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Full text of "University of Maryland men's football media guides (Orange Bowl)"

MARYLAN 



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From Susan Potter Norton 
Orange Bowl Committee President 

January 2, 2002 



Welcome to tonight's FedEx Orange Bowl as it features two 
ot this season's top college football teams in the country. 

The FedEx Orange Bowl has been a celebration ot everything 
unique about South Florida for 68 years. We have established a 
tradition ot welcoming the finest college football teams in the nation. 
The Orange Bowl Festival is a showcase of our community's 
pride, diversity and excellence. In 1935, with a game attended by 
just 2,000 fans, South Floridians could not have envisioned how 
this Festival would portray our wonderful community to mil- 
lions throughout the world into the 21st Century. 

The annual Orange Bowl Festival attracts approximately 400,000 
people, more than 250 million viewers and an economic impact 
and media added value exceeding more than $180 million. Since 
its beginning in 1935, the Festival has been the one thread that 
unites our entire community. This tradition is represented in 
"The PATCH," the official logo for the FedEx Orange Bowl. 

We have had another successful Orange Bowl Festival. Our 
youth football teams participated in the third annual FedEx 
Orange Bowl Youth Football League "Bowl Before The Bowl" and 

the YFL cheerleaders had their chance to compete for an opportunity to participate in tonight's pregame and halftime festivities. We hi tst- 
ed four outstanding college basketball games during our Men's and Women's Basketball Classics. South Floridians had an opportunity to 
dive into an "Underwater Wonderland" during this year's Orange Bowl Parade. Everyone had the opportunity to "Think ORANQEJ" 

Enjoy tonight's game and, as we celebrate during tonight's FedEx Orange Bowl that culminate^ this month-long Orange Bowl Festi- 
val, let us pause to remember those who are defending our country. 

Sincerel 





Susan Potter Norton 
President 





From Frederick W. Smith 

FedEx Corporation 

Chairman of the Board 



On hehalt of the officers, directors, and more than 200,000 
dedicated FedEx employees and contractors worldwide, 1 would 
like to welcome you to Miami and the 2002 FedEx Orange Bowl. 

For the past 1 3 years, FedEx and college football have gone 
together hand-in-hand. FedEx has been the proud and enthusi- 
astic sponsor of the FedEx Orange Bowl since 1989, and is now 
in its fi lurth year as a spi insor of the Bowl Championship Series. 

Similar to the two teams on the field, FedEx strives for per- 
fection. Whether it is on the ground or through the air, provid- 
ing world-leading transportation solutions is our focus at FedEx. 
In today's fast-paced world, the combination of FedEx Express, FedEx 
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services tor our customers. 

In being selected to play in the FedEx Orange Bowl, tonight's 
teams display the dedication, teamwork and precision that we at 
FedEx value. As a world leader in our industry, FedEx is proud to 
be associated with these two great universities. 

Congratulations to both teams, coaches, fans, and alumni on 
an exciting season and on reaching the 2002 FedEx Orange 
Bowl. I wish the best of luck to all and look forward to an excit- 
ing game. 

All ot us at FedEx hope for a prosperous and peaceful 2002. 



Sincerely, 



6J 4<L-& 




Frederick \V. Smith 

( :hairman, President, and ( Ihiel Exec utive Officer 

I'll • • orpoi ition 



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2002 ORANGE BOWL GAME 
OFFICIAL SOUVENIR MAGAZINE 

Special thanks to Courtney Morrison-Archer. 

David Stroot and Al Santasiere at the Orange 

Bowl Committee; Dave Haglund, Meredith Traber 

and the athletic media relations staff at the 

University of Maryland; John Humenik, Tony 

Morreale and the sports information staff at the 

University of Florida. 




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Published by Professional Sports Publeabons, Inc. 355 Lexington Ave , 
Newtork. N Y 1 001 7. © 2001 Professional Sports Publications, All nghts 
reserved Reproduction in whole or part without permission of publisher 
iddil ii iifograms, call 1-800-769-8843. 

Program contents designed by Michael Kass 



8 David Meets Goliath 

Perennial BCS contender Florida brings its customary aerial attack to Miami 
for a showdown with the underestimated Terrapins from Maryland. 

14 Scouting Reports 

Kathy Orton and Pat Dooley dissect the Terps and Gators playbooks and report 
on who to watch on both sides of the hall. 

84 Miami: The Magic City 

For 68 years, the Orange Bowl Festival and its 30 annual events have called 
South Florida and Miami home. This year will be no different. 

88 Home of Champions 

Throughout its history, the Orange Bowl has been the center ot national atten- 
tion with 15 previous national championships - more than any other bowl 
game. 



Florida 



32 The University 

34 Galor Athletics 

37 Head Coach Steve Spurrier and Staff 

40 Season in Review 

44 Spirit 

46 Meet the Gators 




Florida 



Maryland 



59 Meet the Terrapins 

68 Spirit 

70 Season in Review 

75 Head Coach Ralph Friedgen and Staff 

78 Terrapin Athletics 

80 The University 




Departments 



1 Orange Bowl President's Welcome 

2 FedEx Chairman's Welcome 
20 Orange Bowl Committee 

25 Orange Bowl Past Presidents 

28 Halftime Show and Performers 

83 Hall ot Honor 

96 Orange Bowl Sponsors 

98 Orange Bowl Patrons 

102 Orange Bowl Records 

104 Scores. Results and MVPs 

107 Festival Events 

112 Pro Player Stadium 





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Perrenial 
BCS contender 
Florida brings its 
customary aerial 
attack to Miami 
for a showdown 
with the 
underestimated 
Terrapins from 
Maryland 



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FLORIDA 



OVERVIEW: 

No one is sur- 
prised to see 
Florida play- 
ing in Miami 
in 2002. The 
Gators have 
been a major 
force on the 
college land- 
scape since 
Steve Spurrier took 
over at his alma mater 
and collect big-time 
bowl appearances like 
few other schools. But 
Maryland's arrival in 
the big time is quite 
shocking. In just one 
season, new coach 
Ralph Friedgen has 
turned the Terps from 
Atlantic Coast Confer- 
ence also-rans to 
league champions. 
Maryland's 10-1 record 
was a five-game improvement from the 
2000 campaign and confounded the ex- 
perts, who figured Maryland would land in 
the ACC's second division. 

"This shows we can get it done at 
Maryland," Friedgen says. "We no longer 
have to tell everybody what our potential 
is. We've proven we can win and be a 
major force in college football here. 1 did- 
n't think it could happen this fast. This 
will act as a foundation for years to come." 
The Terps are thrilled to be playing 
in a BCS g;niK', bui they aren't satisfied 
with merely showing up. A win ovei 



Florida would provide further validation 
for their turnaround. The Gators, mean- 
while, are trving to erase the bitter taste of 
a loss to Tennessee in their final regular 
season game and reach 10 wins for the 
eighth time in nine seasons. Although 
Florida did harbor hopes ot playing in the 
hi 'S title game, before tailing to the Vols, 
it will no doubt be playing before a large 
crowd ot Gator supporters and should be 
anxious to put on a show. 

HISTORY: 

Although tlu-se teams have played 



8 




each other 1 7 times over the years, they 
haven't hooked up in 21 seasons. In 
1981, Florida defeated the Terps, 15-10, 
in Gainesville. But the two teams aren't 
strangers to post-season meetings. 
Maryland won the 1975 Gator Bowl, 13- 
0, for the program's first win over an 
SEC team in 20 years. Florida gained 
revenge tive years later with a come- 
from-behmd, 35-20 triumph. The Gators 
scored the game's last three touchdowns, 
riding the passing combination of 
Wayne Peace to Cris Collinsworth to 
victory. 



KEY 
MATCHUPS: 

"■Maryland's sec- 
ondary \ s. Florida's 
receivers: It is on this 
battle that the game 
could well turn. The 
Gators boast the 
nation's most danger- 
ous collection of pass- 
catchers. Jabar Gaft- 
ney, Reche Caldwel 
and Taylor Jacobs have 
combined for 1 70 
receptions and 30 
touchdowns. They are 
expert at making 
yardage after the catch 
and can get deep. 
Teams which rely too 
heavily on man-to- 
man coverage against 
the Gators usually get 
burned. Gaffney is par- 
ticularly dangerous. 
His blend of speed and 
elusive moves makes him practically 
impossible to cover with just one 
defender. 

"We're facing the nation's number 
one scoring and (total) offense team," 
Friedgen says. "This will show us where 
our program is at, defensively." 

Maryland counters the Gators' 
weapons with an opportunistic group ot 
defensive backs. Its four starters picked off 
1 s p.^-cs between them rlu- ve it ind ben- 
efitted greatly from a pass rush which pro- 
duced 38 sacks. Safety Tony Jackson (six 
interceptions) and corner Tony 



Andra Davis (far left), who has tallied 
107 total tackles, two sacks and one 
interception in 2001, leads an impres- 
sive Gator defense that has surrendered 
only five passing touchdowns all year. 
Maryland wide receiver Guilian Gray 
(left) is the team's primary target (49 
rec, 727 yds., six touchdowns) and will 
need to have a huge day against a tough 
Florida secondary if the Terrapins are to 
capture a victory. 




9 



CONTINUED 




Gameday Feature 

Okanlawon (five), both 
seniors, are expert ball- 
hawks, while soph cor- 
ner Curome Cox (three) 
and senior centerfielder 
Randall Jones (four) get 
after the ball, too. It 
there is one concern for 
Terp fans, especially 
against such a dangerous 
group of wideouts, it's 
that Maryland allowed 
opponents to complete 
55.0 percent ot then- 
passes and score 16 
times through the air in 
2001. If the Terps can't 
force the turnovers, they 
could be facing some 
trouble. That's why UF 
quarterback Rex 

Grossman will likely see 
a variety of blit: pack- 
ages from Maryland 
defensive coordinator 
Gary Blackney. 

Florida's offensive line vs. 
Maryland's front seven: After the Gators 
struggled mightily on the ground in an 
October loss at Auburn, Spurrier made a 
change along the offensive front, inserting 
Dave Jorgensen at center and switching 




CM2 

Rex Grossman (left), 
Florida's sophomore gun 
stinger, tossed the pigskin 
for 3,896 yards, 34 touch- 
downs and an average of 
354.2 yards per contest. 



larly with E.J. Henderson in the middle of 
everything. The junior all-American has 
made 150 tackles this year (103 solos), 
including a whopping 28 behind enemy 
lines. "1 don't think I've met a guy who, 
day-in and day-out, plays as consistently 
hard as E.J. does," Friedgen says. 



enough moves to beat 
enemy tackles several 
ways. But it's not like the 
Terps haven't faced top- 
quality ends before. 
Crawford and Snader 
helped keep North 
Carolina all-America 
Julius Peppers under 
control in a 23-7 victory 
over the Tar Heels on 
Sept. 1. Maryland quar- 
terback Shaun Hill was 
sacked just 18 times all 
year, a testament to the 
strong protection he 
received and his ability to make quick 
decisions with the ball. Don't discount the 
value of the Terp ground game, either. 
Because Bruce Terry (1,242 yards) is so 
dangerous, Brown won't have the ability 
to load up tor the pass rush on every play. 
Perry's dangerous in the passing game, too. 



"\Ne are looking forward to ending our season in a positive way 

and, if possible, winning against a really good Maryland team that 

is going to be excited and sky high and really ready to play. " 

— Steve Spurrier 



Zai Zedalis from pivot to guard. That 
move, coupled with the healthy return ol 
running back Earnest Graham, helped 
revitalize the Florida rushing attack and 
gave I IF much-needed balance. Although 
Zedalis is back in the middle — for the 
inn. being — the message was sent. The 

1 latoi m ni't tr\ in grind it out against 

ly, i In \ must have some su< ( ess 
running the ball, the bettet to keep the 
lerps from sending ever\ kind of blitz 
combinatii in at I Irossman. 

Ii mi t lund out how haid it < an be to 
tun ilu d k ill ill againsi the lerps, partk u- 



Henderson wasn't the only person 
creating trouble in opposing backfields. 
Maryland made 1 10 tackles behind the 
line, a big reason why foes averaged just 
2.6 yards per carry and 90.6 yards/game on 
the ground, while scoring just five times 
on the run. 

\l.n\ I. in. I offensn e i ai klcs Man 
C Irawford and (. 'hns Snadei vs. Florida I )E 
Alex Blown: Few ends in football are as 
dangerous as Brown, who combines speed 
and strength into a package capable of 
harassing iust about any quarterba< k. I le'll 
line up on eithei side of the field and lias 



His 40 receptions were second <<n the 

team. 

"Bruce carried us the first four or five 

weeks of the season, while we were still 
adapting to our new offense," Friedgen 
says, "lie came out of the chutes fast and 
allowed us to bold onto the ball. Bui 
when we Started seeing eight and nine- 
man fronts, we bad in throw the ball." 

COACHES' 
PHILOSOPHIES: 

Spurrier's offensive system is what 
you would expect from an old quarterback. 



10 



CONTINUED 



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He wants to throw — early and 
often. He doesn't want to have a 
nice, run-pass statistical balance, 
merely enough threat ot the run 
to prevent teams from coming 
after Grossman on every play, 
without fear of getting burned by 
the draw or counter. Florida will 
use three wideouts most of the 
time and can employ up to five. 
Grossman works frequently out of 
the shotgun and has become a 
master at finding and exploiting 
mismatches. 

Although the Gators do 
gameplan for their opponents, 
Spurrier is often more concerned 
with how his people implement 
his attack. If the Gators are doing 
it right, he reasons, no one should 
be able to stop them. 

That should make for an 
interesting matchup with the 
Terps, who have faced only one 
truly pass-happy opponent this 
year: Florida State. And though 
Maryland hung tough with the 
Seminoles for most of three quar- 
ters, FSU ran away late, 52-31, 
behind its strong passing attack. Maryland 
must be able to contain the Gator attack 
to prevent a similar track meet. 

That's where Friedgen's offense comes 
into play. He wants to hit teams with a 
variety of looks and a balanced offense 
(2,428 yards rushing, 2,409 yards passing) 




is production but control, a big reason 
Maryland turned it over just 18 times all 
year. Perry's production will help slow 
down the Gators, too. He averaged 5.7 
yards per carry during the regular season 
and can chew up clock by gobbling up 
yards. 



Aaron Thompson (left) and the 
Maryland defense will face the 
daunting task of shutting down 
Florida's high-octane passing 
attack. The Terrapins have forced 
34 turnovers this season (24 inter- 
ceptions, 10 fumble recoveries) 
and have held opponents to 2.6 
yards per carry. 

five touchdowns all year against a 
group of D-backs that is rarely 
beaten deep. 

INTANGIBLES: 

*Expect the Terps to be 
heavy underdogs to the more 
established and explosive Gators. 
That doesn't bother Friedgen. 
"No one has given us that much 
respect all year," he says. "We're 
blue-collar kids who like playing 
really hard. We don't have any- 
thing to lose in this one. Nobody 
expects us to win." 

* The Gator ground game 

gets a big boost from the return of 

Earnest Graham, who suffered a 

twisted knee in the win over 

Florida State and missed the Tennessee 

contest. He is expected to be at full speed 

for the Orange Bowl. 

* This is Florida's third Orange Bowl, 
and Spurrier has played a big role in the 
other two Gator appearances — both 
wins. He quarterbacked Florida to a 27-12 



7 don't want the team to just be happy to be here. I want 

them to go out there and play hard. We didn't get 

this far just to show up. " 

— Ralph Friedgen 



that can move the ball every way imagina- 
ble — and hold onto it for a while. The 
Terps are going to throw it, but they don't 
I i i the same kind of down-the-field 
assault as does Florida. Not that Friedgen 
doesn't want to. It's just that his personnel 
don't allow for that kind of attack. Hill 
will ii reci ivers Guilian Gary, Jafar 
Williams and Pin on hotter routes, hop- 
ii I- ifter the catch. The object 



Florida counters with a defense based 
on speed. The Gator front seven is a 
swarming group that attacks the backfield 
on both running and passing plays. But, as 
Tennessee's Travis Stephens showed when 
he rushed for 226 yards in the Vols' 34-32 
win over UF, the Gators are susceptible to 
a strong ground attack. There isn'i too 
much room for success against the Florida 
secondary, however. Rivals threw for just 



victory over Georgia Tech in the '67 game, 
his final as a collegian. Spurrier directed 
the Gators to a 31-10 rout of Syracuse in 
the '99 Classic. 

* This season has paid off handsomely 
for Friedgen, who after just one year at the 
helm ot the Maryland program, was 
rewarded with a 10-year contract exten- 
sion, assuring that he'll be with the school 
tor quite .i while 



12 




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FLORIDA OFFENSE 



Rex Grossman may have been the 
Associated Press college football 
Player of the Year, but he may not 
have been his own team's most 
valuable player. 

Not if you look at what happened 
when Earnest Graham was out of the 
Gator lineup this season. 

Nine games with Graham - nine 
wins. 

Two games without Graham - two 
losses. 

Graham's rushing totals were hardly 
gaudy - 650 yards and nine touchdowns. 
But his presence was a big factor in mak- 
ing Florida's offense No. 1 in the SEC in 
both yardage and scoring. 

Without Graham, the Gators could 
not establish a running game and made 
Grossman a sitting duck for pass rushes by 
Auburn and Tennessee. But when 
Graham played, Florida's balance made it 
a devastating offense. 

Grossman set a national record for 
the most touchdown passes for a player in 
his freshman and sophomore years. This 
season, he passed for 3,896 yards, eclipsing 
the 300-yard mark in 10 of Florida's 11 
games. His 34 touchdown passes fell just 
short of Danny Wuerffel's school record of 
39 set in 1996. 



Grossman showed his toughness 
throughout the season as well. In a year 
where Steve Spurrier's offense threw 
the ball an amazing 462 times, the 
Florida quarterback had to 
stand in the 
pocket while 
defenses tried 
to knock 
him out of 
the game. 
On more 
than one 
occasion, 
he came 
up limp- 
ing, but never left 
a game unless it was 
well in hand. 

Grossman had 
plenty of targets to throw 
to with all-SEC receiver Jabar 
Gaffney leading the way. 
Gaffney shook off any 
thoughts of a sopho- 
more jinx with 67 
catches for 1,191 yards 
and 13 touchdowns. 
He was comple- 
mented by Reche 
Caldwell, who 




caught 65 passes fot 1,059 yards and 10 
scores. 

Grossman was also 
helped by the emergence of 
a third receiver - Taylor 
Jacobs - who caught 38 
passes, seven for 
touchdowns and 
tight end Aaron 
Walker (16 catches 
for 179 yards). The 
Gator offensive line is 
anchored by all-con- 
ference left tackle 
Mike Pearson and a 
pair of true sopho- 
mores, Shannon Snell 
and Max Starks, whose improvement 
during the season were a major fac- 
tor in Florida's offensive success. 

Jabar Gaffney is one of three 
receivers that Rex Grossman will 
look to involve in the Gator aerial 
assualt. 



i£ 




FLORIDA 



OFFENSIVE LEADERS 

RUSHING GP Art 


Gain 


Loss 


Net 


Avg 


TD 


Long 


Avg/G 


Earnest Graham 


9 


125 


665 


15 


650 


5.2 


9 


50 


72.2 


Robert Gillespie 


11 


94 


241 


26 


395 


4.2 


1 


25 


35.9 


PASSING 


GP 


Effic 


Att-Cmp-Int 


Pet 


Yds 


TD 


Lng 


Avg/G 




Rex Grossman 
RECEIVING 


11 


170.75 


395-259-12 


65.6 


3896 


34 


80 


354.2 




GP 


No. 


Yds 


Avg 


TO 


Long 


Avg/G 






Jabar Gaffney 


11 


67 


1191 


17.8 


13 


80 


108.3 






Reche Caldwell 


11 


65 


1059 


16.3 


10 


64 


96.3 






Taylor Jacobs 


11 


38 


712 


18.7 


7 


64 


64.7 









14 



MARYLAND DEFENSE 



M 



laryland's defensive premise is to 
Idisrupt, ii\-. Hi- confusion and 
■cause as many problems as possi- 

Ihle for .in opponent. It lias been 
a successful formula for the 
Terrapins, who held then oppo 
neni s to 1 1 >. 1 points per 
game to rank No. 18 
in Division 1-A in 
scoring defense. 

In order to 
force its oppi 
nents into 
disarray 
and keep 
them off- 
b a lance, 
Man I. m, I li e 
quently switches its 
formations just 
before the hall is 
snapped. The Terrapins 
keep offenses guessing by 
disguising which defenders 
are rushing the passer and 
which are dropping into pass 
coverage. 

Although this strategy carries 
some risk, Maryland has enjoyed suc- 
cess against a variety of offenses. 
Whether teams try to spread the field with 
tour and five wide receiver sets, run the 
ball up the middle or speed up the tempo 




with a no huddle attack, the Terrapins 
effectively have flustered their opponents- 
particularly in the early going as teams try 
to adjust to Maryland's defense. 
Opponents have scored just 23 points 
in the first quarter againsi the 
Terrapins. 

The trademark of 
Maryland's defense is its 
blitz. What makes the 
Terrapins' attack so diffi- 
cult to counter is that 
the blitzes come in a 
variety of situations 
and from an assort- 
ment of positions. 
The safeties, cor- 
nerbacks and 
inebackers all 
take turns 
going after 
the oppos- 
ing quarter- 
back. 
Henderson, a 6- 
foot-2, 243-pound middle 
inebacker who was 
selected to the Walter 
Camp all-America team 
and is a Butkus Award 
finalist, is the heart of 
Man land's defense. A 
tenacious defender. 



I [enderson sets the tone tor the Terrapins 
1 le led the ACC in tackles ( 1 SO) and set a 
school record in tackles for a loss (28). He 

also had a team-high six sacks. 

Those times the opposing quarter- 
back isn't worrying about being hit, then 
he is most concerned about Maryland's 
pass defense. Because of the variety of for- 
mations the Terrapins use to camouflage 
their coverages, quarterbacks have had a 
tough time connecting with their 
receivers. Maryland finished second in 
Division I-A with 24 interceptions. Tony 
Jackson, a 6-1, 205-pound safety, led the 
team with six. 

Maryland's defense also has benefited 
from the good field position that all-ACC 
punter Brooks Barnard has put it in. 
Barnard is averaging 44.5 yards per punt 
and has placed 17 kicks inside the oppo- 
nent's 20-yard line. 

Look for E.J. Henderson to lead the 
Terps defensive charge. The junior 
led the conference in tackles. 




DEFENSIVE LEADERS 

Tackles 


Sacks 


Pass Def 




Fumbles 


Blkd 




GP 


Solo 


Ast Total TFlTYds 


No-Yards 


Int BrUp 


QBH 


FF FR 


Kick 


E.J. Henderson 


11 


103 


47 150 28(-76) 


6.01-40) 


1 4 


7 


2 1 


2 


Charles Hill 


11 


44 


37 81 8(-26) 


2.01-17) 





9 








Tony Jackson 


11 


47 


33 80 3(-5) 


010) 


6 9 





2 





Leon Joe 


11 


40 


36 76 8(-17) 


101-7) 


1 1 


9 








Aaron Thompson 


11 


30 


30 60 10(-43) 


4.51-36) 





5 


2 








15 



CONTINUED 




NATIC 






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Scouting Reports 




MARYLAND OFFENSE 



Ralph Friedgen arrived at Maryland 
with a reputation as an offensive 
innovator. At Georgia Tech 
and with the San Diego 
Chargers, Friedgen masterminded 
exciting offenses that pro- 
duced lots of points. 
Yet, there's 
nothing particular- 
ly flashy about 
Maryland's offense. 
And that's the 
genius of Friedgen, 
who took what he 
had and made it work. 
He played up the Terrapins' 
strengths and did a remarkahl 
job hiding their weaknesses as he 
guided them to their first bow 
appearance in 1 1 years. Under 
Friedgen's intuitive guidance 
Maryland finished 7-0 at home, a 
school record, and has scored 
more points (387) than any team 
in school history. 

Friedgen now has the Terrapins 
playing m their first January bowl since 
the 1 977 Cotton Bowl. Maryland's last 
win in a January bowl game dates all the 
way back to 1952 when the Terps 
knocked off Tennessee in the Sugar Bow 




Although it took some time for the 
players to grasp Friedgen's complicated 
system, they eventually flourished 
under their first-year head coach. 
Maryland, which set a school 
record for most points scored 
in a season and ranks 
No. 12 in Division 1- 
A in scoring offense 
(35.5 points per 
game), has an oppor- 
i tunistic offense. 
They don't 

attempt to do 
more t^an they 
it and try 
play only 
esents ' 

itjji 

Fhe ball. The* d./'t 
ike mistakes/lMary- 

uiiL lia^ aimed Kiffy^ 

i\ J ! jnjf ' l/lM'Vtlll! 

hies, Win? interceptions 
However, their attack is 
not one-dimensional. 
When teams stack the 
box to take away the 
run, the Terrapins turn 
k' «. . to versatile tailback 



Bruce Perry. 

Perry, a 5-foot-9, 189-pound sopho- 
more, is not only a threat to run the ball 
but also to catch it. In addition to rushing 
for 1,242 yards on 219 carries - an average 
of 112.9 yards per game - he also was the 
team's second-leading receiver with 40 
catches. 

Quarterback Shaun Hill, a 6-3, 221 
pound junior college transfer, has been 
Maryland's offensive catalyst. His leader- 
ship has been as invaluable as his arm 
strength and scrambling ability. He runs 
the option well, completing nearly 60 per- 
cent of his passes for 2,380 yards and rush- 
ing for another 309 yards. 

• BY KATHY ORTOIXI 

Kathy Orton is a freelance writer who covers 
colleges in the Washington, DC area. 

(LgftLShaun Hill's mobility will keep the 
Florida defense guessing, the junior 
transfer averaged over 200 yards passing 
per contest while rushing for 300 plus 
yards on the season. 

(Right) SEC Defensive Player of the Year 
Alex Brown shattered the Gator record 
for career sacks with 32.5. 



OFFENSIVE LEADERS 



RUSHING 


GP 


Art 


Gain 


Loss 


Net 


Avg 


TD 


Long 


Avg/G 


Bruce Perry 


11 


219 


1274 


32 


1242 


5.7 


10 


80 


112 9 


Marc Riley 


10 


85 


358 


20 


338 


4.0 


10 


69 


33.8 


PASSING 


GP 


Effic 


Att-Cmp-Int 


Pet 


Yds 


TD 


Lng 


Avg/G 




Shaun Hill 


11 


128.21 


329-197-9 


59.9 


2380 


13 


64 


216.4 




RECEIVING 


GP 


No. 


Yds 


Avg 


TD 


Long 


Avg/G 






Guilian Gary 


11 


49 


727 


14.8 


6 


53 


66.1 






Bruce Perry 


11 


40 


359 


9,0 


2 


38 


32.6 






Jafar Williams 


11 


39 


425 


10.9 


2 


36 


38.6 







18 





FLORIDA DEFENSE 



Ayeai aftei being among the nation's 
Leaders in interceptions, Florida 
managed onl\ 1 2 picks in 200] 
But there was no question the 
Gator defense is the best it has been in 
Jon Hoke's three years .is defensive coordi- 
nator. 

The return of Andra Davis at middle 
linebacker was the key tor Florida as he 
led the team in tackles and inspiration. 
Davis missed almost .ill of 2000 with a 
knee mini \ 

He is the catalyst tor a defense that 
led the SEC in fewest points and yards 
allowed. Only Travis Stephens' 226 rush- 
ing yards in the finale 
spoiled what was a 
dominating sea- 
son tor the 
defenders. 



While Davis was an all . i mfi rem i 
player, he received plenty oi support from 

l\u kup Travis I at roll t 'arroll, i transfer 
from Alabama, had two interceptions and 
was sixth on the team in tackles despite 
limited playing time. Outside linebackers 
Mike Nattiel and Bam Hardmon also had 
outstanding seasons. 

Despite the loss of starting corner- 
hack Robert Cromartie before the season, 
Florida's pass defense allowed only five 
touchdowns all year. And while corner- 
hack Ltto Sheppard didn't have as many 
hig plays as he did the pre- 
vious year, tew teams 
threw in his direction. 







Junior Todd I oh lis, mi has Fee ome one 
ot Hoke's favorite players while manning 
the free safety spot, making it almost 

impossible lot teams to throw deep. Senior 
strong safety Marquand Manuel has been 
solid all season. 

One of Florida's best defensive play- 
ers only started two games this season. 
Sophomore Guss Scott played in Florida's 
nickel package and gives the Gators a 
unique look - a defensive back who tack- 
les like a linebacker. 

Florida's defensive line is young with 
the exception ot SE( ' Defensive Player ot 
the Year Alex Brown. The senior led the 
team in big plays with 34.5 and set the 
school's all-time career saek reeord mid- 
u.i\ through the season. 

Sophomore Ian Scott has become a 
force in the middle, often requiring dou- 
ble teams that tree up the other tackle, 
Tron LeFavor. 

Florida's goal this season was to 

force more three-and-outs and the 

tiators have done that, putting the 

ball in the hands of a potent offense 

more and more. 



BV PAT DOOLEV 

THE GAINESVILLE 
SUN 



DEFENSIVE LEADERS 

Tackles 


Sacks 


Pass Def 




Fumbles 


Blkd 




GP 


Solo 


Ast Total TFlTYds 


No-Yards 


Int BrUp 


QBH 


FF FR 


Kick 


Andta Davis 


11 


68 


39 107 81-21) 


21-14) 


1 


2 


1 2 





Guss Scott 


11 


49 


26 75 4(-9) 


3.5 1-16) 


4 


6 


2 


1 


Todd Johnson 


11 


46 


26 72 





2 3 





2 


1 


Mike Nattiel 


11 


37 


29 66 1(-3) 





1 2 


1 


1 





Marquand Manuel 


11 


40 


22 62 2 (-7) 


31-21) 


1 2 


2 


2 1 
























19 




SUSAN POTTER NORTON 

PRESIDENT 



ALFONSO A. COETO 
PRESIDENT-ELECT 



DEAN C. COLSON 

VICE PRESIDENT 



CHRISTOPHER E. KNIGHT 
VICE PRESIDENT 



MICHAEL KOSNITZKY 

SECRETARY 




CARLOS A. MIGOYA 
TREASURER 



SHERRILL W.HUDSON 

IMMEDIATE PAST PRESIDENT 



KEITH R.TRIRBLE 

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER 



Officers 

SUSAN POTTER NORTON 

President 

ALFONSO A. CUETO 

President-Elect 

DEAN C. COLSON 

Vice President 

CHRISTOPHER E. KNIGHT 

Vice President 

MICHAEL KOSNITZKY 

Secretary 

CARLOS A. MIGOYA 

Treasurer 

SHERRILL VV. HUDSON 

Immediate Past President 

KEITH R. TRIBBLE 

Chief Executive Officer 

Board of Directors 

James L. Armstrong, 111 
Hilane Bass- 
Josie Romano Brown 
Clark Cook = 
Thomas A. Daniel 
Albert 1:. Dotson , Jr. 
Russell H. Etlmg 

ii e I' i lautier, III 

Barry T. K.iti >s* 
Leslie Pantin, Jr.# 

Peter T. Pruitt, Jr. 
C. Turn Rainey 
John P. Seller 
Donald D.SIesnick II 
Roberta B Stokes 



G. Ed Williamson II 
Steven H. Wood 
Sandra Graham Younts 
#E.\-0//ieio non-voting members 

Senior Members 

Year Name 

1984 Walter H. Alford 

1963 James L. Armstrong, III* 
1968 F. E. Autrey* 

1979 James T. Barker* 

1978 FredBerens 

1978 R. Eugene Caldwell 
1986 James D. Carreker 

1964 Alvah H. Chapman, Jr. 
1967 E.Todd Clay 

1979 Charles E. Cobb, Jr. 
1986 Clark Cook* 

1981 H. Ronald Cordes 
1970 Nicholas A. Crane* 
1986 Merrill W. Crews 
1984 William O. Cullom 
1979 W Harper Davidson, Jr.* 
1974 James L. Davis 

1989 Albert E. Dotson, Sr.* 
1986 Robert C. Ellyson 

1982 Robert L. Epling* 
1970 Walter Etling 
1974 Peter T. Fay 

1988 Thomas R. Ferguson 

1974 John Michael Garner 

1^72 Lawrence P Gautier, |r. 

1976 R. RayGoode* 

1982 Roberl A Griese 

1990 Ben Hill Griffin, III 
1962 John A. Guyton, Jr. 



1983 M. Lewis Hall, III 
1950 M.Lewis Hall, Jr.* 

1984 Barry G. Hastings* 
1984 Robert C. Hector, Jr. 
1950 Robert C. Hector, Sr.* 
1987 H. C. Henry, Jr. 

1981 Arthur H. Hert:* 

1986 Sherrill W. Hudson* 

1971 Lester Johnson 
1984 Cyrus M. Jollivette 

1987 Edgar C.Jones Jr.* 
1991 D Burke Kibler, III 
1959 John L. Kitchens 

1988 Howard Kleinberg 
1987 C. Frasuer Knight 
1984 David Kraslow 
1981 Donald E. Kubit* 

1972 Robert S. Lafferty, Jr.* 

1978 Sidney Levin 

1980 John L. Ludwig 
1990 Charles P. Lykes, Jr. 
1967 Stephen A. Lynch III* 
1984 Raul P. Masvidal 
1987 David Mcintosh 

1979 W. Allen Morris 

1984 Sister Jeanne OLaughlin, O.P 

1976 Rod E. Overholt 

1986 Leslie Pantin, Jr.* 

1975 H. Jack Ptleger, Jr. 

l l >74 Peter T. Pruitt, Sr. 

1981 C. Tom Rainey, D.V.M. 

1982 Walter L.Revell 
1984 Charles E. Rice 
1984 WillieC Robinson 
1974 E.E. Tete" Seller, Jr. 

DAM 



1987 Merrett R. Stierheim 

1990 William L. Sutton 

1975 Stewart P. Thomas 

1989 William W. Tovell 

1973 John W. Underwood 
1985 David S. Walker. Jr. 
1959 William D. Ward* 

1990 Sherwood M. Weiser 
1969 Robert A. White* 
1982 G. Ed Williamson II* 

1974 Thomas D Wood, Sr.* 
* Past President 



Active Members 

Year Name 

Leonard L. Abess, Jr. 
Kelson L. Adams, III. 

M.D. 
Henry N. Adorno 
Alejandro J. Aguirre 
Cesar L. Alvarez 
Richard P. Anderson 
Antonio L. Argiz 

1993 Jose "Joe" Arnol.i 

1997 HilarieBass 

lames K\le Beard 
Robert G. Beam 
Vincent L. Berkley lr. 
Willy A. Bermello 
rhihp E Blumberg 
|osie Rom. mo Brown 
Earl "Butch" Buchholz, Jr. 
Monsignot Ftanklyn M 

Casale 
Michael IV Chavies 
Bruce |ay i lolan 



1990 
1998 

1995 
2001 

1997 
1989 

AW 1 



2000 
1996 

1997 
1990 
1994 
1995 
1997 

2000 
2001 



20 



CONTINUED 






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The art of performance i JAGUAk 



Ufa 


myc duwi Minn 


lllllll 


rC continued 


1 986 


Dean C. Colson 


1997 


Donald D. Slesnick II 


1995 


Harold F. Corrigan 


1988 


Roberta B. Stokes 


1993 


Charles Crispin 


1996 


Ronald G. Stone 


1989 


Alfonso A. Cueto 


2000 


William F. Thies, Jr. 


2000 


Cynthia W. Curry 


1987 


Lawrence O. Turner, Jr. 


1996 


Thomas A. Daniel 


2001 


Lynn C Washington 


1989 


Nancy J. Davis 


1991 


Dale Chapman Webb 


1994 


Alan T. Dimond 


1993 


Pauline Winick 


1993 


Albert E. Dotson, Jr. 


1992 


Steven H. Wood 


1996 


H. Michael Dye 


1995 


Thomas D. Wood, Jr. 


1994 


Richard R. Ellington 


1993 


Sandra Graham Younts 


1991 


Russell H. Etling 


1997 


Stephen N. Zack 


1992 


Michael T. Fay 






1994 


Wilkie D. Ferguson, Jr. 


Corporate 


1991 


Ronald G. Fraser 


Members 


1990 


Regina Jollivette Frazier 


Year 


Name 


2000 


Robert E. Gallagher, Jr. 


1999 


Jorge L. Arrizurieta 


1994 


Antonia Williams Gary 




Huizenga Holdings, Inc. 


1995 


Lawrence P. Gautier, 111 


1996 


Jose A. Calvo, II 


2000 


O. Ford Gibson 




Angel Leasing 


1995 


Sandra B. Gonzalez-Levy 


2000 


Mehdi Ghomeshi 


1993 


Joel K. Gustafson 




BankUnited 


1995 
2001 


John C. Harrison, Jr. 
Andrew P. Hertz 


1998 


Ray Gough 


2001 


Robert W. Hudson 




Florida Coca-Cola 


2000 


Frederick Jackson, Jr. 




Bottling Company 


1990 


Daryl L. Jones 


1997 


Keith Harrell 


2001 


Manuel Kadre 




American Airlines, Inc. 


1996 


Barry T. Kates 


1997 


Fred Havenick 


1994 


William H. Kerdyk, Jr. 




Flagler Greyhound Track - 


1993 


Christopher E. Knight 




Sports Entertainment 


1993 


George F. Knox 




Center 


1998 


Michael Kosnitzky 


1993 


Adolfo Henriques 


1991 


Joseph P. Lacher 




Union Planters Bank 


2001 


Michael Levy 


1998 


Robert C. Hilson 


1997 


Jay T. Malina 




Bank of America 


2000 


Charlie Martinez 


2001 


Robert C. Hudson 


1989 


Arva Parks McCabe 




AvMed Health Plan 


2001 


Angel Medina Jr. 


2001 


Tomas T. Johansen 


1995 


Michael T. Moore 




Univision Television 


1990 


Nathaniel "Nat" Moore 




Gtoup 


1993 


Charles O. Morgan, Jr. 


1997 


Brian E. Keeley 


2000 


Rene V. Murai 




Baptist Health Systems of 


1993 


William R. Myers 




South Florida 


1992 


Susan Potter Norton 


1998 


Morgan D. King 


1 998 


Phillis Oeters-Pena 




Centex Rooney 

Construction Company 


1992 


Ramiro A. Ortiz 




1 989 

2001 


Francisco J. Paredes 
Edward C. Peddie 


[993 


1 'avid Landberg 
The Miami Herald 


1993 
1997 
1996 


William R. Perry, III 
Jeffrey A. Pfleger 
( '.irl.iv Planas 


1999 


Lincoln S. Mendez 
HealtliSoiith Doctors' 


1993 


Vim Hi S. Podhursl 




1 [ospital 


1994 


S. Daniel Pi mi > 


1993 


l. 'arlos A. Migoya 


2001 


I i lem 1 're coti 




First Union National 


1995 


Petei 1 Pruitl , |i 




Bank oi Florida 


1994 


Larry Rentz 


1995 


Mirtha Orue Mullci 


1997 


1 I'M A wi '. .'.i Ku e 




AT&T Wireless Services 


1996 


Jeffrey T. Roberts 


1998 


Joel Paige 


2000 


lose M. Sanchez 




Doral (. !olf Resorl and Spa 


2000 


Eduardo Sardina 


2001 


s l.llkll.l Puig 


[993 


William M.I Schmidt,M 1 1 




1 lisp, ink I'm iadcasting 


' 


1 i.inl Si ruggs 




< 'orpoiati. in 


194 


Min P "J;u k" Seller 


1994 


|.ni 1 Shebel 


2000 


rrod 




Ass, < jated Industrie ol II 





1993 Gregory T Swienton 
Ryder System, Inc. 

1993 Frederick J. Wilson, III 
Bacardi U.S.A., Inc. 

2001 Gary R. Bruton 
Royal Caribbean 

Honorary 

Members 

Year Name 

1993 William H. Baughn 
1995 Robert Beamon 

1997 Eugene F. Corrigan 
1995 Carl C.James 

1998 Tom Osborne 

1994 Bernard Rosen 
1990 LeanderJ. Shaw, Jr. 

2000 Donald F. "Don" Shula 
1956 George A. Smathers 

1998 Chesterfield Smith 
1963 Henry King Stanford 

Members-At-Large 

Year Name 

2001 Paul Anderson 

1995 John D. Baker, II 

1999 Governor Jeb Bush 
2001 KeynaCory 

2001 Charles Frankel 

2000 Pamela Gerig 

1979 Senator Bob Graham 

1999 Nicki E. Grossman 

2001 Bruce Keller 
1997 Corey Johnson 

1997 Ruben J. King-Shaw, Jr. 

2001 David Kniseley 

1999 Warren E. "Mac" McLaughlin 
2001 Joseph Millsaps 

2001 Harve A. Mogul 

2001 Matthew E. Morrall, Esq. 

2000 Senator Bill Nelson 

2001 General Peter Pace 
2001 Garth R. Parker 
2001 Larry Serlo 

2001 Phil Smith 

2001 Dwight Stephenson 

1999 William D. Talbert, III 
2001 Edward T. Foote, II 

Collegiate 
Representatives 

Year Name 

1994 Anthony J. Catanese 

Florida Atlantic University 

2000 Michael L. Covone 
Barry University 

1993 Paul Dee 
University of Miami 

2001 Ray Ferrero Jr. 
Nova Southeastern 

I ni\iTslt\ 

2001 Dr. DonnaShalala 

I 'niversity . 'I Miami 

1994 Modesto \ Maidique 

Florida Inlernation.il 

i in-. .asm 



2000 RickMello 

Florida International 
University 
1996 Albert Emanuel Smith, 
Ph.D. 
Florida Memorial College 

Emeritus Members 

Lawrence H. Adams* 
William D. Atwill 
DuBose Ausley 

C. Jackson Baldwin* 
Wendell R. Beard 
Edwin N. Belcher, III 
John T "Jack" Branham, Jr. 
James M. Brown 

Frank J. Callahan 

Richard G. Capen, Jr. 

Edward N. Claughton 

Charles L. Clements 

Armando M. Codina 

Eugene E. Cohen* 

Dean Davidson 

George D. Edens 

William H. Fields* 

Richard W Fincher 

Lester Freeman 

Maurice R. Harrison, Jr. 

Bob Hildreth 

Edwin H.Hill, Jr. 

John R. Hoehl* 

J. Stephen Hudson* 

Charles A. Kimbrell* 

George R. Langford 

James L. Llewellyn* 

Peyton White Lumpkin, M.D. 

Malcolm G. MacNeill 

Damon May 

Richard W McEwen 

Cristina L. Mendoza 

Lee E. Monroe, Jr. 

John W. Nelson 

W. Keith Phillips, 111 

W. Keith Phillips, Jr. 

James H. Punt t 

Russell L. Ray, |r. 

D. Frank Rentz DDS* 

Jose A. (Tony) Rodriguez, M.D. 

Doyle Rogers 

Raymond A. Ross, Jr. 

Ralph A. Sanchez 

T. Terrell Sessums 

Joseph Sharit 

Leah A. Simms 

Robert 1 1. Simms 

Joe I. y nl • i 

Bethany Baldwin Tesche 

N.u M Turnbull 

R. Pete Williams 

Vlexandei McW Wolfe, Jr. 
L. Gerald Wright 
J. Luckett Yawn, Jr. 

leresa "Tere" Zubizarreta 
1 Past President 



22 




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AS MUCH A PART OF COLLEGE FOOTBALL AS ®*>offrc 




ROBERT LEPLING 
1993-94 



R.RAY GOODE W.HARPER DAVIDSON ARTHUR H. HERTZ 

1992-93 1991-92 1990-91 



D.WOOD SR. JAMES T. BARKER 

1989-90 1988-89 



LARRY H. ADAMS 

1987-88 




J R.HOEHL ROBERT S. LAFFEFTTY JR. STEPHEN A. LYNCH III CHARLES A. KIMBRELL J.STEPHEN I 

1985-86 1984-85 1983-84 1982-83 19 



NICHOLAS A. CRANE EUGENE E. COHEN 

1980-81 1979-80 




ROBERT A. WHITE F.E."GENE"AUTREY JAMES L.ARMSTRONG III D. FRANK RENTZ WILLIAM H. FIELDS WILLIAM D.WARD 



1978-79 



1974-75 



W. KEITH PHILLIPS JR. 

1970-71 




JAMES L. LLEWELLYN ROBERT C. HECTOR SR. M.LEWIS HALL JR. C.JACKSON BALDWIN 



1964-65 



1962-63 



25 



CONTINUED 




Past Presidents 



conti nued 



W. Keith Phillips, Sr.* • 1935-38 
Charles F. Baldwin* • 1939-41 
William G. Ward* • 1941-42 
Oscar E. Dooly* • 1942-43 
Arthur A. Ungar* • 1943-44 
Van C. Kussrow* • 1944-45 
George E. Whitten* • 1945-46 
R.D. "Buck" Freeman* • 1946-47 
John G. Thompson* • 1947-48 
Will M. Preston* • 1948-49 
Daniel J. Mahoney* • 1949-50 
S. Grover Marrow* • 1950-51 
Stuart W. Patton* • 1951-52 
Sam H. McCormick* • 1952-53 
W. Bruce Macintosh* • 1953-54 
G. Gordon Anderson* • 1954-55 
Robert Pentland, Jr.* • 1955-56 
Raymond D. Miller* • 1956-57 
Joseph H. Adams* • 1957-58 
Harry Hood Bassett* • 1958-59 
Stephen A. Lynch, Jr.* • 1959-60 
Jess Yarhorough* • 1960-61 
Everett A. Clay* • 1961-62 
C.Jackson Baldwin • 1962-63 
B. Boyd Benjamin* • 1963-64 
M.Lewis Hall, Jr. • 1964-65 
Robert C. Hector • 1965-66 
John R. Ring* • 1966-67 
William C. Lantaff* • 1967-68 
[ames L. Llewellyn • 1968-69 
L. Allen Morris* • 1969-70 
W. Keith Phillips, Jr. • 1970-71 



William D. Ward • 1971-72 
James S.Dunn* • 1972-73 
William H. Fields • 1973-74 
D. Frank Rentz • 1974-75 
James L. Armstrong, III • 1975-76 
EE. "Gene" Autrey • 1976-77 
James S. Billings* • 1977-78 
Robert S. White • 1978-79 
Eugene E. Cohen • 1979-80 
Nicholas A. Crane • 1980-81 
J. Stephen Hudson • 1981-82 
Charles A. Kimhrell • 1982-83 
Stephen A. Lynch III • 1983-84 
Robert S. Lafferty, Jr. • 1984-85 
JohnR. Hoehl • 1985-86 
Stan Marks* • 1986-87 
Larry H. Adams • 1987-88 
James T. Barker • 1988-89 
Thomas D. Wood • 1989-90 
Arthur H. Hertz • 1990-91 
W Harper Davidson, Jr. • 1991-92 
R. RayGoode • 1992-93 
Robert L. Epling • 1993-94 
G. Ed Williamson, II • 1994-95 
Donald E. Kubit • 1995-96 
Clark Cook • 1996-97 
Leslie Pantin, Jr. • 1997-98 
Albert E. Dotson, Sr. • 1998-99 
Edgar C. Jones, Jr. • 1999-2000 
Sherrill W.Hudson • 2000-01 



*-decease< 



26 



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The 2002 FedEx Orange Bowl Bacardi 
USA Halftime Show will once again 
feature a world-class lineup of talent. 
This year, various So So 
Def/Columhia recording artists Jagged 
Edge, Jermaine Dupri, Lil' Bow Wow and 
Da Brat will perform during the most stun- 
ning halttime show in college football his- 
tory, along with special guests Christina 
Milian and Frankie Negron. 




"Where's the Party At?" Ask Jagged 
Edge, whose popular hit single from their 
third album jagged Little Thrill is being 
played in dance clubs all across the country. 
The four-man group, featuring Richard 
Wingo, Kyle Norman and twin brothers 
Brian and Brandon Casey, was nominated 
by the Billboard and Source Awards for 
R&B Artists of the Year. They released 
their first album, A Jagged Era, in 1998, 
then followed that up with the multiplat- 
lnum smash J.E. 
Heartbreak in 
2000. The group 
had the opportu- 
nity to break plen- 
ty of hearts when 
they opened for 
Mary J. Blige dur- 
ing her sold-out 
tour. 

Jermaine 
Dupri will be 
releasing his sec- 
ond album, In- 
structions, later 





this month. The Atlanta-based rapper-pro- 
ducer-songwriter-record mogul burst onto 
the music scene by guiding the careers of 
the multiplatinum artists Kris Kross. As the 
founder of So So Def Records (in 1992 at 
the age of 19), he regularly works beside his 
label's talent, Jagged Edge, Lil' Bow Wow 
and Da Brat. He has also collaborated with 
artists such as Usher, TLC, Destiny's Child, 
Aretha Franklin, Elton John and Janet 
Jackson. 

Teenage heartthrob Lil' Bow Wow 
will also be entertaining the FedEx Orange 
Bowl crowd. The 13-year-old has been 




penned the "new millennium's prince of 
hip-hop" and has shown talent well beyond 
his age. He began is career at the age of six 
with his first stage appearance on the 
Chronic Tour — a bit of destiny as he was 
seen by Snoop Dogg, given his current 
name and hired as the opening act for 
Snoop Dogg's tour. Lil' Bow Wow rhymes 
with profanity-free lyrics on his Beware of 
the Dog album. 




Da Brat rounds out the So So Def 
crew. Even with a three-year hiatus before 
releasing her latest album, the Chicago 
native always managed to stay in the spot- 
light with appearances on MTV and show- 
stopping performances at the "Soul Train 
Awards" and "Source Awards." Da Brat was 
the first solo female rapper to go platinum. 

Who's joining the party.' Popular 
Cuban singer Christina Milian is an hon- 
ored guest. Her debut album, AM to PM, 
has already received worldwide acclaim. 
The title song feature- her distinct singing 
talent and proves she can rock just about 
any crowd. The remainder of the album's 



28 



CONTINUED 



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tracks blend urban, larin and pop sounds. 
Singing is not her only talent, as Milian 
has also proven that she is a real entertain- 
er, incorporating choreographed dance into 
all ot her performances. She has also made 
a variety of television and film appear- 
ances, and received co-writing credit on 
Jennifer Lope:'s hit "Play," as well as PYT's 
first single "Same 'Ol Same 'Ol." 

WEA Latina artist Frankie Negron 
also made the guest list following the 
release of his third album. Negron has 
proven himself as an outstanding salsa 
singer and performer, but this album also 
includes his first ballad. Tonight he will 
perform a rousing remix ot his song, "With 
All My Love." 

With a lineup like this, the party is 
definitely at Pro Player Stadium! 

Orange Bowl 
Halftime 

Performers 

Lancaster High School Band 
Lancaster, Virginia 
Ri ibert Spiers, 1 Jirector 
Hendersonville High School Rand 
1 lendersonville, North ( Carolina 
Fran Shelton, 1 >iivl' ir 
Urbana High School Band 



Ijamsville, Maryland 

Randy Rumpf, Director 

St. Peter High School Band 

St. Peter, Minnesota 

Jim Siewert, Director 

Maconaquah High School Band 

Bunker Hill, Indiana 

Jeff Evans, Director 

Upper Arlington High School Band 

Columbus, Ohio 

Mike Manser, Director 

Crossland High School Band 

Temple Hills, Maryland 

Hugh Barnes, Director 

Northfield High School 

Northfield, Minnesota 

Debbie LeRoy 6k Paula Stowe, Directors 

Center for Dance Education 

Clark, New Jersey 

Christina, Evy 6k Georgia 

Zavolas.Directors 
Patrice's School of Dance 
Mayo, Florida 
Patrice Jackson, Director 
NSG 

Garland, Texas 
John Calitn, Director 
Leggz Limited Dance Ensemble 
Rockville Centre, New York 
Sam Carrell, Director 
Maryann's Cheer Angels 
Stockton, California 
Maryann 6k Heather Myers, Directors 
Mary Munstermon School of Dance 
Port Sulphur, Louisiana 
Mary Jane Tesvich, Director 
Parkway Studio of Dance-Kids in Motion 
Naples, Florida 
Nancy Ann Brooks, Director 
Dancers in Motion 
Costa Mesa, California 
Jean Savopolos, Director 
Antioch Deer Valley Allstars 
Antioch, California 
Dena Grant, Director 

First Position Dance Studio Fancy Dancers 
Spring, Texas 
Lynette Capps, 1 )irector 
Mid-American PomPon All Stars Team 
Farmington, Mn higan 
Karen Blazaitis, 1 )ire< i"i 
Wando High School B-Team 
Mi Pleasant, s > iuth ( '■w ilina 



Ruby Mitchum, Director 

Licking Valley High School Cheerleaders 

Newark, Ohio 

Robin Bradley, Director 

British Ballet Academy 

Irvine, California 

Gilbert Duran 6k Kristy Conelley, Directors 

US Cheer Allstars 

Elgin, S.C - Lauren Branham 

Cayce, S.C- Morgan Smoak 

Jefferson, S.C- Shana Myers 

North Myrtle Beach, S.C- Chelsey 

Lawrimore 6k Candise James 

Hanahan, S.C- Andrea Belcher 

COA Allstars 

Athens, OH - Lindsay Watson 

Valliant, OK- Valerie Suhr 

JAMZ Allstar 

New Boston, NH.- Jamie Queen 

Loganland Allstar 

Logansport, IN- Kim Costello 

Dancers 

Jaclynn Puccino, Angely Pichel, Ginette 
Riley, Kim Middleton, Khristine 
Marinucci, Ali Rodriguez, Jose Leon, 
Marcia Mincey, Zorana Valles, Ashli 
Parker, Caleb Mckenzie, Jerry Marcano, 
Adrian Bradford, Jesus Lopez, Jamie 
Christian, Jessica Michaels, Elizabeth 
Moore 

Production Staff 

Event Director- Douglas K. Green 
Show Conductor-Barry Bernhardt 
Field Coordinators and Adjudication Staff- 
Robert Hesse, Dr. Scott McBride, 
Norm Ruebling, Barry Bernhardt, 
James Thomas 

Bowl Games of 
America Event Staff 

Topher Horman, Amy Barnett, Shelley 
1 lilbert, N. it. die 1 lilbert, Kami Rose\ ear, 
C T.ug Rosevear, KriMin Beach, Mike 
Beach, Tawni Ferguson, i. lynthia Bers< h, 
Mark Robinette, Erk Robinette, Mark 
Cheplowitz, Scott Ken, R.i\ Fhacker, 
Michelle Tamagawa, I iloria Burns, John 
Bums, lenin t iiauque 

Tonight's show was produt t .1 bj 
/ > i • i < ■,' / 1 < s K. t i i llii and Bowl Games oj 
America, a division oj Worldstrides. 



30 



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With 176 National Merit Scholars enrolled, UF ranked seventh out of 381 participating 
schools nationwide and fourth among 140 public colleges. 



Florida's oldest university, The Univer- 
sity i if Florida traces its beginnings ti i the 
-i it. -funded East Florida Seminary in 
1853. The seminary moved to C Jainesville 
following the Civil War and was consoli- 
dated with the state's land-grant Florida 
iral ( ■ II. ■■'.■, then in Lake City, to 
tie the University of Florida in 1905. Until 



1947, UF was for men only and one of only 
three state universities, along with the Flori- 
da State College tor Women (now Florida State 
University) and Florida A&M. 

Today, UF is among the 10 largest uni- 
versities in the nation, and out of more than 
1,300 colleges and universities in the coun- 
try, UF is one ot only 61 belonging to the Asso- 



ciation of American Universities — the most 
prestigious organization for higher learning 
in North America. 

Now home to 
about 44,000 students, 
4,000 faculty mem- 
bers and nationally 
recognized research 
centers in brain 
research, engineer- 
ing, aging, genetics, 
cancer and medicine, 
UF is a renowned 
leader in education 
and teseatch. 

One of the uni- 
versally accepted 
measutes of a great university is the caliber ot 
its students. And based on recent achievements 
by University of Florida students, it is clear 
that Gainesville is home to one of the best uni- 
versities in the country. 

UF consistently tanks among the nation's 
top five public universities when measuring 
enrollment of the nation's best and brightest 
students. Fot example, the 1999-2000 school 
year included a freshman class that once 
again ranked among the nation's top schools 
in recruiting National Merit and National 
Achievement Scholars. With 176 National 
Merit Scholars enrolled, UF ranked seventh 
out of 381 participating schools nationwide 
and fourth among 140 public colleges. In 
National Achievement Scholar attendance, 
UF ranked fifth among 143 participating 
schools across the country and second among 
the 63 public colleges. 

National Metit Scholars scored in the 
top one-half percent of high school seniors in 
their state on the Preliminary Scholastic 
Aptitude Test. National Achievement Schol- 
ars are minority students who place well on 
the Scholastic. Aptitude Test. 

Such excellence in the student bod} 
comes as no surprise when last year's freshmen 
— almost all of whom were covered by Florida's 
Bright Futures Scholarship Program — arrived 
with middle 50 percent GPA scores between 
5.6 .i\v\ 4.2 and SAT scores between 1 190 and 
1360. 



32 



SSG. Calvin Garrett. Drill Sergeant. AN ARMY OF ONE. SM in the United States Army. 



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T" 8B he University of Florida had a banner 
2000-01 season, adding a new chapter 
to a rich athletic history. 
Florida is one of just two schools that 
has ranked among the nation's 10 best colle- 
giate athletic programs for 18 consecutive 
years. UF has won at least one national cham- 
pionship in 12 of the last 20 years. In 2000- 
01, The Florida men's golf team won the 
school's 1 5th national title, and the seventh 
since 1992. Seven other Gator teams fin- 
ished in the top 10 of their respective sports 
in 2000-01. 

Florida and Notre Dame were the only 
schools this past academic year to have its 
football team appear in a Bowl Championship 
Series Bowl game, have its men's and women's 
basketball team go to the NCAA Tourna- 
ment and have its baseball team invited to 
NCAA tournament. 

Florida also captured five Southeastern 
Conference Championships in 2000-01, rais- 
ing its total to 60 since the 1990-91 academ- 
ic year, the top total among league schools 
over that time span. UF won SEC crowns in 
men's basketball, football, soccer, women's 



tennis and volleyball. 

Three Gators were part 
of NCAA Individual 
Championships and 64 UF 
student-athletes earned 
131 All- America honors 
this past year. Nick Gilliam 
captured the Men's NCAA 
Golf Championship, Rick- 
ey Harris captured the 400- 
meter indoor title, while 
Whitney Laiho and Jessi- 
ca Lehnhoff claimed the 
NCAA Doubles Champi- 
onships. 

The University of Florida captuted the 
Southeastern Conference All-Sports title for 
the 10th consecutive year and for the 12 th 
time in the last 14 yeats. 

The Gators captured the New York Times 
Regional Newspaper Group SEC All-Sports 
title, finishing first in the women's all-sports 
competition and third in the men's. Florida 
is the only school in SEC history to ever win 
both the men's and women's all-sports titles 
in the same academic year, pulling off the feat 




JEREMY FOLEY 
ATHLETICS DIRECTOR 



in 1992, 1993, 1996, 1998 
and 2000. 

Florida has also been 
successful away from the 
athletic arena, earning a 
league record 133 South- 
eastern Conference Aca- 
demic Honor Roll acco- 
lades in 2000-01. UF has 
had 1,279 Academic All- 
SEC honorees since 1980, 
tops in the league. Four 
UF student-athletes also 
earned spots on Verizon 
Academic All-America 
teams in 2000-01, giving the Gators 41 Aca- 
demic All-Americans since 1992, the fourth 
highest total among Division I schools in the 
past decade. 

In addition, in an era when the NCAA 
estimates 70 percent of Division 1 schools are 
losing money on intercollegiate athletics, 
the University Athletic Association has 
contributed more than $19.43 million to 
the University to fund academic endeavors 
since 1990. 




With a capacity of 
83,000 plus, Ben 
Hill Griffin Stadium 
at Florida Field has 
been the site of the 
largest football 
crowds — college 
or pro — in the state 
of Florida. 



34 




Florida Athletics 




con t i n ued 




Athletics Department Staff 




ANN MARIE ROGERS 

ASSOCIATE ATHLETICS 

DIRECTOR -WOMEN'S 

SPORTS 



JAMIE MCCLOSKEY 

ASSOCIATE ATHLETICS 

DIRECTOR -COMPLIANCES 

MEN'S SPRING SPORTS 



GREG MCGARITY 

ASSOCIATE ATHLETICS 

DIRECTOR -INTERNAL 

AFFAIRS 




DR. KEITH CARODINE 

ASSOCIATE ATHLETICS 

DIRECTOR -ACADEMIC 

AFFAIRS 



DR .NICHOLAS CASSISI 

NCAA FACULTY 
REPRESENTATIVE 




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W 



un Stc\ ( Spurrier 

w.is hired as head 
1 football c oac h at 

i he I Iniversit y ol 
Florida in L990, even the most 
opt imistic ( iators fans could- 
n't have predic ted the le\ el oi 
spectacular success Florida 
would attain. In 1 - seasons at 
Ins beloved alin.i mater, the 
I 966 I [eisman Irophy recipi- 
ent has led Floi ida to a 
national title, sustained excel- 
lence in the highly competi- 
tive Southeastern Conference, 
and a highly deserved status as one ol 
the nation's truly elite programs. 

Florida's success under Spurrier 
since 1990 has resulted in the Gator pro- 
gram being labeled a "dynasty" by the 
NCAA in its annual record book publi- 





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STEVE SPURRIER 

HEAD COACH 

cation, a rare and 
elite honor be- 
stowed upon only 
a few schools in 
the nation. UF's 
six consecutive 




Sp 


urrier File 




Year 


School/Organization 


Overall Record 


Bowl 


1983 


Tampa Bay (USFL) 


11-7 


Playoffs 


1984 


Tampa Bay (USFL) 


14-4 


Playoffs 


1985 


Tampa Bay (USFL) 


10-8 




1987 


Duke 


5-6 




1988 


Duke 


7-3-1 




1989 


Duke 


8-4 


Ail-American 


1990 


Florida 


9-2 




1991 


Florida 


10-2 


Sugar 


I 'l 1 ).' 


1 londa 


9-4 


Gator 


1993 


Florida 


11-2 


Sugar 


1994 


Florida 


10 2 1 


Sugar 


1995 


Florida 


12-1 


Fiesta 


1996 


Florida 


12-1 


Sugar 

(National 

Champions) 


1997 


Florida 


10-2 


Citrus 


1998 


Florida 


10 2 


Orange 


1999 


Florida 


9-4 


Citrus 


2000 


Florida 


10-3 


Sugar 


2001 


Florida 


9-2 


Orange 


COACHING TOTALS: 


Florida Record 
12 years 


121-27-1 (.816) 


88-13(,871) 


College Record 
15 years 


141-40-21.776) 


98-23-1 (.807) 


Overall Record (including Pros) 


176-59-2(747) 


18 years 





10-win seasons 
from 1993-98 ranks 
as the third longest 
streak in that cate- 
iM>r\ in major col- 
lege history. UF is 
also one of only 
three schools in 
major college his- 
2 tory to win at least 
; nine games for 12 
01 consecutive seasons 
§ (19 9 0-2001). 
n Florida became just 

■< the sixth major col- 
o 

c 

Steve Spurrier won 
o his 100th game at UF 
j in just his tenth 

= season, quicker than 

ii 

| any ma|or college 

j coach in the 20th 

z century. 



lege program in history to win 100 games 
in a decade (102-22-1 in 1990's) and its 
73 SEC victories in the 1990's is the 
most during a decade in the stoned his- 
tory of the conference. Florida is one of 
only two schools to finish in the top 15 
of the polls in each of the last 1 1 seasons 
(1990-2000) and its 121 total wins since 
1990 ranks as third best in the nation 
over the last 1 2 years. 

Prior to his arrival, no Florida team 
had captured an official Southeastern 
Conference championship in 56 vears as 
a charter member of the league. 
Spurrier's six outright SEC titles (1991, 
1993-'96, 2000) ranks tied for second 
best in league history, trailing only Paul 
"Bear" Bryant of Alabama (11) and Ole 
Miss' John Vaught also has six. 

Spurrier, who led Florida to its first 
national championship in 1996 in his sev- 
enth year at the helm, has posted a 
tremendous 87-14 record in SEC games 



37 



CONTINUED 




Sieve Spurrier 



cont i n ued 





over the last 12 seasons, a win- 
ning percentage of .861 — by far 
the best mark in SEC history. 
His overall win percentage of 
.816 (121-27-1) at Florida ranks 
third-best in SEC history, and 
second-best for a coach in major 
college football since 1990. 

Spurrier has been voted 
SEC Coach-of-the-Year five 
times, 1990, 1991, 1994, 1995 
and 1996, an honor he also 
captured in the Atlantic Coast 
Conference as head coach at 
Duke University in 1988 and 
1989. 

He won his 100th game at 
UF in 1999 in what was the 
eighth game of his tenth Gator 
season, an accomplishment tor 
quickness in that category 
unmatched by a major college 
coach at a school in the 20th 
century. 

The 1966 Heisman 
Trophy winner as Florida's 




quarterback, Spurrier started his coach- 
ing career as the Gators' quarterback 
coach in 1978. In 1979, he served as 
offensive coordinator and QB coach at 
Georgia Tech. He served in that same 
capacity at Duke from 1980-82 before 
moving to the USFL in his first head 
coaching job, with the Bandits, in 1983. 
He returned to Duke as head coach in 
1987 and produced that school's first 
ACC championship in 24 years in 1989. 
Steve and Jerri Spurrier met while 
UF students and were married on Sept. 
14, 1966, just before his senior football 
season at Florida. They have four chil- 
dren — daughters Lisa King and Amy 
Moody, and sons Steve, Jr., who is an 
assistant football coach at the University 
of Oklahoma, and Scott. They also have 
six grandsons and one granddaughter: 
Trey King, Davis Graham King, Jake 
Moody, Kyle Spurrier Moody, Gavin Orr 
Spurrier, Luke Phillip Spurrier and Emma 
Starr Spurrier. Gavin, Luke and Emma 
are triplets who were born to Steve, Jr. 
and his wife Melissa on Jan. 10, 2001. 



Coaching Staff 




JON HOKE 

ASSISTANT HEAD 

COACH/DEFENSIVE 

COORDINATOR/SECONDARY 

COACH 



JIM COLLINS 

OUTSIDE UNEBACKERS 

COACH/SPECIAL TEAMS 

COORDINATOR/RECRUITING 

COORDINATOR 



RICKY HUNLEY 

DEFENSIVE LINE COACH 



JERRY ODOM 

INSIDE LINEBACKERS COACH 



DWAYNE DIXON 
WIDE RECEIVERS COACH 




rf.Ad < 




LAWSON HOLLAND 
RUNNING BACKS COACH 



JOHN HUNT 

OFFENSIVE TACKLES COACH 



JIMMY RAY STEPHENS 

OFFENSIVE LINE COACH/RUN 
GAME COORDINATOR 



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GAME 1 

FLORIDA 49, MARSHALL 14 

Sept 1, 2001 

Quarterback Rex Grossman passed 
tor a career-high 375 yards (including 343 
in the first halt) and three touchdowns in 
leading Florida to a 49-14 season opening 
victory against Marshall at Ben Hill 
Griffin Stadium. The crowd of 85,445 was 
the largest season opening day crowd in 
Gator history. Led by Grossman, the 
Gators opened up the game with 35 unan- 
swered first half points. Florida finished 
the game with 541 total yards (430 pass- 
ing/ 1 1 1 rushing). 

GAME 2 

FLORIDA 55, LOUISIANA-MONROE 6 

Sept. 8, 2001 

After opening with a shaky seven 
minutes that included two fumbles and 6- 
deficit, Florida exploded for 55 unan- 
swered points, 600 total yards and 34 first 
downs before Ben Hill Griffin Stadium's 
72nd consecutive sellout crowd (85,011). 
The Gator defense held the Indians to 
105 total yards, including 27 net rushing 
yards and only five first downs. Florida 
improved to 76-1 under Steve Spurrier 
against unranked teams and 49-0 at "The 
Swamp." 




Running back Earnest Graham ran for a career-high three touchdowns in the Gator's 
season opener against Marshall. 



FLORIDA 44, KENTUCKY 10 

Sept. 22. 2001 

In its first action since a postponed 
matchup against Tennessee due to the 
World Trade Center tragedy, Florida used 
a dominating second half to capture a 44- 
I0 win at Kentucky. The win gave Florida 
its I lib SE( ' opening victory in 12 years, 
lis 15th straight win over Kentucky and 
the l lators' 2Kt win in the last 22 garni 
against the Wildcats. 

GAME 4 

FLORIDA 52. MISSISSIPPI STATE 

Sept 29, 2001 

Florida's ofl i led ^5 firsi J, iwns 

and ' ■ ill a total thai ranks 



sixth all-time at UF. Mississippi State 
entered the game surrendering an average 
of 68.0 passing yards per game, but UF fin- 
ished the day with 507 passing yards. 
Quarterback Rex Grossman set the school 
record with his fourth consecutive 300+ 
yard passing performance, as he threw for 
a career-high 393 yards and five touch- 
downs. Two Gators went over 100+ yards 
receiving — Jabar Gaffney (9-159) and 
Reche Caldwell (5-101. two TDs). 
Florida's defense held the normally potent 
Bulldog rushing attack to 44 yards. 

G A M E 5 



surpassed 300+ yards in his fifth consecu- 
tive week. Gaffney (164) and Caldwell 
(120) each registered the 100th catch of 
their careers and each surpassed 100 + 
receiving yards for the second straight 
game. Florida's defense came up with 
three interceptions, and senior defensive 
end Alex Brown broke the L'F career s. K k 
record with his 27.5th sack. 



FLORIDA 44. LSU 15 

Oct. 6, 2001 

Rex Grossman threw tor a school- 
n i ord 464 yards and five touchdowns as 
Florid. i coasted to a 44-15 victor) at LSU 
before a Tiger Stadium-record crowd of 
92,010. In the first hall alone, Grossman 



AUBURN 23, FLORIDA 20 

Oct. 13, 2001 

Damon Duval's 44-yard field goal 
with 10 seconds remaining broke a 20-20 
til to lift Auburn over No. I ranked 
Florida. Duval's winning kick came aftei a 
drive from theii own two yardline which 
began with 4:28 left on the clocli aftei 

Auburn's fourth interception oil ,i Rex 
Grossman pass. The night wasn't all bad 
loi ( irossm.m, however, as be completed 



40 



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2 5 of 42 passes for 364 yards and two 
touchdowns. Wide receiver Reche 
Caldwell registered career-highs tor recep- 
tions (nine) and receiving yards (128). 
Florida only managed-36 yards rushing, 
the second-worst total in school history. 

G A IVI E "7 



FLORIDA 24. GEORGIA 10 

Oct. 27, 2001 

Florida racked up 584 total yards of 
offense hut needed to overcome four 
turnovers and 12 penalties to defeat 
Georgia 24-10. The victory gave Florida 
its fourth consecutive win against Georgia 
and its 11th victory in the past 12 meet- 
ings. Rex Grossman completed a career- 
high 27 passes for 407 yards and registered 
his school record seventh consecutive 
300+ yard passing game. Earnest Graham 
rushed 23 times for 131 yards and caught 



three passes for 36 yards (167 yards of 
total offense). Reche Caldwell caught six 
passes for 87 yards, and extended his 
touchdown-receptions streak to eight 
games. 

GAME 8 

FLORIDA 71, VANDERBILT 13 

Nov. 3, 2001 

Playing at "The Swamp" for the first 
time in over a month, Florida put on an 
impressive offensive, defensive and special 
teams display on Homecoming as it 
defeated Vanderhilt 71-13. Florida gained 
over 500 yards of total offense (571) for 
the seventh time on the year and passed 
for its third 400+ yard game of the season. 
The Gators scored 10 touchdowns, col- 
lected 28 first downs and were never 
forced to punt. UF's defense forced five 
turnovers (two interceptions and three 





tumble recoveries), and the special teams 
units blocked three kicks (two punts and 
one PAT). 



Free safety Todd Johnson recorded a career-high 17 tackles in the Gators' 
road win at South Carolina. 



FLORIDA 54. SOUTH CAROLINA 17 

Nov. 10, 2001 

Florida scored 44 unanswered points 
as it defeated 14th ranked South Carolina 
for the 11th straight time, before 84,900 
fans. For the second consecutive week, 
the Gators did not attempt a punt. Florida 
scored on its first nine possessions and 
converted all six of its chances in the red 
zone (four TD and two FG) while amass- 
ing 482 total yards of offense, led by quar- 
terback Rex Grossman's ninth straight 
300+ yard passing game (21-33, 302 yards, 
3TD). 

GAME 1 O 

FLORIDA 37, FLORIDA STATE 13 

Nov. 17. 2001 

Florida cruised over Florida State 
before 85,732 fans, the second largest 
crowd at Ben Hill Griffin Stadium. The 
victory snapped a three-game Florida 
State win streak in the series and 
knocked Florida State out of the national 
polls for the first time since 1989. Florida 
finished with 453 total offensive yards 
(123 rushing/330 passing) while the 
Gator defense held Florida State to 268 
yards of total offense, including only 40 
rushing yards. 

GAME 11 

TENNESSEE 34, FLORIDA 32 

Dec. 1, 2001 

With a SEC East title, SEC 
Championship Game berth and possible 
national title game appearance on the 
line, Tennessee's Travis Stephens rushed 
for 226 yards, the second-most rushing 
yards ever yielded by a Gator defense, as 
the No. 5 Vols handed No. 2 Florida a 
heartbreaking 34-32 loss. It was UT's first 
win in Gainesville since 1971. In the loss, 
Reche Caldwell posted 115 yards receiv- 
ing joining Jahar Gaffney at the 1,000- 
yards receiving mark. Rex Grossman 
threw for )62 vards to reach 3,896 passing 
yards on the season, ,i mark thai links s lt 

ond in SEC fusion 



42 




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The University- of Honda has one of col- 
lege football's most loyal fallowings and 
the numbers support the claim. Flori- 
da has ranked in the top 15 nationally 
in college football attendance in each of 
the last 18 years, and in each of the last 
nine seasons Florida has ranked among the 
top six. In addition, with capacity at 83,000- 
plus at Ben Hill Griffin Stadium at Florida 
Field, the University of Florida has been 
the site of the largest football crowds — 
college or professional — in the history of the 
state of Florida. 

When Gator tans cheer, they're led by one 
of the nation's most outstanding groups of 
cheerleaders. In addition, Albert, the pop- 
ular alligator mascot, and his counterpart 
Alberta join in the fun. 

At Florida games, it's important to get to 
the game early and stay in your seats at 
halftime, so as to not miss out on the "Pride 
of the Sunshine," the University of Florida's 
Fightin' Gator Marching Band. Matt Sexton, 
Director of Bands, leads a group of 250 
students through da::ling performances 
each week. 

At the end of the third quarter, the band 
strikes up "We Are the Boys from Old 
Florida," and all Gator fans stand together and 
sway left and right, arm-in-arm, while singing 
this traditional tune. 





SCHOOL SONGS 

UF ALMA MATER 

Florida, our Alma Mater 

Thy glorious name we praise 

All thy loyal sons and daughters 

A joyous song shall raise 

Where palm and pine are blowing 

Where southern seas are flowing 

Shine forth thy noble; Gothic walls 

Thy lovely vineclad halls 

'Neath the Orange and Blue victorious 

our love shall never fail 
There's no other name so glorious 
All hail, Florida, hail. 

THE ORANGE AND BLUE 

On, brave old Flor-i-da, just keep on marching 

on your way! 
On, brave old Flor-i-da, and will cheer you 

on your play! Rah! Rah! Rah! 
And as you march a-long, we'll sing our 

victory song anew 
With all your might Go on and Fight Gators 

Fight for Dixie's rightly proud of you 
(Chorus) So give a cheer for the Orange 

and Blue, Waving for-e-ver, forever 
Pride of old Flor-i-da, May she droop nev-er 
We'll sing a song for the flag to-day, 

Cheer for the team at play! 
On to the goal we'll fight our way for Flor-i-da. 

WE ARE THE BOYS 

We are the boys from old Florida, 

F-L-0-R-l-D-A. 
Where the girls are the fairest, the boys are 

the squarest of any old state down our way 
We are all strong for old Florida down where 

the old Gators play 
In all kinds of weather we'll all stick together 

for F-L-0-R-l-D-A. 



44 




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For the second straight season, cornerback Lito Sheppard 
garnered both All-America and All-SEC recognition. 



46 







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Miami-Dade County 




Miami-Dade Board Of County Commissioners-Betty T. Ferguson. District 1; Dorrin D. Rolle. District 2; 

Dr. Barbara M. Carey-Shuler, District 3; Gwen Margolis. District 4; Bruno A. Barreiro, Distnct 5; Rebeca Sosa. District 6; 

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Joe A. Martinez. District 11; Dr. Miriam Alonso, District 12; Natacha Seijas. Distnct 13. 

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No. 


Name 


Pos. 


HI. 


Wt. 


Yr. 


Hometown 






Pos. 


Ht 


Wt 


Yr. 


Hometown 


30 


Bennie Alexander 


CB 


5-9 


175 


SR 


Raiford 


63 


Jonathan Marvin 


OG 


6-3 


290 


FR 


Hendersonville, NC 


24 
67 
7 
13 


Cory Bailey 
Steven Bell 

Brock Berlin 
Alex Brown 


FS 
OL 
QB 
DE 


5 
6 
6 
6 


11 
5 
2 
A 


183 
301 
211 
254 


FR 
SO 
SO 
SR 


Miami 
Boca Raton 
Shreveport, LA 
White Springs 


57 
47 
91 


Bobby McCray 
Todd McCullough 
Sylvester McGrew 


DE 
LB 
DT 


6-6 
6-5 
6-3 


243 
215 
260 


SO 
FR 

FR 


Miami 
Macclenny 
New Orleans, LA 


16 


Vernell Brown 


CB 


5 


■8 


148 


FR 


Gainesville 


62 


Bennie Mills 


OG 


6-2 


277 


FR 


Metaine, LA 


53 


Wesley Bryant 


OG 


6 


3 


275 


FR 


Charlotte, NC 


94 


Clint Mitchell 


DE 


6-7 


254 


SO 


Clearwater 


56 


Lance Butler 


OT 


6 


6 


313 


FR 


Lexington, NC 


61 


Mo Mitchell 


OT 


6-7 


330 


FR 


Albany, GA 


17 


Reche Caldwell 


WR 


6 


1 


198 


JR 


Tampa 


72 


Thomas Moody 


OG 


6-3 


312 


SR 


Seville 


55 
36 
33 


Travis Carroll 
Deshawn Carter 
Ran Cailhon 


LB 
CB 
TB 


6 
6 
6 


4 




237 
198 
213 


SR 
FR 
SO 


Jacksonville 
Hammond, LA 
Key West 


92 
59 


Sean Morton 
Mike Nattiel 


P 
LB 


6-2 
6-0 


182 
224 


SO 
JR 


Auburndale 
Archer 


49 


Jeff Chandler 


PK 


6 


2 


215 


SR 


Jacksonville 


21 


Lester Norwood 


FS 


6-2 


190 


SR 


Marietta, GA 


78 


Jonathan Colon 


OT 


6 


7 


297 


FR 


Miami 


50 


Marcus Oquendo-Johnson 


LB 


6-4 


218 


JR 


Rockledge 


18 


Jeff Creveling 


QB 


6 


2 


237 


FR 


Gainesville 


22 


Tre Orr 


DB 


6-1 


205 


FR 


Lake City 


25 


Robert Cromartie 


CB 


5 


9 


193 


SR 


East Point, GA 


58 


Kenny Parker 


DT 


6-3 


287 


SO 


Warner Robins, GA 


45 
68 

34 


Andra Davis 
Mike Degory 
Daryl Dixon 


LB 
C 

FS 


6 

6 
5 


1 

5 
10 


243 
315 

194 


SR 

FR 
JR 


Live Oak 
Palm Bay 
Oak Hill 


95 
71 


Ma|or Parker 
Mike Pearson 


DE 
OT 


6-4 
6-7 


236 
300 


SR 
JR 


Fort Lauderdale 
Seffner 


81 


Ronald Dowdy 


DE 


6 


4 


256 


FR 


Fayetteville, NC 


23 


Carlos Perez 


WR 


6-0 


199 


SO 


Hoboken, NJ 


70 


Dewayne DuBose 


C 


6 


1 


275 


FR 


Lutz 


38 


Matt Piotrowicz 


PK 


5-10 


190 


FR 


Chicago, IL 


35 


Kennard Ellis 


DE 


6 


2 


244 


SR 


Orlando 


1 


Keiwan Ratliff 


CB 


5-10 


181 


SO 


Columbus, OH 


43 


Matt Farrior 


LB 


6 


2 


229 


SO 


Petersburg, VA 


52 


Chris Reynolds 


DT 


6-1 


272 


JR 


Tallahassee 


40 
10 
20 


Reid Fleming 
Jabar Gaffney 
Robert Gillespie 


LB 
WR 
TB 


6 

6 
5 



1 
9 


225 
197 
190 


SO 

so 

SR 


Panama City 
Jacksonville 
Hattiesburg, MS 


44 
65 


Rob Roberts 
Arpedge Rolle 


FB 

DT 


6-2 
6-1 


256 
276 


SR 
JR 


Dade City 
Miami 


5 


Earnest Graham 


TB 


5 


10 


215 


JR 


Ft Myers 


60 


Bryan Savelio 


DT 


6-2 


285 


JR 


Henderson, NV 


32 


Willie Green 


TB 


5 


9 


214 


FR 


Kissimmee 


9 


Guss Scott 


SS 


5-10 


196 


SO 


Jacksonville 


8 


Rex Grossman 


QB 


6 


1 


223 


SO 


Bloommgton, IN 


99 


Ian Scott 


DT 


6-3 


300 


SO 


Gainesville 


42 


Byron Hardmon 


LB 


6 


1 


227 


JR 


Jacksonville 


37 


Antoine Sharp 


WR 


6-0 


195 


FR 


Jacksonville 


27 

15 
87 


Travis Harris 
Brian Haugabrook 
Danny Heard 


LB 
WR 
WR 


6 
6 
5 


2 
1 

9 


234 
202 

184 


SO 
SR 
SR 


Decatur, GA 
Wildwood 
Orange Park 


3 
39 


Lito Sheppard 
Matt Sitter 


CB 
FB 


5-10 
6-0 


195 
231 


JR 
SR 


Jacksonville 
Orlando 


46 


Jarvis Herring 


CB 


5 


11 


185 


FR 


Live Oak 


11 


O.J Small 


WR 


6-2 


211 


FR 


Jacksonville 


29 


Dwright Jackson 


LB 


6 


2 


220 


SO 


South Bay 


41 


RaySnell 


FB 


6-0 


237 


FR 


Tampa 


19 


Matt Jackson 


WR 


5 


10 


189 


SO 


Live Oak 


75 


Shannon Snell 


OG 


6-5 


307 


SO 


Tampa 


6 


Taylor Jacobs 


WR 


6 





195 


JR 


Monticello 


77 


Max Starks 


OT 


6-8 


345 


SO 


Orlando 


26 
54 
64 
48 


Todd Johnson 
David Jorgensen 
David Kearley 
Larry Kendrick 


FS 
C 

OG 
DB 


6 
6 
6 

5 


1 
4 

4 
11 


198 
302 
305 
217 


JR 
JR 
JR 

FR 


Sarasota 
Hartford, CT 
Niceville/Niceville 
Haines City 


89 
66 
93 


Brian Stone 
Erik Strange 
BrendtTalcotl 


WR 
OG 
PK 


6-0 
6-5 
6-0 


189 
302 
190 


FR 
SR 
SO 


Nashville, TN 

Orlando 

Lakeland 


2 


Kelvin Kight 


WR 


6 





195 


SO 


Lithoma, GA 


76 


Chad Tidwell 


OG 


6-5 


310 


FR 


Tallahassee 


88 


Alex Kish 


WR 


6 


3 


205 


FR 


New Smyrna Beach 


84 


Ben Troupe 


TE 


6-5 


255 


SO 


Augusta, GA 


98 


Tron LaFavor 


DT 


6 


2 


280 


JR 


Ft. Lauderdale 


80 


Reggie Vickers 


WR 


5-11 


175 


FR 


Belle Glade 


31 
14 
86 
73 


Johnny Lamar 
Matt Leach 
Darrell Lee 
Jonathan Lively 


CB 
P 

DE 
C/LS 


5 
6 
6 
6 


10 
1 

4 
1 


179 
182 
261 

271 


SO 
FR 
SO 
FR 


Ft. Lauderdale 
Sarasota 
Kirkwood, MO 
Belle Glade 


82 
83 
28 


Aaron Walker 
Kirk Wells 
Marquis Westbrook 


TE 
TE 
CB 


6-6 
6-4 
5-8 


257 
225 

177 


JR 
JR 
JR 


Mims 

Riverdale, GA 
Cordele, GA 


4 


Marquand Manuel 


SS 


6 


1 


204 


SR 


Miami 


79 


Bobby Williams 


OT 


6-4 


270 


FR 


New Smyrna Beach 


12 


Ingle Martin 


QB 


6 


2 


210 


FR 


Nashville, TN 


74 


ZacZedalis 


OG/C 


6-3 


295 


SR 


Alachua 



54 



X 



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Customers Only. Cannot be Combined With Any Other Offer. License Nos.: AK If BL403692, BL256239. 25686: AL # 22820, 01-233. 01-458, 01-506; AR s 0030740102: EO055; AZ K109396-C12, 109402-L67; 
CA ft PPO-12949, 707408, ACO-4227; CT # L5-105789, ttL5-106053; DC ft 611Z-39703010; DE if 85-26. 1993100437, FAL-0014, FAC-0045; FL ft EF0000911. EF0000950, EF 0000949, EF 0000273, EF 0001194, 
EG 0000169, EF0000142. EF0000507; GA # LA204776, LU001160, LA002833. LA003870, ID ft 12256-A-4(8), 2643 SCL; IL #124-001426. 127-000364; LA ft BF000252. BF000251, 24889; MA tt 1533-C; 
MD It 42487, 50162, 107-527. 04814768; ME II MC6O017614. LM50016603; MI II A-0170B, BA1158(A-E), 51-03116; MN # CC00910; MS II 04408 ; HT If 99-FPC; NE ft 22814; NV ft 0040091, 115-787-280. 
F-27, F-5: NM « 056126; NY II 12000025576, 11000023666: NC tt 12646/04-SP-LV; OH tt 19352. 50-18-1052, 50-57-1034, 53-89-1329, 53-31-1582. 50-50-1019. 50-48-1032, 50-25-1050, 50-76-1025; 
OK tt 0067; OR It 26-209CLE, 59944; RI II AFC-0126, 840. 18004; SC ft 449, 451, 452, 448: TN S QA-482. 173, 280, 281. 330, 512, 872, 18146: TX ft B00536. ACR 1460; UT ft 297869-6501; VA ft DOS 
11-1878, 11-1879, 11-3247, 2701-O35978A; WA It EC06 ADTSES103205. WA601-636-830; WV # WV014142; WY ft LV-A-20: MI - 3054 East Lake Lansing Road, East Lansing. MI 48823. MT - 2110 Overland 
Avenue, Suite 110, Billings, MT 59102. NY - Licensed by the N.Y.S. Department of State. Rl - 333 Smith Street, Providence, RI 02908. SC - 7154 Cross County Road, North Charleston, : C 29418. 
TX - 140 Heimer Rd. #100. San Antonio, TX 78232; Texas Commission on Private Security, 4930 South Congress Ave, Suite C-305, Austin, TX 78745. WA - 841 Powell Avenue Southwest. Suite 101. 
Renton. WA 98055. c 2001 ADT Security Services. Inc. 



Bubble #36-8401 (g) 



Duties include: 
making victory 
that much sweeter 





When Maryland 
Has the Ball 

Terrapin Offense 



MARYLAND TERRAPINS 



WR 


21 


Guilian Gary 


43 


Daryl Whitaker 


11 


74 


C.J. Brooks 


76 


Eric Dumas 


LG 


66 


Todd Wike 


72 


Kyle Schmitt 


C 


67 


Melvin Fowler. Jr 


72 


Kyle Schmitt 


RG 


n 


Lamar Bryant 


69 


Reggie Kemp 


RT 


m 


Matt Crawford 


79 


Lou Lombardo 


TE 


82 


Jeff Dugan 


88 


Matt Murphy 


OB 


14 


Shaun Hill 


4 


Latrez Harrison 


TB 


1 


Bruce Perry 


2 


Marc Riley 


FB 


5 


James Lynch 


31 


Chad Killian 


WR 


19 


Jafar Williams 


2b 


Scooter Monroe 


Gator Defense 






DF 


36 


Darrell Lee 


57 


Bobby McCray 


NT 


99 


Ian Scott 


60 


Bryan Savelio 


DT 


98 


Tron LaFavor 


60 


Bryan Savelio 


RF 


13 


Alex Brown 


86 


Darrell Lee 


WIB 


59 


Mike Nattiel 


43 


Matt Farrior 


MLB 


1!. 


Andia Davis 


55 


Travis Carroll 


SLB 


42 


Byron Hardmon 


50 


Marcus Oquendo-Johnson 


CB 


3 


Lito Sheppard 


1 


Keiwan Ratliff 


SS 


4 


Marquand Manuel 


9 


Guss Scott 


FS 


a; 


Todd Johnson 


34 


Daryl Dixon 


CB 


30 


Bennie Alexander 


28 


Marquis Westbrook 



No. Name 


Pos. 


No 


Name 


Pos 


No 


Name 


Pos. 


1 Bruce Perry 


TB 


32 


Leon Joe 


LB 


71 


Durrand Ro mdl 


DE 


2 Marc Riley 


TB 


33 


Rod Littles 


SS 


72 


Kyle Schmitt 


OG 


! RobAbii 


WR 


34" 


Sieve Suter 


WR 


73 


Lamar Bryant 


0G 


4 Latrez Harrison 


OB 


34" 


Madieu Williams 


SS 


74 


C.J. Brooks 


OT 


5 James Lynch 


FB 


35 


Marlon Moye-Moore 


LB 


75 


Eric Dumas 


OT 


6" Domonique Foxwonh 


CB 


36 


Sal Aragona 


CB 


76 


Tim Donovan 


OT 


6' 'Scott McBrien 


QB 


37 


Jamal Chance 


CB 


77 


Russell Bonham 


OT 


7 Chris Kelley 


QB 


38 


Gerrick McPhearson 


CB 


78 


Matt Crawford 


OT 


8 Mario Merrills 


TB 


40 


Aaron Thompson 


LB 


79 


Lou Lombardo 


OT 


9' Jason Crawford 


TB 


41 


Kevin Eli 


DE 


80 


Eric James 


TE 


9" Hunter Cross 


QB 


42 


E.J. Henderson 


LB 


82 


Jeff Dugsn 


TE 


10 Ike Roberts 


WR 


43 


Oaryl Whilmer 


WR 


83 


Derrick Fenner 


WR 


11* Tony Okanlawon 


CB 


44 


Bernie Fiddler 


FB 


84 


Derek Miller 


TE 


11" Brian Ramey 


QB 


45 


Craig Reutepohler 


LB 


85 


Aaron Smith 


WR 


12" Randall Jones 


FS 


46 


Nick Novak 


PK 


86 


Jason Bell 


WR 


12' Shai Warsaw 


QB 


47 


Jon Condo 


LB 


87 


Ryan Flynn 


TE 


13 Dennard Wilson 


CB 


48 


Ryan Swift 


LB 


88 


Man Murphy 


TE 


14 Shaun Hill 


QB 


49 


Jamahl Cochran 


LB 


91 


Akil Patterson 


DT 


15 Curtis Williams 


FS 


51 


Andrew Henley 


LB 


92 


Brandon Thomas 


TE 


16 Brooks Barnard 


P 


52 


Monte Graves 


LB 


95 


William Shime 


NT 


17 Vedad Siljkovic 


PK 


53 


Reggie Lewis 


LB 


96 


C.J.Feldheim 


DT 


18 Maurice Shanks 


WR 


54 


Scott Smith 


DE 


97 


Tosin Abari 


DT 


19" Richard Harngan 


CB 


55 


Mike Whaley 


LB 


98 


Charles Hill 


DT 


19" Jafar Williams 


WR 


56 


Jesse Kluttz 


LS 


99 


Landon Jones 


DT 


20 Chris Downs 


TB 


57 


Randy Starks 


DE 




Brian Bishop 


LB 


21 Guilian Gary 


WR 


58 


Ricardo Dickerson 


LB 




Richard Beniamin 


LB 


22 Rich Parson 


WR 


59 


Maurice Smith 


LB 




Davian Bryan 


DL 


23 Andrew Smith Jr. 


CB 


60 


Jason Holman 


C 




Omid Janloo 


LB 


24 Leroy Ambush 


LB 


61 


Ed Tyler 


OG 




Jeffrey Kuczynski 


LB 


25 Scooter Monroe 


WR 


63 


Raheem Lewis 


OG 




Onochie Onwuemene 


WR 


26 Raymond Custis 


SS 


64 


Mike Steele 


0G 




Mohamed Savage 


DB 


27 Tony Jackson 


SS 


65 


Matl Powell 


OG 




Henry Scott 


FB 


29 Tyrone Stewarl 


FS 


66 


Todd Wike 


0G 




Preston Taylor 


DB 


30 CuromeCox 


CB 


67 


Melvin Fowler Jr 


C 




Robert Whittles 


WR 


31 Chad Killian 


FB 


69 


Reggie Kemp 


0G 




Jeremy Wong 


FB 



Punter 16 Brooks Barnard 

Placekicker 46 Nick Novak 

Kickoffs 1 Bruce Petty 



Terrapin Specialists 

Snapper 47 Jon Condo 
Holder 16 Brooks Barnard 



Punt Ret. 21 Guilian Gray 

27 Tony Jackson 

Kickoff Ret 1 Bruce Perry 

22 Rich Parson 



FLORIDA GATORS 



No. Name 


Pos. 


No. 


Name 


Pos 


No. 


Name 


Pos 


1 Keiwan Ratliff 


CB 


38 


Matt Piotrowicz 


PK/P 


77 


Max Starks 


OT 


2 Kelvin Kight 


WR 


39 


Matt Sitter 


FB 


78 


Jonathan Colon 


OT 


3 Lito Sheppard 


CB 


40 


Reid Fleming 


LB 


79 


Bobby Williams 


OT 


4 Marquand Manuel 


SS 


41 


RaySnell 


FB 


80 


Reggie Vickers 


WR 


5 Earnest Graham 


TB 


42 


Byron Hardmon 


LB 


81 


Ronald Dowdy 


DE 


6 Taylor Jacobs 


WR 


43 


Matt Farrior 


LB 


82 


Aaron Walker 


TE 


7 Brock Berlin 


QB 


44 


Rob Roberts 


FB 


83 


Kirk Wells 


TE 


8 Rex Grossman 


QB 


45 


Andra Davis 


LB 


84 


Ben Troupe 


TE 


9 Guss Scott 


SS 


46 


Jarvis Herring 


CB 


86 


Darrell Lee 


DE 


10 Jabar Gaffney 


WR 


47 


Todd McCullough 


LB 


87 


Danny Heard 


WR 


11 0.J Small 


WR 


48 


Larry Kendnck 


DB 


88 


Alex Kish 


WR 


12 Ingle Martin 


QB 


49 


Jeff Chandler 


PK 


89 


Brian Stone 


WR 


13 Alex Brown 


DE 


50 


Marcus Oquendo-Joh 


^son LB 


91 


Sylvester McGrew 


DT 


14 Matt Leach 


P/PK 


52 


Chris Reynolds 


DT 


92 


Sean Morton 


P 


15 Brian Haugabrook 


WR 


53 


Wesley Bryant 


OG 


93 


BrendtTalcott 


PK 


16 Vernell Brown 


CB 


54 


David Jorgensen 


C 


94 


Clint Mitchell 


DE 


17 Reche Caldwell 


WR 


55 


Travis Carroll 


LB 


95 


Major Parker 


DE 


18 Jeff Creveling 


QB 


56 


Lance Butler 


OT 


98 


Tron LaFavor 


DT 


19 Matt Jackson 


WR 


57 


Bobby McCray 


DE 


99 


Ian Scott 


DT 


20 Robert Gillespie 


TB 


58 


Kenny Parker 


DT 








21 Lester Norwood 


FS 


59 


Mike Nattiel 


CB 








22 TreOrr 


OB 


60 


Bryan Savelio 


DT 








23 Carlos Perez 


WR 


61 


Mo Mitchell 


0T 








24 Cory Bailey 


FS 


62 


Bennie Mills 


OG 








25 Robert Cromartie 


CB 


63 


Jonathan Marvin 


OG 








26 Todd Johnson 


FS 


64 


David Kearley 


OG 








27 Travis Harris 


LB 


65 


Arpedge Rolle 


DT 








28 Marquis Westbrook 


CB 


66 


Erik Strange 


OG 








29 Dwright Jackson 


LB 


67 


Steven Bell 


OL 








30 Bennie Alexander 


CB 


68 


Mike Degory 


C 








3! Johnny Lamar 


CB 


70 


Dewayne DuBose 


c 








32 Willie Green 


TB 


71 


Mike Pearson 


OT 








33 RanCarthon 


TB 


72 


Thomas Moody 


OG 








34 Daryl Dixon 


FS 


73 


Jonathan Lively 


C/LS 








35 Kennard Ellis 


DE 


74 


ZacZedalis 


OG.'C 








36 Deshawn Carter 


CB 


75 


Shannon Snell 


OG 








37 Antoine Sharp 


WR 


76 


ChadTidwell 


OG 









Punter 49 Matt Leach 

92 Sean Morton 

Placekicker 49 Jeff Chandler 

93 Brent Talcott 



Gator Specialists 

Snapper 44 Rob Roberts 

Holder 89 Brian Stone 



Punt Ret. 3 Lito Sheppard 

1 Keiwan Ratliff 

Kickoff Ret. 3 Lito Sheppard 

1 Keiwan Ratliff 

2 Kelvin Kight 



When Florida 
Has the Ball 



Gator Offense 



WR 


10 


Jabar Gaffney 


23 


Carlos Perez 


WR 


17 


Reche Caldwell 


6 


Taylor Jacobs 


IT 


71 


Mike Pearson 


78 


Jonathan Colon 


LG 


75 


Shannon Snell 


62 


Bennie Mills 


C 


74 


Zac Zedalis 


54 


David Jorgensen 


RG 


72 


Thomas Moody 


66 


Erik Strange 


RT 


77 


Max Starks 


61 


Mo Mitchell 


TE 


82 


Aaron Walker 


84 


Ben Troupe 


f)B 


8 


Rex Grossman 


7 


Brock Berlin 


FB 


44 


Rob Roberts 


41 


RaySnell 


RB 


5 


Earnest Graham 


20 


Robert Gillespie 


Terrap 


n Defense 






DE 


71 


Durrand Roundtree 


54 


Scott Smith 


NT 


98 


Charles Hill 


95 


William Shime 


DT 


96 


C J. Fieldheim 


57 


Randy Starks 


LEO 


55 


Mike Whaley 


49 


Jamahl Cochran 


MIB 


42 


E.J. Henderson 


52 


Monte Graves 


WLB 


32 


Leon Joe 


35 


Marlon Moye-Moore 


SLB 


40 


Aaron Thompson 


24 


Leroy Ambush 


CB 


6 


Domonique Foxworth 


13 


Dennard Jackson 


SS 


27 


Tony Jackson 


33 


Rod Littles 


FS 


12 


Randall Jones 


29 


Ty Steward 


CB 


30 


Curome Cox 


37 


Jamal Chance 




I 2002 The Coca-Cola Company. Coca-Cola", the Red Disk Icon and the Contour Bottle design are registered trademarks of The Coca-Cola Company 



Coca-Cola Bottling Company of Florida 




IF SUV'S COULD PLAY FOOTBALL, 
THIS ONE WOULD BETHE MVR 




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COMPLIMENTS OF YOUR 

BALTIMORE AND WASHINGTON 

TOYOTA DEALERS. 



GET THE FEELING. TOYOTA. 




No. 


Name 


Pos 


Ht. 


Wt. 


Yr 


Hometown 


Nn 


Name 


Pos 


Ht 


Wt 


Yr. 


Hometown 


97 


Tosin Abari 


DT 


6-0 


258 


So. 


Mt Rainier. Md 


53 


Reggie Lewis 


LB 


6-0 


247 


Sr 


Chicago, III. 


3 


Rob Abiamiri 


WR 


6-3 


203 


Fr. 


Randallstown, Md 


33 


Rod Littles 


S 


5-11 


201 


Sr 


Gainesville, Fla. 


24 


leroy Ambush 


LB 


6-1 


220 


So. 


Frederick, Md 


79 


Lou Lombardo 


OT 


6-6 


307 


Fr 


Baltimore, Md. 


36 


Sal Aragona 


CB 


5-8 


184 


So. 


Staten Island, NY 


5 


James Lynch 


FB 


5-11 


261 


So 


Washington, D C 


16 


Brooks Barnard 


P 


6-2 


182 


Jr 


Arnold, Md. 


6(d) 


Scott McBnen 


QB 


6-2 


180 


So 


Rockville, Md 


86 


Jason Bell 


WR 


5-10 


173 


Jr 


Silver Spring, Md. 


38 


Gernck McPhearson 


CB 


5-11 


185 


Fr. 


Columbia, Md 




Richard Benjamin 


LB 


6-1 


239 


So. 


White Plains, Md 


8 


Mario Merrills 


TB 


5-10 


186 


Fr. 


Columbia. Md 


77 


Russell Bonham 


OT 


6-4 


318 


Fr. 


Winston-Salem, N.C. 


84 


Derek Miller 


TE 


6-8 


243 


Fr 


Carlisle, Pa. 


74 


C.J. Brooks 


OT 


6-5 


311 


Fr 


Rex, Ga 


25 


Scooter Monroe 


WR 


6-1 


195 


Jr 


Abingdon, Md 




Davian Bryan 


DL 


5-10 


289 


Fr. 


Hyattsville, Md 


35 


Marlon Moye-Moore 


LB 


6-1 


232 


Sr. 


Brandywine, Md. 


73 


Lamar Bryant 


OG 


6-3 


301 


So. 


Clinton, Md. 


88 


Matt Murphy 


TE 


6-5 


255 


Sr. 


New Haven, Mich 


37 


Jamal Chance 


CB 


6-1 


190 


Jr. 


Ephrata, Pa. 


46 


Nick Novak 


PK 


6-0 


186 


Fr. 


Charlottesville, Va. 


49 


Jamahl Cochran 


LB 


6-0 


240 


Fr. 


Mornstown, N J 


11(d) 


Tony Okanlawon 


CB 


5-11 


183 


Sr. 


Forestville, Md. 


47 


Jon Condo 


LB 


6-3 


225 


Fr 


Philipsburg, Pa. 




Onochi Onwuemene 


WR 


6-0 


187 


So 


Silver Spring, Md 


30 


Curome Cox 


CB 


6-1 


192 


So. 


Arlington, Va. 


22 


Rich Parson 


WR 


5-10 


185 


Fr 


Newark, Del- 


9(d) 


Jason Crawford 


TB 


6-2 


216 


Fr 


Forestville, Md. 


91 


Akil Patterson 


DT 


6-3 


278 


Fr 


Frederick, Md 


78 


Matt Crawford 


OT 


6-6 


314 


Jr 


Moravia, N.Y. 


1 


Bruce Perry 


TB 


5-9 


190 


So 


Philadelphia, Pa 


9(d) 


Hunter Cross 


QB 


6-3 


207 


Jr 


Hagerstown, Md 


65 


Matt Powell 


OG 


6-4 


315 


Fr 


Ft Washington, Md 


26 


Raymond Custis 


SS 


5-8 


191 


Fr. 


Germantown, Md. 


11(d) 


Brian Ramey 


QB 


6-0 


185 


Fr 


Upper Arlington, Ohio 


58 


Ricardo Dickerson 


LB 


6-3 


227 


Fr. 


Hyattsville, Md 


45 


Craig Reutepohler 


LB 


5-9 


191 


Fr 


Huron, Ohio 


76 


Tim Donovan 


OT 


6-4 


323 


Fr. 


Crofton, Md 






























2 


Marc Riley 


TB 


6-3 


218 


Sr. 


Coram, NY 


20 


Chris Downs 


TB 


5-8 


192 


Jr 


Philadelphia, Pa 


10 


Ike Roberts 


WR 


5-11 


169 


Fr. 


Staten Island, NY 


82 


Jeff Dugan 


TE 


6-4 


264 


So 


Allison Park, Pa 






























71 


Durrand Roundtree 


DE 


6-3 


260 


Jr 


Baltimore, Md. 


75 


Eric Dumas 


OT 


6-6 


312 


So. 


Atlanta, Ga. 




Mohamed Savage 


DB 


5-8 


169 


So 


Gaithersburg, Md. 


41 


Kevin Eli 


DE 


6-4 


251 


Fr 


Deptford, N.J. 






























72 


Kyle Schmitt 


OG 


6-5 


309 


Fr 


Latrobe, Pa. 


96 


C.J. Feldheim 


DT 


6-3 


267 


So. 


Parkton, Md. 




Henry Scott 


FB 


6-1 


250 


So 


Baltimore, Md 


83 


Derrick Fenner 


WR 


5-11 


177 


Fr 


Hampton, Va. 






























18 


Maurice Shanks 


WR 


6-4 


193 


Fr 


Hampton, Va 


44 


Bernie Fiddler 


FB 


6-1 


235 


So 


Swedesboro, N J 






























95 


William Shime 


NT 


6-4 


283 


Jr 


Ft. Washington, Md 


87 


Ryan Flynn 


TE 


6-4 


249 


Fr. 


Youngstown, Ohio 






























17 


Vedad Siljkovic 


PK 


6-2 


222 


Sr 


Montenegro, Yugoslavia 


67 


Melvin Fowler Jr 


C 


6-3 


297 


Sr. 


Wheatly Heights, N Y 






























85 


Aaron Smith 


WR 


6-5 


197 


Fr 


West Point, NY 


6(d) 


Domonique Foxworth 


CB 


5-11 


170 


Fr. 


Randallstown, Md. 






























23 


Andrew Smith Jr 


CB 


6-0 


193 


So 


Fort Meade, Md. 


21 


Guilian Gary 


WR 


6-0 


187 


Sr. 


Horseheads, N Y 






























59 


Maurice Smith 


LB 


6-0 


214 


Fr. 


Waldorf, Md. 


52 


Monte Graves 


LB 


6-0 


247 


Sr. 


Annapolis, Md 






























54 


Scott Smith 


DE 


6-4 


271 


So 


Philadelphia, Pa 


19 (d) Richard 


CB 


5-8 


184 


Sr. 


St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin 




























Islands 


57 


Randy Starks 


DE 


6-4 


305 


Fr 


Waldorf, Md. 


4 


Latrez Harrison 


QB 


6-3 


214 


So. 


Atlanta, Ga. 


64 


Mike Steele 


OG 


6-5 


275 


Fr 


Woodbine, Md. 


42 


E.J Henderson 


LB 


6-2 


243 


Jr. 


Aberdeen, Md 


29 


Tyrone Stewart 


S 


6-0 


197 


Jr 


Washington, D C 


51 


Andrew Henley 


LB 


5-11 


217 


So. 


Riverdale, Md 


34(d) 


Steve Suter 


WR 


5-9 


195 


Fr 


Manchester, Md. 


98 


Charles Hill 


DT 


6-2 


293 


Sr 


Palmer Park, Md 


48 


Ryan Swift 


LB 


6-1 


242 


Sr 


Hinsdale, III 


14 


Shaun Hill 


QB 


6-3 


221 


Sr 


Parsons, Kan. 




Preston Taylor 


DB 


6-1 


203 


Sr 


College Park, Md. 


60 


Jason Holman 


C 


6-2 


264 


Fr. 


Midlothian, Va 


92 


Brandon Thomas 


TE 


6-5 


200 


Fr, 


Temple Hills, Md 


27 


Tony Jackson 


S 


6-1 


205 


Sr. 


Elhcott City, Md 


40 


Aaron Thompson 


LB 


6-1 


231 


Sr 


Baltimore, Md 


80 


Eric James 


TE 


6-2 


260 


Sr 


Washington, DC 


61 


Ed Tyler 


OG 


6-3 


308 


So 


Franklinville, N.J 




Omid Janloo 


LB 


5-11 


220 


Fr 


Ellicott City, Md 


12(d) 


Shai Warsaw 


QB 


6-1 


189 


Fr 


Sandy Springs, Md. 


32 


Leon Joe 


LB 


6-1 


223 


So. 


Clinton, Md. 


55 


Mike Whaley 


LB 


6-1 


242 


So 


Lexington, S.C. 


99 


Landon Jones 


DT 


6-4 


261 


So 


Marion, Ohio 


43 


Daryl Whitmer 


WR 


6-0 


187 


Sr. 


Waldorf, Md. 


12(d) 


Randall Jones 


S 


6-2 


217 


Sr 


Frederick, Md 




Robert Whittles 


WR 


5-8 


168 


So 


Laurel, Md 


7 


Chris Kelley 


QB 


6-2 


198 


Fr. 


Germantown, Md. 


66 


Todd Wike 


OG 


6-3 


291 


Jr. 


Lebanon, Pa. 


69 


Reggie Kemp 


OG 


6-4 


332 


Fr. 


Hyattsville, Md 


15 


Curtis Williams 


FS 


6-2 


203 


Fr 


Huntington Station, N.Y. 


31 


Chad Killian 


FB 


6-2 


246 


Jr. 


Pittsburgh, Pa. 


19(d) 


Jafar Williams 


WR 


6-2 


201 


So. 


Philadelphia. Pa. 


56 


Jesse Kluttz 


LS 


6-3 


236 


Fr. 


Fallston, Md 


34(d) 


Madieu Williams 


SS 


6-1 


188 


Jr. 


Lanham, Md. 




Jeffrey Kuczynski 


LB 


6-0 


246 


Fr. 


Clarksville, Md 


13 


Dennard Wilson 


CB 


5-11 


182 


So. 


Upper Marlboro, Md 


63 


Raheem Lewis 


OG 


6-3 


335 


Fr. 


District Heights, Md. 




Jeremy Wong 


FB 


6-0 


198 


Fr 


Knoxville, Md 



59 



ZOOM, BABY 





Talk about running a fly pattern. The University of Maryland hasn't just come into its own, it's zoomed into its own. The Final 
Four last March, the Orange Bowl, and don't forget the NCAA record, seven straight titles for women's lacrosse. And it's not just 
athletics we're pumped about. We have the same momentum in academics. Ten years ago we had just one program qualify 
for a top-25 ranking. Today, we have 61. Our faculty now includes six Pulitzer Prize winners, a Nobel Prize winner, and scores 
of Fulbright scholars. Our students are distinguishing themselves in virtually every field. First down, University of Maryland. 




k UNIVERSITY OF 

MARYLAND 



ZOOM 



www.maryland.edu 




BROOKS BARNARD 
PUNTER 



JASON BELL 
WIDE RECEIVER 



Charles Hill (above left) helped key a stingy Maryland defense which led the ACC in 
quarterback sacks (37). Punter Brooks Barnard (above), a Ray Guy Award semifinalist, is 
a dangerous special teams weapon for the Terps. 
61 




U.FELDHEIM 
DEFENSIVE TACKLE 










FOXWORTH 

CORNERBACK 






GUILIAN GARY 


MONTE GRAVES 


RICHARD HARRIGAN 




LATREZ HARRISON 


EJ. HENDERSON 


ANDREW HENLEY 


WIDE RECEIVER 


LINEBACKER 


CORNERBACK 


62 


QUARTERBACK 


LINEBACKER 


LINEBACKER 
CONTINUED 



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Doug is one of thousands of people who have written to 
tell us they won't let pain slow them down. That's why 
he takes Aleve. Just two pills can work all day for relief 
from back pain, minor arthritis pain, and even tough 
headaches. So if you're looking for a pain reliever that 
can actually make a difference in your life... try Aleve. 
Then write and tell us how you feel. (www.Aleve.com) 

All day strong. All day long. 




Mmi mn Terrapin 





i 



CHARLES HILL 

DEFENSIVE TACKLE 





LANDON JONES 

DEFENSIVE TACKLE 



o 




RAHEEM LEWIS 
OFFENSIVE GUARD 






SHAUN HILL 

QUARTERBACK 





RANDALL JONES 

SAFETY 



TONY OKANLAWON 
CORNERBACK 




\*mf 




JASON HOLMAN 

CENTER 



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QUARTERBACK 




LITTLES 

SAFETY 




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SAFETY 



ERIC JAMES 
TIGHT END 



DEREK MILLER 

TIGHT END 




RICH PARSON AKIL PATTERSON 

WIDE RECEIVER DEFENSIVE TACKLE 





3 ^ 




LEON JOE 

LINEBACKER 




MATT POWELL 
OFFENSIVE GUARO 



64 



CONTINUED 



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DENNARO WILSON 
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The University of Maryland 
Marching Band has long been an 
integral part of the spectacle, 
excitement and tradition of 
Terrapin football. Whether it be on-the- 
field presentations at halftime, its cheer- 
ing choruses and energetic musical selec- 
tions in the stands, or public appearances 
as representatives of the university, the 
marching band has developed a tradition 
of excellence. 




In addition to performing at every 
home game and selected road games, the 
band makes frequent appearances at pro- 
fessional sporting events and civic func- 
tions. Recent performances have taken 
them to Hamburg, Barcelona, Paris, 
Scotland and Rio de Janeiro. 

Open to all students with previous musi- 
cal experience, the eight bands that form 
the University of Maryland Band Program 
provide rewarding musical experiences for 
more than 400 students study- 
ing in nearly all of the col- 
leges of the university. 
There are approximately 
250 members in the Mighty Sound 
Df Maryland, including instrumentalists, 
percussionists, flag handlers, dancers, 
twirlers and drum majors. 

Under the direction of Dr. L. Richmond 
Sparks, the "Mighty Sound" is led by drum 
majors Phil Barnes, Justin Doyle and Missy 
Thompson. 



Complementing the efforts of the 
"Mighty Sound" are the Terrapin cheerlead- 
ers, under the direction of Tina Simijoski 
and Lura Fleece. 




DR. I. RICHMOND SPARKS 

ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR OF BANDS 



Maryland 
Victory Song 

Maryland, we're all behind you. 
Wave high the black and gold, 
For there Is nothing half so glorious 
As to see our men victorious. 
We've got the team, boys, 
We've got the steam, boys, 
So keep on fighting, don't give in! 
M-A-R-Y-L-A-N-D 
Maryland will win. 

Maryland 
Alma Mater 

Hail Alma Mater! 
Hail to thee, Maryland! 
Steadfast in loyalty, 
For thee we stand. 
Love for black and gold, 
Deep in our hearts we hold, 
Singing thy praise forever 
Throughout the land. 




68 





RATHGEBER/ 

GOSS 

ASSOCIATES 



Consulting Structural Engineers 

15871 Crabbs Branch Way. Rockville. Maryland ?0855 
7(301)590-0071 F (301) 590-0073 E mall«Sralh-goss com 



SERVING THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY SINCE 1991 




rrrrrnr 




GO TERPS! 



MICHAEL J. GOSS 
MARYLAND CLASS OF 75 

www.rath-goss.com 











1 ■ ^bd 


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-■1 




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Palm Beach County Sports Commission would 
like to extend a special thank you to the 
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GAME 1 

MARYLAND 23, NORTH CAROLINA 7 

Sept. 1, 2001 

Ralph Friedgen's head-coaching debut 
was a huge success as the Terps overcame an 
early 7-0 deficit by scoring 23 unanswered 
points in posting the ACC victory over the 
Tar Heels. Brooks Barnard played a key role 
in the win with his precision punting; he aver- 
aged 50.4 yards on eight kicks and kept the 
Tar Heels pinned in their own end for much 
of the game. Shaun Hill threw a pair of TD 
passes, Bruce Perry rushed for 116 yards, 
and the Terrapin defense limited UNC to just 
276 total yards. 

GAME 2 

MARYLAND 50, EASTERN 
MICHIGAN 3 

Sept. 8, 2001 

The Terrapins recorded their most lop- 
sided victory since 1996 by holding the 
Eagles to just 124 total yards, the fewest by 
a Maryland opponent since 1980. The 
Terps, who led 41-0 after three quarters, scored 
six rushing touchdowns, including three 
by tailback Bruce Perry, who finished with 
133 yards. Shaun Hill completed 15 of 21 
passes for 187 yards and one TD, and E.J. 
Henderson led the hit parade with eight total 
tackles. 

GAME 3 

MARYLAND 27. WAKE FOREST 20 

Sept. 22. 2001 

Man land held on for a big ACC road win 
in a game that went down to the final seconds. 
Bruce Pern' was the ston - of the game for the 
Terps, rushing tor a career-high 276 yards, 
including Til romps of SO and 50 yards. E.J. 
Henderson had a game-high 1 7 tackles, and 
bun Jackson preserved the win with an 
nil. i, eption in the end zone with 39 seconds 
remaining in the game. 

GAME 4 

MARYLAND 32, WEST VIRGINIA 20 

Sept. 29, 2001 

Bruce Pern had his fourth consecutive 
100-yard rushing game, but the ston, of the da} 




Senior center Melvm Fowler is one of the up-front anchors for the highest-scoring offensive 

unit in school history. 



was the six takeaways by the Terrapin defense, 
including a 52-yard fumble return for a touch- 
down by linebacker Mike Whaley. The Terps, 
who led 19-13 at the half, opened up a 25-13 
advantage when Randall Jones picked off a pass 
and returned it 30 yards to set up a TD by the 
Maryland offense. Shaun Hill threw one TD 
pass and ran for another. 

GAME 5 

MARYLAND 41, VIRGINIA 21 

Oct. 6, 2001 

Shaun Hill threw tor two scores and ran 
for another as the Terps ended a nine game 
Losing sin-.ik in tin- Cavaliers. The Terps 
scored twoTDs in a 73-second span to l>> up 
24-7 at hall, the first on a 5 5 yard pass from 



Hill to Guilian Gary, and the other when Leroy 
Ambush recovered a blocked punt in the end 
zone. Bruce Perry rushed tor 143 yards and 
had a career-high eight catches. 

GAME 6 

MARYLAND 20, 
GEORGIA TECH 17 (OT) 

October 1 1 , 2001 

Freshman kicker Nick Novak became a 
household name with his clutch performance 
in the win over the No. 15 Yellow Jackets 1 fa 
46-yard field goal as time expired in regula- 
tion forged a 17-17 tie, .uv\ he provided the 
difference in overtime with a 26-yarder. E.J. 
I ienderson, who opened the scoring with a 
56 \ ard tumble return tor a TD, led the Ter- 



70 



CONTINUED 




classmates have 




i fi 



much more 
interesting 
things than 
you think. 



"V 



Catch up with them through the new Terp Alumni Network, 

an online community 

featuring. . . 

A Searchable Alumni Directory and Permanent Terp Email 

The online alumni directory will help you to quickly locate others through a database of current biographical data and a 
powerful search engine. Through Permanent Terp Email, you can maintain a permanent and personal email address that 
will never change even when you change jobs or mail providers. 

Register for FREE at www.alumni.umd.edu. 

These services are just the beginning of what promises to be an exciting forum m cyberspace. We look forward to 
keeping in touch with you through this virtual alumni community and welcome vour comments as we continue to build 
it. To join the Alumni Association and for information on the South Florida Alumni Club, call 800.336.8627. 



MARYLAND 

ALUMNI 

ASSOCIATION 



The Terp Alumni Network i* available only to University of Maryland, College Park, graduates .md members of the alumni as 





rapin defensive effort widi 18 tackles. The win 
was Maryland's first over a ranked oppo- 
nent since 1990. 

GAME 7 

MARYLAND 59. DUKE 17 

Oct. 20, 2001 

Shaun Hill became only the third QB in 
ACC history to throw for 300 yards and 
rush for 100 yaids as the Terps routed the Blue 
Devils on homecoming. Maryland scored 
on its first six possessions and amassed 697 



total yards in recording its seventh consec- 
utive win. Five different players scored touch- 
downs, including Hill, who rushed for two 
scores and passed for another. Hill threw 
for 323 yards and rushed for 105 in three quar- 
ters of play. 

GAME 8 

FLORIDA STATE 52. MARYLAND 31 

Oct. 27. 2001 

Four turnovers were too much to overcome 
for the Terps, who suffered their only regu- 




Strong safety Tony Jackson had a team-high six interceptions for the Terps, who finished 
second nationally in pickoffs (24) and seventh nationally in takeaways (34). 



lar season loss. Tied at 31 late in the third quar- 
ter, a pair of fumbles undid the Terps in the 
fourth, as the Seminoles scored 2 1 points in 
a five-minute span to break away. Maryland 
opened a 14-0 lead midway through the sec- 
ond quarter, but the 'Noles struck for three 
scores in less than three minutes - including 
an interception for a TD - to lead 21-17 at 
halrtime. 

GAME 9 

MARYLAND 47. TROY STATE 14 

Nov. 3, 2001 

The Terps dominated on both sides of the 
ball in rolling to the non-conference win over 
the Trojans. Maryland opened a 34-0 halftime 
lead by scoring on six of eight possessions, while 
the Tenapin defense limited Troy State to just 
two first downs and 26 total yards. Shaun Hill 
passed for 228 yards and two touchdowns, and 
Nick Novak made four field goals, including 
boots of 50 and 46 yards. 

GAME 1 O 

MARYLAND 37. CLEMSON 20 

Nov. 10, 2001 

The fourth-latgest crowd in Byrd Stadi- 
um history (52,462) saw the Terps clinch at 
least a share of the ACC title with their 
school-record seventh home victory. A stout 
defense, led by E.J. Henderson, held stand- 
out Clemson QB Woody Dantder to just 30 
nishing yards and 153 passing yards. Henderson 
had tour TFL's in the game to break former 
All-American Randy White'-. Mi-iiile—ea^on 
school record. QB Shaun Hill passed tor 
189 yards and two touchdowns. 



GAME 11 

MARYLAND 23. NC STATE 19 

Nov 17, 2001 

Shaun Hill's eight-yard TO pass toGuil- 
i.in t Jary with 41 seconds remaining lifted the 
Terps to the thrilling come-from-behind 
win and gave the Terrapins their first outright 
ACC title since 1985. Trailing 19-16 with 2:19 
left, 1 lill calmly marched the Terps on a 10- 
pl.iv, 61-yard scoring drive thai was set up when 
the Terrapin defense forced N< State to 
punt the Kill away. Gary had a pair of TP 
catches in the game, .\nA E.J. Henderson 
had a career-best JO tackles. 



72 



CONTINUED 




there's one thing guys love more than football. 



it's tall, 



AND MOST APPEALING 





*1 



It 



!)! 



We've (*o\ Your 
Winning 6iame Flan! 



Adjacent to the University of Maryland! 



40.000 square feet of meeting space! 
2/} meeting rooms! 



An amphitheater that seats 15o! 



An elegant ballroom! 



(•) in 6uest rooms! 

The harden F-estaurant &■ 



f 



Oracle Lounge! 
►Access to state-of-the-art fitness center!] 
Q) Hosted numerous Terrapin Club 
Outings, Alumni Association 6vents, 
Holiday Parties &• Academic Conferences! 
* © &»*eat location to Clarice Smith 

Performing Arts building £r Terrapin 
Athletics! 









^4 


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'* 




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A«,agx», 






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The Inn and Conference Center 

at the Univ. of Maryland, University College 



Contact Coach Brian McGuire • Phone 301-985-7743 • www.conferencecenters.com/wasum 










Undeterred by .1 
preseason media poll 
which tabbed the 
Terps tn finish no 
higher than seventh in 



Friedgen 
File 

PERSONAL 

Full Name Ralph Harry Friedgen 

Date "1 Birth April 4, 1947 

Hometown Harrison, N.Y. 

Alma Mater Maryland, 1969 
Family Wife, Gloria; 

daughters, Kelley 
(23), Kristina (14), 

Katharine (12) 

Playing Experience 

Guard, one letter at Maryland (1968) 

Years in Coaching (College): 33 (28) 

COACHING EXPERIENCE 

Maryland 

2001 Head Coach 

Georgia Tech 

1997-00 Assistant Coach - 

Offensive Coordinator/Off. Line 

San Diego Chargers 
1994-96 Assistant Coach - 
Offensive Coordinator; 
1992-93 Assistant Coach - 
Running Game Coordinator/ 
H-Backs/TightEnds 



They say you can't go home again, hut 
tor the University of Maryland, no 
choice made more sense than to make 
sure that Ralph Friedgen did, indeed, 
return to College Park. 

And what a return it has been. 
In his first season as a head coach following 
32 years as an assistant, all Friedgen has 
done is lead his alma mater to an outright ACC 
championship, a top 10 national ranking, and 
a berth in the prestigious Bowl Champi- 
onship Series. 

Oh, yes, he also is this year's ACC and 
national coach of the year. 

In what has truly has been a whirlwind year 
for Friedgen, who took over as the Terrapins' 
3 3rd field general a little over 13 months ago, 
the Terps enter the BCS as one of the top sto- 
nes of the 2001 college football season. 



Georgia Tech 
1987-91 Assistant Coach - Offensive 
Coordinator/Quarterbacks 



Maryland 

1982-86 Assistant Coach - 



Offensive Coordinator/Off. Line 



Murray State 
1981 Assistant 

Head Coach 

William & Mary 
1980 Assistant 
Coach - Offensive 

Coordinator 

The Citadel 
1977-79 Assistant 
Coach - Offensive 
Coordinator 
1973-76 Assistant 
Coach -Defensive 

Line 

Maryland 
1969-72 Graduate 
Assistant 




the nine-team ACC, Friedgen and his tr< » 1 

stampeded their way on to the national 
stage with seven consecutive wins toi pen the 
seasi in, including .1 never-say-die comeback 
victory over I 5th-ranked C Jeorgia Tech on 
national TV. The Terps wrapped 
up their Inst ACC title since 
1985 with Late-season victories 
over Clemson and NC State. 

Named the winner of the 
Frank Broyles Award as the top 
assistant coach in the country in 
1999, Friedgen, one of tin- best 
offensive minds in football, 
brought 32 years of coaching 
experience - including 21 as an 
offensive coordinator either in 
college or the NFL - with him in 
his return to College Park. In his 
most recent stop before becom- 
ing the Terps' head coach, Fried- 
gen spent four seasons as offen- 
sive coordinator at Georgia Tech, 
where he orchestrated an offen- 
sive unit that averaged 36.7 
points and 444 yards of total 
offense per game. 

A 1969 graduate of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland, where he 
earned a degree in physical edu- 
cation, Friedgen launched his 
coaching career as a graduate 
assistant before heading off to a 
number of jobs, including stints 
at The Citadel (1973-79), 
William & Mary (1980) and 
Murray State (1981). In '82, he 
returned to Maryland as offensive 
coordinator and offensive line 
coach under Bobby Ross, with 
Friedgen's tenure lasting until 
1986. During that stretch, the 
Terps captured three consecutive 
ACC championships ( 1983-85) 
and played in four bowl games. 
During his five-year stay at 
Maryland under Ross, Friedgen 
was, along with quarterbacks 
coach Joe Knvak, instrumental 
in the development ot future 



75 



CONTINUED 




pro quarterbacks Boomer Esiason, Frank 
Reich and Stan Gelbaugh, all of whom spent 
,ii least 10 seasons in the National Football 
League. 

Friedgen followed Ross to Georgia Tech 
in 1987, becoming the Yellow Jackets' offen- 
sive coordinator and quarterbacks coach for 
the next five seasons, including the 1990 cam- 
paign when Tech, unranked in the preseason, 
captured the national championship with an 
11-0-1 record. 

When Ross was named head coach of the 
San Diego Chargers in 1992, he tapped 
Friedgen to serve as running game coordinator 
for two seasons (1992-93) before elevating 
him to offensive coordinator in 1994, when 
the Chargers advanced to Super Bowl XXIX 
for the first time in franchise history. 

Friedgen returned to Tech in 1997, where 
he served another successful stint as offensive 
coordinator and quarterbacks coach, this 
time under current head coach George 
O'Leary. 

Friedgen originally came to Maryland as 
a quarterback in the mid-'60s and spent 
most of his career as an offensive lineman, let- 
tering in 1968 and capturing Academic All- 



ACC honors the same sea- 
son. 

Friedgen's coaching 
roots run deep. His father, 
Ralph Sr., was a high 
school coach for more than 
30 years and mastermind- 
ed, among other teams, 
the 1964 Westchester 
County (N.Y.) High 
School team that went 
undefeated and averaged 44 
points per game running 
what was then an unusu- 
al multiple offense. It was 
an offense run by a 190- 
pound quarterback later 
recruited by Maryland 
named Ralph Friedgen, Jr. 

Friedgen and his wife, 
the former Gloria Spina, 
have three daughters: Kel- 
ley, 23; Kristina, 14, and 
Katharine, 12. Gloria is 
currently serving as an 
adjunct professor at the 
University of Maryland. 



Coaching Staff 



fe 



« **' 



» 



A tt 




GARY BLACKMEY 

DEFENSIVE 
COORDINATOR/SECONDARY 



RODSHARPLESS 
INSIDE LINEBACKERS 



TOM BRATTAN 

OFFENSIVE LINE 



JAMES FRANKLIN 

WIDE RECEIVERS 



MIKE LOCKSLEY 

RUNNING BACKS 



RAY RYCHLESKI 

SPECIAL TEAMS 
COORDINATOR/TIGHT ENDS 






ALSEAMONSON 
OUTSIDE LINEBACKERS 




n 



tiytv 



P* 



DAVE SOLLAZZO 
DEFENSIVE LINE 



CHARLIE TAAFFE 

OFFENSIVE COORDINATOR/ 

QUARTERBACKS 



BRIAN FLINN 

GRADUATE ASSISTANT 



GREG SESNY 

GRADUATE ASSISTANT 



TOM OEAHN 

DIRECTOR, FOOTBALL 

OPERATIONS 



76 



M 



Iaryland's appearance in the Bowl 
Championship Series caps an in- 
credible calendar year for the Ter- 
rapin athletic program — easily one 
of the most successful 12-month periods in 
school history. 

Just 10 months after Gary Williams led 
the Terp men's basketball team to a berth in 
the Final Four, another Maryland alum, Ralph 
Fnedgen, has been at the controls of the Terps' 
stunning run to an ACC football title, top 10 
national ranking, and berth in the BCS. 

Together, the twin accomplishments have 
vaulted the Terrapins' program onto the na- 
tional stage like never before. But inspect a lit- 
tle closer and one will discover a well-rounded 
athletic program with across-the-board success 
in its 25-sport program. For example, in be- 
tween the Final Four and ACC football cham- 
pionship were the Terps' seventh consecutive 
NCAA title in women's lacrosse and an 
NCAA runner-up finish in field hockey. Mary- 
land annually ranks among the top 1 5 percent 
of all NCAA Division I athletic institutions in 
the national all-sports ranking. 

Leading this broad-based, 25-sport pro- 
gram, located just minutes away from Wash- 
ington, D.C., is one of the country's best rec- 
ognized athletic administrators, Dr. Deborah 
A. Yow, who last year served as president of the 




DR. DEBORAH A. YOW 

ATHLETICS DIRECTOR 

6,000-member National Association of Colle- 
giate Directors of Athletics. 

A former highly successful collegiate bas- 
ketball coach who guided both Honda and Ken- 
tucky to first-ever Top 25 rankings, Debbie Yow 
understands what it takes to win. She has vig- 
orously pursued excellence in all areas of the 
organization, and her vision and leadership pro- 
vide clear and compelling testimony to her val- 
ues of integrity, teamwork and accountability. 
She recognizes publicly the value of collegia] 
working relationships with the university com- 
munity as well. 

Since taking over at Maryland in 1994, 



she and her staff have: 

* Transformed Maryland athletics in a re- 
sponsive, goal-oriented organization. 

* Balanced all seven of the department's 
annual budgets (the first balanced budgets in 
the 10 years prior to her arrival). The overall 
budget now exceeds $36 million annually, and 
the sizable, inherited debt has been eradicated. 

* Greatly enhanced the academic support 
services provided to student-athletes, with an 
enviable exhausted eligibility graduation rate 
of between 85 and 90 percent in most years dur- 
ing her tenure. 

* Significantly expanded marketing and 
fund-raising efforts on behalf of Maryland 
athletics. 

* Taken a lead role in the development 
and eventual construction of the 470,000 square 
feet Comcast Center, a $125 million, 17,100- 
seat on-campus arena, home to athletics and 
student activity center slated to open in Sep- 
tember, 2002. 

Maryland's athletic department contin- 
ues to make remarkable progress under the lead- 
ership of Dr. Yow. Regarding the many achieve- 
ments of Terrapin athletics over her tenure, Dr. 
Yow says: "We are pleased but we are not sat- 
isfied. ..our vision is to be one of the top 10 pro- 
grams in the nation consistently.. .we see no rea- 
son to settle for less." 




CONTINUED 




Athletic Deparment Staff 



r\ 



A 





^ - s 






DAVE HAGLUND JOE HULL ROBERT KOONCE JANE MULLENS ROBERT MULLENS 

ASSOCIATE ATHLETICS INTERIM SR. ASSOC ATHLETICS ASSOC AO/ACADEMIC SUPPORT ASST ATHLETICS DIRECTOR/ EXECUTIVE SENIOR ASSOC. 

DIRECTOR/MEDIA RELATIONS DIRECTOR/EXTERNAL OPERATIONS & CAREER DEVELOPMENT COMPLIANCE/SWA AD/CHIEF OF STAFF 




t 



J_L 



CHARLES WELLFORD 

FACULTY ATHLETIC 
REPRESENTATIVE 




KATHLEEN WORTHINGTON 

SENIOR ASSOC 

AD/INTERNAL OPERATIONS 



Yi 



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ien CO. "Dan" Mote Jr. became 
the 19th president of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland on Sept. 1, 
1998, he proclaimed it the state 
of Maryland's most important asset. Three years 
later, under his guidance, die value of that asset 
is soaring. 

Mote is committed to milking the university 
even more valuable by creating a culture of 
excellence across the campus, continuing 
to emphasize the highest quality education 
for students, and achieving distinction as 
an institution where discovery takes place every 
day and everywhere. 

The university's value can be measured by 
the quality of its programs; the stature of its 
faculty; the talent of its students; and its 
world-class facilities, among other things. 

Quality Programs 

As of September, Maryland had 61 pro- 
grams ranked in the top 25 
nationally by U.S. News and 
World RefxTt, compared with one 
in 1991. While the university's 
academic successes are across the 
board, it has emerged as a true 
powerhouse in business, com- 
puter science, earth sciences, 
engineering, education and 
journalism. 

Faculty Stature 

Maryland continues to 
attract the best faculty available. 
Last year, a Nobel Laureate m 
Physics and three more Pulitzer 
Prize winners (to join three 
already on the campus) joined 
the faculty. Maryland faculty 
are frequently sought by the 
media for their expertise in 
technology, government, busi- 
ness and education. 



Talented 
Students 

Over the past 10 years, each 

ii in w freshman class has 

been the mosi talented ever. The 



average GPA of entering 
students improved from 
3.00 to 3.76 from 1990 to 
2001. As many as 40 per- 
cent of all new freshmen are 
now enrolled in such pro- 
grams as Honors, Gem- 
stone, College Park Schol- 
ars and other living-learning 
communities that bring 
together students with sim- 
ilar academic interests in a 
residential setting. 



World-Class 
Facilities 

The university is currently engaged in the 
largest building boom in its history, with 
more than $100 million in new projects 
now under way. Highlights of the construc- 
tion activity on the campus include the 




brand-new Clarice Smith 
Performing Arts Center; 
the Comcast Center; and 
new classrooms for chem- 
istry, computer science, 
business and engineering. 

Athletic 
Excellence 

Mote sees athletics as 
an integral part of the 
university experience, not 
just a showcase to impress 
visitors and friends. "Insti- 
tutions that are commit- 
ted to excellence tend to be excellent in every 
endeavor. Our successes in football, bas- 
ketball, lacrosse and other sports reflects 
our quality as much as our successes in engi- 
neering, business, education and journalism," 
Mote says. 




University of Maryland's 1,580 acre campus is located between the cultural and population centers of 

Washington, D.C. and Baltimore, Md. 



80 






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Steve Walsh 



Irving Fryar 



Ray Graves 



Trio Will Be Introduced Pregame of 2002 
FedEx Orange Bowl 



The Orange Bowl Committee is 
adding to the tradition of the FedEx 
Orange Bowl tonight by inducting 
three outstanding new members 
into the Orange Bowl Union Planters 
Hall of Honor, all of whom are legends at 
their positions in college football. 

Steue WalSh followed in the tradition 
of Miami's great quarterbacks by leading 
the Hurricanes to the 1988 FedEx Orange 
Bowl Game, where they defeated the 
Oklahoma Sooners, 20-14, to win the 
National Championship. 

While at Miami, Walsh was coached 
by another Hall of Honor member, Jimmy 
Johnson. Walsh was named to the All- 
America Team in 1988 and placed fourth 
in the Heisman Trophy balloting. As a 
starter, he went 2 VI overall and finished 
his career tied with Vinny Testeverde in 
school history with 48 career touchdown 
passes. 

\\ alsh passed up his senior season 
with Miami and was chosen by Johnson 
and the Dallas Cowboys in the supplemen- 
tal dratt. He also played tor current Miami 
Dolphins' head coach Dave Wannstedt in 
Chicago and with the Dolphins. 



Irving Fryar'S Nebraska Comhuskers 
won the 1983 FedEx Orange Bowl Game 
with a 21-20 victory over LSU. He was 
the first overall choice in the 1984 Draft 
by the New England Patriots and had a 
I 7-year career in the NFL. 

Fryar was a consensus All-American 
in 1983 and had more than 1,100 receiv- 
ing yards during his career on Husker 
teams that led the nation in rushing twice 
and finished second once. He left 
Nebraska with 2,769 all-purpose yards. 

Fryar spent nine seasons with the 
Patriots. Little did anyone know that he 
was only halfway through his career. After 
being traded to Miami, Fryar put up his 
best receiving totals of his career, includ- 
ing two years of more than 1,000 yards 
receiving. In 1996, Fryar signed with the 
Philadelphia Eagles as an unrestricted free 
agent. He became the "go-to" receiver for 
the Eagles, and was voted to the Pro Bowl 
tor the fourth time. He ended his career 
with the Washington Redskins in 2000. 

Ray Graves coached in two FedEx 
Orange Bowl games during his career. His 
first was with Georgia Tech in 1952 as an 
assistant to current Hall of Honor member 



Bobby Dodd. In 1967 as the head man for 
the Florida Gators, he coached against 
Dodd and won (Dodd's only loss in four 
FedEx Orange Bowl appearances). He 
also coached Heisman Trophy winner 
Steve Spurrier in that game. Spurrier will 
be leading the Gators in tonight's game. 

While Graves is most famous for his 
coaching abilities, he was also a three-year 
starter for the Tennessee Volunteers where 
he played in the 1939 Orange Bowl. 

His overall record as the head coach 
at Florida (1960-1969) was 70-31-4. Five 
of his teams went to bowl games, winning 
tour. He also produced 14 football Ail- 
Americans, including Heisman Trophy- 
winner and current Florida Gator head 
coach Steve Spurrier. 

Graves also served as the athletic 
director at Florida tor 19 years, during 
which the Gator program won the 
Southeastern Conference All-Sports title 
five times. 

In April of 1972, Graves was elected 
to the State of Florida's Sports Hall of 
Fame. In 1990, he was chosen tor induc- 
tion into the National Football 
Foundation Hall of Fame. 



83 




I iami: Thei 




For 68 years, the Orange 
Bowl Festival and its 30 
annual events have called 
South Florida and Miami 
home. This year will he 
no different. 

BY ARVA PARKS McCABE 

Greater Miami is different. No question 
about it. For a start it is the only sub- 
tropical megalopolis in the conti- 
nental United States. It sits on a 
unique piece i il ge< igr iphy at the encl of a cc >n- 
tinent and points more south than north. It 
has sunshine and blue skies, ocean beaches and 
picturesque bays, hurricanes and heat, mos- 
quitoes and mildew and a lot of cockeyed 
Optimism — no matter what. It is young, 
vibrant and alive, li reverberates to the sounds 
dI the salsa and mcrengue, the melody of the 
steel drum and the twang oi country guitar. Its 
pis 'i I' o 'in' from everywhere. 

li is die newest of America's major cities, 
h ivingcelel rated its < entennial in 1996, but 
a ilso ha i '!»■ ui die nation's oldest u , i ird 
i, i hundred years beton die 



Pilgrims set foot on Plymouth Rock, the 
Spanish were exploring South Florida. 

When Ponce de Leon sailed into Biscayne 
Bay in July, 1513, he probably met the people 
whom the Spanish called the Tequesta Indi- 
ans. The ancestors of the Tequestans lived in 
South Florida on the site of the future City of 
Miami as early as 2000 B.C. In 1567, two 
years after founding St. Augustine, Pedro 
Menendez de Aviles sent two Jesuit priests to 
Tequesta to build a fort and establish a mission 
on the north bank of the Miami River. Menen- 
dez held the distinction of being the first per- 
son to actually succeed in settling North 
Ametica and was rewarded by being appoint- 
ed both governor of Florida (which included 
more than half of the present United States) 
and of Cuba. Although die mission at Teques- 
ta and several other attempts at settlement failed, 
the Spanish remained friendly with the 
natives. When the British gained possession 
of Florida in 1763, the remaining Soudi Flori- 
da people followed the Spanish to Cuba 
rather than live under British rule. 

In 1821, after almost WO years of Span- 
ish rule, Florida became a territory of the 
United States. By this time South Florida 
had become a haven for pirates, Bahamian 
wreckers, Cuban fishermen, ainawav slaves arid 
Seminole Indians oi I reck extraction, who had 
been pushed southward by American settlers 
in Georgia and North Florida. 

The Seminoles would dominate South 

84 



Florida's history for the next 35 years. The new 
county of Dade was created in 1836 and 
named after Major Francis Langhorne Dade, 
who had been killed by the Indians near 
Bushnell, Fla., in late 1835, along with 109 of 
his men. Tins massacre marked the beginning 
of a series of wars with the Indians that would 
not end until 1857. The federal government 
built Fort Dallas at the mouth of the Miami 
River, but not even the Army, Navy and the 
Marines could dislodge all the Seminoles 
from their Everglades stronghold. 

During the Civil War, the Union Navy 
tried to blockade South Florida, but die seem- 
ingly never-ending coastline could not be 
effectively patrolled. At war's end, a few 
hardy individualists claimed free, 60-acre 
homesreads under the new Homestead Act, 
even though the only way they could get to 
South Florida was to come by boat or walk bare- 
foot down the beach. 

By the 1880s, the homesteaders and 
othei pioneers had managed to establish per- 
manent settlements at Coconut Grove and 
Lemon City. The small, but incredibly diverse 
population wis made up oi black and white 
Bahamians, (. iibans, Seminole War veter- 
ans, European immigrants, Southern tanners, 
carpetbaggers, Aineru an capitalists and assort 
ed adventurers. Many had grandiose plans 
tor Miami, w 1 lile i ihcrs simply sought the refuge 
ol the wilderness. 

i loconut tiro\e became die firsi nil 



: 



Magic City 




community in the Miami area. Charles and 
Isabella Peacock, who came from England, 
opened the Bay View House, South Florida's 
first hotel. Nearby, pioneers organized the first 
school, library and Sunday School. They 
also brought in the area's first tourists — an inter- 
national group, at that. Black settlers, who came 
from the Bahamas to work at the hote 
founded Kebo, Coconut Grove's black com- 
munity. 

But Miami still didn't exist when the 
widow Tuttle put ashore on the north bank 
of the Miami River on November 13, 1891 
to claim the 640 acres of wilderness she had 
purchased. The two miles of waterfront were 
impressive enough but the aggressive tropi- 
cal growth was rapidly overtaking the few 
improvements left by previous occupants. 
Like the dozen or so prior owners, including 
the King of Spain, Mrs. Tuttle had big plans 
for Miami. "It may seem strange," she wrote, 
"but it is the dream of my life to see this 
wilderness turned into a prosperous country." 

Unlike the others, Julia Tuttle did some- 
thing about her dreams. By 1895, with the aid 
of a hard freeze in North Florida, she had con- 
vinced Standard Oil millionaire Henry Fla- 
gler to extend his railroad to frost-free N liami, 
lay out a city and build a luxury hotel on land 
she gave him. On julv 28, 1896, only three 
months after the first train amved, the "Magic 
City" was bom and the nation had the begin- 
ning of its first major city created to please the 
tourists. 

When Julia Tuttle died in 1899, Greater 



Miami had a population of 2,500 people. It 
was still little more than a raw-boned, fron- 
tier, boom town that came alive each Janu- 
ary when Flagler's Royal Palm Hotel opened 
and the tourists poured into town. In an 
interview held shortly before her death, Tut- 
tle spoke of her dreams for Greater Miami's 
future. She saw it as more than a tourist cen- 
ter. Her vision of Greater Miami was as the 
center of the Americas, a place for interna- 
tional trade and commerce. 

In reality, Miami was still more like a one- 
horse southern town than anything else. Ha- 
gler's steamships had regular runs between 
Miami and Nassau and Miami and Cuba, 
but the port was too shallow to fully develop 
its potential. Then the incredible real estate 
boom of the 1920s began, which almost 
overnight transformed Miami into an instant 
city. New fantasy suburbs like Coral Gables, 
Hialeah, Miami Shores, Opa-Locka, South 
Miami and Fulford (North Miami Beach) were 
created from farms, pumped-up bay bottom 
and pumped-out Everglades swampland. 
Advertising hype permeated the Amencan psy- 
che and the whole nation saw its "future in 
Florida." 

South Florida and the "Roaring Twen- 
ties" were made for each other. Prohibition 
was the law, but Florida's desolate coastline 
made it "the leakiest spot in .America" for con- 
traband booze run in from the Bahamas. 
Authorities aimed a blind eve to illegal gam- 

85 



bling and supported anything that pleased the 
tourist and the real estate developer. 

The fun and games couldn't last. Over- 
speculation, over-building and the killer hur- 
ricane of 1926 ended the party for a little while. 
By the mid-1930s, however, while the rest of 
the nation still suffered, South Florida start- 
ed its comeback. Pan American Airways' 
"Flying Clippers" brought in thousands of 
Latin American visitors and gave the city a 
real claim to being "The Gateway of the 
Americas." Tourists amved from the north as 
well, spurring a new building boom on Miami 
Beach and creating the now famous Art 
Deco District. When pari-mutuel gambling 
was legalized in the 1930s, Hialeah Park 
became one of the most beautiful racetracks 
in America. The Orange Bowl Festival, 
which began in 1935, gave the tourists anoth- 
er exciting winter event. 

Not even World War II could stop 
Greater Miami's progress. Boosters convinced 
Uncle Sam to send thousands of military 
personnel to train in Miami and Miami 

CONTINUED 




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Reach. Thus, South Florida thrived even in 
the midst ol war. At war's end, thousand"; of 
C id. s returned to South Florida to stay, and the 
area's next big boom was underway. By the end 
of the '50s, Greater Miami more than d< mbled 
Us population and had become a real metrop- 
olis with a Metropolitan-style government to 
prove it. 

When Fidel Castro look over the gov- 
ernment ol l uki in 1°59, nil one had any idea 
thai this revolution would change Miami as 
much as it did Cuba. Within the next 20 
years, 500,000 Cubans fled Castro and came 
to South Florida. They bn night a \ ariety i il skills, 
talents and a innccrions that gave just die right 
impetus to set Julia Tittle's version of Create] 
Miami's future into motion. 

It was nor an easy time for Miamians. At 
the same time South Florida was absorbing a 
halt million refugees, it was dismantling a 
traditionally segregated society — schools, 
public facilities and life-styles. Tire changes of 
the '60s were mind boggling, even by Miami 
standards. 

The 70s brought more change. South 
Florida suffered both a serious recession and 
a reeoverv before the decade ended. It was a 
decade of tirsts, as many representing Greater 
Miami's diverse population made history. 

As the '80s began, a new vibrant, multi- 
ethnic, cosmopolitan Greater Miami was 
emerging. The new Miami, however, was not 
without its problems. In the incredible month 
of May 1980, Miamians suffered through Kith 
a major riot and the sudden arrival of 125,000 
new Cuban refugees, main with criminal 
records. For a brief time, it seemed that Miami 
might be overwhelmed. 

Those who really knew South Florida 
never lost hope. History had already proved 
drat Miamians could survive anything. Imbued 
with a spirit of adaptability, created by a his- 
tory of change, Greater Miami ended the 
'80s with a new sense of itself. Its skyline 
completely changed and became spectacularly 
beautiful. The spirit of Horatio Alger was 
alive and well and living in the Magic l in 
In only 30 years, Greater Miami's Cubans 
rose from refugee to the highest positions of 
power — taster than any immigrant group in 
American history. People returned to down- 
town for sports, culture and tun. Almost 
overnight, Miami-Dade County's new port 
became the biggest cruise ship purtin the w < irld. 



Miami International Air- 
poi i bei ame the second 
busies! inteniaiion.il ail • iti 
way in the United States, 
offei nig more internal ional 
flights than any other airpi irt 
in the world! I Kindreds ol 

multi-national Corp rations, 

banks and insurance firms 
opened oil ices in what had 
Ixi ome the center of the 
New \\ '< 'i 1 1. A futuristic bil- 
lion-dollar Metrorail system 
glided into town. 

In August 1992, Hur- 
ricane Andrew, the costliest 
natural disaster in history, 
ravaged South Dade Coun- 
ty. Today, the lush tropical 
growth and the determina- 
tion of its people have oblit- 
erated the path of its destruc- 
tion. 

In 1994, Miami's selec- 
tion as the site of die historic 
"Summit of the Americas" signaled its emer- 
gence as a model multicultural community of 
the Americas and its ascendancy as a world- 
class international city for business, trade, 
health care, culture and recreation Like 
Miami's founders, who carved the city out ot 
the wilderness a little over 100 years ago, 
today's Miamians are seizing a moment in 
time ripe with opportunity. They are creating 
something new and unique in American his- 
tory — a place author CD. Allman called the 
"City ot the Future." 

Greater Miami ot the new millennium 
is \ ibrantly alive and thriving on change. 
No longer at the end of something. Miami is 
.it the middle ot everything — the connector 
of the Americas and the center ot the New- 
World. From its beginning, Miami has shi iwn 
an uncanny ability to absorb different people 
from different places who were looking tor a 
new lite. Whether they were refugees ffi un the 
cold to the north or from the political oppres- 
sion to the south, Miami changed them, and 
they changed Miami. 

Greater Miami is undergoing anothei of 
it~ legendary building booms. The new Loews 
Miami Beach brings South Beach a full-ser- 
vice convention hotel. Just south of the 
ever-exciting Lincoln Road, the grand new h tel 




lovingly embraces the beautifully restored 
St. Moritz, one ot the district's histi tic gems. 
All around the new Loews, other projects 
are underway. The southern parr of Collins 
Avenue continues to offer itself as an upsi ale 
shopping, hotel and entertainment street. 
North of Lincoln Road, other historic hotels 
are undergoing restc iratic in, as the SoBe c-xl ite- 
ment pushes m >rth. 

At n 6S the h i\ . Bnckell Avenue continues 
toboi ira, as new hotels, apartmenrs and office 
building-- give the city a whole new aura a- the 
Bnckell Village takes shape. Downtown, the 
new AmericanAirlines Arena rises skyward. 
UK a tew blocks from the new Performing Arts 
Center. 

Today, Greater Miami is alive and well 
and, as usual, busy becoming something new. 
Always youthful in outlook, Greater Miami 
looks to the future and the new millennium 
with renewed enthusiasm for what lies ahead. 

ARVA PARKS McCABE IS A 
WELL-KNOWN MIAMI HISTORIAN 
AND AUTHOR OF "MIAMI: THE 
MAGIC CITY." THE CITY'S OFFI- 
CIAL HISTORY. SHE IS A MEM- 
BER OF THE ORANGE BOWL 
COMMITTEE. 



87 



Throughout its history, the Orange Bowl has been the center of 

national attention with 15 previous 

national championships — more than any other howl game 



Committee Formed to 
Aid Tourism 

The Orange Bowl game and festival is one 
of the nation's most colorful annual spectacles. 
It was the brainchild of men with great imag- 
ination and k iresight — hut with few resources 
— who wanted to attract folks to Miami in the 
middle of the Great Depression. 

In 1932, George E. Hussey was athletic 
director for Florida Power ek Light and Miami's 
official greeter. He, along with Earnie Seiler, 
Miami's recreation director, took notice of the 
media attention generated by California's Rose 
Bowl and parade. Miami could offer a similar 
climate at that time of the year. 

Hussey called Chick Meehan, a friend and 
coach of powerhouse Manhattan College. He 
asked Meehan if his team would play the Uni- 
versity of Miami on New Year's Day. Meehan 
accepted. Although organizers were appre- 
hensive about sending the 3-3-1 Hurricanes 
against such a formidable team, plans were set 
in motion for the first game in Miami. It w< luld 
be called the Palm Festival. 

To save on expenses, Manhattan took a 
three-day boat trip to Miami, but financial prob- 
lems almost prevented the game from taking 
place. The organizers came up $ 1 ,500 short of 
their $3,000 guarantee to Manhattan, and Mee- 
han would not take the field until his team was 
fully paid. "That's when we 
made the sheriff our fi- 
nance director," said Seil- 
er. "Three hours before 
kickoff, the sheriff brought 
one ot the local bookies to 
us who peeled oft 15 crisp 
$100 bills from his 
bankroll and saved the 
game." 

Miami beat the 

mighty Manhattan, 7-0, in 
the game played on a 
Moore Park field mx inch- 
i li ep in sand. Tin u idi 

' ; ui that day 



has grown into the single largest tourist attrac- 
tion in South Florida. 

The Palm Festival 
Becomes the 
Orange Bowl 

In 1934, W. Keith Phillips, then president 
of the Miami Chamber of Commerce, called a 
group together to put on another post-season 
football game that could be identified with 
Florida and Miami. Among them were Palm 
Festival veterans who had worked behind the 
scenes with organizers for two years. 

The name Orange Bowl was put before 
the group and immediately embraced. On Jan- 
uary 1, 1935, the game was played for the first 
time under the Orange Bowl banner. Bucknell 
was invited to oppose the Hurricanes and the 
Bison routed Miami, 26-0. 

With a full year to prepare for the 1936 
matchup and riding the crest of a wave of na- 
tional publicity achieved in the initial contest, 
the Committee decided to expand the offer- 
ings and hold a lavish parade on New Year's 
Day along with the football game. 

By now, the organization referred to itself 
as the Orange Bowl Committee. It decided to 
arrange a game with two out-of-state teams, 
reasoning that two teams would double the na- 
tionwide interest. Thus, Catholic University 




was chosen to represent the North and Missis- 
sippi the South. 

The game was a squeaker. A missed extra 
point gave the win to Catholic, 20-19. CBS 
Radio's Bill Monday announced the game to a 
regional audience, costing the Orange Bowl 
$500 to cover the cost of lines. 

Committee Hooks Top 
CBS Announcer 

Following the '36 bowl, the Committee 
signed a contract with CBS to broadcast the 
1937 game on national radio. The Committee 
had somewhat embellished the magnificence 
of the stadium press box facilities and convinced 
CBS to send top announcer Ted Husing. A 
week before Duquesne and Mississippi State 
were to play, ground was broken on a new 
stadium. 

Husing arrived several days ahead of the 
game to familiarize himself with the teams. He 
didn't get to see the "stadium" until game time; 
he was wheeled to night clubs, boat trips and 
members' homes to keep him occupied. 

Husing finally saw that his broadcast booth 
was nothing but a shed with a banner mount- 
ed over the wooden bleachers. After learning 
of the plans for the new stadium, he showed ad- 
miration for the ingenuity of the bowl's organ- 
izers and became one of the Orange Bowl's most 
vocal supporters. 

It may have helped 
Husing 's enthusiasm that 
the '37 contest was won by 
Duquesne, 13-12, on an 
exciting 72-yard scoring 
pass from Boyd Brumbaugh 
to Earnie Herferle in the fi- 
nal two minutes. 

Orange Bowl 
Stadium 
Built; Game 
Hits Big Time 
in '39 

The new Orange 



88 



CONTINUED 





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Bowl Stadium was dedicated on December 10, 
1937, and was ready for the '38 Auburn-Michi- 
gan State game. 

On March 3, 1939, Earnie Seiler, one of 
the organizers of the Palm Bowl, became the 
( (range Bowl's first full-time business manag- 
er. On May 15, the Committee incorporated 
. is . i in m-pn if it organization and die charter was 
i i ted by the first membership. 

Seller's successful marketing approach and 
Ins subsequent delivery of undefeated Okla- 
hi ima catapulted the Orange Bowl into the "big 
time" in 1939. As the story goes, Seller went 
to Norman to invite the Sooners to Miami, but 
he had competition from the Cotton, Sugar 
and Rose, who wen offering twice as much 
guarantee mi me^ 

Seiler chalked the Oklahoma campus side- 
walks with slogans that lead. "( k\ to Miami" 

and "See you at the 1939 Orange Bowl." He 
showed Soonei players photos o( Miami's 
• at i indpn n\ girls, and promised 
tosetthi te p with dates, The players over- 
whelmingly voted foi Miami. 

Oklahi maci ai h Ibm Stidham, a friend 



of Tennessee coach General Robert Neyland, 
asked Neyland to bring his second-ranked Vols 
to Miami. The matchup of undefeated teams 
led to such media and public interest that, for 
the first time, the demand tor tickets was more 
than the bowl could accommodate. More than 
10,000 requests were denied and 32,191 fans 
lammed into the stadium, despite a listed ca- 
pacity of 22,050. Spectators got their money's 
worth in the game. Tennessee shut out Okla- 
homa, 17-0. 

In the years that followed, the Orange 
Bowl grew into one of college football's "Big 
Four" bowls, taking its place with the Cot ion. 
Sugar and Rose m producing championship 
football year in and year out. In its 68 years, the 
I 'range Bowl Committee has seen I 3 nation 
al champions come out of Miami, including six 
suae 1991 - more than any other Is iwl game 
in the country. 

1940s: The Fabulous 
Forties 

The '40s wen i period ot growth lor the 
I )range Bowl garni ' " ■ ngia's W . 1 1 1 \ Butts, Mis 



souri's Don Farout, Georgia Tech's Bobby Dodd 
and Neyland all brought teams to Miami. Mis- 
souri's 'Passin' Paul Christman (1940), Geor- 
gia's Frankie Srnkwich ( 1942 ), Boston College's 
Mike Holovak (1943), LSU's Steve Van Bu- 
ren (1944), Georgia Tech's Frank Broyles 
( 1945 ) and Texas' Tom Landry ( 1949) graced 
the game during the decade. 

Frankie Srnkwich and Steve Van Buren 
had two of the finest individual performances 
in Orange Bowl history. Sinkwich, the Ail- 
American quarterback played with a broken 
jaw, yet chalked up 365 yards of total offense, 
threw tor three touchdowns and ran for another 
as Georgia beat TCU, 40-26. Van Buren led 
LSU to a 19-14 win over Texas A 6k M in a 
wartime game, running for 172 yards, kicking 
off, punting and kicking an extra point, all on 
a sprained ankle. Holovak 's 141 rushing yards 
and three TDs, Landry's 119 yards rushing and 
Broyles' 304-yard Orange Bowl-record passing 
pertonnance added to fans' excitement. 

Arguably the best game of the era came 
in 1946 when Jack Harding's Miami team beat 
Holy Cross 13-6 on a touchdown after time had 
expired. With just 10 seconds left, Crusader 
quarterback Gene DeFilippo threw a bomb 
downfield. The intended receiver, Bob Con- 
way, saw it deflected into the outstretched amis 
of Miami defensive back Al Hudson, who re- 
turned it 89 yards for the winning points. Hud- 
son crossed the 35 after the final gun. 

1950's: Maryland and 
Oklahoma IVIatchups 
Define '50s 

New teams and new faces marked the '50s 
as the Orange Bowl saw its first two top-ranked 
teams play in Miami. At the time, the Associ- 
ated Press voted on the national champion pri- 
or to the K iwl games. In 1 954, they chose Jim 
Tatum's Mankind Terrapins. That year, a five- 
year tie-up of the AC X." and Big Sewn confer- 
ences was launched. The Orange Bowl matched 
Maryland and Bud Wilkinson's No. 4 Okla- 
homa S(x>ners. 

The Terps, minus All-Amerie.in qu lltei 
ba< k Bernie Faloney, were shut out, 7-0, for the 
In si time in 51 games. In a 1956 rematch, 
Wilkinson's team, riding a i0-gamc winning 
streak, had the top ranking and Maryland was 
No. 5. Wilkinson employed a surprise burn- 
up. 'ttciise after halftime and( )klahoma scored 
14 third-quarter points en route to a 20-6 vic- 



90 



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cory. Oklahoma teams played in the Orange 
Bowl Classic four times during the period. 

C.'k'iiiM ui'-s close shave, a 1 5-14 win over 
Miami, happened in 1 95 1 . In 1 95 V ( :BS tele 
vised the howl - a first. A national audience 
tuned into the broadcast, which showed Al- 
abama's 61-6 blowout over Syracuse behind an 
offense that piled up 5S6 yards. 

The legendary coach Bear Bryant, then 
at Kentucky, was introduced to the Orange 
Bowl in 1950. Georgia Tech kicker Pepper 
Rodgers, in his first OB appearance, beat Bay- 
lor with a game-winning three pointer in '52, 
and returned in '69 as a coach. Kentucky's Babe 
Parilli (1950), Oklahoma's Prentice Gautt 
(1959) and Clemson coach Frank Howard 
(1951 and 1957) were at the peak of college 
careers during the decade. 

1960's: JFK Visits 
Orange Bowl; Night- 
time Television Begins 

Individual greatness continued to be as- 
sociated with the Orange Bowl in the '60s. 
Georgia's Fran Tarkenton (I960), Missouri's 
Dan Devine (I960, '61), Navy's Joe Bellino 
( 1961 ), Alabama's Lee Roy Jordan ( 1963), 
Auburn's Shug Jordan ( 1964), Alabama's Lee 
Roy Jordan, Ray Perkins ( 1965 6k 1966) and 
Steve Sloan ( 1965 6k 1966), Florida's Larry 
Smith ( 1967) and Kansas' John Riggins (1969) 
all impacted the bowl. But it was an Alabama 
coach and his quarterback who wete key to the 
Orange Bowl's giant leap to the top of the bowls. 

In 1963, President John F. Kennedy was 
one of 73,380 fans to witness Bear Bryant's pow- 
erhouse Alabama team, led by young quarter- 
back Joe Namath. With the sophomore com- 
pleting nine of 1 7 passes for 86 yards and a TD 
and linebacker Shug Jordan recording 3 1 tack- 
les, Alabama beat Oklahoma 1 7-0 in Bryant's 
first OB game with the Tide. 

Two years later, in 1965, the first night 
game in Orange Bowl history was telecast. This 
was also the first of 31 straight telecasts by NBC. 
That year, Bear Bryant and Namath's top- 
ranked Crimson Tide were upset by No. 5 
Texas, 21-17. Namath, who didn't start because 
of a knee injury, brought Alabama back from 
a 21-7 halftime deficit to close to within four 
points. In a game for the ages, Frank Bednck 
and Tommy Nobis stopped Namath inches 
short of the goal line on a crucial fourth down 
plav with six minutes left. 



j'JaLjjukij'j 



Although the national 
. I tampii mship year ended on 
a down note for Alabama, 

Namath did win the (. Vange 
Bowl's first MVP award for 
his l8-of-37, 255-yard, two- 
touchdown performance. 

In 1966 the AP voting 
took place after the bowl 
games, and Alabama w< >n I he 
national championship out- 
right in the Orange with a 
39-28 win over Big Eight 
champion Nebraska. In the 
most unusual of Orange Bowl 
finishes, the 1969 Kansas- 
Penn State battle was won by 
young Joe Patemo's Nittany 
Lions, 15-14, over a Pepper 
Rodgers-coached Kansas 
team that was flagged for a 
penalty on the game's most 
crucial play. 

After a Perm State score 
that made it 14-13 during the 
final minutes, Kansas broke 
up quarterback Chuck 
Burkhart's two-point con- 
version try. But referee Foster 
Grose noticed 12 men on the Kansas side of 
the ball and awarded the Nittany Lions a sec- 
ond try. Bob Campbell then ran it in for Perm 
State. 

1970s: Nebraska Wins 
Back-to-Back National 
Championships 

In the '70s, the Orange Bowl saw some of 
the game's greatest coaches on its sidelines: Bear 
Bryant, Joe Patemo, Dan Devine, Ara Parseghi- 
an, Charlie McClendon, Bo Schembechler, 
Woody Hayes, Lou Holt: and Barry Switzer. 
The decade, however, should be known as the 
Bob Devaney years at the Orange Bowl. The 
longtime Nebraska coach brought three teams 
to Miami in the early '70s and won two national 
championships. 

In 1971, playing in the OB for the first 
time in five seasons, Nebraska captured the na- 
tional title with a 17-12 win over LSU. The 
key play was late in the fourth quarter when 
Jerry Tagge performed a quarterback sneak on 
a fourth-and-one play at the one-yard line. 
Tagge had initially been stopped, but he 







Jj^iJuuJ ^'ulaJ / '2LP-/33r T 3liJ jjjjyia-ijLijjjs mjiihiifshxiji-l 



stretched the ball over the g< >al line for the na- 
tional title. 

The Huskers won their second consecu- 
tive national championship, beating Bear 
Bryant and the Ctimson Tide 28-6 in 1972. 
Wingback Johnny Rodgers broke the Tide's 
back on the final play of the first quarter. Ap- 
parently hemmed in after receiving an Alaba- 
ma punt, he broke free and scampered 77 yards 
to a TD and a 14-0 Nebraska lead. 

Devaney 's final game on the Nebraska 
sidelines ended in a third straight Orange Bowl 
victory, this time a 40-6 crushing of Notre Dame 
in 1973. The all-time winningest collegiate 
coach moved Johnny Rodgers to I-Back from 
his usual wingback position, and the Heisman 
Trophy winner closed out his collegiate career 
with arguably the greatest individual perform- 
ance in Orange Bowl history, scoring four 
touchdowns and passing for another. The last 
of his record 50 Nebraska touchdowns came 
on a 50-yard pass reception in the third quar- 
ter, after which he sat out the test of the game. 

The Orange Bowl was the site of anoth- 
et national championship game on New Year's 



93 



CONTINUED 



. 



Home of Siiampions 




con tin ued 




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•itjiijJBi Al -jbujjj-j jjj inB'lUUU yujiiB y/ijjla i 
U/uuya Uyyy] /a^urdi fur jjujj •iiiajjjpij !-JiJ. 
uJvipJaiJDjjj (li-'J). Urudy rsu-jjjiJyiuuMjj 
tiuii-i^ iut uib i'lb'/j Eijiji 

Day 1976, when Oklahoma heat Big 10 run- 
net-up Michigan, 14-6. Here, Barry Switzer 
coached the first of his nine Sooner Orange 
Bowl teams. 

Also memorable were Joe Paterno's 1970 
and 1974 Penn State squads, both undefeat- 
ed and both Orange Bowl champions. 

Parseghian retired from Notre Dame af- 
ter his 13-11 win over Alabama in 1975. 
Arkansas' 3 1 -6 upset of Oklahoma in 1 978 af- 
ter Lou Holtz suspended his top three scorers 
and the 1979 Big Eight rematch of Nebraska 
and Oklahoma were other decade spotlight 
games for the Orange Bowl. Penn State's Fran- 
co Hams (1970), 1 lcisman Tn >phy winner John 
Cappelletti (1974) and Nebraska's Rich Glover 
(1971,1 972 6k 1 973 ) roamed the Orange Bowl 
turf during the decade. 

1980s: Home of the 

Champions 

Four national championship games were 
put together b\ the Orange Bowl Committee 
in the 1980s, largely due to the strength of the 
Big Eight i Conference and the arrival i >l the 
University of Miami on the national scerv i 4 




lahoma made six Orange Bowl ap- 
pearances and Nebraska four, with 
each school playing in two title 
games. The Orange Bowl game 
added corporate sponsor Federal Ex- 
press to its title for the -'90 game, 
pushing its payout to $4 million per 
team. 

A 12-0 Clemson team won 
the 1982 Orange Bowl and the na- 
tion's top honor behind quarter- 
back Homer Jordan and defense- 
men Terry Kinard and William 
"The Refrigerator" Perry. It beat a 
formidable Tom Osborne-coached 
Nebraska team, 22-15. 

The 50th anniversary Orange 
Bowl gave the Kiwi one of the finest 
and most exciting games in college 
football post-season history. Miami 
won its first national title, 31-30, in 
a high-sconng affair diat ended with 
strong safety Ken Calhoun batting 
down the would-be winning two 
point conversion pass thrown by Ne- 
braska's Turner Gill. 

The Howard Schnellenberger- 
coached 'Canes had pulled out to a 
1 7-0 lead but Nebraska came back in the sec- 
ond penod to post 14 points of its own, includ- 
ing six on a controversial 19-yard "fum- 
blerooskie" play by Nebraska lineman Dean 
Steinkuhler. Miami owned the third quarter by 
scoring 14 points to the Cornhuskers' three, but 
Nebraska put togethet a fourth-quarter come- 
back that fell short. 

The 'Canes, led by freshman quarterback 
Bernie Kosar's 300 passing yards, had beaten 
an 1 1-0, No. 1 -ranked Nebraska team. In 1986, 
Oklahoma was back at the top of the Big Eight 
picture and No. 3 nationally. The Sooners were 
pitted against top-tanked independent Penn 
State. A 25-10 Sooner victory and national 
championship finish was sparked by 16 second- 
quarter points that included a 71-yard TDfrom 
quarterback Jamellel Iolicw.i\ to tight end kci 
ih Jackson. 

In 1988, Oklahoma was back for its fourth 
traight Orange Bowl apivarancc bul II was Mi 
aim I hat captured its second national champi 
onship. The Hurru anes, under |immy |ohn- 
son, capped a perfect II regular season with 
a 20-14 vii ton 

The '80s shi iwc ased Big I ight rushing 




champions. Oklahoma's Billy Sims, who rushed 
for 305 yards and three TDs in three OB ap- 
pearances, was instrumental in Sooner victo- 
ries in 1980 and 1981 over Florida State. Fel- 
low Sooner Lydell Carr played in three games 
from 1985 to 1987, rushing for 288 yards and 
a TD in two OU wins. The great Mike Rozier 
played three games in a Nebraska uniform 
( 1982- 1984), rushing for 340 yards. 

The University of Miami, which became 
a pipeline for the NFL, saw quarterback Steve 
Walsh pass for 486 yards and four TDs in die 
1987 and 1988 Orange Bowl games. Wide re- 
ceivers Eddie Brown (1984) and Michael Irvin 
( 1988) both played key roles for the 'Canes dur- 
ing the decade. 

1990s: More National 
Titles in the Nineties 

The Orange Bowl had continued to host 
top-ranked teams as the '90s opened due to the 
strength of the Big Eight and one of its emerg- 
ing teams. The Colorado Buffaloes came into 
the 1990 and 1991 FedEx Orange Bowl Games 
ranked No. 1 and played Notre Dame on both 
occasions. In '90, the Fighting Irish knocked 
Colorado from the top position, 21-6, but in 
'91, an exciting 10-9 victory by Colorado put 
the Orange Bowl right back in the national 
championship picture. 

The '91 finish is one that folks are still 
talking about. Trailing 10-9 with 43 seconds 
remaining, Notre Dame's Raghib "Rocket" Is- 
mail fielded a punt and returned it 91 yards tor 
a winning so ire, but a late clipping penally' nul- 
lified the play and 11-1-1 Colorado had its first 
national title. 

In 1992, a Miami-Nebraska matchup gave 
the OB a second straight national champi- 
onship game when the 'Canes, under Dennis 
Erickson, shutout the Big Red Machine, 22-0. 

The changing waters of college football 
brought on the need fi I] < lunges in the b m 1 

system as the 90s began, and the Orange Bowl 
Committee led the way in the formation ol the 
Bowl Coalition. The three-year period under 
theC oahtion introduced order to the bowl se- 
lection process, and the ( trange Bowl was in 
i luded in a four-bowl "Tier I" pecking order. 
The Coalition years yielded two more union 
,il titles toi the* h inge Bowl, both tunes with 
Big 1 i 'la i hampii m N< braska holding the na- 
tion's top ranking. 

In 1994, the No. 2-rariked Florida Stat> 



94 



CONTINUED ON PAGE 100 




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CONTINUED FROM PAGE 9a 

championship. It was only the eleventh time 
in college football history that the No. 1 and 
No. 2 teams were matched and the third such 
matchup in the OB. 

Behind by a point with under a minute 
ti i gi i, Heisman Trophy winner Charlie Ward 
and his "Fast Break Offense" raced down the 
field and watched Scott Bentley nail the go- 
ahead points on a 22-yard field goal at the 0:21 
mark. Nebraska wasn't finished. In the next 
20 seconds, quarterback Ti mimic Frazier t< x >k 
In- team to the FSU 38-yard line. Byron Ben- 
nett, who hit i 27-yard field goal at the 1:16 
mark to move into the lead, missed the game 
winner from 45 yards. 

The fourth nati< inal championship in five 
u i ana- in the 1995 FedEx Orange Bowl 
u 1 in i the top-ranked 1 tuskers relumed for their 
t. mitli straighi appearance. Aftera 24-17 win 
against Miami, Tom Osborne, who had 
hed under Devanev. had his tirsi nation 
al title. 

In the fall of 1994, the Orange Bowl 
i i ii i n i in in voted to move its game to Joe Rob- 
iw Pro Playei Stadium) as a 
ition of being included in a new three- 
alliance. The Allian. e av aided the Fi- 



esta Fjowl the national championship game in 
1996, the Sugar Bowl in 1997 and the Orange 
in 1998. With the first Bowl Alliance game in 
1996 came the end of the longtime contrac- 
tual relationship between the Big Eight and 
die Orange Bowl. All told, die conference had 
a team in the bowl for 36 of the previous 40 
years. Also ended was a 3 1 -year relationship 
with NBC. 

The Jan. 1, 1996, FedEx Orange Bowl, 
a tour-point Honda State victory (31-26) over 
Notre Dame, was the first of two Orange Bowls 
played in 1996. It was also the first of three tel- 
evised by CBS. In the second 1996 game, the 
University of Nebraska defeated Virginia Tech, 
41-21 in the 63rd FedEx Orange Bowl on New 
Year's Eve. 

Tie 1998 FedEx Orange Bowl was the fi- 
nal bowl game in the original Bowl Alliance 
Ix-tore moving to the Bowl (. Jiampii inship Se- 
nes (RCS) on ABC. The "Battle by the Beach" 
was true to tonn, as the Nebraska ( lomhihkcr- 
claimed a share of the national title with a 42- 
17 win over Tennessee. 

The FedEx Orange Bowl is now pan ol 
the I^CS, a tour-howl rotation where No. I and 
No. 2 teams are matched up fol a national 
championship game. This arrangement also 



re-establishes conference affiliations, which 
partners the Atlantic Coast and Big East Con- 
ferences with the Orange Bowl. 

The last Orange Bowl of the nineties 
brought ti igether the University of Florida and 
Syracuse. The Gators routed the Orangemen 
31-10, earning Travis Taylor an MVP award. 

OB in the New 
Millennium 

Y2K brought the Orange Bowl another 
national championship game. The No. 1- 
ranked Oklahoma Sooners, sporting a 12-0 
record, met the No. 2-ranked Florida State 
Seminoles. It matched the country's top quar 
terb.u ks I SI l's I leisman Froph\ winnci ( hris 
Weinke and Ol "s Josh 1 leupel, the 1 leisman 
runner-up. Oklahoma nearly shut out the 
Seminoles, winning the game 1 V2. 

The FedEx Orange Bowl's involvement 
in deciding the college football national cham- 
pion will continue through at least 2006, as 
conference commissioners approved its inclu- 
sion I Ik FedEx Orange Bowl, along with the 
Nokia Sugar Bowl, Tostitos Fiesta Bow 1 and 
the Rose Bowl, will continue id rotate over the 
next four years in hosting the No Ivs No 2 
n hi. inal championship. 



100 



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INDIVIDUAL 
TOTAL OFFENSE 

MOST YARDS GAINED: 365, Frank 

Sinkwich (Georgia) vs. TCU, 1942 
BEST PER-PLAY AVERAGE: 15.8, Mike 

Holovak (Boston College) vs. Alabama, 

1943 
MOST TDs RESPONSIBLE FOR: 5, 

Johnny Rodgers (Nebraska) vs. Notre Dame, 

(4 rush, 1 pass), 1973 

PASSING 

MOST ATTEMPTS: 5 1 , Chris Weinke 

(Florida State) vs. Oklahoma, 2001 
MOST COMPLETIONS: 34, Tom Brady 

(Michigan) vs. Alabama, 2000 
MOST INTERCEPTIONS THROWN: 5, 

Terry McMillan (Missouri) vs. Penn State, 

1970 




MOST YARDS PASSED FOR: 369, Tom 
Brady (Michigan) vs. Alabama, 2000 

MOST TOUCHDOWN PASSES: 4, Danny 
Kartell, (Florida State) vs. Notre Dame, 
1996 

BEST PASSING PERCENTAGE: .769(10- 
13), Jim Still (Georgia lech) vs. Kansas, 
1948 

LONGEST TD PASS: 79, Brewster Hobby to 
Ross Coyle (Oklahoma) vs. Syracuse, 1959 

SHORTEST TD PASS: 1 , Pete Dranginis to 
Bill Adamaitis (Catholic) vs. Ole Miss, 
1936; Tommie Frazier to Gerald Armstrong 
(Nebraska) vs. Florida State, 1993 

RUSHING 

MOST ATTEMPTS: 3 1 , Fred Cone 

(Clemson) vs. Miami, 1951 
MOST YARDS: 206, Ahman Green 

(Nebraska) vs. Tennessee, 1998 
MOST YARDS PER RUSH: 15.7 (6-94), 

Prentice Gautt (Oklahoma) vs. Syracuse, 

1959 
LONGEST RUSH: 94, Larry Smith (Florida) 

vs. Georgia Tech, 1957 
MOST RUSHING TDs: 4, Johnny Rodgers 

(Nebraska) vs. Notre Dame, 1973 

RECEIVING 

MOST RECEPTIONS: 10, David Terrell 

(Michigan) vs. Alabama, 2000 
MOST YARDS: 159, Ray Perkins (Alabama) 

vs. Nebraska, 1966; Travis Taylor (Florida) 

vs Syracuse, 1999 
MOST TD CATCHES: 3, David Terrell 

(Michigan) vs. Alabama, 2000; Andre 

Cooper (Florida State) vs. Notre Dame 

(1996) 

INTERCEPTIONS 

MOST INTERCEPTIONS: 3, Bud Hebert 

(Oklahoma) vs. Florida State, 1980 
MOST YARDS ON RETURNS: 94, I >avid 

Baker (Oklahoma) vs. Duke, 1958 
LONGEST RETURN: "4, David Baker 

(Oklahoma) vs. Duke, 1958 
LONGEST RETURN (WITH LATERAL): 

98, Greg Mather (Navy) vs. Missouri, 1961 

PUNTING 

MOST PUNTS: 13, Hugh Keeney (Rice) vs. 

Tennessee, 1 L M7 
BEST AVERAGE: 52.3 (6 $14), Chris Hogue 

t lennessee) vs. Nebraska, 1998 
LONGEST PUNT: 82. Ike Pickle (Mississippi 

State) v v Duquesne, l l "7 

PUNT RETURNS 

MOST RETURNS: 6, |ohnn> Rodgers 
(Nebraska) vs Alabama, 1". 



MOST YARDS RETURNED: 136, Johnny 
Rodgers (Nebraska) vs. Alabama, 1972 

LONGEST RETURN: 80, Cecil Ingram 
(Alabama) vs. Syracuse, 1953 

KICKOFF RETURNS 

MOST RETURNS: 6, Steve Williams 

(Alabama) vs. Nebraska, 1972 
LONGEST RETURN: 90, Camp Wilson 

(Tulsa) vs. Georgia Tech, 1945 
MOST YARDS: 1 30, Frank Solich (Nebraska) 

vs. Alabama, 1966 

SCORING 

MOST POINTS: 24, Johnny Rodgers 

(Nebraska) vs. Notre Dame, 1973 
MOST TOUCHDOWNS: 4, Johnny Rodgers 

(Nebraska) vs. Notre Dame, 1973 
LONGEST PLAY: 98, Greg Mather (Navy) 

vs. Missouri, 1961 (fumble return) 
MOST FIELD GOALS: 4, Scott Bentley 

(Florida State) vs. Nebraska, 1994; Tim 

Lashar (Oklahoma) vs. Penn State, 1986 
LONGEST FIELD GOAL: 56, Greg Cox 

(Miami) vs. Oklahoma, 1988 
MOST PATs: 7, Bobby Luna (Alabama) vs. 

Syracuse, 1953 

TEAM 

TOTAL OFFENSE 

MOST PLAYS: 90, Nebraska (vs. Notre 

Dame), 1973 
MOST YARDS: 596, Alabama (vs. Syracuse), 

1953 
FEWEST YARDS: 28, Miami (vs. Bucknell), 

1935 
BEST PER-PLAY AVERAGE: 7.74, 

Alabama (vs. Syracuse), 1953 
MOST FIRST DOWNS: 30, Nebraska (vs. 

Notte Dame), 1973; Nebraska (w 

Tennessee), 1998 
FEWEST FIRST DOWNS: 2, Michigan 

Slate (vs. Auburn), 1938 

RUSHING 

MOST ATTEMPTS: 71, Ohio Stale (vs. 

Colorado), l l| 77 
MOST YARDS: 41 1, Oklahoma (vs. Florida 

State), 1980 

BEST PER-RUSH AVERAGE: 7.6 (48-366), 

Oklahoma (vs. Arkansas), [987 
FEWEST RUSHING ATTEMPTS: 16, 

Colorado(vs I SI I, 1962 
FEWEST RUSHING YARDS (-S), N.n v (vs. 

Missouri), 1961 

PASSING 

MOST ATTEMPTS: 52, Florida State (vs. 

Oklahoma), 2001 
MOST COMPLETIONS: 35, Michigan (vs. 
Mabama), 2000 



102 




MOST INTERCEPTIONS THROWN: 7, 

Missouri (vs. Perm Suite), 1970 
MOST YARDS: 369, Michigan (vs. 

Alabama), 2000 
FEWEST YARDS: (-17), Rice (vs. 

Tennessee), L947 
MOST TOUCHDOWNS: 4, ( ieorgia (vs. 

TCU), 1942; Florida State (vs. Notre 

Dame), 1996; 4, Michigan (vs. Alabama), 

2000 
BEST COMPLETION PERCENTAGE: 

.745 (35-47), Michigan (vs. Alabama), 2000 
FEWEST ATTEMPTS: J, Catholic (vs. Ole 

Miss), 1936; Oklahoma (vs. Nebraska), 1979 
FEWEST COMPLETIONS: 0, Miami (vs. 

Holy Cross), 1946; Rice (vs. Tennessee), 

1947 

INTERCEPTIONS 

MOST INTERCEPTIONS: 7, Penn State 

(vs. Missouri), 1970 
MOST YARDS RETURNED: 167, 
Oklahoma (vs. Duke), 1958 

PUNTING 

MOST PUNTS: 15, Tennessee (vs. Rice), 

1947 
BEST AVERAGE: 52.3 (6-314), Tennessee 

(vs. Nebraska), 1998 

SCORING 

MOST POINTS: 61, Alabama (vs. Syracuse), 

1953 
MOST TOUCHDOWNS: 9, Alabama (vs. 

Syracuse), 1953 
LARGEST MARGIN OF VICTORY: 55, 

Alabama (vs. Syracuse), 1953 
MOST POINTS BY THE LOSER: 34, 

Alabama (vs. Michigan), 2000 
FEWEST POINTS BY THE WINNER: 6, 

Auburn (vs. Michigan State), 1938 
MOST POINTS IN A QUARTER: 27, 

Oklahoma (vs. Duke), 1958 
FEWEST POINTS SCORED: 0, Miami (vs. 

Bucknell), 1935; Michigan State (vs. 

Auburn), 1938; Oklahoma (vs. Tennessee), 

1939; Tennessee (vs. Rice), 1947; Missouri 

(vs. Georgia), 1960; Oklahoma (vs. 

Alabama), 1963; Nebraska (vs. Miami), 

1992 

TURNOVERS 

MOST FUMBLES: 8, Colorado (vs. 

Clemson), 1957 
MOST FUMBLES LOST: 4, Nebraska (vs. 

Alabama), 1966; Ohio State (vs. Colorado), 

1977; Nebraska (vs. LSU), 1983 
FEWEST FUMBLES: 0, Mississippi State (vs. 

Duquesne), 1937; Miami (vs. Oklahoma), 

1988; Florida State (vs. Nebraska), 1993; 

Florida State (vs. Nebraska), 1994; Nebraska 



(vs. Virginia Tech), 1996; Florida (vs. 
Syracuse), 1999 
MOST TURNOVERS: (Fumbles 6k 

Interceptions): 9 (2-7), Missouri (vs. Penn 
State), 1970 

PENALTIES 

MOST PENALTIES: IS, Alabama (vs. 
Michigan), 2000 

MOST YARDS PENALIZED: 157, 
Tennessee (vs. Oklahoma), 1939 

FEWEST YARDS PENALIZED: 5, 

Mississippi State and Duquesne, 1937; Holy 
Cross (vs. Miami), 1946; Alabama 1 1 - 
Notre Dame), 1975; Colorado (vs. Notre 
Dame), 1990 

TEAM (All-Time) 

MOST APPEARANCES: 17, Nebraska; 17. 

Oklahoma 
MOST CONSECUTIVE APPEARANCES: 

4. Oklahoma (1978-91), (1985-88); 

Nebraska (1992-95) 
MOST WINS: 12. Oklahoma 

TWO-TEAM RECORDS 

MOST POINTS: 69, Texas (41 I vs. Georgia 
(28), 1949; Oklahoma (48) vs. Duke (21), 
1958; Michigan (35) vs. Alabama (34) 2000 

FEWEST POINTS: 6, Auburn (6) vs. 
Michigan State (0), 1938 

MOST POINTS IN QUARTER: 35, 
Michigan (21) vs. Alabama (14), 2000 

MOST PLAYS: 157, Nebraska (90) vs. Notre 
Dame (67). 1973 

MOST FIRST DOWNS: 47, Nebraska (25) 



vs. Virginia Tech (22), 1996 
FEWEST FIRST DOWNS: 12, Texas A&M 

(8) vs. LSU (4), 1944 
MOST YARDS: 903, Florida State (478) vs. 

Notre Dame (425), 1996 
MOST RUSHING YARDS: 547, Arkansas 

(317) vs. Oklahoma (230), 1978 
MOST PASSING YARDS: 528, Alabama 

(296) vs. Nebraska (232), 1966 
MOST PASSES ATTEMPTED: 91, Florida 

State (52) vs. Oklahoma (39), 2001 
MOST PASS COMPLETIONS: 50, Florida 

State (25) vs. Oklahoma (25). 2001 
MOST TOUCHDOWN PASSES: 7, Georgia 

(6) vs. TCU (1), 1942; Florida State (4) vs. 

Notre Dame (3), 1996 
MOST INTERCEPTIONS: 10, Georgia (6) 

vs. TCU (4), 1942 
MOST RUSHES: 11 7, Oklahoma (65) vs. 

Michigan State (52), 1976 
MOST FUMBLES: 9, Tennessee (4) vs. 

Oklahoma (5), 1939 
FEWEST FUMBLES: 0, Auburn vs. 

Michigan St., 1938; Mississippi State vs. 

Duquesne, 1937; Nebraska vs. Oklahoma, 

1979; Miami vs. Nebraska, 1989; Florida 

State vs. Nebraska, 1993; Florida State vs. 

Notre Dame, 1996 
MOST FUMBLES LOST: 6, Tennessee (3) 

vs. Oklahoma (3), 1939 
MOST YARDS PENALIZED: 247, Alabama 

(132) vs. Oklahoma (115), 2000 
FEWEST YARDS PENALIZED: 10, 

Mi-sissippi State (5) vs. Duquesne (5), 1957 



103 



2001 
2000 
1999 
1990 
1996 
1996 
1995 
1994 
1993 
1992 
1991 
1990 
1909 
1900 
1907 
1906 
1985 
1984 
1983 
1982 
1981 
1980 
1979 
1970 
1977 
1976 
1976 
1974 
1973 
1972 
1971 
1970 
1969 
1968 
1967 
1966 
1965 
1964 
1963 
1962 



Oklahoma 13 
Florida Stale 2 
Michigan 35 
Alabama 34 (01) 
Florida 31 
Syracuse 10 
Nebraska 42 
lennessee 17 
Nebraska 41 
Virginia lech 2 1 
Florida Stale 31 
Notre Dame 26 
Nebraska 24 
Miami 17 
Florida State 18 
Nebraska 16 
Florida Stale 27 
Nebraska 14 
Miami 22 
Nebraska 
Colorado 10 
Notre Dame 9 
Notre Dame 21 
Colorado 6 
Miami 23 
Nebraska 3 
Miami 20 
Oklahoma 14 
Oklahoma 42 
Arkansas 8 
Oklahoma 25 
Penn State 10 
Washington 28 
Oklahoma 17 
Miami 31 
Nebraska 30 
Nebraska 21 
ISU20 
Clemson 22 
Nebraska 15 
Oklahoma 18 
Florida State 17 
Oklahoma 24 
Florida State 7 
Oklahoma 31 
Nebraska 24 
Arkansas 31 
Oklahoma 6 
Ohio Stale 27 
Colorado 10 
Oklahoma 14 
Michigan 6 
Notre Dame 13 
Alabama II 
Penn State 16 
LSD 9 

Nebraska 40 
Notre Dame 6 
Nebraska 38 
Alabama 6 
Nebraska 17 
LSU12 
Penn Stale 10 
Missouri 3 
Penn State 15 
Kansas 14 
Oklahoma 26 
lennessee 24 
Florida 27 
Georgia lech 12 
Alabama 39 
Nebraska 20 
Texas 2 1 
Alabaman 
Nebraska 13 
Auburn 7 
Alabama 17 
Oklahoma 
LSU25 
Colorado 7 



Bob Stoops 
Bobby Bowden 
Lloyd Can 
Mike DuBose 
Steve Spurrier 
Paul Pasqualoni 
lorn Osborne 
Phillip I nliuw 
lorn Osborne 
Frank Beamer 
Bobby Bowden 
Lou Hottz 
lorn Osborne 
Dennis Fnckson 
Bobby Bowden 
lorn Osborne 
Bobby Bowden 
lorn Osborne 
Dennis Fnckson 
lorn Osborne 
Bill McCartney 
Lou Hole 
Lou Hull; 
Bill McCartney 
Jimmy Johnson 
lorn Osborne 
Jimmy Johnson 
Barry Switzer 
Barry Switzer 
Ken Hatfield 
Barry Switzer 
Joe Patemo 
Don James 
Barry Switzer 
H.Scbnellenberger 
lorn Osborne 
lorn Osbome 
Jerry Stouall 
Danny Ford 
lorn Osbome 
Barry Switzer 
Bobby Bowden 
Barry Switzer 
Bobby Bowden 
Barry Switzer 
lorn Osborne 

Lou Hull; 

Barry Switzer 
Woody Hayes 
Bill Mallory 
Barry Switzer 
Bo Schembechler 
Ara Parseghian 
Paul Bryant 
Joe Palerno 
Charlie McClendon 
Bub Devaney 
Ara Parseghian 
Bub Devaney 
Paul Bryant 
Bob Devaney 
Charlie McClendon 
Joe Patemo 
Dan Oevine 
Joe Palerno 
Pepper Bodgers 
Chuck Fairbanks 
Doug Dickey 
Ray Graves 
Bobby Dodd 
Paul Bryant 
Bob Dovanay 
Darrell Royal 
Paul Bryant 
Boh Devaney 
Shug Jordan 
Paul Bryant 
Bud Wilkinson 
Paul Oietzel 
Sonny Grandalius 



Torrance Marshall (Oklahoma) 1 3-0 



David Terrell (Michigan) 

Travis Taylor (Florida) 

Ahman Green (Nebraska) 
Jamal Lewis (Tennessee) 
Damon Benning (Nebraska) 
Ken Oxendine (Virgnia Tech) 
Andre Cooper (Flonda State) 
Dernck Mayes (Notre Oame) 
lommie Fraziei (Nebraska) 
Chris 1 Jones (Miami) 
Charlie Waid (Flonda State) 
lommie Fraziei (Nebraska) 
Charlie Ward (Flonda State) 
Corey Dixon (Nebraska) 
Larry Jones (Miami) 
Tyrone Legette (Nebraska) 
Charles Thompson (Colorado) 
Chns 2orich (Notre Dame) 
Rahgib Ismail (Notre Dame) 
Danan Hagan (Colorado) 
Steve Walsh (Miami) 
Charles Fryar (Nebraska) 
Bernard Clark (Miami) 
Darrell Reed (Oklahoma) 
Dante Jones (Oklahoma) 
Spencer Tillman {Oklahoma) 
Sonny Brnwn (Oklahoma) 
Tim Lasbar (Oklahoma) 
Jacque Robinson (Washington) 
Ron Holmes (Washington) 
Bemie Kosar (Miami) 
Jack Fernandez (Miami) 
Turner Gill (Nebraska) 
Dave Rimingtoo (Nebraska) 
Homer Jordan (Clemson) 
JeH Davis (Clemson) 
J.C. Watts (Oklahoma) 
Jarvis Coursey (Flonda State) 
J.C. Watts (Oklahoma) 
Bud Herbert (Oklahoma) 
Billy Sims (Oklahoma) 
Reggie Kinlaw (Oklahoma) 
Roland Sales (Arkansas) 
Reggie Freeman (Arkansas) 
Rod Gerald (Ohio State) 
Tom Cousmeau (Ohio State) 
Steve Davis (Oklahoma) 
Leo Roy Salmon (Oklahoma) 
Wayne Bullock (Notre Oame) 
Leeroy Cook (Alabama) 
Tom Shuman (Penn State) 
Randy Ciowder (Penn State) 
Johnny Rodgers (Nebraska) 
Rich Glover (Nebraska) 
Jerry Tagge (Nebraska) 
Rich Glover (Nebraska) 
Jerry Tagge (Nebraska) 
Willie Harper (Nebraska) 
Chuck Biiikhiirt (Peon Stale) 
Mike Reid (Penn State) 
Donnm Shankbn (Kansas) 

Bob Warmack (Oklahoma) 

Larry Smith (Florida) 

Steve Sloan (Alabama) 

Joe Nemalh (Alabama) 

N/A 

N/A 

N/A 



10-2 

10-3 

10-2 

8-4 

13-0 

11-2 

11-2 

10-2 

10-2 

9-3 

13 

10-2 

12-1 

12-1 

12-1 

9-3-0 

12-0 

9-2-1 

11-1-1 

9-3 

12-1 

11-1 

11-1 

11-2 

12-0 

11-1 

11-1 

9-3 

11-1 

11-1 

11-1 

9-2-1 

11-1 

12-1 

12-1 

0-3-1 

12-0 

9-3 

10-2 

10-2 

11-1 

11-1 

11-1 

9-3 

10-2 

11-1 

9-2-1 

0-4 

11-1 

0-2-2 

11-1 

10-2 

12-0 

9-3 

9-2-1 

3-3 

13-0 

11-1 

11-0-1 

9-3 

11-0 

9-2 

11-0 

9-2 

10-1 

9-2 

92 

9-2 

9-1-1 

10-1 

10-1 

10-1 

9-2 

10-1 

9-2 

0-3 

101 

9-2 



76.635 
70.461 
67,919 
72,385 
51.212 
72.198 
81,753 
81.530 
57,324 
77.747 
77.062 
81.191 
79,480 
74,760 
52.717 
74.170 
56,294 
72,549 
54.407 
72.748 
71,043 
66.714 
66.365 
60.907 
65.537 
00,307 
71,001 
60,477 
00.010 
78.151 
80.699 
78,262 
77,719 
77,993 
72,426 
72.214 
72.647 
72.647 
72.880 
68.150 



1961 
1900 
1959 
1958 
1957 
1956 
1955 
1964 
1953 
1952 
1951 
1950 
1949 
1948 
1947 
1946 
1945 
1944 
1943 
1942 
1941 
1940 
1939 
1930 
1937 
1936 
1935 



Missoun 21 
Navy 14 
Georgia 14 
Missoun 
Oklahoma 21 
Syracuse 6 
Oklahoma 48 
Duke 2 1 
Colorado 27 
Clemson 21 
Oklahoma 20 
Maryland 6 
Duke 34 
Nebraska 7 
Oklahoma 7 
Maryland 
Alabama 61 
Syracuse 6 
Georgia Tech 17 
Bayloi 14 
Clemson 15 
Miami 14 
Santa Clara 21 
Kentucky 13 
Texas 41 
Georgia 28 
Georgia Tech 20 
Kansas 14 
Rice 8 
Tennessee 
Miami 13 
Holy Cross 6 
Tulsa 26 
Georgia Tech 12 
LS019 

Texas ASM 14 
Alabama 37 
Boston College 21 
Georgia 40 
Texas Christian 26 
Mississippi State 14 
Georgetown 7 
Georgia lech 21 
Missouri 7 
lennessee 17 
Oklahoma 
Auburn 6 
Michigan State 
Ouquesne 13 
Mississippi State 12 
Catholic 20 
Mississippi 19 
Bucknell 26 
Miami 



Dan Oevine 
Wayne Hardin 
Wallace Bulls 
Dan Devine 
Bud Wilkinson 
Ben Schwartzwalder 
Bud Wilkinson 
Bill Murray 
Dallas Ward 
Frank Howard 
Bud Wilkinson 
Jim latum 
Bill Murray 
Bill Glasslord 
Bud Wilkinson 
Jim latum 

Harold R. "Red" Drew 
Ben Schwartzwalder 
Bobby Dodd 
George Sauer 
Frank Howard 
Andy Gustafson 
Leo Casanova 
Paul Bryant 
Blair Cheery 
Wallace Butts 
Bobby Dodd 
George Sauet 
Jess Neely 

General Robert Neyland 
Jack Harding 
John OaGiosa 
Henry Fmka 
W.A.Alexander 
Bemie Moore 
Homer Norton 
Frank Ibomas 
Dennis Myers 
Wallace Butts 
Leo R. Meyer 

Allyn Mi K 

Jack Haggerty 
W.A. Alexander 
Dan Faurot 

General Robert Neyland 
lorn Stidham 
Jack Meaghei 
Charlie Bachman 
Jack Smith 
Ralph SassB 
A.J. Bergman 
Ed Walker 
Hooks Myhn 
lorn McCann 



N/A 



N/A 



N/A 



N/A 



N/A 



N/A 



11-0 


72.212 


9-1 




10-1 


72.186 


6-5 




10-1 


75,281 


8-2 




10-1 


76.318 


6-3-2 




7-2-2 


73.280 


8-2-1 




11-0 


76,561 


10-1 




0-2-1 


68.750 


3-6-1 




9-1-1 


60.640 


10-1 




10-2 


66.200 


7-3 




11-0-1 


65.839 


0-2-1 




9-0-1 


65.181 


9-1-1 




9-3 


64.816 


9-3 




9-2 


60.523 


7-3-1 




10-1 


59.??? 


8-1-2 




9-2 


36.152 


9-2 




9-1-1 


35.709 


8-2 




8-3 


23.279 


8-2 




7-2-1 


25.203 


6-3 




8-3 


25.166 


8-2 




9-1-1 


36.786 


7-3-1 




10-0-1 


29.564 


8-2 




8-2 


29,278 


8-2 




11-0 


32.191 


10-1 




6-2-3 


18.972 


8-2 




8-2 


9,210 


7-3-1 




8-1 


6.568 


9-2 




7-2-2 


6.134 


6-3-1 






104 



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BANK UNITED 
ORANGE BOWL 
SPONSOR GOLF 
CLASSIC 

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2001 • 8:00 A.M. • 
DORAL GOLF RESORT & SPA, GREAT WHITE 
COURSE 

The Sponsor i !olf Classic is held every 
u .it to reward corporate sponsors for their sup- 
port of the Orange Bowl Festival. Theannu- 

al Golf Classic is open to approximately 

1 44 employees and guests ot corporate spon- 

9 as fi Tall Orange Bowl events. Participants 
include Fortune 500 companies and top 
South Florida institutions including FedEx, 
Puhlix, Bacardi USA, Bank United, AvMED 
I lealth Plan, Coca-Cola, Frito Lay, Chrysler 
and SunTrust. The tournament was held at 
1\ Til G 'It Res, irt ek Spa, home of the Genu- 
ity Championship. 

LEGION OF HONOR 
RECEPTION 

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 19. 2001 • 5:00 P.M. • 
UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI WELLNESS CENTER 

The Orange Bowl Legion of Honor 
Program has honored some of South Florida's 
brightest students over the last tour years with 
four-year scholarships to the University of 
N harm. The Orange Bowl Committee award- 
ed full scholarships to two South Florida 
students, Lindsey Rutland of (.'oral Springs 
High School and Benjamin Stearns from 
St. Thomas Aquinas. Each scholarship is val- 
ued at approximately 5100.000. 

FEDEX ORANGE BOWL 
YOUTH FOOTBALL 
LEAGUE "CHEER TO 
THE FEDEX ORANGE 

BOWL" 

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2001 • 8:00 A.M. • 
LOCKHART STADIUM, FORT LAUDERDALE, FL 

Cheerleaders from the five member 
leagues of the FedEx Orange Bowl Youth Fcxit- 
hall League had their chance to shine in 
the second annual "Cheer to the FedEx 



t )range Bowl" Lock- 
hart Stadium host 

more than 1,000 

cheerleaders c om- 
peting in eight cate- ~ 
godes. The winners 
will participate in 



it 




the many Orange Bowl Festival events 
including the Orange Bowl Parade and the 
pregame and halftime shows at the 2002 
FedEx Orange Bowl. 

LOU GROZA 
COLLEGIATE 
PLACEKICKER 
AWARD, PRESENTED 
BY THE ORANGE 
BOWL COMMITTEE 

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2001 • 6:30 P.M. • 
SHERATON WEST PALM BEACH HOTEL 

The award going to the top Division 
I A place kicker is given out annually in 
South Honda. A national selection committee 
comprised of up to 1 10 voters narrows a 
field of 20 semifinalists to three finalists. 
This year, Seth Marler of Tulane Universi- 
ty was announced as the tenth wanner of the 
Lou Groza Award that was presented to him 
by the Orange Bowl Committee. The award 
is named after the late Lou "The Toe" Gro:a, 
a Hall of Fame kicker and offensive lineman 
for the Cleveland Browns. Proceeds from 
the event benefit the Palm Beach County 
Sports Institute, a youth program of the 
Palm Beach County Sports Commission. 



SUNTRUST ORANGE 
BOWL FEAST ON THE 
FIFTY, PRESENTED BY 
AVMED 

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2001 • 6:00 P.M. • 
PRO PLAYER STADIUM 

Every year, the Orange Bowl Festival 
begins its celebration with a party known as 
the "Feast on the Fifty." Participating coach 
es, the Orange Bowl Committee, corporate 

sponsors and ticket patrons enjoy food, bev- 
erages and entertainment on the same field 
that the 2002 FedEx Orange Bowl will be 
played. 

FEDEX ORANGE BOWL 
YOUTH FOOTBALL 
LEAGUE "BOWL 
BEFORE THE BOWL" 

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2001 • 8:00 A.M. • 
ORANGE BOWL STADIUM 

The FedEx Orange Bowl Youth F<x)tball 
League crowned eight South Florida cham- 
pions in its third annual "Bowl Before The 




107 



CONTINUED 





Ball ready for play 
"Untlmed down 





Time nut 
Discretionary or injury time- 
out (follow by tapping 
hands on chest) 




TV/Radio lime-out 




Touchdown 

Field goal 

Point(s) attar touchdown 




Safety 





CCk, 





Incomplete forward pass 

Penalty declined 

No play, no score 

Toss option delayed 




Legal touching ol forward 
pass or scrimmage kick 




Inadvertent whistle 
(Face Press Box) 




Disregard (lag 






Illegal touching Uncatchable 

or 30-second timeout forward pass 





Offside defense 
Encroachment (NF) 




False start 

Illegal formation 

Encroachment offense 

Illegal procedure (NF) 



20 r 




Illegal shift ■ 2 hands 
Illegal motion - 1 hand 




Delay of game 




Substitution Infraction 




Failure to wear 
required equipment 





Unsportsmanlike conduct 
Noncontact foul 




Illegal participation 




Sideline Interference 




Running Into 

or roughing kicker 

or holder 




Illegal batting 

Illegal kicking 

(Followed by pointing 

toward toe tor kicking) 



32 




Illegal fair catch signal 

Invalid fair catch 

signal (NF) 




Forward pass 

Interference 

Kirk catching interference 




Roughing passer 





Intentional grounding 




Ineligible downfleld 
on pass 





Clipping 



40 




Blocking below waist 
Illegal block 




Chop block 




Holding/obstructing 
Illegal uie of hands/arms 



43 




Illegal block In the back 

Illegal use of 

hands or armi (NF) 




Helping runner 
Interlocked blocking 



45 




Grasping face mask or 
helmet opening 



Note; Signal numbers 25 and 26 are for future expansion. 

(NF) National Federation of State High School Aseociatlons signal. 




Tripping 




Player disqualification 




Festival Events 



continued 




Bowl." The FedEx Orange Bowl Youth 
Football Limbic I 'h.impionship games arc hold 
in December, with more than 25,000 youth 
football players and cheerleaders partici- 
pating in the five-month league. A cham- 
pionship was held tor eat h weight division, 

with teams representing the member leagues. 

ORANGE BOWL 
WOMEN'S FAB FOUR 
BASKETBALL 
CLASSIC 

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2001 • 2:00 P.M. • 
AMERICANAIRLINES ARENA 

The Third Annual Orange Bowl 
Women's Fab Four Basketball Classic followed 
tradition bv ottering two more fantastic 
matchups. Hometown favorites Florida 
International and Miami earned big wins over 
Colorado State and Texas, respectively. The 
games were played in the beautiful Amen- 
canAirlines Arena in downtown Miami. 

BURGER KING 
ORANGE BOWL 
INTERNATIONAL 
TENNIS 

CHAMPIONSHIPS 
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9— SUNDAY, DECEM- 
BER 16 , 2001* ALL DAY • TENNIS CENTER AT 
CRANDON PARK, KEY BISCAYNE, FL 

The 2001 Burger King Orange Bowl 
International Tennis Championships reairned 




to the hard courts of the Tennis Center at 
Crandon Park on Key Biscayne, home to the 
ATP's Ericsson Championships (formerly 
the Lipton Championships). More than 
1 ,000 players from 80 countries gathered to 





compete for one i >t the wi dd's top junior ten- 
nis titles. Entering its 55th year of play, 
many of the nation's top tennis juniors will 
try to join the list of past champions that 
includes Chris Evert, John McEnroe, Boris 
Becker, Stefan Eclberg, Anna Kournikova and 
Gahnela Sabatini. 

ORANGE BOWL MEN'S 
BASKETBALL CLASSIC 

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2001 • 5:00 P.M. • 
AMERICANAIRLINES ARENA 

Four great basketball programs com- 
peted in the Ninth Annual Orange Bowl Bas- 
ketball Classic. This year's Classic consist- 
ed of two games with match-ups of Indiana 
against Miami followed by defending Con- 
ference USA champion Charlotte facing 
off with nationally-ranked Florida. The 
Classic moved to the beautiful Amen- 
canAirlines Arena in Downtown Miami 
this year. 

ORANGE BOWL 
SAILING REGATTA 
SERIES 

SUNDAY DECEMBER 16 - MONDAY, DECEM- 
BER 17 • ALL DAY • SHAKE-A-LEG CENTER, 
COCONUT GROVE, FL 

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 27 - SATURDAY, DE- 
CEMBER 30, 2001 • ALL DAY • CORAL REEF 
YACHT CLUB 

The Regatta Series is a traditional event 
of the Orange Bowl Festival that brings 
more than 600 sailors from around the world 
to South Flonda. The series includes four days 
ot competition, featuring four separate races. 
Past races have included the International 
Optimist Dinghy Class (Collegiate Sailors — 
Coral Reet Yacht Club), International Youth 
Regatta (Youth— Coral Reef Yacht Club), One 
Design Classes (Coconut Grove Sailing 
Club), Shake- A-Leg (Handicap Sailors — 
Shake-A-Leg Center). 

FCA ORANGE BOWL 
PRAYER BREAKFAST 

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2001 • 7 JO A.M. • 
RADISSON MART HOTEL 

The Fellowship of Christian Athletes once 
again organized this annual Prayer Breakfast 



109 



CONTINUED 



iStiwai Events 



conti n ued 





for young athletes, participating teams, spon- 
sors and guests. Former Nebraska standout Irv- 
ing Fryar was the keynote speaker for this 
year's event. Past speakers have been the 
Who's Who in College Football: Florida's 
Steve Spurrier, Tennessee's Peyton Manning, 
former Nebraska head coaches Tom Osborne 
and Bob Devaney, Chicago Bears' great Mike 
Singletary, Bobby Bowden and Lou Holtz. 

ORANGE BOWL 
HOSPITAL VISITS 

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 28. 2001 • 9:30 AM. • 
JACKSON MEMORIAL HOSPITAL AND BAP 
TIST CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Teams participating in the 2002 FedEx 
Orange Bowl will take a day from their prac- 
tice schedules to visit South Florida youth in 
area hospitals. In addition to distrib- 
uting gifts with the Universities' logo, 
players from both teams spent two 
hours with the kids at either Jackson 
Memorial Hospital or Baptist Chil- 
dren's Hospital. 

AT&T WIRELESS 
ORANGE BOWL 
COACHES 
LUNCHEON 

MONDAY, DECEMBER 31,2001 -11:30 
AM. • RENAISSANCE BISCAYNE BAY, 
MIAMI 

The coa< hes of the participating 

teams i it the 2002 FedEx Orange Bowl 

n thi f Him d guests oi the annu- 

d( IrangeBowK baches Luncheon The 

'< m ' I > ".',! I fill ol ll,»nor ( Ilass of 
2001 wen- also reo igni ed prior to 




their induction held during tonight's FedEx 
Orange Bowl pregame. Nominees of this year's 
class are Irving Fryar, Ray Graves, and Steve 
Walsh. 

62ND ANNUAL 
ORANGE BOWL 
PARADE 

MONDAY, DECEMBER 31, 2001 • 5:00 P.M. • 
BISCAYNE BOULEVARD, DOWNTOWN MIAMI 

Get the New Year's Party started right 
with the 2001 Orange Bowl Parade. This 
"Underwater Wonderland" will have all the 
pomp and pageantry of the American tradition 
in downtown Miami. More than 300,000 will 
gather on the final night of 2001 to enjoy the 
world's most colorful nighttime parade-the 
Orange Bowl Parade. That spirit is shared with 
the rest of the nation through the syndi- 
cated prime-time telecast of this family 
event. In its 62-year history, many famous 
Americans have ridden down Biscayne 
Boulevard perched atop a float. Grand mar- 
shals were representatives of the New York 
Fire and Police Departments. 

ORANGE BOWL 
PATCH BEACH BASH 

TUESDAY, JANUARY 1, 2002 • 12 NOON— 
8:00 P.M. «DANIA BEACH PIER 

The party really got started on this 



first day of the new year. Great musical 
entertainment also featured in tonight's 
halftime show, delicious food and visits 
from the Florida and Maryland pep bands 
and cheerleaders capped off the overall 
beautiful setting of the Dania Beach Pier. 
Thousands of South Flondians and guests 
from around the country assembled for 
this event, included in the FedEx Orange 
Bowl Traveling Tailgate Party. 

PUBLIX ORANGE 
BOWL ULTIMATE 
TAILGATE PARTY 

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2. 2002 • 12 NOON— 
7:30 P.M. « PRO PLAYER STADIUM 

The 68th Annual FedEx Orange 
Bowl kicks off with the Publix Ultimate 
Tailgate Party. The event, which ran 
until 7:30 p.m., serves as the ultimate 
starter for the annual bowl game on 
January 2, 2002. The tailgate party fea- 
tured live bands and many other enter- 
taining participants. Also performing 
were the Florida and Maryland pep bands. 
Other attractions included interactive 
games and an Orange Bowl Memory Lane. 
This relatively new event has become one 
of the hottest tickets of the Orange Bowl 
Festival. 




110 



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In its 1 5th season as the premiet sports and 
entertainment facility in the country, state- 
of-the-art Pro Player Stadium is home of the 
Miami Dolphins and Florida Marlins. The 
75,000-seat stadium has hosted numerous world- 
class sporting events, such as the 1988, 1994 and 
1999 Super Bowls and the 1997 World Series. Pro 
Player Stadium is one of only five facilities in the 
country to host the National Football League and 
Major League Baseball in the same venue. 
HISTORY 

The stadium, originally called Dolphin 
Stadium, was the first of its kind to be con- 
structed entirely with private funds. The late 
Joe Robbie led the financing campaign to build 
"Joe Robbie Stadium" for the Miami Dolphins 
of the NFL. JRS revolutionized the econom- 
ics of professional sports when it opened in 1987. 
Inclusion of a club level, along with executive 
suites, helped to finance the construction of the 
stadium. Season ticket holders committed to 
long-term agreements and, in return, received 
first-class amenities in the state-of-the-art fa- 
cility, which is still used as a model for new fa- 
cilities across the country. 

In 1990, H. Wayne Huizenga, then chair- 
man of the board and chief executive officer of 
Blockbuster Video and Huizenga Holdings Inc., 
agreed to purchase 50 percent of JRS and became 
the point man in the drive to bring Major League 
Baseball to South Florida. The effort was rewarded 
in July of 1991 , when South Honda received a 
National League expansion franchise. In 1994, 
Mr. Huizenga acquired the remaining 50 percent 
of the stadium. Since 1991, several million dol- 
lars have been spent to upgrade and renovate the 
stadium. 

On August 26, 1996, Pro Player, the sports 
apparel division of Fniit of the Lxim, sponsored 
the renaming of Joe Robbie Stadium as Pro Play- 
er Stadium. The first fmthall game in Joe Robbie 
Stadium was held on Aug. 16, 1987, when the 
Miami D ilphins met the Chicago Bears in a pre- 
season battle. The game also marked the 22nd 
anniversary of the Dolphins franchise. The sta- 
i limn hosted the National Fmtball Leagues pre- 
mier game, Super Bowl XXIII on Jan. 22, 1989, 
marking the return of the Super Bowl to South 
Rorida after a ten-year absence. 

Major League Baseball officially began in 
South Rorida in the spring of 1993, as the Ron- 



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da Marlins opened their inaugural campaign. On 
April 5, 1993, the "new" look of Pro Player Sta- 
dium as a baseball facility was unveiled to the pub- 
lic for the first time as the Marlins hosted the Los 
Angeles Dodgers. 

The whole world watched in excitement 
when Pro Player Stadium hosted four games of 
the 1997 World Series. More than 65,000 fans 
packed the stadium for all four games to see the 
Marlins claim the World Championship in dra- 
matic fashion. 

Behind the scenes, Pro Player Stadium un- 
derwent renovations to accommodate the Mar- 
lins. The conversion included the installation 
of retractable seating on the north side of the sta- 
dium, die construction of the baseball press box 
in the southwest corner of the facility, the build- 
ing of the dugouts, the addition of 660 new lights 
suitable for night play and the installation of an 
electric disappearing pitcher's mound. The stadi- 



Stadium Quick Facts 

Capacity: 75,291 

Prescription Athletic Turf ('95) 
560 Metal Halides (150+ footcandles) 
August 16, 1987 
owd 75,283(96) 

74, 021 (90) 
General Admission, Club Level, Suites 
Wayne Huizenga 
M. Bruce Schulze 
2269 Dan Marino Boulevard 
(305)623-6100 



um also features a synthetic warning track de- 
signed to absorb water. 

On the field, Pro Player Stadium is equipped 
with a Prescription Athletic Turf (PAT) system, 
which provides draining for its natural grass. The 
system provides three times the drainage capac- 
ity of the old systems and ensures a firm, dry play- 
ing surface widun half an hour's time after as much 
as a three-inch-per-hour rain fall. 
WORLD CLASS EVENTS 

Pro Player Stadium displays its versatility 
every year by hosting a wide variety of events. 
Along with Miami Dolphins football and Ron- 
da Marlins baseball, college football takes die field 
widi the FedEx Orange Bowl (which plays host 
to tonights game). 

The Stadium has also played host to nu- 
merous concerts, featuring entertainers such as 
U2, Pink Hoyd, Elton John and Billy Joel, the 
Rolling Stones, Gloria Estefan, Guns &. Roses, 
The Who, Rtxl Stewart, Paul McCartney, and 
die Three Tenors World Tour. 

Odiereventsheld.it Pro Player Stadium in- 
clude international soccer games, featuring die 
United States World C 'up Team, high xdiu >l U < H 
ball, television commercials, movies, corporate 
meetings and numerous trade show-.. 

VISIONS FOR THE 
FUTURE 

Pro Flayer Stadium will continue to enhance 
the tan expenence by its commitment u > capital 
improvements. New renovations will heighten 

die guest expenence by providing increased aim- 
tort and unique amenities. 



112 



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