Mancherji Nanji 

Wanikji Sorabji Kardkd 

Mdnikji Rastamji Javeri 



.Govt. Exhibition. 

..Govt. Scholarship. 
..Govt. Scholarship, 
..Govt. Scholarship. 
..Govt. Scholarship. 
..Govt. Scholarship. 



.Alfred Scholarship. 



.Dhdrvdd Scholar- 
ship. 



t Free student. 



380 



RECOGNIZED INSTITUTIONS. 



Bamanji DorJlbji DotivAld 

Barjorji DdcUbLii Ednd 

Mdnikji Kharshedji Tdrdchand 
St. John Duarte ... 

D. M. DeSilva 

BdMrdm Bdpwji Rele , 

Phirozshdh Navroji Karanjid ... 

Ratan j i Behrdm j i LAM 

Pitdmbardds Kuberdds Patel ... 
Dhanji Khimji Merchant 

Herbert, John Adamson Fido ... 
Mangesh Ndrdyan Dhume 
Reginald Hamilton Summers .. 
Vindyak Balvant Chitnis 
Mdnikji Dosdbhai Gorvdld 

Sordbji Mdnikji Pdvri 

Hormasji Navroji Virdjogi 
JRastamji Kharshedji Munshi .. 
Ddmodar Vdsudev Ednitkar . . 

Hoshang Sordb j i K ot vdl 

Anant Narsopant Godbole 
Anant Ghanashdm Sabnis 
Kavasji Behramji Mehta 

Ddji Ganesh Deshpdnde 

Edalji Dinshdh Ldm 

Khandubhai Indraji Desdi, B.A. 
Kaikhosru Tirandoz Irdni, B.A. 
TrikamrAi Mahipatrdi Oza 



Samuel Jacob 

Shamsabal Sitdrdm Misser 

Pdndurang Lakshiiman Pardnjapye 

Chanduldl Gheldbhdi Mai. 

John Moniz 

Kaikhosru Edalji Doctor 

Behrdmshdli M. Marshall 

Rdmchandra Ndriyan Jddhav . . . 

Ganpat Sokarji Trilokekar 
Mulchand Gangdrdm Thadani ... 
Pidmshankar Ganesh Aiijdrid ... 
Vindyak Sokarji Trilokekar 



.Edo Sir Prdgmalji 
Soholarship. 



..Govt. Exhibition. 

..Govt. Exliibition, 
and Sir Jasvant- 
singji Scholarship. 

.Govt, Scholarship. 

.Govt. Scholarship. 

.Govt. Scholarship. 

..Govt. Scholarship. 

.Govt. Scholarship. 

Sir Cowasjee J. Scho- 
larship. 

.Sir Cowasjee J. Scho- 
larship. 

..Jamkhandi Scholar- 
ship. 

..Sind Scholarship. 



t Free student 



POONA COLLEGE OF SCIENCE. 381 

Charles Cochrane 

Bdlu LallubhAi Kindrivdld 

Jivraz Gheldbhdi Doshi 

Rdnikrishna Ndrdyan Parmanand 
Jagmohandds Chhabildds Merchant ... 

Balkrishna R. Shirgdvkar 

Sakhdrdin Ganesh Kdnitkar 

Vardraj Govind Naidii 

Dosdbhcli Hormasji Kdmdin 

Purshottam Vishnu Rdngnekar 

RanchordAs Parmdnand Vord 

Bdpuji Ratanji Wddia .. 

Narsinh Trikamji Mehta 

Abasali Alibhai Hathivdld 

Soribji Ratanji Sirvii 

Kaikhosru Mdnikji Dubdsh 

Vinayak Gop41 Kirlo.=ikar 

Hh'jibhdi Jehangier Dddisett ... 

Yashvant Mangesh Sanzgiri 

Kdikhosru Edalji Master 

Ardesir Dordbji Doctor 

Nardyan Vindyak Bhdgvat 

Kavasji Behrdmji Shroff 

Popat Prabhurdm Vaidya 

Narayandds Ddmodardds Shdh 

Purshottam Harichand Daldl ... 
Bdlkrishna Ramchandra Jc\yakar 

Sordbji Mancherji Gandevid 

Ardesir Manikji Dotivdld 

Dosdbhai Rastamji Dh^bhar 

Shivdds Parmdnand Broker 

Dordbji Kavasji Doctor 

Jehingier Manchershdh Meherhomji ... 

Vikdji Dordbji Afinvald 

Vaman Ganesh Sdthe 

Rafiudin Imamudin Mouhd 

Prabhashankar Dalpatrdm Patani 
Pestanji Ukarji Engineer 



X.— POONA COLLEGE OP [SCIENCE. 
(Recognized 1865.) 
The Poona College of Science (formerly the Poona Civil En- 
gineering College) arose out of a school established in Poona in 
1854 by^Govemment, at the suggestion of Lieut.-Colonel (now 
Major-General) Walter Scott, Bombay Engineers, for the purpose 
of educating subordinates for the Public Works Department. 



382 RECOGNIZED INSTITUTIONS. 

The College is under the control of the Principal, who is 
subordinate to the Director of Public Instruction. 

The College is divided into four Departments : — 

1. Matriculated Students who are educated through the 
English language for University Degrees in Civil Engineering 

2. Matriculated Students who study Scientific Agri- 
culture in the College and the farm attached to it, and who 
obtain certificates of qualification from the College. 

3. Matriculated Students who enter the Forest Branch 
of the College, to which Branch six appointments have been 
guaranteed annually by the Bombay Forest Department. 

4. Students, who prosecute their studies in the College 
and the Workshops attached to it, with the object of 
becoming educated Maistries. 

Attached to the College are workshops where practical 
instructilon is conveyed to the students, and where work of 
various kinds is executed for Government and the Public. 

In July 1863, Cowasjce Jehanghier Readymoney, Esquiro, 
offered to Grovernment the sum of Rupees 50,000 to assist 
in the erection of suitable Buildings for the College. The 
foundation-stone was laid by His Excellency Sir Bartlo 
Frere on the 5th August 1865. 

Felloivsliips. 

Four Fellowships of Rs. 25, each tenable for one year, are 
attached to the College. 

ScliolarsMjJS. 

The following Scholarships, each tenable for one year, are 
annually open for competition : — 

1 of Rs. 15 per mensem. 



1 ,, 12 




3 „ 10 




1 „ 9 




5 „ 8 




3 „ 7 




4 „ 6 




„ 5 




2 „ 4 




2 ■„ 3 




1 McDougall Scholarship of Rs. 6 per mensem. 


1 Frero ticholarship of „ 25 „ 



POONA COLLEGE OF SCIENCE. 383 

McDougcdl Scholarship. 

On the retirement from India of the Eev. James Mc Dougall 
in 1862, a subscription was raised by the ex-Students of the 
Poona Civil Engineering College for the purpose of perpetu- 
ating in the then school the name of its former Principal. 
A sum of Rupees 1,300 "was subscribed, and fix»m the inter- 
est accrviing from this sum the amount of Rupees 72 is placed 
annually at the disposal of the Principal, to be awarded as 
a Scholarship to the most deserving student. 

Frere Scholarship. 

At a meeting of the Is'ative inhabitants of Poona held on 
11th November 1866, BZhdn Bahadur Padamji Pestanji pre- 
siding, it was resolved — That, in order to prepetuate in 
Poona the memory of His Excellency Sir Bartle H. E . Frere, 
a fund be raised, and a Scholarship in connection with His 
Excellences name be established in the Poona Ci^"il Engi- 
neering College. This Scholarship, value Rupees 25 per 
mensem, is tenable for one year, and will be conferred on 
that student who shall have obtained most marks in the 
preceding First Examination in Civil Engineering, provided 
that he shall not at the same time hold a Fellowship or 
Scholarship in any College afl&liated to the University. 

List of Principals. 

1854. The Rev. James McDougall. 
1857. Henry Coke, M.A. 
1859. Captain G. Close, R.E. 
1864.. Captain H. WUkins, R.E. 
1864. TheodokeCooke,M.A., MJ., LL.D., F.G.S, 
1884. 
Principal. 
Theodore Cooke, MA., M.I., LL.D., F.G.S. , M. Inst. CJ;.I. 
Professors and Teachers. 

Samuel Cooke, M.A., F.I.C., F.G.S., Assoc. M. Inat, C.E., 
Professor of Chemistry and Geology. 

James Scorgie, F.C.S., Mem.Soc. Eng,, Professor of Mechanism 
and Applied Science. 



384 EECOGNIZED INSTITUTIONS. 

Rdo Bahddur D^ji Nilkanth Nagarkar, Professor of Mathe- 
matics and Civil Engineering. 

William Shearer, Agricultural Instructor. 

G. M. Woodrow, Teacher of Botany. 

Eaghundth Viniyak Dhairyavdn, Drawing Master. 

Fardunji Mancherji Dastur, M.A., Assistant Professoi- of 
Mathematics. 

Hastings M. Page, First Master. 

Ndnabh4i Ardesir Mus, L.C.E., Second Master. 

Bamanji Hormasji Pdvri, L.C.E., Third Master. 

Mdrtand Ganesh Panse, Assistant Vernacular Teacher. 

Robert Royal, Superintendent of Workshops. 

Librarian. 

Saddshiv Ganesh Pardnjapye. 

/. — Civil Engineering Department. 

Fellows. 

Mangeshrdo Kdtre, L.C.E. 

* Parashurdm Krishna Chitale. 

* Busavdpattam Subrao. 

Frere Scholar, 

* Mahddev Yashvant Dole, M.A. 

Undergraduates holding Scholarskips. 
Third-year Students. 

* C. Chakravarti. 

* Balkrishna Vdman Dhume. 

* Mdnkeshvar Gopdl Mhaskar. 

* Gokaldds Rdjpdl Mehtd. 

* Ardesir Kdvasji Vakil. 

Second-year Students. 

Krishndji Balvant Wdgle, M.A. 
Karjjur Shrinivdsrdo. 

C. Tudball. 
H. Grogan. 

Baburdo Yashvant Nerurkar. 
Bhagvdndds Harkisandds Daldl. 

D. Maitra. 

* Has passed the F.C.E. Examiuation. 



fOOKA COLLEGE OP SCIE5CE, 385 

K. S. Rdmr^. 

N. V. Rdmasvdmi layengaf. 

First-year Students. 

AtmArdm Ndrdyan Mhatre. 
Gajanur Nardyanrao. 
Jandrdan Balvant Joshi. 
Shaloam Elijah. 
Charles Hammond Dracott. 
Gopal Rdmchandra Sine. 
Chhotdkl Dvarkidds Shdh. 
Edward John Hale. 
Rioji MoteM Patel. 

Undergraduates not holding Scholarshipt. 

Third-year Students. 

Bechardds ChhaganlAl Pdrikh. 
Bhag\-ant Sakharam Kirtane. 
Hari Bdlaji Khatav. 
C. B. Halgaya Gowda, 
Sitdrdm Hari Ajrekar. 

■ Ardesir Kdvasji Patel. 

' Chunildl Jethdbhdi Mehtd. 

Rudishankar Girjdshankar Oza. 
' Jehdngier Mancherji Billimorid. 
' Chhaganlal Govindlal Kinkhdbvald. 

Venkdji Rdmchandra Jdlnapurkar. 

■ Vishnu Yithal Gole. 

Second-year Students. 

Appaji Rdmchandra Kulkami. 
Rdmchandra Shrinivda Kulkami. 
W. C. Dracott. 
A. Robinson. 
Panpanpally Bhimsenrdo. 

A. SdmbamurtL 

B. B. Garudachdrya. 
SordbjiXasarvdnji Vakil. 
Pestanji Phirozcshdh MeherjL 
Mandrdm Rupsing Chavdn. 
Chhotdldl Kdshibhdi Patel. 
Hari Anant Athavale. 
Kdrdyan Vithal Godbole. 

P. Wright. 
Joseph Baptista. 

* Has passed the F.C.E. Examination. 
B 1030—33 BU 



38G EECOGKIZED INSTITUTIONS 

Lakshuman Vithal Edvankar. 
Charles H. Parker. 
Balvant AppAji Sahasrabudhe. 
Bulabhji Narsi Trivedi. 

First-year Sttidents. 

Vasantrdi Mahipatrai Oza. 
Umidshankar Gavrishankar Mehtd. 
Keshavji Gopdlji Dave. 
Dlianjibh;li Rastamji Sethn^. 
Shantdppd Ganesh Shashitalkar. 
V^man Vishvandth Lele. 
Venkdji Hanmantnio K^tarki. 
Vishnu Balvant Pandit. 
Mansukhbhdi Varajrai Mehtd. 
Keshavldl Sakhidds Sanghiini. 
Edalji Kdvasji Amrolivald. 
Harichandra Kdshindth Mhdtre. 

Half-free Students. 

* Bdldbhdi Guldbchand Kord. 
Bdlkrishna Govind Bhdte. 
Gopdl Ddmodar Vddthekar. 
Ddjrdo Amritrdo Yichare. 
Pdndurang Vishnu Gopujkar. 
Dinshdh Mancherji Mobedjind. 

Quarter-free Students. 

Ganesh Vdman Gadre. 
Pestanji Dordbji Sanjdnd. 

//. — Agricultural Department, 
Durlabhrdm Rdmji Jdni. 
Hari Edmchandra Chakradev. 
Tdpishankar Prdnshankar Dave. 
Edmchandra Anant Ndik. 
Parshurdm Vithal Gole. 
Balvant Gangddhar Potnis. 
Gopdl Krishna Karve. 
Juddh Haim Mhasilkar. 
Nilkanth Raghundth Hingne. 
Ndgardds Harjivandds Shdh. 
Raghundth Mdrtand iSutbhdi. 
Shivrdm Kashindth Bhdgvat. 

* Has the passed F.C.E. Examination. 



POOXA COLLEGE OF SCIENCE. 367 

Datto Balkrishna Vaidj-a. 
Jaganndth Ganesh BatlLe. 
Dattatraj^a Panclurang Bhosekar. 
Nardyan Ganesh Tilak. 
Jagannath Bapu Akut. 
Pandurang Eknath Dharddbar. 
Gangddhar Damodar Vartak. 
Ganesh Vishnu Bere. 
Vishnu Yashvant Sohoni. 
Bdlkrishna Mahddev Adhye. 
Vishvanath Lakshuman Apte. 
Baldji Khanderao Bhise. 
Venkatesh Hanmant Bevur. 
Vishnu Nardyan Dhamdhare. 
Nardyan Sakharam Pardnjapye. 
Vithal Vishnu Chital^. 
Bdburdo Rdojirdo Chavdn. 
Anant Hari Phalke. 
Edmchandra Baldji Kopa. 
Eknath Vimanrdo Shukre. 
Vishvanath Anndji Moghe. 
Lakshuman Vishnu Mahdjani. 
Damodar Pdndurang Deshpdnde. 
Xdrayan Manohar Ddte. 
Kdehonath Ddmodar Dhekne. 

///. — Forest DepartmoU, 

Govind Ganesh Junre. 
Mahadev Bdlkrishna Tddpatri. 
Saddshiv Venkatesh Pdnde. 
Shridhar Lakshuman Dhekne. 
Bhdrgav Govind Shahdne. 
Pdndurang Vdman Bhdgvat. 
Krishndji Hari Patvardhan. 
Vishnu Trimbak Joshi. 
Bhiskar Kdoji Gandhi. 



XII. 



ENDOWMENTS. 
I. The Munguldass Nathoo-") 

bhoy Travelling Fel- > Rs. 20,000 

lowsMp , ) 

II, The Manockjee Limjee f " ?'^^^ 

Gold Medal ) " -^'SJ! 

III. The Bhugwandass Pur- ^ , ^ ^ „ « 

shotuindass Sanskrit f " I'^nA 

Scholarship. ) » ^'^^^ 

IV. The Homejee Cursetjee ( » ^'^^^ 

^«^y^-^ I ;; I'ioo 

V, The Jugonnath Sunkersett ") on ^aa 

Sanskrit Scholarships,, j " "^"'^^^ 

VI. The Jam Shri Vibhaji ) „ 4,500 

Scholarship j „ 600 

VII. The Cowasjee Jehanghier ") w „ -^ 

Latin Scholarship j " ^'^^^ 

VIII. The Kinloch Forbes Gold J '» 2'20O 

^^^1 1 ;; 2;ooo 

IX. The David Sassoon) „ 5,000 



^1 



Hebrew Scholarship ... j „ 1,700 

X. The James J. Berkley/ " f?^? 

GoldMedal I ;; \f2 

Carried forward . . . Rs. 1,02,00,0 



E^TDOWMEXTS. 

Brought over Rs- 1 ,02,000 

XI. The Ellis Prize „ MOO 

XII. The Hebbert and La- ") 5 qqq 

Tonche Scholarship ... ) " 

XIII. The Wilson PhUological ") „ 23,500 

Lectureship i „ 500 

XIV. The Ellis Scholarship ... „ 7,500 
XV. The Chancellor's Meclal. „ 

XVI. The Amould Scholarship. „ 6,000 

XVII. The Duke of Edinburgh 1 ^^ qqq 

Fellowship 5 " ' 

XVIII. The Bai Maneckbai By- ") o 000 

ramjeeJeejeebhoy Prize ) " "' 

XIX. The Rao Sir Pragmalji ) „ 30,000 

Scholarships j „ 1,500 

XX. The Sir Jasvantsingji ") 25 000 

Scholarships ) " ' 

XXL The Karsandas Mulji Prize „ 3,000^ 

XXII. The Dossabhoy Hor-") „ 5,000 

musjee Cama Prize ... j » 1,500 

XXIII. The HugMings Prize... „ 2,500 

XXIV. The James Taylor Prize. „ 2,500 
XXV. The BhauDaji Prize... „ 6,000 

XXVI. The Venayekrao Jugon- ) 

nathji ' Sunkersett V „ 4,500 

Prize ) 

XXVIL The Mervanji Framjee ) g qqq 

Panday Scholarship... j " ' 

XXVIII. The Kahandas [Mancha- ) g ^qq 

ram Scholarship j " ' 

XXIX. The Dhirajlal Mathura- ) ^ qq^ 

das Scholarship J " ' 

XXX. The Sinclair Prize „ 1,500 

Carried forward ... Ra. 2,58,000 
B 1030-33 Br* 



339 



390 ACCOUNTF, &C. 

Brought over Es. ?,?8,000 

XXXI. The Gibbs Prize „ 2,000 

XXXII. The Narayan Vasudev ") j. ^^^ 

Scholarship ) " ' 

XXXIII. The Cobden Club Medal. „ 

XXXIV. The Sir George Le Grand) o nnn 

Jacob Scholarship j » "^'^^^ 

XXXV. The Sir George Le Grand | tt nr^n 

Jacob Prize f " "^^'^^^ 

XXXVI. The Jairazbhoy Peerbhoy j ^ qqq 

Scholarship 3 " ' 

XXXVII. The Varjivandas Madhav- 1 ^ ^^fj 

das Sanskrit Scholarship 3 " ' 

XXXVIII. The Jamsetjee Dorabjee 7 o aaa 

Naegaumvala Prize 3 " ' 

XXXIX. The Melvill MemoriaU ^ .^^ 

Scholarship | " ^'^^^ 

XL. The Sir Frank S outer \ 1 o cnn 

Scholarships j " "^^'^^^ 

XLI. The Charles Morehead ) ^ z^aa 

Prize 5 " ^'^^^ 



3,16,500 
BENEFACTIONS. 

L University Hall Rs. 1,00,000 

II. University Arms and ") -■ oaa 

Common Seal j " ' 

"^' "^B^^n^ ..^^!"1] » 2,00,000 
IV. The Rajabai Tower J 

with Clock and Peal } „ 2,00,000 

of Bells ) 

V. Mace for the University. „ 1,200 

VL The Gibbs Library , 12,808 

5,15,208 

Total Es. 8,31, 7( 



391 



THE UNIVERSITY OF BOMBAY 



The total annual value of Endowments at present is 
Rs. 12,710. 

The total amount of Benefactions received is Bs. 6,15,208. 

Ten Institutions are recognized by the University of 
Bombay. 

The number of Matriculated Students is 5,989. 



392 



RESULTS OF EXAMINATIONS. 



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XIII. 



The TArE>"TT-THiRD Convocation of tlie University of 
Bombay for Conferring Degrees was held on Tuesday, the 
loth January 188i, at 5-15 p.m., in the Sir CoTrasjee Jehan- 
ghier Hall of the University of Bombay. 

The Members of the Senate present on this occasion 
were : — 

His Excellency the Right Honourable Sir James 
FEKGrsso-v, Bart., K.C.M.G., CLE. 

The Honourable Mr. Justice Wbst, C.S., M.A., LL.D. 
F.E.G.S. 

The Honourable J. B. Peile, C.S., C.S.L, Ar.A. 
The Honourable F. L. Latham, M.A. 
H. V. Cakteb, M.D. 

The Honourable Major-General C. J. MEKKiMAy, C.SJ., 
R.E. 

W. Wordsworth, B.A. 

I. B. Ltox, M.E A.S., F.C.S., F J.C. 

C. E. Fox, M.A. 

Kashlsath Trimbak Telaxg, M.A., LL.B. 

The Honourable Eao Saheb Vishyasath Xabatax 

MA>fDLiK, C.S.L, M.E.A.S. 
James Jardixe. M.A. 
G. A. :NLicoxACHiE, M.D., CM. 
H. J. Blaxc, B.A., B.Sc, M.D. 
Lieut, 'Colonel G. L. C. Merewxiher, E.E. 



394 



CONVOCATION FOR 



Peter Peteeson, D.Sc. 

Captain H.Momand,F.R.G.S.,F.R.A.S., Assoc. Inst. C.E. 
Nanabhoy Byramjee Jeejeebhoy. 

The Honourable Sir Charles Sargent, Knight, M.A. 

The Right Reverend Leo Meukin, S.J., D.D. 

The Honourable Mr. Justice Kehiball, C.S. 

The Honourable Mr. Justice Pinhey, C.S. 

The Honourable Mr. Justice Nanabhai Haridas, LL.B. 

The Honourable Mr. Justice Scott. 

The Honourable Sir Jamsetji Jeejeebhoy, Bart. 
The Honourable Badrudin Tyabji. 



Manockjee Cursetjee. 
Dhunjeebhoy Framjee Patel. 
Dosabhoy Framjee, C.S.I. 
A. N. Hojel, L.K. & Q.C.P.I. 
Kharshedji Rustomji Cama. 
Shankar Pandurang Pandit, 

M.A. 
Satyendrana.th Tagore, C.S. 
Bal Mangesh Wagle, M.A. 

LL.B. 
W. Gray, M.B. 



KhanderAo Chimanrao Bedar- 

kar, B.A., LL.B. 
Shantaram Narayan. 
Atmaram Pandurans:, G.G.M.C. 
Navroji Fardunji, CLE. 
Harichand Sadashivji, Assoc. 

M. List. C.E. 
Kilo Baluldur Nana Moroji. 
Raghmiatli Narayan Kliote, 

CLE. 



COXFEKEIXG DEGREES, 18?3-S4;. 



395 



Rahimtulah iluJianimad Say- 

ani, M. .\., LL.B. 
Homeje.e Cursetjee Dady. 
EduljeeNusserwanjee,G.G.M.C. 
A'aman Abaji Modak, B,A. 
Ardesir Framji Moos. 
Shantaram Vithal Sanzgire, ' 

L.M. 
Khdn Bahadur Jamsetji Dhan- 

jibhoy Wadia. 
Kaikhosra Raatamji Vikaji, 

L.M., M.D. 
Javerilal Umiashankar Yajnik. 
J. Anderson. K.L,S. 
•J. G. DaCunha, M.R.C.S., 

L.R.C.P. 
J. T. Hathomtliwaite, M.A. 
Kdo Bahiidur Vasudev Bapuji 

Kanitkar. 
Sakharam Arjun Ravut, L.il. 
P. Ryan. 
Sir Frank H. Souter, Knight, 

C.S.I. 
Khan Bahadur Mancherji Ka- 

vasji Murzban, Assoc. Inst. 

C.E. 
Nanabhai Rastamji Ranina. 
L. P. De Rozario, L.M. 
RastamjeeXasserwanjee Khori, 

L.M., M.D..M.R.C.P.Lond., 

F.R.CS.Lond., F.R.O.S. 
Dastur Jaraaspji Minocherji 

Jamaspasana. 
S. Newcome Fox, B.A. 
Jamsetji Ardesir Dalai, M.A., 

LL.B. 
Jehanghier Barjorji Vacha. 
Kamrudin Tyabji. 
Varjivandas Madhavdas. 
Cowasjee Hormusjee, G.G.M.C. 
Yashvant Vasudev Athale, 

M.A., LL,B. 
G. Waters, L.R.C.S., L.R.C. 

P.E. 



Cowasji Pestonji, G.G.M.C. 
Joseph Ezekiel. 

Jehanghir Cowasjee Jehanghier 
Readymoney. 
Grattan Geary. 

D.MacDonakl.M.D.,B..Sc.,C.M. 
Vishram Ramji Ghole. 
Cowasjee Xowrojee, G.G.M.C. 
Kavasji Dadabhai Naegaum- 

vala, M.A., F.C.S., F.I.C. 
H. C. Kirkpati-ick, M.A. 
Michael ^lacmillan, B. A. 
Mancherji Navroji Banaji. 
Pestonjee Mancherji, G.G.M.C. 
M. Starling, B.A., LL-B. 
The Rev. B. Blake, M.A., B.B. 
Kaikhosrii Nowroji Kabraji. 
Shivshankar Govindram. 
J. M. Sleater, Mem. Inst. C.E 
Vasudev Krishnarao Dhairya- 

van, B.A., LL.B. 
Dosabhoy Nasservanjee Wadia, 

M.A. 
E. McG. H. Fulton, C.S. 
Surgeon K. R. Kirtikar, 

M.R.C.S. (Eng.), L.R.C.P. 

(Lond.). 
Rustomjee Merwanjee Patel, 

M.A., LL.B. 
Temulji BhikajiXariman, L.M. 
Mahadev Chimnaji Apte, B.A., 

LL.B. 
Jagannath Sadashivji Hate, 

Assoc. Mem. Inst. C.E. 
Bononiry Surgeon Khdn Bahd- 

dur Shekh Haidan Kasim. 
Surgeon Dhanjishah Navroji 

Parakh, L.R.C.P. 
Rilo Silheb Sitaram Vishvanath 

Patvardhan, B.A. 
A. N. Pearson, F.R.Met.S., 
I F.C.S., A.LC, and 



R;io Saheb Ganpatrao Moroba Pitale, Assistant Registrar, 
who carried the Mace. 



896 CONVOCATION FOE 

The Members of the Senate having taken their seatS) 
the Honourable Major-General Merriman, R.Iil., Dean in 
Civil Engineering, rising, supplicated a Grace of the Senate 
as follows : — 

" Mr. Chancellor, — On behalf of Mokshagundum Vis- 
vesvaraiya, B.A. ; Vdman Ndrfiyan Dev, Mangesh Rdo 
Katre ; Bhailal Purshottumdds Shah ; Sitaram Samba- 
siv Varneshiyar ; Nasarvdnji Mancherji Dalai ; Vithal 
Balkrishna Date ; Ndrayan Dattatraya Garde ; Moro 
Govind Joshi ; Karasji Bejanji Sethnd ; and Gavri- 
shankar Harjivandas Vyds, of the Poona College of 
Science, I submit the Certificates required by this 
University and move that the Senate do pass a Grace 
for their admission to the Decree of Licentiate of 
Civil Engineering." 

"Whereupon the Eight Honourable the Chancellor put 
the question, " Doth it please you that this Grace be 
passed" ? and the Senate assenting, the Chancellor said, 
" This Grace is passed." 

The Grace having been passed, the Honourable Major 
General Merriman presented the Candidates in the 
following words : — 

" Mr. Chancellor, — I present to you the Candidates (named 
above) who have been examined and found qualified 
for the degree of Licentiate of Civil Engineering, to 
which I pray they may be admitted." 

Upon which the Right Honourable the Chancellor 
addressed the Candidates as follows : — 

" By the authority given me as Chancellor of this Uni- 
versity, I admit j^ou, one and all, to the degree of 
Licentiate of Civil Engineering ;. and I charge you 
that ever in your life and conversation you show your- 
selves worthy of the same." 

The same words, mutatis miitandis, were used successively 
both for Grace and Admission on behalf of Candidates 
for the degree of Licentiate of Medicine and Surgery, 
Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of 
Laws, and Master of Arts ; Dr. Carter, the Dean in 
Medicine, supplicating for Candidates in Medicine and 
Surgery ; the Honourable Mr. Peile, Dean in Arts 
supplicating for the Candidates in Science and Arts ; 



CONFEREiyO DEGREES, 1883-84. 397 

and the Honourable Mr. Latham, Dean in Law, suppli- 
cating for the Candidates in Law. 

The Chancellor presented the James Berkley Prize of 
Books, of the value of Rs. 250, to Mokshagundam Visves- 
variya, B.A , L.C.E., of the College of Science, Poona; The 
Chancellors Medal to Krishnaji Balvant Wdgle, M.^-? of 
Elphinstone College; and the Manockjee Limjee Gold 
Medals, one for 1882 to Kavasji Bejanji Sethna, B.A.,LL.B., 
and one for 1883 to Granesh Balvant Joshi, BAu, both of 
Elphinstone College. 

The Eegistrar then made declaration of the Degrees 
conferred as follows : — 

LICENTIATE OF CmL ENGINEERING. 

First Clas^ 
Mo^kshagundam Visvesvaraiya, | p^^^ ^^^^^ ^^ ^.^^^^^ 

Second Clctus. 

Viman Nir^yan Dev < 

Mansresh Rao K^tre fr> /-.n -o- 

Bhaikl Purshottamd^ Shih ... \ ^^°* <^«"^g« 0^ Science. 
Sitar^m Sambasiv Vameshiyar... J 

Pass. 



Nasar\-anji Mancherji Dalai ..."j 
Tithal Balkrishna Date ... 
Narayan Dattatraya Garde 
Moro Govind Joshi 
Kavasji Bejanji Sethnd ... 
Garrishankar Harjivandas Vyds . J 



' ' }■ Poona CoUege of Science. 



LICENTIATE OF ilEDICINE , AND. SURGERY. 
First Division, 



Nasarvinji Hormasji Chokshi 
Tuljirdm ChimilAl Khandvala 
Kivasji Kharshedji LdlkAkd 
Sorabji Kharshedji Nariman 
Meherjibhai Rastamji Shett 

B 1030—34 BC 



:i 



Grant Medical College. 



398 



CONVOCATION FOR 



Second Division. 



Parakhi Shrinivds Achyutarao 
Nasarvdnji Frdmji Banshdh 
Shridhar Sakhdrdm Barve 
Kdvasji Mothdbhdi Bdtlivdla 
JMaganldl Umidshankar Bhat 
Mahddev Hari Bhatavadekar 
John Eugene Bocarro . . . 
Gangddhar Gopdl Bopardikar 
Bhovanishankar Bdlkrishna Dd 

darkar. 
Francis X. DeAttaidea ... 
Herbert Leslie Gordon . . . 
Keshav Gopdl Kdmle 
Dosdbhdi Hormasji Kdtrak 
Rastamji Nasarvdnji Laskari 
Pestanji Bhikdji Narimdn 
Jijibhdi Pestanji Nicolson 
Anubhdi Mahipatrdm Nilkanth 
Dhanjibhdi Hirjibhdi Patel 
Jehdngier Mdnikji Penti... 
Kharshedji Santukji Santuk 
Ndrdyan Raghundth Sdtpute 
Kaikhosru Ndndbhdi Spencer 
Jamshedji Bhikdji Unvdld 
Atindrdm Vdsudev Velkar 



f Grant Medical College. 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE. 

Second Class. 



Mancherji Kdvasji Kdngd 
Adarji Mernosji Masdni ... 



Elphinstone College. 
Free General Assembly's Insti- 
tution, Bombay. 



BACHELOR OF ARTS. 

First Class. 



Moreshvar Gopdl Deshmukh, Elphinstone College 

L.M,&S., B.Sc. 
Bhimbhdi Jivanji Ndik ... 
Vaijandth Kdshindth Rdjvdde 
Jamshedji Rastamji WAdid 



Elphinstone College. 
Deccan College. 
Elphinstone College. 



CONFERRING DEGREES, 1883-84. 



199 



Second Class. 



Raghundth Ndriyan Apte 
Shrikrishna Khanderdo Bengdli . 
FrArnji Dordbji Bharuch^ 
Vidyddhar Vdman Bhide 
Ardesir Jamshedji Billimorid . . . 
Shankar MAdhav Chitnia 

Balvant Ndrdyan Dabir 

Men'dnji Shdvakshdh Ddvar ... 
Ddmodar Lakshuman Deshpdnde. 

BApu ]!fardyan Dhekne 

TribhuvandAs Kalliandds Gajjar. 
Keshav Saddshiv Ketkar 
Shankar DattAtraya Khdndekar . 
Ddmodar Nilkant Khare 
Purshottam Parshurdm Khare ... 
Gopdl Lakshuman Killeddr 

Erishndji Hari Kirkire 

Rdmchandra Trimbak Kirtane . . . 

Hiraji Kdvasji Kold 

Sheshgiri Kdmchandra Koppikar. 

Ddmubhdi Ddydbhdi Mehtd 
Hari Rdmkrishna Oltikar 
Mervdnji Ndndbhdi Sakldtvdld ... 
Tahilrdm Khemchand Vazirdni... 



Elphinstone College. 
Deccan College. 
Elphinstone College. 
Deccan College. 
Elphinstone College. 
Elphinstone College. 
Deccan College. 
Elphinstone College. 
Elphinstone College. 
Deccan College. 
Elphinstone College. 
Deccan College. 
Deccan College. 
Deccan College. 
Deccan College. 
Deccan College. 
Elphinstone College. 
Deccan College. 
Elphinstone College. 
Free General Assembly's Insti- 
tution, Bombay. 
Elphinstone College. 
Elphinstone College. 
Elphinstone College. 
Elphinstone College. 



Pass, 



Dolat Purshottam BarodiA 
Edghavendra Bhojo Betigiri 

Mahddev Vdman Bhat 

Bamanji Rastamji Boyce 
Ranchhoddds Ldlbhdi Damnid .. 
Mahddev Gangddhar Ddmle 
Meher Hoshang Dastur ... 
Varajrdi Santokrdi Desdi 
Viniyak Sakhdrdm Deshmukb .. 
Rdmchandra Malhdr Deshpdnde , 
Praujivan Ndrdyan Doctor 
Rdmchandra Venkatesh Gadre.. 
Ndgesh Keshav Godbole... 
Vishvanath Mahddev Herlekar.. 
Kaikhosru Tirandoz Irdni 

Bulchand Kodumal Jagatidni .. 
Jametrdm Raghuram Jokdgar .. 



Elphinstone College. 
Deccan College. 
Deccan College. 
Elphinstone College. 
St. Xavier's College. 
Elphinstone College. 
Deccan College. 
Elphinstone College. 
Deccan College. 
Deccan College. 
Elphinstone College, 
Deccan College. 
Deccan College. 
Deccan College. 
Free General Assembly's Insti- 
tution, Bombay. 
Elphinstone College. 
Elphinstone College. 



400 



COITVOCATION FOK 



Pass— continued . 



Ndrdyan Ddmodar Joshi 

Mangesh Anant Kulkami 

Bejanji Navroji Kutdr 

Keshav Govind MAli 

Rustam Mdnikji Mehervaid 
Mohanrdi Dolatrii Mnnshi 
Lakshuman Krishniji Nulkar .. 

Vishnu Bhdskar Phdtak 

Pdndurang Ganpat Patvardhan 
Phirozshdh Nasarvdnji Pleader.. 
Vindyak Harishankar Pradhdn . . 
Chimanldl Harildl Setalvdd 
Eimchaadra Shankar Tdki 
Durgeshvar Natvarji Trivedi ., 

Hyder Kamrudin Tyabji.,. 
Saddshiv Kangndth Vdnavale .. 



Deccan College. 
Elphinstone College, 
St. Xavier's College. 
Elphinstone College, 
Elphinstone College, 
Elphinstone College. 
Elphinstone College. 
Deccan College. 
St. Xaver's College. 
St. Xavier's College. 
Elphinstone College. 
Elphinstone College. 
Elphinstone College. 
Free General Assembly's 

stitution, Bombay, 
Elphinstone College. 
Deccan College. 



BACHELOR OF LAWS, 

Second Division'. 



Alii Muhdmmad Hussanalli^i 

Akhtind. 
Kaghundth Sakhdrdm Dali 
Moro Vishvanath Joshi ... 
Ddmodar Manji Kdpadid 
Jandrdan Sundarji Kirtikar 
Pdndurang Shridhar Pdthak .., 
Vindyak Krishna Sovani 
Govardhanrdm ^Mddhavrdm Tri' 

pdthi. 
Manchhdshankar Jivanrdm Vakil 



[ Govenunent Law School, 



MASTER OF ARTS 
First Class. 
Krishndji Balvant Wdgle ... Elphinstone Ccdiege. 



Jijibhdi Peatanji Miatri ... 



.. St. Xavier's College. 



COSFEREING DEGREES, 1883-84. 



401 



The following Report was then taken as read .— 

Mb. ChjVkcellob, 

I have the honour, by direction of the Syndicate, to lay 
before you and the Senate a Report of the Proceedings of 
the University since the last Convocation for Conferring 
Pegrees, held on the 23rd January 1883. 

The Report mentions the principal results of the Univer- 
sity Examinations, Endowments to the University, and th? 
more important Academical events of the past year. 

EXAMINATIONS. 

Matriculation Examination. — This Examination was 
conducted at Bombay, Poona, Ahmedabad, Belgaum and 
Karachi. One thousand seven hundred and eighty-five 
Candidates were examined. 

The following is a statement showing the number of Can- 
didates sent up from the various Schools and Private Tutors, 
and the number of those who succeeded in passing the 
Examination : — 





No. of 


No. of 


Schools. 


Candidates 


successful 




sent up. 


Candidate^ 


Elphinstone High School 


120 


68 


Poona High School 


67 


37 


St. Marj-'s Institution, Bombay 


38 


27 


Fort High School... 


71 


22 


Bombay Proprietary School ... 


51 


22 


Dhdrs-M High School 


35 


19 


Sir J. J. Parsi Benevolent Institution, 

Bombay. 
R^jardm High School, Kolhlpur 


21 


19 


28 


18 


Surat High School 


40 


17 


Surat Mission High School ... 


31 


16 


Belgaum London Mission High School . . . 


28 


15 


New English School, Poona... 


20 


U 


Ahmedabad High School 


52 


13 



B 1030^34 BC* 



402 



CONVOCATION FOR 



Schools. 



No. of 

Candidates 

sent up. 



No. of 
successful 
Candidates 



Free General Assembly's Institution, Bom» 

bay. 
Kdthiawir High School, Rdjkot 
Haidardbad High School 
New English School, Dh^rvdd 
Belgaum Sirddrs' High School 
Kdrwdr High School ... 

Sir Cowasjee Jehanghier Navasdri Z, 

Madressa 
New English School, Belgaum 
BarodA High School 
Dhuliii High School 
Eatndgiri High School 
Byramjee Jeejeebhoy High School, Thind 
Sdtdrd High School 
Bishop's High School, Poona... 
Cathedral High School 
Chandanvidi High School, Bombay 
Naridd High School 
Bahddurklianji High School, Jundgad 
Amrdoti High School 
Ndrdyan Jagann4th High School, Kardchi 
Kobert Money Institution, Bombay 
Nasik High School 
Bhdvnagar High School 
Broach High School 
Scottish High School, BycuUa 
Sdngli English School 
Ahmedabdd Irish Presbyterian Mission 

High School. 
Sdvantvddi English School . . . 
Ahmednagar High School 
Navanagar High School 
St. Mary's School, Poona 
Miraj English School 
Ahmednagar Mission High School 
John Connon High School . . . 
Sholdpur High School 
St. John's Anglo- Vernacular Portuguese 
School, Mdbim. 



31 

27 
20 
28 
27 
14 

11 
18 
23 
15 
16 
IS 
23 

9 
10 
20 

7 
14 

9 
13 
19 
16 
11 
11 

7 

4 
20 

10 
12 

4 

5 
13 

8 

2 

6 

3 



COKFEERING DEGREES, 1883'S4. 



403 



Schools. 



No. of 

Candidates 

sent up. 



No. of 
Successful 
Candidates 



Poona Free Church Mission Institution ... 


4 




Grammar School, Karachi 


2 




Shikarpur High School 


10 




Fort Convent School 


1 




Free Church Mission School, Jalna 


1 




General Assembly's Institution, Bombay. . . 


2 




Bombay High School 


5 




St. Peter's Boys' School, Mdzgaon 


2 




St. Peter's Girls' School, Mdzgaon 


1 




Alfred High School, Bhuj ... 


3 




St. Mary's Seminary, Madras 


1 




Karachi Mission High School .., 


1 




Sholdpur A. V. English School 


1 




Prabhu Seminary, Bombay ... 


3 


None. 


Poona Native Institution 


6 


None, 


Akola High School 


4 


None. 


Bombay Private English School 


8 


None. 


The Indian High School 


2 


None. 


The Fort Imperial High School 


2 


None. 


Private Tuition ... 


620 


64 




1,785 


599 



Of the successful Candidates 192 took Sanskrit as their 
second language, 73 Latin, 3 Hebrew, 129 Persian, 7 French, 
59 Marathi, 77 Gujarathi, 56 Cinarese, 1 Hindustani and 
2 Sindhi ; 414 were Hindus, 126 Parsis, 24 Europeans and 
Indo-Europeans, 16 Portuguese, 10 Muhdmmadans, 6 Jews, 
and 2 Native Christians. 



Previous Examinaiion, — At this Examination there were 
333 Candidates. 

The following is a statement showing the numlDer of Can- 
didates sent up from each of the seven Colleges and the 
numljer of those who succeeded in passing the E^amina* 
tion :— 



CONVOCATION FOR 



Colleges. 


Kg. of 
Candidates 
sent up. ( 


No. of 
Successful 
Candidates 


JElphinstone College ... 

Deccan College 

Free General Assembly's Institutjon, Bombay, 

St. Xavier'a College ... 

GujarAt College, Ahmeddbdd 

BAjdrAm College, Kolhdpur 

Barod^ College 


114 
64 
33 
43 
18 
27 
34 


38 

36 

10 

7 

7 

12 
14 




333 


124 



Of the successful Candidates lOO were Hindus, 18 Parsis, 
2 Mulidmmadans, 2 Europeans, 1 a Native Christian and 1 
a Jew. Of these, 89 selected Sanskrit as their second 



language, 15 Latin, 19 Persian and 
the Second Class, 



1 Hebrew. 17 passed in 



First Examination for the Degree of B.A. — At this E xa- 
mination there were 153 Candidates. 

The following is a statement showing the number of Candid 
dates sent up from each of the five Colleges and the number 
of those who succeeded in passing the Examination : — 





3 


m 3 


3 


^ n! 


o 




Colleges. 


X 


=5^ 


1^ 


11 


2 
— '"5 


11 
111 


Elphinstone College 


15 


8 


53 


33 


68 


41 


Deccan College . . 


8 


4 


37 








Free General Assembly's 














Institution, Bon.bay .. 


4 


3 


6 


3 


10 




St. Xavier's College 


1 


1 


20 


12 


?.l 


13 


Rajfirim College, KolhS- 
pur 


•• 




9 


5 


9 


5 




IfS 


1 95 



CONFEEBIKG DEGEEES, 1883-84. 



405 



Of the successful Candidates 71 were Hindus, 21 Pirsis, 
2 Jews, and 1 a Muhammadan. 6S selected Sanskrit as 
their second language, 7 Latin, 19 Persian and 1 Hebrew. 
24 passed in the Seoond Class. 

Second Examination for the Degree of B. A. — At this Exa« 
mination there were 63 Candidates. 

The following is a statement showing the number of 
Candidates examined from each of the four Colleges and 
the number passed: — 













^^ 






3 




5 


i» 


O 


s — 


Collies. 




"S 1 


1 
m 
o 
o 


U 
f 1 




1-3 

ill 

1=' 


Elphinstone College 


7 


5 


31 


23 


38 


28 


Deccan CoUege 


4 


4 


13 


U 


17 


Ifi 


free General Assembly's 














Institution, Bombay . . 


1 


1 


3 


3 


4 


4 


St. Xavier's College 


1 




3 


3 


4 


3 




63 


51 



Of the successful Candidates 39 were Hindus, 11 Parsis, 
and 1 a Muhdmmadan. 5 passed in the First Class and 25 
in the Second Class. 33 selected Sanskrit as their second 
language, 4 Latin and 14 Persian. In the selected Groups 
11 passed in Language and Literature (Group A), 20 in 
History and Political Economy (Group B), .5 in Logic and 
Moral Philosophy (Group C), 5 in Mathematics (Group D), 
and 10 in Natural Science (Group E). 

Examination for the Degree of B.A. (Old System). — At this 
Examination, which was held for the last time, there were 
41 Candidates. 



The following is a statement showing the number of Can- 
didates sent up from each of the four Colleges and the num- 
ber of those who succeeded in passing the Examination : — 



406 



CONVOCATION FOR 



Colleges 



j No. of j No. of 
(Candidates Snccessful 
sent up. ICandidates 




Elphinstone College ... 

Deccan College 

Free General Assembly's Institution, Bombay. 

St, Xavier's College ... 



Of the successful Candidates 20 took up Sanskrit as 
their second language, 3 Latin and 2 Persian. In the 
selected Groups 16 passed in History and Political Econo- 
my (Group B), 3 in Logic and Moral Philosophy (Group 
C), 5 in Mathematics (Group D), and 1 in Natural Science 
(Group E). 24 were Hindus, and 1 a P^rsi. 5 passed in 
the Second Class 

First Examination for the Degree of B.Sc — At this Exa* 
mination there were 3 Candidates, of whom 2 passed the 
Examination. They were both Hindus from the College 
of Science, Poona, and one of them was placed in the 
Second Class. 

Examination for the Degree of B.Sc — At this Examina- 
tion there were 3 Candidates, of whom 2 passed the Exa- 
mination, in the Second Class : 1 from Elphinstone College 
and 1 from Free General Assembly's Institution, Bombay. 
They both were PArsis. 

Examination for the Degree of M.A. in Languages. — At this 
Examination there was only 1 Candidate from St. Xavier's 
College who passed the Examination. He was a Parsi and 
had selected Persian as his Second Language. 

Examination for the Degree of M.A. in Mathematics. — At 
this Examination there were two Candidates, of whom one 
passed the Examination. He was from the Elphinstone 
College and was placed in the First Class. He was a 
Hindu. 

Examination for the Degree of M.A. in Natural Sciences'. — 
At this Examination there were 4 Candidates,' who failed 
to pass the Examination. 



CONFERRING DEGREES, 1883-84. 407 

Examination for tlie Degree of LL.B. — At this Examina- 
tion there were 23 Candidates from the Government Law 
School, of whom 9 passed the examination, and were placed 
in the Second Division : 8 were Hindus, and one a Muham- 
madan. 

First Examination in Medicine. — At this Examination 
there were 79 Candidates from Grant Medical College, of 
whom 42 passed the Examination : 7 passed in the First 
Division and 35 in the Second Division. 15 were Hindus, 
18 Parsis, 7 Portuguese, 1 European and 1 Muhammadan. 

Examination for the Degree of L.M. & S. — At this Exa- 
mination there were 37 Candidates from Grant Medical 
College, of whom 28 passed the Examination. 5 were 
placed in the First Class and 23 in the Second Class. 10 
were Hindus, 16 Parsis, 2 Portuguese, and 1 a European. 

First Examination in Civil Engineering. — At this Exa- 
mination there were 24 Candidates from Poona College 
of Science, of whom 12 passed the Examination. Ten were 
placed in the Second Class. 11 were Hindus and 1 a Parsi. 

Examination for the Degree of L.C.E. — At this Examina- 
tion there were 19 Candidates from Poona College of 
Science, of whom 13 passed the Examination. 1 was placed 
in the First Class and 5 in the Second. 10 were Hindus 
and 3 Parsis. In the selected subjects, 6 passed in Analy- 
tical Geometry and Differential and Integral Calculus, 3 in 
Mining and Metallurgy, 3 in Mechanical Engineering, and 
1 in Optics and Astronomy. 

UNIVERSITY PRIZES Als'D SCHOLARSHIPS. 

During the year under report the University Prizes and 
Scholarships were awarded as follows : — 

SCHOLARSHIPS. 

The Jugonndth SunTcersett Sanskrit Scholarships. — First to 
Bhaskar Vishnu Joshi, and second to Narayan Sakhdrdm 
Pause, both of New English School, Poona. 

Thf- Coicasjee Jehanghier Latin Scholarship. — To Samuel 
Gerald Maidment, of Cathedral High School, Bombay. 



408 CONVOCATION FOR 

The Ellis Scholarship. — To Barjorji Jamasji Padshah, of 
Elphinstone College. 

The David Sassoon Hebreio Scholarship, — To Isaac Aron 
Bhdstekar, of Free General Assembly's Institution, 
Bombay. 

The Arnould Scholarship. — To Moro Vishvandth Joshi, of 
Government Law School. 

The Bdo Sir Prdgmctlji Scholarships. — To Keshavji Gopalji 
Dave, of Alfred High School, Kutch. 

TJie Sir Jasvantsingji Scholarships. — First to Chunilal 
Harilal Vakil and second to Umiashankar Gavrishankar 
Mehta, both of Bhdvnagar High School. 

The Merwanjee Frdmjee Pandaij Sclwlarship. — To Sitdram 
Sambasiv Varneshiyar, of the College of Science, Poona. 

The Ndrdyan Vdsudevji Scholarship. — To Jamshedji 
Eastamji Wddia, of Elphinstone College. 

TJie Varjivandds Mddhavdds Sanskrit Scholarship. — To 
Sakhdrdm Keshav Bhagvat, of Elphinstone College. 

The Sir George LeOrand Jacob Scholarship. — To Hari 
Sadashiv Apte, of Rdjaram High School, Kolhapur. 

The Jairdzbhoy Peerhhoy Scholarship. — To Mahomed 
Akbar Nazerdlli Haidari, of St. Mary's Institution, Bombay. 

Tlie Kahandds Munchdrdm Scholarship. — To Keshavlal 
Sakhidds Sanghani, of Kathiawdr High School, Edjkot. 

TJie Melvill Memorial Scholarship. — To Chaturbhai 
Valabbhai Patel, of Baroda College, formerly Gujarat 
College. 

The Sir Frank Souter Scholarships — 

1. Matriculation. — To Syed Taher Macdi, of St. Mary's 

Institution, Bombay. 

2. Previous. — To Akhund Ghuldm Mnhdmmad Ghuldm 

Ali, of Elphinstone College. 

3. First B.A.—To Surdjudin Abdul Fattd Maulvi, of 

Elphinstone College. 



COJTFEEEING DEGREES, 1883-84. 409 

PRIZES. 

The 'Homejee Cursetjee Dady Prize for 1SS3. — To Jehdngiet 
Dordbji Nimachvala, of Elphinstone College. 

The Ellis Prize. — To Chunilal Anuprdm Mehta of Xariad 
Higli School. 

The Bdi Maneckhai Byramjee Jeejeehhoy Prize, — To 
Kharshedji Hormasji Captain, of Fort ffigh School. 

TliJi HugUings' Prize. — To Herbert "niomas Lenahan, of 

Elphinstone College. 

The James Tayl&r Prize. — To Barjorji Jdmdsji Padshdh, 
of Elphinstone College. 

The Bhau Ddji Prize. — To Krishndji Hari Kirkire, of 
Elphinstone College. 

The Vindyakrm Jugonndthji Sunkersett Prize, — To Hari 
Krishnaji Paranjapye, of Deccan College. 

The Sinclair Prize. — To Yasudev Eashindth Paranjapye, 
of Amrdoti High School. 

The Gihhs Prize.— To Bhikaji Dorabji Bhard^ of Elphin- 
stone College. 

Th^ Jaraes Berkley Prize of Boohs. — To Visresvaraiya 
Mokshagundam, B.A., of the College of Science, Poona. 

The .Jainshedji Dorabji Naegamvala Prize — To Bhailal 
Pni-shottamdas Shdh, of the College of Science, Poona. 

MEDALS. 

The Manockjee Limjee Gold Medal for 1883.— To Kavasji 
Bejanji Sethna, B.A., LL.B., and the Medal for 1883 to 
Cranesh Balvant Joshi, B.A., both of Elphinstone College. 

The Chancellor's Medal. — To Krishnaji Balvant Wagle, 
B.A., of Elphinstone College. 

The Cobden Club Medal— To Barjorji Jamasji Padshah, 
of Elphinstone College. 

PHILOLOGICAL LECTURESHIP. 

The Wilson Philological Lectureship.— A. Fiihrer, Ph. D., 
has been elected to deliver these Lectures on " Hebrew and 
the other Semitic Languages. ' 

B 1030—3.5 Bx: 



410 CONTOCATION FOK 

ENDOWMENTS. 

During the year under report the Senate accepted with 
their best thanks the offers made by the Melvill Memorial 
Committee and the Muhdmmadan National Association of 
Bombay, of the sums of Rs. 6,000 in Government 4- per 
cent. Paper and Rs. 13,630 in cash, for the foundation of 
" The Melvill Memorial Scholarship" and of " The Sir 
Frank Souter Scholarships". 

Dr. Henry Carter, on behalf of the Morehead Memorial 
Committee, offered to the University the sum of Rs. 5,000 
in Government 4 per cent, paper for the foundation of a 
Prize to be called " The Charles Morehead Prize", of the 
value of Rs. 200, to be awarded every year to the Candi- 
date who passes the L.M. and S. Examination with the 
highest number of marks in Clinical Medicine. 

At a meeting of the Senate held on the 17th September 
1883 this offer was accepted with the best thanks of the 
Senate. 

Mr. Dosabhoy Framjee, C.S.I., Honorary Secretary to 
" the Ashburner Memorial Committee", has lately offered 
to the University in the name of that Committee a sum of 
Rs. 3,000 in 4 per cent. Government paper for the founda- 
tion of a Scholarship to be called " The Ashburner Scholar- 
ship", to be awarded every year to the Candidate approved 
by the Examiners in Sanskrit and in English who will for 
one year apply himself, under Regulations made by the 
University, to the study of Indian Art as illustrating its 
history and literature. 

The Syndicate will have much pleasure in submitting at 
an early date this offer for the acceptance of the Senate. 

The Rdjdrdm College, Kolhilpur, has been recognized in 
the Faculty of Arts for the purposes of the First Examina- 
tion for the Degree of Bachelor of Arts. Application for 
similar recognition on behalf of the Gujardt College, 
Ahmeddbfid, has lately been made and will be submitted 
shortly for the consideration of the Senate. 

BYE-LAWS AND REGULATIONS. 

Since the last Convocation for conferring Degrees regii' 
lations for awarding "The Jamshedji Dorj^bji Naegilum 



CONFERRING DEGREES, 1883-84. 411 

vala Prize", " The Melvill Memorial Scholarship", " The 
Sir Frank Souter Scholarships" and " The Charles More- 
head Prize" have been made by the Senate and have 
received the approval of His Excellency the Governor in 
Coimcil. Further concession has been given to Bachelors of 
Science who may wish to present themselves as Candidates 
for the Degree of Bachelor of Arts. The following clause 
has been added to the Regulations for awarding the 
^arayan Vasudev Scholarship : — 

"The Scholarship shall be awarded to Physical and 
Biological Sciences in alternate years, provided that, if 
no Candidate qualifies for the Scholarship in the 
branch of science to which it has been assigned for the 
year, the Scholarship shall be awarded to the Candi- 
date who passes the B.A- Examination with the high- 
est number of marks in the other branch of science in 
the same year, and is recommended as provided in 
Eegulation 1." 

At a meeting of the Senate held on the ] 7th September 
last it was resolved that aU Examinations for degrees in 
Arts, Medicine, Civil Engineering and Law should be 
thrown open to women on the same terms as to men. 

The Eight Honourable the Chancellor then addressed the 
Senate as follows : — 

Mr. Vice-Chancellor, and Gentlemen of the Senate, — At 
this great annual gathering, which marks another year that 
has passed in the history of this University, it is most 
gratifying to admit to the degrees and licence so many 
yovmg men who to-day receive the reward of their industry 
and their self-denial, and I trust they will advance to-day 
another step in then- career with higher hopes and increased 
aspirations to public usefulness. I trust that the interest — 
the enduring and increasing interest — which is taken in 
these annual meetings, will tend to increase in their minds 
the importance of a Univei-sity degree, seeing that it is 
the hall-mark of their scholarship, and that it not only 
quaUfies them for admission to the highest employment 
open to their ranks in this country, but will so stimulate 
them, I trust, to rise still higher in the career which they 



412 CONTOCATION FOB 

have chosen for themselves. I need not, I hope, caution 
them against supposing that the success which has so far- 
attended their efforts is all that they ought to aspire to. 
Too many suppose that the knowledge which they have 
gained entitles them to- criticise and dogmatise ; true know- 
ledge should always be modest, because, as the searcher 
proceeds, he sees how much there remains behind to attain. 
It should stimulate the modest and thoughtful mind rather 
to diffidence than to self-confidence. I hope that the idea, 
which some years ago was deprecated, of the right of those 
who attain to degrees in the University to public State 
employment is fast disappearing. It would be, indeed, 
unfortunate if neither learning was loved for itself or 
its possession was held to render a humble occupation 
unworthy of the holder. In the countries where learning 
has been most widely diffused — take, for instance, the 
kingdom of Prussia — it is thought by no means derogatory 
for those who obtain successes in the Universities to pur- 
sue humble callings. Not only should knowledge respect 
labour, but it should seek to produce increased discoveries- 
for the benefit of its profession and of mankinds Gentle- 
men, this year has not been an eventful one in the sense o£ 
any extraordinary occurrence in the history of this Univer-^ 
sity. We have pursued the even tenour of our way without 
any very extraordinary event having marked the year 1883 ; 
but yet we can congiatulate ourselves on the increased num- 
bers of those who have offered themselves for the Matricu- 
lation Examination ; and the increased proportion of those 
who have been successful is shown by the larger number of 
those who have attended to take degrees, whereby I am 
sorry to say the seats provided for the graduates have- 
proved insufficient. But, gentlemen, in the history of a 
University we cannot always look for startling events. We- 
must be contented in this, as in other phases of our career, 
to lay one more stone of the edifice which we hope to raise 
to solid and enduring usefulness. It is thiis that in the 
little span of our lives, which seems to us important, but 
which is soon forgotten by our fellOwmen, we must be satis- 
fied that we have maintained the standard of the past 
and contributed something little to the cause in which we 
are all interested. On this great annual occasion I should 
do wrong if I forgot the memory of one who was well 
known to ns, but a few days since passed away. I refer to 
the IIou. John Marriott, who on several occasions had filled. 



CONFERRING DEGREES, 1883-84. 413 

an important ofl&ce in this University. That one so eminent 
m his profession, so entirely respected in his private life, 
enjoying the regard of so many, should in the full enjoy- 
ment of his intellect have passed away from us with start- 
ling suddenness, is an event which must cause us regret 
and sorrow. But, gentlemen, it must be a satisfaction to 
us to know that his memory will be cherished amongst us 
He was one who raised himself from the threshold of his 
profession to the front by his own industry^and one against 
whose memory no man can cast a stone. 

Then, too, gentlemen, during the past year we have had 
to congratulate ourselves on fresh contributions to the 
means of reward to our diKgent students. The four fresh 
scholarships which have been announced to-day testify to 
the public spirit of our citizens and to the interest which 
they take in this useful institution. I am sure no more 
pleasing tribute can be paid to the memory of past mem- 
bers of the service who have gone from us than that their 
names should be perpetuated by the encouragement of 
academical distinctions in those branches in which they 
themselves took an interest. 

It is indeed to me a matter of congratulation that the 
m^ost important step has^ been taken of admitting women to 
public examination. There are many steps that wUl have 
to be taken before they will have the fiill benefit of the 
University. They cannot yet, for example, without pre 
ceedings being taken by Government, be admitted to the 
enjoyment of our colleges ; and no doubt many matters will 
have to be considered before such a step can be taken ; but 
I do not think that the warmest advocate of female educa- 
tion can object to one step being taken at a time ; and it is- 
well that ladies should, I trust, present themselves in no 
small numbers at first and show their capacity for these 
examinations. Gentlemen, for myself I can see no ground 
why women should be excluded from the educational 
advantages which are extended to men. I will not insult 
the female good sense by wishing that they should be place<J 
in all respects on an equality with men. They have their 
career — and a very high career of duty it is — which must 
always be entirely distinct from ours, but their intellects- 
are as acute, their power of assimilating knowledge as great, 
and means of usefulness open to them by the acquisition of 
knowledge not inferior to those of men. In all countries 



414 CONVOCATION FOE 

the education and development of the female character must 
rest with female teachers. It may be that instruction in Arts 
and Sciences can best be conferred by men, but the formation 
of character must always rest with female teachers. How can 
female teachers be qualified to a due extent if they have oot 
educational advantages open to them ? Therefore I cannot 
see myself why the whole benefit of an University should 
not be extended to women ; but in this country, until 
society greatly changes, we cannot hope — we cannot expect 
if we do hope — that women, except in their young years, can 
be present at mixed places of education. The education which 
they must receive after years of childhood, and many of 
them who have not had any educational advantages in 
childhood at all, must be derived, if at all, from female 
instructors. Therefore, I say in this countiy it is peculiarly 
advantageous that female education should be encouraged 
to the utmost extent ; and that no advantages which this 
society can offer, should be denied to women. I have some- 
times thought that we may be rash in judging what may 
be best for races and people and religions so different from 
our own as are those in this country : but I cannot be 
wrong in thinking that as we in old time derived all our 
knowledge and civilization from the East, so we should 
bring to the East and oSer as a debt of gratitude the fruits 
of that which we derived from them. The result must be 
in the hands of your own people ; and we must look to the 
leaders of society that what we think reforms shall have 
their support to be judiciously carried out. No greater 
bond can exist between the natives of this country and 
their foreign rulers than the common desire for their future 
advantage. Gentlemen, finally, the Supreme Government 
have empowered this University, with those of Calcutta 
and Madras, to confer honorary degrees. This power will 
enable the University to reward merit in many quarters in 
which at present no recognition is possible. It will, I 
doubt not, be exercised with discretion and reserve, for, 
as in the case of fellowships, the value of such degrees 
depends upon their judicious distribution. With regard 
to fellowships, I may say that it is a matter as much of 
regret as it is a bounden duty to Government to confer 
that honor only in the case of academical and literary 
distinction, while a degree may be not inaptly given in 
recognition of service which would not qualify for a fellow- 
skip. I thought when 1 rose that I hud little to say, and 



COXFERRIXG DEGREES, 1883-84 415 

that my observations would not be long, yet there is one 
more consideration I -would offer, which I trust will not be 
out of place, and which I cannot reconcile to myself to 
omit. In the year 1883 the country has been greatly 
distracted by political strife. Animosities have been 
excited, as they must always be excited by a political differ- 
ence, which has been greater than we can remember for 
many years. The University has the priyilege of sitting 
high above the waves of faction. Those — and there may 
be some amongst us — who have taken part in the contro- 
versy of the past year never sought to carry it into their 
academical life. What occurs to me, gentlemen, is this. 
We have in such an institution as this a healing element 
which may go far to soothe the diflBcuIties which political 
controversy has raised, because in this Senate sit men of 
different races and countries, actuated simply by the one 
conunon desire, to benefit the people of this country of 
whatever races in one and the same way. With us there 
is only that desire to impart to them to the utmost the 
knowledge which we ourselves prize ; and this considera- 
tion, which seems to me to rise to the highest stage of 
Catholicism, must, I think, so heal dissensions that they 
will endure but for a day and in a few years be forgotten. 
Gentlemen, I trust that this is one of those institutions 
which will bring home to the people of this country the 
true and deeply-seated desire of England to use her great 
mission in this country for the highest benefit of India; 
and that it may be seen that Englishmen, and Muhamma- 
dan, and Hindu, and Parsi may sit on the same benches to 
co-operate, not only without jealousy, but with one motive 
and aspiration, the advantage of our fellow countrymen. 

His Excellency the Eight Honourable the Chancellor, 
after a short pause, declared the Convocation dissolved. 



3-84. 



B 1030-1 ex 



a^xattuuatio« ^^m% 



l_A copy of the following Directions is laid on the Table of each 
Candidate at the beginning of each Examination.] 

1. Write your number on the list and your name, beginning 
with your surname, at the top of each sheet of foolscap. 

2. Make a margin (as in this paper), and write in the margin, 
at the top of each page, the number of the answer. 

3. Write upon one side only of the paper, and do not write 
any part of your answer upon the margin. 

4 . Begin each answer at the top of a new page. 

5. Arrange your papers with care in the order of the question, 
and tie them together with the piece of string provided. 

6. Write on the back of the last sheet — 

1st. Your number on the List. 

2nd. Your name, beginning with your Surname. 

7. Candidates in want of anything are to apply to the 
Examiner or other officials in charge, but are not to leave their 
seats on this or any other account, except to deliver up their 
answers. 

8. If any Candidate bring any book or paper into the Exa- 
mination Hall, or speak to, or communicate in any other way 
with, another Candidate while the Paper Examination is going 
on, he will be instantly expelled, and his name reported to the 
Board of Examiners. 

9. Candidates, when they have given up their answers, are on 
no account to return to their seats. They must at once leave the 
Hall without loitering. 

PETER PETERSON, D.Sc, 
University Registrar. 



MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1883-84. iii 



MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1883-84, 
EXAMINERS. 



The Rev. J. M. Hamilton, S.J. ...^ 

The Rev. A. C. Grieve I 

G. W. Forrest, B.A I 

The Rev. G. T. Rea, M.A - 

K. T. Best, M.A 

M. P. Lynch, Esq 

The Rev. J. I. Bambridge J 

Shankar Moro Raxade, B.A, 

A. L. P. Tucker, C.S 

Joseph EzEKiEL, Esq 

Khdn Bahadur Hoshang Jamasp Das- 



Id English and in History 
and Geography. 



TTTK ... 

O. S. Pedraza, Esq 

A. P. De Axdrade, G.G.M.C. 

Bal Maxgesh Wagle, M.A., LL.B.... 

Javerilal Usuashankar Yajsik, 

Esq 

Rdo Bahadur Jayasatyabodhrao Tir- 

MALRAO lyAStDAR 

HaJI GhULAM MUHAJttMAB MUSSHI, 

Esq 

BAo Sdheb Alxtmal Trikamdas Bhoj- 

VAXi, B.A 

The Rev. F. Dreckmanx, S.J. 
Kavasji Dadabhai Naegamvala, 

M.A., F.C.S.,F.T.C 

Go\a>-D Vithal Kttrkaray, B.A. ... 
Khan Bahadur Bamanji Sorabji, 

L.C.E., A.iI.I.C.E 



In Sanskrit. 
In Latin. 
In Hebrew. 

In Persian. 
In French. 
In Portuguese. 
In Marattii. 

In GnjardthL 

In Cinarese. 

In Hindustdni. 

In Sindhi. 



> In Natural Science. 

I In Arithmetic and Al- 
t' gebra and Euclid. 



iv MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1883-84. 

Friday, 23rd November, 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

ENGLISH. 

The Rev. J. M. Hamilton, I The Rev. G. T. Rea, M.A. ; 

S.J. ; K. T. Best, M.A. ; 

The Rev. A. C. Grieve ; M. P. Lynch, Esq. ; 

G. W. Forrest, B. A. ; I The Rev. J . L Bambridge. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

N.B. — Ten marks are assigned to legibility and general neatness 
of writing, 

1. Paraphrase the English passage or translate any one of 20 
the vernacular passages : — 

'Tis raging noon ; and, vertical, the sun 

Darts on the head direct his forceful rays. 

O'er heaven and earth, far as the ranging eye 

Can sweep, a dazzling deluge reigns ; and all. 

From pole to pole is undistinguished blaze. 

In vain the sight, dejected to the ground. 

Stoops for relief ; thence hot ascending steams 

And keen reflection pain. Deep to the root 

Of vegetation parched, the cleaving fields 

And slippery lawn an arid hue disclose, 

Blast fancy's blooms, and wither even the soul. 

Echo no more returns the cheerful sound 

Of sharpening scythe : the mower, sinking, heaps 

O'er him the humid hay, with flowers perfumed ; 

And scarce a chirping grasshopper is heard 

ThroiTgh the dumb mead. Distressful nature pants. 

The very streams look languid from afar ; 

Or, through the unsheltered glade, impatient seem 

To hurl into the covert of tlie grove. 

^^ 3Tfcf ^-f^sfr ^cfr^fr ^\^\^\ ^\^^\ i]^\. 
311^1 ^g'R ^^r^T m%\ 5^ drff. c^r# ^\^^ 
^t df^ 5iw?f arr^ ^^#r ^^^\ ^'{€\ ^\^^\ 
^^^^ 3Trf^ 5TfcT ^^i 3it 5T[^ 5>| ^\ ^r 
^^ ^\^ =^m^ 3T[^ ^^i"#5 ^^^ «rr?^ ^^\- 



MATRICULATION KXAMIKATIOX, 1883-84. 

^^t ^m\ ^"^T^ ^^i^ 5TT^r fl^r. ^crnfr ^- 

^(^^77^ ^9 ^\^\ r^o5^ ^HcT. -sTm ^r ^u- 

NO 

3Tr^l ^TTOT^ ^"JiT^r " 3Tt ^\%^ f^w^m^u 
4^ i?f mrf "fill e^rl; flt ^^Tr ^qcTr ctu ^^rt 

irmT iifi] fcT^^r ^^r ^rr^fr^r^i ^4 fr^, 
'^rP^t, 5-^u 3^r^ ^Tfr. mcT^^TH ^ir# t't? 

nfr^, ^m\ ^fr^, ^rr^n >tf^1^ ^rrfr. errfn- 



'liw'H'<3i l\i[\% ^r\[^,% >*i'-{Hi =i^a'-^ ^'I'Hi 

B 1030—1 ex* 



vi MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1883-84. 

^=»^^(>il v"^ ^^ ^iNiai ^? h\ '\€\ B^m ^4-1- 

^ti^i <M^ cMi^i ^^i>iici •u^:Hi \si ^i ^^^» ^^- 

"H^ nmC^ ^=(1 ^^I'^i^.ioi ^.-^m f^^-nn fit? 'i 
^cti ^l^n^ ^idiKl JjSi^uW "idiT-fl ^ ^m ^^ 

h^"^ Hn^i ^^15 Jf^-lUi (3MlJy'^l>li ^i =Hytai 



^©j Jj^oScid SJdiiloObSS^S 8JS?i1 SoJS^A eCJSJ^ S(^^ 

I ? a(°j5^ ©d^j^ cob's? ^Wjrf Brec^jSffl©^ ? eOccdj 1^^ 



MATRICULATION EXAMnfATlON, 1883-84. vix 

J3^^? S33?)^ §J3S^^ eS^fSrf^, il^J^^^ cje;3S?J, 8J£7< 



At6 aqui temos tido grandes cousas a registrar como grilhSes 
em uma continuada cadea de magnificas descubertas. Pelo este 
e oeste a ouaada mao do homem tinha rasgado o veu do seio do 
oceano e per fim elle tem pegado pela sua cintura com sua garra. 
Ha\-ia volvido um pequeno seculo depois que a esperancosa 
varonilidade do Infante D. Henrique o ^^ra esforcarse na investi- 
gacao das desconhecidas veredas do Atlantico quando o mundo 
foi circumnavegado por homens cuja nitrepidez foi mantida pelo 
exemplo de sua perseveranca. Nao hade volver um seculo depois 
do successo do3 sens fracos mas persistentes esforcos em dobrar 
o entao formidavel Cabo Bojador sem que outra joia seja addida 
& coroa daquella pequena mas gloriosa na^ao para cujos corajosos 
esforcos o seu genio e constancia haviam dado o primeiro impulse. 
Seguiram logo as grandes descubertas de Francisco Pizarro e 
Diogo de Almagro na costa occidental da America meridional. 
Nao foimuito depois do cumprimento da assaz memoravel viagem 
ora narrada, que a Australia— aquelle vasto continente insular 
com cuja descuberta es tamos costumados a connectir o nome do 
nosso illustre Cook, on ainda alem o de Dampier — foi explorada 
pelos Portuguezes tanto pelos sens lados orientaes como occiden- 
taes. 






Viii MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1883-84. 

(^y\'^c>'i^]-y^^j <j*.b ^^^\ j^j L^^ ly^ 

eJ^^-U^" b"^ Jl Jj £^ ^^b /^ ^y^ 

Jt L^:* O^^ L^J^ ^^^ V^ L^'^J'-'' 



MATRICULATION EXAMIXATIOS, 1883-84. ix 

•• •• •« 

CiJ^v^l/ l/^^^" <^^ -^ "^^ ^J 



X MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1883-84. 

M 'mm 

L^^^" L^ ' (^^ I — LT^ L^e-^ ,^i<^ ^J^^=» 

«* M M M •* 

•• . ' '' « 

, gs 
*>?-? ^^^ ^t L^'' l/ L^'-'j^ ^A' 



A 



.M> 



MATEICULATION EXAMIXATIOS, 1883-84. xi 

9 ^ 

^*-? r 1:;^=^ ^- ^ L^> ^^ L^-T* 

I * H •* W 

l/^^ (^ (^ <o" ^^^ ^U J y U*^ 

Mm mm 



2. Describe in an essay of about 30 lines any journey 35 
which yon have made by rail, road or sea, or any pleasant 
walk you may remember to have taken. 

3. Explain the following sentences : — 18 

(a) The good run of business he had last season set him 
up for life. 

(6) He brought the horse to the hammer and knocked 
him down to the highest bidder. 

(c) His salary was so small that he could scarcely keep 

his head above water. 

(d) I received a letter at the dead of night written in a 

dead language. 

(e) The old man felt that his days were numbered. 

(f) At that time the practice of keeping late hours was 

verj- common. 

(g) There was little to choose between the rebels and 

their oppressors. 



Xii MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1883-84. 

(A) He is sure to do his business well, I'll be bound. 
(/) As a poet he presents a faint analogy to Milton. 

4. (a) Give some account of the Indo-European family of 
languages. To what stock of that family does English 
belong ? 

(6) Give the Saxon equivalents of the following words 
of Latin origin : —Loquacity, mendicancy, sorcery, 
serpentine, larceny, anticipate, abstain, solitary, 
prevent, conversation, combustion, important. 

5. Give— 

(a) the plurals of '.leaf,' 'ox,' 'analysis,' 'criterion'; 

(6) the feminine of 'abbot,' 'actor,' 'duke,' 'songster,' 
' testator, ' ' nephew. ' 

(c) Give the rules for the formation of the comparative 
and superlative degrees of adjectives. Explain the 
forms, 'worse,' ' next,' 'first,' 'farthest.' 

{d) Give the rules for forming the possessive cases of 
nouns. Write down the possessive singular and 
objective plural of 'knife,' 'conscience,' 'penny,' 
' lady mayoress,' ' whosoever.' 

6. Parse the words in italics, and explain the construction 
where necessary : — 

(a) The above remarks, as we noticed above, apply above 

aU to the third class. 

(6) There was no one there but you, 

(c) The coat is worth quite thirty rupees. 

{(l) Do as you please ; only let your intention be apparent. 

(e) The green trees whispered soft and low. 

(/) Now is the witching time of night. 

7. Write short sentences illustrating the meaning of each 
of the following pairs of words :— Officious and official ; 
ingenious and ingenuous ; popular and populous ; tempera- 
ment and temperature ; wilful and willing. 

8. (a) Distinguish between ' accent ' and ' emphasis. ' 

(b) What is meant by rhyme, quantity, metre, allitera- 

tion ? Give examples of each, 

(c) Define the following terms : — Tautology, euphemism, 

verbiage. 



MATRICULATION" SXAMINATIOX, 1883-84. xiii 

9. (a) What parts of the verb may be used (1) as noons, 15 
and (2) as adjectives ? Apply your answer to the word 
' speak," by making short sentences in which this verb is 
used in the diiferent ways we have mentioned. 

(b) Make use of the words horse, kick, man, as subject, 
predicate and object respectively to form one sen- 
tence in which (1) the subject is enlarged by an 
adjective sentence and (2) the predicate is enlarged 
by an adverbial sentence relatii^ to cause. 



Fbidat, 23rd Novembkr. 
[2 pjf. TO 4 r.M.] 

ELEMENTARY HISTOEY and GEOGRAPHY. 



The Rev. J. M. HAiULTON, S.J. ; 
The Rev. A. C. Grieve ; 
G. W. Forrest, B.A. ; 



The Bev. G. T. Rea, M.A. 
K. T. Best, MA.. ; 
M. P. Ltxch, Esq. ; 



The Rev. J. I. Bambridgk. 
[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. What instances are there in English history of the S 
deposition of a reigning sovereign ? Date the event in each 
case. 

2. "WTiat great events do you associate with the names 6 
of Thomas a Becket, Edward the Black Prince, and John 
Hampden ? 

3. Give some account of the Corporation Act, the Act S 
of Uniformity (during the reign of Charles II.), the Con- 
venticle Act, and the Five Mile Act. 

4. Between whom, in what year, and with what result 7 
in each case were the foUo^^-ing battles fought : — The three 
battles of Pdnipat, Bannockbum, Pinkie, St. Quentin, 
Senlac, Vittoria, Zutphen ? 

5. Who weriB the Ghurkas, the Pindaris, the Sikhs, the 10 
Begums of Oudh, the Slave Kings ? What part did they 
play in Indian history ? 

6. What are the leading characteristics of the rule of 8 
Lord William Bentinck as Governor General ? \Mien did 

he rule ? Mention and describe the chief reforms carried 
out by him, 

B 1030—2 ex 



xiv MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1883-84. 

7. Of what states are the following towns the capitals : — 
Stuttgart, Quito, Bankok, Bucharest, Teheran, Lima, the 
Hague ? 

8. (a) Name in order, going from west to east, the prin- 
cipal islands in the Mediterranean Sea, stating the country 
to which each belongs. 

(b) Name the chief rivers of Asia, saying of each of them 
into what sea it flows. 

9. Give some account of the Gulf Stream, the Trade 
Winds, and the Monsoon. 

10. Compare Europe, Asia, Africa and the Americas as 
to physical structure and features, pointing out special 
similarities and differences. 



Saturday, 24th November. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

SANSKRIT. 
Shankar Moro Ranade, B.A. 
[The figures to the right indicate full marks .] 
1. Join according to the rules of Sandhi : — (a) t{\ i 

^^: «i# 3T^^[^? ^ar ^\^ ^R^. (c) ^q-^%*. 
(d) \^^^ z(m, (e) ^l\^^* ^^^^Kt: b^^ m\^ 

3T>fiS* 3T==ci:^i^^m "^ ^ ^^ f^':§-: 3i5«^ 

state the rule or rules that obtain in the cases marked 
with an asterisk. 

2. Give the Nom. and Instr. of f^J^jf?^ n. ; Loc. pi. of 1 

f^^^^5 ^®5"RI^ an^ ^^^ *^^ ^^^ of g"q[^5^ 

and ^^[^[^; Nom. sing, fem, and dual n. of Parasm. 



MATBICCLATION EXAMINATION, 18S3-84. XV 

prea. participles formed from the roota 5Tj f^T^i rT2" 
OT, 3T^, §■» ^, Vr»3T , cT^ and q^ . and Xom. sing. 
fem, of participles formed from the simple fut. Paraem. of 

r^^, ^"If % H^, ^^, R?T, ^and ^. 

c 

3. Decline in all their cases the following : — 3?"^^) the 9 
optional forms of JJ^SR" and ^f^, ^tM{ f^5I^, ^^ m,, 
and 5r?T. 

4. Erpress in Sanskrit : — 59, 643, 1578S9, by 101 women, 5 
and 999 Brdhmans. 

5. State what yon understand by the following technical 6 
terms :- ^T^ , ^, 3^1^, ^^, 10 ^^TRs, 
|uj-d ^T*T optatives, denominatives, absolutives, and the 
Radical and S-Aorists. 

6. Give — 12 

(a) 2 and 3 sing. Imperf. Parasm. o^ ^^, ^^^ ^^S] , 

(6) Pres. Parasm. of ^ and ^TfffJ 3 pi. Pres. Parasm, of 
^ and ^[' Impera. sing, of 3TH^ to be, \^^ ^, 5n^, 
1^ }T^> ^R? ^» ^, ^ to go, and ^^. 

(c) 2 sing. Perf. of ^ with ^q^ 3^^, q^, ^^, 

f ^, 3Tyr, ^^ and 3Tq\ 

(d) 3 sing. Aor. of |" with 3TI^, ^, 3TH(4thconj.), 
h , T^T, ^ with q-, ^ Atm. with g-q, and TJll^ 
A'tm. 



Xvi MATRICULATION BXAMISTATION, 1883-84, 

(fi) 3 sing. Pres. Frequentative of ^^T ^ ^, 5"S" , 

c 

7. State the general rules for the formation of perfect 7 
participles, and explain the uses of such terminations as 

c^Fj ^> *'°'' ^"^ ^^^ formation of the Sanskrit gerund. Give 
instances of the latter. 

8. Translate into English : — 23 " 



ofrf^crr nft'^^icr f^^'crr^i: ^m^: i ^cqq- 



Name and dissolve the comijoimds underlined in the above. 



MATRICULA.TIOJr KXAMIXiTIOF, 1883-84. xvii 

9. Translate into Sanskrit :— 20 

(a) The incessant weeping of my wife, and the piteous 
complaints of the pretty babes, who, not knowing what to 
fear, wept merely because they saw their mother weep, filled 
me with terror for them, though I did not for myself fear 
(Aor. Jf|) death ; and all my thoughts were bent to 

contrive means for their safety, I tied ( Aor. ^^ ) my 

youngest son to the end of a small mast ; at the other end 
I bound the youngest of the twin slaves, and at the same 
time I directed (Cans. Aor. of ^) my wife to fasten the 
other children in like manner to another mast. 

(6) Wife of psT* ^"^"e of ^^• wife of ^^W; 'w^e of 

Sjf^. wife of an :3TJ7EIJ[q". a female 3"'Tr^r^: ^^e 

of a ^"^q"; a ^\^^ woman. 

K.B. — In the translation of (b) the original Sansirit icordt 
f^, 1*T, dee., mtist be retained, and the necessary feminine 
terminations alone affixed thereto. 



Sattrdat, 24th Novembbh. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

LATDs. 

A. Lu P. TrcKER, C.S. 
[The figures to the right indicate fall marks.] 

1. Decline throughout — 

Lex, dies, locus, genus, servitns. 

2. Give the Infinitive Present, 1st person singular Per- 
fect Indicative, and Supine of — 

Mico, dico, dico, confiteor, nascor, nandscor, eo, curro, 
jubeo, spondeo. 

3. Decline throughout — • 

Aliquis, iste, duo, tres, uterque. 
B 1030—2 ex* 



xviii MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1883-84. 

4. Give the comparatives and superlatives of — 5 

Facilis, hilaris, dives, juvenis, pulcher. 

5. What cases are governed by the following prepositions * 5 
Give examples of each : — 

Contra, sub, sine, de, inter, 

6. Put the following sentences into Latin : — 20 

(a) You ought (oportet) not to speak thus. 

(b) You ought not to have spoken thus. 

(c) Such was his iniquity, that he was thought unworthy 

to serve government. 

{d) These two men lacked food for seven days. 

(e) It cannot be denied that this is a proper time for pro- 
posing the law. 

7. Translate into Latin : — 30 

While this was going on in Asia it happened by chance 
that the ambassadors of Prusias supped with the consul 
Flaminius at Rome : and when mention of Hannibal was 
made there, one of them said that he was in Prusias' kingdom. 
Flaminius reported this to the senate on the following day. 
The conscript fathers, who thought that they would never be 
free from danger while Hannibal was alive, sent ambassadors 
toBithynia, Flaminius among the number, to request the king 
not to keep their worst enemy with him, and to surrender 
him. Prusias did not dare to refuse the ambassadors : but 
he did refuse to do anything contrary to the law of hospital- 
ity, and said that they might catch Hannibal themselves if 
they could : that they could easily find the place where he 
was. 

8. Translate into English :— 25 

Rex interim Juba, ut ex proclio fugerat, una cum Petreio 
interdiu in villis latitando, tandem nocturnis itineribus con- 
fectis in regnum pervenit atque ad oppidum Zamam accedit. 
Quem oppidani, antea rumore exoptato de Cajsaris victoria 
audito, oppido prohibuerunt. Postquam Juba ante portaa 
diu multumque primo minis pro imperio egisset cum Zamen- 
sibus, deinde cum se parum proficere intellexisset, precibus 
orasset ut se ad suos deos penates admitterent, ubi eoa 
l)erstare in sententia animadvertit nee minis uec precibus 
suis moveri, quo magis se reciperent tertio petit ab eis ut 
sibi conjuges liberosqtie redderent ut secum cos asportaret. 
Postquam sibi nihil onmino oppidanos responsi reddere ani- 



MATfilCULlTION BIAMIKATION, 1883-84. xix 

madvertit, nulla re ab his impetrata ab Zama discedit atque 
ad villam suam cum M. Petreio paucisque equitibus se con- 
fert. Zamenses interim legates de Ms rebus ad Caesarem 
Uticam mittunt petimtque ab eo ut ante quam rex manum 
oelligeret seseque oppugnaret sibi auxilium mitteret. 



Satcbdat, 24th NorEMBER. 
[10 A.M. TO 1 P»M.] 

HEBREW. 

Joseph Ezekiei, Esq. 

[The figiires to the right indica te full marks.] 

1. (a) What letters of the Hebrew alphabet are Paragogie? 5 
Why are they so called ? Give some examples. 

(6) What effect has Makkaph on the word preceding it ? 

(c) Show the difference between a compensative Dagesh 
and a characteristic Dagesh. 

2. How are fractions expressed in Hebrew? Give the 8 
Hebrew of one-third of a Hin, one-fourth of a year, oru-teaih 

of an Epha. 

3. (a) Give the construct forms of 2i^ ^2t^ ^H^^ j^H 7 

T " T T 

and T I 

(6) Decline ttJ^t^ a man, tT'^fc^n thtman,aad. Jint^ 

• T T - 

thou. 
(c) Give the plurals of p'ltT and ^^'^ \ 

'XL') 

4. What are the chief peculiarities of the verb H 7 '• 5 

5. (a) Give the pronominal affixes of the accusative case. 10 
(6) Render the foUo^-ing into Hebrew : — Thou didat 

remember me. I shall remember thee. They will remember thet. 
He remembered V3. She will remember thee (f). 

6. Give the second person masculine singular past and 5 
future Kal of ^>1"^ ,y^^ n^Jt^l ih'^ and ^"^ •. 

7. Give the EngUsh of T'^'l^ H^H CiTHin AT^ 



10 



XX MATRICULATION BXAMINATION, 1883-84. 

,a''riT^'in ^m'^^l'' »^T'^i'^ ^"njin and the Hebrew 

of / went down ; I shall bring dovm ; go down (m. s.) ; wiU 
thou go down ? Cause thou (f ) to go down ; will he go down ? 

8. Correct the errors in the following : — 10 

• : T T 

: ;iT^ nt?5 vS« "^^^"1 (6) 

t; V T T • T : V V •— — 

9. Translate the following passage into English : — 15 

T T •• : • V - : • T X T : 

^^n n-tn Di^n nsn : ryrii^"^ typn?D Tn nsn 

T V — - •• • ' V T T *■• - : • T •• • 

n^tp« ^h 'yo\i^^ T^v onni ^nO^ "'^^l 

t: • -'t: '..•.. • •• T . . • T . -. 



MATRICtLATION ElAMIKATION*) 1883-84. XXI 

h^ i^i^'"' "itpt?2 : Ti rr^O ^^ ''Tl ^ t"^ 

: irn^ tr:;?-^? ^nnisi r\*2 2^2 n.n« nt*"^ ^^^T^ 
ni^ 2^1 «TA ^r^^ ^^''^ '^^^i inV X- '^t'TI 

' VT • •••::•: • • 

10. Translate the folio-wing passage into Hebrew : — 25 

And Nathan said to the king, go, do all that is in thine 
heart ; for the Lord is with thee. And it came to pass that 
night, that the word of the Lord came imto Nathan, saj-ing, 
go and tell my servant David, thus saith the Lord, shalt thou 
build me an house for me to dwell in ? "NMiereas I have not 
dwelt in any house since the time that I brought up the 
children of Israel out of Egypt, even to this day, but have 
walked in a tent and in a tabernacle. In all the places 
wherein I have walked with all the children of Israel spake 
I a word with any of the tribes of Israel, whom I commanded 
to feed my people Israel, saying, why build ye not me an 
house of cedar ? Now therefore so shalt thou say unto my 
servant David, Thus saith the Lord of Hosts, I took thee from 
the sheep cote from following the sheep, to be ruler over my 
people, over Israel. 



Saturday, 24th November. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

PERSIAN. 
Khln Bahidur Dastur Hoshasg Jamas?. 
[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 
1. Give the literal meanings of the following words : — 10 
^0.0^-^-J- ? .La^-CLsL)! and Ji] and give 
their equivalent grammatical terms in English. Define 
> JmoJU ^J«^La.-L^ycuvO \(^^>a/0 and 4^0 Ia, \0,*a/0 



Xxii MATRICULA.TION EXAMIKATIOK, 18S3-84. 

Illustrate your answer by examples. 

2. Write in Persian characters the Persian grammatical 10 
terms for the following : — ' Reciprocal pronoun,' ' demonstra- 
tive pronoun,' 'pluperfect tense,' and 'copulative con- 
junction.' Give examples. 

3. Give the imperative forms of, ,j4> *Xm) — .l.^ylj— .!U«». 4 
(to escape) and -l^* t (to grow). 

4. (o) Give the meanings of the following t(\ia<o in 14 
English : — 

^^1 and 

(6) Decline the verbs jJoB****^ and JUo Uh *J in the 

following forms : — (1) 3rd pera, plu. of the aorist ; (2) 
Snd pers. sing, of the future tense ; (3) present participle ; 
(4) 1st pers. plu. of habitual (i.e. past potential). 

5. (a) Define (j:^U?ly^l^i£» C!L>U.UolJI^ 8 

>(^.»a^ »»^ ^^d yj^^ L<^ Illustrate your definitiona 

by examples. 

(b) Explain the meanings of the letters C— ? CL» and ^ 

in the following, giving their technical names : — 

OJlT i^Z^a ^ijs J I y^ji ^ (6) 
6. Translate into English :— 25 



MATEICTLATION EXAMINATION, 1883-84. xxiii 



Xxiv MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1883-84 

L-ft^f^r ./voU. U j^ >J<i ^^ ^^i^<^*^ jjU* ^»;* 
tlT^ L^'^' f^ C^y- ^^'°' '^' CJviL^ 

7. Translate into Persian : — 29 

Courtesy. 

It was said of Charles I. that he granted favours in so un- 
pleasing a manner, that they procured him less affection than 
some other kings gained by courteously declining to gratify 
their petitioners. A peasant, meeting Artaxerxes, king of 
Persia, in one of his journeys, having nothing to present 
to his sovereign, ran to an adjacent stream, and filling his 
hands with water offered it to the king. The monarch smiled 
at the oddness of the present, but thanked the giver, in 
whom, he said, it shewed at least a courteous disposition. 
Such a peasant might be to all appearance a clown, but his 
mind must have been by nature that of a gentlomau. 



MiiTRICtrLATIOK EXAMINATION, 1883-84. XXT 

Satttbdat, 24th Novembek. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

FRENCH. 

0. S. Pedraza, Esq. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1 . Re-write the following sentences, correcting all the 12 
mistakes : — 

(a) J'ai arrive k Bombay sur le vendredi, le vingt-premi«r 
de May de dix-huit cents et quatre-vingts. 

(6) Je vous ne donne rien. 

(c) Je ne connais pas loi mats il connait moi. 

(rf) D a mouru sans ayant eu le consolation de voir voos 
one dernier temps. 

(e) Pourquoi m'avez vous introduisit a cette madame 7 

(/) Je I'aime pas si beaucoup que vous disez. 

2. Explain the diflference between : — 12 

Le poste et la poste. Le voile et la voile. Le barbe et 
la barbe. Le manche et la manche. Le livre et la livre. 
Le vase et la vase. Le mousse et la mousse. Le mode et 
la mode. Le page et la page. Le tour et la tour. Le 
somme et la somme. Le critique et la critique. 

3. Translate into French : — 

(a) The lady in question was born at Havre in seventeen 
hundred and ninety-six. 

(6) I met him at my son-in-law's this morning at about ten 
minutes to nine. 

(c) You look very pale this morning. What is the matter 
with you ? 

4. How are adverbs of manner formed from adjectives ? 3 
Form adverbs with the following adjectives :— Savant, 
malheureux, assidu. 

5. State the rules for forming the plurals of compound 7 
nouns and wiite the plurals of : — 

Lieutenant-general, chou-fleur, chef-d'oeuvre, tete-k-tete, 
cure-dents, arc-en-ciel, contre-amiral, aide-de-camp, chef- 
lieu, perce-neige. 

B 1030- 3 ex 



XXvi MATRICULATION EXAMINATIOTT, 1883-84. 

6. State the second person plural of the present indica- 10 
tive and past definite of : — 

Faire, manger, dire, renoncer, savoir, acquerir, vivre, 
prendre, croire, croitre. 

7. Translate into English either of the following ex- 30 
tracts : — 

(a) Nous ne croyons pas que les Mordecai soient nombreux, 
qu'il se trouve beaucoup de juifs pour soupirer encore aprfes 
la terre promise, apr^s ses montagnes pierreuses, ses vignes 
et ses oliviers. Depiiis longtemps ces exiles ne maudissent 
plus Babylone. On ne les voit plus errer tristement le long 
des fleuves et suspendre leurs harpes aux branches pliantes 
des saules ; on ne les entend plus s'6crier : " Si je t'oublie, 
Jerusalem, que ma droite s'oublie elle-meme ! que ma langue 
se coUe a mon palais ! " lis se sont attaches au pays des 
gentils, leurs afiaires y prospferent et leurs coeurs y out pris 
racine. C'est une si bonne chose que la civilisation, meme 
un peu faisandee ! Personne n'en savoure comme eux les 
commodit^s et les douceurs. II leur serait glorieux sans 
doute de fonder une r^publique de I'Anti-Liban ou une 
Belo-ique oripntale gouvern^e par des prophetes ; mais sans 
parler des objections du Grand-Turc, leur entreprise souffri- 
rait bien des difficult^s. La theocratic n'est plus un gouver- 
nement a la mode, et rien ne ressemble moins k un Beige 
qu'un prophete. 

(h) Avant peu, les juifs de Francfort et de Berlin, qxioi 
qu'en disc le docteur Duhring, deviendront d'aussi bons 
AUemands que les juifs de Bordeaux et de Paris sont devenus 
d'excellens Fran9ais. Cela ne les empechera pas de rester 
juifs, et les gens sens6s ne s'en plaindront point. II est bon 
qu'il y ait dans un pays des minorit6s influentes dont on 
respecte les droits ; il est bon que leur importance soit 
disproportionn6e a leur force num6rique ; il est bon qu'une 
nation ne soit pas gouvern^e exclusivement par cette force 
souvent aveugle, toujours brutale, qu'on appelle le nombre. 
Fa9onner toutes les totes sur le meme patron, couler toutes 
les ames dans meme moule, mettre de niveau tons les esprits, 
pousser jusqu'a la fureur le goftt de I'equerre et du fil k plomb, 
jusqu'au fanatisme le culte de I'ordonnance et la religion de la 
sym6trie, tirer les soci(ittis au cordeau et rectifier sans cesse 
I'alignement, tel est sans doute I'id^al d'uu homme d't5tat 
chinois, mais, n'en d^plaise aux miindarius de Berlin et de 
Paris, I'Europe n'est pas encore la Chine. 

8. Translate into French :— 20 

The trouvadours of Aragon and Catalonia were the chief 
means of raising the Spanish language into the position of 



MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1883-84. XSyii 

having a literature worthy of being preserved ; and in the 
court of Ferdinand and Isabella, the Castilian became the 
language of fashion, which stiU fvirther increased its import- 
ance — the Aragonese courtiers who had followed Ferdinand 
being led to abandon their mother-tongue and learn that of 
their adopted countiy, and since the sixteenth century the 
Castilian has alone been the language of Spanish literature. 



Satueday, 24th Novembee. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

PORTUGUESK 

A. P. DeAndbade, G.G.M.C, 

[The figures to the right indicate fuU marks. ] 

1. Translate the following into Portuguese : — 20 

We no sooner drew near the inlet than we found the coast 
to be inhabited, and three canoes came off to the ship. In 
one of these were two men, in another six, and in the third 
ten. Having come pretty near us, a person in one of the 
two last stood up and made a long harangue, inviting us to 
land, as we guessed by his gestures. At the same time he 
kept strewing handfuls of feathers towards us, and some of 
his companions threw handfuls of red dust or powder in the 
same manner. The person who performed the office of orator 
wore the skin of some animal and held in each hand some- 
thing which rattle<l as he kept shaking it. After tiring him- 
self with his repeated exhortations, of which we did not 
understand a word, he was quiet. After the tumultuous 
oration had ceased, one of them sung a very agreeable air, 
with a degree of softness and melody which we could not 
have expected. In a short time the canoes began to come 
otf in great numbers ; and we had at one time thirty-two of 
them near the ship, carrying from three to seven or eight 
persons each, both men and women. 

2. que se entende por palavras variaveis e invariaveia 6 
ua lingua Portugueza ? E porque sSo assim chamadas ? 
Enumere e classifique todas as partes da oracSo, que compre« 
hendem palavras variaveis e invariaveis, esclai'ecendo a 
resposta com um ou dois exemplos. 

3. Quaes sSo os nomes que nSo tem singular, e quaes os 4 
que n&o tem plural ? De-me tres exemplos de cada hum. 



XXviii MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1883-84. 

4. que se entende por grdos nos substantives e adjectives ? 6 
Como se forma o grdo diminutivo nos substantives ? E nos 
adjectivos, quantos sao, e como se formam os grdos ? De-me 

um ou mais exemplos de cada hum. 

5. Forme o plural dos seguintes nomes : — 4 
Cherubim, prata, phrenesi, annel, paeiencia, ourives, jejum, 

chumbo, comarcao, fuzil, coronel, alferes, amal, lapis, colchao, 
tabelliao, volcao, ceitil, rebanho e caes, 

6. Quaes sao os nomes que debaixo da mesma termina^ao 8 
designao ambos os numeros ? 

7. Forme adjectivos das seguintes palavras : — 6 

Heroe, trabalho, ironia, habito, nevoa, horisonte, virtude, 
provincia, aldea, comarca, coUusao, devassidao, sympathia e 
saude. 

8. Que cousa e verbo ? Quantos verbos substantives ha ? 8 
De-me exemplos des verbos substantives, e enumere alguns 
verbos que podem ser empregades na lingua Portugueza como 
substantives, exemplicando-os. 

9. O que se entende per conjuga9ao regular e irregular, 6 
e quantas sao ellas ? Forme uma ou mais senten9as de cada 
uma para se esclarecer a resposta. 

10. Conjugue o tempo presente do modo indicative e do 4 
conjunctive des verbos caber, hir e sahir. 

11. What de you meaxL hy locugoens conjunctivas ? lUus- 8 
trate your answer by three or four examples. 

12. Translate the following into English : — 20 

At6 aqui se ponderavamos a insensibilidade de um cora^fto 
humane nae amar, e a terpeza de nao amar a Deus : i-esta 
ainda penderarmos a ingratidae de nao amar a Deus que o 
ama, e que e amacomsigo mesmo, pois elle 6 o amor essencial. 
!Se Deus, sendo, como 6, por si s6 infinitamente amavel, nos nao 
amasse (que podia ser, pois seu amor para comnesco 6 muito 
livre e so a si mesmo necessariamente se ama) ; ainda assim 
devia ser sebre todas as cousas amado, adorado e obedecido, 
]»or ser elle quern 6 em si mesmo : edeste mode o amam algumaa 
almas na terra ; que, nao se satisfazendo, para motive de seus 
»ffectes, dos beneficios de Deus, e achae mais nobre e efficaz 
na centempla9ae do bem que este Senhor 6 etemamente 
tlentro em si mesmo. Porem accrescende para n6s sobre 
atjuelle titulo este segundo mais connatural ao nosso modo ; e, 
sobre ser Deus tao amavel em si, ser amante nosso ; e 
ainda assim uRo o amannos ! Aqui uao sei que diga desta 



MATEICULATION IXAMTNATION, 1883-84 xxlx 

miseria ; e pode ser que mais se diria, dizendo nada. Pe^o 
ao leitor que nao passe por estas clausulas acceleradamente. 
NSo amar eu a meu Deus que me ama ! Meu Deus me tem 
amor, e elle 6 o mesmo amor com que me ama : e eu nSo 
tenho amor a Deus ! Creou me Deus & sua imagem e seme- 
lhan9a para o altissimo e felicissimo fim de o gozar etema- 
mente ; e eu nao amar a quem me creou ! Oh lastimosissima 
cegueira ! Oh miseria , verdadeiramente digna de perpetuas 
lagrimas ! 



Satttedat, 24th Novembsk. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

MAEA'THI. 
Bal Mangesh Waglb, M.A., LL.B. 
[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. State the rules for the pronunciation of 37Ht^il! in 
Mardthi. Point out the difference, if any, in the pronunciation 
of the ^T'T^^f^ in the following words : — 

3Tt^, 3tcf, qf?t3T, %^, iIt^, ^q^ITT, ^F, ^5T^; 

and point out the difference in the meaning caused by the 
pronimciation of the 3^«T(^r^ ^ ^^^ following words : — 

^^m, ^m^, and ^^. 

2. Mention five nouns which are always used in the sin- 
gular and never in the plural in Mardthi, and also five nouns 
which are always used in the plural but never in the 
singular. 

3. Distinguish between the forms ^^ c^f. 3JT^, 

fcT^, &c., and ^TTf^r^, 5?^^, f^'^^\^y &c., and 
state when the latter forms have to be used in preference to 
the former. 

4. Decline ^ and ^o^. 

5. How are feminine nouns formed in Mardthi from mas- 
culine nouns ? Illustrate your answer by examples. 

6. Give five examples of adjectives formed upon adjec- 
tives in 37J. 

B 1030—3 ex* 



XXX MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1883-84. 

7. What is a q^qj^T^ [%^rT5' ? State the different 7 
ways in which they are formed. Illustrate your answer by 
examples. 

S. Define a Jf ^fT. ^rive the characteristic difference of 8 
each ^^\^[ as it obtains in Mardthi, Convert (a) 5'^[% 

^FcT^r ^^^r^Tr, and(&) 5^ rV^rm fi^R^ldr 

nto m^ and ^If UT[ constructions respectively. 

9. Annotate the following sentences : — S 

(1) r%^^T^ 5Ti^r ^^ ifr^ f^^ ^j- 

(2) ^m 'Trerl f]*^^ ^^^]^, 

(3) ^ ^]^ q^r ^^J^^\. 

(4) ^ ^']T]^\ 5uWr^. 

(5) f^^ ^m^i^ ^^ ^^l^^. 

10. Translate into English the following -^I^; 10 

fdT^ ^r^ Trt 3Tf f^ ^1% ^ lliTr%Ttf[ 

Tcfr %^r 5^r% ^ssqrt ^5 scicr ^t^ ii 

11. Translate into English the following passage : — 20 

^ ^[^cTT, 5rr^ 5?rr^ ^f^ 3t^^, 5Tr=^r ^^ 



MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1883-84. XXxi 

^^ ^rT^T 3TTITR ^^\ ^^^ t ^tCt %:^ 

^^ ^iB^, 3TTf^ f^^^^TT ^1"nT^ *rint^ ff":i3t=^ 
5^: ^^: ^rrffrT jtt^ ^t^ ^# ^tfr ^fr. cT^i^rtX^ 

12. Translate into Mardthi the following passage : — 20 

A person got a bag of com stolen from his house. He 
went and complained to the judge, who ordered all the people 
of the house to appear before him. He gave each of them a 
piece of stick, all of equal length. He said that whoever 
was the thief, his stick would be a finger's breadth longer 
than the rest. They were then dismissed from his presence. 
The thief, afraid of being found out, cut a fingers breadth off 
his stick. Next day, when they were summoned to produce 
their sticks before the judge, the thief s was found to be 
shorter than any of the others. In this way he was detected 
and was at once led away to suffer punishment for hia 
offence. 

Saturday, 24th November. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

GUJARATL 
Javerilal Ujoashakkar Yajxik, Esq. 
[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 
1. Translate into English the following passage : — 25 

^mm ^?5>tl 3iM S'^H^ ^'$^41 f\>i^i'-(l i'^ ^[h'Hi 
^lui ^y ^afi^Mi^ y$^ii R^Mi ^^n y<l oi^{l 



XXxii MATEICULATION EXAMINATION, 1883-84. 

(3<i\^, ^4 ^ H'^n >ij^H ^i^i tih'i ^iH^ "^i 

H^'i h\^. ^%f[ cl Sf^HM ^fM'll "Wil^MMi 
^l<rn'll ■a^l='Ml'(l '^'^\ i\H[ <MM^. ^^«Hl>li ^l«wi 

f*i(i-ii "i^^i ^i^ ^icQ Jf^^i -^iW \[<^'a ^ilii 
^^ >i^ »iim^ ^[oivll ^IM^ ^toii ^^ (acVi 

2<iM^, ^^ Hi^ m\ >ii ^if^ :m^^ "^ =^i 

»iiM (3'4^ ^i\ ^l^^l ct ^l<rn (3Mli) ii ^. ^ 

\[\[>i\ ^Hi ^i^i ^rti li h(i ^[^ ^£\. <^W »liH 

dM^ ^^ "s^^ ^i^'li >ll»ll"4 Ri^lH 41^1 "^IVJ §Mli\ 
^1<M^ <3mi\ c-Q^i ■=»^^ ^^ 5fi^ ^i '^^' ^ 

2. Paraphrase (in Gujardti) the following :— 

3. Construct compound words of the following, observ- 
ing the rules of Sandhi for vowels and consonants :— 

1. ^ci, {k<x, "^^ ^i-i?; ^. ^^l' 'Ml^fM; 3. 



MATKICULATI05 IXAMISATIOX, 1883-84, XXxiii 

4. Illustrate the meanings of the following Upatargas 4 
by two examples in each case : — 

5. Give the causal forms of the undermentioned verbs : — 5 

ami, ^^i> '^^i ^li '^i* ^'**i' ^^-3> 
^i -^i^ "^li 

6. State the different ways of forming the past tense of 4 
verbs and illustrate them by examples. 

7. Conjugate the verbs ^m^d and (^Y^^ i» ^^^ 9im,- ^ 

8. State and illustrate the use of auxiliary verbs in 3 
Gnjar^tL 

9. Give the original Sanskrit forms of the following 8 
words : — 

ymu -fit '^i^' ^i^^5 ^i^j % '^^' ^M^Ai 

^^<.<{ W^, and r\<J\:^Vi, 

10. Give instances of the formation of Gnjardti vocables .3 
from Sanskrit by a mere change of ^ into gy ^ into cj 
and ^ into y*^^ 

1 1 . Give the roots, with their meanings, of the following 8 
words : — 

^^1=15131. 55^a5, ^liai, ^^^l^l, u-fi^ri, 2^«^taj, 

ya^, w>tm, ^^ni and «ii"Hm. 

12. Translate the foUowing into idiomatic Gujarati : — 5 

(a) It is never too late to mend. 

(b) A bird in hand is worth two in the bush. 

(c) It never rains but pours. 

(d) Afflictions are often but blessings in disgoise. 
(f ) There's not a string attuned to mirth 

Bat has its chord in melancholy. 



XXxiv MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1883-84. 

13. Translate the following into idiomatic Gujardti : — 20 

Practical wisdom is only to be learnt in the school of 
experience. Precepts and instructions are useful so far as 
they go, but, without the discipline of real life, they remain 
of the nature of theory only. The hard facts of existence 
have to be faced, to give that touch of truth to character 
which can never be imparted by reading or tuition, but only 
by contact with the broad instincts of common men and 
women. To be worth anything, character must be capable 
of standing firm upon its feet in the world of daily work, 
temptation and trial, and able to bear the wear-and-tear of 
actual life. Cloistered virtues do not count for much. The 
life that rejoices in solitude may be only rejoicing in selfish- 
ness. Seclusion may indicate contempt for others ; though 
more usually it means indolence, cowardice or self-iiidulgence. 



Saturday, 24th November. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

CANARESE. 

Edo Bahadur Jayasatyabodheao Tirmalrao Ixamdak. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks,] 

1. Mention the cases, with examples, in which oDb enters 6 
into the formation of two words. 

2. State how many forms of declensions of Nouns there 8 
are in Cauarese, and how they are distinguished from each 
other. Give examples. 

3. What forms are made use of in denoting the degrees 6 
of comparison ? Illustrate your answers with examples. 

4. What signification does a Noun or Pronoun convey 6 
when it is twice repeated ? Exemplify your answers. 

5. What effect is produced when the word S;S^J is joined 6 
to a Noun or Verb ? Give examples. 

6. Parse fully the words underlined in the following 15 
sentence : — 



MATRICrLATlOX EXAMISATION, 1883-84. XXXV 

* c • 

7. Explain, with examples, the difference between the 9 
two negative words «IS and ©£) , 

8. Translate into English :— 24 

a jraroCj sSj^^ soc^sascss) 3o«)3r^, s;j|„£!j ssj^rtvj 

^rD3:::S^ s!;i^£:j ; « u^3t!?sj ijosSj, jSjs^a, sikeoj 
w?3n9 3fje€ e^i^c.^j 30^ sibit ^rizSj ^jsccSj 

9. Translate into Canarese : — 20 

Shivaji was a good horseman, swordsman and marksman. 
He had sprung from a race of mighty hunters and athletes. 
His spare wiry form and small stature admirably adapted 
him for climbing, and his training from boyhood put him on 
a par with the best climbers in the Deccan. He not only 
loved climbing for its own sake, but atlmired and rewarded 



SXXvI MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1883-84. 

it in others. When he had finished the fortifications of 
RAigad, he one day called an assembly of the people and 
held out a bag of gold and a bracelet worth Rs. 500 as a 
reward to any man who accomplished the ascent in any way 
excejDt through the gate he had constructed, and without 
rope or ladder. 



Saturday, 24th November. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

HINDUSTA'NI. 

Ha'ji Ghctla'm Muhammad Muxshi, Esq. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

Section I. 

1. Distinguish between Urdu and Hindi languages, and 6 
give a short account as to the growth and source of each. 

2. Explain the following grammatical terms and give 8 
their English equivalents : — 

9 ^ 9 

3. Give, with meanings, any three of the folio-Hang :— 12 

9 > 

(a) Plural of jj(JaLo-kA->rLa.-^ALsk and J^a. 
(6) Derivations of jj Uy* - i»»5 Laj ( - yJ«JtO and 

^ 9 , 

(c) Past imperfect tense of U^iJ in all the persons and 

both the genders and numbers. 
{(i) Urdu synonyms for H'f^j ^W, ?"^r, and ^^^ 



MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1883-84. XXXvii 

4. Write what you know about "Construction of the 5 
reported speech." i.e. direct and indirect, 

5. Give rules for the formation of Hindustani plurals. 7 

6. Give at least three examples for each of the fol- 7 
lowing : — 

(a) Masculine nouns ending in i^ 

{b) Feminine nouns ending in | 

(c) Compound verbs ending in y l^ 

Section II, 

7 . Explain and give English equivalents for : — 10 

^Jl 8 OJ OJ I (a) 

U5o<^ir^iJ (6) 

Uy J ^^[^ ji ^^}^ (c) 

15 I ^j^ (—To A J {d) 

8. Give Hindustani idiomatic expressions for : — 10 

(a) He lives next but two doors to me. 

(b) Where does this road lead to ? 

(c) Come to me every other day. 

(d) Do not come within the reach of my sword. 

(e) I can prove an alibi. 

9. Translate into English : — 15 

Zl <jV- j>?' ^^ ^ ^*^ tri 

B 1030—4 ex 



XXXviii MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1883-84. 

9 

10. Translate into Hindustd,ni any two of the following 
paragraphs, (but one of the two in Devan^gari characters if 
you can) : — 

(a) Sultdn Mahmucl was one day passing through the great 
square of Ghazni, when he saw a porter who was carrynig a 
heavy stone on his hack for the repair of the place. The 
man suffered much pain and fatigue. When the Sultan 
perceived his distress he felt commiseration, and in the 
kindness of his heart directed him to throw down the stone. 
Ho the porter threw down the stone in the middle of the 
square, and there it remained. 



JtlTBICULATIOS BXAMIXATIOJT, 1883-84. ixxix 

When the horses came near it they used to shy and plnnge. 
A party of nobles at a suitable opportunity represented the 
circumstance to the Sultdn thus : — " On such a day, a porter, 
according to the royal order, threw down in the square a 
stone which he was carrying. There it still remains, and 
horses are with difficulty induced to pass the spot. No one 
besides that porter is able to lift it. It ia very desirable that 
he should be ordered to remove it and make the way clear. ^ 

(c) The king spoke thus :— The order had passed from my 
tongue, 'Lay it down'; if I should now say, "Take it up,' men 
would ascribe it to my inconstancy. Let the atone remain 
where it is." It is related that the stone lay in the square 
tiU the end of the life-time of the Sultan, and' that even after 
his death, from a motive of respect for his word, no cme of 
his children removed it, 

X. B. — Candidates should answer at leaa one question out 
of each section. 



SATtrKDAY, 24th XovEMBjau 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

SDTDHI. 

Bio S^eb Axxr»XL Tbikaxdas Bhojtaxi, B.A. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1 . Translate into Sindhi the following : — 2S 

At one resting-place, parties of women came to visit my 
wife and tell her stories of me, and how " at first they used 
to be afraid of the gentleman with the ' red trousers ' ; but 
he had done them no harm, and the country was not so quiet 
now as when he had been with them," and more that was 
pleasant to me to hear. 

At Hominabad, in particular, the welcome given to me was 
on a great scale. All the merchants and others assembled 
about half a mile from the town headed by my old friend 
Atmaram, the dean of the guild ; and there were baskets of 
flowers, sweetmeats, and fruits, which I had to accept. The 
town pipers and drummers played us to our tents ; provi- 
sions were provided for all the party : and in the afternoon 
crowds came to visit me and have a talk over old times in 
their simple homely fashicm. 



Xl MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1883-84. 

2. Translate into English the following : — 25 

^^^ ^^'cS' iOy:^\ 4; f Law ^J^H- ^{.^ 
" ^ L ** 

^ ^ ^=Djt UUJi ^jU l-wIj ,^^ * 

>" ^ ^ f 

- ** ^ J - - 



MATRICrLATION ElAMINATIOy, 1883-84. xli 

5 H ^j^ JUw l/y "ijU ^«} ^ 4;;£=x^ 

— L?'^^ l^tV^J >Ai. ^ ^ ^^^ 

3. Annotate grammatically the follo-vdng verse and parse 12 
fully the words underlined :— 

4. Give the etymology of the following words : — 8 

J j^a(i*) ^l{r) bfi^)- bj^jc^[ I ) 

5. Conjugate ^ ><^ in the potential present and write 6 
the present participle of ^ J O and ^^Sj 

6. Explain the grammatical ccmstruction of the following 6 
expressions :— 

9 

JliSr^fe- (r) 



1030-4 ".r* 



xUi MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1S83-84. 

7. How are compound verbs formed iu Siiidhi ? Give 10 
examples. 

8. When will the verb in Sindhi agree with the subject 
and when with the object ? Illustrate your answer by 
examples. 



Satttrday, 24th November. 

[2 P.M. TO 4 P.M.] 

NATURAL SCIENCE. 

The Rev. F. Drkokmann, S.J. ; 
Kavasji Dadabhai Naegamvala, M.A., F.C.S., F.I.C. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks. ] 

1. A beam 40 ft. long is supported horizontally at its 8 
two extremities. Deteiniine the additional pressure on 
each of the supports when a weight of 2,400 lbs. is hung at 

a point 10 ft. distant from one end. 

2. Find the condition of equilibrium in the wheel 10 
and axle. 

What force will be required to work the handle of a 
windlass, the resistance being 1,200 lbs., the radius of the 
axle 6 in. and that of the handle 2 ft. 6 in. ? 

3. Under what conditions is the resultant of two equal 8 
forces equal to each of them ? Show how to find the resultant 

of four forces acting at a point. 

4. How would you show that water is formed when 10 
hydrogen is permitted to burn in air ? Show how to extract 
hydrogen from water by the agency of heat. 

.5. Enunciate the three principal laws of chemical combi- 9 
nation and illustrate each of them by one example. 

6. How much manganese dioxide is required to produce 10 
sufficient oxygen for the formation of 90 grammes of water ? 
(Atomic weight of manganese = 55.) 

7. Distinguish between apparent and mean noon and 10 
sjive approximately the greatest diflference between them. 

8. Explain the phenomena of the seasons, 10 



MATEICULATIOS EXAMIKATIOX, 1883-84- xliil 

Monday, 26th Novembeb. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

ARITHMETIC and ALGEBRA. 

GovixD ViTHAL Kttekarat, B.A. ; 

Khin Bahddur Bamanji Sorabji, L.C.E., A.M.I.C.E. 

[The fignres to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. (a) Express in figures :— Sixteen billion, seventy -five 16 
million, forty thousand and two. 

(6) Simplify the expression — 

(c) Find the value of — 

375 of OS. 6d. + 5-05 of £3. Is. Sd. + 5-07 of '«. 6d. 
+ 3135 of £2. 1*. 3d. 

2. At the examination of a school -^5 of the chiltlren were 9 

presented in the 6th standard, ^ in the 5th standard, J in 
the 4th, ^ in the 3rd, ^ iu the 2nd, and the remainder 107 
in the 1st standard ; how many were presented altogether, 
and how many in each of the other standards ? 

3. In a bicycle race of two miles over a circular course 10 
of 1 furlong, the winner in his last round overtook the 
second at a point in his fifteenth round. Their paces were 

as 159 to 149. At what distance was this point from the 
winning post ? 

4. Find the expenses of an excursion, which includes 5782 9 
miles of railway at frf. per mile, 317 miles of carriage at 
l^W. per mile, 57 days of hotel keep at 14s. Sd. per day, 
allowing 5 guineas for extras. 

5. Di\'ide l'04by 000078125 and prove your result by 10 
%-ulgar fractions. Find the square root of 8658 3025 and the 
cube root of 7o3'571. 

6. Show that— 10 

a \ b J {ai + bi) a2 b-2 \ a» ^ 62 /= 

are identical expressions, such that the one can be d aced 
from the other. 



xliv MATRICULATION EXAMINATION, 1883-84. 

7. Divide a? + 8f — 27^* + ISxyz hy x — 5z + 2y and 10 
resolve into factors of the first degree a^ (b + c) + b^ (c + a) 

+ c^ (a + b) + 2abc. 

8. A criminal having escaped from prison, travelled 10 12 
hours before his escape was known. He was pursued so as 

to be gained upon 3 miles an hour. After his pursuers had 
travelled 3 hours, they met an express going at the same 
rate as themselves, who met the criminal 2 hours 24 minutes 
before. In what time after the commencement of the 
pursuit will they overtake him ? 

9. Divide the number 127 into four such parts, that the 8 
first increased by 18, the second diminished by 5, the third 
multiplied by 6, and the fourth divided by 2^, shall all 

be equal, 

10. Solve the equation — 12 

17 — 3a; 4x + 2 ^ „ , 7x + 14 

=0 — bx + . 

5 3 3 

And find the value of ^ + -± ^ ^ + 2b 



when X =: 



X — 26 
4ab 
a + b' 



Monday, 26th November. 

[2 P.M. TO 4 P.M.] 

EUCLID. 

GOVIND VlTHAL KURKARAY, B.A. ; 

Khdn Bahadur Bamanji Sorabji, L.C.E., A.M.I.C.E 
[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. If a parallelogram and a triangle be on the same base 7 
^nd between the same parallels, the parallelogram shall be 

uble of the triangle. 

2. AB is the hypotenuse of a right-angled triangle ABC ; 12 
find a point D in AB such that DB may be equal to the per- 
pendicular from D on AC. 

3. In obtuse-angled triangles, if a perpendicular be drawn 10 
from either of the acute angles to the opposite side produced, 
the square on the side subtending the obtuse angle is greater 



MATRICULATIOS EXAMINATION, 1883-84. xlv 

than the squares on the sides containing the obtuse angle, 
by twice the rectangle contained by the side on which, when 
produced, the perpendicular falls, and the straight line inter- 
cepted without the triangle, between the perpendicular and 
the obtuse angle. 

4. In a triangle whose vertical angle is a right angle, a 10 
straight line is drawn from the Vertex perpendicular to the 
base : show that the square on this perpendicular is equal to 
the rectangle contained by the segments of the base. 

5. The angles in the same segment of a circle are equal to 8 
one another. 

6. Two tangents are drawn to a circle at the opposite ex- 1 1 
tremities of a diameter and cut oflF from a third tangent a 
portion AB : if C be the centre of the circle, show that ACB 

is a right angle. 

7. Describe a circle about a given triangle. 7 

8. Inscribe an equilateral and equiangular pentagon in a 10 
given circle. 



xlvi PREVIOUS EXAMINATION 1883-84. 



II. 

PREVIOUS EXAMINATION. 

EXAMINERS. 



H. LiTTLEDALE, B.A ) 

M. Macmillan, B,A > In English. 

A. Barrett, B.A ) 

Yashvant Vasudev Athalye, M.A., LL.B. | 

Vaman Shivram Apte, M.A > In Sanskrit. 

The Rev. A. Fuhrer, Ph.D. ... ... ) 

R. G. Oxenham, M.A.... I Tn Tatin 

The Rev. J. LeHalle, S.J i 

Joseph EzEKiEL, Esq In Hebrew. 

Jamshedjee Pallonjee Kapadia, Eaq. ••• I in Persian. 
MiRzA Hassan Khan, Esq ...» 

The Rev. B. Blake, M.A., B.D ) In History and in 

Abaji VisHNtr Kathavatk, B.A. .« ... i Logic. 

J. T. Hathorxthwaite, M.A. 1 

Fardunji Mancherji Dastur, M.A. ... (^ j Mathematics 

The Rev. R. Scott, M.A ( 

Jamshedji Ardesir Dalal, M.A. , L.L.B. ... ) 

The Rev. F. Dreckmann, S.J. ) j^j Natural 

Kavasji Dadabhai Naegamvala, M.A., > Q^io„„p 
F.C.S., F.I.C ) ^'=^^°^^- 



PREVIOUS EXAMINATION, 18S3-84. xlvii 

MoxDAY, 5th November. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

ENGLISH. 

H. LiTTLKDALE, B.A. ; M. Macmillait, B.A. ; A. Bakrett, B. A. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

Scott's " RoL-eby" ; Southey'a " Life of Nelson." 

(JT. 5. — Arrange your answers in three bundles, corre- 
sponding to the three Sections of the Question Paper.) 



IS 



Section I. 

1. Paraphrase : — 

A shapeless mass lie keep and tower, 
That, hissing to the morning shower, 
Can but with smouldering vapour pay 
The early smile of summer day. 
The peasant, to his labour bound, 
Pauses to view the blacken 'd mound, 
Striving amid the ruin'd space 
Each well-remember'd spot to trace. 
That length of frail and fire-scorch'd wall 
Once screen 'd the hospitable hall ; 
VSTien yonder broken arch was whole, 
'Twas there was dealt the weekly dole ; 
And where yon tottering columns nod, 
The chapel sent the hymn to God. 
So flits the world's uncertain span ! 
Nor zeal for God nor love for man, 
Gives mortal monuments a date 
Beyond the power of Time and Fate. 

2. Write grammatical notes on the following passages :— 10 

(a) We wedded secret. 

(b) The owl has seen him and is hush. 

(c) The blood left Wilfrid's ashen cheek. 

(d) Bertram is— what I must not telL 
(«) Happy in friendship's ready aid, 

Let all my murmurs here be staid. 



Xlviii PREVIOUS EXAMINATION, 1883-84. 

Section II. 

3. Explain : — 10 

(a) Led Bertram Risingham the hearts, 
That countered there on adverse parts, 
No superstitious fool had I 
Sought El Dorados in the sky ! 

What is an El Dorado? Who were the principal leaders 
in the battle referred to, and how can they be said to have 
sought El Dorados in the sky ? What would Bertram have 
liked to do with the opposing armies ? 

(h) "Speak, Hamlin, hast thou lodged our deer? " 
" I have, but two fair stags are near." 

(c) That Phantom Ship, whose form 

Shoots like a meteor through the storm. 

4. What do you know of the manners and customs of the 9 
Buccaneers ? Mention some of their superstitions. 

5. Give the etymology and meaning of : — Roundhead, 8 
cavalier, ban-dog, cross-bow, ambuscade, doff, orison, and 
parole. 

6. What eminent services did Lady Hamilton render to 10 
her country ? How did Nelson try to get them adequately 
rewarded ? 

Section III. 

7. Explain the following passages, giving the meaning of 20 
the italicised words : — 

(a) I will write immediately to the treasury, 

(6) I'll have a gazette of my own. 

(c) He was thrown into the King's Bench. 

(d) The bowsprit was found to be sprung in three places. 

(e) He would have escaped the perpetration of those 

crimes which have incarnadined his soul with a 
deeper die than that of the purple for which he 
committed them. 

Mention some of the crimes referred to. 

(/) We put to the issue in five minutes what diplomatic 
forms would be five months doing. 

{g) The Agamemnon passed them within half pistol- 
shot ; almost every shot passed over her, for the 



PBEVIOUS EXAMINATION, 1883-84. xlix 

French had elevated their guns for the rigging, and 
for distant firing, and did not think of altering the 
elevation. 

8. Tell all you know about the strange present given by 7 
Captain Hallowell to Nelson. 

9. Give the meaning of the following terms : — Glebe, 3 
Navigation Act, privateer, warrant carpenter, fire-ship, and 
buoy. 



Monday, 5th November. 

[2 P.M. TO 4 P.M.] 

HISTORY. 

The Rev. Buchanan Blake, M.A., B.D. ; 
Abaji Vishnu Kathavate, B.A. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. State briefly the causes of the Peloponnesian War. 10 
Explain the colonial policy of Athens. 

2. Give the terms of "the peace of Nikias," and show 12 
how far these were carried out. Contrast the views of 
Pericles and Nikias. 

3. What were the occasions of the battles of Delion and 10 
Mantinaeia respectivelj ? Give the results and dates in 
each case. 

4. Show the importance of Pylos and Dekeleia as centres 8 
of military operations daring the war. 

5. What do you know of Anaxagoras, Aristophanes, 8 
Thucydides, and Antiphon ? 

6. Describe the position of Syracuse. Give an account 8 
of the Athenian expedition, and account for its want of 
cnccess. 

7. What were the relations of Sparta and Persia at this 9 
time ? Give the terms of the several treaties between these 
two countries. 

8. Examine the circumstances of the trial of the accused 10 
generals. What light do this trial and its attendant circum- 
stances throw on the social state of Athens ? 

B 1030—5 ex 



PREVIOUS EXAMINATION, 1883-84. 

Tuesday, 6th November. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

SANSKRIT. 

Yashvant Vasudev Athalye, M.A., LL.B. ; 
Vaman Shivram Apte, M.A. ; The Rev. A. Fuhber, Ph.D. 

N.B. — Arrange your ansivers to the three sections in 
separate bundles. 

Section I, 

1. (a) Translate closely into English : — 11 

^qi^q^ ^^^\ \^\^^\ i^crr ^ I 

{b) Name and dissolve the compounds underlined. 
Dissolve also ^Tn^h R^l%^, 3TPT^q^|'^gr, 

fcT^I^-SR, q^T^: , ^fcTT^^r^, and f rrf^t 

•1. Ti-anslate, briefly givhig the context :— 1 1 

(a) ^i\ %^rcr%^n^r ^m^\ ^^\ ffrr: i 

Vv'hat sense would ^SFRfcT^P^^r give ? 



PRBVIOOS EXAMINATION, 1883-8i. li 

What sense would 311^71^ g^^® • Which reading do you 

prefer ? 

Erplain the allosioii. 

3. (a) Give the full title of the play and explain its 5 
formation. How far is it a significant title ? 

(b) Write down the meanings of 5T^^, Tl^T^j ^- 

4. Says a Subhaahita : — 3 

What is it that makes the 4th Act and the four verses 
so charming? 

5. (a) Justify or correct the following constructions : — 10 

(1) ^r nKcnT(% m ^i: ^R^frr I 

(2; ^^^ STfr^r^^ T^^: | 

(3) ^ ^ |(cfqi5'[: ^^K?^ I 



lii PREVIOUS EXAMINATION, 1883-84 

(4) ^nqfrf ^ ^ ifiT^^r^ iu\i I 

Parse ^^q and B'f^cT in (2) and (4). 

(6) Give the 3rd pars. sing. Aori'^t, Simple Future and 
Desiderative Present of the roots in the words underlined in 
the following verse : — 

^H^R^ II 

Section II, 
6. Translate closely into English : — 10 

(a) q;(I^arRTfl^^f^^'T m 

(b) r^^l^m^^r^i: TT-^Jr^r 

=^qd: r5T^lr^q^r#^q I 



^_«^ 



ij]^ ^mT^ qpffl%: li 
(r) c^^qr: ^ ^^[qq^^q^i-qq 

^qrf^^T fqs^ ^[=qq |^qK: | 



PREVIOUS E3SAMINATI0N, 1883-84. liii 

Name and dissolve the componnds underlined. Which 
reading in (c) do you prefer, and why ? 

7. (a) Give the precise meanings of — S 



*^ 



]k, ^^I%?i?^, 51cl^T, r^l'JiTT^'q", and ^rriRXr. 

(6) Write short notes on— 

c^^r «f"^R: T^f^Jfr % and 5T ^-qr. 

8. Give in English some of the most important of the 5 
geographical intimations of ancient India contained in the 
$ixth canto of Raghuvams'a. 

9. (a) WTiat are the prevailing metres of the cantos of 7 
Raghuvams'a you have read ? 

(b) What trees and plarts are most commonly referred to 
by Kalidasa ? Give both tl.eir Sanskrit and scientific names. 

(c) Give a short sketch of the character of Aja, with 
quotations or references. 

Sbction in. 

10. Translate into English :— 13 

B 1030— 5 fx* 



liv PREVIOUS EXAMINATION, 1883-84. 

NO 

11. Translate into Sanskrit ;— IT 

A fox having fallen into a well made a shift by sticking 
his claws into the sides to keep his head above water. Soon 
y.fte", a wolf came and peeped over the brink, to whom the 
fox applied himself very earnestly for assistance, entreating 
that he would help him to a rope or something of that kind 
which might favour his escape. The wolf, moved with 
compassion at his misfortune, could not forbear expressing 
his concern : " Ah, poor Keynard," says he, "I am sorry for 
you with all my heart. How could you possibly come into 
this melancholy condition ? " " Nay, prithee, friend," replies 
the fox, " if you wish me well do not stand pitying me, but 
lend some succour as far as you can." 



PP.EVIOCS EXAMrXATIOX, 13S3-S4. Iv 

Tuesday, 6th Novembek. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 V.V,] 

LATIX. 
R. G. OxENHAM, M.A. ; The Rev. J, LeHalle, S.J. 
[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. (a) Translate :— 23 

Timor inde patres incessit, ne, si dimissus exercitus foret, 
rursus caetus occulti conjurationesque fierent. itaque, quam- 
quani per dictatorem dilectus habitus asset, tamen, quoniam 
in consilium verba jurassent, sacramento teneri militem rati, 
per causam renovati ab Aequis belli educi ex urbe legiones 
jussere. quo facto maturata est seditio. et primo agitatum 
dicitur de consulum caede, ut solverentur sacramento ; doctos 
deinde nullam scelere religionem exsohn, Sicinio quodam 
auctore, injussu consulum in sacrum raontem secessisse. 
trans Anienem amnem est, tria ab urbe milia passuum. ea fre- 
quentior fama est quam, oujus Piso auctor est, in Aventinum 
secessionem factam esse, ibi sine ullo duce vallo fossaque 
communitis castria quieti, rem nullam nisi necessariam ad 
victuni sumendo, per aliquot dies neque lacessiti neque 
lacessentes sese tenuere, pavor ingens in ui be, raetuque mutuo 
suspensa orant omnia, timere relicta ab suis plebes violentiam 
patrum ; timere patres residem in urbe plebem, incerti, 
manere earn an abire mallent. quam diu autem tranquiUam, 
quae secesserit, roultitudinem fore ? quid futurum deinde. 
si quod externum interim bellum existat ? nullam profecto nisi 
in concordia civium spem reliquam ducere ; eam per sequa, 
per iniqua reconciliandam civitati esse, 

(6) What reasons are there for considering the early Roman 
historj' as given by Li%-y to be mythical ? 

(c) What do you understand by the words patres, plebs, 
jentes, curife, tribus ? 

2. Translate into Latin prose : — 25 

After this TuUus waged many wars with his neighbours, 
the Etruscans and the Sabines, and he became proud and 
haughty, and forgot the gods and their service, and regarded 
not justice and the precepts of Xuma. Therefore the gods 
sent a plague among the people, and at last they smote him 
also with a grievous disease. Then he became aware that he 
had stuned and he tried to investigate the will of Jupiter 
according to the spells of 2^uma. But Jupiter was wroth at 
his sinful attempt, and struck him with lightning and de^ 
stroyed his bouse, so thj^t it left no trace behind. Thus ended 



Iv-i PREVIOUS EXAMINATION, l^^ 83-84, 

TuUus Hostilius, after he had been king for thirty-two 
years ; and Ancus Marcius, the grandson of Numa Pompilius, 
succeeded him in the kingdom. 

3. Translate, adding notes on the words in italics ; — 29 

Non hsec (OcyrhcE) artes contenta paternas 

Edidicisse fuit ; fatorum arcana canebat. 

Ergo ubi vaticinos concepit mente furores, 

Incaluitque deo, quern claustim pectore habebat ; 

Adspicit infantem : " Totique sahUfer orbi 

Cresce puer," dixit, " tibi se mortalia ssepe 

Corpora debebunt : animas tibi redilere ademtas 

Fas erit ; idfjue semel dis indignantibus ausus, 

Posse dare hoc iterum flamma prohibebere avita, 

Eque deo corpus fies exsangue, deusque, 

Qui niodo corpus eras, et bis tua fata novabis. 

Tu quoque, care pater, nunc immortalis et, sevis 

Omnibus ut maneas, nascendi lege creatus, 

Posse mori cupies tum, cum cruciabere dirse 

Sanguine serpentis per saucia membra recepto ; 

Teque ex aeterno patientem numina mortis 

Efficient, triplicesiiue dece tnafila resolvent." 

Restabat fatis aliquid. — Suspirat ab imis 

Pectoribus, lacrimseque genis labuntur obortse, 

Atque ita " Prsevertunt me," inquit, mea fata, vetorqua 

Plura loqui, vocisque mese prsecluditur usus. 

Non fuerant artes tanti, quae numinis iram 

Contraxere mihi ; mallem nescisse futura. 

4. (a) Give the meanings of — 23 

Fas, jus ; patiens figoris or frigus ; memini patris or 
patrem ; ad Brundusium pugnatum est ; Ciceroni aqua 
et igni interdictnm est. 

(h) Give the constructions of — 

Desperare, communicare, damnare, multare, interest, 
piget, opus est, potior, pono, abdicare. 

(c) Give rules, illustrated by examples, for the use of — 

(i) ut, ne, ne non, after verbs denoting apprehension ; 
(ii) quin, dum. 

[d) Translate and account for the tenses after simulat- 
que— 

Simulatque Vfrri occasio visa est consulem deseruit. 
Alcibiades simulatque se remiserat neque causa suberat 
qnare animi laboreni perferret, dissplutus reperiebatur. 
Me sapientia simulatque aa eamconfugero in iiberti^tem 
vindicabit. 



PEKYIODS EXAMINATION, 1883-84. Ivii 

Tuesday, 6th Novembee. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

HEBREW. 

Joseph Ezekikl, Esq. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks. ] 

1. (o) Give the infinitive and imperative of a 2 D verb. 10 

(b) What kind of verb doubles the third radical ? When 
is it doubled ? Give an example. 

(c) Give with examples the difi'erent senses in which the 
Hithpael conjugation is used. 

{d) How is a verb intransitive in the Kal conjugation nsed 
transitively ? Give an example. 

2. (a) State the difference between "^712^ ^l^^PI and 10 

(6) How is the phrase DTlS^^ «"^1 "\tr« 

v: T T V ~z 

rritoS^^ rendered by the Septuagint ; and what change 
does it make in ^n^n>'l rPSlt^n H^l^l^^ and in 

(c) What is the word Ht^ in the phrase ''H'^ip 

■^"^ ilt^ t!J^^^ equal to ? Quote another instance 
T : 

where this word is used in that sense. 

3. Translate the following passage into English :— 12 

□"'an 'hpri rrsi^-h ir,fct^'2 n^i^n n^ n^^i 



Iviii PREVIOUS KXAM/NATION, 1883-84. 

rt\272 ml^n n«!^r2 ^h^ : nni^^rr ^^b hv^ 

— T T- t:t : tt-:t": -.. 

D^r2 '•s nnnn ^« v^« ntijnn nhr^ p]:h 

• - • T •• - V ,T ■• T X - T : - I - : 

^?^1 Onj?".! It n^0^i y-i^rr h^ ^:b h^ 

- ; . VT~ T •• — V T •• T 

^1^ m^ n^l'^n v^i^ i^ini : nnnn 
"'S nil 3?Ti n^D^i f)"^tp n^T n^i? nsm 

nop; b^h nDl^rr n^ n^'ty'ii D'''^n^^ d'^d^ 

'^iTQ D^an ^n"in ti'rh m^a titrb^"ii niuj 

T •• . - - : T V - T V : I • T XT 

mm b^"!"*! nnnn noDn nt^ ni "id^i p^n 

•• • : :-T X •• - •• : • v x - x- i vx x 

: nt2i«n ^^B ^T)n 

X X -: X •• : : X 

4. (a) Parse the words ^'Jl^') and ^H*'*''! in the above 

V X - V X • - 

passage. 

(6) Give with examples the different senses in which 
the words ]2t^ and T are used. 

X X 

5. (a) Distinguish between Dil*''! *"<! D^n^T 

nnnn and m:inn hBnn and ^nonn : 

XX- TX*.' T - ' X-:* ^ 

(6) Explain the figure of speech used in the first verse 
of the first Psalm. 

(c) Give the etymology of D^fc^SyH ^H'^'^Dil and 



10 



PREVIOUS EXAMIXATION, 1883-84. Hx 

6. Translate the following into idiomatic Hebrew : — 5 
(o) For in his days was the earth divided. 

(6) He began to be mighty one in the earth. 

(c) And Noah began to be an husbandman. 

{d) Hold up my going in thy path, that my footsteps 
slip not. 

(e) Then did I beat them small as the dust before the 
wind ; I did cast them out as the dirt in the street. 

7. Translate the following into English : — 5 

: ^rinn a^tp:^ "^iiti ^h n^^r^; jnlin hijin ^^^ 

8. Translate the following passage into Hebrew : — 40 

The kiag shall joy in thy strength, Lord ; and in thy 
salvation h^jw greatly shall he rejoice ! Thou hast given 
him his heart's desire and hast not withbolden the request 
of his lips. Selah. For thou prevented him with the bless- 
ings of goodness : thou settest a crown of pure gold on his 
head. He asked life of thee, and thou gavest it him, 
even length of days for ever and ever. His glory is great 
in thy salvation ; honour and majesty hast thou laid upon 
him. For thou hast made him most blessed for ever : thou 
hast made him exceedingly glad with thy countenance. For 
the king trusteth in the Lord, and the mercy of the most 
Higli he shall not be moved. Thine hand shall find out all 
thine enemies : thine right hand shall find out those that 
hate thee. Thou shalt make them as a fiery oven in the 
time of thine anger ; the Lord shall swallow them up in his 
wrath, and" the fire shall devour them. Their fruit shalt 
thou destroy from the earth, and their seed from among 
the children of men. For they intended evil against thee : 
they imagined a mischievous device, which they are not 
able to perform. Therefore shalt thou make them turn their 
back, when thou shalt make ready thine arrows upon thy 
strings against the face of them. Be those exalted, Lord, 
in thine own strength : so will we sing and praise thy power. 



Ix PRKVIOUS EXAMINATION, 1883-84. 

TcKSDAY, 6th Novembkb. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

PERSIAN. 

Jamsbedjee Pallonjee Kapadia, Esq. ; 

MiRZA Hassan Khan, Esq. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

Anwar-i-SuhaiU, Chap. VIT. and VIII. ; Divdn-i-Hdfiz, 
Odes CX.—CIX. 

1. Give with meanings — 

(a) The singular and plural forms of : — 

jls'**' I and t«il»<flai 

{b) — yr y^ — c:^^ ^-^ — d,^**^ — J^ 

Cjl.J-<^ and ei^l^a. ^ Y^ 

(c) The derivations of : — 

U^!^'^! and c:^*^U — ci^^/ol^c — J-r^iJ 

(d) The contrary terms for :— 
^^^..^^—^Ij^ — ^J — ^y^^-^J^ 

\i a and 

2. Explain the following :— 

— e^'^^-^v u^e-— <^^^ ^ — (Sio ob 



PKETIOUS EXAMINATION, 1883-84. Ixi 

• • • 

3. Translate, name the metres, and scan the following 10 
verses : — 

Ly^J i^^-J^ l/^J l^"> 

4. Distinguish between ^.j^',^\ jJ^'-C ^ ij^ ' 

tiJ^J^ and — c^ ^ J'y— '^J'^ >? 

5. Translate into English :— 19 

^(Ajj ci>c^U ^ t:jU^„^ l/^^^ c>i-^ 



B 1030—6 ex 



Ixii PREVIOUS EXAMINATION, 1888-84. 

6. Translate and name the authors of the following : — 2 

jt* ^^J^i V^ j'^0 ^' 



PEEVTOUS EXAMINATION, 1883-84. Ixiii 

7. Say what peculiarity you find in the following 12 
verse. From what book is the first ^ yoA quoted? Give 

its second distich and complete the original verse. 

*>jl63 ^U^ ^J^ ^ ^C^j CL^^ J ^ 

8. Translate into Persian : — 20 

When the violence of the monsoon had subsided, Sadd- 
shivrdo raised Mirzd Jawin Bakht, the son of the absent Shdh 
Alam, to the throne of Delhi, and proclaimed Shujd-ud-dow- 
Uh vazir of the empire. He then left Xdru Shankar [R4ja 
Bahadur] with a gai-rison in the citadel, and proceeded in 
person to Kunjpura, a fortified town, strongly garrisoned, 
which he breached and stormed. Ahmed Sh4h had been 
very desirous of relieving this post, but the Jamnd was not 
yet fordable. 



Ixiv PREVIOUS EXAMINATION, 1883-84. 

Tuesday, 6th November. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

ALGEBRA. 

J. T. Hathornthwaite, M.A. ; 

Fakdukji Mancherji Dastur, M. a. ; The Rev. R. Scott, M.A. ; 

Jamshedji Ardesir Dalal, M.A., LL.B. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

Algebra. 

1. Prove that (w + 1) {n + 2) (n + 3) to n factors 7 

= 2 X 1.3.5 to w factors. 

^. Shew that a factor may be found which will rationalize 8 
any binomial. 

Vl + X — V^l — 35 /g 

Reduce , — /, where x = —-• 

^1 + X '^1 — x 2 

3. Distinguish between a quadratic equation and a quadra- 12 
tic expression and shew that a quadratic equation has two and 
only two roots. 

Solve the equation \/x2 — 3a; + 8 = | (a;2 —^x + 8). 

4. Define ratio, variation, proportional, commensurable, 7 
If A vary as B when C is constant and A vary as C when 

B is constant, prove that A will vary as the product BC 
when both B and C are variable. Give fully a geometrical 
illustration. 

5. Sum the series : — 15 

(1) 17i, 14i, lOf to 24 terms. 

(2) 1, 3, 6, 10, 15, to n terms, 

(3) h ir, ^\. tW to infinity. 

6. Investigate a formula for the number of permutations 8 
of n things taken all together which are not all different. 

How many different numbers can be made out of all the 
figures of 111223? 

7. Enunciate the Binomial Theorem and prove it for a 18 
positive integral exponent. 

Write down the r + 1^^ term in the expansion of V<^^ — x2 

\ -i- X 

and the coefficient of a;'" in 7; :, • 

(1 — xf 



PREVIOUS EXAMTXATION, 1883-84. IxV 

WeDXESDAT, 7th NoVEMBJtB. 
[10 A.M. TO 12 N00>'.] 

EUCLID. 

J. T. Hathorsthwaite, M.A. ; 

Fardcxji MAycHERji Dastub.M.A.; The Rev, R. Scott, M.A.; 
Jamshedji Akdesir Dalal, M.A., LL.B. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Make a triangle of which the sides shall be equal to S 
three given straight lines ; but any two whatever of these 
must be greater than the third. 

Construct, if possible, a triangle the sides of which are 
in the ratio of one, two and three ; and another the angles 
of which are in the same ratio. 

2. Shew that six eqiial circles can be placed around a 7 
given circle of the same diameter, so as to touch each other 
and the given circle. 

3. Draw a straight line from a given point, either without 10 
or in the circumference, which shall touch a given circle. 

If the diameter of a circle be produced so that the part 
produced is equal to the radius, and tangents to the circle 
be drawn from the exterior point, the concave part of the 
circumference between the points of contact shall be double 
of the convex. 

4. In a circle the angle in a semi-circle is a right angle. 8 

If a semi- circle be described on the side of a quadrant, 
and from any point in the quadrantal arc a radius be drawn, 
the part of it between the quadrant and the semi-circle is 
equal to the perpendicular from the same point on the com- 
mon tangent. 

5. Inscribe an equilateral and equiangular pentagon in 15 
a given circle. 

If a figure of any odd number of sides have all its angular 
points on the same circle, and all its angles equal, then shall 
aU its sides be equal. 

6. If the angle of a triangle be di^-ided into two equal 12 
angles by a straight line which also cuts the base, the seg- 
ments of the base shall have the ratio which the other sides 



Ixvi PREVIOUS EXAMINATION, 1883-84. 

of the triangle have to one another ; and conversely, if the 
segments of the base have the same ratio which the other 
sides of the triangle have to one another, the straight line 
drawn from the vertex to the point of section divides the 
vertical angle into two equal angles. 

Given the base, the ratio of the sides and the vertical 
angle ; construct the triangle. 

7. Equiangular parallelograms have to one another the 15 
ratio which is compounded of the ratios of their sides. 

What is meant by compound ratio and ex cequali ? Explain 
your definitions. 

If two triangles ABC, AEF have a common angle at A, 
the triangle ABC shall have to the triangle AEF the ratio 
compounded of the ratios of the sides, in each triangle, about 
the angle A. 



Wednesday, 7th November. 

[2 P.M. TO 4 P.M.] 

LOGIC. 

The Rev. Buchanan Blake, M.A., B.D. ; 
Abaji Vishnu Kathavate, B.A. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. State clearly and illustrate what you understand by 8 
Induction and Deduction. How do you answer those that 
disparage the latter as useless ? 

2. Divide the term ' Educational Institutions ' accord- 9 
ing to any three principles of division you can think of. 

3. State in logical form, and convert the following pro- 10 
positions : — 

(a) Men will sacrifice remote good to immediate pleasure. 
' (b) None but poets know the pleasure of poetic pains. 

(c) All liars are untrustworthy. 

(d) All lies are not mischievous. 

(e) If taxes on imports are protective, they will raise the 
prices of things. 



PREVIOUS EXAMINATION, 1883-84. Ixvii 

4. Derive the special rules of the Second Figure from the 5 
general rules for the syllogism. 

5. Frame an argument to prove that some useful reforms 10 
are not popular, and express it in the First and the Third 
Figures. 

6. Either modem science is worthless or table-turning 4 
is a deception. To what conjunctive propositions is this 
equivalent ? 

7. What is a dilemma ? How does Whateley's definition 8 
differ from Fowler's ? State the reasons of both. 

8. Describe and illustrate the fallacy of ignoratio eUnchi. 6 

9. State in logical form, and examine the following 15 
arguments : — 

(a) Have not men who never stepped beyond the advice 
of their medical attendants come to an untimely end, 
while their reckless friends enjoyed the sweets of 
nature unrestrained ? ^yhy do you, then, waste your 
money in medicines and doctors' fees ? 

(6) Health never fails men if they live temperately. 
Why do you ask me if I have been always temperate, 
when you see me hale and sound though I am eighty- 
five years old ? 

(c) A representative government with universal suf&age 
must be a backward government. Those who repre- 
sent cannot be wiser than those they represent ; and 
the average intelligence of a nation must be less than 
that of the upper few. 



Thursday, 8th November. 
[10 A.M. TO 12 xoox.] 

NATURAL SCIENCK 

The Rev. F. Dbeckmaitn, S. J. ; 
Kavasji Dadabhai Naegamvala, M.A., F.C.S., FJ.C. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Enunciate Newton's laws of motion, and ;_illuatrate 
each of them by one example. 



Ixviii PREVIOUS EXAMINATION, 1883'84. 

2. Explain the construction of the barometer and show 12 
how it can be used to determine the height of a place. 

3. A stone is thrown upwards with a velocity of 49 10 
meters ; to what height will it reach and after what time will 

it return to its original position ? 

4. Explain the principle of Conservation of Energy, and 10 
show that the observed velocities of bodies moving in circles 
and ellipses are consistent with it. 

5. Given a Savart's machine, a tuning-fork and a cylin- 14 
drical glass jar, show how to determine the velocity of 
sound in air. 

6. Explain the action of Davy's safety-lamp. 6 

7. Describe any one method of determining the specific 14 
heat of a substance. 

In what proportions must a kilogramme of water at 50° C. 
be divided in order that tlie heat which one portion gives 
out in cooling to ice at 0° may be sufl&cient to change tlie 
other into steam at 100° ? 



FIR.-I EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B.A., 1883-84. llix 



III. 



FIRST EXAMINATION FOR THE DEGREE 
OF BACHELOR OF ARTS. 

EXAMINERS. 



H. LlTTLEDATK, B.A ) 

M. Macmillan, B.A J In English. 

A. Barrett, B.A ••• ) 

Yashvaxt Vasudet Athalye, M.A., LL.B. ) 

Vamax Shi VRAM Apte, M.A ,• In Sanskrit. 

The Rev. A. Fchrer, Ph. D 

E. G. OXENHAM, M.A 

The Rev. J. LeHalle, S.J 

Joseph Ezekiel, Esq 

Jamshedjee PallokjeeKapadia, Esq. 
MiRZA Hassan Khax, Esq 

J. T. Hathornthwaite, M.A. 
Fardcnji ManchepvJI Dastur, M.A. 

The Rev. R. Scott, M.A 

Jamshedji Ardjssib Dalal, M.A., LL.B. 



S 

I In Latin. 

In Hebrew. 
I In Persian. 

> In Mathematics. 



Ixx FIEST EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B.A., 1883-84. 
Monday, 5th November. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

ENGLISH -Paper I. 

H. LiTTLEDATE, B.A. ; M, Macmillan, B.A. ; A. Barrett, B.A. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

[This paper was also set to the Old B.A, Candidates with the 
following directions : — 

Candidates for the B.A. Examination (Old System) who have 
talcen up the two books from which the following questions are drawn 
are required to answer this paper from 10 — 1 ; but the Candidates 
who have taken up only one book are required to answer the questions 
from that book from 10 — 11^.] 

Burke's ' ' French Revolution. " 

1. How, according to Burke, were the monastic institu- 7 
tions " a great power for the mechanism of political benevo- 
lence " ? What evils does he anticipate from the civil con- 
stitution of the clergy ? 

2. Explain :— 20 

(a) "They (the assembly) have not the sanction and 
authority of the character under which they first 
met." 

(ft) " It would have been more wise to have completed 
the business of the fifth and sixth of October." 

(c) " The month of July 1789, the period of ever-lasting 

commemoration. ' ' 

(d) " Marquis de la Fayette (or what is his new name ?)" 
Why neiu name ? 

(e) " The new landed interest connected with the new 

reipuhlic for its very being." Show clearly the mean- 
ing of the italicized words. 
(/) "He spent the income of his prerogatives nobly, 

but he took care not to break in upon the capital. 
(g) ' ' Commendatory abbots. " 
(h) "The Anabaptists of Mtinster." 
(i) " You attempt to limit logic by despotism." 
(j) ' ' Credat who will — certainly not Jtidams Apella. " 
{k) " They cannot bear to hear the sands of his Missis- 
sippi compared with the rock of the church on 
which they build their system." 



FIEST EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OP B.A., 1883-84 lixi 

3. "It woTild have been prudent, along with the parlia- 7 
ments, to preserve their ancient power of registering, and of 
remonstrating." Give a brief account of this power and the 
circumstances of its development. 

4. "It (the deposed government) had long been employ- 9 
ed in some instances wholly to remove, in many considerably 

to correct, the abusive practices and usages that had pre- 
vailed in the state." State in what respects and with what 
degree of discretion the condition of the lower classes had 
been ameliorated. 

5. What, according to Burke, are the real rights of nuin ? 7 

Shakespeare's "Richard III." 

6. " The drama recommenced in England, as it began in 7 
Greece, in religion." Explain this, and quote any illustra- 
tive expression from your play. 

7. Paraphrase the following and point out more than 10 
one peculiarity of construction : — 

' ' The king, of his own royal disposition, 
And not provoked by any suitor else ; 
Aiming, belike, at your interior hatred, 
Which in your outward actions shows itself 
Against my kindred, brothers, and myself, 
Makes him to send ; that thereby he may gather 
The ground of your ill will, and to remove it." 

8. " Pride of intellect is the characteristic of Richard, 9 
carried to the extent of even boasting to his own mind of his 
villainy. " What critical \news have Ijeen expressed concerning 
Richard's undisguised avowals of his own villainy in his 
soliloquies ? 

9. Annotate : — 12 
(a) ^Margaret's battle at Saint Alban's. 

(6) Well struck in years, 
(c) His physicians fear him mightily. 
((/) I humbly beg the death. 
(t) You may denj' that you were not the cause. 
(/') Pitchers have ears. 
(;7) The innocent and aweless throne. 
(h) Welcome, sweet prince, to London, to your chamber, 
(i) Soon at after supper. 
(j) The determined respite of my wrongs. 

10. In what sense da you find the following words used 12 
in this play : — Feature, obsequiously, for, curst, exhale, pre- 
sently, proper, careful, plagued, from, taU, cousin, sugges- 
tion, conceit, defend, bid ? 



Ixxii FIRST EXAM. FOB THE DEGKEE OF B.A., 1883-84 
Monday, 5th November. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

ENGLISH-PAPER n. 

- H. LITTI.EDALE, B.A. ; M. Macmillan, B.A. ; 
A. Barrett, B.A. 
[The figures to the right indicate Ml marks.] 

t tr. fhP Old B.A. Candidates with th 
[This paper was aUo set to the VM n.^ 

followbig direction:- .^,^ ^Qld System) whohai 

Candidates for the BJ. ^^^'^^f.uLng questions are draw 

taken npthe tv^obooks from Ml mj^ J ^^^^ ^^ CandidaU 

from that hook from 2-32. J 

Golden Treasury. 
, 1 •„ T,nP+<? resard the departure of 

v,ov in the Golden Treasury any de- 
^- J'" r„\S«fle tedinthe water, and any con-pan- 

3 What •^^^^r^l^tr^tT^t^^'TX 
picture drawn ? 

hi white robed ''f °fi' ° -Xnigence ! 
• nSuhorca-t f Sigh Uen rejects the lore 

'^h'-'^^iS'S:^^^ SsSdTorthe sense 
So deem d the man _ ^^^^^ branchmg roof 

These lofty P\\^;j^P,,i i^to ten thousand cells 
Self P0\«.«lv^"A'2ade repose, where music dwells 
Where light f^,^''^^^';^^/^^ as loth to die- 
Lingering ^^f^Xse Tefy sweetness yieldeth proof 
i^^tryCrEforLmortality. 



nSST EXJLM. FOR THE DEGRSB OP B,A., 1883-84, Ixxiii 

5. Explain the following passages : — 14 

(a) O sweet Fancy ! let her loose ; 

Everything is spoilt by use. 

(b) With no restraint but such as springs 

From quick and eager visitings 
Of thoughts that lie beyond the reach 
Of thy few words of English speech : 
A bondage sweetly brooked, a strife 
That gives thy gestures grace and life. 

(c) And sometimes like a gleaner thou dost keep 

Steady thy laden head across a brook. 

(d) The mind's least generous thought a mendicant 

For nought but what thy happiness could spare. 

<c) The line 

Of the olive- sandalled Apennine 
In the South dimly islanded. 

Milton : Paradige Regained, Books I. and II. 

6. What was Milton's own opinion regarding the com- 10 
larative worth of Paradise Lost and Paradise Regained 7 

)o you agree with what he is reported to have said on the 
ubject ? How is it that Paradise Regained has never been 
nd is never likely to be a very popular poem ? 

7. Why have some critics imagined that Paradise Re- S 
;ained is incomplete ? Show what considerations probably 
;uided Milton in his choice of the Temptation as the subject 

if the poem. 

8. By what arguments does Satan try to prove that he S 
s useful to God and not hostile to man, and how are his 
jguments answered ? 

9. Paraphrase the following passage and annotate the 15 
talicised words : — 

What woman will you find 
Though of this age the wonder and the fame, 
On whom his leisure will vouchsafe an eye 
Of fond desire ? Or should she confident. 
As sitting queen adored on Beauty's throne. 
Descend with all her ^^ning charms begirt 
To enamour, as the zone of Venus once 
Wrought that effect on Jove, so fables tell ; 
How would one look from his majestic brow 
Seated as on tlie top of Virtue's hill, 

B 1030—7 ex 



Ixxir FIRST EXAM. FOR THE DEGREB OF B.A., 1883-84. 

Discountenance her despised, and put to rout 

All her array ; her female pride deject 

Or turn to reverent awe ! for beauty stands 

In the admiration only of weak minds 

Led captive ; cease to admire, and all her plumes 

Fall flat, and shrink into a trivial toy. 

At every sudden slighting quite abashed. 

]0. Discuss the various interpretations that have been 
suggested for the two following passages, and give the 
punctuation appropriate to each explanation : — 

(a) Princes Heaven's ancient sons ethereal Thrones 
Dffimonian spirits now from the element 
Each of his reign allotted rightlier called 
Powers of Fire Air Water and Earth beneath 
So may we hold our place and these mild seats 
Without new trouble. 

(h) The way he came not having marked return 
Was difficult by human steps untrod. 



TuESDAT, 6th November. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

SANSKRIT— Paper I. 

Yashvant Vasudev Athalye, M.A., LL.B. 
Vaman Shiveam Apte, M.A. ; The Eev. A. Fchbee, Ph.D. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 
[This paper was also set to the Old B.A. Candidates tvith thf 
folloiciiig directions : — 

CandAdate^ifor the B.A. Examiimtion (Old System) who hat^ 
taken up the two hooks from which thefolloioing questions are draum 
are required to answer this paper from 10—1 ; but the Candidate.* 
who have taken up only one book are required to answer the question* 
from thai book from 10 — Hi-J 

Section I. 
1. Translate into English :— 14 

(a) ^ ^w ^kA\^^v^]^z\B ^\^m \ 



T^^\^i'^ ^r ^\t 



PIBST EXAM, FOR THE DEGREE OF l.A., 1883-84. IxiV 

{b) if #it^l ^^rfr i>|V^ ^KSkK T^^r 






^ '^rliqicT ^ R jV^Bf ^^r ^ k^ Tf^r 






^w' T^ct: II 

^^ ^m-^^g: 1 
^f5^^ II 



Ixxvi FIRST EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B.A.., 1883-84. 

^^ ^i^q-^ II 

2. Give the different senses of the preceding underlined 8 
sentences according to Sayana's interpretation, and translate 

(a), (d), ig) into classical Sanskrit. 

3. Explain the syntactical connection of the words in the 7 
following sentences. Translate the lines : — 

(&) g^l h^^\ [\f^ TT^l' 3T^cq u^^r 
(c) q-ff' T^^ T^HrntiW: ^f^<% ^W- 
{d) ^^ ^q'lcf ^^m \^4^ ^^r ^rsrl ^ir- 

— — "I 

(6) f^?:r^'i»-fRr5t[ ctr'^'^c ^^r-^R^r^ 

^m I 
(/) i^^ € ^^^ ^^^^ '^1^5 ""^^^ ^\- 

c# ^^icf I 
qr ^i^rw 3r^a- ft^: ^^ii 



FIRST SXAM. FOB THE DEGREE OF B.I., 1883-84. IxXTU 

4. Mention the passage indicating the current use of the 5 
lunar and solar years at the Vedic period, and the method of 
adjusting the one to the other. 

5. Give as many forms of the Vedic Aorist as you may 6 
know. 

For B.A. Candidates, Choice IT. alone. 

6. State the character, functions and epithets of Vamna, 4 
gi\'ing quotations and translating them. 

7. (a) The influence of the winds upon the sea alluded to 6 
in different hymns indicates more familiarity with the ocean 
than we should have expected from the traditional inland 
position of the early Hindus. Give references. 

(6) Quote the passage indicating an advanced as well as a 
corrupt state of society — the occurrence of debt and severity 
of its pressure. 

Section* II. 

8. \Miat is meant by the terms aTT^affKrgfV ■j-qtj- 4 

^5" and ^r^ • ^^^lat use is made of the last in the play ? 

9. Are any indications of Bhavabhfiti's having imitated 7 
Kalidasa to be found in the play ? Note any resemblances 

in ideas and expressions occurring in the works of Kalidasa 
and the M^ti-Madhava to support your answer. 

10. Translate the following : — 10 

{a) ^\^^ : — ^^^ it 5?^^-^ [j-^^r f^T- 
R=^r^cr f^ wit m^v^' ^m' li 

B 1030—7 ex* 



IXXViii FIRST EXAM. FOR THE DEGEEE OF B.A., 1883-84. 

Give the metre of the verse in (b) and the figure used in (a). 

11. (ffl) Explain the following words and phrases, and S 
dissolve the compounds underlined : — 

(I) What are q"(rfl^^r and f^G^J^q-afj ? What char- 
acters take part in each ? 

12. Translate, discussing the various readings and briefly 1 1 
giving the context : — 



FIBST EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OP B.A., 1883-84 Izzix 

{c) m^ l^k^P^ R^^^ ^^^ ^^'^TJ^- 

Far B.A . Candidates, Choice II. alone. 

13. (a) Write grammatical or explanatory notes on J^^- jq 

^^^^:, ^^*r: q^w, TK^^^i^, and 5-^^F^cr. 

(6) Explain fully the words underlined in the following, 
and give a free translation of the whole : — 

qsT^r-cft^rd ^^?^cf q^i^ : fqq^^Tf^yarq?q'f^[Tr- 

Section" III. 

14. Translate into Sanskrit : — 20 

The worshippers of the S'akti, the power or energy of the 
divine nature in action, are exceedingly numerous amongst 
all classes of Hindus. This active energy is, agreeably to 
the spirit of the mythological system, personified, and the 
form with which it is invested, considered as the especial 
object of veneration, depends upon the bias entertained by 
the individuals towards the adoration of Vishnu or Siva. 

Even Sarasvati enjoys some portion of homage much more 
than her lord Brahmi, whilst the vast variety of inferior 
beings of malevolent character and formidable aspect receive 
the worship of the multitude. 



IxXX FIRST EXAM. JOE THE DEGREE OF B.A., 1883.84. 

Tuesday, 6th November. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

SANSKRIT— Papeb II. 

Yashvant Vasudev Athalye, M.A., LL.B. ; 
Vaman Shivram Apte, M.A. ; The Eev. A. Fuhrer, Ph.D. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

[This paper was also set to the Old B.A, Candidates itMh the 
following dii-ections : — 

Candidates /or the B.A. Examination (Old System) who have 
tahen up the two hooks from which thefolloiving questions are draivn 
are required to answer this paper from 2 — 5; but the Candidates 
loho have taken up only one book are required to answer the questions 
from that hook from 2 — 3^. 

Candidates for the B.A. Examiiiation, Choice I., are not to ansiver 
questions from Uttara Mamacharita.] 

Section I. 

1. Translate into English : — 10 



FIRST EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B.A., 1883-84. Ixixi 

sgr^c-q^^r m^u ^^m cf^T'f ^ ^i^'^i^ ^^' 

2. Explain :— 12 



Ixxxii FIRST EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF D.A., 1883-84. 

m^^'ff^rR i^7^pf^r^r r^rq^^rTcrr'^ ii 

3. Write grammatical or explanatory notes on : — 

(a) ^«t ^ c4 5TM ^ ^^^^J ^ ^-^qrrr ^r 

(c) ^tRTJ, q-K^^. 

4. Give a description of the shrine of DurgS, which Chan- 
dr^pida Aasited on his journey to Ujjayini. 

5. " Buna's prose is an Indian wood, where all progress 
is rendered impossible by the undergrowth until the tra- 
veller cuts out a path for himself, and where, even then, he 
has to reckon with malicious wild beasts in the shape of 
unknown words that affright him." How far do you jiistify 
this remark of Prof. Weber in the case of Kadambarl? 
Support your answer by quotations. 

6. (For B. A. Candidate.^, Choice II. alone.) (a) Write 
in Sanskrit a brief essay on Bana's life, times, and writings, 
and a literary estimate on Kadambari. 

[h) What do you gather from Kadambarl about Bud- 
dhism ? 

Section II. 

7. Explain the following fully : — 

(a) cT^^^^H cfcEf^r5[^[5vrqr5^=-TpJ: I 

c 
Dissolve the compound ■^J'lj'sjf^l't 



FIEST ESAil. FOR THE DEGREE OF B.A., 1833-84. Ixxxiii 

c 

Compare the use of the word 'T^T^^T i° ^^^ ylaee with 

its use elsewhere in the Tarkasangraha. CriticLse the pro- 
piosition here laid down. 

What is the purpose served by the word ^^if^^ : 

S. ^Thich of the nine// '■'< are objects of direct per- 2 
ception ? 

9. Why is 3?[^r5T conceived to exist as an independ- 3 
ent kind of dravya different from I^^^ ; 

10. Give the precise meanings of the following words as 5 

used in the Nyaya philosophy : — 

11. Which hetmhhdm in the Indian logic corresponds 4 
to the fallacy of Petitio Principii ? Give an instance. 

12. Reduce the following to the form of a syllogism, and 6 
criticize the correctness of the reasoning : — 

13. All is not gold that glitters ; 6 
Gold is a metal ; 

.*. Every metal does not glitter. 

Express this in Sanskrit as a pardrthdnumdna. If the 
reasoning be fallacious, state the hetvdbhdsa involved 
therein. 

14. (For B.A. Candidates, Choke II. alonf.) (a) Give 10 
the different kinds of ■SPTI^ ^ given by Annambhatta. 

To what remark is his division open ? 



Ixxxiv FIRST EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B.A., 1883-84 

(6) Distinguish between ^^^CJT and ST^r^fl^CT 

causes ; between ^JT^fq" and ^^Tf^ ■ between Jf^ff 

and ^■'[^ • between ^T^tr'^f^r^ and ^Tcq'-cTriTr^ • 

and between 3"Tf^fcf and v3'Cfl?'J?f. 

15. (For First B. A. Candidates alone. ) Translate into 20 
English :— 



^. rv 



^113; I rf'-ir ^m" ^r^^ f^%^d^2T '^{^^ ^^^rrf^^^r 



riBST EX13(. FOR THE DKGBEE OF B.A., 1883^4. IxXXT 
Tuesday, 6th November, 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

LATIN— Paper I. 

R. G. OxEKHA-M, M.A. ; The Rev. J. LeHalle, S,J. 

[The figures to the right indicate fall marks.] 

[This paper toas aho set to the Old B^. Candidates with the 
folUncimj directions: — 

Candidates for the B.A. ExaminaXioH (Old System) tcho have 
taken up the two hoolcsfrom, which the following queMions are drawn 
are required to anmcer this paper f-om 10 — 1; but the Candidates 
who hare taken up only one book are required to answer the question* 
from that book from 10— 11^.] 

1. Translate and give the foil import of the parts in 25 
italics : — 

(a) Ego vestros patres, P. Scipio tuque C. Laeli, viros 
clarisaimos mihique amicissimos vivere arbitror, et eam 
quidem vitam, quae est sola vita nominanda. Nam dum 
sumus in his inclusi compagibus corporis, munere quodam 
necessitatis et gravi oi)ere perfungimur. Est enim animus 
ccelestis ex altissimo domicilio depressus et quasi demeraus in 
terram, locum dii'ince naturce (eternitatique contrarium. Sed 
credo deos immortales sparsisse animos in corpora humana 
ut essent, qui terras tuerentur, quique ccelestium ordinem 
contemplantes imitarentur eum vitce modo atque constantia. 
Quid multa ? sic mihi persuasi, sic sentio, quum tanta cele- 
ritas animorum sit, tanta memoria prseteritorum futurorum- 
que prudentia, tot artes, tantse scientise, tot inventa, non 
posse eam naturam, quae res eas contineat esse mortalem : 
quumque semper agUetur animus nee principium motus ha- 
beat, quia se ipse mortal, ne finem quidem habiturum esse 
motus, quia nunquam se ipse sit relicturus ; et quum simplex 
animi natura esset, neque haberet in se quidquam admixtum 
dispar sui atque dissimile, non posse eum dividi, quod si non 
possit, non posse interire. 

(b) Hsec igitur lex in amicitia sanciatur, ut neque roge- 
mus res turpes nee faciamus rogati. Turpis enim excusatio 
est et minime accipienda, jutim in ceteris peccatis, turn si 
quis contra rem publicam se amici causa fecisse fateatur. 

B 1030—8 ex 



IxXXvi FIRST EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B.A., 1883-84. 

His igitur finibus uteiulum arbitror, ut quum emendati 
mores amicorviin sint, turn sit inter eos omnium rerum, con- 
siliorum, voluntatum sine villa exceptione communitas, ut 
etiam si qua fortuna accident, ut minus justse amicorum 
voluntates adjuvandse sint, in quibus eorum aut caput agatur 
aut fama, declinandvm sit de via, modo ne summa turpitudo 
sequatur : est enim quatenus amicitise dari venia possit. 

2. Give a short analysis of the treatise de senectute. What 15 
opinion on suicide does Cicero put into the mouth of Cato ? 
Can the above two passages de amicitia be reconciled with 
each other ? Give reasons for your answer. 

.S. Translate and explain : — 10 

Ego vero me minus diu senem esse mallem quamesse senem 
ante quam essem ; me vero et magisteria delectant a majori- 
bus institnta, et is sermo qui more majorum a summo 
adhibetur in poculis ; senes nee difficiles nee inhumani ; suasor 
legis ; vadimonium constituere ; sensim sine sensu ; culmus 
geniculatus ; baud scio an ; idipsum ut lubebit ; ad carceres 
a calce revocari ; breviter et commode dicta ; usque ad vivum 
reseco ; pingui Minerva ; acta agere. 

4. Translate into Latin :- - 36 
(a) The next day early in the morning the general led 

out his troops to the field of battle, nor did the enemy delay 
to engage him. His troops consisted of upwards of twenty 
thousand infantry with twelve hundred and fifty horse. 
The contest was fierce and protracted. For more than four 
hours neither side had the advantage, nor did any other 
circumstance more impede the Romans than that the heads 
of their enemies were made the price of their liberty. For 
when each man had gallantly slain his enemy, first, he 
lost time in cutting off his head, which was done with diffi- 
culty amid the crowd and confusion, and secondly, all the 
bravest troops ceased to be engaged in fight, as their right 
hands were employed in holding the heads. 

(h) Nor does he deserve so well of human society, who 
imparts to us the art of speaking well, as he who teaches 
us to lead a pioiis and innocent life. Therefore, amongst 
the Greeks, philosophers were held in higher repute than 
orators ; for those were considered to be the teachers of an 
honest mode of life, which is of far greater importance, 
because to speak well appertains but to a few, while to live 
well is the duty of all. That practice however in fictitious 
law-suits has been of such use to us, that we are now able to 
plead the cause of trutli with a greater force of argument and 
elegance of diction. 

5. Give the rules for the use of the subjunctive in relative 14 
clauses and illustrate them by examples. 



FIRST EXAM. FOE THE DEGREE OP B.A., 1883-84. IxxiTU 
TtTESDAY, 6th November, 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

LATIN— Paper II. 

R. G. OxEXHAM, M.A. ; The Rev, J. LeHallk, S.J. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

[Tliis paper was also set to the Old B. A. Candidates voith the 
following directions : — 

Candidates /or the B. A. Examination {Old System) who have 
taken up the two boois/rom which the following questions are drawn 
are required to aHsu>er thli paper from 2 — 5 ; but the Candidates 
who have taken up only one book are required to answer the questions 
from that book from 2— 3^.] 

1. (a) Translate :— 50 

Igitur cupido Caesarem invadit aolvendi suprema militibus 
ducique, permoto ad miserationem omni qui aderat exercitu 
ob propinquos, amicos, denique ob casus bellorum et sortem 
hominum. Prsemisso Caecina, ut occulta saltuum scruta- 
retur, pontesque et aggeres humido paludum et fallacibus 
campis imponeret, incedunt msestos locos, visuque ac memo- 
ria deformes. Prima Vari castra, lato ambitu et dimensis 
principiis, trium legionum manus ostentabant ; dein semimto 
vallo, humili fossa accisse jam reliquiae conse<lisse intellige- 
bantur ; medio campi albentia ossa, ut fugerant ut restiter- 
ant, disjecta vel aggerata. Adjacebant fragmina telonun 
equorumque artus, simul truncis arbomm antefixa ora. 
Lucis propinquis barbarae arse, apud qnas tribunos ac 
primonim ordinum centuriones mactaverant. Et cladis ejus 
superstites, pugnam aut vincula elapsi, referebant hie 
cecidisse legates, illic raptas aquilas : primum ubi vulnus 
Varo adactum, ubi infelici dextera et suo ictu mortem 
invenerit ; quo tribunali eoncionatius Armiiiius, quot pati- 
bula, captivis, quse scrobes ; utque signis et aquUis per 
superbiam illuserit. 

Give notes on the words in italics. 

(b) Have we any reasons for believing that Tacitus does 
less than justice to Tiberius ? Describe this emperor's per- 
sonal character and system of administration. 

(c) What do you understand by the legal terms *ma- 
jestas,' ' imperium,' ' delator ' ? 



IzXZViii FIRST EXAM. FOB THE DEGKEE OB «.A., 1883-84. 

2. (a) Translate :— 50 

Dixit : et avertens rosea cervice refulsit, 
Ambrosiaeque comse divinum vei tice odorem 
Spiravere ; pedes vestis defluxit ad imos ; 
Et vera incessu patuit dea. Ille ubi matrem 
Agnovit, tali fugientem est voce secutiis ; 
Quid natum toties crudelis tu quoque faisis 
Ludis imaginibus ? an dextrse jungere dextram 
Non datur, ac veras audire et reddere voces ? 
Talibus incusat, gressumque ad mcenia tendit 
At Venus obscuro gradientes sere sessit 
Et multo nebulae circum dea fudit amictu 
Cemere ne quis eos, neu quis contingere posset, 
Molirive moram, aut veniendi poscere causas. 
And 
*' Haec fatus, latos humeros subjectaque colla 
Veste super fulvique insternor pelle leonis ; 
Succedoque oneri. Dextrse se parvus Tulus 
Implicuit, sequiturque patrem non passibus sequis ; 
Pone subit conjux : ferimur per opaca locorum 
Et me, quem dudum non uUa injecta movebant 
Tela, neque adverso glomerati ex agmine Graii, 
Nunc omnes terrent aurse, sonus excitat omnis, 
Suspensum et pariter comitique onerique timentem." 

(6) The emperor Napoleon and other writers have criti- 
cised Virgil's account of the taking of Troy as incomplete. 
What internal evidence can you adduce to show that V^irgil 
intended to give the personal narrative of one of the Trojan 
heroes and did not propose to write a Latin Iliad ? 

(c) Give the exact force of the words italicized in the 
following passage : — 

(1) " Infandum regina jubes renovare dolorem. " 

(2) " Classibtis hie locus. " 

(3) ' ' sic medio turbatus inermis constitit. " 

(4) "Muit oceano nox. " 

(5) " Summa sequor fasiigia rerum." 

(6) " dextrae se parvus Tulus. 

" Implicuit, sequiturque patrem non passibus cequis." 



riR3T IXAM. FOB THE DEGRSB 0? B.A., 1883-84 Ixxxix 
TcKSDAT, 6th Novkmbkb. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

HEBREW— Papkb L 

(For the First B.A. Exanunation only.) 

Joseph Ezkkikl, Esq. 
[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. (a) What is the Hebrew name of the second book of 
Moses ? How does it get the name, and why is it called 
Exodus ? 

(b) A history of what period is contained in the book of 
Exodus ? 

2. (a) Give the Hebrew and English names of the ten 12 
plagues. 

(6) Give the Hebrew and English names of the twelve 
precious stones in the High Priest's breast-plate. 

(c) Give the names of some Jewish measures of length 
and measures of capacity with their value in English measures. 

(d) Give the value of 123 and hpW in English money. 

(e) What are the different significations of the word 
n33 a^d what is its etymology ? 

T • 

3. (a) Write from your memory the] Fourth Command- 10 
ment in Hebrew. 

(6) How many sons had Moses ? Give their names with 
their significations. 

(c) Give a short accoimt of the first battle fought by the 
Israelites after their departure out of Egypt. 

4. (a) Translate the following passage into English : — 12 

vSn nnn") hijt'v^n ''n^b|i n« ^^^i^n 
: -yriirh a^^ri asp^ ■^•'SDn n^^S nto^5 

B 1030—8 ex* 



XC FIRST EXAM. FOR TBE DEGREE OF B.A., 1883-84. 

(i) What change does the Samaritan vei-sion make in the 
above passage ? Do you approve of it ? State your reasons. 

(c) Show the difference between rfb^"^ and HtH ♦ 

T T T T 

5. Give the Hebrew of dish, spoon, howl, grate, looking- 
glass, chapiter, and the English of ^D'^Hp 7^ ^VD'^p 

T • : T - T T -: T V ; - t v x : 

: vtrip 

T t': 

6. (rt) Translate the following passage into English :— 

{b) Explain and correct the inconsistency in the above 
passage. 

(c) Quote the law of retaliation and the law of mortgage . 

7. Translate the following passage into English : — 

-itr« nntn ^r^^i n^^ r^vn h:^ ^p^Bn'^^ («) 

V -: XT- •• : • V XX X ' : X : • - 

: pD^ vn ''^^:^ nisi"i jrrbn 

8. (a) Give the different renderings of the word IDlHil 
in the first passage. 

(b) From what root is the word T^tofl in the second 

X : - 
passage derived by the authorized version? Give its 
different renderings, 



FIRST EXAM. FOE THE DKGEKE OF B.A , 1883-84, xci 
9. Translate the following passage into English : — 35 

nrS^^ •'"' nr^n^n nb^ nb^'i^n nnt^ imi rare 
: tripn ^"T:?n^^ "ini^i^ ^^7^ "fJ^^ ^!7« 

• : • T - - • T — . T T- 

tr^^^ hy\ irrt "^^3 ^3 vy\2^ n^ra'^i d^:i nn 

t: tt •: T T ; --~; wt t 

ic^ii tr-ibi ^3') : ;:^ 2nT nc'irn r)''2rT "itt?ij 
2"^trnn nii^i D^^'^^^r3 □^'•n niri anri 

•t: : -tt:--" : ••: 

ntpn:i ?id3 n'?^"!^^ ant? ^3 : iN^inn 
^Tj. in« «i*^: "itrtit h'y\ ^^ Ty^r\r\ nsi i«"^nn 
n©i^ ^Di : it^''3rT rravT] n3^tj ^3^ □'•tsttj 
nS3nn n« mt:^ ^«^3'n 'iVc^ nn^s nS nn3n 

^:3« nN i«''nn Q'^t^^c^rn :a''TirrT n« 
rrntp^prr ]?^tr^i "^"i^^p^ i"3f n n^i cmn n«i 



Xcii FIEST EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B.A., 1888-84. 
Tuesday, 6th November, 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

HEBREW- Papek II. 

{For the First B.A. Examination only.) 

Joseph Ezekiel, Esq. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. {a) When did Zechariah prophesy ? Give the date. 
{b) Into how many parts may the book of Zechariah be 

divided according to the subjects treated in it ? Give a short 
summary of each of these divisions. 

(c) The genuineness of what portion' of the book of Zechariah 
is disputed ? On what grounds is it disputed ? To whom 
is that portion ascribed ? How is the argument of the dis- 
putants refuted ? 

2. (a) To commemorate what events in Jewish history 
were the fasts of the fourth, fifth, seventh and tenth 
months instituted ? 

(b) Describe in short the state of the Jewish nation in the 
days of Zechariah. 

3. (a) Give the situations of Tyrus, Zidon, Gaza, Ekron 
and Ashkelon. What is the Hebrew name of Tyrus ? 

{b) Give the names of the Jewish months with their 
derivations. 

4. Ti-anslate the following sentence, and explain the 
allusion in it : — 

"7DPP5 D'l^tr^-^^si iBO^ri ^:j*'. vn^nri D-i^ia 

5. (a) Translate the following passage into English : — 
v'-t: t -- t:t:-t 



FIRST EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B.A., 1883*84, xciii 

{b) What change is required in the first verse according 
the Masoreth ? What is such a change called in Hebrew 1 

6. (a) Translate the following passage into English :— 5 

vji©^. lonto nv'^v h^ a'lr^jrrT h^b hd^dstd 
: V"t^n •'■''1:1 V3 m^r icd«:i 

[b) Explain what is meant by ', HDQ^P IHtji 

7. Give the following phrases in idiomatic Hebrew : — 10 
(a) Take away thy filthy garments. 

(6) My cities through prosperity shall yet be spread. 

(c) They 'made their hearts as an adamant stone. 

(flO As it were a paved work of a sapphire stone. 

{e) A gift blindeth the wise, and perverteth the words 
of the righteous. 

8. Translate the following passage into English : — 15 

iDm vjDtp n^N r^Dipp '^ti^h nit^n^ npi 
c'lm n:^^'^?! : i''ni<t nsi tD-i^ 'icjr D^^rTr\ 

u^V) i^'i^t^ ''■p^n Drp;]«^; ni-^b ?inD 
ann'^n nh^;i rrvmn ni<) jh?2;?p i"'^u? i?2d 
c^^s^n T^i Imi:^ nit^n^ mrr; n!?® -l^>^^ 
: n'li^n? TTp\ n«n biis ?i^j7. ■'rn D'':tri^")rT 



Xciv FIRST EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B.A., 1883-84 

^3 bv D-^iTDfe^i : n^ij^n? mil"! -^dn vo^^ 

T — '*~; T •' ; T . T . T T . V 

Dn^'in^ HDtr: n^ni n^^r^^ ^h -lUJtfi D-'isn 

T - : T : V I V V * — T • .... 

9. Translate the following passage into Hebrew :— 
And I will strengthen the house of Judah and I will save 
the house of Joseph and I will bring them again to place 
them ; for I have mercy upon them : and they shall be as 
though I had not cast them off : for I am the Lord their God 
and will hear them. And they of Ephraim shall be like a 
mighty man, and their heart shall rejoice as through wine ; 
yea, their children shall see it, and be glad ; their heart shall 
rejoice in the Lord. I will hiss for them, and gather them ; 
for I have redeemed them : and they shall increase as they 
have increased. And I will sow them among the people : 
and they shall remember me in far countries and they shall 
leave with their children 'and turn again. I will bring them 
again also out of the land of Egypt, and gather them out of 
Assyria ; and I will bring them into the land of Gilead and 
Lebanon and place shall not be found for them. And he 
shall pass through the sea with affliction, and shall smite 
the waves in the sea, and all the deeps of the river shall dry 
up ; and the pride of Assyria shall be brought down, and 
the sceptre of Egypt shall depa)t away. And I will strength- 
en them in the Lord ; and they shall walk \ip and down in 
his name, saith the Lord. 



FIRST EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B.A.., 1883-84 XCT 
TcissDAY, 6th November. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

PERSIAN— Paper I. 

Jamshed.jke Pallokjee Kapadia, Esq 
MiKZA Hassan Khan, Esq. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

[This paper teas also set to the Old B.A. Candidates vnth the 
'oUotinng directions ■ — 

Candidates /&)• the B.A. Examination (Old System) tcho have 
'oken up tketvfo books from which thefolUncing questions ore draum 
ire reiptired to answer this paper from \0 — 1; but the Candidate^' 
>Bho have taken up only one book are required to angicerthe questions 
^rom that book from 10 — 11^] 

Terislda :— Ibrahim II. of the Adil Shdhi Dynasty. 

1. Explain : — 10 

c'v^ and ^jO-}**»j CL5t>L-i> dAjfyj ij(^ 

2. (a) Give, with meanings, the plurals of :— 7 

— l)t^ — ^^^ — f^' — t^y — C T 

f^ and «uld yo^ yJtClli S^ \^^^=^ 



XCvi FIRST EXAM. FOR THE DEGEEB OF B.A., 1883-84 
2, (6) Derivations of : — 

Cl-^ Ld 1 and — -^Jaft — ijbJLs* 
(c) Singulars of : — 

yU? and Jjlsfi 
{d) Synonyms for :— 

^A. o and JV.A*»J 

3. Give the Imperative and past tense of : — 7 

^jt>o and 

4. Distinguish between : — 7 

dij'^^SA* J LTLJ^aS** and 

5. Explain what you understand by : — 1(» 

— Ji«iJ I ^Ulandj yiS^iyM—y^\lsy,J—i^,^*;^}ilo 

6. Say from whom the following quotation is taken, scan !' 
it and name its metre : — 



FIEST EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B.A., 1883-84. XCvii 

7. Name the four principal sects of the Sunnites and give 8 
some account of the sect to which Ibrdhim Adil Shih 11. 
belonged. 

8. Translate the following into English : — 20 

^^lUU ci^s^Ui^ ciT (jU=w ^^U. ,JJb lijloj 

^jj jU;| (3^ ^jy 5l>^j^^ 
L- • lysL) <^lj ^^x;*o J c>^ ^\j^ ^^/\ 

'*^ «^ ' >^-^* -'^ ^'^^ ^^*^' 'j ji '^^ 

B 1030— 9 ex 



XCViii FIRST EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B.A., 1883-84. 

9. Translate the following passage into Persian : — 

The advance of Nizd.m Ali hastened the conclusion of a 
treaty between Saldbat Jang and Colonel Forde, although 
Besdlat Jang endeavoured to destnict the arrangement. 
The treaty did not provide for the assistance of the English 
against Nizdm Ali, as every inducement on that point was 
resisted by Colonel Forde. Salabat Jang returned to Hy- 
derabad, where, on the arrival of Nizdm Ali, much discus- 
sion arose among the brothers, but Saldbat Jang was con- 
strained to restore the office of Divdn to Nizam Ali, and 
Besdlat Jang departed for his government, the seat of which 
was Adonee. 



Tuesday, 6th November. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

PERSIAN— Paper II. 

Jamshedjee Pallonjee Kapadia, Esq. ; 
MiRZA Hassan Khan, Esq. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

[This paper was also set to the Old B.A. Candidates with tlte 
following directions : — 

Candidates for the B.A. Examination (Old System), who have 
taken up the two books from which the following questions are drawn 
are required to answer this paper from 2—5 ; but the Candidates 
who have taken up only one book are required to answer the questions 
from that book from 2 — 3^.] 

Divdn-i-Hdfiz, Odes CGI.—CCL. 

1. Explain the following : — 3 

and L-AJU — (_/»*>a4* jj^ J Y*^ 

•1 . What do you understand by ? — 

J U^ «) J and 



£'J 



FIRST EXAM. FOB THE DBGREE OF B.A., 1883-34. xcix 

3. Translate the following into English :— -^ 

^1*5" AjG c>b J c:^JLb (_^ ^-^ j^ 

^' ufey^j^ ^y*-? t>^ Jam. ci^v^j^ 

j^/cL.y^' j^j ' j^y cryt jt/; 
ty*! i^j^ c/*y ^ 0^ ^ A^' ^ 

jtyj sob jtoLT^-^e^ '^^l/^ 



FIRST EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B.A., 1883-84 



4. Translate the following verses, scan and also name the 25 
metres thereof : — 



OoUo ^^*J^ Is****^ <*J iji^ (^1 »c>J»* (a) 

ool ^ y^l l3 yi. ^^ sU ^r >::*> 

5. Take a brief notice of any two of the following per- 10 
sons : — 

Jo li and .o>.*A)J L-ft^ I 

6. (a) Analyse yjj. Of what parts of speech is it com- 10 

pounded ? 

(6) What kinds of genitive cases are there in the following 
phrases ? : — 

y AC. ^^ C>i> 

^ I t>j 1 J'^^ ^ J^ jk 

7. Say from whom the first 9 ^.a/O of the following 12 

verse is quoted. Name its other distich and complete th« 
original verse : — 



FIRST ESA¥. TOB THB DEGSBB OF B.i., 1883-84, f' 

8. Instead of the 4tli question the Old R A. students 25 
ehould translate the following, and scan the 1st verse : — 

jjsT* !j Ijy^ f*"^^ f^ i:)' ci;* 

JjaJ U^--^ ^yO ^^ jO ^ 

'^jt^ Mt j*^' r**-?**^ ^ 

ir;/ jd^ r^J --^^ -^ 
t>^ Uj;^ 3 l^ ^ ^ ' J 

B 1030—9 €jr* 



Cii FIRST EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B.A., 1883-84. 

;j 8^^^ Ji^ C/^ t:)J^ ^ 
9. Translate and explain the allusions in the following :— 12 

(^^^ Jl OlJ J ^ Ji-Lo ^y>U ^y^ (c) 



(«) 



(^^) 



fibst exam. for the degree of b a., 1883-84 cul 
Wedke-sday, 7th Xovkmbkb. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

TRIGONOMETRY. 

J. T. Hathoknthwaite, M.A. ; 

Fakduxji Mascherji Dastub, M.A. ; The Rev. R. Scorr, M.A. ; 

Jamshedji Akdesik Dalal, M.A., LKB. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

[ This paper teas dbo set to the FvrU. B.Se. Examination.^ 

1. The numerical measures of the angles of a quadri- 12 
lateral when referred to units containing 1°, 2*, 3°, 4" re- 
spectively are in arithmetical progression, and the diiference 

of the second and fourth is equal to a right angle ; find the 
angles. 

2. Shew that the trigonometrical ratios remain un- 6 
changed so long as the angle remains unchanged. 

Between what hmits in the first quadrant is the cosine of 
an angle (1) greater, (2) less than the sine ? 

3. Explain the conventions which are adopted with re- 10 
spect to positive and negative lines and angles. 

Trace the changes in sign and value of cos B — sin 6 as 6 
increases from zero to Itt. 

4. Obtain a formula for all the angles which have a 10 
given sine. 

Shew that all the angles which have both the same sine 
and the same cosine as a are included in the expression 
2«7r -i- a. 

5. Investigate the sine and cosine of the diflFerence of two 7 
angles in terms of the sines and cosines of the angles them- 
selves. 

Find sin — and sin — . 
12 12 

6. Express by means of inverse notation the formula 12 

COt(a-ff)^ l^cotacotg 
cot ;3 — CO a 



A 


+ cot 


B 


+ cot 


C 


= cot 


A 


cot 


B 


cot 


C 


2 




2 




2 




2 




2 




2 



civ FIRST EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B-A., 1883-84, 

Hence solve the equation 

3 cot~^ (2 + -/ 8) — cot "~^ a: = cot~^ 3. 

7. If A + B + C = 180°, prove that 10 

tan A + tan B 4- tan C = tan A tan B tan C 
and from this deduce 

cot 

8. In any triangle obtain the formula 7 

2hc "~~~"~~'^~ 
and shew that this value of sin A is always possible. 

9. Solve a triangle having given two sides and the in- 12 
eluded angle. 

Given a = 1900 log 3 = '4771213 

6 = 100 L tan 57° 19' = 10*1927506 

C =^ 60° L tan 57° 20' ^ 10-1930286 

determine the angles A and B. 

Also without using logarithms find the side c. 

10. If r be the radius of the circle inscribed in a triangle, 14 
and rj, r^, r^ be the radii of the circles inscribed between 
this circle and the sides containing the angles A, B, C re- 
spectively, prove that 

rj rg _ r^ _ 

't'^i^G^ tan2 H^ '■ 



first exam. foe the degree of b.a., 1883-84. cv 
Wednesday, 7th November. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

STATICS. 

J. T. Hathob>thwaite, M.A. ; 

Fardunji Maxcherji Dastcr, M.A. ; The Rev. R. Scott. M.A. ; 

Jamshbdji Ardesir Dalal, M.A., LL.B. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

[This paper was also set to the First B.Sc., F.C.E., and B.A. 
(Old System) Candidates.^ 

1. Explain the statement that the tension of a string it 10 
the same throughout. 

A heavy particle is attached to the end of a string, the 
other end of which is fixed ; find the horizontal force which 
must be applied to the particle in order that the string may 
de\'iate by a given angle from the vertical and find also the 
tension of the string. 

2. Assuming that the Parallelogram of Forces is true with 10 
respect to the direction of the resultant, prove it for the 
magnitude of the resultant. 

Two chords OA, OB of a circle represent in magnitude 
and direction two forces acting at the point ; shew that if 
their resultant passes through the centre of the circle, either 
the chords are equal or they contain a right angle. 

3. Shew that a given force may be resolved into two 15 
components in an infinite number of ways. 

A man with a uniformly smooth spherical head wears a 
conical hat of given weight ; find the ichole pressure on his head 
and examine the circumstances under which his head will 
crack. 

4. Why does the theory of couples require exceptional o 
treatment ? Prove that two unlike couples in the same 
plane will balance each other if their moments are equal. 

5. Prove that a botly can have onlj' one centre of gravity, 10 
and hence prove that the straight lines drawn from the an- 
gular points of a triangle to bisect the opposite sides meet in 

a point. 



cvi FIRST EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B.A., 1883-84 

6. Shew that the centre of gravity of a trapezium divides S 

the line joining the middle points of the two parallel sides 

■ , . a + 2b , , 

in the ratio ^ , , the lengths of these sides being a and 6, 

7. Show how to graduate the Z)anis7i /S'fee^yarc?, 15 
In the Danish Steelyard, if a^ be the distance of the ful- 
crum from that end of it at which the weight is suspended, 
the weight being n lbs., prove that 

1 2_ J_ _ 

«n + 2 «n + 1 "^ «„ ~ ^- 

8. Determine the conditions of equilibrium on a pair of 5 
Toothed Wheels. 

9. Enunciate the Principle of Virtual Velocities. Is it 10 
always necessary that the displacement should be infini- 
tesimal ? Demonstrate the principle for the Screw. 

10. What do you understand by the limiting position of 12 
equilibrium ? 

If the roughness of a plane which is inclined to the horizon 
at a known angle be such that a body will just rest supported 
on it, find the least force requisite to draw the body up. 



SECOXD EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B.A., 1883-84. Cvii 



lY. 



SECOND EXAMINATION FOR THE DEGREE 
OF B.A. AND B.A. EXAMINATION (Old 
System). 

EXAMINERS. 

fl. LiTTLEDALE, B.A. t 

M. Macmilla^t, B.A- /In English. 

A. Baerett, B.A ) 

Yashvant Vascdkv Athalye, M.A., 

T T R 
Vaman SHn-KAM Apte, M. a 5^ ^ Sanskrit. 



L 

The Rev. A. Fchrer, Ph.D. ... ) 

R. G. OxEXHAM, M.A It„t-*- 

The Rev. J. LeH.vlle, S.J \ "^ ^*"^- 

Jamshedjee Palloxjee Kapadia, 



Esq. > In Persian. 

MiKZA Hassan Khax, Esq. ) 

The Rev. B. Blake, M.A., B.D. ... \ I^^ History and Political 
Abaji Vishst; Kathavate, B. A. . . . ) Economy and m Logic 

[ and Aloral Philosophy. 
J. T. Hathorxthvtaite, M.A. ... j 
Fakdunji Maxcherji Dastub, M.A. j 

The Rev. R. Scott, M.A V In Mathematics. 

Jamshedji Ardesik Dalal, M.A., ( 
LL.B. J 

The Rev. F. Dreckmaxx, S.J. ... ] 

Kavasji Dadabh.ai Naegamvala, I In Experimental Physics 
M.A., F.C.S., F.LC. I 

I. B. Lyox, M.R.C.S., F.C.S., F.LC. ) t t nx. ■ 

Kaikhosru Rastamji Vikaji, L.M.. i ^ Inorganic Chemistry 
1^1 J) ' 'I and in Metallurgj-. 

Sakharaji Arjfn RAVrr, KM. ... \ ^° Vegetable Anatomy 
D. MacDonald, M.D., B.Sc., CM. . ) 1° . Physiology and 
' ( Systematic Botany. 

G. WATER.S, L.R.C.S., L.R.C.P.E... ) In Comparative Anatomy 
A. Atmabam, B.M., B.Sc, Lond. ... J and Physiology. 



Cviii SECOND EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF li.A., 1883-84. 
Monday, 12th November. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

ENGLISH. 

H. LiTTLEDALE, B.A.; M. Macmillan, B.A,; 

A. Barrett, B.A. 
[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

N.B. — Old B.A. Candidates who take half this paper are to 
answer Questions 3, 4, 7 and 8. 

Bacon's '* Advancement of Learning." 

1. Bacon says that the handling of final causes is " well 10 
inquired and collected in metaphysic, but in physic they are 
impertinent." Why so ? 

2. How does Bacon show from the ancient practice of 10 
deification the superiority of learning and inventive skill to 
political and military merit ? 

3. Briefly enumerate the defects or neglects which Bacon 10 
notices in the medical science of his day. 

4. Summarise Bacon's analysis of " civil knowledge." 10 

5. By what examples does Bacon illustrate his statement 10 
that the mind of man is "rather like an enchanted glass, 
full of superstition and imposture, if it be not delivered and 
reduced " ? To his instances add some from your own obser- 
vation. 

6. Illustrate Bacon's love of gardening from his metaphors 10 
in the Advancement. 

7. Explain the following passages : — 20 

(a) The children of time do take after the nature and 
malice of the father. 

{b) So as there is a kind of contemplative heraldrj', as 
well as civil. 

(c) Nay, they are'indeed but remoracs and hindrances 
to stay and slug the ship from further sailing. 

{d) It is true that the imagination is an agent or mes- 
senger, in both provinces, both the judicial and the 
ministerial. 

(e) Hitherto men are rather beholden to a wild goat for 
surgery, or to a nightingale for music, or to the ibis 



SECOND EXAM. POR THE DEGREE OF B.A., 1883-84. cix 

for some part of physic, or to the potlid that flew 
open for artillery. 

(/) For as knowledges are now delivered, there is a 
kind of contract of error between the deliverer and 
the receiver. 

{g) Particulars being dispersed do best agree with dis- 
persed directions. 

(h) It is a rule, that whatsoever science is not consonant 
to presuppositions, must pray in aid of similitudes. 

(») Many forms are equal in signification that are dif- 
fering in impression. 

{j) The interpretations of the scriptures are of two 
sorts : methodical, and solute or at large. 

8. Paraphrase :— 10 

Trencher philosophers ; relation (as the lawyers speak) ; 
the carriers of knowledge ; men of experience ; learning 
should be referred to action ; commutative and distributive 
justice ; Vulcan is a second nature ; the footsteps of diseases ; 
the axle-tree of heaven ; colours of good and evil. 

9. Give the meanings of the following words as used by 10 
liacon : — Morigeration, minion, platform, worthies, treacle, 
places, resorts, heteroclites, presently, cards. 



Monday, 12th November. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

SANSKRIT. 

Yashvant Vasudev Athalve, M.A., LL.B. ; 
Vaman Shivram Apte, M.A. ; The Rev. A. Fchrer, Ph.D. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

Sectiox L 

Kd vyaprakds'a, 

[N.B. — B.A. Candidates, Choice I., are not to answer Q. 1 

(«), id), {€) ; Q.2;Q.5(ib); Q.6 (b) ; Q. 7 (b) and (e).] 

1. Translate and explain, giving the context shortly : — 17 

(a) ^I-cmfTOci^rT^^t I 

B 1030—10 ex 



ex SECOND EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B.A., 1883-84- 

m^ I 
{g) ^^Nm ^\'^m^^^^^ ^^qT==^^ f^- 

2. Define ^^^. Name and explain the several kiiuls 
of it. Distinguish it from ■S^'TfTTTf with an illustration. 

3. What are the different theories as regards the import 
of sentences (c{[^q7?J) ? How are they technically named, 
and to whom are they ascribed? Under which of Mam- 
mata's arthas would the ^f^q"!^ as expounded by the dif- 
fercnt schools come ? 



SECOND EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B.A., 1883-84. CXi 

4. "Singular terms merely denote individuals; while 6 
common terms denote individuals as well as connote attri- 
butes." How far does Mammata recognize this ? ^^'hat is 

his view about the import of words ? X^Tiat are the different 
theories referred to by him on the subject? 

5. (a) Define ^^^ and distinguish it from »;^IpcT^T5,» ' 

(b) To what kind of ^^tJ[f is ^^^ allied ? 

6. (a) "VMiat alatikdras correspond to Irony and Climax ? 4 
(6) Name the different kinds of S^f^^l^lf^. 

7. ^Vhat are the alanldras in the following? State 14 
fully your answers. 

(d) ^^: ^lu ^^^: ^^i^i ^^\^\^ I 



Cxii SECOND EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B.A., 1883-84 

8. Translate into English : — 20 

s^^^ri: ^s^-iTf^ ^^'jrq'rqq-r?"^!^ fp^ %g;^ ^^r- 

Section II. 

9. Translate into Sanskrit : — 20 

Among the several virtues that tend to magnify the char- 
acter of man, conscientiousness and a thorough integrity of 
purpose may be ranked as pre-eminent. It often happens 
that we might gain money, or promotion, or otherwise bene- 
fit ourselves, by means which no law forbids, but which 
nevertheless are injurious to the feelings or to the interests 
of our fellow-creatures, or are in themselves mean and 
unworthy. ' ' Do unto others as you would be done by, " has 
been a maxim recoguized by all systems of morality, and no 
one who sincerely wishes to act in conformity with this 
principle, or who has any respect for liimself, would be at a 
loss to know how he should shape his conduct in such cases. 



SECOyD EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OP B.A., 1883-84. CxIm 
MoNDAV, 12th Novembkr. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

LATIN. 

R. G. OxESHAM, M.A. ; The Rev. J. LkHallk, S.J. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

For Second B.A. Candidates. 

1. (a) Translate, with notes on the words in italics : — "»0 

Bruto Prretore tenente 
Ditem Asiam, Riipili et Per si jxir pugnat, uti non 
ComposUi melius cum Bitho Bacchius. In jus 
Acres procurrunt, magnum spectaculum uterque. 
Persius exponit causam ; ridetur ab omni 
Conventu : laudat Brutum laudatque cohortem ; 
Solem Asise Brutum appellat, stellasque salubres 
Appellat comites, excepto Rege ; canem ilium, 
Invisum agricolis sidus, venisse : ruebat 
Flumen ut hibemum, fertur quo rara securis. 
Turn Prcenestinus salso multoque fluenti 
Expressa arbusto re<jerit convicia, durus 
Vindemiator et invictus, cui srepe viator 
Ce-ssisset, magna compellans voce cucullum. 
At Grsecus, postquam est Italo perfusus aceto, 
Persius exclamat : Per magnos. Brute, deos te 
Oro, qui reges consuesti tollere ; cur non 
Hunc Regem jugulas? operum hoc, mihi crede 
iuorum est. 

{h) Translate, explaining the allusions to Horace's life : — 

Romae nutrii-i mihi contigit atque dooeri, 
Iratus Graiis quantum nocuisset Achilles : 
Adjecere bonae paulo plus artis Athense ; 
Scilicet ut possem cur%o dignoscere rectum, 
Atque inter silvas Academi qujorere verum. 
Dura sed emovere loco me tempora grato, 
Civilisque rudem belli tulit sestus in arma, 
Caesaris Augusti non responsura lacertis. 
Unde simul primum me demisere Philippi, 
Decisis humilem pennis, inopemque patemi 
Et laris et fundi, paupertas impiilit audax 
Ut versus facerem : sed, quod non desit, habentem 
Quae poterunt unquam satis expurgare cicutae, 
Ni melius dormire putem quaui scribere versua 7 

B 1030-10 <x* 



CXIV SECOND EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OP B.A., 1883-84. 

2. Translate and explain : — 14 

Ab ovo usque ad mala ; nil sequale homini fuit illi ; nil fuit 
unquam sic impar sibi ; emunctse naris ; durus componere 
versus ; usque laborantes ; respondere vadato ; post mediam 
noctem'quum soninia vera ; omnis res mea ad medium Januni 
fracta est ; intestabilis ; addicere nummo ; bruma nivalem 
interiore diem gyro trahit ; pars hominum gestit conducere 
publica ; senes in vivaria mittere ; Cserite cera digni ; zonam 
perdere ; hie sponsum vocat hie auditum scripta. 

3, Translate into Latin : - 36 

In his satires Horace wished to teach us to wage war 
against our vices, to control our affections, to follow the 
guidance of nature in subduing our desires, to distinguisii 
truth from falsehood and appearance from reality, to shake 
off prejudices rashly formed, to Lave a clear notion of the 
principles and motives of our actions, lastly to avoid the 
ridiculous pertinacity of those who obstinately cling to the 
opinions which they have once imbibed without regard to 
the foundations on which they rest. In one word, he 
endeavoured to make us satisfied with ourselves, agreeable 
and faithful to our friends, affable, useful and kind to all 
those with whom we live.— Hence to explain the words of 
this author, to point out the figures of speech he used, to 
guide the reader through the labyrinths of an intricate 
construction, all this is not much, nor, as Epictetus says, in 
any way beautiful or worthy of a wise man. But the chief 
sim, and that which is principally to be sought for, is to 
show the usefulness and aiDplication of these precepts, so 
that it may be clear to all, that those who neglect to 
conform their manners to this example, act like those sick 
people who indeed read books in which remedies for their 
diseases are prescribed, but are so far from following the 
advice given them that they do not even take it into 
consideration. 

For Old B.A. Candidates. 

4. (cr) Translate :— ■ ;J2 

Pastor quum traheret per freta navibus 
Idseis Helenen perfidus hospitam, 
Ingrato celeres obruit otic 

Ventos, ut caneret fera 
Nereus fata : Mala ducis avi domum, 
Quam multo repetet Groecia milite, 
Conjurata tuas nimpere nuptias, 

Et regnum Priami vetus, 



SECOXD EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B.A., 1883-84. CXV 

Heu, hen ! quantus eqnis, quantns adest viris 
Sudor ! quanta moves funera Dardanje 
Genti ! Jam galeam Pallas et ajgida 

Currusque et rabiem parat. 
Nequidquam. Veneris pra?sidio ferox, 
Pectes Cai'sariem, grataque feminia 
Imbelli cithara cannina divides : 

Nequidquam thalamo graves 
Hastas et calami spicula Gnossii 
Vitabis, strepitumque, et celerem sequi 
Ajacem : tamen, heu serus adulteros 

Crines pulvere coUines. 
Iracunda diem proferet Ilia 
Matronisque Phrygum classis Achillei ; 
Post certas hiemes uret Achaius 

Ignis Pergameas domos. 

{b) State the occasion on which this ode is supposed to 
have been composed, and explain the train of thought con- 
tained in it. 

5. Translate the first half of Question 3. ' '' 



MOSDAY, 12th Xo^•EMBER. 
[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

PERSIAN. 

Jamshedjee Palloxjee Kapadia, Esq. ; 
MiKZA Hassan Khan, Esq. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

Rouzat-us-Safa — From the life of Ayoob to the reign of Kyamarth .- 

or 

Haheebos-Sear — Second portion of the frst Volume (History of thf 
ancient Persian and Arabic Kings down to the Mahomedan Era). 

1. (a) Give the meanings and derivations of sLidL) 15 

jjbu>liy£jj and ^^jULi as per j^t>JllA>Uc 

and show that these translations are incorrect as per modem 
philology. 

(h) Under what names are the principal kings and warriors 
of these two dynasties known in the Vedas and the Avesta ? 



CXvi SECOND EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OP B.A,, 1883-84. 

(c) Show wherein and how far these three accounts differ 
from each other, 

2. (a) Discuss M^hy all Mahomedan authors omit the Achje- 1 
menian and Parthean dynasties from their list of Persian 
kings. 

{b} Show philologically .and ethnographically that their 
method of treating the histories of the ^^ b J 1 (>A»0 and 
(O U3 Lj dynasties from a Semitic point of view is quite 
incorrect. 

3. What is the etymology of »(3JX»*>? State the chief 12 

points of difference in the history of this king as given by 
the oriental and occidental writers. Describe also his char- 
acter from the Persian standpoint, and compare him with 
Caesar, Hannibal and Napoleon (a) as a general, {h) as a 
statesman, (c) as an orator, and (d) as a legislator. 

4. Render the following English into Persian and vicf. ."> 
versa : — 

(a) The Platonists ; Natural and Peripatetic philosophers ; 
heavenly bodies ; anatomy ; materialists and fatalists. 

(Jl:>.S]j and ! C> s^^c, 

5. Render in pure Persian the following sentences with 7 
their translations : — 

JlsT" CL>L>U2 ^i^i^S 8 jU. JI {h) 
jji.A]t>*'^ ^ Ci^iua; L-jU**' C^is^j J\ {e) 

ju jU ^^j^))^y>-i -^^^ y^.^ cLi^ 



SECOND EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OP B.A., 1883-84. CX%ii 

6. Name the authors and the metres of the following C 
verses and scan them : — 



A^ J (i?v«*J J^t^' t)Jj 't3>-^ (a 



0^ I U x» ! ;>J CL5 J 'ou- ^j I J U* (6) 

^t^U- <«to|c:^^'(j^^ J.*s^ (c) 

7. State from whom is the following hemistich. Fill up 5 
the other part of the distich, and complete the couplet ; also 
explain the allusion : — 

8. Explain what you understand by l ^ .^<c^.**« l ol 7 
and L > J wO yj2 and give an example of each. 

9. Translate into EInglish either (not both) of the follow- 13 
ing passages : — 

^cUj J^^ J'^' di} J^ j^ (''' 



CXviii SECOND EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B.A., 1883-84. 

^U^ IjU ^r oy o>^ b ' t>c. ^ b : J I i_^.i 
'T .. .. . " 



SECOND EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OP P.A., 1883-84. CXIX 

^ ^•LLiob tl*^^ .^ cS jt> Ui z+J^ v?- 

10. Translate into Persian : — oq 

Herodotus and Xenophon have had a long innings ; the 
world has become familiar with the Persian Uon as painted 
by the Greek, but the lion has now taken the brush, and 
vre shall see whether the Uneaments of Apollo do not become 
marred at the hands of a less partial painter. It gives one 
some assiirance that our author is not entirely a partisan, for 
he admits that Salamis was a Persian defeat ; but he points 
out that the invaders had then been six years away from 
their recruiting grounds and arsenals, and he brings into 
prominent notice some previous naval fights in which the 



eJCX SECOND EXAM, FOR THE DEGREE OP B.A., 1883-84, 

Persians were victorious, but of which the world has heard 
little. The Greek character also fares ill at the hands of 
their modern assailant, for they are shown not only to have 
falsified history in their own favour, but in support of their 
craftiness to have forged treaties that were never made. 



Tuesday, 13th November. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

Group A. (Language and Literature). 

ENGLISH— Paper I. 

H. LiTTLEDALE, B.A. ; M. Macmillan, B.A. ; 
A. Barrett, B.A. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

Papers " Moral Essays" and "Satires." 

1. With special reference to Pope's estimates of men and 10 
women, discuss his claim to be considered a great moral 
poet. 

2. " You may see not unfrequently playing on the surface 10 
of Pope's fancy the shadows that were cast by the restless 
leaves of the poison-tree of a godless philosophy. " Account 

for and illustrate this. 

3. How does Pope S 

"show, a Poet's of some weight, 
And (tho' no soldier), useful to the state "? 

4. Paraphrase : — 25 

Peace to all such ! but were there one whose fires 
True genius kindles, and fair Fame inspires ; 
Blest with each talent and each art to please, 
And born to write, converse, and live with ease ; 
Should such a man, too fond to nile alone, 
Bear, like the Turk, no brotlier near tlie tlirone, 
View him with scornful, yet with jealous eyes, 
And hate for arts that caused himself to rise ; 
Damn with faint praise, assent with civil leer, 
And without sneering, teach the rest to sneer ; 
Willing to wound, and yet afraid to strike. 
Just hint a fault, and hesitate dislike ; 
Alike raserved to blame or to commend, 



SECOSD EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B.A., 1883-84. CXxi 

A timorous foe, and a suspicious friend ; 
Dreading even fools, by flatterers besieged. 
And so obliging that he ne'er obliged ; 
Like Cato, give his little senate laws, 
And sit attentive to his own applause ; 
While Wits and Templars everj' sentence raise, 
And wonder with a foolish face of praise : — 
Who but must laugh, if such a man there be ? 
Who would not weep, if Atticcs were he ? 

5. Explain the allusions, and remark on the rhymes, in 5 
the above passage. 

6. Write brief notices of the persons mentioned in the 15 
following : — 

But why then publish ? Gramille the polite, 
And knowing Walsh, would tell me I could write ; 
Well-natured Garth inflamed with early praise ; 
And Congrere loved, and Swift endured, my lays ; 
The courtly Talbot, Somers, Sheffield, read ; 
Even mitred Rochester would noil the head ; 
And St. John's self (great Dryden's friends before) 
With open arms received one Poet more. 

7. Reproduce the description of " Timon's villa," and 12 
write a note on the controversy concerning it. 

8. Explain : — IS 

(a) without one distress, 

Sick of herself thro' very selfishness. 

(6) Oh ! that such bulky bribes as all might see, 
Still, as of old, encumbered villainy. 

(c) Extremes in Nature equal good produce. 

Extremes in Man concur to general use. 
{d) To rest, the cushion and soft Dean invite. 

Who never mentions Hell to ears poUte. 
(e) This the blue varnish, that the green endears. 

The sacred rust of twice ten hundred years. 
(/) As drives the storm, at any door I knock. 

And house with. Montaigne now, and now with Locke. 
(g) In Quibbles Angel and Archangel join, 

And God the Father turns a school-divine. 
(A) The great Alcides, every Labour past. 

Had still this Monster to subdue at last. 
( i ) And own, the Spaniard did a waggish thing. 

Who cropt our ears, and sent them to the king. 
B 1030—11 ex 



CXxii SECOND EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B.A., I883-8i~ 

Tuesday, 13th Novembek, 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

Group A. (Language and Literature). 

ENGLISH— Paper II. 

H. LiTTLEDALE, B,A, ; M, Macmillan, BiA ; 
A. Baerett, B.A. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

Cowper's Letters. 

1. What reasons does Cowper give for the failure of 10 
Pope's Homer ? 

2. Mention any incidents referred to in these letters 9 
which form the subjects of any of Cowper's poems. 

3. What causes led to the change of residence from 9 
Olney to Weston ? 

4. \Yhat circiunstances at the time of the publication of 12 
the " Task " were favourable to its success ? 

5. What do you know of the following persons: — 10 
Mr. Smith, Mr. Rose, Mr. Teedon, Rev. W. Bagot, Mr. 
Fuseli, Mai-tin Madan, Mr. Ashburner ? Who was 'Sephus ? 

6. Give a short account of Mr. Newton, and relate the 9 
circumstances which brought about a misunderstanding 
between him and Cowper. 

7. Describe the visit paid to Cowper by a parliamentary (> 
candidate. 

8. Give Cowper's opinion about pluralities, stating by 12 
what considerations his views appear to have been modified 

in particular instances. 

9. Explain the following allusions ; — 20 

{a) Fluellin would say, they are as like as my fingers to 
my fingers, and there is salmon in botli. 

{b) The tragedies of Lloyd and Bensley are both very deep. 

(c) I have gulped and swallowed, and I have written to 
the Chancellor and I have written to Colnian. 

{d) I have been to the races. 



SECOND EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B.A., 1883-84. CXxiii 

I am determined that, whatsoever king shall reign, you 

shall be Vicar of Olney. 
( /) The Jfarquis is dead, and is succeeded by a Bea^j. 

' .She is imder some apprehensions that a tender regard 

for the drum of your ear may keep you from her. Never 

mind ! You have two drums ; and if she should crack 

both, I will buy you a tnunpet. 
{h) Mr. Scott, who I believe is a surgeon that makes more 

use of the knife than the poultice. 
(i) I fasten a new string to my bow, and my youngest 

boy, a lad of alx>ut thirty years of age, having played 

with my arrows till he has stripped off all the feathers, 

I find myself obliged to repair them. 
(j) How can you avoid giving offence, unless you escape 

by an archdeaconism ? 



Wednesday, 14th November. 

[10 AJI. TO 1 P.M.] 

Group A. (Language and Literature}. 

SANSKRIT— Paper I. 

Yashva>jt Vascdev AxHALrE, M.A., LL.B. ; 
VA34AN Shivram Apte, M.A. ; The Rev. A. Fchrer, Ph.D. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Translate freely into English : — 30 

(a) ^1^5^%^ ^^mi ^ IK^mi^^^ 

(b) ^*Tr^^r^[wr fl f«fe: I h^ ^^^]^• 



CXxiv SECOND EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B.A., 1883-84. 

sTTcf^^ w^q?^m"^c^[^5TTJTrcr^ I 

2. (a) In what sense are the words t^T^^T*^'" 

Sf^f ! occurring in a mantra construed by the Sankhyas 

and the Vedantins ? Name the principles recognized by the 
former, a discriminative knowledge of which is, according to 
them, the way of preventing future pain. 



SECOND EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B.A., 1883-84. CXXV 

(b) Who are regarded as the fotindera of the S4nkhya and 
the Yoga philosophy ? Mention the points of agreement and 
disagreement between the two. 

3. What persona are mentioned by the author of the 8 
S<itras in connection with the relation between the Indivi- 
dual and the Supreme Soul ? Give briefly their views, and 
state with whom the Bhashyakara agree in the main. 

4. "The effect (the manifold, impure Universe) is not 15 
different from the cause (the one, pure Brahma)." State the 
several arguments by which this conclusion is established. 
(Answer this question in Sanskrit.) 

5. Explain the following S<itras, stating clearly what 12 
each is intended to prove : — 



(a) ^r^qr^ I 



(d) 



^^HCR^^^r^icT =^^ ^\m\^ I 



6. State the arguments advanced in favour of Taria 8 
(Reason) being admitted in the solution of theosophic ques- 
tions. How doesS'ankar&charya try to refute them ? How 
far do you consider his line of argument conclusive and ex- 
haustive ? 

To what extent is this doctrine maintained by the S6tra- 
kara and the Bhashyakara ? Quote passages in support of 
your answer. Explain in connection with this question the 

Sfltra ^f ^TTq%^ I 

8. (a) What is meant by S'drtra and Upanishad ? 7 

How is the designation ^f^m^^ 5^?r*T applicable to the 

Vedanta philosophy ? 

(b) Give the precise import of the following words as used 
in the Bhashya : — 



^TtW. 



^rfJT^r, iqJTH, 3T^g, w^'^K, ^^^ and 

B 1030-Jl ex* 



CXXVi SECOND EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OP B.A., 1883-84. 
Wednesday, 14th November. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

Group A. (Language and Literature). 

SANSKRIT— Papek II. 

Yashvant Vastjdev Athalye, M.A., LL.B. ; 
Vaman Shiv^ram Apte, M.A. ; The Rev. A. Fuhrer, Ph.D. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 
Mrich chhahatiM. 
1. Translate with necessary explanation : — 14 

(a) iff ^rt fl ^^ ^^q^^rf^cr^^ i\^K I 
3Tfq=^ I 

3TR^ I 

^cTFrcTfl^^R: TF^^TcT^IW ^if^cf^lO^: | 



SECONT) EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B.A., 1883-84. CXXVii 

(c) W^ sft^^T^PT f HcTI ^m ^]^^J: 

Explain the compounds underlined and give the cdankdras 

in (6). 

2. Translate into Sanskrit and English the following, 15 
stating in what dialects thej' are written : — 

(c) ^r ^3T^^ '^^ ^ irrf^^ 5T f^^f ^^ 
qmit ^R 1% II 

^^ ^^ fj^'JI^Wf%''5 II 

3. Delineate in Sanskrit the character of Samsthanaka. S 

4. Explain the following : — 6 

«r. 3Tffl^^ \^\^^ ^, ^^^TRJI% and ^[nt- 



CXXviii SECOND EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OP B.A., 1883-84 

5. (a) Show the accuracy with which Buddhist observan- 7 
ces are adverted to and the flourishing condition in which the 
members of that sect are represented to have existed at the 
time. 

(6) Draw a picture of the practical administration of 
Hindu law under Hindu government according to the ninth 
act of the Mrichchhakatika. 

Mudrdrdkshasa. 

6. Contrast the style and sentiment displayed in the 6 
writings of S'ftdraka and Vis'akhadatta, and state what you 
know of the lives of each of these poets. 

7. Describe and compare the civil policy of Ch^nakya 9 
and Rakshasa. What natural advantages had the former on 

his side ? 

8. State what you know of the history of Chandragupta 5 
from Greek, Roman, Buddhist, or other sources, and give a 
comparison of the historical account of that king with that 
given in the MudrErakshasa. 

9. Translate (adding a few explanatory notes where 19 
necessary) : — 

^i^^f^v II 



crSf r1f» ^ =^T^ H^^ iTcffw I 



SECOXT) EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF RA., 1883-84. CXxix 

in=^iiH^^^ cT^^H^p-Ti^f fr^^^"^^^ ^^r- 

^^^ II 

10. Explain the following, translating the Prakrit into 11 
Sanskrit : — 

^^r\^% II ^]^^\ ^^H^^\(\ i\% II 



CXXX SECOND EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B.A., 1883-84. 

To what religious sect does Jivasiddhi belong ? Is the 
author right in calling him a Kshapanaka ? If not, give 
reasons. 



Wednesday, 14th November. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

Group A. (Language and Literature). 

LATIN— Papee I. 

R. G. OxEKHAM, M.A. ; The Rev. J. LeHalle, S.J. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Translate :— 50 

(a) Audax omnia perpeti 

Gens humana ruit per vetitum nefas. 

Audax lapeti genus 

Ignem fraude mala gentibus intulit : 

Post ignem aetheria domo 

Subdiictum Macies et nova Febrium 

Terris incubuit cohors : 

Semotique prius tarda necessitas 

Leti corripuit gradum. 

Expertus vacuum Dpedalus jera 

Peunis non homini datis. 

Perrupit Acheronta Herculeus labor 

Nil mortalibus arduum est. 

Caelum ipsum petimus sultitia, neque 

Per nostrum patimur scelus 

Iracunda Jovem ponere fulmina. 

(6) Me nee tam patiens Lacedpenion, 

Nee tam Larissre percussit campus opimse, 

Quam domus Albuneaa resonantis, 

Et prseceps Anio ac Tiburni lucus, et uda 

Mobilibus pomaria rivis, 

Albus ut obscuro deterget nubila cnalo 

Sajpe Notus, neque parturit imbres 

Perpetuos : sic tu sapiens finire memento 

Tristitiam vitteque labores 

MoUi, Plance, niero : sen te fulgentia signis 

Castra tenent, sen densa tenebit 

Tiburis umbra tui. 

What do you understand to liave been the occasion and 
meaning of this ode ? 

(c) Ante hac nefas depromere cnecubum 
Cellis avitis, dum Capitolio 
Kegina dementes ruinas, 



SECOND EXAM. TOR THE DEGREE OF B.A,, 1883-84 CXS)d 

Funns et imperio parabat 
Contaminato cum grege turpium 
Morbo vironim, quidlibet impotens 
Sperare, fortunaque dulci 
Ebria. iSecl minuit furorem 
Tix una sospes navis ab ignibus : 
Meiitemque lymphatam mareotico 
Redegit in veros timores 
C;esar, ab Italia volantem 
Eeniis adurgens : accipiter velut 
MoUes columbas, aut leporem citua 
Venator in campis nivalis 
Hcemonise ; daret ut catenis 
Fatale monstram ; qu£e generosius 
Perire quarens, nee muliebriter 
Expavit ensem, nee latentes 
Classe cita repara\'it oras : 
Ansa et jacentem visere regiam 
Vultu sereno, fortis et asperas 
Tractare serpentes, ut atrum 
C'orpore combiberet venenum I 
Deliberata morte ferocior : 
Sa?vis Liburnis scilicet invidena 
Privata deduci superbo 
Non humilis mulier triumpho. 

Explain the historical allusions and give the" exact force 
of " fatale monstrum " " deliberata morte ferocior." 

2. How do you suppose that Horace was politically 15 
useful to Augustus ? Compare his position in this respect 
with that of any of his contemporaries. 

.3. What internal evidence can you adduce of the relative 15 
dates of Horace's various poems ? 

4. What do you gather from Horace as to the habits of 20 
the Romans in the forum, at meals, and on the farm ? 



WEDyESDAYf 1 iXH NOVEMBER. 
[2 P,JI, TO 5 P.M.] 

Group A. (Language ami Literature). 

LATIX— Paper II. 

R. G. OxENHAM, M.A. ; The Rev. .J. LeHalle, S.J. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. (a) Translate, adding notes on the words in italics ; 60 

Exegi monumentum aere perennius, 
Regalique situ pyramidum altius ; 



CXXXli SECOND EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OP B,A., 1883-84. 

Quod non imber edax, non Aquilo impotens 
Possit diruere, aut innumerabilis 
Annorum series et fuga temporum. 
Non omnis moriar ! multaque pars mei 
Vitabit Libitinam. Usque ego postera 
Crescam laude recens, dum Capitolium 
Scandet cum tacita virgine pontifex. 
Dicar, qua violens obstrepit Aufidus, 
Et qua pauper aquaj Daunus agrestium 
Regnavit populorum, ex humili potens, 
Princfeps JSoUum carmen ad Italos 
Deduxisse modos. Sume superbiam 
Quajsitam meritis et mihi Delphica 
Lauro cinge volens, Melpomene, comam. 

(h) Vertumnum Janumque, liber, spectare videris ; 
Scilicet ut prostes Sosiorum pumice mundus, 
Idisti clavis et grata sigilla pudico ; 
Paucis ostendi gemis, et communia laudas ; 
Non ita nutritus ! Fuge quo descendere gestis, 
Non erit emisso reditus tibi. Quid miser egi ? 
Quid volui ? dices, ubi quid te Iwserit : et scis 
In breve te cogi, plenus quum languet amator. 
Quod si non odio peccantis desipit augur, 
Cams eris Romse, donee te deserat setas. 
Contrectatus ubi manibus sordescere vulgi 
Coeperis, aut tineas pasces taciturnus inertes, 
Aut fugies Uticam, aut vinctus mitteris Ilerdam. 
Ridebit monitor non exauditus,: ut ille, 
Qui male parentem in rupes protrusit asellum 
Iratus : quis enim invitum servare laboret ? 
Hoc quoque te manet, ut pueros elementa docentem 
Occupet extremis in vicis balba senectus. 

(c) Ignotum tragicae genus invenisse Camenas 
Dicitur et plaustris vexisse poemata Thespis 
Qui canerent agerentque peruncti fajcibus ora. 
Post hnne pernonoi pallceque repertor honestoe 
^schylus et modicis instravit pulpita tignis, 
Et docuit magnumque loqui nitique cothurno. 
Successit vetus his Comcedia, non sine multa 
Laude ; sed in vitium libertas excidit, et vim 
rignam lege regi. Lex est accepta, Chorusque 
Tiirpiter obticuit, svhlatojure nocendi. 
Nil intentatum nostri liquere poetae : 
Nee minimum meruere decus, vestigia Grseca 
Ausi deserere, et celebi-are domestica facta, 
Vel qui prcetextas, vel qui docuere togatas. 



SECOXD EXAM. FoR THE DEGREE OF B.A., 1883-84. CXXXlii 

2. (a) Who were the models of Horace among the Greeks ? 15 

(6) Who were his predecessors among the Romans ? 
(c) In what consists his ownmerit as a Latin poet ? 

3. What information about the moral state of Boman 15 
society can we gather from the works of Horace ? 

4. Translate and explain : — 10 

Cui lecta potenter erit res nee facundia deseret hunc nee 
lucidiis ordo ; si dicentis erunt fortonis absona dicta Romani 
tollent equites peditesque cachinnum ; mediocribus esse 
poetis non homines, non di, non concessere columnse ; fcenum 
habet in comu ; arenre mensor ; fautor ntroque pollice ; 
difficile est proprie communia dicere ; equus ut me portet 
alat rex ; rixatur de lana ssepe caprina ; unctum qui recte 
ponere possit. 



Wednesday, 14:Th November. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

Group A. (Language and Literaiure). 
PERSIAN— Papeh I. 

Jamshedjee Pallon'jee Kapadia, Esq- ; 

MiKZA Hassax Khan, Esq. 
[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

(1) Hdji Lutfahj—Atash.kadd; 

(2) Habeeb-os-Sear—Changiz Khdn and his descendants, 

or Rauzat-us-Safa — Changiz Khan, Vol. V. 

1. Who do you consider was the first Persian poet? 
Say with what English poet you would compare him, giving 
your reason for it. 

2, What do you understand by — 

5- 
^ ^^ *^.j\ ^»;fej! 
Name them and quote any verses you remember of the 
!)hree of them in praise of ^ 5 1) yS 
B 1030—12 ex 



CXXxiv SECOKD EXAM. FaR THE DEGREE OF B.A., 188S-84- 

3. Give a short account of the life and writings of 2.0 
^ Iam> >^^^ ^^^ ^*y ^" what torms do 

i^^ S ,,y OJ ' i) ^^» a>nd J ULk speak of him as 

a Sufi poet. Translate the following and scan the first 
verse : — 

L^^l JU ^5 I. J I ^ ^,^ 



SECOND EXAM. FOR THE DEG^BEE OP B.A., 1883-84. CXXXV 



if* 

JXJ '^J ^^ 






(^ 



"^ J\ yd J^ "^r -^^ 






CXXXvi SECOND EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B.A., 1883-84. 



Write what you know about Vaa*»> ^JLc aJ and ] y^ ! 

4. Comment upon lAljliki and LJbUw from Sufi 15 
standpoint and say to what family of languages do 

, ^ I) y« and J | yus belong. Draw out also a table of 
languages, both dead and living, belonging to the same 
group, 

5, Scan and name the metres of the following. For (a) 8 
and (fe) quote parallel verses from SAdi and in verse (c) say 

^ ,^^^>*o ^, , ^>N^ \/0 was and why he was so called : — 



SECOND EXAM, FOR THE DEGREE OP B.A., 1883-84 CXXXVii 

LT^ ^y h\j^ KSy^. *'^ 

6. Translate into idiomatic English the following three .5 
Oriental proverbs : - - 

»OJt> ty^iU J *J ^ 5 0>j^ (a) 

7. Translate and say from whom are the following verses, 22 
Annotate and explain fully the words underlined : — 



B J030-12 ex* 



CXXXVm SECOND EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B.A., 1S83-8 
OOi^i. jjWjJ /p^ ^ ^ ^*f y CLi ^SXxi 

t-^iy ji^ ^^>oj ij ^^ j ^^^ ^(^ 

ti* i ^^ (^ \)T C^ f^*-*^ ♦><.; 



3EC0VD EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B.A., 1853-84 CXX^ix 

8. " Poets are men of peace ; they bear no arms, but their 10 
tongues are sharper than Actius his razor ; their pens 
carry further and give a louder report than thunder." 

Quote any verses you remember from **»J c> o and 

L< 0>^ I niore or less akin to the aforesaid sentiments. 

9. ((/) Describe * ^ U^J State for what it was celebra- 10 

tetl in the time of the Ach^emenian and Parthian kings. 
Under what name was it known to the ancient Persian writers 
as a halting place of the primitive A'rj-au migration ? 

(b) Give its condition in the time of Jengis Khan, 

(c) ilention its Greek nanje and say who were its princi- 
pal poets as well. 

Wed>«esdat, 14th November. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

Group A. (LangiioQe and Literature). 
PERSIAN— Paper II. 

JAMsirEDjEE P.vLLoyjKE Kapadia, Esq. ; 
MiRZA Hassax Khax, Eoq. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks. ] 

(1) J//> Khond—Rauzat-un-Safa, Vol. V,or Habeeh-us- 
Senr, first poiiion of the Zrd vol, (Channiz Khan and his 
iescendants). 

(2) Hdji Luffahj—Atashl-adn, 

1. State from whom are the following verses. Quote any 7 
«rallel verses you remember from Anwari, SMi, Hafi? 
nd Firdusi : — 



Cxl SECOND EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OP B.A,, 1883-84 

2. How would Firdiisi compare with Pope find other ' 
English satirists ? Discuss this subject, quoting any 
similar passages from them. Compare him also with 
Khikdnu, Anwari and other Persian satirists as well. 

3. Translate :— ' 

. r .... 

I 4. Give a short account of the life and writings of 
t Uoc .»•> tiJ I cV J- Explain the plot in his yjaj | /ytAfi 

from the 3 ^ standpoint. 
5. Translate the following and scan the first verse : — 9 

^«*- ^jUam» y-- v^s^ (^^ J^y 

M*^ rfJ U^.^* L^J^-? CuLaAjjl j^^la (^/*%* 

tt/'J r? Jt^J rx J''' 6^ ^^ J' r^^^" 



SECOND EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B.A., 1883-84 cxli 

^ J i>jU;j »j«^ ^1 "^^ u^^f ^y^ 

J ^y^j\ v^jt 'H'j-?'/^ J' L?y^ 

6. Give a short account of the principal poets and philo- 12 
phers who flourished in the time oi j«| l^ \3 U I State 
long the learned men of what city a discussion arose in his 
ign as to the comparative merits of (^ * »^| and 

-) b ) o ynJ^ Who was applied to and what decision 

i he give ? 

7. Translate, explain the allusions underlined and scan 22 
e first verse : — 

'^^■^"f ii;^' yi-^ Lfi ^' Cf^ 

^^J ^Lo. |*Ua. J (jl^l^ ij'Jj^ 



Cxlii SECOND EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OP B.A., 1883-84 

^«f ^^ J'^<^ u'j^ J^J^ 






8. Give the idiomatic Persian of the following ijroverb.j :- - 

(a) Neither liave I the means of liberation, nor the way 

of escaping. 
{h) Neither have 1 the power to remain, nor tlie ability 

to go. 

(c) Neitlier patience iu the heart of a lover, uor water in 
a sieve. 



SECOND EIAM. FOB THE DEGREE OF B.A.^ 188S-84 cxliii 

9. Say who were the contemporaries of ^Xs^S^^^Jt 10 

both in Asia and Europe ? Give also a short account of the 
learned men of his court. 



TrKSDAY, 13th November, 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

Group B. (H'ldorii avtrl Political Economy.) 

POLITICAL ECONOMY. 

The Rev. Buchanan Bl.\ke, M.A., B.D. ; 
Ab.aji Vtshsc Kathavate, B„1. 

[The- figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Can a statesman afford uniformly to be guided by the 6 
conclusions of Political Economy ? If not, why not ? 

2. "A demand for commodities is not a demand for 12 
Ltbour." Explain and prove this proposition. What practical 
inferences can be drawn from it ? 

.3- What is Smith's theory of the rent of land ? Wliat is 8 
Ricardo's 7 

4. Describe some of the principal systems o^ land tenure. 15 
If you can, notice some which obtain in India at present. 

5. What are the disadvantages incident to slave labour ? ft 
Are there gi-ounds other than those of humanity for which 

it is being gradually given up ? 

6. India is capable of enormously extending, the produe- lOi 
tion of raw materials. Hence it is argued that the zeal of 
those who encourage manufacturing industries is iU directed. 
Discuss the question on economical and general grounds. 

7. What are the general rules with regard to taxation 10 
laid down by Smith ? What difference does he point out 
between the operation of a tax on the necessaries of life and 

of a tax on luxuries ? Illustrate this by an example, 

. 8. Are import taxes on all kinds of conmiodities equally 13^ 
objectionable from an economical point of view ? Show the 
different results which may follow the imposition of taxesL 
on different classes of commodities. 



Cxllv SECOND KXAM, FOR THE DEGREE OP B.A., 1883-84. 

9. What is meant by the exchange being against a coun- 8 
try ? Is it an accurate index of ultimate liabihties ? 

10. (a) What are the advantages and disadvantages of a 10 
double currency? How may the disadvantages be mini- 
mised ? 

(h) What are the advantages of a paper currency ? When 
is auch a cuxTency attended by harm ? 



Tuesday, 13th November. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

Group B. (History and Political Economy.) 

HISTORY OP INDIA. 

The Rev. Buchanan Blake, M.A., B.D. ; 
Abaji Vishnu Kathavate, B.A. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Give a short account of the Afghan invasions of India. 

2. What do you know of Prithvirdj of Ajmeer? 

3. Give an account of the return of the Siir dynasty. 

4. Narrate the principal events of the reign of Shdhdjahdn. 

5. State the principal administrative measures of Sivdji. 
Describe his character and aspirations, supporting your state- 
ments by facts. 

6. How does Mill contrast the institutions of the Hindus 
with those of their Mahomedan invaders ? Criticise his 
Tiews where you think it necessary. 

7. What led to the battle of PAnipat ? Give a full ac- 
count of the events connected with it. Did the Peishwas do 
anything to regain the honour they lost here ? 

8. Describe briefly how Bengal came into the hands of 
the British. 

9. Give a sketch of the progress and decline of the French 
power in India. 

10. Describe briefly the life and character of Ndna Phad- 
navis, pointing out if there was anything in these which 
remotely led to the fall of the Maritha power. 



SECOND EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B.A., 1883-84 Cxlv 
Wednesday, 14th Novembeb. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

Group B. (History and Political Economy.) 

HISTORY OF ROME, GREECE, or EXGLAXD. (Political J 

The Rev. Buchanan Blake, M.A-, B.D. ; 
Abaji Vishnu Kathavate, B.A. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marka.] 

History of Rome. 

1. State briefly what is known of the early inhabitants of 9 
Rome. 

2. What led to the overthrow of the second Decern- 9 
>-irate ? What was the fate of Appius Claudius ? 

3. What were the Publilian Laws? 8 

4. Describe the events of the Second Samnite War. 10 

5. Describe the condition of Carthage on the eve of the 10 
war with Rome. Notice the points of contrast between 
the two powers which led to the overthrow of the former, 

6. Narrate the events in Sicily from the death of Hiero to 12 
the taking of Agrigentumby Laevinus. 

7. Describe the operations of Hannibal in the Second 15 
Punic War from his entering the Alps to his retiring to 
Apulia, showing the most important places on a sketch map, 

8. Give a brief account of the rivalry and hostilities 15 
between Pompey and Caesar. 

9. Sketch briefly the military and administrative acts 12 
of Sylla. What was his end ? 



History of Greece. 

1. Account for the failure of the attempts of Persia to 15 
conquer Greece. 

2. Trace the policy and growth of Athens from the 15 
Confederacy of Delos to the beginning of the Peloponnesian 



War. 

B 1030—13 ex 



cxlvi SECOND EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OP B.A,, 1883-84. 

3. Give some account of the life and character of Kleon. 10 

4. Criticise the terms of "the peace of Nikias." Give 15 
the date of this peace. 

5. Describe the condition of Athens after the battle of 10 
Aigospotamoi. What were the terms on which peace was 
granted ? 

6. Write a brief account of the life of each of the follow- 15 
ing : — Pausanias, Alcibiades, and Demosthenes (the orator). 

7. Give reasons for the supremacy of Thebes, assigning 10 
dates to the events you mention. 

8. Describe briefly the career of Alexander the Great. 10 
Give some estimate of his character. 



History of England. 

1. Describe the policj'^ of Clarendon, and account for his 10 
impeachment, 

2. Explain the steps taken by James II. to secure a parlia- 10 
ment pledged to carry the Indulgence. What frustrated 

his efforts ? 

3. What was the importance of the naval battle fought 10 
off La Hogue ? State the circumstances. 

4. Give an account of the relations of England and Spain 10 
at the time of the South Sea Company's scheme? What 
was Walpole's foreign policy ? 

5. State the causes of the American War of Independence. 10 
What do you know of the previous history of the American 
Colonies ? 

6. Justify the Act of Union with Ireland, and account 10 
for tlie diiierences between it and the Act of Union with 
Scotland. Give dates. 

7. What military services were rendered to his country 10 
by Lord Nelson ? Describe any one of them. 

8. Account for the formation and overthrow of the 10 
(yoalition Ministry of North and Fox. Trace the rise, and 
state the services of Charles James Fox. 

9. What was the influence of the French Revolution on 10 
■English politics ? 

10. Give some accoiint of the " Armed Neutrality." 10 



SECOND EXAM. FOR THB DEGREE OP B.A., 1883-84 Cxlvii 

Wednesday, 14th Novembkr. 

[2 PM. TO 5 P.M.] 

Group B. (History and Political Economy.) 

HISTORY or ROME, GREECE, or EXGLAND. 

( Ittstitutions, Literature, <tc.) 

The Rer. Buchanan Blake, M.A., B.D. ; 
Abaji Vishnc" Kathavate, B.A. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

HisroKY OF Rome. 

1. Show how Rome was prepared to enter on the con- 10 
quest of the world. 

2. Account for the importance attached in Roman history 10 
to agrarian legislation. 

3. Point out the several ways in which Rome dealt with 10 
conquered towns and countries. 

4. It has been said that "vanquished Greece took Rome, 15 
her captor, captive," In what way was this done? Give 
illustrations. 

5. What were the results of the Punic Wars on the moral 10 
and social state of Rome ? 

6. What circumstances in the Roman state or constitution 10 
occasioned the civil wars ? 

7. Examiae the relations of the Comitia Centnriata, 15 
Comitia Tributa, and the Senate. Criticise the tribunitian 
veto. 

8. Give some account of Cicero as an orator, a philosopher 10 
and a statesman. Contrast him with any other statesman 
who was also distinguished in literature. 

9. What was the relation of the Roman rehgion to the 10 
state ? Point out the consequences of such a relation. 



History op Greece. 

1. Clearly bring out the unit of Greek civilization, and 10 
account for the failure of the Athenian Empire. 

2. Indicate the several stages in the formation of the 15 
Athenian constitution, naming the reformers and the part 
contributed by each. Can ostracism be justified ? 



CXlviii SECOND EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OPB.A., 1883-84. 

3. What do you know of the life and works of Aristo- 10 
phanes ? 

4. Show what importance attaches to the controversy 14 
between Socrates and the Sophists. Illustrate the Socratic 

" irony." 

5. Who were the chief historians of Greece ? Contrast 12 
the works and style of any two of ihem, 

6. Point out the chief styles of Greek architecture, and 12 
briefly describe some of the chief buildings of Athens. 

7. What are the relations of art and religion ? Can you 12 
illustrate these from the history of Greece ? 

8. Show the connection which existed between the mys- 15 
teries of Eleusis and the Greek religion? What purpose 
was served by the several oracles ? 



HiSTOEY OF England. 

1 . Give the chief terms of the Law of Treason as amended 10 
in William's reign, and contrast it with any previous or later 
legislation on the same subject. 

2. Explain the position of the peerage in England. In 10 
this connection criticise the Peerage Bill of Simderland, and 
the large creation of peers in Anne's reign, and by William 
Pitt. 

3. What important issue was raised by the appointment 10 
of William Pitt as leader of the ministry on the overthrow 

of the Coalition Ministry ? Clearly bring out the relations 
involved. 

4. State what important questions were brought to the 10 
front in the trials of Wilkes and Woodfall, and show how 
they were settled. 

5 Show the interest attaching to the letters of Junius 10 
both from a constitutional and a literary point of view. 

6. What was the position of literary men in the reign of 15 
Queen Anne? Contrast it with their position now, and ac- 
count for any aiTerence you discover. Why is Anne's reign 
called the Augustan age of English literature ? 

7. Explain the reformation of the calendar in 1752, and 10 
give some account of the life and writings of Lord Chester- 
field. 



SECOKD EXAM. FOR THE DEGBBE OP B.A., 1883-84 Cx]ix 

8. Trace the history of the efforts to secure religions 15 
liberty for the Non-conformists and Roman Catholics, and 
atate their tiual result, with dates. 

9. Examine the circumstances of the trials of Warren 10 
Hastings and Queen Caroline. 



Tuesday, ISth November. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

Group C. (Logic and Moral Philosophy. ) 

LOGIC— Paper I. 

The Rev. Buchanan Blake, M.A., B.D. ; 
Abaji Vishxc Kathavate, B.A. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Why is Logic so called ? State and criticise some of 10 
the definitions of Logic. 

2. Name and describe all the processes the mind goes 12 
through before a proposition is formed. 

3. State and explain the various divisions of terms, giving 12 
examples. 

4. What theories regarding the import of propositions 12 
are noticed by Mill ? What is his own ? 

5. What is understood by modem logicians by the terms 10 
genus and species ? How does Mill justify the distinction 
made by the Schoolmen between these two and other classes ? 

6. Li what sense does every syllogism involve a petitio 10 
principii ? How is the objection answered by Whateley and 
how by Mill ? 

7. What does Mill say against Mr. Spencer's and 14 
Dr. Whewell's theories respecting axioms ? 

8. Examine the following arguments : — 20 

(a) Those that sympathise with you vnll counsel you in 
the same way as your own mind does ; otherwise they are 
no sympathisers ; those who have no sympathy with you 
will never be able to realise your thoughts and feelings, and 
will consequently throw cold water on all your plans. So 
do what you think best and mar not your plans by coqi 
sultation. 

« 1030—13 ex* 



within tbemseUe^s ana ^^^^_^ 

the consent of others. V ^prtainly, if a «^*" 

S^ rii'S- U.S own. ^^ „,„ ,,, l..t 

,„ He W.0 i. ™o»t .™ry ;* S W. eat. most. 
ia most hungry ; thereioi 

TUESB^V, 13TH I^OVKMBKK. 
[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

LOGIC-PAPKB 11. 

f to the ric^ht indicate full xnarkB.1 
tThe figures to the r ^^^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^ ^^^^^ 

1. State the objections^Jnch U ^. ^^ ^^^^^^^^^^ , 
"^Tl7::!l:naillustrateI.pe.ectInauction. 
'• ""' I illustrate the method of Kesidues. 

4 What is a hypothesis . Js 
legitimate hypothesis. peductive me 

5. What are the three stags of ^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 

fi A philosopher went into a tern ,^^^^^^ ^^ ^^^^ ^^ 

*^ it fully- ., n-^^t, are in this world •. 

^' ^ 'seeing that ^^-^-^1^ 1- theory of K'ate . ,, 
§^ in different ways, ni^u^^^t^ P ^^ ^^.^^^_ 

% Expose the ^^^^^^^l^^^^,^ ^he difference betw 

« Explain anu • 

,,atio»t and exp^mneHi. 



SECOND EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF RA,, 1883-84. cH 
Wednksday, 14th Novembbk, 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

Group C. (Logic and Moral Philosophy.) 

MORAL PHILOSOPHY— Papeb I. 

The Rev. Buchanan Blakk, M.A., B.D. ; 
Abaji Vishnu Kathavatb, B.A. 

[The figures to the right indicate fuU marks.] 

1. \VTiat do you understand by Positive Morality and 10 
Positive Law ? Carefully distinguish the spheres of Ethics 
and Politics. 

2. " Man is always led by the strongest motive." 15 
Elxamine this statement, specially considering its relation 

to a true conception of Free WiU. 

3. (a) Indicate the grounds of necessity attaching to 15 
moral rules. What did Kant mean by the Categorical 
Imperative ? 

(6) " While moral distinctions are permanent and univer- 
sally binding, caste and class distinctions are of temporary 
and local value only." Consider the truth of this remark. 
' If true, give illustrations of its practical importance. 

4. Explain the difficulties which arise when "the great- 10 
*»t happiuess " is made the end of moral action. 

* ^ '^^^ ^^^ Hume's definition of virtue ? Is it adequate? 8 
made b ° t ^^® * more satisfactorj- definition. 

„ y one the chief supporters of Intuitionism. Give a 8 
. ■ . .. 3 unt of this system. 

how by Miite clearly what is meant by the morality of common 8 

7. What 

Dr. WheweUt do you understand by a moral sanction ? State 10 

8. Exami "sanctions whicb have been given, and consider 
/ \ fu i. ' particular as a sanction. 

the same way n accoimt of humility as a virtue. 8 

no sympathise iu vi .l- r 

wiU never be a^^ *^® obhgation of promises. % 

will consequen 
do what you 
sultation. 

S 1030—13 



clii SECOND EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OP B.A., 1883-84. 
Wednesday, 14th November. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

Group B. (Logic and Moral Philosophy. ) 
MORAL PHILOSOPHY— Paper II. 

The Rev, Buchanan Blake, M.A., B.D. ; 

Abaji Vishnu Kathavate, B.A. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Account for any differences that exist between ancient 12 
(or pre-Christian) and modem systems of moral philosophy. 

2. What light does the constitution of man's nature 12 
throw on the future, according to Butler ? 

3. Prove from analogy that the beginnings of a righteous 10 
administration may be found in nature. 

4. State Butler's position as to the origin of conscience, 15 
and contrast it with any other theory on the subject. 

5. What is the relation of conscience to man's passions or 15 
propensities ? Point out extreme views on this point. 

6. Rousseau said that the sole inborn passion in man is 12 
self-love, aud that this was good. Examine this statement. 

7. Give a true description of resignation, and distinguish 12 
it from indifference and fatalism. 

8. On what grounds has forgiveness of injuries been called 1 % 
in question as a moral obligation ? Criticise these grounds. 



Tuesday, 13th November. 

[10 A.M. to I P.M.] 

Group D. (Mathematics.) 

CONIC SECTIONS. 

J. T. Hathornthwaite, M.A. ; 

Fardunji Manchekji Dastor, M.A. ; The Rev. R. Scott, M.A.; 

Jamshedji Ardesir Dalal, M.A., LL.B. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks. ] 

1. Define a Conic Section. Enumerate and distinguish 8 
the Qonic sections. 



SECOND EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B.A., 1883-84. cliii 

Given the focus, directrix and eccentricity of a conic, 
determine any number of points on the curve. 

2. If from an external point a pair of tangents OQ, OQ' 6 
be drawn to a parabola, and the chord QQ' be joined, prove 
that the area of the figure boxmded by QQ' and the curve is 
two-thirds of the triangle QOQ'. 

3. The tangent at P meets the major axis of an ellipse 10 
produced in T, and PiVis the ordinate of the point F ; shew 
thatCr. CN^ CA\ 

Also if the normal meet the axis-major in G, prove that 

CT. CG = CS^. 

4. If the tangent at any point P of an ellipse meet a pair 13 
of conjugate diameters in T and t, and CD be conjugate to 
CP, prove that 

sp. s'P = ciy = PT. PL 

5. The tangent at any point P of an hyperbola meets the 13 
asymptotes in L&udil; shew that the area of the triangle 
LCI is equal to the rectangle contained by ^C and BC. 

If any two tangents be drawn to an hyperbola, prove that 
the lines joining the points where they intersect the asymp- 
totes will be parallel. 

6. Find the condition that the straight lines represented 6 
by the equation Ax^ + Bxy + Cy- = may be at right 
angles to each other. 

7. Define the radical axis of two circles and prove that it 10 
is at right angles to the line joining the centres of the circles. 
Shew that the ralical axis of a point and a circle always 
falls without the circle. 

8. Investigate the polar equation to a parabola. 12 

If a, 6 be the lengths of two tangents to a parabola at 
right angles to each other and I be the latus rectum, prove 
that 

6* ai ^ 

9. Find the equation to the normal at any point of an 8 
ellipse in terms of the tangent of the angle it makes with the 
major axis of the curve, and determine in terms of the same 
the length of that portion of it which is included between 
the curve and the major axis. 



cliv SECOND EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OP B.A., 1883-84. 

10. How do yon obtain the relations x ^ a cos <|), 14 
y = 6 sin in the ellipse ? What are the corresponding 
relations in the hyperbola? Find the geometrical angle 
which corresponds to (^ in the latter case. 

Hence prove that if from the foot of any ordinate of a 
hyperbola a tangent be drawn to the auxiliary circle, the 
tangent bears a constant ratio to the ordinate. 



Tuesday, 13th November. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

Group D. (Mathematics.) 

DIFFERENTIAL and INTEGRAL CALCULUS. 

J. T. Hathornthwaite, M.A. ; 

Fardtinji Mancherji Dastur, M.A.; The Rev. K. Scott, M.A. 

Jamshedji Ardesir Dalal, M.A., LL.B. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Investigate the limiting value of I 1 + — \ when x 6 

increased indefinitely. 

2. Find the differential coefficients of 11 

(1) tan— 1 X (from first principles) 

(2) __i^-^:^l^— 

(X + i)i {x + m 

and (3) shew that if (1 — x2)i + (1 — .V2)* = a (x — y\ then 
i^ = / I— ?/2 Y 
dx \1 — x-z/ ' 

3. Enunciate and prove Maclaurhi's Theorem. 6 
Expand e 8in~^ a: in a series proceeding by powers of x. 

4. Investigate the limiting value of a function which 13 
assumes the indeterminate form ^ ^^'^ complete the de- 
monstration when this limit is really zero or infinity. 



SECOND EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B.A., 1883-84. clv 

f (x) 
Shew that the limit of V ^ ' when x = ex, supposing 

/(x) to be then infinite, is the same as the limit oi/(x + 1) 

— f{x) ; and deduce the limit of if (x)| x when z = a, 
supposing/ (z) then = a or 0. 

5. Prove that (^ K ^^M ^ always a maximum or mini- 16 
mum wheny (x) is so ; but that if c be a maximum or mini- 
mum value of /(x), (c) is not a maximum or minimum 
value of (/) (x). 

6. Find the greatest possible area included by four 10 
straight Lines of given lengths. 

7. Explain the method of integration by substitution, 10 

Find the value of / x„_ - l \ dx. 

Jo **^ 1— x{l— X) 

8. It being required to integrate the fraction rJ^» "-^ 

determine the partial fractions corresponding to a pair of 

non-recurring imaginary roots of F (x) = 0. 

x2 
Hence decompose the fraction . and 

find its integral. 

9. Prove that 8 

J*^ 4> {x)dx = jI" I (t> {X) + (f> (2a — X) }dx. 
Evaluate 



dx. 



y»" X 81 
1 + C032 X 

10. Integrate 10 



(1) /* aecxdx; (2) f- _ ''^ 

»/ / {x + h) 



n/ox-' + bx + 



clvi SECOND EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OP B.A., 1883-84. 

Webnesday, 14th November. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

Group D. (Mathematics.) 

DYNAMICS. 

J. T. Hathornthwaite, M.A. ; 

Fardunji Mancherji Dastur, M.A. ; The Rev. R. Scott, M.A. ; 
Jamshedji Ardesir Dalal, M.A., LL.B. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Define velocity, acceleration. How is velocity mea- 12 
sured ? 

If the force of gravity be taken as the unit of force and 
a rate of 10 miles an hour as the unit of velocity, find the 
units of length and time. 

2. Find the line of quickest descent from a given straight 6 
line without a given circle to the circle. 

3. Investigate the equation s = ut + ^ft^ and explain it 8 
icording as / is positive or negative. 

A particle is projected vertically upwards with a velocity 
of 100 ft. per second ; find the time when it is at a height 
of 140 ft. above the point of projection, g being 32. 

4. Determine the position of the focus of the parabola 12 
described by a projectile. 

Bodies are projected from the same point in the same ver- 
tical plane so as to describe parabolas having a latus rectum 
of given length ; shew that the locus of the foci is an equal 
parabola with its vertex downwards and focus at the point 
of projection. 

5. If particles are thrown from the same point, at the same 6 
instant, with the same velocity, in different dii-ections, shew 
that they will at any future instant be all on the surface of 

a sphere. 

6. Explain carefully the formula F = Mf. 10 

A weight of 16 lbs. is placed on a plane which is made to 
ascend vertically with an acceleration of 12 ft. per second ; 
find the pressure on the plane, g being taken = 32. 

7. A body A impinges directly on another B ; determine S 
the velocities after impact, the elasticity being imperfect . 



ac 



SECOND BXAM. FOB THE DEGREE OP B.A., 1883-84. clvii 

Find the necessary and sufficient condition in order that 
the velocity of B after impact may be equal to the velocity 
of A before impact. 

8. A perfectly elastic ball is projected at an inclination 14 
a to a plane -which is inclined at an angle ^ to the horizon, 
and ascends it by bounds ; shew that in order that the ball 
may rise vertically at the ntt» boxmd we most have 

cot a cot ^ = 2n + 1. 

'J. Two bodies of weights W and W hang from the ex- 16 
tremities of a string passing over a smooth pulley ; determine 
the motion. 

If at the end of each second from the beginning of motion 
the greater weight W be suddenly diminished and W be 
suddenly increased so as not to experience any impulse by 
i^^ of thpir original difference ; shew that they will have no 
velocity at the end of n + 1 seconds. 

10. A body descends a smooth curve in a vertical plane ; S 
prove that the velocity acquired at any point is the same as 
if the body had fallen freely down the same vertical height. 



WkDXESDAT, 1-tTH XOVEMBKR. 
[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

Group D. (Mathematics.) 
HYDROSTATICS. 

J. T. Hathorsthwaitf., M.A.; 
Fabdo'JI Maschkbji Dastdk, M. a, ; The Rev. R, Scott, M. A. ; 
Jamshedji Akdesik Dalal, M.A., 1»L.B 

[The figures to the right indicate fuU marks.] 

1. Obtain the formula W = gpV and explain the con- 10 
vention with regard to the units implied in the equation. 

Find the unit of time, when 2 ft. is the unit of length, 
in order that the units of weight in W = gpV and W = sV 
may be equal. 

2. If two liquids that do not mix meet in a bent tube. It 
the heights of their upper surfaces above their common 
surface will be inversely proportional to their densities. 

Equal volumes of oil and alcohol (specific gravities '915 and 
•795 respectively) are poured into a circular tube so as to fill 

B 1030—14 ex 



Clviii SECOND EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OP B.A., 1883-84. 

half the circle ; shew that the common surface rests at a 
point whose angular distance from the lowest point is 

tan 57' 

3. A vertical cylindrical vessel of height k, closed at the 
base, is formed of staves held together by two strings, which 
serve as hoops, and is filled with fluid, the strings being at 
equal distances a from the top and the bottom of the vessel • 
compare their tensions. Find how much of the fluid must be 
withdrawn from the cylinder in order that the tension of the 
upper string may vanish. 

4. A vessel in the form of an open semi-cylinder, with its 
ends vertical, is filled with water ; find the resultant pressure 
on either of the portions into which it is divided by a vertical 
plane through the axis of the cylinder. Where is the 
centre of pressure ? 

5. Investigate the formula p = Jcp (1 +at). 

The same quantities of atmospheric air are contained in 
two hollow spheres, the internal radii being r, r' and the 
temperatures t, t' respectively ; compare the whole pressures 
on the surfaces. 

6. State the conditions of equilibrium of a floating body. 
What do you understand by stable and unstable equilibrium ? 

A body immersed in a fluid is balanced by a weight P to 
which it is attached by a string passing over a fixed pulley ; 
and, when half immersed, is balanced in the same manner 
by a weight 2P. Compare the densities of the body and 
fluid and determine the nature of equilibrium in each case. 

7. Describe the condenser and the gattge of a condenser. 
What limit is there to the density of the air in the receiver, 
if the distances of the highest and lowest ranges of the piston 
from the bottom of the cylinder be a and a' ? 

8. Shew how the specific gravity of a solid can be found 
by means of the Hydrostatic Balance. 

9. Find the resultant vertical pressure of a rotating liquid 
on any surface. 

A hemispherical bowl, just filled with liquid, is inverted 
on a smooth horizontal table, and rotates uniformly about 
its vertical axis ; find what its weight may be, in order that 
none of the liquid may escape. 

10. How is tension measured ? A spherical vessel contains 
fluid ; find the relation between the pressure and tension at 
any point. 



SECOND EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OP B.A., 1883-84. clix 

Tuesday, 13th November. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

Group E. (Natural Science.) 

ELEMENTARY.PHYSICS— Papeb I. 

The R«v. F. Dreckmaxx, S.J. ; 
Kavasji Dadabhai Naegam\'ala, M.A., F.C.S., F.LC. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Account for the fact that a person after descending 8 
the shaft of a coal-pit in the cage, when being brought to 
rest near the bottom, feels as if he were being lifted up 
again. 

A body is projected vertically with 30 m. velocity ; a 
second later another body with 40 m. velocity is similarly 
projected from the same point. When wiU the two meet ? 

2. Describe the Aneroid barometer and Bourdon's mano- 12 
meter. 

In an imperfectly filled barometer tube 80 cm. in length, 
the mercury stands at 74 cm. when in a similar weU-filled 
tube the height is 76 cm. Determine the height of the 
standard barometer when the mercury is at 70 cm. in th^ 
imperfect one. 

3. A syphon or U tube with the shorter leg of capillary 12 
bore is gradually fiUed with water by the other leg. Give 
three characteristic sketches indicating the forms the menis- 
cus in the narrow tube will successively assume and the 
respective heights of the water in the other. State in 
general terms how you account for the phenomena observed. 

4. Describe the mercurial pendulum. If the rod be of 11 
iron (coefficient expansion = -000012) and 40 inches in length 
atO^ C, what must be the height of the mercury at .32-4° C? 

5. When water is fonned from ice by pressure, the 9 
water formed is below 0° C. Give reasons for it and explain 
the apparent viscosity of ice and the motion of glaciers. 

6. What quantity of carbon will be necessary to boil 9 
away at ordinary pressure 15 kilogrammes of ice at —10' C? 
Specific heat of ice =0" 5. 



clx SECOND EXAM. FOB THE DEGREE OF B.A., 1883-84. 

7. Criticise the statement that " a gas is a non-saturated 
vapour." 

8. Compare the heat spectra produced by a system of 
rock-salt prisms and lenses with solar and electric light 
respectively. State the probable cause of difference and 
instance some observations which support your statement. 



Tuesday, 13th November. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

Group E. (Natural Science.) 

ELEMENTARY PHYSICS— Paper II. 

The Rev. F. Dreckmann, S. J. ; 

Kavasji Dadabhai Naegamvai^a, M.A., F.C.S., F.I.C. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. If the dipping needle move in a plane perpendicular to ( 
the meridian, show that it will remain vertical. How will 
you observe the dip accurately, making allowance for the 
several sources of error ? 

2. What is specific inductive capacity? Show how it i 
may be determined experimentally. 

3. A Leyden jar is charged and placed on the top of a li 
gold-leaf electroscope. A small insulated conductor is brought 
near the knob of the jar and then removed. Describe and 
explain all the indications of the electroscope (a) when the 
small conductor is neutral, (6) when it is positive, (c) when it 

is negative. 

4. Describe the sine-galvanometer and show that the 1( 
strength of the current is proportional to the sine of the angle 

of deflection. How would you use a tangent-galvanometer 
as a sine-galvanometer ? 

5. Describe an arrangement in which a fixed circular 1 
current produces a continual rotation in a moveable current, 
and explain the action of the two currents on each other. 

6. Describe Faucault's method of determining the velocity 1( 
of light in water, and show fully why the results arrived at 
are incompatible with the corpuscular theory. 

7. State the laws of reflection of light and show how they ( 
may be deduced from the undulatory theory. 



SBCOSD EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF RA., 1883-84. clli 

8. Describe Hadley's sextant and show how the angular 10 
flistance between two objects may be determined by it. 

9. From the formula _ + _ =i determine the nature 11 

P P' f . . :, , 

(whether real or virtual), position and relative magnitude of 
the image of an object which approaches a biconvex lens from 
an infinite distance. 



Wednesday, 14th Novejcber. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

Group E. (Natural Science, ) 
INORGANIC CHEMISTRY— Papeb I. 

I. B. Lyox, M.R.C.S., F.C.S., F.I.C. ; 
Kaikhosru Rastamji Vikaji, L.M., M.D. . 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Calculate the specific gravity of arsenic vapour com- 12 
pared with air. 

2. How does the element hydrogen resemble the metals 10 
in its chemical relations ? 

3. What is the action of sulphuric acid on potasaic chlo- S 
rate? 

4. What is the action of chlorine gas on hot and cold 12 
solutions of potassic hydrate ? Indicate the reaction in each 
case by symbols. 

5. State the chief chemical and physical properties of the 12 
Tarious allotropic modifications of sulphur. 

6. Compare the chemical qualities of the elements oxygen 10 
and sulphur, and illustrate by examples the analogy existing 
between them. 

7. \Miat are amides, amic acids, and ammonium amates ? 12 

8. Describe shortly the compounds of phosphorus and 12 
hydrogen. 

9. What are the principal forms in which silica occurs in 12 
nature ? How can a solution of silica be obtained ? 

B 1030—14 ex* 



clxii SECOND EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OP B.A., 1883-84. 
WEDNKSDi^Y, 14:TH NOVEMBER. 

[2 p.m. to5p M.] 

Group E. ( Natural Science. ) 
INORGANIC CHEMISTRY— Paper II. 

I. B. Lyon, M.R.C.S., F.C.S., F I.C. ; 
Kaikhosbu Rastamji Vikaji, L.M., M.D. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. One gramme of rock-salt yields 1"153 grammes of 10 
sodium sulphate ; what is the percentage of sodium chloride 
present in it ? 

2. What are the following, how are they prepared, and 15 
for what purposes are they employed : — {a) Plaster of Paris ; 

{h) superphosphate of lime ; (c) sodium thiosulphate ? 

3. How is alum manufactured ? What are its chief uses ? 12 

4. How is potassium iodide prepared ? What are itsprin- 10 
cipal properties ? 

5. In what form is iron contained in chalybeate waters ? 8 
What is likely to occur when chalybeate waters flow over 
exposed surfaces ? 

6. How is bismuth trichloride prepared ? What is the 8 
action of water on it ? 

7. What are galvanized iron, Bessemer steel, and Muntz's 10 
metal t 

8. How are the following oxides prepared : — Cuprous 12 
oxide, mercuric oxide, and barium monoxide ? 

9. What is the action of, respectively, nitric and sul- 13 
phuric acids on the following metals :— (a) Mercury, (6) lead, 

c) antimony ? 



SECOND EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B.A., 1883-84. clxi 

TXTESDAY, 13th NoVEMBRR. 
[10 A.M, TO 1 P.M.] 

Group E. (Natural Science.} 

VEGETABLE ANATOMY, PHYSIOLOGY axd 
SYSTEMATIC BOTAlvi^— Papee L 

Sakharam Arjitn' Ratct, L.M. ; 
D. MacDoxald, M.D., B.Sc, CM. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Mention the different forms of stem, giving examples 15 
of the plants in which they are seen. Define an herb, a 
bush, an undershrub, and a shrub, and give examples of 
each. 

2. What is meant by secondary roots ? Describe the 15 
different forms of these and give examples of plants in which 
they are found. 

3. Describe the placentation, as seen on section, of the 15 
fruit called pepo, and give the nature of the seeds, their coats, 
contents, and the position of the embryo. 

4. Give briefly the structure of the leaf of an exogenous 20 
plant. Describe the specimen on the table. 

5. ^^^lat is meant by a perfect flower ? Give all the 15 
parts of such a flower, the arrangement of the carpels in a 
3yncarjx)us ovary, and explain the formation of free central 
placentation. 

6. Give the essential characters of the Natural Orders 20 
Cucurbitacese, Apocynaceae, and Amaryllidacese, with the 
names of four plants from each order. 



clxiv SECOND EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OP B.A., 1883-84. 
Tuesday, 13th November. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

Group E. (Natural Science,) 

VEGETABLE ANATOMY, PHYSIOLOGY and 
SYSTEMATIC BOTANY— Paper II. 

Sakharam Arjun Ravut, L.M. ; 
D. MacDonald, M.D., B.Sc, CM. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. In how many different ways do cells originate ? Give 20 
an idea of the rapidity of cell production, illustrating it by 
some familiar examples, and mention the circumstances to 
which this rapid growth is due. 

2. Explain the manner in which the absorption and the 15 
transmission of fluids take place in the economy of a plant, 
and state the difference which is observable in this respect 

in cellular and in vascular plants. 

3. Give the functions which hairs perform in the economy 10 
of plants, and mention plants in the hairs of which circulating 
currents are seen. 

4. What are the essential functions of the leaves of 20 
plants ? Explain the relations which these functions are ob- 
served to bear towards the condition of the atmosphere, the 
fertility of the soil, and the health of the inhabitants. 

5. What is the nature of the fluid transpired by plants (not 15 
excreted) ? Mention some of the familiar instances in which 
large quantities of watery excretions are known to occur. 

6. Explain the principle and scope of the Natural System 20 
of Classification ; and lay down briefly the instructions to be 
observed in preparing specimens of plants for an Herbarium. 



SECOND EXAM. FOR THB DEGREE OF B.A., 1883-84. clxv 

Wednesday, 14th November, 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

Group E (Natural Science). 

COMPARATIVE ANATO^IY axd PHYSIOLOGY— Papeb I. 

G. Watees, L.RC.S., L.R.C.P.E. ; 
A. Atmaram, M.B., B.Sc. (Lend.) 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Describe the mechanism by which the act of degluti- 15 
tion is accomplished. 

2. Describe the mode of secretion of bile, and state fuUy 25 
the pari; played by it in the process of digestion. 

3. Give the structure of the testicle and the character 25 
and mode of secretion of the spermatic fluid. 

4. State the influence of the nervous system on respira- 25 
tion, and the effects of respiratory movements on the 
arterial tension. 

5. Describe and name specimens Nos. 1, 2 and 3 under 10 
the microscope. 



Wednesday, 14th Novesiber. 
[2 P.M. to 5 P.M.] 

Group S (Natural Science). 

COMPARATIVE ANATOMY a>T) PHYSIOLOGY— Paper II. 

G- Waters, L.R.C.S., L.R.C.P.E. ; 
A. Atmaram, M.B., B.Sc. (Lond.) 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Distingmsh between "natural" and "artificial" 20 
classification. Give the principal sub-divisions of the ani- 
mal kingdom with their characteristics. 

2. Give a fidl account of the minute structure and life- 20 
history of a sponge. 

3. Describe the structure of any insect you please. 20 
What do you understand by " metamorphoses of insects " ': 



clxvi SECOND EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B.A., 1883-84. 

4. Give a detailed account of the reproductive organs of 20 
the frog. 

5. Contrast the heart and the vascular system of a bird, 20 
a lizard, and a fish. In what essential characters does the 
blood differ in these thi'ee animals ? 



[For the B.A, Examination (Old System), Choice I and 11 only.] 
Wedxesbay, 7th November. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

EUCLID AND GEOMETRICAL CONIC SECTIONS. 

J. T. Hathornthwaite, M.A. ; 
Fardunji Mancherji Dastur, M.A. ; The Rev. R. Scott, 'M.A. ; 
Jamshedji Ardesir Dalal, M.A., LL.B. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Erect a straight line at right angles to a given plane 10 
from a given point in the plane. 

On an equilateral triangle as base describe a regular tetra- 
hedron. 

2. If a solid angle be contained by three plane angles, 6 
any two of them are together greater than the third. 

S. Define conic, eccentricity, tangent, normal. • 10 

Sliew that the tangent to a conic measured from the point 
of contact to the directrix subtends a right angle at the focus. 

4. The distance of any point inside the parabola from the 4 
focus is less than its distance from the directrix ; and the 
distance of any point outside the parabola from the focus is 
greater than its distance from the directrix. 

5. If Q F be an ordinate to the diameter PVofa. parabola 12 
and QD be drawn at right angles to P V, prove that 

QP = ASP. PV 

QD'^^ A AS. PV. 

6. Shew that the feet of the perpendiculars from the foci 20 
of an ellipse on any tangent lie on the circumference of a 
circle of which the diameter is the major axis of the ellipse. 



SECOND EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B.A., 1883-84. clxvii 

Prove that the perimeter of the quadrilateral formed by 
the tangent, the perpendiculars and the major axis will be 
the greatest possible when the focal distances of the point of 
contact are at right angles to each other. 

7. If QV he any ordinate to the diameter PCP' of an S 
ellipse and CD be conjugate to CP ; then 

Q r-' : PV.P'V :: CD- : CP'. 

8. Compare the area of an ellipse with the area of its 8 
auxiliary circle and shew that it is equal to tt x product of 
semi-axes. 

9. Tangents to an hyperbola subtend equal or supple- 12 
mentary angles at either focus according as they are drawn 

to the same branch or opposite branches. 

10. Shew that the asymptotes of a rectangular hyperbola 10 
bisect the angles between a pair of conjugate diameters. 



[tor the Examiiuxtion for the Degree of B.A. (Old System) only.l 
Thubsday, 15th November. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

ANALYTICAL GEOMETRY. 

J. T. HATHORyTHWAITE, M.A. ; 

Fardunji Mancherji Dastur, M.A. ; The Rev. R. Scott, M.A. ; 
Jamshedji Ardesir Dalal, M.A., LL.B. 

[The figiires to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Investigate the polar equation to a straight line. 10 
AB, BC are two straight lines at right angles to each 

other ; A is fixed and B moves along a given straight line 
and the ratio of AB to BC is constant : determine the locus 
of C. 

2. Prove that the two tangents drawn from an external 10 
point (A, A-) to a circle are represented by the equation 

(K- + P — C^) (X2 -f y2 _ c2) ^ Qiy. + l^y _ c2)I 

where c is the radius of the circle. 

3. The axis of a parabola is the axis of x, and the 10 
curve passes through a given point (o, h) ; prove that its 



Clxviii SECOND EXAM. FOE THE DEGREE OF B.A., 1883-84. 

equation is of the form y^ = k'(l + -7 )• Interpret the 
case in which ^ = a. 

4. Investigate the equation to the normal of a parabola 5 
in terms of the tangent of the angle made by this line with 
the axis, and shew that from any point there cannot be 
drawn more than three normals. 

5. Investigate the equation to an ellipse referred to a 12 
pair of conjugate diameters as axes. 

If any variable tangent to an ellipse meet two fixed paral- 
lel tangents, prove that it will intercept portions on them 
whose rectangle is equal to the square of the semi-diameter 
parallel to them. 

6. Find the length of a line drawn from a point in a 11 
given direction to meet an ellipse and hence find the equation 

to the locus of the middle points of all chords of an ellipse 
which have the same length 2c. 

7. Find the equation to the normal at any point of an 4 
ellipse and shew that it bisects the angle between the focal 
distances of the point. 

8. Investigate the equation to a tangent to an hyperbola 8 
at any point, referred to asymptotes as axes, and hence shew 
that the area of the triangle formed by the tangent and the 
asymptotes is constant. 

9. If tangents be drawn to an hyperbola from points in a 10 
given straight line, prove that the chords of contact pass 
through a fixed point. 

If the chord of contact pass through the focus, determine 
the position of the given straight line. 

10. Investigate the polar equation to the tangent at a 20 
point of the conic — = 1 + e cos 6, 

A series of conies is described with a common latus rectum ; 
prove that the locus of points upon them at which the per- 
pendicular from the focus on the tangent is equal to the 
latus rectum is given by the equation r coa 26 + 1 = 0, 



FIRST EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OP B.SC, 1883-84. clxix 



V. 



FTRST EXAMINATION FOR THE DEGREE 
OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE. 



EXAMINERS. 

J. T. Hathornthwaite, M.A 

Fardunji Manc'herji Dastue, M.A. 

The Rev. R. Scott, M.A 

Jamshedji Ardesir Dalal, M.A., LL.B... 

I. B, Lyon-, M.R.C.S., F.C.S., F.I.C. 
Kaikhosru Rastamji Vikaji, L.M., M.D 

The Rev. F. Dreckmaxn, S.J 

Kavasji Dadabhai Naegamvala, ma. 
F.C.S., F.I.C 

Sakharam Aejux Ravft, L.M 

D. MacDonald, M.D., B.Sc. CM 

A. Atmaram, B.M., B.Sc. (Lond.). 



> In Mathematics. 



la Inorganic Che- 
mistry. 

In Experimental 
Physics. 



In Biology. 



B 1030—15 ar 



clxx FIRST EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B.SC, 1883-84. 

Wednesday, 7th November. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

TRIGONOMETRY. 

J. T. Hathornthwaite, M.A. ; 

Fardunji Mancherji Dastur, M.A.; The Rev. R. Scott, M. A.; 

Jamshedji Ardesir Dalal, M.A., LL.B. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

[The same as set for the First B.A. Examination, Seepage ciii] 

Wednesday, 7th November. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

STATICS. 

J. T. Hathornthwaite, M.A. ; 

Fardcnji Mancherji Dastur, M.A. ; The Rev. R, Scott, M. A.; 

.Jamhsedji Ardesir I)alal, M.A., LL.B. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

[The same a* set for the First B.A. Examination. See page cv.] 

Monday, 5th November. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

INORGANIC chemistry-Paper i. 

I. B. Lyon, M.R.C.S., F.C.S., F.LC. ; 
Kaikhosru Rastamji Vikaji, L.M., M.D. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. What reasons can you assign for representing the I "J 
composition of nitrogen dioxide gas by the formula NO 
instead of by the formula N'-'O- ? 

2. What is meant by the " critical point " or tempera- 12 
ture in the liquefaction of a gas? What is the critical 
point for carbon dioxide gas when under process of lique- 
faction ? 



FIRST EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OP B.SC., 1883-84. cLxxi 

3. What is understood by the term " compound radi- 12 
cal " ? Under what conditions can a group of atoms be so 
designated ? Give examples of compound radicals of differ- 
ent quautivalence. 

4. The specific heat of a metal was found to be 0*057 ; ' 12 

its chloride was found to contain 37 "8 parts by weight of 
the metal to 35"46 parts by weight of chlorine : what con- 
clusions would you draw from this as to the atomic 
weight of the me^ in question ? 

5. What is the composition of the crystals which form 8 
in the leaden chambers during the manufacture of sulphuric 
acid ? ^Vhat is the action of water on them ? 

6. What is the action of (1) free iodine on solution of 10 
sulphurous acid, and (2) free bromine on solution of potassic 
hydrate? 

7. \NTiat are the principal points in which the two ele- 12 
ments phosphorus and nitrogen resemble one another ? 

8. What is the action of heat on — 12 

(1) Ck)mmon phosphate of soda, 

(2) Sodium dihydrogen orthophosphate, 

(3) Cupric nitrate ? 

9. How are the insoluble aiUcatea decomposed for 10 

analysis ? 



Monday, 5th November. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

mORGANIC CHEMISTRY— Paper II. 

I. B. Ltox, M.R.C.S., F.C.S., F.I.C. ; 
Kaikhosru Rastamji Vikaji, L.M., M.D. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Describe and compare the properties of the nitrates 12 
of potassium, sodium and ammonium. 

2. Give a short description of the principal forms in which 12 
calcic carbonate occurs in nature. 

3. State how manganous and manganic salts may be 10 
obtained from manganese dioxide. 



clxxii FIRST EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B.SC, 1883-84. 

4. What steps would be necessary in order to obtain 12 
metallic aluminum from common alum ? 

5. Contrast shortly the chemical relations of the metals 12 
iron, cobalt, and nickel. 

6. Enumerate and describe the oxides of lead. 10 

7. Describe Marsh's process for the detection of arsenic. 10 

8. What are the following and how are they obtained : — 12 
(1) Turpeth mineral ; (2) Powder of Algaroth ; (3) Fuming 
liquor of Libavius ? 

9. Give a short description of the physical properties of 10 
the metal bismuth? What classes of compounds does this 
metal form ? 



Tuesday, 6th November. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

EXPERIMENTAL PHYSICS— Paper I. 

The Rev. F. Dreckmann, S. J. ; 
Kavasji Dadabhai Naegamvala, M.A,, F.C.S., F.I.C. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks. ] 

1. Name and define the C. G. S. units of force and work. 
Give the value of g in the same scale of measurements. 

2. An iron ball weighing 12 kilogrammes floats in mer- 
cury covered with water. Find the weights of the parts 
in the two fluids. (Specific gravity of Hg = 13'6; of 
Fe = 7-5.) 

3. Write short notes on the diffusion, effusion, occlusion 
and transpiration of gases. 

4. Show mathematically that the work done by a ball 
rolling down the side of an inclined plane is equal to tliat 
generated by one falling parallel to the height. 

5. What effect is produced on the perception of sound by 
(a) favourable and unfavourable winds, and (h) by tempera- 
ture differences in horizontal layers of the atmosphere ? 

6. Prove the laws governing the longitudinal vibrations 
of rods. Define fumlamentals and overtones. What is the 



FIRST EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B.SC, 1883-84. clxxiii 

series of harmonics which can be obtained respectively from 
a tnbe stopped at both ends and at one end, and also from 
one open at both ends ? 

7. How is the apparent expansion of a liquid determined 9 
by the " weight thermometer " ? Why is it so caUed ? 

8. Obtain an expression to determine the rise in tempera- 12 
ture produced in a body by the sudden arrest of its motion. 

With what velocity must a mass of iron strike a hard 
non-conducting substance to raise its temperature through 
2" C. ? (Specific heat of Fe = O'll.) 

9. Give Dalton's laws of mixture of gases and vapours 1 1 
and illustrate them. 



Tuesday, 6th November. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

EXPERIMENTAL PHYSICS— Paper II. 

The Rev. F. Dreckma>-x, S.J. ; 
Kavasjt Dadabhai Najsgamvala, M.A., F.C.S., F.I.C. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Show, by diagrams if possible, the errors in the com- 14 
pass needle produced by large masses of iron on board a ship 

in its various positions, and indicate a method of correcting 
them. 

2. A stick of sealing wax rubbed with silk is held over 16 
a gold-leaf electroscope and the cap touched for a moment ; 
the stick is then brought nearer and afterwards removed 
farther away ; a large plate of metal, first insulated then un- 
insulated, is held between the stick and the electroscope, and 
finally a plate of ebonite is substituted for the metal plate. 
State and explain the indications of the leaves in every case. 

3. Explain what is meant by electrostatic induction and 12 
polarisation of the dielectric. Show how to prove experi- 
mentally that the quantity of electricity induced by a charged 
body is equal to the quantity on the inducing body. 

4. Describe accurately the electrolytic process when a 15 
current is passed through dilute sulphuric acid. How much 
copper will be deposited from a solution of sulphate of copper 

in one cell by a current whilst 25 "92 grains of silver are depo- 
sited by the same current in another cell from a solution of 
silver in cyanide of potassium ? 

B 1030- 15 ex* 



Clxxiv FIRST EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B.SC, 1883-84. 

5. Investigate the effect on the current of a battery of five 9 
cells with an external resistance equal to that of one cell (a) 
when half the liquid of one of the cells is removed, (b) when 

for the zinc of one cell another metal is substituted such 
that this cell by itself would produce a current only half that 
of one of the other cells. 

6. Find at what angle two mirrors A and B must be in- 10 
clined so that a ray of light falling on A in a direction 
parallel to B may after two reflections be parallel to A. 

7. Show how to find the absolute refractive index of a 12 
gas. 

8. A ray of white light is passed through two prisms 12 
placed at right angles to each other Describe the spectrum 
produced and show the conclusions which may be drawn 
from the experiment. 

Thursday, 8th November. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

BIOLOGY— Paper I. 

Sakharam Aejun Ravut, L.M, ; 

D, MacDonald, M.D., B.Sc, CM. ; 

A. Atmaram, M.B., B.Sc. (Lond.) 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks. ] 

1. " Putrefaction is a concomitant, not of death, but of 10 
life." Explain the bearing of this passage, and give the life 
history of the organisms that play an important part in putre- 
faction ordinarily so called. 

2. Articles of leather in a moist atmosphere are often 13 
found covered with a green crust. Describe the nature of 
the organisms of which this crust is composed. Give their 
life history, and mention the position which they occupy in 
the vegetable kingdom. 

3. Mention some of the forms of plant life in the cells of 10 
which protoplasmic movements are easily seen, and give a 
description of the latter. 

4. A solution of a saccharine substance when exposed to IS 
ordinary atmosphere is found to undergo a change. Describe 
the nature of this change, and give the life history and mi- 
croscopic appearance of the organisms which attend it, and 
their position in the organic world, stating your reasons. 



FIRST EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B.SC, 1883-84:. clxXV 

5. Describe the plant on the table morphologically, and 25 
the structures which may be discovered in a transverse and 

in a longitudinal section of the root stock. Trace the deve-' 
lopment of the plant from the organ known as the " spore.' 

6. Name the organs of vegetation and those of reproduc- 25 
tion in a dicotyledonous plant (Vicia) and the tissues which 
compose its body. Give a general description of the physio- 
logical processes which go on in a plant of this kind, alluding 

to the circumstance of its combining in itself the two lower 
types of the Fungus and Alga. State what is understood by 
the tei-m "circulation" in vegetables, and explain the 
mechanism by which this process is efifected. 

Thttrsdav, 8th November. 

[2 P,M. TO 5 P.M.] 

BIOLOGY— Paper II. 

Sakharau Arjcx Ravut, L. M. ; 

D. MacDoxald, M.D., B.Sc.,C.M. ; 

A. Atmaram, M.B., B.So, (Ixjnd.) 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Give a full account of the Amceba, including its re- 13 
production. On what grounds is ic placed in the animal 
kingdom ? 

2. Explain the terms • contractile vesicle,' 'peristome,' 20 
* ectoderm,' * pseudopodium,' ' nematocyst, ' 'epimeron,' 

' branchiostegite,' ' mesentery,' ' cloaca,' and ' urostyle,' 
and illustrate them by examples. 

3. Give an account of the life history of Hydra viridis. 20 
What is its green colour due to, and where is it situated ? 

On what structural grounds would you place i: in a higher 
scale of animal life than the Amceba ? 

4. Describe the Heart and the process of circulation in a 20 
Cray -fish or a Lobster, What is the character of the fluid 
circulated ? 

5. Give an account of the minute structure of two of the 10 
following animal tissues :— (o) Ciliatary epithelium ; (6) 
Connective tissue ; (c) Cartilage ; (d) Bone ; (e) White nen'e 
fibres. 

6. What is the effect of respiration on the blood ? How 1 3 
would you demonstrate it by an experiment ? In w hat M-ays 
does a frog carry on the function of respiration ? 

• [Xote. — Give diagrams where vou can,] 



clxxvi SECOND EXAM. POH THE DEGREE OF B.SC, 1883-84. 



VI. 



SECOND EXAMINATION FOR THE DEGREE 
OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE. 



EXAMINERS. 

I. B. Lyox, M.R.C.S., F.C.S., F.I.C. 
Kaikhosru Kastamji Vikaji, L.M., M.D. 

Sakharam Arjun Ravitt, L.M 

D. MacDonald, M.D., B.Sc, CM 

A. Atmaraai, B.M., B.Sc. (Lond.) 

Ct. Waters, L.R.C.S., L.R.C.P.E 



In Chemistry. 

In Botany, 

In Zoology. 

In Animal 
siology. 



Phy 



SECOND EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B.SC. 1883-84. clxxvii 

Tuesday, 13th November. 
[10 a.m. to 1 P.M.] 

CHEMISTRY— Paper I. 

I. B. Lyox, M.R.C.S., F.C.S,, F.I.C. ; 
Kaikhosku Rastamji Vikaji, L.M., M.D. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. What is hydroxylamine? Give a method of preparing 10 
it and discuss its composition. 

2. How may the molecular composition of sulphuretted 10 
hydrogen gas be determined ? 

3. Compare the chemical qualities of the elements 13 
carbon and silicon, and illustrate by examples the analogy 
existing between them. 

4. Give a short account of Wanklyn and Chapman's process 8 
for the estimation of the amount of organic impurity in 
potable waters. 

5. How is potassium dichromate manufactured? How 12 
may chrome alum be obtained from it ? 

6. How may bleaching powder be valued ? 10 

7. Explain the use in dyeing of the following salts : — 7 
Manganese sulphate, alum, lead acetate. 

8. \Miat is the chemical composition of the following 10 
minerals ; — Camallite, cryolite, greenockite, and malachite ? 

9. State shortly what you know about the cuprous com- 10 
pounds. 

10. Give a short account of the properties and txses of 10 
metallic bismuth. 



Tpesday, 13th Xovkmbkk. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

CHEMISTRY— Paper U. 

1. B. Ltox, M.R.C.S., F.C.S., F.I.C. ; 
Kaikhosbu Rastamji Vikaji, L.M., M.D. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Indicate shortly how the quantity of nitrogen present 10 
in organic compounds is estimated. 



clxxviii SECOND exam, for the degree of b.sc, 1883-84. 

2. Name the hydrocarbons capable of being prepared 15 
synthetically. State how each is obtained, and indicate how 
from them more complex organic substances may be 
procured. 

.3. What substances are capable of being formed by the 15 
action of chlorine on eth ylic alcohol ? Give formulae showing 
the chemical change which takes place in each case. 

4. What is alizarin ? How is it obtained ? 10 

5. (iive a short description of the more important acids 15 
derivable from erythrite and its homologues. 

6. State what you know respecting the substances 10 
polymeric with cyanic acid. 

7. State the composition and explain the derivation of 25 
the following : — 

(1) Aniline. 

(2) Amygdaline. 

(3) Pyrogallic acid. 

(4) Glycocyamine. 



Monday, 12th November. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

botany-Paper i. 

Sakharam Arjun Ravut, L.M.; 

D. MacDonald, M.D., B.Sc., CM. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Describe a cell, and trace its development from the 
young to the "^mature state, mentioning and describing the 
contents as they appear. 

2. Mention the different forms of cell which constitute 
the fibro-vascular system of plants, and give examples of 
the plants and their parts in which these forms are found. 

3. Describe the different layers of which the cortical 
system in exogens is composed ; mark the position of the 
cambium, and give its microscopic structure. 

4. In what respects does a leaf -bud differ from a flower- 
bud ? Give the different kinds of leaf-bud, with examples 
of the plants in which they are seen. 



SECOND EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B.SC., 1833-84. clxxix 

5. Define the following terms and give examples : — Rhi- 15 
zoma, Torus, Tetradynamous, Rostellum, t^arcocarp, Scle- 
renchyma, Siliqua, Sucker, Tegmen, Versatile. 

6. Give the essential characters of the Leguminosa and 15 
Myrtaceae, -with six plants, from each order, ordinarily 
found in India. 



Monday, 12th Novembkk. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

botany-Paper ii. 

Sakharam Arjun Ravut, L.M. ; 

D. MacDonald, M.D., B.Sc, CM. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. What is meant by exhalation in plants ? Describe the 20 
various purposes which this process subserves in the eco- 
nomy of plant life and of nature. 

2. What is meant by cross fertilization in plants ? 15 
Illustrate this by the phenomena of dimorphism. 

3. How is the origin of species explained by Darwin ? 20 
Define what is meant by "variety" in the language of 
Botany. 

4. What important functions are carried on in the eco- 10 
nomy of plants by their green parts, and in what essential 
respect do these parts differ in their operation from the 
colourless ones ? 

5. What functions does the epidermal tissue perform in 15 
a plant, and how do the atomata act according to the moist 

or dry state of the surrounding atmosphere ? 

6. What are the functions of the roots ? In which of 20 
their parts do active operations go on, and in what manner 
are they enabled to reach fresh stores of nutriment ? 

TcESDAY, 13th November. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

ZOOLOGY— Paper I. 

A. Atmaram, M.B., B.Sc. (Lond.) 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

[N.B, — Fh-e only of the questions are to be attempted. 
Give diagrams where you can.] 

1. On what grounds are the vegetable and animal king- 20 



clxXX SECOND EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B.SC, 1883-84. 

doms differentiated ? Discuss these in connection with the 
lowest vegetable and animal growths. 

2. Explain the terms, 'abiogenesis,' 'phylogeny,' 'species,' 20 
'boastoderm,' 'homology,' ' hectocotyius, ' ' schizocoele,' 
'otlith,' 'gastrula,' and 'degradation,' illustrating them 

by examples, 

3. Give a full account of the Foranimifera. 20 

4. Describe Taenia solium, and give a complete account of 20 
its life-history and reproduction. 

5. Describe two of the following animals, giving their 20 
position in the animal kingdom : — (a) Hirudo ; (6) Lumbri- 
cus ; (c) Cyclops ; {d) Oniscus ; (e) Buccinum ; (/) Gadus. 

6. Trace the modifications of the foot and of the gill- 20 
filaments in the various groups of Mollusca. 

7. Give a general account of the organization of the 20 
Echnioderms, and point out the characters which separate 
the Crinoidea from the remaining groups as a distinct section. 

8. The Ascidians (Tunicata) are placed by many authori- 20 
ties under the sub-kingdom Vertebrata. What facts in 
their development justify such a position ? 

Tuesday, 13th Novkmber. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

zoology-Paper ii. 

A. ATM ARAM, M.B., B.Sc. (Lond.) 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

N.B, — Five only of the questions are to be attempted. 
Give diagrams where you can.] 

1. What do you understand by " variation of species" ? 20 
Mention Darwin's views on the subject and the experiments 
and facts with which they are supported. 

2. Give an account of the life-history and structure of the 20 
Amphioxus. 

3. What are the sub-divisions of the class Pisces ? On 20 
what morphological grounds are they made ? Give the 
characteristics of the gauoidei. 

4. What are the distinctive characters of the Amphibia ? 20 
In what respects does a frog differ from a newt ? Give a 
sketch of the development of each. 



SECON'D EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF B.SC, 1883-84. clxxxi 

5. Describe the heart of a crocodile, and contrast it with 20 
that of a vulture. 

6. Give a general account of the Cetacea. 20 

7. Show how the pectoral arch of a Monotreme differs 20 
from the same part as normally developed in the Mammalia. 

8. Contrast the skull of a monkey with that of man, 20 
pointing out the affinities and differences between them. 

Wednesday, 14th November. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

AXIMAL PHYSIOLOGY— Paper I. 
G. Waters, L.R.C.S., L.R.C.P.E. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Mention the conditions necessary to the process of 20 
absorption by the blood vessels. 

2. Mention the circumstances which respectively augment 20 
or retard the force of the circulation. 

3. Give the anatomical arrangement concerned in the 20 
sense of touch. 

4. Give the functions of the pneumagastric nerve and its 20 
branches. 

5. Explain fully the physiological significance of the 20 
terms 'growth' and 'assimilation.' 



Wkdnesday, 14th November. 
[2 P.M. TO 5 p.m.] 

ANIMAL PHY^SIOLOGY— Paper n. 
G. Waters, L.R.C.S., L.R.C.P.K 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks. ] 

1. Describe mucous membrane generally, and give the 20 
distribution in the body of its different varieties. 

2. Describe the process of secretion generally. State the 20 
structural elements necessary to a gland, briefly describing 
each. 

3. State in detail the functions of the skin. 15 

4. Give the respective functions of the corpora quadri- 30 
gemina, corpora striata, and the thalami optici. 

5. Describe the effect of exercise on the secretion of 15 
urine. 

B 1030—16 ex 



dxxxii EXAM. FOB THE DEGREE OF M.A., 1883-84. 

VII. 

EXAMINATION FOR THE DEGREE OF M.A. 
EXAMINERS. 

BRANCH I.— LANGUAGES (ENGLISH 
AND PERSIAN). 

The "Venerable Archdeacon S. Stead, ) 

M.A. V In English. 

R. G. OXENHAM, M.A ) 

Jamshedjee Pallonjee Kapadia, Esq. ) -r -p.^- 
MiRZA Hassan Khan, Esq \"^ rersian. 

BRANCH III.— MATHEMATICS. 

J. T. Hathornthwaite, M.A I t„ a*„+t,«™„+;«» 

T. S. Tait, M.A.. B.Sc. } ^^ Mathematics. 

BRANCH. IV.— NATURAL SCIENCES. 

G. Waters, L.R.C.S.. L.E.C.P.E. ... ) ^^.''^TkinZ^^^a 
A.ATMARAM,B.M.,B.Sc.(Lond.) ... j ^^;;;,ii"^^'"y' ^"** 

Sakharam Arjun Ravtjt, L.M. ... ) In Botany and Vege- 

D. MacDonald, M.D., B.Sc, C.M. ... ) table Physiology. 

The Rev. F. Dreckmann, S. J. ...") 

KavasjiDadabhaiNaegamvala, M.A., }-In Chemical Physics. 

F.C.S., F.l.C. J 

IB.LvoN,M.R.C.S.,F.C.S F.I.C .-ij^ j .^ ^^^^.^_ 

Kaikhosku Rastamji Vikaji, L.M., >• . «= 

M.D. J ^'^y- 

A. N PKAKSO.V, F.R.Met.Soc., F C.S.J ^jJ^toV"' a^S 
'^•^•^- ) Physical Geography. 



EXA31. FOR THE DEGREE OF M.A., 1883^84. cixxxiii 

BRANCH I— LANGUAGES (ENGLISH 

AND PERSIAN.) 

Friday, 23rd November. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

ENGLISH— Paper I. 

The Venerable Archdeacon S. Stead, M. A. ; 

R. G. OXBNHAM, M.A. 

Spenser : " Faery Queene " ; Shakespeare : " King Lear," 

" The Temper," and " Richard III." ; Word^tcorth : 

Selections Jrom, by Matthew Amoid. 

1. Explain precisely what is meant by the statement 
that the sources of the Faery Queene can be traced to 
Chaucer, old English romances, and Italian poets. 

2. Give examples of archaisms in Spenser (a) verbal, 
(6) grammatical, (c) metrical. Examine the common charge 
against Spenser of affectation in this matter, and show how 
far such archaism was both deliberate and in keeping with 
the poet's intention and aim. 

3. How do you account for the contemporary popularity, 
the subsequent neglect and modem revival of interest in the 
Faery Queene ? 

4. What were Spenser's relations to the great questions 
of his time (a) political, (6) theological ? Quote or refer to 
passages in the Faery Queene, Book I., to illustrate your 
answer. 

5. The Tempest has been considered one of Shakespeare's 
earliest plays. Do you consider this opinion well founded 
or otherwise ? Give your reasons. With regard to the 
supernatural element in the plot of the play (a) show how 
far it was in keeping with contemporary \iews, (6) compare 
it with the use of this element by Slilton and by writers of 
the 18th century. 

6. In what respects can it be said that . ;/• is the 
most completely tragical of all Shakespeare's tragedies ? 

7. Give the meaning of the following passages, with notes 
on the words italicised : — 

(a) For, you trow, nuncle, 

The hedge-sparrow fed the cuckoo so long, 

That its had it head bit of by it young. 

So, out went the candle, and we were left darkling. 

(b) None of these roeues and cowards 

But Ai;v - ' tool. 



Clxxxiv EXAM, FOR THE DEGREE OF M.A., 1883-84. 

(c) I have no way, and therefore want no eyes ; 

I stumbled when I saw : full oft 'tis seen, 
Our means secure us, and our mere defects 
Prove our commodities. 

(d) Ye caimot reason almost with a man 
That looks not heavily and full of fear. 

(e) And must she die for this ? let her live 

And I'll corrupt her manners, stain her beauty ; 
Slander myself as false to Edward's bed ; 
Throw over her the veil of infamy ; 
So she may live unscarr'd of bleeding slaughter, 
I will confess she was not Edward's daughter. 

8. What indications do you gather from his works of 
Shakespeare's views as to the principles of succession and the 
constitutional position of the sovereigns of England ? 

9. What special reasons are there for making a selection 
in the case of Wordsworth's poetry, and on what principles 
do you think Arnold's selections of Wordsworth have been 
made ? 

10. In what form is Wordsworth's poetic sympathy with 
nature shown ? Compare this with what you know of 
Shelley. 

11. Quote or refer to any passages which appear to you 
remarkable for their excellence as specimens of — 

(a) ballad poetry ; 

(6) descriptive poetry ; 

(c) poetical philosophy. 

Give reasons for your preference in each case. 



Friday, 23rd November. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

ENGLISH— Paper II. 
The Venerable Archdeacon S. Stead, M.A. ; 

R. G. OXENHAM, M.A. 

Hooker : ' ' Ecclesiastical Polity, " Book I. ; Coleridge : 
" Biographia Literaria," I. — XIII. 

1. When did R. Hooker flourish? Mention some great 
contemporary literary works. 

How was the Ecclesiastical Polity occasioned and affected by 
contemporary controversies ? 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF M.A., 1883-84. clxxxV 

2. What is the main purpose and drift of the Ecclesiastical 
Polity? What is its philosophical and literary interest? 
What influence has it had on English thought and culture ? 
Mention some of ita chief merits. 

3. Give Hooker's definition of Law in its widest sense ; of 
Eternal Law ; of the Law of Reason. What are the marks 
of the latter ? Why are the Laws of Reason ill-observed ? 

4. Distinguish, according to Hooker, between the Law of 
Nature and Law Politic ; between Positive and Natural. 
What are the ' ' known laws of making Laws Politic " ? 

5. WTiat are the "two fountains of human action"? 
^Vhat is the chief natural test of goodness ? Why is not good- 
ness always chosen ? Distinguish between Will and Appetite. 

6. "Is Philosophy possible as a science and what are its 
conditions ? " How does Coleridge answer these questions ? 
On what principle does he base his o\to philosophy ? From 
whom did he mainly derive it ? 

7. Explaia the following words: — 'Esemplastic,' 'dis- 
course,' 'sensuous,' 'intuition,' 'objective,' 'subjective,' 
' reason,' ' understanding,' ' fancy,' ' imagination.' How does 
Coleridge defend himself from the charge of pedantry in the 
accurate use of them ? 

8. \\Tiat character, influence and merit does Coleridge 
claim for his own political writings and for those of Edmund 
Burke ? Mention the main topics of them, 

9. State Wordsworth's doctrine of poetic diction. Sum- 
marize Coleridge's criticisms of it, and his rea^ns for only 
partially accepting it. 

10. What, according to Coleridge, were the defects and 
excellences of Wordsworth's poems ? Mention the chief of 
Coleridge's own poems and the place they hold ia English 
literature. 



Monday, 26th November. 
[10 A.M. TO 2 p.m.] 

ENGLISH COMPOSITION. 

The Venerable Archdeacon S. Stead, M.A. ; 

R. G. OXEN'HAM, M.A- 

Write an Essay on one of these subjects : — 

I. What is Poetry, and what are the functions and aims of 
the Poet ? 

p 1030—16 ex* 



elxXKvi EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF M.A., 1883-84 

II. lu the study of Politics what are the advantages and dis. 
advaatages of Periodical Literature? 

Saturday, 24th Novkmber. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

PERSIAN— Paper I. 

Jamshedjee Pallonjee Kapadia, Esq. ; 

MiRZA Hassan Khan, Esq. 

[Tht; figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. "Knowledge is power." Quote any verse from 5 
>*»J(3 k9 in which a similar maxim is expressed. 

2. Give the etymologies of the following. Say which ren- 5 
dering for each of them is in your opinion correct : — 

C>/ja».U and yJ^ ilUajj^ jjUUfc. 

3. Discuss and illustrate by reference to the i^ aavO 10 
what you consider to have been the opinion of 

>jj , .J t>J I ilUiw regarding the views of the ancient 

Persian philosophers, that the earth hangs in apace by the 
power of attraction. 

4. (a) Explain fully what you understand by the follow- 6 
ing :— 

S*a4>J| i,,.,/0».U and 
(h) Distinguish between — 
^ ^yS- — ^}^^ yti^\ J (^^ ^' 

Jt^ I vJ S f,aa. I wj and L-5 A.*yA 
5. Explain what you understand by .^^^_)'^ ^"*i ^ 
say why • »j.ci^ was so called. 
(). Translate and explain the allusions in the followiug 2'* 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF M.A., 1883-84. clxxxvii 

^ Jus ^/ ! J (-4^ ^ Lu^ J Oi <'/) 

^ ' v3^ v/ «y" O ^^ J^j 
y5}\ ^\ jO ^U ^;U j^j 

iy^M>j ciJ^M ivJs ija,. s,>i 

7. Who was , jLe? In whose reign did he flourish? g 

What was the name of his book ? Describe also the tenets 
of his religion and the causes of its failure. 

S. Name all the different heretical sects that arose and 10 
disturbed Christendom, up to the time of the Crusades, from 

the religion of J Lo • Give also a brief account of the 
tenets of each of these heresies. 

9. Quote any verses from the ^^ U 5 li you remember S 

having alliterations on the first words and also on the last 
words in the vocative cases. 

10. Translate — 'J-' 



(f) 



</") 



clxxxviii EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF M.A., 1883-84, 

JI s^> Jo «k5 t^A^I (^J3 «-£> t>l:o| Ovl^ 
j^U. jt>U jjfls*^ J I <^ ij ^„ <-:>^I ^5-cU 

wUs ^ wJ^ ^T^J' ^^J^ ^"■^i ^c>J ^)U^ 1^ 

0*;' -^'-*^'-j '^^'^y c*^if**L? ^j^y^ '^iiy '*i>*f'-*^^ 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF MA., 1883-84. clxxxix 

j<^ ^/ ^'r jx^y '^ ^^ 

c> •* J d^ y vCiJ jUa. ^j '^ vo <*-*«^ J ' ^ 

> . ^. . - ^- (^ • 



CXC EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OP M.A., ] 883-84. 



Saturday, 24th November. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

PERSIAN— Paper IL 

Jamshedjee Pallonjee Kapadia, Esq. ; 
MiRZA Hassan Khan, Esq. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks. ] 

1. Discuss, quote authorities pro and con, and prove 12 
whether ^'^ . the hero of the __^ Ij S Ui was a real or 

a fictitious being. Point out also wherein he agrees or 
disagrees wdth the account of Hercules as given by the 
(Jreek writers. 

2. Explain each and all the intermediate sttiges of the 10 
ascension and descension of the prophet to heaven and 

earth from J ya standpoints. 

3. Translate the following and say on whose and what 7 
\ erscs of him they are the comments : — 

j^iw d) O^ I ^j^k ^Ij JU ^[<^ 



&r (^ 



EXAM. FOP. THE DEGREE OF M.A.. 1883-84. CXCl 

^y O'^ LT^J ^^-' ^^'" 

4. Give the accounts of the two stories mentioned in 9 
the t^Xfi and describe from them the characters of 

l5 ^ li and "law yji State what would have been the 
state of Islam had their order of succession been reverted. 
5. Translate the following verses :— 20 



CXCii EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF M.A., 1883-84 

♦ JU ! « . . .A/0 J i\ui ^i Ai , J Uk. 



(jL^ Ovxj o-ib a'-li^ G ^ 

6. Give a short account in Persian of the t^^i jLa» of 

7. Compare /) l> U ^ yvuJw with t) ^ o ^ w«*^ 

(a) as a general, (ft) as a statesman, (c) in opulence, and 
(d) in magnificence. Give their cliaracters as given by 

iJJ ^'^ yMt> and quote the saying of the prophet that ' ' I 

am Ijorn in the reign of a just king." 

8. Give at least four Persian expressions for each of 
the following : — ' To converse,' ' to adorn, ' ' wonder,' ' early 
in the morning,' 'to kill,' 'to erect,' 'to lament,' 'more,' 
and ' noise. ' 

9. Render the following Persian proverbs into idiomatic 

F'-nglish : — 

Ik o ^^ J tyc I c-> I ('7) 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF M.A., 1883-84. CXciii 

10. (a) Define and give examples of — 

(ft) Name all the metres in common use in Persian. 
Monday, 26th November. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

PERSIAN TRANSLATION. 

Jamshedjee PALLoyjEE KapAdia, Esq. ; 

MiEZA Hassan Khan, Esq. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1 . Translate either of the folio wing two passages : — .50 

(a) "To be, or not to be, that is the question: — 

Whether 'tis nobler in the mind, to suffer 

The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune ; 

Or to take arms against a sea of troubles. 

And, by opposing end them ? — To die, — to sleep, — 

No more ; — and, by a sleep, to say we end 

The heartache, and the thousand natural shocks 

The flesh is heir to, — 'tis a consummation 

Devoutly to be wished. — Ay, there's the rub ; 

For in that sleep of death what dreams may come, 

When we have shuffled off this mortal coil, 

Must give us pause ; there's the respect, 

That makes calamity of so long life : 

For who would bear the whips and scorns of time, 

The oppressor's wrong, the proud man's contumely. 

The pangs of despised love, the law's delay. 

The insolence of office, and the spurns 

That patient merit of the unworthy takes. 

When he himself might his quietus make 

With a bare bodkin ? Who would fordels bear. 

To grunt and sweat under a wearj' life ; 

But that the clread of something after death, — 

B 1030—17 ex 



CXciv EXAM. FOE THE DEGREE OF M.A., 1883-84. 

The undiscovered country, from whose bourne 
No traveller returns, — puzzles the will ; 
And makes us rather bear those ills we have, 
Than fly to others that we know not of ! 
Thus conscience does make cowards of us all ; 
And thus the native hue of resolution 
Is sicklied o'er with the pale cast of thought." 

{h) ' ' But our author, being acquainted with most that has 
during the last twenty years been written concerning the 
fascinating themes, founded on the study of comparative philo- 
logy, as revealing secrets of pre-historic period, could not rest 
content with the mere patriotic design of his original work. 
Accordingly, in this magnum opus, he has scorned to give up 
to race what pertains to mankind, and he essays to lead his 
Parsi brethren back in fancy, through all their vicissitudes 
as a portion of the Persian people, to the time when they were 
on equal terms with the wielders of the Irdnian power ; and 
further still , to that far period when their ancestors were an 
uudistinguishable portion of the undivided A'ryan race, in 
times compared with which Zoroaster is but of yesterday. 
Nothing better illustrates the vast sweep of pre-historic retro- 
spect to which these speculations invite us, than a reference to 
the revolution in climate cycles, or in the position of the earth 
itself, that must, according to these theories, be supposed to 
have occurred since the Golden Age —the paradisaical era of 
the A'ryan race. " 

2. Translate the following into English : — 

9- 



EXAM. FOB THE I'lGKEE OF M.A., 1883-8-i. CXCV 

^j^y y.w*o ji ^:^y sj^ ^^j*! .taj^ik 




t>>GU X;>^i.r t> »J iP^J ^jUIJ ^^^^^^^ J v*Ji 
0-ii;5J,^| ^(J ^^Jl 0-i^!»i Cl^v-jj <j ^ 



CXCvi EXA.M. FOR THE DEGREE OP M-A., 1883-84. 
C>^^\^ji ^;^0 ^ I ^)JJ Cl^S^^ VyO 

Si 

lt>a^ L^<^y l>^ Ij^ »<>-^^ 
OJvio'j (jOlo C->|c>| U»!y> 



EXAM. FOE THE DEGREE OF M.A., 1883-84. CXCvil 

yf L^Jj^" ^^^^^ f )^ 



BRANCH m— MATHEMATICS. 
Fkiday, 23rd November, 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

EUCLID AND GEOMETRICAL CONIC SECTIONS. 
J. T. Hathoknthwaite, M.A. ; T. S. Tait, M.A., B.Sc. 

1. Shew that the three interior angles of every triangle 
are equal to two right angles. 

If a triangle is tixmed over all its sides in snccession an 
even number of times the resulting position is a simple 
translation of the triangle in space. 

2. If from any point without a circle two straight lines 
be drawn, one of which cuts the circle and the other touches 
it ; the rectangle contained by the whole line which cuts the 
circle, and the part of it without the circle, shall be equal to 
the square on the line which touches it. 

A straight line AB is bisected in C and CB again bisected 
in D ; shew that if a circle be described with B as centre and 
BC as radius and any chord EF be drawn through A, ED and 
DF Tfsnll make equal angles •with AB. 

3. Prove that the three perpendiculars drawn to the sides 
of a triangle through their middle points meet in a point. 

From this deduce that the three perpendiculars drawn to 
the sides of a triangle from the opposite angles meet in a 
point. 

4. If the vertical angle of a triangle be bisected by a 
straight line which also cuts the base, the segments of the 

E 1030—17 rx* 



e3:cviii exam, for the degree of m.a-, 1883-84. 

base shall have the same ratio which the other sides of the 
triangle have to one another. 

A, B, C are three points in a straight line and D a point at 
which AB and BC subtend equal angles ; find the locus of D. 

5. Two straight lines which are each of them parallel to 
the same sti'aight line, and not in the same plane with it, are 
parallel to one another. 

Draw a plane to cut the four faces of a pyramid on a quad- 
rilateral base so that the section shall be a parallelogram. 

6. Shew that the portion of the tangent to a conic which 
is intercepted between the point of contact and the directrix 
subtends a right angle at the focus. 

The centre of a circle coincides with a focus of a conic and 
a tangent is drawn to each so that the points of contact 
and the focus are in the same straight line ; prove that the 
locus of the intersection of these tangents is a straight line. 

7. If it be known that at every point of a conic the rela- 
tion PN' = 4 AS. AN holds true, shew that the conic is a 
parabola. 

If P be any point on a parabola whose A^ertex is A and if 
Pfi perpendicular to AP meet the axis in B, shew that a 
circle whose centre is i? and radius EP will pass through the 
ends of the ordinate to the parabola through P. 

8. If the tangent at P meet a pair of conjugate diameters 
of an ellipse in T and t and if CD be conjugate to CP, then 
PT. Pt = CD'K 

Given two conjugate diameters of an ellipse, shew how to 
find the directions of the principal axes. 

9. Prove that perpendicular tangents to a hyperbola 
intersect on a fixed circle. Why is this circle called the 
Director Circle ? If the hyperbola does not admit of a 
director circle, shew that its conjugate does. 

10. Shew that the section of a right cone by a cutting 
plane parallel to a generating line is a parabola. 

If the vertical angle ]' of the cone be a right angle, P any 
point of the parabolic section and PN perpendicular to the 
axisof the parabola ; prove that F/* ^ 2 AS-\- AN, where 
A is the vertex and S the focus of the parabola. 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGEBE OF M.A., 1883-84. CSCix 

Friday, 23rd November. 
[2 p.m. to 5 P.M.] 

ALGEBRA axd TRIGONOMETRY. 
J, T. Hathorxthwaite, M.A. ; T. S. Tatt, M.A., B.Sc. 

1. Define convergent and divergent series and prove any 

test for ascertaining whether a series is convergent or diver- 
gent, stating the cases (if any) in which the test fails. 

Apply your test to the infinite series 

1 a; ar 



Find the sum of this series and shew that if a; < 1 the 
series is efjuivalent to 

1 — ar -r a:^ — a^ + z® — x® + 



2. Prove that all the solutions in positive integers of the 
etjuation ax — by = c are in Arithmetical Progression. 

A numbef consisting of two digits (the second of which is 
not zero) has a cypher inserted between them and thereby 
becomes an integral multiple of ita former value ; find the 
number. 

.S. State the principle of indetemunate coefficients and apply 
it to prove that the coefficient of x in the product 

(1 + rx)(l + r^x) (1 + r^x) 



'>n 

(l_r2) (1 _»-«) (1 — r«) (1 — r ) 

the number of factors being infinitely great and r less than 

unity. 

4. Shew that the arithmetical mean of any number of 

positive quantities Cj, q, c,i is greater than their 

ometrical mean c, and hence that 

(1 + c,) (1 + cj) (1 + c„) >(1 -r cf- 

."). Enunciate and prove FermaCs Theorem, 



CC EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF M.A., 1883-84 

If n be a prime number and a not a multiple of n, and a^ 
be the first power of a which is of the form rn + I, shew 
that a"'~^~ will also be of the same form, and that all the 
terms of the series 



a, a', a* 



when divided by n will leave remainders different from 
each other and from unity. 

6. State De Moivre's Theorem, and prove it for a nega- 
tive integral index. 

Deduce a series for cos w ^ in terms of sin 6 and cos 6 and 
their powers. 

7. Obtain the exponential values of sin 6 and cos 6. 

If tan {6 + (f) V — 1) = cos a + -/ — 1 sin a, where a, 6 
and (f) are real ; shew that 

4^ = (2m +1)77, 40 = log]-±-?i^, 
1 — sin a 

8. Resolve e" — 2 cos 6 + e~' into factors. 
Hence prove that 

r'- e- = 2^ (l + ^I) (l + ^) (l + 3^.) 

9. If one spherical triangle be the polar triangle of 
another, shew that the latter will be the polar triangle of 
the former, and that the sides and angles of the polar triangle 
are respectively the supplements of the angles and sides of 
tlie primitive triangle. From the latter result what general 
proposition follows ? 

10. Investigate the radii of the inscribed and circum- 
scribed spheres of a regular polyhedron. 

A dodecahedron and an icosahedron are described about a 
given sphere ; prove that the sphere described about these 
polyhedrons will be the same. 



EXAM. lOR THE DEGEEE OF M.A., 1883 84. ( 

Saturday, 24th Novkmbek. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

XEWTOX S PRIXCIPIA asd ASTRONOMY. 
.J. T. Hathornthwaite, M.A. ; T. S. Tait, M.A., B.Sc. 

1. By means of Lemma II or Lemma IV find (1) the area 
)f an ellipse and (2) the area of that portion of a parabola 

vhich is cut oflf by a diameter and an ordinate to the 
liameter. 

2. Enimciate and prove Lemma IX. 

• 3. A body revolves in the circiunference of a circle ; 
ind the law of force by which it is attracted to a given 
K)int. If the given point S be in the circumference of the 
:ircle prove that the velocity at any point P varies inversely 
Ls the square of SP. 

4. Shew that the periodic times in all ellipses round 
he same centre of force in the centre are equal. 

The angular velocities of a body moving in an ellipse 
.bout a force in the centre are 4° and 9" per hour at the 
ixtremities of the major and minor axes respectively ; find 
;he periodic time. 

5. A body revolves in an ellipse ; find the law of force 
ending to one of the foci. 

If the velocity of a body be the same at a certain point 
vhether it describe the ellipse in a time t about one focus 
>r a time t! about the other focus ; prove that the focal 

listances of the point are -^ and -, where 2a is the 

najor axis. 

6. Describe the diflferent systems of co-ordinates made 
ise of for determining the position of a star. 

Prove that when the Sun rises in the north-east at a place 
n latitude I, the hour-angle at sunrise is cot— l ( — sin I). 

7. What are tropical, sidereal and anomalistic years ? 
■^tate their relative magnitudes. 

•Shew that the effect of the Gregorian correction of the 
calendar is to make the average length of the civil year 
J*J5"2425 days. 



Ccii EXAM. FOE THE DEGREE OF M.A., 1883-84 

8. Define the copffir'n'nt of vff ruction, ami shew how it may 
be determined from ohscrvations of circumpolar stars. 

9. Enunciate Kepler's third law and state what can be 
deduced from it. 

Find the periodic time of Mars, having given that his 
mean distance from the Sun is to that of the Earth 
as 152^: 100. Find the same from the fact that his synodic 
period is about 780 days. 

10. Investigate the conditions of possibility of a lunar 
eclipse. Shew also that the length of the shadow is 
a cosec (S — P) where a is the Earth's radius, 8 the angular 
semi-diameter of the Sun and P the horizontal parallax 
of the Sun for the time of observation. 



Saturday, 24th November. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

ANALYTICAL GEOMETRY and DIFFERENTIAL axd 

INTEGRAL CALCULUS. 
J. T. Hathorntiiwaite, M.A. ; T. S. Tait, M.A., B.Sc, 

1. Shew that the lines a = X/3, Xa ^ ^are equally inclined 
to the lines a = 0, ^ — 0. 

TP, TQ are two tangents to the conic a/3 =/xy-,andthe 
})isector of the angle PTQ meets PQ inO; prove that the 
segments of any chord through subtend equal angles at T. 

2. All chords of a conic section which subtend a right 
angle at a given point of the curve meet in the normal at tliat 
point. 

3. Investigate the equation to a conic which passes through 
the angular points of a given triangle. 

Ellipses are inscribed in a triangle, each with one focus in a 
fixed straight line ; shew that the locus of the other focus is 
a conic described round the triangle. 

4. The equation connectiftg two variables x and // bcinu' of 
the form cf> (x, y) = so that y is an implicit functiou dl ,'■ : 

find expressions for -,' . ' 7"'.2 ^n tei"ms of tlic successive partial 
differential coefficients of (x, y) witli respect to x and y. 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF M.A., 1883-84. Cclii 

5. State the conditions for the existence of a maximnm or 
minimum value of a function of two or more variables. 

Determine the plane triangle of given perimeter and of 
maximum area. 

6. Define the asymptotes (rectilinear and curvilinear) of a 
given curs^e, and shew how to find the rectilinear asymptotes. 

Investigate the asymptotes of the Folivim of Descartes 

jj -{-2/3 — 3axy = 0. 

7. Shew that the locus of the points of ultimate intersection 
of the cunes represented by the equation/ (z, y, a) =0 touches 
each of the series of intersecting curves, and that the contact 
will be of the second order if at the points of contact 

'^l = '^^ ^ = _^ -^. 
da^ ' dx da a dy dy da dx 

Find the envelop of the rectangular hyperbolas represented 
by the equation 

a^ — y^ — 4r cos-^a + 4.y srn''a + 3 cos 2a = 

and prove that the contact is always of the second order. 

8. Having given two equations connecting four variables 
X, y, u and v, shew how to change the variables to u and v 

in the integral^/// (x, y) dy dx. 

By changing the variables to r and prove that 

the uitegral being extended over all the positive values of z 
and y which make x' + y^ not greater than unity. 

9. Indicate how the Integral Calculus may be applied to 
questions of probability. 

A piece is cut at random from a rod and the remainder is 
then divided into two parts at random ; shew that the 
chance of the three pieces forming a triangle is log 2 — ^. 

10. Trace the curve 

r = a (sec 6 + tan 6) 

and find the area included between the curve and its asymptote 

r = 2a sec 0. 



CCir EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF M.A., 1883-84. 

Monday, 26th November. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

STATICS AND DYNAMICS. 
J. T. Hathornthwaite, M.A. ; T. S. Tait, M.A., B.Sc. 

1. Find the resultant of any number of forces which act 
on a rigid body in one plane, and in case the forces can be 
reduced to a single resultant find the equation to its line of 
action. 

Forces P, Q, R act along the sides BC, CA, AB of a 
triangle and their resultant passes through the centres 
of the inscribed and circumscribed circles ; prove that 
P : Q : Ji :: cos B — cos C : cos C — cos A : cos A — cos B. 

2. Shew how to find the centre of gravity of a surface of 
revolution. Find the centre of gravity of a hemisphere 
when the density varies as the square of the distance from 
the centre. 

3. Define the anfjle of friction and find a relation between 

it and the coefficient of friction. 

Two rough spheres, the larger of which is fixed, rest on 
a rough horizontal plane and a board rests upon the top of 
them. Shew that if m and n are the distances between the 
centre of gravity of the board and the points of contact of 
the board with the larger and smaller spheres respectively, 
m tan \' — tan 2X . , , 

then — = T ?r^ 1 r-, where X and X are the angles 

11 tan 2 X — tan X 

of friction between the board and the larger and smaller 
spheres respectively. 

4. A heavy uniform string is stretched over a rough plane 
curve ; find the tension at any point. 

If the length of the string he — a and if it rest in limiting 

equilibrium on the circumference of a rough vertical circle 
of radius A so that one extremity of tlie string is at the 

flTT 

highest point of the circle, prove that (1 — /**) e 2 — 2 ^. 

5. Investigate the attraction of a circular arc on a par- 
ticle situated at the centre of the circle. 



7.XAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF M.A., 1883-84. CCV 

Shew that the attraction of a semi-circular ring of unit 
density and section on a particle of mass m at the extremity 

of the diameter which bisects the ring is — log tan — 

a S 

where a is the radius of the ring. 

6. A point moves in a plane curve ; find the accelera- 
tions at any moment along the tangent and normal. 

The accelerations of a point describing a curve are resolved 
into two, along the radius vector and parallel to the prime 
radius respectively ; find these accelerations ^ith reference 
to polar co-ordinates. 

7. A particle moves in a straight line under the action of 
a force always directed to a point in that line and varying 
inversely as the square of the distance from that point ; 
determine the motion. 

Shew also that the time of motion through the first half 
of the initial distance is to that through the last half as 
»r + 2 : TT — 2. 

8. Shew that the velocity of a projectile at any point of 
its path is that which would be acquired in falling from the 
directrix to the point. 

A particle is projected from a given point so as just to 
pass over a vertical wall whose height is 6 and distance 
from the point of projection o. Prove that when the area 
of the parabolic path described before meeting the horizontal 
plane through the point of projection is greatest, the range 

is — and the height of the vertex ^ . 
2 8 

9. A particle is acted on by a central force ; find the 
polar equation of its path. 

If the orbit be given by the equation r = a sec n 6, prove 
that the central force varies inversely as the cube of the 
distance. 

10. A particle is projected with given velocity in a 
medium of uniform density, the resistance of which varies 
as the velocity ; find the motion. 



B 1030— 18 ex 



CCvi EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF M.A., 1883-84. 
Monday, 26th November. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

HYDROSTATICS and OPTICS. 

J. T. Hathornthwaite, M.A. ; T. S. Tait, M. A., B.Sc, 

1 . State the position of the centre of pressure of a triangle 
immersed in a liquid with one side in the surface, the pressure 
of tlie atmosphere being neglected. 

A parallelogram whose plane is vertical and centre at a 
depth h below the free surface is totally immersed in a homo- 
geneous fluid. If a and h be the lengths of the projections of 
its .sides on a vertical line, shew that the depth of the centre 

a? + 6* 
of pressure below the centre of figure will be ,„. - • 

ti. Investigate the differential equation 

dp = p2 (f) (r) di' 

in the case of a fluid subject to the action of central forces. 

A rigid spherical shell is filled with homogeneous, inelastic 
Huid, every particle of which attracts every other with a force 
varying inversely as the square of the distance ; shew that 
the difference between the pressures at the surface and at 
any point within the fluid varies as the area of the least sec- 
tion of the sphere through the point. 

'S. Obtain the conditions of equilibrium of a floating body. 

A hollow cone floats with its vertex downwards in a cylin- 
drical vessel containing water ; determine the equal quanti- 
ties of water which may be poured into the cone and into the 
cylinder that the position of the cone in space may be un- 
altered. 

4. If fluid at rest under the action of given forces be con- 
tained in a cylindrical surface of any form, prove that the 
tension at any point of a section perpendicular to the axis of 
tlie cylinder is the same. 

5. Investigate the resultant vertical pressure of a rotating 
liquid on a surface with which it is in contact. 

A hollow paraboloid whose axis is equal in length to the 
latus-rectum and containing sCven-eighths of its volume of 
liquid is placed with its axis vertical and vertex upwards, 
and revolves with such an angular velocity about its axis that 
the free surface of the liquid is confocal with the paraboloid ; 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OP M.A., 1883-84. CCvii 



shew that in this case the pressiire on the base is greater 
than when the liquid was at rest in the ratio 

^ • ^ ~ 272" 

6. State the Laws of Reflection and Refraction of light 
and explain the critical angle. 

A sphere of a refracting substance whose index is ;^ 3 has 
a concentric spherical nucleus which is a reflector, whose 
radius is such that a ray which just enters the sphere grazes 
the surface of the nucleus. Prove that if a ray which is in- 
cident at an angle .r return to the point of incidence after 
reflections at the nucleus and internal siu-face of the sphere, 
the path within the medium wUl be - of what it would be if 
tliere were no nucleus. 

7. A ray from a point Q in the axis of a concave spherical 
mirror after reflection at any point B cuts the axis in q, is 
the centre of the sphere and the tangent at E cuts the axis in 
T ; prove that 

Tq ^ TQ TO 
and deduce the ordinary formula. 

Two concave mirrors face one another ; 0, 0' being their 
centres and the distance A A' between the mirrors greater 
than the sum of the radii. Shew that li Q, q he conjugate 
foci for each mirror, Qq wUl be the diameter of a circle which 
cutsat right angles the two circles on .40, A'O' as diameters. 

8. Examine the form of a small pencil of light after oblique 
refraction through a prism. Shew that if the axis of the 
pencil be incident so as to pass through the prism with mini- 
m.um de\'iation, the whole pencil may be considered to diverge 
from a point at a distance from the edge equal to that of the 
original source of light. 

9. De&ae focal lewjth. When is the focal length of a lens 
positive and when negative ? 

Two lenses of crown glass and flint glass are placed with 
their surfaces ia contact and coinciding ; determine the rela- 
tion between their refractive indices and the three radii of 
their surfaces in order that a pencil of parallel rays may 
continue parallel after transmission through the combination. 

10. Discuss the optical phenomena of the Rainbow, 



CCviii EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF M.A., 1883-84. 

BRANCH IV.-NATURAL SCIENCES. 
Friday, 23rd November. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

ZOOLOGY, COMPARATIVE ANATOMY and 
PHYSIOLOGY— Paper I. 

G. Waters, L.R.C.S., L.R.C.P.E. ; 
A. Atmaram, M.B., B.Sc, (Lond.) 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Give an account of the phenomenon known as "alter- 20 
nation of generations, " and explain its relations to ordinary 
reproduction. 

2. Give a general account of the structure of the coral- 20 
forming Actinozoa, and explain Mr. Darwin's theory of the 
formation of coral reefs. 

3. What is the " Organ of Bojanus " and in what animals 20 
is it found ? Mention its relation to the circulatory system 
and its probable function. 

4. What is the true homology of the swimming-bladder of 20 
a fish ? State the grounds on which your view is founded. 

5. Compare the fore foot of a horse with the hand of a man 20 
including in details the points of homological correspondence 
between the two. 



Feiday, 23bd Novembek. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

ZOOLOGY, COMPARATIVE ANATOMY and 
PHYSIOLOGY— Paper II. 

G. Waters, L.R.C.S., L.R.C.P.E. ; 
A. Atmaram, M.B., B. Sc. (Lond.) 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Give the modifications of the urinary system in the 30 
Mammalia; compare that of the Lissencephala with that of 
the Bovidae. 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF M.A, 1883-84. Ccix 

2. Describe the mascnlar system of the Quadrumana ; 20 

compare the muscles of the limbs of these with those of the 
Bimana. 

3. Describe and compare the osseous systems respectively 15 
of the Omithorhynchus and Echidna. 

4. Describe the alimentary canal and the process of diges- 25 
tion in the Ruminantia ; compare it with the same in the 
Rodentia. 

5. Give the outlines of the modifications of the nervous 20 
-ystera in the Vertebrata, 



Saturday, 24th Novesibee. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

BOTANY AND VEGETABLE PHYSIOLOGY— Papbb I. 

Sakhaeam Aejtjn Ravttt, L.M. ; 
D. ]VIacDonald, M.D., B.Sc., CM. 

[The figures to the right indicate ivM marks.] 

1 . Mention the contents of a fully developed vegetable 20 
cell. Give the nature of the cell wall, and the chemical 
properties and development of the substance known as starch. 

2. Give a general idea of the monocotyledonous stem, 20 
and the origin and growth of the vascular bundles. Explain 
what is meant by growth by terminal buds, and state why such 

a stem is limited in its age. 

.3. Make a table of the reproductive organs and their ap- 15 
pendages in a phanerogamous plant. Define definite inflores- 
^;nce, and give its difierent kinds with examples. 

4. \Miat is understood by syncarpous fruits? Define 10 
those called superior with a dry indehiscent pericarp, and 
give examples. 

5. Describe the plant on the table, and give the construe- 25 
tion of the stomata as they are seen in the leaves of plants in 

■jueral. 

6. Give the botanical characters of the Convolvulaceae and 15 
Euphorbiaceae, and their alliances ; and name six indigenous 
plants from each order. 

B 1030— 19 ec* 



cox EXAM, FOR THE DEGREE OF M.A.,l883-84. 

Saturday, 24th November. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

BOTANY AND VEGETABLE PHYSIOLOGY-Papek II 

Sakharam Arjun Ravut, L.M. ; 
D. MacDonald, M.D., B.Sc, CM. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Define the process of fertilization as observed in an^ 20 
giospermous plants. Give a histological description of 
pollen grains ; and explain the formation of the pollinia, 
and the condition of the pollen grains as found in some of 
tJie membei-s of the Natural Order Onagracese. 

2. Mention the prevailing views with reference to respira- 10 
tion in plants, particularising those advocated by Mohl and 
Henfrey. 

3. What is understood by assimilation and metastasis lj> 
in plants ? Give the products of these processes, and state 
wiiy some vegetables become more agreeable and wholesome 
when deprived of light during their growth. 

4. Explain the phenomenon of defoliation in plants. 15 

5. Describe and name the specimens under the micros- 20 
cope. 

6. In what respects does the Natural system diflfer from 2Q 
the Linnsean system ? Give the process of preparing speci- 
mens of plants for an Herbarium. 



Monday, 26th November. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

GEOLOGY— Paper I. 

A. N. Pearson, F. R. Met. Soc, F.C.S., A.I.C. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. What is the scope of geological inquiry? Give in l.'J 
outline the headings, divisions and principal sub-divisions 
of the science. 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF M.A., 1883-84. CCXl 

2. Give some account of what is known concerning under- 1 . 
ground temperature ; showing in connection therewith the 
meaning of the term isogeolhenn ; and adducing any facts 
which may in part explain the irregularities in the rate of 
increase of heat with increase of depth. 

3. \Miat is meant by the terms e.i<-^nfial and acces«ori/ as 16 
applied to rock constituents? Are all the original conati- 
tuents of a rock necessarily essential ones ? 

What essential and accessory constituents are to be found 
in the following rocks : — GraniU', Syenite, Gabbro, Olivin" 
Fork? 

4. Give a brief sketch of the more important advances is 
which have been made in the study of rocks bj' the use of the 
microscope. 

5. Describe clearly and in their proper order of sequence 18 
the various phenomena which are observable during a vol- 
canic eruption. 

What reasons are there for believing that in the earlier 
;tratigraphical periods volcanic phenomena were, as some 
suppose, similar to, or, as others suppose, different from, what 
they are at the present day ? 

6. What is meant by the term CBO^ian when used geologi- 16 
■ally? Describe some fomiations which illustrate aolian 

Action. 



Monday, 26th November. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

GEOLOGY— Paper H. 

A. N. Peaksojt, F.R. Met. Soc, F.C.S., A.I.C. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Describe fully the geological value of fossils. Are the 16 
rossil remains of plants equal in value to those of animals ? 
Show by known instances that the paheontological record is 
incomplete ; and give d priori reasons for expecting that it 
would be so. 

2. What is a geological horizon ? What precautions 15 
should be observed in fixing upon one ? 



CCxii EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF M.A., 1883-84, 

3. Give the geographical distribution of the Lov)er Gond- 17 
v)ana rocks of Peninsular India. Describe them, name some 

of their more important fossil genera, and discuss their 
origin and probable geological position. 

4. Give a general sketch of the geology and palaeontology 18 
of the island of Bombay, 

5. Discuss on stratigraphical grounds the probable geolo- 18 
gical age of the Himalayan Mountains. 

6. What are the principal geological arguments in sup- 16 
port of the antiquity of man ? 



Friday, 23ed November. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

CHEMICAL PHYSICS— Paper I, 

The Eev. F. Dreckmann, S.J. ; 
Kavasji Dadabhai Naegamvala, M.A., F.C.S,, F.I.C. 

1. Gravity increases from the equator towards the poles ; 
to what is this increase due ? Show that it is proportional 
to the square of the sine of latitude. 

2. Describe accurately any one method by which the mean 
density of the Earth may be determined. 

3. How do you explain the formation of crystals ? Give 
a short description of the six systems of crystallization and 
show how in the first system the octahedron and the tetra- 
hedron may be deduced from the cube. 

4. A horizontal disc of glass is held up by means of a 
film of water between it and a similar disc of the same or 
larger diameter above it ; show that the weight of the lower 
disc together with that of the water between the discs is ap- 

proximately equal to — where r is the radius of the 

lower disc, T the surface tension of water, and d the distance 
between the two discs which is very small compared with r. 

5. Show "how the work done by a steam-engine is measur- 
ed by the indicator diagram. 

6. Show how to determine the coefficient of conductivity 
of liquids. 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF M.A., 1883-84. CCxiii 

7. State the principal results of Guthrie's researches on 
the action of freezing mixtures. 

8. From the ratio of the specific heat of air at constant 
pressure to its specitic heat at constant volume show how to 
determine the " mechanical equivalent " of heat. 

What were the errors originally committed by Mayer in 
his determination, and how were they corrected by Joule? 



Fkiday, 23rd November. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

CHEMICAL PHYSICS— Paper II. 

The Rev. F. Dreckmann, S.J. ; 
Kavasji Dababhai Naegamvala, M.A., F.C.S., F.I.C. 

1. What arguments can be adduced in favour of the views 
generally recognised regarding (1) the properties of the 
" luminlferous ether " and (2) tJbe electro-magnetic theory of 
light ? 

2. Give a detailed description of Focault's method of 
determining the velocity of light, and deduce an expression 
for the velocity from the data thus obtained, 

3. Describe in detail the chromatic condition after emer- 
gence of a parallel pencil of white light incident at an angle 
on a parallel transparent plate. 

Describe carefuUy Huygen's (Campini's) negative eye-piece 
and show how it is achromatic. 

4. State the reasons why interference colours of " thin 
plates " vanish on the films exceeding a certain limit in 
thickness. Give experimental proofs Ln support of your 
statement. 

5. When is polarisation elliptical and when circular? 
How are the phenomena produced by Fresnel's rhomb ? 
How will you proceed to distinguish a pencil of circular 
polarised light from ordinary light ? 

6. Discuss the relation existing between the energy of a 
Leyden jar and its charge and capacity. Show that as a 
storage of electricity the "cascade arrangement" has no 
value. 



CCXiv EXAM, FOR THE DEGREE OF M.A., 1883-84. 



Give one method of measuring the capacity of a condenser 
in absolute units. 

7. Deduce the condition of equilibrium in Wheatstone's 
bridge. State fully, giving reasons, how you will determine 
the resistance of a galvanometer by its own deflection. 

8. What is Thomson's effect ? A current is passed through 
a bar of iron the ends of which are maintained at 100° and 
0°C. and a like cun-ent is also passed through a bar of copper 
similarly heated. State what happens in each case. How 
are the results accounted for ? 

9. Give a synopsis of Crooke's experiments on electric 
discharges in high vacua and state the principal deductions 
that he has attempted to draw therefrom. 



Satdeday, 24th November. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

INORGANIC CHEMISTRY-Papek I. 

I. B. Lyon, M.R.C.S., F.C.S., F.I.C. ; 
Kaikhosru Rastamji Vikaji, L.M., M.D. 
[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. At what temperature and pressure have the gases 15 
oxygen and hydrogen been liquefied ? State the principles 
involved in the processes employed for their liquefaction. 

2. State the law of isomorphism propounded by Mits- 10 
cherlich. Give instances of isomorphous, dimorphous and 
trimorphous substances. 

3. Sketch briefly the outlines of Hofmann's method for 16' 
finding the specific gravity of a gas or vapour and state in 
what essential respects it differs from the method of Dumas. 

4. How would you ascertain the presence of chlorides, 15 
bromides and iodides in a solution containing all three ? 

5. Give formula? showing the action of free iodine on (1) 12 
sulphurous acid, (2) arsenious acid, (3) sodium thiosulphate. 

6. Describe briefly Hofmann's experiment for the demons- 10 
tration of the volume composition of ammonia gas. 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF M.A., 1883-84. CCXV 

7. What is the chemical actiou of chlorine when mixed 12 
with each of the following gases and exposed to the sun's 
rays : — (1) Hydrogen sulphide, (2) carbon monoxide, (3) 
marsh gas ? 

8. How would you determine volumetrically the percent- 15 
age of carbon dioxide present in atmospheric air ? 



Saturday, 24th November. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

INORGANIC CHEMISTRY— Paper II. 

I. B. Lyon, M.R.C.S., F.C.S., F.I.C. ; 
Kaikhosru Rastamji Vikaji, L.M., M.D. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Sketch how you would fully analyse a sample of 16 
gunpowder. How are the properties of the powder liable to 

be affected by the composition of the charcoal employed in its 
manufacture ? 

2. In what ways can the amount of ferrous salt present in 10 
a solution containing a mixture of ferrous and ferric salts be 
ascertained volumetrically ? 

3. Give a formula showing the reaction of manganese 10 
dioxide on oxalic acid in presence of sulphuric acid. To what 
account is this reaction turned in the valuation of manga- 
nese ores ? 

4. What is the composition of the more valuable precious 12 
stones ? 

5. Give a short account of the principal 'compounds into 12 
which the radical chromyl may be supposed to enter. 

b'. How would you analyse a piece of type metal ? 12 

7. What is the composition of the following minerals : — 12 
Triphyline, Hausmannite, Chrome iron ore, Wulfenite 
Ilmenite? 

8. Describe the compounds obtainable by the action of 16 
ammonia on the chlorides of mercury. 



CCXvi EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF M.A., 1883-84. 
Monday, 26th November. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

METEOROLOGY and PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY— Paper I. 

A. N. Pearson, F.R. Met. Soc, F.C.S., A.I.C. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Give a concise and clear account of the objects of 11 
meteorological research. 

2. Illustrate the meteorological application of the term 10 
abnormal. 

3. Describe in detail some form of anemograph, stating 12 
its special defects and advantages. 

4. Give a general description of the distribution of baro- 14 
metric pressure over the globe, (a) in January, (6) in July. 

5. What relation has been found to exist between the 14 
diurnal changes of the wind and of the barometer ? What 
explanations have been suggested as to the cause of that 
relation ? 

6. State and discuss Piddington's " Law of Storms." 13 
Does it apply to all storms? On what facts do "storm- 
warning " systems base their predictions ? 

7. Describe the dififerent forms of cloud ; explain so far 12 
as you can the formation of each kind ; and state the objects 

of cloud observations. 

8. Draw carefully the daily and yearly temperature curves 14 
of any station in Western India ; and state the caixsea which 
lead to the forms of those curves. 



Monday, 26th November. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

METEOROLOGY and PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY— Paper II. 

A. N. Pearson, F.R. Met. Soc, F.C.S., A.I.C. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks. ] 

1. What is meant by the Earth's axis of rotation and 13 
axis of inertia? Name any mundane causes which conld 
produce a change in the position of these axes. 



EXAM. FOB THE DEGREE OF M.A., 1883-84. CCXvii 

2. Classify, according to their origin, the different kinds 11 
of valleys, naming actual instances of each kind. 

3. Describe and state what is known about the origin 12 
and formation of the different kinds of coral islands. 

4. Describe the nature and formation of icebergs, and give 1 1 
instances of their effect upon climate. 

5. Give a brief description of the different kinds of earth- 12 
quake. Describe some simple form of instrument nsed 

in earthquake observation. State what other iindulatorj- 
movements of the ground besides earthquakes are known to 
exist. 

6. What is supposed to be the nature of the connection 14 
between volcanic outbursts and barometric changes ? 

7. Show by known instances what are the chief causes 13 
affecting the geographical distribution of species. 

8. Illustrate by actual facts the effect of human agency 14 
m modifying the physical geography of countries. 



B1030— I9«a: 



CCIviii EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF LL.B., 1883-84. 



YIII. 



EXAMINATION FOR THE DEGREE OF LL.B. 

EXAMINERS. 

The Honourable Rdo Sdheb Vishvanath Naeayak Mandlik, 
C.S.I. 

M. Starliko, B.A., LL.B. 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF LL.B., 1883-84. CCXII 
Friday, 23bd Novembek. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

PAPER I. 

The Hon'ble R^o S4heb Vishvanath Narayas Makdlik, C.S.I. ; 

M. Stabltn-g, B.A., LL.B. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

Roman Civil Law, Elements of General Jurisprudence and 
International Law. 

1 . What were the essentials of the justm nuptux ? What 10 
were the three earliest forms of marriage among the Romans, 
and what were their respective etfects upon the women? 
How could she prevent herself from passing in manum viri ? 

2. What is the distinction between dominium and pof- 5 
iessio ? What were ser\"itudes ? 

3. Describe the three kinds of heirs under the Roman 10 
law, and their respective liabilities as heirs of their testator ? 

4. What constituted the contract of emptio et venditio? 10 
What were the obligations contracted by the vendor in 
respect of the thing sold, and at whose risk was it after the 
conclusion of the contract ? 

5. What is the distinction between jus civile and jus gen- 5 
Hum ? Is the latter the same as motlem international law ? 

If not, what is the classical term for this latter ? 

6. Trace the rise of yvs na/uraZe among the Romans and 1 
point out the difference in the mode in which the Law of 
Nature was evolved (1) by the Roman jurists, (2) by Rous- 
seau. 

7. What is the difference between crimen and delictum ? 10 
Point out and illustrate by examples the difference between 

the ancient and modem views of penal law. 

8. Discuss the grounds upon which the rule of English 10 
law that ignorance of law does not excuse a man may be 
Bupported. 

9. In what way do the rights and privileges of a consul 10 
differ from those of an ambassador ? What are the ordinary 
duties of a consul ? 



CCXX EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF LL.B., 1883-84 

10. What are the rights and duties of a neutral state 5 
towards a belligerent one ? 

11. A neutral ship is found outside neutral limits carrying 10 
enemy's cargo ; how would the ship and cargo respectively 

be dealt with? t, f j 

12. What is piracy ? By whom and where can it be 5 
punished ? 



Friday, 23bd November. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

PAPER II. 

The Hon'ble Rdo Sdheb Vishvanath Nakayan Mandlik, C.S.I. ; 
M. Starling, B.A., LL.B. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

Su-ecession and Family Rights with special reference to Himlu and 
Makomedan Laws. 

1. State the rules of intestate succession in the cases of 12 
(o) a Pilrsi male, (b) a Poona Christian female, (c) a Hindu 
female, married or unmarried, and (d) a Mahomedan male 

or fenaale. 

2. Describe the cases in which limited grants of probates 7 
are made, and state fully the conditions attached to such 
grants. 

3. State the fundamental rules for the construction of 8 
wills. Give examples. 

4. What are the changes introduced by the Hindu Wills 10 
Act, and how far do they afifect the Hindu law ? 

5. In what modes can a Hindu terminate his connection 15 
as a member of a united Hindu family ? 

A divides with his brothers B, C, and nephews D, E, and 
F, the foUowinfj properties : — 
(a) A family dwelling-house ; 
(i) A Baithak-khdna ; 
(c) A well for drinking water ; 



EXAM. FOB THE DEGREE OF LL.B., 1883-84, CCIli 

(rf) Two water-courses ; 

(«) Six tanks, four of which are attached to gardens ; 

(/) Kulkami and Chaudhari watans ; 

{g) Management of a religious Samsth^ ; 

(h) Family trade ; 

(i) Shetsanadi servants and moveable property ; 

(/) The maintenance of the mother, and the marriages of 
two sisters and three nieces are to be provided for, 
one of these nieces is the daughter of a deceased 
sonless brother and two are sisters of D, E, and P. 

State in detail the mode in which you will effect the par- 
tion, and give reasons for your answers. 

6. In a Hindu famUy union is to be presumed. What are 10 
the reservations with which this doctrine may be received ? 
What are the evidentiary signs proving the unitedness or 
the separation of a Hindu family? What are conclusive 
signs of either or both ? 

7. Describe those properties which cannot be divided. 10 
What may properly be set up as a self -acquisition ? Give a 
brief outline of the question. 

8. State the circumstances which exclude a Hindu or a 10 
Mahomedan from inheritance, totally or partially. How 

are the excluded persons provided for, and what are the 
rights of their descendants ? 

9. Describe the rules under which pre-emption may be 10 
claimed under the Mahomedan law. Give examples. Are 
there such rights, or analogous rights, claimable under the 
Hindu law ? 

10. How far can the creditors of a deceased Mahomedan 8 
or Hindu follow property in the hands of a bondjide pur- 
chaser from the heirs ? Discuss the question fully. 



B103O— I9er* 



CCXxii EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF LL.B., 1883-84. 

Saturday, 24th November. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

PAPER III. 

The HonTile RAo Sdheb Vishvanath Nakayan Mandlik, C.S.I. 
M. Starling, B.A., LL.B. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

The Law of Contracts, a7id of the Transfer and Lease of 
Immoveable Property. 

1. What are the rights of an agent against his principal ? 8 

2. State the principles which govern the right of a princi- 8 
pal to sue a third party on a contract by his agent made in 

his own name. 

3. Define a lien, distinguishing between particular and 8 
general liens. How is a lien acquired and how is it lost ? 

4. What is a guarantee ? By what means is the suret)' 8 
discharged ? What right of indemnity has a surety against 

his principal and against his co-sureties ? 

.5. When and to whom must a bill of exchange payable after 5 
sight be presented for acceptance ? In case of the dishonour 
of a bill of exchange by non-acceptance or non-payment, to 
whom must notice of dishonour be given ? 

6. In a suit against joint promissors, need all the promis- 8 
sors be joined as defendants ? In a suit by joint promissees, 
need all the promissees be joined as plaintiffs ? If some of the 
joint promissees are dead, who should be made parties plain- 
tiffs in a suit against the promissor ? 

7. D&^ne partnership. Under what circumstances may a 10 
person contribute money to the funds of a partnership or par- 
ticipate in its profits without becoming a partner ? 

8. What is a warranty in a policy of insurance ? In what 10 
way does a warranty differ from a representation? What 
warranties are usually implied in policies of marine in- 
surance ? 

9. What is a charter-party ? In what way do the rights 8 
of the parties thereto differ according to the form in which the 
contract is made ? 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF LL.B., 1883-84. CCXXiii 

10. What classes of documents require to be registered in 10 
India ? Mention the exceptions to these classes. Within 
what time or times must a document requiring registration be 
presented for registration ? 

11. A lease contains a covenant by the lessee not to assign 8 
without the lessor's license ; in what ways can the lessee deal 
with the term comprised in the lease without breaking the 
covenant ? 

12. Draw a short form of an agreement for the sale of im- 14 
moveable property in Bombay of which either the vendor or 
purchaser could compel specific performance without the 
agreement being registered. 



Satukday, 24 th Novebtbeb. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

PAPER IV. 

The Hon'ble R^o Sdheb Vishvanath NakayanMandlik, C.S.I. ; 
M. Stabling, B.A., LLJB. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

E<iuUy with special reference to the Law of Trusts, Mortgages 
and other Securities for Money, and Specific Relief. 

1. Define an executed and an executory trust, and point 10 
out any distinction between the way in which each class 
will be carried out by a Court of Equity. What is the 
difference (if any) in construing an executory trust under 
marriage articles and under a will ? 

2. A solicitor was active in founding a banking com- 10 
pany. Before its establishment he entered into a secret 
agreement with a stranger that the latter should purchase 
some property eligible for the banking house on a joint 
speculation. After its establishment the company pur- 
chased part of the premises for their banking house, not 
knowing that their solicitor was interested in it. On a 
suit by the bank, what would be the rights and liabilities 

of the solicitor and the stranger in respect of any profits 
made on the sale to the bank ? 

3. A debtor conveys his property in trust for the 10 
payment of his debts ; under what circumstances is such 

a trust revocable, and under what irrevocable ? 



CCXXiv EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF LL.B., 1883-84. 

4. Point out the circumstances from which it may be 10 
determined whether a person, in possession of the title-deeds 

of another, is or is not entitled to an equitable mortgage 
on the property to which they relate. 

5. Under the Specific Relief Act, what contracts can, 10 
and what cannot, be specifically enforced ? 

6. Can a contract to refer a dispute to arbitration be 10 
enforced (1) in an English Court of Equity, (2) xmder 
the Specific Relief Act ? Is there any way in which a con- 
tract to refer to arbitration can be enforced in India ? 

7. Under what clrcumstauces and within what limits 5 
can the High Courts in India make an order in the nature 

of a mandamus ? 

8. Under what circumstances can a barrister or a lO 
solicitor safely take a gift or a security from a client? 

9. What is the difference between the lien of an attorney 5 
upon the papers of his client and upon a fund realized 

by his exertions in a suit? 

10. What is election? Under what circumstances will 10 
a person be required by a Court of Equity to elect ? 

11. When is and when is not a trustee who joins with 10 
his co-trustees in signing a receipt for money paid to 
them liable for their misappropriation of the same? Is 

an executor liable under the same circumstances for the 
misapplication by his co-executor of money received by 
him ? 



Monday, 26th November. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

PAPER V. 

The Hon'ble R6o SAheb Vishvanath Narayan Mandlik, C.S.I, ; 
M. Starling, B.A., LL.B. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

The Law of Torts and Crimes. 

1. A joint decree is passed against A and B in conse- 10 
buence of a tort committed by them. Under what circum- 



BXAM. FOR THE DE(5REE OF LL-B., 18S3-84. CCXXr 

Stances will they have a right of contribution against each 
other ; and what will be a successful defence in a suit 
brought to claim such a contribution ? 

2. How will you decide the following cases ? Give 10 
reasons for your answers : — 

(a) A, a tenant of C, suffers from water falling from 
the room occupied by B, another tenant of C. A 
sues C for the damage. 

{b) A owns a horse and carriage. B, a friend of A, 
drives the carriage alone with the permission of 
A, and while so doing injures C's horse. C sues 
A for injury done to his horse. 

(c) A prepares a dinner for 100 castemen. B informs 
the caste that A had offended certain caste-rules 
and the guests refuse to attend. A sues B for 
damages. 

3. A's tricycle is injured by collision with B's carriage. 6 
What must A allege and prove before he can recover 
damage for the injury caused ? 

4. Under what circumstances will consignors or bailors t» 
make themselves liable for damages caused by their acts ? 
(livil examples. 

5. When may malice be inferred ? WTien must it be 12 
proved ? Wbat constitutes malicious prosecution, libel 
and slander ? What is the law in regard to actions for 
'lamages arising therefrom in the presidency-towns and 

in the mofussil ? 

6. Define 'wrongful gain,' 'wrongful loss,' * fraudu- S 
lently,' 'valuable security,' 'special law,' 'injury,' 'life,' 
and ' good faith. ' 

7. A is convicted of the offence of murder and is 10 
sentenced to death and to forfeiture of property. How 
will the sentence affect such proper ty in Bombay and 
Bengal ? Give reasons for your answer. 

8. Define 'an unlawful assembly' and 'a riot,' and 12 
describe the punishments laid down for these offences. WTiat 

is the responsibility of land or house owners on whose 
premises or for whose benefit such offences are committed ? 

9. WTien does culpable homicide amount to murder, 12 
and when does it not ? Discuss the question fully, and 
give examples. 

10. Define defamation. WTiat may amount to defama- 12 
tion, and what are the exceptions which may be set up 
against a charge of defamation ? Give examples. 



CCXXVi EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF LL.B., 1883-84. 

Monday, 26th November 

[2 P.M TO 5 P.M.] 

PAPER VI. 

TheHon'bleRdoSdheb VisHVANATH Nabayan Mandlik, C.S.I. 
M. Starling, B.A., LL.B. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks. ] 

The Law of Evidence, Civil Procedure including Limitation, 
and Criminal Procedure. 

1. What classes of questions are excluded from the cogni- 10 
zance of our civil courts, and when ? Give examples. 

2. State the claims cognizable and non-cognizable by 10 
Courts of Small Causes ; and the procedure in respect to the 
trial of one suit of the former class outside the presidency- 
towns. 

3. State briefly the procedure to be followed — 10 

(a) when a person wants to avail himself of the insolvency 

provisions of the Code of Civil Procedure ; 

(b) when he wishes to sue or appeal in/ormd pauperis ; 

(c) when he seeks to obtain a review of judgment. 

Compare the provisions of the Code of 1859 and 1882 in 
these matters. 

4. Under what limitations will secondary evidence be ad- 10 
missible to prove the contents of written documents ? Discuss 
the question and give examples. 

5. When are the confessions of an accused relevant? When 10 
are they inadmissible? How are they to be recorded ? When 
and to what extent can they be used against the co-accused ? 

6. When is evidence of character relevant in criminal S 
oases ? To what extent must such evidence go in order to 
justify a Magistrate in requiring persons to give security for 
keeping the peace or for good behaviour ? 

7. When and in what cases can a Magistrate direct the 12 
removal of what he holds to be a public nuisance ? State the 
procedure to be followed, and give examples. State if any 
and what remedies are open to the aggrieved. 



EXAM. FOB THE DEGREE OF LL.B., 1883-84. CCXXvii 

•^. State how far an acknowledgment in writing will 12 
save a claim from being barred ? ^Tiat conditions must 
8uch an auiknowledgment fultil ? Give examples 

& How is a right to an easement acquired? State the 10 
present law, and compare it with the law prior to 1871 Give 
examples 

10 Explain fully what you mean by (a) formal or aym- 8 
bolical possession, (b) possession, and (c) adverse possession. 
Give examples 



ecxxviii examination foe homodes m law, 1883-84. 



IX. 



EXAMINATION FOR HONOURS IN LAW. 



EXAMINERS. 

The Honourable EAo S^heb Vishvakath Naratak Mahduc, 
C.S.I. 

M. Staruho, B.A„ LL.B. 



EXAMIATION FOR HONOUES IN LAW, 1883-84. CCZXix 
Fbiday, 23rd November. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

ROMAN CIVIL LAW— Part L 

The Hon'blc Rio S^eb Vishvanath Narayan Maxdltk, C.S.I. ; 
M. Starltn-g, B.A., LL.B. 

[The figures to the right indicate fuU marks.] 

1 . Into what classes do Justinian and Gains respectively 10 
divide things ? Define res sacrce, res religiosce and res sanctce. 

2. Give a short account of the lex Furia, the lex Voconia, 10 
and the lex Falcidia. What was the object of the actio de 
inofficioso testamento and under what circumstances could it 

be brought ? 

3. What was the law of the Twelve Tables with regard to 10 
succession to enfranchised slaves ? How was it altered by 

the praetor and by Justinian ? 

4. What was the contract of locatio et eonductio and into 10 
what heads was it divided ? 

5. How many kinds of societates were there in Roman 10 
law ? By what acts was a societas dissolved ? 

6. Define dolus, culpa, lata culpa, culpa Urns in concreio 10 
and culpa levis in abstracto. 

7. What was the original form in which the contract of 10 
mandatum was entered into ? How was the contract of Twan- 
daium used by a creditor to secure a remedy against his debtor 
and^dei jussor ? 

8. What is the distinction between obligationes ex contractu 10 

and those quasi ex contractu ? Mention the examples of cases 
given by Justinian in which obligationes quasi ex contractu 
would arise. 

9. What was acceptilatio ? To what contracts was it 10 
directly applicable and how was it applied to other contracts? 

10. Describe the proceedings in bankruptcy under the 10 
Roman law. 

B 1030—20 ex 



3C 



10 



CCXXX EXAMINATION FOE HONOURS IN LAW, 1883-84. 

Friday, 23rd November. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

ROMAN CIVIL LAW— Part IL 
Tlie Hon'ble R^o Salieb Vishvanath Narayan Mandlik, C.S.I. 
M. Starling, B.A., LL.B. 
[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 
1. Item in potentate nostra sunt liheri nostri quos mstis 1' 
nuiHits procrearimus, quod jus proprium civium Romanorum 
est iere cnim nulli alii sunt homines qui talem in JiUos sues 
habent j)otestatun, qualem nos habemus. 

Translate the above passage and explain what is meant by 
potestas and justce nuptice. 

2. What is bonorum possessio cotitra tabulas ? i 

3._ Write a short account of adoption among the Romans 
tracing the changes which took place down to the time of 
•Tustmian, and compare it with adoption under the Hindu 
law. 

4. "V^Hiat is a stipulatio and how was it entered into' 
What stipulationes were imUiles ? 

_ 5. T>efmeadstijmlator, sponsor, fideipromissor, and fidei 10 
n'-ssor. To what contracts were the last three adjuncts ? 

6. Name the various kinds of kgis adiones. What were S 
the pnncipal objections to the uge of the legis actiojies ? 

7. Describe the procedure in an actio sacramenti. Is there 12 
anything in old English procedure which corresponds to any 
part of the procedare j'ou have just described ? 

8. Define excepfiones, and enumerate tlie classes into 10 
which they were divided. What was the eftect of filing an 
exceptio, and l>y what form of pleading might an exceptio be 
met by a plaintiff? 

Saturday, 24th November. 

[10 a.m. to 1 P.M.] 

GENERAL JURISPRUDENCE, INCLUDING INTER- 
NATIONAL LAW-Pakt I. 
The Hon'ble lluo Siiliel> Vjshvanatji Narav an Mandlik C.S.I. 
M. Starling, B.A., LL.B. 
[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 
1. The owner of a neutral vessel enters into a contract to 10 
carry on trade with a blockaded port. Is this a, municipal 



EXAMINATION FOR HONOURS IN LAW, 1883-84 CCXXXi 

oftence according to the Law of Nations ? Discnas the princi- 
ples, usages, and authorities bearing on the subject. 

2. An American citizen serving on board a British ship 10 
caused the death of another American citizen serving in the 

' same ship sailing on the river Garonne, within French terri- 
tory- at a place where the tide ebbed and flowed and 
great ships went. Is his conviction by the Central Criminal 
Court of Great Britain correct ? Discuss the question fully 
and give authorities. 

3. The commander of a Danish vessel passing within 10 
3 miles of the shore of England on a voyage to a foreign port 
ran into a British ship and sank her, whereby a passenger 

on boar<l the latter was dro\vned. Has the English Central 
Criminal Court jurisdiction to try him? If not, which 
Court has ? 

4. The Governor of Jamaica detained a private schooner 12 
which, it was alleged, had put into the port of King-^fon in 

i distress and for repairs ; and being sued in an action of tres- 
I pass, pleaded that the act was done by him as Governor of 
'\ the colony. How far would such a plea succeed * Compare 
> this case with, or distinguish from, the following : — 

(a) The Raja of Tanjore's case. 

(b) Forster and ot/iers v. The Secretary of State for 

India. 
'■■ (o) Edja Sdligrdm v. The Secretary of State for India., 

', 5. Describe the different sources of international law 12 
! and state the different views of the chief leading writers on 
[. the subject, Enghsh, Continental and American. 

f- 6. Define a sovereign slate, and discuss the chief ingre- 12 
J dients which make up sovereignty, limited or unlimited. 

;' How may this be affected temporarily, or changed entirely, 
and in what respects will a change in the identity of a state 
affect its relations with foreign nations or their subjects ? 
e examples. 

7. State and discuss the absolute rights and the cowU- 10 
rial rights of sovereign states, and give examples from the 
Ntory of Europe and America. 

-. Sovereign states are naturally equal. Discuss this 12 
. ctrine, and describe the circumstances under which this con- 
dition of equality may to a gi-eater or less degree be departed 
from. Would such a departure affect the rights of property 



CCXXxii EXAMINATION FOR HONOURS IN LAW, 1883-84. 

possessed by such a state, and how far ? Give examples from 
the history of the whole world. 

9. Describe the principal effects of a conquest and a 10 
cession in its effects on the subjects of the conquered or 
ceded territory. 

Saturday, 24th November. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

GENERAL JURISPRUDENCE, INCLUDING INTER- 
NATIONAL LAW— Part II. 

The Hon'ble Rdo S^heb Vishvanath Narayan Mandlik, C.S.I. ; 
M. Starling, B.A., LL.B. 

[The figures to the ri^ht indicate full marks.] 

1. State fully the main facts and issues in the case of 12 
Damodar Gordhan v. Deoram Kanji, deceased, by his sons 
and heirs, and the decision of Her Majesty's Privy Council 

in that case. What are the practical bearings of that case 
on the various cessions made to or by the British Govern- 
ment in British India ? 

2. State the facts of the case of Her Highness Ruckma- 12 
hoye V. Lulloobhoy Moteechand and the decision of the 
Privy Council thereon, and the reasons given in support 
thereof. 

Statutes of limitation or prescription are a part of the lex 
fori. Discuss the principles on which this proposition is 
based, and give your authorities. 

3. What are retro-active statutes ? How are they inter- 10 
preted in Europe aud America ? Give the rules and their 
reasons. 

4. When there is a conflict between statutes, what are 12 
the reasons which decide their applicability in regard to 
domicile, marriage, divorce, debts and rights of action, and 
contracts ? Discuss the subject fully. 

5. What are the different parts of a statute, and how are 12 
they to be construed ? 

What are the powers of the several legislatures in India ? 
Are there any limitations ? If there are, describe them. If 
these are exceeded, what are the remedies ? 



BXAMINATION FOB HONOUBS IH LAW, 18^3-84. CCXTxiii 

6. What is ovmersMp ? How has it been understood 10 

and defined in Europe and Asia ? 

Discuss the question of co-ownership, both co-ordinate and 
subordinate, which may exist in the same thing, and the 
consequences of such ownership, giving examples from the 
history of both India and England. 

7. What are the principles which govern the cognizance 12 
and punishment of crimes in each state ? On what considera- 
tions are they founded ? What classes of persons are 
exempted from their operation, and why ? 

8. State the different varieties of exterritorial jurisdic- 10 
tion for criminal offences, and describe and discuss the 
principles on which they are founded, 

9. Describe the different political tenures in India, the 10 
rules of succession applicable thereto, and the rights of 
reversion in those tenures. 



MoiTDAT, 26th November. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

THE SEVERAL SYSTEMS OF MUNICIPAL LAW WHICH 
OBTAIN IN INDIA— Part I. 

The HonTble Rdo Sdheb Vishvakath Nakayan Manduk, C.S.I. ; 
M. Starling, B.A., LL.B. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. When and how far on a sale does the property in goods 8 
and chattels pass to the vendee although they may still remain 

in the possession of the vendor? Under such circumstancss 
what are the rights of the vendor ? 

2. A contract is made in France and sued upon in Eng- 8 
land ; by what law is its validity to be tested, by what law 

is it to be construed, and under what law is it to be enforced ? 

3. "What is general average ? In what way does it differ 8 
from particular average, and what things are liable to con- 
tribute to it ? 

4. In what does seaworthiness consist ? To what policies 8 
of insurance does the implied warranty of seaworthiness 
attach ? 



B 1030—20 ex* 



CCXXxiv EXAMINATION FOR HONOURS IN LAW, 1883-84. 

5. On what grounds is an injunction granted to restrain 8 
the wrongful use of a trade mark (1) at Common Law, (2) in 
Equity ? 

6. A, B and are partners ; A becomes insolvent and 8 
petitions the Court for the Relief of Insolvent Debtors. 
What are the rights of the Official Assignee in respect of A's 
interest in the partnership against B and C ? 

7. Under what circumstances will an action lie by one 8 
partner against the others during the continuance of the 
partnership ? 

8. A purchases property in the name of B. State fully 10 
the circumstances under which there will and will not be 

a resulting trust in favour of A, and by what means a 
resulting trust may be rebutted. 

9. What is the difference of manner in which a mortgage 8 
was looked upon at Common Law and in Equity ? What are 
the rights of the owner of an equity of redemption ? 

10. What are the circumstances under which in a Court 10 
of Equity notice to an agent is also notice to his principal ? 

11. Under what circumstances can a suit be brought in a 8 
Ck)urt of Equity respecting property situated outside the 
jurisdiction of the Court ? 

12 What acts on the part of the creditor will have the S 
effect of discharging a person from his liability as surety ? 



Monday, 2Gth November. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

THE SEVERAL SYSTEMS OF MUNICIPAL LAW 
WHICH OBTAIN IN INDIA-Part II. 

The Hon'ble Rdo S^heb Vishvanath Narayan Mandlik, C.S.I. ; 

M. Starling, B.A., LL.B. 

[The figures to the^right indicate full marks.] 

1. State the diff'erent tenures of land in the Bombay 15 
['residency, held entirely or partially free from the payment 
of Government revenue ; and how far they have been affected 
by the Regulations and Acts passed since 1799. State liriefly 
the corresponding tenures in the other provinces of India, 
and tliC sub-tenures under the two above classes of superior 
holders in this Presidency, 



EXAMINATION FOB HONOURS IN LAW, 1883-84. CCXXXV 

2. A's in^n holding haa been settled under Bombay Act 8 
ri. of 1863. He is now called upon under a new Forest Act 

J make fresh pajments for the forest within his settled 
i.olding. How would you advise him to act? Give full 
reasons for your answer, citing authorities. 

3. Give a brief history of the Mirds and other similar 1- 
: nures in the Bombay Presidency. Give the substance of 

ue leading Bombay case illustrative of the leading incidents 
of this tenure, and contrast or compare it with the Full 
Bench Madi-as case of Sakkaji Rao and others v. Latchmana 

laundana. 

4. How far has the doctrine of re«jMrfi<-a/a been motlified 11 
■ extended by the Civil Procedure Acts of 1877 and 1882? 

live your reasons. State the leading points decided in the 
lollowing cases : — 

(a) M'ler Raghobardydl v. JRaja Shio Baksh Sing. 

{b) Soorjomonee Dayee v. Sadanund Mohopatter 

5. State and discuss the leading points decided and ex- 10 
plained in the case of Sdvltribdi v. Laxmibdi, and give your 
authorities. How has the law therein laid down been ex- 
plained, followed or modiiied in subsequent cases ? 

6. State and discuss the principles on which Sapinda 12 
relationship in its threefold character is founded, and de- 
scribe the dififerent rules of inheritance deduced therefrom 

by the eastern and western schools of law. Give authorities. 

7. State the changes in the Registration law of Bombay 12 
from 1827 to 1877 in respect to its effect on competing con- 
veyances. 

Registration cures the defect of possession. How far does 
this doctrine apply ? 

State the points decided in Lalluhhdi Snrchand v. Bai 
Amrit and the authorities on which they are based. 

8. State fully the rules in regard to Mahomedan mar- 10 
riages and divorces, and the effect of the latter on the wife 
and children. Will mere acknowledgment suffice to give the 
children capacity to inherit ? 

State the leading points decided in the case of Naicdb 
Muhammad Azmat AU Khan v. Mushmut Lali Begum and 
others. 

9. Two Hindu brothers enter into an agreement never 10 
to divide their ancestral immoveable property. Can such an 
agreement be enforced against an unwilling brother ? Dis- 
cuss the question and cite cases. 



CCXXXvi fIBST BXAMINATION IN MKDICINS, 1883.84. 



X. 



FIRST EXAMINATION IN MEDICINE. 

EXAMINERS. 



W.K. Hatch, M.B,, CM., M.R.C.S. 
K. R.KiRTiKAE, M.R.C.S. ,L.R.C.P. 
(Lond.) 

G. Waters, L.R.C.S., L.R-C.P E. 
A. ATMARAM, M.B., B.Sc. ^Lond.) 

I. B, Lyon, M.R.C.S., F.C.S., F.I.C. 
Kaikhosru Rastamji Vikaji, L.M.. 
M.D. 



Sakaram Arjun Ravut, L.M. 

D. MacDonald, M.D., B.Sc, CM. 



In Anatomy, Descriptive 
and Practical. 

In Physiology and Histo- 
logy- 
fin Chemistry, including 
I Practical Chemistry, Ge- 
{ neral and Pharmaceuti- 
I cal Chemistry, and De- 
I tection of the Adultera- 
l tion of Drugs. 

In Botany, Materia Me- 
dica, and Pharmacy. 



FIRST EXAMINATION IN MEDICINE, 1883-84. CCXXXvii 
Monday, 17th September, 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

ANATOMY. 

W. K. Hatch, M.B., CM., M.R.C.S. ; 
K. R. KiRTiKAR, M.R.C.S., L.R.C.P. (Lond.) 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1 . Describe the cartilages of the Larynx, and their arti- 25 
culations. 

2. Give the steps in dissection of Perinaeum (in the male) 25 
and describe shortly the structures met with. 

3. Describe the kidneys and their relations (omitting 25 
the minute anatomy). 

4. Give the origin, course, branches and relations of 25 
the 9th or Hypoglossal nerve. 

5. What structures are in relation with the shoulder- 25 
joint ? Give origin, insertion and action of muscles there 
found. 

N.B. — Answer any /our of these questions. 



Monday, 17th Septembee. 
[2 P.M. TO 5 p.m.] 

PHYSIOLOGY AND HISTOLOGY. 

G. Waters, L.R.C.S., L.R.C.P.E. ; 
A. Atmaram, M.B., B.Sc. (Lond.) 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Give the minute structure of the Retina. 20 

2. Describe the mechanism of urine-secretion by the kid- 20 
neys, and the influences which govern it. State briefly the 
composition of healthy urine. 

3. Enumerate the vascular glands of the body, and 20 
describe the changes effected by the spleen on the fluids 
circulating through it. 



CCXXXviil FIRST EXAMINATION IN MEDICINE, 1883-84. 

4. Describe the minute structure of the Spinal Cord, 20 
giving the relation of the motor and sensory nerve-tracts 

in it. 

5. Describe fully the part played in digestion by the 20 
small intestine. 

6. Name and give short descriptions of the specimens 20 
A, B, C, and D under the microscopes. 

[N.B. — ^owr of the first five questions to be answered. 
The sixth question must be attempted. ] 

Tuesday, 18th September. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

CHEMISTRY. 

I. B. Ltox, M.R.C.S., F.C.S., F.I.C. ; 
KuKHOSRU Rastamji Vikaji, L.M., M.D. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks,] 

1. State what occurs when strong Sulphuric Acid is 12 
poured on (1) Potassium Chlorate, (2) Potassium Bichromate, 
and (3) Potassium Permanganate. Give formulae shelving 
the chemical change which is produced in each case. 

2. In what forms does free Carbon occur in nature ? De- IS 
scribe shortly the principal characters of each substance you 
enumerate as consisting of or containing free Carl>on. How 
may the composition and molecular formula of a gaseous 
compound of Carbon and Hydrogen be determined ? 

3. Give examples of each class of inorganic compounds 9 
into the composition of which the radical Hj'droxyl may be 
supposed to enter, and of the substances which may be 
formed from these by the replacement of Hydroxyl by Ami- 
dogen, 

4. A white powder heated in a tiibe does not char and 9 
gives a white sublimate ; heated in a narrow glass tube with 
Sodium Cai'bonate and powdered charcoal it gives a metallic 
sublimate. What metals may snch a powder contain, and 
supposing one metal only to be present in the powder, how 
would you ascertain by liquid tests wliat it is ? 

5. Describe Manganese Dioxide and state shortly the 12 
various purposes for which it is employed. 



FIBST EXAMIXATIOX IS MEDICINE, 1383-84. CCXXlix 

6. What is the composition of (1) Cane 8agar, (2) GIu- 1'2 
cose, and (3) Starch? How are they chemically distinguish- 
able from one another ? Give a formula showing the effect 

of fermentation on glucose. 

7 . Define the following :— ( 1 ) Methylated Spirit, (2) Proof 6 
Spirit. What do you understand by the expression "Spirit 

20 per cent, over proof "? 

8. What is Chloroform, how is it prepgured, and what 10 
is its relation to Chloral? 

9. Give: ' : and show the derivation of the follow- 12 

ing :— (1) > ine, (2) Citric Acid, (3) Gallic Acid, 

(4) TaurocL^^- -^.. .. 



TrEsi>AY, ISth Seftembeb. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

BOTAST, MATEEIA MEDICA and PHARMACY. 

Sakhap^m Aejtx Ratat, L M. ; 

D. MacDoxau), M.D., B.Sc., CM. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

] Describe a vegetable ceU and its contents in the young lo 
u: I in the mature state; give the different forms of the 
F.' :- vascular Tissue, mentioning the plants and parts in 
V, c.-ii each is found. 

2. Dissect an orthotropous, ariQate, albuminous seed, 15 
and mention the parts fn^m without inwards, giving the 
position of the embrjo and its development in the Angios- 
permise. 

3. Refer arrow-root, sago, tapioca, tobacco, and cas- 20 
tard apple to their respecrive Xatural Orders, mentic ning 
the scientific namts of the plants from which each is der;ved. 
Give the botanical characters, properties and uses of the 
Myrtaceje and Pahnacese. 

4. Give the composition, uses and doses of the following 15 
drugs : — 

(a) Mistura Sennae Composita. 

{b) Pilula Colocythidis Composita. 

(e) Pilula Plumbi cum Opio. 

{d) Pilula Saponis Composita. 

(?) Pulvis Ipecacnanhae Compoaitus. 

(/) Tinctura Camphors Composita. 



CCxl FIRST EXAMINATION IN MEDICINE, 1883-84. 

5. Give the botanical source from which Digitalis is 15 
obtained, its therapeutic uses, and the doses of its various 
preparations. 

6. Distinguish between the actions of — 20 

(1) Nitrous Oxide, 

(2) Sulphuric Ether, and 

(3) Chloroform, 

when used as anaesthetics in reference to — 

(a) the quantity required to produce anaesthesia ; 

(b) the time within which anaesthesia is commonly 

produced ; 

(c) the duration of the anaesthesia ; 

(d) the dangers attending their use ; and 

(e) the causes of these dangers. 



KXAM. FOE THB DSGEEB OP L.M. <fc S., 188S-84. CCxli 



XI. 



EXAMINATION FOR THE DEGREE OF 
L.M. & S. 

EXAMINERS. 



\' HojEL, L.K. andQ.C.P.I. 
KY Smith, M.D 



W. Gray, M.B. 

Pv Manser, M.R.C.S.... 



In Principles and Prac- 
tice of Medicine, includ- 
ing Pathology. 

' In Principles and Practice 
of Surgery, including 
Surgical Anatomy and 
Ophthalmic Surgery. 

In Midwifery, and Dis- 
eases of Women and 
Children, 



E. H. R. Lasgley, B.A 

D. N. Parak, M.RC.S., L.R.C.P. ... 

I.B.Lyon, M.R.C.S., F.C.S., F.I.C... \ In MedicalJurisprudenc, 

K.UKHOSRXJ Rastamji ViKAJi, LM., •< including Practical To - 

M.D. 1 xicology and Hygiene.. 



a 1030—21 fx 



CCxlii EXAM. FOR THE DEGREK OF L.M. & S., 1888-84.. 

Monday, 26th November. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

MEDICINE AND PATHOLOGY. 

A. N. HojEL, L.K. & Q.C.P.I. j Sidney Smith, M.D. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. With what cerebral lesion is Aphasia usually con- 20 
nected ? Give a description of the aphasic state in its most 
common form ; and also the different varieties that are some- 
times met with. 

2. Describe a typical case of Pertussis. What complica- 20 
tions are likely to arise during the course of the afifection ? 
State the treatment you would adopt in uncomplicated and 

in complicated cases. 

3. Mention the diseases of the liver that are characterized 20 
by enlargement of that organ ; and describe the pathological 
conditions which are present in each. 

4. Give the physical signs of a cavity in the lung, and 20 
state what circumstances might lead to its formation. 

5. WTiat means and remedies are available for the reduc- 20 
tion of temperature in the febrile state ? 



Monday, 26th Novembeh. 
[2 p.m. to 5 P.M.] 

SURGERY, SURGICAL ANATOMY, and 

OPHTHALMIC SURGERY. 

W. Gray, M.B. ; R. Manser, M.R.C.S. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Give the differential diagnosis of the various 
comma Hiours found in Scarpa's triangle. 

2. Name the chief varieties of fracture of the clavicle. 
Describe the deformity in each case, the causes of the de- 
formity, and give the treatment. 

.". Describe the course, relations, distribution, and 
communications of the internal pudic artery ; and state 
under what circumstances the trunk of this vessel may 
be wounded. 



E5AM. FOR THE DEGREE OF L.M. & S., 1883-84. CCxliii 

4. (live the pathology and treatment of acute abscess. 17 
Mention the principal circumstances in which this abscess 

~ likely to bs followed by sinus and fistula. 

5. What surgical diseases can be seen, or their exist- l-n 
:e inferred, by simple inspection of the anas, ischio- 

tal region, and perinseum ? 

•;. What are the causes, complications, results, and 15 
-..tment of ulceration of the cornea ? 



Tc"ESDAT, 27th November, 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

MIDWIFERY AN-D DISEASES of WOMEN and CHILDREN. 

E. H. R. LuiNGLBr, B.A. ; D. N. Pabak, M.R.C.S., L.R.C.P. 

[The figures to the right indicate fall marks.] 

1. In Placenta Pracvia, what conditions would justify 20 
respectively (1) non-interference, (2) taming, (3) instrumental 
interference ? 

2. Describe the method of performing Bipolar Podalic 20 
Version. What are the conditions favourable to the suc- 

vssful performance of the same ? 

3. \Miat are the local causes of Menorrhagia, and the 20 
treatment you would adopt in each case ? 

4. Give the sjTnptoms and treatment of Laryngismus 20 
stridulus, and name the diseases with which it might be 

nfounded. 

rt. What are the symptoms and treatment of Vaginismus ? 20 



Tuesday, 27th November. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

MEDICAL JLTIISPRUDEXCE axd HYGIENE. 

L B. Lyox, M.R.C.S., F.C.S., F.LC. ; 
Kaikhosbu Rastamji Vikaji, L.M., M.D. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks. ] 

1. Mention the principal affections the symptoms of 10 
iiich simulate those of corrosive or irritant poisoning, and 
ate how you would differentiate them from poisoning. 



CCXliv EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF L.M. & S., 1883-84 

2. A person purchased at a druggist's " Essential oil of 15 
bitter almonds " and inadvertently administered a teaspoon- 

ful of it in water to a person suffering from colic. JDeath 
ensued within an hour. Discuss this case, pointing out the 
symptoms probably present, the nature and probable quan- 
tity of the poison administered, and the method to be em- 
ployed for its detection. 

3. Enumerate the characters of the wound which wotlld 15 
lead you to infer suicide in — 

(a) a case of death from cut throat ; 

(b) a case of death from a gunshot wound. 

4. What are the principal characters laid down as dis- 15 
tinguishing homicide by insane from homicide by sane 
persons ? 

5. State the chief causes of impotence in the male and 15 
sterility in the female, distinguishing those which are reme- 
diable. How do the medico-legal relations of remediable 
impotence differ from those of irremediable impotence? 
What are the general limits of activity of the reproductive 
organs in the two sexes ? 

6. Explain the terms " ground air " and " ground water. " 15 
What is known about them? How is "ground water" 
supposed to influence the health of a locality ? 

7. Enumerate and classify the principal food staples em- 15 
ployed by the non- meat -eaters of India. Roughly sketch out 

a dietary formed from these suitable for a healthy adult in 
active work, and calculate approximately its nutritive value. 



FIRST EXAMINATION IN CIVIL ENGINEEEING, 1883-84. CCxlv 



XII. 



FIRST EXAMINATION IN CIVIL 
ENGINEERING. 

EXAMINEES. 
J. T. Hathorsthwaite, M.A, ^ 

FARDUyjiMANCHERJiDASTtJB, M.A. I 

The Rev. R. Scx)Tr, M.A. j- la Mathematics. 

Jamshedji Ardesir Dalal, M.A,, | 
LL.B. J 

1. B.Lyon-, M.R.C.S., F.C.S., F.I.C. ] 
Kaikhosru Kastamji ViKAji, L.M., I In Chemistry. 
M.D. j 

The Rev. F. Dreckmann, S.J. ) 

Kava.sji Dadabhai Naegamvala, > In Experimental Physics. 

M.A.,F.C.S., F.I.C. ) 

Lieut. -Colonel W. M. Ducat. R.R | 
Jamks Scorgie, F.C.S,, Mem. Soc. > In Engineering. 

Eng. 



B 1030—21 ex* 



CCxlvi FIRST EXAMINATION IN CIVIL BNGINEERINQ, 1883-84. 
Tuesday, 6th November. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

ALGEBRA and ARITHMETIC. 

J. T. Hathornthwaite, M.A. ; 

Fardunji Makcherji Dastur, M.A.; The Rev. R. Scott, M.A. ; 

Jamshedji Ardesir Dalal, M.A., LL.B. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

Algebra. 

1. Prove that (n + 1) {w+ 2) (n + 3) ton factors 7 

— 2n X 1.3 5 to n factors. 

"2. Show that a factor may be found which will rationalize S 
auy binomial. 

Reduce .- — ,- where x= ~^. 

^l + X -^1 —X 2 

3. Distinguish between a quadratic equation and a quadra- I'i 
tic expresfiion and shew that a quadratic equation has two 
and only two roots. 

Solve the equation ^ x^ — 3x + 8 = | (x" — 7x + 8). 

4. Define ratio, variation, ■proportional, cammensurabU. 7 
If A vary as B when C is constant and A vary as C when 

B is constant, prove that A will vary as the product BC 
when both B and C are variable. Give fully a geometrical 
illusti'ation. 

!i. Sum the scries : — 1-^ 

(1) 17i, 14^, 10| to 24 terms. 

(2) 1, 3, 6, 10, 15, tort terms. 

(3) h -/t, ?V t«V to infinity. 

6. Investigate a formula for the number of permutations 8 
of n things taken all together which are not all different. 

How many different numbers can be made out of all the 
figures of 111223? 

7. Enunciate the Binomial Theorem and prove it for a 1 5 
positive integral exponent. 

Write down the r + 1th term in the expansion of ^Z «" — *' 

+ a;l 
and the coefficient of x^o in -• 

(1— »)» 



'IR3T EXAMIKATIOK 15 CIVIL BSGIXBKRIIG, 1883-84. CCxlvii 



ABirmCETIC. 



8. What are the adrantages of decimal fractions and a 
decimal coinage — 

•i4-r'144- (1^1) x(.OOOl^-Ol) 



3 428571x416 

9. Find to five decimal places the side of a square and 
the diameter of a circle that are each equal in area to a tri- 
angular field whose sides are 400, 500 and 600 yards. 

10. A sum of money amounts to £392 I3». 4d. in 5 years 
and 4 months at simple interest, Find how much more 
or less it would have amounted to in 4 years at compoond 
interest, interest being at the rate of 4§ per cent. 



Wedsbsdat, 7th Notembeb. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

EUCLID ASD TRIGONOMETRY. 

J. T. HATHOWfTHWAITK, M.A. ; 

Fabdcsji Maxcheeji Dastcb, M.A. : The Rev. R. Scott, M.A. ; 
Jajcshsdji Abdesib Dalal, M.A., LL.B. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1 . Draw all the common tangents to two unequal circles, 
which do not cat or touch each other. 

2. Inscribe an equDat^^ and equiangular pentagon in a 10 
given circle. 

If a figure of any odd number of sides have all its angular 
points on the same circle and all its an^es equal, then shall 
all its sides be equal. 

3. Equiangular parallelograms have to one another the 1 2 
ratio which is compounded of the ratios of their sides. 

What is meant by compound ratio and ex aquali ? Explain 
your definitions. 

If two triangles ABC, AEF have a common angle at A, 
the triangle ABC sball have to the triangle AEF tbe ratio 
compounded of the ratios of the sides in each triangle 
about the angle A, 



CCxlviii FIRST EXAMINATION IN CIVIL ENGINEERING, 1883-84. 

4. Erect a straight line at right angles to a given plane 8 
from a given point in the plane. 

On a given equilateral triangle as base describe a regular 
tetrahedron. 

5. The numerical measures of the angles of a quadrilateral 10 
when referred to units containing 1°, 2°, 3°, 4° respectively 
are in arithmetical progression, and the diflference of the 
second and fourth is equal to a right angle ; find the angles. 

6. Investigate a formula for all the angles which have a 10 
given sine. Shew that all the angles which have both the 
same sine and the same cosine a as are included in the 
expression 2mT + a. 

7. Express by means of inverse notation the formula 1 1 

cot(a-^) = 1+cotacot^ . 
cot /3 — cot a 



Hence solve the equation 
3 cot {2 + \ 
8. In any triangle obtain the formula 



3 cot ^ (2 + a/3)— cot ^x = cot ^3. 



sin A ^ \/2 (f' c" + c^ g'^ + g' b'-) — {a* + b* + c" ) 
Wc 
and shew that this value of sin A is always possible. 

9. Solve a triangle having given two sides and the included 1 2 
angle. 

Given a = 1900 log 3 = -4771213 

6 = 100 L tan 57° 19' = 101927506 
C = 60° L tan 57° 20' = 10-1930286 
determine the angles A and B. 

Also without using logarithms find the side c. 

10. If r be the radius of the circle inscribed in a triangle, 14 
and r-i, r^, r^ be the radii of the circles inscribed between this 
circle and the sides containing the angles A, B, C respect- 
ively, prove that 



tan'^-tC'tan^Cj^ tan^A_±.B 
4 4 4 



flBST EXAMINATION IN CIVIL ENGINEERING, 1883-84;. CCxUx 

Wednesday, 7th Novembek. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

STATICS, 

J. T. Hathornthwaite, M.A. ; 

Fardcxji MancherjiDastcr, M.A. ; The Rev. 11. Scott, M.A.; 

Jamshedji Ardesir Dalal, M.A , LL.B. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks. ] 

[The same as set for the First B.A. Examination. See page cv.] 



TtJESDAY, 6th November. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

DYNAMICS AND HYDROSTATICS. 

J. T. Hathorkthwaite, M.A. ; 

Fardunji Mancherji Dastur, M.A. ; The Rev. R, Scott, M.A. ; 

Jamshedji Ardestr Dalal, M.A., LL.B. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Define acceleration and explain carefully the meaning 10 

of the symbol g. 

Shew that if / denote an acceleration when a second is 
the unit of time and a foot the unit of length, then the same 

acceleration will be denoted by — ■/ if we take m seconds 

n 
as the unit of time and n feet as the unit of length. 

2. A, B, C, D are points in a vertical line, the lengths 8 
AB, BC, CD being equal, and a body is let fall from A ; 
compare the times of describing AB, BC, CD. 

3. Prove that a particle projected in any direction and 12 
acted on by gravity only will describe a parabola. 

Prove also that the time of describing any arc PI" is pro- 
portional to the diflference of the tangents of the angles which 
the directions of motion at P and P' make with the horizon. 

4. A ball A strikes directly another ball B which is at 10 
rest, and after collision their velocities are equal and opposite ; 



CCI FIKST EXAMINATION IN CIVIL ENGINEERING, 1883-84. 

find the mutual elasticity of the balls and shew that the 
problem is impossible unless B's mass is at least 3 times as 
great as that of A. 

5. A body starts from one given point and after reflexion 8 
at a given fixed smooth plane it is to pass through another 
given point ; determine the direction of incidence, the index 

of elasticity being supposed known. 

6. What is meant by the pressure at any point within a 15 
mass of fluid ? 

A closed air-tight cylinder of height 2a is half full of 
water and half full of air at the atmospheric pressure, which 
is equal to that of a column h of water. Without letting 
any air escape water is introduced so as to fill an additional 
height k of the cylinder, and the pressure on the base is 
thereby doubled ; prove that 

k = a + h — ^h (a + h). 

7. Shew how to find the specific gravity of a solid whether 9 
heavier or lighter than water. 

A piece of wood weighing an ounce in air has attached to 
it a piece of metal weighing 4 ounces in air and 2 ounces in 
water, and the two together weigh an ounce in water ; what 
is the specific gravity of the wood ? 

8. Find the centre of pressure of a triangle with its 8 
vertex in the surface of a fluid and base horizontal. 

9. Describe the mercui'ial barometer. 1- 
A barometer is held suspended in water by a string at- 
tached to its upper end so that a portion of the string is im- 
mersed ; find the height of the mercury and tension of the 
string. 

10. Describe the common pump and investigate the 8 
tension of the piston rod when the pump is in full action. 



Monday, 5th November. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

HEAT AND FllICTIONAL ELECTRICITY. 

The Rev. F. Drkckmann, S.J. ; 

Kavasji Dadabhai Naegamvala, M.A., F.C.S., F.I.C. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

I Prove k'^ = V^^ {?Il±-^\ P- , enunciate the laws 16 
V273 + t/p' 



FIRST EXAMISATIOX IK CIVIL ESGIXEEBrS'G, 1883-84. Ccli 

expressed by it, and show how you will proceed to prove 
them experimentally. 

2. Describe an ice calorimeter, 12 

A hole is made in a block of ice at 0' C, and an iron ball 
weighing 200 grammes and at 100' C. is dropped in. When 
the ball melts no more ice, the water formed is weighed and 
found to amount to 29 grammes. Find the specific heat of 
iron. 

3. What i* saturated vapour? 20 

Compare the change of pressure occasioned in a mass of 
saturated vapour compressed to half its original volunte 
without change of temperature, with that produced in a 
mass of dry air similarly compressed (a) without change of 
temperature and (6) with consequent change of temperature. 

Whenever two masses of saturated air at different temper- 
atures meet and mix, cloud or mist is formed. Why is this ? 

4. Describe and give an explanation of the phenomena of 12 
the " spheroidal state." Show how boiler explosions may be 
accounted for on the same principle, 

.5. Describe the lightning-conductor and its action ; 15 
state and explain the principal points to be attended to in 
its construction and in its erection upon a large building. 
What is the return shock 7 Compare its effects with those of 
the direct flash. 

6. There are two similar gold-leaf electroscopes, one of 15 
them with a point attached to the cap. A piece of sealing wax 
rubbed with silk is held over each of them and removed. 
Describe and explain the indications of the electroscopes 
before and after removal of the sealing wax. 

7. Describe Lane's unit jar and show how it is used to 10 
measure the charge of a battery. 



MoxDAT, 5th Xovember. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

INORGANIC CHEMISTRY. 
I. B. Ltox, M.KC.S., F.C.S., F.I.C. ; 
Kaikhosru Rastamji Vikaji, L.M., M.D. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 
1 . Under what circumstances is sulphuretted hydrof'en 
naturally evolved ? How is it artificiidly prepared ? Stote 
what effect it produces when passed into (1) a solution of 
chlorine, (2) a solution of ammonia. 



Cclii FIRST EXAMINATION IN CIVIL ENGINEERING, 1883-84, 

2. What are the common impurities of commercial 12 
nitric acid ? Upon what properties of this acid does its em- 
ployment in the arts and manufactures chiefly depend ? 

3. What quantivalence is exhibited by the element 10 
nitrogen in combination ? Illustrate your answer by symbols 
for' some of its compounds. 

4. What do you know about the production of ozone in 12 
the air ? State what agents in the atmosphere destroy it. 
Discuss its composition. 

5. Describe the action of heat on ammonic nitrate and 10 
ammonic nitrite. 

6. Iodine vapour is 8716 times as heavy as air. Find 10 
from this its molecular weight. 

7. In the gravimetric synthesis of water, the loss of 15 
weight of cupric oxide was found in one experiment to 
amount to 8 '246 grammes, and the water obtained weighed 

9 "270 grammes. Calculate the percentage composition of 
water as shown by this experiment, and compare the results 
with theorj'. 

8. How do chlorine and sulphurous acid respectively act 9 
as bleaching agents ? 

9. What are the two chief products which tend to lower 10 
the illuminating power of gas oljtained from the distillation 

of coal, and how is coal gas purified from them ? 



Thursday, 8th November. 
[10 a.m. to 1 P.M.] 

ENGINEERING FIELD-WORKS. 

Lieut. -Colonel W. M. Ducat, R.E. ; 
James Scokgie, F.C.S., Mem. See. Eng. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks. ] 

1. What is a horizontal surface ? «i 

2. What are the two scales of the ordnance maps of 8 
Britain, and what is the smallest scale permitted by the 
standing orders of Parliament for the deposited plans of 
proposed works? 



FIRST EXAMINATION IN CIVIL ENGINEEEING, 1883-84 Cclili 

3. In the plans and sections of a railway or canal, what 12 
information should invariably be written on the plan and 
wliat on the section ? 

4. Describe as fully as possible a Gunter's chain. What 10 
is meant by a " change " in a long line, and how is the tally 

of changes sometimes kept? 

5. Describe the circular protractor. 10 

6. Describe the permanent adjustments of the Dumpy 15 
level. 

7. How can the errors of curvature and refraction be neu- 10 
tralized in levelling ? 

8. For nautical surveys what is the datum surface rela- 10 
tively to which the levels of the bottom are stated ? 

9. How do you determine the position of stations afloat ? 20 
Describe the method of plotting the sanie by two inter- 
sectin^ cii'cles. 



TuuRSDAY, 8th November. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

MATERIALS USED in CONSTRUCTION. 

Lieut. -Colonel W. M. Dccat, R.E. ; 

James Scorgie, F.C.S,, Mem. Soc. Eng. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Name the classes into which building stones are usu- 12 
ally di\-ided, and give an example of each. State some of 
the external appearances from which the probable durability 

of a stone may be inferred. 

2. State some of the causes of decay in building stone. 8 
Describe and explain the silicate of lime process for the pre- 
servation of stone. 

3. How woidd you judge of the good or bad quality of 10 
a brick (1) for ordmary building purposes, and (2) for hy- 
draulic works ? 

4. When natural hydraulic lime stones are not available, 7 
how would you endeavour to form hydraulic mortar arti- 

cially ? 

B 1030 -22 ex 



CCliv FIRST EXAMINATION IN CIVIL ENGINEERING, 1883-84. 

5. Give some of the uses of the mixture of sand with lime 8 
t3 form mortar. What kind of sand should be employed ? 

6. How Avoiild you test a mortar with a view to ascertain 13 
(1) its adhesiveness to bricks, (2) its internal cohesion, and 

J3) the proportion of sand it will " beak- "? 

7. What is the essential difference between cast and 12 
wrought iron ? How is the quality of wrought iron affected 

by the presence of phosphorus or sulphur ? 

8. How would you judge of the quality of a sample of 10 
wrought iron from the appearance of a recent fracture ? 
Wliat is necessaiy to produce a good weld ? 

9. What are the characteristics of firwood and hard- 8 
wood ? When is the best time for felling timber trees ? 

10. How are drying oils prepared ? Describe the process 12 
of knotting, priming, and painting in oil an ordinary piece of 
joiner's work. 



Friday, 9th November. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

MASONRY. 

Lieut, -Colonel W. M. Ducat, R.E. ; 

James Scorgie, F.C.S., Mem. Soc. Eng. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. State the general principles to be observed in the build- 12 
ing of all classes of stone masonry. 

2. Describe with free hand-sketches the construction of 12 
coursed rubble masonry. What should be the proportion 

of bond-stones in each course, and how should they be 
placed in successive courses ? Why is great care necessary 
in the inspection of rubble work ? 

3. Explain the use of cramps and dowels. g 

4. What is the essential difference between English and 14 
Flemish bond ? In what case is the latter preferred to the 
former ? Draw to a scale of !i inch to a foot the plan of two 
successive courses, in Flemish bond, where one wall meets 
another at i-ight angles, the walls being two bricks thick. 



FinST EXAMINATION IX CIVIL ENGINEERING, 1883-B4. Cclv 

5. Name the vaiious parts of a masonry bridge and S 
explain their uses. 

6. Draw the plan and development of a rectangular 14 
groined roof formed by two vaults of the same height but 
tlifferent in diameter. 

7. Define the term /oMwrfa//t)». What are the principles 10 
to be attendetl to in preparing foundations where the soil is 

at all of a doubtful character ? 

S. Describe the constriiction of a coffer-dam. In what 12 
situation would you recommend its use ? 

9. What is a caisson ? When would you use a caisson in 10 
preference to a coffer-dam ? 



Friday, 9th November. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

EOADS AND EARTHWORK. 

Lieut.-Colonel W. M. Ducat, R.E. ; 
James Scorgie, F.C.S., Mem. Soc. Eng. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks. ] 

1. In calculating the stability of earth- work what is the 7 
only force that can be permanently relied on, and why ? 

2. What is meant by the term iMlf-breadth of a piece of 5 
earth-work ? 

.3. What is meant by equalizing earth-work, and what is 10 
the object of it ? 

4. In forming an embankment on soft soil where it is 20 
found ad\-isable to dig out the natural soil and fill in 
with a stal)le material, give Rankine's formulae for the depth 
and breadth of the foundations. 

5. In blasting in rock, what is about the average weight 8 
^,f rock loosened to the weight of powder exploded ? 

(J. ^Vhat is the rule for the charge of powder in small 10 
blasts? 



Cclvi PIEST EXAMINATION IN CIVIL ENGINEERING, 1883-84. 

7. What is the size, weight and description of good road- 10 
metal ? 

8. What is the requisite thickness of metal for a first 10 
class road with heavy traffic, and how should it be laid on ? 

9. How is a metalled road repaired ? What is meant by 10 
darning ? Is this recommended ? 

10. What is blinding 1 What reason does Rankine give 10 
for calling the use of blinding bad practice, and how can 
this be corrected ? 



8XAM. P0& THE DEaBEB OP L.C.B., 1883-84. CCItu 



xin. 



EXAMINATION FOR THE DEGREE OF L.C.E. 



EXAMINERS. 



J. T. Hathor>thwaite, M.A ^ 

FARDcyji Maxchekji Dastuk, M.A, . 

The Rev. R. Scott, M.A }- 

Jamshedji Abdeseb Dalal, M.A., | 
LL.B j 

I. B. Lyos, M JLC.S., F.C.S., F.LC. ... 

Kaikhosbu Rastauji Vikaji, L.M., 

MJ) 

The Rev. F. Dkeckmajts-, S.J. 

BLaVASJI D.VDABHAI X.VEGAMVALA. 

F.C.S., F.I.C 



,m.a! ( 



A. N. Peabson, F.R. Met.Soc, F.C.S., 
AJ.C 

Lieut. -Col. W. M, Dccat, R.E, 
James ScoBGiE, F.C.S., Mem. Soc. Eng. 

James Scorgie, F.C.S., Mem. Soc. Eng. 
Geobge E. OKMisroN, Mem. Inst. C.E. 

Sakharam Aejc>- Ravut, L.M. ... 1 
D. MAcDoyALD, M.D., B.Sc., CM. .. I 



In Mathematics. 



In Inorganic Chemia* 
try and in MetaQar- 

gy- 

In Experimental Phy- 
sics. 

In Creology and in 
Mining and Meteo- 
rology. 



[ In^^Engineering, 



In Mechanical Engi- 
neering. 

In Botany. 



B 1030—22 ex* 



COlviii EXAM. FOE THE DEGREE OF L.C.E., 1883-84, 

Friday, 16th November. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

MENSURATION of SURFACES and SOLIDS. 

J. T. Hathorxthwaite, M.A. ; 

Fardunji Mancheeji Dastur, M.A. ;The Rev. R. Scott, M.A, 

Jamshedji Ardesir Dalal, M.A., LL.B. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. If a regular polygon of n sides be inscribed in a circle 7 
of radius R, and in the inscribed circle of this polygon a 
similar polygon be inscriljed, and another similar polygon in 
the inscribed circle of this polygon, and so on, ad infinitum, 
find the sum of the areas of all the polygons. 

2. (rt) The sides of the perimeter of the transverse section 10 
of a frustum of a prism are 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7 feet, and the lengths 

of the edges through the intersections of the first and second, 
second and third sides, &c., are 13, 17, 15, 14, and 12 feet 
respectively ; find the area of the lateral surface. 

(6) Each side of the base of a regular octagonal pyramid is 
4 feet, and the altitude is 20 feet ; find the point in the axis 
through which a plane must be drawn parallel to the base to 
divide the lateral surface into two equal parts. 

3. Calculate the area and construct the figure of the poly- S 
gon, the co-ordinates of the angiilar points of which, in feet, 
are:- (0, — 8-12), {9-31, —16-21), (2511, -9-61), (30,0), 
(23, 0), (22-1, 15-4), (7-23, 1648) and (0, 11). 

4. Find approximately, by Simson's Rule, the area of a S 
curvilinear figure from the following data : — 

The base line is 360 feet ; 

The positive ordinates are : — 0, 34, 56, 63, 71, 77, 80, 83, 
90, 88, 81, 84, 70, 54, 0. 

The negative ordinates are : — 0, 40, 56, 63, 74, 80, 77, 72, 
69, 64,62, 61, 55, 41, 0. 

b. Find the number of cubic yards of earth excavated 12 
from a railway cutting made through ground, the original 
surface of which was an inclined plane ninning in the same 
direction as the rails ; the length of the cutting being 5 
chains, the breadth at bottom 30 feet, the breadth of top at 
one end 75 feet and at the other 125 feet, and the depths of 
these ends 20 feet and 40 feet respectively. 



EXAM. FOE THE OEGEEB OF L.C.E., 1883 S4- CCUX 

6. If two circles be described on the boanding ladii of a ' 
quadrant of a circle of 4 inches <liameter, find the area <*™' 
mon to the two circles, and the area intercepted between the 
arc of the quadrant and the circumferences of the two circles. 

7. («) Three equal circles touch each other ; find the area iQ 
of the space between them. 

(6) If the area of the double lune contained between an 
eUipee and the circle on its major axis be twice the area of the 
double lune contained between the same eUipse and the circle 
on its minor axis, find the ratio of the axes. 

S. AheaTy sphere is placed in a hollow circular cone S 
whose axis is vertical, and vertex downwards, and the inter- 
mediate space is filled with water which just covers the sphere 
as it begins to flow over. If the sphere be withdrawn slowly, 
find the" depth through which the water will sink, the alti- 
tude of the cone being 20 inches and the vertical angle GO . 

9. Draw figures of an oval and an involute of a regular 15 
polygon. 

Find the »ea of tie ov^ and the length <A tiie involute 
after the string has been uncoiled from p conaecntive aides of 
the polygon. 

10. Find the area of the aturface of a sphere, and of any 15 
segment or zone of it. 

Compare the areas in the zones of the earth's hemisphere ; 
the frigid zone ext^'uding to 234^ from the pole, the torrid to 
•23V from the e^juator, and the intermediate belt being occu- 
pied by the temperate. 

Ttbsdat, 13th Novkmbkr. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

CO^'IC SECTIONS AST) ANALYTICAL GEOMETRY 
OF TWO DIMEXSIOXS. 

J, T. Hathornthwaite, M.A. ; 

FARDryji Manchxeji Dasttk, M.A.; The Rev. R. Scott, M.A. 

Jamshedji Abdssib Dalal, M.A., LL.B. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Define a Conic Section. Enumerate and distinguish 8 
■ e conic sections. 

Given the focus, directrix and eccentricity of a ccmic, deter- 
mine any number of points on the curve. 



CClx EXAM. FOE THE DEGREE OF L.C.E., 1883-84. 

2. If from an external point a pair of tangents OQ, OQ' 
be drawn to a parabola, and the chord QQ' be joined, prove 
that the area of the figure bounded by QQ' and the curve is 
two-thirds of the triangle QOQ'. 

3. The tangent at P meets the axis-major of an ellipse 
produced in T, and PN is the ordinate of the point P ; 
shew that GT.CN =jCA^ . 

Also if the normal meet the axis-major in G, prove that 

4. If the tangent at any point P of an ellipse meet a pair 
of conjugate diameters in T and t, and CD be conjugate to 
CP, prove that 

SP. S'P = CUi- =PT. PL 

5. The tangent at any point P of an hyperbola meets the 
asymptotes in L and I ; shew that the area of the triangle 
LGl is equal to the rectangle contained by ^C and BC. 

If any two tangents be drawn to an hyperbola, prove that 
the lines joining the points where they intersect the asymp- 
totes will be parallel. 

6. Shew that the equation Ax + By + C = always 
represents a straight line. When does the general equation 
of the second degree represent straight lines ? 

Draw the lines Sx + 5y — S0 =^ 0, x^ + xy — 1y^ = and 

«(<>.?) = .. 

7. Find the condition that the straight lines represented 
by the equation Ax^ + Bxy + Cy^ = may be at right 
angles to each other. 

8. Shew how to change the direction of rectangulr axes 
without changing the origin. Find the value of 6 in order 
that the term involving xy may be removed from the 
equation 

aa;2 + bxy + cyi + d = 0. 

9. Investigate the equation to the circle referred to polar 
co-ordinates. 

A straight line is drawn from a fixed point 0, meeting a 
fixed circle at P ; in OP a point Q is taken so that OP. OQ 
= k^ ; determine the locus of Q. 

10. Tangents are drawn to a circle from a given external 
point ; find the equation to the chord of contact. 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF L.C.E., 1883-84. CClxi 

What interpretations can be assigned to the equation of 
this form, when the point is (1) on the circle and (2) within 
the circle ? 



Wednesday, 14th November. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

STATICS AND DYNAMICS. 

J. T. Hathornthwaite, M.A. ; 

Fardunji Mancherji Dastttr, M.A. ; The Rev. R. Scott, M.A, 

Jamshedji Ardesir Dalal, M.A., LL.B. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Prove that a system of forces in one plane will be in 8 
equilibrium if the sums of their moments about three points 
not in one line vanish. 

A rod AB moveable about a given fulcrum is in equilibrium 
when acted on by forces represented by AC and BD ; the 
point C being given, find the locus of D. 

2. The sides of a triangular frame are uniform and of 16 
lengths 12, 16 and 20, and it is capable of moving in a verti- 

cai plane about a point in the side whose length is 16. If the 
line from the largest angle to the middle point of the oppo- 
site side is vertical when the frame is in a position of equili- 
brium, find the distance of the point of suspension from this 
angle. 

3. Shew that a body placed on a horizontal plane will 10 
stand or fall according as the vertical line drawn through its 
centre of g^a^^ty falls within or without the base. 

A round table stands on three legs placed on the cir- 
cumference at equal distances ; prove that a body whose 
weight is not greater than that of the table may be placed on 
any point of it without upsetting it. 

4. How may the requisites of a good balance be satisfied ? 10 

If a man sitting in one scale press with a stick against any 
point of the beam between the fulcrum and point of suspen- 
sion of this scale, shew that he will appear to weigh more 
than before. 

5. Enunciate the principle of virtual velocities and prove 6 
it for the lever. 

6. De&ae velocity, accelerati07i. How is velocity measured ? 10 



Cclxii EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF L.C.E., 1883-84 



If the force of gravity be taken as the unit of force and a 
rate of 10 miles an hour as the unit of velocity, find the units 
of length and time. 

7. Determine the position of the focus of the parabola 10 
described by a projectile. 

Bodies are projected from the same point in the same 
vertical plane so as to describe parabolas having a latus- 
rectum of given length ; shew that the locus of the foci is an 
equal parabola with its vertex downwards and focus at the 
point of projection. 

8. Explain carefully the formula F — Mf. 8 

A weight of 16 lbs. is placed on a plane which is made to 
ascend vertically with an acceleration of 12 ft. per second ; 
find the pressure on the plane, g being taken = 32. 

9. A body A impinges directly on another B ; determine 6 
the velocities after impact, the elasticity being imperfect. 

Find the necessary and sufficient condition in order that 
the velocity of B after impact may be equal to the velocitj' of 
A before impact, 

10. Two bodies of weights W and W hang from the ex- 16 
tremities of a string passing over a smooth pulley ; determine • 
the motion. 

If at the end of each second from the beginning of motion 
the greater weight W be suddenly diminished and W be 
suddenly increased so as not to experience any impulse by 

i of their original difference ; shew that they will have no 
n 

velocity at the end of w + 1 seconds. 



Wednesday, 14th November. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

HYDROSTATICS. 

J. T. Hathornthwaite, M.A. ; 
Fardunji Mancherji Dastur, M.A. ; The Rev. R. Scorr, Jl. A.; 

Jamshedji Ardesir Dalal, M.A., LL.B. 
[The same as setjor the Second B, A. Examination. See page clvii.] 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF L.C.E., 1883-84. Cclxiii 
MoxDAY, 12th November. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

INORGANIC CHEMISTRY. 

I. B. Lyox, M.R.C.S., F.C.S., F.I.C. ; 
Kaikhoskxt Rastamji Vtkaji, L.M., M.D. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Explain the process for the artificial production of 16 
nitre. Given its specific gravity 2 '07, calculate the amount 

of oxygen available for the oxidation of combustible bodies 
in 10 cubic centimetres of the salt. State what volume of 
atmospheric air is represented by 10 cubic centimetres of 
nitre in power of supporting combustion. 

2. Descril>e the ammonia process for the manufacture of 12 
carbonate of soda. 

3. Show by a formula the reaction which takes place 10 
when ferrous sulphate, sulphuric acid, and nitre are heated 
together. 

4. Indicate briefly the composition of the following sub- 12 
stances : — Mineral kermes, ultramarine, spiegeleisen, and 
mineral chameleon. 

5. \Miat is the principal mineral used for the extraction 16 
of aluminum ? How is the metal extracted from it. and what 

is the percentage of aluminum contained in it ? Give a short 
account of the chemical and physical properties of metallic 
luniinum and the uses to wiiich it is put in the arts. 

G. What are the principal applications of lime in the 12 
arts? What is the composition of hydraulic moiiars? How- 
may lime have hydraulic properties conferred upon it ? 

7. Describe briefly the physical and chemical properties 10 
of metallic tin. To what uses is it put in the arts ? What is 
the composition of its principal alloys ? 

S. Name and state the composition of the several metallic 12 
salts used ais white, yellow, red, and green pigments. 



Cclxiv EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF L.C.E., 1883-84. 

Monday, 12th November. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

HEAT, VOLTAIC ELECTRICITY and MAGNETISM. 

The Rev. F. Dreckmann, S.J. ; 
Kavasji Da^dabhai Naegajivala, M.A., F.C.S., F.I.C. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Distinguish carefully between convection and radla- 16 
tion. 

Define thermal conductivity. How much water will be 
evaporated per minute in an iron boiler which exposes a 
surface 60 ft. to the fire, the average thickness of the plates 
being | in., the furnace temperature being 140" C, while the 
temperature of the inside of the boiler is 130° ; it being given 
that six units of heat pass on an average per minute through 
an iron plate a foot square and an inch thick ? 

2. Give the theory of exchanges. Why is not the tempe- 10 
rature of a body exposed to a constant source of heat inde- 
finitely raised ? How would you explain the apparent 
radiation of cold as observed in the ice experiment with 
conjugate reflectors ? 

,3. What conditions are favourable for the formation of 1 4 
dew ? Give reasons for your answer. 

4. Describe and explain the various appearances observed 10 
when a platinum foil marked with black ink is heated to 
incandescence in a dark room and looked at successively from 
either side. 

5. Show how to find the intensity of the earth's magnetism ] ( • 
at any place by the oscillations of the declination needle. 

G. What are local currents and the polarisation of the 10 
electrodes ? Show how tlie existence of the latter can bo 
proved and how both are got rid of in Daniell's batteiy. 

7. Give a short description of Ruhmkarffs coil and its lo 
action, withadiagram showing the construction of the commu- 
tator. What ia the supposed action of the condenser ? 

8. Describe accurately an arrangement by whicli a coil 15 
of wire can be made to set like a magnetic needle in tlie 
magnetic meridian by passing an electric current through it. 



EXAM. FOR THE DEaBEE OF L.C.E., 1883-84. CclXT 

Fmbay, 16th November. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

GEOLOGY. 

A. N. Peabson, F. R.Met Soc., F.C.S., A.I.C. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. What is meant by the terms stratumy geological series, 12 
geological mfgtem, dyke, omilier, escarpment, denuclation, 
detritua ? 

2. State what you know about the nature and origin of 12 
the following rocks : — Shingle, sand^one, shale, dolomite, 
qaartzite, syenite, basalt, laterite. 

3. How do you suppose the Sahy^dri HiUs or Western 16 
Ghats have been formed ? To what causes do you attribute 
the peculiar flatness of their tops and the stair-Uke appear- 
ance of their slopes ? Let your answer be as detailed as 
possible. 

4. A series of alternating beds of limestone and sandstone 17 
dip at an angle of 15° to the north ; they are covered un- 
confonnably by a series of beds of trap, sandstone and tuff, 
which dip to the north at an angle of 10'. A basaltic dyke 
¥nth an east and west strike passes through these rocks, 
causing a downthrow to the north. The whole mass is 
then covered nnconformably by horizontal beds of nummulitic 
limestone : and is finally disturbed by a simple fault rnnning 
east and west, with a downthiDw to the south. 

Represent the above by a vertical north and south section. 

5. Describe the general characters of each of the following 14 
fossils, and state the geological systems in which they 
occur : — Oldhamia, Encrinite, Calamite, Labyrinthodon, Am- 
monite, Belemnite. 

6. Give the distributicm of the cretaceous rocks in India, 1.5 ' 
and name some of the more important fossil genera which 
have been found in them. In what part of India are these 
rocks of special economic value ? 

7. What is meant by the "Succession of Strata"? 14 
What is the order of succession in Peninsular India ? 

B 103C— 23 ex. 



Cclxvi EXAM. FOE THE DEGREE OF L.C.E., 1883-84. 

Thursday, 22nd November. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

ENGINEERING FIELD and OFFICE WORK. 
Lieut. -Colonel W. M. Ducat, R.E. ; 
James Scoegie, F.C.S., Mem. Soc. Eng. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks. ] 

1. What is the chief difference between a map and a 3 
plan? 

2. What is a contour line ? 7 

3. Why is it that in accurate surveying by triangula- 8 
tion one base is measured on the ground and the other 
points in the survey fixed by taking angles to them ; and 
that in plotting such a survey the lengths of the sides are 
calculated, not plotted by angles ? 

4. What is meant by prolonging a base ? How is it 8 
done and why is this operation ever necessary ? 

5. Set out a circular curve touching two given straight 12 
lines when the point of intersection of those straight lines 

is accessible, and give the formula for calculating the angle 
at the circumference. 

6. In a Gh4t road or railway on a steep hill-side, why 10 
is it necessary to have frequent accurate cross sections ? 

7. How would you range and set out a tunnel ? 12 

8. What are land-marks and of what use are they in 10 
marine surveying ? 

9. What is a station-pointer and how is it used to 12 
plot the position of a station afloat ? 

10. Find the latitude of a place by one meridian 18 
altitude of a star. 

Thursday, 22nd November. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

STRENGTH of MATERIALS. 

Lieut. -Colonel W. M. Ducat, R.E. ; 
James Scorgik, F.C.S., Mem. Soc. Eng. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 
1. Define strain, stress, working load and proof load. 10 
What load would you cousider safe to suspend from a bar of 



EfeAM. FOE THE DEGREE OF L.C.E., 1883-84 CClxvii 

wrought-iron one inch in section ? In applying this material 
to cranes that are exposed to surges from various causes 
would you give the same load ? If not, why not ? 

2. What is meant by the modulus of elasticity ? A bar 10 
of steel 40 feet long, 2" x 1" in section, is stretched ^" under a 
load of 20 tons ; find the modulus for steel. 

3. What is meant by the limit of elasticity ? How is 10 
this limit afiiected by the duration of the strain. Wliat is 
the average limit of good cast-iron, wrought-iron and teak ? 

4. Explain how the scantling of a pillar is calculated ; and 10 
state how its form and the manner of fixing its ends affect 
the result. 

5. What weight expressed in tons will be required to 10 
force a punch of 1" diameter through a bar of wrought iron 

1" in thickness ? State the law by which the force required 
for other sizes of holes may be known. 

6. Investigate the strength of a single or double riveted 
joint. 



7. Draw a stress diagram of a symmetrical truss of 48 feet 
span, with rafters braced at their middles, and load ver- 
tical. 



18 




8. A brick wall 25 feet high and 5 feet thick has to sus- 
tain the pressure of water. 1^'ind the highest point the depth 
of water could reach without overturning the wall. (C. ft. 
brickwork — 112 lbs. ) 



10 



CClxviii EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF L.C.E., 1883-84. 

9. Give the diagrams of stress for a Warren girder of five 12 
bays (1) when loaded at the centre and (2) when loaded at 
each of the top joints. 

10. A beam supported at its ends has to bear a weight 8 
W : is it more liable to break if the weight be uniformly 
distributed along it, or if W be divided into halves resting 
respectively on the two points, which are midway between 
the centre and extremities of the beam ? 



Feiday, 23ed November. 

[10 A.M. TO I P.M.] 

BRIDGES. 

Lieut .-Colonel W. M. Ducat, R.E. ; 
James Scorgie, F.C.S., Mem. Soc. Eng. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks. ] 

1. How would you determine the mean velocity of an 12 
unobstructed river ? What considerations fix the maximum 
velocity through the arches of a bridge, and in case of 
foundations on rock what should be the safe limit ? 

2. Give an expression for finding the artificial waterway 7 
from the mean velocity of the natural waterway ; and work 
out an example by assigning imaginary values to the quan- 
tities used. 

3. Describe the arrangements usually made in the 10 
construction of floating bridges, to admit of the navigation of 
the river being readily opened, for the passage of boats, &c. 

4. Describe and discuss the comparative merits of deep 12 
and shallow well foundations for large bridges in deep sandy 
beds. State the consideration which would influence you 

in deciding which to adopt. 

5. When a bridge consists of a number of arches, what 6 
precaution should be taken that in the event of an arch 
falling the injury may be confined within a very narrow 
limit ? 

6. Given the rise and span of a bridge, show how you 12 
would, in most cases, be able to ascertain the dimensions of 
most of the other parts. 

7. Give a neat hand-sketch of a wooden centre for an 11 
arch of 35 feet span, to be without intermediate supports. 
When do the arch stones begin to press against the lagging ? 
What conditions are necessary in a good centre ? 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF L.C.E., 1883-84. Cclxix 

8. Give a cross section of a cast-iron girder, and explain 8 

why the flanges are not made according to theory. 

9. Describe a Bowstring Girder, What great practical 10 
advantage has a bowstring over other forms of girders ? 

10. Show that the principles involved in the construe- 12 
tion of suspension bridges are similar to those of the arch. 
Find graphically the load which will keep a chain in equili- 
brium when the dimensions and curve are given. 

Fbii'AT, 23rd Novembeb. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

IRRIGATION AJTD HARBOUR. 

Lieut.-Colonel W. M. Dccat, R.E. ; 

James Scobgie, F.C.S., Mem. Soc. Eng. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1 . What is meant by the greatest, least and mean velocities 8 
of a river? In what positions of the channel are they re- 
spectively found and to what is the difference in velocity due ? 

2. In an open river channel what is the ratio between the 10 
mean and greatest velocity ? 

3. What is the hydraulic mean depth of a channel ? 5 

4. What is the rule for computing the thickness of a pipe 10 
to resist a given head of pressure of water ; and what is the 
empirical rule that expresses very accurately the limit to the 
thinness of cast-iron pipes in ordinary practice ? 

5. Whatarethetwomethodsof making the joints of faucet 10 
and spigot pipes, and what are their respective advantages 
and disadvantages 7 

6. In a town water-supply, what are the respective ad- 10 
vantages of " constant service " and "intermittent service " ? 

7. On what principles are the two classes of water- 12 
meters commonly used for measuring the flow of water in 
pipes constructed ? Explain the action of each. 

8. WTiat is the distinction between docks and basins 8 
for shipping ? 

9. What causes a bar to form at the mouth of a tidal 12 
river ? 

10. Describe as fully as possible the object and action of 15 
a scouring basin. 

B 1030-23 «* 



Cclxi EXAM, FOR THE DEGREE OF L.C.E., 1883-84. 
Saturday, 24th November. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

SPECIFICATION and ESTIMATING. 

Lieut. -Colonel W. M. Ducat, R.E, ; 
James Scorgie, F.C.S., Mem. Soc. Eng. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks,] 

1. Take out the quantities of a rectangular domed 30 
store-room measuring 24 feet by 15 feet interior measure- 
ment, having walls 4 feet thick and 12 feet high to the 
springing of the arch, which is a semicircle of 15 feet 
diameter 18 inches thick at the crown and backed at the 
haunches. There is one door 6 feet wide by 8 feet high 
and two windows each 5 feet by 4 feet, 

2. Give an abstract of the quantities of the above 30 
estimate with rates filled in, the rates being the current 
building rates of Poona or of any other district you know 
and can name. 

3. Write a careful des,cription and specification of the 4(i 
»bove building for a contractor to work from. 



Saturday, 24th November. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

RAILWAYS. 

laeut. -Colonel W. M. DucaT.'KE. ; 
James Scorgie, F-C.S., Mem, Soc. Eng. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Enumerate and explain the principal elements of 12 
resistance to be overcome by a railway train on a level and 

on an incline ; and show how these justify large expenditure 
upon excavations and embankments. 

2. How are engineers able to use more severe gradients 8 
now than formerly ? How should ascending and descending 
gradients be connected ? 

3. Is there any diff'erence between the gauge on curves 5 
and on straight lines ? Give a reason for your answer. 



BXAM. FOR THS DEGKBE OF L.C.E., 1883-84. Cclxxi 

4. What is the headway allowed for over and lauUr- 10 
bridges 1 Wbat precaatkmB are necessary in dangerons s.nl to 
prerent the Tibration of tzains passing below distarbing the 
loandatioQs ? 

5. Explain how the centres and lerels are transferred 14 
from the surface to the bottom of a shaft in a tonnel. What 

are the two systems of driving tnnnela 7 

6. What are reversing triangles * When are ttey nsed, 9 

and what is the objectiou to their use ? 

7. State the diSerenoe between a tcatk en^e and a trudt S 
engine. For wlu^ class of work are they reqiectiTely oaed ? 

8. What is the arerage aiqoant of adheaian of a loco- 8 
motive ? State any contrivance employed to prevent the 
adhesion falling below the average. 

9. Describe the construction of the Rigi Ladder Railway 14 
and explain how a light engine may be employed under this 
system for drawing heavy weights up an Lnolme. 

10. Elxplain the action of a brake on a train. What is 12 
the co-efficient of sliding friction ? Explain the wtHUiig of 

the Clark and Webb brsie, 



Thtjbsday, 15th Novkmbss. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

ANALYTICAL GEOMETRY or TWO DIMENSIONS. 

J. T. Hathorxthwaite, M.A. ; 

FAKorirji Mascherji Dashtb, M, A. ; The Rev, R. Scott, M.A. » 

Jamshbdji Arpibtr Daial, M.A,, LL.B. 

pile figures to tihie right indicate full marks.] 

1. The axis of a parabola is the axis of x, and the curve 10 
passes tiiroQgh a given point (o, 1:) ; prove that its equation 

is of the form y = i ( 1 + f )• Interpret the case in which 

2. Investigate the equation to the normal of a parabola a 
in terms of the tangent of the angle made by this line with 

the axis, and shew that from any point there camtot b^ 
J rawn more than three normals. 



cclxxii EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF L.C.E., 1883-84. 

3. Shew that the perpendiculars from the angles of a 12 
triangle formed by three tangents to a parabola on the op- 
posite sides intersect on the directrix. 

4. Investigate the equation to an ellipse referred to a pair 1 2 
of conjugate diameters as axes. 

If any variable tangent to an ellipse meet two fixed paral- 
lel tangents, prove that it will intercept portions on them 
whose rectangle is equal to the square of the semi-diameter 
parallel to them. 

5. Find the length of a line drawn from a point in a given 1 1 
direction to meet an ellipse and hence find the equation to 
the locus of the middle points of all chords of an ellipse 
which have the same length 2c. 

6. Find the equation to the normal at any point of an 4 
ellipse and shew that it bisects the angle between the focal 
distances of the point. 

7. Investigate the equation to a tangent to an hyperbola 8 
at any point, referred to asymptotes as axes, and hence shew' 
that the area of the triangle formed by the tangent and the 
asymptotes is constant. 

8. PQ is a chord of an ellipse at right angles to the major 8 
axis AA' ; find the locus of the intersection of AQ and AT. 

9. If tangents be drawn to an hyperbola from points in a 10 
given straight line, prove that the chords of contact pass 
through a fixed point. 

If the chord of contact pass through the focus, determine 
the position of the given straight line. 

10. Investigate the polar equation to the tangent at a 20 

point of the conic - = 1 4- e cos 6. 

A series of conies is described with a common latus rectum ; 
prove that the locus of points upon them at which the per- 
pendicular from the focus on the tangent is equal to the latui 
rectum is given by the equation r cos 2^ + ^ = 0. 



EXAM. FOE THE DEGREE OF L.C.E., 1883-84. Cclxxiii 

TCESDAT, 13th yOVEMBEK, 
[2 P. M, TO 5 P. M.] 

DIFFEEEKTIAL Aif© INTEGRAL CALCULUS. 

J. T. Hathoknthwaite, M.A. ; 

Fardcnji Mascherji Dastcb, M.A. ;The Rev. E, Scott, M.A 

Jamshedji Ardesir Dalal, M.A., LL.B. 
[Th'! sdm". at set for the Second B.A. ExanuMOtion. See page div-'\ 



Thup^sday, 15th November. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

OPTICS. 

J. T. Hathorsthwaite, M.A. ; 

Fardusji Maxcherji Dasttr, M.A. ; The Rev. R. Scott, M. A.; 
J.vmshedji Ardesir Dalal, M.A., LL.R 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Specify the three parts into which a pencil of light is S 
usually divided when it is incident on the surface of a 
medium different from that in which it is proceeding and 
shew why in passing into a denser medium a ray of light is 
bent towards the normal to the bounding surface. 

Li shooting at a fish in the water, is it necessary to aim 
above or below the fish ? 

2. In one side of a triangle, the interior of which is 10 
iuable of reflecting light, there are two holes ; determine 

'\\Q position of a point from which rays may enter so as 
each to pass out after one reflexion. 

3. Explain the method of deriving the formulse of reflec- 10 
tion from the corresponding formulae for refraction. 

If 7 be the geometrical focus of a pencil of light after re- 
flection at a spherical surface whose centre is C, correspond- 
ing to a luminous point at Q, and F be the principal focus ; 
prove that CF is a mean proportional between FQ and Fq. 



Cclxxiv EXAJl. FOR THE DEGREE OF L,C.E., 1883-84 

4. A luminous point beingiplaced between two parallel 5 
plane mirrors, find the position of the images formed by 
successive reflexions at the mirrors. 

5. When a ray of light passes through a prism of denser 10 
material than the surrounding medium, in a plane perpen- 
dicular to the edge of the prism, shew that the deviation on 
the whole is from the edge. 

Shew that if the angle of a prism be greater than twice 
the critical angle for the medium of which it is composed, no 
ray can pass through. 

6. Find the geometrical focus of a pencil after direct 15 
refraction through a lens of sensible thickness. 

Two equal and similar concavo-convex lenses of inappre- 
ciable thickness are placed so as to contain in the hollow 
part between them a fluid ; find the geometrical focus of a 
pencil of parallel rays after refraction through them. 

7. Define real image and virtual image. 10 

A short object is placed perpendicularly on the axis of a 
concave spherical refractor, and at a distance from it equal 

f 
to -^j /being the distance of the principal focus from the 

surface ; prove that the linear magnitude of the virtual 
image is half that of the object. 

8. What expedients are employed to make distant or 8 
near objects distinctly visible ? Why is it impossible for 
the unaided eye to obtain a clear view of a small object ? 

Investigate the magnifying power of a lens for given posi- 
tions of the object and eye with respect to the lens. 

9. Why is Ramsden's or Huyghen's eye-piece used ? 12 
The object glass of an Astronomical Telescope is composed 

of two lenses in contact, one convex, the othar concave, 
whose focal lengths are 10/ and 110/ respectively, and a 
Ramsden's eye-piece whose lenses are each of focal length 
/and separated by a distance §/; find the distance of the 
eye-piece from the object-glass when a staris seen distinctly 
by an ordinary eye. 

10. Describe Gregory's Telescope and find its magnify- 12 
ing power. 



EXAM. FOB THE DEGREE OF L-C.E., 1883-84. Cclxxv 

Thxtbsdat, 15th November. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

ASTRONOMY. 

J. T. Hathobsthwaite, M.A. ; 

Yakdvtsji Mancheeji Dasttr, M.A. ; The Rev. R. Scott, M.A.; 

Ja3jsh£djt Abdesib Dalal, M.A., LL.B. 

1. Draw a figure of the celestial sphere, and indicate 5 
by means of it how the position of a star may be determined 

by any of the three following systems of co-ordinates : 
(1) altitude and azimuth, (2) declination and right ascension, 
(3) polar distance and hour angle. 

2. Describe the general changes in the appearance of the 10 
heavens during the night to an observer in north latitude. 
Shew that the apparent rotation of the heavens may be ac- 
counted for by the rotationof the Earth. 

3. Enunciate Kepler's Laws and state what inferences S 
may be dra^-n from them. 

4. Describe the phenomena of the seasons. How would 12 
they be altered if the Earths axis were in the plane of the 
ecliptic 7 

5. Examine the variation in the equation of time through- 16 
out a year, considering separately the two causes to which 

it is due and the effects thus produced. Represent this 
variation graphically by means of a diagram. 

6. Describe the effect of refraction on the apparent posi- 10 
tion of a star. 

What is twilight ? Why is its duration less at Bombay 
than at Cambridge ? 

7r Shew how the parallax of the moon may be determined S 
by observation at two places on the same meridian. 

8. Describe the nature of the motion called Precession, i 
and discuss its cause and effects. 

9. Investigate the solar ecliptic limit and number of 15 
eclipses of the sun possible in a year. Why cannot the 
totality of a solar eclipse last longer than 4 minutes ? 

10. Describe the apparent motion of the planet Mercur. 



CClxxvi EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OP L.C.E., 1883-84 
Thursday, 15th November. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

MINING. 

A. N. Pearson, F.E, Met. Soc, F.C.S., A.I.C. 
[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. Describe the more important features of mineral 11 
veins. 

2. State fully what you understand by prospecting. 1 2 

Of what use may the bed of a nulla be in prospecting a 
piece of land ? 

3. Give a sketch, with dimensions, showing how you 14 
would work out a portion of a vertical or nearly vertical 
lode by underhand stopeing. 

Under what circumstances would you adopt this system 
in preference to that of overhead stopeing ? 

4. What are the main points to be attended to iu plan- 14 
ning out a colliery ? 

Show by a sketch plan drawn to scale how you would work 
out a bed of coal on an improved post and stall system. 

5. In the above sketch plan, show how you would arrange 13 
the course of the ventilating currents. 

6. What is the object of tubbing ? Describe the process 14 
of tubbing a shaft with wood. What is the advantage of 
wood tubbing over iron tubbing ? 

7. Give a general description of boring operations in their 11 
simplest form. 

8. What are the uses of safety lamps ? Give a sketch 1 1 
either of Boty's or of Mueseler's lamp, and state what are its 
special defects and advantages. 



EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF L.C.E., 1883-84 CclxxvH 

ThUBSDAV, 15th NoVKMBKfi. 
[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

METALLURGY. 

L B. Lyox, M.R.C.S., F.C.S., F.LC. ; 
Kaikhosru Rastamji Vikaji, L.M., M.D. 

[The'figures to the right indicate^fall marks.] 

\. Describe the chief chemical changes which take place 15 
in the blast furnace during the production of cast iron, and 
state shortly the composition of the products obtained. 

2. What influence is exerted upon iron by the presence 15 
of (1) manganese, (2) phosphorus, (3) sulphur, (4) silicon, 

(5) arsenic ? 

3. State the composition of the principal ores of copper, 15 
and give approximately the percentage of copper contamed 

in each. 

4. How is sheet zinc made ? State the composition and 12 
describe the properties of the principal alloys of zinc and 
copper. 

5. Describe the processes of soldering and brazing. 9 

6. What is the composition of English standard silver ? 12 
How are articles electro-plated with sUver ? 

7. State in general terms how you would ascertain the 12 
composition of a piece of bronze. 

8. How are copper and silver extracted by the wet 10 
method from pyrites residues ? 



Thuksday, 15th November. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING. 

James ScoRGiE, F.C.S., Mem. Soc. Eng. ; 
G. E. Ormistox, Mem. Inst. C.E. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks. ] 

I. Two pulleys A and B are driven by an endless belt. 
If the diameter of A is 18 inches, what must be the diameter 
of B, so that it may make 4 revolutions while A makes 3 ? 

B 1030-24 C.r 



cclxxviii EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF L.CE., 1883-84, 

2. Design a Whitworth V thread. Give the pitch and 8 
number of threads in a screw 1^ inches in diameter, and 
draw to scale (or give dimensions) a hexagon nut for a 1^ inch 
bolt. 

3. If the maximum strain to be allowed on iron be taken 7 
at 6000 lbs. per square inch, what pressure may be applied 

at the end of a crank 21 inches long to be transmitted by a 
shaft 13 inches in diameter? 

4. Explain the terms lap, lead, angular advance and clear- 10 
ance. What is the eflect produced by adding lap to a slide 
valve ? 

5. What is meant by the total heat of combustion ? Find 10 
the theoretical poundage of a sample of coal containing 80 per 
cent, by weight of carbon, 6 per cent, of hydrogen, 5 per cent. 

of oxygen and 10 per cent, of ash, &c. ; also the actual effi- 
ciency of a boiler which evaporates 9 lbs. of water per horse- 
power with the same coal. 

6. A safety-valve is loaded to 40 lbs. per square inch by 8 
a direct weight of 450 lbs. How much would be required to 

be taken ofl this weight so as to reduce the pressure to 32 lbs. 
per square inch ? 

7. State the Board of Trade regulations regarding the size 5 
of the safety-valve of a boiler, 

8. The initial pressure of steam in a cylinder whose stroke 10 
is 5 feet 4 inches is 45 lbs. and expansion commences when 

2 feet 3 inches have been performed ; find the pressure at 
the end of the stroke. 

9. Explain the principle of Bourdon's gauge, 10 

10. What is the horse-power of an engine, the diameter of 10 
cylinder being 64 inches, length of stroke 3 feet, revolutions 
per minute 60, and the pressure per square inch on the piston 

23 lbs.? 

] 1 . Prove the rule — 5 

Nominal H.P. , diam.'-' X speedof^pjston 
6000 

12. Give an expression for finding the horse-power of 22 
(1) an undershot water wheel, (2) an overshot wheel, and 
(3) a breast wheel. 



EXAM. lOR THE DEGREE OF L.C.i:., 1880-84. cclxxix 

Thursday, 15th November. 

[10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.] 

BOTANY. 

Sakharam Arjun Ravct, L.M. ; 

D. MacDonald, M.B., B.Sc, CM. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 

1. How are the different organs of the higher plants 20 
divided ? Mention the diii'erent organs in each division, and 
give the development of the embryo in an angiospermous 
exogen. 

2. Describe the strncture of the primary root, and give 20 
the different kinds of this root, with examples. 

3. What is parenchyma? Give the main features of 20 
parenchymatous cells, and the different kinds of tissue formed 

of these cells, mentioning the plants, and their parts, in which 
these are found. 

4. Define the following tei-ms and give examples : — Adnate 15 
stipules, Acrogenous, Balausta, Coleorhiza, Cruciate, Cynar- 
rhodium, Decurrent, i^ndocarp. Follicle, Glomerule. 

5. Describe the structure of a vegetable hair. Mention 10 
the different kinds of hair met with, and their uses in the 
economy of a plant. 

6. Give the essential characters and uses of the Natural 15 
Orders Rubiaceee and Asclepiadaceae, with the names of five 
indigenous plants from each order. 



Thursday, I5th November. 

[2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.] 

METEOROLOGY. 

A. N. Peaksox, F.R. Met. Soc, F.C.S., A.I.C. 

[The figures to the right indicate full marks.] 
1 . Describe and state the principles of the wet-bulb hygro- 
meter. What is it necessary to do before taking the reading 
of the wet-bulb thermometer when the atmosphere is calm ; 
and why is it necessary ? 



CCIXXX EXAM. FOR THE DEGREE OF L.C.E., 1883-84. 

2. Describe some form of rain-guage, and state the pre- 12 
cautions necessary in using it. 

At Indian meteorological observatories the rain-guages are 
always fixed with their rims exactly 1 foot above the ground. 
Why is this ? 

3. Describe, or show by diagrams, the usual course of the 14 
yearly variation of atmospheric pressure at two stations in 
the Bombay Presidency, the one in the north and the other 

in the south ; and give reasons for the differences between 
the movements in the north and the south. 

4. What precautions are necessary in taking observations 12 
of air temperature for meteorological purposes ? 

5. What are the Trade Winds and how are they caused ? 11 

6. State Buys Ballot's law. 11 

7. What are the causes of coloured skies at sunrise and 12 
sunset ? 

8. A range of mountains stands out in an open plain. In 15 
one case, a damp wind blows over the plain, up the mountain 

on one side, and, without having deposited any rain on the 
top, blows down the other side. Its temperature after 
descent to the foot of the mountain on one side is about the 
same as it was before ascent from the foot of the mountain 
on the other side. In another case, the damp wind blows 
the same as before, but deposits rain on the mountain top. 
In this case the temperature after descent is found to be 
greater than before ascent. Can you explain this ? 




■ /