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Full text of "University of Maryland men's football media guides (Gator Bowl)"

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Madieu 

WILLIAMS, FS 

Senior 

2nd Team All-ACC 



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Head Coach j 



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1st Team All- 




Scott 

McBRIEN, [ 

Senior 





JACKSON, LB 

Sophomore' 

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2004 TERRAPIN GATOR BOWL MEDIA GUIDE 



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2004 MARYLAND GATOR BOWL GOIOE 



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2004 TOYOTA GATOR BOWL GUIDE 



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Tabic Of Contents 

Media Information 


Terrapin Game Notes 


2 


ii 1 West Virginia Series History 


10 


Flashbact To 1975 


II 


Terrapin Honor Roll 


12 


Depth Chart 


15 


Regular-Season Statistics 


16 


2003 Game Recaps 


24 


Head Coach Ralph Friedqen 


32 


Staff On The Field 


34 


Staff In The Booth 


35 


Suoport Staff 


36 


Roster Information 


37 


Terps To Watch 


39 


Postseason History 


55 


Bowl Game Records 


62 


University of Maryland 


63 


President CD. Mote Jr. 


66 


Athletics Director Deborah A, Yow 


67 


Footballl News Clippinqs 


69 


^ 



Additional Media Information 

Maryland Athletics on the Internet 

Daily reports from the bowl game will be filed on the 
official website of Maryland Athletics, www.umterps.com . 

In addition, media can obtain news clips from 
throughout the 2003 season by going to the site and selecting 
Terp News Clips from the main page, and then clicking the 
"football" link at the top of the news clips page. 




Maryland Broadcast Sportsline 

Broadcast quality sound bites from coach Ralph Fnedgen 
are available each week on Maryland Sportsline. Call |4I0| 
45 1-4 1 1 7 for recaps from each game. 

FridgeTV.com 

Fans and media alike can take advantage of a new, state 
of-the-art website that goes behind the scenes of Maryland 
football like no other website. Ralph Fnedgen.s 
'FndgeTV.com' l www.fridgetv.com | has highlights and game- 
week video footage from each of the Terrapins 1 2 games 
from 2003 with access to the team's news conferences, 
practices, pregame preparations and postgame speeches 



Guide Credits 

The Maryland Gator Bowl Guide was written by Greg Creese, 
Doug Dull and Sean O'Connor, design and layout by Jason 
Yellin. Editorial assistance provided by Julie Baronas, Mary 
Smith and Chelsey Trowbridge. Photogrpahy by Bill 
Vaughan. Pnnted by Multi-Ad. 



Maryland Football Media Information 

For interviews with University of Maryland coaches, players or staff members, contact 
Greg Creese, assistant director, or Doug Dull, associate athletic director for media relations. 
Associate director Jason Yellin will also be accompanying the team at most bowl-week 
functions. 

Practice times and information are below and the guidelines are similar to the Terrapins' 
regular-season media opportunities. The first 20+ minutes of nearly every practice session 
are open to media while availability is dictated by where the day falls on the game week 
schedule. 

Please note that media will be asked to leave daily practice sessions prior to the start of 
period four . In addition, availability post-practice will often be abbreviated due to time 
commitments associated with the bowl. 

During bowl week, any interviews that take place outside of the normal practice and 
press conference setting must be arranged through the media relations staff. Player interviews 
should not be conducted at the team hotel or any other site without consent of the media 
relations staff. 

Greg Creese • e-mail: gcreese@umd.edu 

Doug Dull • e-mail: ddull@umd.edu 

Jason Yellin • e-mail: jyellm@umd.edu 

Maryland Media Relations • Main Office #: (301 1 314-7064 



Greg Creese 



/•v A 




Bowl Week Schedule/Media Opportunities 

Fri., Dec. 26 


Jason Yellin 


Buses leave Colleqe Park 


8:00 a.m. 


Arrive Jacksonville Airport 


approx. 12:30 p.m. 


CSX Welcome Party fTerrace Suites, Alltel Stadium] 


5:00 -7:30 p.m. 


Sat, Dec. 27 


Practice [first half hour open, players and coaches availability briefly] 


9:30 -11:30 a.m. 


Sun., Dec. 28 


Practice (first half hour open, players and coaches availability briefly 


Noon- 2:00 p.m. 


Mon., Dec. 29 


Practice (first half hour open, players and coaches availability] 


11 :00 a.m. -1:00 p.m. 


Wolfson Children's Hospital Visit (select players) 


2:00 p.m. 


Tue., Dec. 30 


Practice (first half hour open; Friedqen only post-practice] 


11:00 a.m.- 1:00 p.m. 


Wed., Dec. 31 


Walkthrouqh (closedl 


9:45- 10:30 a.m. 


Press Conference (Friedqen and selected players, Adam's Mark Hotel) 


11:00 a.m. 


Coaches Luncheon and Hall of Fame Induction (Adam's Mark Hotel) 


Noon 



2002 ORANGE BOWL 



Driving Directions - Jacksonville University 

Maryland will be practicing at the Jacksonville University football practice fields. There exist potential changes in the 
possible entrance to the university due to construction scheduled to take place, so the instructions below are for media 
simply going to the university from the media hotel (Adam's Mark), and not specifically to the practice fields: 

From the Adams Mark, go east on Water Street toward S. Hogan Street 

Turn left (north) on S. Ocean Street 

Turn right on E. Union Street 

Take the ramp toward Alltel Stadium/Sports Complex 

Merge onto US-90 Alt E 

Merge onto N. University Boulevard 

Jacksonville Univ. is on the left at 2800 N. University Boulevard take the last (third) entrance to the university. 

The practice fields are located behind the school's football stadium. 

■ 2002 PEACH BOWL • 2004 GATOR BOWL 




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MARYLAND GATOR BOWL GUIDE 




MARYLAND'S GATOR BOWL GAME NOTES 



#23/24 Maryland (9-3, 6-2 ACQ 



A28 


at No. Illinois |Fox Sports Net) 


L 


13-20 lot] 


S6 


at Florida State* (ESPN2I 


L 


10-35 


S13 


THE CITADEL 


W 


61-0 


S20 


WEST VIRGINIA 


w 


34-7 


S27 


at Eastern Michiqan 


w 


37-13 


04 


CLEMSON" |ABC| 


w 


21-7 



Oil DUKE* 



W 



33-20 



023 at Georgia Tech' IESPNI 



3-7 



N1 NO, CAROLINA** |JP Sports))* 59-21 

Ml 3 VIRGINIA* IESPNI W 27-17 



IM22 at NC State* |ABC) 



26-24 



N29 at Wake Forest' (ESPN| 



41-28 



Jl vs. West Virginia (NBC) 



12:30 p.m. 



* ACC dame; + homecoming 



#20/23 W. Virginia (8-4, 61 BE) 

A30 WISCONSIN |ESPN) L 17-24 



S6 at East Carolina 



48-7 



SI 3 CINCINNATI 



13-15 



S20 at Maryland 



7-34 



02 at Miami' 



20-22 



Oil RUTGERS* 



W 



34-19 



022 VIRGINIA TECH' 



W 



28-7 



N1 CENTRAL FLORIDA 



W 



36-18 



N8 at Boston College' 



35-28 



N1S PITTSBURGH* 



W 



52-31 



N22 at Syracuse* 



34-23 



N29 TEMPLE* 



W 



45-28 



Jl vs. Maryland (NBC) 



12:30 p.m. 



• Big East Conference game 



all caps indicates home game, all time s Eastern 



Broadcast Information 

TV: NBC: Tom Hammond, play-by-play: Pat Haden, color 
analysis: Lewis Johnson, sidelines. 

Radio: Terrapin Sports Network (Noon) - Johnny Holliday. 
play-by-play. Jonathan Claiborne, color analysis: Tim Strachan. 
sidelines. 

Internet: Audio can be accessed by logging on to 
www.umterps.com. 



Maryland Quick Facts 



Head Coach 


Ralph Fnedgen (Maryland, 70) 


Record at Maryland (years) 


30-8 |ihird) 


■ cord 


Same 


Coordinator 


Charlie laaffe 


Defensive Coordinator 


Gary Blackney 


Md All-; 


Md leads, 20-19-2 


2003 Ho- 


6-0 / 3-3 / 0-0 



Maryland Media Information 



Football f 


: Creese 


Phone 


'7065 






e-mail 

Media Relation . 

' 'for more media infc 





#23/24 Maryland vs. #20/23 West Virginia 

"fh MJTk* Thursday, January 7, 2004 • 12:30 p.m. IEST1 "V^ 
' ?*• MTEL Stadium, Jacksonville, Fla. 173,000} ^ 

TV: NBC Sports • Radio: Terrapin Sports Network 



PfOYOTA 



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The Game 

■ The University of Maryland football team heads to Jacksonville, Fla., for its third bowl game in as many years as it will 
take on regional rival West Virginia University in the 2004 Toyota Gator Bowl. The game, played on New Year's Day, will be 
televised nationally by NBC and broadcast locally on the Terrapin Radio Network. Kickoff from Alltel Stadium is slated for 
1 2:38 p.m. with radio pregame starting at noon. 

■ The Terrapins (9-3, 6-2) earned a spot in the bowl - which gets first choice of the Atlantic Coast Conference's non-BCS 
team - by way of their second-place finish in the conference standings. They were 
named the bowl's first selection on Mon., Nov. 24, following their thrilling, 26-24, come- 
from-behind win over NC State in Raleigh and then went on to beat Wake Forest, 41-28, 
after trailing by double digits in Winston-Salem. 

■ West Virginia learned its bowl fate after completing its regular season with a 45-28 
win over Temple. The Mountaineers (8-4, 6-1 Big East) were co-champions of the Big 
East Conference this season, winning their last seven games and nearly running the 
table in the league (their lone loss was a two-point heartbreaker at Miami). 

■ Between Maryland and WVU, the Toyota Gator Bowl is getting two of the hottest 
teams in college football as the two teams have a combined record of 1 7-4 since Sept. 1 3 
and have combined to win 1 6 of their last 1 7 games (Maryland nine of its last 1 0; WVU 
seven-straight to end the season). 

■ After spending nearly the entire second half of the season just outside of the nation's 
Top 25, the Terps made their way into the national polls after the close of the regular 
season. Maryland heads into its final game of the 2003 season ranked 23rd in the 
Associated Press poll and 24th in the ESPN/USA Today Coaches' poll The Mountaineers 
are ranked 20th and 23rd, respectively. 




QUICK FACTS 

location: 

Jacksonville, Fla 

Founded: 

1945 

Preiident: 

Richard M. Catlett 

Bowl Ties: 

ACC & Big East 

2004 Minimum Payout: 

$ 1 4 million per team 

Media Contact: 

Chen O'Neill, Vice Pres 

O'Neill Phone: 

(904) 798-5892 

O Neill Email: 

cheri@gatorbowl.com 

Media Hotel: 

Adams Mark 

Hot el Phone: 



(904) 633-9095 



Swamp Notes - Terrapins in the Gator Bowl 

■ This year's trip to the Toyota Gator Bowl will be the fourth in school history for 
Maryland and its first since 1975. The Terrapins are 2-0-1 in three previous trips to the 
bowl with wins over Missouri (20-7 in 1 950) and Florida ( 1 3-0 in 1 975) and a 20-20 tie 
with Georgia (1948). 

■ The Gator Bowl served as the site of the schools first- and second-ever bowl ap- 
pearances. The first was the 20-20 tie with Georgia on Jan. 1. 1 948 and the second was 
the 20-7 win over Mizzou on Jan. 2, 1 950. 

■ On the heels of last year's Peach Bowl win, Maryland will head into this years bowl 
game with an all-time postseason record of 7-10-2. 

■ The 2004 Gator Bowl marks the first time since the 1 997 Independence Bowl in 
Shereveport, La., that a pair of teams will be rematched in a bowl game after playing in 

the regular-season and just the 14th all-time. In 1997, Louisiana State downed Notre Dame. 27-9 in the postseason after the 
Irish had beaten LSU. 24-6 during the regular season. Prior to 1 997, Florida and Florida State played each other in the 
regular-season finale and rematched a little more than a month later in the Sugar Bowl in both 1 994 and 1 996. This season, 
Miami and Florida State will also re-match in the FedEx Orange Bowl after playing in the regular-season for the 1 5th bowl- 
game rematch 

• This years meeting marks just the second time in Gator Bowl history that two teams have met for the second time in the 
same season. The first time occurred 58 years ago when Wake Forest got a rematch with South Carolina in 1 945, a season 
that saw the two teams tie in the first meeting before the Demon Deacons prevailed 26-14 in the bowl game. 

■ Maryland's postseason appearance is its third in as many seasons undei Ralph Friedgen It marks the third time that 
the Terrapins have earned a bowl bid in three straight years or more as the team went to six-straight bowl games under Jerry 
Claiborne (1973-78) and four-straight under Bobby Ross (1982-85) 

Series Notes - Terps S Mountaineers 

• This years Gator Bowl marks the 42nd meeting between the Terrapins and Mountaineers in a series that entered this 
season completely deadlocked but became untied after the Terps' win on September 20. The senes - which began in 1919 
- currently stands at 20-1 9-2 in Maryland's favor. 



2002 ORANGE BOWL 



2002 PEACH BOWL 



2004 BATOR BOWL 



■ Maryland and WVU have met every year since 1 980 The two teams have split the last 1 4 games of the series, but the 
Terrapins have won three-in-a-row and four of the last five 

• Ralph Friedgen and Rich Rodriguez each took the helm of their respective alma maters in 2001 Maryland is 3-0 
against WVU in that time, but Rodriguez success has seemingly come after playing the Terps the last two years. In 2002 and 
2003, WVU is a combined 1 3-3 in games following its loss to Maryland. 

■ As the all-time record indicates, the series between the two Mid-Atlantic schools has been very evenly matched over the 
years. So much so, in fact, that this year's victory at Byrd Stadium kept the two schools on pace to have identical records at 
their own venues. Maryland is 11-9-1 at Byrd Stadium and WVU is 1 0-9-1 at Mountaineer Field. 

■ This year's Toyota Gator Bowl will mark the first time in the history of the series that Maryland and West Virginia have met 
at a neutral site 

■ The last two seasons, Maryland has dominated the Mountaineers from start to finish. This year, the Terps scored 34 points 
before WVU scored for the first time. The Terrapins outgamed West Virginia 498-1 56, held a 28-1 1 advantage in first downs, 
limited WVU to 36 yards passing and outgamed the Mountaineers at their strong suit - rushing - by 1 40 yards (260-1 20). 

■ Maryland put the 02 game away early, posting 28 points in the first quarter of an eventual 48-1 7 win and marking a 
triumphant return by OB Scott McBrien to his former school. From that point in the season on, Maryland lostjust one of its 
final eight games while the Mountaineers also played well from that point on, winning six of their final eight following the 
game. 

■ McBrien and then-freshman TB Josh Allen were the story in the 2002 game McBrien had a strong game, finishing 
8-of- 1 8 for 162 yards with one passing and one rushing TD |2I yards) while throwing no interceptions. Allen finished with 
a career-high 1 16 yards - a mark he just surpassed last week - with two touchdowns including a 70-yard scamper in the 
decisive first quarter. 

■ Only once in the last nine meetings between the Terrapins and the Mountaineers has the game's winner not scored at 
least 30 points |WVU, 13-0 in 1 996). 

Friedgen's ACCepf/ona/ Start 

• Ralph Friedgen has opened his career as a head coach by setting one coaching record 
after another and as his third season in College Park winds down, he has once again moved 
himself to the top of the record books. 

• Last year, Friedgen became the winningest second-year head coach in ACC history with his 
2 1 -5 record, surpassing Clemsons Ken Hatfield by two wins. With one game left in 2003, Friedgen 
has positioned himself at the top of the list of third-year coaches in the conference. 

■ With Maryland's win in its regular-season finale at Wake Forest, Friedgen became the only 
coach in ACC history to win 30 games in his first three years on the job 

■ With the Terps win against UNC, Friedgen - now 30-8 - set a new record for wins by a third- 
year coach in the ACC, besting the win totals of Lou Holtz (26-8-2. NC State, 1 972-74) and Danny 
Ford |26-9-0. Clemson. 1979-8 1 1 

■ With his teams win against Duke, Friedgen broke Bobby Ross' record of 25 wins from 1 982- 
for wins in three seasons. 




Ralph Friedgen 



84, the Maryland standard 



Tenured at the Top 

• With the hiring of Ralph Friedgen and Friedgens ensuing hires of offensive coordinator Charlie Taaffe and defen- 
sive coordinator Gary Blackney prior to the 200 1 season, the Terrapins got the equivalent of three head coaches atop one 
coaching staff. Though Friedgen is in just his third season as a head coach. Taaffe (Montreal Alouettes and The Citadel) and 
Blackney (Bowling Green) each bring significant head coaching experience to the table. 

■ Taaffe and Blackney were able to maintain success virtually everywhere they went as head coaches. While in Montreal, 
Taaffe guided the Alouettes to a combined 25-14 record (two seasons) and an appearance in the 2000 Grey Cup. In 1 999 
and 2000, he was named the CFLs Coach of the Year, making him only the second coach to earn such an honor in back-to- 
back seasons (Marv Levy was the first in 1 974) and the first ever to do so in his first two campaigns. In addition, he is the 
winningest coach in The Citadel's history (55-47-1 ). 

■ Blackney was able to achieve success in his own right as a head coach at Bowling Green. In 1 seasons, Blackney won 
60 games (third-most in school history), was the only coach in school history to win a bowl game (his Falcons won the 1 99 1 
California Raisin Bowl and the 1 992 Las Vegas Bowl) and was the only coach to win more than 1 games in back-to-back 
seasons (II in 1991; 10 in 1992). 

• Now in their third seasons at Maryland, the three coaches comprise one of the most experienced triumvirates in college 
football. With their 88 years of combined, full-time experience at the college and/or pro levels. Friedgen, Taaffe and Blackney 
are the fifth-most experienced trio in Division l-A. Below is a list of the company they keep: 



Rk. 


School 


Yrs. 


Staff IPos./Yrs. of Experience] 


1 


Penn St 


105 


J. Paterno |HC/52|. F Ganter IOC/301. T Bradlev IDC/231 


2 


Florida St. 


95 


B. Bowden [HC/431. J. Bowden (OC/I6I, M. Andrews [DC/361 



3 Mississippi St. 93 . J. Shemll (HC/34), M. Watts IOC/401, R. Cooper IDC/19) 



Air Force 



91 



F DeBerry |HC/35|. C. Petersen IOC/151, R. Bell (DC/41) 



Maryland 



88 



R. Fr iedgen |HC/31), C. Taaffe (OC/26), G. Blackney (DC/34J 



Terps By The Numbers 

.833 

Maryland's winning percentage in months after September 
under Ralph Friedgen. The Terps are 20-4 from October to 
January in his two-plus years. 

1st 

The Terrapins rank in the ACC in four different defensive 
categories this year - total defense, scoring defense, pass 
defense and pass efficiency defense. 



All four of Maryland's starting defensive backs earned AII-ACC 
honors this year (Williams and Foxworth were second team 
selections while Cox and Wilson earned honorable mention 
status). No other school had more than two DBs on the list. 

w 

Maryland players to earn first or second team mention on 
this year's AII-ACC teams, most of any school in the league 

74 

Points needed by junior Nick Novak to become the Atlantic 
Coast Conference's all-time leading scorer. 

29 

Average margin of victory for Maryland in its last two meetings 
with West Virginia. In four of the five meetings prior to 2002. 
Maryland failed to score 29 points, much less win by it 

31 

Career passing touchdowns at Maryland by senior Scott 
McBrien. third-most in school history. With his two 
touchdowns against NC State, he moved ahead of long-time 
NFL QB Neil O'Donnell 126, 1 987-89). 

m 

Team-leading tackles total by sophomore D'Qwell Jackson in 
his first season as a staner. With 1 3 tackles in the bowl game, 
he will have posted the most ever by a Maryland sophomore. 

264.8 

Average rushing yards by the Terps in the last four games of 
2003. In that span, the team had backs eclipse 200 yards in 
two separate games. 



Note: Totals reflect years coaching pnor to the 2003 season; years as a GA or prep coach are not included. 

2002 ORANGE BOWL • 2002 PEACH BOWL 




3 



2004 GATOR BOWL 



'TOYOTA 

GATOR 



jBmspinmm mes 



2004 MARYLAND GATOR BOWL GOIDE 



Single-Game Bests 

RUSHING YARDS 

Josh Men, TB 257 vs. Virginia 


> 

2003 


Bernie Fiddler. FB 


13 vs. Eastern Michiqan 


2001 


Sammy Maldonado. TB 


88 vs. West Virqmia 


2003 


Mario Merrills, TB 


79 vs. Akron 


2002 


Scott McBnen QB 


67 at Clemson 


2002 


Bruce Pern/, TB 


276 at Wake Forest 


2001 


PASS COMPLETIONS 

Scott McBnen. QB 


IB vs. Duke 


2003 


Orlando Evans. OB 


7 at Flonda State 


?00i 


PASSING YARDS 

Scott McBnen OB 


349 vs North Carolina 


2003 


Orlando Evans. OB 


70 vs. The Citadel 


2003 


RECEPTIONS 

RobAbiamin. TE 


1 two times 


2003 


Josh Allen, TB 


3 at Eastern Michiqan 


2003 


Vernon Davis, WR 


2 at Eastern Michiqan 


2003 


JeffDugan, TE 
Derrick Fennel WR 


5 vs. Middle Tennessee 
2 three times 


2000 
2003 


latrez Harrison, WR 


leiqht times 


2002/03 


Sammy Maldonado. TB 


1 vs. The Citadel 


2003 


Danny Melendez. WR 


3 at Duke 


2002 


Mano Merrills. TB 


3 vs Eastern Michiqan 


2002 


Derek Miller. TE 


1 four times 


2002/03 


Rich Parson, WR 


4 at NC State 


2003 


Bruce Perry. TB 


8 vs. Virqinia 


2001 


Steve Suter. WR 


4 four times 


2003 


JoJo Walker. WR 


6 at NC State 


2003 


Jafar Williams. WR 


7 at Georqia Tech 


2001 


RECEIVING YARDS 

RobAbiamin. TE 


8 vs. West Virqinia 


2003 


Josh Allen. TB 


43 vs. North Carolina 


2003 


Vernon Davis. WR 


19 at Eastern Michiqan 


2003 


JetTDuqan, TE 


91 vs. Middle Tennessee 


2000 


Derrick Fenner. WR 


69 vs. Clemson 


2003 


Latrez Harrison, WR 


109 at Duke 


2002 


Sammy Maldonado, TB 


;ivs TheO'oCtel 


2003 


Danny Melendez. WR 


37 at Duke 


2002 


Mario Merrills, TB 


50 vs. Eastern Michiqan 


2002 


Derek Miller. TE 


8 at Flonda State 


2003 


Rich Parson, WR 


114 at NC State 


'XiOb 


Bruce Perry. TB 


70 at Flonda State 


2001 


Maunce Shanks, WR 


1 7 two times 


2001 


Maurice Smith, FB 


18 vs West Virqnia 


2003 


Steve Suter. WR 


97 vs. Eastern Michiqan 


2002 


JoJo Walker. WR 


99 vs. North Carolina 


2003 


Jafar Williams. WR 


77 at Virqinia 


2001 


KICKOFF RETURN YARDS 

RichParson. WR l23atNCState 


2001 


Steve Suter. WR 


101 at Virqinia 


2002 


JoJo Walker, WR 


97 at No. Illinois 


2003 


PUNT RETURN YARDS 

Rich Parson. WR 


51 atNC State 


2003 


Steve Suter. WR 


142 at West Virqinia 


2002 


Jo Jo Walker. WR 


69 vs The Citadel 


2003 


TACKLES 

Leroy Ambush, LB 


7 three times 


2002/03 




!:>■:<:■ ,'.,'"..■', 


2003 




,'f.l ■■, •■.■•'!■'. 


2003 




5 at Fin' 


2003 


Jamal 


13 vs. West Virqinia 


2002 




8 two times 


2002/03 




2eiqhttimes 


2002/01 




7 two times 




CB/LB 


6 vs AkronS, Ga Tech 


2007 




8 twice 


2003 






2001 






200 
2001 












:.::■ . ■ 










2003 


mes. DE 












U 1/ ... . 


































2002 0RAN6E BOWL 



A Wealth of Experience 

■ The coaching experience on the Terrapin staff does not 
end with Coach Friedgen and his coordinators The Mary- 
land staff, overall, possesses a combined total of 187 years 
of full-time experience at either the collegiate or pro levels. 

■ That total includes four coaches (excluding Friedgen, 
Taaffe and Blackneyl who have been at it for 1 7 years or 
more, and the 187 years means an average of almost 19 
years of experience per coach on the 2003 staff. 

Coaching Connections 

• Ralph Friedgen is not the only member of the Terra- 
pin coaching staff with previous ties to College Park, though 
this is his fourth stmt at Maryland (player from 1 965-68; gradu- 
ate assistant from 1 969-72; offensive coordinator/offensive 
line coach from 1 982-86 and the present stint). 

■ Defensive line coach Dave Sollazzo was a graduate 
assistant for the Terrapins in 1 984 and defensive line coach 
in '86-87. 

■ Sollazzo is also one of several coaches with a connec- 
tion to another school - The Citadel Sollazzo played for 
(1974-76) and helped coach (1989-98) the Bulldogs, while 
Friedgen coached there from 1973-79. Charlie Taaffe was 
a head coach there from 1987-96 and outside linebackers 
coach Al Seamonson served there from 1 987-99. 

■ Friedgen was actually Sollazzo's position coach at The 
Citadel In addition, the head coach at the college at the 
time was former Terp mentor Bobby Ross (Bulldog head 
coach from 1973-77; Terps from '82-86). 

Quick Hits v.2003 

• Below are notes of some of the more interesting feats 
that have happened in the Terps' respective games of 2003: 

■ Maryland lit the scoreboard first in each of its first 1 
games of 2003, but fell behind in each of its final two games. 

■ Prior to the North Carolina game - a game Ralph 
Friedgen sees as having turned his team's season - Mary- 
land had either led throughout in each game or lost. In 
three of the last four games, the Terrapins had to overcome 
deficits of eight points or more to win (8 vs. UNC, 1 4 in the 
fourth guarter at NC State; and 14 at Wake Forest) 

■ The Terrapins have held half of their opponents off of 
the scoreboard in the first guarter this season. 

■ In Ralph Friedgens two-plus seasons, Maryland is 26- 
when leading at halftime. With the win over Wake Forest, 
he also moved to 4-7 all-time in games when his team has 
gone into the half trailing with three of the four wins com- 
ing against NC State. 

■ From an offensive standpoint, Maryland has been most 
prolific in the second guarter this season. In the second frame, 
the Terps have scored more points (133) than their oppo- 
nents have in the entire first half (1 1 1 1 this season. 

■ Defensively, the start of each half has been Maryland's 
strength. In the first quarter, opponents are averaging just 
3.2 points this year. In the third, they average just 2.6. 

■ Maryland's 6 1 points against The Citadel this year were 
the most by a Terrapin team since 1975, when they beat 
Virginia, 62-14. The margin of victory was the largest in a 
game since a 74-1 3 win over Missouri in 1 954. 

■ The Terrapins' 39-point second quarter against UNC was 
an ACC record for points in a single frame. 

■ By beating NC State this year, Maryland ensured that it 
is the only Atlantic Coast Conference school that Philip Rivers 
never beat in his prolific career. 

• 2002 PEACH BOWL • 



■ Prior to this season, the Terrapins had only hit 40 points 
in a half once since 1 980 (42 vs. Duke in 200 1 ). This years 
team did it twice (44 vs. The Citadel and 45 vs. North Caro- 
lina). 

■ Maryland's home attendance average this season was | 
5 1 ,236. Though the Terps attendance this season ranks just 
40th nationally in terms of raw numbers, but as a percent- 
age of capacity. Byrd Stadium has been the third-best in the 
nation as it has exceeded its seating capacity 1 1 06.6 percent 
filled this year). 

These Are The Days 

■ With its win over Wake Forest, Maryland has 30 victo- 
ries over its last three seasons. That three-year win total is 
the best in school history. 

■ Maryland's previous best was when it won 28 games in 
a three year span, which occurred on three occasions: 1974- 
76 when it went 28-7-1; 1 975-77 when it also went 28-7-1 
and 1976-78 when it posted a 28-8 mark. 

■ Maryland has secured its 1 2th nine-win season in school 
history, dating to 1892. The nine or more wins in three con- 
secutive seasons is a first in school history. 

■ Maryland equaled a school record set in 1 976 with 1 1 
wins last season. With a win in the Toyota Gator Bowl, it will 
join the teams of 1951, 53, 55 and Friedgens first year in 
2001 as squads to win 10 games. 

■ With a win in the Toyota Gator Bowl, Maryland would 
have its seventh double-digit season win total in program 
history. 

Terps Among Nation's Elite 

• Over the course of the past three years, the Maryland 
football program has been among the best in the nation. 
The Terrapins are 30-8 in that span with a 18-1 record at 
home. 

■ Maryland is one of just five Division l-A programs to 
win - or have a shot at winning - at least 1 games in the 
last three years. The four others are Miami (Fla.|, Oklahoma, 
Texas and Washington State (which also needs to win its bowl 
game this season to reach the 10-win plateau). 

■ The Terrapins are one of six teams from BCS conferences 
to have won 30 games in the last three years. The others are 
Oklahoma (35-4), Texas (32-6). Miami (3-4-3) and Georgia [31- 
7). Non-BCS schools include Marshall (30-8) and Boise State 
(31-6| while three other schools (Washington State, Tennes- 
see and LSU| can join the 30-win club with a postseason 
victory. 

Just Like A Tortoise 

• Starting I -2 is never ideal, especially for a team whose 
expectations were as high as Maryland's coming into 2003. 
But after winning nine of its last 1 games coupled with the 
team's run at the end of last season, maybe it isn't such a bad 
way to start a campaign. 

■ Last year, the Terps opened 1-2 and then went on to 
win 1 of their last 1 1 games, running off eight in a row at 
one point before dominating Tennessee. 30-3, in the Chick- 
fil-A Peach Bowl. 

■ After a I -2 start this season, Maryland is now 9-3 and 
headed to a third bowl game in as many years. Though 
interesting, it may not be irony that the team has again come 
back from the depths of a slow start. 

• Since 1 980, Maryland has started a season I -2 (or worse| 
1 times Ralph Friedgen has been a coach on four of 

2004 BATOR BOWL 




TOYOTA 

TBRRapin aaiUB naTBS GATOR 

I BCWL 



2004 MARYLAND GATOR BOWL GUIDE 



those 10 teams f 1 982 & '84; 2002-03). The four teams 
Friedgen has been involved with have a composite record of 
37-13 (.740) while the other six are a combined 17-47-1 
|.269). 

Idle Chatter 

■ Maryland's second and final bye week of the '03 sea- 
son came three weeks ago. Seeing an open week, however, 
is something the Terps have been accustomed to seeing this 
season - on their opponent's schedule. 

■ For the season, five of Maryland's 1 2 opponents get or 
have gotten their bye weeks right before taking on the Terps. 

End of the Line 

• A total of 2 1 seniors are playing their final game as 
Terrapins in this year's bowl game. The class has been one of 
the most successful in Maryland history, heading into the 
game with a 35-14 record in the last three-plus years. The 
following is a list of those players: 

Name Letters Hometown 



Tosin Abari, DT 


• 


Mt. Rainier, Md. 


Lerov Ambush, LB 


... 


Frederick, Md. 


Lamar Bryant 


... 


Clinton, Md. 


Jamal Chance, CB 


* 


Ephrata, Pa. 


Curome Cox, CB 


*.* 


Arlinqton, Va. 


Jeff Duqan, TE 


« i « 


Allison Park, Pa. 


Eric Dumas, OT 


... 


Atlanta, Ga. 


Orlando Evans, QB 




Stockton, Calif. 


CJ. Feldheim 


... 


Hereford, Md. 


Bernie Fiddler, FB 


** 


Swedesboro. NJ. 


Latrez Harrison, WR 


... 


Atlanta, Ga. 


Andrew Henley, LB 


** 


Riverdale, Md. 


Leon Joe, LB 


... 


Clinton, Md. 


Scott McBrien, QB 


* 


Rockville, Md. 


Bruce Perry, TB 


*»* 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


Andrew Smith Jr., S 


** 


Fort Meade, Md. 


Scott Smith. DE 


... 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


Ed Tyler 


• 


Franklinsville, NJ. 


Jafar Williams, WR 


... 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


Madieu Williams, FS 


« 


Lanham, Md. 


Dennard Wilson, SS 




Upper Marlboro, Md. 



Running On Empty 



■ It seems like the Maryland corps of running backs has 
had a different injury to contend with all year, from Bruce 
Perrys ankle at the start of the season to Sammy 
Maldonados knee to Josh Aliens ankle sprain prior to the 
season finale. The one thing that the adversity hasn't af- 
fected, however, is the one thing that it would be expected 
to - the teams production running with the football. 

■ In the last four games, the Terrapins have run the ball 
more effectively than at any point in the last three years. In 
that span, the average rush output per game has been a 
stout 264.8 yards per game. 

■ In each of the last three games, the Terps have had a 
100-yard performance and twice the team has had a back 
go over 200 yards. 

■ Allen's 257-yard day against Virginia was the top rush- 
ing performance in the ACC this year, the seventh-best in the 
NCAA and the third-best in Maryland history. 

■ Perrys 237-yard effort against Wake Forest was his sec- 
ond career 200-yard game, with both coming at Wake For- 
est (he posted a career-high 276 in 2001, the second-best 
rushing day in school history). 




2002 ORANGE BOWL 



McNificent 

■ Quarterback Scott McBrien has been, at worst, a 
consistent force for the Terps this year, but since Maryland's 
win over UNC, the senior has been nothing short of out- 
standing in leading the Mary- ts 
land offense. <l* 

• For the season, McBrien 
has a 137.1 efficiency rating, 
throwing for 2.291 
yards on l52-of-28l 
passing while tossing 
16 TDs to go along 
with six interceptions, few- 
est by a starter in the ACC. 

■ Ironically, it seems that 
a concussion - that had him 
sit out the second half of the 
Georgia Tech game - was the 
turning point for McBrien. In 
the four games that followed, his 
play took a dramatic turn. 

■ In the four games following the 
setback at Tech [all wms| he was 58-of- 
105 |55%| for 981 yards, 10 touch- 
downs, one interception and 111 
yards rushing with three TDs. During ' 
that span, his QB rating was 163.2. 

■ McBrien enters his last game as a 

Terp 20-6 as a starter |not including starts at WVU). 

■ In just two seasons of work at Maryland, McBrien will 
leave the school with the third-most touchdown passes in 
school history. With his TD passes against NC State. McBrien 
took sole possession of third, surpassing Neil O'Donnell ( 1 987- 
89) with 28. He now has 3 1 for his career. 

■ This year's UNC game was the finest of McBrien's career 
as he completed 1 5-of-25 passes for a career-high 349yards, 
four touchdowns (also a career high) and no interceptions. 
He also rushed for a pair of touchdowns, tying his career 
best. Impressively, the huge numbers came in just three 
quarters of work. 

■ For the second-straight season, McBrien threw for three 
touchdowns against Clemson. It was the first time he had 
done so in 2003 but he went on to throw for three or more 
two other times in the season (vs. UNC and Wake Forest). 

■ Against Eastern Michigan, McBrien threw for 252 yards 
and a TD on 1 4-of-l 9 passing while completing 8-of-9 passes 
in the second half to rally the Terps. 

Mr. Versatility 

• After making his mark by tying the 
NCAA record for punt returns for a 
touchdown in a season last year and 
setting the career record for punt 
return yardage this year, some pun- 
dits viewjunior Steve Suter prima- 
rily as a returns specialist. As time 
has gone on, however, Suter's 
touches have come in returns, receiving 
and rushing, giving the Terps a breakaway 
threat from all angles. 

■ Now in his second year as a regular at 
wide receiver and on special teams, Suter has 
brought an explosiveness unparalleled at 
Maryland the last few years. In that time, he 
has averaged 1 5.2 yards per touch whether it 

2002 PEACH BOWL 




2003 ACC Standings 

Overall ACC 
Teams W L W L Streak 


Florida State 


10 2 


7 1 W2 


Maryland 


9 3 


6 2 W4 


Clemson 


9 4 


5 3 W3 


N( State 


7 5 


4 4 L2 


Virqinia 


7 5 


4 4 Wl 


Georqia Tech 


6 6 


4 4 LI 


Wake Forest 


5 7 


3 5 L3 


Duke 


4 3 


2 6 Wl 


North Carolina 


2 10 


1 7 L2 


v 



Terps' In The Polls 

Week AP ESPNAJSA Today 

Preseason #15 #13 


> 
BCS 


1 18/26-9/11 


#15 


#14 


N/A 


2 19/2-9/81 


RV 


RV 


N/A 


319/9-9/151 


NR 


NR 


N/A 


4 19/1 6-9/221 


RV 


NR 


N/A 


5 (9/23-9/291 


RV 


RV 


N/A 


6(9/30-10/61 


RV 


RV 


N/A 


7(10/7-10/131 


RV 


RV 


N/A 


8(10/14-10/201 


RV 


RV 


N/A 


9(10/21-10/271 


RV 


RV 


NR 


10(10/28-11/31 


NR 


RV 


NR 


11 (11/4-11/101 


NR 


RV 


NR 


12111/11-11/171 


NR 


RV 


NR 


13111/18-11/241 


RV 


RV 


NR 


14(11/25-12/11 


RV 


RV 


NR 


15(12/2-12/61 


#24 


#25 


#24 


1 6 Final Req. Sea. 


#24 


#24 


#23 


key NR = not ranked. RV = received votes, but not ranked. 



Terps' Coaching Staff 



Ralph Fnedqen | 



Head Coach 



Gary Blackney |f| 



Defensive Coordinator 



James Franklin (f| 



Wide Receivers/Recruiting Coord- 



Ray Rychleski (fl 



Special Teams Coord./Tiqht Ends 



Dave Sollazzo |f| 



Defensive Line 



Tom Deahn |f[ 



Director of Football Operations 



Charlie Taaffelbl 



Offensive Coordinator 



Tom Brattan |b| 



Offensive Line 



Bill O'Brien |b| 



Running Backs 



Al Seamonson |b| 



Outside Linebackers 



Tim Banks |bl 



Inside Linebackers 



John Donovan (b| 



Assistant Recruinnq Coordinator 



Bnan Hickson] 



Grad. Assistant - Offense 



Greq Sesny |b| 


Grad Assistant - Defense 


Dwiqht Gait 


Strenqth and Conditioninq 


Sandy Worth 


Head Trainer 


Mitch Wilkens 


video Coordinator 


Ron Ohrinqer 


Equipment Manaqer 


Key Ibl = in coaching booth durinq (jams: tfl = on field dunna oame 


>- 



© 



2004 GATOR BOWL 



iiiiiiiiii'iii minimus 



MARYLAND GATOR BOWL GUIDE 



Where The Terps Rank 



2003 NCM RANKINGS 
Team 

Rushing O ffense 



24th 



Passing Of fense 



195.5 ypq 



61st 



Total Offense 



217 8 ypq 



34th 



Scoring Off ense 



413 3 ypg 



36th 


30.4 ppq 


Rushing Defense 


29th 


127.3 ypq 


Pass Defense 


17th 


186.8 ypq 



P ass Ef fici ency Defense 



19th 



Scoring Defense 



106.42 eft : nq. 



12th 



Total Defense 



16.6 ppq 



16th 



Net^Punting 



3l4.0ypq 



23rd 



38.3 net avq. 



Individual 

Punting 



30th 



Pass Efficiency 



Adam Podlesh, 42.6 avq. 



33rd 



Kickoff Returns 



Scott McBrien, 137.10 nq. 



46th 



Field Coals 



Steve Suter. 23 6ypr 



6th 



Scoring 



Nick Novak, I.Bfqpq 



25th 



Nick Novak. 8.7 ppq 



2003 ACC RANKINGS 
Team 

Rushmg Offense 



2nd 



Passing Offense 



195 5 ypg 



6th 



Total Offense 



217.8 ypq 



4th 



Scoring Offense 



4 1 3.3 ypq 



3rd 



Rushing Defense 



30 4 ppq 



3rd 



Pass Defense 



127.3 ypq 



1st 



Pass Efficiency Defense 



186 8 ypq 



1st 



Scoring Defense 



106.42 eff.no. 



In 



Total Defense 



16.6 ppq 



1st 



Net Punting 



314.0 ypq 



3rd 



Sacks By 



38.3 net avq. 



2nd 



13 



Individual 

Punting 

Pass Efficiency 

5th 
Field Goals 



Adam P odlesh, 42 6 avq^ 



Scott Mc Bnen, 137 10 nq 



1st 



I fgpg 



2nd 



Sacks 



2nd 



3rd 

8th 

Tackles for Loss 

Tackles 



7 ppq 






Passes Detensed 

4th 







be rushing, receiving or in the returns game. 

■ Despite playing nearly the entire season on an injured 
knee (probable meniscus tear in his left knee|, Suter still man- 
aged to become one of four Terrapins to earn first team All- 
ACC recognition. 

■ A year after tying the NCAA record for punt returns for 
a touchdown In a season [4|, Suter notched his first of 2003 
by breaking tackles and then bursting free for a 75-yard jaunt 
against The Citadel. 

■ Suter also owns the Maryland career record for punt 
returns for a touchdown with five. 

■ Against UNC, Suter tied for the team lead with a ca- 
reer-high tying four receptions for 72 yards (he had a diving 
grab called back that would have put him over the century 
mark] and nearly had his first kick return for a TD this year 
with a 67-yarder. He also made a diving catch to give the 
Terps a two-point conversion that tied the game at 1 4 early 
in the second guarter. 

■ At Eastern Michigan, he posted a game-high four re- 
ceptions for 84 yards, including a 45-yarder before halftime 
that set up a Nick Novak field goal. 

■ With 42 punt return yards against West Virginia, Suter 
became Maryland's all-time leader in punt return yardage with 
922 He enters postseason play with 1 .0 1 4 and stands just 
1 78 yards from the all-time ACC mark (Ledel George, NCSU, 
l,19l|. 

Action Jackson 

• In his first season as a starter at middle linebacker sopho- 
more D'Qwell Jackson looks more like his predecessor EJ. 
Henderson than a first-time starter. 

■ Jackson currently leads 

» the team and is seventh in the 
J&T**" \V Atlantic Coast Conference 
with an average of 10.6 
tackles per outing 1 124 to- 
tall. 

■ In addition to his tackle 
\ totals, Jackson has 
posted 7.5 TFLs, 2.5 
sacks, two interceptions 
one returned for a touch- 
down!, two pass breakups, 
1 QB hurries, one forced 
fumble and one blocked 
kick 

■ Jackson has led the 
Terrapins in tackles in 
seven of 1 2 games this 
year. He has also had 
eight games with 
, double-digit tackles 
'UDk yjj/k (nine career) 

■ Jackson 

vHfijyyi ^B needs ' 4 Iack,es 

\^^P in the Gator Bowl 

to break the record 
for tackles by a sopho- 
more at Maryland. The cur- 
rent record holder is Ratcliff Thomas who notched 137 in 
1994. 

• In his first return to his home state as a collegian, Jack- 
son was easily the Terps' player of the game against Florida 
State. He finished with 1 1 tackles (five solo| and a forced 
fumble, but big plays were what helped him make his mark. 




2002 ORANGE BOWL 



2002 PEACH BOWL 



On FSUs first offensive play, he stepped in front of Chris Rix's 
intended receiver, came up with the interception and rumbled 
58 yards - running through Rix along the way - for what 
would be Maryland's only touchdown of the game. Later in 
the quarter, he broke through the line on special teams and 
blocked a Xavier Beitia field goal attempt to momentarily help 
the Terps maintain a 10-7 lead 

■ In his debut as Man/lands starter against Northern Illi- 
nois, Jackson led the team with 1 5 tackles (eight unassisted), 
a TFL and three QB hurries. 

Depth And Experience 

■ This year's Maryland squad is easily the deepest and 
most experienced of any during Ralph Friedgen's two-plus 
year tenure in College Park It is one thing that could be 
cited for the team's ability to regroup in its final two games - 
- both on the road - and overcome double-digit deficits. 

• The 2003 edition of the Terrapins features 2 1 seniors, a 
stark contrast to the 02 Terps, a team with just 10 seniors. 
Of the 1 seniors on last year's roster, just six were starters at 
season's end. 

■ A look at the most recent offensive and defensive depth 
charts shows that 1 2 seniors are listed atop the chart at their 
respective positions. 

Terps 12 th In Scoring Defense 

• After an uncharacteristically slow start in its first two 
games, the Terrapin defense has spent the rest of the season 
looking like the same group that has been one of the top 
units in the country over the last three years. 

■ The Terp defense finished the regular season ranked 
1 2th in the nation in scoring defense (16.6 ppg| and 1 6th in 
the NCAA in total defense (31 4 0ypg|. The team ranks first 
in the ACC in both categories. 

■ Since 2001, only one school - Georgia - has ranked 
higher nationally each season in scoring defense than Mary- 
land. 

• Only four opponents this season have scored more than 
20 points against the Terps. 

■ Ranked in the nations top 20 in scoring defense each 
of the three years since Gary Blackney took the reins of 
the defense, Maryland has yet to see a year under his watch 
where opponents average more than 20 points per game. 

■ The Terps held opponents scoreless in 30 quarters in 
'02. second-most of any team in Division l-A football (Kansas 
State led the nation with 34). In 1 2 games this year, the 
Terps held their opposition scoreless in 23 quarters. 

• Maryland held Virginia, one of the conferences premier 
offenses, to just 1 86 passing yards, 1 08 rushing yards and 
1 7 points. Matt Schaub completed 50 percent of his passes, 
more than 20 percent below his average coming into the 
game. 

■ The Terrapins held Clemson to 1 yards rushing and 
seven points while intercepting Charlie Whitehurst twice 
(Whitehurst came into the game with just three interceptions 
for the season). 

• Against West Virginia, the Terps held an offense that 
entered averaging 366 yards a game (and now averages 
almost 380) to just 156 

Nowhere To Run 

• Last season, all but two Maryland opponents were held 
at or below their rushing average heading into play against 
the Terps and on average, Maryland held its foes to more 

2004 BATOR BOWL 




than 57 yards below their season averages. The trend con- 
tinued in nearly all of 2004. 

• Maryland has held its opponents below 1 00 yards in 
four games this season |and seven below 1 20). 

■ Eight of 1 2 opponents have been held below their re- 
spective averages coming into the game. 

■ Heading into the Wake game, Maryland's opponents 
were going for an average of 48.3 yards below their rushing 
average coming into their games with the Terps in 2003. A 
ground war with the Deacons on a cold night dropped that 
number to 1 3 yards. 

■ The Terrapins held Northern Illinois to 59 yards rush- 
ing, 1 4 1 yards below their average of the season before. In 
addition, the defense held Michael Turner - the nations lead- 
ing returning ball carrier - 69 yards below his average and 
held him to 5) yards and a 2.1 average in the game's first 
three quarters. 

■ Since 2001. Maryland has held its opposition below 
100 yards rushing eight times. 



The Four Comers 

« Once a liability at Maryland, 
'the defensive backfield has been 
a strength for the Terrapins since 
.2001 Heading into the Gator 
Bowl, the Terps are ranked 1 7th 
nationally and first in the ACC in 
pass defense, giving up an aver- 
age of just 186.8 yards through 
the air per game. 
• Described by Ralph 
Friedgen as four players with 
"great character," corners 
Curome Cox Domonique 
Foxworth along with safeties 
Dennard Wilson and Madieu 
Williams also bring extraordi- 
nary skill to the table. All four 
players started a year ago and all 
Ifour have spent at least some 
portion of their collegiate career 
at cornerback, giving the team 
'one of the most versatile second- 
anes in the country. 

■ Maryland was the only 
school in the ACC to put all four 
'of its defensive backs on the list 
of alkonference performers this 
year as Williams and Foxworth 
were named to the leagues sec- 
ond team while Cox and Wilson 
were honorable mention selec- 
tions. No other school had more 
than two defensive backs on the 
list. 

■ Cox is currently fourth in the 
ACC in passes defensed with 1 2 
and moved into a tie for seventh 
on the Maryland all-time intercep- 
tions list with his interception in 
the end zone against NC State, 
the 1 0th of his career. 

■ Between them, Maryland's 
starting defensive backs bring 
129 career starts, 27 interceptions 




Curome Cox 




Domonique Foxworth 




Madieu Williams 



s. J 



Dennard Wilson 

and 98 pass breakups. 



• The Terrapins were the only school this year to hold 
the ACCs top passer, Philip Rivers, without a touchdown pass. 
They also held Rivers to season lows in completions 1 1 6| and 
completion percentage (.533). 

• Maryland has held three opponents this season below 
1 00 yards passing. 

Size-Wise 

• One matchup that has benefited the Terps at times this 
year has been that of the team's wide receivers against the 
oppositions defensive backs, as Maryland possesses the best 
size in years at wide receiver. 

• Of the 1 wide receivers on the Maryland roster most 
likely to see significant playing time, seven are 6-2 or taller. 
Three are 6-4 only the team's slot receivers are under 6-0 tall. 

■ The Terps next opponent. West Virginia, has starting 
cornerbacks averaging just over 5-1 1 and 187 pounds. 

a Stark Talent 

• Now in his third year and second as a 
starter, junior Randy Starks has become a 
player to watch on the Terrapin defense. 
The object of nearly constant double 
teams, Starks has become the focus of 
opponent's blocking schemes but re- 
mains one of the Terps' top producers 
on defense. 

■ In just his second year as a 
starter, Starks has become a force 
in the middle along with se- 
nior C.J. Feldheim 
A first team AII-ACC 
pick this year, Starks 
caught the eye of many 
college football pundits 
heading into this season 
Most notably, ESPN. 
picked him as its pre- 
season ACC Defen 
sive Player of the 



#> 



I com .^^P 

ire- j ± 



2 2 ORANBE BOWL 



■ The Waldorf, Md., native came up with a sack against 
Wake Forest, giving him 1 7.5 for his career. He now stands 
ninth on the Maryland career list and can move as high as a 
tie for second before season's end |three are tied for second 
with 19). 

■ Starks is currently fourth on the team with 72 total tack- 
les. He leads the team with 14.5 TFLs, is second with 7.5 
sacks, has three PBUs and 1 3 QB hurries. 

• Starks recorded eight tackles [four solo) on a team-high 
63 plays with a sack, a quarterback hurry and one fumble 
recovery in the Terrapins' 26-24 win over NC State. Four of 
his eight tackles were stops on third down, forcing NC State 
to punt or attempt a field goal. 

■ The junior provided nearly all of the Terps' big plays on 
defense in this years win over Virginia. He finished with 
eight tackles [five solo), all three of the team's TFLs and its 
only sack while batting down a pass at the line. 

■ Against Duke, Starks finished with a season-high nine 
tackles. 1 .5 sacks, three TFLs, one forced fumble and three 
QB humes while batting down a pass at the line of scrim- 
mage. 

2 2 PEACH BOWL • 



TBRRaPM 9MB MBS 


2004 MARYLAND GATOR BOWL G0IDE | 




Records Watch 

ACC RECORDS 

SCORING 


Career Points 


1. "UJ, 1993-96 


326 


2 Sebastian Janikowski IFSUI, 1997-99 


324 


3. Luke Manqet fGT], 1 999-02 


322 


4. Nick Novak, 2001 present 


313 


PUNT RETURNS 


Career Punt Return Yards 


1. Ledel Georqe INCSUI. 1990-93 


1,191 


"py Rh/no IGT). 1999-02 


1.135 


3 TrovSladefDUl 1973-75 


1.021 



TOYOTA 

GATOR 
BCVJL 



4. Steve Suter, 2001 -present 



1,014 



MARYLAND RECORDS 

RUSHING 




Career Yards 


1. LaMont Jordan. 1997-2000 


4.147 


2. Charlie Wysocki, 1978-81 


3.317 


3. Steve Atkins, 1975-78 


2.971 


4. Bruce Perry, 1 999-present 


2,424 


5. Rick Badanjek. 1 982-85 


2.417 


6. Louis Carter, 1972-74 


2.266 




Career Touchdowns 


1 Rick Badaniek. 1982-85 


44 


2 LaMont Jordan, 1997-2000 


36 


3. Steve Atkins. 1975-78 


31 


4. Charlie Wysocki. 1978-81 


26 


5. Louis Carter, 1972-74 


25 


6. Ed Modzelewski, 1949-51 


21 


7. Buddy Rodqers, 1994-97 


19 


8. (Three-way tie) 


18 


11. Bruce Perry, 1 999-present 


17 


PASSING 


Career Passinq IDs 


1. Scott Milanovich. 1992-95 


49 


2 Boomer Esiason. 1981-83 


42 


3 Scott McBrien, 2002-03 


31 


4. Neil O'Donnell. 1987-89 


26 


SCORING 


Career Points Scored 


1. Nick Novak, 2001 present 


313 


PUNT RETURNS 


Career Punt Return Yards 


1. Steve Suter, 2001 -present 


1,015 


j : the top of the Maryland charts for single-season yards 
an) TVs 


ALL-PURPOSE YARDS 


Career All-Purpose Yards 


1. LaMont Jordan. 1997-2000 


4.960 


2. Jermaine Levins, 1992-95 


3.950 


7. Rick Badaniek, 1982-85 


3.406 


8. Alvin Blount, 1983-86 


2.885 


9. Mark Mason, 1990-93 


2.738 


10. Steve Suter, 2001 -present 


2.718 


II. Willie Joyner. 1980-83 


2.671 


RECEIVING 


Career Receptions 


1. Jermaine Lewis. 1992-95 


193 


13. BrenLowrev, 1986-89 


89 


14 Jafar Williams, 1 999-present 


86 


Career Receivinq Yards 


1. Jermaine Lewis. 1992-95 


2.932 


9. James Millinq. 1984-87 


1.446 


10 Russell Davis. 1981-83 


■ 408 


II. Frank Russell. 1972-74 


' 344 


12. Vernon Joines. 1985-88 


1.253 


13. Mancel Johnson. 1993-96 


1.240 


14. Jafar Williams, 1 999-present 


1,236 


15. Dean Richards, 1975-78 







2004 GATOR BOWL 



TOYOTA 

GATOR 
BCWL I 



i a hi i;w i ii am i i hi i 11 1 il\ 



2004 MARYLAND GATOR BOWL GUIDE 



Terp History and Facts 

TEAM HISTORY 

Overall- 1 1 1 th season 1 1 892-94, 1 896-present) 
56449243 (.532) 

Byrd Stadium — 53rd season [1950-present) 
174-100-1 (.636) 

NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIPS 

1953 

ACC CHAMPIONSHIPS 

1953, 1955, 1974, 1975, 1976, 1983, 1984, 1985, 2001 

FINAL RANKINGS (AP; AP/Coaches] 

1949 1 14), 1951 |3|, 1952 |13), 1953 (1), 1954 (8), 1955 |3), 
I973|20), 1974 (13). 1975(13), 1976(8), 1978(20), 1982(20/ 
18), 1983 (NR/24), 1984 ( 1 2/9). 1985 |I8/17|, 2001 (11/1 0), 
2002(13/13) 

BOWL GAMES (7-10-2) 

1948 Gator Bowl. 1950 Gator Bowl, 1952 Sugar Bowl, 1954 
Orange Bowl, 1 956 Orange Bowl, 1973 Peach Bowl, 1974 Lib- 
erty Bowl, 1975 Gator Bowl, 1977 Cotton Bowl, 1977 Hall of 
Fame Bowl, 1978 Sun Bowl, 1 980 Tangerine Bowl, 1982 Aloha 
Bowl, 1 983 Citrus Bowl, 1984 Sun Bowl, 1 985 Cherry Bowl. 1990 
Independence Bowl. 2002 Orange Bowl, 2002 Peach Bowl, 2004 
Gator Bowl 



Terps In The NFL (as of 12/t) ' 

Brooks Barnard, P |NE| 


Eric Barton, LB fOAKI 


LaMont Jordan, TB|NYJ) 


Cliff Crosby, CB (IND) 


Jermame Lewis, WR (JAX| 


Melvm Fowlet OL (CLE) 


Durrand Roundtree, DE (WAS) 


EJ. Henderson, LB (MINI 


Lewis Sanders. DB (CLE) 


Eric Hicks, DE |KC| 


Chad Scott, CB (PIT) 


Charles Hill. NT IHOUI 


Al Wallace, Ub |CAK| 


Shaun Hill, QB (MINI 


Todd Wike, OG |OAK| 


Kris Jenkins. DT (CAR) 


Frank Wycheck,TE (TEN) 


V J 



Terrapin Council 

Below are the 1 players who were chosen as members of the Terra- 
pin Council for 2003. a group which serves as a collective voice for 
the players when communicatinq issues with the staff: 


Curome Cox 


Sr. 


Cornerback 


Jeff Duqan 


Sr. 


Tiqht End 


Latrez Harrison 


Sr. 


Wde Receiver 


Scott McBrien 


Sr. 


Quarterback 


Madieu Williams 


Sr 


Safety 


CJ. Brooks 


Jr. 


Offensive Guard 


Nick Novak 


Jr. 


Kicker 


Steve Suter 


Jr. 


Wide Receiver 


Domonique Foxworth 


Jr. 


Cornerback 


Randy Starks 


Jr. 


Defensive Tackle 


Josh Allen 


So. 


Tailback 




Pronunciation Guide 

97 TosinAbari TOE-sun uh-BAR-ee 


81 


Vjiamiri 




3 


Rob Abiamiri 


Ah-BE-uh-meefy 


JO 


ic Cox 


!OME 


75 


EricDui 


DOO-mas 


4 




il 


14 






52 






76 


Eddie Matto 


I toe 


7 


• Bnen 


BRIAN 


80 




'. i M-uh-knee 


36 


Adam Podlesh 


lesh 


16 




e-um 


34 






19 






10 






^1 




duh N 



or this 1 %r ^ 

ard, J** 




2002 ORANGE BOWL 



AutoMat-Nick 

■ Placekicker Nick Novak came on midway through the 
2001 season and now, just a junior, is widely considered 
one of the nations premier kickers. 

■ Starting with his game-tying kick at Geoi 
gia Tech in 1 , Novak has made 58 of his last 
68 field goal attempts |85%). with four 
of the 1 misses coming from 50 yards 
or further and one being a block. 

■ A semifinalist for this 
year's Lou Groza Award, 
Novak is 22-of-28 on 
field goal attempts this 
season. Just one of 
the six misses came from 
inside 40 yards. 

■ With his game-winning 43-yard 
field goal at NC State. Novak became 
the all-time leading scorer in Maryland his- 
tory, surpassing the 308 points of Jess 
Atkinson (1981-84). 

• Novak is currently fourth in ACC his- 
tory with 3 1 3 points and needs just 1 4 
to break the mark of FSU's Scott Bentley 
(326) 

■ Novak tied the Maryland school 
record with a 54-yard field goal against 
Duke this year. The kick tied the mark 
set more than 30 years ago by Steve 
Mike-Mayer (Sept. 29, 1973). 

■ A first team AII-ACC in 2002 and 2003, Novak is cur- 
rently sixth in the NCAA and first in the ACC with an average 
of 1.8 field goals per game 

■ Novak has hit the only three game-winning attempts 
of career, beating Georgia Tech in 200 1 and NC State in 2002 
and 03 

■ The Charlottesville, vk, native has made 64 percent (7- 
of- 1 1 1 of his attempts for his career from 50 yards or further. 

Off On The Right Foot 

■ Attempting to fill the shoes 
of your school's all-time leading 
punter is a daunting task. With 
his first regular season as 
Maryland's starting punter behind 
him, however, redshirt freshman 
Adam Podlesh is unphased. 

• Podlesh is averaging 42.6 
yards per punt, 30th-best in the 
NCAA and second-best in the 
ACC. He has also helped the 

Terps to the 23rd-best net average in the nation at 38.3 yards 
per punt 

■ On 5 1 punts this year, Podlesh has dropped 43 percent 
|2 1 1 inside the opponents' 20-yard line. 

• Should he maintain his current average, Podlesh will 
post the fifth-best average in school history and best by a 
freshman. 

■ In being named a second team AII-ACC selection at 
punter, Podlesh became the first freshman in school history 
to be recognized by the league. 

■ Podlesh was a big part of the Terps' win at NC State, 
averaging 46.0 yards on five kicks with a long of 57 and two 
being placed inside the opponent's 20-yard line. 

2002 PEACH BOWL 




Adam Podlesh 



• Punting into the wind on five of seven attempts againsr 
Clemson, Podlesh averaged 4 1 yards per kick with three going 
out inside the 1 5 and one going out at the Tiger one-yarc 
line He earned ACC Specialist of the Week honors for his | 
performance. 

■ In front of the fourth-largest crowd in Florida State his- 
tory, Podlesh averaged 43.7 yards per punt on seven kicks 
with a long of 52 and three downed inside the Seminole's 
20-yard line. 

On eight punts against Northern Illinois, Podlesh 
averaged 45.4 yards per kick, leaving four punts in- 
side the 20 and one inside the 1 0. He also had a 
booming 63-yard effort, the longest by a Terrapin in 
more than two years. 



2U- 

fjt: 



Homeboys 

f ■ In his first signing day with the Terps (2001). 

Ralph Friedgen said that in addition to landing 
some of the top recruits nationally, one of his goals was to 
make sure that all of the best players in the state of Maryland 
stayed in state and became Terps. 
• Over the course of the past six years, the Maryland- 
D.C.-Virginia recruiting area has been tapped more success- 
fully in each ensuing year. In 1997, just 23 players on the I 
Maryland roster hailed from either Maryland, D.C. or Virginia, 
with six of those serving as opening-game starters. Since 
that time, however, numbers in both categories have risen 
steadily. Below is a look at the trend: 



MdJD.CJVa. 97 98 99 OO 01 


02 


03 


Players on Roster 23 34 39 46 49 


54 


56 


Starters' 6 5 7 12 10 


14 


10 


'reflects number of starters in the season opener. 



Iron Terps 

■ For the third-straight season. Maryland boasted record 
strength numbers and again posted its highest number of 
student-athletes earning "Iron Terp" status. In preseason 
strength and conditioning testing this year the Terrapins again 
set four team strength records. 

■ This year's Terps set team records for strength index, 
power clean, squat and verticaljump, improving on the pre- 
vious all-time team highs that had been established since 
such records have been kept (started in 1 983). 

■ Not only were new records set. but the team as a whole 
improved dramatically, as 84 percent of the players on this 
year's team elevated their personal bests in strength index - 
which encompasses all of the tests into one number - from 
the year previous. 

■ The player who set the most records at his position this 
year was the versatile Steve Suter The standout wide re- 
ceiver and return man posted records for strength index (768), 
squat (580 pounds), power clean (352 pounds) and vertical 
jump (42 inches). 

Local Ties 

• No Terrapin players call the state of West Virginia home, 
but starting QB Scott McBrien transferred from WVU prior 
to the 200 1 season 

• West Virginia has 10 players who call the state of Mary- 
land home: WR Milo Austin |Bowie), OT Chris Bassler (New 
Windsor). LB Mo Howard (Baltimore), DB Brian King (Dam- 
ascus), LB Drew King (Damascus), OB Antonio Lewis 
(Waldorf), DL Chris Malamet (Frederick), DE Brad Palmer (Oak- 

2004 OATOR BOWL 




land), DB Jerry White |Rockville| and FB Moe Fofana [Silver 
Spring). In addition, LBs Leonard Mernman (Archbishop 
ti Carroll) and Eric Ruth [Dunbar) are from Washington, DC 
■ WVU quarterbacks and special teams coach Bill Stewart 
was an assistant at Navy in 1 984 . 



lr 



Scouting The Mountaineers 

■ It has been a tale of 
two seasons for West Vir- 
ginia this year - how it 
played before taking on 

5 Maryland and how it played 
'after. In any event, the 

Mountaineers enter this 

year's Gator Bowl with an 8- 

'4 overall record |6-1 Big 

| East) and a co-Big East 

p championship under their 

q belts 

3 ■ The Mountaineers lost three of their first four games, 

including the 34-7 defeat at College Park, but things turned 
.> soon thereafter The team took a lead late into its game with 
■ Miami, an eventual 22-20 loss, and then went on to win the 
j rest of its games (seven straight) and pull off the Big East 
; championship, its second since 1993. 
i ■ Offensively, the rushing attack is the name of the game 
n for WVU. The team ranks 1 4th in the NCAA, averaging 217.3 

yards per game The passing game picked up in the second 
i half of the season, keying off of the strong run game, and 
j ended up averaging 162.3 per game, 
i ■ One of eight semifinalists for this year's Doak Walker 
'Award, Quincy Wilson is the Mountaineers offensive star. 
| He averages 1 2 1 yards per game - 1 1 th-best in the NCAA - 

and became the third-fastest Mountaineer to 1 , 000 yards (he 

currently has 1,331). 

■ Similar to its offensive counterparts, West Virginias de- 
fense is much better in the run department than it is against 
the pass. The team is 34th nationally in run defense, allow- 
ing 1 30.7 yards per game, but is 93rd in the NCAA in pass 

defense, allowing an average of 249.8 yards per game. 

• West Virginia has four players with 1 00 tackles or more 
nwith senior Grant Wiley leading the way with 1 58 (94 solo). 
i Safety Brian King has also had an outstanding year coming 

up with 1 08 tackles, six interceptions and 2 1 passes defensed. 
I 

WVU Bowl Notes 

] • West Virginia is 0-3 in three trips to the Gator Bowl and 
'9-13 all-time in bowl games. 

■ The Mountaineers last played in the Gator Bowl in 1 997, 
: a 20-1 3 loss to North Carolina. 

'■ In eight meetings all-time against the ACC in bowl 
Igames, WVLJis 1-7. 

« West Virginias meeting with Clemson in 1989 set the 
IGator Bowl and Alltel Stadium attendance record as 8 1 ,9 1 1 
saw the Tigers defeat the Mountaineers 

WW's Rich Rodriguez 

Rich Rodriguez is in his third year as the head coach at 
West Virginia. He owns a 20-1 6 record in his first stint as a 
head coach and has had two straight strong seasons in 
Morgantown In 2002, the Mountaineers finished 94. earn- 
ing a bid in the Continental Tire Bowl and the team is 8-4 this 
'year and Big East co-champs. 




Rich Rodriguez 



2002 ORANGE BOWL 



• Rodriguez is WVU's 31st 

head coach after coming to 

Morgantown following two suc- 
cessful two-year stints serving 

under Tommy Bowden. The first 

was as offensive coordinator and 

quarterbacks coach at Tulane in 
1 997 and '98. In 1 999 and 2000, 
he served under Bowden as of- 
fensive coordinator and associ- 
ate head coach at Clemson. 

■ In their years together, 

Rodriguez and Bowden took little time to turn things around 
at Tulane and Clemson. At both schools, teams struggled 
somewhat in year one |a combined 13-10 record| only to 
have strong second years (21-3). 

■ The best year Rodriguez had as an assistant was at 
Tulane in 1 998 when the Green Wave rode the strong play 

of quarterback Shaun King to a perfect 1 2-0 record and a 

berth in the Liberty Bowl 

• A native of Grant Town, W Va., Rodriguez was a three- 
time letterwinner at defensive back for WVU from 82-84. 

Byrd-fection 

■ With Maryland's win over Virginia on Nov 1 3, the Terps 
finished the 2003 season with a perfect 6-0 record at home, 
marking the second time in Ralph Friedgens three-year 
tenure that the team has finished its home slate unblemished 

■ In 1 1 1 seasons of football, Maryland has finished un- 
defeated at home 1 9 times. Just seven of those occasions, 
however have come since 1950 |when Byrd Stadium opened) 
and just three times has it happened since 1975(1 976, 200 1 
and 2003). 

• The Terrapins' 6-0 mark is a tie for the second-best record 
at home in school history. The 1 976 team was also 6-0, only 
to be trumped by the 200 1 team which won all of its games 
on a seven-game home slate. 

H Class Act 

• The success of the Maryland football team has not 
stopped on the playing field in recent years, as the team has 
improved its academic standing under Ralph Friedgen 
watch. 

» A total of 23 of Maryland's 24 players who count as 
part of this years senior class are on schedule to earn their 
degrees on time. 

■ Five players on this year's team - OG Ed Tyler, OG 
Lamar Bryant, CB Curome Cox, TE Jeff Dugan and DT 
Tosin Abari - have already earned their degrees. 

■ Tyler earned his degree in economics prior to last sea- 
son, finishing his course work in just three years. He is cur- 
rently pursuing a second degree (history) 

• From the membership has its benefits file: Fnedgen lets 
players line up to eat by grade point average. The Terps 
must be hungry - 24 players earned a 3.5 grade point aver- 
age or better in the spring of 2003. 

Building For The Future 

• When the Terrapins took the field at Byrd Stadium this 
year, changes were still taking place at the site that has been 
home to the Terps since 1 950. Some will be apparent as 
soon as one sets foot in the stadium and others would only 
be noticeable to the men who wear the Maryland colors on 
game day. 

2002 PEACH BOWL ■ 



TBRRapm mm mm 



2004 MARYLAND GATOR BOWL GUIDE 



GATOR 
BCWL 



■ After getting a state-of-the-art scoreboard and a new 
academics unit a year ago. the renovation has now moved 
on to improving other areas. Included in the changes are a 
remodeled weight room and a dining hall, a hall of fame 
area and a team meeting auditorium 

■ In addition to the bright visible new video board, it 
may go overlooked by some that expansion has already taken 
place on the building below it, the Gossett Football Team 
House. Thus far. the coaches' offices have been refurbished 
as have meeting rooms and the equipment room 

■ One other change noticeable at the start of fall camp 
and appreciated by players and coaches alike was the Terps' 
new practice facility, which features two state-of-the-art grass 
fields and a field turf, perfect for weeks when Maryland plays 
on an artificial surface. 

A 25-Year Holliday 

• "Voice of the Terps" 
Johnny Holliday is celebrating 
his silver anniversary with Mary- 
land this year, as the broadcaster 
is in his 25th season as the key 
cog in the Terp broadcast team. 

■ With a long list of creden- 
tials that includes covering nu- 
merous summer and winter 
Olympics and the Masters, the 
Terps' director of broadcasting 
may be best known to some fans from his days as a disc 
jockey in Cleveland, work which ultimately landed him in 
that town's Rock & Roll Hall of Fame and most recently (Oct. 
5) in the Radio & Television Broadcasters' Hall of Fame. 

Season Ticket Sales Climbing 

• In the last two years, season ticket sales for Terp foot- 
ball games have moved dramatically higher. 

■ Prior to the start of the season, the total sold was 28,350, 
an improvement of almost 10,000 tickets from Ralph 
Friedgen's first season in College Park and more than 1 2.000 
more sold than in 1 999. 

■ Maryland had six home games this year with attendance 
going over the 50.000 mark in each of the six games It is 
the first time in school history that has happened in any one 
season. 




Johnny Holliday 




2004 GATOR BOWL 



TOYOTA 

GATOR 
! BCWL 



ww mm mbs 



2004 MARYLAND GATOR BOWL GOIDE 




■ 



MARYLAND-WEST VIRGINIA SERIES 



r 


STATISTICAL 
COMPARISON 




1 


Tcrps vs. Mounta 

TEAM COMPARISONS 


West 


srs 

Virginia 


Maryland 


Cateqory 


195.5 


Rushinq Offense 




217.2 


217.8 


Passina Offense 




162.3 


413.3 


Total Offense 




379.6 


30.4 


Scorinq Offense 




30.8 


127.2 


Rushinq Defense 




130.7 


186.8 


Passinq Defense 




249.8 


314.0 


Total Defense 




380.4 


16.6 


Scorinq Defense 




21.3 


71-164 I43%l 


Third Down Conv. 


57-170 |34%| 


6-8 [75961 


Fourth Down Conv. 


6-15|40%| 


33-257 


Sacks By-Yards 




16-97 


19-118 


Sacks Allowed 




12-76 


76-652 


Penalties-Yards 




98-884 


25-11 


Fumbles-Lost 




25-10 


30:24 


Avq. Time of Poss. 




31:10 


WEST VIRGINIA STATISTICAL LEADERS 


TO YPG 


Rushing 


6 Alt. Net 


Avq. 


Quincv Wilson 


11 270 1.331 


4.9 


12 121.0 


Kay-Jav Harris 


1 1 85 468 


5.5 


4 42.5 


Rasheed Marshall 


1 1 93 268 


2.9 


3 24.4 


Passing 


e a<a pa. 


Yds. 


TO YPG 


Rasheed Marshall 


11199-99-8 .497 


1.642 


15 149.3 


Charles Hales 


533-19-0 .576 


306 


4 61.2 


Receiving 

Chris Henry 
Miquelle Hendersor 
Travis Garvin 
Quincy Wilson 
Aaron Neal 


G Rec. Yds. 

1 1 38 960 
) 8 17 204 

10 16 307 

11 13 100 
3 7 76 


Avg. 

25.3 
12.0 
19.2 

77 
109 


TO YPG 

10 87.3 
2 255 
2 30.7 
1 9.1 
1 25.3 

J 



In The Trenches 

Below is a comparison - based on the average size of each teams 
starters - of Maryland and West Virginias offensive and defensive 
lines 



6-5, 30S lbs. 

Terp 0-Line 

n. 

WVUD I 

6-3, 273 li 



6-4, 283 lbs. 

Terp 0-Une 

VS. 
WW 0-line 

6-4, 292 lbs. 



LAST MEETING 

Sept. 20, 2003 

Maryland 34, Wast Virginia 7 

COLLEGE PARK, Md — Maryland dominated the first three 
quarters offensively and defensively scoring 34 straight points before 
allowing a late West Virginia touchdown, in beating the Mountaineers 
before a sellout crowd at Byrd Stadium 

The Terrapins outgained the Mountaineers, 498-1 56, and held a 
28-1 1 edge in first downs in controlling both sides of the ball. 
Maryland had 260 yards on the ground, getting a balanced rushing 
attack with four different ballcarriers gaming at least 47 yards. 

Sammy Maldonado finished with 88 yards, Bruce Perry gained 
79 yards and scored a pair of touchdowns, Josh Allen had 54 yards 
and a score, while quarterback Scott McBnen finished with 47 yards 
rushing McBnen also had 220 yards through the air. including his 
first touchdown pass of the season with a 25-yard strike to Latrez 
Harrison early in the fourth quarter 

Maryland took the opening kickoff and went 1 4 plays before a 
drive stalled Nick Novak missed a 52-yard field goal attempt, his first 
missed kick of the season 

The Terps held West Virginia to a three-and-out to set up a 52- 
yard, five-play scoring drive that ended with a 4-yard TD run by Perry. 

WVU picked up one first down on its next possession, but was 
forced to punt Maryland then made it 1 0-0 on a 4 1 -yard field goal 
by Novak The Terps' next two possessions ended in a 2-yard scoring 
run by Allen and a 32-yard field goal by Novak with six seconds left 
in the first half 

By halftime, Maryland held a 279-58 edge in total offense, and 
held the ball for 1 9 46 over the first two quarters 

Maryland scored on its second series of the third quarter as Perry 
went in from 1 2 yards out to make it 27-0 Just 1 1 5 into the final 
quarter, the score improved to 34-0 on McBriens pass to Harrison 

West Virginia, which got 7 1 yards rushing and 1 3 yards receiving 
from Quincy Wilson, averted the shutout when Kay-Jay Harrison 
scored on a 1 3-yard run with 4 02 left in the game The score capped 
a six-play, 50-yard drive The Mountaineers had 78 of their 1 56 yards 
of total offense in the fourth quarter 

Sophomore middle linebacker D'Qwell Jackson led a strong 
defensive effort with 1 tackles, including a sack Kevin Eli, making 
his first career start at defensive end, finished the game with a pair 
of sacks 



Box Score 

West Virginia (1-31 
MARYLAND |2-2| 



1st 2nd 3rd 4th Final 

7 7 

7 13 7 7 34 



Fine Quarter 

MD ■ Bruce Perry 4 run (Nick Novak kick). 4 38 
Second Quarter 

MD-FG Nick Novak 41. 10:29 

MD • Josh Allen 2 run |Novak fuck). 2 23 

MD-FG Nick Novak 32. 0.06 
Third Quarter 

MD - Bruce Perry 1 2 run |Novak kick). 3:40 
Fourth Quarter 

MD ■ Latre? Harrison 2S pass fr Scott McBnen [Novak kickj. 1 3 45 

WV - Kay- Jay Hams 1 3 fun (Brad Cooper kick). 4:02 





WV 


MD 


■irst Downs 


II 


28 


tushes-Yards 


39120 


49-260 


CompAtt-Int 


3-12-0 


15-26-1 


Passing Yards 


36 


238 


teturn Yards 


147 


67 


■urns 


9-41.0 


1-580 


: umhles-Losl 


00 


2-1 


'enalties-Yards 


9-80 


10-80 


Sacks By Yards Lost 


2-17 


4-24 


Time of Possession 


26 04 


33 56 


NDIVtDUAL STATISTICS 







RUSHING West Virginia Ouincy Wilson 20-71. Kay-Jay Hams 4-34 
4-16. Erick Phillips 3- 1 0. Rasheed Marshall 8-mmus 1 1 . Maryland Sammy Maldonado 
13-88. Bruce Perry 14-79. Josh Allen 1654, Scott McBnen 4-47, Steve Suter II. Or- 
lando Evans I -minus 9 

PASSING West Virginia Rasheed Marshall 2-70-2S. Charles Hales l-S-0-1 I.Mary- 
land Scott McBnen 1 4-25- 1 -220. Orlando Evans 1-1-0-18 

RECEIVING West Virginia Q » UiqueTie Henderson I 23 Maty 

orison 448, Jeff Dugan J-S0. Jo Jo Walker 2 3 3 Josh Aller ' 

(Son 1-12, Ml Abiamm I -8. Bruce Perry I - 

' 19 Anthony 

u.tJBIueford 2-4-6 Maryland D Jackson 10-2-12. M 
W«iams53-8.Joc257 Stacks 2-4-6. Mernman 4- 1 5, Eli 3-2 5, Ambush 3 MfeMhem 

An 51 973 WEATHER 81 degrees, hqtulouds M 



2002 ORANGE BOWL 



2002 PEACH BOWL 



SERIES HISTORY vs. 
West Virginia 

Series Record: 

Maryland leads. 20-19-2 
Series at Maryland: 

Maryland leads, 11-9-1 
Series at West Virginia: 

West Virginia leads 10-9-1 
Neutral: 

Gator Bowl will be first meeting 
First Meeting: 

1919. West Virginia, 27-0 
Last Terrapin Win at Maryland: 

2003 (34-71 
Last Terrapin Win at West Virginia: 

2002/48-171 
Last Mountaineer Win at Maryland: 

1997I31-14) 
Last Mountaineer Win at West Virginia: 

2000(30-171 
Current Series Streak: 

Maryland has won three 
Maryland s Largest Victory Margin: 

47(54-7. 1951} 
West Virginia's Largest Victory Margin: 

31 (55-24. 19881 

HOW THEY FARED AND WHO'S NEXT 

MARYLAND (9-3, 62 ACQ 

Last Week: beat Wake Forest, 41-28 
Next Game: vs. West Virginia IGator Bowl) 

Aug. 28 at Northern Illinois ( 10-2, b-2 MAC) 
Last Game beat Eastern Michigan, 38-24 
Next Game regular season concluded 

Sept. 6 at Florida State (10-2. 7-1 ACQ 
Last Game: beat Florida. 38-34 
Next Game: TBA regular season concluded 

Sept. 13 The Citadel /6-6\ 5-4 Southern! 
Last Game: lost to ETSU. 16-13 
Next Game, season concluded 

Sept. 20 West Virginia (8-4. 6-1 Big East) 
Last Game: beat Temple. 45-28 
Next Game: vs. Maryland. Gator Bowl 

Sept. 27 at Eastern Michigan (3-8, 2-S MAC) 

Last Game: lost to Northern Illinois. 16-13 
Next Game: regular season concluded 

Oct. 4 Clemson (8-4. 6-3 ACC) 

Last Game: beat South Carolina. 6317 
Next Game: vs. TBA Peach Bowl 

Oct. 1 1 Duke 14-8. 2 b ACC) 

Last Game: beat North Carolina. 30-22 
Next Game: season concluded 

Oct. 25 at Georgia Tech fb-6, 4-4 ACC) 
Last Game: lost to Georgia. 341 7 
Next Game: vs Tulsa. Humanitarian Bowl 

Nov. I North Carolina (210, 1-7 ACC) 
Last Game: lost to Duke. 30-22 
Next Game: season concluded 

Nov. 13 Virginia (7-S. 5-4 ACC) 

Last Game, beat Virginia Tech. 35-21 
Next Game: vs Pitt. Continental Tire Bowl 

Nov. 22 at NC State (7-S. 4-4 ACC) 

Last Game: lost to Maryland, 26-24 
Next Game: vs. Kansas. Tangenne Bowl 

Nov. 29 at Wake Forest (S-7. 3S ACC) 
Last Game lost to Maryland. 45-28 
Next Game season concluded 

Jan. t West Virginia (8-4. 61 Big East) 
Last Game beat Temple. 45-28 
Next Game: vs Maryland. Gator Bowl 
2004 OAT OR BOWL 




tbobpiii amiB mires GATOR 

1 BCWL 



2004 MARYLAND GATOR BOWL GUIDE 



FLASHBACK TO 1975 

The Last Time The Terps Played In The Gator Bowl 



Notable Dates 

■ Jan. 1 - Nixon henchmen H.R. Haldeman, 

John Erlichman, John Mitchell and Robert 
Mandian are convicted in the Watergate 
conspiracy. 

• Feb 1 1 - Margaret Thatcher becomes the 

first woman to lead a British political party 
by being elected leader of the 
Conservative party. 

■ April 23 - President Gerald Ford announced 

the end of U.S. involvement in the 
Vietnam War. 

• June 24 -Eastern Airlines Flight 727 

crashes while landing at New York's 
JFK Airport, killing 1 1 3 passengers 
and crew members. 
'< July 3 1 - Jimmy Hoffa. former 

president of the Teamsters Union, is 
reported missing in Detroit. 

■ Sept. 18 - Patty Hearst is arrested by 

the FBI, ending a 1 9-month search. 
jf Nov. 3 - In a reorganization of his 
cabinet, President Ford announces 
that George Bush will succeed 
William Colby as CIA director. 

Ither Notable Events 

I Computerized checkouts begin to 

appear in supermarkets, 
i' Disposable razors are introduced. 

I I Catalytic converters are introduced in cars. 
1 Lyme disease discovered. 

Sports 

The Pittsburgh Steelers defeat the Minnesota 

Vikings, 1 6-6, to win their first ever Super 

Bowl. 
The Cincinnati Reds defeat the Boston Red Sox 

in game seven to win the World Series. 
Archie Griffin of Ohio State wins the Heisman 

Trophy. 

Top Movies 

. Jaws |S 1 07.2 million) 

. The Towering Inferno ($55 million) 

. Benji ($30.8 million) 

. Young Frankenstein ($30 million) 

. The Godfather, Part II ($28.9 

million) 
rademy Award Winner, Best Picture: 

One Flew Over The Cuckoos 

Nest 




Jimmy Hoffa 




5 m*&i 



■: 13 

»'■ / 




Troops on their way home from the Vietnam War in J 975. 



Other Notable Movies in 'TS: 

Dog Day Afternoon 

Monty Python & the Holy Grail 

The Rocky Horror Picture Show 

Shampoo 

Tommy 

Young Frankenstein. 



Grammy Award Winners 

Album of the Year: Still Crazy After All These Years." Paul Simon 
Record of the Year: Love Will Keep Us Together," Captain & Tennille 
Song of the Year: "Send in the Clowns," Stephen Sondhem (songwriter) 
Best Song by an R& B Group: Shining Star," Earth, Wind & Fire 



Tap TV Shows 

1. All In The Family 

2. Rich Man, Poor Man 

3. Laverne & Shirley 

4. Maude 

5. The Bionic Woman 



toil* W ' 



Terry Bradshaw led the 
Steelers to the Super Bowl. 





Captain i Tenmlle had the Record oTthe Yet. 



2 2 ORANGE BOWL • 2002 PEACH BOWL • 2004 GATOR BOWL 



M €■ >V/ • B F * W 



12004 MARYLAND GATOR BOWL GUIDE 




MARYLAND'S 2003 HONOR ROLL 




Josh Allen 



C.J. Brooks 




Curomc Cox 



Domoniquc Foxworth 



ACC Predictions 

ACC Media 


3rd 


Athlon 3rd 


Lindy's 


1st 


Street & Smith's 


1st 


The Sportinq News 


3rd 


Preseason Rankings 

Associated Press 


15th 


Athlon 


17 th 


ESPN/USA Today 


13th 


Colleqefootballnews. com 


14th 


Lind) s 


10th 


Sportsline.com 


12th 


Street & Smith's 


11th 


The Sportinq News 


17th 


Individual Honors 

Ralph Friedgen, Head Coach 

No 1 "Offen. Genius" in Nation 


Kirk Herbstreit, ESPN 


3rd amonq nations top coaches 


CoSeqefootballnews.com 


ACCs Best Strateqist 


Street & Smiths 


Tod X's & O's Coach 


Sports Illustrated 


Gary Blackney, Defensive Coordinator 

No. 2 "Def. Wizard" in Nation 


Kirk Herbstreit, ESPN 


Josh Ulen, TB 

ACC Co-Off. Back of the Week 


Nov. 17 Ivs. Virqinial 


C.J. Brooks, G 

ACC 


AII-ACC First Team 


No. 1 6-rated G in Nation 


The Sportinq News 


Hon. Mention Preseason AJWmencan 


Street & Smith's 


Lamar Bryant, G 

No. 8-rated G in Nation 


Undv's 


No. 7 OL "Risinq Star" 


Colleqefootballnews com 


Hon. Mention Preseason AlWmencan 


Street 6. Smith's 



Curome Cox, CB 

ACC 


AILACC Honorable Mention 

Street & Smiths 


Hon Mention Preseason AlWmencan 


Jeff Dugan, TE 

ACC 


AII-ACC Second fcim 


No. 1 6-rated TE in \ 


TheSportin. 


Kevin Eli, BE 

ACC 


AII-ACC Second Team 


Domonique Foxworth, CB 

AC( 


■ 


No 8-rated CB in Nation 


The Sportinq News 


No 13-rated CB m Nation 


Lindys 


Hon Mention Preseason All-Amencan 


Streets. Smiths 


Watcd list 


Jim Thorpe Award 



2002 ORANGE BOWL 



2002 PEACH BOWL 



2004 OATOR BOWL 




L#', 




TOYOTA ! 

TBfflMPin gam noTBS GATOR 

BCWL 



2004 MARYLAND GATOR ROWL GUIDE 




Scott McBrien 



Nick Novak 




truce Perry 



Randy Starks 



D'Qwell Jackson, LB 

ACC 


AII-ACC Secc 


Wesley Jefferson, LB 

No 3-rated Freshman LB in Nation 


Street & Smiths 


No 7 Impact Freshman in Nanon 


Kirk Herbitreil ESPN 


Leon Joe, LB 

No 1 0-rated ILB in Nation 




Hon. Mention Preseason AlWmencan 


.Smiths 


Scott McBrien, QB 

No 24-rated QB in Nation 




Hon. Mention Preseason All-Amencan 


Street & Smiths 


■Watch List" 


Davey O'Brien Award 


Shawne Merriman, LEO 

ACC Def. Lineman of the Week 


Oct. 6 Ivs. Clemson) 


Nick Novak, PK 

ACC 


AII-ACC First Team 


2003 Semifinalist 


Lou Groza Award 


No. 5-rated PK in Nation 


Lind/s 


No 6-rated PK in Nation 


The Sportmc 


Hon MenDon Preseason AJtAmencan 


Street (. Smith's 


Hon. Men. Preseason AltAmer 


Collegefootballnewscom 


ACC Specialist of the Week 


Sept IS Ivs. Citadel} 


ACC Specialist of the Week 


Oct 13 ivs Do- 


ACC Specialist of the Week 


Nov 3 ivs UNCi 


Bruce Perry, TV 

No. 7-rated RB in Nation 


Lmdy's 


No. 12-ratedRB in Nation 


The Sporting News 


No. 7 Heisman "On the Rac n 


The Sporting News 


Hon. Mention Preseason AltA- 


Street & Smith's 


ACC Co-Offensive Back of the '.'. 


Dec. 1 Ivs. Wake) 


Adam Podlesh, P 

ACC 


AII-ACC Second Team 


2003 Semifinalist 


Ray Guy Award 


ACC Specialist of the Week 


Oct 6 Ivs. Clemsonj 


Kyle Schmitt, C 

ACC 


AII-ACC Honorable Mention 


"Watch List" 


Rimington Award 


Randy Starks, 01 

Rivals.com 


Honorable Mention All-Amencan 


ACC 


AIFACC First Team 


Preseason ACC Defensive Player of Year 


ESPN.com 


No. 5 "Enforcer" |DT| in Nation 


Kirk HerbsveiL ESPN 


No. 5-rated DT in Nation 


The Sporting News 


No. 7-rated DT in Nation 


Lindy's 


No. 61 on preseason Top 100 


ESPN the Magazine 


Hon Mention Preseason AlWmerican 


Street & Smiths 


ACC Def- Lineman of the Week 


Nov. 17 Ivs. Virginia) 


ACC Def. Lineman of the Week 


Nov. 24 Ivs. NC State) 



® 



2002 ORANGE BOWL 



2002 PEACH BOWL 



2004 GATOR BOWL 




+i 



■ 




Steve Suter, WR/KR 

ACC 


AII-ACC First Team 


2nd team Preseason All-Amer. KR 


The Sportinq News 


3rd team Preseason All-Amer. KR 


Street 6. Smith's 


3rd team Pre. All-Amer. KR 


Colleqefootballnews. com 


3rd team Pre All-Amer PR 


Colleqefootballnews. com 


No. 2-rated KR in Nation 


The Sporting News 


No. 1 0-rated All-Pur pose in Nation 


Lindy's 



Nladieu Williams, FS 

ACC 



No. 2 "Center Fielder" in Nation 



No 1 1 on preseason Top 1 00 



AII-ACC Second Teatji 

Kirk Herbstreit, ESPN 

ESPN the Magazine 



Steve Suter 



Madieu Williams 



No 3 rated FS in Nation 


The Sportinq News 


No. 3-rated "Rislnq Star" DB 


Colleqefootballnews. com 


No. 8-rated Safety in Nation 


Lmdv's 


Hon Men Preseason AlfAmer 


Colleqefootballnews com 


"Watch List" 


Brunt" Naqurski Award 


"Watch List" 


Jim Thorpe Award 


ACC Defensive Back of the Week 


Dec 1 (vs. Wakel 


Dennard Wilson, SS 

ACC 


AII-ACC Honorable Mention 


TEAM HONORS 
Defensive Backs 

3rd-rated Unit in Nation 


Athlon 


8th-rated Unit in Nation 


Lmdys 


1 Oth-rated Unit in Nation 


The Sportinq News 


Defensive Line 


1 Oth-rated Unit in Nation 


The Sportinq News 


Runninq Backs 


2 1 st-rated Unit in Nation 


Colleqefootballnews. com 


Overall Defense 


1 1 th-rated Unit in Nation 


Colleqefootballnews com 


Overall Offense 


20th-rated Unit in Nation 


Colleqefootballnews. com 


Special Teams 


6th-rated Unit in Nation 


The Sportinq News 


1 2th-rated Unit in Nation 


Colleqefootballnews com 




2002 ORANGE BOWL 



2002 PEACH BOWL 



2004 BATOR BOWL 




TBmapm asm iwms 



2004 MARYLAND GATOR BOWL GUIDE 



TOYOTA 

gator; 



TERRAPIN DEPTH CHART 



Offense 



34 

85 



Steve Suter 

Dan Melendez 



4 Bernie Fiddler 6 1 244 Sr.-2V 

!) Maurice Smith 5-11 229 Jr-2V 

Ricardo Dickerson 6-3 238 So-lV 



510 192 Jr.-IV 
6-2 176 So-IV. 



70 StephonHeyer 6-6 295 So-IV 

78 RyanFlynn 64 272 Jr.-IV 




Defense 



6 Dom. Foxworth 511177 Jr.-2V 

25 Josh Wilson 5-9 176 Fr-HS 






41 Kevin Eli 
76 Henry Scott 



6-4 268 Jr.-IV 24 Leroy Ambush 6-1 

6-1 280 Jr-Sq <j_ 51 Andrew Henley 6-0 



74 C.J Brooks 6-6 318 Jr.-2V 

77 Russell Bonham 6-4 295 So-IV 





225 Sr.-3V 

240 Sr.-2V 




96 C.J. Feldheim 

91 Rob Armstrong 
or 97 Tosin Aban 



6-3 287 Sr.-3V 

6-3 303 Fr-HS 
5-10 274 Sr.-IV 



13 Dennard Wilson 5-10 189 Sr.-3V 

23 Andrew Smith 5-1! 207 5r.-2V 

or 2 Chris Kelley 6-2 210 Jr.-IV 



7 
16 



Scott McBrien 6-0 182 Sr.-IV 

JoelStatham 6-1 207 Fr.-RS 




72 Kyle Schmitt 

68 Ryan McDonald 



6-5 

6-2 



297 

282 



Jr.-2V 
So-Sq 





" 



73 Lamar Bryant 

61 Ed Tyler 



33 Josh Allen 
' I Bruce Perry 



5-11207 So.-IV 
5-10 205 Sr.-3V 



52 DQwell Jackson 6-1 224 So.-IV 

27 TimCesa 6-0 240 Fr-HS 

or 53 Reggie Holmes 6-2 240 Fr.-RS 



10 Madieu Williams 6-1 
26 Raymond Custis 5-9 




75 Eric Dumas 6-6 301 Sr.-IV 

79 LouLombardo 6-6 287 Jr-2V 



3w 



> Jo Jo Walker 5-9 165 So.-IV 

>2 Rich Parson 5-10 187 Jr-2V 

14 Steve Suter 5-10 192 Jr-IV 




Jeff Dugan 

Derek Miller 
3 Rob Abiamin 



wu 



6-5 258 Sr.-3V 

6-8 258 So-IV 
6-2 241 Jr-Sq 



49 


Jamahl Cochran 6-0 254 Jr.-2V 




45 


Shawne Mernman 6-4 253 So.-IV 






JJ|J^P— -q 32 Leon Joe 


6-1 232 Sr.-3V 




W ' 4 8 William Kershaw 


6-3 233 So.-IV 




4 Latre* Harrison 6-2 223 Sr.-3V 

19 Jafar Williams 6-2 210 ST.-3V 

89 Drew Weatherty 64 200 Fr-HS 



ecialists 








30 CuromeCox 6-0 197 Sr.-3V 

37 Jamal Chance 60 200 Sr.-IV 




Nick Novak 6-0 183 Jr.-2V 

CVO 149 Fr.-RS f 



IS 

47 Jon Condo 
55 B McDermond 



6-3 241 Jr.-2V 

6-1 245 Fr-HS 



36 Adam Podlesh 5-1 1 209 Fr.-RS 
16 JoelStatham 6-1 207 Fr.-RS 



36 Adam Podlesh 5-11 209 Fr.-RS 

85 Dan Melendez 6-2 175 So.-IV 
or2 Chris Kelley 6-2 210 Jr.-IV 



KR/PR 

34 Steve Suter 

9 Jo Jo Walker 
22 Rich Parson 



5-10 192 Jr.-IV 
5-9 165 So.-IV 
5-10 187 Jr.-2V 



2002 ORANGE BOWL 



2002 PEACH BOWL 



2004 6AT0R BOWL 



TOYOTA 

GATOR 
BCwl 



2BBSS1SU MB WMU1 



2004 MARYLAND GATOR BOWL GOIDE 




2003 REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS 



Results 



RECORD 


OVERALL 


HOME 


AWAY 


NEUTRAL 


ALL GAMES 


9-3 


6-0 




3-3 




0-0 




CONFERENCE 


6-2 


4-0 




2-2 




0-0 




NON-CONFERENCE 


2-0 




1-1 




0-0 




Date 


Opponent 


Score 


W/L 


Overall 


Conf 


Time 


Attend 


Aug 28, 2003 


il Northern Illinois [FSNJ 


13-20 


L-OT 


0-1-0 


0-0-0 


3:21 


28,018 


Sep 06, 2003 
Sep 13,2003 
Sep 20 2003 


at #10 Florida State* IESPN2 


10-35 


L 


0-2-0 


0-1-0 


3:27 


82,885 


THE CITADEL 


61-0 


W 


1-2-0 


0-1-0 


2:48 


51,594 


WEST VIRGINIA 


34-7 


W 


2-2-0 


0-1-0 


2:45 


51,973 


Sep 27, 2003 
Oct 04 2003 


at Eastern Michiqan 


37-13 


w 


3-2-0 


0-1-0 


2:50 


19,628 


CLEMSON* IABCI 


21-7 


w 


4-2-0 


1-1-0 


3:15 


51,545 


Oct II, 2003 


DUKE' 


3 3 20 


w 


5-2-0 


2-1-0 


3:16 


50 084 


Oct 23 2003 


at Georqia Tech* |ESPN| 


3-7 


L 


5-3-0 


2-2-0 


3:07 


51.524 


Nov 01 2003 


NORTH CAROLINA* |JP| 


59-21 


w 


6-3-0 


3-2-0 


3:15 


51,195 


Nov 13.2003 


VIRGINIA* [ESPN] 


27-17 


w 


7-3-0 


4-2-0 


3:02 


51,027 


Nov 22 2003 


at NC State* (ABC) 


26-24 


W 


8-3-0 


5-2-0 


3:30 


53.800 


Nov 29, 2003 


at Wake Forest* (ESPN) 


41-28 


W 


9-3-0 


6-2-0 


3:12 


18,783 


" denotes Atlantic Coast Conference game 













Team Statistics 

TEAM STATIS TICS 
SCORING 

Points Per Game 



MD 



OPP 



365 



199 



30.4 



166 



FIRST DOWNS 



254 



201 



R ushing 
Passing 



125 



100 



Penalty __ 
RUSHING YARDAGE 



20 



2,346 



1,527 



Yards gained rushing 

Jrardsjost. rushing 

Rushing Attempts 
Average Per Rush 
Averag e Per Ga me 

TDs R ushing 

PASSING YARDAGE 



2,579 



1,900 



233 



373 



504 



452 



4.7 



34 



195.5 



127.2 



23 



2,614 



2.241 



Att-Comp-In t 



328-179-7 



349-174-12 



Average P er Pass 
Average Per Catch 
Average Per Game 



8 



6.4 



14.6 



12.9 



2178 



TDs Passing 



10 



TOTAL OFFENSE 



4,960 



3,768 



Total Plays 



832 



801 



Avera g e Per Play 



6.0 



4.7 



Average Per Game 



413.3 



3140 



KICK RETURNS: fl YARDS 


23530 


44-915 


PUNT RETURNS: tf-YARDS 


46-443 


24-221 


INT RETURNS: »-YARDS 


12-172 


7-63 


KICK RETURN AVERAGE 


23.0 


20 8 


PUNT RETURN AVERAGE 


9.6 


9.2 


INT RETURN AVERAGE 


143 


9.0 


FUMBLES-LOST 


25-11 


11-5 


PENALTIES-YARDS 


76652 


75-583 


,■ Per Game 


54.3 


48 6 


PUNTS-YARDS 


51-2,174 


81-3,157 




42.6 


39.0 


' 


38 3 


33 5 


TIME OF POSSESSION/GAME 


30:24 


29:36 


3RD-DOWN CONVERSIONS 


71/164 


65/178 


.vn Pet 


1 


37 


4TH-DOWN CONVERSIONS 


6/8 


7/17 



vn Pet 
SACKS BY-YARDS 

TOUCHDOWNS SCORED 



75 : 
33-257 

P_ 

43 

22-28 



PAT-ATT: 
ATTENDANCE 

SCORE BY OTRS 

Oppt' 

a o o 2 



1ST 






2ND 



37-41 
307,418 

6/51.236 

3RD 

87 



41 
19-118 

25_ 

26 



254,638 



6/42.440 



4TH 

62 



OT 





TOTAL 

365 






73 



31 



50 



ORANGE BOWL 



199 

2 2 P 



Bushing 



Playe r 



Att Gain Loss Net Avg TD 



Lq Avq/G 



Josh Allen 



12 175 



9IE 



24 894 5.1 



80 



Bruce Perry 



9 127 671 25 646 5.1 



80 



Sammy Maldonado 



7 51 306 



I 



305 6.0 



Scott McBnen 

Mario Merrills _ 



12 74 366 93 273 3.7 



23 



90 



86 



37 



43 
9 



Rich Parson 



79 







79 113 



29 



74 

71.8 " 
436 
22.8 " 

21 
79 



Steve Suter 



58 



58 8_3 



24 



5.3 



J P Humber 



39 



39 3 9 



13.0 



Dan Melendez 



14 14.0 



JoJo Walker 



12 



3.0 



Maurice Smith 



6.0 



OS 



Derrick Fenner 



5.0 



Jafar Williams 



3.0 



Drew Weatherly 



1.0 



O.o 



Joel Statham 



5 



28 



-20 -2.5 



Orlando Evans 



5 



40 



-34 -5 7 



Total 



12 504 2,579 233 2,346 4.7 



23 



80 195.5 



Oppo nents 



12 452 1,900 373 1,527 3.4 



14 



74 127.2 



Passing 



Play er 

Scott McBnen 



Joel Statham 



G Effic Att-Cmp -Int Pet Yds TD Lo^ Avg/G 

I90. 9| 
35 31.. 



12 137.10 281-152-6 54 1 2.291 16 69 



92.42 



25-12-1 48.0 156 



Orlan do Evans 
Latrez Harrison 



5 146.78 



21-14-0 66.7 161 



12 150.40 



1-1-0 100.0 



62 
6 



Total 
Opponents 

Receiving 

Player 

Latrez Harrison 
Steve Suter 
JoJo Walker 
Rich Parson 



12 134.35 328-17 9- 7 54.6 2,614 17 69 



12 106.37 349 174-12 49.9 2,241 10 70 



217.8 
186.8 



No 



Yds 



38 



553 



Avg 



TD 



146 



Lg Avg/G 

~49 46.1 



25 



387 



155 



45 35.2 



20 



273 



136 



67 22.8 



310 



18.2 



42 31.0 



Jeff Dugan 



12 



175 



125 



26 14 6 



Josh Allen 



192 



14.8 



43 160 



Derrick Fenner 



298 



298 



69 33.1 



Jafar Williams 
Bruce Perry 



10 



136 



136 



41 17.0 



42 



5.2 



28 



4.7 



Dan Melendez 



75 



125 



6.8 



Bernie Fiddler_ 



35 



7.0 



3.2 



Vernon Davis 



7.8 



2.6 



Maurice Smith 



25 



12.5 



18 2.3 



Rob Abiamiri 



12 



12 



6.0 



8 1.0 



Derek Miller 
Curtis Williams 



5.0 



0.8 



35 



35.0 



35 



Sammy Maldonado 
Scott McBnen 



16 



160 



16 



2.3 



I 



90 



Total 



12 



179 2,614 14.6 



17 



Opponents 

Punt Returns 

Player 



12 



174 2,241 12.9 



10 



9 0.8 

69 217.8 

70 186.8 



No. 



Yds 



Avg 



TD Long 





33 


240 


7.3 


1 


75 


JoJo Walker 


9 


122 


136 





36 


Rich Parson 


3 


81 


77 





51 


Total 


46 


443 


9.6 


1 


75 




24 


221 


9.2 


t 


83 


Interceptions 


No. 


Yds 


Avg 


TD 


Long 


Domomque Foxworth 




64 


21 3 


1 


44 


Mrtdicu Williams 




10 


33 





6 






58 


29 


1 


58 


Curome Cox 




2 


1.0 





2 J 


Andrew Smith 




15 


150 





15 .] 






23 


23 





23 


Total 


12 


172 


14.3 


2 


58 


Opponents 




63 


9.0 





32 


Kick Returns 

Player 


No. 


Yds 


Avg 


TD 


Long 


■ Suter 


14 


331 


73 6 








JoJo ;'. 




135 


725 





28 






45 


22 5 





31 


Rich Parson 




19 


190 





19 


Total 


23 


530 


23.0 





67 


Opponents 

EACH BOW 


44 

L • 


915 

2 O 


O 4 


OATOB BOWL 




2B0S srars ana HBViBiu GATOR 

BCWL 



2004 MARYLAND GATOR BOWL GUIDE 



Scaring 



'layer 


TD 


FGs 


Kick 


Rush 


Rev 


Pass 


DXP 


Saf Points 


Mick Nov.A 





22-28 


33-37 


0-0 
















99 


>sh Allen 


9 


0-0 


0-0 


0-0 





0-0 










54 




6 








0-0 


1 


0-0 










38 




6 








0-0 





0-0 










36 


i on McBrien 


5 


0-0 


0-0 


0-0 





2-2 










30 


, Maldonado 


3 


0-0 


0-0 


0-0 





no 










18 


tteve Sutei 


2 


0-0 





Oil 


1 


0-0 










14 


Jerrick Fenner 


2 


0-0 





0-0 
















12 


:)an Melendez 


2 





0-0 


0-0 





0-0 










12 


1. 1 Walker 


2 


0-0 


0-0 


0-0 





0-0 










12 


Miller 


1 


0-0 


0-0 


0-0 





1)0 










6 


Ziario Merrills 


1 


0-0 


0-0 


0-0 
















6 


i nams 


1 


0-0 





0-0 





DO 










6 


OQwell Jackson 


1 


0-0 


0-0 


0-0 
















6 


;ich Parson 


1 


0-0 


0-0 


0-0 
















6 


-Oomomque Foxworth 


1 


0-0 


(M) 


0-0 





0-0 










6 


Oan Ennis 





0-0 


44 


0-0 





0-0 










4 


rotal 


43 


22-28 


37-41 


00 


2 


22 










365 


Opponents 


26 


6-10 


25-25 


0-1 





0-0 










199 


All-Purpose 

■layer 


G 


Rush 


Rec 


PR 


KOR 




IR 




Tot Avg/G 


osh -M'i ■;■ 


12 


894 


1 92 















1.086 


90.5 




II 


58 


387 


240 


331 









1,016 


92 4 


'errv 


9 


646 


42 















688 


76 4 


aire; Harrison 


12 





553 





45 









598 


49 3 


Walker 


12 


9 


273 


122 


135 









539 


44.9 


"feich Parson 


10 


79 


310 


HI 


19 









489 


48 9 


tammy Maldonado 


7 


305 


16 















321 


45 9 


Derrick Fenner 


9 


5 


298 















303 


33/ 


.' Brien 


12 


273 


9 















282 


23.5 


eff Dugan 


12 





175 















175 


1 4.6 


it,) 1 Uiili.mn 


8 


3 


136 















139 


!74 


'Jan Melendez 


II 


14 


75 















89 


8 I 


Total 


12 


2346 


2614 


443 


530 


172 




6105 


508.8 


Dpponents 


12 


1527 


2241 


221 


915 




63 




4967 413.9 



Total Offense 

Player 


G 


Plays 


Rush 


Pass 


Total 


Avg/G 






Scott McRrim 


12 




11', 


7791 


2 564 


213.7 






losh Allen 


12 


175 


894 





894 


H ': 






Bruce Perry 


9 


127 


646 





646 


71 8 






Sammy Maldonado 


7 


51 


305 





105 


•i ■: 6 






Joel Statham 


5 


33 


-20 


156 


l 16 


27.2 






r Irlando I vans 


5 


// 


14 


161 


127 


25 4 






Total 


12 


832 


2,346 


2,614 


4,960 


413.3 






Opponents 


12 


801 


1,527 


2,241 


3,768 


314.0 






Punting 

PUNTING 


No. 


Yds 


Avg 


Long 


TB 


FC 50+ 


120 Blkd 


Adam Podlesh 


51 


21/4 


42.1 


63 


5 


, 


21 





Opponents 


81 


3157 


39.0 


58 


6 


11 


15 


1 


Field Baals 

FIELD GOALS FGMFGA 


Pet 


1-19 20-29 30-39 40-49 50-99 


Lq 


Blk 


Nil I Novak 


11 28 


78.6 


0-0 


5-5 


7-8 


8-12 2-3 


54 


1 


Novak oreer 


62-8/ 


76 5 


/-/ 22-25 17-20 15-23 7-12 


54 


3 


FG SEQUENCE 


Maryland 






DpponentJ 






Northern Illinois 




[46].{50| 






[521,1251,43 







Florida State 



J44L 



28 



The Citadel 



:31j,(38j.(21],(42j 



West Virginia 



52.|4IJ,|32] 



Eastern Michigan 



ML 



|42|.|25| 



Clemson 
Duke 

Georgia Tech 



48 



:'|. [341.40 I'M -;.-, 



, 39,(35) 



North Carolina 



|24|.|20|.|46| 



Virginia 



|33).47.|45) 



[43[ 



NC State 



[29M43J 



26.I32J 



Wake Forest 



41 



Numbers in (parentheses) indicate field goal was made 



Blocked Kicks 

Curtis Williams (FG vs. Northern Illinois, Punt vs. Wake Forestl 



D'Owell Jackson |FG vs. Florida State) 



defensive Statistics 




I— — 


— Tackles- 


1 




1-Sacks-| 


|-Pass Def-| 


1- 


-Fumbles— | Blkd 






DEFENSIVE LEADERS 


GP 


Solo 


Ast 


Total 


TFL/Yds 


No-Yds 


Int-Yds BrUp QBH 


Rcv-Yd 


f 


Kick Saf 


f2 D'Owell Jackson 


12 


82 


42 


124 


7 5-27 


25-17 


2-58 ; 


10 






1 


112 Leon Joe 


12 


62 


41 


103 


3.5-13 


1.0-8 


1-23 


5 












) Madieu Williams 


12 


59 


22 


81 






3-10 


1 


I-C 








>7 Randy Starks 


12 


38 


34 


72 


14.5-69 


7.5-57 




13 










115 Shawne Mernman 


12 


38 


15 


53 


9.5-59 


8.5-58 






12 


\< 










M Kevin Eli 


12 


25 


28 


53 


11.0-58 


5.5-50 




1 12 








!4 Leroy Ambush 


12 


37 


14 


51 


4.0-15 


1.0-5 












13 Dennard Wilson 


12 


34 


II 


45 


2.5-7 






12 1 








i Domonigue Foxworth 


12 


35 


6 


41 






3-64 


( 




l-( 










% CJ. Feldheim 


12 


18 


21 


39 


1.0-1 


1.0-1 




, 


2 


1-f. 










"19 Jamahl Cochran 


12 


25 


13 


38 


! 5-7 


1.5-7 
















iO Curome Cox 


II 


29 


8 


37 


3.0-5 




2-2 


1 












18 William Kershaw 


10 


17 


b 


23 


1.0-1 








4 










>1 Andrew Henley 


12 


16 


7 


23 










l-( 










!3 Andrew Smith 


12 


17 


4 


21 


2.0-32 


2.0-32 


1-1! 














'6 Henry Scott 


9 


6 


8 


14 


3.0-13 


1.0-7 
















J7 Jamal Chance 


12 


9 


5 


14 


2.0-7 


0.54 
















)7 Tosin Aban 


12 


4 


8 


12 










4 










>l Robert Armstrong 


11 


6 


6 


12 










2 










>4 Scott Smith 


3 


5 


6 


11 


1 0-9 


1 0-9 






2 










53 Reggie Holmes 


5 


6 


4 


10 




















Chris Kellev 


12 


6 


2 


8 




















>6 Ravmond Custis 


12 


6 


2 


8 




















30 Onnie Onwuemene 


10 


6 


1 


7 




















!7 Vernon Davis 


12 


7 




7 




















)5 Conrad Bolston 


9 


4 


3 


7 


2.0-5 


1.0-3 
















15 Curtis Williams 


12 


3 


4 


7 














; 






17 Jon Condo 


12 


3 


2 


5 




















> Ricardo Dickerson 


11 


2 


1 


3 




















10 Maurice Smith 


11 


2 


1 


3 




















>4 Steve Suter 


11 


3 




3 




















i6 Adam Podlesh 


12 


2 




2 




















>5 Josh Wilson 


10 


2 




2 




















33 Dernck Fenner 


9 


2 




2 




















T EAV 


12 


























Total 


12 


626 


329 


955 


69-328 


33-257 


12-172 5< 


69 


5- C 


6 3 






12 


498 


347 


845 


54-190 


19-118 


7- 63 3< 




11-25 


17 1 




2 2 O R A 


N G E 


B O 


W L 


• 2 


2 


P E A C 


H B 


w 


L • 2 


O O t 


1 G J 


I T O 


ft B 


D W L 



® 



i GATOR 
! BCWL 



zaaa srars ana rbvibui 



2004 MARYLAND GATOR BOWL GOIDE 




OFFENSIVE GAME-BY-GAME STATS 



Rushing 



TC-Yds. / TD 



#1 Perry 



#7 IHcBrien 



08 Merrills 



#11 Evans 



#20 Humber 



#22 Parson 



#29 Maldonado 



#33 Allen 



at No Illinois 



dnp-in| 



9-17/0 



dnt 



dnjKd_ 



dn[xd 



1-10/0 



4-19/0 



20-67 / 1 



at Florida State 



10-32/0 



4-22/0 



dnt 



3-(-23) /0 



0-0/0 



1-0/0 



9-41/0 



2-1/0 



The Citadel 



dnp-inj 



5-15/1 



13-42/1 



2+2\/ 



6-24 / 



0-0/0 



12-66/2 



11-136/1 



West Virginia 



14-79/2 



4-47/0 



dnp-cd 



l-|-9[/0 



dnp<d 



0-0/0 



13-88/0 



16-54/1 



atE Michigan 



11-38/0 



4-37/0 



6-27 / 



0-0/0 



dnp-cd 



1-15/0 



dnp-cd 



18-71/2 



Clemson 



17-33/0 



i/0 



dnp-cd 



dnp-cd 



dnp-cd 



0-0/0 



dnp-cd 



16-65/0 



Duke 



8-36 / 1 



4-14/0 



dnp-cd 



dnp-cd 



dnp-cd 



1-29/0 



5-15/1 



9-36 / 



at Georgia Tech 



17-75/0 



4-2/0 



dnt 



dnp-cd 



dnp-cd 



dnp-inj 



3-33/0 



5-0/0 



North Carolina 



1 7-96 / 



8-24 / 2 



3-15/0 



0-0/0 



4-15/0 



0-0/0 



5-43/0 



9-31/1 



Virginia 



dnp-inj 



6-10/0 



1-2/0 



dnpcd 



dnpcd 



1-15/0 



dnp-inj 



38-257/2 



at NC State 



8-20 / 



9-16/1 



dnpcd 



dnpcd 



dnpcd 



1-3/0 



dnp-inj 



23-144/0 



Wake Forest 



25-237/3 



9-61/0 



dnpcd 



dnpcd 



dnrxd 



1-7/0 



dnp-inj 



8-32/0 



Receiving 



Rec-Yds./TD 


#1 Perry 


#3 R.Abiamiri 


#4 Harrison 


#9 Walker 


#1 5 C.Williams 


#19 J.Williams 


#22 Parson 


#29 Maldonado 


#33 Allen 


it No Illinois 


dnp-inj 


0-0/0 


448/0 


0-0/0 


0-0/0 


2-18/0 


3-12/0 


04/0 


1-8/0 


at Florida State 


1-5/0 


14/0 


1-14/0 


441/0 


0-0/0 


1-9/ 


1-23/0 


04/0 


04/0 


The Citadel 


dnp-inj 


0-0/0 


4-51/0 


2-0/0 


1-35/0 


1-8/0 


246/0 


1-16/0 


2-37/0 


West Virginia 


l-[-5] /0 


1-8/0 


4-88 / 1 


2-33/0 


0-0/0 


dnp-inj 


1-12/0 


04/0 


1-19/0 


at E Michigan 


0-0 / 


0-0/0 


3-32/0 


0-0/0 


0-0/0 


dnp-inj 


1-25/0 


dnp-cd 


3-31/0 


Clemson 


1-6/0 


0-0 / 


4-39/0 


0-0 / 


0-0 / 


1-7/0 


1 10/ 1 


dnp-cd 


04/0 


Duke 


2-34/0 


0-0/0 


4 oo / 1 


1-23/0 


0-0 / 


/ 


2-22/0 


04/0 


1-|-1|/ 


at Georgia Tech 


2-|4|/0 


0-0 / 


1 20/0 


1-13/0 


0-0/0 


1-6/0 


0-0/0 


04/0 


1-22/0 


North Carolina 


0-0/0 


0-0 / 


4 54/2 


3-99/1 


0-0/0 


dnrxd 


0-0 / 


04/0 


143/1 


Virginia 


dnp-inj 


0-0/0 


4-63/1 


1-7/0 


0-0/0 


141/0 


04/0 


dnp nj 


1-6/0 


at NC State 


0-0/0 


0-0/0 


4-38/0 


6-57/1 


0-0 / 


0-0 / 


4-114/0 


dnp-inj 


1-25/0 


Wake Forest 


1-6/0 


0-0/0 


1-18/ 1 


0-0/0 


0-0/0 


347/1 


246/0 


dnp-inj 


1-2/0 




















Rec-Yds., TD 


#34 Suter 


#40 M.Smith 


#44 Fiddler 


#82 Dugan 


#83 Fenner 


#84 D.Miller 


#85 Melendez 


#87 V.Davis 




at No. Illinois 


dnp-inj 


0-0/0 


0-0/0 


0-0/0 


o-o/o 


0-0/0 


1-15/0 


04/0 




at Florida State 


0-0/0 


1-7/0 


0-0/0 


0-0/0 


2-12/0 


1-8 n 


04/0 


1-1/0 




The Citadel 


1-6/0 


0-0/0 


0-0/0 


2-22/0 


1-62/1 


04/0 


04/0 


04/0 




West Virginia 


04/0 


1-18/0 


dnp-inj 


3-50/0 


1-15/0 


04/0 


dnp-inj 


04/0 




at E. Michigan 


4-84/0 


0-0/0 


1-5/0 


0-0/0 


1-58/0 


0-0/0 


1 14. 1 


2-19/0 




Clemson 


3-42/1 


(H)/0 


1-7/0 


1-11/0 


1-69/1 


0-0/0 


1-13/0 


04/0 






448/0 


04/0 


04/0 


3-18/0 


0-0/0 


04/0 


1-6/0 


04/0 




at Georgia Tech 


460/0 


0-0/0 


1-5/0 


1-17/0 


2-18/0 


0-0/0 


0-0/0 


04/0 




North Carolina 


4 72 / 


0-0/0 


0-0/0 


1-17/0 


2-64/0 


0-0/0 


0-0/0 


1-11/0 




Virginia 


3-23/0 


0-0/0 


1-11/0 


3 40 / 


dnp-inj 


dnpcd 


0-0 / 


04/0 




at NC Si 


0-0/0 


0-0/0 


1-7/0 


0-0/0 


dnp-inj 


1-2/1 


04/0 


04/0 




rest 


2-52/0 


0-0/0 


0-0/0 


0-0/0 


dnp-inj 


o-o/o 


2 27/1 


04 






















Passing 








Field Goals 






Punting 






A-CI/Y/TD 


#7 McBrien 


#11 Evans 


016Statham 


Made, Missed 


#46 Novak 




No-Avg. / In20 


#36 Podlesh 




at No. Illinois 


110/0 


dnrxd 


dnrxd 


at No Illinois 


46g. 50g 




at No Illinois 


845 4 / 4 




at Florida 


18- 6-1 


12-7-0/57/0 


dnrxd 


at Florida '■• * 


44g 




at Florida State 743 7 / 3 


TheCit 


178/0 


6-4-0 / 70 / 1 


1-1-0/35/0 


The Citadel 


31g, 38g, 2lg, 42 


g 


The Citadel 


0/1 




West V/ 


220/1 


1-10/ 18/0 


dnrxd 


West Virginia 


52s. 4lg,32g 




West Virginia 






at E Mil 1 




16/0 


0-0-0/0/0 


at E Michigan 


27g 


higan 


4-46 5 ' 1 




Clemson 




dnp-cd 


dnrxd 


Clemson 


48s 


Clemson 


741.0/3 




Duke 




dnp-cd 


040/0/0 


Duke 


54g, 34g, 40wr 3 


g, 48g 


Duke 


4-42 6 / 1 




at Georgia Tech 
North Carolina 




dnrxd 


22-10-1 /1 10/0 


at Georgia Tech 


39wl. 35g 


at Georgia Tech 


5-39 2/2 






11/0 


North Carolina 


24g, 20g, 46g 


North Carolina 


2-38.5/1 




Virginia 






dnpcd 


Virginia 


33g, 47blk. 45g 


Virginia 


3-28 0/1 










dnp<d 


at NC ■ ' 


29g, 43g 


il N< State 


546i 




•est 






dnp-cd 


'.l ; ih forest 


4lwl 


Wake Forest 


4-37.8/2 





2 2 



N G E BOWL 



2002 PEACH BOWL 



2004 BATOR BOWL 




DEFENSIVE GAME-BY- 




TOYOTA 

7003 sws ano rbmui GATOR 

BCWL 



2004 MARYLAND GATOR ROWL GUIDE 



STATS 



UT-AT-TT / Sk 


02 Kelley 


#6 Foxworth 


#10 M. Williams 


#13 D.Wilson 


015 C.Williams 


023 A. Smith 


024 Ambush 


025 J.Wilson 


026 Custis 


; at No. Illinois 


0-0-0/0.0 


2-1-3/00 


6*6 / 0.0 


2 0-2 / 


1*1 /oo 


5*5/1.0 


4-3-7/0 


dnt 


0-0-0 / 0.0 


at Florida State 


1-1-2/0.0 


9-0-9/0.0 


3-1-4/0.0 


1-2-3/0 


0-0-0 / 


3-0-3 / 


1-1-2/1.0 


dni 


1*1 /oo 


The Citadel 


3-0-3/0.0 


01-1 /0.0 


1-1-2/0.0 


3-14/0.0 


00-0/ 0.0 


0-0-0 / 


1-0-1/0 


2*2 / 


0*0 / 


West Virginia 


0-0-0/0.0 


0-0-0/0.0 


5-3-8/0.0 


2-0-2/0 


1-2-3/0.0 


1-1-2/00 


3-1-4/0 


0-0-0 / 


0-1-1/0.0 


'at E. Michigan 


0-0-0/0.0 


2-1-3/0.0 


5-2-7/0.0 


3-14/0.0 


1*1/0.0 


01-1/ 0.0 


4-2-6/00 


00-0/ 0.0 


0-0-0 / 


Clemson 


1-0-1/0.0 


2-02/ 0.0 


3-3-6/0.0 


7*7/0.0 


0*0/0.0 


4*4/1.0 


1*1/0.0 


00-0/ 0.0 


0-0-0 / 


Duke 


0*0/0.0 


l-OI/O.O 


2-1-3/00 


2-1-3/0.0 


00-0/ 0.0 


0*0/0.0 


4-1-5/0.0 


/ 


1-1-2/0.0 

2*2/0 

OOO 


i at Georgia Tech 


0*0/0.0 


3-1-4/0.0 


6-1-7/0.0 


3-2-5/0.0 


0*0/0.0 


0-0-0 / 


5-1-6/0.0 


0-0-0 / 


; North Carolina 


0-0-0 / 


5-0-5/0.0 


5-0 5/0 


3-2-5/0.0 


0*0/0.0 


0-1-1 /oo 


3-2-5 / 


O-OO / C 


i Virginia 


0-OO/ 0.0 


2-0-2/0.0 


7-4-11/0.0 


1-1-2/0.0 


00-0/ 0.0 


0-1-1/0.0 


2-0-2/00 


0-0-0 / 


'.' 
2-0-2 / 


at NC State 


1-1-2/0.0 


2-0-2/0.0 


7-2-9/0.0 


1-1-2/0.0 


0-1-1/0.0 


2 0-2 / 


4-1-5/0.0 


0-0-0 / 


Wake Forest 


0-0-0 / 


7-2-9/0.0 


9-4-13/0.0 


6-06/ 0.0 


0-1-1 /oo 


2*2/0.0 


5-2-7/0.0 


0-0-0 / 


00-0/ 0.0 




















UT-AT-TT / Sk 


030 Cox 


#32 Joe 


#36 Podlesh 


037 Chance 


041 Eli 


045 Merriman 


047 Condo 


048 Kershaw 




1 at No. Illinois 


1-2-3/0.0 


7-7-14/05 


0-0-0 / 


1-1-2/0.5 


1-2-3/1.0 


3-2-5/0.0 


2-0-2 / 0.0 


0*0 / 


at Florida State 


6-1-7/0.0 


7-5-12/0.0 


1*1/0.0 


3-2-5/0.0 


1*1/0.0 


3-14/1.0 


0*0/0.0 


0*0/00 




'The Citadel 


3-03/ 0.0 


1-1-2/0.0 


0*0/0.0 


0-1-1/0.0 


3-0-3 / 1 


2-1-3/1.0 


0-1-1/ 0.0 


4-1-5/0.0 


■West Virginia 


01-1/ 0.0 


2-5-7/0.0 


0*0/0.0 


0-1-1/0.0 


3-2-5/2.0 


4-1-5/ 1 


0*0/0.0 


3-14/00 




at E Michigan 


2-1-3/0.0 


5-5-10/0.0 


0-0-0 / 


1-0-1/0.0 


14-5/0.0 


7*7/0.0 


0-0-0 / 


3-3-6/0 




Clemson 


3-2-5/0.0 


5-3-8/0.0 


0*0/0.0 


2-0-2/0.0 


2-3-5/0.0 


4-2-6/2.0 


0*0/0.0 


dnp<d 




;Duke 


3-14/0.0 


7-2-9/0 5 


1*1/0.0 


0*0/0.0 


2 6-3/00 


4-04 / 1 


0*0/0.0 


2*2/0.0 




(at Georgia Tech 


OOO/ 0.0 


9-5-14/0.0 


0*0/0.0 


1*1/0.0 


4-3-7/1.0 


1-1-2/0.0 


OI-I/OO 


dnpxd 




North Carolina 


2-02/ 0.0 


3-2-5/0.0 


0-0-0 / 


0-0-0 / 


2-1-3/0.5 


2-1-3/0.5 


0*0/0.0 


1*1/0.0 




(Virginia 


8-0-8 / 


5-0-5/0.0 


00-0/ 0.0 


0-0-0 / 


1-34/0.0 


2-24/0.0 


0*0/0.0 


1*1/0.0 




Rat NC State 


1-01/ 0.0 


3-5-8/0.0 


0-0-0 / 


0*0/0.0 


4+8/0.0 


3-1 4 / 1 


1*1/0.0 


2*2/0.0 




U.w - ":".: 


dnp-inj 


8-1-9/0.0 


0*0/0.0 


1*1/0.0 


0*0/0.0 


3-3-6/1.0 


0-0-0 / 


1-1-2/0.0 




































UT-AT-TT/ Sk 


#49 Cochran 


#51 Henley 


#52 D. Jackson 


053 Holmes 


054 S. Smith 


057 Starks 


059 Holloway 




at No. Illinois 


2-1-3/0 


0-0-0 •■ c 


8-7-15/0.0 


dnrxd 


3-14/1.0 


3-2-5/1.0 


dnp<d 






at Florida State 


7-2-9/0.0 


1-0-1 /oo 


5-6-11/0 


1-2-3/0.0 


24-6/0.0 


4-3-7/0.0 


0*0/0.0 






|The Citadel 


OI-I/OO 


0-1-1 zoo 


6-1-7/0.0 


3*3/0.0 


0-1-1/0.0 


2-24/0.0 


2*2/0.0 






J West Virginia 


1-2-3/0.0 


2-02/ 0.0 


102-12/ 1.0 


1*1/0.0 


dnp-inj 


2-4-6 / 


dnp<d 






|at E. Michigan 


1-1-2/0.0 


2-02/ 0.0 


9-7-16/0.0 


01-1 /OO 


dnp-inj 


3-3-6/1.0 


dnrxd 






Clemson 


2-02/ 1.0 


1-1-2/0.0 


9-1-10/1.0 


dnrxd 


dnp-inj 


1-1-2/0.0 


dnrxd 






^Duke 


3-1-4/0.5 


3-2-5/0.0 


8-4-12/0.5 


1-1-2/0.0 


dnp-inj 


4-5-9/1.5 


dnp<d 






J at Georgia Tech 


2-2-4/0.0 


02-2/ 0.0 


7-6-13/0.0 


dnrxd 


dnp-inj 


54-9/0.0 


dnp-cd 






J North Carolina 


1-0-1 CO 


2-02/ 0.0 


3-1-4/0.0 


dnrxd 


dnp-inj 


3-14/1.0 


dnp-cd 






Virgim.i 


2-1-3/0.0 


2-1-3/0.0 


2-24/0.0 


dnrxd 


dnp-inj 


5-3-8/1.0 


dnp-cd 






j at NC State 


1-01/ 0.0 


000/ 0.0 


9-2 ■ P 2 


dnrxd 


dnp-inj 


4+8/1.0 


dnp*d 






J Wake Forest 


3-2-5/0.0 


3-03/ 0.0 


6-3-9/0.0 


dnrxd 


dnpnnj 


2-24/1.0 


dnp-cd 




















- UT-AT-TT/ Sk 


#76 Scott 


#80 Onwuemene 


087 V.Davis 


#91 Armstrong 


095 Bolston 


096 Feldheim 


097 Abari 






. at No. Illinois 


dnrxd 


dnrxd 


0*0/0.0 


dnrxd 


1-4-5 2 


0*0/0.0 


0*0/0.0 






J at Florida State 


01-1/ 0.0 


dnrxd 


1*1/0.0 


0*0/0.0 


1-1-2/0.0 


01-1/ 0.0 


01-1/ 0.0 






The Citadel 


1-1-2/0.0 


01-1/ 0.0 


2*2/0.0 


1*1/0.0 


1-1-2/0.0 


02-2/ 0.0 


1*1/0.0 






West Virginia 


1-3-4/0.0 


OOO/ 0.0 


1*1/0.0 


1*1/0.0 


1-0-1 /oo 


3-14/0.0 


2-24/0.0 






at E. Michigan 


1-1-2/0.0 


2-02/ 0.0 


2*2/0.0 


0*0/0.0 


1*1/0.0 


4-1-5/0.0 


03-3/ 0.0 






Clemson 


000/ 0.0 


1-01/ 0.0 


0*0/0.0 


0*0/0.0 


1-1-2/1.0 


0-1-1 /0.0 


1*1/0.0 






Duke 


1-1-2/0.0 


0*0/0.0 


0*0/0.0 


2-1-3/0.0 


0*0/0.0 


1-1-2/1.0 


0*0/0.0 






at Georgia Tech 


dnrxd 


0*0/0.0 


0*0/0.0 


1-2-3/0.0 


dnpcid 


2-3-5/0.0 


0*0/0.0 






North Carolina 


2-1-3/1.0 


1*1/0.0 


0*0/0.0 


0*0/0.0 


0*0/0.0 


0*0/0.0 


OI-I/OO 






Virginia 


jick;: 


0*0/0.0 


0*0/0.0 


1-2-3/0.0 


dnp-cd 


3-14/0.0 


0*0/0.0 






at NC State 


dnrxd 


1*1/0.0 


0*0/0.0 


01-1/ 0.0 


0*0/0.0 


2-24/0.0 


01-1/ 0.0 






; Wake Forest 


0*0/ 0.0 


1*1/0.0 


1*1/0.0 


0*0/0.0 


01-1/ 0.0 


14-5/0.0 


0*0/0.0 





















i dnp-<nj - did not play/injury; dnp-cd - did not play/coach i decision 
2002 ORANGE BOWL 



® 



2002 PEACH BOWL 



2004 GATOR BOWL 



7003 mis ano novioui 



12004 MARYLAND GATOR ROWL GUIDE 




2003 TEAM GAME-BY-GAME STATISTICS 



Game 



SCORE 



FIRST DOWNS 
Tot Ru-Pa-Pe 



RUSHING 
No-Yds-TD 



PASSING 
A-C-l Yds 



TOTAL OFF. 
TD Pl-Yds 



PUNTS 
No-Avg 



FUM 
F-L 



PEN SACKS BY 

No-Yds No-Yds 



3RD 
DNS 



4TH 
DNS 



MARYLAND 

at Northern Illinois 


13 
20 


12 
21 


6- 5-1 
4-14-3 


35-112-1 
43- 59-0 


24-12-1 
35-21-1 


110 
266 



2 


59-222 
78-325 


8-45 4 
7-41.0 


2-1 
0-0 


9-90 
5-56 


547 
2- 5 


3-13 

10-19 


0-0 
0-0 


26:41 
33:1' 


MARYLAND 
at Florida State 


10 
35 


13 
23 


74-2 
13- 7-3 


31- 73-0 
46-196-3 


31-14-1 
30-17-1 


124 
231 



2 


62-197 
76-427 


7-437 
7-42.7 


3-2 
2-0 


6-55 

10-81 


2-17 
3-20 


3-14 
7-16 


1-2 
1-1 


26:0 
33:5 


MARYLAND 
The Citadel 


61 



28 

7 


15-12-1 
5- 2-0 


53-282-5 
31- 90-0 


27-17-0 
20- 3-1 


283 

47 





80-565 
51-137 


1-60.0 

11-36 9 


1-0 
0-0 


7-64 

8-54 


2-16 
3-18 


7-14 
3-14 


2-2 
0-0 


35:4 
24:1 


MARYLAND 
West Virginia 


34 
7 


28 
11 


15-10-3 
5- 2-4 


49-260-3 
39-120-1 


26-15-1 

12- 3-0 


238 
36 





75-498 
51-156 


1-58 
9-41 


2-1 
0-0 


10-80 
9-80 


4-24 
2-17 


8-13 
4-12 


0-0 
0-0 


33:5 
26:0 


MARYLAND 
Eastern Michigan 


37 
13 


22 
13 


9-12-1 
6- 7-0 


41-199-3 
39-149-0 


21-16-0 
20-14-1 


268 
126 




62-467 
59-275 


4-46 5 
8-44. 1 


2-2 

0-0 


4-20 
3-27 


1- 6 
0- 


8-13 
2-14 


0-0 
1-1 


26:4 
33:1 


MARYLAND 
Clemson 


21 

13 


19 
17 


11- 8-0 
3-12-2 


44-134-0 
29- 10-0 


27-14-0 
45-22-2 


204 
320 


3 


71-338 
74-330 


7-41 
6-36.2 


2-1 
0-0 


6-53 
740 


6-50 
1-11 


8-16 
6-18 


0-0 
1-3 


31:2 
28:3 


MARYLAND 
Duke 


33 
20 


19 
17 


8-10-1 
9-13-3 


31-131-2 
45-143-2 


32-18-1 
47-20-1 


238 
270 




63-369 
92-413 


4-42 8 
7-357 


2-1 
2-1 


6-60 
13-88 


4-36 
1- 5 


2-11 
6-20 


0-0 
2-5 


23:5 
36:1 


MARYLAND 
at Georgia Tech 


3 
7 


14 
14 


4-10-0 
7- 7-0 


35- 96-0 
41-130-0 


33-14-2 
28-12-1 


157 
98 





68-253 
69-228 


5-392 
9-31.9 


5-2 
1-0 


1- 5 
3-15 


1-10 
3-19 


6-16 
5-16 


0-0 
1-2 


29:2 
30:3 


MARYLAND 
North Carolina 


59 
21 


27 

16 


13-13-1 
5-11-0 


50-252-3 
25-108-1 


27-16-0 
32-21-1 


360 
277 


4 


77-612 
57-385 


2-38 5 
348.0 


0-0 
2-2 


441 
5-35 


3-23 
1- 3 


10-16 
2- 8 


1-1 

0-3 


34:3 
25.2 


MARYLAND 
Virginia 


27 
17 


14 
14 


6- 8-0 
6- 8-0 


48-278-2 
32-108-1 


21-14-0 
26-13-0 


191 
186 




69-469 
58-294 


3-28.0 

5-348 


1-0 
0-0 


645 
446 


1- 8 
0- 


5-12 
7-13 


1-1 

0-0 


35:2 
24:3 


MARYLAND 
at NC State 


26 

24 


24 
19 


11-11-2 
7-10-2 


42-190-1 
34- 98-2 


37-17-1 
30-16-1 


243 
276 


2 



79-433 
64-374 


5-46 
5-474 


3-1 
4-2 


8-64 
5-41 


2-11 
3-20 


5-14 
4-12 


0-1 

1-1 


31:0 
28:5 


MARYLAND 
at Wake Forest 


41 
28 


25 
21 


15-10-0 
11- 7-3 


45-339-3 
48-316-4 


22-12-0 
24-12-2 


198 
108 


3 



67-537 
72-424 


4-378 
4-335 


1-0 
0-0 


9-75 
3-20 


2- 9 
0- 


6-12 
9-16 


1-1 

0-1 


29:4 
30:1 





20 



TURNOVERS 


PUNT COVERAGE 


Takeaways - 1 7 


Punts -Md. 51, Opp 81 


Giveaways - 1 8 


Blocks by-Md. I.Opp. 


Points Following Turnovers 


Fair Catches by - Md. 0, Opp. 5 


Md. - 73 |9 TD. 3 FG| 


Touchbacks - Md. 5, Opp. 6 


Opp. -38(5 TD. 1 FG| 


Inside 20 -Md. 21, Opp 15 


SPECIAL TEAMS 


Returns Allowed |Md.| - 24-22 1 |9.2 avg.| 
Returns Allowed (Opp.) - 46-443 (9.6 avg.) 


Blocked Kicks (by Md ,| - 3 |2FG, Punt) 
Blocked Kicks (by Opp | - 1 |FG| 


RED ZONE 




Md. ScoresTTimes in Red Zone 


KICKOFF COVERAGE 


Scoring Percentage - 4345 |.956| 


Kickoffs-Md. 75. Opp 44 
Fair Catches by - Md 0, Opp 
Touchbacks by-Md 31. Opp. 18 
Onside Attempts - 

Md 10 rec ). Opp. 2 10 rec.| 
Out of Bounds by-Md 0. Opp 1 
Returns Allowed |Md | - 44-9 1 5 (20.8 avg | 
Allowed (Opp | - 23-530 (23 avg | 


TD Percentage - 3045 ( 667( 
Scores - 43 (30 TD. 13 FG) 
Non-Scores - 2 |2 End of Half) 
Odo Scores/limes in Red Zone 
Scoring Percentage - 20-25 (800) 
TD Percentage- 16-25 (600) 
Scores -20 (16 TD. 4 FG) 
Non-Scores - 5 IBIocked FG. Missed FG. 
2 Downs. In( ) 



Terrapin When... 





Total 


ACC 


Record 


9-3 




Home 


6-0 


40 


Away 


3-3 


2-2 


Neutral 


0-0 


00 


Current Streak 


Won -• 


Won 4 


Current Home Streak 


Won II 


Won 7 


Current RoadStreal 


Won 2 


Won 2 


Day Game 


44 


40 


Night G, 


5-3 


2-2 


rVGctme 


5-3 


5-2 


Auqust 


0-1 


0-0 


Srpli'iHii ' 


3-1 


01 




2-1 


2-1 


Novembei 


40 


40 


vs Top 25 


0-1 


0-1 


Scoring First 


7-3 


4-2 


Come-From-Behmd 


3-3 




After 1 it Otr 


6-2 


3 1 




0-1 




1st Otr 


3-0 


30 





Total 


ACC 


Leadmq at Halftime 


7-0 


40 


Tied at Halftime 


0-1 


0-1 


Behind at Half! me 


2-2 


2-1 


Leadinq After 3rd Otr 


8-1 


5-1 


Tied After 3rd Qti 


0-1 




Behind After 3rd Otr 


1-1 


1 1 


Overtime 


0-1 


0-0 


Sconnq 20+ Points 


9-0 


60 


• Points 


40 


30 




3-1 


l-l 




6-2 


3-1 


I Yard Rusher 


40 






20 


10 


With 300 Yard Passu 


10 


10 




10 




1 ponenl 




5-1 




40 


30 




6 


40 



2002 ORANGE BOWL 



2002 PEACH BOWL 



2004 BATOR BOWL 




looa sms ana inii/iinii 



2004 MARYLAND GATOR BOWL GUIDE 



TOYOTA 

GATOR 
BCVIL 



GAME-BY-GAME STARTERS 



Career Starts In Superscript 



Vffense 



1 

GAME 


WR/TE 


Left Tackle 


Left Guard 


Center 


Right Guard 


Right Tackle 


TE/WR 


Quarterback 


Tailback 


FB/TE 


Wide Receivei 


I 

Jit No Illinois 


J Williams 


Heyei 


Brooks-" 


Schmitf 


Patterson 


Dumas' ' 


Dugan' 1 ' 


McH' 




Fiddler 1 


Harrisi 


1 
it Florida State 


J Williams''' 


Heyer 


Brooks 


Schmitt 4 


rylei 


Dumas" 


Parson' 


McBi ' 






Ham'si i 


The Citadel 




Heyer 3 


Brooks" 


Si hmitt 


1 lynn 


Dumas 


Dugan"' 


McBrien" 


Allen' 


M.Sn 


Harri 


-West Wi 


■'- 


Heyer 1 


Brooks" 


Si hmitt 


Bryant 


; lumas 


Dugan 1 


Mi Bnei 


Allen 


M. Smith* 








Heyer 


Brooks' 


Schmitt' 


Bryant 33 


Dumas' 


Dugan 36 


McBnen" 


Allen 




Harrison" 


Clemson 


Suter 1 


Heyer 


Brooks'' 


Schmitt 8 


Bryant 3 ' 


Dumas 21 


Dugan' 


McBnen 20 


Allen 




Harr 


"Duke 


Suter 


Heyer' 




Si hmitt 


Bryant 


Dumas" 


Dugan 


McBrien 


Allen 






(at Georgia Tech 


Suter 


Heyer 


Brooks 31 


Schmitt 


Bryant" 


Dumas* 1 ' 1 


Dugan 


McBnen 22 


Perry 


Fiddler 


Harris 


JNorth Carolina 


Suter' 


Hever 


Brooks" 


Schmitt 


Bryant 1 ' 


Dumas-' 


Dugan 


McBnen 23 


Perry' 5 




Harrison ' 


[Virginia 


Suter 


Heyer : 


Brooks" 


Schmitt" 


Bryant 


Dumas 


Dugan 43 


McBnen 


Allen 


D Miller 


Harrison" 


Mate 


Suter' 


Heyer 


Brooks* 


Schmitt' 3 


Bryant 3 ' 


M nil 


Dugan 


Mi Bnen 


Allen 
p erry 


; ddler 
Davis 


Harrison- 
Har"* 


jat Wake Forest 


J.Williams" 


Heyer" 


Brooks 3 ' 


Schmitt" 


Bryant 


Dumas 26 


Dugan" 


McBnen 











defense 



GAME 


LEO 


Def. Tackle 


Nose Tackle 


Def. End 


WLB 


MLB 


SLB 


Cornerback 


Strong Safety 


Free Safety 


Cornerback 


''at No Illinois 


Cochran" 


Starks" 


Feldheim 20 


S Smith 


Joe- 


Jackson 1 


Ambush 13 


Cox 3 ' 


D Wilson 


7 JVilliams 


Foxworth" 


fat Florida State 


Cochran' 5 


Starks" 


Feldheim 2 ' 


S.Smith 2 


Joe 26 


Jackson 2 


Ambush" 


Cox 35 


D Wilson 


V jr/ilhams 


Foxworth" 


adel 


Cochran" 


Starks" 


Feldheim*'*' 


S.Smith 3 


Joe 2 ' 


Jackson 3 


Ambush' 5 


Cox" 


D Wilson 




Foxworth ■ 


*West Virginia 


Cochran" 


Starks 20 


Feldheim 23 


Eli 1 


Joe 28 


Jackson 


Ambush 16 


Co) 


D.Wilson 22 


M.Williams" 


Foxworth 20 


at E. Michigan 


Cochran" 


Starks 2 ' 


Feldheim 2 ' 


Eli 2 


Joe 2 ' 


Jackson 5 


Ambush" 


Cox'- 






Foxworth 21 


Iciemson 


Merriman' 


Starks 22 


Feldheim 25 


Eli 


Joe 30 


Jackson 6 


Ambush" 


Cox 3 ' 


D.Wilson 2 ' 


M. Williams 20 


Foxworth 22 


"lOuke 


Cochran" 


Starks 


Feldheim 26 


Eli' 


Joe 31 


Jackson 7 


Ambush" 


Cox* 


D JViKon 


M.Williams 21 


Foxworth 23 


|at Georgia Tech 


Merriman 2 


Stacks 


Feldheim 2 ' 


Eli 5 


Joe 32 


Jackson 8 


Ambush 20 


Cox" 


:.' .».' .'son- 


M. Williams 22 


Foxworth 2 ' 


^ North Carolina 


Merriman 3 


Starks 25 


Feldheim 28 


Eli 6 


Joe 


Jackson' 


Ambush 21 


Cox* 2 


D.Wilson 27 


M.Williams 2) 


Foxworth- 1 


Virginia 


Merriman' 


Starks 


Feldheim 2 ' 


Eli' 


Joe' 


Jackson 10 


Ambush 22 


Cox" 


D.Wilson 28 


M. Williams 2 ' 


Foxworth* '- 


at NC State 


Cochran 20 


Starks 27 


Feldheim 30 


Eli 8 


Joe 35 


Jackson" 


Ambush 23 


Cox" 


D Wilson 


M.Williams 25 


Foxworth" 


at Wake Forest 


Cochran 21 


Starks 


Feldheim 31 


Elf 


Joe 36 


Jackson" 


Ambush - 


Chance 


'. 


M.Williams 26 


Foxworth 28 



















































Class Starters by Game (Includes Kicker/Punter) 



.GAME 


Seniors 


Juniors 


Sophomores 


R-Freshmen True Freshmen 


Total 


: atNo. Illinois 


13 


6 


4 


1 





24 


at F oi da State 


14 


7 


2 


1 





24 


■{The Citadel 


II 


9 


3 


1 





24 


West Virginia 


10 


9 


4 


1 





24 


at E. Michigan 


12 


8 


3 


1 





24 


Clemson 


12 


7 


4 


1 





24 


Duke 


12 


8 


3 


1 





24 


at Georgia Tech 


13 


7 


3 


1 





24 


North Carolina 


13 


7 


3 


1 





24 


Virginia 


11 


7 


5 


1 





24 


at NC State 


12 


8 


3 


1 





24 


at Wake Forest 


13 


7 


2 


1 


1 


24 















"Terrapin Playing Expci 


ricncc Superlatives 




— > 


Most overall starts, career — 


Offense 

45, Jeff Dugan (TE| 
40, Lamar Bryant |OG) 


Defense 

44, Curome Cox |CB| 
36, Leon Joe |LB| 




Most overall starts, 2003 — 


12, Heyer |OT|; Brooks |OG); Schmitt |C|; 
Dumas fOT); McBnen (QB) 


1 2. by 8 




Most consecutive starts, career — 


26, Scon McBrien |QB| 
19, C J. Brooks (OT) 


25, Randy Starks |DT); Dennard Wilson (SS|; 
Madieu Williams (FS|; Domonique Foxworth (CB] 




Most consecutive starts, 2003 — 


12, by 5 


1 2. by 8 


4 



® 



2002 ORANGE BOWL • 2002 PEACH BOWL • 2004 GATOR BOWL 



Jii>W«W±1 



12004 MARYLAND GATOR BOWL GUIDE 




PARTICIPATION CHART 



SENIORS (21) 


Nl 


FS 


a 


wv 


EM 


cu 


DU 


CT 


NC 


VA 


ST 


WF 


1 Perry TB 


inj 


S 


inj 


X 


X 


X 


X 


s 


S 


inj 


X 


s 


4 Harrison WR 


S 


s 


S 


X 


S 


S 




s 


s 


S 


S 


s 


7 McBrien QB 


S 


s 


S 


S 


S 


S 




s 


s 


S 


S 


s 


10 M. Williams FS 


s 


s 


S 


s 


S 


S 




s 


s 


S 


S 


s 


1! Evans QB 


cd 


X 


X 


X 


X 


cd 




dnt 


X 


cd 


cd 


cd 


13 D. Wilson SS 


s 


s 


S 


s 


S 


S 




S 


s 


S 


S 


S 


19 J. Williams WR 


S 


s 


X 


inj 


inj 


X 




X 


cd 


X 


X 


s 


23 A. Smith SS 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 




X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


24 Ambush LB 


S 


s 


S 


S 


S 


S 




S 


s 


S 


S 


S 


30 Cox CB 


S 


s 


S 


s 


S 


S 




S 


s 


S 


S 


inj 


Joe. 


s 


s 


S 


s 


S 


s 




S 


s 


S 


S 


S 


17 Chance 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 




X 


X 


X 


X 


S 


44 Fiddler FB 


S 


s 


X 


inj 


S 


s 




S 


s 


X 


s 


X 


51 Henley LB 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 




X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


54 S. Smith DE 


S 


S 


S 


inj 


inj 


inj 




inj 


inj 


inj 


inj 


inj 


61 lyierOG 


inj 


s 


X 


X 


X 


cd 




X 


X 


X 


cd 


cd 


73 Bryant OG 


inj 


inj 


inj 


S 


S 


S 




S 


S 


S 


S 


S 


75 Dumas OT 


S 


S 


S 


S 


s 


S 




S 


S 


S 


S 


S 


82 Dugan TE 


s 


X 


S 


s 


S 


S 




s 


s 


S 


S 


S 


96 Feldheim NT 


s 


S 


S 


s 


s 


s 




s 


s 


s 


s 


S 


97 Abari DT 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


Class Participation 


17-13 20-14 19-11 


18-10 19-12 18-1218-1219-1319-1318-1118-1217-12 




JUNIORS (23| 


Nl 


FS 


CT 


WV 


EM 


CU 


DU 


GT 


NC 


VA 


ST 


WF 


2 KelleySS 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


3 R. Abiamiri TE 


X 


X 


X 


S 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


Foxworth 


S 


S 


S 


S 


S 


S 


S 


S 


S 


S 


S 


S 


15 C. Williams WR 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


IS Shanks WR 


dm 


dnt 


cd 


cd 


cd 


cd 


cd 


dnt 


cd 


cd 


dnt 


dnt 


22 Parson WR 


X 


S 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


inj 


inj 


X 


X 


X 


26 CustisFS 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


Maldonado 


X 


X 


X 


X 


cd 


cd 


X 


X 


X 


inj 


inj 


inj 


31 AjeDB 


dm 


dnt 


X 


cd 


dnt 


cd 


cd 


dm 


cd 


cd 


dnt 


dnt 


Suter .-. 


inj 


X 


S 


X 


S 


S 


S 


S 


S 


S 


S 


S 


M. Smith 


X 


X 


S 


S 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


41 El. 


X 


X 


X 


S 


S 


S 


S 


S 


S 


S 


S 


S 


Novak 


S 


S 


S 


s 


S 


s 


s 


s 


S 


S 


s 


s 


47 Condo LEO 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


49 Cochran LEO 


S 


S 


S 


S 


S 


X 


s 


X 


X 


X 


S 


S 


57 StarksDT 


S 


S 


S 


s 


s 


S 


s 


S 


S 


S 


S 


S 


Schmitt 


S 


S 


S 


s 


S 


s 


s 


s 


s 


S 


s 


S 


Brooks 


S 


S 


S 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


S 


s 


S 



n scon de 

18 FlynnC; 
Lombardo OT 



cd 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


cd 


X 


X 


cd 


X 


x 


X 


S 


X 


inj 


inj 


inj 


inj 


X 


X 


X 


cd 


r x 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 



Onwuemene J. '? 


cd 


cd 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


: Bryan'.' 










dm 


cd 


cd 


dm 


cd 


cd 


dnt 


dm 


Class Participation 


17-0 


19-7 


22-9 


20-9 


18-8 


18-7 


19-8 


17 7 19 7 


18-7 


18-8 


18 8 




SOPHOMORES (18| 


Nl 


FS 


a 


WV 


EM 


CU 


DU 


GT 


NC 


VA 


ST 


WF 


Dickerson FB/DL 


X 


cd 


X 






X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


Merrills 


dm 


dm 


















cd 


cd 


Walker 


X 


X 


















X 


X 


Allen 
























X 


McPhearson 
















dnt 


cd 


cd 


dnt 


dnt 


Merriman ■ 
















S 


S 


s 


X 


X 


1 Kershaw IB 


X 


X 


X 




X 


cd 


X 


cd 


X 


X 


X 


X 


. Jackson 


S 


S 


s 




S 


S 


S 


S 


S 


S 


S 


S 


Patterson 










cd 


cd 


cd 


nm 


cd 






dnt 


Duffie '. 








inj 








inj 


inj 








M.Powell 














X 


cd 


cd 









SOPHOMORES|cont| 


Nl 


FS 


a 


WV 


EM 


CU 


DU 


GT 


NC 


VA 


n 


WF 


68 McDonald OG 


cd 


cd 


X 


X 


X 


cd 


X 


cd 


X 


cd 


cd 


cd 


70 Heyer OT 


S 


S 


S 


s 


S 


S 


S 


S 


S 


S 


S 


S 


77 Bonham OG 


cd 


cd 


X 


X 


X 


cd 


X 


cd 


X 


cd 


inj 


inj 


83 FennerWR 


X 


X 


X 


5 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


inj 


inj 


inj 


84 D. Miller TE 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


S 


X 


X 


85 Melendez WR 


X 


X 


X 


inj 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


85 Augustyn WR 


cd 


dnt 


X 


cd 


dnt 


cd 


cd 


dnt 


cd 


cd 


dnt 


dnt 


Class Participation 


12-4 


11-2 


12-3 


13-4 


14-3 


9-4 


13-3 


9-3 


13-3 


10-5 


9-3 


9-2 




R-FRESHMEN |16| 


Nl 


FS 


a 


WV 


EM 


CU 


DU 


GT 


NC 


VA 


ST 


WF 


11 EnnisPK 


cd 


cd 


X 


cd 


cd 


cd 


X 


cd 


cd 


cd 


cd 


cd 


12 WimbushFS 


dnt 


dnt 


X 


cd 


cd 


cd 


cd 


X 


cd 


cd 


cd 


cd 


14 Brant FS 


dnt 


dnt 


cd 


cd 


dnt 


cd 


cd 


dnt 


cd 


cd 


dm 


dnt 


14 HollenbachOB 


cd 


cd 


X 


cd 


cd 


cd 


cd 


cd 


cd 


cd 


cd 


cd 


Statham ]E 


cd 


cd 


X 


cd 


X 


cd 


X 


X 


X 


cd 


cd 


cd 


20 HumberTB 


cd 


X 


X 


cd 


cd 


cd 


cd 


cd 


X 


cd 


cd 


cd 


21 Choice CB 


dm 


dnt 


X 


cd 


cd 


cd 


X 


cd 


cd 


cd 


dnt 


dnt 


36 Podlesh P 


S 


S 


S 


S 


S 


S 


S 


S 


S 


S 


S 


S 


44 J. Smith _ ; 


dnt 


dnt 


X 


cd 


cd 


cd 


cd 


dnt 


cd 


cd 


dnt 


dnt 


50 Stellacci LB 


dnt 


cd 


cd 


cd 


dnt 


cd 


cd 


dnt 


cd 


cd 


dnt 


dnt 


53 Holmes LB 


cd 


X 


X 


X 


X 


cd 


X 


cd 


cd 


cd 


cd 


cd 


59 Holloway LB 


cd 


X 


X 


cd 


cd 


cd 


cd 


cd 


cd 


cd 


cd 


cd 


81 P. Abiamiri WR 


dnt 


dm 


X 


cd 


dnt 


cd 


cd 


dnt 


cd 


cd 


dm 


dnt 


86 SchellTE 


cd 


cd 


X 


cd 


cd 


cd 


cd 


cd 


cd 


cd 


dnt 


dnt 


88 QuaintanceDT 


dnt 


dnt 


X 


cd 


dnt 


cd 


cd 


dnt 


cd 


cd 


inj 


inj 


92 Sanders TE 


dnt 


dnt 


X 


X 


dnt 


cd 


cd 


dnt 


cd 


cd 


cd 


cd 


Class Participation 


1-1 


4-1 


13-1 


3-1 


3-1 


1-1 


5-1 


3-1 


3-1 


1-t 


1-1 


1-1 




TRUE FRESH. (21 ) 


Nl 


FS 


a 


WV 


EM 


CU 


DU 


GT 


NC 


VA 


ST 


WF 


Mitch QE 


dnt 


dnt 


cd 


cd 


dnt 


cd 


cd 


dnt 


cd 


cd 


dnt 


cd 


25 J. Wilson CB 


dnt 


dnt 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


27 Cesa LB 


cd 


cd 


cd 


cd 


cd 


cd 


cd 


cd 


cd 


cd 


cd 


cd 


31 Ball TB 


dnt 


dnt 


cd 


cd 


dnt 


cd 


cd 


cd 


cd 


cd 


dnt 


dnt 


35 Jefferson LB 


cd 


dnt 


cd 


cd 


dnt 


cd 


cd 


cd 


cd 


cd 


cd 


cd 


39 Richmond FS 


dnt 


dnt 


cd 


cd 


dnt 


cd 


cd 


dnt 


cd 


cd 


dnt 


dnt 


50 Lemons LB 


dnt 


dnt 


cd 


cd 


dnt 


cd 


cd 


dm 


cd 


cd 


dnt 


dnt 


55 McDermond OL 


cd 


cd 


cd 


cd 


cd 


cd 


cd 


cd 


cd 


cd 


cd 


cd 


58 Nixon OT 


cd 


dnt 


cd 


cd 


dnt 


cd 


cd 


dnt 


cd 


cd 


dnt 


dnt 


63 Crummey C/G 


cd 


dnt 


cd 


cd 


cd 


cd 


cd 


cd 


cd 


cd 


cd 


cd 


66 Clig OG 


dnt 


cd 


cd 


cd 


dnt 


cd 


cd 


dnt 


cd 


cd 


dnt 


dnt 


Woods 


dnt 


dnt 


cd 


cd 


cd 


cd 


cd 


dnt 


cd 


cd 


dnt 


dm 


71 ChoateOT 


dnt 


dnt 


cd 


cd 


cd 


cd 


cd 


cd 


cd 


cd 


dnt 


cd 


76 Matto OG 


dm 


dnt 


cd 


cd 


dnt 


cd 


cd 


dnt 


cd 


cd 


dni 


dnt 


Haynos 


dnt 


dnt 


cd 


cd 


dnt 


cd 


cd 


dnt 


cd 


cd 


dnt 


dnt 


87 Davis TE 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


S 


89 Weatherly WR 


cd 


cd 


cd 


X 


inj 


cd 


X 


cd 


X 


X 


cd 


cd 


90 P.Powell DE 


dnt 


dnt 


cd 


cd 


dnt 


cd 


cd 


dnt 


cd 


cd 


dm 


dnt 


Armstrong DT 


cd 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


Bolston DE 


cd 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


cd 


X 


cd 


X 


X 


98 Savage LB 


dnt 


cd 


cd 


cd 


dnt 


cd 


cd 


in: 


cd 


cd 


dnt 


dnt 


Class Participation 


1-0 


30 


40 


so 


4-0 


4-0 


50 


3-0 


50 


4-0 


4-0 


4-t 




ACTIVE PLAYERS 


48 


57 


70 


59 


58 


SO 


60 


51 


59 


51 


50 


49 



x - indicates played in game 

S - indicates started game 

cd- indicates did not play/coach s decision 

inj - indicates did not play or travel due to injury 

dnt - indicates did not travel lor reason other than injury 

rs ■ indicates will sit out season as a redshirt 



2002 ORANOE BOWL 



2002 PEACH BOWL 



2004 BATOR BOWL 





SEASON SUPERLATIVES 



TOYOTA 

zaassrars ano utii/itiiii GATOR 

BCWL 



2004 MARYLAND GATOR BOWL GUIDE 



individual Maryland Game Highs 



lushes 

'arts Rushing 
"D Rushes 



38 

257 

3 



Josh Allen vs Virginia I Nov 13, 20031 



Josh Allen vs Virginia |No v 1 3, 20031 



ong Rush 



Bru ce Pe r ry at Wake Forest INov 29, 200 31 
Josh Allen vs Virginia INov 1 3, 20031 
Bruce Perry at Wake Forest INov 29, 20031 



'ass attempts 



1/ 



'ass comp letions 

using 

D Passes 

.ong Pass 

dece ptions 



349 



Scott McBnen at NC State |Nov 22, 2003) 
Scott McB rien vs Duke (Oct II, 2003] 
Scon McBnenvs North Carolina (Nov 01 2003J 
Scon McBrien vs North Carolina (Nov 1 , 2003) 



69 Scon McBrien vs Clemson (Oct 04, 2003) 
JoJo Walker at NC State (Nov 22, 2003) 



'ards Rec eiving 
D Receptions 
ong Re ception 



6 
114 
2_ 

69 



Rich Parson at NC State (Nov 22, 200 i) 

Latrez Harrison vs North Carolina (Nov 1 , 2 0031 

Derncl Fennei vs i lemson [Oct 04, 2003) 



■leld Goals 



NicF "Joval vs The Citadel (Sep I ! 2003) 



Nicl Novai vs Duke (Oct 11 20031 



'.ong Field Goal 



54 Nick Novak vs Duke IQct 1 1.20031 



'unts 



8 Adam Podlesh at Northern Illinois (Aug 28, 2003) 



"'unting Aya 


60.0 


Adam Podlesh vs The Citadel (Sep 13, 20031 


,.ong Punt 


63 


Adam Podlesh at Northern Illinois |Auq 28, 20031 


-.ong Punt Return 


75 


Steve Suter vs The Citadel fSep 13, 2003] 


.onq Kickoff Return 


67 


Steve Sutervs North Carolina INovOl, 20031 


j'ackles 


16 


D'Qwell Jackson at Eastern Michiqan (Sep 27, 2003] 


tacks 


2.0 


Kevin Eli vs West Virginia (Sep 20, 2003] 






Shawne Mernman vs Clemson (Oct 04, 2003) 


ackles For Loss 


3.0 


Kevin Eli vs West Virginia (Sep 20, 200]j 






Rand) Starks vs Duke (Oct 11 2003) 



nterceptions 



Randy Starks v s Virginia INov 13, 20031 



Domon ique Foxworth at Northern I llinois (Aug 28, 2003] 



D'Qwell Jackson at Florida State (Sep 06, 2003) 



Madieu Williams vs The Citadel (Sep 13 2003) 



Domonique Foxworth at Eastern Michigan (Sep 27, 20031. 



Madieu Williams vs Clemson (Oct 04, 2003) 



Leon Joe vs Clemson (Oct 04, 20031 



Andrew S mith vs Duke (Oct II, 2003] 



Curome Cox at Georgia Tech (Oct 23, 20031 



Domonique Foxworth vs North Carolina (Nov 01, 2003] 



Curome Cox at NC State (Nov 22, 20031 



Madieu Williams at Wake Forest (Nov 29, 2003) 



D'Qwell Jackson at Wake Forest (Nov 29, 20031 



Maryland Team Highs 

pushes 53 



Cards R ushing 



vs The Citadel (Sep 13. 2003] 



339 at Wake Forest (Nov 29 2003; 



'ards Per Rush 



7.5 at Wake Forest (Nov 29, 20031 



-T) Rushes 



vs The Citadel (Sep 13, 20031 



fass attempts 



37 at NC State [Nov 22, 20031 



- 'ass completions 



18 vs Duke (Oct II. 20031 



'ards P assing 



360 vs North Carolina (Nov 1 , 2003] 



/ards Per Pass 



13.3 vs North Carolina INov 01, 2003] 



V Passes 



vs North Carolina INov 01, 2003] 



ctel p '?\i 



80 vsTheCitadel (Sep 13, 20031 



otal Offense 



612 vs North Carolina INov 1 , 2003] 



'ards Per Play 



8.0 at Wake Forest (Nov 29. 20031 



'omts 



jacks By 



61 vsTheCitadel (Sep 13, 2003) 



vs Clemson (Oct 04, 200 3] 



-irst Downs 


28 


vs The Citadel (Sep 13, 20031 


vs WestWainia ISeo 20, 20031 


'enalties 


10 


vs West Virginia (Sep 20, 2003] 



'enalty Yards 


90 


at Northern Illinois (Auq 28, 2003) 


urnovers 


4 


at Georqia Tech (Oct 23, 20031 


nterceptions Bv 


2 


vs Qemson (Oct 04, 20031 


at Wake Forest INov 29, 20031 









Individual Opponent Game Highs 

Turner, M ic hael, at Northern Illinois (Aug 28, 2003) 
Barclay, C, at Wake Forest (Nov 29, 2003) 



Rushes 

Yards R ushing 
rD Rushes 
Long Rush 
Pass attempts 
Pass i ompletions 
Yards Passing 
TD Passes 



30 

24 ) 

3 

74 

3/ 

22 

320 



Barcla y, C, at Wake Forest (Nov 29, 2003) 



Barclay, C, at Wake Fore st (N o v 29, 2003] 



Schneider, Mike, vs Duke (Oct 1 1, 2003) 
Whitehurst, C, vs Clemson (Oct 04, 2003) 
Whitehurst C , vs Clemson (Oct 04, 2003) 



Haldi, Josh, at Northern Illinois |Aug 28, 2003) 
Rix, C, at Florid a State (Sep 06, 2003) 



Long Pass 



70 Whitehurst, C, vs Clemson (Oct 04 , 2003) 



Receptions 



13 Fleck, PJ, at Northern Ill inois [Aug 2 8, 20031 



Yards Receiving 



1 75 Hamilton, Pert, vs Clemson (Oct 04, 20031 



TD Recep tions 



1 Sheldon. Dan, at No rthern Illino is (Aug 28, 20031 



Fleck, PJ„ at Nor thern Illinois [Aug 2 8, 20031 



Thorpe, C, at Florida State (Sep 06, 2003) 



Sam I't at Florida State (Sep 06 2003, 



/ ireki Kevin it Eastern Michigan [Sep 27 2003) 



Hamilton, Derr, vs Clemson [Oct 04, 2003) 



lohnson. Lance v: Duke [Oct I I 2003J 



Smith, J ,it'j"u':ji.. ['■"■.'".! ■ ."■ : ! 



Scott, '" , vs North Carolina No\ 31 2003) 



Pearman, A , vs Virginia [Nov 1 3, 2003) 



Long Reception 



70 Hamilton, Derr, vs Clemson [Oct 04, 2003) 



Field Goals 



tar. Steve, at Northern Illinois (Aug 28, 2003) 
Wellocl Andrew, at Eastern Michigan [Sep 27, 20) i 



Long 1 leld Goal 



52 Azar, Steve, at Northern Illinois (Aug 28, 2003) 



Punts 



1 1 Travis Zobel, vs The Citadel [Sep 1 3. 20031 



Punting Avg 



54,0 Hall. C . at Florid a Stat e [Sep 06. 20031 



ong Punt 



58 Herbert. A , at NC State (Nov 22, 20031 



Lo ng Punt Return 



83 Hall. T. at NC State (Nov 22, 20031 



Long Kickoff Retutn 



96 Mason, M„ vs North Carolina |No v 1 , 20031 



Tackles 



1 6 Lusky, David, at Eastern Michigan (Sep 27, 2003] 



Sacks 



2.0 Fred Townsend, vs The Citadel (Sep 1 3, 2003) 



Melee, Kevin, vs West Vir ginia |Sep 20, 2003] 



Henderson, E„ at Georgia Tec h [Oct 23, 2003) 



Tackles For Loss 



3.0 Henderson, E„ at Georgia Tech (Oct 23, 2003) 



Interceptions 



Opponent Team Highs 

Rushes 48 



Butler, J., at Georqia Tech (Oct 23, 20031 



it .>. ik. Forest (Nov 29 20( 



Yards Rushing 



316 at Wake Forest (Nov 29, 2003] 



Yards Per Rush 



6.6 at Wake Forest (Nov 29, 2003) 



TD Rushes 



4 at Wake Forest (Nov 29, 2003) 



Pass attempts 



47 vs Duke (Oct II, 20031 



Pass completions 



22 vs Clemson (Qg 04, 2003] 



Yards Passing 



320 vs Clemson (Oct 04, 20031 



Yards Per Pass 



9.2 at NC State INov 22, 20031 



TD Passes 



at Northern Illinois |Auq 28, 2003) 



at Florida State [Sep 06 2 ■ >3 



Total Plays 



92 vsDukeJPct r 2003 



Total Offense 



427 at Florida State (Sep 06, 2003) 



Yards Per Play 



6.8 vs North Carolina INov 01, 20031 



Points 



3S at FlondaState Sep 06 2003 



Sacks By 



at Florida State (Sep 06, 20031 



vs The Citadel (Sep 13, 2003) 



at Georqia Tech |Oct 23, 20031 



at NC State INov 22, 2003] 



First Downs 



25 vs Duke (Oa 1 1.2003] 



Penalties 



13 vs Duke IQct 1 1,20031 



Penalty Yards 



vsDukelQg 11. 20031 



Turnovers 



vs North Carolina INov 01, 20031 



at NC State INov 22, 2003] 



Interceptions By 



at Georqia Tech (Qg 23. 2003] 



2002 ORANGE BOWL 



2002 PEACH BOWL 



2004 GATOR BOWL 



JhfrWaWilL 



GATOR 
IBCWL 



ZOOS ST3TS 3RD HBVIBUI 



2004 MARYLAND GATOR BOWL GUIDE 





Huskie Stadium 
DeKalb, III. 
Aug. 28, 2003 
Northern Illinois 20 
#15 Maryland 13 (ot) 



Doak Campbell Stadium 
Tallahassee, Fla. 
Sept. 0, 2003 

#10 Florida State 35 

Maryland 10 



24 



DEKALB, III — After Dan Sheldon caught a 20-yard touchdown pass from Josh Haldi 
in overtime, Randee Drew turned the score into a victory when he intercepted a pass in 
the extra period to lift Northern Illinois to a victory over 1 5th-ranked Maryland in the 
season opener for both teams played before a sellout crowd. 

The homestanding Huskies forced the overtime with a 25-yard field goal by Steve 
Azar with just 1:12 left. After NIL) held the Terps on the next possession, the Huskies 
drove 43 yards in 27 seconds to set up Azar with a 43-yard field goal with five seconds 
left that could have won the game. But Maryland's Curtis Williams blocked the attempt, 
sending the game into overtime. 

The Terrapins scored on their first possession of the game when Josh Allen dived over 
from the 1-yard line midway through the first quarter. The score capped an eight-play, 
58-yard drive and gave Allen a score in his first start as a Terrapin. 

The Huskies took a 1 0-7 lead into halftime, getting a 52-yard field goal by Azar and a 
5-yard scoring pass from Haldi to PJ. Fleck. Haldi finished with 266 yards passing, including 
1 1 6 on 1 3 catches by Fleck. 

Northern Illinois' star running back Michael Turner finished the game with 30 carries 
for 90 yards. 

A 46-yard field goal by 
Maryland's Nick Novak tied 
the game early in the third 
quarter, and the Terrapins 
went ahead 13-10 midway 
through the fourth quarter 
when Novak boomed a 
50-yard field goal. 

Scott McBnen hit 1 2 of 
24 passes for 1 10 yards for 
theTerrapins, who were 
led on the ground by 
Allen's 67 yards on 20 
carries. Redshirt freshman 
punter Adam Podlesh kept 
the Terps out of trouble 
through much of the 
game, averaging 45.4 
yards in his collegiate 
debut and pinning NIL) 
inside its own 20-yard line 
on four of his eight punts. 

D'Qwell Jackson took 
advantage of his first 
career start, finishing with 
a team-high 15 tackles, 
with Leon Joe add 
for a Maryland de 
that allowed the Husku 
just 59 yards rushing. 



r Box Score 




> 


1st 


2nd 3rd 4th OT 


Final 


MARYLAND (0-1 1 7 


3 3 


13 


Northern III. 1 1-0) 


10 3 7 


20 


First Quarter 






MD - Josh Allen 1 run (Nick Novak kick). 8:43 




Second Quarter 






NIU-FG Steve Azar 52. 14:51 






NIU - PJ. Fleck 5 pass from Josh Haldi (Azar kick), 7 : 1 5 
Third Quarter 




MD-FG Nick Novak 46, 9:42 






Fourth Quarter 






MD-FG Nick Novak 50, 9:10 






NIU-FG Steve Azar 25. 1:12 






Overtime 






NIU - Dan Sheldon 20 pass from Josh Haldi (Azar kick) 




First Downs 


MD NIU 

12 21 




Rushes-Yards 


35-112 43-59 




ComfMtt-Int 
Passing Yards 
Return Yards 


12-24-1 21-35-1 
110 266 
150 61 




Punts 


845 4 741.0 




Fumbles-lost 


2-1 0-0 




Penalties-Yards 


9-90 5-56 




Sacks By-Yards Lost 
lime of Possession 


547 2-5 
26:46 33 14 





INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS 

RUSHING-Maryland: Josh Allen 20-67, Sam Maldonado 4-19, Scott 
McBnen 9-17. Rich Parson 1-10, Team l-|-l|, NIU: Michael Turner 30-90. 
Team I -|- 1 1, Josh Haldi 1 2-(-30|. 

PASSING-Maryland: Scott McBnen 12-24-1-1 10; NIU: Josh Haldi 21-35- 
1-266, 

RECEMNG-Marytand: Latrez Harrison 448. Rich Parson 3- 1 2, Jafar Wil- 
liams 2-18. DanMelendez 1-15. Scon McBnen 1-9. Josh Allen 1-8; NIU. PJ 
Fleck 13-1 16. Keith Perry 3-54, Dan Sheldon 3-34, Michael Jurner 141, 
Brad Oes. •• 

FIELD GQALS-NIU: Steve Azar 43 IWocked by Curtis Williams) 
'.'■ ,tind DOwellJackson8-7IS. Leon Joe 7-7- 1 4. LeroyAm 
. Williams 6-0-6, Andiew Smith 5-0-5. Shawne Mernman 
rJhdml-4-5 NIU Nick Duffy 44-8, Vinson 

LH ri'nbottom 4-2-6 
1 8 WEATHER- 88 degrees, hazy 



'Box Score 














1st 


2nd 


3rd 


4th 


Final 


MARYLAND (0-2. 0-1 1 


10 











10 


No. 1 Florida State (2-0. 


2-0|7 


14 


7 


7 


35 



TALLAHASSEE, Fla. — Maryland took a 10-0 lead in the opening five minutes, but 10th 
ranked Florida State reeled off 35 unanswered points to earn a victory over the Terrapins ir 
Maryland's Atlantic Coast Conference opener played before 82,885 at Doak Campbell Stadiumi 

Seminole quarterback Chris Rix passed for a pair of touchdowns, while senior tailback Geg 
Jones added two other scores on the ground. Jones finished the game with 88 yards on 14 
carries for FSU. 

D'Qwell Jackson started the scoring for the Terps by making the most of his first careei 
interception. He picked off a pass from Rix and went 58 yards for a touchdown, running 
through Rix and Lorenzo Booker on the way to the end zone just 1 :54 into the game. 

On the next drive, the Terps turned a long punt return from Steve Suter into a 44-yard fielq 
goal from Nick Novak that gave Maryland a 1 0-0 lead in the opening 4:54. 

Florida State came back to score on its next possession. 

Rix, who completed 1 6 of 29 passes for 228 yards, had his first TD pass on 1 8-yarder t 
Craphonso Thorpe midway through the first quarter. Jones first touchdown run, a 44-yard 
scamper, came early in the second quarter and gave the Semmoles their first lead of the gamt 
at 1 4- 1 0. Jones dived in from 
the 1 -yard line with 5:38 left 
in the second quarter to give 
Florida State a 21-10 
halftime lead. 

Both defenses stiffened 
early in the third quarter, as 
Maryland kept the Semmoles 
within reach. On their 
second possession after 
halftime, Maryland drove 
into FSU territory, but had to 
punt. From there, Florida 
State went on an 80-yard, 

1 1 -play drive that was 
capped by a 34-yard scoring 
pass from Rix to PK. Sam, 
putting the Semmoles ahead 
28-10. 

FSU finished the scoring 
on a 2-yard plunge by Willie 
Reid that was set up by a 
Terrapin turnover. 

Orlando Evans came off 
the bench to complete 7 of 

1 2 passes for 57yards for the 
Terps, who got four catches 
from Jo Jo Walker. Bruce 
Perry returned from an 
injury suffered during fall 
camp, gaining 32 yards 
rushing and five more on a 
reception in his first start of 
the season. 



First Quarter 

MD - D'Qwell Jackson 58 interception return (Nick Novak kick), 1 3:06 

MD-FG Nick Novak 44, 10:06 

FS - Craphonso Thorpe 1 8 pass fr Chns Rix (Xavier Beitia kick), 7:28 
Second Quarter 

FS - Greg Jones 44 run (Beitia kick), 1 1 :29 

FS - Greg Jones 1 run (Beitia kick). 5:38 
Th/rd Quarter 

FS - RK. Sam 34 pass fr Rix (Beitia kick), 07 
Fourth Quarter 

FS - Willie Reid 2 run (Beitia kick). 9:06 





MD 


FS 


First Downs 


13 


23 


Rushes-Yards 


31-73 


46-196 


Comr>Att-lnt 


14-31-1 


17-30-1 


Passing Yards 


124 


231 


Return Yards 


196 


88 


Punts 


743 7 


742 7 


Fumbles-Lost 


3-2 


2-0 


Penalties-Yards 


655 


10-81 


Sacks By-Yards Lost 


2-17 


3-20 


Time of Possession 


26:07 


33:53 


INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS 







RUSHING-Maryland Sammy Maldonado 94 1 . Bruce Perry 1 0-32. Scott 
McBnen 4-22, Jo Jo Walker 1 - 1 , Josh Allen 2- 1 , Rich Parson 1 -0, learn I [■ 1 1 
Orlando Evans 3-(-23|. Florida State Gieg Jones 1 4-88. Lorenzo Booker 7- 
42, Willie Reid 8-30. Chns Rix 8-15, James Coleman 2-11 PK Sam 1-8. BJ 
Dean 3-5. Ryan Reynolds 2-3. team l-|-6) 

PASSING ■ Maryland Scott McBnen 618-1-61. Ortando Evans 7 12-0 
57. Latrez Hamson I ■ I -06; Flonda State Chns Rix 1 6-29-1 -228, Fabian Walker 
1-1-0-3 

RECEIVING ■ Maryland Jo Jo Walker 441. Demck Fenner 2-12. Rich 
Parson I -23, Latrez Hamson I 1-8. Maurice 

Smith 1-7, Bruce Perry 1-5, RobAbiamin 14, Vernon Davis 1-1. fi. 
Craphonso Thorpe 5-56 PK Sam 3- 1 1 3, Chns Daws 3-25. Chauncey Stovall 
2-16, Willie Reid 2-9. Matt Henshaw 1-9. Donnie Carter 1-3 

MISSED FIELD GOALS - Flonda State Xavier Beitia 28 (blocked by D'Qwell 
Jacksonl 

TACKLES Maryland Leon Joe 7-5-12, DQwell Jackson 5-6 1 1. 
Domomque Foxwonh 9-0-9, Jamahl Cochran 7-2-9, Cuome Cox 61 -7. Randy 
Starks 4-3-7. Flonda State Michael Boulwas 4 2-6. AJ Nichols 
Claudius Osei 0-5-5, Kylei Hall 314. Kendyll Pope 2-24, Enc Moot 2-24 

ATT ■ 82.885 WEATHER ■ 82 degrees, bnef shower cloudy 



2002 ORANBE BOWL 



2002 PEACH BOWL 



20B4 BATOR BOWL 




zoos mis ana Review GOTO 

i BCWL 



MARYLAND GATOR BOWL 




Box Scare 












The Citadel |1-2| 
MARYLAND |l-2| 


1st 

24 


2nd 

20 


3rd 


10 


4th 

7 


Final 



61 



COLLEGE PARK. Md — Maryland got its struggling offense going early and often, starting 
With Josh Aliens 72-yard touchdown run on the first play from scrimmage and Maryland went on 
t.o score its biggest win since 49 years in a victory over The Citadel before a sellout crowd for the 
jferrapins home opener at Byrd Stadium. 

, Allen finished with 136 yards on only 1 1 carries, including 1 19 yards on eight rushes in the 
irst quarter. It was Maryland's first 1 00-yard rushing effort of the season, and Allen had his century 
nark in the opening four minutes of the game. 

Sammy Maldonado followed with a 7-yard scoring run on the Terps' next possession, as 
Arlaryland scored on its first nine possessions, not including a 75-yard punt return for a score by 
Steve Suter. The first of two scoring runs by Maldonado came after a 12-play. 99-yard scoring 
•drive 

! Suter followed the score with his first punt return TD of the year, following the four he had a 
/ear ago. Nick Novak closed the first-quarter scoring with a 3 1 -yard field goal, his first of four on 
'•he day and running a string of successful kicks to 7-for-7 field goals and 6-for-6 in extra-point 
locks. 

{ Maldonado went over from three yards out to open the scoring in the second quarter for the 
Terps. Novak followed with 
field goals of 38 and 2 1 yards 
3efore McBrien dived over 
^om the 1-yard line on the 
final play of the first half and 
Maryland went to the locker 
■oom with a 44-0 halftime 
ead and holding a 2 1 -2 edge 
n first downs. 

Meanwhile, the Maryland 
jefense was well on its way 
to a shutout, holding the 
Bulldogs to just 4 1 yards in 
total offense in the first half 
Quarterback Willie Simmons 
was 2-for-ll passing for 18 
yards in the first two quarters, 
and The Citadel ended the 
game having completed only 
three passes. 

The Terps, who needed to 
punt only once in the game, 
got three scores in the second 
half, as Maryland rested its 
starters after halftime Novak 
had his final field goal of the 
contest before reserve 
quarterback Orlando Evans 
hit Demck Fenner with a 62- 
yard touchdown pass. 

Mario Memlls finished the 
scoring with a 4-yard run in 
the final quarter. 

Man/lands lopsided win 
was ib largest since a 74-13 
rout of Missouri in 1 954. The 
Terps scored more points in 
the first quarter than they had 
in the first two games of 
2003 



For ousts 

MO -Josh Allen 72 run (Nick Novak Jack). 14 44 

MD - Sammy Maldonado 7 njn |Novak kick|. 6:52 

MD - Sieve Suter 75 punt return INovak kjck|, 5 35 

MD-FG Nick Nova* 31. 0-42 
Second Quarter 

MD - Sammy Maldonado 3 run |Novak kick). 1 1 50 

MD-FG Nick Novak 38. 6:18 

MD-FG Nick Novak 21. 2:10 

MD - Scott McBnen I run |Dan Ennis kick|. 0:00 
Third Quarter 

MD-FG Nick Novak 42. 8:02 

MD - Demck Fenner 62 pass fr Orlando Evans |Ennis kick). 3:52 
Fourth Quarter 

MD - Mano Memlls 4 run |Enms k 



Fis Downs 

Rushes-Yards 
CompAtt-Int 
Passing Yards 
Return Yards 
Punts 

Fumbtes-Lost 
Penalties-Yards 
Sacks By-Yards Lost 
Time of Possession 

INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS 



or 

7 

31-90 

3-20-1 
47 
117 

1 1-36.9 
OO 
8-54 
3-18 

24:15 



MD 

28 

53-282 

17-27-0 
283 
202 

1-60.0 
1-0 
7-64 
2-16 

3545 



RUSHING-The Otadel Em Mills 1 0-58: Nehemiah Bcughton 12-31. Justin 
Hardin I -3. Porter Johnson 1 -0. Willie Simmons 4-0, Chns Gibbs 3+2|; Maiy- 
land: Josh Allen 1 1-136. Sammy Maldonado 12-66. Mano Memlls 13-12.J.P 
Number 6-24. Scon McBrien 5-15. Jafar Williams 1-3. Joel Statham 3+2|. 
Orlando Evans 2+2). 

PASSING - The Otadel: Wile Simmons 3-20-1-47: Maryland Scott McBrien 
12-200-178. Orlando Evans 4*0-70. Joel Statham 1-1-0-35. 

RECEIVING- The Grade): Bud Pough 1-29. Scooter Johnson HI. Ross 
Arrnsttng 1-7. Maryland: Latrez Harrison 4-51 . Rich Parson 2-46. Josh Allen 
2-3flfcff Dugan 2-22. Jo Jo Walker 2-0. Derric* Fenner 1 -62. Curbs Williams 
.Maldonado 1-16. JafarWiftwns 1-8. Steve Suter 1-6 

TACKLES - The Otadel: TJ Rose 7-3- 1 0. Shawn Grant 4-5-9. James liner 
2-64 Maryland: DOwel Jackson 6-1-7. William Kershaw 4-1-5. DerrarJ 
Wilson 3-M. Randy Starts 2-24 

ATT- 51.594 WEATHER - 77 degrees, cloudy. 



Byrd Stadium 
College Park, Md. 
Sept. 20, 2003 

Maryland 34 

West Virginia 7 



COLLEGE PARK. Md — Maryland dominated the first three quarters offensively and 
defensively, scoring 34 straight points before allowing a late West Virginia touchdown, in 
beating the Mountaineers before a sellout crowd at Byrd Stadium. 

The Terrapins outgained the Mountaineers, 498-1 56, and held a 28-1 1 edge in first downs 
in controlling both sides of the ball. Maryland had 260 yards on the ground, getting a balanced 
rushing attack with four different ballcarriers gaining at least 47 yards. 

Sammy Maldonado finished with 88 yards, Bruce Perry gained 79 yards and scored a pair 
of touchdowns. Josh Allen had 54 yards and a score, while quarterback Scott McBrien finished 
with 47 yards rushing. McBrien also had 220 yards through the air, including his first touchdown 
pass of the season with a 25-yard strike to Latrez Harrison early in the fourth quarter 

Maryland took the opening kickoff and went 14 plays before a drive stalled. Nick Novak 
missed a 52-yard field goal attempt, his first missed kick of the season. 

The Terps held West Virginia to a three-and-out to set up a 52-yard, five-play scoring drive 
that ended with a 4-yard TD run by Perry. 

WVU picked up one first down on its next possession, but was forced to punt. Maryland 
then made it 1 0-0 on a 4 1 -yard field goal by Novak. The Terps' next two possessions ended in 
a 2-yard scoring run by Allen and a 32-yard field goal by Novak with six seconds left in the first 
half. 

By halftime, Maryland 
held a 279-58 edge in total 
offense, and held the ball for 
19:46 over the first two 
quarters. 

Maryland scored on its 
second series of the third 
quarter, as Perry went in 
from 1 2 yards out to make it 
27-0 Just 1:1 5 into the final 
quarter, the score improved 
to 34-0 on McBnens pass to 
Harrison. 

West Virginia, which got 
71 yards rushing and 13 
yards receiving from Qumcy 
Wilson, averted the shutout 
when Kay-Jay Harrison 
scored on a 1 3-yard run with 
4:02 left in the game. The 
score capped a six-play. 50- 
yard drive. The 
Mountaineers had 78 of 
their 156 yards of total 
offense in the fourth quarter. 

Sophomore middle 
linebacker D'Owell Jackson 
led a strong defensive effort 
with 10 tackles, including a 
sack. Kevin Eli, making his 
first career start at defensive 
end, finished the game with 
a pair of sacks. 



Box Score 

West Virginia I 3. 
MARYLAND (2-2) 



1st 2nd 3rd 4th Final 
7 7 

7 13 7 7 34 



First Quarter 

MD - Bruce Perry 4 run |Nick Novak kick). 4:38 
Second Quarter 

MD-FG Nick Novak 41. 10:29 

MD -Josh Allen 2 run INovak kicM. 2 23 

MD-FG Nick Novak 32. 0:06 
Third Quarter 

MD • Bruce Perry 1 2 run INovak kidc|. 3:40 
Fourth Quarter 

MD - Latrez Harmon 25 pass fr Scott McBnen INovak kick). 13:45 

WV - Kay-Jay Hams 1 3 run |Brad Cooper kick). 4:02 





SfV 


MD 


First Downs 


II 


28 


Rushes-Yards 


39-120 


49-260 


CompAn-Int 


3-12-0 


15-26-1 


Passing Yards 


36 


238 


Return Yards 


147 


67 


Punts 


9-410 


1-58.0 


Fumbtes-Lost 


OO 


2-1 


Penalties-Yards 


9-80 


IOO0 


Sacks By-Yards Lost 


2-17 


4-24 


Time of Possession 


26:04 


33:56 


INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS 







RUSHING - West Virginia Ouincy Wilson 20-71. Kay-Jay Hams 4-34, 
Charles Hales 4-16, Erie* Phillips 3-10. Rasheed Marshall Smnus 1 1. Mary- 
land: Sammy Maldonado 13-88. Bruce Perry 14-79. Josh Alen 16-54. Scott 
McBnen 4-47. Steve Suter l-l. Orlando Evans l-rr»nus9 

PASSING - West Virginia Rasheed Marshal 2-7-025. Charles Hales 1-5- 
0-1 1; Maryland Scoo McBrien 14-25-1-220. Orlando Evans 1-1-0-18. 

RECEIVING - West Wrgma: Ouincy WJson 2-1 3. Msuefe Henderson I - 
23: Maryland: Latrez Harrison t88. Jeff Dugan 3-50. Jo Jo walker 2-33. 
JoshAfen 1-19. MaunceSmrth 1-18. Demck Fenner 1-15. Rich Parson 1-12. 
RrjbAbiarniri 1-8. Bruce Perry 1 -minus 5 

TACKLES - West Vigna Leandre Washington 7-4-1 1, Oar* Wiley 6-3-9. 
Anthony Mms 7-07. Adam Jones 5-2-7. Fed Bueford 2+6 Maryland: D. 
Jackson 10-2-12 M. WBams 5-JO. Joe 2-5-7. Starts 2-4-6. Mernman 4-1-5. 
^noush 3-M. FeMhem 3-1-4. 

An - 51 .973. WEATHER - 8 1 degrees. I«gh clouds 



2002 ORANGE BOWL 



2002 PEACH BOWL • 2004 GATOR BOWL 



! GATOR! zoos mn aoo mam 




Byrd Stadium 
College Park, Md. 
Oct. 4, 2003 

Maryland 21 

Clcmson 7 



26 



r Box Score 














1st 


2nd 


3rd 


4th 


Final 


MARYLAND (3-2) 


6 


10 


7 


14 


37 


Eastern Michigan |1-4) 


3 


7 


3 





13 



YPSILANTI, Mich — Maryland senior quarterback Scott McBnen had his best throwing day 
of the season thus far, throwing for 252 yards on 1 4-for- 1 9 passing with one touchdown 
through the air and another on the ground to lead the Terrapins to a dominating second half 
and a victory at Eastern Michigan at Rynearson Stadium 

McBnen was 8-for-9 for 1 48 yards in the second half alone, as Maryland scored the games 
final 21 points to break out from the 16-13 edge it held early in the third quarter. He found 
Danny Melendez on a 1 4-yard scoring pass midway through the final period, and scored on his 
own with a 9-yard run on the first play of the fourth quarter. 

The Terrapins also stiffened on defense after halftime, allowing the homestanding Eagles to 
just three points and three first downs in the second half 

Domonique Foxworth got Maryland on the board early On third down on the Eagles' first 
possssion of the game, Foxworth intercepted a sideline pattern and went 44 yards for a 
touchdown, Maryland's second interception for a TD this season (D'Qwell Jackson vs. Florida 
State). Two series later, EMU got a 42-yard field goal from Andrew Wellock to pull within 6-3. 

Josh Allen scored the first of his two touchdowns on the day late in the second quarter, 
capping a 1 3-play, 70-yard drive But after EMU recovered a fumble on a punt return, the hosts 
converted the turnover into an 8-yard scoring pass from Chmedu Okoro to Kevin Zureki with 
23 seconds left 

Latrez Harrison gave the 
Terps good field position with 
a 3 1 -yard kick return and 
McBnen found Steve Suter 
on a 45-yard pass to set up a 
Nick Novak field goal with 
two seconds left in the half, 
sending Maryland into the 
break with a 16-10 lead 

Eastern took the second- 
half kickoff 64 yards in nine 
plays to set up a 25-yard field 
goal by Wellock But 
Maryland responded, using 
1 1 plays to go 83 yards, a 
drive capped by an 8-yard 
touchdown run from Allen. 

The Terrapins scored on 
each of their next two 
possessions to put the game 
away, as McBnen ran and 
passed for touchdowns after 
the next two drives. 

Allen finished with 71 
yards and a pair of 
touchdowns on 18 carries. 
while Suter finished with four 
catches for the Terps. 

Anthony Sherrill became 
the first opposmr: 'unning 
back to hit thf 
against Mat, 
rushed 28 times 
yards. 



First Quarter 

MD - Domonique Foxworth 44 interception return (Novak kick), 

EM - FG Andrew Wellock 42, 2 09 
Second Quarter 

MD-Josh Allen I run (Novak kick), 4:56 

EM - Kevin Zureki 8 pass fr Chmedu Okoro (Wellock kick), 0:23 

MD-FG Nick Novak 27, 0:02 
Third Quarter 

EM - FG Andrew Wellock 25, 1 0:54 

MD -Josh Allen 8 run |Novak kick). 5 42 
Fourth Quarter 

MD - Scott McBnen 9 run |Novak kick|, 1 4:54 

MD - Danny Melendez 14 pass fr McBnen (Novak kick). 9: 16 



First Downs 
Rushes-Yards 
Comp-Att-Int 
Passing Yards 
Return Yards 
Punts 

fumbles-Lost 
Penalties-Yards 
Sacks By-Yards Lost 
Time of Possession 

INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS 



MD 

22 

41-199 
16-21-0 

268 

105 
4-46 5 

2-2 

4-20 

1-6 
26:48 



EM 

13 

39-149 

14-20-1 
126 
132 

8-44 I 
0-0 
3-27 
0-0 

33:12 



RUSHING Maryland Josh Allen 18-71. Bruce Perry 1 1-38. Scott McBnen 
4-37. Mario Merrills 6-27, Rich Parson 1-15. Steve Suter l-l I, Eastern Michi- 
gan Anthony Sherrell 28-1 1 7, Nelson Drew 8-30. Chmedu Okoro 3-2 
PASSING - Maryland Scott McBnen 14-19-0-252. Orlando Evans 2-2-0- 

m Michigan Chmedu Okoro 14-20-1126 
RECEIVING - Maryland Steve Suter 4-84, Lauez Hamson 3-32, Josh Allen 
3-31. Vernon Davis 2-19, Derrick Fenner 1 -58. Rich Parson 1-25. Danny 
Melendez 1-14, Bernie Fiddler 1-5: Eastern Michigan. C R Roberson 3-23. 
OS 311. LKevm Zureki 2-16. T, Riley 1-30. AJ. Bennett lk-29. E 
Jrlson Drew 1-3. ChnsTalley 1-3. 
" (land DOwell Jackson 9-7-16. Leon Joe 5-5-10. Madieu 
' 1. Shawne Memman 7-0-7. Leroy Ambush 4-2-6. William Kershaw 
:i 16, Kevin Hamson 
i Michael Woods 4-3-7 R Woodruff 1-5-6 
\, ATT udy with showers 



Box Score 

Clemson (3-2, 1-1) 
MARYLAND (4-2, 1-1 1 



1st 

7 



2nd 
7 
7 



3rd 4th Final 
7 

7 21 



COLLEGE PARK, Md — Scott McBnen threw three touchdown passes and the Maryland 
defense held Clemson scoreless in the second half as the Terrapins won their first Atlantic Coast 
Conference game of the year with a victory over the Tigers before the third straight sellout 
crowd at Byrd Stadium 

McBnen threw touchdown passes to Steve Suter, Rich Parson and Derrick Fenner as the 
Terrapins won their fourth straight game and snapped a three-game Tiger win streak. 

Clemson took the opening kickoff and drove 49 yards to the Maryland 3 1 , before missing a I 
48-yard field goal into a stiff wind. The Terps took advantage on their first possession of tha 
game, using 1 2 plays to go 68 yards to set up a 25-yard scoring pass from McBnen to Suter 
with 5:41 left in the first quarter 

Maryland's next possession was set up on a short Tiger punt, and the Terps used the short 
field to their advantage McBnen ended a 44-yard drive with a 10-yard scoring pass to Parson 
on a fade pattern, giving the hosts a 1 4-0 lead just three plays into the second period 

Clemson got on the scoreboard late in the first half when Charlie Whitehurst hit Derrick 
Hamilton on a 70-yard scoring pass with 233 left before halftime 

The Whitehurst-to-Hamilton hookup would work often through the game, with Hamilton 
finishing with 175 yards on seven catches. Whitehurst completed 22 of 45 passes for 320 
yards, but was picked off twice and sacked six times by a Maryland defense that allowed jus; 
1 net yards rushing to the Tigers. 

Both defenses stiffened early in the second half before Maryland picked up its biggest play 
of the season to date. 
McBnen hit Derrick Fenner 
along the right sideline on a 
69-yard bomb that made it 
21-7 with 2:43 remaining 

Clemson drove to the 
Maryland 25-yard line on its 
next possession, but failed to 
convert a fourth-and-1. 
Clemson's next two 
possessions ended with 
interceptions, as Madieu 
Williams and Leon Joe picked 
off Whitehurst passes. Joe's 
pick came as the Tigers had 
advanced to the Terrapins' 
24-yard line 

Josh Allen led the 
Maryland running game 
with 65 yards on 16 carries, 
while Latrez Harrison had 
four catches for 39 yards 
McBnen finished with 204 
yards passing on a 1 4-for-27 
day 

The game marked the first 
time in Byrd Stadium history 
that Maryland had drawn 
more than 50.000 in three 
consecutive home games. 



First Quarter 

MD - Steve Suter 25 pass fr Scott McBnen (Nick Novak kick), 5:41 
Second Quarter 

MD - Rich Parson 10 pass fr McBnen |Novak kick). 13:32 

CU - Dernck Hamilton 70 pass fr C Whitehurst (Aaron Hunt kick|. 2:33 
Third Quarter 

MD • Derrick Fenner 69 pass fr McBnen (Novak kick), 2:43 



First Downs 


MD 

19 


01 

17 


Rushes-Yards 


44-134 


29-10 


Comr>Att-lnl 
Passing Yards 
Return Yards 


14-27-0 
204 
47 


22-45-2 

320 
75 


Punts 


7-41 


6-36.2 


Fumbles-lost 


21 


0-0 


Penalties-Yards 


6-53 


7-40 


Sacks By-Yards Lost 
Time o( Possession 


5-30 
3123 


HI 
28:37 


INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS 







RUSHING ■ Maryland Josh Allen 1 6-65. Bruce Perry 1 7-33. Steve Suler 
1-24. Scott McBnen 8-8. Maurice Smith 1-6. Team I -(minus 2). Clemson: 
Duane Coleman 1 1 -36, Kyle Browning 3-8. Chad Jasmin 2-5. Derrick Hamilton 
1-0, Charlie Whiiehurst I2|mmus 39) 

PASSING ■ Maryland Scott McBnen 14-27-0-204, Clemson Charlie 
Whitehurst 22-45-2-320 

RECEIVING - Maryland latrez Hamson 4-39. Steve Suter 3-42, Dernck 
Fenner I -69. Dan Melendez I ■ 1 3. Jeff Dugan I ■ 1 1 . Rich Parson I ■ 1 0, Bernie 
Fiddler 1-7, Jafar Williams 1-7, Bruce Perry 1-6, Clemson Dernck Hamilton 
7-175. Kevin >bungblood 644. Tony Elliott 4-57. Chad Jasmin 2- 1 0. Airese 
Curne 2-7. Kyle Browning 1-7 

TACKLES ■ Maryland. DOwell Jackson 9-1-10, Leon Joe 5-3-S. Dennard 
Wilson 7-0-7, Shawne Memman 4-2-6, Madieu Williams 3-3-6, Clemson LeRoy 
Hill 9 1-10, Justin Miller 5 2 7, Travis Pugh 5-1-6, John Leake 3-3-6, Jamaal 
Fudge 3-2-5 

ATT-51.545 WEATHER -67 degrees. cloudy 



2 2 



ANGE BOWL 



2002 PEACH BOWL 



2004 OATOR BOWL 




TOYOTA 1 

zoos srars aoo hmoui GATOR 

I BCWL 



2004 MARYLAND GATOR BOWL GUIDE 





Box Score 



Duke |2-4. 0-3) 
MARYLAND |S-2, 2-1 1 



1st 2nd 


3 10 



3rd 

14 



4rn Final 
20 20 
6 33 



Byrd Stadium 
College Park, Md. 
Oct. 11, 2003 
Maryland 33 
Duke 20 



' COLLEGE PARK, Md — Maryland rolled to a 27-0 lead through three quarters before Duke 
S.aged a comeback bid as the Terrapins won their fifth straight game of the season in a victory 
■iver the Blue Devils before the fourth consecutive crowd of more than 50.000 fans at Byrd 

.tadium. 

1 Through three quarters, the Terrapins took advantage of good field position set up by a 

efense that held the Blue Devils to 201 yards prior to the fourth quarter Duke scored three 
imes in the final period, though, including a pair of rushing touchdowns by Alex Wade, gaining 
fl 1 2 yards in the final 1 5 minutes alone, 
i Maryland got four field goals from Nick Novak, including a 54-yarder in the first quarter that 

'ed a school record for the longest successful field goal Novak also hit from 34, early in the 
ijscond quarter, and helped the Terps hold off the Blue Devils fourth-quarter comeback bid 
Q/ith kicks of 3 1 and 48 yards. 

Scott McBnen threw for 238 yards and a touchdown, completing 1 8 of 32 passes. Two of 
jiose completions were for 49 yards and 1 5 yards to Latrez Harrison, accounting for the only 
wo plays on a scoring drive late in the second quarter that gave the Terps at 1 3-0 halftime 
tad. ' ^^^^_^^__^^^_^^_^^_^ 

I Maryland took the 
Opening drive of the second 

alf to the Duke end zone, 

oing 80 yards in eight plays 
set up an 18-yard 

Duchdown run by Bruce 

erry less than three minutes 

no the third quarter 
The Terps went ahead 27- 
late in the quarter when 

ammy Maldonado went 

ver from five yards out, 

llowing Maryland to cash in 

n a Blue Devil fumble on the 

0-yard line. 
Novak's two field goals 

/ere sandwiched between 

Hikes touchdowns by Wade. 
Lance Johnson caught a 

yard scoring pass from Mike 

chneider to finish the Duke 

onng with 1 :37 left in the 

ame 
D'Qwell Jackson had 

2tackles, Leon Joe finished 

i/fth nine, while Randy Starks 

lad nine tackles, including 

iree for loss, 1. 5 quarterback 

acks. three quarterback 

lumes. a pass breakup and a 

Dreed fumble. 
The Maryland defense 

ras on the field a great deal 

l the game, as Duke ran 92 

•lays and held the ball for 

nore than 36 minutes over 

le contest. 



First Quarter 

MD-FG Nick Novak 54, II 45 
Second Quarter 

MD-FG Nick Novak 34. 6:51 

MD - Latrez Hamson 1 5 pass fr Scott McBnen |Nick Novak kick|, 4.25 
Third Quarter 

MD - Bruce Perry 1 8 run |Dan Ennis kick), 1 2 24 

MD - Sammy Maldonado 5 run |Nick Novak kjck|, 2:13 
Fourth Quaner 

DU - Alex Wade 23 tun (Matt Brooks kick), 1 4:00 

MD-FG Nick Novak 3 1, 9:38 

DU - Ale* Wade I run |Mike Schneider run failed|, 5:18 

MD ■ FG Nick Novak 48, 3 40 

DU - Lance Johnson 3 pass fr Mike Schneider [Mart Brooks kick|. 137 





MD 


CU 


First Downs 


19 


25 


Rushes-Yards 


31-131 


45-143 


Comp-Att-lnt 


18-32-1 


2047-1 


Passing Yards 


238 


270 


Return Yards 


38 


108 


Punts 


442,8 


7-357 


Fumbles-Lost 


2-1 


2-1 


Penalties-Yards 


6-60 


13-88 


Sacks By-Yards Lost 


4-36 


M 


Time of Possession 


23:50 


36 10 


INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS 







RUSHING - Maryland Josh Allen 9-36, Bruce Perry 8-36. Rich Parson I- 
29. Sammy Maldonado 5-15. Scott McBnen 4-14. Steve Suter 1-4. Diew 
Weatherty l-l. Team 2-|mmus 6|; Duke Chris Douglas 1 5-77. Alex Wade 14- 
65. Mike Schneider 1 2-33. Sentemo Landrum 2-7. learn 1 -|mmus 1 7|. Khary 
Sharpe Hmmus 22) 

PASSING ■ Maryland Scott McBnen 18-32-1-238. Duke Mike Schneider 
2047-1-270 

RECEIVING - Maryland Latrez Hamson 4-88. Steve Suter 448, Jeff Dugan 
3-18. Bruce Perry 2-34. Rich Parson 111. Jo Jo walker 1-23. Dan Melendez 
I -6. John Allen I -jminus 1 1 Duke Alet Wade 448. Lance Johnson 4-34, 
Khanjfcarpe 3.38. Andy Roland 243, Sentemo Landrum 24 1 . Calen Powell 
2-32, Oins Douglas 1-19. Ronnie Elliott 1-9. Reggie Love 1-6. 

TACKLES - Maryland DOwell Jackson 84-12. Leon Joe 7-2-9. Randy 
Starks 4-5-9. Kevin Eli 1-M. Letoy Ambush 4-1-5. Andrew Henley 3-2-5: 
Duke Ryan Fowler 54-9, Brendan Dewan 4-1-5. Kenneth Sranfoid 4-1-5. 
Matt Zielinski 14-5. DeAndre Whfte 4-04. Terrell Smith 2-24 

ATT- 50,084 WEATHER- 72 degrees, cloudy , 



3^-rjrrjl-i "■-!"■ fl 




7 . 



'/ 



k'V S 



^ \ 



Bobby Oodd Stadium 
Atlanta, Ga. 
Oct. 23, 2003 

Georgia Tech 7 

— -~ J Maryland 3 



ATLANTA, Ga — Georgia Tech used one of Maryland's four turnovers to set up an 
early touchdown in the fourth quarter and held on for a victory over the Terrapins in an 
ACC game played before 5 1 ,524 at Bobby Dodd Stadium 

The game, played on national television as part of ESPN's Thursday Night Football 
schedule, jumbled the league's standings and placed six teams in the middle of the pack 
with a pair of conference losses. 

Following a Terrapin fumble, Tech got the ball on the Maryland 1 8-yard line late in the 
third quarter The Yellow Jackets needed five plays to get into the end zone to erase a 3- 
deficit, scoring when Reggie Ball hit Jonathan Smith with a 4-yard scoring pass in the 
back of the end zone, 

Maryland had gone ahead late in the third quarter on a 35-yard field goal by Nick 
Novak. The play capped a 1 2-play, 62-yard drive engineered by redshirt freshman 
quarterback Joel Statham, who replaced starter Scott McBnen after the senior suffered a 
concussion in the second quarter. 

Seeing his first significant playing time as a Terrapin, Statham finished by hitting 1 of 
22 passes for 1 1 yards, but suffered three sacks and an interception by a Yellow Jacket 
defense that applied tremendous pressure. 

Georgia Tech iced the game with a long drive in the fourth quarter. The Yellow Jackets 
took 7:08 off the clock on a 1 2-play drive that began on their own 4-yard line after an 
outstanding punt by Maryland freshman Adam Podlesh. 

The Maryland defense was outstanding in the game, led by Leon Joe ( 1 4 tackles), 
D'Qwell Jackson 1 13) and Randy Starks (nine). The Terps limited Georgia Tech to just 228 
yards in total offense in the 
game and forcing nine 
punts. 

Bruce Perry, making his 
second start of the season 
for Maryland, had a strong 
performance with 75 yards 
rushing on 17 carries. 
Steve Suter led the Terps 
with four catches for 60 
yards and added 9 1 yards 
on punt and kick returns. 

McBnen had 47 yards 
on4-for-l 1 passing before 
leaving the game with 
2: 17 left in the first half. 



RUSHING -Maryland: BrucePerry 17-75.Sammy Maldonado 3-33. Jo Jo 
Walker 14. Scott McBnen 4-2, Josh Allen 5-0. Joel Statham 5-|minu5 I8|; 
Georgia Tech PJ Daniels 21-63, Reggie Ball 1646. Jonathan Smith 2-18. 
Chns Woods 2-3 

PASSING - Maryland: Joel Statham 10-22-1-1 10, Scott McBnen 4-1 l-l- 
47; Georgia Tech: Reggie Ball 12-28-1-98. 

RECEIVING - Maryland: Steve Suter 4-60. Derrick Fenner 2-18. Bruce 
Perry 2-(minus 4|. Josh Allen I -22. Laoez Harmon 1 -20. Jeff Dugan 1-1 7, Jo 
Jo Waiier 1-13. Jafer Williams 1-6. Berme Fiddler I -5: Geoga Tech: Jonathan 
: JohnPadFoschi4-32.NateCurry2-l9.Danusw1llianisl4. 

TACKLES - Maryland Leon Joe 9-5-14. DQweJ Jackson 7-6-13. Randy 
Starks 54-9. Madieu Williams 6-1-7. Kevin Efi 4-3-7; Geoigia Tech: Keyaron 
Fox 5-6-1 1 . Dawan Landry 7-3-1 0. Travis Parker 1-M. James Bude/ 1-7-8. 
Dan/I Smth 4-3-7. Enc Henderson 34-7 

ATT- 51, 524. WEATHE8-70 degrees, deac . 



Box Score 










1st 


2nd 


3rd 4th Final 


MARYLAND (S-3. 2-2) 








3 3 


Georgia Tech (S-3, 3-2 1 








7 7 


Third Quarter 








MD-FG Nick Novak 35. 3:14 








Fourth Quarter 








GT - Jonathan Smith 4 pass fr 


Reggie Ball |Dan 


Burnett kick|. 14:10 




MD 




GT 


First Downs 


14 




14 


Rushes-Yards 


35-96 




41-130 


CompArMnt 


14-33-2 




12-28-1 


Passing Yards 


157 




98 


Return Yards 


93 




82 


Punts 


5-39 2 




9-31.9 


Fumbles-Lost 


5-2 




1-0 


Penalties-Yards 


1-5 




3-15 


Sacks By-Yards Lost 


1-10 




3-19 


Time of Possession 


29:25 




30 35 


INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS 









2002 ORANGE BOWL 



2002 PEACH BOWL 



2004 GATOR BOWL 



IGATOR 
JBCWL 



2003 srm mo rbvibui 



2004 MARYLAND GATOR 





Byrd Stadium 
College Park, Md. 
Nov. 1 2003 
Maryland 59 
North Carolina 21 



Byrd Stadium 
College Park, Md. 
Nov. 13, 2003 

Maryland 27 

Virginia 17 



28 



r Box Score 














1st 


2nd 


3rd 


4th 


Final 


North Carolina (1-8, 0-5) 


14 


7 








21 


MARYLAND [6-1, 3-2| 


6 


39 


14 





59 



23 



COLLEGE PARK, Md — With five minutes remaining in the first half Maryland and North 
Carolina were tied. When Maryland went to the locker room at halftime, the Terrapins used a 
lightning strike over those last five minutes to take a 45-21 lead into the bieak. 

The Terps used that streak to go on to capture a Homecoming victory over the Tar Heels 
before a sellout crowd of 5 1 , 1 95, the fifth time in as many games Maryland had played before 
50,000 or more this season at Byrd Stadium 

Senior quarterback Scott McBnen threw for four touchdowns and ran for two others in the 
victory, McBnen, who played three quarters, finished with a career-high 349 yards passing on 
a 1 5-for-25 day. Two of his touchdown throws went to Latrez Harrison, while he also found 
Josh Allen on a 43-yard TD pass and Jo Jo Walker on a 67-yard scoring strike. 

Maryland's 39 points in the second quarter set an Atlantic Coast Conference record. The 
Terps rolled up 6 1 2 yards in total offense, including 259 on the ground 

North Carolina led 7-3 when Nick Novak hit his second field goal of the first quarter UNCs 
Mike Mason took the ensuing kickoff 96 yards for a touchdown, giving the Tar Heels a 14-6 
lead, despite having run only 
nine plays and holding the 
football less than four 
minutes. 

Maryland responded 
when McBnen scored on a 
6-yard run, then found Steve 
Suter for a two-point 
conversion to tie. But UNC 
quarterback Darian Durant 
hit Chad Scott on a 52-yard 
scoring pass and the 'Heels 
recaptured the lead at 2 1 - 1 4 
with 9:13 left in the second 
quarter. 

From that point, the Terps 
scored the final 45 points of 
the contest. Maryland scored 
on its first nine possessions 
of the game and I Oof its first 
II. The Terps turned two 
UNC turnovers late in the 
second quarter into points, 
aiding in the 39-point 
outburst in the period. 

Defensively, Maryland 
blanked the potent Tar Heels 
over the final 2- 1 12 quarters, 
led by eight-tackle days from 
Domonique Foxworth and 
D'Qwell Jackson. 

Bruce Perry had his top 
game of the season in 
leading the Terrapin rushing 
game, finishing the first half 
with 96 yards on 1 7 carries 
before leaving the game 
i injury at halftime. 



First Quarter 

MD-FG Nick Novak 24, 9 59 

NC ■ Chad Scott 3 run |Dan Oner kick). 545 

MD-FG Nick Novak 20, 4:10 

NC - Mike Mason 96 kickoff leturn (Orner kick], 3:56 

Second Quarter 

MO - Scott McBnen 6 run |Steve Suter pass fr McBnen), 
NC • Chad Scott 52 pass fr Danan Durant |Orner kick), 9:13 
MD - Latrez Harrison 14 pass fr McBrien |Novak kick), 7:44 
MD-FG Nick Novak 46. 4:54 
MD - Josh Allen 43 pass fr McBrien |Novak kick), 3:35 
MD - Jo Jo Walker 67 pass fr McBnen |Novak kick). 0.57 
MD - Josh Allen 5 run (Novak kick], 0:29 

Third Quarter 

MD - Latrez Harrison 1 6 pass fr McBnen fNovak kick), 8:10 
MD - Scott McBrien I run |Novak kick). 0:05 



First Downs 
Rushes-Yards 
CompAtMnt 
Passing Yards 
Return Yards 
Punts 

Fumbles-Lost 
Penalties-Yards 
Sacks By-Yards Lost 
Time of Possession 

INDIVI DUAL STATISTICS 



MD 

27 
50-252 
16-27-0 

360 

90 
2-38.5 

0-0 

4-41 

4-28 
34:37 



NC 

16 

25-108 

21-32-1 
277 
125 

348.0 
2-2 
5-35 
1-3 

25:23 



RUSHING - Maryland: Bruce Perry 1 7-96. Sammy Maldonado 5-43, Josh 
Allen 9-31 , Scott McBrien 8-24, Mario Merrills 3-15. J.P Humber 4-1 5. Dan 
Melendez 1-14. Steve Suter 1-5. Derrick Fenner 1-5, Jo Jo walker 1-4. North 
Carolina Ronnie McGill 9-63. Jacque Lewis 5-40. Danan Durant 6-1 1, Chad 
Scott 2-8. Team l-fminus2|. C J. Stephens 2-(mrnus I2| 

PASSING • Maryland: Scott McBrien 1 5-25-0-349. Joel Statham I -2-0-1 1 , 

North Carolina Darian Durant 18-28-1-209, CJ. Stephens 3-4-0-68. 

RECEIVING - Maryland: Steve Suter 4-72. Latrez Harrison 4-54. Jo Jo 

■ Dernck Fenner 2-64. Josh Allen 1-43. Jeff Dugan l-17.\ernon 

North Carolina Jawarski Pollock 8-78, Jesse Holley 442, Jon 

had Scott 2-69, Justin Phillips 2-28. Derielc Mitchell 1-18, 

, land Domonique Foxworth 7- 1 -8. DOwell Jackson 4-4- 
> 12-6, Madieu Williams 24-4. Leon Joe 3-14. North Caio- 
■ irds 4-4-8. Mahlon Carey 4-2-6. Michael 
h neH Green W-4. Devflen BullarrJ +04 

)S weather -6i degrees. ctea 



Box Score 

Virginia (5-5. 3-4) 
MARYLAND (7-3, 4-2| 



1st 



7 



2nd 
7 
17 



3rd 
7 




4th Final 
3 17 

3 27 



2002 ORANOE BOWL 



2 2 P E 



COLLEGE PARK, Md — On a night when driving winds made the running game criticall' 
important, Maryland sophomore Josh Allen had a career night. 

Allen ran for 257 yards, the third-best single-game rushing total in Maryland football history] 
scoring a pair of touchdowns and leading the Terrapins to a victory over Virginia in a Thursday 
night game nationally televised by ESPN. 

With sustained winds of more than 25 mph and gusts to 40 mph, each teams running game 
was crucial. Allen carried 38 times for his 257 yards, including an 80-yard touchdown run in the, 
middle of the second quarter. 

He had 1 54 yards by halftime, but also had 86 important yards in the final period that allowed 
Maryland to hold off a strong comeback bid by the Cavaliers. The Terrapins held the ball for nearly 
1 1 minutes in the fourth quarter, keeping the ball out of the hands of Virginia quarterback Mat) 
Schaub, the reigning ACC Offensive Player of the Year. 

Schaub finished with 1 86 yards and one TD pass on a 1 3-for-26 night. The Cavs managed just 
over 1 00 yards rushing, with 56 yards from Wall Lundy and 53 from Alvm Pearman. 

On the opening coin toss, Virginia elected to take the wind. Despite the strategy, Maryland took 
its opening drive 84 yards in 1 1 plays, setting up an 1 1-yard scoring pass from Scott McBrien id 
Latrez Harrison to allow Maryland to score first for the 1 0th time this season. 

Early in the second quarter, a 4 1 -yard pass from McBrien to Jafar Williams set up a I -yard scoring; 
run by Allen, capping a six-play 61 -yard drive. 

Virginia got on the board 
on its next possession, with 
Schaub diving over from the 
4-yard line to complete an 80- 
yard drive 

On the next play from 
scrimmage, however, Allen 
scampered 80 yards for a score 
that put the Terps ahead 21- 
7. Nick Novak had a 33-yard 
field goal with 32 seconds left 
to send Maryland to halftime 
with a 24-7 edge. 

Virginia scored the games 
next 1 points, getting a third- 
quarter score on a pass from 
Schaub to Pearman. A 43-yard 
field goal into the wind from 
Connor Hughes brought the 
Cavs within seven points with 
9 15 left 

But Maryland used a 10- 
play, 45-yard drive that took 
5.33 to set up a 45-yard field 
goal by Novak that extended 
the Terps' edge back to 10 
points. 

The Terp defense forced a 
three-and-out on the Cavs' 
next possession, including a 
sack by Randy Starks, who 
finished with eight tackles, 
including three for losses 
Virginia never again got the 
ball and Maryland had its 
seventh win in its last eight 
games. 
A C H BOWL ' 



First Quarter 

MD - Latrez Harrison 1 1 pass fr Scott McBrien (Nick Novak kick|. 8:24 
Second Quarter 

MD - Josh Allen I run (Novak kick|, 1 2 : 1 6 

VA - Mart Schaub 4 run (Connor Hughes kick). 8:31 

MD - Josh Allen 80 run (Novak kick), 8 : 1 7 

MD-FG Nick Novak 33, 0:32 
Third Quarter 

VA - Alvm Pearman 1 4 pass fr Schaub (Hughes kick), 6:00 
Fourth Quarter 



VA ■ FG Connor 


Hughes 


43,9:15 




MD-FG Nick Novak 45. 3:42 












MD 


VA 


First Downs 






23 


14 


Rushes-Yards 






48-278 


32-108 


CompAtt-Int 






14-21-0 


I3-2M 


Passing Yards 






191 


186 


Return Yards 






33 


10 


Punts 






3-28.0 


5-34.8 


Fumbles-Lost 






1-0 


M 


Penalties-Yards 






6-45 


1-46 


Sacks By-Yards Lost 






1-8 


0-0 


Time of Possession 






35:25 


24:35 


INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS 









RUSHING ■ Maryland Josh Allen 38-257, Rich Parson 1-15, Scott McBner 
6- 1 0, Mario Merrills I -2, Team 2-jminus 6|, Virginia: Wall Lundy 1 6-56, Alvin 
Pearman 1 1-53, Matt Schaub 3-1. Devon Williams 1-0, feam l-|minus 2j 

PASSING - Maryland: Scott McBnen 14-210-191, Virginia Ma 
13-26-0-186 

EMNG • Maryland Latrez Harnson 4-63. Jeff Dugan 3-40. Stew 
Suter 3-23, Jafar Williams 1 4 1 , Bemie Filddler 1 - 1 1 . Jo Jo Walker 1-7 Josh 
Allen I -6, Virginia Alvin Pearman 5-3 1 , Ryan Sawyer 325, Wad Lundy 2-66, 
Ottowa Anderson 2-25, Heath Miller 1-39 

I \ Man/land Madieu Williams 74-1 1, CuromeCox M-9. Randy 
Starks 5-3-8. Leon Joe 5-0-5. Virginia Ahman Brooks 7-3- 1 0. Kai Parham 3-5- 
■ Winborne 7-0-7, Chns Canty 5-1-6. Bennan Schmidt 4-2-6. 
An - 5 1 027 WEATHER - 38 degrees, cloudy high winds 



2004 OATOR BOWL 




#* 



««2iftyi 





11- 

Carter F/ntei/ Stadium 
Raleigh, N.C. 
Nov. 22, 2003 
Maryland 26 
NC State 24 




2003 srars mm imi/mm GATOR 



2004 MARYLAND GATOR BOWL GUIDE l'lifVi<l 





12- 

Graves Stadium 
Raleigh, N.C. 
Nov. 29, 2003 
Maryland 41 
Wake Forest 28 



Box Score 

MARYLAND (8-3, 5-2| 
NC State |7-5, 4-4| 



1st 2nd 3rd 4th Final 
10 16 26 

7 7 7 3 24 



a RALEIGH, N.C. — Nick Novak kicked a 43-yard field goal with 23 seconds left, capping an 
rnprobabte comeback victory in which Maryland needed 16 points in the final 6:23 to beat 
ijie Wolfpack before a regional television audience and clinch at least a tie for second place in 
tie Atlantic Coast Conference, 
The Terrapins trailed 24-1 with 8:45 left in the game after Adam Kiker hit a 32-yard field 

Ml 

I But Maryland went quickly down the field, needing just five plays to go 80 yards and set 
|P a 1 0-yard touchdown pass from Scott McBnen to Jo Jo Walker that pulled the Terps within 
*ven points. 

i The Terps forced a NC State punt minutes later, then went 78 yards in only six plays to set 
sip a 2-yard scoring scamper by McBnen with 2:29 left. Novak missed the extra-point kick, 
'owever, and Maryland still trailed by one point. 

■i On the second play of the Wolfpack's possession, Leroy Ambush forced a fumble by T.A. 
,1cLendon and Terp safety Madieu Williams recovered with 1 :50 left on the State 46-yard line, 
i Maryland picked up one first down to set up Novaks game-winning kick. 
( NC State scored on its first possession of the game, with TA McLendons 1 -yard run capping 
; drive set up by a Maryland turnover. The Wolfpack led from that point, grabbing the advantage 
t'ss than three minutes into the game and holding it until there were 23 seconds remaining, 
j Maryland's Josh Allen had his second straight 1 00-yard rushing game, finishing with 1 44 
ards on 23 carries. McBnen 
assed for 243 yards and 
no touchdowns, 

ompleting 17 of 37 passes 
i Jo Walker led the 
rrapins in receiving for the 
rst time this season, getting 
x catches for 57 yards. Rich 
arson went over the 
entury mark In receiving 
ards, getting 1 1 4 yards on 
)ur catches. 

NC State quarterback 
hilip Rivers, who had his 
:rsey retired in pregame 
eremonies, finished with 
76 yards on a 1 6-for-30 
assing day. Jerncho 
otchery grabbed six 
xeptions for 1 02 yards for 
ie Pack. McLendon had a 
air of I -yard scoring runs in 
ie first half and finished 
/ith 65 yards on 2 1 carries. 

Maryland's defense 
rjlayed well over the final 2- 
/2 quarters, keeping the 
/olfpack offense from 
:onng a touchdown in the 
ames final 36 minutes. NC 
tate turned a 1 4-1 halftime 
sad into a larger advantage 
lidway through the third 
uarter on an 83-yard punt 
?turn for a score byTramain 
fall 

2 2 OR 



First Quarto 

ST - TA McLendon I run |Adam Kiker kick], 1 2:06 
Second Quarter 

ST - TA McLendon I run |Kiker kick). 6:28 

MD - Derek Miller 2 pass fr Scott McBrien (Nick Novak kick). 

MD-FG Nick Novak 29. 0:05 
Third Quarter 

ST • Tramam Hall 83 punt return (Kiker kick|. 6:52 
Fourth Quarter 

ST -FG Adam Kiker 32. 8:45 

MD - Jo Jo Walker 1 pass fr McBrien (Novak kick), 6:23 

MD - Scott McBnen 2 run |Novak kick railed). 2:29 

MD-FG Nick Novak 43, 0:23 





MD 


ST 


First Downs 


24 


19 


Rushes-Yards 


42-190 


34-98 


CompAtMnt 


17-37-1 


16-30-1 


Passing Yards 


243 


276 


Return Yards 


77 


155 


Punts 


5-460 


5-47.4 


Fumbles-LOSt 


3-1 


3-1 


Penalties-Yards 


844 


541 


Sacks By-Yards Lost 


2-11 


3-20 


Time of Possession 


31:06 


28:54 


INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS 







RUSHING - Maryland Josh Allen 23- 1 44, Bruce Perry 8-20. Scott McBnen 
9-16 Steve Suter 1-7, Rich Parson 1-3. NC State: TA McLendon 21-65. Reggie 
Davis 3-19, Philip Rivers 9-10. Richard Washington 1-6. 

PASSING - Maryland- Scott McBnen 1 7-37-1-243. NC State Philip Rivers 
16-30-1-276 

RECEIVING - Maryland: Jo Jo Walker 657. Rich Parson 4-1 14. Laoez 
Harrison 4-38. Josh Allen 1-25. Bernie Fiddler 1-7. Deck Miller 1-2; NCSute 
Jemcho Cotchery 6-102. TA McLendon 4-70. Tramam Hall 3-64. TJ. Will- 
iams 2-29 Richard Washington 1-11 

TACKLES - Maryland D'Qwell Jackson 9-2-1 1. Madieu Williams 7-2-9. 
Kevin Eli 44-8, Randy Starks 44-8. Leon Joe 3-5-8. NC State: Toy Graham 9- 
3-12. Andre Maddox 4*10. Oliver Hoyte 2-7-9. Dwayne Hemdon 2-5-7, 
Pat Thomas 2-3-5. Freddie AughtryLindsay 0-5-5 

AH - 53.800. WEATHER - 75 degrees, clear 



Box Score 

MARYLAND (9-3, 6-2| 
Wake Forest (5-7, 3-5) 



1st 2nd 3rd 4th Final 

6 7 22 6 41 

7 14 7 28 



WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. — Bruce Perry made the most of his final Atlantic Coast Conference 
contest, as well as his final trip to Groves Stadium by rushing for 237 yards and three 
touchdowns, bringing Maryland to a comeback win for the second time in as many weeks. 

Maryland, which earlier in the week had accepted an invitation to play in the 2004 Toyota 
Gator Bowl, clinched sole possession of second place with the victory. 

Perry, who had rushed for more than 200 yards in a game at Wake Forest as a sophomore, 
scored all three of his touchdowns in the second half. In fact, coupled with a touchdown pass 
from Scott McBrien to Jafar Williams, Perry's scoring runs helped Maryland score 28 points in a 
span of 6:46 late in the third quarter and early in the fourth that erased a 21-13 halftime 
deficit. 

Perry and Demon Deacon sophomore Chris Barclay (243 yards on 28 carries) each went 
over the 200-yard mark on the ground, marking the first time in ACC history and only the fifth 
time in NCAA Division I action that opposing rushers gained 200 yards in the same contest. 

The Terrapins trailed 2 1 -6 after a 5-yard run by Barclay with 4:21 left in the second half 
McBrien, who threw three touchdown passes, hit Dan Melendez on a 1 4-yarder to bring the 
Terps within eight points at halftime. 

Late in the third quarter, Perry capped an 87-yard drive that took only three plays by going 
the final 49 yards with 2:56 
left McBrien hooked up with 
Rich Parson for 3 1 yards to 
aid that drive. 

On Wakes second play of 
the next drive, Madieu 
Williams got an interception 
for Maryland. McBrien hit 
Jafar Williams on a 28-yard 
pass and Maryland had its 
first lead at 28-2 1 . 

Barclay brake loose for a 
74-yard scoring run on the 
next play from scrimmage to 
tie the game. 

But Perry answered on 
the Terps' next play, going 
80 yards to put Maryland on 
top again. 

The Terrapins' defense 
got a three-and-out on the 
next series and Curtis 
Williams gave Maryland a 
short field when he blocked 
the Deacs' punt. McBrien 
took the Terps 28 yards in 
seven plays to set up Perry's 
2-yard score for the games 
final points. 

Madieu Wlliams finished 
with 13 tackles to lead the 
Maryland defense. McBrien 
finished with 198 yards 
passing on a 1 2-for-22 day. 



First Quarter 

WF - Chris Barclay 53 run (Matt Wisnosky kick). 1 3:02 

MD - Latrez Harnson 1 8 pass fr Scott McBnen (Novak kick failed). 9:0 1 
Second Quarter 

WF - Cory Randolph 5 run (Wisnosky kick). 1 1 :58 

WF - Barclay 5 run (Wisnosky kick). 4 2 1 

MD - Dan Melendez 1 4 pass fr McBrien [Nick Novak kick). I 02 
Third Quarter 

MD - Bruce Perry 49 run (Novak kick). 2:56 

MD -Jafar Williams 28 pass fr McBrien (Perry pass fr McBrien). 1 :57 

WF - Barclay 74 run (Wisnosky kick), I 29 

MD - Perry 80 run INovak kick). 1:16 
Fourth Quarter 

MD - Perry 2 run INovak kick failed). 1 1 : 1 





MD 


WF 


First Downs 


25 


21 


Rushes-Yards 


45-339 


48-316 


CompAtt-Int 


12-22-0 


12-24-2 


Passing Yards 


198 


108 


Return Yards 


67 


119 


Punts 


4-37 8 


4-335 


Fumbles-Lost 


1-0 


OO 


Penalties-Yards 


9-75 


3-20 


Sacks By-Yards Lost 


2-9 


0-0 


Time of Possession 


29:44 


30:16 


INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS 







RUSHING - Maryland: Bruce Perry 25-237. Scott McBrien 9-61 . Josh Allen 
8-32, Rich Parson 1-7, Steve Suter 14, Team !-(mtnus2|; Wake Forest Chns 
Barclay 28-243. Cory Randolph 1349, Chns Davis 4-30, learn 3-(minus 6| 

PASSING - Maryland: Scott McBrien 12-22-0-198; Wake Forest Cory 
Randolph 12-24-2-108. 

RECEIVING - Maryland: Jafar Williams 347. Steve Suter 2-52. Rich PaF 
son 246. Dan Melendez 2-27. Latrez Harnson 1-18. Bruce Peny 1-6. Josh 
.'. ake Forest Chris Davis 445. Chns Baiclay 4-35. Jason Anderson 
2-17. Willie Idlette 2-11. 

TACKLES -Maryland: Madieu WJIiams 94-1 3. Leon Joe 8-1-9, Domonique 
Foxworth 7-2-9. D Qwell Jackson 6-3-9. Leioy Ambush 5-2-7. Wake Forest 
Dion Williams 7-2-9. Brad White 6-2-8, Eric King 5*5, Quinrtin Williams 5* 
5. Obi Chukwumah +04, Caion Bracy 4-04. 

An - 1 8.783. WEATHER - 48 degrees, dear 



» 



ANGE BOWL 



2002 PEACH BOWL • 2004 6AT0R BOWL 




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12004 MARYLAND GATOR BOWL GOIDE : 

THE LAST TIME, 




Kickoff Returned for TD 



Ma ryland - Lewis Sanders | 98 yards! vs W. Carolina, 9-1 1-97. 



Opponent - M ike M ason (96 yards). North Carolina, 1 1-1-03. 



Blocked Punt Returned for TD 



Maryland - Leroy Ambush vs. Virginia, 1 0-6-0 1 . 



Opponent - David Carter | T yards). W Virginia, 9-19-98. 



Punt Returned for TD 



Maryland - Steve Suter (75 yardsl vs The Citadel, 9-1 3-03. 



Opponent - Tremain Hall 183 yards). NC State, 1 1-22-03. 



Inte rception Returned for TD 



R ecorded a Safety 



Maryland - Curtis Williams vs. Wake Forest, 1 1-29-03. 



Opponent - Malcolm Tatum, at Florida State, 11-13-99 



Blocked a Field Goal 



Maryland - D'Qwell Jackson at Florida State 9-6-03 



Opponent - Lance Evans, Virginia, 1 1-1 1-03. 



Blocked a PAT 



Maryland - William Kershaw at Duke, 1 0-26-02 



Opponent - Rick Sherrod, West Virginia, 9-29-01 



Defensive Shutout 

Maryla n d-vs. T he Citadel 161-01, 9-13-03. 
Opponent - Notre Dame (22-0). 8-3 1 -02. 

Player Passed for 6 TDs 



Maryland - None 



Player Scored 5 TDs 



Player Passed for 5 TDs 



Maryland - Scott Milanovich (S M 27,5 12) vs NC State IJ -5-94 
Opponent - Chris Rix 1 1 6, 9, 28, 22, 3 1 1, at Florida State, 1 0-27-0 1 . 

Player Scored 4 TDs 



Player Scored 4 TDs Rushing 



- Scott McBnen (14, 4 3,67, 1 6), vs. North C arolina, II- 
Opponent - Rex Grossman ( 15 4 ',',. 10), Florida, 1-2-02. 



03 



Player Scored 3 TDs 

Maryland - Bruce Perry (49 rush. 80 rush, 2 rush), at Wake Forest, 1 1-29-03 
Opponent - Chris Barclay (53 rush, 5 rush, 74 rush]. Wake Forest, 1 1- 29-03. 



Player Scored 3 TDs Rushing 
Maryland -Bruce Perry 14 

Opponenl ... i i rest, 11-29-03 



Player Passed for 3 TDs 



md - Scott McBrien 118 28, 14; at Wake Forest. 11-28-03 
Opponent- Matt S( l. '73-02 

Player Scored 3 TDs Receu 

. and - Guilian Gary (32 re 1 3 rec.l vs Georgia Tech, 1 1 - 1 8-00 

Opponent - Talman Gardri' Florida State, 10-27-01 



2002 0RAN6E BOWL 




Three Players Scored 2 TDs 



Maryland - Jermaine Lewis |5 rec, 27 rec], Mancel Johnson ( 1 4 rec, 12 rec), Geroy Simon [94 

KOR, 5 reel vs. NC State, 11-5-94. 

Opponent - Earnest Graham (1 rush, 6 rush), Jabar Gaffney |4 rec, 33 rec. |, Taylor Jacobs (4| 
rec, 15 reel, Florida, 1-2-02. 



Two Players Scored 2 TDs 



Maryland - Scott McBrien (6 rush, 1 rush], Latrez Harrison 1 1 4 pass, 1 6 pass), vs. North 

Carolina, 11-1-03. 

Opponent - Earnest Graham (1 rush, 6 rush), Jabar Gaffney (4 rec, 33 rec), Taylor Jacobs |4 ; 
rec, 15 rec], Florida, 1-2-02. 



Maryland - Domonique Foxworth (44 yards] at Eastern Mi chigan, 9-27-03 



Player Scored 2 TDs Rushing 



Maryland - Bruce Perry [49. 80, 2), at Wake Forest, 1 1 -29-03 



Opponent - Michael Boulware (23 yardsl, Florida State, 10-27-01. 

Fumble Returned for TD 

Maryland - Domonigue Foxworth 1 1 2 yards) vs. Georgia Tech, 1 0-1 7-02. 
Opponent - LeVar Talley [ 1 yards), Temple, 9-26-98 



Opponent - Chris Barclay (53, 5, 74). Wake Forest, 1 1-29-03 



Player Passe d for 2 TDs 

Maryland -Scott McBrien ( 18. 28, 1 4|, at Wake Forest, 11-28-03. 



Opponent - Chris Rix ( 1 8, 34), Florida State, 9-6-03. 



Maryland - vs. Wake Forest, 1 2-30-02 (E J. Henderson sack in the end zone). 

Opponent- Wpfford 9-28-0 2 (Scott Mi Brien sacked in the end zone by Andre Jones) 

Blocked a Punt 



Player Scored 2 TDs Receiving 



Maryland -Latrez Harrison (14. 1 6), vs. North Carolina, 11-1-03. 

Opponent -Jabar Gaffney 14, 33), Taylor Jacobs 146, 15), Florida, 1-2-02. 

50-Yd. Field Goal 



Maryland - Nick Novak (54 yardsl vs. Duke, 1 0-1 1 -03. 



Opponent - Steve Azar (52 yards), Northern Illinois. 8-28-03. 



45 Yd. Field Goal 



Maryland - Nick Novak (45 yards), vs. Virginia. 1 1-13-03. 



Opponent - Steve Azar |52 yardsl. Northern Illinois. 8-28-03 . 



Five Field Goals 



Maryland - Dale Castro (45, 29, 18, 32, 42| vs. Mississippi State, 9-22-79. 
Opponent- Nicholas Setta 151. 32, 18, 46, 24), Notre Dame, 8-31-02. 

Four Field Goals 



Maryland - Nick Novak 154, 34, 31, 48) vs. Duke, 10-1 1-03. 



Opponent -Aaron Hunt (29. 35. 22, 42). Clem son. 1 1-16-02 



Three Field Goals 



Opponent - Chris Weinke 16, 5, 6, 30, 26, 281, at Florida State, 1 1-1 3-99. 



Maryland - Nick Novak (24. 20, 46). vs. North Carolina, 1 1-1-03. 



Maryland - Bob Shemonski [22 rush, 26 rush, 82 PR, 4 rush, 8 rushl vs. Va. Tech, 1 1-7-50. 



Opponent -Aaron Hunt 129, 35, 22, 421, Clemson, 1 1-16-02. 

Three Field Goals 40 Yards or More 

Maryland - None, 



Opponent - None. 



Two Field Goals 40 Yards or More 



Maryland - Nick Novak (54. 481 vs. Duke. 10-1 1-03. 



Opponent - Nicholas Setta [5 1 , 42J, Notre Dame, 8-3 1-02. 



Marylan d - Chris Downs (9 rush, 36 rush, I rush, 6 rushl, at North Carolina, 1 1- 02-02. 
Opponent - Robert Baldwin [3 rush, 1 rush, 1 1 rush, 34 rush), Duke, 9-3-94. 



Four Field Goals 30 Yards or More 



Maryland - Nicl Nova! (54, 34, 31 48) vs Duke. 10-11-03 
Op ponent - None. 



Mary land - Chris Downs |9, 36. 1, 61, at North Carolina, 1 1-02-02. 
Opponent - Robert Baldwin |3, !, II, 34], Duke, 9-3-94 

Player Passed for 4 TDs 

Maryland 



Three Field Goals 30 Yards or More 



Maryland - Nick Novak (54, 34, 31 48] vs Duke, 10-11-03. 



Opponent - Nicholas Setta (29, 35. 22, 42|, Notre Dame, 8-3 1-02. 
Two-Point Conversion by Rush 



Maryland - Shaun Hill run vs. NC Sta te, 1 1-4-00. 



Opponent - Jamie Bamette run , NC State, 11-21-98. 



Two-Point Conversion by P»a 



Maryland - Scott McBnen to Bruce Perry, at Wake Forest, 1 1-29-03 



Opponent - Spen cer Romine to Richmond Fl owers . Duke, 1 0-30-99 



Missed PAT (kick) 



jyiaryland - Nick Novak, at Wake Forest (2), 
Opponent - Brent Ga rber, Duke, 10-26-02. 



-29-03. 



Defensive Extra-Point 

Maryland - None 



Opponent -L Grant (1 00-yd Interception return], Duke, 10-26-96 



40 Rushing Attempts 



Maryland - Charlie Wysocki (49-21 7J at Duke, 10-25-80 
Opponent -Ray Robinson (40-1 78], NC State, 11-4-00 

2002 PEACH BOWL • 2004 GATOR 



BOWL 




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BCWL 



2004 MARYLAND GATOR ROWL GOIDE 



Rushing Attempts 
Maryland - Josh Allen J38-257J v\ Virginia 11 Him 



: Opponent - Michael Turner |30-90], Northern Illinois. 8-28-03 

Rushing Attempts in One Half 

ft Maryla nd - Charlie Wys ocki |32| at Duke, 10-25-80. 

00 Rushing Yards 

■ij -LaMont Jordan (37-306) vs Virginia 11-20-99 
Opp onent -John Leach [46 329), Wake Forest. 1 1-20-93 

00 Rushing Yards 

erry 125-2371, at Wake Forest 1 1-29-03. 

Opponent - Chris Barclay (28-243), Wake F orest, 11-29-03. 



50 Rushing Yards 

md- Br uce Perry 125-2371, at Wake Forest, 1 1-29-03. 
Opponent - C hris Barclay (28-24 3) , Wake Forest, 1 1-29-03. 



00 Rushing Yards 



Maryland - Bru ce Perry (25-237). at Wake Forest, 1 1-29-03. 



Oppone nt- Chris Barclay 128-2431, Wake Forest, 1 1-29-03. 
00 Rushing Yards by a Quarterback 



! i d -Shaun Hill |1 1-1051 vs. Duke, 10-20-01. 



Opponen t - Woodrow Dantzler (22-1 83). Clemson, 10-16-99. 



wo Players with 100 Yards Rushing 



Maryland - LaMont Jor dan ( 1 351 and Brian Underwood 1 1 1 4| at Temple, 9-27-97. 
Opponent - Zack Cro c kett 1 1 23) and Warrick Dunn 1 1 04). Florida St., 9-1 0-94. 

hree Players with 100 Yards Rushing 

Maryland - Richard Jennings 136] Steve Atkins (126) andJamh Franklin (105) vs Virginia, 
1 1-22-75. 

5-Yd. TD Run 

n d - Bruce Perry |80|. at Wake Forest, 1 1-28-03. 



Opponent - Chris Barc lay (74), Wake Forest, 1 1-28-03. 



O-Yd. Non-Scoring Run 



Maryland - Sc ott M cBnen (54), at Clemson, 1 1-16-02. 
■I Opponent - Gordon Gmkscale |5 1 1, Georgia Tech, 1 0-1 7-02. 



0-Yd. TD Run 



Mary lan d - Bruce Perry (80), at Wake Forest, 1 1-28-03. 



j Opponen t - Chris Barclay (74|, Wake Forest. 1 1-28-03 



Pass Attempts 



I Maryland- Scott Milanovich 16246-1, 380, 1 TD) at Florida St., 11-18-95. 
' Opponent - Brad Lewis 152-3 1 4, 279, I TD). West Virginia. 9-29-0 1 . 

Pass Attempts 

Maryland -Shaun Hill 146-29-1. 3 1 8. 3 TD| vs. Georgia Tech, 1 1-18-00. 
Opponent -Mike Schneider 147-20-1, 270, I TD). Duke, 10-11-03. 

5 Pass Attem pts 

1 Maryland - Scott McBnen 137-1 7-1, 243, 2 TD), at NC State, 1 1-22-03. 
■ Opp onent -Mike Schneider (47-20-1, 270, I TD). Duke. 10-11-03. 



Pass Completions 



Maryland - Scott Milanovich 16246-1, 380, I TD) at Florida St.. 1 1-18-95. 
; Opponent - James MacPherson 149-28-3. I TD), Wake Forest. 1 0-2 1 -00. 

Pa ss Com pl etions 

i Maryland - Scott Milanovich (6246-1. 380. I TD) at Flonda St., 1 1-18-95. 

1 Opponent - Devin Scott 149-32- 1 -228, TD), Temple, 9-2-99. 

5 Pass Completions 



Maryland - Shaun Hill 132-26-1, 323, 1 TD) vs. Duke. 10-20-01 . 



Opponent -AJ. Suggs 145-28-0, 272. OTDI, Georgia Tech. 10-17-02. 



00 Yards Passin g 



Maryland - Scott Milanovich |416) at Wake Forest. 1 1-20-93. 



Opponent - Spencer Romine |404|, Duke, 10-30-99. 



00 Ya r ds Pass ing 



Maryland - Scott McBnen (349). vs. North Carolina, 1 1-1-03. 



Opponent - Charlie Whitehurst 13201. Clemson, 10-04-03. 



50 Yards Pa ssing 



Maryland - Scott McBrien (349). vs. North Carolina. 1 1-1-03. 



Opponent - Philip Rivers 12761. at NC State, 1 1-22-03. 



10 Receptions 



M aryland - Geroy Simon |16-l 24), at Florida State, 1 1 -1 8-95, 



Opponent - PJ Fleck |1 3-1 1 6), Northern Illino is, 8-28-03. 
Two Players with 10 Receptions 



Maryland - Walt Willia ms ( 1 1 ) and Geroy Simon [ 1 0| at Syracus e, 1119-94 



1 00 Yards Receiving 



Maryland - Scooter M onroe 13- 1671, at North Carolina, 1 l-02a02_ 
Opponent - Jerncho Cotchery (6- 1 02), at NC State, 1 1 2 2-03. 



Two Players with 100 Yards Receiving 



Mary land - Geroy Simon ( 1 24) and Jermame Lewis ( 1 02) at Florida St., 11-18-95. 



Opponent -Taylor Jacobs 110-1701 and JabarGaffney [7-1 1 81, Florida, 1-2-02 
Three Players with 100 Yards Receiving 



Maryland - 
11-20-93. 



Jason Kremus (119), Mancel Johnson ( 1 06) and Russ Weaver ( 1 05) at Wake Forest, 



200 Yards Receiving 



Maryland - Jermame Lewis (9-205) vs. Duke, 9-23-95. 



Opponent - Dez White 15-2 1 51 , at Ga. Tech, 9-30- 99. 



75-Yd. Non-Scoring Reception 



Maryland - Scott Milanovich to Jermame Lewis (78) at No Carolina. 9-1 1-93 
Opponent- C. Randolph to Jax Landfned (73). Wake Forest, 12-30-02. 



75-Yd. TD Reception 



Maryland - Scott McBrien to Scooter Monroe 180), at Nor th Carolina, 1 1-02-02. 
Opponent -Joe Hamilton to Dez White (80), at Ga. Tech, 9-30-99. 

50-Yd. Non-Scoring Reception 

Maryland - Scott McBrien to Derrick Fenner (55), vs. North Carolina, 1 1-1-03 
Opponent- Matt Schaub to Wall L undy 16 2), Virginia, 1 1-13-03. 

50-Yd. TD Reception 

Maryland - Scon McBrien to Jo Jo Walker (671. vs. North Carolina, 1 1-1-03. 
Opponent - Parian Durant to Chad Scott |52|, North Carolina. 1 1-1-03. 

Team Gained 300 Y a rds Rus hing 

Maryland - at Wake Forest 1339], 1 1-29-03. 
Opponent - Wake Forest 13 1 61. 1 1 -29-03. 

Team Gained 400 Yards Rushing 

Maryland - vs. Virginia 1445). 1 1-20-99. 

Opponent - Ga. Tech (411). 1 0-9-93. 

Team Failed to Gain 100 Yards Rushing 

Maryland - at Georgia Tech (96), 10-23-03. 
Opponent - NC State (981. 1 1-22-03. 

Team Gained 300 Yards Passing 

Maryland - vs. North Carolina (360), 1 1-1-03. 

Opponent -Clemson (3201, 104-03. 

Team Gained 40 Yards Passing 

Maryland - at Wake Forest (425), 1 1-20-93. 

Opponent - Flonda (456), 1-2-02. 

Team Failed to Gain 100 Yards Passing 

Maryland - vs. Virginia (69), 1 1-20-99. 

Opponent - Georgia Tech (981, 10-23-03. 

Team Gained 400 Yards Total Offense 

Maryland- at Wake Forest 1537), 11-29-03. 
Opponent - Wake Forest 14241, 1 1-29-03. 

Team Gai ned 500 Yards Total Offense 

Maryland- at Wake Forest (537). 11-29-03. 

Opponent -Florida |659|, 1-2-02. 

Team Gained 600 Yards Total Offense 
Maryland - vs. North Carolina 1612), 1 1-1-03. 
Opponent -Florida 16521. 1-2-02. 

Team Failed to Gain 200 Yards Total Offense 

Maryland -vs. Notre Dame 1133), 8-31-02. 

Opponent - West Virginia ( 1 561, 9-2003. 

Sco red 50 Points or more 

Maryland - vs. North Carolina (59-211, 1 1-1-03. 

Opponent - Florida (23-561, 1-2-02. 

Played an Overtime Game 'All-Time 2-1 in Overtimel 

at Northern Illinois (L-IOT, 20-13). 8-28-03. 



3> 



2002 0RAN6E BOWL 



2002 PEACH BOWL 



2004 GATOR BOWL 



JfcfrfiKWilL 



2004 MARYLAND GATOR BOWL GOIDE 





Head Coach 

(Maryland 70/ 

Third Season 



Ralph Fnedgen, the first coach in University of Mary- 
land history to lead the Terps to back-to-back seasons of 
1 wins or more, entered his third year with the Terps 
with a rapidly-growing reputation as one of the top 
coaches in the game today. With just one game left in 
that third campaign, he has a shot to lead his team to a 
third-straight 1 0-wm season with a win over West Virginia 
in the Toyota Gator Bowl. 

A long-time successful assistant coach at Georgia 
Tech, where he was credited with overseeing one of the 
nations most potent offensive attacks, Fnedgen contin- 
ues to build a new level of pride and glory to his alma 
maters football program, guiding the Terps to a 30-8 record 
and a trio of major bowl appearances in his three seasons 
as a collegiate head coach. His 30 wins aie four more 
than any third-year coach in Atlantic Coast Conference 
history. 

The consensus national Coach of the Year in 2001 
after leading Maryland to its first ACC championship since 
1 985, Fnedgen and Co. have now proved in back-to-back 
seasons that his 10-2 rookie campaign of 2001 was no 
one-hit wonder, posting 20 wins in the last two years — 
including a school-record tying 1 1 wins in 2002 — while 
leading Maryland to a dominating 30-3 win over Tennes- 
see in the 2002 Chick-fil-A Peach Bowl. The 30 wins by 
the Terps over the last three seasons equals Maryland's 
win total in the six years prior to Fnedgens arrival. 

By making its way to this years Toyota Gator Bowl, 
Maryland will be making a third consecutive bowl appear- 
ance for the first time since playing in four consecutive 
postseason games from 1982-85. 

Long overlooked as a head-coaching candidate, the 
1970 Maryland graduate was tapped as the Terps' head 




Ralph Friedgen and his wife, Gloria, met President 
George W. Bush at the 2002 White House 
Correspondents Dinner. 

2002 ORANGE BOWL 



football coach following the 2000 season, and he wasted 
no time in returning the program to the glory days it 
achieved when Friedgen was an assistant to Bobby Ross 
in the 1980s. 

Two years ago, in his first season as the Terps' grid 
boss, Maryland won its first seven games and eventually 
halted Florida States reign as perennial ACC Champion, 
earning the leagues automatic berth in the Bowl Cham- 
pionship Series. Last season, despite a 1-2 start and with- 
out 1 9 seniors from the previous year, the Terps made 
their way back to a major bowl game, winning 1 of 
their last 1 1 games and finishing in a tie for second in the 
ACC. 

This season provided a bit of deja vu for Friedgen 
and the Terrapins as they again started 1-2, only to run 
off nine wins in the final 1 games of the regular season 
to earn a second New Year's bowl bid in three years. 

Named the winner of the Frank Broyles Award as 
the top assistant coach in the country in 1 999 while at 
Tech, Friedgen brought 32 years of assistant coaching 
experience - including 21 as an offensive coordinator ei- 
ther in college or the NFL - with him in his return to Col- 
lege Park. 

The 56-year-old Friedgen /pronounced FREE-junj 
owns the rare distinction of coordinating the offense for 
both a collegiate national champion (Georgia Tech in 
1 990) and a Super Bowl team (San Diego in 1 994) 

Friedgen spent 20 seasons with Ross in coaching 
stops at The Citadel, Maryland, Georgia Tech and the San 
Diego Chargers. He returned to Tech in 1997, where he 
served another successful stint as offensive coordinator 
and quarterbacks coach. 

A 1 970 graduate of Maryland, where he earned a 
degree in physical education, Friedgen launched his 
coaching career as a graduate assistant before heading 
off to a triumvirate of jobs including stints at The Citadel 
(1973-79), William & Mary (1980) and Murray State (1981). 
In '82, he returned to Maryland as offensive coordinator 
and offensive line coach under Ross, with Fnedgens ten- 
ure lasting until 1 986. During that stretch, the Terps cap- 
tured three consecutive ACC championships ( 1 983-85) and 
played in four bowl games. All told, the Terrapins were 
39-15-1 from 1982-86 and won two bowl games (the 
Sun Bowl in 1 984 and the Cherry Bowl in 1 985). It is the 
type of success Friedgen has re-instilled in the current 
group of Terrapins. 

During his five-year stay at Maryland under Ross, 
Friedgen was instrumental in the development of future 
pro quarterbacks Boomer Esiason, Frank Reich and Stan 
Gelbaugh, all of whom spent at least 1 seasons in the 
National Football League. Esiason played professionally 
from 1984-97, Reich from 1985-98 and Gelbaugh from 
1986-95. 

The Ross-Fnedgen connection began in 1 973, when 
Ross hired the former Maryland offensive lineman as de- 
fensive line coach at The Citadel. Fnedgen spent seven 
seasons at The Citadel, the last three as offensive coordi- 
nator and offensive line coach. Friedgen then worked one 
season ( 1 980) as offensive coordinator at William & Mary 
and one season ( 1 98 1 1 as assistant head coach at Murray 
State before Ross tapped him to be his offensive coordi- 
nator at Maryland in 1982. 

Friedgen followed Ross to Georgia Tech in 1987, 

• 2002 PEACH BOWL 



fe* 




*, 




becoming the Yellow Jackets offensive coordinator ar 
quarterbacks coach for the next five seasons, includir 
the 1 990 campaign when Tech, unranked in the pr 
season, captured the national championship with an 
0-1 record. The national title came just two years after tli 
Jackets had posted back-to-back seasons of three wins 
less. 

When Ross was named head coach of the San ( 
ego Chargers in 1 992, he tapped Friedgen to serve 
running game coordinator for two seasons (1992-9 
before elevating him to offensive coordinator in 199 
when the Chargers advanced to the Super Bowl for tl 
first time in franchise history. During his time with tt 
Chargers, Friedgen helped a club that had not made tt 
playoffs in a decade reach postseason play three times 
five seasons. 

Known for developing balanced offensive attai 
with multiple looks, Tech was one of only two teams 
the country in 1 999 to average at least 200 yards rushu 
and 200 yards passing. Tech also accomplished the h 
under Fnedgens guidance in 1990, '91 and '98. The 19 
team, with the diminutive Joe Hamilton calling the s 
nals at quarterback, set 59 school records, rewriting ma 
marks established by the 1990 national champions! 
team, which was led by another Friedgen pupil, sign 

2004 GATOR BOWL 








aller Shawn Jones 1 1 989-92). Friedgen was a finalist for 
ne Broyles Award as the nation's top assistant coach in 
998 when the Rambling Wreck set a then-school record 
vlth 50 touchdowns. 

The first Maryland alum since Bob Ward 1 1967-68) 
|o serve as the Terps' head football coach, Friedgen origi- 
nally came to Maryland as a guarterback in the mid-60s 
ind spent most of his career as an offensive lineman, let- 
enng in 1 966 and '68 and capturing Academic AII-ACC 
lonors. He was a two-time winner of the George C. Cook 
Memorial Award ( 1 968-69) for having the highest aca- 
Jemic average on the football team. 

Friedgens coaching roots run deep. His father, 
falph, Sr, was a high school coach for more than 30 
/ears and masterminded, among other teams, the 1 964 
Vestchester County (NY) High School team that went 
jndefeated and averaged 44 points per game running 
vhat was then an unusual multiple offense. It was an 
)ffense run by a 1 90-pound guarterback later recruited 
jy Maryland named Ralph Friedgen, Jr 

Friedgen and his wife, the former Gloria Spina, have 
hree daughters: Kelley Kristina, and Katie. Gloria is cur- 
ently serving as an adjunct professor at the University of 
Maryland. 








The Friedgen File 



Personal 

Full Name 




Ralph Harry Friedqen 


Date of Birth 




April 4, 1947 


Hometown 




Harrison, N.Y 


Alma Mater 




Maryland, 70 


Pronunciation 




FREE-jun 


Coaching Experience 

Maryland 

2001- 


Head Coach 


Georgia Tech 

1997-2000 


Assistant Coach • 
Offensive Coordinator/Offensive Line 


San Diego Chargers 

1994-96 Assistant Coach - 


Offensive Coordinator, 


1992-93 Assistant Coach - 
Runnmq Game Coordinator/H-Backs/Tiqht Ends 


Georgia Tech 

1 987-9 1 Assistant Coach - Offensive Coordinator/Quarterbacks 


Maryland 

1 982-86 Assistant Coach - Offensive Coordinator/Offensive Line 


Murray State 

1981 




Assistant Head Coach 


William & Mary 

1980 


Assistant Coach 


- Offensive Coordinator 


The Citadel 

1977-79 


Assistant Coach 


- Offensive Coordinator 


1973-76 


Assistant Coach - Defensive Line 


Maryland 

1969-72 




Graduate Assistant 


Playing Experience 

Maryland 

1966, 1968 


Guard |2 letters] 



Coaching Honors 

+2001 Associated Press National Coach of the Year 



+ 2001 Home Depot National Coach of the Year 
+2001 Football News Coach of the Year 
• 200 1 American Football Monthly Coach of the Year 
+2001 The Sport ing News Coach of the Year 
+2001 Eddie Robinson/FWAA National Coach of the 

Year 

+2001 Bobby Dodd National Coach of the Year 
+2001 Walter Camp National Coach of the Year 
+2001 Washington D.C. Pigskin Club Natl Coach of 

the Year 

+2001 CNN/SI National Coach of the Year 
+2001 CBS Sportsline. com National Coach of the Year 
+2001 ABC Sports.com Nat ional Coach of the Year 
+2001 ACC Coach of the Year 




2004 MARYLAND GATOR BOWL G0IDE 



Friedgen's Bowl History 

1 'A Overall. 1-1 as a head coach 




A 


m assistant coach except lor 2001 i 2002} 


1 982 - Aloha Bowl (Washington 


2 1 , Maryland 20) 




1 983 - Citrus Bowl (Tennessee 3 


3, Ma 
fenne 


yland 2 1) 




1984 -Sun Bowl (Maryland 28, 


ssee 271 




1985 — Cherry Bowl IMaryland 35, Syracuse 181 


1990 - Citrus Bowl iGeoraia Tech 45. Nebraska 211 


1991 -Aloha Bowl IGeorqia Tech 18. Stanford 17| 


1997 — Carquest Bowl IGeorqia Tech 35, West Virq 




IV.;., i , ,ror Bowl IGeorqia lech 35, Notre Dame 281 
1 999 — Gator Bowl IMiami 28, Gee 


2001 — Oranqe Bowl (Florida 56, Maryland 231 


2002 - Peach Bowl (Maryland 3 


, Tennessee 31 




Yearly Head Coaching Results 

2001 


10-2-0 [7-0, 3-1, 0-1) ■ ACC: 7-1-0, Champions 


SI North Carolina 


W 


23-7 


44,080 


S8 Eastern Michigan 


W 


50-3 


42,105 


S22 at Wake Forest 


W 


77 20 


22.372 


S29 West Wrqinia 


W 


32 20 


40,166 


06 |25| (-1 Wrqinia 


w 


41-21 


44,197 


Oil (22| (15| at Georqia Tech 


w 


20-17 [otl 


40,574 


O20 [I2| |-| Duke 


w 


59-17 


43,528 


027 [101 |18| at Florida State 


L 


31-52 


82,565 


N3 |15| [-1 Troy State 


W 


47-14 


38,415 


N10 |13| [-1 Clemson 


W 


37-20 


52 462 


N17 |10| |-| at NC State 


W 


23-19 


51,500 


FedEx Orange Bowl 


J2 |6| 15] Florida 1 


L 


23-56 


73,640 


1 at Miami. Fla. IPro Plater Stadiuml 


2002 


11-3-0 (6-1, 3-1, Ml ■ ACC: 6-2-0, T-2nd 


A25 (211 vs. Notre Dame' 


L 


0-22 


72,903 


S7 Akron 


W 


44-14 


48,057 


SI 4 Florida State 


L 


10-37 


51,758 


S21 E. Michiqan 


W 


45-3 


46,098 


S28 Wofford 


W 


37-8 


44,098 


05 at West Wrqinia 


W 


48-17 


55,146 


017 Georqia Tech 


W 


34-10 


41.766 


026 at Duke 


W 


45-12 


23,451 


N2 at North Carolina 


w 


59-7 


44.000 


N9 [25| [14| NC State 


w 


24-21 


52,915 


NI6 [191 at Clemson 


w 


30-12 


72,000 


N23 [181 at Wrqinia 


L 


1348 


58,358 


N30 125] Wake Forest 


W 


32-14 


39,006 


Chick-f il-A Peach Bowl 


D31 [181 vs. Tennessee' 


W 


30-3 


68,330 


1 at Cast Rutherford. NJ. fCiantz Stadium). ■' 
Dome) 


it Atlanta. Ga 


ICeorgia 


2003 


9-3-0 (6-0. 3-3, 041 • ACC 


6-2-0, 2nd 




A28 [151 at Northern Illinois 


L 


13-20 [otl 


28,018 


S6 [111 at Florida State 


L 


10-35 


82,885 


SI 3 The Citadel 


W 


61-0 


51,594 


S20 West Wrqinia 


W 


34-7 


51,973 


S27 at E. Michiqan 


W 


37-13 


19,628 


04 Clemson 


W 


21-7 


51.545 


Oil Duke 


W 


33-20 


50,084 


023 at Georqia Tech 


L 


3-7 


51,524 


Nl North Carolina 


w 


59-21 


51.195 


N13 Wrqinia 


w 


27-17 


51,027 


N22 at NC State 


w 


26-24 


53.800 


N29 at Wake Forest 


w 


41-28 


18,783 


Toyota Gator Bowl 


Jl 1231 1201 vs. West Wrqinia 


r at Jxkionviie A3. 











2 2 ORANGE BOWL 



2 2 PEACH BOWL 



2004 BATOR BOWL 






BCWL 



coacmns STIFF 



12004 MARYLAND GATOR BOWL GUIDE 




STAFF ON THE FIELD 



GARY BLACKNEY JAMES FRANKLIN RAY RYCHLESK 




Defensive 

Coordinator/ 

Secondary 

(Connecticut '671 

Third Season 



Wide Receivers/ 

Recruiting 

Coordinator 


7 *»■ v "^ 


lEast 
Stroudsburg 'SSI 


dVl 


Fourth Season 






Special Teams 

Coordinator/ 

fight ends 

IMillersirille '731 

Third Season 






~ s 




Coaching Experience 

Maryland 

200 1 - Assistant Coach - Defensive Coordinator/Secondary 


Bowling Green 

1991-2000 


Head Coach 


Ohio State 

1988-90 


Assistant Coach - Inside Linebackers 


1985-87 


Assistant Coach - Defensive Coordinator 


1984 


Assistant Coach - Defensive Backs 


Syracuse 

1980-83 


Assistant Coach - Defensive Backs 


UCLA 

1978-79 


Assistant Coach - Defensive Backs 


Wisconsin 
1977 


Assistant Coach - Defensive Coordinator 


1975-76 


Assistant Coach - Defensive Backs 


Rhode Island 

1973-74 


Assistant Coach - Offensive Backs 


Brown 

1970-72 


Assistant Coach - Defensive Backs 


Connecticut 

1968-69 


Graduate Assistant 


V , . 


J 



' Coaching Experience 

Maryland 

2003- Recruitmq Coordinator 


2000- 


Assistant Coach - Wide Receivers 


Idaho State 

1999 


Assistant Coach - Wide Receivers 


Washington State 

1998 


Assistant Coach - Tiqht Ends 


James Madison 

1997 


Assistant Coach - Wde Receivers 


East Stroudsburg 

1996 


Graduate Assistant - Secondary 


Kutztown 

1995 


Assistant Coach - Wide Receivers 


^ M 


J 



Coaching Experience 



Maryland 

2001- Assistant Coach - Special Teams Coordinator/Tight Ends 



Wake Forest 

1999-2000 



1996-98 



Assistant Coach - Tight Ends/ Special Teams I 



Outside Linebackers I 



1993-95 



Defensive Line 



East Stroudsburg 

1 992 Assistant Coach - 

Special Teams Coordinator/Defensive Backs 



Toronto Argonauts 

Summer, 1992 



Volunteer Assistant Coach - Defense 



Penn State 

1991 



Northeastern 

1989-90 



Graduate Assistant - Offensive Line 

Assistant Coach - 
Defensive Coordinator/Inside Linebackers 



Temple 

1 98 1 -88 GA/Assistant Coach - Outside Linebackers and Rovers 



Neshaminy (Pa.| High School 

1980 



Head Coach - Freshman Team 



Manheim (Pa.) Township High School 

1979 Assistant Coach - Quarterbacks/Defensive Backs 



DAVE S0LLAZZ0 TOM DEAHN DWIGHT GALT 




Defesnive Line/ 
NFL Liasion 

[The Citadel '771 

Third Season 




Director of 

Football 

Operations 

IHeidelberg '871 

Fifth Season 



Director of 

Strength S 

Conditioning 

/Maryland '811 

15th Season 




34 



Coaching Experience 

Maryland 

■n Defensive Line/NFL Liaison 
Georgia Tech 

5 Tackles 
The Citadel 
1989-98 



Guilford (N.C.| College 




1988 


tensive Line 


Maryland 




1986-87 


tensive Line 


Stratford |$.C.| High 




1985 




Maryland 




J984 





2002 ORANGE BOWL 



2002 PEACH BOWL 



2004 BATOR BOWL 




COMHIIMSIW 



GOTO 



2004 MARYLAND GATOR BOWL GUIDE 1*1 



STAFF IN THE BOOTH 



CHARLIE TAAFFE TIM BANKS TOM BRATTAN 



Offensive 
Coordinator/ 


v[=*Jj 


Quarterbacks 




(Siena 731 


xm 


Third Season 


wtk^mm 




Inside Linebackers 

{Central 
Michigan '941 

First Season 




Offensive Line 

(Delaware 721 

Third Season 



it 



Coaching Experience 

Maryland 

2001- Assistant Coach • 

Offensive Coordinator/Quarterbacks Coach 

Monrre.il Alouettes |CR) 

1999-2000 

1997-98 



The Citadel 
1987-96 



Head Coach 
Offensive Coordinator 

Head Coach 



US Military Academy 

1981-86 Assistant Coach - 

Offensive Coordinator, Quarterbacks, Offensive Backfield 
Virginia 

1976-80 Assistant Coach - 

Offensive Backfield, Linebackers, Special Teams 
NC State 



1975 



Graduate Assistant - Offensive Backs 



Georgia Tech 
1974 



Graduate Assistant - Wide Receivers 



, |N.Y.| 
1973 



Assistant Coach - Offensive Backfield 



Coaching Experience 

Maryland 

2003- Assistant Coach ■ Inside Linebackers 



Memphis 

2002 



Assistant Coach - Cornerbacks 



2001 

Bowling Green 

2000 



Assistant Coach - Outside Linebackers 



Assistant Coach - Defensive Backs 



1999 



Assistant Coach - Runn ing Backs 



Ferris State 

1997-98 



Assistant Coach - Defensive Backs 



Bowling Green 

1996 



Graduate Assistant - Defense 



Coaching Experience 



Maryland 
2001- 



Assistant Coach - Offensive Une 



Stanford 

1 999-2000 Assistant Coach - Offensive Line [centers and quardsl 



Northwestern 

1997-98 



Assistant Head Coach 



1992-98 



Assistant Coach - Offensive Line 



William & Mary 

1 9 84-9 1 Assistant Coach - Offensive Coordinator/Offensive Line 
1 983 Assistant Coach - Offensive Backfield 



Highland Springs (Va.) High School 

1979-82 



Head Coach 



Lloyd C. Bird (Va.) High School 

I9_78 



Head Coach 



McKean (Del.) High School 
1977 



Head Coach 



Highland Springs |Va.) High School 

1973-75 Assistant Coach - Offensive Line 



Delaware 
1972 



BILL O'BRIEN AL SEAM0NS0N JOHN DONOVAN 




Running Backs 

(Brown '921 

First Season 



Outside 

Linebackers/ 

Special Team Asst. 

(Wisconsin '821 

Third Season 




Assistant 

Recruiting 

Coordinator 

(Johns Hopkins '971 

Third Season 




Coaching Experience 

Maryland 

2003- Assistant Coach - Runnina Backs 


Georgia Tech 

2002 




Assistant Head Coach 


2001-2002 


Offensive Coordinator/Quarterbacks 


1999-2000 




Recruitinq Coordinator 


1998-2000 




Runninq Backs 


1995-1997 




GraduWe Assistant - Offense 


Brown 

1994 




Inside Linebackers 


1993 




Tiqht Ends 





Coaching Experience 

Maryland 

2001- Assistant Coach - 
Outside Linebackers/Special Teams Assistant 



Bowling Green 

2000 Assistant Coach ■ Special Teams Coordinator/Linebackers 



Tne Citadel 

1987-99 Assistant Coach - 
Special Teams Coordinator/Linebackers/Wide Receivers 



United States Military Academy 

1985-86 Assistant Coach - Linebackers 



Wisconsin 

1983-84 



Graduate Assistant - Defensive Backs 



^ 1982-83 



Part-Time Assistant Coach - Wide Receivers 



35 



2002 ORANGE BOWL • 2002 PEACH BOWL 



2004 BATOR BOWL 



E7S1 



GATOR 
I BCWL 



coacHinn si.vf 



2004 MARYLAND GATOR BOWL GOIDE 



SUPPORT STAFF 




GREG SESNY BRIAN HICKSON 







— 1 


Graduate Assistant 

IDefensei 






(Catholic '93/ 






Third Season 









' >-^J 




\- sk 


Graduate Assistant 
lOffensel 


JBfejBK 


1 Tows on 'Oil 


urm 


Second Season 


■ i v 




Wead Equipment 
Manager 

I Mary land '851 

16th Season 




BRIAN CRITES, M.D. SANDY WORTH HEATHER ABIANNfl 




Head Team 

Physician/ 

Orthopaedic 

Surgeon 

First Year 



4 



«»! 




Head Athletic 
Trainer 

30th Season 




Associate Director 

lAcademic Support 

S Career 

Oevelopmentl 



MITCH WILKENS BUTCH RHOBERICK KARYL HENRY 



' 



Director of Video 
Services 

{Tennessee '971 

Third Season 





Administrative 

Assistant to the 

Head Coach 



MONA FELDER PAULA BROGLIO STACEY JBHNSO 



i 





Administrative 

Assistant 

lOffensel 



Administrative 
Assistant 
IDefensei 



Administrative 

Assistant 

IRecruitingl 




2002 ORANGE BOWL • 2002 PEACH BOWL • 2004 GATOR BOWL 




2004 MARYLAND GATOR BOWL GUIDE 



MARYLAND FOOTBALL ROSTER 



Jo. 


Name 


Pos. 


Hgt 


Wgt 


CI. 


Exp. Hometown (High School/Last School) 


>7 


" Tosin Aban 


DT 


5-10 


274 


Sr. 


IV Mt. Rainier, Md. (Good Counsel HS| 


» 


Paschal Abiamin 


WR 


6-2 


193 


Fr 


RS Randallstown Md [Mount 51 Joseph HS] 



i 


Rob Abiamiri 


TE 


6-2 


241 


Jr. 


SQ 


Randallstown, Md. (Mount St. Joseph HS) 


11(d) 


Olufemi Aie 


DB 


5-9 


180 


Jr. 


RS 


Silver Spring, Md (Springbrook HS) 


13 ' 


Josh Allen 


TB 


5-11 


,'(i/ 


So. 


IV 


Tampa, Fla. (Eleanor Roosevelt HS (Md )) 


16 (.1) 


Chimenem Amadi 


DB 


5-10 


198 


Fr. 


HS 


Rlverdale, Md. (Laurel HS) 


!4 


• Leroy Ambush 


LB 


6 


225 


Sr 


3V 


Frederick, Md. (Thomas Johnson HS) 


)| 


Robert Armstrong 


DT 


6-3 


303 


Fr. 


HS 


Arlmqton, Va. |Washinqton-Lee HS/Fork Union Military) 


ISIdl 


Tom Auqustyn 


WR 


6-0 


197 


So 


RS 


Fairfax, Va. (Robinson HS) 


II |dl 


Lance Ball 


TB 


5-9 


229 


Fr. 


HS 


Teaneck, N.J. (Teaneck HS) 


8|dl 


Quintin Beltwn 


TB 


5-11 


190 


So. 


SQ 


Woodbridge, Va (C D Hylton HS) 


>5 


Conrad Bolston 


DE 


6-2 


279 


Fr 


HS 


Burtonsville, Md (St Johns Colleqe HS) 


7 


Russell Bonham 


OG 


6-4 


295 


So 


IV 


Winston-Salem, N.C. (Carver HS) 


4 |d) 


Matt Brant 


FS 


6-0 


153 


Fr. 


RS 


Chevy Chase. Md. (Gonzaqa Colleqe HS) 



C.J. Brooks 



Davia n Bryan 



OT 6-6 318 Jr. 2V Rex , Ga. JMorrow HS) 



NT 5-1 1 



276 Jr. 



SQ Hyattsville , Md. (Northwestern HS) 



'3 


• ' * Lamar Bryant 


OG 


63 


313 


Sr. 


3V Clinton, Md. (Crossland HS| 


'7 


Tim Cesa 


LB 


6-0 


240 


Fr. 


HS Kennesaw, Ga. (Harrison HS) 


1/ 


* Jamal Chance 


CB 


6-0 


200 


Sr. 


IV Ephrata, Pa. (Ephrata HS/Lackawanna JC) 



Brock Choate 
Chris Choice 



OT 6-4 273 Fr. 



HS Montoursville, Pa. (Loyalsock Township HS) 



CB 5-11 



193 Fr. 



RS Suitland, Md . (Eleanor Roosevelt HS) 



Garrick Cliq 



OG 6-3 296 Fr. HS Port Orange, Fla. (Spruce Cre ek HS) 



Jamahl Cochran 



LEO 6-0 254 Jr. 



2V Morristown, N.J. (Morns to wn HS) 



David Coleman 



RB 5-11 177 So. SO Rosedale, NY (Bavside HS) 



Jon Condo 



LEO 6-3 241 Jr. 2V Philipsburq, Pa. (Philipsburq-Osceola HS) 



Tre Cooper 



WR 5-8 



173 Fr 



RS Atlanta. Ga. (Benedict Colle qel 



Curome Cox 



CB 6 



197 Sr 



3V Arlington, Va (Gonzaga College HS) 



Andrew Crummey C/OG 6-4 273 Fr. 



Raymond Custis FS 5-9 



189 



HS Van We rt, Ohio JVan W ert HS) 
2V Germant own, Md (Northwest HS) 



Vernon Davis 



WR 6-3 



23) Fr. 



HS Washington, D C (Dunbar HS) 



Ricardo Dickerson 



_FJ 6-1 



243 So. 



IV Hy attsville, M d. (Northwestern HS) 



Justin Duffie 



PL 6-1 287 So. IV Gaithersburq, Md. (Landon HS| 



Jeff Duqan 



TE 6 5 



258 Sr. 



3V Allison Park, Pa. (Central Catholic HS) 



Eric Dumas 



OT 6 6 301 Sr. 



3V Atlant a, Ga. IBenjamin Mays HS) 



Kevin Eli 



DE 6-2 



272 Jr. 



IV Deptford, N.J. (Deptford HS) 



Daniel Ennis 



_PK 6-0 



149 Fr. 



RS Sykesville, Md. IGlenelq HS) 



Orlando Evans 



QB 6-0 



193 Sr 



SQ Stockton, Calif. IBrookside Christian/CCSFI 



CJ. Feldheim 



NT 6-3 



287 



3V Hereford, Md. (Hereford HS) 



Derrick Fenner 



WR 6-0 185 So. IV Hampton, Va. (Hampton HS| 



Bernie Fiddler 



FB 6 I 



244 Sr. 



2V Swedesboro, N.J. (Kmqsway HS) 



Ryan Flynn 



OT 6-3 



273 Jr. 



IV Younqstown, Ohio ICardinal Mooney HS) 



Domonique Foxworth CB 5-11 



177 Jr 



2V Randallstown, Md. (Western Tech HS) 



Jon Gruber 



FB 5-9 209 Jr. SQ Somerville, N.J. IBndqewater HS) 



Milton Harris 



DB 5-11 195 So. 



SO Lanham, Md. (Duval HS/Delaware State) 



Latrez Harrison 



WR 6 2 223 Sr 



3V Atlanta, Ga. (Booker T. Washington HS| 



Joey Haynos 



TE 6-8 



247 Fr. 



HS Rockville, Md. (Gonzaqa Colleqe HS) 



Andrew Henley 



LB 6-0 240 Sr. 2V Riverdale, Md. (DeMatha HS) 



Stephon Heyer 



OT 6-6 295 So. IV Lawrenceville, Ga. (Brookwood HS) 



Sam Hollenbach 



QB 6-5 



223 Fr. 



RS Sellersville, Pa. IPennndqe HS| 



David Holloway 



LB 6-2 228 Fr. 



RS Stephentown, NY lAlbany Academyl 



S3 


Reqqie Holmes 


LB 


6-2 


240 


Fr. 


RS 


Bowie, Md. (Bowie HS) 


!2(d| 


Jonathan Howell 


WR 


5-9 


165 


Fr. 


HS 


Brandywine, Md. (Brandywine HS) 


>0[d| 


J.P Humber 


TB 


6-0 


217 


Fr. 


RS 


Lakeland, Fla. (Georqe Jenkins HS) 


i2 


* D'Qwell Jackson 


LB 


6-1 


224 


So. 


IV 


Larqo, Fla. (Seminole HS) 


«|d| 


Wesley Jefferson 


LB 


6-1 


233 


Fr. 


HS 


Clinton, Md. (Gwynn Park HS) 


12 


*** Leon Joe 


LB 


61 


232 


Sr. 


3V 


Clinton, Md. (Friendly HS) 


15 |d| 


Albert Jones 


TB 


5-11 


212 


So. 


SQ 


Brandywine, Md. (Gwynn Park HS) 


i 


* Chris Kellev 


SS 


6-2 


210 


Jr. 


IV 


Germantown, Md. (Seneca Valley HS) 


18 


William Kershaw 


LB 


6-3 


:33 


So 


IV 


Raeford. N.C. (Hoke County HS) 


iOfd] 


Jermaine Lemons 


LB 


6-1 


246 


Fr. 


HS 


Tampa, Fla. (Thomas Jefferson HS) 


'9 


** Lou Lombardo 


OT 


6-6 


287 


Jr. 


2V 


Baltimore, Md. (Calvert Hall HS) 


!9 


Sammy Maldonado 


TB 


6-1 


233 


Jr. 


RS 


Harrison, N.Y (Harrison HS/Ohio State] 




2002 ORANG 


E B 


OWL 


2 


002 PEACH BOWL 



Numerical Roster 

No. Name 


Pos. 


1 


Bruce Perry 


TB 


2 


Chris Kelley 


SS 


3 


Rob Abiamiri 


TE 


4 (dl 


Latrez Harrison 


WR 


4 Ml 


Mike Moyseenko 


QB 


5 


Ricardo Dickerson 


FB 


6 


Domonique Foxworth 


CB 


7 


Scott McBrien 


QB 


8 


Mario Merrills 


TB 


9 


Jo Jo Walker 


WR 


10 id] 


Ryan Mitch 


OB 


JIM* 


Madieu Williams 


FS 


nidi 


Dan Ennis 


PK 


11 Ml 


Orlando Evans 


QB 


12 


Marcus Wimbush 


FS 


13 


Dennard Wilson 


SS 


14 (dl 


Matt Brant 


FS 


14 Id) 


Sam Hollenbach 


QB 


15 


Curtis Williams 


WR 


16 


Joel Statham 


QB 


18 Id! 


Quintin Beltran 


TB 


18 Id] 


Maurice Shanks 


WR 


19 


Jafar Williams 


WR 


20 Id) 


J.R Humber 


TB 


20 Id] 


Greq Powell 


WR 


21 


Chris Choice 


CB 


22 (dl 


Jonathan Howell 


WR 


22 Id] 


Rich Parson 


WR 


23 


Andrew Smith 


SS 


24 


Leroy Ambush 


LB 


25 


Josh Wilson 


CB 


26 


Raymond Custis 


FS 


27 Id] 


Tim Cesa 


LB 


27 (dl 


Milton Harris 


DB 


29 Id] 


Sammy Maldonado 


TB 


29 Id) 


Michael Vanison 


DB 


30 


Curome Cox 


CB 


31 (dl 


Olufemi Aje 


DB 


31 (dl 


Lance Ball 


TB 


32 


Leon Joe 


LB 


33 


Josh Allen 


TB 


34 


Steve Suter 


WR 


35 (dl 


Wesley Jefferson 


LB 


35 (dl 


Albert Jones 


TB 


36 (dl 


David Coleman 


RB 


36 (dl 


Adam Podlesh 


P 


37 (dl 


Jamal Chance 


CB 


38 


Gerrick McPhearson 


CB 


40 |d] 


Maurice Smith 


FB 


41 


Kevin Eli 


DE 


43 


Jon Gruber 


FB 


44 (d| 


Jeris Smith 


LB 


44|d| 


Bernie Fiddler 


FB 


45 


Shawne Merriman 


LEO 


46 


Nick Novak 


PK 


47 


Jon Condo 


LEO 


48 


William Kershaw 


LB 


v 




J 



2 4 GATOR BOWL 



37 



12004 MARYLAND GATOR BOWL GUIDE 




38 



No. 


Name 


Pos. 


Hgt 


Wgt 


CI. 


Exp. 


Hometown (High School/Last Schooll 


76 [d| 


Eddie Matto 


OG 


6-4 


278 


Fr. 


HS 


Miami Lakes, Fla. IDelanev HS [Md.ll 


7 


Scott McBnen 


QB 


6-1 


182 


Sr. 


IV 


Rockville, Md. [DeMatha HS/West Virqinial 


55 


Brendan McDermonc 


OL 


6-1 


245 


Fr. 


HS 


Columbia, Md [River Hill HS| 


68 


Ryan McDonald 


OG 


6-2 


281 


So. 


RS 


Haqerstown, Md. IWilliamsport/Concord Colleqe) 


38 


Gerrick McPhearson 


CB 


5-10 


192 


So. 


IV 


Columbia, Md. [Howard HS) 


85 [d] * 


Dan Melendez 


WR 


6-2 


175 


So. 


IV 


Lancaster, Pa. [J.P McCaskev HS) 


8 


Mario Merrills 


TB 


5-10 


2 no 


So. 


IV 


Columbia, Md. [Wilde Lake HS| 


45 


Shawne Mernman 


LEO 


6-4 


253 


So. 


IV 


Upper Marlboro, Md. [Frederick Douqlass HS) 


84 


Derek Miller 


TE 


6-8 


258 


So. 


IV 


Carlisle, Pa. IBoilmq Spnnqs HS) 


10|d| 


Ryan Mitch 


QB 


6-1 


207 


Fr. 


HS 


McLean, Va. (DeMatha HS) 


92 Id) 


Dre Moore 


DT 


6-4 


285 


Fr. 


HS 


Charlotte, N.C. [Independence HS) 


4 Id! 


Mike Movseenko 


QB 


6-1 


190 


Fr. 


HS 


Haqerstown, Md. (So. Haqerstown HS) 


58 


Brandon Nixon 


OT 


6-5 


337 


Fr 


HS 


Pottstown, Pa. (Pottstown HS) 


46 


Nick Novak 


PK 


6-0 


133 


Jr. 


2V 


Charlottesville, Va lAlbemarle HS) 


80 [d| * 


Onnie Onwuemene 


WR 


6-1 


181 


Jr. 


IV 


Silver Spnnq, Md [Good Counsel HS| 


22 [d| ** 


Rich Parson 


WR 


5-10 


187 


Jr. 


2V 


Newark, Del INewark Academyl 


1 


Bruce Perry 


TB 


5 10 


205 


Sr. 


3V 


Philadelphia, Pa. IGeorqe Washinqton HS) 


36 (dl 


Adam Podlesh 


P 


5-11 


209 


Fr. 


RS 


Pittsford, NY IPittsford Sutherland HS) 


20 [dl 


Greq Powell 


WR 


5-11 


172 


Fr. 


HS 


Annapolis, Md. (Annapolis HS) 


65 


Matt Powell 


OT 


6-4 


331 


So. 


SQ 


Ft. Washinqton, Md. [Oxon Hill HS) 


90 


Patrick Powell 


DE 


6-3 


248 


Fr. 


HS 


Richmond, Va. [LC. Bird HS) 


88 


Dave Quaintance 


DT 


6-5 


275 


Fr. 


RS 


Philadelphia, Pa [Archbishop Ryan HS] 


92 [dl 


Darren Sanders 


TE 


6-4 


253 


Fr 


RS 


Pomfret, Md. IMcDonouqh HS) 


98 


Omarr Savaqe 


LB/DE 


6-5 


248 


Fr. 


HS 


Piscataway, N.J. (Piscataway HS) 


86 [d] 


Brad Schell 


TE 


6-5 


247 


Fr. 


R5 


Spencerville, Md (Paint Branch H5i 


72 


Kyle Schmitt 


C 


6-5 


297 


Jr. 


2V 


Latrobe, Pa. (Derry Area HS) 


76 Id] 


Henry Scott 


DE 


6-3 


279 


Jr. 


SQ 


Baltimore, Md. (Kenwood HS] 


18|d| * 


Maurice Shanks 


WR 


6-4 


197 


Jr. 


IV 


Hampton, Va. (Phoebus HS) 


23 


Andrew Smith 


ss 


511 


207 


Sr. 


2V 


Fort Meade, Md [Meade HS) 


44 [dl 


Jens Smith 


LB 


6-2 


233 


Fr 


RS 


Eldersburq, MO [Liberty HS) 


40 


Maurice Smith 


FB 


5-11 


229 


Jr. 


2V 


Waldorf, Md. (Westlake HS] 


54 


Scott Smith 


DE 


65 


257 


Sr. 


3V 


Philadelphia, Pa. (Georqe Washinqton HS) 


57 


Randy Starks 


DT 


6-4 


305 


Jr. 


2V 


Waldorf, Md. (Westlake HS| 


16 


Joel Statham 


QB 


6-1 


207 


Fr. 


RS 


Chatsworth, Ga. IMurray County HS] 


50 (dl 


Paul Stellacci 


LB 


6-2 


217 


Fr. 


RS 


Carmel NY (Carmel HSJ 


34 


Steve Suter 


WR 


5-10 


192 


Jr. 


IV 


Manchester, Md. (North Carroll HS) 


61 


Ed Tyler 


OG 


63 


293 


Sr. 


IV 


Franklinville, N.J. (Delsea HS] 


29 /dl 


Michael Vanison 


DB 


5-9 


181 


So. 


TR 


IDeMatha HS/Bowie State) 


9 


Jo Jo Walker 


WR 


5-9 


165 


So. 


IV 


Carrollton, Texas [Creekview HS] 


89 


Drew Weatherly 


WR 


6-4 


200 


Fr. 


HS 


Georqetown, Del (Sussex Central HS] 


15 


( urtis Williams 


WR 


6-2 


199 


Jr. 


2V 


Huntinqton Station, N.Y (Huntinqton HS] 


19 


Jafar Williams 


WR 


62 


210 


Sr. 


3V 


Philadelphia, Pa. IGeorqe Washinqton HS) 


lOldl * 


Madieu Williams 


FS 


6-1 


188 


Sr. 


IV 


Lanham, Md. [Duval HS/Towsonl 


13 


Dennard Wilson 


SS 


5-10 


189 


Sr. 


3V 


Upper Marlboro, Md. (DeMatha HS) 


25 


Josh Wilson 


CB 


5-9 


172 


Fr. 


HS 


Uppei Marlboro Md [DeMath i HS] 


12 


Marcus Wimbush 


FS 


5-11 


205 


Fr. 


RS 


Washinqton, D.C. IDunbar HS) 


69 


Donnie Woods 


OT 


6-3 


286 


Fr. 


HS 


Dade City, Fla (Thomas Jefferson HSI 


Idl indicates duplicate number. 


Key; ' indicates varsity letters earned; RS indicates redshirted in 2002; SQ indicates on squad in 2002 but did not letter; HS 
indicates hiqh school; TR indicates transfer 



















Pronunciation Guide 



Players 


Pronunciation Guide 


Tosin A] 


toe-sunn uh-BAR-ee 


Paschal Abiamin 


PASS-kull A-BE-uh-meery 


Rob Abiamin 


A-BE-uh-meery 


Curome Cox 


curr-OHM 


Eric Do' 


DOO-mus 


itn 


luh-TREZ 


Sam Holleo. 


hall-un-bock 


D'Qwell Jacks. 


dee-KWELL 


Gerrick McPh* 
Onnie Onwun 


lounced with hard g 
on-WEM-ui 


Adam Podlesh 


pod-lesh 



Joel Statham 


state-umm 


Jafar Williams 


juh-FAR 


Madieu Williams 


muh-DEE-ooh 


Dennard Wilson 


duh-NARD 


Coaches 


Tom Brattan 


rhymes with latin 


Ralph Friedgen 


FREE-jun 


Ray Rychleski 


nch-LESS-key 


Dave Sollazzo 


Si 1 1 AH-.'o 


Charlie Taaffe 


ryhmes with half 



No. 


Name 


Poj. 


49 


Jamahl Cochran 


LEO 


50 |d| 


Jermaine Lemons 


LB 


50 Id] 


Paul Stellacci 


LB 


51 


Andrew Henley 


LB 


52 


D'Qwell Jackson 


LB 


53 


Reqqie Holmes 


LB 


54 


Scott Smith 


DE 


55 


Brendan McDermond 


OL 


57 


Randy Starks 


DT 


58 


Brandon Nixon 


OT 


59 


David Hollowav 


LB 


61 


Ed Tyler 


OG 


63 


Andrew Crummey 


C/OG 


64 


Justin Duffle 


DL 


65 


Matt Powell 


OT 


66 


Garnck Cliq 


OG 


68 


Ryan McDonald 


OG 


69 


Donnie Woods 


OT 


70 


Stephon Heyer 


OT 


71 


Brock Choate 


OT 


72 


Kyle Schmitt 


C 


73 


Lamar Bryant 


OG 


74 


C.J. Brooks 


OT 


75 


Eric Dumas 


OT 


76 (dl 


Eddie Matto 


OG 


76 Id) 


Henry Scott 


DE 


77 


Russell Bonham 


OG 


78 


Ryan Flynn 


OT 


79 


Lou Lombardo 


OT 


80(d) 


Joey Haynos 


TE 


80|d| 


Onnie Onwuemene 


WR 


81 


Paschal Abiamin 


WR 


82 


Jeff Duqan 


TE 


83 


Derrick Fenner 


WR 


84 


Derek Miller 


TE 


85(d) 


Tom Auqustyn 


WR 


85 Id] 


Dan Melendez 


WR 


86 (d| 


Chimenem Amadi 


DB 


86 (d| 


Brad Schell 


TE 


87 


Vernon Davis 


WR 


88 


Dave Quaintance 


DT 


89 


Drew Weajherly_ 


WR 


90 


Patrick Powell 


DE 


91 


Robert Armstronq 


DT 


92 Idl 


Dre Moore 


DT 


?2Jdl 


Darren Sanders 


TE 


93 


Davian Bryan 


NT 


95 


Conrad Bolston 


DE 


96 


C.J. Feldheim 


NT 


97 


Tosin Aban 


DT 


98 


Omarr Savaqe 


LB/DE 



Id] indicates duplicate number. 

Key: ' indicates varsity letters earned; RS indicate 

redshirted in 2002; SO indicates on squad in 2002 bu 

did not letter; HS indicates high school; TR indicate ' 

transfer. 




2002 ORANGE BOWL 



2002 PEACH BOWL 



2004 BATOR BOWL 




TOSIN ABARI 




NOSE TACKLE 

6-0 • 274 - SR.-IV 

MT. RAINIER, MO. 

moo COUNSEL] 



Hard-working fifth-year senior sees playing time at defensive 

tackle ... has gotten bigger every year since walking on at 

■ndin 1999 ... Is of of Nigerian descent ... Season : {at 

jA/C5(J) ... had one tackle in the game along with two QB 
hurries ... {at EMU] finished with two tackles ... {vs. WVU\ 

j... had a career-high four tackles (two solo) ... (at FSU] 

I recorded first tackle of the season. 

1 



Statistics 

Defense &CS UT AT TT TFL 


Sacks 


> 
FCftt PS Int. 


12-0 4 8 12 0.0-0 


0.M 





Career 31-0 8 It 19 1.0-11 


1.0-11 





^ 




■i 



ROB ABIAMIRI 




TIGHT END 

6-3 ' 241 • JR.-SQ 

RANDALLSTOWN, MO. 

MOUNT ST. JOSEPH! 



Added 1 5 pounds in the off-season . . . worked his way to the 
top of the depth chart at receiver prior to the fall of 2001 
before succumbing to a foot injury which limited his ability 
to compete in 1 and 02 ... has good agility for a player his 
size ... Season : {vs. WVU] ... had an eight-yard reception on 
pass up the sideline in the third quarter ... far FSU] ... re- 
corded his first career reception for four yards. 



Statistics 

Receh/inq MS /?«. 


Yds. 


Avg. 


717 Long 


2003 12-1 2 


12 


6.0 


o e 


Career 16-1 2 


12 


6.0 


8 


^ 



JOSH ALIEN 

33 





2 2 ORANGE BOWL 



TAILBACK 

S-11 • 207 • SD.-1V 

TAMPA, FLA. 

IELEAN0R ROOSEVELT! 

Second-year back who worked his way into sig- 
nificant playing time at tailback as a true fresh- 
man ... has breakaway speed ... an Iron Terp 
,., posted a 340-pound bench and a 565- 
pound squat in spring testing 
... strength index of 688 is 
second-best among Terp 
running backs ... has 4.9 
percent body fat on a -J] 
206-pound frame Sea- > 
son: ranks fifth in the 
ACC with 74.5 rushing 
yards per game... leads 
Maryland with eight 
rushing touchdowns 
and 894 yards ... [at 
WFU] ... finished with 32 yards on 
eight rushing attempts ... added two 
yards on a catch from a Scott McBrien 
screen pass to the left side after he 
broke off of his blocking assignement 
... used sparingly due to an injury 
suffered against NC State ... (at 
NCSU] ... averaged 6.3 yards per 
carry, finishing with 144 rush- 
ing yards on 23 attempts ... 
longest run of the game, 32 
yards, came in the fourth quar- 
ter as he broke through the line 
and sprinted up the middle of the 
field ... he then ran for a 28-yard 
gain in the fourth quarter by split- 
ting two defenders and taking the 
ball up the the left sideline on a 
key play in the Terps' final touch- 
down drive ... added a 25-yard re- 
ception on a screen pass in the sec- 
ond quarter to gain a first down ... 
(vs. UVa) ... had an incredible perfor- 
mance, rushing for 257 yards on 38 
carries with two touchdowns ... 
257-yard day was the 1 1 th-best in 
ACC history and the third-best i 
single-game rushing performance 
in Maryland history behind only 
Lamont Jordan's 306 yards against Virginia in 1 999 and Bruce 
Perry's 276 yards vs. Wake Forest in 2001 ... 38 rushing at- 
tempts in the game stands as the fifth-highest amount in a 
single game in Terp history ... second touchdown came on 
an 80-yard touchdown run in the second quarter when he 
bounced off right tackle and outran the Virginia defenders 

• 2002 PEACH BOWL • 




2004 MARYLAND GATOR BOWL GUIDE 

downfield to the end zone ... run was the longest of his ca- "" 
reer ... {vs. UNC] ... had a career-long reception for 43 yards 
and his first career-receiving touchdown on a screen pass 
from Scott McBrien in the second quarter ... ran for a touch- 
down in the second quarter on a five-yard play as he banged 
his way up the middle to the end zone ... (at EMU\ ... fin- 
ished with 7 1 yards on 1 8 rushing attempts and three recep- 
tions for 3 1 yards ... scored two rushing touchdowns ... sec- 
ond touchdown run of the game featured a stiff-arm of the 
linebacker on the way to an eight-yard gain ... (vs. WVU\ ... 
gained 54 yards on 16 rushing attempts ... showed good 
awareness by catching a pass which deflected off Jo Jo Walker 
for a gain of 18 yards in the first quarter... scored a touch- 
down in the second quarter ... (vs. The Citadel] ... finished 
with 136 yards on 1 1 rushing attempts ... sprinted off left 
tackle for a 72-yard touchdown on the first offensive play 
of the game ... also had a 28-yard reception that came 
in the second quarter after he broke two tackles ... (at 
NIU] ... had 67 yards on 20 rushing attempts ... 
scored the Terps' first offensive touchdown 
of the season on a one-yard run in the 
first quarter ... Career: stands two 
rushing touchdowns shy of the ca- 
reer top 1 at Maryland. 



[Statistics 

Hushing C-CS 


Atl. Gun Loss Nel 


Aug. 


TO 


> 
If 


2003 


12-8 


175 918 24 894 


5.1 


8 


80 


1 Career 


204 


23S 1,325 26 1,299 


5.5 


16 


80 


Receiving 


G-GS 


ffec. Yds. Avq. 


77J 


Long 




2003 


12-8 


13 192 14.8 


1 


43 




Career 


20-8 


16 200 12.5 


1 


43 














> 



LER0Y AMBUSH 





LINEBACKER 

6-0 • 225 • SR.-3V 

FREDERICK, MD. 

{THOMAS JOHNSON! 



Senior who has played a vital role in the defense the last two 
years ... also a strong special-teams performer ... added al- 
most 1 pounds in the off-season while keeping his body fat 
at 5.7 percent, lowest among Maryland linebackers ... Sea: 
son : has started all 12 games at strongside linebacker ... 
seventh on the team with 5 1 tackles (37 solo) ... (at WFUj ... 
had an impressive game, tying a career-high with seven tack- 

2004 GATOR BOWL 



39 




■."-^wilpp 



rive 



MARYLAND GATOR BOWL GUIDE 



les (five solo) ... (at NCSUI ... had a strong game with five 
tackles (four solo) ... made what was possibly the play of the 
season, forcing a fumble late in the fourth quarter by put- 
ting a crushing hit on T.A. McLendon to 
knock the ball loose which was recov- yi\ 

ered by Madieu Williams . fumble 
gave the Terps time to drive 
back down the field and set up 
the game-winning field goal 
by Nick Novak ... (vs. 
UNCj ... finished 
with five 
tack- 
les- 
(three 

a tackle for a loss of four yards . 
(at GTj .. had six tackles (five 
solo) ... had a tackle for a loss 
of three yards in the second 
quarter... /vs. Duke) . fin- ■ 
ished with five tackles (four 
solo) ... (at FSUj ... fin- 
ished with two tackles 
(one solo) ... credited 
with a sack in the sec- 
ond quarter when 
he chased Chris Rix 
out of bounds for | 
a loss of five yards 

(at NIU) ... finished with seven tackles (four solo) Ca- 
reer has appeared in 44 career games with the bulk of his 
work before 2002 coming on special teams 




C. J. BROOKS CONRAD BOLSTOI 



OFFENSIVE GUARD 

6-6 • 318 • JR.-2V 

REX, 6 A. 

{MORROW 





f> 




First-Team AII-ACC 



r 

Statistics 

Defense G-GS UT 


AT TT TFL Sacks 


> 
FC FRPBU Int. 


2003 12-12 37 


14 51 4.0-15 1.0-5 


10 


Career 44-24 72 


39 111 9.0-32 2.0-10 


10 


V 




J 



ROB ARMSTR0N6 



91 





DEFENSIVE TACKLE 
6-3 • 303 • FR.-HS 

ARLINGTON, VA. 
WASHINGTON-LEE} 



Strong inside force who has seen playing time in his first 
year as a Terp . . . spent last year at Fork Union Military Acad- 
emy ... originally signed with Virginia out of high school ... 
Season : (vs. UVa) ... tied a career-high with three tackles 
|one solo) ... also recorded the first OB hurry of his career . . . 
had a big stop on a Wall Lundi run for no gam in the first 
quarter ... (at GTj ... finished with three tackles (one solo) ... 
(vs. Duke) ... had three tackles (two solo) ... (vs. The Citadel) 
... recorded the first tackle of his collegiate career ... (at FSUj 
... saw his first action as a Terp. 



Fourth-year junior who has become one of the best 
guards in the ACC ... shifted from tackle to guard last 
season while filling in at tackle when necessary ...a 
very technical blocker who has a firm grasp of the 
offense and blocking schemes ... gets after op- 
ponents and takes pride in finishing his blocks 
has good feet and ideal size for his po- 
sition . . dropped seven pounds in the 
off-season while boosting his 
strength numbers to earn Iron 
§& Terp status is the team's 
^f third-strongest offensive line- 
man . posted a 695-pound squat in spring test- 
ing ... Season : started all 12 games this sea- 
son at left guard ... (at WFU) ... posted 1 1 
big blocks, most by any player in three years 
at Maryland ... had the key block on Bruce 
Perry's 80-yard touchdown run in the third 
quarter as he sealed off his block creating 
a large hole in the left side of the line 
for him to explode through (vs. UVaj 
.led Maryland linemen with four "big 
blocks" (vs UNCI . . tied for the team- 
lead with four "big blocks" on a team- 
high 7 1 plays ... (vs Duke) ... had the 
key block on Sammy Maldonado's i 
rushing touchdown in the third 
quarter ... had two "big blocks" ... 
(vs CUj ... had the key block on 
Steve Suter's end-around run allow- 
ing him to extend the gain on the 
play ... finished with two "big blocks' 
(vs. WVUI ... had a key block on 
Bruce Perry's longest run of the night 
(14 yards) ... led all linemen with a 
season-high six "big blocks" on 63 
plays (vs. The Citadel) recorded 
two "big blocks" on 35 plays 
Career has started all 37 games 
of his career. 



DEFENSIVE TACKLE 

6-2 • 279 ' FR.-HS 

BURTONSVILLE, MO. 

1ST. JOHN'S COLLEDEI 



First-year player who moved to defensive end at the start c 
fall camp but now sees time at tackle ... strong player wh 
has shown the ability to get upfield Season : (at WFU) 
notched one tackle ... (vs. CUj ... recorded his first caree 
sack in the second quarter as he powered his way to the Q 
for a loss of three yards ... finished with two tackles (on 
solo) ... (vs. The Citadel) ... recorded the first two tackles e 
his collegiate career (one solo) ... bulled through the line 
the third quarter to record a tackle for a loss of two yards 
(at FSU) ... saw his first action as a Terp, 



Sta 

I Defen 

^2003 



Statistics 

Defense G-GJ UT AT TT 



TFL Sacks FC FIIFBU In. 



9-0 4 3 7 2.0-5 1.0-3 



« 



Statistics 

Defense G-GJ UT AT TT 


TFL S*. 


FC FRPBU Int. 










^ j 



2002 ORANGE BOWL 



2002 PEACH BOWL 



2004 OATOR BOWL 




LAMAR BRYANT 

m 



JAMAL CHANCE 




OFFENSIVE GUARD 
6-3 • 313 • SR.-3V 

CLINTON, MO. 

ICROSSLANDI 



- : ifth-year senior who has come on in the last two years to 

oecome one of the best guards in the ACC ... after missing 

early in the season due to injury, came on in the second 

ill i if 2003 to help pace the Terp running game ... one of 
' :he strongest players on the team ... an Iron Terp with a 782 
strength index (third-best on the team and tops on the offen- 
vi' line] .. set all-time Maryland offensive line records for 
strength index and squat (740) ... broke his own squat record 
of 695 from a year ago ... also squatted 13 reps of 545 
oounds on testing day ... 475-pound bench is also best 
fcmong Terp linemen ... has good feet and excels at pulling 
: . Season started the last nine games at right guard after 
trussing the first three due to injury (broken right foot) ... /vs. 
^JVaj ... recorded three "big blocks" with no missed assign- 
ments ... /vs. UNQ ... finished with three "big blocks" on the 
game ... fat GTj ... Terps' highest-graded offensive lineman 

/vs. CUj ... notched two "big blocks" on 72 plays, tied for 
the most by any Terp lineman ... /at EMU) ... finished with 
jtwo "big blocks" and had no missed assignments . . . /vs. WVUj 
[.. started his first game of the 
iseason ... notched one "big 
pock" with no missed as- I 
signmentson 43 plays ... 
Career has played 
n 41 games, 
starting 40 ...in- 
jury at the 
(start of the 
year broke a 
string of 30- 
straight 
'Starts ... 
second 
team AII-ACC 
as a junior. 




CORNERBACK 
6-0 ' ZOO ' SR.-1V 
EPHRATA, PA. 
(EPHRATA/ 
LACKAWANNA JO 

Redshirt senior who was impressive in the off-season ... 
worked his way into being one of the first reserve defenders 
into the game for Maryland ... a starting-caliber player ... 
used primarily in nickel and dime situations . . . athletic enough 
to cover and big enough to be strong in run support 
earned Iron Terp distinction for his work in the weight room 
in the off-season . Season : fit WFUj earned first career 
start at cornerback, filling in for an injured Curome Cox ... 
/vs. CUj ... notched two solo tackles ... (vs. WVUj ... com- 
bined with Curome Cox on a key tackle for a loss of one yard 
on third down, forcing a Mountaineer punt in the second 
quarter fit FSUj ... had a career-high five tackles (three 
solo) ... fit NIUI . combined with Leon Joe on a sack for 
four yards ... also had one TFL for seven yards ... TFL and 
sack were first of his career at Maryland. 



u 



, 



r 

Statistics 

Defense G-G5 UT 


AT TT 


TFL 


Sacks 


FC FRPBU Int. 


2003 12-1 9 


5 14 


2.0-7 


OH 





Career 221 19 


8 27 


2.0-7 


0.5-4 

















JAMAHL COCHRAN 




LINEBACKER 

6-0 • 254 • JR.-BV 

MORRISTOWN. N.J. 

IMORRISTOWNI 



V ' 



r 



a 

\ 



1BRPS TO UI3WH GATOR 

BC WL I 



2004 MARYLAND GATOR BOWL G0IDE 



2002 ORANGE BOWL 



Shares time with Shawne Mernman as the starter at the "Leo" 
(outside linebacker) position ... strong player who excels 
against the run ... posted a 765-pound squat in the spring, 
best ever by a Maryland linebacker . . Season: 1 1 th on the 
team with 38 tackles (25 solo) ...fit WFUj ... recorded five 
tackles (three solo) ... /vs. Duke) ... finished with four tack- 
les (three solo) ... combined with Randy Starks on a sack 
in the fourth quarter as they surrounded and collapsed 
the pocket on the Duke QB for a loss of six yards ... /vs. 
CUj... recorded his first sack of the year as he caught 
. QB Charlie Whitehurst from behind for a loss of one 
L yard ... finished with two solo tackles ... fit FSU) ... 
finished with nine tackles (seven solo) ... had a big 
» play in the fourth quarter, coming off of the left end 

to tackle the FSU tailback for no gain. 
• 2002 PEACH BOWL • 



Stati 

Defense 

moi 

Career 


sties 

G4S 


Iff 


AT 


TT 


TFL 


Sacks 


> 

FC FIIPBU Int. 













36-21 


71 


48 


119 


6.5-43 


4.533 


1 


2 





o 






















/ 



JON CONDO 





LINEBACKER/LONG 

SNAPPER 

6-3 • 241 ' JR.-2V 

PHILIPSB0R6, PA 

IPHILIPSBURG- 

OSCEOLA! 



Fourth-year player who has a stronghold on the Terps' long- 
snapping duties while serving as a backup at the "Leo" line- 
backer position ... is in his third season as a snapper since 
winning a wide open race for the job in 2001 ... Maryland 
has not had a punt blocked in his three years at the position 
,., has now been atop the depth chart at long snapper for 
37-straight games Season : fit NCSUI ... had one tackle 
on special teams ... [at GTj... recorded one tackle ... (vs. The 
Citadel/ ■ had one tackle on special teams ... fit NIUj ... 
notched two solo tackles on punt coverage. 



Statistics 

Defense MS UT AT TT TFL 


\ 

Sacks FC FRPBU Int. 


2003 12-0 3 2 5 O.OO 


0(H) 


Career 37-0 9 7 16 0.0-0 


0.0-0 




J 



CUROME COX 

3d" 





CORNERBACK 

6-0' 197-SR.-3V 

ARLINGTON, VA. 

IB0NZA6A COLLEGE H.S.I 



< 



Honorable Mention AII-ACC 

Fifth-year senior who is a viable honors candidate ... a physi- 
cal corner who excels in press coverage schemes ... has the 
ability to throw receivers off of their initial routes ... a sure 
tackier who is solid in run support ... has been an Iron Terp 
since his redshirt freshman season ... posted a 355-pound 
bench press. 570-pound squat and a 37-inch vertical jump 
for a 746 strength index, second-best among defensive backs 
... set a team record for DBs with a 352-pound clean in the 
spring ... Season : fourth in the ACC with 1 .09 passes de- 
fended per game ... second on the team with 1 1 PBUs ... 
ninth on the team with 37 tackles (29 solo) ... started 1 1 
games at CB ... fit WFUj ... missed his first start in 3 1 games 

2004 BATOR BOWL 



© 



■BOX. 



rem to iwteh 



12004 MARYLAND GATOR BOWL GUIDE 



(atNCSU) ... had one solo 



due to a deep thigh bruise . 
tackle, one PBU 
and an intercep- 
tion... intercep- 
tion came in 
the first quarter 
as he made a 
leaping, one- 
handed grab 
in the end 
zone ... (vs. 
UVaj ... tied a 
career-high with 
eight solo tack- 
les ... added 
one PBU as he 
dove to knock 
down a pass 
on a hook 
route in the 
first quarter ... 
(at GT) ... fin- 
ished with one in- 
terception and one PBU 
... interception came 
late in the first quarter, 
as he came back on a 
ball, sneaking in front of 
the Yellow Jacket receiver for the 
pick ... /vs Duke) ... finished with four tack- 
les (three solo) ... also had two PBUs ... one 
was nearly a leaping interception ... (vs CUj 
... finished with five tackles [three solo), 1 .5 
TFLs, and one PBU ,,, one of his TFLs came 
in the first quarter as he drove the Clemson 
tailback out of bounds after hurdling a blocker .., had a key 
hit on a third-and-three in the third quarter as he tackled the 
Clemson QB on a draw play stopping him short of the first 
down and forcing a fourth down conversion attempt which 
failed ... (at EMUj ... (vs. WVUj ... finished with one unas- 
sisted tackle ... hit a Mountaineer receiver on the right side 
of the field, knocking the ball loose in the second quarter for 
his lone PBU of the game ... combined with Jamal Chance 
on a key tackle for a loss of one yard on third down, forcing 
West Virginia to punt in the second quarter ... (vs. The Cita- 
del)... broke up a pass in the end zone on a leaping effort in 
the third quarter ... finished with three solo tackles ... (at 
FSU) ... had seven tackles (six solo) ... recorded the Terps' 
ony two PBUs ... one of his PBUs came when he nailed 
Chauncey Stovall in mid-air forcing him to drop the ball 
streaked downfield on Adam Podleshs 52-yard punt, to tackle 
Dominic Robinson for a one-yard loss . . . Career: has started 
44 games in his career. 





Statistics 

Defense G-G5 l/T 


AT TT TFL 


Sucks 


\ 

FC FRPBU Int. 


2003 11-11 






11 2 


Career 46-44 126 


36 16211.0-25 


2.0-9 


2 2 29 10 



42 



RAYMOND CUSTIS 




FREE SAFETY , 
5-9 • 789 • JR.-2V 
GERNIANTOWN, MB. 
INORTHMSTI 

A physical player who was moved from cornerback to safety 
prior to the 200 1 season and has become a solid contributor 
. sees action primarily in dime situations and on special teams 
... had an outstanding off-season in the weightroom as he 
posted the highest strength index on the team (790) while 
earning Iron Terp status . . . strength numbers included a 3 7 5- 
pound bench, 595-pound squat and a 37 1/2-inch vertical 
jump ... Season : (at NCSU) ... notched two solo tackles ... 
(at GT)... had two solo tackles (at FSUj . . his lone tackle of 
the game (solo) came on a big play in the second quarter 
when he had a huge hit on Chris Rix, stopping his run short 
of a TD on the Terps' one-yard line. 



Statistics 

Defense thCS UT AT TT TFL Sacks 


— > 

FC FRPBU Int. 


2003 12-0 6 2 8 0-0 0.0-0 





Career 34-0 16 6 22 1.0-10 1.0-10 


10 2 1 


^- 


J 




VERNON DAVIS 




2002 ORANGE BOWL 



TIGHT END 
6-3 • 231 • FR.-HS 
WASHINGTON, D.C. 

IDUNRARI 



An outstanding physical specimen for a first-year player ... 
has seen time primarily on special teams ... a player to watch 
in the future ... can play receiver or tight end ... runs a re- 
ported 1 0.7 in the 1 00 meters ... Season : (vs UNC) ... took 
a sideline pass from Joel Statham for an 1 1-yard gain in the 
fourth quarter ... reception was his longest of the season ... 
(at EMU) ... first career game with multiple receptions (two| 
... second career-reception was good for a first down, keep- 
ing the Terps first scoring drive alive ... narrowly missed first 
career punt block as he nearly got a piece of one in the first 
quarter ... had a 10-yard reception in the fourth quarter .. 
had two solo tackles on special teams ... (vs. WVUj his 
lone tackle of the game came on a big hit on special teams 
during the second quarter, forcing the Mountaineers' drive 
to begin at their own 1 8-yard line ... (at FSU) ... had his first 
career reception, which came on a one-yard pass from Or- 
lando Evans in the fourth quarter ... also recorded his first 
career tackle |solo) on special teams ... [at NIU) saw action 
on punt and kick coverage teams in his first career action as 
a Terp ... the lone true freshman to play in game one. 
- 2002 PEACH BOWL 



r 
Statistics 

Receivinq (yCS Rec. 


Yds. 


Avq. 


TD Long 


2003 12-0 4 


31 


7.8 


11 













fflCMDODICKERSMi 

5 




LINEBACKER 

6-1 • 243 • SO.-1V 

HYATTSVILLE, MO. 

(NORTHWESTERN! 



Player in his third year at Maryland who has played botl 
linebacker and fullback in 2003 ... spent the spring at ful 
back in an attempt to solidify a position which had its depti 
weakened by the departure of Chad Killian and James Lync 
. hard-nosed player who has dramatically improved his siz 
and strength since enrolling at Maryland ... has good instinct 
and likes to hit ... an Iron Terp with a 375-pound bench am, 
555-pound squat . Season : has played on both offens' 
and defense during the same game against Eastern Miclii 
gan. West Virginia, and The Citadel ... (at NCSU) forced 
fumble on the last play of the game, a huge hit on V 
McLendon that jarred the ball loose ... (vs. Duke) ... recorded 
his first two tackles of the season (one solo). 



Statistics 

Defense ChCS UT AT TT TFL 


Sacks 


FC FRPBU Int., 


2003 1 1-0 2 1 3 O.M 


0-0 


10 


Career 22-0 10 11 21 0.0-0 


0.04 


10 10 


*- 



JEFF DUGAN 




6-5 • 258 • SR.-3V 

ALLISON PARK, PA. 

{CENTRAL CATHOLICI 



Second-Team All ACC 

A talented tight end who enters his fourth and final season 
a starter described by his coaches as the best blocking tigi 
end in the conference but has been more of a factor as a n 
ceiver this year has ideal tight-end size big, strong, phy ■; 
cal player with good hands . strongest tight end on the tea 
... benched 350 and squatted 540 in spring testing Se. 
son: Terps starting tight end lone non-start was due I 
formation Maryland used to open the game ... fifth on tf 
team with 14 receptions ... (at WFU) ... had the key bloc i 
sealing off a defender, to spring Bruce Perry for an 1 8-yard iu 
in the second quarter . . , (vs. UVaj . . finished with three recei 
tions totaling 40 yards .., longest reception of the game carr 

2004 GATOR BOWL 




rem to mm GATOR 
I BCWL 



In a 20-yard play-action pass from Scott McBrien in the first 
juarter as he spun around in the middle of the field to make 
1 ie grab . had six "big blocks" . . . (vs. UNQ ... made a 1 7-yard 
"atch on a crossing route with the pass coming from Scott 
WcBrien in the first quarter ... (at GT] ... had one reception for 

7 yards ... added three "big blocks'... (vs. WVUj ... recorded 

ne most receptions |three) and the most receiving yards (50) 

i a game since posting a career-high five for 9 1 yards against 

diddle Tennessee State as a freshman in 2000 ... made a leap- 

ig grab for a 1 4-yard gain across the 

liddle on a play-action pass in the ■ 

econd quarter ... recorded his ' / ~ 

xigest reception of the season [26 j 

ards) in the third quarter as he 

Iragged two West Virginia de- 

enders after the catch 

o gain additonal 

ardage... (vs. The 

'.itadelj ... made 
.lis first two re- 
., eptions of the 
jeason for a to- 
''al of 22 yards... 

:areer: has 45 
"areer starts ... 
.inished second 
on the team in re- 

eptions as a redshirt 
jreshmanin2000.. 
yarned honorable 
'jnention AII-ACC 
honors in 2001. 

• Statistics 

Receiving G-GS 



2004 MARYLAND GATOR 



(at EMU) . . . Terps' highest-graded lineman . . . recorded a other sack came in the third quarter when he showed speed 



season-high three "big blocks" with no missed assignments 
on 54 plays ... (vs. WVUj ... Terps' second-highest graded 
offensive lineman .. recorded one "big block" on 62 plays 
Career: was switched from defensive line to the offensive 
line during fall of 1999 




KEVIN EU 
41 




DEFENSIVE END 

6-2 • 272 • JR.-1V 

DEPTFORD, N.J. 

IDEPTFORDI 



Rec. Yds. Avg. TD Long 



12-11 



175 



12.5 







2b 



.Career 

i|S 



48-45 55 649 IIS 



47 



ERIC DUMAS 






OFFENSIVE TACKLE 

6-6 • 301 ' SR.-3V 

ATLANTA. 6A. 

IBENJMN MAYS! 



'"he starter at right tackle, protecting Scott McBnen's blind 
ide an athletic player for his size with long arms and good 
jeet ... in his second season as the starter ... posted an im- 
pressive 34-inch vertical jump on testing day has 14 2 
' Jercent body fat - lowest among offensive line regulars — 
)n a 3 1 4-pound frame ... Season : started all 1 2 games this 
■eason at right tackle ... (at WFUj ... had the key block on 
iruce Perrys 49-yard touchdown run in the third quarter as 
ie angles his man to the middle of the field, creating a hole 
>n the right side for him to run through ... (vs. UVal ... re 
:orded two "big blocks" ... had the key block on Josh Aliens 
>ne-yard touchdown run in the second quarter ... (atCTj ... 
jiad the key block on Bruce Perry's 1 9-yard run in the second 
quarter . (vs. Duke) ... had the key block on Bruce Perrys 
lOuchdown run in the third quarter ... notched one "big block" 
2002 0RAN6E BOWL 



Second-Team All ACC 

Fourth-year junior who has worked his way 
into a starting role this year ... has been an impressive 
pass-rushing force in Scott Smith's ab- 
sence ... an Iron Terp ... registered a 
370-pound bench press on testing 
day . . Season : third on the 
team with 5.5 sacks 
sixth on the team with 
53 tackles (25 



solo) ^_ 

tied for second on ^fl 
the team with Shawne Mernman with I 
12 QB hurries ... injun ^H 

Forest ... (at NCSUj ... had a strong ^j 
game with a career-high tying eight a 
tackles (four solo) along with two QB 
hurries ... (vs.. UNQ ... had three tackles 
(two solo). 1 .5 TFL of six yards and a half sack 
combined with Shawne Mernman on as 
they collapsed on the pocket and sacked the 
Carolina quarterback for a loss of two yards ... 
(at 677 ... notched seven tackles (four solo) and 
had one sack ... had 1 .5 tackles for a loss of 10 
yards ... came around the left side and caught a 
Georgia Tech tailback from behind for a loss of one 
yard in the first quarter . . , (vs. Duke) ... had eight tackles 
(two solo) ... one of his two QB hurries came in the first 
quarter when he hit the Duke quarterback as he released 
the ball, forcing an incompletion ... his lone TFL came in 
the third quarter as he broke free of his blocker to tackle 
Chris Douglass for a loss of one yard ... (vs. CUj... had a 
big hit in the third quarter as he powered off his blocker 
to tackle the Tiger tailback for no gain . . one of his three 
QB hurries came in the fourth quarter when he rushed the 
Clemson quarterback in the end zone, forcing him to throw 
the ball away ... finished with five tackles (two solo) for the 
third consecutive game ... (vs. WVUj ... very impressive in his 
first career start ... finished with five tackles (three solo) ... led 
the Terps with three tackles for losses totaling 15 yards ... 
also led Maryland with two sacks for 1 4 yards . . . fought off a 
block to sack the Rasheed Marshall in the first quarter ... his 

• 2002 PEACH BOWL 



by pursuing the QB from behind . . had a key tackle for a 
loss of one yard on third down, forcing West Virginia to punt 
in the third quarter ... (at NIU) ... finished with three tackles 
(one solo) ... also had a key sack called back due to penalty 
that could have altered the landscape of the game by forc- 
ing a third down and long instead of a first down for NIU. 



Statistics 

Defense G-GS UT 


AT TT TPL 


Sacks 


K FRPBU Int. 


2003 12-9 25 


28 53 11.0-58 


','>% 


10 


Career 16-9 31 


29 60 13.0-62 


5.5-50 


10 


^ -< 



ORLANDO EVANS 






QUARTERBACK 

6-0- W3'SR.-1V 

STOCKTON, CALIF. 

IBR00KSIDE 

CHRISTIAN CCSFI 

Senior quarterback who transferred to Maryland after 
a strong year at the junior college level in Califor- 
nia in 2001 ... earned the backup spot at QB 
with a strong preseason camp . . . playing expe- 
rience and intelligence had him holding onto 
the No. 2 quarterback spot in the spring ... has 
completely recovered from a knee injury suf- 
fered a year ago ... Season: (at EMU) ... saw 
action in the fourth quarter ... completed both 
of his passing attempts in the game for a total 
of 16 yards (vs. The Citadel) ... went 4-of-6 
for a career-high 70 yards ... had his first career 
touchdown at Maryland on a career-long 62 
yard pass Derrick Fenner ... (at FSUj ... came 
into the game with 1 0:22 left in the fourth 
quarter ... finished 7-of-l 2 for 57 yards 
connected with Rich Parson across the 
middle for a 23-yard gain late in the 
game ... Career: began his colle- 
giate career at the University of Or- 
egon. 



Statistics 

Passing OCS Att.Comp 


Int Yds. 


Per. 


TD LP 


2003 


SO 21 14 


161 


667 


1 62 


Career 


6-0 22 14 


161 


.636 


1 62 


Rushing 


OGS Art 


Gain Loss 


Net 


Avq. TD LP 


2003 


50 6 


6 40 


-34 


-57 6 


Career 


64 8 


21 40 


-19 


•2.4 9 





2004 GATOR BOWL 



GATOn 
BCdL 



TBRPS TO UiaTDH 



1 2004 MARYLAND GATOR BOWL GOIDE I 

■ 



C. J.FELDHEIM DERRICK 



NOSE TACKLE 

6-3 • 287 • SR.-3V 

HEREFORD, MO. 

(HEREFORD! 




Senior who has successfully returned from a torn ACL suf- 
fered in game eight of last year . . . had made the shift from 
defensive tackle to nose tackle and was having his finest year 
as a Terp before the injury ...has improved with each season 
at the collegiate level . . . an intelligent player who showed a 
good mix of run-stopping and pass-rushing skills in his first 
year at tackle ... most experienced player on the defensive 
line ... has added 52 pounds since arriving as a true fresh- 
man |was 235 at the time of his arrival) ... earned Iron Terp 
status a year ago but did not complete testing in spring '02 
due to injury ... was able, however, to post a 385-pound 
bench Season : has started all 1 2 games at nose tackle 
(at WFUI . finished with one solo tackle and one PBLJ had 
a key stop on a third-and-three in the second quarter as he 
limited Chris Barclay to a one-yard run, forcing a Demon Dea- 
con punt ... PBU came in the third quarter as he jumped over 
his blocker to deflect Cory Randolph's pass ... /vs. UVaj ... 
.^^ had four tackles (three solo) and 
Jy one QB hurry ... had a key 

/%&*> stop on a third down in the 
\ I first quarter to force a Cava- 
lier punt ... (vs. UNQ ... re- 
covered a North Caro- 
lina fumble caused by 
Leon Joe in the sec- 
ond quarter jat 
OTI ... finished with 
five tackles (two solo)... 
added one PBU (vs. 
Duke) ... finished with 
two tackles (one solo) ... 
one of his hits came on a 
fourth down, stopping 
the Duke tailback short 
of a first down, and 
causing a turnover 
on downs ... /at 
EMUj ... had five 
tackles (four solo) 
. tackles came at 
key times through- 
out the game as 
four of them came 
on third downs... (vs. 
WVUj ...finished with 
four tackles (three 
solo). 




Statistics 


\ 


Defense G-GS UT AT TT :-t Sacks 


FC FRPBU Int. 




1 


Career 35-31 60 57 117 12. S SO 6.5-34 


13 




J 




WIDE RECEIVER 

6-0- 185-S0.-1V 

HAMPTON, VA. 

IHAMPTONI 



Third-year receiver who has earned increased playing time 
with each season ... hard-working player with good quick- 
ness who coaches feel is on his way to developing into a 
strong collegiate receiver ...can also return punts and kicks 
...has good speed and a 36'-mch vertical jump . . Season : 
fourth on the team in receiving yards with 298 . . . missed the 
last three games after having an appendectomy . status for 
bowl game is uncertain ... (vs. UNQ ... tied a career-high 
with two recetions for 64 yards .. . showed his big-play ability 
as he beat his defender downfield in the first quarter to take 
a pass from Scott 

l( ^ 






McBnen for 55 yards 
/vs. CU) ... lone 
reception was a 69- 
yard touchdown 
where he came 
back on the 
field and 
made the 
catch after 
initially being 
forced out of 
bounds by the 
Clemson de- 
fender ... recep- 
tion was the long- 
est of his career ... jat 
EMU) ... lone reception of the 
game came on a 58-yard 
gain in the third quarter... 
got behind defender and 
would have scored, had ' 
ball not been slightly 
underthrown ... /vs. WVUj 
... earned the first start of 
his collegiate career ... 
only reception of the 
game was a 15-yard pass 
up the right side, setting 
up a 32-yard field 
goal by 

Novak to end _ 

the second 

quarter .. . /vs. The Citadel/ . . . showed great speed as he took 
a pass from Orlando Evans 62 yards up the middle for a touch- 
down on his only reception of the night . /at FSUj . . one of 
only two Terps with multiple receptions in the game. 




r 

Statistics 

Receiving G-G5 


Ret. 
10 


Yds. 
298 


Avg 
298 


TD 
2 


> 

Long 
69 


2003 9-1 


Career 17-1 


11 


306 


27.8 


3 


69 












J 



A good athlete who began last season with the possibility o] 
playing on either side of the ball (fullback or linebacker) but I 
now firmly entrenched atop the depth chart at fullback . I 
solid in every aspect as a fullback ... a strong isolation bloct m 
who also has good pass-catching skills ... an Iron Terp with 
658 strength index and 525-pound squat Season: (at WFL 

had the key block on Bruce Perry's two-yard touchdow 
run in the fourth quarter as he hurdeled one defender i 
order to put a block on another ... (at NCSUj ... made a nic 
grab on a seven-yard pass from Scott McBnen as he leapt ft 
the ball and kept his feet in bounds ..had the key block o 
Scott McBrien's touchdown run in the fourth quarter as h 
sealed off his block to create a lane for 
McBnen ... (vs. UVaj ... made an 1 1-yard Iff 
reception and plowed over a defender * 
after catching a slant pass from 
McBnen in the first 
quarter 
catch was his 
longest of the 
season ... fat EMU) 

first reception of 
the season came on a 
five-yard gam deep in 
Eastern Michigan territory 
during the third quarter... (at 
NIUj ... had the key block on Josh 
Allen's rushing TD in the first 
quarter. 





Statisti 

Rushing 


CS 

G-GS 


An. 


Gain Loss Mel 


Avg. 


717 U 


II 10 













Carter 


42-10 


11 


34 34 


31 


t 


Receiving 


G-G5 
11-10 


S 


Yds. Avg. 


TD 


Long 


35 7.0 





II 


Career 


42-10 


6 


47 7.1 





12 



2002 ORANGE BOWL 



2002 PEACH BOWL 



2004 OATOR BOWL 





TBHPS TO UJaTCH 



OOMONIQUE 
FOXUVORTH 




CORNERBACK 

5-11' 177'JR.-2V 

RANOALLSTOWN, MO. 

(WESTERN TECH I 

Second-Team AII-ACC 

.Athletic defensive back who starts at the field cornerback 
position ...a heady player who runs well and always seems 
b be in position to make a play has one of the best work 
'thics on the team ... one of nine Iron Terps in the Maryland 
,'efensive backfield . . . posted a 38 I /2-inch vertical jump and 
' 300-pound bench in spring testing . . . Season : tied for 
.jurth in the ACC and the team lead with three interceptions 
'long with Madieu Williams ... started all 12 games at CB ... 
«. UVaj ... recorded two solo tackles with one PBU ... made 
a leaping play in the 
middle of the field 
to knock down a 
pass in the third 
quarter ... (vs. 
UNQ ... 
had a 
good 
game 
with 





with three tackles (two solo) added onSTBD rl3D 
the Terps' lone interception of the game, his second on the 
season ... interception came on a third-and-one, when he 
stepped in front of the receiver on a quick out and took it 44 
yards for a touchdown ... (vs The Citadel) ... deflected a 
pass on a third down in the second quarter, forcing a Bull- 
dog punt ... recorded one assisted tackle ..was the team's 
highest-graded defensive back ... (atFSU/ ... recorded a ca- 
reer-high nine tackles (all solo) ... chased down PK. Sam from 
the opposite side of the field to save a TD in the second 
quarter ... hit an FSU receiver just as he caught the ball in 
the third quarter, keeping the play to a two-yard gain ... (at 
NIUJ ... had the Terps' lone interception of the game, a div- 
ing effort in the fourth quarter ,., added three tackles (two 
solo) ... Career: led the conference in passes defensed as a 
sophomore, earning first team AII-ACC recognition 



Statistics 

Defense G-GJ UT AT TT 


7F1 


Sacks 


FC FRPBU Int. 


2003 12-12 35 6 41 


00-0 


00-0 


16 3 


Career 28-28 89 14 103 


1.0-3 


0.0-0 


3 25 8 








y 



LATREZ HARRISON 

4 





five solo tackles, one 
f i I PBU and one intercep- 

V 

came in the second 
^^^H i quarter as he made a 

WT~ leaping grab after 

| breaking off his cov- 
^^H I erage ... had a re- 

f turn of 20 yards on 
V the play .../Vs. CUj 
... finished with two 
1 solo tackles and two 
I PBUs ... made a diving 
^^^^^r effort to deflect a pass on 
third-and-eight in the sec- 
ond quarter, forcing a Tiger 
punt ... second PBU of the 
game came on a key fourth- 
and-one situation in the third 
quarter when he hit the Tiger 
receiver as soon as he touched the ball, 
knocking the ball loose and forcing a 
■ turnover on downs ...fat EMUj . . . fin- 

2002 ORANGE BOWL 



2004 MARYLAND GATOR BOWL GUIDE 

the very next play, he recorded his second touchdown re-" 
ception of the season ... (vs. CUj ... led the Terps' with four 
catches for 39 yards despite leaving the game in the third 
quarter with a slight concussion ... longest reception of the 
night, 1 3 yards, came on third-and-nine and resulted in a 
first down to keep the Terps' second scoring drive alive ... 
(vs. WVUI ... had four receptions for 88 yards ... scored his 
first touchdown of the season on an inside post route, knock- 
ing one Mountaineer aside on his way to the 25-yard gain . . 
had a 34-yard reception in the first quarter, setting up Bruce 
Perry's first touchdown run of the night . . . displayed his block- 
ing skills by recording four "big blocks" ... /vs. The Citadel) 
led the Terps with four receptions totaling 51 yards ... made 
a great play in the second quarter by coming back to the ball 
to make a reception that otherwise could have been inter- 
cepted ... (at FSUj ... took five snaps at QB in the wingbone 
formation ... completed a six-yard screen pass to Derrick 
Fenner on his only passing attempt of the game ... his lone 

reception of the 
game came on a 
i play-action pass 
across the 
middle from 
Scott 
McBnen for 
a gain of 14 
yards ... (at 
NIUj ... led 
the Terps with 
four recep- 
tions totaling 
48 yards ,., 
three of his 
four receptions 
resulted in first 
downs ... Ca- 
reer: spent his first 
three years as a quarter- 
back, but agreed while the 
team prepared for the Or- 
ange Bowl two years ago to 
shift to wide receiver to bet- 
ter utilize his skills . . . coaches 
suggested that he was too tal- 
ented to risk not having him on 
the field ... saw action as the 
Terps' No. 2 quarterback in 200 1 
and showed superior talent run- 
ning with the football. 







WIDE RECEIVER 

6-2 ' 223 • SR.-3V 
ATLANTA, BA. 
(BOOKER I 
WASHINOTONI 

Senior with a great combination of size and athleticism 
. transition to receiver was relatively easy as his grasp 
of the offense was from a quarterback's perspective .. 
posted a 365-pound bench and 36 '-inch vertical jump in 
the spring ... an excellent blocking receiver Season : tied 
for 1 0th all-time at Maryland for receiving touchdowns in a 
season with six ... leads the team in receptions with 34 as 
well as receiving yards with 553 ... (at WFUj ... only recep- 
tion of the game was an 18-yard touchdown catch in the 
first quarter ... made a nice play as he broke a tackle and 
powered past two more defenders to reach the endzone af- 
ter catching the pass on a short hook route . . . (vs. UVaj led 
the Terps with four receptions totaling 63 yards, and one 
touchdown ... made a great play in the fourth quarter, tak- 
ing a short slant pass, spinning off a tackle near the line of 
scrimmage and then racing down the right sideline for a 
gain of 45 yards . . . touchdown came in the first quarter on a 
hook route for 1 1 yards on a well-timed pass from Scott 
McBnen ... (vs. UNQ... recorded four receptions for 54 yards 
including two touchdowns ... became first player to record 
two touchdown receptions in a game since Guilian Gary 
scored three against Georgia Tech in 2000 ... first touchdown 
came in the second quarter on a flag pass to the left corner 
of the end zone from McBnen for 14 yards ...second touch- 
down came in the third quarter as he caught a 1 6-yard pass 
from McBnen on a slant route ... (vs. Duke) ... finished with 
four receptions totaling 88 yards ... had his longest reception 
of the season, 49 yards, in the first quarter showing great 
speed to get downfield on the deep-out from McBnen ... on 

2002 PEACH BOWL • 2004 GATOR BOWL 





Statisti 

Receiving 


CS 

trCS 


fee. 


Yds. 


Avg. 


n> 


Long 




2003 


12-1 1 


38 


553 


14.6 


6 


49 




Caree- 


36-21 


58 


922 


15.9 


8 


69 





















45 



I " —- "■-] 



TBRPS TO UiaTEH 



12004 MARY1AND GATOR BOWL GOIDE 



« 




AN DREW HENLEY 

51 w A 



LINEBACKER 

B-0 • 240 • SR.-2V 

RIVEROALE, MO. 

IDEMTHAI 



An athletic senior who is one of the most versatile members 
of the Terp linebacking corps can see action at the "Will" 
or "Mike" linebacker spot ... an intelligent, coachable player 
who is an integral part of the Maryland special teams ... 
posted the highest strength index (743) of any Maryland 
linebacker this off-season ... Iron Terp with a 370-pound 
bench and 650-pound squat ... Season : (at WFUj ... had 
three solo tackles and a PBU ..jumped to tip a pass in the 
third quarter which was then intercepted by D'Qwell Jack- 
son . PBU was the first of his career ... (vs. UVaj ... finished 
with three tackles |two solo] ... stuffed an end-around in the 
second quarter for no gain ... (vs. UNQ ... finished with two 
tackles (one solo) ... recovered a fumble on punt coverage 
after Adam Podleshs punt hit a Tar Heel player in the back .. . 
(vs. WVUj recorded two solo tackles ... had a crushing hit 
on Charles Hales to stop him short of a first down on a QB 
draw during the fourth quarter ... Career: played just one 
year of organized football before deciding to walk on at 
Maryland in the fall of 2000. 



Statistics 

Defense &CS UT 


AT TT 


TFL 


Sacks 


> 
FC FRPBU Int. 


2003 12-0 16 


7 23 


0.M 


0.M 


110 


Career 35-2 48 


18 66 


1.5-3 


0.5-1 


110 










-J 



SIEPH0N HEYER 



70 




OFFENSIVE TACKLE 

6-6 - 295 - SO.- IV 

LAWRENCEVILLE, GA. 

IRROOKWOOOI 



Second-year tackle who saw significant action as a true fresh- 
man and spent all of 2003 as the starter at left tackle ... was 
originally slated to redshirt a year ago, but showed great 
footwork and maturity in his first fall camp . , wears a size-22 
sneaker off the field but likes to squeeze into an 1 8 cleat on 
game days ... strength numbers includea 375-pound bench 
and a 540-pound squat ... name is pronounced STEFF-ahn 
HIGH-en Season: started all 1 2 games at left tackle this 
season ... (vs. UVaj ... finished with three "big blocks" on a 
team-high 69 offensive plays ... (vs. UNQ ... Terps highest- 
graded offensive lineman ... tied for the team lead among 
linemen with four "big blocks" ...(atGTj... notched one "big 

2002 ORANGE BOWL 




"1 




block" with no 
missed assign- 
ments ... (vs. 
Dukej ... recorded 
a team-high 
three "big 
blocks" ... (vs. 
CUI ... Terps' sec- 
ond highest-graded 
offensive lineman 
... finished with 
two "big blocks" 
and no missed 
assignments 
on 70 plays ... 
(vs. WVUj ... 
recorded two 
"big blocks" on 60 
plays 




D'l WflUACKSON 

52 




LINEBACKER 

B-1 • 224 • SO.-1V 

LARGO, FLA. 

ISEMIN0LEI 

Second-Team All ACC 

Second-year player who is now the Terps' 
starter at middle linebacker and playing like 
a budding star ... moved to the "Mike" line- 
backer position in the spring . 
well and is a very sure tackier 
an Iron Terp who posted a 36 
'-inch vertical jump, a 330- 
pound bench and a 535- 
pound squat in spring testing 
Season : listed seventh in 
the ACC rankings for tackles 
per game with 10 7 
leads the team with 1 24 
tackles (82 solo) ... 
started all 1 2 games 
at MLB ... has one 
of the team's 
three blocked 
kicks on the 
season ... (al 
WFUI ... re- 
corded eight tackles 
(six solo) and an in- 
terception ... inter- 
ception came in 
the third quarter 
as he made a 
leaping grab 



on a pass that was tipped in the air by Andrew Henley I 
stood up Chris Barclay on a run to the right side in the frsjl 
quarter for no gain ... (at NCSUj ... had a big game with 1 
tackles (nine solo), including one tackle for a loss ... (at G] 
... finished with 1 3 tackles (seven solo) and one QB hurry 
added a PBU in the second quarter as he nearly intercepts 
a pass from Reggie Ball ... (vs. Dukej ... led the Terps with 1 
tackles (eight solo) .combined with Leon Joe for a sack or 
a third-and-l 1, forcing a Duke punt ... on one of his tvw 
QB hurries, he broke straight through the offensive lint 
to get to the Blue Devil quarterback forcing him to throv 
the ball away . . . (vs. CL// ... led the Terps with 1 tackle 
nine solo], a sack and half a TFL ... threw his blocke 
aside and downed the Clemson QB for a sack in the sec 
ond quarter ... showed his great speed in the third quarte 
on a third down as he caught the Tiger QB stopping hin 
short of a first down, forcing a fourth-down conversioi 
attempt which failed ... (at EMUj ... was all over th 
field, leading the Terps with a career-high 1 6 tackle 
(nine solo] ... (vs. WVUj ... finished with 1 2 tackle 
10 solo) ... caught Rasheed Marshall from be 
hind for a loss of six yards on his first caret 
sack ... (at FSUj ... had a career game 
posted the first interception of his career o 
Chris Rix's first pass of the game and returned 
for a touchdown, running over two FSU players oi 
his way to the end zone ... finished second on the team witl 
1 1 tackles (five solo) ...forced a fumble came flying throuqi 
the right end of the offensive line to block a 28-yard fiel 
goal attempt in the first quarter ... stopped a Chris Rix Q 
sneak on third and one, forcing the Seminoles to punt ... / 
NIUj ... led the Terps with fifteen tackles (eight solo) in hi 
debut as a starter . . . tied for a team lead with three QB hui 
ries ... added one tackle for a loss of two yards 



I 






• 




Statistics 

Defense G-GJ UT 


AT TT TFL Sucks 


FC FRPBU In* 


2003 


V 124 7 5-27 2S17 




Career 26-12 120 


55 17510.5-30 2.5-17 


3 2. 



2002 PEACH BOWL 



2004 BATOR BOWL 






LEON JOE 






s-i 



LINEBACKER 

' 232 • SR.-3V 

CLINTON, NIB. 

IFRIENBLYI 



-A 



76 w^SSatoi&Sk 

onah end-around to stop him for no q.iin intnenr 
... finished with eight tackles (five solo) and a half TFL of one 
yard ... latEMUj ... second on the team with 10 tackles (five 
solo) ... (vs. WVUj ... finished with seven tackles |two solo) ... 
showed good athleticism in pursuit of Quincy Wilson, tack- 
ling him for no gain in the third quarter ... fatFSUj ... led the 
Terps' defense with 1 2 tackles (seven solo) . . . showed his speed 
when chasing down Chris Rix for a solo tackle, limiting him to 
a one-yard gam on the first play of the second quarter ...(at 
NIUj ... finished second on the team with a career-high four- 
teen tackles (seven solo) . . . combined with Jamal Chance on 
a sack for four yards ... had the Terps' lone pass break up of 
the game . . Career : started his 36th career game .. . leading 
returning tackier from 2001 ... ninth-leading tackier among 
ACC returnees from 2002. 



Hi athletic linebacker who has been one of the more under- 
fed players on the Maryland roster the last few years ... on 
?ie "watch list" for the Butkus Award at the start of the sea- 
ipn. . . a sideline-to-sideline player from his "Will" linebacker po- 
iltion ... an Iron Terp who is the strongest linebacker on the 
;pam and posted the highest strength index ever by a Terp 
jnebacker (785) in 2002 ... also owns the record for bench 
,r ess (475 pounds) and vertical jump |4I inches| by a Terp 
nebacker . . . incredible physical numbers include a 6 1 5-pound 
fluat, a 363-pound clean and a 4.43 time in the 40-yard dash 
I Season : second on the team with 1 03 tackles (62 solo) ... 
•/arted all 1 2 games at WLB ... (at WFUj ... had a strong game 
.nth nine tackles (eight solo) ... (at NCSUj ... finished with 
^ght tackles (three solo), including one tackle for a loss of 
:W yards ... TFL came in the first 
.jarter as he caught TA McLendon 
in a run to the outside, wrapping 4 
km up for a loss of three yards on 
le play ... (vs. UNCj ... had I 
ickles (three solo] and 
irced one fumble... 
iimble came in the 
l?cond quarter as 
le put a blistering 
It on a Tar Heel re- 
'eiver after he made 
reception.. (atOTj 
;. had a great 
"ame, tying a ca 
er-high and 
lading the Terps 
1'ith 14 tackles 
jiine solo) ... 
I so had one 
B hurry (vs. 
uke) ... finished with 
ne tackles (seven 
combined 
,1th D'Qwell Jack- 
in for a sack on 
iiirrJand-ll. forc- 
jg a Duke punt... 
\s CUI recorded 
(■e second intercep- 
pn of his career with 
jo seconds left in the 
sme, and returned 
for 23 yards ... 
:ilized his 
leedas he 
lught a Ti- 
;r defender 

2002 ORANGE BOWL 



Statistics 

Defense G-GJ UT AT TT TFL 


Sacks 


\ 

FC FRPBU Int. 


2003 12-12 62 41 103 3.5-13 


1.0-8 


1 1 1 


Career 47-36 193 120 31320.S S3 


3.0-23 


10 5 2 






■i 



CHRIS KELLEY 

~2 





STRONG SAFETY 

6-2 • 210 - JR.- IV 

GERNIANTOWN, MB. 

I5ENECA VALLEY! 



Former quarterback who has moved to strong safety to 
better utilize his skills in 2003 . . also seeing time with 
the first unit on kick coverage teams ... a hard-nosed 
competitor who has seen limited action in nickel 
and dime situations ... one of the more highly- 
recruited players on the roster ... showed a 
nose for the ball and good hitting ability 
his first offseason at defensive back 
Season : has been used prima- 
rily on special teams this season 
... (at NCSUj ... recorded two 
tackles (one solo) on spe- 
cial teams... (vs. CI//... 
raced down the side- 
line to hit the Tiger 
kick-returner at Clemsons own 1 5-yard line on his only tackle 
of the game ... (vs. The Citadel j ... finished with three solo 
tackles . . recorded his first career PBU in the third quarter ... 
(at FSUj ... recorded the first two tackles (one solo) of his ca- 
reer ... had a key block on special teams to spring Steve Suter 
for his longest kick-return of the night in the second quarter 
Career: was slowed by injury in each of his first three 



« 



years at the collegiate level but recovered quickly from a 

knee injury to see action at QB last year . . . tore the ante 

nor cruciate ligament in his right knee pnor to last years 

V spring game ... tore the ACL in his left knee after high 

school and then again pnor to fall camp in 2001 . 



Statistics 

Defense G-G5 UT 


AT 


TT 771 


Sacks 


FC FRPBU Int. 


2003 12-0 6 


2 


8 0OO 


0.OO 


10 


Career 25-0 6 


2 


8 0.0-0 


0.04) 


10 













TBRPS to wren 



2004 MARYLAND GATOR BOWL GUIDE 



WILLIAM KERSHAW 




48 





LINEBACKER 

6-3 • 233 • SB.-1V 

RAEFORB, NX. 

IHBKE COUNTYI 



True sophomore who was one of eight true freshmen to see 
playing time a year ago ... started spring at middle linebacker 
but switched back to strong side where he serves as a backup 
to Leroy Ambush .has put on 27 pounds since the start of 
his freshman season ... Season : (at NCSUj ... recorded two 
solo tackles on special teams ... hit the Wolfpack returner on 
a kickoff late in the fourth quarter on NC States own three- 
yard line, where they would be forced to start their final drive 
of the game ... (at EMUj ... finished with a season-high six 
tackles (three solo) ... had his first career TFL for a loss of one 
yard ... (vs. WVUj ... recorded four tackles (three solo) ... had 
a big hit on Quincy Wilson in the fourth quarter, limiting him 
to a gain of just two yards on the play ... (at NIUj ... forced 
an incomplete pass on a third down in the first quarter by 
hitting the NIL) quarterback as he released the ball. 



Statistics 

Defense GGS UT AT TT 


TFL 


Sacks FC FRPBU Int. 


2003 100 17 6 23 


1 0-1 


0.0-0 


Career 20-0 33 19 52 


1.0-1 


0.0-0 


v 




■d 





SAMMY 
MALDONADO 




2002 PEACH BOWL 



TAILBACK 

6-1 ' 233 - JR.-RS 

HARRISON, NX 

(HARRISON/OHIO STATE! 



Tailback in his second year at Maryland .. . redshirted last year 
after transferring from Ohio State prior to the season ... has 
found a home at tailback after splitting time between there 
and fullback a year ago ... a bruising runner with quick feet 
an Iron Terp who posted the highest strength index (692) 
among Maryland running backs in the spring ... strength 
numbers include a 325-pound bench press and a 550-pound 
squat ... is from the same hometown as Ralph Friedgen ... 
Season : Will not return this season after suffering an ACL 
injury in the North Carolina game . . . Terps' third4eading rusher 
with 305 yards ... averaged 6.0 yards per carry, the most by 
any Terrapin tailback ... (vs. UNCI ... rushed for 43 yards on 
five attempts before leaving the game at the end of the first 

2 4 GATOR BOWL 



i 



TOYOTA 

tbups to mam 
BCWL ' 






12004 MARYLAND GATOR BOWL GOIDE 



quarter due to injury ... had a career-long 3 1 yard run up the 

I left side in the first quarter after breaking a tackle 

near the line of scrimmage... jatGTj... gained 
33 yards on just three rushing attempts ... had 
a 26-yard run in the fourth quarter as 
he bulled his way up the middle 
of the field through defenders 
... (vs. Duke) ... had 1 5 yards 
on five rushing attempts ... 
recorded his third rushing 
touchdown of the sea- 
son in the third quar- 
ter as he broke one 
tackle and stretched 
across the goal line 
' ! on a five-yard play... 
jvs. WVUj ... led the 
Terps with a career- 
high 88 yards on just 1 3 rush- 
ing attempts ... jvs. The Ota- 
dell ... went for 66 yards on 
12 rushing attempts 
plowed over two defenders 
on a seven-yard run in the 
first quarter for his first 
touchdown as a Terp ... 
powered his way through 
1 the middle on a three-yard 
run, giving him a career high 
in touchdowns in a single 
game ... added his first career 
reception as a Terp on a 16- 
yard screen pass in the sec- 
ond quarter ... jat NIUj ... 
£) gained 19 yards on four 
rushing attempts in his first 
career action as a Terp . . . Career: rushed for 2 1 8 yards on 
61 career carries with one TD at Ohio State. 




Statistics 

Rushing G-CS Att. Gain Loss Net 


Avq. 


TD 


> 
LP 


2003j_MD[ 


7-0 51 306 1 305 


6.0 


3 


31 


Career 


21-0 112 534 11 523 


4.7 


4 


31 


Receiving 


G-GS Rec. Yds. Aug. 


TD 


Long 




2003|MD| 


7-0 1 16 16.0 





16 




Career 


214 1 It 16.0 





16 




note career numbers include statistics from Ohio State 










S 



SCOn McBRIEN 



7 




48 



QUARTERBACK 

6-1 • 182 • SR.-1V 

ROCKVILLE. MD. 

IDcYATHA 

WEST VIRGINIA! 

Southpaw quarterb ■ -c-rred from West Virginia 

just before the start of the 2001 season and is a key cog in 
the Terp offense ... the first quarterback since Friedgen's ar- 
rival to return after a full season as a starter ... has a strong 
2002 ORANGE BOWL 






arm throws the out and 
deep ball well ... has good 
quickness and makes 
good decisions on when 
to pull it down and run 
with the ball ... turned 
what was once a ques- 
tion mark - his ability to 
effectively run the 
option - 
into a 
strength 
by the end 
of his jun- 
ior season 
... body fat 
was measured 
at a team-low 
2.2 percent in 1 
the spring is 
surprisingly 
strong ... posted a 
285-pound bench and 
440-pound squat on test- 
ing day Season : fifth in 
the ACC with a passing effi- 
ciency of 137.1 ... sixth in the 
ACC for passing yards per game 
with 1 90.9 and total offense per 
game with 213.6 ... has passed 
for a career-high 1 6 touchdowns 
this season ... jat WFUJ ... went 12- 
of-22 for 198 yards and three touch 
downs ... first touchdown came as he 
hit Latrez Harrison for 1 8 yards in the first 
quarter ... showed pinpoint accuracy on his second touch- 
down pass as he found Dan Melendez in the corner of the tB 
endzone for 14 yards in the second quarter ... third touch- 
down of the game was a 28-yard pass to Jafar Williams in 
the third quarter ..he then hit Bruce Perry on a screen pass 
on a successful two-point conversion ... /at NCSUj ... finished 
1 7-of-37 with two touchdowns and one interception ... led 
the Terps to 16 points in the games final seven minutes ... 
added 16 yards rushing with one touchdown ... rushing 
touchdown came as he kept the ball on an option to the left 
side to put the Terps within one point with 2:29 left in the 
game ... showed his arm strength as he gunned a pass by a 
nearby defender to Jo Jo Walker for a touchdown in the 
fourth quarter ... jvs. UVaj ... went 14-of-21 for 191 yards 
with no interceptions and one touchdown ... touchdown 
pass to Latrez Harrison moved him in a tie for third all-time at 
Maryland with 26 career touchdown passes ... /vs. UNCj ... 
threw for a career-high 349 yards, going 1 5-of-25 with no 
interceptions and four touchdowns ... his career-high four 
touchdowns tied him for sixth all-time at Maryland for pass- 
ing touchdowns in a single game ... added two more touch- 
downs and 24 yards on eight rushing attempts ... 349 pass- 
ing yards was the most by any Terp since Scott Millanovich 
had 380 against Florida State in 1995 . longest touchdown 
pass of the game went to Jo Jo Walker for 67 yards in the 
second quarter as he hit Walker on a slant route across the 
middle of the field ... /vs. Duke] ... finished !8-of-32 for 232 
yards with one touchdown and one interception ... his 18 
completions were a career-high, exceeding the 1 7 he had 
against Wake Forest in 2002... /vs. CL// ... finished l4-of-27 
for 204 yards with three touchdowns and no interceptions 
third TD of the game came in the third quarter as he threw 

• 2002 PEACH BOWL 



the ball with pinpoint accuracy through two Tiger defender 
to hit Derrick Fenner for a season-long 69 yards ... jatEMUj' 
... finished 1 4-of- 1 9 for 252 yards with one passing touch- 
down scored his second rushing touchdown of the sea- 
son on an option keeper for nine yards in the fourth quarter 
,.. jvs WVUj ..had another strong performance against his 
former team ... finished 1 4-of-25 for 220 yards with one 
interception and his first passing touchdown of the 
season ... connected with Latrez Harrison on an 
inside post route for a 25-yard touchdown in the 
fourth quarter ... added a run for 1 1 yards at the 
end of the first quarter, in which he hurdled over 
a West Virginia defender on his way to a first 
down ... had a season-long run of 4 3 yards in 
the second quarter as he saw a hole in the 
middle of the field and took advantage of 
it ... jvs. The Citadel) .. had a solid night, 
finishing 1 2-of-20 for 178 yards despite see- 
tion in just the first half ... scored his first 
rushing touchdown of the season on a QB sneak in the 
second quarter Career ranks third all-time at Mary- 
land for career passing-touchdowns with 31 ... began 
his collegiate career at West Virginia University. 



Statistics 

Passing C-GS Att. Comp int Yds. Pet TD LP 



2003 


12-12 281 152 6 2.291 541 


16 69 


MD Totals 26-26 565 314 16 4.788 .556 


31 91 


Career 


36-27 664 356 19 5,543 .536 


34 91 


Rushing 


frCI Att. Gain Loss Net Avq. 


TD LP 


2003 


12-12 74 366 91 273 3.7 


5 43 


MD Totals 


26-26 162 766 209 557 3.4 


12 54 


Career 


36-27 185 789 290 499 2.7 


12 54 


/lore: career numbers include statistics from West Virqinia 





DAN MELENDE 

85 



» 




WIDE RECEIVER 

6-2' 175*S0.-1V 

LANCASTER, PA. 

UP. MCCASKEYI 



Talented young receiver who has good speed and great hand! 
. . . uses his hands well to create space between himself and W 
defender . . . one of two true freshman wideouts to make 
impact a year ago (Jo Jo Walker is the other) . posted a 38 I 21 
inch vertical jump in spring testing Season : jat WFUj ...f 
ished with two receptions for 27 yards and one touchdown 
made a nice move to break off his defender in the endzone '0| 
the second touchdown reception of his career in the seccK 
quarter ... made a leaping grab along the right sideline for 1. 
yards in the first quarter . . . jvs. UNQ . . . took an end-around fo- ; 
14-yard gam in the third quarter ... jat EMU) ... scored his I s 
career touchdown on a 1 4-yard pass from Scott McBnen durr*. 
the fourth quarter in which he twisted his way into the e k 
zone after the catch ... fat NIUj ... had the Terps' second-longi'S 
reception ( 1 5 yards) on his only catch of the game. 

— \ 



Statistics 

Receiving G-GS 


Rec. 
6 


Yds. 
75 


Avg. 

125 


W 
2 


Long 


2003 11-0 


Career 22-0 


12 


137 


11.4 


2 


25 


^ 



• 2004 OATOR BOWL 




SHAWNE MERRIMAN 

45" 




r 
Statistics 

Defense G-GS UT 


> 
AT TT TFL Sacks FC FRPBU Int. 


2003 12-5 38 


15 53 9.5-59 8.5-58 13 


1 Career 264 71 


31 102 15.5-83 13.5-80 118 


^ -* 




LINEBACKER 

6-4 • 253 • SO.- IV 
IPPER MHRLB0R0, MD. 
FREDERICK DOUGLASS I 



Second-year player with tremendous 
ijpside ... is one of two startmg-cali- 
per players at the Terps' "Leo" line- 
■ position (Jamahl Cochran 
fn the other] ..has great size 

ithleticism ... a big 
friitter ... a potenti 
[honors candidate with 

nore experience at the 

Dosition ... showed 

lashes of greatness in 

2002 ... an Iron Terp 

/vho posted a 4 1 1/2- 

nch vertical jump, a 365- 

Dound bench and a 565- 

Dound squat on testing day ... 

Season : second in the ACC and 

eads the team with 8.5 sacks ... 

tied for second on the team lead 

! with Kevin Eli with 1 2 QB hur- 
ries tied for fifth on the 
team with 53 tackles (38 
solo) ... third on the team 
with 9. 5 tackles for loss... 
(at WFU) ...recorded six 
tackles (three solo) with 
one sack and a PBU... 
showed good 
awareness as he 
contained and 
then collapsed 
on Cory ' 
Randolph for 

Ja sack of four yards in the third quarter ... PBU came on a 
ifourth-and-four play in the fourth quarter ... /at NCSUj ... 
.had four tackles (three solo), one QB hurry and one sack for 
)two yards ... got through the defense in the third quarter 
land used his agility to take down a scrambling Philip Rivers 
Wora loss of two yards ... /vs. UVa) ... finished with four tack- 
les (two solo) and one QB hurry ... pressured Matt Schaub on 
a third-and-l 3 in the third quarter, forcing him to throw the 
ball away and the Cavaliers to punt ... /vs. UNCI ... had three 
tackles (two solo) ... combined with Kevin Eli on a sack as 
they collapsed on the pocket to hit the Tar Heel quarterback 
for a loss of two yards ... (at GTj ...recorded two tackles (one 
solo) and led the Terps with three QB hurries ... one of his 
QB hurries came as he chased Reggie Ball to the sidelines, 
forcing him to throw the ball away on a third-and-seven, forc- 
ing a Yellow Jacket punt ... /vs. Dukel ... recorded four solo 
tackles ... recovered a fumble using his speed to beat the 
quarterback to the loose ball ... fumble recovery was the first 
of his career ... made a heads-up play sacking the Duke quar- 

2002 ORANGE BOWL 



terback for a loss of 10 yards as he was not fooled on the 
play-action ... /vs. CUj ... had an impressive showing in his 
first start of the season ... finished with six tackles (four solo) 
and two sacks ... was in constant pursuit of the quarterback 
throughout the game with two sacks for 20 yards and four 
QB hurries, both team-highs ... added one PBU in the sec- 
ond quarter as he jumped to deflect a pass while rushing 
the QB . /vs. WVUj ... finished with five tackles (four solo) ... 
had a big sack for a loss of four yards in the third quarter by 
speeding through the left side of the line to get Rasheed 
Marshall ... /vs. The Citadel] ... recorded one of the Terps' 
two sacks on the night for a loss of four yards ... finished 
with three tackles (two solo) ... (at FSUJ ... had four tackles 
(three solo) ... caught Chris Rix from behind to record a sack 
for a loss of 1 2 yards in the third quarter ... Career : stands 
1 .5 sacks shy of the Maryland career top 1 0. 



DEREK MILLER 




TIGHT END 

6-8 • 258 • SO.- IV 

CARLISLE, PA. 

IBOILING SPRINBSI 



Tight end who serves as Jeff Dugans primary backup at tight 
end ... a big target with good pass-catching skills ... has made 
great strides as a receiver and blocker since arriving at Mary- 
land ... has fully recovered from a fractured right leg suffered 
in the Peach Bowl . . . Season : has seen playing time at TE in 
all 12 games this season ... (at NCSUj ... made a two-yard 
touchdown reception on a play-action pass from Scott McBnen 
in the second quarter ... touchdown was his first of the sea- 
son ... (at FSUj ... made his first reception of the season, a 
diving effort in the fourth quarter for a gain of eight yards. 



r 

Statistics 

Receiving G-GJ 


Rec. 


Yds. 


Am. 


TV Long 


\ 


2003 12-1 


2 


10 


5.0 


1 8 




Career 26-1 


4 


20 


5.0 


2 9 




V 













2004 MARYLAND GATOR BOWL GUIDE 

NICK NOVAK 

46 




PLACEKICKER 

6-0 • 183 • JR.-2V 

CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA. 

IALBEMARLEI 



First-Team All ACC 

Fourth-year junior who has emerged as one of the top 
placekickers in the country ... has been one of the nations 
top kickers over the course of the last two years . . . semifinalist 
for the Lou Groza Award the past two years ... has a very 
strong and accurate leg .. consistent as both a placekicker 
and with kickoff duties . . . Season : leads the ACC and ranked 
sixth in the nation with 22 field goals ... second in the ACC 
and ranked 26th in the nation for scoring with 8.3 points per 
game ... fourth in the ACC for field goal percentage (78.6) ... 
(at NCSUj ... came back and kicked a 43-yard field goal to win 
the game with 28 seconds left in regulation after missing an 
extra point that would have tied the game two minutes ear- 
lier ... kicked a 29-yard field goal with five seconds left in the 
second quarter ... game-winning kick gave him the school 
scoring record ... (vs. UNCj... had a big game connecting on 
all three of his field goal attempts and his six PATs ... field goals 
came from 20, 24. and 46 yards out ... forced nine touchbacks 
on his 1 1 kickoffs ... (vs. Dukel ... kicked 
a career-long 54-yard field goal for the 
Terps' first score of the game, sur- ' 
passing his previous best of 5 1 
yards ... field goal tied Stever 
Mike-Mayer's 1 973 effort for the 
longest in school history ... con- 
nected on four of his five field goal 
attempts, marking the third time in 
his career and second this season 
that he has kicked four field goals 
in one game . . /vs. WVUI ... 
connected on 
two of his 
three field 




2002 PEACH BOWL 



2004 GATOR BOWL 



TOYOTA 

GATOR 
BCWL 



tbrps ib maim 



2004 MARYLAND GATOR BOWL GOIDE 



goal attempts ..his successful attempts came from 32 and 4 1 
yards out . lone miss came from 52 yards out . . . converted all 
four of his PATs. giving him 10 points on the night... (vs. The 
Citadel) ... connected on all four of his field goal attempts .. 
his attempts came from 21, 31, 38, and 42 yards out ... (at 
NIUI was successful on both of his field goal attempts of the 
night, hitting from 46 yards in the third quarter and 50 yards in 
the fourth quarter . forced touchbacks on two of his four kick- 
offs . NIUs average starting spot after his four kicks was their 
own 17-yard line Career: leads Maryland all-time in points 
scored with 313 .. currently ranks second all-time at Maryland 
for career field goal percentage with .765 |62-of-81| ... leads 
Maryland all-time in points scored kicking with 313 ranked 
second all-time at Maryland for PATs with 127 leads Mary- 
land all-time for field goals made in a career with 62. 




Statistics 

Kicking G4JS KM XP-A 20-29 30-39 40-t9 


SO* Lq. PU. 


2003 12-12 22-28 33-37 5-5 7-8 8-12 


2-3 54 99 


Career 37-37 62-81127-136 22-25 17-20 15-23 


712 54 313 


^ 


J 



RICH PARSON 




WIDE RECEIVER 
S-10- 187-JR.SV 

NEWARK, DEL I 
(NEWARK ACADEMY} 



Slot receiver whose first two seasons have been very produc- 
tive has steady hands, good speed and quick feet . . a 
reliable kickoff and punt returner ... came to Maryland as a 
tailback but was converted to receiver quickly in his first sea- 
son ... still gets the occasional carry in end-around type situa- 
tions ... has had his best season in '03 ... Season : fourth on 
the team with 17 receptions ,., (at WFU) ... notched two re- 
ceptions for 46 yards ... first catch of the game came on an 
inside slant route for a gain of 1 5 yards in the first quarter 
had a 3 1 -yard reception in the third quarter on an inside post 
route ... added seven rushing yards on an option run to the 
right side in the third quarter (at NCSUj ... had the second 
memorable game of his career at NCSU, finishing with four 
receptions for 114 yards which are both career highs re- 
turned one punt for 5 1 yards . . 42-yard reception in the fourth 
quarter came on a slant route, avoiding two defenders after 
the catch to pick up an additional 1 5 yards on the play . (vs 
UVal ... took an option run from Scott McBrien up the left 
sideline for a gain of 15 yards in the second quarter ... (vs 
Duke) ... took a pitch from Scott McBrien in the second quar- 
ter and utilized his speed to gain 29 yards up the sideline ... 
finished with two receptions for 22 yards ... (vs. CUj... caught 
his first touchdown of the season in the second quarter as he 
broke free of his defender in the corner of the end zone for 1 
yards . . . (vs. The Citadel) ... caught a pass up the middle for 35 
yards in the second quarter, his longest reception of the night 
finished with two receptions for 46 yards ... returned two 
punts for 30 yards 



r 
Statistics 

RKeiving &CJ 


Sec. 


Its. 


Avg. 


> 

TO Long 












Career 35-1 


39 


628 


16.1 


2 64 


- 








. > 



BRUCE PERRY 

1 





TAILBACK 

S-1D • BOS • SR.-3V 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

(GEORGE WASHINGTON! 



Fifth-year senior who has 
battled the injury bug 
again this season but 
proved late in the season 
that he is still a big-time 
back ... was a Doak 
Walker finalist and the 
ACC's Offensive ijL 
Player of the Year in i* 
2001 ... injuries a \ 
year ago included a 
strained stomach 
muscle, torn groin 
muscle and injured 
shoulder, but he recov- 
ered to play in the 
seasons final four games 
a quick, explosive 
tailback who is surpris- 
ingly powerful ... com- 
bines quick feet, a strong burst, 
breakaway speed and excellent 
open-field moves ... hits holes 
hard and is always a threat to 
go the distance ... always 
seems to finish plays falling 
forward. ..has the added 
dimension of being an 
exceptional receiver 
. . recorded a 40 1 / 
2-inch vertical jump 
and a 330-pound 
bench on testing 
day Season : 
sixth in the ACC 
with 718 
rushing ^S^T 

yards 
p e r 

game ... second on the team with 646 rushing yards (at 
WFU) ... had an outstanding game, averaging 9.5 yards on 
25 carries for 237 yards and three touchdowns .237 yards 
ties George Scotts performance against Villanova in 1 977 for 
the fifth-best single game rushing performance in Maryland 
history ... had an 80-yard touchdown run in the third quar- 
ter, as he ran off left tackle and beat defenders downfield 
broke through a hole in the right side of the line and outran 
defenders downfield for a 49-yard touchdown run in the third 
quarter ... made a reception in the third quarter on a screen 
pass for a successful two-point conversion ... named ACC Of- 
fensive Back of the Week ... (vs. UNCI ...ran for 96 yards on 



7 carries before leaving the game in the second quartc 
due to injury ... began the game very strong, marching the 
Terps down the field on their opening drive of the game 
with 53 yards on eight rushing attempts ... (at GTj ... had a 
strong performance with 75 yards on 1 7 rushing attempt, 
and added two receptions ... [vs. Duke) ... scored his third 
rushing touchdown of the season in the third quarter as he 
came off right tackle, and broke two tackles on the way to 
the end zone ...took a screen pass from Scott McBrien and 
weaved his way up the sideline for a gam of 28 yards ... (vs 
WVUj... finished with 79 yards on just 1 4 carries., recorded 
his first two-touchdown game since his career-high 276-yard, 
two-touchdown effort against Wake Forest in 2001 ... first 
touchdown of the night came in the first quarter as he 
sprinted off left tackle for four yards . his second touch- 
down came in the third quarter as he bounced off two de- 
fenders for 1 2 yards on his way to the end zone ... (at FSUj 
... started his first game of the season at tailback despite be- 
ing hampered by a high ankle sprain ... gained 33 yards on 
rushing attempts ... Career: ranks fourth on the 
Maryland all-time list with 2,424 yards stands 
one rushing touchdowns shy of the Maryland 
career top 10. 



5l 



/ 

Statistics 

Itushmq CCS 


An. Gain Loss Net 


Avg. 


ID 


> 

LP 


2003 


9-4 


127 671 25 646 


5.1 


6 


80 


Career 


33-16 


448 2,256 75 2,424 


5.4 


17 


80 


Receiving 


G-G5 


ffec. Yds. Avg. 


TO 


Long 




2003 


9-4 


8 42 5.2 





28 




Career 


3316 


55 478 8.7 


2 


38 














> 








!e 


s 


II 


AD 


Al\ 


HP0DI 





2002 0RAN6E BOWL 



2002 PEACH BOWL 



PUNTER 

5-JJ* 209 'FR.-RS 

PITTSFORD, NX 

IPTTTSFORD SUTHERLAND! 

Second-Team All ACC 

Redshirt freshman who serves as the Terps starting punter, 
replacing all-time school leader Brooks Barnard ... a good ath- 
lete with a strong leg ... also serves as the Terps' holder . 
posted a bench press of 330 pounds while squatting 4 1 on 
spring testing day . . Season : second in the ACC and 30th in 
the nation with a 42.6 yard average per punt ... (at WFU) . 
averaged 37.8 yards on four punts with two punts downed 
within the 20-yard line had one punt downed within the 
1 0-yard line ... (at NCSU) averaged 46 yards on five punts 
had one punt downed inside NC States 20-yard line ... longest 
punt of the night went for 57 yards in the first quarter (vs. 

2004 BATOR BOWL 





tbrps m uiarcH GATOR 



W 



position or center a tough player wn 
quick feet ... saw the most extensi 
action of his career last year and was v 
coming on strong before an injury 
kept him from the start- 
ing lineup ... an Iron 
Terp who posted a i 
660-pound squat 
in the spring 



UNCI ... averaged 
38.5 yards on his two 
punts of the game... had one 
punt downed on North 
Carolina's own three-yard 
line in the fourth quarter... 
his other punt of the game 
was fumbled and recov- 
ered by the Terps as it hit a 
North Carolina player in the 
back on the Tar Heels' own 
1 2-yard line... (vs. Duke}... 
had four punts for a 42.8- 
yard average . . longest punt 
of the night was 46 yards... 
his last punt of the game was 
downed at Duke's own two- 
yard line ... {vs. CU) ... finished 
with seven punts for a 4 1 -yard 
average . . . three of his punts 
were downed within the 
20-yard line and two within the 1 ... had one punt downed 
on Clemson's own one-yard line in the fourth quarter . five of 
his seven punts were kicked into the wind .. . {vs. WVU) . . . only 
punt of the night traveled 58 yards and was downed at West 
Virginias four-yard line ... {vs. The Citadel) ... his only punt of 
the game was for 60 yards, and was downed within the 20- 
yard line ... forced two touchbacks on three kickoffs . {at FSUj 
... averaged 43.7 yards per kick on seven punts for 306 yards 
... his longest kick of the night was 52 yards ... had three 
punts downed within the 20-yard line ... jatNIUI ...was out- 
standing in his first game at the collegiate level, averaging 
45.4 yards on his eight punts ... had four punts downed in- 
side the 20-yard line and one inside the 1 . . . his longest punt 
of the night was 63 yards, longest by a Terp in over two years. 







2004 MARYLAND GATOR BOWL GUIDE 



middle of the field on a third-and-12 on Duke's first drive oi 
the game, returning it for 1 3 yards up the sideline ... made 
a diving play in the middle of the field to knock down xM.04 
a pass in the fourth quarter ... nearly intercepted an- 
other pass with a leaping attempt late in the fourth 
■^^ quarter for his second PBU of the game 
{vs. CU) ... had a strong game, fin 

Jishing with four solo tackles, one 
PBU, one QB hurry, and one sack : 
*^(> for a loss of 20 yards ... PBU J\ 

forced a Clemson field goal 
attempt from 48 yards out which 
was not successful ... had another 
key tackle on a third down, stop- 
ping the Tiger tailback short of a 
first down forcing a punt in the third 
quarter ... {at NIU) ... had a strong 
game from his nickel position . 
fourth on the team with five tackles 
|all solo) .., had one sack for 12 
yards which occurred on a key 
third down in the third quar- 
ter, forcing NIU to punt ... 
Career: spent his first two 
years at Maryland as a 
cornerback. ^ 





Season on the "watch list" for this years Rimmgton Trophy . 
Maryland's highest-graded lineman this season started all 
1 2 games at center ... {vs. UVa) ... notched three "big blocks" 
with no missed assignments on a team-high 69 offensive plays 
... Terps' highest graded offensive lineman ... {vs. UNCI . had 
two "big blocks" teams second-highest graded offensive 
lineman ... {vs. CUj Terps' highest-graded lineman .re- 
corded one "big block" on 72 plays ... {at EMU) ... second- 
highest graded lineman ... recorded two "big blocks" with no 
missed assignments {vs WVU) . team's highest-graded of- 
fensive lineman ... his season-high tying four "big blocks" was 
the second-highest total for Terp linemen ... had no missed 
assignments on 60 plays ... {vs. The Citadel) ... posted four 
"big blocks" on 59 plays ... {at FSU) ... was the team's highest- 
graded offensive lineman ... recorded one "big block" ... {at 
NIUj ... had a team-high two "big blocks'" . highest-graded 
offensive lineman 



Statistics 

Defense <KS UT 


AT TT Tfl Sacks 


FC PR PBU Int. 


2003 12-0 17 


4 21 2.0-32 2.0-32 


5 1 


Career 38-1 53 


18 71 4.0-37 4.0-37 


1 11 2 


V 




■i 



[Statistics 

I Punting C 

|Z003 12 



G-GS Pu nts Yds Avg LP 1 20 I lOJUk, 

■12 51 2,169 42.6 63 21 



AN DREW SMITH 




KYLE SCHMITT 





CENTER 

297-JR.-2V j 
LATR0BE, PA. 
IDERRYAREA) 



Honorable Mention AII-ACC 

A talented fourth-year player who serves as the teams starting 
center . . . versatile and intelligent enough to play either guard 

2002 ORANGE BOWL 



STRONG SAFETY 

6-0 • 203 • SR.-2V 

FORT MEADE, MD. 

IMEADEI 

Senior safety who had his best season at Maryland in his first 
year as a safety ... sees time in nickel and dime situations 
has good size and strength ... a sure tackier ... excels in blitz 
situations .an Iron Terp with a 495-pound squat, 335-pound 
bench and a 39 1/2-inch vertical jump ... Season : {vs UNCj 
... had one tackle and two PBUs ..one PBU came when he 
nearly intercepted a pass as he stepped in front of a Tar Heel 
receiver and got his hands on the ball ... {vs. Duke) ... recorded 
his second career interception by making a leaping grab in the 
• 2002 PEACH BOWL • 



FULLBACK 

5-11 • 229 • JR.-2V 

WALDORF, MD. 

IWESTLAKEI 



Junior who moved from linebacker to fullback at the start of 
2002 ... is currently second on the depth chart behind Bernie 
Fiddler ... a regular on special teams . . works on kickoff and 
punt coverage teams ... posted 615-pound squat in spring 
testing Season : {vs. CU) ... had his first career rushing at- 
tempt in the second quarter, a six-yard burst up the middle ... 
{vs. WVU) ... started at fullback in place of the injured Bernie 
Fiddler . . . recorded a career-long 1 8-yard reception up the right 
side in the fourth quarter ... had the key block on Josh Aliens 
rushing touchdown in the second quarter .. . had a huge block 
in the first quarter, allowing Scott McBrien time to scramble 
and connect with Latrez Harrison on a 34-yard pass ... /at FSU) 
... his first career reception came in the third quarter for a gain 
of seven yards. 



Statistics 

Rushing G-GS 


Alt. 


Gain Loss Net Avg. TD 


LP 


2003 


11-2 


1 


6 6 6.0 


i 


Career 


35-2 


1 


6 6 6.0 


6 


Receiving 


MS 


Rec. 


Yds. Avg. TD Long 




2003 


11-2 


2 


25 125 18 




Career 


35-2 


2 


25 12.54 18 












/ 



51 



2004 BATOR BOWL 



Jlt*YZ*iri1L 



GATOR 
IBCWL 



imps w maim 



MARYLAND GATOR BOWL GUIDE 



scon SMITH 





DEFENSIVE END 

6-5 • 257 • SR.-3V 

PHILADELPHIA, PI 

IGEORGE 

WASHINGTON! 

Fifth-year senior who began the season as the Terps' starter at 
defensive end but has missed the last nine games after suffer- 
ing a back injury ... a strong pass rusher who performed well 
when he played in '02 ... good size and athleticism .., has 
good speed for an end |4 . 7 1 1 ... has a knack for getting in the 
opponent's backfield had back surgery prior to spring of 
2002 ..benched 435 pounds and posted a 35-inch vertical 
jump in spring testing Season : attempting to return for the 
Gator Bowl .. /ar FSUj ... tied a career-high with six tackles 
|two solo) ... stood up Greg Jones for no gain with a big hit 
after he quickly closed the running lane during the second 
quarter /at NIUj notched four tackles |three solo) added 
one sack for nine yards which came on a third down play in 
the second quarter, forcing an NIU punt 



r 

Statistics 

Defense G-GS UT AT 


TT TFL Sacks 


> 

FC FRPBU Int. 


2003 3-3 5 6 


II 10 9 10-9 





Career 30-5 28 27 


5512.0-73 6.043 


10 


v 




" > 



RANDY STARKS 




has him ranked as the second-strongest player pound-for- 
pound, on the team . . . physical numbers include a 440-pound 
bench, a school-record 765-pound squat and a 3 1 '-inch verti- 
cal jump ,., Season : ranks sixth in the ACC and leads the 
team with 1 4.5 tackles for a loss ... fourth on the team with 72 
tackles (36 solo) ... second on the team with 7.5 sacks 
started all 12 games at DT ... (at WFUj ... finished with four 
tackles (two solo), one sack, one PBU and two QB hurries 
was relentless in overpowering his man on the way to sack 
Cory Randolph for five yards in the third quarter ... /at NCSUj 
. . continued his strong play with eight tackles |four solo), one 
QB hurry and one sack for nine yards ,.. sack came in the third 
quarter as he powered straight through the line to get to Philip 
Rivers . . . had a big hit on T.A. McLendon on a third-and- 1 for 
no gain in the third quarter, forcing a Wolfpack punt ... /vs. 
UVaj ... had a strong game with eight tackles [five solo), three 
tackles for a loss of 1 1 yards, one sack for a loss of eight yards 
and one QB hurry ... sack came in the fourth quarter as he 
powered his way through the line in pursuit of Matt Schaub ... 
named ACC Defensive Lineman of the Week ... (vs. UNCj ... 
finished with four tackles (three solo) tackles and one sack for 
a loss of 12 yards ... sack came in the fourth quarter as he 
powered his way through the line to get to Danan Durant, 
forcing a third-and-21 ... (at GTj ... had another great game 
with nine tackles (five solo) ... combined with Kevin Eli on a 
tackle for a loss of one yard ... added two QB hurries ... (vs. 
Duke) ... had an outstanding performance with nine tackles 
(four solo), 1.5 sacks, three TFL and leading the team with 
three QB hurries ... forced his first fumble of the season as he 
hit a Duke wide receiver on an end-around his first sack of 
the game came in the first quarter as he chased the Duke QB 
from behind for a loss of six yards ... combined with Jamahl 
Cochran on a sack in the fourth quarter as they surrounded 
and collapsed on the Blue Devil quarterback for a loss of six 
yards ... added a PBU as he jumped over his blocker to deflect 
the pass ..(at EMUj ... beat his 
man around left tackle for the 
Terps' lone sack of the game on 
a second down during the first 
quarter ... finished with six tack- 
les |three solo) ... (vs. WVUj ... 
finished with six tackles |two solo) 
... had a big hit on the Mountain- 
eer QB in the first quarter, forcing 



a loss of one yard after he powered his way off his block . (at 
FSUj ... finished with seven tackles (four solo) .:. also credited 
with two QB hurries . . . one of those QB hurries came wheni 
he bulled his way through the offensive line and hit Chris Ri« 
as he released the ball, forcing an incompletion and an FSU 
punt ... (at NIUj . . notched five tackles (three solo) ... had one 
sack for six yards ... Career: ranks ninth all-time at Maryland 
with 1 7 5 career sacks 



Statistics 

Defense G-GS 


UT AT 


TT 


TFL 


Sacks 


FC FRPBU Int. 


2003 


12-12 


38 


34 


72 


14.5-69 


7.5-57 


1 3 





Career 


37-27 


111 


89 


200 34.0-143 17.5-115 


3 1 9 





v 
















/ 



JOEL STATHAM 





DEFENSIVE TACKLE 

fi-4 • 305 ' JR.-2V 

WALDORF, MD. 

IWESTLAKEI 



First-Team AII-ACC 

Third-year junior who has become a player to watch in the 
ACC in 2003 . has All-American skills ... was on the 
preseason "watch list" for the Lombardi and Out- 
land trophies ... preseason conference defen- 
sive player of the year by ESPN com 
combines athleticism with an 
ideal defensive lineman 
frame ... has 
a great 
burst and 
runs well for 
a player hii 
size an Iron' 
Terp with the 

highest strength index i7B7H"tong defensive linemen 
strength index was a 30-pomt improvement over last year and 

2002 ORANOE BOWL 





QUARTERBACK 

6-1 • S07 • FR.-RS 

CHATSWORTH, GA. 

(HURRAY COUNT/] 



A talented second-year player who was pressed into actior 
this year ... a player the team is looking at as a strong candi- 
date to start next season an athletic quarterback with a 
strong, accurate arm ... grasp of the offense is his lone stum 
bling block ... Season: (vs. UNCj . . completed one of his two 
passing attempts ... pass was an 1 1 -yard completion to Vernon 
Davis in the fourth quarter ... (at GTj ... came in during the 
second quarter to replace the injured Scott McBrien ... fin 
ished 1 l-of-23 for 145 yards with one interception ... nunc 
tough in the face of a relentless pass rush all game ... longest 
completion of the night was a 35-yard pass to Steve Suter on 
a crossing route in the middle of the field. 



Statistics 

Passing G-GJ 


Att. Comp Int 


Yds. 


Pet. 


TD LP 


2003 5-0 


25 12 1 


156 


.480 


35 


k ■* 















STEVE SUTER 




2002 PEACH BOWL 



WIDE RECEIVER 

5-10' 192- JR.- IV 

MANCHESTER, MD. 

[NORTH CARROLL] 



First Team AII-ACC 

Player who burst onto the scene in 2002. giving the Terps < 
breakaway threat in the return game and at receiver a speed) 
receiver with good hands who spent most of the season atop 
the depth chart at slot receiver slight at 5- 1 0. but is one oi 
the fastest and strongest players (pound-for-pound| on the tearr 
iron Terp who set Maryland all-time records for wide 
2004 OATOR ROWL 



— ZT> 




eceivers with a 768 strength index, a 580-pound squat, a 42- 
,nch vertical jump and a 352-pound clean ... also timed at 
B35 in the 40-yard dash Season: ranks fourth in the ACC 
vith 7 3 yards per punt return ... sixth in the ACC with a kick 
•eturn average of 23.6 yards per return ,.. second on the team 
with 25 receptions and 387 receiving yards ... /at WFUj 
recorded two receptions for 52 yards ... made a nice grab on 
B stop-and-go play in the third quarter as he made a diving 
catch in tight coverage to gain 40 yards ... gained 45 yards on 
jtwo kickoff returns ... (vs. UNCj ... finished with four recep- 
fions totaling 72 yards ... longest reception of the night went 
for 30 yards on a crossing route in the first quarter ... gained 
57 yards on his only kickoff return of the game as he weaved 
lis way up the field dodging defenders along the way ...re- 
turn was the longest of his career ... (at GTj ... led the Terps 
with four receptions for 60 yards ... longest catch of the night 
|34 yards) came on an great catch in the third quarter as he 
nade a leaping grab in the middle of the field and held onto 
the ball as he was hit hard in mid-air ... (vs. Dukej ... finished 
Mth four receptions totaling 48 yards . . showed off his good 
lands when reaching out and grabbing an underthrown pass 
3n a quick out in the first quarter for a gain 
of six yards ... (vs. QUI ... recorded 
first receiving touchdown of the sea- " 
;on in the first quarter . showed great 
body control on the touchdown as he 
Tiade a leaping grab and 
the spun off his de- 
fender for the 25- 
/ard play . . used 
'his speed on an 
.lend-around rush 
jfor 24 yards up 
Jthe left sideline 
In the second 
Jquarter 
finished 
jwth three 
receptions 
for 42 yards 

nd one 

shmg attempt for 24 
/ards .. fat EM]... fin- 
ished with a team- 
heading four recep- 
tions for 84 yards, 
jail of which came 
oefore halftime 
had a sea- 
son-long 45- 
/ard reception, 
etting up a 
Nick Novak field ' 
goal with six sec- 
onds left in the first half ... (vs. WVUj ...re- 
lumed six punts for a total of 42 yards, giv- 
ng him the record for most punt return 
/ards in a career all-time at Maryland with 
922 (vs. The Grade// ... broke two tack- 
es on his way to a 75-yard touchdown 
Dn his first punt return of the game 
(added his first reception of the season 
tar six yards Career: leads the Terps 



Statistics 



Receiving 


GG5 


Rec. 


Yds. 


Avg. 


TD Long 


2003 


lt-9 


25 


387 


15.5 


1 45 


Career 


29-10 


42 


690 


16.4 


3 ft 



KickotfRet. G-C5 Ret. Yds. Avg. TO Long 

700) 11-9 14 331 23.6 

Career 2910 36 877 24.4 



67 



67 



Punt Ret. 

2003 



G-GJ Ret. Yds. Avg. TD Long 



11-9 



33 240 



7 J 



I 



75 



Career 

V 



29-10 90 1,014 11.3 



ED TYLER 





OFFENSIVE GUARD 

CENTER 

6-3 • 293 • SR.-1V 

FRANKLMILLE, N.J. 

IDELSEAI 






plf-time with 1.014 career punt return 
yards ... also leads Maryland all-time with 90 career punt re- 
turns leads the Terps all-time for career punt returns for a 
|ID with 5 ... set several NCAA punt return records in 2002. 
inost notably tying the mark for returns for a TD in a season 

Ml. 

2002 ORANGE BOWL 



TOYOTA 

TBRPS TO UiaTDH GATOR 

! BCWL ! 



2004 MARYLAND GATOR BOWL 



ception that came on a slant pass from Scott McBnen recep- 
tion was the longest of his career ... (vs. Dukej ... lone recep- 
tion of the game came on a 23-yard crossing route in the 
fourth quarter ... (vs. WVUj ... had a then career-long 24-yard 
reception, showing his speed on a crossing route in the middle 
of the field during the second quarter ... finished with two 
receptions for 33 yards ... (vs. The Grade// ... returned three 
punts for a career-high 69 yards ... his longest punt return of 
the season came in the first quarter as he evaded several Bull- 
dog defenders to gain 36 yards ... finished with two recep- 
tions ... (at FSUj ... led the Terps in receptions with four as well 
as receiving yards with 41 ... his four receptions and 4 1 receiv- 
ing yards are both career highs his longest reception of the 
night [22 yards] came in the first quarter on a play-action pass 
from Scott McBnen (at NIUI ... returned six punts for 53 
yards in his first game as the Terps' return man . . longest punt 
return of the night was 1 6 yards . . had four kick returns for 
97 yards. 



Backup who saw time at guard early in the season 
... a solid performer who missed portions of last 
I year due to injury fractured his right fibula 
prior to fall last year has strong knowledge 
of entire line's assignments and calls . . gradu- 
ated in August of 2002 with a degree in eco- 
nomics and is working on a second degree 
(history) Season : (vs. The Citadel) . . posted 
two "big blocks" on 27 plays despite being 
hampered by an elbow injury ... (at FSUj ... 
earned his first career start at right guard ... 
injured his elbow, limiting his action. 



JO JO WALKER 

9 



WIDE RECEIVER 

5-9- IBS-SD.-IV 

CARROLLTON, TEXAS 

ICREEKVIEWI 



Second-year player who came on strong at the end of 2002 .. . 
one of the quickest players on the team . . . has the stop/start 
ability that few players possess can return kicks and punts 
... has good hands and showed the ability to catch the ball 
over the middle ...is surprisingly physical and runs well after 
the catch ... will line up primarily in the slot ... an Iron Terp 
with a 36'-inch vertical jump ... Season : third on the team 
with 20 receptions ... (atNCSUj ... finished with a career-high 
six receptions totaling 57 yards and one touchdown ... touch- 
down came midway through the fourth quarter znd pulled 
the Terps to within a touchdown ... (vs. UNCI ... recorded a 
career-high 99 receiving yards on three catches ... scored his 
first-career touchdown in the second quarter on a 67-yard re- 

• 2002 PEACH BOWL • 



Statistics 

Receiving G<iS 


Rec. 


Yds. 


Avg 


TD 


Long 


N 


2003 


12-0 


20 


273 


13.6 


2 


67 




Career 


22-0 


24 


328 


13.7 


2 


67 




Kickoff Ret. 


G-GJ 


ffer. 


Yds. 


Avg 


70 


Long 




2003 


12-0 


6 


135 


225 





- 


Career 


22-0 


9 


204 


22.4 





28 




Punt Ret 


G-GJ 


Ret. 


Yds. 


Avg. 


TD 


Long 




2003 


12-0 


9 


122 


13.6 





36 




Career 


22-0 


9 


122 


13.6 





36 




V 

















CURTIS WILLIAMS 

15 




WIDE RECEIVER 
6-2 • 206 ' JR.-2V 
HUNTINGTON STATION, 
N.Y. (HUNTIN6T0NI I 

Fourth-year junior who has been the Terps' version of a utility 
player the last few years . started at safety before switching to 
linebacker and then back again last year ... is now linemg up at 
receiver ... has excelled on special teams in his first three years 
... has good speed and leaping ability ... seems to perform bet- 
ter in game situations ... is the teams top kick blocker ... an Iron 
Terp with a 360-pound bench press and a 38.5-rnch vertical 
jump ... Season : has two of the Terps' three blocked kicks this 
season ... fat WFUj ... blocked a punt in the fourth quarter as he 
broke through the line on his way to the punter ... (vs. WVUj... 
finished with three tackles (one solo) ... had a key stop on spe- 
cial teams dunng the third quarter, forcing a Mountaineers' drive 
to begin at their own 1 4-yard line . . (vs. The Citadel) ... made 
his first career reception in the fourth quarter for 35 yards ... (at 
NIU) ... blocked a 43-yard field goal attempt with one second 
left in the fourth quarter, forcing the game into overtime ... also 
had one solo tackle on special teams ... Career: has blocked 
three punts and one kick in his career. 



Statistics 

Defense G-GJ UT AT 


TT 


771 


> 
FC FRPBUIntBlk. 


2003 12-0 3 4 


7 


MM 


2 


Career 32-0 14 9 


23 


0.04 


1114 


^ 






-> 



® 



2004 GATOR BOWL 



JAFAR WILLIAMS 



54 




WIDE RECEIVER 

6-2 • 210 • SR.-3V 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

IDEORDE 

WASHINGTON! 

Senior receiver who gives the Terps a big target with the abil- 
ity to get downfield tall, athletic receiver with good speed 
and the ability to gain extra yards after the catch was one 
of just three returning ACC receivers to average over 20 yards 
per reception last year |mmimum 1 5 rec.) Jason Anderson 
fWFU) and Craphonso Thorpe (FSU| are the others . benched 
365 and cleaned 330 pounds in spring testing Season: 
jat WFUI .. led the Terps with three receptions for 47 
yards and one touchdown ... touchdown came on a 
28-yard flag route in the third quarter . touchdown 
was his first of the season had a leaping grab along 
the right sideline on the Terps' first play of the game 
for a 10-yard gam ... jvs. UVaj ... made a 41 -yard 
reception after he got behind defenders in the 
second quarter ... jatGTj ... lone reception of 
the game went for six yards across the middle 
. . . (vs. CUj made a shoestring catch for seven 
yards in the third quarter on his only recep- 
tion of the game ... jat FSUj ... only reception 
of the game was a nine-yard pass from Orlando 
Evans late in the fourth quarter fat NIUJ 
had two receptions for 1 8 yards . . Career: is 1 4 
receptions shy of the Maryland career top 1 



— 
Statistics 

Receivinq (MS 


Rec. 


Yds. 


Avq. 


_ 


2003 8-2 


10 


136 


13.6 


1 4! 


Career 43-16 


86 


1,236 


14.4 


5 55 


V 



MADIEU WILLIAMS 




FREE SAFETY 
6-1> 108-SR.-1V 
LANHAM, HID. 
IDUVAL/ 
TOWSON UNIV.I 

Second-Team All ACC 

Former transfer who estaUisI il the top safe- 

ties in the league - if not the country - in his first season at the 
Division l-A level in 2002 ... on the watch list" for the 2003 Bronko 
NagurskiandJimThorpeawar. 'ticforcewho 

has great versatility ... is big enoug in support yet 

fast and quick enough to man a corn> the defense is 

2002 ORANGE BOWL 



in a nickel or dime package . one of three seniors and four 
returning starters in the Terps' defensive backfield, the deepest 
unit on this years team ... one of the hardest-working players on 
the team ...an Iron Terp with a 36 1 /2-inch vertical jump. 345- 
pound bench, 560-pound squat and 4.5 time in the 40-yard dash 
Season : tied for fourth in the ACC and the team lead with 
three interceptions ... third on the team with 81 tackles (59 solo} 
. started all 12 games at free safety ... jat WFUj ... had a great 
game, tying a career high with 1 1 tackles |seven solo] along with 
one interception made a nice play by reading the play and 
stepping in front of a Demon Deacon receiver to make an inter- 
ception in the third quarter . . . ACC Defensive Back of the Week . . . 
fat NCSUJ . . recorded nine tackles |seven solo) and a PBU . 
recovered a fumble caused by Leroy Ambush late in the fourth 
quarter that gave the Terps the ball for what was ultimately their 
game-winning drive PBU came with just seconds remaining in 
the fourth quarter as he leaped over several Wolfpack receivers 
to knock down a desperation pass by Philip Rivers ... jvs. UVaj . 
finished with a career-high 1 1 -tackles 
|seven solo) ... added a PBU as he 
hit a Virginia receiver when he 
/ ▼ touched the ball on an "out" route 

^ to the right side in the third quar- 
ter . . . jvs. UNQ had five solo 
tackles ... jat GTj fin- 
ished with seven 
tackles (six solo) 
rushed the QB on a 
key third-and-five 
play during the sec- 
ond quarter, as he 
hit Reggie Ball 
while he re- 
leased the ball, 
forcing 
t incompletion 
and a Yellow 
Jacket punt... 
jvs. CUj . 
made his sec- 
ond inter- 
ception of 
the season 
as he per- 
fectly- 
timed his 
f^\A ■ jump over the Clemson defender 

JU m I for the P 1 ^ ■" h ^ 9 reat cover " 

£tM ■ age on a play in the fourth quar- 

^^3 I ' recording his lone PBU of the 
■ game .. finished with six tackles 
I (three solo) ... jvs. WVUj ... second 
> on the team with eight tackles (five 
Y* solo) ... had a PBU in the third quar- 
Jg-- ter when he crushed the West Vir- 

ginia receiver as soon as he touched 
the ball, forcing the 
incompletion ... jvs. The Citadel) ... had the 

Terps' lone interception of the game on a leaping grab ; 
at midfield in the second quarter ... also notched two v 
tackles (one solo) ...jat NIUj ... finished with six tack- , 
les. all solo ... recovered Curtis Williams' blocked kick j 
in the fourth quarter 




DENNARD WILSON 

13 



STRONG SAFETY 
5-10' 1S9-SR.-3V 

UPPER MARLBORO, 
MO. IDEMATHAI 



V. J 



tor- 
ched 



Statistics 

Defense GGS UT AT TT TFL Sucks 

: 59 22 81 0f>0 0.00 


> 
FC FRPBU Int. 


1 1 5 3 


MDTotali26-26 120 43 163 2.0-5 1.0-4 


3 2 12 7 


Cimr 48-46 189 69 258 4.0-16 1.0-4 


3 2 12 8 





Honorable Mention AII-ACC 

Senior safety who came into his own in his first year at the posi- 
tion last season and has been the teams most consistent defen- 
sive back this year ... a confident player who spent his first two 
years at cornerback . a sure tackier with good instincts ...in 
Iron Terp a year ago who posted a 36-inch verticaljump and 345-1 
pound bench press in this year's testing Season : tied for fifth! 
in the ACC with 1.08 passes defended per game ... leads the 
team with 12 PBUs ... eighth on the team with 45 tackles (35 
solo) ... started all 12 games at strong safety ... jat WFUI ... re-i 
corded six solo tackles, one TFL and three PBU's one PBU came 
in the first quarter as he hit a Wake Forest receiver as soon as he 
touched the ball to force the incompletion ... jvs. UVaj... notched 
two tackles (one solo) and two PBUs ... made a nice play by 
coming in on a short pass to reach' 
in front of a Virginia receiver to 
bat the ball away in the second 
quarter ... made a diving effort 
to knock down a pass at the 
goal line in the second quar- 
ter ... jvs. CUj ... combined 
lA with D'Qwell Jackson on a 
/F TFL in the first quarter as he 
quickly closed in on a Tiger 
receiver, hitting him as soon as he 
caught the ball for a loss of one 
yard ... one of his PBUs came 
on a third-and-26 in the second 
quarter, as he made a leaping 
| effort to deflect the pass out 
of bounds, forcing a Tiger 
punt had another nice 
play in the fourth quarter 
when he dove across the 
middle of the field to knock a 
pass down before it reached the re- 
ceiver , , finished with a season-high 
seven solo tackles along with three 
PBUs (vs. WVUj... led the Terps 
with two PBUs both came in the 
fourth quarter when he immedi- 
ately hit the receiver as thty 
touched the ball, forcing 
mcompletions ... also recorded 
I two solo tackles ... /vs. Tie 
Citadel) ... had a key TFL n 
third down for a loss of four yards, forcing The Citadel to punt n 
the second quarter ... four tackles (three solo) and one PBU. 








r 
Statistics 

Defense MS UT AT TT TTL Sacks 
2003 12-12 34 II 0(H) 


FC FRPBU Int. 



CilHl 4230 116 42 158 5.5 26 2.0-18 


2 1 28 2 


^ -^ 



2002 PEACH BOWL 



2004 OATOR BOWL 




2004 MARYLAND GATOR 



TOYOTA 

posTSBason HiswRU GATOR 

! BCWL 



BOWL 
RESULTS 



Record in Bowls: 7-10-2 

Jan. 1, 1948 ■ Gator Bowl 

Maryland 20, Georgia 20 

Jan. 2, 1950 • Gator Bowl 

Maryland 20, Missouri 7 

Jan. 2, 1952 • Sugar Bowl 

Maryland 28. Tennessee 1 3 

Jan. 1, 1954 • Orange Bowl 

Oklahoma 7, Maryland 

Jan. 2, 1956 ■ Orange Bowl 

Oklahoma 20, Maryland 6 

Dec. 28, 1973 • Peach Bowl 

Georgia 1 7, Maryland 1 6 

Dec. 16, 1974 ■ Liberty Bowl 

Tennessee 7. Maryland 3 

Dec. 29, 1975 • Gator Bowl 

Maryland 13. Florida 

Jan. 1, 1977 ■ Cotton Bowl 

Houston 30, Maryland 21 

Dec. 22, 1977 • Hall of Fame Bowl 

Maryland 1 7. Minnesota 7 

Dec. 23, 1978 ■ Sun Bowl 

Texas 42, Maryland 

Dec. 20, 1980 ■ Tangerine Bowl 

Florida 35, Maryland 20 

Dec. 25, 1982 • Aloha Bowl 

Washington 21, Maryland 20 

Dec. 17, 1983 ■ Florida Citrus Bowl 

Tennessee 30, Maryland 23 

Dec. 22, 1984 • Sun Bowl 

Maryland 28, Tennessee 27 

Dec. 21, 1985 ■ Cherry Bowl 

Maryland 35, Syracuse 18 

Dec. 15, 1990 • Independence Bowl 

Maryland 34. Louisiana Tech 34 

Jan. 2, 2002 • FedEx Orange Bowl 

Florida 56, Maryland 23 

Dec. 31, 2002 ■ Chick-fil-A Peach Bowl 

Maryland 30, Tennessee 3 



GATOR BOWL GATOR BOWL 




Gator Bowl 
Jacksonville 
Jan. 1, 1948 

Maryland 20 
Georgia 20 









■ * a>w; 







j.-^.^ 



JACK SOI V I 



In front of the first capacity crowd in Gator Bowl history, 
16,666, Maryland's Lu Gambino was a one-man wrecking 
crew, rushing for 165 yards and scoring three touchdowns. 
Gambinos three scores propelled Maryland to a 20-7 lead, 
but Georgia reeled off 1 3 points in the fourth guarter to tie 
the game The Bulldogs threatened to win the game in the 
closing seconds, but time ran out with Georgia on Maryland's 
4-yard line. Despite the tie, there was no guestion as to the 
games most valuable player. Gambino won the Burkhalter 
Award, signifying the game's outstanding performer. 
Gambino was inducted into the Gator Bowl Hall of Fame in 
1992. 



Bator Bowl 
Jacksonville 
Jan. 2, 1950 

Maryland 20 
Missouri 7 



Three times in the first half Missouri turned the ball over, and 
all three times Maryland scored a touchdown as the Terra- 
pins defeated the Tigers. 20-7, to earn their first-ever 
postseason victory. The Terrapin running attack, led by Bob 
Shemonski and Ed Modzelewski, amassed 266 rushing yards, 
the second-most by a Maryland bowl team Maryland defen- 
sive back John Idzik set up Maryland's first score with a 26- 
yard interception return to the Tiger 1 1 -yard line. Shemonski 
scored on a sweep on the next play for the go-ahead touch- 
down. Shemonski scored again on a six-yard run late in the 
second quarter to put the Terps up 20-0. 



Box Score 



Maryland 
Georgia 



1st 2nd 3rd 4th 
7 13 
7 13 



F 
20 
20 



2-UM - Gambino 35-yard run |McHugh kick) 

3-UG - Rauch 1-yard run |Geri kick) 

3-UM - Gambino 1-yard run [kick failed) 

3-UM - Gambino 24-yard pass from Baroni (McHugh kick) 

4-UG - Geri 4-yard run (kick failed) 

4-UG - Donaldson 9-yard pass from Rauch (Gen kick) 





UM 


UG 


First Downs 


16 


19 


Rushing Yards 


247 


216 


Passing 


127 


190 


CompiWnt 


7-14-1 


12-20-1 


Punts-Avg. 


5-44 


440 


Fumbles-Lost 


0-0 


2-1 


Penalties-Yards 


5-66 


4-80 



RUSHING-Maryland. Gambino 22-165, Idzik 2-32, Bonk 5-23. LaRue 
4-24. Turyn 4-9, Brown 2-6, Tucker 2-3. Siebert 3-3. Rotti 3-1-16). Geor- 
gia. Donaldson 1 0-69, Gen 7-56, Henderson 8-48, Reid 7-46, Nestorak 
3-6, Bodine 3-2, Bradberry 1-2, Brunson 3-|-2|, Rauch 3 |-10| 
PASSING-Maryland, Baroni 7-14-127. Georgia. Rauch 12-20-190. 
Att: 16,666 



t 






-\ 


Box Score 








ht 2nd 3rd 


4th 


f 




Maryland 7 13 


- 


20 




Missouri 


7 - 


7 




l-UM - Shemonski 1 1-yard run |Dean kick) 








2-UM - Modzelewski 3-yard run (kick failed 








2-UM - Shemonski 6-yard run |Dean kick) 








4-MO - Klein 4-yard run (Glorioso kick) 








UM 


MO 






First Downs 1 1 


13 






Rushing Yards 266 


100 






Passing 1 6 


167 






Comp-Att-Int 2-17-1 


1 1-29-3 






Punts-Avg 7-39.0 


3-38.0 






Fumbles-Lost l-l 


5-5 






Penalties-Yards 63 


10 






Att: 18,409 








^ 






4 




2008 ORANGE BOWL 



Maryland celebrates its first bowl in 1 948. 

2 2 PEACH BOWL 



Shoo-Shoo Shemonski goes for a TD vs. Missouri. 
2004 GATOR BOWL 



55 



TOYOTA 

GATOR; POSTSBason MSTtmy 
BO/L L 



12004 MARYLAND GATOR BOWL GUIDE 



SUGAR BOWL ORANGE 





Mane-Sugar 

Bowl 

New Orleans 

Jan. 2, 1958 

Maryland 28 

Tennessee 13 



MMYLMI jL TENNESSEE 



In what may have been the biggest win in Maryland football 
history, the Terps upset No 1 -ranked and regular season 
national champion Tennessee. 28-1 3, in the 1 952 Sugar Bowl. 
The Terps were led by running back Ed "Mighty Mo" 
Modzelewski f 1 53 yards on 28 carries) and the brilliant play 
of running back/defensive back Ed Fullerton, who scored 
two touchdowns and threw for another. The Terps put the 
game out of reach in the third quarter with a 46-yard inter- 
ception for a touchdown by Fullerton, giving the Terps a 28- 
6 lead. Maryland finished the season with an overall record 
of 1 0-0-0 and a No. 3 national ranking. 




ORANGE B0WI 



Orange Bowl 

Miami 

Jan. I, 1954 

Oklahoma 7 
Maryland 



This was the first game of the contract that pitted the Big 
Eight Conference champion against the Atlantic Coast Con- 
ference champion. The Terrapins took an undefeated sea- 
son and the nation's No. I ranking into the game against 
an Oklahoma squad that used a powerful running attack to 
grind out a second quarter touchdown to propel the Soon- 
ers to a 7-0 win. Twice the Terps had first-down opportuni- 
ties with the ball inside the 1 0-yard line and failed to come 
away with any points. Despite the narrow loss, the Terra- 
pins claimed the 1953 national championship. 





Orange Bowl f% 

Miami 
Jan. 2, 1956 M / -:'W 

Oklahoma 20 
Maryland 6 

The third-ranked Terps came into the Orange Bowl riding al 
1 5-game winning streak, only to have it snapped by arra 
Oklahoma team that extended its winning streak to 30l 
games with a 20-6 win. The Terps, who led 6-0 at halftimej 
were stunned when the Sooners went into their famoua 
"fast break offense" and reeled off two third-quarter touch-l 
downs to earn the national championship. Ed Vereb, whoi 
scored the Terps' lone touchdown, finished with 1 08 rush-l 
ing yards. Maryland was hurt by five turnovers. 



Box Score 



Maryland 
Tennessee 



1st 

7 



2nd 

14 
6 



3rd 

7 




4th 

7 



F 

28 

13 



1-UM - Fullerton 2-yard run pecker kick) 

2-UM - Shemonskl 7-yard pass from Fullerton pecker kick) 

2-UM - Scarbath I -yard run (Decker kick) 

2-UT - Rechichar 4-yard pass from Payne |kick failedj 

3-UM - Fullerton 46-yard interception return pecker kick) 

4-UT - Payne 2-yard run (Rechichar kick] 





UM 


UT 


First Downs 


18 


12 


Rushing Yards 


289 


81 


Passing 


63 


75 


Comp-Att-Int 


7-13-1 


9-19-4 


Return Yards 


29 


16 


Punts-Avg. 


8-38.0 


7-43.0 


Fumbles-lost 


7-1 


2-2 


Penalties-Yards 


12-120 


2-20 



RUSHING-Maryland.Modzelewski 28-1 53Tennessee, Payne 11-54. 
PASSING-Ma ryland, Scarbath 6-9-57.Tennessee, Payne 7-14-75. 
Att: 80,271 




56 ) Maryland celebrates its 1 95 J undefeated season. 

2002 ORANOE BOWL 



r- 


~ ~ "> 


Box Score 




1st 2nd 3rd 


4th F 


Maryland 


- 


Oklahoma 7 


- 7 


2-OU - Griggs 25-yard run [Leake kick) 




UM 


Oil 


First Downs 13 


10 


Rushing Yards 176 


208 


Passing 36 


22 


Comp-Att-Int 5-12-0 


4-6-1 


Return Yards 25 


7 


Punts-Avg. 5-29.0 


7-31.3 


Fumbles-Lost 1-1 


2-2 


PenaltyYards 15 


45 


RUSHING-Maryland.Felton 10-51. Oklahoma, Griggs 13-89. 


PASSING-Maryland, Boxold 3-9-42. Oklahoma, Calame 4-4-22. 


RECEIVING-Maryland, Nolan 2-31. Oklahoma, Burris 3-17. 


Att: 68, 178 






Shoo-Shoo 
Shemonski high- 
stepping in the 
1 954 Orange Bowl. 



Box Score 



4th 



Maryland 
Oklahoma 



1st 2nd 3rd 

6 
14 6 



f 
6 
20 



2-UM - Vereb 1 5-yard run (kick failed) 

3-OU - McDonald 4-yard run (Prices kick) 

3-OU - O'Neil I -yard run (Prices kick| 

4-OU - Dodd 82-yard interception return (kick failedj 





UM 


OU 


First Downs 


9 


16 


Rushing Yards 


187 


202 


Passing 


46 


53 


Comp-Att-Int 


3-10-3 


4-10-1 


Punts-Avg. 


7-40.0 


8-34.0 


Fumbles-Lost 


3-2 


1-1 


Penalties-Yards 


4-61 


4-35 



RUSHING-Maryland, Vereb 8-108. Oklahoma, Harris 9-63. 
PASSING Maryland, Beightol 2-7-46.0klahoma, Harris 3-5-34. 
RECEIVING-Maryland, Cooke 1-21. Oklahoma,Burris2-28. 
Att: 75,561 




Ed Vereb rushed fc 
the Terps only TD an I 
1 08 yards in the 5 i 
Orange Bowl. 



2002 PEACH BOWL • 2004 BATOR BBWL 




POSTSBaSOIl HISTOM 



2004 MARYLAND GATOR BOWL 



GATOR 
BCWL 



PEACH BOWL LIBERTY BOWL GATOB BOWL 




Fulton County 

Stadium 

Atlanta 

Dec. 28, 1373 

Georgia 17 

Maryland 16 

: Maryland came away from its first bowl game in 1 8 years a 
,' disappointed team. The Terrapins dominated Georgia in all 
: phases, but the game was tied 1 0-1 at the half thanks to a 
i couple of big plays by the Bulldogs. In the third quarter, a 
i costly Terp fumble led to Georgias go-ahead touchdown, 
j Seven times the Terrapins were inside the Georgia 20-yard 
oming away with only nine points. The Terps' lone 
:' touchdown came via Walter White's 68-yard touchdown 
reception. 




Liberty Bowl 

Mem. Stadium 

Memphis 

Dec. IB, 1974 

Tennessee 7 

Maryland 3 

The Maryland defense, led by AII-ACC defensive tackle Randy 
White, shut out Tennessee for nearly four quarters but lost 
the game when the Volunteers' quarterback, Randy Wallace, 
found Larry Seivers for an 1 1 -yard touchdown pass with 2:08 
to play. The Terps were punting from their own 13 when a 
bad snap from the center was recovered by the Volunteers 
on the Maryland 7-yard line. Maryland had a chance to win 
the game but an apparent 20-yard touchdown pass was ruled 
out of bounds. 





Bator Bowl 

Jacksonville 

Bee. 23, 1375 

Maryland 13 
Florida 

The ACC-champion Terrapins headed into the 1 975 Gator 
Bowl as a seven-point underdog to the Florida Gators. How- 
ever, this did not deter the Terps, who were coming off 
their best season (8-2- J | in 20 years. Maryland shut out the 
Gators, 1 3-0, in front of a large pro-Florida crowd in a steady 
downpour. The Maryland defense held the SEC's total of- 
fense leader scoreless and intercepted two Florida passes 
which led to the first 10 Maryland points. This was the first 
Terp win over an SEC team since 1955. 



Box Score 

Maryland 
Georgia 



1st 2nd 3rd 4th 
10 6 

10 7 



F 

16 

17 



2-UG ■ Poulous 62-yard pass from Johnson |Leavitt kick), 5:27 

2-UM ■ White 68-yard pass from Carter IMike-Mayer kick) 5:04 

2-UM - Mike-Mayer 36-yard field goal, 1:31 

2-UG - Leavitt 26-yard field goal, 0.06 

3-UG -Johnson 1-yard run |Leavitt kick|, 4:24 

4-UM • Mike-Mayer 25-yard field goal. 13:53 

4-UM ■ Mike-Mayer 28-yard field goal. 7:35 





UM 


UG 


First Downs 


15 


11 


Rushing Yards 


219 


170 


Passing 


242 


114 


Comp-Att-Int 


8-18-1 


5-16-1 


Return Yards 


78 


135 


Punts-Avg. 


6-31.8 


8-41.3 


Fumbles-Lost 


4-3 


2-2 


Penalties-Yards 


5-63 


1-5 



RUSHING-Maryland, Carter 29-126. Georgia, King 16-57. 
PASSING-Maryland, Kinard 4-8-113. Georgia, Johnson 5-16-114. 
RECEIVING: Maryland, White 2-106. Georgia, Poulous 2-62. 



Att: 80,271 



/ 


"""> 


Box Score 




1st 2nd 3rd 


4th F 


Maryland 3 


- 3 


Tennessee 


7 - 7 


2-UM - Mike-Mayer 28-yard field goal 




4-UT- Seivers 1 1-yard pass from Wallace (Towsend kick) 


UM 


UT 


First Downs 16 


15 


Rushing Yards 108 


173 


Passing 158 


65 


Comp-Att-Int 15-22-2 


7-16-0 


Return Yards 76 


65 


Punts-Avg. 6-41.0 


7-39.0 


Fumbles-Lost 3-3 


4-2 


Penalties-Yards 4-63 


8-69 


RUSHING-Maryland, Carter 22-65.Tennessee,Gayle 17-106. 


PASSING-Maryland, Avellini 15-22-1 58.Tennessee, Holloway 6-1 5- 


54. 




RECEIVING: Maryland, White 5-68.Tennessee, Seivers 4-38. 


Att: 51,284 




^ 


■> 




Coach Jerry Claiborne /left/ congratulates Georgia 
coach Vmce Dooley after the Bulldogs win. 



Louis Carter 
rushed for 65 
yards in the Terps 
1 974 Liberty Bowl 
appearance. 



Box Score 



Maryland 
Florida 



7sr 2nd 3rd 4th 
7 3 3 




l-UM - Hoover 1 9-yard pass from Dick ISochko kick) 6: 1 5 
2-UM - Sochko 20-yard field goal 6:49 
4-UM - Sochko 27-yard field goal 1 1 :4 1 





UM 


UF 


First Downs 


15 


14 


Rushing Yards 


209 


182 


Passing 


82 


28 


Comp-Att-Int 


7-16-0 


3-19-3 


Return Yards 


26 


25 


Punts-Avg. 


7-39.5 


7-38.5 


Fumbles-Lost 


0-0 


1-1 


Penalties-Yards 


5-47 


6-48 



RUSHING-Maryland,Atkins20-127.Florida,DuBose 18-95. 
PASSING-Maryland, Dick 5-13-67. Florida, Fisher 2-12-33. 
RECEIVING: Maryland, Hoover 2-24. Florida, Lecount 1-25. 
Att: 64,012 




Kim Hoover hauls 
in the only TD of 
the Terps win in 
the IS Gator 
Bowl. 



2002 ORANGE BOWL 



2002 PEACH BOWL 



2004 GATOR BOWL 



BCWL 



rusismwi iiisiumi 



12004 MARYLAND GATOR BOWL GOIDE ' '-^ 



COnONBOWL HALL OF 






liUJjau'jjn 
Cof f0/7 flow/ 

Dallas 
Jan. 1, 1977 

Houston 30 
Maryland 21 

Maryland entered the 1977 Cotton Bowl with a perfect 1 1- 
record, but the hopes for a perfect season were dashed 
quickly when Houston scored 2 1 first-quarter points en route 
to a 30-2 1 win. The Cougars rushed for a total of 320 yards 
in the game and 1 44 in the 2 1 -point first quarter. The Terps 
cut the lead to 27-2 1 in the fourth quarter, but a 5:42 drive 
by the Cougars late in the quarter resulted in a field goal, 
slamming the door on any Terp comeback hopes. 



Legion Field 

Birmingham 

Dec. 22, 1977 

Maryland 17 
Minnesota 7 



jyf1B?BI!BH| 



After allowing an early Minnesota touchdown run, the Terps 
scored the next 1 7 points and shut out the Golden Go- 
phers over the next three quarters to leave Birmingham with 
a 1 7-7 win. Offensively, the Terps looked to George Scott, 
who rushed for 75 yards and two second-quarter touch- 
downs to put Maryland in the lead for good. The Maryland 
defense held the Gophers to only 69 yards of total offense 
in the second half. 




Sun Bawl 

El Paso 

Dec. 23, 1978 

Texas 42 
Maryland 

The Maryland Terrapins, appearing in their sixth consecu 
tive bowl and looking for their second straight bowl win 
ran into a very determined Texas Longhorn team. The Long 
horns' running game amassed 220 yards and five touch 
downs, while the Texas defense held Maryland to 248 yard 
of total offense. It was the first time in 95 games the Terp 
had been held scoreless, ending the third-longest streak irj 
the nation. 



Box Score 



F 
21 
30 



1st 2nd 3rd 4th 
Maryland 7 7 7 — 

Houston 21 6 3 — 

1-UH- Thomas 1 t-yard run (Coplrn kick) 6.27 

I -UH - Blackwell 33-yard run (Coplin kick) 3:13 

I -UH - Blackwell I -yard run (Coplin kick] 0:51 

2-UM - Manges 6-yard run (Loncar kick) 9:36 

2-UH - Bass 33-yard pass from Davis (kick failed] 0:55 

3-UM - Sievers 1 1 -yard pass from Manges ISochko kick) 1 :4 1 

4-UM - Wilson I -yard run ISochko kick) 8:46 

4-UH - Coplin 23-yard field goal 0: 1 8 

UM UH 

First Downs 1 7 20 

Rushing Yards 120 320 

Passing 179 108 

Comp-AtMnt 17-32-0 5-8-0 

Return Yards 13 5 

Punts-Avg. 6-44.0 4-36.0 

Fumbles-Lost 1-1 4-3 

Penalties-Yards 8-80 5-22 



RUSHING-Maryland, Scon 1 1 -47. Houston, Blackwell 22-149. 
PASSING-Maryland, Manges 17-32-179.Houston, Davis 5-8-108. 
RECEIVING: Maryland, Kinney 6-72. Houston, Foster 3-62. 

Att: SB. inn 




Eric Sievers caught 
his first college TD 
on this play in the 
77 Cotton Bowl. 



Box Score 



Maryland 
Minnesota 



1st 2nd 3rd 4th 
3 14 
7 



F 

17 
7 



l-MN - Barber 1-yard run |Rogind kick) 9:02 
1-UM - Sochko 32-yard field goal 5:21 
2-UM - Scott 2-yard run (Sochko kick) 7:04 
2-UM - Scott 1-yard run ISochko kick) 4:53 





UM 


MN 


First Downs 


15 


17 


Rushing Yards 


120 


113 


Passing 


211 


155 


Comp-AtMnt 


12-23-1 


13-26-0 


Return Yards 


3 


6 


Punts-Avg. 


5-36.8 


9-27.7 


Fumbles-Lost 


3-2 


3-2 


Penalties- Yards 


12-80 


6-54 



RUSHING-Maryland, Scott 24-75. Minnesota, Kitzmann 24-76. 
PASSING-Maryland, Dick 12-20-211. Minnesota, Avery 12-23-130. 
RECEIVING: Maryland, White 8-126. Minnesota, Anhorn 5-49. 

Att: 47,000 




George Scott ran for 
two TDs and 75 
yards in the Terps 
77 Hall of Fame 
Bowl win. 



Box Score 



1st 2nd 3rd 4th 
Maryland — 

Texas 21 7 14 — 

1-UT- L Jones 7-yard run |Erxleben kick) 10:27 

1 -UT - J. Jones I -yard run |Erxleben kick) 7:15 

1-UT-L Jones 29-yard pass from McBaeth (Erxleben kick) 4 37 

2-UT- McBaeth 2-yard run (Erxleben kick) 1255 

3-UT-J. Jones 14-yard run (Erxleben kick) 2:42 

3-UT - H. Jones 32-yard run |Erxleben kick) 1 :08 



F 


42 





UM 


UT 


First Downs 


20 


18 


Rushing Yards 


34 


220 


Passing 


214 


45 


Comp-AtMnt 


17-43-4 


2-7-0 


Return Yards 





20 


Punts-Avg. 


8-37 


7-41 


Fumbles-Lost 


2-1 


3-1 


Penalties Yards 


5-35 


7-42 



RUSHING Maryland, Atkins 10-15. Texas, H.Jones 14-104. 
PASSING Maryland.O'Hare 12-27-146.Texas, McBaeth 2-5-45. 
RECEIVING: Maryland, Richards 4-52.Texas, L.Jones 2-45. 
Att: 33,122 




Charles Johnson i 
mood tells the 
story after the 
Terps lost in the 
78 Sun Bowl. 



2002 ORANGE BOWL 



2002 PEACH BOWL 



2004 QATOR BOWL 




■J 



7 3W>ti ; \ 




posmason HiswM 



2004 MARYLAND GATOR BOWL GUIDE 



GATOR 
BCWL 






TANGERINE 
BOWL 




] Tangerine Bowl 

Orlando 

Dec. 20, 1000 

r lor ida 35 
Maryland 20 



Idarylands Charlie Wysocki njshed for 1 59 yards and a touch- 
down, but it was not enough to overcome the passing at- 
tack of the Gators Wayne Peace, who threw for 27 1 yards 
*nd two touchdowns. Peaces favorite receiver, Cns 
!:ollinsworth, caught eight passes for 1 66 yards, including 
i 21-yard touchdown catch that led to Florida's 28-20 lead, 
Maryland's Dale Castro tied a Tangerine Bowl record and 
stablished a new Terrapin bowl record when he booted 
'us fourth field goal in the third quarter. 



Box Score 



Ma) land 

Flonda 



1st 2nd 3rd 4th 
3 6 11 
14 14 7 



f 
20 

35 



l-UM - Castro 34-yard field goal 4:50 
24JF - Collinsworth 24-yard pass from Peace [Dark kick| 1 4:04 
2-UM - Castro 27-yard field goal 4:37 
24JM - Castro 26-yard field goal 4:28 
1 2-UF - Jones 2-yard run [Clark kick| 1 46 
1 34JM- Wysocki 2-yard run fflce run| 1448 
UIM ■ Castro 42-yard field goal 1 0:00 
' 3-UF - Peace I -yard run |Clark kick) 4:43 
' Mif - Collinsworth 2 1 -yard pass from Peace (Clark kick| 3:29 
. 4-UF - Brown 2-yard run (Clark kick) 9 3 1 

UM UF 

19 16 

181 108 

155 271 

12-26-3 20-34-1 

14 54 

4-39.0 6-340 

4-2 1-0 

6-44 11-108 

RUSHING Ma ryland, Wysocki 39-159.F1orida. Brown 16-71. 
PASSING Maryland, Uce ll-23-129.F1orida,Peace 20-24-271. 
RECEIVING: Maryland, Havener 4-83. Florida.Collinsworth 8-166. 
Att: 52,541 



First Downs 
Rushing Yards 
Passing 
Comp-Att-Int 
Return Yards 
i Plints-Avg. 
Fumbles-Lost 
Penalties-Yards 




ALOHA BOWL CITRUS BOWL 





Aloha Stadium 

Honolulu l 
Dec. 25, 1002 

Washington 21 
Maryland 20 

Maryland and Washington made sure the fans who went 
to the inaugural Aloha Bowl got their money's worth. The 
Huskies' touchdown with :06 left secured Washington's 
come-from-behind, 21-20 victory. The Terps had a chance 
to go up by nine points with 3:39 left to play, but Jess 
Atkinson's 32-yard field goal attempt missed. The Terps had 
fallen behind 1 4-6 in the first half and Boomer Esiason had 
completed 1 passes for 1 20 yards and a touchdown in the 
third quarter, sparking Maryland to a 20-1 4 lead early in the 
fourth. 



Box Score 



4th 



Maryland 
Washington 



1st 2nd 3rd 

6 6 8 
7 7 7 



f 

20 
21 



1-UW-AJIen 27-yard pass from Cowan |Nelsonkick| 10 14 
2-UM -DAddio 19-yard pass from Esiason (kick failedl 1452 
2-UW -Allen 71-yard pass from Cowan |Nelson kick) 5 21 
3-UM - Tice 36-yard pass from Esiason (conversion failed) 12 18 
4-UM - Nash 2-yard run (Tice pass from Esiason) 1 0.44 
4-UW -Allen 1 1-yard pass from Cowan |Nelson kick) 0:06 



First Downs 
Rushing Yards 
Passing 
Comp-Att-Int 
Return Yards 
Punts-Avg. 
Fumbles-Lost 
Penalties-Yards 



UM 

17 

68 

251 
19-32-1 

45 
7-38.0 

2-1 
8-55 



UW 

20 

63 

369 

35-55-0 

43 

5-45.0 

4-4 

7-50 



RUSHING Maryland,Nash ll-41.Washington,Robinson 16-50, 

PASSING-Maryland, Esiason 19-32-25l.Washington.Cowan33-55- 

369. 

RECEIVING: Maryland,Tice6-85.Washington,Skansi 10-81. 

Att: 30,055 



Charlie Wysocki 
ran for 159 
yards in the SO 
Tangerine Bowl. 

2002 ORANGE BOWL 




Dave DAddio 
rushes past 
Washington in 
the Aloha 
Bowl. 



2002 PEACH BOWL 





Florida Citrus 

Bowl 

Orlando 

Dec. 17, 1003 

Tennessee 30 

Maryland 23 

Tennessee scored two touchdowns in the fourth quarter to 
overcome a 20-16 deficit and defeat the Terps, 30-23, in 
the 1983 Citrus Bowl. Maryland took a four-point lead into 
the fourth quarter, thanks to outstanding play from reserve 
quarterback Frank Reich. Reich entered the game in the 
second quarter when starter Boomer Esiason suffered a 
shoulder injury, Reichs one mistake of the day, an intercep- 
tion early in the fourth quarter, set the Vols on Maryland's 
1 4-yard line which led to a Tennessee touchdown run that 
was the difference. 



Box Score 



Maryland 
Tennessee 



1st 2nd 
3 6 
7 3 



3rd 



4th 
3 
14 



F 

23 

30 



l-UM-Atkinson ISyard field goal 4:01 

l-UT - Taylor 1 2 pass from Cockrell (Reveiz kick) 1 :04 

2-UM - Atkinson 48-yard field goal 1 3 43 

2-UM -Atkinson 31 -yard field goal 1201 

2-UT- Reveiz 25-yard field goal 4:34 

3-UM - Atkinson 22-yard field goal 10 47 

3-UT - Henderson 1 9-yard run ICockrell pass failed) 5 29 

3-UM - Badanjek 3-yard run (Badanjek run) 4.14 

4-UT - Jones I -yard run (Reveiz kick) 14:01 

44JT- Jones 2-yard run (Reveiz kick) 1 1:58 

4-UM - Atkjnson 26-yard field goal 4:34 

UM UT 

First Downs 1 7 25 

Rushing Yards 95 201 

Passing 253 185 

Comp-Att-Int 18-28-1 16-23-1 

Return Yards 10 26 

Punts-Avg. 0-0.0 1-47.0 

Fumbles-Lost 3-1 1-1 

Penalties-Yards 6-32 1-5 

RUSHING-Maryland.Joyner 17-58. Tennesseejones 29-154. 
PASSING-Maryland, Reich 14-22-192. Tennessee, Cockrell 16-23- 
185. 

RECEIVING: Maryland, David 4-66.Tennessee, Duncan 6-59. 
Att: 50,183 




Bobby Ross 
(far left) and 
Boomer 
Esiason 
[second from 
left) visit 
Goofy at the 
Magic 
Kingdom. 



5 e 



2004 6AT0B BOWL 



OT 

GATOR 
BCWL 



pasTSBasan HisroRy 



2004 MARYLAND GATOR BOWL GOIDE 

■ 




SUN BOWL CHERRY BOWL INDEPENDENCii 



BOWL 





Dec. 22, 1984 

Maryland 28 
Tennessee 27 



The Maryland Terrapins were truly the comeback team of 
1984. Maryland trailed Tennessee 21-0 at halftime and 
erupted for a Terrapin bowl-record 22 points in the third 
quarter. Frank Reich's third-quarter touchdown pass to Ferrell 
Edmunds put the Terps up 22-21, but the ensuing kickoff 
was returned for a touchdown by the Volunteers to give 
them a 27-22 lead. Then with 8:03 left to play, the Terps' 
offense pounded out a 5:05 drive that was capped by a 
one-yard scoring run by Rick Badanjek for the game-win- 
ning touchdown. 



Box Scare 



Maryland 
Tennessee 



1st 


10 



2nd 3rd 4th 

22 6 
116 



F 

28 

27 



1 -UT -Jones 2-yard run |Reveiz kick] 6:34 
I -UT - Reveiz 24-yard field goal 2:29 
2-UT - Reveiz 52-yard field goal 5:13 
2-UT • McGee 6-yard pass from Robinson 
|McGee pass from Robinson| 0:37 
3-UM - Nleal 57-yard run (pass failed| 1 0:35 
3-UM - Atkinson 23-yard field goal 6:32 
3-UM - Badanjek 1-yard run |run failed) 3:47 
3-UM - Edmunds 40-yard pass from Reich (Atkinson kick} 3:47 
3-UT - Penuska 1 00-yard kickoff return [pass failed] 0:10 
4-UM - Badanjek 1-yard run (pass failed) 2:28 

UM UT 

First Downs 22 13 

Rushing Yards 229 148 

Passing 201 132 

Comp-Att-Int 17-28-1 15-24-0 

Return Yards 80 194 

Punts-Avg. 4-39.0 5-42.4 

Fumbles-Lost 2-2 2-2 

Penalties-Yards 8-63 6-49 

RUSHING-Maryland.Neal l2-107.Tennessee,Jones 14-80. 
PASSING-Maryland, Reich 17-28-201. Tenn, Robinson 15-24-132. 
RECEIVING: Maryland, Hill 4-69. Tennessee, McGee 6-66. 
Att: 50,126 





Pontiac 

Silverdome 

Pontiac, Mich. 

Dec. 21, 1385 

Maryland 35 

Syracuse 18 

Quarterback Stan Gelbaugh completed 1 4 passes for 223 
yards, threw two touchdowns and rushed for another as 
Maryland defeated Syracuse 35-18. The Terrapins, who 
trailed 3-0 early in the first quarter, took their first lead thanks 
to Gelbaugh's four-yard touchdown run. Trailing 1 0-6 in the 
second quarter, Gelbaugh hit tight end Chris Knight for a 
three-yard score to put the Terps in the lead for good. The 
touchdown pass also was the start of a 22-point second 
quarter that tied a Maryland bowl record for points scored 
in a quarter. 



Box Score 



Syracuse 
Maryland 



Zsf 

3 
6 



2nd 3rd 4th 
7 8 
22 7 



F 

18 

35 



I -SU - McAulay 26-yard field goal 1 0:27 

l-UM - Gelbaugh 4-yard run (kick failed| 6:36 

2-SU - Drummond 10-yard run (McAulay kick] 12:53 

2-UM - Knight 3-yard pass from Gelbaugh |Badanjek run) , 8:50 

2-UM - Tye 8-yard fumble return (Plocki kick) 3:4 1 

2-UM - Blount 20-yard run (Plocki kick) 1 :43 

3-UM - Abdur-Ra'oof 6-yard pass from Gelbaugh [Plocki 

kick) 11:27 

3-SU - McPherson 1 7-yard run |Schwedes from McPherson| 2:51 

UM SU 

First Downs 22 28 

Rushing Yards 244 241 

Passing 223 204 

Comp-Att-Int 14-20-1 18-30-3 

Return Yards 99 135 

Punts-Avg. 3-38.7 1-52.0 

Fumbles-Lost 0-0 3-2 

Penalties-Yards 5-54 3-26 

RUSHING-Maryland, Blount 24-135.Syracuse, McPherson 21-111. 
PASSING-Maryland.Gelbaugh 14-20-223. Syracuse, McPherson 18- 
30-204. 

RECEIVING: Maryland, Abdur-Ra'oof 5-86. Syracuse, Slano 4-69. 
Att: 51,858 



After rallying 
from a 21-0 
halftime 
deficit, the 
Terps carried 
coach Bobby 
Ross off the 
field after 
winning the 
84 Sun Bowl. 



2002 ORANGE BOWL 




Len Lynch 
163} hoists 
the 1985 
Cherry Bowl 
trophy. 



2002 PEACH BOWL 




Independence 

Stadium 

Shreveport, La. 

Dec. IS, 1990 

Maryland 34 

La. Tech 34 



Tech's Chris Boniol hit a 29-yard field goal with no time remairl 
ing in the 1 990 Independence Bowl, allowing the Bulldogs f| 
escape Shreveport with a 34-34 tie. The Terrapins fell behind 3 1 
20 early in the fourth quarter but rallied to take the lead whel 
Scott Zolak threw a 1 5-yard touchdown pass to Brad Johnscl 
with :52 remaining. However, on the ensuing kickoff, Techl 
Lorenzo Baker returned the kick 41 yards to start the BullrJcl 
drive on the Maryland 39-yard line Five plays and 28 yards latel 
Boniol kicked his second field goal of the game to even tne scoJ 



Box Score 



1st 2nd 3rd 4th 

Maryland 14 6 14 

Louisiana Tech 



14 



14 



F 

34 

34 



1 -UM - Jackson 1 -yard run (DeArmas kick) 1 1 :59 

l-UM -Jackson 2-yard run |DeArmas kick) 5:06 

2-LT - Richardson 5-yard run |Boniol kick) 8:30 

2-LT - Davis 3-yard run (Boniol kick) 0:17 

3-LT- Richardson 1 -yard run (Boniol kick) 1 0:35 

3-UM -Jackson 1 1 -yard run (kick failed) 7:44 

3-LT - Slaughter 7-yard pass from Johnson (Boniol kick) 5:52 

4-LT - Boniol 36-yard field goal 1 3:52 

4-UM - Mason 28-yard pass from Zolak (DeArmas kick) 1 1:20 

4-UM -Johnson 1 5-yard pass from Zolak (DeArmas kick) 0:52 

4-LT - Boniol 28-yard field goal 00 



UM 


LT 


First Downs 1 6 


25 


Rushing Yards 191 
Passing 115 
Comp-Att-Int 11-18-1 
Return Yards 22 


150 

254 

18-28-3 

3 


Punts-Avg. 4-37,2 
Fumbles-Lost 1-1 


1-34.0 
3-1 


Penalties Yards 9-88 


6-53 


RUSHING Marylandjadcon l7-50.La.Tech,Richardson27-81. 
PASSING Maryland.Zolak 7-16-159.U.Tech,Johnson 7-8-70. 
RECEIVING: Maryland. Johnson 5-107.La.Tedi,Slaughter 5-66. 
Att: 48,325 




Clarence Jon 4 
174) lifts TroJ 
Jackson in tl t 
air after the 
Terps third- 
quarter scon 
in the 90 
Independent ? 
Bowl. 



2004 GATOR BOWL 







J a ) 
TOYOTA 

posimsan mswm GATOR 

BCWL 



2004 MARYLAND GATOR BOWL GUIDE 



ORANGE BOWL PEACH BOWL 





Pro Player 

Stadium 

Miami, Fla. 

Jan. 2, 2002 

lorida 56 

Maryland 23 

;laryland made its first bowl appearance since 1 990, but 
Wl to the fifth-ranked Florida Gators, 56-23- Florida's Rex 
(rossman came off the bench to throw for 248 yards and 
>ur touchdowns The Gators jumped out to a 14-0 lead, 



,jt the Terps rallied to close to within 14-10. Florida, how- 
i/er, scored five unanswered touchdowns to pull away. Marc 
; ley rushed for two touchdowns for the Terps. The teams 
(imbmed for an Orange Bowl record 79 points and 1 ,0 1 9 
fital yards. 



Box Score 



1st 2nd 3rd 4th F 

Flonda 14 14 21 7 - 56 

Myfarxj 7 3 13 - 23 



l-UF - Graham 1-yard run |Chandler kick) 9:51 

-Jacobs 46-yard pass from Berlin (Chandler kick) 0:12 

- Williams 64-yard pass from Hill |Novak kick) 0:00 

- Novak 20-yard field goal 1 2:20 

- Jacobs 1 5-yard pass from Grossman (Chandler kick| 2:18 

- Gaffney 4-yard pass from Grossman (Chandler kick) 0:03 

- Graham 6-yard run (Chandler kick) 1 1 22 

- Gillespie 1 1-yard run (Chandler kick) 7.26 

- Gaffney 33-yard pass from Grossman (Chandler kick) 2:52 

- Riley I -yard run (Novak kickj 1156 

- Perez 1 0-yard pass from Grossman (Chandler kick) 10:16 

- Riley I Oyard run (Novak kick) 5 : 1 



:-uv 

2-UF 
I24JF 

HJM 

IWJM 



v *ifSt Downs 
Pushing Yards 
'assing 
:ompnMt-lnt 
lietum Yards 
I'untjAvg 
: umbles-Losr. 
■enatoes-Yards 



UM 

19 

103 

257 

23-39-1 

189 

5-462 

M 

4-20 



UF 

30 

203 

456 

33-49-2 

93 

2-53.0 

2-1 

M3 



iUSHIN&Maryland. Hill 11-31 Flonda. Graham 16-149. 
'ASSINOMaryland. Hill 23-39-257 Flonda. Grossman 20-28-248. 
lECEMN&Maryland, Murphy 5-42 Flonda, Jacobs 10-170. 
«t73 640 






Georgia Dome 

Atlanta, Oa. 

Dec. 31, 2002 

Maryland 30 
Tennessee 3 

The Terps posted their first bowl win since 1 985 with a domi- 
nating performance over the Tennessee Volunteers. QB Scott 
McBrien ran for a pair of touchdowns, Nick Novak booted 
three field goals, All-America linebacker E.J. Henderson regis- 
tered 1 2 solo tackles, and cornerback Curome Cox returned 
an interception for a touchdown to highlight Maryland's per- 
formance. The Terps never trailed in the game, taking their 
opening possession in for a touchdown on a one-yard run 
by McBrien and taking a 1 7-3 lead into intermission. It was 
the most lopsided bowl loss in UT history. 



Box Score 



Tennessee 
Maryland 



1st 2nd 3rd 4th 

3 
7 10 3 10 



F 
3 
30 



I -UM - McBnen 1 run |Novak kick) 6:00 

2-UM - Cox 54 interception return (Novak kick) 1 1 :32 

2-LfT- Walls 38 field goal 4 46 

2-UM - Novak 48 field goal 0:47 

3-UM - Novak 44 field goal 6:48 

4-UM - McBrien 6 run |Novak kick) 12:55 

4-UM- Novak 25 field goal 4: 1 2 





UT 


UM 


First Downs 


18 


17 


Rushing Yards 


45 


154 


Passing 


242 


120 


CompMtt-Int 


23-37-1 


11-19-0 


Return Yards 


85 


177 


PuntsTWg 


647 7 


3-503 


Fumbles-lost 


1-1 


2-1 


Penalties-Yards 


8-68 


2-10 



RUSHING-Maryland, Perry ] 5-50. Tennessee Houston 9-34 

PASSING-Maryland, McBnen. 1 1 - 1 9-0-1 20. Tennessee. Clausen 23-37- 

1-242. 

RECEIVING-Maryland, Harrison 4-74. Tennessee Brown 5-75 

Att: 68.330. 



Marc Riley ran 
for two 
touchdowns, 
including this 
10-yard run in 
the fourth 
quarter. 

E BOWL 




Curome Cox set 
a school bowl 
record with a 
Si-yard 
interception 
return for 
touchdown in 
the Peach 
Bowl. 



2 2 PEACH BOWL 




Seniors Todd Wike and Durrand Roundtree show 
off the 2002 Peach Bowl trophy. 



:hick-f il- a 




Quarterback Scott McBrien was named the Peach 
Bowls Offensive MVP. 

2004 GATOB BOWL 



rir 



i 'lis i sum i nix i ii i hi 



12004 MARYLAND GATOR ROWL GUIDE 

ALL-TIME 

INDIVIDUAL RECORDS 

Rushing Yards 

1 65 (23 carries). Lu Gambino vs. Georgia, 1 948 Gator 
1 53 |28|, Ed Modzelewski vs Tennessee, 1 952 Sugar 
1 59 (39), Charlie Wysocki vs, Florida, 1 980 Tangerine 
1 32 (24). Alvin Blount vs Syracuse, 1 985 Cherry 
127 (20). Steve Atkins vs, Florida. 1975 Gator 
126 (29). Louis Carter vs. Georgia, 1973 Peach 
1 08 |8|. Ed Vereb vs. Oklahoma. 1 956 Orange 
107 1 1 2), Tommy Neal vs. Tennessee. 1984 Sun 

Rushing Attempts 

39, Charlie Wysocki vs. Florida, 1980 Tangerine 

Rushing Touchdowns 

3, Troy Jackson vs. Louisiana Tech, 1990 Independence 

Longest Touchdown Run 

57 yards, Tommy Neal vs Tennessee, 1984 Sun 

Passing Yards 

257 (23 of 39, 1 TD, 1 Int.), Shaun Hill vs Florida, 2002 Orange 
251 (19 of 32, 2TD. I Int.), Boomer Esiasonvs, Washington, 1982 

Aloha 
223 (14 of 20. 2 TD, I Int.), Stan Gelbaugh vs Syracuse, 1985 

Cherry 
2 1 5 1 1 7 of 28. I TD, 3 Int |. Scott Zolak vs Louisiana Tech, 1990 

Independence 
2 1 1 ( 1 2 of 20, TD, 1 Int ), Larry Dick vs. Minnesota, 1977 Hall of 

Fame 
201 ( 1 7 of 28, 1 TD. 1 lnt.|, Frank Reich vs Tennessee. 1984 Sun 

Pass Completions 

23, Shaun Hill vs Florida, 2002 Orange 

Pass Attempts 

39, Shaun Hill vs. Florida. 2002 Orange 

Passing Touchdowns 

2. Boomer Esiason vs. Washington. 1 982 Aloha 

2, Stan Gelbaugh vs. Syracuse, 1985 Cherry 

2, Scott Zolak vs. Louisiana Tech, 1 990 Independence 





Longest Touchdown pass 

68, Louis Carter to Walter White vs Georgia, 1 973 Peach 

Total Offense 

288 yards (3 1 run, 257 pass), Shaun Hill vs. Florida. 2002 Orange 
252 yards (I run. 251 pass). Boomer Esiason vs Washington, 
1 983 Aloha 

Receptions 

8 1 1 26 yards), Charlie White vs Minnesota. 1 977 Hall of Fame 

Receiving Yards 

1 26 (8 rec, TD), Charlie White vs. Minnesota. 1977 Hall of Fame 
107 (5 rec, 1 TD), Barry Johnson vs. Louisiana Tech, 1990 Inde- 
pendence 
106 (2 rec, 1 TD), Walter White vs. Georgia, 1973 Peach 

Touchdown Receptions 

I , Lu Gambino from John Baroni, 1 948 Gator 

1 , Bob Shemonski from Ed Fullerton, 1952 Gator 

1 , Walter White from Louis Carter, 1 973 Peach 

I, Kim Hoover from Larry Dick, 1975 Gator 

I. Eric Sievers from Mark Manges, 1977 Cotton 

1 , Dave DAddio from Boomer Esiason, 1 982 Aloha 

I , John Tice from Boomer Esiason, 1 982 Aloha 

1 , Ferrell Edmunds from Frank Reich, 1 984 Sun 

I, Chris Knight from Stan Gelbaugh, 1985 Cherry 

1 . Azizuddm Abdur-Ra oof from Stan Gelbaugh, 1 985 Cherry 

1 , Mark Mason from Scott Zolak, 1 990 Independence 

I, Barry Johnson from Scott Zolak, 1990 Independence 

1 , Jafar Williams from Shaun Hill, 2002 Orange 



®Lu Gambino holds the Maryland record for rushing 
yards in a game with 165, gained in the 48 Gator 
Bowl. 

2002 0RAN6E BOWL 



All-Purpose Yardage 

1 89 1 1 65 rush, 24 rec.), Lu Gambino vs. Georgia, 1 948 Gator 
184 (93 rush, 47 rec . 44 ret |, Mark Mason vs Louisiana Tech, 
1 990 Independence 

Touchdowns Responsible For 

3, Lu Gambino (35 run, 1 run. 24 rec.) vs. Missouri, 1948 Gator 
3, Ed Fullerton (2 run, 7 pass, 46 int.) vs Tennessee, 1952 Sugar 
3, Troy Jackson (2 run, 2 run. 1 1 run) vs Louisiana Tech, 1990 
Independence 

Field Goals 

5 ( 1 8, 48. 3 1 , 22, 26 yds.), Jess Atkinson vs Tennessee, 1 983 Citrus 
4 (35, 27. 27. 43 yds.), Dale Castro vs. Florida, 1980 Tangerine 

Longest Field Goal 

48 yards, Jess Atkinson vs. Tennessee, 1 983 Citrus 
48 yards, Nick Novak vs, Tennessee, 2002 Peach 

Punting Average 

53 13 for 1 59 yds.). Lynn Beightol vs. Oklahoma. 1956 Orange 
52 4 (5 for 262 yds), Mike Sochko vs. Houston, 1 977 Cotton 

Longest Punt 

77 yards, Mike Sochko vs Houston, 1977 Cotton 

Longest Kickoff Return 

80 yards, Tommy Neal vs. Tennessee. 1 983 Citrus 

Fumble Return for a TD 

8 yard return, Scott Tye vs. Syracuse, 1985 Cherry 

Interception Return for a TD 

54 yard return, Curome Cox vs. Tennessee, 2002 Peach 
2002 PEACH BOWL • 



TEAM RECORDS 

First Downs 

25, 1990 Independence (12 rush, 9 pass, 4 pen.) vs. Louisi; 
Tech 

First Downs Rushing 

14, 1 952 Sugar vs Tennessee 

First Downs Passing 

1 2, 1 983 Citrus vs Tennessee 

Fewest First Downs 

9, 1956 Orange vs. Oklahoma 

Rushing Yards 

289 yards, 1 952 Sugar vs Tennessee 

Rushing Attempts 

54, 1 980 Tangerine (177 yards| vs. Florida 
54, 1984 Sun (229 yards) vs. Tennessee 

Rushing Touchdowns 

3, 1 950 Gator vs. Missouri 
3, 1984 Sun vs. Tennessee 

3, 1 990 Independence vs. Louisiana Tech 

Fewest Rushing Yards 

68. 1982 Aloha vs. Washington 

Passing Yards 

257 yards, 2002 Orange vs Florida 

Pass Completions 

23. 2002 Orange vs. Florida 

Pass Attempts 

43, 1 978 Sun vs. Texas ( 1 7 completions) 

Passing Touchdowns 

2, 1982 Aloha vs. Washington 
2, 1 985 Cherry vs. Syracuse 

2. 1 990 Independence vs. Louisiana Tech 

Fewest Passing Yards 

16. 1 950 Gator vs Missouri 

Total Yards 

467, 1 985 Cherry vs. Syracuse (244 rush, 223 pass) 

Fewest Total Yards 

2 1 2, 1 954 Orange vs. Oklahoma 

Pass Interceptions 

4, 1952 Sugar vs. Tennessee 

Fumbles Lost 

3. 1 973 Peach vs. Georgia 
3. 1 974 Liberty vs Tennessee 

Penalty Yards 

1 20 on 12 penalties. 1952 Sugar vs. Tennessee 



2004 BATOR BOWL 







mmm of mamaim GffTOR 

BCWL 



2004 MARYLAND GATOR BOWL GOIDE 



TESTUDO: TALE OF THE TOP SHELL 




'estudo celebrating the Terps ACC championship 
n 2002. 

Testudo is a Diamondback turtle. Like some other 
amous personages born into the Depression of the 1 930s, 
he derivation of his name is cloudy. But it is likely that his 
moniker is derived from the scientific classification for turtle 
tetudines) . Or the top turtle could be named after testudo 
;|igantia. a species native to the African nation of Seychelles 
<nd one of its remote islands, Aldabra. Or the name could 
|iave come from a dictionary definition that says the word, 
estudo, was derived from the Latin and meant a shelter 
eld over the head of Roman soldiers - like a tortoise shell. 
these explanations are a long way from the Chesapeake 
ay where the Diamondback lives. 

When Testudo had his coming out on May 23, 1 933, 
ie was thrown into a world filled with intimidating mas- 
jots - Wildcats, Tigers, Devils, Wolves. Bears - thought up 
ver a half-century of intercollegiate competition. Mary- 
'|ind College Park was consolidated from different state 
fchools in 1 920 to form the base of today's wide-ranging 
fate system, and the remodeled Maryland needed a flag 
farrier to do battle with Wahoos, Lions and Generals. 

Dr. H.C. Byrd, a football coach who later became 
Jniversity President, recommended the Diamondback as 




mascot in 1 932 in response to the student newspaper's 
search for an "official" leader. Byrd's childhood in Crisfield, 
Md„ apparently included skirmishes with this brand of 
snapping turtle, indigenous to the Bay. The school paper 
was in fact already called The Diamondback, and when 
the Class of 1 933 stepped forward with the idea of giving 
the University a permanent bronzed version as its gradua- 
tion gift. Testudo's family was in to stay. 

Maryland had been referring to itself as Old Liners, 
yet another name whose derivation of which no one seems 
sure. Historians are in a scrimmage over whether the nick- 
name is a reference to a Revolutionary War Troop of Mary- 
land soldiers who distinguished themselves on the field of 
battle, or they feel it could refer to a squabble with Penn- 
sylvania™ over just where the border between the two 
states should be. 



The Class of '33 raised money for casting a Diamond- 
back by holding its Senior Prom on campus to save money 
on expenses. And the yearbook and Student Government 
Association chipped in. Edwin C. Mayo, Class of '04 and a 
former quarterback, donated at cost the 300 pound 
bronzed beauty as President of Gorham Manufacturing in 
Providence, R.I. Robert J. Hill cast the inspired sculpture 
accomplished by company artist Anstide Oanfrani. Fur- 
ther turtleization came when the student yearbook. The 
Reveille, became The Terrapin in 1935. Newspapers, even 
then exploring every angle, shortened Terrapin to Terp 
for headline writing ease when it wasn't trying to cram 
Old Liner into a single column head. The name was in 
place, now came the stuff of legend. 




A bronze statue of Testudo overlooks Byrd Stadium from in front of the Cossett Team House. 



'aryland features a 20-foot high balloon version 
' Testudo beyond the east end zone. 

2002 ORANGE BOWL 



The Diamondback Terrapin 



The Diamondback Terrapin |Malaclemys terrapin) was made the State reptile and official mascot of the University of 
Maryland College Park in 1 994 (Chapter 476, Acts of 1 994; Code State Government Article, sec. 1 3-3 1 3). 

Chesapeake diamondbacks are distinguished by diamond-shaped, concentric rings on the scutes of their upper 
shells. They are predators whose preference for unpolluted saltwater make them indicators of healthy marsh and river 
systems. In winter, they hibernate under water in mud. Around late May, diamondback terrapin emerge to mate, nest, 
and bask in the sun on coastal dunes or narrow sandy beaches. 

Chesapeake colonists ate terrapin prepared Native-American fashion, roasted whole in live coals Abundant and 
easy to catch, terrapin were so ample that landowners often fed their slaves and indentured servants a staple diet of 
terrapin meat. Later, in the i 9th century, the turtle was appreciated as gourmet food, especially in a stew laced with 

cream and sherry. Subsequently, tremendous retail de- 

mand and heavy fishing of the terrapin nearly depleted 
its supply, and protective laws were enacted. 

In 1891, some 89,000 lbs. of terrapin were har- 
vested from Maryland waters. With few exceptions, 
annual harvests since 1956 have remained below 
11,000 lbs. 

Detailed information about the turtle's biology and 
living habits can be found in the National Aquarium in 
Baltimore's "Puffin Report" about the Terrapin. 




2002 PEACH BOWL 



2004 GATOR BOWL 




Strive for clarity, but accept and understand ambiguity 






That phrase captures one way in which an educated person approaches the world and its challenges. 
*» .Students who graduate from the University of Maryland have been exposed to the tools that allow 
them to put that perspective to work. Imparting such a perspective may be an ambitious project for 
undergraduate education, but to aim for anything less would be unworthy of a great university's goals 
for its students. Thirteen years ago, Promises to Keep, a plan for undergraduate education at Maryland, 
articulated those goals so eloquently we repeat them here. . 

Undergraduate education at Maryland "aims to provide students with a sense of identity 
and purpose, a concern for others, a sense of responsibility for the quality of life around them, 
a continuing eagerness for knowledge and understanding, and a foundation for a lifetime of personal enrichment." 

As we learn with and from one another, we try to "develop human values," 

"celebrate tolerance and fairness," "contribute to the social conscience," "monitor and assess private 

and collective assumptions," and "recognize the glory, tragedy and humor of the human condition." 

Your years at the University of Maryland can provide you with all the tools you need to accomplish these goals. 

Students here are "educated to be able to read with perception and pleasure, write and speak with clarity and 

verve, handle numbers and computation proficiently, reason mathematically, generate clear questions and find 

probable arguments, reach substantiated conclusions and accept ambiguity." 



And we also hope you enjoy the journey. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



The Campus 



Libraries 

Seven libraries make up the Univer- 
;ity of Maryland library system: McKeldin 
main) Library, Architecture Library, Art Library, 
ingineenng and Physical Sciences Library, 
Hombake Library, Performing Arts Library and 
JVhite Memorial (Chemistry) Library. 

These libraries constitute the larg- 
est university research library institution in 
tie Washington metropolitan area, provid- 
ng vital resources to researchers, visiting 
icholars. and businesses throughout the 



Did You Know? 



By virtually every measure of quality, the University of Maryland has gained national rec- 
tigmtion as one of the fastest-rising comprehensive research institutions in the country. The 
Tiomentum of recent years has poised the university to move it into the top ranks of higher 
education and take leadership in shaping the research university of the 21° century. 

The university has enjoyed a decade of momentum in all of the aieas that affect quality. 
rhe average high school GPA of entering students has zoomed from 3.01 to nearly 3.90, and 
:he average SATs are now more than 1 270. The student body is a model of diversity with 
ninonties making up more than 32 percent of all students, and at least one graduate and 
jndergraduate student from every state in the nation. 

The university has 67 graduate and undeigraduate programs ranked in the Top 25 by 
U.S. News and World Report up from just one program in 1991 

Sponsored research and outreach has nearly tripled in the same 1 0-year period, exceed- 
ng $350 million last year. Private giving also has increased, and the university last year con- 
cluded its first campaign by topping its $350 million goal by moie than $ 1 00 million. Alumni 
Association membership has been growing 
at an average rate of 1 percent a year since 
1992. 

One of the largest research universi- 
ties in the United States, Fall 2002 enroll- 
■nent was 25,240 undergraduate and 9,56 1 
graduate students There are 94 under- 
graduate programs, 89 masters programs, 
70 doctoral programs and one first profes- 
sional degree program. More than 1 00 cen- 
ters and institutes are engaged in research 
and outreach. 

Faculty at the University of Maryland, 
n all fields of knowledge, are engaged at 
tie highest levels of national and interna- 
:ional concern. The university^ location near 
:he center of federal policy-making and in- 
ternational political and economic activity 
enables it to play an active role in research 
jnd analysis of public policy. 

Maryland is one of 30 public univer- 
sities in the prestigious 63-member Associa- 
tion of American Universities and the only 
twblic institution in the Maryland-DC. area 
yvith membership in the nations most dis- 
tinguished honor society, Phi Beta Kappa. 



A 









Research 

Opportunities for conducting research abound at the University of Maryland, College 
Park, and in the surrounding area, both for faculty to advance their own expertise and bring 
their insights into the classroom, and for students to begin their exploration of their unique 
interests with practical experience. On campus, special facilities and a number of organized 
research centers, bureaus and institutes promote the acquisition and analysis of new knowl- 
edge in the arts, sciences and applied fields. 

The university's enviable location — just nine miles from downtown Washington, 
DC, and approximately 30 miles from both Baltimore and Annapolis — enhances the re- 
search of its faculty and students by providing access to some of the finest libraries and 
research centers in the country. 

Service 

Programs of public service are central to the overall mission of the university. The phi- 
losophy is reflected in the wide array of programs and initiatives that benefit the state's busi- 
ness, agriculture and education commu- 
nities. 

With more than 90 high-technology 
firms in the three-county area of Montgom- 
ery, Prince George's and Frederick coun- 
ties, the university has found abundant op- 
portunity to extend its business and tech- 
nology outreach programs to the region. 
Many of these programs are part of the 
Engineering Research Center, which op- 
erates the Technology Advancement Pro- 
gram and the Maryland Industrial Partner- 
ships, programs designed to provide Mary- 
land entrepreneurs and small businesses 
with research facilities, technical assis- 
tance, administrative support and access 
to technology that will advance their eco- 
nomic base. 

The Institute for Systems Research 
has formed partnerships with major cor- 
porations, including Lockheed Martin, 
Westinghouse, BF Goodrich, Hughes Air- 
craft and Dupont to apply advanced sys- 
tems research to solving industry problems 
in the fields of communications, manufac- 
turing, controls and robotics. 

The university last year opened the 
Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center with 
its six state-of-the art performance halls, 
which has quickly become a center of 
cultural programming in the Washington 
metropolitan area. The university also 
boasts four art galleries and a broad range 
of public art throughout the beautiful cam- 
pus. Additionally intercollegiate, club and 
intramural sports provide students of all 
levels an opportunity to participate as spec- 
tators or athletes. 



In 1991, Maryland had one program listed among Top 25 entrants in the US News 
& World Report Rankings. Maryland now has 67 programs ranked among the nations 
)j elite, and the university is ranked 18th nationally among public universities 

A report card published in Technology Review rated the top U.S. universities in their 
quest for intellectual property, commercial partners and profits. Johns Hopkins Univer- 
/ sity and the University of Maryland (28th) were the Mid-Atlantic (Delaware, Maryland, 
Virginia. District of Columbial schools to make the "campus patenting" top 50 list 

Black Issues In Higher Education tanked the university fourth nationally in bachelor's 

degrees earned by African-American students at traditionally white schools. Maryland 

y ranks first in African-American undergraduate degrees in social sciences and history. 

The Wall Street Journal ranked the Robert H Smith School of Business No 1 6 among 
the world's business schools Maryland is the top-ranked school in the Mid-Atlantic 
]) region (Delaware, Maryland. District of Columbia, Virginia). The Financial Times of 
London ranked the Robert H Smith School of Business No 8 in information technol- 
ogy, No. 6 in faculty research and No. 7 in entrepreneurship 

In the only undergraduate program rankings released by U.S. News 6, World Report- 
business and engineenng-both the Robert H. Smith School of Business (No. 1 8) and 
]) A. James Clark School of Engineering |No. 24) were ranked among the top 25. The 
university also ranked in the top 25 for its learning communities (3rd), first-year expe- 
rience 1 12th) and service learning programs (24th). 

An economic impact study conducted by the economists with the Jacob France Center, 
an applied economics analysis center at the University of Baltimore, concluded that the 
y University of Maryland generates $5.93 of economic activity for every dollar appropri- 
ated by the General Assembly, for a total statewide effect of nearly $1.8 billion. 

Nobel Laureate Wlliam Phillips joined the university's physics faculty and is establish- 
ing a world-class atomic, molecular and optical physics group on campus. The Philip 
[/ Merrill College of Journalism now has five Pulitzer Prize winners on its faculty. A sixth 
faculty member, Eugene Roberts, directed the Philadelphia Inquireno multiple Pulitzers 
as managing editor. . 



egion The libraries' holdings include more than 2.5 million volumes, 24,000 subscriptions to 
Jenodicals and nearly 5 million items available in microfilm format. 

More, Better Students Go To Maryland 



There is no place better to be than the University of Mary- 
and As university President CD. Mote Jr. noted in a recent Balti- 
we Sun front-page story, This place is clearly on a tear." 

With top-ranked academic programs (67 in the top 25, 
iccording to U.S. News and World Report), an honors program 
hat competes with the Ivy League for top students, a pnze-win- 
ling faculty (topped by a Nobel and six Pulitzers, among others), 
i highly diverse population, and a beautiful 1.580-acre campus 
ocated between the cultural and population centers of Washing- 
on, DC, and Baltimore, Md„ it's little wonder that more of 
Maryland's top high school graduates choose the University of 
Maryland over all other Maryland colleges, public and private. 
tombined. 



In the latest U.S. News and World Report rankings. Mary- 
land was 18th nationally among all public universities. The col- 
leges of engineering, education, computer, mathematical and physi- 
cal sciences, and information sciences are all ranked in the top 25 
nationally. So are many of the individual programs in those schools 
and others, including criminology, journalism, public relations, coun- 
seling and others. The Robert H. Smith School of Business has been 
ranked among the top business schools in the world by the Wall 
Street Journal and the Financial Times of London. 

More than 40 percent of all entenng freshmen at Mary- 
land are now enrolled in high-achieving programs like the Hon- 
ors Program. Honors Humanities, College Park Scholars, Gemstone 
and a growing roster of living-learning communities where stu- 



dents with common interests in such topics as civil society and 
entrepreneurship can live and study together. With their wide 
vanety of subject areas and top faculty from throughout the uni- 
versity, these programs compete for students with the best public 
and private universities in the country. 

Supporting the research needs of students and faculty are 
some of the country's best research facilities. In 1 994, the largest 
most technically advanced research archives in the world — Na- 
tional Archives II — moved to College Park. In addition, just out- 
side of College Park are the Library of Congress, the Smit^ : 
Institution and the National Libraries of Agriculture and Me - 
among others The university itself has the most comprehensive 
library system in the area. 




66 



CD. MOTE JR. 




University 
president 

(California '57/ 

Sixth year 



When C. D. "Dan" Mote Jr. became the 1 9th president of 
the University of Maryland on Sept. 1 . 1 998, he proclaimed it a 
university "on the move." Five years later, under his guidance, 
Maryland continues to move - at an ever-accelerating rate - on 
the field, in the classroom, in the community and in the world 

Leading a great university is a big job, but its a role that 
Mote is accustomed to, having spent his entire academic career 
at the University of California at Berkeley, where he earned all his 
degrees, chaired one of the nations top-ranked departments of 
Mechanical Engineering, and eventually became Wee Chancellor 
for University Relations before coming to Maryland 

The University of Maryland is the State of Maryland's most 
important asset, says Mote: The future of the state depends on 
this university." 

As president, Mote is committed to making that asset even 
greater by nourishing a culture of excellence and civility across 
the campus, providing the highest quality education for students, 
strengthening the university's connections with its various stake- 
holders, building partnerships with State and national corpora- 
tions and federal agencies and achieving distinction as an institu- 
tion where discovery takes place every day and everywhere. 

The university's progress can be seen in every area, from its 
nationally-ranked programs to its growing range of partnerships 
to its world-class, state-of-the-art facilities. 



Quality Programs 



Over the past decade, the quality of Marylands programs 
has grown by leaps and bounds. In 2003, the University of Mary- 
land moved up to 18th place among public universities in U.S. 
News & World Report rankings, the first time it has broken into 
the top 20 in its steady climb to distinction. We currently have 49 
graduate and undergraduate programs and units ranked in the 
top 1 5 by U.S. News & World Report, up from 5 eight years ago. 

While our academic successes have spread across the board, 
the university has emerged as a true powerhouse in business, 
computer science, earth sciences, engineering, environmental 
policy, education and journalism Maryland is one of only 1 public 
and private universities that have their programs in computer sci- 
ence, mathematics, physics, and engineering each ranked in the 
top 20, and the Robert H. Smith School of Business is one of 6 
nationally ranked in both the top 1 Business Faculty in Teaching 
and the top 10 Business Faculty in Research. 

Faculty Stature 

With the addition during Mote's third year of a Nobel Lau- 
reate in Physics and three more Pulitzer Prize winners (to join 
three already on the faculty), Maryland continues to attract the 
best faculty available. This past year a faculty member was the 
recipient of the Japan Prize, an award given by the Japanese 
government in technology that is equivalent to the Nobel prizes. 
More than 30 of our faculty an of the national acad- 

emies, the highest professional recognition attainable. 

Experts on the Maryland faculty are regularly sought by 
the news media for their views on a wide variety of issues, includ- 
ing political events, international affairs, social trends, econom- 
ics, the environment, science and technology. 

2002 ORANGE BOWL 



umbrmu of mmumu 



WL J 2004 MARYLAND GATOR BOWL GUIDE 



■miemtu 





Talented Students 

Over the past 1 years, it has become a cliche to announce 
that each year's new freshman class is the most talented ever. The 
average GPA of entering students in fall 2003 is 3.9, while the 
average SAT score is nearly 1,300. 

Not surprisingly the number of students enrolling in hon- 
ors and other special programs has also sky- 
rocketed in recent years. Our extremely 
popular living-learning programs, _ '~. 
which bring together students with 
similar academic interests in a residen- 
tial setting, were ranked 3rd in the coun- 
try in the latest U.S. News & World 
Report. In the last academic 
year, over 6,000 students 
enrolled in such pro- 
grams as Gemstone, 
College Park Schol- 
ars, and the 
Hinman CEO Entre- 
preneurship Pro- 
gram. .._ 



/= 






Business 
Partnerships 

The university's 
reputation for excellence 
and entrepreneurship at- 
tracts new partners to the state 
A key drawing card to bring ma- 
jor players into the state will be the 
University of Maryland Enterprise 
Campus,'"M Square," a 130-acre re- 
search park located near the College 
Park Metro. Tenants include federal 
agency centers and private firms. 

A future tenant with extraordi- 
nary promise for economic enrich- 
ment is China, which is moving rap- 
idly to become engaged in the glo- 
bal economy and seeking links to West- 
ern industry. The Ministry of Science 
and Technology of the People's Repub- 
lic of China has established its first over- 
seas research park in Maryland in part- 
nership with the University. The Ministry 
sees this partnership as an opportunity 
to introduce China's emerging entrepre- 
neurs to Western business practices and 
establish contacts with state's businesses 
and to serve as a base for China's tech- 
nology entree to the US. 

Under Mote's leadership the uni- 
versity also helped to attract Fujitsu Laboratories of 
America to open a research facility in College Park. Fujitsu, the 
third-largest communications company in the world, shares a 
building with the Joint Global Change Research Institute, a re- 
search partnership between the university and the Pacific North- 
west National Laboratory. 

In order to fulfill its role as the states most important as- 
set, Mote has emphasized that the university must be engaged 
with the business and government communities in substantial 
and meaningful ways. In recent years, Maryland has assisted 
hundreds of Maryland businesses through its Technology Exten- 
sion Program and Maryland Industrial Partnerships program, and 
incubated some of the most successful state biotech firms, includ- 
ing Martek and Digene, in its Technology Advancement Program. 

World-Class Facilities 

During Mote's second year in office, the university began 
the largest building boom in its history, with more than S 1 00 

• 2002 PEACH BOWL • 




Mote on the 
sidelines at Byrd, 
supporting the Terps. 



million in new projects breaking ground that year. New facilitl 
address every aspect of university life, from the arts to recreatil 
to classrooms and laboratories, and, in creative partnership v.< j 
the private sector, new residential facilities. 

Highlights of the construction activity on the campus | 
elude the stunning Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center; 
Comcast Center; new classrooms for chemistry, computer sciencj 
business and engineering; new residence halls; extensive renal 
tions to the Adele Stamp Student Union; and new parking stril 
tures. 

Mote also has led the development of a new campus facl 

ties master plan that aims at making the university a leader 1 

example in environmental stewardship. In April 2003, ti 

university was recognized by the Environmental ProrJ 

tion Agency and the National Wildlife Foundation fl 

environmental achievements, including the envlrcl 

mentally friendly master plan and the creation on 

regeneration power system that will significant 

reduce energy consumption. 

Athletic Excellence 

Mote sees athletics as an integral parti 

the university experience. Indeed athletic succqj 

more often than not reflects academic success, I 

^ notes. For example, all four of the teams that play! 

in the 2002 NCAA basketball Final Four, inclufl j 

Maryland, are members of the prestigious Associatirl 

of American Universities, the organization that compr.sl 

the leading research and academic universities in Norl 

America. That's no accident," Mote says. "Institutions cl 

are committed to excellence tend to be excellent in every a 

deavor Our successes in basketball, lacrosse and other spol 

reflects our culture of quality as much as our successes in enl 

neering, business, education and journalism." 



University System of Maryland 



William Kirwan Chancellor 



Irwin Goldstein, Wee Chancellor for Academic Affairs 



Joseph F Wvona, Wee C hancellor for Admin and Fi nance 



Board of Regents 

Clifford M. Kendall, Chairman 



NjthaiA^h^gmaryr^ 



Thomas B Fman, Jr Treasurer 



Patricia S Florestano 



Louise Michaux Gonzales, As sistant Treasurer 



Nina Roda le Houghton 



Richard E. Hug 



The Honorable Steny H. H over, Secretary 



Orlan M. Johnson 



Leronia A. Josey 

Admiral Charles R. Larson, |USN Ret), Wee Chairman 

Bruce L Marcus 

David H. Nevms 



Lewis R Riley, ex officio 



The Honorable James C. Rosapepe 
The Honorable Joseph D Tydings 



William T Wood, Assistant So ■ 



University Administration 

Dr CD MoteJr, President 

Dr William Destler, Wee President for Academic Affair. 

John Porcan, Wee President for Administrativt 

Clement, Wee President for Student Affairs 
Brodie Remington, Wee President for University Relations 
Mark Henderson. Interim Wee President 
and Chief Information Officer ! I 



2004 GATOR BOWL 



DEBORAH A. YOW 






Athletics Director 
10th year 



Deborah A. Yow is in the tenth year of her outstanding 
tenure as director of athletics at the University of Maryland, a year 
that has seen unprecedented success and achievement in Mary- 
land athletics. Each year has brought about continued improve- 
ment and accomplishment in Terrapin athletics In YowS nine years 
at Maryland, the Terrapins have won a remarkable nine NCAA 
national championships as Maryland athletics has soared to new 
heights 

The comprehensive success of Terrapin athletics under 
Debbie Yows leadership is a clear and compelling testimony of 
her values of excellence, teamwork and accountability. 

Likewise, her election to the presidency of the National 
Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics three years ago is 
an indication of the wide respect with which she is regarded 
among its 6. 1 00 members representing 1 .600 colleges in the U.S. 
and Canada. She was recently singled out by Street and Smith 
Sports Business Journal as one of the leading administrators in 
the U S and she received the Carl Maddox Sport Management 
Award presented by the United States Spore Academy for excel- 

n athletics administration. Yow was selected to serve on 
the US Department of Educations Commission on Opportuni- 
ties in Athletics to review the status of Federal Title IX regulations, 
as well as the chair of the Atlantic Coast Conference Committee 
on Television for the 2003-04 academic year The committee, com- 
pnsed of the ACC's athletics directors, is charged with overseeing 
the leagues TV contracts and dealing with issues related to televi- 
sion Additionally, in May. she was chosen as one of three recipi- 
ents of the 2003 Women of the Year award by Women in Spore 
and Events. 

Yow, who recently served on the NCAA Management Coun- 
cil and the NCAA Division I Budget Committee, is a strong and 
steady voice on behalf of intercollegiate athletics in America Since 
taking over as AD at Maryland in 1 994. she and her staff have: 

■ Transformed Terrapin athletics into a responsible, goal- 
oriented organization. 

• Balanced all nine of the annual departments budgets 
[the first balanced budget in the 1 years prior to her arrival]. The 
budget has now reached $42 million annually and the sizable 
prior accumulated operating debts have been eradicated. 

■ Greatly enhanced the academic support services provided 
for student-athletes, with an enviable exhausted eligibility gradu- 
ation rate of approximately 85 percent 

■ Led the Terrapins to a national all-spore ranking in the 
upper 1 5 percent of all NCAA Division I institutions 

■ Significantly expanded marketing and fund-raising efforts 
on behalf of Terrapin athletics As a result, private gifts to athletics 
have increased 240 percent and corporate sponsorship revenues 
have increased by 275 percent dunng her tenure at Maryland 

■ Continued to dramatically improve venues and facilities 
for the departments 25 teams. 

• Implemented a strategic management mode). 

» Developed a comprehensive Internet strategy with man- 
agement, marketing and fund-raising applications. 

■ Significantly improved customer care in every area. 

2002 ORANGE BOWI 



The most recent achievements of Maryland athletics are 
exceptional 

■ Selected recently by U.S. News & World Report as one of 
the Top 20 athletic programs in the nation (for overall guality and 
competitive excellence!. 

■ In football, won the 2002 Atlantic Coast Conference 
championship and played in the 2002 Orange Bowl and followed 
this with an 1 1 -win season and a 30-3 victory over the University 
of Tennessee in the Peach Bowl in December. In men's basketball, 
the Terps advanced to the Sweet 16 in the NCAA Tournament 
following its second consecutive Final Four and the National 
Championship in 2002. The Terps are among only a few NCAA 
institutions to have achieved this level in both these revenue sports 
in the same year. 

Additionally, Maryland is one of only five universities to 
win a National Championship in both basketball and football 
IUCLA Michigan, Michigan State, Ohio State and Maryland!. 

■ Hired the Associated Press National Coach of the Year, 
Brenda Frese. as the new womens basketball coach. 

■ Hired Dave Cottle, the third-winningest active men's la- 
crosse coach in the U.S. 

■ Field Hockey played for the National Championship in 
2001. 

■ Womens Lacrosse has continued its winning ways and 
has won seven consecutive national championships through 
2001. 

■ Enhancing football facilities significantly with Team House 
and practice field upgrades. 

■ Moved into the new $ 1 25 million Comcast Center 

■ The athletics budget was balanced for the ninth con- 
secutive year. 

• In 2002-03, 1 Maryland teams competed in NCAA 
postseason play. 

■ The productivity, morale, and the competitive and aca- 
demic achievement of Terrapin athletics are exceptional and con- 
tinue to gain momentum. 

Regarding the many achievements of Terrapin athletics over 
the past nine years. Yow says We are pleased, but we are 
not satisfied... our vision is to be one of the top lOpro- 
grams in the nation consistently... we see no reason to 
settle for less. 

Yow is known for her goal-oriented and proactive man- 
agement style. She consistently inspires and challenges those 
around her to "raise our sights and sharpen our tools... to 
work hard and smart... to recognize that our only limita- 
tions are those that we place upon ourselves." 



iiiiii/iiiisiimii iwmiim 



2004 MARYLAND GATOR BOWL GUIDI 

As a manager and a leader, she clearly models these prin- 
ciples She is the only known current AD in NCAA Division I who 
has hired both the National Coach of the Year in football (while 
at Maryland! and the National Coach of the Year in men's basket- 
ball |while at Saint Louis University). Yow is known as "a coach's 
AD," while also be highly organized, strategic and proactive leader 
and administrator Quite simply, Debbie Yow personifies the rela- 
tional and management dynamics that are necessary to be an 
excellent administrator. 

A successful former coach at the University of Kentucky 
and University of Florida, she moved into athletics administration 
at the University of Florida and the University of North Carolina, 
Greensboro, followed by a successful tenure as AD at Saint Louis 
University 

She has authored numerous articles and books on athlet- 
ics management and human behavior, and is a respected leader 
m intercollegiate athletics in the United States 

Reflecting on the status of the Terrapin football program, 
Maryland's Director of Athletics points out "Our 2001 ACC Cham- 
pionship and 2002 Peach Bowl champion football team is an im- 
portant part of our emergence as a preeminent national athletics 
program Our football coaches care greatly about their players and 
their welfare. They emphasize the great importance of going to 
class, being good students and getting their college degree. Par- 
ents of our football players understand that these young men are 
in good hands with this wonderful staff of coaches. Our young 
men in Terrapin football have a full range of support in training, 
academics and career guidance from our coaches and staff of car- 
ing specialists We are winning in the classroom and on the 
football field. 

Summing up the entire athletics program, our athletics di- 
rector recently stated, "We have the finest student-athletes, 
coaches, support staff and administrative team in America. It is 
because of their courage, hard work and cooperative spirit that 
we now have a strong, viable athletic program. I am immensely 
proud of each of them. I am equally proud of our Terrapin fans 
who buy tickets, our Terrapin Club members who faithfully sup- 
port the Maryland athletic program with their donations for schol- 
arships, and the M Club members who serve and give liberally 
We are also blessed with a terrific President Dr. Dan Mote, who 
has fostered a mindset of excellence across our institution, he is a 
strong and balanced advocate for what he calls the three As of 
the University — Academics, the Are and Athletics'. We have a 
great Terrapin family Thats the foundation for all of our success. . . 
and the basis for our bright future. Its a great time to be a Terp." 



Chick-fil-A Peach Bowl 




Yow on stage with head coach Ralph Friedgen after the Terps won the 2002 Chick-fil-A Peach Bowl. 
• 2002 PEACH BOWL • 2004 GATOR BOWL 



67 



.TOYOTA 

ATOR hum nisi i no i hi; win ;u in 




2004 MARYLAND GATOR BOWL GOIOE : . . 




THE MIGHTY SOUND OF MARYLAND 



The University of Maryland Marching Band has long been an integral part of the spectacle, excitement 
and tradition of Terrapin football. Whether it be on-the-field presentations at halftime, its cheering choruses 
and energetic musical selections in the stands, or public appearances as representatives of the university, the 
marching band has developed a tradition of excellence. 

In addition to performing at every home game and selected road games, the band makes frequent 
appearances at professional sporting events and civic functions. Recent performances have taken them to 
Hamburg, Barcelona, Paris, Scotland and Rio de Janeiro. 

Open to all students with previous musical experience, the eight bands that form the University of 
Maryland Band Program provide rewarding musical experiences for more than 400 students studying in 
nearly all of the colleges of the university. There are approximately 250 members in the Mighty Sound of 
Maryland, including instrumentalists, percussionists, flag handlers, dancers, twirlers and drum majors. 

The band is under the direction of Dr. L. Richmond Sparks. 
Complementing the efforts of the "Mighty Sound" are the Terrapin cheerleaders, under the direction 
of Tina Simijoski and Lura Fleece. 





N' 



Maryland 


Maryland Alma 


Victory Sony 


Mater 


Maryland, we're all behind you. 


Hail Alma Mater! 


Wave high the black and gold, 


Hail to thee, Maryland! 


For there is nothing half so glorious 


Steadfast in loyalty, 


As to see our men victorious. 


For thee we stand. 


We've got the team, boys. 




We've got the steam, boys, 


Love for black and gold, 


So keep on fighting, don't give in! 


Deep in our hearts we hold, 


M-A-R-Y-L-A-N-D 


Singing thy praise forever 


Maryland will win. 


Throughout the land. 



6S 





2002 ORANGE BOWL • 2002 PEACH BOWL 



2004 BATOR BBWL 








It's the muscle inside the helmet and 
beneath the headset that counts most 



'"" *'-*<•»,£■& 



&m 



- 4 71 



-2.1T 



OOTBALL IS A CHESS GAME with ambulances in waiting. Its long pauses elevate the significance 
>f strategy and preparation. During the week coaches work past midnight searching for opponents' 
weaknesses, and players spend hours poring over film. On game day each play is a symphony of de- 
cisions in the coaching booth, on the sideline and on the field. What's at work? Football intelligent 
It can be a beautiful tiling when bodies and brains are in harmony: USC's Student Body Right ]Jms& 
'70s, Florida's Fun 'n' Gun in the '90s, Oklahoma's defense to begin the new century. Each re 
intelligence applied to the crash of bodies on the football field. And that is how you win. A 



w 



BY JOE 










FDOTBaLL IIBUIS GLIPPIII9S 



MARYLAND GATOR BOWL GUIDE 



^ 'n mmmkiifmm ^ • 



H 



n< 



'^sSaSS 



Sports Illustrated College Football Preview • Aug. 11, 2003 
COLLEGE FOOTBALL 2003 



MJti 



wmm. 



THE X'S AND O'S WIZ ralph friedgen, Maryland 

He is the man behind a near-mythical 600-page playbook, from which Maryland draws 
15 basic running plays with more than 100 variations and 100 pass plays with nearly 1,000 
variations. The third-year Terps coach, who spent 31 years as an assistant, credits his 
father, Ralph Sr., a former high school coach, for teaching him how to turn X's and O's into 
Ws. "I don't think there are geniuses in football," says Friedgen, who often comes up with 
ideas for new plays in church. "I'm just a guy who works hard and prepares hard." 



^^ THE BEST WITH THE LEAST 

RAYMOND MONICA, TEMPLE 

Think you've got a tough job? Try coaching at 
a school that hasn't had a winning record in 13 
years. Yet the 37-year-old Monica presides 
over a top-notch defense for one reason: He's 
the best in the nation at getting ordinary players 
to do extraordinary things. Temple is just one of 
eight Division l-A teams that ranked in the Top 20 in total defense in 
both 2001 and 02. Playing a 4-2-5 base defense, the Owls often fill 
the box with nine players, daring teams to beat them through the air. 



A THE PASS MASTER 

- NORM CHOW, USC 

The man USC coach Pete Carroll says is 
"arguably the best offensive coordinator in the 
history of college football" has coached six of the 
NCAA's top 12 career passing efficiency leaders 
and designed offenses for teams that hold II of the 
top 30 single-season passing yardage totals in NCAA 
history. Yet ask him to define a particular system behind the collegiate 
careers of prolific passers like Steve Young and Heisman Trophy winners 
Ty Detmer and Carson Palmer, and he shrugs. "There's no system, really." 
says Chow. "You try to magnify the strengths of the players you have." 





COMPILED BY KELLI ANDERSON. LARS ANDERSON. KELLEY KING AND GENE MENEZ 




(L i_ _ 



FOOTBaLL IIBUIS CLIPPMS 



2004 MARYLAND GATOR BOWL GUIDE 



rii 






THE MOTIVATOR 

TYRONE WILLINGHAM, NOTRE DAME 

Willingham eschews hokey motivational techniques for 
simple encouragement. One example came last year 
when, in his first team meeting as Irish coach, he put 
together a PowerPoint presentation for his players. The 
final slide they saw contained one word: WIN. They did. 
Last season, working with essentially the same team that 
went 5-6 in 2001, Willingham guided Notre Dame to a 10-3 record. "It's 
difficult sometimes for coaches to implore the kids and tell them how hard it's 
going to be," he says. "It's not like a light switch." 



'e, 



THE DEFENSIVE GURUS 

BOB AND MIKE STOOPS, OKLAHOMA 

When they were assistants at Kansas State in the early 1990s, 
Bob and Mike Stoops developed a defensive philosophy based 
on three principles: create confusion, attack constantly and 
tackle soundly. Every year the Stoops brothers tweak their D— 
they play far more zone now— but since they arrived in Norman in 1999 the results have been 
consistent. The Sooners are one of two teams in the nation that have ranked in the Top 10 in total 
defense in each of the last three years. "We attack from different areas of the field," says Mike 
Stoops. "We have great athletes, which makes it easier, but our athletes are also great tacklers." 








THE ORGANIZATION MAN 

DIRK KOETTER, ARIZONA STATE 

Koetter is so meticulously 
organized, one has to wonder if 
he's in the wrong profession. He 
logs the name of everyone who 
calls his office and the time and 
purpose of the call. He takes notes 
during every meeting he has with a player and keeps them 
in that player's file. He has also been known to type an 
agenda before addressing the local media. Why go to the 
trouble? "Only a handful of plays can turn [a season]," he 
says, "but those plays can be changed by what we do the 
rest of the year. It is not magic. It is attention to detail." 






w 




* * 



THE RECRUITING KING 

MACK BROWN, TEXAS 

How has Texas's Mack Brown 
hooked three consensus top 
five recruiting classes in just 
six years? He is a master at 
using a soft touch to make a 
hard sell. With ample fatherly 
charm, the 51-year-old Brown often has recruits over 
to his lakeside house and also shows off the 
Longhoms' extravagant facilities, which include a 
spacious locker room and players' lounge. "We pride 
ourselves on a family atmosphere," says Brown, "and 
our goal is to win championships with nice kids who 
are graduating." 



tleline sages are the best at preparing their teams 



12004 MARYLAND GATOR BOWL GUIDE 








TOP 25 SCOUTING REPORTS 



Maryland 



Sports Illustrated College 
Football Preview • Aug, 11, 2003 



A healthy running back and a seasoned quarterback 
make the Terrapins' offense formidable again 



THE FIRST TIME Bruce 
Perry opened his mouth in 
spring practice, Scott 
McBrien knew the senior 
running back was his old self 
again. Perry excitedly 
bounced around the Terrapins' practice 
fields, chattered constantly and talked trash 
to defenders. This was in contrast to the 
Perry who last fall quietly labored through 
abdominal, groin and shoulder injuries, 
which limited him to 341 yards rushing in 
six games. "The change in his demeanor re- 
ally has been night and day," says McBrien, 
a senior quarterback 

JUMP START In his first season running the 
offense, McBrien threw for 2,497 yards and 
surprised coaches with his rushing ability. 



72 




That means Maryland, which had a 21-5 
record over the last two years, including 
11-3 last season, has its best offensive 
weapon back at full strength. Perry added 
15 pounds to his 5' 9" frame to get up to 
207 and is ready to prove he's the same 
player who as a sophomore rushed for 
1,242 yards and was the ACC's Offensive 
Player of the Year. "I diink I'll bring some 
maturity and leadership to the offense" 
Perry says. "I'll help provide a sense of 
identity and an overall presence." 

Although last season the Terps got an 
ACC-best 1,154 rushing yards from Chris 
Downs, who graduated, they missed Perry's 
electric performance. "He brings a lot to the 
table," McBrien says. "He's tough, he has 
speed, and he has great hands. Having a 
player like him takes a lot of pressure off 
me. You know he's going to 
get his yards." 

As will McBrien, who as a 
first-year starter in 2002 
threw for 2,497 yards and 15 
touchdowns and had a 141.3 
passing-efficiency rating. Six 
of his top seven wide re- 
ceivers return from an of- 
fense that scored 32.2 points 
per game, as do three 
starters along the line. The 
defense, led by senior line- 
backer Leon Joe (103 tack- 
les), is even more stacked. 

It's no wonder that coach 
Ralph Friedgen preached 
against complacency during 
spring drills. "We've been 
successful the last two years 
because we were unselfish 
and we played for a common 
cause," Friedgen says. 
"Everybody had a role and 
played it well. We may have 
more talent now, but the 
question remains as to 
whether we can play ti tgeth- 
er. The more you win, the 
hardei thai is to do." 



Perry appreciates drat message as much 
as anybody. He spent most of last season 
rising at 6 a.m. to rehab his injuries, furjle- 
ly trying to practice and standing on the 
sideline on game days. This year he'll be 
making sure his teammates work hard. "I'm 
proof that we had better take advantage of 
our chances," Perry says, "because you never 
know when they'll be taken away." — J.C. 



FAST FACTS 



2002 RECORD 11-3 (6-2, T2 in ACC) 

FINAL AP RANK 13 RETURNING STARTERS 17 



KEY RETURNEES (2002 s,a, s) 



QB Scott McBrien (Sr.) 

I2th in the nation in passing efficiency 



RB Bruce Perry (Sr.) 

Averaged 4.7 yards on 72 carries 



CB Domonique Foxworth (Jr.) 

Led Terrapins with five interceptions 



FS Madieu Williams (Sr.) 

All-America candidate anchors secondary 



DT Randy Starks (Jr.) 

93 tackles including 6> sacks 



Coach Ralph Friedgen didn't lack for 
volunteers to fill the shoes of departed All- 
America linebacker E.J. Henderson, but 
sophomore D'Qwcll 
Jackson quickly proved he 
was the best fit. Though 
he's undersized for the 
position (6' I", 222). 
Jackson has great 
instincts and good vision. 



SCHEDULE 

Alif. 28 at Northern minors 

Sept S air " 

13 THCCIIADEL 

20 WEST VIRGINIA 

27 alCailcinMichlcin 

Oct 4 CIEMSON 

II DIME 

23 at Georgia Tech 

">. I NORTH CAROLINA 

13 VIRGINIA 

22 at N estate 




AUGISI II. 2003 



2002 ORANGE BOWL 



2002 PEACH BOWL 



2004 OATOR BOWL 




ESPN.com • Aug. 11, 2003 



FooTBaLL UBiiis cuppings 



2004 MARYLAND GATOR BOWL GUIDE 



Maryland a national title contender? Why not? 

By Gregg Doyel 

Special to ESPN coin 



Maryland Terrapins 




3rd 


11-3 2003 Schedule 


8-28 at Northern Illinois 


9-6 at Florida State 


9-13 The Citadel 


9-20 West Virginia 


9-27 at Eastern Michigan 


10-4 Clemson 


10-11 Duke 


10-23 at Georgia Tech 


11-1 North Carolina 


11-13 Virginia 


11-22 at NC State 


11 -29 at Wake Forest 



Coach Ralph Friedgen (21-5, 
season) 2002 overall record 
Conference record: 6-2 
Returning starters: 
Offense 7, Defense 9. 
Kicker/Punter: 1 



2002 statistical leaders (* - returners) 
Rushing Chris Downs (1,154 yds) 
Passing Scott McBrien' (2,497 yds) 
Receiving Scooter Monroe (614 yds) 
Tackles E.J. Henderson (175) 
Sacks: E J. Henderson (8 5) 
Interceptions Domonique Foxworth' (5) 



Outlook: The Terps could be awesome this season For the first time in his three 
years at Maryland, Friedgen has a quarterback (Scott McBrien) and tailback (2001 
ACC offensive player of the year Bruce Perry) with a full season as a starter under 
their belt That's problematic for opposing defenses who have not been able to stop 
the Terps even when Maryland had new faces learning both positions All-Amencan 
LB E J Henderson and P Brooks Barnard are gone, but almost everyone else is 
back No, Maryland has not been a fluke 

Key game: The Terps have lost just five times the past two seasons, but two have 
come to Florida State - by an average margin of 24 points Maryland could get 
some revenge, and take a huge step toward a second ACC title in three seasons, 
on Sept 6 when they travel to Tallahassee, Fla 

Keep an eye on Perry missed most of last season with a variety of ailments The 
5-foot-9 speed back has gained 15 pounds of muscle to 205, which should help him 
better absorb the pounding If he's simply as good as he was as a sophomore in 
2001 (1,242 rushing yards), the Terps would take that 

It's a good year if. . . Maryland has the talent to win the ACC and play well in a 
BCS game -- which means Maryland has the talent to challenge for the national 
championship With a non-conference game that features West Virginia as their 
toughest test, the Terps might just get there. 

Gregg Doyel covers the ACC for the Charlotte Observer. 



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Washington Post 
Aug. 11, 2002 



® 




lOWtMCDWMU im Wl 



D'Qwell Jackson, left, tackled Notre Dame's Ryan Grant in last year's season opener. "I've just 
got to try not to be him," said Jackson of EJ. Henderson. "I've got to play like I play." 

Terps Have a New Man in the Middle 

Jackson Vying to Fill Void Left by Henderson in Maryland's Defense 



By BarhySvei oca 

Washington Post Staff V'nur 



Almost a year ago, D'Qwell Jackson 
walked out of the tunnel onto the turf al Gi- 
ants Stadium. He was a trur freshman, just 
18. Nearly 73.IXX) tans surrounded him. 
His eyes widened. His joints stiffened 

"Did you ever see The Program'?" Jack- 
son asked, referring to (he cliche-laden. 
decade-old James dan movie about col- 
lege football. In the film . < hnai Epos's char- 
acter walks into a packed stadium for the 
first time — and freezes "I was just like 



thai." Jackson said- "1 was in awe " 

i epl then something happened. Jack- 
son, who never played in hunt ol more than 

three or lour thousand people back home in 
Largo, Ha., made a dozen tackles 
Notre Dame He foughl the Fighting Irish 
|mt the bulk of an otherwise dreary night 
(or the Maryland football team, a 22-0 sea- 
son opening loss. 

"1 didn't know how I would react," Jack- 
son said 

Now. as the Terrapins enter their second 
week ol preseason practice, Jackson must 
react to an entirely different set ol , ircuin- 



stances. He has moved from outside line- 
backer to the middle. And talk about awe: 
All he mus' i replace graduated 

1 I Henderson, who was honored as the 
s liest linebacker and best defensive 
player in 2002 and still elicits bowed heads 
and reverent, hushed tones when spoken of 
in t ollegePark. 

"I don't know il we're ever going to have 

another guj like that," Terps Coach Ralph 

id. "EJ. made so many plays. 

jusl looking for a guy to play the posi- 

II RRAP1NS D I Col 4 



Jackson Becomes 
Terps' New Man 
In the Middle 



TERRAPINS. FrvmDI 



tion pretty good. D'Qwell's a smart guy. and were going to 
try to do some things to help him " 

At 6 feet 1 and just 222 pounds. Jackson may need son, 
help. He is one of just two new starters on Maryland': di 
fense and he's not exa. I 

was. I d like him to be 250 pounds." Friedgen sail 
what he is." 

The Terps need Jackson to understand what he is not 
Most important, he is nol Henderson In spring pra 
Pnedgcn repeatedly told Henderson's potential replaa 
merits— Jacks. m included nol to think making tackle aftei 
tackle comes just from playing middle linel 

"It wasn't the positio theguyokn 

ingthepo.ii is . i . 

^" hc fne coaching 

stall wants to mak vhelmedbys 

ol BJ.wouldhavi , none that." 

. '"- I" low in,.! 

Jr 001 ? . pringprai 

tJ 1 ce, " ,1 "Bui DQwell'sagood 

pbyei Hi 

can. lb 



Kriedgen and defensive coordinatof GarmBlaclcney both 
said Jackson's instincts rival I lenderson's, and they note that 
it be weren't intelligent, be couldn't have walked out of high 
and on-., [he Notre Dame so quickly. 

ii went on to play in every g him and was in on 51 tack- 
!• - Kui il he hadn't controlled ainst the Irish, his 

teammates might have dismissed him as just another ovcr- 
matched freshman 

"When he played like thai against Notre Dame," defensive 
tackle Rand-. St.irkss.nd, "thai gave us confidence in him. We 
knew he could play And don't lei Ins si/e fool you. Hell butt 

Which is exactly whal I been doing in drills thus 

in He takes on running b.nks fearlessly, running around 
them, through them, past them to try to get to the quarter- 
He i ■ .i sound tackier 
Blackne) said that because Jackson is a bil small lor a mid- 
dle linebacker, the lerpsma] itation, using ver- 
satile senior Andrew Henley and perhaps a true freshman, ei 
tin i Weslc) Jefferson or I im ' • 

poundinj lackson However thi | tem works, Jad 

u those bright lights are goni there is no room 
loi thai 
"It's jusl a matter ol mc getting in then and siring how I 

mfortabfc n I pos- 
sibly could bi when he was here He took all the hype Now, 

play like 1 play." 

Terrapins Notes: Fried I hcldheim. 

whohadsui , m his right 

could return to practici this week Orlando Evans, 

potential!) the number two quarter! ed over the 

nd after heart test thing unusual Evanssat 

out the firsl | -mess 

ath 



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Washington Times 
lug. 11, 2003 



Randy II? 

DT Starks wants to emulate 

Terps Hall of Famer Randy White 



By Rick Snider 

THE VWSHWGTON T1M6S 



It's the rumble that leads to the roar. 
Fourteen 50-pound plates hit the second 
tier of Byrd Stadium's makeshift weight 
room floor like a thunderclap. 

"It goes "Boom!" " said Maryland de- 
fensive tackle Randy Starks with a slight 
grin. "It feels like some big block hits the 
ground. I like seeing the big plates It 
feels like I'm doing something." 

Starks wants to win the Outland Tro- 
phy as the nation's best lineman this sea- 
son, which begins for the No. 13 Ter- 
rapins on Aug. 28 against Northern 



Illinois. He hopes Maryland fans will re- 
member him alongside another defen- 
sive tackle named Randy White, who 
took the 1974 Outland and Lombardi 
trophies and made the college and pro 
football halls of fame. 

"He was the best player they had 
here, and one day I want them to say that 
about me," Starks said 

Preseason accolades for Starks in- 
clude All-American honorable mention 
by Street and Smith magazine and a rat- 
ing as the No. S defensive lineman na- 
tionally by the Sporting News. He was 
second-team All-ACC last year with 93 
tackles, 17 quarterback hurries and 6V2 



sacks. Starks was named ACC Defensive 
Lineman of the Week with nine tackles 
and two pass knockdowns against N.C. 
State. He also tipped two passes against 
Wake Forest for interceptions. But he 
played only the first series against Ten- 
nessee in the Orange Bowl before suf- 
fering a groin injury. 

"He's going to demand at least a dou- 
ble team," defensive coordinator Gary 
Blackney said. "I don't know if anybody 
can block him one on one. He is a force. 
He's really become very disruptive in i 
terms of offensive line blocking 
schemes." 

Starks was a Mid-Atlantic blue-chip* 



per from Westlake I ligh School in AjfaJ 7 x 
dorf, Md., choosing Maryland over.Vir- 
ginia Tech and Penn State. He also was 
a standout basketball player on the state 
runners-up. But Starks concedes he 
needed to gain intensity both on the 
field and the weight room when he ar- 
rived. 

"I had to turn it up a lot more," he 
said. "High school wasn't that physical, 
and you only had to turn it on when you 
wanted, but here you have to turn it on 
every play" 

Starks came from a solid prep 

see STARKS, page C3 



Continued on next page 




Randy SUfta gee ■ K p t» wft rxn. *e> Juan OJt» Kcfcng on Tm ft* a Wdy be* of tw WH. W3r\f» Md'manimnl" 

2002 ORANGE BOWL • 2002 PEACH BOWL 



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Maryland vs. 
Northern Illinois 

Thursday, Aug. 28, 7:35 p.m. 

Huskie Stadium, DeKalb, III. 

CSN.AM-630, AM-1090 

www.umterps.com 



STARKS 

From page CI 

weightlifting program, so it wasn't 
difficult becoming one of the "Iron 
Terps" — an elite group that has 
grown from six to 40 players in re- 
cent years based on a strength per 
pound formula. Starks trails only 
linebacker Leon Joe as the Terps' 
strongest player and has done a 
eam-best 765-pound squat press. 

"Randy's a super freak," defensive 
ackle Justin Duffle said. "He loves 
olift." 

But the mild-mannered Starks 
leeded longer to become a feared 
lefender who could dominate in- 
side this year at 6-foot-4 and 312 
pounds. Offensive line coach Dave 
Sollazzo steadily unleashed Starks 
during his freshman season, when 
the player recorded 35 tackles and 
3'/2 sacks. 

"I'm like a teddy bear off the field, 
but on the field I'm an animal," 
Starks said. "It's all about attitude. 
You've got to be nasty. You have to 
want to hit. You have to want to be 
physical. Ifs something you have to 
want to do." 

Starks certainly will be marked 




Pnolo by Joseph Silverman / T>>e Washington Times 

Maryland's Randy Starks: "High school wasn't that physical, and you only 
had to turn it on when you wanted, but here you have to turn it on every play." 



by offensive lines as the Terps' 
biggest pass rushing threat The rep- 
utation already weighs on him. 

"There's a lot of pressure on me 
knowing I have to live up to expec- 
tations," he said. "I can't take a 
play off here and there. I try not to 
read too much, but you can't help 
it. I know people will be watching 
me to see if I'm as good as they say 
I am." 

Starks won't even turn 20 until 
after the regular season, but a third 
straight standout year could force an 
early exit if he is projected high in 
the NFL Draft. Starks doesn't expect 



to depart early but leaves the subject 
open-ended. 

"I'm thinking about staying all 
four years," he said. "If it comes up 
after this season, I'll think about it." 

Notes — Quarterback Orlando 
Evans (headaches) practiced for the 
first time after cleared by medical 
tests. However, running back Mario 
Merrills (hamstring), offensive 
tackle Matt Powell (ankle) and de- 
fensive tackle C.J. Feldheim (knee) 
missed the first full contact practice. 
Feldheim returned after undergoing 
knee surgery Tuesday and could 
practice in one week. 




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Washington Post • Aug. IB, 2003 

Freshmen Climb the Learning Curve 

Injuries to Maryland Starters Provide Opportunities, Make Mastery ofPlaybook Critical 



By Barby Svrltjca 
Washington Post Staff Writer 



The morning haze hadn't yet bro- 
ken, the Maryland football team 
hadn't even stretched out. It was 
7:56 a.m. yesterday, and Vernon 
Davis was hearing it 

Davis, a freshman tight end in just his 
15th practice with the Terrapins, had bar- 
reled through the line to block a punt. But 
he ran over the punter, clearly a penalty. 
Ray Rychleski, the Terps' special teams 
coach, walked right up to Davis, vigor- 
ously pointing out the error of his ways. 
Davis skulked back to the huddle. Wei 
come to college, kid. 

"When the coaches first started yelling 
at me, I was like. Oh, man, this is differ- 
ent,' " said Davis, a graduate of Dunbar 



High in the District "But then I got used 
to it. If they didn't yell at me, I wouldn't 
get better." 

With the slew of injuries' Maryland has 
suffered this week — four potential start- 
ers might miss the opener Aug. 28 at 
Northern Illinois— the Terps' 19 true 
freshmen have been afforded plenty of 
chances to get better. But even for players 
such as Davis, who likely will help the 
team this fall, this is a unique, sometimes 
difficult time: new surroundings, new 
standards, new coaches, new routine, 
new everything. 

"We all say the same things," said Wes- 
ley Jefferson, a freshman linebacker The 
physical part is not hard It's the mental 
part. To go from a teeny little playbook lo 

See TERRAPINS. D8. Col 1 




■ OH1TN4KNTW10N-TX W«U*»«CIC»I POM 



linebacker Wesley Jefferson helps fellow freshman Tim Cesa make the adjustment on 
media day. "The physical port is not hard," Jefferson said. "It's the mental part." 



Continued on next page 




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12004 MARYLAND GATOR BOWL GUIDE 




Opportunity Knocks for Freshmen 



TERRAPINS. From Dl 



a phone book, it's amazing You just 
sit there thinking to yourself. Tm 
supposed to do all this? And this and 
this and this?' It's like, "Wow!" " 

Jefferson, a graduate of Gvvynn 
Park High in Brandywine, is just a 
typical freshman trudging through 
what hundreds of kids like him are 
trudging through at camps across 
the country. At 6 feet 2 and 231 
pounds, he's big enough and alhlctic 
enough to perhaps help immediately 
at both middle and outside lineback- 
er But there are times when he lines 
up for a play, and he realizes, "We 
had 10 defensive sets in high school. 
Now, we have 190. What do 1 dor 

JTJ you know what you're doing 
from the beginning of the play, then 
rlurnig the play, you should be all 
right," Jefferson said. "But mentally, 
there are some times Era 
Sure, and some times Tm not." 

1 Maryland Coach Ralph Friedgen 

has, been impressed with Jefferson, 

■I. "He's a little overwhelmed 

iii;1il now." Not surprising. New 



NCAA regulations in place this year 
eliminated freshman practice, three 
days of workouts staged before the 
upperclassmen reported. Instead, 
Friedgen established a "bridge pro- 
gram over the summer, when 12 of 
the freshmen came to campus, 
worked out some, and took summer 
school classes. 

"It gives us a big advantage over 
the other freshmen," said Jefferson, 
who passed two courses this sum- 
mer. "When they get here, tbey have 
to take time out to learn where ev- 
erything's at, how to get there, 
what's the best way to go — all that 
stuff." 

Friedgen, for one, likes what he 
sees from Davis, Jefferson, defensive 
tackle Robert Armstrong, wide re- 
ceiver Drew Weatherly and tailback 
l.ance Ball, among others. But it is 
hard, Friedgen said, to help the play- 
ers improve while simultaneously 
making them understand that it 
doesn't all come instantly. He said 
Internet recruiting sites pump up 
kids so rnui h. "If they don't come in 
and they don't play right away, they 



think they've failed. I really don't ev- 
er want those kids to think that" 

But with a dozen or so players pe- 
riodically sitting out because of in- 
juries, some freshmen have started 
to get more comfortable. Ball, for in- 
stance, was a shoe-in to redshirt 
when camp opened. Now, with start- 
ing tailback Bruce Perry (sprained 
ankle) and backup Mario Merrills 
(pulled hamstring) out, Friedgen 
could be forced to use him. 

"Coach told me, 'At running back, 
there's a lot of knicks and knacks; 
you don't know when you're going to 
gel in." Ball said. "1 have to be 
reaily." 

It isn't easy. Take a situational 
scrimmage earlier in the week. 
Weatherly broke the huddle with the 
offense The play was intended (or 
him. He grew anxious, and tiptoed 
off the line of scrimmage before the 
snap — illegal procedure. 

"Some of them got a little stage 
fright . " Friedgen said. "But 
Ihe/U be line. They'll recover from 
that They've got to go through it." 

They are going through it now 




Maryland freshman 
tight end Vernon 
Davis, an All Met 
from Dunbar, 
strikes a pose on 
his first media day. 
"Oh, man, this is 
different," Davis 
said of his 
introduction to 
big-time college 
football practice. 
Davis is one of 19 
true freshmen for 
the Terrapins. 



Their minds are sometimes a mess 

Their bodjes occasionally don't 

■ \irl when Ihej 

trudge off the Geld mother da) 

I ■:■ mm i 
• it 

' got so much on our 
mind, ll .'i. lo h am so mi* ' 



he's ahead of schedule He can al- 

ri-ady umve 111 -nil- !• ■ "lb ' ■ ■•• r, up 

I- ii Friedgen said "I think he feels 
like he'll be back sooner rather than 
iatei " 

Wide rea Williams sat 

out yesterday's mm-i in,' practice be 
cause ol a slightly pullet ham Iruig 
that had i-'li' fil hint mi • befon 
training camp Ii' returned i i ihe 
evening session I ■■ 

pi ii (ii ■■ v iih 



back pain . . . 

I he l' rps will hold "1 an I 

■ ■ r . . 1 ij ii B "l Stadium I 
openatlpm.andanautogr.i 
ion wul run lr>'in 2 to 3 with a scrim 
in follow Admiv i 



78 



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Washington Times • Rug. 18, 2003 




FOOTBatL IWI1IS BUPPHI9S 



2004 MARYLAND GATOR BOWL 



The Washington Times 

www.washingtontimes.com 



Melodies and mayhem 

By Rick Snider 

Published August 17,2003 



Maryland guards and roommates C.J. Brooks and Lamar Bryant hit all the right notes — 
as football players and musicians. 

But with Bryant sidelined for six weeks with a broken foot, the music might be more 
mellow than usual. 

Brooks is a promising guitarist whose tastes range from classic rock to folk. Bryant sings 
the national anthem at Terrapins sporting events. Maybe they would be called "Fat and 
Proud" if they performed professionally, Brooks said. After all, not many combos average 
317 pounds 

Each wants to play in the NFL, and both have legitimate shots. However, Brooks 
wouldn't mind a career as a musician, and his 6-foot-6 frame certainly would give him a 
commanding stage presence. Bryant would enjoy continuing to sing after getting started in a 
church choir. 

Sometimes they will jam together late at night to counter the pressures of football. Others 
in the dorm usually can tell their mood by the music drifting into the hallway. 

"Nine times out of 10, if 1 walk by I'll hear music they're working on," offensive tackle 
Eric Dumas said. "They're just making songs. That's how they pass time. If it's real loud and 
you can't hear anything else, you know not to go in." 

Teammates liken Bryant to a mix of Barry White and Luther Vandross, though the 
senior's favorite crooner is Bryan McKnight. Bryant has been known to zone out playing 
video games while Brooks strums his guitar, but it's usually not long before lyrics join the 
melody. 

"1 sing all the time," Bryant said. "I don't even know it. I'll be singing for five minutes 
before 1 know it." 

After all, Bryant teased, he can't leave the singing to Brooks. 

"His singing could use some work, but he can pick up the guitar at any given moment and 
put down a song," Bryant said. "If he put as much time in his guitar as he did in football, he 
would be a heck of a guitarist." 

Brooks began playing guitar at 1 3, about the same time he started playing football. His 
fingers are still nimble — although he plays a position where linemen's hands get so mashed 
they can't pick up change off a countertop, much less pick out a tune. Brooks couldn't play 
the guitar for a month last year because his hands were too sore from football, but he usually 
manages to find something "mellow that I can play that makes me feel good and calms me 
down." 

Brooks can be heard on the campus radio station during his weekly offseason show. 
Bryant and Brooks have been known to mix their own songs for airplay, but Brooks spins 
anything from hip-hop to country. 

"I like to be crazy," he said. "1 don't get the accolades like running backs. When I'm 
behind the mike, I'm showing off as much as I can. I had some dedicated listeners that called 



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2004 MARYLAND GATOR BOWL GUIDE 




in every week, but it was a pretty small gathering." 

Said tight end Jeff Dugan, one of the devoted listeners: "You can tell if he's having fun 
with it. He's mellow in what he plays." 

Naturally, Bryant and Brooks find symmetry with music and football. There's a link 
among melodies and mayhem. 

"They're alike, but it's not visible to see," Brooks said. "Everybody has to do the right 
thing at the right time. One bad note is like one bad snap or missed block and leads to not 
being very good." 

Said Brooks: "Like the play doesn't work, the song doesn't work." 

Perhaps the one upside to his injury is that Bryant might be able to realize his dream of 
singing the national anthem at Byrd Stadium while he recovers. That way, coaches can't 
worry he will be too distracted before a game. However, Bryant said singing is much 
scarier. 

"It's hard because while I play in front of big crowds, to get up in front of a crowd with all 
eyes on you is kind of nerve-wracking," he said. "After you do it, you feel good about 
yourself. It's a big accomplishment." 

Notes — Coach Ralph Friedgen expects to have the Terps play a little more than a half of 
full contact in today's scrimmage at Byrd. Numerous injuries the past week have left 
Friedgen concerned whether the team is ready for contact while preparing for its Aug. 28 
opener at Northern Illinois. Quarterbacks Scott McBrien and Orlando Evans will play. The 
scrimmage begins at 3.30 p.m. There's no admission. ... Defensive end Scott Smith practiced 
yesterday after cutting short Friday's practice with back problems. ... offensive tackle 
Stephon Hyer missed practice with a shoulder injury, while defensive end Kevin Eli was 
hospitalized for heart tests. 



80 



2002 ORANOE BOWL • 2002 PEACH BOWL • 2004 BATOR BOWL 






f 3* 

Baltimore Sun • Hug. 19, 2003 








tr H *I"T*?-, 






FOOTBM (1BU1S CUPPII19S 


GAT 


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2004 MARYLAND GATOR BOWL GUIDE 


lis 


V 



For Terps tight end, it's better to receive 



Noted for blocking, Dugan 
eyes pass-catching role 



By Christian Ewell 



SUN STAFF 



COLLEGE PARK — It could 
be argued that Jeff Dugan was 
at the center of the 2001 play 
that served notice Maryland's 
offense would no longer be of 
the plodding variety. 

The play executed against 
Wake Forest that season, 49 



Stretch, is best known for the 
80-yard touchdown run by 
Bruce Perry, emblematic of the 
Terps' then-newfound ability to 
score from anywhere at any 
time, a quality the team has dis- 
played since. 

But the result — with Perry 
bouncing outside on an easy 
handoff dive play — was made 
possible by a crushing block on 
the left side by Dugan, who be- 
gan making a name for himself 
as one of the top tight ends in 
the Atlantic Coast Conference. 



To attain that status while mak- 
ing only 16 catches over the past 
two seasons is a testament to 
how much his blocking figures 
in what has been the league's 
top running attack over that pe- 
riod. 

"Jeff made it easy for Bruce 
Perry to get 1,000 yards [in 
2001]," said Ray Rychleski, who 
coaches the team's tight ends, 
"and then Chris Downs comes 
in [in 2002] and he becomes an- 
other 1,000-yard rusher." 

Look for [See Terps, 3d) 



For UM tight end Dugan, 
it's good to receive, too 



[Terps. from Page In] 




that trend to continue, but 
Maryland would like to see its 
tight ends become more promi- 
nent in the 
passing game 
as the team's 
playbook ex- 
pands. Since 
the end of last 
season, the 
coaching staff 
has worked to- 
ward adding 
large receivers 
capable of Dugan 
playing tight 

end — such as Rob Abiamiri 
and Vernon Davis — in hopes of 
further challenging defenses af- 
ter scoring a school-record 451 
points last season. 

In addition to playing tight 
end. Abiamiri and Davis have 
the ability to line up as running 
backs and wide receivers in the 
H-back role. In the passing 
game, the team hopes to create 
some room for conventional 
wide-outs Latrez Harrison and 
Steve Suter 

"When you have guys on the 
inside like [slot back) Jo Jo 
Walker and then Rob or Vemon 
on the other side." offensive co- 
ordinator Charlie Taaffe said, 
"the defenses have to think 
about double-covering the out- 



2002 ORANSE BOWL 



side receivers because it forces 
them to use linebackers to cover 
fast tight ends. We feel we can 
win those matchups." 

To keep up, and to increase 
his chances of maintaining his 
playing time, Dugan, 6 feet 4 
and 256 pounds, spent much of 
the summer trying to improve 
his receiving skills. 

"I've seen a lot of improve- 
ment in his game since spring — 
catching balls with [quarterback 
Scott McBrien] in seven-on- 
seven drills and running routes," 
Abiamiri said. "It's all competi- 
tion. We all want to play, and we 
all want to better ourselves so 
we can have a good team " 

Dugan still prefers his high- 
lights in the running game to 
any glories receiving — "it 
pumps you up when you get a 
good block" — but also hopes to 
equal his season-high of 25 
catches from his first year in 
2000. 

When Dugan started at Mary- 
land — as a freshman who had 
played tackle in high school — 
he ran routes, "but not with any 
precision or emphasis on it." he 
said. "Every once in a while, I'd 
get a lot of play-action passes. I 
was more like a glorified tackle." 

Though good feet have been a 
strong point in his blocking, me- 
chanical movements hindered 
Dugan in his previous route run- 




DOUG KAPUST1N SUN STAFF 

Tight end Jeff Dugan, who 
made only 16 catches the past 
two years, hopes to become a 
bigger factor in the Terps" pass- 
ing game this season. 

ning, characterized by "run 
8 yards and turn out," as op- 
posed to a greater ability to read 
defenders that he has recently 
gained 

Because of that, coach Ralph 
Friedgen said he anticipates 
Dugan — who graduated this 
summer with a finance degree — 
will have post-Maryland pros- 
pects on the field. 

"He's a dominant blocker for a 
tight end." Friedgen said. "And 
with the added skills that he has 
as a receiver, he has a legitimate 
shot at playing at the next level 
I don't think you could have said 
that last year" 



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Washington Times • Aug. 19, 2003 

McBrien keeps it all straight 

By Rick Snider 

Published August 16.2003 




82 



When Maryland quarterback Scott McBrien called an unexpected timeout last season, 
coach Ralph Friedgen figured the passer was simply confused. Instead, McBrien was still 
reeling from a hit. 

"He said he couldn't see straight," Friedgen recalled with a chuckle. 

It's little wonder McBrien isn't cross-eyed trying to follow the multi-receiver sets 
Friedgen relishes. Three targets is a conservative call. Often there are two outside receivers 
and another in the slot, plus a tight end. H-back or running back as potential targets. Some 
formations even have two tight ends. 

The Terrapins' optimism for a third straight 10-win season is based heavily on McBrien 
returning for his second year. Maryland stumbled to a 1-2 start last season while McBrien 
learned the offense, but after that he led the Terps on a 10-1 run, including a 30-3 drubbing 
of Tennessee in the Peach Bowl 

McBrien now looks the confident veteran during practice. There's no more happy feet 
while he tries to find alternate receivers. The senior shows the kind of precision gained 
through experience. 

"My guys have a lot more confidence in me knowing that I'm the returning starter," 
McBrien said, "and that feels good when the guys are behind you, and they know who to 
rum to." 

Said receiver Steve Suter: "We know he's the leader. 1 might say something to him 
coming out of the huddle like, 'If I'm one on one, give me a look,' and he says, 'I got you.' " 

McBrien took a roundabout route from nearby DeMatha High School, where he led the 
Stags to a 13-0 season and a No. 13 national ranking in 1999. McBrien started one game as 
a freshman at West Virginia before sitting out 2001 when transferring to Maryland. 

He was a walk-on that season, working on the scout team before gaining a scholarship 
last year, when he beat out Chns Kelley as the starter. McBrien passed for 2,497 yards with 
15 touchdowns and a 141.3 efficiency rating, fifth best in school history, and earned the 
outstanding offensive player award in the Peach Bowl. 

This season seems even more promising for McBrien. The left-hander is showing much 
more poise than in the spring game four months ago. There is a sweetness in his delivery 
during practice, a confidence in his mechanics when he throws across his body. 

"Scott's better than he was last year, not even close," Friedgen said. "His footwork is 
better. But his decision-making is better, so he's not tapping his feet where he has 
indecision. He's throwing sharp, crisp balls where he knows what he's doing. Our passing 
game is going to be much better than it was last year." 

Friedgen has put in some new plays for McBrien even though the quarterback originally 
wasn't sure he could make the throws. Friedgen convinced him to try the plays during the 
summer, and soon they were added to the bulging playbook. Friedgen appreciated McBrien 
trying something that several pro passers had resisted when the coach was a San Diego 

Chargers assistant from 1 992 to 1 996. 

"If pro quarterbacks didn't want to do something, they weren't going to do it," Friedgen 
said. "They wouldn't even try to do it well, so you might as well throw it out." 

Friedgen has developed McBrien steadily, being careful not to overload him. In the past, 
McBrien needed to be comfortable or the play faltered. 

"Sometimes Scott gets out of sync. When he does, he's just another guy." Friedgen said. 
"Sometimes he blows a fuse." 

McBrien has tutored the Terps' three freshman quarterbacks, remembering how Marc 
Bulger helped him as a West Virginia newcomer. He spends nights in the dorm with Suter 
and comerback Dominique Foxworth, remembering when the trio were on the scout team 
instead of playmakers. 

Scott's always joking," Foxworth said. "It's always about making each other laugh. We 
just hang out in the room and laugh " 

h sorth and McBrien forget their friendship during practices. Each likes to get the 

last la on the field. 

"Wl "lit there, I'm sure he doesn't like me much, and I don't like him cither," 

Foxworth said. 



2002 ORANGE BOWL 



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Baltimore Sun • Aug. 23, 2003 



im s Harrison out to eaten a little respect 



Former QB set (<> prove 
\\( s receiving threat 



By Kevin Van Valkenburo 

SUNSTAPP 



COLLEGE PARK — There's a 
new fashion trend on the Man- 
land football team this year, and 
It originated on the right wrist 
of wide receiver Latrez Harri- 
son. 

It's a plain white plastic wrist- 
band, with a single word en- 
graved In the side: RESPECT. 

"I got this because I don't 
think opposing teams or players 
really respect us," Harrison said. 
"We don't think people are giv- 
ing us the respect we deserve. 
We won 10 games In 2001, and 



Terps opener 

Opponent: Northern Illinois 

When: Thursday, 7:35 p.m. 

Where: Huskie Stadium. 
DeKalb, IU. 

TV/Radio: CN8/WBAL 
(1090 AM) 



people said It was a fluke. Then 
last year, they said we didn't 
beat anybody. The media has us 
picked third or fourth In the 
league, and there Just isn't the 
respect there ." 

Or, as Aretha Franklin would 
say. It's about time people 
started giving Maryland its 
propers. 



"Me and (receiver] Jo Jo 
Walker were the first ones to get 
them, but most of our whole 
team is wearing these things 
now," Harrison said. "We don't 
care, we just got to go out and 
prove ourselves again. That's a 
good thing" 

One might say the same of 
Harrison, a player who repre- 
sents one of the biggest un- 
knowns for the Terps as they 
prepare to open their season 
Thursday against Northern Illi- 
nois. If he can perform up to his 
potential and give Maryland an- 
other dynamic offensive threat, 
the rest of the Atlantic Coast 
Conference had better look out. 

"We're expecting big things 
from him," said receivers coach 
James Frank- [See Terps, 3c] 



Ex-QB Harrison going 
for respect as receiver 



[Terps, from Page lc) 



Un. 

A gifted athlete with speed 
and size — Harrison is 6 feet 3, 
225 pounds — he was supposed 
to be the Terps' quarterback of 
the future when he arrived In 
College Park in 1999. His senior 
year at Booker T Washington 
High in Atlanta, he passed for 
2.400 yards and 27 touchdowns, 
and was considered one of the 
nations top-rated high school 
quarterbacks. 

As a freshman at Maryland, 
speculation existed that he 
would compete for the starting 
Job right away, and late In the 
season he made his first career 
start against eventual national 
champion Florida State in Tal- 
lahassee in front of more than 
80,000 people. 

That was about as good as It 
would get for Harrison as a 
quarterback. 

He could look brilliant one 
throw, then ugly the next, and 
even after redshirting In 2000, he 
couldn't overtake Calvin McCall 
or Shaun Hill to win the starting 
Job for good When coach Ralph 
Friedgen replaced Ron Vander- 
Unden In 2001. Harrison had to 
leam a whole new offense, and 
would often stay up as late as 4 
a.m. studying his playbook 
Though he backed up Hill dur- 
ing Maryland's Cinderella run to 
the Orange Bowl, he spent most 
of his tinv not 

playing 

"It didn't make any sense for 
me to have one of the better ath- 



letes on the team standing next 
to me on the sidelines," Friedgen 
said. "I called Latrez in before 
we were going to the Orange 
Bowl, and I said, "You've got to 
do really good in preparation for 
this bowl game, because If you're 
not going to be the starting 
quarterback next year, it doesn't 
make good sense to keep you 
there.' 

"Well, we came back in the 
winter, we had a team meeting, 
and afterward he went to the 
wide receiver meeting. That was 
an indication to me I should 
consider changing him." 

Said Harrison. "I was more 
excited than anything, because I 
really wasn't becoming the 
player that I knew I could. I 
probably would have been the 
fastest receiver at the time. 
Catching the ball Just was some- 
thing that came naturallv to 
me." 

No doubt he could catch and 
he was certainly fast, and as a 
former quarterback he knew 
where to go, but in everything 
else, he was raw. Harrison 
caught 20 passes for 369 yards in 
2002, Including a 69-yard touch- 
down against Duke, but his form 
was far from perfect. 

"Last year, he was probably 
Just a big athlete running 
around," Franklin said. "He was 
such a physical presence, but he 
didn't really know the tech- 
niques or anything." 

That changed this summer, 
when Harrison spent the better 
part of three months refining his 
route-running and his releases 




Once Maryland's quarterback of the future, wide receiver Latrez 
Harrison caught 20 passes for 369 yards as a Junior last season. 



off the line. 

"I had to kind of leam on the 
run last year, but I'm way ahead 
this year." Harrison said. "I 
know I'm going to be more of a 
threat than I was last year" 

With his size and speed, Har- 
rison creates a mismatch nearly 
every time he lines up. Now it's 
just a matter of putting it all to- 



gether. 

"I think Latrez has worked ex- 
tremely hard," said Friedgen. 
who added he hasn't ruled out 
sticking Harrison at quarter- 
back occasionally Just to mix 
things up. "I think he's turned 
into one of the leaders of our 
team. He's going to be a big guy 
to go to In our offense " 



'» 



2002 ORANGE BOWL 



2002 PEACH BOWL • 2004 GATOR BOWL 



wbm hbuis cuppings 



12004 MARYLAND GATOR BOWL GUIDE 



Washington Post 
Aug. 24, 2003 




JONATHAN *ErtTC* TMf AAyHWGTON TOST 



"The family, that's the backbone of everything," says Maryland safety 
Madieu Williams, who spent his summer working with ailing kids at NIH. 

Maryland's 
Vital Role Player 

Learning Through NIH Internship, 
M. Williams Is More Than a Safety 

By Barry Svrluca 

Washington Post Staff Writer 



84 



Each day, there was something different, be 
it a lfryear-old scheduled to have his leg 
removed, a 10 year-old wondering wheth- 
er he would live or die, another kid in for 
yet another chemotherapy treatment. 

Madieu Williams would smile. Always, he 
would smile. "Every day," he said, "was wonder- 
ful." 

Williams's days have generally been wonderful 
since he transferred from Division I-AA Towson to 
Maryland, since he was granted a scholarship after 
walking on to the football team, since he became 
i spins' starting free safety. That's apparent 
from the way he carries himself on the field, confi- 
dent he can do the job assigned to him. It's appar- 
ent from the way he behaves off it, most comfort- 
able making popcorn, plopping on the couch. 
watching a DVD. 

So many of his teammates believe they're pre- 
paring themselves for a future on the loot ball Held, 
the dream of the NFL drives them. Hut three days 
Mus summer, lor lour hours at a time, Wil- 
liams trekked to Bethesda, to the National In- 
stitutes oi Health, to prepare himself foi his future 
away from football His internship in the recre- 
ation therapy section with sick kids, many ter- 
minally ill. under IS— was part of the requirement 
lor his degree in family studies His smile belied 
liffjcult things he saw. 
"He would come in sit down and we would His- 



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M. Williams Fills Needs on and Off the Field 



rERRAPINS 



cuss who waj coming in that day," aid I 
Sales, a recreation therapist al NIH whoso 
Williams's supervisor "We would explain to him 
what the situation was. Everybody can't work in a 
setting like th.n Bui anything that came out of 
that meeting, he could handle ii * 

The goal of recreation therapy is simple 
enough, yet frequently impossible to attain: Take 
kids who can'l gel theil minds off terminal illness 
es — and get their mindsoff them WUbamswould 
arrive in the morning, and report to the 
room ri I tasks matter -of -factly. 

"U someone needed a vide* > game, or a coloring 
book. I'd get it." he said 

Sometimes, it wasn't that easy. 

"These kids, theil setfesteem can be way 
down," Sales said. They're dealing with depres- 
sion and anxiety. They're in the prime of their life, 
and they're looking for anything, any kind of 
WU 

"His smile was that light some days. They 
looked for him on the days he was coming. They 
would ask him if he could come back. These are 
kids who might be having surgery, who might be 
thinking, Tm less than a person." You're dealing 
with a lot of emotions. A child that's sick or griev- 
ing from an illness, when they request a specific 
staff person, you know you've made a connection. 
That's what he did." 

He did it subtly He coidd have walked in and 
acted the part of the macho hero after starting ail 
14 games for a Maryland team that won 1 1 times 
and crushed Tennessee in the Peach Bowl. 

"He didn't introduce himself as a football play 
er." said Lsthei f-pstrm. an art therapist at NTH 

"I didn't want to do that," Williams said "Ii 
they asked, sure Bui for those kids, football isn't 
really im | 

A Lucky Catch for Terps 

Don't mistake football's importance to Wil 
Earns, though At 6 feet 1 and 188 pounds, the 
redshirt senior is not striking as a hard-hitting 
safety. He was even less so at DuVal High in Lan 
ham. when he stood just f» 1 1 

'1 didn't really have a lot of film to send out," 
Williams said "1 wasn't really that big. I was still 
growing. My SATs weren't that great. It's a com- 
bination of things A lot of things in life are about 
timing. I don't think it was my time yet " 

Working out at the Maryland football camp 
didn't help attract the Terrapins. But a couple of 
coaches from Towson worked that camp, too. 
They found out the Maryland staff — under then 
head coach Ron Vanderlinden — wasn't going to 
recruit Williams. Towson pounced 

"He worked himself into a situation where lie 
was contributing right away," Towson Coach 
Gordy Combs said. "We had an injury, and he 
started a couple games as a freshman, and he 
could ph v." 

By his sophomore year, he was starting. But he 
wasn't necessarily happy. His mother, Abigail 
Burscher, was back home. Yes. Lanham is just 50 
miles from Towson. "But Tm very family ori 
ented." Williams said. "My mom. she's my best 
friend" 

The difficulties mounted. The position coach 
who recruited Williams left Towson. Williams 
sprained an ankle, and had a disagreement with a 
trainer about the severity of the injury. The train- 
er thought Williams could play- Williams dis- 
agreed. 

"He felt Qoe he was abandoned." Combs said 
It was one of those things where you're young 
and you're hurt, and medically, it's hard to find 
out how bad it is. And I think he wanted to be 
closer to home " 

Williams asked for his release. Eventually, 
Combs granted it "I wanted to make him sweat a 
little bit." Combs said "I wanted to make sure he 
ms sure." 

He transferred to Maryland and walked on in 
the spring of 2001. new coach Ralph Friedgen's 




Thinking of the sick kids he worked with at NIH help". Terps' Madieu Williams through louqh workouts. 



team. 
Iidn'tknowwh 'ting. Tried- 

gen said. 

They found out quickly 

"You i ould see, right when he got on the prac- 
tice field, thai he could help us," defensive coordi- 
nator Gary Blackney said "He was confident. 
And he's so versatile Weknew very early on that 
he would play for us, and be a very important part 
of this team " 

He was granted a scholarship that spring. Be- 
cause he was a transfer, he had to sit out in the 
fall. But he spent his time winning the Terps* 
im player of the year honors. 

Last year, he got his chance He picket! of I four 
passes. He made 82 tackles He did everything 
the coaches asked, becoming a second-team all 
ACC selection and what Friedgen considers "the 
best safety in the conference, maybe the country." 

His ability has stunned Friedgen more than 
once during this preseason. The key, Friedgen 
said, is his versatility. 

"He's so good in coverage, he could be a cor- 
ner." Friedgen said "But then, he has a knack for 
aiming up and stopping the run He'll find a little 
seam and fill it And he's a great tackier How 
many people in the country can do all of thai?" 

'He Brought . . . More Hope' 



How many football players would apply for the 
type of summer internship Williams had? For Wil 
liams. it was just a step toward what he wants to 
do eventually He doesn't want to coach He 
doesn't want to be involved in physical education 
He doesn't want to go into business Forget all 
those typical goals of typical football player-- He 
wants to be a family therapist 

The family, that's the backbone of every- 
thing." he said "I always feel that everything that 
happen! in life always starts at home. Thei 
lot of things that goon mi he world that ii you just 
look back at a kid's background, you can see 
where it starts. 

"... 1 feel like there's a lot of help that can be 
done, especially for a male There's not a lot of 
males in that field So it's' definitely something 
that's very needed." 

Williams grew up in a single parent home Hi ■ 
father was already in the United States when his 



mother brought him from their native Sierra Le- 
one, bul they divorced soon aftei Much of Wil 
hams'- into family therapy stems 

from that separation 

"My mom. she always gave me what 1 needed." 
Williams said "It wasn't one of those things 
where, "Well, I don't have it Whatever 1 needed, 
she pi ' woman. She 

taught me a lot of how to be a man. She was my 
mother andm\ 

Those stories, and some much more personal, 
would come up in his days at NTH Working with 
Epstein, the art thera| I ' help kids ex 

press feelings through drawings and other imag- 
es rather than words kids were bipo- 
lar or had other mood disorders Williams helped 
draw them out by sharing his own stones 

"It did a lot for iheir depression, more than any 
medication." Epstein said. "He'd say personal 
things to them, but ■• ion expired, 

he'd say. Thank you so much for letting me be 
with you.' I was so impressed with him. He just 
went right in, and he was so incredibly coura 
geous." 

Not surprisingly. Williams has thought of those 
kids during preseason practices, which lead up to 
the Terps' season opener Hiursday night at 
Northern Illinois. Things seem tough? Think of 
the kids. Sick of these drills? Think of the kids. A 
little hot outside 5 Think, again, of the kids 

There's sometimes stuff going on in my life 
that I can't really get up for," he said. "But then, 
seeing them there, they might not be as upbeat as 
I am, but you couldn't really tell They were 
strong. It shed new light for me. just gave me an 
other f-: Me I'm very grateful for the 

opportunity" 

Who was grateful? Epstein said one kid Wd- 
iiams worked with had been depressed for 
"to the point where be had nothing to look for- 
ward to." 

Williams played pool with him. "It made this 
guy's day." Epstein said "He'd always look for 
Madieu. and those were his best times, playing 
pool" 

"He wasn't what you think of as a football play 
er." Sales said "When a patient is not responding, 
and they don't respond to a doctor or their family, 
it can be very bad He brought a little more hope 
to them " 



2002 ORANGE BOWL 



2002 PEACH BOWL 



2004 BATOR BOWL 



Baltimore Sun • Aug. 24, 2003 

With soaring expectations, 
Friedgen, UM reach for sky 




[Vecsey.from Page lc] 



Laura 
Vecsey 



With soaring 
expectations 
Friedgen, U5 
reach for slq 



COLLEGE PARK — Wil 
so much of Maryland's 
aspirations riding on 
what happens the next two 
weeks, one might wish the Tei 
entered this season of sky-hig 
expectations a little n. 
healthy.;*" 

That would Include the coa 

The hip replacement surgei 
carefully scheduled in May to 
not interrupt spring football c 
the start of fall camp, was tou 
enough for Maryland coach 
Ralph Friedgen He was hopii 
that two months after the opt 
ation, he'd get In a little golf. 

Leg elevated and held tight 
post-operative stockings, it h; 
definitely been no dice, even o 
a short round. 

The only golf-cart driving 
Frledgen's doing is around thi 
College Park practice fields. \ 
terday, he maniacally floored 
the electric buggy to maximui 
speed across two gridirons to 
scream holy hell at a walk-on 
center who wasn't where he 
should be. 

Poor walk-on 

Poor [See Vecsey, 



86 



Friedgen. 

"My doctor just looked at me 
and said, 'Work on your short 
game,' " Friedgen said with a 
laugh. 

Now, with the Terps' season- 
opener at Northern Illinois on 
Thursday night, there are com- 
plications that make his recov- 
ery no joking matter. The blood 
clots above and below his left 
knee have Friedgen downing 
blood thinners. It's potentially 
dangerous enough that 
Friedgen gets weekly checks of 
his coagulation levels. 

"I used to stand right behind 
the quarterback [during drills]. 
Now I stand off on the hash 
marks, out of harm's way. If I get 
hit In the leg, there could be 
swelling. If I get hit in the head, 
I could get bleeding on the 
brain," he said. 

He's concerned, he said, but 
not enough to recuperate away 
from the Maryland team that he 
has. in two dynamic seasons, 
guided to a stellar 21-5 regular- 
season record, and a No. 15 As- 
sociated Press ranking this year. 

With gallows humor, Friedgen 
again laughed about his healing 
tactics 

"I told my wife, 1 dont want to 
rust out.' I want to live doing 
what I do. Besides, I think It's al- 
ready on the calendar. It's pre-or- 
dained. When it's time to go, It's 
time. I like winning. I like winning 
football games and graduating 
kids. That's what I do." 

Let this statement from 
Friedgen serve as a preamble for 
the Terps' 2003 season. The 
coach is as focused, as commit- 
ted and as prepared as ever, 
even as Maryland enters this 
season the subject of the highest 
expectations since the Bobby 
Ross days. 

Not that Friedgen cares about 
polls that say Auburn, Virginia 
Tech, Oklahoma, Texas, Kansas 
State, Miami, North Carolina 
State and Ohio State are con- 
tenders 

I think it makes pretty good 
water cooler chatter for our 
alum and our fans They , 
jacked up I'm more excited 
about how we end up. I don't 
know why they do [pre-season 

Ise, Friedgen is w. 



Laura 
Vecsey 

that expectations can have both 
a negative and positive effect. 

"It can be a problem when 
you're losing, and there can be 
problems when you're winning," 
he said. 

"I've got people telling things 
In these kids' ears — things they 
shouldn't hear. I've got 12 kids 
with a chance to be drafted, and 
there are agents talking to 
them. I've already seen some of 
those guys don't want to push, 
they're saving themselves' for 
the league. Well, that's not how 
we've done things around here, 
how we've won. W&'ve haa a 
common goal," he said. 

If the specter of unwanted at- 
tention toward his top players is 
an issue (Friedgen has pulled 
some of those players aside and 
showed them tape of poor prac- 
tices) and if the pre-season polls 
bug him, there are other issues. 

Who would dare mention that 
there's talk about the Terps be- 
ing in the hunt for BCS consid- 
eration? 

That seems a bit of a stretch, 
considering the Terps' relatively 
soft schedule as compared to 
the ACC's two other ranked 
teams. 

Florida State gets its built-in 
ratings boost from matchups 
against Florida and Miami. 

N.C. State, ranked ahead of 
Maryland in most polls and a 
sleeper pick for BCS consider- 
ation, plays defending national 
champion Ohio State on 
Sept. 13. 

There's no discernible jeal- 
ousy in College Park about 
N.C State, but the Wolfpack 
could be the pick of this confer- 
ence, if it lives up to its pre-sea- 
son billing. N.C. State certainly 
could prove a worthy opponent 
for the Buckeyes, who will be 
without Maurice Clarett, the 
embattled sophomore tailback 
set to sit out multiple games for 
NCAA violations. 

For whatever stock can be 
taken from pre-season prognos- 
tications — and we know where 

on this tc| 
t he Terps would pretty much 
have to go undefeated to get 
into a big-money bowl. 

All this conspirps to place 




DOUO KAPUST1N : BUN STAFF 

Terps coach Ralph Friedgen, 
who had hip replacement sur- 
gery In May, has Maryland sit- 
ting at No. 15 In the AP poll. 

even greater emphasis on the 
Terps' second game of the sea- 
son at Florida State. 

"I don't think there's been a 
Maryland team around here that 
has gone down to Florida State 
thinking it has a chance to win In 
a long time. That's something we 
think we can do," Terps quarter- 
back Scott McBrien said. 

Of course, unlike his players, 
who are pleased with their new 
status as a rising football power, 
Friedgen refuses to mentally 
visit Tallahassee. The Terps are 
hampered by Injuries and the 
mood doesn't quite suit 
Friedgen, who smilingly reminds 
us that he is never happy. 

"Someone sent me a tape of a 
pre-season TV show from North- 
ern Illinois," he said. "They were 
calling this the biggest game eve 
to come to their stadium. That 
has me concerned a little. We 
don't have all our bullets, and 
they're going to be flying high. 
They've got good coaching." 

Same goes for Maryland. 

It's probably going to take 
running the table for the Terps 
to get to the next level. With 
Friedgen at the helm, even In hi.- 
golf cart, even nursing his post- 
operative hip and troubled knee. 
It could be time. 



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2004 MARYLAND GATOR BOWL GUIDE 



Washington Post • Hug. 27, 2003 



Allen Happily in the Runnin; 




BY TRACY A WOODWARD— THE WASHINGTON POST 



Running back Josh Allen had 405 yards and 8 touchdowns 
in 60 carries while sharing backfleld duties last season. 



No. 15 Terps Are Confident 
With Backup in the Backfield 



By Barry Svrluga 
Washington Post Staff Writer 



The phone rang in the Allen house that night, a night af- 
ter Bowie High School had beaten Eleanor Roosevelt for 
the Class 4A state football championship. Maryland Coach 
Ralph Friedgen wanted to speak with Josh Allen, then a se- 
nior running back for Roosevelt who was disappointed 
with his performance in that 2001 title game on the Byrd 
Stadium turf, the turf that sits right outside Friedgen's of- 
fice window. 

Allen felt he had let down his future coach. Friedgen dis- 
agreed. 

"Josh," Friedgen said, "youTl never disappoint me." 

Despite being limited by a sprained ankle that day, Allen 
ran for 137 yards on 17 carries. If he were to duplicate 
those numbers Thursday night — when the 15th-ranked 
Terrapins open the season at Northern Illinois — Fried- 
gen's statement would surely hold true. For now, at least, 
Allen is the Terps' starting tailback, and there aren't many 
folks in College Park who are terribly disappointed about 



See TERPS, D8, Col. 2 



Continued an next page 



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I BCWL 



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2004 MARY1AND GATOR BOWL GOIDE 




Terps' Allen Provides 
Backfield Lots of Backup 



TERPS. From Dl 



88 



tiiat. 

"I think he'd be starting for a lot of clubs," 
Maryland offensive coordinator Charlie Taaffe 
said. "He gives us an explosive back in his own 
right." 

The "in his own right" part is important, be- 
cause while Allen has been impressive this pre- 
season, he is the surefire starter because oi se 
nior Bruce Perry's high ankle sprain. To be 
sure, the Terps would like to have all of their 
running backs available, particularly Perry, the 
2001 ACC offensive player of the year. 

But Friedgen and Taaffe haven't obsessed 
about Perry's absence in large part because of 
Allen, a 5-foot-ll, 206-pound sophomore. 
When Friedgen was watching Allen during 
Maryland's football camp in the summer of 
2001, he got a vibe. The Terps, Friedgen 
thought, had enough running backs. But he 
watched Allen run, watched him catch passes. 
Mc >st important, he watched him work. 

"I just liked his competitiveness," Friedgen 
said. "If you looked at him, you wouldn't think 
he is |a competitor | until you see him in a com- 
petitive situation." 

As much as Allen was playing to impress 
Friedgen at that camp, and as much as he 
didn't want to disappoint him during that first 
experience at Byrd Stadium, that's not what 
drives him. Each game, each carry, each play is 
run hard and run fast with one person in mind: 
His mother, Inez, who died of breast cancer 
when Allen was just 9. That event has shaped 
is, how he works. 

"Willi the values that my mom instilled in 
me, I knew I couldn't give up in anything," Al- 
len said. "At one point, I decided I would ded- 
icate my life to her. I decided that I was going 
to make it — if not for myself, for her." 

Inez Allen's death dictated much about 
Josh's young life. He was raised not only by his 
father, Leonard, but by his two older sisters 
when Ix?onard was at work. 

"A lot of kids think about 'Mom,' think 
about being babied, that Mom protects yen 
from Dad when you do something wrong," Al 
lensaid. "I didn't have that. So I definitely bad 
to mature a lot faster than most kids. In a way, 
I think that helped me." 

fed maturity helped him, he said, 
when he moved from Tampa to Bladensburg 
following his sophomore year His new team- 
mates at Roosevelt didn't know how to react 
He was mostly quiet, but 
in Afro, "ihis big bush." he 
said, holding his hands several inches out over 
irows. 
thought he wai kind ol 
time 1 1 Mankind defensiw 

■ •I Mien's al 
vett "I he had thai bush. 

ould tell by his work 
good " 
■ thi hi display al 

to thinking, "What 

■ nl and 




"I think he'd be starting for a lot of clubs," 
Maryland offensive coordinator Charlie Taaffe 
said of sophomore running back Josh Allen. 

such a good kid [who t work habits, 1 

could see him playing al Virginia or North Car- 
olina, one of those places." Friedgen said. 
"And we'd be saying, 'Boy, were we stupid not 
to take him.' " 

So Friedgen offered him a scholarship. In 
spot duty as a freshman, he thrived, running 
for 405 yards on 60 carries and scoring eight 
touchdowns. 

That will help quell any nerves he might 
have when he takes that first handoB Thurs- 
day. But so will this; When Perrj was injured 
for much of last season, Allen and then-senior 
Chris Downs combined foi and 21 

scores. 

"We know two things from that," quarter- 
back Scott McBrien said. "We know that Josh 
is a great back, and we know that the offense 
works." 

I'br [eras' thinking is it will work mst as 
well with Allen as it would with Perrj 

"I have confidence in myself," Allen said. 
"But that confidence the roaches and my team- 
mates have in me, that helps bring oul my own 
i onfidence ' 

Terrapins Notes: Mi. laps' practice yestet 

ir last lull workout ipener, 

was cut short about violent 

thunderstorm that ripped through i 

Park. "It was probably the good lord telling 

get them ofl the field early," 1 1 

said. 

Friedgen s.ml McBrien, who lias been heal- 

I In muscle, Friedgen said, was "stiB 

I .I [ylet who was supposed k 
net aftei ha ined from an 

ii in his lee., u.i^ unexpt I ' 

the trip, Friedgen said, though he like 
Ivuillonly be used in an 



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2004 MARYLAND GATOR BOWL GUIDE I 



Baltimore Sun • Aug. 27, 2003 



Fun f s not just secondary 

Defensive backs: The Terps' unit is one of the nation's best at 
shutting down the pass and opening eyes. And at celebrating. 



By Kevin Van Valkcnburg 
Sun Staff 

August 27, 2003 

COLLEGE PARK - Fear the turtle. But show him a little love, too. 



Sponsored by 

careerbuilder 



That's the way Domonique Foxworth saw things last year in a 34-10 win over Georgia Tech. In the 
closing minutes, he just happened to scoop up a fumble and return it 12 yards for a touchdown, and then, 
in a moment of inspiration, he casually strolled over to the bronze turtle statue in the back of the end 
zone at Byrd Stadium and planted a kiss on its nose. His fellow defensive backs, Curome Cox, Dennard 
Vilson and Madieu Williams, were in stitches. 

It was typical Foxworth: creative, innovative, hilarious. 

"A lot of people assumed it was premeditated, but it wasn't," he says. "1 saw it there and 1 was having 
one of my better games of the season. I just thought it would be a good idea. I was just having fun out 
there, talking trash and celebrating with my teammates." 

It was also a moment that perfectly represents the philosophy Maryland's four starting defensive backs 
live by: Play big, play with emotion, and whenever possible, celebrate with friends. 

"I had a referee come in during the preseason to talk to our team," says Maryland coach Ralph Friedgen. 
"He was trying to explain that one of the things they're really emphasizing this year is cutting out 
taunting or excessive celebrating. So I had our video guy put together a tape of anything from last year 
that looked like it might get a penalty. Of course, the [defensive backs] joked that it was nothing but a 
tape of them." 

At least they were celebrating for good reason. Last year, Foxworth, Williams, Cox and Wilson started 
all 14 games together, and by season's end, the unit was one of the Atlantic Coast Conference's best. 
Foxworth and Williams earned All-ACC honors. Cox was one of the most physical comers in the 
conference and returned two interceptions for touchdowns (one coming in Maryland's 30-3 victory over 
Tennessee in the Peach Bowl). Wilson was, according to Friedgen, the unsung hero of the defense after 
finishing fifth on the team in tackles with 72. 

Because Maryland defensive coordinator Gary Blackney likes to blitz and attack offenses, the pressure 

Continued on next page 



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90 



is usually on the defensive backs to prevent and create game-changing plays. The No. 15 Terps return 
nine starters on defense from a year ago, when the team went 1 1-3, but in the pass-happy ACC, none 
nay be more important than Williams, Cox, Wilson and Foxworth. And this year, the corps of four says 
it expects to be mentioned with the best defensive backfields in the nation. 

"Our goal is to be No. 1 ," Wilson says. "If you're going to set goals, you've got to set them high." 

Hearing that does not surprise Blackney. 

"They're all leaders," he says. "They're all highly motivated. They have a closeness off the field, I think, 
that draws them together on the field. They know each other's strengths, assets and liabilities." 

Strength has never been a liability for Cox, who pound- for-pound, is one of the strongest players on the 
team. (His biceps would make some linebackers jealous.) He's also considered one of the funniest, 
evidenced by the fact that Blackney nicknamed Cox "Jay Leno" for his penchant for wisecracking 
during film sessions. A starter since his freshman year, Cox is the most veteran player in the group, 
having started 33 games in three years. A scholar-athlete in 1999 and 2001, Cox graduated with a degree 
in family studies this summer. 

And while expectations are high in College Park in 2003 after back-to-back seasons with at least 10 
wins, Cox remembers when that wasn't always the case. The year before Friedgen arrived, Maryland 
won five games, finished tied for sixth in the ACC and had its fourth straight losing season under then- 
coach Ron Vanderlinden. 

"Sometimes it's rewarding to see where we came from and to see where we're at now," Cox says. "There 
<s definitely a sense of pride. It shows all your hard work has paid off. A lot of the younger guys, they 
don't know what losing is. They're not as hungry. All they know is success." 

Williams can relate, having come from humble beginnings. Born in Sierra Leone in West Africa, 
Williams and his mother moved to the United States when he was 8 years old. 

"It was tough because I didn't know what to expect coming to a new country," he says. "I was pretty 
naive. I just remember sandy beaches and hot weather." 

When Williams came out of high school, Division I-AA Towson was the only school interested in his 
services. After playing for two years mostly as a cornerback for the Tigers - while getting stronger and 
faster - Williams decided to walk on at Maryland and transferred for the spring semester in 2000. After 
about two practices of watching the quiet, humble Williams play on the scout team, the Maryland staff 
knew a big-time player had fallen into its lap. 

"The first day, you could just see he had an air and a presence about himself," Blackney says. "Right 
after spring, Coach Friedgen said, 'We've got to keep this kid in the program. We've got to get him a 
scholarship.'" 

After sitting out a redshirt year, Williams cracked the starting lineup and has been there at free safety 
ever since. Focused and intense, he earned second-team All-ACC honors last year and was rated 1 1th by 
ESPN The Magazine out of the top 100 impact players in college football. 

^oxworth took a much more traditional path to stardom. One of the top players in the country at 
comeback his senior year at Western Tech, Foxworth could have gone to a number of programs. But 
surprisingly, he <. I iryland. 

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2004 MARYLAND GATOR BOWL GUIDE 



"I remember we were at his house, and his parents really wanted him to commit [to Maryland] that 
night," Friedgen says. "He wouldn't do it. He had promised Coach [Joe] Tiller from Purdue that he 
would allow him to come over first [before he decided]. I respected that. ... He's one of those kids the 
more you recruited him, the more you liked him." 

It also was an indication that Maryland wasn't going to let other schools cherry-pick the local high 
school talent. Injuries thrust Fox worth into the mix his freshman year, and his performance against 
Clcmson helped the Terps clinch its first ACC title since 1985. In 2002, he picked off five passes and 
led the league in passes defended. 

"A lot of people will probably say I'm cocky, but I think it's just confidence," Foxworth says. "I don't 
think I'm good enough to where teams have to game-plan away from me, but I hope to get there soon." 

Wilson, who moved to strong safety when Foxworth stepped into the lineup, doesn't have the natural 
speed some of his teammates do, but it's not for lack of effort. 

"I have to throw Dennard off the practice field every night, or I think he'd just stay," Friedgen says. 

With good reason, Cox playfully describes Wilson as "a serious old man." It's something Wilson won't 
outright deny. 

"I'm a pretty serious guy," Wilson says. "They call me an old man. I just love being around my family. I 
don't think I've ever been away from my immediate family for more than a couple days. They're just 20 
minutes away [in Upper Marlboro], and whenever I get the opportunity, I'm there." 

He's also not afraid to step up and say what's on everyone's mind. Eighteen months ago, after seeing on 
ESPN's SportsCenter that Friedgen was being courted for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers' head coaching 
position, Wilson quickly got word to his teammates on the phone. 

"I told them, at the morning workout tomorrow, don't anybody take off your sweats to run," Wilson 
says. "I said, 'If Coach Friedgen isn't going to be our coach, then we're not running for him.'" 

The next morning, Friedgen asked them what was going on. 

"We need to know, right now, Coach: Are you in or are you out?" Wilson said, throwing one of 
Friedgen's favorite sayings back at him. 

"It was a pretty emotional moment for me," Friedgen says. "I knew right then my work at Maryland 
wasn't done." 

The phrase is now plastered on posters as the rallying cry for the 2003 season. 

Says Wilson: "I think we're all leaders. I think we were bom with the gift to lead. That's pretty rare to 
have a group with the same mentality, that when it's time to step up and face something, we take it upon 
ourselves to do it. And that's why I think we've been so successful." 



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2004 6AT0R BOWL 



® 



MICHAEL WILSON 



Terps, CavsAre at Big Times Door 



W1LBON. From Dl 



Washington Post • Aug. 27, 2003 
MI CHAE L WILSON 

More Than Ever, Area 
Football Worth a Look 



You live in the South or the Midwest, it's pretty 
standard stuff to grab the college football 
schedules when they come out to see which 
opponents the schools where you live are playing that 
fall. Not just your own team, but everybody's teams, a) 
the ones that allow you to look forward to the end of 
summer. 

But if you live around here, around greater 
Washington, the pickings are usually a little sparse, 
particularly these last 10 years when it comes to 
big-time college football. Virginia Tech has become a 
staple, with or without young men named Vick, which 
is why the Tech people would have sold their souls to 
Lucifer to get into the Atlantic Coast Conference. But 
when Tech became a really big deal, Maryland hit the 
skids. And there was no great rush to see Virginia, 
either, these last few seasons. Far too often, local 
college football has been a way to waste time until 
college basketball practice starts in the middle of 
October. 

And that leads me to right now, the first real week of 
college football, which finds Virginia Tech ranked in 

See WII.BON. D8. Col. 4 



.ybody's top 10. and both Virginia and 
maryland ranked in virtually every top 20 
preseason poll of consequence. Virginia's 
quarterback, a kid named Matt Schaub 
who was benched in last season's opener, 
is an honest-to-goodness Heisman Trophy 
contender. And that's a phrase not 
legitimately uttered around here (not 
counting Michael Vick) since Boomer 
Esiason was a senior at Maryland 19 years 
ago. Maryland is good enough to not even 
(ret much over a glut of summer camp 
injuries. And Tech, which has another 
Vick on the depth chart at quarterback, 
might have enough to make a ran at a 
BCS bowl. 

Who says you won't see Vick play on 
Sunday? While Marcus Vick won't start, 
he'll play for the Hokies. who'll begin their 
season ranked No. 9 in the Associated 
Press poll, Sunday against Central 
Florida. Maryland, which opens the 
season Thursday night against Northern 
Illinois, is ranked 15th. And Virginia, 
which jumps into the ACC schedule 
Saturday against Duke, opens at No. 18. 
Okay, so it's not Florida, Florida State 
and Miami, but it's pretty good. There are 
actual dates worth circling on the 
calendar for games that could be of 
""•ional significance. In fact, Maryland 
Florida State in the second week of 

reason, Sept. 6. Even if the Terrapins 
lose that game, they should be 8-1 
entering Thursday. Nov. 13, when they 
host Virginia on national television. The 
Cavaliers get to play Florida State at 
home in Charlottesville on Oct 18 and 
Virginia Tech at home on Nov 29. But 
they're on the road for Clemson, highly 
ranked North Carolina State and 
Maryland. 

There's no question Tech is the most 
talented and the deepest of the three 
When your second-string quarterback is 
Vick's kid brother, and your returning 
feature running back (Kevin Jones) 
rushed for nearly 900 yards as a backup, 
life is good. And they both could receive 
second billing to DeAngelo Hall, the 
cornerback-wide receiver with the Deion 
-.pei i] I et's face it, getting to wati h a 
fledgling Vick for the next few weeks is 
bettei lhan watching none at all. And 
what folks observe about Michael and 
M.hi us so far is that they laugh .ilike. they 
walk alike, at times they even talk ilike. 
which means some defensive coordinators 
will lose their minds when quarterbacks 

are two of a kind. You want .mother 
name? Sophomore s.iti t\ Jimmy Williams, 
1, 213 pounds, and a masher. 
s loaded on o dedon 

se, experienced, the whole deal 
Bui lech .lis., has a Now mbei s< hedule 
(Miami, al Pitt, al Virginia) thai might 
kniH k anybod) out ol B< S i onti ntion 
I s. .ii .. I,, h is ,i perennial threat, even il 
,i relativi K rv i 



Maryland and Virginia would love to be 
in such a position, which Maryland Coach 
Ralph Friedgen spoke to yesterday. Being 
ranked in the top 20 means essentially 
nothing to Tech. But to Maryland, "it 
means we're starting to earn respect 
nationally, which is important to how 
we're viewed," Friedgen said. 

Of attempting to battle for room at the 
top with the likes of Tech, Nebraska, 
Oklahoma. Michigan, Ohio State, 
Tennessee, the three Florida schools, etc., 
friedgen said: "The question isn't what 
we've done [21-5 the last two years], but 
what can we continue to do? Have we 
arrived, or do we expect to go further? 
We've gone from nobody pointing at us to 
a lot of people pointing at us. The 
question becomes, 'Can we handle that or 
not?' Good teams can and bad teams 
can't." 

Well, neither Maryland nor Virginia is a 
bad team, but Friedgen 's larger point is 
this It's one thing to have a breakthrough 
season, even a couple of really nice 
seasons. But it's quite another to become 
an elite program in college football, one of 
those programs that agonizes over going 
7-4. The best thing Maryland and Virginia 
have going for them are their architects, 
their coaches, Friedgen and Al Groh. Not 
coincidentally, both coached at the college 
level, both went to the NFL, and both are 
back in college, now two of the best in 
their business. They have experienced th. 
best of both worlds and can communicate 
it well it enough to drive points home to 
their players and reeru i I s 

Virginia's Schaub. after throwing 28 
touchdown passes last year, ought to be 
even better this season. He's not new to 
this offense, he's not looking over his 
shoulder because he's worried about 
being benched Yes, it could l>e a problem 
that he has no proven receivers because of 
graduation and injury. The top eight 

rs have barely 40 i 
receptions. 

But coaches make a radical din 
in . allege sports, and here's when Groh 
ii inns in. Virginia finished last in total 
i.tti use. even though Schaub was the AC( 
player of the year, anil next to last in i 
defense. But they finished tied fol second 
in the league and return 1 I ol 22 starters 
The coach found ways tosqueea more 
victories than one would expect out of th 
Cavaliers 

Friedgen has better talent and i dl 

team now than he did last year, oi thi 

; Evenso.Tech and Frank Beamer 
have ahead] fft nil roadi 

Maryland and Virginia will begin to drivt 
this season, the difficult road garni - and 
ries ind the 

lions s. yes, pi opleare 
pointing al Virginia and Maryland, and 

■\ quick!) wh< thi i Mh 
programs are n adj to dig in an 
autumn around here a lol more fun than il 
has been 



2002 ORANGE BOWL 



2002 PEACH BOWL • 2004 0AT0R BOWL 




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FBBimi new s cuppiws CATO 

BCW 



2004 MARYLAND GATOR BOWL GUIDE 



Washington Post • Aug. 28, 2003 



Now, McBrien Has a Good Grip on Terps' Offense 



Opening Statement 

■ At Stake: Con a season 
opened be a must-win? With a 
Week 2 date at Florida State. 
Maryland faces such a situation 
tonight An 0-2 start, with a 
competitive ACC schedule 
looming, would deflate high 
expectations A convincing win 
would build momentum toward 
what so far has been the 
Terrapins' impossible dream: 
beating the Seminoles 

■ Burning Question: No 

current college player rushed 
for more yards last season than 
f*-"->m Illinois' Michael "The 
Turner Maryland must 
s, . can stop the run 
without departed linebacker EJ. 
Henderson. 

■ The last Time: Maryland 
was last ranked this high 
entering the season in 1985. 
when the No. 7 Terrapins lost 
their opener to Penn State. 
20-18 

Game Preview, Page D9 




By Barby Svtu-uca 

Washington Post Staff Water 



n oiunwiicwi m m immi mi n i 



Scott McBrien: "You don't just go out there and run plays. 
You've got to know why you run a certain play against a certain 
defense. That's what being a quarterback's all about." 



Scott McBrien would look to the sideline, read the play 
that was signaled in, enter the huddle, inform his team- 
mates, approach the line of scrimmage, survey the de- 
fense and run that very play. Every time. A safety couid 
be blitzing. A linebacker might be dropping back into coverage. 
No matter. McBrien would run the play. 

"He'd just run it against any kind of defense," Maryland wide 
receiver Latrez Harrison said. "He wouldn't change it It didn't 
matter." 

When McBrien comes behind center tonight, when the 15th- 
ranked Terrapins open the season at Northern Illinois, it will 
matter. The Terps' offense is expected to be at least as good — 
and possibly much better — than it was last year, in large part be- 
cause McBrien can look out over defenses, know who will do 
what, and make an informed decision about where to go with 
the balL Ask any number of people around the Maryland pro- 
gram the difference in McBrien between this August and last, 
and they struggle to respond, throwing up their hands, rolling 
their eyes, laughing at the comparison. 

It's like last year was Remedial 101," offensive coordinator 
Charlie Taaffe said, "and now he's at the 400 leveL" 

"Night and day," is McBrien's characterization, but it doesn't 
matter. Black and white. North and south. Cats and dogs. Pick 
your 180-degree cliche. 

"Bullets were flying left and right," McBrien said. 1 was kind 
of lost But it's totally different now. I know what I'm doing. I 



See MCBRIEN, D9. Col. 1 



Maryland's First Three 
Games in 2002 (1-2) 



Maryland's Next 
11 Games (10-1) 



4.1 3.0 94.0 158.7 252.7 18.0 



Turnovers/Game I Ruthing Yardi/fiamp I Paving Yardi/Camt I Total OffenWGame I Points Per Game 



6.4 1.3 227.4 199.3 426.6 39.7 



Continued an next page 



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4 




Quarterback Needs Firm Grasp 



MCBRIEN. From Dl 



94 



know why I'm doing it" 
Finding the Right Coach 

As McBrien learned the whats 
and the whys last season, he threw 
for 2,497 yards and was the 12th- 
ranked passer in the nation. Not 
long before, that would have been 
considered the ultimate success, 
just playing football at Maryland, 
playing college football at all 

McBrien, who grew up in Rock- 
ville and drove by the College F^rk 
campus every day en route to De- 
Matha in Hyartsville, initially played 
3t West Virginia. Perhaps that was 
the first defense he surveyed cor 
rectry: Looking at the situation in 
Morgantown. knowing his chance 
to play was slipping away and calling 
an audible. 

Rich Rodriguez had taken over 
for the retired Don Nehlen at WVU, 
and Rodriguez moved McBrien to 
third string. As a sophomore in 
2000, he had thrown for 755 yards 
in 10 appearances, including one 
start, but he completed just 42.3 per- 
cent of his passes. 

"We really thought he had an out 
standing release," Nehlen said "He 
was very quick, 1 was a Little con- 
cerned 'about his size, but when I 
met him, I fell in love with the kid 
He played a lot fur me, and be was 
going to play even more. He was go- 
ing to be my starter- 
Yet when Nehlen retired. Rodri- 
guez's starter was Brad Lewis; ver- 
satile Rasheed Marshall was the 
backup. McBrien seethed, hut didn't 
tell anybody On Aug. 15, 2001. he 
practiced with the Mountaineers in 
the morning, put some stuff in his 
car in the afternoon, blew off an eve- 
ning workout, and began driving 
home. Already en route, he called 
his mother, Kathleen, who had a 
simple message, "Drive safely." 

T could tell he was emotional," 
she said. "He was just very unhappy 
I wanted him to take his time, so I 
told him, 'Just come on home and 
well talk about it ' " 

Which they did. They talked 
amongst themselves. They talked to 
McBrien \ old coaches al DeMatha 
They talked to Nehlen. 

"1 heard about what happened,* 
Nehlen said. "Hut "*ve got to stay oul 
e things. I couldn't really of- 
fer much advice one way or the oth- 
er." 

Eventually, they talked to Ralph 
Friedgen The Terps' coach was hon 
had plenty of quarterbacks in 
the pt n 

scholarship By this point, none of 
that mattered to McBrien 

"He sajd he'd rather do that than 
go back to We I \ irginia " Kathleen 
McBrien id, 11 1 never 

play (<» A op) to be al 

Maryland ' I lie was 

re mi 

ture— "It's over and i 
I dun't really think al 

aid Bui . l 
McBrien who mad 
lum i" Morgantown I 




In his junior season, Scott McBrien's 141 .J passing rating was fifth-best in 
school history, as was his 2,497 yards passing. He threw for IS TTK, ran for 7. 




Friedgen: "He used to be upset about how much he had to learn, and he'd 
joke about it. But I don't hear that anymore. He's _ quicker with everything/ 



departure with the Mountaineers' 
staff — can't get ovei hei son's re- 
to Friedgen and offensive or> 
< animator Charlie Taaffe. 

"l"hey recruit kids and bring in 
kids, and then coach according to 
their strengths." she said. "Other 

is might want to 
er way, and force kids to do things 
they can't do. That's where [Pried 
genl is the genius over there, and 
Charlie Taaffe the same way When 
Scot! was struggling with tlir play 
book, they knew how to coa< I 
teach without making a kid feel like 
he's no good. They don't belittle yi m 
and make you feel like you're never 
going to make it " 

In truth, the move has worked out 
fol l« <t h parties. The Mountaineers. 
behind Marshall and a strong run- 
ning game, went &-4 last season, 
theii most wins since 1993. 
McBrien led the Terps to a 10-3 rcg 
ular season and a 30-3 victory over 
Tennessee in the Peach Bowl, and 
hi.s comfort level is obvious. Last 
i practice. McBrien stood be- 
side Pried 

MM you think you would h 

d like this at West Virginia 7 " 
Friedgen asked him McBrii 
smiled 

The Light Comes On 

r xcepl it's a bit rn n 
(lun th 

■ Maryland livinc: al home in 

He, leaving at 6:30 every 

chool, then 

i. h night 

■■• he eramnvd 

omplemenl •■ 



es with perhaps the most difficult 
Priedgen's offense. 

"He used to be upset about how 
much he had to learn, and he'd joke 
about it," Friedgen said. "But I don't 
hear that anymore He's just so 
much quicker with everything." 

Which will help, considering 
McBrien can't rely solely on his 
physical gifts, especially while re- 
covering from the right groin strain 
he suffered last week in practice. He 
is listed at 6 feet 1. and at 182 
pounds is (airly slight. But his me- 
chanicj new are nearly impeccable. 
and Friedgen believes that's because 
his feel are better, his arm is better, 
but most of all. his mind is better 

He's not jumping around with 
Ins feet." Friedgen said. McBrien 
used to hop a hit. developing ner- 
vow Feel as tie figured out what to 
do. Now. "He knows where he wants 
to go with the ball, so evtTything's 
smoother. It starts with his decision 
making." 

A k>t goes into that There is a 
better knowledge of Priedgen's sys- 
tem There Li a better understand- 
ing of defenses. But there is also an 
inquisitive look in McBrien's eye, 
hi i) he's not participating in 
plays at practice He stands to the 
lions off 

laalli 

mshave 

grown more intelligent ( >n one play 
[aaflc nid, 
n noticed i safety setting 
i Mils 
"When he's down I 
■ 

up "Whoa Yeah ' Ki ■ 



2002 ORANGE BOWL 



2002 PEACH BOWL 



ing, the coach thought. Keep going. 

"So I've got a soft corner over that 
way," McBrien said, pointing. Taaffe 
glowed: "You got it You got it" 

"He knew, based on that pre-snap 
look, where to go with the ball," 
Taaffe said. "It's like he already sees 
it before the ball's snapped, so when 
he gets the ball, all he has to do is get 
the timing of his drop, and the ball's 
out" 

Which should make the entire of- 
fense — just fourth in the nine-team 
ACC last year, gaining 389.4 yards 

per game — more prolific. As Harri- 
son, one of the Terps' starting wide- 
outs said, "I would say Scott was like 
a Ryan Leaf last camp, compared to 
a Peyton Manning now." 

"It's another level that you rise 
to," McBrien said. "You don't just go 
out there and run plays. You've got 
to know why you run a certain play 
against a certain defense. That's 
what being a quarterback's all 
about. Last year, I was kind of just 
running plays and checking [chang- 
ing play calls at the line] here and 

there, but really not knowing why' I 
was checking." 

Tonight, he will take the field asi 
the Terps' starter— "Our undispffl- ! 
ed general," sli >l receiver Jo Jo Walk- 
er said and begin making the deli- ' 
sions that will determine the course 
of Maryland's season 

"You jus) have to have faith thai 
things happen for a reason," Kath- 
leen McBrien said. "You question 
sometimes why things happ a 
the timing of it all. it was jus 
feet." 



2004 0AT0R BOWL 





Ml- 

Diamondback • Sepf. 70, 2003 




FOOTBaLL I1B11IS CLIPPIM 



2004 MARYLAND GATOR BOWL GUIDE 



l O 




AUSTIN CHOW-THE DIAMONDBACK 

Terrapin junior cornerback Domonique Foxworth dives to try and block a Florida State extra point attempt Saturday in 
Tallahassee, Fla. The Terps have blocked a field goal attempt in each of their first two games this season. 

Cover, return teams special 

Speed, commitment key to units' top-notch production 



By Corey Masisak 

Senior staff writer 

The Terrapin football team is 
blessed with outstanding individu- 
als on special teams. Players like 
kicker Nick Novak and return man 
Steve Suter are among the nation's 
best at their respective crafts. 

One aspect of the Terps, however, 
tends to get lost among the high 
praise for Novak, Suter and new 
punter Adam Podlesh — the effort 
put forth by the special teams. 

"What we have is some depth on 
special teams," Terps special teams 
and tight end coach Ray Rychleski 
said. "We have some guys like Ger- 
rick McPherson who's on a lot of 
special teams that's doing a good 
job who's not a starter. Curtis 
Williams ... Vernon Davis ... Jamal 



Chance — there's a lot of guys chip- 
ping in that nobody kind of sees be- 
cause they're the grunts. They're 
the Marines doing the dirty work." 

Novak is a dependable kicker with 
nearly unlimited range and Suter is a 
burst of energy waiting to shift the 
momentum of a game with one play, 
yet the coverage and return units 
also make a sizable impact. 

Whether the punt coverage team 
pins an opposing offense inside the 
20-yard line or the front line cre- 
ates a dent in the opponent's field 
goal unit to enable a blocked kick, 
special teams are more than just 
special individuals. 

The Terps finished last season as 
the top team in the ACC in both net 
punting and punt returns. Part of the 
team's success covering punts came 
from former Terp Brooks Barnard's 



league-leading 43.1 yards per punt, 
but the coverage team also held op- 
ponents to just more than eight 
yards per return, allowing only one 
return for a touchdown in the first 
game against Notre Dame. 

"We definitely have a lot of fast, 
agile guys that know how to get 
down on the ball," Podlesh said. "I 
think if s also a good relationship be- 
tween the gunners and myself. I 
think that's what works other than 
the physical aspect." 

Two years ago the Terps had 
problems with kickoff. coverage. 
Twice an opponent went 100 yards 
for a touchdown, and the team 
yielded an average of 26. 1 per re- 
turn. Last season, there were no 
touchdowns and the foes' average 



• FOOTBALL, Pitge9 i 



2002 ORANGE BOWL 



2002 PEACH BOWL 



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(S) 



FOOTBALL: Special teams 
make impact with blocks 



\Continuedfrom Page 10 

was six yards less. 

"It was like anything else, it 
was learning on the job," Rych- 
leski said of 2001. "I tried to use 
too many people the first year. We 
played some walk-ons that 
maybe weren't ready We tried to 
save some guys and we found out 
this: If you're going to win games 
and win them in all phases, you 
have to use your best players." 

In 2001 , the Terps finished last 
in the ACC in kick and punt re- 
turn categories. Last season, the 
team was a worst-to-first turn- 
around in both areas. 

The biggest impact this season 
has come on opponents' field goal 
attempts. Curtis Williams forced 



overtime against Northern Illinois, 
and D'Qwell Jackson blocked a 
field goal against Florida State. 

"We are pretty good, but we 
want to make a difference," 
Rychleski said. "If s a shame we 
didn't win that first one in over- 
time, because we would have 
made a difference with the 
blocked field goal." 
■ TERP NOTES: Terp coach Ralph 
Friedgen said backup right 
guards Ed Tyler (elbow) and Akil 
Patterson (high ankle sprain) are 
both doubtful for the team's 
home opener Saturday against 
The Citadel. Friedgen said he is 
unsure who will start against the 
Bulldogs. Friedgen said tailback 
Bruce Perry is also doubtful after 
reinjuring his right ankle. 



Washington Post • Sept. 17, 2003 



96 



When Facing Challenges, 
McBrien' s Old School 

He Prepares for West Virginia Reunion 



Bjr Bakrt Svuluca 

Wathatpon Poll Staff Wntrr 



Here's what Maryland quarterback 
Scott McBrien has to say about Saturday's 
game against West Virginia, the school 
'•■nm which he transferred: "It was defi- 

■ly a lot different last year I think Tm 

TthaL" 

Here's what one person who knows 
McBrien fairly well — his father, Ernie — 
has to say on the Bn I don't 

think it's going to be much different than 
last year, to tell you the truth " 

Perhaps the/re both rigl:' 
McBrien is a year older, a teni 



season removed from his August 2001 exit 
from Morgantown. W. Va., a departure 
that came when new Mountaineers coach 
Rich Rodriguez wanted something differ- 
ent at quarterback, and McBrien tumbled 
down the depth chart. 

Last year, the Terps played in Morgan- 
town, and it was just McBrien 's sixth game 
as Maryland's starter. The separation anxi- 
ety was still fresh, still raw Saturday, the 
game will be in comfortable College Park, 
and though McBrien is off to something of 
a slow start, he is far more seasoned. He is 
the MVP of the Peach Bowi the kid with 

Ste TERRAPINS. 02. Col 3 




UMi » wommtm 



last season, in Morgantown, Scott McBrien opened scoring with 21-yard touchdown nm, 
which led to a 48- 1 7 romp lor the Terps. He transferred from WVU after coaching change. 



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m 



Terps' McBrien Prepares for Reunion 



TERRAPINS, From Dl 



whom much of the Terps' offensive fortunes 
rest. 

Those are the differences, the then-vs.- 
now. It's one thing on which McBrien and 
Rodriguez agree. 

"I don't think it's as much of an issue as 
last year," Rodriguez said. "Now, it's more 
West Virginia against Maryland. It's not real- 
ly going to be brought up at all." 

last year was the big build-up," McBrien 
said Saturday night following the Terps' first 
win of the year, a 61-0 thumping of The Cita- 
del. "1 was going back to Morgan town, play- 
ing in front of fans that either loved me or 
hated me. 

"Now, we're treating it as just another op- 
ponent coming in here that wants to beat 
us." 

The problem, though, is it's not just an- 
other opponent. Just another opponent 
wouldn't include your best friend. Just an- 
other opponent wouldn't have kids with 
whom you used to share your room, your 
complaints, your life. 

Maryland Coach Ralph Friedgen under- 
stands the differences between this oppo- 
nent and, say, The Citadel for McBrien. So 
for the second straight year, he has prohib- 
ited McBrien from conducting media in- 
terviews during the week leading up to the 
game against the Mountaineers (1-2). 

"I think it 11 always be a big deal for Scott, 
and I think it'll always be a big deal for West 
Virginia," Friedgen said. "I don't think he 
needs that to cloud up his mind. I think that's 
my responsibility, to protect him." 
McBrien's mother, Kathy, called that tactic 
"a genius move" on Friedgen's part. A year 
ago, she thought it helped her son focus 
when the Terps traveled to Morgantown. 
That experience could have been tough, 
what with jeering fans and memories of 
Mountaineer Field. 

"I think it was difficult at first," Ernie 
McBrien said. "But after he scored that first 
touchdown . . ." 

Ah, yes, that first touchdown. McBrien 



opened a 48-17 Maryland rout by sprinting 
21 yards for the first of four first-quarter 
scores for the Terps. The crowd quieted. 
McBrien exhaled. 

"I was just ecstatic," Ernie McBrien said. 
"I don't jump out of my seat very often, but I 
was so happy. He had gone out and proven 
himself against them." Which, to a certain 
degree, he needed to do, though it's not 
something he harps on. McBrien is polite 
and accommodating; he isn't a rabble-rouser. 

Given the opportunity to boast about the 
victory afterward, he declined to speak to 
the media. Inside, though, it meant some- 
thing, because he felt Rodriguez — who de- 
moted McBrien to third string after he re- 
placed the retired Don Nehlen — hadn't 
given him a fair opportunity. He was un- 
happy. He left. 

"I'm positive it was a tough decision to 
leave," Ernie McBrien said. "I was just proud 
of him, because he did what he felt was right. 
He didn't know if he'd set foot on another 
football field. He was just so uncomfortable 
up there." 

But McBrien's reserved nature doesn't 
just include the media. Even Friedgen said 
McBrien's even temper used to bother him; 
Friedgen is emotional himself, and he likes 
to see some of that from his players. Not 
McBrien. 

"I always said he'd be a great poker play- 
er," Friedgen said 

Given that demeanor, perhaps it's not sur- 
prising that even as preseason practice be- 
came difficult back in the summer of 2001, 
no one really understood what McBrien felt 
"It's tough for me to get anything out of 
him," Ernie McBrien said. 

There are certain things, though, parents 
just sense. McBrien's father heard some- 
thing in his son's voice over the phone. So 
one Monday, he drove to Morgantown. He 
watched the Mountaineers' morning prac- 
tice session. 

The coach wouldn't let him take a snap," 
Ernie McBrien said. "It was clear he wasn't 
getting a shot. I talked with him after prac- 
tice, at the break. We had lunch, and he still 



didn't tell me what was wrong. I thought he 
had given up. . . . 

"Rich Rodriguez, he was looking for an- 
other Michael Vick. Scott's just a drop-back 
quarterback. Rodriguez wasn't going to give 
him a shot." 

Yet the dynamic between quarterback and 
coach isn't the one that's likely to affect 
McBrien the most this week. His best friend 
is West Virginia cornerback Brian King, who 
is from Damascus. He still has plenty of good 
friends on the Mountaineers. He knows he 
will hear from those folks all week. 

"Brian's like my brother, honestly," 
McBrien said. "We talk every day, almost. 
... I mean, we're like family. It's nothing big. 
There's no trash-talking or anything. We talk 
about not only football, but things in every- 
day fife." 

King declined to speak with Maryland- 
area media this week, understanding the fo 
cus on his relationship with the player who, 
at least for this week, is the enemy. But the 
issue is out there, for so many Mountaineers. 

"It was weird at first, playing against him 
last year," said Mountaineers linebacker 
Grant Wiley, one of McBrien's old room- 
mates. "I remember we'd always talk, and 
when things weren't going well, we'd say, 
'Can you imagine transferring?" And neither 
one of us could. 

"But things weren't working out for him, 
and he did. So it's weird looking across the 
line of scrimmage and seeing your boy over 
there. You have to get used to it" 

McBrien, by now, is used to being at 
Maryland, used to wearing red instead of 
dark blue. Sure, Saturday in College Park 
may be much different from 2002 in Morgan- 
town, but it is also different from every other ' 
opponent on the Terps' schedule. 

"I've still got a lot of close friends up in 
Morgantown," McBrien said. "It is fun, play- 
ing against them. But that's something I 
can't think about. I've got to treat it as a nor- 
mal game and a regular opponent coming in 
here to try to beat us. I've got to take my fo- 
cus off of who we're playing, or who Fm play- 
ing against, and just go out and play." 



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Baltimore Sun • Sept. 19, 2003 




One cut upfield and he's gone 



Terps: Steve Suter was 
once deemed too small to 
play football, but his 
speed makes him a threat 
to score every time he 
touches the ball. 



By Kevin Van Valkenbukg 



SUN STAFF 



COLLEGE PARK — The ball 
is in the air. 

The smallest player on the 
field shuffles his feet, looks sky- 
ward and moves into position. 

An army of tacklers is thun- 
dering down on him, looking to 
separate his head from his body. 

Fifty-thousand pairs of eyes 
watch, and the stadium pulses 
with anticipation. 

In a few seconds, they'll be on 
their feet and screaming, and 
he'll be racing toward the end 
zone. But at this moment, Steve 
Suter hears nothing. It's true 
what they say: For the best punt 
returners, things get real quiet. 
Everything slows down, right up 
until the second the ball flutters 
softly into his hands. By then, 
there's only time for a quick 
glance upfield, and maybe one 
cut. 

Before the other team realizes 
what's happening, Suter is gone. 

"It's just a blur of colors," he 




DAVID HOBBY : SUN STAFF 



Steve Suter is congratulated by teammates after his 75-yard punt 
return against The Citadel. He returned four for TDs last season. 



says. 

In the past year, nobody has 
kept his calm in those moments 
of special teams fury quite like 
Suter, who tied an NCAA record 
in 2002 with four punt returns 
for touchdowns. His speed and 
vision make him a threat to 
score every time the ball ends 
up in his hands, which Maryland 
would like to see happen a lot 
more these days, starting with 
tomorrow's game against West 
Virginia. Suter, who missed 
Maryland's [See Terps, 3d] 



Next for Terps 

Matchup: West Virginia (1-2) 
vs. Maryland (1-2) 

Site: Byrd Stadium, 
College Park 

When: Tomorrow, 6 p.m. 

Radio: WNST (1570 AM), 
WMAL(630AM) 

Line: Maryland by 9 

Tickets: Sold out 



98 



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BC W 



One cut is all it takes for Suter 



[Terps.from Page Id] 



season opener with an Injury, 
will start at receiver for the sec- 
ond straight week. 

Even when he's not at his 
best, Suter can still be electric, 
as evidenced during last week's 
61-0 win over The Citadel. Weak 
from nervous vomiting during 
pre-game, and still nursing a 
hamstring injury, Suter re- 
turned a punt 75 yards for a 
touchdown and admitted after- 
ward he never even reached top 
speed. 

"I've never seen anyone like 
him," says Ray Rychleski, Mary- 
land's special teams coach. "He 
can feel a guy In front of him and 
still concentrate on the ball. He 
just has that instinct. He knows 
when people are near, he knows 
how to catch the ball, and he 
knows how to make the first guy 
miss. 

"That's the key, making the 
first guy miss. From that point, 
you need some help. And guys 
really love and respect him 
They know he can take it to the 
house every time, so they're go- 
ing to try and do everything they 
can to not screw it up- 
Raising eyebrows 

It's not something many 
would have predicted when 
Suter arrived at Maryland in 
2000. Recruited out of North 
Carroll High School by former 
coach Ron Vanderlinden, the 
5-foot-9. 190-pound Suter was 
the second-smallest player on 
the team. Only the kicker, Brian 
Kopka, was smaller. More than a 
few eyebrows were raised. 

"I've always been little," Suter 
says. "I'm used to it IVe just al- 
ways tried to use my size as an 
advantage instead of looking at 
it as a disadvantage." 

Growing up in the small town 
of Manchester, Suter was always 
fast, but he hardly seemed pre- 
destined for greatness. 

"They'd have those little kid 
races in school, and he'd win ev- 
ery one," says his mother, Lynn 
Suter. "Coaches and gym teach- 
ers were always telling us what a 
great athlete he was, but we'd 
never had a son before. We had 
nothing to compare it with. I re- 
member in elementary school, 
someone told me he'd probably 
be good enough to get a college 
scholarship one day. I was like. 



Breaking away 

Steve Suter's longest key 
plays for Maryland: 

2002 

■ 81-yard punt return for TD 
vs. Akron 

■ 91-yard TD catch 

vs. Eastern Michigan 

■ 80-yard punt return for TD 
vs. West Virginia 

■ 63-yard punt return for TD 
vs. Duke 

■ 77-yard punt return for TD 
vs. North Carolina 

■ 61-yard TD run on a reverse 
vs. N.C. State 

■ 79-yard punt return 

vs. Tennessee In Peach Bowl 

2003 

■ 75-yard punt return for TD 
vs. The Citadel 



'Really?' It seemed like a long 
ways off tome" 

Baseball, In fact, was Suter's 
first love. He could fly around 
the base paths, track down fly 
balls in the gap and. most im- 
portantly In his mother's eyes, 
avoid getting hurt. 

That all changed when John 
Etzel, who coached football with 
the Hampstead Recreation 
Council, spotted him during a 
baseball game and persuaded 
him to come out for football. 
Lynn Suter was not thrilled 

"She was a little reluctant to 
let her little boy get beat on," 
Suter says. "Luckily, [Etzel] con- 
vinced her it would be fine, 
thank God, and things took off 
from there" 

By the time Suter got to high 
school, he was still only 126 
pounds, and the coaching staff 
wasn't convinced he could take 
a pounding at the varsity level 
Several freshmen got the chance 
to join the varsity late in the 
year, but Suter wasn't one of 
them 

"He's always been a star at ev- 
erything, so that was a major 
wakeup call." says Lynn Suter. 
"He immediately went and 
started lifting weights and get- 
ting stronger" 

Impressions quickly changed. 
Suter made the varsity as a 
sophomore, and over the next 
three years, he rushed for more 




Suter 



than 4,000 
yards. By the 
time he was a 
senior, he was 
signing auto- 
graphs for little 
kids. North 
Carroll, how- 
ever, wasn't ex- 
actly a re- 
cruiting hot- 
bed, and so 
when Suter sent a highlight tape 
to Maryland, he was a little hurt 
when he never heard back 

"I think they threw It In a 
closet and forgot about it," Suter 
says. "I showed up at their camp 
and ran like the fastest 40 time 
[4.3 seconds] and had the high- 
est vertical Jump. They were 
like, Wow, why don't you send 
us a highlight tape?' I said, 'Urn, 
I sent you one six months ago.' 
They called me back a few 
weeks later and said, 'We like 
what we see.' " 

Speed kicks in 

Problem was, Suter couldn't 
stay healthy enough to get on 
the field. His knees have never 
been great (he's had three sur- 
geries on them already), and his 
freshman year at Maryland, he 
broke the pointer finger on his 
left hand so badly, he had to 
have a pin Inserted to help the 
break heal. 

"He really messed up his 
hand," Lynn Suter says. "I told 
him to hang up his spikes be- 
cause he was Just suffering The 
pin is still there, and the finger 
doesn't bend. They weren't sure 
if he'd be able to catch with it" 

As a result, Maryland coach 
Ralph Friedgen didn't know 
what to think about Suter 

"Everyone kept saying how 
fast he was, but I didn't see it," 
Friedgen says. "Then last year, 
things started to click for him 
and his speed really became a 
factor He's such a bright guy, 
too For some guys, that doesn't 
translate into football intelli- 
gence, but it does for Steve " 

In Maryland's opener last sea- 
son, Suter returned a kickoff 51 
yards against Notre Dame. In 
the next game against Akron, he 
burst free for an 81-yard punt re- 
turn. After punt returns for 
touchdowns against Duke and 
West Virginia, Friedgen started 



looking for ways to get Suter the 
ball any way he could. In Mary- 
land's upset win over N.C. State, 
Suter scored on a 61-yard re- 
verse, then later caught a 
36-yard pass that set up the 
game-winning field goal. 

"He is such a talent," N.C. 
State coach Chuck Amato said 
of Suter after the game. "When 
you have someone that can 
make plays for you, you need to 
find ways to put the ball in his 
hands" 

He was avoiding tacklers left 
and right, and was on his way to 
being named first-team All-At- 
lantic Coast Conference. He also 
had one of the highest grade 
point averages on the team 
(3.8). There was one thing, how- 
ever, he couldn't shake: his habit 
of pre-game puking. Without 
fall, five minutes before kickoff, 
teammates know they can find 
Suter throwing up in the bath- 
room stalls. 

"I've tried everything," Suter 
says. "It's something I've done 
since high school. I've tried eat- 
ing more, eating less, drinking 
water. It doesn't matter. Seems 
like every game I'm good for one 
of those. I don't know if I just 
can't control my emotions or 
what, but I just get too excited 
out there." 

Except on punt returns. There 
he's a picture of calm. Suter 
even watches sometimes on the 
scoreboard video screen to see if 
anyone is about to catch him 
from behind. Against The Cita- 
del, just as Suter was breaking 
into the open, he happened to 
lock eyes with his roommate 
Domonique Foxworth, who was 
sprinting back to block a would- 
be tackier. 

"I was going left and I saw a 
guy I need to cut back on," Suter 
says. "I looked up and made eye 
contact with Domonique. He 
knew. He bumped his guy out, I 
cut left and was gone It's always 
cool when you do that, because 
later we're like, 'I saw you! I saw 
you!' ... 

"I really like being a returner. I 
love the feeling of breaking tack- 
les. I look up sometimes and see 
my name on the stadium [for 
being named All-ACC], and I 
can't believe it. It's a dream 
come true." 



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Washington Post • Sept. 20, 2003 



Terrapins Play Follow the Young Leader 

With Inspired Performances, Sophomore LB Jackson Shows Way 



By Barry Svrluca 
Washington Post Sta" 



Two weeks ago, Maryland lost to Florida State, 35- 10, 
the kind of game, it would seem, from which little posi- 
tive can be taken. The Terrapins' lone touchdown that 
night came on an interception return by sophomore line- 
backer D'Qwell Jackson, a 58 yard first-quarter jaunt 
that amounted to little more than filler for "SportsCen- 
ter's" highlight reel, one terrific Terps play on a night of 
terrible twists and turns. 

Turns out, though, that one play meant something 
more than just six points. 

"The touchdown wasn't like just a walk in the park," 
Maryland Coach Ralph Friedgen said this week. "He 
bowls over two guys and shows his determination to get 
in the end zone. Then, they intercept a ball, and he goes 
and blocks a field goal. 

"When you do some things like that, your fellow play 
ers start to get some respect for you. There's an admira- 
tion that's built up, whether you're a sophomore or a se- 
nior. IPlayers say]. This guy's getting it done on the 
field.' " 

Thus far this season, Jackson has gotten it done for the 
Terrapins (12), who host West Virginia (1-2) on Satur- 
day evening. After earning the middle linebacker job, the 
one that had been held by all- American E.J. Henderson of 
the Minnesota Vikings, Jackson has performed more ad- 
mirably than Friedgen could have hoped. He leads the 
team with 10.3 tackles per game. He scored that touch 
down against FSU, plowing through Seminoles tailback 
Lorenzo Booker and quarterback Chris Rix, flicking 
them off his shoulders as if they were annoying insects 

More surprising: Jackson, just three weeks into his 
true sophomore season, has begun to develop into a lead- 
er. 

"It's not something that you plan." Jackson said. "You 
don't tell yourself you're going to be a leader. I guess it's 
just got to come from within you. Obviously, I try to lead 
by example and then try to pump the guys up. I'm always 
trying to get guys to rally behind me. So are the other 
guys, but if I stick out. then I'll take on that responsibili- 
ty" 

Friedgen says Jackson is ready to take on that rcspon 



sibility not only because of his play — which the coach ad- 
mits]* far ahead of what he expected — but because of his 
overall approach. At just 6 feet 1 and 222 pounds, Jack- 
son isn't physically gifted enough to just flip some switch 
to autopilot and let his talent take over. Rather, he comes 
to practice every day not just trying to make it through, 
but trying to get better. Friedgen knows it sounds like a 
cliche, typical coach-speak. He also thinks it matters. 

"You watch D'Qwell in practice, and he's very precise," 
Friedgen said. "He's very sharp. He's always pad-under- 
pad [when making tackles). He looks his tackles in. Foot- 
ball is very, very important to D'Qwell. He wants to be as 
good as he can be." 

In the process, he just might be making other players 
as good as they can be. Outside linebacker Leon Joe is a 
senior, a player so talented that Friedgen predicts when 
Joe goes through the NFL's battery of pre-draft tests, 
"he'll blow the test away." Yet Joe doesn't play as consis- 
tently as Friedgen would like The attention to detail 
isn't always there. The coach's message: Watch Jackson. 

"I see him every day in practice, and I know what he's 
capable of," Joe said. "I know he has that kind of ability 
I to be a leaderl. He's pretty vocal, and that's something 
that we haven't had around here. We've got a lot of older 
guys who don't yell and scream. I guess he likes the rah- 
rah stuff." 

Friedgen. though, doesn't see it that way. Jackson, he 
said, doesn't seem like the rah-rah type to him. "He's 
more of an introverted guy," Friedgen said. 

In that way, he is like Henderson: Watch what I do, and 
follow my lead. 

"Any time you go out and make plays like D'Qwell has 
made." safety Madieu Williams said, "you definitely look 
at them as a leader There's that old saying: Actions 
speak louder than words. Just look at his actions." 

The rah-rah stuff, though, does come out occasionally 
Prior to the Florida State game, the two teams ap- 
proached each other at midfield, something of a stand-off 
right after the coin toss. The Terps were trying to tell the 
Seminoles they would hold their ground. Jackson, from 
Largo, Fla., was the most boisterous of the bunch, bounc 
ing around, jumping up and down, almost flipping out. 
ildn't contain myself," he said. 

Now, the question is, Can other teams contain him' 




PWlltBl W0CUT.1 

D'Qwell Jackson, helped by Dennard Wilson (13), makes 
tackle; he's averaging team-high 10.3, has earned respec 
Coach Ralph Friedgen, teammates during Terrapins 1-2 • 

Terrapins Notes: Friedgen was pleased with yes 
day's early-morning workout, which got under wa 
5:50 am. to avoid Hurricane Isabel. The Terps began 
practice with John Denver's "Country Road" — comp 
with West Virginia reference — floating through 
speakers. Friedgen said some of his coaches had s 
overnight at the football facility in order to prepare 
workout. . . . 

Friedgen said tailback Bruce Perry, recovering ho 
sprained ankle, practiced very well Wednesday and 
terday. "1 thought he was better than he was at Flo 
State." Friedgen said, referring to Perry's only app 
ance thus far this year Perry will play, but sophoit 
Josh Allen will start. . . . 

Guard Lamar Bryant, recovering from a broken f 
practiced again, but the foot still gets stiff, Friedgen s 
Bryant almost certainly will play, but it will be a pa 
time decision as to whether he'll start. Sophomore , 
Patterson likely would start in Bryant's place. 



IOC 



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Washington Times • Sept. 20, 2003 



Happy returns 
for Terps' Suter 



By Rick Snider 

THE WASHINGTON MMf S 



The normal zip that makes 
Mar>'land's Steve Suter one of 
the nation's top return threats 
has been tempered by a strained 
hamstring So naturally, he 
scored on a 75-yard punt return 
against The Citadel. 

Maybe first gear is still 
enough. 

Suter will start at wide re- 
ceiver for the second straight 
game against West Virginia to- 
morrow night at Byrd Stadium. 
The Ierrapins need more play- 
makers on an offense that 
scored one touchdown in its first 
two games before overwhelm- 
ing The Citadel, a Division I-AA 
team. 61-0 last week. 

Suter^ penchant for big plays 
has the Terps eager for him to 
double up on offense. He aver- 
ages 17.1 yards a touch on re- 
turns and receptions combined 
and plays all three receiver po- 
sitions. 

"He gives you that presence' 
demonstrated by big plays 
every time he touches the ball." 
offensive coordinator Charlie 
Taaffe said 

Several breakdowns have 
hindered Maryland's passing 
game Quarterback Scott 
McBrien missed some down- 
field chances. Injuries to three 
right guards compromised pass 
protection and the running 
game didn't produce the first 
two weeks The receivers 




Maryland 
vs. West Virginia 

Tomorrow, 6 p.m. 

Byrd Stadium 

AM-630, FM-97.9 

Maryland lavored by 9 



dropped several balls in the sea- 
son-opening 20-13 overtime loss 
to Northern Illinois. 

The Terps are hoping Suter 
fills the downfield void His 
speed over the middle stretches 
defenses by drawing defenders. 
Suter also gains yardage after 
the catch, wluch Maryland's re- 
ceivers haven't done consis- 
tently. 

However, Suter believes his 
return technique compro- 
mises his role as a receiver 
because the two jobs require 
different styles of watching the 
ball 

"It hurts me more because as 
a returner, you catch the ball 
with your body," he said. "You 
can't do that as a receiver" 

Suter's touchdown against 
The Citadel was his school- 
record fifth touchdown return in 
two seasons, and he needs 20 
yards to become Maryland's ca- 
reer return leader. Suter has 
proven fearless on punts, some- 
times returning ones which 




QMj rmagtM 

Returner/receiver Steve Suter averages 17.1 yards every time he touches the ball for Maryland. 



coach Ralph Friedgen would 
prefer to see as fair catches. 

"I just block [opponents] out," 
Suter said. "It won't hurt if you 
concentrate on the ball " 

Suter also is elusive, break- 
ing two early tackles in his long 
return against The Citadel. His 
smallish S-foot-9. 191-pound 
frame sometimes enables him 
to slip under bigger defenders. 
He is also one of the "Iron 
Terps" who set three team 
weightlifting marks for re- 
ceivers along with a 42-inch 
vertical leap and 4 35-second 
speed over 40 yards 

"You have your helmet 



halfway on because you might 
have to sit back down if he 
scores a touchdown," offensive 
tackle Eric Dumas said. 

Friedgen said special teams 
blockers also work harder for 
Suter, fearing he may need their 
downfield block even if they're 
far from the ball None wants to 
be the reason Suter is caught 
downfield. 

Notes — The Terps managed 
a complete practice yesterday; 
starting at 5:50 am with "Coun- 
try Roads" blaring out of the 
speakers. Five coaches slept 
overnight in offices readying for 
the pre-dawn workout to beat 



the bad weather. 

"I went down to the locker 
room and didn't hear any com- 
plaining," Friedgen said. "The 
only thing I heard was some- 
body say this seems like a long 
lunch break since they prac- 
ticed [Wednesday] night" 

Running back Bruce Perry 
(high ankle sprain) will play as 
a reserve. Guard Lamar Bryant 
is expected to start after missing 
three games with a broken 
ankle, but Akil Patterson could 
see some snaps. . . . The West 
Virginia game is sold out. . . 
Today's fan breakfast with 
Friedgen was canceled. 



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Washington Times • Sept. 22, 2003 
Terps get Bullish 

By Rick Snider 

Published September 1 8, 2003 




■J I'» .'* V5*"l 




102 



The Terrapins are getting bullish on their running game. 

Sammy "the Bull" Maldonado is emerging as a big part of the Maryland offense — and as 
something of a cult figure among teammates and fans. 

Maybe it's the tattoo on his left forearm that depicts a skull carrying a football that 
indicates his toughness. Perhaps the one on his right shoulder of a lion playing poker with a 
stack of cash shows he's a money player. 

Whatever it is, the Terps are taking notice of this tough-talking New Yorker from coach 
Ralph Friedgen's hometown. 

The Terrapins running back never told teammates that "the Bull" also was his nickname 
in high school, where he nailed opposing runners as a linebacker. It's just a natural moniker 
that has followed him. 

But now his Maryland teammates can't pass him by without calling out, "Sammy the 
Bull." It's sort of a superstition, such as rubbing the Testudo statue's nose outside the locker- 
room door. 

Maldonado and Josh Allen will share backfield duties while Bruce Perry (high ankle 
sprain) will be limited at best against West Virginia on Saturday. The tandem gained 202 
yards and three touchdowns in last week's 61-0 romp over The Citadel. 

The Terps plan to rely heavily on their ground game because quarterback Scott McBnen 
hasn't progressed as much as expected. Maryland figures a solid ground game will enhance 
McBrien's passing, so Allen and Maldonado will carry the ball regularly against West 
Virginia. 

"Sammy wears them out — he allows me to go in there and do my thing," Allen said. "It's 
hard [for defenses] to get used to the tempo. He's going to bust up there real hard. I have the 
speed to get outside. It's different threats." 

Maldonado still has a linebacker's mentality. He challenges defenders, and his 6-foot, 
231 -pound frame is thick enough to win some of the clashes. 

"If I deliver the first blow there's no chance of [a defender] giving me the hit," he said. 
"I'm not one to make a lot of moves. I make one move. If you're in my way, I'll run you 
over." 

Maldonado barreled over The Citadel's defenders regularly for two touchdowns and 66 
yards on 12 carries. Friedgen jokingly calls Maldonado "Sammy the Bull" when he runs 
straight ahead but "Ferdinand the bull" when he takes it outside like Allen. 

"Sammy will pick his own hole and make one if he doesn't see it," offensive tackle Fric 
Dumas said. "He'll go head first. He'll let anybody know he'll run you over. He won't try to 
iiitrun you like Josh." 

Maldonado was once one of the top prep runners nationally. He gained more than 7,000 
yards with 99 touchdowns at Harrison High School in New York, where Friedgen played in 
the 1960s under his father, who also played there in the Depression era. The school's roots 

are so intertwined that Maldonado's prep coach. Art Troilo, was the son of Friedgen Sr.'s 
successor. 

Maldonado scored seven touchdowns in a playoff game where the local paper headlined 
him as "the Bull." He once kept running after losing his helmet fen touchdown runs of 50 
or more yards were negated by penalties. 

"Sammy was really looked up to here," Troilo said. "Every kid wants to be like Sammy. 
He was a tremendous competitor — the rare combination of size and speed. The more he 
pi d, the better he would be." 

onado transferred to Maryland last year after playing little in two seasons at Ohio 
State. He sat out one year under the mandatory transfer penalty, working just on the Seoul 
team and taking 43 credits in one yeai to remain eligible instead of the usual 24 

I inally, Maldonado played before friendly fans and scored touchdowns against I he 
Citadel. Il fell like- Harrison High once again 

"I really missed Saturdays," he said. "It just felt so great to be in the end /.one " 



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Diamondback • Sept. 23, 2003 




Eli capitalizing on opportunities 



By Corey Masbak 

Fbotball players thrive on emotion. They feed off 
heart-pounding adrenaline. Often it inspires them 
to perform better than their talents would suggest 
one capable. 

But for Terrapin defensive end Kevin Eli, a nor- 
mal heartbeat is something he welcomes. 

Eli missed practice time on multiple occasions 
during preseason camp because his heart rate 
spiked to abnormal levels His heart would sud- 
denly beat at a dangerously rapid pace, causing 
him to have trouble catching his breath and forc- 
ing him to stop practicing. 

Each time it happened, Eli had several tests run to 
pinpoint the problem Medical personnel couldn't 
find a finite condition to explain his malady They said 
it was something le.ss concrete Eli was too stressed 

"I think because this year I'm a backup and kn i ■ 
ing that I'm an injury away from playing I put a 1 

iure on myself to do good in practice That way 
in the game it will just o ime to me," said Eli, a junior 
"I calmed down a lot, and I played pretty good " 

Anxiety issues kept him out last Monday, but 
Eli practiced the rest of the week and made his 
first career start Saturday in place of injured 
starter Scott Snu th. 

He had the best performance of his career, record- 
ing three stops behind the hue of scrimmage. He 
sacked West Virginia quarterback Rasheed Marshall 
twice and hounded him on other occasions. 

"I thought [Eli] played very well," Terp coach 
Ralph Fnedgen said. "He came up with a couple of 
big plays, they were trying to bootleg to his side, 
and he contained it about every time " 

Eli is in his fourth year with the Terps. I le was 
once a liighly sought-after recruit from Deptford. 
N.J , who then struggled with the adjustment to col- 
lege football His biggest problem was strength 
Friedgen said Eli was one of the weaker players on 
the team when he arrived before the 2001 season. 

at the start of this season, Eli registered a 
370-pound bench press on testing day and is an Iron 
Teip. a group of players who meet certain stan- 
1 10m. 

"1 le's a kid who hung in the program, got better 
and whei : \\ him he stepped up," Fried 

said "H very well tlus whole year. H 

playing his h life right now and 




AUSTIN CHOW THE OlAMONDBAGtf 

Junior Kevin Eli leads the Terrapins with four sacks. 

we're happy to have him " 

As a defensive end. Eli's biggest responsibility is 
outside containment It's hi i »b I i force running 
backs to cut back toward the rest of the defense and 
to keep opposing quarterbacks from scram- 
bling into open space. 

That was especially important Saturday with 
Marshall's outstanding athletic ability. Marshall fin- 
ished with - 1 1 yards rushing and was never able to 
help his team gain momentum with a critical 
scramble for first down. 
His success this season isn't confined to this past 
He played well m limited duty behind 
Smith in games and leads the Ti 

with t 

abili- 
P iust 
tterol 




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Washington Post • Sept. 25, 2003 



Terps ' Bryant Is Tuning Up 

Back From Injur); Singing Senior Solidifies Line 



By Bamy Svuluga 

Washington Post SlaffWnter 




1 eyes upon him as he stood on the field, 
Lamar Bryant was nervous. Rarely is an of- 
fensive lineman — even Maryland's best of- 
-tensive lineman — so much in the spotlight. 
In fact, football is rarely a problem any more for 
Bryant, a fifth-year senior and a three-year starter 
who made his first appearance of the season for the 
Terrapins in Maryland's 34-7 \ictory over West Vir- 
ginia this past Saturday. 

Rather, Bryant's nerves came last spring, pnor 
to, of all things, a women's lacrosse game. Bryant 



stood upright, microphone in hand, to sing the na- 
tional anthem. He had already started 31 varsity 
football games by then, already played in the Peach 
Bowl, already won the ACC championship. Yet he 
trembled. 

"It felt like I was up there for three hours sing- 
ing," Bryant said. "It felt like a long, long time." 

Maryland's offense felt like it was without Bryant 
for a long, long time. The Terps' starting right 
guard broke his foot in preseason practice and 
missed the first three games. At 6 feet 3 and 318 
pounds, Bryant is gifted physically, and the Terps 

See BRYANT. D4. Col 2 




Lamar Bryant combines two loves— singing and 
football— leading a rendition of Maryland fight 
song after his season debut, against W. Virginia. 



Biyant Can Carry a Tune, Bolster an Offem 



BRYANT, FromDl 



struggled without him, managing just one 
touchdown in their first two games. 

"I don't know if it was all because of La- 
mar or not," quarterback Scott McBrien 
said, and indeed, tailback Bruce Perry was 
hampered by a sprained ankle, McBnen 
himself got off to an inexplicably slow start, 
and the Terps' second opponent, Florida 
State, has yielded just two touchdowns in its 
four games. 

So whether the initial struggles were pri- 
marily because of Bryant's absence, what's 
undeniably important is Bryant's person- 
ality. Singers, even those who get nervous 
before a performance, are outgoing by na- 
ture, and Bryant is exactly that. As Perry 
said; "It's not just his play. It's his presence." 

"When you have Lamar in the huddle, 
that gives you a lot of confidence," McBrien 
said. "That brightens everybody up. When 
you're sitting there, and you don't see La- 
mar, people might be hanging their heads a 
little bit, saying, 'Well, we don't have Lamar. 
We might not be able to do this. We might 
not be able to do that.' He brings a whole 
new atmosphere to the huddle." 



It's an atmosphere that might be accom- 
panied by a utile tune, straight from Bryant's 
ample pipes. At lulls in the huddle, he occa- 
sionally dances to the sounds of the school 
band, though he thinks Tampa Bay's Wanen 
Sapp— who got a Little jiggy after scoring a 
touchdown Sunday — "needs help." Bryant 
figures he could supply it. 

"The kid sings more than anybody I 
know," McBrien said. "Every day, he sings a 
new song." 

And there's no preference, really. "Could 
be rap music, some R&B, might even be 
some country," Bryant said. "Whatever 1 feel 
Like." 

Lest the song-and-dance routine fool you, 
be reminded that Bryant was a second-team 
all-ACC performer a year ago. He is power- 
ful — and emotional. Self-described as "wild" 
on the field — "I used to dive (or loose balls 
and crack my head open every week" in high 
school, he said — his teammates must always 
be wary of what he might do next. 

"He's a guy you got to make sure doesn't 
get kicked out of the game, he gets so excit- 
ed." right tackle Enc Dumas said. "He gets 
to where he wants to fight defensive linemen 
and stuff." 



Perhaps that is what Maryland's offense 
was missing — that fight — in season-open- 
ing losses to Northern Illinois and Florida 
State. Bryants return against West Virginia 
came at a perfect time, in a key nonconfer- 
ence game when the offense needed to per- 
form well. It did just that, ringing up 260 
yards rushing and looking as good as it has 
all season. Still. Coach Ralph Friedgen said 
Bryant can — and will — perform much bet- 
ter. 

"He's just a little rusty," Friedgen said. 
"He hasn't practiced for five weeks. His as- 
signments are fine. It's just his pass protec- 
tion is not where it was before he got hurt." 

Before his career ends this year, Bryant 
would like to sing the national anthem be- 
fore one of Maryland's home games. "Coach 
is worried I'd lose my focus on the game," he 
said. 

Yet Friedgen seems to be relenting, 
though not without reservations. Last year, 
at a banquet pnor to the Peach Bowl, Bryant 
was part of an ensemble s inging the anthem. 
"It really wasn't (air to him." Friedgen said. 
Each singer would be pointed to, and have to 
sing the upcoming lines. When the leader 
pointed at Bryant, he had one eye on a giant 



television screen. When he realizec 
was happening, he froze, (orgettii 
words. He didn't sing. 

'Then they hit him lor the last par 
song." Friedgen said, "and he really hi 
it up." 

He will be hamming it up Saturday 
the Terps play at Eastern Michigan 
clear his throat, work out the rust, ant 
familiar tune. 

"It's so great to be back," Bryax 
"When you're out, you miss it so mu 
hard. But when you get back, you app 
it so much more." 

Terrapins Notes: Friedgen said 
tailback Sammy Maldonado has be< 
pended indefinitely for violating an 
closed team rule. "He'll be back eve:i 
Fnedgen said. "I've got to see how 
haves before I determine when 
back." Maldonado has rushed (or 2!' 
and two touchdowns on 38 carries. 

Wide receiver Jaiar Williams than 
ticipated in part of practice yester i 
Friedgen said he would have to imp:< 
nificantly to be ready to play at I 
Michigan. Fullback Bemie Fiddler (i 
practiced, but remains doubtful. 



104 



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2004 MARYLAND GATOR BOWL GUIDE 



lerps survive uneven start , Ba , timare Sun . s ep t. n, 2003 



regain their balance again 



THE UNIVERSITY of 
Maryland's football 
has taken detours 
nDeKalb.ni., and Tallahassee, 
.•la., but theTerps appear to be 
jack on the road to success. 
Impact players are health! 
■gain, Including the team's top 
mining bock. The national 
iressure Is 00 the roach has a 
letter feel for his players, and 
jVlaryland always gets betti 
the season progresses. 
j TheTerps (2-2) are in such a 
Ijood mood that Friedgen Is 
ilaj nit; music at practices these 
days to help his players relax. 
One day It's rap (edited ver- 
sions) from 50 Cent and I) MX. 
md another day it's punk rock 
From Blink-182. 

I One day last week, Fricdgen, 
In his third season, broke out 
'iome Jolm Denver, who took the 
iferps back through the country 
TJads of West Virginia 

Now, if only the big man starts 
break dancing ... 

When asked if last Saturday's 
: I 7 win over West Virginia was 



■ 



Mike 
Preston 

the turning point of Maryland's 
season, Friedgen said: "I hope 
so. You never know which team 
is going to show up. But we 
played hard and executed well 

"We played gTeat team de- 
fense, took care of our responsi- 
bilities and had people flying to 
the gaps. We tackled well. We 
looked like we were having fun 
again." 

Maybe the last point was the 
most Important. 

The Terps, ranked No 15 in 
the preseason, didn't handle ex- 
pectations. Realistically, they 
are still a recruiting class or two 
away from having enough talent 
or depth to {See Preston, 7k] 

[Preston, from Page 1e] 



be in the Top 10 consistently. 

But their biggest mistake oc- 
curred before the season. Mary- 
land should not have played 
Northern Illinois, which upset 
the Terps, 20-13, In overtime, in 
the opener. 

That was an ambush game. 
As soon as Maryland officials 
found out Florida State was the 
opponent in the second game on 
the road, athletic director 
Debbie Yow should have cut the 
Huskies a check and said good- 
bye. 

If that wasn't good enough, 
then she should have increased 
the ante by throwing In a new 
artificial turf field complete with 
lights and corporate sponsor- 
ship. The final option would 
have been not to show up, pe- 
riod. 

"I kept saying this was a good 
football team," said Friedgen. "I 
kept telling our players during 
the summer that this was going 
to be Northern Illinois' biggest 
game of the year played before 
their largest crowd of the year. 
We went down and scored on 
our first drive, and, after that, 
we became complacent. 

"The most disappointing 
thing was that we still had a 
chance to win the game at the 
end, but we didn't seize the op- 
portunity" 



And the Terps weren't going 
to get it done against Florida 
State either. This was a team 
devoid of leadership early in the 
season. Gone was former Inside 
linebacker E.J. Henderson, who 
was to the Terps what Ray 
Lewis is to the Ravens. He was 
the emotional leader, the big 
rah-rah guy who had the swag- 
ger. There were times when he 
willed Maryland to a win. 

The closest player Maryland 
had to Henderson was offensive 
guard Lamar Bryant, out the 
first three games with a broken 
bone In his right foot. Also on 
the injury list were starting se- 
nior halfback Bruce Perry and 
receiver Steve Suter. Both 
played against Florida State, 
but neither was 100 percent or 
effective. 

Final score: Florida State 35, 
Maryland 10. 

It went as expected. Florida 
State, Miami and Ohio State 
can replace star players without 
a significant drop-off in talent. 
Maryland can't. Maryland has 
played In the Orange and Peach 
bowls the past two seasons, but 
It hasn't been under constant 
pressure from the start of the 
season. 

"In the first game, they 
seemed to be in better shape 
than we were, and that's my 
fault," said Friedgen. "But also 
In those first two weeks, we 
seemed to be without two start- 
ers every game." 

But that has changed. 

Bryant, the team's top line- 
men, started for the first time 
against West Virginia, and has 
brought back some of his head 



banging, in-your-face leader- 
ship. Suter is close to top form 
and returned a punt 75 yards for 
a touchdown against The Cita- 
del on Sept. 13. 

And then there is Perry. 

He gained 79 yards on 14 car- 
ries against the Mountaineers, 
and he looked a lot like the run- 
ner who was ACC's Offensive 
Player of the Year In 2001 when 
he gained 1,242 yards. 

When the Terps are running 
well, quarterback Scott McBrien 
is extremely effective with run- 
ning the option and play-action 
passes. McBrien completed 14 of 
25 passes for 220 yards against 
the Mountaineers, and seemed 
to regain some confidence after 
a shaky start this season. 

But the Terps' new confidence 
isn't based on them beating up 
on The Citadel and West Vir- 
ginia the past two weeks. The 
defense, led by defensive line- 
man Randy Starks and line- 
backers Shawne Merriman and 
D'Qwell Jackson, has been dom- 
inating. 

After going to Eastern Michi- 
gan on Saturday night, Mary- 
land plays against Clemson and 
Duke at home, where the Terps 
have had sellout crowds of 
51,000 the past two games. In 
October and No\'ember during 
the past two seasons, the Terps 
have a combined record of 13-2. 

Barring any more major inju- 
ries, Maryland should be in 
pretty good shape to take on 
Virginia on Nov. 13, and N.C. 
State on Nov; 22, two major 
bumps if the Terps want to con- 
tinue their road of success. 



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Baltimore Sun • Sept 26, 2003 

"It's something I didn't plan, but I do see myself becoming a leader. 



» 



UM's Jackson answers questions 



College football: 

Terps sophomore D'Qwell 
Jackson has responded to 
critics with stellar play 
from his linebacker spot. 

By Kevin Van Valkenburq 

SUN STAFF 



COLLEGE PARK — Ever 
since he started playing football 
at Maryland, D'Qwell Jackson 
has been answering questions. 
Are you big enough to play mid- 
dle linebacker? How will you re- 
place E.J. Henderson? Can you 
handle the pressure? Can a 
sophomore lead the defense? 

But one question comes up 
more than any: How did you end 
up with such a unique name? 

"I would get that question so 
much that I finally went to mom 
[Debra] a few years ago and 
said, 'How did you ever come 
that name?' " Jackson said. "She 
said her and a friend came up 
with it, and they have no idea 
how. It just popped into their 
heads one day. Other than that, 
I have no clue." 

So far this season, it's about 




DAVID HOBBY 



Maryland linebacker D'Qwell Jackson is leading the team with 45 
tackles and Is establishing himself as a defensive leader. 



the only question Jackson hasn't 
had a definitive answer for. Not 
only has the 6-foot-l, 225-pound 
sophomore been able to handle 
filling Henderson's shoes, he has 
begun to make a name for him- 
self nationally, leading the team 
with 45 tackles (11.3 game) and 
establishing himself as leader on 
a defense that's ranked ninth in 
the country. 

"He's just really scratching 
the surface of what he can do," 
said Inside [See Terps, 8d) 



Next for Terps 

Matchup: Maryland (2-2) vs. 
Eastern Michigan (1-3) 

Site: Rynearson Stadium, 
Ypsilantl, Mich. 

When: Tomorrow, 6 p.m. 

Radio: WNST (1570 AM), 
WBAL (1090 AM) in progress 
after 4:05 p.m. O's-Yanks game 
Line: Maryland by 34*4 



_ 



.06 



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2004 MARYLAND GATOR BOWL GOIDE 



BCWL 



Maryland linebacker D'Qwell Jackson, who returned an Interception 58 yards for a score against 
Florida State on Sept. 6, also had 15 tackles In the opener against Northern Illinois on Aug. 28. 

No question, Jackson 
has answers for UM 



\Terps,ffom Page Id] 



linebackers coach Tim Banks. 

The story of how Jackson 
ended up at Maryland Is one of 
both luck and persistence on the 
part of the Terps' coaching staff. 
Jackson grew up In the small, 
football-crazed town of Largo, 
Fla , and In his house, the Flor- 
ida State Semlnoles were like a 
second religion. From the time 
he was 7, Jackson dreamed of 
wearing a gamet and gold uni- 
form. Even at a young age, he'd 
labor for hours In his back yard 
with his uncle Charles Dixon, 
catching footballs 

"My Uncle Charles could have 
played In college, but because of 
his grades and stuff, he didn't 
make It," Jackson said "That's 
why he was so hard on me grow- 
ing up. _ He didn't miss one 
football game of mine from 
when I was 7 years old until af- 
ter I graduated from high 
school. I can remember being 5 
or 6 years old, and we'd be In the 
back yard, and he'd throw foot- 
balls at me as hard as he could, 
until I caught It with my hands." 

By the time he hit high school, 
the precocious Jackson was 
ready and willing to do Just 
about anything on the football 
field. His freshman year, he at- 
tended Largo Hltfi School and 
started on the vsfety as a re- 
ceiver and a safety, but some- 
thing dldnt feel right 

"It Just wasn't challenging ac- 
ademically," Jackson said "I Just 
got a bad vibe from things. I felt 



kind of like 1 was all alone and If 
I needed help with something, I 
couldn't realry get It" 

He transferred across town to 
Seminole High School, and blos- 
somed Into a star. He played 
linebacker, fullback and quarter- 
back, and even punted for the 
Warhawks, and led his team Into 
the regional state finals his Jun- 
ior and senior seasons. Little 
kids would run up to him after 
games, Just to say hello, and it 
got him thinking: How can I 
make a difference In these kids' 
lives? There were drugs and 
problems In Largo. Just like any 
American city these days, but 
Jackson had managed to avoid 
them, thanks to his parents and 
his uncle. How could he make 
sure some other kids did the 
same? 

"Everyone In Largo knows 
each other." Jackson said. "So 
there was a teacher at Bowden 
Elementary school, right across 
from my high school, who 
needed a mentor for some kids. 
They loved football, but they 
needed somebody to tell them 
how Important schoolwork and 
stuff was. 

"My Job was to go over and 
help with their homework, or 
Just sit and talk with them If 
they needed someone to talk to 
After awhile, I'd see them run- 
ning around the neighborhood 
and they'd come up to me and 
tell me how they were doing. Not 
' all of them turned out OK, but 
most of them did ... I guess It 
brought out the teacher In me." 



His senior year, Jackson was 
named first team all-state by 
the Associated Press for the sec- 
ond straight season, but with 
each day, it became more clear 
that Florida State wasn't going 
to call. He Just wasn't seen as 
big enough to play at one of the 
country's elite programs. 

"At first It was frustrating, be- 
cause I didn't know anything 
about the recruiting process," 
Jackson said. "But as I started 
learning more about It and read- 
ing the Ins and outs of how 
things work, I Just looked at It as 
a way at getting back at them." 

Maryland, however, was right 
there from the beginning, 
fending off LSU, N.C. State and 
even Florida late to land Jack- 
son. Late In the recruiting proc- 
ess, the Gators lobbied hard for 
Jackson to come to campus for a 
visit, but out of loyalty to Mary- 
land coach Ralph Frledgen, 
Jackson declined. 

"We had to work real hard to 
keep him from taking that trip 
because, if he'd have gone, I 
think we might have lost him," 
Frledgen said "D'Qwell had a 
relative up here (In Alexandria] 
who could come watch him play, 
so we were trying to sell him on 
that. Sometimes you have to 
have a hook with kids " 



2002 ORANGE BOWL 



2002 PEACH BOWL 



Jackson arrived in College 
Park expecting to redshirt, but 
he was simply too good to keep 
off the field. The first game of 
the season, against Notre Dame, 
he led the team In tackles with 
12, and finished with 51 on the 
year. When the spring rolled 
around, the coaches started to 
throw his name around as a po- 
tential replacement for Hender- 
son. Friedgen was somewhat 
skeptical, but when outside line- 
backer Leon Joe decided he felt 
more comfortable on the out- 
side, the Job was Jackson's. 

"People talk about, 'Is he too 
small?' " Banks said. "Well, com- 
pared to who? He's not as big as 
E.J. Henderson, but a lot of peo- 
ple across the country' aren't as 
big as that guy." 

In the season opener. Jackson 
made 15 tackles in a loss to 
Northern Illinois. The next 
week, he got the chance he'd 
been waiting for every night 
since high school. Maryland was 
playing Florida State. He'd 
never been so pumped up for a 
game in his life. 

"I wish I could feel like that 
every time I played," Jackson 
said. "It Just felt like a little 
league game again. All my family 
and uncles were there and my 
friends where hollering in my 
ear from the stands. I was so fo- 
cused, I can't even explain it" 

No explanation was needed 
after Jackson's very first play in 
the game. Semlnoles quarter- 
back Chris Rix dropped back to 
pass, and Jackson reached out 
and snatched the ball out of the 
air, returning the pass 58 yards 
for a score. On his way, Jackson 
bulldozed Rix and running back 
Lorenzo Booker. 

It wasn't long before Frledgen 
was pointing to Jackson as an 
example of how the Terps 
should conduct themselves. 
This guy, he said, is a leader. 

"I'm not trying to brag, but I 
think it's something that you're 
born with." Jackson said. "When 
I first started playing the posi- 
tion, I talked a little bit, but not 
much because I didn't want peo- 
ple to just look the other way 
and think. He hasn't done any- 
thing.' But after you start 
playing a little bit. you feel com- 
fortable starting to talk more. 
Its something I didn't plan, but 
I do see myself becoming a 
leader" 



2004 GATOR BOWL 



107 



BCWL 



FB0TB3LL HeiUS EUPPIMS 



2004 MARYLAND GATOR BOWL GUIDE 
Washington Times • Oct. 3, 2003 




108 




Washington Times 

Oct. 3, 2003 

Sports, C6 

Pg. 1 of 1 



Fullback/defensive end Ricardo Dickerson is Maryland's first two-way player since 1986. 



TERPS NOTES 



Dickerson does double duty 



By Rick Snider 

"l TIMES 



A! first, Ricardo I lii kerson 
just wanted to get on the field 
Now In. hardly gets off it Mary- 
land's first two-way player in 1 7 
years doubles as a fullback and 
nsiveend. 
h Ralph Fi n 
I Mi kei mi a "pool man's Deion 
Sandei s" as the Terrapii 

on tom <v. 

Teammates joked that tie 
should wear a split red/white 
jersey in practice Ofl 

■ n wondered whether 

■ on cheats on di 
because he knows the snap 
count Defensive teammates 
chanl I .hen he re- 
turns to their side. 

"Three weeks ago, I was on 
the scout team, so I'm just happy 
to play," Dickerson said. 
1 11st Eastern Mi- I 

i son had 2'> 
snaps at fullback and 19 a 

Special teams duties 
be added, ton II 
spends first and second 
use and then thn 

metimes 

idi in the 

"Hi: 

1 them in the 



lii -I- er, the position he 

it Northwestern High 

School, a few blocks .smith of 

the Mai yland campus. He 

! Honda State tju 

:n lis ti mpoi arilyout 

of a gai 

When the Terps needed an- 
othei fullback, Dickerson filled 
in during spring practice In- 
to other defensive ends 
irst two- 
1 
Keeta Covington played some 
1 in 1986 

■ ith in\ bodytype, 
I'm a fullback at this 

on said "Hove defense, 
but 1 was' to be a tai ter onof- 

I'm getting a lot more 
confidem e at fullback. I'm try- 

■ness." 

nit does 
le an edge di 
practic e, one he tries not to ex- 
neat because 
when we go in dime (coverage), 
e goes on a 
quii I- count, so I could jump 

I 

1 I 
1 

k now I' 

' him 

I hi 

I "but 



Strengths collide 

Maryland leads the ACC in 
rui I11111 

bul I It ins. in is known 
king nine man i 
Friedgen said he won't change 

1 nan coverage do ' 

1 ii d i" play 

1 tack [eai her this 
in I 11 just wasn't us," 
si "Win 11 we're 
running the ball well, every- 
thing I action 
and quick game gets in, and 
I quai tei bac I- 1 Scott IMcBrien) 
to a rhythm, and 

Extra points 

Fried ing nine 

coming 

Season 

Football," whit h 

will be released next j 
Random House Authoi 
Curtis is spending the 
with the Terp 

II Bryant (shoul- 
der), rui Perry 

Fin' 

1 "It m 
son' Ih 

I 



2002 ORANGE BOWL 



2002 PEACH BOWL 



2004 GATOR BOWL 




Baltimore Sun • Oct. 3, 2003 




s HEiii£ 



r^ 



FOOTBM neillS BLIPPM9S 



2004 MARYLAND GATOR BOWL GUIDE 



GATOR 
BCWL ; 



Merriman becoming bright light for Terps 



College football: 
Sophomore Shawne Mer- 
riman is earning a reputa- 
tion as one of Man land's 
hunlest hitlers. 



By Kevin Van Valkenburo 

SUM STAFF 



COLLEGE PARK — On 
Shawne Memman's right arm. 
In blue ink, there Is a tattoo of a 
light switch. A hand, with a sin- 
gle extended finger, has Just 
flipped the switch to read: Off 

Lights out, the tattoo^ reads. 
In perfect cursive sen 

Call It the rare example of 
body art imitating life. 

"Kids in high school used to 
tell me that's what 1 did, Is 
knock people's lights out," said 
Merriman, who was a domml- 
nant player at Frederick Doug- 
lass High School in Upper Marl- 
boro. "Since the hurricane 




KARL MFRTON PERRON SUB STAFF 



Shawne Merrtman (light) has three sacks Is 2*03. Ralph Frledgen 
said the sophomore "hasnt even come near bis potential yet." 



knocked everyone's lights off, 
I've been getting Jokes left and 
right. It's been pretty funny." 

The tattoo, however, tells only 
a slice of the story. If all Merri- 
man did was specialize In vio- 



lent collisions, it would be 
enough. But these days, the 
6-foot-3, 245-pound sophomore 
Is everywhere, running down 
quarterbacks from behind, cov- 
ering wide reclevers, firing up 



Next for Te'ri 

Matchup: > 



When 



his teammates, and yes. black- 
ing out opposing ball carriers. 

"He's really a heck of a kid," 
said Maryland coach Ralph 
Frledgen "He's growing every 
day as a football player As good 
as he Is, he hasn't even come 
near his potential yet." 

He's been showing flashes of 
that potential lately, however. 
On the season, he's made 24 
tackles and recorded three 
sacks. Against Eastern Mich] 
gan, Merriman played a game 
Frledgen [See Merriman, 6c) 



[Merriman, from Page lc) 



called "one of his best," harass- 
ing Eagles quarterback Chlnedu 
Okoro Into bad throws, and then 
chasing him down from behind 
when Okoro tried to tuck the 
ball and run. 

On one play, Merriman 
started to rush the passer, only 
to see the ball sail over his head 
Into the arms of a wide receiver. 
In a blur, Merriman stopped, 
planted, then went tearing back 
upfleld to make the tackle. The 
result for Eastern Michigan: a 
1-yard loss. 

"He has the potential to be as 
good as he wants to be," said 
Terps defensive coordinator 
Gary Blackney. "He's not a guy 
who Just talks the talk, he also 
walks the walk." 



Make no mistake, Merriman 
likes to talk the talk. But occa- 
sionally that raw energy will get 
him In trouble, as it did his 
freshman year against Georgia 
Tech. Maryland had a big sec- 
ond-half lead when Merriman 
unloaded on a Yellow Jackets 
running back, leaving him crum- 
pled on the turf. Standing over 
him, Merriman pointed to the 
tattoo on his arm and smiled. 
Frledgen, to put It lightly, was 
not happy. 

"I try to tell people that If I get 
my hands on (game tapes from 
when I was young), I can show 
you the same type of player," 
Merriman said "I was Just 
smaller then." 

Even though Merriman 
weighed all of 170 pounds at one 
point In high school, Maryland's 



coaching staff had a pretty good 
hunch Merriman could achieve 
greatness. When he showed up 
at the Terps' football camp as a 
junior, and proceeded to run 
past, over and through Just 
about everyone there, the only 
question that remained was 
what position he would play. 

"It was love at first sight," 
Frledgen said. 

Frledgen was even more In 
awe when Merrtman put on 50 
pounds by the time he got to 
Maryland. Merriman wanted to 
play middle linebacker, but E J. 
Henderson, an All-American, 
was already there. The Terps 
needed him on the field right 
away Before long, he was split- 
ting time at the Terps "Leo" po- 
sition, where a player Is required 
to be hybrid of defensive end 
and linebacker. 

"It's so hard to find (someone 
to who can play that position.]" 
Friedgen said "It's essentially a 
defensive end. but we do so much 
zone blitzing that he drops Into 
pass coverage a lot You've got to 
find a guy who's strong enough 
to take on a 300-pound offensive 
tackle and stop the run, and yet 
be able to cover a back out of the 
backfield or sometimes a wide re- 
ceiver. ... Shawne could play 
other places, but I think he's go- 
ing to be a dominant player at 
that position." 

This was supposed to be the 
year Merriman turned all that 
potential Into results, but he 
suffered torn cartilage In his left 
knee during the preseason, 
which hobbled him a bit during 
the first two weeks. Merriman 
still rotates series with senior 
Jamal Cochran, but the Terps 
almost always send Merriman in 
on passing downs, 

"Right now, I feel like I can 



have a great game (one week), 
and then have just a good game 
the next," Merriman said. "I 
dont really have too many bad 
games where I make a whole lot 
of mistakes, but If you want to 
be a great player you have to 
come out and prove you're great 
every week." 

Even on a bad knee, Merriman 
still managed to drop a few Jaws 
In Maryland's first game this sea- 
son, laying a violent hit on 
Northern Illinois running back 
Michael Turner Just reliving the 
collision makes Merriman smile. 
Turner was fighting for extra 
yards and got his feet tangled 
up, and Merrtman came flying in 
and turned the lights out 

"I love that feeling. Just know- 
ing that the player In front of 
you can't do anything to stop ' 
you," he said. 'He knows he's go- 
ing to get it and cant do any- 
thing about It. It's Just great ." 



2002 0RAN6E BOWL 



2002 PEACH BOWL 



2004 GATOR BOWL 



BCWL 



fOBTMi nems euppims 



12004 MARYLAND GATOR BOWL GOIDE m 




Washington Times • Oct. 11, 2003 



Terps living up to their namesake 



By Rick Snider 

^HINGTON TIMES 



Fittingly enough, the Maryland Ter- 
rapins are repeating the fable of the tor- 
toise and the hare. 

Maryland seeks its fifth straight vic- 
tory tonight as an overwhelming 27V2- 
pomt favorite over Duke at Byrd Sta- 
dium. After starting 0-2, the Terps 
suddenly are close to rejoining the Top 
25 on the way to a possible third straight 
10 wins-plus season under coach Ralph 
Friedgen. 

The naysayers have been silenced 
since Maryland rebounded from losses 
to Northern Illinois and Florida State, 




Today, 6 p.m., Byrd Stadium 

AM-630AM-1090 

Maryland favored by 27'fe 



both 5-0 and ranked 16th and fifth re- 
spectively. 

"So the moral to that story is, it's not 
where you start but where you finish," 
Friedgen said "Persistence Luck. I 



don't try to panic. [The media says] a 
game early in the season is a critical 
game. It's just another game. The criti- 
cal games come at the end of the year 
because you know where you're at, not 
at the beginning of the year. You can al- 
ways recover from a loss early. It's the 
late ones you have trouble recovering 
from." 

Friedgen's teams haven't always 
started slow and then built momentum; 
in fact, the Terps won their first seven 
in his 2001 debut. In the last two sea- 
sons, however, the Terps seemingly have 
needed a breakout game to rebuild their 

see TERPS, page C5 



TERPS 

From page CI 

confidence — both times against 
West Virginia. Maryland began 
the road back last month with a 
24-3 victory over the Moun- 
taineers, its best overall effort. 

"It's partly who we're play- 
ing," Friedgen said of the slow 
starts. "Most teams get better as 
the season goes on." 

Last season the Terps won 
eight straight after opening 1-2. 
Friedgen has been involved in 
four of Maryland's 1 starts of 1 - 
2 or worse since 1980, including 
two as an assistant coach. Those 
four teams later won 72.7 per- 
cent of their games, but the six 
non-Friedgen teams took 26.9 
percent. 

This week Maryland has 
practiced three of four days in 
light pads despite Friedgen's 
warnings not to take perennially 
weak Duke (2-3, 0-2 ACC) 
lightly. The battered Terps can't 
afford more injuries, so Fried- 
gen gambled that non-contact 
workouts would get Maryland 
(4-2, 1-1) ready. Friedgen said 
the softer workouts weren't be- 
cause Duke has lost 27 straight 
ACC games. 

"A lot of things are going to 
happen within the next six 
weeks," Friedgen said. "There's 
going to be some teams that will 
be able to focus and be there at 
the end and some that don't focus 
and get knocked off. It doesn't 
matter who you're playing, you 
better be focused that week." 

Said safety Dcnnard Wilson: 
"You can't take a breath. We 
can't afford any more losses. 
Eastern Michigan snuck up on 
us. We can't have that anymore." 

Maryland is emerging from 
its early offensive woes. Quar- 
terback Scott McBrien threw 
three touchdowns against C kin 
son in last week's 21-7 victory, 
and the Terps are second in 
rushing in the ACC. Meanwhile, 
the defense has allowed only 27 
points in four games. 

"We're finally hitting stride," 




Photo by Joseph Silverman ; The Washington Times 

Maryland wide receiver Latrez Harrison: "We're finally hitting stride. 
What better time to put together good games than the ACC?" 



TERPS KEYS 

1 . No letdown — The Teips seem 
to play worst when favored most. 
Maryland outslugged Eastern 
Michigan as a heavy favorite and 
lost at Northern Illinois. Coupled 
with the following week off. this is a 
classic trap game. 

2. Contain Alexander — ACC 

sack leader Phillip Alexander will 
test the Terps outside The defen- 
sive end has six sacks and 14 
tackles for losses Maryland might 
have to sacrifice a receiver lor a 
tight end to counter Alexander. 

3. Stay healthy — Terps can't af- 
ford any more injunes at several 
positions. This game should be 
over by halftime to allow reserves 
to play in the second half. 



receiver Latrez Harrison said 
"What better time to put to- 
gether m im " ban the 

The Terps' offensive balance 
has perplexed opposing >h- 
fenses. Running back Sammy 
Maldonado returns from a two 
game suspension for violating 
team rules, Perry 



(high ankle sprain) appears 
healthy to complement Josh 
Allen for a complete backfield of 
power and finesse runners. The 
improved running game is 
drawing safeties closer to the 
line, giving receivers more 
room for medium-range passes 
in single coverage. 

"You stretch the Held verti- 
cally, and if you can do that it 
opens a lot of things.'' Friedgen 
said "The reason we've been 
making some big plays recently 
is because we're running the 
ball pretty good and people are 
trying to g<.-t thosr safeties in 
there to stop the run and it opens 
things in the passing game." 

Friedgen promised players 
three days off during the bye 
which gives Maryland a 
12-day break before the Terps 
visit Georgia Tech on I 
the schedule gets tougher after 
the break, with bowl contenders 
Virginia, N.C State and Wake 
' ahead 

"I'm still waiting for that 
I best | game," he said "I would 
hope we would continu 
better." 



2002 ORANGE BOWL • 2002 PEACH BOWL 



2004 GATOR BOWL 




I — — I 



foamu news eumiws GATOR 

BCWL 



2004 MARYLAND GATOR BOWL GUIDE 



Washington Times • Oct. 20, 2003 



Terps' Novak almost a sure thing 



d proba- 

■ 
• rime Terrapins 
;. t come 

lunnflthe first h i 
'season However, in a nationally 
: hursdavruchtganie.it 
irder at 
..iaon to De the 
irdcr in overtime 
he the game-winner, 
hat] gave 
be the 
is today," coach Ralph 
i said. 

irsday night, Novak will 
rhe place — Georgia 
hby Dodd Stadium — 
first earned his repu- 
.i clutch kicker and 
Uryland's resurgence 
ncdgen Once again it 
■ levised 




Maryland vs. Ga. Tech 



' J5p.m 
,Oocw - ■ 
ESPN, AM-630 



improving Yellow Jack- 
-Mrch of its sixth 
straight 

lably the Terps' 
less Atkinson in 
« a cam- 
•vr the 2001 Geor- 
gia Tech game Fans rejr 1 1 
him stories about where they 
were when he hit the 46-yarder 
In 2001. Novak scored a 
freshman record 89 points and 
ii viand single-season 
marks last year with 24 held 
goals and 1 25 points. He bed the 
school record with a 54 
against Duke on Oct. 1 1 en route 
to converting four field goals for 
the second time this season. 
son Novak has made 14 
■ 
cent) in three years 

But the game-tying kick 

against Georgia Tech probably 

Jess he 



i :'ew more game- 
winning kicks in his final season 
and half 

• kicker 
than two years ago," he said, 
kgave me] coi 

t that I 
elf no matter 
know it will gc 
I doubu ire] and 

was afraid of missing. Now I'm 
fundamentally sound and confi- 
dent th^ trough." 
: te Terps' 
best pro prospect, though he 
jnhl 2005 The 
son of two college professors is a 
perfects i \ grade 
point average last semes 

called Friedgen during a bliz- 
zard last winter and asked him to 
open the practice bubble so he 
could kick while the rest of the 
area tried to dig out Friedgen 

ik that he couldn't even 
open his front door and told the 
kicker to instead work on elevat- 
ing his one B grade to an A. 

The two have a rare coach- 

kicker relationship Friedgen jokes 

iks brain in ajar 

rhe coach teases 

the junior unmercifully for rare 

luring practices But 
Friedgen knows his legacy at 



Maryland was created in part by 
Novak and as a result watches him 
carefully He can tell by the sound 
of kicks how Novak is faring 

"Good an actu- 

aUyhea: . Lid. "You 

hear that thing pop. If you don't 
have a lot of leg str< 
sounds like a marshm... 
ting the 

imates rarely bother 
watching the flight of the ball 
icks that 
open practices. They know he'll 
bombard the video camera op- 
erator who sits on a crane above 
the uprights and often bats away 
balls in 

i ie tells 
v.erehecankick 
it from," quarterback Scott 
McBnen said "I have total con- 
fidence in him." 

Novak learned something 
about what McBrten faces 
every game. 

During a kickoff against Duke, 
the kicker was blindsided and 
pinballed from the side on a hit 
that left him gasping on the 
ground for several minutes. 
Novak said his hair felt Like it was 
on fire and his arm was numb. It 
was simple stinger and it side- 
lined him briefly. He returned to 
two of three field goals. 




P»w» By Hot* 

to the place where he 
made a na :i Tech. 



including a 48-yarder. 

"I finally realized w 
like getting hit — you just get 
licked.' i; -J Scott, 

'How do you take it 5 ' He said, T 
just get up. I don't know how I 
do it. You just keep going.' " 

But Novak isn't some former 
soccerplayer afraid of contact In 
order to avoid becoming the so- 
called solitary kicker, he regu- 
larly carries the ball against the 
defense during practice He 
spent the summer on campus in 
orderto spend more rune with his 
teammates, whom voted him onto 



. s leadership council. 
.Tspect my job." he said. 
"They wouldn't want to do it" 

is so focused on kick- 
ing that he was a guest lecturer 
for an advanced kinesiology 
class. He taught the mechanics 
of kicking on a nearby soccer 
field where he occasionally 
plays pickup games. 

"They told me they thought 

was so easy." he said. 

"It's a matter of consistency — 

the momentum, force and 

levers, phy 

And a little guts, too. 



Qiamondback • Oct. 23, 2003 



Automat-Nick perfecting a science 



Novak works 

on craft on 
field and in 

classroom 

By CoR£Y Ma 



It was 2 very long field goal — 
some teams won't even attempt a 52- 

■ kickers are lu 
make half of their kicks from that dis- 
tance A miss would certainly be 
ible 
But for junior kicker Nick Novak, 
there was no excuse After missing 
ime this season a 

teed up a ball 
from th ■•pot the next 

■ And ihen he drilled 
•her one from the 
r.er Eventually he was satisfied 
after about 1 20 kicks from the 42- 
yard line 
What might border on an unhealthy 
ion for some is the internal 
at 
There are words lo describe it — hard 
' even crazy 
l i-ect to perform up to my 
capabilities every time. 

1 usually don't miss twi 
miss one and usually the next 
one I know what I did wrong and it 
will go through '' 
When the campus was bombarded 
nowstorm last winter, Novak 
called Terp coach Ralph Friedgen to 
open the indoor practice facili' 
could get some work in. Friedgen 
couldn't open his from door 
Novak's passion for kicking goes 



beyond the football field As a kinesi- 
ology major with a 3.45 GPA, he does 
h projects on the science of 
kicking 

projects all the time on 

i;.i "'1 know a lot about 

it. and it makes me a belter kicker It 

i- think about it more ." 

Novak works on his kicking with 

former All- American Paul Woodside 

High School in 

Virginia in the offseason. His work 

ethic also applies to the weight room. 

He and punter Adam Podlesh have 

something of a legacy to uphold 

Former punter Brooks Barnard 
garnered a reputation as a workout 
monster. Special teams coach Ray 
Rychleski said Podlesh could 
approach Barnard's record 400- 
pound bench press and Novak could 
top the 30O mark 

i from day one 

ike about Nick is that he's a 

il player, not a kicker," Rych- 

lid "He's treated like every - 

rise. He gets yelled at by Ralph. 

He gets yelled at by me " 

Fnedgen and Novak have an inter- 
esting bond On most teams, the 
t:id the kicker only cross paths 
after a botched attempt costs the 
team a game But 
Fnedgen and Novak 
have a constant 
■ take, 
which spawned 
from the coach 
trying to build 
mental toughness 
and resulted in forming mutual 
respect 

rite mind trick"' 
i s the first summer camp and 
he was like, 'I'm going to take your 
il hip away if you don't make 
this kick.'" Novak said. "It was a 52- 
yarder from the right hash, and the 
whole team was watching, and I 
made it. Right then and there. I knew 




he was going to mess with my head 
my whole career and try to make me 
a mentally tough individual. When 1 
first came in, I was nervous. Now, 
-c me tough " 
Friedgen says he doesn't need to 
play games anymore, although on 
ions preseason 
nil hinged on Novak's accu- 
ion Novak misses a kick in a 
game. Fnedgen leaves him alone 
Novak is extremely tough on himself 
— hence the extra work after the 
'■Vest Virginia game 

.And besides, it's not like his kicker 
misses very often It's almost a fluke 
when Novak misses from anything 
shorter than 50 yards. He's made 50 of 
■ ^9 tries, and Only five of the 
•■ere from inside 50 
His stnng of success began two 
oat the Madium he's about to 
iter missing seven of 12 tries 
1 l season — including a 
32-yarder earlier in the night — 
Novak's 46-yard field goal as time 
expired propelled the Ter^ 
overtime against Georgia Tech and 
began his ascenl to elite status 

"There was some doubt on my 
p.'irt I'll be the first to admit thai," 

ki said "When he was 
ing those kicks early, we made a tape 
of (hem lo show him he was missing 
them by a foot They weren't wide, 
wide right, they were that close to 
being good. You need to have some 
good things happen to you " 

With more confidence. Novak 
started nailing kicks He made 12 of 
easoo with 
isses coming on 
SO- and 62-yard tries 
Once an anonymous face, 
oneprogramchanginr 
and choirboy looks made 
htm a superstar on campus 
The very next day, at Midnight 
Madness in Cole Field House. 
• t-roics were serenaded 



by 14,000 Terp fans 

tyone was chanting. 'We want 
Novak.' That 9 ureal 

moment of my life," Novak said "1 
was pushed onto the center of the 
floor and everyone was chanting my 
name It was pretty unreal and hum- 
Ming at thesam- 

This season, Novak has missed three 
times — the 52-yarder against the Moun- 
taineers, a 48- yard try into a gusty wind 
against Clemson and a 40-yarder 
against Duke 



The miss against 
the Blue Devils came 
shortly after Novak suffered << 
cussion while covering a kickoff. 
Novak was blindsided on the play, 
and Fnedgen joked the next day his 
kickers would need more tackling 

"We did that [Sunday). I: 
pretty cool," Novak said "It was fun. 
He doesn't think we can tackle He 
thinks soccer players are weak 
[Novak played football and soccer at 
Albemarle High School in Char- 
lottesville). A lot of soccer players 
came up to me and said they didn't 
like that comment. It's a totally dif- 
ferent game than football. Coach 
thinks it's a comedy sport for 
some reason ." 

Jokes aside. Fried- 
gen's relationship 



with Novak is, from an outsider's per- 
speenve. deeper than most player- 
coach connections Both stnve for 
nothing less than perfe . • 
"I kind of took on [Fnedgen's] per- 
■ 
think like he does to do well here He 
expects you to be an A student and he 
expects you to be an A+ fi 
player when you're on the field And if 
you don't, you're not going to last very 
long here. 1 just realized that 
earlyon If you ' 

it will pay off. and 

he's instilled 

that in me '* 

k 



S3*- 



Novaks FG stats rroni last^an^at (icor^ia Tech (O ct. 11, 2001) to present 

Beyond 50 yards 40-49 yards 30-39 yards l&=29 yards Total 

7/11 (64%) 12/14 (86%) 15/16 (94%) 16/18 (89%) 50/59 '(85%) 



And 
Fnedgen's not 
the only one who 
Novak's mental 
toughness A sample post- 
practice scene, from Sunday 
afternoon: 

Terp defensive coordinator 
Gary Blackncy "The 
hit today, you better put bigger 
pads on " 
Novak: "f*m working on it coach " 

WSTM OOW THE DUMONDftlCX 

Junior Nick No yak Tied a In 
record Oct. I! agamst Dufce when 
he converted i 54-rard field (oat 



2002 ORANGE BOWL 



2002 PEACH BOWL 



2004 6AT0R BOWL 



BCWL 



FOOTBM I1BI1IS CLIPPII19S 



1 2004 MARYLAND GATOR BOWL GUIDE 




Baltimore Sun • Bet. 21, 2BB3 



"I'h eg respect my job, and t hep know theg 
wouldn't want to do it. " 




DAVIDHOB8Y SUN STAFF 

Nick Novak came Into the spotlight when he hit two field goals — one to force overtime, a 
second to win the game — against Georgia Tecb In 2001. He has hit 50 of past 57 attempts 

For Novak, not lonely 
at the top of his game 



Football: K i< ■! 

.in ■■Hi ii isolated Imh 

Nick Noval 

i.il place ai 
■ p Icami i 



By Kjivin Vam Vajl*i 






m 



I ARK 

'Ung 

jntform 



becau- inmate. 

has spoiled Novak talking 

t heller time 
en tot 



that r., 

"Nick. It's nothim- 
ashamed ol," Kellej 

not to laugh 

'Besides we're all lamtlv 

here, bro" 

The nakes 

1 >n 3 football 

i-n of respect 

"t the 
when 



Novak isn't lonely 
at top of his game 




'-rem Page lc\ 

some reason" says Novak, who 
■elected 
this season by h 
be on the Terps' leadi 
council [*h my Job, 

knew they wouldn't 
want to do it A lot of guys have 
told me that " 

lurney to this point 
hasn't always been smooth, 
however When Novak won the 
Job as Maryland's placp I 
2001, plenty of people wondered 
how a second-year freshman 
with tin big game experience 
would handle the pressure In 
> weren't even 
hat kind of person he was 
E very day. 
while I 

of the team 
fougl.i II 

■ 
tense prac- 
tices 
Hie we 
eye o( 

Novak 
Ralph 

thi qulel N 

■ 
goals The 
■■ 

)t did: ers when 

Novak stai I ■■■] the 
spraylm; I 
but throi 

TO Of SlX. 
ruling to 
■ 

Novak be- 

doubted 
■ ,.'..■ I 

was Loo afraid to miss" 

Even-thing changed, however. 

he Terps 

when "■■ : -'led to 

: I . 

night game on ESPN With the 

i Novak stepped 

in and dl »rd field 

goal as time expired to force 

-.; iter, he hit 

■ 

td a six- 
game »M well as a 
Top2R ra 

■ 
College Park, Novak bi 

re walk 
ing tnt ill on cam- 

pus, when, to Novak's horror, 
Suter shouted for everyone's at- 

. 
yelled, "and he's the bi 

1 Show him jonr 

. 

him I knew 
he could 

Suter si 

■ 
missed 
■ 
■ 

ips he de 

■houi a 

■ 

.88 per 

' •'*(! of a 
nth shak> 

I 



Novak's knack 



Nick Novak needs 34 points 
to become Maryland's eJ 
leading i. 

Years Pta 



Jess Atkinson* 
Rick Badanjek 
Nick Novak" 
Dan Plockl* 
LaMont Jordan 
Brian Kopka' 
Steve Mike Mover- 
Steve Atkins 
Louis Carter 
Jermaine Lewis 
Dan DeArmas' 
Charlie Wysockl 



198184 308 

1982 85 286 

200103 27S 

1985 88 233 

1997 00 222 

199700 218 

l«72-74 203 

1975 78 162 

197274 162 

199295 158 

1988-91 158 

1978-81 158 



'kickers 



Next for Terps 

Matchup: Maryland (5-2,2-1) 

vs Georgia Teeh (4-3.2-2) 

Site: Bobby Dodd Stadium, 

Atlanta 

When: Thursday, 7:45 p m 

TV/Radio: ESPNAVBAL 

11090 AMI 

Line: Maryland by 2% 



technique, and you've got the re 

ts the main rea 
ik is go- 
ing to have a long and successful 
rmer soc- 
cer player Novak looH tip] 

lit- urging of his 
■ 

who also happened to 
coach (< i -marie 

hool in Charlott 
Va But he loved It so much, he 
quit soccei 

his senior year These days the 
ball doesn't come off his foot It 
explod* 

rou can 

actually hi en says 

"You hear the ball pop If you 

don'l have a lot of leg strength, 

h mallow 

■ 

how much 
pop he ha hmTs last 

game igalntl ■ hrn he 

tied a school record with a 
i He rut four field goals 
includ 
. -uartcr 
1 returned from the 
room after getting 
■ 
vak was a little woozy, but fine i 
ifldence 
. 

no mat 

my head ; I getting 

good ball contact 

It also doesn't hurt that 

ilO studrnl who un 

science behind 

• i fields 
1 1 perfect 

■ ■ I 
■ ■ 

w tight 

game 

■ 



8002 ORANGE BOWL 



2002 PEACH BOWL • 2004 BATOR BOWL 





J 3 

Washington Times • Oct. 31, 2003 



2004 MARYLAND CATOR BOWL GOIDE 



Arlington a model 
for Merriman 



By Rick Snider 



The swagger and speed are 
similar. They even play similar 
roles and deliver equally jar- 
ring hits. 

Maryland linebacker Shawne 
Merriman met Washington Red- 
skins linebacker LaVar Arring- 
ton in 2000 when Merriman 
played at Douglass High School 
in Croom, where Arrington's 
younger brother attended. Ar- 
rington became the mentor and 
Merriman the star pupil. Now 
Merriman is emerging as one of 
the Terrapins' playmakers on the 
nation's No. 5 scoring defense. 

"Sometimes we laugh at each 
other that we walk, talk ai 
just alike," Merriman said. "It 
wasn't hard to get to know each 
other" 

Merriman has the same light- 
ning speed to the quarterback that 
made Arlington the Redskins' 
third overall selection in 2000. 
Three steps melt into one stride 
A quarterback suddenly becomes 
another of Merriman's "Lights 
Out" \ r ictims illustrated by a tat- 
too of a finger turning off a light 
switch on his right forearm. 

"I was just talking to LaVar 
about who has the best closing 
speed. I do." Merriman said. 
"Sometimes I have such a good 
stride I can run anybody 
down." 

Merriman's five sacks are 
third most in the ACC. He can 
play at the line as a pass-rush- 
ing end or drop into pass cover- 
age with equal success. The 
tweener "LEO" position is a key 
in the Terps' defense that coun- 
ters balanced offenses like 
North Carolina tomorrow at 
Byrd Stadium. Merriman's 10 
quarterback hurries tie end 
Kevin Eli for the team lead 

Merriman is only a sopho- 
more, but coach Ralph Friedgen 
believes he could emerge as the 
team's best player 

"I don't think we've seen the 
best of Shawne.' Friedgen said. 
"The position he plays is so hard 
to find. You have to find a guy 
that's good enough to take on a 
300-pound offensive tackle to 
stop a run and fast enough to 
coverawid 
uncanny knack of tin li 




Maryland vs. 
North Carolina 



Tomorrow, noon 

Byrd Stadium 

CSN, AM-630, AM- 1090 

Maryland favored by 17 



terback's pace and jumping up 
and knocking down a pass. By 
the time he's finished here, he's 
going to be a great player if he 
continues to progress." 

Arrington is among Merri- 
man's admirers The two spent 
the summer working out to- 
gether with both weighing 253 
pounds and Merriman one inch 
taller at 6-foot-4. Arrington reg- 
ularly calls with tips, mostly 
constructive criticism. 

"Shawne's a specimen and 
he's got the heart," Arrington 
said. "A lot of times you can have 
potential, but if you don't have 
the heart to go with your talent, 
I don't know how far you can go. 
But he's got a lot of heart, a lot 
of desire. I think he'll be all right. 
Maybe we'll get him one day." 

The phone calls aren't always 
positive, though. Merriman said 
Arrington provides the harsh 
truth at times 

"LaVar is a friend who has 
been at this level, so he gives me 
a lot of pointers, " Merriman said. 
"He doesn't give me too much 
credit. It's not always what I 
want to hear. He helps me men- 
tally to stay focused. If we lost or 
didn't play well, he tells me to 
keep doing what I'm doing." 

Said Arrington: "I watch him 
every time he's out there. I just 
tell him to hang in there." 

Merriman plans to remain at 
Maryland for his final two sea- 
sons but acknowledges that he 
dreams of playing with Arring- 
ton in the NFL 

"Anybody who says they don't 
think about playing in the NFL 
isn't telling the truth." Merri- 
man said. "You have to concen- 
trate on coming out here every 
day to get better" 
• Stq I dy Foldesy con- 

tribir 



2002 ORANGE BOWL 



2002 PEACH BOWL 



2004 GATOR BOWL 






li .<*[*?* 



GATOR 
BC a/L 



FOOTBau now cuppings 



MARYLAND GATOR BOWL GUIDE I 



Washington Post • Oct. 31, 2.003 




Schmitt Tries to Get Terps in Line 



By Bahry Svrluca 
Washington Post Staff Water 

Kyle Schmitt traveled last week- 
end to Latrobe, Pa., leaving behind 
Maryland football for the comforts 
of home. Mom's cooking, a cushy 
couch, a clear head. None of it mat- 
tered. The woes of the Terrapins' of- 
fensive line followed Schmitt right 
to his doorstep. 

Maryland's most recent game, a 
7-3 loss at Georgia Tech, showed ex- 
actly how much Schmitt, a junior 
center, and his linemates are strug- 
gling. They allowed three sacks and 
countless other hits on the quarter- 
back. They couldn't consistently 
deal with Georgia Tech's shifting de- 
fensive front. It aD haunted Schmitt, 
"" he picked up the phone, reaching 
o his teammates. 
. called the guys Friday," Schmitt 
said. "We talked Saturday, Sunday, 
too. We kick everything around a lit- 
tle bit. We have to. It's not like when 
we walk off that practice field, we 
forget about everything that hap- 
pens in football." 

For the Terrapins' players and 
coaches, it's hard to forget what has 
happened to the offensive line, a 
banged-up unit without much depth 
that occasionally forgets the funda- 
mentals of blocking. Asked if he had 
figured out a solution. Coach Ralph 
Friedgen crossed himself. "Our Fa- 
ther," he said. 



He was kidding. Sort of. This is 
not a healthy or deep group. Right 
guard Lamar Bryant has a bum 
shoulder and left guard C.J. Brooks 
is struggling with turf toe. Bryant 
missed four weeks with a broken 
foot 

"But at any time in the season, ev- 
ery offensive line across the country 
is banged up," line coach Tom Brat- 
tan said. "That's part of it" 

Bryant says his shoulder is the 
best it has been in weeks, and his 
foot doesn't bother him. His tech- 
nique, however, has suffered enough 
that Friedgen called him into his of- 
fice yesterday. 

"It's almost like he's a freshman 
again," Friedgen said. "I don't know 
what's happening. Now, he's trying 
to fight through this thing. I just 
have a lot of confidence in him as a 
kid. I'm kind of pulling for the old 
guy, but he's struggling right now." 

Injuries or not, the coaches have 
little choice but to go with who they 
have. And the current group doesn't 
want to hear about injuries or a lack 
of depth or anything else. 

"I think we've used excuses long 
enough, personally," Schmitt said. T 
think it's time that we get the job 
done, whether we're hurt or not. If 
they're hurt, we got to get somebody 
else. Excuses kind of get old to me." 

So, heading into Saturday's home- 
coming game against North Caroli- 
na, the linemen are trying to figure 



out how to simultaneously feel bet- 
ter and play better. That could look 
relatively easy against the Tar Heels 
(1-7, 0-4), who are so horrendous on 
defense that they have allowed at 
least 500 yards six times this year. 

"What's really got us is these 
same guys played pretty good last 
year," Friedgen said. "We're just 
kind of out of sync right now." 

Last year was a bit different, and 
the Terps know it. Led by then- 
seniors Todd Wike and Matt Craw- 
ford — all-ACC selections at center 
and tackle, respectively — Maryland 
was physical up front, rushing for 
198.8 yards per game. Early this 
week, Brattan pulled out tape of that 
group, which included current start- 
ers Bryant, Brooks and Eric Dumas, 
so they could see their former 
selves. 

"Last year, we were being a really 
physical offensive line," Bryant said. 
"We're not doing that much this 
year. We're out there thinking too 
much, in my opinion." 

Defenses, too, are giving Mary- 
land plenty to think about. Georgia 
Tech's scheme involved not only 
blitzing linebackers and defensive 
backs from all angles — putting pres- 
sure on running backs to block, 
too — but flip-flopping defensive line- 
men. The Terps have done a poor 
job of reading those linemen and 
predicting what they'll do. That, in 
turn, has affected their technique. 



"They're having a hard time right 
now with blocking line movement," 
offensive coordinator Charlie Taaffe 
said. 

However, it is exactly the kind of 
defense the Terps are likely to see 
the rest of the way. North Carolina, 
though frequently overwhelmed this 
season, will use lots of players, keep- 
ing them fresh, and blitz frequently. 

"Believe me," UNC Coach John 
Bunting said, Tm sure they won't 
struggle against us." 

Friedgen would like to agree, but 
he knows it's no guarantee. He has 
stewed over the Tech loss, he said, 
more than he normally does. If the 
line doesn't play better, he could 
stew some more next week. 

"Know your landmark, come off 
the ball, and if you miss him, miss 
him going full speed," Friedgen told 
his struggling senior. "But don't be 
tentative. I don't need a 300-pound 
guard who's worried about whether 
he misses a guy or not. Come 
through your landmark and blow 
him up. Have some fun out there." 

Terrapins Notes: Wide receiver 
Rich Parson (foot) is unlikely to play 
against North Carolina. He sat out 
practice yesterday and wore a pro- 
tective boot . . . Friedgen said quar- 
terback Scott McBrien looked fully 
recovered from a concussion suf- 
fered in the Georgia Tech game. 
"We'll have to see how he is when he 
gets hit," Friedgen said. 



2 2 0RAN0E BOWL 



2002 PEACH BOWL 



2004 BATOR BOWL 




*« 




TOYOTA 

FODTBau nBius c uppinas GffTOR 

BCWL ! 



1 --■- 

'***■ 2004 MARYLAND GATOR BOWL GUIDE 



Washington Times • Nov. 3, 2003 



Terps hit 
break 
after 
cruising 



By Rick Snider 



Maryland's renewed momen- 
tum must simmer once again. 
The Terrapins get their second 
bye in three weeks before facing 
visiting Virginia on Nov. 13 in a 
nationally televised game 
Thursday night. 

It's not a welcomed break. 
Maryland's stagnant offense fi- 
nally awakened and its missing 
confidence suddenly overflowed 
after thrashing North Carolina 
59-21 on Saturday The Terps 
3-2 ACC), flashing a 
bravado that has been long 
missing, are hungry for their 
final three games against bowl 
contenders. 

"(Beating North Carolina] in- 
creases the appetite." receiver 
Steve Suter said. "We don't want 
to go to a bowl just because we 
have six wins. I want to go to the 
best bow] we can " 

That's probably the Gator 
for the ACC runner-up. 
Maryland remains alive in the 
conference title chase, but 
Florida State (8-1, 6-0 1 simply 
needs to win one of its final two 
ACC games to clinch the crown. 
The Terps could finish second 
by sweeping Virginia 
NC State (7-3, 4-2) and Wake- 
Forest o-4. 3-3), respectively 
One or two losses probably 
sends Maryland to the Tire or 
Tangerine bowls while a 6-6 fin- 
ish likely would mean the Hu- 
manitarian Bowl. 

"They needed something like 
this to get their confide! 
coach Ralph Friedgen said "I 
just wanted them to play with 
their hearts and pride in them- 
selves. Do it for 6(1 minutes 
Have fun. Don't play^he game 
like you have a 100-pound 




Pnoto by Josepn S .vashington Tunes 



Maryland comerback Domonique Foxworth set up a Terps score with this interception against North 
Carolina, but it was the offense that broke out Saturday scoring 59 points. 



weight on your shoulders It 
doesn't look like you're going to 
win the confen o out 

and have fun and see what hap 
pens, and they did that " 

Maryland ha 
factor against Virginia after 
losing 48-13 last year The loss 
cost the Terps a share of then- 
second straight ACC title. The 
home finale is expected to be a 
sellout. 

"lis now a rivalry." Friedgen 
said "I'm sure Virginia had a 
big circle on the calendar for 
us last year The stadium is 
going to be electric. They are 
going to be jammed in seats all 
i his place. It's what I en- 
n football should be at 
Byrd Stadium " 

Maryland's swagger ret 
just in time for the final post- 
season push. Quarterback Scott 
McBrien finally played like he 
practices. The receivers made 
highlight catches, the offe- 



line opened gaps and the run- 
ning game resurfaced as the 
Terps gained 612 yards and 
1 on their first nine pos- 
it was the type of efforl 
pected when the Terps opened 
the season ranked 15th, but was 
evident only briefly when the 
Terps soundly beat West Vir- 
ginia '.>4-~>andClemson 
during the five-game winning 
streak. The No. 5 scoring de- 
fense has been consistent aside 
from a 35-10 loss to Florida 
State, but it was the offense that 
held back the Terps. If both stay 
strong during the final weeks, 
Maryland still could earn its 
third straight 10-win plus sea- 
son under Friedgen. 

"As good as our defense is," 
cornerback Domonique Fox- 
worth said, "if the offense can 
continue to play like that I don't 
think there's too many teams in 
the country that can play with us." 



McBrien has long been the 
catalyst. The senior returned 
from a concussion against 
Georgia Tech to throw four 
touchdowns and run foi 
more against North Carolina 
He finished 15 of 25 for a ca- 
reer-best 349 yards, the most 
yards by a Terps passer in 
eight years. 

"Finally; it transferred over 
from the practice field," 
McBrien said. "Our whole team 
transferred it from the practice 
field I was very' loose I 
just throwing the ball. I was just 
going out there and winging it 
I felt comfortable who I 

g and what I was reading ." 

Said receiver Latrez Harri- 

I hope it was the breakout 

game for him. Once Scotty gets 

confidence it's hard to stop him " 

Added Friedgen "If Scott 
could play like that for the next 
three games I'd probably start 
growing hair." 



US 



2002 ORANGE BOWL 



2002 PEACH BOWL 



2004 GATOR BOWL 



TOYOTA 

GATOR 
BCWL 



nmmi items euppinss 



2004 MARYLAND GATOR ROWL GUIDE 




Washington Post • Nov. 4, 2003 



Another Gray Area 

Colleges Discover Way to Put Athletes on the Layaway Plan 



By Barry Svrluca 
Washington Post Staff It 



This football season, Dan Gron- 
kowski expected to go through the ex- 
perience that has become part of col- 
lege sports parlance — the redshirt 
year — at Maryland. NCAA eligibility 
rules allow athletes five years to play 
four seasons, and football, more than 
any other sport, takes advantage of 
the practice, affording athletes an ex- 
tra year to mature physically or re- 
cover from an injury' 

Gronkowski worked out all sum- 
mer — training with both a speed 
coach and a passing coach — to pre- 
pare for the experience. Instead, the 
quarterback from suburban Buffalo re- 
mains at home, where he works each 
morning at his father's business and 
shows up each afternoon at his old 
high school's practices, coaching the 
quarterbacks. He's still going to at- 
tend school in College Park, still going 
to play for the Terrapins, but because 
of a loophole in the NCAA's rule- 
book — a loophole some coaches be- 
lieve is being used with increasing fre- 
quency — he won't arrive at Maryland 
until January. The suggestion to 
"grayshirt," as such delayed enroll- 
ment has become known, was made 
by Maryland's coaching staff. 

"It was something different, some- 
thing I've never beard of," Gronkow- 
ski said. "I didn't know it was going 
on " 




BY [XRIK f.tl rOR 1HF WASHINGTON POST 



Dan Gronkowski is a Maryland football recruit, but he will not enroll until second 
semester, saving the Terps a scholarship and giving him more time to prepare. 



Grayshirting — a term still so unfa- 
miliar that some college football 
coaches don't yet know it — involves 
recruiting a player out of high school, 
promising him a scholarship, but ask- 
ing him to wait to enroll full time in 
school until the second semester — 
usually eight months after high scht « >l 
graduation. In the meantime, he is al- 
lowed to spend his time however he 
wants: working at home, taking class- 
es part time, using the extra lew 
months to physically prepare (or col- 



legs football. 

The NCAA doesn't keep track of 
such statistics or trends, but many 
coaches expect more programs to 
grayshirt players in the future. The 
benefits to the program, they Bay, are 
many. St hools are allowed to issue 85 
scholarships for a given semester 
Some college seniors — particularly 
those who have redshirted and are 
thus in their fifth year — graduate alter 

RAYSHIRTS M Coi 1 



116 



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2004 0AT0R BOWL 










TOYOTA 

footbm nBius DUPPinss GATOR 

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2004 MARYLAND GATOR BOWL GUIDE 



Recruiting Explores Another Gray Area 



CRAYSHIRTS 

the first semester, usually in December. 
Rather than having H rships 

go unused in the spring, programs can 
bring in .1 grayshirted player and have 
hnn participate in spring practice. 
I'hcy could then he in school for five- 
and-a-halt years. Gronkowski, lor in- 
stance, will enroll at Maryland in Janu- 
ary 2004, and could be on scholarship 
through the spring of 2009 

g at the education side of 
it." said Gronkowski's father. Gordon, 
win' played college football at Syra- 
cuse He could come out of there with 
i legree. If I can get 5Vi years 
nl school paid for. I think it's a great 
idea." 
By delaying enrollment, schi 

;>la\crs in February on 
"national signing day" than they have 
schi 'larships available; grayshirted 
players don't count toward the annual 
limit of 25 until the spring they enroll. 
Thus, programs can potentially bolster 
their recruiting classes by staying in 
the hunt for more talented players, 
then asking a few less-talented pros- 
vt- to grayshirt. 

"It allows you to be very aggressive 
in recruiting," Maryland Coach Ralph 
Friedgen said. "You get down to the 
end [of the recruiting period], and 
you've got some good players that are 
sitting there at the end, and you don't 
want to get left out there (signing] no- 
body You've got a little bit of a backup. 
I'm trying to play the numbers 
game and still get the best players." 

The idea, then, would be to identify 
-c ime of the players who might Lake longer to de- 
■ lop — and aren't as highly sought as some oth- 
and encourage them to grayshirt. The pro- 
cess is different from "early enrollment,'' in 
which players graduate from high school in 
three-and-a-half years and arrive at college one 
semester early, using the extra time not only to 
get adjusted to college life, but to go through 
spring workouts. North Carolina State's Philip 
Rivers and Southern California's John David 
Booty, both quarterbacks, are among the players 
with the highest profiles to have gone through 
that process. 

Yet in theory, at least, there is a risk to graysh- 
irting for the player. Some grayshirts are prom- 
ised a scholarship, but haven't yet signed their 
national letter-of-intent, the document that 
binds a school to an athlete, and vice vers,!. A 
hing staff could i -hirt opportuni- 

tci a player, ci 'ine acn -s- a more talented play- 

and — poof — the scholarship could be gone, 
ties, though, say it is up to their profes- 
sion to police itself. 

"Any tune you talk about a scholarship. 
whether it's an early offer to a young man who's 
a junior in high school or a grayshirt situation, 
there's got to be a trust factor between the faini- 




Dan Gronkowski works with quarterbacks at his former high school. 
His first college football experience will come in spring practice. 



ly, the son and the university." said Greg Pe- 
iii assistant coachand recruiting coordi- 
nator at Kansas State, where the Wildcats have 
been graj shii i iruj players I' « about a de< ai 
program is only as good as the reputation of your 
words, ll you don't follow through with that "I 
fer. word would gel out quickly that your school 
doesn't follow up." 

Washington State Coach Bill Doba said. "If a 
school did something like that, they'd never be 
able to recruit that area again." 

Doba. in hi lie Cougars' head 

coach, served on the WSU staff for 14 seasons. 
He and Ihen-head coach Mike Price began 
grayshirting players seven years ago. when they 
recruited an undersized linebacker named Rao- 
nall Smith, who became the first grayshirt in the 
Pacific-10. Smith graduated from Peninsula 
High in Gig Harbor. Wash., in the spring i 
but wasn't quite ready for college football. 

"I hadn't even turned IS years old vet." Smith 
said. "They had a whole bunch of linebackers on 
the depth chart. They mst told me to sit out. put 
le weight, and start up Ire^h in January. I'd 
be a little bit elder some of the depth at lineback- 
er would be gone, and I wouldn't have used any 
eligibility." 



Smith did it, taking a course at a ju- 

215-pound frame 1 i tl Janu- 

ary, siit out the next fall — his regular 
redshirt year — and by the time he final- 
ly took the field in tiie fall ol 199S 
had been out of high school for two 
years, and had been thro 
spring practice sessions. By 2000, 
when he was a 22-year-old junior, he 
was honorable mention all-Pae- 1 ( i. 
"Grayshirting gave me a chan' 
learn how to deal with college com 
deal with college in general," Smith 
said. "But I'll tell you, I was a little antsy 
to get out there by the time I could I 
wanted to play." 

Smith graduated in four years, and 
by his senior season in eligibilitj 
could have been working on a master's 
degree. 

"That's probably what I should have 
done." he said 

Instead, he took a course in order to 
remain eligible in the fall, his senior 
n, and spent the spring preparing 
for the NFL draft. That paid off: Smith. 
a second-round selection, is now in his 
second year with the Minnesota Vi- 
kings. 

"That's not always how it works 
out," Doha said. "It's usually with a kid 
who you really think needs time to de- 
velop and can be a contributor by his ju- 
nior or senior years. But I'd be sur- 
prised if more schools don't start doing 
it. You're trading an 18-year-old in your 
program, potentially, for a 23-year old 
who has been with you for five years." 
For Gronkowski, the hook was two- 
fold. At t> feet 7. other programs had re- 
cruited him as a tight end He wanted the chance 
to play quarterback. 

Friedgen promised him at least that chance — 
as long as he was willing to grayshirt. 

"That's one of the main reasons I picked 
Maryland." Gronkowski said. "I want to play 
quarterback. . . . But it was hard to wait all sum 
mer, and it's hard waiting now." 

During the summer, there was still a chance 
iwski would cmne to Maryland in the fall. 
1 >re Moore, a defensive lineman from Charlotte. 
was also willing to grayshirt. When one Terrapin 
transferred i . eason, a scholarship be- 

came available, and it went to Moore. No one 
else transferred or flunked out. so Gronkowski 
waited. 

"It took some convincing, but I think he un- 
ids the benefits now," Gordon Gronkow- 
ski said. "He wants to play, and we trained all 
summer to ! go in the fall. H 

iu could tell he wanted to go. 
"But I'm looking at the whole picture. In my 
class [at . only eight of 30 players got 

their degrees. If he can walk out of there v. ■ 
only with his undergraduate degree, but v 
master's [degree], or a start on his ma 
then it'll be well worth it." 



117 



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2002 PEACH BOWL 



2004 BATOR BOWL 



YOTA 

GATOR 
BCWL 



FOOTBaLL I llil IIS GLIPPIMS 



2004 MARYLAND GATOR BOWL GUIDE 




Offensive line takes a stand for Terrapins 



COLLEGE PARK — When 
the University of Mary- 
land ran up 612 yards or 
total offense 12 days ago against 
North Carolina, no one knew If 
the Tar Heels' defense was that 
ad, or If the Terps' offensive 
ne had Improved significantly. 

And then came last night. 
Guess what? The Terps' line Is 
healthy, happy and playing as 
well as can be expected for a 
group that has missed so much 
playing time together 

Maryland's offensive line of 
tackles Stephon Heyer. Eric Du- 
mas, guards C J. Brooks. Lamar 
Bryant and center Kyle Schmltt 
controlled the line of scrimmage 
early and late In Maryland's 
27-17 win against Virginia last 
night at Byrd Stadium. 

It was an offensive lineman's 
dream game, especially In the 
first half when Man land had 



1 



Mike 
Preston 

293 yards of total offense, and 
the Terps bolted to a 24-7 half- 
time lead. The Terps' offense 
was so balanced because Mary- 
land's offensive line was in such 
control. 

The Terps rushed for 181 
yards In the first half. 154 from 
Josh Allen, who finished with 
257 for the game, the third-best 
single-game total in Maryland 
history. Allen finished with a 
6.8-yards-per-carry average, and 
Maryland coach Ralph Frledgen 



with a smile. 

"How about that offensive 
line'" said Frledgen. whose 
Terps finished 6-0 at home this 
season. "They did a nice Job. 
When a running back puts up 
those kinds of numbers. It's 
good to be part of something 
like that. Josh Allen obviously 
had an unbelievable night. I 
thought our offensive line 
blocked very, very well. 

"(Virginia] is a team that, as I 
said at Tuesday's press confer- 
ence, had done a great Job stop- 
ping the run with a seven-man 
box. They must have heard the 
press conference because they 
were putting eight people In the 
box the whole night " 

After the Terps failed to 
mount any substantial drives in 
the third quarter, the offensive 
line helped Allen and the offense 
grind out {See Preston, 6d I 



Baltimore Sun • Nov. 14, 2003 



118 



Maryland vtphomorr running noi k 
Hardy ( 3<S> on the 7 erpn' flnnl nt 



2002 ORANGE BOW 



M lit JR *VS 

■mprbftck JtrnuUn* 
Lit theCival 



Offensive line 
and stands up 



takes stand 
for Terrapins 




{Preston, from Page Id] 

yards and time late In the fourth 
quarter to secure the victory. 

Virginia pulled within 24 17 
with 9:15 left in the game, but 
Maryland answered with a 
10-play. 45-yard scoring drive that 
ended with a 45 yard field goal 
from Nick Novak with 3:42 re- 
maining Allen ran behind Brooks 
for 10 yards for a critical first 
down on one play, and then ran 
for 19 more behind Brooks again 
down to the Cavaliers' 29 on the 
next pi 

Maryland finished the wa 
started. With the running game 
going so smoothly In the first 
half. Maryland's play-action game 
was superb and Terps quarter- 
back Scott McBrien was comfort 
able in running everything from 
waggles to bootlegs as he threw 
for 112 yards In the first two quar- 
ters, and finished with 191 for the 
game, completing 14 of 21 passes. 

It was the secon#conser 
solid effort by the Terps offensive 
line, and signaled that the group 
has returned from a season of in 
juries and frustration How frus- 
trating? 

At one point this season, 
Frledgen criticized the group 
publicly, and advertised to possi- 
ble Incoming recruits that they 
should come to Maryland where 
they might get a chance to play 
Immetii 

That was gutsy and bold, but 
also true There were several 
times this season when Mary- 
| land's offensive line was deci- 
mated by Injuries and morale 
problems The injuries came 
.rly 

Bryant, the team's best I 
man and emotional leader, broke 
I his right foot In training camp 
His rei had to 

ond week of the season wit: 
infection. So did his replaci-i 
Akll Patterson, who sprained his 
ankle it 
Florida State. Tha' left 1 

I get 

glnla in Game No 4. he was 

■ 'vith an In- 
was 

irted 



Mike 
Preston 

them, but to create some Inten- 
sity. Against North Carolina, he 
came out so fired up that he 
started head butting Bryant. 
Then he started bumping chests 

r players The only 
thing missing for Fried gen was 
gear. 

ot the Terps excited, but 
the North Carolina game was 
considered a nuke because the 
Tar Heels have one of, if not the 
worst, defenses in college foot- 
ball But last night, the Terps 
proved themselves again 

The offensive line gave a strong 
effort in the first half, but seemed 
to lose Its rhythm In the third 
quarter But on their next to last 
offensive series, they helped 
power Allen and the Terps to vic- 
tory "Those two runs helped us 
put them [Virginia] away," said 
Frledgen. 

Schmltt said "After the Geor- 
gia Tech game, we were about as 
low as we could go But this turn- 
around is just incredible. It really 
felt great tonight to play thl 
and we Just want to keep it like 
tlus The offensive line was not 
going to give In tonight With the 
forecast being what it was, we 
were excited The offensive line 
really likes to play In this kind of 
weather." 

It was a big win for Maryland, 
not Just because of bowl bids, but 
becau :inttoestab 

But after three years of s: 
btng their noses and looking 
rvjnla 
might want to pay a tittle iniw 

the border, and we're not talking 

iiKlnla Tech 

Hanged son-.' 

I 



D2 PEACH BOWL 



2004 BATOR BOWL 




TOYOTA 

footbm nBU is cuppings GATOR 

BCWL 



MARYLAND GATOR BOWL GUIDE 



ishingtan Past • Nov. 18, 2003 



Posting 'Help Wanted' Sign 

Franklin Searches for Future Terps Football Players 



By Eric Prisbell 

: m Post StaffWnter 



Dunbar High Coach Craig Jefferies said 
Maryland hasn't seriously recruited any of 
his players this season. But that hasn't 
stopped James Franklin, the Terrapins' re- 
cruiting coordinator, from talking to Jeffer- 
ies more than a dozen times. 

From small talk to discussing X's and O's 
with area high school coaches, the chats 
have helped Maryland's staff in its pledge to 
lure top in-state and Washington area play- 
ers to College Park. Despite losing recruit- 
ing coordinator Mike Locksley, who left for 
Florida after last season, and dealing with 
the uncertainty of an NCAA investigation 
for part of the offseason, the Terps are 
poised to haul in their best recruiting class 
during Coach Ralph Friedgen's three-year 
tenure. 

Much of the success can be traced to 
Franklin, the high-energy former East 
Stroudsburg quarterback who is balancing 
firming up recruiting with duties as wide re- 
ceivers coach for the remainder of the reg- 
ular season. 

' "I didn't think they'd be able to replace 
Locksley," Jefferies said. "But Franklin has 
a good rapport with area coaches. They re- 
cruit the family, the coach and the high 
school. ... We have an open-door policy; 
they can come on campus and talk. I don't 
see why other coaches don't take advantage 
of it." 

To date, Maryland has 17 oral commit- 
ments — including at least two grayshirts or 
players who have delayed enrollment — in a 
class highlighted by players such as George 
Covington, a speedy Eleanor Roosevelt 
High defensive end. The Terps remain in 
the running for a few heralded local players 
as well, such as Covington's teammate Der- 
rick Harvey, a 6-foot-5 defensive end. 

Entrenched in a critical stretch of games 
that Friedgen has said "defines the season," 
the Terps not only are determining which 
bowl offers them an invitation, but also are 
molding their national reputation. Friedgen 
acknowledged that last week's nationally 
televised victory over Virginia was impor- 
tant because of who was watching — name- 
ly, recruits interested in both rival pro- 
grams. 

Before the game, Franklin's energy was 
apparent at midfield, where he and Virginia 
Coach Al Groh exchanged words after a 
Cavaliers player ran through the Terps' 
drills. Exuding enthusiasm and optimism, 
Franklin said, is a requisite for a coach be- 
cause, for one reason, it "shows a recruit 
how excited you are about the young man's 
future. It's contagious." 

NCAA rules prohibit coaches from com- 
menting on unsigned recruits. But Franklin, 



who worked as receivers coach at Idaho 
State before joining the Terps in 2000, 
spoke about Maryland's general philosophy 
and the challenge of in-state recruiting. 

"We're recruiting for a national champi- 
onship," said Franklin, who is schedulingof- 
ficial visits for high school players during 
three weeks in December. "Our number one 
priority is to keep the top players in Mary- 
land home. After that, we recruit the entire 
East Coast, from Maine to Florida." 

Franklin acknowledged the Terps' classes 
are not yet at the level of perennial college 
football powers, which often yield more 
depth on the lines and speed in the second- 
ary and at wide receiver. That said, Mary- 
land's national reputation has soared under 
Friedgen, according to Allen Wallace, pub- 
lisher of the recruiting magazine Super- 
Prep. 

"Maryland now is viewed as a program 
that can compete with anyone," Wallace 
said. Maryland "is very tied to the head 
coach, who is a key to its program. Friedgen 
is viewed as one of the most important 
coaches who has transitioned into the head 
coach position in the last five years. Almost 
like a miracle worker." 

From talking to thousands of college- 
bound athletes since 1985, Wallace said 99 
percent of high school players are not 
swayed if a school they are considering wins 
or loses a rivalry game such as Maryland- 
Virginia. More meaningful, he said, is the 
gut feeling players get from meeting the col- 
lege coaching staff and the tradition a 
school has established. 

Before Friedgen's arrival for the 2001 
season, the Terps struggled with in-state re- 
cruiting, losing local players to Penn State 
and Notre Dame, among others. The Terps 
won as many games in 2001 (10) as Mary- 
land had won the previous two seasons 
combined. 

Franklin said Maryland's shift toward 
homegrown talent has rendered only one 
caveat: Teams now know they can win with 
Maryland players, which has fostered even 
greater recruiting competition. 

"Now, we don't have to sell the dream," 
Franklin said. "We show the positive things 
that are happening." 

Notes: Maryland linebacker-defensive 
end Shawne Merriman (concussion) prac- 
ticed some yesterday but will see only lim- 
ited time Saturday against North Carolina 
State in pass-rushing situations, Friedgen 
said. Left tackle Stephon Heyer and safety 
Andrew Smith have been suffering from the 
flu, but practiced yesterday. 

Offensive lineman Russell Bonham was 
injured after tripping on the turf during 
Wednesday's indoor practice and probably 
won't make the trip to Raleigh, N.C., Fried- 
gen said. 



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ATOR I flwrm news CLimm 
BCWU 



12004 MARYLAND GATOR BOWL GOIDE 




120 




Washington Post • Nov. 20, 2003 




R> lOMN MCOOWrttl THF A» c >*l V'.fiX PO$T 

former Terrapin Jess Atkinson films Ralph Friedgen addressing his football team. Atkinson gets access to program; Friedgen approves content. 

Subject With Approval 

FridgeTV.com Stands Alone Among College Coaches' Web Sites 



Washirar 



Ralph It; 

"I want 

lln pi 
of pri'. 
nil the Internet in the 

Frjih hi Interni 



id football coach 

•■•ill 

d the 









Web silt-, is perhaps the most advanced ex- 
ample of college loaches around the coun- 
try communicating directly with fans, do 
iiurs -and [xitcntial recruits — through the 
Internet. 

With their profession suffering from an 

imagi hat the National 

I '•asketball Coaches held a 

summit last month to discuss 

and with popular chal 

i treading wildly 

i them, coaches 

iglj using their own Wfeb sites 

ive lound a way to 
■ ith recruits thai isn'i 



ered by the strict NCAA regulations govern- 
ing contact with high school athletes — and, 
in some cast's, bring in extra revenue. 

"College athletics have become such a big 
business that there's been a move to a cor 
porate mentality," FHirdue University com- 
munications professor Glenn Sparks said. 
"Like any corporation, you have to manage 
your public image You have to appease the 
appetite lor pn bul by putting 

stuff out there yourself, you're taking 
Irol of your own image and taking away op- 
portunities for real investigative coverage." 

In some ways, Maryland and the i 

I RIDG1 l\ 



2002 ORANOE BOWL 



PEACH BOWL • 2004 BATOR BBWL 




FoomumuisBumiiBS GATOR 

BCWL 



2004 MARYLAND GATOR BOWL GUIDE 



IKMIi.l l\ 



botches are merel) following thi path taken 
ly professional sport 

II hired reporters and editors, many 
m-house 
WVIi site, Mi B i om ] hi Nl l las) week 
lunched its own television channel, NFL 
Network, ami its Web site, NFL.com, offers 
live game updates and news dispatches from 
tin' Aaaoi i ht rites have proven 

immensely popular with Sans durii 
seasons NF1 com and tin- affiliated siies ol 
each NFL team had 517 million page views 
and 12.1 million unique users in October 
Hone, Some NFL teams have hired local 
tewspaper reporters to provide cow 
themselves, 

FridKeTV.com takes the approach a step 
further by allowing access to moments that 
all other media outlets are barred by schjool 
rules from covering. 

an't tell the story the waj it deserves 
to be told — from the inside," said Jess At- 
kinson, the n,. hi behind Ft idgi I \ com. 

Atkinson became Man-land's cat 
ing scorer as a place kicker in the 1980s and 
spent 12 years as a television reporter — 
including at Channel 4 from 1990 to '96 and 
at Channel 9 from 2000 to '02. He said he be- 
came frustrated with the constraints ot local 
sports nc. it hare being de-empha- 

sized nationally in deference to a fan base 
trained to find highlights on ESPN's "Sports- 

kinson went to Priedgen and 
pitched his idea tor a Web site that > 
beyond those of other coaches. He wanted to 
produce feature-length stories on the Terra- 
pins and broadcast Friedgen's news confer- 
ences live. He wanted on-demand TV solely 
devoted to Maryland football. 

The Maryland football fan, the only way 
he gets information on his football team now- 
aday is the newspaper," Atkinson said. 
'How does he gel moving images? Local TV 
is not in the business of sports anymore. It 
just isn't. They don't have the time and re- 
sources. My idea was to use the access that a 
team can grant to essentially communicate 
what a program is about to the people who 
want to see it — when they want to see it." 

They see, of course, what Friedgen wants 
them to see. Because the coach and Atkinson 
had a previous relationship — Atkinson 
played at Maryland when Friedgen was an as- 
sistant coach there — Friedgen felt comfort- 
able allowing Atkinson into the locker room. 
Atkinson is permitted to stay at practice after 
the mainstream media is escorted out. There 
are some things — such as individual or 
group meetings with players — that Friedgen 



hasn'l allowed to be taped, but Atkinson gen- 
erally has free rein. Friedgen can afford to al- 
low that, because before anything goes on 
the mull looks it over and offers 
suggest 

"I told him that I would never want one of 
my kids embarrassed," Friedgen said. "1 
don't want any cursing on there I think it's 
important to get the emotions and the feel- 
In 1 team out there, hut there are lim- 
its I nist think we have to be careful It's a 
powerful medium." 

Fridge TV.com is a more advanced version 
of college coaches' Web sites, which have ex 
isted since the late 1990s, both in conjunc- 
tion with universities and independent of 
them. When Mack Brown arrived to coach 
the University of Texas's football team in late 
1997. he suggested the development of his 
own Web site to Bill Little, who then served 
as the school's sports information director, 
the liaison between the athletic department 
and the media. Little said he understood the 
implication as soon as the site — originally 
called mackbrown com — was latin I 

"When we did this. 1 told the guys in the 
office, 'We're going back in the newspaper 
business.' " Little said. "For years, the job of 
the SID was to provide information to the 
media to try to reach the public. Now. the 
public comes to us." 

They do so, at least in part, because in- 
house productions provide something tradi- 
tional media can't have: full access. 

"It's a way of controlling the message 
about the program, but not by excluding oth- 
er information." said Keith Woods, a faculty 
member at the Poynter Institute, a school tor 
journalists in St. Petersburg. Fla. "Instead. 
they're relying on the notion that the value of 
this information is so potent that you won't 
ask for more." 

Eric Lieberman, associate counsel for The 
Washington Post, said the special access 
lo FridgeTV.com is unfair to other 
media outlets. 

"We don't believe that the University of 
Maryland should be granting this kind of ex- 
clusive access to anyone." Lieberman said. 
"It is unwise as a matter of policy. It also rais- 
es First Amendment concerns because the 
university is a state school." 

Maryland Athletic Director Debbie Yow 
defended the arrangement. 

Atkinson "is in it in tin- media, he's a busi- 
nessman." Yow said. "Our legal office worked 
with us every step of the way on this — every 
step of the way. We talked it to death. That 
kind of access could only be given to some- 
one you trust. Video is reviewed before we 
put it up. We're comfortable with it." 

In some cases, coaches' interest in devel- 



oping their own Web sites came from the 
Internet itself. Independent, fan-produced 
sites, most featuring message boards and 
chat rooms where users can discuss their 
teams' fortunes, are now a staple of college 
athletics. At Virginia Tech, football coach 
Frank Beamer felt that too many rumors 
were being spread through the Hokies' Ian 
site, techsideline.com. His response: The de- 
velopment of beamerball.com. which de- 
buted in September 2000. 

"We knew the Internet was going to be an- 
other avenue to find out about Virginia Tech 
football." said John Ballein, one of Beamer's 
close friends and an associate athletic direc- 
tor for football operations who is responsible 
for the site. This was an avenue for us to 
provide accurate information." 

For now, at least, FridgeTV.com is free. 
Subscribers to beamerball.com. however, 
pay $39.95 per year, allowing them daily 
practice reports, pictures from the locker 
room, a section with messages from Beam- 
er's wife called "Cheryl's Comer" along with 
other news and updates. Most coaches' Web 
sites provide similar content. Seven spon- 
sors — mostly Blacksburg-based business- 
es — appear on the beamerball.com home 
page, providing revenue beyond the sub- 
scriptions, of which Ballein will only say the 
goal is 10,000 members, "and we're on our 
way to our goal," he said. Beamer — who 
earns $1,025 million annually from the 
school and through media and athletic appar- 
el contracts — uses the money to supplement 
the income of his coaching staff "pretty well." 
Ballein said. 

Because Virginia Tech's athletic depart- 
ment couldn't come up with funds to pay the 
coaching staff more, it approved of the site. 
But in the early going, there were instances 
when stories broke on beamerball.com when 
the university would have preferred to re- 
lease the information itself. 

There were some minor conflicts in that 
first year," Virginia Tech Athletic Director 
Jim Weaver said. "But it was just as we were 
all getting used to working together on the 
thing." 

The uses of such sites are almost endless. 
At Texas, two Longhoms players host a 
weekly show on what is now known as mack- 
brown-texasfootball.com called "Kickin' it 
with the 'Horns," offering interviews with 
players ribbing each other that can't be seen 
anywhere else. Each week, the players an- 
swer 10 questions from folks who have 
logged on. 

"We've gotten questions from Canada, 
Paris, Florida, Georgia, places you wouldn't 
even think people cared," said wide receiver 
B.J. Johnson, one of the show's hosts. "We 



try to talk about things that people don't 
know about the players, about what goes on 
in the locker room and on the sideline during 
games, that you can't see anywhere else." 

That, Johnson said, is appealing to high 
school players who might come to Texas. 
FridgeTV.com, too, has recruiting in mind. 
Each week, Atkinson plans on producing a 
story on different aspects of the program, 
such as the academic advisers who check on 
whether players go to class. 

"Ralph will never have to say to a parent, 
when he goes into a home recruiting, 'Listen, 
if your kid is going through a rough time, m 
take care of him,' " Atkinson said. "He can 
say, 'Click on this site, and 111 show you how I 
take care of my players ' " 

The NCAA has a labyrinth of rules dictat- 
ing when coaches can contact high school 
players, right down to how many phone calls 
can be made in a given week. The NCAA, 
however, says it has no way to monitor such 
Web sites. Potentially, at least, they can be 
come avenues for coaches to reach Web- 
sawy teenagers — even during times when 
direct contact is disallowed. In the past, this 
contact was done primarily through the U.S. 
mail. 

Now. in the Internet age. the NCAA does 
not regulate how many e-mails coaching 
staffs send to high school players. The orga- 
nization, in fact, is struggling to keep up with 
how — or if — it should monitor such contact. 

"It's a little bit tricky," said DeUse O'Meal- 
ly, the NCAA's director of membership ser- 
vices. "We have been trying to look at it over 
the last couple of years, as technology has ex- 
ploded. But it's probably gotten a little ahead 
of us. Our rules were written 10 or 15 years 
ago. We're trying to address the issues as 
they come up, but it moves quickly." 

Atkinson believes the model behind Frid- 
geTV.com wfll spread quickly to other 
schools, and he is prepared to help them con- 
struct similar sites. Right now, the site 
doesn't generate revenue for Friedgen — 
whose total compensation approaches $1 
million — or the coaching staff. Atkinson, 
though, has a business model that provides 
for syndication opportunities should regular 
television stations want to buy content, con- 
tent that's much different from the rosters 
and statistics that most college Web sites of- 
fer. 

"For them, that's okay," he said. "For the 
future. I don't think that's okay, because as 
people get into the content business, as I turn 
Maryland into a broadcast outlet, as more 
people do that, the quality of what's broad- 
cast is going to have to continually rise. You'll 
be in the arms race as far as video coverage, of 
college athletics goes." 



121 



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Baltimore Sun • Nov. 22, 2003 



Allen's ego isn't runaway threat 



I'M sophomore sparkles 
given chance but accepts 
role when Perry healthy 



By Kevin Van Valkenburo 

SUN STAFF 




COLLEGE PARK — Josh Al- 
len has speed. He's got power. 
He's got vision, and he's got 
guts. When he ran for 257 yards 
against Virginia on national 
television last week, he got the 
attention of the entire country. 

But this season, It's been the 
thing AUen lacks that has made 
him such an asset to Maryland. 

"He doesn't have an ego." said 
Terps coach Ralph Frledgen. 

That comes In pretty handy if 
you're constantly tinkering and 
tweaking an offense, as Frledgen 
is with Maryland. At times this 
year, Allen has been a classic 
feature back, like last week 
when he carried the ball 38 
times in the 
Terps' 27-17 
defeat of the 
Cavaliers. But 
other times, 
Allen has 
stood pa- 
tiently on the 
sidelines, will- 
ing to take a 
back seat to 
senior Bruce 
Perry, who 
has fought a 
two-year battle with Injuries. 

Against Georgia Tech, Allen 
had Just five carries. Against 
Florida State, he touched the 
ball only twice. Allen, a sopho- 
more, has still managed to lead 
Maryland with 718 yards rush- 
ing, and he has scored nine 
touchdowns in 10 games, easily 
the best on the team. 

"There's certainly been a few 
times when I felt like I could 
have made a difference," said the 
soft-spoken Allen. "You can't be 
a competitive person If you don't 
think that way. But I trust the 
coaching staff, and I've Just tried 
to keep working hard In practice 
to show them I'm capable of do- 
ing the Job." 

■ lgen has always had faith 

In AUen, going back to his high 

days at Eleanor Roose- 

-enbelt. But at the 

: ind had a surpi 

made 




^^ 



Allen 



GENE SWEENEY JR. : SUN STAFF 

Aided by this 80-yard touch- 
down run, Josh Allen rushed for 
257 yards on 38 carries against 
Virginia on national television 
last week. 

end up with 20 running backs and 
no offensive linemen," he said. 

Something about Allen, how- 
ever, made Friedgen change his 
mind. For starters, he decided, 
this kid had character. Secondly, 
Friedgen thought if he didn't 
sign Allen, it would haunt him 
for years. Georgia Tech was one 
of Allen's major suitors, and 
Imagining him galloping 
through Maryland's defense 
made the decision an easy one. 

Finding him a consistent spot 
in the lineup has proven to be 
more difficult. Allen averaged 
6.8 yards a carry as a true fresh- 
man and scored eight touch- 
downs In as many games, but 
playing behind Perry and Chris 
Downs limited him to 60 carries 
for the year. Both players, Allen 
concedes, were better pass 
blockers, and that meant more 
than any of the big plays he was 
making. Those Included a 
70-yard touchdown run against 
West Virginia and a 60-yard run 
against North Cai ■■ 

"Physically, I think I was 
ready," Allen said. "But meir 
I still had a lot to learn. I tend to 
look back and think abon 
bad stuff morp than I do the 
good stuff; the blocks I could 
have made or night 

have run harder." 

There Is a quiet conflden 
A 1 1 p n . hi 

When 



Next for Terps 

Matchup: Maryland (7-3, 4-2) 

vs. N.C. State (7-4. 4-3) 

Site: Carter-Flnlev Stadium, 

Raleigh, N.C. 

When: Tomorrow, 3:30 p.m. 

TV/Radio: Chs. 2, 7/WBAL 

(1090 AM) 

Line: N.C. State by 1 



both Injured against North Car- 
olina, Maryland's coaching staff 
wasn't sure what to do heading 
into the Virginia game. Friedgen 
spent the week trying to decide 
whether to burn the redshlrt 
year of freshman Lance Ball. In 
the hotel the day of the game, 
quarterback Scott McBrlen 
pulled Allen aside. 

"How about 100 yards to- 
night?" McBrlen said. 

"How about 200?" Allen re- 
sponded. 

Allen had 154 yards going into 
the locker room, thanks In great 
part to an 80-yard run in the 
second quarter — the Terps' 
longest of the year. Allen took 
the handoff, bounced outside 
and got a great block from tight 
end Jeff Dugan, and outran two 
Virginia players to the end zone. 

"The entire time I felt like I 
couldn't run because it was so 
cold," Allen said. "I kept thinking, 
'Well, I hope It's affecting them 
more than It's affecting me.' " 

It was the only time all game 
Allen had to look over his shoul- 
der. For the first time all season, 
it was his game to win or lose. 

"Sometimes the beginning of 
the game is like the first round 
of a boxing match, when two 
fighters are Just feeling things 
out. As it goes on. you recognize 
tendencies and read the defense 
better," he said. 

This week. Perry is back from 
an ankle Injury, and the two of 
them will likely split carrlps 
again as Maryland travels to 
N.C. State. Friedgen acknowl- 
edged this week that, If this 
were the NFL or a player with 
more ego, he'd likely have to 
work overtime massaging egos, 
making sure someone didn't feel 
slighted by the arrangement. 
Not the case with Allen. 

"I don't ever feel the need to 
talk to let people know what I 
can do." Allpn said "If I work 
hard, T know I'll . 

Hal Talk dopsn't m 
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Baltimore Sun • Nov. 25, 2003 

Friedgen. 
Billick: 2 ways 
to reach heart, 
light a fire 






AS THE UNIVERSITY of 
Maryland and the Ra- 
vens staged miraculous 
fourt;. quarter comebacks over 
the weekend, it wasn't just the 
explosive offenses that won 
games, but also the strong per- 
sonalities of the coaches that 
played key roles. 

If Terps coach Ralph Friedgen 
and Ravens boss Brian Billick 
have one thing In common, it's 
that they get their teams to play 
with passion. The Terps haven't 
quit on Friedgen in a game in 
three years. Except for the last 
game of his first season against 
New England in 1999, the Ra- 
vens have played equally as hard 
for Billick. 

The Terps erased a 14-point 
deficit against North Carolina 
State on Saturday night to win, 
26-24, and the Ravens overcame 
a 17-point deficit in the fourth 
quarter for a 44-41 overtime vic- 
tory over Seattle on Sunday. 
Whew. What gives? 
It's charisma and motivation; 
the ability to reach a team's 
soul. Some coaches have it; a lot 
of them don't. Evidently. 
Friedgen and Billick have it. 
Just look at the game film. 

The Ravens were extremely 
lucky Sunday and got some 
breaks from the officiating crew. 
But they also got plays from the 
usual playmakers, such as safety 
Ed Reed and Inside linebacker 
Ray Lewis. 

Quarterback Anthony Wright 
and receiver Marcus Robinson, 
two players who had contrib- 
uted very little, came through in 
the second half. 

Seattle should have won the 
game, and the Ravens could 
have easily folded before the 
fourth quarter, but that's not 
their style. Billick's forte is hold- 
ing a team together and keeping 
the players focused. 

Down at Maryland, the Terps 
should be thankful Wollpack 
coach Chuck Amato blows a 
fuse with his [See Preston. 6c] 



[Preston, from Page I 

Ulng in tight games. But 
:; portant] i he Terps 
also showed great resolve. They 
got a big hit from linebacker Le- 
roy An oush and several key 
plays from quarterback Scott 
McB: 

Kjcker Nick Novak, who 
missed an extra point that could 
have tied the game, redeemed 
himself by converting the game- 
winning. 43-yard field goal with 
23 seconds left. 

Again, the Terps didn't quit. It 
has to be something special 
about the coaches 

"The biggest challenge as a 
coach, in the pros or college, Is 
dealing with the collective per- 
sonnel of your team," said 
Billick. 

The message from Billick and 
Friedgen is the same, one of set- 
ting goals and being account- 
able. Both believe in fast-paced 
practices, but on scaling them 
down late in the season. 

Maryland is 10-2 from Novem- 
ber on under Friedgen, and 
BUlick is 24-12 in November and 
December since 1999. Both are 
regarded as players' coaches, 
but they have different styles. 

Billick Is more of a salesman 
and psychologist with the $50 
words and the blustery, confron- 
tational style. Arrogant? Yes. 
Friedgen is more quiet, direct 
and uses more one-syllable 
words. Cocky? Without ques- 
tion. 

Fridge is Bubba. Billick is 
Freud 

Anybody or anything can be- 
come Public Enemy No. 1 of the 
week with Billick. He is liberal 
on bed checks on the road and 
curfew during training camp. 
The team offers a number of 
programs to the players dealing 
with investments and finances 
and seminars on drugs and alco- 
hol abuse. 

A lot of NFL coaches don't 
bother with such things. 

"I grew up in white, middle- 
class, suburban LA." said 
Billick. "For me to lay some of 
that morality on them about 
what they should and shouldn't 
be doing off the field isn't going 
to work. 

"We try to mentor them with 
different programs, even though 
the agents and financial advis- 
.' ant to distance us. We 
ake it easy on them in 
keep their legs fresh in 
r and December, when 
- omething 
nk they appreciate some 
things we do." said Billick. 
I do push the pedal to 
meda; they respond" 

k defuses problems in 

He has already spoken 
nning back Jamal Lewis 



Mike 
Preston 

about his goals of breaking ihe 
single-season rushing mar --. but 
has told him he won't 1 1 
ing him In the last game 
Ravens already are playoff- 
bound, record or no record. 

"There is a natural sell 
est of. 'How do I get mine?' 
said Billick. "It's fine to acki 
edge that it exists and to give 
them the latitude to enhance 
that, but as long as it doesn't af- 
fect the team. You can't wait un- 
til the problem happens. Players 
appreciate the communication 
and working it out like men." 

Friedgen is dealing with 
younger men. His approach is a 
little different. He puts a lot of 
pressure on seniors to lead and 
is more rah-rah. He has been 
known to toss a few chairs and 
tables at halftime. He head- 
butted and chest-bumped play- 
ers before the North Carolina 
game. He stands up and sings 
the school fight song after 
games. 

The players love this kind of 
stuff. 

Like Billick, Friedgen is going 
to fight for his players. He got a 
new dining room facility for his 
players on campus. He was in- 
strumental in getting additions 
to the football field house. 

But unlike Billick, Friedgen 
can't allow as much freedom to 
his players. He is more of a fa- 
ther figure on campus. He has 
to be. because some of his play- 
ers haven't experienced such 
things as flying on an airplane 
or even traveling to another 
state. A college coach has 
greater impact on a player's life 
than a pro coach. 

Friedgen is also direct. He 
points at himself when the 
Terps run a bad play. He is so 
blunt that it might get him in 
trouble one day. 

On Saturday night. Friedgen 
said he saw his team come to- 
gether as a family. The Ravens 
might one day point to Sunday's 
game against Seattle as their 
turning point, too. 

"In the pros, what you repre- 
sent is an authority figure." said 
Billick. "In college, it in itself cre- 
ates a certain authority that 
most kids aren't going to violate. 
They may think you're as 
screwed up as Hogan's goat 
they won't say it. At ttus level 
the players will tell you. ... 
Whichever level you're or 
better be prepared." 

Billick and Friedgen seen, 
have done it verv well. 




Dealing wttb younrer playera, Maryland coach Ralph Frtedeen 
(above) Uaoroellungofa father rirure lo the Tarpa and takea a 
more disciplined approach than doea the Ravens" Brian IJliUek. 



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Baltimore Sun • Nov. 27, 2003 




Terps' Ambush enjoys being big hit 



Fumble-inducing tackle 
puts senior in spotlight 

By Kevin Van Valkenburo 

SUN STAFF 



COLLEGE PARK — When Le- 
roy Ambush awakes each morn- 
ing, bleary-eyed and reluctant to 
drag himself to class, he rolls out 
of bed, boots up his computer, 
and watches the wicked hit he 
put on North Carolina State run- 
ning back TA. McLendon. 

"It makes it pretty easy to get 
motivated to go to class," Am- 
bush said. 

Ambush isn't the only one 
whose mornings are brighter 
from watching the hit, which 
caused McLendon to fumble 
and allowed Maryland to come 
back and defeat N.C. State, 
26-24, on a last-second field goal. 
Scores of Terps fans have down- 
loaded the video clip of Am- 
bush's hit, and the play has also 
been shown repeatedly on 
ESPN. Coach Ralph Friedgen 
went so far as to say the hit 
would go down as one of the 



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DAVID HOBBY : SUN STAFF 



Once known more for his practice bits than for his game coll- 
isions, Maryland linebacker Leroy Ambush no longer Is a secret. 



great plays in Maryland history. 
It has certainly made Ambush's 
morning walk across campus an 
exciting affair. 

"[Monday], people I've never 
seen before were coming up to 
me and congratulating me," Am- 
bush said. "After the game, I 
probably had like 20 missed calls 
on my cell phone." 

Some of the most heartfelt 
thanks came from Nick Novak, 
who had just [See Terps, 3c] 



Nept for Terps 

Matchup: Maryland (8-3, 5-2) 
vs. Wake Forest (5-6, 3-4) 

Site: Groves Stadium, 
Winston-Salem, N.C. 

When: Saturday, 3:30 p.m. 

TV/Radio: ESPN/WBAL 
(1090 AM) 

Line: Maryland by 8 



124 



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Maryland's Ambush enjoys being big hit 



[Terps,from Page lc] 




Ambush 



missed an extra point minutes 
before that left the Terps trail- 
ing 24-23. When Maryland recov- 
ered the fumble with 1:46 re- 
maining, Novak got a shot at re- 
demption, and made a 43-yard 
field goal for the win. 

"He always tells me I'm the 
man," Ambush said of Novak. "I 
felt real bad for Nick after miss- 
ing that extra point. I wanted to 
do anything I could do to help 
him out. I knew if he got another 
chance, he'd knock it down." 

Ambush, a 
senior, has al- 
ways had a rep- 
utation for be- 
ing a big hitter 
at Maryland, 
but most of his 
helmet-rattling 
licks have come 
during prac- 
tice, and as a 
result, gotten 
Uttle attention 
outside the Terps' locker room. 
But that changed last week. 
McLendon dashed through the 
hole and avoided defensive end 
Kevin Eli. In the process, he put 
himself directly in Ambush's 
path, and the 6-foot-l, 
231-pound linebacker from 
Thomas Johnson hit him so 
hard, McLendon's head hit the 
ground before his feet did. 

"Honestly. I had no clue the 
ball came out," Ambush said. 
"My intention ... was just to get 
him on the ground so we could 
line back up and play some 
more defense. But when I got up 
and saw everybody jumping 
around. I figured something 
good must have happened." 

Ambush suspects he has 
watched the replay 25 times. 

"I watch it at least three or 
four times a night when I go 
home," Ambush said. "It hasn't 
really sunk in yet. I've had big 
hits, but never one that changed 
the game like that" 

Ambush's career, in fact, has 
been steady, but for the most 
part, quiet until now. A two-year 
smarter. Ambush plays "the 
"Sam" linebacker position in 
Marjfland's defense, which re- 
quires him to line up on the 
same side as the tight en 

le flashiest position, but it 
isn't an easy one to fill either. 



"He'll be one of the tougher 
guys to replace next year," 
Frledgen said. "I think he's one 
of the unsung heroes of this 
team. He's very consistent. It's 
hard to find big strong guys that 
can line up over the tight end 
that can also play In coverage." 
■ Ambush, who is seventh on 
the team in tackles with 44, 
doesn't mind that the focus and 
attention Is often elsewhere. 
"Everybody has a role on the 

team," he said. "I might not be 
the person in there making all 
the tackles, scoring all the 
touchdowns, but everybody's 
role is just as valuable. ... If I'm 
not making the play, I'm sure 
I'm doing something to help 
somebody else make the play" 

He's had plenty of opportuni- 
ties to relive his moment in the 
sun, including multiple times 

with his parents. 

"My mom was jumping up 
and down but she really didn't 
know what was going on," Am- 
bush said. "She couldn't see the 
play because she was too short 
to see over the fans In front of 
her. She called a bunch of times 
and wanted to talk about it." 

Ambush smiled when he 
heard Frledgen said the hit 



would go down in Maryland lore, 
but shook his head about being 
an unsung hero. 

"It's Just being In the right 
place at the right time," Ambush 
said. "Anyone probably could 
have made the play. It just so 
happens I was the one that did." 

NOTES: Friedgen said run- 
ning back Josh Allen (ankle 
sprain) and wide receiver Latrez 
Harrison (groin injury) are 
doubtful for Saturday's game. 
Tight end Jeff Dugan (concus- 
sion), who practiced yesterday, 
and comerback Curome Cox (leg 
bruise) are questionable. 



125 



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12004 MARYLAND GATOR ROWL GUIDE 



Washington Post • Nov. 27, 2003 




Qii)ctoasl)in0ton|3ost 



SPORTS 



Thursday, November 27, 20o3 



Finding Shelter From the Storm 

Terps' Merriman Didn't Have It Easy Growing Up. 

Now, He Wants to Help Others. 



By Barry Svuxuga 

Washington Post Staff Writer 



Shawne Merriman's body is divided in two, left 
and right, good and bad. 
Tattoos trail down both halves. On his left 
arm, a cross with a crown of thorns, a symbol 
for eternal life, another cross entwined with the 
words, "Forgive me Father." The good. On his right 
arm, the Japanese symbol for extreme pain, an evil- 
lookingSuperman figure surrounded by flames, a light 
switch to match his football-playing nickname, "Lights 




Out." The bad. 

It is what he has gone through in just 19 years, so 
much good now that he is one of Maryland's most im- 
portant and talented defensive players. And so much 
bad. 

The days leading up to Thanksgiving brought a 
chill over the practice fields in College Park, where 
Merriman — a sophomore linebacker-defensive end — 
and the Terrapins spent the last hours of daylight pre- 
paring for Saturday's regular season finale at Wake 
Forest. The cold hits Merriman hard. You wouldn't 
know it by looking at him, imposing at 6 feet 3, 246 

pounds, unflappable, energetic— happy to be playing 
football. But that crispness in the air rattles him, re- 
minds him. 

"This time of year, there's so many people out there 
that won't be able to afford coats," Merriman said. "1 
know the feeling." 

He lived the feeling. Polished and polite off the field, 
disciplined and determined on it, he doesn't exactly 
give off a vibe that his upbringing was, at times, brutal, 
that he didn't always have a winter coat, that he s< >me 

See MERRIMAN, D7. Col. 1 



BV JOHN MCOONNfU -THt WASHINGTON POST 



Shawne Merriman sometimes went without some 
basics, including a winter coat. He is behind a 
Maryland drive to collect coats for those in need. 



126 



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Merriman Finds a Way 
To Help His Community 



MERRIMAN 



times didn'l have heat, that his home 
life was so unsettled he occasionally 

lived with coaches It's all hidden be- 
hind a smile nearly as broad as his 
shoul' 

"He's got the greatest laugh," said 
Bill Johnson, his coach at Douglass 
High in Upper Marlboro. He 
sneaks about the cold days from his 
past. He would rather do something 
about them. 

Tuesday night. Maryland will 
hold the Shawne Merriman Coat 
Drive Fans who attend the basket- 
ball game against Wisconsin at Com- 
cist Center will be encouraged to 
bring their old, used winter coats. 
The collection, will be donated to the 
Prince George's County Family Shel- 
ter Program, which will pass them 
on to those in need. 
The drive was Merriman 's idea. It 
a simple gesture, an athlete 
on the brink of becoming a star giv- 
ing something back. It is. however, 
rooted in Merriman's complex past. 
wing up. not knowing what 
you're going to come home to after 
you leave the field, whether you're 
going to come home and the lights 
i ng to be off or whether there's 
going to be food there, it was hard, 
ard," Merriman said. "I know 
my mom tried the best she could, 
but it wasn't always enough." 

Seeking a Place to Live 



Gloria Williams was all of 16 
when she gave birth to a 10-pound 
baby boy, Shawne, a kid so big that 
at a Washington Bullets fan function 
former star Wes Unseld held up the 
baby and said, "Our next Bullet." 

By the time she was 18, Williams 
had a daughter. Sada. Merriman's fa- 
ther was rarely, if ever, in the picture. 
Williams was too young to handle it 
all, living in Chesterfield, Md., 
where Williams said drugs were so 
prevalent on the street that she 
wouldn't let her kids go outside 
"It wasn't the happiest time of our 

she said. 

In February 1993, a teenager 

tossed a Molotov cocktail through a 

iw in the family's Marlboro 

partment complex. He wanted 

n a resident who had wit- 

a murder that she had better 

keep quiet- 



It was that kind of neighborhood. 

The building burned A I year-old 

girl died. Fifty residents— including 

Gloria Williams and her two kids — 

were left displaced, out in the cold. 

"We lost everything," she said. 
"There was nothing left for us at all." 
Yet they moved back in, only to 
find more trouble. Bullets ripped 
through the patio door one Friday 
night, driving the mother and two 
kids into a closet, huddled together, 
trying to sleep. That was it Too 
much. 

"I broke down and turned it over 
to God." Williams said. "I couldn't 
control myself. I cried. I told him I 
needed him to pick me up, pick up 
my children. I had had enough of 
that neighborhood." 

By Saturday morning, she had 
rented a U-Haiil. She had no place to 
go. She left anyway, and landed for a 
time in Forestville. Eventually, they 
moved to Upper Marlboro. 

"There was so much stuff going 
on," Merriman said. "There was 
negativity all around me." 

Williams eventually married and 
had a third child, another daughter, 
Jaelund. But for Merriman, there 
were new problems. Williams would 
have a job, then lose it, have one, 
then lose it again. Merriman simply 
didn't have what other kids at school 
took for granted. A little spending 
money. Even food. His home life 
was, at best, unstable— not that he 
let anyone know. 

"He's an introvert, and he didn't 
say a lot," said J.C. Pinkney. the head 
coach at Douglass who was an assis- 
tant when Merriman was there. 
"When I first got to know him, we 
had to pry and try to really get him 
to say what the heck was going on. It 
was affecting his performance at 
school. You could just tell: He wasn't 
the normal, happy kid. He wasn't 
eating enough. He never had pocket 
mom 

Williams's troubles were deep. 
Court documents show that her 



inal record "Ties back to 1988. 
■ »ryd with assault 
Hei legal file is d<*&d with various 
charges, including »rt ongoing case 
for forging prescri|. ions. In 199.S. 
she hied lor bankruptcy. She prefers 
not to talk about it all now. "It's pri- 
vate," she said. 

As turbulent as things were, Mer- 
riman sticks up for his mother. "She 
did everything in her power," he 
said. "I love her to death for that, no 
matter what" 

"He is so fiercely loyal." Pinkney 
said. "If you have Shawne on your 
side, you know it would take so 
much — so much — for him to turn." 
One cold night, as autumn turned 
to winter and Merriman was a junior 
at Douglass, he stayed after school 
to watch the seniors practice for an 
all-star game. A Douglass assistant 
coach dropped him off at home. 

Merriman got out of the car. and 
the coach drove away. But when he 
went inside, there was no heat, no 
electricity. Merriman headed to a 
luse for tlu- night. The 
phone rang at 5:30 a.m.: Come 
home. Come home! 

Williams's townhouse was on fire. 
She had lit candles for warmth, and 
fell asleep. 

"It was my fault," she said. "It was 
all my fault." 

Merriman raced home, was there 
by 6. "One side of the house was to- 
tally gone," he said. "It was harsh. 
man. All the tough things I was go- 
ing through already, this added on to 
it. I don't know how I got through 
it." 

His eyes well up at the memory, 
still fresh. He called Pinkney, hyster- 
ical. 

"He was floored." Pinkney said. 
"His life was totally flipped upside 
down." 

Pinkney offered to do whatever 
Merriman needed. He gave him a 
bed. He gave him meals. He gave 
him a chance. Merriman had devel- 
oped into a star player, and there 
hispers around the Douglass 
community that the coaches were 
catering to him. ikney 

said. 

"Some of the kids thought we 
spent a lot of time on Shawne be- 
cause of his talent." he said. "They 
never knew what he was going 
through. He got a lot of attention 
from me because his situation was a 
lot different" 

Merriman remains thankful to 
Pinkney. They talk often, visit in per- 
son as much as possible. 

I only a coach," Merri- 
man said, "but he was an adult figure 
in my life that I could rel) 



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Football as a Focus 




Merriman: "Growing up, not knowing . . . whether you're going to come home 
and the lights are going to be off or whether there's going to be food there." 



128 



Sports as savior. So many times, 
we hear these stories. In Merriman's 
case, though, it is both trite and ac- 
curate to say that sports pulled him 
through, kept him focused, helped 
him mature, gave him a goal- 
provided him with a purpose. All of 
it, from football and basketball. 

"1 was blessed, all the way coming 
up, to have great coaches that looked 
out for me," he said. "Boys Club, and 
on up through high school. And I 
just love football so much." 

When Merriman played at Doug- 
lass as a ninth-grader, he was already 
6 feet tall, but just 175 pounds, John- 
son said. The first thing he ever said 
to Pinkney was, "Coach, all I want to 
do is hit." 

Which he did. As his body filled 
out, and his speed picked up, his re- 
cruitment became fierce. Notre 
Dame. Syracuse. So many letters 
and phone calls, the coaching staff 
didn't always tell him who was writ- 
ing, who was on the other end of the 
line. "He always loved Maryland," 
Pinkney said. 

Normally, such a player would at- 
tract an in-home visit from a pro- 
gran ich. Ralph Friedgen, 
Maryland's head coach, discussed it 
with Mike Locksley, the assistant 
who coordinated the Terrapins' re- 
cruiting effort. 

i the feeling Shawne didn't 
wan to his hoti 

aid 
He didn't Merriman committed 
tott 

ior, Merriii. 
Douglass' .ill time I 

II. ..in All-Mel II. 



named a high school ail-American by 
various recruiting magazines. Once 
at Maryland, he played as a 
man. Now, as a sophomore, he is 
p the Terps' most dynamic de 
tensive player, the one who, more of- 
ten than others, makes fans stand up 
and say, "Wow, look at that hit." 

"He has that kind of ability," 
Friedgen said, "You don't find his 
combination ot size and speed very 
often. He has to continue to get bet- 
ter, but he will, because he works so 
hard at it." 

The simple conclusion would be 
that Merriman works at it as a way 
ipe his upbringing, that he is 
using sports as his way out Natu- 
rally, he thinks about a future in the 
NFL. "You try not to think about it 
too much, because you'd get dis- 
tracted," he said. "But at the same 
time, if anybody wants to say that 
they don't think about it, especially 
at this level, then they wouldn't be 
the truth." 

But as he runs sprints thfc 
he would like to think that hi 
vation would be to play well and win. 

"Evei Istoknov* hi 

direct that motivation, whatever mo 

tivation you have inside," Merriman 

love to play football. I love to 

hit I hat's just who I am I don'l feel 

like I've nude it yet. Whether I make 

till up for gr 

'I'm Blessed' 

In though, tlios. 

it 
"I'm him," Wil 



other things. Bui Shawne, he's very 
smart. He'd always work. He's made 
me proud." 

During the rough spots, when 
Merriman was staying at Pinkney 's 
house or working out More school, 
playing bask I .a.m., Pink- 

ney would remind Merriman of 
what he was going through, how he 
was persevering. 

"I always told him: You remember 
where you came from," Pinkney 

You remember how i 
and if you can give back, you be a 
man and you give hack." 

Now. he's doing it. It's hard to re- 
member, as Merriman said, "I'm just 
19. I might not look like it, but I'm 
19." 

His tattoos. Merriman said, serve 
as a reminder of what he has gone 
through in his 19 years, both good 
and bad, ol the differences in his per- 
sonality on and off the field. The fi- 
nal tattoo Merriman received spans 
his massive hack, from the left shoul- 
der blade. ... Ood side, to 
the right the bad. [tiso 
where gladiators ' 

"I've just had to fight, lil 

tot, for what I haw 

nitely limit a lot oi character that I 

i iw. I've always realized that 
I'm blessed, even [o 

l came from, and 
up. because people who grew up like 

not supposed to make it this 
tar. aren't supposed torn' on this lev 
'\ I'm bles 
light, he will stand .inl- 
and lr 



2002 ORANOE BOWL 



2002 PEACH BOWL 



2004 OATOR BOWL