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Full text of "University Gazette 1915-1916"

illBiiiiiiiiiiiliii^^^ 



OF TH E 



■School oj^T^edicine- 




BOUND BY 

Charles L. Elliottl 

1901 Rosedale St. 

, AT NORTH AVE. 







V 



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AllTTI 





VOL. II. 



A 



We are in such haste to be doing, to be writing, to be 
gathering gear, to malje our voice audible a moment in 
the derisive silence of eternity, that VFe forget that one 
thing, of which these are but the parts — namely, to live. 
We fall in love, we drink hard, we run to and fro upon 
the earth like frightened sheep. And now you ask your- 
self when all is done, if you would not have been better 
to sit by the fire at home, and be happy thinking. To 
sit still and contemplate, — to remember the faces of 
women without desire, to be pleased bv the great de§d^c 
of men without envy, to be everything and everywl^rgvfn 
sympathy, and yet content to remain where and wparyou 
are — is not this to know both wisdom and virtue,',iand to 
dwell with happiness? After all, it is not they whoNcarry 
fliigs. but they who look upon it from a private chamSis^ 
who have the fun of the procession. If you ask yourself 
what you mean by fame, riches, or learning, the answer 
is far to seek ; and you go back into that kingdom of 
light imaginations, which seem so vain in the eyes of 
Philistines perspiring after wealth, and so momentous to 
those who are stricken with the disproportions of the 
world, and, in the face of the gigantic stars, cannot stop 
to split differences between two degrees of the infinitesi- 
mally small, such as a tobacco pipe or the Roman Empire, 
a million of money or a fiddlestick's end. 

— Robert Louis Stevenson. 




y 



BALTIMORE, MD., JULY, 1915 






No. 1 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



Vol. 11. 



JULY I, 1915. 



No. 1. 



CONTENTS 



WHAT THE LAITY SHOULD KNOW 
ABOUT CANCER. C. W. G. Rohrer. 
M. D 3 



EDITORIALS 

Merger with the College of Physi- 
cians AND Burgeons. 
The Honor System. 
Editorially Expressed. 



ITEMS 10 



BIRTHS 15 



MARRIAGES 15 



DEATHS 15 



Footwear for the College Man at Moderate Price. 

N. HESS' SONS - - 8 E. Baltimore, St. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE, MD. 

HON. PHILLIPS LEE GOLDSBOROUGH, Governor of Maryland. Chancellor. 
THOMAS FELL, A. M., Ph. D., L L. D., D. C. L.. Provost. 



ST. JOHN'S COLLEGE, Annapolis, Md. (, °|partment of \ 

•^ VARTS and SCIENCEsy 

Founded 1696. Classical and Scientific College Courses leading to d ;grees. Special advantages to stu- 
dents purposing to study the professions. Military Department under army officers. Also Preparatory 
School for boys fitting for St. John's or other colleges. Term begins SepI amber 21. Address 

THOMAS FELL, Ph.D., LL.D., D.C.L., President. 



DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE. 

Four vears' graded course. New Laboratory Build- 
ing. Clinical advantages unsurpassed. Teaching Staff 
of 66. io8th Annual Session will begin October I, 
1914, and continue 8 months 

R. DORSEY COALE, Ph.D., M.D., Dean. 



DEPARTMENT OF DENTISTRY. 

33d Annual Session begins October I, 1914, and 
continues 7 months. 26 Instructors. New Building. 
For catalogite containing course of study, etc., apply to 

TIMOTHY O. HEATWOLE, U.D.. D.D.S., Dean, 

Baltimore. Md. 



DEPARTMENT OF LAW. 

59th Annual Session will begin Sept. 28, 1914. Faculty 
of 26. For catalogue containing full information ad- 
dress the Secretary, 301 St. Paul Street, Baltimore, 
Maryland. 

EDWIN T. DICKERSON, Secretary. 



DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACY. 

(Formerly Maryland College of Pharmacy). 72nd 
Annual Session begins September 25, 1914. 11 In- 
structors. New Laboratories. Address 

CHARLES CASPARI, JR., Phar.D., Dean, 

Baltimt^re. ^^d. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 

Published Monthly In the Interest of the University of Maryland. 
PRICE $1.00 PER YEAR. 



nontribut,ion.i solicited from Alumni of the 
University. 



Business Address, 60S Professional Buildinie, 
Baltimore, Md. 



Vol. II. 



BALTIMORE, MD., JULY 1, 1915. 



No. 1: 



WHAT THE LAITY SHOULD KNOW 
ABOUT CANCER.* 



By C. W. G. RoHRER, M.D., Class of 1900, P. & S. 



Having had the temerity to accept an invita- 
tion to write a brief article upon so important a 
topic as " What the Laity Should Know about 
Cancer," I shall preface my remarks by begging 
the indulgence of my professional brethren who 
shall chance to peruse these lines. While on the 
one hand there are many features about cancer 
of which the public should be apprised, there are, 
on the other hand, equally as many distressing 
conditions concerning it which should be kept 
beyond their knowledge. Hence, to discriminate 
between what I should say, and what had better 
remain unsaid, is the duty which seriously con- 
fronts me. 

In the phraseology of the laity, every excres- 
cence or new growth is either a "tumor" or a 
"cancer." It is a "tumor" if it is innocent or 
non-malignant in type; it is a "cancer" if it pos- 
sesses elements of malignancy. According to Dr. 
Keirle's definition, copied from my note-book of 
nineteen years ago : "A tumor is an atypical, new- 
formation, subserving no physiological function, 
and not the result of inflammation." It partakes 
of the general nature of the tissue or tissues from 
which it arises, and from this property it derives 
its name. As there are only four fundamental 
tissues — epithelial, muscular, connective and ner- 
vous — the names of all innocent tumors are deriv- 
atives or combinations of one or more of these 
terms. To illustrate : A tumor originating from 
the papillary layer of the skin is termed papil- 
loma, familiar examples being the well-nigh om- 
nipresent toe-corns and warts. A tumor spring- 
ing from muscle is a myoma ; from fibrous or 
connective tissue, a hard or soft fibroma : from 

♦Editor's Note: A ereat many of the leacliiiR medi- 
cal journals in the United States are, this month. 
fpntiii-iii<; articles on Cancer. The Gazette, following 
their example, is particularly fortunate in being able 
to publish this article by so able a writer ami authority 
as Dr. Rohrer. Dr. Robrer is head of The Bureau of 
Communicable Diseases of the State Department of 
Health. He is a graduate of the College of Physicians 
niKl Surgeons. Class of 1900. 



fatty tissue, a lipoma; from nervous tissue, a 
neuroma. Innocent tumors do not recur after 
thorough removal, which includes their capsule, 
covering or enveloping membrane, nor do they 
cause the death of the patient. They may largely 
be viewed in the light of mechanical impediments, 
the degree of annoyance which they produce 
depending largely upon their size and location. 
Serious symptoms, however, sometimes result 
from pressure, especially when the tumor or 
growth is located within the abdominal cavity. 
It should also be borne in mind that a certain per- 
centage of innocent tumors, when subjected to 
undue irritation, become malignant. 

Cancerous tumors or "cancers" are of far 
greater significance to the laity than any innocent 
or non-malignant growth well could be. Cancer, 
as a rule, develops rapidly; a non-cancerous or 
innocent tumor usually develops but slowly, some- 
times requiring years to attain an appreciable 
size. Cancer, unless thoroughly removed in its 
earliest stages, returns after removal, both at 
its original site and in contiguous tissues and 
organs. For example a cancer of the breast, if 
neglected, would eventually spread ("metasta- 
cize") to the overlying skin, the adjacent lym- 
phatic glands (forming the ominous, so-called 
"waxing kernels"), the muscles of the chest, the 
ribs, the pleura, and the opposite breast. In- 
vasion of the skin, the earliest perceptible sign of 
local malignity, may occur as early as the second 
month, or it may be delayed for seven or eight 
years. The average date of its appearance, how- 
ever, is fourteen months from the onset of the 
disease. 

It was the late Dr. Rudolph Virchow, the ereat 
German pathologist, who first demonstrated that 
all tissues are composed of cells and intercellular 
substance, and that the cell is the active constitu- 
ent. Based upon this knowledge, it is customary 
for surgeons and pathologists to classify cancers 
according to the tissues from which they origi- 
nate. If a cancer develops from connective tis- 
sue, it is termed a "sarcoma" ; if from the epi- 
thelial covering of the skin or mucous membrane, 
it is designated "epithelioma" or surface cancer ; 
if it has its seat in a glandular organ like the 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



breast or stomach, it is a carcinoma or glandular 
cancer. Sarcomata or connective-tissue cancers 
usually occur in children and in young adults ; 
epithelial and glandular cancers, grouped under 
the heading "carcinomata," are the rule in per- 
sons who have reached middle life or are in their 
declining years. 

Sarcoma is met with most frequently in the 
bones, especially in the extremities of the long 
ones as the thigh and arm ; in the jaws, the breast 
or mammary gland, the salivary glands, tongue, 
tonsil, intestinal canal, kidney and skin. Carci- 
noma most frequently attacks the stomach, the 
breast or mammary gland, and the womb or 
uterus. It has been ascertained that one-third 
of all women who die of cancer succumb to can- 
cer of the uterus ; and that of all persons who die 
of cancer, in one-fourth of them, the uterus is the 
seat of the disease. 

The etiology of cancer is still the subject of 
much dispute. Numerous theories have been 
advanced and multitudinous causes assigned, a 
circumstance in itself disproving the adequacy 
of any one of them. Among the factors men- 
tioned are heredity, injury, age, climate, mental 
depression, and prolonged irritation. Several re- 
liable observers have attributed the disease to 
microbes, some claiming to have found bacteria 
or vegetable organisms, others protozoa or ani- 
mal parasites ; but the correctness of their views 
remains to be proven. Excessive meat eating, 
especially of pork, and infection with animal or- 
ganisms clinging to vegetables which are eaten 
raw, have been promulgated of late as causes of 
cancer, but such statements are unwarranted. 

Cancer is on the increase. In England and 
Wales, during ten years (1860-1870), as many 
as 2,379,622 persons above the age of twenty 
died, of which number 81,699 deaths were from 
carcinoma, the deaths from this cause constitut- 
ing to all others a ratio of about 1 to 29, If we 
but turn to "Mortality Statistics for 1913, Bureau 
of the Census," p. 28, we find that cancer and 
other malignant tumors caused 49,928 deaths in 
the registration area of the United States, corres- 
ponding to a death rate of 78.9 per 100,000 popu- 
lation, as compared with -16,531 deaths during 
the preceding year, equivalent to a rate of 77. 
For a period of fourteen years (1900-1913 in- 
clusive), with one or two exceptions, the increase 
in the mortality from cancer in the registration 
area of the United States has been uninterrupted 
from year to year. 

The alleged essential or predisposing causes of 



cancer, such as the theory of embryonic remains, 
the presence of cell rests, of carcinoma-matrix, 
etc., need not be discussed in a paper intended 
solely for the eyes of the laity. The various 
reputed exciting causes, however, deserve more 
than a passing notice. Beginning with heredity, 
we find that many persons believe that cancer, 
like tuberculosis, "runs in families." In deference 
to this widespread opinion, we must admit that 
an hereditary predisposition or aptitude for can- 
cer is generally recognized. It affects both sexes 
equally. Statistics show that 23.4 per cent, of 
cancerous patients have had one or more relatives 
afflicted with the same disease. In certain fami- 
lies the heredity of cancer has been shown in a 
marked manner. Sir James Paget relates a case 
in which a lady, two of her daughters, and eight 
of her grandchildren died of cancer. Sibley re- 
lates an instance of cancer of the uterus affecting 
a mother and her five daughters. Warren ob- 
served a cancer of the lip in the father; in one 
son and two daughters, cancer of the breast ; and 
in two grandchildren, cancer of the breast. This 
writer is familiar with an instance in which the 
mother died of .cancer, and three of her six chil- 
dren have already succumbed to the same disease. 
Injuries of various kinds have been regarded 
from time immemorial as a fruitful cause of can- 
cer. Paget, Billroth and Cohnheim all assert that 
about one-fifth of those who have cancer ascribe 
it to injur}' ; while Boll's statistics show injury to 
be the principal exciting cause in 14 per cent. Age 
has already been alluded to as an important de- 
termining cause, cancer being most prevalent in 
persons of middle and past middle life. Walshe 
has clearly shown that the mortality from cancer 
— that is, the number of deaths in proportion to 
the number of persons living — "goes on steadily 
increasing with each succeeding decade until the 
eightieth year." His result is obtained from rec- 
ords of deaths, but it is almost exactly confirmed 
by the tables collected by Paget showing the 
ages at which the cancers were first observed by 
the patients or ascertained by their attendants. 

p.vgivT's t.\ble showing the influence of -XGE 
in the development oe c.xncer. 

Under 10 years 5.00 per cent. 

Between 10 and 20 years.. 6.9 

Between 20 and 30 years. . 21.00 

Between 30 and 40 years. . 48.5 

Between 40 and 50 years. .100.00 

Between 50 and 60 years. .113.00 

Between 60 and 70 years. .107.00 

Between 70 and 80 years. ,136,00 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



Climate and the attending habits of life and 
state of civilization appear to exert an influence 
in the causation of cancer. It is said that the in- 
habitants of southern countries are more predis- 
posed to cancer than are the inhabitants of the 
North. Walshe collected evidence that the maxi- 
mum number of cancer patients are found in 
Europe, and that cancer is very rare among the 
natives of the tropical parts of America. In- 
quiries seem to show that the Indians of North 
America are singularly immune to this affection. 
Mental depression has often been quoted as one 
of the causes in the production of cancer. While 
mental anxiety and worry of all kinds may favor 
the origin and growth of cancer by impairing 
nutrition, we have no evidence that nervous in- 
fluences exert a more direct effect in the causation 
of cancer. 

Long-continued local irritation is frequently 
the exciting cause of cancer. If we examine the 
topography of cancer, we find that it attacks parts 
and organs that are most frequently the seat of 
prolonged and repeated irritation. Cancer is fre- 
quently found about the orifices of the body — the 
lips, the cervix of the uterus, the rectum, and the 
nose — locab'ties often exposed to irritation, and 
where the skin and mucous membrane meet. The 
clay pipe in smokers, the coal-dust in chimney- 
sweeps, the jagged edge of decayed teeth, and 
other local irritants have for a long time been 
regarded as important causes in the production of 
cancer. 

The dread of cancer is almost universal. The 
popular fear, however, of the contagiousness of 
cancer lacks foundation. There is not a single 
well-authenticated case on record of the trans- 
mission of this disease by contagion. 

Statistics show that the male sex is more pre- 
disposed to cancer than is the female. This dif- 
ference may be accounted for in part by the male 
sex leading a more active life, thus being ex- 
posed more to the exciting causes of cancer. C. 
O. Weber gives the proportion of males to fe- 
males as 64 to 36. The proportion varies, how- 
ever, with the different forms of cancer. Cancer 
of the skin is much more frequent in the male 
than in the female, while in glandular cancer the 
reverse is the case. Cancer of the lip is common 
in men, but extremely rare in women. Cancer of 
the stomach and the rectum is more frequently 
met with in males than in females. In the female, 
cancer of the breast and the uterus occurs prob- 
ably more frequently than do malignant tumors 
of all remaining organs. 



Cancer of the breast usually commences as a 
small, circumscribed, densely hard, uneven or 
nodulated growth, which is movable under the 
skin, but fixed in or to the breast itself. In one 
case out of 48, or in 2.08 per cent., several dis- 
tinct nodules are met with, which evince a marked 
tendency to coalesce as the disease progresses. It 
is more frequent, by 5.45 per cent., in the right 
than in the left breast. The seats of election of 
cancer of the breast are the upper and outer quad- 
rant, and the immediate vicinity of the nipple. 
With respect to pain, in 4 per cent, of all cases 
there is absolutely no suffering whatever ; in 8 
per cent, there is merely a sensation of discom- 
fort or weight ; while in 88 per cent, there is real 
pain, which varies, however, greatly in intensity 
and character. 

But the central thought in a paper on cancer, 
written for the laity, is the urgent advice that the 
only hope for complete recovery lies in early 
diagnosis and operation. In no class of diseases 
are delays more dangerous, or fraught with more 
disastrous consequences. Local applications can- 
not be recommended. Connective tissue cancers 
spread through the blood-vessels ; epithelial can- 
cers through the lymphatics; consequently the 
diseased part or organ should be handled as little 
as possible, to prevent detachment of the cancer 
cells and their passage into the vessels. 

As the disease gains headway there is a very 
perceptible loss of weight and strength on the 
part of the patient. The cancer increases in size 
while the patient wastes slowly away. When the 
surface of the cancer becomes covered with dead 
tissue, absorption takes place and a slow form of 
blood poisoning results. An outward manifes- 
tation of this is the cachectic condition, the com- 
plexion taking on a sallow hue. 

Many notable persons have died of cancer. 
Among these may be mentioned the Emperor 
Napoleon, Gen. U. S. Grant, Dr. William Rainey 
Harper, late president of the University of Chi- 
cago, and Professor Simon Newcomb, the dis- 
tinguished mathematician and astronomer. 

In conclusion, I desire to sum up the keynote 
to the present paper: IF YOU HAVE REASON 
TO SUSPECT CANCER, CONSULT AT 
ONCE A REPUTABLE SURGEON AND 
RELY IMPLICITLY UPON HIS JUDG- 
MENT IN REGARD TO DIAGNOSIS AND 
OPERATION. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 

A MONTHLY JOURNAL 

Devoted to the interests of the University 

of Maryland. 

Subscription Price, ?1.00 Per Annum, In Advance 

Reprints Furnished At Cost 

Advertising P.ates Submitted Upon Request. 

608 Professional Building 
BALTIMORE, MD. 



Editorial Board. 

J. BEN ROBINSON, D.D.S "i ^,.,. . ^, . , 

A Tj \T i.Tr^i'T^-n .1- T I . . Editors-m-Chier. 

A. B. MAKO^ ER, li. Law Ij 

NATHAN WIN.SLOW, M.D Business Manager. 

Graduate Members. 

THOMAS FELL, LL.D Academic. 

STANWOOD COBB, B.A Academic. 

H. M. ROBINSON, M.D Medical. 

ALBERT H. CARROLL, M.D Medical. 

F. J. VALENTINE, D.D.S Dental. 

SAMUEL WANT, LL. B Law. 

JOHN H. SlvEEN, LL. B i^aw. 

A. A. SONNENBURG, Phar.D Pharmacy. 

J. M. BRANSKY, Phar.D Pharmacy. 

M. E. SULLIVAN, R.N Nursing. 

Undergraduate Members. 

C. V. WILSON Academic. 

H. GOLDMAN, '15; F. C. MARINO, 

'16; C. 0. WOLF, '17 Medicine 

H. E. WATERMAN, 15; A. Z. ALD- 
RIDGE, '16; E. B LANCASTER, 
'17 Dental. 

J. A, HAGGERTY,'15; B. C. LIGHT- 
NER, '15; C. N. MATTHEWS, 
'16 Law. 

A. L. STERLING, 'IF Pharmacy. 

J. E. EVANS, '16... Y. M. C.A. 

B. C. LIGHTNER, ' Advertising. 

B. G. GOLD, '15 College Notes. 

A. G. DE QUEVEDO Latin-American. 

L. A. BUIE, '15 House Notes. 

LINDSAY ROGERS, '15 General Items. 



JULY 1, 1915. 



MERGER WITH THE COLLEGE OF PHY- 
SICIANS AND SURGEONS. 



Faculty and students of The College of Physi- 
cians and Surgeons of Baltimore, we have waited 
many moons for you to join our host. Trite and 
old-fashioned, though it may be, we cannot re- 
frain from the observing that "in imion there is 
strength." 

Let us hope that our co-operation will be as 



The College Man Sets 
the Styles! 

Uphold your reputation by wearing suits 
made the "Matched Pattern" way, the most 
important clothing invention of the decade ! 

These suits^are sold exclusively by 

THE QUALITY SHOP 

Balto. and Liberty Sis. 




profitable to you as your new relation will un- 
doubtedly prove for us. Though, in a way, we 
were rivals in the past, we have always entertained 
the highest regard for your splendid qualities. 
Honorably we courted you, coquettish mistress 
you were indeed, but now that we join hands we 
can thankfully say, "we have met the enemy and 
we are theirs." 

Lombard and Greene streets will hereafter be a 
greater center of culture, our new organization 
will prove an - added stimulus for scientific re- 
search ; the State, the nation, all humanity will 
profit. 

All over the world the name Johns Hopkins has 
always brought forth admiration, praise, and a 
sort of feeling that "here is an institution that 
justly deserves the name of best." Who shall 
say, with our new possibilities, that we may not 
also some day not far off merit the same inter- 
national respect ? 

—A. B. M. 
• o 

THE HONOR SYSTEM. 



Inevitably, the Honor System for Examina- 
tions will be in force throughout the L'niversity. 
Its success in the Medical School for the past 
few years has proved that it is practical here ; 
the benefits derived from it by the Junior Class 
in the Law School have shown its value ; the pre- 
ponderance of evidence showing satisfactory re- 
Sight, smell and taste plajs big part in digestion. 
EntJuff is a matter of the sympathetic nerves. "No 
lirofit where no pleasure is taken." 

POSITIVELY we feed von BETTEE, at LESS COST 
: nd IX THE CLE.4XEST environment than any one 
h:is ever done before since time began. 

BRIGHTON LUNCH 

14 N. HOWARD STREET 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



suits in over 136 colleges in the United States 
leads us to believe in its advisability. 

Repugnant as the idea of having to so vigor- 
ously guard against cheating may be, and smack- 
ing of mollycoddlism as it does, it cannot be de- 
nied that the Honor System has proved fair, just 
and practical. 

We have already remarked on the success of 
the System in the School of Medicine. There, 
as far as we know, it works with the unwrinkled 
smoothness of velvet. It has passed through that 
critical period of hispidity in which existence was 
"like the quills upon the fretful porcupine." But 
the section of the Law College that has adopted 
the Honor System is realizing, as is quite natural, 
considering its tender age, that the first year of 
an Honor System's life is a precarious one. It 
suffers, like a puny infant, from every change of 
the weather, from every disturbance of the atmos- 
phere. Mistakes are made, and though honest 
blunders, the cruel world outside mocks with 
savage glee. 

Considering that this is the first time the Sys- 
tem has been in operation in the Law School, we 
are of the opinion that it has shown its worth. 
The time is ripe for adoption by the whole Uni- 
versity; the result will be the development of a 
plan more efficient as a result of its united back- 
ing. 

There is one fault, however, that we find in 
the System in the Law School. It does not 
exist in the Medical School's arrangement, — 
and the Law men might profit from the experi- 
ence of their medical fellow-students. In the 
Medical School, the student accused of cheating 
is tried by a secret committee, and if found guilty, 
is told to leave. The faculty hears nothing of the 
whole proceeding, and they are innocent of the 
cause of the gentleman's departure. When this 
outcast seeks entrance to another Medical School, 
the inquiry of his proposed Alma Mater as to his 
reason for leaving the University of Maryland is 
answered by a polite note stating that "we are 

not cognizant as to the reasons for Mr. 's 

leaving this University." 

Thus the man has another chance. Certainly, 
we are not to judge that because he has departed 
from the straight and narrow path here, he is not 
entitled to a chance at another institution. He 
has suffered sufficiently for his wrong at the 
place of its commission. So, we believe, that the 
results of the Committee in the Law School should 
never reach the Faculty. Then, a man, having 



learned the lesson of dishonesty, may, after his 
dismal experience, start again "a wiser and a 
better man." A. B. M. 



EDITORIALLY EXPRESSED. 



"The thought is father to the act," so here 
goes. One of the editors-in-chief of the Gazette 
wishes an exhaust for some of his present sur- 
plus and fast-accumulating energy through ex- 
pressing himself on the things present and prom- 
ising. We do not propose to lambast any person 
or institution for fear the powers might place us 
in the "Slam and Salute" column rather than our 
accustomed editorial position. We will attempt 
to be generous, charitable, judicious, conserva- 
tive, and even neutral if necessary. We have re- 
frained from discussing politics, religion, and the 
war, but now our policy must change. This is 
not campaign year, which is enough on politics ; 
the hot weather is coming on and Billy Sunday 
will follow next winter, so a discussion of reli- 
gion is out of season. The war and vacation 
times are with us and will receive our undivided 
attention. There is no malice aforethought in 
anything we have said, are saying, or will say. 
We merely want to do a mental gyration and 
impose its course on the patient readers of this 
magazine. 



Friend and brother, when we left the good city 
of Baltimore and came to this industrial center of 
West Virginia, namely, Clarksburg, we were sure 
that we had passed so far beyond the confines of 
the Monumental City that visions of our short 
life there would never be experiencd. But the 
place of our professional birth cannot be easily 
forgotten, and we find that while acting as mira- 
cle worker in professional activities with the 
dentists of this hamlet we still have time to peer 
into the past and recall the attendant pleasant 
associations. The evening after our arrival here 
found us guiltily approaching a news stand and 
buying the home paper. The Sun. Maybe you 
have read how the Westerner was so filled with 
joy at seeing a cur dog from back home. Well, 
that Westerner's joy was not in it with ours at 
getting The Sun, and that isn't calling Baltimore's 
leading paper a cur either. Each evening finds 
us buying a Sun (two cents here), and that's how 
we know the UTniversity is still there, that you 
had a commencement, and that W. J. Bryan re- 
ceived his degree. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



One of the most interesting things in reading 
The Sun paper, is the syndicate story it is running 
entitled "The Great European War." The au- 
thor of this story seems to be a prominent Ger- 
man, namely, "William Kaiser," present ruler, or 
mis-ruler, of that doomed people known as the 
Germans. It seems that in 18?5, or thereabouts, 
just after the Franco-Prussian war, in which 
Germany succeeded in defeating France, the 
iniquitous thought was conceived in the then 
military minds of Germany that with a perfect 
military organization Germany could control the 
nations of the globe. Hence the growth of the 
greatest military power known to the history of 
the world. This same "William Kaiser" when 
he ascended the throne dedicated and consecrated 
himself to the theory of legalized murder, and it 
is claimed by some he declares God to be an 
accessory. Under the direction and encourage- 
ment of this war lord this military spirit has 
grown until all other institutions, educational, 
industrial and commercial, have become secon- 
dary to it and made a part of it. The point had 
been reached where a plea of military necessity 
for such display could not satisfy an overbur- 
dened and overtaxed common people, and some 
proof was needed to show the demand for such 
an organization or the people would rebel against 
the "gold-braid-and-lace" domination of the war 
party. Austria aiTorded the prete.xt through a 
damnable alliance of kings into which pact the 
people of neither country had opportunity to 
enter on their own initiative. Xow they publish 
the story written in blood of the common people, 
illustrated by starving old men, women and chil- 
dren, the wanton destruction of happy homes, and 



STYLISH and COMFORTABLE 
FOOT-WEAR 

FOR THE 

UNIVERSITY MAN 

All Leathers — Expert Fitting 
Moderate Prices 

WYMAN 

19 W. LEXINGTON STEET 



loss of lives in ruthless destruction of defense- 
less ships. It is the fault of kings that wars are, 
and both kings and wars should be made to go. 
Poor Germany, poor Austria, poor France, poor 
Russia, poor England must permit their vigorous 
manhood to flow in rivers of blood because a 
measly, worthless heir to a European throne was 
shot by a fanatical partisan. Commercial and 
industrial prestige is not the cause for it; kings 
with an overstimulated militia as a protection to 
personal interest is at the bottom. The kings 
should be rooted up and cast out that the com- 
mon man might come into his own. Alas, too 
true — 

"Princes and lords ma}- flourish or may fade; 
A breath can make them as a breath has made ; 
But a bold peasantry, a country's pride. 
When once destroyed can never be supplied." 

As in our last editorial we stand for "the boys," 
we insist now we stand for the common people. 
A fat, sleek royalty living and enjoying privi- 
leges and royalties at the expense of the common 
people can lay no more just claim to an existence 
than any coftimon individual who decides be- 
cause he wishes he may spend the rest of his 
days in his neighbor's brightest and best room 
and after death pass it on to his even more worth- 
less offsprings. This war has no excuse, and 
any man who attempts to defend it on the part of 
Austria or Germany, the arch conspirators, surely 
invites the contempt of our intelligent American 
public. 



By the way, did it ever occur to you to slip off 
where you are entirely alone and meditate the 
attitude of these United States on the European 
struggle? We have, but we were fortunate in 
not finding it necessary to "slip off." Having 
just started in business here, we have plenty of 
time "alone" and so do some thinking while we 
wait. This country is most fortunate in having 
the good schoolmaster, W'oodrow W^ilson, as her 
head. Such deliberation, such wise counsel, such 
sane action was hardly hoped for, but happily it 
is part of his virtuous nature. We may censure 
liim for his JMexican policy, but any other course 
might have been infinitely more disastrous and 
the probabilities are in proportion to the possi- 
bilities. His watchful waiting may terminate in 
war, but if so he will have exhausted all re- 
sources to maintain peace and bring about calm. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



9 



The aforesaid Woodrow Wilson has been di- 
recting his greatest effort toward preventing 
international complications tending to draw us 
into the great European war. The nations at 
war, and especially "William Kaiser," has broken 
practically all her moral bonds and violates inter- 
national law with impunity. The latter gentle- 
man has influentially declared a submarine war 
on everything that floats from a cork to a first- 
class armed cruiser. However, unarmed and de- 
fenseless merchantmen carrying supposed contra- 
bands is the specialty. To date there have been 
over one hundred vessels sunk, one-fifth being 
ships from neutral countries bound to neutral 
ports. Her object is to isolate the British people 
and starve them into submission. Three separate 
and distinct attacks have been made on American 
rights. The "schoolmaster" at Washington sent 
a short note to "Mr. Kaiser" stating that he must 
respect neutral lives. The reply was a ridiculous 
effort to exonerate Germany and place the blame 
on shipowners for permitting passage of neutrals 
on vessels carrying contraband. It was not a 
reply to the reprimand, but an excuse offered to 
cover up the violation by the miscreant. Mr. Wil- 
son didn't like the excuse so went back at Ger- 
many with language so strong that Mr. Bryan 
resigned from the cabinet and took the first 
train back to his Nebraska farm. It's "Bill 
Kaiser's" next move, and we wager the state of 
New York against a "Busy Bertha" that "Bill" 
plays fair. If he doesn't, the "schoolmaster" will 
keep him after school and when he comes out he 
will tell the boys "he didn't do nothin'." 



combining fight and debate in the ratio of five to 
one we are inclined to mix it up a little before 
our organs of speech are impaired and defense 
destroyed. 



We were pleased to know that Hon. W. J. 
Bryan honored the graduating class of 1915 with 
an address. If any man of fair Columbia's sons 
can turn the trick the great Commoner is the one. 
But even then we are not convinced that the great 
Secretary of State should resign his commission 
at a critical period merely because he differed in 
plans with Mr. Wilson. It is a fact that Mr. 
Bryan is an idealist and has views highly ad- 
mirable, but we fear when he attempts to fight 
practical piracy with theoretical idealism he will 
fall before "Bill Kaiser" as did Archimedes be- 
fore the invading soldiers when he died exclaim- 
ing "Don't spoil my circle." Persuasion is a 
great asset to Bryan, but the average American 
can fight better than he can debate. Personally 
we prefer the debate, but when our opponent is 



All you readers of the Gazette get busy and 
make this paper worth while. It matters little if 
you are in Baltimore or Kalamazoo, there is 
something you can do to help the good work 
along. No matter if you do get "Fisheritis," you 
must "fish it off" and get back on the job. Things 
will not just do themselves, they must be done, 
and each alumnus should make of himself a doer. 



Speaking of "fisheritis" reminds us of the fol- 
lowing. Does it remind you? 

Fisheritis. 
"The air we breathe, the food we eat. 

And all we drink is 'pizen,' 
And how we live from day to day 

Is really quite surprisin'. 
Malaria rages in the South, 

And North and East and West, 
Pneumonia mows us down like grass, 

And Typhoid does the rest. 
But of all the microbes, great or small. 

That Nature sends to fight us, 
The worst that ever struck a man 

Is the germ of Fisheritis. 
When this disease gets hold on you 

Your name is "Dennis Mud," 
For it never quits its working 

When it once gets in your blood. 
So when the thing gets chronic 

It simply can't be broke. 
You've got to go and fish it out. 

Or just lie down and croak. 
But when it's cured it won't stay cured 

Like any other sore. 
And when the thing breaks out again 

You've got to fish some more." — Selected. 

J. B. R. 

The prevalent feeling of happiness and good fellow- 
ship, combined Tvith the inTariably excellent dinner, 
makes all the vrorld jour friend, and produces an 
evening: of surpassing enjoyment. 

THE NEW OLYMPIA RESTAURANT 

308 W. Baltimore St. — 306 E. Baltimore St 

The Olympiii serves nothing' but clean, good io^d. 



10 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



GENERAL. 



THE MERGER WITH THE COLLEGE OF 
PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS. 



Plans to merge the University of Maryland 
Medical School and the College of Physicians 
and Surgeons have at last been consummated. 
The new school will be known as the University 
of Maryland and the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons. In consequence of the merger, the 
city will have but two medical schools in the 
future — the new combined one and Johns Hop- 
kins. 

Also, in consequence of the merger, the com- 
bined school, it is practically certain, will receive 
from the regents of the Maryland State Univer- 
sity $15,000 for each of the years 1915 and 1916. 
An act of the last Legislature, which created the 
Maryland State University, gave that institution 
the sum named to be used for medical education 
in the State. The regents of the State University 
have withheld the money, pending the consumma- 
tion of the plans. Neither of the schools now 
receives State aid. 

The University of Maryland regents will be 
increased to include eight men as representatives 
of the College of Physicians and Surgeons ; and 
the medical faculty of the University, which num- 
bers 11 men, will be increased by 10 from the 
Physicians and Surgeons, making 31 in all. There 
will be no resignations. 

The plan of merger provides that the first and 
second year classmen of the schools will be taught 
by the combined faculty, probably in the buildings 
at the University. The third and fourth year 
classmen will be taught separately — that is, the 
University men at the University and the Phy- 
sicians and Surgeons men at the College — and by 
their present respective faculties. 

The new school will have three hospitals — the 
University, Mercy and the Maryland General. 
Incidentally, the University of Maryland, after 
the merger, will have 1499 students, not counting 
those at St. John's College, which constitutes the 
University's department of arts and sciences. If 
the roster of the latter institution be included, the 
student body of the L^niversity will number 169 I. 

The plan of merger has been accepted by all 
parties concerned, and will become effective im- 
mediately. For a number of years there has 
been a great desire to close up the disreputable 
medical schools of this city and to merge the good 



schools into one strong institution. One by one 
the weak schools have disappeared, and the mer- 
ger with the Baltimore Medical College in 1913 
lead the way to a consummation of the hope that 
we should soon be able to merge all the reputable 
schools except the Johns Hopkins, into one strong 
school. This happily is now effected. The fac- 
ulty of the College of Physicians and Surgeons 
do not come to us as suppliants, but agree to a 
merger in which they shall have full and ade- 
quate representation, from an altruistic belief that 
such a combination is for the best interests of 
medical education in this city and State. 

Work upon the merger has been under way 
for months. The last Legislature created the 
Maryland State University, the constituent mem- 
bers of which are all the colleges receiving State 
aid. State Senator William Milnes Maloy was 
the author of the measure creating the univer- 
sity, and has served as its provost. The pur- 
pose sought in the creation of the university 
was the prevention of unnecessary duplication 
of departments in State-aided institutions. And 
the State University authorities, having $15,000 
a year for two years to apply to medical educa- 
tion, have sought to bring the two schools to- 
gether, so that the money might be given them 
without duplication of effort and energy. 

In the meantime, the faculties of the schools 
were seeking a basis for combination, and finally 
they worked out one for themselves. They were 
assisted in the negotiations by William L. Mar- 
bury and J. Walter ^Lord, representing, respect- 
ively, the College of Physicians and Surgeons 
and the University of Maryland Medical School. 
Both faculties realized that medical education is 
so expensive in this day that tuition fees do not 
yield sufficient and that there must be either a 
considerable endowment — such as the Hopkins 
has — or State aid. 

The University of Maryland Medical School 
was established in 1807, and the College of Phy- 
sicians and Surgeons in 1872. Dr. Arthur M. 
Shipley is acting dean of the former and Dr. 
William F. Lockwood is dean of the latter. The 
combined school will be affiliated with the Mary- 
land State University after it receives State aid. 

It is worth noting, incidentally, that the Uni- 
versity of Maryland Law School recently ab- 
sorbed the Baltimore Law School, so that there 
is now only one law school in the city. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



11 



WORK OF THE LAW HONOR COM- 
MITTEE. 



Shortly after the last examination given the 
Junior Law Class, the Committee on Student 
Honor, having received charges against five stu- 
dents, met to consider same. In the course of 
the proceedings one of the accused was found to 
be a member of a higher class, and being outside 
the jurisdiction of this committee, the case was 
dismissed. The remaining four men, members 
of the Junior Class, were tried and found not 
guilty. 

The conditions under which the examinations 
were held subjected the Honor System to a severe 
test, inasmuch as the class had no separate room, 
and students in other classes taking the examina- 
tions together with them, it was found difficult to 
determine over whom the Honor Committee had 
jurisdiction. 

There was no ill-feeling against the Committee 
for imposing upon the accused appearing before 
them and troubling them with the unpleasantness 
necessarily the result of its action. After the 
trial was over the accused all stated that in the 
beginning they had entertained grave doubts as to 
the ultimate success of the System, but after hav- 
ing seen the practical workings of the Honor 
Committee, they expressed the belief that it was 
practical and worthy of commendation. 

o 

MEDICAL— GRADUATE. 



The Medical Alumni Association held its an- 
nual meeting at the Emerson Hotel, at 7 o'clock, 
P. M., May 31, 1915. Immediately following 
the business meeting the members adjourned to 
the roof garden, where the annual banquet was 
held. The Faculty of Physic acted as host, and 
over 140 doctors, including the members of the 
graduating class, were present. 

Dr. James H. Jarrett, president of the associa- 
tion, was unable to be present, owing to illness. 
In his absence, Dr. Joseph T. Smith delivered 
the introductorv address. 



LEFRANC & AULT 

ARE SHOWING 

NEW NECKWEAR 

AND 

NEW SHIRTS 

AT THE 

"SHIRT SHOP" 

421 N. Howard St., at Franklin 



Dr. G. Lane Taneyhill was toastmaster. He 
introduced the Rev. Dr. DeWitt M. Benham, 
pastor of Eutaw Place Presbyterian Church, who 
delivered an illustrated lecture upon his travels 
in England. Addresses were delivered by Dr. 
Thomas A. Ashby, representing the Faculty of 
Physic, and L. A. Bowie, representing the class 
of 1915. W. G. Horn and James M. Price sang 
several solos. 

Officers for the coming year were elected as 
follows : 

President, Dr. Albert H. Carroll; Vice-Presi- 
dents, Dr. W. E. Wiegand, Dr. Carroll C. Lock- 
ard. Dr. J. Clement Clark ; Corresponding Secre- 
tary, (Dr. John Houff), Dr. J. I. Pennington; 
Recording Secretary, Dr. M. O. Reik ; Assistant 
Secretary, Dr. Howard W. Jones ; Treasurer, Dr. 
John HoufT. 

Executive Committee : — Dr. G. Lane Taney- 
hill, Dr. B. Merrill Hopkinson, Dr. C. R. Winter- 
son, Dr. A. D. Machonichie, Dr. Irving J. Spear, 
Dr. Albert H. Carroll. 

Necrology : — Dr. Joseph T. Smith. 

Central Membership Committee : — Dr. Albert 
H. Carroll, Chairman ; Dr. G. Lane Taneyhill, 
Dr. Guy Steel (Easton), Dr. J. C. Travers (Bal- 
timore), Dr. John Houff (Baltimore), Dr. I. 
Stone Worthington (State), Dr. Marshall West 
(Catonsville). 



WILLIAM J. MILLER 
Jewelry, Diamonds, Watches 

College Jewelry 
Class Pins and Rings, College Seals 
28 East Baltimore St. 



E LLERBROCK 

stiff ffipaitttg CEoUrgp pijotngraplipr 
Baltimore. Md. 22 W. LexingtoH St., • Baltimore, Md. 



13 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



Blome's Chocolates 

Known and enjoyed by students of the 
University for more than half a century. 

Retail Department 
BLOME'S CANDY STORE 

Established 1859 621 W. Baltimore St. 

At the last joint meeting of the Faculty of 
Physic of the University of Maryland and Phy- 
sicians and Surgeons, the following University 
Faculty of Physic was decided on : 

Randolph Winslow, A.M., M.D., LL.D. ; L. E. 
Neale, M.D., LL.D. ; C. W. Mitchell, A.M., M.D. ; 
T. A. Ashby, M.D., LL.D.; J. Holmes Smith, 
M.D.; John C. Hemmeter, M.D., Ph.D., Sc. D., 
LL.D.;" Arthur M. Shipley, M.D. ; David C. 
Streett, A.M., M.D. ; Samuel K. Merrick, M.D. ; 
Ridgely B. Warfield, M.D. ; Gordon Wilson, M. 
D. ; J. W. Chambers, M.D., Sc.D., F.A.C.S. ; Wil- 
liam Simon, M.D., Sc.D. ; William F. Lockwood, 
M.D. ; George W. Dobbin, A.B., M.D. ; William 
Royal Stokes, M.D., Sc.D. ; Harry Friedenwald, 
A.B., M.D., F.A.C.S. ; Archibald Harrison, M.D., 
F.A.C.S. ; Gary B. Gamble, Jr., A.M., M.D. ; Wil- 
liam S. Gardner, M.D., F.A.C.S. ; Standish Mc- 
Cleary, M.D ; Julius Friedenwald. A.M., M.D. 

Dr. G. Carroll Lockard was made Director 
of the Medical Clinic and will have charge of 
the medical service in the Hospital and Medi- 
cal Dispensary. Dr. Lockard will be on half 
time service, giving four hours a day to the work. 

Dr. Frank S. Lynn, class of 1907, was made 
chief of the out-patient department, and will 
have supervision of the entire dispensary. 

Dr. William R. Stokes, class of 1891, was 
elected professor of pathology and bacteriology. 
Dr. Standish McCleary, Physicians and Sur- 
geons, class of 1890, professor of pathology ; Dr. 
Spencer will be full time man in the department 
of pathology ; Dr. W. Simon was elected pro- 
fessor of chemistry ; Dr. Samuel J. Fort, of ma- 
teria medica ; Dr. Zueblin, professor of experi- 
mental medicine ; Dr. Hirsh, who recently re- 
signed the chair of pathology, was elected pro- 
fessor of clinical pediatrics and Dr. Kirle, pro- 
fessor of medical jurisprudence. 

Dr. Joseph Chester Lutz, class of 1914, was ap- 
pointed resident pathologist. Dr. James Chester 
Brogden, class of 1911-, formerly of the surgical 
service at Bay View, has been appointed chief 
resident physician in the University Hospital. 



Now Ready for Spring, 1915. See Us for Classy Clothes 

Suits to Measure, $15.00 to $35.00 
A. JACOBS & SONS, Tailors 

899 NORTH HOWARD STREET 

Open Evenings 9 P. M. Cor. Richmond St. 

Dr. Harry M. Stein, class of 1914, formerly 
of the Tuberculosis Division of Bay View, was 
appointed chief resident physician at the Hos- 
pital. 

o 

LAW— SENIOR. 



Through an error it was stated in the June 
number of the "Gazette" that the Honor Case 
was won by Messrs. Harper and Soboloff. We 
wish to correct this mistake by saying that the 
case was won by Messrs. Zieget and Silverwood. 

■ 

LAW— JUNIOR. 



(Editor this column, this issue — 
DAVt LowENSTEiN, Jr.) 

In the last month's issue of The Gazette, some 
very inquisitive gentleman rather significantly 
inquired into the identity of a certain Elizabeth. 
''Who is this Elisabeth?" he asks in characters 
at once impressive and startling. Yes, li'hof 
zvho? by all means, WHO? 

She is 

A girl in the heart of Maryland, 

Who makes daddy's home a fairyland. 

Rev. Dave, raves o'er and prizes her, 

His only child, just idolizes her; 

This little dear so clever, bright and cheery, 

Makes life pleasant, gay, and merry. 

Sweet as a tulip, pretty as the rose. 

She's daddy's jewel where'er he goes! 

Now, how do you like that, you big stiff! 



Now that A. C. Joseph's brother Dan is a mem- 
ber of the City Council may we not soon expect 
to hear of A. C. himself entering the political 
world and landing a job? We make no refer- 
ence here, of course, to the position left vacant 
by the Hon. Grape Juice Bryan leaving the cabi- 
net so suddenly. Now, mind you, we are not 
insinuating that Mr. Joseph is a less able states- 
man than Air. Brvan. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



13 



Hart Schaffner & Marx, 
Kuppenheimer, 
"Society Brand" 



The clothes thai college men 
like a lot 



Balttmore Street At Chdrles 



Albert C. Ritchie, Attorney-General, looks 
good, sounds good, and he'll make good. 



Were any of our classmates among that sad, 
meek and deluded tribe of mushroom boobs, The 
June Bridegrooms? 

Hans Froelicher, Jr. please answer the roll 
call when your name is read and let us know if 
you are still among the living! 



The Profs, have the last guess until 1917 ; after 
that its the Court of Appeals. 



The Baltimore Sunpaper refuses to commit it- 
self, — but this column is strong for Eugene 
O'Dunne for State's Attorney ! 



A pleasant summer boys — but don't rock the 
boat. 



DENTAL— GRADUATE. 



Dr. J. Ben Robinson, class of 1914, has severed 
his connection with the University, and has lo- 
cated at 504 Prunty Building, Clarksburg, W. 
Va., where he is engaged in private practice. We 
are glad to state, however, that he still maintains 
his interest in the Gazette. He has our best 
wishes for success. 



PHARMACY— GRADUATE. 



The thirty-third annual meeting of the Mary- 
land Pharmaceutical Association was held at 
Braddock Heights, Md., June 32nd to 26th, in- 
clusive, with Headquarters at Hotel Braddock. 

This location is convenient and accessible to all 
members. There is no more beautiful scenery 
in Maryland. The business and social program. 



in addition to the beauties, of nature, made it 
well worth while for all who attended. 

The entertainment programs of our meetings 
have always been enjoyable, but the committee 
for this year made a new record in this respect 
and made it impossible for any one to look on 
any dull moments. The fact that a meeting of 
the General Assembly of Maryland will be held 
during the coming winter, made this meeting a 
very important one from a legislative standpoint, 
which just now is a vital one to the pharmacists 
of the State. The attendance was large and 
representative. 

Several important addresses were delivered on 
legislative, as well as on other subjects of interest, 
and the reports of several committees were up 
to the usual standard. 

Our Association has steadily grown in mem- 
bership, influence and in service to its members. 
Each member owes attendance to its meetings, 
continued interest in its growth, and participa- 
tion in the work it hopes to do in the future. 
Your attendance at the meetings, prepared to 
take an active part in the business program and 
in the entertainment features, will enable you, 
we believe, to go away full of enthusiasm for 
the Association. 

Every pharmacist in Maryland is welcome at 
all meetings and is cordially invited to enjoy 
the social features. If you are not a member, 
this will be a good time to join, to meet your 
fellow-pharmacists, and to help this Association, 
which is working in the interest of every Mary- 
land pharmacist. 



Dr. Henry P. Hynson, who holds the chair of 
practical pharmacy and dispensing, in the de- 
partment of Pharmacy at the University, left re- 
cently on an extended tour West, which will 
take him to San Francisco and Alaska. 

A. H. PETTING 

Manufacturer of 

GREEK LETTER FRATERNITY JEWELRY 

213 N. Liberty St., - Baltimore, Md. 
Factory: 212 Little Sharp St. 



Memorandum package sent to any fraternity member through the 
secretary of the chapter. Special designs and estimates furnished on 
medals, rintfsand pins for athletic meets, etc. 



14 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



4> 



quAi 



^lEHL 

Clothes 



built at 605 W. Baltimore St., 
just around the corner from the 
University, are kept pressed with- 
out cost. 

Suits $15 to $40 

ACADEMIC— GRADUATE. 

The graduation exercises of St. John's Col- 
lege were held in the gymnasium June 16th, at 
10 :30 A. M. There were sixteen graduates, 
eight of whom received the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts and eight that of Bachelor of Science. 
They were as follows : 

Bachlor of Arts. 
Walter Nelson Rider — First Honor, Hebron, Md. 
Henry Devries Cassard Woodstock, Md. 



$18 



We've an idea that 
most of you young men 
will be interested in the 
extreme value, new style 
suits which we have 
prepared for you at $18. 
They have the appearance 
of $25 garments— try 
one on and see for yourself. 



$18 
tl&mbu9gets* 



Baltimore & Hanover Sts. 



HEPBRON & HAYDON 

We Sell Every Law Book and Syllabus Use'i 

at the U. of M. 

St. Paul 8794 1243-53 CALVERT BLDG. 

Charles Thaddeus Hauver. . . .Middletown, Md. 

Herbert Eugene Jump Cordova, Md. 

Wilbert Lacy Merriken Federalsburg, Md. 

Charles Brown Mowbray .... Federalsburg, Md. 

John Edwin Selby Cheltenham, Md. 

Daniel Eugene Walsh Westminster, Md. 

Bachelor of Science. 
Harvey Clarence Mittendorf. . .Cincinnati, Ohio. 
William Dougherty Wrightson. .Baltimore, Md. 

John Lawrence DeMarco Baltimore, Md. 

Francis Arnold Hause Marsh, Penna. 

Orville Monroe Moore Baltimore, Md. 

Oliver Parry Winslow Baltimore, Md. 

Robert Reid Ritchie Lonaconing, Md. 

Chauncey Victor Wilson. . . .Nottingham, Penna. 
The Honorary degree of Master of Arts was 
conferred upon Dr. Frederic Rankin, class of 
1909, of 2134 Maryland Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 
The honorary degree of Doctor of Laws was con- 
ferred upon Judge John C. Rose, a member of 
the Law Faculty. 



Dr. James W. Cain, president of Washington 
College, Chestertown, Md., and former vice- 
president of St. John's College, who tendered 
his resignation as president of Washington Col- 
lege, has withdrawn his resignation, and it is 
announced he will continue at the head of the 
college. 

NURSING. 



Miss Julia C. Foley, assistant Superintendent 
of Nurses, of the Hospital, is spending the month 
at her home in Loch Raven, Md., 



Miss Betty White, class of 1915, has been ap- 
pointed assistant Superintendent of Nurses of the 
Walker Memorial Hospital, Wilmington. N. C. 



Miss Marian Farney, class of 1916, underwent 
an operation at the Hospital recently, and has 
gone to her home in Wagover, N. C, to recu- 
perate. 

Miss Lucy Hill, class of 1914, has accepted a 
position at Bay View Hospital. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 15 

^:=:::^:==:= Intercollegiate Bureau of Academic Costume, Wbany.N.v. 



8 W Saratoo* St 




tBallimore, 

Maryland 



Miss Maud E. Miller, class of 1914, has re- 
signed her position as night Superintendent of 
Nurses at the Hospital and Miss Nettie Bay, 
class of 1915, has been appointed in her place. 
Miss Miller has accepted a position in the Robert 
Long Hospital, Indianapolis, Indiana, and will 
accompany Mrs. Clarke the last of this month. 



Miss Lulu Stepp, class of 1914, is visiting 
relatives in Boston, Mass. 



Mrs. Ethel Palmer Clarke, R. N., fonnerly 
Superintendent of the University Hospital Train- 
ing School for Nurses, vi'ho for the past year has 
been following advanced studies at the Teachers 
College, Columbia University, has completed her 
work there and will now go — July 1st — to the 
University of Indiana, where she has been ap- 
pointed Principal of the School of Nursing, and 
Superintendent of Nurses. 

The School of Nursing is an integral part of 
the State University, which is in the front rank 
of those educational institutions which have come 
of late to realize the necessity of a broader and 
higher plane of teaching of the art of nursing. 
Mrs. Clarke is well equipped for this advanced 
work and will bring to it a broad knowledge and 
wide experience. 

Miss Maud E. Miller, R. N., of the class of 
1914, LTniversity Hospital Training School for 
Nurses, will accompany Mrs. Clarke, as first as- 
sistant at the Robert Long Hospital, Indianapolis. 

Indiana. o 

BIRTHS. 



To Dr. Robert L. Mitchell, class of 190-^. and 
Mrs. Mitchell, of 2113 Maryland Avenue, June 
11, 1915, a son. 






LUTHER B. BENTON 
Dental Depot 



students' Outfits 
a Specialty 



305 North Howard St. ] 

t 



COTRELL & 
LEONARD 

Offlclal Makers of 

Caps and 

Gowns 




Correct Hoods 
for All Degrees. 

Rich Gowns for 
Pulpit and Bench. 

Bulletin, Samples 
etc. on request 



To Dr. Humphrey William Butler, class of 
1913, and Mrs. Butler, of Canhotinoho, Brazil, 
S. A., in April, a daughter. 

o 



MARRIAGES. 



James Henry Samuel, D. D. S., class of 1914, 
of Morristown, N. J., to Miss Rae Fielding 
Hotchkiss, of Auburn, N. Y., at the Osborne 
Hotel, Auburn, June 26th, 1915. Dr. and Mrs. 
Samuel will be "At Home" to their friends after 
the 15th of August at Morristown, N. J., where 
the groom is practicing his profession. 



Dr. Lewis Kyle Walker, class of 1911, of Ahos- 
kie, N. C, to Miss Grace Belle Stoneham, Uni- 
versity Hospital Training School for Nurses, 
class of 1914, of Monaskon, Va., at "Maidley," 
Monaskon, May 26, 1915. Dr. and Mrs. Walker 
will be "At Home" to their friends after June 
2, at Ahoskie, N. C. 



Dr. George Ward Disbrow, class of 191.3, of 
Newark, N. J., to Miss Virginia W. Sprecher, 
of Sykesville, Md., in Washington, D. C, May 
23, 1915. 

o 

DEATHS. 



Dr.Jefifefson D. Wright, class of 1882, a phy- 
sician and druggist of Louisville, Ga., died at his 
home there. April 14, 1915, aged 54 years. 



Dr. John D. Dickerson, Baltimore Medical 
College, class of 1892, a Fellow of the American 
Medical Association and a well-known practi- 
tioner of Stockton, Md., died in Wilmington, 
Del., December 25, 1914, from heart disease, aged 
57 years. 

Dr. Niles Harrison Shearer, class of 1866, a 
member of the Medical Society of the State of 
Pennsylvania and American Academy of Medi- 
cine, surgeon of volunteers during the Civil War, 
a druggist and financier of York, Pa., died at his 
home in that city, May 5, 191.'', aged 73 years. 



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THi um 



IT¥ CAIETT! 




They give 
New views to life, and teach us how to Hve ; 
They soothe the grieved, the stubborn they chastise. 
Fools they admonish, and confirm the wise : 
Their aid they yield to all : they never shun 
The man of sorrow, nor the wretch undone : 
Unlike the hard, the selfish and the proud. 
They fly not sullen from the suppliant crowd ; 
Nor tell to various people various things, 
But show to subjects what they show to kings. 

Now bid thy soul man's busy scenes exclude, 
And view composed this silent multitude : — 
Silent they are, but though deprived of sound. 
Here all the living languages abound; 
Here all that live no more ; preserved they lie, 
In tombs that open to the curious eye. 
Blessed be the gracious Power, who taught mankind 
To stamp a lasting image of the mind ! 

— G. Crabbe. 




VOL. n. 



BALTIMORE, MD., AUGUST, 1915 



No. 2 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



Vol. II. 



AUGUST 1, 1915. 



No. 2. 



CONTENTS 



MR. BRYAN DELIVERS COMMENCE- 
MENT ADDRESS 19 

GENERAL READING FOR A PROFES- 
SIONAL LAW STUDENT. Hon. 
James P. Gorter 19 

A POST - GRADUATE COURSE IN 

LAW. J. Wm. Schimmel 20 

WAR AND THE PHYSICIAN 21 

BIOGRAPHY OF "1915" LAW DEPART- 
MENT, DAY CLASS. Abraham 
Rosenthal 21 



EDITORIALS 22 

Editorially Expressed. 
Editorially Replied. 

ITEMS 24 

QUIPS 29 

BIRTHS 30 

MARRIAGES 30 

DEATHS 31 



i 



Footwear for the College Man at Moderate Price. 

N. HESS' SONS - - 8 E. Baltimore, St. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE, MD. 

HON. PHILLIPS LEE GOLDSBOROUGH, Governor of Maryland, Chancellor. 
THOMAS FELL, A.M., Ph.D., LL. D., D. C. L., ProvosL 



ST. JOHN'S COLLEQE, Annapolis, Md. (^pj° 



EPARTMENT OF 
S AND SCIENCES 



) 



Founded 1696. Classical and Scientific College Courses leading to degrees. Special advantages to stu- 
dents purposing to study the professions. Military Department under army officers. Also Preparatory 
School for boys fitting for St. John's or other colleges. Term begins SepI :mber 15. Address 

THOMAS FELL, Ph.D., LL.D., D.C.L., President. 



DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE. 

Four vears' graded course. New Laboratory Build- 
ing. Clinical advantages unsurpassed. Teaching Staflf 
of 66. 109lh Annual Session will begin October 1. 
1915, and continue 8 months. 

ARTHUR M. SHIPLEY, M. D., Acting Dean. 

DEPARTMENT OF DENTISTRY. 

34th Annual Session begins October 1, 1915, and 
continues 7 months. 26 Instructors. New Building, 
For catalogue containing course of study, etc., apply to 

TIMOTHY O. HEATWOLE, M.D., D.D.S., Dean, 

Baltimore, Md. 



DEPARTMENT OF LAW. 

60th .'Vnnual Session will begin Sept. 28, 1915. Faculty 
of 26. For catalogue containing full information ad- 
dress the Secretary, 301 St. Paul Street, Baltimore. 
Maryland. 

EDWIN T. DICKERSON, Secretary. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACY. 

(Formerly Maryland College of Pharmacy). 73rd 
.Annual Session begins September 25, 1915. 11 In- 
structors. New Laboratories. Address 

CHARLES CASPARI, JR., Phar.D., Dean, 

Ba'.tinr^ie. Md. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 

Published Monthly in the Interest of the University of Maryland. 
PRICE $1.00 PER YEA3EI. 



Oontributionj solicited from Alumni of the 
University. 



Business Address, 608 Professional Building, 
Baltimore, Md. 



Vol. II. 



BALTIMORE, MD., AUGUST 1, 1915. 



No. 2. 



MR. BRYAN DELIVERS COMMENCE- 
MENT ADDRESS. 



Former Secretary of State, William Jennings 
Bryan, delivered the commencement address at 
the graduation exercises of. the University of 
Maryland held at the Lyric, Jime 1, 1915. 

Speaking on the relationship of man to govern- 
ment, Mr. Bryan said : 

"The first thing I want to say to you is that our 
theory of government is the best the world has 
ever known. (Applause.) I do not say that it is 
the best government ; I say it is the nearest to 
perfection which the world has known. How do 
I know that? Because the world is marching 
toward that form of government. You may go 
where you please and you will find that the world 
is coming more and more toward acceptance of 
the theory of government by and of the people. 

"Some of you may ask if that is true in this 
time of war. I answer that war is not the normal 
condition of the world and that peace is, and 
that the true movements of the human race are 
not seen in war, but in peace. Times of war and 
peace may be compared with times of anger and 
calmness in a man. Calmness is a man's normal 
state. If he were angry all the time he would not 
live a year. He would burn himself out. 

"And, here, let me say that the eras of war are 
growing fewer and the eras of peace are growing 
longer. I believe the influences of peace are be- 
coming stronger and that the terrible war now 
raging across the waters will hasten the day when 
the nations of the earth will no longer know war. 

"Now, the last 25 years show the growth of the 
popular form of government. It is the govern- 
ment of the future. So I would have you under- 
stand the controlling principle of this form of 
government. It is that the people have a right 
to what they want. A strong statement, you say. 
Yes, and it has been challenged. But I have tried 
to make it strong, and if you know a stronger one, 
I will use it. A strong statement, you know, 



draws out the opposition and then you are able to 
find and overcome error. 

"In government, you must have the rule of the 
majority or the rule of the minority; you must 
give the presumption to one or the other. If you 
would give the presumption to the majority, you 
need not believe that the majority will not make 
mistakes. 

"You cannot escape mistakes. In a monarchy, 
the king makes the mistakes for the people ; in an 
aristocracy, the few make mistakes for the people, 
and history shows that sometimes they find it so 
profitable to make mistakes that they are unwill- 
ing not to do so. You will have mistakes in any 
form of government. I hold that the people have 
a right to make their own mistakes ; that the ma- 
jcjrity should rule. 

"You will find that the people make mistakes, 
but that they never make them intentionally. 
And you will find, too, that when they discover 
their mistakes they are prompt to remedy them. 
It never pays the people to make mistakes ; it 
always pays them to correct them; when made 
unintentionally. 

"And now let me say this word to you about 
your part in a government in which the people 
rule. Majority rule depends upon the acquies- 
cence of all in the action of the majority; it is, 
therefore, your duty to support the expressed 
will of the majority. That is the only way in 
which you can maintain free institutions. The 
man who would substitute minority rule for that 
of the majority is a traitor to free institutions." 

o 

GENERAL READING FOR A PROFES- 
SIONAL LAW STUDENT. 



Hon. James P. GorTer, Judge Supreme Bench 
of Baltimore City. Class of 1881. 



One-half an hour a day at least should be given 
to general reading by one studying law as a pro- 
fession. A lawyer must not only master the 
science of his profession, but to accomplish the 



20 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



best and highest results, he should be a man of 
education and familiar with all matters of gen- 
eral interest. To become a man of education 
one must not only read but read thoughtfully the 
best books ; read them in such a way that he 
grasps and comprehends the meaning of the 
writer. This requires really more than the mere 
reading of books; it requires a careful study of 
them. It would be a wise thing for a young man 
starting out in his professional studies to get the 
advice of someone qualified to advise him as to 
what books he should read ; to purchase such 
books, well printed and bound, then to read them 
carefully and repeatedly, so as to make them his 
own. 

He should endeavor not only to become familiar 
with all the thoughts and ideas contained in these 
books, but to learn and appreciate the manner and 
style in which those thoughts and ideas are ex- 
pressed. It is essential to a lawyer to write and 
speak well. A great aid to learning to write and 
speak is to become a man of education ; and 
there is no better way of educating one's self than 
by taking some of the classics, say the works of 
Milton, and studying them diligently and thought- 
fully. Endeavor to get at the author's meaning, 
know all his illusions, whether biblical, classical 
or political ; learn the history of the times when 
he wrote; the influences, religious and political, 
that affected those times ; the author's relation- 
ship to the times and their effect upon him and 
his influence upon them. Read much not many 
things, is a good maxim to follow. 

A professional man should not only thus edu- 
cate himself, but he should keep well posted on 
all the questions of the day. To do this he should 
subscribe to two or three of the best periodicals 
and read them carefully and understandingly. 

The law, after all, is only the technique of the 
profession. A man to reach the highest walks 
of his calling must be equipped with a general 
knowledge of all subjects. This he can only ac- 
quire by general reading. One can read with 
more care and interest his own books. He should 
make them his intimate friends. They will be 
friends upon whom he may always rely. 



A POST-GRADUATE COURSE IN LAW. 



J. Wm. Schimmel, 
Member of the Class of 1916. 



At a banquet of the Class of 1916 of the Law 
School of the L^niversity of Maryland held some- 
time ago at the Rennert, some of the members of 
the faculty of law addressed the class. Mr. 
Ward B. Coe, one of the faculty, promulgated 
the propaganda of a (voluntary) post-graduate 
course, which would treat some of the most im- 
portant branches of law and politics, and which 
were not in the regular course of instruction now 
prevailing at the Law School. By voluntary, I 
mean, the fourth year's study would not be neces- 
sary for a degree. 

Mr. Coe said that he had tried on numerous 
occasions to get the faculty interested in his idea, 
but had received no encouargement from that 
body, the thought of the faculty being that the 
student wanted to get his degree and then prac- 
tice law with the least number of years of study 
possible and practicable. This, I think, is an 
erroneous idea, as there are quite a few men now 
studying law at the school who are real students 
and who would welcome an opportunity of learn- 
ing something about politics, political economy, 
the public service commission and law in Mary- 
land, the Workmen's Compensation Law, and a 
few other subjects very necessary to one who 
intends to practice law, but which are not taught 
at the University of Maryland. 

In the Register distributed annually by the Sec- 
retary of the Law School we find the following: 
"All the courses upon History and Politics at the 
Johns Hopkins University are open to law stu- 
dents upon the payment of very moderate fees, 
and are given at hours which do not interfere 
with the attendance upon the lectures at the Law 
School." 

Now with the post-graduate course on the 
course of study it would be unnecessary for stu- 
dents at the University of Mar}dand to attend the 
lectures at the Johns Hopkins University for 
these branches. Besides, these lectures at the 
Johns Hopkins University are given in the day- 
time. How about tfie night scholars at the Law 
School, who are willing to learn while working? 
This cuts them out of "History and Politics',' 
entirely. They can't attend the lectures at the 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



21 



Johns Hopkins University because they must 
work. Can't the faculty help them? The solu- 
tion of this is the starting of a post-graduate 
course. 

The question that the faculty wants answered 
is, will a post-graduate course pay? Can they 
get enough of the students to enroll for a fourth 
year? 

I am of the opinion it would pay. I think at 
least thirty to fifty students would come back for 
a post-graduate course, to take up the very essen- 
tial branches of law and politics not now included 
in our course of instruction at the Law School. 

Won't the students interested in this "post- 
graduate propaganda" let the secretary hear from 
them, so the faculty can take up the suggestion of 
Mr. Coe? Let the secretary or the dean know 
how many are willing and will come back for a 
post-graduate course, and if enough respond to 
make it practical, we can have the next year's 
Register omit one paragraph which has been in 
it so long that the printer has his type already set 
for the next year's work. 



WAR AND THE PHYSICIAN. 



An unequaled opportunity awaits the Christian 
Scientist, the Chiropractor, Osteopath and other 
followers of strange gods, to prove the worth 
of their theories and doctrines. Never before in 
history has there been such a scourge of death, 
suffering and disease, as follows in wake of the 
European war. Servia is plague-stricken with 
typhus, typhoid and dysenteries are following 
every army, and sepsis, gangrene and tetany are 
adding to the mortality among the wounded. 
There has been a shortage of medical supplies, 
vaccines, serums, and dressings. Ordinary rules 
of warfare have been so disregarded that the 
wounded can only be reached after nightfall, and 
the deaths among doctors and nurses of the Red 
Cross Service have been unduly large. In no 
other war has the percentage of deaths among 
physicians been so large. 

Up to now we have heard of no body of Scient- 
ists rushing to the front — no Chiropractor Corps 
have been formed, — no one but the regular phy- 
sician is at the front, risking his life in the per- 
formance of his sacred calling. 

There has been no Chiropractor to manipulate 
the spines of the sick and dying, no Science prac- 



titioner placing in the hands of the suffering a 
copy of Mother Eddy's "Key to The Scriptures," 
and with eyes turned heavenward telling them 
that their suffering and pain is not real but only 
"mental error." 

In fact, wherever and whenever humanity calls 
for help, wherever the sick and dying, the maimed 
and wounded, the diseased and afflicted cry for 
help and succor, it is the regular physician who 
responds. It is his methods and treatments that 
are needed — it is the drugs and serums, the anti- 
septics and anaesthetics that modern medicine has 
discovered and evolved — it is the principles of 
prophylaxis and hygiene that medical science has 
formulated that is conserving the health of the 
vast armies, combating infection and disease, and 
that in spite of the most unfavorable surroundings 
and conditions, limited supplies and facilities have 
raised the percentage of recoveries among the 
wounded higher than any previous war. 

— Medical Sentinel. 



BIOGRAPHY OF "1915" LAW DEPARTMENT, 
DAY CLASS. 



IN 1912 we entered here, 

The law to learn and master; 
Through toil and strife we tried to near. 

The source of knowledge faster. 

At first we thought it was a snap, 

When the lectures we came to hear. 
We'd sit and doze, then take a nap 

While the law was being made clear. 

We warmed our way into the heart 

Of Poe, Judge Bond and Bonaparte, 
Who through the course, with all their might 

Made Sales, Pleading and Contracts a real delight. 

Then came the sorrow and the tears; 

Few knew the Rule in Spencer's Case. 
It was Real Property that raised our fears 

With Conditional Fees and Base. 

At last we pulled through one long year; 

And then we made it two. 
Our Christmas Banquet was the Peer; 

'Twas also something new. 

Once with the Seniors we did clash ; 

One Friday, Practice night. 
It was a big and daring dash ; 

'Twas termed a playful fight. 

Here, ready, we stand, 

The Senior band, 
To win the world's esteem. 

As through life we roam, 
We'll remember our home, 

Alma Mater, "1915." —A. R. 'IS. 



22 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 

A MONTHLY JOURNAL 

Devoted to the interests of the University 

of Maryland. 

Subscription Price, $1.00 Per Annum, In Advance 

Reprints Furnished At Cost 

Advertising Rates Submitted Upon Request. 

608 Professional Building 

BALTIMORE, MD. 



Editorial Board. 

J. BEN ROBINSON, D.D.S "i ,, ,.^ . „, . „ 

A T1 1.T » T'/^T7T-.T> ,1" T (. . . fiditors-in-Chief. 

A. B. MAKOVER, '17, Law j 

NATHAN WINSLOW, M.D Business Manager. 

Graduate Members. 

THOMAS FELL, LL.D Academic. 

STANWOOD COBB, B.A Academic. 

H. M. ROBINSON, M.D Medical. 

ALBERT H. CARROLL, M.D Medical. 

F. J. VALENTINE, D.D.S Dental. 

SAMUEL WANT, LL. B Law. 

JOHN H. SKEBN, LL. B Law. 

A. A. SONNENBURG, Phar.D Pharmacy. 

J. M. BRANSKY, Phar.D Pharmacy. 

M. E. SULLIVAN, R.N Nursing. 

Undergraduate Members. 

C. V. WILSON Academic. 

H. GOLDMAN, '15; F. C. MARINO, 

'16; C. 0. WOLF, '17 Medicine, 

H. E. WATERMAN, 15; A. Z. ALD- 

RIDGE, '16; E. B LANCASTER, 

'17 Dental. 

J. A. HAGGERTY,'15; B. 0. LIGHT- 

NER, '15; C. N. MATTHEWS,t'^''£:iir.i.4 

DAVE LOWENSTEIN, JR., '17. Law. 

A. L. STERLING, 'IF Pharmacy. 

J. E. EVANS, '16... , Y.M.C.A. 

B. C. LIGHTNER, ' . Advertising. 

B. G. GOLD, '15 College Notes. 

A. G. DE QUEVEDO Latin-American. 

L. A. BUIE, '15 House Notes. 

LINDSAY ROGERS, '16 General Items. 

AUGUST 1, 1915. 



EDITORIALLY EXPRESSED. 



In the July Gazette, we departed somewhat 
from our usual form of writing and made ref- 
erence to the present European struggle. We 
attempted to attack Kings and wars and the mili- 
tary spirit. Since the appearance in print of what 
we had to say, we have received two caustic 
reprimands from readers of the Gazette. The 
argument of the one, declaring that we have done 
Germany an injustice, the other, condemning us 



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for violating the neutrality of the American spirit. 
In the first case a knowledge of circumstances 
will justify our position; in the second case a 
knowledge of the meaning of neutrality will suf- 
fice to satisfy. However, for fear of any injured 
feeling on the part of our pro-German readers, 
we insist that no offense was meant to the great 
German people. It is their misfortune that they 
are in this day of enlightenment ruled by one 
who as thoroughly believes in the "divine right 
of kings" as Louis XIV. 



There is much satisfaction to be had from the 
thought that the efforts of the University of Mary- 
land and the College of Physicians and Surgeons 
are unified. It means a greater efficiency and bet- 
ter results. It means that in calling the attention 
of the public to the service of schools of this grade 
that the sacrifice each one has made to blend these 
two long established institutions must call for 
greater admiration and greater patronage. Johns 
Hopkins has its place as distinctly as does the 
University of Maryland, but the latter enjoys the 
more enviable distinction of rendering first aid 
to society in that it gets closer to humble human 
needs. Long live this new formed unit, and may 
she continue to prosper till all the world shall 
rise and call her blessed. 



"PATRONIZE 
OUR ADVERTISERS" 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



33 



EDITORIALLY REPLIED. 



It is always bad weather when editors take 
to fighting each other, for the consequences are 
woeful to behold. There results such a flinging 
of ink-wells, paste-pots, shears, and other news- 
paper paraphanalia in so unchildish and hap- 
hazard a manner, that the conflict is not long over 
before the paper becomes defendant in law-suits 
for personal injuries to employees. Yet man will 
fight, for fundamentally he is a warring animal, 
a lustful beast that glories in the brutal game, and 
who charges at the first blast of the trumpet. So 
we take our editorial sword and shield and enter 
the arena to meet our co-editor-in-chief on the 
question of Germany's position in this war. 

Our readers will recall that in this place of our 
last issue one of the editors-in-chief of the 
University Gazette took occasion to label His 
Imperial Majesty the German Emperor, as a cer- 
tain "William Kaiser, tiie author of a serial en- 
titled 'The Great European War.' " His further 
references to his Majesty were by no means more 
respectful, for he later described him as "the 
present ruler, or mis-ruler, of that doomed peo- 
ple known as the Germans." (Doomed, indeed, 
when they own almost all of Belgium, an eighth 
of France, part of Russia, and not a foot of their 
beloved Fatherland in the hands of the enemy!) 
He then informs us that when "this same Wil- 
liam Kaiser ascended the throne, he dedicated 
and consecrated himself to the theory of legalized 
murder, and it is claimed by some that he declares 
God to be his accessory." (Horrible, gruesomely 
horrible, for God is only with the moral Eng- 
lish!) It would be superfluous to reprint the 
various other epithets and slurs cast at Kaiser 
Wilhelm for they are all of the same type, to-wit : 
the regular, willy-nilly rumble-bumble about 
starting the war, murdering the innocent, and^re- 
tarding the progress of civilization. Heinous 
and bloody are the deeds attributed to Germany's 
ruler.. 

But throwing mud at the Kaiser is the favorite 
diversion of the hysterical observers of this war. 
The fighting men are too busy with their tasks 
to bother themselves with blaspheming the Ger- 
man name, and it is left for neutral America, the 
press backed by the manufacturers of munitions 



of war, old maids, yodlers, burlesque troupes, and 
a stay-at-home coroner's jury of Cork, to spit 
at the German flag. We are indeed surprised 
that our colleague should fall in line with such 
a motley crowd and burst out with imprecations 
and invectives against the Kaiser. 

For our own part we do not believe that Ger- 
many is right in this war. Nevertheless, it is 
equally hard for us to understand that the Allies 
are any more justified than their enemies. In 
fact, it is our hope that Germany will be humili- 
ated because we believe that her militarism is a 
menace to world peace. By humiliated we do not 
mean destroyed — for there could be no greater 
blow to civilization than the destruction of a 
nation that can teach us efificiency, the greatest 
present need of civilized countries. Efficiency 
means everything: Art, Science, Philosophy, 
Manufacture, Prosperity. As Mr. E. W. Howe 
says, "What efficiency will do in war, it will 
also accomplish in peace. Liberally translated, 
the much-discussed German term, Kiiltur, prob- 
ably means efficiency." 

There is one thing that we in America should 
strive to attain during this conflict — and that is 
a judicial temperament that is not inflamed by re- 
ports from the English Press Bureau, and which 
results in such hysterical yelping from coast to 
coast. The place for every man and newspaper 
in this country is in the section marked "Strict 
Neutrality," for if we continue to roam about 
casting slurs and gibes at Germany, we will soon 
intimately know what a 42-centimeter shell 
means. There are no Zeppelins over this coun- 
try dropping bombs, and there is no official cen- 
sor here to announce to the rest of civilization 
that they are falling on women, children, invalids, 
incurables, hospitals and orphan asylums. There 
are no efficient German spies here who are shop- 
keepers by day, and at night builders of concrete 
bases for "Busy Berthas" to be placed there at 
the proper moment to blow our unfortified cities 
to smithereens. 

No, our place is behind the President, to act 
calmly, to check the impassioned speech that rises 
to our lips, to sit by the fire and watch — in a word, 
to throw ofif this rag of bogus neutrality and 
don a cleaner garnet. We know that the wliole 
fighting crowd is but a swarm of rats under the 



24 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



spell of that Pied Piper, Mars. And it is time 
that we settle down and understand that no one 
of the belligerents is individually responsible for 
this miserable business, for they have been wait- 
ing to spring at each other's throats ever since 
the map of Europe was re-arranged. The Eng- 
lish are no more fighting for their ideals than the 
Germans are for theirs. The greatest difference 
is that the Germans are performing their duties 
more like men than the English ; they cry less, 
drink less, cringe less ; they have no internal strife 
in Germany; recruiting officers don't have to 
get down on their knees to beg men to join the 
colors. 

Lastly, when you examine Kaiser Wilhelm un- 
der the Microscope of Truth, you will not find 
him the mean character our editor would have 
us think he is, or the blood-thirsty, fierce-looking, 
Satanic imp that American cartoonists draw daily 
in the attitude of murdering civilization. The 
ruler of the Germans is as sane, brilliant, and 
great a man as any of the rulers of the vi'orld. 
The German people love him as fervently as his 
forbears were adored by the populace in their 
palmiest days, reports from the English notwith- 
standing. 

Perhaps Germany's government is not the kind 
that meets with the approval of democratic 
America, but that, we respectfully submit, is the 
government of the German people, which has 
placed it in the position it holds today, and when 
they are tired of it they can replace it with the 
republicanism of this country. 



STYLISH and COMFORTABLE 
FOOT-WEAR 

FOR THE 

UNIVERSITY MAN 

All Leathers — Expert Fitting 
Moderate Prices 

WYMAN 

19 W.LEXINGTON STEET 



When we follow the crowd in denouncing Ger- f 
many and boosting the cause of the Allies, we are 
but cheating ourselves of the most sacred and 
valued right of a peaceful nation in time of war — 
Neutrality. A. B. M. 



ITEMS. 



MEDICAL— GRADUATE. 
Among the recent visitors to the University of 
Maryland were the following: Drs. Herbert A. ■ 
Codington, class of 1911, of Wilmington, N. C., 
who besides coming to see his friends here was 
buying some furnishings for the Hospital in Wil- 
mington of which he is superintendent, Norman 
T Kirk, class of 1910, of the U. S. Army, Howard 
Edward Lecates, class of 1913, formerly at Tru- 
deau, N. Y., Arthur E. Landers, class of 1907, of 
Crumpton, Md., William L. Byerly, class of 1911, 
of 1225 Maryland Avenue, Baltimore, Md., Wil- 
liam E. Gallion, Jr., class of 1912, of Darlington, 
Md., and Lawrence Kolb, class of 1908, U. S. P. 
H. Service, stationed at Ellis Island, New York. 



The friends of Dr. William A. EUingwood, 
class of 1908, will be pleased to know that he is 
superintendent of the Baltimore Eye, Ear, and 
Throat Hospital. Dr. EUingwood was for eigh- 
teen months resident at the Presbyterian Eye and 
Ear Hospital and after practicing aT Winterport, 
Maine, for several months, accepted the above 
position, which he will hold until October 1st, 
when he will engage in eye and ear work ex- 
clusively. 

Dr. John Smith Fenby, class of 191-1, was re- 
cently commissioned a First Lieutenant in the 
Maryland National Guard. 



Dr. E. S. Johnson, class of 1912, who was chief 
resident surgeon at St. Joseph's Hospital is now 
associated with Dr. Frank Martin. Dr. John- 
son will limit his practice to surgery. 



Dr. R. G. Willse, class of 1909, has re- 
turned from a trip to the Eastern Shore, during 
which trip Dr. Willse combined pleasure and 
business. 

On June 3, 191.5, a meeting was called of the 
members of the medical staff of the University 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



35 



for the purpose of forming a Medical Confer- 
ence to be held once a week during the summer 
months, for University alumni and other grad- 
uates assisting in the dispensary and hospital, 
for the purpose of conferring and exchanging 
opinions on all doubtful conditions of patients. 

Dr. Gordon Wilson was elected chairman and 
Dr. G. Carroll Lockard, secretary. The first 
meeting was held June 11, 1915, in the Amphi- 
theatre. The subject was Pneumothorax, which 
was thoroughly demonstrated and discussed. 

All graduates and others connected with the 
various departments of the medical school are 
cordially invited to attend these meetings. 



Dr. W. G. White, class of 1882, of Yorkville, 
S. C, was up to see the school recently. Dr. 
White was highly gratified to find that his son 
S. Howard White, who is a freshman at the Uni- 
versity, had attained a very excellent percentage 
in his first year's work. While in the city. Dr. 
White visited his classmates, Drs. Hiram Woods, 
Charles W. Mitchell, and J. Mason Hundley. 



Dr. Louie M. Limbaugh, class og 1914, has 
accepted a residency at the Union Protestant In- 
firmary, Jacksonville, Fla. Service will begin 
September 1st, and is mixed. 



Dr. Thomas L. Patterson, M.A., associate pro- 
fessor of biology and physiology, has resigned 
his position at the University in order to accept 
the position of assistant professor of physiology 
in the medical faculty of Queen's University, 
Kingston, Ontario. 



Dr. Charles C. Habliston, class of 1914, has 
been appointed resident physician at the Cleve- 
land Municipal Hospital for Tuberculosis. 



The following is a list of our Medical Alumni 
located in Pennsylvania, which is published by 
request : 

Tempest C. Miller, 1889, Abbottstown. 

Franklin B. Lauderbaugh, 1883, Addison. 

James Earle Quigley, 191 1, Adrian. 

Oliver C. Engle, 1887, Aliquippa. 

John D. Stevenson, B. M. C, 1905, Aliquippa. 

Geo. Harris Boyer, 1902, Allentown. 



Francis P. Ritter, 1881, Allentown. 

Jesse Grim Kistler, B. M. C, 1888, Allentown. 

Thos. M. Morrow, B. M. C, 1898, 937 17th 
street, Altoona. 

Frank Patterson, B. M. C, 1902, Logan House, 
Altoona. 

Harry S. Shimer, 1910, Alum Bank 

Walter C. Arthur, 1897, Ambridge. 

Albert N. Mellott, B. M. C, 1909, Ambridge. 

Geo. M. Krumbine, B. M. C, 1900, Ashville. 

Alfred G. Coughlin, B. M. C, 1905, Athens. 

Simon D. Shive, B. M. C, 1882, Bannerville 
(R. F. D., McClure). 

Thos. A. Carroll, B. M. C, 1904, Belfast. 

Lou Murray Mitchell, 1906, Belle Vernon. 

Edgar H. Sloan, B. M. C, 1898, Ben Avon, R. 
F. D., Pittsburgh. 

Wm. P. Shaw, 1893, Berlin. 

Geo. W. Fahrenbach, B. M. C, 1900, Bernville. 

Chas. E. Schlappich, B. M. C, 1898, Bernville. 

Chas. F. Livengood, B. M. C, 1896, Boswell. 

Milton U. Mclntire, B. M. C, 1907, Boswell. 

John A. Long, B. M. C, 1893, Bowmansville. 

Wm. Thos. Morgan, 1884, 713 Braddock ave- 
nue, Braddock. 

Howard A. Long, B. M. C, 1893, Brickerville. 

Harry Benj. Messmore, 1910, Brownsville. 

Malcom S. Council, 1896, Bryn Mawr. 

Thos. H. Smith, B. M. C, 1897, Burnham. 

Elgie L. Wasson, B. M. C, 1898, Butler. 

Eugene C. Wasson, B. M. C, 1905, Cambridge 
Springs. 

Alpheus E. Dann, 1904, Canton . 

Ellsworth F. Arble, B. M. C, 1894, Carroll- 
town. 

Richard E. Poole, 1892, Castle Shannon. 

Guy P. Asper, 1903, Chambersburg. 

Benj. F. Myers, B. M. C, 1892, Chambersburg. 

Fairfax G. Wright, 1903, Chambersburg. 

David C. Posey, B. M. C., 1908, Chanceford. 

Jos. C. Enos, 1904, Charleroi. 

James F. Might, 1910, Charleroi. 

Sight, smell and tiiste pinys big pnrt in digestion. 

Eating is a matter of tlie sjmpatlietic nerTes. "Jfo 
profit wliere no pleasure is taken." 

POSITIVELY we feed you BETTEB, at LESS COS>i 
end IiV THE CLEAIVEST enTironment than any ont 
has ever done before since time began. 

BRIGHTON LUNCH 

14 N. HOWARD STREET 



26 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



. i-;jaja'j 



James H. Peterman, B. M. C, 1895, Cherry 
Tree. 

Harry C. Donahoo, 1903, Chester. 

Geo. McVey Beatly, B. M. C, 1902, Chicora. 

Jno. R. S. Martin, 1904, Christiana. 

John C. Cort, 1885, Clairton. 

Frank C. Willard, B. M. C, Clarendon. 

F. S. Nevling, B. M. C, Clearfield. 

John M. Quigley, B. M. C, Clearfield. 

Benj. F. Hunt, B. M. C, 1897, Clearville. 

Clarence E. Imbrie, B. M. C, 1904, Clinton- 
ville. 

John R. Brodbeck, 1879, Cordorus. 

S. C. Wilson, B. M. C, Collamer. 

Herbert P. Meyers, 1903, Confluence. 

Henry H. Mclntire, B. M. C, 1907, Connells- 
ville. ij--*-! 

J. Clarence Frye, B. M. C, 191 1, Crenshaw. 

Aaron C. Coble, 1885, Dauphin. 

Jesse F. Cogan, B. M. C, 1892, Dawson. 

Charles R. Stevenson, 1897, De Lancey. 

Geo. W. Carter, 1878, Delta. 

James J. O'Connor, B. M. C, 1907, Dickson 
City. 

E. Earl Houck, B. M. C, 1906, 117 S. Stock- 
dale street, Dubois. 

Wm. C. Hocking, 1890, 41 W. ist street, Du- 
quesne. 

Albert J. Backer, B. M. C, 1895, Duryea. 

Edward P. Warren, 1868, East Berlin. 

Edward G. Bray, B. M. C, 1904, East Mauch 
Chunk. 

N. Allan Overmiller, B. M. C, 1895, East 
Prospect. 

George S. Travis, B. M. C, 1896, East Strouds- 
burg. 

Harry J. Bennett, B. M. C, 1906, Ebensburg. 

Vivian P. Edwards, B. M. C, 1909, Edwards- 
ville (Kingston P. O.). 

Jos. A. M. Smurl, B. M. C, 1896, Edwards- 
ville (Kingston P. O.). 

Henry D. Leh, 1884, Egypt. 

Edward C. Straessley, 1912, Elbon. 

Jesse W. Campbell, B. M. C, 1909, Elderton. 

D. W. Schafifner, 1887, Enhaut. 

Elmare R. Miller, 1892, Ephrata. 

Henry A. Lakin, 1903, 714 W. 8th street, Erie. 

Malcolm J. McCallum, B. M. C, 1901, 133 W. 
9th street, Erie. 



Wm. H. Raueche, B. M. C, 1895, 226 W. 8th 
street, Erie. 

Geo. M. Studebaker, B. M. C, 1896, 426 E. 
loth street, Erie. 

Chas. L. Dries, 191 1, Eshbach (R. F. D. Bech- 
telsville) . 

Harry M. Wilson, 1889, Evans City. 

Milton A. Noon, B. M. C, 1897, Everson. 

Chas. J. Pflueger, B. M. C, 1895, Fairchance. 

Wm. G. Berryhill, B. M. C, 1895, Farrell. 

John A. Hawkins, 1852, Fawn Grove. 

Vallandingham Hawkins, B. M. C, 1894, Fawn 
Grove. 

Wm. E. Lloyd, Jr., B. M. C, 1894, Forest 
City. 

Thomas A. Kurr, B. M. C, 1902, Fredericks- 
burg. 

Harry H. Stewart, B. M. C, 1907, Friedens- 
burg. 

George L. Brown, B. M. C, 1894, Fort Hunter. 

Harry M. Howland, B. M. C, 1903, Gaines. 

Richard T. Pollard, B. M. C, 1891, Garrett. 

Harry D. Hart, B. M. C, 1893, Quenesee. 

Harry M. Hartman, B. M. C, 1902, Gettys- 
burg. 

Walter Henry O'Neal, 1871, Gettysburg. 

Robt. E. Thomas, B. M. C, 1913,'Glen Camp- 
bell. 

Franklin A. Bushey, 1861, Greencastle. 

Charles C. Crownshare, 1905, Greensburg. 

John Walker Fairing, B. M. C, 1898, 234 N. 
Main street, Greensburg. 

James H. Fiscus, 1910, Foster and Sidney 
streets, Greensburg. 

Lemuel Ofifutt, 1876, 302 N. Otterman street, 
Greensburg. 

A. Seanar Keeple, 1909, Hannastown. 

Oliver T. Everhart, 1856, Hanover. 

Chas. A. Keagy, B. M. C, 1902, Hanover. 

Roswell J. Russell, 1882, Hanover. 

H. Hewitt Hooven, 1892, Hartford. 

J. Calvin Cummings, 1884, 138 S. 13th street, 
Harrisburg. 

Claude J. B. Flowers, 1907, 1609 Market street, 
Harrisburg. 

Franklin H. Garveeich, 1888, 1805 State street, 
Harrisburg. 

Jesse L. Lenker, B. M. C, 1907, 402 N. 2d 
street, Harrisburg. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



27 



Harvey A. Stine, B. M. C, 1912, i6th and 
Berryhill streets, Harrisburg. 

Hyman R. Wiender, 1912, 306 N. 2d street, 
Harrisburg. 

Wm. E. Wright, 1888, 206 State street, Har- 
risburg. 

Geo. A. Zimmerman, B. M. C, 19 10, 15th and 
Walnut streets, Harrisburg. 

Willard B. Campbell, B. M. C, 1897, Harris- 
ville. 

Robt. G. Gamble, 1884, Haverford. 

Fredk. A. Lobb, B. M. C., 1910, Hawley. 

Abram M. Miller, B. M. C, 1905, Hyndman. 

David T. Rees, B. M. C., 1896, Hyndman. 

Chas. Elmer Rink, B. M. C, 1904, Indiana. 

Wm. F. Weitzel, B. M. C, 1903, Indiana. 

James D. Hoffman, B. M. C, 1905, Jackson 
Center. 

Scott J. Titus, B. M. C, 1908, Jefferson. 

Chas. I. Shaffer, B. M. C, 1907, Jenners. 

Wm. W. Keim, B. M. C, 1905, Jerome. 

Jacob Alvin Comerer, B. M. C, 1897, Johns- 
town. 

Chas. Cleaveland Custer, B. M. C, 1909, Johns- 
town. 

Wm. Scott Griffith, B. M. C, 1898, Johns- 
town. 

Edward Louis Miller, 1884, Johnstown. 

Harry G. Nickel, B. M. C, 1898, Johnstown. 

Ira E. Sloan, B. M. C, 1892, Johnstown. 

Wm. Murdock Riley, B. M. C, 1913, Kennett 
Square. 

Henry W. Saul, B. M. C, 1894, Kutztown. 

Geo. B. Kirk, B. M. C, 1898, Kylertown. 

Robt. M. Bolenius, 1873, 48 S. Q^een street, 
Lancaster. 

Wm. Bernhart Hamaker, B. M. C, 1905, 137 
N. Duke street, Lancaster. 

John W. Kinnard, 1882, 129 N. Duke street, 
Lancaster. 

John Trout Herr, 1910, Landisville. 



LEFRANC & AULT 

ARE SHOWING 

NEW NECKWEAR 

AND 

NEW SHIRTS 

AT THE 

"SHIRT SHOP" 

421 N. Howard St., at Franklin 



Wm. J. Steward, 1904, 234 N. Duke street, 
Lancaster. 

P. S. Pile, B. M. C, 1905, Latrobe. 

Guy L. Zimmerman, B. M. C, 1906, Lemasters. 

Benj. F. Good, B. M. C, 1900, Letort (R. F. 
D. Lancaster). 

Homer S. C. Hetrick, B. M. C, 1906, Lewis- 
berry. 

John H. Myers, B. M. C, 1883, Lewistown 

Geo. C. Kinnard, 1885, Lincoln. 

Harry E. Gettier, B. M. C, 1897, Little Cooley 
(R. F. D. Centerville). 

Wm. J. Shoemaker, 1882, Lock Haven. 

Wm. T. Morrow, B. M. C, 1908, Loysville. 

B. J. Reasor, 1909, Martins Creek. 

Geo. Washington Gault, B. M. C, 1910, Marys- 
ville. 

A. Edgar Tussey, 1883, McConnellstown. 
James G. Allison, B. M. C, 1895, McGrann. 
Frank John, B. M. C, 1894, 313 Olive street, 

McKeesport. 

Henry Schlesinger, B. M. C, 1913, McKees 
Rocks. 

Virgil H. Lilly, 1869, McSherrytown. 

J. Russell Mosier, 1883, Meadville. 

B. E. Nevin, 1894, Mercersburg. 

Robt. Bently Varden, 1882, Mercersburg. 
Asa Lee Hickok, B. M. C, 1903, Meshoppen. 



WILLIAM J. MILLER 
Jewelry, Diamonds, Watches 

College Jewelry 
Class Pins and Rings, College Seals 

28 East Baltimore St. Baltimore. Md. 22 W. LexingtoH St., = Baltimore, Md. 



ELLERBROCK 



28 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



Blome's Chocolates 

Known and enjoyed by students of the 
University for more than half a century. 

Retail Department 
BLOME'S CANDY STORE 

Established 1859 621 W. Baltimore St. 



Wm. Thos. Rowe, 1895, Meyersdale. 

Maurice Isaac Stein, 1909, Millerstown. 

Thos. F. A. Stevens, 19 12, State Sanatorium, 
Mont Alto. 

James A. Hughes, 1909, Mt. Carmel. 

Jos. E. Ratajski, B. M. C, 1909, 16 E. 2d 
street, Mt. Carmel. 

Winfield M. Thome, B. M. C, 1906, Mt. 
Jewett. 

John Henry Blecker, 1893, Meyerstown. 

Dennis E. Fisher, B. M. C, 1883, Needmore. 

Chas. B. Hunt, B. M. C, 1891, 473 E. Wash- 
ington street, Newcastle. 

Albert S. Kaufman, B. M. C, 1893, New Ken- 
sington. 

David O. Thomas, B. M. C, 1905, New Ken- 
sington. 

John W. Porter, 1895, New Park. 

W. Henry Smithison, 1905, New Park. 

Albert L. Keim, B. M. C, 1913, New Stanton. 

Geo. Albert Parker, Jr., 1910, Newtown. 

Remo Fabri, B. M. C, 1909, 354 E. Main street, 
Norristown. 

Harry E. Podall, B. M. C, 1908, State Hos- 
pital for Insane, Norristown. 

Wm. Henry Conway, B. M. C, 1905, Olyphant. 

Rossiter J. Lloyd, B. M. C, 1897, Olyphant. 

John J. Price, B. M. C, 1896, Olyphant. 

Wm. Thomas Ranee, 1881, Orangeville. 

John A. Murray, 1885, Patton. 

Ambrose H. Stubbs, B. M. C, 1896, Peach 
Bottom. 

A. C. Abbott, 1884, 4229 Baltimore avenue, 
Philadelphia. 

Lewis H. Adler, 1859, 316 S. Broad street, 
Philadelphia. 

Edward Baum, B. M. C, 1895, 1530 Chestnut 
street, Philadelphia. 

C. A. Bicking, B. M. C, 1913, Frankfort Hos- 
pital. Philadelphia. 

(To be continued.) 



Now Ready for Spring, 1915. See Us for Classy Clothes 

Suits to Measure, $15.00 to $35.00 
A. JACOBS & SONS, Tailors 

899 NORTH HOWARD STREET 
Open Evenings 9 P. M. Cor. Richmond St. 

LAW— SENIOR. 



"We have met the enemy and we are theirs." 
This sentence differs from that of historical fame, 
and is made in reference to the recent State Bar 
Examination. 



A great and noble institution of learning has 
recently sprung up in our midst. It bears the 
name of Powell University. Its purpose is to 
give those students wishing to enter the Law 
School, and who do not possess a high school 
sheepskin, a sound knowledge of the arts and 
sciences, including the dead languages. 

In a recent interview with Benjamin R. Powell, 
founder and Provost of the Powell University, 
he stated that he expected great ed-ucational and 
moral results. 

Special stress will be laid on spelling, and the 
Provost, having the needs of the young men at 
heart, will occupy the George Tyler Smith Chair 
of Spelling. 

The head of this great institution has scoured 
the four corners of the earth, and has spared no 
expense in securing one of the ablest faculties. 

With a sly wink of his eye, Provost Powell 
hinted that he might be able to give the "GazETTE" 
reporter a more startling announcement in the 
Fall. 

We predict a very brilliant future for the Pow- 
ell University, and will not hesitate to recommend 
it to all young men in thirst of knowledge. 



LAW— JUNIOR. 



It is easy enough to be happy. 

When with success thru' th' exams you have 

sailed, 
But the stude worth while is the one who can 

smile, 
Wlien the prof, says, "My boy, you have failed !" 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



29 



Hart Schaffner & Marx, 
Kuppenheimer, 
"Society Brand" 

-^^— ^— ^ The clothes that collage men 

like a lot 

TRe (flglB Hub 

BlUlmore Street Al Charlej 



Our old friend, A. "Mencken" Widoff, is so- 
journing in New York City, whence he reports 
great increment to his wallet. We are not in- 
formed of the nature of his lucrative employment, 
but we presume that he is either writing the edi- 
torials for the New York Times or the want ads 
for the Herald. He'll be with us in the fall. 



Mr. A. B. Haupt, we understand, is still at 
Jessups. 

We are advised by the New York authorities 
that OUR Mr. A. B. Makover is also in New 
York city. His address is 1471 Vyse avenue, 
Bronx. Who cares ? 



Help Larkins — take the sting out of the Skeet- 
ers — see you next month. 

We respectfully call the attention of our read- 
ers to the fact that one of the Editors-in-Chief of 
this paper, Mr. Asportatis Bonis Makover, occa- 
sionally has a "poem" in the Good Evening col- 
umn of the Evening Sun of this city. Like horrors 
by the same author fitfully appear in many of 
the leading journals of this country, to-wit, — 
such papers as "The Punktown Punch," "The 
Glueberg Globe," and "The University Ga- 
zette." Such is fame. We pass on with the 
casual remark, "Good Night!" 



NURSING. 

Miss Carrie H. Hudnall, class of 1914, Superin- 
tendent of Nurses of St. Joseph's Tubercular 
Hospital, South Bend, Ind., was a recent visitor 
to the Hospital. 



In addition to his U. of M. work, we under- 
stand that our genial and modest colleague 
"Judge" Gordon cleaned up some big exams at 
the J. H. U. before returning to his home in Old 
Virginia. 

We predict the "Judge" will soon take his 
place on the bench and root for Jack Dunn's 
hired men. 



Miss Marjorie B. Sprecher, class of 1914, night 
superintendent of nurses of the Jefferson Hos- 
pital, Roanoke, Va., is spending the month at 
her home at Sykesville, Md. 



Miss Alfretta Myers, class of 1915, has been 
appointed night superintendent of nurses of the 
St. Joseph's Tubercular Hospital, South Bend, 
Ind. 



Miss Virginia R. Clendennin, class of 1914, has 
resigned her position at Bellevue Hospital, New 
York City. 



Miss Marie John, class of 1916, was operated 
on at the Hospital several days ago and is on 
the convalescent list. 



QUIPS. 

Teacher: "Now, Willie, mention one of the 
customs at Christmas time." 

Pupil : "Running in debt." — Life. 



Government Investigator: "What made you 
burn your books?" 

Railroad President: "The motto of our road 
is "Safety First." — Life. 



A. H. PETTING 

Manufacturer of 

GREEK LETTER FRATERNITY JEWELRY 

213 N. Liberty St., = Baltimore, Md. 
Factory: 212 Little Sharp St. 

Memorandum package sent to any fraternity member through the 
ftwnretary of the chapter. Special designs and estimates furnished on 
medals, ringsand pins for athletic meets, etc 



30 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



!> 



quA 




tDlEHL 

Clothe s 

jm.Li. i .iJJJ.Li.iJJ. i Ji i .iH 

built at 605 W. Baltimore St., 
just around the corner from the 
University, are kept pressed with- 
out cost. 

Suits $15 to $40 

"What is your name?" asked the new teacher 
of the first boy in line. 

"Tom," said the boy. 

"No, it isn't Tom, it's Thomas." 

"And your name?" she inquired of the next 
boy. 

"Jackass," said the boy. — Watcrhurx Chamber 
of Commerce. 



$18 



We've an idea that 
most of you young men 
will be interested in the 
extreme value, new style 
suits which we have 
prepared for you at $18. 
They have the appearance 
of $25 garments— try 
one on and see for yourself. 



$18 
Hamf>«n>gei>s' 



Baltimore & Hanover Sts. 



HEPBRON & HAYDON 

We Sell Every Law Book and Syllabus Use-i 
at the U, of M. 



St. Paul 8794 



1243-53 CALVERT BLDG. 



An American motoring through a small Scotch 
town was pulled up for excessive speed. 

"Didn't you see that notice, 'Dead Slow?' " in- 
quired the policeman. 

"Course I did," replied the Yankee, "but I 
thought it referred to your darned little town." 
— Gargoyle. 

o 



BIRTHS. 



Recently to Dr. Walton H. Hopkins, class of 
1904, and Mrs. Hopkins, of Annapolis, Md., a 
son. Mrs. Hopkins was before her marriage, 
;\Iiss Lila Holmes Trenholm, University Hospital 
Training School for Nurses, class of 1905. 



MARRIAGES. 



Dr. Thomas Leonard Richardson, Baltimore 
Medical College, class of 1898, of Baltimore, Md., 
to Miss Ruby Thompson Moore, of Monroe, N. 
C, at Charlotte, N. C, June 16, 1915. 



Dr. Howard N. Freeman, Baltimore Medical 
College, class of 1912, of Baltimore, Md., to 
Miss Letitia E. Lord, University Hospital Train- 
ing School for Nurses, class of 1914, of Mar- 
tinsburg, W. Va., at Martinsburg, June 17th, 
1915. Dr. and Mrs. Freeman will be "At Home" 
to their friends after the 10th of July, at 15.32 
Linden Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 



Dr. Norbert Charles Nitsch, class of 1913, to 
Aliss Ethel Marie Katzenberger, both of Balti- 
more, Md., at Baltimore, June 23, 1915. For 
the past two years Dr. Nitsch has been resident 
physician at St. Agnes' Hospital, which position 
he has reisigned to take up active practice. 



Dr. Walter S. Niblett, class of 1911, to Miss 
Ethel Wolfe, both of Hillsdale, Md., at Hillsdale, 
June 9, 1915. Following the ceremony, Dr. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



31 



e, w Saratoga St. 




tQallimore, 

Maryland. 



and Mrs. Niblett left for an automobile tour of 
the Shenandoah Valley. They will be "At Home" 
to their friends after June 15th, at Walbrook, 
where Dr. Niblett has taken up the practice of 
his profession. Dr. Niblett was formerly super- 
intendent of the Kernan Hospital for Crippled 
Children. 



Lieutenant Samuel Roland Hopkins, U. S. A., 
(B. A., St. John's, 1905) to Miss Anne Seymour 
Jones, of Warsaw, Va., at Warsaw, June 9, 1915. 



Dr. Cranford Haywood Douthirt, class of 1914, 
to Miss Lydia Isabelle Reid, both of Baltimore, 
Md., at Towson, Md., June 2, 1915. Dr. and 
Mrs. Douthirt will reside at Roaring River, N. C. 
Dr. Douthirt served a year as intern at the Mary- 
land General Hospital. 



Dr. Harvey K. Fleckenstein, Physicians and 
Surgeons, class of 1904, of Baltimore, Md., to 
Miss Isabella Griffith, at Retirement, near Gaith- 
ersburg, the country estate of the bride's parents, 
June 12, 1915. Following a wedding trip spent 
in the North, Dr. and Mrs. Fleckenstein will re- 
side in Baltimore. 



DEATHS. 



Dr. Samuel J. Windsor, College of Physicians 
and Surgeons, class of 1886 ; a Fellow of the 
American Medical Association, until two years 
ago a practitioner of Dames Quarter, Eastern 
Shore, Md., died at his home in Baltimore, June 
21, 1915, from heart disease, aged 52 years. 

LUTHER B. BENTON 
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Dr. Frank Russell, class of 1893 ; a Fellow of 
the American Medical Association; for several 
years a member of the Board of Health of Wil- 
mington, N. C. ; died at his home in that city, 
June 4, 1915, from cerebral disease, age 43 years. 



Dr. William C. Johnson, College of Physicians 
and Surgeons, class of 1887 ; a physician and 
druggist of Coleman, Fla. ; was shot and killed 
by his son, June 6, 1915, aged 52 years. 



Dr. Orlando C. Stewart, class of 1878; for- 
merly of Cookport, Pa. ; died at his home in 
Toledo, Ohio, June 2, 1915, aged 53 years. 



Dr. Lewis H. Adler, Sr., class of 1859, a native 
of Maryland, died of uremia at the Methodist 
Hospital, Philadelphia, July 15, 1915, aged 74 
years. Death came on his seventy-fourth birth- 
day. 

He was born in Baltimore on July 15, 1841. 
Eighteen years later he was graduated from 
the medical department of the University of 
Maryland, and in 1871 was graduated from Jef- 
ferson Medical College, Philadelphia. During 
the Civil War he served as surgeon in the Federal 
Army. 

Last year he was elected president of the 
Alumni Association of the medical department 
of the University of Maryland. He was a mem- 
ber of the Medical Club of Philadelphia, a Mason 
and a Grand Army man. 



Dr. William Gibson Floyd, class of 1878, a prac- 
titioner and druggist of Roanoke, Ala., and for 
several years county physician of Randolph Coun- 
ty, died in a sanatorium in Atlanta, Ga., June 
26, 1915, several days after a surgical opera- 
tion, aged 63 years. 



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EMPLOYERS — POSITIONS WANTED 
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T 



IWIKSITY QAllTTI 




m 



THE POET AND HIS SONG. 

"A song is but a little thing. 
And yet what joy it is to sing ! 
In hours of toil it gives me zest, 
And when at eve I long for rest ; 
When cows come home along the bars, 

And in the fold I hear the bell. 
As Night, the shepherd, herds his stars, 

I sing my song and all is well. 

"There are no ears to hear my lays, 
No lips to lift a word of praise ; 
But still, with faith unfaltering, 
I live and laugh and love and sing. 
AYhat matters yon unheeding throng? 

They cannot feel my spirit's spell, 
Since life is sweet and love is long, 

I sing my song, and all is well. 

"Sometimes the sun, unkindly hot. 
My garden makes a desert spot; 
Sometimes a blight upon the tree 
Takes all my fruit away from me ; 
And then with throes of bitter pain 

Rebellious passions rise and swell; 
But — life is more than fruit or grain, 

And so I sing, and all is well." 




VOL. n. 



BALTIMORE, MD., SEPTEMBER, 1915 



No. 3 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



Vol. 11. 



SEPTEMBER 1, 1915. 



No. 3. 



CONTENTS 



THE FORWARD MARCH OF THE 

LAW SCHOOL. Samuel Want, LL.B. 35 

THE LOGIC OF WAR. Albin Widoff . ... 35 

STIRRING TIMES AT ALMA MATER . . 36 

EDITORIALS 37 



Editorially Expressed. 

Why Have We No Student Post- 
OFEICE ? 

A Post-Graduate Course in Law. 

ITEMS 39 

BIRTHS 46 

DEATHS 47 



Footwear for the College Man at Moderate Price. 

N. HESS^ SONS - - 8 E. Baltimore, St. 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE, MD. 

HON. PHILLIPS LEE GOLDSBOROUGH, Governor of Maryland, Chancellor. 
THOMAS FELL, A. M., Ph. D., L L. D., D. C. L., Provost. 



ST. JOHN'S COLLEGE, Annapolis, Md. ( 



DEPARTMENT OF 1 
ARTS AND SCIENCES^ 



Founded 1696. Classical and Scientific College Courses leading to d ;grees. Special advantages to stu- 
dents purposing to study the professions. Military Department under army officers. Also Preparatory 
School for boys fitting for St. John's or other colleges. Term begins September 15. Address 

THOMAS FELL, Ph.D., LL.D., D.C.L., President. 



DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE. 

Four vears' graded course. New Laboratory Build- 
ing. Clinical advantages unsurpassed. Teaching Staff 
of 66. 109th Annual Session will begin October 1, 
1915, and continue 8 months. 

ARTHUR M. SHIPLEY, M. D., Acting Dean. 

DEPARTMENT OF DENTISTRY, 

34th Annual Session begins October 1, 1915, and 
continues 7 months. 26 Instructors. New Building. 
For catalogue containing course of study, etc., apply to 

TIMOTHY O. HEATWOLE, M.D., D.D.S., Dean, 

Baltimore, Md. 



DEPARTMENT OF LAW. 

60th Annual Session will begin Sept. 28, 191S. Faculty 
of 26. For catalogue containing full information ad- 
dress the Secretary, 301 St. Paul Street, Baltimore, 
Maryland. 

EDWIN T. DICKERSON, Secretary. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACY. 

(Formerly Maryland College of Pharmacy). 73rd 
Annual Session begins September 25, 1915. 11 In- 
structors. New Laboratories. Address 

CHARLES CASPARI, JR., Phar.D., Dean, 

Baltimore, Md. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 

Published Monthly In the Interest of the University of Maryland. 
PRICE $1.00 PER YEAR. 



Oontributiond solicited from Alumni of the 
University. 



Business Address, 608 Professional Building, 
Baltimore, Md. 



Vol. II. 



BALTIMORE, MD., SEPTEMBER 1, 1915. 



No. 3. 



THE FORWARD MARCH OF THE LAW 
SCHOOL. 



Samuel Want, LL.B. 



It is unpleasant to contemplate that in dis- 
cussions and reviews of the educational institu- 
tions of Baltimore the Law School of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland is either not considered at 
all or is merely the subject of insignificant men- 
tion. Indeed, the trend of discussion is frequently 
to the effect that the great gap in the educational 
activities of our State is the absence of a law 
school of rank approaching that of her other 
high grade institutions. 

While there are faults of omission and com- 
mission_in the forward march of the Law School, 
it is undeniable that the institution has attained 
results and maintained standards which, con- 
sidered in the light of the financial and other dif- 
ficulties under which the School has labored, mark 
it as a highly progressive institution and as a 
large influence in the education of the citizens 
of the State. 

There are few exceptions to the statement that 
for a period of at least twenty-five years the 
largest factors in the government of the State 
and in the improvement of its laws were and are 
graduates of the Law School, and much of their 
work must be attributed to the training ^nd in- 
fluences of the institution. 

Nothing would tend more to give the school 
the standing it has justly earned and the greater 
support it imperatively needs than activity upon 
the part of its alumni commensurate with the 
obligations owed by all of us to the institutions 
to which we must trace our professional aspira- 
tions and the sources of their realization. A large 
part of the progress of nearly all large institu- 
tions is directly traceable to the activities and 
contributions of their alumni, fostered and re- 
warded by the co-operative interest of the in- 
stitution benefited. 



Class organizations should be carried on with 
a special view to making them alumni groups 
after graduation. They should have the active 
interest and support of the Faculty. Their man- 
agement should be guided and their conversion 
into alumni groups fostered by the authorities 
of the School. The principle of mutual interests 
and obligations between the School and the grad- 
uates should be a rule of action instilled both 
before and after graduation, and the connection 
between it and civic duty should be persistently 
advanced. 



THE LOGIC OF WAR. 



Albin Widoff, '17. 



What a satire everything is, and the world, as 
Heine somewhere says, nothing but an infinite 
satire. In evidence of this assertion the present 
war is exhibit "A." What irony it is to see jus- 
tification eat justification and Red Book devour 
Yaller Book; to hear what's right and what's 
wrong; what is and ain't. Alas! but saddest of 
all to read the retorts, courteous and discourteous, 
of our Gazette editors trying to explain the war, 
its causes, results, harm, benefit, etc. 

In all war-talk the philosophy of war is, it 
seems, either forgotten or unknown. War, how- 
ever, like truth, is its own justification. Like 
truth, it needs no interpretation nor explaining 
because it mirrors and explains itself. Neverthe- 
less, with utmost dogmatism, I shall endeavor to 
explain the logic of war. 

War is its own dialectics — the dialectics of 
might. How simple war-logic goes ! Might is 
right. With such a formula, 'tis folly to read 
Aristotle, John Stuart Mill. What Omar said 
of wine is true of war: 



36 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



"The grape that can with logic absolute 
The two-and-seventy jarring sects confute, 
The subtle alchemist that in a trice 
Life's leaden metal into gold transmute." 

And so slavery is wrong because the South 
lost the war. I know a gentleman who convinced 
another that his face looked like a pup's, and that 
he suffered from falling hair. The argument this 
gentleman used was a blow to the jaw. The 
argument England, Gennany, et al, are using is 
just the same, differing only in degree. 

As it was written above, war justifies, explains, 
hallows. And all this so simply. Might is right. 
It, therefore, is folly to justify the destruction of 
Belgium, Lorain, Rheims, Lusitania. If Germany 
wins, these will be justified, explained and hal- 
lowed. It also is unwise to justify the starving 
of non-combatants, the betrayal of the Belgians. 
If the Allies win, all will be well. 

Let the editors of the Gazette beware — in war- 
talk there is no right and wrong. It is only might 
that is right, and weakness that is wrong. Vae 
victus ! War is the setting aside of moral values 
and the instituting of immoral ones ; that is, nat- 
ural ones. Peace, then, is moral and unnatural. 

To conclude : What is a good war, which a bad ? 
Zarathustra spoke thus: "Ye say a good cause 
will hallow even war? I say unto you, a good 
war halloweth every cause." 



STIRRING TIMES AT ALMA MATER. 



Adapted from "A Historical Sketch of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland" by the late 
Dr. E. F. Cordell. 



In December, 1838, a professor in the Univer- 
sity of Maryland (Professor Potter) made the 
observation that some of the students, instead of 
proceeding after one lecture to the room of the 
next lecturer, were in the habit of going to the 
apartments of the janitor. His suspicions were 
aroused and he determined to investigate. Ac- 
cordingly, one day he unexpectedly entered the 



janitor's room and found several students en- 
gaged in gambling and drinking, or to use his 
own language, "regaling themselves with spirit 
and cards." .... 

The Committee of Trustees passed a regulation 
forbidding the janitor in future "to sell liquors of 
any kind, fruits, nuts, cigars or tobacco, or to 
permit the students to play at cards or any other 
game in his house for money or any other thing." 

War was then formally declared by the janitor 
against Prof. Potter, the former threatening per- 
sonal violence. In a contest of Potter vs. Janitor 
there could not be any doubt as to the result. 
The Professor's friends among the students could 
hardly be restrained from "sacrificing" the liquor- 
dealing janitor. Though Professor Potter had to 
go armed for the remainder of the session he was 
not subjected to the violence he had prepared to 
resist. 



^-, 



"Nothing Too Large— Nothing Too Small" 

Baltimore City 

Printing and Binding 

Company 

352-363 Equitable Building 



Menu, Banquet and Dance Cards, Commencement Invita- 
tions and Programs, Diplomas, Certificates, Engrossing, U. 
of M. Stationery for Classes and Fraternities, Letter Heads, 
Enrelopes, Cards, etc.. for Pliysioians, Lawyers and Dentists. 

J. H. DOWNS, STATIONER. 229 N. Charles SL 



EMPLOYERS— POSITIONS WANTED 
By students in the Legal, Medical, Dental 
and Pharmaceutical Department of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland. Some are stenographers, 
bookkeepers, etc. Apply SAMUEL WANT, 
1243-1253 Calvert Building. (No charge is 
made for this service.) 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



37 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 

A MONTHLY JOURNAL 

Devoted to the interests of the University 
of Maryland. 

Subscription Price, |1.00 Per Annum, In Advance 

Reprints Furnished At Cost 

Advertising Rates Submitted Upon Request. 

608 Professional Building 

BALTIMORE, MD. 



Editorial Board. 

J. BEN ROBINSON, D.D.S -j „,.^ , ,^, . . 

A T. Ar AT'/^TrT-.!-. >-i -7 T (. . . Editors-lnChief. 

A. B. MAKOVER, '17, Law ) 

NATHAN WINSLOW, M.D Business Manager. 

Graduate Members. 

THOMAS FELL, LL.D Academic. 

H. M. ROBINSON, M.D Medical. 

ALBERT H. CARROLL, M.D Medical. 

SAMUEL WANT, LL. B Law. 

JOHN H. SKEEN, LL. B Law. 

A. A. SONNENBURG, Phar.D Pharmacy. 

J. M. BRANSKY, Phar.D .Pharmacy. 

M. B. SULLIVAN, R.N Nursing. 

Undergraduate Members. 

F. C. MARINO, '16; 0. 0. WOLF, 

'17 Medicine, 

A. Z. ALDRIDGE, '16; E. B. LAN- 
CASTER, '17 DentaL 

C. N. MATTHEWS, DAVE LOW- 
ENSTEIN, JR., '17 Law. 

A. L. STERLING, '15 Pharmacy. 

J. E. EVANS, '16 : Y. M. C.A. 

SEPTEMBER 1, 1915. 



EDITORIALEY EXPRESSED. 



"Editorially Replied'' does not touch the car- 
dinal thought that war is at all times a curse nor 
does he offer substantial rebuttal to the argu- 
ment that the Teutonic allies are responsible for 
the present great conflict. 

We append the thought of the present day 
civilization concerning war as expressed by great 
men in describing it : 

War is cruelty ; you cannot define it. — General 
Sherman. 

A good man never makes a good soldier. The 
worst man always makes the best soldier. The 
soldier is nothing but a hired, legalized mur- 
derer. — Napoleon. 



The College Man Sets 
the Styles! 

Uphold your reputation by wearing suits 
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important clothing Invention of the decade ! 

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The military profession is a damnable pro- 
fession. — Washington. 

O, war, thou son of hell ! — Shakespeare. 

War is a brain spattering, windpipe slitting 
art. — Bacon. 

War is the devil's gambling box. — Fox. 

There never was a good war nor a bad peace. — 
Franklin. 

War never decided any question of right or 
wrong. — Jefferson. 

War loves to seek its victims in the young. — 
Sophocles. 

Napoleon was a great gambler, whose game 
was empires, whose stakes were thrones, whose 
table the earth, whose dice were human bones. — 
Byron. 

War is the statesman's game, the lawyer's jest, 
the hired assassin's trade. — Shelley. 

My greatest regret is that I have been the 
author of three wars in which thousands of lives 
were lost. — Bismarck. 

Peace is the virtue, war the crime of civiliza- 
tion. — Hugo. 

A great war leaves the country with three 
armies — an army of cripples, an army of mourn- 
ers and an army of thieves. — German Proverb. 

Take not up the sword. They that take up 
the sword shall perish by the sword. — Jesus. 

They shall beat their swords into plowshares 
and their spears into pruning hooks. Nation shall 
not rise against nation, nor shall men learn war 
any more. — Isaiah. 

J. B. R. 



38 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



WHY HAVE WE NO STUDENT POST- 
OFFICE? 



At nearly every university of importance hav- 
ing a student registration of five hundred or 
more, there is provided a University Postoffice 
for the use and convenience of students. The 
maintenance of such a system costs but little and 
the benefits derived therefrom are great and 
many. The Postoffice has been established by 
university authorities chiefly upon the theories 
(1) that as a matter of convenience it is a prac- 
tical aid to the student, while resident, in the 
management of his affairs; and (2) that it serves 
as a means of fostering a spirit of unity and 
central organization, a means of keeping intact 
the esprit de corps. 

The university, to be a valuable institution, 
must in a peculiar sense be a home to its mem- 
bers both in faculty and undergraduate circles. 
"Alma Mater" should be the guiding spirit that 
tends the entire organization. The student body, 
particularly, is at home in college precincts, for it 
it a homogeneous gathering. 

As a practical matter the solution to the post- 
office problem at the University of Maryland is a 
cheerfully easy one. The installation of a stu- 
dent postoffice box system would add but little to 
the cost of maintaining the institution. The 
duties of the librarians are not so exacting and 
their tasks so burdensome that the added trust of 
placing several hundred letters a day into num- 
bered boxes would amount to an imposition. No 
extra employees are needed for this purpose. 
One hundred dollars would be more than suffi- 
cient to build enough boxes in the library, where 
there is plenty of room, to accommodate us. Stu- 
dents desiring boxes would be willing to pay an 
annual fee of twenty-five cents for the privilege. 

The manner in which mail addressed to stu- 
dents at the University is handled at present is 
poor. The letters are thrown into a wooden 
box in Davidge Hall without being sorted al- 
phabetically. Think of it! Besides the indignity 
of a proper resting place it lacks also the index 
expnrgatorius! One must search through a mess 
of jumbled paper to discover his mail. Many 



students are unaware that there is even such a 
place where mail is received, and we have seen 
the same letters in the box for six or seven 
months. 

We believe that our Faculty is not aware of 
the crying need of a practical system for receiv- 
ing student mail. We feel confident that it will 
remedy the present condition when properly 
brought to its notice. The Faculty has always 
been anxious to improve when the need of im- 
provements has been brought to its attention; it 
is up-to-the-minute in this respect. 

We respectfully suggest that the most oppor- 
tune time to establish a postoffice is during the 
weeks that intervene before the opening of our 
regular session. 

A. B. M. 



A POST-GRADUATE COURSE IN LAW. 



The question of the advisability of establishing 
a post-graduate course in law again brings to the 
surface a most important problem. Few will 
deny that our law course is too limited to the 
practical side of the subject. A glance at the 
curriculum impresses one with the idea that the 
purpose is to prepare students more for the 
business of law rather than to develop lawyers 
conscious of the history and ideals of their pro- 
fession. 

It is true, to the lasting credit of our instruc- 
tors, let it be said, that they continue to do all 
in their power to mold our minds for an ideal 
professional life. But we believe that their ob- 
ject, however laudable and valiantly striven for, 
is impossible of perfect accomplishment without 
specific courses in the History of the Law, Legal 
Biography and Politics (including the Theory of 
Taxation). There is also great demand for treat- 
ment of Public Service Commission Law and 
Anti-Trust Law. Among those who favor a 
post-graduate course there is a strong belief that 
the common law should receive more attention ; 
perhaps by readings in Blackstone and Kent. 
Our opinion is that our schedule of lectures could 
be so systematized that such courses could be 
given in the regular undergraduate sessions. If, 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



39 



however, the Faculty maintains that this is im- 
possible then we believe that a post-graduate 
course is sorely needed. 

It is further true that we may go to the Johns 
Hopkins University for certain courses at small 
expense. This privilege, valuable as it is, cannot 
be taken advantage of by most students because 
they must work during the hours these courses 
are given. 

We are informed (not authoritatively, how- 
ever) that the main objection on the part of the 
Faculty is that there is not strong enough de- 
mand for post-graduate work to warrant the 
establishment of new courses. Perhaps this is 
true, but there is an easy way to ascertain whether 
it is or not. We must not forget, besides, that 
many lawyers in their first years of practice 
would warmly welcome further opportunity for 
systematic study. 

The GazUTTE is anxious to hear from students, 
alumni and members of the Faculty interested 
in this question. In the meantime we need have 
no fear that the proposal will not receive the 
proper attention and consideration of our Faculty. 

A. B. M. 



ITEMS. 



MEDICAI^GRADUATE. 



Dr. Henderson Irwin, class of 1912, of Eureka, 
N. C, made a business trip to the University 
Hospital. 



Dr. Hugh Raymond Spencer, B.M.C., class of 
1910, associate professor of pathology and bac- 
teriology, is spending the summer at Jonesville, 
Harford county, Md. 



Dr. Tilghman Brice Marden, class of 1892, 
professor of histology and embryology, is spend- 
ing the summer on Mill Creek, near Annapolis, 
where he has built a bungalow. 



Dr. R. Gerard Willse, class of 1909, has been 
spending some time on the Eastern Shore, Md., 
fishing. 



lightfully entertained recently by Dr. John F. 
Lutz, class of 1914, on the Severn, near Annapo- 
lis. 



Dr. George E. Bennett, class of 1909, who 
has been associated with Drs. Bear and Baetjer 
in orthopedics and instructor in orthopedics at 
Johns Hopkins University, has been made junior 
member of the firm of Baer & Baetjer, which will 
hereafter be known as the firm of Baer, Baetjer 
& Bennett. Good for " "09." We congratulate 
Dr. Bennett. 



Members of last year's hospital staff were de- 



The following is a list of our Medical Alumni 
located in Pennsylvania, which is published by 
request: Continued from August. 

Henry O. Sloane, B. M. C, 1908, 1737 N. 
Franklin street, Philadelphia. 

Jos. Stamel, 191 1, 2332 S. Franklin street, 
Philadelphia. 

James J. Sweeney, B. M. C, 1902, 4121 N. 
Broad street, Philadelphia. 

Benj. Ulanski, B. M. C, 1908, 4430 Wayne 
avenue, Philadelphia. 

Geo. H. West, 1889, 803 S. 49th street, Phila- 
delphia. 

Geo. Lewis Williams, B. M. C, 1910, 5545 
Sprague avenue, Philadelphia. 

Morris Winheld, B. M. C, 1904, 970 N. 5th 
street, Philadelphia. 

Morris L. Yubas, B. M. C, 1909, 539 N. 13th 
street, Philadelphia. 

Evan L. Jones, B. M. C, 1898, Philipsburg. 

Frank D. Emack, 1875, Phoenixville. 

Chas. A. Arnold, B. M. C, 1902, 156 McClure 
avenue, Pittsburgh. 

Geo. R. Baelith, B. M. C, 1906, 1015 Wylie 
avenue, Pittsburgh. 

Marcus E. Baldwin, B. M. C, 1900, Keenan 
Bldg., Pittsburgh. 

Silas S. Brown, B. M. C, 1893, 2533 Perryville 
avenue, Pittsburgh. 

Harry Moore Felton, 1905, 109 Climax street, 
Pittsburgh. 

J. Edw. Gross, 1907, 5125 Liberty avenue, 
Pittsburgh. 

John C. Lee, B. M. C, 1907, Rummerfield. 

Samuel E. Ambrose, B. M. C, 1898, Rural 
Valley. 






40 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



Chas. H. Vermilyea, B. M. C, 1897, Russell. 

Byron H. Jackson, B. M. C, 1898, Scranton. 

Louis W. Kohn, 1910, 429 Wyoming avenue, 
Scranton. 

Albert A. Lindabury, B. M. C, 1886, 410 
Spruce street, Scranton. 

Arthur A. Reynolds, B. M. C, 1900, 1519 
Jackson street, Scranton. 

John Szlupas, 1891, 1419 N. Main avenue, 
Scranton. 

Samuel H. Voorhees, 1889, 1521 Pine street, 
Scranton. 

Patrick H. Walker, B. i\I. C, 1904, 509 Lu- 
zerne street, Scranton. 

Daniel E. Remsberg, 1905, 115 Windsor street, 
Reading. 

Edwin D. Schaeffer, B. M. C, 1893, 317 S. 6th 
street, Reading. 

Albert N. Seidel, B. M. C, 1891, 824 N. loth 
street, Reading. 

Edwin Y. Seyler, B. M. C, 1903, 1127 Green- 
wich street, Reading. 

Irvin W. Shallenberger, B. M. C, 1901, 1302 
N. loth street, Reading. 

Wm. C. Werts, B. M. C, 1904, 353 Schuylkill 
avenue, Reading. 

Harry B. McGarrah, B. M. C, 1903, Roberts- 
dale. 

Geo. F. Speicher, B. M. C, 1910, Rockwood. 

Granville M. Brubaker, B. M. C, 1904, Rox- 
bury. 

James P. Kerr, 1888, 1908 Carson street, Pitts- 
burgh. 



STYLISH and COMFORTABLE 
FOOT-WEAR 



FOR THE 



UNIVERSITY MAN 

All Leathers — Expert Fitting 
Moderate Prices 

WYMAN 

19 W.LEXINGTON STEET 



J. J. Kvatsak, B. M. C, 1910, 31 McClure ave- 
nue, Pittsburgh. 

Francis Victor Laurent, B. M. C, 1908, Jen- 
kins Bldg., Pittsburgh. 

Heni Edwin Lutz, B. M. C, 1893, 141 5 Su- 
perior avenue, Pittsburgh. 

Thos. J. McGee, 1880, Lowrie and Ley streets, 
Pittsburgh. 

Grant M. McHugh, B. U. C, 1898, 420 Third 
avenue, Pittsburgh. 

James Patterson, B. M. C, 1898, 5826 DarHng- 
ton road, Pittsburgh. 

Robt. jM. Sands, 1883, 4300 Butler street, Pitts- 
burgh. 

Wm. W. Sirak, 1913, Montefiore Hospital, 
Pittsburgh. 

Sidney G. White, B. :\I. C, 1893, 344 Shetland 
avenue, Pittsburgh. 

Jos. E. Willetts, 1 88 1, Westinghouse Building, 
Pittsburgh. 

Valentine J. Yorty, B. M. C, 1906, 7300 Mon- 
ticello avenue, Pittsburgh. 

Thos F. Flemming, B. M. C, 1901, 1210 Wyo- 
ming avenue, Pittston. 

Herbert Leroy Ransom, 1910, 450 N. Main 
street, Pittston. 

Peter K. Yost, 1868, 32 George street, Pittston. 

Geo. Alilhvard Brewer, 1910, Plumsteadville. 

Lowry N. Burchinal, 1886, Point Marion. 

James E. Dwyer, 1905, Polk. 

Jesse Cunningham Stilley, 1912, Portland 
Mills. 

Elmer A. Kell, B. JNI. C, 1900, 223 King street, 
Pottstown. 

Clinton M. Young, B. M. C, 1906, Queen 
Junction. 

Marriss L. Calm, 1910, 551 N. nth street, 
Reading. 

Geo. Ray Curry, B. M. C, 1906, 415 Walnut 
street, Reading. 

Lloyd H. Teick, B. M. C, 1902, 807 N. loth 
street, Reading. 

John H. OrfF, B. M. C, 1904, 1556 Mineral 
Springs road, Reading. 

Anthony T. Walsh, B. M. C, 1902, 306 Pitts- 
ton avenue, Scranton. 

Chas. J. Wivell, B. M. C, 1901, 1414 Jackson 
street, Scranton. 

John W. Monjar, B. M. C, 1909, Seneca. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



41 



Geo. M. Fickes, 1885, Seven Valleys. 
Geo. W. Kennedy, B. M. C, 1897, Sharon. 
Augustus M. O'Brien, B. M. C, 1900, Sharon. 
Harry White, B. M. C, 1912, Sharon. 
Stanley W. Blazigewski, B. M. C, 1907, Shen- 
andoah. 

Stephen S. Spalding, 1870, Shenandoah. 
Harry B. Schaeffer, 191 1, Shillington. 
John Bruce McCreary, 1892, Shippensburg. 
Jacob Iv. Schoch, 1870, Shippensburg. 
Milton C. Dunnick, B. M. C, 1905, Shrews- 

Elbridge H. Gerry, 1867, Shrewsbury. 

Charles B. Korns, B. M. C, 1909, Sipesville. 

Thos. Duff, 191 1, Slippery Rocks. 

Elmer F. Frasher, 1887, Smicksburg. 

Walter T. Messmore, 1901, Smithfield. 

Irving D. Haverly, B. M. C, 1903, South Gib- 
son. 

LaVerne D. Paige, B. M. C, 1898, Spring 
Creek. 

George M. Bahn, 1881, Spring Grove. 

Wm. Paul Dailey, B. M. C, 1906, Steelton. 

D. O. Todd, B. M. C, 1896, Stewart's Station. 

Jos. Nelson Dunnick, B. M. C, 1899, Stewarts- 
town. 

Chas. D. Gruver, 1902, Stroudsburg. 

Wilmer M. Priest, 1909, Sunbury. 

Ellis A. Smith, B. M. C.', 1891, Sunbury. 

Geo. B. Hennigh, B. M. C., 1891, Sykesville. 

J. A. Weamer, B. M. C, 1896, Tarentum. 

Edward J. Murray, B. M. C, 1910, Throop. 

George S. Coudit, 1910, Tidioute. 

Joseph C. Wilson, 1884, Titusville. 

Boyd E. Wilkinson, B. M. C, 1905, Tremont. 

John W. Phillips, B. M. C, 1896, Troy. 

James W. Parshall, 1887, Uniontown. 

G. T. McGuire, B. M. €., 1898, Vandling. 

John P. LaBarre, 1901, Waltersbury. 

David A. Hart, B. M. C, 1903, Wapwallopen. 

Albert J. Remsburg, 1874, Warfordsbury. 

Wm. Patrick Clancy, B. M. C, 1910, Warren. 

Homer S. Clark, 1885, Washington. 

Aaron B. Sollenberger, B. M. C, 1898, 
Waynesboro. 

H. B. Hetrick, 1888, Wellsville. 

Elmer C. Bruck, B. M. C, 1891, West Beth- 
lehem. 



Arthur M. Greenfield, B. M. C, 1898, West- 
field. 

Wm. G. Morrow, B. M. C, 1896, West 
Hickory. 

Geo. B. Marshall, B. M. C, 191 1, West Leisen- 
ring. 

Edward B. Gavitte, B. M. C, 1897, White 
Mills. 

John L. Batterson, B. M. C, 1893, Wilkes- 
Barre. 

Alfred E. Foster, B. M. C, 1910, Wilkes- 
Barre. 

A. Frank Lampman, B. M. C, 1894, Wilkes- 
Barre. 

Parke C. Sickler, B. M. C, 1900, Wilkes- 
Barre. 

John C. Lemmer, 1885, Wilkinsburg. 

Louie E. Langley, 1910, Williamsport. 

Ross Royman, B. M. C, 1903, Wilmerding. 

Walter P. Thorp, B. M. C, 1905, Winburne. 

Orlando J. Shank, B. M. C, 1896, Windber. 

Ross B. Cobb, 1913, Wissinoming. 

Olen J. Stevenson, B. M. C, 1906, Woodlawn. 

Herman H. Farkas, B. M. C, 191 1, York. 

Geo. B. M. Free, 1883, York. 

John F. Klinedinst, 1889, York. 

Zachariah C. Myers, 1881, York. 

Samuel K. Pfoltzgroff, 1886, York. 

Benjamin F. Posey, B. M. C, 1897, York. 

Niles H. Shearer, 1866, York. 

Philip J. Spaeder, B. M. C, 1907, York. 

Charles H. Venus, B. M. C, 1902, York. 

Henry A. Ziegler, 1870, York. 

Charles L. Myers, 1888, York Springs. 

Walter H. Brown, 1889, Youngwood. 



The following are our P. and S. Alumni in 
Pennsylvania : 
Joseph S. Brown, 1912, Academia. 
Richard S. Schweitzer, 1881, Adamstown. 
John A. Brobst, 1885, Allentown. 
Ethan A. Gerhart, 1884, Allentown. 

Sight, smell and fciste plays big' part in digestiou. 

Eating is a matter of the sympathetic nerves. "No 
profit where no pleasure is taken." 

POSITIVELY we feed yon BETTEB, at LESS COSb 
r.nd IN THE CLEANEST environment than any onC 
has ever done before since time began. 

BRIGHTON LUNCH 

14 N. HOWARD STREET 



43 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



Christopher C. Dick, 1893, Altoona. 
Proctor T. Miller, 1893, Altoona, 
Charles W. Noss, 1907, Altoona. 
Joseph E. Powley, 1892, Altoona. 
John C. Hunter, 1893, Apollo. 
Reuben Elmer Schall, 1904, Arcadia. 
Walter B. Foss, 1887, Ashley. 
Nathan A. Reinbold, 1892, Athens. 
Albert C. Shannon, 1912, Austin. 
William Henry Berge, 1893, Avoca. 
Clermont E. Park, 1905, Avoca. 
John Oliver Wagner, 1880, Beaver Springs. 
Wm. W. McCleary, 1884, Bellefonte. 
Thomas L. Wilson, 1891, Bellwood. 
James G. Stover, 1892, Bendersville. 
Milton E. Weaver, 1904, Benjamin. 
Frank L. Pratt, 1899, Bentleys (Bunola P. O.). 
Allan O. Kisner, 1896, Bethlehem. 
Henry J. Laciar, 1881, Bethlehem. 
George M. Cummings, 1892, Betula. 
Theodore C. Harter, 1881, Bloomsberg. 
Charles D. F. O'Hern, 1907, Bradford. 
Ninian J. Cooper, 1894, Brockwayville. 
Frank R. Flumphreys, 1896, Brockwayville. 
George H. Humphreys, 1896, Brockwayville. 
Wallace C. Quinn, 1884, Brockwayville. 
Lewis N. Reichard, 1899, Brownsville. 
L. Leo Doane, 1886, Butler. 
David Clinton Mock, 1904, Cambridge Springs. 
Frank D. Young, 1897, Cambridge Springs. 
Wm. Francis Dixon, 1902, Carbondale. 
Jacob C. Kisner, 1880, Carlisle. 
Finley R. McGrew, 1880, Carnegie. 
Jos. V. Maucher, 1885, Carrolltown. 
J. L. Walters, 1881, Carrolltown. 
Henry Clay Devilbiss, 1877, Chambersburg. 
John H. Devor, 1885, Chambersburg. 
Edwin M. McKay, 1901, Charleroi. 
Wm. Francis Gerhart, 1912, Cheltenham. 
Sylvester V. Hoopman, 1882, 716 W. 3d street, 
Chester. 
Amos W. Colcord, 1893, Clarion. 
John Thos. Rimer, 1881, Clarion. 
Saml. J. Waterforth, 1893, Clearfield. 
Benj. F. Coe, 1895, Clymer. 
J. S. Miller, 1890, Clymer. 
Josiah B. Kaylor, 1885, Cochranville. 
Jos. Elmer Schaefer, 1896, Cogan Station. 



Loans on Indorsements and Other Security 

A dignified and inexpensive plan of borrowing 
money, to be repaid in small weekly Installments. 
Prompt action. 

THE NATIONAL BUILDING AND LOAN ASSN, 
1063 Calvert Building. 



Chester F. Merkel, 1876, 4th and Ferry streets, 
Columbia. 

Thomas Robt. Francis, 1908, 223 E. Apple 
street, Connellsville. 

Joseph Giorgessi, 1910, 132 N. Pittsburg street, 
Connellsville. 

Elwin H. Ashcraft, 1881, Coudersport. 

Wm. H. Tasseli, 1883, Coudersport. 

Geo. B. Woods, 1887, Curllsville. 

Earl W. Cross, 1908, Curtisville. 

Henry M. Laing, 1884, Dallas. 

Wm. H. Minnich, 1890, Dallastown. 

Elmer E. Bush, 1890, Danielsville. 

M. E. Kemmerer, 1897, Danielsville. 

John Herbert Ewing, 1897, Delmont. 

Harold H. Longsdorf, 1882, Dickinson. 

Edward L. Wilkinson, 1885, Dorranceton 
(Kingston P. O.). 

A. Howard Aber, 1895, Dravosburg. 

Chas. L. Maine, 1892, 116 W. Long avenue, 
Dubois. 

James B. Garvey, 1884, 131 N. Blakely street, 
Dunmore. 

Charles Wm. Cohn, 1908, 29 W. Grant street, 
Duquesne. 

Ferdinand A. Thompson, 1885, Dursell (R. F. 
D. Towanda). 

Edward M. Dailey, 1904, Dushore. 

Edward Hoffman, 1896, 1148 Northampton 
street, Easton. 

James A. Morgenstern, 1907, 137 S. 3d street, 
Easton. 

James H. Douglass, 1882, Eldred. 

Robt. O. Bracklock, 1907, Eleanor. 

Wilmot G. Humphrey, 1880, Elkland. 

Peter L. Swank, 1889, Elk Lick. 

Wilbert L. Grounds, 1910, Emporium. 

John J. Bell, 1901, 8th and French streets, Erie. 

Orel, N. Chaffee, 1906, 820 Sassafras street, 
Erie. 

Chas. B. Chidester, 1881, 219 W. 18th street, 
Erie. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



43 



John F. Flynn, 1904, 529 E. 6th street, Erie. 

John J. O'Donnell, 1904, 2420 Parade street, 
Erie. 

Harvey H. Olds, 1905, 2630 Myrtle street, Erie. 

Albert Wm. Clark, 1895, Ernest. 

Danl. W. Bortz, 1885, Esterly. 

Sylvia J. Ronerts, 1912, Etters. 

Norwin J. Kerr, 1913, Everson. 

James E. Glenn, 1891, Fairfield. 

John F. Mackley, 1882, Fairfield. 

Wm. L. Quinn, 1896, Fayette City. 

Francis H. Finley, 1895, Finleyville. 

Avery W. Skilton, 1910, Force. 

James T. Hurd, 1885, Galeton. 

Frank W. Beck, 1903, Girard. 

Edward M. Davis, 1887, Glenlyon. 

Andrew N. Falkenstein, 1887, Glen Rock. 

Robt. A. Hildebrand, 1895, Glen Rock. 

Eugene R. Albaugh, 1875, Glenville (R. F. D.). 

Danl. A. Chapman, 1907, Greenock. 

Alexander E. Eddy, 1902, Greensboro. 

Gail W. Kahle, 1910, Hadley. 

Albert Z. Buchen, 1876, Hanover. 

John F. Norris, 1900, Hanover (R. F. D. 2). 

Theo. H. Wertz, 1904, Hanover. 

Chas. E. L. Keen, 1891, 1849 Berryhill street, 
Harrisburg. 

Philo A. Lutz, 1886, 105A Market street, Har- 
risburg. 

John W. MacMullen, 1904, 1432 Walnut street, 
Harrisburg. 

Chas. S. Rebuck, 1896, 412 N. 3rd street, Har- 
risburg. 

R. V. Leach, 1876, Hazel Hurst. 

Lawrence H. Smith, 1883, 189 N. Church 
street, Hazelton. 

Edward W. Tool, 1881, Hazelton. 

Jos. E. Bogar, 1892, Herndon. 

Jacob S. Krebs, 1884, Herndon. 

Harry McDaniel, 1883, High Spire. 

Elmer E. Heilman, 1893, Hillsdale. 



WILLIAM J. MILLER 

Jewelry, Diamonds, Watches 

College Jewelry 

Class Pins and Rings, College Seals 

2R East Baltimore St. Baltimore, Md. 



LEFRANC & AULT 

ARE SHOWING 

NEW NECKWEAR 

AND 

NEW SHIRTS 

AT THE 

"SHIRT SHOP" 

421 N, Howard St., at Franklin 



Robt. A. Campbell, 1894, 817 Ann street, 
Homestead. 

Loyal H. Moore, 1910, Houston. 

Wallace H. Dale, 1895, Houtzdale. 

Inman H. White, 1895, Houtzdale. 

Geo. W. Wood, 1890, Houtzdale. 

James H. Johnston, 1896, Huntingdon. 

Francis W. Harper, 1896, Irvona. 

Lewis E. Wolfe, 1891, James Creek. 

Elwood T. Quinn, 1910, Jenkintown. 

M. W. Kuhlman, 1912, Jenners. 

Chas. L. Mohn, 1885, Jersey Shore. 

Albon S. Ficthner, 1882, 121 F street, Johns- 
town. 

John M. Heading, 1886, 301 Chestnut street, 
Johnstown. 

James S. Koontz, 1891, 611 Coleman street, 
Johnstown. 

Clarence C. Spicher, 1903, 566 Park avenue, 
Johnstown. 

Robt. J. Hillis, 1886, Juniata. 

Smith G. Beatty, 1882, Kane. 

Wm. A. Slaugenhaupt, 1885, Kane. 

L Dana Kahle, 1905, Knox. 

Victor O. Humphreys, 1913, Knox Dale. 

Edwin E. Clark, 1893, Knoxville. 

David C. Trach, 1891, Kresgeville. 

R LLERBRQCK 

22 W. Lexington St., = Baltimore, Md. 



44 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



Biome's Chocolates 

Known and enjoyed by students of the 
University for more than half a century. 

Retail Department 
BLOME'S CANDY STORE 

Established 1859 621 W. Baltimore St. 

Wm. B. Beaumont, 1891, Laceyville. 
Louis D. Barnes, 1913, St. Joseph's Hospital, 
Lancaster. 

James S. Dixon, 1913, St. Joseph's Hospital, 
Lancaster. 

C. Melvin Coon, 1903,, Laquin. 

Lauren C. Thomas, 1887, Latrobe. 

Uriah O. Heilman, 1881, Leechburg. 

Milton C. Hunter, 1882, Leechburg. 

Chas. T. Horn, 1878, Lehighton. 

Danl. L. Vevan, 1908, Le Roy. 

Walter S. Wilson, 1879, Lewiston. 

Walter G. Stroble, 1908, Liberty. 

Horace W. Kohler, 1911, Littlestown. 

R. C. McCurdy, 1882, Livermore. 

Wm. G. Morris, 1878, Liverpool. 

P. J. Faughnan, 1892, Locust Gap. 

Chas. G. Hildebrand, 1881, Loganville. 

Wilbert E. Griffith, 1908, Lucernemines. 

John G. Spangler, 1887, Mapleton Depot. 

Henry A. Mowery, 1881, Marietta. 

Geo. S. Kinzer, 1892, Markelsville. 

Saml. H. Smith, 1881, 234 Atlantic avenue, 
McKeesport. 

A. C. Rice, 1897, McSherrystown. ' 

H. V. Hower, 1887, Mifflinville. 

Marion Ulrich, 1880, Millersburg. 

Howard S. Christian, 1887, Millville. 

Wm. D. Hunter, 1901, 490 Reed avenue, 
Monessen. 

Harvey T. Billick, 1885, Monongahela. 

John F. Haines, 1888, Monroeton. 

Emerson Boynton, 1897, Mountville. 

Benj. F. Bartho, 1887, Mt. Carmel avenue and 
Oak street, Mt. Carmel. 

Geo. G. Irwin, 1892, Mt. Holly Springs. 

Wm. W. Longacre, 1893, Mt. Pleasant Mills. 

Maraud Rothrock, 1881, Mt. Pleasant Mills. 

Saml. R. Gregory, 1896, Mt. Union. 

W. L. King, 1880, Muncy. 



Now Ready for Fall, 1915. See Us for Classy Clothes 

Suits to Measure, $15.00 to $35.00 
A. JACOBS & SONS, Tailors 

899 NORTH HOWARD STREET 
Open Evenings 9 P. M. Cor. Richmond St. 

Geo. O. Hall, 1904, Murrysville. 

A. S. Reiter, 1882, Myerstown. 

Dana W. Kingsbury, 1882, Nanticoke. 

A. E. Man, 1912, Broad and Prospect streets, 
Nanticoke. 

Oscar D. Schaeffer, 1886, Nazareth. 

C. S. Baxter, 1882, Nelson. 

J. J. Moyers, 1886, Nascopeck. 

Tom V. Williams, 1892, 1137 S. Mill street, 
Newcastle. 

James L. Yagle, 1902, New Freedom. 

Geo. H. Seaks, 1904, New Oxford. 

W. H. Hoopes, 1887, Newport. 

J. A. Crewitt, 1876, Newtown. 

N. B. Reeser, 1912, Newville (R. F. D. No. 3). 

Chas. R. Newton, 1879, Nicholson. 

C. C. Hall, 1884, North East. 

M. C. Smith, 1887, North Girard. 

E. J. Schlicker, 1884, Nuangola. 

L. D. Johnson, 1912, Ohiopyle. 

W. J. G. Salmon, 1908, Old Forge. 

J. A. McGinty, 1904, Olyphant. 

Geo. L. Jolly, 1883, Orangeville. 
(To be Continued.) 



i 



LAW— JUNIOR. 



Edwin T. Dickerson — Our next Chief Judge. 
Eugene O 'Dunne — Our next State's Attorney. 
Albert C. Ritchie — Our next Attorney-General. 
Maybe we Juniors aren't going some ! 



We were fortunate enough, some weeks ago, 
to pass Ilgenfritz's Studio on N. Charles street, 
where the magnetic influence of one of the pic- 
tures drew our attention to the display cabinet. 
We were not one bit startled to recognize the 
Honorable M. T. Donoho's likeness completely 
surrounded by a bevy of girls in the costumes of 
nurses, and very pretty we recognized them to 



i 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



45 



Hart Schaffner & Marx, 
Kuppenheimer, 
"Society Brand" 



The clothes that college men 
like a lot 



Hub 



Bdllfmore Street At Chdrles 



be. This is as it should be. Moral: (in the 
proper tune by male voices) "O! Let me live on 
an island, completely surrounded by girls!" 



We presume that H. J. Burke is still looking 
after the chickens on his uncle's farm. We re- 
call his pointing out to us two "birds" at Union 
Station. 



J. L. Ebaugh is getting very devilish of late. 
We observed him leaving a moving picture parlor 
recently. "He who goeth forth to no purpose had 
best bide at home," etc.. etc., so forth and so on. 



Mr. F. A. Michaels read three books which in- 
duced him to change his residence. The first 
was Milton's "Paradise Lost;" the second, "Para- 
dise Regained" by the same author; the third, 
"Homes in Paradise," published for a local realty 
company. Mr. Michaels' pleasant address is 
Paradise avenue, Catonsville. 



The new catalogue of the Law School is now 
out and in it may be found the names and various 
degrees of our noble classmates. The writer's 
name is also listed at zero. 



One of our Editors-in-Chief, A.B.M., in boost- 
ing the paper to a prospective subscriber and pos- 
sible advertiser gravely said : "Now, a further 
indication that the Gazette is a high-class paper 
is that we have never published a joke about the 
Ford automobile." 



But, depend upon it, the Ford is a rattling, 
good car ! 



Next issue will contain a complete list of the 
names of all subscribers who have not paid up. 
Junior Class take notice ! 



We wonder if the James Bruce who left with 
the Baltimore delegation for the Military Train- 
ing Camp at Plattsburg, N. Y., is our own little 
Jimmie. As a soldier we believe that Jimmie 
would make a great lawyer. 



Take notice, boys, we open shop September 
27th. 



PHARMACY— GRADUATE. 



Dr. H. B. Wiley and family of the Pharmacy 
Department are spending the summer at their 
cottage on Middle River, Md. 



NURSING. 



Miss M. E. Sullivan, superintendent of nurses, 
is spending the month of August in Massachu- 
setts. 



Miss Laws, class of 1913, of Newbern Hospi- 
tal, N. C, is spending her vacation at Ocean City. 



The class of 1914 was entertained by Miss Lulu 
R. Stepp, 1403 Madison avenue, on Thursday, 
August 5. Seventeen members spent a most en- 
joyable evening. 



A. H. PETTING 

Manufacturer of 

GREEK LETTER FRATERNITY JEWELRY 

213 N. Liberty St., = Baltimore, Md. 

Factory: 212 Little Sharp St. 



Memorandum package sent to any fraternity member through the 
secretary of the chapter. Special designs and estimates furnished on 
medals, ringsand pins or athletic meets, etc. 



46 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



4> 



quA 




^lEHL 

Clothe s 

^ .i.iJJ.ii i iii i .M. i JJJJJJ.i.m a 

built at 605 W. Baltimore St., 
just around the corner from the 
University, are kept pressed with- 
out cost. 

Suits $15 to $40 

Miss S. Davis, class of 1914, has accepted the 
position of assistant superintendent and O. R. at 
Bay View Hospital. 



Miss P. R. Clendenin, class of 1914, has ac- 
cepted the position of night superintendent at 
Bay View Hospital. 



$18 



We've an idea that 
most of you young men 
will be interested in the 
extreme value, new style 
suits which we have 
prepared for you at $18. 
They have the appearance 
of $25 garments— try 
one on and see for yourself. 



$18 
Hamtmfgers' 



Baltimore & Hanover Sts. 



HEPBRON & HAYDON 

We Sell Every Law Book and Syllabus Used 



St. Paul 8794 



at the U. of M. 

1243-53 CALVERT BLDG. 



Miss M. B. Sprecher, class of 1914, has ac- 
cepted a position at the Robert Long Hospital, 
Indiana. 



Miss M. K. Balsley, class of 1914, who has 
been seriously ill with pleurisy at the Hospital, is 
much improved. 



Miss N. W. Bay, night superintendent of M. 
U. H., is spending a few weeks in Harford county 
recovering from a sprained ankle. 



ANNOUNCEMENT. 



The engagement is announced of IMiss Eliza 
Leiper Winslow, daughter of Doctor and Mrs. 
Randolph Winslow, 1900 Mt. Royal Terrace, to 
Dr. John S. B. Woolford, class of 1896, ot Chat- 
tanooga, Tenn. The wedding will take place in 
the fall. 

Dr. Woolford lived in Baltimore some years 
ago. He and Miss Winslow met early last sum- 
mer while they were passengers on a steamer en 
route to Europe. On their return to this country 
their friendship was renewed. 



BIRTHS. 



To Dr. Howard J. Maldeis, class of 1903, and 
Mrs. Maldeis, of Baltimore, Md., Wednesday, 
July 28, 1915, a daughter. Mrs. Maldeis was 
Miss Louise Watkins, formerly a pupil nurse at 
the University Hospital Training School for 
Nurses. • 



To Dr. Amzi Bedell Shoemaker, class of 1908, 
and Mrs. Shoemaker, of North Attleboro, Mass., 
July 24, 1915, a son — Henry Wheaton. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



47 



e, W Saratosa St, 




SaCaryland 



DEATHS. 



Dr. David Street, College of Physicians and 
Surgeons, class of 1878, professor of practice of 
medicine at the University of Maryland and for 
25 years dean of the Baltimore Medical College, 
died at St. Agnes' Hospital following an opera- 
tion for intestinal trouble, from which he had 
been a sufferer for some time, July 30, 1915, aged 
60 years. 

Dr. Street was one of the best-known physi- 
cians in the city, and held many positions of note 
in the medical profession. He was a Democratic 
member of the City Council of Baltimore from 
1883 to 1885. He was born at Chrome Hill, Har- 
ford county, Md., October 17, 1855, and was a 
son of the late Corbin Grafton and Ann S. Street. 
He was educated at the Bethel Academy; A.M. 
(Honorary), Loyola College, 1895; M.D., Col- 
lege of Physicians and Surgeons, 1878. He 
served as resident physician, Maternite, 1878-79 ; 
resident physicians. City Hospital, 1879-80 ; pro- 
fessor of the practice of medicine, Baltimore Med- 
ical College, 1885 — ; dean, Baltimore Medical 
College, 1888 — ; president, Medical and Surgical 
Society, 1891-92; president, Baltimore Medical 
Association; vice-president. Medical and Chirur- 
gical Faculty, 1891-92, 1899-00. He was a mem- 
ber of the University Club, the Flint Club, the 
Board of Charities and Correction, and an elder 
in the Franklin Street Presbyterian Church. He 
wrote many books and papers that were regarded 
as criterions 

He married Miss Sarah Fusselbaugh, of Bal- 
timore, April 25, 1882. She survives him. He 
also leaves a daughter, Mrs. C. B. Gill, and a 
son, Dr. D. Corbin Streett. 



Intercollegiate Bureau of Academic Costume, Aibany.N.v 
COTRELL & 



LEONARD 

Official Mailers of 

Caps and 

Gowns 




Correct Hoods 
for All Degrees. 

Rich Gowns for 
Pulpit and Bencli. 

Bulletin, Samples 
etc. on request 



Statesville, N. C, died recently at his home of 
tuberculosis contracted at Bellevue Hospital, 
New York. 



Dr. Frederick Duvall Caruthers, class of 1892, 
formerly coroner of the Nortlieastern District of 
Baltimore, died at his home, 2229 East Baltimore 
street, from stomach trouble after an illness of 
three weeks, July 27, 1915, aged 44 years. 

Dr. Caruthers was graduated from the Uni- 
versity of Arkansas and studied medicine at Fort 
Smith, Ark., coming thence to the University of 
Maryland, from which he was graduated in 1892. 
Afterward he located at the Maryland Hospital 
for the Insane, Spring Grove, and also served 
as resident physician at Bayview Asylum. He 
was a member of the Knights Templars. His 
wife, Mrs. Helen D. Caruthers, and a brother, E. 
C. Caruthers, of Fort Smith, survive. 



Dr. Albert J. Laciar, College of Physicians and 
Surgeons, class of 1889, for nearly thirty years 
a physician in Northwest Baltimore, died at his 
home, 1735 Linden avenue, from pneumonia, 
which he contracted three weeks ago, July 23, 
1915, aged 52 years. Born in Bethlehem, Pa., 
Dr. Laciar spent his youth there, and came to this 
city in 1886. He is survived by his widow, Mrs. 
Muriel Nicholson Laciar, and two brothers, H. 
J. and C. W. Laciar, of Bethlehem. 



John Benjamin Elgin, D.D.S., class of 1902, 
of Annapolis, Md., died after a lingering illness 
at Blue Ridge Summit, August 10, 1915, aged 
35 years. Dr. Elgin was formerly of Loudoun 
County, Va. 



Dr. Everett Alanson Sherrell, class of 1912, of 



Mr. Maurice T. Williams, formerly a pupil 
at St. John's College, of Spray, N. C, was in- 
stantly killed in an automobile accident near 
Ridgeway, Va., August 15, 1915. 



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iAlITTl 




ALTRUISM. 

A triune faith is this, including faith 

In God, as "ransom, bliss and panoply," 

A faith in self, not egotistical 

Belief that overestimates, nor yet 

A sham humility that culminates 

In proud disparagement of self, but faith 

Profound that being factor in Life's strange 

Equation I must count, the minus sign 

Or plus determined less by where I stand 

Than how I fill the place. Essential too 

Is faith in every man's capacity 

For God ; a faith which sees the heads of gold 

Above the feet of clay, discerns beneath 

Dissimulated satisfaction with 

The husks, consuming hunger of the soul ; 

This trinity of faith stands straight and strong. 

Unmoved by seeming victories of wrong 

Expectant always that humanity 

Shall reach the final Good, and to that end 

Pursues its work of uplift which includes 

The masses and the individual. 



Bvaline Wright Nelson. 




VOL. n. 



BALTIMORE, MD., OCTOBER, 1915 



No. 4 




VERSITY GAZETTE 



Vol. II 



OCTOBER 1, 1915. 



No. 4. 



GREETINGS 51 

The Faculty of Law. 
The Faculty oe Physic. 
The Faculty of Pharmacy. 

PYORRHEA ALVEOLARIS, OR RIGGS' 
DISEASE. D. B. Lancaster 52 



EDITORIALS 54 

Editorially Expressed. 

A Dr. David Streett Scholarship. 



CONTENTS 

EDITORIALETS 55 

ANNOUNCEMENTS 56 

SLAMS AND SALUTES 56 

ITEMS 57 

QUIPS 62 

MARRIAGES 63 

DEATHS 63 



Footwear for the College Man at Moderate Price. 

N. HESS' SONS - - 8 E. Baltimore, St. 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE, MD. 

HON. PHILLIPS LEE GOLDSBOROUGH, Governor of Maryland, Chaneellor. 
THOMAS FELL, A. M., Ph. D., L L. D., D. C. L., Provost. 



ST. JOHN'S COLLEQE, Annapolis, Md. ( 



DEPARTMENT OF 
ARTS AND SCIENCES 



) 



Founded 1696. Classical and Scientific College Courses leading to d ;grees. Special advantages to stu- 
dents purposing to study the professions. Military Department under army officers. Also Preparatory 
School for boys fitting for St. John's or other colleges. Term begins September IS. Address 

THOMAS FELL. Ph.D., LL.D., D.C.L., President. 



DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE. 

Four years' graded course. New Laboratory Build- 
ing. Clinical advantages unsurpassed. Teaching Staff 
of 66. 109th Annual Session will begin October 1, 
1915, and continue 8 months. 

ARTHUR M. SHIPLEY, M. D., Acting Dean. 

DEPARTMENT OF DENTISTRY. 

34th Annual Session begins October 1, 1915, and 
continues 7 months. 26 Instructors. New Building. 
P'or catalogue containing course of study, etc., apply to 

TIMOTHY O. HEATWOLE, M.D., D.D.S., Dean, 

Baltimore, Md. 



DEPARTMENT OF LAW. 

60th Annual Session will begin Sept. 28, 1915. Faculty 
of 26. For catalogue containing full information ad- 
dress the Secretary, 301 St. Paul Street, Baltimore, 
Maryland. 

EDWIN T. DICKERSON, Secretary. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACY. 

(Formerly Maryland College of Pharmacy). 73rd 
.^nnual Session begins September 25, 1915. 11 In- 
structors. New Laboratories. Address 

CHARLES CASFARI, JR., Phar.D., Dean, 

Baltimore. Md. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 





Published Monthly in the Interest of the University of Maryland. 
PRICE $1.00 PER YEAR. 




Contributiond 


solicited from Alumni of the 
University. 


Business Address, 608 Professional 
Baltimore, Md. 


Building. 


Vol. II. 


BALTIMORE, MD., OCTOBER 1, 191S. 


No. 4. 



GREETINGS. 



I gladly avail myself of the opportunity offered 
by the Editor of The University Gazette to 
extend the greetings of the Faculty of Law to the 
students of the Law Department of the University 
of Maryland at the opening of this, the Forty- 
sixth annual session, and especially to those who 
are entering the halls of this old University for the 
first time. The Faculty wishes that every young 
man of good character and serious purpose who 
earnestly desires to qualify himself for the prac- 
tice of the law shall feel that his presence here is 
welcome and that it will be the aim of each and 
every one of the members of the Faculty to aid 
towards the fullest accomplishment of this pur- 
pose so that he may, not only be fitted to render 
useful service to his clients when called to the bar, 
but may gain an honorable place in the ranks of 
a profession which demands the best that any 
man can give and which has always included 
among its members leaders in the life and growth 
of every community. 

To this end our time and such knowledge and 
experience as we have gained are at the com- 
mand of our students. 

The greatest pleasure that can come to a teacher 
is derived from the satisfaction which comes from 
helping those who come to him for help and from 
the friendships which he forms with successive 
generations of fresh and vigorous minds and 
generous and noble spirits. And so we wish that 
our new students shall make us their friends, 
shall allow us to know them, shall come to us 
with their difficulties, shall avail themselves of 
whatever we can give and shall establish with us 
relations of trust and confidence that shall be 
based upon mutual respect and regard. It is in 
this spirit that we bid you welcome and in which 
we express the hope that your stay here may bring 
you a large measure of pleasure and benefit. 

The Faculty oe Law. 



It would be a happier and perhaps better ap- 
preciated thing to write the usual note of wel- 
come and felicitation, but I feel impelled to write 
in a very different spirit to the men in the Medical 
Department who are about to begin the work of 
another session. 

It is true that it would be no difficult matter to 
write in a spirit of congratulation and hope. 
Much has happened that augurs well for the medi- 
cal school and the University. 

A successful merger with the College of Phy- 
sicians and Surgeons has been Accomplished^ 
This gives the merged school the clinical facili- 
ties in three large general hospitals, and many 
special hospitals are affiliated with the medical 
department. 

The merger has doubled the laboratory facili- 
ties of the combined schools so that there is ample 
room, abundant equipment, and many trained and 
able teachers devoting either full time or part 
time to the laboratory branches. 

The University has become a part of the State 
University and no advance in recent times is more 
full of promise for the school than this. 

A most excellent record has been made before 
the State Boards this year, and this is a matter 
for congratulation. 

The hospitals and dispensaries have been put 
into excellent physical condition. 

The merger has added many able and dis- 
tinguished men to the teaching staff, and alto- 
gether we are justified in looking forward with 
courage and hope. 

But there is a matter about which I feel con- 
strained to write very seriously. 

At the end of the last session twenty-seven men 
failed to graduate. When the records of the men 
in the school were gone over carefully it was seen 
that a very large percentage of the men in each 
class are conditioned in one or more subjects, and 
many men are so seriously handicapped thereby 
that they will be compelled either to repeat a year 



52 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



or leave the school. Already a number of men 
have been notified that they will not be allowed 
to again enter the school. 

The Medical School is determined to maintain 
a high standard, both as to entrance requirements 
and as to the kind of work done by the student 
body. 

The study of medicine is a serious undertaking 
and there is no place in a good medical school for 
lazy men or triflers. A medical student's life is 
so full of work that he has neither the time nor 
strength to worship at the shrine of either Bacchus 
or Venus. The time is past when a man can 
dawdle through half the session and then by 
buckling down to work get a clear record for the 
year. It can't be done. 

I have seen so much of bitter disappointment, 
and vain regret within the last four months, and 
it has been my most unpleasant duty to talk to so 
many men who have wasted their chance that I 
feel very strongly in this matter, and I wish I 
could say something that could influence every 
man in the school to look upon his work as a 
high and mighty task toward the accomplish- 
ment of which he must resolutely set his face 
forward. 

The Faculty of Physic. 



In the broader spirit of helpfulness, the true 
University spirit, now pervading The University 
Gazette, the Faculty of Pharmacy extends its 
cordial greetings to the entire student body, espec- 
ially to the Freshmen of all departments. 

To the students of pharmacy, both old and new, 
is offered a hearty welcome and the assurance 
that every possible opportunity will be given them 
to secure as much of the special information re- 
quired to fit them for their life work, as they will 
be able to absorb. More and more it is realized 
that the relationship of student and instructor 
should be of a particularly close and confidential 
nature. It is therefore earnestly hoped that the 
students of this department will always feel at lib- 
erty to come to any member of the Faculty of 
Pharmacy for help or advice regarding special 
or general subjects. 

The growing closer relationship of the various 
professions, based upon the standardization of 
scientific attainment, rather than upon ancient 
prestige makes it possible for the students of the 



University to more generally consult the facul- 
ties of other departments, than those with which 
they may be directly connected. If this should 
be desirable the Faculty of Pharmacy freely offers 
sympathetic and earnest co-operation. 

Visits by all students of the University to the 
Dean's office and Pharmaceutical Laboratory are 
cordially invited. 

The Faculty of Pharmacy. 



PYORRHEA ALVEOLARIS, OR RIGGS' 
DISEASE. 



D. B. Lancaster, A. B., Dental '16 



The attention of dentists, physicians and the 
public has of late been sharply drawn to the here- 
tofore unsuspected prevalence, curability, and 
preventability of Pyorrhea, or Riggs' Disease. 
It has been found present in about 95 per cent of 
all cases examined. More than half of all adult 
teeth are lost through this disease. To the great 
many who are unacquainted with the disease this 
may seem surprising, yet the too little respect paid 
to oral hygiene and the procrastinated visits to the 
family dentist make this perfectly credible. Too 
many sufferers today have neglected their 
mouths, or, perhaps, have been ignorant of the 
importance of the motto "clean teeth never decay 
and good teeth mean good health." Only a very 
few besides those in the dental profession are 
aware of the systemic derangements resulting 
from bad teeth and oral diseases. It is pitiable 
that so few are familiar with this disease and able 
to realize their own possession of it before long 
development has made the case a distressing 
condition. 

But the cause of the disease is not neglect on 
the part of the patient alone, for the disease occurs 
and often persists in mouths of patients who are 
scrupulously clean concerning the toilet of the 
mouth. The cause in many cases can be traced 
to neglect on the part of the family dentist, who 
either failed to recognize and correct the disease 
in its incipiency, or, recognizing it, informed the 
patient that nothing could be done and advised 
letting it go. It is pitiable that so many teeth 
have been lost in the past because of the seeming 
indifference of dentists ; but the wave of prophy- 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



53 



laxis which is floating over the profession today 
is an encouraging sign that individual dentists 
are either equipping themselves to combat the 
disease or are referring the patients thus afflicted 
to dentists who are so equipped. 

Pyorrhea Alveolaris is a purulent inflammation 
of the dental periosteum, with progressive 
necrosis of the alveoli and loosening of the teeth. 
Investigators have recently found that the disease 
is due to the Germ Family, the luxurists on our 
twenty to thirty inches of tooth surface; also 
between and under the teeth, or in crypts and 
pockets about their roots. The name of the princi- 
pal miscreant is entamoeba buccalis, a microscopi- 
cal jelly-like animal which can be demonstrated in 
almost every mouth and gets his living by thrust- 
ing out fingers (pseudopods) from various parts 
of his anatomy, in search of food, or to assist him 
in migration. These protozoa have been known 
for more than fifty years to inhabit the mouth, 
but were first recognized as a cause of pyorrhea 
by Doctors M. F. Barrett and A. J. Smith during 
1914. 

The entamoeba gains an entrance beneath the 
red ramparts of the gums through abrasions or 
wounds, the healing of which is prevented by 
particles of food forced between the teeth. Again, 
the disease may enter through inflammation 
around the roots of the teeth, excited by ill fitting 
crowns, overhanging margins of improperly con- 
structed fillings, or through malocclusion of the 
teeth, or through hard and rough substances called 
calculi deposited from the saliva or blood serum, 
these being almost invariably present in pyorrhea 
and receding gums. Once within the ramparts, 
the amoebas begin the attack upon the membrane 
lining the tooth socket by digging microscopic 
trenches and spreading infection, furnishing soon 
a favorable ground for reinforcements in the form 
of pus-producing germs. At the tooth sockets 
little sacs of pus form and slowly discharge from 
between the gums and necks of the teeth. The 
teeth become tender and the gums bleed easily. 
The former begin to decay and for years the 
patient goes on swallowing the pus and amoebas, 
which is responsible for many forms of rheuma- 
tism, neuralgia, anaemia, etc. It has been clearly 
demonstrated that at least certain kinds of pyor- 
rhea are closely associated with, if not caused by, 
such general diseases and conditions as syphilis. 



tuberculosis, actinomycosis, diabetes, gout, rheu- 
matism, osteomelitis, salivation, phosphor poison- 
ing, and faulty metabolism in general. Ulti- 
mately the suppurative process entirely destroys 
the attachments of the teeth. They fall out, or 
else become so loosened that they can be plucked 
out with the fingers. 

A cure has been somewhat recently discovered. 
It consists of the use of Ipecac or some of its con- 
stituents, as emetine hydrochlorid, either locally 
in the mouth or by hypodermic injections, together 
with a proper surgical and mechanical treatment. 
A few weeks ago Wright and White of the navy 
reported complete and remarkably quick cures in 
twenty-eight cases of pyorrhea by the intramus- 
cular injection of mercuric succinimid. There 
is quite a great deal of difference of opinion to- 
day as to the method of treatment that should be 
employed and as to whether pyorrhea is due to 
endamoebic or bacterial infection. Dr. Barton 
K. Wright states that the disease is not due to 
one organism but to a multiplicity of organisms. 
He is in favor of the mercury treatment, an agent 
which is parasitotropic to all vegetable parasites. 
Mercury, as he states, also has the power of in- 
citing in the presence of vegetable antigen the 
rapid production of a specific antibody. The 
treatment is simple and the dose differs with the 
sex. In males deep muscular injections of mer- 
curic succinimid gr. 1 should be given every seven 
days, until the pus disappears and the gums be- 
come normal. In females, the dose should be 
from gr. 1/5 to gr. 2/.5 less than that of males. 

As a final word, in the prevention and cure of 
pyorrhea, bad teeth, and other diseases, oral 
and systemic, one should faithfully devote him- 
self morning and night, with a good wash and 
paste, to the duty of oral hygiene. Take care 
lest you have pyorrhea; perhaps you now have 
it. Remember thsX"clean teeth never decay and 
good teeth mean good liealth." 



Menu, Banquet and Dance Cards, Commencement Invita- 
tions and Programs, Diploraa.s, Certificates, Engrossing, U. 
of M. Stationery for Classes and Fraternities, Letter Heads. 
Envelopes, Cards, etc., for Physicians, Lawyers and Dentists. 

J. H. DOWNS, STATIONER, 229 N. Charles SL 



54 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 

A MONTHLY JOURNAL 

Devoted to the interests of the University 

of Maryland. 

Subscription Price, $1.00 Per Annum, In Advance 

Reprints Furnished At Cost 

Advertising Rates Submitted Upon Request. 

608 Professional Building 

BALTIMORE. MD. 

Editorial Board. 

J. BEN ROBINSON, D.D.S Editor-in-Chief. 

NATHAN WINSLOW, M.D Business Manager. 

Graduate Members. 

THOMAS FELL, LL.D Academic. 

H. M. ROBINSON, M.D Medical. 

ALBERT H. CARROLL, M.D Medical. 

SAMUEL WANT, LL. B Law. 

JOHN H. SIvBEN, LL. B Law. 

A. A. SONNENBURG, Phar.D Pharmacy. 

J. M. BRANSKY, Phar.D Pharmacy. 

M. E. SULLIVAN, R.N Nursing. 

A. B. MAKOVER, Law, '17 Undergraduate. 

A. B. MAKOVER, Law 17 Undergraduate Editor. 

Undergraduate Members. 

P. C. MARINO, '16; C. 0. VS^OLF, 

'17 Medicine 

A. Z. ALDRIDGE, '16; E. B. LAN- 
CASTER, '17 Dental. 

C. N. MATTHEVi^S, DAVE LOW- 
ENSTEIN, JR., '17 Law. 

A. L. STERLING, '15 Pharmacy. 

J. E. EVANS, '16 Y. M. C.A. 

OCTOBER 1, 1915. 



EDITORIALLY EXPRESSED. 



The beginning of another school year offers 
opportunities for improvements along all branches 
of work. To live is to change — to break down 
and repair. Progress is merely improvement in 
the new over the old and as our school lives and 
moves on its object should be to perpetuate its 
better elements by more thorough enforcements, 
to prune out the objectionable features that the 
operations for efficiency may not be hampered. 
Any thing that is worth doing is worth doing well 
and we will be patronized and favored in propor- 
tion to the value of our product. The task is be- 
fore us and we are all laborers. To the work 
with spirit. 



The College Man Sets 
the Styles! 

Uphold your reputation by wearing suits 
made the "Matched Pattern" way, themogt 
important clothing invention of the decade ! 

These suits are sold exclusively by 

THE QUALITY SHOP 

Balto. and Liberty Sts. 




Young man, your beginning is more vital than 
your commencement, hence it should give you 
more concern. You who work from day to day 
to meet requirements, to discharge your duty, to 
qualify yourself for life's work, need have little 
fear of final examinations, graduation, and state 
boards. Nothing short of natural inability can 
cause failure. Your future is in your own keep- 
ing ; you can or you will not as you elect. If you 
fail do not blame fate or your instructor but pay 
the price for neglect and be a man in suffering 
the penalty. As for your instructor, the one you 
will respect most is the one who is kindly exact- 
ing to the least detail and who after severely driv- 
ing you for the school year rejoices with you at 
your successes. 



Again we have been favored with an article 
from the pen of a student. We are looking for 
such articles written expressly for The Gazette. 
We wish more young men would avail themselves 
of such an opportunity to bring themselves before 
the public, to develop their powers and incident- 
ally to give us the benefit of their impressions and 
experiences. We want articles written expressly 
for The Gazette that the paper's individuality 
may be emphasized. We might suggest that 
articles pertaining to questions in our profession 
are preferred but as specialists we must face 
questions of general interest and should any one 
desire to contribute aside from professional sub- 
jects we would be glad to give space. 



Annually the students at the University publish 
a year book, the Terra Mariae. Practically every 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



55 



school of any importance in the country carries 
the same feature. The main object is to create 
and perpetuate a stronger bond of union among 
the classmen and to advertise the institution. 
From all reports the Terra Mariae has not been 
fulfilling these objects. Last year there was no 
end of embarrassment caused by the manner in 
which the annual was managed, and many of the 
personals were of such a character that a self- 
respecting man would feel resentment at the 
allusions contained. In the first case our adver- 
tisement was negative and in the second the spirit 
of good will was jeopardized by references of 
personal nature reflecting on individual peculiar- 
ities or deficiencies. Let's have a Terra Mariae, 
but let's have the right kind. If it comes to the 
point where the step is deemed advisable a faculty 
supervising committee should be appointed to 
direct the work and see that the work is carried on 
to the credit of the institution. 



A DR. DAVID STREETT SCHOLARSHIP. 



When one dies who has accomplished much, it 
is right and proper that his memory be ever kept 
alive by a suitable memorial, so that those who 
come after him may profit by being imbued with 
the aspirations of the deceased. Doctor David 
Streett was a man who accomplished much not 
only for the medical profession, but by his con- 
stant efforts, the elevation of medical educational 
standards. He took hold of the helm of the Balti- 
more Medical College when it was in its infancy 
and by his energy, indefatigable industry and self 
sacrifice builded a school of which its alumni can 
feel justly proud. During the twenty-five years 
which Dr. Streett occupied the deanship of the 
Baltimore Medical College it was his privilege to 
be thrown into contact with many students from 
the New England States. In no section of the 
country will Dr. Streett 's untimely death be more 
deplored than in New England. The alumni of 
this section through intimate contact with their 
dean came to love him dearly. In every way pos- 
sible he showed them that he was always person- 
ally concerned with their comfort and welfare. 
His many little gracious acts will be forever 
treasured as priceless keepsakes of their college 
days. 



The University feeling that these men would 
like in some concrete and permanent manner to 
outwardly exhibit their appreciation of the kind- 
nesses extended them during their college days by 
Dr. Streett offers the suggestion that our New 
England alumni establish a David Streett Scholar- 
ship for New Englanders. In no better manner 
could permancy be given to a gift. Three thous- 
and dollars would be sufficient for the purpose and 
as there are more than five hundred graduates in 
New England, no great burden would fall upon 
the shoulders of any one man. Already Dr. 
Streett has been surfeited with eulogies and words 
of commendation ; unfortunately fulsome praise is 
good for the ears, but soon forgotten The scholar- 
ship would give a concrete method for you mani- 
festing your love and affection. You were strang- 
ers and he took you in. In your hours of trial 
and tribulation he comforted you. He guided 
you through the maze of medical reefs and 
brought you safely into port. Though first 
teacher and dean, withal he was no less your 
friend. Therefore let us not sing Dr. Streett's 
praises in words alone, but also in a concrete 
form, namely a scholarship. 



EDITORIALETS. 



Caleb Winslow, A.M. has been appointed Reg- 
istrar of the Medical Department of the Univer- 
sity of Maryland. He is a son of Prof. Randolph 
Winslow, and is an A. B. and A. M. of Haver- 
ford College, Pa. He has been engaged in teach- 
ing at the Jefferson School for Boys for the past 
three years. We believe he is exceedingly well 
equipped for the position to which he has been 
appointed. 



There is a very laudable movement on foot to 
endow a chair or scholarship to be named the 
David Streett Scholarship, in honor of David 
Streett, formerly dean of the Baltimore Medical 
College and since the merger of the two schools 
and until his demise Professor of the Principles 
and Practice of Medicine. It is our hope that all 
the friends of the above named will come forward 
and do him honor by contributing. 



56 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



During the last five years there have been num- 
erous improvements to such an extent that the 
former graduates who have not visited the Hos- 
pital in that time will be agreeably surprised. 
Still lately there have been many changes and 
renovations, the former site of the University 
Hospital laundry being replaced with space for 
clinical teaching in addition to present dispen- 
sary. For launday purposes there has been 
errected a new building. The Maternity Ward 
and Wards "K and E" have come in for extensive 
renovations. 



SLAMS AND SALUTES. 



ANNOUNCEMENTS. 



The Gazette desires to publicly thank the Fac- 
ulty of Physic for its kindness in permitting the 
use of space in Davidge Hall for the Editors' 
Office of The University G.\zette. We wish 
also to express our thanks to Acting Dean Shipley 
for the personal interest taken in directing the 
attention of the Faculty to our request for quart- 
ers in the University. 

The G.-\zette will continue to maintain its 
Business Office at 60S Professional Building. All 
matters, other than business, pertaining to the 
undergraduate department will be attended to 
at the Editors' Office, Davidge Hall, University of 
Maryland, Lombard and Greene Streets. In the 
future all undergraduate material for publication 
should be sent to the latter address. 



ELECTION OF EDITORS FOR ENTERING 
CLASSES. 



There are four vacancies on The Gazette un- 
dergratuate editorial board that will be filled by 
October 15th. The presidents of the first-year 
classes in ^ledicine, Law, Dentistry and Phar- 
macy are requested to see ^Ir. A. B. iMakover at 
the Gazette Office in Davidge Hall before Octo- 
ber 10 to arrange for elections in their respective 
classes. We request that the class officers men- 
tioned call as soon as possible as there will be an 
Essay Contest, as usual, before the candidates are 
eligible for election. 



Conduct in The Libr.ary. 



The manners of some of our students when in 
the University Library are quite shocking. They 
seem to forget that Davidge Hall is where men of 
serious minds go to consult works of reference 
and to study. They act as if it were a poolroom 
or some such place where men stand about and 
smoke, talk loudly and make unseemly noises. 

It is impossible to work properly when sur- 
rounded by a crowd of strong voiced young men 
excitedly engaged in conversations at times edify- 
ing, although quite as frequently not so. In most 
of our sister universities the Library is a mecca 
where the most valuable students assemble to 
work, and where they may be certain that annoy- 
ances and interruptions will not disconcert them. 
The regulations for the conduct of persons enter- 
ing the librar\- are strictly enforced and silence is 
always insisted upon. It might be said in passing, 
that the disorder in our Library is not due to any 
neglect of duty b)' the Librarian or her assistants 
but is rather caused by an ungentlemanly lack of 
cooperation on the part of inconsiderate students. 

The present state of affairs is unfortunate, but 
we believe that it is due to the fact that the men 
do not realize the inconvenience that results from 
their unreasonable actions. We urge all students 
to give this matter their earnest consideration. 

A. B. M. 



STYLISH and COMFORTABLE 
FOOT-WEAR 



FOR THE 



UNIVERSITY MAN 

All Leathers — Expert Fitting 
Moderate Prices 

WYMAN 

19 W. LEXINGTON STEET 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



57 



Advice to Freshmen. 



It is far easier to give advice than to take it, 
but we have been through just what you are only 
starting, so it will be well to give ear to our short 
speech. Oracular is our discourse and we speak 
in the manner of Polonius to his son : 
My son, fresh art thou to the ways of culture. 
Forget thou the foppery of thy high-school days 
And unwrinkle thy silly grin. A freshman 
Is twice a child ; hold thy tongue in check 
To become the man. Costly thy habit as thy 
Purse can buy, but taboo thou loudness in 
Neckties ; rich, not gaudy, for neckwear 
Oft proclaimeth one the "freshie." Hock 
Not thy watch lest thou be in direst need. 
And only then till funds arrive. To thine own 
Class stick true, for unity preserveth 
Our college life. Subscribe thou now to 
The Gazette, for, like the Virtues, it 
Maketh soul and body whole. Come thou 
Across with thy dollar like George o'er 
The icy Delaware, courageously and like 
A man. Plug thou hard at thy studies now, 
Lest when cramming time is nigh thou 
Regret the wasted hours. Boost, and knock not. 
This above all : Remember thou that thou 
Enterest not merely to end a Doctor, 
Dentist, Pharmicist or Lawyer, for the 
University aimeth to make of thee withal a MAN. 
Adieu : our blessing season this in thee. 

—A. B. M. 


ITEMS. 



Tables reserved for ladies Open all night 

SPECIAL RATES TO STUDENTS 



MEDICAL— GRADUATE. 



Resolutions on The Death op Prof. 
David Streett. 

It becomes the painful duty of the Faculty of 
Physics and Board of Regents of the Univer- 
sity OF Maryland to place on record the death 
of Prof. David Streett. 

Professor Streett graduated from the College 
of Physicians and Surgeons in the class of 1878. 
He was elected professor of principles and prac- 
tice of medicine in the Baltimore Medical College 
in 1885, and for many years was dean of that 
institution. By his zeal, industry and administra- 
tive ability he was largely instrumental in the 
upbuilding of that college. When the merger of 



AT 



The Imperial Lunch Room 



526 W. Baltimore St. 



Phone St Paul 8478 



Baltimore, Md. 



the Baltimore Medical College with the University 
of Maryland was made effective in 1913 Pro- 
fessor Streett became professor of practice of 
medicine and a regent in the University of Mary- 
land. 

Since his connection with the University of 
Maryland he has been most loyal and active in 
the work of the University and has won the es- 
teem and respect of all his associates. 

Professor Streett was a man of great energy 
and enthusiasm in all professional activities. By 
close application and industry he acquired a large 
fund of knowledge on all literary and scientific 
subjects, and was a highly cultivated Christian 
gentleman. 

By his genial, affable manners and sweetness of 
nature he became greatly beloved by a large circle 
of friends and professional admirers. 

He was widely known and loved by the gradu- 
ates of the Baltimore Medical College and an- 
nually attended the alumni reunions of that col- 
lege. 

Be it Resolved, That a copy of these resolu- 
tions be recorded on the minutes of the Faculty 
of Physics and of the Board of Regents. 

That a copy be sent to the family of Prof. Da- 
vid Streett, with the sympathy of the Faculty and 
Regents, and that a copy be sent to the University 
publications. T. A. Ashby. 

J. C. Hemmeter. 
R. B. Warfield. 



Prof. Jas. M. H. Rowland, has been made a 
member of the Faculty of Physic, vice Prof. David 
Streett, deceased. We believe this is a most 
judicious selection. Dr. Rowland is an energetic 

Sight, smell and taste plays big part in digestion. 

Eating is a matter of the sympathetic nerres. ">'o 
profit where no pleasure is taken." 

POSITITELT we feed you BETTEE, at LESS COSh 
iind IN THE CLEANEST environment than any onl 
lias ever done before since time began. 

BRIGHTON LUNCH 

14 N. HOWARD STREET 



58 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



I 



forceful man and will be a strong man in the 
faculty. 

Dr. Albert J. Underbill has been promoted from 
Associate in Genito-Uninary Diseases to Asso- 
ciate Professor of the same. He is an earnest, 
scientific as well as practical worker and well de- 
served his advancement. 



Loans on Indorsements and Other Security 

A dignified and inexpensive plan of borrowing 
money, to be repaid in small weekly installments. 
Prompt action. 

THE NATIONAL BUILDING AND LOAN ASSN, 
1063 Calvert BuUding. 



Dr. Fred Rankin who has been taking a long 
vacation, spent principally at Atlantic City, has 
returned to the City and taken up his work. 



Dr. J. H. Bates, class of 1907, of Millington 
Md. 

Dr. Ralph E. Dees, class of 1906, of Greens- 
boro, N. C. 

Dr. J. Sterling Geatty, class of 1906, of New 



Dr. Bascom L. Wilson, '15, has left the Uni- 
versity Hospital as resident to take a position in Wmdsor, Md. 
the Soldiers' Home in Washington, D. C. His Dr. Wm. W. Beall, class of 1888, of Rock Hill, 

place being taken by Dr. Bernard R. Kelly, '15. ^'■^- 

Dr. W. H. Smithson, class of 1905, of New 

Dr. M. h. Lichtenberg, formerly resident at Park, Pa. 

the University Hospital, has located at 1638 N. Dr. Arthur E. Lenders, class of 1907, of 

Monroe St., for the practice of General Medicine. Crumpton, Md. 

^. ,„ . .. , rr . Dr. Z. C. Myers, class of 1881, of Lock, Pa. 

The followmg were recent visitors to the Urn- ^^ ^^ ^^^.^^^_ p ^ g^ ^^^^^ ^^ ^^^^^ ^^ 

"^■■^'^y^- Galena, Md. 

^ Dr. Henderson Irvm, class of 1912, of Eureka, ^^ g^^^^^^^j q Love, class of 1914, C. E. Calli- 

North Carohna. ^^^^ ^j^^^ ^^ ^902_ ^f Crisfield, Md. 

Dr. C. N. Famous, class of 1901, of Street, Md. ^^ ^^ ^ gy^^ly^ ^1^3^ ^f jp^j^ of Glenwood, 

Dr. Earl G. Breeding, class of 1913, of Rocky j^jj 

Mount, N. C. £)r. Newberry A. S. Keyser, class of 1883, of 

Dr. Porter P. Vinson, class of 1914, of Trudeau, jonpa Md 

Dr. R. E. Booker, class of 1902, of Lottsburg, 
Va. 

Dr. H. E. Clark, class of 1914, of Sykesville, 
Md. 

Dr. E. E. Travers, class of 1913, of Washing- 
ton. 



N. Y. 

Dr. V. N. Lang, class of 1906, of Winston-Salem 
N. C. 

Dr. Thos. M. Bizzell, class of 1908, of Golds- 
borough, N. C. 

Dr. J. S. A. Woolford, class of 1896, of Chat- 
tanooga, Tenn. 

Dr. Ralph C. P. Truitt, class of 1910, of Jack- 
son, Fla. 



Dr J. Dawson Reeder announces the removal of 

his offices from the Professional Building, 330 N. 

Dr. Charles L. Joslin, class of 1912, of Mt. Wil- Charles Street, to the Walbert, 1800 N. Charles 

son, Md. Street. He will be associated with Dr. Under- 

Dr. Herbert A. Codington, class of 1911, of the hill. Office hours daily from 9 :30 to 11 :30 A. M. 

James Walker Hospital, Wilmington, N. C. o 

Dr. William E. Gallion, Jr., class of 1912, of LAW GRADUATE. 

Darlington, Md. 



Dr. John Cox Keaton, class of 1907, of Albany, Mr. Lindsay Rogers, class of 1915, formerly of 

Georgia. the Editorial Board of the G-xzette, has been ap- 

Dr. Franklin H. Seiss, P. & S., class of 1880, pointed adjunct professor of political science in 

Taneytown, Md. the University of Virginia. He left on the 16th 

Dr. J. E. Garner, B. M. C, class of 1903, of of September for Charlottesville, Va. Mr. 

Wauchula, Fla. • • Rogers is also an alumnus of the Johns Hopkins 

J. H. Bates, class of 1907, of Millington, Md. University. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



59 



Judge and Mrs. Morris A. Soper will leave 
shortly for the California exposition, where they 
will spend several weeks. 



Mr. George L. Goff (Pop.) formerly of the 
class of 1915 — Day — who left the class last year 
to go over to New York with a business firm, has 
returned to the city and expects to complete the 
law course with the class of 1916. 



Mr. Bruce C. Lightner, class of 1915, who has 
been spending some time at his home, 26 Mil- 
bourne Avenue, W. Philadelphia, Pa., left on Fri- 
day, September 10th, for Hagerstown, Md., where 
he will open a law office. He will be associated 
with Mr. R. E. Kanode, also of the class of 1915. 
We wish them both much success. 



We understand that Messrs. Elmer H. Miller 
and Julius Zieget, both of the class of 1915, have 
opened a law office in the city. 



John Henry Skeen, LL. B., class of 1905, who 
is president of the Scoutmaster's Club of this 
city, has succeeded Mr. L. H. Putman as acting 
commissioner of the local scouting activities. He 
took charge September 1st. Mr. Skeen is a native 
Baltimorean and has been engaged in practicing 
law since his graduation from the University. 

o 

LAW— INTERMEDIATE. 



Well, boys, this is official notice that beginning 
this day and continuing therefrom unto the last 
day of May 1916, we are to be known as Inter- 
mediates, meaning that we are between Heaven 
and Hell ; Paradise in the form of the Seniors and 
Hades in the shape of the new embryonic lawyers, 
THE JUNIORS. Gaudiamus igitw. 



We note with great pleasure that our fellow 
student, the great Republican demagogue, lawyer, 
preacher, soldier, author and poet, The Rt. Rev. 
Hon. Albert K. Weyer has been elected delegate 
to the State Convention with instructions to cast 



LEFRANC & AULT 

ARE SHOWING 

NEW NECKWEAR 

AND 

NEW SHIRTS 

AT THE 

"SHIRT SHOP" 

421 N. Howard St., at Franklin 



one vote at least for the Hon. Ovington E. Weller. 
We understand further that the Rt. Rev. Hon. 
Gent, aforementioned, has been selected as the 
star stump speaker for the Republican nominees. 
Vive le politician! 

We have long wondered whether that great 
Authority on Real Property, Mr. Herman P. 
Kassan, is addicted to any particular vice. At 
last we have found him out. The writer, desiring 
to be a good sport, took occasion to invite Kasey 
to have a drink. Our gentle readers will under- 
stand the feeling of the invitor when the invitee 
demanded from the dispenor, "I'll have a glass of 
Lozak." 

We would not be greatly surprised to meet him 
some bright day staggering out of Huylers. 

Not long since we had the pleasure of meeting 
our classmate, Mr. M. H. Laucheimer, who 
sported on that occasion what we will call for the 
sake of the argument a "mustache." "Long may 
it wave." 



We glimpsed Donald R. Hohnberger as he 
passed along Baltimore Street resplendent, in a 
I'urd automobile, during the recent Municipal 
?■ iraae. We are glad to say that the machine 
(or should we repeat Automobile?) bore the 
banner of The Department of Liens. We hope 
to be invited to a joy ride in the near future. 



WILLIAM J. MILLER 
Jewelry, Diamonds, Watches 

College Jewelry 
Class Pins and Rings, College Seals 

28 E.it Baltimore St. Baltimore. Md. 22 W. Lexiogton St., ■ Baltimore, Md. 



R LLERBROCK 



60 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



Blome's Chocolates 

Known and enjoyed by students of the 
University for more than half a century. 

Retail Department 
BLOME'S CANDY STORE 

Established 1859 621 W. Baltimore St, 

DENTAL— SENIOR. 



Well here we are again ready to line up for 
the last lap of the race. Some of us are handi- 
capped by Progress Marks but by burning the 
mid night oil these may be cut down. 

Freshmen are extended a hearty welcome and 
they will find each and every member of the 
Senior Class their friends, willing and ready to 
assist them in every way possible. 

To my classmates and fellow collegians I also 
extend welcome. 

There have been several changes to be noted 
around the school. Namely the Technic Room 
and the Laboratories. "Charlie" and his assistants 
surely must have gotten ambitious and wanted to 
surprise the boys. Let us try to keep the place 
as we intend to keep our own offices. 



The Barber Dentist upon whom we harped 
much last year has been given a new name "Char- 
lie Chaplin" not because of the celebrated feet, 
but on account of a superfluous growth of hair 
on the "Superioris Labii and his cunning smile. 
When Dr. G calls "Al" there is no response but 
when he shouts "Charlie" Al comes on a run. 



Things All Freshmen Should Do. 

1. Subscribe to the Gazette. 

2. Remember they are Freshies. 

3. Boost the school. 

4. Determine to make good. 

5. Do not get home sick. Remember we are all 
your friends. 



Jigger, Sloppy, Burns came to Baltimore for a 
while this summer on a bet, as he claims, but we 
knew Strieker long before him. 



Now Ready for Fall, 1915. See Us for Classy Clothes 

Suits to Measure, $15.00 to $35.00 
A. JACOBS & SONS, Tailors 

899 NORTH HOWARD STREET 

Open Evenings 9 P. M. Cor. Richmond St. 

"Slats" Funderburk and "Fresh" Smith blew 
in on us from the South land the first of Septem- 
ber. The former is our book agent who daily 
receives precious letters from his home town. 
"Fresh" gets letters with loving conclusions. 



The Summer Irrfimiary Squad headed by Dr. 
Al. G. Guerra, as demonstrator, consisted of Drs. 
Davilla, Blatt, Simons, and Ouintero doing post 
graduate work, Seniors, Aldridge, Jones, Nathan- 
son, Haile, Harper, Baklor and McLeod; and 
Juniors, Lancaster, Vina, Kramer and Demarco. 
Much good work was accomplished. 



DENTAL— JUNIOR. 



Freshmen, the class of 1917 bids you a hearty 
welcome and wishes you the blessings of health, 
happiness, and prosperity during your entire 
course. We hope that we shall soon become ac- 
quainted with you and that you will early appre- 
ciate the fact that we are interested in those fol- 
lowing close in our footprints. 



No one has seen or heard of Waynick. We 
suppose he decided that his early experience in the 
infirmary qualified him to hang out a shingle in 
some desolate "tar heel" spot. 



Claiborne, Clark, Smith, and Santoni have paid 
the infirmary occasional visits. Santoni spent the 
first half of his vacation at his home in Cuba. 
Clarke went to his home in Virginia for a short 
visit. 



Vina and Lancaster can tell you about the in- 
finnary. They are saying, "come on fellows, 
don't be bashful." 



Adair is back in harness. Floss says if he were Brown has been spending his vacation over at 

as wise as he is now he would not have returned Johns Hopkins Hospital, and he will be delighted 
so soon. His girls have moved. to relate his psychiatric experiences. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



61 



Hart Schaffner & Marx, 
Kuppenheimer, 
"Society Brand" 



The clothes that college men 
like a lot 



Baltimore Street At Charles 



Coble and Culler have been giving lectures 
in metallurgy to housewives and daughters. All 
Culler needs (in his name) is that "b" in Coble's 
"ble." It is rumored that Coble has purchased a 
Ford. (Guess he got it from Sammy). 

— o 

ACADEMIC— GRADUATE. 



St. John's College reopened September 1.5th 
with prospects for a successful term. A number 
of new students were enrolled. There is only one 
change in the faculty, that of Prof. S. S. Handy, 
former principal of the Easton (Md.) High 
School, who takes the chair of English and his- 
tory, in place of Prof. Stanwood Cobb, resigned. 

With practically every member of last year's 
squad back at college, and good material to pick 
from, the Cadets e.xpect to turn out the usually 
strong football team. The chief loss is that of 
Bowen, a halfback, who, it is understood, has 
decided to enter Georgetown University. 

The formal opening of St. John's College took 
place Wednesday Sept. '20th, when Dr. Thomas 
Fell and the faculty in cap and gown appeared on 
the platform for Chapel exercises. At the con- 
clusion Dr. Fell made an address to the students. 
He said in part, as follows : 

"You have, I hope, assembled within these walls 
refreshed by the vacation just ended, and with a 
well defined intention to do good work during the 
period of your residence here. 

"Unfortunately the good intentions with which 
we commence our college course are not always 
realized for the reason that earnestness of purpose 
is not always maintained, 

an active interest in their studies so as to ac- 
complish the great end they had in view when 
matriculating as students." 



"It has often been said that the success of a 
college does not depend upon mere numbers, 
whether of buildings, books, students or football 
trophies, but upon the men who form the faculty. 
From these emanate the influence which tends to 
produce useful citizens, and it is they, themselves, 
who make or mar the college. 

"An instructor, to be successful must not re- 
gard the pupil as a receptacle, merely to be filled 
up with a certain amount of information; a 
greater responsibility rests upon him — and he 
must conceive the youth as a living spirit, a being 
whose manhood must be built up. 

"There is, however, much that a student should 
do, on his part to promote this process or building 
up character. He must not be passive merely, 
but must be plastic and receptive. He must en- 
deavor to respond to the utmost of his ability, to 
the efforts put forth in his behalf." 

Reference was then made to a feeling of grati- 
fication with the appearance and qualifications of 
the new students. The Freshman Class will 
probably enroll nearly 70 members, to whom the 
Doctor especially spoke, admonishing them to 
avail themselves of their opportunities. 

Dr. Fell said there is no training like the true 
college life, of campus, dormitory and restraining 
discipline for the development of a robust, healthy, 
manly character. He urged them to pay attention 
to the rules and regulations of the college, to 
carefully observe the principles of the honor 
system to which they were pledged, and to take 
an active interest in their studies so as to ac- 
complish the great end they had in view when 
matriculating as students." 

A. H. PETTING 

Manufacturer of 

GREEK LETTER FRATERNITY JEWELRY 

213 N. Liberty St., = Baltimore, Md. 
Factory: 212 Little Sharp St. 



Memorandum package sent to any fraternity member through the 
secretary of the chapter. Special designs and estimates furnished on 
medals, rlngsand pins or athletic meets, etc. 



ea 






THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



NURSING. 



A meeting of the Nurses' Alumnae Association 
of the University of Maryland was held at the 
University Hospital on the afternoon of Septem- 
ber Ittth, Miss M. E. Rolph, president, in the chair. 
Miss C. A. Cox, who was a delegate to the con- 
vention of the American Nurses' Association, 
held in San Francisco in June, gave a very inter- 
esting report of the meeting. 



Miss Barbara E. Stouffer, class of 1911, who 
has been doing substitute work in the Social Ser- 
vice department at Johns Hopkins Hospital for 
the past year, has accepted a permanent position 
in that department. 



Miss Noami Hellend, class of 1911, who is a 
patient in the hospital, is improving. 



Miss Bernice V. Conner, class of 1912, has been 
appointed night superintendent of nurses at the 
hospital. 




Who 

SelU 

Ready- to-wear 



College Clothes 




New Fall Models 

Now Ready 

Prices $15 to $25 



Made to Measure 

From $20 Up 
Samples Cheerfully Given 



19 E. FAYETTE ST. 

Take Elevator 



HEPBRON & HAYDON 

We Sell Every Law Book and Syllabus Use i 
at the U. of M. 

St. Paul 8794 1243-53 CALVERT BLDG. 



Miss Marie K. Balsley, class of 1914, who has 
been ill for some time, has gone to Ashville, N. C, 
to recuperate. 



Miss Nettie Flanigan, formerly superintendent 
of Nurses of the University Hospital Training 
School is located at 1403 Madison Ave., and will 
engage in private nursing for the present. 



Miss Frances A. Shelton, class of 19,14, has 
resigned her position at the St. Joseph's Hospital, 
South Bend, Indiana, and will locate at 1403 Mad- 
ison Ave., ready for private nursing. 

o 

QUIPS. 



No Experiments on Him. 
A Good Joke on Johns Hopkins Hospital 

A few evenings ago we were around at Dr. 
Hyatt's office and while discussing the reason why 
people went away from home for professional 
work that could often be done better at home, the 
doctor remarked that it sometimes worked the 
other way. 

He said, "One evening about 7 years ago I was 
sitting in my office, when in came a grizzly old 
countr)' man, carpet bag in hand and a red band- 
age tied over one eye, saying : ' I am a looking for 
Dr. Hyatt, he is the man I want to see. I have 
been hearing of him for the last 20 years. Some 
of my neighbors wanted me to go to Baltimore 
to see old Dr. Jno. Hopkins, I axed my son about 
Dr. Hopkins and he told me that he thought old 
Dr. Hopkins had quit practicing and had hired a 
lot of young fellows to run his hospital for him. 
I tell you that aint gwine to do for me. I want 
a settled man, one with some experience, to look 
after my eyes. I aint going to allow no young 
fellow to experiment on me. This is Dr. Hyatt 
aint it? Since looking at you, doctor, I am glad 
that I come. You looks like you knows what you 
are about.' " 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



•3 



• W Sakatosa St, 




(Bollitnon, 

Maryland. 



It is needless to add the old man went home 
with a well eye, and declaring that "when a doc- 
tor got too rich to practice and hired a lot of young 
fellows to work for him it was time people were 
looking for another doctor, that North Carolina 
doctors were good enough for him." — Selected. 




MARRIAGES. 



C. John Beeuwkes, LL.B., U. of M., to Miss 
Gertrude H. Brown, both of Baltimore, Md., at 
Baltimore, July 31, 1915. They will be "at home" 
after September 15th at 709 Lennox Street, Bal- 
timore, Md. 

Mr. F. Aloysius Michel, Law, '17, of 14 S. 
Washington street, to Miss Gertrude M. Nizer, 
of 618 N. Washington Street, recently. A nup- 
tial high mass preceded the ceremony in St. 
Andrew's Catholic Church. Rev. J. A. Cunnane 
officiated. Following the ceremony, Mr. and Mrs. 
Michel left for an extended wedding trip South. 



Dr. Nathaniel Garland Keirle, class of 1858, 
America's pioneer disciple of Pasteur, and for 
many years post mortem physician of Baltimore, 
to Miss Pattie E. McCoy, also of Baltimore, at 
Baltimore, August 24, 1915. 



Oscar Bernard Thomas, Phar. D., Maryland 
College of Pharmacy (U. of M.) class of 1904, 
of Baltimore, Md., to Miss Josephine E. Reindol- 
lar, of Taneytown, Md., at Taneytown, Septem- 
ber 7, 1915. After November 1st, they will be at 
home in their apartment at Calvert Court. 

o 

DEATHS. 



Intercollegiate Bureau of Academic Costume, Aibany.N.Y. 

Correct Hoods 



COTRELL & 
LEONARD 

Official Makers of 

Caps and 

Gowns 



E. H. Sims, D.D. S., class of 1915, of 201 N. 
Monroe Street, Baltimore, died at his home Sep- 
tember 10, 1915, aged 34 years. Dr. Sims was 
formerly of Louisa County, Va. 




for All Degrees. 

Rich Gowns for 
Pulpit and Bench. 

Bulletin, Samples 
etc. on request 



Lloyd T. MacGill, D. D. S., University of 
Maryland, secretary of the Frederick Board of 
Trade and auditor of the Circuit Court, died at 
his home in Frederick of heart trouble after a 
short illness, September 6, 1915, aged 52 years. 
Dr. MacGill had not been in practice for some 
years. 

Dr. C. Franklin Mohr, P. & S., class of 1891, 
of 582 Elwood Ave., Providence, R. I. was shot 
and killed while out automobiling, August 31, 
1915. 

Dr. William A. Slaugenhaupt, College of Phy- 
sicians and Surgeons, class of 1885, of Kane, 
Pa., died in the Summit Hospital, Kane, July 21, 
1915, aged 57 years. 



Dr. William P. Barnett, class of 1866, died at 
his home, Lafayette and Guilford avenues, of 
Bright's disease, August 29, 1915, aged 73 years. 
Dr. Barnett was born in Dorchester County. 



Dr. Charles Thomas Harper, class of 1894, of 
Wilmington, N. C, a Fellow of the American 
Medical Association and a member of the State 
Board of Medical Examiners of North Carolina, 
who was operated on for appendicitis recently at 
Harper's Sanitarium, Wilmington, died in that 
institution August 9, 1915, aged 42 years. 



r- 



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Retail). Cor. Baltimore and Light Sts.. Baltimore. Md. 



THE WESTERN NATIONAL BANK 

OF BALTIMORE 



Your Banli Account 
Solicited 



14 N. EUTAW STREET 






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RESINOL OINTMENT AND RESINOL SOAP 

Are Genuine Comforts to Physician and Patient Alike. 
Send for Samples and Try Them. 

RESINOL CHEMICAL COMPANY, Baltimore, Md 



German Savings Bank of Baltimore City 

S. W. Cor. Baltimore and Eutaw Sts. 

Interest Paid On Deposits. 

Drovers and Mechanics' National Bank 

OF BALTIMORE, MD. 

CAPITAL . . Paid in $300,000.00 

Earned 300 , 000.00 $600,000.00 

EARNED SURPLUS AND PROFITS . 533,487.65 

SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES FOR RENT 

Surgical and Hospital Supplies. Sick Room Supplies. 
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L'ENVOI. 

When Earth's last picture is painted, and the tubes 
are twisted and dried, 
When the oldest colors have faded, and the 
youngest critic has died, 
We shall rest, and, faith, we shall need it — lie 
down for an eon or two, 
Till the Master of All Good Workmen shall set 
us to work anew ! 

And those that were good shall be happy : they 

shall sit in a golden chair, 

They shall splash at a ten-league canvas with 

brushes of comets' hair; 

They shall find real saints to draw from — 

Magdalene, Peter, and Paul; 

They shall work for an age at a sitting and 

never be tired at all ! 
r 




And only thfr Master shall praise us, and only the 
Master shall blame ; 
And no one shall work for money, and no one 
shall virork for fame; 
But each for the joy of the working, and each, 
in his separate star 
Shall draw the Thing as he sees It for the God 
of Things as they Are! 




VOL. n. 



BALTIMORE, MD., NOVEMBER, 1915 



No. 5 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



Vol. II. 



NOVEMBER 1, 1915. 



No. 5. 



CONTEN TS 



OPPORTUNITY FOR SERVICE. B. 

Merrill Hopkinson, D.C.D 67 

EDITORIALS 75 

Venus Devoid of Charm. 

SLAMS AND SALUTES 76 



SOCIETY NOTES 77 

ITEMS 77 

MARRIAGES 83 

DEATHS 83 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE, MD. 

HON. PHILLIPS LEE GOLDSBOROUGH, Governor of Maryland, Chaneellor. 
THOMAS FELL, A. M., Ph. D., L L. D., D. C. L., Provost. 



ST. JOHN'S COLLEGE, Annapolis, Md. ( 



DEPARTMENT OF 1 
ARTS AND SCIENCES; 



Founded 1696. Classical and Scientific College Courses leading to d agrees. Special advantages to stu- 
dents purposing to study the professions. Military Department under army officers. Also Preparatory 
School for boys fitting for St. John's or other colleges. Term begins SepUmber 15. Address 

THOMAS FELL, Ph.D., LL.D., D.C.L., President. 



DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE. 

Four years' graded course. New Laboratory Build- 
ing. Clinical advantages unsurpassed. Teaching Staff 
of 66. 109th Annual Session will begin October 1, 
1915, and continue 8 months. 

WM. F. LOCKWOOD, M. D., Dean. 



DEPARTMENT OF DENTISTRY. 

34th Annual Session begins October 1, 1915, and 
continues 7 months. 26 Instructors. New Building, 
r'or catalogue containing course of study, etc., apply to 

TIMOTHY O. HEATWOLE, M.D., D.D.S., Dean, 

Baltimore, Md. 



DEPARTMENT OF LAW. 

60th Annual Session will begin Sept. 28, 1915. Faculty 
of 26. For catalogue containing full information ad- 
dress the Secretary, 301 St. Paul Street, Baltimore, 
Maryland. 

EDWIN T. DICKERSON, Secretary. 



DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACY. 

(Formerly JMaryland College of Pharmacy"). 73rd 
.-\nnual Session begins September 25, 1915. 11 In- 
structors. New Laboratories. Address 

CHARLES CASPARI, JR., Phar.D., Dean, 

Baltimore. Md. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 

Published Monthly In the Interest of the University of Maryland. 
PRICE $1.00 PER YEAR. 



Contributionis solicited from Alumni of the 
University. 



Business Address, 608 Professional Building, 
Baltimore, Md. 



Vol. II. 



BALTIMORE, MD., NOVEMBER 1, 1915. 



No. 5. 



OPPORTUNITY FOR SERVICE.* 



By B. Merrill Hopkinson, D.C.D., A.M., M.D. 



Opportunities to address the combined classes 
of our department present themselves very in- 
frequently to the greater number of the teach- 
ing staff, particularly, opportunities when one 
can speak upon general educational topics, or, 
at all events, upon a theme not assigned by 
those who have given him the authority to de- 
liver specific lectures for regularly allotted 
periods of time. 

Given such a golden occasion, one who fails 
to grasp it is either not an enthusiastic teacher, 
as all teachers should be, or else he fails to 
measure up to the simple requirements which 
might reasonably be expected in a person hold- 
ing so responsible an office. I am reminded of 
the striking poem written by the late Senator 
John J. Ingalls, entitled "Opportunity." It is 
as follows, and you will all do well to remember 
it as you step upon the threshold of your pro- 
fessional careers. 
' ' Master of human destinies am I : 
Fame, love and fortune on my footsteps wait. 
Cities and fields I walk : I penetrate 
Deserts and seas remote, and passing by 
Hovel and mart and palace, soon or late 
I knock unbidden once at every gate. 
If sleeping, wake ; if feasting, rise before 
I turn away ; it is the hour of fate 
And those who foUow me reach every state 
Mortals desire, and conquer every foe 
Save death : while those who doubt or hesitate 
Seek me in vain, and uselessly implore ; 
I answer not, and I return no more. 

As I look backward I realize that I have 



♦Address delivered to the students of the oral 
department, at the opening of the session 1915-16, 
October 4, 1915. 



allowed many opportunities to knock at my 
door unnoticed, or at least without being in- 
vited to enter and become my servants, or 
coadjutors in the warfare of life. 

It will ever be a satisfaction to me to look 
back in those years which may come, and re- 
member that I was not unmindful of the splen- 
did opportunity which I have seized this day. 

May it be your joy in your coming years to 
heed the knock of the unbidden guest. 

When the learned Doctor of Divinity enters 
his pulpit to address his congregation, the cus- 
tom has been, from time immemorial, to an- 
nounce a text, upon which he proceeds to pre- 
sent and elaborate an exegetical argument to 
prove the premise laid down in the particular 
portion of scripture he has chosen for the day. 
The same scheme is followed by lecturers in 
other fields, and he is the most successful 
teacher who can select a striking, forceful 
theme, and follow it to its logical conclusion 
without wandering into byways and lanes of 
thought which are not particularly associated 
or correlated. In gladly seizing the opportu- 
nity to make an introductory address to you, I 
began to cast about in my mind for a theme 
that might prove interesting, and at the same 
time contain some few thoughts which would 
remain with you and be something more than a 
mere stimulus in the course of your future 
study. 

A number of ideas presented with a good 
deal of insistence, and, incidentally, it was diffi- 
cult for me to divorce myself entirely from cer- 
tain phases of the particular branches it is my 
duty and privilege to teach in the University. 
It is said that out of the fulness of the heart 
the mouth speaketh, and you will hear me give 
voice to a few thoughts upon one of the 
topics which is uppermost in my mind, before I 
conclude. 



68 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



After mature deliberation, and after having 
placed my several ideas in their proper rela- 
tion to you and your special life work, I de- 
cided that I could but best occupy the brief 
portion of time afforded me by selecting as my 
text the highest of all human thoughts, the 
noblest of the many impulses which may govern 
your lives, by talking to you upon the theme, 
"Opportunity for service." 

Had the call to a life of service come to a 
class of students in such an University depart- 
ment as ours a few years ago, I can imagine 
the amazement and surprise with which such a 
call would have been received, as the class 
would sit aghast at the mere mention of so 
revolutionary an idea. Today, I am happy to 
say, thanks to the benign influence of our ne\^ 
school of thought, which includes the doctrine 
of oral health for the masses, via the humane 
path of your professional assistance, plus the 
practice of universal prophylaxis, one feels 
that a discourse upon such a theme, as service, 
is not only timely and helpful, but such an one 
as thoughtful students might reasonably ex- 
pect from a thoughtful teacher. 

It has been said, that the departed grandeur 
and glory of Egypt suggests the antidote to 
the subtle poison generated by materialism in 
individual or nation. 

The antidote is, "that life itself is of no value, 
either to the individual or to the world, except 
in so far as it is made of service to the cause 
of humanity." 

What is meant by service? What kind of 
service? It is not difficult to understand ser- 
vice to one's family or country, but what of 
service to humanity? 

The author of a remarkable book, entitled, 
the Magnum Opus was once heard to say, 
' ' the most eloquent sermon that can be preached 
is the example of a consistent life." 

In the pursuit of your study of the ennobling 
theme of service, I would charge you so to live, 
that each day you may become preachers of so 
worthy a sermon to your clientele and the 
community at large. 

I ask you, then, to approach this subject with 
me, not in the spirit of the embryo dental me- 



chanic, of less than a decade ago, but as men who 
propose to enroll themselves as full specialists 
in the noble healing art, whose spirits are aflame 
with a desire to render enduring service to all 
human beings who are not so well equipped for 
the battle of life. 

I do not know of a greater privilege accorded 
to man or woman, than that of being permitted 
to try and teach the youths of our nation, 
whether it be in the elements of education, in 
the advanced stages of knowledge, or in the 
highest realm of science found in the curricula 
of our professional schools. 

In the opinion of your speaker, an instructor 
in this honored University occupies as noble a 
post as the man who preaches the gospel of 
salvation ; for added to his opportunities to 
impart technical and scientific knowledge, there 
lies the God-given privilege of indicating, both 
by precept and example, the way of morality 
and nobility of life, the many paths of hygiene 
and cleanliness of soul and body, as well as the 
prerogative of pointing out the shining path 
over which is blazoned in imperishable letters 
the exalted truth contained in the Golden Rule. 

Holding such tenets you can readily appre- 
ciate the feeling of responsibility which weighs 
upon my heart and mind, as I again take up my 
duties at the beginning of another academic 
year. 

Privilege always brings responsibility, and 
noblesse oblige will follow the humble as well 
as the exalted, for there are few persons in the 
world of whom it can be said there is no one' 
more lowly, no one who cannot rightly ex- 
pect an example of some good sort from some 
one of higher rank. It is in this spirit of ac- 
countability that I approach the labors of the 
coming session, and am here today by invita- 
tion of your dean. 

I hope I may touch some chord in your hearts 
which will vibrate in unison with my ideas of 
your responsible station, give expression to 
some thought which will haunt you and be- 
come an obsession to urge you on to a higher 
plane of life, where you will be forced to ac- 
knoledge the reasonableness ot noblesse oblige 

As I look into the faces of such an eager, 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



69 



alert and intelligent body of students about to 
travel the path of life which has been more or 
less laboriously trodden by myself, I cannot 
help but fall into a train of thought which 
leads me to wonder what may possibly be the 
leading heart's desire of each individual unit 
composing my audience. 

There are many worthy goals toward which 
you may tend and seek to attain. 

You may desire to perfect yourself in some 
particular branch of your specialty, intending 
to make that your life work. You may be look- 
ing forward to the time when you can repay 
parent or friend for an outlay of money which 
has enabled you to prosecute your studies. 

You may simply be engaged in the study of 
the oral branch of medicine in order to broaden 
your general knowledge, and make it supple- 
mentary to some other active vocation in the 
field of medicine. Many such instances are on 
record. 

You may have your mental vision focused 
upon a future day, a revelation of which con- 
tains home, wife and children, a laudable ambi- 
tion for any man and the snmrmim bomnn of 
this world's prizes. 

I could mention a score or more of worthy 
aims, but the above will suffice to indicate, in 
a general way, I am sure, the longings of the 
average student. 

As one who knows the beaten track, who has 
had all the desires and ambitions of the pro- 
fessional fledgling, pray permit me to say, while 
all those I have noted are good in themselves, 
they do not represent the highest aim of any 
human life, and will not satisfy the longings 
of him who has the correct viewpoint of his 
duty to his fellow man as a member of a liberal 
profession. I have known men who have en- 
tered upon the practice of medicine, or one of 
her specialties, whose aim, openly avowed, was 
to make money. 

In some instances they have succeeded, but, 
for the most part, their success was like dead 
sea fruit, bitter to the taste, and without com- 
fort to mind or body. 

Let me counsel you, if you should cherish 
any or all of the above mentioned aims, or 



others correlated, as your goal of ambition, to 
subordinate them to a passionate desire to ren- 
der service to your fellow man, by reason of 
your knowledge and technical skill, for be as- 
sured, that in this way only will you find a 
satisfied mind, a contented spirit, and a well 
rounded career. 

It is quite proper to bear in mind the suitable 
rewards you should receive for services faith- 
fully performed. I sometimes wish I had been 
more thoughtful in this regard; but, while 
exercising due care in such matters, let your 
first and preponderating wish be your ideal; 
viz., to serve your fellow man with the best 
skill and devotion of your mind and body. The 
motto of the Prince of Wales is, "Ich dien," 
and a greater cannot be engraved upon the 
hei'aldic arms of any man. The confessed 
Saviour of the sublime Christian religion, took 
upon Himself the form of a servant, and lived 
His life in altruistic endeavor. 

Your branch of medicine is, scientifically con- 
sidered, about seventy-five years old; and yet, 
the spirit of altruism did not begin to manifest 
itself in this country at least until 1895, when 
the first clinic was established in Rochester, N. 
Y., for rendering much needed aid to the poor 
children of that city. 

Even in the present day, at all gatherings of 
oral practitioners, one will surely find the prin- 
cipal emphasis laid upon the mechanical side of 
practice, and always at the expense of the pure- 
ly scientific aspect of your specialty, by a very 
large majority of those in attendance, the sub- 
ject of service to humanity in the mass, having 
been shamefully neglected until about the year 
1911. 

It will, of course, be absolutely necessary for 
you to keep in close touch with all the wonder- 
ful advances in the marvellous artistic branch 
of your practice, and the ingenuity of the many 

Menu. Banquet and Dance Cards, Commencement Invita- 
tions and Programs, Diplomas, Certificates, Engrossing. U. 
of M. Stationery for Classes and Fraternities, Letter Heads, 
Envelopes, Cards, etc., for Physicians, Lawyers and Dentists. 

J. H. DOWNS, STATIONER. 229 N. Charles St. 



70 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



skilfull men engaged in the practice of oral 
surgery in this astonishing age, keeps one in an 
amazed frame of mind, and causes one to mar- 
vel at the quality of the human brain that is so 
prolific in useful invention. 

To be a good surgeon, general or oral, one 
must be a good mechanic; but must not forget 
the duty one owes to the masses, in the striving 
after perfection in mechanical de'vices and new 
ways of performing operations, to the end that 
he may simply and solely increase his worldly 
goods, thus forgetting that the science of oral 
medicine needs to be developed and advanced, 
pari passu, by the enlarging of our mental hori- 
zon, and increasing our scientific knowledge, by 
the broadening of our view-point, and by keep- 
ing ever in mind the fact that the foundation 
stone of our profession must be an ever increas- 
ing altruism, if we expect to take and hold our 
place as true doctors of a noble vocation. 

This thought of altruism is finely expressed 
in a strong bit of blank verse which appeared 
upon the front page of the October number of 
the University Gazette, the author being Eva- 
line "Wright Xelson. It is worth reproducing 
here. 

"A triune faith is this, including faith 
In God, as 'ransom, bliss and panoply,' 
A faith in self, not egotistical 
BeUef that overestimates, nor yet 
A sham humility that culminates 
In proud disparagement of self, but faith 
Profound that being factor in Life's strange- 
Equation I must count, the minus sign 
Or plus determined less by where I stand 
Than how I fill the place. Essential too 
Is faith in every man's capacity 
For God; a faith which sees the heads of gold 
Above the feet of clay, discerns beneath 
Dissimulated satisfaction with 
The husks, consuming hunger of the soul ; 
This trinity of faith stands straight and strong. 
Unmoved by seeming victories of wrong 
Expectant always that humanity 
Shall reach the final Good, and to that end 
Pursues its work of uplift which includes 
The masses and the individual.' " 

Your calling will simply be a trade if you 



practice for money only, for the carpenter, 
plumber and shoemaker do the same. 

One reason why the dentist, a name I do not 
like, as you will discover more fully later on, is 
not more highly regarded, and has failed to 
take the place, which is his by right, with other 
medical specialists, is because he has proclaimed 
himself in the past by his methods of practice, 
as one who is concerned only with the repair 
and replacement of broken-down and lost teeth, 
and is in no way related to a profession which 
has prophylaxis as one of its vital and absoi'b- 
ing tenets. 

Imagine, if you can, the hygienic condi- 
tion of the civilized world, if the members of 
other medical branches had failed to interest 
themselves in the masses of mankind, in a pro- 
plylaetic endeavor to check the ravages of 
smallpox, bubonic plague, typhoid and typhus 
fevers, and the many other maladies which their 
noble efforts have brought under control? 

Picture to yourselves the mental and physical 
states of man, if all the human repair shops in 
this city alone should suddenly close their doors, 
and all the magnanimous men and women who 
have gladly given their time and talents to help 
the poor and needy should suddenly decide that 
they would abandon their sociologic endeavors, 
and devote their entire time, as has the dentist, 
to a selfish, individualistic scheme of working 
only when there was a quid pro quo in sight? 
Thank God, one cannot paint such forbidding 
and horrible mental pictures, for, so long as 
sickness and sorrow continue, just so long will 
there be found many hearts, yearning to relieve 
and assuage the miseries of those upon whom 
the blight of original sin has fallen so hea^dly. 

What has the oral branch of medicine done 
to relieve the sorely aftticted and ignorant 
masses of the human famUy? What are its 
achievements in the direction of holding in 
check the most prolific disease known to man; 
and to speak well within reasonable bounds, the 
eontrib^^ting cause of many other diseases? 

To the shame of its members, it must be truth- 
fully, if regretfully said, that throaghout the 
length and breadth of our land, one can only 
find an occasional evidence of the worthv 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



71 



spirit of altruism which should be rooted and 
grounded in every human heart. 

"When one thinks of the Porsythe Free In- 
firmary in Boston, one cannot help but rejoice 
to have lived to see the day which has pro- 
duced so noble an institution. To my mind it 
is the greatest single centre for doing good to 
be found in the world, and is a most conspic- 
uous monument to the memory of three noble 
men, who, having had a vision, proceeded to 
reduce it to terms of a material and magnifi- 
cent structure, where countless thousands of 
dear little children will be relieved of the woes 
which they have inherited, either because of 
pre-natal defects, or, of warped or neglected 
sociologic laws. I wish I had time to give you 
a detailed description of this greatest of gifts of 
man to man; but you can read of it elsewhere, 
and I must pass on to other thoughts. 

There comes to mind, just here, the latest 
addition to the opportunities for service in your 
line of practice; viz., the erection and dedica- 
tion of the Evans Memorial Clinic for oral 
troubles, in connection with the University of 
Pennsylvania. Here is another mighty fac- 
tor in the extension of oral hygiene propa- 
ganda, differing principally from the Porsythe 
Infirmary, in the fact, that those treated in the 
former, are treated by students in pursuit of 
ante-graduation oral knowledge. These insti- 
tutions will give an uplift to the care of the oral 
cavity which will be felt throughout the world. 

The Porsythe, founded and endowed as a 
purely sociologic scheme where children will 
receive the best services at the hands of ex- 
perts, for the alleviation and cure of oral mala- 
dies, and those intimately related in nose, 
throat, etc. The Evans, an institution for the 
treatment of oral defects only; conceived, 
planned and endowed by a distinguished prac- 
titioner, and made an integral part of one of 
the great American Universities, where students 
will be aided in the procurement of scientific 
and mechanical knowledge, thereby the better 
enabling them to become accomplished stoma- 
tologists. 

The above are by no means the only places 
upon the American Continent, as you well 



know, where extensive schemes are carried on 
for oral hygiene propaganda ; but they are the 
greatest and most recent, and they should, and 
I am sure, will give an impetus to this most im- 
portant avenue of service to the masses, that 
will know no dimunition, until all peoples will 
acknowledge the necessity for clean and healthy 
mouths. I have placed these great and splen- 
did benefices in contrast before you in order 
to magnify the quality of the first, without mini- 
mizing or detracting from the value of the 
second. 

The first seems to typify, to me, the sort of 
an altruistic doctor I am hoping each of you 
will be ; the second, the more or less selfish 
dentist, whose policy is to get something for 
each service performed. 

I fancy any body of listeners, interested in 
the advance of oral science, would naturally 
expect me to touch upon a topic in which I am 
vitally interested; nay, which has become an 
obsession with me ; and surely, a body of under- 
graduate students who will come under my 
teaching infiuence, would anticipate more than 
a mere mention of oral hygiene propaganda in 
an address bearing the title "Opportunity for 
service." Oral hygiene as taught here, means, 
primarily, service. Service to humanity in the 
mass ; for, while the means to secure and main- 
tain individual mouth health, are gone into in 
intimate detail, the underlying thought of your 
teacher is his longing to instil into your 
minds and hearts the idea that you must take 
your places with all the great scientific forces 
in medical and other ranks, co-operating today 
to bring about an amelioration of the ills from 
which all communities suffer, and suffer so un- 
necessarily. 

I would have you, each one, become a posi- 
tive influence for good in the great world of 
science in which you live, so that those with 
whom you come into contact, will not be at a 
loss as to how to classify you. 

One meets so many negative men, particu- 
larly in your special branch of medicine; men 
who have never done anything to advance a 
new thought, and, so far as they seemed to be 
aware, anything to retard its advance. They 



72 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



have failed to realize, that, as they had not 
ranged themselves as positive forces for the 
advance of any given propaganda, that they 
had actually become hindrances to its progress. 
You have heard much during the past year 
of the necessity for neutrality among the citi- 
zens of this country. When great issues are at 
stake, I do not believe the man lives, who has 
real red blood in his arteries, who can remain 
neutral. He may refrain, for some good reason, 
from openly espousing one, or another cause; 
but, deep down in his heart, his sympathy must 
ally itself upon the side which he feels is right. 
There can be no neutrality in the scientific 
world, and I trust that you will ever be found 
earnest advocates of every form of progression. 
Some of you may have read the poem, by a dis- 
tinguished author, relating to the soul of a 
neutral man who died. This soul presented 
itself at the gate of Heaven, and was much sur- 
prised and chagrined to be denied admittance; 
because, during its earthly period of association 
with the body, it had not performed any spe- 
cific acts of goodness which would justify its 
enjoyment of perpetual heavenly bliss. It 
then sought the gate of hell, and was told that 
there was no record upon the books of that 
place which made it a suitable abiding place 
for so neutral a soul. This nondescript spirit 
has, ever since, been wandering in space, and 
can never find a habitation where it may dwell 
in peace. 

Remember this striking bit of fiction, and in 
your future lives, study well each proposition 
placed before you, and become positive forces 
in your several communities, striving ever for 
the advancement of all your fellow creatures, 
whom you should serve. 

Let it be known that you are, in the first 
place, studying to become twentieth century 
stomatologists, and that your aim in life is to 
range yourselves upon the side of all those 
helpful agencies which I am pleased to call col- 
lectively, altruistic sociology. 

The banner of this illustrious band of men 
and women bears the image of the goddess 
Hygiea, collecting the poison of a serpent in a 
cup, thus preventing its universal distribution ; 



the serpent typifying disease in all its distress- 
ing and loathsome guises, and upon the banner 
is inscribed the noble motto, prophylaxis for 
all mankind. In following this banner, and its 
distinguished apostles, you will be lead out of 
the shadows wherein your predecessors have 
lingered for so many years bearing the obloquy 
of the title of mechanic, into fairer and richer 
fields of usefulness and service. 

This course of service will enable you, nay, 
it will compel you to cultivate a spirit of gen- 
erosity and broad-minded usefulness to your 
less fortunate brethren, and make you reach 
out your hand to him who has lost his way in 
the slough of adversity, to start him upon the 
road toward health and peace. 

This course is the one upon which all mag- 
nanimous men and women have won the laurel 
wreath of nobility in their service for the un- 
fortunate ; and I would have you equip your- 
selves to enter the lists and win the great loving 
cup of service, forcing the public to place you 
in the same category with your fellows in other 
branches of the healing art; all of whom will 
then acknowledge you their equal in every 
sense, as they realize that it is your highest 
aim to prevent the devastation due to the most 
prolific disease known to science, by making 
your life one of service to mankind. 

I shall hope and yearn, day by day, that you 
will reach this coveted goal of a noble am- 
bition; and, if you have not already hitched 



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THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



73 



your wagon to the changeless star of service, I 
charge you so to do, and do it now, here in your 
preparatory work, your period, as it were of 
professional probation. 

As you are assigned a patient hy your demon- 
strator, do not allow the selfish aim of simply 
acquiring knowledge, or future gain from such 
knowledge and added skill, to be your one ab- 
sorbing thought, even though such an aim be 
not a dishonorable one. Never forget that you 
are operating upon your fellows, and one su- 
preme thought should ever predominate, viz. : 
what can I do in pursuit of the clear perception 
of truth and fact for which I am diligently 
seeking, that will be of the highest and best 
service for this person placed under my pro- 
fessional care. With this exalting thought ever 
in the forefront of your mind, you will not only 
render better service from a technical point of 
view, but you will do it in such a manner as to 
eliminate the baser side of your practice, which 
has been the mightiest hindrance to the attain- 
ment to that high station which is the rightful 
heritage of the oral specialist, because of the 
value of the service which he renders to the 
peoples of the earth. 

Habits formed here will follow you to your 
graves. If you permit the material side of 
practice to be that which is ever your mental 
picture, most agreeable, and most desirable to 
be attained, you will not only lose the greatest 
personal satisfaction and happiness of your 
career, you will be another factor in keep- 
ing the oral branch of medicine in the inferior 
place it has occupied in the minds of a vast 
majority of people, for the last three-quarters 
of a century, and, in my opinion, rightly so. 

Let your first thought, then, in the infirmary, 
be helpful service for each patient, and in the 
performance of any given operation, seek your 
knowledge and technical skill with this idea as 
the underlying principle. 

People do not, as a rule, seek the horrors of a 
dental infirmary unless they are sorely afflicted, 
and this, of course, applies with almost equal 
force to any human repair shop. 

Let your service take a higher form, and 
when you look into a human mouth, do not let 



Tables reserved for ladies Open all night 

SPECIAL RATES TO STUDENTS 



AT 



The Imperial Lunch Room 



526 W. Baltimore St. 



Phone St. Paul 8478 



Baltimore, Md. 



your vision stop at a carious tooth or teeth, 
gingival disease, or vacancies in the dental 
arches, but look back of these defects and try 
and discover the principal reasons for them; 
whether they be heredity, environment, ignor- 
ance, vice, ill health, carelessness, neglect, or a 
combination of one or more of these conditions. 
Do not be content to patch up existing troubles. 
Make each person a starting point in your 
scheme for universal prophylaxis, and teach 
him how he can live and act, so as in great 
measure, at least, to avoid a repetition of the 
ills which have brought him under your care. 

I firmly believe that the average student re- 
gards the infirmary patient as a necessary evil 
in his path, and even though he be keen for 
knowledge, he does not appraise his fellow man, 
in such case, at his full humanity value. I do 
not make this statement as a theorist, but as a 
quondam oral novitiate. Remember, that the 
dental infirmary patient has a great sufficiency 
of sorrow in mind and body, and usually 
enough of poverty of soul as well as pocket- 
book, without any unnecessary addition upon 
your part, of any action which might be re- 
garded as unkind in even the remotest way. 
Surround your service with kindness, gentle- 
ness and courtesy attended at all times with 
firmness aiid fixedness of purpose, so that, in 
after years, you may rejoice that you made 
these virtues a fixed habit in your behavior as a 
student. 

I have said that habits formed here will fol- 
low you throughout your lives. I therefore 
charge you to add to the above good, qualities 
a scrupulous neatness and care of your per- 
sonal appearance, never permitting yourselves 
to go into the infirmary in a less presentable 
condition than you would presume to go into 
your private ofiices, remembering that a life of 
service demands an attention to the little re- 



74 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



finements of detail, in the presence of the poor 
and needy, as well as in that of the rich and 
influential. 

I have many times been shocked by the slov- 
enly appearance of students at the operating 
chair, and have found it difficult to refrain from 
administering a well deserved rebuke, knowing 
full well that in any given case it was the unde- 
served scorn of the operator for the charity 
patient, which prompted him to be careless re- 
garding proper attention to the necessary de- 
tails of his toilet. 

Though you go from the vulcanizer to the 
chair, always remember that you have no right 
to begin your operation until you have re- 
moved all traces of the laboratory from your 
hands and clothing. Thoughtlessness in this 
regard must needs be overlooked, if indeed 
noticed, by those whom you serve here, but, 
slovenly habits formed in student days will 
surely work you grievous harm in after life. 
Warnings of such a nature would be needless, 
and really apply to a small proportion of stu- 
dents; if all approached the tasks before them 
with high ideals, and with the thought deeply 
rooted in their hearts, that they must never 
give anything less than the best in their ser- 
vice as professional men. 

Finally, take this thought away with you. 
The men whose duty it is to present and teach 
the various subjects during your several courses 
are fully imbued with this exalted idea of ser- 
vice in your behalf. I therefore ask you to 
meet them in the same self-sacrificing spirit, 
ever bearing in mind that you are engaged in 
a serious search for more light, and refrain 
from any act which may hamper them in the 
noble work of their life's mission. 

I trust that your course in life will be such 
that each of you may receive the highest com- 
mendation at its close ; that which was given 
by the Great Physician to the one who had 
properly used the talents entrusted to his care, 
"Well done good and faithful servant." 



Customer: "Waiter, this is the first tender 
steak I've ever had in your shop." 

Waiter : "My goodness ! You must have got 
the guv'nor's." — Tit-Bits. 



Even the "bugs" see the beginning of the end 
and are resigned to fate. 

POST MORTEM ODE 

Ameba Buccalis 

Met old Staphlococcus, 

And remarked as he heaved a deep sigh, 

"Don't try to digest a 

Blamed tablet Alcresta 

Ipecac, if you don't want to die. 

The jig's up I'm afraid, 

For our game's had a raid. 

That we've played so securely and long; 

For they know our number 

And just where we slumber, 

And now everthing's going dead wrong. 

I've tried to be cheerful. 

But I'm very fearful. 

We'll be wiped off the face of the earth; 

Folks have now gotten wise, 

How to kill us poor guys, 

And that's just why I've lost all my mirth. 

Our hosts have, confound 'em, 

A new gun around 'em. 

They call it Alcresta begorry ; 

And it shoots Ipecac, 

Just in front of their back, 

No longer I say 'I should worry.' 

I'm afraid of that stuff, 

And it sure aint no bluff, 

'Cause it killed all the family but me, 

It has 'bout got my goat. 

And my heart's in my throat. 

For the death of me I plainly see. 

So old comrade good-by, 

I'm at last doomed to die, 

Thus inscribed shall my epitaph be : — 

'Ameba molested, 

Ipecac Alcrested 

Was the darned thing that killed him you see." 

E. E. W. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



75 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 

A MONTHLY JOURNAL 

Devoted to the interests of the University 

of Maiyland. 

Subscription Price, ?1.00 Per Annum, In Advance 

Reprints Furnished At Cost 

Advertising Rates Submitted Upon Request. 

608 Professional Building 

BALTIMORE, MD. 

Editorial Board. 

J. BEN ROBINSON, D.D.S Editor-in-Chief. 

NATHAN WINSLOW, M.D Business Manager. 

Graduate Members. 

THOMAS FELL, LL.D Academic. 

H. M. ROBINSON. M.D Medical. 

ALBERT H. CARROLL, M.D Medical. 

SAMUEL "WANT, LL. B Law. 

JOHN H. SKBEN, LL. B Law. 

A. A. SONNENBURG, Phar.D Pharmacy. 

J. M. BRANSKY, Phar.D Pharmacy. 

M. B. SULLIVAN, R.N Nursing. 

A. B. MAKOVER, Law, '17 Undergraduate. 

A. B. MAKOVER, Law '17 Undergraduate Editor. 

Undergraduate Members. 

F. C. MARINO, '16; C. 0. WOLF, 

'17 Medicine. 

A. Z. ALDRIDGE, '16; E. B. LAN- 
CASTER, '17 Dental. 

JOHN McN. HOLMES, '16; C. N. 
MATTHEWS, '16; DAVE LOW- 
ENSTEIN, JR., '17 Law. 

A. L. STERLING, '15 Pharmacy. 

J. E. EVANS, '16 Y. M. C.A. 

NOVEMBER 1, 1915. 

VENUS DEVOID OF CHARM 



The mutilation or the destruction of the beauti- 
ful calls forth the just indignation of an enlight- 
ened age. Genseric and his wild hordes swooped 
down upon Rome, and the Imperial City for 
fifteen days was given over to the excesses of bar- 
barians. By day the city resounded with the stroke 
of the ax, and by night was illumined with the 
glare of burning temples. At length Genseric sailed 
away with his plunder, leaving the smouldering 
ruins of once beautiful temples as a monument to 
his infamy. His wanton act has become proverb- 
ial, and the word VANDALISM stands as an 
everlasting protest against all acts of destructive 
wantoness. So powerful has this protest become 
during the centuries that even the plea of military 



The College Man Sets 
the Styles! 

Uphold your reputation by weaiiag suits 
made the "Matched Pattern" way, themott 
important clothing invention of the decade ! 

These suits are sold exclusively by 

THE QUALITY SHOP 

Balto. and Liberty Sts. 




necessity hardly justifies the destruction of objects 
of historic or aestlietic interest. 

There is little likelihood that any of us will have 
the opportunity, even if we should have the inclina- 
tion, to practice VANDALISM on so colossal a 
scale ; but each of us is guilty in some petty dgree 
almost every day. It is against a specific act of 
VANDALISM of this type that this article is 
directed; namely the defacing of the beautiful 
Doric columns of the old University building. 
Architecturally this structure is a classic and 
should excite our admiration; historically it is 
venerable and should inspire us with respect. 

A certain sage of antiquity states that hair is 
woman's greatest glory, adding that even Venus, 
devoid of hair, would cease to please. In no less 
sense are these beautiful columns the crowning 
beauty of our classic edifice. 

Let us remember, then, that when disfigured by 
the marks of dirty hands and still dirtier feet, 
they too, like Venus robbed of her crowning glory, 
cease to please. 



And so it is in greater or less degree with many 
things in and about the University buildings. 
Many of the young men are thoughtless and fail 
to respect the rights of the institution by safe- 
guarding its property. We see laboratory equip- 
ment carelessly destroyed, hallways defaced, 
lockers broken, floors besmeared and bespattered 
v/ith the by-product of the pleasure to many of 
tobacco chewing. The authorities have tried and 
are trj-ing to better equip, to make attractive this 
educational home of yours and you should not only 
respect the eflfort but aid in the accomplishment 
of the object. 



76 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



"SLAMS AND SALUTES." 



Post Graduate 
Promulgator 

vs. 

University oe 

Maryland 

A Body Corporate. 



In The 

Faculty oe Law 

OeThe 

University of 

Maryland 

In Equity. 



To the Honorable, The Judges of Said Univer- 
sity : 
The petition of your orator respectfully shows : 

1. Your orator is, and has been for two years, 
a student of law at the University of Maryland, 
and as such student has come into contact with 
the law, thereby absorbing some of the principles 
taught by Your Honors at said University. 

2. Your orator has asked the students of the 
University of Maryland their opinion as to the 
merits and desirability of having incorporated in 
the Law School of said University a post gradu- 
ate course ; but having mistaken his forum, your 
orator now addresses his petition unto this Honor- 
able Court. 

3. Said request was published in the August 
issue of the University Gazette, in which your 
orator stated that in his opinion there were cer- 
tain very important branches of the law which 
were not taught by Your Honors at said Univer- 
sity ; that a knowledge of these branches was 
absolutely necessary to a student who intended to 
take up the profession ; and that in his opinion a 
sufficient number of students would take up the 
post graduate course to warrant its adoption. 

4. Your orator believes and therefore avers that 
lectures on the History and Sources of the Law, 
Politics, Workmens Compensation Law and the 
Public Service Commission are very essential, 
and that one or two other subjects might be prof- 
itably included. 

5. Your orator has frequently heard from 
many of Your Honors the statement that the 

WILLIAM J. MILLER 
Jewelry, Diamonds, Watches 

College Jewelry 

Class Pins and Rings, College Seals 

2A East Baltimor* St. Baltimore, Md. 



LEFRANC & AULT 

are showing 

NEW NECKWEAR 

and 

NEW SHIRTS 

AT THE 

"SHIRT SHOP" 

421 N. Howard St., at Franklin 



number of lectures they had on the subject were 
barely sufficient to cover the course ; said remarks 
being along the following lines : — "In the few 
number of lectures I have been allotted, I can't go 
into detail on this subject" and "I have little time 
to go through the course, so I can't take up that 
phase of the subject." 

6. When looking over and discussing the bar 
examination question of the previous years, in 
preparation for the bar examination of the State 
Board of Law Examiners of the State of Mary- 
land, your orator has heard from many students 
remarks to the effect that "They did not teach us 
anything about that in School," ; and the Inter- 
mediate Class oftimes hears of many new things 
in the Practice Court when the learned Judge 
Sappington hears and discusses questions raised 
by the preliminary calls. 

For These Reasons Your Orator Prays: 

1. That Your Honors in the next term of 
Court take up the question of a post graduate 
course ; and 

2. That your orator may have such other and 
further relief as the nature of his petition may 
require and which unto Your Honors may seem 
meet. 

ELLERBROCK 

22 W. Lexington St., ■ Baltimore, Md. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



77 



Blome's Chocolates 

Known and enjoyed by students of the 
University for more than half a century. 

Retail Department 
BLOME'S CANDY STORE 

Established 1859 621 W. Baltimore St. 

May It Please Your Honors to grant unto 
your orator the writ of subpoena duces tecum 
directed to the defendant, said University of 
Maryland, or against Edwin T. Dickerson, Esq., 
secretary of said body corporate, commanding him 
to be and appear before Your Honors at some day 
certain to be named in said writ and exhibit the 
schedule of subjects taught at the Law School of 
the University of Maryland, so that Your Honors 
may justly decide the merits of this petition. 

And as in duty bound as is ever prayed. 
Law Student, Class 1916. J. Wm. Schimmel, 

Petitioner. Solicitor for Petitioner. 

o 

SOCIETY NOTES. 



The first regular meeting of the Henry D. Har- 
lan Law Society of the University, was held Fri- 
day evening, October 8th, 1915. John McN. 
Holmes was elected President by the unanimous 
vote of the members, the other officers are as 
follows : Vice-President, John W. Edel ; Secre- 
tary, John A. Farley; Treasurer, Wm. C. House; 
Historian, Victor G. Bloede. 

The men succeed the following retiring officers : 
Dudley G. Cooper, President; Frank J. Saylor, 
Vice-President; Herbert Levy, Secretary; John 
A. Farley, Treasurer, and W. Lester Baldwin, 
Historian. 

The large number present exhibited a great 
deal of enthusiasm. A committee is at work 
preparing an interesting program for the winter 
meetings. All signs point towards a pleasant and 
profitable term. 



ITEMS. 



MEDICAI^-GRADUATE. 

The following were visitors to the University 
during the past month : 

Drs. C. N. DeVilbiss, class of 1910, of Laytons- 
ville, Md. 

B. H. Guistwhite, class of 1914, of Lykens, Pa. 



Now Ready for Fall, 1915. See Us for Classy Clothes 

Suits to Measure, $15.00 to $35.00^ 
A. JACOBS & SONS, Tailors 

899 NORTH HOWARD STREET 
Open Evenings 9 P. M. Cor. Richmond St. 

C. H. Metcalfe, class of 1914, of Sudlersville, 
Md. 

A. M. McGovern, B. M. C, class of 1903, of 
West Union, W. Va. 

W. P. Clancey, B. M. C, class of 1910, of War- 
ren, Pa. 

Samuel Luther Bare, class of 1905, of West- 
minster, Md. 

Charles A. Goettling, Jr., class of 1910, of Mid- 
dleburg, Va. 

Walter B. Kirk, class of 1893, of Darlington, 
Md. 

Jacob W. Bird, class of 1907, of Sandy Spring, 
Md. 

Hamilton J. Slusher, class of 1913, of Boisse- 
vain, Va. 

James T. Billingslea, class of 1905, Elvaton, 
Md. 

Ralph C. Bowen, class of 1907, of Grantsville, 
Md. 

Thomas J. Coonan, class of 1891, of West- 
minister, Md. 

C. D. Hamilton, P. &'S., class of 1913, of Sykes- 
ville, Md. 

Robert E. Abell, class of 1912, of Chester, S. C. 

Charles T. Fisher, class of 1901, of Princess 
Anne, Md. 

J. Edward Hubbard, class of 1912, of Hinton, 
W. Va. 

Thomas Brooks, class of 1910, of Santiago, 
Cuba. 

Eugene W. Hyde, class of 1892, of Parkton, 
Md. 

John W. Hebb, Jr., class of 1901, of West 
Friendship, Md. 

George C. Coulbourn, class of 1910, of Marion 
Station, Md. 

Wm. Frank Lucas, class of 1893, of Sykesville, 
Md. 

George H. Hammerbacher, class of 1894, Bal- 
timore, Md. 

C. W. Roberts, class of 1906, of Douglas, Ga. 



rs' 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



Hart Schaffner & Marx, 
Kuppenheimer, 
"Society Brand" 



The clothes that college men 
like a lot 



Baltimore Street At ClMrle> 



LAW— GRADUATE. 



RESOLUTIONS ADOPTED BY THE FAC- 
ULTY OF PHYSIC OF THE UNIVER- 
SITY OF MARYLAND ON THE DEATH 
OF DR. ST. CLAIR SPRUILL. 



The Faculty of Physic of the University of 
Maryland wishes to give expression to the loss it 
has sustained in the death of Prof. St. Clair 
Spruill, who for over twenty-five years was as- 
sociated with the work of the University and who 
by his industry and loyalty contributed to the 
advancement of her best interests. 

Prof. Spruill graduated in the class of 1890 
and the following year became a resident physi- 
cian in the University Hospital. He later became 
medical superintendent of the Hospital and for 
a number of years gave a most valuable service 
to the institution. He was largely instrumental 
in the building of the new University Hospital, 
and until his death was attending surgeon to the 
institution. He was elected to the chair of clinical 
surgery in the Faculty of Physic, which position 
he filled with abihty and distinction. 

As a surgeon. Prof. Spruill was careful and 
painstaking in his work and by his industry he 
achieved wide distinction in his profession. 

Prof. Spruill was respected and beloved by all 
who know him and his memory will ever be held 
in high esteem by his friends, patients, and asso- 
ciates in the Faculty. 

Be It Resolved; That a copy of these resolu- 
tions be placed on the minutes of the Faculty and 
that a copy be sent to the family of Prof. Charles 
W. Mitchell, his most intimate friend, in whose 
house Prof. Spruill had lived most happily for 
many years, where he enjoyed the congenial ties of 
sincere affection and of lasting friendship. 



Bruce C. Lightner, LL. B.,class of 1915, who on 
September 10th, left for Hagerstown, Md., has 
located at the Maryland Apartments. 



R. Enoll Kanode, LL. B. '15, of the firm of 
Kanode and Lightner, Hagerstown, Md., paid a 
visit to the institution on Thursday, October 14. 
He states that business is very fair in Hagerstown 
and that he and Mr. Lightner are boosting the 
State of prosperity by depositing large and num- 
erous retainers from satisfied clients. 



LAW— SENIOR. 



At the first meeting of the Senior Class of the 
Law Department of the University, held on Fri- 
day evening, October 1st 1915, the following 
officers were elected : President, W. Lester Bald- 
win; Vice-President, Wendell D. Allen; Secre- 
tary, Dudley G. Cooper; Treasurer, Edward L- 
G. Wright; Historian, Andrew W. Pardew. 

A spirit of unanimity pervaded the entire meet- 
ing and under the leadership of the officers 
elected the outlook for the present senior law class 
is most encouraging. 

o 

LAW— INTERMEDIATE. 



At a meeting held recently for election of officers 
in this class for the year 1915-16, Hans Froelicher, 
Jr. was re-elected president by unanimous vote. 
The other officers elected were Vice-President, 
Hooper S. Miles ; Secretary, E. W. Beatty ; Treas- 
urer, Wm. H. Maynard. 

A. H. FETTING 

Manufacturer of 

GREEK LETTER FRATERNITY JEWELRY 

213 N. Liberty St., = Baltimore, Md. 
Factory: 212 Little Sharp St. 



Memorandum package sent to any fraternity member through the 
secretary of the chapter. Special designs and estimates furnished on 
medals, ringsand pins or athletic meets, etc 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



79 



It would be far more to the advantage of the 
class if, when members are questioning the lectur- 
ers, the rest of the audience would be decent 
enough to refrain from vociferous demonstra- 
tions of disapproval, discontent, and impatience. 
It is equally unfair to the student asking the 
question and to the members of the class who 
desire the benefit of the answer. Many a hazy 
conception is clarified, many a Gordian knot 
severed, many enlightening remarks are elicited 
from the lecturers because of queries from con- 
scientious students. You will recall that only 
recently, Mr. Ullman expressed the same senti- 
ment when a question put by a member of the class 
resulted in scraping of feet and cat-calls intended 
to intimidate the questioner. Let's be fair, fel- 
lows! 



After reading Mr. Makover's "Slam" in last 
month's issue of this paper, which was a plea for 
silence in the library, we note that as a result 
pandemonium still reigns. In this abode of 
demons we found Mak on a very recent occasion 
the most lawless and disorderly of the species. 
Verbum sat. 



Mr. W. N. Arnold of our class, and of the firm 
of O'Mara and Angelmier, has been busy as a 
bee lately. Our spies report that the said W. H. 
Arnold, of the said class, recently tried a case be- 
fore Justice Hull, said case being lost by the afore- 
said Arnold, because the Justice held that the arg- 
ument of counsel was a direct violation of the 
Rule Against Perpetuities. 



Cohen and Spector, heavyweight champions of 
class 1917 Barristers, won a great legal victory in 
Part III of the Practice Court of the Law School 
of the University of Maryland, at the opening 
session of that Court. The battle went for ten 
rounds, the decision going to the heavyweights. 
The legal giants had the punch and rushed their 
opponents, till when the bell sounded after the 
seventh round the other side was groggy and ex- 
hausted. Thereupon arose Mr. Spector and res- 
pectfully submitted that their opponents failed to 
prove the property to be of an unlawful nature, 
to-wit : a gambling device. Those at the ringside 
expected a knock-out, but the end of the encoun- 
ter resulted in a decision, which carried the purse. 



HEPBRON & HAYDON 

We Sell Every Law Book and Syllabus Used 
at the U. of M. 



St. Paul 8794 



1243-53 CALVERT BLDG. 



We attended a beer and pretzel political meet- 
ing the other evening and had the pleasure of 
hearing OUR Mr. Hoffman make a speech in the 
interest of Mr. Ritchie. Mr. Ritchie is a good 
man. We refrain from commenting on Mr. Hoff- 
man's speech. 



Now that Mayor Preston has announced his 
Green bag, Mr. Herman P. Kassan, mentioned re- 
cently in this column as a soda fountain debauchee, 
may be seen daily wending an uncertain way with 
his GREEN BAG tucked safely under his arm. 
Could we say that this is a Tiffany setting? Er-er 
— ah, that is to say. 



Alex. Stevebold received 100 in Personal Prop- 
erty. We figure that at 6% from the time of the 
examination, due to the delay in getting the marks 
to the Secretary's ofiice, the said Stevebold should 
receive 102 §. Secretary's Office please takd 
notice. 



We learn that from an authentic source that 
Mr. Sol Habelson, seised of a diminutive mus- 
tache, and who has been appointed as counsel by 
Judge Sappington, has filed as his narr, a copy of 
the Declaration of Independence. 



DO YOU CATCH MY EYE, SIR? 



DENTAL NOTES. 



A Litany For The Infirmary. 



From too few patients and too many patients; 
from too few chairs and too many students ; from 
a hypodermic that won't work ; from dental depot 
agencies ; from patients who tell us they will pay 
for their work next Saturday, or who tell us 
they are prepared and then don't hand over the 



80 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



e, W SARATOaA ST, 




Intercollegiate Bureau of Academic Costume, Aibany.N.v. 

Correct Hoods 



Saltimore. 

Maryland 



"dough" ; from inlay troubles and agents for the 
"War Cry" — Good Lord, deliver us. 

From people who begin their letters to us, 
"Dear Sir" ; from boils on the back of the neck 
and phenol on the lips ; from squalling babes and 
nervous women ; from fainting patients and advo- 
cates of painless dentistry, from shoppers, bar- 
gain hunters, and an excessive flow of saliva ; 
from bad cleaning and "coon" extractions; from 
teething babes, and grandfathers who had every 
tooth in their head at the age of ninety, when 
they died — Good Lord, deliver us. 

From people who call us "Doc" ; from "swell 
chickens" and jealous wives; from the dentistry 
in Highlandtown ; from the wrong number on the 
phone, while inserting a Synthetic ; from tooth- 
ache treatments and emergency calls ; from meta- 
amidophenylformalin-exychinolin desensitizing 
pastes — Good Lord, deliver us. 

From distal cavities in third molars ; from 
chronic abscesses and putrescent root canals; 
from porous dentures and exploding vulcanizers ; 
from extracting the wrong tooth and hemophi- 
liacs ; from loose gold fillings and improper con- 
densation ; from process patents and thousand 
dollar fees ; from nervous debility and a penniless 
old age — Good Lord, deliver us. 

D. B. L.— '17. 

A Student Dental Society. 

Such an institution as a society for the dental 
students is not only possible, but such oppor- 
tunities for benefits is most advisable. The Law 
Department has its debating society to school its 
young men in the art of public speaking; the 
Medical Department has its Randolph Winslow 
Surgical Society to offer opportunity for develop- 
ment of the young man as a force in advancing 
the science of medicine. The field of dentistry 
is as broad as either law or medicine, then why 



COTRELL & 
LEONARD 

Official Makers of 

Caps and 

Gowns 




for AH Degrees. 

Rich Gowns for 
Pulpit and Bench. 

Bulletin, Samples 
etc. on request 



not have such an organization for the benefit of 
our dental students. 

There are many questions of close interest to 
llie dental students that discussion would clarify 
for him ; there are problems wholly dark and ap- 
parently almost unsurmountable which explana- 
tion would make him master of. With the present 
senior and junior classes ever ready to adopt the 
thing which will best serve their interest it would 
be no hard task to organize such a society. 

Any of the necessary details might be worked 
out at a meeting called for the purpose. And the 
papers should be prepared, read, and discussed at 
meetings held at stated times, and to which mem- 
bers of the faculty might be present to render as- 
sistance and service. Let's hear from others on 
the subject and get the movement on foot. If 
all will help we can benefit greatly and so initiate 
a feature of permanent good to both the students 
and university. 

A. Z. A.— '16. 

Dr. Guerra's Resignation. 

All who have been associated with the dental 
school for the past few years, will regret to learn 
of the resignation of Dr. M. G. Guerra, chief 
demonstrator of practical prosthesis. His resig- 
nation was recently handed to the faculty to take 



"Nothing Too Large— Nothing Too Small " 

Baltimore City 

Printing and Binding 

Company 

352-363 Equitable Building 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



81 



effect the first of November, when he will leave 
for Boston, Mass., to engage in the practice of 
dentistry. 

Dr. Guerra is of Portugese birth and after 
having completed his education and travel in Eu- 
rope and South Africa came to America to take 
up the study of dentistry. He chose the Univer- 
sity of Maryland as the school best suited to his 
needs and entered the institution in the fall of 
1911. He graduated in the spring of 1914 with 
second honors in a class of eighty-five men. 
Throughout his school career he was recognized 
as an unusualy talented and capable man and upon 
graduation was appointed chief demonstrator of 
prosthetic denistry in which capacity he has con- 
tinued to the present time, discharging the duties 
of his office efficently and faithfully. 

Dr. Guerra's worth will be missed by the en- 
tire student body and his place will be hard to 
fill. He has ever been popular as a good fellow 
and his ever readiness to assist his friends, and 
the student body generally has caused a deep 
feeling of regret on the part of all at his de- 
parture. May success and good fortune ever be 
his as a diligent worker and earnest soul richly 

""'''''■ A. Z. A.-'16. 



IvYMPHATlCS IN PuLP TiSSUE. 

Not long since we heard a demonstrator of 
operative dentistry remark that no lymphatics have 
ever been demonstrated in pulp tissue. We offer 
the following experiment which proves lymphatic 
existence. 

Experiment to prove the existence of definite 
Lymph channels in the Pulp of a tooth. 

The gum tissue of a cat is injected with a solu- 
tion of Prussian Blue. After fifteen minutes the 
cat is killed and bled. After the blood vessels 
are washed with a warm normal saline solution 
they are injected with Camiine Gelatin with pres- 
sure sufficient to force the Gelatin through all 
the capillaries. 

A section is then made of the pulp of one of the 
teeth near which the Prussian Blue was injected. 
By means of a microscope it is possible to distin- 
guish the blood vessels in this section by the 
Carmine that they contain. The Prussian Blue 
can be seen to have penetrated into the pulp and 



to have stained certain vessels blue. As all the 
blood vessels have been stained red these must be 
lymphatic vessels. B, Dental, '17. 

o 

DENTAL— SENIOR. 



The senior class has been increased by the fol- 
lowing men : Jones, from Medical College of 
Virginia; Winner, from University of Buffalo; 
Wolfe, Woods and Via from Ohio College of 
Dental Surgery. All are good men and we wel- 
come them into our fellowship. 



"Casey" Bell, who was forced through illness 
to discontinue his studies last spring has returned 
to resume his study. 



C. R. Martin and R. F. Darwin have not as 
yet returned. We trust they will soon appear 
and hold our class to its original membership. 



The latest innovations in crown and bridge 
work has been contributed by an over zealous 
senior in the form of a "Porcelain Pin" for 
Davis crowns. Oh, you Jim ! 



Funderburk carries on encyclopedia to take 
his notes in. If "Fundy" can memorize all the 
notes he can place in that volume he will go some. 
The book weighs 18 pounds. 



The following officers have been elected for 
the senior year: 

J. Reese Funderburk, President ; Walter E. 
Lena, Vice-President; Albert Z. Aldridge, Sec- 
retary ; John D. McLeod, Treasurer ; T. Oliver 
Broadwater, Editor, Terra Mariae; Alfred G. 
Bryant, Critic ; Thomas J. Harper, Historian ; 
William F. Martin, Poet; Edwin B. Denton, 
Prophet; Roy P. May, Orator; Elmer E. Hobbs, 
Sergeant-at-Arms ; Gerald I. Brandon, Artist; 
Robert F. Darwin, Business Manager, Terra 
Mariae. 



Bryant and Funderburk were both successful in 
passing off a number of branches on the Massa- 
chusetts and South Carolina boards respectively. 



Blevins tried the matrimonial board and suc- 
cessfully passed. "Congratulations old boy." 



82 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



(Many more anticipate this Exam, but not at 
present. Ask "Pop" Harper.) 



Lena to Dr. Robinson : "Rubber dam, please." 
Dr. Robinson: "Sure. What are you doing?" 
Lena: "Doing a case of orthodontia." 



DENTAL— JUNIOR. 



Wasn't Genuine. 

A few days ago Vina was rapturously praising 
the beauty and perfection of one of the lower 
extremities belonging to a lady across the way. 
The only fault he had to find lay in the fact that 
she limped a little. "Oh, Dr. Guerra", he ex- 
claimed, "wasn't that a peach!" Dr. Guerra, 
however, happened to know that the woman pos- 
sessed a cork leg. 



Corrigan has been chasing chickens during the 
summer at the Hotel Manor, Stamford, Conn., 
and as he stated, "feeling like a brick." 



Demarco spent a few weeks in the infirmary. 
To show us how much he liked the infirmary he 
has been bestowing fruit upon us all the summer. 



After having spent part of the summer in the 
infirmary, Cramer decided to end his vacation at 
Wildwood, N. J. He stated that he was almost 
an official censor on bathing suits and that he 
found it much more interesting than cleaning 
teeth. 



"Sammy" initiated the Freshies to the innova- 
tion honorarily established among the Juniors of 
giving prosthetic demonstrations. Each Junior 
is to have his turn, and we hope that the Fresh- 
men will find us handy. 



"Feyther," said Corrigan, "Wasn't it Patrick 
Henry that said, 'Let us have peace?"' "Niver," 
said Feyther. "Nobody by the name of Patrick 
iver said thot." 



( Coon to Sammy) "Boss, dis yuh toof am mity 
nigh killin me ! How much will it cost to hab de 
blame thing yanked out?" 

(Sammy) "Twenty-five cents, to keep it from 
hurting." 

(Coon) "But, loogy yuh, sah — I hasn't got but 
fifteen cents to me name ; kain't yo all pull it out 
half way for dat?" 

(Sammy) "Well, gimme the fifteen." 



The Junior class is now doing hard work under 
a heavy schedule, with 30 members. The new 
men are: Acorn, Betts, Cline, Coyne, Emerson, 
Gareau, Glandille, Marsh, Sabater and Witten. 



Look for the puzzle joke in this: Glandille 
betts cline acorn coyne emerson marsh gareau ; 
sabater witten. 

The Junior class had its election on Thursday, 
October 21. The class officers are as follows : 
President, Manley; Vice-President, Corrigan; 
Secretary, Demarco; Treasurer, Lancaster; Ser- 
geant-at-Arms, Cramer; Executive Committee, 
Santoni ; Chairman, Culler and Coble ; Class His- 
torian, Betz ; class artist. Palmer. 



Miller "blew in" from Maine on the twentieth, 
and he says it seems like old times to be among 
the fellows. 



"Rough" Lena, who conductored on the Bay 
State Railways this past summer was presented 
with a handsome gold watch for being the most 
popular employe of the company at Lawrence, 

Mass. 



ACADEMIC— GRADUATE. 



The many friends of Mr. Charles T. Hauver, 
'15, will be glad to learn that he is in Columbia 
University, New York City, doing graduate work 
in modern languages. Messrs. Brown, Gleason 
and Shepherd, of last year's Pre-Medical course, 
spent a week-end at the college. Mr. C. F. Horine, 
also of the Pre-Medical department, is studying 
medicine in the University of Maryland and spent 
a day at the college. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



83 



NURSING. 



Miss Ellen C. Israel, class of 1910, has re- 
signed her position as assistant superintendent of 
the Emergency Hospital, Annapolis, Md. and will 
engage in private nursing. She is located at 1403 
Madison Avenue. 



Miss Stella W. Ricketts, class of 1911, who has 
been at her home in Kane, Pa., for several months, 
has returned to 1403 Madison Avenue. 



Mrs. Margaret LeSeur, class of 1900, has ac- 
cepted the position as supervisor of nurses at the 
Kernan Hospital for Crippled Children, Hillsdale, 
Md. 



Miss Alice Frances Bell, University Hospital 
Training School for Nurses, class of 1907, who 
since September 1, 1912, has been superintendent 
and head nurse of the Emergency Hospital, An- 
napolis, Md., has tendered her resignation. Miss 
Bell has gone to New York to take a special 
course at Columbia University, in the department 
of which Miss Nutting, a famous nurse and 
noted woman, one time head of the nurses at 
Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, is chief. 

During her several years' stay in Annapolis 
Miss Bell made many friends, who were very 
loath to part with her. The splendid work she 
has accomplished at the Emergency Hospital is 
a lasting monument to her executive ability, 
strength of character, efficiency and capability 
as a hospital superintendent. She carries with 
her in her new work our best wishes. 

Miss Bell succeeded Miss Rosamond Minnis, 
also of the class of 1907, as superintendent of 
the Emergency Hospital. 



Miss Marian Forney, class of 1916, was oper- 
ated on for appendicitis at the hospital and is on 
the convalescent list. 



Misses Olive B. Burns, class of 1904, and M. 
Myrtle Selby, class of 1913, have been appointed 
nurses in the Public Health Work, tuberculosis 
department. 



Loans on Indorsements and Other Security 

A dignified and inexpensive plan of borrowing 
money, to be repaid in small weekly installments. 
Prompt action. 

THE NATIONAL BUILDING AND LOAN ASSN, 
1063 Calvert Building. 



Miss Jennie R. Garner, class of 1911, has re- 
signed her position as superintendent of the Emer- 
gency Hospital, Easton, Md. Miss A. E. Butts, 
class of 1913, assistant superintendent, has ten- 
dered her resignation. 



MARRIAGES. 



Dr. Eugene Bascom Wright, class of 1909, for- 
merly of 1017 Cathedral street, this city, to Miss 
Elsie Everett Daub, of Baltimore, formerly of 
Wheeling, W. Va., at Philadelphia September 11, 
1915. Dr. Wright was resident physician at the 
Church Home and Infirmary for three years, and 
resident surgeon at the Hebrew Hospital. 



Dr. J. Flolmes Smith, Jr., U.S.P.H.S., formerly 
of 37 West Preston street, this city, to Miss Mil- 
dred Clara Oliver, of New Orleans, La, at New 
Orleans, September 23, 1915. Dr. Smith was 
formerly associated with the anatomical depart- 
ment of the University of Maryland. 



Dr. Edward Lingen Bowlus, class of 1906, of 
Middletown, Md., to Miss Georgia Martin Pot- 
ter, of Baltimore, Md., at Baltimore, October 6, 
1915. Dr. and Mrs. Bowlus will reside in Mid- 
dletown. 



DEATHS. 
Dr. William Dudley James, class of 1881, a 
practitioner of East Brady, Pa., died at the Kit- 
tanning (Pa.) Hospital August 14, 1915, from 
cirrhosis of the liver, aged 55 years. 



Dr. Luther H. Keller, P. and S., class of 1875, 
of Hagerstown, Md., was found dead in a chair 
on the porch at the Washington County Hos- 
pital September 30, 1915 aged 75 years. 



Dr. C. H. Fultz, P. and S.. class of 1907, of 
Vanceburg, Ky., died at his home September 3, 
1915, aged 39 years. 



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Also 

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German Savings Bank of Baltimore City 

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MIWIRSITY ^AlITT 



a 




BACKBONE AND WISHBONE. 



Don't you ever wear your wishbone, where your backbone ought to be, 

Is a maxim full of wisdom, and applies to you and me. 

For the fellow who is wishing for the things to come his way. 

Is the one who puts off doing today's work, another day. 

This life is but a mirror, laugh and smiles come back to greet us. 
Scowl at fate and just as surely frowning features ever meet us, 
If it hurts, just grin and bear it, what's the use to cry and curse, 
Make the best of circumstances, take what comes, it might be worse. 

If you don't get what you're wanting, want the things that you can get. 
You can't tell in the beginning just how high your mark to set. 
If your job don't suit your notion, and you think the other would, 
Just remember that the other fellow would swap, maybe, if he could. 

This old world is full of people and a year is made of days, 
Takes a lot of folks to fill up all the time in many ways. 
But if you just keep on doing all you can, your very best. 
Some day opportunity '11 open and you'll find you lead the rest . 

Life don't look alike to people looking at it different ways, 
Better strike an average somehow on the rain and shiny days. 
Wishes won't get there like liustle, grit and push win out, you'll see. 
Don't you ever wear your wishbone, where your backbone ought to be. 

—Homer Clark Bennett, M.D. 




VOL. n. 



BALTIMORE, MD., DECEMBER, 1915 



No. 6 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



Vol. 11. 



DECEMBER 1, 1915. 



No. 6. 



CONTENTS 



ADDRESS ON THE DEVELOPMENT 
OF MEDICAL EDUCATION IN 
MARYLAND. Randolph Winslow... 87 

THE MEDICAL SOCIETY OF DENTAL 

STUDENTS. H. K. Baklor 90 

GOVERNOR-ELECT EMERSON C. 
HARRINGTON 91 

EDITORIALS 92 

Editorially Expressed. 



SLAMS AND SALUTES 93 

FRATERNITY NOTES 94 

ITEMS 94 

ENGAGEMENTS 102 

BIRTHS 102 

MARRIAGES 103 

DEATHS 103 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE, MD. 

HON. PHILLIPS LEE GOLDSBOROUGH, Governor of Maryland, Chaneellor. 
THOMAS FELL, A. M., Ph. D., L L. D., D. C. L., Provost. 

ST. JOHN'S COLLEGE. Annapolis, Md. {^^WlsV'iS^'sSc^s) 

Founded 1696. Classical and Scientific College Courses leading to degrees. Special advantages to stu- 
dents purposing to study the professions. Military Department under army officers. Also Preparatory 
School for boys fitting for St. John's or other colleges. Terra begins Sepl amber IS. Address 

THOMAS FELL, Ph.D., LL.D., D.C.L., President. 



DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE. 

Four vears' graded course. New Laboratory Build- 
ing. Clinical advantages unsurpassed. Teaching Staff 
of 66. 110th Annual Session will begin October 1, 
1916, and continue 8 months. 

WM. F. LOCKWOOD, M. D., Dean. 



DEPARTMENT OF DENTISTRY. 

3Sth Annual Session begins October 1, 1916, and 
continues 7 months. 26 Instructors. New Building, 
For catalogue containing course of study, etc., apply to 

TIMOTHY O. HEATWOLE, M.D., D.D.S., Dean, 

Baltimore, Md. 



DEPARTMENT OF LAW. 

61st Annual Session will begin Sept. 28, 1916. Faculty 
of 26. For catalogue containing full information ad- 
dress the Secretary, 301 St. Paul Street, Baltimore, 
Maryland. 

EDWIN T. DICKERSON, Secretary. 



DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACY. 

(Formerly Maryland College of Pharmacy). 74th 
Annual Session begins September 25, 1916. 11 In- 
structors. New Laboratories. Address 

CHARLES CASFARI, JR., Phar.D., Dean, 

Baltimore, Md. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 

Published Monthly in the Interest of the University of Maryland. 
PRICE $1.00 PER YEAR, 



Oontributiond solicited from Alumni of the 
University. 



Business Address, 608 Professional Buildinis, 
Baltimore, Md. 



Vol. II. 



BALTIMORE, MD., DECEMBER 1, 1915. 



No. 6. 



ADDRESS ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF 

MEDICAL EDUCATION IN 

MARYLAND. 



Randolph Winslow, M.D., LL.D. 



The early settlers of Maryland, like those of 
the other American colonies, were too much oc- 
cupied in overcoming their physical surround- 
ings and in establishing homes in the wilder- 
ness to give much thought to educational mat- 
ters ; nevertheless, we find that in 1696 the Gen- 
eral Assembly, shortly after the removal of the 
seat of government from St. Mary's City to An- 
napolis, founded the first free school in this 
country, under the name of King \Vi'lliam's 
School, which in 1784 became St. John's Col- 
lege. 

In the charter of St. John's College is is ex- 
pressly ordered that it shall unite with Wash- 
ington College, at Chestertown, founded in 1782, 
to form "one university, by the name of the 
University of Maryland." 

Owing to difficulties of communication, and 
[lerhaps to other causes, this union was never 
made effective; but the provision remains in the 
charter of St. John's College to this day. 

In 1907, by a contract of affiliation with the 
present University of Maryland, St. John's Col- 
lege became again a member of a university 
bearing the name of the State. 

Previous to the Revolutionary War there was 
but one medical college in the Colonies — the Col- 
lege of Medicine of Philadelphia — chartered in 
1765, now known as the University of Pennsyl- 
vania. The first graduate of this school was 
Dr. John Archer, of Harford county, Maryland, 
who received the degree of Bachelor of Medi- 
cine in 1768. His medical diploma was, there- 
fore, the first one issued in America, and is now 
a priceless possession of the Medical and Chi- 
rurgical Faculty of Maryland. 

Doubtless there were physicians in the colo- 



nial times who were versed in all the medical 
lore of those days, who had studied in the best 
schools in Europe ; but as population increased 
and became more scattered it was impossible to 
secure physicians of this type, and the young 
men who wished to become physicians appren- 
ticed themselves to older practitioners and re- 
ceived such training as could be obtained in this 
way. Even as late as 1807 only about fifteen 
per cent, of the physicians in the State were 
graduates of medical schools. 

In 1755 Charles Frederick Wiesenthal, a native 
of Prussia, settled in Baltimore. He is said to 
have been physician to Frederick the Great, and 
he was certainly a man of exceptional attain- 
ments. He exercised a great influence in the 
city and State until his death, in 1789. His son, 
Andrew, who also received his training abroad, 
was the first to give regular courses of instruc- 
tion to medical students in Maryland. He lec- 
tured on anatomy, physiology, pathology and 
surgery in 1789-90, and — associated with Dr 
George Buchannan, who lectured on diseases of 
women and children — essayed to found a medical 
school, which project, however, was never ac- 
complished. 

The physicians of the State, however, becom- 
ing more and more convinced that some steps 
were necessary to combat the ignorance and the 
quackery that prevailed, founded the Medical 
and Chirurgical Faculty of Maryland in 1799. 
This Faculty, which is the State Medical Society, 
of which most of us here present are proud to 
be members, was chartered by the Legislature 
in January 1799. By the provisions of its char- 
ter the right of licensure to practice in the State 
was vested in its Board of Examiners, which 
right was exercised for forty years, when it fell 
into desuetude, owing to an act of Legislature 
(hat materially impaired its usefulness. 

.A.fter many years the right to license physicians 
is again entrusted to the Medical and Chirurgical 



88 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



Faculty through a special Board of iledical Ex- 
aminers. Some of us worked hard to secure 
this tardy justice, which was finally accorded 
in 1892. 

Upton Scott, of Annapolis, was the first presi- 
dent of the Medical and Chirurgical Faculty. He 
was born in Ireland, and received his medical 
training in Glasgow and Elinbi:rgh. Migrating 
to America in 1753, he soon became one of the 
most successful and most esteemed physicians in 
Maryland and, though seventy-seven years of 
age, was unanimously chosen to guide the des- 
tinies of the new enterprise into paths of useful- 
ness. 

In 1802 Dr. John B. Davidge began to give 
courses on anatomy and other branches of medi- 
cal science to students in Baltimore and, in asso- 
ciation with Dr. James Cocke, continued these 
classes until 1807. He built an anatomical the- 
atre for the use of his students, but this was de- 
stroyed by a mob, as was that of Wiesenthal a 
decade earlier. 

In 1807 the charter for the College of Medi- 
cine of Maryland was secured from the Legis- 
lature through the efforts of Davidge and Cocke : 
and the school at once began its courses of in- 
struction, which have continued without inter- 
mission to the present time. Chronologically 
this college was the fifth to be founded in the 
United States : The College of Medicine of Phil- 
adelphia was established in 1765, Harvard Med- 
ical College in 1783, Dartmouth in 1798, and The 
College of Physicians and Surgeons of New York 
in 1807, a few months prior to the founding of 
the College of IMedicine of Maryland. All these 
schools are still in active operation. 

In 1812 The College of Medicine of Maryland 
was ordered to annex other faculties and to form 
a university to be known as the University of 
Maryland. 

The building in which we are now assembled 
was erected in ISll and is a reproduction of the 
Pantheon at Rome. It was at the time of its 
erection the handsomest medical school building 
in the United States, and is now the oldest col- 
lege building used for medical instruction in this 
country. In the Anatomical Hall, just above us. 
the Marquis de la Fayette received the honorary 
degree of Doctor of Laws in 1824, and in 1825 



the honorary degree of Doctor of Medicine was 
conferred on Ephraim McDowell, the father of 
ovariotomy — the only medical degree that he 
ever possessed. 

In 1813 a young man named Horatio Gates 
Jameson was graduated at this institution, who 
was destined to become a famous man. He 
was a bold and original surgeon and a pains- 
taking investigator: and his opinions and con- 
clusions, though at variance with those of his 
contemporaries, are now accepted as correct. 

Dr. Henry O. Marcy, of Boston, read before 
the Southern Surgical and Gynecological Asso- 
ciation, at the meeting held in Baltimore in 1906 
a paper entitled "A brief sketch of one of Balti- 
more's greatest men, Horatio Gates Jameson 
M.D. : His most valuable contribution to surgery 
—the occlusion of arteries by the buried animal 
ligature.'' 

Doctor Jameson aspired to a seat in the fac- 
ulty of the University of Maryland, but when he 
failed to realize his ambition he looked about 
him for other avenues of professional advance- 
ment. In 1827 he secured authorization from 
Washington College, Pennsylvania, to establish 
the Washington Medical College in Baltimore : 
and later this medical school was authorized by 
the Maryland Legislature to annex faculties and 
form an institution to be known as Washington 
University. The W'ashington University Medi- 
cal School had a somewhat checkered career un- 
til 1851, when it closed its doors. 

At the beginning of the Civil War, in 1861 
there were two men in the faculty of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland who subsequently became 
famous — Dr. W^illiam A. Hammond, professor 
of anatomy, who resigned his chair and became 
Surgeon-General of the United States Army, and 
Dr. Edward Warren, professor of materia medica 
and therapeutics, who cast his lot with the Con- 
federacy and became Surgeon-General of North 
Carolina. At the close of the war he returned 
to Baltimore and, finding his chair occupied, he 
resuscitated the charter of the Washington Uni- 
versity and re-established the medical school. 
This had considerable success for a time, but 
gradually dwindled in numbers and went out of 
existence in 1877. In 1872 Warren and Byrd re- 
signed from the Washington University and or- 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



89 



ganized a new school under the name of the Col- 
lege of Physicians and Surgeons of Baltimore. 

I think our Prof. William Simon was a mem- 
ber of the first faculty of this college. I at- 
tended its first commencement, held at the Ma- 
sonic Temple in February 1873, at which eighteen 
men were graduated and were addressed by Doc- 
tor Warren. At the close of this session War- 
ren resigned and went to Egypt, where he be- 
came Surgeon-General of the Khedive's army and 
was known as Warren Bey. Subsequently he 
went to Paris, where he practised for a number 
of years, and there died. 

The College of Physicians and Surgeons pros- 
pered, but was hampered by lack of hospital 
facilities until 1877, when it took over the Wash- 
ington University and fell heir to its buildings 
and equipment. Greatly increased classes now 
attended the school and an era of prosperity 
supervened. 

In 1881 Dr. Harvey L. Byrd, having resigned 
from the College of Physicians and Surgeons, 
formed the Baltimore Medical College. The first 
classes were held in the basement of a Methodist 
church on Eutaw street near Mulberry street, 
but a house was soon secured on Paca street 
After a few years the college bought property 
on Linden avenue and Madison street and, under 
the able administration of the late Prof. David 
Streett, who was its dean for twenty-five years 
it rapidly developed into one of the largest schools 
in this country, with fine buildings and a large 
hospital for clinical instruction. In 1913 the Bal- 
timore Medical College was merged with the 
University of Maryland ; and by the recent merger 
with the College of Physicians and Surgeons the 
present medical school combines the forces and 
facilities of the three formerly independent 
schools. 

The University of Maryland has always drawn 
its students largely from the South, but the Bal- 
timore Medical College taught us that they could 
just as easily be drawn from the North, while 
the College of Physicians and Surgeons has suc- 
ceeded in attracting students from the Middle 
and Far West, as well as from the contiguous 
Middle States. We should be, therefore, in a 
position to attract students from all parts of the 
country, as well as from foreign lands, 



When I became a medical student, in 1871 
there were no premedical requirements for ad- 
mission to a medical school, and the course of, 
study extended over two sessions of five months 
each. There were no laboratories except that of 
practical anatomy, which was a very malodorous 
one. The course of instruction was by no means 
perfunctory, however, and we got a good train- 
ing for those days. Even in those days some 
students voluntarily took three years, and gradu- 
ally the number increased and a voluntary three- 
year course was established. 

The Woman's Medical College of Baltimore 
was founded in 1883 and was the first school in 
the city to establish a compulsory three-year 
graded course, as well as an entrance examina- 
tion to determine the fitness of the candidate to 
study medicine. From this small and insignifi- 
cant school for women originated the movement 
that resulted in the formation of the Association 
of American Medical Colleges. 

Through the late Prof. Eugene Fauntleroy 
Cordell a meeting of the medical schools of the 
city was brought about, and from this meeting 
a call was sent to the various schools of the 
country, inviting them to meet and confer on 
the status of medical education in the United 
States and to devise plans to improve it. If my 
memory is not at fault, this call was signed by 
Prof. Aaron Friedenwald, of the College of 
Physicians and Surgeons, the father of our col- 
leagues — Profs. Harry and Julius Friedenwald. 

One of the first acts of this Association of 
Medical Colleges was to lengthen the medical 
curriculum to three years. This became effective 
in 1892, and in 1895 another year was added 
making it compulsory that all graduates in 1899 
and thereafter should have had four years in a 
medical school. Some slight premedical educa- 
tional tests were required, but as they were left 
in the hands of the deans the examinations were 
usually favorable to the students. 



Menu. Banquet and Dance Cards, Commencement Invita- 
tions and Programs, Diplomas, Certiflcatea. Engrossing, U. 
of M. Stationery for Classes and Fraternities. Letter Heads. 
Envelopes, Cards, etc., for Physicians, Lawyers and Dentists. 

J. H. DOWNS. STATIONER. 229 N. Charles SL 



90 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



It soon became evident that it was necessary 
to demand higher educational standards of those 
who were entering upon the study of medicine 
and in 1903 graduation from a four-years high 
school was required. I personally cast the vote 
of the University of Maryland for this advance 
at New Orleans in 1903. For some time it was 
very difficult to administer this requirement, 
owing to the paucity of four-year high schools 
in the area from which we drew our students ; 
eventually, however, the high schools advanced 
their requirements to meet the situation. 

Another factor in the advancement of medical 
education in this country was the establishment 
of the Council on Medical Education by the 
American Medical Association in 1904. At that 
time there were one hundred and sixty-six medi- 
cal schools in the United States, more than there 
were in all the rest of the world; in 1915 the 
number has been reduced by extinctiion and 
merger to less than 100. There are fewer schools 
but better ones. 

The Baltimore schools have been accused of 
being non-progressive, but, as I have already 
stated, the first efforts to advance the cause of 
medical education emanated from our schools 
We have never been backward in meeting the 
new conditions as they arose, though they have 
imposed burdens on us that have been hard for 
us to bear. 

In response to the demands of the times the 
three larger schools have consolidated into one 
body. This has entailed great sacrifices on the 
part of the members of the several faculties, that 
have been made from the conviction that the cause 
of medical education would be advanced thereby 

Last year a year of college work in chemistry 
physics, biology and either French or German 
way required, in addition to a four-year high- 
school course. This has resulted in cutting down 
our freshman and sophomore classes. In 1917 
it is almost certain that two years of col- 
lege work will be required, so that it is prob- 
able that our classes will be small for some years 
to come. This being so, it will be impossible 
for us to conduct the school on the fees of stu- 
dents; indeed, the time in which this could be 
done has already passed. We must have aid 



from private benefactors or from the State. We 
have an endowment fund that is reaching a use- 
ful size, and various legacies will be available 
sometime in the future; but we must have gen 
erous aid from some source, to enable us to stem, 
the current until we can reach solid ground 

In 1914 the Legislature chartered the Mary- 
land State University, of which we are a part 
and $15,000 a year for 1915 and 1916, for medi- 
cal education was appropriated. The future of 
the State University is still uncertain, for, while 
the State created the university it did not appro- 
priate sufficient funds to put it in operation. We 
must wait, therefore, until the next Legislature 
to see what will be the future of the State 
University. In the meanwhile we have cleaned 
up the medical situation in this city ; we have 
consolidated the reputable schools into one strong 
institution, while the less deserving ones have be- 
come extinct. 

We have magnificent clinical facilities, with 
three large general hospitals under our control 
and many other general and special ones from 
which to derive clinical material. We have ample 
and splendid laboratories, in which to instruct stu- 
dents in the fundamental branches ; and we have 
a large corps of able and enthusiastic teachers 
We believe, therefore, that we are on the 
threshold of an era of success and prosperity 



THE MEDICAL SOCIETY OF DENTAL 
STUDENTS. 



By H. K. Baklor, Dental, '16. 



The diversons offered us during the past month 
in the way of extra lectures and assemblages were 
more numerous than usual, and the meeting of 
the Medical Society on the night of November 
16th, stands out in my mind as having been a 
most splendid treat. The papers of Doctors Gor- 
don Wilson and Chandlee were of peculiar in- 
terest to those of the Dental Department. The 
question of the derangement of the system by the 
absorbtion of toxins and bacteria from the mouth 
may not be entirely new to us. But the signifi- 
cance of Dr. Wilson's and Dr. Friedenwald's re- 
marks on the concomittance of gastric ulcers and 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



91 



portal and tonsillar infections is undoubtedly as 
important as it is recent. 

I think we owe Dr. Carroll and his colleagues 
a debt of gratitude for bringing up this subject 
before such an assemblage of specialists as was 
gathered there that evening. I refer to the ques- 
tion of gastric ulcers following portal infections 
merely as an example of the references made that 
evening to the importance of maintainance of oral 
sepsis. And we prospective practitioners as oral 
specialists should be doubly thankful to this 
Society for the work it is doing in helping to 
raze the last barriers of misunderstanding and 
prejudice between physician and dentist. We, in 
turn, are being shown added opportunities for 
service. And in addition we are being forewarned 
as to the direction from which we may expect 
blame as "Accessories after the fact" in abetting 
or causing systemic derangements by oral neglect. 

"Cogito ergo sum" might well be taken as our 
watch-word in this day when the laity are being 
educated up to the point of remunerating us for 
our knowledge as well as for the mere mechanical 
service of inserting* a filling and making artificial 
appliances. It is obviously our unquestionable 
duty to keep ourselves well informed so as to in- 
crease our field of usefulness. It is otherwise 
manifestly impossible for us to be worthy of our 
hire. Such a meeting as the one in question is of 
inestimable value to us in our eiTorts to keep 
abreast of the acomplishments and findings of the 
great research men of the day. 

It is not my object to review the field covered 
by the papers that evening, for such a survey 
would scarcely be complete without rendering due 
homage to the miraculous surgical feat of our be- 
loved friend and surgeon Dr. Winslow. Nor 
would it be proper to overlook the lesson brought 
home to us in the paper of Dr. Gardner on the 
question of the prevention of the spread of 
malignant growths and their early recognition. 
His paper is a splendid supplement to the insist- 
ence and energy which Dr. Bay instills in his 
lectures to the Senior class. 

My object in speaking of the meeting is to bring 
it to the attention of those of the dental men who 
were absent that evening. Let me urge them to 
avail themselves of such opportunities whenever 



they present themselves so as to profit by the un- 
questionable good which they will derive there- 
from. Possibly there may be times when the 
papers will be on medical topics which do not ap- 
ply to our work directly, but such information 
may sporulate for the time being and may vege- 
tate under more favorable conditions so as to aid 
us in our life's work. 



GOVERNOR-ELECT EMERSON C. HAR- 
RINGTON, ST. JOHN'S COLLEGE, 
CLASS OF 1884. 



It gives us much pleasure to announce to our 
readers the election on November 2d of former 
Comptroller Emerson C. Harrington, class of 
1884, of Cambridge, Md., as Governor of the 
State of Maryland. Mr. Harrington was born in 
Dorchester County, Md., and spent his boyhood 
on a farm. In 1880 he went to Cambridge and 
took a competitive examination, winning a schol- 
arship at St. John's College, from which he grad- 
uated four years later. He was the honor man 
of his class. After tutoring at the College for a 
year hei was ofifered charge of one of the depart- 
ments. This he declined and returned to Cam- 
bridge as principal of the High School there. 
Later he began the study of law and was after- 
wards admitted to the bar. Two years later he 
was elected State's Attorney of Cambridge. From 
that time on he has grown steadily in Dorchester 
County, until his election to the Governorship of 
Maryland, the highest honor that the State can 
bestow upon any of its citizens. We desire to 
congratulate Mr. Harrington upon the high honor 
thrust upon him by his fellow men and predict 
for him a successful administration. 



"Anyhow, there's one advantage in having a 
wooden leg," said the veteran. 

"What's that?" asked his friend. 

"You can hold your socks up with thumb- 
tacks." — Columbia Jester. 



92 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 

A MONTHLY JOURNAL 

Devoted to the interests of the University 

of Maryland. 

Subscription Price, ?1.00 Per Annum, In Advance 

Reprints Furnished At Cost 

Advertising Rates Submitted Upon Request. 

608 Professional Building 

BALTIMORE, MD. 

Editorial Board. 

J. BEN ROBINSON, D.D.S Editor-in-Cbief. 

NATHAN WINSLOW, M.D Business Manager. 

Graduate Members. 

THOMAS FELL, LL.D Academic. 

H. M. ROBINSON, M.D Medical. 

ALBERT H. CARROLL, M.D Medical. 

JAMES M. HEPBRON Law. 

SAMUEL WANT, LL. B Law. 

A. A. SONNENBURG, Phar.D Pharmacy. 

J. M. BRANSKY, Phar.D Pharmacy. 

M. B. SULLIVAN, R.N Nursing. 

A. B. MAKOVER, Law '17 Undergraduate Editor. 

Undergraduate Members. 

F. C. MARINO, '16; C. 0. WOLF, 

'17 Medicine 

A. Z. ALDRIDGE, '16; E. B. LAN- 
CASTER, '17; CHARLES F. 
SMITH, '18 DentaL 

JOHN McN. HOLMES, '16; DAVE 
LOWENSTEIN, JR., '17 Law. 

GEORGE KARMANN, '16; C. COL- 
LIER SMITH, '17 Pharmacy. 

J. E. EVANS, '16 Y. M. C.A. 

DECEMBER 1, 1915. 



EDITORIALLY EXPRESSED. 



Many of the subscribers to The Gazette have 
changed addresses and because of that it is doubt- 
ful if the friends of the paper receive their copies 
regularly. Let those who have changed addresses 
or anticipate a change send notice to the business 
office that the paper may reach the subscriber 
without delay. Students whose names are on the 
waiting lists bear in mind to forward to the office 
any change of address, otherwise a disappoint- 
ment may be felt in failing to receive the paper. 



Academy Day and Thanksgiving Day! Both 
welcomed and joyously celebrated by the students 
and faculty. Welcome Christmas with her fes- 
tivities. 



The College Man Sets 
the Styles! 

Uphold your reputation by wearing suits 
made the "Matched Pattern" way, the most 
important clothing invention of the decade ! 

These suits are sold exclusively by 

THE QUALITY SHOP 

Balto. and Liberty Sts. 




Did you carefully preserve the October issue 
in which appeared the excellent address by Dr. 
B. Merrill Hopkinson '" Time will not change the 
verity of his thought, and as we advance in our 
professional careers we will more and more ap- 
preciate his call to service. It is too good to 
lose, preserve it. 



The editor and staff feel extreme satisfaction 
over the increasing interest shown by the student 
body in The Gazette. Today the student in- 
terest and patronage is greater than ever before 
and Vi'e are encouraged to look for an even greater 
interest. 

Rumor has it that the University will develop 
another Glee Club this year. There is much good 
material and organization is all that is needed. 
With Bishop and Yost of the Medical Depart- 
ment, Allen and Baldwin of the Law Department, 
May and Byrant of the Dental Department and 
Robinson of the Pharmacy Department there is 
ample talent for leadership, and all that is needed 
is spirit and enthusiasm. Everybody boost. 



SLAMS AND SALUTES. 



Henry D. Harlan Law Society Notes. 



IV. J'. ( ]Vi)isome I'iola) Harrison, vs Wm. F. 
Russell, Jr. 



One of the features of this year's activities in 
the society will be the mock trial, which has been 
arranged by the Committee appointed by Presi- 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



93 



dent Holmes, with W. Lester Baldwin as Chair- 
man, to be staged Saturday night December 18th. 

Walter V. Harrison of the '16 Law Class, and 
a member of the Baltimore Bar, willbe seen in 
the role of a heart broken damsel seeking balm 
for wounded affections, resulting from the false 
promises of her erstwhile lover, William F. Rus- 
sell, Jr., of Chestertown, Md. Sentimental love 
letters and other very interesting evidence will 
be introduced. 

One of the members of the Supreme Bench of 
Baltimore City will preside. 

Suit is brought on behalf of "Miss" Harrison 
by Gerald F. Kopp and Roger B. Copinger, two 
recent additions to the Baltimore Bar, while Mr. 
Russell has engaged the well-known firm of 
Schimmel & Cooper to defend him. 

All the court officers will be chosen from the 
members of the society. 

The members of all departments of the LTniver- 
sity are cordially invited to attend, with their lady 
friends. 



THE LAW FACULTY AND THEIR SUBJECTS. 



Tables reserved for ladies Open all night 

SPECIAL RATES TO STUDENTS 

AT 

The Imperial Lunch Room 

526 W. Baltimore St. 

Phone St. Paul 8478 Baltimore, Md. 

Judge Harlan taught Domestic Relations ; 

Federal Procedure and Patents, Judge Rose. 
Judge Stockbridge taught the law of Nations, 

Janney taught Commercial law, which he knows. 

It was Sam Want who became our Saviour, 

By the wonderful quizzes he gave. 
All students were on good behavior, 

While the exam, path he did pave. 

Equity Procedure we learned from Tucker. 

Jackson taught us Conflict of laws. 
Howard, of Equity, was our instructor, 

Constitutional law Judge Niles outpours. 

Bankruptcy is taught by Lauchheimer. 

Criminal law is now taught by O'Dunne ; 
As to Personal Property, to Dennis refer ; 

As to Sales, to J. N. Ulman. 

Dickerson now teaches Contracts. 

From Bryan we got Common Carriers. 
From Barton we get Banking extracts; 

Coleman razed Bills and Notes Barriers. 



Three pleasant years of study we spent. 

At the University "Terrae Mariae." 
While there, the Faculty tried to prevent 

The admission of students free. 

We came to hear H. Tiffany 

Explain the law of Real Property. 
He was so well liked, that many, I fear. 

Took his lectures again the following year. 

Chestnut taught Criminal law at the start, 

And the law of Insurance, too. 
Contracts we learned from Bonaparte ; 

And Torts from Frank, 'tis true. 

Then we crammed our heads with Sales from Poe; 

And with Elementary law from Ritchie. 
Title we learned from Ward B. Coe ; 

Testamentary law from Bagby. 

It was Bryant who taught us Practice, 
Judge Gorter with Evidence did advance. 

Judge Bond taught us Pleading tactics ; 
Corporation law by Rawls and France. 



Presiding as judge is Sappington ; 

S. Want is a judge here too. 
Then as judges are Bramble and Dickerson, 

At the Practice Court of the Maryland U. 

Having named the lecturers and the subjects they teach. 

It is, therefore, time to conclude. 
Now that all's over, let all within reach, 

Depart in a pleasant mood. 

—A. R. '15. 



TO BELLADONNA. 



What makes the blood that warms my heart. 

To fill my cheeks with blushes? 
What makes my yellow, fading face 

To glow with crimson blushes? 

What makes my eyes so large and sparkling 
When half dimmed with Despair's black veil.' 

What makes them deep and wide and open 
When half closed by Time's hoary gale? 

What flutters heart and boosts its treasures 
When wearied, chilled by zephyr's blow? 

What quickens pulse in voluminous measure 
When blushing ship sails lazily slow? 



94 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



What heaves my bosom with youthful rhythm 
When slumbering lightly in Twilight Sleep? 

What lightens breath as in anxious hopes 
When breath seems sinking in the Deep ? 

Adorned with these virtues and graces 

Is Belladonna, not "Deadly Nightshade," 
A girl, a lovely, fragrant girl, 

Belladonna, my "Beautiful Lady." 

— B. P. JONES, Dental '16. 
O 

FRATERNITY NOTES. 



Phi Sigma K.\ppa Smoker. 



On Saturday night, November 6th, the Phi 
Sigma Kappa Fraternity held a smoker at the 
Chapter House, 1036 N. Eutaw street. 

In addition to the smoker a general reunion 
was held by a number of "Grads." who returned 
for the occasion. Several members of the Fa- 
culty also helped to enliven the affair. 

Twenty Freshmen were present and pledge pins 
were placed on some of the most promising look- 
ing ones. 

Prospects look bright for the most success- 
ful year in the history of Phi Sigma Kappa at 
the University of Marj'land. 

o 

ITEMS— GENERAL. 



At the first meeting of the Glee Club of the 
University, which was held in Davidge Hall, 
Wednesday evening, November 10th, the follow- 
ing officers were elected: W. Lester Baldwin, 
Law Department, Vice-President : A. J. Bryant. 



STYLISH and COMFORTABLE 
FOOT-WEAR 

FOR THE 

UNIVERSITY MAN 

All Leathers — Expert Fitting 
Moderate Prices 

WYMAN 

19 W. LEXINGTON STE ET 



Dental Department, Secretary, and Thomas J. 
Robinson, Department of Pharmacy, Treasurer. 
Dr. William A. Rea, of the Dental Department 
was again chosen Director of the Glee Club by 
an unanimous vote. J\lr. Roy P. May was elected 
assistant director. 

The Club will meet in the auditorium of Cen- 
tral Y. M. C. A. for rehearsals. At the next busi- 
ness meeting a manager will be elected who will 
develop plans for a series of concerts to be given 
in Baltimore City and throughout the State. 



ACADEMIC DAY. 



Academic Day commemorating the one hun- 
dred and twenty-sixth anniversary' of the found- 
ing of St. John's College at Annapolis, the De- 
partment of Arts and Sciences of the University 
of Maryland, was observed with exercises at 
Westminster Presbyterian Church, November 11, 
1915. The entire Faculty and student body of the 
University participated in the exercises. 

The orator of the day was Mr. Albert C. 
Ritchie, Law, class of 1898, his subject being 
"Lest We Forget." He paid full tribute to each 
of the departments, as well as naming a few 
leaders of the past and present in many fields, who 
either lived in Baltimore or were trained there. 
He told of the founding of the Maryland Col- 
lege of Pharmacy in 1841, of its absorption by 
the University in 190-i, and referred to the times 
of Dr. Horace H. Hayden and the growth, 
through his efforts, of the department of den- 
tistry. In speaking of the law department, he 
suggested that the department's efficiency would 
be greatly increased by the addition of several 
full-time professors to the faculty. 

"It is a far call back to the time when the 
anatomical laboratory of Dr. John B. Davidge 
was destroyed by indignant Baltimore citizens 
who objected to the dissection of bodies," he 
continued. "Strange also is it to recall that when 
the Legislature of 1807 was passing the charter 
of the College of Medicine of Maryland, it was 
discovered that three of the six faculty members 
were not graduates. 

"Since that time such men as John Beale Da- 
vidge and Nathan Smith have been succeeded 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



95 



by such men as Christopher Johnson, Francis 
Donaldson, Julian J. Chisholm, Richard McSherry, 
George Warner Miltonberger, William T. How- 
ard, Isaac E. Atkinson, Francis T. Miles and 
Samuel C. Chew. Those men and others like 
them have linked the name of the medical school 
of the University of Maryland inseparably with 
all that is efficient and brilliant in the medical 
world. It is this University's proud heritage that 
her medical school has contributed among the 
very best to a profession in which honor and self- 
sacrifice and nobility has ever stood pre-eminent." 

The invocation opening the exercises was de- 
livered by the Rev. D. Everett Lyon, pastor of 
the church. Dr. Thomas Fell, provost of the 
University, made a short introductory address, 
and Prof. S. S. Handy, of St. John's, spoke after 
Mr. Ritchie, his subject being "The College Man 
as a Leader." 

In the procession the St. John's boys, in full 
uniform, marched first and then, in order named, 
came the students of the departments of medi- 
cine, law, dentistry and pharmacy. Then fol- 
lowed the faculties of the departments in cap and 
gown, and the regents of the University, Provost 
Fell being last. 

The music was in charge of Dr. B. Merrill Hop- 
kinson, assisted by Robert L. Haslup, as organist, 
and Hobart Smock, Edgar T. Paul and John H. 
Richardson. 

Following the exercises at the church, the usual 
annual luncheon was held at the Emerson Hotel 
for the faculties of the College and University, 
the Board of Regents and invited guests. 



MEDICAL. 

An old and rare collection of books in the 
Dutch language (Nederduitsch) is deposited in 



the Library. A number of them are bound in 
vellum and are curious specimens of the book- 
binder's craft. 

The Librarian gratefully acknowledges the as- 
sistance of Mr. C. P. Andrews ('17) in trans- 
lating the title pages. Mr. Andrews is a native 
of the Transvaal, South Africa, and as that is 
now a bilingual country he has had the advantage 
of an education in Dutch and English. 

To give some idea of the time and literary 
scope of these works a few titles are appended : 

Roupp, H. W. Respiration, according to the 
new chemical process, which has been experi- 
mentally elucidated; and the use of same in ani- 
mal life. Haarlem, 1793. 

Van Jacquin, J. F. Text-book of veterinary 
chemistry. Leyden, 1794. 

Miller, Philip. Short introduction to Botany. 
The botanical classification extended and eluci- 
dated in a treatise on the reproduction of animals 
and plants. Haarlem, 1772. 

Lewis, W. Discussions on cancer, in response 
to the competition proposed in the year 1793 by 
the Society for the Advancement of Physic. 
Amsterdam, 1793. 

. A guide to the method of curing 

internal complaints which may be of service to 
medical practitioners. Leyden, 1788. 

Leurs, Willem. Discussion on the art of treat- 
ing Hernia, and the different varieties. Am- 
sterdam, 1794. 

L. M. D. M. The life of Philip, Duke of Or- 
leans, Regent of France, and the history of his 
reign during the years of Louis XV's minority. 
1787. 

Pleuck, J. J. New and easy method of adminis- 
tering mercury to patients suffering with Venus 
sickness. Utrecht, 1768. 

In addition, there are also dictionaries (Woor- 
denbolk) of the seventeenth century. 



WILLIAM J. MILLER 
Jewelry, Diamonds, Watches 

College Jewelry 
Class Pins and Rings, College Seals 
28 East Baltimore St. 



R LLERBROCK 

Slfp iGf ailing Qlalkge pipitograpI)tr 
Baltimore, Md. 22 W. Lexiflgtoii St., = Baltimore, Md. 



96 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



Mr. J. Bruce Arnold, Jr., a former student at 
the University of Maryland Medical School, who 
went to Serbia last summer to work in the Ser- 
bian Red Cross, has sent the following letter 
home: 

"Losnitza, Sept. 16, 1915. 

"Dear : At last I have arrived at my 

destination, this wonderful city. We had a two- 
day stay in Nish. We spent a week getting a 
supply of drugs and finding interpreters. We 
finally secured both, and on the day we started 
from Nish the War Department discovered that 
our interpreters were born in Austria, so we 
could not take them in the war zone. We left Nish 
without interpreters, using what German. French 
and Serbian we knew. 

"\Mien we got to the first station to change cars 
we discovered that our baggage was lost and de- 
cided to go no further without it. We met a 
Serbian in the station who spoke English. He 
was interpreter, he said, for the English 'mission,' 
and invited us to spend the night there. We went 
and discovered the English mission to be a Scot- 
tish women's hospital unit, with not a man in 
camp except the patients, cook and interpreter. 
They all seconded the invitation to stop with 
them, so we stayed. 

WOMEN .\RE THE DOCTORS. 

"The whole outfit consists of 10 tents for hos- 
pital wards, 20 men in each, and about six tents 
to live in. There were three women doctors and 
10 nurses. They are doing excellent work, wards 
are well equipped, bacteriological laboratory, etc. 

"In the afternoon six nurses, Dr. S. and my- 
self went for a horseback ride to the famous bat- 
tlefield where the Austrians were repulsed and 
30,000 prisoners were taken. It was wonderful — 
shells, caps, bones and such things all around and 
in the trenches. The same night we had a card 
party. There were Serbian officers, French offi- 
cers and the Scottish nurses and the members of 
the British ambulance corps there. We played 
progressive whist. Once I was at a table with a 
Serbian officer, a French nurse and a Russian 
nurse, and no one of these understood the lan- 
guage of the other. It was great fun. 

"Much to our surprise, our baggage turned up 

the next morning, so we proceeded to 

on a cute little pocket edition railroad, and some 



time that day got to \'alievoe. Nothing exciting 
occurred there, and the next morning we took a 
train for Obrenovatz, a small town on the Save. 
We spent the night there, and the next day drove 
to Schabatz. The road winds along the river 
Save, the northern boundarj' of Serbia, and we 
were compelled to make a two-hour detour be- 
cause of the artillery fire in one place, somewhat 
exciting, to say the least. 

HAV'OC AT SCHABATZ. 

"Finally, after a 10-hour drive, we got to Scha- 
batz. The destruction here is terrible. It is truly 
the 'deserted village,' fomierly a town of 30,000, 
now about TOO. I don't believe there are 50 
houses, unharmed by shells. The whole city is in 
ruins, resembling Baltimore's burnt district after 
the fire of 1904. It was the first place invaded by 
the Austrians. We spent the night there and at 
7 A. M. left by rail for Losnitza and got there at 
11 o'clock. Here it is the same story; over half 
the town in ruins and TOO people left of 30,000 
normal population. The town is well protected, 
though, with heavy artillery and efficient infantry. 
However, my clothes are put in order at night so 
that I can jump right into them at any moment. 
I also have handy a little kit, where I keep my 
razor, etc., with a small alcohol stove, alcohol, 
matches, tea and bouillon cubes and a heavy 
blanket. There is no telling just when it will 
come handy. Dr. S. and myself went to Krupany. 
We stayed there three days, living in the officers' 
quarters. We started off at 6 A. M. one day on 
horseback and went up into the mountains along 
the border, where the artillery and infantry are 
established. 

SOLDIERS AS SANITARY WORKERS. 

"I am going to have lots of work here. The 
Prefect of my district says it has a population of 
20,000. I have to vaccinate all against typhoid, 
typhus and cholera, and each disease requires 
three inoculations. This morning 24 patients 
called. Imagine my job with no interpreter! I 
told the commanding officers of the sanitarj- con- 
ditions here, and today have 300 soldiers cleaning 
up the town. There is enough work here to last 
a couple of years. I wrote to the Minister of the 
Interior requesting to be supplied with equipment 
for a hospital, and if he supplies it I think I shall 
stay. The ^Minister of War spoke to me about 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



97 



Blome's Chocolates ^°" ^^^^ ^°^ ''^"' ^^^^ ^^^ ^* ^°^ '''^*^ ciothes 

Known and enjoyed by students of the SuitS to Measure, $15.00 tO $35.00 

A. JACOBS & SONS, Tailors 

899 NORTH HOWARD STREET 
Open Evenings 9 P. M. Cor. Richmond St. 



University for more than half a century 

Retail Department 
BLOME'S CANDY STORE 

Established 1859 621 W. Baltimore St. 



entering the army service at the end of my time, 
but I hardly think I will, as the civil work is 
broader and I am not hampered by any military 
rank. The Serbians certainly do treat us all 
right. When traveling they all do what they can 
to help you. 

"I bought a camera in Nish from a Columbia 
man who was ready to go back. The Serbians 
will allow us to take pictures, but we cannot send 
them out of the country yet. I am waiting now 
for some films which I ordered in Athens. They 
will not allow us to take pictures of the trenches 
or the soldiers in them. In one place we wanted 
to photograph an artillery intrenchment, but were 
not allowed ; also the place is not mentionable." 



MEDICAL— GRADUATE. 



Dr. Richard Hall Johnston has been appointed 
clinical professor of bronchoscopy and esophago- 
scopy. 



Dr. James J. Carroll, class of 1893, desires to 
announce the removal of his office from the Pro- 
fessional Building to 405 North Charles street. 
His practice is limited to eye, ear, nose and throat. 
Consultation hours, 9 A. M. to 1 P. M. 



Dr. Robert B. Hill, class of 1915, one of the 
resident physicians at the University Hospital, 
who was operated on recently for appendicitis at 
the University Hospital, is up and about again. 



LAW— GRADUATE. 



Squire Leggett, ex-'lo, of live wire fame, was 
seen venturing out on the public highways and 
byways a few days ago. He reports that the real 
estate business is progressing according to Hoyle. 



"Kid" and "Sieve" McMullen, '15, of the 
grand and noble law firm of McMullen & Mc- 
Mullen, with legal lair at Cumberland, Md., paid 
a flying visit to Baltimore during the month. 



It was erroneously stated in the last number 
of the Gazette that Kanode & Lightner, '15, had 
located at the Maryland Apartments, Hagers- 
town, Md. Their fount of justice is located at 
209 Arcade Building. They merely stable their 
carcasses at the Maryland Apartments after of- 
fice hours. 



B. C. Lightner, '15, made a short visit to Balti- 
more on November 5th and attended the Phi 
Sigma Kappa smoker on Saturday night. 



LAW— SENIOR. 



At the last meeting of the 1916 class, Walter 
\'. Harrison, Chairman of the Banquet Commit- 
tee, reported that he had interrogated several 
hotel managers regarding a class banquet, and he 
submitted sample menus to the class. The date 
of thei banquet will be definitely settled later, but 
it will be some time the first week in December. 



LAW— INTERMEDIATE. 



Is Mr. Freeliquor present? 



Hats off to Mr. Ritchie, Attorney-General 
elect ! There are none more satisfied with or 
proud of the splendid victory of our own Mr. 
Ritchie in the recent election than the 1917 Law 
Class. Running far ahead of his ticket is evi- 
dence enough that "he is first in the hearts of 
his fellow men." It needed no political victory. 



98 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



Hart Schaffiier & Marx, 
Kuppenheimer, 
"Society Brand" 



The clothes that college men 
like a lot 



Baltimore Street At Cbdrlei 



however, for him to know that he was always 
first in the hearts of his students. W'e hope that 
his added dutjes will not prevent him from 
delivering his lectures on Elementary Law, for 
there could not be a greater loss to the Univer- 
sity. 



Murder will out ! 

In the sun parlor of her father's home, pretty 
Miss Virginia Randolph, famous throughout the 
country for her beauty and wit, daughter of 
Thomas Randolph, Esq., the multi-millionaire 
manufacturer of war munitions, was found un- 
conscious from loss of blood caused by a wound 
inflicted above her heart. The entire Green 
Spring Valley was deeply shocked several hours 
later by the news of her death. Loud cries of 
woe followed their first sorrowful mourning and 
this was succeeded by hysterical weeping, wailing, 
gnashing of teeth, rending of garments, heart- 
breaking lamentations and further signs of pas- 
sionate grief. The very trees and shrubbery 
shriveled and drooped from despair and morti- 
fication. 

John Doe was indicted by the Grand Jury of 
the 1917 Law Class and will be tried on Decem- 
ber 29, 1915, in the Assembly Hall of the Law 
Building. Eminent counsel will represent both 
sides. The State will prosecute through their 
most brilliant attorneys, Messrs. Silberstein and 
Murphy. Mr. Doe will be ably defended by the 
prominent criminal lawyers. Messrs. Page and 
Penn. 

This mock trial promises to be a particularly 
interesting and well conducted case and will 
be worth while attending. We respectfully urge 



the members of the class to attend and the in- 
vitation extends to their lady friends as well as 
gentlemen. 

If the gentleman who recently met Miss Millie 
at the corner of Baltimore and Sharp streets does 
not fork over his subscription to this periodical 
we shall publish his name in green and his full 
(as well as sober) portrait in vermillion in the 
next issue. 

We have turned over to the "Honor Commit- 
tee" the names of the three gentlemen who were 
matching pennies during one of the lectures on 
November 15th. The purpose of the "Honor 
Committee" will be to turn over the amount col- 
lected for deposit in the name of the writer. 



After Mr. Randall's brilliant showing in his 
case in Part 3 of the Practice Court, we would 
hesitate to write him up in this column as he 
knows too much about personal rights. 



We would certainly appreciate the installation 
of sanitary devices to prevent damage to health 
from the expectorating gymnastics of our noble 
classmates. The oflfenders tally up to about eight 
in number, and though we have been shadowing 
them for some time and have sufficient evidence 
to convict them, we are satisfied to first give this 
warning. Beware ! 



For definition of "Big Feed" see our fellow 
conspirator, C. B. Hoffman. 



Judge Sappington (pointing to a gentleman 
seated in the last row of the Dirty Dome) — 
"What's wrong with that declaration?" 

A. H. PETTING 

Manufacturer of 

GREEK LETTER FRATERNITY JEWELRY 

213 N. Liberty St., = Baltimore, Md. 
Factory: 212 Little Sharp St. 



Memorandum package sent to any fraternity member through the 
secretary of the chapter. Special designs and estimates furnished on 
medals, rings and pins for athletic meets, etc 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



99 



Student — "Didn't hear it read, sir." 
Judge S. — "I thought so. What's your name ?" 
Student — "Hooper W. Miles, sir." 
Judge Sappington — "Sixty days. Court is ad- 
journed to remove the prisoner." 



We note with superior regret the return of our 
friends, the "Peanut Fiends," to disturb our 



slumbers during lectures. 



The ordinarily sedate and dignified treasurer 
of the 1917 Law Class, our old pal Maynard, has 
chameleon-like (excuse the hyphen) taken on a 
new color. We have known him as business 
man, expert on international law, exponent and 
chairman of the Honor System, but we had to 
wait until October 19th of this memorable year 
before we found him in the uniform of the draw- 
ing room (drunk and disorderly) in the role of 
best mani to one of our sex "going like the ox to 
slaughter." We trust that this is the nearest he 
will come to meddling with the question a matri- 
monii. 



C. F. Hershfeld, Jr., during a recent lecture 
on Practice was rudely dropped from the arms 
of Morpheus upon whose breast he was so gently 
reclining and so deliciously snoring. Oh, what 
a fall there was when the mighty Hershfeld 
dropped to the floor as his tilted chair slipped 
from under him and both crashed to earth with 
a tremendous racket ! Even the lecturer could not 
refrain from remarking that "the big ones fall as 
well as the little ones," to which we add, "the 
bigger they come the harder they flop." 



HAVE YOU A FRIEND ON THE JURY? 


DENTAL— GRADUATE. 



Dr. J. R. Walker, '15, is practicing in the Ar- 
cade Building, Hagerstown, Md. He has one of 
the finest, if not the finest, dental parlors in that 
city. 



Dr. Eldridge Baskin, class of 1903, of 511 N. 
Charles street, who has been spending some time 
with friends in North Carolina, has returned. 



HEPBRON & HAYDON 

We Sell Every Law Book and Syllabus Used 
at the U. of M. 



St. Paul 8794 



1243-53 CALVERT BLDG. 



Dr. Benjamin H. Webster, 1915, paid a visit 
to the 'Varsity lately. "Ben" has been practic- 
ing in North Carolina, and is meeting with great 
success. 



DENTAL— SENIOR. 



Bacteriology Examination comes before Christ- 
mas vacation. Get busy, boys, and kill the bugs. 



"Bob" Darwin joined the senior ranks in 
November, having been detained because of ill- 
ness. 



How about the Dental Society at the Univer- 
sity? Get busy, boys, and establish something 
that will be a monument to the class of 1916. 



"Jim" wants to borrow a pair of contouring 
shears. He had a pair, but some gviy copped 
'em. Necessity is the mother of invention. 



After trying to use Ca C02, in place of plaster 
a senior found he had made an error. Moral : 
You cannot drive a nail with a sponge no matter 
how much you soak it. Wow ! 



B. R. Jones claims a blowpipe flame immersed 
in water will cause the solder to flow more easily. 
This senior class is becoming most famous for 
research work. Look out for more valuable dis- 
coveries. 



It is reported that "Freshie" Smith goes to the 
brickyard when in search of chicken. Red is a 
signal of danger — beware ! 



J. Reese Funderburk, our class president, who 
recently submitted to an operation for throat 
trouble, is out again. We are glad to have him 
with us. 




THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



Maryland. 



Many of the boys are decorated with hirsute 
adornments. We suggest that Charlie ChapHn 
open up a tonsorial parlor in the University 
neighborhood. 



We would suggest a class donation to provide 
"Charlie Chaplin" Nathanson an alarm clock. 
Perhaps "Al" studies too late? ? 



DENTAL— JUNIOR. 



At a meeting of the Junior Dental Class, held 
November 19th, it was decided to hold a banquet 
before the Christmas Holidays. 

J. Frank Manley, President of the Class, and 
Pierre J. Santoni, Chairman of the Executive 
Committee, will have the matter in charge. Mr. 
Manley has had a good deal of experience in ar- 
ranging affairs of this kind and assures the class 
that it will be a success in every way. 



DENTAL— FRESHMAN. 



The following officers have been elected for the 
Freshman year : Crown O. Diehl, president ; 
Miss Brownie L. Lewis, vice-president; Warder 
A. Hall, secretary ; Miss Ella B. Cox, treasurer. 



Dwyer has matriculated in the medical depart 
ment after having spent a few weeks with 
We wish him success. 



us. 



Tatu had his tonsils extracted November 10. 
At this writing we find him greatly improved. 



The Freshmen take this means of expressing 
the kindness, courtesy and good fellowship shown 
them by their upper classmen. Unlike most 



intercollegiate Bureau of Academic Costume, Aibany.N.Y. 
COTRELL & 



LEONARD 

Official Mal<ers of 

Caps and 

Gowns 




Correct Hoods 
for Ail Degrees. 

Rich Qowns for 
Pulpit and Bench. 

Bulletin, Samples 
etc. on request 



schools we have thus far been looked upon as 
gentlemen in contrast to the so-called rats. 



The class consists of 65 male and 3 female stu- 
dents ; one of the latter is of Porto Rican parent- 
age. From the critic's viewpoint the net has 
been cast far and deep. We refrain from calling 
them fish, although Hall can conscientiously be 
termed an amphibian from his pranks at the Y. 
M. C. A. gymnasium. 



Hutson presents a clever specimen from the 
bottom of the net. Darwin was right. 



An impersonation of Charlie Chaplin can be 
found in Rutrough. A fallen eye-brow. 



Notice- — Temple will kindly retard gas and 
sparks. Also close the cut-out. We deem this 
advisable because the proboscis may go on a 
strike. Safety first. 



Diehl will, surely get the medal for best ladies' 
man. Silence ! Watch him in the clinic. 



Freshmen seem to be painting the town red, to 
express it in the vernacular. Go easy ; the poison 
pangs of Physiology and Anatomy will soon be- 
come visible. 



'Notliing Too l^rge— Notliing Too Small " 



Baltimore City 

Printing and Binding 

Company 

352-363 Equitable Building 



» 
( 

i 

I 
i 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



101 



PHARMACY— GRADUATE. 



For the third time in its history, the American 
Pharmaceutical Association met in CaHfornia. 

In 1889 a Httle band of Easteners traveled west- 
ward and received a glorious greeting at the 
Golden Gate. 

In 1909 the Association met at Los Angeles, 
and six years later the city of San Francisco 
served as host to those who crossed the Rockies. 

There are arguments both for and against meet- 
ings at points so remote from the center of popu- 
lation. Those advocating such gatherings argue 
that the bringing of the Association into such 
sections increases and stimulates membership in 
the neighborhood of the meeting. On the other 
hand, it can be said with equal force that the long 
journey prevented the presence of some of the 
Association's oldest and most valuable members, 
men whose frequent attendance at the meetings 
mjike them particularly fitted to handle the topics 
discussed at the session. 

The Baltimore pharmacists who attended the 
convention were Dr. H. P. Hynson, Dr. J. F. 
Frances and Miss Olive B. Cole. 



Dr. James W. Watkins, class of 1913, was in 
Baltimore for a few days. 



PHARMACY— SENIOR. 



Although the last year's Junior Class was a 
fairly large one, only a small percentage of its 
members are now having the pleasure of being 
Seniors. Our class has 29 members, several of 
which are Seniors for the second time, while two 
of our number are new men who have come here 
from other colleges. They are Messrs. A. J. 
Alacan, of Havana, Cuba, and J. A. Barone, of 
Le Roy, N. Y. We heartily welcome these gen- 
tlemen to our class and hope they will enjoy their 
stay with us. 



Upon our return to the college in September 
we found new headquarters for our chemical 
laboratory work. Although the change caused 
us a little inconvenience at first we are already 



more than repaid,, for the dental laboratory 
which we now occupy is in many respects far 
better than the one we used last year. It's being 
located on the street side of the building, also 
enables us to see die "traffic" pass by — a seem- 
ingly additional feature of interest. 



On the first Monday in October we held our 
initial class meeting, at which remarkable co- 
operation was displayed in the election of our 
officers, all of which were elected unanimously 
without opposing candidates. The officers are: 

T. J. Robinson, president; W. C. Briggs, vice- 
president ; S. F. Marshall, treasurer ; W. H. 
Lloyd, secretary ; R. E. Lee, sergeant-at-arms ; 
A. H. Eise, historian ; H. P. Jones, prophet ; G. 
Karmann, editor. 

Dr. Daniel Base was chosen honorary presi- 
dent. 

Under the leadership of the elected officers 
we feel confident that a spirit of harmony will 
pervade the class during the entire year. 



Apparently chewing tobacco must be a valu- 
able synergist in the performance of laboratory 
work, judging from the number of our mem- 
bers who indulge in that deplorable habit while 
in the laboratory. We only hope that the mal- 
ady will not spread over the entire class ; for, 
in that event, just imagine our lady member 
packing about two-thirds of a sack of the weed 
into her mouth, walking about with one jaw 
three times the size of the other, and hurling 
columns of the dark juice into a cuspidor ten 
feet distant — a most esthetical sight to behold! 

We respectfully request that these degenerated 
individuals keep their pouches off the tables, 
lest the unpolluted members of the class might 
be tempted to taste of thai "delicious filth." 

It has been suggested that, instead of con- 
tributing dues to the class treasury, a fine of 
twenty-five cents for each offense be imposed 
upon those members who invariably take the 
liberty of sleeping during the lectures. Such 
fines would ultimately amount to much more 
than class dues. 

Gentlemen, the question is now open for dis- 
cussion ! 



102 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



PHARMACY— JUNIOR. 



ACADEMIC— GRADUATE. 



Owing to the delay in class organization this 
department was not represented in last month's 
issue of The Gazette. In the future we shall 
contribute our portion of the university news. 
The policy of the editor is to make this depart- 
ment truly representative of the class, and any 
items or suggestions from any member will be 
gratefully received and due credit given in these 
columns to the person rendering the service. 



The following officers were elected for the 
ensuing scholastic year : 

President, Dr. E. H. Hand, Maryland : vice- 
president, C. C. Smith, North Carolina ; secre- 
tary, Miss D. Trachtenberg, Nortli Dakbta ; treas- 
urer, S. R. Warlield, Maryland ; sergeant-at- 
arms, I. Kushner, New, York. 

At a later meeting Orange and Black were 
chosen as class colors. 



All men who entered the Department of Phar- 
macy last year and will graduate with this class 
are cordially invited to join us, and also all three 
year men who entered this year. 



Just here we extend to Mr. Lemler, of our 
class, our congratulations on having passed the 
State Board as an Assistant Pharmacist. 



The class was fortunate in electing for its 
president Dr. E. H. Hand, a man of rare execu- 
tive ability and of wide experience. At this 
early stage of the game he has already demon- 
strated his merit and with him at the helm the 
class bids fair to become one of the best in the 
history of the Department. 



Enthusiasm and class spirit prevail among 
the entire membership, each one giving his or 
her hearty support to plans under way for put- 
ting this class down in the history of the Univer- 
sity as the class that had accomplished things un- 
equalled by its predecessors. A la bon z'oyage! 



Alas ! Despite the coaching of Johnny Wilson, 
Dutch Mellon, Jack Gates, Yellow Clark and 
Robbie Welch, who prior to the game on Satur- 
day, November 20, had injected into the St. 
John's men a bulldog determination to fight and 
win the big football game with Hopkins, their 
colors were doomed to trail in the dust with a 
score of 30 to 6 in Hopkins' favor. The St. 
John's players came on the field with just the 
fight and pep that everyone knew they would 
possess, and it lasted during the entire first half, 
but the constant pounding of the heavier Hop- 
kins line was too much for them in the second 
half, and they succeeded in rolling up a score of 
30 against St. John's 6. St. John's took her de- 
feat well, proving that she is a good loser. We 
wish her better luck next year. 

After the game the St. John's Alumni held a 
smoker at the Hotel Rennert from 5 to 8 o'clock. 
Eater they attended the performance of "The 
Song of Songs" at Ford's Theatre. The: details 
of the smoker and theatre party were managed by 
Philander B. Briscoe, secretary of the Alumni 
Association, and R. H. Williams, chairman of the 
entertainment committee. 



ENGAGEMENTS. 



The engagement is announced of Alexander 
McC. Stevens, B.A., St. John's College, class of 
1907: M.D., Johns Hopkins Medical School, '11, 
to Miss Meta Goldsborough Tharp, both of 
Easton, Md. The wedding will take place the 
early part of January. Dr. Stevens is at present 
a deputy state health officer, with headquarters 
in Salisburv. Md. 



BIRTHS. 



To Dr. Louis Skinner, class of 1901, and Mrs. 
Skinner, of Grenville, N. C, October 16, 1915, 
twins — Louis Cotton, Jr., and Edward Ficklin. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



103 



MARRIAGES. 



George Bryson Girault, B.S., St. John's Col- 
lege, class of 1900, of Denton, Mont., formerly of 
Annapolis, Md., to Miss Harriet Randolph Med- 
calf, of Eewiston, Mont., at Lewiston, October 
23, 1915. Mr. and Mrs. Girault will reside at 
Denton, Mont. 



Dr. John S. B. Woolford, class of 1896, of 
Chattanooga, Tenn., formerly of Cambridge, Md., 
to Miss Eliza Leiper VVinslow, daughter of Dr. 
and Mrs., Randolph VVinslow, of 1900 Mt. Royal 
Terrace, Baltimore, Md., at Baltimore, October 
23, 1915. Dr. and Mrs. Woolford will make 
their home in Chattanooga. 



Dr. Charles Percy Noble, class of 1884, of 
Chestertown, Md., to Miss Elizabeth M. Scanlon, 
of St. David's, Pa., at Towson, Md., October 7, 
1915. 



Dr. Julian Mason Gillespie, Assistant Surgeon 
U. S. P. H. S., class of 1909, formerly stationed 
at the U. S. Marine Hospital, Louisa, Va., to 
Miss Verna Mary Duplantis, of New York City, 
at St. Patrick's Cathedral, New York, October 
12, 1915. Dr. and Mrs. Gillespie will be at home 
to their friends after November 1 at 609 West 
137th street, New York. 



DEATHS. 



James McCloskey Foreman, D.D.S., class of 
1897, of Emmittsburg, Md., died at his home, 
November 11, 1915, aged 42 years. 



John S. Ensor, LL.B., class of 1890, of Mount 
Washington, Md., was run down and killed by 
a street car on Park Heights avenue, October 
26, 1915, in an effort to go to the aid of a friend, 
aged 47 years. 



Dr. Philo Anderson Eutz, P. and S., class of 
1886, of 319 N. Paca street, formerly of Harris- 
burg, Pa., died at his home from heart trouble, 
November 12, 1915, aged 55 years. 



Dr. Lawrence Orr McCalla, College of Physi- 
cians and Surgeons, class of 1893, a retired prac- 
titioner, of Starr, S. C, was shot and killed by 
his wife's nephew, October 9, 1915, aged 52 years. 



Dr. Plarry Oliver Lightner, Baltimore Medical 
College, class of 1896, also a druggist, of Marys- 
ville. Pa., died at his home, October 5, 1915, as 
the result of a nervous breakdown, aged 43 years. 



Dr. Edmund C. Rivers, class of 1879, of 1632 
Welton street, Denver, Colo., a well-known spe- 
cialist on diseases of the eye and ear ; president of 
the board of trustees and professor of ophthal- 
mology in the Denver and Gross College of Medi- 
cine, Denver; vice-president of the board of di- 
rectors and consulting oculist to the Denver Ma- 
ternity and Woman's Hospital Association, was 
drowned while hunting in Barr Lake, near Den- 
ver, October 24, 1913, in an unsuccessful effort 
to save the negro caretaker of the club from 
drowning, aged 57 years. 



Dr. George E. Jordan, College of Physicians, 
and Surgeons, class of 1891 ; a member of the 
Medical Society of the State of North Carolina 
and a practitioner and druggist of Gibsonville, 
died at his home in that place, June 20, 1915, 
from cerebral hemorrhage, aged 56 years. 



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The Chas. Willms Surgical Instrument Co. 

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THl UNIWISSITY GAllTTI 




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VOL. II 



BALTIMORE, JANUARY, 1916. 



No. 7. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



Vol. II. 



JANUARY 1, 1916. 



No. 7. 



CONTENTS 



"LEST \\'E FORGET." Albert C. Ritchie, 

LL.B 107 

A BETTER "TERRAE ^lARIAE." Bruce 

C. Lightner, LL.B Ill 

EDITORL\LS 113 

Editorially Expressed. 

SLAMS AND SALUTES 113 



GLEE CLUB XOTES 114 

HENRY D. HARLAX LAW SOCIETY 

XOTES Ill 

ITEMS 115 

BIRTHS 133 

:\IARRIAGES 123 

DEATHS 1:33 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE, MD. 

HOX. PHILLIPS LEE GOLDSBOROUGH, Governor of Maryland, Chancellor. 
THOMAS FELL, A. M., Ph. D., L L. D., D. C. L., Provost. 

ST. JOHN'S COLLEGE, Annapolis, Md. {^^WlZV'Sc^'^Sc^s) 

Founded 1696. Classical and Scientific College Courses leading to d ;grees. Special advantages to stu- 
dents purposing to study the professions. Military Department under army officers. Also Preparatorj- 
School for boys fitting for St. John's or other colleges. Term begins Sep(:mber IS. Address 

THOMAS FELL, Ph.D., LL.D., D.C.L., President. 



DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE, UNIVERSITY 

OF MARYLAND, AND COLLEGE OF 

PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS. 

Four years' graded course. New Laboratory Build- 
ing. Clinical advantages unsurpassed. Teaching Staff 
of 187. 110th Annual Session will begin October 1, 
1916, and continue 8 months. 

^YM. F. LOCKWOOD, M. D., Dean. 



DEPARTMENT OF DENTISTRY. 

35th Annual Session begins October 1. 1916, and 
continues 7 months. 26 Instructors. New Building. 
For catalogue containing course of study, etc., apply to 

TIMOTHY O. HEATWOLE, M.D., D.D.S., Dean, 

Baltimore. Md. 



DEPARTMENT OF LAW. 

61st Annual Session will begin Sept. 28, 1916. Faculn' 
of 26. For catalogue containing full information ad- 
dress the Secretarj', 301 St. Paul Street, Baltimore, 
Maryland. 

EDWIN T. DICKERSON, Secretary. 



DEPARTMENT OF PHARM.ACY. 

(Formerly Maryland College of Pharmacy). 74th 
Annual Session begins September 25, 1916. 11 In- 
structors. New Laboratories. Address 

CHARLES CASFARI, JR., Phar.D., Dean, 

Baltimore, Md. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 





Published Monthly in the Interest of the University of Maryland. 
PRICE Sl.OU PER YEAR. 




Contributions 


solicited from Alumni of the Business Address, 608 Professional 
University. j Baltimore, Md. 


Building. 


Vol. II. 


BALTIMORE, MD., JANUARY I, 1916. 


No. 7. 



•LEST WE FORGET."^ 



By Albert C. Ritchie, LL.B., Class of 1898. 



Mr. Provost, Honorable Board of Regents and 
Gentlemen : 

I deeply appreciate the honor which has been 
conferred upon me by this opportunity to speak to 
those who have assembled here, according to an- 
nual custom, for the commemoration of the ideals 
and purposes of this great University. Yet so 
rapid has been the world's recent progress in 
every field, and so great the catastrophe of war 
which now overwhelms our friends and brothers 
beyond the sea, that the choice of a subject is 
not an easy task. 

Perhaps I can do no better than ask you to 
pause for a moment in the world's onward 
march, to step from the ranks of men toiling to 
reach varied goals and to attain honorable ambi- 
tions, and briefly survey a few of our recent 
achievements in different lines of activity. It is 
right to take stock, so to speak, of worldly ad- 
vance now and then, lest we forget what our 
fellowmen have done, and so not only fail to ap- 
praise adequately our country's progress, but also 
fail to draw an inspiration from it for ourselves. 

Take, to begin with, literature and the fine arts. 
It is true that in American literature there are no 
living writers entitled to a place beside many who 
in the past contributed so richly to the beauty, 
the strength and the eloquence of the world's 
jjrose and poetry — none, for instance, who can 
Ije compared to the great authors of the \'icto- 
rian era. Yet during the last few years we h£^'e 
presented to the world many notable figures. 

W'inston Churchill's "The Inside of the Cup'' 
is an absorbing discussion of the power of the 
Church to deal with present day problems. In his 
"A Far Country"' we have the parable of the 
Trodigal Son applied to the modern man of busi- 

*Address delivered on Academic Day at the Univer- 
sity of Maryland, November 11, 191p. 



iiess. Henry Sydnor Harrison portrays the fem- 
inist movement in ''Angela's Business," and jour- 
nalism and politics in "Queed.'' Booth Tarking- 
ton in "Monsieur Beaucaire," "The Gentleman 
from Indiana" and "Penrod" give us a story of 
the imagination, a story of American politics and 
the ever fascinating story of the American boy. 
Lily Bart, in Edith Wharton's "House of Mirth," 
is one of the absorbing characters in modern 
prose. William Thayer ranks high as an histo- 
rian and biographer. William D. Howells, the 
dean of American literature, has practically com- 
pleted his work. 

Nothing could be more original and fascinating 
than Edgar Lee Master's "Spoon River Anthol- 
ogy," nothing more charming than the poems of 
Bliss Carman, or than William Vaughan Moody's 
poetry of the west ; nothing more forceful as a 
portrayal of the dignity of labor than Edwin 
Markhanvs "The Man With The Hoe.'' 

In the field of Art, America during recent years 
has given the world Sargeant's Prophets of the 
Old Testament, Abbey's Life of Sir Galahad and 
John Alexander's diversified mural paintings, as 
well as a wealth of portraits by all three. We 
have contributed the works of women like Ce- 
celia Beaux and Mary Cassatt. Irving Couse 
has pictured the stirring events of Indian life, 
as has Remington in his illustrations. Baltimore 
City alone claims Ephraim Keyser, Hans Schuler 
and Edward Berge, three of the world's famous 
sculptors. 

How great indeed is the inspirational power of 
beauty as portrayed by artists such as those ! 
Perhaps the purpose of most of us is to be prac- 
tical, but the dreams and the visions of today 
are often the realities of tomorrow, and art, 
which is the concrete expression of imagination 
and emotion, not only contributes to the joy of life 
when the practical has been mastered, but teaches 
VI- a healthy unwillingness to accept the estab- 



108 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



lished order of things, which has done so much 
for the upward march of the race. 

Our own University was formed for the promo- 
tion of the Arts as well as for its other objects. 
Columbia University this year oflfers a complete 
course upon the history of the fine arts, as well 
Architecture, Ornament and the Decora- 
live Arts. If it be impracticable for us to aspire 
so high, at least it may be our hope and aim to 
commemorate, through mural paintings and de- 
signs, for the inspiration of our students and of 
posterity, some of the great events in law and 
medicine which have shed lustre upon the history 
of our State. 

Music, like art, cultivates the graces which 
sweeten life. The countries of the Old World 
have always realized this, and the lack of musical 
culture has long been one of the short comings of 
American character. Our conservatories and 
schools of music, like the Peabody in Baltimore, 
are now doing much to remedy this. So. of 
course, are all our wonderful Symphony Orches- 
tras, endowed by great benefactors like Higgin- 
son and Flagler. 

The growing custom of open air military band 
concerts in public parks and squares, at which 
the attendance frequently reaches 10,000 or more 
at a single concert, is helping to make the poor 
man a better citizen. During recent years Chairs 
of Music have been estabhshed, with both elemen- 
tary and advanced courses, at our leading Uni- 
versities, such as Yale, Harvard, Columbia, Cor- 
nell, Pennsylvania and Leland Stanford 

We have our great composers, too — Victor 
Herbert and his American Indian legend "Na- 
toma;" Chadwick and McDowell with their sym- 
phonies and orchestral music, and Reginald de 
Koven's "Robin Hood" and "Erminie." 

All this is as it should be. For the love of 
rhythm and melody is innate in almost every hu- 
man breast. As Sidney Lanier said, "the two es- 
sentials of a home, given the raw materials, to- 
wit : wife, children, a house and a friend or two, 
are a good fire and good music." There is no 
reason why the appreciation of music should be 
as it usually is, emotional only. Music is a 
science, founded on definite rules and standards, 
which must be taught to be known, and it is only 
when they are known that man attains the deep 



and broad appreciation and understanding of mu- 
sic which so often in the past has swayed human 
actions and emotions and guided human history. 
Recent developments in the field of science are 
almost too well known to require comment. The 
conquest of the air and wireless telegraphy are, 
c f course, examples. It is a noteworthy fact that 
many of the most remarkable discoveries have 
been made in the laboratories and research de- 
partments which the commercial corporations of 
the present day have established for the study and 
investigation of scientific problems and theories. 

On the morning of October 21, 1915, not many 
months after the establishment of commercial tel- 
ephone service between New York and San Fran- 
cisco, the world was astonished with the knowl- 
edge that wireless telephonic communication had 
been made between Arlington, Virginia, and the 
Eififel Tower in Paris, a distance of 3,800 miles, 
and that the conversation had been heard in Hon- 
olulu, 4,900 miles from Arhngton, and 8,700 miles 
from Paris. This was rendered possible by the 
practical application of principles long recognized 
in the field of theoretical physics, and perfected 
for purely scientific purposes in the laboratories 
of the General Electric Company at Schenectady. 

For centuries the manufacture of objects which, 
like porcelain and steel, require extremely high 
temperatures, has been made difficult by the ina- 
bility to repeat the exact conditions necessary for 
successful manufacture. Recent laboratory inves- 
tigations into the laws under which hot bodies 
radiate heat have resulted in the discovery of 
methods for the measurement of temperatures, 
no matter how high, so that the temperature of 
a blazing furnace can now be measured with 
practically the same accuracy as the temperature 
of water or of the body. By the same methods 
we can now learn the temperature of the sun. 

Among the more important contributions in the 
field of Chemistry may be mentioned Thomson's 
demonstration of the complex nature of even the 
simplest atom; the wonders of radio-chemistry, 
and the conception of Madame Curie and Sir 
Ernest Rutherford of the unstable atom. 

The greatest practical subject in chemistry to- 
day is that of the fixation of atmospheric nitro- 
gen, because the nitrogen which is essential to all 
animal and plant life, and which must come from 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



109 



the soil, must find its way back to the soil, else 
ib.e fertility of the ground will fail and ultimately 
we would face starvation. 

Only a few years ago Sir William Crookes 
spoke of this problem as '"one of the greatest dis- 
coveries awaiting the ingenuity of chemists." Dr. 
Remsen has recently pointed out how chemists 
have solved that problem by causing the nitrogen 
in the air to combine with other substances, and 
thus form compounds of nitrogen which can 
be used for fertilizing the soil, and in the manu- 
facture of explosives. 

In thunderstorms the electric discharges cause 
the nitrogen and the oxygen of the air to unite 
to a slight extent and form compounds which dis- 
solve in water, and which are deposited by the 
rain upon the earth. Man now imitates in the fac- 
tory what thus takes place in the thunderstorm, 
and as a result ways have been found to make 
compounds of nitrogen in any desired quantity. 

The founders of the Maryland College of Phar- 
macy, Thompson and Sharp and Cochrane and 
Stewart, could not have dreamed, when they be- 
gan instruction in 1841, of the developments de- 
stined to take place in the field of pharmacy since 
the merger of the College thev organized with 
the University of Maryland in 1904. 

Pharmacy has made equal progress with that of 
the more exact sciences, such as chemistry, 
physics, microscopy, botany and bacteriology, the 
learning of all of which it applies practically. Re- 
cent years have witnessed the better identification 
of medicinal plants through a closer botanical ac- 
quaintance with the plant cells, and also the stand- 
ardization of drugs, so that the manufacturing 
pharmacist may now present to the medical pro- 
fession drugs of ascertained value and of definite 
and uniform activity, which no longer are subject 
to the considerable variations in these particu- 
l,-..rs which were unavoidable a few decades ago. 

The years which have elapsed since Dr. Horace 
II. Hayden delivered his lectures upon dentistry, 
first in his offices at night with no light but the tal- 
low candle, and later at this University in 1837, 
have been marked by no discoveries of greater 
benefit to the human race than those, which dur- 
iiig recent years, show how many of the ills to 
which the human body is subject, the causes of 
which were either unknown or obscure, really owe 



their origin to the condition of the teeth, so that 
their treatment and cure lies in the field of den- 
tistry. This has led to the establishment of den- 
tal clinics in many of the hospitals of the country. 

Barrett's recent discovery of the organism re- 
sponsible for Rigg's disease, and the treatment of 
the disease bv Emetine, marks the most far-reach- 
ing advance in the science of dentistry for years. 

The Forsyth Dental Infirmary of Boston, dedi- 
cated last November, with an endowment of ap- 
proximately $3,000,000, is the finest institution of 
its kind in the world, and that, together with the 
Dental Infirmary in Rochester, endowed to the 
amount of approximately $1,200,000 by Mr. 
George Eastman and Mr. William Rausch, consti- 
tute two of the most recent and most splendid con- 
tributions to the study and treatment of dentistry. 

At the present time a group of prominent den- 
tists are engaged in research work, for which 
purpose a fund of $50,000 has been placed at 
their disposal, and the benefit of their labors will 
shortly be given to the world. 

Recent economic, industrial and political devel- 
opments have almost revolutionized the practice 
of law from what it was in the days of our fathers. 
The American government has always been a 
government of lawyers. Twenty-two of the twen- 
ty-seven Presidents of the United States have 
been lawyers. Congress and the State Legisla- 
tures have been dominated by members of the 
legal profession. The leaders of reform and of 
fights for popular liberty have nearly all been 
drawn from the ranks of the Bar. 

The reason for this lies largely in the training 
and in the public opportunities which the lawyer 
has, but no matter what the reason, the fact is 
undeniable, and it constitutes the tradition which, 
above all others, has made the profession of the 
law a splendid one, and has enshrined it upon 
the heights to which Mansfield, Erskine, Holt, 
Ellesmere, James Otis, Patrick Henry, Story and 
John Marshall raised it. It is for the lawyer 
of today and of the future to see that commer- 
cialism and less noble ideals do naught to cloud 
that heritage, naught to dim or tarnish the bright- 
ness of it. 

We must not forget that the lawyer of the fu- 
ture, if he would meet the responsibility which 
the past has handed down to him, must not be out 



110 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



of sympathy with what may be called the modern 
movement in democracy, the modern theory of so- 
cial, justice and of human rights. Trained as we 
are in adherence to precedent, we must not for- 
get that ah law is a growth, and must mould itself 
in a proper degree, to the spirit and policy and be- 
liefs of the times. 

Great questions like the restrictions which the 
economic needs of the man, woman and child 
worker places upon the freedom of contract, like 
strictly representative forms of government com- 
pared with the direct participation in government 
by the people, like the rights of private property, 
when, as in the case of conservation, they conflict 
with the interests of the whole people — great 
c|uestions like those can never be solved rightlv, 
by the application of precedents or principles 
born in other days and of other times and other 
conditions. 

The Law School of this University, honored by 
the traditions of nearly a century, and standing 
now in the midst of the radiance which falls 
upon it from the memories of men such as Hplif- 
man, Latrobe, Marshall, Wallis, Phelps, Carter 
and iPoe, will always have its high place in the 
State of Maryland, as the producer of practical 
lawyers, taught by practising lawyers and by 
judges. The Schoors efficiencv would doubtless 
be increased bv the addition to the Faculty of sev- 
eral full-time Professors. But whether that be 
practicable or not, may her aims and ideals never 
fall short of the days 

"When law had her seat in the bosom of justice 
And her voice was the harmony of the world." 

Time will not permit even a general survey of 
the wonders which the last few years of medical 
research offer for the future — such, for example, 
as Crile's anoci-association and as Abel's discov- 
ery for the removal of impurities from the blood. 
But perhaps a few words with reference to the 
Medical School of the University of Maryland 
may be appropriate. 

It is a far call back to the time, over a century 
ago, when a small building, which Dr. John B. 
Davidge had erected on Liberty street near Sar- 
atoga, for anatomical purposes, was destroyed by 
a crowd of indignant Baltimoreans because of the 
then general prejudice against dissection. Strange 



also is it to recall today that when the Legislature 
of 1807 was passing the Charter of The College 
of ]\Iedicine of Maryland, one of the Legislators 
discovered that the Act did not credit three of 
the Six Faculty Members named with the degree 
of Doctor of Medicine, and on inquiring as to the 
cause of this, and learning that it was due to the 
fact that none of these three had ever grad- 
uated, he nevertheless moved that the degree be 
given them anyhow by the Legislature, which 
was unanimousl}' done. 

Since that time men such as John B. Davidge 
and Nathan R. Smith have been succeeded by 
men such as Christopher Johnston, Francis Don- 
aldson, Julian J. Chisholm, Richard McSherry, 
George Warner Miltenberger, William T. How- 
ard, Isaac E. Atkinson, Francis T. Miles and 
Samuel C. Chew. Those men and others like 
them have linked the name of the Medical School 
of the University of Maryland inseparably with 
all that is efficient and brilliant in the medical 
\\orld. It is this University's proud heritage that 
her Medical School has contributed among the 
very best to a profession in which honor and self- 
sacrifice and nobility have ever stood pre-eminent. 

There must be no retrogression in the field of 
our medical activities. Indeed, there is every 
need today for their enlargement. Ten )'ears ago 
there were 1G5 medical schools in the United 
States. Now there are 93. Ten years ago there 
were nine medical schools in Baltimore City. Now 
there are two. In Maryland 200 interneships are 
required each year to take care of the sick in our 
hospitals, and in June, 1915, owing to the ad- 
' vanced requirements for medical education, only 
154 men graduated — not even enough to man our 
own hospitals. 

The Medical School of this University occu- 
pies a most important and unique position in our 
body politic, through the facilities it offers for the 
thorough training of general practitioners. Full 
opportunities are afforded those graduates who 
wish to specialize to do so, but primarily the 
School aims to contribute to the world the well 
equipped Family Doctor so essential to every ru- 
ral or urban community. 

The School is able to do this not only because 
of the ability, standing, experience and industry 
of a splendid board of instructors, but also be- 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



,ii; 



cause of clinical advantages as great if not greater 
than are available at any other University in 
America. 

Since the consolidation of the University of 
Maryland Medical School, the School of Physi- 
cians and Surgeons and the Baltimore Medical 
College, the student has access to 4,500 beds 
where medical, surgical and mental cases are 
cared for in the three controlled general hospitals, 
one affiliated general hospital and eight special 
hospitals. The Johns Hopkins Hospital has a to- 
tal of, only 400 beds. In the dispensaries of the 
three controlled hospitals alone there were last 
year 08,000 visits made by patients. 

The pre-eminent advantage which all this gives 
for clinical work is apparent and cannot be over- 
estimated. It affords an almost unparalleled op- 
portunity for educating and training the student 
in every phase of medical w^ork and practice 
which is necessary to make him an experienced 
and thoroughly efficient practitioner. That is the 
kind of man our University has in the past sent 
forth, and the kind of man she will continue to 
send forth, to minister to the ills of humanity, to 
brighten and sweeten the burdens of life, and 
to make the world a healthier, purer and happier 
i;lace for us all. 

The University of Maryland and her graduates 
have happily done their full share and played well 
an honored part in all this wonderful progress of 
the world during the last few years. The Uni- 
versity must now continue, as the march moves 
onward, to play equally as full a share and to 
take equally as honored a part. Thus may the 
glories of her past be linked with the glories of her 
future, and 

"So shall we glide down to the sea 
Of fathomless eternity." 



A BETTER "TERR.4E MARIAE." 



By Bruce C. Lightner, Law, 1915. 



In view of the disaster attached to the last vol- 
ume of "Terrae Mariae," would it not be advis- 
able to make some changes before the 1916 issue 
goes to press? 



It has always been the custom for the students 
to have complete control of all xnatters pertaining 
to this publication. The faculty has had no su- 
pervision whatever. This was due to two reasons. 
First, because it is a student publication, and as 
such, should be run by the students." Second, 
probably because the faculty failed to tajce the 
proper amount of interest in it. 

The 1915 "Terrae Mariae" will long remain in 
the minds of the students. The former price 
of live dollars was raised to nine dollars. Every- 
one expected to receive a much better annual, 
but instead, the book was a joke. The articles 
were very poor, and the mis-spelled words, and 
grammatical .blunders showed clearly that much 
of it had never been proof-read. 

The "Terrae Mariae" is one of the best.adver- 
tising mediums of the University of .A'laryland. 
The old students take the book with them when 
they go home in the spring. Many prospective 
students see it, and their opinion of the Univer- 
sity and its student life is governed accordingly. 
A good edition will naturally tend to interest a 
young man in the University. It will be a great 
factor in enrolling him as a student. 

Therefore, the faculty should take more .inter- 
est in the "Terrae Mariae." They should' ap- 
point a professor to supervise the articles which 
the various class editors submit. One of the pro- 
fessors should also supervise the receipts and ex- 
penses, and thus prevent a repetition of last year's 
disgrace. 

The students do not object to paying nine d.pl- 
lars for the book, provided they get their money's 
worth. They want a representative year book ; 
one that will be-a credit to the school. ... , 

Most of the class editors have been 'elected. 
Now is the time to get busy. Don't wait until 
April or May to get your material, as was 'the 
case last year. ■ 

We have by far the largest student body of 
any college in the state. Let us have a year Ijook 
that will compare favorably with that of any 
college in the country. This can only be done by 
the hearty co-operation of the faculty arid ^tu- 
dents. •- 



11;; 



UN1\ERSITY GAZETTE. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 

A MONTHLY JOURNAL 

Devoted to the interests of the University 

of Maryland. 

Subscription Price, $1.00 Per Annum, In Advance 

Reprints Furnished At Cost 

Advertising Rates Submitted Upon Request. 

608 Professional Building 

BALTIMORE, MD. 

Editorial Board. 

J. BEN ROBINSON, D.D.S Editor-in-Chief. 

NATHAN WINSLOW, M.D Business Mauiigei. 

Graduate Members. 

THOMAS FELL, LL.D Academic. 

H. M. ROBINSON, M.D Medical. 

ALBERT H. CARROLL, M.D Medical. 

JAMES M. HEPBRON Law. 

SAMUEL WANT, LL. B Law. 

A. A. SONNENBURG, Phar.D Pharmacy. 

J. M. BRANSKY, Phar.D Pharmacy. 

M. E. SULLIVAN, R.N Nursing. 

A. B. MAKOVER, Law '17 Undergraduate Editor. 

Undergraduate Members. 

F. C. MARINO, '16; C. O. WOLF, 

'17 Medicine 

A. Z. ALDRIDGE, '16; E. B. LAN- 
CASTER, '17; CHARLES F. 
SMITH, '18 Dental. 

JOHN McN. HOLMES, '16; DAVE 
LOWENSTEIN, JR., '17 Law. 

GEORGE KARMANN, '16; C. COL- 
LIER SMITH, '17 Pharmacy. 

J. E. EVANS, '16 Y. M. C.A. 

JANUARY 1, 1916. 

EDITORIALLY EXPRESSED. 



Like a thunderbolt from a clear sky comes 
the intelligence that one of the University's best 
friends has fallen bv the wayside. One who has 
labored most earnestly and unceasingly for the 
uplift of the student body has sunk to the lowest 
plane of depravity through practices so loathsome 
that self respect abhors even the thought. 
Through recent years he has been laboring for 
civic righteousness and the suppression of vice 
only to come back submerged in the slough of 
unrighteousness by the weight of an unspeakable 
vice. 

We do not condone the act nor excuse the man, 
but we do argue that in the light of the good that 
he had done, of the acts of friendship he so often 



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way, the most important clothing 
invention of the decade ! 

These suits are sold exclusively by 

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Balto. and Liberty Sts. 




performed, gratitude should have tempered the 
action of the student who so fiendishly pro- 
claimed his downfall and of the Y. M. C. A. 
officials who so quickly gave to the public through 
the papers verification of student accusation. If 
it were the one individual, the man alone, who 
might be concerned, then the scathing condem- 
nation of his associates, the quick denunciation by 
his church peers, the jeering of his student friends 
would pass unquestioned. But the fall of the 
house has carried with it the embellishments of 
the home, has ruined other lives, and forever 
blasted hopes of innocent ones. A most accomp- 
lished and lovable wife is heart broken and 
prostrated to the earth, a brilliant daughter's 
future has been blackened, the publicity has 
embarrassed a most conscientious and devoted 
congregation, a feeling of doubt has been intro- 
duced into the student-mind, and the enemies of 
right living have been presented with argument 
lor self defense. 

That it was imperative that the offender should 
go is not denied ; that he should have been re- 
moved from his high place for the protection of 
the virtues which the church claims to possess and 
protect is not questioned, but that the student 
who for a season has enjoyed the hospitality of the 
clnirch and its organizations should so promiscu- 
ously retail scandal and that the Y. AI. C. A. 
should publicly expose the case to their own 
detriment makes one feel that there is more honor 
among thieves. Every man who knew the of- 
fender has been damaged in proportion to the 
extent of his former faith in the individual. The 
revelation that one so apparently pious was in 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



113 



reality a base character tends to force the young 
man to doubt mankind generally, and such a state 
of mind is unwholesome and reacts against the 
general uplift. Publicity and scandal are most 
damaging exercises and we should be very careful 
how we respond to the temptation to play with 
our fellows' faults. 

Let us forget the debasing act and remember 
the man for what he did as an exponent of good. 
Let us only remember that he was a friend to the 
student and that his motive was sincere and not 
sinister. Let us remember that our needs were 
liis first thought and our dilemmas his problems. 
Let us support his church, support the stand he 
and his co-workers have taken for right living, 
support his proposed ideals for student life and 
uplift, and only remember that "He saved others 
but himself he could not save." 



Tables reserved for ladies Open all night 

SPECIAL RATES TO STUDENTS 



AT 



When we assumed the editorship of the G.v- 
ZETTE we called the attention of the student to the 
opportunity the paper affords for the young men 
to assist in creating higher ideals for the student 
and for the University. Last March we pro- 
posed changes and introduced features of interest 
to the student, making the paper beneficial to 
him and yet retaining the support of the Alumni 
Association. Our editorials have, in the main, 
been devoted to student problems and have aimed 
to encourage and help. We have, through these 
columns, solicited student support and at the same 
time done personal work to secure patronage. 
Again we make the appeal for the young men to 
come in and assist. If the student lacks interest 
and rejects proffered opportunities we must lose 
spirit and ultimately leave the task to a more 
constructive and more efficient executive head. 

Xo man has ever launched a noble enterprise 
and enjoyed success who has placed himself and 
gratification of personal ambition above the ser- 
vice his action may render his fellov^'s. Selfish- 
ness is the deadly enemv of real service and at 
the same time it robs the individual of the true 
subjective pleasure he may feel at having done 
liis work well. If a work is undertaken with the 
first thought to attract the public for popular 
applause, the individual should step down and 



The Imperial Lunch Room 

526 W .Baltimore St. 

Phone St, Paul 8478 Baltimore, Md. 



push in the one who, though capable and 
interested, remains in the background because 
honors are not sought. Envy and spitefulness 
are not elements of the true gentleman nor does 
the satisfaction of ambition mean success. "If 
thine eye offend thee, pluck it out." 

o 

The beginning of a new year carries with it the 
atmosphere and indeed the reality of a new life. 
With the coming of 1916 there stretches before 
us a span of time that will be spent by us in 
performing acts which will reflect our ideals and 
more fully establish character. In this lies the 
value of the New Year's resolution. The future 
has much in store for us, and we as pilots of our 
own lives can steer our course to the desired 
point. We should cultivate high thoughts, high 
hopes, high aims, and a resolution to attain the 
pinnacle of a laudable ambition. To the observer 
we may have done our best, we may have grasped 
every opportunity, we may have qualified to the 
letter of the law, but each one of us can review 
our past year and see our many failures which a 
firmer grip would have turned into success. Let 
us resolve that as the opportunities of the new year 
come to us we will more diligently and zealously 
perform our tasks looking to and laboring for a 
fuller compensation. 

o 

SLAMS AND SALUTES. 



YIDDISH OR IRISH? 



The first Lord Baltimore took his title from a 
little Irish seaport near Cork. What was the 
original signification of the word was long a 
matter of dispute : but modern scholars are almost 
all pretty well agreed on this question. As is 
by no means unusual, Science espoused the com- 
monplace, rejecting a theory that would charm 
fancy-loving Romance. This theory was, in 



114 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



short, that "Baltimore" meant "Great Baal's 
Temple." 

By a strange coincidence there is a place in 
Palestine named Baal-tamar. Pronounced rapid- 
ly, this word displays a striking similarity to 
Baltimore, and we might produce a strong case 
for the Baal theory if we could establish an 
ancient connection between these remote places. 
The scholars of the last generation thought the}' 
had done this when they found in the tin mines 
of Cornwall shafts and workings of known 
antiquity. These were attributed to the Jews or 
the Phoenicians and seemed to corroborate the 
persistent tradition that the Phoenicians made 
voyages to Britain for tin. Substantial evidence 
is, however, lacking, so we must attribute these 
workings to the native Briton or to his energetic 
cousin, the Gaul. Finally, "Baal-tamar" signifies 
"Sanctuary of the Palm,'' and has no connection 
with the god ; so our romantic theory is rendered 
untenable, and we must pass on to something- 
more probable. 

The prefix "Bal" or "Bally,'' so frequently met 
in Irish topography, has been proved by recent 
philology to be cognate with the Sanscrit "palli" 
(Greek " ttoXk " ; Norse "bol"), which means 
town or place. The second syllable "ti" is said 
to be merely intensive ; and, as the last syllable 
almost certainly has a meaning nearly akin to the 
English, the signification of the whole word would 
be "the great town." 

Had our forefathers been aware of this, thev 



STYLISH and COMFORTABLE 
FOOT-WEAR 

FOR THE 

UNIVERSITY MAN 

All Leathers — Expert Fitting 
Moderate Prices 

WYMAN 

19 W. LEXINGTON STEET 



would doubtless have paused before giving such 
an epithet to their rude settlement in the wilder- 
ness ; yet they could have searched far for a name 
more truly auspicious. 



Glee Club Notes. 



We wish to correct a typographical error in 
Ic'.st month's issue, under General Items. W. 
Lester Baldwin, of the Law Department, was 
elected President of the Glee Club instead of 
\'ice-President. Everett L. Bishop, of the Medi- 
cal Department, was elected Vice-President. 



Fifteen 'l(i Law men were present at the last 
rehearsal of the University Glee Club. Two 
quartets have already been formed from one 
department. The "Senior Law Quartet" is J. D. 
Armstrong, first tenor; E. E. Oldhauser, second 
tenor; J. A. Farley, barytone and W. L. Baldwin, 
basso. The new quartet, which has not yet been 
given a name by its members, consists of W. C. 
House, first tenor ; E. L. G. Wright, second tenor ; 
A. W. Pardew, barytone and D. E. Smith, basso. 
These men are very enthusiastic over the Glee 
Club work and have done a great deal toward 
keeping things livelv about the law building. 



HEXRV D. HARLAN LAW SOCIETY 
NOTES. 



The last month of the old year has seen better 
attendance at the meetings of this society than 
ever before. The discussions have been livelier 
and have seemed more interesting. 

The Impromptu Speaking Contest, which has 
been so ably conducted by President Holmes's 
committee consisting of Messrs. J. D. Armstrong 
(chairman), Herbert Lev\- and J. W. Edel, came 
In a close the first meeting night in December, 
viz. December .3rd. Messrs. Allen, Baldwin, 
Cooper and Pardew were chosen by the committee 
as the four best impromptu speakers. The final 
contest, to decide upon the best speaker, will be 
held later. 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



115 



Dance. 
On Wednesday evening, December 1.5th, 1915, 
the society held a dance at the Garrison Country 
Ckib — which turned out to be a great success. 
The large ball room of the famous club was 
handsomely decorated with plants and ferns while 
the walls were bedecked with numerous banners 
and pennants. Many friends of the society were 
present and every one of the forty or more 
couples (even those who did not "trip the light 
fantastic out") had the time of his life. The 
committee, and President John McN. Holmes, are 
to be congratulated upon the huge success of the 
Society's first social attempt. 



Mock Trial. 

W^. V. {I'Viusome Viola) Harrison . 
vs. 
Wm. F. Russell, JR- 

In the Mock Tri^l Court 

of the 

Henry D. Harlan Lazv Society. 

Twenty-three cents as a balm for wounded 
affections ! ! This was the verdict returned in 
the above entitled cause, by a very eminent jury, 
after being confined until eleven o'clock Saturday 
night, December ISth, 1915, with neither food nor 
drink by order of Court. The trial was begun 
at 8 o'clock in the large law lecture room of the 
University, with former Judge Harlan in the 
chair. A large audience of ladies and gentlemen 
filled the "Courtroom" to its capacity. Walter 
\''. Harrison, of the 1916 Law Class, who appeared 
in the role and feminine costume of the plaintiff, 
was seeking balm for her blighted affections. 
Wm. F. Russell, Jr., otherwise known in the 
trial as "Gunpowder" (owing to the alleged 
spontaniety of his affections) was the defendant. 

Attorneys for the defense were Gerald F. Kopp 



and Edward E. G. Wright ; for the plaintiff, 
1. William Schimmel and Dudley G. Cooper. 
Witnesses for both sides caused much merriment 
in the crowded "Courtroom," especially when the 
"little brother" of the plaintiff, crowned by a 
golden wig, told how he was under the sofa when 
the alleged proposal was made. The bailiff was 
kept busy shouting for "silence in the Courtroom" 
throughout the entire trial. 

Among the jurors were the following mem- 
bers of the law faculty : G. Ridgely Sappington 
(foreman), James U. Dennis, Charles McH. 
Howard, Arthur L. Jackson and Forrest Bramble. 

Witnesses were J. D. Armstrong, plaintiff's 
father ( ?) ; H. A. Waldkoenig, plaintiff's little 
brother ( ?) ; E. E. Oldhauser, rejected lover; and 
W. M. Lythe, dancing fiend. 

The court officers were J. W. Edel, clerk ; Jacob 
Kartman, bailiff, and Irwin J. Sullivan, stenog- 
rapher. 

W. Lester Baldwin, chairman of the mock trial 
committee, was very ably assisted by Mr. Frank 
J. Sayler, who was chairman of this committee 
last vear. 



ITEMS. 
MEDICAL— GRADUATE. 



Dr. Salvatore Demarco, class of 1900, of 1004 
Linden avenue, who was operated on recently at 
the University Hospital, for appendicitis, is re- 
covering rapidly, and is now out of danger. 



Dr. Louis A. Btiie, class of 1915 has resigned 
his position of resident at the University Hospital, 
and accepted the position of resident at Kernan's 
Hospital. 



Dr. Edwin P. Kolb, class of 1912, who is located 
in the Adirondacks in the neighborhood of the 
sanitarium, stopped at the University Hospital on 
his way home for the Christmas holidays. 



WILLIAM J. MILLER 

Jewelery, Diamonds, Watches 

College Jewelry 
Class Pins and Rings, College Seals 

28 East Baltimore St. uaitiiiioi. , M.I. 22 W. LexingtoH St., = Baltimore, Md. 



R LLERBROCK 



116 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



We are glad to learn that Dr. Thomas A. Ashby 
who has been sick at his home is improving. 

Dr. R. Gerard Willse, class of 1909, who has 
been on a hunting trip on Eastern Shore, has 
returned. 



Dr. Joseph W. Holland, class of 1896, will leave 
shortly for a trip through the West. He will 
visit the Mayo Clinics in Rochester, Minn., and 
also clinics at Chicago and Cleveland. 



At the last meeting of the American College of 
Surgeons, which was held October 29, 1915, the 
following graduates from the combined medical 
school of the University of Maryland were ad- 
mitted as Fellows 
Drs. Edgar G. Ballenger, U. of M., class of 1901, 

of Atlanta, Ga. 
Andrew J. Crowell, U. of M., class of 1893, of 

Charlotte, N. C. 
Howard E. Ashbury, U. of M., class of 1903. 
Charles F. Blake, U. of M., class of 1905. 
Eugene FI. Hayward, B. M. C, class of 1901. 
Francis J. Kirby, U. of M., class of 1892. 
G. Milton Linthicum, P. & S., class of 1893. 
James C. Lumpkin, B. M. C, class of 1898. 
Frank S. Lynn, U. of M., class of 1907. 
Samuel K. Merrick,, U. of M., class of 1872. 
Wm. B. Perry, B. M. C, class of 1889. 
Anton G. Rytina, U. of M., class or 1905, all of 

Baltimore, Md. 



The annual oyster roast of the adjunct faculty 
of the University of jNIaryland and Physicians 
and Surgeons was held at the Schlipper's Pickel 
Factory, Ridgely near Cross Streets, on the 
evening of December 9th, 1915. 

This oyster roast has been an annual custom 
of the College of Physicians and Surgeons' 
portion of our faculty for several years and is an 
occasion always looked forward to with pleasure, 
as the committee not only serves up an excellent 
menu, but it brings into intimate social contact 
the various members of the faculty, and generates 
a spirit, which is helpful to the institution, and 
at the same time affords an evening of relaxation 
and enjoyment to many of our busy faculty. 



A large representation from the Physicians and 
Surgeons' portion of our faculty was present, 
but it was a universal regret that more of the 
University of Maryland contingent did not grace 
tiie occasion bv their presence. However, the 
committee feels that the half dozen of the latter 
representatives will serve as active emissaries in 
causing a much greater attendance at the next 
meeting, by reciting the fineness of the repast 
and the excellent opportunity for relaxation and 
enjoyment. 

The menu consisted of oysters, ordered direct 
from Tangier's Sound, served in most every fash- 
ion, pig tails and sour krout, beer direct from the 
keg, and for the more temperate and fastidious 
soft drinks and real coffee. 

Entertainment was offered by the singing of 
the Schnitzelbank, in which all heartily joined. 
InU special mention should be made of the lusti- 
ness with which Dr. Edgar B. Friedenwald sang 
his part. The Salaamander was also sung under 
the able direction of Dr. C. E. Bracks The 
feature of the entertainment was the excellent 
rendition by Dr. C. E. Brack, of the Chariot Race, 
on a piano, which was well ripe with age. The 
force with which Dr. Brack hammered his theme 
was much commented upon by all those present. 

The committee consisted of Drs. W. \\". 
Requardt, C. E. Brack, and A. C. Rytina. 



LAW— GRADUATE. 



.Mr. .\lfred Thomas Edel, LL.B., class of 1915, 
is associated with Mr. George C. Thomas, and is 
located at 1313-1314 Fidelity Building, Baltimore, 
Md. He came to see us recentlv. 



Mr. John T. Tucker, LL.B., class of 1915, is 
located at 222 Law Building, City. 



We are disgusted to learn that Abe Rosenthal, 
'15, attache to Mr. Samuel Want, has one hun- 
dred and three clients on his staff. Abe admits 
it himself. Fie will long be remembered as the 
author of those sweet words in "Terrae Mariae" 
in reference to coy, little "Becky" Fax. in which 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



117 



he said, "To know him is to love him." Oh ! 
Yea. Oh ! Yea. 

Late reports from Lancaster, Pa., state that 
an ill wind (accent on the "wind") has descended 
upon that fair city. "Jiggs" O'Donohue, ex-'lo, 
sometimes called "Dinny," arrived with much 
pomp and splendor, after making life miserable 
for the train butcher for several hours. He at 
once proceeded to kid the cab drivers at the sta- 
tion, gave the girls on King street an exhibition 
of how English clothes are being worn in best 
circles this year, and completely demoralized the 
town with his stage jokes, which he used to re- 
hearse during lectures. 

During the Thanksgiving vacation a Gazetti; 
reporter ran into Chas. Zimmerman, ex-'15, wild- 
ly swinging on a strap in the Philadelphia '"Ele- 
vated." He was hiding behind a few of the most 
beautiful shreds of crimson brush on his lip that 
have been seen for many moons. The color 
scheme was a riot. He has taken the laurels 
away from Dan McMullen for all time. "Zimmy" 
has lately taken unto himself a wife. In all jus- 
tice to him we must say that he is a very, very 
much better judge of feminine beauty than he is 
cf the proper colors which should be associated 
ir. one moustache. Here's luck to you in your 
married life ! 

R. E. Kanode, '15. now of Hagerstown, Md., 
recently paid a flying visit to Baltimore. Pie is 
looking fat and prosperous. During the last 
n:onths he has issued several writs of "Efus 
defus tecum" and "L^fus defus tuces." His 
chief ambition in life is to be able to wear 
a frock coat and displa}- himself in this 
disguise to the Honorable Judges of the Court 
of Appeals. James Hepborn, '13, is given until 
January 5th to show cause why the "Boss" is not 
entitled to adorn his landscape with said frock 
coat. 

o 

LAW— SENIOR. 



Now Ready for Fall, 1915. See Us for Classy Clothes 
Suits to Measure, $15.00 to $35.00 

A. JACOBS & SONS, Tailors 

899 NORTH HOWARD STREET 

Open Evenings 9 P. 31. Cor. Kichiuond St. 

There are two kinds of men in the class of '16: 
The men who lift and the men who lean. 
And, oddly enough, you will find, too, I ween. 
There's only one lifter to ten who lean. 
Ill which class are you ? Are you easing the load 
Of overtaxed lifters who toil down the road? 
Or, are you a leaner, who lets others share 
Your portion of labor and worry and care? 
JVith apologies to "Ella IJ'heeler IVilcox." 



With examinations near at hand, a puzzling- 
thesis subject staring us in the face and a diploma 
so near ( and yet so far) , it is surprising, but 
gratifying, to find such remarkable manifestations 
of Class and University spirit as have been shown 
by the members of the 191(i law class during the 
past month. Glee Club rehearsals, Terrae Mariae 
board meetings. Henry D. Harlan Law Society 
meetings, dance and mock trial have all been well, 
and enthusiastically, attended. In fact they have 
kept our "lifter's" so busy that nothing short of 
an increase in the number of days in the week 
could satisfy 'their longing for a few days of 
rest. Here's hoping that we shall all enjoy the 
respite which the holidays will afford us, and that 
we shall come back on January 3rd ready to 
continue these all important activities with even 
more zeal, and make ours a banner class. 



Happy New Year ! 



Bar exam. over. Soft!! Everybody passed?? 



O you "Thesis Subject !" 



Better be "boning" for the mid-year "nerve 
wreckers." Chesnut's are hard in January. 



The proceeds of University Night will go It took Mr. Jackson thirty minutes to tell us 

towards the support of Terrae Mariae. So don't not to write more than tzvo pages in answering 
iViil to be present. January 17th is the night. his examination. "Do as I say, not as I do." 



lis 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



Hart Schaffner & Marx, 
Kuppenheimer, 
"Society Brand" 



The clothes that college men 
like a lot 



Hub 



Baltimore Street At C^arlel 



Senior Law Advisory Board. 

An advisory board of editors for the 1916 
Terrae Mariae has been chosen from the Law 
Department and it is endeavoring to have all the 
material from this department in the hands of 
the editor-in-chief before the Christmas holidays 
begin. 

The members of this board are as follows : 
W. L. Baldwin (chairman), N. T. Nelson, E. L. 
G. Wright, F. H. Henninghausen, W. V. Harri- 
son, Herbert Levy, J. A. Farley and D. G. Cooper. 

The purpose is to enable every man in the 
class to have a friend prepare his ^vrite-up, and 
to distribute the work, in order to raise the ItiKi 
Terrae Mariae to as high a standard as possible. 



University Night. 
The board of Terrae Mariae editors has deter- 
mined to inagurate a new thing in the social life 
of the University. Instead of the annual senior 
theatre party, which is usually held around this 
tmie of the year, it is proposed to inaugurate a 
"University Night," when students, alumni and 
faculty, from all departments of the University 
will be invited to attend the performance at some 
local theatre, in a body, with ladies. This can 
and should be made a time for great demonstra- 
tions of Class and L^niversity spirit. 191(3 "L'ni- 
versity Night'' will be observed on Monday 
night, January 17th, at the New Academy of 
Music, at which time Granville Barker's original 
London Company will present George Bernard 
Shaw's satirical comedy, "Androcles and the 
Lion." Manager Tunis F. Dean assures us that 
this will be one of the best shows of the winter. 
It ran for several months in New York Citv. 



Active work will be begun by Messrs. W. L. 
Baldwin and D. G. Cooper, who are represent- 
ing the Law Department on the committee, im- 
mediately after the Christmas holidays. 



LAW— INTERMEDIATE 



Saturday evening, December 11, 191.5, the 1917 
Law Class gave a theatre party followed by a 
supper. The class occupied the mezzanine boxes 
at the 2\Iaryland Theatre. The "get-together" 
after the Thanksgiving holiday was a huge suc- 
cess and much credit must be given to the gentle- 
men who served on the committee of arrange- 
ments. The Committee consisted of Alessrs. 
Johnson, Griiifith, Kassan, Roache and Hoffman. 
President Hans Froelicher, Jr., presided at the 
table in his usual brilliant manner. Informal 
after dinner talks were made by various members 
of the class. 



STEP OUTSIDE THE LECTURE ROOM 
IF YOU WANT TO READ THAT PAPER— 



— and now our friend Waldo Hack is paying 
strict attention to the lectures on Title. 



L'lman was talking on a question of Sales, 

Remembrance of which occasioned some wails. 

The Court of Appeals 

Contrarily feels 

On a point Ulman claimed was unlawful ; 

Penn thought it unjust 

And nearly did bust 

For he screamed out in class, "That's awful !" 



S. Senior vs. K. Intermediate. 

For money payable by the defendant to the 
])laintiff : 
1. For goods sold and delivered by the Plaintiff' 

to the Defendant. 
.And the plaintiff' claims therefore 20 cents. 

Code Art. 7.5. 



.Vfter the theatre party j\Ir. S. T. Griffith at the 
conclusion of his remarks after the supper, rend- 
ered a most beautiful and touching poem. The 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



119 



rendition by j\Ir. Griffitli was infinitel}' superior 
to anything we have ever heard and the soft 
modulation of his voice while declaiming the 
most pathetic lines brought tears to the eyes of 
many. It rang true to life and echoed the senti- 
ments of those present. To the members of the 
class who were unable to attend we respectfully 
and urgently suggest that they prevail upon Mr. 
Griffith to recite this poem for them. 



The winner of the Opening and Closing 
Window Contest Between Messrs. Spector and 
Whiting, will be presented at the annual banquet 
of the Class with a piece of the tail of Sir William 
Blackstone's dove. 



By His Honor Judge Gorter (During a lecture 
on Evidence) : 

"And now, gentlemen, if you ivill keep this 
principle in mind you zvill then have the proposi- 
tion in a concrete shape." 

And we respectfully suggest that the learned 
Judge might have used the word "ivory" with 
equal effect. 

Eduardo Gutierrez-Canedo, who came from 
Georgetown this year, has been chosen Secretary 
of the Pan-American Conference which meets in 
Washington. December 27th. He has assisted 
materially in arranging details and his important 
duties as Secretary will necessitate his absence 
from school this week. 



DENTAL— GRADUATE. 



Dr. B. S. Wells, '14, has been placed in charge 
of the practical prosthetic work at the University 
to succeed Dr. ^I. G. Guerra '1-1:, resigned. 



\'isitors to the University have been Drs. T. L. 
Spoon, '14 ; J. H. Summerfield, '14 ; B. J. Hammit, 
Jr., '14; H. E. Waterman, '15; A. S. Lowenson, 
'15 and 15. H. W^ebster, '15. 



HEPBRON & HAYDON 

We Sell Every Law Book and Syllabus 
Used at the U. of M. 

St. Paul 8794 1243-53 CALVERT BLDG. 



We have been informed that our old friends, 
P. P. Payne, '14 and H. E. B. Webb, '14, have 
recently forsaken the folds of bachelorhood and 
are now enjoying marital bliss. We wish them 
happiness and prosperity. 



Dr. A. E. W^orsham, '14, who recently under- 
went an operation at the University Hospital, is 
convalescing and will soon be out. 



Dr. Robert L. Thacker, '98, now practicing in 
West Virginia, was a recent visitor. 



DENTAL— SENIOR. 



We wish all associated with the University, 
from the Dean to Charley, a ]\Ierry Xmas and a 
Plappy New Year. 



Every one is filled with holiday spirit at this 
time and there is very little doing except talk 
about the girls at home and the parties which the 
fellows expect to attend when they get "back 
home." 



Recently at a senior lecture a rain coat belong- 
ing to W. E. Lena mysteriously disapperaed. 
Every one knows that this coat could not walk 
out of the room unassisted, nor is such material 
soluble in atmosphere. Perhaps some fellow 
took it by mistake. If so it should be returned to 
Mr. Lena at once. Instruments have been known 
to dissolve in the sterilizer but a rain coat 
NEVER. 



An elimination contest will soon be started 
among our pugnacious class-mates to determine 
who shall hold the chami)ionship title. The con- 
test will be limited to tiie feather-weights. 



120 



L'NRERSITY GAZETTE. 



A society for dental students was started on 
December Ki, l!)lo, by several enterprising- 
seniors. Dr. J. Hen Robinson, junior demon- 
strator, presided at the meeting and appointed a 
ctmmittee to draw up a constitution. The com- 
mittee is composed of A. J. Aldridge, MO; A. C. 
Albert, 'Ki and E. B. Lancaster, '17. The com- 
niittee will report Wednesday evening, January 
.->, 191(i. Much enthusiasm is being demonstrated 
and we look for lasting good from such an 
organization. 



Santa Claus, fur the senior class, remembered 
Dr. W. A. Rea, demonstrator, and Mrs. Beulah 
Welsh, secretary of the infirmary. The former 
received a gold pocket knife and the latter ,.. gold 
mounted fountain pen. J. Reece Funderburk 
made the presentation sjieech. 

Let our New Year resolution be that every 
man who started in the freshman class and who 
has been carried up this far be graduated in 
June l!)l(i. 



The officers of the infirmary are very much 
pleased with the work of the senior class, claiming 
that for both quantity and quality, their accomp- 
lishment surpasses that of any previous class. 



DEXTAL— JUNIOR. 



"If a man can write a better book, preach a 
better sermon, or make a better mouse trap than 
his neighbor, though he builds his house in the 
woods, the world will make a beaten path to his 
door." 

We are glad to have Tracy and Edwards with 
u: again after a long vacation. They were both 
greeted with a hearty welcome {Sit down). 



There seems to be plenty of good material 
among- the three classes for an instrun-iental musi- 



Intercoilegiate Bureau of Academic Costume, Aibany.N.Y 
COTRELL & 



LEONARD 

Official Mal(ers of 

Caps and 

Gowns 




Correct Hoods 
for All Degrees. 

Rich Go-wns for 
Pulpit and Bench. 

Bulletin, Samples 
etc. on request 



cal club. We are very busy, it is true, but every 
one should be able and willing to devote at least 
one evening each week in practicing together. It 
i ; up to every fellow with any talent whatever, 
from mouth-organist to pianist, to get interested 
and busy. Let's start something. We can at 
least make a big noise. Talk it up fellows. 



Fellows, we hope you have all had a Merry 
Christmas and a Happy New Year. We also 
hope you didn't gormandize too ravenously. 



N. B. — On Sunday, December 
tended church with a "chicken." 



Miller at- 



Vina has orthodontic trouble in his toes. He 
is going to consult the chiropodist concerning 
torsal occlusion. 



Manley says he has a cemetery up in his home- 
town everybody is dying to get into. 

A patient came up into the infirmary the other 
day and inquired for "Charlie Chaplin." Has 
anybody seen Santoni. 



Glanville resorted to Epson Salts and quinine 
as a throat gargle. After administering unto 



Glanville insists there are deciduous bicuspids. i 



"Nothing Too Large— Nothing Too Small " 

Baltimore City 

Printing and Binding 

Company 

352-363 Equitable Building 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



121 



himself, he explained (one hand on his head and 
the other on his stomach), "Oh! It may be 
awful good, but I can't stand it." 



Coble called on a lady friend and was violently 
ordered out by the landlady with a broom-stick. 
Beware Coble, for it is the truth ! 



We all feel very regretful of the fact that 
Martinez, who is now at the Church Home and 
Infirmary, will be unable to continue with us. 
He has the heartiest sympathy of the fellows. 



Wray wanted to borrow a pair of contouring 
shears. 



. DENTAL— FRESHMAN. 



An article appeared in one of the local news- 
papers a few weeks ago posing the ladies of our 
class as "the underlying cause of dissension which 
terminated in a constitution to govern the class." 

Now we admit that a body of laws have been 
composed and passed upon by a majority of the 
members of the class ; they are deserving of the 
highest esteem ; but the ladies had no voice in this 
v/hatever. They have neither offered advice in 
class meetings or otherwise, nor have they nego- 
ti?ted with other members of the class. 

This being true, is it possible for them to ap- 
pear as the paper stated? We beg of you, dear 
author, to either cease from interpretations or 
become more proficient in your methods of 
espionage. 



J. E. Egan was taken suddenly ill with an 
attack of appendicitis at a clinic about three 
weeks ago. He was operated upon at the Uni- 
versity Hospital and at this writing is greatly 
improved. He has the very best wishes of the 
entire class for a speedv recovery. 



L. B. Wolverton was elected sergeant-at-arms 
at a recent class meeting. 



when eleven (11) of our worthy class-mates 
presented themselves with neckscarfs, the bright- 
est of red. 

After the clouds lifted, however, we were much 
elated to learn that they were paying tribute to 
their initiation in the Psi Omega Fraternity. 



Although Dunn cannot be called a junk dealer, 
still he is a criterion on bones. 



PHARMACY— SENIOR. 



We were greatly puzzled not many weeks ago 



Now that the holidays are over and the coming 
examinations are staring us in the face, our time 
is naturally closely occupied by "boning up" for 
the exams, yet, notwithstanding this fact, there 
are certain matters which, although they have no 
bearing on our school work proper, should receive 
at least some little thought and attention. These 
are our class afi'airs. 

Each member should consider it his duty to 
attend all class meetings and take an active part in 
them, as there will be many important matters 
to discuss in the near future, which will be of 
concern to everyone. Futhermore, many seniors 
have until now neglected to have their photographs 
taken for the annual. There is absolutely no 
excuse for any further delay, and the individuals 
in question should attend to this at once. 

Finally a word as to the management of the 
annual, the "Terra Mariae." Unlike some of the 
previous editions, the present one is being con- 
ducted on a strictly business basis, especially the 
financial end of it. Each department is duly 
represented on the stafif ; the pharmacy depart- 
mnet by Mr. Lee, assistant business manager. A 
detailed account of all receipts and disbursements 
will be kept, and the financial standing will be 
furnished any members of the board of editors 
upon request. 

Thus the editor-in-chief and business manager 
have plainly shown that it is not their object to 
act as absolute bosses over the book, as has been 
the case heretofore, nor that they are looking- 
for personal gain ; and for these reasons they 
should receive the confidence and financial sup- 
port of every student. 



122 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



PHARMACY— 1 UNIUR. 



At the meeting of the class on Thursday, De- 
cember 2, Mr. Kushner resigned as Sergeant-at- 
Arms and at a call meeting on the following 
Thursday Mr. Sneed was chosen as successor. 
The lanky Tra\'eler from the Blue Ridge is phys- 
ically capable of maintaining order and we have 
no doubt that one withering look from the "Sarg" 
will be enough to quiet the most obstreperous. 

At the same meeting Mr. Bowes was elected 
Class Historian. The price of Quinine has de- 
clined from $"-^.2.5 per ounce to GO cents. From 
"Still reigns — The King!" 



For an interesting side-light to Pharmacy see 
"Barney Oldfield" Campbell, Flivver Expert. 



Miller has developed into such a problem tiend 
that we begin to regard him as somewhat of a 
problem himself. No one has yet solved the 
problem of "Why is a Problem Fiend?" 



On account of the European War the price of 
our Chemical Apparatus has increased consider- 
ably. Sherman said it ! 



Thank goodness we are not like the Seniors. 
We have no "mashers" of the weed in our class. 
Not one of our number would be guilty of such a 
sacrilege as polluting the sacred floors of our 
laboratory v\'ith expectorations of the amber fluid. 
We voluntarilv waive that inalienable right of 
"Buyin' our own tobacco and spittin' where we 
please." 

Some members of the class say that the\- are 
sorry that the Christmas Holidays were as long 
as they were and that they were not desirous of 
losing so much time from their studies. Sing, 
brother, sing ! 



The editor of this department wishes to ask 
the assistance of the entire class in making our 
part of The G.-vzetti; all that it should be. 



If you have a bit of news, 

Send it in ; 
Or a joke that will amuse. 

Send it in. 



A story that is true, 
An incident that is new. 
We want to hear from you. 
Send it in. 

Will your story make us laugh? 

Send it in. 
With or without your autograph 

Send it in. 
Never mind about your style. 
If it's only worth the while 
And will make the reader smile. 

Send it in. — Tile and Till. 

o 

ACADEMIC— GRADUATE. 

Prof. Harvey C. Mittendorf has resigned as 
professor of mechanical drawing and ph3'sics and 
accepted a position with an electrical engineering 
firm in ^Milwaukee. Professor Mittendorf is a 
graduate of St. John's College and the United 
States Naval Academy. 



UNDERGRADUATE. 
The first of the series of Cotillion Club hops 
was held in the College Gymnasium, Friday 
evening, December 10th. It was a very enjoy- 
able afi'air and the new hop committee is to be 
congratulated- especially for the excellent music 
provided. Professor and Mrs. Rippere received. 
There were a number present from out of town. 

o 

NURSING. 



The Alunnise Association of the University Hos- 
pital Training School held a dance at Lehmann"s 
Hall on the evening; of December lith. The 
proceeds are to be used as a sick benefit fund 
for the nurses of the Association. A special car 
conveyed the members of the training school to 
the hall. About three hundred persons were 
present. Miss Laura Chapline, class of 1909. 
was chairman of the committee on arrangements 
and we all are greatly indebted to her and her 
assistants, for their splendid eft'orts in making 
the aft'air such a great success. 



Miss Alva M. Williams, class of 1911 who was 
with her patient, on the steamer Tivoli, en route to 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



133 



Crisfield, when it was burned on the Chesapeake 
Bay, some time ago, has been confined to her 
home at the Hampton Court Apartments, since 
the accident. — Miss Wilhams' patient died from 
exhaustion and both were taken from the water 
by a motor boat and taken on board the City of 
Baltimore. She says if she had been unable to 
swim, she would have been drowned — and the 
experience she encountered, she will never ferget. 



BIRTHS. 



A meeting of the Maryland State Association 
of Graduate Nurses was held at the Medical and 
Chirurgical Library on the afternoon of December 
18th, Miss Lauber, president, in the chair. A 
report of a special committee was presented and 
freely discussed, the chief topic being "Com- 
pulsory registration." 

Dr. Smith, Superintendent of Johns Hopkins 
Hospital, gave a very interesting talk, giving his 
ideas of registration- — stating in part that he con- 
sidered that the registration of nurses was as 
necessary as that of physicians. Judge Harlan 
was scheduled to give a brief talk but was unable 
to be present. 

The Association is aiming to procure a State 
Inspector of Training Schools and compulsory 
registration for nurses in Maryland. 



Miss Lucy Lilly, class of 1915. superintendent 
of nurses of the Rocky Mount Hospital, Rocky 
Mount, N. C, is visiting friends in the city. 



Miss Jane Pennewell, of the intermediate class, 
who was confined to the hospital for several 
weeks, has gone to her home at Snow Hill, Md., 
to recuperate. 

Miss Betty Butts, class of 1913, was operated 
on at the hospital recently. 



Miss Emily Kenney, of the intermediate class, 
had a Paracentesis performed recently and is doing 
well. 

i\liss Lillian Blake, class of 1912, had a Tonsil- 
lectomy performed at the hospital on the 18th of 
December. 

Miss Martha B. Michael, class of 1893, was 
operated on at the hospital some days ago. 



Recently to Dr. Wilbur M. Scott, class of 1913, 
and Mrs. Scott, of Devereaux, Ga., a daughter. 
Mrs. Wright was formerly Miss Vera Wright, 
University Hospital Training School for Nurses, 
class of 1909. 



To Mr. and Mrs. Hyde Hopkins, of Baltimore, 
Md., December 17, 1915, a daughter. Mrs. 
Hopkins was formerly Miss Lillie Booker Carter, 
University Hospital Training School for Nurses, 
class of 1909. 

o 

MARRIAGES. 



Miss Mary Juliette Miles, University Hospital 
Training School for Nurses, class of 1913, to Dr. 
John Russell Perins, of Spencer, Va., at Balti- 
more, November 3, 1915. Dr. Perkins was for- 
merly resident surgeon of the Baltimore Eye, Ear 
and Throat Charity Hospital. He will practice 
in Winston-Salem, N. C. 



DEATHS. 



Dr. James G. Linthicum, class of 1859, promi- 
nent for half a century in medical and fraternal 
circles in Baltimore, died at his home, 1337 West 
Fayette street, December 7, 1915, from pneu- 
monia, aged 81 years. 



SONNENBURG'S PHARMACY 

Baltimore and Greene Streets. 

ONE MINUTE CLINICAL THEEMONETERS, 
WITH CHAIN AND GUARD PIN, 50 CENTS 



SULTAN DRUG COMPANY 

PHARMACEUTICAL CHEMISTS, ST. LOUIS, MO. 

Manufacturers of 
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THE WESTERN NATIONAL BANK 

OF BALTIMORE 

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Satisfying Supply Service 



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VACCINES 
SERUMS 
BACTERINS 



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Madison 405 
LINDEN & NORTH AVES. 



Hynson, Westcott and 
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BALTIMORE 



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Soilers 

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Your Special Attention is Directed to pEJI^QL OINTMENT AND RESINOL SOAP 

Beef, Iron and Wine 

With Hydropepsin, 

Liquid Pi-cine Co» Red Sjr. Hjpopliosphites Co. 

Thomas & Thompson Co. 

Manufacturers and Dispensers of 

PURE MEDICINES 

(Wholesale and Retail) 

Cor. Baltimore and Light Sts. 
BALTIMORE, MD. 



Are Genuine Comforts to Physician and Patient Alike. 
Send for Samples and Try Tliem. 

RESINOL CHEMICAL COMPANY, Baltimore, Md 
German Savings Bank of Balimore City 

S. W. Cor. Baltimore and Eutaw Sts. 

interest Paid On Deposits. 

Drovers and Mechanics' National Bank i 

OF BALTIMORE. MD. 

CAPITAL. . . . Paid in $300,000.00 

Earned 300,000.00 $600,000.00 
EARNED SURPLUS A>D PROFITS . . 533,487.65 
SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES FOR RENT 

Surgical and Hospital Supplies. Sick Room Supplies. 
Dental Forceps. Microscopes and Accessories. 

The Chas. Willms Surgical Instrument Co. 

300 \. HOWARD STREET. 



THl UM¥IKSIT¥ ^AlITTI 




There's a man In the world who is never turned down. 

Wherever he chances to stray, 
He gets the glad hand in the populous town, 

Or out where the farmers make hay; 
He's greeted with pleasure on deserts of sand, 

And deep in the trail of the woods. 
Wherever he goes there's the welcoming hand, 

He's the man who delivers the goods. 

The failures of life sit around and complain 

The gods haven't treated them right; 
They've lost their umbrellas whenever there's rain, 

And haven't their lanterns at night. 
Men tire of the failures who fill with their sighs 

The air of their own neighborhoods. 
There's one who is greeted with love-lighted eyes 

He's the man who delivers the goods. 

One fellow is lazy and watches the clock. 

And waits for the whistle to blow. 
And one has the hammer with which he will knock 

And one tells a story of woe; 
And one if requested to travel a mile. 

Will measure the perches and roods. 

But one does his stunt with a whistle or smile 

He's the man who delivers the goods. 

One man is afraid he will labor too hard — 

The world isn't yearning for such; 
And one man is always alert on the guard 

Lest he put in a minute too much. 
And one has a grouch or a temper that's bad, 

And one is a creature of moods; 
So it's, "Here's to" the joyous and rollicking lad 

To the one who delivers the goods. 

— Walt Mason. 




VOL. n. 



BALTIMORE, FEBRUARY, 1916. 



No. 8. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



Vol. II. 



FEBRUARY 1, 1916. 



No. 8. 



THE COLLEGE MAN AS A LEADER. 

Sydney S. Handy, M.A 127 

OUR UNIVERSITY — ITS VALUE. 

Bruce C. Lightner, LL.B 129 

AN INTER - FRATERNITY BOARD. 

Bruce C. Lightner, LL.B 130 

TRIP THROUGH THE HUMAN BODY. 

B. P. Jones 131 

EDITORIALS 132 

Editorially Expressed. 



CONTENTS 

SLAMS AND SALUTES 133 

ORGANIZATIONS 134 

ITEMS 135 

QUIPS 142 

ENGAGEMENTS 142 

MARRIAGES 142 

DEATHS 143 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE, MD. 

HON. EMERSON C. HARRINGTON, Governor of Maryland, Chancellor. 
THOMAS FELL, A. M., Ph. D., L L. D., D. C. L., ProvosL 

ST. JOHN'S COLLEQE, Annapolis, Md. { ^f^°l''^"Vsci'eScEs) 

Founded 1696. Classical and Scientific College Courses leading to degrees. Special advantages to stu- 
dents purposing to study the professions. Military Department under army officers. Also Preparatory 
School for boys fitting for St. John's or other colleges. Term begins September 15. Address 

THOMAS FELL, Ph.D., LL.D., D.C.L., President. 



DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE, UNIVERSITY 

OF MARYLAND, AND COLLEQE OF 

PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS. 

_ Four vears' graded course. New Laboratory Build- 
ing. Chnical advantages unsurpassed. Teaching Staff 
of 187. 110th Annual Session will begin October 1, 
1916, and continue 8 months. 

WM. F. LOCKWOOD, M. D., Dean. 



DEPARTMENT OF DENTISTRY. 

3Sth Annual Session begins October 1, 1916, and 
contmues 7 months. 26 Instructors. New Building. 
For catalogue containing course of study, etc., apply to 

TIMOTHY O. HEATWOLE, M.D., D.D.S., Dean, 

Baltimore, Md. 



DEPARTMENT OF LAW. 

61st Annual Session will begin Sept. 28, 1916. Faculty 
of 26. For catalogue containing full information ad- 
dress the Secretary, 301 St. Paul Street, Baltimore, 
Maryland. 

EDWIN T. DICKERSON, Secretary. 



DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACY. 

(Formerly Maryland College of Pharmacy). 74th 
Annual Session begins September 25, 1916. 11 In- 
struciurs. iNcw Lauoratonca. Address 

CHARLES CASFARI, JR., Phar.D., Dean. 

Baltimore. Md. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 

Published Monthly in the Interest of the University of Maryland. 
PRICE $1.00 PER YEAR. 



Contributions solicited from Alumni of the 
University. 



Business Address, 608 Professional Building, 
Baltimore, Md. 



Vol. n. 



BALTIMORE, MD., FEBRUARY 1, 1916. 



No. 8. 



THE COLIvEGE MAN AS A LEADER.* 



By Sydney S. Handy, M. A., Professor of Eng- 
lish, St. John's College. 



Mr. Provost, Faculty and Students of the Univer- 
sity of Maryland, Ladies and Gentlemen : 

As I listened to the eloquent words of the dis- 
linguished gentleman who preceded me I felt 
anew the significance of this gathering — this 
bringing together the various departments of the 
University of Maryland. Nowhere do we find 
more enthusiasm, more energy, more hopeful- 
ness, more courage than in groups of college men 
and women. And never before in the history 
of the world has the college occupied so promi- 
nent a place in the affairs of men and in the coun- 
cils of the nations. So, as I look into your faces 
today there comes into my mind this question : 
What is the dominant purpose of the college? 
What is, in large terms, its most significant func- 
tion? It is to a consideration of this question 
that I briefly invite your attention. 

Answers would doubtless vary. Some would 
say the college exists for the purpose of the ac- 
quisition of knowledge. True, this is, in a large 
measure; for surely no institution of learning 
could exist for a moment unless this were an 
important part of its work. Yet we believe there 
is something more far-reaching than this. 

For the training of the mind, is another ready 
response. This, too, is important — indeed in this 
age of early and intensive specialization, of vo- 
cational emphasis, and of utilitarian notions, we 
are in danger of leaving the inestimable value of 
mind training almost entirely out of the ques- 
tion. This is, in our opinion, unwise. 

But mind may be strong either for good or 
for evil. We are reminded of Milton's mighty 
line, 

•Address delivered on Academic Day, November 11, 
1915. 



"The mind is its own place, and in itself can 
make a heaven of hell, a hell of heaven." 

So not to mind training would we give the 
most prominent place among the answers to our 
question. 

What then is the dominant purpose of the col- 
lege ? Mindful of the progress of ages past, con- 
scious of the turmoils of the human race at 
present, and with a firm belief in a still greater 
and grander future, we are of the opinion that 
the great purpose is to advance civilization, to 
blaze the way to more important discoveries in 
the realm of thought and action, to show to the 
world what greater things God has yet in store 
for humanity. 

Upon a thousand hills of our broad land the 
college stands with her turrets and her towers 
pointing the way ever onward and upward. 

Upon a lofty hill in the city of Richmond there 
is a large equestrian statue. It overlooks the 
city, the waters of the noble James and the fields 
and hills of old Virginia. It is the statue 
of Washington. He sits upon his steed 
erect, and while with one hand he holds the reins, 
with the other he points the way with extended 
arm ever onward and upward. So the college 
calls in no uncertain tones to the men and women 
of our generation to greater discoveries, greater 
inventions and greater activities of mind and 
soul. 

As some great heroic figure upon the summit 
of a mountain beckoning to those below to come 
up higher to gain the distant view where lies the 
promised land of peace on earth and good will to 
men, so the college in trumpet tones sounds the 
forward note to higher aims and ideals, to nobler 
lives and loftier deeds for the complete develop- 
ment of the human race. 

And yet again the college may be likened unto 
an angel robed in white flying through the serene 
air of heaven, bearing the torch of knowledge in 
her grasp, and calling the children of men in the 



128 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



melting harmonies of the music of the spheres — 
caUing, ever calhng, from darkness into hght. 

So all hail the American college, the hope of 
our democracy of the glory of our nation ! 

In what shall the college lead? It shall lead in 
the solving of the great problems that now perplex 
society. The great questions of labor and capi- 
tal, of the proper distribution of wealth, of equal 
opportunity for all, of our position in international 
questions, of the best methods of fighting crime, 
poverty, disease and ignorance — these and many 
more of like nature are claiming our attention. 
They can be solved only by the careful study of 
our college-trained men. It must never be forgot- 
ten that the large majority of the leaders of our 
country today are college men. 

You, then, gentlemen of the University of 
Maryland, will become leaders. In medicine you 
will lead in the great discoveries for the allevia- 
tion of human suffering. You will aid in rid- 
ding us of the incubus of incurable disease. Oh, 
what a blessing to men is that man, who, 
by patient research discovers a cure for some dis- 
ease that has been a scourge to humanity ! We 
honor the man who saves one life, but here is 
one who saves millions, not only of this genera- 
tion, but also of the generations to come. Bless- 
ings be upon you, then, gentlemen of science, in 
your efforts to make the world better and 
stronger. 

To the gentlemen of the law this appeal also 
comes with force. There is a great majesty of 
the law. It guarantees to men life, liberty and 
property. It preserves evenly the scales of justice. 
Richard Hooker in his "The Laws of Ecclesiasti- 
cal Polity" pays this tribute to law : 

"Of law there can be no less acknowledged 
than that her seat is the bosom of God, her voice 
the harmony of the world ; all things in heaven 
and earth do her homage ; the very least as feeling 
her care, and the greatest as not exempted from 
her power; both angels and men, and creatures of 
what condition soever, though each in different 
sort and manner, yet all with uniform consent ad- 
miring her as the mother of their peace and joy." 

There is great opportunity in the law to render 
help and succor to those who are oppressed and 
wronged by the greed of the evil-doer. Widows 
and orphans often need the right arm of the law. 
In every case of oppression there is the oppressed, 



in every injury, there is the injured. So let us 
not forget the great consolation and the protec- 
tion of the law. Here is a splendid opportunity 
for leadership. 

And you, my friends, young gentlemen of St. 
John's, you will also be leaders. In every village 
ir our State are leading men today who once at- 
tended our institution. In a large measure they 
owe their greatness to the lessons learned in the 
classic halls of old St. John's. Her past has been 
glorious. The Governor-elect, Emerson C. Har- 
rington, is an alumnus, and not the least of his 
honors is that he caught for four years on the 
St. John's baseball team. Be ever mindful then 
of the name and fame of your alma mater. 

In the second book of Virgil Aeneas, when 
thinking of the great deeds of his country, says : 
"Quorum magna pars fui." (A great part of these 
I have been.) 

So you, young gentlemen, in the coming years, 
wTien the deeds of our country shall be recorded 
as the greatest ever performed by the nations of 
the earth, then you, too, can truly say : 

"Quorum magna pars fui." 

Lead, then my countrymen, but lead right ! 
Leadership brings responsibility. When the 
leaders err, then the people indeed fall upon evil 
days. So lead, for truth, for honor and for justice. 

Possibly it may not be the destiny of all to 
tread the paths of greatness. Some are called to 
more humble stations. But even here there is 
need of leadership. No matter in how sequestered 
a spot, or how insignificant the community in 
which we reside, there is abundant opportunity 
for leading men and women to brighten and bet- 
ter things. Many suffer for want of competent 
counsel and in every locality there are men and 
women looked up to as leaders by those possibly 
more unfortunate than they. So wherever we are, 
the college has stamped upon our brow in imper- 
ishable letters, "Be ye leaders of men." 

And finally if our country, the mother of us all, 
should need her sons in her defense • if the heel of 
foreign foe, which may God forbid, should tread 
upon our shores, then, mindful of our great lead- 
ers of the past, of the noble Washington, of Lin- 
coln, the friend of the people, of the gallant Grant, 
of the immortal Stonewall Jackson, and the peer- 
less Lee, stand, men of Maryland, stand a wall 
of living- fire around our beloved land. 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



139 



OUR UNIVERSITY— ITS VAEUE. 



By Bruce C. Lightner, LE.B., Class of 1915. 



In a recent issue of the Baltimore Siin there 
appeared a very elaborate article deploring the 
big waste of funds for higher schools in the State 
of Maryland. This creation of a very inventive 
and undoubtedly very biased mind waxed eloq- 
uent and flowery over the fact that during the 
present and the next fiscal year the Legislature 
will have appropriated to State institutions the 
sum of $1,048,6-14.88, and that the State gets as 
little in return as can be imagined. The writer 
further stated that of all the schools receiving 
aid from the State, our old rival, Johns Hopkins, 
is the only one giving an adequate return for its 
appropriation. Of this sum nearly one-third, 
namely, $300,000, is given to Johns Hopkins. On 
the other hand, the Maryland State University, 
of which it can be fairly said that the University 
of Maryland is the backbone, receives, $30,000. 

It seemed perfectly natural to the writer of that 
article that Johns Hopkins should receive almost 
one-third of the total appropriation, and the other 
colleges should be satisfied with the few crumbs 
which are bestowed upon them. He also seemed 
to think that the other institutions should be able 
to give the same results on their small allowance 
which Hopkins does on the lion's share. 

We do not deny for one minute that Johns Hop- 
kins University is a great school, but we do con- 
tend most emphatically that Hopkins is not head 
and shoulders above the other colleges of the 
State. We do not envy the laurels which the 
medical school has won for Hopkins, but we do 
get somewhat tired of reading the continual press- 
agent material in some of the Baltimore papers 
of the wonderful educational achievements of 
Hopkins. 

Compare Hopkins with the University of Mary- 
land. Our school was founded half a century 
ahead of them. From the start we have had an 
uphill fight. Many serious obstacles have been 
met and overcome. The University of Maryland 
is not an endowed school ; comparatively few do- 
nations of money have been given to us, and it 
has been a case of work for every thing we have 
received. 



Hopkins is an endowed university. It has re- 
ceived numerous bequests with which to carry on 
its work, but even in view of these facts it is con- 
tinually setting up a plea for more money. What 
have they done with their money, and why, in 
the name of sound reason, should they receive 
almost one-third of the total amount appropriated 
by the State ? 

The University of Maryland, alone, as one of 
the units of the Maryland State University, has 
approximately 1,600 students, as against 850 at 
Hopkins, yet the entire State University receives 
only $20,000 to be divided among the various 
colleges of which it is composed. 

We have the only schools of Law and Phar- 
macy in the State, — the Baltimore College of Den- 
tal Surgery is our only rival in the dental field, 
and Hopkins our only rival in medicine. Can the 
writer of that article say that the University of 
Maryland is not making just returns for its appro- 
priations? Who are our lawyers, dentists, phar- 
macists; yes, we will even take issue with Hop- 
kins in regard to doctors? I dare say that an 
unprejudiced survey would disclose the fact that 
the majority of the leaders in their respective pro- 
fessions in Maryland are men who have been 
graduated from the University of Maryland. 

In the article in question another statement 
was made in regard to the academic courses at 
our colleges. The ridiculous assertion was made 
that the courses at Baltimore City College and 
Polytechnic Institute were equal to those of our 
colleges. Both of these schools are preparatory 
schools and cannot be ranked with our colleges. 
If such a condition were true why do many gradu- 
ates of these institutions matriculate each year 
as regular students at St. John's College, our aca- 
demic department ? The only answer I can give 
is that they do not enter the senior class at St. 
John's, and this is the best proof that the courses 
are not on the same level. City College and Poly, 
offer nothing more than a high school course, ex- 
cept that Poly, specializes in engineering. 

Therefore, we are rude enough to join issue 
with the writer of the article in The Sun. We con- 
tend that the State receives as much in return 
for its appropriation from the University of Mar\'- 
land and the State University as it does from 
Johns Hopkins. We even go further, and say 



130 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



that the State receives as much from us in return 
as it does from Hopkins, notwithstanding the 
great difference in the amount of the appropria- 
tions. If the writer of the said article can show us 
different, then we will be willing to have Hopkins' 
praises set to music and proclaimed the national 
anthem. We will then sing it with all the spirit 
and good will which students of one college should 
bear toward another. 



AN INTER-FRATERNITY BOARD. 



By Bruce C. Eightner, LL.B., Class of 1915. 



One of the most urgent needs of the student 
body of our University at the present time is an 
Inter-Fraternity Board. 

The University of Maryland is the largest col- 
lege in the State. It is one of the oldest institu- 
tions of higher learning in the United States. 
Many of its graduates are leaders in their respec- 
tive lines of work. On the strength of these facts 
the University has been very fortunate in securing 
chapters of some of the strongest national fra- 
ternities in the college world. In addition to the 
national fraternities we have several local frater- 
nities. 

There has, however, been too much of the 
"dog-eat-dog" spirit displayed by the various fra- 
ternities. Each fraternity for itself, and victory 
doubly sweet if it can "put one over" on another 
fraternity. 

It is needless to say that this spirit should not 
prevail. Fraternities take in only those men 
whom they think are entitled to membership on 
account of some achievement on their part, such 
as scholarship, excellence in athletics, general 
goodfellowship, etc. Their sole object is to grow 
stronger and be a credit to the University. Each 
fraternity should view the others in that light. 
The men, although they are not fraternity broth- 
ers, should feel that they have something in com- 
mon by being honored by membership in a fra- 
ternity. There should be a spirit of harmony in- 
stead of antagonism. For years the members of 
the various fraternities at our school have been 
knocking the others, causing general enmity and 
hard feeling all around. Is it not time to wash 



off the war paint and throw away the hammers 
that have been beating such an incessant tattoo 
on the anvil? Let the fraternities join hands and 
do their part. An Inter-Fraternity Board will 
do the rest. 

An Inter-Fraternity Board could easily be or- 
ganized, composed of one member from each 
chapter. Meetings should be held regularly at 
the various fraternity houses. All questions aris- 
ing between the fraternities could be decided by 
the board instead of each fraternity trying to 
have its way and waiting to stab the other in the 
back for revenge. 

The board could provide rules for the "rush- 
ing" of freshmen, election of class officers, wheth- 
er or not liquor should be allowed in the chapter 
houses, etc. 

At present there is no agreement in regard to 
"rushing" freshmen. Immediately after the E'ni- 
versity is opened in the fall the fraternities swoop 
down upon the freshman and run him through 
smoker after smoker until he can hear his tongue 
rattle in his head and he feels like a smoked 
herring. Often the freshman makes a disadvan- 
tageous plunge into the wrong fraternity, and 
often the fraternity makes a poor grab, due to the 
short time in which they have to act under the 
present system, or lack of system. Why not set 
a date, such as Thanksgiving, up to which time 
an order of "Hands off!" should apply? This 
would give both the fraternity and the freshman 
time to investigate more thoroughly and thus 
avoid many mistakes. ^ 

An agreement in reference to the election of 
class officers should also be entered into by all 
the fraternities. Cast aside the old "Ward-Boss" 
tactics of trying to railroad your fraternity broth- 
ers into office regardless of their qualifications 
and fitness for the offices. Let the best man win. 
Naturally a fraternity takes pride in having its 
members in office, but would it not take more 
pride in knowing that they were elected by the 
popular vote of the students, and not through 
petty fraternity politics ? 

Some of the chapters prohibit liquor in the 
house, while others permit it. This should cer- 
tainly be a question for the board to decide. This 
would eliminate the "knocks" which one fraterni- 
ty gives another at the present time. 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



131 



Think it over, Fraternities, and decide whether 
organization would not be more beneficial to all 
concerned than the present "cut throat" system. 
Anti-Fraternity legislation is now being at- 
tempted in several States, based mainly on the 
points set out in this article. Who can tell when 
it will strike here? Get busy and work together, 
and you will thus eliminate this possible dilemma. 



TRIP THROUGH THE HUMAN BODY. 



By B. P. Jones, Dental, 16. 



It was a fine summer day when Bili Rubin and 
Bill Verdin closed up the Ol-factory and invited 
their lady friends, Ethyl Alcohol and Bella Don- 
na, to accompany them to the Islands of Langer- 
han's to hear the great Trochanter speak on the 
Navel question. Bili Rubin had procured before 
Hand a bundle of Eats, neatly tied up with 
Spinal cord, costing three Bones. 

Pso-as to get there quickly, they sailed down 
the Alimentary Canal to McBurney's Point in 
a Blood Vessel. On the way down Bili Rubin 
tried to make Bella Donna believe she was as 
Cutis Vera, but in Vein. She told him he had 
too much Nerve and Gall, and to be careful or the 
Recurrent Tibial would swamp them. Tym-panic 
had sailed there before and the Recurrent Tibial 
had Rectum on the shores of Gall. Poor Sole! 
They went from the Alimentary Canal into Hun- 
ter's Canal. 

Ethyl Alcohol was reading a very Humerus 
book entitled "On The Trail of the Lonesome 
Spine," by Mic-Robe. Bili Verdin remarked that 
he was green at sailing but was not as Red-y as 
Bili Rubin. At the end of Hunter's Canal the 
bunch left the Vessel in the hands of Art-ery to 
get some Col-on board. They crossed the Islands 
of Langerhan's on Foot via the Pons Varolii. 
Within a Radius of half a mile they could see 
flocks of Ducts. The Ducts of Lieberkuhn, float- 
ing on Peristalic Waves. On reaching the island 
lunch was served beneath a Shed of Tears, away 
from Solar Rays. Here was served cold Shoulder 
and hot Tongue on Flatlets of Wharton's jelly, 
the white substance of Swan, with Heart-Beat 
Salad. 



After lunch Bili Rubin strolled off to get some 
of Adam's apples, while the rest of the body 
picked berries in Peyer's Patches. They thought 
they could hear Eye-ball and Verte-brae and 
were very much frightened and this grated on 
Jacobson's Nerve. However, by taking a Glisson's 
Capsule they became quite Serus. The noise they 
heard, however, was the music from the Dental 
Band marching along the Alveolar Border to 
Meat the great Trochanter, who was coming to 
the Island in a Lymph Vessel, decorated with 
Two-lips, and propelled by the Oculo-motor. The 
great Trochanter, having pointed out the Vas De- 
ferns between the two Navel policies, told about 
his Tryps-in the Teres Minor, with Sartorius ; he 
also told about the Pacchionian Bodies buried in 
the Pyramids of Malpighi and the Temple built 
in the regiion of Gluteus Maximus. The pro- 
ceedings were very much interrupted by Ro- 
lando and Sylvius, Fissures by trade who had 
been down to Glen-oid, a Tough Joint, and got 
"stewed." E-rips-in and smashes Lymph's nose. 
They had their Cheek all right. 

The Nerve of Bell was shown when he leeped 
the Loops of Henle — some Feet I assure you. 
Some of the people rode Bronchi up and down 
the race Tracts of Gall and Burdach; others 
watched the Ce-cum in on the shore. The children 
enjoyed the Cytes of L'euko- and Lympho- and 
made their Pa-tell-a story to them. After con- 
sulting the Auricles of the Heart they all went 
home through the Ventricles. At present Bili 
Verdin is in the Central Acini Cells with the 
Giants breaking Gall Stones for insulting the 
Great Omentum. This made Poly-morph sore, so 
she caught Oliva by the Body and placed him 
in the Cell-a Tursica, taking a Spleen and making 
Osteoblasts across his Solar Plexus, then Amy- 
lopsin spoke of Indican and Skatol being in at- 
tendance. Now, concerning poor Bili Rubin — 
alas ! ! he Tryps-in the Ol-factory and loses his 
Toes. It must be terrible to Lac-tose — amen. 



Girl (reading letter from brother at the front) ; 
"John says a bullet went right through his hat 
without touching him." 

Old Lady : "What a blessing he had his hat on, 
dear." — London Opinion. 



132 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 

A MONTHLY JOURNAL 

Devoted to the interests of the University 

of Maryland. 

Subscription Pricft. $1.00 Per Annum, In Advance 

Reprints Furnished At Cost 

Advertising Rates Submitted Upon Request. 

608 Professional Building 

BALTIMORE, MD. 

EDITORIAL STAFF. 

J. Ben Robinson, D.D.S Editor-in-Chief 

Nathan Winslow, M.D Business Manager 

James M. Hepbron, LL.B Law 

A. A. Sonnenburg, Phar. D Pharmacy 

M. E. Sullivan, R. N Nursing 

A. Z. Aldrldge, '16 Dental 

W. Lester Baldwin, '16 Law 

George Karmann, '16 Pharmacy 

FEBRUARY 1, 1916. 



EDITORIALLY EXPRESSED. 



"Right is right and wrong is wrong. Seven 
words in a creed, and all of life to live." 



Have you subscribed to the Gazette? See 
your class representative, pay the subscription fee 
of one dollar and get the paper for the year. Let's 
help each other ! 



That old law of compensation still holds. We 
get out of life in proportion to what we put into 
it. Don't blame the other fellow if things aren't 
what you like. You might have done better. 



Between a chronic Mexican revolution on the 
one hand and the bloodiest war of all time now 
going on in Europe on the other we are spending 
much of our time lamenting our unfit condition to 
participate in a similar pastime. Preparedness is 
a fine propaganda for a political issue in an Amer- 
ican Presidential campaign, or better, an excuse 
for a partisan Congress to consume much valu- 
able time in discussing, but beyond that it can 
only serve to arouse our neighbors and present 
good friends to a sense of danger in our activities 
and to develop a militaristic spirit on our part, the 



The College Man Sets 
the Styles! 

Uphold your reputation by wearing 
suits made the "Matched Pattern" 
way, the most important clothing 
invention of the decade ! 

These suits are sold exclusively by 

THE QUALITY SHOP 
Balto. and Liberty Sts. 



sequel of which is war and disaster. Christ com- 
manded: "Take not up the sword. They who 
take up the sword shall perish by the sword." 




Since the last issue of the Gazette there has 
been a complete reorganization of the Editorial 
staff. The object is to have all departments 
equally represented and to secure representatives 
who will show an active interest and who will 
feel a responsibility in the success of the paper 
and so support its columns. At one of the meet- 
ings of the Editorial staff the suggestion of creat- 
ing an individuality in the paper was strongly 
urged. This can best be done by the editors and 
friends interesting themselves by writing articles 
of general interest for the Gazette. All are re- 
quested to assist the Editors in making this paper 
second to none among the college papers of the 
country. 



One of the things vitally essential to the suc- 
cess of any publication is its circulation. The 
circulation of the Gazette among the students, we 
are frank to admit, has not been what it should be. 
We have, however, received splendid support 
from the alumni and this has helped in a way to 
offset the apparent lack of interest among the 
students. 

We feel confident that if the student will take 
the trouble to acquaint himself with the Gazette 
and what it is doing he will immediately realize 
what he has hitherto missed. The Gazette pro- 
poses to give the students a real "live, up-to-the- 
minute" college paper, and to do this we must 
have your support and co-operation. 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



133 



There are just two ways in which you can 
help "boost" the Gazette: One is to subscribe 
yourself and the other is to get some one else to 
subscribe. Fall in line, fellows, and let's have 
that subscription now. 

"How dear to our hearts is the steady subscriber. 
Who pays in advance at the birth of each year, 

Who lays dov/n the money, and does it quite 
gladly, 
And casts 'round the office a halo of cheer. 

"He never says 'Stop it ; I cannot aflford it, 

I'm getting more journals than now I can read.' 

But always says 'Send it; all readers like it — 
In fact we all think it a help and a need.' " 



Tables reserved for ladies Open all night 

SPECIAL RATES TO STUDENTS 



AT 



SLAMS AND SALUTES. 



THE FABLE (IN SLANG) OF AN ALTRU- 
ISTIC DENTAL STUDENT. 



Once there was an ass — beg pardon, a dental 
student. Like Caesar he came, he saw, but did 
he conquer? It was just about the time of his 
coming that his cerebral mechanism had received 
into some of its convolutions a certain bug. This 
particular bug was the exalting bug of ALTRU- 
ISM, and it came straight to that poor boob's door 
knob, strange to say, direct from the "nuts" of 
several of the most ardent believers in its buzz 
and sting. It had tried to alight before, and had 
almost succeeded inasmuch as the kid was hot- 
headed and gave it a warm reception. Why, 
when just old enough to wear galluses he had 
thought of the day he could feel in his bones the 
right to push out his jersey, swell up and feel as 
gay as the guy who wrote "Home, Sweet Home." 
Time came when he felt much like taking a real 
practical swig of his own out of the demijohn of 
helpfulness and good. Thereby he began to cast 
his lachrymal orbits all about and around for a fit 
subject for experimentation upon and research 
therewith. 

He found the subject. A small skirt, model 18, 
stock No., Potash and Perlmutter. He found one 
chicken. She had one sweet a da beake, and fina 
da expression. You know the kind. That sweet 



The Imperial Lunch Room 

526 W .Baltimore St. 

Phone St. Paul 8478 Baltimore, Md. 



ilrooping lily, ready to be undrooped, and every- 
thing was all set and ready to unjosh the droops. 
The student made a bunch of figures around his 
head and came to think that what the jane needed 
wasateaspoonful (large size) of his unadulterated 
and untapped brand of altruism. So he began the 
undrooping. With a liquid eye he looked over and 
down her masticatory cavity and finds the chief 
masticatory organs scarce as hen's teeth. Once 
more he feels the thrills of exaltation. The hero 
must aid the suffering and rescue the perishing. 
He would give a mint for a watchword. He must 
have a watchword to succeed. With restora- 
tion he links that awful word SACRIFICE. He 
needs this word, too, for the poor thing can only 
make a time to have her dental work done after 
the hour of six in the evening. The reason : She 
would rather loaf on the boss than on the Kid. 
So thusly, the Kid joins the night class, for he 
realizes a late evening's work for many days in 
the old infirmary. Nevertheless he answers the 
call of "Bring on the Gladiator," and prepares 
to grasp this noble piece of specimen work to be. 

He wur-ruks, he labors, he cusses. He fits a 
band for a crown and pays for the Kid's mate- 
rial. A crown which he makes the big mistake to 
think is a crown of glory and joy forever. Gosh! 
This inspissated hunk of prune thinks he is an 
altruist, perhaps as great a man as Henry Ford 
or the late deceased Booker T. Washington. 

But all of a sudden he is rudely awakened. 
Another actor has entered upon the scene. An- 
other ass — pardon, another dental student. The 
newcomer speaks to the young thing. There is a 
physiological phenonenon called "reciprocal in- 
nervation." I have it a reciprocal attraction and 
consequent attachment. The chicken flew the 
first kid's coop. She left him with blasted hopes 
of expected thankfulness, with his circulatory 
pump reversed, his gears grinding, the bug Black 



134 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



Flagged, and his dough sticky and lacking yeast, 
while his thoughts were damnable. 

Some say a chicken will come home to roost, 
but the kid has locked the coop and thrown the 
key away. This kid on the following day re- 
quested the demonstrator to search him out a 
handsome cleaning. Mor.'Vl: Never put arsenic 

ON AN ACHING TOOTH. P. T. S. 



ORGANIZATIONS. 



Dental Society Notes. 

The F. J. S. Gorgas Odontological Society was 
organized Jan. 12, 1916. A constitution was 
adopted and officers were elected for the remain- 
ing part of the present school year. At the next 
meeting — June 26, 1916 — a program will be an- 
nounced for the subsequent meetings. Forty-nine 
seniors and juniors make up the membership of 
the society and the present enthusiasm indicates 
a great future for the society. The officers are: 

Honorary President — T. O. Heatwole, M.D., 
D.D.S. 

President — J. Ben Robinson, D.D.S. 

Vice-President — A. Clinton Albert. 

Secretary-Treasurer — A. Z. Aldridge. 

Critic— W. E. Bean. 

Executive Committee — A. C. Albert, chairman ; 
J. R. Funderburk, A. G. Bryant, R. F. Brown 
and C. T Haile. 



STYLISH and COMFORTABLE 
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PSI OMEGA. 
Psi Omega Dental Fraternity is enjoying a most 
successful season. Beside a large membership 
from both senior and junior classes a goodly num- 
ber has been received from the freshmen class. 
Psi Omega will hold two dances during February, 
one to be given by the newly-elected officers. 

J. R. F. 



PHI SIGMA KAPPA. 
The Phi Sigma Kappa will hold their annual 
dinner at the Hotel Rennert, Saturday, February 
19, at 7.30 P. M. It is expected that Mr. Daniel 
Willard, president of the B. & O., will be one of 
the chief speakers. 



THE DICKERSOX LAW SOCIETY. 



With Messrs. William L. Murphy, Jr., and J. 
I. McCourt, as president and secretary, respec- 
tively, the Dickerson Law Society, of the interme- 
diate class, has been very active since its reor- 
ganization last October. The meetings are held 
every Friday night, from 7 to 8 P. M. Several 
juniors have been taken in as members and they 
have shown as much interest and enthusiasm as 
the members of the intermediate class. 

The object of the society is to train its mem- 
bers in the art of forensic oratory and to teach 
them to debate upon a subject without having 
first prepared it. 

Several spirited debates have been held and 
the subjects proved interesting and instructive 
to the members present. On one occasion the 
society formed a congress and then argued on 
the bill which was presented for their considera- 
tion. A debate was held recently with the debating 
team of the Young iMen's Christian Association, 
at which time the judges decided in favor of the 
Dickerson Law Society. 

The most elaborate affair, however, that the 
society has held was a mock trial which took 
place on Wednesday, December 28, 1915. At that 
time the friends and relatives of the members 
were invited and the attendance was so large that 
many were turned aawy. The accused, Mr. 
Hiram C. Griffin, was on the stand for the murder 
of the only daughter of a multi-millionaire. He 
was ably defended by Messrs. Page and Penn, 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



135 



and on behalf of the State Messrs. Murphy and 
Silberstein proved a good match for their oppo- 
nents. The trial was presided over by Judge 
Gorter and the jury found a verdict in favor of 
the accused. 

The training which the members get at the 
meetings of the society was clearly brought out 
at the trial. H. Wroth Shenton, 

Historian. 



ITEMS. 



MEDICAI^GRADUATE. 



At the last meeting of the Faculty of Physic 
Dr. Albert H. Carroll, class of 1907, was promoted 
from associate to associate professor of Gastro- 
Enterology. For some years Doctor Carroll has 
been devoting his entire attention to diseases of 
the gastro-intestinal tract and has been doing 
very meritorious work along these lines. 

When he took charge of the dispensary clinic 
it had dwindled away to almost nothing and now, 
by his energy, enthusiasm and competency, he has 
made it one of the largest and best conducted de- 
partments of the dispensary. Always on the alert 
to increase the efficiency of the gastro-enterologi- 
cal clinic, he has spared no effort in time or en- 
ergy. Hence his promotion comes with especial 
gratification to his friends and colleagues. 

Doctor Carroll's best work has been along the 
lines of fractional gastric and duodenal analyses. 
By this method it has been demonstrated that the 
gastric digestion passes through a cycle, varying 
according to the stage, in either the normal or ab- 
normal individual. Thus it has been proven that 
reliance should not be placed upon a single gastric 
analysis, but that a number of analyses of con- 
tents withdrawn at stated intervals should be 
made before a diagnosis is attempted. He has 
likewise attained a considerable degree of both lo- 
cal and general prominence by his writings on the 



subject dearest to his heart — diseases of the ali- 
mentary tube. 

He has shown a marked degree of executive 
ability not only in his organization and manage- 
ment as the president of the University of Mary- 
land Medical Society, but also as president of the 
Medical Alumni Association, as secretary of the 
General Alumni Association and of the Medical 
and Chirurgical Faculty, each one and all of 
which positions has felt the impulsion of his en- 
ergy. It is, therefore, with particular gratifica- 
tion that the Gazette, on behalf of his friends, 
congratulates Doctor Carroll upon his well- 
merited promotion. 



Dr. Ralph P. Truitt was in the city a few days 
ago. For the past two years he has been making 
his home in Louisiana. He was on his way to 

visit his parents in Snow Hill, Md. 



The following were recent visitors to the Uni- 
versity Hospital: 
Drs.— 

Louis B. Henkle, Jr., class of 1884, Annapolis, 
Md.; 

Edwin D. Cronk, class of 1884, Winfield, Md. ; 

H. Lee Kneisley, class of 1905, Hagerstown, 
Md.; 

Frederick N. Nichols, class of 1902, Denton, 
Md.; 

Roland R. Diller, class of 1910, Denton, Md. ; 

William E. Martin, class of 1909, Harrisville, 
Md.; 

H. M. Fetting, class of 1897, Westminster, Md. ; 

L. Neale Patrick, class of 1909, Gastonia, N. C. ; 

L. L. Gordy, class of 1915, Sharpstown, Md. ; 

Charles H. Keesor, class of 1911, Wheeling, 
W.Va. 

Preston Boggs, class of 1906, Franklin, W. Va. 

Edgar M. Bush, class of 1896, Hampstead, Md. ; 

Charles H. Legg, class of 1907, Union Bridge, 
Md. 



WILLIAM J. MILLER 

Jewelery, Diamonds, Watches 

College Jewelry 
Class Pina and Rings, College Seals 
28 East Baltimore St, Baltimore, Md. 22 W. LcxingtOH St., ■ Baltimore, Md 



R LLERBROCK 



136 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



Dr. A. Aldridge Matthews, class of 1900, super- 
intendent of the University Hospital from 1903 to 
1904, and now practicing in Spokane, Wash., was 
also a recent visitor. He was greeted by many old 
friend and extensively entertained. Mrs. Mat- 
thews accompanied him. 



Dr. Vincent J. Demarco, class of 1915, who is an 
intern at the Metropolitan Hospital, was here on a 
visit of several days. 



Dr. A. S. Coleman, class of 1914, has resigned 
his position as resident gynecologist to the Univer- 
sity Hospital and gone to Columbus, Ga. He will 
act as resident surgeon in a sanitarium there. 



We are glad to learn that Dr. John D. Fiske, 
class of 1875, who fell down the ladder of a steam- 
boat recently and fractured the surgical neck of the 
humerus, is making a good recovery, and has been 
seen around the Hospital little the worse for the 
accident. 



The Adjunct Faculty of the University of Mary- 
land Medical School and the College of Physicians 
and Surgeons organized and elected the following 
officers : President, Dr. Wilbur P. Stubbs ; Secre- 
tary, Caleb Winslow ; Executive Committee, Drs. 
William Tarun, G. Milton Linthicum and Alexius 
McGlannan. The officers were instructed to pre- 
pare by-laws to govern the organization. The 
Faculty consists of over 100 physicians who are on 
the teaching staff of the Medical School. The at- 
tendance was good, there being about 60 members 
present. 



LAW— GRADUATE. 



Mabbett K. Reckord, class of 1914, who is now 
located at 901 Keyser Building, has recently re- 
turned from Atlantic City, where he spent nearly 
three months for his health. 



Messrs. Fisher & Fisher, of the class of 1909, 
have removed their law offices from 18 E. Lex- 
ington St. to the Union Trust Building. 



Saul Praeger, of Cumberland, Md., was in the 
city during the past week working on an impor- 



tant law case which is to be tried in Allegany 
county in the near future. Mr. Praeger repre- 
sents a lady who is suing a well-known Cumber- 
land physician for damages caused by the fact 
that she has turned black. This fact is due, she 
claims, to the large quantities of nitrate of silver 
she has taken on the physician's orders. Mr. 
Praeger graduated from the Law School of the 
L^niversity of Maryland in 1911. 



John L. Cornell, class of 1913, counsel for the 
Society for the Suppression of Vice, has just is- 
sued an interesting pamphlet on "The Abolition 
of the Red-Light District." Copies of this article 
may be secured by writing Mr. Cornell at 628 
Equitable Building. 



William J. Riordan, class of 1914, spent about 
a week at his old home at Mt. Vernon, N. Y., re- 
cently. No, Mt. V^emon is not the home of the 
famous whisky of that name. 



"Boss" Kanode and Bruce Lightner, both of 
the class of 1915, composing the well-known law 
firm of Kanode & Lightner, of Hagerstown Flag 
Station, were aroused from their usual morning 
siesta several days ago by a caller. No, it didn't 
happen to be a client, and was none other than 
Paul M. Taylor, the much-talked of Baltimore 
lawyer and journalist. This is the third caller 
this renowned firm has had this month — the other 
two were book agents. It's strange the way busi- 
ness keeps up ! 



"Prof." Alexander Geddes, the sweet singer of 
democracy, who was officially crowned Poet Lau- 
reate by his Honor James Harry Preston, was the 
guest recently of the Henry D. Harlan Law So- 
ciety, and entertained the members with what he 
called his "comedy scream and crying act." 

The "Professor" recited "Old Ned's Christ- 
mas," which is even better than "The Face on the 
Barroom Floor" (the Professor admits it him- 
self), and sang several songs in his rich tenor ( ?) 
voice, being accompanied in the chorus by that 
well-known University soloist, Mr. "Jimes" 
Byrne. 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



137 



Abe Rosenthal, class of 1915, recently suc- 
ceeded in defeating such legal lights as Louis Ash- 
man and Bernard Cline in a case in the Circuit 
Court of Baltimore city. Rosenthal represented 
the plaintiff in a case where a conveyance of real 
estate was attacked on the grounds that it was 
made to defraud creditors. 



LAW— SENIOR. 



We wish to extend our hearty congratulations 
to the following of our classmates who passed 
the recent State Bar examination : Allen, Arm- 
strong, Bailey, Bloede, Brickwedde, Cooper, D. 
G. ; Cooper, W. H.; Diggs, Farley, Gambrill, 
Gwynn, Henninghausen, Hughes, Kieffner, La- 
mar, O'Connor, Pardew, Rosenberg, Russell, 
Schmied, Sullivan and Thomas. 



Mr. William Frazier Russell, Jr., of Chester- 
town, Md., has found it necessary to give up his 
work at the University because of illness. The 
strain of the Bar Examination and preparations 
for the January examinations, together with his 
work as instructor at the Maryland School for the 
Blind, proved too much for himi. He has been 
compelled to give up his work at the Blind 
School and is now recuperating at Palm Beach, 
Florida. ( ?) 

Mr. Russell has had many requests from the 
citizens of his home town and county to open up 
his law office there, and expects to do so as soon 
as he recovers his health. He made a very envi- 
able record in debating and oratory at Washing- 
ton College, from which he graduated in 1912, 
and he lead the class at the University in Prac- 
tice Court work, being the only man to receive a 
perfect mark in both pleadings and argument of 
every case he tried. 

"Fraz's" pleasant smile and great personal 
magnetism have won for him many friends among 
his classmates, who, because of his recognized 
ability, are very proud to send him back to his 
Eastern Shore as a representative of the class of 
*16. We deeply regret, however, losing four 
months' of his delightful companionship. 



George Raymond Hughes, of Cumberland, Md., 
has begun the practice of law in his home town. 



Now Iteady for Fall, 1915. See Us for Classy Clothes 
Suits to Measure, $15.00 to $35.00 

A. JACOBS & SONS, Tailors 

899 NORTH HOWARD STREET 
Open ETenings 9 P. M. Cor. Kichmond St. 

We believe one of Cumberland's fair damsels 
took advantage of her leap year rights while 
"Huesie" was home during the holidays and pre- 
vailed upon him to "put out his shingle" at once. 
We congratulate her for grasping opportunity 
by the forelock and catching such a splendid 
partner — but we miss him very much at the 
University. 



Mr. Wendell D. Allen has been made secre- 
tary to one of the Senate committees, of which 
his father is an influential member. Wendell as- 
sures us that he will do all he can to secure a 
large appropriation for his alma mater — Wash- 
ington College — to enable it to replace the mag- 
nificent William Smith Hall, which was destroyed 
by fire Sunday morning, January 15th. 



The following men have been chosen by Prac- 
tice Court, Judges Sappington and Bramble, to 
contest in the preliminaries for the Honor Case : 
Baldwin, Kieft'ner, Levy and Bartlett; Holmes, 
Pardew, Allen and Kartman ; Leitch, Cooper, D. 
G., Sullivan and Gambrill. The four best men 
will be chosen for the Honor Case in April. 



The Henry D. Harlan Law Society has been 
unable to hold but one meeting during the month 
because of quizzes and examinations. 



HAVE YOU HAD YOUR PHOTOGRAPH 
TAKEN FOR TERRAE MARIAE? 



HAVE YOU HANDED IN YOUR CLASS 
STATISTIC BLANK? 



LAW— INTERMEDIATE. 



Owing to a complete change in the policy of 
the Gazette no editor has yet been appointed 
from this class. We hope they will have a good 
write-up next month. 



138 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



Hart Schaffner & Marx, 
Kuppenheimer, 
"Society Brand" 



The clothes that college men 
like a lot 



Bdlllmore Street At Ch^rlel 



DENTAL— SENIOR. 



Mr. Hobbs, who was operated on at tiie Uni- 
versity Hospital during the Xmas holidays, is with 
us asrain. 



E. L. Smith, after many hours of research work, 
has brought forth a wonderful discovery in Dental 
Histology, namely the "Enameloblasts." "Sic 
him, Prince, he bit your father." 



Dr. Haynes (to Welch) — "Mr. Welch, what is 
a tooth?" 

Welch — "A tooth is a mouth organ for masti- 
cating purposes." (Aside to Jones) — "Oh, I 
know my stuff, alright ; eh, bo ?" 



The boys took up a collection and presented 
"Polly" May with a shave. He is 12 pounds 
lighter. 



Hello Woods, how are the little Bushes? 
Wadda ya mean ? 



We wonder what has become of the big "B" 
which belongs to the beautiful "S" which adorns 
the coat of our famous "Charley Chaplin" Al? 



Via heard over phone — "I am sorry, madam, 
that I cannot see you today, but if you come up to 
the infirmary I will get you another good den- 
tist." 

"Don't hit him with that ; it has nails in it" 



The contest for position of noisiest man in the 
class is being closely contested between "Rough" 
Lena and "Amos" Bennett. 



"Warning to Laggards." — Get busy, boys, we 
have only three and a-half months in which to 
prepare for the deciding battle. Shall we be vic- 
tors or shall we be the vanquished ? This is for 
you to decide. 

Join the dental society and come to our meeting 
on Feb. 9th or Feb. 23rd, 1916. 



DENTAE— JUNIOR. 



E. B. Lancaster, '17. 



Roy P. Smith, at window, intending getting an 
amalgam filling with a cement slab — "How am I 
going to get the mercury?" 

"Red" Corrigan, handing a small bottle in at the 
desk — "Please give me a nickel's worth of absorb- 
ent cotton." 

Cable attended a party the other night at which 
the thirst-quencher was, with the exception of 
one vote, selected as beer. Someone ask Cable 
how he enjoyed his glass of milk. 



In Friday night quiz — "Mr. Brown, what is the 
first permanent tooth to erupt?" "I declare I 
don't know, Doctor." 



Miller, Huckous and Sampson, the hot sports, 
recently spent the week-end with us down at 
school. Charlie Claiborne also paid us a short 
visit last week. 

During the Xmas holidays Santoni acted as 
official interpreter at the second Pan-American 
Scientific Congress held in W^ashington and had 
the occasion of meeting many of the most promi- 
nent scientists of South America as well as a 
number of the high officials of the United States, 
including the President, etc. Congratulations to 
the Duke. 



DENTAL— FRESHMAN. 



Ch.arles F. Smith. 



Are you familiar with these? — 
Doctor Whitney — "At our last — 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



139 



Doctor Patterson — "I say " 

Doctor Heatwole — "So much for that 

Doctor Matthews — "The State Board of" 
Doctor Marden — "Now we take up" 



Conway, possibly because of his weight, refuses 
to use elevators. He, on the other hand, prefers 
pulling a Chap Charlie stunt down the stairway. 
A recent demonstration was given in a local thea- 
tre. 



We realize that the fellows are not as yet con- 
noisseurs on their technical instruments, but Tetu 
should be wiser than to call a right angle lead piece 
a "right handed articulator. 



Who didn't know the meaning of "Yiddish ?" 



What happened to Phinney on his return after 
the holidays ? 



A few changes have been brought about in the 
Editorial staff which we hope is for your benefit. 
It is and will be our object to give you value re- 
ceived in a good, clean moral paper. The pur- 
chases of this have been few in this class in com- 
parison with the number of members. We promise 
you to do our best. Will you reciprocate financial- 
ly by its purchase ? 



PHARMACY— SENIOR. 



At its last meeting the class decided upon a 
class pin, a matter which had been under discus- 
sion ever sinre this time last year. The pin is a 
plain design of Roman gold, bearing the let- 
ters U of M, '16, in black enamel 



After all the holidays were the sweeter on ac- 
count of their being short. Thanks to Brother 
Schmidt, who deserves all the credit for our 
presence on the three days which we declared 
holiday. 

It is perhaps now in order for the class to de- 
cide upon a Washington's Birthday holiday ex- 
tension. 



Let us hope the chemical laboratory is now a 
thing of the past for all of us. 



HEPBRON & HAYDON 

We Sell Every Law Book and Syllabus 
Used at the U. of M. 

St. Paul 8794 1243-53 CALVERT BLDG. 



"Let us eat, drink and be merry" might be a de- 
sirable slogan after the examinations are over. 
What about a class banquet? 

o 

PHARMACY— JUNIOR. 



C. C. Smith. 



Since the last issue a radical change has been 
made in the editorial plan of the Gazette., which 
change is fully explained in other pages of this 
issue. We realize our shortcomings and have 
endeavored to make this journal more worthy of 
your esteem and support. For one to be really 
interested in any thing the editor of this de- 
partment feels that it is necessary to have the 
members of the class feel that they are a part of 
that thing. Eor this reason we have asked in these 
columns for news items and suggestions from the 
class, but in vain. 

Again we sound the S. O. S. May wc not in 
the future count on your assistance in making a 
Greater Gazette? 



On Thursday, January 14th, the class, after 
much discussion, civil and otherwise, adopted 
the honor system. Up to the time of going press 
no definite plans have been agreed upon. Let's 
get together, fellows, and not number ourselves 
among the failures along this line. 



After beginning the year with a most remark- 
able display of interest and enthusiasm class spirit 
seems to be decidedly on the wane. Out of 73 
members only 25 were present at the last class 
meeting. A still smaller number have paid their 
dues. If we have that banquet we must get busy 
at once as the time approacheth. Come on, gen- 
tlemen, start something! 



February 1st and the intermediate exaii's are 
upon us, and we look forward to the day when 



140 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



they shall end. There will be many who shall re- 
joice on that day, we fear tha: there will also be 
weeping and wailing and gnashing of teeth. Let 
your lamps be trimmed and burning for 

"Of all the sad words of tongue or pen, 
The saddest are these, 'It might have been.' ' 



Dr. Culbreth in Materia Medica — "If you were 
called to the bedside of a person who said : 'Doc- 
tor, I have just taken a tablespoonful of landnum 
by mistake,' what would you say''" 

Voice from the rear — "Call the wagon!" 



Mr. Paulk ("from Georgia, suh"), emergency 
professor of Latin, being asked by Dr. Base to 
describe an ice plant, described something rang- 
ing from an ice plant to a water wagon to a 
brewery, but resembling miostly the last named. 
Get any connection between the last two ? 



Mr. Retaliatta has been looking very pale and 
melancholly of late. Can anyone diagnose his 
case? We have already formed an opinion and 
have decided that his malady is beyond the aid 
of any drug yet discovered. Seems to be the 
wrong season of the year though and quite con- 
trary to "In the spring a young man's fancy," et 
cetera. 

Judging from some of the long-winded discus- 
sions in class meetings some of our members 
would make new records as Marathan runners. 



Mr. H. G. Becker thinks his seat in the Chem- 
istry lecture hall too close to the experimental 
table and he is fully convinced of the fact that 
oxygen supports combustion. 



Lock the doors ! 
hat. 



Mr. Kushner has lost his 



A certain member of our class had his hair cut 
and there followed one solid week of rainy weath- 
er. For goodness sake wait until summfer when 
the crops need it before again having your locks 
shorn. 



Last week we went into a lunch room to ob- 
tain something to satisfy the demand of the in- 
ner man. Seeing an apparently appetizing three- 
storied hunk of cake covered on top with choco- 



late icing and sprinkled with coaconut, we de- 
cided to take a chance. Steve Brodie fared little 
worse. The aforementioned cake was handed 
out with a spoon which looked rather suspicious. 
On being touched with the spoon the socalled 
cake immediately went into pieces, bearing a 
sticky resemblance to corn flakes. Undismayed, 
we tried to corrall a few of these shavings with the 
spoon, but as soon as they were touched they too 
broke up into smaller pieces. After about 10 
minutes, when the particles began to approach 
the molecular state, we gave up in despair. This 
goes to prove the truth of one familiar saying: 

"They all look good when they're far away," 
and the fallacy of another, 

"A thing of beauty is a joy forever." 

We warn you against three-storied, chocolate- 
coated, cocoanut-besprinkled, lunch-room cake 
served with a spoon. 



THE BOOKKEEPER. 

Under a glaring electric light 

The Pharmacy Student sits. 
The Student — a mighty man is he, 

With quick and sharpened wits : 
AH the rest come easily to him, 

But Bookkeeping gives him fits. 

His face shows resolution and purpose strong, 
Though care has made it thin and worn; 

His brow is wet with honest sweat; 
To conquer he has sworn; 

But as he looks things square in the face 
Hope seems all forlorn. 

Week in, week out, from night till morn 

He sees the hours go by; 
You can hear the scratching of his pen 

As another way he'll try: 
And to himself he keeps on saying: 

"I'll do it or I'll die." 

Does he go on Sunday to the church 

And sing from out the hymnal? 
Does he hear the parson pray and preach 

And tell of joys eternal? 
Nay! He sits aloue in his back room 

And enters in his Journal. 

Toiling, rejoicing, sorrowing, 

On through the Ledger he goes: 
Each evening sees some task begun, 

Each morning sees it close (?) 
Something attempted, nothing done; 

He's lost a night's repose. 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



141 



At last in direst desperation 
To a classmate now he cries, 

"Everything to this old Bookkeeping 
I have to sacrifice." 

And from his classmates' books he copies 
And to the teacher lies. 

Maybe it is a sin to copy and to steal 

To pass examination. 
But when I've opened up a pill shop 

In a wayside station 
I'll give to some poor bookkeeper 

A lifetime situation ! " 



We acknowledge with thanks the two contribu- 
tions from members of the class received just be- 
fore going to press. 



ACADEMIC— UNDERGRADUATE. 



The Junior Class met recently and elected their 
June Ball Committee. The members of this com- 
mittee will have charge of the farewell ball in 
Commencement Week. It is composed of the fol- 
lowing men : John W. Noble, William H. Price, 
R. H. Maddox, John M. Storm, C. C. Jarman, Ira 
B. Talton, G. N. Weaver and John Somerville. 



On Friday, January 17th, the Cotillon Club gave 
another of its very entertaining dances, which was 
attended by a large number of the battalion, the 
Delaware College debaters and a number of men 
from Annapolis. The gymnasium was tastefully 
decorated with orange and black and the 
lights were shaded in red. Doctor and Mrs. Fell 
received. There were a number present. 



NURSING. 



The regular meeting of the Nurses' Alumnae As- 
sociation of the University of Maryland was held 
at the University Hospital on the evening of Janu- 
ary 3, Mrs. Edmunds in the chair. A report of the 
nurses' dance was given by Miss Laura Chaplain, 
which proved a splendid success — the proceeds 
are to be used as a sick benefit fund for nurses. 
After the business meeting, nursing topics of gen- 
eral interest were freely discussed — the nurses' 
question box being a recent but most satisfactory 
feature of the meetings — after which a social hour 
was spent. 



Intercollegiate Bureau of Academic Costume, Aibany.N.v 
COTRELL & 



LEONARD 

Official Makers of 

Caps and 
Gowns 




Correct Hoods 
for All Degrees. 

Rich Qowns for 
Pulpit and Bench. 

Bulletin, Samples 
etc. on request 



Miss Julia C. Foley, class of 1914, and assist- 
ant superintendent of nurses, of the University 
Hospital, was operated on for Appendicitis, and 
has gone to her home at Loch Raven, Md., to re- 
cuperate. 

Miss Katherine Zepp, class of 1914, is substi- 
tuting during Miss Foley's absence. 



Miss Katherine Shea, class of 1913, supervisor 
of the private halls of the University Hospital, has 
been confined to the hospital for several days with 
an attack of Bronchitis ; but is rapidly improving. 
Miss Frances Meredith, class of 1910, is substitut- 
ing during Miss Shea's absence. 



Miss Frances M. Robey, class of 1896, has gone 
to Savannah, Ga., to engage in private nursing. 



Miss Elizabeth C. Lee, class of 1896, has been 
appointed School nurse in the Public Health work. 



Miss Naomi Hellend, class of 1911, has been 
appointed nurse in the Infant Milk Work. 



Mrs. T. Harrison Cassard (nee Louise Walker), 
class of 1904, L^niversity Hospital Training 
School for Nurses, was operated on at the Hos- 
pital a few days ago, and is doing nicely. 



"Nothing Too Large— Nothing Too Small" 

Baltimore City 

Printing and Binding 

Company 

352-363 Equitable Building 






148 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



Miss Nell Curtis, class of 1911, Surgical nurse 
at the Watts Hospital, Denham, N. C, has been 
spending several days in the city. 



We are glad to report that Misses Jane Penne- 
well, and Laura Keffer, who have been ill for 
many weeks, have recovered and returned to the 



Training School. 



Misses Nellie Dix, Emily Kenney, Judith Vi- 
berg and Altha Ensor, of the Training School, 
have been confined to the hospital for some days, 
and are on the convalescing list. 



QUIPS. 

Silently, one by one, in the infinite meadows of 

the teachers' notebooks. 
Blossom the lively zeros — the forget-me-nots of 

the students. 



Ashes to ashes, 

Dust to dust ; 
If Botany doesn't kill us. 

Vegetable histology must. 



Doctor — "What happens to a body when it is 
immersed in water?" 

Enterprising Student — "WTiy, it gets wet, of 
course !" 



Dr. Hynson says— "Get Credit!" 
"Give me the CASH !" 



Professor — "By what method do you study ?" 
Ego — "Me? Oh, I generally study by osmosis !" 



A Student — "How does your head feel just be- 
fore an examination ?" 

Student No. 2 — "Like a chemical infusion." 



"Why is vegetable histology like music ?" 
"Because you have to C sharp or B flat." 



Politeness is a cheap thing and anyone who be- 
haves is entitled to it. Therefore mark ye well 
my words. 



Favorite expressions heard around the lecture 
halls : 

1. — "It takes money to run this school." 
2. — "When does your check come in?" 
3. — "Don't you know the answer to that chemis- 
try question? Ask Lemler!" 
4. — "Hand me a weed !" 
5. — "Exam, oh, Exam, how I love you???" 
Look out, Becker! That ivill explode. 
Discovered at last — "In a Bretvery." 
First Student— "Oh, I'll get through easy." 
Second Student — "Yes, I guess you will. The 
door is always open." 



ENGAGEMENT. 



The engagement is announced of John Nico- 
demus Wilson, St. John's football team coach, 
1913-1915, of Tilghman's, Md., to Aliss ]\Iar- 
guerite E. Clark, of Annapolis, Md. No date has 



been set for the wedding. 



MARRIAGES. 



Mr. David H. King, Law, class of 1916, to Miss 
Beulah M. Barker, both of Baltimore, at Balti- 
more, Md., January 23, 1915. His class extends 
its congratulations. 



Dr. John Christopher Woodland, class of 1915, 
of Jessups, Md., to Miss Margaret Blanche Ow- 
ings, of Sparrows Point, Md., at Sparrows Point, 
November 17, 1915. Dr. Woodland is resident 
physician at the State Reformatory School at 
Jessups. 



Dr. Philip Jenifer Bean, class of 1912, to Miss 
Sarah O. Goodrich, both of Jarboesville, Md., at 
Jarboesville, November 29, 1915. Dr. Bean was 
formerly connected with the Bayview Hospital. 



Dr. William Anderson Gracie, class of 1910, 
to Miss Anna Lee White, both of Cumberland, 
Md., at Cumberland, November 30, 1915. Dr. 
Gracie is the Allegany county physician. They 
will live in Cumberland. 



Dr. Dawson L. Farber, B. M. C, class of 1913, 
to Miss Jean Cowan Ennis, both of Baltimore, 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



143 



Md., at Rockville, Md., September, 9, 1915. They 
will reside in Magnolia, Ohio, where Dr. Farber 
will practice. 

Dr. David Silbennan, class of 1912, to Miss 
Jennie Merowitz, both of Baltimore, Md., at 
Baltimore, January 4, 1916. Dr. and Mrs. Sil- 
bertnan will reside at 1729 Linden avenue. 
o 

DEATHS. 



Roger T. Gill, LL.B., class of 1888, of Balti- 
more, Md., died at the Church Home and In- 
firmary as the result of an operation for gall 
stones, December 15, 1915, aged 50 years. 



Dr. William Philip Spratling, College of Phy- 
sicians and Surgeons, class of 1886, professor of 
physiology and nervous diseases in the College of 
Physicians and Surgeons from 1908 to 1909, for 
the last four years a resident of Welaka, Fla., 
died in that place December 22, 1915, from the 
effects of a gunshot wound accidentally self-in- 
flicted while hunting; aged 52 years. 



Dr. Henry McKee Tucker, class of 1899, of 
128 North Blount street, Raleigh, N. C, died at 
the Rex Hospital, that city, after a short illness 
from meningitis, November 24, 1915; aged 40 
years. Dr. Tucker was formerly an assistant 
resident surgeon at the University Hospital from 
1899 to 1900. 



Dr. Charles A. Hollingsworth, class of 1881, 
a member of the Medical and Chirurgical Faculty 
of Maryland; from 1881 to 1912 a practitioner 
and druggist of Belair, Md., and since that time 
postmaster of that city, died at his home, Novem- 
ber 10, 1915, from nephritis ; aged 58 years. 



Dr. Philip R. Hengst, Physicians and Surgeons, 
class of 1883, of Waco, Tex., died suddenly at 
532 N. Broadway, Baltimore, from apoplexy, De- 
cember 13, 1915, aged 59 years. Dr. Hengst was 
one of the most prominent physicians in Texas, 
and his death came as a distinct shock to his 
many friends and patients. 



died at his home near Waverly, Va., November 
30, 1915, from the effects of a gunshot wound of 
the head believed to have been self-inflicted while 
suffering from depression due to ill-health, aged 
65 years. Dr. Baird was formerly a member of 
the Medical Society of Virginia. 



Dr Albert Augustus Lindabury, B. M. C, class 
of 1886, Hahnemann Medical College, Philadel- 
phia, 1890, of Scranton, Pa., died in the Scranton 
State Hospital, November 22, 1915, from dia- 
betes, aged 53 years. 



Dr. Josiah Lee McComas, class of 1858, pio- 
neer physician of Oakland, Md., died from' in- 
firmities of age at the home of his son, Dr. Henry 
Wheeler McComas, class of 1888, in Oakland, 
Monday, December 20, 1915, aged 80 years. 

Dr. McComas was the son of Lee and Sarah 
(Millias) McComas. He was born in Balti- 
more, where he acquired his early education in 
the public schools and graduated from the high 
school, after which he attended Newton Uni- 
versity. 

His funeral took place at 10.30 o'clock De- 
cember 23 from St. Paul's M. E. Church in Oak- 
land. The bell which tolled his funeral was pre- 
sented the church by the deceased many years 
ago. 



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Manufacturers of 

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Dr. James Walter Baird, Physicians and Sur- 
geons, class of 1874, of Surry county, Virginia, 



Tour Bank Account 
Solicited 



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Liquid Pi-cine Co., Bed Syr. HypophospliiteB Co. 



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Interest Paid On Deposits. 



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THI UNI¥IRSIT¥ Q^IITTI 




Somebody said that it couldn't be done, 

But he, with a chuckle, replied 
That maybe it couldn't, but he would be one 

Who wouldn't say so till he'd tried. 
So he buckled right in, with the trace of a grin 

On his face — if he worried he hid it; 
He started to sing as he tackled the thing 

That couldn't be done — and he did it. 

Somebody scoffed, "Oh, you'll never do that — 

At least, no one has ever done it." 
But he took off his coat, and he took off his hat. 

And the first thing we knew he'd begun it. 
With the lift of his chin and a bit of a grin. 

Without any doubting or quiddit, 
He started to sing as he tackled the thing 

That couldn't be done — and he did it. 

There are thousands to tell you it cannot be done. 

There are thousands to prophesy failure; 
There are thousands to point out to you, one by 
one. 

The dangers that wait to assail you. 
But just buckle in with a bit of a grin, 

Then take off your coat and go to it ; 
Just start in to sing as you tackle the thing 

That "cannot be done" — and you'll do it. 

— Selected. 




VOL. U. 



BALTIMORE, MARCH, 1916. 



N«. a 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



Vol. II. 



MARCH I, 1916, 



No. 9. 



A STRANGE CASE OF ANTRUM 
TROUBLE. Howard M. Finch, D.D.S.. 147 

COLLEGE SPIRIT. Bruce C. Lightner, 
LL.B 148 

THE MEDICAL AND DENTAL AS- 
PECTS OF CHRONIC AVEOLAR 
OSTEOMYELITIS. Bennie R. Jones. . . 149 

EDITORIALS 151 



CONTENTS 

Editorially Expressed. 
SLAMS AND SALUTES.. 

ORGANIZATIONS 

Items 

QUIPS 

MARRIAGES 

DEATHS 



153 
153 
154 
163 
163 
163 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE, MD. 

HON. EMERSON C. HARRINGTON. Governor of Maryland, Chancellor. 
THOMAS FELL. A.M., Ph.D., L L. D., D. C. L., Provost 



ST. JOHN'S COLLEQE. Annapolis, Md. (^^° 



DEPARTMENT OF 
S AND SCIENCES 



) 



Founded 1696. Classical and Scientific College Courses leading to degrees. Special advantages to stu- 
dents purposing to study the professions. Military Department under army officers. Also Preparatory 
School for boys fitting for St. John's or other colleges. Term begins September 15. Address 

THOMAS FELL, Ph.D., LL.D., D.C.L., President 



DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE, UNIVERSITY 

OF MARYLAND. AND COLLEQE OF 

PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS. 

Four vears' graded course. New Laboratory Build- 
ing. Clinical advantages unsurpassed. Teaching Staff 
of 187. 110th Annual Session will begin October 1, 
1916, and cuntinue 8 months. 

WM. F. LOCKWOOD, M. D., Dean. 

DEPARTMENT OF DENTISTRY. 

35th Annual Session begins October 1, 1916, and 
Contmues 7 months. 26 Instructors. New Buildmg 
For catalogue containing course of study, etc., apply to 

TIMOTHY O. HEATWOLE, M.D.. D.D.S.. Dean, 

Baltimore. Md. 



DEPARTMENT OF LAW. 

61st Annual Session will begin Sept. 28, 1916. Faculty 
of 2b. For catalogue contammg full information ad- 
dress the Secretary, 301 St. Paul Street, Baltimore, 
Maryland. 

EDWIN T. DICKERSON, Secretary. 



DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACY. 

(Formerly Maryland College of Pharmacy) 
Annual Session begins September 25, 1916. 
structors. New Laboratories. Address 



. 74th 
11 In- 



CHARLES CASFARI, JR., Phar.D., Dean, 

Baltimore, Md. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 

Published Monthly in the Interest of the University of Maryland. 
PRICE $1.00 PER YEAR. 



Contributions solicited from Alumni of the 
University. 



Business Address, 608 Professional Building, 
Baltimore, Md. 



Vol. II. 



BALTIMORE, MD., MARCH 1, 1916. 



No. 9 



A STRANGE CASE OF ANTRUM 
TROUBLE.* 



Howard M. Finch, D.D.S., Class of 1911. 
Rochester, N. Y. 



Sitting in the lodge one evening, I became in- 
terested in the report of one of the committees re- 
garding a sick member of the Order. The man 
had been sick and unable to work for nearly 
two years, and, in spite of the efforts of the phy- 
sician employed, he was constantly growing 
worse. His pain was so intense that he could not 
sleep; and death itself would have come as a re- 
lief to this patient sufferer. 

In listening to the details of the report, I 
noted that the trouble seemed to come from the 
side of the man's face and that the doctor had 
told him it was the result of a diseased fifth 
nerve. The general details led me to suspect 
antrum trouble, and I suggested to the committee 
that they have the man call at my office so that 
I might talk with him. 

A few days later the patient called at my office 
and I made a thorough examination. I asked a 
number of questions concerning the symptoms, 
and in practically every detail, my beliefs were 
confirmed. In fact, the patient seemed delighted 
to find someone who could ask questions that 
indicated some knowledge of his trouble. It was 
all so different from the physicians he had con- 
sulted that he expressed both pleasure and sur- 
prise. 

I found that his physician had used injections 
at several different times, a very painful opera- 
tion, attempting to strike the nerve by going 
through his facial muscle. This treatment mere- 
ly increased the swelling and made the pain 
more intense. In desperation, the physician had 
finally suggested that the only chance of relief 



*Written for the Gazette. 



was an operation. The plan was to operate back 
in the ganglion and bisect the fifth nerve — imagine 
the consequences and the chance that this poor 
man was asked to take. 

By means of an antrum light, I found that the 
cavity on the diseased side of the face appeared 
cloudy and opaque. The breath was very bad 
and the patient's general condition was one of 
depression. His face showed an unnatural color 
and was swollen at times. The pain was fre- 
quently so severe that the parotid gland was so 
over stimulated as to cause the saliva to flow 
profusely from his mouth. The roof of the 
mouth was also extremely sensitive. The pain 
seemed to travel from beneath the eyes down- 
ward extending towards the ear and back again 
on the lower jaw. These pains were nearly al- 
ways present and at periods of from five to seven 
days they would become much worse, then sub- 
side somewhat for a day or two. His tempera- 
ture showed no real fever. It ran probably no 
higher than 98 3-5 and as low as 96 2-5; up and 
down but no high temperature. 

An X-ray photograph had previously been 
taken of the whole head; but I had the X-ray 
expert make several small pictures of the antrum 
region on each side. From these photographs, I 
was practically certain that small particles of roots 
had been left in the process some ten or twelve 
years before this when all teeth were extracted 
from this part of the patient's jaw ; and that they 
had pierced the antrum in such a way as to cause 
an irritation that resulted in the formation of 
more or less puss at regular intervals. 

The X-ray also showed a distinct difference 
in the appearance of the antrum on the diseased 
side from that on the healthy side. 

I administered local treatment, using aconite 
and iodine. This produced a temporary decrease 
in the pain as I had expected, but gave no per- 
manent relief. 

Having thus confirmed my conclusions in sev- 



148 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



eral different ways, I suggested an antrum opera- 
tion as treatment for the case. The man, being 
almost desperate with pain, gladly gave his con- 
sent. His ankles had already begun to swell and 
his fingers were cracked and painfully sore. 

After consulting again with some of my medi- 
cal friends, I decided to undertake the operation. 

The usual tests at the hospital having resulted 
satisfactorily, we took the patient to an operating 
room. I made an incision from the condyle to a 
point near the location of the second bicuspid. 
After probing, I found several tiny pieces of 
tooth as indicated in the X-ray photograph. I 
then took a large vulcanite burr and went through 
into the antrum. The excessive flow of blood 
prevented me from getting an accurate idea of 
just what the conditions were and so I carefully 
packed the opening and waited results. 

As soon as the patient recovered we took him 
home and the next morning he was able to 
come to my office with the report that he had 
been able to get more sleep than he had secured 
in any night for weeks previous to the opera- 
tion. 

On removing the packing, the odor and dis- 
charge of puss left no doubt as to existing con- 
ditions. I cleansed the cavity b}' forcing a 
solution clear through the antrum, then 
through the sinus into the nose, packed the 
cavity and sent the man home. This process 
was repeated every 24 hours, using thymol 
and warm water as the douche. The pain has 
gradually ceased, the swelling in the ankles dis- 
appeared, and the sore finger tips have healed. 
The color of the face is now quite natural and 
the patient eats well and sleeps all night for 
the first time in over two years. 

This is just one of the wa3"s in which the 
public (for this man will not forget to tell all 
his friends of the "miracle" that was performed 
in his case), is gradually coming to realize that 
modern dentistry is concerned with many 
things far more important than the extraction 
of worthless teeth. Such cases should also sug- 
gest to the medical practitioner the desirability 
of consulting his fellow worker in the dental 
profession when there is any doubt as to the 
cause of trouble in this part of man's anatomy. 



COLI.EGE SPIRIT. 



Bruce C. Lightner, LL.B., Class of 1915. 



"Gee ! This is a rotten dump ! No school spirit 
a-tall. Might just as well be attending McGuire's 
Barber College!" So spake the prophet. Ah! 
He longs for the "Drink Her Down for Good Old 
Maryland," and other songs and chatter indica- 
tive of college spirit. When you say "longs," 
you have spoken. He not only longs, but he 
waits ; waits for some other "colleger" to burst 
into song and verse for the good old school. He 
wants to hear the other fellows uncork the spirit. 
Does he as a student thirsting for college spirit 
chirp in with the rest? Nary a chirp! 

Have you ever heard a wail similar to the one 
which ushers in this article ? I dare say you have 
heard it many times. But, did you ever stop to 
look over the landscape of the "stude" who was 
bemoaning his fate? Did you every try to esti- 
mate the amount of "knowledge buzz" or "horse 
sense" that might or might not be contained in 
that broad expanse of ivory under the wild green 
hat or riotous checkered cap? 

As a rule the authors of "sob" remarks of this 
calibre can be found on nice, warm sunshiny days 
draped over the benches in front of the IMedical 
Building. Their books are lying under the bench, 
covered with cobwebs and many half-smoked 
white paper dainties. They all have their little 
hammers with them, and make the anvil ring with 
knocks at the old school. ]\Ieanwhile, the pro- 
fessor is at his station in the lecture room. He 
is trying to drill home some of the fundamentals 
of his subject. His audience is composed of a 
small handfull of the "faithful" who manage to 
successfully run the gauntlet past the nice warm 
benches. They pay their tuition for and insist 
on getting an "earfull" on the art of curing the 
gout, pulling the elusive molar, rolling the little 
pill, or practicing before the justice of the peace. 

The fellow who generally bewails the lack of 
spirit is the one who hasn't time to attend the 
College Night Reception in Davidge Hall each 
year. He does not lend a hand at the "get to- 
gether" meetings during the year. Nor does he 
help the Glee Club make night hideous. The 
same man who was not present at the class elec- 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



149 



tion, and comes around the next day and "beefs" 
because they elected a rank set of officers. His 
vote might have changed the result, but he was 
too busy; had to go to the movies, etc. 

The University of Maryland does not manu- 
facture college spirit and distribute it among the 
students. Neither does any other college. It is 
up to the students to produce the spirit. The Uni- 
versity can boast of a very successful career, 
dating from 1807. Its course of instruction has 
fitted many of our leading men to practice their 
profession. It now enjoys a national reputation 
as one of our leading educational institutions. 
The start was made with a very meagre supply 
of money, but a wealth of spirit ! The founders 
were men of such sterling spirit that every stu- 
dent of the University may well be proud of them ; 
proud of the wonderful advancement which our 
school has made, and proud of the many ways 
in which it has benefitted the public. The Uni- 
versity of Maryland has done its part. 

College spirit does not consist of singing 
"Drink a Highball at Nightfall" and giving the 
school yell. Of course, this is a good thing to 
take the bad taste out of your mouth after burn- 
ing the midnight oil over those lessons which 
you are trying to tuck away in your "think tank." 
However.real college spirit is reckoned by your 
work at the University; by striving to absorb 
an average amount of knowledge, and having 
time to help a less fortunate classmate. It is 
determined by the amount of energy which you 
exert toward lifting up the name of your school ; 
by doing things yourself, and not waiting for the 
other fellow to lead the way. 

Now, you fellows who bemoan the fact that our 
college spirit is below par, get together, put away 
you knocking utensils, and take part in the various 
college activities. You will do your school more 
good, and will derive much more pleasure out of 
it yourself. Don't wait for the other fellow to do 
the work ; do your part, and give the University 
the kind of support it deserves. 

And you, who have some college spirit in 
your blood, the next time you hear a poor de- 
luded and abused student cry for school spirit, 
ask this fellow what he does toward distributing 
his share of the spirit. It is a ten to one shot 
that he is an active member of the Bench Brigade. 



THE MEDICAL AND DENTAL ASPECTS 

OF CHRONIC AVEOLAR 

OSTEOMYELITIS. 



By Bennie R. Jones, Dental, '16. 



Chronic Aveolar Osteomyelitis, Pyorrhoea 
Aveolaris, or, popularly, the White Plague of 
the Human Mouth, is a topic of vast import- 
ance and interest both to the physician and to 
the dentist, not only from its direct oral effect, 
but also from its indirect systemic influence. 
This indirect efifect is an untold and, hence, 
underestimated etiological factor in the diag- 
nosis of a great many diseases. In fact, we 
are not sufficiently awake to the dangers which 
threaten every one who carries in his mouth a 
diseased root or tooth. (Wiley.) 

At the time of birth the mucous membrane 
of the mouth affords the same protection and 
resistance as in the other parts of the body. 
However, this condition is only temporary, 
for as each tooth is erupted, a hole is punc- 
tured through this protective covering, and at 
maturity leaves thirty-two holes. The mucous 
membrane is not tightly attached to the tooth 
and hence leaves a space into which the bac- 
terial flora and parasites may enter the deeper 
structures. Although the tooth fills this opening 
the margins are open as long as the tooth is 
in the mouth. This condition is eliminated 
when a pyorrhoea tooth is extracted, thereby 
closing the opening and rendering a cure. Look- 
ing at a definition of pyorrhoea, we see that 
it is the deeper structures that are mainly af- 
fected. Pyorrhoea Aveolaris is a purulent dis- 
charge, a discharge of pus from a condition of 
suppurative inflammation of the periosteum 
lining the tooth socket, characterized by de- 
structive lesions, shrinking of the gums, and 
loosening of the teeth. It is a bacterial disease 
due to various forms and combinations of pyo- 
genic organisms, and its destructive lesions are 
due to bacterial activity. Amoebae are not 
pyogenic (Patterson: Rosenberger), and even 
Bass and Johns failed to find amoebae in non- 
pustular mouths, hence they act as scavengers 
and their presence is inversely proportional to 
the cleanliness of the mouth. 



160 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



The teeth bear about 1,700 pounds of pres- 
sure a day (Black), and the bacteria are thus 
forced into the broken, injured and wounded 
tissues and bone. The infected surface of a 
pyorrhoea case is three to seven inches and the 
quantity of pus and toxic matter swallowed is 
about half a teaspoonful, and small, but con- 
siderable dosage with bacteria and their pro- 
ducts from a local fucus tends to gradually 
break down immunity (Good by). The special 
ferments of the blood do not inhibit the bac- 
teria as they are protected by a poor blood sup- 
ply, calculi, and the dense tissues and mem- 
branes inhabited. This is shown by the rarity 
of primary blood infection. Positive cure can 
result, then, only when the teeth are extracted 
or the culture bed of bacteria removed by 
bacteria surgical methods.* 

The peculiar odor of pyorrhoea is produced 
by the Treponema mucosum, a new species of 
Spirochaeta reported by Noguchi. This organ- 
isms simulates the spirochaeta of syphilis, but 
its action is pyogenic and does not grow in 
healthy tissue. 

Post-operative pneumonia is due in many 
cases to pyorrhoea mouths having a super 
quantity of Pneumococcus. E. C. Rosenow 
discovered the transmutation by animal pas- 
sage of the Streptococcus viridans into the 
Pneumococcus. The organism in rheumatism 
locates in joints and endocardium because of 
the low degree of oxygen pressure due to the 
avascular condition found at the end of the 
capillary supply. The same infection by a pro- 
cess of conversion may show Streptococcus 
viridans in endacarditis and hemolytic strepto- 
coccus in the joints. The focus most common- 
ly found is the oral cavity. Among many 
others cases of arthritis deformens, ulcer of 
the stomach, chronic dyspepsia, patient having 
abumen, all have been returned to a normal 
condition by dental treatment of the pyorrhoea 
mouth. Upson reports that pyorrhoea causes 
many cases of insanity and that a large num- 
ber of these are restored by curing the oral 



pyorrhoea. Dyspepsia, flatulence and gastric 
ulcer are caused by constantly swallowing 
large numbers of bacteria and their products. 
The tonsils, bronchi, even lining membrane of 
arteries and heart may be infected from di- 
seased gums. Many eye and ear complications 
are relieved by curing the pyorrhoea. Zilz, of 
Vienna, reports that 75 per cent, of cases of 
diabetic patients have pyorrhoea aveolaris and 
half gave a history of gum trouble before the 
diabetes. 

Conversely, however, a sluggish liver, inac- 
tive kidneys, constipation, germ infected fecal 
matter, inadequate elimination with auto-intoxi- 
cation all throwing into the blood stream bac- 
teria and products, may break out in some 
favorable location, for instance, the gums 
around the teeth, particularly if they were al- 
ready partly diseased and non-resistant. 

Notwithstanding that general pathology is 
not caused by pyorrhoea, each month startling 
discoveries certainly tend that way, all of which 
go to show the necessary intimate relationship 
which should exist between the two profes- 
sions, as each, being branches, both tend to 
the relief of humanity. 



IN MEMORIAM. 



*This is done by sterilizing the field, planing the roots 
of the teeth, and curretting the pockets leaving a fresh 
blood clot. 



Whereas, The Omnipotent Father has seen 
proper to call from this world our beloved 
brother, Jocelyn William Blackmer, we, the 
Committee from Delta Chapter of Chi Zeta 
Chi, do resolve: 

First, That Chi Zeta Chi has lost one of its 
most esteemed and beloved brothers. 

Second, That wc, his brothers in Chi Zeta 
Chi, extend to his sorrowing family our sin- 
cerest sympathy in this hour of our bereave- 
ment and mutual loss. 

Third, That a copy of these resolutions be 
spread upon the minutes of the Fraternity, that 
a copy be sent to his mother, to the Phi Zeta 
Chi Record, and the University Gazette. 
C. RIGLEY, 
E. P. THOMAS, 
C. M. REDDIG, 

Committee. 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



151 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 

A MONTHLY JOURNAL 

Devoted to the interests of the University 

of Maryland. 

Subscription Price. $1.00 Per Annum, In Advance 

Reprints Furnished At Cost 

Advertising Rates Submitted Upon Request 

608 Professional Building 

BALTIMORE, MD. 

EDITORIAL STAFF. 

J. Ben Robinson, D.D.S Editor-in-Chief 

Nathan Winslow, M.D Business Manager 

James M. Hepbron, LL.B Law 

A. A. Sonnenburg, Phar. D Pharmacy 

M. E. Sullivan, R. N Nursing 

A. Z. Aldridge, '16 Dental 

W. Lester Baldwin, '16 Law 

George Karmann, '16 Pharmacy 

MARCH 1, 1916. 

EDITORIALLY EXPRESSED. 



The present is a crucial time in the history of 
the University. The pubhc is searching us out 
and asking the question, "Does it deserve our 
patronage," and the support we are seeking and 
the assistance we need will come only when pub- 
lic opinion has been satisfied that we are a de- 
serving institution. 

Dr. Albert H. Carroll, of the medical teaching 
staff, has suggested and is working for a general 
banquet to bring together all candidates for de- 
grees, the faculties and teaching forces of the 
four schools and as many members of the general 
alumni as possible. This suggestion when put 
to the heads of the different schools received 
enthusiastic support in three of the schools. The 
fourth rejected the proposal. 

There are a number of reasons why such a sug- 
gestion is not only good but that it should be 
adopted. In the first case the student has been 
engaged in study for three or four years and, 
having come to the close of his school days, it is 
fitting that he should be tendered some token 
of esteem on the part of the school in recognition 
of his devotion to the excellent work we are try- 
ing to do. In the second case it brings together 




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the schools, the classes and the University men; 
it strengthens the ties of university interests and 
tends to a unity of effort for a general university 
spirit. It introduces the student to the real great- 
ness of our institution and makes him see the 
large field we cover as he has never seen through 
his entire previous days here, and so sends him 
away with a better thought for the University 
and its interests than previous classes could have 
felt. 

Again, such a scheme, if properly conducted 
and advertized, would awaken Baltimore and 
Maryland to the real necessity of perpetuating the 
University interests. We need publicity. We 
need to be seen and heard, to throw out our 
strength that it may command public opinion 
and compel public support. Let us each do all 
in our power to secure this suggested banquet 
and may the one school holding aloof reconsider 
and enter heartily into the plan. 
o 

It was with much regret that we learned of 
the destruction by fire of William Smith Hall, 
the new building at Washington College, on Jan- 
uary 17 last. All the archives of the college, in- 
cluding many historic documents, several of 
which were in the handwriting of George Wash- 
ington, and the college library and laboratory fix- 
tures were burned. The portrait of Dr. Wil- 
liam Smith, the first president of the college and 
in whose honor the building was named, was the 
only thing saved from the burning building, 
Washington College was founded in 1783, suc- 
ceeding the old Kent County School. George 
Washington was a member of its first board of 



152 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



visitors and the college conferred the degree of 
doctor of laws upon him in 1789. The college has 
had an eventful history, many of its graduates be- 
coming prominent in Maryland history. In 1821 it 
was burned but immediately rebuilt. May it soon 
rise again to continue the great educational work 
it has been doing for the past century and a 
quarter for the State of Maryland. 



In the October, 1915, issue of "Oral Hygiene," 
Dr. John Philip Erwin, of Perkasie, Pa., takes 
great umbrage at Dr. Woods Hutchinson, a phy- 
sician, for discussing popular denta^ subjects 
through the colums of the "Philadelphia Ledger." 
He insists that these articles were written for ad- 
vertising purposes and questions the right of the 
physician to unmolested poaching on the estate of 
the dental surgeon and the "purloining of dental 
honors." In the February, 1916, issue Dr. B. 
Merrill Hopkinson, professor of Oral Hygiene 
and Dental History in the Dental Department of 
the University of Maryland, took occasion to de- 
fend Dr. Hutchinson, and to do literary violence 
to the aforementioned puny efforts at resenting 
encroachment. We agree with Dr. Hopkin- 
son, not because he is our co-worker, but be- 
cause as servants to society and as individuals 
operating to reduce the ills humanity is heir to we 
should welcome co-operative effort of the physi- 
cian to educate the the masses to oral attention. 
Dr. Hopkinson, as instructor in oral hygiene, has 
labored incessantly to educate the young men 
of the University to enter upon a warfare against 
the oral conditions which produce so many dele- 
terious effects and has succeeded in convincing 
his pupils of the righteousness of such work. He 
is doing efficient work for a great cause and we 
editorially acknowledge the credit due him for 
this recent defense of what should be our pro- 
fessional ideal. 



SLAMS AND SALUTES. 



A Plea for .\ Conjoint Banquet. 



For a number of years it has been the desire 
of a number of the most loyal supporters of 
the University of Maryland to have a joint 
graduation banquet, rather than the picayun- 



nish departmental affairs. They advance the 
argument in favor of the proposition that the 
University of Maryland has long since passed 
the day of the isolated department, and that 
now we are a university in name as well as 
fact. Therefore everything tending to propo- 
gate the idea of unity should be cultivated 
assiduously. A banquet of the proposed char- 
acter tends to the consummation of this idea. 
With this end in view Dr. Albert H. Carroll, 
President of the Medical Alumni Association, 
has worked long and faithfully and has ob- 
tained the consent of the deans of all of the 
departments with the exception of the Law to 
participate in the affair. As there is this diver- 
gence of opinion concerning the feasibility of a 
banquet of the proposed character, it is pro- 
posed to drop the plan for the present. This 
would be a calamity. As much as we desire 
the presence of the Law Department, their 
lack of participation should not cause fore- 
goance of the idea. Every innovation must 
have a beginning. A successful issue comes 
only after man}' difficulties have been over- 
come. Therefore, boys, take heart. Let's make 
a beginning by having a combined medical, 
dental, and pharmaceutical banquet, and let's 
inform those lawyers who desire to come that 
they will be welcome. Certainly one large af- 
fair will do much more toward enlightening the 
public as to the magnitude of the University of 
Maryland, than a number of insignificant 
spreads. N. W. 



The following letter of Mr. Lincoln, which has 
never hitherto been printed, is believed to be of 
sufficient importance to justify its publica- 
tion:*! 

J. P. N. 

Executive Mansion, 
Washington, U. C, January 36, 1863. 
Major General Hooker: 

General : I have placed you at the head of the 
Army of the Potomac. Of course I have dope 
this upon what appears to me to be sufficient rea- 



♦From book owned by Mrs. Briscoe, Librarian, and 
lent to The Gazette through her courtesy. 

t Forty-five copies privately printed. 1S79. Philadel- 
phia. 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



153 



sons, and yet I think it best for you to know that 
there are some things in regard to which I am 
not quite satisfied with you. I believe you to be 
a brave and skillful soldier, which, of course, I 
like. I also believe you do not mix politics with 
your profession, in which you are right. You 
have confidence in yourself, which is a valuable, 
if not an indispensable, quality. You are ambi- 
tious, which, within reasonable bounds, does good 
rather than harm ; but I think that during General 
Burnside's command of the army you have taken 
counsel of your ambition, and thwarted him as 
much as you could, in which you did a great 
wrong to the country and to a most meritorious 
and honorable brother officer. I have heard, in 
such a way as to believe it, of your recently say- 
ing that both the army and the Government 
needed a dictator. Of course it was not for this, 
but in spite of it, that I have given you the com- 
mand. Only those generals who gain success 
can set up dictators. What I now ask of you is 
military success, and I will risk the dictatorship. 
The Government will support you to the utmost 
of its ability, which is neither more nor less than 
i*' has done and will do for all commanders. I 
much fear that the spirit which you have aided 
to infuse into the army, of criticising their com- 
mander and withholding confidence from him, 
will now turn upon you. I shall assist you as far 
as I can to put it down. Neither you nor Napo- 
leon, if he were alive again, could get any good 
out of an army while such a spirit prevails in it. 
And now beware of rashness, but with energy and 
sleepless vigilance go forward and give us vic- 
tories. 

Yours, very truly, 

A. Lincoln. 



ORGANIZATIONS. 



The Harlan Law Society. 



At the regular meeting of the Henry D. Har- 
lan Law Society on Friday night, February 4, 
the following officers were elected for the new 
term: W. Lester Baldwin, President; Andrew 
W. Pardew, Vice-President; Harry A. Kohler- 
man, Secretary; William C. House, Treasurer, 
and E. E. Oldhauser, Historian. The retiring 



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officers are John McN. Holmes, President; 
John W. Edel, Vice-President; John A. Farley, 
Secretary; William C. House, Treasurer, and 
Victor G. Bloede, Jr., Historian. 

By an almost unanimous vote, after a long 
and very heated discussion of several proposed 
plans, the members of this society decided to 
continue the present organization under the 
name of "The Alumni Association of the Henry 
D. Harlan Law Society of the University of 
Maryland," but decided to take in members from 
the present Junior Class to continue the Society 
at the University. 

o 

The Gorgas Odontological Society. 



Although yet in its infancy "The Gorgas 
Odontological Society of the University of 
Maryland" is rapidly growing in strength and 
enthusiasm. The picture of the members is to 
be put in the 1916 issue of "Terra Mariae," to- 
gether with the history and roll. 

At the meeting held on February 9, 1916, 
much interest was taken by the students of 
the Senior and Junior classes who attended 
in a goodly number. Drs. B. Merrill Hopkin- 
son and E. Baskin, of the University Faculty, 
were present and gave interesting talks on the 
finer points in conducting an office practice. 

There was a discussion among the members 
as to the various methods of devitalizing and 
extirpating pulps of teeth. The many compli- 
cations which follow extirpation were thorough- 
ly discussed. The faculty members joined in 
the discussion and gave the boys many valua- 
ble practical hints concerning this work. 

At the next meeting on February 33 we ex- 
pect to be entertained by Dr. S. Whiteford 
Moore, Demonstrator of Nitrous Oxide Anes- 
thesia and Analgesia at the University. 



154 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



Dr. Moore will give a lecture and demon- 
stration of "The Uses of Nitrous Oxide in 
Dental Operations." All interested are invited 
to attend. 



Psi Omega. 



The Psi Omega dental fraternity gave an 
informal dance at Keating's Dancing Academy 
on February 18, 1916. The Dental Department 
turned out in full force, including Drs. Heat- 
wole, Baskin, Matthews, Rea, Haynes, Robin- 
son, Philips and Wells. Students from the 
other departments were present. The hall had 
been tastefully decorated with the fraternity 
colors, blue and white, including scores of 
college pennants and banners. Eighteen 
dances were on the program and, from the 
snappy air of the first one-step to the dreamy 
strains of the last waltz, everyone present 
thoroughly enjoyed himself. During the intermis- 
sion delicious refreshments were served. Every- 
one voted the dance a huge success and much 
credit is due the committee, W. E. Lena, J. D. 
McLeod and T. O. Broadwater, for their un- 
tiring efforts in arranging and carrying out 
the program. 



The Phi Sigma K'\ppa Fraternity Banquet. 



The Phi Sigma Kappa Fraternity of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland held its annual banquet 



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Saturday, February 19, at 7.30 P. M., at the 
Hotel Rennert. About seventy-five members 
were present, representing the different depart- 
ments of the University, including St. John's 
College. Dr. Thomas Fell, president of St. 
John's College, was one of the principal speakers. 
The keynote of his address was that "a man must 
not only be good, but good for something and 
render service to his fellow-man." Others who 
spoke were Prof. Arthur M. Shipley, Mr. J. 
Newell Graham, Drs. J. Ben Robinson and J. M. 
Holland, and Mr. F. Stone Posey. Bruce C. 
Lightner, LL.B., class of 1915, acted as toast- 
master and kept the ball rolling. The success 
of the banquet was largely due to the efforts of 
Mr. Gilbert J. Morgan, chairman of the commit- 
tee on arrangements. 



ITEMS— GENERAL. 



The Pennsylvania branch of the General 
Alumni Association will hold its eleventh an- 
nual banquet Thursday, March 9, 1916, at the 
Hotel Walton, Philadelphia, Pa., at 7 o'clock 
P. M. 

These gatherings have served to keep alive 
the esprit-de-corps of our alumni in Pennsyl- 
vania and, now with the re-enforcements from 
the Baltimore Medical College and the College 
of Physicians and Surgeons, should prove 
larger and more successful than ever. Here's 
hoping that every alumnus in Pennsylvania will 
make every effort to attend. 

Those desiring to attend should communi- 
cate with the Secretary, Dr. John C. C. Beale, 
41 South Fifteenth St., Philadelphia, Pa. The 
cost of the dinner will be two dollars. 

Even if you find it impossible to get away from 
home on this date, do not fail to notify the Sec- 
retary to that effect and request him to place your 
name on the membership list. A large attend- 
ance is hoped for. Think it over and come. The 
University needs your influence and the Penn- 
sylvania branch needs your help. 



MEDICAL— GRADUATE. 



In recognition of the many books and trea- 
tises Dr. John C. Hemmeter, professor of 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



155 



physiology and clinical medicine, has written 
on diseases of the stomach, he has been honored 
by election as a Fellow of the Royal Society of 
Arts of England, of which the King of England 
is honorary president and the Duke of Con- 
naught is active president. 

His "History of Medicine" also brought spe- 
cial recognition from the society and his work 
with the X-ray for the recognition of diseased 
conditions of the stomach and intestines is 
highly regarded. He is also a Fellow of the 
American Association for the Advancement of 
Science, a member of the Physiological Society 
of Germany, of the Imperial German Academy 
of Natural Sciences, of the Imperial Associa- 
tion of Austrian Physicians and of the Acade- 
mia di Scienza of Palermo. 

Dr. Hemmeter was notified of his election 
several days ago. This a high honor for him 
and he has been warmly congratulated by his 
friends. 



It is interesting to learn that Senator James, 
of Kentucky, has introduced in the Senate the 
bill, recently offered in the House, directing that 
Colonel Louis Marvin Maus, Medical Corps, U. 
S. A. (retired), class of 1874, be placed on the 
retired list with the rank of brigadier-general. 
Colonel Maus, who has the distinction of having 
served longer than any other ofificer in the Medi- 
cal Corps of the Army, was born in Baltimore, 
and is now secretary of the Kentucky Tubercu- 
losis Commission, with headquarters at Frank- 
fort. He entered the Medical Corps in 1874, and 
was given a medal of honor by Congress for 
bravery in an expedition against the Indians in 
the latter seventies. He was one of the men 
who helped clean up Havana and later he was 
detailed to the Philippines to suppress the epi- 
demic of bubonic plague. 



We are sorry to learn that Dr. Thomas A. 
Ashby is still so sick at his home. He has our 
very best wishes for a speedy recovery. 



MEDICAL— SENIOR. 



The first of a series of entertainments for the 
members of the senior class of the University 
of Maryland and the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons was held Thursday evening, Feb- 
ruary 18, at the home of Dr. John C. Hemmeter, 
739 University Parkway. Twenty-five students 
were present. 

Rev. Dr. Julius Hoffman delivered a lecture 
to the young men on "Advantage of the Ger- 
man Language in Medicine." He spoke of 
the rapid rise of the student of medicine fol- 
lowing the learning of the language and of our 
large German population, one-fifth of the en- 
tire population of the United States. Dr. Hem- 
meter addressed the gathering on "Music and 
Medicine," speaking of the value each had 
to the other in making the life of a man a suc- 
cess. The eighth symphony of Beethoven, with 
interpretations, was rendered by Prof. Arthur 
Oehm. Refreshments were served the gather- 
ing. 

Dr. Hemmeter has made a life study of the 
anatomic and physiologic foundations of piano 
and vocal technique and described the manner 
of co-ordination between various muscles and 
nerves in the production of tone, the conduc- 
tion paths for hearing in the brain. 



The following appointments of our fourth 
year men have been made : J. T. Hennessy, an 
intern at St. Joseph's Hospital, Syracuse, N. Y. ; 
B. C. Carter, an intern at the Boston Marine 
Hospital, Boston, Mass., and H. M. Wellman, 
an intern at the Western Pennsylvania Hos- 
pital, Pittsburgh, Pa. 



WILLIAM J. MILLER 

Jewelery, Diamonds, Watches 

College Jewelry 
Class Pins and Rings, College Seals 

28 East Baltimore St. Baiumore, Md. 22 W. Lcxingtoii St., - Baltimore, Md. 



R LLERBROCK 



156 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



LAW— GRADUATE. 



It is particularly gratifying to us to learn 
that Mr. Robert F. Stanton, LL.B., 1891, has 
been appointed to the Supreme Bench to take 
the place made vacant by the death of Judge 
Thomas Ireland Elliott, also an alumnus of 
the Law School, class of 1878. The Gazette 
on behalf of its readers, desires to congratulate 
Judge Stanton on his promotion to the Bench. 



Mr. Bruce C. Lightner, class of 1915, came 
all the way from Hagerstown to see us. He 
was a guest at the Phi Sigma Kappa House, 
1036 N. Eutaw street, while in the city, and 
attended the fraternity banquet at the Rennert 
Hotel on the evening of Saturday, February 
19, at which he acted as toastmaster. 



The Class of 1915 held a meeting recently at 
the offices of Messrs. Stocksdale and Wortche, 
in the Equitable Building, and arranged to have 
a "get-together" affair on the Gunpowder river. 
Messrs. Smith, Wortche, Elly and Stocksdale 
were appointed a committee to arrange the de- 
tails. 

Dan Healey, of the 1915 Class, stops in at the 
University about twice a week and gives short 
talks on how to pass the Bar examination. 



Dan McMullen, senior member of the firm of 
McMullen & McMullen, of Cumberland, Md.," 
stopped in Baltimore while en route to Annapo- 
lis. Dan is the son of the present State Comp- 
troller, Hon. Hugh A. McMullen. 



W. Melbourne Hart (1913) reports that busi- 
ness is good. He just settled quite an important 
case with Benjamin Baker, attorney for Messrs. 
Curran and Morgan. The real facts of the case 
have never been made public. We wonder what 
it's all about. 

Prof. Alexander Geddes has promised to write 
a poem for the next issue of the G.^izette and 
special arrangements have already been made to 
run off an extra ten thousand copies of the 
coming number. AVe don't know what the poem 
will be about, but we know it will be good. 



R. E. Kanode, the well-known Hagerstown at- 
torney and politician, made a flying visit to Ca- 
tdnsville about the middle of the month while his 
partner, B. C. Liglitner, took full and complete 
charge of affairs during his absence. Lightner 
was so rushed during Kanode's absence that he 
was compelled to put on three extra clerks. The 
firm is always rushed around the first of the 
month. At the first of last month they received 
forty letters and two telephone calls. Thirty- 
nine of the letters contained bills and the other 
letter was from Kanode's girl. 



Ray Jones (1913), State's Attorney of Gar- 
rett County, reports that business is not what it 
used to be since the passage of the local option 
bill. 



Millard E. Tydings (1914) is making quite a 
name for himself as a member of the House of 
Delegates at Annapolis. 



H. E. Harshman (1913) gave up practicing 
law at Hagerstown, Md., to accept a position in 
the legal department of the Workmen's Com- 
pensation Commission. 



Benjamin Gold (1915) is now local counsel 
for the Washburn-Crosby Co., the well-known 
flour makers. 



John W. Reynolds, Jr. (1913), after an ex- 
tended tour through Pennsylvania, New Jersey, 
New York, Massachusetts and points in the mid- 
dle west, has returned to Baltimore and resumed 
practicing law. 



Louis Hofferbert (1914) is now connected 
with the sales department of the Mar-Del Mobile 
Company. 



It is rumored that John E. Magers (1915), of 
the firm of Hall & Magers, is slated as one of 
the judges of the Peoples' Court. 



LAW— SENIOR. 



The senior classes have decided to hold a 
theatre party at Ford's Opera House on the 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



157 



evening of February 29, 1916, for the benefit 
of Terra Mariae. The tickets are 50 cents and 
can be obtained from W. Lester Baldwin, Cen- 
tral Y. M. C. A., or any other member of the 
committee. Below is a fac simile of the ticket: 



FORD'S GRAND OPERA HOUSE 



ELEANOR PAINTER 

In Her Great Success, 

" THE PRINCESS PAT." 

Auspices of the 

Senior Classes of the University of Maryland. 

Tuesday eve, February 29, 1916, at 8.15 P. M. 

Tickets 50 Cents. 

This ticket can be exchanged at Ford's Opera House 

on or after aate of sate. 

t'eoruary 6'jtu only comes once in four years. Cele- 
brate u right this year. 



The editor wishes to acknowledge receipt of 
the announcement of Mr. Edward L. G. 
Wright, class of '16, that he has opened his law 
ofhces at 8 East Lexington street, Baltimore, 
Md. Mr. Wright will represent the Equitable 
Adjustment Company, which is prepared to 
make collections anywhere in the United States, 
through bonded attorneys. We fail to see how 
an attorney with Mr. Wright's ability and 
practical business experience can fall short of a 
brilliant success. He has our best wishes. 



"Jimes" Byrne failed to show up at certain 
lectures recently. It has been rumored that he 
was too busy talking politics to Morris Frank- 
lin. 



From all reports Geo. Tyler Smith seems to 
have gotten a corner on the legal business. Abe 
Rosenthal, with his 103 clients, isn't even in the 
running. 



We have just recently learned that our pop- 
ular classmate, Mr. Gerald F. Kopp, who 
passed the State Bar Examination last June, is 
associated in the practice of law with the well 
known law firm of Mackenzie, Marbury and 
French. Mr. Kopp appeared on the brief, rep- 
resenting Prince George's County, in a case 
which went to the Court of Appeals recently. 
We feel honored by this distinction of our fel- 



low classmate and we trust that Gerald is not 
suffering from that anxiety which is usually 
present while one awaits a decision from the 
highest state court on his first appeal. 



At the time this issue goes to press all of the 
material for "Terra Mariae," from the Law 
Department, will have been in the hands of the 
Editor-in-Chief to be turned over to the printer. 
The contract calls for the completion of the 
ann^ual by May 10. 



Heard in THg Practice Court and Lecture 
Room. 

May it please the Court: I shall first take 
up plaintiff's third prayer. It has such glaring 
defects on its face that it needs immediate at- 
tention. 



Copinger (holding out a 5,000 page volume of 
Cyc) — "Now, gentlemen, I shall read to you 
from my Little Book .... at page 4297." 



Judge Sappington — "Say, friend, what is that 
you're quoting from, anyhow?" 

Mr. Franklin (in his most dignified man- 
ner) — "Why, your Honor, this is the digest to 
L. R. A. New Serious (Series)." 



Kieffner (about six times every lecture) — 
"In other words, Professor, . . . . " (repeating 
the lecturer's statements in other words). 



Judge Niles to "Johnnie" Holmes — "Let me 
see, your names is Rosenberg, isn't it?" 

"Johnnie" (much peeved) — "No, Judge, I'm 
Scotch." 



Judge Rose (calling the roll at tenth lecture) 
— "Harrison 1" 

Mr. Harrison— "Here !" 

Judge Rose — "Where is he? I'm glad to 
make your acquaintance, Mr. Harrison. I 
hope we may have the pleasure of your com- 
pany again. Ahem." 



158 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



Hart Schaffner & Marx, 
Kuppenheimer, 
"Society Brand" 



The clothes thai college men 
like a lot 



BolUmore Street At Ctiirles 



LAW— INTERMEDIATE. 



Albin Widoff, '17. 



The annual banquet of what we deem the 
most energetic, illustrous class of the past two 
years, if not in the history of the Law Depart- 
ment of the University of Maryland, will be 
held at the Rennert Hotel, March 11. There 
will be dishes that are sure to tickle the palate 
of any fastidious epicure and enough to sate 
the hungriest. The food can be washed down 
by anything your money can buy; water will 
be absolutely free. All the professors of the 
second year have been invited to attend. They 
will sign their autograph on the menu cards 
or any other paper but negotiable paper. This, 
to be sure, is an added inducement for students 
to attend. And then there will be many novel- 
ties never before shown or heard in a public 
or private exhibition. President Wilson, Roose- 
velt, Bryan and Emma Goldman will sing the 
romantic ballad entitled "Soldiers should be 
fed with garlic so they'll keep the enemy away." 
Other persons will speak, sing and dance, thus 
insuring a good run for the money. 

Any student who can go, but does not, is a 
PIKER; I said it. 



H. M. Rodman had finished telephoning in 
Davidge Hall. He, then, rushed into the library 
excited and flushed. Stopping before a number 
of students at one of the tables, he exclaimed: 



"Hey, fellers, congratulate me ! Congratu- 
late me!" 
"What did you do," said one, "get married?" 
"No, I got '78' in Title." 



Speaking about quips in Don Quixote, let us 
pray that Mr. France has forgotten Rabelais, 
the Decamaron of Boccaccio or Balzac's Droll 
Stories. 



The Hall of Fame. 
A. B. Makover — The idealist personified; the 
poet in a bar room ; the witness that can tes- 
tify whether idealism is its own punishment, 
and also that idealism can — crucify! 



Ernest W. Beatty — Blackstone reading the 
"Outlook;" the leading one of a half dozen stu- 
dents who possess, that elusive thing known 
as "a legal mind;" the clergyman among law- 
yers. 



Herman Kassan — Disraeli in minature ; the 
synonym of suavity ; one with a weakness for a 
stiff collar. 



M. H. Lauchheimer — An "A.B." in nigger- 
heaven ; Paganini viewed from the clouds. 



DENTAL— SENIOR. 



The Knocker. 



"After God had finished making the rattle- 
snake, the toad and the vampire he had some 
awful substance left with which he made the 
knocker. 

A knocker is a two-legged animal with a 
cork-screw soul, a water-logged brain and 
backbone made partly of jelly and of glue. 
Where other men have their hearts he carries 
a tumor of decayed principles. 

When the knocker comes down the street 
honest men turn their backs, the angels in 
heaven shed tears and the devil shuts the gates 
of Hell to keep him out." 



Dr. Davis (at a Senior Oper Quiz)- 
where do we obtain Gutta Percha?" 



"From 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



159 



Bennett (in an undertone) — "We buy it at 
the dental depot or get it from Mrs. Welsh." 



Mr. Sowers of this class, was suddenly 
called home the first part of February due to 
the serious illness of his sister. The class wishes 
her a speedy recovery. 



The mid-year exams are over and here's hop- 
ing that everyone came through with flying 
colors. 

Messrs. Epting, Magee, Walberg and Deindt 
have returned to school and are spending much 
time in the Infirmary doing operative work. 



Lena (to Sowers) — "Let us go down to the 
Ritter Exhibit at the New Howard." 
Sowers — "I've done been." 



The pictures have been made for the 1916 
"Terra Mariae" and the boys sure do look some 
pumpkins all dolled up in academic costume. 



"Long" Bennett and "Slops" Boins have re- 
cently joined forces and have gone in the part- 
nership on a room. We do not know who got 
stung, but we guess both. 



We do not envy the Freshmen having co-eds. 
We have May and Lena. Wow ! 



Mr. Clark who came to us from U. of P., has 
returned to his old Alma Mater. 



We have learned that Mr. C. R. Martin, who 
was with us in the Freshman and Junior years, 
is traveling in the West for his health. He is 
an agent for a cottolene concern. 

o 

DENTAL— JUNIOR. 

D. B. Lancaster, '17 



Mrs. Sillygrin — "Your statement about mak- 
ing shoes out of all kinds of skins is absurd, 
Mr. Foolish ; for instance, they can't make 
shoes out of banana skins." 

Mr. Foolish — "No, but they make good slip- 
pers. 



HEPBRON & HAYDON 

We SeU Every Law Book and Syllabus 

Used at the U. of M. 
St. Paul 8794 1243-53 CALVERT BLDO. 

Pat — "When is a Junior like a bird?" 
Corrigan — "Never, never; it's preposterous." 
Pat — "When a Junior comes into physiology 
class late, doesn't the instructor make him 
quail?" 

Corrigan has been requested to provide 
himself with a pair of maxim silencers, rub- 
ber boots. 



Patient — "Mister, is dis de place where dey 
patch teeth?" 

Emerson — "Yes, just walk up stairs; I'll be 
up in a minute." 



Palmer saw this advertisement : "Young 
man, a woman dearly loves you. Would you 
know who she is? Send a postal order for 
$2 to the below address and learn who she is." 
He sent the money and received the answer: 
"Your mother." 

Vina said that he prepared an inlay that in- 
volved 3/3 of a bicuspid. 



Demi — "Hello, George !" 

George (whispering) — "Don't you see those 
ladies over there? Don't call me 'George;' call 
me 'Doctor.' " 



There is a difference between a plug and a 
filling; one should bear that in mind lest he 
be subject to criticism. 



He that buildeth up a gold filling and payeth 
too little attention to the foundation, may be 
likened unto the man who built his house upon 
the sand, for when the saliva and the food 
will beat upon it, verily will it fall, and great 
will be the fall thereof. He that hath ears to 
hear, let him hear. 



160 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



Demi — "Is that cavity vital, Clarke?" 
Clarke — "No, it's just sensitive, but the pulp 
is out." 

Weyneck with little girl in chair — "What 
are you doing, George " 

George — "I'm working over these eyes of 
brown." 



Manly treats himself to a small fry every 
day after infirmary hours. 



Brown says he has been suffering from 
exostosis. 



Marsh is going to open up a pawn shop soon 
on Raborg street. He will have various and 
sundry collections of dental specialties, ranging 
from second hand brooches to left-handed foil- 
carriers on sale "below cost." 



The lazy man may think he is having a good 
time, but right down the road is the poor 
house. 



It is wonderful how much time some fellows 
can consume in telling how much they have 
to do and what a load they are carrying. Gen- 
erally their heaviest loads are the imaginary 
ones. The fellow who is really worth while 
is the one who does a thing and shuts up about 
it. 

o 

DENTAL— FRESHMAN. 



Charles F. Smith, '18. 



Histology examination is almost here. Yes, 
we advocate preparedness, too. 



Practical anatomy started last month. This 
adds another and quite difficult subject for the 
remainder of the semester. We may have been 
deceived in the past but now we can tell those 
fellows who used to follow the art of butcher- 
ing. 



H. L. Wood recently joined our ranks. He 
enlisted about two weeks ago and has since 



become a regular. He'll find firing from the 
trenches rather disagreeable at first. 



Mr. Chas. F. Smith, who has been ill for the 
past two weeks, is now in the University Hos- 
pital where he is improving very rapidly. He 
was operated on recently, having his tonsils 
removed. It is the wish of the class that he 
make a speedy recovery. 



Mr. W. A. Gray, who had a tonsilectomy 
performed recently, is out and with us again. 



Through the kindness and generosity of Dr. 
Wright students were allowed to attend the Psi 
Omega dance. 



Dissecting in Gray Laboratory is progress- 
ing very well and everyone is happy. Even 
the gentler ones enjoy it. Question : Where 
are all the previously enthusiastic Juniors who 
neglected duty to aid the maids? Why not 
don dissecting gown and wield the knife. Of 
course, all things are not altogether pleasant 
but it is a long way from Gray Lab. to M. B. 
Home. 



Histology examination is expected the first 
part of March. Fellows, let's not have a fail- 
ure. Burn your landlady's midnight oil. Dr. 
Matthews will appreciate it. 



There seems to be a great deal of discussion 
as to who is the biggest bone in the class. Gen- 
tlemen, this is a class matter. 

o 

PHARMACY— GRADUATE. 



The January meeting of the Baltimore 
branch of the American Pharmaceutical As- 
sociation was held on Wednesday, the 19th, in 
the assembly hall of the pharmacy of Plynson, 
Wescott & Co. 

The committee appointed to arrange for a 
series of talks by Professor Caspari on the 
changes in the new Pharmacopoeia reported 
that the matter had better be postponed to 
some future date, owing to the indisposition 
of Professor Caspari as the result of an attack 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



161 



of grip and also because the Pharmacopoeia 
would not be issued for several months. 

The following officers were elected to serve 
for the ensuing year: President, Ivouis 

Schulze; Vice-President and Chairman of Ex- 
ecutive Committee, Charles L. Meyer; Secre- 
tary-Treasurer, William J. Lowry, Jr. ; Assist- 
ant Secretary, Olive B. Cole; Chairman of 
Membership Committee, Otto Muelhouse; of 
Professional Relations, Henry P. Hynson; of 
Science and Practice of Pharmacy, Charles C. 
Neal; of Education and Legislation, Henry 
E. Wich; of Social Committee, Anna M. Pat- 
terson. 



Dr. Frontis Lentz, 1914, is assisting Dr. 
Kelly in the pharmacy laboratory. 

o 

ACADEMIC— GRADUATE. 



On Saturday evening, February 12, the St. 
John's College Alumni Association held its an- 
nual banquet at the Rennert Hotel. Dr. James 
A. Nydegger, president of the Alumni Associa- 
tion, acted as toastmaster. The principal speakers 
were Dr. Thomas Fell and Governor Emerson 
C. Harrington. Dr. Fell spoke of the jealous 
rivalry that existed between the colleges 
of Maryland, the State debt to the college 
and the encouraging prospects for raising 
an endowment fund. He said in part : "There 
is now in bank about $10,000, and I have been 
informed that a gentleman living in New York 
has recently made his will in which he be- 
queaths $100,000 to the college. As I have said 
on previous occasions, we can get a donation 
of $50,000 from the General Education Board 
if we could raise on our part $100,000 to meet 
it." 

Governor Harrington spoke briefly of the 
part St. John's College played in his life. He 
stated that had it not been for a scholarship to 
this institution his learning would have been 
seriously neglected, also that he cherished the 
memories of St. John's and especially the period 
spent as teacher there. There were about 
seventy-five members present. 



Intercollegiate Bureau of Academic Costume, Aibany.N.v. 
COTRELL & 

LEONARD 

Official Makers of 

Caps and 
Gowns 




gg Correct Hoods 
for All Degrees. 

i Rich Qowns for 
I Pulpit and Bench. 

.^ Bulletin, Samples 
etc. on request 



ACADEMIC— UNDERGRADUATE. 



Owing to a case of scarlet fever among the 
student body the College was closed by the 
authorities for about ten days. After being 
thoroughly fumigated it was reopened on the 
14th. The case was a very mild one and no 
further danger is anticipated. 



On Friday evening, January 21st, the Cotil- 
lion Club gave another of its delightful dances. 
The gymnasium was tastefully decorated with 
the College colors — orange and black. The 
programs were very attractively gotten up. The 
guests were received by Governor and Mrs. 
Harrington. The dance attracted unusual in- 
terest because of the presence of the new Gov- 
ernor, who is a graduate of the College, class 
of 1884. There were a large number present. 

o 

NURSING. 



The thirteenth annual meeting of the Mary- 
land State Association of Graduate Nurses was 
held at the Medical and Chirurgical Library, 1211 
Cathedral street, on Friday, January 28. Miss 
E. M. Lawler, president, in the chair. 



i 1 

j "Nothing Too Large— Nothing Too Small" ' 



Baltimore City 



Printing and Binding 
Company 

352-363 Equitable Building 






163 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



Miss Anna G. Goodrich, president of the Amer- 
ican Nurses' Association, gave a talk on "State 
Registration." Miss Mallalien read a paper on 
"Private Duty Nursing," and Miss French dis- 
cussed the "Johns Hopkins School and Con- 
valescent Home." Miss Grace Barclay, who went 
to France with other Maryland nurses as part 
of a Red Cross detachment, rendered an ac- 
count of her experiences from the time she left 
Baltimore until she returned. This was very- 
interesting. 

The Senior nurses of the Training Schools 
attended in a body. 

A reception was held and refreshments were 
served. 

Officers elected for the year were : President, 
Miss E. M. Lawler, Johns Hopkins; 1st Vice- 
President, Miss Janes Nash, Bellevue; 2d Vice- 
President, Miss M. E. Sullivan, University of 
Maryland; Secretary, Miss E. J. Taylor, Johns 
Hopkins; Treasurer, Miss E. C. Lee, University 
of Maryland. 



Miss Susan M. James, class of 1897, has been 
appointed school nurse in the Public Health De- 
partment. 



Misses Pauline Pleasants, Frances Meredith 
and Ellen Israel, class of 1910, have located at 
1237 Mt. Royal Terrace. 



Miss Stella Ricketts, class of 1911, is at the 
same place. 



Miss Ann Dukes, class of 1914, is located at 
1403 Madison avenue. 



Miss Emily Ely, class of 1909, has recovered 
from a recent operation for paracentesis and has 
left the hospital. 



Miss Ann Drye, class of 1910, who has been 
confined to the hospital for several days is out 
again. 



Misses Katherine Shea and Julia Foley, who 
were ill for several weeks, have resumed their 
positions at the hospital. 



Miss Elva M. Boor,. class of 1915, has accepted 
a position as surgical nurse in a government 
hospital at Ancon, Canal Zone, Panama. This 
position was a civil service appointment. 



Miss Lulu Eichner, class of 1916, was operated 
on at the hospital for tonsils. 



Miss Katherine Dukes, class of 1909, was con- 
fined to the hospital for several days, suffering 
from an infection. 



QUIPS. 

The city youth secured a job with Farmer 
Jones. The morning after his arrival, promptly 
at 4 o'clock, the farmer rapped on his door and 
told him to get up. The youth protested. 

"What for?" he asked, rubbing his eyes. 

"Why, we're going to cut oats," replied the 
farmer. 

"Are they wild oats," queried the youth, "that 
you've got to sneak up on 'em in the dark ?" — Cir- 
cle and Success. 



"I understand that you have a new motorcar." 
"Yes." 

"Do you drive it yourself?" 
"Nobody drives it. We coax it." — Washington 
Star, 



MARRIAGES. 



Dr. Russell H. Dean, class of 1912, to Miss 
Esther F. Haile, both of Jacksonville, Fla., at 
Jacksonville, December 16, 1915. The cere- 
mony was very quiet, being witnessed only 
by the immediate relatives of the contracting 
parties. 

Dr. and Mrs, Dean, on their return, will 
reside with the former's parents at 305 Cedar 
street. 

Now Beady for Spring 1916. See Ts for Classy Clothes 
Suits to Measure, $15.00 to $35.00 

A. JACOBS & SONS, Tailors 

899 NORTH HOWARD STREET 
Open ETcnlngs 9 P. M. Cor. Biclimond St. 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



163 



DEATHS. 



Dr. James Mercer Garnett, former president 
of St. John's College, died February IS, 1916, at 
his home, 1310 Bolton street, after a brief illness. 
He was 75 years old. 

Dr. Garnett was a scholar of rare ability, 
having taken his degree of master of arts at 
the University of Virginia in two years. He 
was graduated in 1859. He was an LL.D. of 
St. John's College and was president of the 
college from 1870 to 1880. He was also pro- 
fessor of English at the University of Virginia 
from 1882 to 1986,, since which time he has 
lived in Baltimore. He also served at one time 
as professor of Greek in the Louisville State 
University. 

He held numerous literary honors, among 
them being the presidency of the American 
Philological Association and of the American 
Dialect Society and the vice-presidency of the 
Modern Language Association of America. He 
was the author and editor of various text- 
books. 

He is survived by his widow, who was Miss 
Kate H. Noland, a daughter of the late Major 
Burr P. Noland, one son and one daughter. 



Dr. George Hamilton Schwinn, Maryland 
College of Pharmacy University of Maryland), 
class of 1893 ; Medical Department Columbian 
College (George Washington University), 
class of 1898, of Washington, D. C. ; first as- 
sistant physician of the Government Hospital 
for the Insane, died in his apartments at the 
hospital following an illness of more than a 
year, about February 6, 1916, aged 42 years. 

Dr. Schwinn was a native of Baltimore, in 
which city he received his early education. 
Following his graduation from the Maryland 
College of Pharmacy, he entered the medical 
department of the George Washington Uni- 
versity, then the Columbian College. Imme- 
diately after graduating he became connected 
with the Government Hospital for the Insane. 



Plis ability as physician and alienist advanced 
him on the staff to the position he held at the 
time of his death. He was an associate mem- 
ber of the American Medico-Psychological As- 
sociation and a charter member of the Society 
of Nervous and Mental Diseases of Washing- 
ton. He is survived bv a widow and two sons. 



Judge Thomas Ireland Elliott, class of 1878, 
of the Supreme Bench, died at his residence, 
3026 Mt. Royal Terrace, Baltimore, from heart 
disease, December 5, 1915, age 61 years. 



Cadet John R. Somerville, St. John's College, 
class of 1917, died at the home of Prof. Regi- 
nald R. Ridgely, Annapolis, February 3, 1916, 
from the effects of the grip and an infected 
arm, aged 20 years. 



It is with much regret that we announce 
the death of William H. McKenna, .a fourth- 
year student of the medical school at the Uni- 
versity Hospital, from the effects of a broken 
jaw and fractured skull, February 9, 1916, aged 
25 years. 



Dr. R. C. Buck, class of 1874, of Bristow, 
Va., died at his residence in that place, Feb- 
ruary 1, 1916, aged 65 years. 

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THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



\ 



Vol. II. 



APRIL 1, 1916. 



No. 10. 



CONTENTS 



IMPRESSIOXS OF THE CHICAGO 
CONFERENCE. Caleb Winslow, M.A. 167 

SOME OF THE HINDRANCES TO 
THE EXTENSION OF ORAL HY- 
GIENE AMONG THE PEOPLE AT 
LARGE AND HOW I CAN AID IN 
THEIR REMOVAL. M. K. Baklor... 16S 

THE HENRY FORD PEACE EXPEDI- 
TION. Edgar T. Fell 171 

EDITORIALS 172 



Editorially Expressed. 
SLAMS AND SALUTES: 

ORGANIZATIONS 

ATHLETICS 

ITEMS 

ENGAGEMENTS 

BIRTHS 

MARRIAGES 

DEATHS 



173 
173 
173 
174 
181 
181 
182 
183 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE, MD. 

HON. EMERSON C. HARRINGTON, Governor of Maryland, Chancellor. 
THOMAS FELL, A. M., Ph. D., L L. D., D. C. L.. Provost. 



ST. JOHN'S COLLEGE. Annapolis, Md. {^^^I^^^^VI^^^Sces) 



Founded i6g6. Classical and Scientific College Courses leading to degrees. Special advantages to stu- 
dents purposing to study the professions. Military Department under army officers. Also Preparatory 
School for boys fitting for St. John's or other colleges. Term begins September 15. Address 

THOMAS FELL, Ph.D., LL.D., D.C.L., President 



DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE, UNIVERSITY 

OF MARYLAND, AND COLLEGE OF 

PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS. 

Four years' graded course. New Laboratory Build- 
ing. Chnical advantages unsurpassed. Teaching Staff 
of 187. 110th Annual Session will begin October 1, 
1916, and continue 8 months. 

WM. F. LOCKWOOD, M. D., Dean. 

DEPARTMENT OF DENTISTRY. 

35th Annual Session begins October 1, 1916, and 
continues 7 months. 26 Instructors. New Building. 
For catalogue containing course of study, etc., apply to 

TIMOTHY O. HEATWOLE, M.D., D.D.S., Dean, 

Baltimore, Md. 



DEPARTMENT OF LAW. 

61st Annual Session will begin Sept. 28, 1916. Faculty 
of 26. For catalogue containing full information ad- 
dress the Secretary, 301 St. Paul Street, Baltimore, 
Maryland. 

EDWIN T. DICKERSON, Secretary. 



DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACY. 

(Formerly Maryland College of Pharmacy). 74th 
Annual Session begins September 25, 1916. 11 In- 
structors. New Laboratories. Address 

CHARLES CASPARI, JR., Phar.D., Dean, 

Baltiioore, Md. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 

Published Monthly in the Interest of the University of Maryland. 
PRICE ?1.00 PER YEAR. 



Contributiond solicited from Alumni of the 
University. 



Business Address, 608 Professional Building, 
Baltimore, Md. 



Vol. II. 



BALTIMORE, MD., APRIL 1, 1916. 



No. 10 



IMPRESSIONS OF THE CHICAGO 
CONFERENCE. 



By Caleb Winslow, M.A., 
Registrar Medical Department. 

This is an age of organization. As I glanced 
over the programme of the Twelfth Annual Con- 
gress on Medical Education, Public Health and 
Medical Licensure, and saw that three national 
societies, The American Medical Association, 
The Federation of Sate Medical Boards of the 
United States, and The Association of American 
Medical Colleges, were to confer jointly on medi- 
cal problems, I realized that this aphorism is 
eminently true of the medical profession. At- 
tendance at the convention, which was held in 
Chicago on February 7 and 8, confirmed this 
belief. 

Reasons for joint action by these various or- 
ganizations were brought out in the early part of 
the conference. Dr. Arthur Dean Bevan, Chair- 
man of the Council on Medical Education, opened 
the proceedings with a resume of the progress in 
medical education, remarking that we now have 
as high a standard as any country in the world, 
and that in the evolution of medical education in 
this country the medical profession had done 
more to place itself on an efiicient basis than any 
other profession or field eflfort. Secretary N. 
P. Colwell, in his report, stated that this pro- 
gress had been attended with a great decrease in 
the number of medical schools and students — 
43% and 50% respectively. To this house- 
cleaning he attributed the great increase in medi- 
cal cults ; a problem the state licensing boards are 
being called upon to solve. These state boards 
are exerting a rapidly increasing influence toward 
the betterment of medical education. This is 
done by setting a high standard which the various 
colleges must meet if their graduates are to be 
permitted to stand the licensing examinations. It 
can readily be seen what a powerful whip a state 
board has, particularly over the schools in its 



state ; likewise, how detrimental it would be to a 
school for a group of states to boycott its gradu- 
ates. 

One of the most interesting movements on 
foot at the present time is the establishment of a 
National Board of Medical Examiners. This 
board has met many obstacles, and is not yet in 
active operation ; but the obvious need is so great 
that it is sure to meet with success. The moving 
spirit in this undertaking is Dr. Wm. L. Rodman,* 
of Philadelphia. The board has its headquarters 
at the National Capital, and its standard will be 
so high that its results will be accepted by every 
state in the Union. At the present time the 
jealousy of a few states is hampering the work; 
but even when it becomes an active body, there 
will still be need of the boards of the various 
states ; for its standards will be so high that com- 
paratively few students will desire to stand its 
rigorous tests. 

To me the meeting of the College Association 
was the most interesting occasion of the confer- 
ence. I had been present at a meeting of the 
Executive Council, and knew that the Council 
was to recommend the addition of another pre- 
medical year, to go into effect in the session of 
1918-19. Many of the delegates felt that the time 
was not yet ripe for change ; but the measure was 
passed in spite of this opposition. The Univer- 
sity of Maryland was among those who advocated 
caution in this matter, the chief argument ad- 
vanced being that a dearth of physicians in rural 
Maryland would result from too-advanced en- 
trance requirements. 

It is pertinent to ask how this additional pre- 
medical year will affect the University. A large 
decrease in the student body will almost inevitably 
result; but, as the requirements become known 
throughout the country, the students will accom- 



*Note. — Since this article went to press the medical 
profession has sustained a great loss by the death of 
Dr. Rodman. It is sincerely to be hoped that some 
one will take his place and carry the work of the 
National oard to a successful issue. 



168 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



modate themselves to the change and the enrol- 
ment will gradually swing back to its present 
mark. Certainly the quality should improve ; for 
three laboratory courses cannot be adequately 
taught in one pre-medical year. There was gen- 
eral complaint at the conference that students 
come to the medical schools without a thorough 
knowledge of anything. 

In conclusion I would say that the present ten- 
dency, as I interpreted the conference, is to stand- 
ardize everything medical. 

First, to freeze out all schools not of A grade ; 

Second, to classify hospitals in order to evalu- 
ate the intern year ; 

Third, to pass medical practice laws imposing 
uniform requirements upon all applicants for 
licensure; and 

Fourth, to establish a National Board of Medi- 
cal Examiners whose certificates shall be accept- 
able throughout the length and breadth of the 
land. 



SOME OF THE HINDRANCES TO THE 
EXTENSION OF ORAL HYGIENE 
AMONG THE PEOPLE AT LARGE 
AND HOW I CAN AID IN THEIR RE- 
MOVAL. 

By M. K. Baklor, Dental, '16. 

Ignorance plus contributory negligence are 
probably the two most potent factors in keeping 
the propaganda of Oral Hygiene at its present 
comparatively low status. With the criminal 
gross negligence such as is being prescribed by 
Dr. Feldman, Dr. Peck and those others who are 
advocating the abolition of the tooth brush we 
have little to do — directly. It is manifestly im- 
possible to legislate people virtuous and likewise 
it is an impossibility to bring such people within 
the jurisdiction of the law. For those all right- 
thinking, level-headed people can tolerate only a 
deep feeling of commisseration, for they are more 
to be pitied than censored. 

But when we enter the realms of ignorance 
the vista changes. We ourselves become in- 
volved as grave factors for good or evil. It is 
indeed hard to realize how little we of the pro- 
fession have thus far advanced in the accumu- 
lation of and in establishing the authenticity of 
scientific data on the question of practical Oral 
Hygiene. So long as we keep putting in crowns 



and bridges (such as they are) we have but a 
poor conception of Oral Hygiene, its value and its 
manifold possibilities. I realize full well that the 
cream of the profession is today building a repu- 
tation on its bridge work, and yet when we think 
of the awful atrocities which are being perpe- 
trated against Nature by these men we shudder 
involuntarily. I do not wish to be unnecessarily 
severe with these men, but I am still waiting for 
someone to show me how to adapt a band be- 
neath the free margin of the gum without im- 
pinging on the soft tissues, without setting up a 
chronic irritation, more or less severe, and with- 
out leaving an ideal lodging place for food debris 
and bacteria. 

Truly "charity begins at home," and our first 
duty to mankind demands that we educate our- 
selves and that we improvise more hygienic 
methods of replacing and restoring those teeth 
which must inevitably be lost in the mouths of the 
susceptible. True enough we may assist a large 
number to avoid the extensive inroads by the 
teaching of oral prophylaxis, but is there anyone 
so brazen as to say that teeth will not decay in 
the mouths of some in spite of all our best efforts ? 
Familiarity breeds contempt, and so it is with 
our bridge work of today. Dr. Burgess, of New 
York, showed at the meeting of the Maryland 
Dental Association last June in what direction he 
was expending his efforts to eliminate crown 
work by the use of large inlays. So if bridge work 
is unavoidable it behooves us to awaken to a 
realization of the fact that we may make it more 
endurable to the patients' general economy by 
seeking more scientific methods of overcoming 
the unhygienic aspect of same. 

But this question disposed of we turn to the 
more serious problem of ignorance on the part 
of the masses. There lies a tremendous task 
and vast field for the display of the best that is 
within us in the way of organized effort. We 
may speak of the education of the laity and of our 
civilization as if it were a matter of fact, but in 
our heart of hearts we know that there is a great 
deal yet to be desired. Some of our most intelli- 
gent friends have been so rocked in the cradle of 
oral neglect that it has never given them any 
grave concern. Our natural laws of immunity 
have taken such wonderful care of them thus 
far that they have been lulled into a spirit of great 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



169 



security. And now it becomes our duty to rouse 
them out of their lethargy. With reference to 
the adults there are two practical methods for 
instruction. The first one is that of informing 
our patients while in the chair of the grave sig- 
nificance to their general economy of the main- 
tenance of oral health. We should convince them 
that the mouth is the portal of entry for a host 
of unmentionable diseases. Some orists plead 
that there is not enough time in a busy man's 
schedule for such talks ! Someone should wake 
them up. They, too, are sleeping at their posts 
of dutyl 

The second method is that of essays and lec- 
tures. And here we find dissension in our own 
ranks because of the havoc which is being 
wrought by the advertising man. In the attempt 
to offset that the conservative men oppose all 
forms of publicity. A case in point is that of Dr. 
Grady who was improperly accused by the Mary- 
land Dental Association because he was supposed 
to have permitted the mention of his name in 
connection with some instructive and enlightening 
information published in one of our foremost 
periodicals. Such conservatism must be met and 
overcome for the sake of co-operation and har- 
mony. We cannot afford to have our honest 
efforts discountenanced by those doubters who 
question the sincerity of our motives. The dental 
associations should by unanimous decisions 
authorize the publication of essays on oral hygiene 
from time to time in our recognized magazines. 
Those of us who are gifted with oratorical ability 
can do splendid service in the spread of the 
Oral Hygiene propaganda by delivering ad- 
dresses before various assemblies. If properly 
approached, the corporations and employers will 
gladly permit us to deliver a talk to their as- 
sembled employees in the dissemination of such 
knowledge. But we must have the moral backing 
and sanction of the authorities, i. e., the dental 
associations. In this connection I am reminded of 
the words of the immortal Longfellow : 

"When'er a noble deed is wrought, 
When'er is spoken a noble thought. 
Our hearts in glad surprise 
To higher levels rise. 

The tidal wave of deeper souls 
Into our inmost being rolls, 



And lifts us unawares 
Out of all meaner cares. 

Honor to those whose words or deeds 
Thus help us in our daily needs, 
And by their overflow 
Raise us from what is low." 

To reach the minds of the young through their 
schools and to educate them now is an easier task 
than to instruct their elders who are perhaps 
more sensitive. According to the pioneers in 
this splendid field of endeavor we should put forth 
our best efforts in that direction so as to reach 
the adults through their younger friends and 
to train the nation in its infancy. Ways and 
means are constantly being devised by the pro- 
fession in their society meetings. All that some 
of us lack is the energy and will power to put 
our shoulders to the wheel. The incentive for 
action has long since been supplied by those 
splendid men who are initiating us into the 
mysteries and the delights of altruism. But more 
of that anon. In passing I can but rest a moment 
to render homage to Dr. Hopkinson who delivered 
such a splendid address on opportunity for ser- 
vice at the opening of the session. May the in- 
spiration linger with me and my classmates for 
many a year to come. 

Then comes the question of negligence on the 
part of the laity, of parents as well as of teachers. 
One way to overcome this is to spread our doc- 
trine to the extent that it may become common 
knowledge and that all those who fail to heed 
its precepts, its warnings and dangers may be 
made to support the weight of a troubled con- 
science when the ravages of disease overtake 
them. That other extreme of neglect such as is 
concommitant with financial straits, strains and 
worries is for us an impenetrable quagmire. 
Those cases come within the jurisdiction of benev- 
olent societies and philanthropists. They will per- 
sist until the millenium when our present dwarfed 
social and economic laws have undergone a great 
evolution. Thanks to the kindness of Fate many 
of us are spared the pain which comes with the 
knowledge of the existence of certain conditions I 
have in mind ; conditions redounding with squalor 
and wretchedness. Poverty stands out in my 
mind as one of the grave hindrances to the spread 
of oral hygiene. The removal of such an obstacle 



170 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



from our path would tax the patience of Job as 
well as the strength of a Samson. 

Just a few more words on the subject of al- 
truistic efforts. In discussing the subject of Oral 
Hygiene with several practitioners I was im- 
pressed with their scepticism and suspicion of 
those disinterested workers who are so nobly 
sacrificing so much effort in this field. Some 
men seem to consider it an absolute impossibility 
for anyone to work without the prospects of im- 
mediate remuneration in view. They seem to 
agree thoroughly with Henderson who writes 
under the heading of Social Welfare: "The con- 
ception of social welfare becomes inverted and 
tyrannous just as soon as it fails to square most 
rigidly with the ideas of personal good fortune 
and individual happiness." This same psycholo- 
gist further insists : "Social welfare, unchastened 
by the idea of individual good fortune, is a 
hideous thing, and opens the door to as many 
mischiefs as the most unbridled self-indulgence 
of individuals." And because I consider altruism, 
the watchword of Oral Hygiene, such an in- 
fluential factor in this propaganda I will now state 
my own views on the subject. 

In the case of a few of us there is an inherent 
lust for the study of science when we undertake 
the pursuit of medicine and its allied courses. 
But the ambition of the average man, be he of 
the profession or one of the laity, is ever the 
same, i. e., to win the respect and admiration of 
his fellow-men, to be popular, to make his ex- 
istence known and felt ; in short, he wants to 
feel that he is exerting an influence and that 
he is occupying a place in the community. This 
is a highly laudable and commendable ambition 
worthy of any man with real red blood throbbing 
through his heart. After the departure from 
our midst of such a man it will be unnecessary to 
add in the words of Antony : "He was ambitious, 
if it were so, it was a grievous fault and grievous- 
ly hath he answered it." 

I contend that there is one sure way of endear- 
ing oneself to the community and that is to show 
them that we are interested in their well being 
and happiness and are willing to teach them and 
to show them how to lighten their burden. In 
this day when the struggle for existence, especial- 
ly in the larger cities, has become as soul crushing 
as it is heart-racking, the average individual finds 



himself absorbed to distraction and finds little 
or no time for the observance of those rules of 
hygiene upon which his very fitness and hopes 
of survival depend. We, who by inclination or 
good fortune have been enabled to spend some 
time in the study of science and in the accumula- 
tion of knowledge, owe it to our less fortunate 
brethren and to the community as a whole to 
disseminate this knowledge and to assist them in 
this unequal struggle for existence. It is an 
example of "Noblesse oblige." We well know 
that poor health prevents many an industrious 
person from qualifying for a position which will 
enable him to earn a decent living wage. The 
ravages of disease aggravate and intensify the 
struggle. By instructing our patients and all 
those who come wnthin the sphere of our in- 
fluence to observe cleanliness of the mouth, that 
great avenue for the entrance of innumerable 
pathogenic micro-organisms, we enable them to 
assist Nature in maintaining a more perfect 
balance. By aiding them in the preservation of 
their health, we make them useful members of 
society, we enable them to assume that optimistic 
view of life which is a sequence of good health 
and remove a possible incubus from the State. 

Thus our work in spreading the propaganda 
of oral hygiene makes of us philanthropists and 
benefactors of humanity. Without depriving us 
of the good things in life we by our own worthy 
efforts augment and enhance those blessings 
which a kind Deity showers upon us. The work 
reaps its own rewards. Our patients realize that 
we have their welfare at heart and that we are 
helping to lift the yoke of oppression and suf- 
fering "which the human flesh is heir to. 

And because we meet with success and our 
practice assumes generous proportions we should 
not desist from further efforts and travail. We 
should ever strive to increase our wealth 'of 
knowledge and fields of utility. Only when that 
great benefactor of humanity, that all providing 
Deity, issues the call are we permitted to lay our 
work aside for others (our descendants) to take 
it up. Then we may know at the parting moment 
that we have led a useful life, that we have served 
a worthy purpose while we existed and that we 
have made this world of ours a little better by 
having dwelt therein. 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



171 



THE HENRY FORD PEACE EXPEDITION. 



Edgar T. Fell, Law, '17. 

The Henry Ford Peace Expedition has never 
been understood by the people of America. It 
has everywhere been talked of as a huge joke, a 
joy ride, an advertising scheme and even by some 
as a disgraceful affair which should have been 
suppressed. The public has never had the facts 
presented to it in their true form and it has 
formed an opinion based largely on the erroneous 
reports printed in the various newspapers during 
the course of the expedition. 

The trip was, upon its face and in the light 
of the statements made at that time, a ludicrous 
conception of an idealist, a project doomed to 
failure and one well calculated to produce dire 
results. This must be granted, and it was this 
unfortunate state of affairs that handicapped be- 
yond measure any attempt of Mr. Ford under- 
taken at that time. 

Mr. Ford did not go to Europe to try to stop. 
the war; he had no thought of being able to do 
such a thing with 160 Americans. True, the 
phrase "Out of the Trenches by Christmas" was 
made the slogan. It was an unfortunate state- 
ment let drop in the fervor of the moment and 
one which could never be shaken off. But he 
did have a very definite plan and purpose. It 
may be summed up in the words "the establish- 
ment of the doctrine of continuous mediation." 
Put plainly, this means the establishment of a 
body of officials of the neutral nations to con- 
stitute a central clearing house to sit during the 
war, to serve as a means of communication be- 
tween the various belligerents, and to take up 
the work of constructive negotiation just where 
the diplomatic officials left off at the beginning of 
the war. Thus he proposed to set in motion, now, 
the very machinery which is ultimately going to 
take up the problem when peace is declared. He 
does not understand why it is necessary to wait 
until the end of the war before beginning active 
work leading to the final settlement. His origi- 
nal plan was to set up an official conference, that 
is, one composed of individuals appointed by the 
neutral governments, and for the furtherance 
of this idea he appealed with numbers of others 
to President Wilson for an official recognition of 
American delegates. The failure to obtain this 



government's support resulted naturally in a sim- 
ilar failure in other neutral countries. 

But unshaken in his faith as to the success of 
his idea when once adopted, Mr. Ford determined 
to go ahead and set up an unofficial conference 
and to take abroad a number of Americans of 
all classes, to travel through Norway, SwedeL, 
Denmark and Holland with a view of presenting 
in public meetings this plan of continuous media- 
tion to the people of those countries and to solicit 
their support. This was done, and in every coun- 
try visited the popular interest was intense, and 
from each a delegation of from ten to fifteen 
joined the expedition and traveled with it through 
Germany to the Hague. Here each delegation 
elected permanently individuals to serve on the 
neutral council, which council immediately or- 
ganized and set to work while the rest of the 
delegation returned to their respective countries. 

This then is the whole sum total of the Ford 
Expedition. The reader must make a distinction 
between the expedition, that is, between its actual 
incidents and work done abroad on the trip, and 
the idea of continuous mediation as a constructive 
peace measure, before asking "Was it a success?" 
The expedition was decidedly a success. It did 
exactly what it was intended to do so far as 
spreading the idea or plan and obtaining the sup- 
port of the foreign neutrals are concerned. It 
established a neutral body of representatives of 
the non-belligerent countries. That body is now 
in session in Stockholm, having moved there from 
the Hague at the urgent request of the people 
of Sweden. 

As to the success of the plan of continuous 
mediation through the existing conference, the 
question is entirely distinct and is one which cannot 
be answered as yet, as the conference has only just 
begun its work. That is a question of the future. 

Should this body, however, obtain official recog- 
nition and be permitted to bring about even thd 
slightest concession or understanding between the 
belligerents in regard to a minute point, while the 
war is now going on, thus tending to hasten the 
end by even a few hours, any money or effort 
expended in this cause will have been amply re- 
paid and will have constituted an act that is at 
once a service to humanity and an honor to the 
men and women thus delegated whose devotion 
and efforts has been expended therein. 



IT'S 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 

A MONTHLY JOURNAL 

Devoted to the interests of the University 

of Maryland. 

Subscription Price, ?1.00 Per Annum, In Advance 

Reprints Furnished At Cost 

Advertising Rates Submitted Upon Request. 

608 Professional Building 

BALTIMORE, MD. 

EDITORIAL STAFF. 

J. Ben Robinson, D.D.S Editor-in -Chief 

Nathan Winslow, M.D Business Manager 

James M. Hepbron, LL.B Law 

A. A. Sonnenburg, Phar. D Pharmacy 

M. E. Sullivan, R. N Nursing 

A. Z. Aldridge, '16 Dental 

W. Lester Baldwin, '16 Law 

APRIL 1, 1916. 

EDITORIALLY EXPRESSED. 



It is indeed a pleasant surprise to find the 
changes which have been brought about in the 
University Library in the past two years. From 
an ill-kept, dust-covered, dark, uninviting den to 
a neat, clean, bright, attractive reading room; 
from a few arm chairs and individual tables to 
an ample number of large library tables and 
chairs; from a great mass of books scattered 
promiscuously about in wall cases to a greater 
number of books departmentized and placed in 
convenient up-to-date library cases; from a few 
old faded periodicals to most of the best maga- 
zines of the day — in short, a transformation from 
the undesirable and useless to the inviting and 
necessary. We thought that perhaps it lacks 
student support, but Mrs. Briscoe, the very capa- 
ble trained librarian in charge, says no. There 
are from seventy-five to one hundred students 
who daily take advantage of the opportunity this 
reading and study room affords. The library 
in Davidge Hall is a thing the University might 
well be proud of and we recommend it to the 
patronage of both faculty and student. 



The College Man Sets 
the Styles! 

Uphold your reputation by wearing 
suits made the "Matched Pattern" 
way, the most important clothing 
invention of the decade ! 

These suits are sold exclusively by 

THE QUALITY SHOP 
Balto. and Liberty Sts. 




Terra Marine is now in press and will soon 
be ofl^ered to the public. Last year the manner in 
which its business was conducted did everything 
but reflect credit on the University, and this was 
in no small degree a consequence of the lack of 
support and appreciation on the part of the 
alumni and faculty. This year the personnel of 
the editorial staff indicates a clean business record 
and a most creditable literary publication. When 
the young men who have given freely of their 
time and energy are ready to place the annual 
on sale every one should do his part in paying 
the small subscription and so aid a cause which 
deserves patronage. 



Billy Sunday is in our midst and has hit the 
right track. If we have said anything dis- 
paragingly of him we retract. He is all that his 
friends claim and even more. We have not "hit 
the trail," but we have been converted to a belief 
in Mr. Sunday's sincerity and devotion. He seeks 
out evil and evil-doers and flays them without 
mercy, and by so doing makes enemies where 
he might court a favor. He hits us all alike, 
but we deserve it, and his scathing invectives 
must be accepted as proper rebuke to the male- 
factor. Long live Sunday ! 



On the night of March 18, the University was 
allotted reservation of one thousand seats in the 
Sunday Tabernacle. This, to the average mind, 
would seem sufficient to accommodate the stu- 
dents and faculties of the four departments. 
However, indiscretion and selfishness seem to 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



173 



predominate in the mind of some pretended 
friends of the Law Department and a second 
reservation was secured to accommodate the law 
men. The law students were there and showed 
the proper college spirit, and there can be no 
criticism offered them for not joining the other 
three departments, but of the one or ones who 
erred in creating such a breach of college spirit 
there can be no reasonable excuse. A refusal to 
join in a general university banquet and a prefer- 
ence for segregation at the Sunday meeting would 
indicate a desire on the part of some one to avoid 
any association with the other departments. "Lay 
on, MacDuff." 



SLAMS AND SALUTES. 



THE PARTING ODE. 



To The Class 1916. 



T'will soon be graduation, 
And studies will be o'er. 
But still it's just beginning 
To learn a little more. 

II. 

Where only is found the manner, 
Just the way to work in law. 
Like farmers do in ploughing, 
Or carpenters with saw. 

III. 
We hope each faithful student, 
An average high to claim ; 
We hope some day in history 
He will reach "Boss" Kanode's fame. 

— By Poet Laureate, Alexander Geddes. 
Only Poet Laureate in the United States of 
America. 



"What are they moving the church for?" 
"Well, stranger, I'm the mayor of these dig- 
gin's, an' I'm fer law enforcement. We've got 
an ordinance what says no saloon shall be nearer 
than 300 feet from a church. I give 'em three 
days to move the church." — Successful Farming. 



Now Eeady for Spring, 1916. See Us for Classy Clothes. 

SPECIAL RATES TO STUDENTS 



AT 



The Imperial Lunch Room 

526 W .Baltimore St. 

Phone St Paul 8178 Baltimore, Md. 



ORGANIZATIONS. 



HARLAN LAW SOCIETY NOTES. 



The regular and special meetings of the Harlan 
Law Society during the past month have been 
full of life and vigor. The average attendance 
for the month is twenty-six, and everyone has 
seemed to enjoy every minute of each meeting. 
Open discussion of some subject announced by 
the president has made up the programs. The 
subject which was under discussion at both the 
first and second meetings after the Gazette went 
to press last month was "The Good and Bad of 
the Present System of Running the Law School ;" 
at the third meeting, "Billy Sunday and His 
Methods. Edel and Byrne were the leaders, pro 
and con. At the meeting of March 17 we were 
greatly benefited by a debate on the subject "Mis- 
representation is a ground for the Rescission of 
an Executed Contract." Messrs. Oldhauser and 
Kartman for the affirmative. Levy and Cooper, 
D. G., for the negative. The judges, Messrs. Say- 
ler, Sullivan and Firley, held their decision sub 
curia. Mr. Sayler will read the written decision 
of the judges at the meeting of March 24. 



ATHLETICS. 



The baseball season of St. John's College 
opened on March 29 with the game with Rock 
Hill at Ellicott City. In addition to this game 
the following schedule has been arranged: 
Apr. 1— Mt. St. M. at Annapolis. 
" 8— Pending. 
" 12 — Mt. St. J. at Annapolis. 
" 15— M. A. C. at College Park. 
" 29— Mt. St. M, at Emmittsburg. 



174 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



May 



3— Mt. St. J. at Irvington. 

6 — Delaware Col. at Newark. 
16 — Rock Hill at Annapolis. 
13 — Wash. Col. at Annapolis. 
17 — Delaware Col. at Annapolis. 
18 — Navy at Annapolis. 
20 — ^Johns Hop. at Homewood. 
24 — M. A. C. at Annapolis. 
27— West. Md. at Westminster. 
31 — Wash. Col. at Chestertown. 


ITEMS— GENERAL. 



The eleventh annual dinner of the Pennsyl- 
vania branch of the General Alumni Association 
of the University of Maryland was held at the 
Hotel Walton, Philadelphia, Thursday evening, 
March 9, at 7 o'clock. In spite of the fact that 
there were only thirteen members present, the 
meeting was most enthusiastic. The 1917 meet- 
ing will likely be held in Harrisburg. The officers 
elected for the ensuing year are Dr. Z. C. Myers, 
President, of York, Pa. ; Dr. James G. Heading. 
Vice-President, of Port Royal, Pa., and Dr. J. C. 
C. Beale, Secretary-Treasurer, of Philadelphia. 
Pa. 



Don't get excited. If you must knock, or 
pound, do it all on the gold filling. 



You can't demonstrate Fletcherism to the 
patient by chewing the rag. 



STYLISH and COMFORTABLE 
FOOT-WEAR 

FOR THE 

UNIVERSITY MAN 

All Leathers — Expert Fitting 
Moderate Prices 

WYMAN 

19 W. LEXINGTON STREET 



Dr. Winslow is in receipt of the following let- 
ter from Dr. Thomas Fell, President of St. John's 
College : 

March 19, 1916. 
"My Dear Dr. Winslow : 

"I notice in the copy of the University 
Gazette a paragraph above your initials regard- 
ing a joint graduation banquet of the University 
of Maryland. 

"I heartily approve your suggestions and hope 
you will be able to get the deans of the Law 
School to participate in the plan. 

"However, I notice in a foregoing editorial 
that the writer refers only to the faculties and 
teaching forces of the four schools. 

"Why should the fifth school, viz : Department 
of Arts and Science, be left out of consideration? 

"With kind regards, I am, 

"Very sincerely yours, 
"Thomas Fell." 



MEDICAL— GRADUATE. 



Dr. William P. Caton, class of 1896, of Acco- 
tink, Va., was a recent visitor to the University 
Hospital. He was warmly greeted by a number 
of old friends. 



Recent gifts to the Medical Library include 
twenty-six fine books on various subjects from 
Messrs. Lea & Febiger, publishers, and Collec- 
tanea Jacobi, edited by Dr. William J. Robinson, 
in eight volumes, and one through the courtesy of 
Sir William Osier. 



Dr. Bascom L. Wilson, class of 1915, who has 
been visiting the hospital for a few days, is resi- 
dent at the Old Soldiers' Home Hospital in 
Washington, D. C. His work is very varied. 



Dr. Charles C. Habliston, class of 1914, was on 
a visit to Baltimore lately. He is at present resi- 
dent at the Cleveland Municipal Tuberculosis 
Hospital at Warrenville, Ohio, where he is doing 
good work. He has been induced to stay another 
year. 



Dr. and Mrs. Arthur M. Shipley gave an in- 
formal dance at their home, 1827 Eutaw Place, on 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



171 



March 14, for the graduating nurses and resi- 
dent physicians of the University Hospital. The 
guests numbered about fifty. A buffet supper 
was served late in the evening. Two of the resi- 
dents sang. 

Dr. Everett Le Compte Cook, class of 1914, 
who for the past two years has been resident at 
the iVIunicipal Tuberculosis Hospital, will enter 
private practice soon. 



Dr. Charles W. Mitchell, who has been serious- 
ly ill with broncho-pneumonia, following an at- 
tack of grippe, has been slightly improved the 
last few days. We wish him a speedy recovery. 



Dr. Thomas A. Ashby, who has been very ill, 
is now a regular and frequent visitor to the 
hospital. We are delighted to learn that he is 
getting better. 

Dr. E. Howard Tonolla, class of 1915, will 
leave the University Hospital April 1 to accept a 
position at Gouveneur Hospital in New York. 



At a recent meeting at Westminster of the Car- 
roll County Medical Society, Dr. Joseph W. Hol- 
land, class of 1896, read a paper on "Modern 
Treatment of Fractures of Long Bones." 



Among the recent visitors to the hospital were 
Drs. John T. McKee, class of 1907, of Raleigh, 
N. C. ; Guy P. Asper, class of 1903, of Chambers- 
burg, Pa. ; D. B. Moffitt, class of 1915, now con- 
nected with the Episcopal Hospital, Washington, 
D. C. ; S. Harry Greenburg, class of 1915, of 
Los Angeles, Cal. ; W. H. Smithson, class of 
1905, of New Park, Pa., and Nelson Osborn, class 
of 1909, of Martinsburg, W. Va. 



We have been definitely informed that some 
of the residents have hit the "sawdust trail." 



We are pleased to announce that Dr. Frank W. 
Keating, class of 1896, Superintendent of the 
Maryland Training School for Feeble Minded 
Children, Owings Mills, Md., who was operated 
on recently for gall stones and chronic appendi- 
citis at the University Hospital, is rapidly con- 
valescing. 

o 

MEDICAL— SENIOR. 



Mr. A. S. Lowsley, class of 1916, has been ap- 
pointed to a two-year surgical internship in the 
Methodist Episcopal Hospital, Brooklyn, N. Y. 



LAW— GRADUATE. 



Elsewhere in this number of the Gazette will 
be found a beautiful poem by "Prof." Alexan- 
der Geddes, the only Poet Laureate in America. 
The Gazette is indeed fortunate in securing the 
"Professor's" latest effusion for exclusive pub- 
lication. In the near future "Professor" Geddes 
will have a poem on "Love" in the Gazette. 



Several dozen requests have been received from 
our feminine subscribers asking us to publish the 
picture of R. E. Kanode, '15, the now famous 
Hagerstown politician and attorney. To comply 
with this request will be out of the question for 
the present at least, as the only photograph we 
have of the "Boss" is one taken last summer at 
Glen Echo Park while he was eating a hot 
doggie. 



David C. Levenson, '15, otherwise known as 
"Ignatz," seems to be on the crest of a wave of 
prosperity, for he is sporting a 7 carat diamond 
ring, worth in the neighborhood of $2,000.00. He 
must have bought some duPont stock. 



WILLIAM J. MILLER 

Jewelery, Diamonds, Watches 

College Jewelry 
Class Pins and Rings, College Seals 
S8 East BalUmore St Baltimore, Md. 22 W. LexlngtOH St., = Baltimore, Md. 



RLLERBROCK 



176 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



J. Owen Knotts, '14, of Denton, Md., was in 
the city during the month. Mr. Knotts was re- 
cently made counsel to the Board of County Com- 
missioners of Caroline County, and despite his 
youth is even now a factor in Caroline politics. 



The reunion banquet of the 1915 class which 
was held at the Hotel Rennert, on March 25, was 
quite a success. The 1915 class decided to hold a 
similar affair at least once a year in the future, 
so that the class may be perpetuated. 



Mabbett K. Reckord, '15, is at present in the 
Hebrew Hospital recovering from an operation 
for appendicitis. He expects to leave the hos- 
pital in about a week. 



Daniel J. Healy, '15, wishes to emphatically 
deny that he has starter a Bar Quiz Class. Some- 
one, it seems, had posted a notice to this effect 
in the library, but it was without Mr. Healey's 
knowledge or consent. 



Chas. C. Dipaula, '14, is now the proud father 
of a baby boy, and in honor of the occasion he 
moved his law offices to larger and more luxurious 
quarters. He is now located at 215 Courtland 
street. 



Webster C. Tall, '13, has accepted a position in 
the legal department of the U. S. F. & G. Co., 
and is at present located in Albany, N. Y. 



Mr. George Oscar Blome, LL.B., class of 1915, 
one of the assistant librarians and student ad- 
visors for the Law Department, has been recently 
appointed clerk to the Practice Court. 



William McKendre Travers, LL.B., class of 
1915, announces that he has entered upon the 
practice of law with offices at 43 Central Savings 
Bank Building, Charles and Lexington streets, 
Baltimore. Phone, St. Paul 1622. The Gazette 
wishes him a great deal of success. 



Of the eight lawyers who were admitted to 
practice in the courts of this city by the Supreme 
Bench on March 15, on motion, having been ad- 
mitted by the Court of Appeals, five of them were 



University men. They were Messrs. Charles 
Frederick Kammerer and Elmer M. Harper, both 
of the class of 1915, and William S. Gwynn, 
James Burgess Diggs and Frederick Herman 
Hennighausen, class of 1916. The Gazette ex- 
tends its congratulations. 



The attractive appearance of the library has 
been greatly enhanced during the past month 
by a gift from the Law Department of six hand- 
some clothes trees. These supply a long-felt want, 
as with the large and increasing attendance in all 
departments, the comfortable disposition of the 
coats and hats was a problem. 



LAW— SENIOR. 



The four men who will argue the Honor Case 
this year, as announced by Sappington, Chief 
Judge of the Practice Court, Friday night, March 
17, are George E. Kieffner, Wendell D. Allen, W. 
Lester Baldwin and Dudley G. Cooper. Names 
of the twelve men who were chosen to participate 
in the preliminaries were published in the Feb- 
ruary number of the Gazette. 



Monday! Tuesday! Wednesday! 

Thursday ! Friday ! 

Saturday! 

Sunday! Sunday! Sunday! 



Two hundred students from the Law School 
heard Rev. William A. Sunday, at the Taber- 
nacle, Saturday evening, March 18. W. Lester 
Baldwin, president of the Senior Class, lead the 
delegation in university yells and in cheers for 
St. John's College, Dean Harlan, Mr. Sunday and 
Secretary Dickerson, respectively. 

When Mr. Rodeheaver called for our delega- 
tion to stand up we sang, to the tune of "Brighten 
the Corner Where You Are," the following 
words : "Up in that college where we are ! Up 
in that college where we are! We'll take the 
examinations, then we'll pass the bar, Up in that 
college where we are." 

At the call for trail hitters about half the dele- 
gation, lead by Mr. Dickerson and Walter V. 
Harrison, Esq., went up to shake hands with Mr. 
Sunday. 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



177 



Mr. Ellis Rosenberg begs to announce the open- 
ing of his law office at 1207 Calvert Building. Mr. 
Rosenberg was one of the lucky ones who took the 
recent State Bar Examination and passed. We 
congratulate him and wish him much success. 



Morris Franklin, the well-known politician, and 
Ellis Rosenberg have opened law offices at 1207 
Calvert Building. 



"Jimes" Byrne, debonair young sportsman of 
the senior class, recently lost a bet. For full par- 
ticulars see Levin or Hepbron. 



Graham, Brown and Gambrill have taken offices 
in the Title Building and will be open for busi- 
ness in the near future. This will, no doubt, put 
an end to a persistent rumor that Newell Graham 
and Morris Franklin had formed a partnership. 


LAW— INTERMEDIATE. 



Albin Widoff, '17. 



As usual the banquet with Hans Froelicher, 
Jr., as toastmaster, was a rattling success, success 
to the n-th degree, success with a bun on. With 
our Hans behind anything success is a concomit- 
tant. Hooper S. Miles, as chairman of the ban- 
quet committee, cooked up a dinner for the gods, 
but lawyers ate it. Judge J. P. Gorter is to be 
thanked for his optimistic speech, and all who 
attended hope that the "swift" boys like Meyer, 
Weyer, Ragland, Maynard, etc., take heed to his 
warnings about dissipation. 

S. Rogers Page spoke with the boldness of a 
pirate, with the destructive criticism of a Socrates 
and, alas, too, too solemly. Ah, if he only knew 
how lightly his auditors took it, what a tragedy 
there would be. Dave Lowenstein, Jr., had to 
slaughter his speech because of the lack of time. 
However, the little that was heard provided pleas- 
ure. Edgar T. Fell gave an interesting descrip- 
tion of the baths of Stockholm, told about Ford, 
the Oscar II and the nuts on board. Albin Widoff 
gave out prizes to the members of the class who 
were voted as excelling in various vices and vir- 
tues. The prizes caused amusement. W. Lester 
Baldwin, president of the senior class, was the 



orator of the evening. His talk on "An Ancient 
Lie" caused discussion and surprise. Nobody 
had indigestion and nearly all got home safely. 



Hall of Fame. 

J. V. McCourt: A gentleman who does not 
let law interfere with manners ; the essence of the 
unassuming; an aristocrat who imagines himself 
a democrat. 



Jesse Fine: The apotheosis of nimble wit; a 
mind like a hair-trigger; great expectations, a 
rosy morning; too much common sense. 



W. L. Murphy: Shallowness that cannot be 
fathomed ; a hero at Greene and Lombard streets ; 
a pleader before the Court of Appeals; just think, 
a name like that — hitting the trail 1 



J. R. Dykes : Whatever I do I do thoroughly; 
an enthusiast; a pro-German; one with convic- 
tions and therefore one who shall find out here- 
after that if one must have convictions they must 
not be naked, but encased in a hard shell or at- 
tired with gaudiness. 



Word has just reached us that our colleague, 
Wm. H. Maynard, the incarnation of dignity, 
was seen at the Suburban Garden performing the 
one-step and the kitchen sink. We positively re- 
fuse to believe it. 



LAW— JUNIOR. 



Edwin K. Gontrum, 18. 



With fifty-seven members of the class present 
and with an elaborate menu that would satisfy the 
palate of the most fastidious, the banquet of the 
class of 1918 was held Saturday night, March 
4, at the Rennert Hotel. Considering the fact 
that it was the first afifair of its kind given by 
the class, the committee in charge had every rea- 
son to feel elated over the splendid turn-out. 

Ex-Judge Henry D. Plarlan was the principal 
speaker. He made particular mention of the 
bill which he prepared requiring better qualifica- 
tions in the ranks of those who aspire to legal 



178 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



Hart Schaffner & Marx, 
Kuppenheimer, 
"Society Brand" 



DENTAE— SENIOR. 



The clothes that college men 
like a lot 



Baltimore Street At Charlei 



practice in the State. He expressed keen regret 
because of the fact that the bill had been tabled. 
The other speaker was Edwin T. Dickerson, sec- 
retary and treasurer of the Law Department. He 
dwelt on the subject of efficiency and the recon- 
struction and progress of the country since the 
Civil War, calling attention to the part of the 
legal profession in this work. Herbert T. Tif- 
fany and James B. Dennis also spoke. They 
advised the students to uphold the standards of 
the University and to hold strictly to the ethics 
of the profession. 

Robert H. Landstreet, president of the class, 
acted as toastmaster. Other members of the 
class who spoke included J. Calvin Carney, Stan- 
ley K. Harmon, Allan W. Rhynhart, J. C. Carter, 
Moses Paulson and C. W. Hill, all of whom 
spoke of the importance of school spirit and urged 
a closer feeling of fellowship among the mem- 
bers of the junior class. 

The committee in charge of the banquet was 
composed of J. Calvin Carney, chairman; H. D. 
Bierau, G. F. Robinson, Charles Ruzicka, Joseph 
Bernstein, Richard Wilkins, Paul C. Wolman, 
George H. McCready and E. A. Cole. 

After all expenses were paid for the banquet, 
a small balance was left which has been turned 
over to the treasurer of the class. The price of a 
place was $2.50. 

o 

They had cut off a Chinaman's queue, 
And were painting his head a bright blueue; 
So the Chinaman said. 
As they daubed at his head : 
"When I sueue yueue, yueue'll rueue what 
yueue dueue." 

— Current Opinion. 



L. A. Bennett has gone to his home in Vir- 
ginia for a few weeks rest. Ben has been troubled 
with La Grippe all winter. Here's hoping 
the rest will prove beneficial. 



Since Ben has gone to his home "Boins" sleeps 
alone. He rolls around in bed so much that he 
recently skinned his toes. His feet are not to 
be compared with Lena's neck. 

Nathanson was early for a lecture one day last 
week. And lo and behold, the prof, did not show 
up. Remember the old proverb, "Al :" "Try, try, 
again." 

Any one wishing to know why "Fresh" Smith 
suffers from general atrophy will ask "Oy ! Oy !" 
Funderburger, the Hypertrophied Jew. 



Sowers has returned to school after a short 
visit to his home. 



McLeod has taken unto himself a wife and 
recently let the glad news out. The class ex- 
tends its best wishes to the happy pair. 



The boys enjoy immensely the Monday metal- 
lurgy quizzes. 



Terra Mariae has gone to press and the issue 
is the best published for many years. 



"Al" Kendall, last year's president, has again 
returned to school. 



Speaking of patriotism, Lena came down to 
school on "Pats" Day dolled up in a green suit, 
a green hat, green tie and a green carnation 
adorned his button hole. We suggest that he be 
given a bouquet of green bananas. No, Lena 
isn't German. 



In two months some of us shall leave the old 
stamping grounds never to return again. Others 
will return in the fall. Men, you know the 
prophylactic treatment! No 1916 men are wanted 
or want to return in the fall. "Nuf sed." 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



179 



DENTAL— JUNIOR. 



E. B. Lancaster, '17. 



Echoes From The Professors. 

1. Crown and Bridge — "Now, er, the wax 
must be carefully removed." 

2. Physiology — "Lo and behold, gentlemen, 
the doggone thing won't contract. . . . Don't 
forget it. . . But to begin the argument." 

3. Prosthetic Lab. — "You must, must get to 
work. 

4. Orthodontia — "To digress a little, gentle- 
men, if you will excuse a personal reference." 

5. Materia Medica — "Well, so much for 
that." 

6. Operative Dentistry — "I call that chagrin." 

7. Bacteriology — "Stick to you scopes, gen- 
tlemen, and don't discuss politics." 

8. Oral Surgery — "Make full incision and 
drainage." 

9. Dr. Rea — "Smooth up your margins." 

10. Dr. Robinson — "Make your collection 
now, Doc." 



Dr. Rob — "Brown, is that right what I've been 
hearing about you?" 

Brown — "Doctor, has that wap been talking 
about me again?" 

N. B. — George Waynick longs for a little fuz 
around his labii superiors. 



Tobacco is an injurious weed ; 
The devil sowed the seed ; 

I like it. 
It rots your teeth and stinks your clothes ; 
It makes a smokestack of your nose; 

I like it. 
Tobacco is a dirty weed ; 
It satisfies no normal need; 

I like it. 
It makes you thin, it makes you lean; 
It satisfies no normal need ; 
Its's the worst dam stuff I've ever seen ; 

But I like it. 



HEPBRON & HAYDON 

We Sell Every Law Book and Syllabus 
Used at the U. of M. 



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Betts 


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Edwards 


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chicken 


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yiddishers. 


karve 
a 

nifty 
specimen. 




PHARMACY— GRADUATE. 



The Baltimore branch of the American Phar- 
maceutical Association at its February meeting 
took a decided stand against the bill introduced 
in the Maryland Legislature which sought to 
impose onerous restrictions upon physicians who 
dispensed their own medicines. The measure 
has since been killed. 

The prescription presented at the November 
meeting by Charles L. Meyer, which called for 
4 drams of copaiba, 2 drams of balsam of Peru, 3 
drams of oil of turpentine and syrup of lemon 
sufficient to make 6 ounces, in which the balsam 
of Peru was the disturbing factor, was shown ta 
be a good emulsion when made by the addition 
of 2 drams of sweet almond oil, the mixture 



180 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



being emulsified with 4 drams of acacia and 6 
drams of water. The balsam of Peru was added 
to the primary emulsion and thoroughly incor- 
porated, the syrup of lemon being added last. 



The creation of a social committee was ap- 
proved with Miss Annie M. Patterson as chair- 
man. 



A number of articles in the pharmaceutical 
journals were brought up and discussed. One of 
them stated that when tincture of strophanthus is 
mixed with water hydrolysis takes place, and a 
toxic compound is formed. It was therefore 
thought best that the tincture should not be pre- 
scribed in aqueous mixtures, but should be diluted 
just before administering. 

Tincture of lavender compound was stated to 
be an excellent disguise for valerian, and oil 
of lavender was mentioned as very good for re- 
moving the odor of valerian from mortars, es- 
pecially of pills of the three valeriates. 

The oil was also recommended for masking 
the odor of cook cabbage. 



The March meeting will probably be a joint 
session with the Retail Druggists' Association, 
at which Dr. Beavers will be requested to give a 
stereopticon lecture on vaccines and sermus. 



The social committee of the Maryland Pharma- 
ceutical Association gave a card party and dance 
at the Hotel Eemrson on Tuesday, March 7, at 
8 P. M. The attendance was large and the affair 
proved a great success. 



ACADEMIC— GRADUATE. 



The first of the Course of University Extension 
Lectures was delivered on Monday evening, 
March 6, in McDowell Hall, by Lieut. George D. 
Riley, of the Coast Artillery Corps United States 
Army, on "Our Regular Army, and What 
America Demands of Her Young men." Lieu- 
tenant Riley paid a glowing tribute to the sterling 
qualities of manhood which have been a part of 
the American soldier from the very earliest pio- 
neer days of our country. He then took up our 



Army as it is today, its different branches, dis- 
cipline, personnel, and just what is expected of 
men and officers. At the conclusion, he compli- 
mented Lieutenant McNeil and the battalion upon 
the good work which the latter is doing during 
the drill hour every day. 



We are very glad to see Professor Gray, who 
has been confined to his home since February 3 
on account of scarlet fever, out again. He has 
resumed his duties in the chemical laboratory. 



ACADEMIC— UNDERGRADUATE. 



The 1916 Rat-Tat, comparatively speaking, is 
nearing completion. Most of the material has 
been turned over to the printers and, unless some 
unavoidable delay occurs, the annual will be out 
promptly on the 1st of May. The book has 
been modeled on an entirely different line from 
that of last year. Ideas and suggestions have 
been gleaned from other year-books, re-arranged 
in some cases and embodied in it. The sponsor- 
ship effect, the pages of cartoons, humorously 
depicting different phases of student life and 
various other little fooleries, should be of interest 
to the students. The cover will be black morocco 
stamped in gold block letters and bids fair to be 
most attractive. 



The last regular pre-Lenten hop was given in 
the gymnasium Friday night, March 3d, by the 
Cotillion Club. The guests were received by 
Prof, and Mrs. S. S. Handy. All the well-known 
"fussers" were present and a lot of attractive 
girls, both from town and out of town. It was a 
most enjoyable affair and, coming just before 
Lent, was all the merrier. The next hop will be 
the Easter one. 



As we go to press we learn that the Faculty 
has granted permission for a formal dance to be 
held in the gymnasium on Friday, March 31st, 
under the auspices of the Senior Class. A formal 
hop in mid-Lent is somewhat of an innovation 
at St. John's and this affair should do much to 
add life to this season when there are so few 
diversions. 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



181 



NURSING. 



The regular meeting of the Nurses' Alumnae 
Association of the University of Maryland was 
held at the University Hospital on the afternoon 
of March 1, Miss M. E. Ralph, president, in the 
chair. 

Nursing topics were discussed and a commit- 
tee was appointed whose work it is to see why 
the graduates of the Training School do not be- 
long to their Alumnae Association. 

Miss Pauline B. Pleasants, class of 1910, was 
elected delegate to the annual convention of the 
American Nurses' Association which is to be held 
in New Orleans the last of April. 

After the meeting refreshments were served 
and a social half hour spent. 



The regular monthly meeting of the Maryland 
State Association of Graduate Nurses was held 
at St. Joseph's Hospital on the evening of Feb- 
ruary 25, Miss E. M. Lawler, president, in the 
chair. 

Dr. Mary Stone, of China, gave a brilliant talk 
of her medical and nursing experiences and asked 
the members of the Association to interest nurses 
in that field of work as the opportunities for 
women to help humanity in China were unbound- 
ed, as nursing was in its primitive stage. 

This was strictly a social meeting and refresh- 
ments were served. 



Miss Florence Skinner, class of 1915, is con- 
fined to her home with scarlet fever, and we 
all wish her a speedy recovery. 



Miss Sophie Featherstone, class of 1900, has 
opened a small hospital at Sandy Spring, Md., 
with Dr. Jacob Wheeler Bird, class of 1907, as 
head physician. The Gazette wishes her much 
success. 



Miss Lillian 'McDaniel, class of 1915, was 
operated on at the Kernan Hospital, Hillsdale, 
for appendicitis and is able to be out again. 



Miss Sadie Davis, class of 1914, has been ap- 
pointed superintendent of nurses of the Surgical 
Department, Bay View Hospital. 



Intercollegiate Bureau of Academic Costume, Aibany.N.Y. 
COTRELL & 

LEONARD 

Official IVIaliers of 

Caps and 
Gowns 




Correct Hoods 
for All Degrees. 

Rich Qowns for 
Pulpit and Bench. 

Bulletin, Samples 
etc. on request 



Miss Mattie Coale, class of 1913, who has been 
a nurse in the Instructive Visiting Nurses' Asso- 
ciation, of Baltimore, under the supervision of 
Miss Lent, for the past four years, has accepted 
the position of superintendent of nurses of the 
Visiting Nurses' Association, of Jacksonville, 111. 



Miss Lucy Squires, class of 1909, of Savannah, 
Ga., has been visiting friends in Baltimore. 



Miss Lida Grey, class of 1897, who was 
operated on at the hospital for appendicitis, is 
doing nicely. 



ENGAGEMENTS. 



The engagement is announced of Dr. M. L. 
Lichtenberg, class of 1912, for several years resi- 
dent physician of the University Hospital, now 
practicing at 1638 N. Monroe street, to Miss S. S. 
Sagner, of 2555 McCulloh street. Dr. Lichten- 
berg has done much and varied work in the 
different specialties and great things are expected 
of him, his friends believing that he will be very 
successful. The Gazette extends its congratu- 
lations. 



"Nothing Too Large— Nothing Too Small" 

Baltimore City 

Printing and Binding 

Company 

352-363 Equitable Building 



182 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



The engagement is announced of John Nico- 
demus Wilson, St. John's football team coach, 
1913-1915, of Tilghman's, Md., to Miss Mar- 
guerite E. Clark, of Annapolis, Md. No date has 
been set for the wedding. 



BIRTHS. 
To Dr. Norbert Charles Nitsch, class of 1913, 
and Mrs. Nitsch, of Baltimore, .Md., in March, 
1916, a son — Norbert Charles Nitsch, Jr. 



MARRIAGES. 



Dr. Frank Martin, class of 1886, professor of 
operative and clinical surgery, University ot 
Marjdand, of Baltimore, Md., was married to 
Miss Elizabeth Prescott Bigelow, of Boston, 
Mass., March 1, 1916. The ceremony was per- 
formed at 3 o'clock P. M., at Trinity Protestant 
Episcopal Church, Copley Square, Boston, by 
Rev. Dr, Mann in the presence of the mem- 
bers of the two families and a few friends. The 
wedding was very quiet, owing to the recent 
death of the bride's brother. A small reception 
followed at the town house of Mr. and Mrs. 
Bigelow on ]\Iarlboro street. 

Through all the years since his graduation Dr. 
Martin has been an integral and important factor 
in the University and the University Hospital. 

His history has been one of singular devotion 
to his work in surgery, and that work has been 
of an excellence that has given him distinguished 
success and a prominence in his community and 
out of it of the first rank. Grounded in his art in 
his younger years by a fortunate and close asso- 
ciation with our master surgeon, Dr. Tiffany, he 
has continually developed and expanded, keeping 
abreast with modern advance and offering by the 
way from time to time to the progress valuable 
contributions of his own. 

He is a skillful, painstaking operator, abun- 
dantly bold, yet admirably conservative. As a 
teacher, he is original and forceful, direct and 
convincing. His medical inheritance is of a cen- 
tury's growth. His father's father was a con- 
spicuous pioneer in Baltimore practice, and his 
father, too, was through an active life and in the 
best sense a T^Iaryland doctor of the old school. 



Through his mother, also, he brings medical tra- 
dition, and by colonial descent is related widely to 
representative families throughout the State. 

Dr. and Mrs. Martin will reside at 1000 Cathe- 
dral street upon their return from Palm Beach, 
Fla. 



Miss Letitia E. Lord, class of 1914, was mar- 
ried to Dr. Howard N. Freeman, Baltimore 
Medical College, 1912, on Thursday, June 17th, 
at Martinsburg, W. Va. Dr. and Mrs. Freeman 
will be "at home" after the 10th of July, at 1532 
Linden Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 



DEATHS. 



Dr. Josiah Lee McComas, class of 1858, pioneer 
physician of Oakland, Md., died from infirmities 
of age at the home of his son. Dr. Henry Wheeler 
McComas, in Oakland, December 20, 1915; aged 
80 years. 



Joseph Lewis Rathie, D.D.S., class of 1892, 
of Cockeysville, Md., died suddenly of hearti 
disease at his home, March 8, 1916, aged 44 years. 

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Suits to Measure, $15.00 to $35.00 

A. JACOBS & SONS, Tailors 

899 NORTH HOWARD STREET 
Open Evenings 9 P. M. Cor. Bichmond St. 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



183 



Dr. Rathie was born in Eeesburg, Loudoun 
County, Va., but early migrated to Maryland 
where he attended the University of Maryland, 
Dental Department. He is of French descent 
and is said to be the last one to bear that name 
in the United States. He is survived by a widow 
and one daughter. 



Dr. Walter H. Mayhew, class of 1901, of 
Sabillasville, Md., formerly demonstrator of his- 
tology and embryology in his alma mater, died in 
Baltimore, December 13, 1915, from pulmonary 
tuberculosis, aged 37 years. 



Dr. William A. Marbury, class of 1867, for- 
merly of Woodville and Aquasco, Md., died at 
the home of his sister in Laurel, Md., February 
3, 1916, aged 74 years. 



Dr. Charles L. Wachter, College of Physicians 
and Surgeons, class of 1881, a member of the 
Medical and Chirurgical Faculty of Maryland, 
a member of the Frederick County School Board 
and director of the Thurmont Bank, died at his 
home in Sabillasville, Md., February 3, 1916, 
aged 60 years. 

Dr. Paul Rider, College of Physicians and Sur- 
geons, class of 1911 ; a Fellow of the American 
Medical Association, and a practitioner of War- 
densville, W. Va., died at the home of his wife's 
parents in Morgantown, W. Va., February 1, 
1916, from m)rocarditis, aged 31 years. 



Dr. George E. Jordan, College of Physicians 
and Surgeons, class of 1891, a member of the 
Medical Society of the State of North Carolina, 
and a practitioner and druggist of Gibsonville, 
died at his home in that place, June 20, 1915, 
from cerebral hemorrhage, aged 56 years. 



Samuel J. Harman, LL.B., class of 1875, of 
2021 Eutaw Place, Baltimore, died suddenly on 
a Linden avenue car on his way to his office, 
March 21, 1916, aged 73 years. Mr. Harman 
was senior member of the law firm of Harman, 
Knapp, Ulman and Tucker. 



Dr. Buehler Shoup Boyer, class of 1911, medi- 
cal examiner for the Baltimore and Ohio system 
at Parkersburg, W. Va., died in — . 



When You Are 
All Fagged Out 



from hard study, long hours and the prolonged efforts 
that are inseparable from earnest University work, 
and 'vacation time' is a long way off, you will be 
gratified to see how quickly you will respond to the 
tonic-uplift that is the logical sequitur to the use 
of our Pills of Amorphous Phosphorus i gr. 
Let us send you a sample; one or two t. i. d. is the usual 
dose. Interesting literature on it is yours for the asking. 

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Purveyors to the Medical Profession Since 1860 



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1^ E 



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ITTI 



VOL. II. 



BALTIMORE, MAY, 1916. 



No. 11. 



Jt ta no US? to gr«nibl? nnh rotti|ilain ; 
jit's ;uat 30 rtj^ap anJi pasg tn r^^nirp, 
|0n (iob Bortfl nut IIjp tufatljpr anJ> senhB ratu- 
l. rain's mg rlroirp. 

—James Whitcomb Riley. 



Pollen Immunization in Hay Fever. 



T TAY FEVER, whether of the early or late type, has long been recognized as a pollen intoxication— the spring 
■*■ •*■ variety being due to the pollen of grasses, especially timothy; the autumnal variety, so common in North America, 
chiefly to the pollens of ragweed. 

TIMOTHY POLLEN EXTRACT is an efficient immunizing agent against the early variety of hay fever. 

RAGWEED POLLEN EXTRACT is an efficient immunizing agent against the late variety of hay fever. 

While susceptibility to both types of pollen is not common, we also supply POLLEN EXTRACT COMBINED 
(Timothy emd Ragweed). 

The extracts are administered hypodermatically. They are accurately standardized. 

Each package contains three 5-miI (5-Cc.) vials, of 10 units, 100 units 
and 1000 units per vial, respectively: one vial of physiological salt solution 
for use as a diluent, and one scaritier. 

We also supply a package containing, in addition, a graduated all- 
glass syringe. 

Full directions as to application and dosage accompany each package. 

Pollen extracts have given very good results v^rhen administered after the onset of symptoms, but the heat effects 
ate to be obtained by starting the immunizing treatment a month or six weeks before the pollen seasons. 

FOR SPRING POLLINOSIS-IMMUNIZE NOW! 

Literature on any or all of our pollen extracts 
sent to physicians on request. 



Home OfEcea and Laboratories, 
Detroit, Michigan. 



Parke, Davis & Co. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 



Vol. il. 



MAY 1, 1916. 



No. 11. 



CONTENTS 

LOYALTY. B. Merrill Hopkinson.D.C.D. 1S7 I ORGANIZATIONS 

ITEMS 



REMARKS OF DR. -FRANCIS TUR- 
OUAND MILES , 190 

EDITORIALS 192 

Editorially Expressed. 

SLAMS AND SALUTES 193 

LIBRARY NOTES 194 



QUIPS 

ENGAGEMENTS 
MARRIAGES .... 
DEATHS 



195 
195 

2oa 

203 
203 
203 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE, MD. 

HON. EMERSON C. HARRINGTON, Governor of Maryland, Chancellor. 
THOMAS FELL, A. M., Ph. D., L L. D., D. C. L., Provost 



ST. JOHN'S COLLEGE, Annapolis, Md. (^^° 



EPARTMENT OF 
RTS AND SCIENCES 



) 



Founded 1696. Classical and Scientific College Courses leading to d agrees. Special advantages to stu- 
dents purposing to study the professions. Military Department under army oiScers. Also Preparatory 
School for boys fitting for St. John's or other colleges. Term begins Seplsmber 15. Address 

THO^L\S FELL, Ph.D., LL.D., D.C.L., President 



DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE, UNIVERSITY 

OF MARYLAND, AND COLLEGE OF 

PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS. 

Four vears' graded course. New Laboratory Build- 
ing. Clinical advantages unsurpassed. Teaching Staff 
o£ 187. 110th Annual Session will begin October 1, 
1916, and continue 8 months. 

WM. F. LOCKWOOD, M. D., Dean. 

DEPARTMENT OF DENTISTRY. 

3Sth Annual Session begins October 1, 1916, and 
continues 7 months. 26 Instructors. New Building, 
r'or catalogue containing course of study, etc., apply to 

TIMOTHY O. HEATWOLE, M.D., D.D.S., Dean. 

Baltimore, Md. 



DEPARTMENT OF LAW. 

61st Annual Session will begin Sept. 28, 1916. Faculty 
of 26. For catalogue containing full information ad- 
dress the Secretary, 301 St Paul Street, Baltimore, 
Marj'land. 

EDWIN T. DICKERSON, Secretary. 



DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACY. 

(Formerly Maryland College of Pharmacy). 74th 
Annual Session begins September 25, 1916. 11 In- 
structors. New Laboratories. Address 

CHARLES CASPARI, JR., Phar.D., Dean, 

Baltimore, Md. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 

Published Monthly in the Interest of the University of Maryland. 
PRICE $1.00 PER YEAR. 



Contributiona solicited from Alumni of the 
University. 



Business Address, 608 Professional Building, 
Baltimore, Md. 



Vol. II. 



BALTIMORE, MD., MAY 1, 1916. 



No. 11. 



LOYALTY. 



B. Merrill Hopkinson, D. C. D., A. M., M. D., 
Professor Oral Hygiene and History. 



On Thursday, March 2, the ranks of the mighty 
caravan marching silently into the great unknown 
was augmented by the presence of the soul of a 
noble man who, having labored faithfully for 
three-quarters of a century during his probation- 
ary period here below, passed on to rest and his 
reward. The flood of happy memories which 
passes in review as I think of my good friend 
and co-worker, Dr. G. Lane Taneyhill, Sr., is 
indeed overwhelming in intensity as well as in 
the number and character of the various inci- 
dents. His life furnished me many an inspiration 
for better service, to him I am indebted for many 
honors from our mutual Alma Mater, and his 
passing has stimulated me to write this paper for 
the Gazette. I wish we had more men of his 
type. There are many men, now living, who 
must be included in the list of helpful agencies in 
the good work for the University, and when they 
shall have finished their course their names also 
will be placed upon the honor role. I knew Dr. 
Taneyhill intimately for many years, first of all 
as a charming, genial gentleman, endowed with 
all the courtly graces of a generation, which has 
alas, passed away. I met him in many relations 
of life, but more especially in connection with 
university matters relating to the Alumni Asso- 
ciations of the Medical Department and the Gen- 
eral Association. While he was specifically de- 
voted to the former, the latter always had his 
cordial co-operation ; indeed there was not a phase 
of university activity in which he was not keenly 
interested. It is primarily due to his untiring en- 
trgy, zeal and good management that the first 
mentioned association has been kept alive. There 



has been an annual election of President and oth- 
er officers, with an executive committee, whose 
duties it was to conduct its affairs. These duties 
consisted in meeting upon the call of Dr. Taney- 
hill and simply ratifying each separate item 
which he had carefully arranged in advance, the 
minutest detail having been thoughtfully consid- 
ered by him. In my opinion his greatest joy, out- 
side of his ideal family life, was the annual meet- 
ing and banquet of this association, when, for the 
most part, he denied himself the pleasures of the 
table in his ceaseless efforts to make everyone 
present enjoy himself to the fullest possible ex- 
tent upon this joyous night. 

The above service is but an index to all his 
labors for his Alma Mater, which he made real 
labors of love, honoring her alike by his life of 
purity and high ideals, as well as by a sincere de- 
votion, manifested by material acts, whenever it 
was in his power to render them. I do not think 
we University of Maryland men fully grasp the 
immense value of membership in the Alumni As- 
sociation. If we did, instead of having a few 
hundred names, we should have thousands upon 
the roll. This association is the link which unites 
the fledgling to his Alma Mater and helps to 
keep alive the spark of loyalty when, sheepskin 
in hand, he goes out from her watchful care to 
enter the great arena of life's combat and fight in 
his own strength. Dr. Taneyhill felt this most 
keenly, and, like the writer, loved to think of the 
charm and power of the last impression given the 
student after he had reached his university goal. 
Who can measure the good which his many years 
of service, and his whole-souled devotion to this 
one cause, achieved for our beloved institution? 
Let us honor his memory and enshrine him in our 
heart of hearts, as "Miiis sini dignus ista digna 
parente." 

Why is it that so many of our graduates fail 



188 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



to exhibit tliat degree of loyalty to the Alma 
Mater, which is the distinguishing mark of the 
alumni of almost every, other institution in the 
world. This question has been an unanswered 
riddle to me since I received my authority to 
practice. There seems to be a strange feeling in 
the minds of many of our graduates, viz. ; that in 
the payment of tuition fees all obligations are 
cancelled and, with diploma in hand, all indebted- 
ness ceases. I cannot comprehend such an un- 
natural attitude of mind. When I think of the 
real sacrifices which have been made by many of 
the teaching staff and their universal loyalty to 
the highest ideals of university tradition, I mar- 
vel that so many countless hundreds who have 
been nurtured within her walls, have failed to 
manifest some measure of loyalty in the ordinary, 
everyday avenues, opened to all. To my way of 
thinking one can never repay ones Alma Mater, 
certainly not in money, for the priceless gift of 
knowledge gained in student days. Such a 
thought never enters the mind of a youth when 
thinking of a loving parent who has enabled him 
to pursue his studies, or of a school, college or 
university, from which he has received his earlier 
degrees. His gratitude and love for these agen- 
cies remain when thousands of other cherished 
memories have passed beneath the every swelling- 
tide of Lethe. Wherein are our graduates 
lacking in loyalty, and what can be done to keep 
alive the fires of devotion upon the hearthstone 
of our Alma Mater? In the first place, all those 
who have not affiliated with the Alumni Associa- 
tion should do so at once. By using the definite 
article I mean the General Association, which 
includes graduates from all departments. I feel 
that I am justified in taking this stand as a loyal 
alumnus of the Medical Deparment, having main- 
tained my membership in its association since the 
year of my graduation, more than a quarter cen- 
tury ago ; and that, in so doing, I am not disloyal 
to the department which gave me the knowledge 
and the right to practice medicine. For many 
years I have felt that it would be best to have only 
one association, in which case, we might, perhaps, 
approach a little nearer, in one way at least, the 
university idea, so lacking in the general scheme 
of our most worthy institution. The Medical As- 
sociation has honored me in every way in its 



power, and while I cannot help but feel that it 
would be best if it should merge with the Gen- 
eral Association, which would then become the 
Alumni Association, I shall remain a loyal mem- 
ber until the end. By becoming a member of an 
alumni association one enters into a bond with 
his Alma Mater and is much more likely to keep 
up a vital interest in her aft'airs than should he 
sever all connection after graduation. When one 
enters into fellowship with our General Associa- 
tion one of the rewards is that he is immediately 
placed upon the mailing list of this paper, and 
is thereby, month by month, kept in close touch 
with all the happenings in the university, and 
nothing so stimulates a loyal spirit as to read of 
the ambitions, struggles, hopes and successes of 
one"s Alma Mater. I question if there is any 
event in our lives that so touches the heart as an 
Alumni reunion, which brings together, year by 
year, the men who sat upon the same benches 
during student days. The above ideas, and many 
others, have been beautifully expressed by Dr. J. 
Franklin Jameson in his poem, "Alma Mater," 
which I herewith reproduce : 
To thee we come from far and near. Alma Mater, 

bearing 
Each his gifts to lay them here, each thine honors 

sharing. 
At thy feet once more they sit, find each year 

returning. 
The torch at which our Tamps we lit, still serenely 

burning. 
Afar we see that beacon liglit. hear abroad thy 

praises. 
Oh, feed that holy flame aright, till none more 

brightly blazes. 
We enkindling here anew, light of thy bestowing. 
Bear us as thy servants true, on thine errands 

going. 
Fill us with the highest things, oh, benignant 

mother. 
All that lifts man, all that brings brother near to 

brother. 
Spread the truth that maketh free, night to day- 
light turning. 
Let the world receive from thee, noblest fruits of 

learning. 
To enroll oneself as a member of an alumni 
association is good, but that is not sufficient. One 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



189 



must bring his gifts and lay them at the feet of 
his Ahna Mater. One must, year by year, return 
in the body, if possible, if not, then in spirit, and 
relight one's lamp at her torch, ever keeping 
within the rays of her signal light. One must 
spread abroad, as well as hear, her praises, and 
feed the holy flame so that all will know which 
beacon is the brightest upon the sea of scientiiic 
life. As we live true to her noble traditions, we 
will willingly share her burdens, go upon he er- 
rands, never permitting any earthly thing to dim 
the light of our benignant mother who has given 
us our chart and compass whereby we may sail 
safely upon the ocean of life, spreading her truths 
for the benefit of all the world. 

In the second place, we live in an age which 
does not hold a place for people or institutions 
of retiring dispositions. We are sons and daugh- 
ters of one of the oldest and noblest institutions 
in the land. Her traditions are the best, her 
graduates have held, and are holding, positions 
of conspicuous prominence wherever science is 
known. It should be our duty to make known 
her traditions, her superlative facilities for educa- 
tion, which when contrasted with other seats of 
learning, place her facile princeps among institu- 
tions of highest rank. This is more especially true 
regarding the legal, medical and oral departments, 
the former standing alone, the two latter hav- 
ing absorbed all other schools but one in Bal- 
timore. When one considers the handicap laid 
upon an unendowed school for many years past 
and the painful apathy of our Alumni, the strug- 
gle to keep in first-class company has indeed been 
an almost superhuman one ; but the exalting fact 
that those whose duty it has been to manage our 
affairs have succeeded in so doing has been mar- 
vellous and inspiring. The University has had a 
noble heritage and all who hold her degree may 
well be proud of her standing, and that of many 
of her Alumni in the practice of all the sciences 
in which they were instructed while within her 
honored precincts. Lastly, the days of the unen- 
dowed school are numbered. Will the thousands 
of our living alumni who proudly display their 
diplomas only awake to the full realization of 
their lack of loyalty upon being shown the start- 
ling handwriting upon the wall which convulsed 
the great King Belshazzar in days of antiquity. 



and which may apply alike to Alma Mater and 
Alumni, "mene, viene, tekel, upharsin." Thy 
educational kingdom is numbered and finished ! 
Thou are weighed in the balances and art found 
wanting ! Thy kingdom is divided and given to 
another! God forbid that the day should ever 
dawn for us when wei might witness the close of 
our noble institution, after a life of forceful activ- 
ity of our hundred and nine years. The future 
holds such a possibility if our Alumni fail in the 
loyal duty of providing adequate means of sus- 
tentation, and the State refuses to recognize prop- 
erly, the claims of the oldest and best school with- 
in her borders. Other, and newer institutions 
have not been laggards, as we have been, in seek- 
ing, and receiving large sums of money, from in- 
dividuals and the State, and in sending broadcast 
their individual and corporate claims to recogni- 
tion from every point of view. Let us take a 
much needed lesson from such sources, proceed 
to advertise our Alma Mater by establishing a 
bureau of information and publicity. Let each 
Alumnus make himself, and herself, a committee 
of one to tell the world that those desiring an 
education in the arts and sciences, in medicine, 
law, pharmacy and stomatology, can best accomp- 
lish this by matriculating and pursuing their 
course of studies in the University of Maryland. 
Not only so. Let each Alumnus lay the subject 
of securing a large permanent fund for endow- 
ment upon his conscience, and each do his part 
in securing it. If each one of the thousands of 
our Alumni gave but one dollar a year, think how 
rapidly our fund would increase, and how soon 
our University would be placed upon a sound and 
enduring financial basis. This is the most help- 
ful avenue of service open to our graduates, and 
as one of the trustees of our endowment fund 
I cannot too strongly urge a deeper and more 
fruitful loyalty upon the part of our sons and 
daughters than that which can be manifested in 
giving of their substance, and urging others to 
give, to the kind mother who gave them so much, 
Who wUl join with me in an annupl contribution 
to the general endozvment fund? Put me down, 
Mr. Editor, for one dollar per year, which I agree 
to pay annually before the first day of June. I 
say one dollar, for I shall hope thousands will 
follow me with a similar amount, but I am per- 



190 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



fectly willing to say five dollars, and it is a pleas-- 
ure to look back and think that I have already 
given many times five. I would suggest that an 
endowment column be opened in the Gazette, in 
which, as upon a roll of honor, all the names of 
subscribers be published; may it grow to mighty 
proportions, and let no one feel that he, or she, is 
limited as to the amount which may be subscribed. 
I have merely touched upon a few points wherein 
I feel there has been a lack of Alumni loyalty 
Others will occur, I am sure, to those who may 
read this paper. I wish it were possible to plac^ 
this, or a similar reminder in the hands of each 
living Alumnus, and not have such an appeal stop 
after being read by the few hundreds who receive 
this journal, many of whom do not need it. I 
firmly believe, however, that some good result 
comes from every honest effort made in this 
world, be it ever so humble or imperfect ; and it is 
my heartfelt wish that this earnest plea of mine 
for a more abiding loyalty, may touch the hearts 
of many negligent sons and daughters of our be- 
loved institution and lead them into increased 
paths of usefulness in the days which are to 
come. In conclusion, I ask you all to join with 
me in saying in your hearts and with your lips, 
the following lines which I have the honor to 
dedicate to my 

ALMA MATER. 
University of Maryland, 1916. 

Dear mother, we greet thee with loyal acclaim, 

And with trustful hearts faithful and leal : 
To thy hearthstone with each passing year, we 
come 

Both our love and devotion to seal. 
We render thee homage Terra Mariae, 

Ever keeping thy blest mem'ry warm, 
True guide in our journeyings, flow'r of our 
hearts, 

Always glowing thro' calm and thro' storm. 

When thy children return and bow at thy shrine 
To acknowledge allegiance and worth, 

How rich are thy mem'ries ! The sun brighter 
beams 
Than when shining on less hallowed earth. 

EacW man and each maiden will shed fairer light 
In thy sacred halls, where they began 



Their journey towards science, to broaden the 
streams 
That make worthy their labors for man. 

Heaven bless thee and grant thee a destiny great. 

May thy sons e'er ennoble thy name, 
"Filius sim dignus ista digna parente" 

Be emblazoned in letters of flame! 
Then onward we press in the combat of life. 

In the strength of thy precepts and lore ; 
Still striving for honor and battling for right. 

Till we rest on eternity's shore. 



■:o: 



REMARKS OF DR. FRANCIS TURQUAND 
MILES. 



The following remarks were made by Dr. Miles 
at the Academy of Music, October 12th, 1880, 
at a Commemorative Dinner of the Maryland His- 
torical Society, given in celebration of the One 
Hundred and Fiftieth Anniversary of the Settle- 
ment of Baltimore. They were in response to the 
fourth toast of the evening : 

"The Arts and Sciences in Baltimore — ^Liberal 
Arts Should Thrive where the Useful Arts Have 
Thriven." 

Mr. President and Gentlemen : 

"The regret you all must have felt at the ab- 
sence of one whose graceful manner and pointed 
matter have illustrated so many festive occasions, 
will culminate when I tell you that he was to have 
replied to the toast just given, and that I, with 
ideas and digestion disordered by the sudden call 
made upon me, must rise in his place, to impress 
you with how much you have lost. 

"And surely Arts and Sciences will flourish in 
Baltimore; truly she has proved good and quick 
soil in the past. When the 'Clipper' (the fastest 
craft of her time, I am told,' was launched, her 
masts were the first feeble shoots of the forest 
which noAV raises in our harbor. Latrobe's 
pioneer work in engineering broke ground for the 
foundations of many noble structures not only in 
Baltimore but throughout the land. When the 
venerable and honored guest at the head of the 
board (Mr. Peter Cooper) ran the first train from 
Baltimore to Ellicott City, the seed was sown for 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



191 



the great road whose roots bind together many 
States in mutual benefit. And for the future, 
what a generous harvest we may look for when 
the abundant seed is sown from the garners of 
the Johns Hopkins University, the Peabody Insti- 
tute, aye, and the Decorative Art Society, the 
latter under the direction of those who do, and of 
right, ought to direct us in our efforts towards 
the true and the beautiful. Yes, let the fair city 
press on in her career, mingling the useful and 
the elevating until she is, like her own women, 
strong and graceful, beautiful and beneficent." 



Note. — Dr. Miles who was professor of Physi- 
ology in the University of Maryland, was a fluent 
and eloquent lecturer, and greatly beloved by his 
colleagues and students. He was renowned es- 
pecially for his lectures on anatomy of the brain ; 
his knowledge of the nervous system surpassing 
that of any of his contemporaries, and were 
delivered in such a masterful manner as to attract 
the profession in general to his lecture hall. 



Dr. Francis Turquand Miles was born on a 
plantation near Charleston, S. C, on February 
11, 1827. He received his academic training and 
the degree of Batchelor of Arts at the Charleston 
College. His professional training and medical 
degree were obtained at the Medical College of 
the State of South Carolina, in the same city. 
Shortly after his graduation in 1849, he went 
abroad and studied in Paris under Charcot and 
Hirschfeld. Returning to Charleston, he became 
connected with the teaching faculty of his Alma 
Mater, filling successively the role of Prosecutor, 
Assistant Demonstrator, Demonstrator, Assistant 
Professor, and, in 1860, full Professor of 
Physiological Anatomy, as successor to Professor 
Holbrook. On the outbreak of the Cival War, 
he entered the service of the Confederate States 
as an infantry private. He soon rose to be lieu- 
tenant and later captain. For a time he had 
charge of Fort Sumter during the attack upon it 
by the Federal fleet, and he was very proud of this 
experience. At the battle of Chancellorsville, S. 
C, in 1863, he was shot through the thigh, and in 
the following year he was wounded at Fort Sum- 
ter. This latter wound led to his retirement 



from active service. During the last year of the 
war, he held rank as full Surgeon in the Medical 
Department. The war closing, he resumed his 
chair in the College. In 1868 he removed to 
Baltimore, and was immediately appointed Pro- 
fessor of Anatomy in Washington University 
School of Medicine. In 1869 he was called to 
the University of Maryland to fill the chair of 
Anatomy and Clinical Diseases of the Nervous 
System. In 1880 he was transferred to the 
chair of Physiology. Dr. Miles' health began to 
f<iil during the session of 1902-03. He attempted 
to continue his lectures, sitting during their de- 
livery. But early in 1903 he had to give up 
entirely, and his resignation quickly followed. 
After several months of confinement and suffer- 
ing, he died July 30, 1903. 

Dr. Miles was twice Vice-President of the 
Medical and Chirurgical Faculty, and was an 
honorary member of the American Association of 
i'hysicians, and for two terms (1880-82) he was 
President of the American Neurological Associa- 
tion. In 1889 he was made a consulting physician 
of the Johns Hopkins Hospital. 

Professor Miles was one of the most prominent 
figures in University circles. Endowed with 
d handsome face and figure, with the ease and 
grace of manners and dignity which distinguished 
the true Southern gentleman, he would have been 
a marked figure anywhere. He had a good voice 
and ready command of language, never using 
notes. He was devoid of vanity, pretense and 
prejudice, a hater of shams, and modest as to 
his own achievements. He was an enthusiastic 
student, being master of French and German, a 
close reader and deep thinker and presented his 
thoughts with so much eloquence, force and 
clearness as to captivate all who heard him. 



There was an old druggist 
Who lived in our town : 
His trade got so rotten 
He'd almost shut down. 
So he purchased an iceless — 
A Beauty, they say — 
Now every day it's "Sundae" 
Up that fellow's way. 

— Bulletin of Pharmacy. 



192 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 

A MONTHLY JOURNAL 

Devoted to the interests of the University 

of Maryland. 

Subscription Price, $1.00 Per Annum, In Advance 

Reprints Furnished At Cost 

Advertising Rates Submitted Upon Request. 

608 Professional Building 

BALTIMORE, MD. 

EDITORIAL STAFF. 

J. Ben Robinson, D.D.S Editor-in-Clilef 

Nathan Winslow, M.D Business Manager 

James M. Hepbron, LL.B Lav? 

A. A. Sonnenburg, Pilar. D Pharmacy 

M. E. Sullivan, R. N Nursing 

A. Z. Aidridge, '16 Dental 

W. Lester Baldwin, '16 Law 

P. Fred Marshall, '16 Pharmacy 



MAY 1, 1916. 



EDITORIALLY EXPRESSED. 



It is difficult to understand how young men 
can so forget themselves and take chances on fail- 
ing their course at the end of their school life 
by attempting to pass examinations by unfair 
means. Students should and do understand the 
consequences of such action and when they are 
detected and summarily dismissed from school 
they should have no complaint at the visitation 
of sin on their own heads. 



We trust that the plans for the banquet to 
the University graduates of this year will de- 
velop into real action. Doctor Fell thinks so 
well of the plan that he has written a letter of 
commendation and asks "why not admit the fifth 
department (St. John's)' of the University?" 
There is no advertisement so beneficial to any in- 
stitution as an appreciative alumni body. A ban- 
quet in honor of the graduates would be a fitting- 
close to the school course and would tend to es- 
tablish a lasting feeling of good will toward our 
Alma Mater. 



The College Man Sets 
the Styles! 

Uphold your reputation by wearing 
suits made the "Matched Pattern" 
way, the most important clothing 
invention of the decade I 

These suits ate sold exclusively by 

THE QUALITY SHOP 
Balto. and Liberty Sts. 




This month sees the closing examinations for 
all departments and for some the State boards 
will be met. We trust our students have so ap- 
plied themselves that they will pass all tests suc- 
cessfully. If any have failed to apply themselves 
the inevitable and just rewards will be served. 
Let the undergraduate men observe and thought- 
fully consider lest they also may, through neg- 
lect, reap a harvest of barren regrets. 



Again our country is face to face with the 
ghastly possibility of war, and again our profec- 
sional politicians are busily engaged in an at- 
tempt to confuse the issue and create a condition 
of unrest in the public mind and a feeling of dis- 
trust for the present administration. The man 
who attributes to himself the virtue of patriotic 
citizenship and who will by misrepresentation and 
jingoist methods attempt to make market out 
of human emotions and happiness for political ad- 
vantage, be he a former President, former cabi- 
net officer, minority leader of the House of Rep- 
resentatives, minority member of Foreign Rela- 
tions Committee or what not, is a blight on our 
citizenship, a menace to his party, a traitor to his 
country and deserves to be remembered with 
Judas Iscariot and Benedict Arnold. Let us 
stand by the people, by the high principles of 
liberty and justice our Government was intended 
to serve and by our big, strong, great, manly 
President who dares to do right. 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



193 



SLAMS AND SALUTES. 



jVow Beady for Spring, 1916. See Us for Classy Clothes. 

SPECIAL RATES TO STUDENTS 



IN APPRECIATION. 



AT 



Was there ever a class in all school history in 
which there has been no discontent? And what 
did it amount to ? Was there ever a student who 
appreciated all his professors and sanctioned all 
their teachings? From our brief experience we 
think not. While no one in the Senior Class has 
any ill feeling against any professor in any way, 
shape or form, we do not wholly agree with them 
in all their opinions. However, those differences 
of opinion are varied and of minor importance, 
and the close friendship and companionship exist- 
ing between student and professor is no where 
more marked than in the University of Maryland. 

Go into any laboratory or classroom and there 
you will find student and professor almost as 
companionable as classmates. This does not sig- 
nify that the respect for the professor is gone, as 
it is far from that. In no department is respect 
and esteem for the professor observed any more 
than in the Pharmacy Department. That feeling 
which cannot be expressed in words, painted on 
canvas nor set to music exists. More like the rev- 
erence for a father and love for a brother. 

Before our coming here we thought of no such 
existing feeling. All we could imagine were cold 
cheerless walls and a professor with heart of 
stone. 

Did we find it ? No ! Just the reverse. We 
found our professors human, kind and willing 
to go out of their way to aid us in whatever we 
needed their assistance and counsel. Instead of 
a prison feeling which we brought we are carry- 
ing away the greatest love and highest esteem 
that can exist between man and man. 

If those who are contemplating entering the 
U. of M. could have seen before they came what 
is here there would be no dread of facing the dean 
and his staff of professors. 

As to the students, we are a big family of boys ; 
when time and place affords, we are ready for a 
romp and song, filling the air with mirth and 
pleasure. We will admit that many jokes and 
remarks would sound very commonplace to those 
outside the big family, but to us it has a mean- 



The Imperial Lunch Room 

526 W .Baltimore St. 

PLoue St. Paul 8178 Baltimore, Md. 



ing — taken as a joke. The law of compensation 
operates and soon it will be repaid with big in- 
terest. 

It is no pleasant thought to meditate going 
out into our profession knowing that we will all 
never be together again. Some no doubt will go 
into remote fields along with their profession; 
others will surrender their ambition to engage in 
a different business, while others may not be able 
to withstand the temptations, pit falls and dark 
places and fall to a position of unworthiness and 
uselessness. May we hope and trust that the 
latter may never occur, and all may become men 
of great service to community and profession. 

Because of this when we think of our com- 
mencement a feeling of sadness comes into our 
thoughts and creates a desire to remain. May we 
all complete our course with credit and go out 
into the world determined to reach the highest 
plane of professional achievement and at some 
future day the classes of '16 return to Balti- 
more to renew old friends and acquaintances 
and be boys again just for a night. 

"Loyalty," Pharmacy, '16. 



MARYLAND PHARMACEUTICAL EXAM. 



Perhaps no event within the last year has 
created so much discussion and preparation as 
has the examination on the 6th and 7fh of 
April, held by the Maryland State Board of 
Pharmacy. The Department of Pharmacy of 
U. of M. was well represented by both classes; 
about one-half of the Senior Class participating 
in the exam, for pharmacists. 

For several weeks prior to this exam, those 
contemplating taking it could be found studiously 
reviewing all the work from the beginning of the 
course in pharmacy up to the very end. 



I 



194 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



One thing was particularly noticeable, that the 
men taking part in this exam., those of college 
training especially, were of a confident nature 
while those not enjoying the privilege of college 
..^i.i.ai^ _vU..d not help but exhibit a certain 
aiuouiii of nervousness. 

The exam, in its entirety was wholly different 
from anything expected by the participants; it 
was fairly difficult, not in the questions them- 
selves, but in the uncertain and puzzling manner 
in which they were asked and in the amount of 
writing necessary to answer any single question. 
The greater majority of the questions were fair, 
but there were many that were merely a case of 
memory. These types of questions are without 
doubt subject to much criticism and certainly just- 
ly so because they do not tend to show up a 
man's thinking ability or power of deduction by 
reasoning, but really appear to want to know if 
a man is a human pharmacopoeia or some text- 
book on pharmacy. 

The object of any education is not to make 
simply a book worm or a walking encyclopedia 
of a man, but rather to train him where to get 
and how to utilize his knowledge to the best ad- 
vantage coupled with a certain amount of facts 
to be retained for that particular profession in 
which he is engaged. Education is supposed to 
comprehend any series of instruction and discip- 
line which is intended to enlighten the under- 
standing and fit us for our usefulness in our va- 
rious chosen professions. A man is said to be in- 



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telligent when he has the power of understanding 
and reasoning for himself. 

Memory is, no doubt, a valuable asset, but 
memory without the power of thought or reason- 
- .\ uriii : ut -ittie to us. 

We cannot help but say that many of the ques- 
tions asked could not be even answered offhand 
by the examiners themselves, and so why expect 
a man not having one-tenth of the experience to 
answer them? The unfairness of it is certainly 
apparent. 

There has been some discussion that a man 
should be a graduate of pharmacy in order to be 
permitted to stand the exam., yet the examina- 
tions now are of such a character that unless such 
is the condition he has small chance of succeeding. 

We do not doubt that all our men have suc- 
ceeded in passing and certainly await anxiously 
the returns with that idea in view and fully trust 
and hope that none will be disappointed. 

Participant, '16. 



:o:- 



LIBRARY NOTES. 



MEDICAL. 



In response to a formal note of thanks to Sir 
William Osier, Bart, for the beautiful copy of 
Dr. Edward L. Trudeau's autobiography, which 
he recently presented to the Library, Mrs. Bris- 
coe, the Librarian of the University, has received 
the following communication, which will be of 
interest to the friends and admirers of the late 
Dr. Eugene Fauntleroy Cordell : 

"From the Regius Professor of -Medicine, 

"Oxford, March 3, 1916. 

"Dear j\lrs. Briscoe: So glad you liked the 
Trudeau book. I hope the Library is prospering. 
Dear old Dr. Cordell was so devoted to it, and 
really did a great work. Best wishes. 

"Sincerly yours, 

"(Signed) W. Osier." 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



195 



DENTAL. 
Professor Merrill Hopkinson has presented 
to the Library a copy of Guerini Vincenzo. A 
history of dentistry from the most ancient times 
until the end of the 18th century. 



LAW. 

During the month of March, 1916, the Law 
Library has received the following accessions, 
the gift of Edwin T. Dickerson, Esq. 

Coke's Reports, 8 vols. 

Schoales & Leroy's Reports, 2 vols. 

Burrow's Reports, vols 1-5. 

Brown's Chancery Reports, vols. 1-4. 

Barnewall & Alderson's Reports, vols. 1-4. 

Garrison's Chancery. 

Lilly's Entries, vols. 1 and 2. 

Sidney on Government, Vol. 2. 

Arabier's Report, 1 vol. 

Salkeld's Reports, vols. 1-3. 

Moody's Nisi Prins. Vol. 1. 

Burn's Justice. 

Blackstone's Reports, 2 vols. 

Broderip and Bingham's Reports, vols. 1-3. 

Strange's Reports, vols. 1 and 2. 

Fitzherbert, Natura Brevium. 

N. Y. Chancery Reports, 8 vols. 

N. Y. Reports, No. 64. 

Hill on Trustees. 

Taunton's Reports, vols. 1-4. 

Atkyn's Reports, vols. 1-3. 

Dumford and East's Reports, vols. 2-8. 

East's Reports, vols. 1-8. 

Raymond's Reports, vols. 1-3. 

Plowden's Reports, vols. 1 and 2. 

Vernon's Cases, vols. 1 and 2. 

Comyn's Reports, vols. 1 and 2. 

Bingham's Reports, vols. 2-4. 

Cowper's Reports, vols. 1 and 2. 



Brown's Reports, 2 vols. 
Peere William's Reports, vols. 1-3. 
William's Reports, vol. 11. 
Croke's Reports, vols. 1-3. 



ORGANIZATIONS. 



Harlan Law Society Notes. 



At the last regular meeting of the Henry D. 
Plarlan Law Society the following members of 
1918 Law Class were admitted into the active 
membership of the society and took the oath of 
membership : Henry Gardner, V. P. Evans, P. 
R. Hessenkamp, E. F. Dukes, E. R. Milbourne, 
I. Taylor, J. C. Metcalf, J. Lickenberg, I. Kush- 
mer, William Cohen, A. Davidson, M. L. Shipley, 
Harry Greenstein, T. L. Haylock, Metzner, Miles, 
Stein, Weinsdale, Voloshon and Martinet. The 
society extends to these new members a most 
cordial welcome. They and other men from the 
Junior Class will have full charge of the society 
next year when the present Senior Class will 
have left the University. 



■:o:- 



ITEMS. 



MEDICAL— GRADUATE. 



Dr. Raymond L. Johnson, class of 1914, of 
the resident staff of the University Hospital, tend- 
ered his resignation March 31, to accept a posi- 
tion with the Atlantic Coast Line Hospital, Way- 
cross, Ga. 



Dr. Thomas A. Ashby, who has been ill at his 
home, has gone to Chaplin Manor, Blue Ridge 
Summit, Pa., to recuperate. He writes us that 
he is improving and sends his love and best 
wishes to his friends. 



WILLIAM J. MILLER 

Jewelery, Diamonds, Watches 

College Jewelry 
Class Pins and Rings, College Seals 
88 East Baltimore St. Baltimore, Bid. 22 W. LcxingtOIl St., ■ Baltimore, Md. 



R LLERBRQCK 



196 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



Dr. E. F. Arble, B.M.C., class of 1898, has 
been spending some time in the city attending 
cHnics, especially children's clinics. He paid the 
Hospital a visit. 



Dr. E. B. Breeding, class of 1913, of Rocky 
Mount, N. C, also paid us a visit last month. 



We are in receipt of a letter from Dr. Porter 
P. Vinson, class of 191-t, in which he says that 
after spending 18 months at Saranac he went to 
the Montreal General Hospital, ]\Iontreal, Can- 
ada, January 1, where he has been doing work 
in pathology. He writes that it is a wonderful 
service and that they have had 116 post niortems 
since that time out of less than 135 deaths. He 
insists though that some of them do get well. 
He wishes to be remembered to his friends, espe- 
cially his instructors. 



-:o; 



LAW— GENERAL. 



Through the efforts of Mr. Lindley, who has 
charge of the student work carried on by the 
Y. M. C. A., weekly talks on the Bible are given 
in the Law Department on Wednesday nights. 

The first talk was given by the Rev. R. W. 
Hogue of Ascension Church on the necessity of 
the Bible to the lawyer. It was attended by over 
fifty students. 

Judge Henry D. Harlan will be the next 
speaker. 



LAW— GRADUATE. 



John L. Cornell, LL.B., '11, Counsel for the 
Society for the Suppression of Vice, was recently 
overruled by the Board of Liquor License Com- 
missioners by a vote of two to one on his petition 
asking that licenses be refused the Gayety Raths- 
keller, the Rose House and Nachman's Hotel. 
The case was a hard-fought one and Mr. Cor- 
nell was ably assisted by Wm. J. Riordan, LL.B., 
'M. 



W. Milbourne Hart,, LL.B., '13, recently rep- 
resented one of Baltimore's City Councilmen in a 



damage case against the L^nited Railways, 
was awarded a judgment. 



He 



Daniel J. Healey, LL.B., '19, is the attorney in 
a murder case that will be tried in the Criminal 
Court during the present term. With Mr. Healy 
on the case are Messrs. Levin and Morovitz. 



Walter E. Prem, LL.B., '14, has opened law 



offices at 210 E. Lexington street. 



J. J. D'Donohue, LL.B., '15, has gone to At- 
lantic City to take charge of an exhibit shown by 
the Du Pont Powder Works. 



LAW— SENIOR. 



All Seniors have been excused from attending 
Practice Court, the last senior case being tried 
Friday night, April 11th. This means that every 
member of the class has argued two moot cases 
this year. 



Banking examination was given Wednesday 
night, April 19th. Some of the men at first 
sight mistook the examination paper, which con- 
tained nine pages, for a special syllabus of ques- 
tions published by Hepbron and Haydon. 



We wonder if many of the men were as for- 
tunate as Walter V. Harrison, Esq., who claims 
that his practical personal experience of banking 
made it unnecessary for him to attend any of the 
quizzes on the subject. i\Ir. Plarrison is the 
originator of many new methods for discounting 
notes. 



We trust that I. J. Sullivan, Esq., has fully re- 
covered from his recent sickness. Mr. Sullivan 
reported an acute attack of sea sickness as a re- 
sult of listening too attentively to Judge Rose's 
course on "Admiralty." 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. . 197 

LAW— INTERMEDIATE. DENTAL— SENIOR. 



Albin Widoff, '17. 



To a cynical observer the recent class meeting, 
wherein A. B. Makover was elected editor-in- 
chief of the Terra Mariae, would be a first rate 
mirth provoker were it not for the fact that there 
were at least three redeeming features in it. 

The first one is self-evident. It is the wise 
selection of a real editor-in-chief, A. B. Makover. 
Not only does Makover deserve it but he is 
doubly vindicated. Vindicated for the shame- 
less treatment that he received last year by the 
stupid voting of the class. And again unwitting- 
ly recompensed for his "squeeze-out" on the 
Gazette. This squeese-out occurred while the 
class looked on with its inherent listlessness. 

The second redeeming feature is the peculiar 
fact, voted on by many, that there are no cliques 
or factions in the class. And if there are, they 
are merely fractured factions or chickless cliques. 
Alas ! there are no factions but the one that votes 
"yes," and the one that votes "no." 

The third redemption is, as yet, an inchoate 
redemption. It is this I mean ! Now, after the 
class have selected their editor-in-chief will 
there be a supine compromise with the other 
colleges represented in the Terra Mariae. Here 
is a chance to reward Makover for the un- 
fraternal treatment meted out to him in the past. 
The reward must be the firm resolve to have 
him editor-in-chief, if not of the Terra Mariae, 
then of our own publication. 

Makover as editor or bust, that's all! 



Mr. Edgar" T. Fell, whose article on "The 
Henry Ford Peace Expedition" appeared in last 
month's issue of the Gazette, was one of forty 
students representing as many leading American 
Colleges and Universities, who were members 
of the Ford Peace Party. 



Suppposing that this shall be my last contri- 
bution to the Gazette as Senior Editor, I take 
my pen in hand to wish all my classmates the 
best of success in the coming exams. And here's 
hoping that there will be no regrets given out 
on Announcement Day. 

The time is growing shorter and soon we 
shall bid each other Good Bye never to meet 
again. 



L. A. Bennett of this class is at his home in 
Virginia. Ben has decided to give up Dentistry, 
as it does not agree with his health. 



"Rube" Cassteven is with us again. He will 
not room with Big "Bill." There's a reason. 



"Phil" Schaefer is quite an expert at recogniz- 
ing Pathology slides, but "Ray" Weidert with a 
few spots of ink on a slide proved his undoing, 
and Schaefer is still wringing his hands and 
gnashing his molars. P. S. He also tears his 
hair. 



Bob Darwin recently found that "Your Credit 
is no Good" on the United Railways. He board- 
ed a car without a sou in his jeans. After argu- 
ing with the "Corn Doctor" for three blocks he 
was put off amid a shower of tears. Now "Bob" 
limps abit as he has corns on the soles of his 
feet. GOSH! 



The metal plates are completed now. 
maybe the boys aren't glad. 



And 



"Fresh" Smith, who sold Alumnum silverware 
during this past year, intends to sell -i ft. yard 
sticks this year. 



It is rumored that Miss Florence Levin, the sis- 
ter of Mr. Ellis Levin, the genial night librarian, Here's hoping that all our Juniors will be ad- 
is to be married in the very near future to Mr. vanced to the Senior Class with clean slate for 
Samuel Shannon, of the Intermediate Class. 1917. 



198 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



Hart Schaffher & Marx, 
Kuppenheimer, 
"Society Brand" 



The clothes that college men 
like a lot 



Baltimore Street At Charles 



DENTAL— JUNIOR. 



E. B. Lancaster, '17. 



Vina can get a haircut with his hat on now. 
Culler is also acquainted with these words "going ! 



going ! gone !' 



E. S. Calvi recently spent a few days with us, 
and we were all glad to see him again and to 
hear his characteristic he ! he ! 



C-n-s-r: "For the benefit of the plumbers, 
I will repeat that again, as it might be useful 
to them in their trade." (Guffaw). 



"Gentlemen, you can look out for one question 
on the urine." 



Waynick is now using herpicide on his must- 
ache. 



A patient in the hospital had the affliction of 
being so crosseyed that every time he cried the 
tears ran down his back. The doctors diagnosed 
his condition as being a very severe case of 
bacteria. 



Patient at the cage: "I'd 
suiting surgeon, please." 



ike to see the con- 



A duck, a lamb, and a skunk wanted to have 
some dental work done. The duck had a bill, 
the lamb had four quarters, but the skunk had 



only a cent, which the dentist didn't want. 
Moral: don't eat onions, unless you have good 
teeth. 



How many fellows are going to stay here this 
summer and work in the infirmary? Think it 
over — 'twill be a big help to you. Ask some- 
body who stayed last summer. 



Englishman: "What is your brother doing 
now ?" 

American : "He's drilling. 

Englishman: "What? Is he going to be a 
soljuh?" 

American: "No, he's a dentist." 



Buckle down for those exams, .fellows. You 
know, our class is small enough now, without 
thinking what it might be at the end of next 
spring. Don't forget, we shall be seniors soon, 
otherwise next fall you might be a 



Jack: "What are those little white things in 
your head that bite?" 

Ethel : "Er-er-or go on, child !" 
Jack: "Don't be bashful!" 
Ethel: "I don't know— what is it?" 
Jack: "Why, your teeth, of course!" 



DENTAL— FRESHMAN. 



A. Wesley Phinney, '18. 



"Give every man thy ear, but few thy voice ; 
Take each man's censure, but reserve thy judg- 
ment." —Hamlet. 



Some students are so deeply interested in the 
welfare of the L^niversity Gazette that they don't 
even know the price of a single copy. (Note. — 
Ten cents per, if you are interested.) 



Anyone desiring preliminary instruction in 
operative technics, after the session, should con- 
sult Dr. J. Ben Robinson, in the infirmary, and 
receive particulars. 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



199 



At the recent Psi Omega dance a new spectac- 
ular step was introduced. Some say it's the 
"Kangaroo Glide." (Mais, je ne sais pas.) 



Dr. Wright — "What is the origin and inser- 
tion of the Pectoralis, Major?" 

Sherman — "External crest of the ilium and 
third lumbar vertebrae." 

Dr. Wright— "?X ?!?!?!" 



Brazil, who visited in Philadelphia recently, is 
with us again and reports a pleasant trip. We 
are gratified to know that he didn't get tangled 
in the knot which he helped to tie. 



Freshman (in dissecting room) — "It smells as 
if something is dead around here." 



Billy Sunday hasn't put us on the sawdust 
trail as yet, but Dr. Matthews, instructor in his- 
tology, has put us on the path leading to 1918. 



Any Freshman to Dr. Patterson — "Have you 
seen Anna?" 
Dr. Patterson— "No ! Anna who ?" 
Freshman — "Anatomical." 
Guess no one will see Anna 'til next year. 



Recently a gentleman garbed in blue coat and 
brass buttons called on a certain student. We 
are glad to say that Hamil was the wrong man. 



Caldwell, better known as "String," has been 
renovating teeth in the infirmary. His patient is 
surviving and says it was a "Rough" beginning. 
Freshmen and others are surprised that (Dr.) 
Cox was not chosen to don the white coat. 

Parks — "Doctor, what passes through the ca- 
rotid triangles? Do you know?" 
Dr. Garredy (blushing)— "Yes." 



The Universitv Yell — 

M-A-R-Y-L-A-N-D 
(3 Times.) 
— Maryland — 
(3 Times.) 
Have you ever heard it? Would you recog- 
nize it if you did? 



HEPBRON & HAYDON 

We Sell Every Law Book and Syllabus 

Used at the U. of M. 
St. Paul 8794 1243-53 CALVERT BLDO. 

PHARMACY— GRADUATE. 



The Baltimore branch of the American Phar- 
maceutical Association held a meeting February 
16th. 

Mr. James A. Black informed the meeting that 
a sister of Dr. Hynson had died and the question 
arose as to the advisability of adjourning the 
meeting out of respect to Dr. Hynson. After 
some discussion it was thought best, in view of 
Dr. Hynson's broadmindedness, to continue the 
meeting. 

A resolution offered by Mr. Black was then 
passed directing the secretary to write Dr. Hyn- 
son a letter of sympathy. 

Two resignations from chairmanship of com- 
mittee were considered and were held over until 
the next meeting, one member consenting to hold 
his until then and the other waiting on a report 
from Dr. Hynson, who was endeavoring to get 
the consent of another member to fill the place. 

A bill presented to the Legislature prohibiting 
doctors from dispensing excepting in cases of 
great emergency and hedging them about with 
onerous and humiliating restrictions, was dis- 
cussed, and the secretary was instructed to write 
the committee on hygiene, to which the bill had 
been referred, voicing the branch's disapproval of 
the bill, an action which the Retail Druggists' As- 
sociation had already taken on the preceding Mon- 
day. 



The sixty-fourth annual meeting of the Amer- 
ican Pharmaceutical Association will be held at 
Atlantic City, N. J., from September 5 to 9, 1916. 

The first council session will be held on Mon- 
day, September 4 (Labor Day), at 7.30 P. M., 
the first general session on Tuesday, September 
5, at 11 A. M., and the final general session on 
Friday, September 8, at 2 P. M. 

Headquarters of the Association will be the 
Hotel Chalfonte. 



200 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



The American Conference of Pharmaceutical 
Faculties and the National Association of Boards 
of Pharmacy have decided to meet in Philadel- 
phia on Thursday, August 31, Friday, September 
1 and Saturday, September 2. 

The meetings of the boards will be held on 
Thursday and Friday and those of the faculties 
on Friday, while on Saturday there will be a 
joint session of the board and faculties. 

Additional sessions may be held during the 
evenings, or on Monday, if necessary. 

The A. C. P. F. will meet in the rooms of the 
Philadelphia Drug Exchange and the N. A. B. P. 
in the rooms of the Philadelphia Board of Trade 
or other rooms of the Philadelphia Bourse Build- 
ing. 

After adjournment the members of these 
bodies will go to Atlantic City to attend the ses- 
sions of the American Pharmaceutical Associa- 
tion the following week. 



The Baltimore Retail Druggists' Association 
held its annual dinner on the evening of March 
13 at the Emerson Hotel, when about 100 mem- 
bers of the organization occupied seats around the 
festal board. 

President R. E. Lee Williamson, manager of 
the Calvert Drug Co., occupied the place of honor 
and received in the course of the evening. There 
were no set speeches, but a number of diners 
made addresses, which dealt with pharmaceutical 
matters, such as increasing sales, the prescrip- 
tion business, co-operation, the value of a strong 
and well-attended organization and the benefits of 
meeting for interchange of ideas were empha- 
sized. Melville Strasburger, F. A. Hancock, 
Leroy Oldham, H. P. Hynson and Samuel Y. 
Harris spoke. 

:o: 

PHARMACY— SENIOR. 



The other morning when Lloyd awoke his eye- 
brow had fallen to his upper lip. We are anxious 
that Lloyd remove it, but he refused and said "I 
always wanted a mustache." 



Dr. Base is wondering why Jones' breakage 
bill is so much. If he will go up and look in his 
room he will never ask that question again. 



In the latest account from Dr. Kelly's lab. 
breakage it seems as though Wolfe tried to break 
up housekeeping. Possibly he tried Jones' plan. 
How about it, Wolfe? 



Sullivan says he is anxious for school to close 
as he is very desirous to return to the sunny 
south. His whole thoughts are toward Raleigh, 
N. C. We wonder why? 



Lee's old story of always being broke has 
proven a fallacy. The other morning he came in 
class with a big plug of "Star tobacco." 



We all are much concerned why Roy Schlosser 
goes home every Friday. (There's a reason. 
Watch the June papers.) The class extends con- 
gratulations. 



Sullivan, sitting in a dreamy state of mind was 
heard to murmur, "I love you, I love you." 
What's the cause, "Plugger." 



Jones says he would rather have $15 worth of 
beer than his State Board papers. Go to it, Jones, 
you will get full some day. 



Eise says he never takes anything that is fast 
or too heavy to carry. 



Hitz says he likes to play with suppositories 
and soluble elastic capsules. From the way he 
bombards the other members of the class we 
think it quite evident. 



Shad Lowe says he doesn't mind being bald, 
but he hates it to be mistaken so often for a 
target. Hetz, beware. 



We have seen and heard of mean things, but Rosenburg says he's a sticker. We don't know 
the meanest act possible is to steal a fellow's what he means. However, we know he was 
burner, hose and gas. Skie says it's hell. chairman of the pin committee. 



5^ 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



301 



We are quite sure it would have been profitable Intercollegiate Bureau of Academic Costume, Albany.N.Y. 



to Jones and Levy to have complied with Dr. 
Base's request and purchased an automatic bed. 
Napoleon said "When it's time to turn over it's 
time to turn out." 



Found — One cap and gown. Great mystery ! 
What is it ? Ask Eichelberger. 



Briggs' sneezing in Pharmacy lecture almost 
broke up lecture, thereby causing a great deal of 
merriment on part of class and professor. Do 
it again, Briggs. Brighten up the corner where 
vou are. 



I 



Josephine, you say, an enticing name, but ap- 
plies to an enticing young man. Lee, how did you 
get that name, anyhow. But it won't stick ; we 
hear that you are called "Coldie" now. 



The question now before us is where Briggs, 
Lee and Jones got their loud shirts and how they 
have nerve enough to wear them. Boys, are you 
collecting patterns for crazy quilts? We beg of 
you not to further punish us by advertising your 
wares. 



■:o:- 



ACADEMIC— GRADUATE. 



During the closing days of the State Legisla- 
ture two bills were passed which will have a vital 
bearing upon the affairs of St. John's College. 
The first bill provides for an appropriation of 
$35,000 for each of the next two years. The 
second bill provides for commissioning the Fac- 
ulty as officers in the Maryland National Guard 
upon the request of the Board of Visitors, authoi- 
ized by the Governor. By this bill the President 
of the College would become a colonel, those 
members of the Faculty who have held their 
chairs for 10 years would become majors aiv' 
less than 10 years, captains. They would re- 
ceive the pay due their rank when on duty. 



COTRELL & 
LEONARD 

Official Malters ef 

Caps and 

Gowns 




Correct Hoods 
for All Degrees. 

Rich Gowns for 
Pulpit and Bench. 

Bulletin, Samples 
etc. on request 



ACADEMIC— UNDERGRADUATE. 



Owing to the fact that the hop of the Cotillion 
Club, scheduled to take place on Aprili 28th, con- 
flicted with the Inter-Collegiate Oratorical Con- 
test, the entire schedule for the May hops has been 
changed, and is now as follows : May 5 and 19. 
There will also be a hop on June 2. 



On April 6 Professor Washburn, of the U. S. 
Naval Academy, gave a most interesting lecture 
in McDowell Hall on the United States Navy 
League. He was introduced by Dr. Fell, who 
gave a brief outline of the work of the league 
and told all who wished to join to see him after 
the lecture. Professor Washburn showed slides 
of many famous battle flags captured by the 
United States in the War of 1813 and the Span- 
ish-American War. 



In response to an appeal made by Cadet J. C. 
Fell to the alumni for some assistance toward 
fixing up the tennis courts, the generous sum of 
$90.00 has been collected. The ground for the 
new courts has just been leveled and will be 
rolled by a steam roller some time soon. Con- 
tracts have also been let for the new backstops. 



I "Nothing Too Large— Nothing Too Small " j 

Baltimore City 

Printing and Binding 

Company 

352-363 Equitable Building 



202 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



NURSING. 



The regular monthly meting of the Nurses' 
Alumnae Association of the University of Mary- 
land was held at University Hospital on the aft- 
ernoon of April 4th, Miss M. E. Rolph, president, 
in the chair. 

Miss Barbara Staufifer, who is in the Social 
Service department of Johns Hopkins Hospital, 
gave an interesting talk on her work. 

The ofificers elected for the year were : Presi- 
dent, Miss Nancy McNabb; first- vice-president, 
Miss Mary Gavin ; second vice-president, Mrs. 
Page Edmunds; treasurer, Mrs. Nathan Wins- 
low ; secretary, Mrs. Frank Lynn. 



The regular monthly meeting of the Maryland 
State Association of Graduate Nurses was held at 
The Sheppard Pratt Hospital, Towson, Md., on 
Friday, April 14th, Miss E. M. Lawler, president, 
conducting the meeting. 

Miss Jane Delano, chairman of the National 
Committee of the Red Cross Nursing Service, 
spoke on "The Organization of Hospital Units 
for Service in War." Motion pictures, portray- 
ing "The Activities of the Red Cross Town and 
Country Nursing work," were shown. These were 
very interesting. 

Refreshments were served and a social hour 
spent. 



Miss Elva Dean, class of 1913, who has been 
superintendent of nurses of the Cumberland Gen- 
eral Hospital, Fayetteville, N. C, for the last 
three years, has resigned and will engage in pri- 
vate nursing. She is located at 1403 Madison 
avenue. 



Miss Alice Colbourne, class of 1914, has re- 
signed her position at Bay View Hospital and 
will do private nursing. She is located at 1403 
Madison avenue. 



The commencement exercises of the graduating 
class of the University Hospital Training School 
for Nurses will be held at Lehman's Hall on the 
evening of May 18th. 



QUIPS. 

Some people, like teeth, are capable of giving 
one an excruciating pain. 

Don't get excited. If you must knock, or 
pound, do it all on the gold filling. 

Keep your eyes open. No sign 'cause an ounce 
of prevention is worth a pound of cure that an 
ounce of alloy is worth a pound of gold. 



There are two brands of pulling. One is pull- 
ing teeth, the other is pulling the one to whom 
the teeth belong. To do a clean job an anesthetic 
is indicated in both cases. 



A patient is "hooman" and blood is blood — 
even blue blood which is often no thicker than 
water. 



Don't think your name must be Al in order to 
be Al-truistic. 



SONNENBURG'S PHARMACY 

Baltimore and Greene Streets. 
ONE MINUTE CLINICAL THERMOMETERS 
WITH CHAIN AND GUARD PIN, 50 CENTS 

SULTAN DRUG COMPANY 

PHARMACEUTICAL CHEMISTS, ST. LOUIS, MO. 
Manufacturers of 

PRUNOIDS SENG CACTINA FILLETS 
THE WESTERN NATIONAL BANK 

OF BALTIMORE 



iir B;iuU Account 

«nHcltod 



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Now Beady for Spring 1916. See Us for Classy Clothes 
Suits to Measure, $15.00 to $35.00 

A. JACOBS & SONS, Tailors 

899 NORTH HOWARD STREET 
Open Evenings 9 P. M. Cor. Richmond St. 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



303 



Keep in your noodle that arm rests, head rests 
and laps were intended for the patient's comfort. 
Only the patient's mouth was intended for you. 



Don't be chicken-hearted. Please kill one 
germ. 

If you think so lightly of your bridge work 
ability why not cut out the profess, and join the 
structural iron workers. 



A tongue is often a tough proposition for the 
dentist. Don't be discouraged ; others have had 
difficulty in holding that organ. 



You can't demonstrate Fletcherism to the 
patient by chewing the rag. 



A good housekeeper never wants for a broom. 
If you haven't any pumice use "Old Dutch 
Cleanser." Necessity is still the mother of in- 
vention. 

'Tend your part of the human house well. 

o 

ENGAGEMENTS. 
Doctor and Mrs. Thomas A. Ashby have an- 
nounced the engagement of their daughter, Miss 
Sue Seymour Ashby, to Mr. Alphonso Pitts Rob- 
inson, of Belair, Md. No date has been set for 
the wedding. 



The engagement is announced of Dr. David 

Corbin Streett, of the Johns Hopkins Hospital, 

son of the late Dr. David Streett, to Miss Ferebe 

■ G. Westcott, of Washington, D. €., formerly of 

Baltimore. The wedding will take place in June 

o 

MARRIAGES. 
Dr. Grover Augustus Stem, class of 1912, of 
Westminster, Md., to Miss Irene Miller, of Bal- 
timore, Md., at Baltimore, in September, 1911. 



Dr. Arthur L. Fehsenfeld, class of 1909, to 
Miss Doris V. Thomas, both of Forest Park, 
city, at Forest Park, April 1, 1916. Only the 
families of the bride and bridegroom and a few 
intimate friends were present. Immediately after 
the ceremony Doctor and Mrs. Fehsenfeld left 
for a tour of the North. 



Dr. Austin H. Wood, class of 1914, of Balti- 
more, Md., to Miss Zelda Treece, of Shy Beaver, 
Pa., at Shy Beaver, March 16, 1916. Dr. and 
Mrs. Wood will reside in Baltimore. 



■:o: 



DEATHS. 
Mr. Jackson Schultz Fay, former student, St. 
John's College, of 1401 Linden avenue, formerly 
of Annapolis, Md., died at his home April 2, 1916 
from heart disease, aged 35 years. He was the 
son of the late Professor and Mrs. William Wirt 
Fay, of Annapolis. Later he came to Baltimore 
and became connected with the firm of J. G. Va- 
liant Company, interior decorators. For the past 
two years he had been forced to give up his busi- 
ness duties and was confined to his bed. He is 
survived by two brothers and four sisters. His 
remains were carried to Annapolis and buried in 
the Naval Academy Cemetery. 



Dr. Edward Wachtell Palmer, Baltimore Med- 
ical College, class of 1902, of Greencastle, Pa. ; 
a member of the Chambersburg Hospital staff and 
the Franklin County Medical Association, and 
president of the Greencastle School Board; died 
in the Chambersburg Hospital April 17, 1916, 
following an operation for appendicitis, aged 46 
years. 



Dr. George A. Strauss, Sr., College of Phy- 
sicians and Surgeons, class of 1883, of 13 East 
Montgomery street, Baltimore, died at his resi- 
dence after a long illness from heart disease and 
dropsy, April 5, 1916, aged 59 years. Dr. Strauss 
was not in active practice, having retired three 
years ago. 



Dr. Robert H. Hoge, College of Physicians 
and Surgeons' class of 1873, of Hoge's Store, 
Va., for manjr years chairman of the Board of 
Health of Giles County, Va., died at his home, 
March 7, 1916, aged 64 years. 



Dr. Henry Chandlee, class of 1882, associate in 
roentgenology, of 742 West North Avenue, one 
of the leading X-ray experts of the city, died at 
the University Hospital April 19, 1916, from the 
effects of a carbuncle after an illness of two 
weeks, aged 62 years. 



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Manufacturers and Dispensers of 

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RESINOL OINTMENT AND RESINQL SOAP 

Are Genuine Comforts to Physician and Patient Alike. 
Send for Samples and Try Them. 

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German Savings Bank of Balimore City 

S. W. Cor. Baltimore and Eutaw Sts. 

Interest Paid On Deposits. 



Drovers and Mechanics' National Bank 

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THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 

OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



VOL. II. 



BALTIMORE, JUNE, 1916. 



No. 12 




]K1^0©D[13[L(K 

CBOUMD roor* oMi nici or cuuA 



A PERFECT BIFOCAL 



Onl.v the wearer knows they are double 
vision. N'o unsightly line separates the 
distance and reading portions. 

Aslv for the light and graceful ULTEX ! 
Cast aside your dust-collecting old-style 
bifocals! 



D. HARRY CHAMBERS 
312-314 North Howard Street 

LOCAL DISTRIBUTING AGENT 



Beef, Iron and Wine, with Hydropepsin 

Liquid Pi-cine Co. Red Syr. Hypopliospliites 

Comp. Salol Capsules 

THOMAS & THOMPSON 

Manufacturers and Dispensers of 



Pure Medicines 



Corner Baltimore and Lign! Streets, Baltimore 

Staff of Eight Competent Men at Prescription Counter 




A valuable agent for the treatment of infections of 
mucous membranes. 

SILVOL is a proteid-silver compound containing approximately 20 per cent, of silver. It is 
a non-toxic, non-irritating germicide of marked power and efficacy. It is freely soluble in 
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Endometritis, Etc 



SILVOL is used in aqueous solutions of 5 to 50 per cent. it is supplied as follows: 
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EDWIN T. DICKERSON 
Attorney -at -Law 
: Secretary and Treasurer 

102 Law Building 



THE LAW SCHOOL 



:OF THE; 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Lombard and Greene Streets 
BALTIMORE, MD. 



A DAY SCHOOL and a NIGHT SCHOOL, with the same Faculty, 



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requirements, course of instruction and fees in each. 

DAY SCHOOL, 4-7 P. M. 
NIGHT SCHOOL, 6-9 P. M. 

FOR CATALOGUE AND FURTHER INFORMATION. APPLY TO 

EDWIN T. DICKERSON 



Secretary and Treasurer 



102 Law Building 



BALTIMORE, MD. 



University of Maryland 

DENTAL DEPARTMENT. 



The regular Winter Session begins on October 1st 
of each year, and continues until the following May. 

The Annual Catalogue contains Course of Study, 
Terms, etc. Attendance upon three regular Winter 
Sessions will be required before the final examinations 
for the degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery. 

Graduates of Medicine and those who have attended 

one or more previous sessions at a reputable dental 

school, admitted to higher grades. The requirements 

for admission are the same as in all other reputable 

dental colleges. 

PEES: 

Matriculation (paid once only) $ 5.00 

Tuition Fee 150.00 

Diploma Fee 30.00 

Dissecting Fee (paid once only) 10.00 

Students who have attended a Session of this, or anj 
other College, prior to 1906-1907, are admitted on the old 
fees. For information and Annual Catalogue, Address 

T. 0. HEATWOLE, M.D., D.D.S., Dean 
Baltimore, Md. 



Safe Deposit Boxes Notary Public Fire and Burglar Proof 



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Interest Paid On Deposits. 

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When You Are 
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from hard study, long hours and the prolonged efforts 
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SHARP & DOHME 



Purveyors to the Medical Profession Since 1860 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 

Published Monthly in the Interest of the University of Maryland. 
PRICE $1.00 PER YEAR. 



r.cntributiono solicited from Alumni of the 
University. 



Business Address, 608 Professional Building. 
Baltimore, Md. 



Vol. II. 



BALTIMORE, MD., JUNE 1, 1916. 



No. 12 



ADDRESS DELIVERED AT THE GRADU- 
ATION EXERCISES OF UXR'ERSITY 
HOSPITAL TRAINING SCHOOL FOR 
NURSES, MAY 18, 19in. 



Bv Arthur M. Shipley, M. D. 



Young Ladies of the Graduating Class and of the 
Training School, Miss Superintendent, Mr. 
President, Ladies and Gentlemen : 

It is mv duty and pleasure to congratulate the 
members of the Graduating Class at this time, and 
I do so with great heartiness because it is an oc- 
casion toward which you have been working and 
yearning for three years, and while three }ears 
is not a long time judged by some standards, it 
is both long and most valuable time when com- 
pared with the span of human life — three years. 
What things may happen in three years? How 
much learned and forgotten, how many ideas 
shattered, what new visions opened to view, how 
many of life's problems may be solved, how many 
abandoned as hopeless of solution, what growth 
in knowledge and in character and in deeds, may 
not be attained in three years : what friendships 
formed, what habits, gootl and bad, mended or 
broken : how many hearts lightened by the vision 
of a sunny smile and a spirit full of hope, how 
many hours spent in fruitless yearning for the 
unattainable, what visions of happiness may not be 
seen, what dark hours of bitter disappointment 
suffered — three years : and often when weariness 
and disillusionment hung heavy over your spirits, 
three long years — now happily drawing to their 
end. 

And yet I venture this prophecy, strange as it 
may seem to you, that when you shall have come to 
the evening time of life and shall look back over 
the years, there will be no period in your lives, 
however happily and usefully spent, toward 
which you will look with greater satisfaction and 
pleasure, than the years spent in training. Why? 
you ask. For a number of reasons. 



You have had youth with you during these 
three years. Youth that hopes all things, be- 
lieves all things, and is not afraid. Youth, of all 
things physical, the most beautiful and the most 
desired. 

Then also you are passing through that period 
of life when friendships are most easily formed. 
"There is a 'dumb devil' that sits upon our fancy 
and our thoughts." We feel so many things that 
we cannot say and hope so many things that we 
cannot do. Much of this belongs in that beautiful 
childish realm of the "make believe." As the 
years go by we relincjuish one thing after another, 
ideals and beliefs and ambitions, and a kind of 
dull despair enters into our hearts and robs us of 
our peace of mind. Not quite — there is a God- 
given balm for most of these ills, and that is 
Friendship. Friends atone to us for our lost 
youth, our large hopes, our broken idols and add 
a glow to the autumn of our lives that makes us 
forget in part the freshness and the beauty and 
the glory of the spring. 

Then again during these creative years, when 
you are building your character and your place 
in the world, your minds are still resilient enough 
to give a lodging to sentiment. 

In his volume entitled "Great Women," John 
Lord has this to sa\- of sentiment: "When Adam 
and Eve were expelled from Paradise they found 
one flower wherever they wandered blooming in 
perpetual beauty. This flower represents a great 
certitude without which few would be happy, 
subtle, mysterious, ine.xplicable, a great boon rec- 
ognized alike by poets and moralists. Pagan and 
Christian : >-ea. identified not only with happiness 
but with human existence and pertaining to the 
soul in its highest aspirations. Allied "with the 
transient and the mortal, even with the weak and 
the corrupt, it is yet inuiiortal in its nature and 
lofty in its aims, at once a passion, a sentiment, 
and an inspiration." 

Near the end of his strength .\belard came in 
his wanderings to Clunv, was given shelter there 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



211 



by the Abbott, and after a short period of rest 
and meditation, died within the peaceful walls 
of the monastery. Under the instinct of a senti- 
ment as sacred as religion itself, Peter, the vener- 
able Abbot at Cluny, felt that Abelard above and 
Heloise on earth demanded the last consolation 
of a reunion in the grave, so quietly in the dead 
of night, dreading scandal, yet true to his im- 
pulses, without a hand to assist or an eye to 
witness, he exhumed the coffin which had been 
buried in the Abbey Cemetery and conveyed it 
himself to the Paraclete and intrusted it to He- 
loise. She survived him twenty years, was buried 
in the same leaden coffin, which remained for 500 
years in the abbey. The coffin was then con- 
veyed to Paris and buried in the cemetery of Pere 
la Chaise over which the French in a spirit of re- 
membrance and understanding have erected a 
monument, and here almost daily flowers are still 
brought as silent ofiferings. So great and lasting 
is the spirit of sentiment. 

And you have found your life work. In this 
way you have solved a most important problem, 
and have entered fairly upon your task. In these 
years just ending, one of the best things about 
them has been that you have been always busy. 
Your time has been taken up with tasks that have 
occupied most of your thought and effort, and 
this is a great source of peace of mind. In these 
days of your youth there still cling to you some of 
the beliefs of childhood. As we grow away from 
plaits and pinafores we loose one after another the 
illusions of those happy days: fairies, goblins, 
giants, buried treasure, and all the rest. Fortu- 
nately, one of the last of these to go are the 
dreams of childhood. Some of us are able to 
project into our later years this most happy child- 
ish trait. You remember the dainty verse of An- 
drew Lang about dreams : 

In dreams she grows not older 
The land of dreams among, 

Though all the world wax colder, 
Though all the songs be sung, 

In dreams does he behold her 
Still fair and kind and young. 

And then there is that beautiful lullaby of baby 
days : 



At eventide when the sky is red 

And the sun sinks down in the sea. 
And the bodies of children are in their beds 

And their little souls are free, 
In twos and threes the}' come trooping down 

Like flocks of shepherdless sheep 
Out of the portals of wake-o'-day town 

To the twilight valley of sleep, 
And once past the gate where the goblins wait 

And the witch fires of fancy gleam 
The Angel of Silence opens wide the gate 

To the Land of Beautiful Dream. 

And now we might justly ask : "What gifts of 
heart and mind ought a nurse to bring to the 
service of her hospital and her calling?" 

She should bring a spirit of reverence ; rever- 
ence for her sex, for her profession, for her work, 
appreciation of the opportunities of life, that may 
pass her way but once. Reverence for her elders 
and for those who are her teachers, reverence for 
little children, and for all that is beautiful and 
good in the world. 

"She should be resolute to say the right thing, 
and always to do the right thing," remembering 
the saying of the wise old philosopher of the 
Golden Age of Pericles. "The difficulty, my 
friends, is not in avoiding death, but in avoiding 
unrighteousness, for that runs faster than death," 
and the same voice rings clear and vibrant down 
the stretch of twenty-three centuries. "Where- 
fore I say, let a man be of good cheer about his 
soul, who has adorned t'..e soul in her own proper 
jewels, which are temperance and justice and 
courage, and nobility and truth ; in these arrayed 
she is ready to go on her journey to the other 
world when her time comes. These things have 
to do with character, and let us consider it briefly. 
Not that the subject merits briefness ; it is big 
enough to fill the world. Emerson, in his essay oi\ 
character says that he has read somewhere that 
those who listened to Lord Chatham, felt that 
there was something finer in the man than in any- 
thing he said, that it had been complained of the 
'brilliant Carlyle that when he had told all the facts 
about Mirabeau, they did not justify his estimate 
of his genius. 

This indefinable thing that is incapable of dem- 
onstration is character, and it is the foundation on 



019 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



which all effort and all achievement must be built, 
good or bad, and life's work will stand or fall in 
the last analysis, because of tlie character that 
underlies it. "And the rain descended and the 
floods came, and the winds blew and beat upon that 
house, and it fell ; and great was the fall of it, be- 
cause it was built upon the sand.'" 

The history of our country affords a very strik- 
ing example of the fundamental power of char- 
acter. Washington in dash was no match for 
Arnold, and suffers by comparison with Greene in 
military tactics. He was in creative genius, far 
outshone by Hamilton. As a diplomat he could 
not match the elder Adams or Franklin, and as an 
organizer and leader of men, was unequal to Jef- 
ferson. A careful study of his campaigns fails to 
justify his fame as a soldier of the first rank, and 
a critical perusal of his state papers does not en- 
tirely establish his right to rank with the world's 
greatest statesmen. Yet, in spite of all this, Wash- 
ington is justly called the father of his country, 
and all things considered, still stands after more 
than a century, as the greatest man that this conti- 
nent has produced. In matchless purity and 
strength of character he was without a peer. 

Much the same may be said of Jefferson. As a 
lawyer he was surpassed by Burr and Marshall. 
He was not an orator at all. His greatest ability 
was as a writer, and yet he was inferior to Hamil- 
ton. As a diplomat, Franklin and Jay were his 
superiors, and yet his fame is greater than the 
combined fame of all of these, and rightly so. 
Jefferson died July 4, 1826, just fifty years after 
the signing of that famous declaration of Inde- 
pendence of which he was the author. Among his 
papers was found the inscription, which he wished 
placed on his tomb, "Here was buried Thomas 
Jefferson, author of the Declaration of American 
Independence, of the statute of \'irginia for re- 
ligious freedom, and Father of the University of 
Virginia," not a word about his honors or his 
offices ; he who had been Governor of Virginia. 
Secretary of State, maker of presidents, and twice 
President of the United States. 

Charles Dickens, in his will, enjoined his friends 
to erect no monument to his memory, and to in- 
scribe only his dates upon his tomb, adding the 
proud provision: 'T trust my claim to the re- 
membrance of mv country on mv works," thus 



fulfilling again the age-old truth: "By their 
fruits, ye shall know them." 

There are other traits than these that the nurse 
should bring to her calling. Courage, steadfast- 
ness, and simplicity, honesty, and a liking for 
work. You should make everjf effort to attune 
your thought and conduct to the times and cir- 
cumstances in which you live. The ability to do 
this is one of the chief factors in success. The 
processes of thought are no better than they were 
during the height of the Grecian civilization, more 
than two thousand }'ears ago, but the manner of 
doing things has been completely changed. This 
is an age of efficiency, and efficiency is composed 
of two things — ability and training. 

There is no better way of illustrating the re- 
semblance and difference between our modern 
daj' and these old civilizations than to compare 
Socrates and Aristotle. Socrates typifies to us 
the best type of the thinking man, the true philoso- 
pher, and the ruling maxim of his life was: "As 
a man thinketh in his heart, so he is ;" or to put it 
dift'erently, "there is no good or evil in the world, 
but thinking makes it so," but Aristotle with a 
prophetic vision looked far down the centuries 
ahead of his time, and laid the foundation of 
science, the chief stone of which is knowledge, not 
thought, and the ruling maxim of his life was : 
"It is better to know than to think." 

You should strive to bring to your calling a 
healthy body. There is but one temple in the 
universe says the devout Novalis and that is the 
body of Man. It is the highest point of perfection 
reached by the greatest of all Artisans, Nature, 
herself, and if you are to work out your destiny 
to its ultimate greatest usefulness, you will need 
a good workshop in which to perform the task. 
Good work has been done and will be done by 
courageous spirits housed in frail bodies, but 
health and strength are cheerful companions on 
the highway of life. 

Now that you have settled the momentous ques- 
tion of choice of vocation, and have come this far 
along your chosen path, what may you confidently 
expect to accomplish? As of old, we still hope 
for the good faries, who will bring all our wishes 
true. What are vour Iiopes and expectations to- 
night? Mankind desires many things, his needs 
are much less numerous, but of all the legimitate 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



213 



quests of the human heart, success and happiness 
are the most desired. Alany other things may be 
added ; length of Hfe, wealth, strength, power, 
friendship. 

Let us look at success a little more closely. It is 
made up of many things. It is strangely willful in 
its moods. It often eludes the most earnest search 
and sometimes appears when least expected and 
least deserved. It is above all things fickle and in- 
constant, nor is it bound by any of the established 
rules of conduct. Opportunity and ambition are 
its hand-maidens, and in its train may be seen 
courage and patience and constancy. 

Success comes in many different guises and is 
at times unrecognized. It is said that Kipling was 
so dissatisfied with the Recessional that he threw 
it in his waste-basket, whence it was rescued by 
his wife. Mr. Moody, after the first delivery of 
one of his most powerful sermons, was found by 
one of his friends in anguish of spirit over its 
apparent failure. Lincoln's Gettysburg speech 
occupies an unique position among American 
papers. It is one of the shortest speeches on 
record, is famous as a state paper, and is a classic 
in the literature of the English language. It is a 
gem of pure Anglo-Saxon diction and breathes the 
unconquerable spirit of democracy, and courage 
and hope, and yet it is a matter of histor\' that 
President Lincoln was deeply mortified and dis- 
appointed after its delivery because he thought it 
was a failure. The life of Henry Clay expounds 
in a striking way the strange vagaries of success. 
After he had come to the full fruition of his 
powers, it was his greatest ambition to be presi- 
dent of these United States. He was three times 
candidate for this position and three times de- 
feated, and it was an apparent irony of Fate that in 
only two elections were the Whigs successful, but 
on neither of these occasions was Mr. Clay a 
candidate. In spite of this apparent three-fold 
failure, his fame looms larger than most of the 
presidents. The names in this country that are 
entitled to stand with him are very few indeed, and 
in his record of service, probably only th.ree are 
entitled to stand above him — Washington, Jeffer- 
son and Lincoln. He was the originator of the 
American System, and the author of tlie famous 
tariff' of 1833. It was his influence more than any 
other that gave us the courage to declare war in 



1812, and he was a commissioner of peace after- 
ward, and for five weary months stood firm, and 
finally won. He was the father of the Missouri 
Compromise and saved the Union, and 30 years 
later, in 18.50, brought about a second compromise 
that put off the Civil War for eleven years. As 
Secretary of State under John Quincy Adams, he 
negotiated more treaties than had been arranged 
in the preceding thirty-five years. As a parli- 
amentary leader he was the greatest in our history. 
He was six times elected Speaker of the House of 
Representatives, and not one of his rulings was 
reversed. He had a record of almost continuous 
public service over a period of fifty-two years, and 
near the end of it was elected unanimously to the 
Senate from a state bitterly divided by party strife 
in a time when the very existence of the Union 
hung in the balance. 

The historian, Rhodes, said of him that no man 
had ever been loved as the people of the United 
States loved Henry Clay. Proctor said that he 
had the faculty of making friends and holding 
them through life by ties which no circumstances 
or condition could sever. He was born in 1777, 
the year of the Battle of Saratoga, and died in 
1852, and after nine years the memory of his great 
name and his love of the Union prevented Ken- 
tucky from seceding. Had he still been living in 
1861, it is highly probable that he could have pre- 
vented the war. 

And yet this man measured by the standard of 
his great ambition, was a failure. What a pity it 
is that in these days when the very foundations of 
society seem to be tottering, that there are not a 
few more such failures in our National Congress. 

A hospital with its School of Medicine and 
Training School for Nurses is something more 
than a group of buildings where patients are 
treated, and nurses and students taught. If one 
has eyes that see, and ears that hear, and a heart 
that understands, he will see and hear and under- 
stand many things that are not written in books. 
He will begin to appreciate somewhat the spirit 
and traditions of the place, which gives to it a 
sort of local Deity. 

Hospital life is a great leveler. The hospital is 
too busy to be interested in your accomplishments, 
in your ambitions, in your thoughts. There are 
too many patients to be dressed, too nianv medi- 



2U 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



cines to be given, too many questions to be 
answered. Each one succeeds or fails because of 
herself alone. 

There are those who say that the hospital is only 
a big machine. It is more than that. 

Sickness and death teach us many tl:ings. They 
lay bare most of the unrealities of life and rob us 
of all sham. Think of the many things that pass 
through the hospital rooms and wards — accident, 
sudden death, infant mortality, infectious diseases, 
the social problem, undesirable aliens, starvation, 
insanity, alcoholism, heredity, suicide, assaults, 
murder, poverty, crime. Here are seen daily the 
grim tragedies of life, and much that is comic. 
This plunge into the actual flood of living is apt 
to unsettle you in the beginning, to leave >ou lost 
in a maze of conflicting emotions. 

The hospital is a miniature world dealing in 
bare realities, following its vocation with little 
time and little interest in matters outside of itself. 
If We have sufficient imagination, a new stage is 
being constantly set before our eyes, and the actors 
thereon are many and varied. "How the World 
Lives," is played to us daily with a full cast — hero 
and heroine, villian and victim, with a crowd of 
supers at the back of the stage and in th.e wings. 

Most men know very little of the lives of others, 
but hospital workers get very close to people. They 
come for advice and help. No two are just alike, 
and their records laid bare, range through every 
shade of color from the purest white to nauseating 
black. The wise nurse soon learns that she must 
forget many old things, and learn many new ones, 
and most important of all, she must learn lives, 
and the tragedy of lives ruined, lives sunk will 
knock at her heart ; while she will be tremendously 
heartened by lives that are brave and charitable 
and good. So that many of the erstwhile interest- 
ing things of the world loose their power to move 
her, for every day she sees a little bit of both 
Heaven and Hell. So she sees things as they are, 
but does not always put the right interpretation 0:1 
them. At first, she is apt to look too much on ihc 
dark side. Everything seems sick or wrong, sunk 
in crime or drink, and unless she is careful of the 
gifts that she ought to have brought with her. 
down with a crash come Faith and Hope and 
Charity, and she will be at great eft'ort and difli- 
culty to set them up again. 



After a little while, however, the bright side be- 
gins to be seen. There will come to her again and 
again the great joy of turning away the hand of 
death, the opportunity of lessening pain, of bring- 
ing order out of confusion, of preaching the beautv 
of cleanliness, she will see people face the great 
crises of life with splendid courage, she will see 
hope and faith go down with sufi^erers to the very 
brink of the river, whose name is death, and she 
will be rewarded by the happy tears of mothers 
carrying home again the children whom she has 
nursed back to life and health, and the end of each 
day's work, however hard, however fraught with 
weal 01 woe, will bring its own reward. 

A poor man nursed b}- thee shall make thee 

rich. 
A sick man helped by thee shall make ih.ee 

strong. 
Thou shalt be served thyself by every sense of 

service thou hast rendered. 

"Fair, indeed, is the prize and the hope great." 
In conclusion, it is my privilege on beha^lf of 
the hospital management and for your man}- 
friends to wish you a happy fulfillment of all vour 
hopes, yiay your ships come sailing into port 
richly laden with delectable gifts of a kind Fate, 
and may the words of Queen Guinevere to Enid 
come true for each one of you : "Be prosperous 
in this journey as in all, and may you light on all 
things that vou love." 



ORGANIZATIONS. 



I-L\RLv\N L.\w Society Notes. 



At the last meeting of the Flenry D. Harlan 
Law Society seven new members were taken in 
from the present Junior Class and temporary 
officers were elected to start things going next 
fall. 

The ofificers elected are : Allan W. Rynhardt, 
president : Oscar C. I\lartenet, Jr., vice-president ; 
Paul Hasenkamp, treasurer, and Charles Ruzicka, 
secretary. 

We wish these men much success. 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



215 



THE UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 

A MONTHLY JOURNAL 

Devoted to the interests of the University 
of Maryland. 

Subscription Price. $i.00 Per Annum, In Advance 

Reprints Furnished At Cost 

Advertising Rates Submitted Upon Request. 

60S Professional Building 

BALTIMORE. MD. 

EDITORIAL STAFF. 

J. Ben Robinson, D.D.S Editor-in-Cliief 

Nathan Winslow, M.D Business Manager 

James M. Hepbron, LL..B Law 

A. A. Sonnenburg, Phar. D Pharmacy 

M. E. Sullivan, R. N Nursing 

A. Z. Aldridge, '16 Dental 

W. Lester Baldwin, '16 Law 

F. Fred Marshall, '16 Pharmacy 



JUNE 1, 1916. 



EDITORIALLY EXPRESSED. 



In his article on Loyalty, published in The 
Gazette of May, Dr. Hopkinson urges action 
in the creation of an endowment fund for the 
University. 

The thought should not cease with the sug- 
gestion, but should take such form as to de- 
velop into a foundation upon which a permanent 
fund may be established and developed to pro- 
portions commensurate 'with the university needs. 
The sponsor for such a fund should be the 
Alumni of the Lhiiver^ity, operating through tl'.e 
Alumni Association. Having contributed as the 
members themselves feel able then the organiza- 
tion is in a position to soHcit patronage from 
men able to give and willing to assist. The 
UNIVERSITY SHOULD BE ENDOWED. 



Are we all we profess to be? Are we class "A" 
school in fact as in reputation ? Are we organiza- 
ing our forces along lines of efficiency, which 
will make us a permanent institution in this 
age of great progress? Is our thought single \o 
the best service we may render society in prop- 
erly equipping young men for the professions? 



The College Man Sets 
the Styles! 

Uphold your reputation by wearing 
suits made the "Matched Pattern" 
way, the most important clothing 
invention of the decade ! 

These suits are sold exclusively by 

THE QUALITY SHOP 
Balto. and Liberty Sts. 




Are our courses so arranged as to give the young 
men advantage of the best professional training 
his future requires ; Have we "dead wood" in 
our system which should be cut out or have we 
need of things lacking? We should engage in a 
bit of introspection and having come to know 
ourselves cultivate the better parts and cast out 
that of no beneiicial consequences for fear of 
tiltimate harm. Let our standard be TLIE 
BEST. 



To Dr A. H. Carroll all credit is due for the 
successful arrangement of the University ban- 
quet at the Emerson ITotel, May 31st. Dr. Car- 
roll gave lavishly of time and energy that the 
hope of such a gathering might be realized, and 
all members of the Alumni Association as well 
as the graduates of the 191G class owe much to 
him for the success of the occasion. A few 
more workers of his zeal would soon make 
all our organizations teem with activity. May 
he now resolve to have a Second Annual Alumni 
Bancjuet in the spring of 1917. 

:o : 

MEDICAL— GRADUATE. 



Dr. Frank V. Fowlkes, class of 1SS7, of Burke- 
ville,, Va., was a recent visitor to the University. 
He is connected with the Mellin's Food Com- 
pany, of Boston, Mass. 



Dr. E. L. Whitney, associate professor of 
Physiological Chemistry, Pharmacology and 
Clinical Pathology, has tendered his resignation. 
He will leave shortly for Portland, Oregon. 



216 



UNIA^ERSITY GAZETTE. 



Dr. William Simon has resigned from the chair 
of Chemistry and the Facuh> of Physic. 



LAW INTERMEDIATE, 



-:o :- 



MEDICAL— SENIOR. 



■\Ir. J. R. Knowles, ex-191G, has been ap- 
pointed resident surgeon at the Fort Dearborn 
Hospital, Chicago, III. 



LAW— SENIOR. 



Whatever feeling the men of this class have 
expressed toward the joint banquet idea before 
the law faculty decided to become a party 
to it, it was very easy to see that everyone was 
well pleased when it was announced that the 
faculty had entered into the plan. You can 
count on it that every senior law man who will 
graduate this year will be present at this joint 
university banquet, and if they don't display 
plenty of "pep" it will be somebody else's fault. 



The VMG Terra Mariae was ready for dcli\'ery 
on the dav set out in the contract, viz. May 10th, 
and the editors expect to have enough money on 
hand to pay up the contract price by Wednesday, 
May 21. No books will be (leli\ered until the 
publishers are paid in full or have positive as- 
surances as to where any balance is coming from. 
At this writing the Dental department is way 
behind in its collections, which is tending some- 
what to delay a final settlement with the 
publishers. 



We learn from reliable sources that William 
Frazier Russell, Jr., Esq., is already causing his 
name to be spread throughout the whole length 
and breadth of his home county of Kent by his 
speellbinding- oratory. He was unable to con- 
vince the judge, however, in a recent case, that 
the negro he was defending did not steal the 
four-dollar horse blanket, as charged by the 
State. The negro got six months — aiul the 
blanket. 



Albin WidoFF, '17. 



Prosper Amato is going to New York June 
](} and will locate there. 



TiiK Fourth Movement. 

"We thank with brief thanksgiving 
Whatever gods may be; 
That no life lives forever, 

That dead men use up never, 
That even the weariest river 

W^inds somewhere save to sea." 

— Sivinbunie. 

"This shall be the last time we meet," said 
Plans Froelicher at the last examination. Our 
president uttered the truth then, for he is wise 
as to college affairs. May 19 was the last time 
we met — the last time as students. Hereafter 
we shall hold many meetings, but they will be 
attended by young men who have just been ad- 
mitted to the bar, and by those to whom admit- 
tance is merely a matter of days. Then to such 
young- men as we the days of college life will 
have lost its tang. The legal principles we will 
hereafter contend with will not be altogether 
new ; they will be mereh' elaborations of the 
principles that appeared so new to us two years 
ago. We will be like matured fruit that longs 
for the autumnal wind to blow — to blow it to 
an independent existence. In fact, the legal 
symphony rounds its fourth movement. We 
now play a calm melody awaiting the fortissimo 
finale. 

And then — what? 

To many it will be a hollow triumph. The 
conclusion of the struggle will corroborate the 
fact that the honors we seek are but delusions. 
We find that the prize lacks lustre and, like 
Macbeth, we look back to the halcyon days and 
murmur : 
"Tomorrow and tomorrow and tomorrow, 

luich flits on its pretty fact from day to day. 

Till the last syllable of recorded time." 

Then will we know the unlocked for but simple 
fact that existence is but a continual assertion 
of what we really are. So near are we to God 
that all our struggles are but to assert that fact. 
-And so all our attainments disajipoint. Each 
victory is but a breathing spell, a preparation for 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



217 



anotlier endeavor to realize how great man can 
be. 

Therefore rest and contentment are stagna- 
tion. Those who take the bar examination must 
know this fact. Receiving a hcense to practice 
is but a means to an end. The means is the 
practice of kiw, the end is the self-development, 
the assertion of the individual. Anyone who 
begins with the preconceived notion that he must 
better the world, or reform it, or help his fellow- 
man, is making a vain efTort to substitute a man- 
made, for a natural, law. Man thinks that an 
individual can help to develop the race. Nature 
does not think so. To her only an individual 
here and there is capable of development and 
sometimes, to develop him, nature sacrifices a 
whole race, maybe two. Let any altruistic stu- 
dent ponder upon the futility of philanthropy, 
altruism par excellence, or on the futility of all 
mass movements, i. e., altruistic movements. 
Every Utopia has ended upon the rocks. Beware 
of the peddlers of Utopia, said Nietzsche. Yes, 
beware of the mob. 

On the other hand, let the individualistic stu- 
dent ponder upon the past — races and peoples 
have gone, only the individuals remain, the 
grandees of intellect, Plato, Spinoza, Pascal, 
Nietzsche; the poets. Homer, Dante, Shakes- 
peare, Goethe; the rulers, Caesar, Justinian, 
Napoleon, Lincoln, etc. 

But the people, the races do not they serve ? 
Oh, yes, they serve. Plow? As the fertilizer, 
of course. 

:o : 

LAW— JUNIOR. ■ 



Edwin K. Gontrum, '18. 



Our class pins have been distributed. While 
there are a few disgruntled ones who do not like 
the design, yet the majority of the fellows are 
very much pleased with it. The pin is not of the 
ordinary kind. Its attractiveness lies in the 
oddity of design. At the top are the letters U. of 
M.. 1918, in the centre is an owl head, emblematic 
of wisdom, while at the bottom is the word 
"law" in raised letters. The pin committee is to 
be congratulated on its selection. 



HEPBRON & HAYDON 

We Sell Every Law Book and Syllabus 

Used at the U. of M. 

St. Paul 8794 1243-53 CALVERT BLDG. 

now are things of the past ; that is, until the bar 
exams, are encountered. Until then and to them 
who have safely "pulled through," may the 
courses above mentioned, especially the first, ap- 
pear as nightmares stripped of their terrors, as 
bugbears which Horace no longer dreads to meet. 
Real Property was the highest htu'dle thus far 
met. Only one to be apprehended remain.s — 
Title. Rumors are insistent concerning the 
difficulties of this subject. The prevailing opin- 
ion, however, seems to indicate that it is less 
difficult than Real Property. Let us hope so. 



Whatever be the difficulties in the studv of law, 
there is at least one great advantage. It opens 
up a most enticing field of thought, one which 
to the lay mind is totally incomprehensible, but 
to the student, from the first inkling he receives 
(and we Juniors have but the first) to the 
broader view that opens to him as he proceeds, 
becomes more and more fraught with interest, 
more and more laden with all the qualities that 
make it the instrument through which justice is 
dispensed and by which society is constrained 
into a harmonious whole. Blackstone, in his 
"Farewell to His Muse," expresses well the aim 
and workings of the law : 

"Observe how parts with parts unite 
See countless wheels distinctly tend 
By various laws to one great end ; 
While mighty Alfred's piercing soul 
Pervades and regulates the whole." 



Real Property, Tolls and Testamentary Law 



While the last two weeks of the school were 
of course busy ones, according to reports, there 
were some very interesting discussions among the 
fellows as to the probable class officers next vear. 
And if we can judge by what has been said there 
will be some real rivalry next fall in the contest 
for officers. For class president the trend of dis- 
cussion seems to point to \\'eech, Williams and 
Robinson as candidates from whom the selection 
will Ije made. 



218 



UNIVERSITY GAZETTE. 



Hart Schaffner & Marx, 
Kuppenheimer, 
"Society Brand" 



The c/othes that college men 
like a lot 



TReUSIlsHub 

Baltimore 6ireet At Charles 



NURSING. 



The University Hospital Training School for 
Nurses held its graduating exercises on Ala)' ISth. 

In the morning there was a special service for 
the class at St. Paul's Episcopal Church, after 
which breakfast was served at the hospital. 

The exercises were held in the evening at Leh- 
mann's Hall. The Rev. Arthur B. Kinsolving of- 
fered prayer. The address was rendered by Dr. 
Arthur M. Shipley and the diplomas were con- 
ferred by Dr. Randolph VVinslow and presented by 
Dr. Thomas Fell, Provost of the University. 

There were 85 graduates as follows : 

Margaret Dunn, Julia Irene Kauffman, Marion 
Asbury Forne}-. Marguerite Mary Walter, Sallie 
Smith, Laura Polly Clark, Inez May Scarfif, .-\.nna 
Spilleo Flurst, Emma Blanche Hoftmaster, Lillie 
Grace Null, Helen Bertielle McSherry, Serena 
Webster Selfe, Margaret Colin ]\Iayo, Bernice 
X'iolet Smith, Elsie Love Rutherford, Helen Lam- 
bie Blake, Hildegrade Reamy, Marie Estelle Lan- 
genfeldt, Nellie Eureka Dix, Elizabeth Flelen 
Phelan, i\Iary Edna John, Julia Louise Henkel. 
Lucy DuLaney Scaggs, Lula Kathryn Eichncr 
and Maud Waring Simmons. 

The success of the commencement is largely 
due to the efforts of Dr. Randolph Winslow. 



The Nurses' Alumnae Association of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland entertained the graduating 
class at a bancjuet at the Emerson Hotel on Tues- 
day evening, MaylGth. Miss Laura Chapline was 
toastmistress. Miss Nancy McNabb, the presi- 
dent, made the address of welcome. Miss Mary 
Gavin gave an interesting talk on the histors- of 



the Alumnae pin. Miss Elizabeth Getzendanner 
talked on the Florence Nightingale cap, which 
is worn by the University Hospital graduates. 
Mrs. Frank Lynn rendered a most interesting re- 
port on the progress of the Alumnae Association, 
telling of the benefits derived from it. Miss E. 
Blanche Hoff master, president of the graduating 
class, made an address on behalf of the class. The 
class song was sung. There was dancing and a 
most enjoyable evening spent. 



The class of li)17. University Hospital Train- 
ing School for Nurses, entertained the graduating 
class in the Nurses' Home on the evening of the 
I'lth of May. Supper was served in the nurses' 
diningroom. A most delightful time was spent 
in dancing. Dr. Coleman allowed the Residents 
of the hospital to attend. 



ENGAGEMENTS. 



The engagement is announced of Mr. J. Kemp 
IJartlett, Jr., Law, 'IC, of Baltimore, Md., to Miss 
Katharine Kendall Simons, of Germantown, Pa 
The wedding will take place in Germantown, 
June 10. 

Air. Bartlctt graduated at Princeton Univer- 
sity in i;)l;5 with high honors in athletics and in 
literary work. He was our class president dur- 
ing our first year and has taken an active interest 
in most of the university activities. Passing the 
State Bar examination in June, 1915, he immedi- 
ately began the practice of law and is now asso- 
ciated in practice with the well known firm of 
['.artlett, Poe, Claggett & Bland. 

Kemp has the congratulations and best wishes 
of his classmates and of the Gazette. 



We Do Not Prescribe Glasses--We Make Them 

BOWEN & KING 

Prescription Optician 
405 N. Charles Street 



Telephone 



BALTIMORE, MD. 




Fellows' Compound Ssnrup 
of Hypophosphites 

1866-1916 

Not a new-born prodigy or an untried 
experiment, but a remedy whose useful- 
ness has been fully demonstrated during 
half a century of clinical application. 

For 50 Years The Standard 

J>; Syr. Hypophos. Comp. FELLOWS* 

jj . ^^ Cheap and Inefficient Substitutes 

^X Preparations "Just as Good" 




/f= 



Therapeutic Thoroughness 

is possible only when the remedies used by the 
Patient, are exactly what the Doctor prescribed. 

More than 20 years experience, among physi- 
cians in all parts of the world, show that there 
is no successful substitute for 



'SIS'.' "^I'BR THE 1-l'OD ."0 I"- ^ 





Directions ;~ Always hcDt 
in Ihc original container by 
placing in hot water. 
Needless exposure to the 
air, impairs its osmotic 
properties - on which its 
therapeutic action, largely 
depends. 



There are many uses for Antiphlo- 
gistine during the warm season — slight 
yet annoying ailments, such as occur 
during out-door activities — Bruises — 

By ordering Antiphlogistine in full and original packages : Small, 
Medium, Large or Hospital Size "a perfect poultice" is asssured. 



Sprains — "Base Ball fingers" — Stings — 
Bites of insects and reptiles—Sunburn — 
Poison Ivy — Inflamed wounds from Fire- 
works or Firearms, etc., etc. 



Physicians should WRITE "Anliphlogiatine" to AVOID "substilutes". 

"There s Only One Antiphlogistine." 

M.MN OFFICE AND LABORATORIES 

THE DENVER CHEMICAL MFG. CO., NEW YORK. U. S. A. 

Branches; LONDON. SYDNEY. BERLIN. PARIS. BUENOS AIRES. BARCELONA. MONTREAL 



TALCOLETTE 

(TALCUM VIOLET) 

AN IMPROVEMENT IN TALCUM POWDER 

DAINTY FRAGRANT HYGIENIC 
A superior Toilet Powder, scientifically 
prepared and delicately perfumed with the 
Essence of Neopolitan Violets, imparting to 
the skin the odor of the freshly cut flower. 

JIade only by 

THE HENRY B. GILPIN CO. 

Baltimore, Md. 



INSURANCE 



Accident 
Automobile 



Health Burglary 

Physicians' Defense 



Maryland Casualty Co. 

Si. Paul 2218 T. T. TONGUE & CO.. General Agenis 



Morrison & Fifer 

Dispensing Chemists 



We solicit your patronage and assure you we 
personally supervise every prescription or order 
intrusted to our care. 

LINDEN AV&. AND DOLPHIN ST. 



Walnut Grove Dairy 



:PURE: 



MILK, CREAM 
AND BUTTER 



C. & p. Phone 



Office and Dairy: 

2620 and 2622 Francis St. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE, MD. 

HON. EMERSON C. HARRINGTON, Governor of Maryland, Chancellor. 
THOMA.S FELL, A.M., Ph.D., L L. D., D. C. L.. Provost. 



ST. JOHN'S COLLEGE, Annapolis, Md. ( 



DEPARTMENT OF 
ARTS AND SCIENCES 



) 



Founded 1696. Classical and Scientific College Courses leading to d agrees. Special advantages to stu- 
dents purposing to study the professions. Military Department under army officers. Also Preparatory 
School for boys fitting for St. John's or other colleges. Term begins Sepl ;mber 15. .\ddress 

THOMAS FELL, Ph.D., LL.D., D.C.L., President. 



DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE, UNIVERSITY 

OF MARYLAND, AND COLLEGE OF 

PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS. 

Four vears' graded course. New Laboratory Build- 
ing. Clinical advantages unsurpassed. Teaching Staff 
of 187. 110th Annual Session will begin October 1, 
1916, and continue 8 months. 

WM. F. LOCKWOOD, M. D., Dean. 

DEPARTMENT OF DENTISTRY. 

3Sth Annual Session begins October I, 1916, and 
continues 7 months. 26 Instructors. New Building, 
-'or catalogue containing course of study, etc., apply to 

TIMOTHY O. HEATWOLE, M.D., D.D.S., Dean, 

Baltimore, Md. 



DEPARTMENT OF LAW. 

61st Annual Session will begin Sept. 28, 1916. Faculty 
of 26. For catalogue contammg full information ad- 
dress the Secretary, 301 St. Paul Street, Baltimore. 
Maryland. 

EDWIN T. DICKERSON, Secretary. 



DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACY. 

(.Formerly Maryland College of Pharmacy). 74th 
.Annual Session begins September 25, 1916. 11 In- 
structors. New Laboratories. Address 

CHARLES CASPARI, JR., Phar.D., Dean, 

Baltimore. Md. 



AMERICAN ARTIFICIAL LIMB CO. 



(incorporated) 



665 W. Baltimore Street, Baltimore, Md. 



MANUFACTURERS OF THE 



Original Air-Socket Limbs 



(patented) 



MECHANICAL ARMS AND HANDS 

We Handle a Complete Line of Accessories. Includin'^ Crutches, Stunip Socks. Suspenders, Etc. 




Phone. St. Paul 4028 



Capital, - - $ 100.000 
Surplus. - - 70.000 

Deposits Over 2.500.000 



CALVERT BANK 



IN THE 
SHOPPING DISTRICT 



S. E. Corner Howard and Saratoga Streets 

Branches: 1813 Pennsylvania Ave. Baltimore and Carey Sts. Light and Cross Sts. Gay and Monument Sts. 



\VM. C. I'AGE, PresideBt ItlCHAKD GWIiN'X, L'd Vice-President 

JAMES II. PRESTON, Vice-President and Counsel W. H. DASHIELL, Cashier 

.T. S. TOWNSEND, Asst. Cashier 

DIRECTORS 
Hon. James II. Preston Kiehard Gwinn Thos. W. Jenkins 

Wm. C. Page Charles W. Hurst Frederick H. Gottlieb 

W. O. Horsey J. C. Taliaferro William P. Knox 

COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT— Large and small deposits receiged subject to check 
SAVINGS DEPARTMENT— Deposits received from 25 cents up. 3 Vi 'A. interest paid 
LiiTi-fnl Depository for any Trust ee. Receiver, Guardiiiii, E.xec-iitor or A<Iiiiinistrator, Coiuiiiittee, Asei't. 

Piililie Officer or Fidiiciary 



E. J. LUCKE. Asst. Cashier 
H. W. LUCKE, Asst. Cashier 



Chas. W. Jones 
Wm. B. Fallon 
B. J. McCullough 

SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES. 

$3 AND UPWARDS 



Insist on LOZAK 



^ Buttermilk is not the same, nor just 
as good as a properly prepared food. 

^ Dispensers of drink or food who try to 
substitute for LoZak, do so because 
buttermilk is an otherwise worthless by- 
product of creameries and retails at a 
larger profit. 

^ LoZak is a scientific preparation, 
thoroughly sterilized and composed of 
today's whole certified milk, albumen 
from yester-laid eggs, lactic acid and 
Bulgarian bacillus. 



^ Your doctor will tell you of the food 
and health values of each mgredient of 
LoZak. 

^ LoZak is especially indicated to 
offset inertia and exhaustion. The taste 
for LoZak does not require cultivation. 
LoZak is a delightful, refreshing drink. 
^ Insist on LoZak. 

N. B.— We are prepared to enforce the proper hand- 
ling and dispensing of L.oZak by retailers. Sugges- 
tions are welcome that vv'ill improve this detail of our 
business. 

It you are not familiar with LoZak we shall be 
glad to make you acquainted at our expense. 



SOLD AT ALL DRUG STORES AND CAFES. 5 AND 10 CENTS 



FEDERAL ANTI-NARCOTIC LAW 

AND 

GLYCO-HEROIN (SMITH) 



The composition of Glyco-Heroin (Smith) is 
not being changed to meet any of the exemptions 
or privileges allowed under the so called "Har- 
rison Anti-Narcotic Law," and whereby it might 
be sold to the public. 

Glyco-Heroin (Smith) will remain just what it 
always has been, and just what it was always in- 
tended to be, viz: a stable, uniform and depend- 
able product for the convenience and use of 
physicians only, in the treatment of Cough, 
Bronchitis, Whooping Cough, etc. 

In prescribing Glyco-Heroin (Smith) use ordi- 
nary prescription blanks. Give the name and 
address of patient, your own name and address in 
full, your registry number and date when written, 
(no copy or other record required.) 

Prescriptions cannot be refilled 



MARTIN H. SMITH CO., - - New York 



WM. J. COLEMAN, 

Medical Superintendnnt 



SONNENBURG'S PHARMACY 

Haltiniore and Greene Streets 
ONE MINUTE CLINICAL THERMOMETERS 
WITH CHAIN AND GUARD PIN, 50 CENTS 



SULTAN DRUG COMPANY 

PHARMACEUTICAL CHEMISTS, ST. LOUIS, MO 
Manufacturers of 

PRUNOIDS SENG CACTINA FILLETS 
THE WESTERN NATIONAL BANK 

OF BALTIMORE 



Vour H.iuk Aciouut 
Soliciteri 



14 N. EUTAW STREET 



Noiv Heiitly lor Sprini; I'.IK!. See Us for Classy Clothes 
Suits to Measure, $15.00 to $35.00 

A. JACOBS & SONS, Tailors 

8J9 NORTH HOWARD STREET 

Open Kunings 9 P. M. Cor. Uiehmond St. 



H. H WARFIELD. 

Manager 



UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL 

COR. LOMBARD AND GREENE STREETS 
BALTIMORE. MD. 





SUITING FOR UNIFORMS 

Every nurse cares to have nice looking uniforms -and every nurse can have such uni- 
forms at trifling cost. 

We sell tremendous quantities of the material — it is popular with everybody who uses it. 

Linen-finish Suiting— a medium weight fabric with smooth finish; SGinches wide. 15c 
a yard. 

Shrunk Suiting— Samson cloth finish; 36 inches wide. 12}4c. a yard, 



Write for 
Samples 



JOEL GUTMAN & CO. 



Eutaw Street, Near Lexington 



BALTIMORE, MD. 




The Qundry Sanitarium 

(ATHOL) 

A Private Sanitarium for the care and treatment of Nervous 
and selected cases of Mental Diseases of Women. 

Splendidly located, retired and accessible to Baltimore; sur- 
rounded by 2S acres of beautiful grounds. Buildings modern 
;ind well arranged. Every facility for treatment and classi- 
fication. Under the management of Dr. A. T. GUNDRY. 

For further information, write or telephone 

Dr. ALFRED T. QUNDRY 



THK (VHt-XnY S.\MTAKII;M (.VTHOL) 
ratonsville. Md. 



DEER PARK SANITARIUM 

PIKESVILLE, BALTIMORE COUNTY. MD. 

I'U. \V. I'. K. \VV8i:, I'liysic ian-in-Charge DR. GHAKLKS G. MILL, (.'onsuU.Tnt 




A quiet countiy retreat for Invalids, Convalescents, N'ervous Cases and those addicted to Alcoholic and Drug Hahlts, 
conducted as little like an institution and as miu.'h like a private home as possible. Situated in the center of an estate 
of 106 acres, a few miles from Baltimore, in its most beautiful suburban section near the celebrated Green Spring Valley. 
For further information, write or telephone 

DK. W. P. E. WYSE, PikesTille. Baltimore County, Md. 



Satisfying Supply Service 



SERVICE YOU NEED 

To secure for yourself and 
your patients, quickly, 

ANTITOXINS OXYGEN 

VACCINES NORMAL SALT SOLUTION 

SEEUMS INFUSION APPARATUS 

BACTERINS CAMPHOR OIL AMPULES 

Also 

STAINS, REAGENTS, CHEMICALS, 
APPARATUS 

TELEPHONE 

Mt. Vernon 890 Madison 405 

CHARLES & FRANKLIN STS. LINDEN & NORTH AVES. 

Hynson, Westcott and 
Company 

BALTIMORE 



Your Special Attention is Directed to 

Beef, Iron and Wine 

With Hydropepsin, 

Liquid Pi-cine Co^ Red Syr. Hjpopliospliites Co. 

Thomas & Thompson Co, 

Manufacturers and Dispensers of 

PURE MEDICINES 

(Wholesale and Retail) 

Cor. Baltimore and Light Sts. 
BALTIMORE, MD. 




i^nt^l IRpntiprt 



EUROPEAN PLAN 



BALTIMORE, MD. 




AMENORRHEA 

DYSMENORRHEA 
MENORRHAGIA 

METRORRHAGIA 
ETC. 

ERGOAPIOL (Smith) is supplied only in 
y packages containing twenty capsules. 

V DOSE: One to two capsules three , 
,\ or four times a day. ■<-<-« 



If 



^ 



SAMPLES and UTERATURE 
SENT ON REQUEST, .. 




i| MARTIN H. SMITH COMPANY, New York. N Y,U S A 






I 







fl 



IP