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Full text of "University Gazette 1914-1915"

OF THE 



-School of i^edicme 



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Charles L.^E 

I9U1 Rosedale St. 

AT NORTH AVE, 

BALTIMORE 



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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



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http://www.archive.org/details/universitygazett01unse 



The UNlVERSlSfc{^ETTE 

Devoted to the interests of the Unfversfty'ol" Mar^fetl 



Vol. I. 



Baltimore, Md., July 1, 1914 



No. 






V 

ii 

^ 



iFor^uinrb 




WING to the lamentable death of Professor Eugene 
Fauntleroy Cordell, the founder and editor of "Old 
Maryland," it has been decided to change the name of 
~TBpK the University publication to "The University Gazette." 
"^^iw "Old Maryland" ivas the offspring of Professor Cor- 
dell, and with his demise the guiding hand and inspir- 
ing mind of its distinguished editor ceased to exercise that controlling 
influence that was so apparent formerly. We feel that the work of 
"Old Maryland" has been finished and its mission accomplished. It 
will always be a monument to our lamented colleague and illustrious 
friend. A new era is dawning upon the University, and it seems best 
to us to meet this changed condition by a change in the name and 
character of the University magazine. With this issue,, therefore, 
the name of "Old Maryland" will cease to appear, and the publica- 
tion will be continued under its new designation. 

We beg to assure our subscribers and patrons that their interests 
will be carefully protected, and we bespeak the cordial interest and 
support of all our friends. 






-————-—— 4 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE, MD. 

HON. PHILLIPS LEE GOLDSBOROUGH, Governor of Maryland, Chancellor. 
THOMAS FELL, A. M., Ph. D., L L. D., D. C. L., Provost. 



ST. JOHN'S COLLEGE, Annapolis, Md. (^^°|^a^;"|-;o.^J 



Founded 1696. Classical and Scientific College Courses leading to d ;grees. Special advantages to stu- 
dents purposing to study the professions. Military Department under army officers. Also Preparatory 
School for boys fitting for St. John's or other colleges. Term begins Sepl i;mber 21. Address 

THOMAS FELL, Ph.D., LL.D., D.C.L., President. 



DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE. 

Four years' graded course. New Laboratory Build- 
ing. Clinical advantages unsurpassed. Teaching Staff 
of 66. 108th Annual Session will begin October i, 
1914, and continue 8 months 

R. DORSEY COALE, Ph.D., M.D., Dean. 



DEPARTMENT OF DENTISTRY. 

33d Annual Session begins October i, 1914. and 
continues 7 months. 26 Instructors. New Building. 
For catalogue containing course of study, etc., apply to 

TIMOTHY O. HEATWOLE, M.D., D.D.S., Dean. 

Baltimore, Md. 



DEPARTMENT OF LAW. 

59th Annual Session will begin Sept. 23, 1914. Faculty 
of 26. For catalogue containing full information ad- 
dress the Secretary, 301 St. Paul Street, Baltimore, 
Maryland. 

EDWIN T. DICKERSON, Secretary. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACY. 

(Formerly Maryland College of Pharmacy). 72nd 
Annual Session begins September 25, 1914. 11 In- 
structors. New Laboratories. Address 

CHARLES CASPARI, JR., Phar.D.. Dean, 

Baltimore, Md. 



\. 



, , -^ 



^)A^ UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



Vol. I. 



-^-{rULY 1, 1914. 



No. 1. 



•Vi:--^: 



CONTENTS 



ADDRESS DELIVERED BY THE GER- 
MAN AMBASSADOR. COUNT YON 
BERNSTORFF 

EDITORIALS 

The University Gazette. 
Go to A Memorv Oculist. 



EDITORIALETS 7 

^ ITEMS 7 

'^ I QUIPS 14 

6 BIRTH 15 

MARRIAGES 15 

DEATHS 15 



Footwear for the College Man at Moderate Price. 

N. HESS' SONS - - 8 E. Baltimore, St. 



UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL 



COR, LOMBARD AND GREENE STREETS 

WM. J. COLEMAN, H. H. WARFIELD. 

Medical Superintendent. BALTIMORE. MD. Manager. 




f( 




THE UNlVSRSlTVmAZETT 



A 5. 



Published Monthly /p the ^Interest of the University ^ Maryland. 



Ai 




Contributions solicited from Alumni \)f,'the/;>p 
University. 



(mulW^ 



ess, 60S Professional Building. 
Baltimore, Md. 



Vol. I. 



BALTIMORE, MD., JULY 1, 1914. 



No. 1. 



Address Delivered by the German Ambassador, 
Count Johann von Bemstorff, at the One 
Hundred and Seventh Annual Commence- 
ment of the University of Maryland. 



I have read that, when the Prince of Oranje, 
wishing to make some return to the people of 
Leyden for their heroic sufferings and losses 
during the siege of the city offered either to 
remit their taxes or to establish a university, the 
people showed their fine valor and wisdom by 
asking for a university. The jseople of the United 
States have chosen as nobly and bravely as the 
citizens of Leyden. AVith a liberality without 
parallel in history the rich men of this country 
have endowed universities in every part of this 
great country. Of late the governments of the 
States have also fallen the higher education in 
hand, as this has alwa.ys been the case in Ger- 
many. There is nothing one can note with 
greater pleasure in this country than the con- 
tinued advance of the. American colleges and 
universities. The last thirty years have seen 
the establishment and development by the Sta,te 
Legislatures of a large number of state institu- 
tions of higher education, to which annually 
liberal grants of money are made. This Avit- 
nesses to the enlightened wisdom and zeal of 
the state authorities, who rightly think that 
nothing better could be done for the youth of 
the state than to place before them the amplest 
facilities for prosecuting every kind of study. 

The appreciation of such facilities is shown 
by the large and constantly increasing attend- 
ance, not only at the universities and technical 
colleges suppoi'ted by the States, but also at the 
univensities of private foundation. 

The habit of sound, careful and independent 
thinking is the best intellectual quality a young 
man can start with in his .iourney through life. 
That and the love of truth are what a university 
ought to teach. One of the highest tributes 
paid to your universities was lately paid by a 



great German professor, when he said that what 
he most admired in them was the conscientious 
ardor with which the teachers .devoted them- 
selves to the search for truth and the implant- 
ing of a zeal for it in their pupils. 

The purpose of every educational institution 
is to recruit the ranks of the greatest Of all pro- 
fessions, good citizenship. The study of the 
humanities includes something more than the 
study of Latin and Greek ; it includes the study 
of the literature of every time and every nation ; 
its purpose is higher and broader than mere 
intellectual endowment ; we learn the past to 
know the future ; its purpose is to teach us the 
wisdom of the men who have long since passed 
away; by giving us all the past contained that 
was good and beautiful and true, it permits us 
to create for ourselves ideals for our present 
and our future guidance. 

The basis of all patriotism is national con- 
science, and there can be no national conscience 
unless it is founded upon a Imowledge of a 
nation's history and development. The educa- 
tion of the people, not only of the privileged 
few, but of the masses, is therefore the vital 
condition for popular government. Liberty and 
political freedom without a correlating high in- 
tellectual standard of the people have often re- 
sulted in disturbances and anarchy. The higher 
and fuller the education is, the more stable and 
permanent the institutions of a nation will be. 
Everybody should have the opportunity of 
availing himself of the advantages that higher- 
education affords. The political and social evo- 
lution of a nation will be more powerful and 
energetic if fresh forces are continually rising 
from the masses into the luxurious classes. of 
society. Education has freedom in its train 
and, as Milton has said, "No sea swells like the 
bosom of a man set free." You Americans as 
the 3'oungest of the great nations of the Teu- 
tonic race are the rejoicing heirs of the.cultun.' 
of all the others. All branches of the Teutonic 
race sent many of their descendants to these 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



hospitable shores, aud from all who came you 
adopted what was good and suitable to you and 
so created the culture of this great nation which 
is different from all others but kindred to those 
from whom it sprang. 

The exchange of professors so happily in- 
stituted between German and American univer- 
sities, which increased the alread.y existing per- 
manent friendly intercourse between them, has 
drawn renewed attention to the fact that the 
American universities as the younger institu- 
tions have learned much from the older German 
sisters, and that in our days, after the American 
universities liave attained a position which in- 
spires respect in all foreign lauds, there is very 
much for both to learn from one another. 

The strongholds of opinion among Americans 
friendly to Germany, have been for the last 
sixty years the Amei-ican universities and col- 
leges in so many of which are professors and 
tutors who, having studied in Germany, have 
brought back a certain love for the German 
Fatherland. They were impressed by the large 
and liberal system of the German universities, 
and devoted themselves to iirging a similar sys- 
tem in this country. Therefore, while the Ameri- 
can college goes back for its origin to the first 
half of the 17th century and is fashioned after 
the English pattern with adaptation, the Ameri- 
can universities have come into existence during 
the past fifty years and have been organized 
largely on the German model. They are a de- 
velopment under the guidance and stimulus of 
German example out of the American college. 
To this fact als6 is due in no small measure the 
feeling of kinship which binds Germany to this 
great and youthfull.y vigorous nation. The 
former American Ambassador in Berlin. J\Ir. 
Andrew D. White, who was himself a student 
of a German university and later a distinguished 
teacher and practically the founder of a great 
American University, in a public address once 
attributed much of the fame which Germany 
enjoys in America to the German universities. 
It was, he said, principally due to them that 
Germany was looked upon in the United States 
as a kind of second mother country. 

Progressive in many walks of life, you Amer- 
icans have also first realized the good, alumni 
associations and similar organizations can do 
for their institutions. This plan of forming 
alumni organizations of which you Americans 
are the pioneers impresses me as much as many 
of the other original things you do. You were 



the first to show what can be done for an insti- 
tution by strengthening the bond between those 
who have left your colleges and universities and 
those institutions. You do not know how much 
it has done for American colleges and univer- 
sities. This in itself has accomplished great 
things for education in America. It is a Avon- 
derful plan and demonstrates again the spirit 
of the American people. Under the system 
initiated in some universities of giving the grad- 
uates Azotes in the election of trustees and to 
representative alumni seats in the governing 
board, the whole student body has become, in a 
new sense, part of the institution and are to 
a certain extent held responsible for it. 

In Germany there is no great bond between 
the alumni aud their Alma Mater, chiefly be- 
cause the students generally visit at least two 
universities and because these are all state in- 
stitutions and do not need any help from their 
alumni. The only German organizations which 
remind me of the American alumni associations 
are the various fraternities of students, which 
are particularly prosperous and celebrated in 
Bonn. Heidelbei'g and Goettingen. Any man 
who has been a member of siich a students' 
fraternity will remain loyal to it all his life. 

Among the forces making for good-will be- 
tween nations, one of the foremost is mutual in- 
timate knowledge of their culture. If we are 
reciprocally truly at home in the spiritual world 
of our two nations we will recognize their close 
independence and be filled with the desire to 
promote their mutual understanding. 

Germans are particularly inclined to take 
such a view of the friendl.y intercourse so hap- 
pily instituted between the universities of our 
countries, as in Germany the universities have 
always stood first and foremost of all modern 
institutions as responsible representatives of the 
highest ideals of the people. The two ideas, 
essential to the making of great universities, the 
right of the teacher to be free in what he says 
and the liberty of the student to learn, form the 
basis of German academical life. The teacher is 
expected to be true to the truth he sees and is 
thought false to it if he dare not give expression 
to what he believes. On the other hand the 
student may refuse to be satisfied Avith the 
voice of authority upon anj' subject because be- 
ing a student he is free to learn, free to ques- 
tion, free to think. This old intellectual free- 
dom of the universities was the starting point 
from Avhich the German nation proceeded to 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



religious freedom, liberty of speech and liberty 
of the press. In other countries political free- 
dom is older than academical freedom. In 
Germany, however, intellectual freedom was the 
mother of political freedom. That is why our 
universities still today have great influence and 
why professors have played a great part in 
German history. The renascence of Pi-ussia 
after the collapse in 1806 was largely due to 
the patriotic activity of German professors, 
among whom Arndt, Fichte, and Niebuhr were 
most prominent, and German unity was their 
ideal and constant thought long before Bis- 
marck realized their ideals. In our days men 
like Harnrack, Adolf Wagner, Brentano, 
Schmoller, and others always raise their voices 
when great national questions are at issue. 

The elements of strength of the German uni- 
versity are chiefly the inner freedom they en- 
joy and the spirit of investigation among the 
members. The German university is a state in- 
stitution. It is established and supported by 
the Government and under its control, but it 
retains some not unimportant features of the 
original corporative character. It still pos- 
sesses a certain degree of autonomy. It elects 
its own officers, the rector, the senate and the 
deans, and also exercises a considerable in- 
fluence in the appointment of professors. By 
its power to confer the Doctor's degree and ap- 
point the private docents the university deter- 
mines the circle from which the members of the 
facultj' are usuallj' drawn. In addition to this 
it receives from the Government the right to 
nominate candidates for the different chairs. 

The peculiar characteristic of the German uni- 
versity as a laboratory for scientiflc research 
as well as a school of instruction in all the 
higher branches of general and professional 
knowledge becomes at once apparent when the 
internal organization of the institution is con- 
cerned. It offers a broad and deep course of 
instruction in the arts and sciences. This is 
the special province of the philosophical facul- 
ty. It offers technical instruction for the 
learned professions in that it trains the clergy, 
judges and higher officers of administration, 
physicians and high school teachers. But it is 
in addition the most important seat of scientific 
work in Germany and the nursery of scientific 
investigation. According to the German idea, 
the university professor is both a teacher and a 
scientific investigator, and such emphasis is laid 
upon the latter function that one ought rather 



to say that in Germany the scientific investiga- 
tors are also the instructors of the academic 
youth. This statement, of course, implies that 
such academic instruction is primarily purely 
theoretical and scientific. The important thing 
is not the student's preparation for practical 
calling, but his introduction into scientific 
knowledge and research. 

This intimate union of investigation and in- 
struction gives the German university its pecu- 
liar character. In Germany it is taken for 
granted that all university professors are in- 
vestigators and scholars and that all investiga- 
tors and scholars are teachers at universities. 

The German system, like all institutions in 
this world, naturally has its shadow sides, but 
I do not wish to dwell on them as I today in- 
tended to draw your attention to the elements 
of strength in the German university, the fore- 
most representative of German culture. Which 
are the characteristic features of the German 
culture ? 

In the course of the ISth century the Ger- 
man mind reached a height of cultivation which 
it has never attained and which is known by 
the great names of Lessing and Goethe, Schiller 
and Kant. For the first time since six centuries 
a literature was produced in Germany, which 
etiualled the works of the great civilized 
nations, even surpassing them in poetry and 
philosophy and immediately becoming the start- 
ing point for a most important advancement 
of all the sciences. This literature was full of 
ideal efforts of philosophical depth and moral 
strength, being at the same time adverse to the 
artificial, conventional and typical. It ennobled 
aesthetic beauty by conceiving the latter as the 
most valuable means for moral refinement. In 
declaring the development of religious to be the 
highest expression of cultured mankind, it pro- 
claimed the independence of the human mind 
without showing hostile opposition to the tra- 
ditional denominations. We understand readi- 
ly what an abundance of freedom and pro- 
ductiveness was brought to the world by this 
new school and that it was bound to further the 
scientific development of the nation. To point 
out these fruits of German culture is the chief 
task of German instruction. The knowledge 
of the past must become a power of the present 
not for boasting of vain knowledge of obsolete 
things, but for leading our judgment regarding 
the malters of today. 

(To be Continued.) 



THE UNm:RSITT GAZETTE. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 

A MONTHLY JOURNAL 

Devoted to the interests of the University 

of Maryland. 

Subscription Price, 51.00 Per Annum, In Advance 

Reprints Furnished At Cost 

Advertising Rates Submitted Upon Request. 

60S Professional Building 

BALTIMORE, ilD. 



Editorial Board. 

H. il. ROBIXSOX. il.D Editor-in-Chief. 

XATHAX WIXSLOW. M.D Editor-in-Chief. 

ALBERT H. CARROLL, M.D Editor-in-Ctief. 

Graduate Members. 

SAMUEL TVAXT, LL.B Law 

r\ J. VALEXTIXE, D.D.S Dental 

A. A. SONXEXBURG, Phar.D Pharmacy 

THOMAS FELL, LL.D -Academic 

G. L. WIXSLOW, B.A Academic 

M. E. SULLWAN, R.X Nursing. 

Undergraduate Members. 
H. W. BTERS, '14, H. STEIN, '14, 

J. W. ICATZENBERGER, '14, H. 

GOLDMAN, '15, F. C. MARIXO, '16, 

C. 0. WOLFF, '17 Medicine. 

C. 0. SPAilER, '14, A. M. REID, '14, 

J. A. HAGGERTY, '15, M. A. TRE- 

GOR. 15, C. X. :MATTHEWS. '16.. Law. 
J. B. ROBIXSOX, '14, C. A. BUIST, 

'15, A. Z. ALDRIDGE, '16 Dental. 

C. S. ARMSTROXG, '14, J. M. BRAX- 

SlCr, '14, A. L. STERLING, '15 Pharmacy. 

R. L. HOBBS Academic. 

J. E. EVAXS. '16 Y. il. C. A. 

B. C. LIGHTNER, '15 AdverUsing. 

B. G. GOLD, '15 College Notes. 

W. P. ST APLETON, '14 Art. 

A. BALART Latin American. 

JULY 1, 1914. 



The University Gazette. 
"With changed conditions, the editorial board 
as indicated in the "Foreword," believe that a 
change in name of the Univei-sity periodical 
should take place. Old Maryland was not a 
snfBciently comprehensive designation, espec- 
ially in face of the formation of the 31arylaud 
State University, so it has been decided in the 
future to call the University magazine The 
University Gazette. "We will then be at liberty 
to incorporate any news arising in the compo- 
nent parts of the Maryland State University'. 
Therefore, in the future, your magazine ^vill 
appear under this name. Promising to sei-ve 
the University to the best of our abilities, we 
ask the same liberal support of our subscribers 
and advertisers as heretofore. 




"CoUar Hug" Clothes 



'Manhattan" Shirts 



THE QUALITY SHOP 



Baltimore and Libert\' Sts. 



Go to A Memory Oculist! 

When you find yoiu- eyes are at fault, you 
are immediately concerned — glasses are sought 
for and obtained, and Presto, whether short- 
sighted or far-sighted you are in a fair way to 
having the trouble corrected. But when in the 
eoui"se of coUege events, you enter upon a Ufe 
of a slaving nature, to become citizens of the 
Avorld, frequently you are apt to forget the 
scenes where more than most other places you 
en.joyed life to its full, where at last you began 
the getting of a true perspective. 

Oiu- memories become short-sighted, our pa- 
triotism (so called school spii-it) becomes 
blunted, we forget the mother just as does the 
ungi"ateful babe if taken from its parent. Ton. 
who as after dinner orators, spoke so feelingly 
of your dear Alma Mater, your never-to-be- 
forgotten class; who dilated on those wonder- 
fid more-than-friendly associations begotten in 
our school days — ^was it all bosh? TTas it just 
for a pretty effect? 



SPRING SHOES 

FOR THE 

UNIVERSITY MAN 

All Styles — All Leathers 
Best Shoes — Moderate Prices 



WYMAN 

19 W. LEXINGTON STREET 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



Go to the lueuiory oculist! You will find 
him in Baltimore around Greene and Lom- 
bard streets. Trj' to find some old friend while 
here. Trj- to get up a class reunion. It will 
amply rejjay you for the money spent. 

Did you mean your protestations to come-, 
back after a few years to meet again as a class '! 
We did — and I hope we will eveutually. But 
I know we can never meet as a full class, for 
some have gone, never to return. How is your 
class? And — are j'ou coming- back? Honor 
your school ; men great in their professions have 
come from its halls. You have a mother to be 
proud of. Praise her. She is worthy of it. Do 
not fear to be sentimental. You can stand it. 
And University of Maryland needs it. Dentist 
or Lawyer, Pharmacist or Miidieo, speak for, 
honor and come back occasionally to your Alma 
Mater. 



EDITORIALETS. 

It is respectfull\' submitted to the deans of 
the several departments that incoming students 
be apprised that the honor system is in vogue 
at the University of ilarylaud, and further 
that a statement to this effect be printed on Llu' 
back of each matriculation ticket. Before a 
matriculant is accepted he must subscribe to 
this regulation, aiul to show his earnest thereof 
his signature shall be attested before a notary 
iniblie. Furtherniore. it is our opinion that 
some statement coucei'uing the honor system 
should be published in tlu^ catalogues of the 
several departments. 



Messrs. Members of the Faculty : Elsewhere 
you have been requested to visit us. Since 
that invitation was penned, a i|tiestion has been 
put. It has to do with the number of patients 
treated. 

I cau't think this is the case, and yet it has 
been said. The number treated may serve as 
an index, to be sure, and is in a way a guide. 
but it is only one element entering into the 
diagnosis. 

There are many conditions governing and 
controlling the attendance — far too many to 
mention. 

In one department, numerous laboratory tests 
are required along with a complete physical 
exam. If the patient won't consent to this, or 
won't aid, we do not encourage a return. There 



is no guessing in this department. And placebos 
are not indtilged in. So it goes. 

Come into personal contact with the dispen- 
sary heads ! This is the best way to encourage 
good work and to form correct opinions. 



A modern, up-to-the-miunte heating equip- 
ment has been installed in the hospital. Blow, 
ye winds, when winter comes again. Mr. "War- 
Heid has closed the doors permanently to Jack 
Frost and his second cousins, the Misses Small 
Drafts. 

Cheer, vou residents. 



■"General" McElfresh, so our scouts inform 
us, and we take the information to be reliable, 
has definitely concluded not to forsake dietetics 
for anesthesia. Mae, old boy, we know the deci- 
■ sion was hard to make. We congratulate you 
upon your steadfastness and hope that in the 
future no such false rumors will be spread. 

o 

ITEMS— GENERAL. 

On Saturday night. May 30th, at 8 o'clock, 
the class of 1909, U. of M., Law Department, 
held a banquet and reunion in the Blue Room 
of the Emerson Hotel i.n commemoration of their 
fiftli anniversary of graduation. May 31, 1909. 

Holmes R. Johnson was toastmaster and in- 
troiluced the speakei's. William Curran, City 
Couueihuau of the Second Ward, delivered a 
speech on "Relation of the University to the 
State. ' " The toasts and those responding were : 
"University of Maryland," Martin H. Hihn; 
"Class of '09," Rollins R. Webb; "The Facul- 
ty," Vernon Badger; "The Ladies," John T. 
Ford, Jr. 

Those around the festive board were : Robert 
V. Badger, Samuel C. Bowan, Grover C. Furst, 
John A. Graham, Henry C. Hines, Lewis A. In- 



J. FRED SHAFER. Pres. WM. E. READ. VicePres. WM. G. HORN. Sec'yTreas 

THE HORN-SHAFER CO. 

Printers and Publishers 

3-5 GERMAN STREET, EAST 

BALTIMORE 

Private Branch Exchange, St. Paul 7077-7078 

Printers of 1912, '13 and '14 "Terra Marlae" 
There must be a reason 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



nerarity, Robert E. Joues, Bernard MuUer, Ray- 
mond A. Reik, William 0. Schilling, Edwin H. 
Worten, St. Paul White, Crawford M. Bishop, 
Frank B. Evans, John T. Ford, Jr., Emmett 
E. Hearne, Martin M. Tlihu, Holmes R. John- 
son, Leroy M. Langrall, John W. Prinz, Lionell 
T. Revell, Rollins L. Webb, Karl Singewald and 
George M. G. Benson. 



Medical — Graduate. 

Dr. H. D. Clark, class of 1914, will be at the 
Garrett Hospital for the coming year. 



Dr. Lou Seth, 1908, Medical, has also been up 
lately from the wilds of Maryland to wander 
around the old diggings. 



Dr. Condit, 1910, Medical, has been here some 
time, working in the Gynecological Depart- 
ment. Condit wants to become a "ladies' man." 



Dr. Wm. L. Byerly, class of 1912, who is as- 
sociated with Dr. Spruill and in the dispensary 
with Dr. Timberlake, has been giving very pop- 
ular lectures in Red Cross work under the aus- 
pices of the Public Instruction Committee. 



Dr. Robei't E. Abell, class of 1912, and for two 
years assistant to Dr. St. Clair Spruill, will re- 
turn to Chester, S. C, where he will practice 
surgery. Popular as a student, universally 
liked and admired as a hospital resident, with 
a splendid foundation in medicine and in sur- 
gery, it is safe to predict for him a brilliant 
future. Were these qualifications not as great 
as they are, success could not help but be his 
because of his common sense and charming jDer- 
sonality. Dr. Abell will be missed but he will 
take with him our best wishes. He will aid in 
spreading the good name of "Old Maryland" 
in his home state in no small wav. 



Dr. C. E. Dovell, class of 1914, will go to 
Cumberland, Md., where he will have charge of 
the very large interests of F. Merton & Sons' 
Orchard District. It is a broad field and a 
splendid opportunity. He is to be congratu- 
lated. 

Dr. George Coulbourne, 1911, came quite a 
distance — namely, from Pocomoke, Md., his 
place of existence — to see the University nui'ses 
graduate. Wonder who she was? 



Lefranc & AULT 

ARE SHOWING 

NEW NECKWEAR 
NEW SHIRTS 

and the 

Latest Shapes in Collars 

AT THE 

"SHIRT SHOP" 

421 N. Howard St., at Franklin 



It is with sincere regret that we hear that 
Dr. G. A. Stem, '12, who has been on the 
Gynecological service of the University Hos- 
pital for the past year has resigned his position 
and will take the army examinations in Sep- 
tember. 

We should have a mutual admiration society 
here. It is a good thing. But in the absence 
of one we wish to extend our sineerest con- 
gratulations to Dr. G. E. Bennett, '09, who, at 
the last Johns Hopkins University Commence- 
ment announcement was appointed Instructor 
of Clinical Surgery, a much coveted position. 
We are sure George will amply do honor to 
himself and school. 



Drs. Jack Norman, Muggsy McGraw and 
Arthur Cannon, all of the class of '09, made a 
flying visit to these diggings, renewed a few 
friendships, and, like the Arabs, folded their 
tents and hiked. 



It is pleasing to notice that some of our 
alumni are considering entering the live stock 
business and we trust that theirs' will be the 
fullest success. Our only regret is that we 
could not sooner forward the information de-. 



Hart Schaffner & Marx, 
Kuppenheimer, 
"Society Brand" 



The clothes that college men 
like a lot 



Hub 



Bjltlmore Street At Charles 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



NEW YORK CLOTHING HOUSE Blome's Chocolates 



102 & 104 E. BALTIMORE ST. 

Men's Boy's and Children's Clothing 

Automobile & Uniform Outfitters - - Bert's Shoes 

sired. Probably some of our better informed 
readers Avill be able to supply the needed 
knowledge. Query: Drs. S. S., and Bob Abell 
wisli to know how they can ship a rare speci- 
men of the sow species to Rocky Creek, Md. 



It is with great regret that we must chroni- 
cle the fact that Dr. W. H. Toulson, '13, who 
has occupied the position of Resident Patholo- 
gist at the University Hospital, is to leave 
June 22, and will shortly afterward take up the 
position of Resident Surgeon at Bay View Hos- 
pital. There is no doubt in our minds as to 
how well Dr. "Pete" Toulson will be liked at 
Bay View, for he is one of the most popular 
residents, whether with doctor, nurse, patient 
or other laymen. 



Dr. "Reds" Marrett, '11, who is at the New 
Jersey State Sanatorium, has just wandered 
in to see us. 



Dr. J. Holmes Smith, Jr., is becoming an all- 
around specialist, as well as an immigi-ation 
expert. Holmes, Jr., says that he takes part in 
referring from one hundred to two hundred pa- 
tients to the Government Hospital every day. 
He is quite infatuated with the Ellis Island 
station. Besides, New York is "some" place. 
He dropped in to see old faces at the U. of M. 
the other day. 



It does one's heart good to see old friends 
and classmates once in a while. It renews mem- 

A. H. PETTING 

Manufacturer of 

GREEK LETTER FRATERNITY JEWELRY 

213 N. Liberty St., = Baltimore, Md. 

Factory: 212 Little Sharp St. 

Memorandum package sent to any fraternity member through the 
secretary of the chapter. Special designs and estimates furnished on 
medals, rings and pins for athletic meets, etc. 



Known and enjoyed by students of the 

University for more than half a century. 

Retail Department 

BLOME'S CANDY STORE 

Established 1859 621 W. Baltimore St. 

ories and youth; and because we all have so 
little time here on earth, we who have gradu- 
ated from awful examinations should return 
every once in a while to swap stories and hand- 
clasps and memories of football days or frat. 
meetings. Apropos of the above, Moore, 1909, 
Medical, came all the way from Nebraska to 
see us once again. He has also been over to 
Johns Hopkins Hospital, viewing clinics. 



Law — Graduate. 



Mr. William J. Riordan, of the class of 1914, 
has opened law offices at 12.39-41 Calvert Build- 



ang. 



Mr. W. C, Boreherding is spending the sum- 
mer at Mountain Lake Park. 



Mr. F. L. Cobourn, of the class of 1913, has 
been elected City Attorney of Havre de Grace. 



Mr. Aruuah S. A, Brady is touring the moun- 
tain section of Wales. 



Mr. J. N. Bieseeker, of the class of 1914, has 
opened real estate offices at 17 E. Saratoga 
street. 



Through the efforts of Mr. Ellis Levin, of the 
class of 1914, a statute was enacted by the last 
Legislature enabling young men under the age 
of 21 to take the Bar examination where they 
are graduates of the University of Maryland. 
Mr. Levin has proved himself an efficient legis- 
lative whip. 



Mr. Murra.y McNabb, formerl.y an assistant 
librarian of the Law School, and who was dis- 
charged during the month of November, after 
only two months of sei'vice, recently brought 
suit against the University of Maryland, claim- 
ing to have been employed by it for a year 
and wrongfully discharged. The suit was de- 
cided in favor of the University. 



10 



THE UNB^RSITT GAZETTE. 



One hundred students took the Bar examina- 
tion \vhieh was held diu-ing the early pai-t ot 
this month. The returns were expected to be 
in about July ]st. 



Mr. J. Harry Tregoe, LL.B., class of 1905, 
seoretary-treasnrer of the National Association 
of Credit Men. -41 Park Row, New York, for- 
merly of Baltimore, was among those who ap- 
peared in favor of the Sabath bill before the 
House Committee on Postof&ces. The bill is 
to prohibit transmission through the mails of 
false statements in writing for the procuring 
of credit. The measure provides a fine of not 
more than $5,000 or imprisonment of not more 
than one j-ear, or both, for violations. 



Mr. George Stewart (Stovey) Brown, LL.B., 
class of 1895, formerly of Baltimore, who was 
recently made a member of the Board of Gen- 
eral Appraisers, AAath offices in New York City, 
has been spending a few days at Atlantic City. 
While South he stopped in Baltimore to see his 
father, General Stewart Brown. 



Mr. William L. Marbury, LL.B., class of 1882, 
is president of the Southern Maryland Society. 
The society was organized a short time ago, and 
has for its object the bringing together in a 
social way of the sons of old Southern Mary- 
land. The first dinner was held at the Belve- 
dere, April 29th. Among those who spoke and 
their subjects were: 

William L. Marbury, class of 1882, "South- 
ern Maryland. ' ' 

Robert Crain, class of 1896, "The Future of 
Southern Maryland." 

James M. Munroe, class of 1877, ' ' The South 
River Club." 

George W. Williams, class of 1896, "The Sec- 
ond Generation." 



On May 11th State Senator William Milnes 
Maloy, LL.B., class of 1899, delivered an illus- 
trated lecture on "The Legislature in Session" 
before the Homestead League and Improve- 
ment Association, in assembly hall of Branch 
15 of the Pratt Library, Gorsuch avenue and 
Taylor street. 



"Hear we have a prettj' good quarter-back."" 

"He's passing fair." .^, , .„ 

— lale Record. 




MICROSCOPES 

LABORATORY SUPPLIES 

SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS 

HOSPITAL SUPPLIES 



McKee Surgical Instrument Co. 

310NEUrAWST. BALTIMORE, MD. 



FAREWELL, SENIORS. 

This is the "farewell" of the Intermediate 
class to the Seniors; this, their bon voyage to 
their departure from our akna m^ter into the 
field of legal endeavor. In a moment of lighter 
vein we have ehided them for their baekwaxd- 
ness, their lack of spirit and for their love of 
"home, lecture and chicken." AVhile we have 
done this, we have been fully aware of the 
"Turtle and Hare'" incident and know the suc- 
cess of plodders. 

In lighter vein it had been done, and now, in 
serious vein, we undo it. Our Seniors have our 
heartiest and most sincere wishes for honor, 
distinction, fame and success in their future 
endeavors. 

Seniors, you have won laurels that raise you 
to a position above any other class of men. To 
you is given the knowledge whereby you may 
fully enjoy our great republican liberty. You 
as lawyers know fully your rights, your liber- 
ties and the curtailment of these rights and lib- 
erties. You are empowered by your under- 
standing of the law to walk with firmer step 
among j'our fellow-men. The world is yours 
because you make its laws. It expands before 
your vision robbed of its complexity, and you 
see straight paths where the layman sees 
forests. 

Great trusts and confidences are imposed 
upon you because of your profession. Guard 
well these trusts and the honor of your profes- 
sion. Men whose names are now famous have 
started, as you will start, the rugged and uphill 
joui'ney you are about to embark upon, and 

/^UR Prices are low, but this does not mean that we are 
^-' patronized by "cheap" people, or that we supply cheap 
food— you will find the best at the BRIGHTON, both in 
menu and materials. 

BRIGHTON LUNCH 

14 NORTH HOWARD 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



11 



^ 



quA 



iDlEHL 

XOTHES 




built at 605 W. Baltimore St., 
just around the corner from the 
University, are kept pressed with- 
out cost. 

Suits $15 to $40 

found honor and fame at the end. In the high- 
est places the lawyer stands pre-eminent. He 
is the pilot of progress, the steering gear of the 
world and the conservator of society. 

Success is yours for the taking. Had we it 
to give, it would be yours. We can only tender 
our best wishes, and we do sincerely and with a 
will. 



JIGGS (?) 

He has coddled it and coaxed it, 
He has nursed it with great care ; 

He has taken all precautions 

'Gainst the dampness and the air. 

Bought a guaranteed vibrator. 

Bought a special comb and brush, 
Solutions and dilutions, 
But the dog-gone thing won't rush. 

Each silken hair's located. 

Its length and width on file. 
Each one indexed and numbered 

And its effect on every smile. 

In vain he has tried 'to darken 

The shade of his upper lip, 
But the best result recorded is, 

He can hear it when he sips. 



It sounds not like a sylvan strain 
As a breeze plays thru the trees, 

But joyous to his anxious ears 
Is the sound of it as he breathes. 

De minimus uon curatur, 

But, "JIGGS," do not despair; 
All things come to him who labors. 
And while there's life "there's hair." 

J. A. H., '15. 


Dental — Graduate. 

Pending the remodeling of 818 N. Charles 
street. Dr. L. W. Parinholt, class of '98, desires 
to announce that he will be located temporarily 
at .509 N. Charles street. 



Many members of the classes 1884, 1894 and 
1904 responded to the reunion called for this 
year. The class of 1904 was particularly well 
represented, there being at least twenty-five 
members of that class present. 



Of the seventy-five dental graduates of 1914 
who do not have to face state board examina- 
tions, because of having successfully met re- 
quirements prior to completing their course are, 
Drs. Tinsley and Lacy, of Virginia; Whalen, 
Mitchell, Foley and Hoy, of Massachusetts, 
and Hyde and Jenkins, of West Virginia. 



Reports from the Maryland Board shows 
that most of the men taking the examination 
were successful. Thirty-five of the fifty-six 
taking the board were U. of M. men, while only 
three of the nine failures were from this school. 



Dr. Manuel G. Guerra, 1914, was in Boston 
the week of June 1st, taking the Massachusetts 
dental examination. He will locate in Balti- 
more and will be assistant professor of prosthe- 
tic dentistry at the University of Maryland. 
He has charge of the prosthetic work at the In- 
firmary during the summer months. 



WILLIAM J. MILLER 
Jewelry, Diamonds, Watches 

College Jewelry 
Class Pins and Rings, College Seals 
28 East Baltimore St. Baltimore, Md. 22 W. LCXiHgtOn St., = BaltimOrC, Md. 



ELLERBROCK 



12 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



e W SARATOGA St 




'jalUmore, 

Maryland. 



Dr. J. Beu Robinson, 1914, has opened his 
office at 113 N. Charles street, Baltimore. He 
is now in charge of the Infirmary work at the 
University of Maryland, and will be assistant 
instructor in Materia Mediea and Therapeutics 
for the coming session. 



Many of the 1914 boys have been seen about 
their old haunts at the University, meeting and 
congratulating themselves over the success in 
passing the Maryland Board. Among these are 
Drs. Holmes, Guerra, Ruppersberger, Frederick, 
Robinson, Summerfield, Wright, Mendelsohn, 
Quitt and Goldstrom. 



Miss Elsie Roof, 1915, is spending a month 's 
vacation with friends in Detroit, Mich. 

Mrs. Martha E. Hicks, Infirmary Secretary, 
left June 20th for North Carolina where she 
will spend the summer with friends and rela- 
tives. Dur'ing her absence her place will be 
filled by Mrs. Beulah G. Welsh. 

Those now in the Infirmary for the summer 
are : Waterman, Paul, Peindt, Lowenson, Honig 
and Quintero, 1915, and Jones and Aldridge, 
1916. The boys are hustling and making good 
progress. 



Since the close of the regular school year, 
cupid has invaded the ranks of the dental fac- 
ulty and enticed some of its choicest members 
to form life partnerships. Dr. Alex. Horn Pat- 
erson was the first to cross the Rubicon, his mar- 
riage to Miss Caroline Elizabeth Haas taking 
place at the home of the bride's parents, 509 N. 
Calhoun street, Baltimore, Md., Tuesday morn- 
ing, June 2nd. They spent their honey-moon at 
Watkin's Glen, New York. Our distinguished 
and highly respected Dean immediately fol- 
lowed the example of his junior partner, and 
was married to Mrs. Amiie B. Latham, on Wed- 
nesday evening, June 17th. Dr. and Mrs. Heat- 
wole are spending their honey-moon in North 
Carolina. Dr. Wm. A. Rea, '01, chief infirmary 



Intercollegiate Bureau of Academic Costume, Aibany.N.Y. 
COTRELL & 

LEONARD 

Official Maimers of 

Caps and 
Gowns 




Correct Hoods 
for All Degrees. 

I Rich Gowns for 
Pulpit and Bencli. 

Bulletin, Samples 
etc. on request 



demonstrator, was next in line to surprise his 
friends when his wedding to Miss Ruby Marie 
Hodges, Sidney, Iowa, was announced for Wed- 
nesday evening, June 24th. They are spend- 
ing their honey-moon in the West. To all these 
recent benedicts we extend congratulations, 
and our sincerest wishes for a long, happy and 
prosperous married life. 



June 13, 1914. 
Dear Mr. Editor: 

The oral hygiene exhibit of Dr. Benjamin 
Gross presented in recent competition for the 
pri-ze I have offered each year, is, in my opinion, 
entitled to more suitable recognition than that 
of honorable mention. Acting upon this con- 
viction, I have decided to give him a silver 
medal as a slight token of my pei-sonal appre- 
ciation of his very meritorious exhibit which 
is botli a credit to him and his Alma Mater. 
Yours truly, 

MERRILL HOPKINSON, M.D., 
Prof. Oral Hygiene and History. 

o 

Pharmacy — Graduate. 

The annual dinner given by the faculty of 
the University of Maryland to the graduating 
class of the Department of Pharmacy was held 
June 1st, at the Emerson Hotel. Dr. Henry 
P. Hynson was toastmaster. He called on Dr. 
Charles Caspari, Dr. D. M. R. Culbreth, Dr. 
L. M. Burger, Dr. Daniel Base, Dr. C. C. Plitt 
and Dr. J. C. Wolf, of the faculty, for responses. 
Speeches were made for the students by C. L. 
Armstrong, president of the class ; Miss A. M. 
Patterson, Frontis Lentz and others. 



LUTHER B. BENTON 
Dental Depot 



students' Outfits 
a Specialty 



305 North Howard St. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



13 



The Maryland Pharmaceutical Association 
held its annual convention at Annapolis, Md., 
on June 23, which lasted about four days. A 
large crowd was present, and many new mem- 
bers were taken in. Dr. Kelly was present, 
also many of the former graduates of the Phar- 
macy Department, including the prominent re- 
tail druggists of the city. The mornings were 
devoted to business meetings, and the evenings 
to dances, card parties, etc. There was also 
an address by the Governor. 



F. Lentz, of this year's graduating class 
and the Manner of the two medals of the Phar- 
macy Department, is practicing in Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

On "Wednesday, June 3, a box party was 
given by the women graduates of the Phar- 
macy Department in honor of Miss Pattereon, 
who received her diploma Avith honors at the 
Commencement Exercises on June 1. Among 
those present were Misses Grace Lotz, Carrie 
Mossup, Alice Cole, Annie Patterson and Amelia 
Sonnenburg. 

The lectures on Pharmaceutical Law conduct- 
ed by Dr. Burger proved very helpful to those 
who took the course. A broad field was cov- 
ered, including Labeling and Selling of Poisons, 
Misbranding, Adulterations and Food and 
Drugs Law of the State of Maryland. 
o 

Academic — Graduate. 

The graduation exercises of St. John's Col- 
lege were held in the gymnasium June 17th, at 
10:30 A. M. There were thirteen graduates, 
twelve of whom received the degree of bachelor 
of arts and one that of bachelor of science. 
They were as follows: 

Bachelor of Arts. 
Godfrey Child — First Honor, Pocomoke City, 

Md. 
Benjamin Milton Cissel, Highland, Md. 
Robert Lincoln Christian, Ellicott City, Md. 
Royal Lee Hobbs, Reisterstown, Md. 
John Walker Holraan, Friendsville, Md. 
Lucius Q. C. Lamar, Rockville, Md. 
Willia mDove Noble, Preston, Md. 
Samuel Maurice Phillips, Quantico, Md. 
Wilmer Stanley Phillips, Whitehaven, Md. 
Daniel Earle Smith, Hoyes, Md. 
William Randolph Woodward, Annapolis, Md. 



Bachelor of Science. 
Harry L. Reeder — Second Honor, Butler, Pa. 

The honorary degree of doctor of laws was 
conferred upon Governor Phillips Lee Golds- 
borough and Comptroller Emerson C. Harring- 
ton. The honorary degree of doctor of divinity 
was conferred upon Rev. Walter G. McNeil. Mr. 
Cornelius Comegys, of Scranton, Pa., delivered 
the address. 

Lieut. Chauncey St. C. McNeill, commandant 
of cadets, made the annual award of a sabre to 
the cadet commanding the "color" company of 
the battalion to Maurice Phillips. Lieutenant 
McNeill announced that Cadet Major Reeder, 
the battalion commander, and Cadet Captains 
Phillips and Noble, the companj' commanders, 
would be commended to the War Department 
for their military proficiency. 

With the singing of the class ode and the 
benediction by the Rev. William B. Beach, of 
Scranton, Pa., the ceremonies were brought to 
a close. 



NURSING. 

Miss Burns, '14, was in town a few days ago 
and was very enthusiastic in her remarks about 
the work at Mount Wilson where she and Miss 
Clendenin, also of '14, are working their sum- 
mer months. 

Miss Prince, 11, has returned from Way- 
cross, Ga., where she has been attending one 
of her patients. 



We are glad to announce that Mrs. E. P. 
Clarke, who has been kept from her duties as 
Superintendent of the Nurses ' Training School 
by influenza and an infected tooth, has recov- 
ered sufficiently to continue her work. Miss 
Punk was Acting Superintendent in her ab- 
sence, having been temporarily Assistant Super- 
intendent in the absence of Miss Sullivan, who 
is on her vacation. Miss Sullivan left June 1 
for Boston, Mass., where she will try to re- 
juvenate herself for the continuance of her post. 



The Imp— Pardon me, your honor, but may I 
ask you why they call you Satan ? 

The It— Oh, that's just a little Old Nick 
name of mine. 

— Princeton Tiger. 



14 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



New Neckwear 

for summer wear — 
novelty patterns, the 
nobbiest in town 

Hamburgers' 

Baltimore and Hanover Sts. 



QUIPS. 

PLEASE COME CALL ON US. 

Big changes have been brought about in 
many of the various departments. Much has 
been accomplished upon which we may con- 
gratulate ourselves. We aim high, and we are 
rapidly reaching the standard we have set. 
"But: There is aiwavs a "but." if you look for 




•The 

Merchant 
Tailor 



Who 

Sells 
Keady-to-wear 



College Clothes 



New Spring Models 

Now Ready 
Prices $15 to $25 



Made to Measure 

From $20 Up 
Samples Cheerfully Given 



19 E. FAYETTE ST. 

Take Elevator 



fflj 



it. "But" very often indicates that a com- 
plaint is coming, and this will be no exception. 

But. being but a hard-working short-horn, 
buried deep down in the dispensary, I ask you, 
why don't you "big fellows" fall down the 
steps into "near utter darkness" and stimulate 
us by hauling us over the coals every week 
or so? 

There we stop, day in and day out, sending 
interesting material into the gilded halls above. 
Its' a pretty good old place that dispensary, 
and I for one would be at a loss if it were de- 
nied me. But we do want to see the "big boys" 
more often among us. Perhaps we would like 
them to know what decent work we are doing 

I can imagine the surprise which would arise 
if several members should drop into the "Eye 
Box" these days. Some class to this depart- 
ment. I tell you. How about this, Looper? 

Ru]i along, then, to the "Orthopedic Box.'' 
It also has taken on a new life, a new vigor, 
and a greatly increased work. (Will you deny 
it, Bennett?) 

Dash to the "Surgical Box" and peep 
around. Dr. Bay is liable to blush, but he will 
show you a few things. (So will Little Frankie.) 

Don't slip upon the fine new floor! 

Slide to the "Stomach Box" and learn where 
H large number of cases sent in to the "surgical 
side" pome from. That's a secret, however, as 
this is not general information and maj^ account 
I'oi' a lessened clinic, as regards numbers, if not 
of less thorough work done. (Salute the Ma- 
joi'.) (No "test meals," no treatment here!) 

And then, with this as a start, go across the 
street, and beam with pride! There is "class;" 
there is our medical department of the Dis- 
pensary. 



One interesting thing is worth observing: 
IMaeks, at times a bit overly human in odor, 
seated next white people, who often have 
aromas of their own also. No doubt, there may 
Itr many persons who come once, and don't re- 
(nrn because of this. Please, Mr. Powers That 
Arr. can't we arrange to separate the blacks 
from the whites, while they wait outside our 
doors ' T hope so, I trust so. Come down often, 
anyway, as suggested earlier, and say "How 
arc you?'' occasionally, if only to call on the 
(llunil.lc B) in the G. U. Box. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



15 



BIRTHS. 

To Dr. Walter H. Mayhew, class of '01, and 
Mrs. Mayhew, June 3, 1914, a daughter, Matil- 
da Ruth Mayhew. Dr. Mayhew is a resident 
physician at the State Sanatorium, Sabillas- 
ville, Md. 



To Dr. George C. Loc'kard, class of '03, asso- 
sociate professor of clinical medicine and pedia- 
tries, and Mrs. Lockard, of 1631 West La- 
fayette avenue, in May, 1914, a son. 
o 

MARRIAGES. 

Alex. Horn Paterson, D.D.S., 1911, of Penn- 
sylvania, to Miss Caroline Elizabeth Haas, of 
Baltimore. Md., at Baltimore, June 2, 1914. Dr. 
and Mrs. Paterson spent tlieir honeymoon at 
Watkin's Glen. New York. 



William A. Rea, D.D.S., 1901, of Pennsyl- 
vania, to Miss Rviby Hodges, of Sidney, Iowa, 
at Sidney, June 24, 1914. They are spending 
their honevmoou in the West. 



Dr. H. Clifford Grant, class of '14, of North 
Carolina, to Mis.s Nora J. Mee, of Baltimore. 
Md.. at Baltimore, June 1. 1914. Dr. Grant will 
take his bride to his home in North ('arolina. 



Dr. J. C. Pound. Baltimoi'e Medical College, 
class of "96. to Miss Bertha M. CostelJo, both 
of Baltiino'e. Md., at Baltimore, June 1, 1914. 
Immediately aftei- the ceremony Dr. and ]\lrs. 
Pound left on an extended automobile tour. 



Lullie B. Carter, R. N., University Hospital 
Training School for Nurses, class of "09, of 
Roanoke, Va.. to Mr. George Hyde Hopkins, of 
1531 Linden avenue, at Baltimore. May 25, 1914. 
Mr. and Mi's. Hopkins will be at home to their 
friends aftei- September 1 at 1531 Linden ave- 
nue. 



Timothy O. IleatwoJe. M.D.. D.D.S.. Dean 
of the Dental Department, to Mrs. Anna B. 
Lathan. both of Baltimore. Md., at Baltimoi'e. 
June 17, 1914. Immediately after the ceremony 
Dr. and Mrs. Heatwole left for North Carolina, 
where Dr. Heatwole is to read a papei- at a 
convention of dentists to be held there. 



WARNER 8c CO. 
... I|att^rj0 ... 

222-224 WEST BALTIMORE ST. 

DEATHS. 

Cadet William Raymond Bolus, St. John's 
College, 15, of Middletown, Md., died at the 
Emergency Hospital, Annapolis, May 25, 1914. 



Dr. Philip Heldrich, class of 1883, of 2151 
AVilkens avenue, died at his home, after a lin- 
gering illness, May 1, 1914, aged 63 years. 



John Thomas Shepherd, acting assistant sur- 
geon, U. S. P. H. and M. H. Service, class of 
1874, a active member of the Association of 
Military Surgeons of the United States since 
1905, died at his home in Chattanooga, Tenn., 
March 22, 1914, from heart disease, aged 64 
years. 

He was born in Troup county, Georgia, April 
21, 1848, the son of John W. and Mary (Skin- 
ner) Shepherd. His ijreliminary education was 
received in the schools of Cartersville, Ga., and 
his medical course was taken at the University 
of ]\Iaryland. from which he was graduated in 
1874. After a term as interne in the Baltimore 
pnfirmary, he returned to Cartersville and prac- 
ticed there until 1885, when he moved to Chat- 
tanooga, Tenn. He was for four years physi- 
?pian to the Hamilton County Hospital and a 
member of the visiting staff of the Baroness Er- 
{anger Hospital, Chattanooga. 

At the age of sixteen he entered the Confed- 
erate Army and served for the last two years 
\)t the war. 

On August 31, 1888, he was appointed acting 
assistant surgeon in the Public Health and Ma- 
t^-ine Hospital Service, and remained in that po- 
fiition and in that station until its abolition in 
August. 1911. He had been in ill health for the 
last two years of his life. 



Dr. Frank Slingluff, class of 1868. of 1701 
'North Calvert street, died at his home June 13, 
1914, of apoplexy. Dr. Slingluft" had not been 
5n active practice for some years. 



By Comparison 



We believe it will be found that, in the Selection, 
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Renal Functional Test : Phenolsulphonephthalein Ampoules 



"Nothing Too Large— Nothing Too Small " 

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Company 

352-363 Equitable Building 



Surreal and Hospital Supplies. Sick Room Supplies. 
Dental Forceps. Microscopes and Accessories. 

The Chas. Willms Surgical Instrument Co. 

300 N. HOWARD STREET. 

THE WESTERN NATIONAL BANK 

OF BALTIMORE 



SONNENBURQ'S PHARMACY 

Baltimore and Greene Streets. 

ONE MINUTE CLINICAL THERMOMETERS, 

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PHARMACEUTICAL CHEMISTS, ST. LOUIS, MO. 



PRUiVOIDS 



Manufacturers of 
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Your Bank Account 
Solicited 



14 N. EUTAW STREET 



Menu, Banquet and Dance Cards, Commencement Invita- 
tions and Programs, Diplomas, Certificates, Engrossing, U. 
of M. Stationery for Classes and Fraternities, Letter Heads, 
Envelopes, Cards, etc., for rhysicians. Lawyers and Dentists. 

J. H. DOWNS, STATIONER. 229 N. Charles St. 



Your Special Attention is directed to 

Beef, Iron and Wine with Hydropepsin, 
Liquid Pi=cine Co., Red Syr. Hypophosptiites Co. 

THOMAS & THOMPSON CO. 

Manuf rs and Dispensers of P ure Medicines (Wholesale and 
Retail). Cor. Baltimore and Light Sts., Baltimore. Md. 

RESINOL OINTMENT AND RESINOL SOAP 

Are Genuine Comforts to Physician and Patient Alike. 
Send for Samples .and Try Them. 

RESINOL CHEMICAL COMPANY, Baltimore, Md 
German Savings Bank of Baltimore City 

S. W. Cor. Baltimore and Eutaw Sts. 

Interest Paid On Deposits. 

Drovers and Mechanics' National Bank 



OF BALT'MORE. MD. 



CAPITAL 



. Paid in $300,000 00 

Earned 300,000 $600,000 00 

EARNED SURPLUS AND PROFITS . 533,487 65 

SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES FOR RENT 

EMPLOYERS — POSITIONS WANTED 
By students in the Legal, Medical, Dental 
and Pharmaceutical Department of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland. Some are stenographers, 
bookkeepers, etc. Apply SAMUEL WANT, 
1243-1253 Calvert Building. (No charge is 
made for this service.) 



The University Gazette 

Devoted to the interests of the University of Maryland. 



Vol. I. 



Baltimore, Md., Aug^ust 1, 1914 



No. 2 




Thomas Fell. ph.Di. ll.d., d.c.l., provost 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



Vol. I. 



AUGUST 1, 1914. 



No. 2. 



CONTENTS 



ADDRESS DELIVERED BY THE GER- 
MAN AMBASSADOR, COUNT VON 

BERNSTOFF 19 

A SUGGESTION ' 21 

EDITORIALS 22 

The "Come-Back" Call. 
Why "The University Gazette." 
Appeal to the Washington Branch of 
The General Alumni Association. 



EDITORIALETS 24 

ITEMS 25 

BIRTHS 31 

MARRIAGES , 31 

DEATHS 31 



Footwear for the College Man at Moderate Price. 

N. HESS' SONS - - 8 E. Baltimore, St. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE, MD. 

HON. PHILLIPS LEE GOLDSBOROUGH, Governor of Maryland, Chancellor. 
THOMAS FELL, A. M., Ph. D., L L. D., D. C. L., Provost. 



ST. JOHN'S COLLEGE, Annapolis, Md. (^ 



DEPARTMENT OF 
RTS AND SCIENCES 



) 



Founded 1696. Classical and Scientific College Courses leading to degrees. Special advantages to stu- 
dents purposing to study the professions. Military Department under army officers. Also Preparatory 
School for boys fitting for St. John's or other colleges. Term begins SepI :mber 21. Address 

THOMAS FELL, Ph.D., LL.D., D.C.L., President. 



DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE. 

Four vears' graded course. New Laboratory Build- 
ing. Clinical advantages unsurpassed. Teaching Staff 
of 66. io8th Annual Session will begin October i, 
1914, and continue 8 months 

R. DORSEY COALE, Ph.D., M.D., Dean. 



DEPARTMENT OF DENTISTRY. 

33d Annual Session begins October i, 1914. and 
continues 7 months. 26 Instructors. New Building. 
For catalogue containing course of study, etc., apply to 

TIMOTHY 0. HEATWOLE, M.D., D.D.S., Dean, 

Baltimore, Md. 



DEPARTMENT OF LAW. 

S9th Annual Session will begin Sept. 23, 1914. Faculty 
of 26. For catalogue containing full information ad- 
dress the Secretary, 301 St. Paul Street, Baltimore, 
Maryland. 

EDWIN T. DICKERSON, Secretary. 



DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACY. 

(Formerly Maryland College of Pharmacy). 72nd 
Annual Session begins September 25, 1914. 11 In- 
structors. New Laboratories. Address 

CHARLES CASPAR!, JR., Phar.D., Dean, 

Baltimore, Md. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 

Published Monthly in the Interest of the University of Maryland. 
PRICE $1.00 PER YEAR. 



Contributions solicited from Alumni of the 
University. 



Business Address, 608 Professional Buildine. 
Baltimore, Md. 



Vol. I. 



BALTIMORE, MD., AUGUST 1, 1914. 



No. 2. 



Address Delivered by the German Ambassador, 
Count Johann von Bernstorff, at the One 
Hundred and Seventh Annual Commence- 
ment of the University of Maryland. 

(Continued from July Number) 



In Germany, as you know, all instructiou is 
directed and supervised by the state. In our 
opinion the human powers to be developed by 
education must be considered from the stand- 
point of ■jaationality. Whoever succeeds in 
creating a national spirit, has found the best 
means of education. The state's educational 
influence upon its citizens continues through 
constitution, legislation and administration. It 
would endanger the whole existence of the state 
if the latter ceded to others the first step of this 
education, the instruction of the child. In the 
opinion of Fiete, the great educator of the Ger- 
man nation, the state must employ pedagogical 
measures in order to fulfill its moral purpose, 
i. e., to lead the people to mortality. The state 
is a political community entrusted with the ed- 
iication of mankind. In the state and through it 
a nation must form its character, which is the 
highest moral obligation for a whole people 
as well as for the individual. For this reason 
the state should legally fix the general princi- 
ples of education, over-anxious and exhaustive 
regulations of details, too precise a uniformity, 
mechanical orders and obeying, however, should 
be avoided. By making the attendance of 
schools compulsory, a minimum of education is 
guaranteed. Administrative force and liberty, 
prosperity and military power, knowledge and 
religion are the great contrasts to be reconciled 
in order to create idealism of free personality 
which sacrifices itself voluntarily and cheer- 
fully for the common good and, if unhampered, 
will employ all its forces. 

The organization of schools in America is dif- 
ferent from that in Germany. I will not at- 
tempt to examine Avhether it is better or if it is 
less effective. The truth probably is that like 



all things in this world, some features may be 
better here and some there. In Germany, for 
instance, the unnatural crowding of the learned 
professions, no doubt originated in the fact that' 
in German schools formerly too much stress was 
laid on classical' education. In America the 
opinion grows steadily that the Gei-man lan- 
guage is a valuable equipment for everybody. 
As Goethe said: "Whoever knows and studies 
the German language, goes to the market where 
all nations offer their goods. He plays the part 
of the interpreter, at the same time advancing 
his interests. He who does not known foreign 
languages, does not know his own." May the 
spirit grow more and more here, which is so 
evident in German schools, the spirit of faith- 
fully doing one's duty and of recognizing the 
importance of ideal goods. Our highest object 
in life is the forming of ideals and the acting 
according to them. Civilization is a positive 
gain only if it leads to culture, to an aesthetic 
view of life and to morality. 

Of late the German Government has taken 
further steps in order to develop the idea which 
led to the exchange of professors. In this ob- 
.iect an "America-Institute" has recently been 
founded in connection with the Berlin Univer- 
sity. The idea of founding this institute was 
conceived by Friedrich Althoff, recently de- 
ceased, who for many years occupied a leading 
position in the Royal Prussian Department for 
Public Instruction. The establishment of a 
union of all scientific efforts was the aim of his 
life. He Avorked for an effective intellectual in- 
tercourse among nations, because he considered 
it the best means of bringing them nearer 
together in the domain of common human in- 
terests. The exchange of German and Ameri- 
can university professors was the first realiza- 
tion of this idea. When Harvard University 
conferred the honorary degree of a doctor on 
Althoff, President Eliot referred to him as "the 
father of the idea of exchanging professors." 

The influence of his efforts for an intellectual 
intercourse between America and Germany has 



20 



THE UNIVEKSITY GAZETTE. 



not departed with him., but is still keenly felt. 
The "Ameriea-In.stitute"' was probably his last 
desire and his last scheme. 

Dr. Althoff 's life-work has found enthusiastic 
support; in Germany, especially from the Em- 
peror, in the United States through the active 
interest of prominent men. This has made 
possible the establishment of exchange lecture 
courses and of the Roosevelt aud Emperor Wil- 
liam professorships. It has also enabled the 
foundation of the German "America Institute," 
viz: by the Koppel donation in Germany, and 
in America by the funds donated by Mr. James 
Speyer. Already several years ago Mr. Speyer 
placed considerable sums at the disposal of the 
German Emperor for an effective encourage- 
ment of the exchange of professors. His in- 
terest in the matter has again been proved by 
his still more generous donation for the "Amer- 
ica Institute." 

The famous historian, Profesor Karl Lam- 
precht, in his lecture recenth' referred to a 
"New Era," which, in his opinion, is approach- 
ing and in which the problem of a higher politi- 
cal culture will be added to the care for the edu- 
cation of a new man. An active intercovirse 
among nations with regard to common human 
interests will facilitate the introduction of such 
a new time. This gives the "America Insti- 
tute" its eminent importance. If more funds 
are available it will have a great future and to 
be able to afford very valuable assistance to all 
American students visiting German universities, 
as a German goveriunenta.l institution in the 
Department of the Miuistery of Education de- 
voted to the furthering of the cultural rela- 
tions between Germany and the United States. 

The American public still knows so little 
about this new "America Institute" that it is 
indeed worth while to point out its significance. 
Its program is to further and to expand the cul- 
tural relations between the United States and 
Germany. This sounds almost trivial and it ap- 
pears as if jiist this labor were being performed 
in many places ; but in the whole history of civi- 
lization probably no such enterprise has ever 
been recorded, and what it aims at may triily be 
the model for future developments. Here we 
have, at last, that desirable modermzation of 
international intercourse — a kind of efficiency 
management in the world of ideals. The rela- 
tions of civilized countries have always been 



carefully organized in jjolitical, legal and 
economic affairs ; but in the fields of educa- 
tion and scholarship, of art and literature, of 
moral and social purposes, the international 
exchange is nothing but disorder. Energies 
are wasted, eft'orts are scattered, the cheapest 
elements often rush into the foreground, the 
best impulses remain inhibited — in short, disor- 
ganization prevails. Though the national work 
might become a stimulation and an inspiration 
to the neighbors it too often becomes a source 
of irritation and contempt. The purpose of this 
new German institute is to improve the situation 
so far as Germany and America are concerned. 
A scholar, for instance who desires connections 
with universities or libraries, museums or ar- 
chives; laboratories or industrial establishments, 
municipal or political offices, finds the doors 
opened through the agency of the Institute. 
Care is taken that the best and most character- 
istic works be translated ; that the art of one 
land be made known to the other ; that teachers 
and students be helped; that congresses and 
exhibitions be supported, and that truth about 
the foreign land be disseminated. Statistics 
are gathered, investigations are carried on, and 
every day brings new and important tasks to 
the Institute, which occupies seven rooms in the 
magnificent structure of the new Royal Library 
in Berlin. No rivalry is possible between this 
new America Institute and any society or es- 
tablishment that Avorks toward the mutual un- 
derstanding of the two nations. Such rivalry 
can no more exist there than between a cham- 
ber of commerce and any business undertaking. 
The chamber of commerce is not doing biisiness, 
but it organizes and regulates and helps biisi- 
ness all around. The America Institute, too. 
sees its aim in helping and ad,iusting and har- 
monizing the scattered efforts which have arisen 
and may arise on both sides of the ocean. 

Its present activities are briefly as follows : 
Americans in America and Germans in Ger- 
many, in various public and scientific pursuits, 
find themselves in need of information as to 
what has been done respectiveh' in Germany in 
this matter or in America in that matter. They 
are often at a loss how to obtain the desired 
information. The America Institute finds it- 
self increasingly employed in acting as a 
medium of inquiry on all sorts of subjects in 
both countries. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



21 



Again, every year a number of Germans are 
going to America, and a number of Americans 
coming to Germany. They are going and com- 
ing as students in particular fields, or as gov- 
ernment officials, professors on sabbatical leave 
or as the representatives of scientific organiza- 
tions, or of learned societies. They are more 
or less ignorant of local conditions; they may 
lack a speaking knowledge of the language. 
They meet with difficulties and may be directed 
to the Institute as a place where they can per- 
haps find assistance. These requests cover a 
very wide range of subjects, and satisfactory 
response to them involves intimate knowledge 
of men and affairs in the two countries. 

The Institute has a special arrangement with 
the United State Copyright Office by which it 
undertakes to assist German authors and pub- 
lishers in obtaining a copyright for German 
books in the United States. During the few 
years of its existence more than 2,500 German 
books have been copyrighted through the In- 
stitute. In connection with this service the In- 
stitute has found opportunity to encourage the 
translation of books and articles of one country 
into the language of the other. 

The Institute is accumulating a library (now 
numbering about 11,000 volumes) that is in- 
tended to be a representative collection of 
America in Berlin, dealing with the history 
of, and the life and the conditions, in the United 
States. It is the object of the Institute to pro- 
vide a good working collection, and, by making 
the books more informally and easily available, 
to supplement the service of other libraries in 
Berlin and Germany. The library is being used 
by Germans studying American questions, and 
by Americans wishing the advantages of an 
American library abroad. 

The America Institute is co-operating with 
the Smithsonian Institution of Washington, D. 
C, in the International Exchange of documents 
between Germany and the United States, a 
traffic of exchange which involved the handling 
of the sum total of 34,591 packages during the 
year ending December 31, 1912. The service is 
rapidly increasing. 

The work of the Institute, in short, is to serve 
in a concrete way the every-day needs of those 
Germans and Americans who are interested in 
the life and the institutions of the other coun- 
try. The interests are realities. In view of the 



innumerable ways in which they manifest them- 
selves the task is a large one. For this very rea- 
son, they afford a practical opportunity for pro- 
moting and developing the ideal of understand- 
ing and good will between the two nations. 
It is the belief of those in charge of the Insti- 
tute that this work can be done more effectively 
by gradually eliminating the naturally haphaz- 
ard and accidental means of intercourse and 
substituting in their place methods that are to 
some degree organized and systematic. 

This Institute is an interesting illustration, 
not only of the very friendly attitude of the 
German Government towards your own coun- 
try, but of the deep and intelligent interest 
which our Government takes in the development 
of intellectual and social life. One of its pur- 
poses is to foster an interest in German uni- 
versity education in this country. 

"When the American Institute has been at 
work some time, it is to be hoped that more 
wealthy friends of the idea it represents will 
come forward in both countries and endow the 
Institute with funds). If this should be the case, 
the Institute will in the future be able to offer 
scholarships to American students who are de- 
sirous of studying in Germany. It is obvious 
that this would be a splendid development of 
the idea of exclianging professors, which has 
proved so successful in both countries. 



A Suggestion. 

With the most kindly of feelings and without 
any intention of criticizing, we feel it incum- 
bent upon us to call attention to an oversight 
in the late musical given by the Orchestra 
and Glee Club of the University. It is no more 
or less than this : Does it ever occur to our 
people that we have an academic department in 
Annapolis, and that that self-same department 
has an excellent band? Certainly a few selec- 
tions from this organization at the above-men- 
tioned concert -would have gone a long way 
toward making the evening a little more suc- 
cessful , besides showing to the public the versa- 
tility of our students. In the future, therefore, 
we suggest that whenever the orchestra appears 
in public the St. John's Band be asked to par- 
ticipate. 



22 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 

A MONTHLY JOURNAL 

Devoted to the interests of the University 

of Maryland. 

Subscription Price, $1.00 Per Annum, In Advance 

Reprints Furnished At Cost 

Advertising Rates Submitted Upon Request. 

60S Professional Building 

BALTIMORE, MD. 



Editorial Board. 

H. M. ROBINSON, M.D Editor-in-Chief. 

NATHAN WINSLOW, M.D Managing Editor. 

Graduate Members. 

ALBERT H. CARROLL, M.D Medical. 

SAMUEL WANT, LL. B Law. 

F. J. VALENTINE, D.D.S Dental. 

J. BEN ROBINSON, D.D.S Dental. 

A. A. SONNENBURG, Phar.D Pharmacy. 

J. M. BRANSKY, Phar.D Pharmacy. 

THOMAS FELL, LL.D Academic. 

G. L. WINSLOW, B.A Academic. 

M. E. SULLIVAN, R.N Nursing. 

Undergraduate Members. 

H. GOLDMAN, '15; F. C. MARINO, 

'16; C. 0. WOLFF, '17 Medicine. 

J. A. HAGGERTY, '15; M. A. TRE- 
GOR, '15; C. N. MATTHEWS, '16. Law. 

C. A. BUIST, '15; A. Z. ALDRIDGE, 
16 Dental. 

A. L. STERLING, '15 Pharmacy. 

R. L. HOBBS Academic. 

J. E. EVANS, '16 Y. M. C. A. 

B. C. LIGHTNER, '15 Advertising. 

B. G. GOLD, '15 College Notes. 

A. G. DE QUEVEDO Latin-American. 

L. A. BUIE, '15 House Notes. 



AUGUST 1, 1914. 

THE "COME-BACK" CALL. 

Attention, 1909 and 1914, and every other 
chiss whose 5th or 10th anniversaiy comes this 
year ! 

Don't you think it about time to re-visit your 
Alma Matgr? Surely you are not like the un- 
grateful sou, who, having been nurtured to man- 
hood, forsakes his mother because he is so much 
greater than she is. 

Don't you realize that you owe your school 
far more than the few dollars you paid for your 
tuition? 

And, besides, didn't you mean to come back 
to the fellows whom you lived with, studied 
with, and sported with shoulder to shoulder, 
year on year? In our parting affairs did you 
not say you would be sure to return to the 




"Collar Hug" Clothes 



"Manhattan" Shirts 



THE QUALITY SHOP 

Baltimore and Liberty Sts. 



University after the lapse of every five years- 
As a member of the class of 1909, Medical, 
we distinctly remember everyone actually vow- 
ing to return, and as nearly as possible to re- 
duplicate our last banquet. 

Our class was as nice and loyal a class as 
could be gotten together. We are proud of it, 
and to show our class spirit we, the members 
of the class of 1909, Medical, are, if possible, 
coming back to our old school this fall, five 
years after graduation, and,- with that object 
in view, have appointed a committee to arrange 
everything. 

Go thou and do likewise ; we should very 
much like all the departments of the U. of M. 
to do the "caucus act" at this same time. 

The date? "Well, somewhere around Aca- 
demic Day, about November 12 or 13, 1914. 
Those other departments that seriously con- 
template the "come back" act please communi- 
cate with the Editnr-in-Chief. who is chairman 



SPRING SHOES 

FOR THE 

UNIVERSITY MAN 

AU Styles— All Leathers 
Best Shoes— Moderate Prices 



WYMAN 

19 W. LEXINGTON STREET 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



23 



of the 1909, Medical, "Come Back" Committee. 

Don't get into a rut! You can't afford it 
and your patients will suffer by it. Are you 
going to be like old Drs. So and So who knew 
enough medicine when they received their sheep 
skins and would never have to visit a hospital 
or read a medical magazine. Don't get into 
any sort of rut, nor become like a stagnant pool. 

However it hurts you, physically, mentally 
or (what is moie to the point) financially, get 
out of fixed habits ; leave your woi'k every once 
in a while; meet your old school friends, and 
see the clinics here and at other hospitals. 
Come back ! If you think we are sentimental, 
well, then, we glory in it. We may not have 
been among the brightest members of the class, 
but we are full of the brightest memories of 
those school days. 

Come back! This dear, old University needs 
you and your school spirit. Think about it. 

Do. not forget this, that 1909 can never come 
together again as a full class because some have 
already gone over to the other shore, never to 
return, and your Editor came near going on his 
last hike last year and wishes to run no more 
risks of not seeing the fellows again. 

Come back! You cannot honestly say that 
you are not able to afford leaving your work 
nor the expense of traveling to Baltimore. 

There are certain things that pay more than 
money-getting, and we are sure that it would 
be worth while to travel from California, 
Florida and even Syria to see the fellows again, 
the fellows that plugged for exams, with us, 
that went to theatres with us and that fought 
with us on the teams. Make a special effort to 
come back! 

We want to see' you this November to have 
a banquet together, to shake hands together at 
least once more. 

Come back, 1909, and if you can, 1904. 
Clinics, theatre, boat rides and banquet — and 
then back to work refreshed. 



"WHY "THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE." 

The Editorial Board sincerely hope our read- 
ers will be pleased with the new name of their 
publication. Many names were proposed, but 
for obvious reasons laid aside. With the limited 
time at our disposal for a choice the present 



seemed the most appropriate and subject to the 
least objection. With the Foreword it had been 
our intention of letting the subject drop, but 
some sources have severely criticized the 
change, therefore in all fairness to our readers 
we desire to state the Editorial Board did not 
make the change for the sake of changing, but 
was to a certain extent compelled to, the Cor- 
dell estate having withdrawn the privilege of 
a further use of the old name, which is regis- 
tered with the Secretary of State of Maryland. 
It is unnecessary to enter further into details. 
So here's to the "Gazette," may it serve the 
University long and faithfully. It will be con- 
ducted along as liberal lines as the receipts jus- 
tify. As heretofore especial emphasis will 1m 
laid upon student activities, not without an eye, 
however, to what the alumni are doing, as it is 
our belief loyalty to your college begins in un- 
dergraduate days, and if not developed then 
will never be properly so, no matter what effort 
is spent in the endeavor. We regret the neces- 
sity of this further explanation, but believe now 
that the facts have been set forth our readers 
M'ill understand. 



APPEAL TO THE WASHINGTON BRANCH 
OF THE GENERAL ALUMNI ASSOCIA- 
TION. 



It is with great grief we learn that the Wash- 
ington Branch of the General Alumni Associa- 
tion is practically extinct, being alive in name 
only. At one time our Washington alumni as- 
sociation was a very active body and did much 
to create and foster a healthy interest in the 
University of Maryland. We are extremely 
sorry that these days seem to be of the past. 
Surely, this lethargy does not denote lack of 
interest in the University of Maryland; at any 
rate, we in Baltimore do not believe so. To our 
mind it is merely a Rip Van Winkleian somnam- 
bulence which needs merely the mystic wand of 
an expert conjurer to re-awaken the society 
from its, we are glad to say, three, but not twen- 
ty years' sleep. If the "University Gazette" 
can in any way play the part of the conjurer, 
by opening its pages to this work, the editors 
will consider it a great privilege to assist in 
the resurrection. 



24 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



Appended herewith is a list of om* Wash- 
ington alumni, with their present locations, as 

far as we are able to ascertain. 

Gentlemen, we are with you body, soul and 

spirit, in any eit'orts you may make in the re- 
juvenation of this branch of our society. 

Bowen, W. S. 1339 Connecticut Ave., N. ^Y., 
Washington, D. C. 

Bishop, Francis B., M.D., 1913 Eye St., X. W.. 
Washington, D. C. 

Carrico, A. J., M.D., 2903 14th St., N. W., Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

Cole, G. R. L., M.D., 1418 7th St., S. W.. Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

Cook, G. W., M.D., 3 Thomas Circle, N. W.. 
Washington, D. C. 

Fry, Henry D., M.D., 1929 19th St., N. W., 
Washington, D. C. 

Hurtt, Harry, M.D., 1710 H St.. N. W.. Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

Lewis, John L., M.D., Bethesda, Md. 

Lewis, William, il.D.. Kensington, Md. 

Logic, E. R., M.U., 1836 Connecticut A\e.. 
N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Malone, W. P., M.D.. The Farragut. 17th and 
Eye Sts., Washington, D. C. 

Moncaster, C. M., M.D., Miami, Fla. 

Nichols, N. J., D.D.S., 1342 New York Ave.. 
N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Parsons, Alfred V.. M.D., Takoma, D. C. 

Richardson, J. J., M.D., 1509 16th St.. N. AY.. 
Washington, D. C. 

Robins, Wm. L., M.D., The Aochambeau, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

Russell. Chas. F.. ]\I.D., Herndon, Va. 

Shanis, A. R., M.D., 901 16th St., N. E., AYash- 
ington, D. C. 

Siinpkins, AVm. E., D.D.S., 1309 F St., N. AY.. 
Washington, D. C. 

Skinner, J. 0., M.D., Columbia Hospital, AA^ash- 
iugton, D. C. 

Smallwood, John M., j\I.D., AYest End, Va. 

Souter, W. M., M.D., 911 16th St., N. W., Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

Stone, Chas. G., M.D., Brightwood, D. C. 

Stone, Isaac S., M. D., Stoneleigh Court, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

Thompson, J. Ford, M.D., The Rochambeau. 
Washington, D. C. 

A'alentine, A. W., M.D., 610 North Carolina 
Ave., S. E., AVashiugton, D. C. 

AVynkoop, J. C, M.D., 1629 14th St., N. AY., 
Washington, D. C. 



LEFRANC & AULT 

ARE SHOWING 

NEW NECKWEAR 
NEW SHIR IS 

and the 

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AT THE 

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421 N. Howard St., at Franklin 



Chisholm, F. M., M.D., The Rochambeau, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

Lattimer, Guy W., M.D., Hyattsville, Md. 

Lattimer, Thos. E., M.D., Hyattsville, Md. 

Forster, L. H., Ph.D., 11th and M Sts., X. W., 
AVashington. D. C. 

Bowen, A\^ S., M.D., 1339 Connecticut Ave., 
N. W.. AVashington, D. C. 

Piggott, J. B., M.D., 1400 M St., N. W., Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

Rogers, J. B., M.D., 1400 M St., N. AY.. Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

Newhouse, Benj., M.D.. 1136 6th St.. N. W., 
Y^ashington, D. C. 

A^an Sweriugin, Y^ M., i\I.D., 1722 S St., N. W.. 
Washington, D. C. 

Nalley, J. B.. M.D., Mt. Rainier, Md. 



EDITORIALETS. 



We were once upon a time a partial assistant 
to the late Prof. E. F. Cordell as librarian and 
can vouch for the fact that he could always find 
whatever book was wanted because he was in 



Hart Schaffner & Marx, 
Kuppenheimer, 
"Society Brand" 



The clothes that college men 
like a lot 



TRe tflQIIB Hub 

BolUmcre Street At C^arleJ 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



25 



NEW YORK CLOTHING HOUSE Blome's Chocolates 



102 & 104 E. BALTIMORE ST. 

Men's, Boy's and Children's Clothing 

Automobile & Uniform Outfitters - • Burt's Shoes 

the librai-y heart aud soul ; but now that he is 
goue we find that it is difficult for those iu the 
library to locate books desired, although no 
fault of theirs, and we Avould suggest that all 
books iu the library be re-listed, re-indexed and 
put under proper headings. This procedure 
was hinted at; we trust it has been executed. 



Items — General. 

Latin- American Fraternity Phi Chi Delta. 

ETA CHAPTER. 

Maryland University. 

Baltimore, Md., May 30, 1914. 
To the Senate Committee on Fraternities 

of the University of Maryland. 

Gentlemen: — Considering the benefits which 
in all times and countries have been derived 
from the union of individuals guided by the 
same thoughts and fighting for the common 
cause, inspired by high ideals and mutual help, 
not only in the days spent in college, but out in 
the world as well, we decided on the 2d of 
November, 1913, to found a chapter of the 
National Latin-American Fraternity Phi Chi 
Delta in the University of Maryland, for the 
mutual benefit of all and for each one and all 
its men who fulfill the necessary requirements 
to be admitted as a member of said Fraternity. 

Our organization is the Chapter Eta of said 
Fraternity Phi Chi Delta, founded iu Louisiana 
State University in 1904. Today there are nine 
chapters legally established in the following 
universities : Louisiana State University, Tu- 

A. H. PETTING 

Manufacturer of 

GREEK LETTER FRATERNITY JEWELRY 

213 N. Liberty St., = Baltimore, Md. 
Factory: 212 Little Sharp St. 

Memorandum package sent to any fraternity member through the 
secretary of the chapter. Special designs and estimates furnished on 
medals, rings and pins for athletic meets, etc. 



Known and enjoyed by students of the 

University for more than half a century. 

Retail Department 

BLOME'S CANDY STORE 

Established 1859 621 W. Baltimore St. 

lane Universit}', Michigan University, Pennsyl- 
vania State College, George Washington Uni- 
versity, Chicago College of Medicine and Sur- 
gery, College of Physicians and Surgeons and 
College of Dental Surgery (last two of this 
city), and the Maryland University. We also 
are making arrangements to found five or six 
more in Pennsylvania University, Cornell, Illi- 
nois, etc. 

The main objects of the Fraternity corre- 
spond exactly with most of the other fraterni- 
ties in the country : Mutual help among its 
members, not only in college but out in the 
world as well. We select our members from 
the best among the best. We encourage each 
of its members to attain the highest possible 
standard in his classes and thus make him work 
hard and diligently. It is one of our mottos 
to obtain as much benefit of college life as pos- 
sible, not only mentally, but morally and physi- 
cally as well. 

Our sphere of action is not limited to the 
place where our Chapter is situated. We are as 
loyal to our Alma Mater as any other Maryland 
man can be. For this reason we try to exali 
her greatness wherever we go, and we look 
up with great interest that those of our coun- 
trymen who come here have the highest stand- 
ing, not only in their studies but in society as 
well. This is well exemplified by the members 
and the class of the new Latin-American stu- 
dents who have enrolled in the University this 
year. 

With all these views in mind we have founded 
our Chapter and it is our hope and desire that it 
will soon rank high among the leading fra- 
ternities of this institution of learning. 

We, therefore, take great pleasure in making 
petition to the Senate Committee on Fraterni- 
ties of this University of Maryland to consider 
our Fraternity as a Campus Organization and 
we will gladly submit to the rules and laws of 
said committee. 

Very respectfully yours. 
Grand Master, 

M. 6WAMAN, JR. 



26 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



Medical — Graduate. 

Drs. DiUer, Gribble, Mace, A. L. Webster, 
Hair, aud Mayhew have been visiting the Uni- 
versity within the past month. 



Dr. Dodson, 1911, who is jihy.sieian to the 
the Atlantic Coast Line Eailroad, stationed at 
AYayeross, Ga., has been spending the last few 
days with us. 



Dr. George Walter, 1910, of Jacksonville, 
Fla., is in Baltimore and expects to spend some 
time here. He hopes to absorb enough knowl- 
edge of dermatology and sj^Dhilis to enable him 
to specialize in same on his return home. Dr. 
Walter is working with Dr. Gilchrist and his 
assistants at the University and Johns Hopkins 
Hospitals and is making very good headway. 



Dr. M. L. Lichtenberg, who for the past two 
3'ears has been resident at the Universitj' Hos- 
pital, has left us to go into general practice in 
Baltimore. We are very sorry to lose "Mose" 
for various reasons ; firstly, he made a very good 
assistant to both Professors Mitchell and Zueb- 
liu, and was always well up in his work on 
cases. And, then, besides being always well 
dressed, he was our advanced fashion plate for 
the residents. 



The 1909 "Come Back Committee" on ar- 
rangements is as follows: Drs. H. M. Eobin- 
son, chairman; Fredk. Rankin, J. G. Sehweins- 
berg, R. G. Willse and Fredk. Yinup. It is 
urged that on the receipt of a letter from the 
Committee each member of the class of 1909 
will immediately forward answer, and if possi- 
ble, remittances covering cost of banquet and 
theatre. Don't neglect to come back! 



Dr. J. Holmes Smith, Jr., has temporarily 
forsaken EUis Island and is taking the position 
of surgeon on board one of the Govermnent 
ships. He will return in the fall in tune to take 
part in patrolling the yacht race course. 



Dr. Leo M. Cavanaugh, class of 1913, is lo- 
cated at Cresaptown, Md., where he is prac- 
ticing his profession. 



Their Work. 

We honor those who love their work 

Despite the soot or grime, 

AYho give at length of all their strength 

But fear to squander time; 

Who view achievement as an end. 

And to their tasks, fear not to lend 

A hand; for these, life will portend 

The best of any clime. 

We honor those who do not fear 

To bear the worker's name, 

Tho' horny hands may be the brands. 

Yet find no cause for shame. 

As laborer or household drudge, 

As preacher, nru-se, physician, judge, 

By spotless desk, or dreary smudge. 

They find their steps to fame. 

We honor those who know their lives 

Must never be denied 

The thirst for spoil, by honest toil. 

Wherein is honest pride; 

But whether slave or whether free. 

Or if at work on land or sea, 

AVe pray their souls may never be 

Content or satisfied. 

H. M. Robinson. M.D. 



1909. 



Law — Graduate. 

On page 9, Yolume I, Xo. 1, of the Gazette, a 
statement appears to the effect that Mr. Murray 
MacNabb was discharged as assistant librarian 
of the University during the month of Novem- 
ber; also he had lost a suit against the Univer- 
sity instituted for recovery of a year's salary. 

The editors regret exceedingly the cropping 
in of this item, but in the hurry of the make-up 
overlooked it. To say the least, far be it from 
us to cause any injury, heart-burning, or em- 
barrassment to any of our readers or alumni. 
The purpose of the Gazette is to weld together, 
not to alienate the aft'ectious of our alumni. 
j\Ioreover in this instance, it appears a distinct 
injustice, as will be noted from the attached 
letter, has been done Mr. MacNabb. Whether 
our correspondent deliberately set about to 
injure Mr. MacNabb or in his zeal for news 
unconsciously did so. the editors take this occa- 
sion to publicly apologize to Mr. MacNabb, and 
sincerely regret the appearance of the state- 
ment. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



27 



!> 



quAi 



eIDiehl 

Clothes 



built at 605 W. Baltimore St., 
just around the corner from the 
University, are kept pressed with- 
out cost. 

Suits $15 to $40 



July 20tli, 1914. 
To the Editor-iu-Cliief of 

' ' The University Gazette : ' ' 

I noticed iu the current number of your mag- 
azine a small news item from the Law Depart- 
ment in which it was stated that I was 
discharged as an assistant librarian aud that 
the suit brought by reason of this discharge was 
decided in favor of the defendant. 

This is untrue. Mr. Want was the real party 
sued and the University of Maryland was in- 
eluded at his suggestion. I obtained a judg- 
ment for the time served and one mouth for 
notice, as he was unable to shoAV any just cause 
for my discharge. Mr. AVant paid the judg- 
ment and costs out of his own money. 

I am unable to see, therefore, why he should 
have neglected to mention in his news item that 
he was sued as well as the University of Mary- 
land. He certainly ought to remember his hav- 
ing paid the judgment and costs. 

The records of the Court will show that this 
statement to "The University Gazette" was 
absolutely false. 

I always regretted the necessity of including 
the University of Maryland in this suit, but 
under the circumstances it was necessary in 
order to obtain the money 1 had actually earned 
as assistant librarian. 



Trusting that you will see that the facts of 
this matter are made plain, and with best 
wishes for your magaziue, I am, 
Very truly yours, 

MURRAY MacNABB. 



Judge and Mrs. James P. Gorter have joined 
the Baltimore colony at York Harbor, Maine, 
wliere they will spend several weeks. On their 
return they will occupy a cottage at Roland 
Park. 

Legalibiis Let Loose. 

The melancholy days have passed. Lectures 
on Constitutional Law, examinations in Federal 
Procedure and the glories of Commencement 
Day are but fond memories of the dim distant 
past. Legalibus has fled the blistering, swelter- 
ing city and pitched his nine-by-twelve tent 
'neath the old maples by the purling rills of the 
Gunpowder. 

Those soft palms that never knew harder 
labor than pushing a fountain pen through a 
lengthjr examination, have discovered that a 
sledge hammer may gain from ten to fifty 
pounds by the time the fortieth tent peg is 
driven to its final abiding place. Even blistered 
palms may become rich memories. Who would 
rob camp life of joys such as these? Who 
would gainsay the right of a hornet to' dispute 
your right to adverse possession by a well di- 
rected blow upon that noble brow so crammed 
with legal lore! AVhat delights of university 
life can favorabh^ compare with the unbounded 
joys of toting water from the spring or of 
gathering fire wood for a stove with a rapacious 
appetite. 

From that cracked and smoky stove by the 
rock there emanates a bewitching savory smell, 
aud thereby hangs a tale. Mistress Hahn, a 
blithe and buxom dame, had taken a strong 
notion into her head that poultry house nests 
were too common and plebeian for one of her 
class. So she selected a choice low bough under 
the fir tree upon which to lay her daily egg. In 
the course of a three-foot drop humpty-dumpty 



WILLIAM J. MILLER 
Jewelry, Diamonds, Watches 

College Jewelry 
Class Pins and Rings, College Seals 
28 East Baltimore St. Baltimore, Md. 22 W. LcxingtOtl St., = Baltimore, Md. 



R LLERBRQCK 

ullje ICcaiiing (EoUrgr |JI)utogra;jItrr 



28 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



8. W Sahatooa St 




^allimore, 

JiCaryland. 



iuvariably came to the same sad end, and this 
to the great delight of the dogs and other chick- 
ens, who thereby acquired a forbidden taste 
in this freshlj' scrambled farm product. Even 
hens may teach us that prolonged continuance 
of an evil habit leads to the inevitable conse- 
quence of our sin, for when Prau Hahn's foolish 
propensities were discovered by the farmer's 
wife her hours of labor and leisure were num- 
bered. This morning, but a few houi-s after 
dawn, the murderous ax of the executioner 
descended upon her proud, fair neck. She was 
soon denuded of her plumage and ruthlessly 
drawn and quartered for the pot in bloody haste 
by the executioner's wife who abetted the fowl 
deed. Her last gift to humanity, undelivered in 
life, was, like MacDuff of Shakespearean fame, 
untimely snatched from her warm bodj' and in 
its unscrambled foi'm was laid away in safety 
to grace a subsequent omlette. 

Did any of you city folk ever say you liked 
strawberries? Then don your oldest clothes 
and a wide brimmed hat and come with me to 
the sunny patch. For the first day we will not 
expect of you more than forty quart boxes. 
Try kneeling among the plants first and pick 
carefully. Every berry you crush comes moist 
and cooling to your tender knees. Change 
oft' a while and sit on your haunches Indian 
fashion till your stretched muscles yearn for 
action. Next you become aware of the fact 
that you have a back. The elusive red morsels 
of delight persist in hiding behind the leaves. 
Oh, the joy of filling that fortieth box ! A load 
is lifted from your shoulders. Try to stand up 
and stretch a bit if you can. Stiff? Oh, no, not 
a bit. 

Better still, is to be up in a breezy, swaying 
tree with the birds, picking cherries. That is 
pure delight. See the hawks and buzzards 
soaring aloft in the cloudless blue, and watch 
the songsters close by trill their evening melo- 
dies. 

Are you an adept in bird calls' If nol, 
you have missed half the pleasures of an ar- 



Intercollegiate Bureau of Academic Costume, Aibany.N.r. 
COTRELL & 

LEONARD 

Official Makers of 

Caps and 
Gowns 




Correct Hoods 
for All Degrees. 

Rich Qowns for 
Pulpit and Bench. 

Bulletin, Samples 
etc. on request 



boreal life. I actually flirted with a cat bird 
in a cherry tree by the barn the other day. 
My first call brought her from the depths of 
the tree to a nearer bough whence she eoylj' 
peeked at me from behind the leaves. A little 
startled at first, she flew off to a fence rail fifty 
feet away and eyed me askance. Bj' gentle 
coaxing she returned to an exposed branch 
close by, and with a little teasing soon began to 
perform the most wonderful maxixies and tango 
dips for my personal pleasure. Such trailing 
and dipping of wings ; such a puffing up of her 
demure quaker-gray feathers ; such bold flirta- 
tious posings of her head and tail and what 
scandalous coquetry from her saucy snapping 
black eyes. It was a treat for the most 
abandoned bird lover. Only the pangs of a 
gnawing camp appetite could finally drag me 
awaj' from this entrancing siren of the cherry 
bough. 

Alas, those lean cheeks and sunken eyes 
which you marked about examination week 
will no more be seen. Fresh country food and 
air, and no style but old clothes will have 
wrought wonders by the time Legalibus makes 
his appearance in the city three weeks hence. 
He will be as round as he is long and the gentle 
summer sun will paint a long cherished coat of 
tan upon his skin as a reminder of the sum- 
mer's joys for many months to come. 



Dental — Graduate. 

We are in receipt of the first issue of ' ' The 
University Gazette" and wish to extend our 
hearty support to the promoters in their effort 



LUTHER B. BENTON 
Dental Depot 



students' Outfits 
a Specialty 



305 North Howard St. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



29 



to provide the University with an up-to-date 
live journal. Success is assured if all work in 
harmony, so here's our pledge and a toast to a 
long and useful life for our Alma Mater's offi- 
cial organ, "The University Gazette." 



Pharmacy — Graduate. 



Address Delivered by Mr. J. M. Bransky at the 
Annual Banquet of the Graduating Class 
of the Pharmacy Department, June 1, 1914. 



The Irish and the Dutch go hand in hand. 
Dr. Harold J. Foley, 1914, representing the 
Emerald Isle, announces the opening of his 
dental offices at 203 Bridge street, Springfield, 
Mass. Dr. C. A. Ruppersberger, our Dutch con- 
tingent of 1914, announces the opening of his 
office at the corner of Pennsylvania and Fulton 
avenues, Baltimore, Md. Both are aggressive 
and capable men and are sure to succeed. We 
wish them much success. 



Dr. Sanshiro Okugawa has been spending the 
past month with the Japanese Ambassador at 
Washington, D. C. He will spend the summer 
in the East before returning to Japan in the fall. 



Miss Elsie Roof, 1915, has returned from a 
trip about the Great Lakes. She reports a pleas- 
ant vacation. 

Dr. G. K. Paterson, 1912, of Winston-Salem, 
N. C, was at the University June 6. He stopped 
off for a few hours on his way to the National 
Dental Association at Rochester, N. Y. 



Dr. Richard W. Davis, 1910, of Blakeley, Ga., 
was a recent visitor. He accompanied his sister 
who came to the University Hospital for treat 
ment. 

Dr. and Mrs. T. 0. Heatwole spent June 16, 
17 and 18 at Ocean Grove, N. J., attending the 
State Dental Association. 



Information from North Carolina shows that 
every applicant before the Dental Board was 
fortunate in securing a favorable report. That 
is flattering when we consider North Carolina's 
Board is one of the hardest in the Union. 



Dean Heatwole is in receipt of a letter from 
Dr. F. F. Drew, Secretary of Maryland State 
Board of Dental Examiners, in which he com- 
pliments the showing made by the University 
applicants. Such reports should make the in 
struetors of the department feel gratified for 
the great effort they are putting forth to qualify 
men for the profession. 



"Mr. Toastmaster, Dr. Caspari, the 

Faculty and Fellow Classmates : 
We are assembled here tonight perhaps for 
the last time to meet as a body, and before we 
part, I think there is no more fitting place than 
here to say a few words in regard to the duty 
we owe our school. 

President Wilson said in his inaugural ad- 
dress: 'That today is not a day of triumph but 
a, day of dedication,' and so with us today, fel- 
low classmates, and graduation has in a sense 
been a dedication and not a triumph. Because 
from tonight the majoi-ity of us will dedicate 
our future life's work and happiness. 

Before we go, we must reflect a while and see 
to whom we are indebted that we are in a posi- 
tion to take up the work of our profession. 

Fellow classmates, I wish to impress upon 
you, that we have been educated at the public's 
expense, and it is to them and our most es- 
teemed faculty that we are highly indebted ; 
and to such an extent that perhaps we will 
never be able to repay. 

We have reviewed our elementary education 
at the public schools. Perhaps our fathers have 
paid their pro rata share of school tax, but if 
it were not for the public in genei-al and with- 
out their support we would not be able to main- 
tain our elementary and higher educational in- 
stitutions which for years have crowned the 
educational world with their most glorious and 
efficient work. If these institutions had to de- 
pend solely upon the tuition fees they received 
from their students, they would never have 
reached the position they are occupying today 
in the educational world, and I dare say 
whether we would have any large colleges at 
all. It is to the public that these schools are 
directly indebted and the students indirectly 
indebted. The public has supported them by 
providing large endowment funds which were 
personal contributions so that these institutions 
could carry on their good work. 

Now, let me ask you, gentlemen, why is the 
(tublic maintaining such great and expensive in- 
stitutions of learning? Not for the sole, selfish 



30 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



& 




New Neckwear 

for summer wear- 
novelty patterns, the 
nobbiest in tow.i 

Hamburgers' 

Baltimore and Hanover Sts. 



purpose of educating the student as an indi- 
vidual, but as a student body, so that the ed- 
ucated boy or giii should be able to give the 
public something in return for the trust con- 
fided in him. They expect us to be more liberal 
and broader-minded in our views than the un- 
educated boy or girl. They also expect us to 
take a leading part in all public affairs, be they 
what they may, and to deal with them as un- 
biased, intelligent men should. They also have 




Thei 

Merchant 

Tailor 



Who 

Sells 

Ready-to-wear 



College Clothes 



New Spring Models 

Now Ready 
Prices $15 to $25 



Made to Measure 

From $20 Up 
Samples Cheerfully Given 



19 E. FAYETTE ST. 

Take Elevator 




the right to demand that we, as pharmacists, 
should carry on our profession in a most honor- 
able and legitimate way. And we also owe 
it to the faculty and ourselves to try and be- 
come the leading lights in our profession. 

The most excellent and noble work done D^ 
our faculty in the past should serve as a cri- 
terion for us to follow in our future life's work. 

I now take this opportunity on behalf of the 
class to thank the faculty from the bottom of 
our hearts for the time, patience and labor they 
have expended in our behalf. And we assure 
them that the 'Trust of Doc. of Pharmacy' 
which they have placed in our hands today 
shall not be miscarried." 



-0— 



Academic — Graduate. 

Mr. C. W. Stryker has been elected head of 
the history department in the faculty of the 
Tome School for the coming year. Mr. Stryker 
formly held a similar position at St. John's 
College. Since his resignation there, he was 
for a year acting professor of economics at 
Kenyon College, Gambler, Ohio, after which he 
spent a year in historical work at Columbia 
Universitv. 



Harry Smith, son of former County Commis- 
sioner James S. Smith, of Anne Arundel County, 
has given up his studies at St. John's College, 
Annapolis, to take a position with a surveying 
corps of the United States Government in Idaho. 
His home is in Brooldyn. 



Edgar Fell, son of Dr. Thomas Fell, president 
of St. John's College, recently sailed for Spain, 
where he will spend the summer months and 
study the language. He will return to this 
conntrv in tlie fall. 



NURSING. 

Miss N. E. Curtiss, class of 1911, who is sur- 
gical nurse at the Watts Hospital, Durham, 
X. C., has been spending a few days in the city. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



31 



Miss Jessie S. Punk, class of 1914, has beeu 
appointed surgical nurse at the De Sota Sana- 
torium, Jacksonville, Fla. 



Mrs. B. M. Sigmon, class of 1914, has been 
api^ointed surgical nurse at the York Hospital, 
York, Pa. 



Miss Frances Meredith, class of 1910, is sub- 
stituting in the Infant Milk work. 



Miss Stella W. Ricketts, class of 1911, and 
Miss Lena E. Stouffer, class of 1912, have beeu 
appointed substitute nui'ses in the Public HeaLlh 
work, Tuberculosis Division. 



Miss Sophie F. Hessler, class of 1913, was 
operated on at the hospital the first of the 
month. 



Miss Nettie Bay, of the senior class, and Mi.':s 
Helen McSherry, of the intermediate class, were 
operated on at the hospital a few days ago and 
are doing nicely. 



Miss Lulu Stepp, class of 1914, is night .mp n-- 
intendent of nurses at the hospital. 



BIRTHS. 

Recently to Mr. Philemon H. Tuck, LL.B., 
class of 1874, and Mrs. Tuck, of 926 Cathedral 
street, a daughter — Dorcas. 



WARNER 8c CO. 

222-224 WEST BALTIMORE ST. 



Md., at Elkton, July 15, 1914. Immediately 
following the ceremony the bridal couple 
motored to Wilmington, where they were guests 
at the Hotel Dupont. Later they left for the 
North, where they will spend their honeymoon. 
They Avill reside in Centreville, where the groom 
is practicing his profession. 



MARRIAGES. 

Dr. George Washington Mitchell, class of 
1896, to Miss Katherine E. Diggs, both of Bal- 
timore, Md., at Baltimore, June 20, 1914. After 
a honeymoon spent in New York and Atlantic 
City, Dr. and Mrs. Mitchell will occupy their 
apartment at the Algonquin, 11 E. Chase street. 



Dr. Harry Lyman Whittle, class of 1903, to 
Miss Helen Juanita Whittle, both of Baltimore, 
Md., at Baltimore, June 15, 1914. They will 
reside in Baltimore, where the groom is prac- 
ticing his profession. 



Dr. William Henry Fisher, class of 1905, to 
Miss Jennie Mae Howser, both of Centreville, 



DEATHS. 

Dr. John M. Coouau, class of 1861, for two 
years health warden of the Nijitli ward of Bal- 
timore, assistant surgeon of volunteers during 
the Civil War. and for twenty years connected 
with the medical department of the army for 
Indian Service, died at his home in Baltimore, 
June 6, 1914, aged 79 years. 



Dr. Benjamin H. Todd, class of 1874, died at 
his home in Ridgewood, jMd., A])ril 23, 1914, 
aged 50 years. 



Dr. Samuel Claggett, class of 1898, of Peters- 
ville, Md., died at the University Hospital, July 
9, 1914, aged 41 years. 



Dr. Frank Slingluft', class of 1868, of, 1701 N. 
Calvert street, died at his home June 13, 1914, 
of apoplexy, aged 68 years. Dr. Slingjuff had 
not been in active practice for some years. At 
the time of his death he was president of the 
Baltimore Mutual Fire Insurance Company and 
was formerly vice-president of the Commer- 
cial and P'armers' National Bank. 



Di'. Christopher Johnston, class of 1880, died 
at his home, 216 Ridgewood road, Roland Park, 
of heart disease, June 26, 1914, aged 58 years. 
Dr. Johnston was professor of Oriental history 
and archaeology at Johns Hopkins University, 
and was known abroad as well as at home for 
his learning. 



By Comparison 



We believe it will be found that, in the Selection, 
Preparation and Dispensing of Pharmaceuticals, we 
maintain a Standard in Pharmacy that is, relatively, 
as high as are the Advanced Standards of Medical 
practice and Hospital service. 

Exceptional 
Prescription Compounding 

Hynson, Westcott & Co. 

Pharmaceutical, Surgical and Hospital 
Supplies 

Charles and Franklin Linden and North 

Streets Avenues 

BALTIMORE MARYLAND 



Scientific Therapeutic Agents : 
Bulgara Tablets, Glycotauro Capsules, Lutein Tablets 



Renal Functional Test : Phenolsulphonephthalein Ampoules 



" Nothing Too Large—Nothing Too Small " 

Baltimore City 

Printing and Binding 

Company 

352-363 Equitable Building 



Ik--. -..«.-.. .»-«^..>->-<>-—-— --. — — — — — — — — - — - 4 



Surgical and Hospital Supplies. Sick Room Supplies. 
Dental Forceps. Microscopes and Accessories. 

The Chas. Willms Surgical Instrument Co. 

300 N. HOWARD STREET. 

THE WESTERN NATIONAL BANK 

OF BALTIMORE 



Tour Bnnk Account 
Solicited 



14 N. EUTAW STREET 



SONNENBURQ'S PHARMACY 

Baltimore and Greene Streets. 

ONE MINLTE CLINICAL THERMOMETERS, 

WITH CHAIN AND GUARD PIN, 50 CENTS 



SULTAN DRUG COMPANY 

raARMACEUTICAl, CHEMISTS, ST. LOUIS, MO. 

Manufacturers of 

PRUAOIDS r.ENG CACTINA FILLETS 



Menu. Banquet and Dance Cards. Commencement Inrita- 
tions and Programs, Diplomas, Certificates, Engrossing. T'. 
of M. Stationery for Classes and Fraternities, Letter Heads. 
Envelopes, Cards, etc., for Physicians. Lawyers and Dentists. 

J. H. DOWNS, STATIONER. 229 N. Charles St. 



Your Special Attention is directed to 

Beef, Iron and Wine with Hydropepsin, 
Liquid Pi-cine Co., Red Syr. Hypophosphites Co. 

THOMAS & THOMPSON CO. 

Manufrs and Dispensers of P ure Medicines (Wholesale and 
Retail). Cor, Baltimore and Light Sts., Baltimore. Md. 

RESINOL OINTMENT AND RESINOL SOAP 

Are Genuine Comforts to 1-h.vsician and Patient Alike. 
Serd for Samples and Try Them. 

RESINOL CHEMICAL COMPANY, Baltimore, Md 



German Savings Bank of Baltimore City 

S. W. Cor. Baltimore and Eutaw Sts. 

Interest Paid On Deposits. 

Drovers and Mechanics' National Bank 



CAPITAL 



OF BALT'MORE. MD. 

Paid in $300,000 00 



Earned 300.000 00 $600,000 00 
EARNED SURPLUS AND PROFITS 533,487 65 

SAFE DEPOSIT BOXFS FOR RENT 

EMPLOYERS — POSITIONS WANTED 
By students in the Legal, Medical, Dental 
and Pharmaceutical Department of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland. Some are stenographers, 
bookkeepers, etc. Apply SAMUEL WANT, 
1243-1253 Calvert Building. (No charge is 
made for this service.) 



The University Gazette 

Devoted to the interests of the University of Maryland. 



Vol. I. 



Baltimore, Md., September 1, 1914 



No. 3 




Ethel Palmer Clarke. R. N. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



Vol. I. 



SEPTEMBER I, 1914. 



No. 3. 



CONTENTS 



ADDRESS OF GEHEIMRAT, PROF. 
ADOLPH SCHMIDT— Academic Day, ' 
November 11, 1913, After Having Re- 
ceived the Honorary Degree of Doctor 
of Laws 35 

ADDRESS DELIVERED BY THE HON. 
HENI^Y D. HARLAN, in Presenting 
Daniel Willard for the Degree of Doc- 
tor of Laws, at the Commencement 
Exercises of the University of Mary- 
land, June 1, 1914 36 



PUBLIC INSTRUCTION COMMITTEE.. 37 

CORDELL MEMORIAL FUND 37 

EDITORIALS 38 

Ethel Palmer Clarke, R. N. 

EDITORIALETS 39 

ITEMS 39 

DEATHS 47 



Footwear for the College Man at Moderate Price. 

N. HESS' SONS - - 8 E. Baltimore, St. 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE, MD. 

HON. PHILLIPS LEE GOLDSBOROUGH, Governor of Maryland, Chancellor. 
THOMAS FELL, .\. M., Ph.D., LL. D., D. C. L., Provost. 



ST. JOHN'S COLLEGE. Annapolis, Md. (.,?r:S;"lc7.M°c%s) 

Founded 1696. Classical and Scientific College Courses leading to d ::grees. Special advantages to stu- 
dents purposing to study the professions. Military Department under army officers. Also Preparatory 
School for boys fitting for St. John's or other colleges. Term begins September 21. Address 

:. ; THOMAS FELL, Ph.D., LL.D,, D.C.L., President 



DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE. 

t'our years' gradisd course. New Laboratory Build- 
ing. Clinical advantages unsurpassed. Teaching Staff 
of 66. loSth Annual Session will begin October i, 
1914, and continue 8 months 

R. DORSEY COALE, Ph.D., M.D., Dtan. 



DEPARTMENT OF DENTISTRY, 

33d .\nnual Session begins October i, 1914, and 
continues 7 months. 26 Instructors. New Building. 
For catalogue containing course of study, etc., apply to 

TIMOTHY O. JHEATWOLE, M.D., D.D.S., Dean. 

Baltimore, Md. 



DEPARTMENT OF LAW. 

59th Annual Session will begin Sept. 28, 1914. Faculty 
of 26. For catalogue containing full information ad- 
dress the Secretary, 301 St. Paul Street, Baltimore. 
Maryland. 

EDWIN T. DICKERSON, Secretary. 



DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACY. 

(Formerly Maryland College of Pharmacy). 72nd 
Annual Session begins September 25, 1914. 11 In- 
structors. I^ew Laboratories. Address 

CHAliLES CASPARI, JR., Phar.D., Dean. 

Baltimore, Md. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 

Published Monthly in the Interest of the University of Maryland. 
PRICE $1.00 PER YEAR. 



nontributions solicited from Alumni of the 
University. 



Business Address, 608 Professional Building. 
Baltimore, Md. 



Vol. I. 



BALTIMORE, MD., SEPTEMBER 1, 1914. 



No. 3. 



ADDRESS OF GEHEIMRAT. PROF. ADOLF 
SCHMIDT— ACADEMIC DAY, TUESDAY, 
NOVEMBER 11, 1913, AFTER HAVING 
RECEIVED THE HONORARY DEGREE 
OF DOCTOR OF LAWS. 

Mr. Provost and Gentlemen : — 

1 beg of you to accept my sincerest thanks 
for the honor which you have bestowed upon 
me by conferring on me the degree of Doctor 
of Laws from your famous UniversitJ^ You 
may be sure that I know how to esteem it, and 
that I consider it not only an acknowledgement 
of my own endeavor in advancing sciences, but 
also as an expression of reverence paid to Ger- 
man science in general. 

I have often been told, during my stay here, 
that America is much indebted to Germany for 
the advancement of the sciences, but I have 
met here with such a high development of them 
— especially in medicine — that there is no 
doubt our sitggestions have found a fertile 
ground and grown in an unexpected manner. 
You have long since emancipated yourselves 
from j'our European masters, and it is a fact 
that nowadays plenty of German medical men 
come over to the United States not only to see 
your land and to gather impressions of your 
standard of life, but also to learn from your 
head men in science and practice. 

It is. of course, impossible to enumerate the 
names of all these men, or to speak about the 
single facts we owe them ; nevertheless you 
will allow me to mention here some new and 
prominent American discoveries in medicine. 
The most brilliant of them, of which we may 
expect great things in the future, is the culti- 
vation of animal cells and tissues outside the 
body, and their transplantation within the 
body, carried out by Alexis Carrel. Since he 
has succeeded in appljdng his method even to 
pathological tissues, especially to tumor cells, 
we are allowed to devote ourselves to the hope 
that one of the most actual problems of medi- 



cine — the cancer problem — is to be solved 
within measurable time. 

Another problem — the artificial fertilization 
of animal germs — has been already far ad- 
vanced by Jacques Loeb. Although both of 
these authors were not born in the United 
States, they have been impregnated with Ameri- 
can science in such a degree that you are right 
in claiming them your own. 

Studying metabolism under normal and path- 
ological conditions, Dr. Benedict, of Boston, 
has reached the highest perfection in exacti- 
tude, by which he found some most important 
physiological facts. His methods are based on 
technics, and just in the technical part of medi- 
cine American physicians are prominent. Thus 
surgery, gynecology and dentistry have reached 
their highest perfection in the United States. 

As to your old and famous University, you 
might be proud of a number of most promi- 
nent medical men who have started from the 
University of Mai'yland. I only mention Major 
James Carroll, the discoverer of the transmis- 
sion of yellow fever by the bite of a specific 
mosquito. As he permitted an infected mos- 
quito to bite his own person, he caused the 
first case of yellow fever that was experimen- 
tally produced, and as he later died from the 
indirect consequence of the following attack of 
yellow fever, the University of Maryland be- 
came the Alma Mater of a great martyr to 
science. Further of mention. Dr. William T. 
Councilman,' one of the best pathologists and 
bacteriologists ; Alexander C. Abbott, another 
successful bacteriologist; John W. Williams, 
the gynecologist ; and last, but not least, my 
friend Prof. John C. Hemraeter, who stands in 
the first rank of prominent clinicians. 

On account of the immense increase in popu- 
lation in your country, the building of new 
hospitals is a necessity, and the manner in 
which they are erected shows at once the state 
of development reached by medical knowledge. 
What I have seen in the hospitals of New York, 



36 



THE UNI^^RSITY GAZETTE. 



Boston, Cincinnati, Philadelphia, Baltimore and 
other cities, proves that the United States are 
not only in no way behind Europe, but in sev- 
eral points ahead of it. 

One of the nio^t striking facts of scientific 
life in America is the rapid development of 
your universities. Beginning as simple schools, 
part of them have turned wdthin a short space 
of time into large institutions not only for 
instruction, but also for culture and research, 
which are second to none of our famous old 
universities. You have adopted the combina- 
tion of teaching and research work which is 
characteristic of our system. But as you per- 
haps are aware, this old-fashioned system, of 
which we always have been proud, is nowadays 
in danger of being broken down. The idea has 
won space to erect special institutions for re- 
search Avithout any connection with university 
life. The Kaiser Wilhelm Gesellschaft, in Ber- 
lin, has already founded several institutions 
corresponding to your splendid Rockefeller 
Institute. There can be no doubt that in some 
way this manner is of great use, because a good 
teacher is not always a good investigator, and 
an excellent scholar need not necessarily be an 
excellent instructor. But in following the ten- 
dencies of the Kaiser Wilhelm Gesellschaft, the 
government risks the undermining of the posi- 
tion of the universities, putting them down to 
second-class institiitions. The only way which 
leads out of these difficulties is to put the right 
man in the right place ; it is to allow a research 
professor to follow his inclination bj^ giving 
him the means he wants, and in addition, asso- 
ciating a substitute teaching assistant with him. 

Returning to the honor you have paid me, 1 
am mt/dest enough to suppose I have not re- 
ceived the degree of Doctor of Laws by my 
merits in jurisprudence, which I fear are too 
little, but by the mutual respect which one 
branch of science owes to another. It gives me 
great satisfaction that T enjoy, also, the recog- 
nition of your distinguished member, Professoi 
Hemmeter, who in the same branches is myself 
has achieved eminent work. 

The American science is young, but the world 
belongs to youth. New problems, brought about 
by the astonishing evolution of your country — 
the country of unlimited possibilities — call for 
young and fresh powers and an enormous en- 



ergy, which noAvhere else can easier be found 
than here. Your own University is in a state 
of development which gives hope for the best 
results in the future. Being now one of you, 
let me comprise my feelings in the words: 
Always ahead in sciences, m honor of truth, 
and for the advancement of mankind 1 



Address Delivered by the Hon. Henry D. Har- 
lan in Presenting Daniel WiUard for the 
Degree of Doctor of Laws, at the Com- 
mencement Exercises of the University of 
Maryland, June 1, 1914. 
I have the honor, in accordance with the man- 
date of the Regents, of presenting to you and 
of asking you to admit to the degree of LL. D.. 
in this University, honoris causa, one whom the 
Regents have adjudged worthy to receive the 
same — Daniel WiUard, a man of affairs, pre- 
eminent in his profession — the head of a great 
railroad system — sustaining large responsibility 
— wielding broad power and exerting wide in- 
fluence but meeting his responsibility so fully, 
employing his power so wisely and using his iu- 
fluence Avith such just appreciation of the true 
functions of a public service corporation and of 
its duty and obligation to the public and the 
State, to its stockholders and emploj'ces, as not 
only to have demonstrated the possession ol' 
superior intellectual ability, useful learning and 
knowledge of the highest order, but to have 
made a contribution to the proper handling (iF 
the transportation problem, equal, in its bem^- 
ficient results, to the contributions that ha^e 
Avon distinction for learned men in the fields oi 
Science and Literature — tAvice decorated Aviih 
Avhat is looked upon by associates as the highe t 
honor that can be conferred upon a railrond 
officer, the presidency of the Anierican Railro"d 
Association, an association of all the railroa 's 
of the United States and Canada. Selected as 
the representation of fifty-tAvo railroads in tlie 
Northeastern part of the United States on the 
Arbitration Board Avhich adjusted the diifer 
ences betAveen these roads and their locomotive 
engineers, in the spring of 1912, and determine d 
issues of the most momentous import to tliis 
co\intry. Again selected in 1913 by the samp 
railroads to act as Chairman of a Committee of 
Presidents to present to the Interstate Com- 
merce Commission the ease of the railroads for 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



37 



an advance of rates, and fulfilling this trust 
with such conspicuous ability as to command 
the admiring attention and respect of observant 
men everj'where. A patriotic citizen, a stu- 
dent of the world, one who, compelled to leave 
college earh'' because of failing ej'e-sight, has 
acquired culture in the midst of absorbing oc- 
cupation and has shown his interest in higher 
education by consenting to serve upon the 
Board of Trustees of a great University. 

I ask, sir, that Daniel "Willard may be made a 
member of this University and that his name 
be enrolled upon its honor list. 



Public Instruction Committee. 

Dr. Randolph Winslow is to be highly com- 
mended upon his appointments to the various 
committees for 1914 of the Medical and 
Chirurgical Faculty. The University of Mary- 
land supplied him with able material for com- 
mittee work, and his appointees will undoubted- 
ly be continued in many instances by the new 
president. A full report of the Committee on 
Public Health Instruction appears in the May 
issue of the "Medical and Chirurgical Bulle- 
tin." Drs. Jos. E. Gichner, A. H. Carroll, H. G. 
Beck, S. J. Fort and Emil Novak form this 
committee, Drs. W. L. Byerly, Frank Lynn and 
Edward A Looper have each been appointed 
as Red Cross instructors to various groups of 
Camp Fire girls. Many public lectures have 
been given in the schools and various other 
places. Dr. Winslow is ever ready to afford an 
opportunity for work and for the extending of 
the influence in this and m other ways to the 
graduates of the University of Maryland. 
Others serving on various committees are : Drs. 
A. M. Shipley, G. Lane Taneyhill, Harry Adler, 
Herbert Harlan, David Streett, William J. 
Todd, B. M. Hopkinson, Gordon Wilson, Thomas 
A. Ashby, Charles W. Mitchell, Wm. Caspari, 
Ernest Zueblin, A. P. Herring, John S. Pulton, 
H. J. Maldeis, H. W. Stoner and L. E. Neale. 

This in no way is an overbalancing by LTni- 
versity men but it serves to illustrate in its 
small way how wide is the influence and how 
great is the usefulness of the University grad- 
uates. Let us congratulate Dr. Winslow upon 
his firm stand taken during the past year in re- 
gard to many perplexing questions which have 
come before the Faculty. He has handled them 



bravely. His diploniacj- belongs to that type 
which brings about its result through clear 
thinking and a lack of fear in expressing his 
earnest convictions. He is to be admired for 
his toleration, but one to be dreaded where 
straightforward methods and ethical procedure 
are in question. Much has been accomplished 
which might not have come about had a less 
forceful person served as president for 1914. 



CORDELL MEMORIAL FUND. 



Although the Cordell Memorial Fund has not 
advanced at the rate we had expected, still 
those interested are not discouraged. Your 
committee had hoped by this time to have had 
the Fund completed. A tablet of sufficient 
merit will cost at least $200.00. Therefore, 
your committee urgently requests those con- 
templating a contribution do so at their earliest 
convenience. 

The following have subscribed : 

Dr. A. M. Shipley, $25. 

Dr. Nathan Winslow, $10. 

Dr. D. W. Cathell, $10. 

Dr. Eugene Kerr, $10. 

Dr. Randolph Winslow, $10.- 

Mrs. Randolph Winslow, $5. 

Dr. Hiram Woods, $10. 

Dr. J. W. Holland, $10. 

Dr. J. Mason Hundley, $10. 

Mrs. Nathan Winslow, $1. 

Dr. Joseph E. Gichner, $1. 

Dr. Ernest Zueblin, $5. 

Dr. Edgar G. Ballenger, $10. 

Dr. Louis W, Armstrong, $5. 

Wilmer Brinton, $5. 

B. F. Tefft, Jr., $5 

J. Sterling Geatty, $2. 
Thomas & Thompson, $10. 
Henry P. Hynson, Phar.D., $10. 
Dr. C. W. McElfresh, $3. 
Mr. W. A. Shaw, $5. 
Dr. Albert H. Carroll, $5. 
Dr. A. W. Valentine, $3. 
Dr. S. Demareo, $1. 

Subscriptions may be sent to Nathan Wins- 
low, 608 Professional Building. Acknowledg- 
ment of receipt will be made in "The Univer- 
sity Gazette. 



Dr 
Dr 

Dr 



38 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 




THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 

A MONTHLY JOURNAL 

Devoted to the interests of the University 

of Maryland. 



Subscription Price, $1.00 Per Annum, In Advance "Collar Hug" ClothcS 

Reprints Furnished At Cost - 

Advertising Rates Submitted Upon Request. 

608 Professional Building 

BALTIMORE, MD. 



Editorial Board. 

H. M. ROBINSON, M.D Editor-in-Chief. 

NATHAN WINSLOW, M.D Managing Editor. 

Graduate Members. 

THOMAS FELL, LL.D Academic. 

G. L. WINSLOW, B.A Academic. 

ALBERT H. CARROLL, M.D Medical. 

F J. VALENTINE, D.D.S Dental. 

J. BEN ROBINSON, D.D.S Dental. 

SAMUEL WANT, LL. B Law. 

A. A. SONNENBURG, Phar.D Pharmacy. 

J. M. BRANSIvY, Phar.D Pharmacy. 

M. E. SULLIVAN, R.N Nursing. 

Undergraduate Members. 

R. L. HOBBS Academic. 

H. GOLDMAN, '15; F. C. MARINO, 

'16; C. 0. WOLF, '17 Medicine. 

C. A. BUIST, '15; A. Z. ALDRIDGE, 

•16 Dental. 

J. A. HAGGERTY, '15; M. A. TRE- 

GOR, '15; C. N. MATTHEWS, '16. Law. 

A. L. STERLING, '15 Pharmacy. 

J. E. EVANS, '16 Y. M. C. A. 

B. C. LIGHTNER, '15. Advertising. 

B. G. GOLD, '15 College Notes. 

A. G. DE QUEVEDO Latin-American. 

L. A. BUIE, '15 House Notes. 



"Manhattan" Shirts 

THE QUALITY SHOP 



SEPTEMBER, 1, 1914. 



ETHEL PALMER CLARKE, R.N. 

Mrs. Ethel Palmer Clarke has tendered her 
resignation as superintendent of the University 
of Maryland Training School, and will go to the 
Teachers' College of Columbia University in 
September to follow advanced work in hospital 
organization and administration. 

Immediately after graduation in 1906 Mrs. 
Clarke accepted the position of head nurse at 
Dr. R. Tunstall Taylor's Hospital for Crippled 
Children, where she remained until October of 
that year, when she returned to her home in 
Richmond, and there practiced private nursing 
until June, 1907. 



Baltimore and Liberty Sts. 



At this time the desire for larger and broader 
work, institutional in character, became very 
strong, and the superintendency of the DeSoto 
Hospital in Jacksonville, Fla., was accepted and 
continued for four years, or until her return to 
Baltimore to her Alma Mater as its superintend- 
ent three j'ears ago. 

With a .splendid capacity for work, she has 
during the past three years brought the train- 
ing school to a ver.y high degree of excellence. 
But she has not confined herself to the manage- 
ment of this alone. Because of an unusual de- 
gree of ability as an organizer, man.y changes 
have been brought about, much teaching done, 
and new methods introduced, and yet time 
fotuid to accomplish nuuiy things beyond the 
walls of the training school. 

Deeply interested in all of those fields of work 
which have to do with the progress and welfare 
of the members of her chosen profession, work- 



STYLISH and COMFORTABLE 
FOOT-WEAR 



FOR THE 



UNIVERSITY MAN 

All Leathers — Expert Fitting 
Moderate Prices 

WYMAN 

19 W. LEXINGTON STREET 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE, 



39 



iug aloug with other active and enthusiastic 
Maryland women, she has gained a wide knowl- 
edge, and this she has brought back into her 
University. And in the doing of it not only has 
she profited, but her alma mater has had its 
sphere of activities broadened and its good 
name extended. Had Mrs.'C'larke done nothing 
else besides what she has accomplished in this 
held alone during the past three years, her time 
could not have been called wasted or the period 
one of small activity and reward. 

In June, 1913, she waf> elected President of 
the Maryland State Association for Nurses, and 
re-elected for 1914, and for one year was Secre-, 
tary of the Maryland State League of Nursing, 
In January, 1914, Mrs. Clarke was elected Pres- 
ident of the Alumnae Association. -She is a Red 
Cross nurse, and is Secretary of the Board of 
Directors of the Central Directory for Regis- 
tered Nurses. 

With a great enthusiasm for her work and 
just pride in the growing reputation of her alma 
mater, she has given abundantly to its benefits 
arising from this broad and rich experience. 
With a well-selected staff of teachers, with a 
keen appreciation of that nice balance which 
tnust be established and maintained between 
the practical and the didactic teaching, a very 
high standard has been set, and the graduates 
of the school pass from its doors excellently 
well equipijed for their life work. 

When Mrs. Clarke goes to Columbia she will 
take with her two very valuable things — the 
knowledge of a work well done and a pleasing 
memory of the many friends left behind. In no 
small way should this help recompense her for 
the heart throbs which she will experience in 
the severing of old ties. 

Good, solid stepping-tones have been laid in 
the past for the future journey. Each of these 
bears the imprint of " opportunity embraced," 
of ' ' ability, ' ' and of ' ' enthusiasm. ' ' Over these 
one may step to further successes, to the "Land 
of Greater Usefulness." 



Editorialets. 



time of their lives. Something will be doing 
everj' minute, so change your mind and "dit" 
in the push. Everybody else has promised to 
be there, so come back for auld times' sake. 
Five years hence, maybe you amongst the num- 
ber will have received the word to lay down 
your earthly tasks to sojourn where thei'e is no 
work. Some of the class have already received 
the call. Time is fleeting, therefore \\lule you 
can, come back. Your classamtes want to see 
you and hear from your own lips what success 
has been yours. Be a boy once again. Live 
over those days which we would give our all. 
if we could only be again. Remember, your pres- 
ence is necessary to make the reunion a success, 
so pray do come back. Old Robbie will be 
there, so will little Freddie, likewise the rest 
of the gang — Willse. Bennett. Vinup. not for- 
getting Schweinsberg and C. C. Smink. 

So we beseech and implore you not to spoil 
the party by remaining away, but come and 
give the old tTniversit.y and the boys the once 
over. 

• 

FOOTBALL TEAMS ELECT. 



Captains Named For 1914 By Many of The 
Leading College Squads. 



What! You are not coming to thC; Fifth An- 
niversary Reunion of the Class of 1909? Why 
not? Those who remain away will miss the 



With captains elected for a number of the 
leading college football teams for next year, 
there appears to be little preference in award- 
ing leadership so far as playing positions are 
concerned. The returns from twenty-six col- 
leges and universities of the East and West 
show that fourteen captains have been selected 
from backfields, and twelve from the line. 

Halfback appears to be the most popular 
position, with quarter-back, center and tackle 
all tied for second honors. Ends are the lowest 
on the list 

The list of 1914 captains, as selected at the 
leading colleges to date, is as follows: 

College. Player. Position. 

Brown S. Mitchell Center. 

Princeton H. Ballin Tackle. 

Pennsylvania. . . . L. Young Halfback. 

Syracuse J. Schufelt .Center. 

Wash. & JeffersoiB. Cruickshank. . .Cfinter. 

N. Y. University . . E. R. Huntley .... Qiiarterback. 

Lafayette R. Diamond Quarterback. 



40 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



Northwestern. . . . W. Tightower. . . . Quarterback. 

Gettysburg G. Schaffer Halfback. 

Haverford J. Carey Quarterback. 

Ursinus R. Mltterling Halfback. 

Tufts G. W. Angell Halfback. 

Yale N. S. Talbott Tackle. 

Carlisle P. E. Busch Guard. 

Swarthmore B. Cline -Fallback. 

Pittsburgh W. Smith Guard. 

Rutgers J. P. Toohey Tackle. 

CTiicago D. Desjardiens. . . Center. 

Indiana M. Erehart Halfback. 

Iowa L. Dick Halfback. 

Bowdoin H. A. Lewis Tackle. 

Bates E. M. Moore Guard. 

Michigan J. W. Paynsford . . End. 

Michigan Aggies. G. E. Julian Fullback. 

Colby P. F. Fraser Halfback. 

Washington & LeeE. A. Donahue. . . .Halfback. 



Medical — Graduate. 



Have you taken a peep into the large, bright 
room that is being prepared for the benefit of 
the ease of hard-working physicians and resi- 
dents? It is situated in tlie Dispensary to the 
left of the staircase, on the inner side of the 
corridor. This will take the place of the loung- 
ing or resting room that previously was situ- 
ated behind the office, as that and the former 
rooms of the residents have been converted into 
private rooms for patients. 



Drs. A. M. Shipley and R. P. Bay have been 
chosen to represent the University in the first 
aid preparations for Banner Centennial Week. 
' iiey are to locate first-aid stations throughout 
. .aious portions of the city. 



Dr. Wm. Emrich, "03, has just returned from 
a two years' service on the Madeira More Rail- 
road, in Brazil. 



Dr. Joseph Sparck, '13, has left the Municipal 
Hospital and will probablj- locate in Martins- 
burg, W. Va. 



Among those who made a hasty trip to the 
University during the past month were Drs. A. 
E. Landers, '07, of Crompton, Md. ; Tom Tay- 
lor, '08, of Madison, N. C. ; John J. McGarrell, 
'08, of Ohio ; R. R. Diller, 10, of Detour, Md. ; 
J. E. Hair, Jr., '12, Greenville, S. C. ; Walter H. 
Mayhew, '01, of Sabillasville. Md., and L. C. 
Skimier, '01, Greenville, X. C. 



LEFRANC & AULT 



SELL 

INTER-WOVEN 
HOLE-PROOF \ 
ONYX J 



HOSIERY 



AT THE 



"SHIRT SHOP" 

421 N. Howard St., at Franklin 



Dr. R. G. Hussey, '11, who is practicing at 
Sabillasville, Md., also paid us a short visit. 



The following letter has been sent to all the 
alumni of the Class of 1909. We hope for a 
generous response 

"Fellow Classmate: As a member of the Class 
of 1909, Medical, of the University of Maryland, 
you are hereby requested and urged to 'come 
back' to yoiar Ahna Mater this, the fifth year 
after your graduation, for the purpose of swap- 
ping handclasps and remembrances. 

Do not raise the plea of financial embarrass- 
ment — it is probably only an excuse, and the 
majority of us are most likely in the same boat. 

However far away you may be, you must 
know it will amply repay you to see us all to- 
gether again. Some we shall never see again, 
and before many more years pass more of us 
may go, so let's not delay any longer. 

At our Sophomore, and again at out Senior 
Banquet, we promised to have a five-year re- 
union; let's have it. 

We believe that ours was really the most rep- 
resentative class the School has had in many 



Hart Schaffner & Marx, 
Kuppenheimer, 
"Society Brand" 



The clothes thai college men 
like a lot 



TRe ^^ Hub 

Bdlllmore Street At Chirlel 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. . 41 

NEW YORK CLOTHING HOUSE Blome's Chocolates 



102 & 104 E. BALTIMORE ST. 

Men's, Boy's and Children's' Clothing 

Automobile & Uniform Outfitters - - Burt's Shoes 

years. Athletic, social, mental aud moral, our 
class was always in the forefront. And many 
of Ninety-nine are doing verj^ good work in 
medicine. 

We trust you are ready to come back. Let's 
show the school there is such a thing as school 
and class sijirit here among us. 

We have thought that the date of our reunion 
might fall on Academic Day (about Nov. 10), 
and the day following, with the probable pi*o- 
gram as follows : 

First Day — Academic Day exercises, Lunch- 
eon, Theatre. 

Second Day — Clinics in a class, auto rides 
around town, banqviet. 

In order to pay expenses for banquet, etc. 
(and we promise jon a very good banquet), 
you are hereby requested to let us have at your 
earliest convenience your cheek or money order 
for six ($6.00) dollars, and in the next few 
numbers of the "University Gazette" we will 
give a list of those who are coming back. Make 
check payable to the chairman. 

Sincerely hoping you will see your way to 
"come back," we remain, 

H. M. ROBINSON, Chairman, 

FRED. RANKIN, 

GEO. E. BENNETT, 

R. G. WILLSE, 

J. G. SCHWEINSBURG, 

F. H. VINUP. 



A. H. PETTING 

Manufacturer of 

GREEK LETTER FRATERNITY JEWELRY 

213 N. Liberty St., = Baltimore, Md. 
Factory: 212 Little Sharp St. 

Memorandum package sent to any fraternity member through the 
secretary of the chapter. Special designs and estimates furnished on 
mcdaU, rinfls and pins for athletic meets, etc. 



Known and enjoyed by students of the 

University for more than half a century. 

Retail Department 

BLOME'S CANDY STORE 

Established 1859 621 W. Baltimore St. 

Following is list of those who have already 
signified their intention of "coming back" or 
who have gone further and sent money : 

George Bennett, 

A. L. Pehsenfeld, 

H. B. Gantt, 

William Queen, 

Fred. Rankin, 

li. M. Robinson, 

J. G. Schweinsburg, 

P. H. Vinup, 

G. R. Willse, 

C. C. Smink. 



Dr. P. P. Vinson, '14, who showed such 
promise in the Tuberculosis Clinic while in the 
University Hospital, has definitely taken up 
the tuberculosis work and is located at the 
Adirondack Cottage Sanatorium, Trudeau, New 
York. 



We are in receipt of the following letter from 
Dr. Edward P. Kolb, la, and as it is full of 
news we append it below. We are always glad 
to receive "boosts" and hope others are as 
pleased with the "Gazette" as is Dr. Kolb: 
"Dr. H. M. Robinson, 

Editor-in-Chief, University Gazette. 

Dear Robbie — Kindly have the address of my 
copj' of the Gazette changed from lola Sana- 
torium, Rochester, N. Y., to New York State 
Hospital for Incipient Tuberculosis, Ray Brook, 
N. Y. I wish to congratulate the editors on the 
new paper ; I certainly like it very much. 

Am 'getting along' in tubercular work, and 
like it very much. Was assistant resident phy- 
sician at lola Sanatorium, Rochester, N. Y., 
from November until June 1, when I was ap- 
pointed resident physician at the State Sana- 
torium for Incipient Tuberculosis Avith mj' sal- 
ary doubled. 

This is a very fine sanatorium, located about 
three miles from Saranac Lake. As it is an 
incipient hospital, the work is much nicer than 
at Rochester. I am in charge of the female 
side. 



42 



THE UNIVEESITY GAZETTE. 



The old University is well repres.ented in the 
Adirondaeks. Heisse, '07, is superintendent at 
Trudeau; Lecates, '13, and Vinson, '14, are resi- 
dent physicians there. Allison, '12, left July 1 
to go to Sea View Hospital, New York. Clay- 
tor, ',12,, .and Dusty Sherrill, '12, are patients at 
Trudeau. Claytoi' is getting along finely, and 
was out fishing with me last week. Sherrill is 
still confined to bed. 

Hope you are well. Best regards to all the 
boys. "Hastily, yours truly, 

"Edwin P. Kolb. '13." 



Dr. and Mrs. A. M. Shipley had a very narrow 
escape while out in an automobile the other 
day. Dr. Shipley was running along very easily, 
and not speeding, when, with a ear on one side 
and a pole on the other, a little girl jumped in 
front of his auto, but with great presence of 
mind Dr. Shipley ran his ear into the pole, 
smashing the machine, but escaping injuries for 
himself and Mi's. Shipley. 



Dr. Morris C. Robins, '94, Spokane, Wash.,is' 
at present a patient at the University Hospital. 



Dr. T. A. Ashby, professor of gynecology, and 
Dr. David Streett, professor of clinical medi- 
cine of the University of Maryland faculty, at- 
tended the fifth annual rehnion of .thre- New 
York Medical Alumni of the University of 
Maryland, held at Syracuse, N. Y. Both pro- 
fessors discussed till' merger of the University 
of Mai'yland and the lialtimore Medical School 
at the bani]uet. About 20 Central New York 
physicians attended the reunion. 



;vWe regret to inform our readers that several 
of our teachers and aluiinii have been marooned 
in;Europe in the initlst of the great war. Of these 
we may mention Drs. Randolph Winslow, Prank 
Martin, T. Caspar Gilchrist, Ernest Zeublin and 
W. F. Sowers. We trust they will be able to 
retiii'ii unscarred and unmarred by battles' rav- 
ages before long. 



Dr. James A. Nydegger, of the United States 
Public Health Service, has returned to the city 
after a week's absence in Rhode Island and 
New York City. 



Port Sherman, Canal Zone, was a recent visitor 
to the University. He was formerly stationed 
at Fort Bayard, New Mexico. Dr. Borden was 
warmly welcomed by old friends while in the 
city. 

Dr. Marshall Langton Price, class of 1902, 
formerly of 6 East Franklin street, Baltimore, 
is stopping at The Belgravia, Boise, Idaho. 



Dr. Hampson G. Biedler, class of 1876, of 119 
West Saratoga street, who has been seriouslj^ ill 
with ptomain poisoning, has recovered. 



Dr. William C. Ensor, B. M. C, class of 1900, 
of Coekeysville, who was appointed health offi- 
cer of the Eighth district, has tendered his 
resignation to the County Commissioners, sit- 
ting as the County Board of Health. Dr. J. H. 
Draeh, class of 1880, of Butler, was appointed 
to fill the vacancy. 



Dr. William Benjamin Borden, first lieuten- 
ant, M. R. C, U. S. A., class of 1906, on duty at 



Dr. Frank S. Lynn, '07, surgeon for the 
Maryland Naval Militia, recently returned from 
a cruise on the Chesapeake on the cruiser Mont- 
gomery. 

At a meeting of the Medical and Chirurgical 
Faculty, held April 30, 1914, at the Faculty 
Building, 1211 Cathedral street, Dr. James W. 
Humrichouse, class of 1873, of Hagerstown, 
Md., was elected president for the ensuing year 
to succeed Dr. Randolph Winslow. 

Dr. Humrichouse is one of the leading physi- 
cians and specialists of Hagerstown and West- 
ern Maryland. He was born in Baltimore, 
JIarch 7, 1849, and is the younger son of Charles 
W. and Mary (Hawkenj Humrichouse, and a 
descendant of ancestors who served in the 
French and Indian wai' and in the war of the 
Revolution. 

He was educated at St. James' College, Wash- 
ington county, Md., and Pemisylvania College, 
Gettysburg, Pa., from which latter he gradu- 
ated in 1869. Having determined on the pro- 
fession of medicine as his vocation in life, he 
matriculated at the University of Marjdand 
School of Medicine, and graduated from there 
with the degree of M. D. in 1873. He then went 
abroad, and from 1873 to 1878 was a student at 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



43 



!> 



quAi 



eIDiehl 

Clothes 



built at 605 W. Baltimore St., 
just around the corner from the 
University, are kept pressed with- 
out cost. 

Suits $15 to $40 



Wurtzburg, Vienna, Sti'asburg and Bei'lin. In 
1880 he located for general practice at Hagers- 
town. Dr. Humriehouse is a member of the 
American Medical Association, trustee' and for- 
mer vice-president of the Medical and Chirui*- 
gieal Faculty of Maryland, one of the organizers 
of the Medical Society of Washington county, 
Md., and also of the Cumberland Valley Med- 
ical Association, one of the staff of the Wash- 
ington C^ounty Hospital, and a medical exam- 
iner of the United States BureuU of Pensions. 
He is a vestryman of St. John 's Protestant Epis- 
copal Church, Hagerstown. 

He is one of the oldest members of the asso- 
ciation, and not only is he prominent in Wash- 
ington county, where he has lived for many 
years, but he has many friends throughout the 
State and in the medical profession throughout 
the country. He is a specialist in eye, ear, nose 
and throat work, and has been practicing in 
Hagerstown for the last thirty or more years. 

In 1883 he married Miss Bessie Roman, a 
daughter of Benjamin Franklin and Sarah 
(Jacques) Roinan, of "Washington county, and 
has one daughter, Louise Roman. 



ThereoS,jaany; a good thing lost by not ask- 
ing for it — Think it over. 

WILLIAM J. MILLER 
Jewelry, Diamonds, Watches 

College Jewelry- 
Class Pins and Rings, College Seals 
28 East Baltimore St. Baltimore, Md. 



Law — Graduate. 



The library of the University continues open 
during the summer mpnths during the boui's of 
12 M. aiid 2 P. M. George Blome, Esq., of the 
class of 1914, has charge of the Law Depart- 
ment and Mrs. Ruth Briscoe of the Medical De- 
partment. 



The Library Committee, and, Mr. Want, who 
has. personal charge of the library, secured the 
seiwices of Mrs. Ruth Briscoe as assistant iu 
charge of, the medical department, with a view 
of- having the. books rearranged and reclassified. 
Mrs. Briscoe has had considerable experience 
along, these lines, and, is considered eminentlj' 
qualified for the-task. The work has progressed 
steadily since the close of the school term, and 
the library is assuming the appearance that its 
iinpoi'tiince deserves. 



Messrs. Levin and Silverman, of the class of 
1914, contemplate the establishment of offices 
at 1243-1253 Calvert Building. 

Melbourne Hart, of the class of 1912, has es- 
tablished offices in the Munsey Piuildiii^-. 



Messrs. George Blome and James 0. Steele, 
of'fhe'gl'aduating class of this year, have estab- 
lished offices at 1231-1233 Calvert Building. 



Mr. Revell, of the class of 1914, has deeidett 
to begin the practice' of law in the. State of 
Georgia. He carries with hiju, Die coiu])liuients 
and best wishes of all his classmates. 



Most of the graduates of the graduating class 
of this year who took the bar exanunation in 
June have been swoi'n in at Annapolis as attor- 
neys and counsellors at , la\^,, This .qitalifies 
them to engage iu the general [jraeiice of law. 
thoughjhey mu,st be sworii in again befoi-e the 
tribunals of- their respective localities before 
they will be qualified to appear before the iMi' 
pi'ius courts. ,.,'.iq' ■"""■•■''. 



E LLERBROCK 

22 W. Lexington St., = Baltimore, Md. 



44 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



e W Saratoga St 




Intercollegiate Bureau of Academic Costume, Aibany.N.Y. 
COTRELL & 



Maryland. 



To graduates who are going to practice in 
this city, Mr. Want extends an invitation to call 
on him for any assistance in the line of practice 
and procedure before the courts that he may 
be able to give. It has always been his pleasure 
to cover, in this way, many of the pitfalls that 
beset the young lawyer who has had no expe- 
rience in the practical side of his profession. 



James S. Clark, of the class of 1914, has 
opened offices at 110 East Lexington street. He 
has already won a very important case, having 
recently entered the bonds of matrimony. 



Law. 

Upon the reopening of the Law School on 
September 28 several changes iu the Board of 
Instruction and in the currieuliun will go into 
effect. 

Judge Bond will not lecture on Pleading this 
year, but will lecture only on Bills and Notes. 

Mr. Dickerson will have charge of all ihe lec- 
tures on Contracts. 

Judge Gorter will continue to lecture on Evi- 
dence, and in addition will teach the course on 
Pleading. 

Mr. Jackson will lecture on International 
Law in the place of Judge Stockbridge, and will 
continue to teach Conflict of Laws. 

Mr. Rawls will not lecture on Contracts, bat 
will continue to lecture on Corporations. 

Mr. Barton will lecture on Banking Law. 

Mr. Sappington will have charge of Practice 
Court, and will also teach Legal Ethics. 

Medical Jurisprudence will be a Junior sub- 
ject this year, and will be taught by Mr. 
'Dunne in connection with the course in 
Criminal Law. 

Bills and Notes, by Judge Bond, will be an 
Intermediate subject. 

Admiralty and Federal Procedure, oy Judge 
Rose, will be a Senior subject. 



LEONARD 

Official Makers of 

Caps and 

Gowns 




Correct Hoods 
for All Degrees. 

Rich Gowns for 
Pulpit and Bench. 

Bulletin, Samples 
etc. on request 



The State Board of Law Examiners has is- 
sued a list of those who were successful ju the 
examinations held on June 4 and 5. Sixty-six 
men passed the examinations, a very large ma- 
jority of whom are University of Mai-yland 
men. The result is most gratifynig to che mem- 
bers of the faculty and the students of the Uni- 
versity. The following men were successful : 
Rowland K. Adams, Henry G. Morgan, 
Moris Baron, J. Walter McDonnell, 

John N. Biesecker, Alfred T. McDorman, 

George 0. Blome, Harry C. McMechen, 

W. E. Bockmiller, W. Harry Noeth, 

William J. Bratton, J. P. Obrecht, Jr., 
Arthur E. Briscoe, Lewis E. 'Brian, 

Ralph D. Broadrup, George E. Pickering, 
Stanley L. Cochrane, Harry E. Pohlman, 
Edward B. Considine, John L. Raap, 
Albert J. Curran, William T. Revell, 

Garland B. Day, Henry W. Ritter, 

Aiigust Euler, Harry L. Robinson, 

John Ganster, Moses W. Rosenfeld, 

George L. Goff, Abraham Rosenthal, 

Bepj. G. Gold, Lausdale G. Sasscer, 

M. L. Goldsborough, J. Paul Schmidt, 
James W. Greene, Martin R. Schuster, 

Arthur E. Hamm, J. Louis Shochet, 

Oliver Y.- Harris, Simon Silverberg, 

Ollie E. Harvey, Simon E. Sobeloff, 

Robert M. Jenifer, Carl 0. Spamer, 

Edward E. Johnson. James Steele, 
Willis R. Jones, Joseph J. Stewart, 

Edwin B. Kelly, Wm. McK. Travers, 

Samuel Krelow, . Tjudwig Wagner, Jr., 
R. L. Lang'sdale, James P. Walsh, 

Ellis Levin, Joseph E. Weisheit, 

Albert D. Mackey, George G. Wheeler, 

John E. Magers, Oliver C. White, 



LUTHER B BENTON 
Dental Depot 



r 

[ students' Outfits 
{ . a Specialty 

«... 



305 North Howard St. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



45 



John S. Mahle, 
Macall M. Merritt, 
Elmer H. Miller, 



Arthur E. Williams, 
W. Briley. Wright, 
Edwin P. Wrightson, 



Law — Senior. 



Arthur V. Keene, who is employed in Balti- 
more, visited his parents in Virginia during the 
first part of August. 



"Jiggs" O'Donohue has spent most of the 
summer in New York and Philadelphia selling 
his wares to unsuspecting victims. "Jigg's" 
vocabulary has dwindled down to one word — 
"New York." 



Stanley Deakyne, of Denton, Md., has been 
seen lurking around Baltimore on several oc 
casions this summer in a loud blaze of green 
and yellow. 



B. G. Gold visited his home in Beaufort, N. C, 
after safely navigating the rapids in the State 
Bar Examination. 



Dr. E. W. Walker, of Rallo, Mo., spent some 
days during the month of August in looking 
over our institution. His object is to visit the 
more progressive dental schools of the East for 
the purpose of gaining information on tlie 
newer things in dentistry. His next stop will 
be New York, and from there he goes to Bos- 
ton, where he will spend some time in the Den- 
tal School of Harvard University and the For- 
sythe Institute. Dr. Walker appeared well 
pleased with the information gained while in 
Baltimore, and there can be little doubt about 
his being able to put this information to good 
account on his return to his home. His clien- 
tele will be the better served for his investiga- 
tions, and it would be well if more men engaged 
in rural practice were to adopt Dr. Walker's 
policy of keeping abreast of the times. 



Dr. Lewis Goldstrom, Jr., 1914, arrived in 
Baltimore, August 15, after having spent two 
months on the Hudson, in the Catskill Moun- 
tains, and in New York City. 



Dr. Eva Carter, 1914, was in Baltimore two 
weeks in August. She had accompanied her 
mother to the University Hospital, where she 
submitted to an operation. 



Dental — Graduate. 



Mr H. E. Waterman, 1915, spent July 4th 
and 5th in Alexandria, Va. Waterman's faith- 
fulness to the work in the infirmary would not 
permit hrm to remain away longer. 



Mr. Francisco Quintero, 1915, was in Wash- 
ington Friday, June 17th. He is so loyal to his 
Mexican allegiance that he immediately called 
at the Mexican Embassy after hearing of 
Huerta's withdrawal from Mexican politics. 



Dr. Frank H. Ackrill writes that he is located 
at 4 Westminster street, Providence, R. I. 



Other dental alumni who liave visited the 
University recently are Dr. A. E. Worsham, 
1914, North Carolina; William P. Wilson, 1910, 
North Carolina; M. Montesinos, 1912, Porto 
Rico ; D. T. B. Houston, 1912, New Jersey ; Joel 
Fleischman, 1913, Baltimore. Wm. L. Lloyd, 
1912, Baltimore. 



The Baltimore Sun of Augu.st 7 had the fol- 
lowing to say: "A home run for Cupid was 
scored this morning when David C. Danfortli, 
former pitcher with the Baltimore Orioles, and 
Miss Florence M. Oliphant were married by 
Rev. J. S. Snyder at the parsonage of. Emory 
Methodist Episcopal Church at EUicott City." 
Mr. Danfoi-th is a member of the Senior Dental 
class. We wish him much joy. 



46 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



Pharmacy — Graduate. 



Nursing. 



There seems to be an opportunity to give the 
students of :the Pharmacy Department some 
practical experience in dispensing by allowing 
them to work in the. .pharmacy laboratory of 
the Uniyersity Hospital, It ^.appears that in- 
stead of allowing graduate pTiarmacy students 
who are studying ' medicine, "or physicians ■ to 
do the pharmaceutical work in~fhe dispensary, 
that this opportunity, if given to the pharmacy 
students, would be of 'more valrre to the school 
in general. Tfte facuffies' of bothy epSrtments 
could come to some- mutual agreement and 
allow the pharmacy students, under the 
supervision of one of their professors, to 
do the aforesaid work. It - 'Would be of 
great benefit to the student body of both de- 
partments. It will bring them closer together 
with one another and bring a mutual feeling 
among the students. It has been the aim of the 
faculties of all departments to get their stu- 
dents in closer touch with one another. We 
hope that this suggestion will be given serious 
consideration by the faculties of both dejaart- 
ments. 



During the scholastic year of 1913 and 1!)14 
the faculty decided to enlarge their pharma- 
ceutical technique course by giving the students 
more time in the dispensary laboratory. It ap- 
pears that the dispensing course, by being en- 
larged, has robbed the facility of an opportun- 
ity to enlarge the pharmaceutical laboratory 
course, which appears to be of more value to the 
student. 

Dr. Caspari said at a meeting of tbe Ameri- 
can Pharmaceutical Association in 1913 that 
"the reason that so many druggists were 
caught violating the pure food law was because 
they were not familiar enough with the prepar- 
ing of the preparations of the United States 
Pharmacopeia." In spite of this statement 
and having an opportunity to enlarge the 
course of the pharmacy laboratory and make 
the students more familiar with the U. S. P. 
preparations, he, as Dean of the school, let the 
opportunity pass by enlarging the pharmaceuti- 
.cal technique course instead of the pharmacy 
laboratory work. 

This statement is made with the highest re- 
gard for the opinion of the faculty of the de- 
partment. 



Mrs. Ethel Palmer Clark, who recently ten- 
dered her resignation as superintendent of the 
University of Maryland Training School for 
Nurses, has gone to her. home in Richmond, Va., 
where she will be until September 1.5. From 
there she will go to the Teachers' College of 
Columbia University to follow advanced work 
in hospital organization and administration. 
She carries with her our best wishes. 



Miss Susan S. Ravenel. class of 1894, is ill at 
the Hospital. 



Miss Margaret G. Laws, class of 1913, has 
been appointed superintendent of imrses of the 
Newberne Hospital, N. C. 



Miss Addie Coward, class of 1913, of Graf- 
ton, N. C, is spending her vacation in the city. 



Miss Martha Misikofski. supervisor of nurses 
of the Maternity, is enjoying her vacation. 



Miss Helen McSherry, one of the pupil nurses, 
Avho was ill at the Hospital for some time, has 
gone to her home in Frederick to recupei'ate, 
and we all lioite she will be Avith us before long. 



QUIPS. 

We met a recent graduate of the University 
not long ago who decried the necessity of ever 
revisiting the scenes of his studies, and who 
(seriously) pooh-poohed such a thing as class 
or school spirit. To him and to any other of 
like ilk we have but a few words. If at any 
time during your student years at this school, 
or later in your professional relations, j'ou have 
had unpleasant eneoilnters. we trust you have 
not confounded the personality of your teach- 
ers with the symbol of your Alma Mater. And 
furthermore, to our mind, the alumnus Avho 
allows personal animosity, personal ambition 
(and we are hitting at no one), or personal gain 
to influence his conception of an Alma Mater, 
or to make him a pessimist as regards loyalty 
to his school, or who allows himself to be (by 
himself) influenced to the detriment of pleasant 
memories — well, we are heartily sorry for such 
alumni and ashamed of them. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



47- 



New Neckwear 

for summer wear — 
novelty patterns, the 
nobbiest in town 

Hamburgers' 

Baltimore and Hanover Sts. 



Probably the Democratic administration may 
be indicted for decrease in banking house clear- 
ings for the recent fiscal year, but she can't ob- 
struct the progress of Dan Cupid among the 
dental alumni. Since the last issue Drs. Tins- 
ley and Keller, of the 1914 class, and Dr. W. H. 
Herber, of 1913 class, have fallen victim to his 
wiles. We extend congratulations. 




The 

Merchant 

Tailor 



Who 

Sells 

Ready-to-wear 



College Clothes 



New Spring Models 

Now Ready 
Prices $15 to $25 



Made to Measure 

From $20 Up 
Samples Cheerfully Given 



19 E. FAYETTE ST. 

Take Elevator 



WARNER & CO. 

222-224 WEST BALTIMORE ST. 

Distressing news comes from Cumberland 
that the drought has played complete ha^-oc 
with Dan McMuUen's mustache. Aiiotlier )'e- 
port states that Hugh McMullen with malice 
aforethought placed some ravenous moths in 
Dan's shrubbery, which caused it to sink inio 
oblivion like ''Live Wire" Leggett on cxamimi- 
tion day. We hope these alarming reports arc 
false. It has been the intention of the Vigi- 
lance Committee to hold Dan's hirsute atlorn- 
ment as a horrible example before tVie ambitious 
and aspiring Freshmen in the fall. 



DEATHS. 

Dr., Samuel Claggett, class of 1898, of Peters- 
sille, Md., died at the University Hospital, July 
9, 1914, aged 41 years. 



Dr. CTCOi'ge Irvin Barwick, class of 1891, for- 
merly of Kennedyville, died at his late home. 
1003 Poplar Grove street, Baltimore, from a 
sudden attack of angina pectoris, July 25, 1914, 
aged 45 years. 

Dr. Barwick was a native of Kent county and 
a graduate of the Western Maryland College 
and of the medical department of the Univer- 
sity of Maryland. He removed from Kennedy- 
ville to Baltimore about four years ago and 
took up the practice of medicine. For a num- 
ber of years Dr. Barwick practiced medicine at 
Kennedyville, had a large clientage and, was 
held in the highest esteem by all who knew him. 
He was for years actively interested in Demo- 
cratic politics, and wielded a large influence 
in the councils of hi.s party. P^our years ago lie 
was a candidate for Clerk of the Circuil Court 
as an independent, and received a .sub.stantial 
vote. 

Dr. Barwick is survived by a widow. Mrs. 
Carrie M. Barwick; a daughter. Miss Elizabeth 
Barwick ; a sister. Mrs. H. F. Jefferson, of Ches- 
tertown, and his mother, Mrs. Elizabeth Bar- 
wick. 



By Comparison 



We believe it will be found that, in the Selection, 
Preparation and Dispensing of Pharmaceuticals, we 
maintain a Standard in Pharmacy that is, relatively, 
as high as are the Advanced Standards of Medical 
practice and Hospital service. 

Exceptional 
Prescription Compounding 

Hynson, Westcott & Co. 

Pharmaceufical, Surgical and Hospital 
Supplies 



Charles and Franklin 

Streets 



Linden and North 
Avenues 



BALTIMORE MARYLAND 



Scientific Therapeutic Agents : 
Bulgara Tablets, Glycotauro Capsules, Lutein Tablets 



Renal Functional Test : Phenolsulphonephthalein Ampoules 
"Nothing Too Large— Nothing Too Small" 

Baltimore City 

Printing and Binding 

Company 

352-363 Equitable Building 

Surreal and Hospital Supplies. Sick Boom Supplies. 
Dental Forceps. Microscopes and Accessories. 

The Chas. Willms Surgical Instrument Co. 

300 N. HOWARD STREET. 

THE WESTERN NATIONAL BANK 

OF BALTIMORE 



Your Bank Account 
Solicited 



14 N. EUTAW STREET 



SONNENBURQ'S PHARMACY 

Baltimore and Greene Streets. 

ONE MINL'TE CLINICAL THERMOMETERS, 

WITH CHAIN AND GUARD PIN, 50 CENTS 

SULTAN DRUG COMPANY 

PHARMACEUTICAL CHEMISTS, ST. LOUIS, MO. 



PBUNOIDS 



Manufacturers of 
f.ENG CACTINA FILLETS 



Menu, Banquet and Dance Cards, Commencement Invita- 
tions and Programs, Diplomas, Certificates, Engrossing, U. 
of M. Stationery for Classes and Fraternities, Letter Heads, 
Envelopes, Cards, etc., for Physicians, Lawyers and Dentists. 

J. H. DOWNS, STATIONER. 229 N. Charles St. 



Your Special Attention is directed to 

Beef, Iron and Wine with Hydropepsin, 
Liquid Pi=cine Co., Red Syr. Hypophosphites Co. 

THOMAS & THOMPSON CO. 

Manuf'rs nnd Dispensers of P ure Medicines (Wholesale nnd 
Retail). Cor. Baltimore and Light Sts.. Baltimore. Md. 

RESINOL OINTMENT AND RESINOL SOAP 

Are Genuine Comforts to Physician and Patient Alike. 
Send for Samples and Try Them. 

RESINOL CHEMICAL COMPANY, Baltimore, Mil 
German Savings Bank of Baltimore City 

S. W. Cor. Baltiinore and Eutaw Sts. 

Interest Paid On Deposits. 

Drovers and Mechanics' National Banl^ 

OF BALT'MORE. MO. 

CAPITAL . . Paid in $300,000 00 

Earned 30 0.000 00 $600,000 00 

EARNED SURPLUS AND PROFITS . 533,487 65 

SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES FOR RENT 



EMPLOYERS — POSITIONS WANTED 
By students in the Legal, Medical, Dental 
and Pharmaceutical Department of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland. Some are stenographers, 
bookkeepers, etc. Apply SAMUEL WANT, 
1243-1253 Calvert Building. (No charge is 
made for this service.) 



The University Gazette 

Devoted to the interests of the University of Maryland. 



Vol. I. 



Baltimore, Md., October 1, 1914 



No. 4 




lOHX .1. R. KROZL'JR, .M. D. 
■JHK OLUKS'I' LIVING MHIJICAL ALUMINUS. 



fo^«ded1PHE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 




OCTOBER 1, 1914. 



No. 4. 



CONTENTS 



AN ABORTIVE ATTEMPT TO RE- 
STRICT THE FREEDOM OF THE 
PRESS IN MARYLAND. Samuel 
Want 51 

RETROSPECT AND PROSPECT. Ran- 
dolph Winslow, M. D 52 

A GREETING TO THE DENTAL MEN. 

J. Ben Robinson, D. D. S. 53 

A GENERAL MAGAZINE 53 

ADDRESS DELIVERED BY THE HON. 
HENRY STOCKBRIDGB, in Present- 
ing His Bscelleney Count Johann von 
Bernstorff for the Degree of Doctor 
of Laws, at the Commencement Exer- 
cises, June 1, 1914 54 



TO LIVE A CENTURY, 
son, M. D 



H. M. Rohin- 



54 

EDITORIALS 55 

Getting and Keeping An Ideal. 
Exploiting the University. 
Mary E. Sullivan, R. N. 
Julia C. Foley, R. N. 

EDITORIALETS 56 

ITEMS 56 

QUIPS 62 

BIRTHS 63 

MARRIAGES 63 

DEATHS 63 



Footwear for the College Man at Moderate Price. 

N. HESS' SONS - - 8 E. Baltimore, St. 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE, MD. 

HON. PHILLIPS LEE GOLDSBOROUGH, Governor of Maryland, Chancellor. 
THOMAS FELL, A. M., Ph. D., L L. D., D. C. L., Provost. 



ST. JOHN'S COLLEGE, Annapolis, Md. ( 



DEPARTMENT OF 
ARTS AND SCIENCES 



) 



Founded 1696. Classical and Scientific College Courses leading to d agrees. Special advantages to stu- 
dents purposing to study the professions. Military Department under army officers. Also Preparatory 
School for boys fitting for St. John's or other colleges. Term begins SepI :mber 21. Address 

THOMAS FELL, Ph.D., LL.D., D.C.L., President. 



DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE. 

Four vears' graded course. New Laboratory Build- 
ing. Clinical advantages unsurpassed. Teaching Staff 
of 66. io8th Annual Session will begin October i, 
1914, and continue 8 months 

R. DORSEY COALE. Ph.D., M.D., Dean. 



DEPARTMENT OF DENTISTRY. 

33d Annual Session begins October i, 1914. and 
continues 7 months. 26 Instructors. New Building. 
For catalogue containing course of study, etc., apply to 

TIMOTHY O. HEATWOLE, M.D., D.D.S., Dean, 

Baltimore, Md. 



DEPARTMENT OF LAW. 

59th Annual Session will begin Sept. 28, 1914. Faculty 
of 26. For catalogue containing full information ad- 
dress the Secretary, 301 St. Paul Street, Baltimore. 
Maryland. 

EDWIN T. DICKERSON, Secretary. 



DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACY. 

(Formerly Maryland College of Pharmacy). 72nd 
Annual Session begins September 25, 1914. n In- 
structors. New Laboratories. Address 

CHARLES CASPARI, JR., Phar.D., Dean, 

Baltimore, Md. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 

Published Monthly in the Interest of the University of Maryland. • 

PRICE $1.00 PER YEAR. ■'■'' 



Contributions solicited from Alumni of the 
University. 



Business Address, 608 Professional Building. 
Baltimore, Md. 



YoL I. 



BALTIMORE, MD., OCTOBER 1, 1914. 



No. 4 



AN ABORTIVE ATTEMPT TO RESTRICT 
THE FREEDOM OF THE PRESS IN 
MARYLAND. 



By Samuel Want. 



Among the enactments of the last Legisla- 
ture is to be found this curious addition to the 
penal statutes of the State: 

(1) "Any person Avho 

(2) "With intent to injure, humiliate or de- 
fraud any person, body corporate, of this State, 

(3) "By causing any false notice by way of 
advertisement, or otherwise, to be inserted in 
the columns of auj^ newspaper, periodical or 
public press 

(4) "Shall be deemed guilty of a misde- 
meanor, and \ipon conviction thereof shall be 

(5) "Punished by imprisonment in the 
House of Correction, not exceeding six months, 
or by a fine not exceeding five hundred dol- 
lars, or by both fine and imprisonment, as 
aforesaid, in the discretion of the Court." 

If this act was intended to comfort certain 
moral and political lights whose antics have 
furnished material for editorial and other com- 
ment of a humiliating or otherwise unpleasant 
character — and such, apparently, is its under- 
lying idea — it will fall far short of its pur- 
pose. Indeed, it is likely to be found that the 
new law is but an affirmation of what was al- 
ready the law, and that it is, therefore, prac- 
tically abortive. 

It will be observed that the act applies to the 
iniblieation of "false" notices that injure, hu- 
miliate, etc., and not merely to injurious or 
liumiliating notices as such. This limitation 
upon the effect of the act was necessitated by 
the constitutional guarantee of the freedom of 
the press, and likewise takes all of the teeth 
out of the statute. 

Just recently Judge Thomas, speaking for 
the Court of Appeals in the case of Weeks 
against the News Publishing Company, took 



occasion to say that, "in order to constitute a 
libel it is not necessary that the i^ublication 
should charge one with the commission of a 
crime or with having a contagious disease, but 
any [false] words which impute to him con- 
duct or qualities tending to injure his charac- 
ter or to degrade him, or to expose him to con- 
tempt, I'idicide or public hatred, are per se 
libelous. ' ' 

It thus appears that the statute is substan- 
tially a statement of the pre-existing law. 

As applied to magazines and newspapers, the 
princijile is liberally applied, so as to allow a 
large amount of freedom in the presentation 
of matters of public interest. 

In a recent work on the subject the principle 
is correctlj' stated, as follows : 

"The received American doctrine is that so 
long as the press does not convert itself into 
an organ by which, under pretense of promot- 
ing the public good, private rancor, personal 
hostility and individual malice are really 
sought to be gratified, it must be left free to 
discuss, almost without restriction, not only 
the end and aim of every public measure, but 
also the character and conduct, together with 
the personal qualifications of every public man 
and of every man who aspires to pub- 
lic official station. Every man who comes be- 
fore the pople as an applicant for office is pre- 
sumed to tender himself to public scrutiny, 
Avithout reservation, so far as his fitness for the 
place is concerned, and hence his talents, his 
learning, his experience, his mental and moral, 
and even his physical qualifications for the po- 
sition are all liable to be freely reviewed and 
discussed." 

Yet the privilege and freedom thus conferred 
are not without limits, for, as stated in the same 
Avork, 

"It is not undei-stood that the candidacy of 
a man involves an absolute renunciation of all 
right of protection against newspaper or other 
published assault. The freedom which is most 
cheerfully accorded to the press, both by the 



52 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



force of public opinion and the weight of ju- 
dicial decision, in matters of public concern, in 
respect of the wisdom or expediency of public 
measures; the soundness and even honesty of 
political opinions, and the conduct and qualifi- 
cations of public men, is not to be considered 
as justifying or excusing calumny and mali- 
cious falsehood ; and hence public men in office 
and candidates for office are not to be wan- 
tonly, cruelly and falsely abused. Their claims 
to public confidence and respect may be freely, 
fearlessly and vigorously analyzed, but they 
are not targets for malice and defamation ; and 
they have the same right as others to demand 
that, as to matters of fact, they shall be dealt 
with honestly and in good faith and that the 
truth shall be spoken and written concerning 
them and their conduct precisely as it must be 
in regard to private individuals." 

Again, it has been well said: 

"The editors of newspapers have been sup- 
posed by some to have greater privileges in re- 
lation to the publication of defamatory matter 
than persons engaged in other employments; 
and it has been suggested and attempted to be 
maintained that they are not responsible for 
publications confessedly libelous in their char- 
acter — even of charges proved to be untrue, 
provided they make them in good faith, believ- 
ing them to be true, and have reasonable 
grounds for that belief after exercising due 
care and prudence in ascertaining or endeavor- 
ing to ascertain the facts. This doctrine, how- 
ever, is not sustained by authority, nor con- 
sistent with sound reason or public policy. The 
law does not recognize such distinction be- 
tween the proprietors of newspapers and other 
persons, but requires of them, as of others, that 
if they publish matter alleged to be libelous 
they are bound to establish its truth or respond 
in damasfes to the in.i'ured party." 

It will thus be perceived that, entirely aside 
from statutory enactment, expressions of opin- 
ion in newspapers, however humiliating and in- 
jurious they mav be, have never been regarded 
as creating liability upon the part of the pub- 
lishers, while on the other hand statements of 
fact which are knowingly untrue have always 
aflforded a right of action for damages. Hence 
the statute in question simply affirms the doc- 
trine stated, in so far as it applies to editorial 
and other material appearing in news or edi- 
torial columns of a pewspaper or magazine. 



RETROSPECT AND PROSPECT. 



By Randolph Winslow, M.D., LL.D. 



The 108th annual session of the Medical 
School of the University of Maryland begins 
on October 1, 1914. For seven years more 
than a century has this school been engaged in 
a beneficent work. During this long period its 
doors have never been closed, and each autumn 
has seen new classes assembled. Vicissitudes 
of various kinds have befallen the institution; 
and periods of stress, local and national, have 
been encountered. The War of 1812-1815 over- 
took the school in its infancj', and some of its 
professors took an important part in that con- 
flict, but the courses of instruction continued. 
The Mexican War of 1846-1848 was waged 
without any sinister influence upon the for- 
tunes of the Medical School, now in the full 
vigor of its prime. The Civil War came on 
apace, in 1861, and for four years rent the 
country in twain. The professor of anatomy 
became Surgeon General of the United States, 
while the professor of materia medica and 
therapeutics cast his lot with the Confederacy 
and became Surgeon General of the State of 
North Carolina. The gaps in the faculty Avere 
filled and the college continued to! educate 
jdiysicians, some of whom entered the Federal 
and some the Confederate army. The Spanish 
War of 1898 claimed another of the faculty ; 
and the professor of chemistry forsook his 
l;il)oratory and buckled on his sword, and went 
lo the front as colonel of the Fifth Maryland 
Volunteers. Many of the students also joined 
the colors and served during the hostilities, 
and returned when their services were no 
longer needed by their country. During this 
long period medical education has constantly 
advanced and the University of Maryland has 
ever been ready to stand for progress. While, 
on account of lack of adequate financial 
strength, she has not always been able to be 
the first to make radical changes in the re- 
((uirements, she has never been a laggard in 
the race, and has kept well up with the ad- 
vance. The session of 1913-14 was the most 
prosperous one in the history of the school, 
owing to several factors. The total enrolment 
for the session was 472. On the first of this 
year higher preliminary requirements went 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



53 



into effect, and it is certain that we shall have 
a small freshman, class enter this fall. In fact, 
the Dean has spent a busy summer telling 
applicants that they did not have the neces- 
sary requirements for admission. A year from 
now we believe prospective students will have 
equipped themselves to meet the new conditions 
and that we shall have normal classes again. 
What we shall lack in numbers this year we 
hope to make up in quality, and we believe 
the new men entering this session will be 
much better equipped than has been the case 
hitherto. We welcome, therefore, these men, 
whether they be many or few, as the advance 
guard of a new era. With better equipped 
men we should be able to obtain better results 
in medical education and should turn out bet- 
ter physicians. There is bound to be a limit 
to the preliminary educational requirements ex- 
acted of medical students, and Ave believe that 
will be two years of college work. With the 
exaction of higher requirements the weak 
schools will be obliged to go out of existence, 
and, while there will be fewer students in the 
aggregate, the attendance at the schools that 
are strong enough to survive should not be 
diminished. 

The times are parlous, but we must meet 
them with a spirit of optimism and of earnest 
endeavor, and we are confident that .our be- 
loved, and now venerable. Alma Mater will 
not onlj' survive but will rise to still higher 
usefulness and renown. 



A GREETING TO THE DENTAL MEN. 

The Gazette extends a hearty welcome to all 
new matriculates and greetings to those return- 
ing. The coming year is for you and the 
accomplishment of all that is for your best in- 
terests will be the aim and effort of those in 
charge at the Univereity. Bear in mind the 
purpose of your coming and what influence 
your preparation for life's work has on the 
success of your undertaking. If demands are 
made on you to meet requirements know that 
it is for the good of the student. 

The work as outlined for tlie dental man 
this year will require all his time. Every man 
enrolled should start in work expecting to be 
on hand in the class-room, in the laboratory, 
or in the infirmary from nine o'clock in the 
morning to six o'clock in the afternoon. Any 



variation from this program should be the ex- 
ception and not the rule. Strict adherence to 
the requirements will equip you for your pro- 
fession and incidentally eliminate j^our chances 
for heartaches at seeing "Progress" marked 
on your grade sheet or coming face to face 
with "Failure" on the day of announcement. 

Nixon Waterman has said: 
"Do not loiter or shirk; 
Do not falter or shrink; 
But just think out your work, 
And then work out your think." 

Theodore Roosevelt said: 

"Work while you play, but do not play 
while you work." 

Will Carleton encouraged us by saying: 
"If the day looks kinder gloomy an' your 

chances kinder slim; 
If the situation's puzzlin', an' the prospects 

awful grim 
An' perplexities keep pressin', till all hope is 

nearly gone, 
Jus' bristle up and grit your teeth an' keep 

on keepin' on." 

The student will always find his instructors 
ready and willing to lend assistance, and to 
these he should turn when in need. We be- 
speak for the Dental Department her best year 
for the coming season, and all concerned are 
called to the support of the University and the 
best interests of all. — J. Ben Robinson, D. D. S. 



A GENERAL MAGAZINE. 

Because of the fact that the Medical School 
of the U. of M. has always taken (with empha- 
sis on the "taken") such large parts in the 
various undertakings of the school, Ave are apt 
to think that the "Gazette" is primarily for 
the Meds. But it is not. It represents the 
general school, and therefore everyone who is 
an alumnus may contribute, and, if the ma- 
terial be Avorth Avhile, Ave Avill use it. 

For the University! — not for the Medical 
School alone ! 



(Woman in ear sitting next to a man, who 
is smoking a cigarette) 

"Sir, if you Avere my husband, I Avould give 
you poison!" 

He — ' ' Madam, if you were my Avif e, I 'd take 
it myself." 



54 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



Address Delivered by the Hon. Henry Stock- 
bridge in Presenting His Excellency Count 
Johann von Bernstorff for the Degree of 
Doctor of Laws, at the Commencement Ex- 
ercises of the University of Maryland, June 
1, 1914. 

Mr. Provost: 

1 have the honor and privilege to present 
Count Johann von Bernstorff, upon whom, by 
unanimous voice, the Board of Regents have 
directed to be conferred, honoris causa, the de- 
gree 01 Doctor of Laws. 

It is hardly necessary, Mr. Provost, that to 
you, or to this audience, I should enumerate 
the considerations which have led to this action 
of the Board of Regents, yet it may be worth 
M'liile that there should be placed upon the rec- 
ords of this University a brief epitome of him, 
who has this day so graciously honored us by 
his presence and scholarly address. 

Descended from an illustrious ancestry, Count 
von Bernstorff was imbued with that lofty sense 
of patriotism, all too rare in these days, which 
impelled him to forego the winning of academic 
honors in the land to which he owed allegiance, 
that he might serve that State. A quarter of a 
century ago he entered the diplomatic service 
of his Fatherland at Constantinople, and since 
then has been continuous in that service at 
Belgrade, Dresden, St. Petersburg, Munich, 
London and Cairo. In 1908 he became the am- 
bassador of the German Empire at our own 
capital, Washington. How Avell he has per- 
formed the difficult and at times delicate duties 
devolving on him, his successive advancement 
from post to post, tells more eloquently than 
could ain^ words of mine. Simply by way of 
illustration, let it be borne in mind that it was 
by his tactful and intelligent discharge of duty 
as councillor of the German Legation at Lon- 
don between the years 1902-6 that good feeling 
and a proper nmtnal understanding between 
two great peoples, the English nnd tlie German, 
were restored. 

When he came to our shores as the successor 
of the accomplished Baron von Sternberg, wo 
knew of his achievements in his chosen field of 
activit.y, but Ave had to learn that the able dip- 
lomat Avas no less a finished scholar. The pro- 
ducts of his pen Avhich have appeared in the fcAV 
short years he has been among us, such as "The 
Development of Germany as a World PoAver" 



(Am. Acad, of Soe. & Polit. Science, Jan., 1910), J 
"The Foundations of the German Empire" I 
(Univ. of Chicago Magazine, July, 1911), "Ger- 
many and France, Avith Special Reference to the 
Moroccan Situation" (Outlook, Jan., 1912), and 
others Avhich Avill occur to you, have shown at J 
one and the same time a broad sense of patriot- '^ 
ism, a keen power of analysis and a genuine 
scholarship. 

We do not honor him today. Already the de- 
gree about to be conferred on him has been 
bestoAved by Columbia University, Brown Uni- 
versity, Joans Hopkins, the University of Wis- 
consin, Union University, the University of 
Pennsylvania and the University of Chicago. 
But in placing his name upon our roll, Ave honor 
ourselves and shoAV our appreciation of the work 
he has accomplished in knitting more closely 
together the great nations of the world. 
• o 

TO LIVE A CENTURY. 



(Mrs. 



who has reached the age of five 



score years has told her rules of living which has 
helped her reach that age. — News item.) 



Wouldst live one hinidred years or more? 

Then heed, ye Avise or fools ! , 
You merely need obsei've a score 

Or more of vital rules. 

For instance, Avorry is taboo ; 

No f roAvn your broAv may crease ; 
No taint of fret may harry you; 

Your mind must be at peace. 

Your foods must of the simplest be — 

Not much of SAveet or sour — 
And they but dine most thoroughly 

Who've chcAved each bit one hour. 

And sleep — it should be long and sound; 

Not marred by any dream; 
Early to bed ; a sleep profound, 

With rest fully supreme. 

You may not smoke, you maj^ not cheAv, 

You may not exercise. 
Nor dare imbibe of any brew, 

Nor strain too much your eyes. 

In short (avc must our rules compress), 

If you'd five score years run, 
First: Think a little; then Do less. 

Last : Be nothing. 'Tis Done ! 

— H. M. Robinson. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



55 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 

A MONTHLY JOURNAL 

Devoted to the interests of the University 

of Maryland. 

Subscription Price, $1.00 Per Annum, In Advance 

Reprints Furnished At Cost 

Advertising Rates Submitted Upon Request. 

60S Professional Building 

BALTIMORE, MD. 



Editorial Board. 

H. M. ROBINSON, M.D Editor-in-Chief. 

NATHAN WINSLOW, M.D Managing Editor. 

Graduate Members. 

THOMAS FELL, LL.D Academic. 

G. L. WINSLOW, B.A Academic. 

ALBERT H. CARROLL, M.D Medical. 

P. J. VALENTINE, D.D.S Dental. 

J. BEN ROBINSON, D.D.S Dental. 

SAMUEL WANT, LL. B Law. 

A. A. SONNENBURG, Phar.D Pharmacy. 

J. M. BRANSKY, Phar.D Pharmacy. 

M. E. SULLIVAN, R.N Nursing. 

Undergraduate Members. 

C. V. WILSON Academic. 

H. GOLDMAN, '15; F. C. MARINO, 

'16; C. O. WOLF, '17 Medicine. 

C. A. BUIST, '15; A. Z. ALDRIDGE, 

'16 Dental. 

J. A. HAGGERTY, '15; M. A. TRE- 

GOR, '15; C. N. MATTHEWS, '16. Law. 

A. L. STERLING, '15 Pharmacy. 

J. E. EVANS, '16 Y. M. C. A. 

B. C. LIGHTNER, '15 Advertising. 

B. G. GOLD, '15 College Notes. 

A. G. DE QDEVEDO Latin-American. 

L. A. BUIE, '15 House Notes. 



OCTOBER 1, 1914. 



GETTING AND KEEPING AN IDEAL. 

At this season, when so mauy of us are em- 
barking on careers which may hold untold 
crowns and crosses, we liave believed it not out 
of place to mention the word "Ideal." 

"Whatever may be the real reason for our 
venture into unknown fields, there is, we be- 
lieve, no doubt but that some sort of an ideal 
has actuated our steps. 

Either the picture of worthiness witli an hon- 
est existence attached, or a picture of fame, of 
great accomplishments, and, if our dreams 
have a sordid trend, of much wealth rolling in 
on us. We must admit that we know that 
only those who accomplish may live. Only 




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those, whether their ideals are multicolored 
or plain, who believe iu their ideals may suc- 
ceed. There is a place for all of us. It is true 
that it will be nigh impossible to fit a round hole 
with a square peg. 

But if you have had any ideal; if you have 
admired your father, your uncle, your brother, 
or even your family physician, and worshiped 
their marvelous knowledge and work, whether 
as doctor, lawyer, pharmacist or dentist; if 
.you have chosen any of these branches because 
of the mysteries and the opportunities thought 
to be there — remember throughout your com-se, 
throughout your life work, that the mystery 
and opportunity is still there and with it a 
living. 

You will find many croakei'S obstructing 
.your path — trying to obstruct your progress. 
Don't give in. An ideal is a wonderful thing, 
and only those succeed, truly succeed, who 
keep their ideals intact. 



STYLISH and COMFORTABLE 
FOOT-WEAR 



FOR THE 



UNIVERSITY MAN 

Ail Leathers — Expert Fitting 
Moderate Prices 

WYMAN 

19 W. LEXINGTON STREET 



56 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



EXPLOITING THE UNIVERSITY. 

There is no reason why any other college or 
university should be claimed and praised and 
(to use a slang phrase) "boosted" by its 
alumni and our school neglected. 

Neglected is the word. For no other school 
gives to its pupils any more opportunity for 
learning, and even research. This State and 
this eountry owns some of our men as its 
ablest citizens. In Congi*ess, before the bar, 
iu the laboratory, in the office, etc., etc., gradu- 
ates of the U. of M. stand out as shining lights. 

There are many ways in which we can do 
honor to our Alma Mater. First and fore- 
most, be great and j'et remember with kind- 
ness your school. Secondly, talk about your 
school not with disiDaragement, but with praise. 
Somewhat apropos of the latter, we would men- 
tion the part of the University in the Star- 
Spangled Banner Centennial. Numerous 
among the medical aid committee were our 
alumni, a fcAV being Drs. R. P. Bay, A. M. 
Shipley, J. R. Abercrombie, J. E. Gichner and 
P. J. Kirby. 

Many took part in the militar^^ and naval 
parade. But what spoke loudest in honor of 
the school was a boat in the historical pageant, 
with an exact miniature reproduction of our 
University, entitled "Education." The pity of 
it is that we could not obtain a photo of this 
float that we might reprint same here. 

Fellows, old and young, boost your school. 



MARY E. SULLIVAN, R. N. 

The vacancy in the superintendency of the 
University Hospital Training School for 
Nurses, created by the resignation of Miss 
Ethel Palmer Clark, R. N., class of 1906, has 
been filled by the appointment of Miss M. E. 
Sullivan, class of 1911. Miss Sullivan's ap- 
pointment will be satisfactory as well as pleas- 
ing to her many friends. She is exceptionally 
well prepared for the arduous duties which she 
has shouldered, and, we believe, will measure 
up to her responsibilities. 

Having been assistant superintendent of the 
Nurses' Training School from July, 1912, to 
the time when Mrs. Clarke resigned her posi- 
tion, it was only fitting that the office of super- 
intendent should be tendered her. 

Miss Sullivan graduated from the U. H. 



Training School in 1911, and served as night 
superintendent from Januarj^ to July, 1912. 
She is populai', a good disciplinarian, and we 
know that she will siicceed in her work, and 
as her co-workers on "The University Gazette" 
we wish her the fullest success. 



JULIA C. FOLEY, R. N. 

Miss Julia C. Foley, class of 1914, has been 
appointed assistant superintendent of the Uni- 
versitj- Hospital Training School for Nurses, 
beginning September 1, 1914. Miss Foley is a 
graduate of Notre Dame and of the Maryland 
Institute, and was elected president of the se- 
nior class. This is unusual, as Miss Foley was 
a junior member of the senior class, but was 
not unexpected, as she is very bright, standing 
well up in her studies, and very popular be- 
cause of her iDersonality. TTe are sure Miss 
Foley will have the support of all who know 
her. 



Editorialets. 

We respectfully submit to the Board of Re- 
gents the eligibility of Dr. John J. R. Krozer, 
class of 1848, for the honorary degree of M.A. 
For over sixty years Dr. Krozer has been 
actively engaged in the practice of medicine in 
Baltimore. In a modest and unassuming way 
he has been for that period alleviating the ills 
of those seeking his advice. He is a courtly gen- 
tleman, as well as a sympathetic and efficient 
doctor. The compliment would be well placed 
and upon deserving shoulders. After sixty- 
four j'ears of service he is imbued with the de- 
termination to wear out and not to rust out. He 
is deserving of the honor. 



It might not do much harm to clean the 
library once in a while. Someone prod the 
janitor. 



Medical — Graduate. 

The "1909 Come-Back Committee" is pa- 
tiently awaiting the returns from the loj'al 
members of the class. We hope they have not 
lost the power of appreciating what it will 
iiienn to see, to feel, to talk to your classmates 
ngain. Let's hear from vou at once. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



57 



Within the past few weeks the following 
have been visitors to the University: Drs. W. 
Thomas Chipman, '12, of Pelton Del. ; Charles 
Wallace Armstrong, '14, Troy, N. C, who is 
the first man of his class to bring a patient to 
the Hospital ; James J. Edelen, '11, La Plata. 
Md. ; C. N. Devilbiss, '10 ; S. Luther Bare, '05, 
Westminster, Md. ; A. E. Landers, '07, Crump- 
ton, Md., and L. C. Carrico, '85, Bryantown, 
Maryland. 



We wish to tender our heartfelt sympathies 
to our classmate. Dr. J. G. Sehweinsberg on 
the loss of his little daughter, Ida, two and a 
half years old, who was run over by a truck 
and died a few hours after the accident. 



Dr. B. Boyer, '11, lias been a patient at the 
University Hospital with neijhritis. Dr. Boyer 
is improving rapidly and will leave the Hos- 
pital within a few daj's. 



Dr. Joseph E. Thomas, '11, has been up to 
the University Hospital several times lately, 
bringing patients with him. Dr. Thomas is do- 
ing quite a large amount of work at Jefferson, 
S. C, where he is located. 



Dr. L. Douglas, '11, has returned from a de- 
lightful visit to the Eastern Shore, Va. 



The following members of the Medical Corps 
of the Maryland State Militia and Alumni of 
the University and B. M. C. attended the camp 
of instruction at Saunders' Range, Glenburuie, 
Md.: Majors R. P. Bay, W. C. Claude, J. H. 
Ullrich (B. M. C), H. Ashbury, Captains Vin- 
up, Stansbury, W. C. Coleman, Madera, Lieu- 
tenants Sehoenrich and Fred. Rankin. 



Dr. M. L. Lichtenberg, '13, has been appoint- 
ed chief resident physician of the Hebrew 
Hospital temporarily. 



Dr. Morris Robbius, of Washington State, 
has left the University Hospital in a much bet- 
ter state of health. 



Dr. Hair, a recent patient at the University, 
visited us during the past few weeks, consider- 
al)ly improved. 



Lefranc & AULT 



SELL 

INTER-WOVEN 1 
HOLE-PROOF i 
ONYX J 



HOSIERY 



AT THE 



"SHIRT SHOP" 

421 N. Howard St., at Franklin 



Prof. R. Dorsey Coale, Dean of the Medical 
School, has lately returned from a short vaca- 
tion trip to Atlantic City. Dr. Coale was at 
the Chalfonte during his stay at the resort. 



Dr. John S. McKee, '07, has been elected 
Health Commissioner of Raleigh, N. C. 



The names of the members of the Class of 
1909 (Medical) who expect to come back for 
the reunion are slowly (too slowly) coming in. 
Thus far the list is as follows : Brown, Bennett, 
Fehsenfeld, Gantt, Martin, Queen, Rankin, 
Robertson, Robinson, Sehweinsberg, Shank- 
wiler, Vinup and Willse. 



Dr. James Craighill, Chief Police Surgeon, 
and Dr. Nathan Winslow, 3304 Walbrook ave- 
nue, sailed September 14 for Jacksonville, Fla., 
aboard the steamship Somerset, of the Mer- 
chants and Miners' Line. The physicians are 
going for a restfvil trip and will not leave the 
ship in Florida. They expect to return to Bal- 
timore Tuesday of next week, which will give 
them eight days upon the sea. 



Hart Schaffner & Marx, 
Kuppenheimer, 
"Society Brand" 



The clothes thai college men 
like a lot 



TRe (HgilB Hub 

Bjlllmore Street At Chjrlci 



102 & 104 E. BALTIMORE ST. 



Men's, Boy's and Children's Clothing 



58 THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 

NEW YORK CLOTHING HOUSE Blome's Chocolates 

Known and enjoyed hy students uf the 

University for more than halt a century. 

Retail Department 

BLOML'S CANDY bTORE 

Established 1859 621 W. Baltimore St. 

Washington and Lee University 1910. Mr. 
Praeger, the senior member of the firm, on 
September 15, opened a new office for the gen- 
eral practice of the law in the Engineers' Build- 
ing at Cleveland, Ohio, and will divide his time 
between the two offices. 



Automobile & Uniform Outfitters 



Burt's Shoes 



Dr. John W. iiobei'tsou, class of 1909, writes 
IIS as follows : 

"Dr. H. M. Robinson, Chr., Baltimore, Md. 

"My Dear 'Peanuts' — Enclosed find check in 
the sum of $6.00, as requested, for assessment, 
class reunion. 1 am going to make every effort 
to be present, and unless something unforeseen 
happens will be there. I often wonder what 
has become of our bunch, and nothing will give 
me more jjleasure than to greet and be greeted 
by the fellows of '09. Scattered, as Ave are, 
over the globe, each with happy recollections 
of bj^-gone college daj's, it Avill strengthen our 
ties and renew old friendships which will cling- 
to us throughout life. Each has become more 
or less engrossed in local affairs which are not 
as interesting to the other fellow, but beyond 
this there extends the same old class spirit and 
college friendship that separation never de- 
stroys. 

"So here's to '09. May she always live in 
the annals of our Alma Mater. Best wishes to 
you all. "Fi-aternally, 

"Robbie." 


Law — Graduate. 

Saul Praeger, LL.B., University of Maryland 
1911, and special graduate student of political 
science, Johns Hopkins University, 1909-1911, 
who for the past three years has been pi'ac- 
ticing laAv in Cumberland, Md., has formed a 
partnership with Fuller Barnard, Jr., LL.B.. 



A. H. PETTING 

Manufacturer of 

GREEK LETTER FRATERNITY JEWELRY 

213 N. Liberty St., = Baltimore, Md. 
Factory: 212 Little Sharp St. 

Memorandum package sent to any fraternity member through the 
secretary of the chapter. Special designf; and estimates furnished on 
medals, rinss and pins for athletic meets, etc. 



At the meeting of the Supreme Bench, held 
on Friday, September 18th, the following gen- 
tlemen were admitted as members of the Balti- 
more bar: 



Messrs. — 

Rowland K. Adams, 
George 0. Blome, 
Albert J. Curran, 
Edward B. Considine, 
Garland B. Day, 
August Euler, 
G. L. Goff, 
Benj. G. Gold, 
Arthur E. Hamm, 
Oliver Y. Harris, 
Willis R. Jones, 
Samuel Krelow, 
Ellis Levin, 
Harry C. McMeehen, 
John S. Mahle, 
John E. Magers, 



Maeall M. Merritt, 
Elmer H. Miller, 
W. Harrj^ Noeth, 
J. F. O'Brecht, Jr., 
Harry E. Pohlmann, 
Moses W. Rosenf eld, 
Abraham Rosenthal. 
John Louis Rapp, 
Simon E. Sobeloff, 
J. Louis Shochet, 
James Steele, 
J. Paul Schmidt, 
Simon Silverberg, 
Wm. McK. Travers, 
Ludwig Wagner, Jr., 
James P. Walsh. 



John E. Magers, 1914, has opened offices for 
the practice of laAv at 232 St. Paul street. 



Oliver Y. Harris, 1914, has opened offices for 
I he practice of law in the Title Building. 



George G. Wheeler, 1914, has opened offices 
I'nr the practice of law at Towson. Address 
Court House. Towson, Md. 



Ira Day Lang, 1914, has opened offices for 
the practice of la^v at 232 St, Paul street. He 
is associated with Henry J. Broening. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



59 



The engagement is announced of Ridgely P. 
Melvin, LL.B., class of 1902, of Murray Hill, 
Annapolis, Md., to Miss Augusta Burwell, of 
West River, Anne Arundel eountJ^ Md. The 
wedding will take place in the fall. Mr. Melvin 
is also a graduate of St. John's College. At 
present he is city counselor of Annapolis and 
lo the County Commissioners. 



Arthur E. Hamm, class 1914, has associated 
liimself with Messrs. Klemm & Oyeman, with 
offices at 216 St. Paul street. 



James Steele will shortly become associated 
with Messrs. Graham and McEvoy, with offices 
in the Title Building. Mr. Graham is Secretary 
of State, while Mr. McEvoj' is president of the 
ISoard of Police Commissioners. 



Messrs. Dickerson and Want are planning 
their State bar quiz course for the November 
examination. The course will begin about Oc- 
tober 1st. 



The new Digest of the Maryland Reports, 
which is being edited by Samuel Want and D. 
List Warner, is now in press. The first volume 
will be issued during the fall. There will be 
seven volumes in all. 



Judge Henry Stockbridge, who spent part of 
the summer in the White Mountains, at the 
Mount Washington, Bretton Woods, has re- 
turned to his home. 



Judge and Mrs. Henry D. Harlan, who have 
been occupying Poplar Hill, Roland Park, 
which they leased for the summer, will open 
their residence, 9 West Biddle street, in Oc- 
tober. 



Law — Senior. 

Only a few days ago a well-trained squad of 
180 men in the eoniplex art of legal tactics at- 
tempted to cross the line of the latest con- 
structed trenches of the bar examiners in Phila- 
delphia. But when the fifing had ceased and 
a truce declared it was found that only 50 had 
shown sufficient strategy to nonplus the exam- 
iners, thereby passing their heavy and deadly 
artillery. The other 130 were repulsed, de- 
feated— " flunked. " 



This bulletin should prove to be of immense 
interest to that valorous U. of M. brigade who 
will not long hence march forth to do deadly 
destruction to the Maryland Bar exams. It 
merely emphasizes the importance of keeping 
your headpieces well oiled, greased and other- 
wise in readiness for the coming conflict. As 
an art, wind-jamming is at times extremely use- 
ful, and, indeed, often effective in ordinary skir- 
mishes, but when it comes to a fierce struggle, 
a bloody battle such as is before planned by 
the enemy — Board of Law Examiners — only 
those with a knowledge of legal tactics can 
hope to come out victorious, for the shot and 
shell are heavJ^ There is no dodging. It is a 
fight to a finish. Do you perceive? Well, then 
prepare. Forward, march ! 



Dental — Graduate. 

The Summer Session just ended has ranked 
among the best in the history of the School. 
If the senior student would realize what a 
summer in the infirmary means to him, he 
would make any sacrifice to take advantage 
of the opportunity. 



Dr. Patterson, Associate Professor of Pros- 
thetic Dentistry, and Dr. Guerra, Chief Dem- 
onstrator of Practical Prosthetic Dentistry, are 
working out their plans for a full year's work 
in that course. Some stiff course, but it is 
pi-aetical and easily possible. 



The infirmary work for the juniors will be 
changed this year and a chief placed in charge 
of the work done by them. Dr. Robinson will 
have full charge, and any man failing to meet 
the requirements as outlined by Drs. Davis and 
Robinson will be denied senior privileges until 
he has satisfied the course next year. 



Every student in the Dental Department 
should subscribe to the Gazette at the open- 
ing of the school year. Give it your support 
and encouragement and it will soon make it- 
self a necessary institution at the University. 



"Mary had a little calf. 

But it was white as snow: 
She wore her skirt slashed up the side. 

And that is how I know." 



60 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



^ 



quAi 



iDlEHL 

Clothes 



built at 605 W. Baltimore St., 
just around the corner from the 
University, are kept pressed with- 
out cost. 

Suits $15 to $40 



Pharmacy — Graduate. 



Letter to Dr. Edward P. Kolb and Old Friends 
Through "The Gazette." 



"Parsons, ^Y, Va., Sept. 8,, 1914. 
"Dr. Edwin P. Kolb, Ray Brook, N. Y. 

"Dear Doctor — I was very glad indeed to see 
and read your letter in the September 'Univer- 
sity Gazette,' and am very glad to know that 
you are satisfactorily located. Probably you 
do not remember me, but I was a pharmacy 
student and graduated in 1910. I boarded for 
two years at Miss Cooper's, 640 West Franklin 
and remember while there that you under- 
went a very delicate operation, and I hope have 
fully recovered from the shock. I am very glad 
to know that you are doing well, and wish you 
much success indeed. Would like to receive a 
letter from you when at leisure. 

"IIow are the boys of 1910 in pharmacy 
getting along? Would like to hear from some 
of them at any time, and wish them all un- 
bounded success. All honor to the old Uni- 
versity. KENT W. SCOTT." 



Many a girl looks sweet on the outside — 
So does a sugar-coated pill. 



Academic — Undergraduate. 

College was officially opened for the collegi- 
ate year 1914-1915 on Wednesday, September 
16. This venerable institution then began its 
one hundred and twenty-sixth session. A large 
number of new men have matriculated and the 
student body promises to be larger than at any 
time last year. 

On Monday, September 21, College opened 
formally. After assembling in the chapel the 
students Avere addressed bj^ Prof. J. B. Rip- 
pere, vice-president of the College. He called 
attention to the temporary absence of our 
president. Dr. Thomas Fell, who has always ad- 
dressed the students at the opening for so 
many years. Dr. Fell, he said, is now sailing 
from Europe to the States and will be with us 
by October 1. 

Prof. Rippere explained the new form of dis- 
cipline decided upon by the board of governors 
and visitors and faculty, designed to prevent 
any possibility of hazing. He went on to say 
that as the Preparatory School has been abol- 
ished and a sub-freshman class organized in its 
stead, it has made the classification of new stu- 
dents more difficult, even making it necessary 
to turn some away. These changes, he said, 
while preventing things from running quite so 
smoothly at first, will do much for the better- 
ment of the College. He made an aj^peal to 
the students to co-operate with the faculty in 
doing this constructive work for our institu- 
tion. 



Three new professors have taken up their 
duties here this year. Prof. S. Cobb, formerly 
instructor in Robert College, Constantinople, 
takes the place of Prof. Sidney Gunn in the De- 
partment of English and Oratory. Prof. Mit- 
tendorf, of the United States Naval Academy, 
is now instructor in the Department of Engi- 
neering and Physics, which place has lately 
been occupied by Prof. Charles G. Eidson. 
Prof. H. F. Sturdy, formerly instructor in the 



WILLIAM J. MILLER 
Jewelry, Diamonds, Watches 

College Jewelry 
Class Pins and Rings, College Seals 

28 East Baltimore St. Baltimore. Md. 22 W. LexingtoH St., = Baltimore, Md. 



E LLERBROCK 

Slip Hcaitng CColIrgr Jilliotograplipr 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



61 



a W Saratoga St 




!Boltimore, 



Department of Mathematics at St. John's, has 
since specialized in History and Economies and 
now takes the place of Prof. Edmond E. Lin- 
coln in teaching these subjects. 



The following is taken from a letter written 
by Dr. Fell to some of his friends here : 

"9th September, 1914. 

"We have just returned from seeing the 
play 'Drake,' at Her Majesty's Theatre, which 
was magnificently staged and full of appeal to 
patriotic sentiment. Now we are hopefully 
considering the prospect of sailing from Eng- 
land on the 19th of September on the 'Phila- 
delphia' for New York. Edgar will meet us in 
Liverpool and will sail with us, so we shall all 
probably reach home about the 29th of Sep- 
tember." 



On Monday afternoon, September 14, the 
members of the Peggy Stewart Tea Party 
Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolu- 
tion, of Annapolis, held an interesting ceremony 
on the campus of St. John's College, when 
iui old cannon of the War of 1812, with tablet 
marker, was formally dedicated as a memorial 
to Francis Scott Key. The cannon is one of the 
relic's recovered from the bed of the Patapsco 
River and presented to the Peggy Stewart 
Chapter by Dr. Arthur B. Bibbins, chairman of 
the Baltimore Centennial Commission. 

The Daughters in turn decided to present 
the relic to St. John's, where it would have a 
permanent place as a memorial. Key was a 
graduate of St. John's and Amiapolis was 
closely asociated with much of the author's 
early life. 

The presentation of the relic on behalf of the 
Peggy Stewart Chapter was made by Mrs. L. 
Doi-sey Gassaway, and an address was deliv- 
ered by Mrs. Anna Key Bartow, of New York, 
a granddaughter of the author. The tablet 
w&s unveiled by Miss Ellen Key Habersham, of 
Annapolis, a niece of Key, and the acceptance 



Intercollegiate Bureau of Academic Costume, Aibany.N.v. 
COTRELL & 

LEONARD 

Official Makers of 

Caps and 
Gowns 




Correct Hoods 
for All Degrees. 

Rich Gowns for 
/ Pulpit and Bench. 

Bulletin. Samples 
i etc. on request 



of the memorial on behalf of the College was 
by Robert Moss, chairman of the Board of Gov- 
ernors and Visitors. A feature of these exer- 
cises was the singing of the national anthem by 
the public school children of Annapolis. 



NURSING. 

Miss Jessie Funk, who recently went to the 
DeSota Sanatorium, Jacksonville, Fla., in 
charge of the operating room, was compelled to 
resign on account of illness, and Mrs. Bertie 
Sigmon, class of 1914, has accepted the posi- 
tion. Miss Nettie Flanagan, former superin- 
tendent of the U. H. Training School, is super- 
intendent of the hospital. , 



Miss Julia C. Foley, class of 1914, has been 
appointed assistant superintendent of nurses of 
tlie University Hospital Training School for 
Nurses. Miss Foley was president of her class. 



The Misses Clendennin, Davis and Coulbourn, 
all of the class of 1914, are located at 339 Dol- 
phin .street (phone Mt. Vernon 826), ready for 



We take pleasure in announcing that Miss 
Carrie Edith Murray, '14, who was lately oper- 
ated on for appendicitis, has recovered sufB- 
ciently to leave the hospital to go to her home 
in Buena Vista, Va., to recuperate. 



Miss Grace Hull, class of 1914, who has been 
away for several weeks, has returned to Balti- 
more, and will resume work at the hospital 
tlie first of October. 






LUTHER B. 



BENTON • 



Dent al De pot 



students' Outfits 
a Specialty 



305 North Howard St. } 



62 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



New Neckwear 

for summer wear — 
novelty patterns, the 
nobbiest in town 

Hamburgers' 

Baltimore and Hanover Sts. 



QUIPS. 

Salacious, seductive, saporous and savage ad- 
vice from a ' ' Senior ' ' to the freshmen : Do not 
fail to read, reason, remember and record the 
case of 

J. G. vs. H. G., 33 Md. 401. 



Some men like stev^ed chicken- 
"We like ours sober. 




The 

Merchant 

Tailor's 



College Clothes 



New Spring Models 

Now Ready 
Prices $15 to $25 



Made to Measure 

From $20 Up 

Samples Cheerfully Given 

19 E. FAYETTE ST. 

Take Elevator 

|l'lllllili!llillllHl,.'lillllHllillllllllthtilllllllllliillllllllllllll!il!! 



WARNING 1 

Tlie University has proclaimed her Neutral- 
ity. 

What is Neutrality? Judge Bridgestock, the 
eminent authority on "'International Self- 
preservation."' gives the following definition: 

""Hoch der Kaiser." 
■'Long live the King." 
■'Vive la France." 
• ' Down with the Czar. ' ' 



Prof. J. 6. S. and his venerable assistant 
have not been seen together lately. M. could 
not be located, and sorrow has therefore 
reigned supreme. Let us not despair ; the sage 
has spoken and it is so; the inseparables will 
not be separated long; the professor and his 
assistant will be \mited shortl}'. 



Coming events cast their shadows before 
them. We have a cold: a good old-fashioned 
rhinitis. Our nose is red and we feel down and 
out. Therefore, welcome to thee. Fall; we 
await thee with open arms. We will hike our- 
selves to our Uncle Benny, ask for a loan of oiir 
overcoat in exchange for some simoleons; we 
will resurrect our flannels, fling away our 
straw hat, and then, ho! for the first days of 
college work and plugging. 



Synonyms from the list of hopefuls admitted 
as members of Baltimore bar: 

ADAilS— The Presidency; the first man. 

15L0ME— Chocolates. 

CURRAN — Precocity in politics. 

ITAMM— AVorkmen's compensation; Illinois 

whiskers. 
.MAHLE — Baltimore county politics. 
X(-)ETH— Titles. 



Jack — "I am going to change my hotel, there 
is a lady opposite me who comes in at all hours 
of the night and undresses, leaving the shades 



up. 



Tom— "What's that got to do with you? 
Jack— "T can't stay awake all night!" 



Til 



home stretch — the parlor sofa. 

— Harvard Lampoon. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



63 



Sneeze your nose, boys, and blow the dust otf 
your brains. They have been lying idle now for 
some time. There is dust enough on and around 
irianj^ legal principles which we will be obliged 
to wrestle with; therefore harken unto these 
words: When a dusty, delusive and discour- 
aged brain starts to flirt and fraternize with a 
fifteenth century legal proposition, also dusty, 
dingy and decayed, there is going to be some 
friction. Do you follow me, "Studes"? — some 
friction. 



You can't throw mud without getting your 
hands dirty. 



BIRTHS. 

Recently, to Dr. Peter P. Causey, class of 
1897, and Mrs. Causey, of "Wilmington, N. C, 
a son. Mrs. Causey was before her marriage 
Miss Esther E. Brewington, University Hospital 
Training School for Nurses, class of 1907. 



In August, to Robert Grain, LL.B., class of 
1886, and Mrs. Crain, at Mount Victoria, 
Charles county, Md., a daughter, Margaret 
Bennett Crain. 

■ 

MARRIAGES. 

Dr. Burman Karl Blalock, class of 1913, of 
Norwood, N. C, to Miss Mary Nealson Rennie, 
U. Hospital Training School for Nurses, class 
of 1913, of Baltimore, Md., at Baltimore, Sep- 
tember 9th. Dr. and Mrs. Blalock will reside 
in Norwood. N. C. 



Dr. Charles P. W. Bove, B. M. C, 1913, of 
Cumberland, Md., to Miss Cecelia H. Plaig, 
formerly of Catskill, N. Y., at Catskill, August 
22, 1914. Dr. Bove was formerly connected 
with St. Joseph's Hospital, this city. He has 
since located in Cumberland, where he is en- 
KHged in private practice. 



Dr. J. G. Powble Smith, class of 1906, of 
Sykesville, Md., to Miss Sara Prances Moore, 
of Silver Springs, Md., at Elkton, August 15, 
1914. Dr. Smith is a member of the Spring- 
field State Hospital staff. 



WARNER 8c CO. 

222-224 WEST BALTIMORE ST. 

ney, of Baltimore, Md., at Baltimore, in Sep- 
tember. Dr. Yoeum was formerly an assistant 
surgeon of the Maryland Steel Company. After 
a short wedding trip. Dr. and Mrs. Yocum left 
for China, where the doctor has been assigned 
to the Oxner Memorial Hospital in Pingtu, 
Shantung, as a medical missionary. 



DEATHS. 

Edgar H. Cans, LL.B., class of 1877, of Go- 
vans, Md., died at his home, Beaumont, York 
road, Govans, Md., September 20, 1914, aged 
.58 years. 

Mr. Gans was born in Harrisburg, Pa., No- 
vember 24, 18.56, and came to Baltimore with 
his parents in 1870. He was educated in the 
public schools, being graduated from the City 
College in 1875. He later entered the Univer- 
sity of Maryland Law School, and in 1877 was 
graduated and admitted to the bar. He studied 
at Mount St. Mary's College, Emmitsburg, Md., 
for a time, and was given an honorary degree 
as doctor of laws at Loyola College. He re- 
turned to the law school in 1883 as a member 
of the faculty and retained this position until 
a few years ago, being regarded as one of the 
most brilliant instructors at the institution. 
For the past 25 years he has been one of the 
most distinguished members of the Baltimore 
bar. 

Mr. Gans wrote several books that are val- 
uable to the law student and to the practi- 
tioner. He devoted a large part of his time 
when not engaged on cases to reading, taking 
up novels, poetry, law or other subjects as the 
fancy struck him. He spent practically all of 
his spare time at home, where he had an ex- 
tensive librarj'-. He is survived by a wife and 
five children — three daughters and two sons. 



Dr. Alfred W. Yocum, B. M. C. of 1912, of 
Sparrows Point, Md., to Miss Daisey C. Dis- 



Dr. Leonard H. Spalding, class of 1869, for 
thirty-three years a practitioner of Peoria, 111., 
died in Rochester, Minn., August 22, 1914, from 
heart disease, aged 69 years. 



By Comparison 



We believe it will be found that, in the Selection, 
Preparation and Dispensing of Pharmaceuticals, we 
maintain a Standard in Pharmacy that is, relatively, 
as high as are the Advanced Standards of Medical 
practice and Hospital service. 

Excepiional 
Prescription Compounding 

Hynson, Westcott & Co. 

Pharmaceutica/, Surgical and Hospital 
Supplies 



Charles and Franklin 
Streets 



Linden and North 
Avenues 



BALTIMORE. MARYLAND 



Scientific Therapeutic Agents : 
Bulgara Tablets, Glycotauro Capsules, Lutein Tablets 



Renal Functional Test : Phenolsulphotiephthalein Ampoules 



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"Nothing Too Large— Nothing Too Small " 

Baltimore City 

Printing and Binding 

Company 

352-363 Equitable Building 



Siirgicnl nnd Hospital Supplies. Sick Room Supplies. 
Dental Forceps. Microscopes and Accessories. 

The Chas. Wlllms Surgical Instrument Co. 

3(l(> >. HOWAHI) STREET. 



THE WESTERN NATIONAL BANK 

OF BALTIMORE 



SONNENBURQ'S PHARMACY 

Baltimore and Greene Streets. 

ONE MINUTE CLINICAL THERMOMETERS, 

WITH CHAIN AND GUARD PIN, 50 CENTS 



SULTAN DRUG COMPANY 

PHARMACEUTICAL CHEMISTS, ST. LOUIS, MO. 



PRUXGIDS 



Manufacturers of 
f-ElVG CACTINA FILLETS 



Menu, Banquet and Dance Cards, Commencement Invii:i- 
tions and Programs, Diplomas, Certificates, Engrossing, I'. 
of M. Stationery for Classes and Fraternities, Letter Heads, 
Envelopes, Cards, etc.. for Pli.vsicians. Lawyers and Dentists. 

J. H. DOWNS, STATIONER. 229 N. Charles St. 



Your Special Attention Is directed to 

Beef, Iron and Wine with Hydropepsin, 
Liquid Pi-cine Co., Red Syr. Hypophosphites Co. 

THOMAS & THOMPSON CO. 

Manuf'rs and Dispensers of P ure Medicines (Wholesale and 
Retail). Cor. Baltimore and Licht Sts., Baltimore. Md. 



RESINOL OINTH^ENT AND RESINOL SOAP 

Are Genuine Comforts to Physician and Patient Alike, 
Send for Siunples aiul Try Tlieni, 

RESINOL CHEMICAL COMPANY, Baltimore, Mrl 



German Savings Bank of Baltimore City 

S. W. Cor. Baltimore and Eutaw Sts. 

Interest Paid On Deposits. 



Drovers and IVIechanics' National Bank 

OF BALT'MO«e. MD. 

CAPITAL . , Paid in $300,000 00 

Earned .300,000 00 $600,000 00 

EARNED SURPLUS AND PROFITS . 533,487 65 

SAFE DEPOSIT BOXFS FOR RENT 



Vour B;ink Account 
Solicited 



14 N. EUTAW STREET 



EMPLOYERS — POSITJONS WANTED 
By students in the Legal, Medical, Dental 
and Pharmaceutical Department of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland. Some are stenographers, 
bookkeepers, etc. Apply SAMUEL WANT, 
1243-1253 Calvert Building. (No charge is 
made for this service.) 



The University Gazette 



Devoted to the interests of the University of Maryland. 



Vol. I. 



Baltimore, Md., November 1, 1914 



No. 5 




OLDEST OF THE TWO ORIGINAL UNIVERSITY PICTURES. 



> 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



Vol. I. 



NOVEMBER 1, 1914. 



No. 5. 



CONTENTS 



TURKEY AND THE TURKS. Stanwood 

Cobb, B.A.. M.A 67 

THE MARITjAND STATE UNIVERSITY. 

Samuel Waut 68 

HISTORY OF OUR TRALVING SCHOOL. 70 

EDITORIALS 71 

St. -John^s College. 
Neutrality. 



EDITORIALETS 72 

ITEMS 72 

QUIPS 82 

ENGAGEMENTS 83 

BIRTHS 83 

MARRIAGES 83 

DEATHS 83 



Footwear for the College Man at Moderate Price. 

N. HESS' SONS - - 8 E. Baltimore, St. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE, MD. 

HOX. PHILLIPS LEE GOLDSBOROUGH, Governor of Maryland, Chancellor. 
THOMAS FELL, A. Isl., Ph. D., L L. D., D. C. L.. Provost. 



ST. JOHN'S COLLEGE, Annapolis, Md. (^^?r:^ricYEN°cEs) 

Founded 1696. Classical and Scientific College Courses leading to cf ;grees. Special advantages to stu- 
dents purposing to study the professions. Military Department under army officers. Also Preparatory 
School for boys fitting for St. John's or other colleges. Term begins September 21. Address 

THOMAS FELL. Ph.D.. LL.D., D.C.L., President. 



DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE. 

Four years' graded course. New Laboratory Build- 
ing. Clinical advantages unsurpassed. Teaching Staff 
of 66. 108th Annual Session will begin October i, 
1914, and continue 8 months 

R. DORSEY COALE. Ph.D., M.D.. Dean. 



DEPARTMENT OF LAW. 

59th Annual Session will begin Sept. 28, 1914. Facultj' 
of 26. For catalogue containing full information ad- 
dress the Secretary, 301 St. Paul Street, Baltimore. 
Maryland. 

EDWIN T. DICKERSON. Secretary. 



DEPARTMENT OF DENTISTRY. 

33d Annual Session begins October i, 1914. and 
continues 7 months. 26 Instructors. New Building. 
For catalogue containing course of study, etc., apply to 

TIMOTHY 0. HEATWOLE, M.D., D.D.S., Dean. 

Baltimore. Md. 



DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACY. 

(Formerly Alaryland College of Pharmacy). 72nd 
Annual Session begins September 25, 1914. 11 In- 
structors. New Laboratories, .'\ddress 

CHARLES CASPAR!, JR.. Phar.D.. Dean, 

Baltimore, Md. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 

Published Monthly in the Interest of the University of Maryland. 
PRICE $1.00 PER YEAR. 



Ccntributions solicited from Alumni of the 
University. 



Business Address, 608 Professional Buildlne, 
Baltimore, Md. 



Vol. I. 



BALTIMORE, MD., NOVEMBER 1, 1914. 



No. 5 



TURKEY AND THE TURKS. 



By Stanwood Cobb, B.A., M.A., Professor of 
English and Oratory, St. John's College. 



Few races are so misunderstood or so unrea- 
sonably hated as the Turks. This prejudice 
arises partly from ignorance as to their true 
qualities, partly from deep-seated religious pre- 
judice, and partly from the massacres and 
atrocities committed in Turkey during the last 
quarter of the Nineteenth Century. 

One is surprised, therefore, upon first visiting 
Constantinople, to find the Turks not only a 
likable but an admirable race ; to find that they 
are beloved by most Americans and English liv- 
ing among them ; and that missionaries living in 
the interior prefer to live in the Turkish rather 
than in the Greek or American quarter of the 
town. 

The Turk has many fine qualities. To begin 
with, he is honest — the most honest of any race 
living in the Orient, with the exception, per- 
haps, of the Chinese. As a servant he can be 
absolutely trusted ; in business, he is too honest 
to succeed in competition with Jewish, Greek 
or Armenian merchants. It has been the ex- 
perience of missionaries traveling through Asia 
Minor that if they lost an article in a Greek 
or Armenian town they stood only one chance 
in ten of recovering it ; while if they lost any- 
thing in a Turkish town, nine cases out of ten 
it was returned. 

Strange as it may seem in the face of mas- 
sacres and atrocities committed in Turkey, the 
Turk in his daily life is extremely kind, gentle 
and peaceable. He spoils his children with 
kindness ; would go out of his way to do a favor 
to a stranger; is the essence of politeness and 
good manners, which spring from a really kind 
heart. He discourages brawls and street fights, 
is shocked at brutality to animals, and im- 
presses all who meet him with his big-hearted- 
ness and magnetic charm. 



The Turk is the soul of courage, honor, and 
loyalty, — qualities which we most admire in a 
race and which have made of the Turks a race 
of conquerors. The career of this sturdy and 
warlike nation is a proud one. Coming into 
the field of history in the Twelfth Century, 
they had by 1453 conquered most of the Near 
East, including the great Byzantine Empire ; 
and in the Sixteenth Century they more than 
once made Europe tremble, penetrating twico 
with their victorious armies to the very walls 
of Vienna, which was each time saved by al- 
most a miracle. Because of this glorious his- 
tory of the past, the Turk is proud and self- 
reliant. He is not at all the cringing, obse- 
quious, despicable rascal which he is generally 
faken to be, by those who fail to distinguish 
him from some of the efi'ete Oriental races 
which he has con(|uered and which now com- 
pose a part of the Turkish Empire. 

The Turk is possessed of great strength, en- 
durance and vigor. Simple living, and the 
non-use of alcohol enjoined upon him by his 
religion, have kept him in good physical condi- 
tion. A distinguished surgeon and dietetician 
who visited Constantinople after attending a 
medical congress in Budapest told me he con- 
sidered the Turks to possess the finest physique 
of any race he had ever seen. Moreover, be- 
cause of the simple outdoor life of the Turks, 
with their habit of going early to bed, nervous 
prostration is a thing unknown among tliem. 
Here is no effete race, ready to be thrown into 
the world's scrap-heap, but a race of proud 
achievements in the past, of splendid poten- 
tiality for tlie future, one which will yet make 
history, if I am not mistaken. 

The Turk is still medieval, it must be granted. 
in his customs of daily living, his business, his 
schools and his religion. This accounts for his 
savageness and cruelty in war. Although in 
daily life he is gentle, when his religious fanat- 
icism is aroused he is capable of any degree 
of barbarity, as was the population of Europe 



68 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



in the Middle Ages. Yet the recent Balkan 
War gave evidence that the Greeks, Bulgarians 
and Servians were in this respect every whit 
as bad ; and the terrible war now going on in 
Europe, with its constant reports of barbari- 
ties, demonstrates how hard it is to eradicate 
from the human heart those qualities of 
hatred, cruelty and blood-thirst which we have 
inherited from the dim past. 

By far the greatest prejudice against the 
Turks is in regard to their religion. Yet one 
who has lived in Turkey and studied at first 
hand the religious life of the Tiirks comes to 
admire Islam. It is a powerful, earnc-it. mas- 
culine religion, lived out in the daily life of 
these simple people. It pervades their every 
action; and their strong faith in Allah and pa- 
tient submission to his will gives their life a 
serenity and calm which we might do well to 
imitate. The mosque service is very impress- 
ive. Here is absolute sincerity of worship — 
such devotion that no stranger entering the 
mosque can divert the Mohammedan's devo- 
tion from his prayers. Here is a religion of true 
democracy, in which all kneel together in the 
woi*ship of their God — rich and poor, merchant 
and street porter — all one before their Maker. 
Christianit}^ too, teaches the brotherhood of 
man, but does not live it out as. does Islam. 

One great virtue of Mohammedanism is its 
strict injunction of total abstinence. That does 
not mean that some Turks do not drink, and 
that drunkenness is not sometimes seen among 
the Turks ; but it does mean that in purely 
Turkish towns no saloons are to be found, no 
noisome ' alleys with their foul bar-rooms, no 
drunken street brawls, no jails filled with 
drink-encited murderers. Turkey needs no 
temperance uplift, no prohibition party, for the 
whole country is dry, and has been ever since 
Mohammed first commanded that men shoidd 
not put to their lips that which stole away 
their senses. 

In many other respects one may find much 
in the religion of the Turks to admire. Next 
to Christianity, it is the most vital and most 
actively missionary. 

The greatest need in Turkey today is educa- 
tion and scientific progress. These would lift 
Turkey out of the Middle Ages, in which she 
now exists, and enable her to take an important 
place among the nations of the world. 



THE MARYLAND STATE UNIVERSITY. 



Bv Samuel "Want. 



Any bill which purports to effect a far-reach- 
ing reform without carrying with it an exten- 
sive appropriation or providing for the appoint- 
ment of a commission, is on that account alone 
entitled to particular attention, in these days 
of fat appropriations and commission mania, 
and if such a bill goes still further by omitting 
all coercive measures to effect its purpose, de- 
pending for its successful operation upon its 
own intrinsic merit, then indeed it should com- 
mand genuine respect. 

Just such a bill is Senate Bill Number 122, 
introduced in the last Legislature by Senator 
Maloy, of Baltimore City, and enacted into law. 

The Act in question seeks to do nothing less 
than provide a plan for the complete rehabili- 
tation of the educational system of the State. 
Its purpose is to introduce into the field of edu- 
cation the principles of efficiency that have 
been the basis of the wonderful development of 
resources in many other lines of endeavor, and 
thus, by eliminating all waste of expense and 
etfoi-f. economize as Avell as advance in the 
great field of academic and professional educa- 
tion. 

The basic feature of the situation is well ex- 
pressed in the preamble .of the Act, thus : 

"^XHiereas, At divei's times in the history' of 
the State of Maryland, there have been incor- 
porated, either by the General Assembly of 
Maryland or under the General LaA^'s of the 
State governing the formation of Corporations, 
various universities, colleges, seminaries, conser- 
vatories, institutes, professional and technical 
schools, designed to oii'er opportunities to the 
youth of this and other States to become edu- 
cated in the liberal arts, letters, music, sciences, 
professional and technical knowledge and other 
branches of the higher education: and, 

"Whreas, These several institutions for the 
higher education are not related to each other, 
and to the public school system of the State in 
a consistent scheme, whereby the highest stand- 
ard of excellence and efficiency may be main- 
tained for the advantage of the youth of this 
State, to the end that he may pass, without in- 
terruption, from his primary and secondary 
studies to the pursuit of the collegiate and the 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



Gd'^f 



professional of the other branches of education ; 
and, 

"Whereas, It has been deemed advisable and 
as tending to promote the cause of education, 
and to advance and make uniform the standard 
of seholai'ship, and to increase the opportuni- 
ties and facilities for studj^ and research, and 
to encourage and promote higher education in 
this State, by creating an executive center 
about which the various collegiate, teclmical 
and professional, and similar institutions of this 
State, may be coordinated in carrying out a 
comprehensive and harmonious scheme of edu- 
cation ; and to utilize to the best advantage the 
aid that may be contributed by the State and 
by individuals to the cause of higher educa- 
tion, etc."' 

It is notorious that under existing conditions 
many institutions in the same communities, 
having exactly the same aims, and operated for 
the same purpose, are working in competition 
with each other, each barely maintaining its 
own foothold, and all retarded in the improve- 
ment of standards and equipment by the divis- 
ion of patronage and the commercial demands 
of the competition itself. The development of 
the standards of education, and the rapid ad- 
vances in the sciences, demand greater facilities 
and increased expenditures, while the spirited 
competition engendered by the existence of var- 
ious institutions in the same fields, renders 
healthy advances little less than impossible. 

The Act in question recognizes this factor, 
and it assumes that co-ordination of the whole 
educational system, and the elimination of un- 
necessary institutions will be readily accom- 
l>lished by simply providing a well-defined and 
properly sanctioned method of procedure. 

This assumption is not without adequate foun- 
dation. Acting entirely alone and withovit the 
expenditure of a single dollar, the present Uni- 
versity of Maryland has already blazed the way 
and set the pace for the work intended to be 
accomplished by the Act in question. In the 
course of a very few years, it has absorbed no 
less than five different institutions, not in a 
spirit or upon a plan of monoply, but in an 
effort to meet the demand for the concentration 
of resources, the improvement of standards, 
and the co-ordination of educational institu- 
tions in general. These institutions were the 
Dental Department of the Baltimore Medical 
College, the Maryland School of Pharmacy, St. 



Jolm's College, th% Baltimore Medical "CoMge,' - 
and the Baltimore Law School. 

The Act does not provide for the formation 
of a new educational institution. It provides, 
in brief, for the formation of a corporation to " 
be known as the Maryland State University. 
This institution, which in itself willha,ve no dis- 
tinct equipment, is to be governed by a Board 
of Regents, composed of the Governor, the 
Comptroller of the Treasury, the State Superin- 
tendent of Education, one person to be ap- 
pointed by the Governor from each of the six' 
Congressional districts in the State, and two 
representatives fi'om each of the institutions 
which shall become affiliated with the L^niver-" 
sity. The Board of Regents is to elect a Pro- 
vost of the University. 

It is then provided, 

"That is shall be lawful for the said Mary- 
land State University to enter into any con- 
tract, articles of agreeinent or mutual ordi^j,, 
nances or statutes with any existing or here- 
after created college, univereity, conservatary, 
institute, technical, professional, military or 
agricultural school, or other similar institution, 
and to affiliate said institution with th& said 
university under such terms as may, to the re- 
spective governing bodies of the said institu- ^ 
tion and of the said Maryland State University ^ 
seem meet and proper; it shall be lawful for the 
said Maryland State University to enter into 
any contract, articles of agreement, or mutual 
ordinances or statutes with any existing or 
hereafter created hospital, infirmary, labora- 
tory, home, asylum, or similar institution, with ' 
any normal school, school of pedagogy, insti- 
tute of art and design, library, or other insti- 
tution of a similar character, the terms of con^" 
tract between the said Marjdand State Univei^- 
sity and the said contracting institutions to be 
such as the governing bodies of the several con- 
tracting institutions may deem meet and proper; 
l^rovided that the affiliation with the said Uni- 
versity of any other institution shall not be 
held to deprive such institution of any of its 
corporate rights, privileges or franchises under 
its charter and the supplements thereto, nor in 
any way injuriously to effect or impair the 
same, nor vest in the said University the right 
or title to any of the property of such other in- 
stitution, except as shall be mutually and dis- 
tinctly agreed on in writing between the gov- 



70 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



erning bodies of such institutions and of the 
said University." 

Section 6 of the Act, provides : 

"That it shall be the duty of the said Board 
of Eegents to provide for a closer relation be- 
tween the High Schools of the State and the 
colleges affiliated under this charter, and also 
between the said colleges and professional 
schools constituting the University. ' ' 

By other provisions the University is given 
such appropriate powers as those of acquiring 
property, making the necessary rules for its 
own government, granting degrees, etc. 

It will be perceived that the statute leaves 
everything to the voluntary action of the exist- 
ing educational institutions of the State, and 
yet provides a palpably effective scheme for 
establishing an efficient and co-ordinated sys- 
tem of academic and professional education. 

The plan to have a commission to study the 
-educational problems confronting the State, 
should not be permitted to thwart this unusual 
measure. Its operation cannot possibly be 
lOtherwise than beneficial, and while a commis- 
sion is studying in detail the factors that call 
for remedy, the institution here provided for 
will be steadily reducing the size of the prob- 
lem, and eliminating the waste in and increas- 
ing the efficiency of the factors now constitut- 
ing our educational system. 



HISTORY OF OUR TRAINING SCHOOL. 



On the afternoon of December 14, 1889, at 3 
P. M., our Training School, the second in Mary- 
land, had its birth, when three young women 
were assigned to duty in the Citizens', Sailors' 
and Emigrant Wards, respectively, to begin a 
course of two years' training. 

The Sisters of Mercy, who hitherto had 
charge, left at this time and removed to the 
City Hospital. 

The Training School, in its early stage, was 
most fortunate in securing for its superintend- 
ent, Miss Laura Parsons, a graduate of St. 
Thomas' Hospital, London, England, and who 
had served six months as Head Nurse at Johns 
Hopkins Hospital. 

In the course of a year our number increased 
M'ith marked rapidity from three to twenty, 
forecasting a future which so noble a profes- 
sion demanded, The Chapel, used so long for 



devotional worship, was transformed into sleep- 
ing apartments and sitting room. It was divided 
into eight rooms, the center forming a sitting 
room. 

As things progressed, the two night nurses, 
who were not graduates, weie dismissed. They 
had both been most faithful in their work, but 
were unable to cope with the new regime. 

During the first year there were then some- 
times two Head Nurses, who were graduates 
of Philadelphia Hospitals. In the couree of 
eight months the Maternity was also supplied 
with a superintendent. The gynecological nurs- 
ing in the private halls was nearly all done by 
an old lady who remained several years after 
the organization of the School. 

On May 4, the University of Marjdand real- 
ized the first fruits of its efforts, when it pre- 
sented to the world its band of uniformed 
graduates. After a successful stay of two 
years, and her struggle with the School in its 
infancy. Miss Parsons resigned. 

The superintendency was then filled success- 
ively by: Mrs Wilton, from 1892 to 1893; Miss 
Hale, from 1893 to 1897 ; Miss McKechine, from 
1898 to 1900; Mrs. Taylor, from 1900 to 1904; 
Miss Flanagan, from 1904 to 1907 ; Miss Russell 
and Miss Fehrman serving the intervening 
months ; Miss Bertha Wilson, from 1907 to 1911 ; 
Mrs. Ethel Palmer Clarke, from 1911 to 1914; 
Miss Mary E. Sullivan, 1914. 

Thus we have the gradual progress and the 
triumphant success of our Training School, 
which we hope has been a credit to its Alma 
Mater, the State of Maryland, and the world at 
large. 



Sight, smell and taste plays big 
part in digestion. 

Eating is a matter of the sympa- 
thetic nerves. "No profit is where 
no pleasure is taken." 

POSITIVELY we feed you BET- 
TER at LESS COST and IN THE 
CLEANEST environment than any 
one has ever done before since 
time began. 

BRIGHTON LUNCH 

14 N. HOWARD STREET 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



71 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 

A MONTHLY JOURNAL 

Devoted to the interests of the University 

of Maryland. 

Subscription Price, $1.00 Per Annum, In Advance 

Reprints Furnished At Cost 

Advertising Rates Submitted Upon Request. 

608 Professional Building 

BALTIMORE, MD. 



Editorial Board. 

H. M. ROBINSON, M.D Editor-in-Chief. 

NATHAN WINSLOW, M.D Managing Editor. 

Graduate Members. 

THOMAS FELL, LL.D Academic. 

G. L. WINSLOW, B.A Academic. 

ALBERT H. CARROLL, M.D Medical. 

F. J. VALENTINE, D.D.S Dental. 

J. BEN ROBINSON, D.D.S Dental. 

SAMUEL WANT, LL. B Law. 

A. A. SONNENBURG, Phar.D Pharmacy. 

J. M. BRANSKY, Phar.D Pharmacy. 

M. E. SULLIVAN, R.N Nursing. 

Undergraduate Members. 

C. V. WILSON Academic. 

H. GOLDMAN, '15; F. C. MARINO, 

'16; C. 0. WOLF, '17 Medicinal. 

H. E. WATERMAN, 15; A. Z. ALD- 
RIDGE, '16; H. I. HAWKINS, 
'17 Dental. 

J. A. HAGGERTY,'15; B. C. LIGHT- 
NER, '15; C. N. MATTHEWS, 
'16 Law. 

A. L. STERLING, '15 Pharmacy. 

J. E. EVANS, '16 Y. M. C. A. 

B. C. LIGHTNER, '15 Advertising. 

B. G. GOLD, '15 College Notes. 

A. G. DE QUEVEDO Latin-American. 

L. A. BUIE, '15 House Notes. 

LINDSAY ROGERS, '15 General Items. 



NOVEMBER 1, 1914. 

St. John's College. 

The matter of "hazing," its prevention and 
its cure, has become a very important question 
in American universities and colleges. Many 
plans have been tried, but experience has 
shown that the only way to eradicate the evil 
is by building up a strong sentiment against it 
among the students themselves. 

The present session at St. John's has opened 
in a very satisfactory manner. The Prepara- 
tory School has been abolished and only stu- 
dents of college rank have been received. The 
number of applicants for entrance to the fresh- 
man class is in excess of former years, and, in 



Young Men's Suits 

$10, $12.50 and up to $40 



THE QUALITY SHOP 

Baltimore and Liberty Sts. 
Haberdasher/ of Excellence 




addition, several young men, looking to the 
Medical School next year, have entered to take 
the pre-medical course. 

In September, when the college reopened, the 
seniors and juniors were already pledged on 
their honor to refrain from hazing in any form 
and to use their influence to prevent its occur- 
rence. 

The sophomore class voluntarily gave pledges 
on September 25 to abolish hazing, and during 
the present week all the new students com- 
prising the freshman and sub-freshman classes 
made a similar pledge. 

In reaching this result the maintenance of a 
strong sentiment in favor of the honor system 
is noteworthy. The honor system was adopted 
in 1906, and has dealt more particularly with 
the work in classrooms and examinations, but 
now will be extended to cover the closer and 
more intimate relations of students. 

As the whole student body is now pledged 
against the practice of hazing, the new students 
have been unmolested, and, as a consequence, 
thej^ will not feel it incumbent upon them, as 
in former years, to hand down the traditional 
belief that one entering a class must go through 
the same unpleasant ordeal which they them- 
selves endured. 

This voluntary action of the students must 
exert a great effect upon their well-being while 
at college, and will tend to keep St. John's at 
the forefront in scholarship, high ideals, and 
general good standing throughout the State. 

In regard to the military department, the in- 
specting officer of the United States Army has 
reported that the officers of the cadet corps ar« 
capable of holding commissions in a volunteer 
army. The general rating may be considered 
the best the college has ever had. The eertifi- 



;72 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



eate'of^t. John's College will be accepted at 
West Point for candidates desirous of entering 
there under the new rules. 

Dr. Thomas Fell is retaining his position as 
provost of the University of Maryland and pres- 
ident of St. John's College, by consent of the 
Board of Visitors and Governors. 



NEUTRALITY. 



"Wx^do not give a tinker's dam, nor an Am- 
sterdam, nor any otlier kind of a , for either 

side. We are just eternally glad we are Amer- 
icans and can rest in the shadow of the eagle's 
wing. 

But — if we are neutral, their honorable maj- 
esties the Profs, are not. They will keep after 
j'ou tooth and nail, will charge you in front 
or try to flank you. Mobilize ! Get your 
forces together! Ye leading lights, or trudg- 
ing drudges, get your new textbook guns, your 
notebook swords, and into the fray ! It "s a 
long fight, a steady fight, and only they will 
come out victors who can stick ! 



EDITORIALETS. 



We are taking the opportunity to ask the 
students to read carefull.y the advertisements 
in the Gazette. Note the firms that advertise 
with us. They are all leaders in their lines. 
The}' handle the best goods to be had in the 
city. Were it not for our advertisers we would 
be unable to publish the Gazette. They have 
siiown the right spirit by giving us their ad- 
vertisements. Let us shown the right spirit 



sii; 



STYLISH and COMFORTABLE 
FOOT-WEAR 



FOR THE 



UNIVERSITY MAN 

All Leathers — Expert Fitting 
Moderate Prices 

WYMAN 

19 W. LEXINGTON STREET 



by giving them the preference when making 
purchases. Buy from these firms, and you will 
be treated right. The more advertisements we 
get, the better and larger Gazette we will be 
able to publish. It rests with your patronage 
whether the advertisers will renew. When 
buying from these firms, please mention the 
fact that you saw their advertisement in the 
Gazette. 



Speaking of our advertisers, we take pleas- 
ure in announcing that the Brighton Lunch 
Room, 14 North Howard street, is now pre- 
pared to sell meal tickets to the University 
students exclusively. Tlie tickets sell for $2.00 
each, giving the students a discount of 10 per 
cent. The Brighton serves good meals at very 
moderate prices. You'll appreciate the clean- 
liness and good cooking. Give them a trial. 



Do not forget Academic Day, ye men of ]ued 
icine, ye slaves of disease I Throw ofl:' the 
shackles temporarily and spend the day in 
breeding good-fellowship. Not for each de- 
partment as an entity, but for the L^niversity 
as a whole. Hurrah 1 



ITEMS— GENERAL. 



Preliminary steps looking to close co-opera- 
tion between the state-aided medical colleges in 
Baltimore were taken at a recent meeting of 
the board of regents of the Maryland State 
University in the Governor's offices in the Gar- 
rett Building. 

The report of the committee on medical edu 
cation to the board is believed to point toward 
the eventual merging of the medical schools ol 
the University of ilaryland. the College of 
Physicians and Surgeons and what there is of 
the ilaryland iledical College into one State 
institution. This is known to have been one of 
the objects of the State University act which 
was put through tlie Legislature by State Sena- 
tor William Jlilnes Maloy. so that the State 
might concentrate its aid on one strong institu- 
tion instead of scattering if among a numlier. 
each fighting for the largest amoinit. 

The committee on nunlical education, which 
consists of Senator Maloy and Drs. Randolph 
Winslow, J. W. Chambers and J H. Braiiliam. 
reported to the regents that a plan was being 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



worked out to effect co-operation between the 
medical colleges in the first and second years of 
the course and in laboratory work, so that the 
State's appropriation may be put to the best 
use. No definite action was taken on the re- 
port. 

The regents will meet again on December 11 
to get reports from each of the institutions. At 
the meeting were Dr. Thomas Pell, Dr. Sylvan 
H. Likes, Dr. Fred Carnthers, Dr. W. F. Lock- 
wood, Dr. Thomas H. Lewis, Prof. James W. 
Cain, William P. Ryan, Df. J. H. Bixler, Dr. -J. 
W. Englar and Judge James Alfred Pearce. 



Medical — Graduate. 

Dr. D. C. Absher, '09, is engaged in some ex- 
cellent public health work in Red Springs, N. C. 



Dr. C. A. Neatie, "09, has just begun private 
practice at Pontiae, Mich., after having spent 
two and one-half years as a member of the staff 
of the Pontiae State Hospital. 



We wish to correct an error which appeared 
in the September Gazette, namely, that Dr. 
E. P. Kolb is not of 1913 class, but of 1912. 



Dr. M. L. Liehtenberg has been appointed 
to the Gynecological Service, to take the place 
of Dr. J. Duggan, '13, resigned. 



Among recent visitors at the University Hos- 
pital were the following : Dr. Michaels, Frost- 
burg, Md. ; Dr. Guy Steele, '97, Cambridge, 
Md.; Dr. J. N. N. Osborne, "09, Washington, 
D. C; Dr. J. F. Byrne, '10, B. & 0. R. R. sur 
geon, of Newcastle, Pa. ; Dr. George C. Coul- 
bouru, '10, Marion Station, Md. ; Dr. Peter P. 
Causey, '97, Wilmington, N. C. ; Dr. W. H. 
Toulson, '13, Bay View Hospital ; Dr. H. Rosen- 
berg, "08, Atlanta, Ga. ; Dr. S. J. Price, "09. 
Queenstown, Md. ; Dr. T. H. Legg, '07, Union 
Bridge, Md. ; Dr. A. J. Crowell, '93, Charlotte. 
N. C; Dr. W. E. Gallion, Jr., "12, Darling- 
ton, Md. 



Doctors, classmates, schoolmates ! Lend me 
your ear. (We daren't ask for other goods.) 
This is the last call. You who were of the 
class of 1909, come back to your Alma Mater. 
If you're a real man, you'll forget grievances 
and business and come. 



The Indiscriminate Use Of Hospitals. 

We are in receipt of an epistle from Dr. H. H. 
Weinberger, 1908, in Avhich he rids himself of 
what he considers a just grievance. We will 
mention three points of his letter, as near ver- 
batim as space will allow : 

1. "After six years of futile effort . . . 
to find a plausible reason for certain condi- 
tions at certain hospitals," 

2. "Why is it that members of the medical 
profession who are standardized by a state 
board are denied the privilege of treating their 
private cases at any and every hospital?" 

3. "It is very well for the editor to call at- 
tention ... to a closer union between 
alumni, etc., etc" 

To begin Avitli, if those six years had been 
spent in'disiDeiisary work at any of the hos- 
pitals, further preparing himself for the prac- 
tice of medicine, there is little doubt but that 
the writer would have had the privilege of 
treating his cases at the hospital. It is surely 
not asking too iuueh to expect a graduate to 
do at least one year's dispensary work, that is, 
teaching in a minor capacity, before giving 
him the privilege of becoming one of the ad- 
junct facultJ^ Even at this demand' the Uni- 
versity Hospital is more lenient than other 
hospitals, in that one must reach much higher 
than adjunct faculty in a medical school of 
Class A or higher before being granted the 
privilege of treating cases there. 

None of us are too busy to devote one hour 
a day for either three to six days a week in in- 
creasing one's medical knowledge. 

Then, to expect that a man passing a written 
examination, which every educator in the 
country avers is not a fair test of a man's abil- 
ity, to expect such a man to be allowed to 
pi'ivatel.y treat cases in a hospital, is, to our 
mind, asking too much, because four years" 
schooling and a state board examination are 
what they claim to be only, an opening to 
commencement day. Even four years' school- 
ing is not sufficient, and more years to be added 
are at present in contemplation. 

The hospitals are stringent in their restric- 
tions in that they do not wish to allow them- 
selves to be open to legal liability through any 
accident or mistake, and the hospital cannot 
judge of anyone's woi'k unless that work is 
done under its supervision for some lengtli of 
time. 



74 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



NEW YORK CLOTHING HOUSE 

102 & 104 E. BALTIMORE ST. 

Men's, Boy's and Children's Clothing 

Automobile & Uniform Outfitters - - Bart's Shoes 



Lastly, we, personally, as editors, beg to re- 
mark that if any person graduate their loyalty 
by the profits accrued them, and the privileges 
granted them, we do not care to think of ther" 
as alumni and as claimant to "come-back" 
honors. 



University Medical Society Meeting. 

The annual meeting of the University of 
Maryland Medical Society was held in the Hos- 
pital amphitheatre on the evening of October 
20th, 

Dr. Randolph Winslow addressed the meet- 
ing, and recounted numerous interesting ex- 
periences of his recent European trip. He dis- 
cussed also the field work done bj^ Sir Arbuth- 
not Lane, and traced his work up to the present, 
which just now, appears to be of such an ad- 
vanced order, that the average pathologist and 
surgeon fails to see the rationale of it. Mr. Lane 
tells us that the colon is the seat of most of the 
troubles of mortal man, and recommends its 
removal in a great number of cases. This he 
does with wonderful results, and with no ap- 
parent difficulty. If it is not necessary to re- 
move the colon, then about the onlj' therapeutic 
measure advocated by him is the almost unlim- 
ited use of liquid paraffine. And this must be 
of the Russian variety in Mr. Lane 's opinion. 

This eminent gentleman states that his ob- 
servers are at liberty to draw their own con- 
clusions. Since he apparently gets results, his 
critics must take no mid-way stand, they must 
not hedge. Lane says that he is either correct 
or insane. He wishes the public to decide one 
way or the other. His past work would not 
justify the last conclusion, although we can 
not accept in their entirety Mr. Lane's teach- 
ings as regards the colon, as being the principal 
etiological factor in all pathological conditions. 

Dr. Frank Martin reviewed his extensive ob- 
servations made in a great number of clinics. 
He spoke from the painstaking notes jotted 
down at the time of his visits to each clinic, 



and compared the work of the various surgeons. 
The conduct of the clinics, the technique of the 
various celebrated operators and their methods 
of work proved intensely interesting. 

Dr. Albert H. Carroll was reelected president 
of the Medical Society, and Dr. J. Howard Mal- 
deis, secretary, for the coming year. 

An informal reception was tendered to the 
members of the society and to the Senior and 
Junior classes of the Medical School, in Dav- 
idge Hall, immediately after the meeting. 



Medical — Senior. 

Well, well, here we are on the last lap, and a 
hundred strong at that. Pretty much the same 
crowd that started out three years ago, with 
the addition of our friends of the amalgama- 
tion period. And remember how we were 
classified at the start. No graduates in 1915 ! 
Was that it ? Oh, I don 't know ! I guess 
there'll be a few. Wait seven months, and 
then let 'em pass the cards. 



On Wednesday, October 14, we were called 
together in Chemical Hall and the following 
officers of the senior class were elected: Presi- 
dent, Le Roy Lewis ; vice-president, G. H. Dor- 
sey ; chairman of executive committee, M. J. 
Egan ; executive committee, Messrs. Armstrong, 
Schreiber, Ross, Robinson and Merkel; editor- 
in-chief of annual, N. B. Hendix ; secretary, H. 
Ray ; treasurer, L. C. Sanders ; prophet, K. Me- 
CuUough; artist, S. D. Shannon; sergeant-at- 
arms, C. W. Myers; historian, H. E. Gilbert; 
honor committee, Messrs. Kelley (chairman), 
Moses, Grossman, Arnold, Rush. 



"Orderly, get your mop and come here quick. 
I want you to . . . Oh, I beg your pardon, 
Mr. Schreiber. You see, the white coat mis- 
led me." 



Now the question arises: If residents wear 
white suits in order to distinguish them from 
the clinical assistants, why not give the clinical 
assistants a fair amount of consideration? Who 
thinks that "orderly" is a laudatory cognomen 
for men who have worked several years in 
order to fulfill requirements for entrance here 
and three full years here besides? Consid- 
eration of the vital interests that will be in 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



75. 



BLOME'S 

Honey Molasses Taffy 

FOR SALE EVERYWHERE 



the hands of some of us a few months hence 
leads us to believe that we are men, and we 
are of the opinion that uniforms or uniform 
coats for the orderlies would contribute ma- 
terially to the exigency of the occasion. 



In the little escapade which was enacted in 
the amphitheatre a few weeks ago at the G. U. 
clinics, did Dr. Underbill play his joke on Dr. 
Carroll, or was it on the senior class? 



One more point in the shape of a sugges- 
tion and then we will put the hammer up : 
Due to the fact that some of us have been 
posted on operations for surgical clinics, we 
have been forced to be absent from medical 
ward classes held at the same time. Now, this 
complication could be obviated very easily in 
the following manner: The class is divided 
into sections, medical ward classes and surgi- 
cal clinics to be held at certain stated times. 
It so happens, due to the fullness of our sched- 
ule, that these sections must meet at the same 
hour in a number of instances. Now, with a 
very little trouble, the names of the men in 
the different sections could be obtained from 
the secretary of the University. A mere 
glance at this schedule would show what men 
would go to the surgical clinic, and the assist- 
ants on the operation could be selected from 



J. FBED SHAFER, Pris. WM. E. READ, VicePres. WM. G. HORN. Sec'y-Treas 

THE HORN-SH AFER CO. 

Printers and Publishers 

3-5 GERMAN STREET, EAST 

BALTIMORE 
Private Branch Exchange, St. Paul 7077-7078 

Printers of 1912 '13 and '14 ''Terrae Mariae" 
There must be a reason 



that group. This would give the men expected 
to attend ward class a chance to be present, 
and at least two of those expected at the surgi- 
cal clinic a better insight into the operation. 



Let's get together and get all we can out of 
the year that we have just commenced. We 
have an excellent curriculum outlined for us 
and we have men who know how to guide us. 
It's our opportunity, so let's grab it. 



LAW— GRADUATE. 



COURTS HONOR EDGAR H, GANS. 



In the Superior Court, where the ability of 
the late Edgar H. Gans as a lawyer had been 
often displayed, members of the bench and bar 
of the city assembled September 25th, to honor 
his memory by their praise of his talents and 
character. Judges and lawyers were not the 
only ones in the crowd that filled the court- 
room, which is the largest in the Courthouse. 
There were many there not in the profession 
who wanted to show their appreciation of his 
qualities by their presence. 

Chief Judge Soper and all other members of 
the Supreme Bench, except Judge Elliott, sat 
on the bench, with Judge Henry Stockbridge, 
of the Court of Appeals, and former Judge Pere 
L. Wickes. Judge Elliott was engaged in the 
trial of a murder case. At the trial tables sat 
former Judge Henry D. Harlan, Attorney-Gen- 
eral Edgar Allan Poe, William L. Marbury, 
Roger W. Cull, Joseph C. France, Moses R. 
Walter and Albert C. Ritchie, members of the 
committee of the bar appointed to prepare a 
memorial and present it to the bench. B. How- 
ard Haman, business partner of Mr. Gans, and 
Joseph Packard had also been appointed on the 
committee, but were unable to be present. Mr. 
Haman is still in Nova Scotia. He sent a eulo- 
gistic letter containing his recollections of Mr. 
Gans, which was read by W. Calvin Chestnut, 
also a member of the firm. 

Tribute was paid Mr. Gans for his ability and 
character in the memorial, and a number of 
addresses which followed it. 

In presenting the memorial, former Judge 
Harlan said it expressed the unanimous senti- 
ment of the committee. It characterized Mr. 
Gans as an eminent member and leader of the 



76 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



bar. who had passed away in the zenith of his 
power. Seldom, if ever, surpassed in his ability 
as an advocate, the memorial also stated, as a 
citizen he stood among the foremost. 

Attornej'-General Poe, the first speaker, said 
Mr. Gans had one of the most brilliant minds of 
the profession and had earned the high place 
he held at the bar. 

The most distinguishing characteristic of Mr. 
Gans, in the opinion of Mr. France, was his 
keen sense of the proper place to put the em- 
phasis. Mr. France said he formed this opinion 
when he and Mr. Gans were at the City College 
at the same time, although in different classes, 
and Mr. Gans corrected his rendering of certain 
line he had to speak in a Christmas entertain- 
ment. 

Mr. Haman in his letter read by Mr. Chestnut 
said he had met J\Ir. Gans when he was 16 years 
old and they had been friends until his deatli. 
At all times straightforward and honest, tlie 
letter also stated, Mr. Gans possessed a wealth 
of romance which was onh' known to a privi- 
leged few. 

The inspiration of the example of Mr. Gans 
to the students whom he taught at the Law 
School of the University of Maryland was re- 
cited by Mr. Ritchie. 

Mr. Marbury said that after a long associa- 
tion with Mr. Gans he did not have a memory of 
him that Mr. Gans would not like him to liave. 
"I never found a sign of professional jealousy 
in him," Mr. Marbury also said, "or a disposi- 
tion to shirk individual responsibility." 

Chief Judge Soper, in his response, said in 
part: "Pew men have more clearly shown than 
Mr. Gans the heights to which capacity and 
application unaided by influence or unusual 
opportunity can attain. He was not n^irsed or 
cuddled into prominence. He made his own 
way, and in the making he proved the round- 
ness of his faculties. The successful prosecutor 
of criminal cases seems distinctly different to 
the lawyer skillful and dominant in the man- 
agement of great commercial and corporate 
causes. Mr. Gans Avas both." 



HEPBRON & HAYDON 

We Sell Every Lav/ Book and Syllabus Used 
at the U. of M. 



Students' Eyes 



should have the best light obtainable 
— that is the Belgian. Call us up. 



Spilcker's, 



207 
Park Avenue 



Law — Senior. 

The Senior Day Class held a meeting on Mon- 
day, October 12, at 4 P. M., for the purpose of 
electing officers. The following men were 
elected : B. C. Lightner, president ; L. Sr Sehan- 
berger, vice-president; A. V. Keene, secretary; 
E. K. Schultz, treasurer; B. G. Gold, class edi- 
tor of Terra Mariae; A. Rosenthal, historian 
and prophet ; J. R. Brunsman, sergeant-at-arms. 



Abe Rosenthal is associated with Samuel 
Want, Esq., in the practice of law at 1231-1233 
Calvert Building. 



B. G. Gold has opened a law office at 217-219 
St. Paul street. 



St. Paul 8794 



1243-53 CALVERT BLDG. 



Time certainly brings about some M-onderful 
changes. Who could ask for a more striking 
example of this than is the case -sVith our own 
"Josh" Hull? "Josh's" father, during the 
extreme youth of his son, had planned a minis- 
terial career for him. He even went so far 
as to build a small church at Halethorpe, con- 
taining pictures of "Josh's" ancestei-s in the 
stained glass Avindows. But Avhen the time ar- 
rived for a decision "Josh's" piety and maid- 
enly reserve had fled, and he flatly turned down 
his father's offer to spread the Gospel to the 
natives of Halethorpe. A new light had 
dawned upon liim. He would become a notary 
public and attorney-at-law. To the tune of 
the weeps and wails and gnashing of molars of 
his parents, he hied himself to the secretary's 
office and enrolled as a student in the Law 
School. From that time he seemed to seek a 
lower plane, drifting down and down, associat- 
ing with Magers and smoking "Two Orphans" 
cigars. The final degradation, however, oc- 
curred at Practice Court on October 16, when 
he was "balled out" bj' Mr. Sappington for 
using some naughtj' Avords.in a conversation 
with a classmate while Mr. Sappington was 
also trying to do some talking. We fear the 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



77 



worst, as "Josh" has reached the stage where 
he openly admits that he is tough. The class 
has appointed a committee of three, composed 
of Hepbron, Wortsehe and O'Donohne. to save 
him from total destruction. 



Law student, addressing the law librarian : 
"Have you a book containing the ten com- 
mendments to the ITnited States Constitution?" 



Dental — Graduate. 

In recognition of an item in the last issue of 
the Gazette, may we say to the management 
that we are not envious of your responsibility 
for the publication of the Gazette. We recog- 
nize the vast amount of time and trouble it en- 
tails and do not feel that the honor is commen- 
surate with it. The managers must make sac- 
rifices that few are willing to nmke, and any 
criticism prompted by intei'-departmental jeal- 
ousies are far from charitable and thoughtlessly 
unjust. Let us say that the dental department 
is grateful for your interest in all, and we will 
work in no small way to help .you and assure 
you of no envy or covetousness on our part. 

Inter-departmental jealousies are not com- 
patible with the high tone intellectuality of 
Avorthy professional men. Lets get together on 
the Gazette Alumni Association, Academic Day, 
Glee Club, and Glee Club Concert Dance, and 
thus make things move. In union there is 
strength, in disruption there is failure. 

That Glee Club reminds us, Mr. Editor, St. 
John's was invited to take part in the Glee 
Club Concert Dance program of last year. Mr. 
Cocco, director of the orchestra, personally 
made a visit to Annapolis and invited the boys 
to participate, but because of so many of the 
members having made arrangements for Easter 
vacation, the invitation was not accepted. 

It is to be hoped that many of the young men 
of the University will be seen at the annual 
reception to college men in Baltimore, which 
will be given November 6th, at Fayette Street 



! LUTHER B. BENTON 

( 
I 
t 
t 



Dental Depot 



I students' Outfits 
{ a Specialty 



305 North Howard St. j 



LEFRANC & AULT 



SELL 

INTER-WOVEN 1 =^=^^ 
HOLEPROOF HOSIERY 

AT THE 



ONYX 



1 

J 



"SHIRT SHOP" 

421 N. Howard St., at Franklin 



Methodist Church. Last year's reception was 
a great success, but this year promises much 
more than last. 

The student is ever welcome at Rev. Murray's 
church, and will always feel at home to find so 
many of his friends there. Practically all the 
male voices in the choir are University men ; 
an organized Bible class of University men, 
meets each Sunday afternoon with Dr. Murray 
as leader; a students" debating club meets in 
the Sunday School room of the church each 
Friday evening. Attend one or all of these or- 
ganizations and keep up your habits. 

A movement is on foot to arrange a ' ' benefit 
night ' " at the Academy of Music later on, the 
proceeds to go to the Glee Club. Look for an- 
nouncements and support the good cause. . 



Dental — Senior. 

John J. Pureed, Jr., President of last year's 
Junior class, went to Albany, N. Y. to attend 
the Seventeenth Convention of the Phi Sigma 
Kappa Fraternity. He was a delegate from 



A. H. PETTING 

Manufacturer of 

GREEK LETTER FRATERNITY JEWELRY 

213 N. Liberty St., = Baltimore, Md. 
Factory: 212 Little Sharp St. 






Memorandum package sent to any fraternity member through the 
secretary of the chapter. Special designs and estimates furnished on 
medals, rings and pins for athletic meets, etc. 



78 



THE UNrV^ERSITY GAZETTE. 



!> 



quA 



IeIDiehl 

Clothes 



:i ,ii i ,a i ,!jjjj, i j, i ,i,ij, i j .i. i . i .i. i . i . i .mj. | 



built at 605 W. Baltimore St., 
just around the corner from the 
University, are kept pressed with- 
out cost. 

Suits $15 to $40 



Eta Chapter. Dr. C. A. Ruppersberger, who 
was also iu Albany during the convention, was 
highly entertained in Troj-, by Drs. Pieper and 
Bristol of last year's class. 



Miss Roof went to New York City, just be- 
fore school opened. 



Miss McKeown was a week late in returning 
to school. Many of the boj's were anxious 
about her, for reports went around that she was 
going to change schools. 



B. B. Smith is working in Newark. N. J., and 
will not return until November 1st. 



Mr. J. A. Daville, a new member of our class 
this year, has been attending the Texas Dental 
College, during the past two years. We are 
glad to have him with us this year. 


Dental — Junior. 

Back again, ready for a hard year's work, in 
the classrooms as Well as in the Infirmary and 
Laboratories. 



Hart Schaffner & Marx, 
Kuppenheimer, 
"Society Brand" 



The clothes that college men 
like a lot 



Bjlllmore 6trcel At Charles 



This time we come as Juniors, not the green 
trembling Freshmen that we were a year ago, 
but real Juniors who are privileged to shout 
"Freshmen Out" and to wear mustaches un- 
molested. There are two of our number miss- 
ing : Parks, who has decided to complete his 
course at the B. C. D. S., and Gareau. who has 
as yet not been heard from. 

"Do unto others as they have done unto you" 
is our motto, and I can surelj' say that the 
Freshmen have received their welcome in the 
manner which we appreciated so much last 
year. They were not welcomed by barbarous 
hazing, but with a grasping of hands, and made 
to feel that they are welcome to Old Maryland. 
I am sure that every man in our class feels 
much better than if the Freshies had been 
painted and dolled up like monkeys as in former 
years. 

N. B. — Hence we are becoming civilized, 
proving that upper classmen are not so wild as 
they are thought to be. 



Any Freshman desiring assistance of any 
kind in his work at College, can have it free of 
charge by applying to anj' one of the Juniors. 



Mr. Sowers, of our class, who was threatened 
with typhoid fever the first of the month, and 
compelled to spend a short while in the hospi- 
tal, is with us again working harder than ever. 



Mr. Harry Burns, of this class, took a short 
trip to New York last week. He claims to have 
had a "derned good time." Went to two 
motion picture shows, and stayed up one night 
till nigh on to nine-thirty. "He's a devil. By 
heck!" 



Instead of asking the unfortunate ones 
whether the re-exams, were hard, ask Funder- 
burk when he is going to change boarding 
houses again. 

He wishes me to state that he is now at the 
Kentucky. How long he will remain there he 
did not say. Pete's is next I suppose. ' 



Things Juniors should do: — 
I. — Get the medical branches off, namely : 
Physiology, Materia Medica. Chemistry and 
Anatomy. 

II. — Put your best efforts in all of your spec- 
imen work. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



79 



8. w Saratoga St 







III. — Do all the Operative Dentistry you can 
without slighting your studies. 
IV. — Attend all lectures. 



The Junior class has held its election, and 
the following men will endeavor to serve ns 
as best their ability and time permits : 

A. C. Albert, W. Va., President. 

R. P. Darwin, S. C, Vice-President. 

W. E. Bean, N. Y., Secretary. 

H. W. Burns, Vt., Treasurer. 

R. Brown, N. J., Historian. 

T. J. Harper, S. C. Sergeant-at-Arms. 

C. I. Brandon, Jamaica, Artist. 



A. Z. Aldridge has again been appointed edi- 
tor to the University Gazette. 



Being a Junior means : 
No more dissecting at night. 
Work in the Infirmary. 
Raise mustaches and look intelligent. 
Bulldozing Freshmen as to how much you 
know, and harder work and more of it. 



Pharmacy — Graduate, 

We regret very much to hear that Dr. Dun- 
ning has tendered his resignation as a member 
of the faculty of the pharmacy department. 

Dr. Dunning has been connected with the 
school for a number of years as quiz master 
in chemistry, and filled that chair with great 
credit to himself and the school. He was a 
great favorite with the students and was one 
of the most popular members of the faculty. 
Dr. Dunning "s reasons for resigning were due 
to the fact of the great pressure of outside 
business. 

He is a member of the well-known firm of 
Hynson, Westcott & Co., and has charge of the 
pharmacy laboratory. It has been due to his 
most diligent and excellent work in their 
laborator.y that they have been able to exploit 



Intercollegiate Bureau of Academic Costume, Aibany.N.Y 
COTRELL & 



LEONARD 

Official Mal(ers of 

Caps and 

Gowns 




Correct Hoods 
for All Degrees. 

Rich Gowns for 
Pulpit and Bench. 

Bulletin, Samples 
etc. on request 



certain specialties upon the market. The most 
familiar product of his labor is the Bulgara 
tablet, which was made and perfected by Dr. 
Dunning. We wish to extend our heartfelt 
thanks for the time, patience and labor that 
he has expended in our behalf, and wish him 
the greatest success in his future work. 



Wednesday, December 11, has been set aside 
as Academic Da.y, and we wish to impress upon 
pharmacy graduates that it is their duty to 
attend the exercises, if possible, and make a 
creditable showing for our department. 



The pharmacy department is one of the de- 
partments which has an exceedingly large 
freshmen class. We attribute this showing to 
the good work of the faculty and their earnest 
attempt to place the pharmacy department on 
a high and efficient plane. They have taken 
every opportunity to enlarge their course and 
entrance requirements, so as to make their 
school one of the leading pharmacy schools of 
the country. I think it the duty of every grad- 
uate and student to co-operate with the faculty 
and help to make our Pharmacy School the 
leading department of the University. 



Lest we forget : There will be a general ban- 
quet on Academic night, December 11, 1914, so 
please save up your pennies and hire your 
evening dress suit and be there in all your 
splendor and glory. 



Academic — Graduate. 
Lieutenant Ronald E. Fisher, one of our 
former commandants, is spending his furlough 
in Annapolis. He is an officer in the Fourteenth 
Cavalry, and up to the time when his leave be- 
gan, he was stationed on the Mexican border. 
He. expects to be with us until November. 



On Sunday evening, October 11th, Prof. S. 
Cobb, addressed the Y. M. C. A. His subject 



80 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



ivas "Turkey and the Turks." Prof. Cobb has 
lived in Constantinople, and thoroughly under- 
stands the Turkish customs. His talk was most 
interesting and instructive. 



Four members of the class of 1914 are taking 
up the study of law at the University of Marj-- 
laud. They are Godfrey Child, D. E. Smith, 
William Woodward, and L. Q. C. Lamar. 



Three members of the same class have entered 
the Hopkins Medical School. They are R. L. 
Hobbs, former editor-in-chief of the " Colle- 
gian. ■" W. D. Noble, and B. M. Cecil. 



The following members of our alumni have 
visited us since the College opened : — Philip 
Alger, 13; Godfrey Child, 14; B. M. Cecil, 14; 
E. L. Crum, 13 ; J. Caminero, ex- 14; C. C. Dor- 
sey, ex-14; A. W. Joyce, 13: G. W. Gering. 
13; W. D. Noble. 14; A. A. Gladden, ex- 13; 
L. Q. C. Lamar, 14 ; R. Y. Hoffman. 13 ; W. S. 
Fitzgerald, 13 ; F. S. Matthews. 13 : E. L. Yost. 
ex-14; "Robbie"' Welch and J. A. Stevens. 
"Robbie" Welch is now a medical student at 
the University of Maryland. This is his second 
year at the University. 



The old gymnasium, wliich stood for so long 
on the rear campus and about which a ver.y in- 
teresting history centered, has been torn down. 
According to tradition, it was used either as a 
dining hall for soldiers or a hospital, or both, 
during the Civil War. It was in late years 
used as a gymnasium and a dance hall, and was 
known to have the best dance floor in town. 



Mr. Harold B. Scarborough, class of 1914, of 
Girdletree, Md., has been appointed Assistant 
to the Commandant of Cadets at St. John's. 
Mr. Scarborough graduated last year with the 
degree of B. S. and is now taking a post-grad- 
uate course in mathematics and physics for an 
M. A. degree. 



Dr. Herbert D. Taylor, who Avas graduated 
from the Johns Hopkins Medical School in 
June, has been appointed professor of bacteri- 
ology and pathology at Wake Forest, North 
Carolina. 

Dr. Taylor is a Baltiraorean and a graduate 
of the. class of 1910, St, John's College, Anna- 



polis. For a time he was a member of the city 
staff" of The Baltimore Sun. Prior to going to 
Wake Forest he was engaged in dispensary 
work at Johns Hopkins Hospital. 



We are in receipt of news that Captain von 
Schwerdtner is now on the Russian frontier. 
After his arrival in Germany, he delivered a 
lecture on his trip from New Yoi'k, for the 
benefit of the Red Cross Society. He was oft'ered 
the position of Captain Quartermaster with a 
cavalry regiment, and is now stationed at one 
of the forts before Graudens, on the Yistula 
)'iver. 



Academic — Undergraduate. 

The iirst scholastic month of the year ended 
October 24th. Marks show that the Academic 
work so far is very satisfactory. Improvements 
have lately been added to the Chemistry Lab- 
oratorj'-, which Avill help to make the work in 
this department still more practical. 



At this early date the military ti'aiuing has 
made more than usual progress. It compares 
very favorably Avith the work last year, which 
was highly complimented by Captain Schindel. 
who made the Annual Military Inspection. Only 
one college in the country received a better re- 
l^ort than St. John's. 



The St. John's football team has so far played 
three games and emerged victorious in every 
contest. In the first game of the season. Rock 
Hill received an overwhelming defeat by the 
score of 60 to 7. In the next game at Wash- 
ington, St. John's won from the Catholic Uni- 
versity, 3 to 0. A decisive victory was won 
from the Pennsylvania ililitary College at 
Chester, on October 17th; score, 35 to 0. 

The back field has been showing speed and 
shrewdness, and with the help of the ends, the 
forward pass is being used very effectively. It 
was feared that the line would be weak, but by 
the hard and consistent work of Captain Selby, 
the players, though light, are working together 
and making a line of remarkable strength. 



Several graduates of St. Jolui's who are now 
in the Harvard Law School are doing excellent 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



81 



work. Among these are W. S. Blades, 'lU; W. 
Lentz, '12 ; J. P. Pinkerton, '10, who has lately 
won a faculty scholarehip, and C. Magnider, 
13, recently awarded the Langdell Scholarship 
by the Harvard Club of Maryland. Magruder 
is one of the honor men in his class, and was 
among those elected to the editorial board of 
the Harvard Review. At Harvard, to be chosen 
to the Law Review is the highest honor that a 
Law School man can get. In a friendly letter 
lately received from the President of Harvard 
University, Dr. Fell was informed of the suc- 
cess of St. John's men in the Harvard Law 
School. 



A bronze tablet to the memory of Pi'ancis 
Scott Key, the gift of the Alumni Association 
of St. John's College, was unveiled shortly 
after four o'clock Monday afternoon, Octobei' 
19th. The tablet was placed to the right of the 
main entrance of McDowell Hall, on the College 
Campus, and the exercises were well attended 
by the cadet battalion of the College, many 
Alumni, together with citizens arid school chil- 
dren of Annapolis. 

The unveiling ceremony assumed something 
of the nature of a dual celebration, as that day 
was also Peggy Stewart Day, the one luuidred 
and fortieth anniversary of the burning of the 
brig, Peggy Stewart, in the Annapolis harbor. 
The exercises were held on the front porch of 
McDowell Hall. Dr. James D. Iglehart. of Bal- 
timore, presided and made the presentation 
addrss. Bishop Murray, of Baltimore, offered 
the invocation. 

In the absence of Governor Goldsborougb, 
the tablet was accepted on behalf of the Collego 
by Dr. Fell. The principal address was made 
by Philemon H. Tuck, of Baltimore, a member 
of the Board- of Visitoi-s and 6overnoi-s of St. 
John 's. 

A number of members of the Peggy Stewart 
'I'ea Party Chapter, Daughters of the American 
Revolution of Annapolis, attended the cere- 
monies, and Mrs, Weems Ridout spoke. 

WILLIAM J. MILLER 
Jewelry, Diamonds, Watches 

College Jewelry 

Class Pins and Rings, College Seals 

28 East Baltimore St. Baltimore, Md. 



The tablet is three by three and a half feet. 
It was selected by a committee of the Alumni, 
and bears the following inscription : 

1814 1914 

FRANCIS SCOTT KEY, 

1780 1843 

CLASS OF 1796 

Author of the "'Star Spangled Banner" 

In loving memory of her distinguished son. 
whose eulogy is Avithin the heart of the nation, 
and whose fame has spread thi'oughout the 
world. This tablet is erected by the Alumni 
Association of St. John's College. 



NURSING. 



Miss Pearl Weaver, class of 1914, has beeu 
ai)pointed Seeretarj- of Associated Charities, of 
Ashville, X. C. 



Miss Lucy B. Squires, class of 1909, of Blue- 
tield, W, Ya.. has been spending several days 
in the citv. 



Miss Katherine Shea, class of 1913, is enjoy- 
ing her vacation at her home in Springfield, 
Mass., and will return to the hospital on the 
first of November. 



Miss E. Jennie Guerrant has returned to the 
Nurses' Club, 21 North Carey Street, after sev- 
eral months' absence from the citv. 



Misses Colbourne, Roussey, Murray, Shelto)i. 
Ryan. Sprecher. Margaret Erwin, Zepp. Weber 
and Hudnall, class of 1914, have taken the 
Fall State Board Examinations for nurses. 



Misses Elsie MeCann, Margaret Erwin, Edith 
Erwin, and Shelton. are located at 1403 Madi- 



son avenue. 



R LLERBRQCK 

alt|p IGfaiitng (EoUpgp piiotograptjpr 
22 W. Lexington St., = Baltimore, Md. 



82 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



Y. M. C. A. 



■ 



At the opening of school, the Y. M. C. A., as 
has been the custom, had a man stationed in 
Davidge Hall for the purpose of being of as- 
sistance to the new men who wished informa- 
tion concerning rooms, board, etc. In so doing, 
the Y. M. C. A. answers a crying need of a 
"Bureau of Information"' where new comers 
may be able to find out how, when and where 
things happen here. 



"College Night" had been announced for 
Friday night, October 2nd, but it was post- 
poned until Thursday, October 6th. 

At this reception, which, by-the-way, is the 
only thing save Academic Day, held in common 
by all classes of all departments, we had 
speeches from various men of the Student body, 
the Dean of the Dental Department and visit- 
ing men of the city. It is done in order to cul- 
tivate a more friendly and open intercourse be- 
tween departments, as well as to help the Y. M. 
C. A. We had between two hundred and fifty 
and three hundred men present. All seemed to 
enjoy the speeches, and even the refreshments. 




Who 

Sells 
Keady-to-wear 



College Clothes 



New Fall Models 

Now Ready 
Prices $15 to $25 



Made to Measure 

From $20 Up 
Samples Cheerfully Given 



19 E. FAYETTE ST. 

Take Elevator 

liiriiiiiiiiiiihiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiwtiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiTiMng 



How many of you 
men are watching 
these talks of ours? 
How many of you 
are wearing those 
clothes of ours? Are 
you aware that an 
actual count will 
show a majority of 
your friends dressed 
in Hamburger Suits — 
in Hamburger overcoats? 
WHY are they? 
Think it over! 

Baltimore & Hanover Sts. 



which were served in the lower room of the 
building. 

The different Bible classes that are conducted 
under the auspices of the Y. M. C. A. are re- 
jiorted with bright prospects. We would like 
to see each man belong to one of these, as they 
are very interesting and instructive. 

The membership has grown slightly, but we 
expect to have a campaign in which we will 
put forth our effort to have each man join. 

The prospects are good, and everything 
points to a great year for the Y. M. C. A. We 
all believe and realize that it is a great force 
for good, and though it may not always make 
a great show, yet it does work reaUy worth 
while! 



Quips. 

Did you notice how wide-awake some of us 
are? We find the wooden tiers in the amphi- 
theatre of a feathery softness, and sleep is 
dearer to us than skin. Apropos: A Monday 
in October, and pleasant music from top row. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



S3 



Sou! Get dowu to work. And lug 

The big 
Book home. Get to Ijusiue.ss. Plug! 

And dig! 

H. M. R. 



1 saw a charming widow, 

She wore some charming hose; 
She hugged me tight, and kissed me right. 
And I woke up from a doze. 
Usual luck. 

H. M. R. 



Who is the difference between a knife and 
a college man? Answer — Because the more 
you grind a knife the sharper it gets ; the more 
a C. M. grinds the duller he gets. No argu- 
ment, Jio — no con! 



1. 
Have no money. 

Lost my job ; 
Lost my fingers. 

Cannot rob. 

2. 
Lost a bully 

Appetite ; 
Lost both arms, 

Couldn't fight. ' 

3. 
Lost my supper 

(Bread and .jam) 
Lost my temper. 

Then, said . 



IT. M. Robinson. 



We are a full-fledged doctor ; we saw a case 
today. We know quite well you'll doubt us. 
but, it was a case, we say; all battered up and 
usele.ss, we almost shed a tear: but then, we 
could not help it, it was a case of beer. 



ENGAGEMENTS. 



Judge and Mrs. Henry D. Harlan, of 9 West 
Biddle street, Baltimore, Md., have announced 
the engagement of their daughter. Helen, to 
Mr. Matthew Gault, Jr., of this city. The 
wedding will take place in the fall. 



WARNER & CO. 
... I|att^r0 ... 

222-224 WEST BALTIMORE ST. 

BIRTHS. 



Recently to Dr. Leo J. Goldbach, class of 
1905, and Mrs. Goldbach, of 2217 E. Pratt street, 
a daughter — Julia Gertrude. 



Recently to Gordon E. Riggin, B. A., St. 
John 's College, and Mrs. Riggin, of Fort Wayne, 
Ind., a daughter— Anne Gordon. 



-0- 



MARRIAGES. 



Ridgely Prentiss Melvin, B. A., M. A., St. 
John's College, '99, University of Maryland 
Law School, '02, of Annapolis, Md., to Miss 
Augusta S. Burwell, of West River, Anne Arun- 
del County, Md., at West River, October 24, 
1914. After a short wedding trip, Mr. and Mrs. 
Melvin will reside at South River. 



Dr. Adolph Schumacher, professor of modern 
languages, St. John's College, to Miss Aehsah 
D. Robb, of Annapolis, Md., at Annapolis, Sep- 
tember 9, 1914. Dr. and Mrs. Schumacher spent 
their honeymoon in Philadelphia and Potts- 
town, Pa. They have taken an apax'tment in 
the Claude Flats on State Circle, where they 
will reside. 



DEATHS. 



Dr. Joseph E. Beatty. class of 1861, of Locli 
Raven, Md., died at a sanatorium outside of 
Baltimore, October 13, aged 77 years. Dr. 
Beatty was a regimental surgeon in the Civil 
War. 



Dr. Wilber Gray Smith, class of 1880, of Oak- 
land, Cal., died at his home, August 6. 1914. 
aged 55 vears. 



Henry W. Fox. LL. B., class of 1872, died ai 
his home, 1110 Bolton street, after a lingering- 
illness, September 24, 1914, aged 63 years. 



By Comparison 



We believe it will be found that, in the Selection, 
Preparation and Dispensing of Pharmaceuticals, we 
maintain a Standard in Pharmacy that is, relatively, 
as high as are the Advanced Standards of Medical 
practice and Hospital service. 

Exceptional 
Prescription Compounding 

Hynson, Westcott & Co. 

Pharmaceutical, Surgical and Hospital 
Supplies 

Charles and Franklin Linden and North 

Streets Avenues 

BALTIMORE. MARYLAND 

Scientific Therapeutic Agents : 
Bulgara Tablets, Glycotauro Capsules, Lutein Tablets 



Renal Functional Test : Phenolsulphonephthalein Ampoules 
"Nothing Too Large— Nothing Too Small " 

Baltimore City 
Printing and Binding 



352-363 Equitable Building 
fc . -i 



.Surgical and Hospital Supplies. Sick Room Supplies. 
Dental Forceps. Microscopes and Accessories. 

The Chas. Willms Surgical Instrument Co. 

300 Jf. HOWARD STREET. 

THE WESTERN NATIONAL BANK 

OF BALTIMORE 



^'°"'' ioHoite^d""""* '■♦ N. EUTAW STREET 



SONNENBURQ'S PHARMACY 

Baltimore and Greene Streets. 
ONE MINt'TE CLINICAL THERMOMETERS, 
WITH CHAIN AND GUARD PIN , 50 CENTS 

SULTAN DRUG COMPANY 

PTIARMACEUTICAb CHEMISTS, ST. LOUIS, MO. 

Manufacturers of 

PRUXOIDS S^^ENG CACTINA FILLETS 



Menu. Banquet and Dauce Cards. Commencement Invita- 
tions and Programs. Diplomas, Certificates. Engrossing. V 
of M. Stationery for Classes and Fraternities. Letter Heads. 
Envelopes. Cards, etc.. for Physicians. Lawyers and Dentists. 

J. H. DOWNS, STATIONER. 229 N. Charles St. 



Your Special Attention is directed to 

Beef, Iron and Wine with Hydropepsin, 
Liquid Pi'cine Co., Red Syr. Hypophosphites Co. 

THOMAS & THOMPSON CO. 

Manufrs and Dispensers of P ure Medicines (Wholesale and 
Retail). Cor. Baltimore and Light Sts.. Baltimore. Md. 

RESINOL OINTMENT AND RESINOL SOAP 

.\re Genuine Conit'orts to Physician and Patient Alike. 
Scud for Samples anil Try Them. 

RESINOL CHEMICAL COMPANY, Baltimore, Mri 

German Savings Bank of Baltimore City 

S. W. Cor. Baltimore and Eutaw Sts. 

Interest Paid On Deposits. 

Drovers and Mechanics' National Bank 

OF BALTIMORE. MD. 

CAPITAL . . Paid in $300,000 00 

Earned 300.000 00 $600,000 00 

EARNED SURPLUS AND PROFITS . 533,487 65 
SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES FOR RENT 

EMPLOYERS — POSITIONS WANTED 
By students in the Legal, Medical, Dental 
and Pharmaceutical Department of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland. Some are stenographers, 
bookkeepers, etc. Apply SAMUEL WANT, 
1243-1253 Calvert Building. (No charge is 
made for this service.) 



Vol. 1. 



BALTIMORE, MD., DECEMBER 1, 1914. 



No. (I 




EUNIYERSITY 




DEVOTED 
TOTHE INTERESTS OF 
THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Buie 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



Vol. I. 



DECEMBER 1, 1914. 



No. 6. 



CONTENTS 



OUR FIRST FIVE-YEAR REUNION. 

H. M. Robinson, M.D 87 

REMARKS OF PROF. RANDOLPH 
WINSLOW TO THE CLASS OF 
1909 88 

ACADEMIC DAY 89 

ADDRESS OF DEAN HENRY D HAR- 
LAN in Presenting James Walter 
Thomas for the Degree of Doctor of 
Letters at the Academic Day Exer- 
cises, November 11, 191-1 90 



POST MORTEM OF SIR TURK 90 

EDITORIALS 91 

"For Men Are Prone to Go It Blind." 

Our University Library. 

EDITORIALETS' 93 

FRATERNITY NOTES 92 

ITEMS 93 

QUIPS 102 

BIRTHS 103 

MARRIAGES 103 

DEATHS 103 



Footwear for the College Man at Moderate Price. 



N. HESS' SONS 



8 E, Baltimore, St. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE, MD. 

HON. PHILLIPS LEE GOLDSBOROUGH, Governor of Maryland, Chancellor. 
THOMAS FELL, A. M., Ph. D., L L. D., D. C. L., Provost. 



ST. JOHN'S COLLEGE, Annapolis, Md. (^^° 



EPARTME~ 
S AND set 



T OF \ 

lENCES / 



Founded 1696. Classical and Scientific College Courses leading to d ;grees. Special advantages to stu- 
dents purposing to study the professions. Military Department under army officers. Also Preparatory 
School for boys fitting for St. John's or other colleges. Term begins Sep! I'mber 21. Address 

THOMAS FELL, Ph.D., LL.D., D.C.L., President. 



DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE. 

Four vears' graded course. New Laboratory Build- 
ing. Clinical advantages unsurpassed. Teaching Staff 
of 66. loSth Annual Session will begin October i, 
[914, and continue S months 

R. DORSEY COALE, Ph.D., M.D., Dtan. 

DEPARTMENT OF DENTISTRY. 

33d Annual Session begins October i, 1914. and 
continues 7 months. 26 Instructors. New Building. 
For catalogue containing course of study, etc., apply to 

TIMOTHY O. HEATWOLE, M.D., D.D.S., Dean, 

Baltimore, Md. | 



DEPARTMENT OF LAW. 

59th Annual Session will begin Sept. 28, 1914. Faculty 
of 26. For catalogue containing full information ad- 
dress the Secretary, 301 St. Paul Street, Baltimore, 
Maryland. 

EDWIN T. DICKERSON, Secretary. 



DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACY. 

(Formerly Maryland College of Pharmacy). 72nd 
Annual Session begins September 25, 1914. 11 In- 
structors. New Laboratories. Address 

"^ CHARLES CASPARI, JR., Phar.D., Dean, 

Baltimore, Md., 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 

Published Monthly in the Interest of the University of Maryland. 
PRICE $1.00 PER YEAR. 



Contributions solicited from Alumni of the 
University. 



Business Address, 608 Professional Buildine, 
Baltimore, Md. 



Vol. I. 



BALTIMORE, MD., DECEMBER 1, 1914. 



No. 6 



OUR FIRST FIVE-YEAR REUNION. 



H. M. Robinson, M.D., '09. 



"Veni, Vidi, Vici." 

For five long years members of the Class of 
1909, scattered to the four corners of the earth, 
had labored in the interests of humanity, both 
jjersonal and impersonal, some as superintendents 
of hospitals, others in public health work, others 
of the poor (or rich in thanks) class that minister 
to individual wants. As we have before said, our 
class was and is one to be proud of, and while at 
times there were little rifts in the faith we had of 
? reunion, yet, in the main, we felt that, all 
things considered, we would be able to come to- 
gether once more. And our faith was justified. 
Twenty-two members returned. Twenty-two 
pairs of hands clasped in all honesty and hearti- 
i;ess. 

We met Tuesday morning. A few of us were 
present when Fritz Rankin did an appendectomy 
under local anesthesia; more of us foregathered 
in Dr. Winslow's office, and we were all present 
when words of welcome were offered us by the 
difi"erent professors of our school days. Prof. 
Charles W. Mitchell was the first to address us. 

Before saying anything he walked to the board 
and wrote "Page 480." I think it is needless to 
remind you all what that means. For it can 
mean nothing if not the fact that our school days 
will never be forgotten, and that each little inci- 
dent will always be magnified in our minds and 
associated with wonderful companionships. 

Following Professor jMitchell, Prof. J. C. Hem- 
meter addressed us, first tendering the members 
of the class an invitation to his country home, 
which we regretted to decline, as our banquet fell 
on the day of the invitation. 

Professor Winslow then spoke to us, dwelling 
chiefly on the fact that we were not returning to 



"old camping grounds," but to O. C. G.'s made 
new by numerous improvements. 

Professor Shipley followed with a few words 
of greeting, after which Professor Winslow took 
the class around to view the various improve- 
ments in the hospital, the yard and the dis- 
pensary. 

And we wish to mention here that we almost 
regret the improvements that have really done 
away with old associations, to a large extent. 
True, the old must always give way to the new, 
yet we may and do treasure the old. 

Reuniting in the evening for our theatre box 
party, we occupied three boxes with the nurses 
of our hospital (1909) class, enjoying "Zieg- 
feld's Follies." And it was a good show. Even 
the trite things made us laugh, for we were 
happy. 

The nurses were in full regalia and fully en- 
joyed everything. We trust that this will always 
be a part of our program. 

Those present were : 

blisses — 

Grace Tull, 

Catherine Dukes, 

Laura Chapline, 

Emily Ely, 

Vera Wright, 

Lillie Carter (Mrs. Hopkins), 

Gertrude Tews (Mrs. Cole), 

Elizabeth Getzendanner. 

The next day, Wednesday, was Academic Day, 
and it must have been the effects of the theatre 
affair, because very few showed up to give, as 
we intended, our class yell. 

And, lastly, our banquet at the Rennert. 

Our repast began at 8.45. Though only here 
and there (at first) were offered scattered mor- 
sels of anecdotes of the days leading to 1909, yet, 
as courses progressed, our tongues loosened and 
reminiscences were abundant. Many of the little 



88 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



follies that abound in a college man's life were 
aired. We acted what we were, a reunited frag- 
ment of a family. Every man but Schweinsberg 
and Johnny Walkup regaled us with a tale. Even 
Peanuts loosened up. Even the best of events 
must cease, so our banquet drew to a close. 
It was resolved : 

1. Tliat some souvenir or token of our five- 
year reunion be made and distributed to the come- 
back members. 

2. That our next reunion be held in 1919. 

It is our regret that only one of our class presi- 
dents was present, Jack Norman, and we hope 
that Gibson and Joe Hooper can be with us at 
our next affair. 

Lastly, we wish to make mention of one "fly 
in the ointment." Strosnider, one of the fbiest 
and most loyal members of our class, appeared 
on the scene one day too late. Arrived at the 
U. H. Thursday morning, November 12, 1914. 

We trust we can make better connection with 
Stro next time. 

That Strosnider and Norman came from North 
Carolina, Robertson from Virginia, Walkup from 
Florida, Shankwiler from Michigan, etc., etc., are 
facts which we are verj' proud of. Those pres- 
ent were : 

George Bennett, 
Paul Brown, 
Arthur Cannon, 
Fuzzy Fehsenfcld, 
Harry Gantt, 
Morris Green, 
\\'illiani Martin, 
Jack Norman, 
Nelse Osborne, 
Bill Queen, 
Fritz Rankin, 
Peanuts Ro1)inson, 
John Robertson, 
Pop Russel, 
John Schweinsberg, 
Claude Smink, 
Shunk Shankwiler, 
C. F. Strosnider, 
Fritz A^inup, 
Johnny Walkuji, 
Dud Willse, 
Gene Wright. 



Remarks of Prof. Randolph Winslow to the 
Class of 1909. 



And so endeth our first five-vear reunion. 



TTT 



Gentlemen of the Class of 1909: 

I heartily reciprocate the sentiments just ex- 
pressed by Professor Hemmeter, but I differ 
from him in one particular. He invited you to 
inspect the old halls and to visit the old wards. 
Since you graduated w-e have made many changes 
and improvements and have practically made our 
\''ards new. I invite you, therefore, to visit our 
new wards and see the many improvements that 
have been made. Last year was the most pros- 
perous one in the history of the Medical School, 
?nd there were 472 persons enrolled as students. 
This was due to two factors, ( i ) the merger 
with the Baltimore Medical College, through 
which we gained, perhaps, 130 students; (2) the 
fact that it was the last year in which students 
could be admitted on a four-}ear high school 
diploma, and many took advantage of this to 
escape the higher requirements. On the ist of 
January, 1914, the new educational requirement 
of graduation from a four-year high school, with 
an additional year of college work in chemistry, 
physics, biology and French or German, went 
into effect. In consequence of this, we have a 
very small freshman class this year. The other 
three classes are full. When I entered as a stu- 
dent in 1S71 there were no preliminary require- 
ments, unless, perhaps, it was that of being able 
to plough a straight furrow or to hoe a good row. 
There were, however, many most excellent stu- 
dents at that time, who have made their mark 
since. The first school to establish a preliminary 
examination for admission was the little A\'oman's 
Medical College of Baltimore, now extinct, in 
1883, 'o"R before almost any other medical school 
in this country. In 1892 the LTniversity of Mary- 
land adopted a three years' graded course, and in 
1895 increased it to four years. The preliminary 
educational recjuirements have been graduallv 
raised from nothing to the present standard. By 
next session prospective students will have had 
time to acquire the necessary qualifications, and 
we believe our next freshman class will be of the 
normal size. 

I congratulate you upon the presence of so 
many of your class on the occasion of your fifth 
anniversary. We are glad to see you, and hope 
that you may return to your Alma Mater not only 
every five years but every year. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



89 



ACADEMIC DAY. 



The one hundred and twenty-fifth anniversary 
of the opening of St. John's College, at Annapo- 
lis, the Department of Arts and Sciences of the 
University of Maryland, was observed with 
Academic Day exercises at Westminster Presby- 
terian Church, November ii, 1914. The entire 
Faculty and student body of the University par- 
ticipated in the exercises, and the occasion pre- 
sented a spectacle of much life and spirit. 

The Faculty and students of St. John's College 
left Annapolis at 8.45 A. M. on special cars of 
the Baltimore and Annapolis Short Line, and ar- 
rived in Baltimore at 9.30. Without delay the 
companies were fonned and the students marched 
up the street, with the band playing, until they 
reached the University campus on Lombard 
street, where they waited for the procession to be 
formed. 

At 10 o'clock the academic procession, headed 
by the college band, began the march to West- 
minster Church. This procession consisted of 
the following L^niversity groups in the order 
named : The students of the Department of Arts 
and Sciences, St. John's College ; students of the 
Department of Medicine, students of the Depart- 
ment of Law, students of the Department of 
Dentistry, students of the Department of Phar- 
macy, Alumni of the University of Maryland. 
Faculties and Adjunct Faculties, Governors of 
St. John's College, the Regents of the LTniver- 
sity of Maryland, the Provost, orators and guests 
of the University of Maryland. 

As the procession entered the church. Organist 
Robert LeRoy Haslup, of Brown Memorial Pres- 
byterian Church, began the coronation march 
from Svendsen. After the invocation by the pas- 
tor, Rev. D. Everett Lyon, a quartet consisting 
of Messrs. Edgar T. Paul, ITbbart Smock, John 
H. Richardson and Dr. B. Merrill Hopkinson. 
sang "O for a Closer Walk With God." 

The address of welcome was given by the Pro- 
vost, Dr. Thomas Fell. He extended his greet- 
ings to the members of all the Faculties and to 
all the students, expressing his satisfaction with 
the growth and progress made by the University. 

He referred to the fact that the day was 
the 125th anniversary of the opening of St. John's 
College, on the nth of November, 1789, and de- 
scribed the scene of the dedicatory ceremonies on 



that day. He also pointed out that the Right 
Reverend John Carroll, first Roman Catholic 
Archbishop ; Dr. Williamson Smith, of the Prot- 
estant Episcopal Church, and Rev. Patrick Alli- 
son, of the Presbyterian Church, were among the 
original members of the Board of Visitors, and 
that Bishop Carroll was elected President of the 
Board. 

Twenty years later, in 1807, a Medical School 
was established in Baltimore, very largely due to 
the efforts and activities of St. John's College. 
Five years later, in 1812, the University of Mary- 
land, with this school as its base, was instituted in 
the city of Baltimore. 

The next number on the program was a duet 
for two tenor voices, by Messrs. Paul and Smock. 

The principal address of the occasion was de- 
livered by Dr. James W. Thomas, of Cumberland, 
Md. Dr. Thomas is an alumnus of the Law De- 
partment of the University of Maryland, also an 
historian and author of "Chronicles of Colonial 
Maryland." His subject for Academic Day was 
"Some of Maryland's Contributions to American 
History." This he considered in three phases: 
First, the imprint Maryland's colonv made on the 
nation : secondly, the part the State played in 
winning American independence ; and, thirdly, 
the Commonwealth in its formative period and its 
influence on the life of the nation. 

Then was given a baritone solo by Dr. B. 
Merrill Hopkinson, followed by an address on 
"Groningen University" by Dr. Frank Martin. 

The quartet sang a selection entitled "Sing 
Alleluia Forth." Then followed a very interest- 
ing feature of the celebration, which was the un- 
veiling of a large oil painting by Irving Ward 
of Prof. Eugene F. Cordell, who died August 27, 
1913. Dr. Cordell was professor of the History 
of Medicine at the University and at one time 
president of the Medical and Chirurgical Faculty 
of Maryland. The presentation of the portrait 
was made by Dr. John C. Hemmeter, of the Fac- 
ulty, who, in an address, told of the many sterling 
qualities possessed by Dr. Cordell, and of his 
loss, not only to the University, but to the medical 
profession at large. 

The speaker of the occasion was then honored 
by the University by having conferred upon him 
the honorary degrees of Doctor of Letters and 
Doctor of Laws. Former Judge Henry D. Har- 
lan, now Dean of the Law School of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland, presented Dr. Thomas for 
the degrees. 



90 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



The benediction was pronounced by the Rev. 
Kenneth G. Murray, pastor of Fayette Street 
Methodist Episcopal Church. The organist then 
played "JXIarche Royale," and the students re- 
mained standing during the exit of the Provost, 
Regents, orators, guests and various faculties and 
alumni. 

Luncheon was provided for the St. John's stu- 
dents in the chapel room adjoining the church. 
The faculties of the College and University, and 
the Board of Regents, with invited guests, gath- 
ered at the Hotel Emerson for the annual 
luncheon. 

o 

ADDRESS OF DEAN HENRY D. HARLAN 
IN PRESENTING JA^MES WALTER 
THO:\IAS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOC- 
TOR OF LETTERS AT THE ACADE:\HC. 
DAY ENERGISES, NO\'EMBER ii, 1914- 



Mr. Provost: 

It has been an immemorial custom for univer- 
sities on festal occasions to bestow upon men of 
learning personal tokens of appreciation and 
gratitude. In conformity to this usage this Uni- 
versity desires to place upon its honor list on this 
occasion the name of one who has given much 
time to historical study and particularly to writing 
an accurate account of important incidents in the 
liistor\- of Colonial [Maryland, and I have the 
privilege in accordance with the mandate of the 
Regents of presenting to you and of asking you 
10 admit to the degree of Doctor of Letters in 
tliis University honoris causa, James Walter 
Thomas, of Cumberland, ^laryland — lawyer, 
scholar, historian, a bachelor of letters of St. 
John's College, a man of affairs, a speaker of 
force and grace, a master of style, successful in 
his profession, for fifteen years president of the 
\\'estern Maryland Hospital, for six years presi- 
tient of the Board of School Commissioners of 
Allegheny County and otherwise prominent and 
useful in the life of the communitv where he 
dwells. 1 tearing in his veins the blood of three 
Colonial Governors of Maryland — Leonard Cal- 
\ert, ^^'illiam Stone and Robert Brook — it was 
not strange that the events of the period in which 
they lived should have attracted his deepest in- 
terest, and, touched bv the Muse of Historv, that 



h.e should have been led, after- exhaustive investi- 
gation, to write the Chronicles of Colonial Mary- 
land. In this Avork he has made what those com- 
petent to judge have pronounced "a valuable 
contribution to Maryland history and to Ameri- 
can literature." 

In recognition of the work of this scholar in 
the fields of historical research and narrative, I 
ask, sir, that he may be admitted to the degree 
for which he has been recommended. 



POST INIORTEM OF SIR TURK. 

T'hanksgibin' day am ober, 
Sir Turkey he am went; 
Our hearts am sad and sober, 
^\"e miss de poor ol' gent. 

But 'deed tho' he wuz yelpin'. 
We helped him leave dese banks 
To gib us folks more helpin', 



And we all gib t'anks. 



-H. M. R.. '09. 



THE PUBLIC ROLLER TOWEL. 

Roll on thou stiff and dark old towel-roll, 

A hundred hands are wiped on thee each ray; 

Thou leavest mystic records, like a scroll. 
And finger prints of all who pass thy way. 

And where be those who saidst thou should not 
stay ? 
The}' pass, but thou rollest thy length immense. 

— From "Judge." 

Sight, smell and taste plays big 
part in digestion. 

Eating is a matter of the sympa- 
thetic nerves. "No profit is where 
no pleasure is taken." 

POSITIVELY we feed you BET- 
TER at LESS COST and IN THE 
CLEANEST environment than any 
one has ever done before since 
time began. 

BRIGHTON LUNCH 

14 N. HOWARD STREET 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



91 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 

A MONTHLY JOURNAL 
, Devoted to the interests of the University 
of Maryland. 

Subscription Price, $1.00 Per Annum, In Advance 

Reprints Furnished At Cost 

Advertising Rates Submitted Upon Request. 

608 Professional Building 

BALTIMORE. MD. 

Editorial Board. 

H. M. ROBINSON, M.D Editor-in-Chief. 

NATHAN WINSLOW, M.D Managing Editor. 

Graduate Members. 

THOMAS FELL, LL.D Academic. 

STAN WOOD COBB, B.A Academic. 

ALBERT H. CARROLL, M.D Medical. 

F. J. VALENTINE, D.D.S Dental. 

J. BEN ROBINSON, D.D.S Dental. 

SAMUEL WANT, LL. B Law. 

A. A. SONNENBURG, Phar.D Pharmacy. 

J. M. BRANSKY, Phar.D Pharmacy. 

M. E. SULLIVAN, R.N Nursing. 

Undergraduate Members. 

C. V. WILSON Academic. 

H. GOLDMAN, '15; F. C. MARINO, 
'16; C. O. WOLF, '17 Medicinal. 

H. E. WATERMAN, 15; A. Z. ALD- 
RIDGE, '16; H. I. HAWKINS, 
'17 Dental. 

J. A. HAGGERTY,'15; B. C. LIGHT- 
NER, '15; C. N. MATTHEWS, 
'16 Law. 

A. L. STERLING, '15 Pharmacy. 

J. E. EVANS, '16 Y. M. 0. A. 

B. G. LIGHTNER, '15 Advertising. 

B. G. GOLD, '15 College Notes. 

A. G. DE QUEVEDO Latin-American. 

L. A. BUIE, '15 House Notes. 

LINDSAY ROGERS, '15 General Items. 

DECEMBER 1, 1914. 

"FOR MEN ARE PRONE TO GO IT 
BLIND." 

Most men are imitators. A few, indeed a 
rare few, strike out in new and tmtried paths. 
So in the professions the ranks and file are satis- 
fied with the gold old way of doing things. The 
method of by-gone days were siiflicient for their 
fathers and grandfathers, why not for the pres- 
ent generation? The chief function of an uni- 
versity is to produce men who see visions, not 
visionary men, btit men who add something to 
the world's knowledge. The University of Mary- 
land, and the statement is made without qualifi- 
cation, is training men to think for themselves, 
men worth-while, men who leave their impress 



Young Men's Suits 

$10, $12.50 and up to $40 
THE QUALITY SHOP 

Baltimore and Liberty Sts. 
Haberdashery of Excellence 




in the world. As examples of the University's 
contribution to the nation, mention need only 
be made of James Carroll and Weigel ; the first 
gave his life in proving yellow-fever was trans- 
mitted by mosqtnto and in no other way; the 
second, as a result of pioneer work in that mys- 
terious agency for weal or ill, the X-ray. So to- 
day, undoubtedly there are in the making 
amongst the present student body, men who will 
blaze forth new trials in their chosen profes- 
sion, men who will not follow the calf-paths of 
their predecessors. 

"For men are prone to go it blind 
Along the calf-paths of the mind, 
And work away from sun to sun 
To do what other men have done. 

"They follow in the beaten track, 
And out and in, and forth and back, 
And still their devious course pursue, 
To keep the paths that others do." 

Without self adtilation the University of Mary- 
land is willing to abide by the Scriptural injunc- 
tion, "By their fruits, ye shall know them." 
What holds true for the past, with the larger 
facilities at the command of the present faculties, 
will prove equally true in the future. The Uni- 
versity of Maryland man has always been known 
for his self-reliance in meeting emergencies, and 
the blazing forth of new trails. He has not in the 
past, nor will he in the present or future, tread 
in the paths of others. 



OUR UNIVERSITY LIBRARY, 



A new order of things has begun nntler the 
reorganization of the Library staff, and it is the 



92 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



hope of the Faculty that it will become even a 
more essential feature in student life than hereto- 
fore. 

Mrs. Ruth Lee Briscoe, the librarian-in-chief, 
will have the responsibility of the Medical Li- 
brary, with the assistance of Mr. George O. 
Blome ('14) and Mr. Ellis Levin ('14) in the 
I/aw Library. The Library will be open from 10 
A. M. until 10 P. ]M., and students can have the 
advice of trained helpers at all times. 

In addition to a ^ledical Library of over 15.000 
volumes, there are the leading medical periodi- 
cals, which are alphabeticallv arranged on a large 
table. 

It is not generally known that the Library con- 
tains a collection of fine books non-professional 
in character (novels, travel, biography, theology, 
etc.). These have been placed in a separate case, 
and students have the privilege of enjoying them. 
Thus a little leisure between clinics or lectures 
may be filled with pleasure and profit. The Y. 
M. C. A. supplies periodicals, and it is hoped to 
augment this by a file of daily papers. 



EDITORIALETS. 

As per the notice on the bulletin boards, all 
Seniors are requested to hand in their write-ups 
for Terrae Mariae to Abe Rosenthal and J. H. 
Haggerty. As it is quite a task to get these 
V. rite-ups in their proper form, we are taking this 
opportunity to ask each man to help the editors 
as much as possible. Let us all work together 
and make this the best year book ever published 
a!" the L'niversitv. 



STYLISH and COMFORTABLE 
FOOT-WEAR 

FOR THE 

UNIVERSITY MAN 

All Leathers — Expert Fitting 
Moderate Prices 

WYMAN 

19 W. LEXINGTON STREET 



Been reading the G.^zette recently ? You want 
10 get on the roll. The only real dope on Uni- 
versity life is there. There is going to be a 
"Tightwad" campaign, and unless you want to be 
scandalized you better subscribe. This is not a 
threat ; it's a friendly tip. You know we don't 
need subscriptions, 'cause the printer prints the 
book or the paper absolutely gratis ; he just loves 
his work and won't accept any money, and of 
course the paper itself doesn't cost anything. 
Your subscription, you know, goes to give ban- 
quets and silver service to the editors and pay 
them a bi-weeklv salarv. 



FRATERNITY XOTES. 



The.^tre P.-^rtv at Fords.' 



Beta Beta Chapter of the Phi Chi Medical Fra- 
ternity will hold their Second Annual Theatre 
Party, November 30th, at Fords, to see the com- 
edy. "The Third Party." 

Many prominent physicians and surgeons of 
the University will occupy the boxes, which will 
be prettily decorated with pennants and Autumn 
leaves. 

The student body of the University will also 
attend in a large number, and many Class and 
Fraternity 3'ells will be heard during the course 
of the evening, and a very pleasant time is ex- 
pected. 



Phi Sigma KLappa News. 



Following two very successful smokers held by 
the Eta Chapter of Phi Sigma Kappa, an initia- 
tion was held on Saturday night, November 14th, 
at which the following men were added to the 
chapter roll : 

C. B. Ray, 'lo. Medical, Raleigh, N. C. ; J. R. 
Funderburk, 'IC, Dental, Cheran, S. C. ; R. T. 
z^rnest, '16, Medical, Hague, \'a. ; B. C. Lightner, 
'1.5, Law, Philadelphia, Pa.; J. W. Welsh, '16, 
Law, Cumberland, Md. 

\\'ith the opening of the 1914-15 session, the 
house was moved from 1252 Mt. Royal avenue, 
to 1036 N. Eutaw street. Never before in the 
history of the local chapter have prospects been 
so bright for a successful vear. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



93 



MEDICAL— GRADUATE. 



Succes.s in surg'ery is not tlie only and ultimate 
aim of surgeons of today. j\. goal has been fixed, 
and before that goal may be attained it is essential 
that a man's work and his professional dealings 
with other men be above reproach. We have had 
occasion heretofore to mention in detail the Amer- 
ican College of Surgeons, and now we have the 
added pleasure of mentioning that at the annual 
convention of the American College of Surgeons, 
which was held in Washington the week begin- 
ning November i6th, more than 600 surgeons 
from all parts of the United States and Canada 
were admitted as Fellows into the college, among 
whom was Dr. Nathan Winslow. This is one of 
the highest compliments that the profession can 
bestow upon its members, and we desire to con- 
gratulate Dr. Winlsow upon his admission into 
the college. Dr. Nathan Winslow, who has also 
been made a member of the Southern Medical 
Association, an organization which is doing so 
much for Southern medicine and surgery, fully 
deserves this distinction as a man, as a surgeon, 
and as an instructor, and we know will do honor 
to the college. 

We also desire to extend congratulations to 
Dr. Robert P. Bay, Class of 1905, who is also one 
of the younger members of our adjunct faculty 
upon whom the title of F. A. C. S. has recently 
been bestowed. 



On Tuesday, November l?th, a clinic was held 
at the University Hospital, in the amphitheatre, 
for the visiting surgeons of the American College 
of Surgeons, who were delegates to the conven- 
tion which convened in Washington, N^ovember 
Kith. An appendectomy was done by Prof. Ran- 
dolph Winslow, a diagnosis of a spinal tumor by 
Prof. Spear, followed by an operation on same 
by Prof. Winslow. There was also a vaginal 
hysterectomy by Prof. Ashby, and a salpingec- 
tomy by Prof. Martin. The amphitheatre was 
packed by many of the most prominent surgeons, 
including Dr. Charles H. Mayo, of Rochester, 
Minn.. Dr. H. B. Cole, of Mobile, Ala., Dr. H. 
M. Doolittle, of Dallas, Dr. G. O. G. Guab, Pitts- 
burgh, Pa., Dr. Charles H. Peck, Dr. J. W. Long, 
president of the Southern Surgical and Gyneco- 
logical Association, and many others. 



Dr. R. G. WilLse, class of 1909, has just re- 
turned from a pleasant hunting trip on the East- 
ern Shore, where he was the guest of Dr. Samuel 
Price, also of the class of ]9()9. 



We are sorry to learn that our industrious busi- 
ness manager, Dr. Nathan Winslow, Class of 
1901, is sick at his home, 3304 Walbrook avenue, 
suffering from an acute attack of laryngitis. He 
has our best wishes for a speedy recovery. 



MEDICAL— SENIOR. 



Well! Well! Well! 

Welcome back to our good old University. I 
reckon as yo' all feel kinda good to be back ! The 
front all decorated, new fixtures in the stairs 
of sighs (leading to amphitheatre), and a new 
watch-charm on Howard. Well, we certainly 
are glad to see you back, and hope you all will 
have a successful and enjoyable year and come 
back next year? ! ! — ? . . . .' . 



You talk about war — (we agree with Sherman) 
— but the latest news from the Fall Battle be- 
tween the Faculty and the Seniors seems to have 
left us mortally wounded. Quite a number of 
brave and aspiring men on our side fell by the 
way-side and are very ill now with Faculitis. 
Prognosis — patients may and usually do get bet- 
ter in one year. Treatment : Prophylactic most 
important which can be summed uj) as follows : 

K 

Tincturae Osier gm. 20. 

Emulsum'. Shipley. .; gm. 10. 

Syrupi Wilson gm. 15.5 

Fluid Extracti Ashby gm. 10. 

Extracti Neale gm. 15. 

Mo fiant solutio. 

Sig. — Shake well, add a few drops of Spirits 
of Lochard et Martin, and use at every opportu- 
nity. 



Well— to get back ! 

"Sshh!" Our old friend Scjuire Hiram Ben- 
nett is engaged to a well known young lady 
called Miss Placed Eye Brow. 



It takes experience and a silver tongue to 
strike home the truth to medical students, and for 
these you've got to hand it Prof. Streett. If a 
stranger had walked into the lecture hall when 
he was lecturing on the great pandemic of In- 
fluenza of 1890. the different expressions on the 
various faces certainly would ha\c told liim much. 
We looked, and even at the expense of looking a 
line, had to laugh notwithstanding. (That's how 
to wear out good trousers.). 



94 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



NEW YORK CLOTHING HOUSE 

102 & 104 E. BALTIMORE ST. 

Men's, Boy's and Children's Clothing 

Automobile & Uniform Outfitters - - Burt's Shoes 

Who said Sebacious Cyst? 



We certainly are a slow bunch. Let's have a 
class dance and make it before Christmas. 



Congratulations to Dr. Bay on his new appoint- 
ment. 



How much do you weigh : 



A Fabi,E. 



There was once a student who had a clean 
sheet (not shirt). 



Now for some harsh words. 

Friends and Classmates : 

Are we Seniors or are we still Freshmen? Rebel 
yells belong to Freshman days as do whistling 
and feet stamping. California brick-bats, and 
the throwing of confetti also come in this cate- 
gory. If a Senior in name and standing be one 
in action and manner, and so serve to bring the 
poor freshman to a higher level and also be a 
good example, so that he, humble now, may show 
his underlings. 

Will you take the pledge? 



Famous Sayings of Famous Men. 
Let's have a class meeting. 



A Tip on A 100-To-l Shot. 

Don't cut classes or clinics, and you'll come 
out ahead. 



Tuesday, the 17th of November, 191-1, will go 
down in the history of our University. On that 
day members of the American College of Sur- 
geons were present at our clinics, and we have 
no fear that all of them will remember them ; and 
especially the first one, in which Professors Wins- 



low and Spear were- the headliners. Never be- 
fore had such a brilliant diagnosis, reached by a 
process of elimination, by Professor Spear, been 
seen in our hospital, and then to be followed by 
Professor Winslow — such technique, such speed, 
such ingenuity of hand — all — all of them coupled 
and interlocked, gave us a clinic which will never 
fade from memory as long as life lasts. 

AVhen Professor Winslow presented the tumor 
from the canal, there was a thunderous burst of 
applause from the famous surgeons who were 
banked in rows around him. And Professor 
Winslow, great in victory as in defeat, exclaimed 
with his ever present over modesty, "The diag- 
nosis was good, but I can't say as much for the 
surgery.". 

But it was good, as Dr. Charles Mayo said : 'Tt 
was the best clinic he has ever been fortunate 
enough to attend." 

"Almost miraculous" was the general impres- 
sion, as Professor Spear says, "All you have 
to do is to learn my subject, and learn the anat- 
omy and physiology of the Central Nervous Sys- 
tem." Modesty? Well, all we have to say is 
that we know that the University is proud of 
you gentlemen, but more especially your own 
senior class, doubly so, since it is their fortune 
to be closely associated with you ! Yes, — we're 
proud of you ! 



LAW— GRADUATE. 



Mr. Lee S. Meyer announces that he has re- 
moved his law offices to 302-303 Continental 
Building, Baltimore, Md. 



Mr. Arthur E. Williams, Class of 1914, an- 
nounces his association with his father, Mr. Jay 
Williams, as partner, in the general practice of 
law in the Williams Law Building, Salisbury, 1.16.. 



Mr. George O. Elome ('14) and Mr. Ellis 
Levin ('14) will act as assistant librarians and 
student advisers in the Law Library. As they 
are lawyers of good judgment and scholarship, 
their services will be valuable to the students. 



Mr. Want sends us the two following letters 
which were received recently at his office. As 
specimens of English and of mental visions, he 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



95 



Blome's Chocolates 

Known and enjoyed by students of the 
University for more than half a century. 

Retail Department 
BLOME'S CANDY STORE 

Established 1859 621 W. Baltimore St. 



thinks each is a model in its class. 

"Mr. Want Dear Sir I asked Mr. Seitz what 
he did with the colt machine he shipet it to the 
ware House in Balto^according to the rules of 
the P. R. R. Co — I suppose if the colt co — Has 
not Paid the frait on it it shurly Has Been sold 
for frait But more the liken they Have Had it 
shiped Back to colt co — If the shall Be a tril I 
will have a nuinber of wittness nailer — zegnelt 
I millson — anderson — Seitz — nelson — all of these 
People know of the Delay I will Be in town 
monday if nothing Happings if you see Thomas 
B. Marshall of the colt co ask him to Have all 
things ready for me trust you will Be in readi- 
ness for the colt People one of my witness was 
Delayed He Had to Post Pone a shoe on the 
account of the lights not Been lited. 

Very truly 
yours, 

(Signed) "— ." 



"Buffalo, Kansas, Sept. 24, 1914. 

Mr. Samuel Want, 

Baltimore, Md. 
Dear Sir: 

The land where some of the city of Baltimore 
now stands was once owned by my wifes great 
grandfather whose name was Chalmers, and 

J. FRED SHAFER, Pns. WM. E READ, Vice-Pres. WM. G. HORN. Sec'y-Treis. 

THE HORN-SHAFER CO. 

Printers and Publishers 

3-5 GERMAN STREET, EAST 

BALTIMORE 

Private Branch Exchange, St. Paul 7077-7078 

Printers of 1912 '13 and 14 "Terrae Mariae" 
There must be a reason 



some thing more than a hundred years ago he 
leased out Eighty acres or more of it for a 
period of 99 years. 

"This lease Expired about Eight or ten years 
ago, and so far there has not been anything ac- 
complished toward recovering the land for the 
heirs, of which there are now C|uite a number. 

"Soon after the lease expired, the heirs Em- 
ployed an attourney and raised some funds, and 
some of this property was traced by records, 
back to the time the old gentleman Chalmers 
owned it. but for some reason it was dropped, 
and since then there has been no effort made 
to recover the property. Please advise if you 
think there would be any chance to realize any 
thing out of a proposition of this kind. Will 
pay you for any trowble this may put you to 

Yours Very Respy. 

(Signed) " " 



LAW— SENIOR. 



About two weeks ago "Boss" Kanode brought 
his "goose" up from that dear Gaithersburg for 
the purpose of injecting some real rah-rah "pep" 
into his crowd in the Law School. 

After herding up his flock, composed of "Syl- 
labuster" Hepborn, "Outside" McMullen, "G.-B.- 
S." Feisenmeyer and "Squire" Lightner, and 
after said flock had mortgaged all of their 
worldly belongings to buy gasoline, oil, etc., he 
started for Washington on the maiden voyage. 

"Hep" sat in front with the "Boss," kept his 
eagle eye on the speedometer and called out the 
figures for the benefit of the gentlemen on the 
rear seat. . 

Going most of the time at fifty, all was sweet 
peace until the "Speed Demon" breezed through 
Hyattsville. At this most desolate spot in Mary- 
land our hero ran over half a horseshoe, whose 
nails had not been manicured, and which gnawed 
its way through tbe tire and inner tube. With 
a loud report, both from the tire and the gang, 
the machine was brought to a stop. As it was 
8 P. M., and as the inhabitants of this fair town 
had long ago sought their straw-stufifed mat- 
tresses, the garage keeper could not be found. By 
tliis time the enthusiasm had cooled off remark- 
;ibly. The cries of glee had ceased, dark and 
threatening glances were cast towards the "'Boss," 



96 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



and mutterings of mutiny were heard. There 
was no confusion in making repairs, however, as 
all the members of the crowd withdrew to a safe 
distance while the "Boss" removed the tire and 
put it back again. 

During our intermission we had a very pleas- 
ant ten minutes with a society man (_he admitted 
it himself) returning slightly under the influence 
from the grog shop over the line. He gave some 
very helpful suggestions, and by a wonderful 
change of disguise by placing his derby sideways 
on his head gave an exhibition of Washington 
crossing the Pacific, as he said. We took his 
vi'ord for it. Since then, however, the "Boss" 
saj's he doesn't believe Washington ever crossed 
the Pacific. 

Ilepbron waxed ambitious toward the close of 
lliis scene and manned the pump. After a few 
pumps he straightened up and gurgled, '"Dah- 
gunnet, there goes a suspender button !" And to 
convince the crowd that it was a button and not 
his ambition that had snapped, after some very 
expert deep diving' the right hand came up from 
the depths of his pantalettes bearing the proof. 
He refused to return to the pump, however, and 
went on a foraging expedition with Lightner. 
soon returning with sandwiches and pie. 

The trail was soon taken up again and the 
party arrived in Washington, going direct to a 
garage and getting the tire fixed up right (with 
all due respect to the "Boss's" skill). 

After seeing the sights, we returned to Balti- 
more and had another blow-out. Fate was with 
us, however, as we were near a garage. 

Some "goose," some time, some "Boss." 



Recently "Live Wire" Leggett took a ride in 
the Janus hydroplane. This isn't the first time, 
however, that he has been up in the air. He 
generally breaks all altitude records at the exams. 



At a meeting of the Senior Night Class, held 
on Tuesda}', October 6th, the following officers 
were unanimously elected : Joseph A. Haggerty, 
president ; Walter Prem, vice-president ; Arthur 

HEPBRON & HAYDON 

We Sell Every Law Book and Syllabus Used 
at the U. of M. 

St. Paul 8794 1243-53 CALVERT BLDG. 



B. Nickerson, treasurer; Joseph Gutberlet, sec- 
retary; John J. O'Donohue, sergeant-at-arms. 

A novel feature in the way of a sinking fund 
was introduced whereby each member of the class 
contributes a small sum weekly toward defraying 
the expenses of graduation banquet and cap and 
gown fees. 

The new Senior Class still maintains the life 
and pep that won it such distinction as the Inter- 
mediate Class, and, while at present a certain 
calm prevails, due to bar preparation, several 
social ideas are being formulated which are to 
become efifective after the big examination. 

Arrangements for the perpetuation of the Class 
of 191 5 are being discussed, and several good 
ideas for projecting this memorable class beyond 
the 191 5 scholastic era are being developed by a 
committee appointed for that purpose. 



Reminiscent Smiles. 
Professor Jackson's ]\Ioral Geography. 



A marriage contract is essentially the same as 
a contract to buy a mule. 

It is the only contract that a man enters into in 
which he can not anticipate its results. 

It leads you to the status all right, but then ab- 
ruptly leaves you. 



His Honor Judge Rose's fear of disturbing the 
Sopor Society. 



Visitor — "What has become of that class that 
created such furor last year?" 

Mr. Dickerson — "Sh ! Let us enjoy this blessed 
peace without reference to them while we have a 
chance. They are preparing for the bar exami- 
nation. " 



The new Intermediate Class shows a little bet- 
ter form as such than they did as Juniors. We 
l;ad almost given up hope, but if they mean the 
Jiniker that they have displayed in their recent 
class meetings there is a chance for another live 
class. 

Give 'em your heavy artillery, boys, and if you 
need a few range-finders or marksmen you can 
call on some experts in the senior class. 



"Hello ! St. Paul 240 ! Yes." 
"No. Who says so?" 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



97 



"I can't help it if the whole school is talking." 

"O'Neill is a liar. It's just a similarity of 
names." 

"Because I've been busy at the office and 
couldn't get down." 

"I can't help it if it does seem funny. I 
haven't been there for the reason I've given. I 
say it is not so, and I don't care what O'Neill or 
anyone else says, I'tn not, and that's all. Good- 
bye!" 

Click! 

So I guess Arthur B. Nickerson of the Senior 
Law Class is not married. 



The class jester added to his long list of accom- 
plishments recently by running over a skylight in 
the Dental Building and breaking up a clinic by 
the falling glass. 



"Boss" Kanode and Dan McMuUen hopped 
over to Hyattsville incognito in the "Boss's" 
Metz a few days ago and "rang in" on a little 
party that the home talent were giving. 



DENTAL— GRADUATE. 



The Students' Reception. 



Those who missed the students' reception, 
given at Fayette Street Methodist Church on No- 
vember 6th, missed the only real students' affair 
of the college year at the U. of M. The loyal ones 
were there from all departments. Noses were 
counted, and Law, Pharmacy, Medicine and Den- 
tistry seemed equally represented in numbers. 

The student was made first in all things, and 
because of this he was most interested and his 
spirit of allegiance to his institution was as pro- 
nounced as men of any college could hope to be. 
The students received, the students made ad- 
dresses, the students sang, the students ate and 
joined in an hour of most pleasant social feeling. 



r- 



LUTHER B. BENTON 
' Dental Depot 



students' Outfits 
a Specialty 



305 North Howard St. 



LEFRANC & AULT 



SELL 



INTER-WOVEN 



{!Jt5"»°f I HOSIERY 

AT THE 

"SHIRT SHOP" 

421 N. Howard St., at Franklin 



Of course. Rev, Mr. Murray, pastor of the 
church, was present and had his good time along 
with the boys, of which he is always one. In 
tact, he was so proud of his "bunch" he had in- 
vited Dr. Kelly in to see them. Among others 
who came to see were Dr. Kout, a medical mis- 
sionary ; Dr. Hunner, of Johns Hopkins; Dr. 
Duffield, of Washington, and Dr. Lichliter, of 
Grace Church. Each of these gentlemen spoke a 
word of encouragement, which was greatly ap- 
preciated by all. 

The students who made addresses were: Mr. 
Trueblood, "The College Y. M. C. A."; Mr. 
Rietzel, "The College Fraternity"; Mr. Allen, 
"The Students' Debating Club"; Mr. Lowery, 
"The Students' Bible Class"; Mr. Kendall, "Col- 
lege Spirit" ; Mr. Woo, of Hopkins, "The Orien- 
tal View of American Colleges." All the boys 
did themselves credit, and showed the talent 
which exists if it were only given opportunitv to 
express itself. 

The music was provided by a few of the men 
of last year's Glee Club — Drs. Rea and Robinson, 
first tenors ; Bryant and Miller, second tenors ; 
Drs. Robinson and Lowery, first bass ; Mitchell 



A. H. PETTING 

Manufacturer of 

GREEK LETTER FRATERNITY JEWELRY 

213 N. Liberty St., = Baltimore, Md. 
Factory: 212 Little Sharp St. 



Memorandum package sent to any fraternity member through the 
secretary of the chapter. Special designs and estimates furnished on 
mcdaU, ringt and pins for athletic meets, etc. 



98 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



!> 



quA 




iDlEHL 

Clothes 

I JJl l l l .lUJ.I.UI. I .UJJ. I fl 

built at 605 W. Baltimore St., 
just around the corner from the 
University, are kept pressed with- 
out cost. 

Suits $15 to $40 



and May, second bass. Their numbers received 
nearty applause and proved that there' is a strong 
nucleus for forming a University Glee Club this 
}ear. 

Finally the boys were turned loose on an elabo- 
rate luncheon, whicli had been arranged for by 
Drs. Kelly and Murray. The men thoroughly 
enjoyed this feature of the program. After giv- 
ing yells for the Old University, Dr. Kelly and 
Dr. Murray, everyone paid his respects to the 
host. Dr. Murray, and went home rejoicing. 

o 

. DENTAU— SENIOR. 



Class elections are over and everyone happy. 
The officers of the Senior Class must expect a 
very busy year, judging from the amount of sta- 
tionery purchased. 



The members of the Senior Class seem to think 
$8.oo is rather high for Tcrrae Mariac this year 
against $5.50 last. What is the idea in making it 
so high? Is it the size? 

Why not subscribe for the University G.\- 

ZETTE ? 



Hart Schaffner & Marx, 
Kuppenheimer, 
"Society Brand" 



The clothes that college men 
like a lot 



TRe lUSllB Hub 

Bjltlmore Street At C^arleJ 



McGee has devised a new method of exca- 
vating cavities. He uses a No. 7 bur in a right 
angle handpiece. He suggests a modification of 
the method by cutting the bur in halves. Hello, 
Malone ! 



We are glad Dr. Cruzen reached the good old 
U. S. A. before the war. 



Dr. Hemmeter must have had some inside in- 
formation as to prospects for war, or maybe his 
Shark story will last another vear. 



Mr. B. B. Smith is back in school. Hello, 
B. B., glad to see you back. 



What Senior is it who thinks laterals are cus- 
pids? Don't get rattled, Dr. Patterson is still 
with us. 



Congratulations to the Senior who separates 
models from the bite by burning the wax. Who 
said Feindt? 



The officers for the ensuing year are : A. H. 
Kendall, president ; W. N. Scruggs, vice-presi- 
dent; Miss L. E. McKeown, corresponding secre- 
tary; Miss Elsie Roof, recording secretary; C. J. 
O'Connell, treasurer; C. K. Epting, B. M. Terrae 
Ulariae; T. R. Secrest, critic; J. J. Purcell, chair- 
man executive committee; H. Paul; C. V. Wal- 
berg, orator; J. R. Walker, editor; D. C. Dan- 
forth, sergeant-at-arms. 



Whose diamond ring is Purcell sporting? 
Some diamond. 



DENTAE— JUNIOR. 



At a recent Quiz on Operative Dentistry, Dr. 
Davis asked this question : "What are the quali- 
fications of a good operator?" The answer was: 
"He must be neat, courteous, willing, and have 
ability." 

Let us all see if we can't be good operators. 
Anyone can be neat and courteous; the ability 
may strike some of us hard, but this can be easily 
acquired through the willingness to work. A 
regular and prompt attendance in the infirmary 
will gain for you that desire to work. The best 
operators make the most out of their profession, 
so let us all be good operators. 



8, W Saratoga St 




THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 99 

=^=^^^^^=^^ Intercollegiate Bureau of Academic Costume, Aibany.N.v. 

Correct' Hoods 
for All Degrees. 



^a/fi'more, 

Maryland. 



The work in Prosthetic and Crown and Bridge 
work is progressing, and some good plates and 
bridges are anticipated. 



At a recent class meeting Dick Bundy was 
elected editor to Terrae Mariae. 



Nathanson, our eminent barber-dentist from 
the Harford road, had a terrible accident in the 
infirmary the early part of this month. He was 
cleaning out a root canal when, as he thought, he 
ran the broach through the apex into the Antrum 
of Highmore. He hurried to Dr. Robinson and 
breathlessly told him the horrible news. Upon 
investigation it was found that the apex had not 
been passed, but that the broach had not been 
securely fastened in the holder and had slipped 
down in the handle when the apex was reached. 
Hence the cause for Nathanson's anxiety. 



E. L. Smith has recently tried to raise hair on 
his upper lip. After a vain effort of one week, 
in which nobody noticed the change, he became 
disgusted and shaved it off. You are too young, 
my boy — too young. 



Why not change Flossie Adair's name to Follie 
Adair? Ask someone why. 



Amos Bennett, who is now under the care of 
Al Kendall, says he loves to work in the infirm- 
ary when Dr. Val gives him a pretty chick to hug. 
Good judgment, -\mmic, old boy. 



"Kleine'" Smith has reformed. He no longer 
carries matches, and goes to see a dainty little 
Miss upon whom he lavishes candy. 



Funderburk and Lena took two girls to Emory 
Grove and had to walk 'em home. 'V\niy? 



T. T. Smith still wears the same style collars. 
He says his girl likes them. 



COTRELL & 
LEONARD 

Official Makers of 

Caps and 

Gowns 




Rich Gowns for 
Pulpit and Bench. 

Bulletin, Samples 
etc. on request 



ACADEMIC— GRADUATE. 



A recent \isitor to the College was L. Claude 
Bailey, of Salisbury, Md. Mr. Bailey graduated 
as honor man of the class of 1911, and also as 
honor man at the University of Maryland in 1913. 
At present he is the law partner of Joseph L. 
Bailey, the former State's Attorney of Wicomico 
county. 



Other visitors noticed during the week ending 
November 21. were: two football stars of the 
1913 St. John's team; G. E. Dryden ("Puss"), 
and H. ciaude ("Deak") ; W. S. Phillips, "11, at 
present teaching in the Wicomico High School 
at Salisbury, Md. ; and R. S. Hopkins, '13, who 
is now at Norfolk, Va., and employed by the 
Chesapeake and Oho Railroad. 

Lieut. George Donald Riley, class of 1907, a 
former member of the staff of The Baltimore 
Sun, is now stationed near Boston, in the Coast 
Artillery Corps, U. S. A. He has been desig- 
nated as the especially qualified officer at Fort 
Banks, to conduct a series of ten lectures this 
Winter to the officers and non-commissioned offi- 
cers of the garrison, on "The Military Policies of 
the United States." 

Lieutenant Riley was one of the range officers 
at the National matches held at Sea Girt, N. J., 
in -September, and received afterward, through 
official channels, a letter from the executive offi- 
cer of the matches. General Spencer, reporting 
the lieutenant's great ability and efficient manner 
of performing his duty. 

Being an old St. John's player, lieutenant 
Riley has taken to football again as coach of the 
Fort Banks team, which has won all the games 
played in the forts around Boston, for the har- 
bor championship. The team defeated Fort 
Andrews twice and Fort Strong once, 33 to 7. 
Lieutenant Riley is the athletic officer of Fort 
Banks. Some of St. John's old trick's in the 
game, as well as new ones from the modern rules, 
were used to coach the Fort Banks team. 



100 




THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



13, has been awarded 
the Faculty of Johns 
taking a post-gradu- 
d law. 



Kemp, Jr., secretary, and i\Ir. P. P. Blanchard, 
treasurer. 



alumni were present at the 
dedication of the bronze tablet to the memory of 
F'rancis Scott Key, which was unveiled October 
19th, on the rear campus. Among them were the 
following, some of whom took part in the exer- 
cises : A. PI. Krug, of Baltimore ; Judge Walter 
I. Dawkins, Dr. J. D. Iglehart, Hon. Philemon H. 
Tuck. Judge Daniel R. Magruder. Hon. George 
A. Frick, Dr. Elihu S. Riley, and Edgar Fell. 



Several of our alumni are at the Boston Tech. 
They are P. L. Alger, '12; S. D. Hopkins, '12, 
and G. Petit, ex-'i4. 



J. T. Bartlett, a former student of St. John's 
College, has been elected president of his class at 
Hopkins. 



Among the recent visitors to the College was 
H. F. Warrenfeltz, Class of 1910. He has a 
position with the Goodrich Rubber Company. 



Mr. Jay Williams announces his association, 
as partner, with his son, Mr. Arthur E. Williams, 
as Williams & Williams, in the general practice 
of law in the Williams Law Building, Salisbury, 
Md. Both are alumni of St. John's College. Mr. 
Jay Williams graduated in 1880, and Arthur E. 
Williams in 1912 from St. John's and from the 
Law School of the University of Maryland in 
1914. 



Mr. A. W. Joyce, Class of 1913, is teaching or- 
ganic chemistry at Yale University. He is also 
doing research work there. He is located at 51 
Prospect street. New Haven, Conn, 



The St. John's College Alumni Association 
held its second annual smoker on Wednesday, 
November 25th, at 8.30 P. M., at the Emerson 
Hotel. The object was to get the alumni together 
before the Plopkins-St. John's football game on 
the 26th. 

The officers of the Alumni Association are as 
follows : Dr. James A. Nydegger, president ; 
Messrs. W. C. Devecmon, Philemon H. Tuck and 
George A. Frick, vice-preisdents ; Mr. J. H. C. 



Among the alumni seen at the Academic Day 
exercises were D. E. Smith, R. P. Smith, E. L. 
Yost and W. R. Woodward, all of the Class of 
1914, and H. R. Holljes, 1912. 



ACADEMIC— UNDERGRADUATE. 



Rowland Hazard, of Richmond, Va., ex-mem- 
ber of the Class of 1915, was back to pay the 
college a visit recently. It will be recalled that 
Mr. Hazard presented the silver cup to the rifle 
team from Company A. which was the winning 
team in the rifle practice last spring. During his 
vi.sit Mr. Hazard had the cup engraved. 



A choir composed of students has been organ- 
ized, and now leads the singing each morning in 
the chapel exercises. It is under the direction of 
Mr. Mowbry, to whom credit must be given for 
organizing it. 



The first CoHllion Cl'j.b dance Vv-ill be held on 
December i8th. The date was formerly set for 
the nth, but on account of not being able to se- 
cure the music for that night was changed to 
the i8th. 



The Philokalian Literary Society held a formal 
dance in the gymnasium on Friday, November 
20th. There were a number present and it was 
very much enjoyed. 



J. H. Onion, ex-' 15, is with the Poli Players 
in Baltimore. 



H. Foreshaw, ex-'i6, is assistant purser on one 
of the B., C. & A. Company's steamers. 



C. L. Loyd, ex-' 1 5, attended the Academic Day 
exercises on November nth. 



The military department has recently purchased 
one hundred and fifty shelter tents for the use of 
the batallion in practice marches. This completes 
the field equipment, as other accessories were 
bought last spring. Lieut. McNeil intends to 
give the batallion a little more field work this 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



101 



year, and it is probable that practice marches 
will be made, sometimes from Friday afternoon 
to Saturday morning, spending one night in camp. 



A Victrola has been placed in the Y. M. C. A. 
room. This, with the various magazines and 
daily papers, will make the room a club room. 
At present the collections of records for the Vic- 
trola is very small, and any contribution to it by 
Alumni or other friends, will be gladly accepted. 



As a token of St. John's part in the Star Span- 
gled Banner Centennial Celebration, held in Bal- 
timore, September 6 to 13, 1914, Dr. Fell has 
received a Commemorative Medal of this occas- 
sion, presented to him by Mayor Preston, who 
acted on behalf of the City of Baltimore. The 
medal is the work of Mr. Hans Schuler, of Bal- 
timore, one of the leading sculptors of the United 
States. The Mayor is president of the Star 
Spangled Banner Association, and also an active 
member of the Alumni Association of St. John's. 



"The Real Turk.'' This is the title of a new 
book by Prof. Stanwood Cobb, of the depart- 
ment of English of St. John's. Prof. Cobb was 
an instructor, for three years, in Robert College, 
Constantinople, Turkey, and is well fitted to write 
an account of the Turk. 

In this book. Prof. Cobb brings out the good 
and not the bad in the Turk, for, as he says, "so 
much has been written of the more unfavorable 
aspects that I prefer to present the good side of 
the Turk, believing that the best way of helping 
a people is by seeing their good qualities as well 
as their bad." 

Several chapters have appeared before in The 
New England Magazine. Anyone who wishes to 
learn the character, the home life, the Turk as a 
citizen, Islam and its inner life, will do well to 
read this book. A copy has been presented to 
the Philokalian Literary Society by the author. 

The book is beautifully bound, well illustrated, 
and contains 301 pages. It is published bv the 
Pilgrim's Press, Boston, Mass. 

WILLIAM J. MILLER 
Jewelry, Diamonds, Watches 



On Thursday, November 19th, the Pre-Medi- 
cal Department of St. John's College was in- 
spected by Dr. W. F. Shenton, who acted on be- 
half of the Board of Medical Examiners of 
Maryland. 

A thorough inspection was made of the labora- 
tories and equipment, the standard of class work 
and other details of the course. All these were 
spoken of as being highly satisfactory. A report 
is to be sent in to the entrance examiner of the 
Board, Isaac L. Otis. 

Approval of the Entrance Examiner of the 
Board of Medical Examiners of Maryland, not 
only insures the publication of the name of the 
Institution in the Board's Bulletin of Informa- 
tion, which is sent to all Educational Departments 
in this country and to many foreign Educational 
Departments, but also insures the acceptance of 
that school's work by the University of the State 
of New York, in lieu of examinations. 

At present there are eight pre-medical students 
in college who later expect to enter the Medical 
School of the University of Maryland. This de- 
partment of the College was started at the be- 
ginning of the present yeai", and there are many 
possibilities for its future development. The 
would-be medical student finds at St. John's 
agreeable surroundings, where he can receive to 
the best advantage the college training necessary 
to enter the University Medical Schools. 



NURSING. 



Miss A. L. Wham, Class of 1909, Supervisor 
of Nurses of the Operating Rooms, has been con- 
fined to the hospital for the past two weeks suf- 
fering from an infection, and we all wish her a 
speedy recovery. 



Miss Mary Rutherford, Class of 1913, Super- 
intendent of Nurses of the Rocky Mount (N. C.) 
Hospital, has resigned, and Miss Lucy Lilly, 
Class of 1912, has accepted the position. 

R LLERBROCK 



College Jewelry 
Class Pins and Rings, College Seals 

2« East Baltimore St. Baltimore, Md. 22 W. Lcxington St., = Baltimore, Md. 



103 



THE UXR'ERSITY GAZETTE. 



]\Iiss Barbara E. Stauffer, Class of 1911, who 
has been doing public health nursing, tubercular 
department, for the past two years, is doing sub- 
stitute work in the Social Service Department of 
the Johns Hopkins Hospital. 



Aliss Ann Dukes, Class of 1914, has been ap- 
pointed assistant superintendent of nurses of the 
Cambridge (Md.) Hospital. 



INIisses Sadie Davis and Alice Colbourne, Class 
of 1914, have accepted positions at Bav \'iew 
Hospital. 



OUIPS. 



Phill-osify. 



Disillusionment is one of the sad experiences 
of mankind. One good wav to guard against it 
is to give due allowance, in the beginning, to the 
frailty of those whom we are likely to esteem. A 
proper understanding of each other's character- 
istics, moods, ideals, mentality, mental processes 




The 

Merchant 

Tailor 



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From $20 Up 
Samples Cheerfully Given 



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i,r7T:^>!!] !'illlliMMIl!l'L 



How many of you 
men are watching 
these talks of ours? 
How many of you 
are wearing those 
clothes of ours? Are 
you aware that an 
actual count will 
show a majority of 
your friends dressed 
in Hamburger Suits — 
in Hamburger overcoats? 
WHY are they? 
Think it over! 

Hamborgers' 

Baltimore & Hanover Sts. 



Ba 



and sympathies and what not is necessary in 
forming genuine friendship. It is of no impor- 
tance how we come by this knowledge, nor the 
length of time, be it short or long, that we ac- 
quire it : however, it is requisite in order to obtain 
it that truthfulness and rugged honesty predomi- 
nate their thoughts toward each other. "\\'hen 
once this foundation is firmly established, they 
should then be able to approach each other with 
an unsullied trust in the truth of their hearts. 

On other occasions the use of tact and diplo- 
macy indicates excellent discretion ; but when we 
come to deal with those we desire to elevate as 
friends we must disarm ourselves and be what 
we are, nothing more and nothing less. Dispense 
uith all weapons which do not substantiallv rep- 
resent our real selves, and let those in this way. 
who seek friendship, come together on open, 
clear grounds, and they shall find friends. 

One's standard of friendship is equaled only 
by what that one represents ; so if one's aims or 
purposes be of a high order, likewise shall one's 
friends be. But whoever is chosen as a candi- 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



103 



aate for such companionship, unless they have 
come to know each other in a way free from 
artificially, the inevitable result will be — disillu- 
sionment. Bee Gee Gee. 



BIRTHS. 



To Roger Brooke, Jr., B. M. C, Class of 1900, 
:\Iajor, M. C., U. S. A., and Mrs. Brooke, Oc- 
tober 18, 1914, a son — Roger Brooke, 3d. Major 
Brooke is stationed at the Presidio, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 



MARRIAGES. 



Levin Creston Beauchamp, LL.B., Class of 
1912, to Miss Annie Frances Dashiell, both of 
Princess Anne, Md., at the Johns Hopkins Hos- 
pital, in which Mr. Beauchamp was a patient, 
October 16, 1914. 



Dr. Ernest Howard Gaither, B. M. C., Class of 
1905, of the Latrobe Apartments, was married to 
r\Iiss Elsie Carola Langrall, of 312 Oakdale road, 
Roland Park, November 4, 1914. The ceremony 
was performed at the home of the bride by the 
Rev. Frank Isaac, pastor of Franklin Street 
■Methodist Episcopal Church. The bride, who 
was given in marriage by her father, was gowned 
in ivory satin, combined with tulle and lace, and 
her tulle veil was arranged in the Dutch cap ef- 
fect, with a chaplet of orange blossoms. She 
carried a bouquet of lilies of the valey. A recep- 
tion followed the ceremony. The house was dec- 
orated with palms and flowers, and an orchestra 
played during the evening for the dancing on the 
porches, which were enclosed for the occasion. 
Dr. Gaither, who is assistant to Dr. Thomas R. 
Brown at Johns Hopkins Hospital, and his bride 
left later in the evening for a weddincf iournev. 



Dr. Herbert C. Blake, B. ^I. C, Class of 1905, 
of 1014 West Lafayette avenue, was married to 
Miss Helen Niely, of Paradise, Catonsville. at 3 
o'clock Saturday afternoon, November 14, at the 
home of the bride. The ceremony was performed 
by the Rev. Dr. Eugene Blake, president of the 
i^.Iartha Washington College, Abington, Va. Im- 
niediatelv following the ceremony, which was 
witnessed only by the immediate families, the 
bride and groom left for a Northern trip. Upon 



WARNER & CO. 

222-224 WEST BALTIMORE ST. 



their return they will reside at 1014 West Lafay- 
ette avenue. 

— o 

DEATHS. 



Dr. John PI. Grimes, Class of 1868, of 2100 
Maryland avenue, died of uraemic poisoning at 
the Sheppard and Enoch Pratt Hospital, Novem- 
ber 7, 1914, aged 73 j^ears. Dr. Grimes was one 
of the best known of the older physicians in Bal- 
timore and practiced continually from the time 
of his graduation in 1868 until 1907, when age 
and failing health caused him to retire from ac- 
tive practice. He was stricken with paralysis 
three years ago and had been declining steadily 
ever .-ince. 



Dr. S. Butler Grimes, Class of 1897. of loi 
Longwood road, Roland Park, Aid., died sud- 
denly at the home of his father. Dr. John H. 
Grimes, 2100 ^Maryland avenue, October 26, 1914, 
aged 39 years. He is survived by a widow and 
two children. 



Dr. Ernest J. Waddey, Class of 1 891, of Water- 
loo, la., a Fellow of the American Medical Asso- 
ciation, a charter member of the Waterloo Medi- 
cal Society, and once president of the Black Hawk 
County Medical Society, district surgeon of the 
Illinois Central system and a member of the 
r.oard of Commissioners of Insanity of Black 
1 Tawk County, died in St. Francis' Hospital, 
Waterloo, October 14, 1914, from organic nerv- 
ous disease, aged 47 years. 



Dr. William James Lumsden, Class of 1869, a 
Fellow of the American Medical Association, a 
Confederate veteran, formerlv secretary of the 
Medical Association of the State of North Caro- 
lina, for more than forty years a practitioner of 
Elizabeth City, N. C, one of the most beloved 
l)hysicians of Eastern North Carolina, died at his 
home, October 14, 1914, from cerebral henior- 
rhage, aged 68 years. 



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EMPLOYERS — POSITIONS WANTED 
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Vol. I. 



BALTIMORE, MD., JANUARY 1, 1915. 



No. 7. 




lYERSITY 




DEVOTED 
TOTHE INTERESTS OF 
THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Buic 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



Vol. I. 



JANUARY 1, 1915. 



No. 7. 



CONTENTS 



EUGENE F. CORDELL— A Biography of 
the Late Professor of History of Med- 
icine at the University of Maryland. 
John C. Hemmeter, M.D 107 

THE TRUE NURSE 109 

EDIT(3RIALS Ill 

A Suggestion. 
New Year. 



EDITORIALETS 112 

ITEMS 113 

QUIPS 121 

ANNOUNCEMENT 122 

MARRIAGES 122 

DEATHS 123 



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UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE, MD. 

HON. PHILLIPS LEE GOLDSBOROUGH, Governor of Maryland, Chancellor. 
THOMAS FELL, A. M., Ph. D.. L L. D., D. C. L., Provost. 



ST. JOHN'S COLLEQE, Annapolis Md. ( 



DEPARTMENT OF \ 
ARTS AND SCIENCES/ 



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THOMAS FELL, Ph.D., LL.D., D.C.L., President. 



DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE. 

Four years' graded course. New Laboratory Build- 
ing. Clinical advantages unsurpassed. Teaching Staff 
of 66. io8th Annual Session will begin October i, 
1914, and continue 8 months 

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59th Annual Session will begin Sept. 28, 1914. Faculty 
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dress the Secretary, 301 St. Paul Street, Baltimore, 
Maryland. 

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33d Annual Session begins October i, 1914. and 
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For catalogue containing course of study, etc., apply to 

TIMOTHY O. HEATWOLE, M.D., D.D.S., Dean, 

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(Formerly Maryland College of Pharmacy). 72nd 
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Baltimore, Md. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 

Published Monthly in the Interest of the University of Maryland. 
PRICE $1.00 PER YEAR. 



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Business Address, 60S Professional Bulldins. 
Baltimore, Md. 



Vol. I. 



BALTIMORE, MD., JANUARY 1, 1915. 



No. -7 



EUGENE F. CORDELL — A BIOGRAPHY 
OF THE LATE PROFESSOR OF HIS- 
TORY OF MEDICINE AT THE UNI- 
VERSITY OF MARYLAND. 



By John C. Hemmeter, M.D., Phil.D., Sc.D., 
LL.D. 



According to one of our late Presidents, Col. 
Roosevelt, there are two ways of learning to 
know a man. One is to work with him, and 
the other is to fight with him. It has fallen to 
my lot to have to use both of these methods in 
learning to know Prof. Eugene F. Cordell, and 
therefore I feel, in a measure, competent to ad- 
dress you concerning this unique and interesting 
man. Those who at the present day have to do 
with the conduct of universities may well be dis- 
couraged at times by the extent to which self- 
interest takes the place of idealism and routine 
takes the place of reason. Under these circum- 
stances the spectacle of a man animated by the 
most exalted impulses, and devoting his energies 
to the promotion of pure science, or history, or 
good works, and leaving many fragrant memo- 
ries, ought to be the source of encouragement and 
inspiration. 

Cordell, although a poor man in the worldly 
sense, was a philanthropist, an intellectual philan- 
thropist, and his philanthropy expressed itself 
in ceaseless efforts to make others enjoy the same 
wide view of medical science, especially medical 
history, which the master himself enjoyed. Dr. 
Cordell, who was the Professor of the History 
of Medicine and Librarian of the School of 
Medicine, was born in 184,3 in Charlestown, 
W. Va. He was the son of a physician, and in 
his great two volume "History of the University 
of Maryland" he gives a biography of himself. 
In order to indicate his appreciation of the 
strenuous life, his biography, which is composed 
of about five and one-half columns, consists very 
largely of his experiences during the Civil War, 
and he states, evidently with some pride, that he 



was the great-great-grandson of Rev. John Cor- 
dell, a clergyman of the Protestant Episcopal 
Church, who emigrated to America in 17-13. Rev. 
John Cordell during the Revolutionary War was 
a captain and chaplain of the American Army, 
and Dr. Eugene Cordell refers to him as "the 
Fighting preacher." No wonder he showed so 
much combativeness in his temper. 

He was also the author of a great "History 
of the Medical and Chirurgical Faculty of Mary- 
land," which contains a short biography of almost 
every physician in this State at that time. He 
was the founder of our medical department 
alumni association; of the General Alumni Asso- 
ciation, and also of the Home for Widows and 
Orphans of Physicians. Very few clinicians 
know that Dr. Cordell was the first to conceive 
and suggest the organization of the American 
Association of Medical Colleges. 

When I was first approached by the commit- 
tee to present this portrait to the Regents I had 
-my misgivings regarding my personal fitness for 
the honor of this selection, and I requested that 
a more competent person be chosen. In my 
vacant evenings I was working on a biographic 
study of great men of science, parts of which 
have already been published in this country and 
abroad, and I came across an interesting character 
description, which one of my distinguished teach- 
ers had published concerning another brilliant 
teacher. I refer to the characteriation of Henry 
Augustus Rowland by my distinguished teacher, 
Prof. Remsen, the second president of the Johns 
Hopkins University, which is found in David 
Starr Jordan's "Leading American Men of 
Science," page 412. 

Remsen speaks as follows about Rowland ; 

"I remember that first meeting very clearly. 
The first impression that Rowland made on me 
was not favorable. Knowing that, in the natural 
course of things, we were to be thrown much 
together, I could not help wondering whether 
this was to be a pleasant or an unpleasant ex- 
perietice. I had my doubts. We were both, in 



108 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



those days, somewhat high-strung. It soon be- 
came evident that we should not always agree, 
and that between us there were likely to be heated 
conversations, but let me say at once that in 
a short time we came to know each other as 
well as two men can know each other, and for 
twenty-five years we were intimate, most inti- 
mate, friends. We understood each other and 
were ready to make such allowances as must 
always be made between friends if friendship 
is to continue. Strangers and casual acquain- 
tances had a wrong conception of Rowland. This 
is easily understood. He was apt to put his 
worst foot forward. He made no attempt to 
conciliate — rather the contrary. It took time to 
get over this first impression, but those who 
know him best learned that he had many most 
attractive traits of character. He was absolutely 
sincere. He was generous and affectionate. He 
had the highest ideals and tried earnestly to attain 
them. On the other hand, he despised sham and, 
whenever he detected it he did not hesitate to 
express his opinion in strong language — not al- 
ways strictly parliamentary. Indeed it must be 
said that he appeared to derive a certain amount 
of pleasure from this kind of activity, and he no 
doubt often gave offense by it. He was a merci- 
less critic, and no doubt the world offered him 
abundant opportunity for the exercise of his 
powers." 

All this fits very well to the character of our 
late friend. 

Herraclites says in one of his aphorism : 

TTokefjLd)'; Trarep iravojv 

"War or contention is the father of every- 
thing." 

Whilst this readiness to defend one's mental 
attitude brings out many brilliant features of the 
contending minds, Cordell's temperament was not 
such as to enable him to work well, as one of a 
number of managers, who all regarded them- 
selves entitled to as much consideration and 
authority as himself. His dictatorial manner and 
fondness for having his own way caused some 
friction in the conduct of affairs, and sometimes 
could only be met by a homeopathic conduct, 
namely, the "similia, simUibus curantur." The 
same could be said, however, of many American 
men of science, much greater than Cordell. I 
have already given the account of Remsen con- 
cerning Rowland. But it is also true of the 
great American paleontologist, Othneil Charles 



Marsh. It is said of Marsh that his sensitive 
nature was so irritated by any strictures or criti- 
cisms of his scientific work that he would fight, 
and there were years in his scientific life when 
he permitted controversy and a struggle for 
priority to hinder his work. The same can be 
said of Benjamin Thompson, the New England 
man, who became later the Under Secretary of 
State in England, and Count Rumford, of the 
Holy Roman Empire. This Massachusetts boy 
also became the founder of the Royal Institu- 
tion of England, and the discoverer of so great 
a genius as Sir Humphrey Davy. It is not neces- 
sary to further multiply the biographic instances 
that a certain high-strung temperament and 
pugnacity is no hindrance to scientific brilliancy, 
but quite the contrary, sometimes the very indi- 
cation of it. 

Goethe once classified the various kinds of 
nature contemplation in a comprehensive way : 
First, the lowest grade is represented by the 
Nutzenzuchenden — the utility seekers — who ap- 
ply that which Nature offers for their utilitarian 
purposes. The second are the Wissbegierigen — 
or those simply eager for knowledge — the "cur- 
ious for Nature." The third are the Anschauen- 
den — who seek to avoid imagination as far as 
possible and reduce everything to intuition (from 
the Latin mtiteri, to look on or into). The fourth 
group are the Umfassenden — these minds operate 
in the opposite manner from the intuitionalists, 
for they start from preconceived ideas and try 
to encompass (timfassen) their problem by seek- 
ing of a realization of their ideas in Nature. 

This classification is a helpful one in endeavor- 
ing to understand great minds like that of Cor- 
dell. 

In his inspiring book, "Great Men," Wilhelm 
Ostwald divides the great investigators into two 
groups : 1, The classicists ; and 2, the romanti- 
cists. They are distinguished by the differences 
in the reaction times of their minds. The clas- 
sicists are the slow thinkers, the romanticists the 
more rapid. The classicists are the thorough, pen- 
etrating, objective zvorkers, who exhaust their 
problems. The romanticists are the subjective 
zvorkers, who. according to Goethe (die Umfas- 
senden, he calls them), would bound the multi- 
plicity of their problems by the limits of their 
own ideas. They are more frequently guided by 
preconceived ideas, are not so thorough, but have 
great wealth of thought. This superfluity of 
ideas, in fact, determines the mental pulse rate. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



109 



For this reason the romanticists, such as Davy. 
Liebig, Benjamin Thompson (Count Rumford), 
cannot be so exhaustive as the classicists, because 
they undertake too many problems and are di- 
verted from the same degree of concentration 
by the superabundance of their conceptions. 
In his sixteenth aphorism, HeracHtus expressed 

this as follows : iroXvfxadiri voov ?X'"' "" SiSdcricei : 

Excessive knowledge does not favor understand- 
ing. 

Was Dr. Cordell a classicist or a romanticist .' 
I knew him well, personally, and have eagerly 
read his works, but must acknowledge being at 
a loss how to place this man in Ostwald's classifi- 
cation. He produced much and rapidly, his in- 
tellectual reaction was quick, he possessed a 
remarkable wealth of ideas, and was filled with 
enthusiasm. These are characteristic of the 
romanticist. 

On the other hand, he lacked certain character- 
istics of the romanticist — for he was thorough, 
not superficial, he did not allow himself to be 
led by a priori, i. e., intuitive, conceptions; he 
belonged to Goethe's Anschauenden, contempla- 
tive, believing that all experience comes from 
contemplation. 

Being myself a musician I may be pardoned 
for referring to the artistic side of his character. 
Very few know that Cordell had acquired a pro- 
found understanding and appreciation of music. 
He himself once showed me an endeavor at an 
instrumental sextette which had considerable 
merit. He was the poet of our University Ode. 
for which Hemberger composed the instrumental 
and choral music. 

Horace's Monument. 

I've reared a monument — my own — 

More durable than brass ; 
Yea, kingly pyramids of stone 

In height it doth surpass. 

Rain shall not sap, nor driving blast 

Disturb its settled base, 
Nor countless ages rolling past 

Its symmetry deface. 

I shall not wholly die. Some part. 

Nor that a little, shall 
Escape the dark Destroyer's dart, 

Again his grim festival. 



As long as, with his Vestals mute, "'■ 

Rome's Pontifex shall climb 
The Capitol, my fame shall shoot 

Fresh buds through future time. 

Where brawls loud Aufidus and came 
Parched Daunus erst, a horde 

Of mystic boors to sway, my name 
Shall be a household word. 

As one, who rose from mean estate. 

And first, with poet's fire, 
^olic song to modulate 

To the Italian lyre. 

Then grant, Melpomene, thy son 

Thy guerdon proud to wear. 
And Delphic laurels, duly won. 

Bind thou upon my hair. 

A great heart, beating warmly for its fellow- 
men, has been stilled, a profound thinker has 
found peace ; an artist in rhetoric, as well as 
music, has been called to participate in the "har- 
mony of the spheres." According to Hippocrates, 

iiXv ^lOi fipayvi, rj 8e T()(vr] fuiKpa^ Life is short. 

l)ut art is long'. 



THE TRUE NURSE.* 



The world in general does not appreciate the 
true nurse to the extent she should be appre- 
ciated. To say she is a nurse seems to begin 
and end the woman, thus showing how little the 
masses are capable of thought other than self- 
ish thought. I have heard many people say the 
above, "She is a nurse," and the expression and 
intonation spoke their inward thoughts more 
plainly than words, "I would not be one." They 
little realize how much more of the true woman 
is developed in the nurse than there is in the 
woman who is not. We, believing that woman's 
true sphere in life is to be a true wife and mother, 
and in this position her real and and true work 
is performed, and, with the exception of this, the 
nurse stands first in the realms of woman. No 
other position in life exceeds that of the true 
nurse. She it is that can look around the world 
with a kindly sympathy for all suffering humanity. 



-Year Book, Class of 190.-.. 



JUi 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



J4er life has broadened and she lias gained those 
noble attributes which make the true woman. She 
can soothe and comfort the cries of pain and suf- 
fering of the fever-stricken waif of the street with 
as much gentleness and sympathy as if it was a 
petted child of fortune; can wipe the damp, cold 
sweat from the brow of the reprobate with the 
same prayer on her lips and the same pity in 
her heart as if he was one of fortune's favor- 
ites. She realizes that they are creatures of cir- 
cumstances, created by one God, and, each as- 
signed his part to play in life, which he has 
played to the finish ; and the same God willed 
the end, and they go to stand before Him, naked 
of soul. He says if it was badly or well done. 
She never dares to judge; her only thoughts 
are a prayer, "We all play our part." She 
lives the words of the poet : 

"Speak gently to the erring one ; 
Oh ! do not thou forget, 
However darkly stained with sin. 
He is thy brother yet. 

'"Heir of the self-same heritage. 
Child of the self-same God, 
He has but stumbled in the path 
\'\'hich thou, in weakness, trod." 

Then again, her life always runs with the under- 
current of lives. The deeper, truer, but sadder 
part of life. The sea is not the surface which 
we see bright and sparkling ; it is that which lies 
under the surface. So it is with life, it is not that 
with which we are surrounded, but it is that that 
lies buried in the heart. It is the diver that knows 
the sea. So it is the nurse that knows life. It is 
in times of trouble that she enters the homes 
when one of the dearest lies on the bed of afflic- 
tion. The mother, wearj' and worn out with 
many hours of anxious watching, trusts to her 
implicitly the life and care of all that is dear to 
her on earth. She assures the mother by manner 
and voice that all possible in human power shall 
be done for her loved one. She seems surrounded 
by a quite peace, and as she quietly and gently 
enters the sick-room, it seems to diffuse itself to 
all present. The heretofore restless sufferer be- 
comes quiet, and with deft fingers she smooths 
the pillow under the fevered head. In a sweet, 
quiet, womanly way, she gradually lifts the lower- 
ing cloud of despair ; but how many the long dark 
days and nights the soul hovers between this life 
and the next, and she stands by and almost 
despairs of hope, and knows that she must not 



by word or act, rob the family of the slightest ray 
due them; and when there is no hope, it is i:o 
slight task to tell them all earthly help is futile — 
that the last good-bye must be said. Now is her 
duty to the living. How hard to offer words of 
comfort to an agonized, grief-stricken falnily. 
Only too well does the nurse know how ponderous 
the task. As she tries to speak words of com- 
fort, how cold and heartless they sound to her, 
and she inwardly shivers as she speaks them. 

And, again, how often when a nurse enters a 
home in hours of trouble and trial, many family 
secrets, and often the skeletons in the closets 
are laid bare. These are the tests which prove 
her worth. The true nurse is the woman, who. 
under these circumstances, "Has eyes and sees 
not, ears and hears not." To her these confidences 
are most sacred, and she buries them deep and 
never betrays such trusts. She knows all are 
human, and when the burden of life seems too 
heavy to bear, being human, we seek human sym- 
pathy, and it is thus she comes in contact with 
the undercurrent of most lives. She is compelled 
to carr\- many sorrows not her own, and yet are 
truly sorrows to her. Therefore, a woman should 
think long and test herself severely before enter- 
ing this profession, for she not only holds within 
her hand the saving of a human life, but the hap- 
pmess of homes. 



May the New Year be bright and prosperous 
to every one connected with The Gazette. 
whether faculty, student, or the "rest" of the 
faculty — The janitor. 



FOOTE.-VLL SCORES 1914. 

St. John's 60 Rock Hill 7 

St. John's 3 Cath. U 

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St. John's U. of V 88 

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207 



118 



Siarlit, smell and taste plays big: part in digestion. 

Eating is a matter of the sympathetic nerres. ">o 
profit -where no pleasure is taken." 

POSITITELY we feed you BETTER, at LESS COST 
and I> THE CLEANEST en\ironment than any one 
has ever done before sinee time began. 

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14 N. HOWARD STREET 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



Ill 



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Graduate Members. 

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Undergraduate Members. 

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.JANUARY 1, 1915. 



A SUGGESTION. 



One improvement in the administration of the 
Law School is sadly needed : there should be 
compulsory registration of the students, and they 
should be asked to signify definitely the courses 
which they expect to follow. 

It is ridiculous, for example, to sit in the 
Practice Court Friday evening and hear Judge 
Sappington call the roll. He reads out long 
lists of names without the semblance of a re- 
sponse. Some of the men, to my knowledge, 
have not been near the school for two vears. 



Young Men's Suits 

$10, $12.50 and up to $40 
THE QUALITY SHOP 

Baltimore and Liberty Sts. 
Haberdashery of Excellence 




One made his last appearance in February, lyio, 
and is now at Harvard. Another never took 
examinations and never paid any tuition ; a third 
ij married and living in California; a fourth has 
given up law for engineering, and is a student 
at the Johns Hopkins University. Yet their 
names are called with the same care as those of 
regular attendants. These are only a few 
instances in which my knowledge shows me that 
the roll is sadly defective; others could probabl)- 
furnish additional cases, and in fact, very often 
some one pipes up and tells Judge Sappington 
that a particular man has not been near the school 
for a couple of years or that, having fulfilled the 
two years' residence necessary for the bar exami- 
nation, the former student has stopped before 
graduation and is now practing law. 

Some remedy ought to be fairly easy to find, 
and that there are no stricter and no more busi- 
ness like methods of administration is regrettable, 
if not reprehensible. It makes the atmosphere 
different from what one would expect to find 
in a professional school where men are preparing 
themselves for their lifework. 

Part of the [annual tuition, five dollars, I 
believe, is called a "library fee." Would it not 
be possible to change the name, or at least the 
purpose, and call it a "registration fee," the pay- 
ment of which would be compulsory before the 
student would be considered a regular attendant 
on courses at the University of Maryland? It 
seems to me that the authorities would find it 
possible to adopt some such measure as this, and 
promulgate a rule that no student would be given 
credit for attendance on the Practice Court or 
lectures for the half year until he had appeared 
at the Office, paid his two dollars and a half, and 
said just what work he expected to do. This, 
which would work a hardship on no one, would 



ila 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



relieve the professors of the bother and dis- 
appoinment of calling long, unanswered rolls, 
and would certainly be more professional. 
Something of the sort is sadly needed in the 
University of Maryland Law School. 

o 

NEW YEAR. 



EDITORIALETS. 



Not a happy new year, nor a merry one, nor 
a prosperous one, nor even one necessarily filled 
with friends. 

Happiness is sought for, desired. We readily 
or frequently forget the more harrowing phases 
of our existence while we are happy, and some of 
us desire little else than happiness. And being 
merry is a very shallow desire, and surely not to 
be taken seriously. A tickled rib soon gives way 
to an irritation. 

And Money Trust. Of itself without a proper 
knowledge of its value, money, however, much 
it is desired is in the ultimate analysis a burden. 
Money to spend in idleness is merely another 
way to rot. 

And I do not wish for you any new friends 
nor new evidences of old friendship. Friends 
alone rarely satisfy. But we do wish you a 
wish with all our heart, and that is that you 
may have work and more work and still more 
work, and with work we know you will have 
all these other things. You who are seniors, 
these are our wishes for you, and that you may 
have a proper appreciation of your work. 



STYLISH and COMFORTABLE 
FOOT-WEAR 



FOR THE 



UNIVERSITY MAN 

All Leathers — Expert Fitting 
Moderate Prices 

WYMAN 

19 W. LEXINGTON STREET 



The prohibiting of smoking in the library has 
denied to the smokers of the University their 
apparent great necessity. They realize, however, 
that this is not an arbitrary prohibition, but was 
rendered necessary by the fact that the insurance 
companies absolutely refused to carry insurance 
upon the building and contents should smoking 
be permitted. When the students consider the 
value of eighteen to twenty thousand volumes, 
some of which cannot be replaced, they ac- 
knowledge that a moment's pleasure is not worth 
the hazard involved. 



Why not to the point? It has been the rule 
that certain students at the University of Mary- 
land shall not make social engagements with the 
nurses in the Training School. 

Is there occasion for this rule? Is the rule 
obeyed? Can a rule of this kind be strictly 
enforced ? 

As to the first question, much may be said both 
for and against, and the question may still re- 
main an open one. No matter what may have 
brought about the establishing of the rule, there 
can be but little doubt that the continuance of it 
is bound to result in the future, as in the past, 
in the constant breaking of it. 

The rule is not observed. There is not a day 
that passes without its being broken — not once, 
but in many cases. This is well known to all the 
students and to many who have been students. 

The last can hardly be expected to report what 
they may observe from day to day. They have 
in many instances been guilty themselves, and to 
report a student or a nurse would be out of the 
question. It would hardly be a safe thing to do. 
It naturally would result in no permanent good. 
It would cause a lot of trouble for the particular 
ones involved, but the practice would continue 
just the same. 

So why not revoke such a rule? Why not 
allow a student to call at the hospital and join 
there the nurse he has an engagement with, and 
later return with her to the same place ? 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



113 



As to where they should go and to how an 
evening should be spent appears to me to be a 
question for the young lady to decide. She 
surely should not be forced to slip out and meet 
the student on some corner. Nor should it be 
necessary to sneak into back seats in the theatre 
for fear of seeing someone who might report her. 
The same holds goods as regards where a supper 
may be eaten. 

It is far wiser and more self-respecting to dine 
openly in a well-known hotel dining-room than 
to hide away in a "private dining-room'' in some 
obscure place. 

A nurse loves good things to eat and good seats 
ill the theatre, and so does the student. Why 
should they be deprived of doing the open, above- 
board, self-respecting thing because of a rule 
which is not observed, never will be, and which 
cannot be enforced ? It would be a fine thing to 
quietly do away with it ; to allow our students 
nnd nurses the freedom which all young men and 
women should have. You can't make a sneak out 
of an honorable person, but you can make a 
pretty good imitation of one if you attempt to 
demand the unnatural and the unreasonable. 



ITEMS— GENERAL. 



At the meeting of the Board of Regents, held 
December 11th, in the Governor's office in the 
Garrett Building, St. John's College was the only 
one of the seven institutions of learning men- 
tioned in the law passed by the last Legislature 
creating the Maryland State University which 
did not formally affiliate with the university. 

The institutions which entered into the contract 
with the board were Western Maryland College, 
Washington College, Blue Ridge College, the 
University of Maryland, the College of Physi- 
cians and Surgeons and the Maryland Medical 
College. 

Dr. Thomas Fell, one of the regents, said that 
St. John's had not refused to join, but a better 
expression was "hesitated to do so." He said 
that at the Board meeting it was decided to study 
the matter before the college should enter into 
affiliation with the State University, and that the 
question would probably be decided at the annual 
meeting of the Board, which will be held in An- 
napolis on January 3. 



The Board of Regents, after some discussion, 
decided to postpone the selection of a provost 
and a secretary of the university until the meet- 
ing on the second Friday in January, and that in 
the meantime the chairman. State Senator Wil- 
liam Milnes Maloy, should appoint a committee 
of three to nominate the two officials. No one 
was suggested as provost, but there was some 
discussion of names in connection with the sec- 
retaryship. 

Among others the name of Lloyd Wilkinson, 
chairman of the Ways and Means Committee in 
the last House of Delegates and Democratic floor 
leader, was proposed to the Regents. It was ar- 
gued that as one of the important duties of the 
Board was recommending to the Legislature the 
amount of State aid that each institution should 
need, and as Mr. Wilkinson had a thorough 
knowledge of the conditions of Maryland col- 
leges and schools as well as of appropriations, 
not to speak of his political skill and knowledge, 
he would be a valuable aid to the Board, espe- 
cially in presenting and defending its recom- 
mendations to the Legislature. Some objection 
was made to Mr. Wilkinson and the matter went 
over. 

At the suggestion of the representatives of the 
University of Maryland, certain rules as to stand- 
ards were slightly modified and changed, and 
some changes in the form of the contract were 
made at the suggestion of the Western Maryland 
College delegates. It was decided that any insti- 
tution might withdraw from affiliation after giv- 
ing six months' notice, but it would, of course, 
thereby lose any advantages which it gained by 
affiliating. 

The law, which was fathered in the Legislature 
and put through by Senator Maloy, aims to se- 
cure co-operation and co-ordination among vari- 
ous State-aided institutions, without necessarily 
losing their separate identities, to have some cen- 
tral body supervise and standardize entrance re- 
(juirements, standards for graduation and the 
like, and especially to be able to advise the Leg- 

Tlie prevalent feeling' of happiness and good fellow- 
ship, combined with the invariably excellent dinner, 
makes all tlie world your friend, and produces an 
evening of surpassing enjoyment. 

THE NEW OLYMPIA RESTAURANT 

308 W. Baltimore St.-—306 E. Baltimore St. 
The Olympia serves nothing but clean, good food. 



THE UNlVERSiTV GAZETTE. 



NEW YORK CLOTHING HOUSE 

102 & 104 E. BALTIMORE ST. 

Men's, Boy's and Children's Clothing 

Automobile & Uniform Outfitters - - Burt's Shoes 

islature as to the needs of each institution, so 
that the money will not be distributed under the 
time-sanctioned rule of the most to the biggest 
pull, but according to some reasonable scale, and 
so that the work will not be duplicated, so that the 
State should be paying for the same thing done 
in two places instead of one. 

The Regents have an appropriation of $5,000 a 
year for administrative expenses, including the 
salaries of the provost and secretary, and $15,000 
a year for the promotion of medical education, 
which, it is expected, will be given for joint labo- 
ratory work by the three medical schools. The 
Board of Regents consists of the Governor, Comp- 
troller, Treasurer and Superintendent of Edu- 
cation, one layman from each of the six Con- 
gressional districts and two representatives from 
each of the institutions affected by the law. 

Present at the meeting were Chairman jMaloy. 
Robert Garrett, William P. Ryan, Prof. M. Bates 
Stephens, W. Thomas Kemp, Dr. Thomas Fell 
and Robert Moss, of St. John's ; Dr. Thomas H. 
Lewis and Joshua Miles, of Western Maryland 
College; Prof. James W. Cain, of Washington 
College ; Dr. Randolph Winslow and Philemon 
H. Tuck, of the University of Maryland; Dr. 
William F. Lockwood, of the College of Physi- 
cians and Surgeons ; Dr. Joseph H. Branham and 
Dr. Fred Caruthers, of the Maryland Medical 
College, and Drs. E. C. Bixler and J. Walter 
Englar. of Blue Ridge College. 



Strange things have again come to pass : Men 
adorn themselves with white "caps of purity," 
carry their books to school like good little boys 
in baskets, tread the pathway of the absurd 
before the eyes of fellow men. And this with- 
out fear or regret, for great is the reward, bril- 
liant that which follows. From the ridiculous 
to the sublime, and incidentally to other things. 
"W'hat say you now to the strange lands tra- 
versed ?" Rest quietly in your sleep. The storm 
had to come. The fire did burn with unusual 



brilliancy. The bowels of the earth are always 
cold and dank. Man can master the elements 
at times. 

Can you beat it ? Not for a minute : T. N. E. 
stood up on its hind legs and now walks like a 
man. Walks and should walk like a real man 
among men, for with at least one open secret, 
that of good fellowship, and without prejudices, 
jealousies, or politics to play, it is as it should 
be, a great privilege and honor to be a member 
of this 'Frat of Frats'. 



MEDICAL— GRADUATE. 



Dr. N. Nitch, T.3, who has been an interne at 
St. Agnes' Hospital for the past one and a half 
3ears, was recently operated on for appendicitis. 
Dr. Nitch is now fully recovered and is spending 
a few weeks on a trip before again entering on 
his work. 



Dr. Leonard Hays, class of 191:!, was a visitor 
here a short time ago and mentioned some of the 
interesting work he is undertaking. Dr. Hays has 
Ijeen in Dr. Gottheil's clinic and expects shortly 
to work under Dr. Fordyce, both of whom are 
among the foremost dermatologists and syphi- 
lographers in this country. We extend our hearty 
congratulations to him on the opportunity for 
special work in serology. 



Dr. W. E. Martin, '09, while attempting to 
crank his car a few days ago sustained a com- 
minuted fracture of his right forearm. 



Among recent visitors at the University Hos- 
pital were the following: H. R. Wiener, '12. 
Harrisburg, Pa. ; Devilbliss, '10, Md. ; S. J. Price, 
'09, Md. 



Dr. Charles F. Strosnider, class of 1909, is 
taking a several weeks' course at the University 
Hospital, in internal medicine. 



Among recent visitors at the University Hos- 
pital were Drs. Cantwell, 'o6, North East, Md. : 
James Bay, 'o8, Havre de Grace, Md. ; E. Strass- 
ler, 'i2, Shawmett, Pa.; Sappington, 'oi, Han- 
cock, Md. 



At the annual meeting of the Southern Medi- 
cal Association held in Richmond, Ya.., there was 
born another link in the chain which is ever bind- 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 115 

B L O M E ' S HEPBRON & H AYDON 

We Sell Every Law Book and Syllabus Used 

Honey Molasses Taffy at the u. of m. 

FOR SALE EVERYWHERE st. Paui8794 1243-53 calvert bldg. 



iug the forces of the University of Maryland into 
a closer union. Reference is made to the South- 
ern Alumni Association of the University of 
Maryland. Throughout the South there are 
located numbers of the University graduates, and 
until now no effort has been made to bind them 
into a homogeneous body. It is therefore with 
especial pleasure that The Gazette announces 
to our readers that this organization has been 
founded mainly through the eft'orts of Professor 
T. A. Ashby. This is indeed good news, and The 
Gazette sincerely hopes that every alumnus in 
the South will join the organization. It is through 
such agencies as these that the influence of the 
University of Maryland can be enhanced, and 
since our connection with The Gazette noth- 
ing has occurred which to our minds possesses 
the same potentialities of good as the creation 
of the Southern Alumni Association. It is to 
meet annually at the annual meeting of the South- 
ern Medical Association wherever that may be. 
Do not delay, but send in your application for 
membership immediately to Dr. W. S. Rankin, 
Raleigh, N. C. 

o — 

LAW— GRADUATE. 



The foundation of a post-graduate course for 
the Law School of the University of Maryland 
was advocated by Ward B. Coe, of the faculty 
of the university, at a banquet given Saturday 
evening, December 19th, at the Hotel Rennert 

J. fREO SHAfER, Prts. WM. E. READ, Vice-Pres. WM. 6. HORN, Sec'y-Treas. 

THE HORN-SHAFER CO. 

Printers and Publishers 

3-5 GERMAN STREET, EAST 

BALTIMORE 

Private Branch Exchange, St. Paul 7077-7078 

Printers of 1912 '13 and '14 "Terrae Marlae" 
There must be a reason 



by the law class of 1916. 

Thirty-three members of the university's 
students who hope to be graduated as lawyers 
a year from next June gathered around a big 
table and heard speeches, sang songs and enjoyed 
a most appetizing meal. George Tyler Smith, 
president of the class, was toastmaster. 

Mr. Coe, in discussing the advantages a post- 
graduate law course would give, declared that he 
hardly expected his suggestion to be adopted, 
since it had not been considered seriously by the 
Regents of the University. 

Judge James P. Gorter made a brief address, 
in which he told the students that there was 
always room at the top for good lawyers, and 
urged upon them the necessity of studying hard, 
of reading much and of learning to be good 
speakers. 

Other speakers were Howard Bryant and 
Edwin T. Dickerson, also members of the faculty 
of the law school, and ^Vendall D. Allen, Charles 
M. Cover and J. Newell Graham, students. Piano 
music was furnished by Herbert Levy, while 
vocal selections were given as a quartet by C. 
Denny Armstrong, W. Lester Baldwin, John F. 
Farley and E. E. Oldhauser. 

Others present were Edwin L. G. Wright, I. 
J. Sullivan, R. J. McGregor, J. Read Bailey, P. J. 
Wilkinson, W. S. Cooper, J. D. Brickwedde, 
R. Gordon Gambrill, J. W. Edel, Grafton Duvall, 
Victor G. Bloede, Jr., John Scheiner, J. Edwin 
Smith, John A. Farley, Dudley G. Cooper, H. 
A. Waldkoenig, Frank J. Sayler, W. M. Lytle, 
George R. Hughes, Howell C. Gwaltney, James 
F. Ethridge, Roger B. Copinger, Edward J. 
Coolahan and J. William Schimmel. 



LAW— SENIOR. 



Curse. 



Oh ! Ye conquerors, great gods of lust. 

Who wrench your glory from thv brothers' 
dust. 

Cease while yet thy eyes can see. 

Cease ere this curse shall fall on thee. 



IIG 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



Squirming before your eyes iii a midst of red, 
Be the blood-soaked bodies of your glorious 
dead, 

Mangled and torn may they greet your eyes, 
And may thy ears eternall}' hear their cries. 

May thy tongues feel their pangs of thirst. 

Thy lives be o'ercast by the oaths they've cursl. 

Thy slumbers haunted by their dying groans. 
Thy waking hours by their piteous moans. 

May thy nostrils breathe the hideous smell, 
That rises to God from where they fell ; 

The curses of mothers thy flesh shall sear. 

For thy greedy slaughter of their cherished 
dear. 

Stained may thy covers be, blood red, 

Stained as the snow by the blood of the dead, 

Massed be the bones of those who fell. 
Into a throne for thee in hell. 

J. A. H., T5. 



Mr. Chas. F. O'Neill, otherwise known as the 
pink whiskered Scandanavian of the Senior 
Class, was recently mistaken for a member of 
"Honey Boy" Evans minstrel troupe. 

Thomas was hesitating . and fox trotting 
about 2 A. M. and it seems by some magnetic 
force he drew all the ladies in the place to his 
side, indeed he had 'em lined up waiting for their 
tlance. Mr. Tom was also at a loss to explain 
this favoritism,- but we know it was because they 
thought he was ail actor man. 

Thomas F. told some one the day after, when 
asked what time he got home, that it was shortly 
after 12, but he didn't get it across 'cause "some 
one" had waited for him 'till 1.20 A. M. Poor 
Tom ! 



We have recently discovered a reason for the 
Morpheus Club's soporofic exhibitions during 
class. These gentlemen have gotten the hour of 
retiring and that of arising mixed. I say this 
because at least three nights during the last week 
when I have at 2 A. M. suggested going home 
and incidentally to bed they exhibited surprise 
and insisted that bed at such an hour was a very 
puerile thing and only for invalids and spinster 
ladies. 

The organization is governed by the same oth- 
cers as last year : High Chief Soper. N^'alter H . 
Prem, Master of Poses, C. B. Smyth, Inspector 
of Dopes, Thos. F. O'Neill. 



The editors of Terra Marise have asked the 
members of the Senior Class to respond promptly 
to all Terras Marise business. It has been done 
as usual Not! There is quite a lot of detail 
work in editing a year book and the men who 
liave had the work wished on them have also the 
same other work to do that you have. 

When contributions are asked, please be 
prompt because a publisher is a very insistent 
person to deal with and a very independent one 
also. 

Each Senior's assessment is eight dollars — pay 
in weekly installments and be done with it; be 
photographed and send in your autobiographies. 



Mr. Benj. G. Gold sure went a long way for 
a Thanksgiving dinner. Cincinnati is no little 
distance to go for turkey, but did he go for 
chicken or turkey, or both ? Well, we have an 
opinion. 



It's time to renew subscriptions and you want 
them renewed. See your editor. 


DENTAL— GRADUATE. 



Dr. L. Whiting Farinholt, D.D.S., class of 
1898, announces his return to his former offices, 
:>18 North Charles street (over John Cook's 
flower store), on December 1, 1914. Telephone 
St. Paul 1591. 

0- ■ — ■ — 

DENTAL— SENIOR. 



At a recent meeting of the Senior Class, Mr. 
Magee was elected artist to succeed Mr. Adams, 
who has left school. 



The dental department has organized for 
baseball next spring. At a recent meeting, 
"Dandy" Dave Danforth was elected manager, 
and W. S. Mitchell captain. J. J. Purcell will 
assist Danforth in his managerial duties. 



Mr. Magee has a new treatment for the hair. 
It consists in placing the head at the proper 
angle for direct vision of the occlusal of the 
third molar tooth, and near enough to the alcohol 
lamp to start a conflagration and remain in this 
.nttitude until some fellow student arrives on the 
scene. Thanks to Nathanson's life-saving ability 
for Magee's presence among us. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



117 



Waterman has a cigar box partially tilled 
with hairpins and other head paraphernalia. 
Anyone desiring antique and interestuig keep- 
sakes apply at the impression rooms. 



Lynough is certainly tryiiiy to hand it out to 
the professors. He is playing safe as times are 
getting hard. He is the senior who says he is 
not afraid of work. \Ve should think not, as 
he has been known to sleep by it. 



It has been suggested that the senior class 
present Buist and Webster with cuspidors. They 
are there with the "scrap." 



Uur genial Irish friend, J.J. Purcell, otters the 
following as a sequence to class observation : New- 
infirmary Rules. 

I. Never wear a clean coat. It looks too pro- 
fessional. 

n. li you want anything in the line of instru- 
ments, you will find it in the nearest open case. 
Uo not ask for it, as you may offend the owner. 

HI. Throw all paper and cotton on the floor; 
the waste baskets are distinctively ornamental. 

I\'. Collect money from patients, but do not 
turn it in at the desk. The school is supported 
by its foundations. 

V. In passing a foot engine, give it a kick. 
It will not injure the engine, and aids the oper- 
ator in his work. 

VI. When a demonstrator otters instructions, 
do the opposite thing ; it is the best way to learn. 

VII. Smoking and chewing are advised and 
encouraged. Partially smoked cigars and cig- 
arette stubbs may be had from window ledge at 
head of steps. 

VIII. Do not keep appointments with your 
patients, as it gives this infirmary a good name, 
and tends to add to your chances to get off 
infirmary requirments. 

IX. When anything goes wrong let out a 
string of oaths to assure the patient you have 
a well-equipped vocabulary. 



LUTHER B. BENTON 
Dental Depot 



students' Outfits 
a Specialty 



305 North Howard St. 







LEFRANC & AULT 




MEN'S AND WOMEN'S 




Guaranteed Goatskin Gloves 




Also Fownes' Make 




AT THE 




"SHIRT SHOP" 




421 N. Howard St., at Franklin 









X. When demonstrators are engaged in con- 
conversation "but in." It is part of your busi- 
ness to learn of their private affairs, and they 
love to have your presence. 



DENTAL— JUNIOR. 



Pipe Dreams. 

Your plate is perfect — Patterson. 

(On first inspection) Margins are O. K. 

— Rea. 
No examinations this mid-year. — Heatwole. 
Juniors need not do infirmary work. 

— Robinson. 
What is the use of practical prosthesis? 

Guerra. 
Bridge work is optional. — Farinholt. 
Physiology is not required of dental men. 

■ — Hemmeter. 
Lecture attendance does not count. — JMatthews. 
Oh, Morpheus ! Clasp us tightly to thy bosom. 



The Junior Class has decided to present J. S. 
Geiser, former prosthetic demonstrator, a pic- 
ture of the class. 



A. H. PETTING 

Manufacturer of 

GREEK LETTER FRATERNITY JEWELRY 

213 N. Liberty St., = Baltimore, Md. 
Factory: 212 Little Sharp St. 



Memorandum package sent to any fraternity member through the 
secretary of the chapter. Special designs and estimates furnished on 
medals, rings and pins for athletic meets, etc. 



118 



THE UNIVERSJTV GAZETTE. 



^ 



quA 




eIDiehl 

Clothes 

J.Ml l .L I .Nl l .LLL I J.MJ. Iffl 

built at 605 W. Baltimore St., 
just around the corner from the 
University, are kept pressed with- 
out cost. 

Suits $15 to $40 



Nathanson has been chosen chief of the In- 
firmary Volunteer Fire Department. For par- 
ticulars, see Senior item.s. 



Several Juniors recently battled with fraternity 
goats, etc. They say they are gradually becom- 
ing normal again. 



PHARMACY— GRADU.A.TE. 



The local branch of the American Pharm- 
aceutical Association held a special meeting at 
Charles and Franklin sts., called by Dr. Hynson. 

It was for the purpose of reviving interest 
among Baltimore pharmacists in the affairs of 
the American Association. 

President Mayo, of New York addressed the 
meeting. He said, "Marylanders had long been 
leaders in the A. Ph. A. It had furnished five 
presidents and six vice-presidents and last but 
not least the father of pharmacy. Dr. Proctor." 

Dr. Kelly, president of the Baltimore branch 
was in the chair ; Dr. Hodson took his part as 
secretary. Dr. Englehardt, chairman of the scien- 
tific section made several good statements and 



Hart Schaffner & Marx, 
Kuppenheimer, 
"Society Brand" 



The clothes that college men 
like a lot 



TReiUSIlDHub 

Baltimore Street At C^arle5 



Dr. Thomas associate in the commercial section 
of the organization, spoke of the progress in 
their fields. 

Dr. Chas. Caspari, State Food and Drugs Com- 
missioner spoke on the new Pharmacopoeia and 
many valuable additions which had been made. 

Six women pharmacists, all members of the 
Maryland Association, were present and much 
real interest was shown by them for the affairs 
of the National Association, and they join Dr. 
Hynson in taking pride in keeping the state 
well to the front, in pharmaceutical progress. 

After the business and scientific discussions 
were ended, a luncheon was served and about 
eleven o'clock the meeting adjourned. 

Everyone spent a very enjoyable evening and 
felt profited to the extent of advancing his in- 
dividual interests. 



ACADEMIC—GRADUATE. 



A. W. W. Woodcock, "03, St. John's College, 
graduate of law University of Maryland, '10, and 
.\[.A. at Harvard 1912, who was Secretary to 
Senator Jackson and who this fall conducted the 
Republican state campaign as Secretary to the 
Republican State Central Committee, has just 
formed the law partnership of Woodcock & 
W^ebb to practice law in Salisbury and Washing- 
ion. 



At a meeting of the Board of \'isitors and 
( iovernors, held on Monday evening, December 
; , formal recognition was granted to the Phi Mu 
Theta Fraternity, which was recently organized. 
It is to be governed by the same rules now apply- 
ing to the Phi Sigma Kappa. 



The Faculty of St. John's College has pre- 
sented Dr. and Mrs. Adolph Schumacher with a 
beautiful set of silver knives and forks. Since 
their marriage in August they have received many 
N'aluable presents from their many friends. 



R. B. Spencer, A.B., St. John's, 1901, LL.B.. 
(Georgetown, 1913, has just been appointed Solici- 
tor in the Department of Justice and sent on spe- 
cial duty to Chicago. 



W. Thomas Kemp, '97, graduate in law Co- 
kimbia University, and attorney for the Oyster- 
men's Association, has just been appointed as one 
of the Board of Governors of St. John's College. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



119 



B w Saratoga St 




Maryland- 



Duncan Walton, 1905, St. John's College, and 
M.D., Johns Hopkins, 1909, is stationed at the 
United States Naval Academy as a member of 
the medical staff. 



H. B. Scarborough, 1904, is pursuing graduate 
work at St. John's in mathematics and electricity. 



H. F. Sturdy, 1906, has been asked to serve 
as one of the three official umpires of the Eastern 
Intercollegiate Basketball League, comprising 
University of Pennsylvania, Princeton, Dart- 
mouth, Cornell, Yale and Columbia. Mr. Sturdy 
is also official basketball representative of the 
South Atlantic Intercollegiate Athletic Associa- 
tion. 

On Friday, November 27, 1911, the annual 
meeting for the interpretation of basketball rules 
was held by the Inter-collegiate Basketball Rules 
Committee at Hotel Astor, New York City. Pro- 
fessor H. Sturdy, '06, attended the meeting as 
a representative from St. John's. 



Major E. W. Evans, military instructor, St. 
John's College, 1899, and now with the Tenth 
Cavalry on the Mexican frontier, visited the 
college last week. 



J. P. Jacobs, '12, is instructor in St. Paul's 
School, Baltimore. 



William F. Childs, Jr., '07, of Salisbury, Md., 
holds the position of Resident Highway Engi- 
neer. 



J. G. Shannahan, '08, was married recently. 
He is now in Baltimore and connected with the 
Continental I.ife Insurance Company. 



Just after the Hopkins game Dr. Fell re- 
ceived a telegram from John T. Harrison, of 
New York City, congratulating the team on its 
splendid victory. Mr. Harrison is manager of 
the Fidelitv Trust, New York. 



Intercollegiate Bureau of Academic Costume, Aibany.N.v 
COTRELL & 



LEONARD 

Official Malters of 

Caps and 

Gowns 




Correct Hoods 
for All Degrees. 

Rich Gowns for 
Pulpit and Bench. 

Bulletin, Samples 
etc. on request 



Lieutenant E. B. Garey, U. S. A., clasS of 
1903, made a short visit to the college on Tues- 
day of last week. He has just returned from 
China, where he has been stationed for the past 
few years, and now is spending a short while 
home in Denton, Md. Lieut. Garey was captain 
of the St. John's football team in 1902 and also 
captain of the football team at West Point. 



Several alumni were prominent speakers at 
the mass-meeting held on the eve of the Hop- 
kins game. For instance, Roger Moss, '11, one 
of our young Annapolis lawyers, spoke and said 
the team would win. The students have greatly 
appreciated his interest in the team and aid in 
helping to coach. 



Lieut. E. P. Duvall, U. S. A., has written a 
very interesting letter to Dr. Fell, in which he 
says that he and Walter Smith, class of '97, 
would like to join in offering their congratula- 
tions to the football team. 



Mrs. Anna Key Bartow, the granddaughter 
of Francis Scott Key, has presented a very hand- 
some flag to St. John's College, and writes to the 
President of the College, as follows: 

"My affection for my native State, and es- 
pecially for Annapolis, has been, and is, an endur- 
ing interest to my life, and I value highly my 
affiliation with the old and revered names that 
stand on the record of the Alumni of St, John's 
College." Thus she modestly withholds any spe- 
cial reference to her honored grandfather, in 
whose memory the flag is undoubtedly given. 

A ceremony of formal presentation was held 
in the chapel on Friday morning, December 11. 
Dr. Fell made appropriate remarks, and the stu- 
dent body sang the National anthem, "The Star- 
Spangled Banner." 

It was very much regretted that Mrs. Bartow 
and Miss Habersham, the only descendants of 
Francis Scott Key, now living in .Vnnapolis, were 
unable to be present. 



120 



THE UNR'ERSITY GAZETTE. 



ACADEMIC— UNDERGRADUATE. 



Delightful refreshments were served during 
the course of the evening. 



H. R. Holljes, '12, well known among St. 
John's men as "Long John/' visited the college 
and addressed this mass-meeting. He is now 
doing student work in engineering for the Balti- 
more and Ohio Railroad Company. While at 
St. John's he was verj^- prominent in all musical 
organizations and still makes use of these talents, 
being at present leader of a band organized 
among the MeDonough School Alumni. 



Immediately after the Hopkins game in Balti- 
more, the St. John's football team, while assem- 
bled for the big dinner of that evening, elected 
Irving Heise captain for the season of 1915. 

The Sun says of Heise : "He is a good gen- 
eral, very capable in running the ends, an adept 
in making the forward pass and a splendid de- 
fensive player." In addition, Heise is an all- 
round athlete being a foremost player in baseball 
and basketball as well. 



FOOTBALL DANCE. 

The members of the football squad were the 
guests of honor at a dance given on the night of 
Friday, December i, in the Gymnasium, by Dr. 
Fell and Coach Wilson, assisted by several of 
the Annapolis followers of the Orange and Black. 

The guests were received by Mrs. Robert Moss 
and Dr. Fell. 

The gymnasium was tastefully decorated, the 
football used in the Hopkins game, with the score 
printed upon it. occupying a prominent position. 

The members of the football team received 
their monograms from the hands of Mrs. Moss, 
while Mrs. E. Berkeley Iglehart handed each 
man a gold football scarf pin, the pift of Coach 
Wilson. As a token of their appreciation of his 
untiring efforts during the season jitst passed, 
the football squad next presented Mr. \\'ilson 
with a handsome ring. Dr. Fell making the pre- 
sentation speech. 

The men who received monograms and pins at 
this occasion are as follows : Captain Selby, 
Heise, Andrews, Bowen, Turner, Hause. Hyde, 
Noble, Stromeyer, Winslow. ^^'alsh, Bielaski, 
Lamar. 

There was a full attendance of Annapolis girls, 
and also a number from out of town. The danc- 
ing, by special permission of the Board, lasted 
until 11.30 P. M.. this being a rare treat to the 
students. 



Students Celebil\te Their Victory Over 
Hopkins. 

As a fitting climax to the 1911 football season, 
and especially in celebration of the big victory 
over our old rivals of Johns Hopkins University 
in Baltimore on Thanksgiving Day, the student 
body on Monday night engaged in a jollification 
about the streets of Annapolis. 

The famous serpentine dance started on Prince 
George street and proceeded through all the prin- 
cipal streets of the city, and for more than an 
hour our cheers, songs, and yells rent the air. 
Stopping at the principal corners, our yells were 
given first for the team, then for some individual 
friend, and finally for the Annapolis people in 
general. The best of good feeling prevailed 
among the students and residents of the city, and 
all along the way cheers were given for the 
happy cadets. The most favored of the stunts 
was the counting of the score of the St. John's- 
Hopkins game, of which the figures were 34 to 
13. 

\\'e believe, as do our friends, that we have 
an equal claim with M. A. C. to the State cham- 
pionship. Each team lost one game with the 
other State colleges, but, <:omparing the scores, 
.St. John's smothered other teams with twice the 
score as did the Maryland Aggies. There is, ap- 
parently, no way of settling the title now, so it 
will necessarilv remain a matter of sentiment. 



FOOTBALL iL\XAGERS FOR 1915. 

At a meeting of the Athletic Association, held 
on December 3, R. O. Jones was elected manager 
of the football team for 1915. S. ^^^ Freeny was 
elected assistant manager of this team. 



NURSING. 



The regtilar fall meeting of the Nurses' 
Alumnae Association of the University of Mary- 
land was held at University Hospital on the 
afternoon of December 7th, j\Iiss M. E. Rolph. 
president in the chair. After the business meet- 
ing several nursing topics were discussed and a 
social hour was spent. Tea was served. 

Miss Corinne Bogart, class of 1915, was 
operated on for appendicitis at the hospital, the 
first of the month and has gone to her home in 
Martinsburg, \\". \"a.. to recuperate. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE, 



121 



We are glad to announce to her many friends 
that Mrs. Nathan Winslow — Margaret Kable 
Massey, class of 1903, University Hospital Train- 
ing School for Nurses — who recently underwent 
a second operation for intestinal obstruction, will 
soon be able to leave the hospital. Mrs. Wins- 
low has always taken a great interest in anything 
pertaining to the uplifting of the nursing pro- 
fession, especially with regard to her alma mater, 
for a number of years and at present being treas- 
urer of the Alumnae Association of the Univer- 
sity Hospital Training School for Nurses. She 
is also treasurer of the Ladies' Auxiliary Board 
of the University Hospital. 



Y. M. C. A. NOTES. 



Miss Lucy Hill, class of 1914, who was re- 
cently operated on at the hospital, has resumed 
her duties. 



Miss Nancy L. Walton, class of 1904, is a patient 
at the University Hospital. We are glad to re- 
port that she is convalescing nicely and soon will 
be able to return to her home in Annapolis. 



Mrs. Ryan, a probationer, is convalescing from 
an appendectomy which she recently underwent 
at the University Hospital. 



Miss E. M. Getzendanner, class of 1909, has 
sufficiently recovered from the accident to her 
knee to return to her home in Frederick, Md. 



Miss S'. A. Hostrawser, class of 1908, has re- 
turned from her home in Canada and resumed 
private nursing. 



Miss N. L. Brian, class of 1907, who for some 
years had charge of the Atlantic Coast Line Hos- 
pital at Rocky Mount, N. C, has returned to 
Baltimore to engage in private nursing. 



Mrs. C. U. Whelchel (nee Mary A. Ruther- 
ford). 1913, who was married on the ",^3(1 of No- 
vember, will reside in Gainesville, Ga. 



WILLIAM J. MILLER 
Jewelry, Diamonds, Watches 

College Jewelry 

Class Pins and Rings, College Seals 

26 Bast Baltimore St. Baltimore, Md. 



We are glad to announce that we are to have 
a treat in January as we expect to have "Ted" 
Mercer with us. Most of the third and fourth 
year men will remember when he was with us 
two years ago. Mr. Mercer is a college man, 
having attended the University of Virginia. He 
has had a most interesting career and is now in 
college work for the Y. M. C. A. He has visited 
nearly every Eastern college and is familiar with 
college work and college men. 

We expect to have him meet and talk to the 
different classes as well as to make an address 
lo the entire student body as Dr. Fell has prom- 
ised to secure one hour for this purpose. Also 
we hope that he will be able to visit each fra- 
ternity house and thus come in close touch with 
a great number of men. 

All who know Mr. Mercer can testify to his 
strength of character and the splendid message 
that he brings to college men. Every place he has 
gone he has impressed college men with the real 
value of Christianity, and as he says, his life 
shows what it can do for a man. 

We know that all will be glad to hear him when 
he comes, so keep in mind the date, January 20tli 
to 21th. 

o 

QUIPS. 

Some months back the Gazette suggested the 
appearance on the back of the matriculation card . 
I he promise to abide by the honor system. As 
the suggestion has not been followed, the 
GAZiiTTE again urges its desirability. 

All honest men will willingly subscribe to the 
covenant: "I hereby promise to uphold the honor 
system in vogue at the University of Maryland, 
and as an earnest thereof attach my signature." 
Those who are unwilling to subscribe are not 
desired. The University is better off without 
them. It does not need them. They will be no 
credit to their Alma Mater. 

E LLERBROCK 

SIl^p spacing (Eollpg? ^l^ntograptjpr 
22 W. Lexington St., = Baltimore, Md. 



12-^ 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



And in the meanwhile the proposition voiced 
by the GAZETTE months ago that a commercial 
department would be a desirable addition, still 
holds. Not only would such an addition bring 
more students to the University, but it would 
give to the community men and women better 
prepared to engage in life's battle. This is an 
opportunity which should not be allowed to fall 
through. 

o 

ANNOUNCEMENT. 



Mr. and Mrs. E. Russell Cooper, of Calvert 
street ,announce the engagement of their daugh- 
ter, Josephine Irene, to Mr. George Brauer 
Oehm. On her father's side Miss Cooper is a 
direct descendant of Earl Russell. Duke of Bed- 
ford. Her mother is from an old Covenanter 
family of New York. 

Mr. Oehm is a graduate of the Maryland Uni- 
versity School of Law and is a member of the 
well-known Oehm family of Baltimore. 

The marriage will take place this winter. 




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the very finest hats 
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a fraction of their 
real values. 

Baltimore & Hanover Sts. 



MARRIAGES. 



Mr. Charles C. Di Paula. LL. B., Class of 1914, 
was married to Miss Rose Agatha Maggio, both 
of Baltimore, on December 3, 1914. The cere- 
mony was performed at St. Peter's Church and 
was witnessed by numerous friends and relatives. 

An elaborate reception was given from six to 
ten P. M. at the residence of the groom's father. 
No. 11:4:5 E. Eager Street. 

Mr. Di Paula and his bride left later in the 
evening for a wedding journey. Their itinerary 
included Washington. New York, Boston, Phila- 
delphia and Atlantic City. They will be at home 
after December 15, at 1445 E. Eager Street. 



Oliver Y. Harris, LL.B., class of 1914, of Bal- 
timore, was married to Miss Laura A. Albert, of 
Halethorpe, in the parsonage of Starr Methodist 
Protestant Church, Mount Alto, by the Rev. 
George W. Haddaway, November 15, 1914. The 
bride wore a traveling suit of brown gabardine. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



123 



with brown picture liat and plumes to match, and 
carried yellow chrysanthemums. Immediately 
following the ceremony, Mr. and Mrs. Harris 
left for Atlantic City. They will reside at 1438 
W'est Lanvale street, Baltimore. 



William Fenmore Childs, Jr., St. John's Col- 
lege, class of 1907, of Annapolis, Md., was mar- 
ried to Miss Alice Blanche Carr, of Hyattsville, 
Md., in Pinkney Memorial Protestant Church, 
Hyattsville, October 14th. The Rev. Henry 
Thomas, rector of St. Matthew's parish, offi- 
ciated. Following the wedding a reception was 
held at the bride's home. Mr. and Mrs. Childs 
will reside in Salisbury, Md. 



Dr. Cleveland D. Whelchel, class of 1913, of 
Gainesville, Ga., was married to Miss Mary A. 
Rutherford, University Hospital Training School 
for Nurses, class of 1913, of Winchester, Va., No- 
vember 23, 1914. The ceremony was performed 
at the apartment of the bride's sister, Miss Volina 
Rutherford, G40 West North avenue, by the Rev. 
James M. Wallace, pastor of Aisquith Street Pres- 
byterian Chmxh. Miss Camilla Rutherford was 
her sister's maid of honor, and Dr. J. William 
Ebert, of Winchester, 'Va., a cousin of the bride, 
was the best man. After a wedding journey the 
couple will reside in Gainesville. 



Dr. John E. O'Neill, class of 1910, of 3508 
North Charles street, of the Health Department, 
was married to Miss Catherine Agnes Thurman, 
of 2134 Oak street, November 23, 1914. The 
ceremony was performed at a nuptial mass at 
SS. Philip and James' Catholic Church by the 
Rev. Hugh J. Monaghan. Only members of the 
two families and a few friends of the couple were 
present. After a wedding breakfast. Dr. and 
Mrs. O'Neill left for their honeymoon. They 
will reside at 2508 North Charles street. Dr. 
O'Neill has charge of the tuberculosis dispensary 
work for the Health Department. 

o 

DEATHS. 



WARNER 8c CO. 

222-224 WEST BALTIMORE ST. 



his early education with private teachers in this 
city, later entering Dickinson College, from which 
he was graduated in 1879. 

At the expiration of his college career he re- 
turned to Baltimore and began the study of law 
at the University of Maryland, at the same time 
being principal of old Grammar School No. 12. 
He was admitted to the bar in 1889, and a year 
later entered the faculty of the City College. At 
the college he was a colleague of Prof. Charles 
F. Raddatz, who died last January. 

Few men in this city could command a larger 
number of personal friends than could Mr. Cole 
— or Professor Cole, as he was affectionately 
known by the scores of men who had been his 
pupils when he was head of the department of 
history and political economy at the Baltimore 
City College. He entered the faculty of that in- 
stitution in 1890 and resigned six years later to 
take up the practice of law with Charles W. Field. 

His membership in the State Board of Educa- 
tion extended from 1904 to 1912. At the same 
time, and later, he was prominently identified 
with the Dickinson College Alumni Association 
of Baltimore. 

On November 12, 1895, Mr. Cole married Miss 
Elizabeth A. Rice, of this city. She is his only 
survivor. 



Robert Clinton Cole, LL.B., class of 1889, of 
107 Ridgewood road, Roland Park, died suddenly 
from apoplexy at his home, December 16, 1914, 
aged 57 years. 

Mr. Cole was born in Cecil county, November 
16, 1857, and was the only child of the late Rob- 
ert C. and Ellen A. (Wise) Cole. He received 



Dr. Joseph Muse Worthington, class of 1872, a 
member of the Medical and Chirurgical Faculty 
of Maryland, died at his home in Annapolis, from 
a lingering illness, September 21, 1914, aged 68 
vears. 



Dr. Samuel J. Hoffman, class of 1877, a mem- 
ber of the Medical Society of 'Virginia, died at his 
home in Woodstock, 'Va., from carcinoma, aged 
62 years. 



Dr. Charles Irving Stotelmeyer, class of 1892, 
of Hagerstown, Ind., a member of the Indiana 
State Medical Association, trustee of Jefferson 
township, died in the Reid Memorial Hospital, 
Richmond, Ind., November 12, 1914, after a sur- 
gical operation, aged 55 years. 



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EMPLOYERS — POSITIONS WANTED 
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Vol. I. 



BALTIMORE, MD., FEBRUARY I, 1915. 



No. 8. 



TheUniyersity 




DEVOTED 
TO THE INTERESTS OF 
THE UNIVERSITY OFMARYLAND 



Buie 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



Vol. I. 



FEBRUARY 1, 1915. 



No. 8. 



CONTENTS 



TRI-CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 
THE UNH^ERSITY OF GRONIN- 
GEN, THE. Frank Martin, M.D 137 

EDITORIALS 13 1 

Loyalty \ersus Magazine. 
Ye Editors and Ye Lova'u'v. 



ITEMS 135 

QUIPS 141 

BIRTHS .11-3 

MARRIAGES 142 

DEATHS 143 



Footwear for the College Man at Moderate Price. 

N. HESS' SONS - - 8 E. Baltimore, St. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE, MD. 

HOX. PHILLIPS LEE GOLDSBOROUGH, Governor of Maryland, Chancellor. 
THOMAS FELL, A. M., Ph. D., L L. D., D. C. L.. Provost 



ST. JOHN'S COLLEGE. Annapolis, Md. (.^^r^SL^IolNCEs) 

Founded i6g6. Classical and Scientific College Courses leading to d jgrees. Special advantages to stu- 
dents purposing to study the professions. Military Department under army officers. .\lso Preparatory 
School for boys fitting for St. John's or other colleges. Term begins Sepl :mber 21. Address 

THOMAS FELL, Ph.D., LL.D., D.C.L., President. 



DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE. 



Four years' graded course. New Laboratory Build- 
ing. Clinical advantages unsurpassed. Teaching Staff 
of 66. loSth Annual Session will begin October i, 
1914, and continue 8 months 

R. DORSEY COALE, Ph.D., M.D.. Dean. 



DEPARTMENT OF DENTISTRY. 

33d Annual Session begins October i, 1914, and 
continues 7 months. 26 Instructors. New Building. 
For catalogue containing course of study, etc., apply to 

TIMOTHY 0. HEATWOLE, M.D., D.D.S., Dean, 

Baltimore, Md. 



DEPARTMENT OF LAW. 

59th Annual Session will begin Sept. 2S, 1914. Faculty 
of 26. For catalogue containing full information ad- 
dress the Secretary, 301 St. Paul Street, Baltimore, 
Maryland. 

EDWIN T. DICKERSON, Secretary. 



DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACY. 

(Formerly Maryland College of Pharmacy). 72nd 
Annual Session begins September 25, 1914. 11 In- 
structors. New Laboratories. Address 

CHARLES CASPAR!, JR., Phar.D., Dean, 

Baltimore, Md. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 

Published Monthly in the Interest of the University ot Maryland. 
PRICE $1.00 PER YEAR. 



Contributions solicited from Alumni of the 
University. 



Business Address, 608 Professional Bulldinff. 
Baltimore, Md. 



Vol. I. 



BALTIMORE, MD., FEBRUARY 1, 1915. 



No. S 



THE TRI-CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION 
OF THE UNIVERSITY OF GRONINGEN.* 



Dr. Fr.-\nk Martin'. 



To the Provost of the University of Maryland. 
^ To the Faculty of the Unii'crsity. 
W To the Students of the various departments^ 

Ladies and Gentlemen — 

Just prior to my sailing last June for Europe, 
1 was asked by our Provost Professor Fell, to go 
as a delegate to the tri-centennial celebration of 
the Uni\ersity of Groningen which was to take 
place the end of June. I must confess I was a 
little dubious when this honor was thrust upon 
me. whether to dare say I would accept or not ; 
first because 1 knew nothing of the Dutch lan- 
guage, and I am free to admit that I knew nothing 
of the history of the Groningen University, 
llowexer, I accepted the honor and promised to 
be present and represent the University of Mary- 
Irmd at this celebration, as best I could. 

I might say that the principal reason for my 
being asked to be the representative of our Uni- 
\ersity was as a substitute, in view of the fad 
that I had arranged to be on the continent and 
attend the continental clinics which had been 
l)re-arranged for a large body of .\merican 
surgeons and physicians as a prelude, as it were, 
to the fifth annual session of the Clinical Con- 
gress of Surgeons of North America, which was 
held in London the week of July 37th. 

I sailed with a large number of surgeons on the 
S. .S. Oceanic June Kith, arri\-ing in Cherbourg 
June 30th, and proceeded at once to Paris, where 
we found the now almost deserted city, on ac- 
count of the ravages of war, then in its gayest 
attire, June being one of the most beautiful 
months in Paris. Their artistic floral decorations 
were at their best and the life there the gayest and 
brightest of any city the world over. Our atten- 
tion was given up mostly to the Parisian clincs 

*Note. — Read at the Academic Day exercises on 
November 11th, 1914, University of Maryland. 



which were elaborately gotten up for our benefit, 
and I found them distinctly worth while. Part 
of the time was devoted to seeing many of the 
iiUeresting historical sites of Paris and the mas- 
terpieces of art in the various galleries. We 
remained in Paris nearly a week, and the ques- 
tion arose in mv mind whether to continue there, 
as the time was drawing near for the celebration 
at Groningen, because it would have been easier 
for me to have reached Groningen from that 
centre than from the other centres which we were 
booked to visit. 

Berne, Switzerland, was our next place to visit, 
so I determined to go as I was more than an.xious 
to make use of my opportunity of seeing once 
inore that great living master of surgery who has 
stamped his impress on more things that are 
worth while in surgery than any other living 
surgeon — Theodore Kocher. I had gained much 
inspiration from meeting him on my former visit 
to his clinic five years previous, and I was de- 
lighted to see that he was still the master and 
(loing the same wonderful work. 

From Berne we went to Zurich, largely for the 
purpose of seeing one of the world's famous 
thoracic surgeons — Prof. Sauerbruch, of the 
University of Zurich, and I was fully repaid for 
so doing. I had now just time to reach Gronin- 
gen in time for the celebration June 29th. It 
was a trip of 34 hours, going by w^ay of Basle, 
through the beautiful country of the Rhine, 
Cologne, Dusseldorf, Emerich and Utrecht, 
where I changed to x\rnheim, which is the resi- 
dence of the Dukes of Guelders. and whose 
inhabitants are described by an old proverb as 
"Great in courage, poor in goods, sword in hand, 
such is the motto of Guelderland." The town 
is prettily situated on the right of the Lower 
Rhine, and is one of the most attractive towns 
in Holland. 

From here on my trip wended its wa\- through 
that beautifully picturesque Netherland country 
which still retains its national costumes more 
generally tlian in almost any other country. Al- 



128 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



though nature has not bestowed her charms lav- 
ishly oil Holland, the careful cultivation of the 
held, garden and plantations imparts a pictur- 
escjue and prosperous appearance to the country. 
In the vicinity of the larger cities, especially 
between Arnheim and Groningen, numerous vil- 
las and country-seats are seen near the roads and 
canals, frequently enclosed by carefully kept gar- 
dens, parks and pleasure grounds. The canals 
intersect the country in every direction. The 
houses are generally narrow and low and have 
about them a distinct air of cleanliness and neat- 
ness. One of the chief characteristics of almost 
every Dutch landscape is the windmills (molens). 
They add much to the beauty of the scenic effect 
and are to be seen in great abundance in the sec- 
tion through which I went. 

I reached Groningen in the afternoon of Sun- 
day, June 28th and found it to be rather a pictur- 
esque town of about 80,00 inhabitants, located in 
the northern-most portion of Holland, not far 
distant from the North Sea, and abounding in 
canals which are navigable for sea-going vessels. 
In size it ranks as the fifth town of the Nether- 
lands, and is the birthplace of the famous paint- 
ers, Joseph Israels and H. W. Mesdag. Its 
historic records date back to the 9th century. 
One of the chief centres of interest, apart from 
the famous University, is the Church of St. Mar- 
tin, a beautiful Gothic brick structure with lofty 
tower, supposed to have been built in 1477. This 
is famous for its wonderful chimes which pro- 
claim the quarters of every hour by playing a 
few bars of some popular air. 

The University is one of world-wide fame, and 
was founded in 1614. It now occupies a new 
building (1909) in the Dutch Renaissance style, 
and consists of 5 faculties, .'52 professors and 
lecturers and is attended by about 500 or 600 
students. On arriving there, I found the town 
all decked in gorgeous array of colors and flags. 
very much alive, and the streets filled with people 
parading up and down and evidently ready for 
some great function. On reaching the hotel T 
asked them if I could be taken care of, and was 
told by the manager that he could take care of 
me for that night only, but that it was the Feast 
Week and on account of the celebration at the 
Universitv his rooms were all engaeed and his 
house was filled ; but he would see what he could 
do for me. T told him then I was there as a 
delegate to this celebration, and he said, "Oh, 
that being the case you are already provided for. 



and I will at once get in touch with the Committee 
on Arrangements and will find where you have 
been assigned." He went to the phone and in a 
few minutes told me that I had been assigned to 
a private home and directed me to the residence 
of a well-known lawyer of the town, and to my 
great delight, when I reached there, I found my 
hostess was an English-speaking woman and 
welcomed me most heartily, in view of the fact 
that she had originally lived in Baltimore, and 
knew many of my personal friends. It was a 
source of great delight, I assure you, to find that 
I was to be so agreeably taken care of, and more 
so from the fact that they could speak English, 
because I had come to the conclusion that the 
Dutch language was even more impossible for me 
than the German. 

Here I found awaiting me invitations to the 
various functions which were to take place dur- 
ing the following week, and I readily saw that it 
was to be an inspiring occasion, and that the 
whole town and country were alive with enthu- 
siasm for this great event which represented the 
tri-centennial celebration of this famous Univer- 
sity, 1614-1914. I never in my life have been 
more hospitably received, or more kindly looked 
after. 

That evening my host and hostess took me out 
to show me some of the features of their town, 
and it was whilst on our walk that we found 
posted a notice of the assasination of the Arch- 
duke of Austria. This in no special way added 
to the excitement of what I might call the "mob 
element" which seemingly abounds in this town 
very distinctly. My hostess said that it was one 
of the features of the place that she could not 
get used to ; that the under-classes were definitely 
of a mob type. It was verv'- noticeable on this 
occasion to me, for while standing looking at the 
notice of the assasination of the Archduke some 
of the element purposely nearly knocked my feet 
from under me, seeing I was a stranger, and went 
their way. I cite this as an illustration of what 
seems to exist in this town, perhaps more em- 
phasized by the festivities which were then pre- 
vailing. 

The celebration began its opening on Monday 
evening. June 29th. I shall not attempt to more 
than briefly cite some few of the events that took 
place during this week. This evening, the open- 
ing function of the celebration was a large 
reception in the University building. The invita- 
tion to this read as follow : — 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



129 



'The Rector and the Senate of the University of 
Groningen imll be at home to meet the 
former professors of the University and the 
delegates from Academies and Universities, 
Dutch and foreign, in the University Build- 
ing Monday June 2gth, p P. M. 
Academic robe." 
This, indeed, was a most auspicious event, and a 
sight truly never to be forgotten for the costumes 
alone were almost spectacular in the gorgeousness 
of their array. In this large gathering were to be 
noted distinguished counselors, learned profes- 
sors, dukes, counts, lords and various other 
knighted dignitaries, on account of the numerous 
honors they had won in sciences, arts and the 
various departments of literature, all assembled 
in their academic costumes of varied, glittering 
and rich colors, as representatives of the different 
nations the world over. As far as I know, no 
nation was overlooked ; each and all had a repre- 
sentative. There were many to he noted of 
marked distinction and culture, having won 
world-wide fame, and the variation of the color 
scheme in the beauty and richness of the costumes 
made it a most imposing spectacle. 

The chief function was the presentation, by 
formal introduction, of the various delegates to 
the Rector-Magnificus, Dr. H. J. Hamburger, 
Professor of Physiology at the University. Each 
and all were formally presented by name, as 
though we were being presented to the King of 
England. Of course, along with the robe cos- 
tumes were the beautifully gowned women who 
consisted of the wives of the professors and 
many other celebrities. The students were not 
at this celebration. The number of delegates 
must have been at least 300, each country the 
world over being well represented . 

After this, there was a short address by the 
Rector-Magnificus and then a general reception, 
with a feast, and following this, outside of the 
building, a very beautiful serenade was given by 
the students. Towards the end of the evening 
there was a meeting of the delegates in the Senate 
Chamber, and we were all presented with medals, 
one of which I show you. The motto it bears 
in the words of Tibullus, as translated, means, 
"T too have contributed to thy glory." 

The following morning, June 30th, there was 
a meeting of the Curators, Senate and Faculty in 
a large octagonal church which was well arranged 
for the seating of. a very large audience, consist- 
ing of the University people, the delegates and 



the invited guests. The delegates marched in 
line to this meeting and assembled to hear the 
high officials of the University, give their ad- 
dresses, namely, the President-Curator,- -Rector- 
Magnificus and Minister. Each one assembled 
in his academic robe over full evening dress, 
making a most pleasing and attractive sight. 
During every function this mode of dress was 
observed. The addresses were given in their 
own language, but fortunate to relate, the pro- 
gram had some of the addresses published in 
English, and those less fortunate could follow the 
addresses in that way. Most of the addresses 
were masterfully and solemnly delivered. To 
give an illustration, I wish to read a few lines 
from the address of the President of the Cura- 
tors : 

"Your Excellencies, Ministers of the Crown. 
Professors of the Different Universities. 
Highly esteemed audience — 

"Being President of the College of Curators 
and as such President of the Senatus Amplissi- 
mus, the high honor falls to my share of extend- 
ing a hearty welcome on this memorable day, to 
our guests, ministers, Dutch and foreign scholars, 
to all who have kindly accepted our invitation to 
celebrate this feast with us. 

"We celebrate the tercentennary of our 
University. 

"In the all but desperate struggle against the 
power of Spain for our independence and our 
liberty, a struggle in which we staked everything, 
m which we strained our powers to the utmost, 
a generation was born that we still remember with 
pride, a generation that distinguished itself in 
every domain, and that carried the fame of our 
country far beyond its boundaries. 

"These men, from a deeply felt need of learn- 
ing and higher culture, founded, in an unostenta- 
tious manner, our University. 

"The Sovereign States of the Provinces, the 
Town and the Country, three powers often at 
variance, were all of one mind at its foundation. 
With a true liberality of spirit attempts were 
made at the very outset to draw the best men 
hither. 

"Thus we have been working here for three 
centuries. 

"Times of great prosperity alternated with 
times of decay, of discord, of deep humiliation 
under foreign rule. The University, however, 
has enjoyed at all times the profound interest 



130 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE, 



of Province and Town, of the whole northern 
part of the country. 

"We are deeply attached to our University, 
and share in its fortunes, in its joys and its sor- 
rows. ^V'e are proud of the recognition, the dis- 
tinctions awarded to its professors and its pupils. 

"On this occasion we remember with venera- 
tion our manly, energetic ancestors, men great in 
word and deed, and are thankful for their inherit- 
ance. 

"The best liomage we can pay them today is 
a solemn vow. made also in the name of those 
coming after us, to devote after their examjjle, 
our best energies to our beloved University. 

"Gentlemen, highly esteemed guests, we highly 
appreciate your accepting our invitation to come 
and offer us your congratulations and to celebrate 
this festival with us. 

"(Jur resources, such as they are. have enabled 
more than one of our professors to open up new 
roSds in his particular subject, thus obtaining 
results which have drawn the attention far beyond 
our frontier. The continual subdivision of the 
various branches of learning is often a danger to 
the indispensable unity of the University. The 
possibility of a frequent interchange of thoughts 
between the professors of the various faculties, so 
much better ensured in a small circle, but more 
especially that of personal intercourse between 
the professor and his students we look upon as a 
great advantage and a great privilege. 

"All this makes us more sensible of the fact 
that it is the presence of so many great scholars 
from the whole of Europe, America and Australia 
which gives solemnity to our festival. 

"We are sincerely grateful to you, the more so 
as in our simple environment you cannot have 
looked for great festivities. 

"W'e may see in your presence so manv proofs 
of your kind interest and sympathy." 

I have incorporated the foregoing remarks as 
it shows the deep interest that is shown in their 
University. The address of the Rector-Mag- 
nificus was an address on the "Old and Modern 
University in Learning and in Life." It was 
indeed a classic and a wonderful portrayal of the 
subject. Prof. Hamburger is versed in every 
language, and his English is as clear as his mother 
tongue. His fame as a physiologist is world- 
wide. His address was such a masterpiece that 
I would strongly recommend all those who are 
interested in the life of a university to read it, if 
possible, as it contains much food for thought. 



He addresses his audience in the following way ; 
"Ministers of the Crozvii; Representatives of 
Dutch and Foreign Unii'ersities and of 
Learned Bodies; Professors and Lecturers 
of tliis University; E.v-Stndents and Stud- 
cuts; And you, vast number of women and 
men. wlio by your presence add lustre to this 
memorable solemnity." 
In one portion of his address he asks this ques- 
tion, which could be easily asked on an occasion 
of this kind by any university — 

"A twofold question suggests itself on this 
day. Has our university fulfilled its task in the 
course of its existence, and is it at present in a 
condition in which we. who represent it at this 
moment, can without hesitation and with confi- 
dence transmit it to succeeding generations? 

"\Mto wishes to answer this question should 
first realize distinctly what the task of a univer- 
sity consists in. This task can be no other than 
to be the standard-bearer for the developmen' 
and the elevation of the human mind, the guide 
in learning and in life. But then it should before 
anything penetrate deeply into the spirit of the 
times, and fathom the prevailing intellectual and 
social currents. Keeping mainly this point of 
view I shall try to answer the foregoing questions. 
Limited as I am, however, by time and knowledge 
] shall have to restrict myself to a few items, 
for the choice of which I request the kind indul- 
gence of my auditors." And so it goes, rich in 
thought throughout, and in his closing words 
he intimated the great stability of the University. 
"Material resources are liberally supplied ; not 
a single justifiable request, thoughtfully pre- 
ferred, but it is, if not immediately, granted. 
Not a single part of the great academic whole is 
neglected. Sustained by that sense of liberty, 
which finds a classical soil in Holland, every 
mental current is respected and can freely mani- 
fest itself. 

"It does not become me to speak about the 
position of its teachers in the Republic of learn- 
ing. But it may be said that, pervaded by the 
.'■pirit of the times, they share in its activiites, 

Sig:lit, smell and tnsto plays big part In digestion. 

Eating is a matter of the sympathetic nenes. "No 
profit where no pleasure is taken." 

POSITITELY we feed vou BETTER, at LESS COST 
and IN' THE CLEANEST environment than any one 
has ever done before since time began. 

BRIGHTON LUNCH 

14 N. HOWARD STREET 



TJIE L'XLVERSITY GAZETTIi. 



I.il 



watch its development, and not seldom exert a 
guiding influence in this country and abroad. 

"As at the height of its prosperity it stands, 
well-known and honored, no longer threatened 
cither b)' internal strife as in the Ifcith century, 
or by neglect at the hands of some short-sighted 
governments, as in the 19th, full of youthful life 
and inner strength, the pride of our couiUry, a 
blessing to mankind." 

J^ittle did he realize at the closing of these 
remarks how soon the ravages of war would 
play havoc here as it has with all other centres of 
learning in all of the countries now involved in 
war, which is of far-reaching significance. 

This session was a most imposing one, although 
somewhat lengthy on account of the abundance 
of the program. 

The evening following there was given a beauti- 
ful banquet, gotten up in the most elaborate way 
possible, and needless to say, everyone of the 300 
guests enjoyed not only the attractions of the 
feast but the well prepared speeches that were 
delivered. Following the banquet we attended a 
cabaret show. 

The following morning, July 1st, one of the 
most important meetings of the occasion took 
place in the same church where the preceding 
meeting was held. One of the special features 
of this meeting which called forth so much 
erithusiasm was the fact that the Queen of Hol- 
land had come on for the occasion, bringing her 
court and her traps from the palace at The Hague 
to take part in the celebration. After the meet- 
ing was called to order, with most profound 
dignity, the Queen made a most pleasing address 
and then retired with her ladies in waiting. The 
session went on and the chief interest in the meet- 
ing was the delegates assembhng together and 
marching up to present their congratulations from 
their various universities to the Rector-Mag- 
nirtcus. After this the conferring of the degrees 
took place. 

To show you the interest that the countries at 
large took in sending representative men, I 
would say that from the British Empire out of 
l)Ossibly 'A universities there were "2(1 universi- 
ties represented : — 
I -ondon — 

British Academy, London, by The Right lion. 
D. J. Mackay Lord Reay. 

Royal Institution. London, by Major E. H. 
Hills. 
ijL University of Birmingham, by Prof. C. .\. 
B Leedham Green. 

Ik 



University of Cambridge, by Prof. E. \V. 

Hobson. 
University of Leeds, 
University of Liverpool, by Prof. Richard 

Caton. 
University of London, by Sir William J. Col- 
lins. 
University of Manchester, by Prof. S. J. 

Hickson. 
University of Oxford, by Prof. Kirsopp Lake. 
University of Sheffield, by Prof. H. R. Dean. 
Scotland — • 

Royal Society of Edinburgh, by Sir Edward A. 

Schafer. 
University of Aberdeen, by Very Rev. G. A. 

Smith. 
University of St. Andrews, by Prof. J. E. 

A. Steggall. 
University of Edinburgh, by Jrof. James Mac- 

kinnon. 
University of Glasgow, by Prof. John Fergu- 
son 
Wales — 

University of Cardiff, by Dr. J. Lynn Thomas. 
Ireland — 

Royal Irish Academy and University of Dublin, 

by Prof. Rt. MacAllister 

British Colonies and States. 
India — 

University of Bombay, by D. J. Baron 

Mackay. Lord Reay. 
University of Calcutta, by Prof. G. Thibaut. 
-Australia — 

University of Adelaide, by Prof. G. C. Hen- 
derson. 
University of Melbourne, by Mr. E. J. Robson. 
University of Sydney, by Prof. M. W. Mac- 

Callum. 
University of New Zealand, by Prof. J. \\^ 

Joynt. 
Canada — 

McGill University, Montreal, by Principal W. 

Peterson. 
University of Toronto, Pres. R. A. Falconer. 
Belgium — 

Academic Royale de Belgique, by Prof. Leon 

Fredericq, Ch. Julin, J. Verschaffelt. 
Koninklijke Vlaamsche Academie, by Prof. W. 

de Vreese. 
Staats Universiteit, Gent, by Prof. Cam. de 

Bruyne. 
Universite de I'Etat, Liege, by Prof. Ch. Julin 

and L. Fredericq. 



133 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



Universite Catholique, Louvain, by Prof. A. 

Noyons. 
Universite libre, Bruxelles, by Prof. Jean 

Demoor. 
Denmark — 

Kgl. Vidensk. Selskab, Kopenhagen, by Prof. 

W. L. Johannsen. 
Universitet Kopenhagen, by Prof. J. C. Jacob- 
sen. 
Germany — 

Kgl. preuss. Akademie "der Wissenschaften, 

by Prof. G. Roethe, Berlin. 
Akademie der Wissenschaften, by Prof. A. 

Schmarsow, Leipzig. 
Universitat Berlin, by Prof Dietrich Schafer. 
Universitat Bonn, by Prof. Al. Schulte. 
Universitat Breslau, by Prof. F. Pax. 
Universitat Erlangen, by Prof. G. Specht. 
Universitat Freiburg, by Prof. R. Wieders- 

heim. 
Universitat Gieesen, by Prof. E. Konig. 
Universitat Gottingen, by Prof. E. Kauttman, 
Universitat Halle, by Prof. F. Kattenbnsch. 
Universitat Heidelberg, by Prof. Eb. Gothein. 
Universitat Jena, bv Prof. A. Cartellieri. 
Universitat Kiel, by Prof. G. Ficker. 
Universitat Konigsberg, by Prof. M. Schulze. 
Universitat Leipzig, by Prof. O. Mayer. 
Universitat Marburg, by Prof. L. Traeger. 
Universitat Munster, by Prof. K. Spannagel. 
Universitat Munchen, by Prof. A. Doderlein. 
L'liiversitat Rostock, by Prof. Fr. Erhardt. 
Universitat Strasburg, bv Prof. H. Chiari. 
Universitat Tubingen, by Prof. C. J. Fuchs. 
Universitat ^^'urzburg, by Prof. Ernst Mayer. 
Finland — 

Societas fennica and Universitet, Helsingfors, 

by Prof. R. Tigerstedt. 



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France — 

Academie de medecine, Paris, by Prof. Raph. 

Blanchard. 
Universite de Bordeaux, by Prof. Ch. Cestre 

and Prof. L. Duguit. 
Universite de Grenoble, by Prof. M. Perriol. 
Universite de Lille, by Prof. H. Bornecque. 
Universite de Lyon, by Prof. Jean Appleton. 
Universite de Montpellier, by Prof. M. Moye. 
Universite de Nancy, by Prof. G. Thoulet. 
Universite de Paris, by Prof. Em. Durkheim. 
Greece — 

University of Athens, by Prof. Christos 
Androustsos. 
Hungary — • 

Univ. de Kolozvar, by Prof. Jules de Szadec- 
sky. 
Italy — 

Univ. Catania, by Prof. Vincenzo Casagrandi. 
Univ. Palermo, by Prof. Vine. Ussani. 
Netherlands — 

Academie v. Wetenschappen, by Prof. P. D. 

Chatepie de la Saussaye, \'oorz. 
Rijks-Universiteit, Leiden, by Prof. G. Jel- 

gersma and Prof. J. M. Janse. 
Rijks-Universiteit, Utrecht, by Prof. B. J. 

Kouwer and Prof. H. Snellen, Jr. 
Stedelijke-Universiteit, by Prof. R. H. Saltet. 
\'rije-Universiteit, Amsterdam, by Prof. P. A. 

C. Sillevis Smit. 
Technische Hoogeschool, Delft, by Prof. W. 

K. Behrens and Prof. C. L. van der Bilt. 
Handels-Hoogeschool, Rotterdam, by Prof. G. 
Nauta. 
Norway — 

Univ. Kristiana, by Prof. Br. Morgenstierne. 
.\ustria — 

Universitat Czernowitz, by Prof. Eug. Ehrlich. 
Univer. Lemberg, by Prof. Const. Zakrzewsky. 
Deutsche Univ. Prague, by Prof. R. von Zeynek. 
Roumania — 

Univ. Jassy, by Prof. Dim Alexandresco. 
Russia — 

Kais. Univ. St. Petersburg, by Prof. Th. F. 

Zielinsky. 
Univ. Moskau, by Prof. Iv. Al. Kabloukov. 
L'niv. Tomsk, by Prof. Al. Kouliabko. 
United States — 
National Academy of Sciences and Carnegie 

Institution, by Prof. J. C. Kapteyn. 
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, by Prof. 
Fred. Newton Scott. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



133 



I 



University of Maryland, Baltimore, by Prof. 

Frank Martin. 
Johns Hopkins University Baltimore, by Prof. 

J. Wilson Bright. 
North-VVestern University, Chicago, by Prof. 

O. Floyd Long. 
Cornell University, Ithaca, by Prof. Ch. H. 

Hull. 
Columbia University, New York, by Provost 

W. H. Carpenter. 
University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, by 

Provost E. F. Smith. 
Princeton University, Princeton, by Henry 

van Dyke. 
Rice Institute, Houston, Texas, by Prof. E. O. 

Lovett. 
University of Wisconsin, Madison, by Prof. 
E. Burr Van Vleck. 
.Sweden — 

Svenska Vet. Ak. and Karolinsk Institu. 

Stockholm, by K. A. H. Morner. 
Universitet Lund, by Prof. Ewart Wrangel. 
Hogskola Stockholm, by Prof. G. Lagerheim. 
Universitet Upsal, by Prof. A. Noreen. 
Switzerland — 

Universite de Fribourg, by Prof. Fr. Daniels. 
Universite de Geneve, by Prof. Ch. Girard. 
Universite de Lausanne, by Prof. Edm. Ros- 

sier. 
The spokesman for the States was our am- 
bassador to the Netherlands, Henry van Dyke, 
and we all felt exceedingly proud of our repre- 
sentative and spokesman, for the general im- 
pression of the entire audience was that he made 
the most charming and graceful speech of the 
meeting, and it was very well received. Part of 
van Dyke's speech was given in Dutch and part 
in English. Each delegate spoke in his native 
language. The spokesman for the British Em- 
pire showed very distinctly the wonderful culture 
that prevails therein. He was the Rev. G. A. 
Smith, representing the University of Aberdeen, 
and his short speech for his country was a master- 
piece. Each country had its spokesman, and 
delivered his address in his own tongue. 

P'ollowing this very entertaining and instructive 
meeting, the professors of the University and the 
delegates marched in procession through the 
town to the large statehouse building where we 
witnessed a splendid pageant gotten up by the 
students, having to do with the times when the 
declaration of peace was made between Spain 
and Holland. This was given in a most elaborate 



manner, with the Queen and her court as the 
audience. Their costumes were all in keeping 
with the date of the occasion and it was as well 
and cleverly conducted a pageant as I ever 
witnessed. 

Immediately following this was a large recep- 
tion and formal presentation of all the delegates 
to the Queen of Holland. 

There were many opportunities during this 
time to visit the various laboratories and depart- 
ments of the University, but there was so much 
on hand and time was so taken up that I, person- 
ally, did not get an opportunity to go through 
the laboratories to any extent. Their physiolog- 
ical laboratory is most wonderfully equipped and 
one of the most complete on the continent. I 
was very much gratified to see what a splendid 
hospital they had under the management of the 
University. I had the pleasure of going through 
this with Sir William Collins of London, and we 
were both tremendously impressed and pleased 
with the workings of their clinic and the splendid 
equipment of their hospital in general. 

I have never seen anywhere greater enthu- 
siasm in a L'niversity than was shown during this 
celebration. They are exceedingly proud of it 
and deservedlv so. Many of their men have 
enviable names, and the good work that is done 
unquestionably deserves the recognition that they 
have gotten. 

Following the afternoon reception where the 
Queen received the delegates there was another 
banquet and various and sundry entertainments. 
As I left early the following morning, to meet 
my party in Vienna, I could not take part in any 
thing further of the celebration. 

While at the Groningen celebration I had the 
pleasure of meeting most of the delegates from 
the States and of being thrown in with them. 
VVe were always glad to meet one another, and 
the wonderful kindness and culture of the Uni- 
\ersity people as a body made a most lasting 
impression upon me. 

I thank you ladies and gentlemen for your kind 
indulgence and consideration. 

The prevalent feeling: of happiness and good fellow- 
ship, combined with the invariably excellent dinner, 
makes all the world jour friend, and produces an 
evening' of surpassing enjoyment, 

THE NEW OLYMPIA RESTAURANT 

308 W. Baltimore St.— 306 E. Baltimore St. 

The Olympia serves nothing but clean, good food. 



134 



■ME UNIVHRSITV GAZETTE. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 

A MONTHLY JOURNAL 

Devoted to the interests of the University 

of Maryland. 

Subscription Price, |1.00 Per Annum, In Advance 

Reprints BXirnistied At Cost 
Advertising Rates Submitted Upon Request. 

60S Professional Building 
BALTIMORE, MD. 



Editorial Board. 

H. M. ROBINSON, M.D Editor-in-Chief. 

NATHAN WINSLOW, M.D Managing Editor. 

Graduate Members. 

THOMAS FELL, LL.D Academic. 

STAN WOOD COBB, B.A Academic. 

ALBERT H. CARROLL, M.D Medical. 

F. J. VALENTINE, D.D.S Dental. 

J. BEN ROBINSON, D.D.S Dental. 

SAJMUEL WANT, LL. B Law. 

A. A. SONNENBURG, Pliar.D Pharmacy. 

J. M. BRANSKY, Phar.D Pharmacy. 

M. E. SULLIVAN, R.N Nursing. 

Undergraduate Members. 

C. V. WILSON Academic. 

H. GOLDMAN, '15; F. C. MARINO, 

'16; C. O. WOLF, '17 Medicine. 

H. E. WATERMAN, 15; A. Z. ALD- 
RIDGE, '16; H. I. HAWKINS, 
'17 Dental. 

J. A. HAGGERTY,'15; B. C. LIGHT- 
NER, '15; C. N. MATTHEWS, 
■16 Law. 

A. L. STERLING, '15 Pharmacy. 

J. E. EVANS, '16 Y. M. C. A. 

B. C. LIGHTNER, '15 Advertising. 

B. G. GOLD, '15 College Notes. 

A. G. DE QUEVEDO Latin-American. 

L. A. BUIE, '15 House Notes. 

LINDSAY ROGERS, '15 General Items. 



FEBRU.\RY I, 1915. 



LOY.VLTY \-ERSL'S MAGAZINE. 



It is truly a matter for lament to have to con- 
sider any club, whatever its purpose, or organi- 
zation, whatever its scope, or school or college or 
university, be it professional or otherwise, among 
whose members there is little lo\alty to be found. 
Loyalty is the strength of life, to which we pin 
our hopes at one time or another. .A^nd where 
there is loyalty, there is also a desire for inform.i- 
lion concerning the object of loyalty. We would 
know the new arrivals, the late departures, the 



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Haberdashery of Excellence 
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visitors — everything, anything liowever insignifi- 
cant. Antl you, of the University ! Are you noi 
at all concerned with the occurrences in the lives 
of your fellow students ; of your fellow class- 
mates, who have graduated with you, only to 
leave for some very distant clime, and who only 
live in these columns again? 

This is the University Gazette — for undergrad- 
uate and graduate ; for pupil and teacher. 

The Editors, we beg to assure you, are not 
paid in coin, but are amply remunerated when 
you applaud and keep the journal going. We 
aim to represent each department, and to let no 
item of news escape. 

Therefore, subscribe — not only now, but keep 
yiiur subscription alive. Let us hear from you, 
and in this way you will keep others in touch 
with yourself. Be a loval son and subscriber. 



YE EDITORS AND YE LOYALTY. 



Fellow editors, pen-pushers or authors, we beg 
your attention for a few moments. 

x\nd our complaint is not that you are failing in 
yoiu" principal work, that of news getting, etc., 
but that having once obtained the news you have 
not proceeded to help us get readers for it. 

We agree that ordinarilv we should not be e.x- 
pected both to supply the material and readers 
for that material. But otir case is not really that 
of a business basis. Our employe expects us to 
do our best, and "then some." 

If you can, in the few spare moments of your 
news-getting or editorial writing, speak a word 
for the G.\ZETTE. 

Boost it. Peddle it. Do anything, but .some- 
thing to help make the G.\zette popular. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



135 



Blome's Chocolates HEPBRON & HAYDON 



Known and enjoyed by students of the 
University for more than half a century. 

Retail Department 
BLOME'S CANDY STORE 

Established 1859 621 W. Baltimore St. 



]\TEDICAL— GRADUATE. 



Dr. Fred. W. Rankin, class 1909, made a visit 
to North Carolina, and spent the Christmas holi- 
days with Dr. McElwee, also of 1909. Dr. Mac 
asked about his classmates and the school. 



Dr. M. L. Lichtenburg, 1913, who was under 
the weather for a few days, has recovered and 
has resumed his work. 



Dr. R. G. Willse, 1909, is rapidly recovering 
from torn ligament of the wrist, sustained by 



falling down stairs. 



Dr. Charles R. Law, 1911, of Berlin, Md., Dr. 
\'ernon H. ]\IcKnight, 1910, of North East, Md., 
and Dr. Wilbur M. Scott, 1912, who is located 
near Macon, Ga., were recent visitors to the hos- 
viital. 



MEDICAL— JUNIOR. 



We Sell Every Law Book !and Syllabus Used 
at the U. of M. 



St. Paul 8794 



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Shipley; practice, Drs. Wilson and Mitchell; ob- 
stetrics, Drs. Neale and Freeman; therapeutics, 
Dr. Messick ; clinical laboratory. Dr. E. L. Whit- 
ney ; pathology, Drs. Hirsh and Spencer ; neurol- 
ogy, Dr. Irving J. Spear; operative surgery, Dr. 
Frank Martin and assistants ; women, Drs. Ashby, 
Brent and Hundley ; physiological therapeutics, 
Dr. Joseph Gichner ; i physical diagnosis, Drs. 
AlcCarty, Hirschman, etc. 

We defy all medical schools to show a better, 
more systematic, and a more harmonious team. 

Football coaches scout about for excellent ma- 
terial for their teams ; baseball men have in- 
dulged in the fine art of legally stealing players; 
but of all the scouting, buying and acquiring of 
players, etc., never has a medical faculty made a 
better or wiser acquisition than in the assigning 
of our old alumnus and new Professor of Thera- 
peutics, Dr. Messick. 



Since football is now far removed from the 
public gaze, it is customary for newspaper men 
and coaches to pick their choice for an all-star 
team. Of course, their stars are criticised by 
many, but who, in the professional world, could 
criticise this selection for an "All-American Ju- 
nior Medical Faculty": Surgery, Dr. Arthur M. 



J. FRED SHAFER. Pris. WM. E. READ. Vice-Pres. WM. E. HORN. Sec'Mreas. 

THE HORN-SH AFER CO. 

Printers and Publishers 

3-5 GERMAN STREET, EAST 

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Private Branch Exchange, St. Paul 7077-7078 

Printers of 1912 '13 and '14 "Terrae Marlae" 
There must be a reason 



A few weeks ago the Junior class held a meet- 
ing and elected the following officers for the 
ensuing year : President, Bernard Ferry ; vice- 
president, Samuel Pruitt : treasurer, Norwood 
Voss ; secretary, Edward P. Thomas ; historian, 
Henrv L. Bolen : sergeant-at-arms, Frank E. 
Mason ; editor of Terra Marie, Henry L. Bolen ; 
honor committee, Rigby (chairman), Evans, 
Wellman, Bowden, Cudd. 



We wish to call attention to the wise selection 
of. Mr. Bolen as Junior editor to the Terra Marie. 
Mr. Bolen has had wide experience in news- 
paper work, and should make a good editor. His 
work this year will probably have a great deal to 
do in the production of a banner book in 1916. 



We wish to extend our most profound sym- 
(;athy to Mr. Edward TJiomas, whose mother and 
brother are seriously ill. \\^e wish both a com- 
plete and rapid recover}'. 



We wish to extend our sympathy to Mr. Cecil 
Rigby, who was called home, due to the deaths of 
his father and mother. 



13G 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



NEW YORK CLOTHING HOUSE 

102 & 104 E. BALTIMORE ST. 

Men's, Boy's and Children's Clothing 

Automobile & Uniform Outfitters ■ - Bart's Shoes 



THE QUESTION. 

1. Who has not subscribed to The University 
Gazette ? 

2. Why so many fooHsh questions, !Mr. Short? 

3- Is honey-sucking a paying and legal game ? 

4- \Mio put diacetic acid in Hon. Harry Stein's 
24-hour specimen? 

.5. \Mio told Scimeca he could denote a mur- 
mur ? 

6. Has Rogers Xo. 2 a hypertrophied salivary 
gland or a perpetual flow of saliva? 

7. Ferneyhowe and Rogers should do a profit- 
able business in moonshining. 

8. Time changes any man. What changed 
Brown ? 

9. I wonder why Dr. Freeman questioned S. P. 
so? Anything personal, Sammy? 

10. Special for February 22, 1915: Star bout 
between "Battling Schumacher and Kids Fingle 
and Ginze." All who have lectures to attend are 
requested not to miss this night. 



Keep it up. ^Ir. President. The class has its 
eye on you. 



LA\\'— GR.\DUATE. 



Former Judge Henry D. Harlan was the guest 
on January 15, of the Henry D. Harlan Law 
Society of the University of Alaryland, and made 
an address, which was preceded by a debate on 
the subject, "Resolved,, That in Jury Trials a 
Two-Thirds A'ote Should Be Sufficient to De- 
cide a Case." The debaters for the affirmative, 
E. P. IMason and D. G. Cooper, won. I. J. Sulli- 
van and A. W. Pardew took the negative side. 
Wendell D. .\llen, president of the society, pre- 
sided. 



LAW. 



The State Board of Law Examiners, composed 
of Col. D. G. Alclntosh, Col. John Hinkley and 
Stevenson A. Williams, have completed the 
ratings of the applicants at the examination which 



was held Xoxember 27 and 28. The following 68 
applicants were successful and will be recom- 
mended to the Court of Appeals for admission to 
the bar : 

Horace E. Alexander, George A. ilahone, 

Walter C. Beaven, G. Albert Marshall, 

John B. Berger, Thomas E. Mason, 

Johnson \'. Best, Joseph O'C. McCusker, 

Geo. \\'. Bradford, Jr., John C. McLaughlin, 

J. ^\'alter Bueschel, Daniel F. ^IcMullen, 

John A. Cannon, .\rthur B. Nickerson, 

William B. Clagett, Bernard J. Nolan, 

James W. Clayton, Joseph D. Noonan, 

C. Stanley Crane, Thomas F. O'Neill, 

Francis R. Cross, Peter Peck, 

Giarles 'SI. Daley, John J. Pratt, Jr., 

J. Stewart Davis, Walter H. Prem, 

Thomas L. Dawson, William F. Reed, 

Julius F. Diehl, Frederick R. Riehl, 

Charles C. Dipaula, L. William Rook, 

E. B. Donaldson, Jr., \\'ashington I. Salter, 

J. Davis Donovan, Hemian Saul, 

A. Robert French, John H. Schisler, 

Charles M. Gosnell, Raymond Schlegel, 

A. Page Gough, Jacob Schroeder, 

Francis J. Gutberlet, Clarke L. Smith, 

Joseph .\. Haggerty, Charles B. Smyth, 

Winfield B. Harward, J. Lawrence Sullivan, 

John A. Helldorfer, Paul M. Taylor, 

Samuel H. Hoffberger, James Thomas, Jr., 

Chas. L. Hutchins, Jr., Milton W, Toole, 

William W. Jump, John T. Tucker, 

Charles C. Keedy, Daniel F. Turpin, 

Floyd J. Kintner, Henry H. W^aters, 

Edward Leinke, ^^'illiam C. Wylie, 

Charles S. Lerch, John X. Yost, 

Samuel J. Lichtenberg, Robert E. Lee Young, 

^^'iIliam C. Lurssen, Julius Zieget. 

With few exceptions, the above list is com- 
posed of University of Maryland men. 



LAW— SENIOR. 



-A. wild report has been circulated that "Jiggs" 
O'Donohue is now a book agent, having given up 
the sale of rubber keys. ]Mr. O'Donohue was in- 
terviewed by a G.xzETTE reporter, and the story 
was emphatically denied. The rumor grew out 
of the fact that he was seen carrying a book two 
days last week. "Jiggs " assures us that this will 
not happen again. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



lo i 



A large number of the men in the Senior class 
passed the State Bar Exam, held in November. 
"Squire" Galium and "Tenor" Traub also took it. 



"Jim" Hepbron is the greatest little collector 
around these parts. One of our bright yoimg 
students bought some books on "tick" from him 
last year, and until a few weeks ago evidenced 
no great amount of speed in paying the bill. 
"Jim" finally wrote to him. Part of the letter 
was as follows : 

"Your idea of credit is a violation of the rule 
against perpetuities." 

The next day he received a check in full. 

By the way, "Jim" is the proud father of a 
baby girl, which was bom on January 17, Con- 
gratulations ! "Jim" has decided to name her 
"Errol," being fond of the name, and also in 
honor of Errol Kanode. He always contended 
that Errol was a girl's name. 



One day last week, a colored man was 
brought before Judge Heuisler in the Criminal 
Court. 

"Do you want a lawyer?" asked the Judge. 

"No sir. Judge, I come here to tell de truf !" 
was the somewhat startling reply. 



The old story that young lawyers have great 
difficulty in luring clients into their office for 
several years, has been refuted by a great pre- 
ponderance of evidence. "Ben" Gold, the silver- 
tongued orator, admitted that he has made $20.00 
since last June. 



Stanley Deakyne, Senior, called at the library 
a few days ago to get his mail. Visit us again, 
Stanlev. 



The Seniors have all been photographed, but 
their photographs have no monetary value with a 
publisher ; therefore each Senior will pay to his 
treasurer $4.00 during the first week of February. 

»■— - — ——„—»_.•.—.«._.__._._.»..».._._.., 

LUTHER B. BENTON 
Dental Depot 



students' Outfits 
a Specialty 



305 North Howard St. 



LEFRANC & AULT 

MEN'S AND WOMEN'S 

Guaranteed Goatskin Gloves 
Also Fownes' Make 

AT THE 

"SHIRT SHOP" 

421 N. Howard St., at Franklin 



Unless your account shows that you have made 
some substantial progress in paying your assess- 
ment, your write-up will be postponed until you 
have. This is dangerous, because the date for 
final settlement is not far off, and the book will 
not be delayed because a few have been negligent 
in this respect. 



SENIOR THE.Vl'RE PARTY AND DANCE. 



On December 24, 1914, the Senior class, in a 
large part, assembled at the New Academy of 
Music to see ''Papa's Darling," a very clever 
Klaw and Erlanger production. 

Unlike the usual musical comedy, there was an 
intelligent plot running through it. 

.\fter the show, the Dance Hall was thrown 
open, and to the strains of Cecile and Mississippi 
Cabaret, the Seniors gave obeisance to terpsichore 
until about 3 A. M. 

Messrs. Want and Sappington, of the Practice 
Court, with their wives, were present and en- 
joyed themselves as much as if they were just 
ordinary ])eople who had just become of age. 



A. H. PETTING 



Manufacturer of 



GREEK LETTER FRATERNITY JEWELRY 

213 N. Liberty St., = Baltimore, Md. 
Factory: 212 Little Sharp St. 



Memorandum package sent to any fraternity member through the 
secretary of the chapter. Special designs and estimates furnished on 
medals, rings and pins for athletic meets, etc. 



i:58 



THR UNIVERSJ'rV GAZlCTTIv 



!> 



qUAQE^IEHL 

Clothes 



DENTAL— GRADUATE. 



built at 605 W. Baltimore St., 
just around the corner from the 
University, are kept pressed with- 
out cost. 

Suits $15 to $40 



If you did pass the bar, it isn't much use being 
jovous ; 'cause life is just one Exam, after another. 



L< *ST. — One photograph of ex-president C. I'>. 
Smyth, capped and gowned in regulation order 
for Year Book. It's not the value of the picture 
— but just think — you can't tell where it's liable 
to turn up and — then "C. B." is SO nice — really 
he is quite upset about it. 



Our hero has just "become of age". As a man. 
his first acts were to gather the "boss," "outside" 
McA'Iullin and a few other dashing spirits of the 
"U" together, beat it to the "United," and buy a 
deck of Richmond Straight Cuts. After accom- 
plishing the "Cigies," the dare-devils bethought 
themselves of a little liquid refreshment, and with 
a whoop, swarmed down on "Bobs" for a little 
ginger ale. It was 2 A. M. when they got "out- 
side" and the "boss" away from "hurry back." 
A warning — cigarettes, ginger ale and "hurry 
back" are bad for a man. 



Hart Schaffner & Marx, 
Kuppenheimer, 
"Society Brand" 



The clothes that college men 
like a lot 



TReajQllBHub 

BaHlmore Street At Chdrle) 



By request, we publish 1)elow a list of our 
1 )ental .\lun:ni located in Pennsylvania, with 
class and addresses as nearly as we are able to 
ascertain : 

D. Guy Hollinger, 1899, Abbottstown. 

Clinton AI. Koontz, 1888, 824 Hamilton street, 
Allentown. 

Euther D. Blackwelder, 1895, Bedford. 

'W. S. Burd, 1892, Bellwood. 

John M. Herr, 1909, Boiling Springs. 

Harry H. Sargent, 1903, 812 Braddock avenue, 
Braddock. 

Samuel S. Burt, 1900, Bradford. 

Raymond P. Dorman, 1904, Canton. 

John J. O'Neill, 1909, Carbondale. 

Curtis S. Basehoar, 1900, Carlisle. 

Charles E. Wogan, 1890, Carlisle. 

Curtis Leroy Hartman, 1897, Chambersburg. 

Charles F. Heisler, 1897, Dallastown. 

R. Delamer Dodson, 1883, Delta. 

J. Clinton Maconiber, 1892, Delta. 

N. Preston Scarborough, 1907, Delta. 

George C. Cobean, 1902, Gettysburg. 

Dennis R. Hartman, 1900, Gettysburg. 

Edgar H. Markley, 1892, Gettysburg. 

Charles B. Stouffer, 1892, Gettysburg. 

Charles G. Wiley, 1892, Glen Rock. 

John A. Keepers, 1888, Greencastle. 

Thomas H. Charmbury, B. M. C, D. D., 1900. 
Hano\er. 

Irwin T. Xaille, 1903, Hanover. 

W. Spry Ilurlick, 1899, 1719 \. Front street, 
Harrisburg. 

Clyde M. McKelvey, 1891, 3d and State streets, 
Harrisburg. 

Reiff J. Reigle, 191 1, B. AI. C, D. D., 1446 
Market street, Harrisburg. 

Curtis A. Sheely, 1902, 1227 N. 2d street, Har- 
risburg. 

Howard E. Stine, 1912, B. M. C. D. D., 440 
S. i6th street, Harrisburg. 

Harry C. Stover, IsSil, -.'lU S. 13th street, Har- 
risburg. 

Wellington C. Miller, 1887, Homestead. 

W. J. Baker, 1896, Jermyn. 

Charles A. Matthews, 1894, 546 Main street, 
lolmsonburg. 

Ervin J. Diehl. 1903, 46 E. Orange street, 
I .ancaster. 

Christian G. Frantz. 1887, 108 E. King street, 
Lancaster. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



T3J1 



8 W SARATOGA St 




Intercollegiate Bureau of Academic Costume, Aibany.N.v. 

COTRELL & lil^ *<iMl Correct Moods 

for All Degrees. 



c^aryland. 



J. Frank Stevens, 1891, 64 N. Queen street, 
Lancaster. 

D. Alonzo Lang, B. M. C, D. D., 1904, Lititz. 
Thomas P. Myers, 1890, Lock Haven. 

P. L. Landis, 1910, Alanheim. 

Stanton D. Diffendere, 1894, Aliddleburg. 

James E. Pickett, 1901, Minersville. 

George T. Barben, B. M. C, D. D., 1903, 
Afonessen. 

Oren B. Richards, B. M. C., D. D., 1898. 
:\Ioosic. 

Charles E. Culver, B. M. C., D. D., 1899, ^h. 
Union. 

Benson L. Miller, 1902, Muncy. 

Russell R. Reiff, 1897, New Cumberland. 

E. C. Neckerman, 1906, New Kensington. 
Wm. R. Snyder, 1902, New Oxford. 
Charles H. Rogers, 1904, Newport. 
Jessie R. Pifer, 1908. Newville. 

John C. C. Beale, 1892, 41 S. 15th street, 
Philadelphia. 

Richard A. Ker, B. M. C, D. D., 1903, 10 1 X. 
('Oth street, Philadelphia. 

\Vm. H. Kuich, 1893. 926 Lehigh avenue, Phil- 
adelphia. 

Henry N. Pheneger, 1897, 1900 Columbia a\ c- 
nue, Philadelphia. 

Jonathan R. \\'illis, 1904, 1700 W. Columbia 
avenue, Philadelphia. 

Oscar A. Zinnerman, 219 S. Broad street, 
Philadelphia. 

Carl Dinger, B. M. C, D. D., 1902, Philips- 
burg. 

Frank W. Chessrown, 1891, 81 13 Jenkins 
BIdg., Pittsburgh. 

Samuel E. Lower, 1902, 524 Federal street, 
Pittsburgh. 

Archey C. Shoemaker, 1889, ^y Miners' ISank 
Bldg., Pittston. 

Will L. \'an Ormer, 1901, Schellburg. 

Ronald B. Colvin, 1902, Somerset. 

Jacob L. Weirich, 1888, Steelton. 

R. D. Dodson, 1883, Stewartstown. 

Atwell T. Jarrett, 1883, Washington. 

Sheldon H. Wolf, 1895, Washington. 



LEONARD 

Official Makers of 

Caps and 
Gowns 




Rich Qowns for 
Pulpit and Bench. 

Bulletin, Samples 
etc. on request 



J. Calvin Criswell, 1895, Waynesboro. 

iienry Frantz, 1896, Waynesboro. 

David B. Snively, 1888, Waynesboro. 

John F. Mayock, B. M. C, D. D., 1899, 7 E. 
.Market street, Wilkes-Barre. 

N. Robert Hubbard, 1890, 360 Alarket street, 
Williamsport. 

W. S. Trapp, 1885, 15 E. 3d street, Williams- 
Ijort. 

Charles E. Ay res, 1897, 17 S. George street, 
York. 

Horace E. Basshore. 1886, 31 S. Water street, 
^'ork. 

Wilbur C. Bressler, 1884, 464 W. King street, 
York. 

Harry A. Free, 1888, 50 X. George street, 
York. 

Francis A. Hoodner, 1903, 39 E. King street, 
York. 

George E. Kirschner. 1912, 219 E. Philadel- 
phia road, York. 

John W. McKinnon, 1889, 22 W. Market 
street, York. 

Eli H. Xeiman. 1883, 2^, W. Market street, 
York. 

Raymond S. Xeiman, 1908, Lehmayer Bldg., 
\'ork' 

Harvey G. A. Oderick, 1900, 224 W. Market 
street, York. 

Harry A. Reese, 1904, 216 W. Market street, 
York. 

W. W. Wogan, 1887, 43 X. George street, 
York. 



Dr. T. O. Heatwole represented the University 
of Maryland at the meeting of the Xational Board 
of Dental Faculties held at Ann Arbor, Michigan, 
January 27. 



We are glad to learn that Dr. F. J. \"alentine, 
who has been ill and confined to his room, is able 
to be out again. 



uo 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



Dr. M. G. Guerra is successfully treating a case 
of fracture of the mandible. All students should 
observe carefully the manner of treatment and 
look for results. The work is ver-\- instructive. 



ACADEMIC— GRADUATE. 



DEiNTAL— JUNIOR. 



T. T. 
by Dr. 
worry ' 



Smith is worrying about being flunked 
Guerra in practical prosthesis. Don't 
Spike." We will use our in-floo-ence. 



Aldridge and Funderburk who recently re- 
ceived "Pop" Bryants kodak while having their 
beauty struck are seriously considering selling 
copyright of proof to some corn-cure company 
to be used as, "Before using." 



Place : U. of M. infirmary. 

Date : December 9, 1914. 

Time: S.bO P. M. 

Cast Anxious young man, J. E. Funderbm'k. 

On the west side of the room, and facing the 
beautiful sunset (anticipated), a chair has been 
distinguished from its fellows by the addition 
of two spotless towels (borrowed from Adair). 
A bottle of green liquid, giving off a strong odor, 
not unlike a barber shop, is on top of the case. 
The bracket has been carefully spread with 
napkins, and instruments placed thereon. A new 
cement slab as large as a tombstone is placed there 
for its initiation. Cologne has been sprinkled 
about on the equipment as well as "Fundy's" 
clean coat. The jireparation would indicate that 
Sir \\'alter is spreading his coat for the fair 
Elizabeth to walk on, but it is merely Funderburk 
preparing to recive his Peabody lady. At the 
other end of the room Bean has made like prepar- 
ations, and his heart is palpitating like a trip- 
hammer. Of course Reese has spread the news 
of the coming event, and has called on the demon- 
strator to do the valet stunt, as this is his 
"Maiden" synthetic filling, and no mistake can be 
made. At -l :0o P. M. the young ladies arrive. 
They are met by the gallants, and escorted to the 
chairs. Introductions are had by many of the 
boys, and the girls receive proper attention from 
all. Drs. Robinson and Guerra do their best to 
assure Fundv of excellent work, and it has been 
said that he really outdid himself. We shall 
hand it to the boys for taste. The ladies were 
there both in looks and manner. But Funtly 
wants to know who sprinkled his cologne over 
his chair. 



L. B. Miller, '13, visited us last Friday. Miller 
now teaches modern languages at the Baltimore 
Polvtechnic Institute. . 



E. B. Roberts, editor of The Collegian, 1910-11, 
is teaching Biologv and Chemistry in Kittanning 
( Pa.) HiHi School. 



A. C. Thompson, class of '07, St. John's, and 
graduate of Georgetown University, is now prac- 
ticing- medicine in Colorado. 



Whether St. John's College ought to join the 
.State L'niversity and come within the direction 
of the Board of Regents created by the last Legis- 
lature, was one of the leading subjects of dis- 
cussion at the annual meeting and dinner of the 
.\lunini Association of St. John's College, held 
at the Rcimert on the evening of January 30. 
The matter of raising an endowment fund for the 
college, and the advisability of getting a club- 
room for the association were also discussed. 

.A.mong the speakers .were Governor Golds- 
borough, who spoke on the work of the Board 
of Regents of the State University, Dr. Thomas 
Fell of St. John's, and Dr. James W. Cain, of 
\\ ashington College. 

The alumni association was reorganized in 
.April, 1913, with 50 members. It now has 232, 
and Dr. James A. Nydegger, president, thinks 
that a verv nuich larger number ought to join 
and take a more active interest in the affairs of 
their college. 



We were interested to know that Cornelius 
Comegys. of Scranton, Pa., who delivered the 
commencement address at St. John's in 1914, is 
prospering in his home State. 

The Scranton "Times," in a recent issue, has 
the following to say of him : 

"It is |)robable that Cornelius Comegys, Esq., 
of this city, will be a candidate for one of the 
vacancies on the superior bench at the primaries 
w hich will be held in September. Mr. Comegys 
was a candidate for the same office two years ago, 
and received a magnificent endorsement in Lack- 
awanna county and other counties throughout 
the coal region. At home he was practicallv the 
unanimous choice of the people, and in the en- 
tire State he ran fourth in a group of ten candi- 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



1.41 



dates. Mr. Comegys' ability as a lawyer is un- 
questioned. He would surely be an ornament to 
the bench of the superior court, or even of the 
supreme court. He largely increased his acquaint- 
ance throughout the State in his former canvass, 
and he would undoubtedly have a much better 
chance of being nominated next fall than he had 
two years ago." 

o 

ACADEMIC— UNDERGRADUATE. 



A. S. J. Hopkins, ex-'15, has a position with a 
construction company of Pittsburg. He is one of 
our few members who has started out in life. 
and appears to be "making good." 



The third of a series of cotillion hops was held 
in the College Gymnasium on Friday, January 29. 
A number of out-of-town girls were present.. 
— — o — — 

NURSING. 



Miss Bessie M. Roussey, class of 1914. has ac- 
cepted a position in the Tubercular Department, 
Bay View Hospital. 



Miss Lulu Stepp, class of 1914, who has been 
on a visit for the past month at her home in Ash- 
ville, N. C, has returned to the hospital, and re- 
sumed her work as night superintendent of nurses. 



Miss Lelia Shields, class of 191."), was operated 
on at the hospital recently, and is doing very well. 



Miss Virginia Clendennin, class of 1914, has 
accepted a position at the Bellevue Hospital, N. Y. 



Mrs. Ethel P. Clarke, class of 1900. former 
superintendent of nurses of the University Hos- 
])ital Training School, who is now taking a course 
in "hospital administration" at the Teachers' Col- 
lege, Columbia University, New York city, visited 
the hospital the first of the month. 



Mrs. Carrie M. Barwick (Carrie M. Bowen), 
class of 1894, and widow of the late Dr. G. I. 
Barwick, class of 1894, is ill at the hospital, and 
though slowly improving, is still very ill. We all 
wish her a speedv recovery. 



Miss Nellie Carter, class of 1906, of Chatham, 
Va., is confined to the hospital, and will undergo 
an operation in a few days. 



OUIPS 



HIS OLD FATHER WAS SATISFIED. 



(From Chicago Advance.) 

Twenty years ago a discouraged young doctor 
in one of our large cities was visited once by his 
old father, who came up from a rural district to 
look after his boy. 

"Well, son," he said, "how are you getting 
along?" "I am not getting along at all," was 
the disheartened answer. "I am not doing a 
thing." 

The old man's countenance fell, but he spoke 
of courage and perseverance. Later in the day 
he went to the "Free Dispensary,'" where the 
}oung doctor had an unsalaried position and 
where he spent an hour or so each day. 

The father sat by, a silent but intensely inter- 
ested spectator, while twenty poor unfortunates 
received help. The doctor forgot his visitor while 
lie bent his skilled energies to his task, but hardly 
had the door closed on the last patient when the 
old man burst forth : 

"I thought you told me }0u were not doing 
anything! \Miy, if I had helped twenty people 
in a month as much as you ha\e in one morning, 
I would thank God that my life had counted for 
something." 

"There isn't any money in it. though,'" e.x- 
. plained the son, somewhat abashed. 

".Money!" he old man shouted, still scornfully. 



WILLIAM J. MILLER 

Jewelry, Diamonds, Watches 

College Jewelry 
Class Pins and Rings, College Seals 
28 East Baltimore St. Baltimore, Md. 22 W. LcxingtOH St., = Baltimore, Md. 



R LLERBROCK 



143 



THE^ UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



"Money ! What is money in comparison witli 
being of use to your fellow-men ? Never mind 
about money ; you go right along with this work 
every day. Til go back on the farm and gladly 
earn money enough to support you as long as I 
live — yes, and sleep sound every night with the 
thought that I have helped you to help your 
fellow-men." 



BIRTHS. 



Recently, to Dr. William E. TvIcClanahan, class 
of 1902, and Mrs. McClanahan, of 1619 South 
Clinton street, Baltimore, a daughter — Marjorie 
Mercedes. 

o 

MARRIAGES. 



Dr, Thomas Brooks, class of i9ro, to Miss 
Dolores Maria Mason, both of Santiago, Cuba, 
at Santiago. December 9. 1914- 




The 

Merchant 

Tailor 



Who 

Sells 

Ready-to-wear 



College Clothes 



New Fall Models 

Now Ready 
Prices $15 to $25 



Made to Measure 

From $20 Up 
Samples Cheerfully Given 



i 



19 E. FAYETTE ST. 

Take Elevator 

llliiiiiiiniiiiiiniii,iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMmTTiMim 



It's not often that 
yon z^'ill find ct'crytliino- 
III tins store reduced — 
It's I'cry seldom, indeed, 
that you can select just 
about anxtliinii in the house 
and pay only a fraction 
of its real value. Vet 
such is the cose right 
nozo. Whatever it is yon 
l^ant. you'll never find 
a better time to ^ret it. 



Hambtiifgers' 



Baltimore & Hanover Sts. 






Sahatore Scimeca. medical student. 1915, of 
i'alcrnid. Italy, to Miss Elsie Roof, dental stu- 
dent, 1915, of llremen, Germany, at Baltimore, 
January 6, 1915. Both the medical student and 
his bride have been in this country several years, 
and both have nearly completed their courses at 
the L"niversitv. 



I'lorence I. Dilworth. R. N., University Hos- 
pital Training School for Nurses, class of 1904, 
lo Mr. William M. Porter, both of Jacksonville, 
IHa., at Jacksonville, December 3. Mr. and Mrs. 
l^orter will make their home in Jacksonville, 
where .\Tr. Porter is engaged in business. 



Mr. James M. King, a former student at St. 
John's College, and Miss Georgia Wiltner, of 
( iood Hope, Ohio, were married on October 31. 
The bride is a beautiful girl and highly accom- 
plished. Mr. King is a former member of the 
class of 1!)]."). Mr. and Mrs. King are spending 
U the winter in the South, at Rivera Beach, Texas. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



143 



Vera Wright, R. N., class of 1909, was mar- 
ried to Dr. Wilbur Scott, class of 1912, and 
formerly a popular member of the resident staff 
of the University Hospital, at Easton, Md., Wed- 
nesday, January 20. Dr. and jMrs. Scott will 
make their home in Devereaux, Georgia. 



Dr. Hugh Warrent Brent, class of 190.3, of 
2121 Maryland avenue, Baltimore, was married 
to Miss Helen R. Vogeler, daughter of the late 
Jerome I. Vogeler and Mrs. Vogeler, of 1500 
Eutaw place, on Wednesday afternoon, Decem- 
ber 16, 1914, at the home of the bride's mother. 
The ceremony was performed by the Rev. Wil- 
liam Page Dame, assistant rector at Memorial 
Protestant Church, in the presence of the mem- 
bers of the two families. Immediately following 
the ceremony, Dr. and Mrs. Brent left for a 
Southern wedding trip. Upon their return they 
will reside at 2124 Maryland avenue. 



Lieutenant Enoch Barton Garey, U. S. A., St. 
John's College, class of 1903, was married to 
Miss Alice Brewer Ross, daughter of Rear Ad- 
miral Albert Ross, U. S. Navy, Thursday even- 
ing, December 31st, at the First Presbyterian 
Church, Clarion, Pa. Lieutenant Garey is the 
son of Mrs. Vashti S. Garey, of Denton, Md., 
and is now with the Eighteenth Infantry, U. S. 
Army. 



DEATHS. 



Dr. John Cronniiller, class of 1857, of Laurel, 
Md., died January i, 1915, at the LIniversity 
Hospita^^VBaltimore, after an illness of several 
weeks, aged 82 years. 



Mary Compton Burnett, R. N., University Hos- 
pital Training School for Nurses, class of 1901, 
of Spokane, Wash., died at St. Luke's Plospital, 
Spokane, September 11, 1914, after a long and 
painful illness. Miss Burnett was a valuable and 
prominent worker in the nursing affairs of her 
State. Her pioneer work in the West is an ex- 
ample of excellence and efficiency. 



WARNER & CO. 
... Ifatt^rs ... 

222-224 WEST BALTIMORE ST. 

J. Edwin I-Iengst, Phar.D., former president of 
the State Pharmaceutical Association, died at the 
home of his nephew, in Carlisle, Pa., December 
29, 1914, aged 57 years. Dr. Hengst studied 
pharmacy at the old Maryland College of Phar- 
macy, now merged in the LIniversity of Mary- 
land, and graduated in 1877. 



Harrison A. Freeman, D.D.S., class of 1907, of 
1619 West North avenue, died at his home of 
peritonitis, January 3, 191 5, aged 33 years. 



Dr. Edward W. Myers, class of 1862, a pioneer 
practitioner of Leavenworth, Kan., died at his 
home in Kansas City, Mo., December 14, 1914, 
aged "jy years. 

Dr. Clinton Wagner, class of 1859, surgeon-in- 
chief of the Second Division of the Fifth Army 
Corps of the Army of the Potomac ; prime mover 
in the establishment of several military hospitals, 
including the first floating hospital on Western 
waters ; founder of the New York Laryngological 
Society and instrumental in the founding of the 
American Laryngological Society ; first professor 
of laryngology and rhinology in the New York 
Post-Graduate Medical School and Hospital ; in- 
ventor of many surgical instruments and the 
author of voluminous literature relating to his 
specialt}', died in Geneva, Switzerland, November 
25, 1914, aged JJ years. 



Dr. Charles W. Shreve, class of 1858, for many 
years a practitioner of Dickerson, Md., died at the 
home of liis son in Washington, D. C, November 
24, 1914, from the effects of a fracture of the hip 
three months before, aged 80 years. 



Dr. J. M. Sheppard, B. M. C, class of 1894, a 
member of the West Virginia Medical Associa- 
tion, was found frozen to death near his home at 
Falls Mills, Va., November 21, 1914. 



Dr. Ralph H. Auger, B. M. C, class of 1909, a 
Dr. Charles Edward Wingo, of 228 North post-graduate worker in Johns Hopkins Llospital, 
Greene street, died from Brigbt'.s disease at his was found dead in his office in Baltimore, No- 
liome December 20, 1914, aged 48 years. vember 27, 1914, aged 32 years. 



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/ ■ 



Vol. I. 



BALTIMORE, MD., MARCH 1, 1915. 



No. 9. 




o 




EUNIYERSl 




DEVOTED 
TOTHE INTERESTS OF 
THE UNIVERSITY OFMARYLAND 



Bui< 



• 



^ 



• 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



Vol. I. 



MARCH 1, 1915. 



No. 9. 



CONTENTS. 



OPPORTUNITIES AND ADVAN- 
TAGES OF PRACTICING PRO- 
FESSIONS ABROAD. Stanwood 
Cobb, M.A 147 

OUR DEMAND. Louis A. Buie 148 

HISTORY OF THE CAP 149 

EDITORIALS 151 

Editorially Expressed. 
"I Speak This to Your Shame." 
Plodding, Push and Grit, Win Out, 
You'll See. 



SLAMS AND SALUTES 154 

ITEMS 156 

DEBATING CLUB NOTES 161 

BIRTHS 162 

MARRIAGES 163 

DEATHS 163 



Footwear for the College Man at Moderate Price. 

N. HESS' SONS - - 8 E. Baltimore, St. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE, MD. 

HON. PHILLIPS LEE GOLDSBOROUGH, Governor of Maryland, Chancellor. 
THOMAS FELL, A. M., Ph. D., L L. D., D. C. L., Provost 



ST. JOHN'S COLLEGE, Annapolis, Md. (,,°r^^;"lcVEN°c%s) 

Founded 1696. Classical and Scientific College Courses leading to d agrees. Special advantages to stu- 
dents purposing to study the professions. Military Department under army officers. Also Preparatory 
School for boys fitting for St. John's or other colleges. Term begins Sepljmber 21. Address 

THOMAS FELL, Ph.D., LL.D., D.C.L., President. 



DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE. 

Four vears' graded course. New Laboratory Build- 
ing. Clinical advantages unsurpassed. Teaching Staff 
of 66. loSth Annual Session will begin October I, 
igi4, and continue 8 months 

R. DORSEY COALE, Ph.D., M.D., Dean. 



DEPARTMENT OF DENTISTRY. 

33d Annual Session begins October i, 1914, and 
continues 7 months. 26 Instructors. New Building. 
For catalogue containing course of study, etc., apply to 

TIMOTHY 0. HEATWOLE, M.D., D.D.S., Dean, 

Baltimore, Md. 



DEPARTMENT OF LAW. 

Spth Annual Session will begin Sept. 28, 1914. Faculty 
of 26. For catalogue containing full information ad- 
dress the Secretary, 301 St. Paul Street, Baltimore, 
Maryland. 

EDWIN T. DICKERSON, Secretary. 



DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACY. 

(Formerly Maryland College of Pharmacy). 72nd 
Annual Session begins September 25, 1914. 11 In- 
structors. New Laboratories. Address 

CHARLES CASPARI, JR., Phar.D., Dean, 

Baltimore. Md. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 

Published Monthly In the Interest of the University of Maryland. 
PRICE tl.OO PER YEAR. 



Contributions solicited from Alumni of the 
University. 



Business Address, 608 Professional Building, 
Baltimore, Md. 



Vol. I. 



BALTIMORE, MD., MARCH 1, 1915. 



No. 9 



OPPORTUNITIES AND ADVANTAGES 

OF PRACTICING PROFESSIONS 

ABROAD. 



By Stanwood Cobb, B. A., M. A., Professor of 
English and Oratory, St. John's College. 



The world is constantly getting smaller, and 
modern methods of transportation have increased 
travel to such an extent that it is no uncommon 
thing to encircle the globe. For those who love 
travel and yet have not the means or leisure for it, 
there are many ways in which one can see the 
world while at the same time earning a living. 

Many of the professions today can easily be 
practiced in foreign countries. There are busi- 
ness openings in vaa.ny quarters of the globe, 
China and South America in particular holding 
splendid opportunities for the ambitious and en- 
terprising. Industries in this country which do 
a large export business often send employees to 
Europe, and in this way young men have an op- 
portunity to enjoy a bit of sightseeing. 

The profession of teaching lends itself admir- 
ably to travel. There are many positions opening 
yearly in the American schools of Turkey, Per- 
sia, China, Japan and South America. Besides 
that, the Government schools of these countries 
are turning more and more to Americans. When 
China gets on its feet financially and begins to 
establish a modern educational system there will 
be a demand for thousands of American teachers 
yearly. Recently the custom of exchanging pro- 
fessors has sent annually many of our professors 
to England, France, Germany and Japan. This 
custom, I believe, will grow rapidly — and were 
ever an auxiliary universal language to be 
established, teachers could easily settle in any 
part of the world. 

Engineering is a profession which can and is 
practiced in foreign countries. On the Island of 
Spitzbergen, working the most northerly coal 
mine in the world, is a young American engineer. 
In Turkey, in China, in South America, are 
scores of graduates from our technical schools. 



Medicine and dentistry are often practiced 
abroad. I have met American dentists in all the 
leading cities of Europe. In Constantinople, 
even, and in Cairo, are lucrative openings for up- 
to-date Americans. In China enormous fees are 
received by American dentists. American doc- 
tors can work up a practice among the American 
and English colonies in London, Rome, Paris, 
Munich, Berlin, St. Petersburg, Constantinople, 
etc. ; also there are many calls from mission 
schools and colleges. 

The diplomatic and consular services carry 
their agents to every part of the globe. A pro- 
vision of the Civil Service enables young men 
who receive appointments to embassy or consul- 
ate to study the language and customs of the 
countries to which they are sent, wholly at the 
expense of our Government. The navy, also, is 
a profession particularly leading to travel. 

While there are difficulties connected with prac- 
ticing one's profession abroad, and a certain hand- 
icap in that one in time falls behind in the latest 
technical advances being made in this country, 
1 would say that the advantages of going abroad 
far outweigh the disadvantages. Travel is a 
great educator and broadener. Just as the trans- 
planted flower or tree gains new strength from 
fresh soil, so human nature thrives and develops 
from being placed in a new environment, where 
unusual problems develop the powers of thought 
and observation to a remarkable degree. In 
travel, moreover, one meets mucii more interest- 
ing and notable personalities than one would 
meet in one's own native town. From the experi- 
ence of travel comes a poise and breadth of char- 
acter and culture which stamps a man as cosmo- 
politan. One who is equally at home in all the 
capitals of Europe is quite a different person from 
one who has remained peacefully vegetating in 
some corner of his native village. 

I venture to predict that the time will come, 
and is not far distant, when a man will venture 
to take up his life work in Europe or Asia or 
South America with the same confidence and ease 



148 THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 

with which he now accepts positions in this coun- 



try; and that it will be no more difficult a thing 
to go from here to China to fill a position than it 
is now to go from the Eastern to the Western 
coast of this country. The world is becoming 
smaller, humanity is growing more homogeneous, 
and the adoption of a universal twentieth century 
world culture which will make professional travel 
easy and delig'htful is certain to come within our 
generation. 

In closing, I cannot advise too strongly the 
young men graduating from our colleges and 
universities who are free firom family ties and 
responsibilites to take advantage of any oppor- 
tunity for travel which crosses their path. 
-o 



OUR DEMAND. 



By Louis A. BuiE. 
Medical, Class of 1915. 



im 



A man's intellectual as well as his moral quali- 
ties proceed from the depths of his own nature 
and are not the result of external influences. 
This is the ideal situation and the one which has 
been sought for at the University of Maryland 
for a number of years, and there can be no 
greater stigma on any man or group of men 
than to have it said that thev are opposing the 
honor system by word or deed. 

The only decent — in fact, the only possible — 
modus vivendi between faculty and student must 
be based on the honor principle. No faculty is 
strong enough to incorporate the honor system 
into a working code. It can never successfully 
come from that side. It was on this account 
that the students initiated this system, which 
would better be called the "common decency 
system" several years ago. Its essential foun- 
dation is justice. We, who have known it for a 
long time, have tried it and seen its merits, and 
feel that on this account we can better judge 
whether or not it should continue in the Univer- 
sity curriculum. It has become an inherent part 
of the University and cannot be rejected by any 
class or group of men. 

The reason why respect is paid to age is that 
old people have necessarily shown in the course 
of their lives whether or not they have been able 
to maintain their honor unblemished, while that 
of young people has not yet been put to the 
proof, though they are credited with the posses- 
sion of it. Do we want to disregard entirely 
that privilege which has been bestowed upon us? 



Certainly not ! And, furthermore, we will not 
have anyone associated with us shown such con- 
tempt for an honorable inheritance. "Trust men 
and they will trust you; treat them grandly and 
they will show themselves great, though they 
make an exception in your favor to all their 
rules of trade." This noble utterance of Emer- 
son's clearly portrays what can be accomplished 
by the existence of honor among men. 

In order that the honor system may live suc- 
cessfully, the following conditions must exist, 
namely : 

Firstly, the greatest majority of the students 
must be honorable and the initiative must come 
from these men. Otherwise the system has no 
chance for existence. The principle of honor 
must be inherent in each individual. It cannot 
be the result of external influence, because no 
educational or other scheme can turn a born 
simpleton into a man of sense. 

Secondly, there must be no failures of justice. 
An undiscovered cheat does little harm to anj'- 
one excepting himself. However, it is essential 
that punishment be properly administered fol- 
lowing detection. If students do not enforce the 
system it becomes a wretched farce, and those 
who are continually questioning its success are 
the ones who are mostly responsible for its un- 
steadiness. 

Thirdly, there should be a single penalty. The 
sentence is fixed, automatic and unchangeable 
and can never be varied. The honor committee 
is not called upon, neither does it come within its 
jurisdiction, to fix the penalty. Theirs is merely 
to decide whether or not, according to the evi- 
dence, there has been a breach of the honor 
decorum. 

Lastly, there should be a pledge. The nature 
of this pledge I have suggested once before. 
There are numerous types, any of which might 
be made suitable. Probabh' the most desirable 
would be the one inserted on the back of the 
matriculation card. In this manner the pros- 
pective student would sign the pledge when he 
enters the L"niversity, thus being entered upon 
the honor system. If he refuses to show in this 
simple manner that he is desirous of striving for 
that which is right, then I say the profession is 
better off without him and it is safer and better 
that he be not allowed to enter. This would 
avert numerous difficulties, most noteworthy of 
which is the case in which a class has the audac- 
ity to assume the power to attempt to decide 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



149 



whether or not the honor system shall apply to 
them. The principal purpose of the pledge, how- 
ever, is to make the offense specific. Cheating 
is a very vague term, and one may obtain or give 
advice on an examination in different ways. The 
honor system is not a system of ethics ; it is a 
code, and any breach of the code should be as 
clear and definite as possible. The pledge accom- 
plishes this, and a misunderstanding of require- 
ments cannot be a plea. The pledge supplies a 
basis for action and makes of the honor com- 
mittee not a set of judges, but a jury to deter- 
mine the facts. The question is not "Did he do 
a dishonorable thing?" but "Did he knowingly 
sign his name to a pledge which he would not 
sustain?" 

These are the essentials of our honor system 
and these are the principles which all honorable 
men in the University demand shall be observed. 
It is an assumption of unparalleled audacity on 
the part of any class or group of men in a class 
to take it upon themselves to try to decide 
whether or not they shall follow the honor sys- 
tem. It has been adopted bv the University stu- 
dents and substantiated b}- the faculty and is fast 
becoming traditional with us. Therefore, it be- 
hooves no one to do aught but uphold it and 
strive for its perfection. 



HISTORY OF THE CAP.* 

To the University of Maryland belongs the 
honor of bestowing upon its graduates the only 
cap which, to my knowledge, possesses any real 
history. The graduate nurse is no longer a nov- 
elty, nor her career an experiment. In the hos- 
pitals and in the homes, throughout all civilized 
countries, her ministrations are accepted and (in 
the hour of danger, at least) appreciated. When 
all is again calm, it often happens, yet, that we 
are called upon to listen while the real heroines of 
tlie household recount to what extent the 
"starched angel" depended upon them for assist- 
ance and support, and how she carried off the 
lionors which really belonged to them. However, 
the silent acknowledgment of our commanding 
officer, the physician, or surgeon, and the grati- 
tude of the patient quite neutralizes the corroding 
effect which many such acerbities might other- 
wise produce, and we have the courage to renew 
the battle with disease and death. It is quite true 
that we do receive valuable assistance and sup- 



port from those who wear no uniform, but when 
the blunder is made, no matter who made it, 
there is only one to receive the blame. So, if she 
may be sometimes flattered, petted and even 
spoiled, it is not likely to be a steady diet. 

There was a time, also, when this cap of ours 
v,-as worn b}' one who was a piwieer in a work 
which has proved to be almost miraculous in its 
results, and where ease and luxury were unknown 
terms. I mean the care of sick and wounded sol- 
diers in camps and upon the field of battle. This 
afterward developed more fully into the care of 
the homeless, sick and suffering in the time of 
any calamity, fire, flood or pestilence when the 
difficulties to be met and overcome must be 
;'.ljparent to anyone. 

I think no nurse could read "The Red Cross," 
by Clara Barton, and fail to experience a thrill of 
enthusiasm, partaking of reverence, sympathy 
and admiration. 

Some who will see this Annual will not have 
forgotten their ministrations to our own soldiers 
at the University of Maryland during the Span- 
ish-American War. Many of the victims of that 
war, however, while deprived of the sustaining 
and stimulating experience of an actual engage- 
ment, were called upon to make a brave fight for 
life against typhoid fever or some other danger- 
ous malady, but could not reach home to receive 
the care and attention which would gladly have 
been lavished upon them. The deep prejudice of 
some of the army surgeons forbade the admission 
of female nurses to the wards of the division hos- 
pitals. To quote from "The Red Cross" : "There 
was 'lack of woman's nursing,' but there was no 
'dearth of woman's tears' at home." In nearly 
every instance, however, the time came when 
the most deeply prejudiced opposer of the plan 
yielded, and "women nurses" were sought for 
and welcomed to the hospital by hundreds. 

Delegates who represented other training 
schools will remember hearing reports from sev- 
eral of these nurses, when the Associated Alum- 
nae met in New York City. These talks simply 
recounted some of the experiences of army nurs- 
mg. There was no complaint nor regret for the 
liardships encountered and overcome. Their 
only glory appeared to be in the fact that they 
liad been permitted to reduce the sum of human 
suffering. Nor was there a trace of morbid sen- 
timentality which has been ascribed to them by 
their enemies. 



150 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



At the close of the volume which has furnished 
material which I have considered it not unfair to 
appropriate (while acknowledging the source) 
there is a tribute to the Red Cross nurses which 
every wearer of our cap should read. It is writ- 
ten by Franklin B. Hussey, of Chicago, and is 
addressed "To the army of women, brave, gen- 
erous and true, who * * * made up that 
magnificent array of womanhood, ready for sacri- 
fice on the altar of humanity and their country." 
He begins : "The war is over. Now let us re- 
joice. Now erect your tablets and monuments to 
the heroes of the war — the living and the dead. 
Write their names on the long roll of honor — 
Dewey, Schley, Hobson and Wainwright ; Roose- 
velt, Tee, Wheeler and all the rest — and along- 
side their names write those of the private sol- 
dier and 'the man behind the gun.' They remem- 
bered the Maine ! And while we rear our sym- 
bols of marble and of bronze to commemorate 
their brave deeds, there is one we must not, we 
cannot forget." 

He then tells how, when the "brave boys" left 
home, the "gentle presence of woman walked 
beside them." Next he notes the fact that in 
the adornment and decoration of the city, when 
the arches spanning the streets are covered with 
names and portraits of patriots, he missed "hers 
of whom I speak." And in the procession pass- 
ing under those arches her form is not seen. 

Again, at night, when the banquet is spread 
and toasts are given, still no mention is made of 
her. "Not that she was forgotten * * * 
but because she went about her duty of self- 
sacrifice so simply, so modestly, without even a 
thought or expectation that anyone would ever 
know or care whether she lived to come back 
from the fever-laden swamp or not; her part in 
the great victory had been for the time being 
overlooked. She asks no recognition * * * 
she seeks no praise; but on some sunny slope of 
one of our wooded parks I want to see a simple 
shaft uplifted in memory of the girl with a red 
cross on her arm. She went forth to war with 
no blare of trumpets or beat of drums * * * 
She carried neither sword nor musket, but only 
the gentle ministrations of a woman's hand and 
heart * * * She carried balm and healing, 
not only to broken and bleeding bodies, but to 
broken and bleeding hearts as well * * * 
Let some great sculptor, catching aright the in- 
spiration of his theme, outline that slender form, 



that woman's form, with melting heart and 
nerves of steel, against the soft blue of the sum- 
mer sky * * * and underneath let these 
words be traced : "To the Nurses of the Red 
Cross — those angels of the battlefield — who min- 
istered to our soldiers and sailors, the thanks of a 
grateful nation ; for 'inasmuch as ye have done 
it unto one of the least of these, ye have done it 
unto Me.' " 

And now, where is any history of the cap to 
be found in all these quotations ? In her intro- 
duction from the book from which I have so free- 
ly given extracts. Miss Barton says: "(Al- 
though ) the gradual growth of the idea of some- 
thing like humanity in war, stimulated by the ig- 
norant and insane horrors of India and the Cri- 
mea, and soothed and instructed by the sensible 
and practical work of Florence Nightingale, had 
slowly but surely led up to the conditions which 
made such a movement possible," etc., etc. 

Thus it is that the Nightingale cap comes 
down to us bearing its honored associations, 
and awakening an honest pride in its wearers 
who will preserve it from reproach, and seek to 
maintain its true dignity. The historian of the 
training school will doubtless have told you that 
the University of ilaryland was me first train- 
ing school in Baltimore. In acknowledging our 
Superintendent, Miss Louise Parsons, of St. 
Thomas' Hospital, London, as our benefactress 
in the matter of bringing to us the cap, may I 
add my tribute of respect and gratitude to one 
who possessed and exemplified many noble traits 
which she has in common with those wonderful 
women, Florence Nightingale and Clara Bartoon. 
The horrors of war were not unknown to her 
when she established the training school, and 
more than one badge of honor or other royal rec- 
ognition, her services to sick and wounded sol- 
diers were in her possession at that time. 



!=Year Book, Class of 1905. 



Siglit, smell and tnste plays bi^ part in digestion. 
Eating is a matter of the sympathetic nerres. "No 
profit wliere no pleasure is taken." 

POSITIVELY we feed you BETTER, at LESS COST 
and I\ THE CLEANEST environment than any one 
has ever done before since time beg'an. 

BRIGHTON LUNCH 

14 N. HOWARD STREET 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



151 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 

A MONTHLY JOURNAL 

Devoted to the interests of the University 

of Maryland. 

Subscription Price, $1.00 Per Annum, In Advance 

Reprints Furnished At Cost 

Advertising Rates Submitted Upon Request. 

608 Professional Building 
BALTIMORE. MD. 



Editorial Board. 

J. BEN ROBINSON, D.D.S Editor-in-Chief. 

NATHAN WINSLOW, M.D Managing Editor. 

Graduate Members. 

THOMAS FELL, LL.D Academic. 

STANWOOD COBB, B.A Academic. 

H. M. ROBINSON, M.D Medical. 

ALBERT H. CARROLL, M.D Medical. 

F. J. VALENTINE, D.D.S Dental. 

SAMUEL WANT, LL. B Law. 

JOHN H. SKEEN, LL. B Law. 

A. A. SONNENBURG, Phar.D Pharmacy. 

J. M. BRANSKY, Phar.D Pharmacy. 

M. E. SULLIVAN, R.N Nursing. 

Undergraduate Members. 

C. V. Vl'ILSON Academic. 

H. GOLDMAN, '15; F. C. MARINO, 

'16; C. 0. W^OLF, '17 Medicine. 

H. E. WATERMAN, 15; A. Z. ALD- 
RIDGE. '16; H. I. HAWKINS, 
'17 Dental. 

J. A. HAGGERTY,'15; B. C. LIGHT- 
NBR, '15; C. N. MATTHEWS, 
'16 Law. 

A. L. STERLING, 'IF Pharmacy. 

J. E. EVANS, '16. . Y. M. 0. A. 

B. C. LIGHTNER, ' Advertising. 

B. G. GOLD, '15 College Notes. 

A. G. DE QUEVEDO Latin -American. 

L. A. BUIE, '15 House Notes. 

LINDSAY ROGERS, '15 General Items. 



MARCH 1, 1915. 



EDITORIALLY EXPRESSED. 



Success is an accomplishment of work which 
secures to the individual the realization of his 
ideals. The future of the good, bad and indif- 
ferent is determined by present thought and as- 
pirations. H the man is a malefactor the evil 
in him is not resident in overt acts, but a conse- 
quence of the evil having been conceived in medi- 
tation of fundamentals which develop evil fruits. 
If, on the other hand, one is possessed with great 
powers of mind, with deftness of movement, with 



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QREATLY REDUCED PRICES 



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accuracy of visual interpretation or vocal expres- 
sion, or if, perchance, he may control and lead in 
a religious, social, political or professional ca- 
reer, the life is the fruit of proper thought and 
effort, an evidence of nurtured thought of the 
one possessing such superior power. The thought 
is father to the act, and in our lives greater care 
nuist be had with our mental than physical acts 
that a satisfying success may bless our efforts. 
In this lies the value of an ideal. 



Roger Williams dreamed of religious free- 
dom, and his pioneer work established the 
thought which resulted in the separation of 
church and state and made freedom of worship 
what it is today; Thomas Payne dreamed of po- 
litical freedom and wrote so inspiringly that the 
colonists were encouraged to resent the outrages 
of an English king and succeeded in securing 
political rights ; Benjamin Franklin dreamed of 
a united country and his editorial writings 
brought ultimate co-operation to our colonies in 
the form of United States ; Thomas Jefferson 
believed in the sovereignty of the people and the 
practice of democracy in all high places and so 
overturned the empirical customs established by 
his predecessors and made democracy reign with 
this country's chief executive. Each had his ideal 
which was his ruling passion. If worked out, 
they meant crowning glory to mankind. Each 
succeeded, and each is great in proportion to ser- 
vice rendered. In the service they rendered us 
lies the value of their ideals. 



The law is universal and we are what we think. 
The old adage that one "can tell a man by the 
company he keeps" means that his company re- 
flects his ideals. It is useless to say that we can 
not direct our thoughts and acts ; this theory 



152 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



savors too much of fatalism, and we are anti- 
fatalistic. If the wrong idea or false conception 
of a good time enters j'our mind kill it at once. 
We once saw an old white hen that killed every 
black chicken that appeared in her brood from ill- 
chosen hatchings. She had a hig-h sense of duty 
because she refused to perpetuate the thing that 
tended to supplant her kind. We believe in the 
democracy of the heart, freedom of will, and 
unlimited power to accomplish. The University 
can succeed, prosper, and progress, but she must 
follow ideals. Beware the value of an ideal. 



What is your ideal of a University, an Alumni 
Association, a student body, of a Gazette? 
When we hear an instructor lament the Univer- 
sity spirit we wonder what he does to shape the 
spirit : when we hear an alumnus deprecate the 
work of the Association we question his status 
as a useful member ; when students follow lives 
that reflect on the name of the institution we 
doubt their true conception of a good time and 
tremble for their future ; when the college paper 
must be a pariah to Faculty, Alumni Association 
and student body we say there is something 
wrong, and the "Kelly act" is in order. It must 
be of service to all by having ideals of its own, 
and upholding ideals toward which the students 
strive. 



The editor-in-chief of this paper holds that 
the G.'\zETTE should be a force in the life of each 
student, that he may be made to think, where 
heretofore he has been, as the old darkey, "think- 
in" nothing." It should permit expressions on 
questions of interest pertaining to school work 
and life from any student who respectfully ad- 



STYLISH and COMFORTABLE 
FOOT-WEAR 



FOR THE 



UNIVERSITY MAN 

All Leathers — Expert Fitting 
Moderate Prices 

WYMAN 

19 W. LEXINGTON STREET 



dresses the public through its columns ; it 'should 
attempt to unify the University spirit by creating 
common interest in activities into which all de- 
partments can enter ; it should develop the pro- 
fessional by publishing current developments 
and discoveries along scientific lines bearing on 
the profession, as well as noting any de- 
cision of higher courts that may be of in- 
terest and service to the law student; it will ad- 
vocate a higher standard of morality, education 
and professional service. Having these as 
ideals, with co-operation the magazine can be a 
force that will be felt and recognized where now 
it is unknown. 



Some things needed : State aid, endowments, a 
high standard of entrance requirements and 
equally high graduating requirements, a peda- 
gogical and systematic method of instruction, a 
reasonable examination system, an air-tight hon- 
or system, an elimination of the paid-quiz sys- 
tem, an efficiently organized Y. M. C. A, a dor- 
mitory, a modern library and system, fraternity 
houses, an organized athletic association, a 
Glee Club concert dance annually, ad inftnition. 
Can it be done? Ask any housewife why she 
uses "Old Dutch Cleanser" and she will tell you 
that she reads in every store window "Old Dutch 
Cleanser will cleanse." Think these things, talk 
these things, put forth effort to secure these 
things, and test the value of an ideal. 



■ I SPE.\K THIS TO YOUR SHAME. 

Not in a sense of levity, but with due rever- 
ence do I employ the Scriptural injunction, "I 
speak this to your shame." And, members of 
the General Alunmi Association and members of 
the teaching Faculties, I do speak it to your 
shame. At any rate, I sincerely hope I do. In 
a iMedical Faculty of over 100, and large Dental, 
Pharmacetitical and Legal Faculties, there was 
not a corporal's guard present at the annual ban- 
quet of the General Alumni Association, Feb- 
ruary 30, 1915, at the Hotel Rennert. What are 
things coming to when there was only one mem- 
ber of the major -Medical Faculty, that faithful 
war-horse. Prof. Randolph Winslow, one of the 
Dental. Dr. Isaac Davis, and none of the Law or 
Pharmaceutical present? Indeed, one may per- 
tinently ask how can the Faculties expect to see 
the institution advance when they as individual 



THE UNIVERS 



units show so little interest? It is not enough 
that a man deliver a set of lectures and think that 
lets him out. If that is the case, things have 
come to a pretty pass. And how can the Facul- 
ties expect the rank and file to take pride in the 
institution if they as individuals take so little 
interest in lending their presence to a Univer- 
sity affair of such a character? It is time to 
think, and think seriously, concerning the' ulti- 
mate outcome of the University when so little 
enthusiasm is manifested by those who should. 
Yea, verily, "I speak this to your shame." It is 
not enough to subscribe ; you should have embel- 
lished the gathering by your presence. And, 
gentlemen of the rank and file, I speak chas- 
tisingly to you also. Where were you? Have 
you lost all your love for your Alma Mater? 
Surely, the gathering was a sorry spectacle — 
all told, thirty-two strong, four of whom were 
invited guests, and seven, members of the Penn- 
sylvania Branch of the General Alumni Asso- 
ciation. My heart bled when I beheld the vast- 
ness of the assemblage. So little enthusiasm 
forbodes evil to the institution. 



PLODDING, PUSH AND GRIT, WIN OUT, YOU'LL SEfi. 

Success is measured by the amount of effort 
expended in properly preparing for the problem 
in hand. By proper preparation is meant the dili- 
gence one expends in thoroughly grounding him- 
self in the elements of his profession. This im- 
plies a lot of hard work in conquering the funda- 
mentals. Nobody has ever succeeded in reaching 
the pinnacle of his profession without steady 
plodding — by which is meant work. 

Because a man stands at the head of his class 
during school years does not necessarily signify 
he will outdistance his fellow-members in the 
chase of life. Experience teaches such oftentimes 
is not the case. And why? The leader assumes 
after graduating he has acquired all there is to 
know of his profession, whilst his brother knows 
he has not learned it all. The one lays down, the 
other sets out with firm determination to thor- 
oughtly ground himself, so that when occasion 
arises, he will be prepared to measure up to the 
demands. When opportunity knocks, be prepared 
to grasp it. It is now too late to bewail lack of 
preparation. Even wishing you were prepared is 
idle pastime, for wishes availeth nothing. Never, 
never, will wishes get you there, like hustle. 
"Plodding, push and grit win out, you'll see." 



^.-^^uivy-iurtner notice. Jferhaps' 
the misunderstanding arises from the non-receipt 
of a membership certificate. If this is desired, 
there is an additional charge of 50 cents, which 
should accompany the membership fee. 

Below we give a list of the officers of the Gen- 
eral Alumni Association for the ensuing year : 

President, Eugene W. Hodson, Phar D. ; Vice- 
President, E. J. W. Revell, LL. B.; Treasurer, 
William K. Stichel, Phar. D. ; Recording Secre- 
tary, Albert H. Carroll, M. D. ; Corresponding 
Secretary, Edward P. Crummer, EL. B. 



). FRED SHAFER, Pr>s. WM. E. READ, Vice-Pres. WM. G. HORN, Sec'yTreas. 

THE HORN-SHAFER CO. 

Printers and Publishers 

3-5 GERMAN STREET, EAST 

BALTIMORE 
Private Branch Exchange, St. Paul 7077-7078 

Printers of 1912 '13 and '14 "Terrae Mariae" 
There must be a reason 



The prevalent feeling of happiness and good fellow- 
ship, combined with the invariably excellent dinner, 
makes all the world your friend, and produces an 
evening of surpassing enjoyment. 

THE NEW OLYMPIA RESTAURANT 

308 W. Baltimore St."=306 E. Baltimore St 

The Olympia serves nothing but cleaa, good food. 



152 



;iTY GAZETTE. 



ItittiliStK . i 








of a goo*' : 


i: 








an Qio 




>i kiiied every 


, ...v rv V 


: , ..-,- 




htood from ill- 


o^i") ;. 






sen -^e of duty 






■" . :MUi_i. 


.vt in t;:.. 






■--li-t fr!= 


...ill or..; 



Recenty the University was subjectcJ to hu- 
miliation by a party of students who, presuming- 
to have a good time, had attended a fraternity 
smoker and, having -imbibed too freely, became 
boisterous to the point of arrest. We know the 
boys, and we know that the fraternity is com- 
posed of a fine group of men, but in this group 
are a few individuals who foolishly think that the 
best time is had when drunken revelry reigns. 
The writer contends that the professional man 
should not "booze,"' as it renders him absolutely 
unreliable, therefore, the student should keep 
himself free from its influences ; that any or- 
ganization permitting its members to become in- 
toxicated in attendance at any meeting or social 
gathering cannot thrive and should be forced to 
purge its membership or be banished from an 
educational institution. Let this particular fra- 
ternity, and all others so afflicted, take a lesson 
and dismiss from' its ranks men who do not 
respect it sufficiently to protect its good name. 
— Tosh u A Wheat. 



Dlstribution of Terra Mariae Honors. 

As a member of the Law Department, I desire 
to enter protest against the arrangement that 
prevails regarding the distribution of officers of 
Terra Mariae. Since the foundation of the an- 
nual, so I have been informed, the Medical and 
Dental- Departments have had the editor-in-chief 
and business management, respectively, while the 
law department has had two associate editors — 
— emphasis on the associate. This arrangement 
might have been wise when the annual was 
inaugurated, the Law Department then having 
few members, but now, with an enrollment of 
416 men, forty of whom are college graduates. 



-iiould the Law men take a back seat and con- 
c^ 'e the Medics to be better equipped to do the 
iiterarjf work for the annual than they of equal 
preliminary training? The Law men are leaders 
'ill numbers and brains, and the assertion true that 
the University spirit is greater with them than 
au}- other department, as shown by their stand- 
ing, societies, athletic enthusiasm and frequent 
social gatherings. The Law Department financial 
ronrributions are fully as large as any of the other 
dcjjartments, and they should in justice receive a 
distributive share of honors. Precedents are verj' 
}jood, and no one should respect them more than 
the prospective lawyer, but we cannot respect pre- 
cede It that is absolutely at variance with our 
sen^d of justice. Therefore, I suggest that the 
four departments confer about the matter and 
more equally distribute favors, and in so doing 
gi\e the Law Department what it rightly de- 
serves—editor-in-chief, 1916. J. H., '16. 



A DENTAL INFIRMARY WRONG. 

A word about the tendency of instruments to 
take wings and fly away. This constant loss of 
instruments when left unguarded is certainly not 
creditable to a body of future professional men. 
Neither is it fair to the majority who endeavor 
to deal fairly and honestly with their fellows. 
Instruments are very often lost in the sterilizer; 
steel is not soluble in water, hence we must con- 
clude that they have help in their disappearance. 
Everyone knows the inconvenience of keeping 
watch over various articles while at work in the 
laboratories, yet it is most necessary for protec- 
tion. For the good of all, let those who collect 
these souvenirs of another's carelessness see the 
practice in its true light as pure and unadulter- 
ated thieverv. a dental student. 



THE HONOR SYSTEM. 

Good clothes do not make good law-abiding 
citizens. A good churchgoer does not necessarily 
mean a good man or woman. Good looks are but 
skin deep. The term "Honor System" does not 
necessarily mean an honorable assemblage of men, 
and so, after a careful study of all the phases 
of the Honor System at present in vogue at the 
L'nixersity of ^laryland, the following thoughts 
arise : 

Should the Honor System be used as a mask 
to forward by its unlawful manipulation ulterior 



THE UNIVEI 



ends ? By all means, no ! and with me are the 
men who believe in a system of honor, character 
and integrity. 

There is at present in the U- of M. an Honor 
System governing the students' exams, class 
quizzes, etc. For this system to be a success it 
must have power, and power should be used to- 
ward the right end. Nations with large armies 
are not necessarily strong nations; besides num- 
ber, they must have unity of purpose, able leader- 
ship, and the power to enforce all demands. Does 
our Honor System comply with the above re- 
quirements ? Let's analyze it and see : 

Until a few years ago no one would think of 
condemning the aforesaid system. It was an ideal 
success, but unfortunatelv this success has been 
slowh- waning. As I understand from my own 
ears and from other sources, one class has refused 
to sanction the system. In another, it has been 
openly opposed and threats made that some ill 
might befall him who abided strictly by its rules 
and regulations. In the other two classes, by a 
minority equal to one-third or two-fifths of the 
students, it is believed to be a joke, a farce, or a 
very ingenious means of advancing the name of 
the U. of M., and not a system to be obeyed. 

I am strongly in favor of the Honor System in 
all its phases; I believe it is a most excellent 
system if properly employed ; I believe that it 
will raise the standard of the school ; I believe 
that it will make men out of possible crooks; I 
believe that it will encourage study ; but I do 
not believe that it should be used in any way, 
shape or form as a mask behind which to hide, 
and make cheating and cribbing, or what not, a 
profitable game. If we are to have an Honor 
System, we must have an Honor System, and not 
simply a useless ornament whose worth is simply 
a name. 

I wish to cite one specific example : Last 
spring, during the finals, the doctor in charge left 
the room, believing the students to be on their 
honor. A few minutes later groups of three and 
four left the room, presvmiably to go to the toilet 
or to have a little smoke. In the toilet- room, it is 
alleged and in fact is a common saying, there 
were books, and in these books there was the 
knowledge required to pass the exams. The of- 
fenders in question even offered their aid to any 
strange or familiar brother in distress. No one 
was exempt from cribbing, all were invited, and 
Tve all know the temptation. 



i,_ii X iiavC VVliLtwi 



the resentment it will arouse. I hope I shall beable 
to stir up the honorable students or Faculty to a 
solution of the present difficulty before our com- 
ing finals. Open criticism of this attack or any 
corrobative evidence will be welcomed by the 
editor, and will be published in the University 
Gazette and answered to the best of our ability. 
— Contributed. 



If the Honor System is as abused as reported 
in the "Slam" column in this issue, the standard 
of honor among the medical students of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland is certainly in a deplorable 
condition. It is hard to believe, and I for one do 
not believe, that the majorit)' of medical students 
are constituted on such a low moral plane. I 
would hate to think that such animals were being 
admitted to the rights and privileges of the medi- 
cal profession, or that they were to be my future 
associates. A man who would cheat at an exami- 
nation is not too mean to perform an abortion if 
pushed financially. In fact, he would stop at 
nothing to further his own ulterior plans. Some 
time ago the Gazette voiced the sentiment that 
the L'niversity of Maryland does not want 
amongst its student body crooks, and by no other 
name can a man who cheats be designated. If a 
man cheats, and it can be proven, he will be ex- 
pelled immediately. In this action the student 
body will be upheld by the Faculty of Physic. 
Formerly it was up to the Faculty of Physic to 
prevent breaches of this rule. Now the onus is 
upon the students' shoulders. If there be crooks 
among them, it is up to the student to face the 
matter squarely and report them. In the event 
of such action, the students may rest assured the 
Faculty will stand behind them. 



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ITEMS. 



IMEDICAL— GRADUATE. 



Dr. Joseph C. Enos, class of 1901, of Charle- 
roi, Pa., was in Baltimore last week. \\Tiile in 
the city he stopped at the Belvedere. 



Dr. William Culbert Lyon, class of 1907, As- 
sistant Surgeon, Medical Reserve Corps, U. S. 
N., formerly of 1518 Mt. Royal Avenue, this city, 
is still on duty at Galveston, Tex. He is assistant 
surgeon of the recruiting district of the United 
States Navy in Southeastern Texas, established 
about two years ago. This district was made ne- 
cessary on account of the size of Texas and by rea- 
son of the great number of desirable recruits that 
are obtained in the State. Galveston was selected 
as the headquarters by reason of its being the 
chief seaport city. Dr. Lyon is in charge of the 
medical department of the Galveston office. Prior 
to his detail at Galveston he was on duty at the 
Richmond, Va.., Station. 



Dr. Frederick L. Detrick, class of 1913, is lo- 
cated at the Metropolitan Hospital, Blackwell's 
Island, Xew York. 

Since our last issue two of our Baltimore 
alumni have moved. They are Drs. Albert H. 
Carroll and Robert P. Bay. Both have taken 
apartments in the W'albert. 



MEDICAL— SENIOR. 



In the annual amphitheatre examination for 
internships at Bay View the following gentle- 
men were appointed from the senior class : 
Messrs. Etzler. Ross, Waff, Lane, Lowry, Shar- 
key and Goldman. 



The following appointments from the senior 
class for internships at the University Hospital 
were made : Messrs. Buie, Egan, Tonolla, ^^'il- 
son, Demarco, Jenkins, Hill, Bennett, Rush, Zieg- 
ler and Dorsev. 



Now " eady for Spring, 1915. See Us for Classy Clothes 

■ its to Measure, $15.00 to $35.00 
. JACOBS & SONS, Tailors 

899 NORTH HOWARD STREET 

Op- venings 9 P. M. Cor. Richmond St. 

What we'd like to know : Who is Lipnick's 

"ficia! anaesthetist every day at the various lec- 

i. -ires'-' He goes to sleep so peacefully, without 

cri exciting stage, that we'd like to hire him ! 

By the way, do you know John Bunny? 



Kelly tried to get Pat Durkin sore the other 
night. Both had studied until 3 A. M., and Pat 
said, "Let's go to sleep," and with that went to 
get a drink. On returning he found Kelly still 
studying, so he turned out the light and got in 
bed. Kelly was so angrj' that he said, "I've got 
a good notion to study until 5 o'clock, just for 
spite,"' and he did — not. 

Four Kings ! ? ? ! 



"Pop" Bridges better behave himself in class, 
because somebodv sure will sit on him if he's not 
careful; and as for "Countryman" Lackey, he's 
flirting with death. 



Got a couple of fresh iclinical assistants — • 
Sima, Linhardt and Clinkscales. Soft stuff! 



"Fractures and dislocations." Somewhere in 
the past have we heard these two terms (bug- 
bears once), but now faded and indistinct. Yes, 
Professor Winslow had us locked up for three 
hours. "Do you know where the seniors are?" 
some one asked Professor Winslow. "Yes ; I've 
just locked them up for three hours." He did! 



Famous sayings of famous men : The Ides of 
]\Iarch are coming ! — Prof. Neale. 

MEDICAL— JUNIOR. 



FAMILIAR SAYINGS. 

1. Now, boys, let's don't play. 

2. I was asked a few questions at the close 
of the last lecture, and I shall proceed to answer 
them. 

3. You know, boys, the Ides of ^larch ap- 
proaches. 

4. Well, look it up in the book. 

■5. There must be some questions. 
6. Fire! Fire! 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



157 



7. Hey ! Charlie. Who in the h cut off my 

p — n — s from this stiff? 

8. Is my lecture so dry or is it the dryness of 
of the air which is causing you to fall asleep? 

9. Some day you'll be an ordinary, common 
physician. 

10. We sometimes ask this exam. boys. A 
word to the wise is sufficient. 



10. Please knock your University at everyi 
chance you get. It is a good and free advertise- 
ment. 



.\ RECENT ADVANCE IN THE SCIENCE OE MEDICINE. 
BY MR. N. S. 

Within the last month or so the obstetrical 
world was astonished to And that a new obstet- 
rical forceps was invented. Its only use in the 
science of medicine was to reach the external 
uterine os. All other instruments were too short ; 
the one in question was three feet long. 

After ages of experience and practice on cows 
and dogs, our most beloved class-mate came to 
the conclusion that the external os was far out 
of the reach of any human tool, or instrument. 
He, therefore, invented the above said forceps, 
only to have his dreams of fame and fortune 
thrown to the winds by our Dr. S., who informed 
the gentleman in question that the external os 
was within reach of modern tools, and not three 
to five feet from the external world. 

To make a long story short, it all depends on 
the depth of the and the length of the . 



RULES TO BE OBSERVED BY JUNIOR STUDENTS. 

1. Always stamp your feet; it seems to add to 
your asinine qualities. 

3. Please expectorate on the floor. The lakes 
so produced are a source of beauty to the school. 

3. Always clap your hands before the lecture. 
It rattles the lecturer. 

1. When you feel home sick, let loose one of 
those cow yells (a la Hutton), which are so com- 
mon on the farm. 

5. Please throw plenty of bull ; the grass on 
the campus is very scant. 

6. Never get to the lecture on time ; it may 
cause the Prof, to think you are interested. 

7. Always leave the lecture before its com- 
pletion, else your snoring may cause undue dis- 
turbance. 

8. If you have a knife, carve your name on the 
furniture. The school wants some memo- to re- 
member you by. 

9. Hold all your conversations during the lec- 
ture, else we may be able to hear the lecturer. 



IN MEMORIAM. 

P>eing always on the lookout for the welfare 
of any sister or brother in misery, we can scarcely 
remove our tear-stained eyes from our late Mr. 
Bishop, who, from all intents and purposes, is 
about to enter into the field of matrimony. Poor 
girl, we pity her, and may all her troubles be lit- 
tle ones. 



The train is well on its way to the end of the 
year ; all stragglers kindly get on the front coach, 
else we will have to leave them. 



At the suggestion of the editor-in-chief of the 
191.5 Terra Marise, the Junior Class recently 
elected as the editor-in-chief of the 1916 Year 
Book, Mr. Bishop ; art editor, Mr. Bowers Growt. 
The selection of the editor-in-chief at the end of 
the Junior year should do much toward lessen- 
ing the work during school session, and should be 
an all-important factor in the production of a 
banner book in 1916. 



The Junior Class wishes to extend its sym- 
pathy to our class-mate, Mr. Thomas Brown, 
who has been recently operated upon for a per- 
forated appendix. 



Mr. Moses has returned from New York after 
an illness of three weeks. 



An epidemic of foot and mouth disease is re- 
ported among Junior medical students. Those 
afflicted are Messrs. R., B., M., F., etc., etc. May 
be mouth disease, but that is not the common 
name for it. 

A. H. PETTING 

Manufacturer of 

GREEK LETTER FRATERNITY JEWELRY 

213 N. Liberty St., = Baltimore, Md. 
Factory: 212 Little Sharp St. 

Memorandum package sent to any fraternity member through the 
secretary of the chapter. Special designs and estimates furnished on 
medals, rings and pins for athletic meets, etc. 



158 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



!> 



quA 




iDlEHL 

Clothes 

built at 605 W. Baltimore St., 
just around the corner from the 
University, are kept pressed with- 
out cost. 

Suits $15 to $40 

LAW— SENIOR. 



FOUND. 

In this place last month we noted the myster- 
ious disappearance of a photograph of the Hon. 
C. B. Smythe, ex-president of the 1915 Class, 
and expressed our gravest concern as to where 
the said photograph might ultimately show up. 

It has been found ! 

In use in advertising some nostrum for all the 
ills of beast or man, or some highly commendable 
brew ? 

Bah ! No ! 

Then perhaps in decking the walls of some 

fashionable "tea-room" over the inscription of 
"Our Distinguished Patrons"? 

Impulse of a base mind ! No ! 

The photograph has lain supinely and in ab- 
solute safety in the back of the cash register, 
where a too-bibulous barkeep had put it, and 
then became stricken with a fonn of aphasia. 

We rejoice with the hon. gentleman, and take 
this opportunity to tell his friends that the fur- 
rows have left his forehead, and his brow is now 
in that smooth, round argillaceous state that be- 
speaks his accustomed mental quiescence. 



In a recent issue of the Gazette an article, 
presumably by a student, set forth the real or ap- 
I)arent lack of business-like methods used in con- 
ducting the practice court. We do not here in- 
tend to discuss whether such an article was or 
was not proper, but by the same token intend to 
call the student's attention to some business-like 
methods which should be used by the student in 
the part he plays in managing the practice court. 

The calling of several names that to all appar- 
ent intents should not be on the roll is a thing 



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best understood by the Faculty or by those to 
whom the keeping of the roll is delegated. The 
answers that should be made to the names that 
are on the roll and that a7-e notoriously known to 
beat the University four other days in the week 
is where the "business methods" are most 
needed. 

Is it more tiresome to listen to names called 
that should and could answer if present, or to 
listen to names we know should not be present? 

Suppose a system of merits and demerits was 
inaugurated at practice court ; don't you think 
the student would attend in a little more busi- 
ness-like manner? 

Suppose Judge Sappington, especially, and 
Judges Bramble, Want and Dickerson, generally, 
were to pay you back with the same consideration 
}'ou pay them? That would be a business-like 
way of handling one part of the poorly-managed 
moot court. 

Don't you, Mr. Student, feel a sort of embar- 
rassment when such glaring disrespect as is com- 
mon Fridaj- nights is paid to the gentlemen whom 
even kindergarten ethics decree to be respected 
above all other — your preceptors ? 

Suppose this most important and practical 
branch of the course were discontinued, would 
you miss it? If it is continued in its present 
condition, CAN it do vou any good? 

Suppose we shock Professor Sappington and 
the other members of the practice court system 
by acting like men some night, instead of in the 
usual high school girl or kindergarten fashion. 

Suppose yourself to be in the pit and unable, 
because of certain conventions, to rough up a 
few of your disrespectful auditors. Let's do a 
little business-like co-operation ! 



WEIX-KNOWN S.WINGS. 

"Take it from me, if I get by this half, I'm 
gonna study. They ain't gonna ketch me short 
and cramming no more." 



"No; I'm gonna go home right after lectures 
for about six weeks and catch up." 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 159 

^^-~~^^^^^~~^ Intercollegiate Bureau of Academic Costume, Aibany.N.v. 



8. W Saratoga St 




Baltimore, 

Maryland. 



"Got your umbrella, C. B. ? 



"Ain't it tough, the way the Faculty treats 
Squire Healey? The Squire says it's only an- 
other way to usher in the four-year course. 



Last call for "Terrible Mariae." All Seniors 
must pay up by March 1. No man's write-up or 
picture will go in the book unless he has paid. 
Every man should have his picture in the book, 
as this is the last year this wonderful class of 
ours will be together. After Commencement 
you will never see many of your classmates 
again, except in the book. You should be there 
with them. Don't let a classmate say "non est" 
when he looks for you in the book. 



Ben Gold was recently elected official caretaker 
of homeless canines. "Jiggs" O'Donohue has 
been appointed his assistant by the Faculty. Need- 
less, to say, these are both positions of high hon- 
or, which were well earned by these gentlemen. 



"Josh" Hull allows as how there are more fra- 
ternities at the University than you can shake a 
stick at. In proving this, our hero said : "You're 
a Phi Sigma Kapita, and you're a Kapita Sigma, 
and I'M A PHI SIGMA PHI. Fie! Fie! Josh- 
ua ; you have neglected your Greek ! 



Certain members of the Faculty have rudely 
interrupted King Schultz, royal keeper of the ex- 
chequer, in his courtship during the lectures. It 
ir very annoying to King. The members of the 
class are also indignant, and there is considerable 
talk of sending a petition to the Faculty to pre- 
vent further annoyance by the lecturer. We 
trust the professors will see this item and make 
the petition unnecessary. 

LUTHER B. BENTON 
Dental Depot 



students' Outfits 
a Specialty 



305 North Howard St. 



COTRELL & 
LEONARD 

Official Mailers of 

Caps and 

Gowns 




Correct Hoods 
for All Degrees. 

Rich Qowns for 
Pulpit and Bencli. 

Bulletin, Samples 
etc. on request 



DENTAL— GRADUATE. 



Dr. B. S. Wells, class of 1914, is located in 
Keyser, W. Va., where he is practicing his pro- 
fession. He was a recent visitor to the Uni- 
versity. 



DENTAL— SENIOR. 



It is very much to be regretted that Mr. Mitch- 
ell has been in the hospital for an operation. He 
is now at his home in Charlottesville, Va., recu- 
perating. 



Mr. Epting, our worthy leader in anatomy, 
reported that Mr. Mitchell's operation was very 
serious, so much so that it was found necessary 
to remove an appendix from each side. 



Mr. Epting's latest discovery is, according to 
the following, quite an advance : Professor of 
Dental Anatomy — "When does the upper first 
molar calcify? Mr. Epting — "Six to seven 
months before birth." 



Mr. Friend has been advised by one of the 
professors that a little extra gas burned in the 
perusal of Gray's Anatomy is a good place to 
learn to spell anatomical names. 



The seniors are glad to welcome back to the 
class Mrs. Scimeca, nee Miss Elsie Roof. 
Brides in this department are scarce, and we are 
pleased to extend congratulations to the for- 



We are not sure whether Lyman or Purcell 
upset a glass of water in his patient's lap. Pur- 
cell says it was Lyman, but we are inclined to 
think that public opinion is against Purcell. 



It is rumored that Purcell and one of his med- 
ical friends have lately been doing some fancy 
stunts — automobiling with a uniformed chauf- 
feur and footman. Some class! 



160 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



The baseball war has resulted in the organi- 
zation of a baseball team in this department. 
Dandy Dave Danforth is manager, and a good 
team is anticipated. 



ACADEMIC— UNDERGRADUATE. 



ACADE:\IIC— GRADUATE. 



H. L. Reeder, 1914; G. W. Gering, 1913, and 
C. R. Buckley, ex-191-i, were recent visitors to 
the College. 



G. Child. 1911, has been traveling in Florida 
and Cuba, 



A very large audience greeted Prof. Stanwood 
Cobb, of St. John's, at his lecture on "The Real 
Turk,'" which was held in the Presbyterian 
Church, Duke of Gloucester Street, Friday even- 
ing, February 12. The lecture was given under 
the auspices of the Cornelius Class of Boys, 
taught by Mrs. John Fore Hines, and was most 
interesting and instructive. Several musical se- 
lections were rendered, and the entertainment 
was greatly enjoyed by all. 



The last formal hop before Easter was held 
in the College Gymnasium, Februar}' 12, at 
which Lieut, and ]\Irs. C. S. McNeill received. 



Capt. Thomas Leverett Brewer, U. S. A., class 
of 1889, paid us a visit recently. It is his first 
visit to Annapolis for IT years. 



Among the recent visitors to the College were : 
D. E. Smith and L. O. C. Lamar, both of the 
class of 1914, and at present studying law in the 
University of Maryland, and L. W. Anderson, 
who is studying medicine in the same University. 



George W. Gering, 1913, has a position with 
the Annapolis Short Line Railroad Company. 



Prof, and ^Irs. Charles G. Edison, of Balti- 
more, formerly of St. John's, visited the College 
recentlv. 



"Chic" Bosley and Dutch Mellon were both 
seen on the football field recently. "Chic," 
among other things last season coached the eleven 
of the ^larston's University School for Boys, 
Baltimore, while Dutch instructed the Polytech- 
nic Institute eleven. 



W. L. Merriken, of the Senior Class, who was 
operated on recently at the Emergency Hospital, 
is doing nicely. He has the best wishes of the 
student body for a speedy recover}'. 



The following ofiicers of the Y. M. C. A. were 
elected to serve the last terms of this year and 
the first term of next year : President, O. M. 
;\Ioore ; Vice-President, T. Spicknal ; Secretary, 
J. \\'. Knighton ; Treasurer, I. B. Talton. These 
new officers hav always shown a great deal of in- 
terest in the Association, and are fully deserving 
of the honors bestowed upon them. They have 
our best wishes for a successful year. 



P. K. Moisan, ex-'lo, and R. H. Elliott, visited 
the College recently. The latter is employed by 
the Maryland State Roads Commission, and while 
here played on the 1913 football team. Mr. Moi- 
san was assistant manager of this team, and 
also elected manager for 1914. 



The Y. J\I. C. A. is considering purchasing 
either a \'ictor or a Columbia machine to be kept 
in the meeting-room. This would be a source of 
great enjoyment to the music-lovers. Games will 
also be played and every effort made to make the 
room cheerful and attractive — a sort of club- 



Lefranc & AULT 

MEN'S AND WOMEN'S 

Guaranteed Goatskin Gloves 
Also Fownes' Make 

AT THE 

"SHIRT SHOP" 

421 N, Howard St., at Franklin 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



161 



Hart Schaffner & Marx, 
Kuppenheimer, 
"Society Brand" 

^-^— — — — The clothes that college men 



like a lot 



TRe »]©» Hub 

Baltimore Street A( Charles 



' NURSING. 



Mrs. Carrie M. Barwick (Carrie M. Bowen), 
class of 1894:, and widow of the late Dr. G. I. 
Barwick, class of 1894, who has been ill at the 
hospital for several weeks, underwent a slight 
operation recently, and we all wish her a speedy 
recovery. 



Miss Nellie Carter, class of 1906, of Chatham, 
Va., who has been ill at the hospital for some 
time, is steadily improving, 



The regular meeting of the Nurses' Alumnae 
Association of the University of Maryland was 
held at the University Hospital on February 1, 
Miss M. E. Rolph, president, in the chair. After 
the business meeting there was a discussion of 
nursing topics. 



The regular monthly meeting of the State 
League for Nursing Education was held at the 
Johns Hopkins Hospital on the afternoon of 
February 17. There was a discussion of training 
school records, after which tea was served and a 
social hour spent. 



The twelfth annual meeting of the Maryland 
State Association of Graduate Nurses was held 
as Osier Hall, 1211 Cathedral street, on Feb- 
ruary 18. The business meeting was held in the 



afternoon, and a very interesting report of the 
progress of the association was given by the 
president. Miss Eawler. A reception and supper 
followed, and in the evening an address was de- 
livered by Miss Ella Phillips Crandall, executive 
secretary of the National Organization for Public 
Health Nursing. This was very instructive and 
interesting. The officers elected for the year 
were: President, Miss E. M. Lawler, Johns 
Hopkins Hospital ; first vice president, Miss M. 
C. Packard, Massachusetts " General Hospital ; 
second vice president, Miss M. E. Sullivan, Uni- 
versity Hospital; secretary, Miss E. J. Taylor, 
Johns Hopkins Hospital; treasurer. Miss E. C. 
Lee, University Hospital ; members of the board. 
Miss A. F. Bell (University Hospital), Mrs. C. 
M. Sargent (Johns Hopkins Hospital) and Miss 
AL E. Lent (Johns Hopkins Hospital). 



Miss Jane Garner, class of 1911, superin- 
tendent of the Emergency Hospital, Easton, Md., 
visited the Hospital the last of the week. 



DEBATING CLUB NOTES. 

The University of Maryland Debating Society 
is an organization the object of which is to give 
its members a literary training, including parlia- 
mentary law. Any student of Medicine, Den- 
tistry or Pharmacy (the Law Department having 
a literary society of its own) at the University, 
who desires to improve his ability to stand be- 
fore an audience and express his views in regard 
to any special subject in an intelligent manner is 
eligible for membership. 

The Society meets every Friday at 7 o'clock P. 
M. in the Sunday-school room of the Fayette 
Street Church, Fayette Street, east of Fremont 
Avenue. The executive board of this church has 
been very kind and generous in allowing us the 
privilege of using this room. 

The majority of men who graduate from the 
University of Maryland go to some country town 
to practice; and this is an age that every prac- 
titioner is expected to take an active part in build- 



WILLIAM J. MILLER 
Jewelry, Diamonds, Watches 

College Jewelry 
Class Pins and Rings, College Seals 
28 East Baltimore St. 



R LLERBROCK 

Baltimore. Md. 22 W. Lexiflgtofl St., = Baltimofe, Md. 



162 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 
There 



ing up the town in which he is located, 
are men who have very wise and sensible ideas 
who occupy positions of great influence toward 
putting them into force, but they have not the 
ability to stand upon their feet and express their 
ideas in words. This is a weak point in some of 
our professional lines that each member of the 
Society has an opportunity to strengthen. 

The following programs have been arranged 
for the next two meetings : 

Friday, ^March 5, T P. M. 
1. Latest Events at the University, 

Dr. J. Ben Robinson 
2 Current Events Rev. K. G. Murray 

3. Debate bv ^lembers of the Society : Resolved, 

That the smaller college is more advantageous 
than the larger college. 

4. Impromptu Speech Mr. Porterfield 

Friday, :\Iarch IS, 7 P. M. 

1. Current Events 2^Ir. E. C. Reitzel 

"2, Impromptu Speech. 

.3, Suggestions for the Improvement of Our 
University, JMessrs. L. H. Smith, Tarking- 
ton and others. 
Any University student or graduate who is in- 
terested in the work that this Society is doing is 
welcome to any of its meetings. 




The 

Merchant 

Tailor 



Who 

Sells 
Ready-to-wear 



College Clothes 



New Fall Models 

Now Ready 
Prices $15 to $25 



Made to Measure 

From $20 Up 
Samples Cheerfully Given 



19 E. FAYETTE ST. 

Take Elevator 



a 



Wniiiiii'iiiHiiiii! 



It's not often that 
you. will iind everything 
in this store reduced — 
It's very seldom, indeed, 
that you can select just 
about anything in the house 
and pay only a fraction 
of its real z'alue. Yet 
such is the case right 
nou.'. Whatever it is you 
-iVant, you'll never find 
a better time to get it. 



Hambt^rgers' 



Baltimore & Hanover Sts. 



THE HENRY D. H.\RL.\X LAW SOCIETY. 

Through the efforts of Allen, '16, Baldwin, '16, 
and Holmes, '16, the Henrj^ D. Harlan Law So- 
ciety has been formed in the Intermediate Class, 
and is now in a flourishing condition. 

There is an average attendance of 10 members. 
Recently Judge Harlan was the guest of the So- 
ciety and favored it with an address. 

The officers are D. G. Cooper, '16, President; 
Savior, '16, A'ice-President ; Levy, '16, Secretary ; 
Farley, '16, Treasurer, and Baldwin, '16, His- 
torian. 

The Society has already scheduled debates with 
the M. C. A. Debating Team, the University of 
-Maryland Literary Society and the Edward T. 
Dickerson Law Society, and is arranging for a 
battle with the Maryland Single Tax Club. 



BIRTHS. 



To Dr. Roscoe D. Jilc^Iillan, class of 1910, and 
Mrs. ^McMillan, of Red Springs, N. C, December 
20, 1914, a son— Franklin Ellison. Mrs. McMil- 
lan was before her marriage Miss Gertrude A. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



163 



Garrison, University Hospital Training School 
for Nurses, class of 1910. 



To Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Reese Cornelius, of 
Govans, Md., February 7, 1915, a son. Mrs. Cor- 
nelius was before her marriage Miss Maude F. 
Smith, University Hospital Training School for 
Nurses, class of 1908. 



To Mr. and Mrs. Douglas C. Blackwell, of 
Reedville, Ya., December 19, 1911, a son. Mrs. 
Blackwell was before her marriage Miss Lucy C. 
Barber, University Hospital Training School for 
Nurses, class of 1910. 



Recently, to Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Blood, of 
Brookline, Mass., a son. Mrs. Blood was before 
her marriage i\Iiss Lela Munder, University Hos- 
pital Training School for Nurses, class of 1904. 



MARRIAGES. 



Dora I. Brosene, R. N., University Hospital 
Training School for Nurses, class of 1905, for- 
merly of Baltimore, Aid., to Mr. Oliver, ot 
Washington, D. C, at Washington, recently. 



Samued W. Moore D. D. S., 1904, to Miss 
Margaret E. Lawrence, University Hospital 
Training School for Nurses, class of 1906, both 
of Baltimore, Md., at Baltimore, January 23, 
1915. Dr. Moore is the official anesthetist to the 
University Hospital. They will reside at 1701 
Guilford Avenue. 



Dr. Henry E. Jenkins, class of 1905, Assistant 
Surgeon, U. S. N., of Norfolk, Va., to Miss Gate- 
wood, of Washington, D. C, daughter of Captain 
and Mrs. James D. Gatewood, U. S. N., at Wash- 
ington, in October, 1914. Dr. Jenkins is stationed 



in Washington. 



DEATHS. 



Dr. A. Trego Shertzer, class of 1869, of 35 
AVest Preston Street, died at his home from heart 
disease, January 22, 1915, aged 71 years. 



Dr. William G. Wilson, class of 1852, of Shel- 
byville. 111., died at his home, January 16, 1915, 
aged 87 years. 

Dr. Wilson was born near Emmorton, Md., 
and was the oldest son of the late Dr. Joshua and 



WARNER 8c CO. 

222-224 WEST BALTIMORE ST. 



Rebecca Lee Wilson. He made his home at Shel- 
byville since shortly before the was, being en- 
gaged in the practice of his profession until a 
few years ago. He is survived by two daughters, 
a son and two grandchildren. 



Dr. Henry Wahon Wood, class of 1902, of 
Boston and New Bedford, Mass. ; a Fellow of 
the American Medical Association and a special- 
ist in mental diseases, died in the Jefferson Hos- 
pital, Philadelphia, January 12, 1915, aged 35 
years. 



Norman Bo3'er, LL. B., class of 1903, of New 
York, editor of the "Smart Set," died suddenly 
at the home of his brother, Mr. Stuart Boyer, 150 
Rhode Island Avenue, Washington, D. C, Feb- 
ruary 10, 1915. Mr. Boyer was a member of the 
Eta Chapter, Phi Sigma Kappa. 



Former Judge Daniel Randall Magruder, St. 
John's College, Class of 1853, of AnnapoHs, Md., 
died at his home from the infimities of age, Feb- 
ruary 19, 1915, aged 80 years. 

Judge Magruder was born in Annapolis, Jan- 
uary 6, 1835. He was the son of the late George 
Lee Magruder and Henrietta Sanford Randall 
Magruder. He attended private schools and later 
entered St. John's College. He was the youngest 
member of his class at the time of his gradua- 
tion in 1853, and the last sur\dvor. He practiced 
law for many years. He was a native of Annapo- 
lis, but lived for some time in Calvert county. It 
was while there that he was named chief judge of 
the Seventh Judicial District and became a mem- 
ber of the Court of Appeals bench. After leav- 
ing the bench. Judge Magruder continued the 
practice of his profession in Annapolis. He re- 
tired from active work several years ago. 

Judge Magruder was twice married. He is 
survived by a widow, two daughters and three 
sons, one of whom, Calvert Magruder, also grad- 
uated from St. John's with the highest honors in 
1913. He is now attending the Law Department 
of TIarvard University, and we predict for him a 
brilliant future. 



By Comparison 



We believe it will be found that, in the Selection, 
Preparation and Dispensing of Pharmaceuticals, we 
maintain a Standard in Pharmacy that is, relatively, 
as high as are the Advanced Standards of Medical 
practice and Hospital service. 

Exceptional 
Prescription Compounding 

Hynson, Westcott & Co. 

Pharmaceutical , Surgical and Hospital 
Supplies 

Charles and Franklin Linden and North 

Streets Avenues 

BALTIMORE. MARYLAND 



Scientific Therapeutic Agents : 
Bulgara Tablets, Glycotauro Capsules, Lutein Tablets 



Renal Functional Test : Phenolsulphonephthalein Ampoules 



"Nothing Too Large— Nothing Too Small " 



Baltimore City 
Printing and Binding 



Company 



352-363 Equitable Building 






Surgical and Hospitiil Supplies. Sick Boom Supplies. 
Dental Forceps. Microscopes and Accessories. 

The Chas. Willms Surgical Instrument Co. 

300 N. HOWARD STREET. 

THE WESTERN NATIONAL BANK 

OF BALTIMORE 



SONNENBURQ'S PHARMACY 

Baltimore and Greene Streets. 

ONE AlINL'TE CLINICAL THERMOMETERS, 

WITH CHAIN AND GUARD PIN, 50 CENTS 

SULTAN DRUG COMPANY 

PHARMACEUTICAL CHEMISTS, ST. LOUIS, MO. 

Manufacturers of 

PBOOEDS fEXG CACTI>A FILLETS 



Menu, Banquet and Dance Cards, Commencement Invita- 
tions and Programs, Diplomas, Certiflcates, Engrossing, V. 
of M, Stationery for Classes and Fraternities, Letter Heads. 
Envelopes, Cards, etc., for Physicians, Lawyers and Dentists. 

J. H. DOWNS, STATIONER. 229 N. Charles St. 



Your Bnnk Account 
Solicited 



14 N. EUTAW STREET 



Your Special Attention is directed to 

Beef, Iron and Wine with Hydropepsin, 
Liquid Pi=cine Co., Red Syr. Hypophosphites Co. 

THOMAS & THOMPSON CO. 

Manuf'rs and Dispensers of P ure Medicines CWholesale and 
Retail). Cor. Baltimore and Light Sts.. Baltimore. Md. 

RESINOL OINTMENT AND RESINOL SOAP 

Are Genuine Comforts to Physician and Patient Alike. 
Send for Samples and Try Them, 

RESINOL CHEMICAL COMPANY, Baltimore, Mrt 
German Savings Bank of Baltimore City 

S. W. Cor. Baltimore and Eutaw Sts. 

Interest Paid On Deposits. 

Drovers and Mechanics' National Bank 

OF BALT'MO»E. Mn. 

CAPITAL . . Paid in $300,000 00 

Earned 300,000 00 $600,000 00 

EARNED SURPLUS AND PROFITS . 533,487 65 

SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES FOR RENT 

EMPLOYERS — POSITIONS WANTED 
By students in the Legal. Medical, Dental 
and Pharmaceutical Department of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland. Some are stenographers, 
bookkeepers, etc. Apply SAMUEL WANT, 
1243-1253 Calvert Building. (No charge is 
made for this service.) 



I 



UMWIRSITY QAIETTI 







"In the busy world around us, 

As we see it day by day, 
While we hurry on, unmindful 

Of the beauties by the way, 
There are those who in the turmoil 

Of the busy strife for gain 
Pass by gems of greatest value 

Which they long have sought in vain. 

"While they search with greatest ardor, 

Looking high, and far, and wide, 
They o'erlook the thing they're seeking. 

And go onward in their pride, 
Till some humbler, meeker brother, 

Trav'ling o'er the self-same track, 
Finds the gem on which the other. 

Passing by, had turned his back. 

"Thus we see that those deluded, 

That the good beyond is found, 
And pursuing this, neglecting 

All the better things around. 
Oft may miss it, while another. 

No phantasmal goal in mind. 
Ever watchful, finds the jewel. 

And thus benefits mankind. 

"Like the children in the story, 

Gath'ring lilies on the pond. 
Always hoping, ever seeking 

For still prettier ones beyond. 
Put off plucking till the boatman 

Rowed the craft back to the land 
And the darkness coming on them. 

Found them each with empty hand. 

"So may we be prone to wander. 

And neglect our chances thus. 
Till the opportune time passes, 

Never to return to us ; 
Then let us be up and doing, 

Gather flowers while we may, 
Do our best now, and rememiser. 

We're not coming back this way." 




VOL. I. 



BALTIMORE, MD , APRIL, 1915 



No. 10 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



Vol. I, 



APRIL 1, 1915. 



No. 10. 



CONTENTS 



CHEMISTRY AND SYNTHESIS OF ' HENRY D. HARLAN LAW SOCIETY 

COCAIN, THE. Bennie R. Jones. ... 167 NOTES ....;. 172 

USE OF EMETIN HYDROCHLORIDE DEBATING CLUB NOTES 173 

IN THE TREATMENT OF PYORR- FRA.TERNITY NOTES 174 

HEA ALVEORLARIS, THE. Robert 

Darwin 168 ITE:\IS 174 



EDITORIALS 170 ' QUIPS . . 

EDITORIALET 169 BIRTHS . 

SLAMS AND SALUTES 170 j DEATHS 



182 
183 
183 



Footwear for the College Man at Moderate Price. 

N. HESS' SONS - - 8 E. Baltimore. St. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE, MD. 

HON. PHILLIPS LEE GOLDSBOROUGH, Governor of Maryland, Chancellor. 
THOMAS FELL, A. M., Ph. D., L L. D., D. C. L., Provost. 



ST. JOHN'S COLLEGE, Annapolis, Md. (,,?r^^L"lc,;N°c%s) 

Founded 1696. Classical and Scientific College Courses leading to d agrees. Special advantages to stu- 
dents purposing to study the professions. Military Department under army officers. Also Preparatory' 
School for boys fitting for St. John's or other colleges. Term begins Sepl amber 21. Address 

THOMAS FELL, Ph.D., LL.D., D.C.L., President. 



DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE. 

Four vears' graded course. New Laboratory Build- 
ing. Clinical advantages unsurpassed. Teaching Staff 
of 66. 108th Annual Session will begin October i, 
1914, and continue 8 months 

R. DORSEY COALE, Ph.D., M.D., Dean. 



DEPARTMENT OF DENTISTRY. 

33d Annual Session begins October i, 1914. and 
•continues 7 months. 26 Instructors. New Building, 
For catalogue containing course of study, etc., apply to 

TIMOTHY 0. HEATWOLE, M.D., D.D.S., Dean, 

Baltimore, Md. 



DEPARTMENT OF LAW. 

59th Annual Session will begin Sept. 28, 1914. Faculty 
of 26. For catalogue containing full information ad- 
dress the -Secretary, 301 St. Paul Street, Baltimore, 
Maryland. 

EDWIN T. DICKERSON, Secretary. 



DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACY. 

(Formerly Maryland College of Pharmacy). 72nd 
Annual Session begins September 25, 1914. 11 In- 
structors. New Laboratories. Address 

CHARLES CASFARI, JR., Phar.D., Dean, 

Baltimore. Md. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 

Published Monthly in the Interest of the University of Maryland. 
PRICE $1.00 PER YEAR. 



Ccntributionj solicited from Alumni of the 
University. 



Business Address, 608 Professional Building. 
Baltimore, Md. 



Vol. I. 



BALTIMORE, MD., APRIL 1, 1915. 



No. 10 



THE CHEMISTRY AND SYNTHESIS OF 
COCAIN. 



By Bennie R. Jones, Dental, '16. 



Regardless of the fact that Coca (Erythroxy- 
lon Coca) was well known to the Peruvians in 
the time of Pizzaro in 1532, it was only in 1852 
that Monardes gave an account of its issues, 
which resemble the modern habitues. Then it 
seems to have been forgotten until INIontegazza in 
1859 again called attention to its medical value. 

Cocain, 1-cocain, or laevogyrate cocain, natural 
cocain, the most abundant and physiologically the 
most valuable alkaloid of Coca, was isolated by 
Niemann in 1860, and its formula, 

C„ Hj, NO, 
was ascertained by Lossen. In recent years 
it has been pursued with success by Einhein, Lie- 
bermann and Willstatter. However, while nu- 
merous observations were reported it was only 
in 1884 that its value as a local anaesthetic was 
simultaneously recognized by KoUer, Frankel 
and Jelinek, although the temporary insensibility 
was noted by Niemann and Von Anrep. 

Cocain (levorotatory) is a crystalline, tertiary 
base, crystallizing in monoclinic prisms, fusing at 
98° (208.4° F), and is an ester, which, on hydro- 
lysis with mineral acids or baryta, breaks up into 
a new tertiary base, 1-ecgonin, benzoic acid, and 
methly alcohol. This occurs when cocain or 
its hydrochloride is heated with 20 parts water 
and 10 parts of baryta (BaO) to 120°, and then 
it is decomposed according to the equation : 

C,, Hsi N04-t-2 HbO=:C,, H„ NO^-f- 
CjHs. COOH-I-CH3. OH. 
Cocain is soluble in 704 parts cold water, is 
more soluble, but with a liability to decomposi- 
tion, in hot water, readily soluble in ether, alco- 
hol, benzene, and when hot, in chloroform, methyl 
alcohol, acetone, but these deposit it on cooling. 
It is laevogyrous [(a)]D= — 15.8°). Its solu- 
tions are alkaline to most indicators. In the liv- 
ing body it rapidly decomposes, and ecgonin may 



be found in the urine; this decomposition occurs 
very slowly after death. 

In medicine it is used in the form of its chlor- 
ide, cocaium chloride, or cocain hydrochloride, 
which crystallizes in anhydrous, colorless prisms, 
plates or scales, fusible at 181.5° (358.7° F.), 
soluble in 0.75 part water, difficultly soluble in 
absolute alcohol, insoluble in ether or benzene. 
Its soutions are neutral and decompose in a short 
time. 

The Synthesis of cocain was effected by Merck, 
by heating together ecgonin, benzoic anhydride 
and methyl iodide to 100° for 10 hours in a sealed 
tube. Eiebermann has efifected and patented an 
industrial method of obtaining cocain from ecgo- 
nin ; 1-cocain has been reconstructed by the rever- 
sal of the process of decomposition. Thus its 
total synthesis through ecgonin has been accom- 
plished. The structure of cocain, therefore, 
depends upon that of ecgonin. The various co- 
cains, natural and artificial, are esters of ecgo- 
nin, with different acids. In natural cocain, 
ecgonin is combined with methylated benzoic 
acid : in cinnamyl-cocain (occurring in Java coca) 
ecgonin is combined with cinnamic acid ; in trux- 
illin (cocamin) with truxillic acid, etc. 

An artificial cocain, d- or r-cocain, has been 
synthesized: Sodium tropinone, when sus- 
pended in ether and treated with CO2, forms so- 
dium tropinone-carboxylate, and this, on reduc- 
tion with sodium amalgam, in faintly acid solu- 
tion, is converted into ecgonin and a second 
isomer, which contains no hydroxyl group and 
resists ordinary processes of methylation. 

Thus : Sod. Tropinone 

CHj — CH — CHNa 

I I 

NCH3 CO 

I I 

Crlg — CH — CHg 

Sod. Tropinone Carboxylate 

CHj — CH — CH.COONa 

I I 

NCH3 CO 

I I 

CH„ — CH - CHj 



168 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



r-ecgonm. 

CHj — CH - 

I 
NCH3 

I 
CH.---^ CH — 



CH.COONa 
, I 
CH.OH 

I 
CH. 



r-ecgonin differs in optical properties from the 
ecgonin of the vegetable alkaloid, for, naturally, 
ii is inactive, and, as it contains four ass3'mmetric 
carbon atoms, may represent several pairs of 
enantiomorphs. Apart from this, it closely re- 
sembles ecgonin, and, like- it, may be converted 
into the methyl-benzoyl ester or r^cocain. Thus : 
r-cocain : 



CH„ 



CH= 



CH 

I 
NCHs 

I 
CH - 



CO.OCH3 

I 

CH.OCOCsH; 

I 
CH., 



(Mr. Jones added his bibliography and gave due 
credit to the workers in this field of chemistry, but 
his readings were so extensive we do not publish his 
references.) — Editor-in-Chief.) 

o 

THE USE OE EMETIN HYDROCHLORIDE 

IN THE TREATMENT OF PYORRHEA 

.ALVEOLARIS. 



By Robert D.^rwin, Dental, '16. 



Pyorrhea alveolaris has been perhaps the least 
understood of all the pathologic conditions the 
dental surgeon is called upon to treat and the 
result of its treatment the most unsatisfactory. 
Theory after theory has been advanced placing 
the blame upon various micro-organisms, local 
deposits, etc. These local deposits have received 
a great deal of attention, although the occurrence 
of pyorrhea around the teeth comparativelj' free 
from such deposits has led most obser\'ers to 
conclude that they are only contributing causes. 
By the local irritation set up they furnish fertile 
ground for micro-organisms. 

In the past the treatment has consisted largely 
in the removal of deposits and local antisepsis. 
This was a tedious process, and its results uncer- 
tain and unsatisfactory. In fact, the prognosis 
has been considered so hopeless that many prac- 
titioners have resorted to inunediate extraction 
and the construction of artificial dentures. 

Naturally, this disease has received the atten- 
tion of numerous research workers ; and definite 
results seem to have been accomplished at last. 
Drs. Barrett and Smith, of the University of 
Pennsylvania, and Bass and Johns, of Tulane, 
were struck by the constant presence of a cer- 
tain type of endameba in contents of the pyor- 
rhea pockets. 

Becoming convinced by the constant associa- 



tion of this endameba with the characteristic 
lesions of pyorrhea that it was a causative factor 
in the disease, their next thought was to find a 
remedial agent suited to the condition. 

Ipecac has enjoyed for years an enviable repu- 
tation as an amebecide in the treatment of amebic 
dysentery," amebic abscess, "etc. However, tlie 
deadly nausea produced bjr the necessarily large 
doses caused it to fall into disuse. Within the 
last few years the use of emetin, the active prin- 
ciple of the drug, has caused a revival of its use 
in these affections, as the alkaloid was found to 
be practically free from the -disadvantages of the 
crude drug. 

Hence emetin hydrochloride was the natural 
recourse of these observers in their search for an 
amebecidal agent. 

Barrett and Smith used the drug as a local ap- 
plication to the site of infection, while Bass and 
Johns administered it hypodermically. Both 
methods were successful to a remarkable degree, 
producing very rapidly the disappearance of pus 
and the restoration of a healthy condition in the 
previously inflamed and suppurating gums. This 
improvement was coincident with the disappear- 
ance of the specific endameba which formerly 
had been present in all cases of undoubted pyorr- 
hea. 

The treatment, when made public, was eagerly 
adopted by the dental profession and has been 
administered with most gratifying results by 
dentists in all sections. 

The usually accepted routine of treatment is 
about as follows : All calculi and other deposits 
should be carefully and thoroughly removed and 
the teeth well polished. Local antiseptic treat- 
ment should be administered. A solution of eme- 
tin hydrochloride, of a strength varying from ..5 
to 1 per cent., is administered locally, flushing all 
the pus pockets thoroughly. This is done first 
daily, then at longer intervals, until a cure is se- 
cured. Hypodermic administration of the drug 
would be useful to reach deep-seated infections 
not amenable to local treatment. As there is a 
likelihood of an accompanying mixed infection in 
the diseased area, autogenous vaccines would 
probably be of value in stubborn cases. Proper 
diet and exercise with systematic treatment to 
restore normal metabolism and nutrition hastens 
the restoration of normal conditions. 

The wonderful results obtained by the use of 
emetin give us hope that in it we have a remedy 
on which we can rely in the treatment of a dis- 
ease as disastrous as it is prevalent, interfering, 
as it does, with the normal metabolism and func- 
tioning of the entire body. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



169 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 

A MONTHLY JOURNAL 

Devoted to the interests of the University 

of Maryland. 

Subscription Price, $1.00 Per Annum, In Advance 

Reprints Furnished At Cost 

Advertising Rates Submitted Upon Request. 

608 Professional Building 

BALTIMORE. MD. 



Editorial Board. 

J. BEN ROBINSON, D.D.S Editor-in-Chief. 

NATHAN WINSLOW, M.D Managing Editor. 

Graduate Members. 

THOMAS FELL, LL.D Academic. 

STANWOOD COBB, B.A Academic. 

H. M. ROBINSON, M.D Medical. 

ALBERT H. CARROLL, M.D Medical. 

F. J. VALENTINE, D.D.S Dental. 

SAMUEL WANT, LL. B Law. 

JOHN H. SKEEN, LL. B Law. 

A. A. SONNENBURG, Phar.D Pharmacy. 

J. M. BRANSKY, Phar.D Pharmacy. 

M. E. SULLIVAN, R.N Nursing. 

Undergraduate Members. 

C. V. WILSON Academic. 

H. GOLDMAN, '15; F. C. MARINO, 

'16; C. O. WOLF, '17 Medicine. 

H. E. WATERMAN, 15; A. Z. ALD- 
RIDGE, '16; E. B LANCASTER, 
'17 Dental. 

J. A. HAGGERTY,'15; B. C. LIGHT- 
NER, '15; C. N. MATTHEWS, 
'16 Law. 

A. L. STERLING, '1.'^ Pharmacy. 

J. E. EVANS, '16 Y. M. C. A. 

B. C. LIGHTNER, ' Advertising. 

B. G. GOLD, '15 College Notes. 

A. G. DE QUEVEDO Latin-American. 

L. A. BUIE, '15 House Notes. 

LINDSAY ROGERS, '15 General Items, 



APRIL 1, 1915. 



Young Mr. Editor : — \\'ill you kindly furnish 
us with your copy by the 15th of the month, if 
possible? Write personals as far as you can and 
guard against the strong tendency to introduce 
classroom incidents that smack of vulgarity. We 
are not "sissy," but even a man may be par- 
doned for expecting decency from high places. 
To date contributions, as a rule, have not been 
marred beyond recognition by our blue pencil, 
but some have felt its influence. Let's have a 
good, clean paper. 

Editor-in-Chief. 



C 0LLAR= HUG C lothes 

FOR SPRING ARE READY 

See Our Wonderful 

Style Show 



THE QUALITY SHOP 

Balto. and LIBERTY 
Quality Corner 




In this issue may be found two articles writ- 
ten b)' students of the dental department. They 
were written by students from a student's view- 
point, and should be so accepted. This is part 
of the new scheme for a college paper, and we 
invite more articles to test our theory that the 
magazine should be devoted to the interest of the 
student. Medicine, Law, and Pharmacy are in- 
vited to contribute. The editor cannot see you 
personally, as he does the dental man, but he is 
as anxious to hear from all departments as this 
one. Any article which may be of benefit to the 
student body and possibly to the profession at 
large will be gladly accepted. 



When writing for the Slam Column be con- 
cise and brief. The honor system is getting its 
share of attention, as are some other reform 
questions. Don't think because you meet oppo- 
sition that animosity should ensue. President 
Wilson said, "Discussion rationalizes thought," 
and with the honor system, as with most other 
(juestions of regulation "much might be said on 
both sides of the question." 



Not long" since one of our professional associates 
asked why so many professional men are finan- 
cial failures as compared to other business men. 
In meditating the question and observing some of 
our leading professional associates and students, 
we were struck with the limitations of their store 
of information when taken outside of professional 
study. We wonder if it is not true that profes- 
sional men become so extreme in their specializing 
that all other phases of life are sacrificed to the 
accomplishment of their professional ideals. Yes, 
it is a fact that the American practice of placing a 
monetary value on all thought and action has 
caused an acute cultivation and development of 
the utilitarian at the expense of the cultured. 



170 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



One of our contributors complains of the ex- 
cessive use of tobacco — chewing and smoking cig- 
arettes — in the lecture rooms and hallways. We 
often hear the complaint that we lack school 
spirit. We can't have school spirit without re- 
spect, and we can't have respect when conditions 
are such as to disgust rather than command ad- 
miration. The editor of this paper has had occa- 
sion to reprimand dental students for smoking in 
the infirmary. They do not hesitate to come into 
the infirmary with a lighted cigarette or cigar in 
their hands, and we have counted as high as seven 
white-coated men standing just outside the in- 
firmary door smoking cigars and cigarettes with 
the smoke demurely passing into the big operat- 
ing room and filling the atmosphere with its 
fumes. Then to prepare for an operation they 
forcefully cough up the irritating mucous, expec- 
torate on the floor and back to the chair. The 
practice is merely a projection of class-room 
habits into professional work. So long as stu- 
dents are permitted to so act in classroom and 
hallways — both dental and medical — so long will 
the nefarious habit cling, and so long will such 
men as the writer of "Bad Habits for Professional 
Men" complain and wonder why the better class 
should show spirit when the one lacking respect 
ir permitted to indulge his lack of respect for per- 
sons and things. 



SLAMS AND SALUTES. 



EDITORIALET. 



The burst of spring is upon us. The days are 
lenghtening. The birds, returning from their 
migration southward, with song and whistle 
loudly proclaim the advent of spring. All nature 
is in tune. Even the flowers are beginning to 
poke forth their heads. In fact, the burst of 
spring is upon us and all nature rejoices. So it 
is with the University of Maryland. There has 
been a reawakening. It is well out of its hiber- 
nation of one hundred years. New aspirations 
have firmly rooted themselves in its soil ; a reali- 
zation that it must be up and doing if it is to jus- 
tify its existence is now firmly planted. It is 
alive to its latent possibilities as a distributor of 
knowledge. In reality it is a rejuvenated insti- 
tution, which has passed through the winter's 
storms and as the rest of nature rejoice^ in the 
burst of its spring. 



BAD HABITS FOR PROFESSIONAL M£N. 

One would be surprised to learn of the unsani- 
tary habits of some of the men of the two pro- 
fessions which are supposed to teach sanitation 
and hygiene to the world at large. It would 
seem an insult upon the face of the matter to 
accuse young physicians and dentists of such 
unsanitary practices as of expectorating on the 
floor of the lecture halls, stairs, etc., of the build- 
ings. Nevertheless, it is practiced in both de- 
partments of the University. It is needless to 
mention the menace to the health of those who 
are compelled to attend lectures in these halls 
from the many infectious diseases which are 
transmitted in this manner. The departments 
of bacteriology and hygiene seem to have been 
unable to impress the practical importance of 
these branches of medicine on the students, be- 
cause this is not a practice of lower classmen, 
but of upper classmen as w-ell. We do not hold 
the janitors of the different buildings guiltless, 
either, because dust and dirt can be found in most 
any and every corner, some of which no doubt is 
of historic origin. The ventilation could be 
greatly improved upon, especially since the 
weather has gotten wanner. By the co-opera- 
tion of the student body and the janitors we are 
sure the halls would be more pleasant, more 
healthful and more presentable to the chance vis- 
itor. First, by the students acting more like 
they expect to in their offices, and secondly, by 
a little additional work from the janitors daily. 
Perhaps a little stimulation from the vis a tergo 
would improve conditions. — Consistency. 

ON THE HONOR SYSTEM. 

We respect honor, we covet the spirit of hon- 
esty, we dislike unfairness in any sense; like 
Mr. Buie. we practice honesty in our school work. 



Sight, smell and taste plays big part in digestion. 
Eating is a matter of the sympathetic nerres. ">'o 
profit where no pleasure is taken." 

POSITITELT Tve feed vou BETTER, at LESS COST 
and IX THE CIE.VXEST environment than any one 
has ever done before since time began. 

BRIGHTON LUNCH 

14 N. HOWARD STREET 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



171 



with all consideration for the able champion writ- 
ing in the March issue of The Gazette, we 
object to the honor system. 

The gentleman's chief argument is that if the 
student will give or receive help he is lost to all 
honor and as a moral degenerate has no right 
to professional opportunities. All of us who 
know men and the influence of conditions and 
environments on the minds of men only see pre- 
sumption as support for such argument. Success 
in this life is not measured by continual perfect 
action, but by overcoming difficulties when met 
and by regaining balance when mistakes are 
made. Many otherwise honest men have erred 
and have lived to be most useful and honorable. 
It is the stress of the occasion that makes us 
falter and perhaps give way, and this is why men 
with unblemished past records have stolen bread 
to keep their families from starvation and em- 
bezzled funds to stand off financial disaster. 
History both past and current is full of the 
stories of the fall of good men, and the cry is 
"Oh, the pity!" and the true human cause is 
overlooked. Even good Peter denied his Christ 
three times, and he was one of the noblest char- 
acters of' all Biblical history. 

Again, he argues that students may be re- 
formed and made better by the honor system. 
The little contact of the student with the system 
and limited influence of the system on his life is 
not sufficient to insure his salvation. He is too far 
advanced in habits of life and his conception of 
right conduct and expediency too highly devel- 
oped. He holds the idea — and justly so — that 
an examination is his mortal enemy, and uncon- 
sciously he follows the law — "self-preservation 
is the first law of nature." To have spent any 
number of years in study of a subject and to face 
a failure, to go down in school and experience 
blasted hopes for future professional activity, 
would be a force sufficiently strong to cause any 
man to accept assistance. At this point we hold 
the man is rendered weaker by his fear and under 
the stress is not the man he is under normal cir- 
cumstances. 

Again, we object because of the temptation it 
ofi^ers weak men to follow the line of least resist- 
ance, which is a natural law. There is a fas- 
cination for securing the unforbidden which the 
child, ..infant or grownup, can scarcely resist. 
Mother Eve began it and now everybody's doin' 
il. We merelv want it because we need it, and it 



may be good or bad, yet to place the unforbidden 
within our reach we will stretch to secure it. 
Pope expressed it when he wrote: 

"Vice is a monster of so frightful mien. 
As to be hated need but to be seen, , 
But seen too oft, familiar with her face. 
We first endure, then pity, then embrace I" 

Had as well place strong drink on the table in 
a young man's room and preach total abstinence ; 
or advise nude pictures on his walls, lewd stories, 
attendance on burlesque shows and companion- 
ship of strange women and warn against lasciv- 
iousness ; or teach him the fascination of the 
ivory, the cards, the races and kindred sports and 
tell him to indulge is to be forever damned. 

Eet's have the instructor in charge of our ex- 
aminations to protect the weaker ones from 
temptation, as we police our cities to protect inno- 
cent persons from criminal violence. — Justice. 



TERRA MARIAE HONORS. 

From Biblical times lawyers have been con- 
sidered more or less wise. This surely is not 
true of law students. For a typical bunch of 
wiseacres, take the present intermediate class of 
the Law Department. A few agitators from this 
class were going to demand their rights regard- 
ing offices on the 1916 Terra Mariae. ;.. 

What happened? They were arguing their 
rights in the matter while the Medical Depart- 
ment elected the editor-in-chief and the Dental 
Department elected the business manager. The 
reason advanced for this early action was to get 
an early start on the book. Other years the 
officers were never elected until fall. This was 
slipped -over in this manner to forestall any action 
the Law Department might take. 

Do the other departments think that when 
they levy an assessment on the Law School for 
their share of the book that the students of the 
1916 class is going to endorse this high-handed 
action and raise any amount that is asked for 
and still have no voice in the management or 
policy of the annual? 

Is the Dental Department, with 37 members 
in the class, going to dictate to the Law side, 
with 135 members? . " 

Admitting that the co-operation of the Law 
Department is necessary for the success of the 
book, from whom should the overtures come? 
The Law Department would not like to with- 



172 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



draw their support from the book, but if the 
other departments do not care to confer with 
them or arbitrate the matter there is such a thing 
as getting out a separate annual for the Law 
Department. 

If the members of the 1916 classes of the 
Medical and Dental Departments have the inter- 
ests of the University at heart they will recon- 
sider their hasty action, and at least consult the 
wishes of the law students. The law students 
are always talking about the revivification of 
Law School spirit, but it will continue in its 
present moribund condition tmless some quick 
action is taken that will express the wishes of 
the student body on the matter of Terra Mariae 
officers. —J. H., 'IG. 

o 

A PROTEST. 



WE OF THE JUNIOR DENTAL CLASS HAVE A RIGHT 

TO FEEL HURT AT THE ATTITUDE OE 

THE CHAIR OF PHYSIOLOGY. 



During the entire session we have attended lec- 
tures faithfully, with the idea in view that the 
law of compensation would some day take care 
of us. We were not content to sit through many 
lectures on subjects that did not directly touch 
on our profession ; but nevertheless we were ea- 
gerly willing to grasp anything which intimated 
useful and scientific knowledge. 

The time arrived for a topic to be lectured upon 
which did directly bear jipoii our work, namely, 
the saliva, which would have given us infor- 
mation well worth the knowing. 

Instead of unfolding this useful information. 



STYLISH and COMFORTABLE 
FOOT-WEAR 



FOR THE 



UNIVERSITY MAN 

All Leathers — Expert Fitting 
Moderate Prices 

WYMAN 

19 W. LEXINGTON STREET 



the chair of physiology forsook his class and lec- 
ture hall. 

He informed us, with special sympathy to the 
dental students, that we had lost forever that im- 
portant lecture, because the disorder in the lec- 
ture hall was so great he could not, out of re- 
spect to his own feelings, proceed with the topic. 

Men of the Junior Dental, was there such a 
great disorder? If so, who was the perpetrator? 
Should tlie Dental men again suffer? 

If we were children we would claim it to Dr. 
Hemmeter's advantage not to help the dentist, 
but 7CC are not children; therefore, we are forced 
to record the doctor's decision as a further proof 
that as yet "might makes right." 



HENRY D. HARLAN LAW SOCIETY 

NOTES. 



Program of Henry D. Harlan Law Society, 
March 23: Parliamentary Debate; subject, Re- 
solved, That Maryland should adopt the initia- 
tive and referendum. Leader of Parliamen- 
tarians, Mr. Woodward ; leader of Congressmen, 
Mr. Wright. 

March 29: Debate; subject. Resolved, That 
the United States should prohibit the exf>orta- 
tion of munitions of war to the belligerent na- 
tions of Europe. Affirmative, Messrs. Jusley 
and Edel; negative, Messrs. Umstot and Mason. 

March 30: Debate at Y. M. C. A. ; subject. 
Resolved, That the various States and the United 
States should amend their constitutions so as to 
permit the recall of judicial decisions of their 
Supreme Courts. Affirmative, Y. M. C. A., 
Schadt and McKee ; negative, Allen and Farley. 



Saylor's pet scheme — a real trial — witnesses, 
bailift"s and a real judge is at last realized. 

Credit for all the arrangements is due Frank 
J. Saylor, while Dr. Joseph T. Smith, of the 
Medical Department, showed his thorough way 
of doing things by the preparation that the ex- 
pert witnesses showed in their answers on the 
stand. 

This big aft'air took place on March 20 in the 
large lecture-hall of the University. Hon. James 
P. Gorter, of the Supreme Bench, presided. All 
the court officers were members of the Henry D. 
Harlan Law Society, under whose auspices the 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



173 



trial was held. The expert testimony was given 
by members of the Medical Department. Those 
who took part as follows : 

Trial Court Officers — Presiding judge, Hon. 
James P. Gorter; clerk, E. Paul Mason; sten- 
ographer, John A. Farley; court crier, Walter 
V. Harrison; bailiff, Paul J. Wilkinson; sheriff, 
David H. King. 

Deceased — John Blank. 

Witnesses for Statei — J. Denny Armstrong, 
Edward J. Coolahan, Norman T. Nelson, I. J. 
Sullivan; expert testimony, Dr. Salan, Dr. Bar- 
rishaw, Insley. 

Witnesses for Defense — William F. Russell, 
Jr., John McN. Holmes ; expert testimony, Dr. 
Silverstein, Dr. Vaughn. 

Post Mortem Examination — Dr. H. L. 
Wheeler. 

Attorneys for State — Allen & Pardue. 

Attorneys for Defense — Baldwin & Levy. 

Prisoners — George R. Hughes, E. E. Old- 
houser. 

Trial Committee — Frank J. Saylor, William 
Lester Baldwin, William F. Russell, Jr. 

At the close of the trial Judge Gorter was 
elected to honorary membership in the Society. 



THE UNIVERSITY DEBATING SOCIETY 
AND BIBLE STUDY CLUB. 



(Meets twice weekly at the Fayette Street 
M. E. Church, Friday evening at seven o'clock 
for literary work and Sunday afternoon at two 
o'clock for Bible study work.) 

On February 26 the Club gave an evening of 
entertainment which was very well attended and 
enjoyed by all. Due to some of the speakers on 
the program being absent an "old fashioned" de- 
bate took place. The subject, "Resolved, That the 
country boy enjoys superior advantages to the 
city boy." Readings by G. I. Brandon, Dental, 
solos by R. P. May, Dental, and Mr. Rankin, J. 
H. U., and quartette by Messrs. T. J. Robinson, 
Bryant, May and Jones completed the evening's 
entertainment. Refreshments and a social hour 
followed. 



her in placing herself ahead of all other such 
organizations and congratulate ourselves that 
some of her leading men are members of our de- 
bating club. 



Sunday evening, March 11, Dr. Thomas H. 
Lewis, of Western Maryland College, spoke to 
the students from the pulpit of Fayette Street 
Church. His topic was "Spiritual Gravitation" 
and his text, "And he went to his own place." 
He likened the spiritual law to the natural law- — • 
"everybody in the universe attracts every other 
body directly proportional to the product of the 
masses and inversely proportional to the distance 
between the two." That the spiritual law is un- 
changeable but is influenced by environment, con- 
ditions, associations, thought, habits, etc., just as 
the physical law is unchangeable but influenced by 
mass and distance. His thought was that for the 
spiritual law to be most perfectly felt is where 
control of the individual over controlling influ- 
ences is most perfectly had. Dr. Lewis' address 
was masterly and most helpful. 



It is gratifying to know that the fraternity re- 
ferred to in the Slam Column of the recent 
G.A.ZETTE has voted that her social gatherings 
in the future shall be dry. Let us congratulate 



The Dickinson College Musical and Glee Club 
of Carlisle, Pa., was presented to the public on 



I. FRED SHAFER, Pres. WM. E. READ, Vice-Pres. WM. 6. HDRN, Sec'y.Treas 

THE HORN-SH AFER CO. 

Printers and Publishers 

3-5 GERMAN STREET, EAST 

BALTIMORE 

Private Branch Exchange, St. Paul 7077-7078 

Printers of 1912 '13 and '14 "Terrae Mariae" 
There must be a reason 



The prevalent feeling of happiness and good fellow- 
ship, coniliined with the invariably excellent dinner, 
makes all the world jour friend, and produces an 
evening of surpassing enjoyment. 

THE NEW OLYMPIA RESTAURANT 

308 W. Baltimore St.--=306 E. Baltimore St 

The Olympia serves nothing but clean, good f.oo.4», .., 



174 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



the evening of Saturday, March 27, under the 
auspices of the Debating Society. Everyone was 
invited. The admission was 25 cents. 



In reading and hearing of what has been done 
by the famous "Billy" Sunday at U. of P., Prince- 
ton and other colleges, we are reminded of simi- 
lar work being carried on among colleges by other 
men. The following clippings from the Christian 
Advocate shows the scope of the work: 



ONE THING JOHN R. MOTT HAS DONE FOR US. 

John R. Mott, as head of the Student Federa- 
tion of the World, has made the student approach 
to Christ an easy and natural matter today. It is a 
significant fact that a larger proportion of stu- 
dents become Christians than of any other class in 
the world. It is also significant that a larger num- 
ber of students are becoming Christians now than 
ever before. The student approach to Christ is 
one of the marvels of our day. The opportunity 
to student evangelism is one of the great open 
doors which carries with it searching responsibil- 
ity to the Church of Jesus Christ. 



One result of the four days' religious campaign 
at Yale was that about one thousand students in 
the Sheffield Scientific School and elsewhere 
signed pledges accepting Christ and promising 
to lead a new life. This is said to be the most 
effective religious movement ever tried among the 
Yale students. The speaker at the night services 
was Sherwood Eddy. The meetings were held in 
Woolsey Hall and are said to have had a greater 
attendance than any ever held at this great in- 
stitution. 



FRATERNITY NOTES. 



The Phi Sigma Kappa Fraternity entertained 
the graduate members at a smoker at the Chap- 
ter House on Saturday night, March I3th. Many 
of the graduate members were present, and an 
enjoyable time was had talking over old times 
and plans for the future. 



A theatre benefit was held at Ford's on Wed- 
nesday night, March 17th. The play presented 
was "The Bird of Paradise." The acting and 
scenery were fine and the play was No. Al. 



An initiation was held last month at which the 
following men were admitted : Turner, Law, '15 ; 
Graham, Law, '16, and Burns, Dental, '16. 



Judge James P. Gorter was a guest Saturday 
evening, Februray 27th, at an informal dinner 
given by Alpha Alpha Chapter of Kappa Sigma 
Fraternity, of the University of Maryland Law 
School, at the Fraternity House, 1223 North 
Charles street. 

Judge Gorter spoke to the men, some of whom 
are practicing members of the bar, and other stu- 
dents on the ethics of the profession, impressing 
on them the high ideals which the profession 
should inspire and the necessity of adhering to a 
straight policy in practice. 

In addition to Judge Gorter those at the table 
were : 
Emmet White, 



Herbert Grimes, 
L. P. Bolgiano, 
J . W. Darley, 
IT. H. Waters, 
Raymond Schlegel, 
A. W. Bryan, 
J P. Travers. 
H. C. Butler, 



G. T. Smith, 
W. McK. Travers, 
J. Newton Matthews, 
James E. Smith, 
Wendell Allen, 
James B. Diggs, 
W. Warren Jump, 
David C. Gibson. 



The Sigma Xu Delta (Society) Fraternity, of 
the University of Maryland, gave a delightful 
dance in the Lyceum Parlors of Albaugh's The- 
atre, Friday evening, March 5, 1915, from 9 :00 
tc 1 :00 o'clock. 



MEDICAL— GRADUATE. 



The following were recent visitors to the Uni- 
versity Hospital : Charles L. Schmidt, 1911, and 
Thomas H. Legg, 1907, of Union Bridge, Md. ; 
Robert E. Abell, 1912, formerly one of the as- 
sistant physicians at the LTniversity Hospital; 
Clifton N. DeVilbiss, 1910, of Laytonville, Md., 
and John W. Ebert, 1912, of Lutherville, Md. 



Dr. Walter L. Richards, 1914, who was oper- 
ated on recently at the U^niversity Hospital, is 
reported to be doing nicely. We all wish him a 
speedy recovery. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



175 



[ Dr. John C. Stansbury, 1912, who is located 
t 1307 Edmondson avenue, has decided to do 
ome special work in dermatology in the Univer- 
sity Hospital Dispensary. Dr. Stansbury has 
just lately returned from Glasgow, Scotland. On 
the return trip he acted as ship surgeon. 



Dr. Thomas H. Phillips, 1907, of 1701 Hollins 
street, Baltimore, was operated on a few days 
ago for duodenal ulcer. We are glad to learn 
that he is doing nicely. 



Dr. T. Casper Gilchrist, professor of derma- 
tology, who has been very ill with influenza, has 
again taken up his work of lecturing, and is rap- 
idly regaining his health. 



Dr. Edgar R. Strobel, associate professor of 
dennatology, has also been ill, suffering from an 
attack of the grip. He is recovering slowly. 



Dr. Howard Elmer Ashbury, 1903, announces 
the removal of his offices and X-ray laboratory 
to 827 North Charles street, where the newest 
equipment has been installed for Fleuroscopy 
Diagnosis and X-ray Therapy. Offfce hours, by 
appointment. Telephones, Mt. Vernon 2571 
and 2572. 



The March meeting of the University of Mary- 
land Medical Society was held in Chemical Hall, 
northeast corner Lombard and Greene streets, 
Tuesday, March 16, 1915, at 8:30 P. M. The 
meeting was most interesting and instructive. 
Dr. Martin E. Rehfuss, of Philadelphia, gave an 
illustrated lecture on "Conclusions to be Drawn 
from Recent Gastro-Intestinal Studies," followed 
by a discussion by Drs. Randolph Winslow and 
Frank J. Kirby. In addition there was a lecture 
on "Achylia" by Dr. Thomas R. Brown, followed 
by a discussion opened by Dr. Gordon Wilson. 
These monthly lectures are very instructive and 
are well attended by the physicians and medical 
students. 



Dr. Challice Haydon Metcalf, 1914. has lo- 
cated at Lutherville, Md. 



We are in receipt of the following letter from 
Dr. J- M. Buch, class of 1913, who is located at 
Sagarra Alta, No. 43, Santiago, Cuba: 



"Santiago de Cuba, Feb. 19, 1915. 
"Dr. Nathan Winslow, 

"Baltimore, Md. 

"Dear Dr. Winslow — Received your letter of 
the 28th last and a copy of the The University 
Gazette, for subscription to which I am enclos- 
ing herewith postal money order for one dollar. 

"I wish you would send me the name of some 
medical man I know at the Hospital who could 
give me the details and technique to obtain the 
Bass-Watkins blood test for typhoid fever, as I 
want to introduce it here. It is more practical 
than the Widal reaction. This favor I will 
highly appreciate. If any of my classmates were 
at the Hospital now I would write them. 

"Is Dr. Fitz still at Baraboo, Wis?" 

"Please remember me to him, as well as to 
\our father. 

"Hoping you are working hard, and with suc- 
"-■ess, "I am, sincerely yours, 

"J. M. BucH." 



MEDICAL— JUNIOR. 



The Junior class breathed a sigh of relief when 
Messrs. Ford and Brown were seen out of the 
Hospital. We wish them both a speedy and per- 
fect convalescence. 



MEDIC.'VL DICTIONARY. 

Freshman : A graduate M. D. taking a post- 
graduate course. 

Sophomore : One who is beginning to realize 
iiis lack of knowledge. 

Junior : A meek but knowing individual. 

Senior: An unsteady, tight rope-walker, with 
but a short distance to go. 

Ilio-tibial band : A musical comedy of connec- 
tive tissue origin with Mr. Iliac crest as origina- 
tor. 

Flunker : One who knows medicine, but has 
failed to prove it to the faculty. 



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THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



Blome's Chocolates 

Known and enjoyed by students of the 
University for more than half a century. 

Retail Department 
BLOME'S CANDY STORE 

Established 1859 621 W. Baltimore St. 



I am willing to wager that the Junior class will 
know some gross pathology at the end of the 
year. Why ? . Well, we are going to have Dr. 
Spencer as instructor of pathology instead of Dr. 
W., who would have instructed us as to what we 
should have done instead of studying medicine. 



SOME WIT. 

1. God only knows. 

3. Dr. S (to Mr. H.)— "What are the prepar- 
ations of opium?" 

Mr. H. — "Well — oh, ah, I don't believe I re- 
member, Doc, but I know the dose of quinine." 

3. Dr. S (to Mr. G.) — "How would you pre- 
serve the integrity of the reflex arc?" 

Mr. G (somewhat comatose due to alcohol and 
heat of the lecture hall) — "Oh, pickle it." 

Dr. (to Mr. Ginzie) — "Well, sir, why didn't 
you attend my lecture in physical diagnosis last 
week?" 

Ginzie (with violent elbow and wrist jestures) 
— "Veil, all year I come mit your visical diag- 
nosis and I never hierd a noise." 

5. Dr. N. (to senior student of abd. pal.) — 
"Well, sir, what is your diagnosis of the case?" 

Senior (with every imaginable picture in his 
brain of L. O. A., L. O. P., etc., etc.) — "I don't 
know. Dr. ; the case seems very difficult." 

Dr. N.— "Huh ! Why, that is a G. O. K. Don't 
you remember now?" 

Senior — "Well, sir, I guess I did hear it at one 
time or another, but I just can't call it to mind." 

Dr. N. — "Well, the Ides of March approacheth, 
so look out. Young man, the G. O. K. position 
is one of those God Only Knows variety." 

6. Mr. G. (after being made the point of criti- 
cism by fellow students) — "I don't care; a man is 
what he is, what he ain't, no matter who makes 
mit him a damn fool." 

7. Dr. G. (during an enthusiastic lecture) — 
"You can delude yourself that you have got 
something vich you haven't got, but you can't de- 
lude mit yourself that you haven't got something 
vich you have got. That's it, gentlemen ; that is 
it exactly." 



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Suits to Measure, $15.00 to $35.00 
A. JACOBS & SONS, Tailors 

899 NORTH HOWARD STREET 

Open Evenings 9 P. M. Cor. Richmond St. 

A little quiz in practice of medicine would aid 
materially in clearing up some doubtful phrases 
and in stimulating studv. 



Would it not be more honorable if we would 
keep our books closed during class quizzes? 



The Mayo Brothers, Finge and Ginzie, have 
recently parted company and now are at dagger 
ends. 

Ginzie says : "Some people try to make mit you 
a damn fool yet, but they make themselves, eh !" 



Sherman said "War is hell." But he never had 
to take frog laboratory (view of a Soph.). 



We wish to call attention to the fact that iiever 
before has the Faculty been so accommodating 
and friendly. They gave us our request at Xmas, 
declared the 32d of February a holiday, and have 
shown in various ways their friendly attitude. It 
behooves us to reciprocate and so conduct our- 
selves as to be worthy of their respect and friend- 
ship. 

Laboratories should close early in April. The 
work is. very tiresorne about that time, due to op- 
pression from the weather and thought of the 
exams. 

PRE-EXAM. SAYINGS. 

1. If I ever get through this year I am going 
to study. Xo more running around after this. 
I've been a fool, but from now on I'm going to 
study medicine. That's final and straight goods. 
(Same remark has been made three times by 
Juniors, twice by Sophs and four times by Sen- 
iors.) 

2. It is easy enough to be pleasant 
When life flows along like a song; 
But the man worth while 

Is the one who will smile — "In Mav." 



Poker club is meeting rather regularly nowa- 
days. Would it not be wise if the school would 
tax each and every club member for the use of 
the buildings? 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



17^ 



At a meeting of the Supreme Bench February 
28th 36 new lawyers, who had been previously 
admitted to the bar by the Court of Appeals, 
were admitted to practice here. They were : 
Charles M. Gosnell, Julius F. Diehl, 
George W. Bradford, Jr., Arthur B. Nickerson, 
Daniel F. McMullen, Peter Peck, 
Paul M. Taylor, Charles B. Smyth, 

Raymond Schelgel, A. Robert French, 

Henry H. Waters, James W. Clayton, 

W. Warren Jump, Frederick R. Riehl, 

W. Caspari Wylie, Charles C. Dipaula, 

C. Stanley Cuane, Chas. L. Hutchins, Jr., 

Daniel F. Turpin, Joseph A. Haggerty, 

L. William Rook, Joseph O'C. McCusker, 

Charles M. Daley, John J. Pratt, Jr., 

Ollie E. Harvey, Herman Saul, 

Samuel H. Hofifberger, Jacob Schroeder, 
Julius Zieget, Floyd J. Kintner, 

John N. Yost, James Thomas, Jr., 

William C. Lurssen, John C. McLaughlin, 
William F. Reed, Francis O'Neill. 

With a few exceptions, the above list is com- 
posed of .University of Maryland men. 



LAW— SENIOR. 



Our old friend "Jiggs" O'Donohue grasped 
another opportunity to get in the foreground 
through this column by distinguishing himself 
with a Mercer car about one mile from Freder- 
ick a few days ago. Ask "Jiggs" about it. It's 
too painful to put in print. 



Let's have order, please! Mr. Coleman will 
now request the class to be quiet so the Rosen- 
thal-Gold debate can be continued. Well, there 
was some speed while it lasted ! 



As per his usual custom, instead of calling the 
roll on March 18th, Judge Niles went from man 
to man, trying to name him. He had pretty fair 
success until he reached Greenblatt, whose name 
eluded him. Judge Niles said : "Let's see, 
what's your name?" Waiting a reasonable 
length of time for a reply, he looked again and 
discovered that our hero was sound asleep. One 
of the "collegers'' sitting in his row gave liim 
an affectionate jab in the ribs and brought him 
out of his coma, and thereby ruined two hours 
for Greenblatt. 



Rosen, in arguing a bankruptcy case in Part I 
of the Practice Court on March 19th, said : 

"The reason that the Bankruptcy Act was 
passed exempting farmers from involuntary pro- 
ceedings was purely a political matter. It was 
done to influence the people to settle on the 
LAND WHICH IS SCATTERED throughout 
this country." That's a good point, boys. There 
is considerable land SCATTERED through this 
country. The rest of us probably never thought 
of that before. What it takes to do it, Rosen 
has it ! 



CAW— JUNIOR. 



The junior class of the University of Mary- 
land Law School had a dinner Saturday evening, 
March 6th, at the Rennert, and made it a very 
jolly affair. James Bruce led the discussion. 

Hans Froelicher., Jr., president of the class, 
was the toastmaster. Those who were down for 
speeches included Hooper S. Miles and Mr. 
B'ruce, members orf the class; former Judge 
Henry D. Harlan and Edwin T. Dickerson, of 
the Faculty ; Eugene O'Dunne and Congress- 
man J. Charles Linthicum. Former Judge Har- 
lan was prevented from attending because of a 
heavy cold, and Mr. O'Dunne and Mr. Linthicum 
were also unable to be present. Judge James P. 
Gorter and Alfred Bagby, Jr., of the Faculty, 
were present. 

Mr. Bruce explained the origin and operation 
of the honor system. He told of its institution 
at the University of Virginia nearly 100 years 
ago ; of its adoption by Princeton, and of his ob- 
servation of it at that university, where he was. 
one of the committee which tried those charged 
with violation of the code. He said the system 



A. H. PETTING 

Manufacturer of 

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213 N. Liberty St., = Baltimore, Md. 
Factory: 212 Little Sharp St. 

Memorandum package sent to any fraternity member through the 
secretary of the chapter. Special designs and estimates furnished on 
medals, rinjts and pins for athletic meets, etc. 



178 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



^ 



quAi 



iDlEHL 

Clothes 




built at 605 W. Baltimore St., 
just around the corner from the 
University, are kept pressed with- 
out cost. 

Suits $15 to $40 



had worked at the University of Virginia and at 
Princeton, but had failed in some other schools. 
His theory was that the danger to the success 
of the system is that students would fail to in- 
form against those who cheat. Unless they can 
be brought to understand that it is their obliga- 
tion to inform, that it is a matter of protection 
of the honor of the student body, his opinion is 
that the system will fail. Therefore, he argued 
that the system should not be instituted at the 
University of Maryland unless the student bod} 
agreed practically without a dissenting voice. 

— 

DENTAL— GRADUATE. 



On th 12th of April the Dental Department 
will celebrate her second annual homecoming for 
decennial classes. This year invitations have 
been extended to the classes of '8.5, '9.5 and '05, 
and from the responses received a goodly repre- 
sentation is anticipated. Some of the local alumni 
of these classes are Dr. Ferd Groshans, '85 ; Drs. 
T. O. Heatwole and J. S. Geiser, '95, and Dr. 
Wilbert Price, '05. On this date the exhibition of 
work done in the department of mechanical den- 
tistry will be made and prizes for best work 
awarded to Senior, Junior and Freshman classes. 



Recent alumni visitors were : Dr. L. Ruffin 
Self, '05, N. C. ; Dr. Luther P. Baker, '07, N. C. ; 
Dr. N. W. Denton, '83, Va. ; Dr. George A. 
Bunch, Jr., '13, S. C. Dr. Denton was visiting his 
son, who is a Junior dental student, and Dr, 
Bunch stopped off on his way to Alaska, where he 
will locate. 



HEPBRON & HAYDON 

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at the U. of M. 



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Dr. E. R. Bryant, of New Haven, Conn., and 
Secretary of the Connecticut Dental Association, 
was visiting his brother, A. G. Bryant, of the 
Junior dental class, a few days in early March. 
Dr. Bryant said many complimentary things of 
the work being done by this department. 
o ■ — ■ — — 



DENTAL— SENIOR. 



Dr. Baskin is doing double duty at present and 
is certainly imparting some very valuable knowl- 
edge. 



Notice to Seniors : Attend lectures. It is your 
golden opportunity before exams, and state 
boards. 



The class treasurer reports a surplus of thirty 
cents. Why not spend it and be happy? 



Our genial friend Purcell is specializing in ex- 
tracting at present. 



O'Connell is back after taking the Massachu- 
setts State Board. Best wishes for success. 



We miss our good friend. Dr. Davis, very much 
and trust he will soon resume his lectures in op- 
erative dentistry. 



We would suggest to Lewis that he sleep at 
home and not during Dr. Bay's lecture. 



Dr. B. Merrill Hopkinson is wondering why 
the Seniors are taking such active interest in 
dental history lectures. He was compelled to wel- 
come at least eighteen on St. Patrick's Day. 

Talk about Seniors being in such dire straits 
recalls Wolk's experience. He was seen running 
after a patient clear to Lombard Street. Some 
hustle for a gold filling. We fear he's missed his 
calling. He has the qualifications of a good cloth- 
ing salesman. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



179 



a w Saratoga St 




Maryland. 



We are told that all reputable dental schools 
give a course in anesthesia. The Seniors would 
like to know where they will receive their in- 
struction. 



It seems to be the habit of some of the Seniors 
to practice economy, but it strikes us that it is 
crowding the laundryman to turn an erstwhile 
white coat inside out, especially when there is a 
red label on the collar. J. S. says it is the new 
style. 



JUNIOR— DENTAL. 
Well, now we have just one month in which to 
prepare for our final battle with examinations. 
Let us all gird on the armor of study and be 
prepared to combat and overcome any tactics to 
which the enemy might resort. Victory means 
that we press forward to the Senior Ranks. De- 
feat means that we return and wage the same 
battles again in the fall. Some of us will sweat 
blood, but we can persevere and win. Here's 
hoping that we may all be conquerors and none 
be vanquished. 



Information wanted. Is Walter Edward Bean, 
of Troy, N. Y., a co-ed at the Peabody or a 
Junior student in the U. of M. dental department? 



$.5,000,000 REWARD. 

For the person who can produce the man who 
can whistle two tunes at the same time. "Tex," 
you were either in your cups, or anesthetized 
when you heard him. Couldn't it have been some 
one else under the table? 



LUTHER B. BENTON 
Dental Depot 



students' Outfits 
a Specialty 



305 North Howard St. 



Intercollegiate Bureau of Academic Costume, Aibany.N.v. 
COTRELL & 



LEONARD 

Official Makers of 

Caps and 

Gowns 




Correct Hoods 
for All Degrees. 

Rich Qowns for 
Pulpit and Bench. 

Bulletin, Samples 
I etc. on request 



Bennie Ross Jones of this class is becoming a 
naughty boy. He was chewing gum last week. 
He will be stealing matches from home next. 



"Pop" Bryant, although rapidly becoming hair- 
less, still retains his boyish laughter. 



Any circus or side show desiring a strong man 
can find a good one in our classmate Lena. He 
can lift nine to twelve at one time. 



Aldridge has shaved oflf his moustache. Why 
not take the hairs and make "Dick" Bundy a 

wig? 



Eunderburk has changed his rooming place 
again. Twenty-seven times in one year is going 
some. Doesn't he deliver the cash? 



Please pay all class dues. This means you. 



Can one class have two deans? It is acknowl- 
edged by some that a Baltimore lad should hold 
the title. But a usurper has appeared in the 
person of one James (Flossie) Adair, who lays 
claim to the title. Confidentially, Jimmie, there 
are too many other good operators in the class 
on, whom you don't count. Our advice is to do 
more work and less talking, else at some unex- 
pected moment the bottom of your air castle 
might fall out and then, bing! 



DENTAL— FRESHMAN. 



Mr. Godson wants to know if the iliac vein 
doesn't go to the stomach. We also congratulate 
him on his bet that there was no such thing as 
the median nerve. All who are desirous of ar- 
ranging bets will do well to see Mr. Godson first. 



180- 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



' If anybody wants a room well situated and 
with all the up-to-date conveniences, it would be 
well for him to see Mr. Demarco. He is a 
-resident of this city and should know. He has 
already referred quite a number of his friends to 
Highlandtown as the most refined and cultured 
residential section of the city. 



E. F. Kelly. Mr. Jones conducts a very success- 
ful drug business in Hattiesburg. 



Mr. Corrigan's latest discovery is quite an ad- 
vance in prosthetic dentistry and merits consid- 
erable attention. The exact date is not known, 
but the profession, at any rate, feels proud of the 
recent improved method of setting up teeth. The 
virtue of the discovery lies in the fact that a bet- 
ter occlusion can be obtained by letting the apices 
of the teeth represent the occlusal surface, — the 
cusps will then serve as excellent fangs. 



"My goodness!" exclaimed Mr. Culler, "if you 
don't stop, I'll be darned if I don't go home." 
Somebody had certainly better keep an eye on 
him, or there might come a time when his "ale" 
will never have a chance to settle. 



One evening while Mr. Clarke (now popularly 
known as "Doctor Clark") was making a call, he 
was met at the door by the little sister. He in- 
quired for his lady and was told that probably 

mother knew whether or not E was in. A 

few minutes later he heard the following at the 
top of tlie stairs : "Oh, mother, the doctor's 
here !" 



We regret that Mr. Waynick was in so much 
suspense recently. His friends wonder if he 
is still in the notion for another dollar. It's diffi- 
cult to believe that he could have so much wanted 
an Ingersoll movement. 



PHARMACY— GRADUATE. 



T. C. Crowell, Pharmacy, '13, spent several 
days in the University recently doing some chemi- 
cal work with Dr. Bose. Mr. Crowell holds a 
responsible position with the Pesi-Cola Company, 
of New Bern, N. C. 



J. E. Jones, '02, of Hattiesburg, j\liss., was a 
recent visitor. He spent a number of days here 
in company ^vitll his classmate and room-mate, 



Lewis Schultz, Ph. G., '84, was re-elected presi- 
dent of the Lutheran Church Extension Society 
of Baltimore City at a meeting of that organiza- 
tion February 15, 1915. 



ACADEMIC— GRADUATE 



Professor Waddell was called away recently 
by the death of his sister. We wish to extend 
to him our sincere sympathy. 



Dr. James W. Cain, president of Washington 
College. Chestertown, Md., and former vice-pres- 
ident of St. John's College, has tendered his 
resignation to the Board of Visitors and Gover- 
nors of the College, to take effect at the end of 
the academic year. This action is said to be the 
result of friction of several years' standing be- 
tween the president and the Board. 

Dr. Cain is one of the best known educators in 
Maryland. He was born in New Haven, Conn., 
September 1, 1860. His preliminary education 
was received at Hillhouse High School. He was 
admitted to Yale College in 1880, graduating 
with the degree of bachelor of arts in 1881. He 
later took a post-graduate course and received 
his master's degree in 1893. St. John's College, 
Annapolis, conferred the degree of doctor of 
laws upon him in 1903. 



LEFRANC & AULT 

ARE SHOWING 

NEW NECKWEAR 

AND 

NEW SHIRTS 

AT THE 

"SHIRT SHOP" 

421 N. Howard St , at Franklin 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



181 



Hart Schaffner & Marx, 
Kuppenheimer, 
"Society Brand" 



The clothes that college men 
like a lot 



Balllmore Street At Cbdrles 



His first teaching experience was gained in 
the evening schools of New Haven while a stu- 
dent at Yale. Following his graduation in 18,84, 
he became principal' of Lewistown Academy, 
Lewistown, Pa., and served two years, whenihe 
was elected to the faculty of St. John's College, 
Annapolis. He was appointed treasurer of St. 
John's in 1889 and vice-president in 1896. I 

While connected with St. John's Ife introduced 
courses in advanced English and created the de- 
partment of economics, holding during later years 
of his connection with the College the professor- 
ship of English and economics. • ' 



ACADEMIC— UNDERGRADUATE. 



St. John's is famous for her sons in almost 
every profession. James H. Onion, formerly of 
the class of 1915, is making a name for himself 
ir. a new field. He is at present director of the 
Triangle Film Corporation, and is probably the 
youngest moving-picture producer in the world. 
His work has been lately pronounced good by 
Baltimore critics. 



Our back campus has lately been improved 
with a pile of old tin cans. Thanks to the donor. 



Among the five Marylanders who passed the 



recent examinations for entrance to the Naval 
Academy were Philip P. Welch and W. E. Tar- 
button, both former students at St. John's. 



The Junior class held a meeting on March 7 
and elected the editorial staff of The Collegian 
for the next academic year. Those elected for 
this work are as follows : 

Editor-in-chief, C. L. Hartsock ; assistant edi- 
tor- in-chief, R. O. Jones; athletic editor, W. F. 
Stromeyer ; associate editor, A. B. Jacques ; asso- 
ciate editor, L. T. Miles ; business manager, G. T. 
Mackenzie ; business manager, J. C. Miller. 

It is customary for the Junior Board to begin 
the work of getting out The Collegian the first 
Tuesday in May. This gives them practice for 
the coming year and relieves the Senior Board 
from Collegian work during the Senior examina- 
tions, which begin on May 10. The Seniors will 
publish the last issue of The Collegian, a com- 
mencement number, on June 15. 



On Friday night, March 12th, a dance was 
given in the College Gymnasium under the aus- 
pices of the Cotillon Club for the benefit of the 
Battalion colors. 

Mr. and Mrs. James M. Munroe received, 
while Lieut, and Mrs. C. S. McNeil were also in 
the receiving party. The attendance was not as 
large as had been hoped, this being largely due 
to the fact that quite a number of cadets were 
unsuccessful in their attempts to have a party of 
out-of-town girls down for the occasion. Those 
who were present, however, seemed to enjoy 
themselves to the fullest extent, there being so 
n-uch more room on the floor than usual. 



NURSING. 



■ Miss Lucy Scaggs, of the Intermediate class, 
was operated on at the hospital the last of Feb- 
ruary. 



WILLIAM J. MILLER 

Jewelry, Diamonds, Watches 

College Jewelry 
Class Pins and Rings, College Seals 

28 East Bsitimore St. Baltimore, Md. 22 W. Lcxington St., = Baltimorc, Md. 



E LLERBROCK 

Ull|f ICpaJittig (Collfgp pijatograpljrr 



182 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



Miss Lillie Hull, of the Intermediate class, was 
operated on at the hospital some days ago and is 
recuperating at her home. 



Miss Jane Pennewell, a member of the Junior 
class, was operated on for appendicitis at the 
hospital and is convalescing at her home in Snow 
Hill, Md. 



Miss Grace Tull, class of 1909, is doing sub- 
stitute nursing in the infant milk work. 



Miss Grace Stoneham, class of 1914, is spend- 
ing a few days in the city. 



Miss Mary V. Dowdell, class of 1901, had a 
mastoidectomy performed about a week ago and 
is very ill. We all wish her a speedy recovery. 



QUIPS. 

CHEERING THE PATIENT. 

The eminent physicians had been called in con- 
sultation. They had retired to another room to 
discuss the patient's condition. In the closet of 




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that room a small boy had been concealed by the 
patient's direction to listen to what the consult- 
ants decided and to tell the patient, who desired 
genuine information. 

"Well, Jimmy," said the patient, when the boy 
came to report, "what did they say?" 

"I couldn't tell you that," said the boy. "I 
listened as hard as I could, but they said such 
liig words I couldn't remember much of it. All I 
could catch was what one doctor said : 'Well, 
\\ e'll find that out at the autopsy.' " 



CHASING THE "SLEEP BUG." 



-Vnother "bug" is to be added soon to the 
world's collection. It is the "sleep bug" and a 
whole brigade of scientists from an Illinois col- 
lege are on its trail. 

A great thought is behind the pursuit. It has 
long been a puzzle why college students were so 
much given to sleeping in classrooms, and, para- 
do.xical as it may seem, more than one scientist 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



183 



has spent sleepless nights trying to solve the 
mystery. 

The common belief has been that the unsci- 
entific element of dryness in a professor's lecture 
had some rather close relation to his student's 
drowsiness during its delivery. Also the hour 
that various sleepy students retired the night be- 
fore and their physical condition at the time were 
popularly supposed to be, in some measure, re- 
sponsible. 

But no, we have been in error. The "sleep 
bug" is the goat. It has been figured out — tenta- 
tively, it is true, but with great show of confi- 
dence — that bad air contains great swarms of 
these sleep-producing creatures and that for a 
professor to try to deliver an uninteresting lecture 
in an unventilated classroom is much like sowing 
seed on a rock, so far as hope of harvest is con- 
cerned. 

Having agreed upon the theory, these Illinois 
scientists are now going about to prove it. They 
are collecting bottles of classroom air of vari- 
ous degrees of foulness. The "sleep bugs" are 
secureh' sealed inside until such time as the col- 
lection is large enough to justify the next step 
in the process, that of studying the germ and 
getting him ready to mount in their collection. 

The idea of bottling "sleep bugs" is alluring. 
Once the creature is caught and labeled and ban- 
ished from classrooms, drowsy students will have 
their only excuse for snoozing taken away. 
Alertness in class may regain some of its lost 
respectability. And the next thing one knows, 
some wide-awake concern will be ofifering for sale 
on the market this bottled air guaranteed to con- 
tain so many million "bugs" for the use of insom- 
niacs. — Cleveland Plain Dealer. 



BIRTHS. 



WARNER 8c CO. 
... Hl^tt^rs ... 

222-224 WEST BALTIMORE ST. 



To Dr. Harry D. McCarty, class of 1905, and 
i Mrs. McCarty, of 37 West Preston Street, Balti- 
more, February 18, 191.5, a son — Horatio Ball. 



To Dr. James Herbert Bates, class of 1907. 
and Mrs. Bates, of Millington, Md., February 28, 
191.5, a daughter — Margaret. 



DEATHS. 



Dr. Joseph Walter Sim, class of 1892, health 
ofiicer of Glenwood, Md., died at his home, Janu- 
ary 8, in]."), aged 57 years. 



Dr. Henry Walton Wood, class of 1902, of 
UG County Street, New Bedford, Mass., died in 
February, 1915, at the Jefiferson Hospital in Phil- 
adelphia, after a lingering illness. He had been 
sick about eighteen months. 



Dr. Thomas Gay Whims, class of 1911, of 
Lasker, N. C, died at the University Hospital, 
Baltimore, March 7, 1915, after a lingering ill- 
ness, aged 38 ^^ears. 



Dr. Henry C. Shipley, class of 1865, former!}^ 
of Eldersburg, Carroll county, Md., but for the 
last 13 years a resident of Washington, D. C, died 
at the home of his daughter, 1935 Summit Place 
N. E., Washington, after a lingering illness, Feb- 
ruary 11, 1915. Dr. Shipley is survived by three 
children, Mrs. R. W. Pearson, Mrs. Allen Smith 
of Washington, and Marriott Shipley of Sykes- 
ville, M:d. 



Dr. Kurt Seyforth, class of 1885, formerly 
professor of languages in the Baltimore City Col- 
lege, died at his home in Baltimore, January 9, 
1915, from diseases of the liver, aged fi2 years. 



Dr. Th.omas F. Keen, class of 1881, formerly a 
member of the Medical Society of Virginia, presi- 
dent of the Hamilton (Va.) Bank, one of the 
most widely known practitioners of Northern Vir- 
ginia, died at his home in Hamilton, January. 24, 
1915, aged 57 years. 



Recently to Dr. J. -Dawson Reeder, class of ' G. A. Knabe, Ph.D., University of Maryland. 
1901, and Mrs. Reeder, of 639 T'ulton Avenue, ' died at his home in Montgomery, Ala.,, of acute 
Baltimore, a daughter. Bright's disease, October 4, 1914 . 



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THI UHIWIRSITY GAIITTI 




If you can keep your head when all about you 

Are losing theirs and blaming it on you; 
If you can trust yourself when all men doubt you, 

But make allowance for their doubting, too; 
If you can wait and not be tired by waiting. 

Or being lied about don't deal in lies, 
Ui being hated don't give way to hating. 

And yet don't look too good, nor talk too wise. 

If you can dream — and not make dreams your master; 

If you can think — and not make thoughts your aim; 
If you can meet Triumph and Disaster 

And treat these two impostors just the same; 
If you can bear to hear the truth you've spoken 

Twisted by knaves to make a trap for fools. 
Or watch the things you gave your life to broken. 

And stoop and build 'em up with worn-out tools; 

If you can make one heap of all your winnings 

And risk it on one turn of pitch and toss. 
And lose, and start again at your beginnings 

And never breathe a word about your loss; 
If you can force your heart and nerve and sinew 

To serve your turn long after they are gone, 
And so hold on when there is nothing in you 

Except the will, which says to them: "Hold on!" 

If you can talk with crowds and keep your virtue, 

Or talk with kings — nor lose the common touch; 
If neither foes nor loving friends can hurt you. 

And all men count with you but none too much; 
If you can fill the unforgiving minute 

With sixty seconds' worth of distance run. 
Yours is the earth, and everything that's in it. 

And which is more — you'll be a Man, my son! 

Rudyard Kipling. 




VOL. I. 



BALTIMORE, MD., MAY, 1915 



No. 11 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



Vol. I. 



MAY 1, 1915. 



No. 11. 



CONTENTS 



ADDRESS DELIVERED BY HIS EX- 
CELLE\"CY PHILLIPS LEE GOLDS- 
BOROUGH AT THE FIFTH AN- 
NUAL HEALTH CONFERENCE, 
FEBRUARY 8, 1915 187 

THOUGHTS ON A TREE 189 

EDITORIALS 190 

SLAMS AND SALUTES 191 

HENRY D. HARLAN LAW SOCIETY 
NOTES 193 



CLUB NOTES 193 

FRATERNITY NOTES 193 

ATHLETICS 193 

ITEMS 195 

QUIPS 303 

MARRIAGES 203 

DEATHS 203 



Footwear for the College Man at Moderate Price. 

N. HESS' SONS - - 8 E. Baltimore, St. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE, MD. 

HON. PHILLIPS LEE GOLDSBOROUGH, Governor of Maryland, Chancellor. 
THOMAS FELL, A. M., Ph. D., L L. D., D. C. L., Provost. 



ST. JOHN'S COLLEGE. Annapolis, Md. U^^V^ZITIc^sS^es) 

Founded 1696. Classical and Scientific College Courses leading to d ;grees. Special advantages to stu- 
dents purposing to study the professions. Military Department under army officers. Also Preparatory 
School for boys fitting for St. John's or other colleges. Term begins SepI jmber 21. Address 

THOMAS FELL, Ph.D., LL.D., D.C.L., President. 



DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE. 

Four vears' graded course. New Laboratory Build- 



DEPARTMENT OF LAW. 

59th Annual Session will begin Sept. 28, 1914. Faculty 



vng. Clinical advantages unsurpassed. Teaching Staff ! of 26. For catalogue containing full information ad- 

of 66. lo8th Annual Session will begin October i, , dress the Secretary, 301 St. Paul Street, Baltimore, 

1914, and continue 8 months , Maryland. 

R. DORSEY COALE, Ph.D., M.D., Dean. EDWIN T. DICKERSON, Secretary. 



DEPARTMENT OF DENTISTRY. 

33d Annual Session begins October i, 1914, and 
continues " months. 26 Instructors. New Building. 
For catalogue containing course of study, etc., apply to 

TIMOTHY O. HE.\TWOLE, M.D., D.D.S., Dean, 

Baltimore, Md. 



DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACY. 

(Formerly Marj-land College of Pharmacy). 72nd 
Annual Session begins September 25, 1914, n In- 
structors. New Laboratories, .\ddress 

CHARLES CASPARI, JR., Phar.D., Dean, 

Baltimore. Md. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 

Published Monthly in the Interest of the University of Maryland. 
PRICE $1.00 PER YEAR. 



Oontributionj solicited from Alumni of the 
University. 



Business Address, 608 Professional Buildine. 
Baltimore. Md. 



Vol. I. 



BALTIMORE, MD., MAY 1, 1915. 



No. 11 



ADDRESS DELIVERED BY HIS EXCEL- 
LENCY PHILLIPS LEE GOLDSBOR- 
OUGH AT THE FIFTH ANNUAL 
HEALTH CONFERENCE, FEBRUARY 
8, 1915. 

The progress of the State in any of its depart- 
ments is first accomplished, not by the effort of 
a large body of its citizens, but rather by an 
individual here and there. And so it is that, in 
the adoption of laws, followed by their intelligent 
application and enforcement, which have made 
for the improvement of the health of the people 
of Maryland. I might name a distinguished 
man, and a few of his associates, who are richly 
entitled to the credit of having established a State 
Department of Health which, for the splendid 
work it has done and is now doing, challenges 
the admiration of all people. Need I speak of 
some of its recent accomplishments? 

First — The division of the State into health 
districts, presided over by trained sanitarians, 
or to be presided over by such men so soon as 
they may be had. There is, I am told, a scarcity 
of men with this equipment just now, but it is 
gratifying to learn from Dr. Welch that one of 
the great Foundations in this country is seriously 
contemplating, if it has not already decided to 
do so, taking up the training of men for this 
work. These men being fully equipped for their 
work, appointed solely on merit, by the State 
Board of Health, free from loss of position by 
any change in the political fortunes of the State, 
will work a boon for suffering humanity that is 
immeasurable.. 

Second — An act for the better preservation of 
the public health by preserving the purity of the 
waters of the State : providing for the supervision 
and control by the State Board of Health over 
water and ice supplies, sewerage, trades waste, 
and refuse disposal ; and for the maintenance, 
alteration, extension, construction and operation 
of systems and works relating thereto ; providing 
for the raising of funds by counties, municipali- 
ties, and sanitary districts ; for the maintenance, 
alteration, extension, and construction of the 



same, and prescribing penalties for violation of 
the orders and regulations of the State Board of 
Health made in connection therewith, and to 
appropriate a sum of money for carrying into 
effect the provisions thereof. 

Third — Making more efficient the work of the 
Examining State Board of Physicians. 

Fourth — The regulation of factory and work- 
shop conditions, and requiring the owner of 
every factory, manufacturing and mechanical 
workshop, and of every store or other mercantile 
establishment emplo}-ing five or more persons, to 
register same with the Bureau of Statistics and 
Information : and providing for the granting of 
licenses and supervision of conditions under 
which the work is done by the Chief of the Bu- 
reau of Statistics and Information ; and particu- 
larly to ascertain, after consulting the records of 
th" Io<-a1 Health Department or Board, or other 
proper local authority, charged with the duty of 
sanitary inspection, the presence of any infec- 
tious, contagious or communicable disease, or the 
existence of any unsanitary conditions in or about 
factory, room or apartment. 

Fifth — An act making more stringent the pro- 
vision that the physician shall, in writing over his 
own signature, give notice to the Board of Health 
or health officer of the city, town, county or dis- 
trict, of the presence of infectious or contagious 
diseases. 

Sixth — An act requiring the local Boards of 
Health of the counties of the State to meet semi- 
annually in the months of May and October, and 
as much oftener as they may deem necessary, 
and that they shall act in conjunction with the 
State Board of Health, and shall report to said 
Board such facts in reference to the santiary 
conditions of their respective counties as they 
may deem important and necessary. 

Seventh — An act to provide for the medical 
examination of school children and the promo- 
tion of their health, and authorizing the Board 
of County School Commissioners of any county 
in the State to appoint one or more school physi- 
cians and assign one to any public school within 
the limits of such county, and to provide such 



188 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



school physician, when so appointed, with proper 
facihties for the performance of his duty, the 
phvsician being required to make a prompt exam- 
ination of all children referred to him, and then 
file written report of such examination; that the 
principal or teacher of any school to which a 
school physician has been assigned shall refer to 
the physician every child returning to school 
without a permit from the health officer of the 
Board of Heath after an absence on account of 
illness, and every child attending such school who 
appears to be in ill health or is suspected to be 
sick with any infectious or contagious disease 
shall be immediately excluded from the school 
under the provisions of the general statutes for 
sanitary regulations in force in such town or 
district. 

Eighth— An act amending the statutes relating 
to State Registrar of Vital Statistics, and provid- 
ing that each election district, city and incor- 
porated town shall Constitute a registration dis- 
trict, permitting, the State Registrar, with the 
advice of the local Board of Health, to designate 
a competent person in each registration district 
who shall' act as local reg'istrar, and shall within 
his district receive death certificates, issue burial 
permits and receive birth certificates, and per- 
form such other services as the local Board of 
Health may direct ; and further, that it shall be 
the duty of every local registrar, on or before the 
.5th day of every month, to transmit tothe State 
Registrar of \^ital Statistics, in envelopes fur- 
nished for that purpose, the originals of all cer- 
tificates of birth or death remaining in his pos- 
session on the last day of the month next preced- 
ing, and at the time of mailing his returns to the 
State Registrar he shall also mail to the County 
Registrar a copy of all certificates of births or 
deaths, .certifying that it is correct, under his 
own hand. 

Men who have accomplished so much can do 
m.ore. And so it is tonight that I make an 
appeal for your help in waging a campaign that 
shall bring about ways and means to care for 
the negroes of the State who are victims of 
tuberculosis. 

WHAT WE .\RE DOING. 

The State has its own Tuberculosis Sanatorium 
at Sabillasville, at which an average of 391 pa- 
tients were cared for during the last year and 
v/hich cost the State $140,000 per year. The 
State also has a small Tuberculosis Sanatorium 



at Salisbury, known as the Pine Bluff Sanatorium, 
which is running at a cost of $10,000 per year 
and which cares for approximately 25 patients. 
In addition, the State is contributing largely to 
the support of the Eudowood Sanatorium, which 
cares for some hundred patients and receives an 
appropriation .of $25,000 per 3-ear. 

The Jevi/ish Hospital for Consumptives of 
Maryland, at Reisterstown, provides for some 55 
patients and receives an appropriation of $6,500, 
and the Allegheny County Tuberculosis Sana- 
torium, which makes provision for approximately 
35 to 35 patients, receives an annual appropria- 
tion of $1,000. 

SITUATION AS AMONGST NEGROES. 

All of the above institutions, however, take only 
white patients. A glance at the records of the 
State Board of Health shows that while the popu- 
lation of the State is approximately five-sixths 
white, the number of deaths among the negroes, 
dying of consumption, is approximately one-third 
of the total number of deaths from that disease. 
The disease would, therefore, seem to be much 
inore prevalent amongst the negroes than the 
whites. 

WHY THE NEGRO URGENTLY NEEDS HELP. 

Not only do humanitarian motives demand that 
we do something to stop this frightful death rate 
amongst the negroes, but, in addition, we must 
see from even a selfish standpoint that we can 
never hope to make great inroads on this disease 
amongst the white race so long as we allow the 
negro to be a centre of infection. 

This is especially true when we consider the 
■fact that the negroes cook our food, put it on 
our table, wash our clothes and care for our chil- 
dren. It would seem, therefore, that the weakest 
spot in our fight against tuberculosis is the negro, 
and it is to be hoped that something definite can 
be worked out for him in the near future. As a 
layman, I cannot say that it is best to establish a 
central sanatorium. On the other hand, there are 
close students of this question who say that the 
more advanced method is that of local sanatoria. 

A writer has said : 

"The utility of hospitals is not to cure the sick; 
it is to teach mercy. The veneration for hos- 
pitals is not because they cure the sick; it is be- 
cause they stand for mercy and responsibility. 
The appeal of physical suffering makes the 
strongest attack on our common humanity." 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



189 



We must help the afflicted, or we, and our de- 
scendants, will become afflicted. 

At the bottom of every fight for principle you 
will find the sentiment of mercy, and I plead for 
mercy for those unfortunates — not alone for 
themselves, great as is the debt due them — but 
also because, if it be not fully given, those of our 
own race must ultimately suffer. 

So much have we heard in these days of the 
new freedom about the conservation of forests, 
streams and mines, the care and protection of our 
natural resources, to all of which I give most 
earnest approval, but far and above this is the 
conservation of the health of the peoples of a 
State and nation. I beg you to enlist under the 
banner of the Maryland Society for the Preven- 
tion and Relief of Tuberculosis, which associa- 
tion, under the leadership of Dr. Henry Barton 
Jacobs, is soon to wage State-wide warfare 
against the white plague, with the hope that in 
no small measure it shall be driven from the 
homes of countless sufferers. 

These poor unfortunates need that you shall 
champion their cause, and no man knows better 
than I the high order of service that the members 
of the Medical and Chirurgical Society are capa- 
ble of giving. I pray you that this plea fall not 
on deaf ears. 

-o 

THOUGHTS ON A TREE. 



(By a convict serving a twenty-year sentence 
in the Maryland Penitentiary. It was sent to 
Rev. K. G. Murray, who kindly handed it to the 
editor-in-chief for publication in the Gazette.) 



The man with twenty years of prison mono- 
tony hanging over his head, spent half an hour 
daily communing with a tree. It was many city 
blocks away and visible only to the raised eye 
from a certain spot in the prison yard. All about 
him were walls and towers and barred windows. 
Beyond was the heart of the city — but to him the 
city was only a mass of ugly roofs — as far as 
the vision extended. Just this tree, towering to 
heaven and spreading its branches to the four 
winds, broke the wearying view. It stood upon 
an eminence, certainly, for among monuments of 
masonry it alone was distinct in form and height. 

In winter it was like a desolate giant. In the 
fullness of summers its summit and branches 
were covered with a vast crown of leaves. It 



seemed the growth of centuries. Storms had 
failed to make it bow — age had brought greater 
strength. It was more wonderful, the thought, 
than the "Old Dolly Barber," the legend tree of 
his home town, which civil engineers had ac- 
cepted for generations as the hub of local sur- 
veys. He had hidden in the great hollow of that 
tree, from whence, the folk tale goes, the beau- 
tiful Dolly and her lover, on elopement bent, 
watched the irate father dash by ; they then dou- 
bled on their course and outwitted him. 

The tree beyond the prison walls furnished 
food for pensive speculation. Was it oak, or 
giant maple? Did it grace a rich man's garden, 
or was it a public tree? It engrossed his interest. 
It represented to him the great world of verdure 
where Nature spoke with a thousand tongues. 

He wondered one midsummer's day whether 
tree crickets were among its branches and what 
story their loud stridulations, interpreted, would 
tell. Did the tree-crow, with his long tail and 
curved bill, find it as secure a retreat from the 
sun, as he, from the hot prison yard had reason 
to believe it to be? The mere toad, with his ad- 
hesive toes, was more fortunate than he. Na- 
ture had fitted him to climb from ground to sum- 
mit and investigate. He remembered some tree 
toads, like chameleons, can change color to elude 
enemies, and he found himself speculating 
v/hether this species flourished there. 

These things were a part of the life of his 
tree. They were nursed by it, comforted by it, 
protected by it. In its foliage birds held high 
carnival, and every leaf gossiped the news the 
straying breezes whispered. 

When he vyas released he intended to proceed 
immediately to the inspection of the great moni- 
tor. If it reared itself in a rich man's yard he 
would ring the bell and ask permission to meas- 
ure its trunk and estimate its height. No man 
should know that tree in the future better than 
he. 

Standing remote, ever silent to him, towering 
night and dav above the works of man, it typified 
vastness — power. It heard no voice, responded 
to no influence save the mighty call of the pano- 
ramic seasons — manifestations of birth — life's 
fullness — harvest time and the deep sleep that 
precedes the resurrection ! 

It was not strange to him that primitive peo- 
ples worshiped trees. Powerful beings they 
thought them — or the seats of divinities. 



190 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 

A MONTHLY JOURNAL 

Devoted to the interests of the University 
of Maryland. 

Subscription Price, $1.00 Per Annum, In Advance 

Reprints Furnished At Cost 

Advertising Rates Submitted Upon Request. 

60S Professional Building 

BALTIMORE, MD. ■'''■"■''■ 



Editorial Board. 

J. BEN ROBINSON, D.D.S Editor-in-Chief. 

NATHAN WINSLOW, M.D Managing Editor. 

Graduate Members. 

THOMAS FELL, LL.D Academic. 

STANWOOD COBB, B.A Academic. 

H. M. ROBINSON, M.D Medical. 

ALBERT H. CARROLL, M.D Medical. 

F. J. VALENTINE, D.D.S Dental. 

SAMUEL WANT, LL. B Law. 

JOHN H. SKEEN, LL. B Law. 

A. A. SONNENBURG, Phar.D Pharmacy. 

J. M. BRANSKY, Phar.D Pharmacy. 

M. E. SULLIVAN, R.N Nursing. 

Undergraduate Members. 

C. V. WILSON Academic. 

H. GOLDMAN, '15; F. C. MARINO, 

'16; C. 0. WOLF, '17 Medicine. 

H. E. WATERMAN, 15; A. Z. ALD- 
RIDGE, '16; E. B LANCASTER, 
'17 Dental. 

J. A. HAGGERTY,'15; B. C. LIGHT- 
NER, '15; C. N. MATTHEWS, 
'16; A. B. MAKOVER, '17 Law. 

A. L. STERLING, 'IF Pharmacy. 

J. E. EVANS, '16 Y. M. C. A. 

B. C. LIGHTNER, ' Advertising. 

B. G. GOLD, '15 College Notes. 

A. G. DE QUEVEDO Latin-American. 

L. A. BUIE, '15 House Notes. 

LINDSAY ROGERS, '15 General Items. 



MAY 1, 1915. 



, EDITORIALLY EXPRESSED. 



\^'ith this issue of The Gazette the school 
year for manv of the students practically closes. 
When the June issue will have come from press 
most of the students will have gone to their 
homes or occupations and will enjoy spending 
their ^-acation away from the student grind. 
Why not take The Gazette with you and keep 
ill touch with the University and her work? 
Drop a note to the editor-in-chief, state your 
class and department, and we wiU be glad to 






Let Us Introduce to You 



The very latest in young men's clothes. "Coriss " 
patented match pattern coats, cut so the patterns 
match at the back seam. 



Sold exclusively by 

THE QUALITY SHOP 

Balto. and Liberty Sts. 




make note of your summer work. In this way 
the students can keep in touch with each other 
and your interest in your school paper will be 
maintained. 



As the graduates of 1915 leave the University, 
let us impress upon you the imp)ortance of join- 
ing the Alumni Association and keeping in touch 
with the progress of vour Alma Mater. 



We have just read President Wilson's late' 
book, "When A Man Comes to Himself." The 
thought is very fine to one who has recently 
entered upon his life's work, as some of our 
seniors will soon be doing. \\'e are not adver- 
tising the publishers, but we would recommend 
this little book as an influence that will greatly 
benefit anyone and especially him who is about 
to enter upon life's duties and needs wise 
guidance. 



Our thoughts are sympathetic with the young 
n^an- who now faces his final examinations and 
State Board. But, brace up, boys! While you 
cannot throw oft' that feeling of anxiety, yet for 
th.e man who has faithfully and zealously applied 
himself there is little cause for worry; his reward 
will come. Compensation says to him who has 
done little, little can only be his return. We get 
as much out of life as we put in. If the student 
has whiled away his life in having a good time, 



Sight, smell and taste plays big part in digestion. 
Eating is a matter of the sympathetic nerves. ">'o 
profit where no plensnre is taken." 

POSITITELT we feed von BETTER, at LESS COST 
and IX THE CLE.\>EST environment than any one 
h:;s ever done before since time began. 

BRIGHTON LUNCH 

14 N. HOWARD STREET 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



191 



he should be a true sport and accept the conse- 
quences. ''To him that hath shall be given, but 
to him that hath not shall be tiken away, even 
tl-at which he hath." 



"SLAMS AND SALUTES." 



(A column dedicated to the free expression of 
opinion on the part of anyone who wishes to 
address the faculty and student body. We re- 
serve the right to refuse for publication any 
article tending to ridicule, and trust that no one 
will abuse his privilege. Kindly signonanae to 
article, that we may be assured of the good faitli 
in which it was written, but name will not be 
pu:blished if contributor so desires. Develop 
your ideal and assist in' maturing college ideals. — 
Editor-in-Chief.) ':'.■■ 



DON T KNOCK BOOST. 

After the first baseball game played by the 
'Varsity, which was lost, there were many "I 
told you so's," who discussed at length the de- 
fects and shortcomings of the team, emphasizing 
the fact that these' fellows could never win a 
game. 'This- is not the proper spirit for the fel- 
lows to show, if they hope to see a successful 
team. The boys are in it for sport and the team 
is made up of sports ; now, be a sport and sup- 
port the boys. Go out and root ; cheer the fel- 
lows in action, and tell them they fought a gooci 
fight when defeated. If you cannot play the 
game or appreciate the spirit of the players, do 
the clam act. Don"t knock. Boost ! 

Square De;.'\l. 



THE FRESHNESS OE SOME FRESHMEN. 

The question of hazing was thought to have 
been settled last year, when the second-year 
classes of all departments decided to eliminate 
hazing. We are not in favor of hazing, espe- 
cially as it is carried on in some places and as 
it has formerly been in this institution. How- 
ever, we are of the opinion that college spirit 
and class distinctions are better when the path 
of first-year men is more clearly defined. The 
freshmen of this year seem inclined to be a little 
more forward than of previous years, especially 
certain ones. It is true some are born "fresh- 
men" and will continue as such, even after their 
graduation. A little lesson to point out the dif- 
ference between the man that knows and the 



one that thinks he knows would be very helpful 
to some men. In the medical department a 
senior can be distinguished from certain ones in 
the freshman class only by his white coat. In 
the dental department the only visible distinction 
is the little senior advertising pin. Probably the 
exalted feeling of some of the dental freshmen 
is increased by certain professors, who flatter 
them of their attainments merely as a means to 
an end to enhance the opinions of others as to 
their ability as instructors. — Modesty. 



HINTS TO THE IMPROVEMENT COMMITTEE OF THE 
DENTAL DEPARTMENT. 

There is a big expenditure made in heating the 
dental building, and no doubt there are many heat 
units wasted. Why not utilize this wasted ener- 
gy by giving the laboratories and infirmary hot 
water? Is there a necessity for hot water? In- 
dications would support the affirmative. 

If one has been working in the laboratories, it 
follows that the hands are in anything but a con- 
dition to operate in the mouth, and very often a 
call comes from the infiritiar)'. It is almost im- 
possible to remove the grime from one's hands 
with water. The idea is not to establish a cos- 
metic barber shop, with a manicure girl steam- 
ing the "paws" of the students, but to secure a 
condition where the simple principles o'f clean- 
liness and asepsis may be followed. Cold water" 
is not fatal to germ life any more than would 
warm water be should it be employed to cleanse, 
but the latter will surely destroy the roosting- 
place of his satanic majesty, bacteria. 

Another object in suggesting hot water is self- 
protection and a catering to one's self-respect. 
After sojourning for an afternoon in the germ 
traps of some of the infirmary patients, how 
many of us would not oflfer up a prayer of 
thanksgiving if we were offered the advantage 
of a suitable and inviting place where we might 
thoroughly disinfect and prepare ourselves for- 
an evening void of constant thought and fear of 
vermin on our hands. , 

And that poor, abused old sterilizer ! The word 
sterilizer, what does it mean to us? One steril- 
izer for the accommodation of almost seventy- 
five men ! This does not speak weH" for an insti- 
tution that is making an effort to teach clean- 
liness and general hygienic methods. It not only 
causes the student to lack respect for proper 
condition of instruments and hands in .opeKatihg, 



192 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



but is also a poor way of educating the very peo- 
ple we wish to impress with the idea of hygiene 
of the oral cavity. 

Therefore, for the good of the students, the 
poor patients, those of our friends who place 
themselves in our hands, and the University in 
general, let us pray that these conditions will 
■soon be remedied. — Observer. 



NEED FOR A FRESHMAN ADVISORY 
BOARD. 

To the newcomer the University of Maryland 
; appears to be little more than a most inhos- 
pitable group of buildings. "Way back in the 
entering student's high school days he cherished 
the vision of being met at the college doors by 
men who have already had the benefit of train- 
ing and culture ; men who are in his trusting mind 
considered of a type meriting respect, admira- 
tion and slavish worship. He had some hazy 
idea that these very men would hold out welcom- 
iing hands and give them a good start ; impart a 
little friendly advice and set him on his feet. 
.'. We know how sad is the disillusionment, how 
demoralizing the disappointment ! Where is the 
welcome to the freshman? Where is the good- 
fellowship in these men whom he had worshiped 
from afar? What response to his heart's long- 
ing, his optimistic ideals? 

Mr. Freshman, entering the territory of the 
Uriiversity, , looks about him expectantly for the 
hearty, "Welcome, old chap ; how are you ? Is 
anything troubling you ? Is your schedule caus- 
ing you any concern? Have you gotten your 



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room? Come and meet the boys!" But instead 

of this hearty greeting there is . Hadn't 

we better drop the curtain on the scene of every 
man going his own way and hustling after his 
education as if it were one grand selfish dash? 
Hadn't we better ring the curtain on that broken- 
hearted little man with his ideals shaken on the 
very first day, and who seems to hear in the 
dreary rattling of the Lombard-street surface cars 
an indication of a mechanical arid uninspiring 
future at the University? 

Aside from this sentimental (if you will) side 
of the question, there is a practical issue. The 
entering man may have some real practical diffi- 
culties to solve. If he is from another town, he 
doesn't know the lay of the land and has numer- 
ous other little troubles that can be straightened 
out by men who "know the ropes." 

We need what every other university of any 
importance has had for the last ten or twelve 
years, that is, a committee composed of two mem- 
bers of each class to form a Freshman Advisory 
Board that will get in its work during the open- 
ing days of each year. The Faculty should 
appropriate the sum necessary to carry on the 
woik, as it is as much their duty to finance the 
plan as it is the student's duty to carry it out. 
The cost would be trivial, perhaps not more than 
$25 each year for all expenses. 

The inauguration of this system, coupled with 
a sound Honor System, will go a long way toward 
making the University of Marjdand what it 
ought to and can be. 

The Gazette would urge class presidents (ex- 
cluding, for obvious reasons, the Senior Class 
presidents) to bring this matter before their 
classes and appoint a committee to look into this 
matter. Contributed. 



Although Holmes, '16, was invited to join "The 
Young Men's Democratic Club," he hasn't been 
enrolled yet. We wonder why. 



When are the presidential aspirants of the 1916 
class of the Law Department going to hold an- 
other political social? 



Woman (in car, sitting next to a man who 
is smoking a cigarette) — Sir, if you were my 
husband, I would give you poison ! 

He — Madam, if you were my wife, I'd take 
it myself. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



193 



HENRY D. HARLAN LAW SOCIETY 
NOTES. 



FRATERNITY NOTES. 



At the regular meeting of the Henry D. Har- 
lan Law Society the following resolution was 
introduced by D. J. Armstrong and carried : 

"Be It Resolved, That the conduct of certain 
members of the intermediate class, in creating 
unseemly noises during the session of Judge 
Want's court, is highly objectionable to the other 
members and unfair to Judge Want ; and be it 
further 

"Resolved, That each member of the Henry D. 
Harlan Law Society do all in his power to keep 
order and to use his influence to have due respect 
shown Judge Want and those who have spent 
their time in preparing their cases ; and be it 
further 

"Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be 
posted and a copy thereof be sent to Judge 
Want." 



The meeting of April 2.3 was given over to the 
discussion of the mayoralty contest. Holmes sup- 
ported Heintzeman; Farley, Preston, and Old- 
hauser, Saunders, the Socialist candidate. A 
straw ballot was taken, giving Preston 18, 
Heintzeman 17, and Saunders 2. 
o 

CLUB NOTES. 



A Young Men's Democratic Club has been 
formed with a nucleus of University students. 
There has been enrolled already 720 members. 

The club is incorporated, and among those 
connected with the University of Maryland on 
the board of governors are Benjamin R. Powell, 
Edwin T. Dickerson, Howard Bryant, G. Ridgley 
Sappington, James Bruce, Joshua S. Hall, Allen 
Bryant, John E Magers and Hart well M. Krug. 

The club has leased spacious quarters at the 
corner of Calvert and Monument streets, and 
have three fully equipped cardrooms, gymnasium 
with shower baths, and two poolrooms. 

On April 36 James H. Preston and leading 
Democrats of the city will address the club. 



Mistress — Was that Johnny I heard crying 
just now? 

Maid — Yes, ma'am, but he ain't hurt. He fell 
agin' the soft pedal — Texas Coyote. 



Forty members of the Phi Chapter of the Psi 
Omega Fraternity, Dental Department of the 
University of Maryland, held their annual din- 
ner Thursday evening, April 8, at the Hotel 
Joyce. B. B. Smith, grand master of the chap- 
ter, was the toastmaster. There were no set 
toasts, but informal speeches were made by Drs. 
C. V. Matthews, J. Ben Robinson, Eldridge Bas- 
kin, F. P. Haynes and A. D. S. Harrower. The 
committee in charge of the dinner was composed 
of H. E. Waterman, J. R. Thompson and John J. 
Purcell, Jr. Each member attended the dinner 
received a gold-handled pocket knife with his 
named engraved upon it as a souvenir. 



ATHLETICS. 



Thanks to the business-like efforts of Manager 
Frank Umstot and the hearty co-operation of 
Captain Bloede, of the University Tennis Team, 
Old Maryland is again making its appearance on 
the athletic map. About thirty aspirants an- 
swered Manager Umstot's call for candidates, 
and. following his election, Captain Bloede, an 
old Lehigh star, with unerring instinct of a big 
league scout, has uncovered several real "finds," 



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evening of surpassing enjoyment. 

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The Olympia serves nothing but clean, good food. 



194 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



and, after the manner of court work, is develop- 
ing a promising string of recruits. 

Although this is the first year that the Uni- 
versity has been represented by a tennis team, 
Manager Umstot has arranged the following ex- 
cellent schedule, for which" he deserves almost as 
much credit as for forseeing the possibility of a 
team, taking the initiative toward its organiza- 
tion and formation : 

AprilSl— Gilman Country School, at Roland 
Park.^ 

April 14 — Washington College, at Chester- 
tcwn.' - • - - 

April 28 — Mt. Washington Club, at Mt. Wash- 
ington. 

April 30 — Maryland Agricultural College, at 
College Park. 

May 1 — St. John's College, at Annapolis. 

May 8 — Delaware College, at home. 

May 15 — Oilman Country School Faculty, at 
Roland Park. 

May 29 — Western Maryland College, at West- 
minster. * • • 

June 5 — Catholic University, at home. 

June 12 — Potomac Club, at Cumberland. 
■ On April ITth the University, represented by 
Captain Bloede, Brusei McClure and Schmeid, 
played a practice ganie with Oilman Country 
School at Roland Park and came out victorious, 
four matches out of six. In this game one or two 
of the players showed lack of practice, but Cap- 
tain Bloede is predicting a clean sweep in the 
game with this team on the 22d. 
,' The team for'^this game and the game with 
Washington College at Chestertown on the 24th 
was picked from the following squad : Victor 
Bloede, a veteran player of Lehigh ; Turnbull, of 
Maryland Athletic Club ; Bruce, recently of the 
Princeton team ; McCIure, of Washington and 
Lee ; Schmeid, of West Forest Park Country 
Club ; Cray, of Maryland Agricultural College : 
Manager Umstot, of Potomac Club of Cumber- 
land ; Le Roy, of Yale, and Nelson, of Maryland 
Swimming Club. Manager Umstot and Captain 
Bloede are very anxious to have this squad at 
least doubled. Let's get together. „ 



V'' 



THXNIS TEAM VICTORIOUS. 

The University of Maryland Tennis Team de- 

■ feated the Oilman Country School team on Sat- 

I'.iday, April 17th'.' The University of Maryland 

racqueters showed fine form, capturing five of 

the si'X matches. Summarv as follows : 



SINGLES. 

Bloede, University of Maryland, beat Bartlett, 
Oilman, 6 — 3 and 6—2. 

Bruce, L^niversity of Maryland, beat Mitchell, 
Oilman, 8 — (i and 67^3. ' : 

Schmeid, University of Maryland, beat Scott, 
Oilman, 8—6 and 6—4. 

Dicke\-, Oilman, beat McClure, University of 
Maryland, 0—6, 6—2 and 3—0. ■ ; 

DOUBLES. 

t . , , . ; ' 

Bloede and Bruce, University of Maryland, 
beat Bartlett and Mitchell, Oilman, 5—7, 7—5 
and 6 — 2. Schmeid and McClure, LTniversity of 
Maryland, beat Dickey and Scott, Oilman, 7 — 5 
and 6—4. 

Some very promising material has reported for 
tlie team, and prospects are bright for a very suc- 
cessful season. Manager Frank J. Umstot has 
arranged a fine schedule, and several matches are 
l^ending. The dates are: 

April 24 — Washington College, at Chestertown. 

April 30 — jMaryland Agricultural College, at 
College Park. 

May 1 — St. John's College, at Annapolis. 

May 8 — Delaware College, at home. 

May 15 — Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, 
at home. 

May 22 — Oilman Country School Faculty, at 
Roland Park. 

June 5 — Catholic LTniversity, at home. 


BASEBALL. 



On Wednesday, March 17, the University of 
Maryland baseball team opened the season with 
Mt. St. Joseph's College on the latter's grounds at 
Irvington. The final score was 9 to in Mt. St. 
Joseph's favor. The real spirit of the contest 
cannot be judged from the score, for, notwith- 
standing the extreme coldness of the day and 
the handicap of not having convenient grounds 
on which to work-out and get in shape, the Uni- 
versity boys put up a good fight. Danforth, 
Senior Dental, worked for five innings, and was 
succeeded by Musgrove, Pharmacy, who pitched 
the remainder. Meadows represented the Jo- 
sephites, and eased down the \'arsity boys with- 
out a bungle. Features of the game were the 
pitching of Danforth and Meadows, each strik- 
ing out eleven men in the five innings : Score : 



THE UNIVERSITY. GAZETTE. 



195 



M.T. ST. JOSEPH. 

AB. E. H. O. A. B. 



CahUl, cf.. 4 
Nolan, 3b . „ 2 
Malone, 2b. 2 
Morgan, c. 4 
Wam'eft If 3 





2 










1 21 



1. 



MIskell,'- ss. 3 0-0 



Cam'ar, rf. 
Galli'n, lb. 



Meado's, p. 3 





1 

1 
1 



Totals... 25 9 3 27 4 2 



u. 


OF 


MD. 








■AB. 


R. 


H. 


0. 


A. 


B. 


Mil'son, ss 


4 








1 








John'n, 3b.. 


3 














1 


Steele, rf . . 


4 








1 





() 


iMul'ay, c. 


4 


I) 





irt 


1 


») 


Mit'eli, lb. 


8 








3 





2 


Bour'as. 2b 


3 








•> 


3 


U 


Mus'ave, If. 


3 








1 








CobeU, ef.. 


3 


u 





1 





1 


Danfth, p. 


•} 

















Roy, If 


1 














u 


Moran, lb.. 








u 


u 





u 



Totals... 30 24 4 4 



SCORE BY IXNINGS, 

Mount St. Joseph's 

Mai-yland University 



00011034 X— 9 
000000-00 0— 



Two-base bits — Wamsley, Moran. Home runs — Camillar. 
Sacrifice fly— Malone. Bases stolen— By Wamsley (2), Mor- 
gan, Camiliar. First base on balls — By Daufortb, Meadows 
(2), MusgraTe (6). Batters hit— by Danforth (Nolan). Str'uck 
out — By Meadows, 21; by Danforth. 11; by Musgrave, 3. 
I'ussed balls — Steele (2). Vv'ild pitch — Musgrave. Left on 
bases — Maryland University, 3; Mount St. Joseph, 3. Time 
of game — 3.30. Umpire — Kautlman. 



-O- 



MEDICAL.— GRADUATE. 

.■ ;^i.' .: ■ 



Prof. Thomas A. Ashby left recently for South 
Carolina. He expects to combine business and 
pleasure on his trip. 



Drs. James B. Parrynipre, Jacksonville, Fla., 
and.Wilmer M. Priest, of New Ygrk, both of the 
class of 1909, have been to visit old scenes at 
the University Hospital lately. While North, 
Dr. Parramore "took in" New York. Dr. Priest 
has been in New York for some time, having 
been a resident in one of the orthopedic hospitals 
there. i 



Other recent visitors to the Hospital were Drs. 
William Michel, of Frostburg, Md., and John D. 
Darby, of Oakley, Md., both of the class of 1912. 



Dr. James M. Craignill, class of 1882, surgeon- 
in-chief of the Baltimore City Police Department, 
while on a sea trip lately was one of the first to 
see the German cruiser Kronprintz interned for 
repairs. 



Dr. Elmer H. Adkins, class of 190.5, of Roan- 
oke Rapids, N. C, is at present visiting the Uni- 
versity. I 
o 

Minute in Regard to the Death of Dr. Sam- 
uel Claggett Chew, Adopted by the Medi- 
cal AND Chirurgical Faculty OF Maryl.xnd. 

The members of the Medical and Chirurgical 
Faculty of Maryland, upon receiving the sad 
news of the death of Dr. Samuel Claggett Chew, 
adopted the following, and directed that it be 



pkced on record and a copy, sent to the family 
of the deceased : ' - 

'Tt is with feelings of profound sorrow and 
deep regret that we, the members of the Medical 
Faculty, are called upon to record the death of 
Dr. Samuel' Claggett 'Chew. '"■'*' 

"He was an active and influential member of 
this body for many years, twice elected vice-presi- 
dent (1873-1871, 1877-1878) and twice' its presi- 
dent (1879-1880, 1898-1899). He served" this 
Faculty with zeal and energy, giving to its affairs 
the best of his care and attentidn in many of its 
darkest hours, in those days, when the Faculty 
was struggling under financial and other burdens, 
his good judgment and his calm and broad- 
minded grasp of the situations were potent fac- 
tors in keeping the organization alive, and the 
Faculty is what it is today in no small measure 
because he lived and labored for its advancement. 

"Fle was a man of strong convictions and de- 
termination of character, and, while he was able 
to deeply impress and influence his fellows, so 
great was his charm of manner and sincerity of 
purpose that he commanded the love, honor and 
respect of his fellow-members, which they 
e\inced by bestowing upon him an honor accord- 
ed to none other, in that he was elected president 
for two terms, the second being the centennial 
year. 

"He had the highest ideals concerning his pro- 
fession and nothing ever induced him to depart 
from them. He was always striving, to develop 
the best that was in him, and, while tolerant of 
the weaknesses and frailties of others, endeavored 
to turn them from groveling and sordid ways. 

"Kind and sympathetic though he was, he never 
allowed these qualities to overmaster the right ; 
his was a life in which the guiding star was truth, 
and in all his actions and dealings with his pro- 
fessional associates, as well as all others, he did 
right for its own sake; nothing, neither money, 
power, influence nor anything that men hold most 
dear, could tempt him to swerve from what he 
believed to be right. 



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196 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



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"He kept himself under control and was not 
swayed by passion nor prejudice. He took a 
calrh, dispassioned view of life, and, therefore, 
was a good counselor. In the counsels of the 
Faculty he rendered valuable services, and was 
a power for good to the young men who joined 
that body, because they always found in him a 
safe guide to the best road to professional suc- 
cess. 

"He was an ardent upholder of the tenets of 
hi.'i profession, and he taught them at all times by 
precept and example, and the acts of his life were 
characterized by the highest ethical culture. Pro- 
fessional ethics even to the smallest details were 
part and parcel of his life, and all who were 
brought into contact with him or called him in 
consultation were treated to the best a Christian 
gentleman could give. 

"Thus it will be seen, and much more might be 
said, that this Faculty has lost a valuable and 
influential power for good in the removal by 
death of Dr. Samuel Claggett Chew, and while 
we mourn his loss greatly, our sympathies go out 
to his widow and family and the many friends 
lie has left behind, to each and all of whom we 
would extend our sympathy in the great sorrow 
which has come upon them. 

"Joseph T. Smith, 
"George L. Wilkins, 
"Albert Shelley, 
"For the Committee. 

"Baltimore, Md., March 27, 1915." 



At a meeting of the Faculty of Physic of the 
University of Maryland, the following minutes 
was adopted : 

"We, the members of the Faculty of Physic of 
the University of Maryland, desire to express 
our deep sorrow at the death of our beloved col- 
league and iViend, Professor Samuel Claggett 
Chew, who for a period of 50 years was inti- 
mately connected with the life of the University. 

"While Dr. Chew's peculiar place in the Uni- 
versity of Maryland, and in the profession of this 
State, can probably never be filled, it is a great 



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solace for the Faculty to have received so endur- 
ing a heritage from his hands. 

"The piety and dignity of his life and the 
serenity of his death have quickened our moral 
sense, the breadth and accuracy of his learning 
have stimulated our minds, and our hearts shall 
ever cherish the memory of the kindliness and 
nobility of his character." 

It was directed that this minute be entered 
upon the records of the Faculty and that a copy 
of it be sent to Professor Chew's family. 

R. DoRSEY CoALE, Dean. 

o^ 

LAW— SENIOR. 



"Pop" Goff has returned to Baltimore and is 
busy shaking hands with his old friends in the 
Law School. All the boys are glad to have him 
back again. His return brings back fond recol- 
lections of the day he applied the firebrand to 
Abe Rosenthal's alfalfa and used Abe and Harry 
Roypen as his victims in his famous head-bump- 
ing act. "Pop" is raising a family, and claims 
to be an authority on Domestic Relations. His 
son, "Little Pop," who has the proud distinction 
of being the mascot of our class, has the old 
man worried. He is already showing strong- 
arm symptoms, and it is feared by his fond par- 
ents that he will follow a pugilistic career instead 
of that of law. 



Sobeloff, the man who maintains the dignity 
cf the courts, condescended to come down and 
hear a few lectures this month. 



The Honor Case, which is awarded annually 
to the four seniors who have conducted their 
c.Tses in the best manner during the year, was 
awarded to Messrs. Harper, Zieget, Silverwood 
and Sobeloff. The case will be tried the early 
part of May. 



Some time ago, while Boss Kanode was gen- 
tly slumbering through Mr. Coleman's lecture, 
three of his little college friends unhaltered his 
"goose" and took a little ride. When they re- 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



197 



turned they backed the '-goose" into a wagon 
and broke the tail light' and bent the rear fender. 
A kind friend informed the Boss when the lec- 
ture was over and some one had awakened him 
to the fact that the boys had crippled his machine. 
Seeing no wild stampede on the part of the Auto 
Jjrcks to make due compensation, the Boss went 
to the police station and put the gumshoe men 
on their trail. Not being in any great need of 
exercise, and as the sleuths caused the boys to 
do much dodging, side-stepping, running, etc., 
they finally came to the Boss with coin of the 
realm and asked that the dogs be taken off their 
trail. They haven't crowded the Boss much, and 
the Boss says the "goose" hasn't been crowded 
either since that fatal day. 

■ — 

LAW— INTERMEDIATE. 



In memory of William Randolph Woodward, 
whose untimely death on April 5 was like "A 
rose that was crushed in the bud" or "A promise 
that was never fulfilled," we respectfully publish 
the following resolutions and tributes : 

"The members of the Henry D. Harlan Law 
Society of the University of Maryland desire to 
express their profound sorrow upon the death 
of their beloved fellow-member and friend, Wil- 
liam Randolph Woodward. 

"We shall miss this sincere, courteous gentle- 
man, loyal and loving man and friend, and we 
mourn his loss in tender sympathy with his fam- 
ily and friends. „„ t o 
-' Frank J. Sayi^er, 

"W. Lester Baldwin, 

"Committee." 



"Whereas, God in His Almighty Wisdom has 
taken from us our dear friend and beloved class- 
mate, William Randolph Woodward, be it 

"Resolved, That we, the members of the Class 
ot 1916 of the Law Department of the Univer- 
sity of Maryland, do sincerely feel and mourn 
his loss, and wish to express our sympathy for 
his family in this their great sorrow ; and, be it 
further 

"Resolved, That these resolutions be signed by 
the officers of our class and published in the LTni- 
versity of Maryland Gazette, and a copy of 
them be sent to his family. 

■ "Geo. Tyler Smith, 

"President. 

"W. Lester Baldwin, Secretary." 



A Last Sad Tribute "to William Randolph 
Woodward — A Gem" Dropped in Memory's 
Casket by a Fellow Collegian. 

With the passing of William Randolph Wood- 
ward we have suffered an irreparable loss. He 
was a man in every sense of the word ; a man of 
strong character, of high morals, of great deter- 
mination and steadfastness of purpose. He was 
not a man to undertake a thing and then lay 
it aside unfinished, admitting weakness and de- 
feat. He was a man who could be depended 
upon to do his best at all times and never shirk 
hi? duty. 

He was a leader among his colleagues, and 
won his way to the hearts of his many friends 
by frank, open and sincere manner, and his 
friends and acquaintances were drawn to him 
by his great personal magnetism and the mag- 
nanimity of his nature. During his life at St. 
John's College he was a leader in all college 
activities up to the time of his graduation. Upon 
entering the L^niversity of Maryland he imme- 
diately forged to the front and won an enviable 
record in the two years which he spent in the 
study of law. He was an earnest worker in all 
his undertakings. 

As a churchman he was also a leader, being a 
member of the Brotherhood of St. Andrew, and 
having held for a number of years the responsible 
position of secretary of St. Anne's Sunday School. 
He was a. devoted and sincere Christian and 
abhored hypocrisy and deceit, and always stood 
for what he believed to be right, even in the face 
of the strongest opposition. He was a loving 
son and brother and a true friend. His past 
was good, brave and noble, and his future held 
golden prospects. May this beautiful life be an 
example to us all. R. S. G. W. 



A. H. PETTING 

Manufacturer of 

GREEK LETTER FRATERNITY JEWELRY 

213 N. Liberty St., = Baltimore, Md. 
Factory: 212 Little Sharp St. 



Mcmonuidum package sent to any fraternity member through the 
Mcretary o( tkc chapter. Special designi and estimates furnished on 
medals, rlni*«ind pins for athletic meets, etc. 



198 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



!> 



quA 




ieIDiehl 

Clothes 

^Ft^itel . l , I . I . I . I J. I , l : I J. I . I . I . I JJ. II . III . I 

built at 605 W. Baltimore St., 
just around the corner from the 
University, are kept pressed with- 
out cost. ": 

Suits $15 to $40 



William R. Woodward — A Tribute and Ap- 
preciation. 

Annapolis has had occasion in the past few 
years to mourn the loss of many of its older citi- 
zens, whose years were well rounded with useful- 
ness. It may well pause now to estimate its loss 
of a very young man, William Randolph Wood- 
ward, for not only is a worthy citizen departed, 
but his early summons has deprived us of the full 
measure of good and service that' in him lay. In 
the one case we have plucked the fruit, and 
grieve that the venerable tree is cut down ; in the 
other we have lost both the tree and the fruit. 

I had the fortune to be a friend of Mr. Wood- 
ward from boyhood — we were together through 
our knickerbocker days at the Annapolis Public 
School, we were four years together at St. John's 
College, and we had begun our preparation to 
eiiter the same profession, the law. There is no 
young man for whom I have felt a greater ad- 
miration, because of his courage, rugged sincer- 
ity, practical common sense and clean temperate 
life — a rich and rare assortment of manly quali- 
ties. At college he did not bother himself too 
much with his books, but I know he would have 
been successful at law, for the characteristics I 
have mentioned, added to his forceful and 
effective manner of speaking, his sense of justice 
and his good level head, would have made him 
a truly powerful advocate. 

No doubt, the saddest words of tongue or pen 
are 'Tt- might have been," but there are times 
when sadness gives a solemn pleasure, and I shall 
love to picture to myself the life of service and 
honor which would have been the lot of this true 
young gentleman had he been spared to walk 
among us. 

One of His Host of, pRispfps. 



HEPBRON & HAYDON 

We Sell Every Law Book and Syllabus Use 
at the U. of M. 



St. Paul 8794 



1243-53 CALVERT BLDG 



LAW— JUNIOR. 



All Junior Class examinations will be held in 
th.e Law Building in May. 



How do you like your class pictures? 



What became of that "wet" banquet? 



Some of you Junior men of the tight-wad class 
had,, better slip us a case note for a year's sub- 
scription.. -Don't get the name "pikers" attached 
to your title. Statistics show that you, can never 
be e.xalted to a position on the Supreme Bench^ 
without having had the benefit of The Gazette's 
dope in your college days. If certain of our par- 
licularly clam-like classmates don't dish out with 
a 'crisp dollar bill for the aforementioned journal, 
tlicre'll be that many more "stififs" for our busy 
Medics to carve. (Last statement held not to 
be duress— 124 Md., 413.) 



President Hans Froelicher, Jr., says that he is 
strictly neutral. He doesn't care whom Germany 
annihilates first! , 



Our old friend Whiting pretty nearly got him- 
self into a mess several weeks ago when he 
started explaining something about a "craps" 
game to Professor O'Dunne. All Juniors are • 
urged to be careful of what they say in the Crim- 
inal Law lectures. Mr. O'Dunne, we understand, 
was once connected with the State's Attorney's 
office ; the Statute of Limitations effects only a 
\ery few criminal cases, and the Police Depart- 
I'lent jitney is not too busy to call. '• 



There is no jurisdictional exemption' from 
p'-osecution and punishment for crimes com- 
iritted on the steps of the Law Building. Better 
do your "crap-shooting" at home! (Especially 
directed to the attention of three Juniors en- 
gaged in a spirited contest on April 10, 1915, 
at 4.45 P. M.) 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



199 



8, W Saratoga St 




!Boltimore, 

^XCaryland. 



Reynolds is still the recipient of numerous for- 
lorn bouquets during arid discourses in the dome. 
Slam, bo3's, slam ! 



The position of the new clock in our spacious 
dome does not meet with the approval of the 
class experts on chronometers. The proper 
authorities are requested to transfer it to a more 
suitable position, viz., above the entrance, where 
the lecturers come in to worry us with their 
muttefinsTS. 



A little more order at class meetings is recom- 
mended. 

o 

DENTAL— J LTNIOR.. 



We are now about to enter upon our vacation, 
which will probably be our last from school. 
When we return in the fall we will be hailed as^ 
seniors. Practically all will return to finish ; 
some may have other intentiorjs. Instead of 
waiting until the new year to make good resolu- 
tions, let's make them now. We started out 
together and we can finish together. Let every 
man resolve to get bv in 191G and set a record 
by having no one fail. Don't wait until March, 
191G, to act on this resolution; begin nozv: 



Mr. Harper, who has been confined to his 
room for some time with la grippe, is with us 
as:ain. 



Robert^ F. Dar'win has been chosen business 
manager of Terra Mariae for 1916. 



r -— — — - 



LUTHER B. BENTON 
Dental Depot 



students' Outfits 
a Specialty 



305 North Howard St. 



Intercollegiate Bureau of Academic Costume, Aibany.N.v. 
COTRELL & 



LEONARD 

Official Mailers of 

Caps and 

Gowns 




Correct Hoods 
for All Degrees. 

Rich Qowns for "' 
Pulpit and Bench. 

Bulletin, Sample's 
etc. on request 



Funderburk demands better transportation 
facilities. ITe will probably own a taxi or "jit- 
ney" when he returns in the fall. 



"Fresh" Smith and his congenial room-mate, 
"Flossie" Adair, are still scrapping. Why don't 
you turn the kid over to "Slats" Funderburk, 
Jim? 



Bean says because he has a friend at Peabody 
and spends much of his time in her company is 
no reason why we should accuse him of being a 
Peabody matriculate. 



Harry Burns, of this class, was recently called 
home on account of death in his family. The 
class extends sympathy. 



We understand that R. P. May is taking a 
correspondence course in "How a professional 
man should walk, eat and sleep." 



The Junior Class as a whole wish to thank 
Dr. J. Ben Robinson for his personal interest in 
their operative work in the infirmary the past 
year. The work done is practically up to senior 
requirements. 



May all members of the Senior Class, receive 
their "sheepskins" and get by the State Board at 
first shot. 



Trusting my friends receive my references to 
them in spirit of jest, which has prompted the 
writing, I will lay aside my pen to the opening 
of the 1916 session. 



Mary had a little calf, 

But it was white as snow; 
She wore her skirt slashed up the side, 
■ And that is how I know. 



.<»_..-• —-^•.^■^■.-^■i 



You can't throw mud without getting your 
hands dirty. 



200 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



ACADEMIC— GRADUATE. 



St. John's College has decided not to become 
affiliated with the State University, and will have 
no representatives on the Board of Regents, ac- 
cording to the action of the Board of Governors 
and Visitors recently taken. The State Univer- 
sity was created by an act of the last Legislature, 
introduced by Senator William IMilnes Maloy, 
and is intended to bring about more co-operation 
'and more uniform standards among the State- 
aided colleges of the State. 



St. John's is the only college mentioned in the 
act which has refused to affiliate. Dr. Thomas 
Fell, president of the college, will remain as pro- 
vost of the University of Maryland under certain 
restrictions. 



On Wednesday evening, April 14, Professor 
Cobb gave a victrola concert in the Y. \l. C. A. 
room. The Globe Furniture Company kindly 
loaned a set of records for the occasion, so that 
the music was new, and very much enjoyed by 
all present. 



R. V. Hoffman, '13, and E. A. Jones, ex-'13, 
were recent visitors at the College. 

"Robbie" Welch and "Phil" Clayton were re- 
cent visitors at the College. J. P. Jacobs, '13, 
and H. L,. Reeder, '14, also paid us a visit. 



ACADEMIC— UNDER-GRADUATE. 



In past years it has been customary for the 
battalion to spend the week before commence- 
ment in camp. Recently the college purchased 
3 full field equipment consisting of shelter tents, 
canteens, etc., so that the battalion is ready for a 
practice march. Lieutenant McNeil is making 
an effort to have the juniors and seniors camp at 
some nearby army post. There will be one or 
more practice marches for the remainder of the 
student body. We should look forward to these 
erxampments with a great deal of interest. There 
will be many valuable lessons learned, besides 
the fun we are sure to experience on expeditions 
of this kind. 



At a recent meeting of the Sophomore Class 
the following editors were elected for the 1916 
Rat Tat: 

Editor-in-Chief — Cox. 



Assistant Editor-in-Chief — Maddox, R. H. 
Business Managers — Spicknall, Noble, J. W., 
Jarman. 

Art Editor— Noble, A. H. 
Alumni Editors — Wachter, Woodward. 
Athletic Editors — Weaver, Horine. 
Campus Editors — Freeny, Crum. 
Calendar Editors — Harrison, Storm. 
Humorous Editors — Curfman, Dunphy, Val- 
des. 

Literary Editors — Price, Stanford, Von 
Schwerdtner. 

Social Editors — Davis, Fell. 

Town Editor— Miller, R. W. 

Photographers — Talton, Somerville. 



The first formal hop after Lent was given by 
the Cotillion Club in the College Gymnasium on 
the night of Friday, April 16. 

Mrs. C. S. McNeil and Cadet H. B. Matthews 
received, assisted bv Dr. and Mrs. Schumacher. 



In the recent appointments to the Harz'ard 
1 aw Rez'iew, Calvert Magruder, '13, was chosen 
note editor. The Harvard Laiv Reviezu is one of 
the oldest student legal publications. The board 
is elected from among the highest standing men 
in the second and third year classes. Appoint- 
ment to the board is one of the highest tributes 
to a student's ability. 



A very interesting lecture was delivered before 
the students and friends of the College on Mon- 
day evening, March 22, by Dr. Ira Remsen, a 
former president of Johns Hopkins University. 
His subject was "A Trip to New Zealand," and 



LEFRANC & AULT 

ARE SHOWING 

NEW NECKWEAR 

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421 N. Howard St , at Franklin 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



301 



Hart Schaffner & Marx, 
Kuppenheimer, 
"Society Brand" 



The c/othes that college men 
like a lot 



Balllmore Street Al Charles 



he gave a very instructive and amusing descrip- 
tion of his voyage of 6,000 miles across the Pa- 
cific to this island. 



Word has been received from the War Depart- 
ment that the Government inspection this year 
will be on April ,28. The inspecting officer will 
be Captain Schindel, U. S. A., who has been the 
inspector for the last two years. 



The battalion of cadets at St. John's is the 
happy possessor of a new flag. The flag is of 
orange and black, the college colors, with the 
inscription of the Corps of Cadets, St. John's 
College, upon it. 



The first of a series of three competitive drills 
between Companies A and B for the awarding 
of the colors was held on the afternoon of Mon- 
day, March 29. The drill resulted in a tie. 
o 

NURSING. 



Miss Lucy Hill, class of 1914:, who was oper- 
ated on a few days ago, is recovering rapidly. 
The operation was very successful. 



The annual meeting of the Nurses' Alumnae 
Association of the University of Maryland was 
held at the University Hospital on April .5. Miss 



C. A. Cox, class of 1908, was appointed delegate 
to the convention of the American Nurses' Asso- 
ciation, to be held in San Francisco, Cal., from 
the 20th to the 36th of June. 

The following officers were elected for the 
ensuing year : 

President— Miss M. E. Rolph, class of 1895. 

First Vice-President — Miss Mary Gavin, class 
of 1908. 

Second Vice-President — Mrs. Page Edmunds, 
class of 1905. 

Secretary — Mrs. Frank S. Lynn, class of 1908. 
Treasurer — Mrs. Nathan Winslow, class of 
1903. ■ 

Members of the Executive Committee — Misses 
Nancy MacNabb, class of 1907; C. A. Cox and 
S. A. Hostrawser, both of the class of 1908, and" 
M. E. SuUivan, class -of 1911. 



Miss Nettie Flanagan, formerly superintendent 
of nurses of the University Hospital Training 
School, who has been superintendent of the De 
Sota Sanatorium, Jacksonville, Fla., for the pa.st 
three years, has resigned her position and will 
take up public health nursing in Boston, Mass. 



Miss Bertie Sigmon, class of 1914, who was 
surgical nurse at the De Sota Sanatorium, Jack- 
sonville, Fla., has resigned her position and has 
been appointed superintendent of nurses of the 
Chester Hospital, Chester, S. C. 



Miss Lena Stouft'er, class of 1912, is doing sub- 
stitute nursing in the public health work, tuber- 
culosis division. 



. Miss Dorothy Weber, class of l3'14, who has 
been in St. Louis, Mo., for some weeks, has re- 
turned to Baltimore. She will locate at 1601 
Park avenue, and will engage in private nursing. 



WILLIAM J. MILLER 
Jewelry, Diamonds, Watches 

College Jewelry 
Class Pins and Rings, College Seals 
28 East Baltimore St. Baltimore. Md. 22 W. LCXingtOH St., = BaltimOrC, Md. 



R LLERBRQCK 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



QUIPS. 

A little boy asked his father, a confirmed dys- 
peptic : 

"Dad, did Moses suffer with indigestion?" 

"I am sure I don't know," snapped his father, 
whose temper was rather soured by his infirmity. 

"Well, I think he must have had it, for our 
teacher told us on Sunday that God gave him 
tzvo tablets!" 



The racqueters of the tennis team are wonder- 
ing why Manager Umstot is so insistent they 
practice every day when he seldom practices him- 
self. Fellows, he's getting more exercise on the 
court than he tells you about. The last few days 
I've seen him several times out on a private court 
at Roland Park. "Ummy," what's her name? 



DOES THIS REMIND YOU? 



I am longing for the country ; I am longing just 

to be 
Where I can let the whiskers grow upon the 

face o' me ; 
^^'here I can let my hair grow in a wild and 

woolly way. 
And where father does the farming and there 

ain't no board to pay. 

— Houston Post. 



•THE WAGES OF SIN IS DEATH.' 



There are in the United States eight factories 
devoted exclusively to the manufacture of teeth, 
and last year they sold 60,000,000 of these teeth 
and expect to sell. many more this year. It's a 
tribute to the neglect practiced by the American 
people, according to a statement prepared by 
the Miami Valley Dental Society, of which Dr. 
J M. Chase is president. — Facts. 



A PRAYER.— Backward, turn backward, oh 
Time in thy flight ; give us a girl whose skirts 
are not tight : give us a girl whose charms, many 
or few, are not exposed by too much peekaboo ; 
give us a girl, no matter what age, who won't use 
the street for a vaudeville stage ; give us a girl 
not too shapely in view ; dress her in skirts that 
the sun can't shine through. — Facts. 



$18 



We've an idea that 
most of you young men 
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They have the appearance 
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$18 

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Baltimore & Hanover Sts. 



PROFESSIONAL UNDERBIDDING. 



"Yes," said the specialist, as he stood at the 
bedside of the sick purchasing agent, "I can 
cure you." 

"What will it cost?" asked the sick man faintly. 

"Ninety-five dollars." , 

"You'll have to shade your price a little," re- 
plied the purchasing agent. "I have a better bid 
than that from the undertaker." — Oral Hygiene. 



SOME SLANG. 



A gentleman with a badly swollen cheek and 
wearing a rag tied under his chin replied when 
asked the cause of his trouble : "Whv have I 
got my dial in a sling? Listen, kid. I've got 
a date with a fang hustler. He says he has got 
to jerk two pearls out of my winning smile and 
then half-sole a biscuit a la Yukon." — Oral Hy- 
eiene. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



203 



CONTRAST. 



The fire-fly is a dandy, tho' he has but little mind, 
He goes through all creation with his headlight 

on behind; 
But the earth-worm is different — when he goes 

out for pelf 
He stretches to his limit, and then he humps 

himself ! — Selected. 



MARRIAGES. 



Dr. Edwin Baker Goodall, class of 1909, of 
Haverhill, Mass., to Miss Carrie Hollander, of 
Amesburg, Mass., at Amesburg, April 29, 1915. 



Lucas A. Cambo, D.D.S., class of 1911, to Miss 
Trina Vina, both of Cuba, in Cuba, recently. 

o — • 

DEATHS. 



Dr. Marshall Langton Price, class of 1903 ; in 
1910 secretary and in 1911 vice-chairman of the 
Section on Preventive Medicine andPublic Health 
of the American Medical Association ; a member 
of the American Public Health Association, 
medical officer of the Tuberculosis Commission 
of Maryland from 190.3 to 190.5, secretary of the 
Maryland State Board of Health from 1907 to 
1913, member of the Maryland-District of Co- 
lumbia Sewerage Commission in 1912, originator 
of the first law for the state control of tubercu- 
losis now in effect in many states of the Union 
and known as the "Maryland System," who 
moved from Baltimore in 1914 on account of ill 
health to Boise, Idaho ; died at sea on board of 
the American Line Steamer St. Paul, April 16, 
1915, presumably from tuberculosis, and was 
buried at sea the next day, age 36 years. 



Dr. Charles Ellis Ross, class of 1889 ; a Fel- 
low of the American Medical Association ; for 
fifteen years a member of the medical staff of the 
Morganton (N. C.) State Hospital and a mem- 
ber of the Board of Health of Burke County : 
died in Grace Hospital, Morganton, April 1, 1915, 
fro mneumonia, aged 52 years. 



Mary Virginia Dowdell, R. N., University 
Hospital Training School for Nurses, class of 
1901, of Baltimore, Md., died at the University 
Hospital, after a short illness following an opera- 
tion, March 22, 1915. 



WARNER 8c CO. 

222-224 WEST BALTIMORE ST. 



Lawrence J. McCormick, Jr., LL.B., class of 
1905, of 929 North Fulton avenue, died from 
pneumonia on March 25, 1915, aged 37 years. 
He was a member of the law firm of Wells & 
McCormick, Baltimore. 



William Randolph Woodward, St. John's Col- 
lege, class of 1914, and a member of the inter- 
mediate law class, University of Maryland, died 
at the Emergency Hospital, in Annapolis, from 
an operation for appendicitis and peritonitis, on 
April 5, 1915, aged 22 years. 



Dr. John H. Jenness, class of 1887, a Fellow 
of the American Medical Association, died at his 
home in Rising Sun, Md., March 29, 1915, from 
pneumonia, aged 52 years. 



Dr. Judson E. Hair, Jr., class of 1912, of 
Greenville, S. C, died at Mobile, Ala., while on 
his way home, March 26, 1915, aged 26 years. 



Dr. Samuel Claggett Chew, class of 1858 ; 
LL.D., University of Maryland, '07 ; professor 
of materia medica in his alma mater from 1864 
to 1866; professor of medical practice until 1907, 
and a year later made emeritus professor of 
medicine; dean of the University of Maryland 
from 1874 to 1879 and twice president of the 
Alumni Association; twice president and thrice 
vice-president' of the Medical and Chirurgical 
Faculty of Maryland ; consulting physician to 
Johns Hopkins Hospital ; president of the board 
of trustees of the Peabody Institute and member 
of the board of regents of the University of 
Maryland ; died at his home in Roland Park, 
Baltimore, after an illness of more than a year, 
March 22, 1915, aged 77 years. 



Dr. William B. Smith, class of 1899 ; a Fellow 
of the American Medical Association and a prac- 
titioner of Hampton, Va., who sailed for Bristol, 
England, February 25 as surgeon of the steamer 
Victoria; died in Bristol, March 10, 1915, aged 
41 years. 



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lu^ 



1 



THI PMIWIMSITY CAllTTI 




Polonius: And these few precepts in thy memory 

See thou character. Give thy thoughts no tongue, 

Nor any unproportion'd thought his act. 

Be thou familiar, but by no means vulgar. 

Those friends thou hast, and their adoption tried, 

Grapple them to thy soul with hoops of steel; 

But do not dull thy palm with entertainment 

01" each new-hatch'd, unfledged comrade. Beware 

Of entrance to a quarrel, but being in, 

Bear't that the opposed may beware of thee. 

Give every man thy ear, but few thy voice; 

Take each man's censure, but reserve thy judgment. 

Costly thy habit as thy purse can buy. 

But not expressed in fancy; rich, not gaudy. 

For the apparel oft' proclaims the man, 

And they in France of the best rank and station 

Are of a most select and generous chief in that. 

Neither a borrower nor a lender be; 

For loan oft loses both itself and friend. 

And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry. 

This above all: To thine ownself be true. 

And it must follow as the night the day, 

Thou can'st not then be false to any man. 

Farewell: my blessing season this in thee. 

—Hamlet. 




VOL. I. 



BALTIMORE, MD., JUNE, 1915 



No. 12 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



Vol. I. 



JUNE 1, 1915. 



No. 12. 



CONTENTS 

SLAMS AND SALUTES 211 

ATHLETICS 212 

PUCK ON CHRISTL\N SCIENCE 208 [ ITEMS 212 

QUIPS 321 

BIRTHS 222" 



A THESIS ON ORAL HYGIENE. H. E. 

Waterman 207 



HONOR SYSTEM ADOPTED BY JU- 
NIOR LAW CLASS. A. B. Makover. 209 



EDITORIALS 210 



MARRIAGES 232 



EDITORIALETS 211 ' DEATHS 322 



Footwear for the College Man at Moderate Price. 

N. HESS' SONS - - 8 E. Baltimore, St. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE, MD. 

HON. PHILLIPS LEE GOLDSBOROUGH, Governor of Maryland, Chancellor. 
THOMAS FELL, A. M., Ph. D., L L. D., D. C. L., Provost. 



ST. JOHN'S COLLEGE, Annapolis, Md. (.R^r^ND^Io^NCEs) 

Founded 1696. Classical and Scientific College Courses leading to d ;grees. Special advantages to stu- 
dents purposing to study the professions. Military Department under army officers. Also Preparatory 
School for boys fitting for St. John's or other colleges.. Term begins September 21. Address 

THOMAS FELL, Ph.D., LL.D., D.C.L., President. 



DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE. 

I'our vears' graded course. New Laboratory Build- 
ing. Clinical advantages unsurpassed. Teaching Staff 
of 66. loSth Annual Session will begin October i, 
ig]4. and continue 8 months 

R. DORSEY COALE, Ph.D., M.D., Dtan. 



DEPARTMENT OF DENTISTRY. 

33d Annual Session begins October i, 1914. and ! 
continues 7 months. 26 Instructors. New Building, 
'■'or catalogue containing course of study, etc., apply to 

TIMOTHY O. HEATWOLE. M.D., D.D.S., Dean, 

Baltimore. Md. 



DEPARTMENT OF LAW. 

59th Annual Session will begin Sept. 28, 1914. Faculty 
of 26. For catalogue containing full information ad- 
dress the Secretary, 301 St. Paul Street, Baltimore, 
Maryland. 

EDWIN T. DICKERSON, Secretary. 



DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACY. 

(Formerly Maryland College of Pharmacy). 72nd 
Annual Session begins September 25, 1914. it In- 
structors. New Laboratories. Address 

CHARLES CASPARI, JR., Phar.D., Dean, 

Baltim.3re, Md. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 

Published Monthly in the Interest of the University of Maryland. 
PRICE $1.00 PER YEAR. 



Oontributionj 



solixjited from Alumni of the 
University. 



Business Address, 60S Professional Buildine. 
Baltimore, Md. 



Vol. I. 



BALTIMORE, MD., JUNE 1, 1915. 



No. 12. 



A THESIS ON ORAL HYGIENE. 



By H. E. Waterman, Phar.D. 



IVhat Can I Do to Extend The Oral Hygiene 
Propaganda? 

To awaken to the realization that every indi- 
vidual has a mission in life, and with that mis- 
sion there is a certain obligation which we owe 
to society, it then becomes clearly our duty to use 
every reasonable effort to discharge this obliga- 
tion and give to our fellowman such aid as is 
within our power and which to him rightfully 
belongs. 

That our efforts may be productive of good 
and contribute somewhat toward the uplift of 
society, both physically and intellectually, it be- 
comes necessary for us to not alone use our every 
endeavor individually, but to co-operate with 
those institutions and other professions engaged 
in kindred work. 

Having during a period of over fifteen years 
as a pharmacist been in close contact with the 
public at large, and casting about for the cause 
of many of their ailments, it became very strongly 
impressed upon me that these were primarily due 
to an unhygienic condition of the oral cavity. 

The increased knowledge of the stibject, ac- 
quired during my college course, has only served 
to strengthen my earlier impression. 

It is undoubtedly a fact, that prevention of 
numerous diseases may be accomplished by proper 
oral hygiene, and strict observance should prove 
of more value than the prescribing of curative 
remedies and the preparation thereof. 

The first question then arises to confront us, 
namely: "Wherein lies the value of Oral Hy- 
giene?" 

In answer to this, we may use the old adage, 
"An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of 
cure." 

It has become very generally recognized that 
numerous diseases have their origin in some 
chronic local infection and it is necessary to ascer- 



tain the point of infection before making a proper 
diagnosis. 

It is claimed by specialists in work on the oral 
cavity, both physicians and dentists, that the 
mouth is the greatest portal of entry for "pyo- 
genic organisms." 

These organisms find opportunity for genera- 
tion in the lymphoid tissues, teeth and gums. 
These organisms will naturally in a short while 
be carried to remote parts, such as the intestines. 

Some of the disturbances which may have 
their origin in the oral cavity are neuralgia, antral, 
eye, ear and pulmonary diseases, gastro-intestinal 
disturbances, mal-nutrition, mal-assimilation and 
many others too numerous to mention here. 

With a sincere belief that lack of care of the 
mouth and teeth is in a large part due to lack 
of knowledge of the necessity for such care, I am 
compelled to stop and inquire, "What can I do to 
extend the Oral Hygiene propaganda?" 

It is certainly wise in our endeavor to extend 
this knowledge to couple wisdom and con- 
servatism with our enthusiasm lest we be looked 
upon as cranks and fanatics and cause the de- 
velopment of undue antagonism. 

We naturally turn to the public school as our 
greatest field for work. This is undoubtedly a 
fertile field but is one which must be carefully 
cultivated. 

^^'ith the thought in mind to begin as near the 
beginning as is possible, I would suggest that by 
watching the daily birth lists and sending the 
proper literature to the mother, she may be in- 
fluenced and taught these aids in the conservation 
of the little life she has so recently offered to the 
world. 

An occasional reminder to this same mother 
should serve to make our work the easier as the 
child grows older and enters school. 

In public school work it has been found advisa- 
ble and practical to institute regular inspection 
and drills in cleansing the teeth. Such drills will 
help form a good habit which will be retained 
throughout life. Such training must always be 
conducted with the co-operation of the teacher. 



208 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



This co-operation a^ a rule may be readily 
secured when she is brought to realize the im- 
portance to health and the increased mental 
activity of the child. 

Our largest field perhaps is the daily paper. 
Well written articles of the "follow up" variety 
may be used with excellent results. 

An observance of some of the patent medicine 
advertisements may teach us aids to our propa- 
ganda. They get results. Why can't we? 

If we as individuals are alive to the full duty 
which devolves upon up. we should certainly never 
show any hesitancy in advising our patients in 
regard to the necessity for proper care of the 
oral cavity. 

Those patients who come to us for treatment 
will, I believe, if properly informed, become in- 
terested in our work and lend their moral support. 

We must not expect to make much progress 
without meeting decided opposition, for no great 
work has ever been done without being made the 
subject for derision and controversy. 

We may find in our work in the schools of 
certain localities such conditions as to require an 
increased amount of financial assistance. It then 
becomes a necessity for us to seek the aid of those 
individuals having civic influence and authority. 

We must expect right here to meet strong and 
decided opposition, yet by patience and persever- 
ance our cause must grow. 

Taking the school on the one hand and the pub- 
lic on the other, we look upon fields for en- 
deavor which must bring forth much good fruit. 

We cannot conceive that any self respecting 
person would allow his body to go unclean for 
anv length of time, yet he may neglect bis teeth. 

No teacher would allow a child to be habitually 
unclean in body without some effort to emphasize 
the importance of cleanliness, yet she may not 
think of the danger within his mouth. 

The home, the teacher and the orist must all 
co-operate in teaching the child all those princi- 
ples to be observed. I would suggest that he 
be especially cautioned as to the danger of the 
public drinking cup and the eating of anything 
which may have been contaminated by contact 
with tbe mouth of another individual. 



the article should be in every doctor's reception 
room. It will give patients an added confidence 
in the physician, and tend a little toward exposing 
the absurdity of this growing fad. 

To use a quotation from Oliver Wendell 
Holmes in referring to Homeopathy, it "has 
proved lucrative, and so long as it continues to be 
so will surely exist, just as surely as astrology, 
palmistry, and other methods of getting a living 
out of the weakness and credulity of mankind 
and womanhood. Though it has no pretentions 
to be considered as belonging to the sciences, it 
may be looked upon by a scientific man as a 
curious object of study among the vagaries of 
the human mind." 

Following is the article in question: 
"The day that the average physician displays 
a name plate on his door announcing that he is 
ready for practice, it is safe to assume that an 
investment has been made in his education ap- 
proximately as follows : 

From four to seven years at a university, 

representing a minimum of $3,000.00 

Livingexpenses during university course, 

minimum 3,000.00 

Books, instruments, laboratory charges, 

etc 1,000.00 

Expenses during hospital intership 1,000.00 

Total cost of medical education. . .$8,000.00 

"In the course of this training, extending over 
from five to ten years of his life, the physician 
has received instruction at the hands of men 
whose entire careers have been devoted to mas- 
tering the practice of medicine. Until he is past 
35 years of age, his career is one constant, pains- 
taking preparation for the protection of humanity 
against disease. 

"A law pending in New York proposes to set 
all this preparedness at naught. The legislature 
of that state has been asked by the Christian 
Scientists to legalize the 'practicing' of their 
healers. 

"The Christian Science 'healer' enters upon his 
activities with the following stock in trade : 



PUCK ON CHRISTIAN SCIENCE.* 



The folowing article is taken from Puck, of 
April 15th and a copy of this weekly containing 



One copy of "Science and Health," by 

Mary B. Eddy $ 3.00 

One satin-faced Prince Albert 35.00 



$38.00 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



209 



"Thus equipped, he can pray over a virulent 
case of smallpox until the infection sweeps the 
neighborhood. He should worry ! There is no 
such thing as smallpox ; the patient is merely in 
'error.' Epidemics under the healer's benignant 
influence might ravage communities ; it would be 
quite unnecessary to take steps to check them : 
there is no such thing as illness. As soon as the 
unfortunate victims receive faith through Mrs. 
Eddy's tract at $3 a copy, the scourge will subside. 

"It is all very simple — buy the book ! 

"Weird incantations over the grievously ill 
passed out of American history when the last 
Kickapoo turned his toes to the setting sun. Be- 
fore the steadv stride of enlightenment, the old 
lady who wore red yarn around her ankle to ward 
off chilblains has linked arms with her consort 
who carried a shriveled horse-chestnut in his 
pocke£ as a cure for rheumatism, and together 
they have passed into the Great Beyond, a little 
earlier, perhaps, than had their ailment been at- 
tended to by a skilled physician. 

"Superstition, whether set forth in 'Science and 
Health,' or Hostetter's Almanac, is banished from 
most intelligent minds. Diseases that a genera- 
tion ago spelled certain fatality are now under the 
doctor's control. They are not cured by prayer, 
nor by sorcery. Mary Baker Eddy was an ex- 
tremely commonplace New England woman. It 
has been our privilege to read some of her early 
correspondence in the original ; much of it was 
illiterate and none of it convincing. 

"Licensing the Christian Science healer is a 
dangerous retrogression. If it meant the substi- 
tution of prayer for Peruna. we would advocate 
it : but we cannot imagine a condition which mighl 
place control over a deadly epidemic in the hands 
of a zealot who enters upon his medical career 
with an investment of $38.00." 



*?\Iedical Sentinel. 



Honor System Adopted iiy Junior Law CL.^ss. 



Froelicher, Jr., toastmaster on that occasion, de- 
clared that the best contribution his class could 
make toward the glory of their Alma Mater 
was an Honor System adapted to the needs of 
the University of Maryland and modeled along 
the lines of those in force in over one hundred 
and seventy- universities in the United States. 
Having since carefully considered the advisability 
of instituting such a system, and having appointed 
a committee to report a practical plan for the 
approval of the class, it was finally adopted by an 
overwhelming and enthusiastic majority at a meet- 
ing marked by heated discussions and instructive 
speechmaking by members of the Faculty and of 
the class. 

The plan adopted provides for the elimination 
of the "spotter system" and rests the responsi- 
bility of conducting an honest examination upon 
the class. A member of the class so far forgetting 
himself as to violate his oath not to cheat, will, 
upon detection by any member of his class, be 
reported to the Committee on Student Honor, who 
will hear the evidence in the case and render its 
verdict accordingly. If the accused does not feel 
that his case has been properly decided by the 
Committee he may appeal for an open trial before 
the class and a jury impaneled from it. The find- 
ings of the Committee will be reported to the 
Faculty for its action. Those found guilty of 
violating the laws laid down in the resolution 
creating and defining the Honor System will be 
unconditionally expelled from the University. 

It is hoped that upon proving successful that 
this system for the conduct of examinations will 
be adopted by the entire Law School and by the 
other colleges of the University. The Honor 
System has been in force in the Medical School 
of the University of Maryland for several years. 

The .Junior Class elected the following to serve 
as their first Committee on Student Honor : W. 
H. Maynard, Chairman ; Alvin R. Whiting, A. C. 
Joseph, E. W. Beatty, Wm. L. Murphy, J. W. 
Brown, Hans Froelicher, Jr., President of Class, 
ex-officio. 



BvA.B.Mako2'cr.Law,'r> 



Having adopted the Honor System for E.xami- 
nations, the Junior Class of the Law School, on 
the evening of May 10, took its first examination 
under that system. 

On March fi, 1915, at the Law Junior Class i--,-- i- 

Banquet at the Rennert Hotel, President Hans ings in the July issue. 



Note. — Just as The Gazette goes to press, we 
hear that the Honor Committee has met to con- 
sider charges against four members of the 1917 
Law Class for cheating during the examinations 
given at the close of the last term. Too late to 
publish the results of the committee's findings, 
this paper will print an account of the proceed- 



210 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 

A MONTHLY JOURNAL 

Devoted to the interests of the University 

of Maryland. 

Subscription Price, $1.00 Per Annum, In Advance 

Reprints Furnished At Cost 

Advertising Rates Submitted Upon Request. 

608 Professional Building 

BALTIMORE, MD. 



Editorial Board. 

J. BEN ROBINSON, D.D.S Editor-in-Chief. 

NATHAN WINSLOW, M.D Managing Editor. 

Graduate Members. 

THOMAS FELL, LL.D Academic. 

STAN WOOD COBB, B.A Academic. 

H. M. ROBINSON, M.D Medical. 

ALBERT H. CARROLL, M.D Medical. 

F. J. VALENTINE, D.D.S Dental. 

SAMUEL WANT, LL. B Law. 

JOHN H. SIvEEN, LL. B Law. 

A. A. SONNENBURG, Phar.D Pharmacy. 

J. M. BRANSKY, Phar.D Pharmacy. 

M. E. SULLIVAN, R.N Nursing. 

Undergraduate Members. 

C. V. WILSON Academic. 

H. GOLDMAN, '15; F. C. MARINO, 
'16; C. 0. WOLF, '17 Medicine. 

H. E. WATERMAN, 15; A. Z. ALD- 
RIDGE, '16; E. B LANCASTER, 
'17 Dental. 

J. A. HAGGERTY,'15; B. C. LIGHT- 
NER, '15; C. N. MATTHEWS, 
'16; A. B. MAKOVER, '17 Law. 

A. L. STERLING, '1.=^ Pharmacy. 

J. E. EVANS, '16. . , Y. M. 0. A. 

B. C. LIGHTNER, ' Advertising. 

B. G. GOLD, '15 College Notes. 

A. G. DE QUEVEDC- Latin-American. 

L. A. BUIE, "15 House Notes. 

LINDSAY ROGERS, '15 General Items. 



JUNE 1, 1915. 



EDITORIALLY EXPRESSED. 



With this last expression of interest in the 
University as Editor-in-Chief of The Uni\t;rsitv 
Gazette the present incumbent will take his de- 
parture to other fields to follow his profession. 
It is not because of lack of interest that he re- 
signs a work that has been a pleasure to do, but 
the fact that opportunities and environments are 
more inviting "back home," hence the change. 

But we are not through with the Gazette nor 
the University. An opportunity presents itself to 



The College Man Sets 
the Styles! 

Uphold your reputation by wearing suits 
made the "Matched Pattern" way, the most 
important clothing invention of the decade ! 

These suits are sold exclusively by 

THE QUALITY SHOP 

Balto. and Liberty Sts. 




prove that an alumnus can remain faithful to his 
Alma Mater's institutions and loyalty will ensue. 
We cannot direct the editorial policy of The Ga- 
zette but we can and will contribute to show our 
interest in its betterment and to encourage the 
boys in their effort to make a success of the work. 

We stand for the boys. In our humble opinion 
no institution can survive and progress without 
having as its first thought its matriculates and a 
focusing of the interest of all concerned on their 
efficiency and complete preparedness when they 
shall have reached the age of graduation. The 
pleasure incident to the student's manifest appre- 
ciation for what an interested and consecrated 
advisor, leveler, and teacher may do cannot be 
expressed by the one serving the new life. The 
recommendation such work affords the institution 
and respect from professional men fully justify a 
concentrated effort to benefit the boy. We have 
stood for all concerned when they seemed to 
us to stand by the right. \\'e stand for the boys 
and the University, the boys and the faculty, the 
boys and The Gazette, and the boys. Long 
live the boys ! 

The seniors will leave to go out in the profes- 
sions of their choice. All other classmen will, or 
should, move up a notch ; new men are coming 
to enter and form a new group. Some one must 
fill up the vacancies to perpetuate the institutions 
which form the University group. Probably each 
man as he either goes out or moves up shares 

Sight, smell and taste plays big part in digestion. 
Eating is a matter of the sympathetic nerres. "No 
profit where no pleasure is taken." 

POSITITELY Tve feed yon BETTEB, at LESS COST 
; nd IN THE CLEANEST environment than any one 
lias ever done before since time began. 

BRIGHTON LUNCH 

14 N. HOWARD STREET 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



211 



the tliought of the Editor-in-Chief as best ex- 
pressed by the following poem : 

To THE Other Fellow. 

Here is a toast I want to drink to a fellow 

I'll never know — 
To the fellow who's gong to take my place 

when it's time to go. 
I've wondered what kind of a chap he'll be, 

and I've wished I could take his hand. 
Just to whisper, "I wish you well, old man," 

in a way that he'd understand. 
I'd like to give him the cheering word that 

I've longed at times to hear ; 
I'd like to give him the warm hand-clasp 

when never a friend seems near. 
I've learned my knowledge by sheer hard 

work, and I wish I could pass it on 
To the fellow who'll come to take my place 

some day when I am gone. 
Will he see all the sad mistakes I've made 

and note all the battles lost ? 
Will he ever guess of the teams they caused 

or the heartaches which they cost? 
Will he gaze through the failure and fruit- 

les toil to the underlying plan, 
And catch a glimpse of the real intent and 

the heart of the vanquished man ? 
I dare to hope he may pause some day as 

he toils as I have wrought, 
And gain some strength for his weary task 

from the battles which I have fought. 
But I've only the task itself to leave with 

the cares for him to face. 
And never a cheering word may speak to 

the fellow who'll take my place. 
Then here's to your health, old chap; I 

drink as a bridegroom to his bride. 
I leave an unfinished task for you, but God 

knows how I tried. 
I've dreamed mv dreams as all men do, but 

never a one came true. 
And my prayer today is that all the dreams 

may be realized by you. 
And we'll meet some day in the great un- 
known — out in the realms of space ; 
You'll know my clasp as I take your hand 

and gaze in your tired face. 
Then all your failure will be success in the 

light of the new-found dawn — 
So I'm drinking your health, old chap, who'll 

take my place when I am gone. 

Anonymous. 



EDITORIALETS. 



In order that those connected with the Univer- 
sity may keep in touch with the work of its alumni 
we have been asked to request that all members 
of the medical alumni who have written or may 
write articles will send copies of their published 
writings and reprints of their papers from medi- 
cal journals, etc., to the University Library. These 
will eventually be bound in volumes as "Contri- 
butions to Medicine, Surgery, etc.," by the Alumni 
of the University of Maryland. 



We have been requested to publish the fol- 
lowing notice : 

During the summer recess the hours at the 
University Library will be from 10 to 2 o'clock 
daily. 



All subscribers to The University Gazette 
who expect to leave town for the summer are re- 
quested to send change of address to the office, 
608 Professional Building. Let The Gazette 
follow you during your vacation ! 



'SLAMS AND SALUTES." 



(A column dedicated to the free expression of 
opinion on the part of anyone who wishes to 
address the faculty and student body. We re- 
serve the right to refuse for publication any 
article tending to ridicule, and trust that no one 
will abuse his privilege. Kindly sign name to 
article, that we may be assured of the good faith 
in which it was written, but name will not be 
published if contributor so desires. Develop 
your ideal and assist in maturing college ideals. — 
Editor-in-CJiief.) 



The article in last month's Gazette urging the 
appointment of a committee to welcome incom- 
ing students shove's an appreciation of University 
of Maryland conditions. Little as we realize it, 
the Freshman class is the backbone of college 
spirit. If the "frosh" get the right idea in the 
lieginning of their L^niversity life, there will be 
no trouble and raving about the lack of this nec- 
essary spirit at the U. of Md. 

Besides, the presidents of University of Mary- 
land classes do not seem to realize the value of 
some of the suggestions that The L^niversity 
Gazette caters to them free of charge. As yet 



212 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



we have had no intimation of any activity on the 
part of class presidents to form an Advisory 
Board to put the freshmen on their feet. — Spec- 
tator. 



U. OF M. Ties St. John's. 



ATHLETICS. 



An athletic association, as yet in an embryonic 
state, is attracting a great deal of attention from 
the students of the University of Maryland. Prac- 
tically every school of importance in the United 
States has an athletic association, througli the 
medium of which the various recognized sports 
of this country are carried on. 

The University now enjoys a national repu- 
tation as a school, the scholastic standing being 
well recognized. This new movement in the or- 
ganization of an athletic association will put the 
old school in athletic circles, and thus help to 
even further spread the fame of the University. 

Although several attempts have been made to 
start a like organization in the past, they have 
all died a natural death. It is the intention of 
the students behind the present movement to put 
athletics on such a plane that it will take a strong- 
blow indeed to break up the organization. 

A petition has been drawn and presented to the 
Board of Regents for consideration. The mem- 
bers of the board who have been interviewed as 
individuals all seem to be heartily in favor of the 
plan, so we have no doubt but that athletics will 
now come to its own in the school. 

Now is the logical time to launch a campaign, 
and we ask every student at the University to 
help boost this movement. The help of every 
student, and of the faculty, will be needed, and 
we appeal to each student to put his shouldei- 
to the wheel and make this movement a success. 



STYLISH and COMFORTABLE 
FOOT-WEAR 

FOR THE 

UNIVERSITY MAN 

All Leathers — Expert Fitting 
Moderate Prices 

WYMAN 

19 W.LEXINGTON STEET 



In a very exciting match U. of J\I. tied St. 
John's racqueters Saturday, May 1, on the latter's 
courts. The playing of both teams was very 
exciting and spirited throughout. Summary : 

Singles — Downs, St. John's, defeated Bruce, 
U. of M., 6-3, 6-2. Bloede, U. of M., defeated 
Goldsborough, St. John's, 7-5, 0-6, 6-2. Bielaski, 
St. John's defeated Craig, U. of M., 6-4, 6-3. 
Grain, U. of M., defeated Fell, St. John's, 6-2, 6-3. 

Doubles — Crain and Bruce, U. of M., defeated 
Downs and Goldsborough, St. John's, 6-0, 6-1, 
Fell and Bielaski, St. John's, defeated Bloede and 
Craig, U. of M., 11-9, 4-6, 10-8. 



ITEMS— GENERAL. 



The one hundred and eighth\ annual com- 
mencement of the University of Maryland was 
held at the Lyric Theatre, Tuesday afternoon, 
June 1, 191.5, at 4 o'clock P. M. 

The Regents and members of the various fac- 
ulties, robed in their academic gowns and dis- 
tinctive hoods, added color and brilliancy to the 
scene. The theatre was packed with an appre- 
ciative audience. The annual oration was deliv- 
ered by Hon. William Jennings Bryan, Secre- 
tary of State, upon whom the honorary degree 
of doctor of laws was conferred, the only hon- 
orary one given. Mr. Bryan was presented to 
the audience by Dr. Thomas Fell, provost of 
the University and president of St. John's Col- 
lege, which is the department of arts and sci- 
ences of the University. His speech was an elo- 
quent plea to those entering upon the serious 
business of life to make that business one of 
service to humanity and to try to render service 
in excess of the expected reward. 

The order of exercises was as follows : 

Overture — "Fast in C" Leutner 

Selection — "Tannhauser" ^^"agne^ 

E-xcerpts from "Chin-Chin" Carylle 

Fantasia — "America" Tobani 

1. Music — March, "La Reine de Saba" Gounod 

2. Prayer by Rev. Wra. Page Dame, D.D. 

.l AJusic — "Melody of Peace" Martin 

4. .\ddress to the Graduates — Hon. Wm. Jennings 

Bryan, Secretary of State of the United States 
of America. 

5. Music — Trombone Solo Selected 

6. Conferring of Degrees by the Provost of the Uni- 

versity. 
Candidates for the Degrees "Bachelor of Arts" 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



213 



7. 

8. 

9. 

10. 



and "Bachelor of Sciences" presented by the 
Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences. 

Candidates for the Degree "Doctor of Aledicine" 
presented by the Dean of the Faculty of Physic. 

Candidates for the Degree "Bachelor of Laws" 
presented by the Dean of Faculty of Law. 

Candidates for the Degree "Doctor of Dental 
Surgery" presented by the Dean of the Faculty 
of Dentistry. 

Candidates for the Degree "Doctor of Pharmacy" 
presented by the Dean of the Faculty of Phar- 
macy. 

Conferring of Honorary Degrees. 

Music — "Panamericana" Herbert 

Award of Prizes. 

Music — "March, "American Republic" Theile 

Prof. Fritz Gaul, Director of Orchestra. 



There were 215 graduates. The}' were pre- 
sented by the deans of their respective depart- 
ments, and were classified as follows : 

Bachelor of Arts 9 

Bachelor of Science 8 

Doctor of Medicine li 

Bachelor of Laws 77 

Doctor of Dental Surgery 36 

Doctor of Phrmacy 12 

Students who received degrees were : 
B.\CHEL0R OF Arts. 



Henry Devries Cassard, 
Herbert Eugene Jump, 
Charles Brown Mowbray, 
Walton Rider Nelson, 



Daniel Eugene Walsh, 
Wilbert Lacy Merriken, 
John Edwin Selby, 
Howard Bidwell Matthews 



Charles Thaddeus Hauver. 

Bachelor of Science. 

John Lawrence DeMarco, Robert Reid Ritchie, 
Francis Arnold Hause, Oliver Parry Winslow, 
Harvey C. Mittendorf, Chauncey Victor Wilson, 
Orville Monroe Moore, William DaughertyWrightson. 

Doctor of Medicine. 

Richard Binion, Georgia. 

Jocelyn William Blackmer, North Carolina. 

Harvey Clifton Bridgers, North Carolina. 

William Arthur Bridges, North Carolina. 

Louis A. Buie, South Carolina. 

William Brown Burleson, North Carolina. 

Thomas Mathew Calladine, New York. 

Ralph Cohen, District of Columbia. 

Charles A. Cohn, Pennsylvania. 

Vincent J. Demarco, Mississippi. 

Louis Diener, Virginia. 

George Hamilton Dorsey, Maryland. 

Joseph Leo Dowling, Rhode Island. 

Patrick Aloysius Durkin, Rhode Island. 



Michael Joseph Egan, Jr., Georgia. 

Dorsey Paul Etzler, Maryland. 

Gustave Adolph Fritz, Maryland. 

Harry Jesse Gilbert. New Jersey. 

Carlos Gonzalez y Gonzalez, Porto Rico. 

Lyle Leland Gordy, Maryland. 

Samuel Harry Greenberg, California. 

Louis Ward Grossman, Pennsylvania. 

Gerald Leo Higgins, New Jersey. 

Robert Burns Hill, North Carolina. 

William Herndon Jenkins, Virginia. 

Milton Easley Jones, Maryland. 

Robert William Johnson, South Carolina. 

William Robert Johnson, South Carolina. 

James Isaac Justice, West Virginia. 

Bernard Richard Kelley, Connecticut. 

Roy Robinson Kerkow, Washington. 

Herman Warner Kranz, Connecticut. 

Franklin Harris Lackey, North Carolina. 

Edgar Winslow Lane. North Carolina. 

Lloyd Jackson Lanich, Pennsylvania. 

Addison Le Roy Lewis, South Carolina. 

Oscar Vernon Linhardt, Maryland. 

John Albert Berchard Lowry, North Carolina. 

Kenneth McCullough, Maryland. 

-^Iva Edgar McReynolds, Illinois. 

Lloyd Rogers Meyers, Pennsylvania. 

William Cleveland Miller, Pennsylvania. 

Daniel Bruce Moffett, Alabama. 

Thomas Lacy Morrow, North Caroline. 

Charles Howard Moses, Pennsylvania. 

Charles Wesley Myers, Pennsylvania. 

Milfert Weaver Myers, Maryland. 

.Mbert Augustus Naumann, Massachusetts. 

.Mlierto Portuondo y del Pino, Cuba. 

Alberto Garcia de Quevedo y Munoz, Porto Rico. 

Moses Raskin, Georgia. 

Hickman Ray, North Carolina. 

Arthur Hatton Riordan, Massachusetts. 

John Daniel Robinson, North Carolina. 

George Perry Ross, Maryland. 

William Thomas Ruark, North Carolina. 

Playford Lorenza Rush, Maryland. 

Lucius Carl Sanders, South Carolina. 

Harry Schnuck, Maryland. 

Louis Walter Schreiber, Maryland. 

Samuel Dennison Shannon, Maryland. 

Myles Bernard Sharkey, New York. 

Frank Earl Shipley, Maryland. 

Charles Edward Sima, Maryland. 

John Thomas Stringer, Virginia. 

David Clemington Studebaker, Pennsylvania. 



The prevnleiit feeliiie: of Imppiiiess and grood fellow- 
ship, combined with the iiivnrlably exeellent dinner, 
makes all llie world joiir friend, and i)roduces an 
evenin;? of snrpassing enjoyment. 

THE NEW OLYMPIA RESTAURANT 

308 W. Baltimore St.--=306 E. Baltimore St 
The Oljmpia serves notliin^g lint clean, pood food. 



214 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



E. Howard Tonolla, Maryland. 
Joseph Judson Waff, Virginia. 
Theodore B. Warner, Maryland. 
Bascom L. Wilson, North Carolina. 
John C. Woodland, Maryland. 
Eugene Joshua Karl Zeller, Maryland. 
Mark Victor Ziegler, Maryland. 

Prizemen. 

University Prize — Gold Medal. 

Michael Joseph Egan, Jr. 

Certificates of Honor. 

Bernard Richard Kelley, Bascom L. Wilson, 

Vincent J. Demarco, George Perrj- Ross, 

E. Howard Tonolla, Louis Ward Grossman, 

Dorsey Paul Etzler. ' 

Bachelor of Laws. 



George Wilton Benson, 

Arthur Clinton Berryman, 

John Nicholas Biesecker, 

George Washington Bradford, Jr., 

Joseph Royal Brunsman, 

John Walter Bueschel, 

Emory Kemp Cathcart, 

John William Chesley, 

Abraham William Cohen, 

Henry Dubois, 

Alfred Thomas Edel, 

August Euler, 

Charles F. Evans, Jr., 

Joseph Fax, 

Charles Walter Frost, 

John Edgar Gans, 

David Campbell Gibson. 

William Henry Gonce, 

Arthur Page Gough, 

Jefferson Cleveland Grinnalds, 

Ferdinand Irvin Gruebel, 

Francis Joseph Gutberlet. 

Joseph Aloysius Haggerty, 

Benjamin Hance, 

Elmer Mittan Harper, 

Samuel Herman Hoffberger. 

Joshua Shelton Hull, 

William Bernard Jacobson. 

Oscar Sutton Jennings, 

Milton De Ralph Jones. 

William Warren Jump, 

Charles Frederick Kammerer. 

Robert Erroll Kanode, Jr., 

Isador Frank Kartman. 

Arthur Valentine Keene, 

Charles Alexander Kelso, 

John Wooders Leonard, 

Samuel Joseph Lichtenberg, 



Bruce Campbell Lightner, 
William C. Lurssen, 
Edwin Alexander McCIuer, 
Daniel Francis Mcilullen, 
John Samuel Mahle, 
Elmer Hall Miller, 
Kenneth Knell Moore, 
William Mueller, 
Thomas Francis O'Neill, 
Frederick Ernest Pausch, 
John Joseph Pratt, Jr., 
Walter Harry Prem, 
Charles B. Redfield, 
John Monroe Richardson, 
Lindsay Rogers, 
L. William Rook, 
Abraham Rosenthal, 
Washington Irving Salter, 
James Lawrence Schanberger, 
Raymond Schlegel, 
Joseph Mitchell Schlessinger, 
Jacob Schroeder, 
Edward King Schultz, 
Simon Silverberg, 
Harry Edward Silverwood, 
Charles Borromeo Smith, 
Simon Ernest Sobeloff, 
James Steele, 
John Lawrence Sullivan. 
Paul Mitchell Taylor, 
William T. Thornton. 
William McKendry Travers, 
Marcus Arthur Tregor, 
John Thomas Tucker. 
Henry Hooper \\'aters. 
Henry Leroy Wortche, 
John Noetzel Yost, 
Julius Zieget, 



Doctor of Dental SLTtGERV. 

William Russell Bird, New York. 

Martin Brumberger, New York. 

Charles Arthur Buist, South Carolina. 

David Charles Dan forth, Texas.' 

Jose Angel Davila, Mexico. 

James William Farr, Connecticut. 

Arthur Horace Hebert, Massachusetts." 

Henry Honick, Maryland. 

Edouard J. Lariviere, Massachusetts. 

Jacob Walter Lewis, Maryland. 

Albert S. Loewenson, Maryland. 

Harold J. Loomis, New York. 

Edward Aloysius Lynaugh, Massachusetts. 

Henry M. McLean, Nebraska. 

Heath McLityre, Canada. 

Lois Eunice McKeown, North Carolina. 

Walter Shields Mitchell, Virginia. 

Harry David Newton, Pennsylvania. 

Christopher James Q'Connell, Massachusetts. 

Harry Winter Paul, Australia. 

Cayetano Ramon Pou Gomez, Porto Rico. 

John Joseph Purcell, Jr., New York. 

Francisco Quintero, INIagana, Mexico. 

Ronald Y. Rankin, Canada. 

V'incente H. Roca y Carbonell, Cuba. 

Elsie D. Roof-Scimeca, Germany. 

Wilbur Nesbit Scruggs, North Carolina. 

John Robinson Secrest, North Carolina. 

Locke Van Grawl Simons, North Carolina. 

Floyd Henry Smith, New York. 

Samuel S. Sobell, New York. 

James Robert Thompson, South Carolina. 

Herbert Edwin Waterman, Texas. 

John Randolph Walker, Alabama. 

Ben Hill Webster, North Carolina. 

Joseph J. Wolk, New York. 

Prizemen. 

University Prize — Gold Medal. 

Albert S. Loewenson. 

Honorable J\lention. 

Jose Angel Davila. 

Doctor of Ph.^rmacy. ' 

A. S. Bradley, West Virgina. • • 

Allan T. Hartman, Maryland. 

Harry A. Kinnamon, Maryland. 

John E. Lillich, Pennsylvania. -> 

Benjamin Mellor, Jr., Maryland. 

John T. Meeth, Maryland. 

Luther F. Mitchell, Maryland. 

Jamie A. Parlade, Cuba. 

John J. Pivec, Maryland. 

Wilmer H. Schulze, Maryland. 

Harry R. Showacre, Maryland. 

Norman F. Storm, Maryland. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



215 



Prizemen. 

Gold Medal for General Excellence and Simon Prize in 
Practical Chemistry, 

Wilmer H. Schulze. 

Junior Class — Honorable Mention (in order of men- 
tion). 



Arthur H. Eise, 



S. Fred. Marshall. 



MEDICAL— GRADUATE. 



We are very sorry to learn of the illness of our 
former editor, Dr. Harry M. Robinson, class of 
1909, of 2010 Wilkens avenue. Dr. Robinson 
was operated on at the University Hospital May 
9th for ruptured appendix. His many friends 
will be glad to know that he is getting along 
nicely. 



The following were recent visitors to the Uni- 
versity Hospital : Drs. William T. Gibson, class 
of 1909, of Batesburg, S. C. ; Charles A. Goett- 
ling, Jr., class of 1910, of Middleburg, Va. ; Louis 
Kyle Walker, of Ahoskie, N. C, and Charles L. 
Schmidt, of Union Bridge, Md., both of the class 
of 1911, and William E. Gallion, Jr., class of 
1912, of Darlington, Md. 



Dr. Ernest Zueblin, professor of medicine at 
the University, has been a patient at the Univer- 
sity Hospital, suffering from an infected leg. Dr. 
Zueblin is rapidly improving and is attending to 
some of his work from a wheel chair. We wish 
him a speedy recovery. 



At a meeting of the local members of the class 
of 1905, medical, held in the office of Dr. Robert 
P. Bay, March 8, 1915, it was definitely decided 
to hold a decennial reunion of the class from June 
22 to 21, inclusive. Dr. Robert L. Mitchell 
(president of the class) was elected chairman, and 
Dr. Robert P. Bay, secretary. A tentative pro- 
gram was outlined as follows : Clinics, smoker, 
dinner at the Country Club, and an afternoon at 
one of the shore resorts. 

T.HE University Gazette heartily endorses 
the reunion and sincerely trusts that each member 
of the class of 1905 will make it a point to attend. 

The following is a list of those who have so 
far expressed their intention of being present : 



E. H. Adkins, Roanoke Rapids, N. C. 

C. M. Benner, Taneytown, Md. 

James S. Billingslea, Armiger, Md. 

Ira Burns, Wilmington, Del. 

J. J. Carroll, 185 Chestnut street, Holyoke, 
Massachusetts. 

J. E. Dwyer, Venango, Polk county, Pennsyl- 
vania. 

J. N. Elderdice, Salisbury, Md. 

J. S. Gibson, Gibson, N. C. 

M. R. Gibson, Raleigh, N. C. 

G. B. Harrison, Colonial Beach, Va. 

H. C. Irvin, Roanoke Rapids, N. C. 

H. E. Jenkins, U. S. Naval Station, Port Royal, 
South Carolina. 

H. L. Kneisley, Hagerstown, Md. 

Eugene Kerr, Towson, Md. 

J. P. McGuire, Clarksburg, Va. 

J. S. Matthews, Spokane, Wash. 

J. P. Matheson, Charlotte, N. C. 

W. J. Riddick, U. S. Naval Hospital, Norfolk, 
Virginia. 

J. L. Riley, Snow Hill, Md. 

J. Holmes Smith, Jr., 163 Dryades street, New 
Orleans, La. 

W. H. Smithson, New Park, Pa. 

E. McQueen Salley, Saluda, N. C. 

W. E. E. Tyson, Jefferson avenue E., Detroit, 
Michigan. 

W. B. Warthen, Davisboro, Ga. 



Resolutions Adopted by the Faculty of Physic of 
the University of Maryland on the Occasion of 
the Death of Professor R. Dorsey Coale, Ph.D., 
M.D., Dean : 

The Faculty of Physic of the University of 
Maryland wishes to give e.xpression to the great 
sorrow and loss which has come to it through 
the death of Prof. R. Dorsey Coale, who for 
thirty-two years has been Professor of Chemistry 
and Toxicology in and for many years Dean of 
the Medical Department of the University. 

Profesor Coale was a man of ripe judgment, 
conservatism and loyalty; at all times devoted to 
the traditions and best interests of the University. 
As teacher and Dean he gave his best efforts to 
the upbuilding of the school which he served 
with unselfish fidelity. 

Though struggling with impaired health for 
some months he continued his work until he fell 
in his chair at his post of duty stricken with 
apoplexy. 



216 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



B I O m e'S Chocolates '^"^ ^^^'^^ ^°^ spring, 1915. see us for Classy Clothes 

Known and enjoyed by students of the SuitS to Measure, $15.00 tO $35.00 
University for more than half a century. 

Retail Department A. JACOBS & SONS, Tailors 

BLOME'S CANDY STORE 899 north Howard street 

Established 1859 621 W. Baltimore St. Open Evenings 9 P. M. Cor. Richmond St. 



By his intellectual gifts, integrity and genial 
personality Professor Coale had won the respect, 
esteem and affection of his colleagues of the 
Faculty, of the student body and of the Alumni, 
who deeply sympathize with his family and 
friends in their great grief. 

Resolved, That these resolutions be placed on 
the minutes of the Faculty, that a copy be sent 
to the family of Professor Coale and that the 
same be published in the daily press. 



LAW— SENIOR. 



We are taking this last opportunity to bring 
"Boss" Kanode's name in print. Not long ago 
Sy Clabuster Flepbron piloted the "Boss" to 
Havre de Grace. The "Boss" was heavily laden 
with many pieces of pewter, which he placed on 
Owanux in the two-mile event. The nag ran 
to the mile and one-half, stopped, pranced and 
jumped around a few times, then turned around 
and walked back home. Our hero collapsed in 
Hep's arm, and was resuscitated with difficulty. 



Our friend "Jiggs" O'Donohue has been tak- 
ing a very instructive course in Indian basket 
weaving during the State Bar Quiz. 



Owing to the fact that the Gazette goes to 

press on May 20th, full details of that great 

Senior Banquet will not appear until the July 
number. 



The Honor Case which was held on May 7th 
was won by Harper and Sobeloff. The case was 
very well conducted and the men who tried it 
deserve much praise. 



The Majesty of the Law certainly took a de- 
cided drop when Jake Schroeder's seat broke 
down in Practice Court during the progress of 
his trial recently. Lindsav Rogers was waxing 
eloquent at the time, and that probably had some 
bad effect on Jake. Abe Rosenthal, a worthy op- 



ponent of Jake's, guffawed loudly as Jake lay 
sprawled out on the floor, thereby committing a 
serious breach of legal ethics. 



Mr. Tucker: "What is the effect of demurring 
to a part of a bill and also filing an answer to the 
bill?" 

Matthews : "The demurrer is no good." 

Mr. Tucker: "Why?" 

Matthews (struggling from the effects of deep 
slumber) : "Because he should demur to only that 
part to which he answered, or, I mean, in other 
words, that he should answer answers to only 
that part to which he has demurrer ! ! ! !" 



SENIOR. 



With apologies to the Editor from the Law 
Department, we publish the following "thoughts 
in rhyme," by Mr. Rosenthal, who gave it to the 
Editor at a late date. 

— Editor-in-Chief. 

FAREWELL. 



Farewell, dear classmates, we must part. 

We've reached our limit of schooling. 
The past three years prepared us to start 

On our life work without fooling. 

How well we learned each other's faults ! 

As well as the goodness, too. 
Let ill-will between us be enclosed in vaults, 

Where it shall get its due. 

We are now on the verge 

Of our commencement of the battle of life. 
Our theoretical knowledge let us merge 

\Vith the practical in this world of strife. 

The fountain of knowledge we did drain 

From the Maryland University. 
That which we learned was not without pain. 

Those poor chaps who failed have our pity. 

In the future practice of our profession, 

Let the fond memories of our classmates stand. 

Should one be in need: show interest; give expression. 
By lending a helping hand. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



21'}' 



We are destined to have our ups and downs. 

Some, positions of honor may fill. 
Let all resolve, — discarding caps and gowns. 

To get to the top of the hill. 

The way may seem hard; and at times, over-powering; 

Grit your teeth, and go forward still ; 
For there, above you, your goal will be towering; 

There, at the top of the hill. 

When you get to the top, give yourself a good rest. 

Don't let the exertion swell your head; 
But remember those below, and try your best, 

That they, too, might earn their bread. 

Again, dear boys, let me bid you farewell; 

As a class, let us meet every year ; 
Where each, of the past, stories shall tell, 

Around a table of jov and good cheer. 

—A. R. '15. 



LAW— JUNIOR. 



Bagby's Hall of Fame. 



David Dunlop (deceased). 

Mrs. Markley. 

Old Doctor Claggett. 

Professor Miller. 

Mr. Reveli. 

Philemon Skinner. 

Reginald O. Wolcott (Regis- 
ter of Wills). 

Mrs. McDonald. 
Note — Besides the above Hall of Fame, the 
Class Editor, if he were bent on evil, by the time 
we go to press, could probably publish Bagby's 
Hall of Shame. But we refrain, for humane and 
diplomatic reasons, from so doing. 



Now that the exams, are over The Reverend 
Dave Lowenstein, Jr., can rave to his heart's con- 
tent about the excellent qualities and virtues of 
Elizabeth. But what we would like to know is. 
Who is this Elisabeth? 



Mr. Albin Widoff is the Mencken of the Law 
School. All ye uplifters and peruna mongers are 
advised to give him a wide berth, for besides 
having a sharp and ready tongue he hath the 
most admirable power of making black look 
white. "War," says this accessory of Nietsche. 
"is mental hygiene." 



son is that we take the Honorable Gent to be a 
good sport vi'ho can josh and be joshed with 
equal equanimity. But we would honestly like 
to know whether the Rt. Hon. A. R. W. really 
had his hair cut so short because it is more com- 
fortable that way during the hot months. It may 
be true that "brevity is the soul of comfort," but 
is it not also true that the above mentioned legal 
expert preferred his hair short in order to have a 
good excuse for not calling on his host of lady 
friends during the lovely month of May, thus 
practically ostracizing himself temporarily from 
polite society and consequently keeping him tied 
down to cramming for the examinations. 
O, Law ! Where is thy sting ? 



The Junior's Farewell to the Dismal Dome, 



The dome has less of brightness. 

Every year ; 
And the furniture less whiteness, 

Every year; 
Nor are lectures as inspiring 
As they once were, for they're tiring, 
While blandly we're inquiring, 

"Ain't it queer?" 

But the "stiffs" are growing stronger, 

Every year ; 
And their perfume lasts much longer. 

Every year; 
And more oft are Junior's snoring. 
For Spring lecturers are boring. 
They are dreaming and adoring ; 

"Ain't it queer?" 

But the purer life draws nigher 

Every day ; 
And we're rising higher, higher, 

Every way; 

A. H. PETTING 

Manufacturer of 

GREEK LETTER FRATERNITY JEWELRY 

213 N. Liberty St., = Baltimore, Md. 
Factory: 212 Little Sharp St. 



The writer of this column takes great delight Memorandum package sent to any fraternity member through the 

, 1 . .1 TT A Tt \\ri •.' r\ secretary of the chapter. Special designs and estimates furnished on 

m knockmg the Hon. A. R. Whitnig. One rea- „,d3|,, ^ngsand pins for athletic meets, etc. 



318 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



!> 



quAi 



iDlEHL 

Clothes 



built at 605 W. Baltimore St., 
just around the corner from the 
University, are kept pressed with- 
out cost. 

Suits $15 to $40 



We leave the dome for cleaner places, 
Intermediates, we will wash our faces, 
And acquire their bloomin' graces. 
By next May ! 

—A. B. M., '17. 



The Junior Class feels a certain amount of 
pride when it considers that Mr. Albert C. Ritchie 
is going to be our next Attorney-General. 



DENTAL— SENIOR. 



Honors Gix'En to Dental Students. 



SENIOR CLASS. 

The James H. Harris Gold Medal, 

First Honorable Mention, 
Second Honorable Mention, 

The F. J. Gorgas Gold Medal, 

The Prof. I. H. Davis Gold Medal, 
First Honorable Mention, 

Second Honorable Mention, 

The Prof. B. Merrill Hopkinson 
Gold Medal, 



Miss L. E. Mc- 

Keown. 
J. A. Davila. 
J. W. Lewis. 

S. S. Sobell. 

C. R. Pou Gomez. 
Mrs. Elsie Roof- 

Scimeca. 
Henry Honick. 

A. S. Loewenson. 



The Alex. H. Paterson Gold Medal, J. R. Davila. 
First Honorable Mention, Heath Mclntyre. 

Second Honorable Mention, H. E. Waterman. 

The Crown and Bridge Gold Medal, Miss L. E. Mc- 

Keown. 
First Honorable Mention, A. S. Loewenson. 

Second Honorable Mention, Heath Mclntyre. 



Orthodontia Gold Medal, 
Honorable Mention, 



C. R. Pou Gomez. 
A. S. Loewenson. 



HONOR ROLL— CLASS OF 191S. 



A. S. Loewenson. 
J. A. Davila. 
Heath Mclntyre. 
H. W. Paul. 
J. W. Lewis. 



H. E. Waterman. 
C. R. Pou Gomez. 
W. S. Mitchell. 
F. H. Smith. 
J. W. Farr. 



HEPBRON & HAYDON 

We Sell Every Law Book land Syllabus Usci 
at the U. of M. 



St. Paul 8794 



1243-53 CALVERT BLDG. 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



The Prosthetic Gold Medal, 
First Honorable Mention, 
Second Honorable Mention, 

Charles R. Deeley Gold Medal, 
First Honorable Mention, 
Second Honorable Mention, 



Gerald I. Brandon. 
R. F. Bundy. 
F, Gonzales. 

R. F. Bundy. 
Gerald I. Brandon. 
M. K. Baklor. 



FIRST YEAR. 

The Luther B. Benton Gold Medal, H. I. Huckans. 

First Honorable Mention, L. H. Miller. 

Second Honorable Mention, O. E. Culler. 

The L. W. Farinholt Gold Medal. L. H. Miller. 

First Honorable Mention, O. E. Culler. 

Second Honorable Mention, E. R. Wray. 

The University Gold Medal, L. H. Miller. 

First Honorable Mention, H. I. Huckans. 

Second Honorable Mention, O. E. Culler. 



PHARMACY— GRADUATE. 



The tide of travel this year turns to the Pacific 
Coast. The forty million dollars spent annually 
by Ameicarn tourists in Europe will be spent in 
seeing America, either North or South. When 
San Francisco was selected as the place of meet- 
ing for the American Pharmaceutical Association 
they had serious doubts of the wisdom of the 
choice, as they feared the expense and time re- 
quired to attend the meeting would make the 
attendance from the eastern part of the United 
States very small indeed. Erom what is learned 
through correspondence and discussion with the 
members in the East it now seems that the added 
attraction of the exposition will so far counter- 
balance the expense as to take fully the normal 
contingent to the meeting from the eastern part 
of the United States. 

The attractions which are offered members en- 
route and at San Francisco make it worth a seri- 
ous effort and even some sacrifice to be present. 
There has already been printed a preliminary an- 
noinicement of the arrangements for travel pro- 
posed by the committee on transportation. 

Every pharmacist who can afford a three weeks' 
vacation or more, and every one should have at 
least three weeks' outing, should make plans to 
be present when the meeting opens in San Fran- 
cisco on August 7. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 219 

Intercollegiate Bureau of Academic Costume, Aibany.N.v. 



e W Sahatooa St 




Maryland. 



ACADEMIC— GRADUATE. 



Frederick S. Matthews, '13, a law student at 
the University of Maryland, visited the College 
recently. He was in time to see the competitive 
drill between the companies, and complimented 
the students on their military work. He was 
captain of Company "A" when here. 



F. H. Hennighausen, '13, of the University 
of Maryland, and P. B. Briscoe, Secretary of the 
Alumni Association, also paid us a short visit. 
Lieutenant Roy M. Jones. U. S. A., Class '10, 
was also here last week. 



Another visitor to the College was Cornelius 
Comegys, class of 1878, now a prominent lawyer 
of Scranton, Pa. He gave a short, but very in- 
teresting talk to the students in the Mess Hall 
at the dinner hour, explaining that his desire 
to visit his former classmates and associates at 
old St. John's had led him to leave his strenuous 
home duties for a brief visit to Maryland. He 
spoke of the many changes which have taken 
place at St. John's since the time that he was 
a student and told of many amusing things which 
happened in those days. He mentioned a number 
of men, now prominent in the affairs of our State, 
who were his chums here at college, and said that 
it gave him great pleasure to visit them and meet 
them again. The students showed that they ap- 
preciated his talk and presence here. 

When in Baltimore. Mr. Comegys was the 
guest of former Judge Henry D. Harlan. De- 
siring to meet again many of those whom he 
had known in college days, Mr. Comegys gave a 
dinner Wednesday night at the University Club, 
Baltimore. A typical Maryland dinner was 

B. BENTON ! 

t 
t 
♦ 
t 
t 



LUTHER 

Dental Depot 



students' Outfits 
a Specialty 



305 North Howard St. ! 



COTRELL & 
LEONARD 

Official Maimers of 

Caps and 

Gowns 




Correct Hoods 
for All Degrees. 

Rich Gowns for 
Pulpit and Bench. 

Bulletin. Samples 
etc. on request 



served, and the college was lauded in song and 
story. 

Those who were at the dinner with Mr. 
Comegys were : James M. Garnett, former pres- 
ident of St. John's; Dr. Thomas Fell, former 
Judge Harlan, Judge H. Arthur Stump, Judge 
Walter I Dawkins, Dr. Herbert Harlan, Dr. 
James A. Nydegger, Dr. J. Clement Clarke, Phil- 
emon H. Tuck and W. Thomas Kemp. 



Professor Edison and L. E. Payne ("Doc") 
were recent visitors here. 



On Wednesday, April 21, Dr. Edward H. Gra- 
ham was inaugurated as president of the Uni- 
versity of North Carolina. Many of the most 
important universities, colleges and learned socie- 
ties in the United States were represented. Dr. 
Fell was present at the exercises to represent .St. 
John's and the University of Maryland. Among 
those who made addresses were: President 
Lowell, of Harvard ; President Alderman, of the 
University of Virginia, and President Goodnow, 
of John's Hopkins University. The formal ex- 
ercises were followed by a luncheon, at which 
Josephus Daniels, Secretary of the Navy, was 
toastmaster. 



ACADEMIC— UNDERGRADUATE. 



At a recent meeting of Sophomore Class, Mr. 
John Murdock Storm was elected associate edi- 
tor of the "Collegian," as the Junior member of 
the board for next year. 



Heine — "Your neck is like a typewriter." 

Dent— "Why?" 

Heine — "Because it is Under- Wood." 



The sixth of the series of hops given by the 
Cotillion Club was held in the College Gymnasium 
on Friday night, April 30. 

Receiving were Mrs. J. B. Rippere and Cadet 
Cassard. 



220 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



The gymnasium was lighted in red, forming a 
suitable back ground for the many colored gown? 
of the ladies, of whom quite a number were fron. 
out of town. 



Prof. Mittendorf — What is a conductor ? 
Jones — A conductor is the fellow who collects 
fares on the street car. 



The following promotions have been announced : 
Cadet Captain W. R. Nelson to be Cadet Major; 
Cadet Captain Hause to be Cadet Captain, Com- 
pany A ; Cadet First Lieutenant Wilson to be 
Cadet Captain of the Band. 



The last of a series of three drills to decide 
to which company the colors should belong for 
the ensuing year, was held Wednesday evening, 
April 28, after Captain Schindell had finished in- 
specting the work of the two companies. It con- 
sisted of ten pitching. Although everybody was 
tired, they threw their spirit into the work and 
both companies did very well. Company A won 
the five points offered for time, btit Company B, 
by using plenty of time, succeeded in getting 
enough on appearance to offset this and win the 
drill and colors. 

Captain Schindell, of the Army, and Lieu- 
tenant James, of the Navy, acted as judges. 

This is the first time that B Company has had 
the colors for several years. By winning the 
colors for his company Captain Cassard wins 
the sabre presented yearly by Lieutenant Jones, 
who is a graduate of St. John's. 



NURSING. 



The graduating class of the University Hospi- 
tal Training School for Nurses attended a Bac- 
calaureate Service at St. Paul's Episcopal Church 
at 7.30 A, M,, May 13th, after which an elaborate 
breakfast was served at the Rennert, which was 
given by Miss Nettie Bay, in honor of the class, 
and which was attended by the staff nurses of the 
hospital. 

The graduating exercises were held in the even- 
ing at Lehmann's Hall. The Rev. Arthur B. Kin- 
solving oft'ered prayer. The address was delivered 
by Dr. Arthur M. Shipley. The late Dr. R. Dor- 
sey Coale, dean of the University, introduced Dr. 
Fell, Provost of the University, who presented 
the diplomas and gave a brief but inspiring talk. 



There were eighteen graduates. They were ; 
Florence Matilda Skinner, jN'Iaryland ; Betty Eliza 
White, Maryland ; Florence Viola Meredith, 
Maryland; Lelia Irene Shields, North Carolina; 
Norma Irene Frothingham, Maryland; Nettie 
Mabel Bay, Maryland ; Emily Ruth Conner, 
Maryland; Alfretta Myers, Maryland; Mabel 
lone Lea, North Carolina ; Ruth Cundiff Stone- 
ham, Virginia ; Elizabeth Blanche Beazley, Vir- 
ginia ; Elizabeth Nordt, Maryland ; Elva May 
Boor, Pennsylvania; Lillian Kemp McDaniel, 
Maryland ; Bertie Susan Pinckard, Virginia ; 
Martha Etta Coppersmith, Maryland; Gertrude 
May Dilly, West Virginia, and Corinne Loraine 
Bogart, West Virginia. 



The Nurses' Alumnae Association of the LTni- 
versity of Maryland gave a reception to the grad- 
uating class on the evening of May lith in the 
Xurses" Home. Miss Alice F. Bell gave a very 
interesting talk to the nurses on the opportunities 
and requirements in the various fields of nursing. 
Refreshments were served and a most enjoyable 
evening spent. 



Miss Bessie Roussey, class of 1914, has been 
appointed nurse in the Public Health work, tuber- 
culosis division. 



Miss A. L. Wham, class of 1909, supervisor of 
nurses of the operating rooms, has been confined 
to the hospital by illness for the past three weeks 
and is steadily improving. 



Miss Virginia McKaye, class of 1910, has been 
appointed superintendent of nurses of the Walker 
Memorial Hospital, Wilmington, N. C. 



LEFRANC & AULT 

ARE SHOWING 

NEW NECKWEAR 

.AND 

NEW SHIRTS 

AT THE 

"SHIRT SHOP" 

421 N. Howard St , at Franklin 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



231 



Hart Schaffher & Marx, 
Kuppenheimer, 
"Society Brand" 



The clothes that college men 
like a lot 



TRe (©a Hub 

Bdlllmore Street At Chdrles 



Mrs. Bertie Sigmon, class of 1914, has been 
appointed superintendent of nurses of the Chester 
Hospital, Chester, S. C. 



Miss Ivulu Stepp, class of 1914. has resigned 
her position as night supervisor of nurses at the 
hospital and will engage in private nursing. She 
is located at 1403 Madison avenue. 



Miss Marguerite Walter, class of 1916. was 
operated on for appendicitis at the hospital on the 
13th and is on the convalescent list. 



The Maryland State Association of Graduate 
Nurses gave a tea to the visiting nurses who were 
delegates to the Convention of Charities and Cor- 
rection on May 14th at Arundel Hall, Eager 
street. 



Misses Meredith, Shields and Skinner, class 
of 1915, have located at 2731 Maryland avenue, 
and Miss Frothingham at 1716 Wilkens avenue, 
and will do private nursing. 



Miss Mary E. Lent, superintendent of nurses 
of the Instructive Visiting Nurses' Association, 
and Miss Eleanor Jones, of the Tubercular Divi- 
sion, Public Health Work, gave interesting talks 
on the requirements and opportunities in Public 
Health Nursing to the graduating class on the 
afternoon of May 7th. 



QUIPS. 



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Buy a bale o' cotton. Bill 
Buy a heavy ham 
Buy a bar'l of apple sass 
Buy a jar o' jam 
Buy a box of oranges 
Buy a car of oats 
Buy yourself a suit of clothes 
Buy some overcoats. 
Buy yourself a ton of hay 
Buy a load of bricks 
Buy a pair of rubber boots 
Buy a flock of chicks 
Buy yourself some chewing gum 
Buy it by the box 
Buy yourself an auto 
Buy a dozen socks 
Buy a year's subscription (Gazettk). 
Pay it in advance 
Then your friend, ye editor 
Can buy a pair o' pants. 

— Bulletin of Pharmacw 



Customer : "Waiter, this is the first tender 
steak I've ever had in your shop." 

Waiter: "My goodness! You must have got 
the g\\\'nov'i''^-Tit-Bits. 



THE W.'iilST PLACES. 

Mary had a little waist, 

'Twas puzzling to her beau. 

For everywhere the fashion went. 
Her waist was sure to go. 

Sometimes it was beneath her arms. 

Sometimes below her knee, 
Sometimes she had no waist at all 

So far as he could see. 

■ — Burt's Box Bulletin. 



WILLIAM J. MILLER 
Jewelry, Diamonds, Watches 

College Jewelry 

Class Pins and Rings, College Seals 

28 East Baltimore St. Baltimore, Md. 



R LLERBRQCK 

Ull|p Siraiiing (Sollrgr $Il]nt05raplipr 

22 W. Lexington St., = Baltimore, Md. 



222 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



BIRTHS. 



To Dr. John \\'illiam Robertson, class of 1909, 
and Mrs. Robertson, of Onancock, Va., May 30, 
1915, a dauffhter — Elizabeth Sue Robertson. 



MARRIAGES. 



Dr. Ernest William Frey, class of 1912. to Miss 
Mary Jeanette Disney, both of Baltimore, Md., at 
Baltimore. March 22, 1915. 



Dr. William Robert Gardiner, class of 1910, 
to Miss MacWalker, both of Berlin, 111., at Her- 
rin, March 21, 1915. They will reside in Herrin, 
where Dr. Gardiner is practicing surgery. 



Dr. Henry Latimer Rudolph, class of 1903, of 
Gainesville, Ga., to Miss Annie Louise Pagett, of 
Atlanta, Ga., at Atlanta, June 2, 1915. Dr. and 
Mrs. Rudolph will reside in Gainesville. 



Dr. Thomas Marshall West, class of 1908, of 
Fayetteville, N. C., to Miss Florence D. King, 
University Hospital Training School for Nurses, 
class of 1910, of Howard county, Md., at Wash- 
ington, D. C., May 12, 1915. They will make 
their home at Fayetteville. 



Dr. Clarke Jackson Stallworth, class of 1912, of 
Republic, Mich., to Miss Mary King, May 5, 1915. 
Dr. Stallworth was formerly at Consul, Ala. 



Dr. WilHam Luther Byerly, class of 1911, of 
1229 Maryland avenue,- Baltimore, to Miss Mary 
E. Jackson, April 30, 1915. Dr. Byerly is engaged 
in general practice. 



DEATHS. 

"Then fell upon the house a sudden gloom, 

And softly from that hushed and darkened room, 

Two angels issued, where but one went in." 

It is with mingled feelings of sadness and re- 



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gret that we announce to our readers the sudden 
death of our much beloved dean. Dr. Robert Dor- 
sey Coale, at the University Hospital, May 18, 
1915, from an attack of paralysis, age 57 years. 
Dr. Coale, who was professor of chemistry and 
toxicology, and for years dean of the medical 
school of the University of ]Maryland, and a 
former member of the Fifth Regiment, Maryland 
National Guard, was born in the city of Balti- 
more, jMd., September 13, 1857, son of George 
Buchanan Coale and Caroline Dorsey Coale. He 
acquired his elementarv education in the Balti- 
more schools, after which he entered the Penn- 
sylvania Alilitary Academy at Chester, Pennsyl- 
vania, where he was graduated with the degree 
of C. E; in 1875. In July,' 1876, he applied for a 
studentship at Johns Hopkins L'niversity, and in 
that connection enjoyed the unique distinction of 
having been the first matriculant at that famous 
institution, his "ticket" being "No. 1." At the 
University he took a special course in chemistry, 
was appointed Fellow in Chemistry for the aca- 
demic year ,1880-1881, and was graduated with 



,;\,>.i 



Y OF 



THE UNIVJ 

the degree of Ph. D. in June of the latter ye 
For the sessions of 1881-1882 and 1883-1883 
was assistant to the Chair of Chemistry, but on 
August 10, 1883, he was appointed to a lecture- 
ship on Chemistry and Toxicology in the Medi- 
cal Department of the University of Maryland, 
and on March 6, 1884, was elected to the Faculty 
in that chair. Since that time Dr. Coale had been 
a conspicuous figure in the University life, es- 
pecially in the Department of Medicine, and also 
as a member of the Board of Regents. On the 
death of Dr. Michael, December 8, 1895, he was 
elected his successor as Dean of the Faculty of 
Physic, and ser\-ed until June 1897. He was re- 
elected to the same office May 29, 1900, holding- 
same up to the time of his death. As Dean of 
the Medical School of the University, Dr. Coale 
had labored zealously in the interest of that de- 
partment of the institution. He was beloved by 
the graduates and students of the school. 

At the commencement of the University of 
Maryland in May, 1912, the degree of Doctor of 
Medicine was conferred upon him. 

For over twenty years. Dr. Coale served as an 
officer in the Maryland National Guard, and at 
the outbreak of the Spanish-American war was 
lieutenant-colonel of his regiment, and when the 
command was mustered into the United States 
service as the Fifth Maryland Volunteer In- 
fantry, he was commissioned its colonel. The 
regiment was intended for active service in Cuba, 
but owing to lack of transportation facilities, it 
was held in camp until the close of the war. (^n 
the return to P)aItimore, Colonel Coale, resumed 
liis former commission of lieutenant-colonel. Pie 
retired as an officer of the regiment in 1909. Just 
three weeks ago he was given the title of brevet- 
colonel, as a reward for his services as colonel 
of the Fifth Maryland Regiment during the 
Spanish-American war. 

Under Governor Lowndes, he was for four 
years Liquor License Commissioner of Baltimore. 

Dr. Coale married. November 15. 1892, Minna 
Plowison, daughter of Captain John W. Howison, 
V. S, R. C. S., who died several years ago. He 
is survived b\- one sister, Mrs. Frances T. Red- 
^vood. 

In the death of Dr. Coale, the University of 
Maryland has suffered an irreparable loss, as 
manv matters of importance must be solved in the 
near future. His death comes at a very inoppor- 
tune moment, for endowed as he was with a 
judicial trend of mind, he was justly looked upon 
as the balance wheel of the Faculty. Another 



to"i»ttii--; 




SITY UKZETrE~ \\ 223 

FCLTs'DED 1813 
^dearrcari-be^crbtained, a5g)tl^r professor of chem- 

■"eath leaves a void hard 



OF 



Dr. Frank Huske Holmes, class of 1895, of 
Clinton, N, C. ; a Fellow of the American Medical 
Association ; formerly president of the Sampson 
County (N. C.) Medical Society; major and sur- 
geon, N, C. N. G. ; superintendent of health of 
Sampson County ; died at a sanatorium in Ashe- 
ville, X. C, April 18, 1915, aged io years. 



Dr. R. Sydney Cauthen, Baltimore Medical 
College, class of 1902, a Fellow of the American 
Medical Association, a specialist on diseases of 
the eye, ear, nose and throat, of Charlotte, N. C, 
died at his home in Charlotte, March 24, 1915, 
from heart disease, aged 43 years. 



Dr. Charles Ellsworth Boyd, Baltimore Medi- 
cal College, class of 1902 ; University of Wooster, 
Cleveland, 1892 ; a Fellow of the American Medi- 
cal Association, died at his home in Newton, 
Iowa, February 27, 1915, from pneumonia, aged 
45 vears. 



Dr. Edward G. Altvater, class of 1911, of 323 
N. Carrollton avenue, a physician at the United 
States Quarantine, died May 2. 1915. at the Uni- 
^•ersity Hospital, following an operation, aged 30 
vears. 



Dr. William Joseph Dougherty. Baltimore 
Medical College, class of 1907, of Beverly Farms. 
Mass., died at the home of his mother in that 
place, April 6, 1915, aged 33 years. 



Dr. J. H, Turner, class of 1840, of Martins- 
ville, Va., died at his home, April 1, 1915, from 
senile debility, aged 89 years. 



Dr. James Belt Chesley. class of 1868, of For- 
est Glen. Md., died at his home, April 7, 1915, 
aged 71 years. 



Dr. Oliver G. Getty, class of 1878, a practi- 
tioner of Grantsville, Md., until 1893, died at his 
home in Meyersdale, Pa., March 14, 1915, from 
cerebral hemorrhage, aged 59 years. 



Dr. Horace M. Julian, class of 1885, died at his 
home in St, Louis. January 30, 1915, from cere- 
bral hemorrhage, aged 53 years. 



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