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Full text of "University Hospital Nurses' Alumnae Bulletin"

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"Patriotism is not enough." 
— Edith Cavell. 



Cfjadottc ^. Cox, aa. ^. 

JSorn in iHartinsfaurg, JUHcst "Virginia, 3fanuarp 17, 1881. 
!3[ grabuate of tije ^Hniberscitp |^0£(pital draining ^cfjool for 
:^\xxiti, CIa«£( of 1908. a 5Rcb Crosst iBturac Kcrbtng toitfj 
tf)e organisation at ti)e time of ttje Qooti in Bapton, (2^i)io. <Z^n 
tintp toitf) ti)e 3^eti CroiCK i^ursfeK for toar sferbice at Camp 
<@reene, Cbarlotte, i^orti) Carolina; tailing for if ranee in ITuIp, 
1918. ase ^aiHanX ^uperbigor of tfje ^llniberKitp of idarplanli 
^asie ^oKpital ?Mnit iSo. 42. Bieb of bpdenterp September 
28. 1918, in iSa^oilleK-Kur-illeude. Jfrance, bofiete Kt)^ t^ais 
burieb biitf) full militarp Ijonorit in ti)e bostpital grabeparb. 



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ISom in 1895. 3 grabuate of tije ^nibericitp lloKpital 
tJTraining Retool for i^urKeK, Clasfd of 1918. ^\t)i at Camp 
Hee, Virginia, in (October. 1918, of pneumonia, following 
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I LIBRARY 

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20271 



Nursing is an art; and, if it is to he an art, requires as exclusive 
a devotion, as hard a preparation, as any painter^s or sculptor's 
work; for what is the having to do with dead canvas or cold marble 
compared with having to do with the living body — the temple of 
God's spirit? It is one of the Fine Arts; I had almost said, the 
finest of the Fine Arts. 

There is no such thing as amateur art; there is no such thing as 
amateur nursing. 

— Florence Nightingale. 





THE ^^^^oj 

University I^^ShraL Nurses 
Alumnae Bulletin 

Vol. I APRIL, 1921 No. 1 

"United we stand, divided we fall." 
The Importance of Our Alumnae Association 

It is evident that there has been a marvellous widening of the 
nurse's horizon in the last decade. A few years ago the new 
graduate was confronted with two alternatives, a hospital posi- 
tion, or special duty. A hospital position meant poor pay, and 
frequently inferior food and shelter, while the special nurse was 
often on duty twenty-one out of the twenty-four hours. 

Today the wide awake ambitious graduate, standing at the 
threshold of the nursing world finds herself bewildered by the 
various opportunities spread before her. She may be a Full 
Time Instructor, a Superintendent, a PubUc Health Nurse, a 
Community Nurse, an Industrial Nurse, an Institutional Nurse, 
a Social Service Nurse, or she may prefer Special Duty. 

Pause for a moment and consider who is responsible for this 
re-birth of the nursing profession — the nursing associations, 
among which is your Alumnae. 

Perhaps you are thinking, "fine, splendid, keep up the good 
work, but don't bother me. I am tired at night, and can't be 
bored with attending alumnae meetings." 

Purely selfish, but let us consider it from a purely selfish view- 
point. Of course we are taking it for granted that you belong 
to your Alumnae, for a nurse of the present day who does not is 
given Uttle consideration in the nursing world. When you 
apply for a position the first question put to you is, are you a 
R. N. If your answer is satisfactory the chances are the next step 
will be a letter to your Alumnae Association. If you have not 
kept in touch with your Alumnae, have not attended a meeting 
for months, it is almost impossible for the Executive Board to 

3 



4 -^ ■ THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

. / 

give you a fair recommendation, although they have the most 
kindly feelings. They are busy women, who have not the time 
to investigate the very excellent work you may be doing. Con- 
sequently you get a mediocre report, when there is no reason 
why you should not have an excellent one. 

Again, a call comes to the Association for a teacher, a super- 
intendent, or a director of public health. These positions fre- 
quently go unfilled, because the Executive Board is not famiHar 
with what the different nurses are doing, with what they would 
like to do, or with what they are capable of doing. In fact the 
nurses, themselves cannot know what they want to do unless 
they attend their Association meeting, and become famiHar with 
what is going on in the nursing world. Even those who are 
satisfied with their work, and have no desire to change, need the 
stimulus to be gotten by rubbing shoulders with their fellow 
workers. 

It is not only that you need your Alumnae, your Alumnae 
needs you. The University Alumnae has been run by too few 
people, not because these few wanted to, but because there was 
no one to take their place. Perhaps you feel that you cannot 
accept an executive position, that you have not the time to 
give. You may not, but you certainly can encourage and assist 
those who are giving their time by attending the monthly meet- 
ings, and by bringing to those meetings questions of interest. 
Above all express yourself. An honest stiff argument is never 
injurious. It is inertia that kills. 

That is exactly what our Alumnae is up against, lack of inter- 
est, deadly inertia. Our ex-president, Mrs. Edmunds, made a 
plain statement at the December Alumnae meeting. She said 
that unless we as a body showed a more united interest, it was 
probable that we would soon cease to be the second largest Nurse's 
Association in Maryland. 

In the nursing world today there is no room for the laggard. 
You are compelled to keep up with the procession, or make room 
for someone else. It is up to you whether the University Hos- 
pital Alumnae Association is to be one of the "trail blazers" in 
advancing the profession of nursing, or simply a trailer. 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 5 

THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, A BRIEF HISTORY 

By Randolph Winslow, M.D. 

The beginnings of the University of Maryland were laid in the 
foundation of the College of Medicine of Maryland in December, 
1807. In December, 1812, the College of Medicine was author- 
ized to "annex to itself the three other colleges or faculties, viz., 
the Faculty of Divinity, the Faculty of Law and the Faculty of 
the Arts and Sciences; and that the four faculties or colleges, 
thus united, shall be, and they are hereby, constituted an uni- 
versity, by the name and under the title of the University of 
Maryland." The Faculty of Divinity was never organized, 
though within the recollection of the writer a representative of 
this department was a member of the Board of Regents. The 
School of Law began its lectures in 1823, which were continued 
until 1836, when they were discontinued until 1869. In the 
latter year the school was re-organized and has continued in 
active operation to the present day. The School of the Arts 
and Sciences was not opened until 1831, when the Baltimore 
College, an academic institution was merged with the University 
and continued as the School of Letters of the University until 
1878, when it was permanently closed. The School of Medicine 
is the only one of the four original facuUties which has had a 
continuous existence since it was chartered in 1807. During 
th^ one hundred and fourteen years its doors have never 
been closed, and, though it has passed through many 
vicissitudes, it is still functioning as an useful and important 
center of medical teaching. In 1882 the dental school was founded 
and in 1903 the Maryland College of Pharmacy was merged as 
the Department of Pharmacy. In 1913 the Baltimore Medical 
College was merged, as was the College of Physicians and Sur- 
geons in 1915. About this time, also, the Baltimore Law School 
was taken over and the dental school of the Baltimore Medical 
College. The estabhshment of an undergraduate school was, how- 
ever, urgently needed in order to complete an university organi- 
zation. In 1906 overtures were made to St. John's College to 
become the Department of Arts and Sciences of the University. 
This effort met with a favorable response and a contract of 
affihation between the two schools was signed in 1907; and as 



\ 



6 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

the School of Liberal Arts, St. John's participated in the cen- 
tennial celebration of the University in 1907. For thirteen years 
this afShation continued, to the mutual advantage of both insti- 
tutions; but an affiliation did not meet the requirements of the 
times and in June 1920, the agreement was terminated. 

The Maryland College of Agriculture was taken over by the 
state in 1914 and formed a nucleus of a state university, but 
lacked the necessary departments. Just at this juncture the 
affiliation with St. John's was brought to an end and the Uni- 
versity offered to cede its property to the state and to join with 
the State College as a state university. The legislature of 1920 
passed the necessary legislation and on June 30, 1920, the old 
Board of Regents of the University of Maryland adjourned 
sine die, and the combined institution, bearing the same name 
and inheriting the traditions of the old school, came under the 
management of a new Board of Regents, appointed by the state. 
The University of Maryland is now absolutely owned by the 
State of Maryland, is under a governing board consisting of the 
following gentlemen — Samuel M. Shoemaker, Chairman; Robert 
Crain, John M. Dennis, Treasurer; Dr. Frank J. Goodnow, John 
E. Raine, Charles C. Gelder, Dr. W. W. Skinner, Secretary; 
R. John Black and Henry Holzappel. 

Dr. Albert F. Woods is President of the University, and has 
assumed his duties with enthusiasm and firmness. Another 
important department of the University work is the Training 
School for Nurses which was founded in 1889 under the direction 
of Miss Louisa Parsons, R.N. of St. Thomas' Hospital, London. 
The first class was graduated in 1892 and classes have been grad- 
uated each year since. In the near future a handsome and com- 
modious Home for Nurses will be erected, which will fill a need 
that has long been felt. The School is now under the efficient 
management of Miss Lucy A. Marshall, R.N., Superintendent of 
Nurses of the University Hospital. 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 7 

THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES' CLUB 
By Bessie A. Read, R.N., 1894 

The Maryland University Nurses' Club was founded Sep- 
tember 1, 1894, at 21 North Carey Street, by fifteen graduates 
of the University Hospital. It was organized by Mrs. Van 
Sanford, and Miss Ravenel, assisted by Miss Sarah S. Martin, 
a graduate of the Massachusetts General Hospital. 

The faculty of the University Hospital kindly gave us one 
hundred dollars toward the furnishing, the nurses making up the 
deficiency. Dr. McLane Tiffany gave the telephone for a year. 
Dr. Tiffany took great interest in the club and was ever a kind 
friend. 

The first years of the Club were not without their hardships. 
We did our own cooking, and the first nurse on the list attended 
to the telephone. For the last twenty-four years Mrs. Ruth 
Aiken has been Registrar of the Directory, as well as a kind 
mother to us. 

In December, 1920, sixty-three nurses registered with us. The 
demand for nurses was far greater than we could supply. 

Miss Louise Parsons, a graduate of St. Thomas' Hospital of 
London, England, and the founder of the Training School of 
the University Hospital in 1889, left, at her death in 1917 $10,000 
to the University Nurses' Club. Owing to the depreciation of 
her securities, the Club only received S6500, to be used as a Sick 
Benefit Fund. The Baltimore Trust Company now has this in 
charge. 

Miss Bradbury, one of her pupils, receives five dollars a week, 
the same eventually reverting to the Club. 



O THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

. THE WOMAN'S AUXILIARY BOARD 
By Florence McIntyre Tyson 

The chief aims of the Woman's AuxiHary Board of the Uni- 
versity Hospital has ever been to aid the physicians in their 
good work, to increase the comfort and efficiency of the buildings, 
and of the corps of nurses, who form so valuable and necessary 
part of the whole. 

Since I have been asked to tell of some of the work that has 
been done by the Board in the last two years, I would speak of 
the installation and furnishing of the cafeteria at a cost of $875. 
Surgical Ughts have been placed in all the wards save one, at a 
cost of $175. There has been given $240 to supply linen; surgical 
night shirts and pajamas for the men, night dresses and wrappers 
for the women have been given in great quantities. 

The children's ward furnished with table and chairs, and easy 
chairs for the sick, and large amounts of clothing have been sent 
for the httle ones. A large refrigerator placed there at a cost 
of $150, as well as sterihzer, costing $75. A stated sum is given 
each month to the children's cHnic, and to the general cUnic, and 
members of the Board give their services in both every day. 

Two rummage sales were held at which $550 was reahzed. 
A member of the Board, Mrs. Wilkens, whose health prevents an 
active participation in the work, has given $10,000 the interest 
from which, $500, is used in hospital work. 

Every Christmas the hospital is decorated, trees provided, 
an entertainment and banquet given the free patients, costing 
much over $100. During the hot months ice cream is frequently 
given the patients, and all during the year dehcacies such as 
jellies, cakes, and fruit are brought to tempt the appetite of the 
sick. Practically all of the invahd chairs used in the ward have 
been given by the Board. To provide the Rockefeller serum 
used for those desperately ill with pneumonia, $100 has been given, 
a portion of which is still held in reserve. 

Several card parties and dances have been given at which 
goodly sums were realized, all of which were used in the hospital. 

A member, who is herself a Daughter of the American Revolu- 
tion has interested that body, who are giving a bed in the Mater- 
nity Ward costing $1000. 

Such are some of the activities of the Board although much 
still remains untold. 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 9 

THE RED CROSS VOLUNTEER AIDES 
By Millicent Geare Edmunds, R.N., 1905 

A year ago, the Red Cross Volunteer Aides started their Wel- 
fare Service in the University Hospital. As this was an entirely 
new work in Baltimore, indeed for that matter, the only work of 
its exact nature in the country, I wish to tell you in as few words 
as possible the story of our struggle and marvelous success. 

In the winter of 1919, Dr. Charles Summers, our Chief of the 
Pediatric Department, wished to reorganize, enlarge and equip 
a modern up-to-date Babies and Children's CHnic. After much 
hard work upon Dr. Summers' part, the whole floor under Davidge 
Hall (the library) was given over for this purpose. Improve- 
ments were made accordingly. Due to various reasons, the 
question arose as to the nursing part of the Clinic. Because of 
the great scarcity of registered nurses, lack of funds, shortage of 
pupil nurses, etc., it seemed for a time almost as if the well 
equipped cUnic could not be put in complete operation. It was 
then that Dr. Summers learned of the Red Cross Volunteer 
Aides and appealed to the Baltimore Chapter for help. 

On December 18, 1919, the Aides started to work under a most 
capable Chairman, Mrs. William Merz. Words fail me when 
trying to describe the splendid service day in and day out all 
through the hottest summer days that these volunteer Aides 
have rendered to both white and colored children ahke. Not 
only do they strip, weigh, measure and take the temperature, 
(rectal), wrap the babies in blankets (pink for white and blue for 
the colored) ready for the busy physician to make his examina- 
tion, but they also are ever ready with sympathy, advice and help 
for the mother, making her feel she has in them a real true friend, 
who deems it a privilege to help straighten out her problem. 
Hot coffee and buns are served daily in the winter, ice tea and 
cakes in summer, and this is often found to be the only food the 
mother gets. Frequently the little ones come in half clad or 
their dirty filthy clothes sewed on for the winter. One sees the 
joy radiating from the face of the chairman when she togs them 
out in clean whole clothing. 

This work is going on most efficiently from the Red Cross 
standpoint and I believe they are giving satisfaction to the phy- 
sicians. So far as the building up of the clinic is concerned, fig- 



10 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

ures speak for themselves. In December 1919, the attendance 
was from three to five children daily and today is it from forty 
to fifty. 

When the General Dispensary of the University Hospital saw- 
how smoothly the Pediatric Department was running, they also 
asked for assistance. So in March 1920 under the very able 
leadership of Mrs. Robert Noble, the Red Cross Volunteer Serv- 
ice was instituted. I am forced to admit that the feeling upon 
the part of the physicians was that "these good ladies will never 
stick" but their prophesy was wrong, for never has there been a 
day no matter what the weather, that the Aides have not reported 
for duty. 

During the last two years, the Aides have also been assisting 
on the wards in the hospital, many times giving most valuable 
service to the overworked nurses, as well as making quantities of 
surgical dressings. In fact I quote the different superintendents 
of nurses in saying that the Aides have been the "saving grace" 
of this very acute situation. 

These Aides in order to be allowed to do this kind of work 
must have had a course in Home Hygiene and Care of the Sick — 
a splendid course, one that every woman should take. After 
having this instruction which embraces Hygiene, Sanitation, 
Prevention of Diseases, Care of Infants and Children, as well as 
the practical simple procedures of Home Nursing, the pupil is 
equipped to be of great assistance to the physician, nurse and 
patient. 

From a standpoint of a private duty nurse, who of us has not 
felt a sense of relief to find in a home a member of the family 
who can intelhgently carry out orders when she is off duty? 
Then too, from the viewpoint of the Public Health Nurse, is it 
not a help to find in the community women who are imbued 
with the proper idea and spirit to further Hygiene, Sanitation 
and Prevention of Disease? It is far easier for the nurse to bring 
about desired conditions with the support and interest of the 
pupils who are taught the importance of these various subjects. 

In summing up the course, I feel that these classes are really 
both an opportunity and privilege offered to all women by the 
American Red Cross, and an appeal to every woman should be 
made to consider it carefully, seriously and reverently because 
after all the responsibihty of promoting good health and service 
to humanity lies directly in her hands. 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 11 

Therefore, I think you will agree with me that in every phase, 
this welfare service at the University Hospital is a wonderful 
work, especially so when we realize that these volunteers are doing 
it only for the love of humanity, and also that they are busy 
women with houshold cares and responsibihties. Verily they 
have shown that they feel that none of us have the right to live 
and only enjoy this world's goods, for "inasmuch as ye have 
done it unto the least of these my brethren, ye have done it 
unto me." 

TEAM NO. 5 

By Elizabeth Getzendanner R.N., 1909, Captain 

The campaign to raise funds to build a Maternity Ward and 
new Nurses' Home opened with an informal dinner at the City 
Club, Friday, October 1, 1920. Everyone, who was a part of 
the organization was cordially invited to be present. Commit- 
tees were formed, and instructions concerning the workings of 
the campaign discussed. 

There were forty teams, with a captain and from eight to 
twelve members to a team. Team No. 5 was known as the 
Nurses' Team. 

During the week of the intensive drive (October 4-9), all the 
team members met each day at 12.30 for luncheon at the Elks 
Club. Pledges were turned in, questions asked, and further 
instructions given. The team, from the Women's Division that 
turned in the highest amount sat at the Banner Table the follow- 
ing day. It is gratifying to add, we occupied the seat of honor for 
one luncheon. To the Nurses' Team also fell the distinction of 
turning in during the week pledges for more money than any 
other women's team, $12,000. In fact there was only one of the 
men's team that turned in more. 

Since the campaign the Alumnae held an oyster supper at the 
hospital, clearing $254.50. This with other money that has been 
collected since the drive makes us now have pledged $14,254. 

We have every reason to think that the Nurses' Home will be 
started in the spring. Plans have been presented for an ideal 
up-to-date building; two rooms to a bath. It is to stand on the 
land owned by and opposite to the hospital. 



12 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

The hospital authorities are fully awakened to the fact that 
the demand for nurses is far above the supply, and that to increase 
this supply they must have the right sort of training school, and 
the right training. That is exactly what the University Hospital 
is now striving for: good food, shortened hours, comfortable 
quarters, and an adequate training. 

EXPERIENCES OF A COMMUNITY NURSE 
By Bernice Conner, R.N., 1912 

The Red Cross Public Health Nursing Service of Baltimore 
County, Maryland was started March 15, 1920. That long, 
stately title might convey to ones mind a score of nurses, well 
equipped offices, and the click from busy typist, when in fact it 
meant one, somewhat bewildered lone nurse, myself. But if 
frantically endeavoring to be in a dozen places at once, while 
attending to numerous duties on the way, constitutes a score, 
that impression is justified. 

To return to the subject, arrangements for cooperation had 
been made with the Children's Aid Society: I was to take care of 
the nursing, while they were to do the relief and social end of the 
work. The officers of both to be in the Piper Building at Towson. 

It took me some time to learn to drive the ambulance, which 
was my first mode of conveyance. Since then, however, I have 
acquired a Ford touring car. As soon as I had reached that 
stage where it is safe to think of something else besides shifting 
gears, and breaks, I turned my thoughts toward organizing. 

I soon had classes in Home Nursing started at Overlea, 
Warren, and Sparrows Point. It is gratifying to be able to add 
that at all of these places, a second class has been completed, or is 
being held at the present time — nine classes in all. 

A rather interesting outgrowth of this work occurred at Spar- 
rows Point, where one of my most efficient classes formed them- 
selves into a Health Club, making child welfare their main object. 
They are using the Child Health Program gotten out by the 
Federal Children's Bureau. Last Christmas they took especial 
interest in the children whose mothers were sick. There were a 
number of little ones, who had it not have been for these good 
women would have missed the joy that Christmas brings. 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 13 

The Health Center at Warren although in its infancy is very- 
encouraging. It is being worked in cooperation with the "Mercy 
and Help Department" of the Epworth League of the M. E. 
Church of the village. All health activities are held at this 
center. A certificate is given after a year's faithful attendance, 
and strict observance of the seven rules of health laid down by 
the National Child's Health Organization. There is also a 
social service being worked out. The village is districted, and 
every person, who is sick is visited. When the center is older it 
is our idea to present them with a flower, fruit, or a dainty dish 
that any sick person can eat. 

At Timonium Fair an ideal contagion room was shown, and 
a nurse was present to explain the means of isolating, and destroy- 
ing germs. In our visitors' register, which contains 346 names, 
can be found Governor Albert C. Ritchie. 

At White Hall Fair the Red Cross Aides (those women who had 
taken the course in Home Nursing) gave the demonstration. 
They explained the use and care of bed-side appUances, the cor- 
rect way to make a bed, and how to make a bed with the patient 
in it. The ofl&cials of the Fair said that they hoped that they 
had treated us so well we would return next year. 

Classes in First Aid have been given at Essex and Colgate 
schools. These classes were held in the principal's room. It is 
surprising the amount of intelhgent interest children show. 
One httle boy asked if I was going to teach at his school again 
nexi: year. When I asked in return what good the First Aid 
course had been to him, he said that he had bandaged up every 
sore finger at his home during the summer, and that they all 
"soon got well." However, the county school teachers have 
been given the opportunity to take this course, and in the future 
they will instruct the pupils in First Aid so that the nurse's efforts 
may be directed toward other Unes. 

Bedside nursing has been done of course. The work was so 
heavy in the fall that we were compelled to employ an extra 
nurse, Mrs. Wells, for three months. We have lately contracted 
to do the visiting nursing for the Industrial Policy Holders of 
the Metropohtan Life Insurance Company. 

In November our office was moved to the Masonic Temple, 
and in January the State Board of Health made our headquarters 
a station for giving out T. B. supplies. 



14 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

To date 277 patients have been treated in the service, and 
1308 visits made. 

The work is very interesting, and at times more far reaching 
than one knows. For instance, one day one of my pupils asked 
a leading question in class. Later I learned that this woman 
had had an operation performed that needed to be done imme- 
diately. Her husband when speaking of her operation said, 
"of course she wouldn't wait when Miss Conner advised her to 
have it done right away." In fact, I did not know until after 
the operation that the woman was not perfectly well. 

IN FOREIGN SERVICE 

Miss Charlotte Cox (died in service) 

Miss Gertrude Brady Miss Josephine Klase 

Miss Bernice Conner Miss Margaret Laws 

Miss Virginia Clendenin Miss Elizabeth Lee 

Miss Margaret Cowling Miss Ethel Monroe 

Mrs. William Deppers Miss Elizabeth Marsh 

(Elizabeth Robinson) Miss Helen McSherry 

Miss Julia C. Foley Miss Goldie Price 

Miss Mary Gavin Miss Harriet Parsons 

Miss Margaret Ervin Miss Margaret Risley 

Mrs. Judson Hair Miss A. C. Robinson 

Miss Blanche Hoffmaster Miss Lula Stepp 

Miss Anna Hurst Miss Barbara Stouffer 

Mrs. Carrie Hudnall Miss Lucy Squires 

Miss Ellen Israel Miss Pearl Weaver 

Miss Irene Kauffman Miss Alva Williams 

HOME SERVICE 

Miss Judith Viberg (died in service) 

Miss Sidney Chapline Miss Marie Langenfeldt 

Miss Naomi Helland Miss Maude Miller 

Miss Lucy Harvey Miss Lena Stouffer 

Miss Emily Kenney Miss May Steiner 

Miss Maude Kinney Mrs. Bertie Sigmon 

Miss Martha Keating Miss Jessie Singleton 

Miss Margaret Lauper Miss Elsie Simpson 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 15 

"CARRY ON" 
By C. Ethel Monroe, R.N., 1917 

While on duty in the Operating Room of Base Hospital No. 
42, the University of Maryland Base Hospital, I on one occasion 
was much impressed when a stalwart American soldier, wounded 
in the thigh, made this reply to the Colonel who had suggested 
the possibility of the necessity of an amputation, "Doctor, can 
I make a hving if I lose it?" Picture, if you can the thousands 
of our men who had that question constantly before them, and 
present to your own satisfaction the remedy for the inevitable 
problem our country had to face. 

I, who had been interested from the first, had been discharged 
from the service eleven months before I definitely learned that 
the government was accomphshing a stupendous task regarding 
the ex-service men. How little, then must others perhaps less 
interested know about it. 

Aid to ex-service men is carried on by three branches of the 
government. The United States Public Health Service gives 
treatment for disabiUties incurred in the Service. The War Risk 
Insurance Bureau awards compensation to any man who suf- 
fered disease or injury during service, regardless of appHcation for 
insurance. The Federal Board for Vocational Education trains 
men who are unable to carry on in their former civil occupations, 
and gives them opportunities to become proficient in new trades 
or professions and thus overcome their vocational handicaps 
resulting from physical disabiUties incurred in the Service. 

After a man has been declared ehgible for training and has been 
placed in training, he is given close supervision from two sections 
of the Board. His progress in training is followed by a training 
officer to ascertain what instruction is being furnished, what 
interest the trainee is taking in his course, his attendance record, 
and his degree of advance. 

Since these men are trainees under the Board because of phys- 
ical disabiUties they are potentially patients at all times, and it 
is essential to keep a watchful eye on each man to forestall, when- 
ever possible, a reactivation of his disabiUty and to keep him in 
the best physical condition possible for him. To that end a 
medical section has been estabUshed with its corps of doctors 
and nurses. In this work, as on a ward in a hospital, the nurse 



16 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

acts as an assistant to the physician. She sees the man, either 
at work, or at home, reports his working and hving conditions, 
his general physical condition, and the characteristic and vital 
symptoms of his case, and submits her report to the doctor, who 
takes action thereupon, when necessary. As the training officer 
is endeavoring to rehabilitate each man industrially and make 
him able to demand "equal pay for equal work" so the Medical 
Section is putting forth efforts to keep the normal healthy indi- 
vidual before each man and rehabihtate him physically as far as 
possible. 

In District No. 3, Division of Rehabilitation, Federal Board for 
Vocational Education comprising Pennsylvania and Delaware, 
twenty-four nurses have been assigned under the United States 
Civil Service Commission. We have now ten nurses in the 
Philadelphia District (including Delaware), four in Pittsburgh, 
two in Harrisburg and in Scranton, one in WilHamsport, in 
Allentown, in Johnstown, and in Erie, and one in State College, 
which is a branch of the Williamsport Office. There is also a 
chief nurse in the District Office in Philadelphia. 

The work of the nurses varies according to the territory to 
which each is assigned. The Philadelphia nurses work in dis- 
tricts much as the city nurses do. At Temple University, with 
600 trainees, one nurse is appointed to supervise the trainees 
there, and finds her day a busy one. In Johnstown the nurse 
sometimes spends three or four days traveling through the coal 
mine region to follow-up her men. And so, it may readily be 
seen, there is great variety in the work. (Miss J. I. Kauffman, 
Class of 1916, U. H. is appointed to State College, Pennsjdvania, 
with 165 trainees to supervise.) 

The general plan is to submit a report on each man within 
thirty days after he begins training and subsequent reports as 
required by his physical condition. There is much required in 
the way of Public Health instruction and demonstration, as well 
of social service, and the "bolstering up of morale" among the 
men and their famifies, liaison with the Red Cross, Y. M. C. A. 
K. of C. and other ex-service men's organizations, which require 
the time and attention of the nurses, but all that can be done is 
gladly and cheerfully done in the one great effort to help "the 
disabled ex-service man to help himself." 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 17 

IMPORTANT CHANGES IN THE CONSTITUTION AND 

BY-LAWS 

Membership. — Section I. Graduates of the University Hos- 
pital Training School for Nurses in good standing are eligible for 
membership, which shall consist of three classes — active or resi- 
dent, non-resident members, and associate members. 

(a) Active members shall be those who are residing in the 
state of which this Alumnae is a part and who are registered 
nurses. This membership includes membership in the Maryland 
State Nurses' Association and in the American Nurses' Association. 

(b) Non-resident members are those whose residence is not in 
the state. 

(c) Associate members are those who desire Alumnae mem- 
bership only, who cannot qualify for active membership, but 
reside in the state. 

Officers. — Section III. All officers shall be elected by ballot 
at the annual meeting and shall continue in office one year or 
until their successors are elected. 

Dues. — Section I. The annual dues for active members shall 
be (S5.00), payable in advance, which shall include dues to Marj-- 
land State Nurses' Association and to the American Nurses' 
Association (one dollar), payment into the General Alumnae 
Fund of two dollars and fifty cents (S2.50), to the Alumnae ReUef 
Fund one dollar ($1.00) and to the National Relief Fund fifty 
cents (8.50). 

Section III. Members faihng to pay dues before September 1 
shall be notified by the Treasurer and those not paying before 
October 1 shall forfeit the right of membership and their names 
shall be taken from the roll of membership. 

Section IV. Members who have been dropped for non-pay- 
ment of dues may be re-instated by the pajinent of dues for the 
current year. 

Relief Fund — Section I. The sum payable to each sick 
member shall be one dollar and fifty cents (SI. 50) per day for a 
period not longer than four weeks in a year. In case of great 
need the period of four weeks may be extended at the discretion 
of the Board of Directors. 

Section II. Members are not eligible for sick benefit unless all 
dues are paid. 



18 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

Section III. All applications for benefit must be made to the 
Treasurer not later than sixty days from beginning of illness, and 
by her submitted to the Board of Directors. 

Section IV. No member shall be entitled to receive sick 
benefit except upon production of her doctor's certificate showing 
that she was confined to bed at least one week. 

THE STATE ASSOCIATION 

Below are some of the activities of especial interest that were 
discussed at the annual meeting of the Maryland State Nurses' 
Association. 

We are now known as the Maryland State Nurses' Association. 
Miss Sarah Martin, 1211 Cathedral Street, is executive secretary. 

Alumnae Members. — There are 18 alumnae in the State Asso- 
ciation; 1139 members. The University has 151 members. 

The Maryland Club House. — Name suggested "Nightingale 
Hall." 

Of the 1500 questionnaires sent out only 173 were returned, 
pledging between $8000 and $9000 in stock. (You are still 
urged to assist in this undertaking.) It was voted that the 
Executive Board appoint a committee of three from the stock- 
holders with power to enlarge if they see fit, to take charge of 
material and information gathered to date; and to go on with the 
work. 

For the benefit of those who are interested, or those who may 
question the advisabihty of a central club house, I will enumerate 
its possibihties : (1) Housing all the activities of the State Asso- 
ciation; (2) housing all the activities of the Alumnae Associa- 
tions, if they choose to avail themselves of the opportunity; (3) 
cafeteria; (4) rooms for nurses, single or en suite; (5) rooms for 
transient nurses; (6) Hbrary; (7) courses of lectures; (8) demon- 
strations especially planned to interest nurses who have been out 
of the hospital for some time; (9) rooms where nurses from con- 
tagious cases could properly disinfect and sterilize their belong- 
ings; (10) purchasing department — nurses' suppHes, uniforms, and 
caps; (11) facilities for caring for minor cases of illness. 

Relief Fund of the American Nurses' Association. — This is a 
special fund estabUshed in June, 1911, for the benefit of members 
in need of financial aid. "The object of the fund is to provide 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 19 

financial aid in time of emergency, to give relief to disabled mem- 
bers not otherwise provided for, and to establish a loan fund." 
Any nurse is eligible for this Fund who is a member of the Amer- 
ican Nurses' Association, or of any other nursing association 
affiliated with it. This Fund at the present time amounts to 
S26,000 and when it reaches $50,000 we will be able to add to its 
usefulness by advancing loans to members needing financial aid. 

At the request of the National Association it was decided to 
ask each nurse to give the equivalent of one days earnings annu- 
ally, or as much as she can spare, to help build up the Fund. 
Maryland has chosen September 15, our President Miss Lawler's 
birthday, as "Relief Fund Day." 

It might interest you to know that one of our graduates received 
$15 a month for nearly a year from this Benefit. How do you 
know that you or I might not be the next one to need this assist- 
ance? Anyhow, while your "ship is sailing in" cannot you spare 
from its cargo a small amount to help those "whose ships have 
ceased their sailings"? 

American Journal of Nursing. — At the present time a campaign 
is being conducted in memory of Miss Palmer, in an effort to 
fulfil her wish, that the Journal might be in the hands of every 
nurse. Only thirty-one per cent of the American Nurses' Asso- 
ciation are Journal subscribers. 

The Nightingale Memorial. — This is a fund contributed by the 
American nurses as a memorial to our nurses who served and 
died in the war. 

The Florence Nightingale School of Nursing is at Bordeaux, 
France. It was established seventeen years ago, under the direc- 
tions of Dr. Anna Hamilton. While established on the right 
bases it was in urgent need of funds for suitable buildings. In 
1920 Dr. Hamilton visited America, and brought her difficulties 
before the National Nurses' Association. The vote was unan- 
imous that we American nurses should be given the opportunity 
to come to the assistance of nurses in France. The plan was to 
concentrate our efforts in raising $50,000 to build an attractive 
home for the nurses which would include the necessary class 
rooms and laboratories for the teaching work. It speaks for the 
loyalty of the American nurses that this Fund was over-subscribed. 

National Headquarters. — 156 Fifth Avenue, New York, is 
national headquarters for the three national organizations : Amer- 



20 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

ican Nurses' Association; National League of Nursing Education; 
National Organization for Public Health Nursing. 

When the need for Red Cross Bureau for Nurses Returning 
from Service ceased it was found that the Bureau was too impor- 
tant to be dropped, and that it could take on other activities. 
As we had no National Headquarters we felt that this was a 
wonderful opportunity, especially as the Red Cross was willing 
to contribute toward the upkeep for the first year. Miss R. 
India Albaugh a Maryland nurse is director. 

The Central Directory of Registered Nurses. — January 1, 1911, 
there were 75 nurses in the Directory. Calls filled in 1911 — 387. 
January 1, 1920 there were 156 nurses in the Directory. Calls 
filled in 1920—1099. (Registrar, Mrs. G. H. Bode, R.N.) 

NEWS ITEMS 

Each year the Alumnae awards to the nurse graduating highest 
in her class a scholarship for a six week course to Columbia Uni- 
versity to stimulate interest in the "extras" which ambitious 
women should add to their three years training in order to be 
able to quahfy for the best positions. She has the choice of four 
courses: Administration, Teaching in Training School, Super- 
intendency, or Pubhc Health Nursing. Miss Ruth Clements 
won the scholarship last year, her general average being 93. 

Last year the Woman's AuxiHary Board awarded a membership 
to the Alumnae Association and an Alumnae pin, to the nurse 
graduating second in her class. Miss Ethelyn Bay was the lucky 
one, her general average being 90.4. The Woman's Auxiliary 
Board expects to continue this custom. 

The Annual Banquet given by the Alumnae to the graduating 
class was held Wednesday, May 19, 1920, at the Emerson Hotel, 
Baltimore, Md. The toastmistress was Mrs. H. K. Fleck. 
Mrs. Fleck in her charming manner presented the speakers in 
the following enjoyable program: 

Mrs. Page Edmunds: Address of Welcome. 

Presentation of Scholarship to Columbia University. 

Presentation of Alumnae Pin and Membership Awarded by 
the Woman's AuxiUary Board. 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 21 

Miss Harriett Leete: Fields of Activity Open to the Graduate 
Nurse. 

Dr. Hiram Woods: Coming Campaign for the University. 

There was every evidence of appreciation of the efforts of the 
Banquet Committee, of which Miss Barbara Stouffer was chair- 
man, assisted by Miss Ethel Dawson, and Mrs. H, K. Fleck. 
After the Banquet friends of the nurses were invited in for dancing. 

Miss Lucy Ann Marshall, we are fortunate in having as Super- 
intendent of the University Hospital Training School for Nurses. 
Miss Elizabeth Getzendanner, class 1909, is Assistant Superin- 
tendent. 

Miss Eulalia Cox, class 1912, has accepted the position as 
Superintendent of the Baltimore Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat 
Hospital. 

Miss Elizabeth Barwick, class 1918, has accepted the position 
as Superintendent of the Fayetteville Hospital, Fayetteville, N. C. 
Her mother, Mrs. C. M. Barwick, is acting as Assistant Super- 
intendent. 

Miss Bernice Conner, class 1912, will continue as Red Cross 
Public Health Nurse of Baltimore County until the fall, when 
she expects to return to Columbia University. Miss Conner is 
working for her B. S. 

Mrs. Page Edmunds, class 1905, is Supervisor of Nursing 
Department, Baltimore Chapter, A. R. C. 

Miss Nannie Lackland, class 1898, is Director of Bureau of 
Public Health Nursing in Mississippi. 

Mrs. Coale Alpha, class 1912, is Director of the Bureau of 
Public Health Nursing in Louisiana. Miss Steiner, class 1912, 
is doing rural nursing in the same state. 

Miss Margaret Laws is doing Red Cross Public Health Nursing 
in Wicomico County. 



22 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

Mrs. Wm. Bridges, class 1916, and Mrs. Fred Smith, class 
1917, are on the nursing staff at the City Health Department. 
Mrs. Bridges is in charge of the Nursing Department of Com- 
municable Diseases. 

Miss Ethel Monroe, class 1917, is chief nurse of District No. 3, 
Division of Rehabihtation, Federal Board for Vocational Educa- 
tion. Miss Lucy Lilly, Miss Irene Kauffman, class 1916, and 
Miss Virginia Clendenin, class 1914, are doing the same kind of 
work. Miss Lilly is at Atlanta, Georgia; Miss Kauffman at 
Penn. State College, and Miss Clendenin at St. Paul, Minn. 

Miss Lucy Harvey, class 1912, is industrial nurse at Sonne- 
born's Clothing Factory. 

Miss Harriet Parsons, class 1908, is in charge of the United 
Railway's Welfare Department. She has her office at the Con- 
tinental Trust Bldg. 

Miss Nettie Flanagan, class 1902, is engaged in landscape gar- 
dening in Groton, Mass. 

Miss Emma Murray, class 1919, has resigned from the I. V- 
N. A., and has returned to her home at Newport News, Va. 

Miss Blanche Prince, class 1912, is industrial nurse at Mt. 
Vernon Mills. Mrs. Cecil, class 1917, is industrial nurse at 
Woodberry Mills. 

Mrs. Page Edmunds gave a deHghtful tea to Miss Marshall, 
at her home at Roland Park. Various superintendents of hos- 
pitals, and nursing organizations were present. Mrs. Edmunds 
was assisted in receiving by the Executive Board of the Nurses' 
Alumnae Association. 

Mrs. Page Edmunds is president of the Woman's AuxiUary 
Board of the University Hospital. Mrs. Nathan Winslow is 
secretary. 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 23 

The first nurse known in Maryland was Miss Bowden, known 
as Sister Helen of the All Saints Sisterhood (Protestant), who 
later became the first superintendent of nurses at Bellevue 
Hospital. 

The first schools for nurses in Baltimore were estabUshed at 
the University Hospital and at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. 

IMPORTANT 

If this Bulletin proves of sufl&cient interest it is our intention 
to publish it annually. It is your privilege to decide this ques- 
tion by writing us whether this Uttle magazine comes to you as 
a dehghtful surprise or as simply more material to Utter up your 
room, apartment, or house, as it may be. (Keep in mind the fact 
that it means considerable work, and is not entirely self sup- 
porting.) 

If you are in favor of continuing this Bulletin, articles, news 
notes, criticism, and suggestions will be warmly welcomed by 
the PubUcation Committee. 

At the December Alumnae meeting it was decided that a 
nurse was entitled to a full day's pay, regardless of the time she 
is on duty. 

A day's duty in the Hospital now means twelve hours. 

The Executive Board will be glad to know the Alumnae's 
sentiment in regard to the Annual Banquet given to the graduat- 
ing class. It is not fair that the Banquet Committee should 
have the amount of work and financial responsibiUty entailed 
unless you are willing to show your appreciation by attending. 
Do you wish this custom to continue? We would appreciate 
your opinions on the subject. 

The Alumnae pin is now $5, and can not be purchased without 
an order signed by the President. 

At a meeting of the Executive Board, held January 1920, it 
was decided to loan any member wishing to take a Post-Gradu- 
ate Course, a sum of money up to $200.00, at 4 per cent interest. 
This money to be borrowed from the Sick Benefit Fund. 



24 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

The loan may be renewed or increased at the discretion of the 
Executive Board, and the number of persons borrowing from the 
fund at one time shall be decided by the Board, The money to 
be paid back as follows: For a six weeks course, refunded in one 
year; for a six months or one year course refunded in two years. 

BIRTHS 

On August 5, a boy, to Dr. and Mrs. WilUam Michel. JNIrs. 
Michel was Jane Garner, class 1911. 

MARRIAGES 

In August, Hildegarde Reamy, class 1916, to Jake Lynn. 
Mr. and Mrs. Lynn live at 3004 Grayson Street, Baltimore, Md. 

In September, Mercedes Brown, class 1919, to Elmer Duval. 
Mr. and Mrs. Duval live in New Windsor, Md. 

In November, Florence Ridgley, class 1918, to E. Killough. 

Recently Anna Hurst, class 1916, to H. A. Hickerson. Mr. 
and Mrs. Hickerson live at 3004 Grayson Street, Baltimore, Md. 

In January, Norma Thorn, class 1917, to Dr. Julian Woodruff. 
Dr. and Mrs. Woodruff live at 2121 Linden Avenue, Baltimore, 
Md. 

In January, Anna Lou Wham, class 1909, to C. M. Pitt, Mr. 
and Mrs. Pitt live at Melrose Avenue, Govans, Baltimore, Md. 

In November, Norma Frothingham, class 1915, to Raymond 
Chapman. Mr. and Mrs. Chapman Uve at 34 S. Fulton Avenue, 
Baltimore, Md. 

In October, Amy B. Tongue, class 1907, to Charles Wiley. 
Mr. and Mrs. Wiley will live in Redwood City, Cal. 

DEATHS 

On February 3, at her home, 1525 Park Avenue, following a 
lingering illness, Katharine Watkins, class 1896. 



OFFICERS OF THE ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 
1921-1922 

President Mrs. Wm. A. Bridges, R.N., Cathedral Apartments 

First Vice-President Mrs. Frank Lynn, R.N. 

Second Vice-President Miss Bernice Conner, R.N. 

Secretary Mrs. H. K. Fleck, R.N., 1606 Eutaw Place 

Treasurer Mrs. C. M. Pitt, R.N., Melrose Ave., Govans 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

The above named officers with 

Mrs. Page Edmunds, R.N. Miss Mary Rolph, R.N. 

Miss Ellen Israel, R.N. Mrs. Nathan Winslow, R.N. 

PROGRAM COMMITTEE 
Mrs. Frank Lynn, R.N., chairman 
Miss Bernice Conner, R.N. Miss Emily Ely, R.N. 

Miss Ethel Dawson, R.N. Mrs. C. M. Pitt, R.N. 

MEMBERSHIP COMMITTEE 
Miss Martha Misikofski, R.N., chairman 

NOMINATING COMMITTEE 
Mrs. Gertrude T. Cole, R.N., chairman 
Miss Frances Meredith, R.N. Miss Margaret Ervin, R.N. 

PUBLICATION COMMITTEE 

Mrs. H. K. Fleck, R.N., editor 
Miss Bernice Conner, R.N. Mrs. C. M. Pitt, R.N. 

Mrs. Gertrude T. Cole, R.N. Miss Elizabeth Patterson, R.N. 
Mrs. Page Edmunds, R.N. Mrs. J. B. Piggott, R.N. 

Mrs. Frank Lynn, R.N. Mrs. Nathan Winslow, R.N. 



25 



ROLL OF MEMBERSHIP 

(Please notify Secretary of change of address) 

HONORARY MEMBER 
Marshall, Lucy Ann Superintendent of Nurses, University Hospital 

ACTIVE MEMBERS 

1892 
Lucas, Kate C. (Mrs.) 1404 W. Lexington Street, Baltimore, Md. 

1893 

Bradbury, M. E 2 Church Street, Cambridge, Md. 

Daly, Emma 21 N. Carey Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Michael, Martha B 528 Church Street, S.W., Roanoke, Va. 

Mayes, Eleanor Petersburg, Va. 

1894 

Barwick, Carrie M. (Mrs.) 21 N. Carey Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Read, Elizabeth 21 N. Carey Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Mergardt, Clara (Mrs. J. Reifsneider) . . .836 N. Strieker St., Baltimore, Md, 

Ravenel, Susan S Aiken, S. C. 

Thackston, E. Grace 138 W. 82d Street, New York City 

Weitzel, Venie C. (Mrs. Charles McNabb) Cardiff, Md. 

1895 

Harry, Addie M 21 N. Carey Street, Baltimore, Md* 

Rolph, Mary E University Hospital, Baltimore, Md* 

1896 

Lee, Elizabeth 1535 Park Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Robey, Frances 1535 Park Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Shipley, Wilhelmina Granada, Col. 

Wilson, Cora M 864 Park Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

1897 

Baldwin, Mary E. E Alleghany and Woodbine Avenues, Towson, Md. 

Jones, Susan M 1412 Park Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Keating, Mattie Centerville, Md. 

Lord, Athalia 63 Clayton Street, Charlotte, N. C. 

Russell, Mary A 1431 Madison Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Slicer, Annette 2127 Callow Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

26 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 27 

1898 

Lackland, Nannie J 216 A Street S.E., Washington, D. C. 

Rossell, Blanche 21 N. Carey Street, Baltimore, Md. 

1899 
Brown, Margaret S 1401 Columbia Road, Washingtln, D. C. 

1900 
Blight, Margarita (Mrs. M. B. LeSeur). .149W. Lanvale St., Baltimore, Md. 

Featherstone, E. Sophie 58 N. Arlington Avenue, East Orange, N. J. 

Gray, Eliza B 1827 Appleton Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Jones, Nannie H 1012 Floyd Avenue, Richmond, Va. 

1901 

Anderson, Grace 1112 Chestnut Street, St. Louis, Mo. 

Blight, E. (Mrs. F. E. Chambers) 771 Orange Street, Macon, Ga. 

Cook, Mamie 1117 St. Paul Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Furbee, Katherine 1106 Julianna Street, Parkersburg, W. Va. 

Henderson, L. Eugenia Presbyterian Hospital, Charlotte, N. C. 

1902 

Burch, Emma C 831 Park Avenue, Baltimore, Md, 

Flannagan, Nettie L 128 Main Street, Waynesboro, Pa. 

Wise, Helen V Peninsula General Hospital, Salisbury, Md. 

1903 

Craft, Elizabeth W 223 S. Cherry Street, Richmond, Va. 

Elgin, M. Elizabeth (Mrs. A. H. Mann) Poolesville, Md. 

Fulton, Isabel 21 N. Carey Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Gallagher, Ella T 21 N. Carey Street, Baltimore, Md. 

King, Anne (Mrs. F. W. Selling) Elkridge, Md. 

Massey, Margaret K. (Mrs. Nathan Winslow) 

1900 Mt. Royal Terrace, Baltimore, Md. 
Miller, Mary C Presbyterian Eye and Ear Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

1904 

Gaskill, Laura M 21 N. Carey Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Guerrant, E. J care Mr. Thomas, Westminster, Md. 

Ladd, Lucy W 211 E. Franklin Street, Richmond, Va. 

1905 

Cowling, Margaret University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va. 

Bailey, Elizabeth R 1922 F Street, N.W., Washington, D. C. 

Geare, Millicent (Mrs. Page Edmunds) . .12 Elmwood Rd., Roland Pk., Md. 
Kuhn, Ruth R A. C. L. Hospital, Waycross, Ga. 

1906 

Clark, Ethel P. (Mrs.) Robert Long Hospital, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Lawrence, Margaret (Mrs. Samuel Moore) 

2106 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, Md. 



28 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

1907 

Bay, Grace I White Hall, Md. 

Brian, Nannie L Clarksville Road, Ellicott City, Md. 

Bell, Alice F. (Mrs. J. B. Piggott) 

Northumberland Apartments, Washington, D. C. 
Griffith, Isabella (Mrs. H. K. Fleck). .1606 Eutaw Place, Baltimore, Md. 

Hissey, Naomi 21 N. Carey Street, Baltimore, Md. 

McNabb, Nancy M. (Mrs. R. P. Bay). .Walbert Apts., Baltimore, Md. 

Minor, Evelyn 1500 John Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Roberson, Clara (Mrs. R. P. Lattimer) Hyattsville, Md. 

1908 
Dawson, Clyde (Mrs. Frank Lynn). .41 W. Preston Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Gavin, Mary The Kenesaw, Washington, D. C. 

Gourley, Henrietta 2128 St. Paul Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Parsons, Harriet The Walbert Apartments, Baltimore, Md. 

Russell, Augusta care Mrs. J. Bowen, Mt. Washington, Md. 

Smith, Maude (Mrs. T. R. Cornelius) . . . .Gittings Avenue, Govans, Md. 

1909 
Ghapline, Laura (Mrs. W. J. Coleman) 

The Walbert Apartments, Baltimore, Md. 

Chapline, Eva The Walbert Apartments, Baltimore, Md. 

Dukes, Catherine (Mrs. J. B. Magruder) 

2821 N. Calvert Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Ely, Emily The Walbert Apartments, Baltimore, Md. 

Getzendanner, Elizabeth University Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

Pue, Louise 1518 Park Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Squires, Lucy B 56 W. 75th Street, New York City 

Saulsbury, Mary The Walbert Apartments, Baltimore, Md. 

TuU, Grace The Walbert Apartments, Baltimore, Md. 

Tews, Gertrude (Mrs. G. T. Cole).. The Walbert Apts., Baltimore, Md. 

Wham, Anna L. (Mrs. C. M. Pitt) Melrose Avenue, Govans, Md. 

Wright, Vera (Mrs. W. W. Scott) Devereux, Ga. 

1910 

Dry, Anne M 20 E. 21st Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Gephart, Louise (Mrs. E. Kloman). .44 W. Biddle Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Israel, Ellen 1803 Bolton Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Kimmel, Mary M 206 E. Preston Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Long, Sarah L. (Mrs. C. E. Smink) 4706 Harford Road, Baltimore, Md. 

McKay, Virginia O. .James Walker Memorial Hospital, Wilmington, N. C. 

Garrison, Gertrude (Mrs. R. D. McMilliam) Red Springs, N. C. 

Murchison, Belle (Mrs. F. H. Vinup) . .1302 W. Lombard St., Baltimore, Md. 

Meredith, Frances 605 Park Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Wiggen, Mae C. (Mrs. H. W. Cole) 829 Beacon Street, Boston, Mass. 

Pleasants, Pauline (Mrs. J. M. Sparks) Monkton, Md. 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 29 

1911 

Brady, Mary U. S. P. H. Hospital, Greenville, S. C. 

Garner, Jane (Mrs. W. Michel). . .2901 Edmondson Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 
Helland, Naomi (Mrs. H. N. Strong). .115 N. Payson St., Baltimore, Md. 

Kinney, Iva (Mrs. E. C. Hagood) Birmingham, Ala. 

Patterson, Elizabeth Glyn Taff, Catonsville, Md. 

Ricketts, Stella 1035 N. Calvert Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Stouffer, Barbara 21 N. Carey Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Sullivan, Mary Havre de Grace, Md. 

Scarf, Marvel (Mrs. J. H. Von Dreele). .846 W. 36th St., Baltimore, Md. 
Robinson, E. E. (Mrs. W. Deppers) 

3223 New Jersey Avenue, Indianapolis, Ind. 
Williams, Alva Panther, W. Va. 

1912 

Blake, Lillian G 23 E. 2l8t Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Conner, Bernice 1622 Bolton Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Cox, Eulalia. . .Baltimore Eye, Ear and Throat Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 
Coale, Mattie (Mrs. C. Alpha) 

Director of Bureau P. H. N., New Orleans, La. 

Dawson, Ethel 1316 Linden Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Harvey, Lucy 1213 Weldon Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Prince, Blanche 3703 Forest Park Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Miles, Juliette (Mrs. R. Perkins). . . .1096 W. 4th St., Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Stouffer, Lena Rockefeller Institute, New York City 

Steiner, Mary 107 Chase Street, Cumberland, Md. 

1913 

Brownell, Edith 21 N. Carey Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Butts, Ann E 21 N. Carey Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Coward, Addie Grifton, N. C. 

Dent, Edith 2424 Broadway, New Orleans, La. 

Hull, Willie 2213 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Hessler, Sophia (Mrs. Roger Parlett) White River, Ariz. 

Laws, Margaret Pittsville, Ind. 

Misikofski, Martha Kenwood Avenue, Raspeburg, Md. 

Price, Goldie G 1605 St. Paul Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Rutherford, Volina 1626 St. Paul Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Shea, Katherine Robert Long Hospital, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Selby, Mary M 328 E. 20th Street, Baltimore, Md. 

1914 

Clendenin, Virginia Federal Board of 

Vocational Education of Disabled Soldiers, St. Paul, Minn. 

Dukes, Ann (Mrs. J. E. Foravielle) Rocky Mount, N. C. 

Davis, Sadie (Mrs. A. W. Rier) Dundalk, Md. 

Foley, Julia The Walbert Apartments, Baltimore, Md. 

Funk, Jessie (Mrs. Walter Cutsell) Adamstown, Md. 



30 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

Hudnall, Carrie (Mrs.) Raleigh Court, Roanoke, Va. 

Miller, Maude Robert Long Hospital, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Ryan, Abigail 9 Randall Street, Annapolis, Md. 

Rush, Pearl 1806 N. Bentalou Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Sigmon, Bertie (Mrs.) Chester Hospital, Chester, S. C, 

Weber, Dorothy (Mrs. A. S. Coleman) Douglass, Ga. 

Murray, Carrie (Mrs. J. R. Smith) Douglass, Ga. 

Sanders, Marie 2905 Garrison Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Stepp, Lula R 21 N. Carey Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Sprecker, Marjorie (Mrs. John Woodcock) HoUidaysburg, Pa. 

Weaver, Pearl 160 Biltmore Avenue, Asheville, N. C. 

Zepp, Katherine 21 N. Carey Street, Baltimore, Md. 

1915 

Bay, Nettie 2223 Callow Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Bogart, Corinne (Mrs. W. E. Starford) Wendel, W. Va. 

Conner, Ruth (Mrs. C. R. Edwards). .33 W. Preston St., Baltimore, Md. 

Coppersmith, Martha (Mrs. Leon Kays) Stanhope, N. J. 

Dix, Nellie 1605 St. Paul Street, Baltunore, Md. 

Dunn, Margaret 1318 Linden Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Dilly, Gertrude (Mrs. D. P. Etzler) Woodsboro, Md. 

Frothingham, Norma (Mrs. R. Chapman). .234 Collens St., Irvington, Md. 

Ervin, Margaret 2808 Guilford Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

McDaniel, Lillian Franklin Square Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

Pinckard, Bertie 1712 N. Calvert Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Simmonds, Maude 6 Lucas Street, Charleston, S. C. 

White, Betty James Walker Memorial Hsopital, Wilmington, N. C. 

Wells, Alice (Mrs. A. C. Galloway) 1600 Eutaw Place, Baltimore, Md. 

1916 

Blake, Helen 23 E. 21st Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Eichner, Lula (Mrs.) 5104 Wilson Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Forney, Marion 1204 Springrose Avenue, Greensboro, N. C. 

Hoffmaster, Blanche Robert Long Hospital, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Hurst, Anna (Mrs. Hickerson) 3004 Grayson Street, Charlotte, N. C. 

Kauffman, Irene Westminster, Md. 

Langenfeldt, Marie Cheltenham, Md. 

Lee, Sarah 351 E. Adams Street, Jacksonville, Fla. 

McSherry, Helen 2905 Garrison Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Mayo, Margaret (Mrs. Winnberg). .3004 Grayson Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Null, Lillie 1225 Linden Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Reamey, Hildegrade (Mrs. Jake Lynn). .3004 Grayson St., Baltimore, Md. 

Rutherford, Elsie 1626 St. Paul Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Scarf, Inez 1500 Eutaw Place, Baltimore, Md. 

Smith, Bernice 2928 Windsor Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Scaggs, Lucy 1207 Baltimore St., Washington, D. C. 

Selfe, Serena (Mrs. W. A. Bridges) . . Cathedral Apartments, Baltimore, Md. 
Smith, Sally (Mrs. Horace Byers) . .749 W. North Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 31 

1917 

Cecil, L. A. (Mrs.) 602 Calhoun Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Cavano, Adaline (Mrs. Fred Smith) 527 E. Preston St., Baltimore, Md. 

Fahrney, Myrtle 1811 Dukeland Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Klase, Josephine 749 W. North Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Kenney, Emily St. Luke's Hospital, Davenport, Iowa 

Keffer, Laura 1225 Linden Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Lloyd, Ellen 826 N. CarroUton Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Monroe, Ethel 328 Maryland Avenue, Westport, Md. 

Marsh, Elizabeth 749 W. North Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Mouse, Lucy University Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

Mohler, Anna (Mrs.) 1406 Madison Avenue Baltimore, Md. 

Murray, Olive 

Minnis, Nancy Bay View Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

Minnis, Jemima University Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

Penneywell, Jane (Mrs. L. Bloom). .303 N. Esplanade, Leavenworth, Kan. 

Quigley, Bertha 717 W. North Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Robinson, A. C. (Mrs. J. Lutz) 12 E. Preston Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Risley, Marguerite 41 W. Preston Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Simpson, Elsie Army General Hospital No. 2, Denver, Colo. 

Thorn, Norma (Mrs. J. Woodruff) 2121 Linden Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

1918 

Barwick, Elizabeth Fayetteville Hospital, Fayetteville, N. C. 

Bay, Beulah 1914 Linden Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Benson, Martha (Mrs. E. M. Jones) 1601 N. 2d Street, Harrisburg, Pa. 

Carr, Esther (Mrs.) 2121 Linden Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Ensor, Altha Lutherville, Md. 

Flowers, Jeanette 1316 Linden Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Hook, Kate 1316 Linden Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Kirkley, Naomi 1235 W. Lafayette Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Lauper, Margaret 16 Albion Street, Waterbury, Conn. 

Leister, Grace 1316 Linden Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Linstrum, Gay (Mrs.) 1711 Ruxton Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Moore, Cecelia 2307 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, Md. 

McMillan Martha 2121 Linden Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

McDaniel, Lena (Mrs. C. Rausenbach) . .3237 Eastern Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

Oldhauser, Minnie 2863 W. Lafayette Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Ridgley, Florence (Mrs. E. Killough) Baltimore, Md. 

Singleton, Jessie Ancon Hospital, Canal Zone, Ancon, Panama 

Ridgley, Helen 2307 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Scout, Temperance 2121 Linden Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Turner, Marion Ancon Hospital, Canal Zone, Ancon, Panama 

1919 

Alrich, Annette 902 W. 37th Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Brady, Ethel care Mrs. F. Doty, Jerome, Mich. 

Gordy, Helen Peninsula General Hospital, Salisbury, Md. 



32 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

Jones, Grace 1025 Harlem Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Murray, Emma 28th Street, Newport News, Va. 

Pleasants, Helen 1025 Harlem Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Brown, M. M. (Mrs. E. Duval) New Windsor, Md. 

1920 

Barnett, Louise Sykesville, Md. 

Bay, Ethelyn 1914 Linden Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Clements, Ruth Chestertown, Md. 

Gilbert, Helen Forest Hill, Harford County, Md. 

Maston, Bessie University Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

Shipley, Goldie 2921 Windsor Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Trivilian, Mabel 522 Norman Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Tillett, Zora Phoebus, Va. 




Alumnae JluUetin 



1922 



OFFICERS OF THE ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 
1922-1923 

President Mrs. Wm. A. Bridges, R.N., Eudowood, Towson 

First Vice-President Mrs. C. M. Barwick, R.N. 

Second Vice-President Miss E. L. Marsh, H.N. 

Secretary Mrs. H. K. Fleck, R.N., 513 Cathedral St. 

Treasurer Mrs. C. M. Pitt, R.N., Homewood Apartments 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

The above named officers with 

Miss Ellen Israel, R.N. Miss Stella Ricketts, R.N. 

Mrs. E. Kloman, R.N. Mrs. Nathan Winslow, R.N. 

PROGRAM COMMITTEE 
Mrs. Frank Lynn, R.N., Chairman 

NOMINATING COMMITTEE 

Miss Francis Meredith, R.N., chairman 
Mrs. L. a. Cecil, R.N, Miss Emily Ely, R.N. 

Miss Nellie Dix, R.N. Miss Lillian McDaniel, R.N. 

MEMBERSHIP COMMITTEE 
Miss Margaret Ervin, R.N., chairman 

PUBLICATION COMMITTEE 

Mrs. H. K. Fleck, R.N., chairman 
Miss Ann E. Butts, R.N. Mrs. C. M. Pitt, R.N. 

Miss Margaret Ervin, R.N. Mrs. O. A. Reifschneider, R.N. 
Mrs. Page Edmunds, R.N. Miss Goldie Shipley, R.N. 

Mrs. Frank Lynn, R.N. Mrs. Nathan Winslow, R.N. 



THE 

University Hospital Nurses 
Alumnae Bulletin 

Vol. II APRIL, 1922 No. 1 



State Nurses Association 

Nearest and dearest to the heart of every one of us is our 
Alumnae, which is as it should be, but while it is most important 
that we give of our tune and thought to this body we must not 
forget that it is an important spoke in the wheel of a larger organi- 
zation: The State Nurses Association. Every nurse should 
prepare herself, and look forward with pleasure to serving on the 
Executive Board of this organization. 

We cannot be too often reminded that in unity there is strength. 
Just as the graduates of a school must form themselves into a 
working body if they would put through any definite measure, 
so must the different Aliminae work in unison if they would push 
forward the profession of nursing. It is a pleasant thought that 
we cannot separate ourselves from our Alumnae; what ever pres- 
tige we gain in the nursing w'orld reflects upon the school from 
which we graduated. It is like drawing compound interest. 

There are few of us who have not sat back and envied the ease 
of manner at which some well known nurse presided at a meeting. 

If you think that she never experienced the nervous tremors of 
the novice, the chances are you are greatly mistaken. It is 
probable that gi'acious manner you so much admired has been 
gained little by little, and is the sum of tears, mistakes, misgivings, 
and sheer hard work. 

Not that one must necessarily be a ready speaker to do splendid 
constructive work in the State Association or any other Associa- 
tion, for after all willingness, sound judgment, and a cooperative 
mind are the most desired attributes. But I still insist that it 
counts to be able to stand up and face an audience without that 
"all-gone" feeling in the pit of your stomach. Seriously it is a 
big handicap to be compelled to have some one present your 
ideas for you. 

3 



4 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NITRSES 

But whether you desire or not to be a leader of nurses, it is your 
duty to take an intelligent interest in your State Associations, 
to attend the meetings, serve on Committees when asked, and in 
every way possible cooperate with those who are bearing the bur- 
den of responsibility. 

It is especially important that every member of the State 
Association make an effort to attend the annual meeting as the 
officers are now elected by ballot at this meeting. Officers 
elected for the year 1922 were: President, Miss Elsie M. Lawler, 
J. H. H.; first Vice-president, Mrs. Robert P. Bay, University; 
second Vice-president, Miss J. E. Nash, Bellew, N. Y.; Secretary, 
Miss Sarah F. Martin, Massachusetts General; Treasurer, Mrs. G. 
H. Bode, Maryland Homeo. ; Directors, Miss Eleanor Evans, Union 
Protestant Infirmary; Miss Laura Stevens, Maryland General; 
Mrs. Nathan Winslow, University; Mrs. H. K. Taylor, Mary- 
land General; Miss E. Getzendanner, University; Miss Mary 
Ingle, Woman's. 

A FEW EXPERIENCES DURING MY EIGHT YEARS IN 
THE OPERATING ROOM 

By Anna Wham Pitt, R.N., 1909 

On September 1, 1909, I took charge of the operating floor at 
a salary of forty dollars per month thinking it would be valuable 
experience. 

Having had a short training there, and naturally feeling a bit 
shaky, imagine my consternation to find the floors in the process of 
being tiled, the Autoclave reposing in the Hall, the instrument 
steriUzers disconnected, a nurse putting up dressings for the House 
in the "White Room," and thirteen operations posted for the 
day. 

At that time room "C" was a private bedroom, and the dress- 
ing room was a diet kitchen for the colored wards. Three nurses 
were allowed for the operating floor. 

Each surgeon had his own selection of instruments, and each 
morning when he was posted, his assistant appeared to get them 
together, wind silk, sharpen razors, etc. This proved to be quite 
a nuisance, but saved me some temporary embarrassment. 

Thus I began ploughing through the days, and spending many 
evenings sewing (such as making pillows from real goose feathers 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 5 

brought up from South CaroHna); and much of the nights in 
planning. By the end of the year I felt that some progress had 
been made. I had at least succeeded in having the house dress- 
ings removed from the "White Room," and had secured another 
nurse. It was about this time that I asked for an increase in my 
salary and was given sixty dollars. 

Eventually all the floors were tiled, and wall stands, instruments, 
and various supplies had been purchased, with proceeds from 
sterile dressings, etc., which I was allowed to use for improvements 
on the floor. 

It was quite a satisfaction to me when the surgeons agreed to 
pool their instruments. In courtesy to Professor Winslow, a 
cabinet was purchased for his instruments, and placed in his 
favorite operating room. The others were all put in a cabinet 
together and the house made responsible for keeping them up. 
After this I got the instruments together for operations myself. 

Christmas of 1911, when I was leaving for a vacation, I told 
Doctor Shipley, chairman of the Hospital Committee, that I 
would return on three conditions, namely: another nurse, seventy 
dollars per month, and the private room no. 27, adjoining the 
operating room for a dressing room. The fact that it had been 
necessary at times to dress cases, even infected ones, in an operat- 
ing room after it had been prepared for a clean operation was 
quite an annoyance to me. Shortly after this I was assm-ed that 
these would all be mine, and asked if there was anything more I 
wanted. Feeling a httle "piggish" I prevaricated somewhat, and 
said, no that was all. I returned enthusiastic over the equipment 
for the dressing room, and visions of more orderly proceedings. 
Then we had a strike among the students and were compelled 
to furnish clean nurses both for handling instruments and holding 
retractors. Two clean and one dirty nurse was supplied for each 
room: A, B, and the amphitheater. 

Every Monday morning I gave lectures and demonstrations, 
endeavoring to make each nurse feel free to discuss the work, and 
ask questions. 

Later the diet kitchen was made into a dressing room, and the 
dressing room into an operating room for infected cases. Then 
three more nurses were added for this room, and after that another 
nurse, which enabled me to run four rooms at the same time and 
use my senior nurse as an assistant. 



6 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

After much planning, stern discipline and continued effort 
things seemed to be about as nearly perfect as I could hope to have 
them with the location and arrangement of the rooms. 

Instead of my experience searing my conscience concerning 
technique, I think it became more and more porous, keeping me 
ever on the alert. Here may I give the substance of dialogue be- 
tween myself and a nurse, who was for the first time being trusted 
to prepare solutions.? 

"Miss S. Is that basin clean?" 

"I think so. Miss Wham." 

"Did your apron touch that basin?" 

"I do not think so, Miss Wham." 

''Here we know things. Get a clean basin." 

The surgeons, as a rule I have found conscientious, courteous, 
and cooperative, though I do not consider them as a class, very 
considerate of their assistants and coworkers. Impatience was 
sometimes manifested as each one wanted the table he wanted, 
and the room when he wanted it. You might be working under 
grave difficulties, and have twenty operations posted, yet each one 
expected to proceed as though he was the only one posted and 
forty other operations awaited him. Indeed he was just as 
exacting in his requirements as though this were true. But after 
all, who of you would not have him feel this way; were you the 
patient? 

This field is not different from others, in that a man gets what 
he deserves, or instinctively demands. Even in this routine 
work that natural pressure is felt which prompts one to do what is 
required for all, but delights in doing more for some, who may 
take a personal interest in you, or may possess qualities which you 
especially admire. 

Before I entered upon my career in the operating room I bore 
the reputation of being an "easy goer," but soon learned the 
necessity of becoming a "firm stander." I learned that I must 
adjust myself to requirements and surprised myself at being 
somewhat able to meet demands. I acquired the reputation of 
being "mean," but I preferred this to that of being unable to run 
the floor. 

It was often necessary to assert myself somewhat as illustrated 
in some of the following incidents: On one occasion a resident 
asked for a bottle of sterile normal salt to take to the accident 



I 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 7 

room, which I refused to give him. He went to Doctor Shipley, 
who told me to give him the salt. I did, but cornered Doctor 
Shipley and told him, that while I did not object to sending one 
bottle of salt to the accident room, I had accepted the position 
with the understanding that I would furnish supplies for the 
operating room only, and I felt that no one had any right to 
demand that I should furnish them for any other department. 

I had been there sometime, when a new resident came to assist 
Professor Winslow. He soon concluded that Doctor Winslow's 
gloves were not properly taken care of, not even sterihzed properly, 
and asked that they be given him, that he might do it as it should 
be done. I refused to do this, and he went for the superintendent, 
who appeared with him and demanded that I give up the gloves. 
I disliked to do so, but refused in the presence of the resident, 
stating that I had been taking care of Doctor Winslow's gloves 
for several years, had had no complaint from him, that it was my 
work, and so long as I held the position I would do my own 
work. 

Then one morning the amphitheater was prepared for an opera- 
tion before the clinic, and the case was later referred by the pro- 
fessor to the resident. We had a very busy day and the room was 
left in readiness until about 6 p.m. when the resident came up and 
announced that he would operate in room "B," and wanted two 
clean nurses. (The operation was: Incision of leg — patient from 
the colored ward.) I was in the dining room and the nurses hesi- 
tated to comply with his request, so he went to the superintendent 
and got a poster for "B." I arrived and refused to have the 
equipment moved and the resident cancelled the operation. 

I found in Doctor Shipley, chairman of the Hospital Committee, 
a strong support, ever ready to help, always a gentleman. We of 
course, had some ups and downs. He wound up one of his 
lectures to me by saying "And I am fond of you, too," which 
overbalanced all the scoldings. He dehghted in teasing me. One 
morning I was unable to read one of the postings, but as it was 
done by one who usually did screen cases, I got together some of 
all the instruments in the cabinet, and told the nurse it would be 
a screen case. The posting was "diarsenal" (they were just 
beginning to give this instead of salvarsan), and only a sterile 
needle was needed. Doctor Shipley enjoyed this. 



8 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

The Committee decided at one time that too much gauze was 
being used, and informed me that so much and no more would be 
sent each day to the operating floor. About this time Doctor 
Shipley did a nephrectomy before the clinic, and I noticed the 
nurse carrying in handkerchiefs by the armsfuU and had her 
put some of them back in the cupboard. Well, at a very critical 
time in the operation Doctor Shipley called for handkerchiefs, 
and the nurse told him, I said he could have no more. I think 
this was the only time he was ever too furious with me to apologize, 
though he asked me afterwards if he had ever acted imgentle- 
manly with me except one time, to which I replied he had never 
acted so at any time. 

Once after a screen operation, he gave me a very spicy lecture, 
in which he informed me that he could not be harassed while 
operating. I did not think it my fault, and my feelings were 
hurt. I told him if I harassed him he could get some one who 
would not. Then I did a womanly, but unprofessional thing — 
I cried. This made him very uncomfortable. To add to this 
I played hide and seek with him a day or so to keep him from 
apologizing. 

After laboring for years with inadequate instrument boilers the 
Committee was finally convinced that new ones were needed. 
When they were being installed I insisted on having four. Doctor 
Shipley said, "I know you think you need four, but you only need 
three. Now you usually have your way, but this is one time you 
will not!" I was surprised later to see four going in and said to 
the engineer, "Why, Doctor Shipley told you to put in three." 
He said, "Yes, but after you left he came back and told me to 
put in four." 

On one occasion I received a letter from the Faculty requesting 
that instead of giving the nurses two hours off duty I give them 
three, as was done in other departments, stating that they had 
advised the superintendent to this effect. They had also informed 
the student nurses that this would be done. 

I answered by giving them an itemized account of a day's 
work, time spent in waiting for the doctors, rearranging things for 
their convenience, etc. Also told them that the nurses had one 
afternoon each week, and extra time when possible, that one nurse 
alternating each week had Saturday afternoon and all day Sunday 
off, and that other classes had expressed their appreciation of 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 9 

this. I said that if I must, I would try, but I felt sure I could not 
regulate the time until the work was regulated. I heard nothing 
more and the hours off duty continued the same. 

A very sad thing occurred one winter when we were having quite 
a few streptococcus infections. One of the staff did a hysterec- 
tomy on a woman in whom I was personally interested. About 
three days after which, I came in from church and found him 
waiting for me. He said, "Miss Wham, this woman has a strepto- 
coccus infection and is going to die." I was of course, distressed. 
He wanted to help me to make our technique more perfect, which I 
appreciated. He suggested that we put up the instrument trays, 
linen, dressings, etc., in double covers. This was being done, but 
I w^nt over the work in detail with him, telling him how I had the 
autoclave tested at intervals, instructions given the nurses, etc., 
and we could think of nothing more we could do. His assistant 
then suggested that I instruct the nurses to pin up the dressings 
leaving only the head of the pin exposed, and in double covers 
pinned at different places. Well, dressings had been pinned up 
w^ith only the head of the pin exposed since the days of Noah, 
and they were being pinned in double covers with a wide lap, which 
I considered better technique than single ones pinned at different 
places, since this did not necessitate handling the sterile dressings 
in single cover when being opened either by the dirty or clean 
nurse. He agreed that this might be better if there was a generous 
lap. I invited him to drop in the "White Room" at any time and 
watch the nurses putting up linen and dressings with the lap over 
one-half the package. This he did, and said he bet he could blow 
germs under the lap. To which I replied, we had no whirlwinds 
in the operating room, but he might take a package from the 
room at any time, and blow to his heart's content, take it to the 
laboratory and have it tested, and if it was proven that he had 
blown germs in, I would then instruct the nurses to put them up as 
he suggested. I heard nothing more from him. 

I had Httle dealings with the students, learning the names of 
very few. I could not have been very attractive to them, for 
they made themselves scarce on the floor when I was on duty. 
But keeping an eye on their technique when they did scrub, and 
have them put one gown on top of another, when they saw ab- 
solutely no reason for it, was no pleasant job. Once when telling 
a student something about technique, at the same time Professor 



10 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

Ashby was calling for sutures, the student dropped everything and 
left the room, saying something about "that woman." 

I had in hand the training of about one hundred and seventy- 
five nurses, and found most of them conscientious, industrious 
and ambitious. I became very fond of almost every one. They 
often tell me now of how they lost their hours off duty, all of which 
I have long ago forgotten. One nurse refused to remove her 
ring before scrubbing for operation, saying her mother put it on 
not to be taken off. In the operating room technique comes be- 
fore sentiment. She was told that she must remove it or lose her 
experience as a clean nurse. She removed the ring and scrubbed. 

One day Doctor Martin was posted to do a laparotomy before 
the clinic, and he afterwards decided to do a curettage, turning to 
a new nurse, who had been sent in to observe, he asked her to 
bring him the low stool from the instrument room. She saved 
herself somewhat by first bringing the stool to me. She had gotten 
a foot-stool about four inches high. 

Another nurse came to me from the operating room one day 
and said, "Miss Wham, Doctor Martin wants his coffee." I 
said, "His coffee?" She said, "Yes, that is what he said." I 
went in and asked him if there was something he wanted, and he 
said, Yes, he would like to have the cautery. She says she will 
respect me to her dying day for not laughing at her. I was 
showing the same nurse how to pin up linen for sterihzation, and 
after pinning up the package said, "Now put this in the sterilizer," 
and she put it in the boiler of water, but was smart enough to get 
it into the soiled linen before I discovered it. 

A very amusing thing happened one day when there was little 
doing, and I had gone off the floor supposedly for most of the 
afternoon. When I suddenly appeared about 4 o'clock not a 
nurse could be seen, not a sound heard. After some investigation 
I opened the screen door to room "A," and there was every 
nurse on duty with straws and coca-colas. Seeing the horrified 
expression on their faces I was convulsed and did not attempt to 
speak. I went down stairs, excused the seniors, who were at class, 
for the rest of the afternoon, got crinoline and had the coca-cola 
drinkers make plaster bandages until 7 o'clock. When they 
gathered in the "White Room" I told them I was very hurt to 
know that they would take advantage of my absence, and do when 
I was not there, what they would not think of doing when I was 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 11 

present. That evening;, while dressing to go out, I was interrupted 
by tap after tap on my door till almost each one had apologized 
for her misconduct. 

1 hold very dear, the appreciation manifested even yet from 
time to time, by almost all the nurses whom I trained. 

Deduct the Sundays and count an average of four operations 
a day (witnesses will admit this is a very low estimate) and you 
will find I had to do with the preparation of over ten thousand 
operations. 

You agree that I got what I went for: Experience. 

INDUSTRIAL NURSING 
By Blanche Louise Prince, R.N., 1912 

This very complex branch of the nursing profession has many 
ramifications, each one of which is a problem in itself. 

It has been ODly within the last few years that the industrial 
world has awakened to the importance of having a nurse installed 
as a permanent fixture, to work out these very confusing problems 
that enter so largely into the lives of industrial workers. It is a 
startUng fact, but nevertheless true, that prior to this time, the 
industrial worker was considered as part of a vast mechanical 
contrivance, and as such, was treated. There seemed to be no 
time to investigate the working conditions of this great mass of 
American people who constitute the backbone of our population. 

The fundamental cause of industrial unrest is the fear of losing 
the opportunity to provide the necessities, not only for the indi- 
vidual, but possibly a family as well. 

WTien a nurse enters this important field she must have the 
hearty cooperation both of the management and of each individual 
employed. Each one must be made to feel that he is an important 
factor in the creating of good will and of good fellowship. An 
excellent plan that is in good working condition in the Mt. Vernon- 
Woodberry Mills, Inc., is the establishment of a committee, 
composed of representatives from the various departments of this 
industry which meet often with the management, and discuss 
their problems of improving the working conditions, whereb}-^ their 
efficiency may be increased, and in return net them a more decided 
increase in finances, beside increasing production for the compan}'. 

There are many individuals in the industrial world who are am- 
bitious and anxious to forge their way ahead. See that these 



12 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

individuals have their chance; help them to grow and to de- 
velop. Here is another avenue by which the tact of the industrial 
nurse may be requisitioned. Her duty is not only a physical, but 
a moral one. Her attitude must be courteous, kindly, and help- 
ful, because their attitude is patterned from hers. 

The question of hygiene enters very largely into the scheme in 
general. First, the hygienic conditions of the plant must receive 
definite consideration. The individual must be impressed with 
the important fact that his working hours constitute the greater 
part of his day, and, hence his surroundings must be kept in such 
a condition of cleanliness that there would be no reflection on his 
ability. Ventilation must be carefully looked into. See to it 
that the ventilation of the plant, in general, is good. I have 
seen employees so stupefied from the absence of fresh air that their 
work suffered as a consequence. Then the question of personal 
hygiene arises, and this is a more difficult one to establish, but 
through much perseverance and example that can be gradually 
overcome. Hygiene of the home is the next important factor 
to be considered. In a great many instances we here meet with a 
stumbling block. For in a family where the father and mother 
and older sisters and brothers are employed the home is very apt 
to be neglected, although one finds quite a few exceptions, where 
the evidences of neatness and cleanliness are ever present. 

Another important factor to be considered is the prevention and 
spread of venereal diseases, tuberculosis, also of other infectious 
diseases. This is one of the uphill fights, for the cases are usually 
reported to us through a disinterested channel. However, we 
must see that treatment is begun, and to that end we must arrange 
that they go to some dispensary clinic. 

Another important point to consider is a place whereby in- 
dustrial workers may relax during the period set aside for that 
time. It must be seen to that they have comfortable chairs, 
both entertaining and instructive reading matter, music, or any 
other diversion that would tend to a thorough relaxation, so 
that they may return to their work in a refreshed condition. After 
all, it is an educative process. It is only by slow stages that we 
will be able to work harmony out of chaos. We must help to 
create ideals and standards, and it is only by this method that the 
conditions we hope to develop in the industrial world can and will 
be established. 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 13 

HEALTH BATHS FOR WOMEN 
By Margarite Blight LeSueur, R.N., 1900 

It had been my intention when finishing my studies at the 
Philadelphia Orthopedic Hospital to give massage to patients 
in hospitals and private homes, principally to "rest cases," but 
owing to circumstances I accepted a position offered me to give 
treatments in massage and hydrotherapy at the Kallotheneion on 
Charles Street. 

Like a great many others, perhaps, you wonder what these 
Treatments are good for. You may have heard them called 
"Beauty Baths." Even so. Can we have beauty without 
health? Can we have beauty without a clean clear skin? In 
these daj's of preventive medicine, we need these treatments for 
women, especially for business women, who have not the time to 
take the exercises needed to keep them in perfect health, without 
which they cannot compete with men. 

These health exercises make the skin active, increase the circula- 
tion, give tone to the muscles and nervous system, and cause the 
body to throw off waste and fatigue products. They should be 
taken from once a month to three times a week. Many people try 
to come regularly once a week. 

We have a very efficient working department. There are two 
large rooms. The first gives one the impression of a small ward 
of four beds, each inclosed with immaculate white draw curtains. 
There are also four private booths fitted with large mirrors and 
the necessary toilet articles. In the next room, which has a mosaic 
floor, are two electric light cabinets, a shower with numerous 
sprays of all sizes and force, and two marble slabs where a body 
shampoo and salt glow is given. These baths should be taken from 
once a week to three times a week at first, and if possible once a 
week the year around. 

The little nurse (who works with me), and I, always speak of 
our patrons as patients. When the patient arrives a sheet is 
placed on the chair in one of the booths, her attention attracted to 
the slippers under the chair, and the curtains drawn. When 
undressed she is taken into the next room, and weighed. Her 
height is noted, and she is told her ideal weight. If much over 
weight she is advised to diet, and at each treatment is given a 
more strenuous massage. 



14 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

After being weighed the patient is given a bathing cap, led to 
the shower where she is given a warm spray, and then taken to 
the cabinet, which is a pretty sight with its hning of mirrors, 
and rows of incandescent Hghts. When the nurse has ascertained 
that the patient is comfortable, seat the right height, and cautioned 
her not to touch the bulbs, as they are hot, the doors of the cabinet 
are closed, leaving the head out, and ice cold cloths are applied to 
head and neck, and cold water given to drink. She is kept here 
from ten to twenty minutes to suit the case. The cabinet, with 
its reflectors, gives a light that is very much like sun light, and has 
a therapeutic value, besides producing heat and perspiration. 

The patient having stayed in the cabinet the required time 
is led to the slab which is well padded with sheets. She is then 
covered with bath towels to prevent chilling, and the entire 
surface of the body gone over with soap and a brush, then rinsed 
off and rubbed with moist salt of medium fineness. This is applied 
with friction movements, the amount of pressure being adjusted 
to the patient's sensation; fair skins are usually more sensitive than 
brunettes. Then this is all removed by warm spray, followed by 
needle shower, and unless contra-indicated finished with a cold 
shower. Many people like a general massage after this. We 
always encourage our. patients to rest for from ten minutes to 
two or three hours after treatments. 

I would like to mention a case or so of the many real patients 
who come to us: 

Mrs. F. has been coming for an extended time twice a week, albumunuria, 
and of course extremely nervous. This woman was a medical student 
before her marriage, and she says that there has been no albumen in the 
urine for five months, pressure normal, and a decided improvement in her 
nerves. 

Mrs. T. Sent by her physician. Arthritis and heart trouble brought 
on by diseased tonsils. Her system still full of toxins although her tonsils 
have been removed. Result, joints are now less stiff, there is less pain, 
able to sleep better. I am told she is to keep up these treatments for a 
year, starting with three a week. 

Mrs. M. Stiff shoulder following dislocation from a fall. Given hot 
packs to shoulder besides full treatment. Wonderful improvement after 
six treatments. 

Mrs. C. Sent by oculist. Loss of sight in one eye. Given six treat- 
ments. The sweating had the effect desired, and sight was regained. 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 15 

Many obese cases have been sent us, who lose from three to 
five pounds a week if they will also abstain from fat producing 
foods. On the other hand we have anemic and thin people, who 
have gained in weight, and whose appearance shows that the 
condition of the blood has improved. 

But of all the patients who come to us there are none we enjoy 
treating quite as much as we do the tired, worn out nurse. 

THE WOMAN'S AUXILIARY BOARD 
By Millicent Gear Edmunds, R.N., 1905 

The prime object of the Board is to do that which tends 
toward the bettering of conditions among the free patients in all 
departments which includes their religious as well as physical 
well being. In this way helping the physician mend not only 
their poor sick bodies but their souls as well. Truly, it is a noble 
work and one that deserves only the very best that one is capable 
of giving. 

It has been a very great pleasure and privilege to serve with 
such a splendid and enthusiastic group of women, whose loyalty 
and devotion to the University Hospital is unquestionable, and 
who at all times have been most ready and willing to cooperate 
and comply with the wishes and requirements of those in 
authority. 

This year we hope to do bigger things. Before us especially is 
the matter of doing better organized Welfare Work in the free 
wards. Our big vision is to introduce "Vocational Training." 
This may. seem most ambitious, but when we realize the wonder- 
ful results that the war has shown us derived through this method, 
we, too, want to help our patients to recovery if it lies within our 
power. However, we do know that only through the coopera- 
tion of our nurses can this be made possible. 

I want to say that in every instance from the Superintendent 
of Nurses down we have received unfailing courtesy and assistance, 
and there does exist a most happy relationship between us. 

Of course the New Nurses' Home is very dear to our hearts. 
I think I can say that every member of the Board is deeply in- 
terested and will do her part toward seeing to its successful 
completion. 



16 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

After glancing through the following report of our accomplish- 
ments during the past year, you will realize just how fortunate 
the University is in having such a Board of interested women, 
and will admit that we can no longer be called the "Board of 
Agitators." 

First, I would like to mention the Nurses' Home Committee. 
It is the pleasure and duty of this Committee to show a personal 
interest in the student nurses and their social life, visit them when 
sick, and in any way that they can increase the comforts in the 
Home, but it is not their province to listen to, or report any com- 
plaints. This Committee presented a silver cap pin to each mem- 
ber of the last class that graduated. The Board presents to the 
nurse graduating second highest in her class each year, an Alumnae 
pin, and a membership in the Alumnae for one year. 

Although what we have been able to do for the nurses, so far, 
may not seem a great deal, yet it means the linking of the Training 
School and the Board, which to my mind is most essential. 

The total number of members on the Board is 192, of which 
65 were elected during 1921. 

During the past year two rummage sales were held from which 
$2486 was raised, and $1000 to endow a bed in the Maternity 
Ward was raised through the kindness of the D. A. R. Society. 

The Board and Monthly Committees have presented to the 
Hospital the following: A complete sterilizing outfit for the 
Maternity Department, a gauze cutting machine, twelve electric 
fans, a dish washer for the nurses' dining room, shades for the sun 
parlor, two refrigerators, twelve instrument sterilizers, wheel 
chairs, blankets, towels, bath robes, slippers, yards of outing 
flannel, etc. Besides this they contributed $1000 toward a new 
ice plant, and $100 toward a victrola for the Nurses' Home. In 
actual money it very nearly touches the $8000 mark. 

There have been many donations given by friends of the Board 
members, such as bath robes, clothing, rugs, curtains, a medicine 
cabinet, Fairbanks scales, a book case, books and magazines, 
50 gallons of paint (Glidden and Company), ice cream, and numer- 
ous articles for the Rummage Sale. 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 17 

NATIONAL ASSOCIATIONS 

The Committee on Publication of the National League of 
Nursing Education are publishing a very attractive calendar. 
It is not only an attractive calendar, but it has historical value as 
well, as it contains the portraits of twelve well known nurses 
with brief biographical sketches, which gives the reader a glimpse 
of the work and influence of these twelve women. The proceeds 
from the sale of this calendar will be used to help maintain and 
develop the activities at the Headquarters of the three National 
Nursing Organizations. 

The Calendar costs $L00 a copj-. Address orders to Head- 
quarters National Nursing Association, 370 Seventh Avenue, New 
York. 

In October the National Organization asked for contributions 
from the different Alumnae to be used toward the upkeep of the 
Central Bureau of National Headquarters. Our Alumnae con- 
tributed .?10.00. 

A National Committee has been formed to secure funds for the 
purpose of erecting a Memorial to the memory of Jane A. Delano. 
The most popular suggestion as to the form that this Memorial 
should take seems to be a portrait statue, descriptive of the spirit 
of nursing, to be placed in the grounds of the National Headquar- 
ters, American Red Cross, Washington, D. C. It has been esti- 
mated that the cost of such a memorial would probably be about 
$50,000. The University Alumnae contributed $75, and there 
were also some individual contributions from our members. Con- 
tributions from individual members are still being accepted by the 
treasurer, Mrs. C. M. Pitt, Homewood Apartments, Baltimore, 
Md. 

It is an interesting coincidence that all the National Associa- 
tions have graduates of Marjdand as their Presidents. 

The next meeting of the American Nurses' Association will be 
held in Seattle, Washington, June 26 through July 1. 



18 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

NEWS ITEMS 

The Annual Banquet given by the Alumnae to the graduating 
class was held at the Emerson Hotel, May 16, 1921. The toast- 
mistress was Miss Bernice Conner. The following interesting 
program was rendered: 

Mrs. Wm. Bridges: Address of Welcome. 

Presentation of Scholarship to Columbia University, awarded 
by the Alumnae. 

Presentation of Ahunnae Pin and Membership Awarded by the 
Woman's Auxiliary Board. 

Mrs. J. B. Piggott: The Cleveland Survey. 

Miss Lucy Marshall : My Aspirations for the Training School. 

There were eighteen graduates entertained, and eighty-one 
nurses present. Friends of the nurses were invited to the dance 
that followed. 

Miss Gaver won the scholarship to Columbia University. 
The pin and membership to the Alumnae went to Miss Susan 
Neady. 

Miss Getzendanner and committee gave a very profitable 
and enjoyable oyster supper at the hospital in November, 1920, 
and a second one in November, 1921, the proceeds from which 
were to go toward the furnishings for the New Nurses' Home. 
Five hundred dollars was realized from the two suppers. Miss 
Getzendanner is now busy getting ready for a dance at the Emer- 
son Hotel, to help swell the fund. She will be assisted by the 
Hospital Staff. 

Members of the Alumnae wishing to take a post-graduate 
course may borrow from the Sick Benefit Fund, a sum of money up 
to $200 at 4 per cent interest. The following was received from 
Mrs. LeSueur, class 1900. 

"I will take this opportunity of expressing my appreciation for 
the loan extended to me by the Alumnae Association without 
which I could not have continued my studies at the Philadelphia 
Orthopedic Hospital, where the coiU"se in Massage and Allied 
Branches is given as Dr. S. Weir Mitchell taught it." 

Miss Read and Mrs. Barwick, both of the class of 1893, are 
visiting Miss Cornman at West Pahn Beach, Fla. 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 19 

Miss M. B. Michael, class 1893, is in charge of District Nursing 
in Roanoke, Va. 

Miss Volina Rutherford, class 1913, is practicing her profession 
in Miami, Fla. 

Miss Harry, class 1895, is spending the winter with her sister in 
Leesburg, Fla. 

Miss M. Smith, class 1912, is engaged in Industrial Nursing at 
Sparrows Point, Md. 

Miss M. E. Rolph, class 1895, is Supervisor of the Nurses' 
Home, University Hospital. Miss Rolph is meeting with much 
success in this work. 

Miss Susan Ravenel, class 1894, after spending the fall in Balti- 
more has returned to her home in Aiken, S. C. 

Miss McDaniel, class 1915, who was formerly Superintendent of 
Nurses at the Franklin Square Hospital, Baltimore, is now asso- 
ciated with the I. V. N. A. 

Miss Inez Scarf, class 1916, is doing private duty nursing in 
Atlantic City, N. J. 

Miss Shertzer, class 1917, has an executive position in the River- 
side Hospital, Newport News, Va. 

Miss Sides and Miss Pleasants, both of the class of 1919, are 
now located in Pueblo, Col., after doing some work in Chicago. 
They shortly expect to leave for Southern California and take up 
work there. 

Mrs. Hildegrade Linn (n^e Reamey), class 1919, is now H\'ing in 
Mata Redonda, Mexico. 

Miss Nettie Flanagan, class 1902, former Superintendent of 
Nurses at the University Hospital, was a patient in the hospital a 
short while ago. Miss Flanagan's numerous friends will be pleased 
to hear of her complete recovery. 



20 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

Mrs. C. M. Pitt (Wham), class 1909, entertained the December 
meeting of the Alumnae Association at her residence in the Home- 
wood Apartments. Miss Ethel Monroe, class 1917, gave an 
interesting talk on the Vocational Training of Disabled Soldiers. 

Miss Hoffmaster, class 1916, who until recently held a position 
in the Eobert Long Hospital, Indianapolis, Ind., is now at her home 
at Funkstown, Md. 

Miss Inez Kaufman, class 1916, who is now located at State, 
Pa., in addition to her Veteran Bureau work is acting as Home 
Service Secretary to the American Red Cross. 

Miss Ethel Logue, class 1912, is ill at her home in McConnells- 
burg, Pa. Her many friends wish her a speedy recovery. 

Miss Ruth Clements, class 1920, winner of the Alumnae 
Scholarship, will enter Columbia University at the beginning of 
the Summer Course. 

Miss Bernice Conner, class 1912, sailed from the United States 
July 30, 1921, and is now with the Serbian Child Welfare Associa- 
tion in Serbia. 

Mrs. Edmunds, class 1905, was reelected President of the 
Woman's Auxiliary Board of the University Hospital. Mrs. 
Nathan Winslow, class 1903, being reelected as Secretary. 

Miss Elizabeth Lee, class 1896, daughter of Richard Henry 
Lee, First Maryland Battery, C. S. A., was decorated in place of 
her father at Lee Birthday exercises, January 19, 1922. 

Mother Hinds is in bed at the Hospital, Room 45, with 
a broken leg. She would be glad to see her friends. It was 
the pleasure of the Alumnae to send her a very beautiful 
plant. 

This year the Nurses' Commencement will be held with the Law, 
Dental, and Medical Departments. 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 21 

The Red Cross Volunteers raised S3799 from the Recital Course 
that was held at the Lyric for the benefit of the Dispensary. 

Friends of Miss Julia Reed, a U. P. I. nurse, who died in June, 
have furnished a room to her memory in the University Hospital. 
Miss Reed organized the Social Service Work in the University 
Dispensary. Her death was a great loss to the Hospital as well 
as to her friends. It is hoped among her friends that later they 
will be able to start a permanent Endowment Fund. 

The following nurses are on dutj'- at the Health Department: 
Eulalie Cox, Bertie Davidson, Azalea Kirkley, Roberta Pinckard, 
Adeline Smith, Ruth Stoneham, Naomi Strong, Alva Williams, 
Margaret Winnberg, Norma Woodruff, Anna Wright. 

At the March meeting of the Alumnae Association, Mrs. Lynn 
suggested that two members from the active list, selected al- 
phabetically, should take charge of each meeting; to be respon- 
sible that there were as many members present as possible, and to 
make out a small program in case there was not enough business 
to fill time of meeting. The Alumnae Association through the 
magazine would like to extend a vote of thanks to those taking 
charge of the meetings during the year, as they feel that the 
increase in interest and attendance is due to their efforts. 

We are glad to announce that S500.00 has been added to the 
fund for furnishing the Nurse's Home, through the interest and 
cooperation of the Woman's Auxiliary Board. Proceeds from 
the concert held at the Lyric on March 21 will help swell this 
fund. 

As we go to press we hear of the death of Miss Ethel Logue, 
1912. For several years Miss Logue has been doing metabolic 
work under the directions of Doctor C. W. McElfresh. Miss 
Logue will be greatly missed by all who knew her. 



22 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

MARRIAGES 

In December, 1921, Miss Cecelia Moore, class 1918, to Mr. 
Herbert Zimmerman. Mr. and Mrs. Zimmerman are living in 
Baltimore. 

In December, 1921, Mrs. Gay Linstrum, class 1918, to Mr. 
Harry Hughes. Mr. and Mrs. Hughes are living at 2125 W. 
North Avenue. 

In January, 1922, Miss J. Nichols, class 1919, to Mr. Lewis. 
Mr. and Mrs. Lewis are living at the Avon Apartments. 

In June, 1921, Christine Alexander, class 1920, to Dr. Joseph 
Mayoral. Dr. and Mrs. Mayoral are at Apavtado 1465, Havana, 
Cuba. 

In July, 1921, Louise Barnett, class 1920, to Dr. C. H. Reifsch- 
neider. Dr. and Mrs. Reifschneider live at 340 S. East Avenue. 

In July, Addie Coward, class 1913, to Mr. R. C. McCotton. 
Mr. and Mrs. McCotton live in Grifton, N. C. 

In October, Miss Marguerite Risley, class 1917, to Dr. Harry 
Stein. Dr. and Mrs. Stein live at 1315 Mt. Royal Avenue. 

October 1, Sally Lee, class 1910, to Mr. Frank Woodward. 
Mr. and Mrs. Woodward live in Tallahassee, Fla. 

August 24, 1921, Mary McDaniel, class 1921, to Mr. Harold 
Weisner. Mr. and Mrs. Weisner are living at 1603 Park Avenue, 

BIRTHS 

On August 26, 1921, a boy to Dr. and Mrs. E. H. Kloman. 
Mrs. Kloman was Miss Louise Gephart, class 1911. 

On October 27, 1921, a boy to Dr. and Mrs. J. B. Piggott. Mrs. 
Piggott was Miss Bell, class 1907. 

On January 13, 1922, a daughter to Mr. and Mrs. John Under- 
bill. Mrs. Underbill was Miss Dolly, class 1916. 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 23 

In July, 1921, a daughter to Dr. and Mrs, John Robertson. 
Mrs. Robertson was Miss Lula Price, class 1910. 

In January, 1922, a son to Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Chapman. 
Mrs. Chapman was Miss Frothingham, class 1915. 

From Miss Mary E. Bradbury, Class 1893 

Cambridge, Maryland, 
February 16, 1922. 
In her will Miss Parsons said — I give to the said Nurses' Home 
my following Nursing medals, namely: Royal Red Cross Medal, 
Egyptian Medal, Khedives Star, Spanish War Medal, and all 
papers connected therewith. 

As to the time of their arrival here, I am not able to say. Miss 
Loring wrote that she had them at last, and would let me know 
when they would be presented in Baltimore. She said that one 
of the noted physicians of Boston, who knew Miss Parsons, was 
anxious to present them, but that he was so busy that it was 
impossible for him to leave just now. She further said that she 
would be so happy to have it done this way, even if it meant 
waiting until spring. 

I imagine this physician was connected with Camp L. Parsons 
at Gloucester, Mass., which was named for her, for the work she 
did during the Spanish War. 

When will the University Hospital have their Nurses' Commence- 
ment this year, as we might have Miss Loring have the medals 
down at that time? 

Sincerely, 

Mary E. Bradbury. 

We are hoping to have the medals presented at the Annual 
Banquet which will be held in June. Owing to the way that the 
Nurses' Commencement will be held this year, we felt that this 
would be preferable. 

It is an interesting coincidence that Miss Barbara Stouffer, 
class 1911, was decorated with the Royal Red Cross in November, 
1919, by the Prince of Wales, a great-grandson of Queen Victoria, 
who decorated Miss Louise Parsons with the Royal Red Cross. 

Miss Mary Gavin, class 1908, was decorated during the War 
with a French Decoration. 



24 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

February 10, 1922. 
Miss Bessie Read, 

21 N. Carey Street, 

Baltimore, Maryland. 
My dear Miss Read: 

At the February meeting of the Nurses' Alumnae the following 
was recommended: 

I. That a nurse who is absent on a case must go to the bottom 
of the list, regardless of the length of said case. 

II. That the club make stricter registration rules and enforce 
them. 

We appreciate the difficulties that must attend the running of 
a registry, and will gladly cooperate in lessening these whenever 
we can. 

Very truly yours, 

Isabella Griffith Fleck, 

Secretary. 

This matter was brought up by Miss Rolph, at the request 
of Miss Read, President of the Club. Miss Rolph said that 
the present system was very unsatisfactory, discouraging, and 
embarrassing. 

She further stated that some of the nurses did not abide by the 
rules; that they reported for duty, and then refused cases when 
called, that they did not notify the registrar when they were not 
available, and had even been known to leave the state without 
reporting off duty. It was exceedingly embarrassing to make 
arrangements to send a certain nurse on a case, and then call her 
up only to be told that she was all ready on a case, down town for 
the day, or couldn't go on account of an engagement at the 
dentist's. This, she said, might be repeated several times, necessi- 
tating the expense of seven or eight calls, to say nothing of the loss 
of time. 

From Miss Sides and Miss Pleasants, 1919 

Salt Lake City, Utah, 
February 3, 1922. 
We, Elizabeth Sides and Pleasy Pleasants, do bequeath "to 
whom it may concern" our well earned experience and fun, 
obtained in the wild and woolly — since we are about to leave for 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 25 

/ 

civilization and twelve-hour duty: the coast. Or at least that's 
what they say. 

We love it even though the Registries are washed away by 
floods, and you have to depend upon calls from the Undertakers; 
and when you arrive find the wards of general duty looking like 
a checker board, one white and then one ace of spades; and are 
told that the orderlies will superintend the diets, while the nurse 
attends to the patients' requests (in the male ward — sh-s-s.) 

Our "haloes" never fail to create interest. Regardless of our 
pride in them we fear we are going to have to don dust or boudoir 
caps if normality isn't soon reached — instead of " thirty-six"-hour 
duty in the "Modern West" as another contradicted. 

Not having gone far enough to expound you may find us sitting 
"tight in the boat" both hands on the steering wheel, and trusting 
to . 

It is all wonderful, but sincerely speaking, give us the East — 
for nursing. 

"us." 

P. S. Speaking of consistency, these Mormons are not per- 
mitted to indulge in cigarettes — state penalty. But the wives- 
wives— w-i-v-e-s ! ! 

From Miss Nettie N. Flanagan, Class 1902 

Lowthrope School, 
Groton, Mass. 
March 7, 1922. 
My dear Mrs. Fleck: 

There was a delay in your letter reaching me. It went to my 
home where, for some reason it was not forwarded promptly, 
therefore, I fear I am very tardy in providing you with anything 
for the Bulletin. Writing articles for publication is not in my 
line. 

Throughout all of my life I have wanted to study plants, both as 
flowering plants and as trees. I like the out of doors, with all 
that it offers of change and season. 

Just why I should select a formal school of Landscape Architec- 
ture for this study, knowing as I did that I possessed no artistic 
ability, I cannot say, except that I like orderliness and straight 
fines. There is an appeal in the harmonious grouping of parts. 
Therefore, I came to Lowthrope and have remained to assist in the 
work of growing flowers and vegetables and fruit. Just now we 



26 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

are getting ready to do some grafting of old apple trees that last 
November's ice storm shattered. 

My duties are numerous and somewhat taxing, but I can 
truly say that whatever the task, "I like the work" as we are so 
often asked in our nursing life. 

I find a great deal of pleasure in caring for an old herb garden 
that gives us fragrance and adds delicious flavor to our salads. 
If this calling should have an interest for any one that the Bulletin 
reaches the full account of opportunities that the course offers 
can be had by writing Miss Amy L. Cogswell, our Principal. 

I have found that to add interest to one's life adds much pleasure 
and profit. I am not sure that I shall not be going to school at 
eighty. 

If I can in any way serve the University Nurses by adding any 
lines to make the matter clearer I shall be glad to do so. I wish 
I might have been present with you when in Baltimore. Probably 
in mid-summer, 1 shall see you again. 

My cordial greetings to the nurses. 

Always sincerely yours, 

Nettie N. Flanagan. 

REPORT OF CHAIRMAN OF PUBLICATION COMMITTEE 

This little magazine is the only published record that we have of 
the works of our graduates, and of the activities of the Alumnae, 
it is the only means that we have of keeping in touch with those 
who are unable to attend our monthly meetings. For this reason 
we would like to make it a sort of exchange desk where the nurses 
young in the service may bring the refreshment of their enthusiasm 
to barter for wisdom gained through experience, where a letter 
from a graduate of 1892 is answered by a member of the class of 
1921, where Serbia and Mexico and California rub shoulders. 
In other words where no one cheats. Each does her part whether 
it be little or much. 

We realize how exacting the nursing profession is, how difficult 
it is to find time to write for publication, but if the nurses reahzed 
how vitally important this Bulletin is to the Alumnae, we are 
sure they would not fail to offer their contributions. 

For the contributions we have received, we are most apprecia- 
tive, and desire to extend to the donors our sincere thanks. 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 27 

We should also like to take this opportunity to express our 
gratitude for the letters of appreciation of last year's copy. 

The expense of last year's Bulletin was $154.38. Of this amount 
$96.50 was collected from advertisements, leaving a deficit of 
$56.88 which was paid from the General Alumnae Fund. 

This year we are asking the small amount of 25 cents a copy for 
the Bulletin, to help cover expense. This may be sent to Mrs. 
H. K. Fleck, 513 Cathedral Street, or if more convenient it may 
be given to Miss Rolph at the University Hospital. 

We would like to repeat that articles, news notes, letters, 
criticism, and suggestions will be warmly welcomed by the 
Publication Committee. 

Isabella Griffith Fleck, 

Chairman. 



28 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

TREASURER'S REPORT 

Statement of Receipts and Disbursements Year Ending 
December 31, 1921 

general fund 
Receipts: 

Dues from Members $644.68 

Total Receipts $644.68 



Disbursements: 

Maryland State Association (Dues 1920) $145.00 

Maryland State Association (Dues 1921) 154.00 

Printing and Stationery 56 . 79 

Bulletin (balance) 56.88 

Banquet 64.25 

Flowers 10.00 

Dues Returned 3.50 

Refreshments 7.40 

Delano Memorial 75.00 

National League of Nursing Education 10.00 

$582.82 
Total Disbursements $582.82 

Balance in Western National Bank of Baltimore, December 
31, 1921 $249.88 

SICK BENEFIT FUND 

Receipts: 

Dues from Members $209 .00 

Total Receipts $209 .00 

Disbursements: 

Paid to Members $269.00 

Total disbursements $269.00 

Balance in Eutaw Savings Bank, December 31, 1921 $1294.28 

Endowment Fund $987.26 

Receipts given for cash only, except upon request. Your check is your 
receipt. 



ROLL OF MEMBERSHIP 

(Please notify secretary of change of address) 

HONORARY MEMBER 
Marshall, Lucy Ann, Superintendent of Nurses, University Hospital 

GRADUATES OF UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL 

1892 

X Dunham, E. (Mrs. Roahe) Staunton, Va. 

X Dunham, Leila 

* Goldsborough, Mary E 

X Hale, Janet 

Lucas, Kate C. (Mrs.) 1404 W. Lexington Street, Baltimore, Md. 

X Lee, Anna (Mrs. Lovingscold) South America 

* Neal, Amy 

X Schleunes, Anna 

1893 

Bradbury, M. E Cambridge, Md. 

X Cornman, Mary E 315 Okeechovu Road, West Palm Beach, Fla. 

X Culbertson, Clara (Mrs. Van Santwoort) 

Daly, E. J 21 N. Carey Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Michael, Martha B 528 Church Avenue, S.W., Roanoke Va. 

X Mayes, Eleanor Petersburg Va. 

Mergardt, Clara (Mrs. J. Reifsneider) 

836 N. Strieker Street Baltimore. Md. 
X Pyatt, M. A Georgetown, S. C. 

Ravenel, S. S Aiken, S. C. 

X Shertzer, Elizabeth 1328 Madison Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

* Williams, E. M 

* Van Santwoort, Elinor (Mrs. W. Mines) 

1894 

* Anderson, Bessie 

* Brown, Mary 

Bonn, C. M. (Mrs. Barwick) 21 N. Carey Street, Baltimore, Md. 

X Hass (Mrs. Ofhole) Winston-Salem, N. C. 

* Judd, Evelyn (Mrs. J. Dingan) 

* Deceased. 

X Graduates not members of the association. 

29 



30 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

X Morgan, Lucy H. (Mrs. Backlow) Lockhaven, Penn. 

J Mergardt, Emma ( ) _ 

X Mellner, Constance (Mrs. Wine) 

i Magruder, Emma Sandy Spring, Md. 

Bead, Elizabeth 21 N. Carey Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Thackston, E. G 490 Geary Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

X Thompson, Mary 

X Weitzel, V. C. (Mrs. C. McNabb) Cardiff, Md. 

1895 

X Blake, Sallie E Tallahassee, Fla. 

X Edmunds, Maria Farniville, W. Va. 

Harry, Addie M 21 N. Carey Street, Baltimore, Md. 

X Jones, Mira New York 

Rolph, Mary E 21 N. Carey Street, Baltimore, Md. 

1896 

Lee, Elizabeth 1535 Park Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Robey, Frances 1535 Park Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Shipley, Wilhelmena Granado, Col. 

Wilson, Cora M. (Mrs.) 864 Park Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

1897 

Baldwin, M. E. E. (Mrs.). .Allegany and Woodbine Avenues, Towson, Md, 

X Cohen, (Mrs.) 

Jones, Susan M 1412 Park Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Keating, Mattie Centerville, Md. 

Lord, Athalia 63 Clayton Street, Charlotte, N. C. 

Russell, Mary A 1431 Madison Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Slicer, Annette 2127 Callow Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

* Watkins, K. N 

1898 

X Hughes, Eunice (Mrs.) 

Lackland, Nannie J 216 A Street, S.E., Washington, D. C. 

* Mauppin, Agnes 

Rossell, Blenda E 21 N. Carey Street, Baltimore, Md. 

1899 

X Brown, Margaret 1401 Columbia Road, Washington, D. G. 

X Edwards, Katherine Hagerstown, Md. 

X Llewellyn, Bernaedine (Mrs. Early) Scottsville, Va. 

* Pittman, Blanche 

X Smith, Virginia 

* Deceased. 

X Graduates not members of the association. 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 31 

1900 

Blight, Margarita (Mrs. M. B. LeSueur) 

149 W. Lanvale Street, Baltimore, Md. 
Featherstone, Sophia Sandy Spring, Md. 

* Gilliland, Lena (Mrs. B. Jones) 

Gray, E. B 1827 Appleton Street, Baltimore, Md. 

t Hobbs, Myra 

Jones, Nannie H 1012 Floyd Avenue, Richmond, Va. 

t Little, Marion 

t Milton, Louise D 241 W. Lanvale Street, Baltimore, Md. 

1901 

Anderson, Grace 1112 Chestnut Street, St. Louis, Mo. 

Blight, Emmeline (Mrs. F. E. Chambers) . .791 Orange Street, Macon, Ga. 

* Burnett, Mary 

* Blake, Katherine 

Cook, Mary 149 W. Lanvale Street, Baltimore, Md. 

* Dowdell, Mary 

X Daniel, Francis B Saranac Lake, New York 

Fendall, Mattie F 18 E. Main Street, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada 

Furbee, Catherine 110(5 Juliana Street, Parkersburg, W. Va. 

Henderson, Eugenia 909 West Avenue, Charlotte, N. C. 

Jones, Mary S University of Virginia 

t Mosby, Pauline 149 W. Lanvale Street, Baltimore, Md. 

1902 

Burch, Emma C 831 Park Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

J Dunderdale, Grace L. (Mrs. W. Koppelman) 

105 W. 29th Street, Baltimore, Md. 
Flanagan, Nettie L Lowthrope School, Groton, Mass. 

* Gregory, Mary W 

X Kinnirey, Nancy (Mrs. Howard Iglehart) 

701 N. Carrollton Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Raines, Martha (Mrs. Jno. Foster) Thomasville, Ga. 

Wise, Helen V Peninsula General Hospital, Salisbury, Md. 

1903 

X Byrd, Margaret 

X Blandford, Sara 2506 K. Street, Washington, D. C. 

X Craig, Louise (Mrs. J. U. Dennis) Cecil Apts., Baltimore, Md. 

* Cooke, Albina (Mrs. J. D. Reeder) 

Craft, Elizabeth 223 S. Cherry Street, Richmond, Va. 

Elgin, Elizabeth (Mrs. A. H. Mann) Poolsville, Md. 

Fulton, Isabel 21 N. Carey Street, Baltimore, Md. 

* Deceased. 

X Graduates not members of the association. 



32 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

Gallagher, Ella T 21 N. Carey Street, Baltimore, Md. 

King, Anna (Mrs. F. W. Seiling) Elkridge, Md. 

Massey, Margaret (Mrs. Nathan Winslow) 

1900 Mt. Eoyal Terrace, Baltimore, Md. 

Miller, Mary Presbyterian Eye and Ear Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

* Northrup, Mary A 

t Reeve, Annie 707 St. Paul Street, Baltimore, Md. 

1904 

Bush, Lucy Ladd (Mrs. H. J. Harby) . .121 Calhoun Street, Sumter, S. C. 

X Daugherty, Sara 

J Dilworth, Florence (Mrs. Porter) Jacksonville, Md. 

Guerrant, E. Janie Westminster, Md. 

J Guerrant, Pattie Los Angeles, Cal. 

Gaskill, Laura M 21 N. Carey Street, Baltimore, Md. 

X Lewis, Christine 

X Munder, Lela (Mrs. S. Blood) Boston, Mass. 

X Parrott, E. May Still Pond, Md. 

Schroeder, Harriett 1624 Eutaw Place, Baltimore, Md. 

X Walker, Louise (Mrs. H. Cassard) . . Preston Apartments, Baltimore, Md. 
X Walton, Nancy Annapolis, Md. 

1905 

Bayley, Elizabeth 1922 F Street, Washington, D. C. 

X Brossene, Dora (Mrs. M. Oliver) Washington, D. C. 

Cowling, Margaret University of Virginia, Charlottesville 

X Ferrell, Nellie Danville, Va. 

Geare, Millicent (Mrs. Page Edmunds) 

12 Elmwood Road, Roland Park, Md. 

X Gildea, Elizabeth (Mrs. Eugene Mullen) Perryville, Md. 

X Hilliard, Nellie (Mrs. H. Covington) North Carolina 

X Jones, Netty (Mrs. J. R. Revelle) Louisville, Georgia 

X Kuhn, Ruth A. C. L. Hospital, Waycross, Ga. 

X Owings, Lelia (Mrs. E. B. Quillen) Rocky Mount, N. C. 

t Schaefer, Carlotta Harford County, Md. 

t Trenholm, Lila (Mrs. W. Hopkins) Annapolis, Md. 

1906 

t Carter, Nellie Chatam, Va. 

X Chapman, Anna (Mrs. F. Wright . . 1221 Bolton Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Clarke, Ethel (Mrs.) Robert Long Hospital, Indianapolis, Ind. 

X Cunningham, Sarah (Mrs. Morse) U. S. Army, Washington, D. C, 

$ Doyle, Lenora fMrs. W. White) 2800 St. Paul Street, Baltimore, Md. 

X Ellicott, Mary 

* Deceased. 

X Graduates not members of the association. 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 33 

t Jessup, Marian (Mrs. F. Hynes) Chestertown, Md. 

Lawrence, Margaret (Mrs. S. Moore) 

2106 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, Md. 
t Phillips, M. (Mrs. H. Greenwell) Lutherville, Md. 

* Query, Clara 

Sanderson, Sarah Haxmot Hospital, Erie, Pa. 

* Truitt, Georgia 

1907 

X Barber, Jennie D 

t Bay, Grace I White Hall, Md. 

Bell, Alice F. (Mrs. J. B. Piggott), 

Northumberland Apartments, Washington, D. C. 

X Brewington, Esther (Mrs. P. P. Causey) Sedley, Va. 

Brian, Nannie L 124 W. Lanvale Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Griffith, Isabella (Mrs. H. K. Fleck), 

513 Cathedral Street, Baltimore, Md. 
X Grimes, Mary Concord, Ky. 

Hissey, Naomi 21 N. Carey Street, Baltimore, Md. 

McNabb, Nancy (Mrs. R. P. Bay). . . .8 Hillside Road, Roland Park, Md. 
X Minnis, Rosamond Centerville, Md. 

Minor, Evelyn 1500 John Street, Baltimore, Md. 

X Ogbom, Ella 

X Peyton, Carrie 

J Pue, Marie (Mrs. C. Chapman) Guilford Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Roberson, Clara (Mrs. R. P. Lattimer) Hyattsville, Md. 

X Tongue, Amy B. (Mrs. Chas. Wiley) Redwood City, Cal. 

1908 

X Anderson, M. B. (Mrs. R. B. Hayes) Hillsboro, N. C. 

* Cox, Charlotte 

X Cunningham, A. K 

Dawson, Clyde (Mrs. F. S. Lynn). .41 W. Preston Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Gourley, Henrietta Camp Meade, Md. 

Gavin, Mary 347 W. 55th Street, New York 

X Hamlin, Martha (Mrs. Haynes) Los Angeles, Cal. 

X Hamlin, Mary U. S. Navy 

X Hostrawser, S. A Canada 

X Price, Lula Caroline County, Md. 

Parsons, H. J The Walbert Apartments, Baltimore, Md. 

Russell, Augusta The Walbert Apartments, Baltimore, Md. 

Smith, Maude (Mrs. R. Cornelius) Gettings Avenue, Govans, Md. 

X Schull, Ethel 

t Wright, M. E. (Mrs. G. H. Richards) Port Deposit, Md. 

* Deceased. 

X Graduates not members of the association. 



34 THE UNIVEKSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

1909 

X Almond, Blanche 

t Carter, Lullie (Mrs. H. Hbpkins) Miami, Fla. 

Chapline, Eva The Walbert Apartments, Baltimore, Md. 

Chapline, Laura (Mrs. W. J. Coleman), 

The Walbert Apartments, Baltimore, Md. 

Dukes, Katherine (Mrs. J. B. Magruder), 

2821 N. Calvert Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Ely, Emily The Walbert Apartments, Baltimore, Md. 

Getzendanner, Elizabeth University Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

t Green (Mrs.) 

t Hall, Beulah 

Pue, Louise 1518 Park Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

t Robey, Helen 

Saulsbury, Mary The Walbert Apartments, Baltimore, Md. 

Squires, Lucy Matthews, N. C. 

Tull, Grace 2751 Madison Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Tews, Gertrude (Mrs. Cole) 19 N. Ellwood Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Wham, Anna Lou (Mrs. C. M. Pitt), 

Homewood Apartments, Baltimore, Md. 

Wright, Vera (Mrs. W. Scott) Devereaux, Ga. 

1910 

X Barrett, Adele (Mrs. Parramore) Georgia 

X Burton, Cora (Mrs. Earle) Centerville, Md. 

X Barber, Lucy (Mrs. Blackwell) Sharps, Va. 

Dry, Anne 20 E. 21st Street, Baltimore, Md. 

X Edmunds, March (Mrs. Rivers) Lynchburg, Va. 

Garrison, Gertrude (Mrs. McMillan). Red Springs, N. C. 

X Holland, A. K. (Mrs. Fisk) St. James Apartments, Baltimore, Md. 

Israel, Ellen 214 W. Monument Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Kimmel, Mary M 1420 Bolton Street, Baltimore, Md. 

X King, Florence (Mrs. West) Fayetteville, N. C. 

Lee, Sarah A 351 E. Adams Street, Jacksonsville, Fla. 

Long, Lillian (Mrs. Smink) Lauraville, Md. 

McKay, Virginia J. W. Memorial Hospital, Wilmington, N. C. 

Murchison, Belle (Mrs. Vinup)..1301 Lombard Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Meredith, Frances M 214 W. Monument Street, Baltimore, Md. 

X Pleasants, P. B. (Mrs. J. M. Sparks) Monkton, Md. 

X Price, Lula (Mrs. Robertson) Onancock, Va. 

X Strohm, Emelia (Mrs. Spalding) Macon, Ga. 

X Taylor, Margaret 

Wiggin, M. C 

X Graduates not members of the association. 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 35 

1911 

Brady, Mary U. S. P. H. Hospital, Greenville, S. C. 

t Curtiss, Nell Fayettsville, N. C. 

Garner, Jane (Mrs. W.Michel). .2901 Edmondson Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Gephart, Louise (Mrs. E. Kloman). .44 W. Biddle Street, Baltimore, Md. 

t Grubb, Anna (Mrs. Janney) Montrie, Georgia 

t Hutton, G. A 

Helland, Naomie (Mrs. Strong). .2309 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Kinney, Iva (Mrs. E. C. Haygood) Birmingham, Alabama 

Patterson, Elizabeth 

Ricketts, Stella 1035 N. Calvert Street, Baltimore, Md. 

t Robinson, Eva (Mrs. W. Dcppers), 

3223 N. New Jersey Avenue, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Stouffer, Barbara 21 N. Carey Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Scarff, Marvel (Mrs. J. H. VonDrele) . .846 W. 36th Street, Baltimore, Md. 
J Sprecker, Frances (Mrs. Smith) Harrisburg, Pa. 

Sullivan, Mary Havre de Grace, Md. 

Williams, Alva Relay, Md. 

1912 

Blake, Lillian 23 E. 21st Street. Baltimore, Md. 

Cox, Eulalia 801 Hamilton Terrace, Baltimore, Md. 

Conner, Bemice Care of Serbian Childs Welfare Association, 

18 Resarslsa Ul, Belgrade, Serbia. 

Cole, Mattie (Mrs. C. Alpha), 

Director of Bureau P.H.N., New Orleans, La. 

Dawson, Ethel 1316 Linden Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Harvey, Lucy 1213 Weld on Circle, Baltimore, Md. 

t Lilly, Lucy (Mrs. G. R. Stokes) Chattanooga, Tenn. 

* Logue, Ethel McConnellsburg, Pa. 

t Miles, Juliet (Mrs. Perkins) Winston Salem, N. C. 

Prince, Blanch 3703 Forest Park Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

t Ridgley, Nally (Mrs. Ringgold) Howard County, Md. 

Steiner, May Cumberland, Md. 

Smith, Marion Sparrows Point, Md. 

Stouffer, Lena City Memorial Hospital, Winston Salem, N. C. 

1913 

Brownell, Edith 21 N. Carey Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Butts, Elizabeth 21 N. Carey Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Coward, Addie (Mrs. Chas. McCotton) Grifton, N. C. 

t Chase, Evelyne Waynesboro, Va. 

t Dent, Edith Broadway, New Orleans, La. 

* Deceased. 

X Graduates not members of the association. 



36 THE UNIVEBSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

Dean, Elva 1125 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, Md. 

t Hull, Willie 2213 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Hessler, Sophia (Mrs. Roger Parlett) White River, Arizona 

Laws, Margaret Pittsville, Md. 

Misikofski, Martha Kenwood Avenue, Raspeburg, Md. 

McCann, Natalie 21 N. Carey Sreet, Baltimore, Md. 

Patterson, Dorothy (Mrs. R. Patterson) Clarksburg, W. Va. 

Price, Golda 1125 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, Md. 

J Rush, Pearl 1507 Linden Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Rennie, Mary (Mrs. Carl Blaylock) Norwood, N. C. 

Rutherford, Volina 1818 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, Md. 

J Rutherford, Mary (Mrs. C. Welchel) Gainsville, Ga. 

Shea, Ivatherine Holyoke, Mass. 

Selby, Myrtle University Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

t Welch, Katherine (Mrs. T. B. Woods) Norfolk, Va. 

1914 

X Bosley, M. K 3028 Belmont Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

t Burns, Olive (Mrs. G. Kup) . . 1343 First Street, N. W., Washington, D. C. 
J Coulbourn (Mrs. J. Stevens) Marion, Md. 

Clendenen, Virginia 309 St. Agatha Apartments, St. Paul, Minn. 

Davis, Sadie (Mrs. A. W. Rier) Kinship Road, Dundalk, Md. 

Dukes, Ann (Mrs. J. Foravielle) Rocky Mount, N. C. 

t Ervin, Edith (Mrs. L. Lewis) Blackstock, S. C. 

Ervin, M. J University Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

Foley, J. C ^ Walbert Apartments, Baltimore, Md. 

t Funk, Jessie (Mrs. J. S. Cutsall) Adamstown, Md. 

j Grant, Pearl (Mrs. Hendrick) Port Deposit, Md. 

t Hill, Lucy (Mrs. L. Prettyman), 

306 Carroll Street, N.W., Washington, D. C. 
t Hughes, Bertie (Mrs. Davidson).. .313 E. North Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Hudnall, Carrie (Mrs. Purcell) 

1208 E. Central Avenue, Albuquerque, Mexico 

* Hull, Grace 

t Lord (Mrs. H. Freeman) 2631 N. Calvert Street, Baltimore, Md. 

j Miller, Maude 2400 Montebello Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

t McCann, Elsie (Mrs. H. C. Hood). .115 W 29th Street, Baltimore, Md. 

t Murray, Carrie (Mrs. J. Smith) Atlanta, Ga. 

J Ryan, A. G Annapolis, Md. 

I Roussey, Bessie (Mrs. R. Stanford) Darlington, Md. 

Sigmon, Bertie (Mrs.) Chester Sanatorium, Chester, S. C. 

t Sprecker, Marjorie (Mrs. J. Woodcock) Hollidayburg, Pa. 

t Shelton, Jennie (Mrs. Clyde Blake) . .123 W. Roe Street, Buchanan, Mich. 

Sanders, Marie 2905 Garrison Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

* Deceased. 

J Graduates not members of the association. 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN &7 

Stepp, Lula 21 N. Carey Street, Baltimore, Md. 

X Stoneman, Grace (Mrs. G. Walker) North Carolina 

t Townville, E Rocky Mount, N. C. 

Weaver, Pearl 160 Biltmore Avenue, Ashville, N. C. 

Weber, Dorothy (Mrs. E. Coleman) Atlanta, Ga. 

Zepp, Katherine 21 N. Carey Street, Baltimore, Md. 

1915 

Bay, Nettie 1735 Park Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Bogart, Corine (Mrs. W. Starford) Wendel, W. Va. 

t Beazley, (Mrs. Rhodes) 1532 W. Fayette Street, Baltimore, Md. 

t Boor, Elva (Mrs. VonGesbeck) Balboa, Panama 

Conner, Ruth (Mrs. C. R. Edwards), 

33 W. Preston Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Coppersmith, Martha (Mrs. Leon Kays) Stanford, N. J. 

Dilly, Gertrude (Mrs. E. B. Eitzler) Woodeboro, Md. 

Frothingham, Norma (Mrs. R. B. Chapman), 

34 S. Fulton Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Lea, Mabel Greensboro, N. C. 

Myers, 

t Meredith, Florence (Mrs. C. B. Hicks), 

141 Holderness Street, Atlanta, Ga. 

McDaniel, Lillian 1123 Madison Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

X Nordt, (Mrs. E. M. Bridges) Blue Ridge Summit, Pa. 

Pinckard, Bertie 2404 Barclay Street, Baltimore, Md. 

X Shields, Lelia (Mrs. G. Dawson) Chester, S. C. 

t Stoneham, Ruth 1610 Eutaw Place, Baltimore, Md. 

X Skinner, Florence (Mrs. H. Caldwell) Galena, Md. 

White, Bettie J. W. Memorial Hospital, Wilmington, N. C. 

1916 

Blake, Helen 23 E. 2l8t Street, Baltimore, Md. 

X Clarke, Laura Greensboro, N. C. 

Dix, Nellie 1125 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Dunn, Margaret 1318 Linden Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Eichner, Louise 813 Hamilton Terrace, Baltimore, Md. 

Forney, Marion (Mrs. S. F. Smith) Ashville, N. C. 

Hurst, Anna (Mrs. C. Hickerson) 140 Pine Street, Charlotte, N. C. 

X Henkel, Julia (Mrs. J. A. Skladowsky), 

638 Columbia Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Hoffmaster, Blanch Funkstown, Md. 

Kauffman, Irene 1318 Linden Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

X Langenfeldt, Marie Cheltenham, Md. 

McSherry, Helen B University Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

X Graduates not members of the association. 



38 THE UNIVEESITY HOSPITAL NUBSES 

Mayo, Margaret (Mrs. Oscar Winnberg), 

3004 Grayson Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Null, Lillie 1225 Linden Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

t Phelan, Elizabeth Turnersville, Ga. 

Reaney, Hildegrade (Mrs. Jacob Linn), 

Route 657 Mata Rodandd, Tampico, Mexico 

Rutherford, Elsie 1818 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Smith, Sallie (Mrs. H. Byers) 749 W. North Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Scarff, Inez Sharon, Md. 

Smith, Bernice 1921 Longwood Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Scaggs, Lucy 1207 B Street, N.E., Washington, D. C. 

I Simmons, Maude Charleston, S. C. 

Selfe, Serena (Mrs.W. A. Bridges) Eudowood, Towson, Md. 

J Walter, Marguerite (Mrs. Theo. Warner), 

Windsor Court Apartments, Baltimore, Md. 

1917 

Cecil, R. (Mrs.) 601 N. Calhoun Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Cavano, A. (Mrs. F. Smith) 1734 Homestead, Baltimore, Md. 

X Dearmeyer, Helen (Mrs. J. Pessel), 

1624 N. Pulaski Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Fahrney, Myrtle 1811 Dukeland Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

* Hedges, Lilly 

X Keffer, Laura West Virginia 

Kenney, Emily 601-9 Chemical Bldg., St. Louis, Mo. 

Klase, Josephine (Mrs. C. S. Warrell), 

1059 W. 52d Street, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Lloyd, Ellen 826 Carrollton Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Marsh, Elizabeth 12 E. Preston Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Mohler, Anna (Mrs.) 1406 Madison Avenue, Baltmore, Md. 

Mouse, Lucy University Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

Minnis, Jemima University Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

Minnis, Nancy Connellsville, Pa. 

Monroe, Ethel 4333 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Murray, Olive 1025 Harlem Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

I Pennewell} (Mrs. Lawrence Bloom) 

Va^O/^'"^ — " Quigley, Bertha 717 W. North Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Q Robinson, Anna (Mrs. J. Lutz) 12 E. Preston Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Risley, Marguerite (Mrs. H. M. Stein), 

1315 Mt. Royal Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Simpson, Elsie 202 W. 5th Street, Frederick, Md. 

X Shertzer, R Riverside Hospital, Newport News, Va. 

I Stoneham, New Windsor, Md. 

Thorn, Norma (Mrs. J. S. Woodruff), 

252 N. Payson Street, Baltimore, Md. 

* Deceased. 

X Graduates not members of the assocciation. 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 39 

1918 

Barwick, Elizabeth Fayetteville Hospital, Fayetteville, N.C. 

Bay, Beulah 321 E. 20th Street, Baltimore, Md. 

X Benson, Martha (Mrs. E. M. Jones). .1601 N. 2nd Street, Harrisburg, Pa. 

Carr, Esther (Mrs.) 2121 Linden Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Ensor, Althea (Mrs. Burch) 413 W. Mulberry Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Flowers, Nettie Central Y.W.C.A., Baltimore, Md. 

Hook, Kate 1316 Linden Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

t Kinney, Maud Frostburg, Md. 

Kirkley, Naoma 1235 W. Lafayette Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Lauper, Margaret University Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

Leister, Grace 1316 Linden Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Linstroum, Gay (Mrs. Harry Hughes) 

2125 W. North Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

McMillan, Martha 2121 Linden Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Moore, Cecelia (Mrs. H. Zimmerman) Baltimore, Md. 

McDaniel, Lena (Mrs. C. Rausenbach), 

3237 Eastern Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Oldhauser, Minnie 2863W. Lafayette Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Ridgley, Florence (Mrs. E. Killough), 

Hamlin Apartments, Baltimore, Md. 

Ridgley, Helen 2108 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Scout, Temperance 2121 Linden Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

t Singleton, Jessie Ancon Hospital, Canal Zone, Ancon, Panama 

t Turner, Marion Ancon Hospital, Canal Zone, Ancon, Panama 

1919 

Alrich, Annette (Mrs. Geo. Holman), 

178 Virginia Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Brady, Ethel 2121 Linden Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

$ Brown, Hady (Mrs. Macis) 

Brown, M. M. (Mrs. E. Duvall) New Windsor, Md. 

Gordy, Helen Peninsula General Hospital, Salisbury, Md. 

Jones, Grace 1025 Harlem Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

X Lloyd, Betty 826 N. Carrollton Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

X Loshe, Mrs Peninsula General Hospital, Salisbury, Md. 

X Kling, Caroline Peninsula General Hospital, Salisbury, Md. 

Murray, Emma 28th Street, Newport News, Va. 

t Mitchell (Mrs. Dennis Smith) New Windsor, Md. 

X Nichols, J. (Mrs. Lewis) Avon Apartments, Baltimore, Md. 

Pleasants, Helen Pueblo, Col. 

Sides, E Pueblo, Col. 

Smarr, Alice 1025 Harlem Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Zepp, Katherine (Mrs. M. Douglass). .34 S. 9th Street, Indianapolis, Ind. 

t Graduates not members of the association. 



40 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

1920 

Alexander, Christine (Mrs. J. Mayoral) Apavtado 1465; Havana, Cuba 

Barnett, Louise (Mrs. Reifschneider) 

2939 Eastern Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Baugher, Margaret 1300 Aisquith Street, Baltimore, Md. 

I Biddlecomb, Emily 1300 Aisquith Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Bay, Ethelyn 321 E. 20th Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Butler, Eleanor University Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

Clements, Ruth 135 W. Lanvale Street, Baltimore, Md. 

t Evans, Emma Benger, Md. 

Gilbert, Helen 2044 Linden Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

t Howell, Florence Rock Hill, S. C. 

t Kirkley, Azalia 2917 W. North Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Little, Rachel 21 N. Carey Street, Baltimore, Md. 

t Langford, Marie 1425 Linden Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

McGovern, Clara 1300 Aisquith Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Northcutt, Lena 21 N. Carey Street, Baltimore, Md. 

t Reynolds, Grace 2237 Eutaw Place, Baltimore, Md. 

t Schwab, Myrtle 1235 W. Lafayette Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

J Scaggs, Edna 21 N. Carey Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Trevelian, Mabel 2044 Linden Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Tillett, Zora 2044 Linden Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Maston, Bessie University Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

t Yates, Edna 3039 W. North Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

I Yingling, Emily 21 N. Carey Street, Baltimore, Md. 

1921 

J Bateman, Louise (Mrs. M. Brooks) Cockeysville, Md* 

Childs, Helen 2121 Linden Avenue, Baltimore, Md« 

t Fisher, Mary Lonaconing, Md- 

t Gaver, Norma 1225 Linden Avenue, Baltimore, Md« 

Gorman, Ruth 323 Church Street, Waynesboro, Pa- 

J Hanna, Isabel (Mrs. L. Goldsborough), 

University Apartments, Baltimore, Md. 

t Hampton, Claribel 1505 Linden Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

I Hogshead, Kate 205 Schencks Street, Greensboro, N. C. 

J Minnis, Christine 116 Snyder Street, Connellsville, Pa. 

Martin, Blanche. . . .Fulton and Pennsylvania Avenues, Baltimore, Md. 
t McDaniel, Mary Halethorpe, Md. 

Neady, Susan P R.F.D. 4, Waynesboro, Pa. 

t Reister, Ruby 139 Park Avenue, Ashville, N. C. 

t Reese, Zadith 2044 Linden Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Reamey, Eugenia. .Fulton and Pennsylvania Avenues, Baltimore, Md. 
t Rhodes, Jessie 1505 Linden Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Smith, Julia Fulton and Pennsylvania Avenues, Baltimore, Md. 

I Woods, Anna Fulton and Pennsylvania Avenues, Baltimore, Md. 

In spite of our efforts we feel that this list is somewhat incomplete. 
Corrections greatly appreciated. 

X Graduates not members of the association. 




Winibtt^itp ?|os;pital Muv^t^* 
Alumnae Pulletin 



1923 



OFFICERS OF THE ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

1923-1924 

President Mrs. H. K. Fleck, R.N., 513 Cathedral St. 

First Vice-President Miss E. L. Marsh, R.N. 

Second Vice-President Mrs. C. M. Barwick, R.N. 

Secretary Miss Grace Elgin, R.N., University Hospital 

Treasurer Miss Blanch Hoffmaster, R.N., University Hospital 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 
The above named officers with 
Miss Ella Israel, R.N. Mrs. Page Edmunds, R.N. 

Mrs. Nathan Winslow, R.N. Miss Frankie Morrison, R.N. 

MEMBERSHIP COMMITTEE 

Mrs. Harry Stein, R.N., chairman 
Mrs. Frank Lynn, R.N. Miss E. L. Marsh, R.N. 
Mrs. John Ltjtz, R.N. Miss Bessie L. Maston, R.N. 

PROGRAM COMMITTEE 

Mrs. L. a. Cecil, chairman 
Miss Eleanor Butler, R.N. Miss Lillian Null, R.N. 
Miss Blanch Martin, R.N. Mrs. C. A. Reifschneider, R.N. 

NOMINATING COMMITTEE 

Miss Francis Meredith, R.N., chairman 
Mrs. L. a. Cecil, R.N. Miss Lillian McDaniel, R.N. 
Miss Emily Sly, R.N. Mrs. John Lutz, R.N. 

PUBLICATION COMMITTEE 

Mrs. H. K. Fleck, chairman 
Mrs. Gertrude Cole, R.N. Miss Francis Meredith, R.N. 

Miss Elizabeth Getzendanner, R.N. Mrs. C. M. Pitt, R.N. 
Mrs. Frank Lynn, R.N. Mrs. Nathan Winslow, R.N. 



I 





LOUISA PARSONS 



^ THE 

University Hospital Nurses 
Alumnae Bulletin 



Vol. Ill APRIL, 1923 No. 1 

LOUISA PARSONS, FIRST SUPERINTENDENT OF 

NURSES IN THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

HOSPITAL^ 

By Harvey Gushing, M.D. 

Five service medals and a single rather illegible letter written 
when she knew her end was near, do not go a long way toward 
revealing a woman's character. They nevertheless make it 
possible, even for one who never knew her, to string together 
some few incidents of a life which is of moment to us on this 
occasion for the reason that at one brief period it intimately 
touched and left an enduring imprint upon this venerable 
institution. 

I do not even know precisely when or where in England Louisa 
Parsons was born, nor mdeed would these details be essential to 
my brief story. It is said to have been somewhere in Devon, 
and that her father was a physician and that she had a sister. 
But what is essential is the fact that as a young woman she 
dedicated her hfe to the alleviation of suffering and in so doing 
chose, whenever opportunity offered, to take the rougher road 
which meant hardship, exposure, and responsibility. 

There is nothing unusual in this. Countless other Marthas, 
whose self-sacrificing labors remain unsung, have done no less. 
But occasionally the fates so dispose that one of these seeking 
neither reward nor recognition, yet becomes singled out for special 
remembrance. So it was with Florence Nightingale, who cared 
so much for service to others and so little for recognition of self 
that her body lies — you and I have forgotten where — in some 

'■ Remarks made in presenting Miss Parsons' medals and decorations to 
the University Hospital Training School on the dedication of its new home, 
November 16, 1922. 

3 



unfrequented spot, whereas a grateful nation wished to give it a 
place in their Abbey. It was a personal choice quite consistent 
with her character. 

It is difficult to realize that this saintly woman, the first Lady 
of the Lamp who made it possible for Louisa Parsons and many 
others of like kind to give themselves to service in an open world 
instead of in a cloister — that this woman died a short twelve 
years ago. Sixty years before, she had paid her first visit to that 
Institute of Protestant Deaconnesses at Kaisersworth on the 
Rhine, and then and there became convinced that nursing might 
be made a "calling" for ladies. 

The ability and instinct to care for the sick is native in all 
women, but Miss Nightingale set herself to raise the art of nursing 
from the menial occupation of a Sarah Gamp to an honorable 
vocation. Her opportunity came with the Crimea, and when, 
hailed as "Santa Filomena," she returned after those arduous 
years in the barrack hospital at Scutari, the nation would have 
thrown itself at her feet. She was olBfered, we may recall, a ship 
of war to bring her home, but chose instead to return privately and 
unannounced on a French passenger boat and to go unnoticed 
to her home. 

The only public recognition of her services she would sanction 
was the raising of a fund to establish a training school for nurses. 
Thus it was that in 1860 the Nightingale Nursing School and 
Home at St. Thomas' Hospital came into being, and there, about 
twenty years later, was graduated the woman to whom we have 
tardily come to pay tribute today. 

Though Miss Nightingale refused to become director of the 
School bearing her name, one may be assured that her interest in 
its welfare was no less than had she been in charge, and that her 
spirit and ideals were emulated by every graduate. Accordingly, 
even without the evidence of the oldest of these medals, we might 
know where Louisa Parsons would be found shortly after her 
graduation. 

Great Britain, as may be recalled, had been left in the early 
'80's to deal single-handed with a complicated situation in Egypt. 
The massacre and pillage in Alexandria had called for intervention, 
and Wolesley's Expedition, dispatched in 1882, succeeded through 
the victory of Tell-el-Kebir in saving Cairo from the fate of Alex- 
andria. So it came about that British troops were left to main- 



AX.UMNAE BULLETIN O 

tain law and order in the land of the Khedive, a well nigh impossible 
task. 

The histories give the details of this and the subsequent Egyp- 
tian campaigns which the British government faced with the 
customar}'- misunderstandings and vacillation born of politics. 
But in these accounts one fails to find reference to the fever- 
stricken and wounded who filled the hospitals of the expeditionary- 
forces in which such as Louisa Parsons slaved — ill equipped, 
undermanned and underwomaned as they doubtless were. We 
only know that on April 23, 1883, at the end of Wolesley's cam- 
paign, under her Majesty's warrant for service in Egypt, she 
with a few others, most of them in all likehhood graduates of the 
Nightingale School, were personally decorated, it is said by Vic- 
toria herself, with the Royal Red Cross. 

But a far more arduous service was ahead. The stern meas- 
ures introduced in the Sudan by Gordon in an effort to suppress 
the slave trade had provoked a revolt, and one ineffective Egyp- 
tian force after another, led by British officers and sent to quell 
the disorders, had been annihilated by the Mahdists. 

To the campaigns which followed in the next two or three 
years, a spot named Suakin on the western shore of the Red Sea 
bore much the same relation as did Scutari in the campaigns of 
the Crimea. Delays, caused largely by governmental and 
military indecision, led to a disaster which saw the death of Gor- 
don, the fall of Khartum, and the separation of the Sudan from 
the rest of Egypt. It is a story of waterless desert, tropical heat, 
thirst, inefficiency, typhoid, dysentery, and disappointment — a 
water column by way of the Nile struggUng against the cataracts 
of the upper river; a rival desert column from Suakin of hetero- 
geneous units, camel corps, Egyptians, Indians and blacks inter- 
mingled with 'red coats' who maneuvered in the old British square. 

Through all this went some stout-hearted women, Louisa 
Parsons one of them, and she is supposed to have accompanied a 
hospital detachment far into the interior. Finally a victim of 
typhoid, she was invalided to England where in time she recovered 
and received from a grateful queen this, the Egyptian Service 
Medal, with its coveted "Suakin 1885" bar. This particular 
award, a silver medal, bears the veiled head of Victoria pendent 
from a distinctive blue and white ribbon. Subsequently, after 
some sort of order under Cromer was estabhshed in lower Egypt, 



b THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

these striking bronze, five-rayed stars which bear the inscrutable 
effigy of the Sphinx, were distributed by the Khedive among those 
who participated in the campaigns of 1884-86 in his ancient land. 

In 1887, Miss Parsons came to this country as the nurse and 
companion of an American women in ill health with whom, and 
until she was restored to health, the next two years were passed 
in Cahfornia and the Carolinas. But suited as she was to fill the 
sometimes trying position of a private nurse, Louisa Parsons was 
a woman capable of larger tasks. 

Early in 1889, the Johns Hopkins Hospital was about to open 
its wards, and as a training school for nurses was to become an 
essential part of the institution, a capable superintendent must 
needs be secured, and accordingly an advertisement asking for 
candidates was issued by Francis T. King, the first President of 
the Board of Trustees. For this position more than eighty 
applications were received. The number was finally sifted down 
to four: Miss Annie McDowell, Miss Caroline Hampton, Miss 
Louisa Parsons, and Miss Isabel Hampton. These four women 
were interviewed by a committee consisting of Mr. King, Mr 
Oilman, Dr. Carey Thomas, Dr. John S. Billings, Dr. Welch and 
Dr. Osier; and though as is known Isabel Hampton was unani- 
mousty selected, the other three candidates were nevertheless 
retained as occupants of other important positions. Since Isabel 
Hampton was unable to enter immediately upon her duties. Miss 
Parsons, being the senior of the three, was temporarily put in 
charge of the embryo school, and during her brief three months' 
period as acting superintendent she demonstrated such a capacity 
for leadership and organization, showed such a thorough knowl- 
edge of nursing and displayed such qualities of devotion and self- 
sacrifice that in December of 1889 on the return of Miss Hampton 
her services were eagerly sought by the University of Maryland 
when its training school for nurses was inaugurated. Of her 
short two years of service as your first Superintendent of Nurses, 
I know less than do many of you, but the fact that we are here 
today to dedicate in her memory the first unit of your new nurses' 
home indicates that the impress of her personality and ability was 
an abiding one. 

Whether it may have been the result of her experiences as a 
campaigner or whether because of an inherent trait, Miss Parsons 
seems to have been a woman inclined or at least destined to change 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 7 

of scene, and she is next found for a period as Superintendent of 
Nurses in a hospital in St. Paul. Nor did she remain there for a 
long period. 

It is not improbable that she had enrolled herself soon after 
coming to this country as a volunteer Red Cross nurse in the 
society which Miss Clara Barton early in the Eighties had suc- 
ceeded in starting. It had already done good service at the time 
of a Mississippi flood, at another of the Ohio, a drouth in Texas, 
a cyclone in Illinois, a yellow fever epidemic in Florida, the 
Johnstown catastrophe, and elsewhere; and it is not unlikely that 
even before her Baltimore days she had been used by Miss Barton 
who had come to learn of her unusual abilities and readiness for 
an active service. 

Red Cross nurses in those days were few and far between, but 
Miss Parsons was a host in herself and so at the time of the dis- 
astrous hurricane with its subsequent tidal flood devastating the 
islands off the Carolinas in August of 1893, she was sent by Miss 
Barton to Beaufort, South Carohna, as the chief Red Cross 
representative. 

Called home shortly after, owing to the illness of her sister, 
she remained for a time in England, but ere long she returned 
again to this country and for the next few j'ears (1895-1897) 
became almost the adopted member of a Boston family who loved 
her for her own sake no less than they depended upon her for her 
professional knowledge. Then came the Spanish War, and she 
was sent as a Red Cross representative to take nursing charge 
of the hospital at Fort MacPherson. That brief campaign might 
well have been called the typhoid war, for few of our volunteer 
army even saw a Spaniard or ever got to Cuba. They battled 
chiefly with camp pestilences, and few of the contract surgeons 
engaged by the army understood the principles of camp sanita- 
tion or could distinguish enteric from malarial fevers. 

Those who remember the fever-stricken camps of the South 
and the train loads of Maryland boys stricken low with typhoid 
who, through the activity of your lamented feflow-townsman 
Ridgely Trimble, were brought back to Baltimore in August of 
1898, can reahze what Louisa Parsons must have felt — that com- 
pared to Fort MacPherson, Suakin with its typhoid patients had 
been a haven of rest. So we find also among these medals and 
decorations the service award of the Spanish War; but far better 



8 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

than the medal in recognition of her services, the name of this 
devoted Enghshwoman was given to one of the organizations of 
Spanish War veterans in far away Gloucester — and the 'Louisa 
Parsons Auxiliary' it remains. 

A year later came the Boer War, and she was recalled to Eng- 
land for duty in South Africa where through the long drawn out 
years of that unhappy conflict she remained in charge of one or 
another of the large hospitals established somewhere behind the 
shifting lines of battle in that spacious continent — hospitals at 
Johannesburg and Bloemfontein filled with Boers and British 
victims alike of wounds and typhoid. 

Unfortunately the thrilling letters she wrote her American 
friends from the field hospitals where she was occasionally stationed 
have not been preserved, and the only record of her service is the 
familiar Queen's medal of the South African War with its orange, 
blue, and red ribbon worn by so many British soldiers and nursing 
sisters in France a sort twenty years later. 

At the conclusion of this war, she again came to America 
for a time where in her short ten years of residence she had made 
countless loyal friends, but owing to her sister's continued illness, 
she once more rejoined her, and finding a badly crippled household 
gave up all other activities for what was plainly a home duty. 

The Great War, and her last, found her no longer in good health, 
no longer young, living on a farm near Reading, caring for her 
brother-in-law who had been incapacitated by an old injury. 
There, doubtless filled with longing to be in Flanders, or Meso- 
potamia, or Africa or Egypt — anywhere, indeed, at the bedsides of 
her beloved Tommies, she must needs content herself with pro- 
viding such care and pleasure for the first of the blue-coated 
convalescents as might have been sent to her neighborhood in 
'Blighty.' But this was not for long. She became aware that 
she was the victim of a hopeless malady. 

And now there enters into the story which nears its end another 
person who also for a few short years intimately touched the life 
of this community. What remains to tell can best be given in 
the words of the messages which passed. On August 29, 1916, 
from Great Lea Farm, Great Lea, near Reading, Miss Parsons 
had written to her old and devoted American friend, the woman 
in whose companionship she had first come to our shores: 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 9 

Your lovely dress came yesterday. You won't mind if I give it to 
Miss Price whom it will just fit. You will be sorry to hear that nothing 
more can be done for me. So I must be brave! Dr. Halpin had Dr. Morris 
in yesterday and his report was very unsatisfactory. I am not well enough 
to go to Oxford to see Dr. Osier but Oh my dear I would give anything to 
see him. I feel if any one could help me he could and I do wish I had gone 
over to America before this happened. I am always wishing I were over 
there — if only in a hospital. 

My heart is full of love and gratitude to you for all your loving kindness. 
I am sorry to send you such a sad letter, but it's best to say frankly to you 
dear just how I am. I have had a poor night with severe pain around my 
heart, and I do not get better but worse 

On receipt of this letter, word was sent Sir William Osier ac- 
quainting him with the circumstances and he replied by cable 
that he would see Miss Parsons promptly. So on September 4 
came from Oxford this hand-written letter. There were no 
secretaries in those days even for an overworked Regius Professor. 

Dear Miss L — , Just as soon as I could get the Gt. Lea Farm located I 
went to see Miss Parsons, who has been failing for three or four months. 
. After receipt of your cable I made all arrangements for her 
transfer to Oxford, and we had hoped to send the ambulance today; but 
Dr. Halpin (a very good fellow, by the way) has just wired that she is much 
worse and not fit to move. Unfortunately I have to go to Newcastle or 
I should pay her another visit. She is being very well looked after and I 

asked Dr. Halpin to get a nurse I will let you know at once 

on my return from Newcastle. I cabled today as I felt you would wish to 
know. 

Sincerely yours, 

Wm. Osler. 

And from Louisa Parsons a few days later: 

. What can I say! How can I thank you for sending Dr. 
Osier to me. It was like a fairly tale — I did want to see him so much and 
could not believe it when his letter came to say he was coming — 

And then again on October 21 from 13, Norham Gardens: 

Dear Miss L — , I saw the dear patient this afternoon and sent you a 
cable on my return. She is in most comfortable quarters and could not be 
better cared for. The nurse is excellent and Miss Parsons likes her very 
much. She had also the little girl who is devoted to her by day. She is 
much weaker, but suffers no pain, only the inconvenience of the somewhat 
frequent vomiting- She has good nights with a moderate dose of morphia. 
Altogether I am glad she did not move to the Acland Home here, as she is 



10 THE UNIVEESITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

among her friends, many of whom come in. I told the nurse to spare no 
trouble or expense. She sends me word every few days. The end cannot 

be far off, but she has wonderful vitality Our boy went 

over last week to join his battery and take his place with the fine fellows 
who are fighting the cause of freedom. 

Yours sincerely, 

Wm. Osler. 

Then a cable the following day, October 22: 

Miss Parsons failing have seen her today not suffering sends love. 

William Osler. 

And two weeks later, another: 

Miss Parsons died November second. 

William Osler. 

On November 11, Lady Osier wrote for her husband as follows: 

. I am sorry this is not in time for toda3^'s post. I thought 
Sir William had written but he was called away and did not have time. 
You know of course that it has been a great pleasure to us both to do 
anything in the world for Miss Parsons or to help you to have everything 
possible done. Fortunately the Farm has been within driving distance 
and he was able to go to the last. I am sure it was a comfort to Miss 
Parsons and as long as she was able she wrote to say what his visits had 
meant to her. I could not go to the funeral, unfortunately, which was a 
disappointment but Sir William went. He sent a wreath — with a card 
saying "From the Medical and Nursing Staff of the Johns Hopkins 
Hospital." It was a military funeral for she belonged as you probably 
know to the Reserve Nursing Staff of the Army. The coffin was carried to 
the church on a gun carriage — a company of soldiers, buglers and a firing 
party — rifles fired over the grave and the "Last Post" sounded by the 
buglers. Sir William said it was immensely impressive — a gorgeous 
autumn afternoon, with wonderful lights and shades — and the roadside 
lined with people from far and near. Isn't it nice it could be so done? 
I am sure you will be glad. I am writing to tell Miss Bonner who has 

always been such a close friend All well with Revere thus 

far but one never knows what to expect at any moment." 

And finally from the Regius Professor himself on November 23: 

. Grace wrote about the funeral, which was really most im- 
pressive. I had never before seen a military funeral given to a nurse. I 
am sorry clippings are forbidden, but I am keeping a paper. I am sending 
a notice to the Johns Hopkins Hospital Nurses' Journal. She was a fine 
character and I can never forget the devoted service she gave us in those 
early daj^s in Baltimore. I am so glad you sent me word about her as I 

fear she would not have let me know Good news from the 

boy from his dug-out on the Ancre 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 11 

So Louisa Parsons died, and her last request was that these, 
her service medals, be left for this school of which she was the 
founder. A short few days before, her nurse, — the Miss Price 
whom the dress just fitted — had written: "She only lives to get 
her treasures packed for those she wishes to possess them. She 
is thinking of others to the very end." Thus it has come about 
that we are meeting here today to fulfill this request. 

Those who remember her say that she was a woman who would 
immediately be singled out as a person of distinction, a woman of 
charming manner, with a pleasant voice and the brilliant com- 
plexion of a gipsy, a woman who loved animals, who was always 
found doing something for someone else; but a woman of deter- 
mination, prompt of action, knowing no indecision; a woman, 
moreover, who appears to have been capable of instilling in 
others because of her unselfishness, modesty, and charm, such a 
devotion toward herself as she in turn gave to those in need of 
her professional care. 

Of such a disciple Florence Nightingale might well have been 
proud, and of her as well as of her famous prototype Longfellow's 
lines might have been written: 

As if a door in heaven should be 
Opened and then closed suddenly, 

The vision came and went, 

The light shone and was spent. 

A Lady with a Lamp shall stand 
In the great history of the land, 

A noble type of good, 

Heroic womanhood. 



12 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

DEDICATION OF NURSES' HOME 

On Thursday afternoon, November 16, at 4:00 p.m. the dedi- 
cation of the New Nurses' Home took place; the exercises being 
held in the Second English Lutheran Church adjoining the Home 
with the following program: 

Musical Selection 

Prayer Rev. Arthur B. Kinsolving, D.D. 

Musical Selection 

Presentation of Nurses Home Mr. George Shriver 

Acceptance of Building in Behalf of State.. Mr. John M. Dennis 

Dedicatory Address Governor Albert C. Ritchie 

Presentation of Medals of Louisa E. Parsons, 

Dr. Harvey Gushing 

Presentation of Piano President A. F. Woods 

Presentation of Edith Cavell Edition of Thomas k Kempis "The 

Imitation of the Life of Christ,' Rev. J. E. Grubb ., 

Benediction Dr. Hugh Birckhead 

Reception 
Inspection of Home 

Dr. Harvey Cushing's address will be bound and placed with 
the medals in the Nurses' Home. 

Miss Elizabeth Read, 1894, President of Nurses Club, 21 N. 
Carey Street, accepted the medals, on behalf of the Club, she in 
turn presenting them to the Nurses' Home. 

The piano, book and medals were accepted for the Home by the 
Superintendent of Nurses, Miss Annie Creighton, in a most 
pleasing manner. 

Only the first unit of the Home has been constructed ; the second 
will be started when sufficient funds have been raised. The cost 
of this building is estimated at $116,500; it is six stories high and is 
constructed of brick. Eighty nurses can be housed comfortably 
in the building. Kitchenettes have been installed on alternate 
floors. On the first floor are spacious sitting rooms, library, 
lecture and class rooms, laboratory and office for nurse in charge 
of Home. 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 13 

EDITORIALS 

The American Nurses' Memorial Building 

All our nurses undoubtedly are interested in the American 
Nurses' Memorial Building (Nurses' Home) connected with the 
Florence Nightingale School of Nursing at Bordeaux, France. 
This building was formalh^ dedicated on May 12, 1922. Miss 
Clara D. Noyes, chairman of the Memorial Fund Committee, was 
asked to be present to present the school to the board, the gradu- 
ates and the students. As it was impossible for Miss Noyes 
to attend, owing to the Seattle Convention, Miss Sophie Nelson, 
Assistant Director of the American Red Cross Nursing Service 
in Europe, was asked to perfoiin this office. Miss Nelson's report 
said : 

I wish you might see the new building yourself. I am sure you would 
not be disappointed in this, our gift to the Bordeaux School. It is abso- 
lutely finished. The reception room, and dining room and class rooms 
are furnished, but the furniture had not arrived for the upstairs bed- 
rooms. One of the most interesting parts of the exercises was 
the presentation of the gold key, which had been provided by the board of 
trvistees for the representative of the .American Nurses' Association to 
present to the oldest graduate of the school. This I presented to Mile. 
Larmanou, who responded and then unlocked the door of the school, and 
Dr. Hamilton entered, followed by the American nurses, who were present, 
the graduates of the school, the student body, and then the other guests. 
The old key and the trowel, both of which have played a conspicuous part 
in the history of the school, are on exhibition in the exhibit room. We 
hope that each nurse will look at them, and will try to visualize what it has 
meant to nursing in France to have received such a notable gift from the 
nurses of America. 

Probably you helped raise this fund. Surely, we could in 
no better way honor the memory of those of our members who died 
in line of duty during the World War than by providing an oppor- 
tunity for the 5'oung women of France to credibly represent the 
profession of our deceased sisters. 

The Isabel Hampton Robb Memorl^l Fund 

The Isabel Hampton Robb Memorial Fund, offers annually a 
number of scholarships to graduate nurses of approved qualifica- 
tions, who wish to prepare for better service in the higher branches 
of hospital, training school, or public health work, or who seek 



14 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

opportunities for study and investigation of some special problem 
in nursing in these fields. Candidates may chose: The Depart- 
ment of Nursing and Health, Teachers College, Columbia Uni- 
versity. The School of Public Health Nursing conducted by Sim- 
mons College and Instructive District Nurses' Association, Bos- 
ton. The School of Applied Social Sciences, Western Reserve 
University, in cooperation with the Instructive Visiting Nurse 
Association and other Agencies, Cleveland. The Pennsylvania 
School for Social Service, in cooperation with the Visiting Nurse 
Societ}'^ and other agencies, Philadelphia. The course in Public 
Health Nursing offered by the Visiting Nurse Association in co- 
operation with Yale University, New Haven. 

The scholarships are $250, I think, which is intended to cover 
the expense of tuition and text books. Of course this does not 
cover living expenses, which amount to about $400 for the aca- 
demic year. 

Application blanks, or information concerning this fund may 
be secured from the secretary of the Committee, Katherine DeWitt, 
Room 13, 19 West Main Street, Rochester, N. Y. 

The McIsaac Loan Fund 

This loan fund is for educational purposes, and was established 
by the American Nurses' Association in memory of Isabel McIsaac. 
Sums not exceeding $200 may be borrowed, at 2 per cent interest, 
for a term of five years. 

Information concerning this fund may also be obtained from 
Miss DeWitt. 

Expansion at National Headquarters 

On April 29, 1921, the National Office of the American Nurses' 
Association was established at 370 Seventh Avenue, New York 
City, adjoining that of the National Organization of Public 
Health Nursing. Considering that the American Nurses' Asso- 
ciation probably represents the largest organization of profes- 
sional women in the world it is fitting that they maintain head- 
quarters on a dignified scale. This will enable them not onty to 
develop, but to conduct the Association affairs in a more efficient 
business like manner. 

But naturally there must be funds. Until the Convention of 
June, 1922, the funds had been derived from several sources: the 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 15 

American Red Cross, the Association's individual treasures, gifts 
from Alumnaes and State Associations, and gifts from hospitals. 
This means of revenue being too uncertain the question as to the 
advisabilitj^ of increasing the National Association dues from 15 
to 50 cents was discussed, and favorably passed upon at the 
Seattle Convention. 

As you probably know $1.00 of the dues that you pay to your 
Alumnae goes to the State Association, who in turn pays 15 cents 
of this to the National Association. In the future the State 
Association will pay 50 cents to the National Association. At 
the annual meeting of the State Association it was voted that the 
State Association increase its dues from $1.00 to $1.50 to meet this 
National increase. 

SECRETARY'S REPORT 

Eight meetings of the Alumnae Association have been held 
during the last year. These Monthly Meetings were held at the 
University Hospital the first Tuesday in each month, at half past 
seven in the evening; with the exception of January when it 
met on the ninth instead of the second. 

March 7, 1922. Miss Rolph made a motion that we have the 
usual annual banquet, seconded by Miss McSherry — carried. 
Miss Getzendanner's report of dance of February 23: cleared 
about $230.00. 

April 4, 1922. jMrs. Lynn reported inability, owing to home 
duties, to continue as chairman of Program Committee. Mrs. 
Wilson accepted the chairmanship. Mrs. Stein accepted the 
chairmanship of the Banquet Committee. Mrs. Winslow made a 
motion that a letter be written Dr. Woods suggesting that the 
first unit of the New Nurses' Home be called after Louisa E. 
Parsons. Aliss Grey seconded the motion — carried. 

May 2, 1922. The chair asked if some one would volunteer 
to get out the postal announcements for the remainder of the 
year, as Miss McDaniel was unable to continue this work. Miss 
Meredith volunteered. A letter from Miss Martin, secretary of 
State Association was read asking for subscriptions to the Ameri- 
can Journal of Nursing. After the business of the meeting was 
over, the graduating class attended in a body. Miss Imuler 
gave an interesting talk on the work of the Baby Milk Fund. 
After adjournment refreshments were served by the Program 
Committee. 



16 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

October 3, 1922. Resignation of Mrs. Wilson as chairman of 
Program Committee accepted with regret. Mrs. Cecil was 
appointed to fill unexpired term. After adjournment ice-cream, 
cake and coffee served. 

November 7, 1922. Treasurer reported that forty-one members 
had been dropped from Alumnae membership roll for non-pay- 
ment of dues. The question of an Associate Membership was 
discussed, and left to the Executive Board for decision. Miss 
Getzendanner, chairman of the Committee to raise funds for the 
New Nurses' Home reported that a piano had been bought and 
presented to the Home with funds raised; that the Committee 
still had on hand about $380. Refreshments served by the Pro- 
gram Committee. 

December 5, 1922. Mrs. Stein was appointed chairmai\ of the 
Membership Committee for the balance of the j^ear. The follow- 
ing proposed changes in the Constitution and By-Laws were 
submitted for consideration by Mrs. Lynn, chairman of By-Laws 
Committee: Article III, Membership. Section 1. (A) and 
(B) no change. (C) Associate Members shall consist of section 
(1) no change. Section (2) those, who reside in or out of the 
state, not engaged in active nursing, but desire to be members of 
the Association without the privilege of voting or holding office. 
Dues shall be $1.00. The chair read a letter from the Secretary 
of the State Association asking for several names that might be 
used on the Nominating Committee of the State Association. 
Mrs. Edwards, Mrs. Lutz and Mrs. Fleck consented to have 
their names sent in to be used if needed. 

January 9, 1922. After some discussion Mrs. Winslow made a 
motion that the amendment to the Constitution be accepted as 
read. Miss Ricketts seconded the motion. Unanimously car- 
ried. Miss Meredith, chairman of Nominating Committee, 
reported election of office for 1923, as given. Refreshments 
served. 

February 6, 1923. Appointment of standing committees as 
given. Discussion of increase in State Association dues. Voted 
that the Alumnae in the future send to the State Association the 
required $1.50 for each member. Voted that, at least for the 
present, the Alumnae assume this additional tax without an 
increase in individual dues. 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 17 

TREASURER'S REPORT 

Statement of Receipts axd Disbursements Year Ending 
December 3^, 1922 

general fund 
Receipts : 

Dues from Members $768 . 60 

Interest on Loan (?200) 16.00 

Loan, Paid on Account 10.00 

Total Receipts §794.60 

Disbursements: 

American Nurses' Relief (Dues) $100.00 

Maryland State Association (Dues) 131 .00 

Bulletin (Balance) 81 .57 

Banquet 50 . 25 

Scholarship (Columbia University) 150.00 

Delano Memorial 8.00 

Dues (Returned) 2.00 

Refreshments 24.59 

Flowers 2 . 50 

Stamps and Stationery 13 . 13 

Printing 34.50 

S597.54 
Total Disbursements $597.54 

Balance in the Western National Bank of Baltimore, Decem- 
ber 31, 1922 S449.24 

SICK BENEFIT FUND 

Receipts: 

Dues from Members $203 .00 

Interest to April, 1921 50.00 

Interest to April, 1922 51.00 

$304.00 
Total Receipts .?304 .00 

Disbursements: 

Paid to Members $315.00 

Nurses' Home Committee 255.84 

Total Disbursements $570 .84 

Balance in Eutaw Savings Bank, December 31, 1922 . . $986.44 

Endowment Fund S998.23 



18 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

REPORT OF CHAIRMAN OF PUBLICATION COMMITTEE 

We would like to take this opportunity to express our apprecia- 
tion for articles, letters, and news notes contributed to the Bulle- 
tin, and to remind you that it cannot be a success without your 
assistance. 

This year we are fortunate in having a most interesting article 
by Dr. Harvey Cushing. We had hoped for a letter from Miss 
Conner in Serbia, as she told Mrs. Edwards that she had written 
us, but to date it has not arrived. 

The expenses of publishing last year's Bulletin was $181.57, of 
which amount $92 was collected from advertisements. We found 
that the charge of 25 cents that was made for the Bulletin was not 
satisfactory, so this year it will come to you free. 

Isabella Griffith Fleck, 

Chairman. 

WOMAN'S AUXILIARY BOARD 
By Millicent Gear Edmunds, R.N., President 

To express ourselves not only in words but in actual deeds is a 
captivating though at times a difficult task, for it means many 
considerations, among them being a sympathetic appreciation, 
an unbounding faith in human nature as well as a big dash of 
common sense and tons of indefatigable energy. However, we 
feel that we have been imbued with many of the necessary in- 
gredients for our successful deeds in possessing a spirit of broad 
vision and large-souled ideals, thereby stimulating our love service 
and good will for humanity. 

What greater stewardship could there possibly be than that with 
which our organization is endowed to make us realize our re- 
sponsibilities and obligations in creating a fervent desire among all 
people to provide comfort and necessities for patients, and com- 
modities for our Hospital, so that we may in a measure increase 
the happiness and welfare of these sick people. 

Very briefly, I will try to give a resume of the work carried on 
in the Hospital by various members of the Board: 

The Wards are visited twice a week, letters written, shopping 
done, and many welfare and social problems attended too, as 
well as fruit, ice cream, etc., being distributed. At Easter a 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 19 

potted plant is put on each table, and at Christmas the Hospital 
is decorated with greens, Christmas trees put up and trimmed, 
stockings filled, as well as entertainment and a delicious Christmas 
dinner provided for each and every ward patient. Religious 
services are held each Sunday through the year. 

The Volunteer Social Service Committee is doing very active 
work in the various clinics of the dispensary, the character of this 
work is clerical and 'follow up' outside visiting, which means day 
in and day out service. On all sides one hears expressions of 
appreciation for this valuable service and for the " stickativeness" 
of this group of women. 

The Discharged Patients Committee looks after taking the 
discharged patients home, who cannot afford the proper mode of 
transportation, as well as bringing patients into the Hospital for 
admittance or treatment. Later these volunteers will revisit 
these poor patients, encouraging them to keep up the prescribed 
after-treatments. 

The Nurses Home Committee has been quite active in planning 
entertainments for the pupil nurses, among which being picnics 
during the summer, dances etc. during the winter. Many of us 
are the proud possessor of a silver cuff pin, which this committee 
has had the pleasure of giving to the nurses of the various graduat- 
ing classes. After all it is in the doing of these small things that 
real interest is being stimulated in the training school. Does not 
the fact of the Board presenting a membership and pin of our 
Alumnae Association to the nurse in each graduating class who 
has the highest mark in practical work, tell its o^vn story? 

Surgical dressings are being made by some of the volunteers, 
and according to the urgent request for this service, it must be a 
very real need. Perhaps we who are not on the spot cannot reahze 
the tremendous quantities of dressings needed to run our ever 
growing surgical department. 

Many opportunities have been presented to and carried out 
by the Board during the year of 1922, which have had to do with 
increasing the comfort and welfare of the patients, as well as 
adding a great deal of very necessary equipment for the Hospital, 
thereby, facilitating and promoting the efficiency of the work of 
every one connected with the institution. While it has been a 
privilege and pleasure to have been able to do these things, it has 
entailed also a great deal of energy, time, thought, and above all 



20 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

everlasting team work, not only for personal services, but also in 
planning the many details for the numerous benefits necessary 
in order to get the where with all with which to purchase equip- 
ment, etc. 

There are to my mind four objects, which have been provided 
by the women of the Board, that stand out as examples of what 
has been accomplished during the past year: A complete steriliz- 
ing outfit for the operating rooms at cost of $2250. The equip- 
ment of a cystoscopic room at a cost of $3000 and of which it is 
said there is no equal of its kind in Baltimore. The furnishing 
of the diet kitchen at a cost of $1229, and the furnishing of the 
living room, library and hall of the Louisa Parsons Home. 

Following is an itemized list which speaks for itself and cannot 
help but make us reahze how very fortunate the University Hospi- 
tal is in having connected with it such an enthusiastic and splen- 
did group of women, who are vitally interested in working with 
the one purpose in mind, to serve "their fellow man." Articles 
donated to the University Hospital by the Woman's Board. 

A mattress sterilizer, $250, a filing cabinet (social service 
departments), a Ford sedan (hospital use), a card filing system, 
two examining tables, an electric dry heat apparatus, an electric 
sterilizer, an electric irrigation machine, two desks, an instrument 
cabinet, a camera, a wall blood pressure instrument, a water 
cooler, two typewriters, linen for wards $120, two electric fans, 
Social Service Director's trip to Convention $96, and shirts, 
stockings, bathrobes, bed jackets by the dozens, toys, candy, 
flowers, ice cream, fruits, etc. 

Donations from friends through members of the Board: Piano, 
furnishing the Julia Ried Memorial Room (Miss Ried instituted 
Social Service Work in the Dispensary), Victrola, 50 records, 19 
dolls, a costumer, 1000 handkerchiefs, 300 garments from Episco- 
pal Church Service League, 21 new books from Episcopal Periodi- 
cal Club for Nurses' Home, and many other contributions of which 
a record was hot made. 

We are deeply grateful for all of these contributions as well as 
for both help and articles donated for Rummage Sales, card 
parties, and Concert Courses. 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 21 

REPORT OF THE SCHOOL FOR NURSES 

Brief summary of the report of the School for Nurses covering 
the period from July 1, 1922, to January 1, 1923. 

Assistants: 

Day 1 

Night 1 

Instructors 2 

In Charge: 

Dispensary 1 

Nurses Home 1 

Operating Room 1 

Surgical Supply Room 1 

Head Nurses 7 

Pupil nurses filling head nurses positions 2 

Wards D and E 1 

Children's Ward 1 

Students from AflBliated Schools 2 

Pupil Nurses 88 

Total number of students in school 90 

Special Nurses: 

Total number of special nurses 657 

Nurses who left School: 

Total number 12 

Of these two were married while on duty and one left to be 
married; three were dismissed, two on account of failure to meet 
required standard of work; and one account of defiance of rules 
and regulations; one withdrew on account of home influence; two 
were probationers who remained only two days and left because 
they were homesick; four were not accepted as student nurses; 
one was suspended for a period of one month on account of diso- 
bedience to rules and regulations. 

Illness. During these months, fifty-two (52) nurses were off 
duty for varying lengths of time because of illness and of these, 
eight (8) were admitted to the halls for treatment, the remainder 
being cared for in the Nurses Infirmary. 

Total time lost through illness 520day^ 

Total number of nurses 52 



22 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

Request for information and admission, July 1, 1922 to January 
1, 1928. 

Number of applications for admission and formally con- 
sidered 226 

Number of applications accepted 39 

Number of applications students entered 33 

Resignations. 

Miss Myrtle Selby Night Supervisor 

Miss Naomi Kirkley Head Nurse, in Maternity 

Miss Margaret Erwin Head Nurse, Private Hall 

Miss Helen McSherry Head Nurse, Night Supervisor 

Reappointments. 

Miss Elizabeth Getzendanner Assistant 

Miss Elizabeth Aitkenhead Operating Room Supervisor 

Miss Bessie Maston Head Nurse, Ward H 

Miss Margaret Lauper Head Nurse, Ward G 

Miss Eleanor Butler Head Nurse, Ward I 

Miss Bertha Rawlings Head Nurse, Dispensary 

Promotions and transfers. Miss Helen McSherry from Upper 
Halls to Night Supervisor. Has since resigned on account of 
illness. 

New appointments. 

Miss Stella Ricketts Night Supervisor 

Mrs. Roland Smith Theoretical Instructor 

Miss Eva Fischer Practical Instructor 

Miss Blanche Hoffmaster Head Nurse, Upper Halls 

Miss Pauline Esslinger Head Nurse, Lower Halls 

Miss Grace Elgin Head Nurse, Wards A and B 

Miss Frankie Morrison Head Nurse, Maternity Ward 

Miss Annie Reeve Head Nurse, Supply Room 

Temporary appointments for relief. 

Miss Ellen C. Israel Assistant 

Miss Stella Ricketts Head Nurse, Upper Halls 

The annual vacations were arranged for and eleven (11) officers 
and sixty-five (65) students were away during these months. 

The summer was a very difficult one. The wards were open 
the entire summer, and while Ward I was closed for one month 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 23 

(August Ist-September 1st), the surgical service was very heavy 
and the hospital very busy. To care for the patients and to 
supply all demands with a staff reduced the entire summer and 
with fewer nurses meant hard work and longer hours. 

The pressure of the work in the wards, the illness of the students 
and the question of equipment and standardized methods being 
some of the factors that contributed to the problems. Slow and 
steady progress has been made in the re-arrangement of the 
schedules, providing that more subjects are given in the Junior 
and Intermediate years, having the Senior free for Special Training. 

Additional lectures in Medicine have been obtained and an 
effort made to have a better correlation between the class room 
instruction and the bedside care. 

The question of class room accommodation and laboratory 
facilities has been solved by the addition of these rooms in the 
New Nurses Home. 

In looking back over these few months, it would seem to us if 
we had not developed a single one of our plans, but some progress 
had been made and I trust the next few months will witness many 
improvements. 

We are most fortunate that we are able to have both a practical 
and theoretical instructor, both of which are very valuable and 
indispensable. We are also fortunate in having a graduate nurse 
in charge of the Surgical Supply Room. 

In conclusion, may I express the appreciation of myself and 
staff for the unfailing interest and cooperation of each and 
everyone. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Annie Crighton, R.N., 
Superintendent of Nurses, 



24 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

NOTES FEOM THE STUDENT NURSES 

Through the courtesy of Mrs. Fleck, the President of the 
Alumnae Association, two pages of The Bulletin have been 
turned over to the Student Nurses of the University of Maryland 
for a description of some of their various activities. 

Of particular importance, is the more intimate relationship 
between the Training School and the interests of the University 
itself. In October, 1921, was organized the Council of Class 
Presidents of the University of Maryland. From this time on, 
the School of Nursing was recognized as a distinct and integral 
department of the University. This was made apparent by our 
active participation in all social affairs of the University, culminat- 
ing in the joint graduation exercises on June 1, 1922. Last year, 
for the first time, the graduating nurses took a definite place at 
Commencement, as members of one of the six distinctly separate, 
yet united schools of our State institution. 

The Presidents' Council is actively supporting the plans for 
the 1923 edition of the year-book, "The Terra Mariae." The 
Training School is represented also on the Editorial Staff, by 
three of the student nurses. Plans for a larger and more vivid 
portrayal of our interests in the book of 1923 are being made. 

It is our ambition to be a University School for Nursing, with 
all that this title signifies. We believe that as we become better 
acquainted with the University atmosphere, and with the ideals 
of its organization, we shall appreciate, more keenly, the meaning 
and dignity of the name. Only by such a true understanding 
shall we be able to raise our own ideals and standards of require- 
ments, until we have attained recognition by a degree. 

We trust we are voicing the sentiments of the Alumnae Associa- 
tion, in these, our ambitions. 

Helen S. Teeple, 1923. 

Activities of the Student Body of Nurses 1922-1923 

This year the Nurses have found many things besides their 
actual nursing to keep them happy and busy. During the month 
of October the girls busied themselves with the Halloween Dance, 
and that night disclosed them in many fantastic costumes appro- 
priate for the occasion. After a long program of dances all helped 
themselves, or were helped, to doughnuts, cider, and apples, 
after which a few more dances and the ball was over. 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 25 

On November 16, all were proud to participate in the Dedica- 
tion of the New Nurses Home, which was decorated and arranged 
for the occasion. In order to add more comforts and pleasures to 
the many which the Home already affords, the nurses have or- 
ganized a "One Dollar Campaign," in which they have pledged 
themselves to raise at least one dollar each, to be used for such 
purposes as furnising the Recreation Room, securing a Tennis 
Court, etc. Various means of raising this money are employed, 
namely: hair shampooing, facial massage, shoe shining, mending 
uniforms, selling candy, peanuts and hot dogs. 

Last, but not least, are plans for a private subscription dance 
scheduled for February 15th. 

In closing, may I remark that many of the nurses have pur- 
chased the University Nurses' cape, consisting of navy blue 
broadcloth lined with cardinal red flannel, with brass state 
buttons. These capes have proven not only a comfort, but a 
real necessity for the daily voyages to and from the hospital. 

L. R. Hoke, 1923. 

NEWS ITEMS 

Mrs. C. M. Barwick, Class 1894, and her daughter Miss Eliza- 
beth Barwick, Class 1918, are spending the winter in West Palm 
Beach, Fla. 

Miss Margaret Laws, Class 1913, is doing Public Health Nurs- 
ing in the State of North Carolina. 

Miss Henrietta Gourley, Class 1908, is associated with the 
Baltimore Agency of the Mutual Life Insurance Company of 
New York. Miss Gourley resigned from the United States 
Army in June. 

Miss Betty White, Class 1915, has accepted the position as 
Superintendent of Nurses at the Atlantic Coast Line Hospital, 
Rocky Mount, N. C. Miss White served at the James Walker 
Memorial Hospital in Wilmington, N. C, for seven years. 

Miss Virginia McKay, Class 1910, has resigned as Superinten- 
dent of Nurses at the James Walker Memorial Hospital, Wilming- 
ton, N. C, and will take a year's rest. 



26 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

Mrs. Edgar S. Fay, who was formerly Miss Naomi Kirkley, 
Class 1918, on the evening of December 28 met with an accident 
when she was struck by an automobile, receiving a serious injury 
to her spine. At the last report Mrs. Fay was slowly improving. 

Miss Blanche Hoffmaster, Class 1916, is Supervisor of the 
private halls, University Hospital. 

Miss Grace Elgin, Class, 1922, is Supervisor of the private 
female wards at the University Hospital. Miss Elgin was the 
member of the Class of 1922 who was awarded the scholarship 
at Columbia University. 

Miss Barbara Stouffer, Class 1911, who has been on duty at 
Fort McHenry for the past year, has resigned from the Medical 
Social Service of the Red Cross. Miss Stouffer, after the first 
of February will be engaged in the Social Service Department of 
the Hopkins Hospital. 

Mrs. William Bridges, who was Miss Serena Selfe, Class of 
1916, was appointed in May, a member of the State Board of 
Examiners of Nurses. 

Mrs. Bridges until July, was Assistant Superintendent of 
Nurses in the Baltimore City Health Department. 

Miss Franke Morrison, who was awarded the Alumnae mem- 
bership and pin for the Class of 1922 is Supervisor of the Maternity. 

Miss Ruth Clements, Class 1920, is office nurse for the Drs. 
Prithcett, Danville, Va. 

We regret to state that Miss Addie Harry, Class 1895, is 
seriously ill at her home in Charlotte, N. C. 

Miss Emily Ely, Class 1909, is engaged in Government Dispen- 
sary work at University Hospital. 

Miss Helen McSherry, Class 1916, was a patient at University 
Hospital for two months during the winter. Miss McSherry is 
convalescing at her home on Linden Avenue. 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 27 

Miss Elizabeth Patterson, Class 1911, is Superintendent of 
Nurses in the Chambersburg Hospital, Chambersburg, Pa. 

The Maryland State Nurses' Association elected the following 
officers for 1923: President, Miss Elsie M. Lawler; vice-president. 
Miss Jane Nash; second vice-president. Miss Harriet Forte; secre- 
tary. Miss Sarah F. Martin; treasurer, Mrs. G. H, Bode; direc- 
tors, Miss Jane B. Newman and Miss Annie Crighton. 

MARRIAGES 

May 27, 1922, Ethelyn Bay, Class 1920, to Mr. Charles Dever. 
Mr. and Mrs. Dever are living in Baltimore. 

December 31, 1921, Rachel Little, Class 1920 to Dr. WilUam 
Leuders. The marriage of Dr. and Mrs. Leuders was announced 
durmg October, 1922. 

September 14, 1922, Kate Hogshead, Class 1921, to Dr. J. M. 
Reese. Mr. and Mrs. Reese live in Lutherville, Md. 

September 15, 1922, Naomi Kirkley, Class 1918, to Dr. Edgar 
Fay. Dr. and Mrs. Fay live at 2919 Belmont Avenue. 

In September, 1922, Nellie Dix, Class 1915, to Mr. Hubert 
Bowers. Mr. and Mrs. Bowers live at Belair, Md. 

Helen Pleasants, Class 1919, to F. M. Smeely. Mr. and Mrs. 
Smeely live in North Fork, Cahf. 

January 11, 1923, Tiffany Minnis, Class 1917, to Eben McLane. 
Mr. and Mrs. McLane live in Pittsburgh, Pa. 

December 31, 1921, Emily Yingling, Class 1920, to Mr. Alberts. 
Mr. and Mrs. Alberts live at 3315 Walbrook Avenue. 

In November, 1922, Margaret J. Ervm, Class 1915, to Mr. 
Preston Landing. Mr. and Mrs. Landing live at Marion Station, 
Md. 

September 20, 1922, Zadith Reese, Class 1921, to Mr. Wm. 
Pitt. Mr. and Mrs. Pitt live 3026 Guilford Avenue. 



28 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

BIRTHS 

On April, 20, 1922, a daughter to Dr. and Mrs. Charles Reid 
Edwards. Mrs. Edwards was Miss Ruth Conner, Class 1915. 

In November, 1922, a daughter to Dr. and Mrs. WilHam 
Michael. Mrs. Michael was Miss Jane Garner, Class 1911. 

In December, 1922, a daughter to Dr. and Mrs. Joseph Majoral. 
Mrs. Majoral was Miss Christine Alexander, Class 1920. 

In January, 1923, a son to Dr. and Mrs. Wilbur Scott. Mrs. 
Scott was Miss Vera Wright, Class 1909. 

From Mrs. Ethel P. Clarke, Class 1906 

Dear Fellow- Alumnae: 

It has been several years since I have had the pleasure of attend- 
ing one of our meetings and talking with you face to face, never- 
theless, I am always interested in any news of our school and 
hospital and eager to learn of its growth and progress. It has 
occurred to me that you might like to hear something of our work 
in the Middle West, and what I have been doing since I left 
Baltimore in 1914. 

I left our school to go to Teachers College, Columbia University, 
feeling the need of contact with those who were thinking along the 
most progressive lines in nursing education, for the educational 
side of the work has always had a special appeal to me. I can never 
be sufficiently glad that I went, for I look back on it as one of the 
most satisfactory years in my life, more than worth any sacrifice 
it cost. 

Towards the close of the year I was asked to come to the Robert 
W. Long Hospital of Indiana University as Director of the Train- 
ing School for Nurses. The school was very young, rather less 
than a year old, and it meant a piece of pioneer organization work 
which appealed to me. 

I entered upon this piece of work July 1, 1915, taking with me 
as an assistant Maude E. Miller, '14, and Nellie Gates Brown, 
Hartford T. S. '10, as an instructor. I had met Miss Brown at 
Teachers College, and she is still with me and has been of great 
assistance throughout. At that time there were five student 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 29 

nurses and probationers. We used graduate nurses throughout 
the building, and it was a few years before we were able to take 
entire care of operating room, night duty and private floor with 
students. 

As the Training School is a department of the University in the 
College of IMcdicine, all our students are required to matriculate 
in the College of Arts and Sciences; which demands a diploma from 
a commissioned high school and a definite course of study. 

We now have 70 students enrolled, all that our living accommo- 
dations will allow us to take care of at present. Each floor has 
a graduate head nurse, and I now have 2 assistants, one of whom 
is Katherine V. Shea, '13, 2 instructors, 1 dietitian and student 
dietitian, and secretary. I have found the work fully as interest- 
ing as I anticipated it would be, and I have met with a splendid 
spirit of cooperation throughout. The years that I have spent 
here have been busy and happy and I have made some delightful 
friends. 

All our teaching is done in the Medical School building. We 
have a lecture room, demonstration room and diet laboratory 
for our exclusive use. A few lectures each week are given in one 
of the other lecture rooms, and one bacteriology and clinical diag- 
nosis teaching in the laboratories used for those subjects for all 
students. The medical library is also used by all students, 
medical, nursing and social service. There is one section in which 
nursing books are kept, but the students have access to anything 
in the library. There are between 90 and 100 journals in the 
journal section which they may use. 

The demonstration room has 5 beds, 1 crib, 3 adult manikins, 
and 1 baby manikin, 2 complete sets of treatment trays, and a full 
assortment of appliances as used on the wards. Our probationers 
spend 108 hours of practice work in this room, and they are kept 
busy I can assure you. Miss Mary Peterson, Bellevue '06, has 
charge of them. 

All our receptions and parties are held in the Medical School 
building, and many good times we have had in it. A good clay 
tennis court furnishes opportunity for out door exercise which 
everybodj^ needs. 

At present our interest is largely centered on the James Whitcomb 
Riley Memorial Hospital for Children which is being erected close 
to us and is also under Indiana University. It will enable us to 



30 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

give most valuable experience in the care of children to all our 
students and much enrich our course and increase our usefulness. 
The first unit will probably be completed next summer and will 
provide beds for about 100 children. It will be a beautiful 
building with gymnasium, zander room, dispensary, and all the 
things that go to make up a modern hospital for children. It is a 
particularly fitting memorial for the Hoosier poet who so dearly 
loved the little ones. 

The various departments of the University cooperate in our 
teaching, e.g., English, Home economics, Sociology, etc. so that 
our students should go out with a broad foundation oq which they 
may build. 

I wish that I might have the pleasure of showing you what we 
are doing. If any of you ever come near Indianapolis I hope that 
you will come to see us. I can assure you that Miss Shea and I 
will give you a hearty welcome. We enjoy the bulletin very much 
and look forward to each issue. 

With best wishes for each one and for our Alma Mater. 

Faithfully yours, 

Ethel P. Clarke, 

Director. 

From M. Estelle Co ale, Class 1912 

My dear Mrs. Fleck: It is with a great deal of pleasure that I 
write this letter to you and all of my sister members of the Alum- 
nae Association of the dear old U. of M. I have not been around 
our hospital very much since my graduation, but I have never 
forgotten my three years spent there and the many kindnesses 
shown me. 

I became interested in Public Health Nursing just before I 
received my diploma and applied for work with the I. V. N. A., 
under the direction of Miss Lent. I accepted different phases of 
the work while in Baltimore, opened up rural districts and did all 
kinds of work, even to relieving as Supervisor for a few months. 
I did not like the office work and was more than glad when I 
was relieved, but the experience made me a much better Public 
Health Nurse. I shall never forget my first appearance as a 
public speaker. Miss Lent sent me down to one of the churches 
to meet the mothers and give a health talk. Well, you can imag- 
ine that,|l hardly knew what to say, and in the midst of the meet- 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 31 

ing Miss Lent came sailing in. She always teased me because 
all the women were "God blessing me" and I would never tell 
why. 

Later, I went to Jacksonville, Illinois, to do T. B. work, and to 
carry out a general health program i a the County. Jacksonville was 
named "Joyville" by me, and the street where I lived, I named "Sun- 
shine Alley," so j'^ou all may know what a wonderful place the town 
was, and in fact, all of Morgan County. An open air school had 
been established, but during my stay there a new school was built 
and turned over to the Board of Education, a new office and clinic 
established, and a campaign run for a definite T. B. tax. This 
tax won by a large majority and when I resigned a wonderful 
county sanatorium was almost completed. I certainly hated to 
leave Morgan County, but I am not much of a person to do regu- 
lar routine work, so accepted demonstration work for the N. O. 
P. H. N. in Louisiana, St. Mary Parish. There were no similar 
nurses in the State except in New Orleans and those had not 
received any special training. You can imagine how the people 
looked upon me, for in the South every Tom, Dick, and Harry is 
a nurse, or in other words all the neighbors come in when there is 
sickness, and are called nurses. Then there are hundreds of 
midwives, who do not know one thing about childbirth, but simply 
are superstitious old "black mammies." The white folks do 
not think that the negroes should be looked after from a medical 
standpoint, and do not seem to understand that they are in close 
contact with their servants, and that most of the children are 
cared for by negro maids. Anyhow, at the end of six months 
with much talking and persuasion the work was established in 
the Parish under the direction of the Red Cross, but since that 
time the work has been taken over by the Police Jury of the 
Parish (in Louisiana, counties are called Parish and County Com- 
missioners, Police JurjTnen). 

Before leaving St. Marys, I accepted the position of State 
Director of Public Health Nursing, and immediately began 
writing to all my friends, trying to persuade them to come to 
Louisiana to take positions as Parish Public Health Nurses. At 
last Miss May Steiner decided to come. Miss Steiner was very 
popular in Acadia Parish, but unfortunately as most of you know, 
she broke her arm. I certainly hated to see her leave for I felt 
much nearer dear old Maryland while she was here. 



32 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

I had many and varied experiences as State Director, for I 
practically roomed on a Pullman for two years, and never seemed 
to get a good bath or have any clean clothes. Nevertheless the 
State was interested in having Public Health Nurses placed, but 
as I was unable to secure trained Public Health Nurses to fill the 
applications the interest died out considerably and with it the 
money. In some cases the Parish has taken over the work and 
in some the Red Cross is still financing the work. I was quite 
ill about a year ago and could not travel as I had, and I certainly 
saw the difference in the work. Close supervision is undoubtedly 
necessary. 

I resigned from this work last September, and am very happy 
once again doing rural work in Jefferson Parish, just across the 
river from New Orleans, where I live. I have eighteen schools, 
and other work, and surely enjoy every minute. The Nursing 
Profession in the South is waking up, but they still do not see the 
need of any special training. 

I have always been so proud to be a graduate of the University 
Hospital, for I am sure the training is equal if not better then 
any other. I hope that I may be so fortunate as to come to 
Baltimore very soon and be present at one of our Alumnae Meet- 
ings. Best wishes to every one. 

Sincerely, 

M. ESTELLE Co ALE. 

From Miss Ruth Clements, Class 1920 

Chestertown, Maryland, 

August 22, 1922. 
My dear Friends: 

Just home from the Summer Session and I do want to tell you 
a few of the things that I feel I gained at Columbia. I wish I 
could tell you everything, but that is impossible, since the results 
of such a course remind me of those of a big convention. One 
can return and report facts, but the inspiration and vision gained 
counts most, and cannot be expressed. 

First of all, I was surprised to find such a large student body 
in the summer time — about 14,000 this year. You can imagine 
what it meant to be constantly associated with that number of 
people, all with the same twofold purpose: a broader knowledge 
and desire to give more efficient service. 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 33 

The Nursing and Health Department is certainly a very thor- 
oughly organized one, and I do not believe that anyone could 
fail to gain a great deal even in the short six weeks. As a matter 
of fact the six weeks are very intensive and amount to a half a 
year of the regular course. 

When I was advised to take no more than three classes, I 
wondered what I would fintl to do with my extra time. That 
time I haven't found yet, and I usually wished for about six added 
hours to the twenty hour. I took a class in Nursing Education 
under Miss Isabell Stewart. Truly she measures up to all requi- 
sites of an excellent teacher. I also took Psychology and a class 
in Hospital Supervision. 

I was not familiar with the curricula of the University Schools 
that the Nursing Educational Board is trying to establish, until 
Miss Stewart explained their plans. In my estimation, it is a 
most excellent eiifort and I will be glad when every state has 
one or more Schools offering such a course. 

The several hundred of us in the Nursing and Health Depart- 
ment were very glad that both Miss Miller and Miss Goodrich 
talked to us on two afternoons, and reported on the great Seattle 
Convention. Surely the East would make no mistake to follow 
the example of the West and thus increase teaching facilities in 
our hospitals. Many improvements were urged, but probably 
the outstanding emphasis of all classes and lectures was for higher 
entrance requirements and the need of co-operation. 

Yes this was my first six weeks at Columbia, but I do not expect 
it to be my last. Indeed, if one had no further purpose, I can 
think of no more delightful vacation for a nurse who has been 
with sick folks for months or years, than to break away and live 
in this wholesome atmosphere. I had most forgotten that there 
could be enough well people to count by thousands. 

I very much appreciate having gone in the University's name 
this time. I have not heard from the examinations, but I hope 
I reflected credit upon the Alumnae Association. 

Yours very sincerely, 

Ruth Clements. 



ROLL OF MEMBERSHIP 

{Please notify secretary of change of address) 

1892 

X Dunham, E. (Mrs. Roache) Staunton, Va, 

t Dunham, Lelia 

* Goldsborough, Mary E 

* Hale, Janet 

Lucas, Kate C. (Mrs.) 1404 W. Lexington Street, Baltimore, Md. 

t Lee, Anna (Mrs. Lovingscold) Tulalip, Wash. 

* Neal, Amy 

X Schleunes, Anna Cecil Apartments, Baltimore, Md. 

1893 

Bradburj', M. E Cambridge, Md. 

X Cornman, Mary E 315 Okeechovu Road, West Palm Beach, Fla. 

I Culbertson, Clara 

Daly, E.J 21 N. Carey, Street Baltimore, Md. 

Michael, Martha B 528 Church Avenue, N. W., Roanoke, Va. 

X Mayes, Eleanor Petersburg, Va. 

Mergardt, Clara (Mrs. J. Reifsneider) 

826 N. Strieker St., Baltimore, Md. 
X Pyatt, M. A Georgetown, S. C. 

Ravenel, S. S Aiken, S. C. 

X Shertzer, Elizabeth 1328 Madison Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

* Williams, E. M 

* Van Santwoort, Elinor (Mrs. W. Mines) 

1894 

* Anderson, Bessie 

* Brown, Mary 

Bonn, C. M. (Mrs. Barwick) 21 N. Carey Street, Baltimore, Md. 

X Hass (Mrs. Pfohl) Winston-Salem, N. C. 

* Judd, Evelyn (Mrs. J. Dingan) 

X Morgan, Lucy H. (Mrs. Backlow) Lockhaven, Penn. 

X Mergardt, Emma 

X Mellner, Constance (Mrs. Wine) 

X Magruder, Emma, Sandy Spring, Md 

Read, Elizabeth 21 N. Carey Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Thackston, E. G 490 Geary Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

X Thompson, Mary, Centreville, Md 

t Weitzel, V. C. (Mrs. Charles McNabb) Cardiff, Md. 

* Deceased. 

X Graduates not members of the association. 

34 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 35 



1895 

X Blake, Sallie E Tallahassee, Fla. 

t Edmunds, Maria Farnivillo, W. Va. 

Harry, Addie M Charlotte, N. C. 

X Jones, Mira Now York 

Rolph, Mary E University Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

1896 

Lee, Elizabeth 1535 Park Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Robey, Frances 1535 Park Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Shipley, Wilhelmena Granado, Col. 

Wilson, Cora M. (Mrs.) 864 Park Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

1897 

Baldwin, M. E. E. (Mrs.) 

Allegany and Woodbine Avenues, Towson, Md. 

X Clegg, Mary C " 

X Cohen, Ella (Mrs.) 

X Crowe, Florence (Mrs. Charles W. Mitchell) 

11 East Chase St., Baltimore, Md. 

Jones, Susan IM 1412 Park Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

X Keating, Martha J Miners' Hospital, Spangler, Penn. 

I Lashley, Josephine Carlyle, Penn. 

Lord, Athalia 63 Clayton Street, Charlotte, N. C. 

Russell, Mary A 1431 Madison Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

X Slicer, Annette 2127 Callow Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

* Watkins, K. N 

1898 

X Hughes, Eunice (Mrs.) York, Penn. 

Lackland, Nannie J 

* Mauppin, Agnes 

Rossell, Blenda E 21 N. Carey Street, Baltimore, Md. 

1899 

X Brown, Margaret 1401 Columbia Road, Washington, D. C. 

X Edwards, Katherine Hagerstown, Md. 

X Llewellyn, Bernaedine (Mrs. Early) Scottsville, Va. 

* Pittman, Blanche 

X Smith, Virginia Irvington, Va. 

1900 

Blight, Margaret (Mrs. M. B. LeSueur) 

149 W. Lanvale Street, Baltimore, Md. 
Featherstone, Sophia Sandy Spring, Md. 

* Deceased. 

X Graduates not members of the association. 



36 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

* Gilliland, Lena (Mrs. B. Jones) 

Gray, E. B Tarboro, N. C. 

t Hobbs, Myra Tow*son, Md. 

Jones, Nannie H 1012 Floyd Avenue, Richmond, Va. 

t Little, Marion 

t Milton, Louise D 149 W. Lanvale Street, Baltimore, Md. 

1901 

Anderson, Grace 1112 Chestnut Street, St. Louis, Mo. 

t Blight, Emmeline (Mrs. F. E. Chambers).. 791 Orange Street, Macon, Ga. 

* Burnett, Mary 

* Bliike, Katherine 

Cook, Mary 149 W. Lanvale Street, Baltimore, Md. 

* Dowdell, Mary 

t Daniel, Frances B Saranac Lake, New York 

t Fendall, Mattie F 18 E. Main Street, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada 

Furbee, Catherine 1106 Julina Street, Farkersburg, W. Va. 

Henderson, Eugenia 909 West Avenue, Charlotte, N. C. 

J Jones, Mary S University of Virginia, Va. 

I Mosby, Pauline 149 W. Lanvale Street, Baltimore, Md. 

1902 

Burch, Emma C 831 Park Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

X Dunderdale, Grace L. (Mrs. W. Koppelman) 

105 West 29th Street, Baltimore, Md. 
Flanagan, Nettie L Lon'thorpe School, Groton, Mass. 

* Gregory, Mary W 

X Kinnirey, Nancy (Mrs. Howard Iglehart) Ten Hills, Md. 

I Raines, Martha (Mrs. John Foster) Thomasville, Ga. 

Wise, Helen V Peninsula General Hospital, Salisbury, Md. 

1903 

X Byrd, Margaret 

t Blandford, Sara 2506 K. Street, Washington, D. C. 

X Craig, Louise (Mrs. J. U. Dennis) Cecil Apartments, Baltimore, Md. 

* Cooke, Albina (Mrs. J. D. Reeder) 

X Craft, Elizabeth 223 S. Cherry Street, Richmond, Va. 

Elgin, Elizabeth (Mrs. A. H. Mann) Poolesville, Md. 

Fulton, Isabel Stewartstown, Pa. 

Gallagher, Ella T 21 N. Carey Street, Baltimore, Md. 

X King, Anna (Mrs. F. W. Selling) Elkridge, Md. 

Massey, Margaret K. (Mrs. Nathan Winslow) 

1900 Mt. Royal Terrace, Baltimore, Md. 
Miller, Mary Presbyterian Eye and Ear Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

. *Deceased. 
X Graduates not members of the association. 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 37 

* Northrup, Mary A 

X Reeve, Annie University Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

1904 

J Bush, Lucy Ladd (Mrs. 11. J. Harby) . .121 Calhoun Street, Sumter, S. C. 

X Dougherty, Sarah W. Va. 

X Dilworth, Florence (Mrs. Porter) Jacksonville, Fla. 

X Guerrant, E. Janie Westminster, Md. 

X Guerrant, Pattie Los Angles, Cal. 

Gaskill, Laura M 21 N. Carey Street, Baltimore, Md. 

X Lewis, Christine New York 

X Munder, Lela (Mrs. S. Blood) Boston, Mass. 

X Parrott, E. May Aigburth Manor, Towson, Md. 

Schroeder, Harriett 1624 Eutaw Place, Baltimore, Md. 

X Walker, Louise (Mrs. H. Cassard). Preston Apartments, Baltimore, Md. 
X Walton, Nancy Annapolis, Md. 

1905 

Bayley, Elizabeth George Washington Hospital, Washington, D. C. 

X Brossene, Dora (Mrs. M. Oliver) Washington, D. C. 

Cowling, Margaret University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va. 

X Ferrell, Nellie (Mrs. Gardner) Danville, Va. 

Geare, Millicent (Mrs. Page Edmunds) 

12 Elmwood Road, Roland Park, Md. 

X Gildea, Elizabeth (Mrs. Eugene Mullen) Perryville, Md. 

X Hilliard, Nellie (Mrs. H. Covington) Rocky Mount, N. C. 

X Jones, Netty (Mrs. J. R. Revelle) Louisville, Ga. 

X Kuhn, Ruth A. C. L. Hospital, Waycross, Ga. 

X Owings, Leiia (Mrs. E. B. Quillen) Rocky Mount, N. C. 

X Schaefer, Carlotta (Mrs. Murphy) 

3014 Windfield Ave., Forrest Park, Md. 
X Trenholm, Lila (Mrs. Walton Hopkins) Annapolis, Md. 

1906 

X Carter, Nellie Chatam, Va. 

t Chapman, Anna (Mrs. F. Wright) .. .1221 Bolton Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Clarke, Ethel (Mrs.) Robert Long Hospital, Indianapolis, Ind. 

X Cunningham, Sarah (Mrs. Morse) U. S. Army, Washington, D. C. 

X Doyle, Lenora (Mrs. W. White)... .2800 St. Paul Street, Baltimore, Md. 

X Ellicott, Mary Georgia 

X Jessup, Marian (Mrs. F. Hynes) Chestertown, Md. 

Lawrence, Margaret (Mrs. S. W. Moore) 

329 Roland Avenue, Roland Park, Md. 
X Phillips, M. (Mrs. H. Greenwell) Lutherville, Md. 

* Query, Clara 

* Deceased. 

X Graduates not members of the association. 



38 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

Sanderson, Sarah Hamot Hospital, Erie, Penn. 

* Truitt, Georgia 

1907 

I Barber, Jennie D 1807 Park Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

I Bay, Grace I White Hall, Md. 

i Bell, Alice F. (Mrs. J. B. Piggott) 

Northumberland Apartments, Washington, D. C. 
J Brewington, Esther (Mrs. P. P. Causey) Sedley, Va. 

Brian, Nannie L Ellicott City, Md. 

Griffith, Isabella (Mrs. H. K. Fleck) 

513 Cathedral Street, Baltimore, Md. 
t Grimes, Mary Concord, Ky . 

Hissey, Naomi 21 N. Carey Street, Baltimore, Md, 

McNabb, Nancy (Mrs. R. P. Bay). .8 Hillside Road, Roland Park, Md. 
t Minnis, Rosamond Lebanon Hospital, Caldwell Avenue, New York 

Minor, Evelyn 1500 John Street, Baltimore, Md. 

t Ogborn, Ella High Street, East Orange, New Jersey 

t Peyton, Carrie Baby Milk Fund, City Hall, Baltimore, Md. 

J Pue, Marie (Mrs. C. Chapman) Guilford Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

t Robertson, Clara TMrs. R. P. Latimer) Hyattsville, Md. 

t Tongue, Amy B. (Mrs. Chas. Wiley) Redwood City, Cal. 

Haydon, Jane 733 N. Broadway, Baltimore, Md, 

1908 

J Anderson, M. B. (Mrs. R. B. Hayes) Hillsboro, N. C- 

* Cox, Charlotte 

t Cunningham, A. K. (Mrs. Wm. McDonald) 

14 Bedford St., Hoverville, Mass. 

Dawson, Clyde (Mrs. F. S. Lynn) 

33 W. Preston Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Gourley, Henrietta 2128 St. Paul Street, Baltimore. Md. 

Gavin, Mary 327 W. 55th Street, New York. 

t Hamlin, Martha (Mrs. Haynes) Los Angeles, Cal. 

I Hamlin, Mary Danville, Va. 

I Hostrawser, S. A Canada 

j Price, Lula (Mrs. Thawley) R. F. D. Denton, Md. 

Parsons, H. J The Walbert, Baltimore, Md, 

Russell, Augusta The Walbert, Baltimore, Md. 

Smith, Maude (Mrs. R. Cornelius) Gittings Avenue, Govans, Md. 

t Schull, Ethel 

i Wright, M. E. (Mrs. G. H. Richards) Port Deposit, Md. 

t Wilson, Rose 

* Deceased. 

X Graduates not members of the association. 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 39 

1909 

% Almond, Blanche Washington, D. C. 

X Carter, Lullie (Mrs. Hyde Hopkins) Miami, Fla. 

Chapline, Eva 2810 Chelsea Terrace, Forrest Park, Md. 

Chapline, Laura (Mrs. W. J. Coleman) 

2810 Chelsea Terrace, Forrest Park, Md. 

Dukes, Katherine (Mrs. J. B. Magrudcr) 

2821 N. Calvert Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Ely, Emily The Walbert, Baltimore, Md. 

Getzendanner, Elizabeth. University Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

t Green (Mrs.) (Mrs. Miller) Norfolk, Va. 

J Hall, Beulah (Married) Jacksonville, Fla. 

Pue,. Louise 1518 Park Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

X Robey, Helen 

Saulsbury, Mary B The Walbert, Baltimore, Md. 

Squires, Lucy Matthews, N. C. 

Tull, Grace 2751 Madison Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Tews, Gertrude (Mrs. Cole) 19 N. Ellwood Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Wham, Anna Lou (Mrs. C. M. Pitt) 

3941 Cloverhill Road, Guilford, Md 

Wright, Vera (Mrs. W. Scott) Devereaux, Ga. 

1910 

X Barrett, Adele (Mrs. Wm. Parramore) Cochran, Ga. 

X Burton, Cora (Mrs. R. T. Earle) Centerville, Md. 

X Barber, Lucy (Mrs. Woodley Blackwell) Sharps, Va. 

Drye, Anne 20 East 21st Street, Baltimore, Md. 

X Edmunds, March (Mrs. Dwight Rivers) Lynchburg, Va. 

X Garrison, Gertude (Mrs. Roscoe McMillan) 

X Holland, A. K. (Mrs. J. D. Fiske)..Reisterstown Road, Baltimore, Md. 

Israel, Ellen C 214 W. Monument Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Kimmel, Mary M 216 W. Madison Street, Baltimore, Md. 

X King, Florence (Mrs. Thomas West) Fayetteville, N. C. 

X Lee, Sarah A. (Mrs. Frank Woodward) Tallahassee, Fla. 

Long, Lillian (Mrs. Claud Smink) Lauraville, Md. 

McKay, Virginia 529 Patterson Street, Cumberland, Md. 

Murchison, Belle (Mrs. F. H. Vinup) 

201 Oakdale Road, Roland Park, Md. 

Meredith, Frances M 214 W. Monument Street, Baltimore, Md. 

X Pleasants, P. B. (Mrs. J. M. Sparks) Monkton, Md. 

I Price, Lula (Mrs. John Robertson) Onancock, Va. 

X Strohm, Amelia (Mrs. Wm. Spalding) Churchville, Md. 

X Taylor, Margaret Atlanta, Ga . 

Wiggin, M. Constance (Mrs. H. W. Cole) 

Naval Air Station, Pensacola, Fla. 

X Graduates not members of the association. 



40 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

1911 

* Berlin, Ruth (Mrs. Wm. Chipman) 

Brady, M. Gertrude U. S. P. H. Hospital, Greenville, S. C. 

t Curtiss, Nell (Married) Durham, N. C. 

+ Garner, Jane (Mrs. Wm. Michel) 

2901 Edmondson Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Gephart, Louise (Mrs. E. Kloman) . .44 W. Biddle Street, Baltimore, Md. 

t Grubb, Anna (Mrs. Janney) Montrie, Ga. 

t Hutton, G. A Nursery & Childs Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

Helland, Naomie (Mrs. Strong) 

t Kinney, Iva (Mrs. E. C. Haygood) Birmingham, Ala. 

Patterson Elizabeth Chambersburg Hospital, Chambersburg, Penn. 

Ricketts, Stella U University Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

t Robinson, Eva (Mrs. W. Deppers) 

3223 N. New Jersey Ave., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Stouffer, Barbara 21 N. Carey Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Scarff, Marvel (Mrs. J. H. VonDreele) 

846 West 36th Street, Baltimore, Md. 
t Sprecker, Frances (Mrs. Smith) Harrisburg, Penn. 

Sullivan, Mary Ellen Havre de Grace, Md. 

Williams, Alva Relay, Md. 

1912 

Blake, Lillian 23 East 21st Street, Baltimore, Md- 

Cox, Eulalia Baltimore Eye and Ear Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

Connor, Bernice American Commission, Valjero, Serbia. 

Coale, Mattie (Mrs. C. Alpha)... 342 Audubou Street, New Orleans, La. 

Dawson, Ethel 1517 Park Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Harvey, Lucy 1213 Weldon Circle, Baltimore, Md. 

t Lilly, Lucy (Mrs. R. G. Stokes) Chattanooga, Tenn. 

* Logue, Ethel 

t Miles, Juliet (Mrs. Perkins) Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Prince, Blanche 3703 Forrest Park Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

t Ridgley, Nally (Mrs. Ringgold) Howard County, Md. 

t Steiner, May Cumberland, Md. 

Smith, Marion Sparrows Point, Md. 

t Stouffer, Lena City Memorial Hospital, Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Wells, Alice (Mrs. Galloway) 1600 Eutaw Place, Baltimore, Md. 

1913 

t Brownell, Edith 21 N. Carey Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Butts, Elizabeth 21 N. Carey Street, Baltimore, Md. 

t Coward, Addie (Mrs. Chas. McCotton) Grifton, N. C. 

t Chase, Evelyne Waynesboro, Va. 

t Dent, Edith Broadway, New Orleans, La. 

* Deceased. 

t Graduates not members of the association. 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 41 

Dean, Elva 214 W. Monument Street, Baltimore, Md. 

t Hull, Willie 2213 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, Md. 

t Hessler, Sophia (Mrs. Roger Parlett) White River, Arizona. 

Laws, Margaret Pittsville, Md. 

Misikofski, Martha Kenwood Avenue, Raspeburg, Md. 

McCann, Natalie 21 N. Carey Street, Baltimore, Md. 

I Patterson, Dorothy (Mrs. R. Patterson) Clarksburg, W. Va. 

Price, Golda G 214 W. Monument Street, Baltimore, Md. 

t Rush, Pearl 1507 Linden Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

t Rennie, Mary (Mrs. Carl Blaylock) Norwood, N. C. 

Rutherford, Volina Miami, Fla. 

t Rutherford, Mary (Mrs. C. Welchel) Gainsville, Ga. 

Shea, Katherine Holyoke, Mass. 

Selby, Myrtle 12 East Read Street, Baltimore, Md, 

t Welch, Katherine (Mrs. T. B. Woods) Norfolk, Va. 

1914 

t Bosley, M. K 3028 Belmont Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

i Burns, Olive (Mrs. G. Kup) 1343 First Street, Washington, D. C. 

X Coulbourne, Alice (Mrs. John Stevens) Marion Station, Md. 

t Clenden^n, Virginia 309 St. Agatha Apartments, St. Paul, Minn. 

Davis, Sadie (Mrs. A. W. Reier) 1 Kinship Road, Dundalk, Md. 

Dukes, Ann (Mrs. J. Foravielle) Rocky Mount, N. C. 

Ervin, Margaret (Mrs. J. P. Landing) Marion Station, Md. 

t Ervin, Edith (Mrs. L. Lewis) Blackstock, S. C. 

Foley, Julia C The Walbert, Baltimore, Md. 

t Funk, Jessie (Mrs. J. S. Cutsall) Adamstown, Md. 

t Grant, Pearl (Mrs. Hendrick) Port Deposit, Md. 

t Hill, Lucy (Mrs. L. Prettyman). .306 Carroll Street, Washington, D. C. 
t Hughes, Bertie (Mrs. Davidson).. 313 E. North Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 
t Hudnall, Carrie (Mrs. Purcell) 

1208 E. Central Ave., Albuquerque, Mexico 

* Hull, Grace 

X Lord, (Mrs. H. Freeman) 2631 N. Calvert Street, Baltimore, Md. 

X Miller, Maude 2400 Montebello Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

i McCann, Elsie (Mrs. H. C. Hood). 115 West 29th Street, Baltimore, Md. 

X Murray, Carrie (Mrs. J. Smith) Atlanta, Ga 

X Ryan, A . G Annapolis, Md. 

X Roussey, Bessie (Mrs. R. Stanford) Darlington, Md. 

Signion, Bertie (Mrs.) Chester Sanitorium, Chester, S. C. 

X Sprecker, Marjorie (Mrs. J. Woodcock) Hollidayburg, Penn. 

X Shelton, Jennie (Mrs. Clyde Blake) 

123 W. Roe Street, Buchanan, Mich. 

Sanderl, Marie ^[.^% . .-Ott^Mt. Royal Terrace, Baltimore, Md. 

Stepp, Lula 21 N. Carey Street, Baltimore, Md. 

* Deceased. 

X Graduates not members of the association. 



42 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

JStoneham, Grace (Mrs. G. Walker) N. C. 

t Townville, E Rocky Mount, N. C. 

X Weaver, Pearl Hendersonville, N. C. 

Weber, Dorothy (Mrs. E. Coleman) Douglass, Ga. 

Zepp, Katherine 21 N. Carey Street, Baltimore, Md. 

1915 

Bay, Nettie 1735 Park Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Bogart, Corinne (Mrs. W. Starford) Wendel, W. Va. 

t Beazley, (Mrs. Rhodes) 1532 W. Fayette Street, Baltimore, Md. 

t Boor, Elva (Mrs. VonGesbeck) Balboa, Panama 

Connor, Ruth (Mrs. C. R. Edwards) .431 Kenneth Square, Govans, Md. 

J Coppersmith, Martha (Mrs. Leon Kays) Stanford, N. J. 

i Dilly, Gertrude (Mrs. E. B. Eitzler) Woodsboro, Md. 

t Frothingham, Norma (Mrs. R. B. Chapman) 

34 S. Fulton Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

t Lee, Mabel (Mrs. Oehler) 1318 Linden Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

J Myers, Altha 

t Meredith, Florence (Mrs. C. B. Hicks) 

141 Holderness Street, Atlanta, Ga. 

J McDaniel, Lillian 1123 Madison Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

$ Nordt£(Mrs. E. M. Bridges) Blue Ridge Summit, Penn. 

X Pinkard, Bertie 2404 Barclay Street, Baltimore, Md. 

X Shields, Lelia (Mrs. G. Dawson) Chester, S. C. 

X Stoneham, Ruth 1610 Eutaw Place, Baltimore, Md. 

X Skinner, Florence (Mrs. H. Caldwell) Galena, Md. 

White Bettie A. C. L. Hospital, Rocky Mount, N. C. 

1916 

Blake, Helen 23 East 21st Street, Baltimore, Md. 

X Clarke, Laura Greensboro, N. C. 

Dix, Nellie, (Mrs. Hubert Bowers) Bel Air, Md. 

Dunn, Margaret 1318 Linden Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Eichner, Louise K. (Mrs.) 2120 St. Paul Street, Baltimore, Md. 

I Forney, Marion (Mrs. S. F. Smith) Ashville, N. C. 

X Hurst, Anna (Mrs. C. Hicherson) 140 Pine Street, Charlotte, N. C. 

X Henkel, Julia (Mrs. J. S. Skladowsky) 
"^^•^vWy-jiA^if . V 638 Columbia Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Hoffmaster, Blanche University Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

Kauffman, Irine State College, Pa. 

X Langenfeldt, Marie -^ Cheltenham, Md. 

McSherry, Helen B 5ll.Pa".2«« Mt. Royal Terrace, Baltimore, Md. 

+ Mayo, Margaret (Mrs. Oscar Winnberg) 

3004 Grayson Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Null, Lillie 1225 Linden Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

* Phelan, Elizabeth 

* Deceased. 

X Graduates not members of the association. 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 43 

t Reamey, Hildegarde (Mrs. Jacob Linn) 

1123 Madison Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 
t Rutherford, Elsie 1818 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Smith, Sallie (Mrs. H. W. Byers). . . .749 W. North Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Scarff, Inez Embassy Apartments, Atlantic City, N. J. 

Smith, Bcrnice 2928 Windsor Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Scaggs, Lucy 1207 B. Street, N. E., Washington, D. C. 

X Simmons, Maude Charlestown, S. C. 

Selfe, Serena (Mrs. W. A. Bridges) Eudowood, Towson, Md. 

t Walter, Margaret (Mrs. Theo. Warner) 

Windsor Court Apartments, Baltimore, Md. 

1917 

Cecil, R. (Mrs.) 601 Calhoun Street, Baltimore, Md. 

X Cavano, A. (Mrs. F. Smith) 1734 Homestead Street, Baltimore, Md. 

X Dearmeyer, Helen (Mrs. J. Pessel) 

1624 N. Pulaski Street. Baltimore, Md. 

Fahreny, Myrtle 1811 Dukeland Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

* Hedges, Lilly Brunswick, Md. 

X Keffer, Laura 

Kenney, Emily Aurora Hospital, Aurora, HI. 

Klase, Josephine (Mrs. C. S. Warrell) 

311 Middlefield Road, Palo Alto, Cal. 

Lloyd, Ellen 826 CarroUton Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Marsh, Elizabeth 2901 St. Paul Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Mohler, Anna (Mrs.) 1406 Madison Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Mouse, Lucy 1619 Eutaw Place, Baltimore, Md. 

X Minnis, Jemima (Mrs. E. McLane) Pittsburgh, Penn. 

X Minnis, Nancy Lebanon Hospital, Caldwell Avenue, New York 

Monroe, Ethel 4333 Chestnut Avenue, Philadelphia, Penn. 

Murray, Olive Lebanon Hospital, Caldwell Avenue, New York 

X Pennewelli(Mrs. Lawrence Bloom) Penn. 

Quigley, Bertha 717 W. North Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Robinson, Anna (Mrs. John Lutz).2901 St. Paul Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Risley, Marguerite (Mrs. H. M. Stein) 

1315 Mt. Royal Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

X Simpson, Elsie 202 West 5th Stret, Frederick, Md. 

X Shertzer, R Riverside Hospital, Newport New.s, Va. 

X Stoneham, Annette (Married) New Windsor, Md. 

X Thorn, Norma (Mrs. J. S. Woodruff) 252 N. Payson St., City. 

1918 

Barwick, Elizabeth St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Bay, Beulah 2201 Aiken Street, Baltimore, Md. 

X Benson, Martha (Mrs. E. M. Jones) 

1601 N. Second St., Harrisburg, Penn. 

* Deceased. 

X Graduates not members of the association. 






44 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

Carr, Esther (Mrs.) 2121 Linden Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

t Dolly, Iva (Mrs. J. M. Underbill) Ashville, N. C. 

Ensor, Althea (Mrs. Burcli) 

Flowers, Nettie Central Y. W. C. A., Baltimore, Md. 

t Flaharty, Nellie (Mrs. Boyd) Street, Md. 

Hook, Katherine 1517 Park Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

X Kinney, Maude Frostburg, Md. 

t Kirkley, Naoma (Mrs. D. E. Fay) 

2919 Belmont Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Leister, Grace 1316 Linden Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Lauper, Margaret University Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

t Linstrum, Gay (Mrs. Harry Hughes) 

2125 W. North Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 
t McCarty, Ellen (Mrs. Frank Ogden) 

115 N. Carey Street, Baltimore, Md. 

McMillan, Martha 2121 Linden Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Moore, Cecilia (Mrs. Herbert Zimmerman) 

103 East 22nd Street, Baltimore, Md. 
t McDaniel, Lena (Mrs. C. Rosenbach) 

3237 Eastern Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Oldhauser, Minnie 2863 W. Lafayette Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

t Ridgley, Florence (Mrs. E. Killough) 

Hamlin Apartments, Baltimore, Md. 

t Ridgley, Helen 2108 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Scout, Temperance 2121 Linden Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

X Singleton, Jessie (Mrs. Ralph Guzzman) Red Springs, N. C. 

X Turner, Marion 1316 Linden Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

X Ward, Mary Lee 

X Yingling, Ruth Williamsport, Penn. 

1919 

Alrich, Annette (Mrs. Geo. Holman) 

178 Virginia Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

X Brady, Ethel 2121 Linden Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

X Brown, Hady (Mrs. F. A. Macis) 

Brown, G. M. (Mrs. E. Duvall) R.F.D. No. 10 Westminster, Md. 

Gordy, Helen Peninsula General Hospital, Salisbury, Md. 

X Jones, Grace 1025 Harlem Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

X Lloyd, Betty 826 N. CarroUton Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

X Lohse, (Mrs.) 321 East 20th Street, Baltimore, Md. 

X Kling, Caroline Peninsula General Hospital, Salisbury, Md. 

Murray, Emma 28th Street, Newport News, Va. 

C^. X Mitchell , Edna (Mrs. Dennis Smith) New Windsor, Md. 

X Nichols, Jane (Mrs. Lewi^) Avon Apartments, Baltimore, Md. 

Pleasants, Helen (Mrs. Smeeley) Northford, Col. 

Sides, Elizabeth (Married) 

X Graduates not members of the association. 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 45 

Smarr, Alice 21 N. Carey Street, Baltimore, Md. 

X Zepp, Katherine (Mrs. M. Douglass) 

24 S. 9th Street, Indianapolis, Ind. 

1920 

X Alexander, Christine (Mrs. J. Mayoral) . . . . Apavtado 1465, Hanava, Cuba 
X Barnett, Louise (Mrs. C. A. Reifschneider) 

2939 Eastern Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Baugher, Margaret 1728 St. Paul Street, Baltimore, Md. 

X Biddlecomb, Emily University Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

Bay, Ethlyn (Mrs. C. Dever) 2201 Aiken Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Butler, Eleanor University Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

Clements, Ruth Danville, Va. 

X Evans, Emma (Mrs.) Benger, Md. 

Gilbert, Helen 2044 Linden Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

X Howell, Florence Rock Hill, S. C. 

X Kirkley, Azalia 2917 W. North Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Little, Rachel (Mrs. Landers) . .3315 Walbrook Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 
X Lankford, Marie 1425 Linden Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

McGovern, Clara 1300 Aisquith Streel , Baltimore, Md. 

Northcutt, Leona 21 N. Carey Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Reynolds, Grace 21 N. Carey Street, Baltimore, Md. 

I Schwab, Myrtle 1812 N. Fulton Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

X Scaggs, Edna 883 N. Kenwood Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Trevelian, Mabel Lebanon Hospital, Caldwell Avenue, New York 

Tillett, Zora St. Paul Apartments, Baltimore, Md. 

Maston, Bessie University Hospital, Baltimore. Md. 

Yates, Edna 3039 W. North Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

X Yingling, Emily (Mrs. Albert) . . .3315 Walbrook Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 
X Shipley, Golda 2912 Windsor Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

1921 

X Bateman, Louise (Mrs. M. Brooks) Cockeysville, Md. 

Childs, Helen 2121 Linden Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Fisher, Mary 1123 Madison Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Gaver, Norma 1318 Linden Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Gorman, Ruth 1123 Madison Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

X Hanna, Isabel (Mrs. L. Goldsborough) 

University Apartments, Baltimore, Md. 

Hampton, Claribel University Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

Hogshead, Kate (Mrs. John Reese) Lutherville, Md. 

X Minnis, Christine Lebanon Hospital, Caldwell Avenue, New York 

Martin, Blanche... .Fulton and Pennsylvania Avenues, Baltimore, Md. 
X McDaniel, Mary (Mrs. H. Weisner) . .1603 Park Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

X Graduates not members of the association. 



46 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

Neady, Susan P 2044 Linden Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Reister, Ruby 139 Park Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

i Reese, Zadith (Mrs. Wm. Pitt) 3026 Guilford Ave, Baltimore, Md. 

Reamy, Helen 1123 Madison Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Rhodes, Jessie 1318 Linden Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Smith, Julia Fulton and Pennsylvania Avenues, Baltimore, Md. 

Woods, Anna Fulton and Pennsylvania Avenues, Baltimore, Md. 

1922 

t Bowie, Lucille 1728 St. Paul Street, Baltimore, Md. 

t Callahan, Vera Dennson, Ohio 

t Deputy, Julia 1728 St. Paul Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Elgin, Grace University Hospital Baltimore, Md. 

DuBois, Cecil 511 Cathedral Street, Baltimore, Md. 

t Lord, Nettie (Mrs.) 21 N. Carey Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Morrison, Frankie V University Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

In spite of our efforts we feel that this list is somewhat incomplete. 
Corrections greatly appreciated. 

X Graduates not members of the association. 



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Slumnae bulletin 



1924 



OFFICERS OF THE ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

President Lillian M. McDaniel, R.N., 1124 Madison Ave. 

First Vice-President Elizabeth L. Marsh, R.N., Frederick, Md. 

Second Vice-President Blanche L. Martin, R.N., 1220 Linden Ave. 

Secretary Marie E. Sander, R.N., 2108 Mt. Royal Terrace. 

Treasurer Ellen C. Israel, R.N., 214 W. Monument St. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

The above officers with 
Margaret Kable Winslow, R.N. Anna Wham Pitt, R.N. 

Isabella Griffith Fleck, R.N. Clyde Dawson Lynn, R.N. 

MEMBERSHIP COMMITTEE 

Helen B. McSherry, R.N., chairman 
Julia R. Smith, R.N. Ruth E. Gorman, R.N. 

Leona M. Northcutt, R.N. Helen L. Dunn, R.N. 

PROGRAM COMMITTEE 

Gertrude T. Cole,. R. N., Chairman 
Martha M. McMillan, R.N. Anne E. Butts R.N. 

Frankie Morrison, R.N. Cora Mason Wilson, R.N. 

Margaret Lauper 

NOMINATING COMMITTEE 

Beulah Bay, R.N., chairman 
GoLDA G. Price, R.N. Elva Dean, R.N. 

Mary McDaniel Weissner, R.N. Jeanette Flowers, R.N. 

REGISTRY COMMITTEE 

Ellen C. Israel, R.N., chairman 
Alice H. Smarr, R.N. Temperance A. Scout, R.N. 

Katherine R. Zbpp, R.N. Naomi Hissey, R.N. 

PUBLICATION COMMITTEE 

Blanche L. Martin, R.N. 1 ^ ,., 

Marguerite Risley Stein, R.N. / 
Clyde Dawson Lynn, R.N. Anne E. Drye, R.N. 

IsABELLE Griffith Fleck, R.N. Margaret Kable Winslow, R.N. 




The Louisa Fausosh IIumk 



THE 

University Hospital Nurses 
Alumnae Bulletin 

Vol. IV APRIL, 1924 No. 1 

THE LOUISA PARSONS HOME 
By Esther W. Whitworth, '24 

No one can tell 

But those who dwell 

In this pile of brick and stone, 

What rest we find 

From the daily grind 

In the Louisa Parsons Home. 

When our bodies ache 

And our hearts they quake 

And all the world looks blue; 

We cross the street 

And our pals we meet 

And things take a different hue. 

It's safe to say 

In many a day 

No matter where you roam. 

That find you'll not 

A pleasanter spot 

Than the Louisa Parsons Home. 

EDITORIAL 
Private I>uty Nurses and Hospital Specials 

Some years ago the bulk of the specializing in the hospital was 
done by the third year students, for which service the patient paid 
the hospital eighteen dollars. This custom, we are glad to know 
has passed into the discard. In its wake has come the Hospital 
Special, a group of women with somewhat different problems to 
solve from those of the Private Duty Nurse who goes into the 
home. 

3 



4 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

There is one problem, however, they have in common, that 
of learning to appreciate how vital the apparently insignificant 
things are in the larger scheme. As we know, entrance require- 
ments to training schools are steadily increasing, and great prog- 
ress is being made in training and education in these schools. 
This is splendid, for the more education a nurse has the more she 
is able to realize that no detail of housework or nursing, when 
necessary, is menial. Many a nurse who has given excellent 
treatment to her patient has been an utter failure because she has 
tried to draw hard and fast rules between the things she would do 
and the things that must be done for her, causing such complica- 
tions in the running of the home as to make the family, and at 
times even the patient, wish she had never entered it. 

This may also apply to the Hospital Special, with the exception 
that the hardship is then borne by the Superintendent of Nurses. 
To the Special, her patient is the one important object in the hospi- 
tal, while to the Superintendent of Nurses that patient is but one 
of many, and that particular Special but one of a large diverse 
personnel. It would be splendid if every superintendent could 
have Specialed in a hospital and if every Special could have served, 
at least an apprenticeship in charge of a hospital. It takes this 
experience to successfully blend the two points of view. 

Routine in a hospital is not a haphazard thing. It is worked out 
carefully, the cogs of one department interlocking with those of 
another. A thoughtful Special can add greatly to the smooth 
functioning, but Specials cannot expect to be thoroughly efficient 
if they are simply tolerated by the hospital that employs them. 
They are entitled to a resonable amount of provided comfort. 
According to an editorial in the American Journal of Nursing, Mt. 
Sinai Hospital, New York City, has considered the comfort of the 
non-resident Special Nurse most carefully. It reads: 

A well ventilated locker room provides ample space for clothing. Well 
lighted dressing booths are conveniently arranged. Lavatories are close 
at hand and even a shower bath is provided. It was a joy to find on each 
floor, a serving room large enough to accomodate without confusion a 
considerable number of special nurses each intent on preparing nourishment 
for her own patient. On every floor, too, there is a small retiring or sitting 
room, with lavatory attached, which is attractively and comfortably 
furnished for the use of nurses temporarily excused from attendance on 
their patients. 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 5 

Undoubtedly the public's main quarrel with the nurse is her 
lack of understanding — ability to "put herself in his place." 
On the other hand there are many Hospital Specials and Private 
Duty Nurses who take splendid care of their patients, cause no 
friction in the home or hospital, and at times actually take cases 
in the country. Who made the wise remark that "all could not 
nurse within the shadow of Washington's Monument?" 

Seriously, the question of meeting the demand for nurses in the 
outlying districts is a problem. During the last two months our 
directory received 335 calls, of which, only 170 were filled. This 
was not because there were no nurses on the list but because some 
nurses were registered against certain type of cases. While we 
scarcely can be censured for wishing to pick our cases, frequently 
it means that patients who do not need a Special have one, while 
some poor soul who is actually in need of professional attention 
goes without, or manages to get a practical nurse. 

We cannot close our eyes and saj^ this is not our problem, for it 
strikes at the very foundation of the nursing profession — Service. 
How can we best serve the public? Some schools have tried to 
meet this fairly by requiring that for the first few years after 
graduation a nurse must accept any case that comes in. They 
argue that this is only fair when one considers that the most recent 
graduate receives the same remuneration as a nurse with years of 
experience. 

But no matter how it is accomplished, we agree that it is up to 
us as nurses to work out some method by which the public may be 
served. 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

Scholarship and Loan Funds 

1 . Isabel Hampton Rohb Memorial Fund 

Through the Isabel Hampton Robb Memorial Fund, scholar- 
ships are annually available for those entering the training school 
field. Application should be made to Miss Katherin DeWitt, 
Secretary Isabel Hampton Robb Memorial Committee, 19 West 
Main Street, Rochester, N. Y. 



b THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

2, The American Red Cross 

The American Red Cross gives a number of general nursing 
scholarships, also restricted to those who are willing to enter the 
Public Health Nursing of the Red Cross. Further information 
may be obtained from the Director of the Department of Nursing, 
The American Red Cross, Washington, D. C. 

S. The LaVerne Noyes Scholarship 

A number of scholarships are offered by the estate of LaVerne 
Noyes. These scholarships are available for nurses who, having 
served in the army and navy in the last war, who have been honor- 
ably discharged and who are in need of this assistance. Further 
information may be obtained from the Trustees of the LaVerne 
Foundation, University of Chicago, Chicago, 111. 

4. The Isabel Mclsaac Loan Fund 

The Isabel Mclsaac Loan Fund also offers a few limited loans 
to Students interested in the more advanced fields of nursing. 
Application should be made to Katherin DeWitt, 19 West Main 
Street, Rochester, N. Y. 

5. The Nurses Alumnae Association Scholarship of the University 

of Maryland 

A scholarship is given by the Nurses Alumnae of the University 
of Maryland for the six weeks summer course at Columbia Uni- 
versity, to the nurse who wins the first honors in her class during 
the three years of training. 

6. School of Practical Arts 

The announcement of the School of Practical Arts, the School 
of Education, or the Summer Session will be sent on application 
to the Secretary of Teachers College, Columbia University, New 
York. 

Application for admission as students of Nursing Education 
should be addressed to the Office of Nursing Education, Teachers 
College, Columbia University, New York City. 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 7 

A DEMONSTRATION IN THE AMALGAMATION OF 
NURSING SERVICES 

By Grace L. Anderson, R.N. 

Of outstanding interest throughout the country today is the 
subject of the amalgamation of all types of services — health, 
social welfare, public utility or what not. It has become a funda- 
mental principle in present day methods, both in social and health 
work, to keep as small as possible the number of agencies and indi- 
viduals who visit the family. We have seen the successful amal- 
gamation of two of our large national health organizations into 
the present American Child Health Association. We are also 
watching with interest the unification of health work in Boston 
under the newly created Boston Health Association. This inter- 
est in the unification of health services or social services is not 
confined to one section of the country. It is of international, as 
well as national significance. New York City, with its many 
well known organizations that through a long period of years 
have maintained important nursing services, is just beginning to 
think in terms of the possible combination of allied health ser- 
vices in the interest of greater efficiency in public service. 

The East Harlem Nursing and Health Demonstration is a study 
in the amalgamation of health services. It was undertaken by 
the Henry Street Nursing Service, the Association for Improving 
the Condition of the Poor, the American Red Cross, and the 
Maternity Center Association, for the definite purpose of studying 
the results of unification from the angle of the private agencies. 

The support of this project, it was decided, would cost $65,000 
a year, which would allow SI. 50 per capita for the type of health 
work that was contemplated. This budget is being met by a 
contribution from the four agencies interested, of half the budget 
or S32,500. The remaining half is contributed by the Laura 
Spelman Rockefeller Memorial. 

The district selected for the Demonstration covers two sanitary 
zones, each with a population of 20,000. These people are all 
living in twenty blocks. The geographical unit is very small and 
can be covered in a few minutes' walk, but one of the great difficul- 
ties is the climbing of tenement house stairs, which is probably 
more fatiguing than walking longer distances on the level. 



8 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

In addition to making certain comprehensive studies, the 
Demonstration obligated itself to care for the health needs of 
this little community. The people are almost exclusively Italian, 
In addition to the handicaps associated with New York conges- 
tion, they are extremely primitive in their health standards. They, 
like most of the south Italians, are superstitous and fatalistic by 
nature. For generations they have been denied the facilities for 
modern education. For this reason it is not surprising that we 
find their felt needs along this line below our American standards. 
The subordinate position of the woman in the home makes work 
with the family difficult, since most of our initial contacts must 
be with the mothers. The other side of the picture, however, is 
the extreme courtesy of the people, who out of their very gracious- 
ness will promise the nurse anything that she may ask, even if 
they do not feel keenly their responsibility for keeping the promise. 
In this community of 40,000 Italians, representing 8575 families, 
of whom 1218 are under one year of age, 6192 between one and 
five years, 6980 between six and sixteen, and 23,000 are adults, 
we are conducting an intensive program of health and nutrition 
work. 

The Demonstration places its greatest emphasis upon the work 
in the home. The medical conferences are not conducted for the 
sake of medical research, but to enable the workers to amplify and 
broaden their home contacts. The field work is done by 16 nurses, 
3 nutritionists and 2 interpreters or aides. It includes as major 
projects, bedside nursing, all phases of maternity service except 
delivery, infant welfare, and the supervision of the pre-school 
child. The prophylactic services include ante-partum confer- 
ences, conferences for the infant, and for the pre-school child, 
posture classes and dental clinics, as well as a special medical 
nutrition conference. In addition to the home visiting and medi- 
cal conferences, the Demonstration is conducting various classes. 
These, hke the medical conferences, are held primarily to gain the 
confidence and friendship of the people of the district and to 
assist the workers in getting over in as many ways as possible the 
lesson of health. Our people are living in such congested condi- 
tions that it seems advisable to bring them out of their homes 
as much as is practicable. 

The headquarters for the Demonstration consist of three floors 
in a building within the district. The first floor provides offices 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 9 

for the field, supervisory, and administrative staffs. The second 
floor is devoted exclusively to the maternity and infant welfare 
services, and the third floor is used for pre-school conferences, 
a group teaching, and posture work. In equipping the house we 
have been mindful of the Italian love for color. Walls, curtains, 
pictures (including a favorite Madonna), posters, exhibits — all 
help to relieve formality and please mothers and children alike, 
without any sacrifice of essential efficiency. 

The Demonstration was planned on the basis of a three year's 
study and one year has already passed. During that time a good 
foundation has been laid. The response given to the work by the 
people has been more than gratifying. During this year 39,551 
visits have been made to our neighbors — 5,945 on account of acute 
illness, 5300 in the maternity service, 4000 in the infant welfare 
service, 8000 to pre-cchool children, 2653 to school children, and 
2269 for adult welfare. The nutritionists made 2684 visits dur- 
ing the year. In addition to the home contacts, the Demonstra- 
tion held 280 medical conferences with an attendance of 5000, 73 
nursing conferences with an attendance of 1000, and 77 educational 
classes with an attendance of 1000. During the second year it 
will be possible to conduct a much more intensive health service. 
The organization difficulties are behind us and the people are now 
our friends and eager for the service that we are here to give them. 
The conception of the project, the gathering of funds, and the 
outlining of principles was the work of a remarkable group who 
serve the Demonstration as its Governing Board, with Mr. Homer 
Folks as Chairman. 

THE STUDENT VOLUNTEER CONVENTION 

By Helen Steeple, '23 

Sherwood Eddy recently was asked, what he considered the 
most significant and far reaching event of this decade. His 
answer, — "The Indianapolis Convention," — was a distinct sur- 
prise. Yet, upon second thought, one who attended this ninth 
Quadrennial Student Volunteer Convention at Indianapolis (from 
December 28 to January 2) cannot fail to perceive the reason for 
that answer. To you Alumnae and friends who may not know 
that the nurses of the University of Maryland are interested in 
international or world questions, I have been asked to tell a little 
about this great Convention. 



10 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

In November, 1923, we first were introduced to the Convention 
idea. Immediately, we decided to send a delegate to Indianapolis, 
and raised more than sufficient funds for the trip. Our nurses 
were very anxious to know just what this Student Volunteer Move- 
ment is, what the Convention could give us; and just how we might 
re-vitalize our lives through it. Of the actual trip to Indianapolis, 
I should like to dwell upon the delightful "getting acquainted" 
with the fifty-two other students in the Tri-State delegation 
(Maryland, Dele ware and District of Columbia). We indulged 
in the songs, yells and college chatter and the jolly comradeship 
and deeply sincere conversations with each other and with our 
leaders. The social contact, we had, in itself, was an education 
for we learned to know and appreciate the other fellow for what he 
actually is. 

Speaking of lesser things first, one of the outstanding impres- 
sions of the convention was the tremendous efficiency and business- 
like methods of administrations. It is no small task to collect, 
assort and correctly stow away in their proper places, 6151 young 
men and women ; to distribute these people in definite groups and 
locations, and still begin and end every meeting on time. Yet, 
this is precisely what the student officials of the Student Volun- 
teer Movement accomplished. It is still more difficult to present 
and discuss vital problems of personal and world wide interest in a 
sane open-minded and fair manner when there are many students 
discussing them and then to arrive at a definite group decision 
regarding these questions. That is exactly what these men and 
women, representing seven hundred and ten different institutions 
from every civilized country accomplished. 

The social side of the convention was more or less incidental and 
entirely informal. Old friendships revived, new ones made, 
reminiscences and discovery of mutual interests made our in- 
between-minutes fly. Meeting as a delegation group for meals 
and a short devotional service every day at a definite place ; find- 
ing one's way about the city in company with some equally as 
bewildered student from another state; arguing hotly over the 
virtues or discrepancies in some speaker's views; riding to and fro 
in a crowded, swaying old bus, — can you see how all these social 
contacts could bring a closer understanding between the American 
students and the three hundred and eighty six foreign students? 
I was particularly happy in that some of the University of Mary- 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 11 

land home folks live in Indianapolis. Mrs. Warren Ricketts, the 
charming sister-in-law of our assistant Superintendent made some 
of my hours fly with lightening speed. She drove me through the 
outskirts of the big city and thus I was able to get a much clearer 
picture of a mid-western city, than perhaps many others of the 
Eastern delegation, even though we suffered much from Indiana 
"Smog" (smoke and fog) Later I was delightfully entertained at 
the Robert Long Hospital which is connected with the University 
of Indiana. Mrs. Ethel Clarke, class of 1906, the superintendent, 
and Miss Catherine Shea, class of 1913, the assistant-superintend- 
ent, were very cordial and showed me the hospital, nurses' home 
and splendid equipment. It was a joy to see our beloved "Florence 
Nightingale" cap so far away, holding such a position of respect 
and honor. 

There were so many big things about the convention proper it 
is hard to know where to begin describing it. Can you picture 
to yourself a huge multitude of over 6000 young men and women 
of all nationalities, met together for the common purpose of study- 
ing the christian solution of some of the momentous problems of 
this world of today? Can you hear the glorious sound of those 
thousands of voices singing the old hymns of worship or suppli- 
cation, with all the beauty and intensity that sincere emotion give 
to youth's voices? Can you appreciate the spontaneous out-burst 
of applause that followed the inspired words of the speakers? 
can you feel the thrill of the consecrated hush of the five minutes 
of silent intercession, when thousands were breathing a silent 
prayer for guidance and Divine help? 

Again, imagine this vast multitude broken up into 49 groups, 
and each one carrying on a spirited, highly intelligent and demo- 
cratic discussion of the problems and questions which they felt 
were of paramount importance to this generation. To many of 
us the consideration of the Race problem was thought to be in- 
significant. Yet 41 of the 49 groups centered most of the time for 
discussion upon the consideration of racial relationships in our 
schools and daily life. 

The economic and industrial situations seemed far beyond us 
students. We had heard and read of strikes and fight for wage 
increase, but we had not realized we could present any actual 
solution. The war question seemed so remote, as a result of one 
famous slogan — ^"War to end War" — that it was a distinct shock 



12 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

to hear and see the vehemence with which hundreds of students 
protested against participation in future wars, and against stu- 
dent military training. We have been so satisfied with our own 
way of Christian Hving, our own vague behefs regarding Chris- 
tianity that it was a definite jolt to have some of our pet dogmas 
assailed, and to be brought face to face with the fact that the 
youth of this country are "the religious slackers of the world." 
The youth of America have become so saturated with its own over- 
weening self-importance and perfection, that it was a staggering 
awakening to be told by Sherwood Eddy and others that 
"America's youth is not 98 per cent all right." 

What are the reactions to all these denunciations? At least we 
were awakened and made to realize that we have to think through 
these questions. 

What can we nurses in our limited fields do? When I came back 
to Baltimore with the inspiration of five days high moral and men- 
tal tension, I wondered what I could give to our nurses that would 
mean anything in their lives. There was a very definite interest 
in all the Student Volunteer Activities, exhibited by my class- 
mates. They want to get some of the spiritual values in their 
own lives. They want to know what is being done in the world 
outside of our little narrow groove. They are anxious to study 
and think. To this end, they sent three delegates to the Tri-State 
Conference at Hood College, Frederick, Md., February 8 to 10 
where more detailed and intimate discussions of the same ques- 
tions took place. 

We are reading the Student Volunteer Bulletin, The Woman's 
Press (Y. W. C. A.) Magazine. We are talking about these prob- 
lems. We would like to establish a Young Women's Christian 
Association in our own school, and we hope to organize a Student 
Volunteer group of consecrated nurses pledged to go out in fields 
where Christian service is needed. 

A FEW NOTES ON MY WORK IN SERBIA 
By Bernice Conner, R. N. 

In the summer of 1921, I resigned my position as Red Cross 
Public Health Nurse in Baltimore County with the expectation 
of working at the Henry Street Settlement, New York City, and 
of studying at Teachers College. But the opportunity of going 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 13 

to Serbia came to me, so on July 30 I sailed on the Rotterdam for 
Europe. 

About this time old King Peter died and Prince Alexander, his 
younger son, came to the throne, Serbia with her former prov- 
inces Herzgovinia, Boznia, and Slovinia together with the coun- 
try of Montenegro now form Jugo Slavia. Eighty per cent of the 
people of Serbia are farmers or peasants, speak the Slav language 
and are Greek Catholics. As a result of periodic Turkish inva- 
sions and wars with their neighboring countries, they have made 
little progress. The schools are poor, and consequently the peo- 
ple are ignorant, superstitious and bound down by tradition. 

The American Red Cross sent a commission to Serbia imme- 
diately after the Armistice. This was succeeded by the American 
Commission to Serbia which distributed the funds given by the 
people of the United States both in admiration for Serbia's wonder- 
ful fighting and in pity for her need. 

There were few doctors left in Serbia and these were found in 
the cities and towns. So the Commission did its work in the rural 
districts. Fourteen stations were organized, each having a dis- 
pensary, a few beds for the criticallj^ ill, and a public health nurse. 
In addition to the nurses there was a doctor, either American or 
Russian. 

I was sent to Bajina Basta station, the one at the greatest dis- 
tance from Belgrade. As American distances go it was not far, 
but in Serbia it required a twenty-four hour ride by train followed 
by a night spent in a little town at the base of the mountain and a 
five-hour ride over the mountain in a kola or Serbian buggy. 

I found Bajina Basta to be a village of about thirteen hundred 
people. The houses were one story wooden buildings with tiny 
windows and were in many instances unfloored. The dispensary, 
however, was floored and was two stories high. A winding moun- 
tain stream furnished water for the village. Water for the hospi- 
tal was hauled to us in barrels by ox kalos. 

My work consisted of visits both to the homes of the sick and to 
the schools. In the latter I gave lectures on Hygiene, Foods, 
Proper Home Conditions, and Disease Prevention. In Hygiene 
I had to start with the fundamentals such as the use of soap, the 
advantage of washing in warm water, the falsity of the belief that 
a bath in cold weather would be disastrous, and the undesirability 
of remaining sewed up in clothes during a whole winter. 



14 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

In talks on Disease Prevention I gave chief attention to the 
means of guarding against intestinal worms, flees, head lice, and 
scabies. I tried to make them forsake the convenient duck pond 
as a source of drinking water supply. The numerous fast days 
miade meat almost unknown as a foodstuff. The children brought 
onions and bread, often corn bread, for lunch. Very seldom did 
they get milk or eggs and vegetables were also scarce. 

In one school I found 83 per cent of the children underweight. 
I tried to get funds from the Commission for the purchase of sup- 
plies so that I might make soups for the children. I succeeded 
only in getting dehydrated hash. After getting permission from 
the Pope for the children to eat this hash, I fed as many as 112 in 
a day. 

I could not do much in the way of improving home conditions 
because the distance made it impossible for me to check up any 
great number of them. Besides, the crowded conditions resulting 
from the presence of perhaps eighteen or twenty persons in a small 
one- or two-room house made impossible very much improvement. 

For the work to have any permanent desirable effects it was 
necessary to provide native workers to carry it on. There were 
none already trained so we had to train them. We opened a 
training school in Bajina Basta for a four month course consisting 
of lectures in Practical Nursing, Surgery, Medical and Surgical 
Diseases, Children, Obstetrics, Home and School Visiting and 
Contagious and Public Health Nursing. The lectures were given 
by the American Commission doctor. At the end of the course 
representatives from the Board of Health and the Board of Educa- 
tion met and were so favorably impressed that they asked us to 
give a six months course at Valjevo. Here the Board of Health 
and the Serbian Red Cross cooperated with us and when I left in 
July they had decided that they wanted the course lengthened 
to one year. Today there have been 64 graduates and they are 
now working in these health stations and in the different govern- 
ment hospitals in Serbia. 

Besides having the advantage of living and working in a foreign 
country, I had the chance to travel in Rumania, Bulgaria, Turkey 
including the city of Constantinople, Smyrna, Egypt, Greece and 
Italy, returning home last September. The chief reason for my 
return was that I might attend Teachers College and resume my 
studies in the Supervision of Public Health Work. I feel that 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 15 

there is no limit to the field which is open to a nurse who is also a 
graduate of Teachers College. I hope very much that I may meet 
other University of Maryland Nurses in my classes next year. 

THE MOTHERS' RELIEF SOCIETY 
By Lillian McDaniel, R.N., 'L5 

There is no more essential work carried on in Baltimore than 
that of the Mothers' Relief Society. Through this organiaation, 
care and attention are provided for mothers and babies before and 
after birth. In addition, the mother is educated to the need of 
prenatal and postnatal care of herself, as well as the importance of 
hygienic surroundings and care for the baby. 

This work centers around a dispensaiy established at 904 S. 
Ellwood Avenue, where clinics are held regularly and where medi- 
cal examinations and advice are given mothers before and after 
childbirth. Cases are brought to the dispensaiy either by mothers 
themselves, other patients, by doctors who cannot handle them or 
through member agencies of the Baltimore Alliance. 

The patients are encouraged to register at the dispensary as 
soon as possible so the prenatal work may be undertaken early. 
The expectant mother reports at regular intervals to the dispensary 
where necessary examinations are made, by the specialist in Obstet- 
rics on the staff of the Mothers' Relief Society, and where she is 
acquainted with the precautions she must observe to insure safety. 
At the same time the home is looked into by the nurse who is on 
the staff of The Instructive Visiting Nurses Association, and 
provision made there for the proper reception of the new baby. 

Normally the baby is brought into the world in the home. How- 
ever, if complications develop, the patient is sent to the hospital. 
When the mother returns to her hom.e the Society is notified and 
resumes its care of the patient. In no event is the Society's care 
and instruction dropped until one month after birth. Care of 
the baby is ordinarily turned over to the Babies' Milk Fund Asso- 
ciation after the baby is two weeks old. 

The primary' aim is to eliminate the midwife and to provide 
better care before and after birth for those who cannot afford to 
pay for constant medical supervision. This aim has not altogether 
been accomplished but gradually these foreign mothers are coming 



16 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

to regard as essential, the education and help at childbirth, and in 
prenatal and postnatal care, which the Mothers' Relief Society- 
gives. 

STUDENT NURSES ACTIVITIES OF THE UNIVERSITY 
OF MARYLAND 

By Dorthy C. Kraft, '24 

We are truly appreciative for the privilege of a space in your 
yearly Bulletin: We consider it an honor. A compliment has 
been conferred upon us to be allowed even the smallest space in 
the thoughts of an Association so esteemeVi as yours. It is espe- 
cially so with the Senior Class for we feel that we are a bit nearer 
that goal than our fellow students. 

Our social activities have not exceeded those of previous years, 
although we have been amply occupied. We started the school 
year with a Hallowe'en Dance which was held at the Emerson 
Hotel. The affair was very successful — thanks to one of the mem- 
bers of the Senior Class who made it possible for us to have the 
Emerson Ballroom. Since then there have been several small 
dances in the Nurses Home. One was for the Graduates and Sen- 
iors and another, a Valentine Dance. Of course, we always have a 
delightful time in our home, for "the older it grows, the dearer it 
becomes to us." We will always be appreciative of the Louisa 
Parsons Home because of the comfort it affords us. 

Educationally, we have made some progress. In the fall, we 
were notified that a World Convention of Student Volunteers was 
meeting at Indianapolis in December and that we should send dele- 
gates. We selected one of our most capable students, Miss Teeple, 
to represent us and bring us something of the thoughts and move- 
ments of the rest of the world. We were fully rewarded by our 
wise selection of a delegate, for she brought back many new things 
for us to ponder over. Because of our interest in the large con- 
vention, we were privileged to have representatives at the Tri- 
State Convention held at Hood College, Frederick. Here we sent 
three delegates, one from the faculty and two from the student 
body. We hope some day, to organize a body of Student Volun- 
teers in our hospital, for it will be more elevating and broadening 
to the minds of students. 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 17 

The number of student nurses admitted has averaged with those 
of previous years. There are more advantages now than formerly. 
Although the monthly allowance is not as large as before, the 
uniforms are furnished by the hospital. When the three months 
probation is over, we are presented with uniforms a trifle lighter 
than we have been accustomed to, apron with bib attached, and 
cuffs that button to the dress just below the elbow: 

The course in theory is more intense during the Probation period 
and Junior year, making it possible for more subjects to be com- 
pleted before the responsibilities of the Intermediate and Senior 
years. We Seniors finish our theoretical work a great deal sooner 
than our predecessors, for which we are duly thankful. We feel 
free even though we do not possess our diplomas. 

Our class — the present Senior Class— is the largest ever grad- 
uated from our Training School. We hope that our quantity will 
ever inspire us to be first in quality the remainder of our time at 
the University of Maryland and as we go out in the world. 

EARLY HISTORY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
TRAINING SCHOOL FOR NURSES 

By Evelyn Pearl Graham, Class 1923 

The College of Medicine of Maryland, the present School of 
Medicine of the University, was established in 1807, and during 
the winter of 1889 and 1890, the growing demand for the services 
of trained nurses led to the establishment of The Training School 
for Nurses, and for the accommodation of this service a building 
was erected in the rear of the hospital at a cost of ten thousand 
dollars. 

Early in 1889, The Johns Hopkins Hospital was about to open 
its wards and was in need of a competent Superintendent of Nurses 
and among 80 applicants, 4 were chosen by the board of trustees, 
Miss Annie McDowell, Miss Caroline Hampton, Miss Louisa 
Parsons and Miss Isabel Hampton. The last named was elected, 
but was unable to fill the position owing to illness, and Miss Par- 
sons was temporarily put in charge, the others being retained in 
other positions. 

During Miss Parsons' activities as Superintendent she demon- 
strated such a capacity for leadership and organization, showed such 
a thorough knowledge of nursing, and displayed such qualities 



18 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

of devotion and self-sacrifice that in December, 1889, on the return 
of Miss Hampton, her services were eagerly sought by the Uni- 
versity of Maryland as Superintendent of its first Training School. 
Miss Parsons was superintendent for two years, and although the 
system of military discipline which she inaugurated was rigid, it 
developed hardy pioneers in the nursing field who "carried on" 
and helped to develop nursing on broader lines, to organize an 
Alumnae, and State Organizations, and to frame the bill for State 
Registration. Miss Parsons was succeeded by Mrs. Sidney Mil- 
ton, as Superintendent of Nurses, who graduated the second class 
and was then succeeded by Miss Janet Hale, one of Miss Parsons' 
pupils. Since then there have been a number of changes. 

In 1895 a meeting of the University of Maryland graduates was 
called for the purpose of forming an Alumnae Association. Mrs. 
Van Santwoort, class of 1893, was elected President of what is now 
our Alumnae Association. In December, 1903, a meeting was 
called by Miss Nutting, Superintendent of Nurses at Hopkins, of 
all the graduate nurses in the state, for the purpose of forming a 
Maryland State Association of graduate nurses. About four 
hundred nurses were present at the meeting and on the first day 
the constitution was read and adopted and Miss Nutting was 
elected President. Mrs. Taylor, Superintendent of Nurses of the 
University of Maryland was elected Vice-President and two other 
University of Maryland graduates were also elected on this board, 
giving the University three respresentatives. 

A number of University of Maryland nurses were on different 
committees and helped to frame the bill for State Registration. 
Twelve names were selected to be sent to the Governor, who 
appointed two University of Maryland, two Hopkins and one 
Massachusetts General nurse for the State Board of Examiners. 
This was the first State Board of Examiners of graduate nurses 
and later on a bill was passed making State Registration compul- 
sory. This state registration has helped to make the work of 
trained nurses a profession. It has standardized the methods of 
the training schools, all of which has resulted in increased efficiency 
of higher standards and also protects the citizen against incompe- 
tency and impostures in the nursing field. 

The University of Maryland can be justly proud of its Training 
School for Nurses, from the work started by Miss Parsons, who 
was a graduate of "The Nightingale Training School" for Nurses 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 19 

at St. Thomas Hospital, London, and, who, imbued with the spirit 
of Florence Nightingale, inspired her pupils to "carry on" the 
high ideals and aspirations with which she herself was inculcated, 
and through her we are direct heirs of the Florence Nightingale 
cap which fact alone should inspire us~to loyalty to our school as 
the American Flag inspires us to loyalty to our country. So, 
from the old school across the sea, the simple task of nursing has 
developed into a mighty army of noble women, self-sacrificing and 
loyal; whose work advocated right living and right thinking, and 
which can justly and proudly be called a Profession. 

In September, 1922, the beautiful new nurses home was opened 
and in November with all due ceremony was dedicated The 
Louisa Parsons Home. At this time the Louisa Parsons' Medals 
were also presented to the school. Not long ago, an interesting 
coincidence was brought to light when Miss Barbara Stouffer a 
University of Maryland graduate was decorated in Washington 
with the Royal Red Cross by the Prince of Wales, as Miss Parsons 
was also decorated by Queen Victoria, the great-grandmother of 
the Prince, with the same Royal Red Cross. 

University of Marjdand has had many trials and tribulations, 
but ever emerges with her splendid traditions intact. 

REGULATION UNIFORM FOR GRADUATE NURSES OF 
THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND HOSPITAL 

It was after the return of our nurses from overseas that such a 
wide spread vogue for the Red Cross Uniform was apparent. The 
nurses excused themselves by saying financial conditions com- 
pelled them to wear this uniform. A number of years passed and 
still the Red Cross uniform was worn by the majority of the nurses, 
or something equally far from regulation. So our Alumnae had 
to take a stand, telling us that we would have until July 1 to get 
in regulation uniform. 

Many have the mistaken idea that the uniform has been greatly 
changed; such is not the case as will be seen by reading the 
following: 

Uniform 

May be plain white material. 

Waist: Perfectly plain; boxpleat 2 inches wide; pocket 3j by 31 inches; 
belt of uniform material, 2 inches wide, to fasten with button instead of 
buckle. 

Sleeves: Long. 



20 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

Cuffs: 2^ inches wide, round corners, fasten with button. 

Skirt: Perfectly plain, 5 or 7 gores; plain back with seam down center, or 
with a very few gathers — either may be worn. 

Length — 7 inches from the floor. 

Hem — 6 inches. 

Plackets in front with three (8) buttons; placket wider at bottom than at 
top. 

Button: The uniform button is the pearl button with fish eye; all buttons 
same size except small sleeve placket buttons. 

Collars: Bishop, or Tress — Red Cross style, to meet — plain bar pin or 
Alumnae Pin to be worn at collar. 

Apron 
Gores — three (3). 
Hem — 4 inches. 
Belt — 2 inches. 

Length even with uniform skirit. 
Bib — just even with shoulder, — fasten with 2 buttons. 
Cuffs: Separate cuffs to be worn with apron only. Cuffs 3| inches 
wide, — two rows hemstitching. § inch space between the hemstitching. 

TREASURER'S REPORT FOR 1923 

GENERAL FUND 

Balance in Western National Bank of Baltimore December 31, \ 

1922 $449.24 

Receipts: 

Dues from members $518 . 97 

Tickets for Banquet 92.25 

611.22 

Total receipts $1060.46 

Disbursements : 

American Nurses Relief (Dues) $65.50 

Maryland State Association (Dues) 148.50 

Bulletin (Balance) 98.95 

Banquet 180.00 

Music for Banquet 46.00 

Refreshments 33 . 44 

Printing 50.89 

Stationery 11 . 15 

Stamps 16.55 

Telephone 2.00 

Framing picture 4 . 25 

Total disbursements $657.23 

Balance in Western National Bank of Baltimore December 31, 

1923 $403.23 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 21 

SICK BENEFIT FUND 

Balance in Eutaw Savings Bank December, 31 1922 986.40 

Receipts: 

Dues from members $142 . 00 

Interest on Bank account 85.08 

Interest on Loan ($200) 8.00 

Received from Dance Committee 154.55 

Total receipts 389.63 

No disbursements 

Balance in Eutaw Savings Bank, December 31, 1923. 1376.03 

Endowment Fund, December 31, 1923 $1030.43 

NOTE FROM THE SECRETARY 

In our Alumnae there are 161 active members, 46 associate 
members. There has been an average of 30 members at the meet- 
ings. This nimiber has greatly increased over last year's average. 

For the benefit of those members who are not in the habit of 
regularly attending the meetings and who need a reminder of the 
date of each meeting the secretary will mail a card a few days 
before the date. Please notify any change of address immediately. 

Should any associate member be in town on the day of the meet- 
ings bear in mind that we are always ready to welcome you at our 
meetings which are held first Tuesday in each month in the Louisa 
Parsons Home at 7:30 p.m. 

Marie Sander, R. N., 

Secretary. 

THE NURSES DIRECTORY 

The closing of our Nurses Club, made it necessary for the Alum- 
nae Association to consider what to do with the Nurses Directory. 
A very thorough investigation by a special committee, Elizabeth 
L. Marsh, chairman, of the various ways and means of supporting 
a Directory, was made, and after free discussion of the subject at 
our general Alumnae meeting in September, October, November 
and December it was almost unanimously decided that the Alum- 
nae Association should assume entire control and responsibility 
of the Director}\ 

A Directory Committee was appointed, composed of five 
active members of the association. It was decided this committee 



22 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

should have direct supervision while all rules and regulations, and 
all matters of importance should be discussed and voted upon at 
the general meetings. 

The following nurses were appointed on the committee for the 
current year — Misses Scout, Smarr, Zepp, Hissey, Israel. Mrs. 
Ruth Aiken was elected registrar. 

It is the desire of the alumnae that the Directory should be 
self supporting. With this in view, the dues were raised to $15.00 
per year and msmbers are required to pay this fee within the first 
sixty days of each year. We received from the Club a list of 70 
members, a majority of whom remained with us. Each one must 
be a member of the Alumnae Association and registered in this 
state. 

The Directory is not able to fill one half the calls received. 
During January and February there were 335 calls and only 170 
filled. This is a very poor showing. 

Our goal should be, to fill every call that comes, and in this way 
not only provide work for our nurses, but render a real service to 
our community. 

This inability to fill calls, is partly due to the demand being 
greater than the supply and partly due to the "habit" nurses have 
fallen into of registering against various cases and places. We 
would ask the members to make an extra effort to respond to all 
calls; it is the only means of success. 

The Committee would like to render every service possible to 
our members ; so if there are any problems which may be straight- 
ened out by discussion or cooperation, or any information desired 
we are only too glad to be consulted. 

The Registrar's office is 4020 Belle Ave., Forrest Park; phone, 
Liberty 6936. 

Ellen C. Israel, 

Chairman. 

REPORT OF THE PUBLICATION COMMITTEE 

The Editors and Publication Committee, wish to thank those 
who contributed articles and news items to the bulletin, all of 
which have gone a long way toward making this publication a 
success. 

We appreciate the generosity of those who have subscribed to 
our advertising space and urge the patronizing of these by our 
members whenever possible. 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 23 

This year we have collected $188.00 from advertisements and 
we hope this amount, including a charge of 25 cents a copy, will 
entirely cover the expense of publishing the Bulletin. 

Blanche Lee Martin, '21, 
Marguerite Risley Stein, '17, 

Editors. 

THE WOMAN'S AUXILIARY BOARD 

During the past year the Woman's Auxiliary Board has equipped 
the Hospital with gas ranges, steam vegetable cookers and equip- 
ment for the kitchen. There are also other things with which the 
hospital has been supplied such as a new accident ward, furniture 
for the dispensary, beds and tables for the wards, electric fans, 
medicine cabinets, blankets, and mattresses. This was done at a 
cost of S10,000 which was raised by various means such as card 
parties, rmnmage sales and musical benefits. 

Margaret Kable Winslow, R.N., 

Secretary. 

REPORT OF SCHOOL OF NURSING 

January 1, 1923 to April 1, 1924 

Assistants: 

Day 

Night 

Instructors: 

Practical 

Theoretical 

In Charge: 

Dispensary 

Operating Room 

Nurses Home 

Head Nurses 

Pupil nurses filling head nurses positions 

Wards D and E 

Ward C 

Lower Halls 

Ward I 

Total number of students in school 88 

Special Nurses: 

Total number of special nurses 1360 

Number of nurses who left the school 20 

Resigned on account of marriage 1 

Number of nurses dismissed 9 



24 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

Of these one was married while on duty and the remainder dis- 
missed for various reasons. 

Illness. During the year 207 nurses were off duty for varying 
lengths of time and of these 76 were admitted to the halls for treat- 
ment, the remainder being cared for in the Nurses' Home. 

Total number of days lost through illness 1745 

Total number of nurses 207 

Requests for information and admission. 

Requests for information and admission 247 

Number of applications accepted 47 

Number of students entered 39 

Resignations. 

Miss Elizabeth M. Getzendanner Assistant 

Miss Eva L. Fischer Practical Instructor 

Miss Elizabeth Marsh Head Nurse, Upper Halls 

Miss Blanche Hoffmaster Head Nurse, Upper Halls 

Miss Margaret Erwin Head Nurse, Lower Halls 

Miss Katherine Swan Head Nurse, Lower Halls 

Miss Pauline Esslinger Head Nurse, Lower Halls 

Miss Bessie Lee Maston Head Nurse, Ward H 

Miss Frankie Morrison Head Nurse, Maternity 

Miss Mary Jones Head Nurse, Ward I 

Reappointments. 

Miss Mary E. Rolph Supervisor of Nurses' Home 

Miss Elizabeth Aitkenhead Operating Room Supervisor 

Miss Margaret Lauper Head Nurse, Ward G 

Miss Annie Reeve Surgical Supply Room 

Promotions and transfers. 

Miss Stella Ricketts — From Night Superintendent to Assistant Super- 
intendent of Nurses 
Miss Grace Elgin — From Head Nurse to Assistant Practical Instructor 

New appointments. 

Miss Ruth Clements Night Supervisor 

Miss Louise Savage Practical Instructor 

Miss Jane Moffatt Head Nurse, Dispensary 

Miss Medora West Assistant in Operating Room 

Miss Ida Nagel Head Nurse, Wards A and B 

Miss Helen Dunn Head Nurse, Ward H 

Miss Leona McMahon Head Nurse, Upper Halls 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 25 

Temporary appointments. 

Miss Bertha Bloom Assistant in Operating Room 

Mrs. Cora Mason Wilson Supervisor of Nurses' Home 

The annual vacations of 1923 were arranged for. The summer 
was a difficult one. The wards were open the entire summer; 
and although Ward H was partially closed for painting for about 
two weeks, the surgical service was very heavy and the hospit3,l 
very busy. To care for the patients and to meet all the demands 
with a staff reduced the entire summer and with 20 nurses away 
meant hard work and longer hours. 

The pressure of the work in the wards, the illness of the students, 
and the question of equipment and standardized methods were 
some of the factors that increased the difficulty of the problem. 
However, the past year has seen many changes in every depart- 
ment and this too has added much to the problem of re-adjustment. 
Slow but steady progress has been made both in practical and theo- 
retical work by the re-adjustment of the schedule, providing for 
more subjects to be given in the Junior and Intermediate years 
leaving the Senior year free for special training. 

In looking back over the past year one can see many changes 
and improvements, but there are still many many more that must 
come. 

In connection with the lectures there are three improvements 
which have been made, namely, 

1. Lectures are now given on time. 

2. Lectures are now given during the day instead of in the 
evening. 

3. When the doctor cannot attend his class he appoints some- 
one to fill his place. 

We have increased the number of hours in Medicine to fifty 
hours, which is given partly in the Junior and Intermediate years. 
In connection with the medical lectures Dr. Krause has given 
bedside clinics for the nurses during the lecture periods. 

Surgery is now given in the Junior year and after next year 
Urinalysis and Laboratory Methods and History of Nursing will 
be Junior subjects. Anatomy and Physiology Lectures are given 
in the laboratories of the Medical School and about eighty hours 
being devoted to same. 

There is no question as to the general improvement of the 
nurses' practical work and the care of the patients and the wards. 



26 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

We are able to have our nurses on ten hour night duty instead 
of twelve and also to post a straight eight hour day with a half 
day on Sunday and holidays. The Red Cross Aides have been 
replaced in the dispensary with student nurses, and nurses of the 
Senior Class in the Social Service Department for four weeks 
training. 

The standard requirements, a high school education or its 
equivalent, have been kept up, and at the present time we have 
no conditioned students in the school. We are now furnishing 
students their uniforms and paying them five dollars, monthly 
throughout the three years. We have also published a catalogua 
for the school. 

t take this occasion to express for my staff and myself, apprecia- 
tion for the unfailing interest and cooperation of each and every- 
one. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Annie Crighton, R.N., 
Superintendent of Nurses. 

NEWS ITEMS 

Miss Elizabeth Getzandanner, Class of 1909, is Superintendent 
of Nurses at the Franklin Square Hospital. 

Miss Mary Rolph, Class of 1892, has been ill at the University 
Hospital for several weeks. Miss Rolph is much improved and 
will take a rest for a few months before resuming her duties as 
Supervisor of the Nurses' Home. 

Mrs. Cora Mason Wilson, Class of 1896, who has been doing 
hospital work at the University, will relieve Miss Rolph during 
her absence. 

Miss Nettie Flanagan, Class of 1902, former Superintendent of 
the University Hospital, is engaged in teaching Landscape Gar- 
dening in a girls' school at Middleburg, Va. 

Mrs. Daniel Justice, Class of 1921, is doing I. V. N. A. work in 
Boston. Mrs. Justice was Miss Norma Gaver. 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 27 

Miss Bernice Conner, Class of 1912, is pursuing postgraduate 
work at Columbia University. 

Miss Grace Anderson, Class of 1901, is Director of the East 
Harlem Nursing and Health Demonstration, New York City. 

Miss Nettie Lord, Class of 1922, who was Night Superintendent 
at the Franklin Square Hospital, has resigned. 

Miss Lucy Mouse, Class of 1917, is doing I. V. N. A. work in 
the city. 

Miss Mary Miller, Class of 1903, has resigned as Superintend- 
ent of the Presbyterian Eye and Ear Hospital, and accepted a 
position at the United States Hospital, RoUa, Mo. 

Miss Emily Biddlecomb, Class of 1920, is engaged in office 
nursing in Wilmington, N. C. 

Miss Clara McGovern, Class of 1920, has resigned her position 
with the Gas and Electric Co., to do private duty nursing in the 
city. 

Mrs, Barwick, Class of 1894, and her daughter, Miss Elizabeth 
Barwick, Class of 1918, are spending the winter in West Palm 
Beach. They expect soon to leave for California for the summer. 
Miss Elizabeth Read, who accompanied them to Florida, will 
return to Baltimore in May. 

Miss Blanche Hoffmaster, Class of 1916, is Superintendent of 
the Emergency Hospital, Annapolis, Md. 

Miss Mazie Herrington, Class of 1923, is Assistant-Superintend- 
ent of the Waynesboro Hospital, Wayesboro, Pa. 

Miss Barbara Stouffer, Class of 1911, who has been ill at the 
Johns Hopkins Hospital for the past six weeks, is reported 
improved. 



28 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

Miss Blenda Rossel, Class of 1898, is planning to give up private 
duty nursing in the early summer, and return to her home in 
Sweden. 

Miss Jessie Rhodes, Class of 1921, has returned to her home in 
Ashville, N. C, for an indefinite stay. She expects to accompany 
her parents on a trip to New Mexico. 

Officers of the Maryland State Nurses Association 1924-1925: 
President, Elsie M. Lawler; first vice-president, Charlotte M. 
Snow; second vice-president, Harriet Fort; secretary, Sarah F. 
Martin, and treasurer, Isabelle Griffith Fleck. 

Board of Directors: To serve 3 years — Martha E. Friend and 
Sarah Maynard; to serve 2 years — Jane B. Newman and Annie 
Crighton; to serve 1 year — Jane E. Nash and Laurinne Stevens. 

MARRIAGES 

June 24, 1923, Cecile DuBois, Class of 1922, to Mr. Daniel 
Bien. Mr. and Mrs. Bien live on Homestead St., Baltimore. 

In June, 1923, Marie K. Bosley, Class of 1914, to Mr. Ralph 
Bonnell. Mr. and Mrs. Bonnell live in Elmira, N. Y. 

In December, 1923, Julia Deputy, Class of 1922, to Mr. Ike 
Strong. Mr. and Mrs. Strong are living in Walter, Kentucky. 

December 29, 1923, Norma Gaver, Class of 1921, to Mr. Daniel 
Webster Justice. Mr. and Mrs. Justice live in Boston, Mass. 

December 31, 1923, Grace Reynolds, Class of 1920, to Mr. 
Charles Warfield. Mr. and Mrs. Warfield are living in EUicott 
City, Md. 

Edna Scaggs, Class of 1920, to Mr. Edwin L. Rembold. Mr. 
and Mrs. Rembold live on Courtship Road, Colgate, Md. 

December 31, 1923, Lucile Bowie, Class of 1922, to Dr. G. 
Richerson Joyner. Dr. and Mrs. Joyner live in Suffolk, Virginia. 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 29 

BIRTHS 

In March, 1923, a daughter to Dr. and Mrs. R. C. McCotter. 
Mrs. McCotter was Miss Addie Coward, Class of 1913. 

On May 8, 1923, a daughter to Dr. and Mrs. Wm. J. Coleman. 
Mrs. Coleman was Miss Laura Chapline, Class of 1909. 

In December, 1923, a boy to Mr. and Mrs. Hubert Bowers. 
Mrs. Bowers was Miss Nallie Dix, Class of 1916. 

On January 16, 1924, a daughter to Dr. and Mrs. John Lutz. 
Mrs. Lutz was Miss Anna Robinson, Class of 1917. 

On August 18, 1923, a son to Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Brooks. 
Mrs. Brooks was Miss Louise Bateman, Class of 1921. 

On March 18, 1924, a son to Mr. and Mrs. Roy A. Boyd. Mrs. 
Boyd was Miss Nell Flaharty, Class of 1918. 

DEATHS 

Miss Addie M. Harry, Charlotte, N. C, Class of 1895, died in 
Florida on March 13, 1924. 

We regret to announce the death of Mr. Ebenezer McLane. 
on April 14, 1924 at Washington, Pa. Mr. McLane is survived by 
his widow who before her marriage was Tiffany Minn is, Class 
of 1917. 

THE BIENNIAL NATIONAL NURSING CONVENTION 

The largest gathering of professional women ever assembled in 
this country, will meet in Detroit this June at the time of the 
Biennial National Nursing Convention. The exact dates are 
June 16 to 21. At least 4000 graduate nurses will be present from 
all parts of the United States and Canada. They will represent 
the various phases of nursing activities — public health work insti- 
tutional work and private duty nursing. Others interested in 
nursing are also welcome to the Convention. 



30 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

There are many high-lights in the forecast of the Convention 
program. The Hon. John H. Clarke, former Associate Justice 
of the United States Supreme Court, will open the Convention on 
Monday evening with an address on "Woman's Relation to the 
World Peace" Dr. George E. Vincent, President of the Rocke- 
feller Foundation, will speak at one evening session on "The 
Public and the Nurse." 

Dr. Haven Emerson of Columbia Universitj'^, will address the 
Convention at another time on "Meeting the Demands of Com- 
munity Health Work." "The Role of the Physician in the Edu- 
cation of the Nurse" is the interesting subject which will be 
developed by Dr. Charles D. Lockwood, one of the leading physi- 
cians of the Pacific Coast. 

The subject of communicable disease holds a prominent place 
on the program. This will be discussed by Dr. Charles P. Emerson, 
Dean of the Indiana University School of Medicine, and Miss 
Elizabeth F. Miller, Superintendent of Nurses of the Philadelphia 
Hospital for Contagious Diseases. 

Appropriately enough in view of the fact that two University 
Schools of Nursing have been established within the past year, the 
one at Yale and the other at Western Reserve University, Dr. 
Christopher G. Parnall will speak on "The Responsibilities of 
the Community and the Hospital in the Establishment of a School 
of Nursing," and at the same session Mrs. Chester C. Bolton, the 
donor of five hundred thousand dollars to the Western Reserve 
University, School of Nursing, will speak on "The Responsibili- 
ties of a University School of Nursing, toward the Hospital and 
the Community." Among the prominent nurses who will lead 
the discussion on many of the pressing problems in nursing work 
today, are Miss Annie W. Goodrich, Dean of the Yale University, 
School of Nursing, and Miss Carolyn E. Gray, Dean of the School 
of Nursing of the Western Reserve University. 

It has been officially announced that the Woodward Avenue 
Baptist Church will be the Detroit headquarters for the convention. 
The information booth, registration rooms, press rooms and the 
educational exhibit will be housed in this building. Many of 
the sessions will be held in nearby auditoriums. 

The educational exhibit promises to be a most interesting fea- 
ture of the convention. In addition to the exhibits of the three 
national nursing organizations (The American Nurses' Associa- 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 31 

tion, The National League of Nursing Education and The National 
Organization for Public Health Nursing), there will be displays 
from the Army Nursing Service, The Navy Nursing Service, The 
United States Public Health Service and The Indian Service. 
Commercial Concerns whose products especially relate to the 
nursing profession will also have booth space. 

The Arrangements committee requests that all hotel reserva- 
tions be addressed to Mr. E. B. Cookson, 821 Ford Building, 
Detroit, Mich. A list of hotels and rates has appeared in the 
March issue of The American Journal of Nursing, and The Public 
Health Nurse. This list may be secured from Mr. Cookson. 

THE "SAN." 

They take ye in a little room, 

With just yourself and them, 
To see if there is any part, 

Of you they can condemm. 
As naked as a jay bird, you 

Are stripped from head to toes, 
They want the naked truth and they 

Can't get it through your clothes. 
They thump you on the back and chest. 

And hammer on your knees. 
Your Bi-ologics scrutinize. 

To locate your disease. 
They listen to your in'ards work, 

With rubber telephone 
To see if any miss or shirk, 

Ask if wild oats you have sown. 
They quizz about your ma and pa 

To see if they "went bad," 
They talk about a dozen things. 

You never dreamed you had. 
Discuss your things in Latin too, 

A language long since dead. 
Which only makes a sick man's hair 

Stand straight upon his head. 
A pretty little girl will give 

Your ear a little prick 
To take a drop of blood to see 

If it is thin or thick. 

She rubbered through my chest. 
And saw through my honest motives and 

You must surmise the rest. 



32 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

They take you in a real dark room 

Which makes you skitish feel. 
Girls serve ye what ye think's ice cream 

Gol darn — it's Berrium Meal, 
The Berrium Meal that ain't half bad, 

What worried me a lot 
I couldn't tell if she was swell 

And pretty, or was not. 
And then they give you what they call 

Metabolism test 
Hog tie ye and gag ye 

Till you clean fill up your chest, 
By breathin' in pure oxygen. 

By what they tell if you 
Assimulate some calories and burn the residue. 
They take you clean on down the line, 

For some past misdemeanor. 
You swallow — one inch at a time, 

A little vacuum cleaner. 
And then upon your side you lie. 

From early spring to fall, 
For weak or strong it takes that long 

To syphen out yer gall. 
You take a trip to Sweden then, 

Where every thing's complete 
From 'lectric liver jigger, 

To a shimmie for your feet. 
And if perchance you have a bone, 

Where microbes frisk and play, 
They push a button Br-r-r-t. 

They find 'em with X-ray. 
They look ye over — under too, 

They look ye through and through 
And find out more about yourself 

Than e'en you thought you knew. 
They diet ye for one full meal 

Digest it over night. 
Then with a pump and garden hose 

Remove yer appetite. 
One hatred I have always had. 

To vomit or to spew. 
But at the San, it ain't so bad. 

The girls do it for you. 
They tried it out on me and though 

Embarrassing as — ^Well, 
The only thing the pump sucked up. 

From me was H. C. L. 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 33 

To them I had suggested that, 

My bronchial tubes were wrong, 
The Doctor paused and thought a moment, 

Then he wasn't long, 
In jottin' down directions that 
Inspired me with new hope, 
A card of introduction to 

The fair Miss Flora Scope, 
They placed her between us and 
They throw you on a kneading board, 

Like use's a sack of flour. 
The 'tendant while he kneads, he sings 

"I knead thee every hour." 
Then wash your feet all clean and white 

Charapodice your toes. 
And with an incandescent light. 
They peek-a-boo your nose. 
You'd better have your tonsils out 

And throw 'em both away. 
They give you rhumetiz and gout, 

And every thing, they say. 
They got another cute machine 

By Gum 'twould make you laugh 
Way down the hall. It's what they call 

The Photo-Cardio-graph, 
An' I just nature-Uy supposed. 

And so would any man, 
'Twas where they made the photo-cards 

To advertise the San. 
It records all about your heart 
Way back fer your hull life, 
How many sweethearts turned you down 

Before you fooled your wife. 
They hitched her up to my old heart 

While I was feelin' mean. 
It kept a running up — up — up — 
'Til it busted the machine. 
I never saw a place like this, 

In all o'my born days 
When all's at ease and perfect peace 

With so many enemas. 
I'd give a million dollars 

For a movie picture reel, 
To be unfurled to show the world 

That semi-colon deal. 
An' all this costs us money — yes. 
But money's wealth, 



34 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

And how the duce could money bless 

With out you had your health 
And when some poor unfortunate, 

With no KALE seed at all 
Comes limping in, they cure him 

And chalk it on the wall. 
And Lordy Lordy bless my soul 

If we no San had had, 
We'd each be in a 6 foot hole, 

Not feeling good — nor bad 
So we've "no kick a coming," and 

There's nothing more to say, 
For San or no San don't you see. 

We're "in the hole anyway." 

— Anontmous. 



ROLL OF MEMBERSHIP 

{Please notify secretary of change of address) 
1892 

jDunham, E. (Mrs. Roache) Staunton, Va. 

JDunham, Lelia 

*Goldsborough, Mary E 

*Hale, Janet 

Lucas, Kate C. (Mrs.) 1404 VV. Lexington St., Baltimore, Md. 

*Neal, Amy 

JLee, Anna (Mrs. Levingscold) Tulalip, Wash. 

jSchleunes, Anna Cecil Apartments, Baltimore, Md. 

1893 

Bradbury, M. E 2 Church St., Cambridge, Md- 

ICornman, Mary E 315 Okeechovu Road, West Palm Beach, Fla. 

JCulbertson, Clara 

Daly, E. J 616 Park Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

Michael, Martha B 528 Church St. S. W., Roanoake, Va. 

JMayes, Eleanor Petersburg, Va. 

Mergardt, Clara (Mrs. J. Reifsneider) . .836 N. Strieker St., Baltimore, Md. 
JPyatt, M. A Georgetown, S. C. 

Ravenel, S. S Aiken, S. C. 

Shertzer Elizabeth 1503 Park Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

♦Williams, E. M 

*Van Santwoort, Elinor (Mrs. W. Mines) 

1894 

♦Anderson, Bessie 

♦Brown, Mary 

Bonn, C. M. (Mrs. Barwick) . . 319 Okeechovu Road, West Palm Beach, Fla. 

JHass, (Mrs. Pfohl) Winston-Salem, N. C. 

♦Judd, Evelyn (Mrs. J. Dingan) 

JMorgan, Lucy, H. (Mrs. Blacklow) Lockhaven, Penn. 

JMergart, Emma 

IMellner, Constance (Mrs. Wine) 

IMagruder, Emma Sandy Spring, Md. 

Reed, Elizabeth 1705 Linden Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

Thackston, E. G 138 N. 28th St., New York City. 

^Thompson, Mary Centerville, Md. 

tWeitzel, V. C. (Mrs. Charles McNabb) Cardiff, Md. 

♦ Deceased. 

+ Graduates not members of the Association. 

35 



36 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

1895 

JBlake, Sallie E Thallahasee, Fla. 

JEdmunds, Marie Farniville, W. Va. 

♦Harry, Addie M Charlotte, N. C. 

$Jones, Mira New York City. 

Rolph, Mary E University Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

1896 

Lee, Elizabeth 1535 Park Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

Robey, Frances 1535 Park Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

JShipley, Wilhelmena Granado, Col. 

Wilson, Cora M. (Mrs.) University Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

1897 

Baldwin, M. E. E Allegany and Woodbine Ave., Towson, Md. 

JClegg, Mary C 

JCohen Ella (Mrs.) 

JCrowe, Florence (Mrs. Charles W. Mitchell) 

St. Paul Apartments, Baltimore, Md. 

I Jones, Susan M 1412 Park Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

JKeating, Martha J Miners Hospital, Spangler, Penn. 

ILashley, Josephine Carlyle, Penn. 

Lord, Athalia 63 Clayton Street, Charlotte, N. C. 

Russell, Mary A 1431 Madison Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

ISlicer, Annette 2127 Callow Ave., Baltimore. Md. 

*Watkins, K. N 

1898 

IHughes, Eunice (Mrs.) York, Penna. 

JLackland, Nannie J 216 A. St. S. E., Washington, D. C. 

*Mauppin, Agnes 

Rossell, Blenda E 101 N. Carey Street, Baltimore, Md. 

1899 

JBrown, Margaret 1401 Columbia Road, Washington, D. C. 

JEdwards, Katherine Hagerstown, Md. 

JLlewellyn, Bernaedine (Mrs. Early) Scottsville, Va. 

*Pittman, Blanche 

tSmith, Virginia (Mrs. B. H. Ransom) 

3169 18th St. N. W., Washington, D. C. 

1900 

Blight, Margaret (Mrs. M. B. LeSueur) 149 W. Lanvale St., Baltimore, Md. 
JFeatherstone, Sophia Brinklow, Md. 

* Deceased. 

t Graduates not members of the Association. 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 37 

*Gilliland, Lena (Mrs. B. Jones) 

Gray, E. B Tarboro, N. C. 

JHobbs, Myra Towson, Md. 

JJones Nannie H 1012 Floyd Ave., Richmond, Va. 

JLittle, Marion 

JMilton, Louise D 1402 Park Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

1901 

lAnderson, Grace 354 E. 116th St., New York City. 

JBlight, Emmeline (Mrs. F. E. Chambers) 791 Orange St., Maco, Ga. 

*Burnett, Mary 

*Blake, Katherine 

Cook, Mary H 149 W. Lanvale St., Baltimore, Md. 

*Dowdell, Mary 

^Daniel, Frances B Saranac Lake, New York City. 

JFendall, Mattie F 18 E. Main Street, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. 

Furbee, Catherine 1106 Julina Street, Parkersburg, W. V. 

^Henderson, Eugenia Presbyterian Hospital, Charlotte, N. C. 

Jones, Mary S University, Va. 

JMosby, Pauline 149 W. Lanvale St., Baltimore, Md. 

1902 

Burch, Emma C 831 Park Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

JDunderdale, Grace L. (Mrs. W. Koppelman) 

105 W. 29th St., Baltimore, Md. 

Flanagan, Nettie L Foxcroft School, Middleburg, Va. 

*Gregory, Mary W 

JKinnirey, Nancy (Mrs. Howard Iglehart) Ten Hills, Md. 

JRaines, Martha (Mrs. John Foster) Thomasville, Ga. 

Wise, Helen V Peninsula General Hospital, Salisbury, Md. 

1903 

tByrd, Margaret 

tBlandford, Sara 2506 K Street, Washington, D. C. 

JCraig, Louise (Mrs. J. U. Dennis). .205 Hawthorne Road, Baltimore, Md. 

•Cooke, Albina (Mrs. J. D. Reeder) 

JCraft, Elizabeth 223 S. Cherry Street, Richmond, Va. 

JElgin, Elizabeth (Mrs. A. H. Mann) Poolesville, Md. 

JFulton, Isabelle Stewartstown, Penna. 

Gallagher, Ella T 226 N. Calhoun Street, Baltimore, Md. 

tKing, Anna (Mrs. F. W. Seling) Elkridge, Md. 

Massey, Margaret K. (Mrs. N. Winslow) 

1900 Mt. Royal Terrace, Baltimore, Md. 

Miller, Mary U. S. Hospital, RoUo, Mo. 

* Deceased. 

t Graduates not members of the Association. 



38 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

*Northrup, Mary A 

Reeve, Annie University Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

1904 

JBush, Lucy Ladd (Mrs. H. J. Harby) . . 121 Calhoun Street, Sumter, S. C. 

JDaugherty, Sarah W. Va. 

tDilworth, Florence (Mrs. Porter) Jacksonville, Fla. 

Guerrant, E. Janie Westminister, Md, 

JGuerrant, Pattie Los Angeles, Cal, 

Gaskill, Laura M 4901 V. St., Sacramento Cal. 

JLewis, Christine New York. 

JMunder, Lelia (Mrs. S. Blood) Boston, Mass. 

Parrott, E. May Aigburth Manor, Towson, Md. 

Schroeder, Harriett 1624 Eutaw Place, Baltimore, Md. 

$Walker, Louise (Mrs. H. Cassard). . .Preston Apartments, Baltimore, Md. 
JWalton, Nancy Annapolis, Md 

1905 

Bayley, Elizabeth 1922 F. St., Washington, D. C. 

JBrossene, Dora (Mrs. M. Oliver) Washington, D. C. 

Cowling, Margaret University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va. 

JFerrell, Nellie (Mrs. Gardner) Danville, Va. 

Geare, Millicent (Mrs. Page Edmunds) 

12 Elmwood Road, Roland Park, Md. 

JGildea, Elizabeth (Mrs. Eugene Mullen) Perryville, Md. 

$Hillard, Nellie (Mrs. H. Covington) Rocky Mount, N. C. 

t Jones, Netty (Mrs. J. R. Revelle) Louisville, Ga. 

Kuhn, Ruth A. C. L. Hospital, Waycross, Ga. 

tOwings, Lelia (Mrs. E. B. Quillen) Rocky Mount, N. C, 

Schaefer, Carlotta (Mrs. Murphy) . .3014 Windfield Ave., Forest Park, Md. 
JTrenholm, Lila (Mrs. Walton Hopkins) Annapolis, Md. 

1906 

tCarter, Nellie Chatam, Va. 

IChapman, Anna (Mrs. F. Wright) 1221 Bolton St., Baltimore, Md. 

Clarke, Ethel (Mrs.) Robert Long Hospital, Indianapolis, Ind. 

f Cunningham, Sarah (Mrs. Morse) U. S. Army, Washington, D. C. 

JDoyle, Leona (Mrs. W. White) 2800 St. Paul St., Baltimore, Md. 

lEllicott, Mary Georgia 

Jessup, Marian (Mrs. F. Hynes) Chestertown, Md. 

Lawrence, Margaret (Mrs. S. W. Moore). 329 Roland Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

JPhillips, M. (Mrs. H. Greenwell) Lutherville, Md. 

*Query, Clara 

Sanderson, Sarah Hamot Hospital, Erie, Pa. 

*Truitt, Georgia 

* Deceased. 

f Graduates not members of the Association. 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 39 

1907 

JBarber, Jennie D 1807 Park Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

JBay, Grace I White Hall, Md. 

JBell, Alice F. (Mrs. J. B. Piggott). . . .2714 35th Place, N. W., Washington 

Brewington, Esther (Mrs. P. P. Causey Sedley, Va. 

Brian, Nannie L 149 W. Lanvale St., Baltimore, Md. 

Griffith, Isabella (Mrs. H. K. Fleck). .513 Cathedral St., Baltimore, Md. 
JGrimes, Mary Concord, Kentucky 

Hissey, Naomi 1705 Linden Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

McNabb, Nancy (Mrs. R. P. Bay) 

8 Hillside Road, Roland Park, Baltimore, Md. 

IMinnis, Rosamond Lebanon Hospital Caldwell Ave., New York 

IMinor, Evelyn 1500 John St., Baltimore, Md. 

JOgborn, Ella High St., East Orange, N. J. 

IPeyton, Corrie Baby Milk Fund City Hall, Baltimore, Md. 

JPue, Marie (Mrs. C. Chapman) Guilford Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

JRobertson, Clara (Mrs. R. P. Latimer) Hyattsville, Md. 

JTongue, Amy B. (Mrs. Chas. Wiley) Redwood City, Cal. 

Haydon, Jane 733 N. Broadway, Baltimore, Md, 

1908 

Anderson, M. B. (Mrs. R. B. Hayes) Hillsboro, N. C. 

*Cox, Charlotte 

JCunningham, A. K. (Mrs. Wm. McDonald) 

14 Bedford St. Hoverville, Mass. 

Dawson, Clyde (Mrs. Frank Lynn). . .41 W. Preston St., Baltimore, Md. 

Gourley, Henrietta 307 L^nion Trust Building, Baltimore, Md. 

JHamlin, Martha (Mrs. N. J. Haynes) 

427 W. Patterson Ave., Glendale, Cal. 

JHamlin, Mary Danville Va. 

JHostrawser, S. A Canada. 

JPrice, Lula (Mrs. Thawley) R. F. D., Denton, Md. 

Parsons H. J The Walbert, Baltimore, Md. 

tRussel, Augusta 314 Monroe St. Jacksonville, Fla. 

Smith Maud (Mrs. R. Cornelius) Gittings Ave., Govans, Md. 

JSchull, Ethel 

Wright, M. E. (Mrs. G. H. Richards) Port Deposit, Md. 

JWilson, Rose Los Angeles, Cal. 

1909 

JAlmond, Blanche Washington, D. C. 

Carter, LuUie (Hyde Hopkins, Mrs.) Miami, Fla. 

Chapline, Eva 2810 Chelsea Terrace, Forest Park, Md. 

Chapline Laura (Mrs. W. J. Coleman) 

2810 Chelsea Terrace, Forest Park, Md. 

* Deceased. 

J Graduates not members of the Association. 



40 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

Dukes Katherine (Mrs. J. B. Magruder) 

2821 N. Calvert St., Baltimore, Md. 
JEly, Emily The Walbert, Baltimore, Md. 

Getzendanner, Elizabeth Franklin Square Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

JGreen, Mrs. (Mrs. Miller) Norfolk, Va. 

JHall, Beulah (married) Jacksonville, Fla. 

Pue, Louise 1518 Park Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

{Robey, Helen 

Saulsbury, Mary B The Walbert, Baltimore, Md. 

Squires, Lucy Matthews, N. C. 

ITull, Grace 2751 Maryland Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

Tews, Gertrude (Mrs. Cole) The Walbert, Baltimore, Md. 

Wham, Anna Lou (Mrs. C. M. Pitt) Trescany Apts., Baltimore, Md. 

JWright, Vera (Mrs. W. Scott) Devereaux, Ga. 

1910 

JBarrett, Adele (Mrs. Wm. Parramore) Cochran, Ga. 

JBurton, Cora (Mrs. R. T. Earle) Centerville, Md. 

f Barber, Lucy (Mrs. Woodley Blackwell) Sharps, Va. 

Drye, Anne 20 E. 21st St., Baltimore, Md. 

Edmunds, March (Mrs. Dwight Rivers) Lynchburg, Va. 

{Garrison, Gertrude (Mrs. Rosco McMillan) Red Springs, N. C. 

Holland, A. K. (Mrs. J. D. Fiske) . .2408 Reisterstown Road, Baltimore, Md. 

Israel, Ellen C 214 W. Monument St., Baltimore, Md. 

Kimmel, Mary M 216 W. Madison St., Baltimore, Md. 

IKing, Florence (Mrs. Thomas West) Fayetteville, N. C. 

Lee, Sarah A. (Mrs. Frank Woodward) Tallahassee, Fla. 

Long, Lillian (Mrs. Claud Smink) 4706 Harford Road, Baltimore, Md. 

McKay, Virginia Presbyterian Hospital, Charlotte, N. C. 

Murchison, Belle (Mrs. F. H. Vinup) 201 Oakdale Road, Roland Park, Md. 

Meredith, Francis M 214 W. Monument St. Baltimore, Md. 

Pleasants, P. B. (Mrs. J. M. Sparks) Monkton, Md. 

JPrice, Lula (Mrs. John Robertson) Onancock, Md. 

tStrohm, Amelia (Mrs. Wm. Spalding) Churchville, Md. 

JTaylor, Margaret Atlanta, Ga. 

JWiggin, M. Constance (Mrs. H. W. Cole) 

Naval Air Station, Pensacola, Fla. 

1911 

♦Berlin, Ruth (Mrs. Wm. Chipman) 

Brady, M. Gertrude U. S. Veterans Hospital, Maywood, 111. 

ICurtiss, Nell (Married) Durham, N. C. 

IGarner, Jane (Mrs. Wm. Michel). .2901 Edmondson Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

Gephart, Louise (Mrs. E. Kloman) 44 W. Biddle St., Baltimore, Md. 

JGrubb, Anna (Mrs. Janney) Montrie, Ga. 

* Deceased. 

I Graduates not members of the Association. 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 41 

JHutton, G. A 15 E. Preston St., Baltimore, Md. 

IHelland, Naomie (Mrs. Strong) Halethorpe, Md. 

IKinney, Ivy (Mrs. E. C. Haggood) Birmingham, Ala, 

IPatterson, Elizabeth (Mrs.) Waynesboro, Pa. 

llicketts, Stella U University Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

Jllobinson, Eva (Mrs. W. Deppers) 

3223 N. New Jersey Ave., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Stouffer, Barbara 

The Brexton Apts., Chase and Park Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

Scarff, Marvel (Mrs. J. H. VonDreele). . . .836 W. 36th St., Baltimore, Md. 
tSprecher, Frances (Mrs. Smith) Harrisburg, Pa. 

Sullivan, Mary Ellen Havre de Grace, Md. 

Williams, Alva Relay, Md. 

1912 

JBlake, Lillian 23 E. 21st St., Baltimore, Md" 

|Cox, Eulalie Baltimore Eye and Ear Hospital, Baltimore, Md* 

Conner, Bernice Apt. 34, 420 W. 121st St., New York City 

JCoale, Mattie (Mrs. C. Alpha) 342 Audubou St., New Orleans, La' 

Dawson, Ethel 1514 Park Ave., Baltimore, Md" 

{Harvey, Lucy 1213 Welden Circle, Baltimore, Md- 

ILilly, Lucy (Mrs. R. G. Stokes) Chattanooga, Tenn. 

*Logue, Ethel 

*Lynch, Agnes M Florida 

JMiles, Juliet (Mrs. Perkins) Winston Salem, N. C. 

Prince, Blanche 3703 Forrest Park Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

JRidgley, Nally (Mrs. Ringgold) Howard County, Md. 

Steiner, May Cumberland, Md. 

ISmith, Marion Sparrows Point, Md. 

Stoufifer, Lena University Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

Wells, Alice (Mrs. Galloway) 1600 Eutaw Place, Baltimore, Md. 

1913 

JBrownell, Edith 7 Chapin Ave., Providence, R. I. 

Butts, Elizabeth 214 W. Monument St., Baltimore, Md. 

Coward, Addie (Mrs. R. C. McCotten) Grifton, N. C. 

tChase, Evelyn (Mrs. Hugh McPherson) Red Springs, N. C. 

JDent, Edith Broadway, New Orleans, La. 

Dean, Elva 214 W. Monument St., Baltimore, Md. 

Hull, Willie 2213 N. Charles St., Baltimore, Md. 

Hessler, Sophia (Mrs. Roger Parlett) Keams Canon, Arizona 

JLaws, Margaret (Mrs. Wm. Walker) Gastonia, N. C. 

Misikofski, Martha Kenwood Road, Raspeburg, Md. 

McCann, Natalie The Walbert, Baltimore, Md. 

JPatterson, Dorthy (Mrs. R. Patterson) Clarksburg, W. Va. 

* Deceased. 

J Graduates not members of the Association. 



42 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

Price, Golda 214 W. Monument St., Baltimore, Md. 

Rush, Pearl 1507 Linden Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

IRennie, Mary (Mrs. Carl Blaylock) Norwood, N. C. 

IRutherford, Volina Miami, Fla. 

IRutherford, Mary (Mrs. C. Welchel Gainsville, Ga. 

Shea, Katherine Robert Long Hospital, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Selby, Myrtle 1507 Linden Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

tWelch, Katherine (Mrs. T. B. Woods) Norfolk, Va. 

1914 

JBosley, Marie K. (Mrs. Ralph Bonnell) 

452 W. Preston St., Elmira, New York 

JBurns, Olive (Mrs. G. Kup) 1343 First Street, Washington, D. C. 

fCoulbourne, Alice (Mrs. John Stevens) Marion Station, Md. 

Clendenin, Virginia (Mrs. Wm. C. Hickling) Moose Lake, Minn. 

Davis, Sadie (Mrs. A. W. Reier) 1 Kinship Road, Dundalk, Md. 

JDukes, Ann (Mrs. J. Foranvielle) Rocky Mount, N. C. 

Ervin, Margaret (Mrs. J. P. Landing) Marion Station, Md. 

JErvin, Edith (Mrs. L. Lewis) Blackstock, S. C. 

Foley, Julia The Walbert, Baltimore, Md. 

JFunk, Jessie (Mrs. J. S. Outsail) Adamstown, Md. 

JGrant, Pearl (Mrs. Hendrick) Port Deposit Md. 

JHill, Lucy (Mrs. L. Prettyman) 306 Carrol St., Washington, D. C. 

JHugh, Bertie (Mrs. Davidson) 116 Cator Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

JHudnall, Carrie (Mrs. Purcell) . 1208 E. Central Ave., Albuquerque, Mexico 
*Hull, Grace 

Lord, L. E. (Mrs. Freeman) 2631 N. Calvert St., Baltimore, Md. 

Miller, Maude Crisfield Hospital, Crisfield, Md. 

JMurray, Carrie (Mrs. J. Smith) Atlanta, Ga. 

JRyan, A. G Annapolis, Md. 

IRoussey, Bessie (Mrs. R. Stanford) Darlington, Md. 

Sigmon, Bertie (Mrs.) Chester Sanitorium Chester, S. C. 

JSprecher, Marjorie (Mrs. J. Woodcock) Hollidayburg, Pa. 

JShelton, Jennie (Mrs. Clyde Blake) 123 Roe St., Buchanan, Mich. 

Sander, Marie 2108 Mt. Royal Terrace, Baltimore, Md. 

Stepp, Lula The Walbert, Baltimore, Md. 

JStoneham, Grace (Mrs. G. Walker) N. C, 

Weaver, Pearl Hendersonville, N. C. 

Weber, Dorthy (Mrs. E. Coleman) Douglas, Ga. 

Zepp, Katherine The Walbert, Baltimore, Md. 

1915 

Bay, Nettie 1735 Park Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

fBogart, Corrine (Mrs. W. Starford) Wendel, W. Va. 

JBeasley, (Mrs. Rhodes) 1011 Bennette Place, Baltimore, Md. 

* Deceased. 

t Graduates not members of the Association. 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 43 

JBoor, Elva (Mrs. VonGesbeck) Balboa, Panama 

Connor, Ruth (Mrs. C. R. Edwards) 

431 Kenneth Square, Govans, Baltimore, Md. 

JCoopersmith, Martha (Mrs. Leon Kays) Stanford, N. J. 

JDilly, Gertude (Mrs. E. B. Eitzler) Woodsboro, Md. 

{Frothingham, Norma (Mrs. R. B. Chapman) 

34 S. Fulton Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

JLee, Mabel (Mrs. Oehler) Summitt Ave., Greensboro, N. C. 

JMyers, Altha Maryland. 

IMeredith, Florence (Mrs. C. B. Hicks) .... 141 Holderness St., Atlanta, Ga. 

McDaniel, Lillian 1123 Madison Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

JNordt, Elizabeth (Mrs. E. M. Bridges). .. .Blue Ridge Summitt, Penna. 

JPinkard Bertie 2404 Barclay St., Baltimore, Md. 

JShields, Lelia (Mrs. G. Dawson) Chester, S. C. 

JStoneham, Ruth 1610 Eutaw Place, Baltimore, Md. 

JSkinner, P'lorence (Mrs. H. Caldwald) Galena, Md. 

White, Bettie A. C. L. Hospital, Rocky Mount, N. C. 

1916 

Blake, Helen 23 East 21st St., Baltimore, Md. 

JClarke, Laura Greensboro, N. C. 

JDix, Nellie (Mrs. Hubert Bowers) Bel Air, Md. 

Dunn, Margaret 1717 Tivoly Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

Eichner, Loula K. (Mrs.) 2120 St. Paul St., Baltimore, Md. 

{Forney, Marion (Mrs. S. F. Smith) Bretmore, N. C. 

tHurst, Anna (Mrs. C. Hicherson) 140 Pine St., Charlotte, N. C. 

JHenkel, Julia (Mrs. J. S. Skladowsky) 638 Columbia, Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

Hoffmaster, Blanche Emergency, Hospital, Annapolis, Md. 

*John, Mary 

Kauffman, Irene State College, Pa. 

JLangenfeldt, Marie Cheltenham, Md. 

McSherry, Helen 1418 Linden Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

{Mayo, Margaret (Mrs. Oscar Winnberg) . 3004 Grayson St., Baltimore, Md. 

Null, Lillie 1225 Linden Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

*Phelan, Elizabeth 

tReamey, Hildergarde (Mrs. Jacob Linn) 

3908 Dennison, Ave., Cleveland, Ohio. 
JRutherford, Elsie 1818 N. Charles St., Baltimore, Md. 

Smith, Sallie (Mrs. H. W. Byers) 749 W. North Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

JScarff, Inez Bryn Mar, Apartments, Atlantic City, N. J. 

Smith, Bernice 2928 Windsor Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

Saggs, Lucy 1511 A St. N. E., Washington, D. C. 

{Simmons, Maude Charleston, S. C, 

Selfe, Serena (Mrs. W. A. Bridges) Eudowood, Towson, Md. 

{Walter, Margaret (Mrs. Theo. Warner) 

Windsor Court Apts., Baltimore, Md. 

* Deceased. 

{ Graduates not members of the Association. 



44 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

1917 

Cecil, R. (Mrs.) 135 Newberg Ave., Catonsville, Md. 

JCavano, A. (Mrs. F. Smith) 1734 Homestead St., Baltimore, Md. 

JDearmeyer, Helen (Mrs. J. Pessel) Michigan. 

Fahrney, Myrtle Grantly St., Baltimore, Md. 

*Hedges, Lilly Brunswick, Md. 

IKeffer, Laura 310 Braddock St., Winchester, Va. 

Kenney, Emily Aurora Hospital, Aurora, 111. 

Klase, Josephine (Mrs. C. S. Warrell) Davis, California (Box, 125). 

Lloyd, Ellen 826 CarroUton Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

Marsh, Elizabeth 5 W. 2nd St., Frederick, Md. 

tMohler, Anna (Mrs.) 1609 Eutaw Place, Baltimore, Md. 

Mouse, Lucy Boone and Madison St., Baltimore, Md. 

Minnis, Jemima (Mrs. E. McLane) Washington, Pa. 

Minnis, Nancy Lanon Hospital, Caldwell Ave, New York. 

Monroe, Ethel 1927 Chestnut Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Murray, Olive Lebanon Hospital, Caldwell Ave, New York. 

fPennewell (Mrs. Lawrence Bloom) Phildelphia, Pa. 

Quigley, Bertha 717 W. North Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

Robinson, Anna (Mrs. John Lutz) 29 College Ave., Annapolis, Md. 

Risley, Marguerite (Mrs. H. M. Stein) 

1315 Mt. Royal Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

Simpson, Elsie Washington, D. C. 

IShertzer, R. (Mrs. J. D. Harrison). .319 51st St., Newport, News, Va. 

JStoneham, Annette (Married) New Windsor, Md. 

IThorn, Norma (Mrs. J. S. Woodruff) Charlotte, N. C. 

1918 

Barwick, Elizabeth 317 Okeechakee Road, West Palm Beach, Fla. 

Bay, Beulah 2201 Aiken St., Baltimore, Md. 

JBenson, Martha (Mrs. E. M. Jones) 1501 N. Second St., Harrisburg Pa. 

Carr, Esther (Mrs.) (Mrs. Wm. Malvin) Havre De Grace, Md. 

JDolly, Iva (Mrs. J. M. Underbill) West Asheville, N. C. 

JEnsor, Althea (Mrs. Burch) Long Island 

Flowers, Nettie 1418 Linden Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

JFlaharty, Nellie (Mrs. Boyd) 2923 lona Terrace, Baltimore, Md. 

Hook, Katie 1316 Linden Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

JKinney, Maud (married) Frostburg, Md. 

Kirkley, Naoma (Mrs. D. E. Fay). . .1812 N. Fulton Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

Leister, Grace Lebanon Hospital, New York. 

Lauper, Margaret University Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

{Linstrum Gay (Mrs. Harry Hughes) . .2125 W. North Ave., Baltimore, Md. 
JMcCarty, Ellen (Mrs. Frank Ogden) 115 N. Carey St., Baltimore, Md. 

McMillan, Martha 2121 Linden Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

* Deceased. 

t Graduates not members of the Association. 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 46 

JMoore, Cecelia (Mrs. Herbert Zimmerman) 

103 E. 22nd St., Baltimore, Md. 

McDaniel, Lena (Mrs. C. Rosenback). . .Lounden Hall, Hammond, Ind. 

Oldhauser, Minnie 2863 W. Lafayette Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

JRidgley, Florence (Mrs. E. Killough). . . .Hamlyn Apts., Baltimore, Md. 
JRidgeley, Helen 734 Reservoir St. Baltimore, Md. 

Scout, Temperance 2121 Linden Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

JSingleton, Jessie (Mrs. Ralph Guzzman) Red Springs, N. C. 

Turner, Marion 1316 Linden Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

JWard, Mary Lee (Mrs. Frank Boyette) Sayersville, N. Carolina. 

JYingling, Ruth 1700 Thomas Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

1919 

JAlrich, Annette (Mrs. George Holman) . . 178 Virginia Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

Brady, Ethel 1404 Linden Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

JBrown, Hady (Mrs. F. A. Macis) Honduras Central America. 

Brown, Mercides (Mrs. E. Duvall). . .609 Cumberland St., Baltimore, Md. 

Gordy, Helen Peninsula General Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

Jones, Grace 1025 Harlem Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

JLloyd, Betty 826 N. CarroUton Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

Lohse, (Mrs.) Waterbury, Conn. 

JKling, Caroline 231 N. Calhoun St., Baltimore, Md. 

King, Bertha Washington, D. C. 

Murray, Emma 2806 Marshall Ave., Newport News, Va. 

JMitchell, Edna (Mrs. Dennis Smith) New Windsor, Md. 

Nichols, Jane (Mrs. Juely) 6 East Read St., Baltimore, Md. 

tPleasants Helen (Mrs. Smealy) North Fork, Cal. 

tSides, Elizabeth (Mrs. McDonald) 206 Ashe St., Greensboro, N. C. 

Smarr, Alice The Walbert Apts., Baltimore, Md. 

tZepp, Katherine (Mrs. M. Douglass) 24 S. 9th St., Indianapolis, Ind. 

1920 

^Alexander, Christine (Mrs. J. Mayoral). . .Apavtado 1465, Havana, Cuba. 

Bamett, Louise (Mrs. Charles Reifschneider) 

2939 Eastern Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

JBaugher, Margaret 1611 Eutaw Place, Baltimore, Md. 

JBiddlecomb, Emily 11 N. 7th St., Wilmington, N, C. 

Bay, Ethlyn (Mrs. C. Dever) 2201 Aiken St., Baltimore, Md. 

Butler, Eleanor Boone and Madison Sts., Baltimore, Md. 

Clements, Ruth University Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

JEvans, Emma (Mrs.) (Mrs. Gregorius). .Ravenwood Ave., Govens, Md. 

Gilbert, Helen 2044 Linden Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

JHowell, Florence (Mrs. Albert Budden) Rock Hill, S. C. 

JKirkley, Azalia 1812 N. Fulton Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

Little, Rachel (Mrs. Leuders) 1514 Linden Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

Lankford, Marie 1425 Linden Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

I Graduates not members of the Association. 



46 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

McGovern, Clara 4225 Wickford Road, Roland Park, Md. 

Northcutt, Leona The Walbert Apts., Baltimore, Md. 

Reynolds, Grace (Mrs. Charles Warfield) EUicott City, Md. 

ISchwab, Myrtle 1812 N. Fulton Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

IScaggs, Edna (Mrs. Edwin Rembold) Kinship Road, Dundalk, Md. 

Trevelian, Mabel Lebanon Hospital Caldwell Ave., New York City. 

Tillet, Zora Roanoke, Va. 

Maston, Bessie 1611 Eutaw Place, Baltimore, Md. 

Yates, Edna 3039 W. North Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

JYingling, Emily (Mrs. Arleigh Albert) 

Halyon Road, Hamilton, Baltimore, Md. 

Shipley, Goldie University Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

1921 

JBateman, Louise (Mrs. Dan Brooks) Towson, Md. 

Childs, Helen Pleasant Hill, Baltimore, Md. 

Fisher, Mary Long, Allegheny County, Md. 

Gaver, Norma (Mrs. Daniel W. Justice) . 112 Mt. Vernon St., Boston, Mass. 

Gorman, Ruth 1123 Madison Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

Hampton, Claribel University Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

Hogshead, Kate (Mrs. J. Morris Reese) Lutherville, Md. 

JMinnis, Christine 116 Fnyder St., Connellsville, Pa. 

Martin, Blanche 1220 Linden Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

McDaniel, Mary (Mrs. H. Weisner). . .844 Hamilton Ter., Baltimore, Md. 

Neady, Susan P Waynesboro, Pa. 

IReister, Ruby 131 Park Ave., Asheville, N. C. 

iReese, Zadieth (Mrs. Wm. Pitt) 3026 Guilford Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

JReamy, Helen Fairport, Va. 

Rhodes, Jessie 23 Majestic Ave., West Asheville, N. C. 

Smith, Julia 1220 Linden Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

Wood, Anna Elizabeth 1220 Linden Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

1922 

JBowie, Lucille (Mrs. Richard Joyner) Suffolk, Va. 

JCallahan, Vera Dennison, Ohio. 

JDeputy, Julia (Mrs. Albert W. Strong) Walton, Kentucky. 

Elgin, Grace University Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

DuBois, Cecil (Mrs. David Bein) 1707 Homestead St., Baltimore, Md. 

Lord, Nettie (Mrs.) 2015 St. Paul St., Baltimore, Md. 

Morrison, Frankie V 2015 St. Paul St. Baltimore Md. 

*Yeager, Eva 

1923 

Boyd, Ruth W 1520 Eutaw Place, Baltimore, Md. 

Dunn, Helen L University Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

* Deceased. 

X Graduates not members of the Association. 



I 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 47 

Graham, Evelyn P 801 Hamilton Terrace, Baltimore, Md. 

JHazen, Dorthy L Erie, Pa. 

JHarkins, Hilda F 1520 Eutaw Place, Baltimore, Md. 

Herrington, Mary M Waynesboro Hospital, Waynesboro, Pa. 

Hoffman Martha M 1817 Linden Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

JHoke, Lillie R Emmitsburg, Md. 

JHorst, Katherine E 813 Hamilton Terrace, Baltimore, Md. 

JKish, Vilma K Sabillasville, Md. 

JMaxwell, Irene A 1817 Linden Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

McCann, Wilhemina N The Walbert, Baltimore, Md. 

Nagel, Ida M University Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

JPratt, Anna E 1655 Appleton St., Baltimore, Md. 

Shroeder, Marie E. Chalmers The Walbert, Baltimore, Md. 

Staily, Margaret, M The Walbert Baltimore, Md. 

JTeeple, Helen S 3344 Guilman Terrace, Baltimore, Md. 

Toms, Kittie Roland 801 Hamilton Terrace, Baltimore, Md. 

Reade, Katherine A 1520 Eutaw Place, Baltimore, Md. 

West, Regina Medora University Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

White, Ruth A 1520 Eutaw Place, Baltimore, Md, 

X Graduates not members of the Association. 




Alumnae puUetm 



1925 



OFFICERS OF THE ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

President Lillian K. McDaniel, R.N., University Hospital. 

First Vice-President. .Helen S. Teeple, R.N., Franklin Square Hospital. 

Second Vice-President Ethelyn Bay Dever, R.N., 2201 Aiken Street. 

Secretary Marie E. Sander, R.N., 2108 Mt. Royal Terrace. 

Treasurer Ellen C. Israel, R.N., 214 W. Monument St. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

The above officers with 
Margaret Massey Winslow, R.N. Anna Wham Pitt, R.N. 
Clyde Dawson Lynn, R.N. Blanche L. Martin, R.N. 

MEMBERSHIP COMMITTEE 

Helen B. McSherry, R.N., chairman 
Helen Dunn, R.N. Irene Maxwell, R.N. 

Julia R. Smith, R.N. Helen Morgardt, R.N. 

PROGRAM COMMITTEE 

Mrs. Cora Wilson, R.N., chairman 
Gertrude T. Cole, R.N. Helen Teeple, R.N. 

Ida Nagal, R.N. Katherine Zepp, R.N. 

NOMINATING COMMITTEE 

Beulah Bay, R.N., chairman 
GoLDA Price, R.N. Mary McDaniel Weissner, R.N. 

Elva Dean, R.N. Jeannette Flowers, R.N. 

PUBLICATION COMMITTEE 

Blanche Lee Martin, R.N., chairman 
Julia Rebecca Smith, R.N. Margaret M. Winslow, R.N. 

Marguerite Risley Stein, R.N. Henrietta Gourley, R.N. 

GoLDA Price, R.N. 

DIRECTORY COMMITTEE 

Ellen C. Israel, R.N., chairman 
Naomi Hissey, R.N. Temperance Scout, R.N. 

Alice Smarr, R.N. Katherine Zepp, R.N. 




ETHEL P. CLARKE, R.N., '06 



THE 

University Hospital Nurses 
Alumnae Bulletin 

Vol. V APRIL, 1925 No. 1 



ETHEL P. CLARKE, R.N., '06 
Birthplace: England. 

Preliminary Education: Private schools in England; Graduate 
of Southern Seminary, Virginia. 

Professional Education: Graduate of University of Maryland 
Training School, 1906. 

Special Courses: Department of Nursing and Health, Teachers 
College, Columbia University, 1914-15. 

Positions Held: Private duty a few months. Superintendent 
DeSoto Sanatorium, Jacksonville, Florida, 1907-11; Superintend- 
ent of Nurses, University Hospital, Baltimore, 1911-14; Director 
Training School for Nurses, Indiana University, Indianapolis, 
1915 . 

Offices Held: President Maryland State Association, 1913-14; 
Member of Board of Directors, National League of Nursing 
Education; Member of Board of Directors, American Journal of 
Nursing, 1923; President Indiana State League of Nursing 
Education. 



4 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

EDITORIAL 
A Larger Service 

Apropos the announcement in a recent issue of the Baltimore 
Sun that Dean Frederic E. Lee of the Department of Arts and 
Sciences has been appointed Executive Dean to the President, 
the Bulletin is authorized to make the following explanation to its 
readers. 

This is in nowise the creation of a new position, only an enlarge- 
ment of the duties already performed by Dean Lee. The Medical 
School has for some years required of its candicates for admis- 
sion two premedical college years. Beginning with the session 
of 1926, the Dental School will require of its matriculants one year 
of college work on top of the high school education now in force. 
The Law School has announced for admission to its courses, 
besides the high school work now required, at least one year of 
college work, beginning in 1926 and two years in 1927. There is 
also in contemplation the institution of a combined academic and 
professional course for pupil nurses desirous of a more liberal 
education. Inasmuch as the Pharmacy School, in cooperation 
with the Department of Arts and Sciences at College Park has 
been giving its students regular collegiate courses in English, 
chemistry, physics, mathematics and foreign languages, and the 
curriculum of the College of Commerce and Business Administra- 
tion is made up of about 50 per cent collegiate studies, it has been 
thought proper to coordinate these studies with similar courses 
given at the College Park end of the institution to the end that all 
such work, wherever given in the University, shall be of a uniform 
standard. In order to accomplish this object Dr. Lee has been 
appointed Executive Dean with supervisory powers. 

While the proposition, at first glance, seems a departure, the 
scheme has really been in operation for the past three years on a 
minor scale, and the present plan is to enlarge the service to such 
a point that a student wishing to take the preHminary collegiate 
studies necessary to enter one of the professional schools can 
obtain this work in Baltimore. 

The Diamondback, College Park, 1925, IV, No. 18, February 
24, page 1, column 1, discusses the appointment of Dr. Lee in the 
following words: 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 5 

As will be noted in the column on Faculty Facts in this issue, Dr. 
Frederic E. Lee, Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, has recently 
been appointed to a new post in the University, and in addition to his 
position in the College of Arts and Sciences in the future will hold the title 
of Executive Dean of the University of Maryland. 

The new position has been made necessary in the University of Mary- 
land by the newer standards which are being met, particularly by the 
professional schools in Baltimore, in the matter of arts and science work. 
The School of Pharmacy is reorganizing its curriculum, which in the 
future will include more basic work in arts and science subjects. The 
School of Dentistry will require at least one year of college work after 
next year before students can enter that school as candidates for a degree. 
The Law School Faculty is considering the plan of requiring a two-year 
pre-law course of all regular students. At present about 50 per cent of the 
work of the College of Commerce and Business Administration is of an 
arts and science character. It is for the purpose of making sure that all 
such work, wherever given in the University, shall be of uniform standard 

that this new position has been created In the capacity of 

Executive Dean, Dr. Lee will function under President Woods, and his 
responsibilities will lie almost wholly in the field of educational matters, 

rather than in administrative work For the next several 

years, however. Dean Lee expects to give his entire thought and energy in 
building up the work of the University of Maryland, and in creating an 
appreciation of, and demand for, a liberal, cultural education in the State 
of Maryland. 

"U. OF M. Plans Nurse Degree" 

The following article appeared with large headlines in The 
Baltimore News on March 19, 1925. 

For the first time in the history of Maryland, young women are to be 
given a chance to obtain the degree of Bachelor of Science as nurses. 

This announcement was made today by oflBcials of the University of 
Marj'land, who said plans have been completed to effect the innovation 
this fall. 

The course is not compulsory. It is an added opportunity — the open- 
ing of a second door to those who wish to go high in their chosen profession 
— with the special training that a college education entails. 

Under no circumstances will the University of Maryland Hospital, 
where classes in nursing are always in training, give up the present three- 
year course. 

The second course will occupy the student for five years. The first 
two years those who enroll must take up studies in the College of Arts 
and Sciences at College Park. 

From there students will be transferred to the University Hospital, 
where they will be given three years of active work in nursing. The 
opportunity is also offered these students, in the last half year of hospital 
work, to fit themselves for specialization work. 



6 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

The field embraces such positions as social service workers, hospital 
superintendents, instructors in training schools, laboratory assistants, 
technicians, staff workers, supervisors and many others. 

Much of the credit for planning the new course is being given to Miss 
Annie Crighton, superintendent of Nurses at University Hospital. 

Miss Crighton said: "There are numerous young women who have 
desired an opportunity to obtain a degree in nursing, but heretofore there 
was no chance in Maryland. 

"The decision to inaugurate a course with a degree of B.S. to strive 
for has been one of the greatest strides in behalf of the education of women 
made in Maryland in recent years. I look for the new course to become 
popular from the start. 

"We will continue to receive students for training for our regular three- 
year course in nursing right here at the hospital. Under no circumstances 
will this work be discontinued. 

"The second course simply means the opening of another door of learn- 
ing for women who plan to take up nursing as a profession." 

Some few details in connection with the new course remain to be worked 
out, but enrollment will begin in June for the classes to start in Septem- 
ber. The classes are not confined to residents of Maryland. 

GENERAL INFORMATION 
Scholarship and Loan Funds 

1 . Isabel Hampton Robb Memorial Fund 

Through the Isabel Hampton Robb Memorial Fund, scholar- 
ships are annually available for those entering the training school 
field. Application should be made to Miss Katherin DeWitt, 
Secretary Isabel Hampton Robb Memorial Committee, 19 West 
Main Street, Rochester, N. Y. 

£. The American Red Cross 

The American Red Cross gives a number of general nursing 
scholarships, also restricted to those who are wilUng to enter the 
PubHc Health Nursing of the Red Cross. Further information 
may be obtained from the Director of the Department of Nursing, 
The American Red Cross, Washington, DwQ. 

3. The LaVerne Noyes Scholarship 

A number of scholarships are offered by the estate of LaVerne 
Noyes. These scholarships are available for nurses who, having 
served in the army and navy in the last war, who have been honor- 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 7 

ably discharged and who are in need of this assistance. Further 
information may be obtained from the Trustees of the LaVerne 
Foundation, University of Chicago, Chicago, 111. 

4. The Isabel Mclsaac Loan Fund 

The Isabel Mclsaac Loan Fund also offers a few limited loans 
to Students interested in the more advanced fields of nursing. 
Apphcation should be made to Katherin DeWitt, 19 West Main 
Street, Rochester, N. Y. 

5. The Nurses Alumnae Association Scholarship of the University 

of Maryland 

A scholarship is given by the Nurses Alumnae of the University 
of Maryland for the six weeks summer course at Columbia Uni- 
versity, to the nurse who wins the first honors in her class during 
the three years of training. 

6. School of Practical Arts 

The announcement of the School of Practical Arts, the School 
of Education, or the Summer Session will be sent on application 
to the Secretary of Teachers College, Columbia University, New 
York. 

Application for admission as students of Nursing Education 
should be addressed to the Office of Nursing Education, Teachers 
College, Columbia University, New York City. 



8 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

LIFE OF A PROBATIONER IN THE EARLY DAYS OF THE 
TRAINING SCHOOL 

By "One of the Original Five" 

At the age of twelve I began to nurse. It fell to me to take care 
of my granf ather who was bedridden for longer than I can remem- 
ber. Grandfather was feeble and decrepit, and practically out 
of his mind; and so I had to feed him and do everything — wash, 
dress and shave him. I could never be spared to go to school. 
My education consisted of nine months attendance at the little 
country school, but I had lots of time to read and there happened 
to be a large number of books in the old farm house suitable for 
old and young, and I read everything that I could lay my hands on. 

Grandfather passed away when I was about sixteen. After that 
I had plenty of work out of doors on the farm as well as in the 
house. Often, I helped to take care of the sick, and helped in the 
homes of friends and neighbors. Years passed, and I heard that 
there was to be a training school opened for nurses. 

My home then was in Baltimore with my married sister. I 
picked up the courage to enter that most wonderful building, 
the Johns Hopkins Hospital. I inquired for the Superintendent, 
and a little lady all in white came to me. I was old enough to 
know better, but was scared. She asked me what I wanted, and 
I stated that I had made application for the training course but 
had never received a reply. She remembered my name, stated 
that she was sorry not to be able to help me, that Miss Hampton 
was the one who would soon be in charge. No doubt she had 
read the application and knew that I would not be accepted. 
However, she took a seat and asked me all about myself, and then 
requested me to come and see Miss Hampton and have a talk with 
her, and stated she would do all in her power to help me. 

With all my heart I wanted to take that training and be a nurse. 
I was a member of the church across from the hospital, and the 
minister at that time was Chaplain at the hospital. With the 
help of Miss Parsons and the minister. Miss Hampton promised 
me an interview. She was so kind in her manner that I felt at 
ease, and talked to her of my lack of education. She said that 
sometimes exceptions were made when one showed a disposition 
to do the work, and thereby make up what they lacked in the 
other essentials. She said she would take me in May, and if I 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 9 

made good would help me to study what was necessary; and it 
goes without saying that I was ever afterwards appreciative of 
Miss Hampton. She secured me a position with friends to help 
take care of an elderly lady until May when a new class was to 
be formed. 

I met Miss Parsons at church, and occasionally she would drop 
me a note. That was early in the winter, and one day to my 
surprise I received a note in which she asked me to be one of her 
nurses; that she would arrange with Miss Hampton. So in 1889, 
the first part of December, on a Saturday, I walked up the steps 
of the most dismal looking building called the Maryland Univer- 
sity, and was met at the door by Miss Parsons. I had always 
recalled to myself "The Little Lady in White" and there she stood 
with a kind light in her eyes which made me feel full of confidence. 

There were four other probationers standing in the hall. The 
inside of the building, it seemed to me, was even more dismal than 
the outside. The gas light was dim, perhaps to save expenses, 
and the new nurses felt ill at ease, not knowing where to begin, 
but in a few minutes the housekeeper appeared and accompanied 
us down a stairway to a small room where a table was set. I 
shall never forget that table. I had no ill feeling towards it, but 
what I saw on it! There was a plate of ham and a dish of berries 
■ — about five berries floating in a quart of syrup. I had been 
invited out to dine so just sat there to keep the other boobies 
company. 

We found our way upstairs and were shown to the rooms we 
were to occupy. Next morning (Sunday) we went on duty — 
the longest day I ever spent in my life. There did not seem to be 
much to do, and yet there must have been plenty, but no one to 
tell or show us, therefore, we sat around like dummies. 

I had never been in either a women's or men's ward, but 
after a while the "little Lady in White" came in and told us to 
straighten up the beds and make the wards tidy, but the beds to 
us were smooth and the wards straight. We did not know 
whether there were patients or not. We went through that day 
somehow, and the following day were shown through different 
wards. The "Little Lady" took us through some dingy halls to 
a small room where a man lay with pneumonia, my first patient. 
Such a shabby looking bed and hnen! The patient had had a 
hemorrhage and the sheets and pillow cases had not been changed. 



10 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

The Superintendent said, "That man is very sick; I want you to 
give him his medicine religiously," and then she left the room. 
There were no chairs to sit on, and if I had dared I would have 
run out of the room. I was not afraid but sick at the sight of 
the blood. I longed for the presence of the "Little Lady in 
White," but she could not come. The house was full of sick per- 
sons, and only five raw probationers to help. 

My patient was a large, robust man and so I was not prepared 
for the shock. As I stood there waiting for the time to come to 
administer his medicine he opened his eyes and remarked: "You 
tink I die?" I managed to say, "I hope not." Then he said, 
"You tell the priest." I said "That is all right," and then he 
closed his eyes and passed to the unknown. 

My next move was to the Medical Ward with its wooden beds 
and soiled hnen, dirty walls and windows and floors. I was glad 
to be where I could be occupied. The orderly was good natured 
about helping me, and I started in to wash window sills, tables, 
chairs and anything that I saw which was not clean. The beds 
had been made up by a convalescent, so I put off cleaning them 
until the next day. As the days flew by things took on a brighter 
hue for me, and the arrival of new patients kept us busy finding 
beds for them. About this time the chapel had been turned into 
a dormitory for the nurses — perhaps six or eight little rooms fur- 
nished with cot, swinging table and chair. We were dehghted 
with the change and when off duty enjoyed exchanging experiences 
of the day's work. 

Soon I was transferred to the surgical ward, with its old wooden 
beds, soiled mattresses, scant linen, dirty walls and floors. Then 
along came the epidemic of la grippe, the same disease as now, but 
called by another name. Every bed in the hospital was occupied. 
Some of the nurses were taken down with pneumonia, I among 
them, which kept me off duty for one month. Two others of the 
original five were also ill with it. I had as good attention as was 
possible, but the change from a bed with a sheet having the seam 
down the middle to one with a full sheet had more to do with my 
recovery than the medicine. 

After I went back to the wards and saw a sheet like that I used 
it for rags, for in those days rags were in demand, at least they 
were at the M. U. H. 

"The Little Lady in White" kept on, never stopping for rest. 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 11 

She had a way of saying "Why how un-nurse like," or "How 
silly." One day she fainted over a patient, and even then while 
being helped up she said, "Why how silly of me." Later, her 
turn came, and we did not see her for days. 

After I came back after my convalescence, having gone home, 
I was much gratified at the warm reception I received from "The 
Little Lady in White," and the surgeon in charge at that time 
one of God's chosen men. He was like a father to the Super- 
intendent and the nurses, gentle and thoughtful of our welfare, 
always anxious about the care of his patients, either poor or rich, 
and lending helpful aid to us poor nurses, pouring forth his 
wonderful knowledge. To him and his wife we were indebted for 
the pleasant social affairs which we attended. 

When I returned I felt that I was better satisfied, as I had ere 
this developed a liking for the old dreary place, and I found that 
many improvements had taken place during the time I had been 
away. New floors had been put in the private ward, and a head 
nurse had been appointed for that section. 

In those days the wards were without extra help, and we had 
plenty of work The old wooden beds were still in uSv?, and it was 
a job to keep them clean. There were not enough rooms for all 
the nurses, and the night shifts were pushed for quarters, so they 
slept in private halls. One day, after they were all tucked away, 
word was received that the hall was needed at once and notwith- 
standing the pleadings of "The Little Lady in White" that she 
could care for the new arrivals, the poor tired probationers had 
to move out and lose the greater part of their day's rest. Then 
"The Little Lady in White" broke down and wept for her nurses. 
Many of us had thought her cold and indifferent, for she was as 
stern as an old sea captain. Once she was heard to say, "If my 
nurses knew how I loved them I could not maintain strict 
discipline. 

As the school grew we heard that a new home for the nurses 
was to be built. We were to receive eight dollars a month and 
furnish our own uniforms and books. It seemed a long time 
before the little eight dollars began to show up. The lessons and 
lectures began about this time, and we were required to write up 
the lectures and studies. When my turn came to report to the 
office the study was "Construction of Bones" if my memory is 
not at fault. "The Little Lady in White" had instructed me to 



12 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

sit down and write out the lesson. I said I could not write it, 
that I did not know how. She smiled and said "You must," 
and then left the office. I lay my head on the desk and sobbed. 
I had no handkerchief, so used the cuffs of my uniform to dry my 
tears. I felt that all was lost, that I could not continue my train- 
ing, and I did want to stay as I loved the work, all but the lectures 
and studies. I did not give a thought to leaving, for I would have 
stayed even if I had to scrub the floors. I must have asked for 
help from a source to whom we all appeal in our hours of trouble, 
for I wrote that thesis about the bones and retired to my ward 
when soon afterwards "The Little Lady in White" came to me 
smiUng and said, "You did very well." 

The hospital was by this time receiving calls for nurses, and 
some of the probationers were sent out to attend private cases. 
Among others I attended one case which lasted fourteen weeks, a 
disagreeable patient. I finished and returned to the school carry- 
ing a nice little amount which was used for necessities for the 
hospital. A few weeks later I was called to attend the same pa- 
tient, and in tears I begged "The Little Lady in White" not to force 
me to go as conditions were objectionable. She investigated and 
no nurse was detailed. 

After the new home was completed we had more room and more 
comforts. The chapel was made into a sitting room where occa- 
sionally we had music, or a dance, and "The Little Lady in White" 
would occasionally join in the merry-making. 

Sometimes she would hustle us all into a street car and carry us 
off to the theatre, and later we would have refreshments. Some- 
times she remembered us with small presents which would be 
found on our bureaus. I remember our first was a pair of dres- 
sing forceps. She was especially kind to the employees of the 
halls and wards and the free patients, and her salary was only 
forty dollars a month. 

The time came when her work was finished at the M. U. H. 
We all tried to keep her, but she would consent to stay only long 
enough to see us take our examinations. I knew that I should 
miss her, for she was ever so patient with me. I was not a favorite 
in school and had but one pal, and am proud to say that I still 
have her and I trust that we will be pals "Over there" with "The 
Little Lady in White." 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 13 

THE VALUE OF THE ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION TO 
THE NURSE 

By Eliza Bond Gray, Class of '00 

Our Alumnae is a growing organization of nurses interested in 
maintaining high ideals for the profession and advancing the cause 
of service to humanity wherever possible. 

Let us consider first the benefits of ideals. Instead of plodding 
along with the thought of a day's work for a day's pay, suppose 
we start out with the idea of doing what lies before us in a way to 
bring better health and more happiness into the lives of humanity. 
There are so many possibilities beyond this, in an ever widening 
circle, that we need the help of others to carry on. What more 
practical way is there for nurses to do this than through an organi- 
zation for "mutual help and improvement" as our Constitution 
words it? The Alumnae reaches out a helping hand to those who 
would fit themselves for positions of larger responsibihty, or take 
up some technical work which might help in the advancement of 
science. Our Association is always eager to help in any forward- 
looking plans for the Training School, or to join with the State and 
National Association in the furtherance of any professional or 
educational advancement of nursing. We should be proud of an 
organization which enables us to meet our responsibilities to our 
Alma Mater and our profession with a degree of helpfulness and 
assurance. 

So much for the larger interests — of what use is the Association 
to ME? I am immersed in my own affairs, making my living by 
my daily toil. Why should I pay dues, or spend time, on some- 
thing in which I am not interested? If I should wish to nurse 
in another State, creditable standing in my own Alumnae and 
State Associations would go far toward paving the way for quick 
and easy entrance into the best nursing circles. To hail from 
Maryland means something since our Bill for Registration was the 
guide for other states for some time after its adoption. There is 
a question in the back of our minds when a strangers says, "My 
time has been filled by my work; I couldn't bother with other 
things." After all, are not those "other things" our affair? 
We can neither live nor die to ourselves, nor would most of us 
want to do so. The social life of an organization has its appeal 
also. The good-fellowship and interest which come from the 



14 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

closer relationship draw us with invisible cords, and we stand 
together in a way that would otherwise be impossible. 

We can at any time make our meetings educational by asking 
for a committee to arrange for lectures on any desired subject. 
Our interest is in that for which we work, and the interest of 
each individual goes far toward the success of the whole. If each 
graduate of the Training School took an active interest in her 
Alumnae, we would have an organization that would make for 
helpfulness and progress beyond our expectations. 

SUMMER SCHOOL 1924 
By Helen Stedman Teeple, R.N., (1923) 

So many times have I "burst into print" in your Bulletin, that 
I feel hesitant about burdening my fellow alumnae with any more 
remarks. My deep sense of obligation and appreciation to you 
for the privilege of attending Columbia University Summer 
School, however, gives me courage to accede to the request for a 
report on my 1924 Summer's work in New York City. The 
trip, the opportunities opened up, and the invaluable contacts 
with other nurses, all give me a subject well worth the telling. 

Seven a.m., July 5th, was the beginning of my experiences in 
New York City. Fortunately, my brother, who knew the city, 
accompanied me, and thus broke the awful ice of strangeness. 
My first duty was to register. By the subway route, I traveled 
to Columbia and got my first and only real thrill in the city. (I 
adored the Subway during all of my stay.) 

Registration at Columbia! The words bring to my mind a 
series of Kaleidoscopic pictures and impressions — standing and 
jostling in long lines that extended for a distance of two city blocks, 
only to find out when I got to the end, that certain O.K.'s were 
needed from some unknown person in another building; question- 
ings and uncertain, or wrong answers; being pushed here and there 
by others just as much in the dark as I, as to our destination; 
finally the sense of reaching a haven in the nursing department 
and making out schedules — with the distracted assistance of the 
instructors, only to find out afterward they had not O.K.d the 
schedule properly; again hastening to the lines, which by then had 
grown like the Hydra-Headed Scylla, for where I had been in 
one of four lines, two blocks long, I was now at the end of one of 



\ 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 15 

ten that wound about the campus like serpents. The final exhaus- 
tive effort to get into the Gymnasium to pay my bills was nearly 
the end of my courage — can you imagine anything worse than 
being one infinitesimal atom among five thousand, or more, 
pushing, perspiring, and rather irritable persons, in a terribly 
crowded building, with only one exit? At last, I held the precious 
receipts and permission cards and weakly staggered out into a 
blazing sunlight to find refreshment. A little French restaurant 
nearby resuscitated my flagging energy and I then went in search 
of a room. 

The problem of housing and feeding the nearly thirteen thous- 
and students had been solved indeed in a rather splendid manner. 
I had been provided with a list of available rooms near Teachers' 
College, and I was quite the most fortunte student in Columbia, 
for at my very first inquiry, I secured a large, airy room, with, 
home conveniences and surroundings in a ground floor apartment 
directly across the street from my class-rooms. Meals were 
available at any of the multitude of restaurants or at the Univer- 
sity dining-rooms. The Teachers' College cafeteria had just 
opened, and there I found excellent well- varied meals, at extremely 
reasonable prices. The cafeteria was a source of joy, for only 
there did I find salted butter! (I had about decided all New 
Yorkers were Nephritics, for I could find nothing but sweet butter 
("salt-free" in Hospital parlance) in the restaurants, or lunch- 
rooms. I tried to imagine I was in France, or in some Continen- 
tal rural home, but that was too much of a stretch for any 
imagination.) 

All of my classes were held in the Teachers' College. Construc- 
tion was going on on all sides, so that at times the classes found 
themselves in humorous situations, or being violently shunted 
from one class room to another at interminable distances. The 
classes were so much larger than had been expected, that accomo- 
dations were not always available — as when students sat at beds 
for desks, and on high stools for chairs ; but then we did not mind 
even that — we were used to beds for any and all purposes. 

My particular classes and teachers were a real joy and inspira- 
tion. With Miss Isabel Stewart, Co-author of our "Dock and 
Stewart Short History of Nursing," I had two classes — one in 
the building of a "Curriculum in a Nursing School," and one in 
the "Teaching of principles and practice of nursing procedures." 



16 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

With Miss Elizabeth Burgess, formerly, New York State Inspector 
Nursing Schools, I had a class in ''Supervision in Nursing Schools." 
And, last and perhaps most dear to my heart, were the class hours 
I spent with Miss Maude Muse, in the pursuit of methods of 
teaching "Materia Medica" — and incidentally Drugs and 
Solutions. 

Each instructor had a class conference hour each week; each one 
gave at least two, and some six examinations during the six weeks; 
each assigned at least one term paper, or plan, and some two 
every week; each had at least two personal conferences with each 
student in the Nursing Department; each required at least one and 
a haK hours library work a day, for each class hour. Twice a 
week we had to attend the Nursing Club lectures. Can you 
see how my day included from twelve to sixteen hours of work? 

At some of our classes we met and heard speakers of vital inter- 
est to every nurse. Miss Carolyn Gray (famous for her part in 
writing the "Kimber and Gray Anatomy") organizer of the new 
University School of Nursing at Cleveland; Dr. Haven Emerson, 
the eminent authority on Pubhc Health; Miss Reichman, the 
Secretary to the International Council of Nurses; and many of 
the foreign born nurses came to give of their store to us. 

In Miss Stewart's class in Nursing, we had a series of interest- 
ing demonstrations. The class was divided into nine groups of 
six each, with one of them as the leader. Each group was assigned 
a demonstration unit, and presented a complete lesson plan and 
demonstration to the class. For example — one group presented 
the unit of transportation of patients, showing all the different 
ways of carrying and moving patients by chairs, stretchers, slings, 
and first-aid methods. Another unit showed the care of a tonsil 
case from entrance to departure from the Hospital. Still another 
showed all the many different utensils and methods of cleaning 
(the Housekeeping unit). My group demonstrated the toilet 
and care of the patient from early morning to night — ^my particu- 
lar bit being the night care of the patient. (Imagine my chagrin 
at starting to sneeze just as I was about to begin — sixteen times 
did I sneeze and weep, so that I feared my patient would be well 
aroused.) 

Following these, were written and oral criticisms of each presen- 
tation, many showing real constructive thinking. During the 
last week, we all went to the Presbyterian Hospital for two 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 17 

demonstrations of procedures, given by Miss Young, the Super- 
intendent of Nurses. There we saw methods and ways of giving 
a Hot Pack, Colon Irrigation (with their own devices). Blood 
Transfusion, Dakin Irrigation and dressing; Surgical dressing; 
croup tent, plus others. 

A trip through Belle vue Hospital was arranged and there we 
saw so many fascinating sights, so many miles of corridors, and so 
few of the sixteen hundred and one patients they had that morn- 
ing that we fell to wondering. The nursery, the laundry and 
central linen room, the Day Boat for Tuberculous children, in- 
trigued us longest. The Nurses' home was quite beyond our 
dreams, but we rallied bravely when they told us they serve tea 
every afternoon during the winter, for the nurses before or 
after classes. 

We also visited St. Luke's Hospital, which was all and more 
we had pictured, but we were unable to go through Mt. Sinai, 
as we had hoped. 

All in all, when final exams came, we did not mind them so 
much, for the courses had been so well planned and presented with 
so many demonstrations, that we really enjoyed (!) the new types 
of "psychological examination" that were given us. 

Of my real relaxations and pleasures there is little to say. The 
Nurses' Club gave the most joyous picnic on the banks of the 
Hudson, where we presented a very hilarious drama — "The 
Gathering of the Nuts" — (we being the "nuts"!) and ate our fill 
of picnic eats, sang songs and toasted marshmallows on the 
rocky banks and even had an impromptu near-drowning — the 
occupants of the canoe were so fascinated by our perky paper 
bonnets and music. 

The Southern Club, an organization of sixteen southern State 
Clubs, gave the most deUghtful and elaborate entertainment of 
the summer. Their "Stunt Night" is the high light every year, 
and "they say" this was the best yet. Each state was represented 
or portrayed by a pantomime, or play. Missouri, with her 
"Coming of the first train to Iron Mountain," won first prize, 
with South Carolina and her Spirituals a close second, and Georgia 
with the portrayal of her traditions of the State flower, — The 
Cherokee Rose, as third. Maryland very graciously gave way to 
Kentucky, when it was found at the last minute that they each 
had planned the same stunt. 



18 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

A unique thing was the naming of the trees of the campus after 
each state. "Under the Maryland Tree" was the rendevous of 
many of the students for study, chatting, punch, or just social 
purposes. 

The music of the Summer School charmed me. Each week a 
concert was given, by notable musicians, for the students. There 
were musical organizations too — The Chorus of two hundred or 
more voices presented Liszt's "Legend of the Roses," with an 
orchestra of fifty accompanying pieces, and four soloists. The 
oratorio was particularly appropriate, as it portrayed so exquis- 
itely the personality of Queen Elisabeth of Hungary, one of the 
followers of St. Francis of Assisi. I found my greatest pleasure 
in attending the semi-weekly rehearsal of this chorus under Pro- 
fessor Walter Henry Hall, noted chorus conductor. 

Of the plays and movies, I saw little. Of the city I saw much 
in the first days. The Fifth Avenue Bus fascinated me, and I 
rode the length of New York many times on top of the bus in the 
blistering sun. The excursions planned by the University for the 
students were always crowded, none more than the trip to West 
Point by boat. I was privileged to see the lovely new hospital 
just recently built for the soldiers (students and officers) at the 
Point. (Imagine even our surprise at seeing two sleeping two- 
day-old cherubs in the nursery, which were shyly displayed by 
our masculine guide, as the pride of the Hospital.) 

Even the hottest of summers, and the hardest of studies must 
come to an end, and so August the fourteenth found me on my 
way to Baltimore, honestly glad to get back to a more leisurely, 
more quiet^ and sane existence. 

My viewpoints of nursing, of teaching, of service had been 
broadened out by my contact with the other twelve thousand, 
nine hundred and fifteen students from every country in the world, 
by my close association with the two hundred and fifty-five other 
nurses in the Department of Nursing and Public Health, and by 
the personal instruction and interest of the leaders of the nursing 
profession. 

The Alumnae members will be glad to know that the Committee 
on Admissions granted me for my training school work thirty- 
one credits toward my B.S. With other credits that I had pre- 
viously received at Johns Hopkins, etc., and my Summer School's 
eight credits, I found I would have to put in two more summer 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 19 

schools and one year of residence finally to obtain the coveted 
B.S. Maybe — some day that dream will come true. 

OUR MODERN-UP-TO-DATE HOSPITAL 
By Cora Mason Wilson, '96 

The University Hospital with its traditions behind it and the 
future before it, having passed through the vicissitudes of tearing 
down, and rearing up, pulUng down and replacing, pounding, 
scraping, painting and polishing, very handsome, quite modern 
and one of which we who love it may be justly quite proud. 

At our Alumnae meeting of January, 1924, Doctor Shipley 
requested that he might come and give us information how we, 
as a body could help in the efforts being put forward for an appro- 
priation for a New University Hospital. 

A wonderfully ambitious desire was entertained by us all, each 
one of us. A new Hospital, which was designed to occupy the 
space from the Louisa Parsons Home, to Greene Street, and from 
Lombard Street on the South to Cider Alley on the north; our 
present hospital to be used as laboratories, etc. How pleased we 
should have been, had we been fortunate enough to obtain our 
desired appropriation. However 'tis a dream which will some 
day come true. 

As we had been loudly proclaimed as a fire-trap; a hospital 
where no one would think of coming as a patient unless he were 
unconscious, or brought in by force or under false pretense or in 
the patrol wagon, — it was necessary to correct this condition. 
We were inspected, were visited by various and sundry persons 
high in authority, the building inspector, and fire underwriters, 
and as a result we were granted an appropriation of $75,000 with 
which we could repair our deficiencies, modernize ourselves and 
make our hospital safe for our patients and those who minister 
to their ills. This appropriation was placed in the hands of our 
Board of Regents. The firm of Smith and May, Architects and 
the firm of Wm. F. Chew and Company, Contractors were 
employed. These worked with Doctor Lomas as Consultant 
who thought out and suggested the various schemes for our 
improvement. 

The improvements began in the Dispensary. The Hospital 
formerly when first built, was heated by hot air, two feet of 



20 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

ceiling being utilized for the purpose of passing hot air ducts 
through. This necessitated the removal of this portion of the 
dispensary and the two feet being added to height of ceiHng, mak- 
ing it ten feet, not an inch too much for air, light and ventilation. 
The portion where this had been was made as fire proof as possible, 
lathing and plaster being employed. 

The space occupied by the stairs leading to the Amphitheater 
from Lombard Street was converted into a large well-lighted 
room and is now occupied by admitting officer of the dispensary. 

The two small cubicles (in front of the drug room which were 
used by maids and orderHes) were taken out. This space and 
another at the foot of the steps leading down from the lobby were 
fitted up with benches. The Dispensary patients' entrance is on 
Greene Street as formerly. 

The room used for medicine has been wonderfully improved. 
The adjoining room was equipped very nicely as a laboratory 
for the students and those who wish to make analyses etc. The 
large cupboard which was filled with instruments, medicines, 
etc., needed for such work was removed. 

The operating room corridor has been greatly improved, and 
has been transformed into a very attractive place. Beams and 
joists have been cut away from this narrow space (which wound 
round the amphitheater) making it much wider; wire netting and 
plaster have been used making it to a degree fire-proof. Two per- 
sons can pass along this passage in comfort. There is room for 
the carriages to stand when not in use. A dressing room has been 
made from the space used by the steps (which lead from dispens- 
ary) a room much needed. 

Perhaps the greatest improvements are the elevators. They 
are new and up-to-date and the shaft of each is fire proof. 

In the event of a fire, the whole hospital has been sectionalized: 
metal frames and metal doors with wired glass, have been placed 
at the entrance of every passage. The doors cut off drafts and 
prevent corridors and staircases from filling with smoke for quite 
a little while, thus allowing time for escape. 

The stairways in the main staircase, have been changed so that 
now the whole is enclosed in metal sheathing and filled with wired 
glass. This makes it now possible for patients to escape down the 
main stairway, in case of emergency, without having to traverse a 
smoke filled staircase. This serves a further advantage, in that it 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 21 

prevents the noise from the main corridors from traversing to other 
floors. Instead of erecting useless fire escapes on the outside of 
the building, advantage was taken of the Greene Street stairway 
and the one at the West end of the building. Both these were 
removed and were replaced by concrete and steel stairways, 
which afford ample resistance to fire and which are accessible 
from all floors of each building. In case of emergency it can well 
be appreciated how much more serviceable these stairways are 
than the perilous journeys which a frightened patient would 
have to take down a fire escape on the outside of the building. 

The Nurses dining room has shared in the general fire-proofing 
scheme. An adequate dumb waiter, properly fireproofed, now 
establishes connection between the kitchen and this room. 

With all these improvements throughout the building, adequate 
opportunity has been afforded to paint the hospital. This has 
been carried out throughout nearly the whole hospital, and tends 
to make all fresh, clean and light. 

These improvements have been brought about by the State 
appropriation referred to above, but there are one or two addi- 
tional improvements which have arisen from other sources. 

The much neglected sun parlor, with its weather beaten appear- 
ance, is now a thing of the past. Through a gift of money from 
the friends of Dr. George Henry Brown of New Windsor, Md., 
who were anxious to establish a Brown Memorial, this room has 
been renovated and now presents the appearance of a very attrac- 
tive solarium. The room has been finished in grey, is provided 
with grey wicker furniture, new grey window shades, etc., while 
the floor has been scraped and polished. 

An upright piano, the gift of one of the ladies of the Woman's 
Auxilliary Board now replaces the old square piano, which was 
so familiar, although an-eye-sore, to everyone. 

We however, do not wish to close without saying we appreciate 
the efforts of Dr. Lomas, our Superintendent, in his attempt to 
make the University Hospital comparable to other institutions of 
high standing. We also are anxious to mention Miss Crighton, 
who has worked most diligently for the betterment of the training 
school for nurses and all that that entails. 

Just at this time comes the pleasant announcement made by 
officials of the University of Maryland that plans have been com- 
pleted, where by young women are to be given the opportunity 



22 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

to obtain the degree of bachelor of science in nursing. This is an 
opportunity for nurses who are ambitious to go higher in their 
chosen profession — with the special training that a college educa- 
tion entails — and 'tis the first time in the History of Maryland 
such chance has been offered to them. 

This course will require five years of preparation by the nurse. 
The first two years those who are registered at College Park must 
take up studies in the College of Arts and Sciences. From there 
the students will be transferred to the University Hospital where 
they will receive three years of active work in nursing. In the 
last half year of the hospital work, if the students desire, they may 
equip themselves for specialization work. 

Two very important requirements demanded are: Candidates 
must be in perfect physical condition and graduates of an aca- 
demic high school. 

The students will have to pay their own expenses during the 
two years at College Park ; but upon entrance to the Hospital for 
the practical work, board, books, uniforms will be supplied them 
by the institution. 

Much of the credit for planning this new course is due Miss 
Crighton. 

We should be remiss were we not to mention the ladies of our 
Auxilliary, who have always been most untiring in their efforts 
towards the welfare of all that the University Hospital stands. 
And finally, there is the every present energy of the nurses and 
doctors, who by their ceaseless efforts and the generosity and 
energy of their friends, have endeavored to make this work 
another degree towards the perfection of this institution. 

Perhaps at some future time, we may realize our dream of a 
large modern, fireproof hospital, where we may do the noble 
work of nursing our unfortunate brothers, who come to us for 
help and comfort and nursing and so ''carry on" the good work we 
have tried to do in the past — and accomplish much more in the 
future. 



I 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 23 

INTERSTATE STUDENT CONFERENCE 
By Esther E. Frick, '25 

In 1923, when we were first introduced to the idea of the Stu- 
dent Volunteer Convention, we enthusiastically raised more than 
sufficient funds and sent Miss Teeple as delegate to the great 
Indianapohs Convention. 

In 1924, still interested as before, we sent representatives to 
the Interstate Conference at Hood College, Frederick, Md., and 
now in 1925, though changes have taken place in our student 
body, the plan was met with as much enthusiasm, and again we 
have been able to send a representative to the Tri-State Confer- 
ence, held at the University of Delaware, Newark, Del. 

Fifty-one Maryland students met at the Y. W. C. A. at 3 p.m., 
Friday, February 13. Here we divided into two groups and 
started for Newark in busses. We were a very happy, gay bunch, 
singing songs, giving College yells, and getting acquainted with 
each other. We had planned to reach Newark at 6 p.m., but our 
plans failed for we met with an accident and both busses were 
turned over. However, no serious injuries resulted, and we were 
able to walk to a near-by railroad station and from there went on 
to Newark by train, none the worse for our experience, except for 
a few minor injuries and being a pretty badly shaken bunch of 
young men and women. 

We arrived at Newark four hours late, and consequently missed 
the first meeting on Friday evening. We were immediately 
shown to the various homes in which we were to be entertained, 
and had a good night's sleep before taking up any Conference work. 

The following morning we assembled, and after a short devo- 
tional service broke into various groups to discuss questions of 
personal and world-wide interest. In the afternoon similar 
groupings were made and similar questions further discussed. 

Social relations at the Conference were very informal. Meet- 
ings at meals and devotional services, discussing speakers, making 
new acquaintances, all were done quite informally, and one was 
perfectly at ease in another's company, even though the acquaint- 
ance had been short. 

Saturday evening we enjoyed a most sumptuous banquet, and 
all toasts made were most interesting and many of them quite 
humorous. 



24 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

We were so fortunate as to have with us Dr. Joseph Maxwell, 
Missionary in the Sudan; Miss Mabel Easton, Missionary in 
Congo-Beige, and Mrs. J. Harvey Borton, formerly Missionary in 
India, who gave us glimpses of the conditions of the Mission Field, 
and told of some of their various experiences there. 

There were so many new and interesting big things about the 
Convention that it would be hard and take a long time to tell all 
in detail. 

Again, as in former years, the Racial problem was much dis- 
cussed, but it was generally agreed that tension and "gap" between 
students of different races was less than that at the Conference 
last year. 

The Conference was really very interesting, spurring all on to 
great enthusiasm. As Miss Teeple asked, "What can we nurses 
do?" great interest in Student Volunteer activities was shown by 
the student nurses. We hope that in future the interest shown 
will be as great as at this Convention, and that each year we may 
be able to send delegates to the various Student Volunteer 
Conventions. 

ACTIVITIES OF THE STUDENT NURSES 
By Carol C. Shoultz, '26 

There are days that make us happy and there are days that 
make us blue. This year the student nurses have had many, 
many activities, which have eclipsed the darkness, turning twilight 
into dawn. 

On the evening of November 5th the University Hospital gave 
the pupil nurses a very delightful dance in the ball room of the 
Emerson hotel. Each wore her prettiest gown and returned 
home at midnight overbounding with thanks to those who made 
it possible for such a delightful evening. 

The reception room of the Nurses' Home was transformed into 
"No Man's Land," through the clever masked entertainment 
given by The Ladies Auxiliary Board, the latter part of November. 
Due to the failure of a sign being printed large enough for a 
"man" to see, one slipped in, and to our amazement turned out 
to be one of our dignified nurses disguised as a groom. The 
bride was there in "extravagance De Luxe." The nigger mammy 
and child appeared. Later in the evening we learned that the 



I 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 25 

mammy was none other than our anaesthetist, who won the prize 
for the most comical costume. The dancing girls were there in 
respective dress. Several scrawny-limbed little girls were seen 
roaming around eating suckers and sticks of candy. A hilarious 
time was spent by all and we were reminded of the old quotation 

"A little nonsense now and then 
Is relished by the best of men." 

As the Star in the East was seen by shepherds from afar, thus 
were the patients on the wards awakened by the sound of voices, 
and the appearance of nurses, singing Christmas Carols. Each 
one was given a bag of candy and fruit, and seemed convinced 
that there was a real Santa, who watched and cared for those who 
are not only sick in body but of heart. 

The Ladies Auxiliary began the New Year by giving a dance in 
the home, which everybody enjoyed immensely. The music 
made us step lightly on fantastic toes. The Alumnae Association 
also has shown much interest in the "girls" in stripes. We wish 
to thank the members for the invitation extended to us and the 
lovely time we had at the dance on February 14. 

Miss Frick of the Senior class, was selected as a Delegate from 
the University Hospital, to the World's Convention of Student 
Volunteers, held in Newark, Delaware. She brought back many 
interesting points which will aid in our daily routine. The Con- 
vention is to assist in Christianizing the younger generation. 

It is our ambition to raise sufficient funds in the near future to 
purchase a radio for the Nurses' Home. 



26 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

A VITAL NEED 
By Henrietta Ashcom Gourley, R.N. 

Yesterday you thought — "Today was Tomorrow." 

Are you doing today what you said yesterday you would do tomorrow? 

So many of us put off the most important things in life from day 
to day feeUng sure that tomorrow will be ours, as the past days 
have been — yet with absolutely no guarantee of it. Unless we 
exercise enough will power and determination to carry out today 
what we said yesterday we would do, we will find that the pro- 
crastinations and extravagances of our youth will be drafts upon 
our old age and payable with interest in later years. 

Arthur Brisbane, in "The Book of Today," says, "Nothing is 
more dreadful than to be old, dependent upon others, and not 
wanted." Statistics show that ninety per cent of the people over 
sixty are dependent upon either charity or the generosity of others; 
yet many of these people were once independent and some rich. 
Nothing should seem more necessary or important to us than to 
protect ourselves against such a contingency. 

Benjamin Franklin is called the Great American Apostle of 
Thrift, and is one of the most inspiring examples of what the 
practice of thrift can do. Son of a poor tallow candler and soap 
boiler, one of seventeen children, he went to work at the age of ten 
to earn his living in his father's shop. From these humble begin- 
nings he succeeded, entirely by his own efforts, in becoming one of 
the world's greatest men. One of Franklin's favorite maxims 
was, "God helps those who help themselves." It devolves upon 
each individual to work out his or her own problems. 

Quoting the Savings Bank of Baltimore's advertisement in the 
Baltimore Sun of January 17-23 inclusive, "National Thrift 
Week always begins on January 17, Benjamin Franklin's birth- 
day. It is celebrated all over the United States, not only by the 
banks, but by other organizations which realize the necessity of 
the cultivation of the habit of thrift by our people. Its slogan is 
"For Success and Happiness." Thrift means persistent earning, 
careful spending, steady saving, wise investing and proportionate 
giving — ^in short, conserve, don't waste. It means a certain 
amount of self control which results in contentment now and in 
old age." 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 27 

Each day was designated for some phase of Thrift, and the sub- 
jects of the talks broadcasted by radio were — "Pay Your Bills, 
Share With Others, Bank Day — Open An Account, Life Insurance, 
Budget Your Expenditures." 

Orison Swett Harden, in his book "Prosperity," says, "enter 
into a compact with yourself to save a certain amount every week 
out of your salary." It is one thing to resolve to deposit a certain 
amount in bank each week, and another to 77iake the deposit. 
Actually making the deposit requires real strength of character. 
The saving, like virtue, is its own reward. 

Too much cannot be said upon the subject of Thrift and its far 
reaching effect upon hmnanity. Women engaged in the business 
and professional world are dependent on their brains for support. 
Their ability to work constitutes their capital, and this capital is 
being consumed day by say. If this ability becomes impaired 
and they are no longer able to carry on they become a burden 
on their family or some organization, and spend many years in 
vain regret — unless they have made preparation for such an 
emergency. 

Martha C. Sears, head of the business woman's department of 
the Bank of the United States in New York City, says, "Who 
but a woman would put through a stretch of successful business 
years with a good salary and never save a cent for a rainy day? 
Who but a woman would gamble with Fate in this manner? 
Yet many women with snow white hair come into the bank and 
admit that in spite of a good salary for years they have not saved 
a penny." 

I ask you, is this fair to one's family or the city charities? 
One of these may be called upon to provide for these improvident 
ones through years of helplessness and misery. Systematic sav- 
ing through a Bank is essential but, even this does not go far 
enough. It is difficult so to conserve one's money out of the earn- 
ings of today to provide a life income either adequate or secure. 
Reports from some of the largest Savings Banks in the country 
show that only two per cent of its deposits remain with the bank 
over ten years. 

None of us can think of three women who are in comforatable 
circumstances as a result of what they have saved through this 
method alone. Their savings might be sufficient to take care of 
their last expenses but not many could do more than that unless 



28 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

they had acquired the "Long Distance Saving Idea" which 
carries with it a written guarantee that they are ehgible for the 
ten per cent. Independent Class, which enjoys peace of mind 
and contentment, far removed from the ninety per cent Depend- 
ent and Unhappy people over sixty. 

The Long Distance Saving Plan is through Insurance, which 
should be your first investment. It is the only investment that 
you can not make with money alone. Without health it can not 
be purchased at any price, but when once secured nothing can 
disturb its value. It is the Scientific, Systematic Saving Plan, 
guaranteeing Safety, Protection, and an Income for Life upon an 
ideal basis. It is the only plan that guarantees to pay you the 
money you intended to save, should you be unable to earn your 
income. 

From the moment you secure it, you are assured of absolute 
independence, because you are certain of a guaranteed income 
under all conditions. 

Is not this what you want — an income under all conditions? 

If it is, get in touch with a Representative of some big Life 
Insurance Organization who will show you how to use Life Insur- 
ance to your advantage. By doing so you are instituting a 
Thrift Plan recommended to you by the best Financial minds in 
the world. It is sure to result in immediate peace of mind, and it 
will also go a long way towards assuring your future happiness. 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 29 

REPORT FROM THE ANNUAL MEETING OF THE 
MARYLAND STATE NURSES' ASSOCIATION 

By Sarah F. Martin, R.N., Secretary of Maryland State Nurses 

Association 

The Twenty-second Annual Meeting of the Maryland State 
Nurses' Association was held in Baltimore, Md., in joint session 
with the Maryland State League of Nursing Education and the 
Maryland State Public Health Nurses' Association, January 27, 
28 and 29, 1925. 

An institute was held in connection with the Annual Meeting 
and was well attended and highly appreciated in spite of the 
inclement weather that made transportation difficult. 

The morning sessions on Tuesday and Wednesday, held in Osier 
Hall, were primarily for the members of the Nursing League,, 
and we were privileged in having with us Miss Isabel M. Stewart 
of the Teachers' College, Columbia University, who spoke on the 
Principles of Teaching and made many helpful suggestions and 
brought fresh inspiration to all who were able to be present. 

We were also fortunate on Tuesday morning in having Mrs. 
Alice Bell Piggott, originator of the Bell System of Training 
School Records as one of the speakers, and her many friends gave 
her a hearty welcome. 

On Wednesday and Thursday at 9:30 a.m. practical demon- 
strations were held at the University of Maryland and Johns 
Hopkins Hospitals, and these proved so popular that the class 
rooms were too small to accommodate the number that attended 
and the amphitheaters of the hospitals were used. These demon- 
strations were held under the supervision of the instructors in 
these schools of nursing, and we are indebted to Miss Savage and 
Misi- Kolb for such a valuable contribution toward the success 
ot the institute. 

The social features of the meeting began with tea at the Mercy 
Hospital on Tuesday afternoon, presided over by Sister Beatrice. 
Dinner at six that same evening at the Hospital for the Women of 
Maryland was given to a small group of representative nurses in. 
honor of Major Julia C. Stimson, who spoke later in Osier Hall. 
Lunch was given on Wednesday at the Church Home, with Miss 
Isabel M. Stewart as the guest of honor, and tea on Wednesday 
at the Instructive Visiting Nurses Association with Miss Walker 



30 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

and her able corps of assistants as hostesses. The Annual Supper 
was given at St. Joseph's Hospital on Thursday evening, presided 
over by Miss Branley and the Sisters of St. Joseph's Hospital, 
and was most enjoyable. These opportunities for the nurses to 
meet in a social way mean much toward increasing the cooperation 
between the members of the various Alumnae Associations. 

Several hospitals opened their different clinics and lectures to 
the members on the three afternoons of the institute. The 
Baltimore Health Department contributed a helpful talk on 
School Work, a demonstration at the Schick Clinic, and an oppor- 
tunity to visit the New Sydenham Hospital, recently opened for 
the care of Communicable Diseases. The automobiles used by 
the Health Department nurses carried the members to the various 
clinics and demonstrations. 

On Thursday afternoon between forty and fifty nurses braved 
the weather, which was the worst Baltimore has had for some 
years, and attended a demonstration of nursing procedures in 
mental cases at the Sheppard-Enoch Pratt Hospital at Towson, 
Maryland. This demonstration was given under the direct super- 
vision of Miss Helen Pease, and all the members who had the 
privilege of attending found it most helpful and instructive. 

On Tuesday evening a large and representative audience of 
nurses from all over the State met in Osier Hall and had the honor 
and pleasure of having as the speaker of the evening Major Julia 
C. Stimson, Dean of the Army School of Nursing. Major Stim- 
son spoke especially to the members of the Alumnae Association, 
and gave them many new ideas of their opportunities and responsi- 
bilities toward the pupil nurses in the various Schools of Nursing. 

Dr. Allen W. Freeman, Director of the Johns Hopkins School 
of Hygiene, was speaker on Wednesday evening. A large audi- 
ence was in attendance. Dr. Freeman spoke on the very great 
opportunity afforded the nurse in Public Health Work. After 
pointing out the great responsibilities that nurses have to meet in 
this particular field of service, he said that they were admirably 
fulfilling these duties. 

On Thursday evening Dr. Katharine J. Gallagher, Professor of 
History at Goucher College, was the speaker at the closing meet- 
ing at Osier Hall, and the nurses gave her the usual hearty wel- 
come that is afforded Dr. Gallagher whenever she speaks before 
a group of women in Baltimore. 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 31 

On Tuesday and Wednesday evenings over one hundred pupil 
nurses, in uniform, led the Community Singing under the able 
leadership of Miss Agnes Zimmisch from the Peabody Conserva- 
tory of Music. The spirit of cooperation that was displayed by 
the response to the call for those who would help with this part of 
the program means much, not only to the State Association of 
today, but for the future. 

The Business Session of the State Nurses Association was held 
on Thursday and a goodly number attended. Miss Lawler 
presided. The report of the Secretary showed that 1187 nurses 
held Alumnae Association membership and 55 held individual 
membership, making a total of 1242 members. 

Reports of the standing committees were read by the several 
chairmen. 

Report of the State Board of Examiners was made by the 
President, Miss Helen C. Bartlett. 

Report of the Central Directory of Registered Nurses, Inc., 
was read by Miss Jane E. Nash, President. 

It was decided that the Maryland Association should apply ic^r 
membership in the section of the American Nurses' Association 
known as the Mid-Atlantic Section. 

The Business Session of the Maryland State League of Nursing 
Education was held on the same day. 

At the close of the Evening Session on Thursday the tellers 
announced the following as officers for 1925 : 

Maryland State Nurses Association 

President Elsie M. Lawler 

First Vice-president Jane E. Nash 

Second Vice-president Charlotte M. Snow 

Secretary Sarah F. Martin 

Treasurer Loime Savage 

To serve for three years on the Board of Directmk^ iMtlL 
Elizabeth Moore Alice Lloyd 'VVtiP;r '"^^ 

Maryland State League of Nursing Education 

President Annie Crighton 

Vice-president Mrs. William S. Bridges 

Secretary Edna S. Calvert 

Treasurer Louise Savage 

Members of the Board 
Mary C. Packard Jane E. Nash Loula E. Kennedy 



32 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

REPORT OF AMERICAN NURSES CONVENTION 
By Lillian K. McDaniel, '15 

As I was fortunate enough to be one of the delegates sent from 
the Maryland State Nurses' Association and our Alumnae Asso- 
ciation to the American Nurses Association Convention in De- 
troit, June 16 to 22 inclusive, 1924, I will endeavor to give you 
a glimpse of it as I saw it. 

We left Baltimore June 15th at 1 p.m., via the Pennsylvania 
Railroad. There were twelve delegates from Maryland all in one 
Pullman, making it quite delightful for us. The trip there was 
beautiful and very pleasant. We arrived in Detroit at 8:55 
Monday morning. From then until we left it was one continual 
rush from one meeting place to another. 

The city had large white footsteps painted on the pavement 
leading from one place to another, making it easy for us to find 
our way around. There were over 5000 nurses registered at the 
Convention. You can imagine the effect it would have upon you 
to go to all the meetings, and find them packed to the doors with 
people standing, and realize that most of them were nurses. It 
was the most representative group of women I have ever seen. 

I will now endeavor to tell you something about the Convention. 

The Convention opened at 9 a.m. Monday, June 16, 1924, 
by a business meeting of the N. L. N. E., Miss Logan presiding. 
The transactions of the meeting consisted of the reports of all the 
committees. 

From 11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. there was a business meeting of 
the N. O. P. H. N. 

The business session of the A. N. A. was held from 2:30 to 4:30 
p.m. 

The report of greatest interest to all was that of Federal Legis- 
lation by Miss Minnegrode. You are all familiar with the pro- 
visions of the Reclassification Bill and the action of the Personnel 
Classification Board in regard to the Classification of Nurses. 
You are also cognizant of the successful efforts made by the nurses 
when the Lehlbach Bill passed the House with nurses excluded 
from the professional service, to have nurses recognized as profes- 
sional in the Senate or through the introduction of the Sterling 
Bill. We had hoped our struggle had ended when the Senate Bill 
was introduced with nurses placed in the professional service. 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 33 

However, the Bill went to the Appropriations Committee and was 
held there one year and returned to the Senate for consideration 
and passage in the last five days of the Sixty-seventh Congress, 
where it was changed almost past recognition. One feature was 
that listed professions were left. 

In August, 1923, the Superintendent of Nurses of the United 
States Public Health Service was detailed to the Personnel Classi- 
fication Board for the purpose of classifying nurses in Govern- 
ment service. Each individual employee in the government ser- 
vice has been required to fill out a questionnaire regarding his 
position, duties and his educational equipment. It was soon 
discovered that it was not the intention of the Board to place 
nurses in the professional service. In October there was a com- 
mittee of three nurses appointed in Washington to watch and 
report on all Federal Legislation as it might affect nurses. Both 
the Director of the Veterans Bureau and the Surgeon General of 
the Public Health Service sent letters to the Board on October 25. 
No impression was made on the Board which had then changed 
the Nursing Group to the Nursing and Attendant Group making 
it a definitely non-professional group. 

At the annual meeting of the American Hospital Association 
a resolution of protest was adopted and forwarded to the Board. 
The A. N. A. also forwarded a resolution. 

It had been recommended that the A. N. A. prepare and intro- 
duced into Congress a bill declaring that nurses are professional 
personnel. This would, it is believed, pass and would have much 
more support than we could hope to secure for a protest. 

Lack of professional recognition by the Personnel Classification 
Board means loss of professional recognition under the Immigra- 
tion Law of 1917. It means loss of recognition by the Census 
Bureau, which only in its last bulletin has placed nurses in the 
professional service. It means eventually loss of our entire pro- 
fessional standing as far as the United States Government is 
concerned. 

The opening evening session was held in the Cass Technical 
High School Auditorium and was called to order at 8 p.m. by 
Miss Adda Eldridge, President of the American Nurses Associa- 
tion. The invocation was given by Dean Warren L. Rogers of 
St. Paul's Cathedral. This was followed by a song of welcome 
written for the occasion by a member of St. Mary's School of 



34 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

Nursing and sung by a chorus of Student Nurses from all the 
Detroit Schools. 

The address of Welcome was given by Dean Rogers to 
more than 3000 nurses. 

In the name of Detroit and all of our good citizens I welcome you 
nurses who have come representing, I think, three different groups. I 
have a message that I want to give you and I want to put it something 
like this. You women are not in jobs. You are not seeking positions but 
you are seeking to attain careers. There is a big difference. To me it is 
one of the most stimulating things in American Life that the day has 
long since passed that men are the only creatures on earth that may have 
careers. You women have attained them and you are doing some of the 
work that comes under your care with splendid service and real achieve- 
ment. I congratulate you upon it. One thing about a career is this, it 
is not easy, jobs are always easy, they are just the same old monotonous 
grind all the while. You have a great task in life, and your career is 
marked by three things, first, it is hard, second, it is needed and third, it 
is lofty, it is worth while. Now, one signal of warning about it. In all 
your work, you are doing everything you can to make yourselves more 
eflBcient. Let us not forget one thing, that all of the tools we have, all 
of the talents we have and all of the work we do must be for a high and 
noble purpose or it is not worth while. We may use our skill for harm as 
well as for good. Do not spend too much time sharpening your tools, 
use them, use them for good, use them for the loftiest purposes we know, 
use them for the benefit of mankind. So your task is one of the biggest 
in the world and we are proud to have here in Detroit so splendid a com- 
pany of you. I give you my greeting with all my heart, in the name of 
the Mayor. 

The response to the welcome was made by Miss Eldredge. 
She also made an address of which I am taking a few important 
points. 

She said, 

I want to speak tonight of a few of the things of which we in our con- 
vention must think, must discuss, and for which we must find a solution. 
Before you tonight, as I hardly need state, are the officers of our three 
national associations, those organizations which have been and are so 
closely associated, where there is most perfect cooperation and which in 
our joint board meetings discuss any matter which is of importance to 
all. There are times when we feel that possibly we might do better work 
with one organization. There are also times when we feel that the work 
we are doing is much better done because we have the three organizations. 

Any action that may be taken regarding our three organizations must 
be taken on the basin of the questions: In which way can we do the best 
work? Where can we give the best service? The question of whether 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 3S 

or not we may lessen our dues is a very trivial question because if the work 
progresses, as it must from time to time, that would be an impossibility. 
You cannot cut down as the work goes on, you must add to. There is not 
one who desires one step to be taken that is not well thought out and 
that does not tend for better and more constructive work. 

The profession of nursing has been a natural outgrowth of scientific 
medicine. In the early days of nursing there was a spirit of comradeship 
and good feeling between doctors and nurses akin to that existing between 
an elder brother and his younger sister. In this formative period the 
nursing profession was more dependent upon the medical man for guid- 
ance and instruction and so he came to look upon the training of the nurse 
as dependent upon the medical profession. 

The Hon. John H. Clarke gave an address, "Woman's Relation 
to World Peace," from which I have taken a few important 
points. He said that now there was no distinction between 
man's and woman's relation to world peace. He also said the 
world had progressed in the fields of science and medicine but in 
statesmanship it has stood still for 150 years. Permit me to add 
that I believe with an equally unshakable trust that the supreme 
distinction of all history is reserved for the nation that shall have 
the inspiration, the vision and the greatness of soul to lead the 
other nations out of the valley of the shadow of death of recur- 
ring wars, unto the heights of enduring peace, and pray to God, 
that nation may be ours. 

The general session on Tuesday was from 9:00 a.m. to 11:00 
a.m. Doctor Chas. D. Lockwood made the address of the meet- 
ing. It was entitled "The Role of the Physician in the Education 
of the Nurse." 

I have given you nearly all of Doctor Lockwood's address as 
his sentiment seemed to invade the entire association. He said, 

It is perfectly obvious that the nurse must constantly widen her hor- 
izon if she is to keep pace with the growth of modern medicine. The 
nursing profession and medical profession are distinct, although closely 
interwoven. The idea which still prevails among medical men, that 
nurses should be subservient to the medical profession, is entirely wrong. 
Nursing has risen to the dignity of a profession and it can be taught suc- 
cessfully to others only by those in the nursing ranks who have had prac- 
tical experience and who are skilled as teachers. 

Were it not for the aid of the nurse, our whole program of social better- 
ment and disease prevention would fall flat. The fear expressed by some 
physicians and seriously discussed in some of our medical journals that 



36 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

the nurse, or super-nurse, whatever that may mean, will supplant the 
physician is to my mind ridiculous. 

The rest of the day was taken up with round tables discussions 
all of which were very interesting and instructive. 

The general session of Wednesday morning was under the 
auspices of the N. L. N. E. Their topic was "A Study on Budgets 
for Schools of Nursing." 

The afternoon general session was under the auspices of the 
A. N. A. Miss Eldredge presiding. She opened the meeting and 
then introduced Miss Christing Reimann of Denmark, secretary 
of the International Council of Nurses, who is studying in this 
country at the present time. The meeting was then turned over 
to the Government Nursing Service and as it was a new section it 
was granted the honor of being allotted an entire session on the 
program. 

All of Thursday morning was devoted to the Private Duty 
Section. They had a get together breakfast at the Woman's 
Club at 8:00 a.m. and we all walked from there to headquarters 
where the meeting was opened by Miss Eldredge, who made a 
short address and then turned the meeting over to the Chairman, 
Miss Francis Ott. 

There were several very good papers read, one of which I will 
try to repeat for you as well as I can. It was entitled"Idealsfor 
Private Duty Nurses," by Miss Mary D. Camp, R.N. She said, 

The realization of what ideals have done for nursing is very definite 
in my mind. During the years in which the art of nursing has become a 
profession, it has been the ideals adhered to, as well as the theoretical 
and technical training that has been the impetus behind the upward curve 
of nursing. This progress has been really a spiritual one. 

Nursing is a profession, it is also a vocation, rich in spiritual value. 
Its ideal, its aim is service. From the beginning it has been an object 
of wonderment that fine cultured women betake themselves to training 
schools for nurses and learn to do happily for sick human beings, things 
that in themselves seem too unlovely to do. It is the ideal of service which 
has led them, the returns from which are great. These compensations 
are spiritual and are the substance that men live by. Nursing as a voca- 
tion, offers to women who are so inclined, a satisfaction, namely, the 
realization of personal ambition or at least an attainment toward that 
realization. It may be well at this point to consider the objectives which 
make any work satisfactory, objectives which fit the nursing profession 
very well indeed. This analysis has been ably worked out by Doctor 
Cabot in his book, "What men live by." 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 37 

First, in order to offer satisfaction and maintain interest a profession 
must "present difficulty enough to call forth from the individual his 
latest powers of mastery." To begin with, a nurse is never a finer nurse 
than she is a woman at any time. Yet what a transformation occurs in 
the three 5'ears between probation and graduation. That organized, 
practical and scientific training has deepened and strengthened her powers 
of judgment. She is able to meet with poise the issues of life and death. 
She has learned obedience, which means in the last analysis that she has 
learned to overcome difficulties which have lain between her and the 
accomplishment of some aim which was before her. She has overcome 
some of the crudeness and imperfections in her character and personality. 
It offers a supreme opportunity to achieve, to accomplish, to do some- 
thing. 

The woman who goes into private nursing carries with her a connec- 
tion with some institution which she will loyally look back to and serve. 
Private nursing itself is the living out a great ideal in daily practice. 

At 1:00 p.m. there was a boat trip down the Detroit River to 
Put-in-Bay. On the way down we stopped at the Parke Davis 
Plant. We were not able to see a great deal of the plant as the 
crowd was so large. Pictures of all were taken and refreshments 
served. This trip took the entire afternoon and was most restful 
and refreshing. 

As Friday and Saturday morning were taken up with business 
meetings, Miss Crighton and I made a tour of the city. We left 
Detroit at 5:00 p.m. and made a night trip by boat to Buffalo, 
N. Y., arriving in Buffalo at 8:00 a.m. As we had engaged rooms 
at the Statler Hotel we went there and rested a short time before 
going on to Niagara Falls, where we spent the day. 

We left Buffalo on Sunday at 8:00 a.m., arriving in Baltimore 
at 7:00 p.m., completing a very interesting and instructive trip. 



38 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

REGULATIONS FOR THE NURSES' DIRECTORY OF THE 
UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL 

Management 

This Directory shall be managed by a Directory Committee 
composed of five members of the Alumnae Association, to be 
appointed every year at the Annual Meeting; Chairman of Com- 
mittee to be appointed by the President — ^other four members 
appointed from the floor. This Committee must give a monthly 
report to the Alumnae Association. 

REGISTRAR 

The Registrar shall be appointed by the Alumnae Association. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MEMBERSHIP ON THE DIRECTORY 

Members of the Directory must be Registered Nurses of Mary- 
land and members of the Nurses' Alumnae Association of the 
University of Maryland. 

DUES 

Dues shall be $15.00 annually, to be paid in advance, to 
Treasurer of Alumnae Association or to the Registrar. Fiscal 
year begins January 1st, members to be taken off Directory for 
non-payment of dues at end of sixty days, and to be notified of 
this by Chairman of Committee. Members are reinstated upon 
payment of dues. 

In time of sickness or other unusual circumstances, time of 
payment may be extended at discretion of Directory Committee. 

RULES 

1. Graduates of more than two years standing are permitted to 
register for or against any kind of case or hospital or duty desired. 

2. Graduates of less than two years are allowed to register 
against contagious, mental and obstetrical cases only. 

3. Members "when on the list" and given call for case not 
registered against, are expected to respond or to go to the bottom 
of the list. 

4. Nurses when on call are expected to keep in close touch with 
the Registrar. 

5. If a member wishes to resign from the Directory she should 
do so in writing to the Chairman of Committee. She may then 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 39 

be reinstated at any time. Any nurse who does not send in writ- 
ten resignation can be reinstated only on payment of all back 
dues. 

6. In cases of contagion the nurse shall be governed by the 
rules of the Health Department. 

7. Any complaints either from Directory members or concern- 
ing them may be made to Chairman of Committee or to Alumnae 
Association at regular meeting. 

8. Nurses fees are regulated by the Alumnae Association. 

$5.00 per day for general cases 
6.00 per day for obstetrical, mental, nervous, alcoholic or con- 
tagious cases 
1.00 per day extra for each extra person 

9. Members may be denied the use of the Directory at any 
time for not observing rules of same. 

ANNUAL REPORT OF DIRECTORY 

Total calls: 2053. 
Filled: 1188. 
Not filled: 865. 

Members on Directory during year 84 

Dues collected $1007 .75 

Expenses 813 .44 

Ellen C. Israel, R.N., 

Chairman. 



40 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

TREASURER'S REPORT FOR 1924 

GENERAL FUND 

Balance in Western National Bank of Baltimore December 31, 1923 $403 .23 

Dues from members $2057 .25 

From Dance Committee 60.00 

From Advertisements and sale of Bulletin 192 .50 

From Supper Tickets 64 .00 

Total receipts 2372.75 

Disbursements: 

Registrar's Salary $600 .00 

C. & P. Telephone 213.44 

American Nurses Relief 82.50 

Maryland State Association 225 .00 

Bulletin 233 .11 

Alumnae Supper 140.00 

Printing 21 .75 

Stationery 14.50 

Dance 34.00 

Refreshments 11 .21 

Council Fund, University of Maryland 50 .00 

Sick Benefit Fund 184.00 

Flowers 16.27 

Delegates to Convention 100 .00 

Scholarship Fund 150 .00 

Dues refunded 1 .00 

Index, Cabinet and Cards 7 .40 

Minute Book and Typewriting 3 .75 

A. N. A. Christmas Calendars. . . 18.75 

Total disbursements 2107.18 

Balance in Western National Bank of Baltimore December 

31, 1924 $669.80 

SICK BENEFIT FUND 

Balance in Eutaw Savings Bank December 31, 1923 $1376.03 

Receipts: 

Dues from members $184 .00 

Interest on Bank account 28.23 

Interest on Loan 12 .00 

Total receipts 224.23 

$1600.26 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 41 

Disbursements: 

Two Benefits paid, each $42.00 $84 .00 

Balance in Eutaw Savings Bank December 31, 1924 1516.26 

Endowment Fund, December 31, 1924 $1064.18 

SECRETARY'S REPORT FOR' 1924 

During the past year, our Association has been very active in 
all nursing affairs of the state. 

In January, 1924, we assisted in the campaign at Annapolis 
trying to get an appropriation for a new hospital. While we did 
not obtain a new building, we succeeded in getting $75,000 to 
make the fire risk of the present building less hazardous. Any 
of the nurses returning will find marked changes and improve- 
ments in the hospital. 

As an outcome of the work done at Annapolis, an Advisory 
Council was formed and composed of two graduates of each school 
of the University of Maryland viz: Medical, Dental, Law, Phar- 
macy, Commercial, Collegiate and Nursing. The dues are $1.00 
per capita for all paid up members of the different associations. 
Our present dues will cover this amount. 

The Alumnae gave several very well attended dances, each one 
netting a profit for the Association. 

The graduating class was entertained at a supper May 29, 1924. 

Our President, Miss Lillian K. McDaniel, was appointed Dele- 
gate to the A. N. A. Convention held in Detroit in June and we 
assisted in sending the Supt. of Nurses to this convention. 

The Directory will continue under the management of the 
Alumnae Association for the present. The past year having been 
so successful, we were able to purchase lockers for the Special 
Nurses at the Hospital. 

During December, our nurses had charge of a booth in one of 
the Department Stores and helped materially with the sale of 
Tuberculosis Stamps. 

The Hospital Council has decided to allow all graduate nurses 
33^ per cent discount on rooms while patients in the hospital. 

Our meetings have been well attended during the past year and 
the nurses have shown a marked interest in all matters brought 
up for discussion. Due to the activity of the Membership Com- 
mittee, there has been a decided increase in the number of new 
members. 



42 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

Any out of town members will be welcome at the meetings 
which are held at the Louisa Parsons Home, the first Tuesday of 
every month at 7:30 p.m. 

Marie E. Sander, 

Secretary. 

REPORT OF THE PUBLICATION COMMITTEE 

The Publication Committee desires to thank the members who 
have contributed articles, reports and news for this issue of our 
Bulletin. 

We are also very glad to hear from so many of our members 
through letters which are most interesting. 

We appreciate the generosity of those who have subscribed to 
our advertising space, and urge our members to patronize them 
whenever possible, always mentioning the Bulletin. 

We hope the subscribers will be very prompt in sending our 
Treasurer the nominal fee of one dollar for this copy. 

Blanche Lee Martin, 

Editor. 

REPORT OF THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Brief summary of the report of the School of Nursing covering 
the period from July 1, 1923 to July 1, 1924. 

Assistants: 

Day 1 

N ight 1 

Instructors: 

Theory 1 

Practice 2 

In Charge: 

Dispensary 1 

Operating Room 1 

Nurses' Home 1 

Maternity 1 

Head Nurses 2 

Upper Halls 1 

Supply Room 1 

Pupil Nurses filling Head Nurses positions 7 

Women's Medical and Surgical Ward 1 

Colored Ward 1 

Men's Medical and Surgical Ward 1 

Lower Halls 1 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 43 

Students from AflBliating Schools 13 

Pupil nurses 71 

Students in Preparatory School 1 

Affiliates (at present time) • 6 

Total number of students in school 78 

Special Nurses: 

Total number of special nurses during year 1068 

Number of nurses who left the school 28 

Illness: During the year 166 nurses were off duty for varying 
lengths of time because of illness. Of these 60 were admitted 
to the halls or isolation for treatment and the remainder being 
cared for in the Nurses' Home. 

The causes of admission were: 

Lobar pneumonia 

Infection of leg 

Infection of face 

Infection of finger 

Removal of fatty tumor 

Removal of infected gland 

La grippe 

Nasopharyngeal infection with mild arthritis 

Food rash 

Tonsillitis 

Sprained ankle 

Erysipelas 

Acute pharyngitis 

Tonsillectomies (10) 

Antrum drainage 

Appendectomies (4) 

Vincent's angina 

Tuberculosis 

Scarlet fever 

Mastoidectomy 

Peri-tonsilar abscess 



Total number of days lost through illness 1494 

Total number of nurses 166 



Requests for information and admission 214 

Nimiber of applications accepted 40 

Number of students entered 29 



44 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

Resignations: 

Miss Eva Fisher Instructor in Practice 

Miss Elizabeth Marsh Night Supervisor 

Miss Mary Jones Head nurse, Ward I 

Miss Katherine Swan Head Nurse, Lower Hall 

Miss Blanche Hoff master Head Nurse Upper Hall 

Miss Bessie L. Maston Head Nurse, Ward H 

Miss Margaret Lauper Head Nurse, Ward G 

Miss Medora West Assistant in Operating Room 

Miss Frankie Morrison Head Nurse, Obstetrical Ward 

Miss Eleanor Butler Head Nurse, Ward I 

Reappointments : 

Miss Stella U. Ricketts Assistant Superintendent of 

Nurses 

Mrs. Janet Nesbitt Smith Instructor 

Miss Jane Moffatt Supervisor, Dispensary- 
Miss Elizabeth Aitkenhead Supervisor, Operating Room 

Miss Mary Rolph Supervisor, Nurses' Home 

Miss Annie Reeve Head Nurse, Supply Room 

Temporary appointments: 

Mrs. Cora Mason Wilson Supervisor Nurses' Home 

Miss Bertha Bloom Assistant in Operating Room 

Promotions and transfers: 

Miss Elizabeth Marsh — from Night Supervisor to Head Nurse on 

Upper Halls 
Miss Grace Elgin — from Head Nurse to Assistant Instructor in 

Practice 
Miss Helen Dunn — from Head Nurse to Night Supervisor 

New appointments: 

Miss Louise Savage Instructor in Practice 

Miss Ruth Clements Night Supervisor 

Miss Helen Dunn Head Nurse, Ward H 

Miss Mary Jones Head Nurse, Ward I 

Miss Katherine Swan Head Nurse, Lower Hall 

Miss Leona McMahon Head Nurse, Upper Hall 

Miss Lena Stouffer Head Nurse, Maternity 

Miss Ida Nagel Head Nurse, Women's Medical 

and Surgical Ward 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 45 

The annual vacations were arranged. The Junior students 
were given three weeks and the Intermediates were given four 
weeks instead of three as heretofore. The wards were open the 
entire summer and the hospital very busy, but due to our full 
staff of nurses we did not feel it so keenly as last year. This 
coming summer will be very difficult due to the depleted staff 
•of nurses and no head nurses, and I am sure the end of this summer 
will find everyone very tired and worn. 

The past year has seen many changes; some very good and some 
very poor. The pressure of the work on the ward, the question 
of an ever changing standardization have added greatly to or 
problem. In spite of these difficulties the nurse does have a better 
knowledge and understanding of nursing principles. 

There was a very marked improvement in the giving of lectures, 
as they were given on scheduled time, except in very few instances 
and these were unavoidable. 

Surgery has been transferred to the latter part of the Junior 
year, as well as the History of Nursing and Urinalysis. 

The problem of a laboratory for Bacteriology is still unsolved 
as the one in the Nurses' Home remains unequipped and the 
nurses continue to go to Mercy Hospital for laboratory work in 
this subject. 

We have also been able to give thirty hours in Dietetics. 

This coming year is going to be very difficult due to the few 
student nurses in the School. As the greater part of the 1924 
class did not finish until late last fall and this spring, we had an 
unusual number of nurses, but now that they have completed their 
time and left the school, we feel the shortage very keenly. We 
are not receiving the number of applications as of last year and 
unless we receive about forty preliminary students this fall I 
cannot see how we shall manage to care for the patients and give 
the nurse the proper training. I have written letters of appeal 
to members of the Medical Alumni of the University of Maryland 
in the following states: 

Maryland 
South Carolina 
North Carolina 
Pennsylvania 

At present our number of student nurses is low and few appli- 
•cations are being received. Just why this condition should exist 



46 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

I am not prepared to say, perhaps due to the propaganda brought 
about during the campaign, the reduction of the student's monthly- 
allowance, or to the greater advantages other schools are offering 
in the social and physical conditions. 

While the living conditions in the New Nurses' Home are ideal, 
that does not take care of the three outside homes which are in 
very poor condition. The addition of paint, dresser covers, 
window shades, rugs and drop lights to the household furnishing 
to these homes would improve things greatly. The only light the 
student has for studying is a small one which hangs from the ceil- 
ing and probably does more harm than good. 

As you know we received the report of the survey of the inspec- 
tion of this school by the New York State University. I feel 
that we need the affiliation in Children and Mental Nursing for 
our nurses if they are to receive the training that nurses of other 
large institutions receive and to qualify them for the State Board 
Examination. 

The preliminary class entering in September will be on four 
months probation instead of three. I feel that we shall know more 
definitely what our students are capable of doing before accepting 
them into our school. 

We also feel very strongly the need of interest manifested in the 
Training School on the part of the nurses, its functions, purposes 
and aims. This we cannot expect until the doctor realizes the 
important part he plays in the education of the nurse and "what 
he is himself is the role he plays." I cannot emphasize too 
greatly this phase of the education of the nurse. As no matter 
what the bedside care is her training is not complete without 
high ideals and principles of ethics and this can be obtained 
only through daily contact with our environment. 

I realize very acutely our "shortcomings" and the criticisms 
made of us are felt keenly, but we cannot struggle alone and must 
have all the aid possible if we are to instill into our students the 
highest ideals of nursing. The older and experienced nurse real- 
izes the justness of such criticism but is more or less powerless to 
help the situation unaided. 

The loss of our head nurses for economic reasons I feel is a very 
definite step backwards. While supervision from the office is 
necessary, it cannot bridge the gap between the head nurse and the 
student nurse in the management of the ward and the constant 
supervision of the student nurse. 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 47 

The question is so often asked "what is the matter with the 
nurse of today compared with the one of fifteen or twenty years 
ago?" There is nothing the matter with her provided she is 
given every opportunity and surrounded with the same ideals 
and purposes. She is a different type of woman today. 
Scientific methods and procedures are more elaborate and require 
more education for the nurse if she is to meet the demands made 
upon her. 

I feel that there has been a marked improvement in the charac- 
ter of the nurses' work and I trust by the end of another year 
many of our physical handicaps wul be eliminated. 

I take this opportunity to express for my staff and myself, 
appreciation for the unfailing interest and cooperation of each 
and everyone. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Annie Crighton, 
Superintendent of Nurses. 

NEWS ITEMS 

The annual entertainment of the graduating class by the 
Nurses' Alumnae was held at the Orange Tree Inn, May 29, 1924. 
The Association deviated from the usual custom of giving a 
banquet, and served a delicious course supper. Miss Ruth 
Clements, Class of 1920, acted as toast mistress, and Dr. Ran- 
dolph Winslow as speaker of the evening. 

Miss Mary Rolph, Class of 1892, has resigned her position as 
Supervisor of the Nurses Home at the University Hospital. Miss 
Lillian McDaniel, Class of 1915, has succeeded Miss Rolph. 

Miss Bessie Lee Maston, Class of 1920, has charge of the operat- 
ing room in the B. & O. Ward at the University Hospital. 

Miss Ethel Monroe, Class of 1917, and Miss Irene Kaufman, 
Class of 1916, are doing visiting nursing in Anne Arundel County. 

Miss Anna E. Wood, Class of 1921, and Misses Elizabeth E. 
Copenhaver and Mary Irene Slez, Class of 1924, are doing insti- 
tutional nursing at Bellevue Hospital, New York City. 



48 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

Miss Jessie Rhodes, Class of 1921, has the position of nurse with 
the MetropoHtan Life Insurance Company in Canton, North 
CaroHna. 

Miss Margaret Lauper, Class of 1918, and Miss Pauline Apple- 
ton, Class of 1924, are doing I. U. N, A. nursing in the city. 

Miss Elizabeth Getzendanner, Class of 1909, is Superintendent 
of Nurses at the Franklin Square Hospital, and has on her staff 
Miss Helen Teeple, Class of, 1923, Instructress; Miss Helen 
McSherry, Class of 1916, Night Superintendent; Miss Frankie 
Morrison, Class of 1922, has charge of a private hall. Mrs. Me- 
dora West Champe is Supervisor of the operating floor. 

Misses Alva Williams, Class of 1911; Carolyn Kling, Class of 
1919; Katheryn Horst, Class of 1923, are now engaged in Public 
Health work. 

Mrs. Ethel Clarke, Class of 1906, has been appointed to the 
Chair of Nursing at the Indiana University, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Miss Emma Murray, Class of 1919, is Supervisor of the Nurses- 
Home at the Buxton Hospital, Newport News, Va. 

• 

Miss Mabel Trevelian, Class of 1920, is taking a post graduate- 
course at Sloane Hospital, New York City. 

Miss Helen Reamy, Class of 1921, has resigned her position as^ 
Public Health Nurse at Cape Charles, Va., and is doing private- 
duty nursing in Cleveland, Ohio. 

Miss Ellen Israel, Class of 1910, is spending three months irt 
California. 

Misses Kate Hook and Marion Turner, Class of 1918, have just 
returned from an extended southern tour. 

Miss Jane Scott, Class of 1924, is doing institutional nursing at 
the Colonial Hospital. 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 49 

Miss Julia R. Smith, Class of 1921, has accepted an industrial 
position with the Standard Sanitary Manufacturing Company in 
Baltimore. 

Miss Katharyn A. Thomas, Class of 1924, is doing institutional 
nursing at the Orthopedic Hospital in New York. 

A delightful benefit dance was given on February 12, 1925, 
at the Hotel Emerson. Miss Ellen Lloyd, Class of 1917, was 
Chairman of the Conamittee. 

MARRIAGES 

June 8, 1924, Willie Hull, Class of 1913, to Mr. John Marden. 
Mr. and Mrs. Marden live in Virginia. 

August 22, 1924, Regina West, Class of 1923, to Dr. Preston I. 
Champ. Dr. and Mrs. Champ live in Baltimore, Md, 

August 22, 1924, EHzabeth Barwick, Class of 1918, to Mr. 
Luther Galtry. Mr. and Mrs. Galtry live in Burlingame, 
California. 

September 22, 1924, Ethel Dawson, Class of 1912, to Mr. E. 
V. Bogart. Mr. and Mrs. Bogart live at 524 W. Twenty-second 
St., Wilmington, Delaware. 

November, 1924, Myrtle Schwab, Class of 1920, to Mr. Phillip 
Grantly. Mr. and Mrs. Grantly live on Warren Avenue, Balti- 
more, Md. 

November, 1924, Lola Forest, Class of 1924, to Dr. George 
Halley. Dr. and Mrs. Halley live in Kimberly, Idaho. 

December, 1924, Helen Gilbert, Class of 1920, to Mr. G. Roop. 
Mr. and Mrs. Roop live in Louisburg, N. C. 

December 20, 1924, Goldie Shipley, Class of 1920, to Lieut. 
Charles Mientz, U. S. N. Lieut, and Mrs. Mientz are stationed 
at Quantico, Virginia. 



50 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

In 1924, Sallie Daugherty, Class of 1904, to Mr. C. H. Yergar. 
Mr. and Mrs. Yergar live in Albuquerque, New Mexico. 

In 1924, Elsie Simpson, Class '17 to Mr. Williamson. Mr. and 
Mrs. Williamson live in Washington, D. C. 

March 25, 1925, Pearl Rush, Class 1913, to Mr. J. K. Voshell. 
Mr. and Mrs. Voshell are living at the Emerson Hotel. 

BIRTHS 

On June 10, 1924, a son to Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Hickling. Mrs. 
Hickling was Miss Virginia Clendenin, Class of 1914. 

In July, 1924, a son to Mr. and Mrs. David Bein. Mrs. Bein 
was Miss Cecil Du Bois, Class of 1922. 

On November 8, 1924, a son to Mr. and Mrs. William Pitt. 
Mrs. Pitt was Miss Zadieth Reese, Class of 1921. 

In December, 1924, a daughter to Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Landing, 
Mrs. Landing was Miss Margaret Ervin, Class of 1914. 

On May 10, 1924, a daughter to Mr. and Mrs. J. Pessel. Mrs. 
Pessel was Miss Helen Dearmeyer, Class of 1917. 

On July 15, 1924, a son to Mr. and Mrs. McDonald. Mrs. 
McDonald was Miss EHzabeth Sides, Class of 1919. 

In November, 1924, a daughter to Dr. and Mrs. Richard Joy- 
ner. Mrs. Joyner was Miss Lucille Bowie, Class of 1922. 

On March 14, 1925, a son to Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Brooks. 
Mrs. Brooks was Miss Louise Bateman, Class 1921. 

In March, 1925, a son to Mr. and Mrs. Roy A. Boyd. Mrs. 
Boyd was Miss Nell Flaharty, class 1918. 

On April 4, 1925, a daughter to Dr. and Mrs. J. Morris Reese. 
Mrs. Reese was Miss Kate Hogshead, Class 1921. 

In August, 1924, a daughter to Mr. and Mrs. Weisner. Mrs. 
Weisner was Miss Mary McDaniel, Class 1921. 



iSatalie ilcCann, l^.i^., '13 

^UBUfift 18, I89l"illarcb 14, 1925 

i^atalic, a bear frienb of ug all. 
0nv logfi anb gorroto cannot lie 
cxpre^sfeb in toorbg, but toe toill 
cber tatJ^ ttc s^toeet memorp anb 
bleg£ieb influence of fj^r all too 
£{f)ort life. 



52 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

LETTERS FROM ALUMNAE 

From Miss Mary Gertrude Brady, Class 1911 

Edward Hines Jr. Hospital, 

Maywood, 111. 
Dear Alumnae: 

After my discharge from the Army Nurse Corps, the first 
hospital in the service to which I was assigned was the hospital 
at Greenville, S. C. It was exclusively for tuberculous patients 
and but recently taken over from the Army. It was a large camp 
hospital of frame buildings, each ward separate, built only for the 
duration of the war, and was closed early in 1924. Our work and 
home life was pleasant, and many of us saw the closing of the 
place with regret. I remained there over four years, during which 
time I received a wonderful experience in the nursing care of 
tuberculous patients. 

The lectures on the treatment of this disease given the nurses 
by specialists were of incalculable value, in addition to the ward 
work. It was gratifying to us also to see so many of the patients 
leaving as arrested cases. 

In December, 1923, I was transferred to this hospital (the 
Edward Hines, Jr.), the gift to the Government of Mr. and Mrs. 
Edward Hines of Chicago in memory of their son who gave his 
life in the service of his country in France. 

It is the largest general hospital in the world under one roof, 
having a capacity of one thousand beds, and is splendidly equipped 
with every modern device known for the care and comfort of the 
patients. It is about twelve miles from Chicago and has excel- 
lent transportation facilities. 

The grounds around the building are beautiful, especially in the 
springtime. There is a wealth of shrubbery and lovely beds of 
flowers. A large number of these are planted and cared for by 
the patients under the supervision of aides of the Occupational 
Therapy Department. 

The first ward of which I had charge was the one for treatment 
of diabetic patients, where the lives of young men suffering from 
this disease are prolonged through the use of insulin. The treat- 
ment is a wonderful one, the patient seldom complaining, and 
after a few months care in the hospital many of them are able to 
resume their former occupations, as they are thoroughly instructed 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 53 

in the use of insulin and the management of their diet before they 
leave. 

In January of this year I was given charge of the gastric ward 
which contains seventy-three beds. Here, the different types of 
stomach tubes reign supreme. I do the fractional stomach tests, 
and in addition to this, every patient has a complete series of 
X-rays of the gastro-intestinal tract. Of the greatest importance, 
of course, is the diet, and I must say that of all the hospitals in 
which I have ever had cases (and they are many) during the four- 
teen years I have been a graduate nurse, this hospital has without 
exception the most efficient dietetic department I have ever seen. 
Rarely do I hear a complaint, which is certainly a high compli- 
ment, coming, especially, from a group of men, whose stomachs 
are affected. Our own tables in the nurses' home are excellently 
served. Each ward has its own diet kitchen in charge of a special 
dietician. In very few places the nurses have care of the trays. 

One section of the hospital is given over to the care of neuro- 
psychopathic cases. Many nurses prefer this line of work and 
have taken special courses in it. There is an excellent hospital 
of this kind at Perryville connected with this service. 

In addition to the other treatments is that of the different 
branches of physio-therapy. Probably, no hospital in the country 
is better equipped for this line of work. One very large room is 
set apart for the electro-therapy treatments; another for cabinet 
baths; and most attractive of all is a beautiful swimming pool to 
which we have access three nights in the week when the water is 
changed and warmed for our benefit. 

In co-ordination with the Physio-therapy is the Occupational 
Therapy Department. One would have to visit the hospital to 
realize the wonderful amount of good done by this Department. 
All branches of this work are a pleasure; almost every known 
design in arts and crafts is taught. The nurses, if they desire, 
can learn to make things that will render them many pleasant 
hours. 

Two very fine greenhouses have recently been built by the 
Women's Legion Auxiliary, and here the patients study floricul- 
ture and gardening. 

One cannot lay too much stress on the importance of close co- 
operation among nurses, dietitians and aides in this work. The 
duties of one blend in with those of the others. It is a great 



64 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

relief to a nurse to be able to send a patient suffering with a painful 
disease like arthritis which no amount of medication can benefit 
for a physio-therapy treatment; or, if he is inclined to be irascible 
or moody, to the open air in the garden where he will become 
interested in his work which will tend to make him forget his 
troubles; and when a man becomes dissatisfied with his food and 
begins to grumble when things do not suit him, it is a great com- 
fort to be able to turn him over to a competent dietician. 

This service is somewhat similar to ttiat of the army, although 
with many less restrictions. It is one which should appeal especi- 
ally to nurses who served in the Army and Navy Corps during the 
war, and for the nurses who were unable to do so it is a splendid 
opportunity for patriotic service, as only ex-service men and 
women are eligible for treatment. 

If at any time I can help the Alumnae Association, will be glad 
to do so. 

Sincerely, 
Mary Gertrude Brady, Class 1911. 

From Miss Ruth Clements, Class 1920 

New Haven Hospital, 
New Haven, Conn., 
March 11, 1925. 
My dear Friends : 

It is indeed good to talk to you all again, even though it must 
be in this impersonal way. Not so many miles lie between New 
Haven and Baltimore, but sufficient to keep us separated for, 
what seems to me, a long space of time. 

I wish I knew what to tell you about first . 

New Haven Hospital has many advantages in its situation in 
this great University town, but it is scattered over an entire city 
block, which adds big nursing problems, chief among them being 
the waste of physical energy necessary to cover such an area in 
caring for an average of two hundred and fifty patients. The 
Private Pavilion, Isolation and Maternity are separate buildings 
from the Main Hospital, comprising eight wards and two semi- 
private floors. 

We four who are on night duty are sharing with the day staff 
in the difficulties that naturally rise when one school is dying out 
and another is in its infancy. The Connecticut Training School 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 55 

for Nurses, having been such an old one, has probably intensified 
the rather hostile feeling for the Yale School of Nursing in this 
first year of its existence. However, in just these six months that 
I've been working with the students in both schools I feel that a 
more co-operative spirit is being established all the time. This 
is very encouraging. 

Let us think for a minute in terms of the student body as a 
whole : one third is composed of the Yale group, one third of the 
last two Connecticut Training School Classes, and the remain- 
ing one third composed of affiliating students. Certainly, the 
responsibility of teaching night as well as day is an enormous 
problem, with such various groups. 

While it is true that affiliation does bring many problems to a 
school, I am heartily in sympathy with the method. Broad 
contacts are always educational, and certainly this is the keynote 
of the Yale School. Much may be said about affiliation, but for 
brevity's sake we will consider three advantages particularly. 

First, the school that gives affiliation gains much. For 
instance, here at the New Haven Hospital about ten schools affili- 
ate. These students bring to our attention many different 
methods of nursing procedures, etc., financially, it saves the 
hospital much money. Think what it would mean to pay thirty 
or forty graduate nurses for general floor duty in the place of these 
many affiliates. 

Secondly, the attendants who come from small training schools 
have in many instances their first opportunity for classes directed 
by expert instructors; they become acquainted with a detailed 
system of records which they themselves largely make; they have 
constantly held before them their responsibility as teachers of 
the patient, his family, and indeed, the community, as regards 
health habits. The affiliating students, as well as members of 
the staff, have a real privilege in studying under Dean Goodrich, 
whose very wide experience, deep interest, educational ideals and 
strong personality, make her one among many in this, our 
profession. 

Thirdly, the nursing profession at large should be benefited by 
all these groups, advertising, as it were, the high standards that 
the Yale School of Nursing fosters. 

The Yale nursing students are all college women; twenty of 
the twenty-five are college graduates. With this educationally 



56 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

advanced group an effort is being made to complete the course in 
two and a half years. 

Dispensary experience is given in every department of service, 
and effort made to correlate the hospital patient with the com- 
munity need. Encouraging it certainly is to realize that the 
nursing profession, along with the medical, is as much concerned 
with the prevention of disease as with the curative measures. 

I shall be interested in receiving the Bulletin, and in this 
same impersonal way hearing from you all. I hope much has been 
accomplished this past year at the Hospital and in the Associa- 
tion; likewise, sincerely wish for you much success in this year's 
work. 

Sincerely yours, 

Ruth Clements. 

From Mrs. Anna Lee Lovenskiold, Class 1892 

Supia, Arizona, 
January 27, 1925. 
(Via Grand Canyon.) 
My dear Miss Sander: 

Thank you for your very cordial letter. I should have answered 
long ago, but my days have been so full up to two weeks ago, as 
at that time I was both nurse and school teacher for the Indians 
and their children. Two weeks ago "Uncle Sam" sent a teacher, 
so now I am "out of the frying pan into the fire," as we have to 
board the dear man. 

I wish you could see these dear little children — twenty-one of 
them come to school, aged from five to eight years. The older 
girls and boys are sent off to Government Schools, but the little 
tots are the dearest and bravest little rascals, too, for no matter 
how much they are hurt they never cry. 

We have been here a little over a year. Mr. L. Lovenskiold is 
Superintendent of the Reservation — ^just a few Indians, nearly 
two hundred, and we found that these children had never had a 
Christmas, or seen a tree, so we got busy about the time your 
letter came. Well, thanks to New York, Baltimore, New Mexico 
and Phoenix friends we were showered with gifts for the children, 
and old folks too. 

We are the only white folks within fifty miles of Grand Canyon, 
and to get there we ride horseback over a mountain trail, and it 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 57 

is a case of up and down over the rocks all the way. But we don't 
mind a bit, as it is a very beautiful spot, and the "Land of the 
Sky Blue Waters." 

If I don't look out this note will run into a letter, so I'll just tell 
you that I appreciate your sending me the Bulletin, and am 
sending the stamps to pay for it. I am so glad you gave the New 
Home Miss Parson's name. She surely deserved something from 
old Baltimore. 

And you mean to say that that old photo found its way into the 
New Home. Well, my dear, I must tell you that I was neither 
pretty nor nice, and now I am a very old woman with snow-white 
hair; seldom well, and expect soon to leave for a better home. 

Cordially yours, 

A. Lee Lovenskiold. 



ROLL OF MEMBERSHIP. 

(Please notify Secretary of change of address) 
1892 

fDunham, E. (Mrs. Roache) .. . .Staunton, Va. 

fDunham, Leiia 

*Goldsborough, Mary E 

*Hale, Janet 

Lucas, Kate C. (Mrs.) 1404 W. Lexington St., Baltimore, Md. 

*Neal, Amy 

Lee, Anna (Mrs. F. S. Loven- 

skiold via Grand Canyon, Supai, Ariz. 

fSchleunes, Anna Cecil Apartments, Baltimore, Md. 

1893 

Bradbury, M. E 2 Church St., Cambridge, Md. 

fCornman, Mary E 315 Okeechobee Road, W. Palm Beach, 

Fla. 

fCulberston, Clara 

Daly, E. J 616 Park Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

Michael, Martha B 528 Church St., S.W., Roanoke, Va. 

fMayes, Eleanor Petersburg, Va. 

Mergardt, Clara (Mrs. J. Reif- 

sneider) 836 N. Strieker St., Baltimore, Md. 

tPyatt, M. A Georgetown, S. C. 

Ravenell, S. S Aiken, S. C. 

Shertzer, Elizabeth 1503 Park Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

♦Williams, E. M 

*Van Santwoort, Elinor (Mrs. W. 

Mines) 

1894 

*Anderson, Bessie 

*Brown, Mary 

Bonn, C. M. (Mrs. Barwick). .319 Okeechobee Road, West Palm Beach, 

Fla. 

tHass, Rose (Mrs. Pfohl) Winston-Salem, N. C. 

*Judd, Evelyn (Mrs. J. Dingan). 
tMorgan, Lucy H. (Mrs. Black- 
low) Lockhaven, Pa. 

tMergardt, Emma (Mrs. Stowj .. Wyanet, 111. 

fMellner, Constance (Mrs. Wine) 

fMagruder, Emma 718 Evesham Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

Reed, Elizabeth 705 N. Fulton Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

tThackston, E. G 138 W. 28th St., New York City 

* Deceased. 

t Graduates not members of the Association. 

58 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 59 

fThompson, Mary Centreville, Md. 

tWeitzel, V. C. (Mrs. Charles 

McNabb) Cardiff, Md. 

1895 

fBlake, Sallie E Tallahassee, Fla. 

fEdmunds, Marie Farniville, W. Va. 

*Harry, Addie M 

tJones, Myra New York City 

Rolph, Mary E 627 N. Carey St., Baltimore, Md. 

1896 

Lee, Elizabeth 103 Linden Terrace, Towson, Md. 

Robey, Frances 2033 Madison Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

Shipley, Mena 3031 Charlotte St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Wilson, Cora M. (Mrs.) University Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

1897 

Baldwin, M. E. E. (Mrs.) Alleghany and Woodbine Aves., Towson, 

Md. 

tClegg, Mary C 

tCohen, Ella (Mrs.) Towson, Md. 

tCrowe, Florence (Mrs. C. W. 

Mitchell) St. Paul Apartments, Baltimore, Md. 

t Jones, Susan M 1412 Park Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

fKeating, Martha J Winchester Hospital, Winchester, Va. 

*Lashley, Josephine 

Lord, Athalia 63 Clayton Ave., Charlotte, N. C. 

Russell, Mary A 11 E. Chase St., Baltimore, Md. 

tSlicer, Annette 2127 Callow Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

*Watkin8, K. N 

1898 

fHughes, Eunice (Mrs.) York, Pa. 

Lackland, Nannie J 216 A St., S.E., Washington, D. C. 

*Mauphin, Agnes 

Rossell, Blenda E 1215 W. Mulberry St., Baltimore, Md. 

1899 

tBrown, Margaret S 1401 Columbia Road, Washington, D. C. 

tEdwards, Katherine (married). .Hagerstown, Md. 
fLUewellyn, Bernardine (Mrs. 

Early) Scottsville, Va. 

*Pittman, Blanche 

tSmith, Virginia (Mrs. B. H. 

Ransom) 3169 18th St., N.W., Washington, D. C, 

* Decetiaed. 

+ Graduates not members of the Association. 



60 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

1900 
fBlight, Marguerite (Mrs. M. B. 

LeSuer) 149 W. Lanvale St., Baltimore, Md. 

fFeatherstone, E. Sophie Brinklow, Md. 

tGilliland, Lena (Mrs. B. Jones) . Winston-Salem, N, C. 

Gray, E. B Tarboro, N. C. 

tHobbs, Myra Towson, Md. 

fJones, Nannie H 1012 Floyd Ave., Richmond, Va. 

fLittle, Marion Baltimore, Md. 

fMilton, Louise D 1402 Park Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

1901 

tAnderson, Grace L 354 E. 116th St., New York City 

tBlight, Emmeline (Mrs. F. E. 

Chambers) 791 Orange St. , Macon, Ga. 

♦Burnett, Mary C 

*Blake, Katherine 

Cook, Mary H 149 W. Lanvale St., Baltimore, Md. 

*Dowdell, Mary 

tDaniel, Frances B Saranac Lake, New York 

fFendall, Mattie F. (married).. .18 E. Main St., Hamilton, Ontario, 

Canada 

Furbee, Catherine 1106 Juliana St., Parkersburg, W. Va, 

Henderson, Eugenia L Presbyterian Hospital, Charlotte, N. C. 

t Jones, Mary Scott University Hospital, Charlottesville, Va. 

fMosby, Pauline V 149 W. Lanvale St., Baltimore, Md. 

1902 

Burch, Emma C 831 Park Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

tDunderdale, Grace L. (Mrs. 

Walter Koppleman) 105 W. 29th St., Baltimore, Md. 

Flanagan, Nettie L Foxcroft School, Middleburg, Va. 

♦Gregory, Mary W 

fKinnirey, Nancy (Mrs. J. How- 
ard Inglehart) 11 Queen Anne's Rd., Baltimore, Md. 

jRaines, Martha (Mrs. John 

Foster) Thomasville, Ga. 

Wise, Helen V Peninsula General Hospital, Salisbury, 

Md. 

1903 

fBird, Margaret 

fBlandford, Sara R 2506 K St., Washington, D. C. 

tCraig, Louise, (Mrs. J. U. 

Dennis 205 Hawthorne Road, Baltimore, Md. 

* Deceased. 

t Graduates not members of the Association. 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 61 

•Cooke, Albina (Mrs. J. D. 

Reeder) 

tCraft, Elizabeth 223 S. Cherry St., Richmond, Va. 

tElgin, M. E. (Mrs. A. H. Mann).Poolesville, Md. 

fFulton, Isabel Stewartstown, Penna. 

Gallagher, Ella T 226 N. Calhoun St., Baltimore, Md. 

tKing, Annie E. (Mrs. F. W. 

Seling) Elkridge, Md. 

Massey, Margaret K. (Mrs. 

Nathan Winslow) 1900 Mt. Royal Terrace, Baltimore, Md. 

Miller, Mary C 132 Hamilton St., Geneva, N. Y. 

*Northrup, Mary A 

Reeve, Annie St. Paul St., Baltimore, Md. 

1904 
tBush, Lucy Ladd (Mrs. H. J. 

Harby) 121 Calhoun St., Sumter, S. C. 

tDaugherty, Sarah (Mrs. C. H. 

Yergar) Alberquerque, N. M. 

tDilworth, Florence I. (Mrs. 

Porter) Jacksonville, Fla. 

Guerrant, E. Janie Westminster, Md. 

tGuerrant, Pattie Los Angeles, Cal. 

Gaskill, Laura M 4901 V St., Sacramento, Cal. 

"fLewis, Christine M New York 

"fMunder, Lela (Mrs. Stanley 

Blood) New Jersey 

Parrott, E. May Aigburth Manor, Towson, Md. 

Schroeder, Harriett 1624 Eutaw Place, Baltimore, Md. 

tWalker, Louise (Mrs. Harrison 

Cassard) Preston Apartments, Baltimore, Md. 

tWalton, Nancy Maryland Ave., Annapolis, Md. 

1905 

Bayley, Elizabeth 1922 F St., Washington, D. C. 

-fBrosene, Dora (Mrs. M. Oliver). Washington, D. C. 

Cowling, Margaret B Greenwood, Va. 

tFerrell, Nellie (Mrs. Gardner). .Danville, Va. 
Geare, Millicent (Mrs. Page 

Edmunds) 12 Elmwood Road, Baltimore, Md. 

tGildea, Elizabeth (Mrs. Eugene 

Mullen) U. S. P. H. Hospital, Perryville, Md. 

tHillard, Nellie (Mrs. H. Cov- 
ington) Rocky Mount, N. C. 

t Jones, Nettie (Mrs. J. R. Revell). Louisville, Ga. 
Kuhn, Ruth A. C. L. Hospital, Waycross, Ga. 

* Deceased. 

t Graduates not members of the Association. 



62 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

to wings, Lelia (Mrs. E. B. 

Quillen) Rocky Mount, N. C. 

Schaefer, Carlotta (Mrs. 

Murphy) 3014 Windfield Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

fTrenholm, Lila (Mrs. Walton 

Hopkins) Maryland Ave., Annapolis, Md. 

1906 

tCarter, Nellie Chatham, Va. 

tChapman, Annie (Mrs. Jos. 

Wright) 1221 Bolton St., Baltimore, Md. 

Clarke, Ethel Palmer (Mrs.) Robert Long Hospital, Indianapolis, Ind. 

tCunningham, Sarah (Mrs. F. W. 

Morse) U. S. Army, Washington, D. C. 

fDoyle, Leonora (Mrs. W. W. 

White) 2800 St. Paul St., Baltimore, Md. 

fEllicott, Mary (married) Georgia 

fJessup, Marian, (Mrs. Frank 

Hines) Chestertown, Md. 

Lawrence, Margaret S. (Mrs. S. 
W, Moore) 329 Roland Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

tPhillips, M. (Mrs. H. Green- 
well) Lutherville, Md. 

*Query, Clara 

Sanderson, Sarah Washington Hospital, Washington, Pa. 

*Truitt, Georgia 

1907 

Barber, Jennie D The Brexton, Baltimore, Md. 

tBay, Grace I White Hall, Md. 

Bell, Alice F. (Mrs. J. B. Pig- 

gott) 2710 36th Place, N.W., Washington, D. C. 

tBrewington, Esther (Mrs. P. P. 

Causey) Sedley, Va. 

tBrian, Nannie L 149 W. Lanvale St., Baltimore, Md. 

Griffith, Isabella (Mrs. H. K. 

Fleck) 513 Cathedral St., Baltimore, Md. 

tGrimes, Mary Concord, Kentucky 

Haydon, Jane 2400 Holmead Place, N.W., Washington, 

D. C. 

Hissey, Naomi 1705 Linden Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

tMcNabb, Nancy (Mrs. R. P. 

Bay) 8 Hillside Road, Baltimore, Md. 

Minnis, Rosamond Connellsville, Pa. 

tMinor, Evelyn 302 N. Calhoun St., Baltimore, Md. 

* Deceased. 

t Graduates not members of the Association. 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 63 

tOgburn, Ella B High St., East Orange, N. J. 

tPeyton, Corrie Babies' Milk Fund, City Hall, Baltimore, 

Md. 
fPue, Marie (Mrs. C. Chapman) . Guilford Ave., Baltimore, Md. 
tRobertson, Clara B. (Mrs. R. P. 

Latimer) Hyattsville, Md. 

fTongue, Amy B. (Mrs. Chas. 

Wiley) Redwood City, Cal. 

1908 

tAnderson, M. B. (Mrs. R. B. 

Hayes) Hillsboro, N. C. 

*Cox, Charlotte A 

tCunningham, A. K. (Mrs. Wm. 

McDonald) 14 Bedford St., Hoverville, Mass. 

Dawson, Clyde (Mrs. Frank S. 

Lynn) 41 W. Preston St., Baltimore, Md. 

Gavin, Mary 347 W. 55th St., New York City 

Gourley, Henrietta 307 Union Trust Building, Baltimore, Md. 

tHamlin, Martha (Mrs. N. J. 

Haynes) 427 W. Patterson Ave., Glendale, Cal. 

tHamlin, Mary Danville, Va. 

fHostrawser, S. A Canada 

tPrice, Lula (Mrs. Thawley) R. F. D., Denton, Md. 

Parsons, H. J The Walbert, Baltimore, Md. 

tRussell, Augusta 314 Monroe St., Jacksonville, Fla. 

Smith, Maud (Mrs. T. R. Cor- 
nelius) Gittings Ave., Govans, Md. 

tSchull, Ethel 

tWright, M. E. (Mrs. G. H. 

Richards) Port Deposit, Md. 

tWilson, Rose Los Angeles, Cal. 

1909 

tAlmond, Blanche Washington, D. C. 

fCarter, LuUie (Mrs. Hyde 

Hopkins) Miami, Fla. 

Chapline, Eva 2810 Chelsea Terrace, Baltimore, Md. 

Chapline, Laura S. (Mrs. W. J. 

Coleman) 2810 Chelsea Terrace, Baltimore, Md. 

Dukes, Katherine (Mrs. J. B. 

Magruder) 2821 N. Calvert St., Baltimore, Md. 

tEly, Emily The Walbert, Baltimore, Md. 

Getzendanner, Elizabeth Franklin Square Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

tGreen, Mrs. (Mrs. Miller) Norfolk Va. 

* Deceased. 

t Graduates not members of the Association. 



64 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

fHall, Beulah (married) Jacksonville, Fla. 

Pue, Louise 1518 Park Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

fRobey, Helen. 

Saulsbury, Mary B The Walbert, Baltimore, Md. 

Squires, Lucy Matthews, N. C. 

fTull, Grace 2751 Maryland Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

Tews, Gertrude (Mrs. Cole) The Walbert, Baltimore, Md. 

Wham, Anna Lou (Mrs. C. M. 

Pitt) Tuscany Apartments, Baltimore, Md. 

tWright, Vera (Mrs. Wilbur 

Scott) Devereaux, Ga. 

1910 
fBarrett, Adele (Mrs. Wm. Parra- 

more) Cochrane, Ga. 

tBurton, Cora (Mrs. R. T. 

Earle) Centreville, Md. 

fBarber, Lucy (Mrs. Woodley 

Blackwell) Sharps, Va. 

Drye, Anne M 20 E. 21st St., Baltimore, Md. 

Edmunds, March (Mrs. Dwight 

Rivers) Lynchburg, Va. 

fGarrison, Gertrude (Mrs. Ros- 

coe McMillan) Red Springs, N. C. 

Holland, A. K. (Mrs. J. D. 

Fiske) 2408 Reisterstown Road, Baltimore, Md. 

Israel, Ellen C 214 W. Monument St., Baltimore, Md. 

Kimmel, Mary M 1318 Linden Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

fKing, Florence (Mrs. Thomas 

West) Fayetteville, N. C. 

fLee, Sarah A. (Mrs. Frank 

Woodward) Tallahassee, Fla. 

Long, Lillian (Mrs. Claude 

Smink) 4706 Harford Road, Baltimore, Md. 

McKay, Virginia O Presbyterian Hospital, Charlotte, N. C. 

Murchison, Belle (Mrs. F. H. 

Vinup) 201 Oakdale Road, Baltimore, Md. 

Meredith, Frances M 214 W. Monument St., Baltimore, Md. 

Pleasants, P. B. (Mrs. J. M. 

Sparks) Monkton, Md. 

fPrice, Lula (Mrs. John Robert- 
son) Onancock, Md. 

tStrohm, Amelie (Mrs. Wm. 

Spalding) Churchville, Md. 

fTaylor, Margaret Atlanta, Ga. 

tWiggin, M. Constance (Mrs. H. 

W. Cole) Naval Air Station, Pensacola, Fla. 

t Graduates not members of the Association. 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 65 

1911 
*Berlin, Ruth (Mrs. Wm. Chipman) 

Brady, M. Gertrude U. S. Veterans Hospital, Maywood, 111. 

tCurtiss, Nell (married) Durham, N. C. 

fGarner, Jane (Mrs. Wm. Michel)2901 Edmondson Ave., Baltimore, Md. 
Gephart, Louise (Mrs. E. Klo- 

man) 44 W. Biddle St., Baltimore, Md. 

fGrubb, Anna (Mrs. Janney) Montrie, Ga. 

fHutton, G. A 15 E. Preston St., Baltimore, Md. 

fHelland, Naomi (Mrs. Strong). .Halethorpe, Md. 
tKinney, Ivy (Mrs. E. C. Hag- 
good) Birmingham, Ala. 

tPatterson, Elizabeth (Mrs. H. 

R. Neeson) McConnellsburg, Pa. 

Ricketts, Stella W University Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

fRobinson, Eva (Mrs. Wm. 

Deppers) 3223 New Jersey Ave., Indianapolis, Ind. 

tStouffer, Barbara The Brexton, Park Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

Scarff, Marvel (Mrs. J. H. Von 

Dreele) 836 W. 36th St., Baltimore, Md. 

fSprecher, Frances (Mrs. Smith) . Harrisburg, Pa. 

Sullivan, Mary Ellen Havre de Grace, Md. 

Williams, Alva Relay, Md. 

1912 

tBlake, Lillian 23 E. 21st St., Baltimore, Md. 

fCox, Eulalie M Baltimore Eye, Ear and Throat Hospitali 

Baltimore, Md. 

Conner, Bernice Apt. 34, 420 W. 121st., St., New York City 

Coale, Mattie (Mrs. C. Alpha). .342 Audobon St., New Orleans, La. 

Dawson, Ethel (Mrs. E. W. 
Bogart) 504 W. 22nd St., Wilmington, Del. 

Harvey, Lucy 1213 Welden Circle, Baltimore, Md. 

fLilly, Lucy (Mrs. R. G. Stokes) . Chattanooga, Tenn. 

*Logue, Ethel 

*Lynch, Agnes M 

tMiles, Juliet (Mrs. Russell Per- 
kins) Winston-Salem, N. C, 

Prince, Blanche 3703 Forest Park Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

fRidgley, Nally (Mrs. Ringgold) . Howard County, Md. 

Steiner, May Cumberland, Md. 

tSmith, Marion Sparrows Point, Md. 

Stouffer, Lena University Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

tWells, Alice (Mrs. A. C. Gal- 
loway) 1600 Eutaw Place, Baltimore, Md. 

* Deceased. 

t Graduates not members Oi the Association. 



66 . THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

1913 

fBrownell, Edith 7 Chapin Ave., Providence, R. I. 

Butts, Elizabeth 214 W. Monument St., Baltimore, Md. 

Coward, Addie (Mrs. R. C. 

McCotten) Grifton, N. C. 

tChase, Evelyn (Mrs. Hugh 

McPherson) Red Springs, N. C. 

fDent, Edith Broadway, New Orleans, La. 

Dean, Elva 214 W. Monument St., Baltimore, Md. 

Hull, Willie (married) 2213 N. Charles St., Baltimore, Md. 

fHessler, Sophia (Mrs. Roger 

Parlett) Alberquerque, New Mexico 

fLaws, Margaret (Mrs. Wm. 

Walker) Gastonia, N. C. 

Misikofski, Martha Kenwood Road, Raspeburg, Md. 

*McCann, Natalie 

fPatterson, Dorothy (Mrs. R. 

Patterson) Clarksburg, W. Va. 

Price, Golda G 214 W. Monument St., Baltimore, Md. 

Rush, Pearl (Mrs. J. K. Voshell) Emerson Hotel, Baltimore, Md. 
tRennie, Mary (Mrs. Carl Blay- 

lock) Norwood, N. C. 

tRutherford, Mary (Mrs. C. 

Welchel) Gainesville, Ga. 

Shea, Katherine Robert Long Hospital, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Selby, Myrtle M Kingsissing Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Welch, Katherine (Mrs. T. B. 
Woods) Norfolk, Va. 

1914 

fBalsey, Marie K. (Mrs. Ralph 

Bonnell) 452 W. Preston St., Elmira, N. Y. 

tBurns, Olive (Mrs. G. Kup) 1343 First St., Washington, D. C. 

fCoulbourne, Alice (Mrs. John 

Stevens) Marion Station, Md. 

Clendenin, Virginia (Mrs. Wm. 

C. Hickling) Moose Lake, Minn. 

Davis, Sadie (Mrs. A. W. Reier). 1 Kinship Road, Dundalk, Md. 
tDukes, Ann (Mrs. J.Foranvielle).Rocky Mount, N. C. 
Ervin, Margaret (Mrs. J. P. 

Landing) Marion Station, Md. 

tErvin, Edith (Mrs. L. Lewis) . . . Blackstock, S. C. 

Foley, Julia The Walbert, Baltimore, Md. 

fFunk, Jessie, (Mrs. J, S. Cut- 
sail) Adamstown, Md. 

* Deceased. 

t Graduates not members of the Association. 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 67 

tGrant, Pearl (Mrs. Hendrick) . . . Port Deposit, Md. 
tHill, Lucy (Mrs. E. B. Pretty- 
man) 37 W. Irving St., Chevy Chase, Md. 

fHughes, Bertie (Mrs. Davidson). Health Dept.,311 St. Paul St., Baltimore, 

Md. 
tHudnal, Carrie (Mrs. Purcell). .U. S. Veterans Hospital, Maplewood, 111. 

♦Hull, Grace 

tLord, L. E. (Mrs. H. M. Free- 
man) 2631 N. Calvert St., Baltimore, Md. 

Miller, Maude McCready Memorial Hospital, Crisfield, 

Md. 
tMcCann, Elsie (Mrs. H. C. 

Hood) 115 W. 29th St., Baltimore, Md. 

tMurray, Carrie (Mrs. J. Smith) .Atlanta, Ga. 

fRyan, A. C. (married) New York 

fRoussey, Bessie (Mrs. R. Stan- 
ford) Darlington, Md. 

Sigmon, Bertie (Mrs.) Chester Sanatorium, Chester, S. C. 

tSprecher, Marjorie (Mrs. J. 

Woodcock) Hollidayburg, Pa. 

tShelton, Jennie (Mrs. Clyde 

Blake) 123 Rose St., Buchanan, Mich. 

Sander, Marie 2108 Mt Royal Terrace, Baltimore, Md. 

Stepp, Lula The Walbert, Baltimore, Md. 

tStoneham, Grace (Mrs. G. Wal- 
ker) Ahoskie, N. C. 

tWeaver, Pearl Hendersonville, N. C. 

tWeber, Dorothy (Mrs. E. Cole- 
man) Douglas, Ga. 

Zepp, Katherine The Walbert, Baltimore, Md. 

1915 

Bay, Nettie 1735 Park Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

fBogart, Corrine (Mrs. W. Star- 
ford) Wendel, W. Va. 

Beazley, Elizabeth (Mrs. 

Rhodes) 1011 Bennett Place, Baltimore, Md. 

tBoor, Elva (Mrs. VonGesbeck) .Balboa, Panama 
Connor, Ruth (Mrs. C. R. Ed- 
wards) 431 Kenneth Square, Baltimore, Md. 

tCoppersmith,Martha (Mrs. Leon 

Kays Stanford, N. J. 

Dilly, Gertrude (Mrs. E. B. 

Etzler Woodsboro, Md. 

tFrothingham, Norma (Mrs. R. 

B. Chapman 34 S. Fulton Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

* Deceased. 

t Graduates not members of the Association. 



68 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

fLee, Mabel (Mrs. Oehler) Sumit Ave., Greensboro, N, C. 

fMyers, Altha Maryland 

tMeredith, Florence (Mrs. C. B. 

Hicks) 141 Holderness St., Atlanta, Ga. 

McDaniel, Lillian K University Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

tNordt, Elizabeth (Mrs. E. M. 

Bridges) Blue Ridge Summit, Pa. 

fPinkard, Bertie 2404 Barclay St., Baltimore, Md. 

jshields, Lelia (Mrs. G. Dawson). Chester, S. C. 

fStoneham, Ruth 1610 Eutaw Place, Baltimore, Md. 

tSkinner, Florence (Mrs. H. 

Caldwell) Galena, Md. 

White, Bettie A. C. L. Hospital, Rocky Mount, N. C. 

1916 

Blake, Helen 23 E. 21st St., Baltimore, Md. 

tCIarke, Laura Greensboro, N. C. 

fDix, Nellie (Mrs. Hubert Bow- 
ers) W. Ghent, Norfolk, Va. 

Dunn, Margaret 1717 Tivoly Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

Eichner, Loula K. (Mrs.) 2120 St. Paul St., Baltimore, Md. 

tForney, Marion (Mrs. S. F. 

SDpith) Biltmore, N. C. 

fHurst, Anna (Mrs. C. Hicher- 

son) 140 Pine St., Charlotte, N. C. 

tHenkel, Julia (Mrs. J. S. Skla- 

dowsky) 638 Washington Boulevard, Baltimore,Md. 

Hoflfmaster, Blanche Emergency Hospital, Annapolis, Md. 

*John, Mary 

Kauffman, Irene 179 Prince George St., Annapolis, Md. 

fLangenfeldt, Marie Cheltenham, Md. 

McSherry, Helen B Franklin Square Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

tMayo, Margaret (Mrs. Oscar 

Winnberg) 3004 Grayson St., Baltimore, Md. 

Null, Lillie 1225 Linden Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

*Phelan, Elizabeth 

fReamy, Hildegarde (Mrs. Jacob 

Linn) 3908 Dennison Ave., Cleveland, Ohio 

Rutherford, Elsie Box 1089, Miami, Fla. 

Smith, Sallie (Mrs. H. W. Byers).749 W. North Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

Scarff, Inez Bryn Mawr Apts., Atlantic City, N. J. 

fSmith, Bernice 1921 Longwood St., Baltimore, Md. 

Scaggs, Lucy 1511 A St., N.E., Washington, D. C. 

Simmons, Maude (Mrs. Cald- 
well) Charlestown, S. C. 

* Deceased. 

t Graduates not members of the Association. 



ALXJMNAE BULLETIN I 

Selfe, Serena (Mrs. W. A. 

Bridges) Eudowood, Towson, Md. 

tWalter, Margaret (Mrs. Theo. 

Warner) Windsor Court Apts., Baltimore, Md. 

1917 

Cecil, R. (Mrs.) 135 Newberg Ave., Catonsville, Md. 

tCavano, A. (Mrs. Fred Smith). .605 Park Ave., Baltimore, Md. 
fDearmeyer, Helen (IVIrs. J. 

Pesel) Lawrenceville, N.J. 

Fahrney, Myrtle 704 Grantley St., Baltimore, Md. 

*Hedge3, Lilly 

tKeffer, Laura 310 Braddock St., Winchester, Va. 

Kenney, Emily Aurora Hospital, Aurora, 111. 

Klase, Josephine (Mrs. C. S. 

Warrell) Box 35, Norco, Cal. 

Lloyd, Ellen 826 CarroUton Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

Marsh, Elizabeth 5 W. 2nd St., Frederick, Md. 

fMohler, Anna (Mrs.) 1609 Eutaw Place, Baltimore, Md. 

tMouse, Lucy 2011 Eutaw Place, Baltimore, Md. 

Minnis, Jemima (Mrs. E. Mc- 

Lane) Washington, Pa. 

fMinnis, Nancy Connellsville, Pa. 

tMonroe, C. Ethel 328 Maryland Ave., Westport, Md. 

Murray, Olive Lebanon Hospital, New York City. 

tPennewell, Jane (Mrs. Lawrence 

Bloom) Philadelphia, Pa. 

Quigley, Bertha 717 W. North Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

Robinson, Anna (Mrs. John 

Lutz) 1911 Chelsea Terrace, Baltimore, Md. 

Risley, Marguerite (Mrs. H. M. 

Stein) 1315 Mt. Royal Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

Simpson, Elsie (Mrs. William- 
son) Falkstone Courts, Washington, D. C. 

tShertzer, R. (Mrs. J. D. Har- 
rison) 319 51st St., Newport News, Va. 

fStoneham, Annette (Mrs. Hobbs) 108 E. Main St., Westminster, Md, 
JThorn, Norma (Mrs. J. S. Wood- 
ruff) 302 Kingston Ave., Charlotte, N. C. 

1918 

Barwick, Elizabeth (Mrs. Gal- 
try) Burlingame, Cal. 

Bay, Beulah 2201 Aiken St., Baltimore, Md. 

•Deceased. 

t Graduates not members of the association. 



70 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

fBenson, Martha (Mrs. E. M. 

Jones) 1501 N. Second St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Carr, Esther, (Mrs.) (Mrs. Wm. 

Melvin) Havre de Grace, Md. 

tDolly, Iva (Mrs. J. M. Under- 

hill) West Ashville, N. C. 

tEnsor, Althea (Mrs. Burch) Stevenson Ave., Towson, Md. 

Flowers, Jeannette 1220 Linden Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

fFlaharty, Nellie (Mrs. Boyd)... 2923 lona Terrace, Baltimore, Md. 

Hook, Katie 1316 Linden Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

fKinney, Maude (married) Frostburg, Md. 

Kirkley, Naomi, (Mrs. E. D. 

Fay) 2919 Belmont Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

Leister, Grace Lebanon Hospital, New York City 

Lauper, Margaret 1123 Madison Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

tLinstrum, Gay (Mrs.) (Mrs. 

Harry Hughes) 1711 Ruxton Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

tMcCarty, Ellen (Mrs. Frank 

Ogden) 115 N. Carey St., Baltimore, Md. 

McMillan, Martha 1906 Linden Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

fMoore, Cecelia (Mrs. Herbert 

Zimmerman) 103 E. 22nd St., Baltimore, Md. 

fMcDaniel, Lena (Mrs. Chas. 

Rausenbach) Louden Hall, Hammond, Ind. 

Oldhouser, Minnie Linthicum Heights, Md. 

tRidgeley, Florence (Mrs. E. 

Killough) Hamlyn Apts., Baltimore, Md. 

tRidgeley, Helen 734 Reservoir St., Baltimore, Md. 

Scout, Temperance A 2121 Linden Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

fSingleton, Jessie (Mrs. Ralph 

Guzzman) Red Springs, N. C. 

Turner, Marion 1316 Linden Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

tWard, Mary Lee (Mrs. Frank 

Boyette) Sayresville, N. C. 

Yingling, Ruth University Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

1919 
tAldrich, Annette (Mrs. George 

Holman) 178 Virginia Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

Brady, Ethel 1404 Linden Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

tBrown, Hady (Mrs. F. A. 

Macis) Honduras, Central America 

tBrown, M. M. (Mrs. E. Duvall). 609 Cumberland St., Baltimore, Md. 

Gordy, Helen 1906 Fulton Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

Jones, Grace 1025 Harlem Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

tKing, Bertha D 2128 Wyoming Ave., Washington, D. C. 

t Graduates not members of the association. 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 71 

Kling, Caroline 231 M. Calhoun St., Baltimore, Md. 

Lloyd, Betty 826 N. Carrollton Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

Lohse, Agnes (Mrs.) 1700 Eutaw Place, Baltimore, Md. 

Murray, Emma 2806 Marshall Ave., Newport News, Va. 

tMitchell, Edna (Mrs. Dennis 

Smith) New Windsor, Md. 

Nichols, Jane (Mrs. Harry 

Julig) 6 E. Read St. , Baltimore, Md. 

tPleasants, Helen (Mrs. Smealy). North Fork, Cal. 
tSides, Elizabeth (Mrs. Mc- 
Donald) 485 Cheney Ave., Oakland, Cal. 

Smarr, Alice The Sherwood, 212 W. Monument St., 

Baltimore, Md. 
tZepp, Katherine (Mrs. M. 

Douglass) 24 S. 9th St., Indianapolis, Ind. 

1920 
fAlexander, Christine (Mrs. J. 

Mayoral) Apavtado 1465, Havana, Cuba 

Barnett, Louise (Mrs. C. A. 

Reifschneider) 2939 Eastern Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

tBaugher, Margaret 2011 Eutaw Place, Baltimore, Md. 

tBiddlecomb, Emily 11 N. 7th St., Wilmington, N. C. 

Bay, Ethlyn (Mrs. C. Dever) . . . 2201 Aiken St., Baltimore, Md. 

Butler, Eleanor 2011 Eutaw Place, Baltimore, Md. 

Clements, Ruth 755 Howard Ave., New Haven, Conn. 

tEvans, Emma (Mrs.) (Mrs. 

Gregorius) Ravenwood Ave., Govans, Md. 

Gilbert, Helen (Mrs. Granville 

Roupe) Louisburg, N. C. 

tHowell, Florence (Mrs. Albert 

Budden) Rock Hill, S. C. 

Kirkley, Azalia 1812 N. Fulton Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

Little, Rachel A. (Mrs. Lenders). 1615 Linden Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

Lankford, Marie 1404 Linden Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

McGovern, Clara 4225 Wickford Road, Baltimore, Md. 

Northcutt, Leona (Mrs. Oliver 

Ridgley) Gary, N. C. 

fReynolds, Grace (Mrs. Chas. 

Warfield) Maryland Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

tSchwab, Myrtle (Mrs. Grant- 
ley) Warren Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

tScaggs, Edna (Mrs. Edwin 

Rembold) Kinship Road, Dundalk, Md. 

tShipley, Goldie (Mrs. Mientz). .Quantico, Va. 

tTrevelian, Mabel Sloane Hospital, New York City 

t Graduates not members of the association. 



72 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

Tillet, Zora 924 Henry St., S. W., Roanoke, Va. 

Maston, Bessie L 1407 Eutaw Place, Baltimore, Md. 

Yates, Edna 3007 W. North Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

Yingling, Emily (Mrs. Arleigh 
Albert) 121 Southern Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

1921 
fBateman, Louise (Mrs. Dan 

Brooks) Towson, Md. 

Childs, Helen Pleasant Hill, Baltimore Co., Md. 

Fisher, Mary Long, Alleghany County, Md. 

Gaver, Norma (Mrs. Daniel W. 

Justice) 112 Mt. Vernon St., Boston, Mass. 

Gorman, Ruth 1123 Madison Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

Hampton, Claribel University Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

Hogshead, Kate (Mrs. J. Morris 

Reese) Lutherville, Md. 

jMinnis, Christine 116 Snyder St., Connellsville, Pa. 

Martin, Blanche Lee .1220 Linden Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

McDaniel, Mary (Mrs. H. 

Weisner) Rolling, Road, Relay, Md, 

Neady, Susan P Waynesboro, Pa. 

tReister, Ruby 131 Park Ave., Ashville, N. C. 

Reese, Zadith (Mrs. Wm. Pitt). .3026 Guilford Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

Reamy, Helen 1258 Nicholson Ave., Cleveland, Ohio 

Rhodes, Jessie Box 403, Canton, N. C. 

Smith, Julia 1220 Linden Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

Wood, Anna Elizabeth 440 E. 26th & 1st Ave., New York City 

1922 
fBowie, Lucille (Mrs. Richard 

Joyner) Suffolk, Va. 

fCallahan, Vera Dennison, Ohio 

fDeputy, Julia (Mrs. Albert W. 

Strong) Walton, Ky. 

Elgin, Grace University Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

DuBois, Cecil (Mrs. David 

Bein) Ill Raspe Ave., Overlea, Md. 

Lord, Nettie (Mrs.) 1609 Eutaw Place, Baltimore, Md. 

Morrison, Frankie V 1609 Eutaw Place, Baltimore, Md. 

*Yeager, Eva 

1923 

Boyd, Ruth W 1513 Bolton St., Baltimore, Md. 

Dunn, Helen L University Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

* Deceased. 

t Graduates not members of the association. 



ALUMNAE BULLETIN 73 

Graham, Evelyn P. (Mrs.) 801 Hamilton Terrace, Baltimore, Md. 

tHazen, Dorothy L Erie, Pa. 

Harkins, Hilda F 421 Winston Ave., Govans, Md. 

Herrington, Mary M 1827 Linden Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

Hoffman, Martha M McCready Memorial Hospital, Crisfield, 

Md. 

Hoke, Lillie R Emmitsburg, Md. 

Horst, Katherine E 1622 Mt. Royal Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

Kish, Vilma K Sabillasville, Md. 

Maxwell, Irene A Sabillasville, Md. 

McCann, Wilhelmina N The Walbert Apartments, Baltimore, Md. 

Nagel, Ida M University Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

Pratt, Anna E 1655 Appleton St., Baltimore, Md. 

Shroeder, Marie E. C 1025 Harlem Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

tStailey, Margaret M 1402 Park Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

Teeple, Helen S Franklin Square Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

Toms, Kittie Roland 801 Hamilton Terrace, Baltimore, Md. 

Reade, Katherine A 1513 Bolton St., Baltimore, Md. 

West, Regina Medora (Mrs. 
Preston Champe) 1022 W. Lafayette Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

White, Ruth A 1513 Bolton St., Baltimore, Md. 

1924 

tAlexander, Edith L Matthews, N. C. 

fAppleton, Pauline V 1123 Madison Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

Barnes, M. Undine Walbert Apartments, Baltimore, Md. 

Bell, Janet M 3308 Harford Road, Baltimore, Md. 

Bennett, Alice M 3010 Berkshire Road, Baltimore, Md. 

tBennett, Pearl P. (Mrs.) Sharpstown, Md. 

Brude, Lucy A 3308 Harford Road, Baltimore, Md. 

Callaway, Esther A 801 Hamilton Terrace, Baltimore, Md. 

Compton, Pinkie Lee 1726 Linden Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

tCopenhaver, Elizabeth E 440 E. 26th St. & 1st Ave., New York City 

Davis, Marie University Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

Fisher, Mary E 1827 Linden Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

Forest, Lola (Mrs. George 

Halley) Kimberley, Idaho. 

tHoopes, Madeline 1402 Madison Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

Headley, Sara P 1715 W. Lafayette Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

tHughes, Claire Virginia (Mrs.). Arbutus Ave., Hamilton, Md. 
tKraft, Dorothy C Ellicott City, Md. 

McCormack, Margaret J 317 E. North Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

Moore, Rachel F 1726 Linden Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

Mogart, Julia Helen University Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

Pope, Jane T 1827 Linden Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

Schaale, Bernice 5004 Wilson Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

t Graduates not members of the association. 



74 THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NURSES 

Scott, Jane Colonial Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

Shaffer, Mary C 317 E. North Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

tSlez, Mary Irene 440 E. 26th St. and 1st Ave., New York 

City 
tSpencer, Lenora F. (Mrs. Taylor 

Medford) 3906 Montgomery Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

Sponsler, Mary R 1446 Homestead St., Baltimore, Md. 

tTillinghast, Robina H 1601 First St., St. Petersburg, Fla. 

fThomas, Kathryn A Fifth Avenue Hospital, New York City 

Thompson, Icelene 332 Ilchester Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

tWhitworth, Esther W Elkton, Md. 

Wertz, Gladys A 1715 W. Lafayette Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

t Graduates not members of the association. 









-34 d:ii^)>r^^'f- - * 






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