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Full text of "University of North Carolina at Charlotte Graduate Catalog"

LNGCHARLJJTTE 



The University of 
North Carolina at Charlotte 



Graduate Catalog 
2005-2007 



Vol. IV 

Available electronically at: http://www.uncc.edu/gradrniss/gs_catalog.htrnl 



The University of North Carolina at Charlotte is open to people of all races, 
committed to equality of educational opportunity, and does not discriminate against 
applicants, students, or employees based on race, color, national origin, religion, sex, 
sexual orientation, age, or disability. Moreover UNC Charlotte actively seeks to 
promote integration by recruiting and enrolling a large number of ethnically diverse 
students. 



ACADEMIC CALENDAR 2005-2007 

Dates pertaining to changes in enrollment and refunds are included in the calendars that appear in the Scheduk of Classes each 
semester and in the summer sessions bulletins. 



- _ 


2005-06 


2006-07 




FALL SEMESTER 








Academic Year Begins 


Aug 15 


Aug 15 




First Class Day 


Aug 22 


Aug 21 




No Saturday Classes 


Sept 3 


Sept 2 




Labor Day-University closed 


Sept 5 


Sept 4 




Student Recess - no classes 


Oct 10-11 


Oct 9-10 




Thanksgiving - no classes 


Nov 23-26 


Nov 22-25 




University closed 


Nov 24-25 


Nov 23-24 




Last Class Day 


Dec 7 


Dec 6 




Reading Day 


Dec 8 


Dec 7 




Final Examinations* 


Dec 9-10, 12-16 


Dec 8-9, 11-15 




Commencement 


Dec 17 


Dec 16 




SPRING SEMESTER 

First Class Day 






li 


Jan 9 


Jan 8 


M.L. King Day - University closed 


Jan 16 


Jan 15 




Student Recess - no classes 


Mar 6-11 


Mar 5-10 




Spring Weekend - no classes 


Apr 14-15 


Apr 6-7 




Saturday Classes Final Exams 


Apr 29 


Apr 28 




Last Class Day 


May 2 


May 1 




Reading Day 


May 3 


May 2 




Final Examinations* 


May 4-5, 8-11 


May 3-4, 7-10 




Ceremony Day 


May 12 


May 11 




Commencement 


May 13 


May 12 




Academic Year Ends 


May 14 


May 14 




FIRST SUMMER TERM 








Class Days Including Exams 


May 22-June 28 


May 21 -June 27 




Memorial Day — no classes 


May 29 


May 28 




SECOND SUMMER TERM 

Class Days Including Exams 






July 5-Aug 10 


July 5- Aug 10 




Fourth of July - University closed 


July 4 


July 4 




EXTENDED SUMMER TERM 






Class Days Including Exams 


May22-Augl0 


May 21 -Aug 10 




Fourth of July - University closed 


July 4 


July 4 





Common Examinations held on the first day of exams. 



Table of Contents 



The University 5 

The Graduate School 9 

Graduate Programs 9 

Graduate Student Life 10 

Admission to The Graduate School 11 

Types of Admission 12 

Application Requirements 13 

Financial Information 17 

Student Expenses and Fee Payments 17 

Tuition and Fees 19 

Financial Aid 21 

Academic Regulations and Degree Requirements 25 

Student Responsibility 25 

Academic Standing 29 

Master's Degree Requirements 33 

Ph.D. Degree Requirements 34 

Ed.D. Degree Requirements 35 

Graduate Certificate Requirements 36 

FERPA Notification 37 

College of Architecture 39 

Master of Architecture 39 

College of Arts and Sciences 50 

Applied Ethics 50 

Graduate Certificate in Applied Ethics 50 

Arts Administration 52 

MA. in Arts Administration 52 

Biology 56 

M.S. in Biology 56 

MA. in Biology 57 

Interdisciplinary Ph.D. in Biology 57 

Chemistry 63 

M.S. in Chemistry 63 

Cognitive Science 67 

Graduate Certificate in Cognitive Science 68 

Communication Studies 70 

M.A. in Communication 70 

Graduate Certificate in Communication 72 

Criminal Justice 74 

M.S. in Criminal Justice 74 

Earth Sciences 76 

M.S. in Earth Sciences 76 

English 85 

MA. in English 86 

Graduate Certificate in Applied Linguistics 87 

Graduate Certificate in Technical/Professional 

Writing 88 

English Education 93 

M.A. in English Education 93 

Geography 94 

M.A. in Geography 94 

Gerontology 100 

M.A. in Gerontology 101 

Graduate Certificate in Gerontology 102 

History 103 

M.A. in History 104 

Ph.D. in History (Aberdeen) 107 

Liberal Studies 108 

MA. in Liberal Studies 108 

Mathematics 110 



M.S. in Mathematics 110 

Ph.D. in Applied Mathematics 113 

Mathematics Education 115 

MA. in Mathematics Education 115 

Mathematics Education - Specialization in the 
Curriculum and Instruction Ph.D 116 

Operations Research 123 

Graduate Minor in Operations Research 124 

Optical Science and Engineering 125 

M.S. in Optical Science and Engineering 126 

Ph.D. in Optical Science and Engineering 127 

Physics 132 

M.S. in Applied Physics 132 

Psychology 136 

M.A. in Clinical/ Community 137 

M.A. in Industrial/Organizational 138 

Public Administration 142 

Master of Public Administration 142 

Graduate Certificate in Nonprofit Management.. 145 

Public Policy 148 

Ph.D. in Public Policy 148 

Religious Studies 156 

MA. in Religious Studies 157 

Sociology 159 

MA. in Sociology 159 

Spanish 162 

M.A. in Spanish 163 

Graduate Certificate in Translating and Translation 
Studies 164 

General Graduate Courses in Arts and Sciences 167 

Anthropology 167 

Foreign Language, French, and German 167 

Political Science 169 

Women's Studies 169 

College of Business Administration, Belk 170 

Accounting 170 

Master of Accountancy 170 

Business Administration 173 

Master of Business Administration 174 

MBA Plus Post-Masters Graduate Certificate 176 

MBA International Programs 176 

Economics 181 

M.S. in Economics 182 

General Graduate Courses in Business 185 

Finance 185 

College of Education 187 

Child and Family Studies: Early Education 188 

M.Ed, in Child and Family Studies: Early Education 

188 

Graduate Certificate in Child and Family 
Development: Early Intervention 190 

Counseling 192 

M.A. in Counseling 192 

Ph.D. in Counseling 193 

Graduate Certificate in Substance Abuse Counseling 

196 

Post-Masters Certificate in School Counseling.... 196 

Curriculum and Instruction 202 

Ph.D. in Curriculum and Instruction 202 



Curriculum and Supervision 206 

M.Ed, in Curriculum and Supervision 206 

Post-Masters Graduate Certificate in Curriculum and 
Supervision 208 

Educational Administration 209 

Master of School Administration (M.S.A) 209 

Educational Leadership 211 

Ed.D. in Educational Leadership 212 

Elementary Education 216 

M.Ed, in Elementary Education 216 

Instructional Systems Technology 218 

M.Ed, in Instructional Systems Technology 218 

Middle Grades Education and Secondary Education 

221 

M.Ed, in Middle and Secondary Grades 222 

Reading Education 225 

M.Ed, in Reading Education 225 

Special Education 226 

Ph.D. in Special Education 227 

M.Ed, in Special Education 229 

MAT. - Special Education 230 

Postbac Fast-Track Licensure Programs - Special 

Education 233 

Academically or Intellectually Gifted Graduate 

Certificate 234 

Supported Employment and Transition Graduate 
Certificate 235 

Teaching 240 

M.A. in Teaching 240 

Teaching English as a Second Language 246 

M.Ed, in Teaching English as a Second or Foreign 
Language 246 

General Graduate Courses in Education 248 

Education 248 

Research 249 

College of Engineering, William States Lee 251 

Civil Engineering 251 

Cooperative Ph.D. Program in Civil Engineering 252 
M.S.C.E. and M.S.E 252 

Electrical Engineering 258 

M.S.E.E. and M.S.E 259 

Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering 259 

Engineering Management 268 

M.S. in Engineering Management 268 

Mechanical Engineering 272 

M.S.M.E. and M.S.E 272 

Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering 274 

College of Health and Human Services 281 

Clinical Exercise Physiology 281 

M.S. in Clinical Exercise Physiology 281 

Graduate Certificate in Clinical Exercise Physiology 
283 

Health Administration 284 

Master of Health Administration 284 

Health Promotion 287 

M.S. in Health Promotion 287 

Graduate Certificate in Community Health 
Promotion 289 

Nursing 291 

School of Nursing 291 

M.S.N. - Adult Health Nursing 292 

Post-Masters Graduate Certificate in Advanced 
Practice Registered Nursing 293 



M.S.N./M.H.A. - Nursing and Health 

Administration 293 

Post-Masters Graduate Certificate in Nursing 

Administration 295 

M.S.N. - Nurse Anesthesia 295 

Post-Masters Graduate Certificate in Nurse 

Anesthesia 296 

M.S.N. - Family Nurse Practitioner 297 

Post-Masters Graduate Certificate in Family Nurse 

Practitioner 298 

M.S.N. - Community Health Nursing 299 

M.S.N. - Adult Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing 

300 

Post-Masters Graduate Certificate in Nursing 

Education 301 

Social Work 307 

Master of Social Work 308 

College of Information Technology 312 

Computer Science 312 

M.S. in Computer Science 313 

Certificate in Advanced Databases and Knowledge 

Discovery 314 

Information Technology 320 

Ph.D. in Information Technology 320 

Software and Information Systems 329 

M.S. in Information Technology 329 

Certificate in Information Security and Privacy ... 330 

Certificate in Management of IT 330 

Inter-College Graduate Programs 334 

Infrastructure and Environmental Systems (INES) . 334 
Ph.D. in Infrastructure and Environmental Systems 

334 

Mathematical Finance 339 

M.S. in Mathematical Finance 340 

Facilities and Services 342 

The Campus 342 

Educational Services and Facilities 343 

Student Activities 347 

Student Affairs and Services 351 

The University and the Community 353 

University Regulation of Student Conduct 357 

Code of Student Academic Integrity 357 

Code of Student Responsibility 357 

Program to Prevent Use of Illegal Drugs and Alcohol 

Abuse 359 

Immunization Requirements 361 

Directory 362 

Index 390 

Correspondence Directory 396 

Campus Map 397 



The University 



The University 



History Of The University Of North 
Carolina 

In North Carolina, all public educational institutions that 
grant baccalaureate degrees are part of the University of 
North Carolina. The University of North Carolina at 
Charlotte is one of the 16 constituent institutions of the 
multi-campus state university. 

The University of North Carolina, chartered by the N.C. 
General Assembly in 1789, was the first public University 
in the United States to open its doors and the only one to 
graduate students in the eighteenth century. The first class 
was admitted in Chapel Hill in 1795. For the next 136 
years, the only campus of the University of North 
Carolina was at Chapel Hill. 

In 1877, the N.C. General Assembly began sponsoring 
additional institutions of higher education, diverse in 
origin and purpose. Five were historically black 
institutions, and another was founded to educate 
American Indians. Several were created to prepare 
teachers for the public schools. Others had a 
technological emphasis. One is a training school for 
performing artists. 

In 1931, the N.C. General Assembly redefined the 
University of North Carolina to include three state- 
supported institutions: the campus at Chapel Hill (now 
the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill), North 
Carolina State College (now North Carolina State 
University at Raleigh), and Woman's College (now the 
University of North Carolina at Greensboro). The new 
multi-campus University operated with one board of 
trustees and one president. By 1969, three additional 
campuses had joined the University through legislative 
action: the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, the 
University of North Carolina at Asheville, and the 
University of North Carolina at Wilmington. 

In 1971, the General Assembly passed legislation bringing 
into the University of North Carolina the state's ten 
remaining public senior institutions, each of which had 
until then been legally separate: Appalachian State 
University, East Carolina University, Elizabeth City State 
University, Fayetteville State University, North Carolina 
Agricultural and Technical State University, North 
Carolina Central University, the North Carolina School of 
the Arts, Pembroke State University (now the University 
of North Carolina at Pembroke), Western Carolina 
University, and Winston-Salem State University. This 
action created the current 1 6-campus University. (In 
1985, the North Carolina School of Science and 
Mathematics, a residential high school for gifted students, 
was declared an affiliated school of the University.) 



The UNC Board of Governors is the policy-making body 
legally charged with "the general determination, control, 
supervision, management, and governance of all affairs of 
the constituent institutions." It elects the president, who 
administers the University. The 32 voting members of 
the Board of Governors are elected by the General 
Assembly for four-year terms. Former board chairmen 
and board members who are former governors of North 
Carolina may continue to serve for limited periods as 
non-voting members emeriti. The president of the UNC 
Association of Student Governments, or that student's 
designee, is also a non-voting member. 

Each of the 16 constituent institutions is headed by a 
chancellor, who is chosen by the Board of Governors on 
the president's nomination and is responsible to the 
president. Each institution has a board of trustees, 
consisting of eight members elected by the Board of 
Governors, four appointed by the governor, and the 
president of the student body, who serves ex-officio. 
(The NC School of the Arts has two additional ex-officio 
members.) Each board of trustees holds extensive 
powers over academic and other operations of its 
institution on delegation from the Board of Governors. 

The University Of North Carolina At 
Charlotte 

UNC Charlotte aspires to be North Carolina's most 
energetic and responsive university, offering unparalleled 
educational opportunities for nearly 25,000 students 
seeking the highest quality undergraduate, graduate, and 
continuing personal or professional enrichment in the 
liberal arts and sciences and selected professions. The 
goal of UNC Charlotte is to be a publicly supported 
Doctoral/Research University — Extensive in North 
Carolina early in the 21st Century. UNC Charlotte will be 
known especially for the individual commitment of each 
member of its collegial and diverse faculty and staff to 
extending educational opportunity and ensuring student 
learning and success, both at the graduate and 
undergraduate levels; its nationally and internationally 
recognized capacity for research and scholarship; and its 
willingness to join its resources in collaboration with 
those of other institutions to address the major 
educational, economic, social, and cultural needs of the 
greater Charlotte region. UNC Charlotte has a special 
responsibility to build the intellectual capital of this 
region. 

The University offers programs in architecture, business, 
education, engineering, health professions, the 
humanities, information technology, physical and 
biological sciences, and social and behavioral sciences. In 
order to meet the growing need for higher education in 
the Charlotte region and in the State, the University 



The University 



continues to expand degree programs and continuing 
education non degree offerings. 

The University is committed to excellence through 
informed and effective teaching in all academic programs 
and emphasizes undergraduate instruction as the 
foundation of life-long learning and advanced formal 
education. The students selected for admission have 
demonstrated a willingness to learn, a capacity to benefit 
from a broad array of intellectual resources, and the 
potential to participate in the opportunities offered by the 
changing global society. University programs are open to 
all qualified students without regard to race, color, 
national origin, gender, age, religious belief, sexual 
orientation, or disability. Participation by students from 
other states and nations is welcomed. 

The size and distinction of our research programs reflects 
the nationally competitive faculty. Recruited from across 
the world, they engage in both basic and applied research. 
Scholarly inquiry informs graduate and undergraduate 
instruction, and takes advantage of the University's 
location in a diverse and dynamic metropolitan region. 

The campus environment encourages the active 
involvement of students in their personal and intellectual 
development, including opportunities to learn leadership 
skills. The policies and practices of the University are 
designed to graduate students with the breadth and depth 
of knowledge and the intellectual and professional skills 
that prepare them for a productive life in an ever- 
changing world. The University experience will:, 

• Foster a realistic understanding of their personal 
potentials; 

• Promote a commitment to responsible 
citizenship and a capacity to lead; 

• Encourage strong ties and commitment to the 
University and its mission and vision; 

• Develop fundamental skills of inquiry in writing, 
mathematical and logical reasoning, information 
literacy and technology, and the sciences 

• Develop an understanding and appreciation of 
the themes of liberal education for private and 
public life in the areas of arts and society, the 
western tradition, global understanding, and 
ethical issues and cultural critique; 

• Develop oral and written communication skills; 

• Develop the ability to engage in reasoned debate 
about pressing moral concerns and to resolve 
them in an ethically sound and responsible 



Institutional Mission Statement 

UNC Charlotte is the only Doctoral/Research University 
- Intensive in the Charlotte region, fully engaged in the 
discovery, dissemination, synthesis, and application of 
knowledge. It provides for the educational, economic, 



social, and cultural advancement of the people of North 
Carolina through on- and off-campus programs, 
continuing personal and professional education 
opportunities, research, and collaborative relationships 
with private, public, and nonprofit institutions. UNC 
Charlotte has a special responsibility to build the 
intellectual capital of this area. As such it serves the 
research and doctoral education needs of the greater 
Charlotte metropolitan region. 

The primary commitment of UNC Charlotte is to extend 
educational opportunities and to ensure success for 
qualified students of diverse backgrounds through 
informed and effective teaching in the liberal arts and 
sciences and in selected professional programs offered 
through Colleges of Architecture, Arts and Sciences, 
Business Administration, Education, Engineering, 
Information Technology, and Health and Human 
Services, and through programs and services designed to 
support students' intellectual and personal development. 
The University offers an extensive array of baccalaureate 
and master's programs and a number of doctoral 
programs. 

With a broad institutional commitment to liberal 
education as the foundation for constructive citizenship, 
professional practice, and lifelong learning, UNC 
Charlotte is prepared to focus interdisciplinary resources 
to address seven broad areas of concern to the Charlotte 
region: 1) Liberal Education; 2) Business and Finance; 3) 
Urban and Regional Development; 4) Children, Families, 
and Schools; 5) Health Care and Health Policy; 6) 
International Understanding and Involvement; and 7) 
Applied Sciences and Technologies. 

Academic Structure 

UNC Charlotte is organized into four administrative 
divisions: Academic Affairs, Business Affairs, 
Development and University Relations, and Student 
Affairs. The Division of Academic Affairs includes 
Enrollment Management; The Graduate School; Library; 
Information and Technology Services; Metropolitan 
Studies and Extended Academic Programs; International 
Programs; Research; the Charlotte Research Institute and 
seven colleges, the Colleges of Architecture, Arts and 
Sciences, Business Administration, Education, 
Engineering, Information Technology, and Health and 
Human Services. The colleges offer 83 undergraduate and 
58 master's degree options and sixth year Certificates of 
Advanced Study, and 12 doctoral programs. Many of the 
departments throughout the University are involved in 
teacher education. The College of Education, advised by 
the University Teacher Education Committee, is 
responsible for these programs. 



The University 7 



Equal Opportunity And Affirmative 
Action 

The University of North Carolina at Charlotte recognizes 
a moral, economic, and legal responsibility to ensure 
equal employment opportunity for all persons, regardless 
of race, color, religion, gender (except when gender is a 
bona fide occupational qualification), sexual orientation, 
age, national origin, physical or mental disability (except 
when making reasonable accommodations for physical or 
mental disabilities that would impose undue hardship on 
the conduct of University business), or status as a 
disabled or Vietnam Era Veteran (except when making 
reasonable accommodations for physical or mental 
limitations of a person with such veteran status that 
would impose an undue hardship on the University). This 
policy is a fundamental necessity for the continued 
growth and development of this University. 
Nondiscriminatory consideration shall be afforded 
applicants and employees in all employment actions 
including recruiting, hiring, training, promotion, 
placement, transfer, layoff, leave of absence, and 
termination. All personnel actions pertaining to either 
academic or nonacademic positions to include such 
matters as compensation, benefits, transfers, layoffs, 
return from layoffs, University-sponsored training, 
education, tuition assistance, and social and recreational 
programs shall be administered according to the same 
principles of equal opportunity. Promotion and 
advancement decisions shall be made in accordance with 
the principles of equal opportunity, and the University 
shall, as a general policy, attempt to fill existing position 
vacancies from qualified persons already employed by the 
University. Outside applicants may be considered 
concurrently at the discretion of the selecting official. 
The University has established reporting and monitoring 
systems to ensure adherence to this policy of 
nondiscrimination. 

Affirmative Action 

Our philosophy concerning equal employment 
opportunity is affirmed and promoted in the University's 
Affirmative Action Plan. To facilitate UNC Charlotte's 
affirmative action efforts on behalf of disabled workers, 
disabled veterans and veterans of the Vietnam Era, 
individuals who qualify and wish to benefit from the 
Affirmative Action Plan are invited and encouraged to 
identify themselves. This information is provided 
voluntarily, and refusal of employees to identify 
themselves as veterans or disabled persons will not 
subject them to discharge or disciplinary action. Unless 
otherwise required by law, the information obtained will 
be kept confidential, except that supervisors and 
managers may be informed about restrictions on the work 
or duties of disabled persons and about necessary 
accommodations. 

Discriminatory Personal Conduct. The University 
seeks to promote a fair, humane, and respectful 



environment for its faculty, staff, and students. To that 
end, University policy explicitly prohibits sexual 
harassment, racial harassment, and all other personal 
conduct which inappropriately asserts that sex, race, 
ethnicity, sexual orientation, disability, or ancestry are 
relevant to consideration of individual worth or individual 
performance. The same policies provide procedures for 
the informal or formal resolution of instances where such 
behavior is suspected or alleged. The policies have 
received wide distribution and are available for inspection 
in all administrative offices on campus. 

ACCREDITATION 

UNC Charlotte is accredited by the Commission on 
Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and 
Schools (1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia 30033- 
4097: telephone number 404-679-4501) to award 
baccalaureate, master's, intermediate, and doctoral 
degrees. 

The Bachelor of Architecture and Master of Architecture 
"first professional degree" programs are accredited by the 
National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB). The 
Department of Chemistry is on the approval list of the 
American Chemical Society. The Master of Public 
Administration program is accredited by the National 
Association of Schools of Public Affairs and 
Administration (NASPAA). The Bachelor of Social Work 
and Master of Social Work programs are accredited by 
the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE). The 
programs in business and accounting are accredited by 
AACSB International - The Association to Advance 
Collegiate Schools of Business. The University's 
professional education programs for BK-12 teachers, 
counselors, and administrators are approved by the North 
Carolina Department of Public Instruction (NCDPI) and 
accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of 
Teacher Education (NCATE). The School Counseling 
and Agency (Community) Counseling programs in 
Counselor Education are accredited by the Council for 
Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational 
Programs (CACREP). The civil, computer, electrical, and 
mechanical engineering programs are accredited by the 
Engineering Accreditation Commission of the 
Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology; 
and the civil, electrical, and mechanical engineering 
technology programs are accredited by the Technology 
Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for 
Engineering and Technology (ABET), 111 Market Place, 
Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012; telephone: (410) 
347-7700. The Nursing programs are accredited by the 
Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE) 
and the BSN program is approved by the North Carolina 
Board of Nursing. The Nursing Anesthesia program is 
accredited by the Council on Accreditation of Nurse 
Anesthesia Educational Programs (CANAEP). The 
Bachelor of Athletic Training program is accredited by 
the Joint Review Committee on Educational Programs in 
Athletic Training (JRCAT) and Commission of Allied 



8 The University 



Health Education Programs (CAAHEP) through 
October 2008. Both the Bachelor of Science in Health 
Fitness program and the Master of Science in Clinical 
Exercise Physiology are in candidacy for accreditation by 
the Committee on Accreditation for the Exercise Sciences 
(CoAES) and Commission of Allied Health Education 
Programs (CAAHEP). The Master of Health 
Administration Program is in candidacy for accreditation 
by the Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare 
Management Education (CAHME). 

The University is a member of the Council of Graduate 
Schools, the Conference of Southern Graduate Schools, 
and The North Carolina Association of Colleges and 
Universities. 



The Graduate School 9 



The Graduate School 



Administration 

Thomas L. Reynolds, Associate Provost for Graduate Programs 
and Dean of the Graduate School 

Kent E. Curran, Senior Associate Dean of the Graduate School 

Johnna W. Watson, Associate Dean of the Graduate School 

Linda J. Dunatov, Assistant Dean for Graduate Student 

Affairs 

Greet Provoost, Assistant Dean for International Student 

Affairs 

Kenneth A. Lambla, Dean, College of Architecture 

Nancy A. Gutierrez, Dean, College of Arts and Sciences 

Claude C. Lilly III, Dean, Belk College of Business 

Administration 

Mary Lynne Calhoun, Dean, College of Education 

Robert E. Johnson, Dean, The William States Lee College 

of Engineering 

Karen Schmaling, Dean, College of Health and Human 

Services 

Mirsad Hadzikadic, Dean, College of Information 

Technology 

History and Organization of the Graduate 
School 

The University of North Carolina at Charlotte was 
established in 1965 by the North Carolina General 
Assembly, which transformed Charlotte College, with 
beginnings in 1946, into a campus of The University of 
North Carolina. The Graduate School was established in 
1985 with the appointment of the first Dean of the 
Graduate School, although graduate degree programs had 
been offered since 1969. Today more than 700 members 
of the Graduate Faculty and more than 4,000 graduate 
students participate in a broad array of graduate programs 
at the master's and doctoral levels and in graduate 
certificate programs. 

The executive and administrative affairs of the Graduate 
School are carried out by the Associate Provost for 
Graduate Programs and Dean of the Graduate School, 
who acts in cooperation with the deans of the seven 
colleges of Architecture, Arts and Sciences, Business 
Administration, Education, Engineering, Health and 
Human Services, and Information Technology. 

The Graduate Council 

The Graduate Council, whose voting members are elected 
by the Graduate Faculty, reviews, develops and makes 
recommendations concerning Graduate School policy. All 
curricular proposals and all criteria for membership on 
the Graduate Faculty come before the Graduate Council. 
In addition, the Graduate Council serves in an advisory 
capacity to the Dean of the Graduate School. 



The Graduate Faculty 

In accordance with criteria developed by each graduate 
program or unit and approved by the Graduate Council, 
the Dean of the Graduate School appoints members of 
the Graduate Faculty for renewable terms. Members of 
the Graduate Faculty offer courses and seminars, mentor 
graduate students, and supervise research at an advanced 
level of scholarship. 

The Graduate Directors and Coordinators 

Each graduate program, and in some cases certain 
program areas within a discipline, has either a Graduate 
Director or Coordinator. This individual is a member of 
the Graduate Faculty and is responsible for coordinating 
various functions of the departmental graduate program. 
Directors and Coordinators assist students with 
understanding program requirements (along with the 
student's specific advisor) and can answer program 
specific questions such as transfer credit, prerequisites, 
program specific admission requirements, etc. 



GRADUATE PROGRAMS 

Doctoral or Master's Degree Programs 

UNC Charlotte offers 12 doctoral and 56 master's degree 
programs. To be admitted to a degree program, an 
applicant must meet all the requirements for admission, 
be recommended by the department in which he/she 
proposes to study and receive the approval of the 
Graduate School. Acceptance into one graduate program 
does not guarantee acceptance into any other program. 
Acceptance into each program must be recommended by 
the department or college offering the program and 
approved by the Graduate School. 

Graduate Certificate Programs 

Graduate certificate programs are mechanisms for 
students who wish to complete a coherent graduate 
program in a defined area in which they do not wish to 
pursue a degree. Students are admitted to a specific 
graduate certificate program and are advised by faculty in 
the unit offering the graduate certificate. Since the 
graduate certificate is not a degree, students may apply the 
credits earned in the certificate program toward a degree 
that they pursue either concomitant with pursuing a 
graduate certificate or after the certificate has been 
awarded. 

Post-Baccalaureate Study 

Applicants seeking to take courses beyond the 
baccalaureate degree for licensure, license renewal, for 
transfer to another institution, as prerequisites for 



10 The Graduate School 



admission to a graduate degree program or for personal 
satisfaction may be admitted as post-baccalaureate 
students. A post-baccalaureate student who is 
subsequently admitted to full standing in a graduate 
degree program may, with the recommendation of 
his/her advisor and the approval of the Graduate School, 
apply a maximum of six graduate credit hours acceptably 
completed in the post-baccalaureate status toward a 
degree. 

Post-Baccalaureate study is not available to international 
students on, or intending to be on, F-l or J-l student 
visa/status, except for those with a valid Employment 
Authorization Document participating in Post Program 
Completion Optional Practical Training (for F-l) or 
Academic Training (for J-l) 

Readmission - All Students 

Post-baccalaureate, graduate certificate and degree 
students whose enrollment is interrupted will remain 
eligible to register for two calendar years without having 
to reapply for admission to the University if they are in 
good standing and have not exceeded the six or eight-year 
limit for their academic program of study. After an 
absence of more than 24 months, the student must apply 
for readmission; acceptance is subject to department, 
program and Graduate School approval. Students whose 
enrollment is suspended or terminated for academic 
reasons should consult the description of the procedures 
outlined in the "Academic Standing" section of the 
Catalog. 

Early-Entry to Graduate Programs 

Exceptional undergraduate students at UNC Charlotte 
may be accepted into some master's programs and begin 
work toward a graduate degree before completion of the 
baccalaureate degree. In those programs offering this 
option, an applicant may be accepted at any time after 
completion of 75 or more hours, although it is expected 
that close to 90 hours will have been earned by the time 
the first graduate course is taken. These students will have 
provisional acceptance status, pending the award of the 
baccalaureate degree. 

To be accepted in this program, an undergraduate student 
must have at least a 3.2 overall GPA and have taken the 
appropriate graduate standardized test and have earned an 
acceptable score. A given program may have more 
rigorous admissions criteria. If an early-entry student has 
not met the normal admission requirements of a 2.75 
overall undergraduate GPA and a 3.0 junior-senior GPA 
at the end of his/her baccalaureate degree, she/he will be 
dismissed from the graduate program. 

Students accepted into an early-entry program will be 
subject to the same policies that pertain to other 
matriculated graduate students. Generally, it will be 
assumed that early-entry students will finish their 
baccalaureate degrees before they complete 15 hours of 



graduate work. No courses taken before admission to the 
graduate program may be applied to a graduate degree. 

Some early-entry programs are also accelerated. Under 
this model, ordinarily up to six hours earned at the 
graduate level may be substituted for required 
undergraduate hours. In other words, up to six hours of 
graduate work may be "double counted" toward both the 
baccalaureate and graduate degrees. Individual programs 
may allow additional hours at the graduate level to be 
substituted. In no case may more than 12 hours be 
double-counted. 

Not all graduate programs have the early entry option. 
Inquiries should be addressed to the appropriate 
department or to the Graduate School. 



GRADUATE STUDENT 
LIFE 

New Graduate Student Orientation 

The Graduate School conducts several University-wide 
orientation programs for new graduate and post- 
baccalaureate students during the course of the year. 
Information about the dates and times of these programs 
can be found on the Graduate School Website 
(http://www.uncc.edu/gradmiss/). Information on the 
fall semester programs is also sent, beginning in July, 
directly to new students admitted for the fall semester. All 
Graduate Assistants are required 'to attend a specific 
orientation program prior to the fall semester as part of 
their assistantship contract. 

The orientation programs offer information about various 
University programs and services for graduate students; 
provide publications, including the New Graduate Student 
Handbook, to serve as resource guides for students; 
various content workshops on issues relevant to graduate 
education and graduate student life; and provide 
opportunities for students to ask specific questions. 

Many of the individual graduate programs conduct 
discipline-specific orientation programs for their new 
graduate students. Degree students should contact their 
major department for information on programs that may 
be available. In addition, the International 
Student/Scholar Office (ISSO) conducts orientation 
sessions specifically designed for international graduate 
students. 

Student Involvement 

Students at UNC Charlotte are encouraged to participate 
in co-curricular activities. UNC Charlotte acknowledges 
that graduate students have many, many priorities in their 
lives. However, as with so many other aspects of one's 
life, active involvement enhances the experience. 



The Graduate School 11 



Graduate and Professional Student Government 

The Graduate and Professional Student Government 
(GPSG) ) is the governing and primary organization for 
graduate students to present their needs to the University. 
The purpose of the Graduate and Professional Student 
Government (GPSG), according to the by-laws, is to 
serve as an appropriate voice on campus for graduate 
students, to meet the various needs of graduate students, 
and to establish a liaison between graduate faculty, 
graduate students, and the University. All graduate 
students are members of the GPSG. 

In the spring of 1998, the Graduate Student Association 
successfully petitioned the student body through a 
referendum on the spring student body elections. The 
results of this referendum provided a significant change 
in the student body constitution and provided for the 
Graduate and Professional Student Government to 
become a separate governing body and representative 
organization for graduate students. In outlining the 
reasons for this separation, the GPSG cited the need for a 
GPSG office and the graduate student share of student 
activity fees to support: departmental graduate student 
associations, graduate student travel to read papers at 
academic conferences, and developing a Graduate 
Student Research Forum. 

During the 1998-1999 academic year, GPSG began 
functioning as its own governing body. In the 1999-2000 
academic year, the recognition of current (and new) 
graduate student organizations and the funding of these 
groups, including the GPSG, became the responsibility of 
the Graduate and Professional Student Government. 
Since the inception of the GPSG in its current structure, 
the availability of student activity fees to graduate 
students directly have increased dramatically. With this 
new governing structure, the GPSG has been very 
successful in advocating for and supporting graduate 
student needs. An annual Research Fair competition was 
begun in the spring of 2001 to showcase and reward 
excellence in graduate student research across all 
disciplines. GPSG continues to be active in new graduate 
student orientation, encouraging and recognizing graduate 
student organizations and increasing the amount of 
student activity fee support for graduate students. Each 
graduate program has the opportunity to be represented 
on the GPSG senate. More information about this 
opportunity can be obtained from the Assistant Dean for 
Graduate Student Affairs at 704-687-3375. 

The GPSG Office is located in the Cone University 
Center, room 3691, (704) 687-3231. The GPSG Web 
address is: http://www.uncc.edu/gpsg. 

Graduate Student Organizations 

There are a number of graduate student organizations 
directly associated with academic programs. They include: 
American College of Healthcare Executives 
American Society of Precision Engineering 
Association of Biology Graduate Students 



Association of Chemistry Graduate Students 
Association of Graduate Information Technology 

Students 
English Graduate Student Association 
Gamma Theta Upsilon (Geography) 
Graduate Economics Student Society 
Graduate History Association 
Graduate Public Health Association 
Graduate Public Policy Association 
Graduate Social Work Association 
Graduate Sociology Association 
Graduate Student Nursing Organization 
International Society for Optical Engineering 
Masters of Architecture Student Society 
Masters of Business Administration Association 
Masters of Public Administration Student Group 
Mathematics Graduate Student Association 

Information on each group is available from the academic 

program department. Some groups have information 

available on the Student Life Website at: 

http://www.uncc.edu/cone/clubs/. 

Please see additional information on the various 
programs, offices and services at UNC Charlotte in 
the "Programs, Services and Facilities" section in the 
back of this Catalog. 



ADMISSION TO THE 
GRADUATE SCHOOL 

Admissions Information 

The University considers all applications without regard 
to race, color, sex, sexual orientation, national origin, 
disability, age or religion. All relevant factors are 
considered, with major emphasis being placed on the 
academic history of the applicant. The intent of the 
University is to offer admission to those applicants whose 
credentials indicate a strong likelihood of success in their 
selected curricula. 

The University reserves the right to withhold or rescind 
the admission of an applicant who fails to meet any of the 
requirements for admission at the time of matriculation. 
Additionally, meeting the minimum admission 
requirements does not guarantee admission to a graduate 
program and the University reserves the right to restrict 
enrollments when necessary because of budgetary or 
other constraints. 

Application Materials 

A separate application and processing fee must be 
submitted for each graduate program of study for which 
a student applies. Requests for application materials and 
additional information about graduate programs should 
be directed to one of the following. 



12 The Graduate School 



Applicants Should Contact 

Office of Graduate Admissions 

UNC Charlotte 

9201 University City Boulevard 

Charlotte, NC 28223-0001 

Telephone: 704-687-3366 

Fax: 704-687-3279 

World Wide Web: http://www.uncc.edu/gradmiss 

(International Students should also see : http:// 

www.uncc.edu/intradmn) 

E-Mail 

For Domestic Applicants 

E-mail: gradadm@email.uncc.edu 

For International Applicants 

E-mail: intlgradadm@email.uncc.edu 

Application Deadlines 

Students are encouraged to apply and to submit all 
supporting documents well in advance of the published 
deadlines. Some programs have earlier deadlines and may 
only admit to a particular term. Please contact the 
department offering the program to which you are 
applying for specific deadline information. The University 
may alter the date for acceptance of applications without 
further notice in accordance with available resources and 
the enrollment limitation established by the North 
Carolina General Assembly. 

Term of Entry: Application Should Be 

Completed By: 

Fall May 1 

Spring October 1 

First or Second Summer Session April 1 

Application Processing 

Applications of US Citizens, US Permanent Residents, 
Asylees and Refugees are processed as "domestic" 
applications. Applications of students on, or intending to 
be on, temporary visa/status in the USA (i.e. F-l, H-l, H- 
4 etc) as well as Pending Permanent Residents are 
processed as "international applications". Applicants 
should follow application instructions accordingly. 

Application Processing Fee 

A non-refundable $55 processing fee (drawn on a U.S. 
bank) must accompany each application that is 
submitted. Acceptable forms of payment are a personal 
check or a money order made payable to UNC Charlotte. 
Please make sure that your name is clearly noted on the 
check or the money order as the intended applicant. 
Applications received without the required fee will remain 
on file, unprocessed, in the Graduate School office for 
one year. 

Application Status 

Applicants will be notified once the application for 
admission has been received. Applicants can monitor the 



status of their applications via the Graduate Admissions 
Website: http://www.uncc.edu/gradmiss. 



TYPES OF ADMISSION 

(For Doctoral Degrees, Master's Degrees, and 
Graduate Certificates 

Full Standing 

Applicants who meet the general requirements for 
admission to graduate study plus any additional 
requirements specified by the college or department of 
academic concentration for the degree sought will be 
admitted to full standing. 

Note: 

Summer Session Entry Term Enrollment is generally 
available to international students already in the USA on a 
temporary visa status, including those who are attending 
UNC Charlotte or another institution of higher education 
in the USA on F-l/J-1 status prior to their intended 
enrollment in UNC Charlotte's Graduate School. Special 
conditions apply for initial entry F-l/J-1 visa/status 
holding international students. Please contact the 
Graduate School's Office of Admissions for further 
information. 

Provisional Standing 

Applicants to graduate programs who have not yet 
completed their undergraduate or masters degree will be 
provisionally admitted, pending the University's receipt of 
final transcripts (and/or diploma / degree certificates) 
indicating the award of the baccalaureate or masters 
degree. Students will have a maximum of one semester on 
provisional admission. Failure to produce the proper 
credentials during the first semester following provisional 
admission will result in a hold on registration. 

Deferment Policy 

An applicant who is admitted to a graduate program of 
study who fails to enroll for the term to which he/she has 
been admitted is presumed to have withdrawn his/her 
application. The application may be reinstated if the 
request to do so is received within one year from the 
originally requested term of entry. This request should be 
in writing and addressed to the Office of Graduate 
Admissions at least six weeks prior to the term in which 
the applicant seeks to register. Students are eligible to 
update an application for admission for one year from the 
original term of application. Applications and supporting 
documents for persons who are admitted to a graduate 
program but do not enroll are maintained on file for one 
year from the original term of application. Note that 
some programs require an applicant's credentials to be 
re-evaluated before deferring admission to a later term. 
International students on, or intending to be on, F-l or J- 
1 visa status may be required to provide updated proof of 
legal status and financial resources. 



The Graduate School 13 



Policy on Updating Applications 

Applicants who do not submit their materials in time to 
be considered for admission to the requested term are 
expected to notify the Office of Graduate Admissions to 
request consideration for admission to a subsequent term. 
Students are eligible to update an application for 
admission to a subsequent term for one year from the 
original term of application. Incomplete applications 
(including test score reports) are maintained on file for 
one year from the original term of application. Supporting 
credentials received without an application will be 
maintained on file in the Office of Graduate Admissions 
for one year. All applications for persons who are not 
admitted are maintained on file for one year. Students 
whose admission to UNC Charlotte was denied may not 
update their application to a future term, but must 
reapply for admission i.e. submit a new application, 
application fee and supporting credentials/forms. 



GENERAL APPLICATION 
REQUIREMENTS FOR 
ADMISSION 

Doctoral Degree Programs 

In order to be considered for admission to a doctoral 
program, an applicant must have a bachelor's degree (or 
its US equivalent) from a regionally accredited college or 
university. Some programs admit baccalaureate students 
directly to the doctoral program, while others require 
applicants to have earned a master's degree. 

To be admitted after a master's program, an applicant 
should have earned an overall grade point average of at 
least 3.5 (on a 4.0 scale) in the graduate degree program. 
To be admitted after a bachelor's program, an applicant 
should have earned an overall GPA of at least 3.0, 
including a 3.0 for the last four semesters of his/her 
bachelor's degree. 

The application package must include: 

1) An application submitted to the Office of Graduate 
Admissions, accompanied by a $55 application fee, 
which is neither deductible nor refundable. Materials 
submitted in support of this application cannot be 
returned. 

2) Two official transcripts of all academic work 
attempted beyond high school. Transfer credit 
posted on the records of other institutions is 
unacceptable and official transcripts of these credits 
must be supplied. 

3) Official agency reports of satisfactory test scores as 
specified in the section on graduate programs in this 
Catalog. GRE/GMAT scores are reportable from 
ETS for a period of five years from the date of the 
exam. Therefore, GRE/GMAT scores more than 
five years old are not accepted since they cannot be 



officially reported. Likewise, MAT scores more than 
five years old are not accepted. For additional 
information regarding test score requirements, please 
see the Test Information section of this Catalog. 

4) At least three evaluations from persons familiar with 
the applicant's personal and professional 
qualifications. 

5) An essay (Statement of Purpose) describing the 
applicant's experience and objective in undertaking 
graduate study (Note: Some academic programs have 
specific items for the applicant to address in the 
Statement of Purpose; please contact the Office of 
Graduate Admissions or the academic department 
for specific requirements). 

6) Submission of official scores on the Test of English 
as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), the Michigan 
English Language Assessment Battery (MELAB) or 
the International English Language Testing System 
(IELTS), if English is not the applicant's native 
language and he or she has not earned a post- 
secondary degree from a U.S. institution. Required is 
either a minimum score of 557 on the paper-based 
TOEFL, a minimum score of 220 on the computer 
based TOEFL, a minimum score of 83 on the 
Internet based TOEFL, a minimum score of 78 
percent on the MELAB, or a minimum overall 
bandscore of 6.5 on the IELTS. Applicants who are 
citizens of, or who have received an associate's 
degree or higher in one of the following countries, 
are exempt from the English language proficiency 
requirement: Australia, British Caribbean and British 
West Indies, Canada (except Quebec), Ireland, 
Liberia, New Zealand, United Kingdom, and United 
States. 

International Students should see the Additional Admission 
Requirements for International Applicants section of the Catalog 
for additional requirements. 

Note: 

Applicants with records of high quality who do not fulfill 
these requirements should discuss with the graduate 
program coordinator other factors that may have a 
bearing on admission. Some programs have higher 
standards or additional admission requirements. 
Additionally, there may be prerequisites for certain 
doctoral programs. Students should consult the graduate 
coordinator for the doctoral program to identify 
prerequisites. A separate application for admission is 
required for each graduate, post-baccalaureate, and 
certificate program of study at UNC Charlotte. 

Master's Degree Programs 

The applicant must possess a bachelor's degree, or its US 
equivalent, from a regionally accredited college or 
university, and must have attained an overall grade point 
average of at least 2.75 (based on a 4.0 scale) on all of the 
applicant's previous work beyond high school. The 
average for the junior and senior years must be a 3.0 or 
better. If the applicant has earned a post-baccalaureate 



14 The Graduate School 



degree, grades in that program will be taken into 
consideration. 

The application package must include: 

1) Application submitted to the Office of Graduate 
Admissions, accompanied by a $55 application fee, 
which is neither deductible nor refundable. Materials 
submitted in support of this application cannot be 
returned. 

2) Two official transcripts of all previous academic 
work attempted beyond high school. Transfer credit 
posted on the records of other institutions is 
unacceptable and official transcripts of these credits 
must be supplied. 

3) Official agency reports of satisfactory test scores as 
specified in the section on graduate programs in this 
Catalog. GRE/GMAT scores are reportable from 
ETS for a period of five years from the date of the 
exam. Therefore, GRE/GMAT scores more than 
five years old are not accepted since they cannot be 
officially reported. Likewise, MAT scores more than 
five years old are not accepted. For additional 
information regarding test score requirements, please 
see the Test Information section of this Catalog. 

4) At least three evaluations from persons familiar with 
the applicant's personal and professional 
qualifications. 

5) An essay (Statement of Purpose) describing the 
applicant's experience and objective in undertaking 
graduate study. (Note: Some academic programs 
have specific items for the applicant to address in the 
Statement of Purpose; please contact the Office of 
Graduate Admissions or the academic department 
for specific requirements). 

6) Submission of official scores on the Test of English 
as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), the Michigan 
English Language Assessment Batter (MELAB) or 
the International English Language Testing System 
(IELTS), if English is not the applicant's native 
language and he or she has not earned a post- 
secondary degree from a U.S. institution. Required is 
either a minimum score of 557 on the paperbased 
TOEFL, a minimum score of 220 on the computer 
based TOEFL, a minimum score of 83 on the 
Internet based TOEFL, a minimum score of 78 
percent on the MELAB, or a minimum overall 
bandscore of 6.5 on the IELTS. Applicants who are 
citizens of, or who have received an associate's 
degree or higher in one of the following countries, 
are exempt from the English language proficiency 
requirement: Australia, British Caribbean and British 
West Indies, Canada (except Quebec), Ireland, 
Liberia, New Zealand, United Kingdom, and United 
States. 

International Students should see the Additional 
Admission Requirements for International Applicants 
section of the Catalog for additional requirements. 



Note: 

Acceptance into each program must be approved by the 
department or college offering the program and by the 
Graduate School. Meeting minimum requirements for 
admission does not guarantee acceptance into a program. 
There may be prerequisites for certain master's programs. 
Students should consult the coordinator for the master's 
program to identify prerequisites. A separate application 
for admission is required for each graduate, post- 
baccalaureate, and certificate program of study at UNC 
Charlotte. 

Graduate Certificate Programs 

The applicant must possess a bachelor's degree, or its 

equivalent, from a regionally accredited college or 

university. 

The application package must include: 

1) An application submitted to the Office of Graduate 
Admissions, accompanied by a $55 application fee, 
which is neither deductible nor refundable. 

2) An overall grade point average of at least 2.75 (based 
on a 4.0 scale) on all of the applicant's previous work 
beyond high school. The average for the junior and 
senior years must be a 3.0 or better. If the applicant 
has earned a post-baccalaureate degree (i.e. master's, 
doctoral), grades in that program will be taken into 
consideration. 

3) Two official transcripts from each institution where 
academic work was attempted beyond high school. 

4) Submission of official scores on the Test of English 
as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), the Michigan 
English Language Assessment Battery (MELAB) or 
the International English Language Testing System 
(IELTS), if English is not the applicant's native 
language and he or she has not earned a post- 
secondary degree from a U.S. institution. Required is 
either a minimum score of 557 on the paperbased 
TOEFL, a minimum score of 220 on the computer 
based TOEFL, a minimum score of 83 on the 
Internet based TOEFL, a minimum score of 78 
percent on the MELAB, or a minimum overall 
bandscore of 6.5 on the IELTS. Applicants who are 
citizens of, or who have received an associate's 
degree or higher in one of the following countries, 
are exempt from the English language proficiency 
requirement: Australia, British Caribbean and British 
West Indies, Canada (except Quebec), Ireland, 
Liberia, New Zealand, United Kingdom, and United 
States. 

Some programs may also require: 

Standardized test scores, a personal statement 
(Statement of Purpose) outlining why the applicant 
seeks admission to the program, and additional 
admission requirements as specified in program 
descriptions. 

Note: 

There may be prerequisites for a graduate certificate 
program. Students should consult the coordinator for the 



The Graduate School 15 



graduate certificate program to identify prerequisites. 
Admission to a graduate certificate program does not 
ensure admission into a graduate degree program. A 
separate application for admission is required for each 
graduate, post-baccalaureate, and certificate program of 
study at UNC Charlotte. 

International Students should see the "Additional 
Admission Requirements for International Applicants" 
section of the Catalog for additional requirements. 

Post-Baccalaureate Study 

The applicant must possess a bachelor's degree, or its US 
equivalent, from a regionally accredited college or 
university. The application consists of a completed 
application form submitted to the Office of Graduate 
Admissions, accompanied by a $55 application fee which 
is neither deductible nor refundable. 

Note: 

A separate application for admission is required for each 
graduate, post-baccalaureate, and certificate program of 
study at UNC Charlotte. A post-baccalaureate student 
who subsequently applies and is admitted to a 
degree program may, with the permission of his/her 
advisor and the Graduate School, apply a maximum 
of six credit hours acceptably completed in the post- 
baccalaureate status toward a degree. Post- 
Baccalaureate study is not available to international 
students on, or intending to be on, F-l or J-l student 
visa/status, except for those with a valid Employment 
Authorization Document participating in Post Program 
Completion Optional Practical Training (for F-l) or 
Academic Training (for J-l) 

Additional Admission Requirements for all 
International Applicants 

1) Submission of official scores on the Test of English 
as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), the Michigan 
English Language Assessment Battery (MELAB) or 
the International English Language Testing System 
(IELTS). Required is either a minimum score of 557 
on the paper-based TOEFL, a minimum score of 
220 on the computer based TOEFL, a minimum 
score of 83 on the Internet based TOEFL, a 
minimum score of 78 percent on the MELAB, or a 
minimum overall bandscore of 6.5 on the IELTS. 
Applicants who are citizens of, or who have received 
an associate's degree or higher in one of the 
following countries, are exempt from the English 
language proficiency requirement: Australia, British 
Caribbean and British West Indies, Canada (except 
Quebec), Ireland, Liberia, New Zealand, United 
Kingdom, and United States. 

2) Submission of the Immigration Status Form - Page 
1. 



Additional Enrollment Requirements for 
International Applicants on, or Intending to 
be on, F-l or J-l Visa Status 

1) Statement of Financial Responsibility, to be 
completed by the applicant, indicating his/her 
sources of funds and understanding of the cost of 
study and stay at UNC Charlotte. . 

2) Affidavit of Financial Support, to be completed by 
the applicant's sponsor, indicating that sufficient 
funds are available through the sponsor to cover the 
applicant's cost of study and stay at UNC Charlotte. 

3) Supporting bank letter/ statement: in the sponsor's 
name indicating the amount of funds available. 

4) International Students on F-l or J-l status, 
transferring to UNC Charlotte from an institution of 
higher education within the USA must submit the 
Immigration Status Form - Page 2. 

Students who are awarded financial aid by UNC Charlotte 
may subtract the amount of the financial aid from the 
required proof of financial resources as listed above. 

Note: 

All applicants submitting transcripts and degree 
certificates from non-U.S. educational institutions should 
note that bachelor's degrees awarded by non-U.S. schools 
may or may not be considered equivalent to the U.S. 
bachelor's degree. Recipients of degrees who are not at 
least equivalent to a U.S. bachelor's degree are not eligible 
for graduate study at UNC Charlotte. 

Form 1-20, for students on, or intending to be on, F-l 
visa status, will not be issued until the applicant has 
been admitted to a degree program, proof of 
sufficient funds has been reviewed and approved, 
immigration status has been verified and financial 
responsibility has been proven. 

Test Information 

Applicants should have their test scores sent directly from 
the testing agency to the Office of Graduate Admissions 
(not to the department in which they wish to study). For 
GRE, GMAT and TOEFL, UNC Charlotte's 
institution code is 5105. For MAT, UNC Charlotte's 
institution code is 1370. 

A student who has already earned a Ph.D., M.D., or 
J.D. from a US institution will not be required by the 
Graduate School to take a standardized test. The 
Graduate Coordinator/Director of a program, however, 
has the right to request that the student take a test and 
submit official scores. This does not apply to the 
TOEFL. 

A student who has already earned a Master's degree 

will not be required by the Graduate School to retake a 
standardized test IF the student can demonstrate that he 
or she has completed the test in the past. The Graduate 
School will accept the student's copy of the official test 
scores (a photocopy is not acceptable) or an official 



16 The Graduate School 



university transcript which prints the scores or a letter on 
official university letterhead attesting to the scores. The 
Graduate Coordinator/Director, however, has the right 
to request that the student re-take the test and submit 
official scores. This does not apply to the TOEFL. 

A student who has taken the GRE, GMAT or MAT 
but has not earned a degree must be able to submit 
official scores that are not over five years old. If the 
student has not taken the test within five years, he or she 
must re-take the test. 

Graduate Record Examination (GRE) ) 

Sylvan Learning Systems, Inc., administers the computer- 
adaptive GRE at Sylvan Technology Centers several times 
per week throughout the U.S. Please call your local Sylvan 
Technology Center to schedule a test. GEE Subject tests 
are also offered at Davidson College (704-892-2000). To 
obtain additional information about the GRE, visit the 
GRE Website at http://www.gre.org or call 1-800-GRE- 
CALL. 

Miller Analogies Test (MAT) 

The Psychological Testing Corporation administers the 
MAT. To schedule a test, please call 1-800-228-0752. The 
Counseling Center at UNC Charlotte at 704-877-2105 
also administers the MAT. 

Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) ) 

Sylvan Learning Systems, Inc., administers the computer- 
adaptive GMAT at Sylvan Technology Centers several 
times per week throughout the U.S. Please call your local 
Sylvan Technology Center to schedule a test. To obtain 
additional information about the GMAT, visit the GMAT 
Website at http://www.gmat.org or call 1-800-GMAT- 
NOW. 

Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) ) 

The TOEFL is offered at the Prometric Testing Center. 
Please call your local Prometric Testing Center to 
schedule a test (in Charlotte, call (704)364-8745). To 
obtain additional information about the TOEFL, visit the 
TOEFL Website at http://www.toefl.org. 

Michigan English Language Assessment Battery 
(MELAB)) 

The MELAB assesses Advanced level English language 
competence of adult non-native speakers of English, and 
scores on this battery may be submitted in lieu of TOEFL 
or IELTS scores. For further information, visit 
http://www.lsa.umich.edu/eli/melab.htm 

International English Language Testing System 
(IELTS)) 

The IELTS assesses the complete range of English 
language skills which students studying in English 
commonly encounter. For further information, visit 
http://www.ielts.org 



Financial Information 17 



Financial Information 



STUDENT EXPENSES 
AND FEE PAYMENT 

Charges for tuition and fees vary according to the 
student's status as a resident or nonresident of North 
Carolina. A nonresident student pays a higher rate of 
tuition than a legal resident. 

The University reserves the right, with the approval 
of proper authorities, to make changes in tuition and 
fees at any time. The University also reserves the 
right to correct any clerical errors on a student's 
account. 

Student Expenses 

Graduate students taking nine or more semester hours 
and undergraduate students taking 12 or more semester 
hours during a regular semester will be charged full 
tuition and fees. Students taking fewer than the nine 
hours for graduate study and 12 hours for undergraduate 
study will be charged a prorated portion of tuition and 
fees as specified in the fee schedules in this Catalog. 

Fee Payment 

Tuition and fees are due and payable by the date specified 
on the bill. Advance registration billing and due dates of 
fees vary with the term. Checks and money orders should 
be made payable to UNC Charlotte. Visa and 
MasterCard are accepted. Payments by credit card may be 
made online through 49er Express/Self-Service. UNC 
Charlotte offers an installment payment option through 
AMS Tuition Pay. For information, please contact AMS 
at 1-800-635-0120 or online at www.tuitionpay.com. 

Returned Check Policy 

If a check is returned by the bank, a letter is sent to the 
maker indicating that a penalty of $25.00 has been 
assessed and the account must be settled within 10 
working days or the check will be considered to be a bad 
check and be processed accordingly. A hold will be placed 
on the student's record until the bad check is covered and 
the penalty is paid. 

A student who pays a previous balance with a check in 
order to have a registration hold flag lifted will have their 
registration cancelled if the check is returned by the bank 
for any reason. 

Residence Status For Tuition Purposes 

Tuition charges are based upon classification of a student 
as a resident or a nonresident of North Carolina for 
tuition purposes. UNC Charlotte shall determine whether 
a student is a resident or a nonresident for tuition 
purposes in accordance with North Carolina General 



Statutes that are summarized below. A more complete 
explanation of the statute and the procedures are 
contained in A Manual to Assist the Public Higher 
Education Institutions of North Carolina in the Matter of 
Student Residence Classification for Tuition Purposes. 
Copies of the Manual are available for inspection in the 
Library and the admitting offices. 

Residence. Generally, in order to qualify as a resident 
for tuition purposes, a person must be a legal resident of 
North Carolina AND must have been domiciled in North 
Carolina for at least twelve (12) months immediately prior 
to classification as a resident for tuition purposes. In 
order to be eligible for such classification, the person 
must establish that his or her presence in the state during 
such twelve-month period was for purposes of 
maintaining a bona fide domicile rather than for purposes 
of mere temporary residence incident to enrollment in an 
institution of higher education. Legal residence is 
accomplished by maintaining a bona fide domicile of 
indefinite duration as opposed to maintaining a mere 
temporary residence incident to enrollment at an 
institution of higher education. Initiative and Proof of Status. 
A student is responsible for seeking classification as a 
resident for tuition purposes. A student must (1) provide 
all of the information UNC Charlotte requires for 
consideration of residence classification and (2) establish 
facts that justify classification as a resident for tuition 
purposes. 

Parents' Domicile. If a dependent student has living 
parents (s) or a court-appointed guardian who maintain 
bona fide domicile in North Carolina, this fact shall be 
prima facie evidence that the student is also domiciled in 
North Carolina. This primary proof of the student's 
legal residence may be supported or rebutted by 
other information. 

If a student's parent(s) or guardian are domiciled outside 
of North Carolina, this fact shall be prima facie evidence 
that the student is also not domiciled in North Carolina, 
unless the student has lived in North Carolina for the five 
years preceding enrollment or re-registration at UNC 
Charlotte. 

Effect of Marriage. A person does not automatically 
obtain North Carolina domicile solely by marrying a 
North Carolina resident. If both spouses have established 
a NC domicile, and one spouse has been a domiciliary 
longer than the other, the member of the couple who has 
the shorter duration of domicile may borrow his or her 
spouse's duration of domicile to meet the 12 months 
maintenance requirement. However, the two durations 
cannot be added together to meet the requirement. 



18 Financial Information 



Teacher Tuition Benefit. According to North Carolina 
General Statue 116-143.5, public school teachers and 
other personnel paid on the North Carolina teacher salary 
schedule who have established a legal residence (domicile) 
in North Carolina, but have maintained the domicile for 
less than twelve months, may be eligible to receive a 
waiver of the tuition difference between out-of-state and 
in-state tuition for courses relevant to teacher licensure or 
professional development as a teacher. If you believe you 
are eligible for this benefit, you must complete the entire 
North Carolina Residence and Tuition Status Application 
and provide supporting documentation for each semester 
that you wish to be considered for this benefit 

Military Personnel. A North Carolinian who serves 
outside the State in the armed forces does not lose North 
Carolina domicile and thus North Carolina legal residence 
simply by reason of such sendee. Students in the military 
may prove retention or establishment of legal residence 
by reference to residentiary acts accompanied by 
residentiary intent. 

In addition, North Carolina General Statutes provide 
tuition rate benefits to certain military personnel and their 
dependents who do not otherwise qualify for the in-state 
tuition rate. Members of the armed services, while 
stationed in and concurrently living in North Carolina, 
may be charged a tuition rate lower than the out-of-state 
tuition rate to the extent that the total of entitlements for 
applicable tuition costs available from the federal 
government, plus certain amounts calculated by reference 
to a North Carolina statutory formula, is a sum less than 
the out-of-state tuition rate for the applicable enrollment. 

A dependent relative of a service member stationed in 
North Carolina shall be charged the in-state tuition rate 
while the dependent relative is living in North Carolina 
with the service member. Under this provision, the 
dependent relative must comply with any applicable 
requirements of the Selective Service System. 

Tuition benefits based on military service may be enjoyed 
only if requirements for admission to UNC Charlotte 
have been met. The military service tuition statute does 
not qualify a person for or provide the basis for receiving 
derivative benefits under other tuition statutes. 

Non-United States Citizens. If you are not a U.S. 
citizen, you may or may not qualify for resident tuition 
status on the same basis as a U.S. citizen; it depends upon 
the type of immigration or legal documents you hold. 
You may qualify if you are a permanent resident alien, a 
refugee, a parolee, or an asylee. You do not qualify if you 
hold one of the following visa or status - - B, C, D, F, J, 
M, P, Q, S. 

If you later receive permanent resident alien status or a 
visa/status that allows you to qualify for resident tuition 
status, you must establish North Carolina domicile and 
wait 12 months. If you have applied for permanent 



resident alien status, but it has not been granted yet, you 
are still considered as being in the country under the visa 
or document that you had before you applied for 
permanent resident status (aka "green card"). 

Grace Period. If a student (1) is a legal resident of North 
Carolina, (2) has consequently been classified a resident 
for tuition purposes, and (3) has subsequently lost North 
Carolina legal residence while enrolled at UNC Charlotte, 
the student may continue to enjoy the in-state tuition rate 
for a grace period of 12 months measured from the date 
the student lost his or her status as a legal resident. If the 
12 month grace period ends during an academic term in 
which the student is enrolled at UNC Charlotte, the grace 
period extends to the end of that term. Marriage to one 
domiciled outside of North Carolina does not, by itself, 
cause loss of legal residence, marking the beginning of the 
grace period. 

Lost but Regained Legal Residence. If a student 
ceases enrollment at or graduates from UNC Charlotte 
while classified as a resident for tuition purposes and then 
abandons and reestablishes North Carolina legal residence 
within a 1 2-month period, that student shall be permitted 
to re-enroll at UNC Charlotte as a resident for tuition 
purposes without meeting the 12-month durational 
requirement. Under this provision, the student maintains 
the reestablished legal residence through the beginning of 
the academic term for which in-state tuition status is 
sought. A student may receive the benefit of this 
provision only once. 

Change of Status. A student accepted for initial 
enrollment at UNC Charlotte or permitted to re-enroll 
following an absence from the institutional program that 
involved a formal withdrawal from enrollment will be 
classified by the admitting institution either as a resident 
or as a nonresident for tuition purposes prior to actual 
enrollment. A residence status classification once assigned 
(and finalized pursuant to any appeal properly taken) may 
be changed thereafter (with corresponding change in 
billing rates) only at intervals corresponding with the 
established primary divisions of the academic year. 

Transfer Students. When a student transfers from one 
institution of higher education to another, he or she is 
treated as a new student and must be assigned an initial 
residence classification for tuition purposes. 

Appeal Procedure. A newly admitted student or 
continuing student who has been classified as a non- 
resident for tuition purposes by the Graduate School may 
appeal the decision to the Graduate Residency Appeals 
Committee. This request must be in writing to the UNC 
Charlotte Graduate Residency Coordinator and must be 
submitted within ten days from the date of the issuance 
of the letter of determination. The request may consist 
simply of the statement, "I wish to appeal the decision as 
to my residence classification for tuition purposes." It 
must be dated and signed and should indicate the 



Financial Information 19 



applicant's UNC Charlotte student identification number 
and mailing address. If the Graduate Residency Appeals 
Committee determines that you are not a resident for 
tuition purposes, you may appeal that decision to the 
University of North Carolina: Office of the President. 



TUITION AND FEES PER 
SEMESTER 

The University reserves the right, with the approval of the 
appropriate authorities, to make changes in tuition and/ or fees at 
any time. Tuition and fee rates for the 2005-2007 time period were 
not available at the time this Catalog was printed. The following 
tuition and fee rates and special fees are the rates charged for the 
Spring 2005 term. 



GRADUATE RATES 




Resident 


Non- 
Resident 


1 Hr. 

(Graduate Residency 

Credit only) 


$108.00 


$608.50 


1-2 Hrs. 


$476.40 


$1,752.40 


3-5 Hrs. 


$751.90 


$3,303.65 


6-8 Hrs. 


$1,205.75 


$5,033.50 


9 or more Hrs. 


$1,776.00 


$6,879.50 




GRADUATE RAT 


^ES (MBA St 


udents) 




Resident 


Non- 
Resident 


1 Hr. 

(Graduate Residency 

Credit only) 


$108.00 


$608.50 


1-2 Hrs. 


$788.90 


$2,064.90 


3-5 Hrs. 


$1,376.90 


$3,928.65 


6-8 Hrs. 


$2,143.25 


$5,971.00 


9 or more Hrs. 


$3,026.00 


$8,129.50 



International students on, or intending to be on, F-l or J-l 
visa status are required, by immigration regulations, to 
provide proof of sufficient funds to cover the cost of 
tuition, fees, housing and other expenses , whether by 
personal, sponsor's or institutional funds, before Form I- 
20 may be issued. Additional information is available at 
the Office of Graduate Admissions. 

Post baccalaureate studentsv/ho are taking only 
undergraduate courses will pay tuition and fees at the 
undergraduate rate. Post baccalaureate students taking 
one or more graduate credit courses will pay tuition and 
fees at the graduate rate for all courses. (Note: This 
policy is presently under review. It is probable that 
beginning with the Fall 2006 semester, post baccalaureate 
students will pay tuition and fees at the graduate rate for 
all courses.) 



The following Student Activities Fees are included in the 
full-time tuition and fee amounts. Fees per semester are: 

Educational and Technology $76.00 

Student Activity Facility 65.00 

Student Activity Center Operations 65.50 

Cone Center Facilities 14.00 

Cone Center Operations 64.00 

Student Activity Fee 24.50 

Student Union Facility 37.50 

Physical Education Facilities Maintenance 6.50 

Physical Education Facility 6.50 

Health Center Services 64.00 

Health Center Facility 12.50 

Athletic 182.50 

Intramural 19.00 

Student Union Planning Fee 7.50 

Association of Student Governments 0.50 

Administrative Computing 26.50 

Student I.D 2.00 

Total fees per full-time student, per semester.... $674.00 

Housing Per Semester 

Shared Residence Hall space is not available to married 
students and/or their family members. There are 
apartments for non-married graduate students on 
campus. The following are 2004-2005 prices and plans 
and are subject to change for subsequent years. 

Apartment $1,722.00 to $2,052.00 

Residence Hall -- Double Room $1,362.00 

Residence Hall - Single Room (if available).... $2,018.00 
Suite $1,642.00 to $2,042.00 

Dining Services Per Semester 

The following 2005-2007 prices and plans are subject to 

change. 

14 meals per week with $200 

declining balance $1,335.00 

12 meals per week with $300 

declining balance $1,445.00 

10 meals per week with $400 

declining balance $1,445.00 

150 block plan with $100 

declining balance $1,155.00 

Upper-classmen living in housing areas that require 
purchase of a meal plan may select one of the plans listed 
above or one of the following: 

Declining Balance Account $915.00 or $1,290.00 

125 block plan with $175 declining balance $1 100.00 

Students living in apartments may select the following 

meal plan or any of those above: 

Declining balance account $500.00 

Commuters or UNC Charlotte apartment residents may 
purchase any of the plans listed above. 



20 Financial Information 



Any student, faculty or staff member may purchase or 
add additional Optional Dining Account funds to their 
49er ID card. Optional Dining Accounts can be 
purchased from the 49er Card Office, located in the 
Auxiliary Services Building or in the ID/Dining Services 
Office, located in the Cone University Center, or at web 
site www.auxiliary.uncc.edu. New Optional Dining 
Accounts require no minimum purchase and may be paid 
by cash, check, or charged to Visa or MasterCard. 

Special Assessments 

During 2004-05, the following special assessments were 
charged to cover the cost of supplies or special materials 
(per semester, except where indicated otherwise): 

Scuba Diving (KNES 2219) $60.00 

Advanced Scuba Diving (KNES 2220) $35.00 

Applied Music Fee (1 credit hour) $45.00 

Applied Music Fee (2 credit hours) $90.00 

College of Engineering Student Fee 

1-7 hours (per academic year) $76.00 

8 hours or more (per academic year) $150.00 

College of Information Technology student fee 

1-7 hours (per academic year) $76.00 

8 hours or more (per academic year) $150.00 

Teacher Licensure Fee $30.00 

Experiential Education Fee $60.00 

Architecture Major General Student Fee 

(per academic year) $80.00 

International Student Fee (per academic year) ... $100.00 
Administrative Cancellation Fee $75.00 

Application Fee. A $55 application fee must be 
submitted with the application for admission. The fee is 
not deductible and is not refundable. 

Housing Deposit. Admission to UNC Charlotte does 
not guarantee residence hall space. Arrangements for on 
campus housing are made, after admission, with the 
Director of Housing and Residence Life. Residence Hall 
space is not available to families or children of enrolled 
students. 

A $100 deposit must be submitted with all housing 
contracts. The deposit is not applied toward payment of 
fees. It is refunded only after the student has left on- 
campus housing and only if the student has met all 
financial obligations to the University. In the case of 
contract cancellation, the date of receipt of the written 
request for cancellation will determine, in part, the 
student's financial obligation to the University (please see 
the Housing Contract for the current academic year for 
specific cancellation dates). 

Student Activities Fee. A part of the general fee 
provides students with a program of cultural, recreational, 
and entertainment activities. It pays for admission to 
many athletic contests, dramatic productions, activities 
sponsored by the University Program Board, social and 
entertainment functions, and for subscriptions to the 
campus newspaper and literary magazine. 



Graduation Fee. Each member of the graduating class 
must pay a graduation fee of $35 at the time he/she 
applies for the degree. This fee includes the cost of the 
diploma and the cap and gown. No reduction of the fee is 
allowed for those receiving degrees in Absentia. (Note: 
This fee is subject to change. Please see the Graduate 
School Website for the most recent graduation fee.) 

Credit By Examination Fee. Fees for credit by 
examination are as follows: A written examination for a 
course will require a fee of $15. A laboratory examination 
requiring the arrangement of such things as laboratory 
materials will require a fee of $25. A combination of a 
laboratory and written examination will require a fee of 
$30. 

Motor Vehicle Registration Fees 

Students attending UNC Charlotte are required to register 
their motor vehicle(s) in order to park on campus; there is 
no free parking. Vehicle registration for fall and spring 
semesters begins two weeks prior to the first day of 
classes. Students may request parking permits to be 
mailed directly to them (fall term only) by contacting 
Parking Services at least one month prior to the 
beginning of classes (704-687-4285). Payment must be 
received before the permit is mailed. Permits are 
required at 8:00 a.m. the first day of class. Two 
categories of permits are issued: Resident (for students 
living on campus) and Commuter (for students living off 
campus). 

Permits sold in August are good for one year. Students 
who graduate in December may return their parking 
permit for a partial refund. The price of the permit is the 
same for faculty, staff and students. Please reference the 
web at www.uncc.edu/parking for current fees. Parking 
Services receives no state funding; therefore, parking fees 
are used to defray construction and operating expenses. 

Night permits, valid only after 3:00 p.m., are sold at a 
reduced rate using the same schedule as the regular 
student permits. Students with night permits who come 
on campus before that time must park and pay at the 
meters or in visitors' spaces. 

Penalties for Parking Violations. Violators of 
University parking regulations are subject to monetary 
penalties ranging from $5 to $100, depending on the 
severity of the violation. Copies of parking regulations 
are distributed with the parking permit. If a citation is 
not paid or appealed within 1 days, the penalty will be 
applied to the student's account with the University. 
Subsequent registration may be withheld for non- 
payment. Parking citations are issued 24 hours a day. 
Decals and meters are enforced from 8:00 a.m. until 
midnight, Monday through Thursday and from 8:00 a.m. 
until 3:00 p.m. on Friday. 



Financial Information 21 



Questions concerning parking on campus should be 
directed to Parking Services, which is open from 8:00 
a.m. until 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday. Emergency 
situations and questions at other times should be directed 
to 704-687-2200. 

Refunds 

Tuition and Fees Refunds 

A student who officially withdraws from the University in 
the fall or spring semester will receive a refund as follows: 



Fall or Spring 
Semester 


% of Tuition and 
Fees Refunded 


Before 1st Class Day 


100% 


Weekl 


100% minus 525 
withdrawal fee 


Week 2 


100% minus $75 
withdrawal fee 


Week 3 


80% 


Week 4 


75% 


Week 5 


70% 


Week 6 


60% 


Week 7 


55% 


Week 8 


50% 


Week 9 


40% 


After Week 9 


0% 



Summer School. Summer School refund schedules are 
reviewed and revised annually based upon the Summer 
School calendar. See www.summer.uncc.edu for the 
refund schedule for the current sessions. 

Exceptions: Charges are refundable by administrative 
action on a prorated basis for the unexpired portion of 
the term for the following reasons: death of the student, 
withdrawal for adequate medical reason as certified by the 
University Student Health Center or family doctor, death 
in the immediate family that necessitates student 
withdrawal, and dismissal or suspension from school. 
Immediate family is defined as wife, husband, parent, 
child, brother, sister, grandparent, and grandchildren and 
includes step-, half-, and in-law relationships. 
Appropriate documentation must be submitted to the 
Dean of Students. 

No refunds will be given to students who are withdrawn 
by administrative action for failure to comply with the 
North Carolina immunization laws. 

Housing Refunds 

The contract period for academic-year contracts is the 
entire academic year (Fall and Spring semesters). The 
student and/or guarantor agree to pay the full amount of 
charges for residential services. To cancel residential 
services, the student and/or guarantor must send a signed 
written request for cancellation of the contract. The date 
of receipt of the written request for cancellation will 
determine, in part, the student's financial obligation to the 



University (please see the Housing Contract for the 
current academic year for specific cancellation dates). If, 
during the time of the Contract, the student loses the 
right to live in University housing by reason of 
disciplinary action, or breach of the Contract, no refund 
of housing charges for the term will be made. 

Summer School: The contract period for Summer School 
coincides with each term of the Summer School calendar; 
housing charges are refundable based upon the number 
of weeks of occupancy. 

Appeal Procedure 

Appeals about tuition and dining refunds should be 
submitted in writing to Student Accounts, UNC 
Charlotte, Charlotte, NC 28223. Appeals about housing 
refunds should be submitted to Department of Housing, 
UNC Charlotte, Charlotte, NC 28223. Appeals are heard 
on a monthly schedule by the Tuition, Housing, and 
Dining Appeal Committee. 



FINANCIAL AID 

UNC Charlotte administers financial aid without regard 
to race, color, national origin, religion, sex, sexual 
orientation, age, or disability. 

The University offers a comprehensive program of 
student financial aid (scholarships, fellowships, grants, 
loans, and part-time employment) to assist both graduate 
and undergraduate students in meeting educational 
expenses. Reasonable educational expenses include 
tuition and fees, room and board, books, supplies, 
transportation, miscellaneous personal expenses, and 
expenses related to maintenance of a student's 
dependents. 

Eligibility 

The programs of student financial aid are administered 
according to a nationally accepted policy that the family, 
meaning parents (or those acting in place of parents) 
and/or spouse, is responsible for a student's educational 
expenses. Therefore, eligibility for financial aid will be 
determined by a comparison of a budget (educational 
expenses as defined above) for the period of attendance 
with what the student's family can reasonably be expected 
to contribute. 

A financial aid applicant will be considered for available 
assistance for which he/she is eligible if the student: 

1) Completes the application process and related forms 
only after thoroughly reading all instructions. 

2) Completes the admission application process and is 
accepted for enrollment at UNC Charlotte. 

3) Is working toward a degree and not simply taking 



22 Financial Information 



Application Process 

To apply for the following programs, a student must 
complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid 
using the instructions and mailing address provided with 
the form. The form is available in the UNC Charlotte 
Financial Aid Office. 

Federal Stafford Student Loans 

Federal Perkins Loan 

Federal Work Study 

University Grants 

University Loans 

University Need-based Scholarships 

Renewal Process 

Renewal of financial aid is based upon a student's making 
satisfactory academic progress. The Free Application for 
Federal Student Aid is required each year that a student 
applies for financial aid. 

Financial Aid Programs 

Loans 

Federal Perkins Loan- Loans of up to $4,000 per year are 
made to students' with the highest financial needs who 
apply by the University's established priority date of April 
1. The interest rate is five percent with repayment 
beginning nine months after graduation 

Federal Stafford Loans— Qualified undergraduate applicants 
may borrow up to $2,625 for the first year, $3,500 for the 
second year, and up to $5,500 per year for the remainder 
of undergraduate study. Graduate students may borrow 
up to $8,500 per year. Independent students may be 
eligible to receive additional loan amounts. 

The interest rate is variable, and repayment begins six 
months after the borrower ceases to be a student. 

Short-Term Emergency Loans— Students may borrow up to 
$300 for unanticipated expenses that occur during the 
semester and up to $1,000 for tuition expenses. Loans 
have no interest and must be repaid within 30 to 60 days. 
Funds for these loans are provided by private donation. 

Grants 

Non-Resident Tuition Differential Grant- -This grant is 
available in selected graduate programs to non-residents 
of North Carolina. To be eligible, a student must be 
admitted to full standing in a graduate program, and must 
hold an assistantship. 

North Carolina Graduate Grant— There are a limited number 
of tuition scholarships available for North Carolina 
residents to assist with tuition and fees. These are for 
students of high merit. Students should contact their 
graduate coordinator about application procedures. 

UNC Campus Scholarships—Funding for this program is 
provided by the General Assembly of North Carolina to 
each constituent institution of the UNC system. These 



awards are for North Carolina residents only. These 
limited awards are provided to doctoral students with 
exceptional financial need who are recommended by the 
graduate coordinator of the academic program in which 
they plan to enroll.. 

UNC Charlotte Grants- UNC Charlotte administers several 
other grant programs funded by the State of North 
Carolina (The State Appropriated Grant) and requires 
North Carolina residency for consideration. These are 
available to both graduate and undergraduate students 
who apply by the established priority date of April 1. 
Contact the University's Financial Aid Office for 
information concerning these grants. 

Graduate Assistant Support T Ian— The Graduate Assistant 
Support Plan (GASP) is a highly competitive support 
package used to attract top graduate students to UNC 
Charlotte. Under this plan, students supported on a 
teaching or research assistantship or a fellowship of at 
least $666.67 per month who meet the minimum 
registration requirements, receive (at no cost to the 
student and for a limited number of semesters) fall and 
spring semester tuition. 

Graduate Assistantships 

Approximately one-half of the University's full-time 
graduate students hold graduate assistantships which 
provide them with financial aid and valuable experience in 
administration, teaching, and research related to their 
academic endeavors. 

To be eligible for an assistantship, a student must be 
admitted to full standing in a graduate program and must 
have had an undergraduate GPA of at least 3.0 or better 
overall; or must have completed at least six hours of 
graduate work with a GPA of 3.0 or better. 

To retain their appointments, graduate assistants must 
maintain appropriate enrollment, register for at least 6 
graduate-level hours each semester, make satisfactory 
progress toward their degrees, maintain a minimum 3.0 
GPA and perform their assigned duties satisfactorily. It is 
expected that graduate assistants will not engage in other 
employment during the term of their assistantship. 

Assistantships are available in most graduate degree 
programs and through some administrative offices. To 
apply, students should complete the Application for 
Graduate Assistantship (available from the Graduate 
School) and submit it to the degree program or 
administrative office in the winter preceding the academic 
year for which the assistantship is sought. 

Fellowships/Scholarships 

While these awards are administered by the Graduate 
School, in nearly all cases, the individual graduate 
programs must determine student eligibility and submit 
nominations to the Graduate School. However, if you 
are interested in any particular competition or have 



Financial Information 23 



questions regarding eligibility requirements, deadlines, and 
nomination procedures, please contact the Assistant Dean 
of the Graduate School for Graduate Student Affairs. 

Everett Foundation First Year Graduate Fellowship 

These first-year fellowships provide stipends of $15,000 
and §10,000 plus tuition awards to one newly admitted 
doctoral student and one newly admitted master's student 
respectively for their first year of study at UNC Charlotte. 

Teachers Insurance and Annuity Association College 
Retirement Equities Fund (TIAA-CREF) Doctoral 
Fellowships 

Doctoral Fellowship program in three areas of study, 
Optical Science and Engineering, Applied Mathematics, 
and Information Technology. Funding for these 
fellowships is provided through a generous gift to the 
University by TIAA-CREF to recruit outstanding 
students who have demonstrated the potential to make a 
significant contribution to their profession and to society 
once completing the terminal degree. TIAA-CREF 
Fellowships provide one year of support to newly 
admitted students for their first year of doctoral study at 
UNC Charlotte. 

McNair Graduate Fellowship 

This award is a stipend supplement to a departmental 
Teaching or Research Assistantship for up to $3,000 per 
year for 2 years. Students must be enrolled full-time in a 
doctoral program and have been a McNair Scholar at 
their undergraduate institution. 

Joanna R. Baker Memorial Graduate Fellowship 

Endowed through the generous gifts of the many friends 
of Dr. Joanna Baker, this fellowship will award $1,000 to 
a graduate student who has a commitment to a career that 
will apply information technology to problem solving in 
the public sector (e.g., criminal justice, health care, 
government). 

John Paul Lucas, Jr. Scholarship 

This is an award given each spring semester to a student 
who has been teaching and wishes to pursue a graduate 
degree in English in the College of Arts and Sciences or 
College of Education. 

The Robert J. Mundt Memorial Scholarship for 
International Study 

Stipends are available to defray the costs associated with a 
study abroad experience. All full-time graduate and 
undergraduate UNC Charlotte students are eligible. 
Applications are available in the Office of Education 
Abroad in Room 114 Denny. 

Giles Fellowships 

Stipends are available to selected doctoral students from 
donations made to the University by the Giles family. 
These awards are usually given in addition to a graduate 
assistantship. 



The Zonta Club 

The Zonta Club award is given annually to an 
undergraduate or graduate student who is continuing a 
university education after considerable time away from 
formal education. This award covers the cost of one- 
year's in-state tuition. 

UNC Campus Scholarships 

Funding for this program is provided by the General 
Assembly of North Carolina to each constituent 
institution of the UNC system. These awards are for 
North Carolina residents only. These limited awards are 
provided to doctoral students with exceptional financial 
need who are recommended by the graduate coordinator 
of the academic program in which they plan to enroll. 

National Fellowships 

These awards are made to an individual rather than to the 
University. Recipients are chosen through competitions 
expressive of the terms of each award. Some examples of 
these awards are listed below. Contact the graduate 
program coordinator to discuss available fellowship 
programs in a specific field. 

National Science Foundation (NSF) Graduate 

Research Fellowship 
Ford Foundation Predoctoral Fellowship for 

Minorities 
Department of Defense National Defense Science 
and Engineering Graduate Fellowship (DOD 
NDSEG) 
Department of Energy Computational Science 

Graduate Fellowship 
NASA Graduate Student Researchers Program — 

Underrepresented Minority Focus Award 
National Consortium for Graduate Degrees for 
Minorities in Engineering Inc. (GEM) 
Fellowship 
National Physical Science Consortium: Graduate 

Fellowships for Minorities and Women in the 
Physical Sciences 

In addition to the fellowships and scholarships mentioned 
above, a number of the graduate programs have 
scholarships and/or assistantships available. Please 
contact the individual units for specific information. 

Employment On-Campus 

The Student Employment Office assists students in 
locating work on campus. The University participates in 
the federal Work-Study Program and attempts to match 
students with jobs related to their academic interests. 
International students on F-l status are permitted, by 
immigration regulations, to work on campus. Restrictions 
apply however. F-l visa status holders are not eligible to 
participate in the federal Work-Study Program. 

Part-Time Employment Off-Campus 

The University Career Center's Job Location and 
Development (JLD) Program assists students in obtaining 
part-time, summer and temporary employment off- 



24 Financial Information 



campus. Job listings may be viewed online to registered 
students in Campus Professional. Jobs may include 
career-related positions in various fields such as 
education, business, entertainment, engineering and 
healthcare. The JLD Program is available to help 
students earn money for their academic and personal 
expenses during their enrollment at the University. 
Students are encouraged also to participate in career 
related experiences such as co-op and internships which 
can be arranged through the University Career Center. 

Education for the Vocationally 
Handicapped 

Students who have suffered a disability that renders them 
vocationally handicapped are eligible for aid provided by 
the North Carolina State Division of Vocational 
Rehabilitation. This aid takes the form of services that 
include vocational counseling and guidance and 
placement. Payment of expenses such as training, medical 
treatment, room and board, books, fees, and tuition may 
be available. A vocational rehabilitation officer is available 
in Charlotte for interviewing applicants. Appointments 
may be made by contacting Vocational Rehabilitation 
Services located at 401 S. Independence Blvd., 704-342- 
5049. 

Veterans Benefits 

UNC Charlotte's Veterans Service Office (VSO), located 
in the Office of the Registrar, works with the Veterans 
Administration to assist in administering the various 
programs of benefit to veterans or eligible relatives of 
veterans. The VSO Certifying Official certifies enrollment 
and transmits necessary credentials and information to 
the proper Veterans Administrative Office. 

Admission to the University should be obtained before 
the student makes application for veteran's benefits. 
Applicants must be accepted into a degree program to 
receive benefits. 



Before the time of registration, each eligible student who 
wishes to enter the University should: (1) apply for 
admission following University procedures and (2) apply 
for a scholarship award to the North Carolina 
Department of Veterans Affairs. 



In order to be eligible for the full monthly allowance 
under any of the above laws, an undergraduate student 
must be enrolled for 12 or more semester hours and a 
graduate student must be enrolled for nine or more 
semester hours. Those enrolled on a part-time basis will 
be eligible for part time compensation. Students are 
responsible for reporting any change in enrollment status 
to the VSO Certifying Official. 

Children of Veterans. The North Carolina Department 
of Veterans Affairs awards scholarships for the children 
of certain deceased or disabled veterans. Those awarded 
"full" scholarships are entitled to tuition, mandatory fees, 
board allowance, and room allowance; those awarded 
"limited" scholarships are entitled to tuition and 
mandatory fees. All inquiries should be referred to the 
North Carolina Division of Veterans Affairs, Albermarle 
Building, Suite 1065, 325 North Salisbury St., Raleigh, NC 
27603, telephone 919-733-3851. 



Academic Regulations 25 



Academic Regulations And Degree 

Requirements 



student 
responsibility 



Each student is responsible for the proper 
completion of his or her academic program, for 
familiarity with the University Graduate Catalog (and 
where appropriate, the University Undergraduate 
Catalog), for maintaining the grade average required, 
and for meeting all other degree requirements. The 
advisor will counsel, but the final responsibility 
remains that of the student. 

A student is required to have knowledge of and observe 
all regulations pertaining to campus life and student 
deportment. The University has enacted two codes of 
student responsibility: The UNC Charlotte Code of 
Student Academic Integrity and The UNC Charlotte 
Code of Student Responsibility, which are summarized 
in this Catalog. As students willingly accept the benefits of 
membership in the UNC Charlotte academic community, 
they acquire obligations to observe and uphold the 
principles and standards that define the terms of UNC 
Charlotte community cooperation and make those 
benefits possible. 

Each student is responsible for maintaining 
communication with the University and keeping on file 
with the Registrar's Office at all times a current address, 
including zip code, email address and telephone number. 

Each student, while associated with the University, is 
expected to participate in campus and community life in a 
manner that will reflect credit upon the student and the 
University. 

Catalog Policies 

The Catalog is not an irrevocable contract. Regulations 
published in it are subject to change by the University at 
any time without notice. University regulations are policy 
statements to guide students, faculty, and administrative 
officers in achieving the goals of the institution. 
Necessary interpretations of these policies will be made 
by the appropriate authorities with the interest of the 
students and the institution in mind. Students are 
encouraged to consult an advisor if they have questions 
about the application of any policy. 

"The University reserves the right to change any of the 
rules and regulations of the University at any time, 
including those relating to admission, instruction, and 
graduation. The University also reserves the right to 



withdraw curricula and specific courses, alter course 
content, change the calendar, and to impose or increase 
fees. All such changes are effective at such times as the 
proper authorities determine and may apply not only to 
prospective students but also to those who already are 
enrolled in the University." 

Each new edition of the Catalog becomes effective at the 
opening of the fall semester following its publication. 

Exceptions to these policies may be necessitated by 
changes in course offerings, degree programs or by action 
of authorities higher than the University. In that event, 
every effort will be made to avoid penalizing the student. 

Course Load 

An appropriate course load is dependent upon two 
factors: the scholastic ability of the student as reflected by 
his/her academic history and the time available for study. 
A course load of nine semester hours constitutes a 
normal full semester program for a graduate student. This 
is lower than the normal undergraduate load because of 
the extensive reading, independent thinking and 
individual research required of graduate students. 
Generally, graduate students should not register for more 
than 12 semester hours during a semester. 

A graduate assistant must register for at least six graduate- 
level semester hours during each semester in which an 
assistantship is awarded. Graduate assistants enrolled in 
the Graduate Assistance Support Plan must register for a 
minimum of 9 graduate credit hours each term. 

International students on F-l visa/status are required, by 
immigration regulations, to pursue a full course load 
during each academic semester, except during official 
school breaks (i.e. summer vacation and winter holidays) 
or unless a reduced course load is approved in advance by 
the Designated School Officer (DSO) at the International 
Students/Scholar Office. Failure to enroll for a full 
course load without prior approval is considered a 
violation of the F-l legal status. 

Registration 

The Registrar is responsible for the management of the 
registration process by which students enroll in classes. 
Registration policies and procedures for each term are 
described on the Registrar's Web site The most recent 
URL to the policies and procedures section of the 
Registrar's Web site may be found on the Graduate 
School Academic Regulations Web page at: 
http://www.uncc.edu/gradmiss/acadregs.html. 



26 Academic Regulations 



Through the registration process, students assume 
academic and financial responsibility for the classes in 
which they enroll. They are relieved of these 
responsibilities only by formally terminating enrollment 
by dropping or withdrawing in accordance with 
procedures and deadlines specified by the Registrar each 
term. For procedures and deadlines related to terminating 
enrollment, see the Graduate School Academic 
Regulations Web page at: 
http://www.uncc.edu/gradmiss/acadregs.html. 

Registration Deadlines 

University policies determine when students may enroll 
or adjust their enrollment in classes. Deadlines for the 
spring and fall semesters are shown below. (Deadlines for 
summer sessions are approximately proportional based on the length 
of the session?) 

Register for classes through the eighth instructional 
day of the semester. 

Drop a class without record (and remain enrolled 
in other classes) through the sixth instructional day 
of the semester. 

Withdraw from the University without record 
through the sixth instructional day of the semester. 
Drop a class with grade of W recorded (and 
remain enrolled in other classes) through the sixth 
week of classes in the semester. No student will be 
allowed to drop a course after this deadline unless 
there are extenuating circumstances recognized by 
the University. 

Withdraw from the University with grade of W 
recorded after the sixth instructional day through 
the third week prior to the last day of classes of the 
semester. No student will be allowed to withdraw 
after this deadline unless there are extenuating 
circumstances recognized by the University. (See the 
Termination of Enrollment section of this Catalog) 

Prerequisites and Permits 

Credit will be awarded only to students who are properly 
registered for it. All students, including non-degree 
students, are required to meet course prerequisites and to 
obtain the required permissions to enroll in courses 
specified in the Schedule of Classes. 

Auditors 

With the consent of the instructor, a student may register 
as an auditor for any class in which space is available. Fees 
and procedures for this non-credit enrollment are the 
same as those for a credit enrollment. 

No student will be allowed to change the designation of a 
course from audit to credit or from credit to audit after 
the eighth instructional day of a semester (or a 
proportional period for summer school). 

The participation of auditors in class discussion and in 
tests or examinations is optional with the instructor. 
Auditors receive no University credit, but they are 



expected to attend class regularly. A formal record of the 
audit on the student's transcript is entered at the 
discretion of the instructor at the end of the course. The 
procedure for adding or dropping an audit course is the 
same as for credit enrollments. 

Dual Undergraduate and Graduate Registration 

Undergraduate students at UNC Charlotte who are 
required to take fewer than 12 semester hours of 
undergraduate work to fulfill all requirements for the 
bachelor's degree may be allowed during their final 
semester to enroll in certain courses for the purpose of 
obtaining graduate credit. Authorization for dual 
undergraduate/graduate registration may be obtained by 
submitting to the Dean of the Graduate School a Special 
Request Form approved by the student's undergraduate 
academic advisor, the instructor(s) of the graduate 
course(s), and the dean(s) of the college(s) offering the 
graduate course(s), accompanied by the post- 
baccalaureate application for admission to graduate study. 
The total hours to be carried in this status shall not 
exceed 12 hours, of which no more than nine may be for 
graduate credit. On the basis of work attempted prior to 
the final semester, such student must meet the grade 
point criteria for admission to a graduate degree program 
at the University. No course for which credit is applied to 
an undergraduate degree may receive graduate credit. 
Permission to take graduate courses under dual 
registration does not constitute admission to any graduate 
degree program at the University. (Undergraduate 
students may also take graduate courses if admitted to an 
early-entry program. See "Early-Entry to Graduate 
Program" in "The Graduate School" section of the 
Catalog) 

Inter-Institutional Registration 

An inter-institutional registration program is available for 
a limited number of undergraduate and graduate students 
with the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, 
North Carolina State University, University of North 
Carolina at Chapel Hill, Duke University, NC Central 
University, and NC A&T University. The registration 
process is initiated in the Registrar's Office and requires 
the approval of the student's college dean. 

Continuous Registration 

Students in graduate degree programs are required to 
maintain continuous registration (fall and spring 
semesters) for thesis, dissertation, project, or directed 
study until work is completed. Students are not required 
to enroll in any summer term unless they are using 
campus facilities or they are completing degree 
requirements in that term. Continuous registration begins 
the semester approval for his/her diesis, dissertation, 
project, or directed study topic is received. Approval of 
this topic is documented on the "Petition for Topic 
Approval" form which is filed by die student with the 
Graduate School. Students who exceed the required 
number of hours without completing their work should 
register for "7999" or "9999" (graduate residence) until 



Academic Regulations 27 



the thesis, dissertation, project, or directed study is 
completed. Students who must remain continuously 
enrolled but are not using University resources should 
apply for a leave of absence. Students choosing this 
option must file a Special Request for a leave of absence 
that states they will not use University resources during 
the leave period. If the leave of absence extends beyond 
two calendar years, the student must re-apply for active 
status in the graduate program. International students on 
F-l visa status may not apply for such leave of absence. 
Students on F-l visa/ status must remain continuously 
enrolled until the thesis, dissertation, project or directed 
study is completed. 

Students must be enrolled during the term (semester 
or summer) in which they graduate from the 
University. 

Change of Degree Program 

To change from one degree program to another, a 
graduate student must complete the application for 
admission to the new program, pay the requisite 
application fee, and provide supporting documentation as 
specified in this Catalog. The student should also provide 
the Graduate School with a letter indicating withdrawal 
from the initial degree program. Contact the Office of 
Graduate Admissions for additional information. 

Note: Students on F-l or J-l visa status who change 
from one degree program to another may be required to 
submit proof of sufficient financial resources, especially if 
the change to another degree program requires the 
issuance of a new Form 1-20 or DS-2019. 

Termination of Enrollment 

Drop or Withdrawal (Course) ) 

A student may terminate enrollment in a course but 
continue enrollment in other courses by following the 
procedure to drop or withdraw from a course specified 
on the Registrar's Web site. A student enrolled in only 
one course must withdraw officially from the University 
to drop the course. 

Withdrawal from the University 

Any graduate student voluntarily leaving the University 
before the close of the term must withdraw officially. A 
student initiates the withdrawal procedure and files the 
completed form at the Registrar's Office in person or by 
letter. A withdrawal is effective when the form or letter is 
received by the Registrar's Office. A student who 
withdraws from the University after the sixth instructional 
day will receive the grade of IF for all courses in progress. 
No student will be allowed to withdraw within two weeks 
prior to the last day of class (or as close to half the 
summer term as possible) unless there are extenuating 
circumstances such as serious illness recognized by the 
University and approved by the Dean of the Graduate 
School. 



Any graduate student who leaves the University before 
the close of a term without withdrawing officially will 
receive a failing or unsatisfactory grade (U for graduate 
credit) in each course for which he/she is registered. A 
graduate student who receives a U is automatically 
suspended from the University and must appeal to the 
Dean of the Graduate School for reinstatement. 

International students on F-l or J-l visa status must carry 
a full course load each academic semester. Students who 
withdraw from UNC Charlotte are advised to consult the 
International Student/Scholar Office for information on 
maintaining valid F-l or J-l status, or reinstatement to 
valid F-l or J-l status. 

Attendance Policy 

Each instructor determines the attendance regulations for 
his or her classes. Students are expected to attend 
punctually all scheduled sessions in the courses for which 
they are registered and are responsible for completing the 
work from all class sessions. 

Absences from class may be excused by the instructor for 
such reasons as personal illness, religious holidays, or 
participating as an authorized University representative in 
an out-of-town event. Whenever possible, students are 
expected to seek the permission of the instructor prior to 
absences. 

Grading Policies 

Instructors assign grades on the basis of their evaluation 
of the academic performance of each student enrolled in 
their courses. At the end of the term, the grades are 
reported to the Registrar's Office which is responsible for 
maintaining student academic records and making grades 
available to students. 

Final Grades 

Final Grades are available through the secure, student 
access pages of the Registrar's Web page. 

Final Grade Changes and Appeals from 
Final Course Grades 

When a final course grade other than Incomplete (I) is 
officially reported by the instructor at the end of an 
academic term, the grade is recorded by the Registrar and 
can be changed only if the grade has been assigned 
arbitrarily or impermissibly as defined in the Faculty's 
"Policy and Procedures for Student Appeals of Final Course 
Grades, " available online at 

http://www.uncc.edu/policystate/gradeappeal.html. 
Students should follow the procedures outlined in that 
policy if they believe that the final course grade that has 
been assigned is incorrect. The policy encourages the 
student to discuss the grade with the instructor as soon as 
possible after the grade is received. Students should note, 
however, that the University is not obliged to respond to 
a grade appeal unless the student files it with the 
appropriate department chairperson or interdisciplinary 



28 Academic Regulations 



program director within the first four weeks of the next 
regular academic semester. When a grade is assigned 
consistent with University policy, only the instructor has 
the right to change the grade except as provided in the 
Incomplete grade policy. When an instructor reports a 
grade change for a grade other than 7, the Change of Grade 
Form must be signed by his/her Department Chairperson 
and Dean. 

Grades 

Letters are used to designate the quality of student 
academic achievement. 

Grade of I (Incomplete) 

The grade of 7 is assigned at the discretion of the instructor 
when a student who is otherwise passing has not, due to 
circumstances beyond his/her control, completed all the 
work in the course. The missing work must be completed 
by the deadline specified by the instructor or during the 
next semester (fall or spring) in residence, but no later 
than 12 months after the term in which the /was 
assigned, whichever comes first. If the 7 is not removed 
during the specified time, a grade of U or TV as 
appropriate is automatically assigned. The grade of 7 
cannot be removed by enrolling again in the same course. 

Grade of IP (In Progress) 

The grade of IP is based on coursework for courses that 
extend over more than one semester. For example, a 
course that requires enrollment for two consecutive 
semesters would be eligible for an IP grade in the first 
term (i.e., Graduate Thesis, Undergraduate Senior Project, 
etc.) The grade in the second term is also awarded for the 
course in the first semester. A grade of IP should not be 
given for coursework to be completed in one given term. 
It cannot be substituted for a grade of 7. The IP grade 
expires after six years, and if no final grade has been 
awarded by that time, the IP grade will default to a grade 
of N(no credit). 

Grade of W (Withdrawal or Drop) 

No grade will be given for a course dropped on or before 
the last day to drop a course without record. After this 
period a student who is permitted to drop or withdraw 
from a course will receive a grade of W. Only students 
with such extenuating circumstances as serious illness will 
be permitted to drop a course after the sixth week of 
classes in the semester or to withdraw from all courses 
during the last two weeks of classes in the semester. 
Unsatisfactory academic performance itself is not an 
extenuating circumstance. The date of withdrawal is 
determined when the withdrawal form is accepted by the 
Registrar's Office. 

Pass/No Credit or Pass/Unsatisfactory Option 

Certain graduate courses, such as research seminars, 
tutorials, internships, theses or dissertations, may be 
designated for Pass/ No Credit or Pass/ Unsatisfactory grading 
upon recommendation of the offering department and 
approval of the Graduate Council. The grade of Pin such 



a course shall be considered as evidence of satisfactory 
performance. A grade of TV (No Credit) or U 
(Unsatisfactory) will affect eligibility for continued 
enrollment and will not apply toward requirements for 
the degree. 



GRADUATE GRADES 


Letter 


Meaning 


Grade Points 

per Semester 

Hour 


A 


Commendable 


4 


B 


Satisfactory 


3 


C 


Marginal 


2 


U 


Unsatisfactory 





I 


Incomplete 




IP 


In Progress 




w 


Withdrawal 




P 


Pass 




N 


No Credit 




AU 


Audit 




NR 


No recognition 
given for audit 





Grade Point Average 

The grade point average for a graduate student is based 
only on those courses in his/her approved program of 
study taken at UNC Charlotte. It is determined by 
multiplying the number of grade points for each grade 
{A— A, 73=3, C=2, U=0) by the number of semester hours 
credit received in that course, adding all accumulated 
grade points together, and then dividing by the total 
number of semester hours the student has attempted 
except those for which the student received a grade of 7, 
IP, W, P, TV, AU, or NR. When a course not listed as 
"May be repeated for credit" is repeated, no additional 
credit hours attempted accrue and the hours earned and 
grade points of the previous grade are replaced by those 
of the current grade. 

Graduate students must have a 3.0 GPA in the courses 
on their degree plan of study in order to graduate. 
However, the grades for all courses attempted will remain 
on the transcript and will be included in the calculation of 
the student's GPA as it is reported on the transcript. 

Repeating a Graduate Course 

A graduate student will be allowed to repeat a maximum 
of two courses in which the student has been assigned a 
grade of C, U or TV (but not an I). If the course grade has 
resulted in suspension of enrollment, the student must 
appeal to be reinstated in order to repeat the course. A 
given course may be repeated one time only. Each grade 
earned in a repeated course is computed into the grade 
point average. The record of the first attempt will remain 
a part of the student's permanent record and will count in 
the number of marginal (Q grades accumulated. 
Successfully repeating a course does not change the 



Academic Regulations 29 



number of marginal (Q grades accumulated. Enrollment 
will be terminated if a student receives a grade of U in a 
repeated course for which the student previously earned a 
UotN. 

Academic Records and Transcripts 

The Registrar is responsible for maintaining the official 
academic records for all students. Upon written request 
by the student, an official transcript of the academic 
record will be issued by the Registrar's Office to the 
person or institution designated, provided that all the 
student's obligations to the University have been settled 
satisfactorily. 

Each student is entitled to one transcript without cost, 
regardless of how early in his/her academic career the 
request is made. A fee of S3 per copy must accompany 
subsequent requests. Requests should reach the 
Registrar's Office at least one week before the date the 
transcript is needed and can be made online through the 
Registrar's Website. 

Course Descriptions 

Course descriptions provide the following information: 
subject prefix; course number; course title; semester 
credit hours assigned to the course; prerequisites and/or 
corequisites (if any); brief description of the course 
content; and when the course usually is offered 
(Evenings, Yearly, Alternate years, Fall, Spring, Summer, 
On demand). The description may specify the number of 
class (lecture) and/or laboratory sessions and hours. If 
no class hours are given, the number of class hours per 
week is the same as the number of semester hours credit 
assigned to the course. For example: 

SUBJ 6234. Title of Course. (Credit Hours) 

Pre/corequisites. Brief description of course content. 
(Three lecture hours and one three-hour laboratory per 
week) (When offered) 

Course Numbering System 

Courses are identified by four-digit numbers. The first 
digit indicates the level of the course: 5000-5999: 
graduate courses with parallel undergraduate courses 
listed at the 4000 level; 6000-7999: master's level courses; 
8000-9999: doctoral work. The following second digits 
designate special types of courses: for topics; 4 for 
internships and practicum, 5 for cooperative education, 6 
for seminars, 7 for Honors courses, 8 for independent 
study, and 9 for research. 



ACADEMIC STANDING 

Requirements for Continued Enrollment 

Students enrolled in any graduate program must maintain 
satisfactory progress toward the degree. Students are 
expected to achieve a commendable or satisfactory grade 



{A or 13) in all course work attempted for graduate credit. 
Students who fail to maintain satisfactory progress toward 
their degree or who do not achieve commendable or 
satisfactory grades in all their graduate course work are 
subject to suspension and/or termination from their 
program of study. 

International students on F-l or J-l visa status must carry 
a full course load each academic semester. Students who 
are suspended or terminated from their program of study 
are advised to consult the International Student/Scholar 
Office for information on maintaining valid F-l or J-l 
status, or reinstatement to valid F-l or J-l status. 

Academic Suspension 

An accumulation of three marginal C grades in any 
graduate course work will result in suspension of the 
student's enrollment in the graduate program. If a student 
makes a grade of U or N in any graduate course, 
enrollment will be suspended. A graduate student whose 
enrollment has been suspended because of grades is 
ineligible to register in any semester or summer session 
unless properly reinstated. (Note: Some Departments 
and/or programs have stricter regulations on suspension 
than those of the Graduate School. See the academic 
regulations presented in the program specific sections of 
this Catalog) 

Appeal Procedure 

Graduate students may appeal a suspension or 
termination using the procedures described in the 
following paragraphs. Other grievances relating to 
academic status are to be addressed to the Graduate 
School. 

Appeal of Academic Suspension for the Purpose of 
Reinstatement 

A student who has been suspended from a graduate 
program may appeal his/her suspension and must be 
reinstated in order to continue his/her program of study. 
After notification of suspension is received, the student 
initiates the appeal procedure by submitting a "Suspension 
Appeal Form" (sent to the student with the notice of 
suspension) to the graduate coordinator/ director of 
his/her academic program explaining any extenuating 
circumstances. The graduate coordinator/director will 
forward this form to the Graduate School with a 
recommendation regarding reinstatement. The Dean of 
the Graduate School makes the decision on the 
suspension appeal and notifies the student of the decision 
in writing. 

A student readmitted to a graduate program through 
reinstatement will be expected to complete the degree 
program with satisfactory or commendable performance. 
Should a student receive a grade of C, U or Nin a 
graduate course after being reinstated to the program, 
enrollment in the graduate program will be terminated. 



30 Academic Regulations 



A student who is denied readmission through the 
suspension appeal process is considered to be terminated 
from the graduate program. Terminated students may 
appeal their termination as identified in the section 
entitled "Appeal of Academic Termination for the Purpose of 
Reinstatement. " 

Academic Termination 

Academic termination of a graduate student's program of 
studies may occur in four ways. 

1 . Students may be required to terminate their graduate 
studies if they fail to maintain satisfactory academic 
progress. One example of failure to maintain satisfactory 
academic progress is non-adherence to the schedule of 
"Time Limits for Degrees. " 

When a program determines that a student is making 
unsatisfactory progress, the program notifies the student 
in writing of the program's concern about the student's 
performance. Such a warning specifies the source of the 
concern, the applicable program and/or Graduate School 
rules, and the proposed action. Warnings specify when 
and on what basis a recommendation for academic 
termination will be considered by the program. A 
probationary period of one academic semester is normal. 

Following the probationary period, a student who fails to 
meet the provisions of the warning is subject to 
termination from the program. If the program believes 
that termination is warranted, the graduate program 
director or coordinator communicates to the Dean of the 
Graduate School in writing the specific reasons involved, 
all warnings communicated to the student, the program 
and/or advisory committee procedures and actions 
leading to the recommendation, and the mailing address 
of the student. After considering all of the information, 
the Dean will make a decision. If the decision is to 
terminate, the Dean will notify the student of his/her 
termination from the Graduate School. 



In all cases of termination from a graduate program, the 
student's transcript will bear the notation "Candidacy 
Terminated." 

Readmission of Terminated Graduate Student 

Students who have been academically terminated from a 
UNC Charlotte graduate program are not eligible for 
readmission to that program or future admission to any 
other graduate program. However, if after two years the 
student can demonstrate the potential for academic 
success and/or personal and professional development 
since leaving the program, the student may initiate a 
request for readmission to the Graduate School. The 
student may initiate the request for readmission to the 
program from which he/she was terminated or to a 
different graduate program. Students seeking readmission 
must submit a new application package which includes 
the full set of materials identified in the section entided 
"General Application Requirements for Admission. " In addition, 
the student must include a letter explaining the 
circumstances that led to his/her termination from a 
UNC Charlotte graduate program and a discussion of the 
academic and/or personal and professional development 
since last attending the University that has prepared 
him/her for a successful return to graduate studies. 

Appeal of Academic Termination for the Purpose of 
Reinstatement 

While an action of termination is considered final, a 
student who is terminated from a graduate program may 
appeal that termination to the Graduate School if there 
are unusual or extenuating circumstances. The type of 
academic termination will determine the permissible 
grounds for the petition and the specific procedure 
utilized to initiate the appeal. 

Category 1: Academic Termination Based on Failure to 
Maintain Commendable or Satisfactory Performance in 
Course Work 



2. A student's graduate studies may be terminated if 
he/she fails to maintain the specific standards of the 
student's academic program as described in the program 
specific sections of the Graduate Catalog. For example, a 
doctoral program may indicate that the accumulation of 2 
C grades or one U grade is grounds for termination from 
the program. 

3. A student's graduate studies will be terminated if, after 
receiving an initial suspension (see "Academic Suspension') 
and subsequent reinstatement (see "Appeal of Academic 
Suspension for the Purpose of Reinstatement'), the student 
receives a grade of C, U or N in a graduate level course. 

4. Students who are suspended from a graduate program 
and are denied re-admittance through the suspension 
appeal process (see "Appeal of Academic Suspension for the 
Purpose of Reinstatement') are considered terminated from 
their graduate program. 



Category 1 appeals are available to students who have 
been terminated for receiving a U, Nor C grade after an 
initial suspension and students who fail to maintain the 
specific grading standards of an academic program. In 
these cases, an Appeal of Academic Termination 
submitted to the Graduate School must be supported by 
the student's graduate program. Without support from 
the student's graduate program, academic termination of 
this type is always considered a final action. 

To initiate a Category 1 Appeal of Academic 
Termination, the student must send a written letter to the 
Graduate School requesting consideration of his/her case 
by the UNC Charlotte Graduate School Appeals 
Committee. In the written request, the student must make 
his/her case for reinstatement. Included with the 
student's letter must be at least two letters of support for 
reinstatement from the student's academic program. For 
master's degree students, the termination appeal should 



Academic Regulations 31 



include a letter from the program coordinator/director 
and a letter from the department chair, major advisor 
and/or the thesis/project advisor. For a doctoral student, 
a termination appeal should include a letter from the 
program coordinator/ director and the advisory 
committee or dissertation committee chair. The letters 
from the program must specify what expectations must 
be met by the student if he/she is readmitted to the 
program. A termination appeal request and the 
supporting documentation must be received by the 
Graduate School within 30 days of the date on the letter 
of termination. 

Once the Graduate School receives a Category 1 Appeal 
of Termination, it will be forwarded to the Chair of the 
Graduate School Appeals Committee. This Committee 
will review all relevant materials and make a 
recommendation to the Dean of the Graduate School. 
The Dean of the Graduate School makes the decision on 
the Appeal of Termination case and his/her decision is 
final. 

Category 2: Academic Termination Based on 
Programmatic Action 

Category 2 appeals are for students who have been 
terminated for failure to maintain satisfactory progress in 
an academic program and for students who have been 
denied re-admittance through the suspension appeal 
process. Academic decisions based on the disciplinary 
expertise and judgment of graduate faculty members and 
program coordinators/directors in a particular field are 
not subject to appeal. The fact that a programmatic 
decision goes against a student's desire for continuation in 
an academic degree program is not grounds for a 
termination appeal. However, a Category 2 appeal may be 
brought on the grounds that there was "procedural error" 
or "discrimination" in the termination decision. 

To initiate a Category 2 Appeal of Academic 
Termination, the student must send a written letter to the 
Graduate School requesting consideration of his/her case 
by the UNC Charlotte Graduate School Appeals 
Committee. In the written request, the student must make 
his/her case for reinstatement. If the student is alleging 
"procedural error," the student must specify what 
procedures were utilized and how the program deviated 
from the specified procedures. If the basis of the appeal is 
"discrimination," the student must show how his/her 
case was handled substantially different from those of 
other students in similar circumstances. A termination 
appeal request and the supporting documentation must 
be received by the Graduate School within 30 days of the 
date on the letter of termination. 

Once the Graduate School receives a Category 2 Appeal 
of Termination, it will be forwarded to the Chair of the 
Graduate School Appeals Committee. The Chair of the 
Appeals Committee will contact the program in question 
and request a response to allegations of "procedural 



error" and/or "discrimination." The program will have 
two weeks to respond to the request of the Appeals 
Committee Chair. Once all relevant information had been 
received, the Committee will review the materials and 
make a recommendation to the Dean of the Graduate 
School. The Dean of the Graduate School makes the 
decision on the Appeal of Termination case and his/her 
decision is final. 

Graduate School Appeals Committee 

The Graduate School Appeals Committee is authorized 
to review appeals for reinstatement from graduate 
students who have been academically terminated. The 
Committee does not hear grade appeals, for which a 
separate procedure exists. The Appeals Committee is 
comprised of four members. The Assistant Dean for 
Graduate Student Affairs serves as the ex officio, non- 
voting chair of the committee. The three voting members 
of the Appeals Committee are graduate faculty members 
named by the Dean of the Graduate School. The 
Graduate Faculty members serve a staggered three year 
term. 

Transferred Credit 

The student's graduate program coordinator is 
responsible for determining the applicability of 
transferred credits to graduate program requirements. See 
the appropriate "Degree Requirements" sections of this 
Catalog for program specific policies. General rules 
governing transferred credit are: 

1) To obtain approval to receive transfer credit, the 
student must submit an Application for Transfer of Credit 
into a Graduate Degree Program form (available in the 
Graduate School office), approved by the graduate 
program coordinator, to the Dean of the Graduate 
School. If the courses being transferred are from 
another institution, the student must include an 
official copy of the transcript along with the request. 
The University is not obligated to accept any 
courses for transfer credit. 

2) No more than six semester hours of transfer 
credit will be considered for acceptance into a 
masters degree program. The amount of transfer 
credit that may be accepted into a doctoral program 
varies by program. See program specific policies in 
this Catalog. 

3) Courses which have been taken as part of any 
graduate program at UNC Charlotte or another 
institution for which the student has received a 
masters or doctorate degree are not transferable into 
a second masters degree program. The transferability 
of masters degree or doctoral course work into a 
doctoral program varies by program. See program 
specific policies in this Catalog. 

4) The grade in any course accepted for transferred 
credit must be the equivalent of that awarded for 
commendable (A) or satisfactory (B) work as defined 
by UNC Charlotte. It should be noted, however, that 
although the credit for a course may transfer, the 



32 Academic Regulations 



grade will not be used to calculate the graduate GPA 
at UNC Charlotte. 

5) Courses accepted for transfer are subject to the same 
time limitation as courses taken in residence. 

6) To be considered for transferred credit, the courses 
must have been undertaken at a regionally accredited 
institution. 

7) Courses in which credit is accepted must be 
appropriate for approved University programs and 
curricula in which the student is enrolled. 

8) To obtain approval to take a course at another 
institution while at UNC Charlotte, a student must 
complete an Application for Transfer of Credit into a 
Graduate Degree Program form, have it approved by the 
graduate program coordinator prior to taking the 
course, and file it in the Graduate School. Upon 
completion of the course(s) the student must request 
that an official transcript be mailed to the Graduate 
School listing the course(s) to be transferred. 

9) Transfer credit is not awarded for non-degree 
seeking graduate students. 

Credit by Examination 

A student currently enrolled at UNC Charlotte may pass a 
specially prepared challenge examination and receive 
credit for a University course without having to do the 
normal course work. The student contacts the program in 
which credit is sought to request administration of an 
examination. Since it may not be appropriate to award 
credit by examination for some courses, the decision to 
offer an examination is that of the program. If the 
graduate program authorizes an examination, the student 
is instructed to pay the fee for credit by examination and 
to bring the receipt of payment to the examination. Credit 
by examination will be indicated on the transcript, but no 
grade points will be awarded. Failure on such an 
examination will incur no grade-point penalty. No student 
may challenge a course for which either a passing or 
failing grade has been received at UNC Charlotte. 

Application for the Degree and/or Graduate 
Certificate 

Each student should make application for his/her degree 
and/or graduate certificate on a form obtained from the 
Graduate School or the Graduate School's Website no 
later than the filing date specified in the University 
Calendar. The application must be accompanied by the 
filing fee in effect at the time of the application. Degrees 
are awarded at commencement exercises held at the end 
of the spring and fall semesters; however, the diploma 
and transcript will reflect the term in which all 
requirements were completed. Graduate certificates are 
not awarded at the commencement exercises. Graduate 
certificates are mailed direcdy to the student. 

Students completing their degree requirements in May, 
participate in the May commencement ceremony. 
Students completing degrees in a summer term as well as 
those completing in December, participate in the 
December commencement ceremony. 



Earning A Second Degree 

A student is permitted to earn a second graduate degree 
subject to the following conditions: 

1) no work applied to a previously awarded degree may 
be applied to the new degree program, 

2) the student must be admitted to a degree program 
different from that of his/her previous graduate 
degree(s), 

3) the student must successfully meet all requirements 
for the new degree. 

Dual Master's Degrees 

In certain instances it may be possible for a student to 
obtain dual degrees in two master's programs through the 
development of an integrated curriculum. It is important 
to remember that a dual master's degree requires a 
special arrangement and should be viewed as 
atypical to standard practice. No degree program is 
obligated to enter into such an arrangement. 

Although other restrictions may apply, basic admission 
and degree requirements are specified below: 

1) The student must apply to each program separately 
and be admitted to both. No admission requirements 
established by the Graduate School or by either 
individual program may be waived. For example if 
one degree requires acceptable scores for the GRE 
and the other the MAT, the applicant must take each 
standardized exam to be considered for admission to 
both degrees. 

2) Once admitted, the student must develop a suitable 
plan of study that is acceptable to both programs and 
to the Graduate School. This plan of study must 
be done within the first semester of 
matriculation and in conjunction with both 
program coordinators or directors. The plan of 
study must be forwarded to the Dean of the 
Graduate School for review and approval. 

3) The student's advisory committee must have 
representation from both degree programs. If there 
is no advisory committee, the student must have two 
advisors; one from each program. 

4) The number of required credit hours for both 
degrees must not be less than 75% of the total 
minimum hours required to complete each degree 
separately. For instance if degree program X requires 
30 credit hours and Y 30 credit hours, a proposed 
dual degree should at a minimum require 45 credit 
hours. 

5) The coordinator or director of each degree must 
agree on which courses may be applied to both sets 
of graduation requirements. 

6) The student must complete the capstone 
requirements for both programs. For example if 
program X requires a written thesis and program Y 
requires a comprehensive exam, the student must 
meet both degree obligations. 

7) If diere is a compulsory qualifying exam in each 
curriculum, it may be possible for the student to take 



Academic Regulations 33 



a single exam as long as the examination committee 
agrees that the assessment covers sufficient 
background information for each discipline. If only 
one program requires a qualifying exam, the student 
is obligated to take the exam. 

8) If the student withdraws or is suspended from one of 
the participating programs, the dual degree 
arrangement is automatically nullified. 

9) All standard policies relating to transfer of courses, 
time to degree, residency requirements, and 
minimum GPA required to graduate, apply to any 
dual degree arrangement. 

No dual degrees will be awarded retroactively. 



MASTER'S DEGREE 
REQUIREMENTS 

Residence Requirements 

No more than six semester hours of transferred 

credit are accepted toward a master's degree. All 

other work must be residence credit. 

Residence credit is credit that is earned under the conditions 
specified herein and may be applied toward the 
attainment of graduate degrees at UNC Charlotte. These 
conditions must be satisfied regardless of the location (on 
campus, on-line, or distance) in which the course is given. 

1) Instruction: The instructor must be a member of the 
UNC Charlotte Graduate Faculty. 

2) Course (s): The content of each course must be 
approved by regularly established college, Graduate 
School and University curricular processes before the 
course is scheduled or offered. 

Residence credit may also be awarded by virtue of an 
examination administered by the Graduate Faculty of the 
department offering credit. A student also, with the prior 
approval of the appropriate UNC Charlotte department 
and the Dean of the Graduate School, may take graduate 
courses for residence and course credit at other regionally 
accredited institutions. 

Advisory Committee 

All students in graduate programs must have a graduate 
advisor who is a regular member of the Graduate Faculty 
in the student's major program. The graduate program 
coordinator/ director appoints the graduate advisor. In 
the case of master's programs requiring theses and/or 
final oral examinations, the graduate advisor serves as 
chair or co chair of the committee. 

In all master's programs requiring a committee, the 
committee will consist of at least three graduate faculty 
members, one of whom is designated as chair. In 
programs not requiring a committee only a major advisor 
is necessary. 



Program Approval 

Each student's individual program of study must be 
approved by his/her department/ college. A maximum of 
six hours of transferred credit may be included in the 
approved program of study. 

Admission to Candidacy 

Upon successful completion of a minimum of 18 
semester hours of graduate work and in no case later than 
four weeks prior to the beginning of the semester in 
which he/she expects to complete all requisites for the 
degree, a student should file for admission to candidacy 
on a form supplied by the Graduate School. This 
application is a check sheet approved by the student's 
adviser, department chairperson and college dean listing 
all course work to be offered for the degree (including 
transferred credit and courses in progress). 

Minimum Hours and Quality 

A student is expected to satisfactorily complete a 
minimum of 30 to 60 semester hours of approved 
graduate level courses, depending upon his/her individual 
program, with an overall GPA of 3.0 or better in courses 
on the degree plan of study. Grades in all courses 
attempted, whether or not on the plan of study, will 
remain on the transcript and will be included in the 
calculation of the student's GPA as it is reported on the 
transcript. No more than six hours evaluated as C may be 
counted toward the minimum hours required for the 
master's degree. 

Comprehensive Examination 

After admission to candidacy, each student must 
successfully complete a comprehensive examination. The 
examination may be written, oral, or both, depending 
upon the student's specific program requirements. 
Generally, a student is allowed to take the comprehensive 
exam two times. A student who fails the comprehensive 
exam the second time is terminated from the master's 
degree program. Students must be enrolled during the 
semester in which they take the comprehensive 
examination. 

Time Limit 

University policy requires that no course listed on a 
master's student's candidacy form be older than six years 
at the time of graduation. This policy is in place because 
of the University's interest in a degree being current when 
it is awarded. Courses that exceed this time limit must be 
revalidated or retaken, whichever the graduate program 
decides necessary, if they are to count in a degree 
program. 

To revalidate a course, the student, along with the 
program coordinator and the course instructor, prepare a 
revalidation plan that must be reviewed and approved by 
the Dean of the Graduate School. This plan often 
involves taking a special examination designed by the 



34 Academic Regulations 



faculty of the graduate program. Once the plan has been 
completed, the program coordinator must notify the 
Dean of the Graduate School in writing. 

Students may not revalidate courses with a grade of C or 
lower, courses that are internships or other forms of 
practica, or courses taken at other institutions. 
Additionally, no more than 25% of the courses on a 
student's program of study may be revalidated and 
for master's students no course older than eight 
years may be revalidated. 

Thesis 

The plan of study for a master's degree may or may not 
include completion of a thesis. The thesis and non-thesis 
approaches are designed to meet the needs of students 
preparing for different types of careers and represent 
qualitatively different educational experiences. 
Consequently, the academic departments and the Dean of 
the Graduate School discourage any switching from one 
plan to another. If a switch from a thesis to non-thesis 
plan is approved, the grade of I for the thesis work will be 
changed to W on the transcript with no refund of tuition 
for the course(s). At the time that the graduate program 
approves the student's thesis topic, the Petition for Topic 
Approval must be filed with the Graduate School. This 
form is available in the Graduate School and on the 
Graduate School Website. 

The thesis should be submitted for final approval by the 
student's thesis committee at least three weeks before the 
date of the oral examination in which the thesis is 
defended. Following the successful completion of this 
defense, the master's candidate must submit three 
unbound copies of the approved and error-free thesis to 
the Graduate School no later than the filing date indicated 
in the University Calendar. Guidelines for the preparation 
of the thesis are available from the Graduate School and 
on the Graduate School Website. 

Course and Other Requirements 

The course and other requirements for specific degree 
programs are presented in the section of this Catalog on 
Graduate Programs. 



PH.D. DEGREE 
REQUIREMENTS 

A doctoral degree is conferred by the University after the 
student has demonstrated outstanding scholarship in an 
approved program of study. Candidates must satisfy all 
University degree requirements in addition to all 
standards established by the doctoral faculty of their 
particular program. Specific program degree requirements 
are listed under the respective doctoral programs in this 
Catalog, In some cases, requirements in a given program 



are more stringent than the minimum requirements 
established by the Graduate School. 

Ordinarily, a student must complete at least 72 post- 
baccalaureate credit hours in order to earn the Ph.D. 

Advisory Committees 

All students in graduate programs must have a graduate 
advisor who is a regular member of the Graduate Faculty 
in the student's major program. The graduate program 
coordinator/ director appoints the graduate advisor. 

For doctoral students the committee will consist of at 
least four Graduate Faculty members, one of whom is 
appointed by the Dean of the Graduate School as the 
Graduate Faculty representative. 

The committee for doctoral students is indicated on the 
Petition for Topic Approval (available in the Graduate 
School office). At the time that the Petition for Topic 
Approval is approved, the Graduate School appoints the 
Graduate Faculty Representative to serve on the doctoral 
committee. 

Program of Study 

Although the maximum amount of credit past the 
baccalaureate degree that a Ph.D. student may count 
towards a doctorate is 30 semester hours, only courses 
appropriate for the approved program and curriculum in 
which the student is enrolled may be transferred. 
Appropriate courses should be determined by the 
student's supervisory committee and approved by the 
program coordinator before the request is submitted to 
the Graduate School. This rule applies whether the 
courses were taken at UNC Charlotte or elsewhere and 
whether a master's degree was earned or not. However, 
no more than six hours taken when the student was in 
post-baccalaureate (non-degree seeking) status may be 
applied toward the doctoral degree. 

Program Approval 

By the end of the first semester of the third post- 
baccalaureate year in the program and no later than the 
filing of the petition to sit for the qualifying examination, 
a student's program of study must be approved by his or 
her advisory committee and submitted to the Dean of the 
Graduate School. 

Course and Other Program Requirements 

The course and other requirements for each degree 
program are indicated in the program descriptions in the 
following pages. 

Time Limit 

All courses beyond the master's degree, including 
accepted transferred credit, that are listed on the 
candidacy form cannot be older than eight years at the 
time of graduation. Courses that exceed this time limit 
must be revalidated or retaken, whichever the graduate 



Academic Regulations 35 



program decides necessary, if they are to count in a 
degree program. 

To revalidate a course, the student, along with the 
program coordinator and the course instructor, prepare a 
revalidation plan that must be reviewed and approved by 
the Dean of the Graduate School. This plan often 
involves taking a special examination designed by the 
faculty of the graduate program. Once the plan has been 
completed, the program coordinator must notify the 
Dean of the Graduate School in writing. 

Students may not revalidate courses with a grade of C or 
lower, courses that are internships or other forms of 
practica, or courses taken at other institutions. 
Additionally, no more than 25% of the courses on a 
student's program of study may be revalidated and 
no course older than ten years may be revalidated. 

Residence 

All doctoral students are required to complete a 
substantial residency requirement during which they have 
sustained contact with the graduate faculty. This 
requirement is specified in the program descriptions. 

Graduate Faculty Representative 

The graduate faculty representative is a member of the 
doctoral student's advisory committee appointed by the 
Graduate School. This faculty member's role is primarily 
procedural. He/she must 1) assure that the doctoral 
student is treated fairly and impartially by his or her 
advisory committee, and 2) assure that University 
standards and policies are upheld. This representative is 
appointed prior to the student's taking the qualifying 
examination and must participate in the examination, in 
the dissertation topic approval process, and in the final 
examination. A student's advisor may consult with the 
Dean of the Graduate School regarding selection of this 
representative. 

Qualifying Examination 

Each student must complete a qualifying examination. 
Ordinarily students who enter a Ph.D. program directly 
from a baccalaureate program sit for this examination 
before the end of their third post-baccalaureate year in 
the program while students who enter a Ph.D. program 
from a master's degree program take the examination 
before the end of their first year in the doctoral program. 
To sit for this examination, the student must have at least 
a 3.0 GPA and must have removed any conditions upon 
admission. 

Re-examination 

A student who fails the qualifying examination may 
petition the program faculty to be re-examined. The re- 
examination may take place no sooner than the beginning 
of the semester following the one in which the failure 
occurred. A student who fails the qualifying examination 
a second time is terminated from the doctoral program. 



Candidacy 

The dissertation topic may be proposed after the student 
has passed the qualifying examination. A doctoral student 
advances to candidacy after the dissertation topic has 
been approved by the student's advisory committee and 
the Dean of the Graduate School. Candidacy must be 
achieved at least six months before the degree is 
conferred. 

Dissertation 

The doctoral program of study must include 1 8 hours of 
research credit including dissertation credit. The doctoral 
candidate must be continuously enrolled in dissertation 
credit hours (See also section: Student Responsibility - 
Continuous Registration) beginning with the semester 
after the dissertation topic is approved until the semester 
of graduation. 

The dissertation must be submitted for final approval by 
the student's committee at least three weeks before the 
date of the final examination in which the dissertation is 
defended. Following the successful completion of this 
defense, the doctoral candidate must submit four 
unbound copies of the approved error-free manuscript to 
the Graduate School no later than the filing date indicated 
in the University calendar. Guidelines for the preparation 
of the dissertation are available from the Graduate School 
and on the Graduate School Website. 

The Graduate School requires publication of the 
dissertation on microfilm and in Dissertation Abstracts 
International^ University Microfilms International of Ann 
Arbor, Michigan. The student is responsible for paying 
the microfilming and optional copyrighting fees. Any 
other arrangements for publications of the dissertation 
must not interfere with publication by University 
Microfilms International. 

Final Examination 

Each candidate must pass a final examination over the 
contents of the dissertation. Sometimes called the 
"dissertation defense" or the "dissertation oral," this 
meeting is traditionally open to members of the 
University community. No student is permitted to take 
the final examination more than twice. 



ED.D. DEGREE 
REQUIREMENTS 

The Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) degree is conferred by 
the University after the student has successfully 
completed all requirements in an approved doctoral 
program of study in the College of Education. Specific 
program degree requirements are described in the College 
of Education section of this Catalog. 



36 Academic Regulations 



Program of Study 

Although the maximum amount of credit past the 
Master's of School Administration (M.SA.) degree that an 
Ed.D. student may count towards a doctorate is 9 
semester hours, only educational administration courses 
approved by the program coordinator may be transferred. 
This rule applies whether the courses were taken at UNC 
Charlotte or elsewhere; however, no more than six hours 
taken when the student was in post-baccalaureate (non- 
degree seeking) status may be applied toward the doctoral 
degree. 

Time Limit 

All courses, including accepted transferred credit(s) that 
are listed on the candidacy form, cannot be older than 
eight years at the time of graduation. Courses that exceed 
this time limit must be revalidated or retaken, whichever 
the graduate program decides necessary, if they are to 
count in a degree program. 

To revalidate a course, the student, along with the 
program coordinator and the course instructor, prepare a 
revalidation plan that must be reviewed and approved by 
the Dean of the Graduate School. This plan often 
involves taking a special examination designed by the 
faculty of the graduate program. Once the plan has been 
completed, the program coordinator must notify the 
Dean of the Graduate School in writing. 

Students may not revalidate courses with a grade of C or 
lower, courses that are internships or other forms of 
practica, or courses taken at other institutions. 
Additionally, no more than 25% of the courses on a 
student's program of study may be revalidated and 
no course older than ten years may be revalidated. 

Comprehensive Examination 

Students are required to successfully pass a written and 
oral examination. The examination is based upon the core 
areas of educational leadership, educational research, and 
instructional technology. 

Admission to Candidacy Requirements 

Students are recommended for admission to candidacy 
after successfully completing the written and oral 
comprehensive examination. 

Dissertation 

Students must complete and defend a dissertation 
focused on a specific problem or question relevant to K- 
1 2 educational organizations, administration, or 
leadership. Students must be continually enrolled in 
ADMN 8999 (3 hrs) (fall, summer and spring sessions) 
for dissertation research credit, beginning with the 
semester following completion of the comprehensive 
examination and continuing through the semester of their 
graduation. Defense of their dissertation is conducted in a 
final oral examination that is open to members of the 
University community. 



Graduate Faculty Representative 

The graduate faculty representative is a member of the 
doctoral student's advisory committee appointed by the 
Graduate School. This faculty member's role is primarily 
procedural. He/she must 1) assure that the doctoral 
student is treated fairly and impartially by his or her 
advisory committee, and 2) assure that University 
standards and policies are upheld. This representative is 
appointed prior to the student's taking the qualifying 
examination and must participate in the examination, in 
the dissertation topic approval process, and in the final 
examination. A student's advisor may consult with the 
Dean of the Graduate School regarding selection of this 
representative. 

Application for Degree 

Students may submit an Application for Degree during 
the semester in which they successfully defend their 
dissertation proposal. Adherence to Graduate School 
deadlines is expected. Degree requirements are completed 
when students successfully defend their dissertation and 
file the final copy of the dissertation in the Graduate 
School. 



GRADUATE 

CERTIFICATE 

REQUIREMENTS 

The graduate certificate is awarded for successful 
completion of a coherent program of at least 12 credit 
hours proposed by a unit of the graduate faculty and 
approved by the Graduate Council. Students are admitted 
to a particular graduate certificate program and are 
advised by faculty in the unit offering the graduate 
certificate. Admission to a graduate certificate program is 
separate and distinct from admission to a graduate degree 
program. Admission to a certificate program is not an 
indication of subsequent admission to a degree program 
just as admission to a degree program is not an indication 
of admission to a certificate program. 

Since the graduate certificate is not a degree, students may 
apply the credits earned in the certificate program toward 
a degree that they pursue either in conjunction with the 
graduate certificate or after the certificate has been 
awarded. However, students may not apply credits earned 
in one certificate program toward the satisfaction of 
requirements in a second certificate program. 

Students may enroll in a graduate certificate program only 
or may complete the certificate in conjunction with a 
graduate degree program at the University. Hours taken 
toward a graduate certificate may be counted toward a 
graduate degree program with the recommendation of the 



Academic Regulations 37 



graduate program coordinator and the approval of the 
Graduate School. 

Graduate certificate programs generally require at least 12 
credit hours of graduate course work. Up to six hours 
taken at post-baccalaureate status at UNC Charlotte may 
be applied toward a certificate with the recommendation 
of the program coordinator and the approval of the 
Graduate School. Students ordinarily may not transfer 
hours from another institution into a certificate program. 
The graduate certificate is awarded to a student who has 
completed the specified program of study with a GPA of 
3.0 or better within four years from the time of 
enrollment in the first certificate course. 

Note: No Graduate Certificates will be awarded 
retroactively. 



FAMILY EDUCATIONAL 
RIGHTS AND PRIVACY 
ACT (FERPA) 
NOTIFICATION 

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) 
affords students certain rights with respect to their 
education records. They are: 

1) The right to inspect and review the student's education 
records within 45 days of the day the University receives a 
request for access. 

Students should submit to the Registrar, dean, head of the 
academic department, or other appropriate official, 
written requests that identify the record(s) they wish to 
inspect. The University official will make arrangements 
for access and notify the student of the time and place 
where the records may be inspected. If the records are 
not maintained by the University official to whom the 
request was submitted, that official shall advise the 
student of the correct official to whom the request should 
be addressed. 

2) The right to request amendment of the student's 
education records that the student believes are inaccurate 
or misleading. 

Students may ask the University to amend a record that 
they believe is inaccurate or misleading. They should write 
the University official responsible for the record, clearly 
identify the part of the record they want changed, and 
specify why it is inaccurate or misleading. 

If the University decides not to amend the record as 
requested by the student, the University will notify the 
student of the decision and advise the student of his or 



her right to a hearing regarding the request for 
amendment. Additional information regarding the hearing 
procedures will be provided to the student's when 
notified of the right to a hearing. 

3) The right to consent to disclosures of personally 
identifiable information contained in the student's 
education records, except to the extent that FERPA 
authorizes disclosure without consent. 

One exception that permits disclosure without consent is 
disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational 
interests. A school official is a person employed by the 
University in an administrative, supervisory, academic or 
research, or support staff position (including law 
enforcement unit personnel and health staff); a person 
serving or company with whom the University has 
contracted (such as an attorney, auditor, or collection 
agent); a person serving on the Board of Trustees; or a 
student serving on an official committee, such as a 
disciplinary or grievance committee, or assisting another 
school official in performing his or her tasks. 

A school official has legitimate educational interest if the 
official needs to review an education record in order to 
fulfill his her professional responsibility. 

4) The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department 
of Education concerning alleged failures by UNC 
Charlotte to comply with the requirements of FERPA. 
The name and address of the Office that administers 
FERPA is: Family Policy Compliance Office, U.S. 
Department of Education, 600 Independence Avenue, 
SW, Washington, DC 20202. 

UNC Charlotte intends to comply fully with these 
requirements. Policy Statement No. 69, "The Privacy of 
Educational Records," explains the procedures for 
compliance. Students may obtain copies of the Policy in 
the Office of the Registrar or 

http//www.uncc.edu/unccatty/policy/state/, and copies 
of the policy statement are available for inspection in the 
offices of each dean and department chair. The policy 
includes a list of the locations of all education records 
maintained by the institution. 

The following categories of personally identifiable 
information about students have been designated as 
public or "directory" information which may be disclosed 
for any purpose without student consent: name, local and 
permanent address, telephone number, email address, 
date and place of birth, class, major field of study, dates 
of attendance, degrees and awards (including 
scholarships) received, participation in officially 
recognized activities and sports, and weight and height of 
members of an athletic team. 

Currently enrolled students may withhold disclosure of 
information in any category by completing the 
appropriate form available in the Office of the Registrar. 



38 Academic Regulations 



Written requests for non disclosure will be honored for a 
maximum of one year, and all such requests will expire on 
the following August 31. UNC Charlotte assumes that 
failure to complete the request indicates approval for 
disclosure. 

All questions concerning this policy on educational 
records may be directed to the attention of the Registrar. 



College of Architecture 39 



College of Architecture 



The College of Architecture at the University of North 
Carolina at Charlotte offers a fully accredited program 
recognized for the outstanding quality of its faculty and 
students, its commitment to outreach and community 
involvement, and the quality and extent of resources 
offered through its labs, classrooms, and studios. Students 
organize their study around concentrations in Urbanism, 
Technology, or Design, Theory & Practice. Each area of 
study is well supported not only by coursework but also 
by travel and research opportunities. The College 
participates in several international exchange programs 
and offers summer travel and study programs in Spain, 
Italy, Canada, and Australia to broaden students' global 
understanding and further inform their work. Locally the 
Charlotte Community Design Studio (CCDS) offers 
hands-on experience with urban design efforts affecting 
Charlotte and the region while the work of a design-build 
studio each year affects the lives of economically 
disadvantaged citizens of our community on a more 
intimate scale. 

The program offers each student significant individual 
time and attention, an engaged and accessible faculty, and 
a wealth of diversity through both the interests of the 
faculty and the varied background of the graduate 
students themselves. Because the College stresses the 
importance of 'making' in addition to thinking, the wood, 
metal, computer, and laser workshops are all equipped 
with the latest high performance equipment to enable 
students to both explore and embody their design ideas. 
Contact with the profession is also emphasized and the 
College is frequently enriched by the expertise of local 
practitioners. An extensive lecture series involving 
nationally and internationally recognized designers and 
theorists further enhances the educational environment 
and exposure to current artifacts and schools of thought. 

Graduate Degree Programs 

Master of Architecture I 
Master of Architecture II 



ARCHITECTURE 

College of Architecture 

Storrs Architecture Building 

http://www.coa.uncc.edu/ 

704-687-2358 

Degree 

Master of Architecture 



Program Coordinator 

Jose L.S. Gamez Assistant Professor 

Graduate Faculty 

Dale Brentrup, Professor 

Kelly Carlson-Reddig, Associate Professor 

Paul Clark, Assistant Professor 

Jose Gamez, Assistant Professor 

Lee Gray, Associate Professor, Associate Dean 

Chris Grech, Associate Professor 

Charles Hight, Professor 

Ken Lambla, Professor, Dean 

Mark Morris, Visiting Assistant Professor 

John Nelson, Associate Professor 

Deb Ryan, Associate Professor 

Linda Samuels, Assistant Professor 

Erci Sauda, Professor 

Greg Snyder, Associate Professor 

Michael Swisher, Associate Professor 

David Thaddeus, Associate Professor 

David Walters, Professor 

Betsy West, Associate Professor, Chair of Instruction 

Peter Wong, Associate Professor 



MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE 

Program Description 

The Master of Architecture degree (MArch) serves two 
groups of students: 1) the three-year MArchI Program, 
which includes two summer sessions accommodates 
students whose previous degree is outside the field of 
architecture; and 2) the two-year MArchll Program serves 
students who have already completed a four-year degree 
program in architecture at a National Architectural 
Accrediting Board (NAAB) accredited institution. The 
courses and options within each program are similar, but 
the advanced standing of MArchll students allows them 
to complete the degree requirements in two years. 
Students in both programs must complete a 
comprehensive design studio and a thesis project under 
the advisement of a faculty committee. Full time 
academic status is expected in both programs. 

The MArchI Program involves four primary 
components: 1) the first year focuses on establishing a 
strong foundation in fundamental design skills, 
architectural history and theory, building-to-site 
relationships, and introductory building technologies; 2) 
the second year focuses on comprehensive architectural 
design and its relationship to building systems as well as 
advanced studies in history, theory, and building 
technology; 3) the summer study program provides the 
opportunity to engage international education, research, 



40 College of Architecture 



or design experience; and 4) the third year is focused on 
the student's thesis research and project execution. 

The MArchll Program is tailored through the advising 
process to the previous educational background of the 
students and to their individual professional and research 
goals. The program involves two primary components: 1) 
the first year focuses on comprehensive architectural 
building design and topical studios with advanced studies 
in the area of concentration; and 2) the second year is 
dedicated to continued study within the area of 
concentration as well as thesis research and project 
execution. 

Admission Requirements 

In addition to the admissions materials required by the 
Graduate School, the College of Architecture requires the 
submission of a portfolio of creative work. Applicants to 
the MArchI program should submit examples of work 
that offer evidence of creativity, self-motivation and 
critical appraisal. Such examples are not expected to be 
architectural in nature. Visual work such as painting, 
sculpture, furniture making, photography, etc. are 
acceptable as are fiction writing, poetry, and any other 
reasonable evidence of sustained creative endeavor. 
Applicants to the MArchll program may offer similar 
evidence of any kind of creative endeavor but must also 
offer significant evidence of a mastery of architectural 
skill and knowledge. 

Students who complete the professional track of the four 
year Bachelor of Arts in Architecture degree program at 
UNC Charlotte and meet the following criteria will be 
permitted automatic admission to the MArchll Program: 

1) Students must complete their undergraduate degree 
with a 3.0 grade point average in Architecture. 

2) Students must complete their undergraduate degree 
with a 2.75 grade point average overall, and a 
junior/ senior grade point average of 3.0 overall. 

3) Students must complete a Statement of Purpose 
describing their objectives relative to graduate study. 

4) Students must fulfill the university's Graduate School 
application requirements in effect at the time of their 
application. 

Students who do not meet the grade point average 
requirements noted above may submit an application for 
admission to the MArchll program for consideration 
with applicants from other architectural programs. 

Degree Requirements 

Concentrations within the MArchI & MArchll 

Programs 

At the end of the third semester of study, MArchI 
students are required to choose an area of concentration 
that will guide their advanced studies. MArchll students 
are required to choose an area of concentration during 
their first semester. Concentrations include 1) 
Architectural Design, Theory, & Practice, 2) Urbanism, 



and 3) Architectural Technology. Concentration 
coursework is comprised of three elective courses 
(selected by the student from a larger set of eligible 
courses) and one elective studio with a focus similar to 
that of the concentration (offered as a topical studio). The 
concentrations from which students can choose are 
described below: 

Architectural Design, Theory, & Practice 

This concentration focuses on a sophisticated and 
detailed study of building and site design involving issues 
of form, space, order, and typology as well as cultural and 
physical context, concept, meaning, etc. It includes both 
investigation and criticism of contemporary practice and 
practitioners as well as the role of theory and historical 
precedent relative to the design and making of 
architecture. 

Urbanism 

This concentration focuses on the critical role of 
architecture in the city - the process and specific intent of 
physical intervention in urban landscapes and 
infrastructures. Through the design of groups of buildings 
as well as larger scale urban areas, issues of policy, 
politics, finance, planning, place, and culture are 
introduced as part of the essential conception and history 
of the city fabric. 

Architectural Technology 

This concentration focuses on study and experimentation 
addressing emerging issues of sustainable design and the 
creative development of building envelopes and systems 
that utilize both new and traditional materials, technology, 
and construction methods in innovative and beautiful 
ways. Seeking to explore the historical as well as 
contemporary realms of thermal, tactile and visual issues 
embedded in this field, students address appropriate 
material selection, methods of daylighting, passive and 
active systems for heating and cooling, etc. with 
consideration of both qualitative and quantitative 
outcomes. 



Master of Architecture I Curriculum 

The MArchI program requires a minimum of 93 hours to 
be completed during three academic years and two 
summer sessions. 

GA Elective General Architectural elective 
AH Elective Architectural History elective 

(minimum of one required during the 
second year of study) 
C Elective Concentration elective (minimum of 
three required) 

Summer (3 hours) 

ARCH5050 Introductory Design Experience (3) 

Year 1 - Fall (13 hours) 

ARCH61 1 1 Design Fundamentals Studio (7) 
ARCH521 1 Architectural History Survey One (3) 



College of Architecture 41 



ARCH5601 Ideas in Architecture (3) 

Year 1 - Spring (1 5 hours) 

ARCH6112 Design Fundamentals Studio (6) 
ARCH521 2 Architectural History Survey Two (3) 
ARCH5312 Architectural Materials (3) 
ARCH6 1 5 1 Design Methodologies (3) 

Year 2 - Fall (14 hours) 

ARCH7101 Design Studio (5) 

ARCH5313 Structures One (3) 

ARCH5315 Environmental Control Systems (3) 

ARCH5213/ 

ARCH6050 AH Elective or C Elective (3) 

Year 2 - Spring (14 hours) 

ARCH7102 Topical Design Studio (5) 

ARCH5314 Structures Two (3) 

ARCH6050 C Elective (3) 

ARCH5214/ 

ARCH 6050 AH Elective or C Elective (3) 

Summer (6 hours) 

ARCH7 1 1 Summer Study Program (6) 

Year 3 -Fall (14 hours) 



ARCH7103 

ARCH5317 

ARCH7111 

ARCH5213/ 

ARCH6050 



Topical Design Studio (5) 
Building Systems Integration (3) 
Project/Thesis Document Prep (3) 

Any Elective within the College of 
Architecture or a Directed University 
Elective (3) 



Year 3 - Spring (14 hours) 

ARCH7104 Project/Thesis Studio (8) 
ARCH51 12 Professional Practice (3) 
ARCH5213/ 

ARCH6050 Any Elective within the College of 
Architecture (3) 



Master of Architecture II Program 

The MArchll program requires a minimum of 56 credit 
hours to be completed during two academic years. If 
applicants accepted to the MArchll Program are 
evaluated and found deficient in entry-level competencies, 
they will be required to enroll in additional course work 
beyond the 56 credits to complete their degree. Below is a 
list of expected entry-level competencies. 

Expected Entry-Level Competencies for MArchll 
Candidates: 

1) A minimum of six semesters of architectural design 
studios; 

2) A minimum of four semesters of architectural history 
and/or theory courses; 

3) A minimum of four semesters of building technology 
courses equivalent to the following UNCC College 
of Architecture courses: 



ARCH5312 Architectural Materials 

ARCH5313 Structures One 

ARCH5314 Structures Two 

ARCH5315 Environmental Control Systems. 

To ensure that incoming students are evaluated 
appropriately, the College of Architecture requires 
candidates for the MArchll program to furnish the 
Architecture Graduate Admissions Committee and 
Graduate Program Coordinator relevant course 
descriptions and syllabi of all architecture courses passed 
and completed which may satisfy entry-level 
competencies. The following curriculum is modeled for 
students accepted to the program who have satisfied all 
entry-level competencies. 

Students who complete professional track of the four year 
Bachelor of Arts in Architecture degree program at UNC 
Charlotte and meet the following criteria will be 
permitted automatic admission to the MArchll Program: 

1) Students must complete their undergraduate degree 
with a 3.0 grade point average in Architecture. 

2) Students must complete their undergraduate degree 
with a 2.75 grade point average overall, and a 
junior/ senior grade point average of 3.0 overall. 

3) Students must complete a Statement of Purpose 
describing their objectives relative to graduate study. 

4) Students must fulfill the university's Graduate School 
application requirements in effect at the time of their 
application. 

Students who do not meet the grade point average 
requirements noted above may submit an application for 
admission to the MArchll program for consideration 
with applicants from other architectural programs. 

Master of Architecture II Curriculum 

GA Elective General Architectural elective 
AH Elective Architectural History elective 

(minimum of one required during the 

second year of study) 
C Elective Concentration elective (minimum of 

three required) 

Year 1 - Fall (14 hours) 

ARCH7101 Design Studio (5) 
ARCH5213 AH Elective (3) 
ARCH5317 Building Systems Integration (3) 
ARCH5213/ 

ARCH6050 Any Elective within the College of 
Architecture (3) 

Year 1 - Spring (1 4 hours) 



Design Studio (5) 
Design Methodologies (3) 
C Elective (3) 



ARCH7102 
ARCH6151 
ARCH6050 
ARCH5213/ 

ARCH6050 Any Elective within the College of 
Architecture (3) 



42 College of Architecture 



Summer (3-5 hours - Optional) 

ARCH7120 Graduate Summer International Study 

(Optional) (3) 
ARCH7950 Graduate Summer Research Study 

(Optional) (3) 

Year 2 - Fall (14 hours) 



ARCH7103 
ARCH7111 
ARCH5213/ 
ARCH6050 

ARCH5213/ 
ARCH6050 



Design Studio (5) 

Project/Thesis Document Prep (3) 

Any Elective within the College of 
Architecture (3) 

Any Elective within the College of 
Architecture or a Directed University 
Elective (3) 



Year 2 - Spring (14 hours) 

ARCH7104 Project/Thesis Studio (8) 

ARCH51 12 Professional Practice (3) 

ARCH5213/ 

ARCH6050 Any Elective within the College of 

Architecture or a Directed University 
Elective (3) 

Requisite & Capstone Experiences 

Comprehensive Design Project 

The Comprehensive Design Project serves as the requisite 
studio experience that bridges between foundational 
studios and advanced studios for MArchI students. The 
Comprehensive Design Project serves as the point of 
entry into the program for MArchll students. Taken in 
the third semester of enrollment for MArchI students and 
in the first semester of enrollment for MArchll students, 
the Comprehensive Design Project is defined as an 
architectural building design project that comprehensively 
demonstrates the student's ability to conceptualize, 
prepare, organize, and design a building having a specific 
programmatic type. All students must demonstrate 
comprehensive design competency before they enroll in 
Topical or Elective studios. 

Thesis 

The normative capstone project for both MArchI and 
MArchll students is the Thesis. For MArchI students, a 
thesis is defined as an architectural design project that 
demonstrates the student's ability to independently 
identify and engage a specific set of issues, a building 
type, and a site. For MArchll students, a thesis is defined 
as an architectural research project that engages and 
explicates primary source material leading to project work 
possessing an original argument. This type of project may 
include design-related materials as part of the final 
submission. Primary source material is data and 
information gathered from original texts and documents, 
interviews, raw data resulting from experiments, 
demographic data, etc. An original argument is a 
proposition that leads to original idea(s) in the discipline 
arising out of primary source material. 



For the Thesis, the student identifies the issue(s) to be 
engaged and the research and/or design methods through 
which this engagement will take place. The student works 
independendy with a committee during the final year of 
study to complete the Thesis. All students must 
demonstrate comprehensive design competency before 
they engage a Thesis. 

Graduate Advising 

A critical component of any successful graduate program 
is academic advising and guidance during the course of a 
student's program of study. The primary advisor for all 
graduate students in the College of Architecture will be 
the Associate Dean in consultation with the Graduate 
Coordinator. Students entering their final year will be 
asked to complete a Plan of Study and identify committee 
members from the faculty to serve as advisors for their 
thesis. 

Transfer Credit 

Transfer credit is normally limited to a maximum of six 
hours of graduate credit. Under special circumstances, a 
greater number of hours may be transferred if a student 
can demonstrate that the courses to be transferred meet 
or exceed the content and rigor of graduate curricula 
offered by the College. 

Waiver Credit 

Waiver credit may be allowed if a student can 
demonstrate that a course or courses taken in his or her 
undergraduate curriculum equals or exceeds in both 
content and rigor of a course or courses required in the 
graduate curriculum. If a required course in the 
curriculum is waived, the student will be allowed to fill 
those credit hours with another course as advised by the 
Associate Dean in consultation with the Graduate 
Coordinator. 

Committees 

For thesis, each student identifies three (3) College of 
Architecture faculty members who will contribute to his 
or her interests, research, and final project. In addition, 
one (1) committee member from outside the College of 
Architecture faculty is required. Additional individuals 
relevant to a student's final project may also participate as 
ex-officio members. 

The members of the committee should offer specific 
areas of expertise and insight relative to the proposed 
project. Members of this committee should be involved 
with the project beginning with the preparation of the 
research document undertaken in ARCH 7111 (Research 
Document) in the Fall semester. 

The responsibility of each committee member involves 
the following: 

1) Review and provide feedback on three (3) successive 
versions of the student's written research document 



College of Architecture 43 



produced in ARCH71 1 1 (Research/Thesis 
Document). 

2) Be present and provide feedback at all public 
presentations (4-5) conducted in ARCH 7104 
(Comprehensive Design/Thesis Project Studio). 

3) Provide feedback on other occasions as requested by 
the student. 

4) Meet with instructors of ARCH71 1 1 and ARCH7104 
as required for coordination. 

5) Deliberate with other committee members on the 
report concerning degree conferral. 

Application for Degree 

In order to meet UNC Charlotte's Graduate School 
requirements for degree candidacy, all graduate students 
must receive a written certification from their department 
confirming successful Thesis defense. This report 
requires approvals from members of each student's 
committee as well as an endorsement from the Chair of 
Instruction. The completion of this report results in the 
granting of the degree. 

Research Opportunities 

MArchI students must take ARCH7110 in the summer 
prior to their final year. The premise of this course is to 
allow students to tailor a summer experience to support 
their growing knowledge of architecture and architectural 
discourse. This experience is intended to inform and 
motivate possible interests that the students might pursue 
in their final year of study. As such, it is an ideal 
opportunity for research. A similar opportunity exists for 
MArchll students who take ARCH7120 or ARCH7950. 
There are three study options that students may engage: 

1. Funded Research Option: 

Students may elect to work with faculty and/or other 
researchers who are conducting professional, scholarly, 
applied, and/or creative research within specialized fields 
of architecture theory, history, technology, etc. Current 
research initiatives include lighting and energy studies, 
building envelope studies, urban studies, and 
design/theory studies. These activities are engaged 
through the Lighting & Energy Technology Lab, the 
Digital Design Center, the Charlotte Community Design 
Center, and through individual faculty research projects 
and ongoing architectural practice. Students may also 
complete the requirements by securing their own grants 
and funding to study a well-defined and focused 
architectural issue. Student initiated research of this type 
must be approved both by the student's Academic 
Advisor and by the Graduate Program Coordinator. 

2. Independent Design Option: 

Students may elect to receive credit for this class by 
completing and entering a regional, national, or 
international architectural competition. This option is 
intended to further students' study of ideas and issues 
relevant to their thesis project and area of Concentration. 



3. Off-Campus and/or International Study Option: 

Students may elect to enroll in College of Architecture 
off-campus or international study programs, and/or 
enroll in similar programs offered by other NAAB 
accredited institutions. The College has long-standing 
study/travel programs in both Italy and Spain. Students 
have also pursued study opportunities in the Netherlands, 
Australia, Canada, etc. Glenn Murcutt's Master Class 
(Australia) and Brian MacKay Lyons' Ghost Project 
(Canada) are among the international study options that 
students may undertake. 

Assistantships, Tuition Differentials, and 
Scholarships 

A number of teaching assistantships, scholarships, tuition 
differentials, and tuition waivers are available to both 
MArchI and MArchll candidates. Awards are based on 
the applicant's academic merit or promise of academic 
merit, and/or on demonstration of need. 

Program Accreditation 

National Architectural Accrediting Board 

All graduate programs of the UNC Charlotte College of 
Architecture are fully accredited by NAAB as professional 
degree programs leading to licensure. The NAAB defines 
an accredited degree as described below: 

In the United States, most state registration boards require a degree 
from an accredited professional degree program as a prerequisite for 
licensure. The National Architectural Accrediting Board 
(NAAB), which is the sole agency authorised to accredit U.S. 
professional degree programs in architecture, recognises two types of 
degrees: the Bachelor of Architecture and the Master of Architecture. 
A program may be granted a six-year, three-year, or two-year term 
of accreditation, depending on its degree of conformance with 
established educational standards. 

Masters degree programs may consist of a pre-professional 
undergraduate degree and a professional graduate degree, which when 
earned sequentially, comprise an accredited professional education. 
However, the pre-professional degree is not, by itself, recognised as 
an accredited degree. 

Following the completion of a professional degree 
program accredited by the NAAB, most states require the 
future architect to complete an internship working for a 
registered architect before sitting for the licensing 
examination. 



Courses in Architecture 

Studio Courses 

ARCH 5050. Introductory Design Experience. (3) 

Prerequisite: B.A., B.S. or equivalent college degree. This 
introductory graduate course in architecture is intended 
for students newly admitted to the College of 
Architecture's MArchI professional program. This three 
week, intensive studio-based course includes an 



44 College of Architecture 



introduction to freehand drawing, 2-D composition, 3-D 
modeling, and visual theory. In addition, the course offers 
an introduction to a variety of related topics (history, 
structure, lighting, materials, etc.) that serve as critical 
departure points for understanding and making 
architectural projects. (Summer) 

ARCH 6111. Design Fundamentals/Skills. (7) 

Corequisite: ARCH5601. This introductory architectural 
design studio focuses on fundamental concepts of 
architecture as well as the acquisition and practice of a 
wide range of technical and graphic skills and media. It is 
intended to complement the reading and writing engaged 
in ARCH5601 (Ideas in Architecture) and to serve as an 
arena to explore and test the issues encountered in that 
course through the act of making. (Fall) 

ARCH 6112. Design Fundamentals/Skills. (6) 

Prerequisite: ARCH6111. This introductory architectural 
design studio focuses on the development of site, space, 
and design process issues as well as the continued 
acquisition and practice of a variety of technical and 
graphic skills. Exploration into the creative and 
appropriate use of a variety of media is addressed. (Spring) 

ARCH 7101. Comprehensive Design Studio. (5) 

Prerequisite ARCH6112. This design studio focuses on a 
site-specific project emphasizing technological and 
systemic issues that lead toward a comprehensive building 
design. (Fall) 

ARCH 7102. Topical Design Studio. (5) Prerequisite: 
ARCH7101. This design studio focuses on issues relevant 
to current architectural practice and/or exploration of 
architectural theory. Students choose from among several 
sections of this studio, each of which addresses a 
different set of issues. The issues addressed as well as the 
pedagogical approach of these studios are defined by the 
faculty teaching them. All students must take a minimum 
of one Topical Design Studio within their area of 
Concentration. (Spring) 

ARCH 7103. Topical Design Studio. (5) Prerequisite: 
ARCH7102. This design studio focuses on issues relevant 
to current architectural practice and/or exploration of 
architectural theory. Students choose from among several 
sections of this studio, each of which addresses a 
different set of issues. The issues addressed as well as the 
pedagogical approach of these studios are defined by the 
faculty teaching them. All students must take a minimum 
of one Topical Design Studio within their area of 
Concentration. (Fall) 

ARCH 7104. Thesis Studio. (8) Prerequisite: 
ARCH7103. This studio offers support and structure for 
students undertaking their individualized thesis project in 
either the MArchI or the MArchll program. For MArchI 
students, this studio will focus upon an individually 
defined architectural design project; for MArchll 
students, this studio will focus upon an individually 



defined research project (see Requisite & Capstone 
Experiences for more details). The faculty member 
teaching ARCH7104 coordinates the activities of the 
students and their advisory committees. (Spring) 

Core Courses 

ARCH 5112. Professional Practice. (3) This course 
serves as an introduction to the objectives of the practice 
of architecture, its responsibilities and procedures, and 
emerging alternative forms of practice and as they pertain 
to the role of the architect. (Spring) 

ARCH 5211. Architectural History I. (3) This course is 
a survey of the theoretical, technical, and cultural 
background of architecture and urban design from 
prehistory to 1750. (Fall) 

ARCH 5212. Architectural History II. (3) Prerequisite: 
ARCH5211. This course is a survey of the theoretical, 
technical, and cultural background of architecture and 
urban design from 1750 to present. (Spring) 

ARCH 5312. Architectural Materials. (3) This course 
introduces the quantitative and qualitative characteristics 
of architectural materials, systems, and processes. 
Students will be introduced to the physical properties of 
materials relevant to their application in construction, 
assembly, and detail systems. Topics will include masonry, 
concrete, wood, steel, glass, cladding, and roofing and 
flooring materials and their assemblies. (Spring) 

ARCH 5313. Structures One. (3) Prerequisite 
ARCH5312. This course introduces issues relevant to the 
fundamentals of structures including statics, strength, and 
stability of materials. Students will be introduced to 
structural concepts, systems, and the tracing of structural 
loads through basic principles, physical modeling, and 
theoretical and analytical methods. Topics will include 
interrelationship between strain, stress, and stability, as 
well as the implications of tension, compression, shear, 
torsion, and bending. (Fall) 

ARCH 5314. Structures Two. (3) Prerequisite: 
ARCH5313. This course introduces specific structural 
applications of wood, steel, concrete, and masonry 
systems commonly used in small-scale 
commercial/institutional buildings. Students will be 
introduced to the design of beams, columns, walls, 
joinery, and connections appropriate to each material type 
through theoretical, analytical, and computer simulation 
methods. (Spring) 

ARCH 5315. Environmental Control Systems. (3) 
Prerequisite ARCH5312 and co-requisite ARCH5313. 
This course introduces qualitative and quantitative 
analytical methods commonly used to assess the impact 
of environmental forces on occupant thermal and 
luminous comfort, energy performance, and regional 
sustainability. Students will be introduced to the interplay 
between climatic events, patterns of building use, and the 



College of Architecture 45 



architectural variables that inform the appropriate 
application of building systems technology. Topics will 
include building envelope performance, and the 
introduction of passive and mechanical systems for 
heating, cooling, illuminating, and ventilating buildings. 
(Fall) 

ARCH 5317. Building Systems Integration. (3) 

Prerequisites: ARCH5314 and ARCH5315. This course 
will introduce a set of advanced issues related to the 
comprehensive, systemic integration of building 
technology systems commonly used in large-scale 
buildings through case study, analytical, and simulation 
methods. Topics will address the resolution of building 
structure, materials, environmental systems, mechanical 
systems, electrical systems, life safety, building water 
supply and waste, and conveying systems in building 
design. (Fall) 

ARCH 5601. Ideas in Architecture. (3) Prerequisite: 
ARCH 5050. Corequisite: ARCH6111. This seminar class 
concentrates on fundamental concepts, issues, and 
working knowledge specific to design in architecture. It is 
intended to complement the design problems 
encountered in ARCH61 1 1 (studio) and to serve as a 
critical platform to raise issues that are not always evident 
in studio making alone. Primary topics addressed include 
order, form and space, site, type, and architectural 
meaning. (Fall) 

ARCH 6151. Design Methodologies. (3) This course 
focuses on examination of analytic and synthetic models 
including information processing, programming, and 
implementation activities used to structure the architect's 
design process, conjectural models, and methods specific 
to the architect's creative skills. (Spring) 

ARCH 7110. Summer Study Program. (6) Prerequisite: 
completion of the first two years of the COA MArchI 
Program (or equal). There are three study options for 
ARCH7110 that MArchI students may engage in the 
summer prior to their final year: Research, Independent 
Design, and International Study. The premise of this 
course is to allow graduate students to tailor a summer 
experience to support their growing knowledge of 
architecture and architectural discourse. This experience 
is intended to inform and motivate possible interests that 
the students might pursue in their final year of study. 
(Summer) 

ARCH 7111. Research Document. (3) This course 
provides structure for the formation and exploration of 
the ideas and issues relevant to the thesis project in either 
the MArchI or MArchll programs. This project is to be 
undertaken individually by students in their final year of 
study. This course results in the documentation of 
relevant research in preparation for the execution of the 
project, which is carried out in ARCH7104. (Fall) 



ARCH 7120. Graduate Summer International Study. 

(5) Prerequisite: completion of first year of the MArchll 
Program (or equal). ARCH7120 is an optional 
International Study course that MArchll students may 
engage in the summer prior to their final year. The 
premise of this course is to allow graduate students to 
engage a summer experience abroad to support their 
growing knowledge of architecture and architectural 
discourse. This experience is intended to inform and 
motivate possible interests that the students might pursue 
in their final year of study. (Summer) 

ARCH 7950. Graduate Summer Research Study. (3) 

Prerequisite: completion of first year of the MArchll 
Program (or equal). ARCH7950 is an optional 
opportunity for research that MArchll students may 
engage in the summer prior to their final year. The 
premise of this course is to allow graduate students to 
engage research activities to support their growing 
knowledge of architecture and architectural discourse. 
This experience is intended to inform and motivate 
possible interests that the students might pursue in their 
final year of study. (Summer) 

Concentration Electives 

Concentration Electives are those non-studio courses that 
fulfill the requirement for coursework within a student's 
chosen area of Concentration. Possible areas of 
Concentration are 1 .) Architectural Design, Theory, & 
Practice, 2.) Urbanism, and 3.) Architectural Technology. 
Three non-studio courses in the student's chosen area of 
Concentration are required to complete the curriculum. 
(See current College of Architecture Prospectus for a 
complete listing of courses.) 

Architectural Design. Theory. & Practice 
ARCH 6050. Objects and Analysis. (3) Prerequisite: 
ARCH4050 (Furniture Making) or ARCH4050 (Making 
Simple Tools). This course is an examination of the 
identity of objects and furniture in relation to ritual and 
space. Through coursework students will develop a 
historical ground and analytical methods that will extend 
into the making of an object. This making will involve the 
exercise of fine craftsmanship in a combination of media. 

ARCH 6050. Architecture/Culture/Discourse. (3) 

This course traces ideological movements that have 
informed the discipline of architecture both past and 
present. In this sense, this course provides a historical 
vantage point from which to view how theories of 
architecture and the city develop as inter-related ideas, 
practices, and traditions through the persistence of 
specific themes over time and space. 

ARCH 6050. Methods and Meaning. (3). This course 
examines a range of architectural ideas with an emphasis 
on developments from the late 1960s to the present. 
Attention will be paid to the interrelation between theory 
and practice and how clusters of ideas formulate the 
discourse as trends both mainstream and marginal. 



46 College of Architecture 



Emphasis will be placed on texts and their interpretation 
alongside examples of work inspired by the same. This 
survey means to formulate a broad understanding of 
contemporary architectural culture. 

ARCH 6050. Representation: Exploits of the 
Architectural Image. (3) This course offers an 
exploration of design themes in the two-dimensional, 
image-based world of the architect. It defines 
contemporary architectural representations and surveys 
ideas that center on drawing in architectural practice. 

ARCH 6050. The Art of Technology. (3) This course 
engages the innovative, artful use of materials and 
technology and their underlying design 
theories/principles. Using the case studies, the course 
critically explores the design principles and theories of 
this century's leading designers who use materials and 
technology to create a new, more responsive, more 
provocative architecture. 

ARCH 6050. Form Z (3-D computer modeling). (3) 

As the profession of architecture becomes increasingly 
computer reliant, the need to acquire skills and 
proficiency to operate computer aided drawings 
applications, becomes a necessity. This course will 
explore Form Z - a three-dimensional modeling program. 

ARCH 6050. Animated Design Methods. (3) This 
course is collaboration between the College and a group 
of young architects in Charlotte who have demonstrated 
skills in integrating design with the use of FormZ as well 
as other sophisticated computer programs. The course 
will begin with a series of workshop introducing advanced 
capabilities in FormZ, Cinema 4D and Poser. The bulk of 
the course will be individual collaborations between 
young practicing architects and students on a invited 
design competition for interventions in Charlotte that will 
be displayed on a web site as well as video kiosk 
installations at the Mint Museum of Craft + Design and 
other sites. 

Urbanism 

ARCH 6050. Urban Setdements. (3) An urban 
settlement, for the purposes of this course, is a city, town 
or a part of either, in which inhabitants live, work, learn, 
recreate and worship in close proximity to one another. 
To make a building is to make a constituent part of a 
settlement. To make a settlement is to consider the 
location, form and meaning of its constituent parts both 
as positive forms (masses) and the interstitial spaces 
(voids) they make This course will explore the discipline 
of Urban Design as an extension of the disciplines of 
both Architecture and Landscape Architecture. 

ARCH 6050. Community Planning Workshop. (3) 

This course serves to acquaint students with 
contemporary theory and practice in planning and urban 
design; to give students experience in applying planning 
and urban design theory and methods to actual problems; 



to provide students with experience in compiling and 
analyzing community scale data, working with citizens, 
professional planners and designers, and elected officials, 
to provide students with experience in the preparation of 
oral reports and technical documents; and to examine 
what it means for the planner and urban designer to 
demonstrate ethical responsibility to the public interest, to 
clients and employers, and to colleagues and oneself. 

ARCH 6050. Shaping The American City. (3) 

Throughout the Twentieth Century urban politics, 
policies, and programs have shaped the space of the 
American City, including the architecture of urban 
setdement patterns, public space, transportation, and 
housing. An understanding of the 
political/social/historical/spatial foundations of urban 
policies in relation to the American City is critical in 
understanding the development of our current urban 
patterns, the spatial distribution of people and resources, 
and the future production of architecture and design in 
urban settings. Issues will be framed in the interstices of 
the space/knowledge/power triad. 

ARCH 6050. Strategies for the Public Realm. (3) 

Contemporary theories and practices in urban design 
underscore the connection between the citizen and the 
public realm and between the physical and social 
attributes of the city. Urban design is not so much an 
aesthetic as it is a strategy for change, transformation, 
dialogue, and interaction. Urban design is the link 
between architecture and urbanism, tying together the 
city's disparate parts and celebrating the complexity and 
connectedness of space. 

ARCH 6050. Dilemmas of Modern City Planning. (3) 

The patterns of man's settlement are predicated upon 
particular paradigms of urbanism, as well as more 
pragmatic concerns of politics, economics and geography. 
An examination of these influences and their 
interconnections provides the necessary theoretical and 
historical background from which to propose 
improvements to the contemporary landscapes of our 
cities. 

ARCH 6050. Real Estate Development Studies: 
Introduction to Real Estate Development. (3) The 

production of buildings requires both architectural and 
economic skill. Likewise, the production of our landscape 
is both a private and public endeavor. To balance these 
skills and endeavors requires an understanding of basic 
facts. This course focuses on an introduction to the real 
estate development process. Course material, lectures and 
case studies focus on the identification and evaluation of 
critical assumptions and issues related to market and site 
feasibility, financial feasibility, planning, acquisition, 
construction, and operation of economically viable 
commercial real estate projects 

ARCH 6050/4213-U01/6133. Public Space in Cities. 

(3) The public realm has historically constituted a set of 



College of Architecture 47 



real places possessing physical form and has been the 
setting for civic and communal life. This traditional role 
of public space is brought into question by the advent of 
cyberspace, with unknown consequences for city form. 
This course focuses on the origins and transformations of 
public space within American culture, and to understand 
principles of urban design as they have related to the 
creation of public space during different historical 
periods. Course material will also focus on the historical 
connection between the public realm and democratic 
principles, and the threats to the continued existence of 
truly public space in American cities. 

ARCH 6050. Urban Form, Context and Economics. 

(3) Urban development and redevelopment can be 
considered typologically in two main categories: large 
"catalyst" projects (performing arts centers, entertainment 
complexes, and other large, mixed-use projects); and 
smaller, incremental interventions in the urban setting 
that lack glamour but contribute much needed depth and 
complexity to the urban environment. This course 
focuses on how and why urban projects are formulated 
by public and private interests. It engages the conceptual 
origins, design development and production of urban 
projects large and small, in an effort to understand the 
relationship between development economics, social 
factors, program development, design concepts and 
urban contexts. 

ARCH 6050. The Changing Urban Landscape: The 
Development of Uptown Charlotte, 1875-2000. (3) 

The design and evolution of cities is a reflection of 
evolving attitudes about gender, race, crime and 
socioeconomic conditions as well as governmental 
interventions and the efforts of private enterprise. 
Charlotte's center city is a unique result of those many 
influences and serves as an excellent laboratory for 
gaining an understanding of the forces that shape the 
making of the places we live. This class will explore the 
historical growth of Charlotte through the eyes of city 
leaders who have lived through it. Specific topics will 
include the development of First Ward from a public 
housing ghetto to a mixed income neighborhood, the 
demise of the Brooklyn neighborhood in Second Ward, 
professional sports in uptown Charlotte, the development 
of Fourth Ward, the civic patron/ corporate factor, 
transportation in uptown Charlotte and finally, the 2010 
Plan for uptown. 

ARCH 6050. Mayors' Institute on City Design / 
South. (3) The Mayors' Institute on City Design is 
comprised of a series of symposia on city design. At each 
meeting of the Institute, mayors and designers discuss 
specific problems facing cities and examine a broad range 
of design ideas, examples from other cities, and strategies 
to make improvements. Each student will be assigned a 
mayor and a city with which to work and will develop a 
case study for that city. Whenever possible, students will 
make site visits and help determine how the design arts 
can benefit the development of their particular city. The 



goals of the course are to familiarize students with the 
basic techniques of urban analysis and principles of urban 
design; introduce students to the interrelationships 
between urban form, building use and transportation, 
economics, and politics; consider the role of the public in 
civic design; and consider strategies for a more 
sustainable and ecologically appropriate urban 
architecture. 

Architectural Technology 
ARCH 6050. Parametric Methods: Notes on 
Sustainable Design Decision Making. (3) A formal 
design decision- making process is developed in this 
course through the elaboration of the systemic principles 
that describe the role of architecture to reconcile the 
pertinent utilization of mechanical, electrical and material 
system choices. Issues of the implicit role of the architect 
to understand the application of appropriate building 
systems technology, public policy decisions and economic 
solutions that provide for the sustained delivery of 
human, environmental and physical performance are 
brought to bear through a variety of methods. 

ARCH 6050. Bio-climatology & Cross Cultural 
Assessments of Traditional Built Form. (3) Through 
this course a conceptual framework of social and 
technical determinism is developed from a single 
disciplinary point of view based on the traditions of 
building design science and environmental technology 
informed through social science theory. Topical field 
assessments will be developed through a research-based 
introduction of the Human Relations Area Files to 
address the cultural/societal and technical realms that 
describe traditional built form. The issues that have 
influenced and are currently impacting human settlement, 
building, and tectonic design are explored through the use 
of the Mahoney Tables to weave the relevant connections 
to built formal response and the interpretation of 
climatically responsive architectural principles of design 
sustainability. 

ARCH 6050. Architectural Luminous Environment. 

(3) The architectural luminous environment is introduced 
in this course as a continuum of technical/material 
innovation from 1 850 to the present. Issues of daylighting 
and electric lighting are explored as an integrated systems 
approach to evaluate current sustainable design practices 
that relate to energy utilization and appropriate resource 
allocation. Case study research methods of assessment, 
computational analysis, physical modeling and economic 
evaluation will be introduced. 

ARCH 6050. Sustainable Design: Ecology, 
Technology and Building. (3) Sustainable design is the 
term most commonly used when describing building 
carried out according to sound ecological and 
environmental perspectives. Utilizing a 
lecture/ seminar/ case study format the course content will 
survey the principles of environmentally sensitive design, 
review case studies of "green building" applications, and 



48 College of Architecture 



explore various concepts for integrating sustainable 
planning and building principles into the form making 
process of architectural design. The process includes an 
analysis of bioclimatic comfort, climate responsive design, 
integration of passive heating and cooling systems, and 
the basis for specifying sustainable building materials. The 
intention of the course is to develop a general 
understanding of the fundamental principles underlying 
sustainable design and the impact on the building design 
process and built form. 

ARCH 6050. The Nature of Architecture and the 
Architecture of Nature. (3) How does the nature of 
Architecture relate to the architecture of Nature? Clearly, 
acts of construction have always had some relation to and 
impact upon the natural settings in which they have 
occurred. Given the dynamic relation between building 
and natural conditions (including the "architecture" of 
climate, material, fauna and flora), societies jointly 
formulated their understanding of the relation between 
architecture and nature. Similarly, society's contemporary 
interpretation of this relation is rooted in traditional 
building habits and rituals. Thus, in order for young 
architects to be in a position to influence society's future 
building habits, especially as they pertain to "sustainable 
architecture," they must first recognize and appreciate the 
rich cultural ramifications entailed in perceptions of the 
nature of Architecture and the architecture of Nature. 

ARCH 6050. Building Envelopes. (3) Just like our 
skin, a building envelope can regulate a building's internal 
and external environments. The building envelope is also 
the single most visible component of a building and it is 
this aspect, which is dealt with comprehensively 
throughout an architect's formal education. This elective 
is dedicated to addressing the connections, which exists 
between form and technology by examining the technical 
properties, and principles of building skins in a way which 
will better inform architects to design environmentally 
and aesthetically sensitive buildings. 

Architectural History Electives 

Architectural History electives offer a topical study of 
issues or areas of history. These courses complement the 
architectural history survey courses (ARCH5211/5212), 
and serve to inform and develop in-depfh research, 
writing, and presentation skills. One Architectural History 
Elective course must be taken during the first year of 
study for MArchll student and during the second year of 
study for MArchI students. Additional Architectural 
History Elective courses may be taken as desired. These 
courses do not count towards completion of 
Concentration requirements unless cross-listed. Cross- 
listed courses are marked with an asterisk (See current 
College of Architecture Prospectus for a complete listing 
of courses.) 

ARCH 6050. The Architecture of the Italian 
Renaissance. (3) This course will examine the history of 
architecture in Italy during the Renaissance. This study 



will include issues such as the aesthetic program of 
Renaissance architecture and attitudes toward the Roman 
classical past, new architectural theories, and architectural 
space, technology, and urban planning. 

ARCH 6050. Renewing the Modernist Debate: The 
Theory and Works of Adolf Loos. (3) At the beginning 
of the 21st century, architecture finds itself in a state of 
uncertainty and change. Like 100 years before, architects 
are pursuing ways of reconfiguring the aesthetic, 
technical, and social demands of their profession in hopes 
of establishing legitimacy in their work. This class will 
investigate the buildings and ideas of the early 20th 
century architect, Adolf Loos (1870-1933), as a vehicle to 
come to grips with our own precepts about modern 
architectural theory and practice. 

ARCH 6050. Histories of Latin American 
Architecture. (3) This course will survey the ways by 
which Latin American architectures (both north and 
south of the US/Mexico border) have come to be seen 
within the western canon. In this sense, this course is not 
purely historical; rather, the class will explore Latin 
American architectures chronologically but from a post- 
colonial perspective rooted in the present. 

ARCH 6050. Popular Modernism: Charlotte 
Architecture in the '50's and '60's. (3) This course will 
investigate the influence of 1950s and 60s modern 
international architecture on Charlotte and the Piedmont 
region. The goals of the course are: (1) to probe deeper 
into why this type of architecture became popular in the 
region, in both its private and public iterations, and (2) to 
link this interest with similar developments in other 
American cities, and to discuss such developments within 
the context of international architecture of the same 
period. 

General Architectural Electives 

General Architectural Elective courses offer study of a 
wide range of topical areas in architecture. Students can 
choose from among many courses, each of which 
addresses a different topic. These courses complement 
the core courses and studios and allow students to pursue 
their specific interests. These courses do not count 
towards completion of Concentration requirements 
unless cross-listed. Cross-listed courses are marked with 
an asterisk. (See current College of Architecture 
Prospectus for a complete listing of courses.) 

ARCH 6050. Watercolor & Representation I. (3) The 

practice of watercolor can make many design notions 
clear for the maker as well as the observer. This course 
introduces basic visual strategies utilizing tactics and 
techniques of watercolor. The class focus is on 
developing a practical vocabulary for skillful 
representation and emphasizes a working knowledge of 
watercolor painting and its application at all phases of 
design work. Students will develop skills presenting 
objects in space using watercolor and pencil. 



College of Architecture 49 



ARCH 6050. Advanced Watercolor Representation. 

(3) This class emphasizes the development of working 
methods for thoughtful representation using watercolor 
for all phases of design work. Issues and skills addressed 
include analysis; representation of interior and exterior 
spaces and events; representation of urban context and 
site; and presentation of organizational strategies. 

ARCH 6050. Furniture Making. (3) This is a 
laboratory course in the fundamentals of designing and 
building of furniture, primarily in wood. Included are the 
basics of materials selection, machine and hand tool use, 
joinery, and finishing. The crafting of furniture of 
student's design is an integral part of the course. 

ARCH 6050. Form Z (3-D computer modeling).* (3) 

As the profession of architecture becomes increasingly 
computer reliant, the need to acquire skills and 
proficiency to operate computer aided drawings 
applications, becomes a necessity. This course will 
explore Form Z - a three-dimensional modeling program. 



as the intersection of art and science, a dual fulfillment of 
the visual, sensual, and intellectual with the structural and 
spatial. Successful photography as well attempts to bridge 
the shores of art and science. Both fields concern the 
creation of a world interpreted, a world created by the 
designer with unique purpose, unique point of view, 
unique qualities and vision. The objective of this class is 
to explore the potential relationship between 
photography and architectural design through 
photographic assignments and student presentations 

ARCH 6890. Directed Independent Study.* (3) 

Prerequisite: permission of the Graduate Coordinator and 
the graduate faculty member advising the study. This 
course enables directed individual study and in-depth 
analysis of a special area related to the interests of the 
student and the expertise of the advising faculty member. 
May count towards completion of Concentration 
requirements if appropriate. (Fall, Spring Summer) 



ARCH 6050. Animated Design Methods.* (3) This 
course is collaboration between the College and a group 
of young architects in Charlotte who have demonstrated 
skills in integrating design with the use of FormZ as well 
as other sophisticated computer programs. The course 
will begin with a series of workshop introducing advanced 
capabilities in FormZ, Cinema 4D and Poser. The bulk of 
the course will be individual collaborations between 
young practicing architects and students on a invited 
design competition for interventions in Charlotte that will 
be displayed on a web site as well as video kiosk 
installations at the Mint Museum of Craft + Design and 
other sites. 

ARCH 6050. Photocollagraphy. (3) A derivation of 
cartographic processes, it is not enough to define 
"mapping" in traditional terms of symbols, borders, 
geography, and human habitation. Instead, mapping as an 
architectural strategy utilizes photography, collage, and 
cartographic techniques to communicate in ways none of 
those fields can completely accomplish on their own. This 
course will investigate the potential relationships between 
architecture and photography, collage and cartography, 
looking specifically at the design process, analysis and 
abstraction, and the exploration and representation of 
ideas. 

ARCH 6050. Leadership in Charlotte. (3) This is an 
intensive short course including both lecture and panel 
formats during which issues relevant to the development 
of Charlotte are explored. Issues include but are not 
limited to an exploration of leadership styles; building 
community, Charlotte and the arts, diversity, health care; 
law enforcement, etc. 



ARCH 6050. Experimental Visions - Photography 
for Architecture Students. (3) Architecture is often seen 



50 College of Arts and Sciences 



College of Arts and Sciences 



The College of Arts and Sciences is the largest of the 
seven colleges at The University of North Carolina at 
Charlotte, housing 21 academic departments and 8 
interdisciplinary programs. The College serves the 
Charlotte region and the state of North Carolina and is 
engaged in the discovery, dissemination, synthesis and 
application of knowledge. It provides for the educational, 
economic, social, and cultural advancement of the people 
of North Carolina through on-and off-campus programs, 
continuing personal and professional education 
opportunities, research and collaborative relationships 
with the private, public, and nonprofit institutional 
resources of the greater Charlotte metropolitan region. 
The College offers a wide array of graduate programming 
including graduate certificate, Master of Arts, Master of 
Science, and Ph.D. programs. 

Graduate Degree Programs 

Master of Arts Administration 

Master of Arts in Biology 

Master of Arts in Communication Studies 

Master of Arts in English 

Master of Arts in English Education 

Master of Arts in Geography 

Master Arts in Gerontology 

Master of Arts in History 

Master of Arts in Liberal Studies 

Master of Arts in Mathematics Education 

Master of Arts in Psychology: Clinical/ Community 

Master of Arts in Psychology: Industrial/Organizational 

Master of Arts in Religious Studies 

Master of Arts in Sociology 

Master of Arts in Spanish 

Master of Public Administration 

Master of Science in Applied Physics 

Master of Science in Biology 

Master of Science in Chemistry 

Master of Science in Criminal Justice 

Master of Science in Earth Sciences 

Master of Science in Mathematics: Applied 

Mathematics/General Mathematics /Applied Statistics 

Master of Science in Mathematical Finance (with the Belk 

College of Business Administration) 

Master of Science in Optical Science and Engineering 

Ph.D. in Applied Mathematics 

Ph.D. in Biology 

Ph.D. in History (with Aberdeen) 

Ph.D. in Infrastructure and Environmental Systems (with 

the William States Lee College of Engineering) 

Ph.D. in Optical Science and Engineering 

Ph.D. in Public Policy 

Graduate Non-Degree Programs 

Certificate in Applied Ethics 
Certificate in Applied Linguistics 
Certificate in Cognitive Science 



Certificate in Communication Studies 
Certificate in Gerontology 
Certificate in Non-Profit Management 
Certificate in Technical/Professional Writing 
Certificate in Translating and Translation Studies 



APPLIED ETHICS 

Department of Philosophy 

Winningham 103 

704-687-2161 

http://www.uncc.edu/ethics/grad-cert-prog.html 

Degree 

Graduate Certificate 

Coordinator 

Dr. William Gay 

Graduate Faculty- 
Marvin Croy, Associate Professor 
Michael Eldridge, Lecturer 
Stephen Fishman, Professor 
William Gay, Professor 

John Lincourt, Bonnie E. Cone Distinguished Professor 
in Teaching 

Judith Presler, Associate Professor 
Eddy Souffrant, Associate Professor 
Rosemarie Tong, Mecklenburg County Medical Society 
Distinguished Professor in Heath Care Ethics 



GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN 
APPLIED ETHICS 

The Graduate Certificate in Applied Ethics is of interest 
to three groups of students: (1) professionals working in 
areas of applied ethics; (2) students just beginning to 
explore graduate work in philosophy; (3) students in other 
master's and doctoral programs, such as biology, health 
administration, and public policy, who expect their 
careers to include work in applied ethics. 

Additional Admission Requirements 

A personal statement outlining why the applicant seeks 
admission to the program and two letters of 
recommendation. 

Prerequisite Requirements 

Bachelor's degree from an accredited institution and a 
minimum undergraduate GPA of 2.75. 



College of Arts and Sciences 51 



Certificate Requirements 

The Graduate Certificate in Applied Ethics requires the 
completion of 15 credits of graduate course work in 
philosophy. The coursework should be distributed as 
follows: 

Theoretical courses (3 credits), drawn from the 
following: 

PHIL621 9 History of Ethical Theory 
PHIL6272 Idea of Human Nature 

Elective courses (9 credits), drawn from the 
following: 

PHIL6229 
PHIL6246 
PHIL6249 
PHIL6233 



PHIL6227 
PHIL6241 



Health Care Ethics and Law 

Language and Violence 

Philosophy of Technology 

Bioethical Issues and the New 

Genomics 

Feminist Theory and Its Applications 

Philosophy of Education 



Concluding Project (3 credits), one of the following: 

PHIL6851 Practicum in Philosophy 
PHIL6855 Directed Readings/Research 

Approval of the Philosophy Department Graduate 
Coordinator is required in order to substitute related 
courses offered by other departments and programs. 

Advising 

Dr. William Gay 

Transfer Credit 

Transfer credit is not accepted in the certificate program. 



Courses In Philosophy 

PHIL 5050. Topics in Philosophy. (1-3) Prerequisite: 
Consent of the department. In-depth treatment of 
selected problems and issues in philosophy. May be 
repeated for additional credit as topics vary. (On Demand) 

PHIL 6050. Topics in Philosophy. (1-3) Prerequisite: 
Consent of the department. In-depth treatment of 
selected problems and issues in philosophy. May be 
repeated for additional credit as topics vary. (On Demand) 

PHIL 6219. History of Ethical Theory. (3) Discussion 
of the traditional ethical theories articulated in 
philosophy, and their relationship to contemporary 
personal and professional ethics. (Yearly) 

PHIL 6227. Feminist Theory and Its Applications. 

(3) Discussion of selected works in feminist thought 
across the disciplines, with the opportunity for students 
to develop original research in an area of interest. 
(Alternate Years) 



PHIL 6229. Health Care Ethics and Law. (3) 

Explores the relationship between ethical and legal 
aspects of controversial issues in health care. (Alternate 
Years) 

PHIL 6233. Bioethical Issues and the New 
Genomics. (3) Discussion of new genetic technologies 
and their ethical implications. (Alternate Years) 

PHIL 6241. Philosophy of Education. (3) Exploration 
of modern philosophies of education, with a focus on the 
relationships between pedagogy and society. (Alternate 
Years) 

PHIL 6246. Language and Violence. (3) Explores 
philosophical theories on the relationship between 
language and violence, on a continuum from subtle forms 
of covert personal violence to grievous forms of covert 
institutional violence. (Alternate Years) 

PHIL 6249. Philosophy of Technology. (3) Examines 
philosophical views on the nature of technology, focusing 
on its effects on society and nature. Computer 
technologies and other cases will be considered. (Alternate 
Years) 

PHIL 6272. Idea of Human Nature. (3) Explores 
whether there is such a thing as human nature, and 
creates a dialogue among different conceptions of human 
nature. Philosophical theorizing will be informed by 
readings from philosophy, religion, psychology, biology, 
multicultural studies and gender studies. (Yearly) 

PHIL 6851. Practicum in Philosophy. (3) Offers 
advanced graduate students an opportunity to explore in 
practice ideas they have studied in the classroom through 
internships and applied research projects. (Alternate Years) 

PHIL 6855. Directed Readings/Research. (3) Offers 
advanced graduate students an opportunity to conduct 
independent readings and research. (Alternate Years) 

PHIL 7999. Residency Credit. (1) 

Continuation of individual Concluding Project or Thesis 
for students completing the program but not enrolled in 
other graduate courses. (Each Semester) 

PHIL 8050. Topics in Philosophy. (1-3) Prerequisite: 
Consent of the department. In-depth treatment of 
selected problems and issues in philosophy. May be 
repeated for additional credit as topics vary. (On Demand) 



52 College of Arts and Sciences 



ARTS ADMINISTRATION 

Department of Art 

1 73 Rowe Building 
(704) 687-2473 
www.art.uncc.edu 

Degree 

Master of Arts 

Director 

David A. Edgar 

Graduate Faculty 

Lili Bezner, Associate Professor 
David A. Edgar, Associate Professor 
Alan Freitag, Assistant Professor 
Jeff Murphy, Assistant Professor 
Gary R. Rassel, Associate Professor 
Gregory A. Wickliff, Associate Professor 



MASTER OF ARTS IN ARTS 
ADMINISTRATION 

The design of the M.A. in Arts Administration is based 
on the underlying belief that successful arts 
administrators must be familiar with both the practical 
and theoretical contexts of the visual arts. The program 
offers professional and academic training in the 
administration and leadership of visual arts organizations 
through balanced interdisciplinary course offerings from 
the Department of Art (which administers the program), 
the Master of Public Administration program, 
Department of Communications Studies, and other 
University resources. The M.A. in Arts Administration 
program serves students who need to acquire professional 
knowledge preparing them to be effective arts leaders and 
managers, whether established professionals seeking to 
broaden existing skills, newcomers seeking future 
employment, artists starting their own organizations, or 
others seeking professional arts administration 
experiences. Students may enroll in the M.A. in Arts 
Administration program on either a full-time or part-time 
basis. 

Educational Objectives 

1) To provide the tools and skills leading to significant 
professional competence and career enhancement in 
arts administration by preparing students for 
leadership positions in various international, national, 
and regional public, private, and corporate arts 
organizations including museums and galleries, 
community non-profit organizations, and arts 
foundations. 

2) To prepare and sensitize students for the expert 
handling, care, research, and presentation and 
exhibition to the public of tangible art objects through 



hands-on experiences, such as internships and staging 
exhibitions. 

3) To teach and encourage responsible fiscal 
management, fundraising, promotion and public 
relations, marketing and development. 

4) To develop and enhance each student's ability to 
promote the arts ethically and responsibly to a 
broader public while developing sensitivity to a 
region's cultural needs and community issues. 

5) To develop an appreciation and understanding for the 
diversity of artistic expression and its roles in 
contemporary society at both practical and theoretical 
levels. 

Additional Admission Requirements 

An undergraduate degree with a major in an arts field (art 
history, museum studies, studio practice, etc.) and/or 
significant experience in an arts related field is preferred. 
An interview with the Arts Administration Program 
Director is recommended. Any determined deficiencies in 
undergraduate coursework will need to be made up 
during the first year. Applicants who fail to meet any of 
the minimal requirements may request an interview with 
the program Director and/or admissions committee; the 
decision of this committee is final. 

Admission to the M.A. in Arts Administration program 
requires: 

1) A complete application package to the Graduate 
School at UNC Charlotte including (among other 
requirements): official transcripts from all post- 
secondary institutions attended; an essay describing 
the applicant's experience and the objectives in 
undertaking graduate study (see #6, below); and three 
letters of reference. 

2) 9 or more credit hours (three courses minimum) of 
undergraduate courses in art history, including Art 
History Survey (two semesters) and Contemporary 
Art. 

3) 9 or more credit hours (three courses minimum) of 
undergraduate courses in studio art; or, demonstrable, 
discipline-based expertise in one art area (may be 
documented by portfolio); or, (for those without 
substantive studio experience), approval of the M.A. 
in Arts Administration program Director and/or 
admissions committee. 

4) Acceptable scores on the Graduate Record 
Examination or Miller Analogies Test 

5) Acceptable scores on the TOEFL test if English is 
not the applicant's native language (557 on the written 
test; 220 computer based test). 

6) Essay exemplifying excellent writing and 
communication skills to be evidenced by the Graduate 
School's required essay for admissions (and, if 
applicable, by an interview with the program 
Director). This essay should address the applicant's 
statement of purpose for enrolling in the M.A. in Arts 
Administration, research interests, career or 
professional goals, and how the applicant hopes to 
expand the enlightenment that the arts can offer. 



College of Arts and Sciences 53 



Degree Requirements 

The Master of Arts in Arts Administration program 
allows students, in consultation with the program 
Director and advisors, to tailor an individual program of 
study within a diverse selection of offerings. A minimum 
of 40 credit hours is required to complete the program, 
including 22 hours of core courses all students must 
complete, 9 hours of elective courses, at least one 3 credit 
hour internship, and 6 hours of thesis credits. The degree 
of Master of Arts in Arts Administration is awarded for 
completion of scholarly research that advances knowledge 
in the field. Evidence of this is demonstrated by a 
successful thesis defense demonstrating mastery of 
relevant subject matter, among other criteria. 

Core Courses (22 credit hours) 

MAAA6001 Introduction to Arts Administration 

(3) 
MAAA6 1 00 Curatorial Theory and Exhibition 

Design (3) 
MAAA 6125 New Technologies for Arts 

Organizations (3) 
MAAA 6150 Law and the Arts (1) 
MAAA 6160 Marketing for the Arts (3) 
MAAA 5212 Contemporary Art Theory and 

Criticism (3) 
MAAA/MPAD631 1 Non-Profit Management (3) 
MAAA/MPAD6324 Financial Analysis for 
Government and Non-Profit 
Organizations (3) 
Elective Courses (9 credit hours; to be chosen and 
designed in consultation with advisor and/or program 
Director; only 6 hours of electives may be taken at the 
5000 level. All other coursework must be taken at the 
6000 level or above) 

MAAA7100 Communication for the Arts (3) 
MAAA71 50 Education and Arts Administration (3) 
MAAA7300 History and Theory of Art Museums 

(3) 
MAAA7700 Topics in Arts Administration (1-3) 
COMM6146 Media Relations (3) 
COMM6145 Communication Campaign 

Management (3) 
COMM5102 Federal Interpretation of the First 

Amendment (3) 
COMM/MPAD6170 Communication Law and 

Policy (3) 
MPAD6134 Human Resources Management (3) 
MPAD61 31 Public Budgeting and Finance (3) 
MPAD6142 Managing Grants and Contracts in 

Public and Nonprofit sectors (3) 
ANTH5120 Intercultural Communications (3) 
ENGL5182 Writing and Designing Computer 

Based Documents (3) 
MPAD6320 Strategic Planning for Nonprofit 

Organizations (1) 
MPAD6321 Resource Development in Nonprofit 

Organizations (1) 
MPAD6322 Volunteer Management (1) 



MPAD6323 Granrwriting (1) 
MPAD6325 Legal Aspects of Nonprofit 
Organizations (1) 

Internship 

MAAA7800 Internship (3) 

Thesis 

MAAA 7990 Thesis I (3) 
MAAA 7991 Thesis II (3) 

MAAA 7999. Master's Graduate Residence (1) (As 
necessary) 

Admission to Candidacy Requirements 

1) Upon completion of 18 hours of coursework for the 
MA. in Arts Administration, the student's 
performance will be evaluated by the program 
Director, who will notify the student of the 
Department's approval of his or her continuation in 
the MA. program. 

2) Upon completion of 18 hours of coursework, the 
student can apply for admission to Candidacy through 
the Graduate School. 

3) Students are required to complete an "Application to 
Candidacy" form no later than the first week of the 
semester they wish to graduate. This form lists all 
courses to be counted toward the degree. It should 
be signed by the student and returned to the 
MAAA. program office. 

Internship 

All students must complete at least one supervised and 
approved field experience with a visual arts organization. 
For those with extensive previous professional arts 
administration experience, this credit could be waived 
(and used for elective credit). For those currently 
employed in an arts organization, this credit could be 
earned at the place of a student's employment, as long as 
it is not simply an extension of regular duties but exposes 
the student to different kinds of challenges. One 3 credit 
hour internship is based on completing 1 20 contact hours 
of work in a 15 week period at the host institution. 

Capstone Experiences 

All students must present a written thesis (written using a 
format acceptable to the Graduate School) to the 
Advisory Committee. The student must defend the thesis 
at a presentation before the M.A.A.A. faculty. 

Advising 

Each student is assigned an advisor and given program 
guidelines when admitted to the program. The advisor is a 
member of the M.A.A.A. faculty. Students should meet 
with their advisors and/or the program Director to 
develop a schedule each semester before registering. 

Transfer Credit Accepted 

Up to six credit hours may be transferred to the Arts 
Administration program from another institution. Only 



54 College of Arts and Sciences 



courses with grades of A or B, earned in a graduate 
program accredited by the Southern Association of 
Colleges and Schools or other similar agency, may be 
accepted for transfer credit. Transfer credit is not 
automatic and requires the approval of the program 
Director and the Dean of the Graduate School. 

Language Requirement 

The program has no language requirement. However, if a 
student seeks an internship in a country wherein English 
is not the primary language (or uses a language with 
which the student has no proficiency), he or she must 
take appropriate language classes in order to prepare for 
this experience. These foreign language courses do not 
count as graduate credits. Each student's individual 
language needs will be negotiated with the program 
Director. 

Comprehensive Examination 

After admission to candidacy, each student must 
successfully complete a comprehensive examination (and 
must be enrolled during the semester in which they take 
the examination). 

Thesis 

All students must complete thesis (capstone) 
requirements consisting of two courses (Thesis I, MAAA 
7990 and Thesis II, MAAA 7991), 3 credit hours each, 
over the last two semesters. The Thesis is the final 
portion of degree work; it provides an opportunity to 
accomplish substantial professional work which focuses 
on each student's professional interests and expertise, and 
culminates in a public defense of the thesis project. 
Students choose between three options, in consultation 
with the program Director and advisors, to suit their 
individual interests: 

1) planning and executing an exhibition (on-campus or 
at another art space in Charlotte or the region) 
accompanied by a written thesis explicating the 
project; 

2) planning and executing an administrative/research 
project (which may be accomplished in the context of 
an internship) accompanied by a written thesis 
explicating the project; or 

3) conducting original research which is presented in the 
form of a written thesis. 

Other Requirements 

Students are required to maintain continuous registration 
(fall and spring semesters) for thesis work until its 
completion. Continuous registration begins the semester 
in which approval for the thesis topic is received. 
Students have a maximum of six years to complete all 
requirements. 

Grade Requirements: Students are expected to achieve 
A's or B's in all course work taken for graduate credit and 
must have at least an average of B in order to graduate. 
Internships and theses are graded on a Pass/No Credit or 
Pass/Unsatisfactory basis and, therefore, will not be 



included in the overall assessment of cumulative average. 
The program Director evaluates the record of any student 
who receives a course grade of C or less or whose grade 
point average falls below a 3.0. On the basis of this 
evaluation and in conjunction with policies in the 
Academic Regulations/Degree Requirements section of 
this Catalog, the student may be placed on academic 
suspension or terminated from the MAAA program. An 
accumulation of more than two grades of C will result in 
suspension of the student's enrollment in the graduate 
program. If a student makes a grade of U for any course, 
enrollment will be suspended and the student cannot take 
any further graduate course work without being 
readmitted to the program. Readmission to the program 
requires approval of the Dean of the Graduate School 
upon the recommendation of the program Director. 

Application for Degree 

Students are also required to file an "Application for 
Degree" with the Registrar's Office in the semester prior 
to the one in which they plan to graduate. 

Financial Assistance 

Awards are available on a competitive basis through the 
Graduate School. Several administrative units on campus 
also employ graduate students. Other forms of financial 
aid, such as loans, are available; contact the Financial Aid 
Office at 704-547-2461 for further information. 



Courses in Arts Administration 

MAAA 6001. Introduction to Arts Administration. (3) 

Recognizing the breadth and complexity of career options 
in art administration, the purpose of this class is to orient 
students to the basic profiles of organizational activities 
within the visual art field. Students will be given a broad 
overview of the fundamentals of administrative structure, 
standards of operation, and functional components that 
are found in various visual art organizations. They will 
have the opportunity to explore, discuss and understand 
the principles of successful art organization management. 
(Fall) (Evening) 

MAAA 6100. Curatorial Theory and Exhibition 
Design. (3) This course introduces students to the 
evolving, diverse principles of curatorial practice and 
design. Topics include: research methodologies; 
formations, acquisitions and management of collections; 
and their use for aesthetic, educational and research 
purposes. It also examines: the roles of professionals who 
care for and use collections; ethics; cataloging and 
registration; loans; issues of interpretation to the public; 
and accessibility (both physical and intellectual). (Yearly) 
(Evening) 

MAAA 6125. New Technologies for Arts 
Organizations. (3) This course will survey the dynamic 
field of current and developing technologies as they relate 
to the administrative aspects of an arts organization. 



College of Arts and Sciences 55 



Course content will address development of Web Sites, 
CD-ROMs and DVDs as well as the basics of digital 
imaging, image management, and video and audio 
technologies. Usability issues related to the World Wide 
Web as well as the principles of interactive and 
presentation design, virtual galleries and exhibition spaces 
together with developing technology plans will be 
investigated in the context of their use as methodologies 
for the effective implementation of new media forms. 
(Alternating Years) 

MAAA 6150. Law and the Arts. (1) This course 
introduces students to the primary legal issues facing an 
arts administrator today, including some consideration of 
history and ethics. Topics explored include: artists' rights; 
freedom of expression, copyright, and trademark; cultural 
property (archaeological preservation, international 
protection of cultural heritage in war and piece, and 
indigenous cultures); and pressing legalities facing arts 
organizations. (Alternating Years) 

MAAA 6160. Marketing for the Arts. (3) Recognizing 
the breadth and complexity of cultural organizations, the 
purpose of this class is to familiarize students with the 
fundamentals of marketing organizational programs and 
activities within the visual art field. Students will be given 
a broad overview of the functional components of 
administrative management and participation in the 
theory and techniques of public relations, audience 
development, market research, advertising and various 
promotional strategies. They will have the opportunity to 
explore, discuss and understand the principles of 
successful marketing for art organizations. (Spring) 
(Evening) 

MAAA 5212. Contemporary Art Theory and 
Criticism. (3) This course surveys the major critical 
theories in recent art history and criticism of the 1980s to 
the present. This course demands a thoughtful, 
questioning, and open intellectual nature in order to be 
appreciated. This class will combine lecture, discussion 
and participation together with written assignments and 
exams. (Alternating Years) 

MAAA 6311. Non-Profit Management. (3) This 
course examines the structure, function and 
administration of nonprofit organizations. Students will 
be taught the development of strategies to insure 
successful financial and ethical management. (Alternating 
Years) 

MAAA 6324. Financial Analysis for Government and 
Non-Profit Organizations. (3) This course will cover 
the topics of fund accounting basics for government and 
nonprofit organizations, preparation and analysis of 
financial statements, evaluating and monitoring financial 
condition, capital budgeting and investment analysis, debt 
policy and management. (Alternating Years) 



MAAA 7100. Communication for the Arts. (3) 

Students will be given a broad overview of the functional 
components of administrative management and 
participation in the theory and techniques of both written 
and oral communications for internal as well as external 
purposes in the context of management documents, 
promotional materials, grant proposals, exhibition 
signage, press releases, oral presentation and public 
speaking. They will have the opportunity to explore, 
discuss and understand the principles of successful 
communications for art organizations. (On Demand) 

MAAA 7150. Education and Arts Administration. (3) 

This course examines the complexities involved in 
providing appropriate educational interpretation, content 
and programs for museums and other arts organizations. 
Recognizing that education is almost always a mission- 
critical aspect of public cultural organizations, students 
will explore how educational programming goals aid in 
both audience development and the artistic enrichment of 
the public audience. 
(On Demand) 

MAAA 7300. History and Theory of Art Museums. 

(3) This course will introduce students to the history, 
philosophy, practice and function of art museums. 
Students will research works of art and working 
relationships with living artists, artists' estates and both 
private and institutional collections. The roles and profiles 
of various visual art organizations both locally and 
nationally will be studied. (On Demand) 

MAAA 7700. Topics in Arts Administration. (1-3) 

This course is designed to supplement existing program 
studies. Topics courses provide for: 1) the offering of 
classes not otherwise covered by the curriculum, and 
incorporation of specialized topics taught by practicing 
professionals; such classes offer the opportunity, as well, 
to explore a course's potential contribution to the overall 
curriculum before officially adding it to the curriculum. 
Samples of potential Topics courses include: Fundraising 
and Resource Development for Arts Administration, 
Managing Artists Residency Programs, Managing Public 
Art and Design Programs, Practical Aspects of 
International Art Business, and Collections Management. 
(On Demand) 

MAAA 7800. Internship in Arts Administration. (3) A 

supervised internship with a credible and functioning arts 
organization. The primary objective is for students to 
acquire a meaningful work experience in a professional 
institutional arts setting. The 3-credit internship is based 
on the student completing 120 contact hours of work in a 
15 week period. Permit Only (Fall, Spring & Summer) 

MAAA 7990. Thesis I. (3) This course prepares the 
exiting MAAA student for execution of his/her Thesis, 
by providing students with the skills necessary to generate 
application-based research questions, critically evaluate 
research studies, construct research designs and generate 



56 College of Arts and Sciences 



viable research proposals. Projects include learning 
appropriate research methods; making an outline/plan; 
creating an annotated bibliography; and forming a thesis 
statement. For those students planning an exhibition, this 
course would include developing a curatorial strategy, 
designing the exhibition, planning and obtaining work to 
show, insurance for the work, etc. Each student is signed 
off by the MAAA Program Director at every stage. 
Permit Only (Fall, Spring) 

MAAA 7991. Thesis II. (3) This course facilitates the 
execution of the preparations achieved during Thesis I, 
under supervision of the Program Director and other 
faculty/professionals on the student's Thesis Committee. 
If the student is pursuing a written thesis, projects include 
researching, writing and producing the final paper. If the 
student is pursuing a public exhibition, projects include 
executing the exhibition and public relations writing, 
catalog/label copy, planning panel discussions, education, 
outreach etc. Each student will give a public presentation 
of his or her project as an oral exiting requirement for the 
course. Permit Only (Fall, Spring) 

MAAA 7999. Master's Graduate Residence. (1) As 

necessary, this course provides a continuous enrolment 
status for degree candidates during completion of thesis 
or other program requirements. Permit Only (Fall, Spring 
Summer) 



BIOLOGY 

Department of Biology 

257 Woodward Building 

704-687-2315 

www.bioweb.uncc.edu 

Degrees 

M.S., M.A, Ph.D. 

Coordinators 

Dr. Todd R. Steck - Master's coordinator 

Dr. Yvette M. Huet-Hudson - Doctoral coordinator 

Graduate Faculty 

Juan Anguita, Assistant Professor 

Lawrence Barden, Professor 

Rob Bierregaard, Adjunct Assistant Professor 

Kenneth Bost, Professor 

Mark Clemens, Professor 

Didier Dreau, Assistant Professor 

Mchael Hudson, Professor 

Yvette Huet-Hudson, Professor 

Francis Monty Hughes, Associate Professor 

Lawrence Leamy, Professor 

Ian Marriott, Associate Professor 

Iain McKillop, Associate Professor 

James Oliver, Professor 



Susan Peters, Associate Professor 
Thomas Reynolds, Professor 
Amy Ringwood, Assistant Professor 
Stanley Schneider, Professor 
Laura Schrum, Assistant Professor 
Inna Sokolova, Assistant Professor 
Todd Steck, Associate Professor 
Christopher Yengo, Assistant Professor 
Jian Zhang, Associate Professor 



MASTER OF SCIENCE DEGREE 
IN BIOLOGY 

The Master of Science degree program is designed for 
students who desire to pursue advanced studies in 
professional and graduate schools or various vocational 
opportunities in biology and related areas (see 
www.bioweb.uncc.edu/Masters/index.htm). The 
program provides the opportunity for broad training in a 
variety of biological areas as well as specialization in areas 
of particular interest to the student. The department has 
two areas of research strength: Biomedical/ 
Biotechnology, and Ecology/Environmental. Students 
also have the opportunity to conduct their thesis research 
under the direction of select faculty at the Carolinas 
Medical Center in Charlotte. 

Additional Admission Requirements 

In addition to the general requirements for admission to 

the Graduate School, the following requirements are 

specific to the Department of Biology: 

Under most circumstances, students admitted to the program will 

have: 

1) A B.S. or B.A. degree from an accredited university. 

2) Evidence of undergraduate preparation in biology 
with a minimum 24 semester hours in biology and 24 
semester hours of cognate study. 

3) An overall grade point average of at least 3.0 out of 
4.0. Additionally, applicants must have a grade point 
average of at least 3.0 in biology. 

4) A score on the Graduate Record Examination 
General Test in at least the 50th percentile (average 
for the verbal, quantitative, and analytical writing 
sections). 

5) A score of at least 220 on the computer-based Test 
of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) for 
applicants whose native language is not English. 
Students who do not pass this examination must pass 
ENGL 1100 (English as a Foreign Language) with a 
grade of C or higher. In addition, these students who 
will be involved in any instructional activity (e.g., 
teaching assistants) will be required to be evaluated 
by the English Language Training Institute at UNC 
Charlotte prior to the beginning of the first semester 
of study. 

6) Three letters of reference, at least two of which must 
be from faculty members. 



College of Arts and Sciences 57 



Degree Requirements 

1. Total hours required. The program leading to the 
Master of Science degree in Biology requires the 
successful completion of 30 semester hours of course 
work approved by a supervisory committee. 

In addition to course work, each degree candidate must 
pass an oral candidacy examination. 

2. Proportion of courses open only to graduate 
students. At least 16 of the 30 required hours, including 
no more than eight hours of thesis research, must be in 
courses open to graduate students only. 

3. Grades required. A student must maintain a 
cumulative average of 3.0 in all course work taken for 
graduate credit. An accumulation of more than two C 
grades will result in termination of the student's 
enrollment in the Masters program. If a student makes a 
grade of U in any course, enrollment in the program will 
be terminated. 

4. Amount of transfer credit accepted. Up to 6 hours 
of transfer credit may be applied to the Masters degree. 
Only courses with grades of A or B may be accepted for 
transfer credit. Courses taken to satisfy the requirements 
of a previously completed degree can not be counted 
toward the Masters degree. All transfer credit must be 
approved by the Student's Supervisory Committee and 
the Graduate Coordinator. 

5. Library workshop. All Masters students will be 
required to take the Library workshop offered each fall 
semester through the Department of Biology. 

6. Departmental seminars. Graduate students are 
expected to attend all seminars sponsored by the 
Department of Biology. 

7. Thesis. The candidate must prepare a thesis based 
upon original research acceptable to the Supervisory 
Committee and the Dean of the Graduate School. The 
student must orally present and successfully defend the 
thesis to the student's supervisory committee in a defense 
that is open to the public. 

8. Teaching. Every student is required to be a teaching 
assistant for at least one class in one semester. 

Admission to Candidacy 

General academic regulations will apply to application for 
admission to candidacy. In addition to these the applicant 
should have: 

1) Removed any identified entrance deficiencies by the 
time of application. 

2) Successfully completed the candidacy examination. 

3) Taken at least 15 hours of graduate work with a GPA 
of 3.0 or better. 



4) Satisfied the supervisory committee that he/she is 
qualified to become a candidate, i.e., can fulfill the 
requirements successfully. 

Assistantships 

Teaching and research assistantships are available on a 
competitive basis for qualified students. A limited number 
of out-of-state and in-state tuition grants are also 
competitively awarded. 



MASTER OF ARTS DEGREE IN 
BIOLOGY 

The Master of Arts degree program is designed for 
students who choose to write a thesis based upon 
published scientific literature rather than on laboratory or 
field research (see 
www.bioweb.uncc.edu/Masters/index.htm).. 

Degree Requirements 

Students who choose to pursue the Master of Arts degree 
must complete the requirements for the Master of 
Science degree with the following exceptions: at least 32 
hours of course work. A maximum of four hours of 
credit for thesis research may be included in the required 
32 hours, and three courses of the 32 hours submitted for 
the degree must include a formal laboratory. 



INTERDISCIPLINARY PH.D. IN 

BIOLOGY 

(Biomedical Science and Biotechnology) 

The Interdisciplinary Ph.D. in Biology Program has as its 
intellectual focus a synthesis of the molecular and 
integrative bases of biomedical sciences and related 
biotechnology. In addition to a vigorous research 
concentration, the program emphasizes the importance of 
relevant course work. All students are required to 
complete a series of core courses that stress the 
interdisciplinary nature of the program. These courses 
expose students to the biological, chemical, physical, and 
engineering aspects of biotechnology and to the ethical 
implications of biomedical and biotechnological research. 
The cornerstone of the program is the student's research 
dissertation. Each dissertation is expected to be a 
significant scientific contribution based on independent 
and original research, leading to publications in 
national/international peer-reviewed journals. 
For further information see our website which is updated 
regularly: www.bioweb.uncc.edu/doctoral 

Additional Admission Requirements 

In addition to the general requirements for admission to 
the Graduate School, the following are required for study 
toward the Interdisciplinary Ph.D. in Biology. 



58 College of Arts and Sciences 



Under most circumstances, students admitted to the program will 
have: 

1) A B.S. or B.A. degree from an accredited university. 

2) An overall grade point average of at least 3.0 out of 
4.0. Additionally, applicants must have a grade point 
average of at least 3.5 in biology, 3.0 in chemistry, 
and 3.0 in mathematics. 

3) A score on the Graduate Record Examination 
General Test in at least the 65th percentile (average 
for the verbal, quantitative, and analytical sections). 

4) A minimum of 24 hours in biology, which must 
include at least one course in each of the areas of 
genetics, physiology, and cell/molecular biology. 
Additionally, applicants must have one year each of 
general chemistry, organic chemistry, physics, and 
mathematics (at least one semester each of calculus 
and statistics). Applicants with academic deficiencies 
may be admitted on the condition that any 
deficiencies are corrected during the first year of 
graduate study. The Interdisciplinary Ph.D. 
Committee will determine the remediation necessary 
for identified deficiencies. 

5) A score of at least 220 on the computer-based Test 
of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) for 
applicants whose native language is not English. 
Students who do not pass this examination must pass 
ENGL 11 00 (English as a Foreign Language) with a 
grade of C or higher. In addition, these students who 
will be involved in any instructional activity (e.g., 
teaching assistants) will be required to be evaluated 
by the English Language Training Institute at UNC 
Charlotte prior to the beginning of the first semester 
of study. 

6) Three letters of reference, at least two of which must 
be from faculty members. 

Degree Requirements 

The Ph.D. acknowledges the value of course work as 
background and preparatory for research, but the primary 
emphasis of the program is on the development of 
research skills and the completion of a research project 
on a significant problem in the area of biomedicine or 
biotechnology. 

1. Total hours required. 

The program requires 72 post-baccalaureate credit hours. 
Because of the interdisciplinary nature of this program, all 
students will be required to take a general curriculum that 
includes a two-year sequence of core courses as shown 
below: 

Core A: 16 semester hours. Four team-taught semester- 
long courses in Principles of Biochemistry (Fall, 4 
credits), Molecular and Cell Biology (Fall, 4 credits), 
Microbiology and Immunology (Spring, 4 credits), and 
Integrative Systems Physiology (Spring, 4 credits). These 
courses will provide the fundamental background for the 
applied focus of the program. 



Core B: 12 semester hours. Four team-taught semester- 
long courses in Biophysics (Fall, 3 credits), Bioethics (Fall, 

3 credit; PHIL 8050), Hypothesis Testing (Fall, 3 credits) 
and Biotechnology and Bioengineering (Spring, 3 credits). 
These courses will build on the material presented in Core 
A and will emphasize the chemistry, physics, and 
engineering principles as they impact biomedicine and 
biotechnology. 

Years 1-4: 

Interdisciplinary Colloquium; 4 semester hours (1 hour 
per year). This course brings together faculty and students 
from the participating programs in an informal discussion 
of interdisciplinary research. (Fall semester only). 

Years 1-4: 

Seminar; 4 semester hours (1 hour per year). Formal 
student presentations of current literature topics in their 
area of study. (Spring semester only). 

Years 1 & 2: 

Laboratory Research Rotations; a maximum of 6 semester 
hours total (3 rotations of 2 hours each). These hours will 
be earned in Year 1 and completed by the beginning of 
Year 2. 

Years 2 & 3: 

Electives; 8 semester hours minimum. Advanced topics 
courses to be selected by students in consultation with 
their dissertation committee. These will be specialty 
topics in the areas of expertise of program faculty. 

2. Proportion of courses open only to graduate 
students. 

All the basic core courses, interdisciplinary colloquium, 
and seminar classes are open to graduate students only. 
Lab rotations are restricted to doctoral students. At least 

4 hours of the minimum 8 hours of electives must be in 
courses at the 8000 level or higher. The remaining 4 
credit hours can be completed in any approved program 
electives. 

3. Grades required. 

A student must maintain a cumulative average of 3.0 in all 
course work taken for graduate credit. Lab rotations and 
the dissertation research will be graded on a 
Pass/Unsatisfactory basis and therefore will not be 
included in the cumulative average. An accumulation of 
two C grades will result in termination of the student's 
enrollment in the graduate program. If a student makes a 
grade of U in any course, enrollment in the program will 
be terminated. 

4. Amount of transfer credit accepted. 

Only courses with grades of A or B may be accepted for 
transfer credit. Although the maximum amount of credit 
past the baccalaureate degree that a Ph.D. student may 
count towards the doctorate is 30 semester hours, only 
courses appropriate for the program and curriculum in 
which the student is enrolled may be transferred. This 



College of Arts and Sciences 59 



should be determined by the student's Dissertation 
Committee and approved by the program coordinator, 
before the request is submitted to the Graduate School. 
This rule applies whether the courses were taken at UNC 
Charlotte or elsewhere, and whether a master's degree 
was earned or not. However, no more than six hours 
taken when the student was in post-baccalaureate (non- 
degree seeking) status may be applied toward the doctoral 
degree. 

5. Departmental seminars. 

Graduate students are expected to attend all seminars 
sponsored by the Department of Biology. 
In addition, each student is required to make a 20 min 
presentation on his/her research at the departmental 
seminar after entering his/her 2 nd year in the program. 
He/she is required to make a 40 min presentation at the 
departmental seminar in his/her 3 rd year into the 
program. The PhD coordinator will work out the logistics 
with the department seminar coordinator concerning the 
arrangement of students' presentations. 

6. Advancement to candidacy. 

For Advancement to Candidacy, a student must complete 
the following by the end of the 5 th semester of study. 
First, the student must pass the Candidacy Examination. 
A dissertation topic will then be proposed to the student's 
Dissertation Committee. A student advances to candidacy 
following approval of the proposed dissertation topic by 
the student's Dissertation Committee and the Dean of 
the Graduate School. 

7. Dissertation. 

The doctoral program of study must include a minimum 
of 18 hours of dissertation credit. The student must 
complete and defend a dissertation based on a research 
program approved by the student's dissertation 
committee which results in a high quality, original and 
substantial piece of research. The student must orally 
present and successfully defend the dissertation to the 
student's dissertation committee in a defense that is open 
to the public. A copy of the dissertation must be made 
available for review by the program doctoral faculty at 
least two weeks prior to the public defense. 
A paper reporting results described in the dissertation 
shall be included in the dissertation (e.g. in an appendix). 
The paper may be published, accepted for publication, 
submitted for publication, or a draft following the 
guidelines of a journal to which the results will be 
submitted. 

8. UNC Charlotte residency requirement. 

The student must satisfy the UNC Charlotte residency 
requirement for the program by completing 20 hours, 
either as course work or research credits. Residence is 
considered to be continuous if the student is enrolled in 
one or more courses in successive semesters until 20 
hours are earned. 



9. Laboratory research rotations. 

Laboratory research rotations allow the student to sample 
areas of research and become familiar with program 
faculty. A student will engage in a minimum of 1 rotation 
with a maximum of 3 rotations. Each rotation will consist 
of a minimum of 4 weeks and there is no expectation that 
the work done during the rotation will result in a 
publication. By the end of the student's second semester 
he/she must have determined their major advisor. A 
rotation must have been completed in the advisor's 
laboratory. 

The purpose of a laboratory rotation is to learn and 
perform techniques associated with the lab, and to 
potentially identify a Dissertation Advisor. A typical 
rotation will involve 5-10 hours per week in the 
laboratory for 4-10 weeks. Students are encouraged to 
identify a sponsoring faculty member well in advance of 
the scheduled rotation. Students must meet with the 
sponsoring faculty member to determine what will be 
done during the rotation, i.e. techniques to be learned and 
identification of the project to be completed. At the end 
of the rotation the student must write a one page synopsis 
of the rotation to be signed by the sponsoring faculty 
member and turned in to the Ph.D. coordinator. 

10. Deadlines 

1) A student must establish their graduate committee by 
the end of the 3 rd Semester 

2) The student and graduate committee must meet by 
the end of the 4* Semester to set timeline for 
candidacy exam. 

3) The student is required to meet with their graduate 
committee at least once a year 

4) The deadline for completing the candidacy exam is 
the end of the student's 5 th Semester. 

11. Time limits for completion. 

All requirements for the degree must be completed within 
eight years after first registration as a doctoral student. 
The student must achieve admission to candidacy within 
six years after admission to the program and complete all 
requirements within six years after admission to candidacy 
for the Ph.D. degree. These time limits are maximums; 
students will typically be expected to complete the degree 
requirements within five years. 



Courses in Biology 

BIOL 5000. Advanced Topics in Biology. (1-4) 

Courses in selected topics and advanced studies in 
biology. Lecture and laboratory hours will vary with the 
topics taught. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. 
(Fall, Spring) 

BIOL 5111. Evolution. (3) Theories of evolution and 
forces which affect gene frequencies. (Fall) 



60 College of Arts and Sciences 



BIOL 5121. Biometry. (4) Prerequisite: one course in 
statistics. Design and analysis of experiments. Three 
lecture hours and one laboratory period of three hours a 
week. (Spring) 

BIOL 5144. Advanced Ecology. (4) Energy flow, 
nutrient cycles, community structure, population growth 
and regulation. Three lecture hours and one laboratory 
period of three hours a week. (Fall) 

BIOL 5168. Recombinant DNA Techniques. (3) 

Modern molecular biological methods (such as DNA 
cloning, gel electrophoresis, nucleic acid hybridization, 
PCR, and DNA sequencing) data analysis and 
interpretation. One lecture hour and two laboratory 
periods of three hours a week. (Fall) 

BIOL 5171. Cell Physiology. (3) The fundamental 
physicochemical properties of cells. (Fall) 

BIOL 5184. Plant Biotechnology. (3) A laboratory- 
oriented course designed to integrate plant molecular 
biology, recombinant DNA technology, and plant cell and 
tissue culture. One lecture hour and two laboratory 
periods of three hours a week. (Spring) {Alternate years) 

BIOL 5189. Mechanisms in Development. (3) Cellular 
and molecular bases of differentiation; an exploration of 
the experimental analysis of causal and controlling factors 
in development. (Spring) 

BIOL 5199. Molecular Biology. (3) Structural and 
functional interaction of nucleic acids and proteins in the 
replication, transcription and translation of genetic 
material. (Fall) 

BIOL 5205. Advanced Horticulture. (3) Topics in 
ornamental horticulture and landscaping, including 
greenhouse projects and field trips. Two lecture hours 
and three hours of lab a week. (Spring) 

BIOL 5221. Plant Systematics. (4) Identification and 
classification of vascular plants, including experimental 
concepts of speciation. Three lecture hours and one 
laboratory period of three hours a week. (Spring) 

BIOL 5223. The Fungi. (3) Morphology, life cycles, 
ecology, taxonomy, and medical economic significance of 
the fungi and organisms historically aligned with the 
fungi. (On demand) 

BIOL 5223L. The Fungi Laboratory. (1) Co- 
requisite/prerequisite: BIOL 5223; Consent of 
department for graduate credit. One laboratory period of 
three hours a week. (On demand) 

BIOL 5229. Dendrology. (4) The identification, 
structure, function, ecology, reproduction, and 
evolutionary relationships of woody plants. Three lecture 
hours and one three-hour lab a week. (Fall) 



BIOL 5233. Parasitology. (4) Morphology, life cycles, 
ecology, taxonomy and economic importance of 
parasites. Three lecture hours and one laboratory period 
of three hours a week. (Spring) 

BIOL 5234. Wildlife Biology. (3) Concepts, principles 
and techniques of wildlife biology. Identification and life 
histories with emphasis on the value, study attraction, 
management, conservation and control of wildlife species. 
(On demand) 

BIOL 5234L. Wildlife Biology Laboratory. (1) 

Prerequisite or corequisite: BIOL 5234. One laboratory 
period of three hours a week plus field trips. (On demand) 

BIOL 5235. Mammalogy. (4) Taxonomy, anatomy, 
physiology and life histories of the mammals. Three 
lecture hours and one laboratory period of three hours a 
week. (Fall) 

BIOL 5242. The Biology of Birds. (3) Prerequisite: 
BIOL 3144 or consent of department. Overview of 
general avian biology, including taxonomy and anatomy, 
but concentrating on behavior, ecology and conservation 
of birds. Focus will be on birds of the southeastern U.S. 
(Spring) 

BIOL 5242L. The Biology of Birds Lab. (1) Meets for 
one three-hour period per week. The laboratory and field 
portion of the Biology of Birds will focus on field 
identification and inventory techniques, with an 
introduction to anatomy. Students will need binoculars. 
(Spring) 

BIOL 5243. Animal Behavior. (3) An ethological 
approach to how animals respond to their environment. 
Causation, development and adaptive significance of 
behavior in social systems. (Fall) 

BIOL 5243L. Animal Behavior Laboratory. (1) 

Prerequisite or corequisite: BIOL 5243. One laboratory 
period of three hours a week. (Fall) 

BIOL 5244. Conservation Biology. (3) Conservation 
values, extinction rates, genetic diversity, demography, 
habitat fragmentation, reserve management, ecological 
restoration. (Yearly) 

BIOL 5244L. Conservation Biology Laboratory. (1) 

Prerequisite or corequisite: BIOL 5244. One laboratory 
period of three hours a week plus field trips. (Yearly) 

BIOL 5250. Microbiology. (3) Morphology, physiology, 
pathogenicity, metabolism and ecology of micro- 
organisms. (Spring Fall) 

BIOL 5250L. Microbiology Laboratory. (1) 

Prerequisite or corequisite: BIOL 5250. One laboratory 
period of three hours a week. (Spring Fall) 



College of Arts and Sciences 61 



BIOL 5251. Immunology. (3) Cellular, molecular and 
genetic basis for immunity; physical chemistry of antigens 
and antibodies and their interactions; defense 
mechanisms. (Spring Summer) 

BIOL 5251L. Immunology Laboratory. (1) 

Prerequisite or corequisite: BIOL 5251. One laboratory 
period of three hours a week. (Spring) 

BIOL 5253. Marine Microbiology. (4) Bacteria, fungi 
and viruses of marine origin, and their response to the 
salt, temperature, pressure and nutrient environment of 
the ocean. Roles of marine microorganisms in public 
health, pollution and fouling. Three lecture hours and one 
laboratory period of three hours a week. (Spring) 

BIOL 5254. Epidemiology. (3) History and practices of 
epidemiology with emphasis on modes of transmission of 
clinically important infectious agents and the analysis of 
epidemiological data. Three lecture hours a week. (On 
demand) 

BIOL 5255. Bacterial Genetics. (3) Regulation of gene 
expression in bacterial systems. Bacteriophage genetics. 
DNA transfer in bacteria. (Spring) 

BIOL 5256. Pathogenic Bacteriology. (3) Cellular and 
molecular interactions of mammalian hosts with 
procaryotic parasites. (Fall) 

BIOL 5256L. Pathogenic Bacteriology Laboratory. 

(1) One laboratory period of three hours a week. (Fall) 

BIOL 5257. Microbial Physiology and Metabolism. 

(3) Bacterial cell growth and division, transport 
mechanisms, catabolism and energy production, 
biosynthesis of cellular components, global regulation of 
gene expression in response to the environment, and cell- 
cell communication between bacteria. (Spring) 

BIOL 5257L. Microbial Physiology and Metabolism 
Lab. (1). Laboratory experiments on such topics in 
general microbiology as the preparation and use of cell- 
free systems, isolation of auxotrophs, transport 
mechanisms, radiolabelling and separation of proteins, 
etc. (Spring) 

BIOL 5259. Virology. (3) Morphology, classification, 
genetics and pathogenicity of bacterial and animal viruses. 
(Fall) 

BIOL 5259L. Virology Laboratory. (1) Prerequisite or 
corequisite: BIOL 5259. One laboratory period of three 
hours per week. (Fall) 

BIOL 5260. Population Genetics (3) The genetics of 
qualitative and quantitative traits in populations, including 
an assessment of the factors affecting the extent and 
pattern of the genetic variation in these traits. (On demand) 



BIOL 5277. Endocrinology. (3) Endocrine glands and 
their physiological roles in metabolism, growth and 
reproduction. (On demand) 

BIOL 5277L. Endocrinology Laboratory. (1) 

Prerequisite or corequisite: BIOL 5277. One laboratory 
period of three hours a week. (On demand) 

BIOL 5279. Neurobiology. (3) Physiology and anatomy 
of nervous systems, especially mammalian. (Spring) 

BIOL 5279L. Neurobiology Laboratory. (1) 

Prerequisite or corequisite: BIOL 5279. One laboratory 
period of three hours a week. (Spring) 

BIOL 5282. Developmental Plant Anatomy. (3) Study 
of plant cells, tissues, organs and patterns of growth and 
differentiation. (Spring) 

BIOL 5282L. Developmental Plant Anatomy 
Laboratory. (1) Prerequisite or corequisite: BIOL 5282. 
One laboratory period of three hours a week. (Spring) 

BIOL 5283. Animal Development. (3) Developmental 
processes occurring chiefly during gametogenesis, 
fertilization, early embryogenesis and organogenesis. (Fall) 

BIOL 5283L. Animal Development Laboratory. (1) 

Prerequisite or corequisite: BIOL 5283. One laboratory 
period of three hours a week. (Fall) 

BIOL 5291. Histology. (4) Animal tissues and organs; 
techniques of preparing tissues for analysis. Three lecture 
hours and one laboratory period of three hours a week. 
(Spring) 

BIOL 5292. Advances in Immunology. (3) Current 
topics in immunology with particular emphasis upon the 
genetic systems and molecular mechanisms underlying 
immune reactions. (Fall) 

BIOL 5293. Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy. (4) 

Prerequisite: BIOL 2111. Comparative studies of the 
anatomy, physiology and functional adaptations of 
selected vertebrates with emphasis on evolutionary 
developments, especially in mammals. Three lecture 
hours and one laboratory period of three hours a week. 
(Spring) 

BIOL 6000. Special Topics in Biology. (1-4) 

Prerequisite: consent of department. Courses in selected 
topics and advanced studies in biology. Lecture and 
laboratory hours will vary with the courses taught. (On 
demand) 

BIOL 6010. Special Topics in Microbiology. (1-4) 

Prerequisite: consent of department. Advanced courses in 
microbiology. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. 



62 College of Arts and Sciences 



Lecture and laboratory hours will vary with the courses 
taught. (On demand) 

BIOL 6020. Special Topics in Systematic Biology. (1- 

4) Prerequisite: consent of department. Advanced courses 
in systematic and evolutionary biology. May be repeated 
for credit as topics vary. Lecture and laboratory hours will 
vary with the courses taught. (On demand) 

BIOL 6030. Special Topics in Genetics. (1-4) 

Prerequisite: consent of department. Advanced courses in 
genetics. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. 
Lecture and laboratory hours will vary with the courses 
taught. (On demand) 

BIOL 6040. Special Topics in Molecular Biology. (1- 

4) Prerequisite: consent of department. Advanced courses 
in biochemistry and molecular biology. May be repeated 
for credit as topics vary. Lecture and laboratory hours will 
vary with the courses taught. (On de?nand) 

BIOL 6050. Special Topics in Physiology. (1-4) 

Prerequisite: consent of department. Advanced courses in 
physiology. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. 
Lecture and laboratory hours will vary with the courses 
taught. (On demand) 

BIOL 6060. Special Topics in Developmental 
Biology. (1-4) Prerequisite: consent of department. 
Advanced courses in developmental biology and 
embryology. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. 
Lecture and laboratory hours will vary with the courses 
taught. (On demand) 

BIOL 6070. Special Topics in Anatomy. (1-4) 

Prerequisite: consent of department. Advanced courses in 
anatomy and morphology. May be repeated for credit as 
topics vary. Lecture and laboratory hours will vary with 
the courses taught. (On demand) 

BIOL 6080. Special Topics in Behavior. (1-4) 

Prerequisite: consent of department. Advanced courses in 
behavior. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. 
Lecture and laboratory hours will vary with the courses 
taught. (On demand) 

BIOL 6090. Special Topics in Ecology. (1-4) 

Prerequisite: consent of department. Advanced courses in 
ecology. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. 
Lecture and laboratory hours will vary with the courses 
taught. (On demand) 

BIOL 6102. Cell and Molecular Biology. (4) 

Prerequisites: CHEM 6101, or consent of instructor. 
Structure of cellular components; the cell cycle; regulation 
of transcription, translation, and protein trafficking; cell 
membranes and transport; cell-cell communication, 
including signal transduction; extracellular matrix. Thirty 
two-hour lectures. (Fa//) 



BIOL 6103. Microbiology and Immunology. (4) 

Prerequisites: CHEM 6101 and BIOL 6102, or consent of 
instructor. Function and pathogenesis of prokaryotes, as 
well as related aspects of host response. Microbial 
physiology with an emphasis on aspects relevant to 
pathogenesis; bacterial genetics with an emphasis on 
operons and regulons as model of control of bacterial 
gene expression; pathogenic microbiology with an 
emphasis on invasion and intracellular survival; 
immunology with an emphasis on the role of the immune 
response in resistance to infection. Thirty two-hour 
lectures. (Spring) 

BIOL 6104. Integrative Systems Physiology. (4) 

Prerequisites: CHEM 6101, BIOL 6102, BIOL 6103, or 
consent of instructor. The functioning of an intact 
mammalian organism with an emphasis on human 
physiology. Traditional survey of organ systems' 
functions, and problems of the response of cells within 
tissues to stress and their impact on organismal response. 
Thirty two-hour lectures. (Spring) 

BIOL 6600. Seminar. (1-2) Topics of current emphasis 
in biology. May be repeated for credit. (Fall, Spring) 

BIOL 6800. Tutorial. (1-4) Directed study in areas of 
specialization in biology and related fields. Maximum 
credit toward degree: four hours. Pass/ No Credit or IP 
grading only. (Fall, Spring) 

BIOL 6900. Research and Thesis. (1-8) Pass/No Credit 
or IP grading only. (Fall, Spring) 

BIOL 7999. Master's Degree Graduate Residence. (1) 

BIOL 8000. Special Topics in Biology. (1-4) 

Prerequisite: consent of department. Courses in selected 
topics and advanced studies in biology. Lecture and 
laboratory hours will vary with the courses taught. (On 
demand) 

BIOL 8010. Special Topics in Microbiology. (1-4) 

Prerequisite: consent of department. Advanced courses in 
microbiology. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. 
Lecture and laboratory hours will vary with the courses 
taught. (On demand) 

BIOL 8030. Special Topics in Genetics. (1-4) 

Prerequisite: consent of department. Advanced courses in 
genetics. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. 
Lecture and laboratory hours will vary with the courses 
taught. (On demand) 

BIOL 8040. Special Topics in Molecular Biology. (1- 

4) Prerequisite: consent of department. Advanced courses 
in biochemistry and molecular biology. May be repeated 
for credit as topics vary. Lecture and laboratory hours will 
vary with the courses taught. (On demand) 



College of Arts and Sciences 63 



BIOL 8050. Special Topics in Physiology. (1-4) 

Prerequisite: consent of department. Advanced courses in 
physiology. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. 
Lecture and laboratory hours will vary with the courses 
taught. (On demand) 

BIOL 8102. Cell and Molecular Biology. (4) 

Prerequisites: CHEM 8101, or consent of instructor. 
Structure of cellular components; the cell cycle; regulation 
of transcription, translation, and protein trafficking; cell 
membranes and transport; cell-cell communication, 
including signal transduction; extracellular matrix. Thirty 
two-hour lectures. (Fall) 

BIOL 8103. Microbiology and Immunology. (4) 

Prerequisites: CHEM 8101 and BIOL 8102, or consent of 
instructor. Function and pathogenesis of prokaryotes, as 
well as related aspects of host response. Microbial 
physiology with an emphasis on aspects relevant to 
pathogenesis; bacterial genetics with an emphasis on 
operons and regulons as model of control of bacterial 
gene expression; pathogenic microbiology with an 
emphasis on invasion and intracellular survival; 
immunology with an emphasis on the role of the immune 
response in resistance to infection. Thirty two-hour 
lectures. (Spring) 

BIOL 8104. Integrative Systems Physiology. (4) 

Prerequisites: CHEM 8101, BIOL 8102, BIOL 8103, or 
consent of instructor. The functioning of an intact 
mammalian organism with an emphasis on human 
physiology. Traditional survey of organ systems' 
functions, and problems of the response of cells within 
tissues to stress and their impact on organismal response. 
Thirty two-hour lectures. (Spring) 

BIOL 8200. Interdisciplinary Colloquium. (1) 

Prerequisites: Admission to the Interdisciplinary Ph.D. in 
Biology Program. Discussion and analysis of topics of 
current emphasis in biomedicine and biotechnology. May 
be repeated for credit. Offered on a Pass/ No Credit basis 
only. (Fall) 

BIOL 8201. Seminar. (1) Prerequisites: Admission to the 
Interdisciplinary Ph.D. in Biology Program. Formal 
student presentations of current literature topics. May be 
repeated for credit. Offered on a Pass/ No Credit basis 
only. (Spring) 

BIOL 8800. Laboratory Rotations. (2) Prerequisites: 
Admission to the Interdisciplinary Ph.D. in Biology 
Program. Directed study in an area of specialization. May 
be repeated for credit. Offered on a Pass/ No Credit basis 
only. (Fall, Spring, Summer) 

BIOL 8999. Doctoral Dissertation Research. (0-9) 

Prerequisites: Admission to the Interdisciplinary Ph.D. in 
Biology Program. Individual investigation that culminates 
in the preparation and presentation of a doctoral 



dissertation. May be repeated for credit. Offered on a 
Pass /No Credit or IP basis only. (Fall, Spring, Summer) 

BIOL 9999. Doctoral Degree Graduate Residence. 
(1) 



CHEMISTRY 

Department of Chemistry 

Burson Building, Room 200 

704-687-4765 

http://www.chem.uncc.edu/grad/ 

Degrees 

M.S. in Chemistry 

Ph.D. Interdisciplinary degree in Biotechnology and 

BioMedicine 

Ph.D. in Materials through Mechanical Engineering 

Ph.D. in Optics and Optoelectronics 

Coordinator 

Dr. Brian T. Cooper 
btcooper@email.uncc.edu 

Graduate Faculty 

Banita W. Brown, Associate Professor 

Brian T. Cooper, Associate Professor 

Bernadette T. Donovan-Merkert, Professor, 

Departmental Chair 

Thomas D. DuBois, Charles H. Stone Professor of 

Chemistry 
Mahnaz El-Kouedi, Assistant Professor 
Kenneth E. Gonsalves, Celanese Acetate Distinguished 

Professor of Polymer Chemistry 
Daniel S. Jones, Associate Professor 
Joanna K. Krueger, Associate Professor 
Craig A. Ogle, Professor 
Jordan C. Poler, Associate Professor 
Daniel Rabinovich, Associate Professor 
John M. Risley, Professor 
Thomas, A. Schmedake, Assistant Professor 
Wade N. Sisk, Associate Professor 



MASTER OF SCIENCE IN 
CHEMISTRY 

The Chemistry Department offers a research-based 
Master of Science (M.S.) degree, which provides the 
background necessary for further graduate or professional 
studies in the physical, life or medical sciences or a career 
in chemistry. The M.S. degree requires a minimum of 30 
credit hours and a thesis based on original research 
carried out under the direction of a member of the 
graduate faculty. Student participation in research 
activities is through selection of a faculty adviser and 



64 College of Arts and Sciences 



enrollment in the special research courses offered. Major 
emphasis is placed upon the research project and required 
thesis. UNC Charlotte B.S. degree chemistry majors may 
elect to participate in the five year Accelerated Early 
Entry M.S. program (described in the undergraduate 
catalog). 

Additional Admission Requirements 

In addition to the general requirements for admission to 
the Graduate School, the following are required for 
graduate study in Chemistry: 

1) A satisfactory score on the Graduate Record 
Examination. 

2) Administration of placement examinations by the 
department each semester just prior to registration as 
an aid in identifying academic deficiencies. 

3) Removal of any deficiencies within one year. 

4) A score of 220 or better is required on the computer 
based TOEFL for international students. 

Degree Requirements 

The candidate for the degree must present a minimum of 
30 semester hours including at least 15 semester hours in 
6000-level courses open to graduate students only. 
Required courses may include CHEM 3141, 3142, 5111, 
5121, 5133, 5134 5135 or 5165. Two semester hours of 
graduate seminar, CHEM 6681 and CHEM 6682, and at 
least one, but up to 16 semester hours of research and 
thesis credit, CHEM 6900, must be taken. In addition, six 
semester hours from the course group CHEM 6060, 
6069, 6082, 6101, 6115, 6125, 6126, 6135, 6138, 6145, 
6146, 6147, 6155, 6165, or MEGR 6109 or another 
course that has been approved by the Chemistry faculty, 
are required. Departmental approval is necessary before 
CHEM 6060 credit can be used to satisfy this 
requirement. Any 5000 level or higher Biology, 
Engineering, Mathematics or Physics course, except those 
designed for a professional education sequence, may be 
taken for graduate credit upon departmental approval. 
Well-prepared students, particularly those with degrees 
from ACS-approved programs, will normally satisfy the 
requirement for CHEM 3141, 3142, 5111, 5121, 5133, 
5134, 5135 or 5165 through placement examinations 
administered after admission. In those cases, hours that 
would have been earned for these courses may be 
replaced by research, CHEM 6900, or by elective courses. 
A grade point average of 3.0 is required for the degree. 
An accumulation of two marginal (C) grades on the 
graduate transcript will result in termination of the 
student's enrollment in the M.S. Program and a 
termination of any assistantships and fellowships they 
were receiving. 

A student in the chemistry M.S. program is required to 
maintain satisfactory progress toward the degree. 
Continued enrollment is at all times subject to review on 
the basis of academic record. This review is performed by 
the departmental Graduate Committee. 



Admission to Candidacy 

An Admission to Candidacy form must be submitted 
approximately one month prior to the beginning of the 
semester in which the graduate student expects to 
complete all requisites for the M.S. degree. 

Assistantships 

Graduate students generally support their education 
through teaching or research assistantships available 
through the Chemistry Department. The department also 
sponsors the Gary Howard Research Fellowship 
competition, which provides significandy greater support 
to one highly qualified applicant. Tuition waivers are also 
available to external applicants through the Thomas 
Walsh Tuition Fellowships. Many faculty may offer 
research assistantships to qualified students Further 
information is available in the Department. Support in the 
summer months is also available. 

Electives 

Any 5000 level or higher Biology, Engineering, 
Mathematics or Physics course, except those designed for 
a professional education sequence, may be taken for 
graduate credit upon departmental approval. 

Advising 

Approval of the program of each student and monitoring 
his/her progress toward the degree is the responsibility of 
the student's research adviser. Prior to the selection of a 
research adviser, graduate student progress is monitored 
by the departmental Graduate Committee. 

Thesis 

A thesis must be written and defended within six calendar 
years after admission into the M.S. program as a degree 
student. 

Thesis Committee 

The written thesis is defended before the department and 
a special thesis committee of no fewer than four persons, 
with at least one member from outside of the Chemistry 
Department. 

Application for Degree 

The Application for Degree can be submitted on the 
form supplied by the Graduate School no later than the 
filing date specified in the University calendar. 

Research Experiences 

Chemistry faculty offer research opportunities in all areas 
of molecular and nanoscale sciences, and many participate 
in formal or informal interdisciplinary research programs. 
Faculty research interests include computational 
chemistry, organic synthesis, polymer chemistry, 
organometallic chemistry, structural and mechanistic 
organic chemistry, electrochemistry, materials and 
interfacial chemistry, catalysis, biochemistry, biophysical 
chemistry, analytical separations, bioanalytical chemistry, 
mass spectrometry, and chemical education. Many 



College of Arts and Sciences 65 



chemistry faculty are active participants in 
interdisciplinary research projects in biotechnology and 
biomedicine, optical science, materials science, or 
electrical engineering. Students receive academic credit 
for their research and benefit from a low student-to- 
faculty ratio. Graduate students are assigned individual 
projects and work closely with faculty members to build 
their own, original contribution to the scientific literature. 
Students have full access to and receive excellent training 
in the use of any departmental instrumentation needed to 
carry out their research. Results are presented at informal 
seminars, scientific conferences, and in articles published 
in high-quality, refereed journals. Research in the 
Department is funded in part from competitive grants 
obtained from agencies such as the American Chemical 
Society, National Science Foundation, National Institutes 
of Health, DoD, DoE, Research Corporation, Dreyfus 
Foundation, North Carolina Biotechnology Center, UNC 
Charlotte Foundation, and private industry. 

Tuition Waivers 

Fellowships are available for students enrolled in the 
Master's degree program in Chemistry and for students 
seeking an interdisciplinary Doctoral degree through the 
Chemistry Department. Further information is available 
in the Department 



Courses in Chemistry 

CHEM 5090. Special Topics in Chemistry. (1-4) 

Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. Selected topics in 
chemistry. Lecture and/or laboratory hours will vary with 
the nature of the course taught. May be repeated for 
credit. (On demand) 

CHEM 5095. Topics for Teachers. (1-4) Prerequisite: 
consent of the instructor. Selected topics in chemical 
education. Lecture and/or laboratory hours will vary with 
the nature of the course taught. May be repeated for 
credit. (On demand) 

CHEM 5111. Instrumental Analysis. (3-4) 

Prerequisites: Consent of the instructor. Selected modern 
instrumental methods of analysis, including theory and 
practice, with considerable attention given to the 
instrument and elementary electronics involved in the 
techniques. Two lecture hours and six hours of lab per 
week (Spring) 

CHEM 5121. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. (3-4) 

Prerequisites: Consent of the instructor. Theoretical 
inorganic chemistry including the application of 
physicochemical principles to the study of inorganic 
systems. Laboratory work involves inorganic preparations 
and characterization techniques. Three lecture hours and 
one laboratory period of three hours a week. (Fall) 

CHEM 5133. Methods of Organic Structure 
Determination. (2) Prerequisites: Consent of the 



instructor. Study and application of modern techniques, 
primarily spectroscopy, to determine the structure of 
organic molecules. One hour of lecture and one 
laboratory period of three hours each week. (Spring) 

CHEM 5134. Organic Reaction Mechanisms. (2) 

Prerequisites: Consent of the instructor. Mechanistic and 
theoretical topics which are beyond the scope of CHEM 
2131/2132, including orbital symmetry control of organic 
reactions, the Hammett Equation and other linear free 
energy relationships, heterocyclic compounds, polycyclic 
aromatic compounds, organic photochemistry, carbines, 
nitrenes, arynes and other short lived, reactive 
intermediates. (Spring) (Alternate years) 

CHEM 5135. Concepts and Techniques in Organic 
Synthesis. (2) Prerequisite or co-requisite: CHEM 5133, 
or consent of the instructor. Modern techniques of 
organic synthesis. Laboratory includes one or more multi- 
step syntheses of complex molecules. One hour of lecture 
and one laboratory period of three hours each week. 
(Spring) (Alternate years) 

CHEM 5165. Principles of Biochemistry I. (3) 

Prerequisite: satisfactory score on an organic chemistry 
proficiency exam, or consent of the instructor. A study of 
the structures, properties, and functions of biological 
molecules, bioenergetics of biological reactions, and 
enzyme catalysis, with particular emphasis on the 
underlying chemical principles, including thermodynamics 
and kinetics. (Fall) 

CHEM 5165L. Principles of Biochemistry I 
Laboratory. (1) Prerequisite or corequisite: CHEM 5165. 
Physical properties of biological molecules and an 
introduction to experimental techniques in biochemical 
research. Eleven four-hour lab periods. (Fall) 

CHEM 5166. Principles of Biochemistry II. (3) 

Prerequisite: CHEM 5165 with a grade of B or better. A 
study of various metabolic pathways and information 
transfer including molecular aspects of cell biology and 
genetics, with particular emphasis on the underlying 
chemical reactions, including thermodynamics and 
kinetics. (Spring) 

CHEM 5167. Structure and Mechanism in Protein 
Chemistry (3) Prerequisites: CHEM 5165, and either 
CHEM 5166 or BIOL 5171, or consent of the instructor. 
Examination of structures, properties, and functions of 
proteins, enzyme catalysis, and bioenergetics, emphasizing 
underlying mechanistic chemical and biochemical 
principles. (Spring) (Alternate years) 

CHEM 5171. Biochemical Instrumentation. (4) 

Prerequisites: CHEM 5165 and 5165L with a grade of B 
or better or the consent of the department. Modern 
instrumental methods used in biorelated areas such as 
biochemistry, biotechnology and medical technology. 
Theory and practice. Potentiometry, spectrophotometry, 



66 College of Arts and Sciences 



chromatography, sedimentation, and electrophoresis. 
Two lecture hours and two three-hour laboratory periods 
per week. (Spring) 

CHEM 5175. Physical Biochemistry. (3) Prerequisites: 
CHEM 5165, 5165L, and 5166, with a grade of B or 
better, or consent of the instructor. Colloid systems, 
equilibria in biological fluids, mass and energy transport 
in fluids and in association with membranes, energy 
storage and dissipation with relation to specific chemical 
bonding, enzyme kinetics. (On demand) 

CHEM 5185. Chemical Fate of Pollutants. (3) 

Prerequisites: satisfactory score on chemistry proficiency 
exam, or consent of the instructor. Chemical reactivity 
and fate of pollutants (in air, water, soil) in terms of their 
chemical structure and energetics, mechanisms, 
structure/energy relationships and their interaction with 
reactive environmental species including light. (Spring) 
(Alternate years) 

CHEM 5200. Computational Chemistry. (4) 

Prerequisite or co-requisite: Consent of instructor. 
Electronic and molecular mechanics-based computational 
methods, including properties, optimized equilibrium and 
transition state structures and potential energy surfaces of 
reactions. Three lecture hours and three hours of 
laboratory each week. Additional projects required of 
graduate students. (Fall, Spring) 

CHEM 6060. Special Topics and Investigations. (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. Directed study of 
topics of current chemical interest. May be repeated for 
credit. (On demand) 

CHEM 6069. Topics in Biochemistry. (3) 

Prerequisites: CHEM 6165, or consent of instructor. 
Discussion of current topics in biochemistry emphasizing 
their biomedical/biotechnological aspects from 
bioinorganic chemistry, bioorganic chemistry, 
bioanalytical chemistry, biophysical chemistry, 
biocomputational chemistry, biomaterials. May be 
repeated for credit. Three lecture hours per week. (Spring) 

CHEM 6082. Surfaces and Interfaces of Materials 
Chemistry. (3) Prerequisites: Any three semesters of 
undergraduate calculus based mathematics (i.e., MATH 
1241, 1242, and 2241) and an upper level undergraduate 
course in thermodynamics (i.e., CHEM 3142, PHYS 3151 
OR MEGR 31 12) or consent of the instructor. 
Theoretical basis, conceptual understanding and 
experimental investigations of the properties of surfaces 
and interfaces of various classes of materials will be 
presented. The content of this course will build from a 
rigorous derivation of the physical chemistry of surfaces 
and interfaces to a discussion of topical materials classes 
and specific materials properties. Three lecture hours each 
week. (Alternate years) 



CHEM 6101. Biochemical principles. (3) Prerequisites: 
Consent of instructor. Molecular biophysics of biological 
molecules. Bioenergetics of biological reactions and 
enzyme structure, mechanisms, and regulation. Metabolic 
pathways and the role of cellular organelles. Biochemical 
analysis methodology. Twenty-three two-hour lectures. 
(Fall) 

CHEM 6115. Advanced Analytical Chemistry. (3) 

Prerequisite: CHEM 5111 with a grade of B or better, or 
consent of the instructor. The application of modern 
analytical methods to chemical problems. Emphasis is 
upon the chemical information, particularly structural, 
obtainable from these techniques. (On demand) 

CHEM 6125. Theoretical Inorganic Chemistry. (3) 

Prerequisite: CHEM 5121 with a grade of B or better, or 
consent of the instructor. Group theoretical treatment of 
current theories of inorganic chemistry. Topics covered: 
Ligand field theory, molecular orbital theory for complex 
ions, electronic spectra of complex ions and the magnetic 
properties of complex ions. (On demand) 

CHEM 6126. Organometallic Chemistry. (3) 

Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. Previous or 
concurrent enrollment in CHEM 5133 recommended. 
Synthesis, structure, characterization, and reactivity of 
organometallic compounds; introduction to catalysis and 
bioorganometallic chemistry. Three lecture hours each 
week. (On demand) 

CHEM 6135. Advanced Organic Chemistry. (3) 

Prerequisite: CHEM 5133 and either 5134 or 5135 with a 
grade of B or better, or consent of the instructor. A 
qualitative discussion of modern mechanistic 
interpretation of the relations between structure and 
reactivity. Special emphasis is placed on the role of 
reactive intermediates such as carbonium ions, 
carbanions, carbines and radicals. (On demand) 

CHEM 6138. Stereochemistry. (3) Prerequisite: 
Advanced course in Biochemistry or Organic Chemistry. 
Three-dimensional chemistry and its chemical, physical 
and biochemical consequences, emphasizing classification 
of isomers and stereoisomers and the consequences of 
molecular shape on chemical and biological properties. 
(Spring) (Alternate years) 

CHEM 6145. Chemical Thermodynamics. (3) 

Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. The posfulatory 
basis of classical thermodynamics. Problems in chemical 
thermodynamics. The use of statistical mechanics for 
calculating thermodynamic functions. (On demand) 

CHEM 6146. Rates and Mechanisms. (3) Prerequisite: 
Consent of the instructor. Consideration of chemical 
kinetics and mechanism schemes, particularly those of 
current interest. (On demand) 



College of Arts and Sciences 67 



CHEM 6147. Molecular Photochemistry & 
Photophysics. (3) Prerequisite: Admission to graduate 
program or consent of instructor. An investigation of the 
excited states of organic molecules and the photophysics 
governing radiative and nonradiative transitions. Topics 
include electronic orbitals, absorption, emission, potential 
energy surfaces, energy transfer, photophysical 
radiationless transitions, singlet oxygen and 
chemiluminescent organic reactions. Three lecture hours 
per week. {Alternate years) 

CHEM 6150. Seminar-Internship. (1-3) Prerequisite: 
Consent of the instructor. Required for all teaching 
assistants. Supervised experience in the teaching of 
college chemistry. Graded Pass/No Credit. May be 
repeated for credit. (Fall, Spring) 

CHEM 6155. Polymer Synthesis. (3) Prerequisite: 
Consent of the instructor. Polymer structure, 
classification of polymerization reactions, theory and 
practice of step growth polymerization, radical, ionic and 
ring opening polymerizations, polymerization by 
transition metal catalysts. Recent advances in polymer 
synthesis. Three lecture hours per week. (On demand) 

CHEM 6165. Advanced Biochemistry. (3) 

Prerequisites: CHEM 6101, BIOL 6102, 6103, 6104, or 
consent of instructor. Advanced course on protein 
structure, enzyme and mechanistic biochemistry, 
metabolic biochemistry, biophysical chemistry. Three 
lecture hours per week. (Spring) 

CHEM 6681. Research Seminar. (1) Prerequisite: 
consent of the instructor. Individual investigation and 
exposition of the results. (Fall, Spring) 

CHEM 6682. Research Seminar. (1) Prerequisite: 
consent of the instructor. Individual investigation and 
exposition of the results. May be repeated for credit. (Fall, 
Spring) 

CHEM 6900. Research and Thesis. (1-16) Prerequisite: 
consent of the instructor overseeing thesis research. 
Laboratory research for the thesis. (Fall, Spring Summer) 

CHEM 7999. Graduate Residence. (1) Prerequisite: 
consent of the instructor overseeing thesis research. 
Required of all master's degree students who are working 
on a thesis but not enrolled in other graduate courses. 
(Fall, Spring) 

CHEM 8069. Topics in Biochemistry. (3) 

Prerequisites: CHEM 6165, or consent of instructor. 
Discussion of current topics in biochemistry emphasizing 
their biomedical/biotechnological aspects from 
bioinorganic chemistry, bioorganic chemistry, 
bioanalytical chemistry, biophysical chemistry, 
biocomputational chemistry, biomaterials. May be 
repeated for credit. Three lecture hours per week. (Spring) 



CHEM 8101. Biochemical Principles. (3) 

Prerequisites: Admission to Ph.D. program or consent of 
instructor. Molecular biophysics of biological molecules. 
Bioenergetics of biological reactions and enzyme 
structure, mechanisms, and regulation. Metabolic 
pathways and the role of cellular organelles. Biochemical 
analysis methodology. Twenty-three two-hour lectures. 
(Fall) 

CHEM 8147. Molecular Photochemistry & 
Photophysics. (3) Prerequisite: Admission to graduate 
program or consent of instructor. An investigation of the 
excited states of organic molecules and the photophysics 
governing the transitions between these states both 
radiative and nonradiative. Topics include electronic 
orbitals, absorption, emission, potential energy surfaces, 
energy transfer, photophysical radiationless transitions, 
singlet oxygen and chemiluminescent organic reactions. 
In this course each student will develop and demonstrate 
a photochemistry laboratory experiment that illustrates a 
principle or problem, or new direction of photochemistry. 
Three lecture hours per week. (Alternate years) 

CHEM 8155. Polymer Synthesis. (3) Prerequisite: 
Admission to Ph.D. program or consent of instructor. 
Polymer structure, classification of polymerization 
reactions, theory and practice of step growth 
polymerization, radical, ionic and ring opening 
polymerizations, polymerization by transition metal 
catalysts. Recent advances in polymer synthesis. The 
course will require a "Research Proposal". This will 
include a presentation in class as well as a ten page 
prospectus style manuscript. Three lecture hours per 
week. (On demand) 

CHEM 8165. Advanced Biochemistry. (3) 

Prerequisites: CHEM 8101, BIOL 8102, 8103, 8104. 
Advanced course on protein structure, enzyme and 
mechanistic biochemistry, metabolic biochemistry, 
biophysical chemistry. Three lecture hours per week. 
(Spring) 



COGNITIVE SCIENCE 

Department of Psychology 

http://www.uncc.edu/cognisci/ 

Degree 

Graduate Certificate 

Coordinator: 

Paula Goolkasian, Professor of Psychology 

Graduate Faculty 

Boyd Davis, Professor of English 

Bei-Tseng (Bill) Chu, Professor of Software and 

Information Systems 



68 College of Arts and Sciences 



Marvin Croy, Associate Professor of Philosophy 
George Demakis, Assistant Professor of Psychology 
Mark Faust, Assistant Professor of Psychology 
Paul Foos, Professor of Psychology 
Jane Gaultney, Associate Professor of Psychology 
Paula Goolkasian, Professor of Psychology 
Mirsad Hadzikadic, Dean, College of Information 
Technology 

Larry F. Hodges, Chair and Professor of Computer 
Science 

Tony Jackson, Associate Professor of English 
Susan Johnson, Associate Professor of Psychology 
Yogendra Kakad, Professor of Electical and Computer 
Engineering 

Kayvan Najarian, Assistant Professor of Computer 
Science 

Anita Raja, Assistant Professor of Software and 
Information Systems 

Alan Rauch, Associate Professor of English 
Ralf Thiede, Associate Professor of English 
Lori Van Wallendael, Associate Professor of Psychology 
David Wilson, Assistant Professor of Software and 
Information Systems 
Jing Xiao, Professor of Computer Science 



GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN 
COGNITIVE SCIENCE 

The Cognitive Science Certificate Program will offer 
graduate students an opportunity for an interdisciplinary 
program of study. Their training will focus on an 
understanding of human cognitive processes and the 
means by which complex mental processes can be 
modeled or simulated by artificial systems. Cognitive 
science is a dynamic and rapidly evolving field that studies 
intelligent systems by synthesizing the knowledge and 
methodology from the fields of cognitive psychology, 
artificial intelligence, linguistics, philosophy of mind and 
cognitive neuroscience. Students will be provided with 
the conceptual framework and the technical skills 
necessary to enhance careers in research, teaching, 
business or government. Students completing the 
program will add an interdisciplinary perspective to the 
training received in their major, better preparing them for 
employment or further study in a variety of sciences and 
social sciences. The certificate may be pursued 
concurrently with another graduate degree program at 
UNC Charlotte. 

Additional Admission Requirements 

The certificate program is open to all students who hold a 
bachelor's degree from an accredited university and 
either: 

1) are enrolled and in good standing in a graduate 
degree program at UNC Charlotte, or 

2) have a minimum GPA of 3.0 for their undergraduate 
courses. 



Application for the Cognitive Science Certificate Program 
is made through the Office of Graduate Admissions. 

Certificate Requirements 

The Cognitive Science Certificate Program involves 15 
hours of coursework. Students must take the required 
introductory course and at least two of the disciplinary 
courses. The remaining hours may come from any of the 
other topics courses listed. A cumulative GPA of 3.0 will 
be required and at most one course with a grade of C may 
be allowed toward the certificate. 

Required 

PSYC/ITCS/ITIS 6216 Introduction to Cognitive 
Science 

Disciplinary courses (Must take at least two) 
PSYC6116 Cognition 

ENG5263 Linguistics and Language Learning 
PHIL6050 Philosophy of Mind 
ITCS6150 Intelligent Systems 

Topics 

ENG6070 Semiotics & Interpretation of Signs 
PSYC6015 Topics in Perception & Physiological 

Psychology, 
PSYC5316 Cognitive Neuroscience 
PSYC61 1 5 Sensation and Perception 
PSYC6102 Research Design and Quantitative 

Methods 
ITCS5 1 5 1 Intelligent Robotics 
ITCS51 52 Computer Vision 
ITCS61 53 Neural Networks 
ITCS6156 Machine Learning 
ITCS6010 Topics: Virtual Reality 
ITCS6170 Logic for AI 
ITCS6158 Natural Language Processing 
ECGR5196 Introduction to Robotics 
ECGR6 102 Optimization of Engineering Designs 
ECGR6266/ECGR8266 Neural Networks Theory 

and Design 
CEGR5181 Human Factors in Traffic Engineering 
Topics, seminars, or other courses in the cognitive 

sciences approved by the Program 

Coordinator. 



Courses In Cognitive Science 

CEGR 5181. Human Factors in Traffic Engineering. 

(3) Study of the driver's and pedestrian's relationship 
with the traffic system, including roadway, vehicle and 
environment. Consideration of the driving task, driver 
and pedestrian characteristics, performance and 
limitations with regard to traffic facility design and 
operation. 

ECGR 5196. Introduction To Robotics. (3) 

Prerequisites: ECGR 2103 or MEGR 2101 and senior 
standing. Modeling of industrial robots including 



College of Arts and Sciences 69 



homogeneous transformations, kinematics, velocities, 
static forces, dynamics, computer animation of dynamic 
models, motion trajectory planning, and introduction to 
vision, sensors and actuators (dual-listed with MEGR 
4127). (Fall) 

ECGR 6102. Optimization of Engineering Designs. 

(3) Prerequisite: ECGR 5101 or consent of department. 
The development of computationally feasible algorithms 
for solving optimization problems in engineering designs. 
Introduction to non-linear programming methods; study 
of constrained and unconstrained problems, linear 
programming problems and other related topics. (On 
demand) 

ECGR 6266/ 8266. Neural Networks Theory and 
Design. (3) Topics include: Neural network model and 
network architectures; single layers, multiple layers 
network, perceptron learning rules; supervised hebian 
learning; performance optimization; widrow hoff 
learning; backpropagation; associative learning; 
competitive learning; grossberg network; Hopfield 
network; application of neural network. (On demand) 

ENGL 5263. Linguistics and Language Learning. (3) 

Readings in, discussions of, and application of 
linguistically oriented theories of language acquisition, 
directed toward gaining an understanding of language- 
learning processes and stages. (Yearly) 

ENGL 6070. Topics in English. (3) Selected topics of 
literature and language. May be repeated for credit as 
topics vary and with English Department approval. (Fall, 
Spring) 

ITCS 5151. Intelligent Robotics. (3) Prerequisites: 
ITCS 1215 and MATH 2164, or consent of the 
Department. General introduction to spatial descriptions 
and transformations, and manipulator position and 
motion. More study on robot planning, programming, 
sensing, vision, and CAD/CAM. (Odd, spring) (Evenings) 

ITCS 5152. Computer Vision. (3) Prerequisites: ITCS 
1215 or MATH 2164, or consent of the Department. 
General introduction to Computer Vision and its 
application. Topics include low level vision, 2D and 3D 
segmentation, 2D description, 2D recognition, 3D 
description and model-based recognition, and 
interpretation. (Odd, Spring) (Evenings) 

ITCS 6153. Neural Networks. (3) Prerequisites: ITCS 
6114. Topics include: Basic notions and models of 
artificial neural nets; single layer neural classifiers; 
multilayer one-way neural nets; single layer feedback 
networks; neural models of associative memory; self 
organizing neural nets; translation between neural 
networks and knowledge bases; applications of neural 
networks. (Even, Fall) (Evenings) 



ITCS 6156. Machine Learning. (3) Prerequisite: ITCS 
6150 or consent of the department. Machine learning 
methods and techniques including: acquisition of 
declarative knowledge; organization of knowledge into 
new, more effective representations; development of new 
skills through instruction and practice; and discovery of 
new facts and theories through observation and 
experimentation. (On demand) 

ITCS 6010. Topics in Computer Science. (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of the department. Topics in 
computer science selected to supplement the regular 
course offerings. May be repeated for credit as topics 
vary. (On demand) 

ITCS 6170. Logic for Artificial Intelligence. (3) 

Prerequisite: ITCS 6150 or consent of the department. 
Introduction to basic concepts of logic for artificial 
intelligence, including declarative knowledge, inference, 
resolution, non-monotonic reasoning, induction, 
reasoning with uncertain beliefs, distributed information 
systems, intelligent information systems, planning and 
intelligent-agent architecture. (On demand) 

ITCS 6150. Intelligent Systems. (3) Prerequisites: full 
graduate standing or consent of the department. To 
introduce core ideas in AI. Heuristic versus algorithmic 
methods; problem solving; game playing and decision 
making; automatic theorem proving; pattern recognition; 
adaptive learning; projects to illustrate theoretical 
concepts. (Fall) (Evenings) 

ITCS 6158. Natural Language Processing. (3) 

Prerequisite: ITCS 6150. Principles, methodologies, and 
programming methods of natural language processing 
including foundations of natural language understanding, 
namely: lexical, syntactic, and semantic analysis, discourse 
integration, and pragmatic and morphological analysis. 
(On demand) 

PHIL 6050 - Philosophy of Mind . (3) This course 
addresses questions concerning the relationship between 
body and mind, the existence of other minds, the nature 
of consciousness, and the architecture of cognition. 
Approaches to these questions include traditional 
philosophical sources (emphasizing metaphysics and 
epistemology) and more recent developments in cognitive 
science (including the computational model of mind, 
mental representation,connectionist systems, and artificial 
intelligence). Also addressed are ethical and social issues 
involved in the design and implementation of intelligent 
systems. (Yearly) 

PSYC 5316. Cognitive Neuroscience. (3) Prerequisite: 
graduate standing or permission of the instructor. 
Biological basis of consciousness and the neurobiology of 
mental processes by which we perceive, act, learn, and 
remember; representation of mental processes from 
electrophysiological and brain imaging techniques, clinical 
neurology, and computational science. (Alternate Years) 



70 College of Arts and Sciences 



PSYC 6015. Topics in Perception and Physiological 
Psychology. (3) An examination of selected topics in the 
areas of sensation and perception, physiological and 
neuropsychology, with an emphasis on the applications to 
the areas of clinical, community, and industrial 
psychology. May be repeated for credit with the 
permission of department. (Alternate years) 

PSYC 6102. Research Design and Quantitative 
Methods in Psychology. (3) Prerequisites: MATH 1222 
and PSYC 2102 or equivalent. Experimental and 
correlational methods of psychological research, including 
single subject designs with emphasis on research design 
and the application of statistical methods to psychological 
research. (Fall) 

PSYC 6115. Sensation and Perception. (3) Processes 
involved in receiving and interpreting sensory data 
including all the sensory systems with an emphasis on 
vision. (On Demand) 

PSYC 6116. Cognition. (3) Concerned with how 
humans acquire information, retain information in 
memory, and use this information to reason and solve 
problems. Current emphases include memory, category 
learning, planning, concept formation, problem solving, 
mental models, and knowledge representation. (Alternate 
Years) 

PSYC 6216/ITCS 6216/ITIS 6216. Introduction to 
Cognitive Science. (3) This course presents multiple 
perspectives on the study of intelligent systems. Broad 
coverage of such topics as philosophy of mind; human 
memory processes; reasoning and problem solving; 
artificial intelligence; language processing (human and 
machine); neural structures and processes; and vision. 
Also included is participation in the cognitive science 
seminar (Same as ITCS 6216, and ITIS 6216) (Fall 
Semester) 



COMMUNICATION 
STUDIES 

Department of Communication Studies 

5000 Colvard North 

704-687-4005 

www.uncc.edu/gradmiss/comsma.htm 

Degree 

M.A., Certificate 

Coordinator 

Dr. Barbara DeSanto, APR, Fellow PRSA 



Graduate Faculty- 
Jonathan Crane, Associate Professor 
Cristine Davis, Assistant Professor 
Barbara DeSanto, Associate Professor 
Robert John DeSanto, Adjunct Professor 
Kirk Duthler, Assistant Professor 
Alan Freitag, Associate Professor 
Heather Gallardo, Assistant Professor 
Dan Grano, Assistant Professor 
Bill Hill, Professor 
Richard Leeman, Professor 
Shawn Long, Assistant Professor 
Clifton Scott, Assistant Professor 



MASTER OF ARTS IN 
COMMUNICATION 

The Master of Arts in Communication Studies is designed 
to provide advanced study in the communication 
discipline, particularly in the areas of organizational 
communication, critical media and rhetorical studies, 
health communication, and public relations. All studies 
emphasize the ability to understand and analyze 
communication practices in different environments in the 
21 st Century. The curriculum is broad-based and is a 
balance of theory and application to practice. 

Additional Admission Requirements 

Students must meet all of the Graduate School 
requirements, including earning an acceptable score on 
the Graduate Record Examination and submit three 
letters of recommendation and a strong personal essay 
outlining their reasons for pursuing a master's degree. 

Degree Requirements 

The Master of Arts degree program requires the 
completion of thirty (30) credit hours of graduate work. 
All students, regardless of orientation and area of study, 
must complete two core courses: COMM 6101 
Communication Theory and COMM 6100 
Communication Research Methods within the first three 
semesters of work in the program. All students then 
complete twelve (12) hours of elective course work in 
Communication Studies, six (6) credit hours of approved 
study in a cognate area. Students writing a thesis or doing 
a directed project earn their final six (6) credit hours with 
these research-based activities. Students electing to sit for 
the comprehensive examination instead of writing a thesis 
or conducting a directed project finish up their final six 
(6) hours with two more elective classes, as the 
comprehensive examination carries no credit with it. 
No more than six (6) credit hours may be taken at 5000 
level. Successful completion of the degree requires a 
minimum GPA of 3.0. 

Post-Baccalaureate Study 

The Department does allow students to take up to six (6) 
credit hours as a baccalaureate student; students must 



College of Arts and Sciences 71 



follow the Graduate School guidelines for application for 
this status. Students are encouraged to meet with the 
Graduate Coordinator as soon as possible after registering 
as a post-baccalaureate student to discuss application 
procedures and program options. 

Admission to Candidacy Requirements 

The official candidacy form must be filed by the 
following deadlines before graduation materials can be 
processed by the Graduate School. Students are 
responsible for securing the proper forms and meeting 
the filing deadlines set by the Graduate School for each 
semester. The candidacy form is available from the 
Graduate School and must be filed with the Graduate 
School. 

Assistantships 

The Department has four regular research/teaching 
assistantships available on a competitive basis to qualified 
students. Students must complete an assistantship 
application (available from the Graduate Coordinator) 
and return it to the Department for consideration as a 
graduate assistant. This form is available to students 
upon formal acceptance into the program. Out-of-state 
students from the sixteen (16) Southeastern U.S. states 
region opting for the International Public Relations 
concentration are also eligible to apply for Academic 
Common Market (ACM) program, which provides 
financial assistance in various forms, including in-state 
tuition consideration and assistantships, based on 
availability of funds. 

Core Courses 

COMM 6100 Communication Research Methods 
COMM 6101 Contemporary Viewpoints in 
Communication Theory 

Area Descriptions 

Organizational Communication 

Organizational communication focuses on the various 
ways individuals influence and are influenced by 
organizations and their members. Work in organizational 
communication is concerned with organizational culture 
and symbolism, interpersonal and group communication, 
change communication, globalization, mediated 
communication, leader communication, structural 
concerns of organizational communication, and critical 
analysis of organizational communication. 

Media/Rhetorical Critical Studies 

Graduate study of the mass media at UNC Charlotte 
concentrates on applied and critical research on the 
organization and effects of media industries and new 
media technologies. Areas of study include persuasion 
and popular culture, computer-mediated persuasion, 
computer-mediated communication, and the rhetoric of 
spectator sport. 



Health Communication 

Health communication is a field of study offering 
students a better understanding of the communication 
within a health context. This includes, but is not limited 
to, provider-patient interaction, the creation, promotion, 
and influence of health information, social and 
community health issues, organizational issues, media 
issues, and interpersonal health communication. 

Public Relations 

The focus of public relations is on building and 
maintaining internal and external relationships with 
entities essential to an organization's success, including 
entities such as media, activist groups, community groups, 
and regulators. The focus of UNC Charlotte's program is 
on public relations management, especially in the areas of 
issues tracking, corporate communication, crisis 
communication, not-for-profit communication, and 
international public relations efforts. One strand of the 
public relations track includes the opportunity to study 
public relations at a partner university outside the U.S. for 
a semester through the Academic Common Market 
program. 

Advising 

Upon formal acceptance, all graduate students must meet 
with the Graduate Coordinator to file a proposed plan of 
study in the department and become familiar with the 
department's expectations. As students progress through 
their program of study, the Graduate Coordinator will 
assist them in selecting a suitable advisor and committee 
members for the thesis or directed project options. 

Capstone Experiences 

Students choose among three (3) options for their 
capstone experience: writing a thesis (6 credit hours); 
designing and conducting a directed project (6 credit 
hours); or taking the comprehensive examination (Ocredit 
hours). 

Thesis 

A thesis is a written research document incorporating 
original research in a student's area of interest. Students 
select a thesis committee chair and two committee 
members and submit a proposal to them. The written 
thesis is defended before the thesis chair and committee 
members in the semester the student graduates. A thesis 
must be written and defended within six (6) calendar 
years after admission into the Communication Studies 
master's program. 

Directed Project 

A directed project is an applied research document 
involving research and application to a real world 
problem or opportunity. Students select a directed 
project chair and two committee members and submit a 
project to them. The completed project is presented to 
the directed project chair and committee members in the 
semester the student graduates. A directed project must 
be successfully completed and presented within six (6) 



72 College of Arts and Sciences 



calendar years after admission into the Communication 
Studies master's program. 

Comprehensive Examination 

The comprehensive examination is a four-hour written 
examination covering communication theory, 
communication research methods, and a third 
comprehensive area in communication. Students opting 
to take the comprehensive examination should indicate 
their intention to the Graduate Coordinator in the 
semester previous to the one in which they plan to sit for 
the examination. The examination itself carries no credit 
hours; students selecting this option must take six (6) 
additional credit hours to reach the thirty (30) hour credit 
requirement. These six credits may be taken in 
Communication Studies or a related department with the 
Graduate Coordinator's approval. The comprehensive 
examination must be successfully completed within the 
six (6) year master's time limit for degree completion. 

Application for Degree 

All degree application forms and deadlines are available 
from the Graduate School. 



GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN 
COMMUNICATION 

The Graduate Certificate in Communication is designed 
to provide advanced study in the field of communication. 
The program emphasizes the ability to understand and 
analyze communication practices in the 21 st century. The 
curriculum is broad based, and includes opportunities to 
study the theory and practice of communication in the 
areas of organizational communication, public relations, 
mass media, and health communication. 

Additional Admission Requirements 

GRE, personal statement, three letters of 
recommendation. 

Certificate Requirements 

Fifteen (1 5) credit hours in graduate communication 
courses, including COMM 6100 Communication 
Research Methods and COMM 6101 Contemporary 
Viewpoints in Communication Theory, with no more 
than six (6) credit hours at the 5000 level are required. 

Core Courses 

COMM 6100 Communication Research Methods 
COMM 6101 Contemporary Viewpoints in 
Communication Theory 

Advising 

All incoming students are advised by the Graduate 
Coordinator. Students are free to designate another 
graduate faculty member of the Department of 
Communication Studies as their advisor of record. 



Courses in Communication 

COMM 5000. Topics in Communication Studies. (3) 

Timely and important areas relevant to communication 
studies. May be repeated for credit with permission of the 
graduate advisor. (On demand) 

COMM 5101. Media and the Law. (3) Survey of legal 
rights, restrictions, and ethical considerations in field of 
communication including the First Amendment, libel, 
invasion of privacy, obscenity law, regulation of electronic 
media, relationships between media and judiciary. (Fall, 
Spring) 

COMM 5102. Federal Interpretation of the First 
Amendment. (3) In-depth case analysis of tests 
determining Constitutional boundaries of expression 
including clear and present danger, prior restraints, 
fighting words/symbolic speech, strict scrutiny, obscenity, 
indecency. (On demand) 

COMM 5141. Advanced Organizational 
Communication. (3) Critical examination of the 
communication practices of organizations which 
accomplish such tasks as establishing organizational 
identification, influencing organizational members, and 
making decisions. Includes application of research 
methods to assess and analyze an organization's 
communication practices. (Fall, Spring) 

COMM 5147. London Seminar in International 
Public Relations (3/3). 

Course examines the complexities of public relations 
practice in an international setting. The seminar is taught 
by UNC Charlotte faculty at Regent's College in London 
for four weeks each summer, from mid-May through 
mid-June. The agenda begins with an overview of the 
factors that complicate communication across cultures 
and borders, then examines how those factors affect 
public relations practice in specific global regions. 
Principles acquired during this course will aid in 
improving international and cross-cultural public relations 
practice, and contribute to success in any profession. The 
seminar includes participation as guest speakers by 
London-based practitioners as well as visits to UK 
organizations relevant to international PR practice. 
(Annually) 

COMM 6000. Topics in Communication Studies. (3) 

Intensive investigation of a timely and important topic in 
communication studies. The topic of investigation may 
vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for 
credit with permission of graduate advisor. (On demand, 
Evenings) 

COMM 6100. Communication Research Methods. 

(3) Methods for systematic investigation of 
communication behavior. Theoretical and practical 
applications of both qualitative and quantitative research 



College of Arts and Sciences 73 



methodologies are utilized for completion of original 
projects. (Spring Evenings) 

COMM 6101. Contemporary Viewpoints in 
Communication Theory. (3) A survey of the leading 
theoretical traditions in communication studies. Covers 
both qualitative and quantitative approaches to 
conceptualizing communication practices. (Fall, Evenings) 

COMM 6110. Advanced Persuasion. (3) Analysis of 
theories of persuasion as a mode of social influence. 
Focus on the understanding and analysis of how 
persuasion works in various communicative contexts 
including mass-mediated, public relations, organizations 
and public advocacy. (On demand, Evenings) 

COMM 6120. Communication and Network Society. 

(3) Examines the social dynamics arising from the global 
embrace of revolutionary communication technologies. 
Topics include the forces that shape new information 
flows and the effects emergent technologies exert across 
nations, local communities and individuals. (On demand, 
Evenings) 

COMM 6121. Communication and the Internet. (3) 

This course considers the Internet as a social, cultural and 
political phenomenon. It will study and debate the 
competing visions of how the Internet does, can and 
should play a role in reshaping society. It will explore how 
the computer and network technologies shape 
communities as well as individual identities. The course 
will also address questions of law and public policy 
connected to issues of access, intellectual property and 
censorship. (On demand, Evenings) 

COMM 6130. Textual Analysis. (3) The application of 
qualitative methods of language and rhetorical analysis to 
communication artifacts. The course uses a seminar 
approach to learn close textual analysis. Methodologies 
include dramatism, situational analysis, genre, metaphor, 
perspectival and postmodern paradigms. (On demand, 
Evenings) 

COMM 6141. Organizational Communication Case 
Studies. (3) Communication theories are applied to real 
and fictional organizational cases. Topics such as culture, 
diversity, change, networks, and diffusion of innovations 
are examined from a communication perspective. (Yearly, 
Evenings) 

COMM 6142. Seminar in Organizational 
Communication. (3) Using a seminar approach, this 
course surveys the theoretical approaches to the study of 
organizational behavior from a communication 
perspective. The course particularly focuses on issues of 
communication, roles and leadership. (On demand, 
Evenings) 



concepts of how communication and technologies 
interact to shape organizational structures and 
communication processes. (On demand, Evenings) 

COMM 6145. Communication Campaign 
Management. (3) A blending of theory and application 
to public relations/communication campaigns. The 
application dimension stresses mastery of the technical 
aspects of the campaign: research, problem-solving, 
planning, evaluation, and teamwork. The theoretical 
dimension stresses the study of actual campaigns and 
formulating generalizations regarding their successes or 
shortcomings. Class members serve on account teams 
with the instructor as manager. Account teams represent 
real-world clients and prepare a campaign book for the 
client's later implementation. (Yearly, Evenings) 

COMM 6146. Media Relations. (3) This course will 
draw on academic and professional research to study the 
communication strategies and tactics associated with 
establishing and maintaining effective relations between 
public relations practitioners and the media. (Yearly, 
Evenings) 

COMM 6170. Communication Law and Policy. (3) 

Survey of legal rights, legal restrictions, and policy 
developments governing public communication in the 
United States. (On demand) (Evenings) 

COMM 6995. Directed Project in Communication. 

(3 or 6) May be repeated by permission of the Graduate 
Coordinator, if taken for three hours credit. Six hours of 
Directed Project may be taken during a single semester. 
Design, implementation, presentation and evaluation of 
an approved applied research project in student's specialty 
area. The Directed Project is of the student's own design 
under the supervision of a research advisory committee. 
(On demand) 

COMM 6999. M.A. Thesis. (3 or 6) May be repeated by 
permission of the Graduate Coordinator, if taken for 
three hours credit. Six hours of Thesis may be taken 
during a single semester. Appropriate research and 
written exposition of that research is required. The Thesis 
is proposed and defended under the supervision of a 
research advisory committee. (On demand) 

COMM 7999. Master's Degree Thesis Residence. (1) 

Required for continuing registration and enrollment while 
completing the Thesis or Directed Project. May be 
repeated with permission of the Graduate Coordinator. 
(On demand) 



COMM 6143. Organizations and Communication 
Technology. (3) This course studies the theories and 



74 College of Arts and Sciences 



CRIMINAL JUSTICE 

Department of Criminal Justice 

226 Garinger Building 
704-687-2563 

Degree 

M.S. 

Coordinator 

Dr. Michael G. Turner 

Graduate Faculty 

Bruce Arrigo, Professor 
Beth Bjerregaard, Associate Professor 
Anita Blowers, Associate Professor 
Charisse Coston, Associate Professor 
Charles Dean, Professor Emeritus 
M. Lyn Exum, Assistant Professor 
Paul C. Friday, Professor 
Jennifer Hartman, Assistant Professor 
David Hirschel, Professor Emeritus 
Joseph B. Kuhns III, Assistant Professor 
Vivian Lord, Associate Professor 
Kathleen Nicolaides, Senior Lecturer 
Michael G. Turner, Assistant Professor 



MASTER OF SCIENCE IN 
CRIMINAL JUSTICE 

The Master of Science degree program in Criminal Justice 
is designed to promote broad based study of the 
phenomenon of crime and to enhance career 
opportunities in the field of criminal justice. The program 
utilizes the social and behavioral sciences in an 
interdisciplinary approach to study law, crime, and social 
deviance, and to examine critically the systems created in 
response to deviance and crime. The objectives of the 
program are to: (1) provide present and future criminal 
justice personnel with the educational background 
necessary to function effectively in the dynamic field of 
criminal justice; (2) familiarize students with the nature, 
methods, and functions of research, and with the existing 
body of knowledge on criminal justice; (3) provide the 
criminal justice system with qualified candidates for 
careers in the field; and (4) prepare students for entrance 
into doctoral programs. Career opportunities available in 
the criminal justice system include law enforcement, 
corrections, administration, planning and analysis, 
juvenile justice, and college instruction. There are also 
private sector careers available, including private security. 
Students may enroll in the program on either a full-time 
or part-time basis. Many classes are scheduled in the 
evening to accommodate the part-time student. 



Additional Admission Requirements 

Admission to the Criminal Justice graduate program is 
open to students with bachelor's degrees in any discipline 
who meet the general requirements for admission to the 
Graduate School, provided they meet the following 
requirements. Applicants must have a grade point average 
of at least 2.75, a satisfactory score on the Graduate 
Record Examination (GRE) or the Miller Analogies Test 
(MAT) , a personal statement, and strong 
recommendation letters from those who are able to attest 
to your academic ability. 

Degree Requirements 

A minimum of 36 semester hours is required. Eighteen of 
these 36 hours must be in courses open only to graduate 
students (6000 level and above). All students must 
complete each of the following five core courses with a 
grade of B or above: CJUS 6100 (Criminal Justice Policy); 
CJUS 6101 (The Nature and Theory of Crime); CJUS 
6102 (Research in Criminal Justice I); CJUS 6103 
(Research in Criminal Justice II); and CJUS 6104 
(Criminal Justice and Social Control). A maximum of 12 
hours may be taken outside the Criminal Justice 
Department, and a maximum of six hours with grades of 
B or above may be transferred from another institution. 
Transfer courses must be consistent with the program 
and will be accepted at the discretion of the department. 
At least 30 semester hours must be taken in residence. In 
addition to the above course work, all students are 
expected to successfully pass a qualifying exam. This 
exam is to be taken after the student has completed 12 
credit hours including 6101 & 6102. Students can not 
proceed to the thesis or the applied research project until 
after they have passes the qualifying examination. 
Additionally, students must complete either a thesis (6 
hours) or an applied research project (3 hours). 

Assistantships 

The Criminal Justice Department offers graduate 
assistantships which are awarded solely on the basis of 
academic merit. 

Financial Aid 

In addition to the graduate assistantships, the department 
offers, as available, research assistantships and grant- 
funded opportunities for students. In addition, the 
competitive Dean Reep Scholarship is available for an 
incoming graduate student each year. 

Qualifying Examination 

The qualifying examination is offered each Fall and 
Spring semester. Anyone who has successfully completed 
12 semester hours, including 6101 & 6102 with a B or 
above, is eligible to take the examination. The qualifying 
examination may be taken no more than two times. 



College of Arts and Sciences 75 



Courses in Criminal Justice 

CJUS 5000. Topics in Criminal Justice. (3) Specialized 
criminal justice topics. May be repeated for credit. (Fall, 
Spring) 

CJUS 5101. Drugs, Crime and the Criminal Justice 
System. (3) Provides an overview of the current state of 
drug use in this country and throughout the world and 
examines the nature and extent of drug use, the history of 
drug use/ abuse, contemporary drug use patterns, licit 
and illicit drug dealing and trafficking, crime and violence 
associated with drug use and drug markets, drug control 
strategies at the local, state, national and international 
level, treatment level, treatment options and alternatives, 
drug policy issues, legalization debates, and prevention 
strategies. (On demand) 

CJUS 5103. International Criminal Justice. (3) 

Examination of the patterns and trends in international 
crime such as terrorism, transnational organized crime, 
and trafficking in people and a review of how the legal 
traditions of common law, civil law, Islamic law and 
socialist legal systems are structured and function criminal 
justice systems of the United States and other nations. 
(On demand) 

CJUS 5160. Victims and the Criminal Justice System. 

(3) Relationship between victims of crime and the 
criminal justice system. Specific topics include an analysis 
of the characteristics of crime victims, victim reporting 
patterns, treatment of victims by the various segments of 
the criminal justice system, victim assistance programs, 
and the issue of compensation and/or restitution for 
victims of crime. (On demand) 

CJUS 5161. Violence and the Violent Offender. (3) 

Issues surrounding violence in today's society and their 
impact on offenders involved in homicide, child and 
domestic abuse, and other forms of violence. 
Examination of myths about violence, victim-offender 
characteristics and relationships, and theories of violence. 
(On demand) 

CJUS 5162. Sexual Assault. (3) Comprehensive and 
critical examination of sexual exploitation in the United 
States. (On demand) 

CJUS 6000. Topics in Criminal Justice. (3-6) 

Specialized criminal justice topics. May be repeated for 
credit. (On demand) 

CJUS 6100. Criminal Justice Policy. (3) Examination 
of the criminal justice subsystems (law enforcement, 
courts, corrections) with particular focus on the 
development of policy and the effectiveness of current 
policies aimed at reducing crime. (Fall) 

CJUS 6101. The Nature and Theory of Crime. (3) 

Definitions and patterns of criminal behavior. Major 



theoretical perspectives on crime, including historical, 
philosophical, individual, community-oriented and 
societal approaches. (Fall) 

CJUS 6102. Research in Criminal Justice I. (3) 

Introduction to research methodology and statistics with 
emphasis on applications to criminal justice settings. 
Topics to be covered include problem selection, theory, 
hypothesis formulation, research design, sampling, 
measurement and proposal writing. (Spring) 

CJUS 6103. Research in Criminal Justice II. (3) 

Prerequisite: CJUS 6102. Advanced research methodology 
with emphasis on conducting, presenting and evaluating 
research in criminal justice settings. Topics to be covered 
include data collection, data input, data analysis, and 
interpretation. (Fall) 

CJUS 6104. Criminal Justice and Social Control. (3) 

Examines how the law functions as a powerful tool of 
social control in our society. Particular emphasis is given 
to understanding the constitutional limitations placed on 
the construction of law, the elements of criminal offenses, 
and criminal defenses. (Spring) 

CJUS 6120. Criminal Justice Management and 
Decision-Making. (3) Application of generic principles 
of management and supervision to operational problems 
confronted by criminal justice agencies with particular 
attention to decision- making and discretion in criminal 
justice settings. (On demand) 

CJUS 6130. Law Enforcement Systems. (3) 

Consideration of the elements of law enforcement 
agencies as subsystems of the total criminal justice 
system. Comparisons of law enforcement systems in 
other countries is also considered. (On demand) 

CJUS 6131. Police Problems and Practices. (3) 

Research on current issues in law enforcement with 
emphasis on the legal, social, and institutional contexts in 
which they occur. (On demand) 

CJUS 6132. Legal Issues in Law Enforcement. (3) 

Law applicable to the functions of police administrators 
and line police officers including constitutional, statutory, 
judicial, and administrative law governing search and 
seizure, arrest, interrogation, use of force, jurisdiction, 
civil and criminal liability of administrators and officers, 
and the rights of officers and suspects. (On demand) 

CJUS 6140. Prosecution and Adjudication Processes. 

(3) Functions and powers of prosecutors, defense 
attorneys, judges and juries including plea bargaining and 
court procedure. (On demand) 

CJUS 6150. Corrections. (3) Functions of correctional 
agencies, principles of punishment and a historical 
analysis of correctional institutions and programs 



76 College of Arts and Sciences 



including prisons, jails, probation and parole systems. {On 
demand) 

CJUS 6151. Correctional Strategies: Rehabilitation 
and Reintegration. (3) Efforts to change offender 
behavior and to facilitate the development of offender- 
community linkages. Institutional classification and 
treatment strategies, pre-release and temporary release 
programs, innovative uses of probation and parole 
systems, community residential programs and new 
dispositional models; e.g., sentencing to community 
service and restitution. {On demand) 

CJUS 6152. Legal Issues in Corrections. (3) Major 
legal issues pertaining to corrections, including 
sentencing, probation, restitution, prisons, parole, pardon 
and restoration of rights with emphasis on legal issues 
often confronted by correctional administrators and 
probation and parole personnel. {On demand) 

CJUS 6160. Juvenile Justice Systems. (3) The process 
by which specific behaviors are identified as delinquent 
and the responses of the juvenile justice system to such 
behaviors. Laws dealing with the juvenile justice system, 
the historical development of the system, and the 
effectiveness of innovative responses to delinquency. {On 
demand) 

CJUS 6170. Program Planning and Evaluation in 
Criminal Justice. (3) Applied research as a foundation 
for criminal justice planning and evaluation. Emphasis on 
the interrelationship of planning and evaluation within 
program management. (On demand) 

CJUS 6800. Directed Individual Study in Criminal 
Justice. (1-6) supervised investigation of a criminal 
justice problem of special interest to the student. May be 
repeated one time with the approval of the student's 
major professor or academic committee. (Fall, Spring, 
Summer) 

CJUS 6901. Thesis I. (3) Students taking this course will 
work on developing a research proposal of a significant 
criminal justice topic approved by the student's thesis 
committee. The final proposal will include an extensive 
literature review and a detailed discussion of the research 
plan. Graded credit/no credit. (Fall, Spring, Summer) 

CJUS 6902. Thesis II. (3) Prerequisite: CJUS 6901. 
Students taking this course will conduct independent 
research developed in CJUS 6901, successfully defend the 
research in an oral defense meeting, and have the final 
written thesis approved by the graduate school. Graded 
credit/ no credit. {Fall, Spring Summer) 

CJUS 6903. The Applied Research Project. (3) 

Prerequisite: must pass the qualifying examination, have 
a research project and Human Subjects Approval, where 
necessary. Students will develop a major paper on a topic 
of criminal justice importance. It is designed to be 



completed within one semester. This project is typically 
designed for research in agencies within the community 
and must be successfully defended in an oral defense 
meeting. It is geared towards the terminal Masters student 
and not appropriate for those seeking the doctorate. 
Graded credit/no credit. (Fall, Spring Summer) 

CJUS 7999. Graduate Residence (1) Continuation of 
work for the thesis or comprehensive exam. (Fall, Spring 
Summer) 



EARTH SCIENCES 

Department of Geography and Earth 
Sciences 

448 McEniry Building 

704-687-2295 

http://wwwgeoearth.uncc.edu 

Degrees 

M.S. Earth Sciences 

Ph.D. Infrastructure and Environmental Systems (With 

the College of Engineering) 

Coordinator 

Dr. John F. Bender 

Graduate Faculty 

Craig Allan, Associate Professor 
John Bender, Professor 
Andy Bobyarchick, Associate Professor 
M. C. Eppes, Assistant Professor 
Brian Etherton, Assistant Professor 
John Diemer, Associate Professor 
Scott Hippensteel, Assistant Professor 
Walter Martin, Associate Professor 
Mark Thomasson, Assistant Professor 



MASTER OF SCIENCE IN EARTH 
SCIENCES 

The Department of Geography and Earth Sciences offers 
a Master of Science in Earth Sciences degree with 
opportunities for study and research in die areas of 
geology, hydrology, atmospheric science and 
environmental science. We also offer, in conjunction with 
the College of Engineering, a Ph.D. in Infrastructure and 
Environmental Systems (INES). Please see the Inter- 
College Graduate Programs section of this Catalog for a 
complete description of die requirements for die INES 
Ph.D. 

Our combined Geography and Earth Sciences 
Department offers Earth Sciences graduate students 
personal guidance typical of a relatively small department, 



College of Arts and Sciences 77 



with the field, laboratory, GIS and cartographic facilities 
and resources that accompany a much larger Earth 
Sciences department. Within this context, you will find a 
healthy combination of both field- and model-based 
Earth Sciences research as well as applied and academic 
research opportunities. 

Our Earth Sciences faculty offer classes and are active in 
specific research areas that include surface and 
groundwater hydrology, vadose zone processes, 
geochemistry, marine geology and volcanology, 
biogeochemistry, mineralogy, structural geology, remote 
sensing, soil science, Quaternary geology, surficial 
processes, fluvial processes and depositional 
environments, clastic and carbonate sedimentology, basin 
analysis, stratigraphy, coastal geology, paleoecology, 
macro- and micropaleontology, environmental geology, 
hydrology and sedimentology, applied climatology, and 
numerical weather prediction and tropical meteorology. 

The program is designed to address a range of student 
needs and to be completed in two years of full-time study. 
Graduates of the program will employ their expertise in a 
wide variety of activities and will be prepared for careers 
such as environmental consultants, geologists in the 
energy and mining industries, regulators in governmental 
agencies, students in doctoral programs, and earth science 
teachers in secondary schools. The M.S. in Earth Sciences 
prepares students for admission to traditional Geology 
and Earth Science Ph.D. programs as well as 
interdisciplinary Ph.D. programs such as Infrastructure 
and Environmental Systems. 

Please refer to the Department of Geography and Earth 
Sciences Graduate Handbook for more details on 
deadlines and procedures. 

Additional Admission Requirements 

It is the policy of the Department to provide equal 
opportunities to all students regardless of race, creed, 
color, sex, or national origin. The Department requires 
applicants to demonstrate evidence of suitability for the 
program. 

All applications for admission are reviewed by the Earth 
Sciences Graduate Committee. The Department admits 
applicants on a competitive basis as space in the program 
allows. 

1) Grade Point Average (GPA): The Department 
expects an overall GPA of at least 2.75 (3.0 for junior 
and senior years). However, exceptions may be made 
if the other elements of the application are strong. 

2) Letters of Recommendation: Three letters of 
reference are required. Letters from college or 
university teachers who have worked with and/or 
taught applicants are preferred. These letters are 
evaluated on the basis of how well the applicant is 
suited in terms of intellect, preparation and 
motivation to perform graduate work. 



3) Persona] Essays: Applicants must write a personal 
essay which directly addresses reasons for the desire 
to conduct graduate work in earth sciences as well as 
the desire to participate in the M.S. program at UNC 
Charlotte. Applicants should comment on their 
expectations regarding the benefits of an M.S. in 
Earth Sciences. Lastly, applicants should address 
directly how the program at UNC Charlotte fits their 
career and/or professional goals and how they would 
benefit from and contribute to the M.S. in Earth 
Sciences at UNC Charlotte. The essay is very 
important in determining the applicant's 
commitment to graduate education and to a 
professional career in earth sciences or a related field. 
Careful preparation of the essay is time well spent. 

4) Scores on the Graduate Record Exam: In general the 
Department expects minimum scores of 1000 on the 
combined verbal and quantitative portions of the 
Graduate Record Exam. Lower scores will not 
automatically exclude applicants if the remainder of 
the applicant's file is strong. 

5) Transcripts of College Course Work: The transcripts 
are evaluated on the basis of performance in a range 
of earth sciences, physical sciences and mathematics 
courses in order to determine the applicant's 
preparation for graduate level course work. 

Additional Requirements for International Applicants: 
Applicants whose native language is not English must 
score at least 557 (paper based) or 220 (computer based) 
on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). 

Prerequisite Requirements 

Minimum Requirements for Students Entering the 

Program: 

All prospective graduate students must demonstrate 
competence in undergraduate subject matter in their area 
of study. While the Department does not require that 
applicants have a degree in Earth Sciences, prospective 
graduate students should provide evidence that they are 
prepared to immediately take full advantage of graduate 
level course work in Earth Sciences. 

Students applying to the program should, at a minimum, 
be familiar with the concepts and materials offered in 
courses such as: Physical Geography, Physical Geology, 
Earth History, Introductory Chemistry, Introductory 
Physics, and calculus-based Mathematics. These courses 
or their equivalents are required for admission to the 
UNC Charlotte M.S. in Earth Sciences program. Courses 
in Computer Sciences are also considered important. Any 
student wishing to pursue additional training in 
Geographic Information Systems (GIS) should have basic 
cartography preparation and computer file management 
and data base skills. 

All decisions concerning the equivalency of courses in an 
applicant's transcript to those listed as minimum 
requirements for entry in the M.S. in Earth Sciences are 
the responsibility of the Graduate Committee and the 
Department Chair. 



78 College of Arts and Sciences 



Assistantships 

Assistantships are much like a part-time job for the 
student. As we try to find work settings that fit the 
student's academic interest, these assistantships can also 
offer valuable training opportunities and work experience. 
The nature of a research assistantship depends entirely on 
the needs of the supervising faculty member. Teaching 
assistantships are assigned on the basis of the student's 
academic background. 

Graduate assistantships are arranged for either one entire 
semester or for an entire academic year (2 semesters or 9 
months). They are normally scheduled for 16 weeks per 
semester and the student is expected to work 20 hours 
per week. The Department makes every effort to provide 
funding to every full-time student in the program. 

Degree Requirements 

The program requires a minimum of 36 hours of graduate 
credit. Up to six graduate credits may be accepted as 
transfer credit. Only courses with grades of A or B earned 
at an accredited university are eligible. Transfer credits are 
not automatic and require the approval of the Graduate 
Coordinator and the Graduate School. The amount of 
transfer credit may not exceed the limit set by the 
Graduate School (6 hours). 

A student is expected to achieve A's or B's in all course 
work taken for graduate credit and must have at least an 
average of B (3.0) in order to graduate. A grade of "C" in 
any course will result in the student being placed on 
academic probation. An accumulation of more than two 
marginal "C" grades will result in suspension of the 
student's enrollment in the graduate program. A grade of 
"U" will result in the immediate suspension of that 
student's enrollment in the graduate program. 
Readmission to the program would require approval of 
the Graduate Coordinator, Department Chair and Dean 
of the Graduate School. 

The student must complete at least 18 of the 36 credit 
hours in courses at the 6000-level or above. Of these at 
least nine credits will consist of 6000-level applied 
research. Students can select one of three options: 1) a 9- 
credit research thesis; 2) a community /industry based 9- 
credit internship; or 3) two faculty directed research 
projects ranging from 3 to 6 credits each. Students also 
must pass a two-part comprehensive examination 
covering 1) general aspects of the Earth Sciences 
discipline, and 2) a defense of one research project before 
receiving the M.S. degree. 

Elective Courses 

We anticipate that students will select electdves from 
among civil engineering, biology, chemistry, physics and 
geography courses in support of particular emphases 
within our program. For example, certain geotechnology 
or waste disposal courses in Civil Engineering may be 
appropriate for the student pursuing problems in 



environmental earth sciences. Students examining the 
interaction of geology and the biosphere may include 
ecology or botany courses in the Biology Department or 
organic chemistry courses in the Chemistry Department 
in their program of study. 

Advising 

Upon admission to the program each student is assigned 
an initial faculty advisor from the student's declared area 
of interest. This advisor guides the student through the 
design and implementation of a program of study tailored 
to the student's specific needs and career goals. The 
advisor generally is available to the student for advice on 
academic and other problems. Students must confer with 
their advisors regularly concerning academic matters. 

Once the student has become familiar with the program 
and the faculty, it is possible to change advisors by 
obtaining prior approval from the faculty member with 
whom the student wishes to work. Advisors are chosen to 
match, as nearly as possible, the student's academic and 
career interests. No student will be allowed to register for 
classes without the signature of his/her advisor. 

All students are required to formulate a complete plan for 
their M.S. after completion of 18 hours. This plan will 
include at a minimum the names of the student's thesis or 
internship committee members, or the names of faculty 
sponsoring the directed studies, a plan of study for 
coursework that will be completed during the degree, and 
a brief proposal of the research project(s). The course of 
study and the research proposal(s) must be approved by 
the student's research committee as well as the Earth 
Sciences Graduate Coordinator, and serves as a guide to 
their course of study and research while at UNC 
Charlotte. 

Committees 

All final research projects are evaluated by a faculty 
committee known as the research committee. Research 
committees must have a minimum of three members 
composed of the graduate faculty of the Department or 
associated departments. Additional members are 
acceptable and in many cases outside members, other 
departments, or internship coordinators from off-campus 
agencies are advisable. 

Concentration Descriptions and Courses 

Concentrations are designed to aid in the focus of study 
for students who have clear ideas of the direction that 
they foresee taking in the future. The concentrations are 
Solid Earth Sciences, Climatology and Hydrology, and 
Environmental Systems Analysis. There are no specific 
course requirements for the three concentration areas. A 
program of study that fits the needs of the individual 
student will be arranged between the advisor, the 
student's committee and the student. 

This Masters in Earth Sciences graduate program 
generally follows a traditional numbering scheme with 



College of Arts and Sciences 79 



5000 and 6000 level courses. The 5000 level numbers 
identify courses that cover accepted bodies of knowledge 
within the earth sciences with the emphasis placed on 
mastery and critical assessment of the theoretical and 
empirical foundations within the discipline. The 6000 
level courses are divisible into two categories. The first 
category is the Earth Systems topic courses wherein 
graduate students review and analyze the dominant 
current working hypotheses that drive contemporary 
research within conceptual areas such as geodynamics, 
global biogeochemical cycles, or climate change. The 
second 6000 level category is the directed research 
courses. This category provides the framework for 
graduate students to complete the research requirements 
within the program and also identifies the area of 
concentration of the directed research. This framework 
permits the assignment of appropriate faculty for research 
supervision. 

Solid Earth Sciences 

Overview 

The Solid Earth Sciences concentration offers course 

work in Environmental Geology, Geochemistry, 

Geologic Mapping, Geomorphology, Hydrogeology, 

Mineralogy, Petrology, Remote Sensing, Sedimentology, 

Soil Science, Stratigraphy, Structural Geology, and 

Tectonics. 

This concentration prepares students for licensure as 
Professional Geologists and for employment in the 
environmental consulting, energy and mining industries as 
well as government agencies charged with assessing 
natural resources and monitoring their utilization. The 
concentration also prepares those students who choose to 
undertake further graduate study or become earth 
sciences teachers. 

Course Work 

The following courses are available in the concentration 

in Solid Earth Sciences: 

ESCI5170 Fundamentals of Remote Sensing 

ESCI5180 Digital Image Processing in Remote 
Sensing 

ESCI5210 Soil Science 

GEOL5100 Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology 

GEOL5105 Geomorphology 



GEOL5 110 Stratigraphy 

GEOL51 1 5 Applied Geophysics 

GEOL5120 Geologic Mapping and Interpretation 

GEOL5125 Geologic Summer Field Camp 

GEOL5130 Optical Mineralogy 

GEOL5135 Tectonics 

GEOL5145 Hydrogeology 

GEOL5165 Aqueous Geochemistry 

GEOL5175 Geochemistry 

GEOL5185 Mineralogy, Economics and the 

Environment 

GEOL5410 Applied Soil Science 



GEOL6101 Earth Systems Analysis: Geodynamics 
GEOL6102 Earth Systems Analysis: 

Paleoenvironments 
GEOL6103 Earth Systems Analysis: Solid Earth 

Geochemistry 
GEOL6651 Workshops in Geology 
GEOL6800 Individual Study in Geology 

Research Credit Options 

GEOL61 10 Directed Research in the Solid Earth 

Sciences 
GEOL6120 Directed Internship in the Solid Earth 

Sciences 
GEOL6130 Thesis Research in the Solid Earth 

Sciences 

Climatology and Hydrology 

Overview 

The Climatology and Hydrology concentration offers 
course work in Aqueous Geochemistry, Biogeochemistry, 
Climatology, Erosion Studies, Geomorphology, 
Hydrology, Hydrogeology, Meteorology, Remote Sensing, 
Stream Geomorphology and Watershed Science. 

This concentration prepares students for careers in both 
the private and public sectors concerned with the study, 
management and regulation of water and air resources. 
Examples of such careers include water quality modeling, 
water supply analysis, forest hydrology, watershed 
management, storm water studies, stream restoration, 
erosion control, underground storage tank permitting and 
groundwater remediation, environmental regulation and 
planning, and weather prediction. This concentration is 
also of interest to secondary school Earth Sciences 
educators who wish to pursue advanced studies in 
atmospheric and hydrological sciences. The program will 
also prepare students who wish to pursue additional 
graduate study at the Ph.D. level in hydrological and/or 
atmospheric sciences and biogeochemistry. 

Course Work 

The following courses are available in the concentration 

in Climatology and Hydrology: 

ESCI5140 Hydrologic Processes 

ESCI5 1 50 Applied Climatology 

ESCI5155 Fluvial Processes 

ESCI5170 Fundamentals of Remote Sensing 

ESCI5180 Digital Image Processing in Remote 
Sensing 

ESCI5222 Watershed Science 

ESCI6060 Earth Sciences Field Investigations 

ESCI6201 Earth Systems Analysis: Climate 

ESCI6202 Earth Systems Analysis: 
Biogeochemical Cycles 

ESCI6250 Urban Air Quality 

GEOL5105 Geomorphology 

GEOL5145 Hydrogeology 

GEOL5165 Aqueous Geochemistry 



80 College of Arts and Sciences 



Research Credit Options 

ESCI6210 Directed Research in Climatology and 

Hydrology 
ESCI6220 Directed Internship in Climatology and 

Hydrology 
ESCI6230 Thesis Research in Climatology and 

Hydrology 

Environmental Systems Analysis 

Overview 

The Environmental Systems Analysis concentration 
offers course work in Environmental Geology, 
Environmental Site Characterization, Geographic 
Information Systems, Planning, Remote Sensing, Soil 
Science, Spatial Decision Support Systems, Stream 
Restoration, and Water Resources. 

This concentration prepares students for employment in 
the environmental consulting industry, government 
agencies charged with assessing and monitoring land use, 
water and air quality, and storm water monitoring. The 
concentration also prepares those students interested in 
further graduate work or a career as an earth sciences 
teacher. 

Course Work 

The following courses are suggested for the concentration 

in Environmental Systems Analysis: 

ESCI5140 Hydrologic Processes 
ESCI5155 Fluvial Processes 
ESCI5 1 70 Fundamentals of Remote Sensing 
ESCI5180 Digital Image Processing in Remote 

Sensing 
ESCI5210 Soil Science 
ESCI5222 Watershed Science 
ESCI5233 Geoenvironmental Site 

Characterization 
ESCI6060 Earth Sciences Field Investigations 
ESCI6301 Earth Systems Analysis: Human- 
interactions 
ESCI6302 Earth Systems Analysis: Statistical and 

Risk-based Decision Support Systems 
GEOL5105 Geomorphology 
GEOL5 115 Applied Geophysics 
GEOL5120 Geologic Mapping and Interpretation 
GEOL5135 Tectonics 
GEOL5145 Hydrogeology 
GEOL5175 Geochemistry 
GEOL5410 Applied Soil Science 
GEOG5120 Introduction to Geographic 

Information Systems 
GEOG5130 Advanced Geographic Information 

Systems 
GEOG5165 Environmental Planning 
GEOG6615 Advanced Seminar in Spatial Decision 

Support Systems 



Research Credit Options 

ESCI6310 Directed Research in Environmental 

Monitoring and Decision Support 

Systems 
ESCI6320 Directed Internship in Environmental 

Monitoring and Decision Support 

Systems 
ESCI6330 Thesis Research in Environmental 

Monitoring and Decision Support 

Systems 

Thesis/Internship/Directed Research 

Projects 

Charlotte is located within short driving distance of 
classic geologic features including pristine barrier islands 
and the impressive relief of the Blue Ridge Escarpment 
and the Great Smoky Mountains. Continued growth in 
the Charlotte region has also resulted in numerous 
student opportunities for environmental, mining and 
water-resources research. Students can pursue research 
experiences that are appropriate to departmental faculty 
resources, individual student's programs, and the 
availability of opportunities that exist to work with allied 
agencies or clients on or off campus. One of three 
options will be available: 1) a nine credit hour traditional 
academic thesis; 2) a nine credit hour research experience 
which involves either a paid or unpaid internship 
arranged with a public or private agency or client; or 3) 
two research projects of 3 to 6 credit hours each. The 
research projects will be supervised by individual faculty 
members and will total a minimum of 9 credit hours. 
Each of these options fulfills program requirements 
equally. In all cases, students must work closely with their 
advisor and program committee to choose the option 
which best fits both their particular program and 
prevailing circumstances. 

Thesis Option: The thesis option allows the student to 
pursue a single research problem in an area of his/her 
individual interest. Students who ultimately plan to pursue 
a Ph.D. degree might be more inclined and encouraged 
toward that option. The same is true of students who 
wish to complete their master's program with that kind of 
individual research activity. Completion of the thesis 
includes adhering to the requirements of the UNC 
Charlotte Graduate School as well as the requirements of 
the Department of Geography and Earth Sciences. 

Internship Option: Students may opt to complete a 
research option that involves working on an applied 
project as an intern for a consulting firm or a government 
agency. Not every student can expect to engage in a paid 
internship because the number of students frequendy 
exceeds a matching number of opportunities funded in 
that manner. Unpaid internships provide the same caliber 
of experience and training in an applied environment. In 
some cases, diat experience may link students with non- 
profit agencies that simply do not have the resources to 
fund an internship. In either case, the topic of the 
internship is defined by the client's problem or needs. 



College of Arts and Sciences 81 



Directed Research Option: Students may choose to 
complete two faculty directed research projects, usually 
one three credit and one six credit project. These 
research projects must be based in at least two of the 
three program concentrations (i.e. Solid Earth, 
Climatology and Hydrology, and Environmental Systems 
Analysis). See the Earth Sciences Graduate Handbook 
for more details. 

Comprehensive Examination 

To complete the program, each student must pass a two- 
part comprehensive examination covering 1) general 
aspects of the discipline, and 2) a defense of their adopted 
research project. It is the responsibility of the advisor for 
the thesis project, internship, or the larger of the research 
projects, in consultation with the student, to arrange each 
of the exams. In every instance, before either part of the 
exam can be administered, every member of the graduate 
faculty of the Department must receive written 
notification. 

The Written Exam 

Part I of the comprehensive exam is a written exam in 
which the student must respond to questions submitted 
by the faculty. These questions will examine knowledge 
from at least two of the program concentrations. The 
questions are solicited from the entire graduate faculty of 
the Department by a memo from the student's primary 
research advisor who then administers the examination. 
The written comprehensive exam is normally taken 
during the third semester (for full-time students) and in 
no case should the student take this exam before 
accumulating 27 hours of course work including courses 
in progress. This exam may not be administered if the 
student has outstanding incomplete grades in any 
graduate course work. 

The Defense of the Research Project 

Part II of the comprehensive exam is the defense of the 
research project (either thesis, internship, or one directed 
research project). This exam is generally administered at 
the discretion of the student's advisory committee and the 
student. When the advisor is satisfied that the student's 
research and writing has progressed sufficiently the 
research document is provided to the other members of 
the research committee. If they agree that the document 
is ready for a defense, an oral exam is scheduled. The 
advisor must then notify, in writing, every member of the 
Department's graduate faculty of the date, time, place and 
the topic (title with abstract) of the defense. 

Admission to Candidacy Requirements 

An application for admission to candidacy should be filed 
upon successful completion of a minimum of 18 semester 
hours of graduate work and no later than four weeks 
prior to the beginning of the semester in which the 
student expects to complete all requirements for the 
degree. Completed forms should be forwarded to the 
Graduate School. 



Courses In Earth Sciences And 
Geology 

Earth Sciences 

ESCI 5000. Selected Topics in Earth Sciences. (1-4) 

Prerequisites: ESCI 1101, GEOL 1 200-1 200L, or 
permission of the instructor. In-depth treatment of 
specific topics selected from one of the fields of the earth 
sciences. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. (On 
demand) 

ESCI 5140. Hydrologic Processes. (4) Prerequisite: 
ESCI 1101 or GEOL 1 200-1 200L or permission of the 
instructor. Atmospheric, soils and geologic aspects of 
surface and ground water processes. Three lecture hours 
and one three-hour lab per week. (Fall) 

ESCI 5150. Applied Climatology. (3) Prerequisite: 
ESCI 3250 or consent of instructor. Methods of acquiring 
and analyzing climatic data in various types of applied 
problems. Emphasis on methods to assess and reduce the 
impact of weather and climate upon human activities. 
(Spring) 

ESCI 5155. Fluvial Processes. (4) Prerequisites: ESCI 
1101-1101L, GEOL 1200-1200L, or permission of the 
instructor. Hydrologic and geomorphic study of the 
transport of water and earth materials within stream 
systems. Erosion, mass wasting, open channel flow, 
sediment transport, flooding, stream channel 
morphology, morphometry of drainage basins, and 
related topics. Three lecture hours, three lab hours per 
week. (Spring) 

ESCI 5170. Fundamentals of Remote Sensing. (4) 

Prerequisite: ESCI 1101 and GEOL 1200, or consent of 
the instructor. Physical fundamentals of remote sensing 
and overview of airborne and satellite systems operating 
in the visible, infrared, and radar regions, and a review of 
applications for resource exploration, environmental 
studies, land use and land cover analysis, and natural 
hazards. One 2-1/2 hour lecture, and one three-hour lab 
per week. (On demand) 

ESCI 5180. Digital Image Processing in Remote 
Sensing. (4) Prerequisite: ESCI 5170 or consent of 
instructor. Scientific and computational foundations of 
digital image processing techniques for extracting earth 
resource information from remotely sensed data. Three 
lecture hours and three lab hours per week. (Spring) 

ESCI 5210. Soil Science. (4) Prerequisites: GEOL 3124, 
GEOL 31 1 5 or permission of instructor. Study of soils, 
soil-forming processes and soil morphology with an 
emphasis on soils as they relate to geologic landscapes 
and surficial processes. Students will learn how to 
describe and interpret soils in the field. Three hours 
lecture, three hours lab per week with occasional field 



82 College of Arts and Sciences 



trips. Graduate students will fulfill the requirements of 
ESCI 4210. In addition, graduate students will be 
required to acquire laboratory and interpretive skills in 
soil chemical analyses and will have additional writing 
assignments for the course. (Fall) 

ESCI 5222. Watershed Science. (3) Prerequisites: ESCI 
4140/5140 or permission of the instructor. Examination 
of the cycling of water and chemical elements in natural 
and perturbed watersheds with emphasis on linkages 
between the hydrologic and biogeochemical processes 
which control runoff water quality. Topics include runoff 
processes, evapotranspiration, nutrient export and stream, 
riparian and hyporheic zone hydrochemical dynamics. 
(On demand) 

ESCI 5233. Geoenvironmental Site Characterization. 

(4) Prerequisites: Earth Sciences, Geology and M.A. 
Geography majors: ESCI 4140 or 4155. Others require 
consent of the instructor. Advanced field-based 
examination of hydrologic and geologic conditions in the 
southeastern United States within the context of current 
state and federal regulatory requirements and site 
characterization activities currently performed by 
professional environmental geoscientists. Hydrologic 
investigation and water quality characterization, and 
geological and geophysical site investigations. (On demand) 

ESCI 5250. Advanced Dynamic Meteorology. (3) 

Prerequisites: ESCI 3250 and ESCI 3251, or instructor 
consent. An extension of ESCI 3250 to provide an in- 
depth examination of atmospheric dynamics, focusing on 
the structure and evolution of synoptic scale dynamical 
and convective weather systems, and atmospheric 
modeling. Three hours of lecture per week. (Fall, On 
demand) 

ESCI 5251. Advanced Synoptic Meteorology. (3) 

Prerequisites: ESCI 3250 and ESCI 3251, or instructor 
consent. An extension of ESCI 3251 sufficient to develop 
an integrated view of dynamic and synoptic meteorology. 
Included are a survey of conceptual models and analysis 
techniques for mesoscale atmospheric features, cumulus 
convection, and tropical storms. Three hours of lecture 
per week. (Spring On demand) 

ESCI 5400. Internship in Earth Sciences. (3-6) 

Prerequisite: consent of the Graduate Committee. 
Research and/or work experience designed to be a logical 
extension of a student's academic program. The student 
must apply to Graduate Advisory Committee for an 
internship by submitting a proposal which specifies the 
type of work/ research experience preferred and how the 
internship will complement his or her academic program. 
The Graduate Committee will attempt to place the 
selected students in cooperating community organizations 
to complete specified research or work-related tasks 
which are based on a contractual arrangement between 
the student and community organization. The student can 



receive three to six hours credit, depending on the nature 
and extent of the internship assignment. (On demand) 

ESCI 5800. Individual Study in Earth Sciences. (1-4) 

Prerequisite: permission of the instructor and credit hours 
established in advance. Tutorial study or special research 
problems. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. (On 
demand) 

ESCI 6000. Selected Topics in Earth Sciences. (1-4) 

Prerequisites: permission of the Earth Sciences Graduate 
Coordinator. In-depth treatment of specific topics 
selected from one of the concentrations in earth sciences 
(Solid Earth Sciences; Climatology and Hydrology; 
Environmental Systems Analysis). May be repeated for 
credit as topics vary. (On demand) 

ESCI 6060. Earth Sciences Field Investigations. (1-6) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. A concentrated field 
investigation of selected earth sciences topics. Course 
subject matter, credit hours, location and duration will be 
specified each time course is offered. May be repeated for 
credit. Pass/No Credit grading. (On demand) 

ESCI 6201. Earth Systems Analysis: Climate. (3) 

Current working hypotheses and research methods are 
reviewed for the study of climatology and climate change. 
Theories and mechanisms of climate change, as well as 
the interrelationships between the components of the 
climate system, are discussed towards understanding and 
explaining past, present and possible future climatic 
behavior. (On demand) 

ESCI 6202. Earth Systems Analysis: Biogeochemical 
Cycles. (3) This course examines the Earth's water and 
major elemental cycles including those of carbon, 
nitrogen, sulfur, phosphorus and the major crustal 
elements. Uncertainties in the current state of 
understanding of global elemental cycles are examined. 
Special emphasis is placed on how these cycles are 
currently being modified through human activities. (On 
demand) 

ESCI 6210. Directed Research in Climatology and 
Hydrology. (3-6) A one or two semester research 
project, performed under the direction of a member of 
the faculty within Climatology and Hydrology. The 
project must be hypothesis-driven, and include 
formulation, implementation, analysis and presentation of 
research components. May be repeated for credit. 
Pass/Unsatisfactory grading. (On demand) 

ESCI 6220. Directed Internship in Climatology and 
Hydrology. (9) Prerequisite: Consent of the Graduate 
Committee. Community/industry sponsored 
research/work experience in hydrological and/or 
climatological sciences with a well-defined applied 
research focus. While each internship may vary in its 
content, die student must submit and have approved a 
well-defined statement of research which details how the 



College of Arts and Sciences 83 



internship will complement his or her academic program. 
Each proposal must identify both a community/industry 
research supervisor, and a faculty internship advisor. A 
final report detailing the research experience and results is 
required. Pass/Unsatisfactory grading. (On demand) 

ESCI 6230. Thesis Research in Climatology and 
Hydrology. (9) Prerequisite: Consent of the Graduate 
Committee. The student will conduct hypothesis-driven 
research involving contemporary issues in Climatology 
and/or the Hydrological Sciences. This option is most 
commonly chosen when a student works under an 
assistantship in association with a funded faculty research 
project. The student will prepare and defend a traditional 
thesis upon completion of their research. A thesis 
proposal must be approved by the student's examination 
committee prior to registration for thesis credit. 
Pass/Unsatisfactory grading. (On demand) 

ESCI 6250. Urban Air Quality. (3) Prerequisites: M.S. 
Earth Science, MA. Geography, and Ph.D. INES and 
Public Policy students: ESCI 4150 and STAT 2221 or 
consent of instructor. Examination of the relationships 
between climatic processes and urban air quality with 
emphasis on trends and patterns. Topics will include 
health and environmental effects of air pollution, ozone 
climatology, pollutant transport, transportation related 
emissions, risk assessment, and air quality management. 
(On demand) 

ESCI 6301. Earth Systems Analysis: Human 
Interactions. (3) Current working hypotheses and 
research methods are reviewed for the regional and global 
scale coupling of categorical human activities and earth 
processes. The focus is on GIS-based modeling 
frameworks for parametric impact assessment. (On 
demand) 

ESCI 6302. Earth Systems Analysis: Statistical and 
Risk-based Decision Support Systems. (3) Statistical 
and risk-based research/decision support methods are 
reviewed for local and regional environmental assessment 
and management. The focus is on parametric statistical 
analysis of large temporal and spatial datasets for the 
human-interface with the local and regional air, water and 
land resources. Valuation, ranking, prioritization, and 
indexing models for environmental management are also 
discussed. (On demand) 

ESCI 6310. Directed Research in Environmental 
Monitoring and Decision Support Systems. (3-6) A 

one or two semester research project, performed under 
the direction of a member of the faculty within the 
environmental monitoring and decision support systems 
area. The project must be hypothesis-driven, and include 
formulation, implementation, analysis and presentation of 
research components. May be repeated for credit. 
Pass/Unsatisfactory grading. (On demand) 



ESCI 6320. Directed Internship in Environmental 
Monitoring and Decision Support Systems. (9) 

Prerequisite: Consent of the Graduate Committee. 
Community/industry sponsored internship in the area of 
environmental monitoring and decision support systems 
with a well-defined research focus. While considerable 
flexibility exists in the research problem design, each 
internship must have a well-defined statement of the 
research problem wherein the independent research to be 
performed by the intern is clearly stated. In addition both 
a community/industry research supervisor, and a faculty 
internship advisor must be identified prior to registration. 
Pass/Unsatisfactory grading. (On demand) 

ESCI 6330. Thesis Research in Environmental 
Monitoring and Decision Support Systems. (9) 

Prerequisite: Consent of the Graduate Advisory 
Committee. Traditional hypothesis-driven research thesis 
focused on contemporary issues in the area of 
environmental monitoring and decision support systems. 
This option is most commonly chosen when a graduate 
student works under a research assistantship in 
association with a funded faculty research project. A 
thesis proposal must be approved by a faculty member in 
the Environmental Monitoring and Decision Support 
Systems area prior to registration for thesis credit. 
Pass/Unsatisfactory grading. (On demand) 

ESCI 6650. Workshop in Geography. (4) A series of 
lectures on the subject matter of the atmosphere and 
hydrosphere with accompanying laboratory sessions. (On 
demand) 

ESCI 6800. Individual Study in Earth Sciences. (1-4) 

Prerequisite: permission of the instructor and credit hours 
established in advance. Tutorial study or special research 
problems. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. (On 
demand) 

ESCI 7999. Master's Degree Graduate Residence. 

(1) Permission needed from department. 

Geology 

GEOL 5000. Topics in Geology. (1-4) Prerequisites: 
ESCI 1101, GEOL 1 200-1 200L, or permission of the 
instructor. In-depth treatment of specific topics selected 
from one of the fields of geology. May be repeated for 
credit as topics vary. (On demand) 

GEOL 5100. Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology. 

(4) Prerequisite: GEOL 3115. Classification, mineralogy 
and chemical properties of igneous and metamorphic 
rocks including the tectonic processes by which they 
formed. Lab emphasizes hand specimen and petrographic 
description and interpretation of rocks in thin sections. 
(On demand) 

GEOL 5105. Geomorphology. (3) Prerequisite: ESCI 
1101; GEOL 1200 and 1200L Surficial processes and 
landform development as controlled by climate, tectonics, 



84 College of Arts and Sciences 



rock characteristics and time with emphasis on plate 
tectonic, weathering, erosion, mass wasting, surface water, 
groundwater, glacial, wind coastal processes and climate 
change in landscape development. (On demand) 

GEOL 5105L. Geomorphology Laboratory. (1) 

Prerequisite or co-requisite: GEOL 5105. Analysis of 
landforms and the surficial processes responsible for 
landform development. One lab period of 3 hours per 
week. (On demand) 

GEOL 5110. Stratigraphy. (4) Prerequisites: GEOL 
1210 and 3124. Vertical and horizontal relationships of 
layered earth materials as a key to understanding basin 
history, past depositional environments and their 
transformation through time. Three lecture hours, three 
lab hours per week. (Spring) 

GEOL 5115. Applied Geophysics. (4) Prerequisites: 
GEOL 3115, 3130 and introductory physics or consent 
of instructor. Instrumental analysis of the earth's physical 
parameters. Study of human-induced seismic and 
electrical signals, and natural magnetic and gravitational 
fields for the purposes of locating faults, ore bodies, 
ground water and other earth hazards or resources. Three 
hours of lecture and one two-hour lab per week. (On 
demand) 

GEOL 5120. Geologic Mapping and Interpretation. 

(4) Prerequisites: GEOL 3130 and 5100 or consent of 
instructor. Field and lab oriented study using principles of 
mineralogy, petrology and structural geology. Involves 
collection and resolution of field data, techniques of 
presenting data, development of geologic maps, and 
critical reviews of existing literature. Two hours of 
lecture, four hours of lab/field work per week. (Alternate 
years) 

GEOL 5125. Geologic Summer Field Camp. (6) 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Concentrated field 
investigation of geologic features. Data collection in the 
field, geologic mapping, report and map preparation and 
time management. Location of field camp will be 
specified each time course is offered. (Summer) 

GEOL 5130. Optical Mineralogy. (4) Prerequisite: 
GEOL 3115. Light optics theory, the behavior of plane 
polarized light in a solid medium. The laboratory 
emphasizes the use of petrographic microscope oil 
immersion techniques and identification of the common 
rock forming minerals. Three hours of lecture and one 
three-hour lab per week. (On demand) 

GEOL 5135. Tectonics. (4) Prerequisite: GEOL 3130 
or consent of the instructor. A systematic examination of 
the evolution and dynamics of the earth from the 
perspective of plate tectonics theory. Three lecture hours, 
one three-hour lab per week. (Alternate years) 



GEOL 5145. Hydrogeology. (4) Prerequisites: GEOL 
1200, MATH 1241, CHEM 1251 or consent of 
instructor. Fundamentals of groundwater hydrology. 
Principles of flow and transport in groundwater aquifiers 
and the vadose zone. Topics include: storage, 
compressibility, capillarity, Darcy's Law, aquifer 
parameters, steady and transient flow equations, well 
hydraulics, geological controls on groundwater flow, and 
transport of non-reactive chemical species by advection, 
diffusion and dispersion in porous media. A series of 
experiments and problems illustrating flow and transport 
in porous media, together with applied problems. Three 
hours of lecture, and three hours of lab per week with 
occasional field trips. (Fall) 

GEOL 5165. Aqueous Geochemistry. (4) Prerequisites: 
CHEM 1251 and 1252 and GEOL 3115, or consent of 
instructor. Interaction of rocks, minerals, and gases with 
water under natural conditions, including an overview of 
the compositions of natural waters from a variety of 
environmental and geologic settings emphasizing a 
rigorous thermodynamic approach to understanding 
water- rock interactions. Three hours of lecture, three 
hours of lab per week. (Fall) 

GEOL 5175. Geochemistry. (3) Prerequisites: GEOL 
1200, 1200L and Chemistry 1251 or consent of instructor. 
Geochemical survey of origin, evolution and present 
composition of the earth. (Alternate years) 

GEOL 5175L. Geochemistry Laboratory. (1) 

Prerequisite or corequisite: GEOL 5175 or consent of 
instructor. Analytical methods and sample preparation 
techniques used by geochemists. One three hour meeting 
per week. (On demand) 

GEOL 5185. Mineralogy, Economics and the 
Environment. (3) This course will focus on the origin, 
distribution, and consumption rate of the Earth's mineral 
resources. This lecture-based class will promote an 
understanding of not only the geologic, engineering and 
economic factors that govern mineral production, but 
also the resulting environmental pollution problems. 
(Alternate years) 

GEOL 5410. Applied Soil Science. (4) Prerequisites: 
ESCI 4210/5210 or permission of the instructor. 
Students will read and discuss current literature pertaining 
to the application of soils to various fields of research 
such as surficial processes, active tectonics, ecology, 
stratigraphy, archaeology, and environmental assessment. 
Topics covered will vary depending on the interests of the 
students. Students will create and execute a semester- 
long soils-based field or laboratory research project of 
dieir choosing. Graduate students will fulfill the 
requirements of GEOL 4410. In addition, graduate 
students will have additional writing assignments 
throughout the semester. Graduate students' semester 
project must contain both field and laboratory 



College of Arts and Sciences 85 



components. Three hours seminar, three hours field or 
lab each week. (On demand) 

GEOL 6101. Earth Systems Analysis: Geodynamics. 

(3) Current working hypotheses and research methods 
are reviewed for the study of crustal and lithospheric 
processes on time scales from the seismic cycle to the 
long-term geologic evolution of basins and mountain 
belts and on physical scales ranging from the fracture and 
flow of rock masses to regional deformation and 
mountain building. (On demand) 

GEOL 6102. Earth Systems Analysis: Paleo- 
environments. (3) Current working hypotheses and 
research methods are reviewed for the study of paleo- 
environments. The interrelationships of tectonics, 
paleogeography, biogeography, and orbital climate 
forcing, as represented in the geologic record, are 
discussed and reviewed in light of modern concerns for 
climate change. (On demand) 

GEOL 6103. Earth Systems Analysis: Solid Earth 
Geochemistry. (3) Current working hypotheses and 
research methods are reviewed for the study of the 
geochemical evolution of the Earth's continental and 
oceanic crust. Hypotheses regarding coupling between 
solid earth geochemical processes and the evolution of 
the Earth's atmosphere and oceans are also briefly 
discussed. (On demand) 

GEOL 6110. Directed Research in the Solid Earth 
Sciences. (3-6) A one or two semester research project, 
performed under the direction of a member of the faculty 
within the Solid Earth Sciences. The project must be 
hypothesis-driven, and include formulation, 
implementation, analysis and presentation of research 
components. May be repeated for credit. 
Pass/Unsatisfactory grading. (On demand) 

GEOL 6120. Directed Internship in the Solid Earth 
Sciences. (9) Prerequisite: Consent of Graduate 
Committee. Community/industry sponsored 
research/work experience in the Solid Earth Sciences 
with a well-defined applied research focus. While 
considerable flexibility exists in the research problem 
design, the student must submit and have approved a 
well-defined statement of the research and how this will 
complement his or her academic program. In addition, 
the proposal must identify both a community/industry 
research supervisor, and a faculty internship advisor. 
Pass/Unsatisfactory grading. (On demand) 

GEOL 6130. Thesis Research in the Solid Earth 
Sciences. (9) Prerequisite: Consent of the Graduate 
Committee. Hypothesis driven research on contemporary 
issues in the Solid Earth Sciences. This option is most 
commonly chosen when a student works under an 
assistantship in association with a funded faculty research 
project. The student will prepare and defend a traditional 
thesis. A thesis proposal must be approved by the 



Graduate Committee prior to registration for thesis 
credit. Pass/Unsatisfactory grading. (On demand) 

GEOL 6651. Workshops in Geology. (4) A series of 
lectures on subject matter of the lithosphere and space 
science with accompanying laboratory sessions. (On 
demand) 

GEOL 6800. Individual Study in Geology. (1-4) 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor and credit hours 
established in advance. Tutorial study or special research 
problems. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. (On 
demand) 

GEOL 7999. Master's Degree Graduate Residence. 

(1) Permission needed from department. 



ENGLISH 

Department of English 

275 Fretwell 

704-687-2296 

http://www.uncc.edu/engldept/ 

Degree 

M. A., Certificates 

Coordinator 

Dr. Tony Jackson 

Graduate Faculty- 
Deborah Bosley, Associate Professor 
Lil Brannon, Professor 
Paula Connolly, Associate Professor 
Boyd Davis, Professor 
Christopher Davis, Associate Professor 
Susan Gardner, Associate Professor 
Elizabeth Gargano, Assistant Professor 
Leon Gatlin, Associate Professor 
Sandra Govan, Professor 
Robert Grey, Associate Professor 
Aaron Gwyn, Assistant Professor 
Tony Jackson, Associate Professor 
Cy Knoblauch, Chair, and Professor, Department of 

English 
Jeffrey Leak, Assistant Professor 
Ronald F. Lunsford, Professor 
James Holt McGavran, Professor 
Kirk Melnikoff, Assistant Professor 
Margaret Morgan, Associate Professor 
Anita Moss, Professor 
Jennifer Munroe, Assistant Professor 
Aimee Parkison, Assistant Professor 
Malin Pereira, Associate Professor 
Alan Rauch, Associate Professor 
Blair Rudes, Associate Professor 
Anthony Scott, Assistant Professor 



86 College of Arts and Sciences 



Daniel Shealy, Professor 

John Staunton, Assistant Professor 

Ralf Thiede, Associate Professor 

Mark I. West, Professor 

Greg Wickliff, Associate Professor 



MASTER OF ARTS IN ENGLISH 

The master's program in English is designed to 
accommodate a wide variety of students: those seeking 
personal enrichment through increased knowledge and 
understanding; those preparing to pursue a Ph.D. in 
English or other advanced professional degrees; and 
those seeking professional advancement in such fields as 
writing, publishing, or teaching on the primary, 
secondary, or college levels. The Department offers a 
broad range of courses in literature, writing/rhetoric, and 
language, including second language studies and applied 
linguistics. The Department also offers concentrations in 
children's literature and technical/professional writing. 

Additional Admission Requirements 

In addition to the general requirements for admission to 
the Graduate School, the following are required for study 
in English: 

1) Thirty hours of undergraduate coursework in English 
beyond the freshman level, or evidence of equivalent 
academic preparation for graduate study in English, 
as approved by the Department. 

2) A satisfactory score on the Aptitude portion of the 
Graduate Record Examination or on the Miller 
Analogies Test. 

Degree Requirements 

The program requires a minimum of 36 semester hours 
of graduate credit with grades of A or B. (A course in 
which a graduate student receives a grade of C is not 
allowable as part of the 36 required hours.) At least 18 
semester hours must be in English courses at the 6000- 
level, open only to graduate students. A student must 
choose one of these emphases: literature, 
writing/ rhetoric, applied linguistics, or a concentration in 
either children's literature or technical/professional 
writing. 

Courses beyond 36 hours of graduate credit may be 
required to remove deficiencies or to satisfy requirements 
for graduate licensure, or may be recommended to 
develop areas of need, to pursue particular interests, or to 
gain specific experience. 

Of the 36 hours of graduate credit, 30 must be in English 
courses; the remaining 6 hours may be taken in English 
or in another discipline. If the hours are to be taken 
outside of English, the student must submit a written 
request to the Coordinator of Graduate Studies, 
explaining how these hours will enrich his/her program. 



No more than 6 hours of ENGL 6890 (Directed 
Reacting), may be applied to the degree without written 
permission of the Chair of the Department. 

Assistantships 

A number of graduate assistantships are available each 
year. Applications must be submitted by March 1 5 for 
assistantships beginning the following academic year. 
Further information is available in the Department. 

Internships 

ENGL 5410. The Department of English offers a 
number of internships for graduate students (limited to 3 
hours of credit), which provide program-related 
experience in local television and radio stations, non- 
profit and government agencies, and local businesses and 
corporations. Further information is available in the 
Department. 

Advising 

The graduate coordinator and other graduate faculty 
member acting as his/her designated assistant will advise 
graduate students. 

Licensure 

Students seeking licensure in English should refer to the 
requirements of the M. A. in English Education program. 

Comprehensive Examination 

Students must satisfactorily complete a written 
examination based on a reading list keyed to their chosen 
emphasis. These lists are available in the Department 
office. The written examination may not be attempted 
sooner than the last semester of coursework, exclusive of 
thesis credits. The reading lists were revised for students 
entering the program in Spring 2002 and thereafter. 

Thesis 

The MA. thesis is optional; it may be either scholarly or 
creative. See course description for ENGL 6996. 

Tuition Waivers 

Each year, one out-of-state tuition waiver is available for 
a new graduate assistant. In-state tuition waiver funds are 
also available for new graduate assistants and sometimes 
for other outstanding applicants. 

Core Courses 

All M.A. candidates, regardless of which concentration or 
emphasis is chosen, are required to take ENGL 6101 
(Introduction to English Studies) and ENGL 6160 
(Introduction to the English Language). 

Emphasis Descriptions 

The Literature Emphasis 

The literature emphasis includes five literature courses, at 
least three of which are historically oriented. Two of these 
courses must be in one national literature and a third in a 



College of Arts and Sciences 87 



different national literature. In addition, one 
writing/ rhetoric course, one literary theory-intensive 
course, and three electives are required. 

The Writing Emphasis 

The writing emphasis includes four writing/ rhetoric 
courses, one writing/ rhetoric theory-intensive course, two 
literature courses, and three electives. The writing 
emphasis may focus on creative writing, 
technical/professional writing, or writing and pedagogy. 

The Applied Linguistics Emphasis 

The Applied Linguistics emphasis includes two 
writing/ rhetoric courses, two literature courses, and four 
courses selected from the following: 
ENGL5161 Modern Grammar 
ENGL5165 Language and Culture 
ENGL5166 Comparative Language Studies for 

Teachers 
ENGL5260 History of the English Language or: 
ENGL6162 History of the English Language 
ENGL5263 Linguistics and Language Learning 
ENGL6163 Language Acquisition 
ENGL6161 Introduction to Linguistics 
ENGL6070 Topics in English (Approval of 
Graduate Coordinator required) 

In addition, students will choose one course from the 
following: 

ENGL5050 Topics in English (linguistics topics 

only) 
ENGL5254 Teaching English/Communications 

Skills to Middle and Secondary School 

Learners 
ENGL5400 English Composition Practicum 
ENGL5264 Literacy in Community/ Family 
ENGL6195 Teaching College English 

The Technical/Professional Writing 
Concentration 

Students accepted into the MA in English program may 
elect a concentration in Technical/Professional Writing. 
The curriculum includes 1) working for real clients; 2) 
learning Internet and Webpage design; 3) building project 
management and teamwork skills; and 4) learning 
applications such as Adobe PageMaker, PowerPoint, 
authoring tools, and word-processing systems. 

Students will learn new computing applications, how to 
work as members of development teams, how to design 
and manage complex publication projects, both online 
and print, and how to assemble professional portfolios. 
Required courses include: 

ENGL6116 Technical/Professional Writing (this 
class should be taken in the first year) 

ENGL5180 Theories of Technical Communication 

ENGL5410 Professional Internship 

ENGL6008 Topics in Technical Communication 
(may be repeated for credit) 

ENGL6166 Rhetorical Theory 



15 hours selected from: 5181, 5182, 5183, 5204, 
5205, 5008 (may be repeated for credit), 5852, 
6062 (maybe repeated for credit), 6890, 6996,up 
to 6 hours of Creative Writing, Literature, or 
Linguistics courses 

The Children's Literature Concentration 

This concentration is premised on the assumptions that 
children's literature is an integral part of many literary 
traditions and that students studying children's literature 
should develop an understanding of the connection 
between children's literature and other forms of literature. 
Students will take: 

6 hours in literature (not Children's Literature) 

6 hours in writing/ rhetoric 

ENGL 6103 Juvenile Literature 

12 hours selected from: 5102, 5103, 5104, 6104, 
6890, 6996, 6070 (Children's Literature 
Winners), 5050 (topics that relate to Children's 
Literature), READ 6100, EDUC 5000 
(Children's Literature across the Curriculum) 

3 hours of an English elective 



GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN 
APPLIED LINGUISTICS 

The Graduate Certificate Program in Applied linguistics 
enables professionals to focus and solidify or update their 
work with language teaching and research applications. As 
technology-supported applications of language theory 
increase, and as teaching and research opportunities 
change in response to demographic and educational 
demands both in the U.S. and in the global community, 
this Certificate grounds the participants in both current 
theory and practice and makes courses in the Applied 
Linguistics Concentration available to persons with 
related degrees and professional aspirations. 

Admission Requirements 

Students are admitted to the Graduate School in a special 
category for certificate programs. In addition to the 
general requirements to graduate certificate programs 
explained elsewhere in this Catalog, students will need to 
include a personal statement of purpose. 

Certificate Requirements 

The Graduate Certificate in Applied linguistics requires 
15 hours in approved courses, including at least 6 hours at 
the 6000-level. A typical program might include 4 of the 
following courses: ENGL 5161 (Modern English 
Grammar), ENGL 5165 (Language and Culture), ENGL 
6161 (Introduction to Linguistics), ENGL 6163 
(Language Acquisition), ENGL 6195 (Teaching College 
English). Students must earn a grade of "B" or better in 
all courses presented for the certificate, and must 
complete the program within four years from the time of 
first enrollment in a certificate course. 



88 College of Arts and Sciences 



Substitutions from the broader linguistics emphasis and 
graduate program will be allowed with approval of the 
Certificate Coordinator, who will act as adviser for those 
enrolled in the Certificate program. 

Students whose dominant language is not English will 
elect coursework in Second Language Writing: Theory 
and Applications. 

Transfer credits are not accepted in the Certificate 
program. Students seeking licensure for the teaching of 
English at levels K-12 should consult the College of 
Education. 



GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN 
TECHNICAL/PROFESSIONAL 
WRITING 

The University of North Carolina at Charlotte offers a 
Graduate Certificate Program in Technical/Professional 
Writing designed for post-baccalaureate, graduate, and 
post-graduate students. Students can complete the 
required 21 graduate credit hours in approximately two 
years. Students will learn to design information, use 
hypermedia tools, create on-line support systems, design 
visuals, develop web pages, manage publications and 
projects, work with clients, develop portfolios, and learn 
page layout, graphics, and other software applications. 

Admission Requirements 

Students must apply for admission to the graduate school 
and must have a minimum undergraduate GPA of 2.75. 
Applicants will be required to submit: 1) a current GRE 
score; 2) a current MAT score; or 3) a portfolio of 
professional documents. Only graduate courses taken at 
UNC Charlotte will count towards this Graduate 
Certificate. 

Certificate Requirements (9 hours): 
ENGL6166 Rhetorical Theory 
ENGL6008 Topics in Advanced Technical 

Communication 
ENGL5410 Professional Internship 

Electives (1 2 hours) 

ENGL5180 Theories of Technical Communication 

ENGL5181 Writing User Documents 

ENGL51 82 Writing & Designing Computer-based 

Documents 
ENGL5 1 83 Editing Technical Documents 
ENGL5008 Topics in Technical Communication 

Other Courses: as appropriate and approved by the 

Department 



Courses in English 

ENGL 5002. Women and Literature. (3) Selected 
topics focusing on women and literature, such as images 
of women, women as writers, and women as literary 
critics. With permission of the English Department, may 
be repeated for credit as topics vary. (However, only six 
hours may be used for the requirements for the English 
major.) (Yearly) 

ENGL 5008. Topics in Advanced Technical 
Communication. (3) Prerequisites: ENGL 2116 and 
COMM 1101. Exploration, both theoretically and 
practically, of the interrelation of written, oral and graphic 
communication within technical rhetorical contexts. May 
be repeated once for additional credit with the approval 
of the English Department. (On demand) 

ENGL 5050. Topics in English. (3) Special topics not 
included in other courses. May be repeated for additional 
credit with approval of the English Department. (On 
demand) 

ENGL 5090. Major Authors. (3) The works, ideas and 
life of one to three significant authors. With permission 
of the English Department, may be repeated once for 
credit as long as different authors are considered. (On 
demand) 

ENGL 5102. Classics in British Children's Literature. 

(3) Focuses on pivotal works in the history of British and 
British Colonial Children's Literature. (Fall) 

ENGL 5103. Classics in American Children's 
Literature. (3) Focuses on pivotal works in the history of 
American Children's Literature. (Spring) 

ENGL 5104. Multiculturalism and Children's 
Literature. (3) Focuses on works that represent one or 
more kinds of cultural, ethnic, or social diversity of the 
United States and other national literatures. (Fall) 

ENGL 5114. Milton. (3) A study of the major poems 
and selections from the minor works of Milton. 
(On demand) 

ENGL 5116. Shakespeare's Early Plays. (3) A study of 
10 representative plays from the comedies, histories and 
tragedies written 1590-1600. (Yearly) 

ENGL 5117. Shakespeare's Late Plays. (3) A study of 
10 representative plays from the period 1600-1611, 
including the late tragedies and tragi-comedies. (Yearly) 

ENGL 5121. The 18th-Century British Novel. (3) The 

novel as narrative form and as mirror of the individual in 
society. Emphasis on fiction by Defoe, Richardson, 
Fielding, Sterne, Austen, with further readings in the 
novel of manners and the Gothic romance. (On demand) 



College of Arts and Sciences 89 



ENGL 5122. The Victorian Novel. (3) Readings in 
British fiction during the triumph of the novel in the 19th 
century, emphasizing major developments in realism, 
romance, naturalism. (Alternate years) 

ENGL 5123. The Modern British Novel. (3) 

Representative British novels that embody the cultural 
and literary developments of the 20th century: the impact 
of two world wars, the influence of important 
psychological and economic factors of modern life and 
their relationships to new techniques in art and literature. 
(Alternate years) 

ENGL 5124. Modern Irish Literature. (3) Readings in 
Irish literature since 1885, with consideration of the 
mythology, folklore, and social history of Ireland as they 
are expressed in poetry, drama and fiction. (On demand) 

ENGL 5131. British Drama to 1600, Excluding 
Shakespeare. (3) A survey of the development of British 
drama to 1600, with representative plays from the 
Mystery-Miracle Cycles, the Morality Plays, and Tudor 
drama, including Lyly, Kyd, Marlowe, Peele, Greene, 
Dekker. (On demand) 

ENGL 5132. British Drama from 1600-1642, 
Excluding Shakespeare. (3) A survey of Jacobean and 
Caroline drama, including plays by Jonson, Beaumont and 
Fletcher, Webster, Middleton, Shirley, Ford. (On demand) 

ENGL 5133. British Drama of Wit and Intrigue, 
1660-1780. (3) The famous bawdy comedy of manners 
and the heroic drama of the Restoration, followed by the 
sentimental comedy and satiric burlesque of the 18th 
century. (On demand) 

ENGL 5143. The American Novel of the 19th 
Century. (3) Major novelists and traditions from the 
beginnings of the American novel through the rise of 
realism, including such novelists as Hawthorne, Melville, 
Twain, Howells, James. (Alternate years) 

ENGL 5144. The American Novel of the 20th 
Century. (3) Major novelists and traditions from the 
emergence of naturalism to the present, including such 
novelists as Crane, Dreiser, Hemingway, Faulkner. (Yearly) 

ENGL 5145. Literature of the American South. (3) 

Selected works of Southern writers which reflect literary 
and cultural concerns from Colonial times to the present, 
including such authors as Poe, the early humorists, local 
color writers, Chopin, Faulkner, Warren, O'Connor, 
Welty. (Yearly) 

ENGL 5146. Contemporary Jewish-American 
Literature. (3) An introduction to the scope and shape 
of the contemporary Jewish-American literary traditions. 
Such writers as Bellow, Malamud, Roth, Singer, and 
Potok will be studied. (On demand) 



ENGL 5147. Early Black American Literature. (3) 

Prerequisite: ENGL 2301. A survey of significant writings 
by black Americans before the Harlem Renaissance. 
(Alternate years) 

ENGL 5148. Twentieth-Century Black American 
Literature: Prose. (3) Intensive study of selected black 
American 20th-century writers of fiction and nonfiction, 
beginning with the Harlem Renaissance. (Alternate years) 

ENGL 5150. Contemporary Poetry. (3) Poetry in 
English (including translations) since 1 940. (On demand) 

ENGL 5151. Modern Drama. (3) Representative 
Continental, British, and American plays, from Shaw to 
the present. (On demand) 

ENGL 5152. Modern European Literature. (3) 

Selected modern European authors, translated into 
English, whose works have been of special interest to 
readers and writes of British and American literature. (On 
demand) 

ENGL 5153. Contemporary Fiction. (3) Selected 
present-day fiction, with an emphasis upon works from 
outside the United States and Britain. Works not 
originally in English will be studies in translation. 

(Alternate years) 

ENGL 5155. Pan-African Literature. (3) Introduction 
to significant Pan-African literature, emphasizing the oral 
tradition, selected works of major authors in the 
Caribbean and Africa, and the relationships of these 
traditions to American, British and other literary 
traditions. Works not originally written in English will be 
studies in translation. (On demand) 

ENGL 5156. Gender and African American 
Literature. (3) Prerequisite: ENGL 2301, 3100 and 3200, 
or permission of instructor or graduate status. 
Exploration of the intersection of gender and African 
American Literature, focusing on either Black women 
writers or Black male writers, or a combination in 
dialogue. Cross-listed as AAA S 4106. (On demand) 

ENGL 5157. African American Poetry. (3) 

Prerequisites: ENGL 2301, 3100 and 3200, or permission 
of instructor or graduate status. Intensive study of 
African American poetry, focusing on one period or 
traversing several. Cross-listed as AAAS 4107. (Alternate 
years) 

ENGL 5158. African American Literary Theory and 
Criticism. (3) Prerequisites: ENGL 2301, 3100 and 3200, 
or permission of instructor or graduate status. History of 
an African American approach to literary analysis, 
including a practicum in modern criticism. Cross-listed as 
AAAS 4108. (Alternate years) 



90 College of Arts and Sciences 



ENGL 5161. Modern English Grammar. (3) A study 
of the structure of contemporary English, with an 
emphasis on descriptive approaches. (Alternate years) 

ENGL 5165. Language and Culture. (3) Readings in 
and discussion and application of the interrelationships 
between language and culture, including basic 
introduction to contemporary American dialects and to 
social contexts of language. (Yearly) 

ENGL 5166. Comparative Language Studies for 
Teachers. (3) Prerequisite: ENGL 3132, or ENGL 6161, 
or permission of the Department. An introductory course 
designed to aid the teacher of English as a Second 
Language in comparing the systems of sound and 
structure of another language with those systems in 
English. (Yearly) 

ENGL 5180. Theories of Technical Communication. 

(3) Prerequisite: ENGL 2116. Rhetorical, psychological, 
and anthropological theories which underscore the 
interrelations of written and graphic communication 
within technical, rhetorical contexts. (Fall) 

ENGL 5181. Writing User Documents. (3) 

Prerequisite: ENGL 2116. Researching and analyzing 
audiences to write publishable instructions. This includes 
the production, testing, and revision of tutorials, 
reference manuals and on-line documents for users of 
computers and other devices. (Spring) 

ENGL 5182. Writing and Designing Computer- 
based Documents. (3) Prerequisite: ENGL 2116. 
Theoretical and practical exploration of desktop 
publishing. Students will write and publish camera-ready 
documents by rhetorically integrating text and graphics 
using computer aids. (Fall) 

ENGL 5183. Editing Technical Documents. (3) 

Prerequisite: ENGL 2116. Document editing, including 
copy editing, proofreading, substantive editing, and 
project management. (Spring) 

ENGL 5202. Writing Poetry. (3) Prerequisite: ENGL 
2126, or graduate status, or permission of instructor. 
Further study of and practice in the writing of poetry 
within a workshop format. May be repeated once for 
credit with the consent of the English Department. (Fall, 
Spring) (Evenings) 

ENGL 5203. Writing Fiction. (3) Prerequisite: ENGL 
2126, or graduate status, or permission of instructor. This 
course provides further study of and practice in the 
writing of fiction within a workshop format. May be 
repeated once for credit with the consent of the English 
Department. (Fall, Spring) (Evenings) 

ENGL 5204. Expository Writing. (3) Writing of essays, 
criticism and various forms of exposition. (Fall, Spring) 
(Evenings) 



ENGL 5205. Advanced Expository Writing. (3) 

Prerequisite: ENGL 5204. May be repeated once for 
credit with permission of the English Department. 
(Alternate years) 

ENGL 5208. Poetry Writing Workshop. (3) 

Prerequisite: ENGL 5202. Designed for advanced writers 
of poetry. Focuses primarily on student work and peer 
criticism of it. May be repeated once for credit with 
permission of department. (Yearly) 

ENGL 5209. Fiction Writing Workshops. (3) 

Prerequisite: ENGL 5203. Designed for advanced writers 
of fiction. Focuses primarily on student work and peer 
criticism of it. May be repeated once for credit with 
permission of department. (Yearly) 

ENGL 5210. Greek and Roman Drama in 
Translation. (3) A study of selected plays of Aeschylus, 
Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes, Plautus, Terence, 
and Seneca with emphasis on dramaturgy and the 
development of the Greek and Roman theater. (On 
demand) 

ENGL 5211. Chaucer. (3) The poetry of Geoffrey 
Chaucer, including the Canterbury Tales and Troilus and 
Criseyde. (Alternate years) 

ENGL 5251. Literary Criticism Through Arnold. (3) 

The major schools and critics of literary criticism. (On 
demand) 

ENGL 5252. Modern Literary Criticism. (3) Theories 
of the modern schools of criticism. (On demand) 

ENGL 5254. Teaching English/Communications 
Skills to Middle and Secondary School Learners. (1- 

3) Approaches to the teaching of English, including 
recent theories and research related to writing and literary 
study, designed primarily for teaching in grades 6-12. 
(T 'early) 

ENGL 5260. History of the English Language. (3) 

Origins and development of the English language, both 
spoken and written, from its earliest forms to 
contemporary usage. (Alternate years) 

ENGL 5263. Linguistics and Language Learning. (3) 

Readings in, discussions of, and application of 
linguistically oriented theories of language acquisition, 
directed toward gaining an understanding of language- 
learning processes and stages. (Yearly) 

ENGL 5264. Literacy in Family and Community. (3) 

Exploration of literacy issues and outreach in schools, 
agencies, and work sites. (Alternate years) 

ENGL 5290. Advanced Creative Project. (3) 

Prerequisite: ENGL 5208 or 5209 or permission of the 



College of Arts and Sciences 91 



instructor. The planning, writing, and polishing of a work 
of at least 20 pages of poetry or at least 40 pages of 
fiction or creative non-fiction by advanced undergraduate 
or graduate students with the guidance of a member of 
the Department's creative writing faculty. The final work 
may be a single piece or a collection of pieces and will 
evolve under the supervision of the primary instructor. 
With permission of the Department, students who took 
the course as undergraduates may repeat as graduate 
students. (On demand) 

ENGL 5400. English Composition Practicum. (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. Through 
supervised tutorial experience and seminars, this course 
introduces the student to current developments 
concerning composition and to a variety of methods for 
teaching English composition. This course is highly 
recommended for those planning to teach or those 
currently engaged in teaching. With permission of the 
English Department may be repeated once for credit. 
(Fall, Spring) 

ENGL 5410. Professional Internship. (3 or 6) 

Prerequisites: permission of English Internship 
Coordinator. Restricted to juniors, seniors, graduate 
students majoring in English or minoring in English or 
communications who have at least a 2.5 GPA and a 
course in professional communication (e.g., journalism, 
technical communication, public relations, public 
relations lab, or mass media). Students work 8-10 hours (3 
hours credit) or 16-20 hours (6 hours credit) per week in a 
placement arranged by the Internship coordinator. Only 
three credit hours may be applied to the English major at 
either the undergraduate or graduate level; three 
additional hours may be counted as a University or 
Communications elective. (Fall, Spring, Summer) 

ENGL 5852. Independent Study. (1-3) Prerequisite: 
consent of the Department. Individual investigations and 
appropriate exposition of the results. (Unless special 
permission is granted by the Department Chair, no more 
than six hours may apply toward the English major.) May 
be repeated for additional credit with approval of the 
English Department. (Fall, Spring Summer) 

ENGL 6008. Topics in Advanced Technical 
Communication. (3) Theoretical and practical 
exploration of advanced topics in technical 
communication, including projects in which students 
write and publish documents by rhetorically integrating 
text, graphics, and other media using computer aids. 
(Yearly) 

ENGL 6062. Topics in Rhetoric. (3) Examination of 
and/or research concerning selected issues in rhetorical 
theory or pedagogy. May be repeated for credit with 
English Department approval. (Fall, Spring) 



topics vary and with English Department approval. (Fall, 
Spring) 

ENGL 6101. Introduction to English Studies. (3) The 

discipline of English— its nature, its history, and its 
methods. Emphasis on (1) the interrelations of literature, 
language, and writing; and (2) the diversity of cultural 
origins and critical perspectives in English studies, with 
concentration on selected major critical approaches. 
Intensive writing and practice in methods of research. 
Required of all M.A. in English students, preferably at or 
near the beginning of their programs. (Fall, Spring) 

ENGL 6102. Literary Theory. (3) Modern literary 
theory focusing on the theoretical concepts which 
underpin literary analysis. Emphases may differ from 
semester to semester; readings will focus on major 
theoretical statements and on criticism which applies 
several approaches to particular literary works. Students 
will be required to apply what they have learned. (Yearly) 

ENGL 6103. The Worlds of Juvenile Literature. (3) 

Covers a range of literature for children and adolescents 
including both historical and contemporary works. 
(Yearly) 

ENGL 6104. Major Figures in Children's Literature. 

(3) Focuses on specific authors or illustrators who have 
made important contributions to the evolution of 
children's literature. (Spring) 

ENGL 6111. Shakespeare's Comedies and Histories. 

(3) Source materials, textual problems and stage 
conventions in selected comedies and history plays 
illustrating Shakespeare's dramaturgy. (Yearly) 

ENGL 6112. Shakespeare's Tragedies. (3) Source 
materials, textual problems and stage conventions of the 
great tragedies, illustrating Shakespeare's dramaturgy. 
(Yearly) 

ENGL 6113. Milton. (3) The complete poetry and 
selections from the prose. (On demand) 

ENGL 6123. The Augustan Age, 1660-1785. (3) Close 
reading of Dryden, Pope, Swift, Johnson,, and a 
consideration of other literary figures and trends, in the 
light of intellectual and historical currents. (On demand) 

ENGL 6125. The Romantic Era, 1785-1832. (3) 

Development of the Romantic movement, with emphasis 
on the works of Wordsworth, Coleridge and other major 
poets. (Alternate years) 

ENGL 6126. The Victorian Era, 1832-1900. (3) 

Emphasis on Tennyson, Robert Browning, Arnold, 
Carlyle, Ruskin, Newman. (Alternate years) 



ENGL 6070. Topics in English. (3) Selected topics of 
literature and language. May be repeated for credit as 



ENGL 6141. American Romanticism. (3) Major 
writers of the 1830s, 40s, and 50s, including Hawthorne, 



92 College of Arts and Sciences 



Melville, Whitman, Emerson, Thoreau, and the 
Transcendental Movement. (Alternate years) 

ENGL 6142. American Realism and Naturalism. (3) 

Major writers of the two movements before and after the 
end of the 19th century, including Twain, Howells, James, 
Crane, Dreiser, Norris. (Alternate years) 

ENGL 6143. American Modernism. (3) Six to eight 
writers of the period since World War I, both prose and 
poetry. (Alternate years) 

ENGL 6144. Stylistics. (3) Methodologies for analysis 
of the style of texts, with special emphasis on diction, 
syntax, prose, rhythm, voice, and metaphor. (On demand) 

ENGL 6147. Perspectives in African-American 
Literature. (3) A survey of African-American literature, 
emphasizing the major authors, those relevant historical 
and social factors, and those specific literary movements 
that have influenced the development of African- 
American literature. (Alternate years) 

ENGL 6160. Introduction to the English Language. 

(3) History and nature of English, its grammar, syntax, 
and lexicon. Integrates the study of language-based 
rhetorical and literary theory, asks students to consider 
the nature of language in general, its impact on the user, 
and the development of the systems of English, 
concentrating on features of major British and American 
dialects and registers. (Fall, Spring) 

ENGL 6161. Introduction to Linguistics. (3) 

Introduction to linguistics, its techniques and objectives, 
descriptive and historical approaches, language families, 
language and culture. (Yearly) 

ENGL 6162. History of the English Language. (3) 

Origins and development of spoken and written English, 
from its earliest forms to contemporary usage, with some 
attention to dialects and lexicography. (May not also 
receive credit for ENGL 4260.) (Alternate years) 

ENGL 6163. Language Acquisition. (3) Prerequisite: 
ENGL 6160 or permission of the instructor. Linguistic 
theories of first and second language acquisition, 
including processes and stages of language development. 
(May not also receive credit for ENGL 4263.) (Yearly) 

ENGL 6166. Rhetorical Theory. (3) Rhetorical 
theories, past and present, focusing on ways that these 
varied frameworks of understanding have informed the 
generation, understanding, and pedagogy of writing and 
other modes of discourse. Emphases will vary from 
semester to semester, readings will concentrate on major 
selected rhetorical theories and on implications of these 
theories for the understanding and pedagogy of discourse. 
(Yearly) 



ENGL 6195. Teaching College English. (3) 

Examination of major issues in the theory and practice of 
literature and composition instruction at the college level. 
(Yearly) 

ENGL 6274. Contexts and Issues in the Teaching of 
English. (4) Prerequisites: Admission to the Program. 
Examine the key concepts of the discipline. Consider own 
identities as readers, writers, teachers, researches, makers 
of meaning. Emphasis upon critical approaches and 
pedagogical issues, with special attention to technology in 
the teaching of language, composition, and literature, as 
well as cultural contexts for the study of English. (Fall) 
(Evenings) 

ENGL 6495. Internship in College Teaching. (3) 

Prerequisite: ENGL 6195. Teaching in one section 
offered by the English Department under the supervision 
of English faculty. Students will be accepted for 
internship only near the end of the degree program and 
upon approval of the department. Students will be 
assigned to teach selected basic courses, and also will 
participate in periodic conferences and seminars. It is 
strongly recommended that students also take ENGL 
4400 before ENGL 6195. (Fall, Spring) 

ENGL 6674. Applied Research Methods in the 
Teaching of English. (4) Prerequisites: Completion of 
ENGL/EDUC 6274 and 12 hours of graduate credit 
toward this degree. Building on the research basis 
established in ENGL/EDUC 6274, this course provides 
the opportunity to apply research methods in classrooms. 
Examine identities as readers, writers, teachers, and 
especially as classroom researchers. (Spring) (Evenings) 

ENGL 6680. Seminar in British Literature. (3) pearly) 
(Evenings) 

ENGL 6685. Seminar in American Literature. (3) 

(Yearly) (Evenings) 

ENGL 6890. Directed Reading. (1-3) (Fall, Spring 
Summer) 

ENGL 6974. Thesis/Project in the Teaching of 
English. (6) Research integrating the fields of English 
and Education in a theoretical or application-oriented 
study. If the thesis/project is the outgrowth of previous 
coursework, considerable additional research and 
exposition must be done. (Department approval) 

ENGL 6996. Thesis. (6) Appropriate research and 
written exposition of that research, which may or may not 
be an outgrowth of work done in previous courses. If the 
thesis is the outgrowth of previous coursework, 
considerable additional research and exposition must be 
done beyond that previously undertaken. The proposed 
thesis work, as well as the final product, will be approved 
by a committee of three graduate faculty appropriate to 
the topic, appointed by die graduate coordinator after 



College of Arts and Sciences 93 



consultation with the student, on the basis of a written 
proposal from the student. It is recommended that thesis 
work not be undertaken until near the end of progress 
toward the degree. The thesis title is to be shown on the 
student's final transcript. A Creative thesis option is 
available for students who have completed appropriate 
coursework in Creative Writing. (A statement of 
recommendations and requirements for form and 
procedures is available in the English Department office.) 
(Fall, Spring Summer) 

ENGL 7999. Masters Degree Graduate Residence. 

(1) (Fall, Spring Summer) 



ENGLISH EDUCATION 

Department of English 

(see previous listing under English) 

Department of Middle, Secondary, and K-12 
Education 

College of Education Building, Room 324 
704-547-3220 

Degree 

M.A. 

Coordinator 

Dr. Lil Brannon 



MASTER OF ARTS IN ENGLISH 
EDUCATION 

Designed for experienced middle and secondary English 
teachers, the M.A. in English Education qualifies 
graduates for the new Masters/Advanced Competencies 
"M" license in English Education. The program includes 
core courses team-taught by faculty in the English 
Department and the College of Education which focus 
on issues in the teaching of English and on research 
methods and advanced study in English and professional 
education, including a core course in teacher leadership. 

Aligned with the 1997 North Carolina Excellent Schools 
Act and the proposition of the National Board for 
Professional Teaching Standards, the program prepares 
graduates to become master teachers who are (1) self- 
directed in their personal and professional growth as 
educators, (2) responsive to children's differences 
influenced by development, exceptionalities, and 
diversity, (3) well-grounded in the content and pedagogy 
of English/Language Arts curriculum, (4) self-reflective, 
self-evaluative, educational researchers, and (5) 
collaborative leaders. 



Additional Admission Requirements 

In addition to the general requirements for admission to 
the Graduate School, applicants must: 

1) Hold the "A" license in Secondary English or Middle 
Grades Language Arts from the North Carolina 
Department of Public Instruction (or its equivalent 
from another state), 

2) have at least two years experience of full-time 
teaching in the secondary or middle grades 
classroom, 

3) an undergraduate GPA of 2.75 overall and 3.0 in the 
junior/senior years and thirty hours of undergraduate 
course work in English beyond the freshman level, 
or evidence of equivalent academic preparation, 

4) a satisfactory essay that provides a statement of 
purpose for Master's degree study, 

5) a personal interview 

Degree Requirements 

The M.A. in English Education Program requires 
completion of at least 38 semester hours of graduate 
credit with grades of A or B in approved courses 
including: 

Core Course Requirements (14 hours) 

ENGL/EDUC 6274 Contexts and Issues in the 

Teaching of English (4) 
ENGL/EDUC 6674 Applied Research Methods in 

the Teaching of English (4) 
ENGL/EDUC 6974 Thesis/Project in the 

Teaching of English (6) 

Professional Requirements (12 Hours) 

MDSK 6260 Principles of Teacher Leadership (3) 

Also, 9 additional hours of graduate-level Education 
courses selected in consultation with the Program 
Coordinator. The program's 9 hours of professional 
courses are not free electives, but a planned program of 
study identified upon the students' enrollment in the 
program as part of the students' overall professional and 
program plan. 

Content Specialization Requirements (12 Hours) 
12 hours of graduate-level English courses selected in 
consultation with the Program Coordinator. The 
program's 12 hours of content specialization courses are 
not free electives, but a planned program of study 
identified upon the students' enrollment in the program 
as part of the students' overall professional and program 
plan. 

At least 18 hours of course work in the program must be 
in English or Education courses at the 5000 level or 
higher. 



94 College of Arts and Sciences 



Assistantships 

Assistants are awarded on a competitive basis through the 
Department of English and the Department of Middle 
Grades, Secondary, and K-12 Education. 

Capstone Experience 

Students are required to complete a Master's 
Thesis/Project, a formal piece of scholarship, that 
investigates a particular problem in English education and 
attempts to provide either data-based practical solutions 
to the problem or a philosophical/theoretical exploration 
of the problem and its implications for the classroom. 
Following the approval from the students' thesis 
committee, the candidate must present the findings in a 
professional manner at a level expected of a master 
teacher. 

Licensure 

The M.A. in English Education qualifies graduates for the 
Masters/Advanced Competencies "M" license in English 
Education. 



GEOGRAPHY 

Department of Geography and Earth 
Sciences 

448 McEniry Building 

(704) 687-2295 

http://www.geoearth.uncc.edu/ 

Degree 

MA. 

Coordinator 

Dr. Tyrel G. Moore 

Graduate Faculty 

Victoria Bowman, Professional Affiliate 

Harrison Campbell, Jr., Associate Professor 

Kenneth Chilton, Assistant Professor 

Owen Furuseth, Professor 

Laurie Garo, Lecturer and Professional Affiliate 

Bill Graves, Assistant Professor 

David Hartgen, Professor 

Edd Hauser, Professor 

Isaac Heard, Jr., Adjunct Professor 

Gerald Ingalls, Professor and Chair 

Jiyeong Lee, Assistant Professor 

Ronald Kalafsky, Assistant Professor 

Dennis Lord, Professor Emeritus 

Tyrel Moore, Professor 

Heather Smith, Assistant Professor 

Jack Sommer, Professor Emeritus 

Jamie Strickland, Lecturer and Professional Affiliate 

Alfred Stuart, Professor Emeritus 

Wayne Walcott, Associate Professor 



Wei-Ning Xiang, Professor 

MASTER OF ARTS IN 
GEOGRAPHY 

The M.A. in Geography at UNC Charlotte emphasizes 
the application of geographic skills, methods, and theories 
to problem solving in contemporary society. To this end, 
students are offered a solid foundation in research 
methods, problem formulation and solution, quantitative 
methods, computer applications and Geographic 
Information Systems (GIS). Faculty and students are 
active in the community and students are encouraged to 
complete their programs with either funded or unfunded 
private or public sector internships. 

One of the program's greatest strengths is the close 
relationship between its students and faculty and among 
the students themselves. Small class sizes, close student 
and faculty contact and a strong sense of community are 
considered essential components of the learning and 
teaching environment at UNC Charlotte. 

The applied geography program at UNC Charlotte is 
recognized as one of the best of its kind in the country. 
Its graduates go directly into jobs as professional 
geographers, research and/or marketing specialists, 
location analysts, planners, transportation specialists, and 
consulting. About 10 percent of the more than 250 
graduates of the program have gone on to study in Ph.D. 
programs. 

Additional Admission Requirements 

It is the policy of the Department to provide equal 
opportunities to all students regardless of race, creed, 
color, gender, or national origin. The Department 
maintains slightly different requirements than the general 
requirements for admission to graduate study at UNC 
Charlotte. The Department requires that applicants 
demonstrate evidence of suitability for the programs via 
evaluation in the five major areas listed below. These are 
weighted equally. 

All applications for admission to the Geography MA. 
Community Planning track will be reviewed by the 
Community Planning Track Interdisciplinary Entrance 
Committee. All other applications for admission will be 
reviewed by the Geography Graduate Advisory 
Committee. The Department will admit applicants on a 
competitive basis as space in the program allows and 
grant exceptions to the minimum standards if deemed in 
the best interests of the program. 
1) Grade Point Average (GPA) : In general, the 

Department would prefer an overall GPA above 3.1 
(or a 3.1 for the last 2 years) and a GPA of 3.2 in the 
major. However, averages less than these will not 
exclude applicants if the other elements of the 
application are strong. 



College of Arts and Sciences 95 



2) Letters of Recommendation : Three letters of 
reference are required. Letters from college or 
university teachers who have worked with and/or 
taught applicants are preferred. These letters will be 
evaluated on the basis of how well the applicant is 
suited in terms of intellect, motivation and 
temperament to do graduate course work 

3) Personal Essays : Applicants must write a personal 
essay which directly addresses why they wish to do 
graduate work in geography and why they wish to 
participate in the M.A. program at UNC Charlotte. 
They should address directly how the program at 
UNC Charlotte fits their career and/or professional 
goals and how they would benefit from and 
contribute to the M.A. in Geography at UNC 
Charlotte. This essay is very important in 
determining the applicant's commitment to graduate 
education and to a professional career in geography 
or a related field. Careful consideration of what goes 
into this essay is time well spent. 

4) Scores on the Graduate Record Exam : In general, 
the Department would prefer scores in the range of 
1000 or more on the combined Verbal and 
Quantitative portions of the GRE. Again, scores less 
than these suggested minimums will not 
automatically exclude applicants if the remainder of 
the applicant's file is strong. 

5) Transcripts of College Course Work : The transcripts 
will be evaluated on the basis of types of courses 
attempted, range of geography, statistical and 
computer course work attempted. Not only will the 
applicant be evaluated on the strength of the 
performance in these areas, but also on the range, 
depth and suitability of the applicant's preparation 
for graduate level course work. 

Additional Requirements for International Applicants : 
Applicants whose native language is not English must 
demonstrate their proficiency in English by taking the 
Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) 
examination. Overall scores of 575 with scores of 55 on 
individual sections (listening comprehension; structure 
and written expression; vocabulary and reading 
comprehension) are preferred. 

Prerequisite Requirements 

Minimum Preparation Suggested for Students Entering the 
Program: 

All prospective graduate students must demonstrate 
competence in the undergraduate subject matter in their 
area of study. While the Department does not require 
that applicants have a degree in Geography, prospective 
graduate students should provide evidence that they are 
prepared to immediately take full advantage of graduate 
level course work in Geography. 

Students applying to the program should, at a minimum, 
be familiar with the concepts and materials offered in 
courses such as basic Economic Geography, Introduction 
to Spatial Analysis, Location Theory, and Introduction to 
Research Methods or Statistics. Any student wishing to 



pursue additional training in Geographic Information 
Systems (GIS) should have basic cartography preparation 
and computer file management and data base skills. The 
relevant courses at UNC Charlotte are Maps and Graphs 
and Cartographic Lab. 

The courses noted above are considered basic for 
admission to the UNC Charlotte Masters of Arts in 
Geography Program. Consequently, a student will 
normally not be considered prepared for graduate study 
without equivalent course work. Any student passing the 
above courses with a grade of B or better at UNC 
Charlotte or the equivalent courses from another 
university with a grade of at least B will not be judged 
deficient in these courses and will not be denied entry 
based solely on a lack of preparation. All judgments in 
this area are the responsibility of the Graduate Advisory 
Committee, the Community Planning Interdisciplinary 
Committee, and the Department Chair. 

Assistantships 

Graduate assistantships are arranged for either one entire 
semester or for an entire academic year (2 semesters or 9 
months). They are normally scheduled for 16 weeks per 
semester and the student works 20 hours per week. 
Assistantships are funded at the rate of $4,500-$5,000 per 
semester. The Department makes every effort to provide 
funding to every full-time student in the program. 

Degree Requirements 

The M.A. in Geography requires a minimum of 36 
semester hours of graduate work. Three specific courses 
(12 semester hours) are required of all students except 
those pursuing the Community Planning Track. Of the 
remaining 24 hours, a minimum of 12 hours must be 
completed through 5000-6000 level geography course 
work. Up to 12 hours may be taken in related work 
which includes all transfer credit, credit by exam, and 
course work in other departments at or above the 5000 
level. At the discretion of the department, transfer credit 
totaling up to 6 hours may be accepted from accredited 
universities. No student may take more than 6 hours in 
graduate level independent study (GEOG 6800). 

Required Courses (for all except the Community 

Planning Track) 

GEOG6100 Quantitative Analysis in Geography (3) 
GEOG6200 Research Design Fundamentals (3) 
GEOG7900 Individual Research Project (6) 

Elective Courses 

1) Other 5000 or 6000-level courses in Geography — a 
minimum of 12 hours 

2) Related work (outside the Department) or transfer 
credits in courses numbered 5000 and above- 
maximum of 12 semester hours. 

Advising 

Upon admission to the program each student will be 
assigned a faculty advisor from the student's declared area 



96 College of Arts and Sciences 



of interest. This advisor will help guide the student 
through the design and implementation of a program of 
study tailored to the student's specific needs and career 
goals. The advisor will be available to the student for 
advice on academic and other problems. Students must 
confer with their advisors regularly concerning academic 
matters. 

More often than not, students will not work with the 
same advisor throughout the entire program. Once the 
student has become familiar with the program and the 
faculty, it is possible to change advisors by obtaining prior 
approval from the faculty member with whom the 
student wishes to work. Advisors should be chosen to 
match, as nearly as possible, the student's academic and 
career interests. No student will be allowed to register for 
a class without the signature of their "official" advisor. 

All students are required to formulate a complete plan for 
their M.A. during preregistration for second semester. 
This plan must be approved by their advisor and will 
serve as a guide to their course of study while at UNC 
Charlotte. 

Concentrations 

Students may elect to study in one or a combination of 
three concentrations and one track. The concentrations 
are location analysis, urban-regional analysis, and 
transportation studies. The University's interdisciplinary 
Community Planning Track also is housed within the 
M.A. in Geography. 

Location Analysis 

Overview 

The location analysis concentration offers course work in 
retail location, applied population analysis, facility siting, 
office and industrial location, trade area analysis, real 
estate development, location research, and regional 
economic development. 

This concentration prepares students for jobs in location 
research with retail companies, real estate developers, 
consulting firms, commercial banks, and economic 
development agencies or for continued academic training 
in economic geography and location analysis. Courses are 
taught by practitioners in the career fields listed above. 

Course Work 

The following courses are suggested for a concentration 

in location analysis: 

GEOG5108 Sport, Place and Development (3) 
GEOG5155 Retail Location (3) 
GEOG5255 Applied Population Analysis (3) 
GEOG6000 Selected Topics in Economic 

Geography (3) 
GEOG6030 Topics in Geographic Techniques (3) 
GEOG6101 Store Location Research (3) 
GEOG6102 Site Feasibility Analysis (3) 
GEOG6103 Real Estate Development (3) 
GEOG6104 Industrial Location (3) 



Urban-Regional Analysis 

Overview 

The urban-regional analysis concentration offers course 
work in community development, regional development, 
GIS based analysis, site feasibility analysis, public facility 
siting, urban economics and social geography. 

Students normally gain employment in public sector 
community development and economic development as 
well as the private sector. 

Graduates of the M.A. in Geography program hold 
positions in a number of local and regional agencies in 
North Carolina and South Carolina as well as in other 
states such as California, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, 
Georgia, Kentucky, New York, and Washington. They 
have responsibility for a broad range of development 
issues and tasks including economic development, 
geographic information systems, housing, land use, 
community and neighborhood analysis. Job placement 
for graduates has been very successful. 



Course Work 
Students normally 
a concentration in 
GEOG5101 
GEOG5103 
GEOG5108 
GEOG5120 

GEOG5130 

GEOG5210 
GEOG5255 
GEOG5260 
GEOG5265 
GEOG6005 
GEOG6015 
GEOG6102 
GEOG6103 
GEOG6104 
GEOG6106 

GEOG6116 
GEOG6615 



choose courses from the following for 

urban-regional analysis: 

Cartographic Techniques (3) 

Computer Mapping (3) 

Sport, Place and Development (3) 

Introduction to Geographic 

Information Systems (4) 

Advanced Geographic Information 

Systems (4) 

Urban Planning Methods (3) 

Applied Population Analysis (3) 

Transportation Policy Formulation (3) 

Transportation Analysis Methods (3) 

The Restructuring City (3) 

Topics in Regional Geography (3) 

Site Feasibility Analysis (3) 

Real Estate Development (3) 

Industrial Location (3) 

Urban Planning: Theory and Practice 

(3) 

Applied Regional Analysis 

Spatial Decision Support Systems (4) 



Transportation Studies 

Overview 

Students in the transportation studies concentration can 
pursue course work in transportation systems analysis, 
policy formulation, impact analysis, and planning. This 
concentration prepares students for jobs in the public and 
private sector, usually as planners in the public sector and 
as analysts for transportation providers and for consulting 
companies in the private sector. 

Job Prospects 

Graduates with this concentration in transportation 

studies have taken positions with local and regional 



College of Arts and Sciences 97 



planning agencies, consulting firms, and transit 
management companies across North Carolina and the 
U.S. 

Course Work 

The following courses comprise the transportation 

studies concentration: 

GEOG5040 Transportation Topics (3) 
GEOG5160 Geography of Transportation Systems 

(3) 
GEOG5260 Transportation Policy Formulation (3) 
GEOG5265 Transportation Analysis Methods (3) 
GEOG5270 Evaluation of Transportation Impacts 

(3) 

Selected courses offered by the Civil Engineering and 
Marketing Departments also are available for students in 
this program. 

Community Planning 

Overview 

The Community Planning Track is structured to provide 
students with grounding in planning skills, methods and 
theory, and practical experience for careers in community 
planning. That structure is supported by interdisciplinary 
perspectives from core coursework in Architecture, 
Economics, Geography, and Public Administration. 

job Prospects 

Graduates have been hired by local and regional planning 
agencies to give the track an excellent placement success 
rate. Perhaps a third of the students who pursue the 
program are practicing planners who wish to build and 
improve their professional skills. 

Curriculum - Required hours 36 semester hours 
The track comprises an interdisciplinary curriculum. 
Core requirements and approved electives are listed 
below: 



Core coursework (21 
GEOG5210 
GEOG6040/ 
ARCH6050 
GEOG6100 
GEOG6106 



hours, required of all students) 
Urban Planning Methods (3) 



Community Planning Workshop (3) 
Quantitative Analysis in Geography (3) 
Urban Planning: Theory and Practice 

(3) 
ARCH5214 Dilemmas of Modem City Planning (3) 
ECON6250 Advanced Urban and Regional 

Economics (3) 
MPAD6128 Public Policy Analysis and Program 

Evaluation (3) 

Elective Coursework (minimum 9 hours) from the following: 
GEOG5120 Introduction to Geographic 

Information Systems (4) 
GEOG5130 Advanced Geographic Information 

Systems (4) 
GEOG5209 Small Town Planning (3) 
GEOG5255 Applied Population Analysis(3) 



GEOG5260 Transportation Policy Formulation (3) 
GEOG5265 Transportation Analysis Methods (3) 
GEOG5270 Evaluation of Transportation Impacts 

(3) 
ARCH6050 The Architecture of Settlements (3) 
ARCH6050 Public Spaces in Cities (3) 
ARCH6050 Urban Transit and City Form (3) 
ARCH7103/ 
ARCH7104 Urban Design Problems (Topical 

Studio) (5) 
MPAD6102 Legal and Institutional Foundations of 

Public Administration (3) 
MPAD61 31 Public Budgeting and Finance (3) 

Capstone Research Project (6 hours, required of all students) 
GEOG7900 Individual Research Project (6) (taken 
in final semester) 

Research Options 

A common capstone research experience is not 
appropriate for all students. Instead, students should 
pursue research experiences that are appropriate to 
departmental faculty resources, individual student's 
programs and career goals, and the availability of 
opportunities that exist to work with allied agencies or 
clients on or off campus. One of three options, 
depending on the previously stated stipulations, will be 
available: 1) a research experience similar to that of a 
traditional academic thesis; 2) a research experience which 
involves a paid internship funded by and arranged with a 
public or private agency or client; and 3) a research 
experience involving an internship that is not funded, but 
arranged with a public or private agency or client. Each 
of these options fulfills program requirements equally. 
Each will produce a finished research effort of thesis 
quality. 

Not every student can expect to develop a capstone 
research project that is similar to a traditional academic 
thesis. It does, however, provide a choice for students to 
pursue a research problem in a direction of his/her 
individual interest. Students who ultimately plan to 
pursue a Ph.D. degree might be more inclined and 
encouraged toward that option. The same is true of 
students who wish to complete their master's program 
with that kind of individual research activity. In all cases, 
students must work closely with their advisor and 
program committee to choose the option which best fits 
both their particular program and prevailing 
circumstances. 

Not every student can expect to engage in a capstone 
research project that is a paid internship because the 
number of students frequently exceeds a matching 
number of opportunities funded in that manner. Unpaid 
internships provide the same caliber of experience and 
training in an applied environment. In some cases, that 
experience may relate student with non-profit agencies or 
social services that simply do not have the resources to 



98 College of Arts and Sciences 



fund an internship. In either case, the topic of the 
internship is defined by the client's problem or needs. 

Committees 

All GEOG 7900 Research Projects are evaluated by a 
committee of faculty. Committees must have a minimum 
of three members composed of the graduate faculty of 
the department— or related departments. Committee 
members may include outside members from other 
departments or internship coordinators from off-campus 
agencies when appropriate. 

Admission to Candidacy Requirements 

The Admission to Candidacy form should be filed upon 
successful completion of a minimum of 18 semester 
hours of graduate work and in no case later than four 
weeks prior to the beginning of the semester in which 
student expects to complete all requisites for the degree . 
Completed forms forwarded to Graduate School must 
include a capstone research project title and the names of 
faculty who comprise the student's committee. 

Comprehensive Examination 

To complete the program, each student must pass a two 
part comprehensive examination covering both general 
aspects of the discipline and defense of the individual 
capstone research project. It is the responsibility of the 
advisor or committee chair, in consultation with the 
student, to arrange each of the exams. 

The Written Exam - Part 1 of the comprehensive is a 
written exam in which the student must respond to three 
questions submitted by the faculty. These questions are 
solicited from the entire graduate faculty of the 
Department by a memo sent by student's advisor who 
then administers the examination. The written 
comprehensive exam is normally taken during the third 
semester (for full-time students) and in no case should the 
student take this exam before accumulating 27 hours of 
completed course work including courses in progress. 
This exam may not be administered if the student has 
outstanding incomplete grades in any course work. 

The Defense of the (GEOG 7900) Individual Research Project - 
Part 2 of the comprehensive exam is the defense of the 
individual research project (GEOG 7900) — the capstone 
research project. This exam is generally administered at 
the discretion of the committee chair and the student. 
When the advisor is satisfied that the student's research 
and writing has progressed sufficiently the research 
document is provided to the other members of the 
independent research committee; if they agree that the 
document is ready for a defense, an exam is scheduled. 



Courses In Geography 

GEOG 5000. Topics in Geography. (3) Major topics in 
Geography. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. 
(Yearly) (Evening) 



GEOG 5040. Transportation Topics. (3) Prerequisite: 
consent of department. Investigation of special topics in 
transportation including: transit systems, mobility and 
travel patterns, land use/transportation interface, air 
pollution, and information systems. (Spring) (Alternate 
years) 

GEOG 5101. Cartographic Techniques. (3) 

Prerequisite: GEOG 2100. Preparation of maps, figures 
and charts at a professional level of competence. 
Techniques to be emphasized include desktop mapping 
with computers, high resolution imagesetting output, 
color separation techniques which include computer 
separations as well as scribing and various related 
photographic processes. Two laboratories of three hours 
each per week. (Spring) 

GEOG 5102. Cartographic Design and Map 
Construction. (3) Design process and basic map 
construction techniques with particular emphasis on the 
graphic elements of map design, planning map design, 
creating visual hierarchies, the uses of color, and basic 
mechanical color separation. (Fall) 

GEOG 5103. Computer Mapping. (3) Prerequisites: 
GEOG 2100 and CSCI 1100 or 1201 and its lab, or 
consent of instructor. Automated methods of gathering, 
storing, manipulating and displaying spatial data. 
Emphasis on the use of existing software and the design 
and implementation of geographic data structures and 
algorithms. (Spring) 

GEOG 5108. Sport, Place and Development. (3) 

Prerequisites: GEOG 1105. Examines sport and its 
impact on the landscape of cities and communities. 
Implications of sport are examined in terms of urban use, 
urban social structure, markets, franchise movement and 
expansion, urban politics, its role in defining sense of 
place, and its impact on the development of communities 
and regions. (Spring) 

GEOG 5120. Introduction to Geographic 
Information Systems. (4) Prerequisite: consent of 
instructor. Development, current state-of-the-art and 
future trends in geographic information processing with 
emphasis on data gathering, storage, and retrieval, 
analytical capabilities and display technologies. A 
laboratory component will include development and 
completion of an applied GIS research project. 
Additional requirements for graduate credit. Three 
lecture hours, one two-hour lab per week. (Fall) 

GEOG 5130. Advanced Geographic Information 
Systems. (4) Prerequisite: GEOG 5120 or consent of 
instructor. Advanced GIS study with emphasis on (1) 
advanced skills for database development and 
management; (2) spatial analysis and modeling; and (3) 
Macro language programming and user interface design. 



College of Arts and Sciences 99 



Three lecture hours and a two-hour lab session each 
week (Spring) 

GEOG 5155. Retail Location. (3) Spatial attributes of 
retailing and related activities. Location patterns, store 
location research, trade area delineation and consumer 
spatial behavior. (Spring) 

GEOG 5160. The Geography of Transportation 
Systems. (3) Geographical and human factors that affect 
the movement of goods and people from place to place. 
Emphasis on transportation routes and networks, 
commodity flow patterns and the locational implications 
of freight rates. (Spring) 

GEOG 5209. Small Town Planning. (3) This course 
will explore small town population dynamics, rural-urban 
fringe land use dynamics, and changes in small towns' 
community identity and sense of place. Emphasis will be 
placed on the issues and techniques that typify small town 
planning environments. Students will investigate these 
issues via field work and data collection at municipal 
scales within the Charlotte region. 

GEOG 5210. Urban Planning Methods. (3) 

Prerequisite: GEOG 5205 or consent of the instructor. 
Scope and methods of urban planning. Emphasis on 
analytical techniques, projections, and data sources used 
in developing comprehensive planning tasks and 
strategies. (Fall) 

GEOG 5240. Geography of Knowledge and 
Information. (3) Examination of the factors that 
influence the location of economic activities in the 
information age. Discussions and lectures explore the 
geographic aspects of the transition away from 
manufacturing to information processing as the primary 
mode of production. The transition is examined in terms 
of technology development, urban and regional 
development, information flows and the location of 
quaternary industry. (Fall, On demand) 

GEOG 5255. Applied Population Analysis. (3) 

Population data sources; measuring population change; 
elementary projection and estimation techniques; spatial 
sampling; migration; survey design; applications in the 
public and private sectors. (Fall) 

GEOG 5260. Transportation Policy Formulation. (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of department. Structure of 
transportation policy at federal, state, and local levels 
including policies concerning highway financing and 
investments, congestion, safety, and use and 
development, energy, transit, and the provision of 
intercity services. (Fall) (Alternate years) 

GEOG 5265. Transportation Analysis Methods. (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of department; statistics 
recommended. Procedures for analy2ing the operation 
and performance of transportation systems; includes 



network planning models, minimum path algorithms and 
assignments; energy, air pollution, and activity analysis 
models; and research approaches, data sources, time and 
activity budgets, infrastructure condition and needs 
assessment. (Spring) (Alternate years) 

GEOG 5270. Evaluation of Transportation Impacts. 

(3) Prerequisite: consent of department. Methods and 
case studies for evaluating impacts and benefits of 
transportation investments including site-level impact 
analysis; project, corridor, and area scales; multi-modal 
evaluation and examination of mutually exclusive 
alternatives. (Fall) (Alternate years) 

GEOG 5405. Urban Field Geography. (6) Prerequisite: 
six hours of urban-related undergraduate courses or 
permission of instructor. Intensive field studies of cities 
of the Carolinas, including one-day and overnight trips to 
cities of the mountains and coastal areas. Emphasis on 
day study trips within the Piedmont. Exercises include 
land-use mapping, trip journals, interviews and 
comparisons of the results of zoning and urban 
development practices within satellite cities of the 
Charlotte Metropolitan Statistical Area. (Summer) 

GEOG 6000. Topics in Economic Geography. (3) 

Major topics in the location of economic activity. May be 
repeated for credit as topics vary. (Yearly) (Evenings) 

GEOG 6005. Topics in Urban Geography. (3) Major 
topics in the form and structure of urban areas examined 
generally and in a specific local occurrence. May be 
repeated for credit as topics vary. (Yearly) (Evening) 

GEOG 6010. Topics in Political Geography. (3) Major 
topics in the spatial aspects of political systems with 
special emphasis on urban and regional spatial patterns 
examined generally and in a specific local occurrence. 
May be repeated for credit as topics vary. (On demand) 

GEOG 6015. Topics in Regional Geography. (3) 

Intensive examination of major spatial questions in a 
given region. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. 
(On demand) 

GEOG 6030. Topics in Geographic Techniques. (3) 

Cartographic, remote sensing, quantitative techniques or 
field techniques. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. 
(On demand) 

GEOG 6100. Quantitative Analysis in Geography. (3) 

Multiple regression, trend surface, factorial analysis, 
cluster analysis, discriminant analysis. (Fall) (Evenings) 

GEOG 6101. Store Location Research. (3) Prerequisite: 
GEOG 6100 or consent of instructor. Market area 
analysis and site evaluation methods, including the 
application of multivariate statistical models, spatial 
interaction-gravity models, and location-allocation 
techniques to the retail location analysis task. (Spring) 



100 College of Arts and Sciences 



GEOG 6102. Site Feasibility Analysis. (3) Prerequisite: 
consent of instructor. Examination of factors affecting 
the feasibility of land parcels for commercial and 
residential development with emphasis on the physical 
evaluation of a given site, the market support for its 
intended use and the financial support for the proposed 
development. (Fall) 

GEOG 6103. Real Estate Development. (3) 

Examination of the real estate development process. 
Identification and evaluation of the critical assumptions 
and issues related to market and site feasibility, financial 
feasibility, planning, acquisition, construction, and 
operation of economically viable commercial real estate 
projects. (Fall or Spring) 

GEOG 6104. Industrial Location. (3) Addresses factors 
influencing the location of industrial and service activities. 
Classical theories of industrial location are augmented 
with contemporary interpretations of the economic 
landscape. Emphasis is placed on theoretical foundations 
and new developments in industrial location theory, 
patterns and trends of industrial location, the site 
selection process, community impacts of locational 
decision-making, and the role of governments. Patterns 
and trends are examined in regional, national, and 
international perspectives. (Fall, Alternate Years) 

GEOG 6105. Applied Real Estate Development. (3) 

Prerequisite: MBAD 6159/GEOG 6103/ARCH 5068. 
This course focuses on the application of the processes 
involved in real estate development. Students will work 
in groups on a semester project to select a site and 
prepare an appropriate development plan that emphasizes 
the market and financial feasibility of the real estate 
development. (Fall or Spring) 

GEOG 6106. Urban Planning: Theory and Practice. 

(3) Alternative planning theories and application of 
theories in urban planning practices. (Alternate years) 

GEOG 6110. Cartographic Preparation and Analysis. 

(3) Cartographic design and analysis of qualitative and 
quantitative data. Emphasis on preparation of maps, 
figures and charts. Techniques include scribing and 
various photographic processes. Two three-hour labs 
each week. (On demand) 

GEOG 6116. Applied Regional Analysis. (3) 

Prerequisite: Basic computer skills including 
spreadsheets. Introduction to methods and techniques 
used in regional analysis. Topical areas include data 
sources and collection, regional delineation, community 
and regional profiles, regional accounts, methods of 
analysis and impact assessment. Topics are discussed in 
terms of theory, use, and role in economic geography and 
regional development. Emphasis is placed on application 
of economic and demographic methods at the regional 
level. (Spring, Alternate Years) 



GEOG 6200. Research Design Fundamentals. (3) 

Scientific research and problem solving. Problem 
identification, bibliographic search, data sources and 
collection, techniques selection and preparation of reports 
and proposals. (Spring) (Evenings) 

GEOG 6201. Analysis and Presentation of Research 
Data. (3) The student is required to complete a research 
project. Topics such as research critiques, preparation and 
presentation of research reports, and the development of 
geographic thought are considered. (Fall) (Evenings) 

GEOG 6600. Seminar in Geography. (3) Study of the 
current trends in geographic thought and research 
methods. Pass/No Credit grading. (On demand) 

GEOG 6615. Advanced Seminar in Spatial Decision 
Support Systems (SDSS). (4) Prerequisite: GEOG 
5120 or consent of instructor. Theoretical aspects of 
spatial DSS including technical, social, political and 
psychological consideration; systems design; systems 
manipulation; and case studies. Three hours of lecture 
and one two-hour lab per week. (Fall) 

GEOG 6643. Rural Development Issues. (3) 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. This course 
provides research experiences that focus on policy 
formulation, and demographic, economic and planning 
issues in rural areas. (Fall) 

GEOG 6800. Directed Problems in Geography. (1-4) 

Individual research into geographic topics. May be 
repeated one time. (On demand) 

GEOG 7900. Individual Research Project. (6) 

Individual research report based on directed study of a 
topic of geographic significance. Pass/No Credit/ 
Unsatisfactory grading. (Fall, Spring) 

GEOG 7999. Masters Degree Graduate Residence. 

(1) Permission needed from department. (Fall, Spring 
Summer) 



GERONTOLOGY 

Interdisciplinary Program in Gerontology 

704-687-4520 
www.coas.uncc.edu/gerontology 

Degrees 

M.A. (Concentration in Planning and Administration is 
available), Certificate 

Director and Coordinator 

Dr. Dena Shenk 



College of Arts and Sciences 101 



Graduate Faculty 

Anita Blowers, Director, Office of Student Success and 

Retention and Associate Professor of Criminal 

Justice 
Bill Brandon, Metrolina Medical Foundation 

Distinguished Professor of Public Policy in Health 
Maren Coffman, Assistant Professor of Nursing 
Boyd Davis, Bonnie E. Cone Professor of Teaching, 

Professor of English 
Mark Dorfman, Professor of Finance and Business Law 
Mark Faust, Assistant Professor of Psychology 
Paul Foos, Professor of Psychology 
Cynthia Hancock, Lecturer, Department of Sociology & 

Anthropology 
Martin Kane, Associate Professor of Civil Engineering 
JoAnn Lee, Associate Professor of Psychology 
Julie McLaughlin, Assistant Professor of Sociology 
Linda Moore, Associate Professor of Adult Health 

Nursing 
Deanna Morrow, Associate Professor of Social Work 
Jane Neese, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, 

College of Health and Human Services 
Gary Rassel, Associate Professor of Political Science 
Dorothy Ruiz, Associate Professor of African- American 

and African Studies 
Dena Shenk, Professor of Anthropology 
Randy Swanson, Associate Professor of Architecture 
Rosemarie Tong, Mecklenburg County Medical Society 

Distinguished Professor 
Michael Turner, Associate Professor of Health Programs 

and Kinesiology 
Carole Winston, Assistant Professor of Social Work 
Diane Zablotsky, Associate Professor of Sociology 



MASTER OF ARTS IN 
GERONTOLOGY 

The Master of Arts in Gerontology is designed to prepare 
graduates with the knowledge and skills to fill a wide 
variety of positions in the developing field of aging. The 
Planning and Administration Concentration will best 
meet the needs of those planning to direct programs for 
older adults, and those interested in the development and 
administration of programs. 

Potential students are encouraged to apply to begin the 
program in the fall semester, although applications are 
reviewed throughout the year. The program can be 
completed on either a full-time or part-time basis with all 
required courses and a selection of electives offered in the 
evening. Some courses may require prerequisites and it is 
the responsibility of the candidate to meet any 
prerequisites (e.g. statistics is a required prerequisite for 
GRNT 6201). Students will work in conjunction with 
their adviser and graduate committee to design and 
implement their individual program. 



Additional Admission Requirements 

Grade point average of at least 2.75 overall and 3.0 in 

courses in Gerontology. 

Satisfactory GRE or MAT scores. 

Three letters of recommendation from persons familiar 

with the applicant's personal and professional 

qualifications. 

An essay is required describing the applicant's relevant 

experience and objectives in undertaking graduate study 

in Gerontology. 

Prerequisite Requirements 

Completion of at least one broad-based undergraduate 
course in Gerontology or the Professional Development 
Program in Gerontology previously offered through the 
Office of Continuing Education, Extension and Summer 
Sessions at UNC Charlotte. 

Degree Requirements 

The Gerontology Program requires 36 semester hours of 
graduate course work. 

Core Courses (required, 21 hours) 

GRNT6600 Current Issues in Gerontology (3) 
SOCY6130 Sociology of Aging: Theories and 

Research (3) 
PSYC61 24 Psychology of Aging (3) 
NURS6275 Health Promotion and Wellness for 

Older Adults (3) 
GRNT6201 Research and Methods in Aging I (3) 
GRNT6202 Research and Methods in Aging II (3) 
GRNT6400 Practicum (3) 

In addition to these core courses, each student will 
complete either a thesis or an applied project (GRNT 
6999 or 6990). 



Elective courses 

GRNT5050 
GRNT5250 



include the following: 
Topics in Gerontology (1 -4) 
Programs and Services for the Aging 

(3) 
GRNT6800 Independent Research Study (3) can 

be repeated, up to 6 credits can be 

counted towards MA electives 
GRNT6210/ 

MPAD6210 Aging and Public Policy (3) 
GRNT6211/ 

MPAD621 1 Administration of Aging Programs (3) 
HPKD5232 Physiology of Human Aging (3) 
MPAD6128 Public Policy Analysis and Program 

Evaluation (3) 
MPAD6172 Administration of the Health Care 

System in the U.S. (3) 
NURS61 1 5 Health Planning in the Health Care 

System (3) 
GRNT5134 Families and Aging (3) 
GRNT51 50 Older Individual and Society (3) 



Other electives may be selected in consultation with your 
adviser. 



102 College of Arts and Sciences 



Comprehensive Examination 

Each student will complete an oral comprehensive exam 
at the time of the thesis or applied project proposal 
defense. 

Committee 

Each student should select his/her Graduate Committee 
before completion of GRNT 6201. 

Thesis or Applied Project 

The thesis option entails 9 hours of elective credits and 6 
hours of thesis credits (GRNT 6999). The student must 
also pass an oral defense of both the thesis proposal and 
thesis, and oral comprehensive exams at the time of the 
thesis proposal defense. 

The applied project option generally entails 12 hours of 

elective credits and 3 hours of applied project credits 

(GRNT 6990). 

The student must also pass an oral defense of both the 

applied project proposal and the project, and oral 

comprehensive exams at the time of the project proposal 

defense. 

Financial Aid/Financial Assistance 

The program offers the NMR Gerontology Graduate 
Scholarship annually with all application materials due by 
June 1. 

Early Entry Program 

Exceptional undergraduate students may be accepted into 
the master's of Gerontology and begin work toward a 
graduate degree before completion of the baccalaureate 
degree. 



GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN 
GERONTOLOGY 

The Graduate Certificate in Gerontology is designed to 
provide graduate education in Gerontology for those who 
already have a graduate degree in another field or those 
currently completing a graduate degree in another field, 
who are interested in working with older adults. It 
requires completion of a set of core and elective courses 
related to the study of aging. Applications for admission 
the Graduate Certificate Program in Gerontology are 
considered as they are received and admissions are 
ongoing. Students are admitted to the Graduate School in 
a special category for certificate students. 

Additional Admission Requirements 

In addition to the general requirements for admission to a 
certificate program, applicants must provide official 
transcripts of all baccalaureate and graduate work 
attempted. 



Three letters of recommendation are required from 
persons familiar with the applicant's personal and 
professional qualifications. 

An essay is required describing the applicant's relevant 
experience and objectives in undertaking graduate study 
in Gerontology. 

Degree Requirements 

The Graduate Certificate Program requires completion of 
a minimum of 15 semester hours of graduate course work 
related to aging and older adults. 

Core Course 

GRNT6600 Current Issues in Gerontology (3) 

Electives 

Primary Electives (choose 2-3 of the following): 
PSYC6 1 24 Psychology of Aging (3) 
SOCY6130 Sociology of Aging: Theories and 

Research (3) 
NURS6275 Health Promotion and Wellness for 

Older Adults (3) 

Secondary Electives (choose 1-2 from the following): 
GRNT5050 Topics in Gerontology (1-4) 
GRNT5250 Programs and Services for the Aging 

(3) 
GRNT6210/ 

MPAD6210 Aging and Public Policy (3) 
GRNT6211/ 

MPAD621 1 Administration of Aging Programs (3) 
GRNT 6400 Practicum (3) 
HPKD5232 Physiology of Human Aging (3) 
MPAD6128 Public Policy Analysis and Program 

Evaluation (3) 
MPAD6172 Administration of the Health Care 

System in the U.S. (3) 
NURS6115 Health Planing in the Health Care 

System (3) 
GRNT51 34 Families and Aging (3) 
GRNT51 50 Older Individual and Society (3) 
Secondary electives may also be chosen from other 
appropriate courses as offered with the approval of the 
Gerontology Graduate Coordinator. 

Transfer Credit 

Transfer credit is not accepted toward a Graduate 
Certificate Program in Gerontology. 



Courses In Gerontology 

GRNT 5050. Topics in Gerontology. (1-4) 

Investigation of specific issues in Gerontology, either 
from the perspective of a single discipline or from a 
multidisciplinaty perspective. May be repeated for credit 
as topics vary. (On demand) 

GRNT 5134. Families and Aging. (3) Theories 
explaining the formation and functioning of American 



College of Arts and Sciences 103 



families with emphasis on the impact of the aging of 
society. Examination of the current demographic trends 
and expectations of multigenerational families, as well as 
the future demands and modifications. (Yearly) 

GRNT 5150. Older Individual and Society. (3) Study 
of the social and cultural context on the lives of aging 
individuals in American society. Will include a focus on 
expectations, social interactions, and psychological well- 
being in the context of retirement, caregiving, and health 
(Yearly) 

GRNT 5250. Aging Programs and Services. (3) 

Examination of federal, state and local framework of 
services and programs for the aging. Graduate students 
required to complete a more extensive final paper. (On 
demand) 

GRNT 5260/WMST 5260. Women: Middle Age and 
Beyond. (3) Position of older women in society and the 
particular problems and issues for women as they age. (On 
demand) 

GRNT 5270. Intergenerational Relationships & 
Programs. (3) Exploration of the importance of and 
consequences of intergenerational relationships and the 
range of programming currently available to encourage 
interaction between people of different ages. (On demand) 

GRNT 6201. Research and Methods in Aging I. (3) 

Prerequisite: Statistics. Examination of variety of 
qualitative and quantitative methods used in research on 
aging and analysis of Gerontology research from a range 
of disciplines. Students will develop a working draft of 
their thesis-applied project proposal. (Fall) 

GRNT 6202. Research and Methods in Aging II. (3) 

Prerequisite: GRNT 6201. Examination of the variety of 
qualitative and quantitative methods used in evaluation 
research in applied settings. Students will develop an 
evaluation project plan. (Spring) 

GRNT 6238/PHIL 6238. Intergenerational Issues of 
Justice. (3) Examination of intergenerational issues of 
justice in public policy toward the elderly and their health 
care needs. Issues of justice and morality will be explored 
in terms of the distribution of limited health care 
resources among competing age groups. (On demand) 

GRNT 6210/MPAD 6210. Aging and Public Policy. 

(3) Examination of the public policy making process with 
attention to aging policy. Consideration of determinants 
of aging policy and institution and actors in the policy 
making process and piecemeal development of legislation 
will be analyzed as factors related to the making of policy 
for the aged. (Alternate years) 

GRNT 6211/MPAD 6211. Administration of Aging 
Programs. (3) Focus will be implementation of public 
policies and programs for the aged and the development 



and administration of these programs. Students will 
become familiar with the process through which policies 
are transformed into aging programs and the budgetary, 
management and evaluative considerations that must be 
taken into consideration. (Alternate years) 

GRNT 6400. Practicum. (3) Completion of a field- 
based educational experience which relates to the 
student's career goals and objectives. Pass/Fall grading. 
(Summer) 

GRNT 6600. Current Issues in Gerontology. (3) Study 
of current topics and issues in the field of Gerontology 
from an interdisciplinary perspective. An ethical 
framework will be used to examine the issues. (Fall) 

GRNT 6800. Independent Research in Gerontology. 

(3) Graduate students meet individually or in small 
groups with the instructor and will complete readings 
and/or research on a topic in gerontology according to a 
contract. Attendance at lectures of an undergraduate class 
in Gerontology may be included among course 
requirements. May be repeated for credit up to a 
maximum of six hours. (On demand) 

GRNT 6990. Applied Project. (3) Permission needed 
from program. Pass/Fail grading. (Fall, Spring, Summer) 

GRNT 6999. Master of Arts Thesis. (3 or 6) 

Prerequisite: application for admission to the thesis 
option. A completed paper and oral presentation are 
required. Pass/Fail grading. (Fall, Spring Summer) 

GRNT 7999. Master of Arts Graduate Residency. (1) 

(Fall, Spring Summer) 



HISTORY 

Department of History 

113 Garinger Building 

704-687-4633 

http://www.uncc.edu/colleges/arts_and_sciences/histor 

y/ 

Degree 

M.A., Ph.D. (joint degree with the University of 
Aberdeen) 

Coordinator 

Dr. Cynthia Kierner 

Graduate Faculty (UNC Charlotte) 

Cemil Aydin, Assistant Professor 
Mario Azevedo, Professor 
Jurgen Buchenau, Associate Professor 
Karen Cox, Assistant Professor 
Jerry Davila, Associate Professor 



104 College of Arts and Sciences 



Daniel Dupre, Associate Professor 
Melissa Feinberg, Assistant Professor 
Karen Flint, Assistant Professor 
John Flower, Associate Professor 
David Goldfield, Professor 
Christine Haynes, Assistant Professor 
James Hogue, Associate Professor 
Lyman Johnson, Professor 
Cynthia Kierner, Professor 
Gregory Mixon, Associate Professor 
Daniel Morrill, Professor 
Steven Sabol, Associate Professor 
John Small, Professor 
John David Smith, Professor 
Robert Smith, Assistant Professor 
Heather Thompson, Associate Professor 
Peter Thorsheim, Assistant Professor 
Mark Wilson, Assistant Professor 



MASTER OF ARTS IN HISTORY 



2) Acceptable performance on the verbal and math 
portions of the GRE. 

Degree Requirements 

The Master of Arts degree in History requires 
completion, with a GPA of 3.0 or better, of at least 30 
hours in approved graduate courses. These courses must 
include at least 24 credit hours in History, of which at 
least 1 5 hours are in seminars or colloquia open only to 
graduate students, and no more than 6 hours in 
individually designed readings or research courses. 
Students taking the comprehensive examination may take 
3 hours of exam preparation and students completing a 
thesis may take 6 hours of thesis preparation toward their 
30 hours. 

Students who pursue the concentration in Public History 
must complete 30 hours of required and elective 
coursework, 3 hours for an internship in some area of 
Public History, and 3 hours of thesis work for a total of 
36 hours. 



The Master of Arts Program in History at UNC Charlotte 
is designed to give motivated students an opportunity to 
pursue advanced studies in close collaboration with 
accomplished scholars. The program emphasizes the 
development of methodological, literary, and conceptual 
skills that graduates can employ as students in a doctoral 
program, as professionally oriented history teachers in 
secondary schools, as staff at museums or historic sites, 
or as citizens more acutely aware of the historical 
evolution of their society. Offering both day and evening 
courses, the Department of History attracts a diverse 
group of traditional and non-traditional students. 
Candidates may pursue the M.A. degree on either a full- 
time or part-time basis. 

The Department offers courses in African, Asian, 
European, Latin American, and United States history, 
with particular expertise in the following areas: 

American South, Old and New 

Modern Europe 

Gender, Race, and Slavery in Comparative 

Perspective 

Latin America 

The Department also offers a concentration in the field 
of Public History under the directorship of Dr. Karen 
Cox. The program emphasizes museum studies, historic 
preservation, and the creation of new media such as 
websites, CD-Roms, and digital images and document 
collections. 

Admission Requirements 

In addition to the general requirements for admission to 
the Graduate School, the following are ordinarily required 
for admission to the M.A. program in History: 
1) A minimum undergraduate GPA of 3.0 in History or 
a related discipline. 



Students must complete all degree requirements, 
including the comprehensive examination or thesis 
defense, within six calendar years of first enrollment in 
the program. 

All students in the program are expected to maintain an 
overall B (3.0) average. Students who do not meet this 
expectation will be subject to suspension on 
recommendation of the Graduate Committee of the 
Department of History. 

Admission to Candidacy Requirements 

An Admission to Candidacy form must be submitted 
during the semester preceding the one in which the 
student plans to complete the degree requirements, either 
by defending a thesis or taking a comprehensive 
examination. 

Assistantships 

The Department of History supports eight students with 
teaching assistantships, two students with editorial 
assistantships, and another with an administrative 
assistantship for the History Freshman Learning 
Community. Assistantships are funded at §9,000 per 
academic year. From time to time, the Department also 
provides students with other assistantship opportunities. 

See the sections on Tuition Waivers and Financial 
Assistance, below, for additional information on 
resources available to graduate students in the 
Department of History. 

Internships 

Internships are available to all students and required for 
those in the Public History program. Graduate students 
have done internships with the Mecklenburg County- 
Historical Commission and the Journal of Urban History, 
both of which are headed by members of the 



College of Arts and Sciences 105 



Department, and with a variety of local historical 
museums and sites. The Levine Museum of the New 
South, located in uptown Charlotte, and the Charlotte 
Museum of History, employ our students for research 
and design. Students also may serve as research assistants 
for members of the Department of History. See the 
Graduate Coordinator or the Director of Public History 
for internship opportunities. 

Core Courses 

All candidates for the degree must complete HIST 6693 
(Historiography and Methodology) with a grade of B (3.0) 
or better. In addition, at least 6 hours of a student's 
History courses are expected to pertain to fields other 
than United States history. 

In addition to those requirements, candidates pursuing 
the concentration in Public History must complete HIST 
6310 (History Museums), HIST 6320 (Historic 
Preservation) and HIST 6330 (History in the Digital Age). 

Electives 

Students may elect to take up to 6 hours of graduate-level 
course work in disciplines other than History. Candidates 
seeking graduate-level teacher certification may use the 
elective option to take courses in professional education 
selected in consultation with the College of Education. If 
a student needs more than 6 hours to satisfy certification 
requirements, those hours will be added to the total 
required for the MA. in History. 

Advising 

Students may not register for graduate-level courses 
without the permission of the Department of History. 
Consequently, students must be advised by the Graduate 
Coordinator, either in person or by phone or email, prior 
to registering for courses each semester, as well as prior 
to filing their admission to candidacy form and 
application for degree. 

Transfer Credit 

No more than 6 transferred hours may be approved for 
application to the requirements for the degree. 

Language Requirement 

Although students are not required to demonstrate 
proficiency in a foreign language, they are expected to be 
able to use whatever languages they need to pursue their 
research interests. 

Thesis/Comprehensive Examination 

After completing the required courses, students must 
either prepare a Master's thesis based on original primary 
research or take three comprehensive written 
examinations based on reading lists compiled in 
consultation with faculty members. In both cases, the 
candidate must then pass an oral examination based on 
their thesis or written examination. 



An Examining Committee, consisting of two graduate 
faculty members from the Department of History and a 
third member selected from History or another 
department, oversees the student's thesis work or 
conducts the comprehensive written and oral 
examinations. 

Tuition Waivers 

The Department has two tuition waivers that enable out- 
of-state students to pay tuition at the in-state rate. There 
is also a modest pool of scholarship money for in-state 
students. The Department awards all waivers and 
scholarship money on a strictly competitive basis. 

Financial Aid/Financial Assistance 

Students may obtain limited financial support from paid 
internships, summer teaching in the Department, archival 
work in the library's Special Collections, and teaching 
opportunities at local community colleges. Students doing 
thesis research or presenting papers at professional 
conferences may receive modest travel grants from the 
Department or from the Graduate History Association. 

Information on non-departmental forms of financial 
assistance is available from the UNC Charlotte Office of 
Financial Aid. 



Courses In History 

HIST 5000. Problems in American History. (3) 

Prerequisite: HIST 2100 or permission of the department. 
A colloquium designed around a problem in American 
history, requiring reading, discussion, reports and a major 
paper. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. (Fall, 
Spring) (Evenings) 

HIST 5001. Problems in European History. (3) 

Prerequisites: HIST 2100 or permission of the 
department. A colloquium designed around a problem in 
European history, requiring reading, discussion, reports 
and a major paper. May be repeated for credit as topics 
vary. (Yearly, Summer) (Evenings) 

HIST 5002. Problems in Non- Western History. (3) 

Prerequisite: HIST 2100 or permission of the department. 
A colloquium designed around a problem in non- Western 
history, requiring reading, discussion, reports and a major 
paper. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. (Yearly) 

HIST 5300. Introduction to Public History. (3) 

Prerequisite: permission of the department. This course 
will provide an overview of the main subfields in the field 
of Public History. Students will learn the fundamentals of 
Museum Studies, Historic Preservation, and other fields 
at the discretion of the instructor. This course is the first 
in a sequence of required courses for graduate students 
doing the Public History concentration; it is also open to 
advanced undergraduates with the consent of the 
department. (Yearly) 



106 College of Arts and Sciences 



HIST 6000. Topics in History. (3) Prerequisite: 
permission of the department. Intensive treatment of a 
period or broader survey of a topic, depending on student 
needs and staff resources. May be repeated for credit as 
topics vary. (Fall, Spring) (Evenings) 

HIST 6151. Seminar on Colonial Latin American 
History (3) Prerequisite: permission of the department. 
A topical seminar devoted to selected themes in colonial 
Latin American history. This course provides an 
introduction to research methods, documentary sources, 
and the critical analysis of historical literature. Topics will 
change. Course may be repeated for credit. (Alternate 
years) 

HIST 6152. Seminar in Modern Latin American 
History (3) Prerequisite: permission of the department. 
A topical seminar devoted to selected themes in modern 
Latin American history. This course provides an 
introduction to research methods, documentary sources, 
and the critical analysis of historical literature. Topics will 
change. Course may be repeated for credit. (Alternate 
years) 

HIST 6196. Urban Systems for School 
Administrators. (3) Corequisite: POLS 6196. An 
interdepartmental, team-taught course which consists of a 
survey of the causes and consequences of urbanization in 
the United States with particular attention to the urban 
South. Urbanization is treated as a system linking historic, 
political, economic, and social factors, particularly since 
1945. (Summer) 

HIST 6200. History Teaching Alliance Institute. (3) 

Open under special arrangement. Pass/No Credit grading 
only. (On demand) 

HIST 6210. Early America, 1607-1820. (3) Prerequisite: 
permission of the department. Development of American 
institutions from the period of English settlement 
through the establishment of Republicanism under the 
Constitution. (Alternate years) 

HIST 6215. Jacksonian America, 1820-1848. (3) 

Prerequisite: permission of the department. Examination 
of important economic, social and political changes 
including industrialization, the rise of the Democratic 
Party and reform movements. (Alternate years) 

HIST 6220. The Old South. (3) Prerequisite: 
permission of the department. Evolution of the Old 
South from the 17th century to its collapse in the Civil 
War and Reconstruction, focusing on southern 
distinctiveness and the tension between democracy and 
slavery. (Alternate years) 

HIST 6225. The New South. (3) Prerequisite: 

permission of the department. Continuity and change in 
the South from the late- 19th century, including 



industrialization, politics, class and race relations, and 
religion. (Alternate years) 

HIST 6230. European Social History. (3) Prerequisite: 
permission of the department. Examination of the views 
of different writers on class formation, the rise of modern 
institutions, gender relations and social protest including 
why certain schools of thought such as modernization or 
Marxism become popular at particular historical 
moments. (Alternate years) 

HIST 6240. U.S. Political and Economic History, 
1865-1939. (3) Prerequisite: permission of the 
department. Emergence of the modern industrial 
economy and the concomitant development of a large 
bureaucratic federal government including big business, 
technological innovation, the labor movement, 
progressive reform and regulatory policies. (Alternate years) 

HIST 6250. Comparative Slavery and Race Relations. 

(3) Prerequisite: permission of the department. Slavery in 
the New World through its abolition including Indian and 
African slaves, the slave trade, the economics of slavery, 
and the impact of slavery on modern race relations in the 
Americas. (Alternate years) 

HIST 6265. Cold War America. (3) Prerequisite: 
permission of the department. Domestic and foreign 
policy problems accompanying the post-World War II 
struggle between East and West, Communism and 
capitalism including McCarthyism, modern technology, 
foreign aid, Korea, Vietnam, civil rights, gender roles and 
natural resources. (Alternate years) 

HIST 6310. History Museums. (3) Prerequisite: 
permission of the department. This course introduces 
students to the management, curatorial, public relations, 
and fundraising aspects of historical museums and related 
historical sites. These skills will be acquired through 
readings, term projects, and a "hands-on" experience at 
local museums and historical sites. (Yearly) 

HIST 6320. Historic Preservation. (3) Prerequisite: 
permission of the department. This course is an 
introduction to the theory and practice of identifying, 
preserving and restoring buildings, sites, structures and 
objects in the historic built environment of the United 
States. (Yearly) 

HIST 6330. History in the Digital Age. (3) 

Prerequisite: permission of the department. This course 
analyzes the impact of new media technology on the 
discipline of history as well as well as die ways in which 
new media enhances the discipline by making history 
accessible to a much broader audience. This course will 
involve an individually-based new media project that will 
require students to learn to work as a team, important to 
their preparation for careers in public history settings. 
Coursework includes common readings of texts and 



College of Arts and Sciences 107 



encounters with on-line studies, with emphasis on 
students' individual media projects. (Yearly) 

HIST 6601. Graduate Colloquium. (3) Prerequisite: 
permission of the department. A colloquium focused on a 
theme or period. Assigned readings, short papers and 
reports directed toward developing research and writing 
skills. May be repeated for credit. (Fall, Spring) (Evenings) 

HIST 6693. Historiography and Methodology. (3) 

Prerequisite: permission of the department. A study of 
historians and their philosophical and methodological 
approaches. Required of all MA. candidates. (Yearly) 
(Evenings) 

HIST 6698. Introduction to Historical Writing. (3) 

Prerequisite: permission of the department. Seminar on 
the process of thesis writing including thesis proposals, 
primary source materials, rules of evidence, structure of 
an argument, and organization of the thesis and its 
chapters. May be repeated for credit. (On demand) 

HIST 6894. Readings in History. (3) Prerequisite: 
prior written consent of instructor. Coverage of historical 
periods or topics through individually designed reading 
programs; scheduled conference with a staff member. 
May be repeated for credit. (Fall, Spring) (Evenings) 

HIST 6901. Directed Readings/Research. (3) 

Prerequisite: prior written consent of instructor and 
graduate coordinator. Graduate students will meet 
individually or in small groups with the instructor and will 
be assigned readings and/or research on a theme that 
relates to the lectures of an undergraduate class. 
Attendance at the lectures is a course requirement. May 
be repeated for credit. (Fall, Spring Summer) 

HIST 6997. Directed Research. (3) Prerequisite: prior 
written consent of instructor. Investigation of a historical 
problem culminating in a research paper. May be repeated 
for credit. (On demand) 

HIST 6999. Thesis. (3 or 6) May be repeated by 
permission, if taken for three hours credit. Six hours of 
Thesis may be taken during a single semester. 
Appropriate research and written exposition of that 
research is required. (On demand) 

HIST 7999. Master's Degree Residence. (1) 



PH.D. IN HISTORY 

Graduate Faculty (at University of 
Aberdeen) 

Nathan Abrams, Lecturer 
Cathryn Brennan, Teaching Fellow 
Terry Brotherstone, Senior Lecturer 
Edward Burton, Lecturer 
Christoph Dartmann, Lecturer 



Enda Delaney, Lecturer 
David Ditchburn, Senior Lecturer 
David Dumville, Professor 
Marjory Harper, Reader 
Howard Hotson, Professor 
Rene Leboutte, Professor 
Alastair Macdonald, Lecturer 
Allan Macinnes, Professor 
Andrew Mackillop, Lecturer 
Ben Marsden, Lecturer 
William Naphy, Senior Lecturer 
Micheal OSiochru, Lecturer 
Frederik Pedersen, Lecturer 
Richard Perren, Reader 
Edward Ranson, Lecturer 
David Smith, Lecturer 
Jane Stevenson, Reader 
Joyce Walker, Teaching Fellow 
Oonagh Walsh, Senior Lecturer 
Philip Withington, Lecturer 

Program of Study 

This program combines the MA. earned at UNC 
Charlotte, or an accepted institution, with a Ph.D. 
conferred by the University of Aberdeen in Scotland. 
After attaining their Master's degrees, qualified students 
will spend one year in Charlotte, one year in Aberdeen, 
and a third year at either of these two institutions. Ph.D. 
candidates will work with faculty and utilize research 
facilities in both America and Europe. Teaching and 
research assistantships are available on a competitive basis 
at both universities. 

Both universities offer a wide range of courses and fields 
of specialization. As indicated above, the Department of 
History at UNC Charlotte possesses particular expertise 
in United States history, the history of the American 
South, Latin America, and the comparative history of 
medicine, race, gender, urbanization, and industrialization. 
The Department of History at the University of Aberdeen 
possesses particular expertise in the following fields: non- 
Anglocentric British history; the North Sea and Baltic 
states, including Russia; diet, disease, and death; gender; 
and the relationship between Scotland and America. 

Additional Requirements for Admission 

In addition to the general requirements for admission to 
the Graduate School, the following are the minimum 
requirements for graduate study in History at the doctoral 
level: 

1) A GPA of 3.5 or better in all Master's level courses. 

2) Above average performance on the math and verbal 
portions of the G.R.E. 

3) Submission of the applicant's M.A. thesis or a 
substantial research paper. 

Degree Requirements 

The joint Ph.D. in History requires successful completion 
of a dissertation proposal, a qualifying examination, and a 
doctoral dissertation. Coursework for the joint Ph.D. will 



108 College of Arts and Sciences 



consist primarily of directed reading and research in 
preparation for writing the dissertation. 

All degree requirements, including the dissertation 
defense, should be completed in 3-4 years. All 
requirements must be completed within six years of 
enrolling in the program. 

Assistantships 

Teaching and research assistantships are available at both 
universities on a competitive basis. Applications for 
assistantships at UNC Charlotte should be submitted 
simultaneously with those for admission to the joint 
Ph.D. program. 

Advising 

Students may not register for graduate-level courses 
without the permission of the Department of History, 
which means that the Graduate Coordinator must register 
them for courses each semester. Regular advising by the 
graduate coordinator is especially essential to arrange 
continuous funding for doctoral students in Charlotte and 
in Aberdeen. 

Qualifying Examination 

Students are required to complete both written and oral 
qualifying examinations during their second semester at 
UNC Charlotte. The written examination will consist of a 
dissertation proposal; the oral examination will cover 
both the student's general field of specialization and the 
proposed dissertation topic. 

Language Requirement 

Although students are not required to demonstrate 
proficiency in a foreign language, they must possess the 
foreign language skills necessary to do primary research in 
their intended field of specialization. 

Dissertation Defense 

Doctoral dissertations are not to exceed 100,000 words in 
length. The dissertation defense is a final oral examination 
at which a student presents and defends his/her research 
before a committee of Aberdeen and UNC Charlotte 
faculty. The defense committee can reject the dissertation 
and instruct the student to revise the work or accept it 
and thereby confer the Ph.D. 



Courses In History 

(Doctoral students only) 

HIST 8894. Readings in History. (3 or 6) Prerequisite: 
doctoral student with prior written consent of the 
instructor. Coverage of historical periods or topics 
through individually designed reading programs; 
scheduled conferences with a designated member of the 
graduate faculty. May be repeated for credit. (Fall, Spring, 
Summer) 



HIST 8999. Dissertation. (3 or 6) Prerequisite: approval 
of dissertation topic by the student's advisory committee. 
Individual research that culminates in the preparation and 
presentation of a doctoral dissertation. May be repeated 
by permission up to 12 hours. Six hours of Dissertation 
may be taken during a single semester. Maximum of 12 
hours allowed under this course designation. (On demand) 

HIST 9999. Doctoral Degree Graduate Residence. 

(1) Maintains continuous enrollment as required by 
University policy. (On demand) 



LIBERAL STUDIES 

Department of Liberal Studies 

103 Macy Building 
704-547-4312 

Coordinator 

Dr. Dale Grote 

Degree 

MA. 



MASTER OF ARTS IN LIBERAL 
STUDIES 

The Master of Arts degree program in Liberal Studies is 
designed primarily for adults seeking to enhance their 
general education in the liberal arts at the graduate level. 
It provides a flexible, multidisciplinary framework to 
accommodate the varied undergraduate backgrounds and 
personal interests that students bring to the program. The 
curriculum draws upon the full range of the humanities, 
social sciences, and natural sciences. The emphasis is on 
liberal arts education rather than on specialized study or 
professional training. 

For recent recipients of the baccalaureate degree, the 
Liberal Studies program may provide the insight needed 
to make an informed career choice, or it may enhance 
opportunities in a career already launched. For returning 
students, graduate liberal studies may renew ties with 
university life or lead to a change of career. For persons 
with significant work experience, the program offers a 
chance to integrate the life of the mind with that of the 
workplace. Just as students come to the Liberal Studies 
program from a variety of fields, so they pursue a variety 
of careers after graduation. The most widely represented 
are in business, education, government, law, and social 
services. 

Although the Liberal Studies program is not exclusively 
an evening program, the majority of courses are offered 
at times convenient for working adults. It is possible to 



College of Arts and Sciences 109 



earn the degree in a timely fashion through evening 
courses only. 

Additional Admission Requirements 

In addition to the general requirements for admission to 
the Graduate School, the following are required for 
graduate study in Liberal Studies: 

1) A GPA of at least 2.75 on academic work beyond 
high school and 3.0 for courses prerequisite to the 
area of proposed graduate study. 

2) Satisfactory scores on the Miller Analogies Test or 
the Verbal and Analytical portions of the Graduate 
Record Examination. 

3) A two-page essay describing the applicant's 
objectives in undertaking graduate work in Liberal 
Studies. 

4) A resume of employment history or volunteer 
experience (for applicants who have been out of 
school for at least five years or whose baccalaureate 
degree was delayed). 

5) Acceptance into the program is contingent on an 
interview with members of the Liberal Studies 
Faculty Advisory Committee. 

Degree Requirements 

The master's program in Liberal Studies requires a 
minimum of 30 semester hours of graduate work with 
grades of A or B, including at least 15 semester hours in 
courses open only to graduate students. A course in 
which a student receives a grade of 'C is not allowable as 
part of the 30 required hours. 

The program begins with two core courses that give 
students some common grounding in the issues of liberal 
arts education. Each student then chooses a program 
emphasis by completing at least four courses that focus 
on a common theme. Degree requirements also include a 
Liberal Studies elective course and two elective courses 
that can be taken in any department in the College of Arts 
and Sciences. The program concludes with a seminar, a 
master's essay or project, and a comprehensive 
examination. The requirements are outlined below: 

Core Courses 

LBST6101 The Liberal Arts Tradition (3) 
LBST6102 Ideas Across the Disciplines (3) 

Program Emphasis 

Four related courses focusing on a theme developed by 
the student and faculty advisor (12 hours). 

Liberal Studies Elective 3 hours 



General Electives 



6 hours 



Concluding Seminar 

LBST6600 Liberal Studies Seminar (3) 

No more than 6 hours of independent study may be 
applied to the degree. Students requesting independent 



study must have successfully completed at least 12 
semester hours in the program, including LBST 6101 and 
6102. A form for such requests is available in the 
Coordinator's office and must be completed and the 
study approved in advance of registration. 

Comprehensive Examination 

Each candidate concludes the program with a 
comprehensive examination taken during the final 
semester of course work. The examination is a part of the 
concluding seminar and is individually designed, based on 
each student's program. It allows the student to integrate 
material from a variety of disciplines and to demonstrate 
understanding of the scope of Liberal Studies. 

Assistantships 

A limited number of graduate assistantships are available 
each year. In order to be fully competitive, applications 
must be received by March 15. Application forms are 
available through the Graduate School. 

Prizes 

A Spring Prize of $250 is awarded annually for an 
outstanding paper or project completed for a LBST 
course. Only students admitted to the Liberal Studies 
program by the submission deadline for the prize are 
eligible. 



Courses In Liberal Studies 

LBST 6000. Topics in Liberal Studies. (3) Selected 
topics approached from interdisciplinary perspectives in 
the liberal arts. May be repeated for credit as topics 
change. Examples include interrelated courses forming 
program emphases on Language and Culture and on 
Religious Ideas in Physical Forms. (Fall, Spring) 

LBST 6101. The Liberal Arts Tradition. (3) The 

concept of a liberal education and its relationship to 
human understanding as reflected in representative 
historical traditions, literature, art, and intellectual works. 
Examination of selected classics of the Western tradition 
and critiques through the use of works from other 
traditions and perspectives. (Fall, Spring) 

LBST 6102. Ideas Across the Disciplines. (3) 

Enduring ideas and their impact on history, society and 
culture. Each semester a single idea is examined through a 
variety of writings spanning the liberal arts disciplines. 
Examples include the idea of nature, the idea of human 
nature, the idea of the democracy and the idea of citizen. 
(Fall, Spring) 

LBST 6600. Liberal Studies Seminar. (3) An 

integration of the course work previously taken by each 
of the seminar members and the completion of a final 
essay or project. (Yearly) 



110 College of Arts and Sciences 



MATHEMATICS 

Department of Mathematics 

376 Fretwell Building 

704-687-2580 

http://www.math.uncc.edu/grad/ 

Mathematics Degrees 

M.S., Ph.D. 

Mathematical Finance Degree 

The Department of Mathematics is one of the 
participating departments in the Inter-College Master of 
Science in Mathematical Finance program. See the 
Mathematical Finance entry in the Inter-College Graduate 
Programs section of this Catalog for complete information 
and program requirements. 

Coordinator for Mathematics 

Dr. Joel D. Avrin 

Mathematics Education Degree 

M.A., Ph.D. in C&I: Math Ed Specialization 

Coordinator for Mathematics Education 

Dr. Victor V. Cifarelli 

Graduate Faculty 

Robert Anderson 
Joel Avrin 
Animikh Biswas 
Charles Burnap 
WeiCai 
Zongwu Cai 
Victor V. Cifarelli 
Ming Dai 
Xingde Dai 
Yuanan Diao 
Jacek Dmochowski 
Alan Dow 
Yuri Godin 
Mary Kim Harris 
Gabor Hetyei 
Evan G. Houston 
Phillip Johnson 
Janusz Kawczak 
Mohammad A. Kazemi 
Michael V. Klibanov 
Alan L. Lambert 
Thomas G. Lucas 
Thomas R. Lucas 
Stanislav Molchanov 
Wanda Nabors 
Hae-Soo Oh 
Alex S. Papadopoulos 
Joseph E. Quinn 
Franz Rothe 



David C. Royster 
Adalira Saenz-Ludlow 
Douglas S. Shafer 
Isaac M. Sonin 
Nicholas M. Stavrakas 
Yanqing Sun 
Rajeshwari Sundaram 
Boris R Vainberg 
Bamet Weinstock 
Volker Wihstutz 
Mingxin Xu 
Alexander Yushkevich 
Zhi Yi Zhang 
You Lan Zhu 



MASTER OF SCIENCE IN 
MATHEMATICS 

The Master of Science Degree in Mathematics is 
organized into three concentrations: the concentration in 
General Mathematics, the concentration in Applied 
Mathematics, and the concentration in Applied Statistics. 
The concentration in General Mathematics is a robust but 
flexible program that allows a student to develop a broad 
background in Mathematics ranging over a variety of 
courses chosen from both pure and applied areas, or to 
tailor a program toward a particular focus that may not be 
as closely covered by our other degree concentrations, 
e.g. one that is interdisciplinary in nature. The 
concentration in Applied Mathematics develops analytical 
and computational skills focused toward applications of 
mathematics in the physical sciences as encountered in 
industry, government, and academia. The concentration 
in Applied Statistics provides theoretical understanding 
of, and training in, statistical methods applicable to 
particular areas of business, industry, government, and 
academia. 

All candidates, regardless of which concentration is 
chosen, are required to take MATH 5143-5144 or STAT 
5126-5127; MATH 7691 (or in the case of the General 
Mathematics concentration, a suitable/approved 7000 
level course); and a comprehensive exam. Students may 
also choose a thesis option for 3-6 credit hours towards 
the required semester hour 
total. 

Concentration In General 
Mathematics 

The Master of Science degree concentration in General 
Mathematics is designed both to provide advanced skills 
and knowledge for persons seeking either positions in 
industry or in government, or teaching positions at the 
community college level, and to provide professional 
development to persons currently in such positions. 
Graduates are also prepared to enter directly into at least 
the second year of a Ph.D. program in mathematics, 



College of Arts and Sciences 111 



applied mathematics or statistics, depending on the 
particular course of study. 

Additional Admission Requirements 

In addition to the general requirements for admission to 
the Graduate School, the following are required for the 
concentration in General Mathematics: 

1) Applicants must present evidence of the satisfactory 
completion of at least 27 semester hours of 
mathematics approved by the department Graduate 
Committee. 

2) A satisfactory score is required on at least the 
Quantitative portion of the Graduate Record 
Examination. 

3) It is recommended that the student have a basic 
knowledge of at least two of the areas of algebra, real 
analysis and topology. 

Concentration Requirements 

The Master of Science degree concentration in General 
Mathematics requires successful completion of at least 30 
semester hours of graduate work approved by the 
department Graduate Committee including: MATH 5143 
and 5144 or their equivalents, at least one course each 
from two of the groups I, II, III, and V, and at least 15 
hours in 7000-level courses. No credit shall be given for 
6000-level math courses. With the approval of the 
department Graduate Committee, one 3-hour, non-thesis 
6000-level course in computer science of a theoretical 
nature may be applied toward the 15 hours. Candidates 
for the degree concentration must demonstrate, to the 
satisfaction of the department Graduate Committee, 
competence on general knowledge in at least three of five 
groupings of courses listed below. This may be 
accomplished by (a) successful performance on a written 
comprehensive examination or (b) successful completion 
of courses in these areas. 



Group I Applied 

OPRS5111 

OPRS5112 

OPRS5113 

OPRS5114 

MATH5165 

MATH5172 

MATH5173 

MATH5174 

MATH5176 

MATH7172 
MATH7176 
MATH7177 
MATH7178 

MATH7273 



Mathematics 

Linear Programming (3) 
Non-Linear Programming (3) 
Game Theory (3) 
Dynamic Programming (3) 
Numerical Linear Algebra (3) 
The Finite Element Method (3) 
Ordinary Differential Equations (3) 
Partial Differential Equations (3) 
Numerical Methods for Partial 
Differential Equations (3) 
Partial Differential Equations (3) 
Advanced Numerical Analysis (3) 
Applied Optimal Control (3) 
Comp. Methods for Fluid Dynamics 

(3) 

Advanced Finite Element Analysis (3) 



Group II Probability-Statistics 

STAT5123 Applied Statistics I (3) 

STAT5124 Applied Statistics II (3) 

STAT5126 Theory of Statistics I (3) 

STAT5127 Theory of Statistics II (3) 

STAT7027 Topics in Statistics (3) 

STAT7122 Advanced Statistics I (3) 

STAT7123 Advanced Statistics II (3) 

STAT7127 Linear Statistical Models (3) 

STAT7133 Multivariate Analysis (3) 

MATH5128 Applied Probability I (3) 

MATH5129 Applied Probability II (3) 

MATH7120 Probability Theory I (3) 

MATH7121 Probability Theory II (3) 

MATH7125 Stochastic Processes (3) 

Group III Algebra-Topology 

MATH5163 Modern Algebra (3) 

MATH5164 Abstract Linear Algebra (3) 

MATH5181 Introduction to Topology (3) 

MATH7163 Modern Algebra I (3) 



Group IV Analysis 



MATH5143 
MATH5144 
MATH7141 
MATH7143 
MATH7144 



Analysis I (3) 
Analysis II (3) 
Complex Analysis I (3) 
Real Analysis I (3) 
Real Analysis II (3) 



Group V Computer Science 

All 5000- and 6000-level Computer Science courses. 

Assistantships 

A number of graduate assistantships are available each 
year (with nationally-competitive stipends) for qualified 
applicants. A limited number of fellowship awards can be 
applied to supplement these stipends for especially 
qualified students. 

Thesis 

Completion of a thesis is optional. With the approval of 
the department Graduate Committee, a candidate may 
receive up to six of the 1 5 hours required at the 7000 
level for the writing of a master's thesis on an approved 
topic. This thesis may be original work, work of an 
expository nature, or the mathematical formulation and 
solution of a particular industrial or business problem 
suggested by the career interests of the student. A 
candidate may receive no more than six of the hours 
required at the 7000 level for course and thesis work in 
computer science. If the thesis option is elected, the 
candidate will be required to defend his/her thesis in an 
oral examination. 

Comprehensive Examination 

A candidate must perform satisfactorily on an oral 
comprehensive examination over his/her program of 
study. 



112 College of Arts and Sciences 



Concentration In Applied 
Mathematics 

The Master of Science degree concentration in Applied 
Mathematics is designed to develop critical thinking and 
intuition, and to provide advanced work in the techniques 
of mathematical analysis and their application to the 
problems of industry and technology. Skills are developed 
to deal with problems encountered in industry, business, 
and governmental work; to hold leadership positions in 
industry or government work; to teach Applied 
Mathematics at the undergraduate or community college 
level; and to study Applied Mathematics leading to the 
Ph.D. degree. 

Concentration Requirements 

A candidate for the Master of Science degree 
concentration in Applied Mathematics must complete at 
least 30 semester hours of graduate work approved by the 
department Graduate Committee to include: 

Core Requirements (21 semester hours) 

1) MATH5143 Analysis I (3) 
MATH5144 Analysis II (3) 
MATH5165 Numerical Linear Algebra (3) 

2) One elective in Numerical Analysis selected from: 
MATH5172 The Finite Element Method (3) 
MATH5176 Numerical Methods for Partial 

Differential Equations (3) 

3) One elective in Advanced Analysis selected from: 
MATH7141 Complex Analysis I (3) 
MATH7143 Real Analysis I (3) 
MATH7144 Real Analysis II (3) 

4) Two electives in Advanced Applied Mathematics 
selected from: 

MATH7172 Partial Differential Equations (3) 
MATH7176 Advanced Numerical Analysis (3) 
MATH7177 Applied Optimal Control (3) 
MATH7178 Computational Methods for Fluid 

Dynamics (3) 
MATH7273 Adv. Finite Element Analysis. (3) 

Electives (6 semester hours) 

1) One advanced elective from: 
MATH7141 Complex Analysis I (3) 
MATH7143 Real Analysis I (3) 
MATH7144 Real Analysis II (3) 
MATH7172 Partial Differential Equations (3) 
MATH7176 Advanced Numerical Analysis (3) 
MATH7177 Applied Optimal Control (3) 
MATH7178 Computational Methods for Fluid 

Dynamics (3) 
MATH7273 Adv. Finite Element Analysis (3) 
MATH7893 Thesis (0-3) 

2) One elective in Mathematics or a suitable area of 
application to be selected with the approval of the 
student's adviser. Suggested electives include: 
OPRS5 1 1 3 Game Theory (3) 

STAT5123 Applied Statistics I (3) 
MEGR41 1 1 Heat Transfer (3) 



MEGR4112 Intermediate Fluid Mechanics (3) 
MEGR61 1 3 Adv. Conductive Heat Transfer (3) 
MEGR6141 Theory of Elasticity II (3) 

Research Seminar (3 hours) 
All candidates for the degree concentration must 
complete three hours of MATH 7691 (Research Seminar) 
in which they carry out an independent project under the 
supervision of a member of the graduate faculty. The 
project could involve a specific application to a concrete 
problem of techniques identified in the literature or 
studied in other courses. All projects are subject to prior 
approval of the department Graduate Committee and 
must be successfully defended before a committee of 
three graduate faculty members appointed by the 
department Graduate Committee. 

Assistantships 

A number of graduate assistantships are available each 
year (with nationally-competitive stipends) for qualified 
applicants. A limited number of fellowship awards can be 
applied to supplement these stipends for especially 
qualified students. 

Thesis 

A student may choose to expand the work begun in 
MATH 7691 into a master's thesis by registering for three 
hours of MATH 7893 to fulfill the advanced elective 
requirement (1) described above. This thesis option 
affords the student the opportunity to do 
professional/scholarly work demonstrating proficiency in 
the area of Applied Mathematics. 

Comprehensive Examination 

Each candidate for the degree concentration in Applied 
Mathematics must perform satisfactorily on a final 
comprehensive examination. This examination will be set 
and administered by a committee appointed by the 
department Graduate Committee. It may be either in 
written or oral form, and it will cover those areas of study 
and/or research deemed appropriate by the committee. 

Concentration In Applied Statistics 

The Master of Science degree concentration in Applied 
Statistics is designed to provide advanced skills and 
knowledge in the planning, design, testing, and 
implementation of statistical methods. Skills are 
developed to deal with problems encountered in statistical 
applications in business, industry and government; to 
hold administrative positions requiring planning and 
implementation of statistical analysis; to teach statistics at 
the undergraduate or community college level; and to 
study statistics leading to the Ph.D. degree. 

Additional Admission Requirements 

In addition to the general requirements for admission to 
the Graduate School, the following are required for the 
concentration in Applied Statistics: 



College of Arts and Sciences 113 



1) An overall GPA of at least 3.0 on all previous college 
work including a GPA of at least 3.0 in courses 
prerequisite to the area of applied statistics. 

2) Evidence of undergraduate preparation in 
mathematics and computer science including: 12 
semester hours of calculus at the level of MATH 
1241/1242/2241/2242; 3 semester hours of linear 
algebra at the level of MATH 2164; 3 semester hours 
of differential equations at the level of MATH 2171; 
6 semester hours of probability and statistics at the 
level of MATH 3122/3123; and 3 semester hours of 
computer programming at the level of CSCI 1100 or 
1214 and its lab. 

Degree Requirements 

A candidate for the Master of Science degree 
concentration in Applied Statistics must complete a 
minirnum of 33 semester hours of graduate work 
approved by the department Graduate Committee 
including: 

Core Requirements (24 semester hours) 

STAT5123 Applied Statistics I (3) 

STAT5124 Applied Statistics II (3) 

STAT5126 Theory of Statistics I (3) 

STAT5127 Theory of Statistics II (3) 

STAT7027 Topics in Statistics (3) 

STAT7127 Linear Statistical Models (3) 

STAT7 1 33 Multivariate Analysis (3) 

MATH7691 Research Seminar (1 -3) 
Electives (9 semester hours) 

1) Two course selected from among: 
STAT7027 Topics in Statistics (3) 
MATH5128 Applied Probability I (3) 
MATH5129 Applied Probability II (3) 
MATH5143 Analysis I (3) 
MATH5165 Numerical Linear Algebra (3) 
MATH7120 Probability Theory I (3) 
MATH7121 Probability Theory II (3) 
MATH7143 Real Analysis I (3) 
MATH7692 Research Seminar (3) 
OPRS51 1 1 Linear Programming (3) 
OPRS51 12 Non-linear Programming (3) 
OPRS51 1 3 Game Theory (3) 
OPRS5114 Dynamic Programming (3) 

2) Any MATH/STAT/OPRS course at the 7000 level. 

Students who, because of their undergraduate work or 
other experience, can demonstrate sufficient knowledge 
of the material in one or more of the core courses may be 
exempted from taking the course or courses. Exemption 
from a course carries no credit towards the degree 
concentration. 

Research Seminar and Thesis Option (3 semester 

hours) 

All candidates for the Master of Science degree 

concentration in Applied Statistics are required to 

complete 3 hours of MATH 7691 (Research Seminar) in 

which they carry out an independent project under the 



supervision of a member of the graduate faculty. The 
project could involve a specific application of techniques 
identified in the literature or studied in other courses. All 
projects are subject to the prior approval of the 
department Graduate Committee and must be 
successfully defended before a committee of three 
graduate faculty members appointed by the department 
Graduate Committee. 

A student may choose to expand the work begun in 
MATH 7691 (Research Seminar) into a Master's Thesis 
by registering for 3 hours of MATH 7893 (Thesis) to 
fulfill the elective requirement under (2) above. This 
thesis option affords the student the opportunity to do 
professional and scholarly work demonstrating 
proficiency in the area of applied statistics. 

Assistantships 

A number of graduate assistantships are available each 
year (with nationally-competitive stipends) for qualified 
applicants. A limited number of fellowship awards can be 
applied to supplement these stipends for especially 
qualified students. 

Comprehensive Examination 

Each candidate for the Master of Science degree 
concentration in Applied Statistics must perform 
satisfactorily on an oral comprehensive examination over 
the candidate's program of study. 



PH.D. IN APPLIED 
MATHEMATICS 

The Ph.D. degree program in Applied Mathematics is 
designed to enable its students to master a significant 
body of mathematics, including a specialty in applied 
mathematics; to relate this knowledge to a coherent area 
of science or engineering; and to carry on fundamental 
research in applied mathematics at a nationally 
competitive level. Recipients of this degree will, according 
to their abilities and choice of sub-specialty, be able to 
work effectively in a research and development 
environment involving mathematical or statistical analysis 
and modeling in business, government or industry; to 
teach mathematics at the college or university level; or to 
carry on fundamental research in their area of specialty. 

Additional Admission Requirements 

In addition to the requirements of the Graduate School 
for admission to doctoral study, applicants must have 
completed at least 27 hours of courses in the 
mathematical sciences at the undergraduate level, as 
approved by the department Graduate Committee, with 
grades of C or better. Admission requires that the 
candidate be able to take Real Analysis 8143 or be able to 
take MATH 5143 and have other factors in their record 
that indicates strong potential to complete the program. 
For prospective students who have done work in 



114 College of Arts and Sciences 



mathematics beyond the bachelor's degree, performance 
on that work will be considered in admissions decisions. 
Candidates for admission must make satisfactory scores 
on the general portion of the Graduate Record 
Examination (GRE). 

Students are admitted to the program by the Graduate 
School, based on the recommendation of the department 
Graduate Committee or its designate, the Graduate 
Coordinator. Recommendations are based on the 
Committee's judgment of the candidate's ability to 
complete the program, as supported by the application 
materials. The department may waive certain 
requirements if it judges the candidate to be nonetheless 
capable of completing the program. If there are more 
candidates than can be accommodated, candidates are 
admitted in order of perceived mathematical ability, 
promise of success, and suitability to the program. 

Program of Study 

The student must complete an approved program of 
study, including a minor, typically including 
approximately 54 credit hours. The minor is 
interdisciplinary and may be satisfied by 9 hours of 
graduate work outside the mathematics department, by 6 
credit hours for a project in an area of application, or by a 
combination of external coursework and directed project 
in an area of application totaling 9 credit hours. 

Each student will have an advisory committee appointed 
by the department Graduate Committee in consultation 
with the student and approved by the Department Chair. 
It includes the prospective dissertation adviser as chair (or 
co-chair, if the dissertation adviser is not a member of the 
Department of Mathematics). The advisory committee 
should be appointed as soon as is feasible, usually within 
a year after passing the Preliminary Examination. Once 
formed, it will have the responsibility of constructing and 
approving the program of study which includes the 
minor. Prior to the appointment of the advisory 
committee the student will be advised by a graduate 
faculty member appointed by the department Graduate 
Committee. 

Grades 

A student is expected to achieve A's or B's in all courses 
included in the program of study and must have at least a 
3.0 GPA to graduate. The dissertation is graded on a 
pass/unsatisfactory basis and, therefore, will not be 
included in the cumulative average. An accumulation of 
more than two marginal (C) grades will result in 
suspension of the student's enrollment in the program. If 
a student makes a grade of U on any course, enrollment 
will be suspended and the student cannot take further 
graduate work without being readmitted to the program. 
Readmission to the program requires approval of the 
Dean of the Graduate School upon the recommendation 
of the department Graduate Committee. 



Transfer Credit 

Only courses with grades of A or B may be accepted for 
transfer credit. Transfer credit must be recommended by 
the department Graduate Committee and approved by 
the Dean of the Graduate School. The amount of transfer 
credit cannot exceed the limit set by the Graduate School. 

Preliminary Examination 

The student is expected to take the preliminary 
examination within three semesters of being admitted to 
the Ph.D. program. The examination consists of two 
parts: a written examination based on Real Analysis I and 
II (8143-8144) and a written examination based on two 
other related courses chosen by the student and approved 
by the department Graduate Committee. At the discretion 
of the department Graduate Committee, the student may 
be allowed to retake a portion of the preliminary 
examination a second time if the student does not pass 
that portion on the first attempt. A student who fails the 
preliminary examination twice is terminated from the 
Ph.D. program. 

Qualifying Examination and Admission to 
Candidacy 

Each student must pass a comprehensive oral 
examination covering her/his chosen field of research 
and related advanced course work. The exam is 
conducted by the student's Advisory Committee and may 
include an additional written examination. The exam is 
open to the graduate faculty of the department. The 
student is expected to take the qualifying examination 
within two years of the appointment of the student's 
Advisory Committee. A student who fails the qualifying 
examination twice is terminated from the Ph.D. program. 
The dissertation topic may be proposed after the student 
has passed the qualifying examination. A doctoral student 
advances to candidacy after the dissertation topic has 
been approved by the student's advisory committee and 
the Dean of the Graduate School. 

Assistantships 

A number of graduate assistantships are available each 
year (with nationally-competitive stipends) for qualified 
applicants. A limited number of fellowship awards can be 
applied to supplement these stipends or provide stand- 
alone stipends for especially qualified students, including 
one award of $25,000. 



Dissertation 

The student must complete and defend a dissertation 
based on a research program approved by the student's 
dissertation adviser which results in a high quality, original 
and substantial piece of research. The student must orally 
present and successfully defend the dissertation before 
the student's Advisory Committee in a defense that is 
open to the public. A copy of the dissertation must be 
made available to the graduate faculty of the department 
at least two weeks prior to the public defense. The 



College of Arts and Sciences 115 



dissertation will be graded on a pass/unsatisfactory basis 
by the Advisory Committee and must be approved by the 
Department Chair and the Dean of the Graduate School. 

Residency Requirement 

The full-time Ph.D. student must enroll for one 
continuous full-time year (i.e. two consecutive semesters 
of at least nine graduate credit hours in each semester) 
following admission to the program. 

Language and Research Tool Requirements 

Each student must demonstrate a reading knowledge of 
French, German or Russian by passing a written 
translation exam in one of these languages conducted by 
the Mathematics Department. In addition, the student 
must demonstrate significant computer expertise 
applicable to research or teaching in his or her major field 
as approved by the student's Advisory Committee. The 
computer expertise requirement may include course work 
or work on a project and may overlap with the minor 
requirement. 

Time Liniit for Degree Completion 

The student must achieve admission to candidacy within 
six years after admission to the program and complete all 
requirements within six years after admission to candidacy 
for the Ph.D. degree. All requirements for the degree 
must be completed within eight years after first 
registration as a doctoral student. 



MASTER OF ARTS IN 
MATHEMATICS EDUCATION 

The Master of Arts in Mathematics Education degree 
program is designed primarily for secondary mathematics 
school teachers interested in professional growth and 
graduate certification in mathematics teaching. Emphasis 
in this program is given to developing depth and breadth 
in mathematics teaching and learning, appropriate to the 
role of the secondary school teacher. 

By the end of his/her first semester in the program, each 
student will select a member of the Mathematics 
Education faculty who will serve as his/her Graduate 
Advisor throughout the program. Approval of the 
program of each student and provision of advice 
regarding progress toward the degree are the 
responsibility of the Graduate Advisor. 

Additional Admission Requirements 

In addition to the general requirements for admission to 
the Graduate School, the following are required for 
graduate study in Mathematics Education: 

1) Twenty-seven hours of undergraduate coursework in 
Mathematics beyond the freshman level, or evidence 
of equivalent academic preparation. 

2) Possession of a North Carolina "A" teacher's license 
or the equivalent from another state. An applicant 



may be admitted on the condition that he/she 
satisfies the Class "A" requirements early in his/her 
course of study. Work applied to the Class "A" 
deficiency may not be applied toward the degree. 

3) Two years of full-time experience teaching 
mathematics in a secondary school or other 
acceptable teaching experience. 

4) A satisfactory score is required on the Aptitude 
Portion of the Graduate Record Examination. 

Degree Requirements 

The Master of Arts in Mathematics Education degree 
requires successful completion of a minimum of 36 
semester hours of graduate credit or the equivalent. Of 
these, 1 8 hours must be in courses numbered 6000 or 
above. Programs of study beyond these 36 hours may be 
required to remove deficiencies in undergraduate 
programs or to develop areas of need, interest, or desired 
experience. 

Core Courses 

Each candidate must complete: 

1) 18 hours of graduate-level Mathematics courses 
selected in consultation with the program 
Coordinator, with at least 9 hours of courses at the 
6000-level. A recommended plan of study includes: 
MATH6I00 Foundations of Mathematics (3) 
MATH6101 Foundations of Real Analysis (3) 
MATH6102 Calculus from an Advanced Viewpoint 

(3) 
MATH6106 Modern Algebra (3) 
MATH6107 Linear Algebra (3) 
MATH61 1 8 Non-Euclidean Geometry (3) 

2) 12 hours of graduate-level courses coveting 
mathematics education learning theory, research, and 
contemporary topics in secondary mathematics 
teaching. These courses include: 

MAED6122 Theoretical Foundations of Learning 

Mathematics (3) 
MAED6123 Research in Mathematics Education (3) 
MAED6I24 Issues in the Teaching of Secondary 

School Mathematics (3) 
RSCH6101 Educational Research Methods (3) 

3) 6 hours of graduate-level professional education 
courses including: 

MDSK6260 Principles of Teacher Leadership (3) 

An additional three hours of graduate-level Mathematics, 
Mathematics Education, or Education courses selected in 
consultation with the student's adviser. 

4) A Basic Portfolio consisting of documents and 
artifacts that provides evidence of the student's 
professional growth during the program. 



116 College of Arts and Sciences 



Comprehensive Exam 

Upon successful completion of all coursework, each 
candidate for the degree in Mathematics Education must 
pass a comprehensive final exam consisting of two parts. 
The student must pass an oral exam on the mathematics 
content courses. The second part of the exam involves 
the student presenting documentation that demonstrates 
their professional growth as teachers and educational 
researchers. The student has the option of presenting 
either a research-based project or a comprehensive 
portfolio. The Graduate Advisor will advise and assist the 
student in planning his/her Comprehensive Portfolio or 
Final Research Report. 



PH.D. IN CURRICULUM AND 
INSTRUCTION: MATHEMATICS 
EDUCATION SPECIALIZATION 

In addition to the Masters of Arts in Mathematics 
Education program, the department offers a Mathematics 
Education specialization to students enrolled in the Ph.D. 
program in Curriculum and Instruction in the College of 
Education. Students choosing a specialization in 
Mathematics Education must complete 24 hours of 8000- 
level coursework in mathematics education courses. All 
students must complete MAED 8160 Readings in 
Mathematics Education. The remaining courses and 
seminars are to be chosen by the student, advisor, and 
graduate committee to expand his/her knowledge base 
and leadership skills relative to issues, problems, and 
solutions in urban-regional education. 



EDCI8125 



EDCI8160 



Issues in the Teaching of Secondary 
School Mathematics. (3) 
Readings in Mathematics Education. 
(3) 



Required (3): 

EDCI8160 



Readings in Mathematics Education. 
(3) 



Additional MAED 8000-level courses (21): 

EDCI8004 Topics in Analysis. (3) 
EDCI8008 Topics in Geometry and Topology. (3) 
EDCI8100 Foundations of Mathematics. (3) 
EDCI8101 Foundations of Real Analysis. (3) 
EDCI8102 Calculus from an Advanced Viewpoint. 

(3) 
EDCI8103 Computer Techniques and Numerical 

Methods. (3) 
EDCI8105 Problem Solving in Discrete 

Mathematics. (3) 
EDCI8106 Modern Algebra. (3) 
EDCI8107 Linear Algebra. (3) 
EDCI81 1 8 Non-Euclidean Geometry. (3) 
EDCI8609 Seminar. (3) 
EDCI8122 Theoretical Foundations of Learning 

Mathematics. (3) 
EDCI8123 Research in Mathematics Education. 

(3) 
EDCI8124 Advanced Topics in Mathematics 
Education. (3) 



Courses In Mathematics, Mathematics 
Education And Statistics 

Mathematics 

MATH 5000. Topics in Foundations or History of 
Mathematics. (2-3) Prerequisite: consent of the 
department. Topics in the foundations or the history of 
mathematics selected to supplement regular course 
offerings in this area of mathematics. May be repeated for 
credit with approval of the department. Credit for the 
M. A. degree in mathematics requires approval of the 
department. (On demand) 

MATH 5040. Topics in Analysis. (2-3) Prerequisite: 
consent of the department. Topics in the foundations or 
the history of mathematics selected to supplement regular 
course offerings in this area of mathematics. May be 
repeated for credit with the approval of the department. 
Credit for the MA. degree in mathematics requires 
approval of the department. (On demand) 

MATH 5060. Topics in Algebra. (2-3) Prerequisite: 
consent of the department. Topics in algebra selected to 
supplement regular course offerings in this area of 
mathematics. May be repeated for credit with the 
approval of the department. Credit for the M.A. degree in 
mathematics requires approval of the department. (On 
demand) 

MATH 5080. Topics in Geometry and Topology. (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of the department. Topics in 
geometry or topology selected as to supplement regular 
course offerings in this area of mathematics. May be 
repeated for credit with approval of the department. 
Credit for M.A. degree in mathematics requires approval 
of the department. (On demand) 

MATH 5109. History of Mathematical Thought. (3) 

Prerequisite: MATH 1241 or consent of the department. 
A study of the development of mathematics in its 
historical setting from the earliest beginnings to modern 
times. Not approved for the M.A. in mathematics degree. 
(Fall) (Evenings) 

MATH 5128. Applied Probability I. (3) Prerequisite: 
MATH/STAT 3122 and MATH 2171 or consent of the 
department. Finite and countable Markov chains, Markov 
Decision Processes, and optimal stopping. Other topics 
selected from: queuing theory, inventor)' models, 
reliability theory, game theory, recurrent events, 
information theory, stochastic control, stochastic control 
with incomplete information and Kalman filtering. 
(tall) (A Iternate years) 



College of Arts and Sciences 117 



MATH 5129. Applied Probability II. (3) Prerequisite: 
MATH 5128 or consent of the department. Continuation 
of MATH 5128. (Spring) (A/tertiate years) 

MATH 5143. Analysis I. (3) Prerequisite: MATH 3141 
with a grade of B or better, or consent of the department. 
First course of a two-semester sequence providing a 
rigorous treatment of continuity, differentiability and 
integration of functions of one and several real variables. 
(Fall) 

MATH 5144. Analysis II. (3) Prerequisite: MATH 5143 
with a grade of B or better or consent of the department. 
Continuation of MATH 5143. (Spring) 

MATH 5161. Number Theory. (3) Prerequisite: MATH 
3163 with a grade of C or better or consent of the 
department. A study of the elements of classical number 
theory including divisibility, congruences, diophantine 
equations, prime numbers and their distribution, 
quadratic reciprocity, number-theoretic functions, and 
famous unsolved problems. Not approved for the M.A. 
in mathematics degree. (Spring) (Alternate years) 

MATH 5163. Modern Algebra. (3) Prerequisite: MATH 
3163 or consent of the department. Groups, rings, 
integral domains, fields. (Fall) (Alternate years) 

MATH 5164. Abstract Linear Algebra. (3) 

Prerequisite: MATH 3163 and 2164 or consent of the 
department. Vector spaces over arbitrary fields, linear 
transformations, canonical forms, multilinear algebra. 
(Spring) (Alternate years) 

MATH 5165. Numerical Linear Algebra. (3) 

Prerequisites: CSCI 1100 or 1201 and 1201L, MATH 
2164 and 2171, all with a grade of C or better, or consent 
of the Department. Gaussian elimination and LU 
decomposition methods for linear systems. Vector and 
matrix norms, condition numbers and accuracy of 
solutions. Solutions of large sparse matrix systems using 
skyline solvers, and Jacobi, Gauss-Seidel, and SOR 
iterative methods. Solution of nonlinear systems. Least 
squares methods using the QR factorization. Selected 
problems will be programmed for computer solution. 
(Fall) (Alternate years) 

MATH 5171. Numerical Solution of Ordinary 
Differential Equations. (3) Prerequisites: CSCI 1100 or 
1201 and 1201L, MATH 2241, 2164, and 2171, all with a 
grade of C or better, or consent of the Department. 
Numerical solution techniques for ordinary differential 
equations such as Runga-kutta, multistep and 
extrapolation methods. Stiff solvers and stability criteria. 
Comparative work with modern robust codes and 
visualization methods. (On demand) 

MATH 5172. The Finite Element Method. (3) 

Prerequisites: CSCI 1100 or 1201 and 1201L, MATH 
2241, 2164, and 2171, all with a grade of C or better, or 



consent of the department. Boundary value problems and 
their variational form. Finite element basis functions, 
computational techniques, isoparametric elements and 
curved boundaries, alternate methods, singular problems, 
eigenvalue problems. Some practical experience with an 
F.E.M. program and graphical output. (Spring) (Alternate 
years) 

MATH 5173. Ordinary Differential Equations. (3) 

Prerequisites: MATH 2171 and MATH 3142, or consent 
of the department. Existence and uniqueness theorems 
for initial value problems; continuous dependence of 
solutions on initial values and right hand sides; linear 
differential equations in R2 and Rn; non-linear differential 
equations in R2 and Rn: phase portraits, singularities, 
cycles; invariant manifolds; linearization; singularities of 
planar systems; Lyapunov stability; examples: van der Pol 
oscillator, Lienard systems, Volterra-Lotka equations. 
(Spring) 

MATH 5174. Partial Differential Equations. (3) 

Prerequisites: MATH 2164 and MATH 3141, or consent 
of department. Classification of types of partial 
differential equations. Separation of variables, Sturm- 
Liouville problems, boundary and eigenvalue problems, 
fundamental solutions and Green's theorem, Fourier 
series and integrals, Laplace transforms. (Fall) 

MATH 5176. Numerical Methods for Partial 
Differential Equations. (3) Prerequisite: CSCI 1100 or 
1201 and 1201L, MATH 2241, 2164, and 2171 all with a 
grade of C or better, or consent of the department. Basic 
finite difference schemes for the solutions of elliptic, 
parabolic and hyperbolic equations. Van Neuman 
analysis, characteristics, boundary conditions. (Fall) 
(Alternate years) 

MATH 5181. Introduction to Topology. (3) 

Prerequisite: MATH 2164 with a grade of C or better. 
Topics from set theory and point set topology such as 
cardinality, order, topological spaces, metric spaces, 
separation axioms, compactness and connectedness. (Fall) 
(Alternate years) 

MATH 5691. Seminar. (1-6) Prerequisite: consent of the 
department. Individual or group investigation and 
exposition of selected topics in mathematics. (On demand) 

MATH 5692. Seminar. (1-6) Prerequisite: consent of 
the department. A continuation of MATH 5691. (On 
demand) 

MATH 6004. Topics in Analysis. (3) Prerequisite: 
MATH 6101 or consent of department. Topics in analysis 
selected so as to complement regular course offerings in 
this area of mathematics. May be repeated for credit with 
the consent of department. (On demand) 

MATH 6008. Topics in Geometry and Topology. (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of department. Topics selected from 



118 College of Arts and Sciences 



Euclidean geometry, non-Euclidean geometry, projective 
geometry, differential geometry, point-set topology, 
algebraic topology. May be repeated for credit with 
approval of department. (On demand) 

MATH 6050. Topics in Mathematics. (3) Prerequisite: 
consent of the department. Topics chosen from applied 
mathematics applicable to other disciplines. 

MATH 6100. Foundations of Mathematics. (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of department. Logic, sets and 
axiomatic systems. (Fall, Summer) (Alternate years) 

MATH 6101. Foundations of Real Analysis. (3) 

Prerequisite: MATH 6100 or consent of department. 
Axiomatic and historical development of the real and 
complex numbers; rigorous development of limits and 
continuity of functions, intermediate and extreme value 
theorems. (Fall) (Alternate years) 

MATH 6102. Calculus from an Advanced Viewpoint. 

(3) Prerequisite: MATH 6101 or its equivalent. A 
continuation of MATH 6101. A rigorous approach to 
differentiation and integration of functions of one real 
variable. (Spring) (Alternate years) 

MATH 6103. Computer Techniques and Numerical 
Methods. (3) Prerequisite: MATH 6101 or consent of 
department. Computer systems, programming, and the 
computer solution of numerical problems. (Summer) 
(Alternate years) 

MATH 6105. Problem Solving in Discrete 
Mathematics. (3) Prerequisite: consent of department. 
Propositional and predicate calculus, counting techniques, 
partially ordered sets, lattices, graphs and trees. (Alternate 
years) 

MATH 6106. Modern Algebra. (3) Prerequisite: MATH 
3163 or its equivalent or consent of department. Topics 
chosen from group theory, rings and ideals, integral 
domains, fields and elementary Galois theory. (Summer) 
(Alternate years) 

MATH 6107. Linear Algebra. (3) Prerequisite: MATH 
2164 or its equivalent or consent of department. Systems 
of linear equations, matrices, vector spaces, linear 
transformations, determinants, canonical forms of 
matrices, inner products. (Summer) (Alternate years) 

MATH 6118. Non-Euclidean Geometry. (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of department. History of Euclid's 
Fifth Postulate and attempts to prove it; work of Gauss, 
Bolyai, Lobachevsky and others; systematic development 
of hyperbolic geometry; relative consistency of hyperbolic 
geometry; relative consistency of hyperbolic and 
Euclidean geometries. (Alternate years) 

MATH 6171. Advanced Applied Mathematics I. (3) 

Prerequisites: MATH 2241 and 2171 with grades of C or 



better, or consent of department. Power series solutions 
of ordinary differential equations, vector calculus, line and 
surface integrals, partial differential equations and Fourier 
integrals. (Fall) (Evenings) 

MATH 6172. Advanced Applied Mathematics II. (3) 

Prerequisites: MATH 2241 and 2171 with grades of C or 
better or consent of department. Complex analysis; 
probability and statistics. (Spring) (Evenings) 

MATH 6201. Statistical Techniques in Finance. (3) 

This course reviews basic concepts and introduces more 
advanced techniques from Probability and Statistics 
which are commonly utilized in mathematical finance. 
Topics covered include random variables, distributions, 
conditional expectations, confidence intervals and 
hypothesis testing, simple and multiple regression, 
multivariate analysis including factor and canonical 
correlation analysis, and time series models including 
ARMA, ARIMA, ARCH, and GARCH. 

MATH 6202. Derivatives II: Partial Differential 
Equations for Finance. (3) This course deals with those 
partial differential equations which are associated with 
financial derivatives based on factors such as equities and 
spot interest rates. 

MATH 6203. Stochastic Calculus for Finance. (3) An 

introduction to those aspects of partial differential 
equations and diffusion processes most relevant to 
finance, Random walk and first-step analysis, Markov 
property, martingales and semi-martingales, Brownian 
motion. Stochastic differential equations: Ito's lemma, 
backward and forward Kolmogorov equations, the 
Feynman-Kac formula, stopping times, Hull and White 
Models, Cox-Ingersoll-Ross Model. Applications to 
finance including portfolio optimization and option 
pricing. 

MATH 6204. Numerical Methods for Financial 
Derivatives. (3) This course will introduce students to 
numerical and computational techniques for solving both 
European- and American-style financial derivatives. The 
approach will be the finite difference method and the 
basic theoretical concepts will be introduced. Final 
projects will involve implementing the techniques on 
computers. Some spectral and Monte Carlo methods will 
also be discussed. 

MATH 6205. Financial Computing. (3) This lab 
oriented course introduces the numerical methods needed 
for quantitative work in finance, focusing on derivative 
pricing and fixed income applications. Topics include 
binomial and trinomial methods, Crank-Nicholson 
methods for various exotic options, treatment of discrete 
dividends, numerical methods for stochastic differential 
equations, random number generators, Monte-Carlo 
methods for European and American options. The 
computing class teaches theory and practice of numerical 
finance as well as the programming skills needed to build 



College of Arts and Sciences 119 



software systems in C/C++, Java, Javascript, and 
Mathematica/Matlab. 

MATH 6609. Seminar. (1-3) Prerequisite: consent of 
the department. A series of regularly scheduled meetings 
in which each student will present one or more topics 
selected by the instructor. May be repeated for credit with 
the consent of department. (On demand) 

MATH 7028. Topics in Probability. (3) Prerequisite: 
MATH 7120 and 7121, or consent of department. Topics 
of current interest in probability and advanced topics in 
probability. May be repeated for credit with the consent 
of the department. (On demand) 

MATH 7050. Topics in Mathematics. (2-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of department. Topics chosen from 
such fields as algebra, topology, analysis, applied 
mathematics, differential geometry, mathematical physics, 
graph theory, probability, statistics. May be repeated for 
credit as topics vary and with the approval of the 
department. (On demand) 

MATH 7065. Topics in Applied Algebra and 
Algebraic Structures. (3) Prerequisite: consent of the 
department. Current topics in Applied Algebra and 
Algebraic Structure. (On demand) 

MATH 7070. Topics in Numerical Analysis. (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of the department. Topics of 
current interest in numerical analysis. May be repeated for 
credit with the consent of the department. (On demand) 

MATH 7071. Topics in Differential Equations. (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of the department. Topics of 
current interest in ODE, PDE, dynamical systems, 
inverse problems and related subjects. May be repeated 
for credit with the consent of the department. (On demand) 

MATH 7120. Probability Theory I. (3) Prerequisites: 
MATH 7143 and MATH/STAT 3122 or consent of 
department. Topics include probability spaces, probability 
measures, sigma-algebras, characteristic functions, 
sequences of random variables, law of large numbers, 
general forms of the Central Limit Theorem. (Fall) 
(Alternate years) 

MATH 7121. Probability Theory II. (3) Prerequisite: 
MATH 7120 or consent of the department. A 
continuation of MATH 7120. (Spring) (Alternate years) 

MATH 7125. Stochastic Processes I. (3) Prerequisites: 
MATH 3122 and 7143 or consent of the department. 
Basic ideas in the study of stochastic processes, selected 
from: discrete and continuous time Markov processes, 
stationary and renewal processes, applications to queuing 
theory, reliability theory, stochastic differential equations, 
time-series analysis, filtering and stochastic control 
theory. (On demand) 



MATH 7126. Stochastic Processes II. (3) Prerequisite: 
MATH 7125. A continuation of MATH 7125. (On 
demand) 

MATH 7141. Complex Analysis I. (3) Prerequisite: 
MATH 5143 or consent of the department. Holomorphic 
functions, complex integration, residues, entire and 
meromorphic functions, conformal mapping, harmonic 
functions. (Spring) (Alternate years) 

MATH 7142. Complex Analysis II. (3) Prerequisite: 
MATH 7141. A continuation of MATH 7141. (On 
demand) 

MATH 7143. Real Analysis I. (3) Prerequisite: MATH 
5144 or consent of the department. Lebesgue integration 
on the real line, Lp spaces, introduction to general 
measure and integration theory. (Fall) 

MATH 7144. Real Analysis II. (3) Prerequisite: MATH 
7143 or consent of the department. A continuation of 
MATH 7143. (Spring) 

MATH 7147. Applied Functional Analysis. (3) 

Prerequisite: MATH 5144. Introduction to functional 
analysis and its applications to such areas as linear and 
non-linear differential equations, integral equations, and 
control theory. Topics chosen from Banach spaces, 
operators, the Hahn-Banach, open mapping and closed 
graph theorems, Sobolev spaces, spectral theory, 
operators in Hilbert space. (Summer) (On Demand) 

MATH 7148. Functional Analysis. (3) Prerequisite: 
MATH 7144 or consent of the department. Material 
selected from: spectral theory, spectral theory of 
differential operators, groups and semigroups of 
operators, nonlinear functional analysis, asymptotic 
analysis, integral equations, Fourier analysis, distributions, 
and Sobolev spaces. (Fall) (Alternate years) 

MATH 7163. Modern Algebra I. (3) Prerequisite: 
MATH 4163 and 4164 or consent of department. Topics 
will be selected from Galois theory, commutative algebra, 
modules, ring theory, homological algebra. (Fall) (Alternate 
years) 

MATH 7164. Modern Algebra II. (3) Prerequisite: 
MATH 7163. A continuation of MATH 7163. (On 

demand) 

MATH 7172. Partial Differential Equations. (3) 

Prerequisite: MATH 5174 and 7144 or consent of 
department. Harmonic functions, mean-value theorem, 
maximum principle, Green's representation for the 
solution of the Dirichlet problem for Laplace's equation; 
Poisson's equations and the Poisson formula; statement 
and proof of the existence theorem for general second- 
order elliptic operators, generalized maximum principles; 
Sobolev spaces. Evolution equations involving elliptic 



120 College of Arts and Sciences 



operators, such as the heat or wave equations, may also 
be introduced. (Spring) (Alternate years) 

MATH 7173. Evolution Equations. (3) Prerequisite: 
MATH 7144 and 7172 or consent of the department. 
Semigroups of operators and their generators, examples 
of semigroups. The heat equation, examples of elliptic 
operators that generate semigroups, Hille-Yosida theory, 
analytic semigroups; examples, fractional powers of 
operators. (On demand) 

MATH 7174. Linear and Non-linear Waves. (3) 

Prerequisite: MATH 5124 and 7144 or consent of the 
department. Hyperbolic waves, characteristics, Riemann 
invariants, conservation laws, weak solutions, shock 
structure. Burger's equation, gas dynamics, dispersive 
waves, group velocity, water waves, non-linear optics. (On 
demand) 

MATH 7175. Inverse Problems. (3) Prerequisite: 
MATH 7144 and MATH 5174 or consent of the 
department. Ill-posed problems and numerical methods 
for them. Applications of inverse problems to real 
processes. One dimensional inverse problems. Multi- 
dimensional inverse problems: uniqueness and numerical 
methods. Inverse scattering problems. (On demand) 

MATH 7176. Advanced Numerical Analysis. (3) 

Prerequisites: MATH 2164, 2171 and 5176 or consent of 
the department. A selection of topics from such areas as 
iterative methods of solving linear and non-linear systems 
of equations, approximation theory, splines, and finite 
element methods for partial differential equations. (Spring) 
(Alternate years) 

MATH 7177. Applied Optimal Control. (3) 

Prerequisites: MATH 5143 or consent of the department. 
Examples of control systems and optimization problems, 
optimal control of discrete-time systems, solutions of the 
general discrete-time optimization problem, optimal 
control of continuous-time systems, the calculus of 
variations, solution of the general continuous 
optimization problem, applications of the Pontryagin 
Maximum Principle, Dynamic programming, and Bang- 
bang control. Controllability and differential games may 
also be introduced. (Spring) (Alternate years) 

MATH 7178. Computational Methods for Fluid 
Dynamics. (3) Prerequisite: CSCI 1100 or 1201 and 
1201L, MATH 2242, 2171, 5174 and 5176 or consent of 
the department. Topics on various numerical techniques 
for the solution of incompressible and compressible 
flows. Finite difference, finite element and spectral 
methods, and shock capturing and fitting methods. Multi- 
grid method and acceleration techniques. (On demand) 

MATH 7179. Advanced Finite Difference Methods. 

(3) Prerequisite: consent of the department. Accuracy 
analysis and design of high order schemes, stability theory 
of schemes with variable coefficients, stability theory of 



schemes for initial-boundary value problems, 
convergence theory for nonlinear cases. (On demand) 

MATH 7181. Topology I. (3) Prerequisite: consent of 
department. Topological spaces, continuous functions, 
connectedness, compactness, and metrizability, and 
further topics from point-set, geometric or algebraic 
topology. (On demand) 

MATH 7182. Topology II. (3) Prerequisite: MATH 
7181. A continuation of MATH 7181. (On demand) 

MATH 7184. Differential Geometry I. (3) Prerequisite: 
consent of the department. Manifolds, differential 
structures, tangent bundles, embeddings, immersions, 
inverse function theorem, Morse-Sard theorem, 
transversality, Borsuk-Ulam theorem, vector bundles, 
Euler characteristics, Morse theory, Stokes theorem, 
Gauss-Bonnet theorem, Whitney embedding theorem. 
(On demand) 

MATH 7185. Differential Geometry II. (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of the department. Differentiable 
manifolds, differential forms, critical points, local and 
global theory of curves, local and global theory of 
surfaces, connections, geodesies, curvature, spaces of 
constant curvature, Lie groups and Lie algebras. (On 
demand) 

MATH 7273. Advanced Finite Element Analysis. (3) 

Prerequisite: MATH 5172 and 5174 or consent of the 
department. Selection of topics from such areas of finite 
element analysis as convergence theorems (Ciarlet), 
hierarchical basis functions, the h-p method, adaptive grid 
techniques and solution methods for nonlinear equations. 
(Fall) (Alternate years) 

MATH 7275. Dynamical Systems I. (3) Prerequisites: 
MATH 5143 and MATH 5173 or consent of the 
department. Cycles and separatrix cycles, Poincare first- 
return map: diffeomorphisms, Poincare-Bendixson 
Theory, flows on the two-torus; structural stability, 
genericity, Peixoto's theorem; singularities of planar 
systems. Degenerate singularities, Hopf bifurcation, 
saddle-node bifurcation, center bifurcation. (On demand) 

MATH 7276. Dynamical Systems II. (3) Prerequisite: 
MATH 7275 or consent of the department. Method of 
averaging, Melnikov functions, hyperbolic structure, 
symbolic dynamics, homoclinic and heteroclinic orbits, 
global bifurcations, infinite dimensional dynamical 
systems, inertial manifolds, Lyapunov exponents and 
dimension of attractors, codimension-two bifurcations, 
Duffing's equation, Lorenz equations, finite dimensional 
systems of dimension at least three. (On demand) 

MATH 7277. Bifurcation Theory. (3) Prerequisite: 
MATH 7275 or consent of the department. Implicit 
function theorem, manifolds and transversality, Newton 
polygons, Lyapunov center theorem, variational methods, 



College of Arts and Sciences 121 



Ljusternik-Schnirelman theory, mountain-pass theorem, 
bifurcations with one-dimensional null-spaces, Morse 
theory and global bifurcations, geometric theory of partial 
differential equations. (On demand) 

MATH 7691. Research Seminar. (1-3) Prerequisite: 
consent of department. A seminar in which independent 
study may be pursued by the student or a group of 
students under the direction of a professor. (On demand) 

MATH 7692. Research Seminar. (1-3) Prerequisite: 
consent of department. A continuation of MATH 7691. 
(On demand) 

MATH 7893. Thesis. (0-3) Prerequisite: consent of 
department. Subject to the approval of the department 
Graduate Committee, the thesis may be original work, 
work of an expository nature, or the mathematical 
formulation and solution of a particular industrial or 
business problem suggested by the career interests of the 
student. The thesis must be defended in an oral 
presentation. May be repeated for credit with the consent 
of department. (Fall, Spring Summer) 

MATH 7999. Master Residency Credit. (1) (Fall, 
Spring, Summer) 

MATH 8028. Topics in Probability. (3) See MATH 
7028 for Course Description. 

MATH 8050. Topics in Mathematics. (2-3) See 

MATH 7071 for Course Description. 

MATH 8065. Topics in Applied Algebra and 
Algebraic Structures. (3) See MATH 7065 for Course 
Description. 

MATH 8070. Topics in Numerical Analysis. (3) See 

MATH 7070 for Course Description. 

MATH 8071. Topics in Differential Equations. (3) 

See MATH 7071 for Course Description. 

MATH 8120. Probability Theory I. (3) See MATH 

7120 for Course Description. 

MATH 8121. Probability Theory II. (3) See MATH 

7121 for Course Description. 

MATH 8125. Stochastic Processes I. (3) See MATH 

7125 for Course Description. 

MATH 8126. Stochastic Processes II. (3) See MATH 

7126 for Course Description. 

MATH 8141. Complex Analysis I. (3) See MATH 7141 
for Course Description. 

MATH 8142. Complex Analysis II. (3) See MATH 
7142 for Course Description. 



MATH 8143. Real Analysis I. (3) See MATH 7143 for 
Course Description. 

MATH 8144. Real Analysis II. (3) See MATH 7147 for 
Course Description. 

MATH 8147. Applied Functional Analysis. (3) See 

MATH 7147 for Course Description. 

MATH 8148. Functional Analysis. (3) See MATH 
7148 for Course Description. 

MATH 8163. Modern Algebra I. (3) See MATH 7163 
for Course Description. 

MATH 8164. Modern Algebra II. (3) See MATH 7164 
for Course Description. 

MATH 8172. Partial Differential Equations. (3) See 

MATH 7172 for Course Description. 

MATH 8173. Evolution Equations. (3) See MATH 
7173 for Course Description. 

MATH 8174. Linear and Non-linear Waves. (3) See 

MATH 7174 for Course Description. 

MATH 8175. Inverse Problems. (3) See MATH 7175 
for Course Description. 

MATH 8176. Advanced Numerical Analysis. (3) See 

MATH 7176 for Course Description. 

MATH 8177. Applied Optimal Control. (3) See 

MATH 7177 for Course Description. 

MATH 8178. Computational Methods for Fluid 
Dynamics. (3) See MATH 7178 for Course Description. 

MATH 8181. Topology I. (3) See MATH 7181 for 
Course Description. 

MATH 8182. Topology II. (3) See MATH 7182 for 
Course Description. 

MATH 8184. Differential Geometry I. (3) See MATH 

7184 for Course Description. 

MATH 8185. Differential Geometry II. (3) See MATH 

7185 for Course Description. 

MATH 8273. Advanced Finite Element Analysis. (3) 

See MATH 7273 for Course Description. 

MATH 8275. Dynamical Systems I. (3) See MATH 
7276 for Course Description. 

MATH 8276. Dynamical Systems II. (3) See MATH 
7276 for Course Description. 



122 College of Arts and Sciences 



MATH 8277. Bifurcation Theory. (3) See MATH 7277 
for Course Description. 

MATH 8691. Research Seminar. (1-3) See MATH 

7691 for Course Description. 

MATH 8692. Research Seminar. (1-3) See MATH 

7692 for Course Description. 

MATH 8994. Doctoral Research and Reading. (0-9) 

Prerequisite: consent of the department. May be repeated 
with consent of the department. (On demand) 

Math 9999. Doctoral Residency Credit. (1) (Fall, 
Spring, Summer) 

Mathematics Education 

MAED 5000. Topics in Mathematics Education, 
Early Childhood. (1-6) Prerequisite: consent of 
department. (On demand) 

MAED 5040. Topics in Mathematics Education, 
Intermediate. (1-6) Prerequisite: consent of department. 
(On demand) 

MAED 5070. Topics in Mathematics Education, 
Secondary. (1-6) Prerequisite: consent of department. 
(On demand) 

MAED 5101. Arithmetic in the School. (3) 

Prerequisite: MATH 1100 or equivalent. A study of the 
number systems with emphasis placed upon the basic 
concepts and meanings, properties of addition, 
multiplication, inverses, systems of numeration and 
number line appropriate for each grade. (Does not count 
toward a major in mathematics. Open only to transfer 
students who have completed six semester hours of 
mathematics at another university.) (On demand) 

MAED 5104. Microcomputing for Teachers. (3) 

Prerequisites: working knowledge of college algebra and 
trigonometry, and consent of department. Introduction to 
basic computer concepts, to microcomputer systems, to 
the design and development of programs to assist 
instruction in mathematics and computer sciences. A 
programming language such as BASIC or LOGO will be 
used. Each student will integrate skills learned by 
selecting, designing and developing a specific project. (No 
prior experience with computer programming required.) 
(Spring) (Evenings) 

MAED 5105. Geometry for Teachers. (3) Prerequisite: 
MATH 2102 or MAED 5101 or consent of department. 
A study of the foundations of Euclidean geometry and a 
brief treatment of non-Euclidean geometry. Emphasis on 
learning activities and teaching techniques for teachers of 
mathematics K-12. (Spring) (Evenings) 



MAED 5141. Mathematics for the Intermediate 
School Teacher. (3) Prerequisite: MATH 2102 or 
consent of department. A study of the algebraic 
properties of the real numbers; functions, equations, 
inequalities and their graphs, activities and applications 
related to upper elementary and intermediate grades. (Fall) 
(Evenings) 

MAED 6122. Theoretical Foundations of Learning 
Mathematics. (3) Prerequisites: Students must be 
enrolled in the Masters of Arts in Mathematics Education 
Program. Introductions to theories of learning that have 
influenced the teaching of mathematics in K-12. An 
overview of theories that have guided reforms in 
mathematics teaching; contemporary constructivist 
theories of mathematics learning. (Alternate years) 

MAED 6123. Research in Mathematics Education. 

(3) Prerequisites: Students must be enrolled in the 
Masters of Arts in Mathematics Education Program. An 
introduction and overview of research in the teaching and 
learning of mathematics in K-12. Overview of 
contemporary research perspectives and paradigms; 
interpreting and synthesizing the research literature; 
survey of contemporary research problems in 
mathematics teaching and learning; development of 
classroom-based research studies. (Alternate years) 

MAED 6124. Issues in the Teaching of Secondary 
School Mathematics. (3) Prerequisites: Students must 
be enrolled in the Masters of Arts in Mathematics 
Education Program. Study of major issues affecting 
secondary mathematics education: analysis of the impact 
of learning theories on methods of teaching; assessment 
methods for improving mathematics learning; analysis of 
the historical and programmatic development of the 
secondary school mathematics curriculum leading to 
current trends, issues, and problems; and analysis of the 
role of technology in the secondary mathematics 
classroom. (Alternate years) 

MAED 8124. Advanced Topics in Mathematics 
Education. (3) Prerequisites: Enrollment in the 
Mathematics Education specialization of the Doctoral 
Program in Curriculum and Instruction. Advanced 
research topics in the teaching and learning of 
mathematics. Includes a survey, interpretation, and 
synthesis of contemporary research problems in 
mathematics teaching and learning. Can be repeated for 
credit. (On demand) 

MAED 8160. Readings in Mathematics Education. 

(3) Prerequisites: Enrollment in the Mathematics 
Education specialization of the Doctoral Program in 
Curriculum and Instruction. Readings in the teaching and 
learning of mathematics K-16; analysis of the historical 
development of the K-16 mathematics curriculum leading 
to current trends, issues, and problems; theory, methods, 
and techniques for assessment; and analysis of 



College of Arts and Sciences 123 



contemporary issues impacting the teaching of 
mathematics. {On demand) 

Statistics 

STAT 5123. Applied Statistics I. (3) Prerequisites: 
MATH 2164 with a grade of C or better and junior 
standing, or consent of department. Review of stochastic 
variables and probability distributions, methods of 
estimating a parameter, hypothesis testing, confidence 
intervals, contingency tables. Linear and multiple 
regression, time series analysis. (Fall) (Evenings) (Alternate 
years) 

STAT 5124. Applied Statistics II. (3) Prerequisite: 
STAT 5123 or consent of the department. Single factor 
analysis of variance. Multi-factor analysis of variance. 
Randomized complete-block designs, nested or 
hierarchical designs, Latin squares, factorial experiments. 
Design of experiments. (Spring) (Evenings) (Alternate years) 

STAT 5126. Theory of Statistics I. (3) Prerequisite: 
STAT 3123 or consent of the department. Survey of the 
mathematical structure supporting applied statistics. 
Discrete and continuous distributions, moment- 
generating functions, sampling, point estimation, the 
multivariate normal distribution, sampling distributions. 
(Fall) (Alternate years) 

STAT 5127. Theory of Statistics II. (3) Prerequisite: 
STAT 5126 or consent of the department. Point and 
interval estimations, hypothesis testing, regression and 
linear hypotheses, experimental designs and analysis, 
distribution-free methods. (Spring) (Alternate years) 

STAT 6027. Topics in Statistics. (3) Prerequisite: 
consent of the department. Topics chosen from applied 
statistics applicable to other disciplines. 

STAT 7027. Topics in Statistics. (3) Prerequisite: 
consent of the department. Topics of current interest in 
statistics and/or applied statistics. May be repeated for 
credit with consent of the department. (On demand) 

STAT 7122. Advanced Statistics I. (3) Prerequisite: 
MATH 7143 and STAT 5127 or consent of department. 
A survey of frequendy used statistical techniques selected 
from: estimation theory and hypothesis testing, 
parametric goodness-of-fit criterion and tests for 
independence, measures of association, regression 
techniques, multi-sample inferential techniques, Bayes 
and minimax estimation, admissibility, minirnax property. 
(On demand) 

STAT 7123. Advanced Statistics II. (3) Prerequisites: 
STAT 7122 or consent of the department. Hypothesis 
testing, Neyman-Pearson Lemma, UMP tests, UMP 
unbiased tests, monotone likelihood ratio families of 
distributions, UMP invariant tests. Confidence bounds 
and regions, uniformly most accurate bounds, regression 
models, least squares estimates, normal equations, Gauss- 



Markov theorem. Large sample behavior of methods of 
moments estimates, maximum likelihood estimates, 
likelihood ratio tests, Chi-square tests, approximate 
confidence regions for large samples. (On demand) 

STAT 7124. Sampling Theory. (3) Prerequisite: STAT 
5126 or consent of the department. Methods and theory 
of survey sampling: simple, systematic, stratified, cluster 
multistage and specialized sampling schemes and the 
problems of their implementation and analysis. (On 
demand) 

STAT 7127. Linear Statistical Models. (3) 

Prerequisites: MATH 2164 and 3123 or consent of the 
department. A selection of topics from the following list: 
distribution and quadratic forms, regression, dummy 
variables, models not of full rank, the two-way crossed 
classification, time series. (Fall) (Alternate years) 

STAT 7133. Multivariate Analysis. (3) Prerequisite: 
STAT 5126 and 5127 or consent of the department. 
Multivariate distributions. Inference for the multivariate 
normal model. Further topics from the following: 
principal components, factor analysis, multidimensional 
scaling, canonical correlation, discriminant analysis, 
cluster analysis, multivariate linear models, special topics. 
(Fall) (Alternate years) 

STAT 8027. Topics in Statistics. (3) See STAT 7027 
for Course Description. 

STAT 8122. Advanced Statistics I. (3) See STAT 7122 
for Course Description. 

STAT 8123. Advanced Statistics II. (3) See STAT 7123 
for Course Description. 

STAT 8124. Sampling Theory. (3) See STAT 7124 for 
Course Description. 

STAT 8127. Linear Statistical Models. (3) See STAT 
7127 for Course Description. 

STAT 8133. Multivariate Analysis. (3) See STAT 7133 
for Course Description. 



OPERATIONS RESEARCH 

Department of Mathematics 

376 Fretwell Building 
(704) 687-4929 

Degree 

Interdisciplinary Graduate Minor 



124 College of Arts and Sciences 



GRADUATE MINOR IN 
OPERATIONS RESEARCH 

The interdisciplinary graduate minor in Operations 
Research is designed to provide advanced problem 
solving skills and knowledge in the general areas of 
operations research and optimization to enable their 
application to effectively address the present day 
problems of business, management science, engineering 
and computer science. This program can serve as an 
effective and focused supplement to existing graduate 
programs in the participating departments. The required 
courses are offered by the participating departments of 
Electrical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Computer 
Science, Mechanical Engineering, Economics, and 
Information & Operations Management. 

Admission Requirements 

Students admitted to graduate degree programs in the 
participating departments and the M.B.A. program who 
are in good standing, are eligible for the minor in 
Operations Research. 

Requirements for the Minor 

1) Declaration of the minor, preferably by the end of 
the first semester of graduate study. 

2) Formation of a Program Committee: Students who 
elect to minor in Operations Research will select a 
participating faculty member as a member of their 
regular graduate committee. A list of participating 
faculty will be available from the coordinator of the 
minor in Operations Research. 

3) Fulfill the requirements of a participative degree 
program and complete OPRS 6101/8101 and one 
course each from two of the following areas selected 
with the advice and knowledge of the student's 
program committee. 

Mathematics : OPRS 5111, 5112, 5113, 5114 MATH 5165, 

7125, 7177 and topics: reliability theory, queuing models, 

variational methods. 

Computer Science : ITCS 6160, 6166 

Management Information Systems and Operations 

Management : MBAD 6121. 6122. 6141 

Economics : ECON 6100, 6112 

Electrical Engineering : EEGR 6111, 6112, 6115, 6116 

Civil Engineering : CEGR 5090, 6181 

Students must have a cumulative 3.0 GPA in courses 
applied to the minor. Course waivers and transfer credit 
will be considered on an individual basis. 



Courses in Operations Research 

OPRS 5010. Topics in Decision Mathematics. (2-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of the department. Topics in 
decision mathematics selected to supplement regular 
course offerings in this area of mathematics. May be 



repeated for additional credit with the approval of the 
department. Credit for the M.A. degree in mathematics 
requires approval of the department. (On demand) 

OPRS 5111. Linear Programming. (3) Prerequisite: 
OPRS 3111 and CSCI 1100 or 1201 and 1201L. 
Mathematical formulation and solution of linear 
programming problems. Topics include: the simplex 
method and its variations, sensitivity and parametric 
analysis, duality, and applications. A project will be 
required for all graduate students. (On demand) 

OPRS 5112. Non-Linear Programming. (3) 

Prerequisites: CSCI 1100 or 1201 and 1201L, OPRS 3111 
and MATH 2241 . Basic unconstrained optimization 
problems, search techniques, some discussion of rates of 
convergence and an introduction to constrained 
optimization. Computer implementation and testing of 
optimization algorithms will be required. A project will be 
required of all graduate students. (On demand) 

OPRS 5113. Game Theory. (3) Prerequisites: OPRS 
3111 and one of STAT 2122, MATH/STAT 3122, or 
OPRS 3113. The theory of zero-sum matrix games, mini- 
max theorem, optimal strategies, symmetric games, 
economic models, infinite, separable, polynomial, multi- 
stage, general-sum and n-person games. A project will be 
required of all graduate students. (On demand) 

OPRS 5114. Dynamic Programming. (3) 

Prerequisites: CSCI 1100 or 1201 and its lab, OPRS 3111, 
and one of STAT 2122, MATH/STAT 3122 or OPRS 
3113. The identification of dynamic programming 
problems and their solution in terms of recurrence 
relations. Elementary path problems, resource allocation, 
shortest path, traveling salesmen problem, discrete-time 
optimal control, replacement models and inventory 
systems. A project will be required of all graduate 
students. (On demand) 

OPRS 6101. Introduction to Operations Research. (3) 

Prerequisite: STAT 3122. Operations Research approach: 
modeling, constraints, objective and criterion. The 
problem of multiple criteria, optimization, model 
validation. The team approach. Systems design. 
Examples, or methodology: mathematical programming, 
optimum seeking, simulation, gaming, heuristic 
programming. Examples, or applications: theory of 
inventory, economic ordering under deterministic and 
stochastic demand. The production smoothing problem, 
linear and quadratic cost functions. Waiting line 
problems: single and multiple servers with Poisson input 
and output. The theory of games for two-person 
competitive situations. Project management through 
probabilistic activity networks and deterministic activity 
network (CPM-PERT). (Fall) 

OPRS 7125. Stochastic Processes. (3) Same as 
MATH 7125. 



College of Arts and Sciences 125 



OPRS 8101. Introduction to Operations Research. (3) 

See description for OPRS 6101. 

OPRS 8125. Stochastic Processes. (3) Same as 
MATH 7125. 



OPTICAL SCIENCE AND 
ENGINEERING 

Department of Physics and Optical Science 

101 Burson Building 

704-687- 2537 
http://www.physics.uncc.edu 

Degrees 

Ph.D. (Optical Science and Engineering) 
M.S. (Optical Science and Engineering) 

Coordinator 

Dr. Robert K. Tyson 
135-E Burson Building 
704-687-3399 
rtyson@email.uncc.edu 

Interdisciplinary Faculty 

Department of Physics and Optical Science 

Vasily Astratov - Assistant Professor 
Angela D. Davies - Assistant Professor 
Faramarz Farahi - Professor 
Mchael A. Fiddy - Professor 
Greg J. Gbur - Assistant Professor 
Tsing-Hua Her - Assistant Professor 
Patrick J. Moyer - Associate Professor 
Jeff Naeini - Assistant Professor 
M. Yasin Akhtar Raja - Professor 
Thomas J. Suleski - - Assistant Professor 
Robert K. Tyson -Associate Professor 

Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering 

Stephen M. Bobbio - Professor 

Lee W. Casperson - Professor 

James M. Conrad - Associate Professor 

Kasra Daneshvar - Professor 

Mohamad A. Hasan - Associate Professor 

Edward B. Stokes - Associate Professor 

Raphael Tsu - Professor 

Department of Chemistry 

Bernadette T. Donovan-Merkert - Professor 
Thomas D. DuBois - Professor 
Mahnaz El-Kouedi - Assistant Professor 
Kenneth E. Gonsalves — Professor 
Daniel S. Jones - Associate Professor 
Joanna K. Krueger - Assistant Professor 
Jordan C. Poler - Associate Professor 



Thomas A. Schmedake - Assistant Professor 
Wade N. Sisk - Associate Professor 

Department of Mathematics 

Wei Cai - Professor 
Yuri Godin — Assistant Professor 
Michael V. Klibanov - Professor 
Thomas R. Lucas - Professor 
Stanislav Molchanov - Professor 
Boris Vainberg - Professor 

Department of Mechanical Engineering 

Robert J. Hocken - Professor 
Stuart T. Smith - Professor 

Department of Computer Science 

Teresa A. Dahlberg - Associate Professor 
M. Taghi Mostafavi - Associate Professor 
Kayvan Najarian - Assistant Professor 

Department of Engineering Technology 

Falih H. Ahmad - Associate Professor 

Programs of Study 

The M.S. and Ph.D. programs in Optical Science and 
Engineering are interdisciplinary involving six science and 
engineering departments [Physics & Optical Science, 
Chemistry, Mathematics, Electrical & Computer 
Engineering, Mechanical Engineering & Engineering 
Science, and Computer Science], the Center for 
Optoelectronics & Optical Communications, and the 
Center for Precision Metrology. The program is 
administered through the Department of Physics & 
Optical Science. The purpose of the program is to 
educate scientists and engineers who will develop the next 
generation of optical technology. The program 
emphasizes basic and applied interdisciplinary education 
and research in areas of optics that include: 

Optoelectronic devices and sub-assemblies 
Devices for telecommunications, sensors, and 
characterization 

Optical materials (semiconductors, polymer- 
organic and crystalline) 
Optical metrology 
Optical imaging 
Optical communication networks 

Applications of this research include: 

Optical telecom and data-corn 

High efficiency, tunable narrow bandwidth laser 

sources and detectors 

Smart structures for distributed sensing 

Wireless technologies for communications and 

remote sensing 

Materials and surface characterization 

Nanostructured optical devices 

Microelectronics 

Biosensing and medical imaging 



126 College of Arts and Sciences 



A complete description of the research activity within the 
Optical Science and Engineering program can be accessed 
at the web address: http://optics.uncc.edu 

Documents to be Submitted for Admission 

1) Official transcripts from all colleges and universities 
attended. 

2) Official GRE scores. 

3) Official TOEFL scores (if the previous degree was 
from a country where English is not the official 
language). 

4) The UNC Charlotte application for graduate 
admission form. 

5) A minimum of three letters of reference. 

6) An essay detailing the applicant's motivation and 
career goals. 



M.S. IN OPTICAL SCIENCE AND 
ENGINEERING 

Additional Admission Requirements 

All applicants seeking admission into the Optics M.S. 
program must fulfill the university's general requirements 
for graduate admission at the M.S. level. Additional 
requirements for admission into the program are: 

1) A baccalaureate or masters degree in Physics, 
Chemistry, Mathematics, Engineering, Optics, 
Computer Science, or a related field with a minimum 
undergraduate GPA of 3.0 overall and 3.0 (A = 4.0) in 
the major. 

2) A minimal combined score of 1000 on the verbal and 
quantitative portions of the GRE, and satisfactory 
scores on the analytical and discipline specialty 
sections of the GRE. 

3) A minimum score of 220 (computer-based test) or 
557 (paper-based test) on the TOEFL if the previous 
degree was from a country where English is not the 
official language. 

4) Positive letters of recommendation. 

5) Students may be required to take undergraduate 
courses determined by the Optics Program 
Committee on an individual basis. Such courses will 
be specified at the time of admission into the 
program. 

Degree Requirements 

The degree of Master of Science in Optical Science and 
Engineering is awarded for completion of scholarly 
research that advances the knowledge base in the field of 
that research. Evidence of this is demonstrated by a 
successful thesis defense. Additionally, recipients of this 
degree should demonstrate mastery of relevant subject 
matter and a potential for success, usually in a position 
with government or industry. 

The minimum requirement for the M.S. degree in Optical 
Science and Engineering is 32 credit hours beyond the 
baccalaureate degree that includes a minimum of 9 credit 



hours of thesis research, 2 credit hours of seminar (OPTI 
6110), and a minimum of 21 credit hours of formal 
course work. The program of study must include at least 
1 5 credit hours in approved courses having an OPTI 
prefix. The remaining 6 credit hours of required 
coursework may be selected from the listing of approved 
optics, engineering, and science electives. 

All graduates of the program must demonstrate 
competency in the Core Curriculum. Students may 
demonstrate competency in the subject matter of the 
Core Curriculum by earning a grade of Pass on each of 
the five sections of a comprehensive qualifying 
examination. Each section of the comprehensive 
examination is based on subject matter in one of the five 
courses comprising the Core Curriculum. Students who 
do not receive a grade of Pass on a given section of the 
comprehensive examination must enroll in the 
corresponding Core Curriculum course. Students 
demonstrate competency in the Core Curriculum by 
passing the comprehensive examination or by earning a 
grade of B or better in those core courses not passed 
during the comprehensive examination. 

Well-prepared students may earn a grade of pass on one 
or more of the five sections of the comprehensive 
examination. In those cases, credit hours that would have 
been earned in the courses, upon which the sections 
passed were based, may be replaced by credit hours in 
OPTI 6991, Thesis Research, and/or other electives 
approved by the student's Advisory Committee and the 
Optics Program Director. 

A student in the M.S. program must maintain a minimum 
GPA of 3.0 in all coursework attempted for the degree. 
An accumulation of two C grades will result in 
termination of the student's enrollment in the program. A 
grade of U earned in any course will result in termination 
of the student's enrollment in the program. 

Qualifier and Admission to Candidacy 

All graduates of the program must demonstrate 
competency in the Core Curriculum. All students must 
prepare a Plan of Study before the end of the second 
semester following admission to the program. The Plan 
of Study must be approved by the Advisory Committee. 

After successful completion of the Core Curriculum 
requirement and approval of the Plan of Study, the 
student will prepare a Research Plan for the thesis that is 
approved by the Advisory Committee. The Research Plan 
must demonstrate: (a) the student's knowledge of the 
relevant literature base, and (b) a research plan that, if 
successfully completed, will lead to an approved thesis. 
The student must present a written plan to the Advisor)' 
Committee. The student must also make an oral defense 
of the Research Plan at a presentation before the 
Advisory Committee. 



College of Arts and Sciences 127 



After successfully demonstrating competency in the Core 
Curriculum, preparation of an approved Plan of Study, 
and approval of the Research Plan by the Advisory 
Committee, the student is admitted to candidacy. The 
qualifier, as described, must be completed within two 
years following admission to the program. A full-time 
student is normally expected to complete the qualifier 
prior to the end of the third semester following admission 
to the program. 

Thesis 

Each student will complete a minimum of 9 credit hours 
of thesis research. The student must present a written 
thesis to the Advisory Committee. The student must 
defend the thesis at a presentation before the Optics 
Faculty. Upon approval of the written thesis and oral 
presentation by the Advisory Committee, the student has 
successfully completed the thesis requirement. The thesis 
must be written using a format acceptable to the 
Graduate School. 

Thesis Advisor and Advisory Committee 

Each student in the program must have a Thesis Advisor 
and an Advisory Committee before being admitted to 
candidacy. The student should select a thesis advisor 
before the end of the first year of residency. The student 
and the thesis advisor jointly determine the advisory 
committee. The Thesis Advisor serves as Chair of the 
Advisory Committee and must be a member of the 
Optics Faculty at UNC Charlotte. The advisory 
committee must have at least 3 members, the majority of 
which must be members of the Optics Faculty. 
Composition of the Advisory Committee must be 
approved by the Optics Program Director. 

Residency Requirement 

The student must satisfy the residence requirement for 
the program by completing 12 credit hours of continuous 
enrollment in coursework/ thesis credit. Residence is 
considered continuous if the student is enrolled in one or 
more courses in successive semesters until 12 credit hours 
are earned. 

Time Limit for Completion of Program 
Requirements 

All program requirements must be completed within 5 
calendar years from the date the student is admitted into 
the program. 

Transfer Credit Accepted 

Up to 6 credit hours of approved coursework may be 
transferred from other accredited masters and doctoral 
programs. Only courses in which the student earned a 
grade of B or better (or its equivalent) can be transferred. 
No more than 6 credit hours of approved coursework 
taken as a post-baccalaureate student may be applied 
toward the degree. Credit for thesis research cannot be 
transferred. 



Assistantships 

Support for beginning graduate students is usually a 
teaching assistantship. Continuing students are often 
supported by research assistantships. 

Comprehensive Examination 

The thesis defense is the final examination. 

Language Requirement 

The program has no language requirement. 



PH.D. IN OPTICAL SCIENCE 
AND ENGINEERING 

Additional Admission Requirements 

All applicants seeking admission into the Optical Science 
and Engineering Ph.D. program must fulfill the 
university's general requirements for graduate admission 
at the Ph.D. level. Additional requirements for admission 
into the program are: 

1) A baccalaureate or masters degree in Physics, 
Chemistry, Mathematics, Engineering, Optics, 
Computer Science, or a related field with a minimum 
undergraduate GPA of 3.0 overall and 3.2 (A = 4.0) in 
the major. In the case a candidate presents a masters 
degree at application, a minimum graduate GPA of 
3.2 (A = 4.0) on all graduate work is required. 

2) A minimal combined score of 11 00 on the verbal and 
quantitative portions of the GRE, and satisfactory 
scores on the analytical and discipline specialty 
sections of the GRE. 

3) A minimum score of 220 (computer-based test) or 
557 (paper-based test) on the TOEFL if the previous 
degree was from a country where English is not the 
official language. 

4) Positive letters of recommendation. 

5) Students may be required to take undergraduate 
courses determined by the Optics Program 
Committee on an individual basis. Such courses will 
be specified at the time of admission into the 
program. 

Degree Requirements 

The degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Optical Science 
and Engineering is awarded for completion of scholarly 
research that advances the knowledge base in the field of 
that research. Evidence of this is demonstrated by a 
successful dissertation defense. Additionally, recipients of 
this degree should demonstrate mastery of relevant 
subject matter and a potential for success in future 
research and teaching. 

The minimum requirement for the Ph.D. degree in 
Optical Science and Engineering is 72 credit hours 
beyond the baccalaureate degree that includes a minimum 
of 1 8 credit hours of dissertation and a minimum of 5 1 
credit hours of formal coursework. 



128 College of Arts and Sciences 



Each candidate for the degree must present: 

1) 5 courses (15 credit hours) from the Optics Core 
Curriculum. Students may be exempted from some, 
or all, of the Core Curriculum courses by passing part, 
or all, sections of the comprehensive qualifying 
examination; 

2) 3 semesters (3 credit hours) of Seminar (OPTI 8110); 

3) A minimum of 21 credit hours (7 courses) in formal 
courses having an OPTI prefix; 

4) A minimum of 44 credit hours of formal coursework 
selected from the list of optics electives and discipline 
specific courses approved for the optics program by 
the Interdisciplinary Optics Program Committee. 

The remaining 7 credit hours needed to satisfy the 
requirement of 51 non-thesis credit hours are free 
electives, and may include additional coursework in 
courses approved for the optics program, independent 
study, seminar courses, and other discipline specific 
courses (i.e., computer science, chemistry, etc.) approved 
on a case-by-case basis by the student's Advisory 
Committee and the Optics Program Director. 

All graduates of the program must demonstrate 
competency in the Core Curriculum. Students may 
demonstrate competency in the subject matter of the 
Core Curriculum by earning a grade of Pass on each of 
the five sections of a comprehensive qualifying 
examination. Each section of the comprehensive 
examination is based on subject matter in one of the five 
courses comprising the Core Curriculum. Students failing 
to receive a grade of Pass on a given section of the 
comprehensive examination must enroll in the 
corresponding Core Curriculum course. Students 
demonstrate competency in the Core Curriculum by 
passing the comprehensive examination or by earning a 
grade of B or better in those core courses not passed 
during the comprehensive examination. 

Well-prepared students may earn a grade of pass on one 
or more of the five sections of the comprehensive 
examination. In those cases, credit hours that would have 
been earned in the courses upon which the sections 
passed were based may be replaced by credit hours in 
OPTI 8991, Dissertation Research, and/or other electives 
approved by the student's Advisory Committee and the 
Optics Program Director. 

A student in the Ph.D. program must maintain a 
minimum GPA of 3.0 in all coursework attempted for the 
degree. An accumulation of two C grades will result in 
termination of the student's enrollment in the program. A 
grade of U earned in any course will result in termination 
of the student's enrollment in the program. 

Qualifier and Admission to Candidacy 

All graduates of the program must demonstrate 
competency in the Core Curriculum. All students must 
prepare a Plan of Study before the end of the third 



semester following admission to the program. The Plan 
of Study must be approved by the Advisory Committee. 

After successful completion of the Core Curriculum 
requirement and approval of the Plan of Study, the 
student will prepare a Research Plan for the thesis that is 
approved by the Advisory Committee. The Research Plan 
must demonstrate: (a) the student's knowledge of the 
relevant literature base, and (b) a research plan that, if 
successfully completed, will lead to an approved thesis. 
The student must present a written plan to the Advisory 
Committee. The student must also make an oral defense 
of the Research Plan at a presentation before the 
Advisory Committee. 

After successfully demonstrating competency in the Core 
Curriculum, preparation of an approved Plan of Study, 
and approval of the Research Plan by the Advisory 
Committee, the student is admitted to candidacy. The 
qualifier, as described, must be completed within two 
years following admission to the program. A full-time 
student is normally expected to complete the qualifier 
prior to the end of the third semester following admission 
to the program. 

Dissertation 

Each student will complete a minimum of 1 8 credit hours 
of dissertation. The student must present a written 
dissertation to the Advisory Committee. The student 
must defend the dissertation at a presentation before the 
Optics Faculty. Upon approval of the written dissertation 
and oral presentation by the Advisory Committee, the 
student has successfully completed the dissertation 
requirement. The dissertation must be written using a 
format acceptable to the Graduate School. 

Dissertation Advisor and Advisory 
Committee 

Each student in the program must have a Dissertation 
Advisor and an Advisory Committee before being 
admitted to candidacy. The student should select a 
dissertation advisor before the end of the second year of 
residency. The student and the dissertation advisor jointly 
determine the advisory committee. The Dissertation 
Advisor serves as Chair of the Advisory Committee and 
must be a member of the Optics Faculty at UNC 
Charlotte. The advisory committee must have at least 4 
members, the majority of which must be members of the 
Optics Faculty. Composition of the Advisory Committee 
must be approved by the Optics Program Director. 

Residency Requirement 

The student must satisfy the residence requirement for 
the program by completing 20 credit hours of continuous 
enrollment in coursework/dissertation credit. Residence 
is considered continuous if the student is enrolled in one 
or more courses in successive semesters until 20 credit 
hours are earned. 



College of Arts and Sciences 129 



Time Limit for Completion of Program 
Requirements 

All program requirements must be completed within 8 
calendar years from the date the student is admitted into 
the program. 

Transfer Credit Accepted 

Up to 30 credit hours of approved coursework may be 
transferred from other accredited masters and doctoral 
programs. Only courses in which the student earned a 
grade of B or better (or its equivalent) can be transferred. 
No more than 6 credit hours of approved coursework 
taken as a post-baccalaureate student may be applied 
toward the degree. Credit for dissertation research cannot 
be transferred. 

Assistantships 

Support for beginning graduate students is usually a 
teaching assistantship. Continuing students are often 
supported by research assistantships. 

Comprehensive Examination 

The dissertation defense is the final examination. 

Language Requirement 

The program has no language requirement. 

Core Curriculum 

A student in either the M.S. or Ph.D. program should 
plan to complete the core curriculum, shown below, 
during the first year of residence. Courses taken after 
completion of the core curriculum are elective, but must 
be approved by the student's Advisor and Advisory 
Committee. Courses in the core curriculum are 
prerequisites to elective OPTI courses. Students in the 
M.S. program are to enroll in courses having a 6XXX 
number. Students in the Ph.D. program are to enroll in 
courses having an 8XXX number. 

Fall 

OPTI6101/OPTI8101 Mathematical Methods of 
Optical Science and Engineering 

OPTI6102/OPTI8102 Principles of Geometrical and 
Physical Optics 

OPTI6104/OPTI8104 Electromagnetic Waves 

OPTI6110/OPTI81 10 Seminar 

Spring 

OPTI6105/OPTI8105 Optical Properties of 

Materials 
OPTI6211/OPTI8211 Introduction to Modern 

Optics 
OPTI6110/OPTI81 10 Seminar 

Approved Electives in the Research 
Concentrations: M.S. and Ph.D. Programs 

CHEM6082 Surfaces & Interfaces of Materials 
CHEM8147 Photochemistry 
CHEM8155 Polymer Synthesis 



ECGR5124 Digital Signal Processing 
ECGR5138 Electronic Thin Film Materials and 

Devices 
ECGR5140 Introduction to VSLI Processing 
ECGR5165 Laser Electronics 
ECGR51 97 Fundamentals of Optical Engineering 
ECGR8111 Systems Theory 
ECGR81 1 8 Applied Digital Image Processing 
ECGR8121 Advanced Theory of Communications 

I 
ECGR8122 Advanced Theory of Communications 

II 
ECGR8125 Optoelectronic Information Processing 
ECGR8132 Advanced Semiconductor Device 

Engineering I 
ECGR8133 Advanced Semiconductor Device 

Engineering II 
ITCS8132 Performance Analysis of 

Communication Networks 
ITCS8140 Data Visualization 
ITCS8 1 52 Computer Vision 
ITCS8153 Neural Networks 
ITCS8166 Computer Communications & 

Networks 
ITCS8168 Wireless Communication Networks 
ITCS8186 Application Specific System Design 

and Simulation 
ITSC8220 Pattern Recognition 
ITCS8224 Bio Image Processing 
MATH5143 Analysis I 
MATH5144 Analysis II 
MATH5165 Numerical Linear Algebra 
MATH5172 The Finite Element Method 
MATH5174 Partial Differential Equations 
MATH5176 Numerical Methods for Partial Diff. 

Equations 
MATH8176 Advanced Numerical Analysis 
MEGR6 181 Engineering Metrology 
MEGR71 82 Machine Tool Metrology 
MEGR7283 Advanced Coordinate Metrology 
MEGR81 66 Mechanical Behavior of Materials I 
PHYS6131 Classical Electromagnetism I 
PHYS6132 Classical Electromagnetism II 
PHYS6141 Quantum Theory I 
PHYS6142 Quantum theory II 
PHYS6271 Solid State Physics 



Courses in Optical Science and 
Engineering (Opti) 

OPTI 6000. Selected Topics in Optics. (3) 

Prerequisite: Consent of Optics Program Director. 
Selected topics in optics from areas such as medical 
optics, adaptive optics, all optical networks, etc. May be 
repeated for up to 6 hours of credit with consent of the 
Optics Program Director. (Fall/ Spring/ Summer) 

OPTI 6101. Mathematical Methods of Optical 
Science and Engineering. (3) Topics include: matrix 



130 College of Arts and Sciences 



theory, series and Frobenius methods of solutions to 
ordinary differential equations, separation of variables 
techniques for partial differential equations, special 
functions, Fourier series, and transform methods. Topical 
coverage will emphasize applications specific to the field 
of optics. Three lecture hours per week. (Fall) 

OPTI 6102. Principles of Geometrical and Physical 
Optics. (3) Ray analysis of common optical elements 
(mirrors, lenses and systems of lenses, prisms). Reflection 
and refraction at plane and spherical surfaces, thin and 
thick lenses, lensmaker's equation, field of view, and 
numerical aperture. Wave properties of light, 
superposition of waves, diffraction, interference, 
polarization, and coherence. Optics of thin films. Three 
lecture hours per week. (Fall) 

OPTI 6103. Light Sources and Detectors. (3). The 

nature of light, blackbody radiation. Optical sources, 
including discharge lamps, light-emitting diodes, gas and 
solid state lasers. Quantum wells. Continuous wave and 
pulsed (mode-locked, Q-switched) lasers. Selected solid- 
state laser systems. Light detection, including thermal and 
quantum detectors, photomultiplier tubes, diode 
detectors. Noise in light sources and detectors. Three 
lecture hours per week. (Fall, Odd Years) 

OPTI 6104. Electromagnetic Waves. (3) Maxwell's 
equations, the electromagnetic wave equation, and 
electromagnetic wave functions. Waves in dielectric and 
conducting media, dispersion. Reflection, refraction, 
transmission, internal reflection, and evanescent waves at 
an interface. Intensity. Introduction to guided waves. 
Three lecture hours per week. (Fall) 

OPTI 6105. Optical Properties of Materials. (3) 

Prerequisite: OPTI 6104 or permission of the instructor. 
Photophysical and photochemical processes in materials. 
Linear and nonlinear optical properties of materials. 
Optical properties of semiconductors and crystals. 
Optical transmission, absorption, and reflection. 
Fluorescence of organic and inorganic materials. Chiral 
molecular systems. Three lecture hours per week. (Spring) 

OPTI 6110. Seminar. (1) Prerequisite: Admission to 
Optics M.S. program. Topics include: discussion and 
analysis of topics of current interest in optics; effective 
techniques for making presentations and utilizing library 
materials; ethical issues in science and engineering. 
Attendance required. May be repeated for up to 2 hours 
credit. Two semesters of seminar required of all students 
in the Optics M.S. program. One to two hours of seminar 
per week. (Fall/ Spring) 

OPTI 6201. Fourier Optics and Holography. (3) 

Prerequisite: OPTI 6102 and OPTI 6104. Principles of 
scalar, Fresnel, and Fraunhofer diffraction theory. 
Coherent optical data processing. Optical filtering and 
data processing. Holography. Three lecture hours per 
week. (Fall, Even Years) 



OPTI 6205. Advanced Optical Materials. (3) 
Prerequisites: OPTI 6104 and OPTI 6105 or ECGR 
6133/8133. Molecular optical materials including 
fabrication methods. Luminescence centers; quenching. 
Nonlinear optics, including higher order terms of the 
susceptibility tensor. Photonic crystals. Three lecture 
hours per week. (Fall, Odd Years) 

OPTI 6211. Introduction to Modern Optics. (3) 

Prerequisites: OPTI 6102 and 6104 or permission of the 
instructor. Fourier analysis and holography, coherence. 
Introduction to light production and detection. Optical 
modulation, including EO effect, Kerr effect, amplitude 
modulation, magnetooptic effect, photoelastic effect, and 
acousto-optic effect. Introduction to nonlinear optics. 
Photonic switching. Three lecture hours per week. (Spring) 

OPTI 6212. Integrated Photonics. (3) Prerequisites: 
OPTI 6102 and OPTI 6104. Theory and application of 
optical waveguides, free-space micro-optics, and 
integrated photonic devices. Fabrication and integration 
techniques, including motivations for choice of approach 
(hybrid vs. monolithic, materials, size, performance, etc). 
Modeling and simulation. Students will be required to 
work with mathematical packages such as Matlab and/or 
Mathematica to illustrate key concepts and to implement 
beam propagation/optical modeling simulations. Three 
lecture hours per week. (Spring, Odd Years) 

OPTI 6221. Optical Communications. (3) Prerequisite: 
OPTI 6102 and OPTI 6103. Introduction to optical 
communications and basic communication block such as 
lasers, optical modulators, and optical transceivers. 
Review of fibers (attenuation, dispersions, etc.). Optical 
amplifiers. Passive and active photonic components such 
as tunable lasers and filters. Coherent and incoherent 
detection. Signal processing, photonic switching, and 
point-to-point links / connections. Three lecture hours 
per week. (Spring Even Years) 

OPTI 6222. Optical Communication Networks. (3) 

Prerequisite: OPTI 6221 or graduate standing in ECE, 
CS, or IT. Optical signal coding, multiplexing and de- 
multiplexing. Time-domain medium access (TDM 
(SONET) and TDMA), wavelength-division multiplexing 
(WDM and WDMA). Optical networks, add-drop 
multiplexing (OADM), switching and routing 
technologies, Dispersion management. Optical clock and 
timing recovery. Optical amplification, wavelength 
conversion, transport, and networking protocols. 
Broadband ISDN concepts. Access, metro, and long-haul 
network topologies. Three lecture hours per week. (Fall, 
Even Years) 

OPTI 6241. Optical System Function and Design. (3) 

Prerequisite: OPTI 6102. Advanced study of telescopes, 
microscopes, cameras, off-axis imaging systems, stops, 
apertures, multiple lenses, use and selection of ray trace 



College of Arts and Sciences 131 



computer codes. Three lecture hours per week. (Spring, 
Even Years) 

OPTI 6242. Optical Propagation in Inhomogeneous 
Media. (3) Prerequisite: OPTI 6102 and OPTI 6104. 
Advanced study of free space propagation, scattering, and 
scintillation of Gaussian and uniform beam waves. 
Random processes, weak fluctuation theory, propagation 
through complex paraxial optical systems (Spring, Odd 
Years) 

OPTI 6244. High Speed Photonics and Optical 
Instrumentation. (3) Prerequisite: OPTI 6103 and 
OPTI 6104. Study of instrumentation used for 
generation, detection, and manipulation of light in optical 
circuits. Topics include ultrashort pulse generation, 
photon-phonon interactions, 2nd & 3rd harmonic 
generation, squeezed light, optical tweezers, OPO, 
electro-optic modulators, selective polarizers, optical 
switches, amplifiers, multiplexing and mixing schemes, 
and application of CCD and CMOS cameras and 
detectors. Three lecture hours per week. (Spring, Odd 
Years) 

OPTI 6261. Modern Coherence Theory. (3) 

Prerequisite: OPTI 6102 and OPTI 6104. Stochastic 
processes. Second order coherence of scalar and vector 
wavefields, radiation and states of coherence. Quantum 
wavefields. (Fall, Odd Years) 

OPTI 6271. Advanced Physical Optics (3) 

Prerequisite: OPTI 6101, OPTI 6102, and OPTI 6104. 
Advanced study of electromagnetic wave propagation, 
stratified media, physics of geometrical optics, 
polarization and crystal optics, absorption and dispersion, 
interference, propagation and diffraction. Three lecture 
hours per week. (Spring, Odd Years) 

OPTI 6281. Modern Optics Laboratory. (3) 

Prerequisite: OPTI 6102. Selected experiments in areas of 
modern optics such as fiber optics, interferometry, 
spectroscopy, polarization, optical metrology, and 
holography. Six laboratory hours per week. (Spring Even 
Years) 

OPTI 6691. Research Seminar. (1 - 3) Prerequisite: 
Consent of student's Advisory Committee. A seminar in 
which independent study may be pursued by the student, 
or a group of students, under the direction of a professor. 
May be repeated for up to a maximum of 6 credit hours. 
(Fall/ Spring/ Summer) 

OPTI 6991. Thesis Research. (1 - 3) Prerequisite: 
Admission to candidacy. Research for the thesis. May be 
repeated for a total of 12 credit hours. Graded Pass/Fail. 
(Fall/ Spring/ Summer) 

OPTI 7999. Masters Residence. (1) Prerequisite: OPTI 
6991. Required of all Optics M.S. students who have 
completed all requirements for the degree except the 



thesis defense and are taking no other courses. 
(Fall/ Spring/ Summer) 

OPTI 8000. Selected Topics in Optics. (3) 

Prerequisite: Consent of Optics Program Director. See 
OPTI 6000 for Course Description. 

OPTI 8101. Mathematical Methods of Optical 
Science and Engineering. (3) See OPTI 6101 for 
Course Description. 

OPTI 8102. Principles of Geometrical and Physical 
Optics. (3) See OPTI 6102 for Course Description. 

OPTI 8103. Light Sources and Detectors. (3) See 

OPTI 6103 for Course Description. 

OPTI 8104. Electromagnetic Waves. (3) See OPTI 

6104 for Course Description. 

OPTI 8105. Optical Properties of Materials. (3) 

Prerequisite: OPTI 8104 or permission of the instructor. 
See OPTI 6105 for Course Description. 

OPTI 8110. Seminar. (1) Prerequisite: Admission to 
Optics Ph.D. program. Topics include: discussion and 
analysis of topics of current interest in optics; effective 
techniques for making presentations and utilizing library 
materials; ethical issues in science and engineering. 
Attendance required. May be repeated for up to 3 hours 
credit. Three semesters of seminar required of students in 
the Optics Ph.D. program during the first two years of 
residence. One to two hours of seminar per week. 
(Fall/ Spring) 

OPTI 8201. Fourier Optics and Holography. (3) 

Prerequisite: OPTI 8102 and OPTI 8104. See OPTI 6201 
for Course Description. 

OPTI 8205. Advanced Optical Materials. (3) 

Prerequisites: OPTI 8104 and OPTI 8105 or ECGR 
6133/8133. See OPTI 6205 for Course Description. 

OPTI 8211. Introduction to Modern Optics. (3) 

Prerequisite: OPTI 8102 and 8104 or permission of the 
instructor. See OPTI 621 1 for Course Description. 

OPTI 8212. Integrated Photonics. (3) Prerequisites: 
OPTI 8102 and OPTI 8104. See OPTI 6212 for Course 
Description. 

OPTI 8221. Optical Communications. (3) Prerequisite: 
OPTI 8102 and OPTI 8103. See OPTI 6221 for Course 
Description. 

OPTI 8222. Optical Communication Networks. (3) 

Prerequisite: OPTI 8221. See OPTI 6222 for Course 
Description. 



132 College of Arts and Sciences 



OPTI 8241. Optical System Function and Design. (3) 

Prerequisite: OPTI 8102. See OPTI 6241 for Course 
Description. 

OPTI 8242. Optical Propagation in Inhomogeneous 
Media. (3) Prerequisite: OPTI 8102 and OPTI 8104. See 
OPTI 6242 for Course Description. 

OPTICS 8244. High Speed Photonics and Optical 
Instrumentation. (3) Prerequisite: OPTI 8103 and 
OPTI 8104. See OPTI 6244 for Course Description. 

OPTI 8261. Modern Coherence Theory. (3) 

Prerequisite: OPTI 8102 and OPTI 8104. See OPTI 
6261 for Course Description. 

OPTI 8271. Advanced Physical Optics (3) 

Prerequisite: OPTI 8101, OPTI 8102, and OPTI 8104. 
See OPTI 6271 for Course Description. 

OPTI 8281. Modern Optics Laboratory. (3) 

Prerequisite: OPTI 8102. See OPTI 6281 for Course 
Description. 

OPTI 8691. Research Seminar. (1 - 3) Prerequisite: 
Consent of Optics Program Director. See OPTI 6691 for 
Course Description. 

OPTI 8991. Dissertation Research. (1 - 3) Prerequisite: 
Admission to candidacy. Research for the dissertation. 
May be repeated for a total of 30 credit hours. Graded 
Pass/Fail. (Fall/ Spring/ Summer) 

OPTI 9999. Doctoral Residence. (1) Prerequisite: 
OPTI 8991. Required of all Optics Ph.D. students who 
have completed all requirements for the degree except the 
thesis defense and are taking no other courses. 
(Fall/ Spring/ Summer) 



PHYSICS 

Department of Physics and Optical Science 

100 Burson Building 
704-687- 2537 
http://www.physics.uncc.edu 

Degrees 

M.S. (Applied Physics) 

Coordinator 

Dr. Robert K. Tyson 
135-E Burson Building 
704-687-3399 
rtyson@email.uncc.edu 



Faculty 

Yildirim Aktas - Associate Professor 
Vasily Astratov - Assistant Professor 
Thomas M. Corwin - Professor 
Angela Davies - Assistant Professor 
Faramar2 Farahi - Professor 
Michael A. Fiddy - Professor 
Greg Gbur - Assistant Professor 
Tsing-Hua Her - Assistant Professor 
Billy F. Melton - Associate Professor 
Patrick Moyer - Associate Professor 
Jeff Naeini - Assistant Professor 
M. Yasin Akhtar Raja - Associate Professor 
Robert Splinter - Adjunct Assistant Professor 
Thomas J. Suleski - Assistant Professor 
Susan R. Trammell - Assistant Professor 
Robert K. Tyson - Associate Professor 



MASTER OF SCIENCE IN 
APPLIED PHYSICS 

The Applied Physics degree program is excellent 
preparation for those planning to continue their 
education through the Ph.D., either in physics or an 
engineering field, or for a career as an instructor in a two- 
year college. Students electing the Thesis Option will be 
well qualified for employment in industry or in a research 
laboratory. 

While students have opportunities for research in optics, 
astronomy, plasma physics, and nuclear magnetic 
resonance, the research emphasis in the Department is in 
the area of applied optics. The Department of Physics 
and Optical Science is a major participant, and the 
administrative coordinator, of M.S. and Ph.D. programs 
in Optical Science and Engineering. These degree 
programs are interdisciplinary involving six science and 
engineering departments [Physics & Optical Science, 
Chemistry, Mathematics, Electrical & Computer 
Engineering, Mechanical Engineering & Engineering 
Science, and Computer Science], the Center for 
Optoelectronics & Optical Communications, and the 
Center for Precision Metrology. The program emphasizes 
basic and applied interdisciplinary education and research 
in areas of optics that include: 

• Optoelectronic devices and sub-assemblies 

• Devices for telecommunications, sensors, and 
characterization 

• Optical materials (semiconductors, polymer- 
organic and crystalline) 

• Optical metrology 

• Optical imaging 

• Optical communication networks 

A complete description of die programs and course 
offerings in Optical Science and Engineering can be 
accessed at the web address http://optics.uncc.edu and 
under the OPTI listing in the Graduate Catalog. 



College of Arts and Sciences 133 



Degree Requirements 

The Department of Physics and Optical Science has three 
concentrations within the M.S. in Applied Physics 
program that include both thesis and non-thesis degree 
options. 

1) Applied Physics Concentration (Thesis or non-thesis 
option) 

2) Applied Optics Concentration (Thesis option only), 

3) Medical Physics Concentration (Non-thesis option 
only). 

All degree options require the completion of 30 credit 
hours approved by the Physics and Optical Science 
Department. A minimum of 1 5 credit hours presented for 
the degree must be in courses numbered 6000 and above. 
Courses for which undergraduate credit has been awarded 
may not be repeated for graduate credit. A rninirnum 
grade point average of 3.0 is required on all coursework 
attempted for the degree. At the time of admission up to 
6 semester hours of graduate transfer credit may be 
accepted if approved by the Department of Physics and 
Optical Science and the Graduate School. All candidates 
for the degree must pass a final examination administered 
by the student's Advisory Committee. 

A student selecting the thesis option must present credit 
for at least 6 semester hours of PHYS 6991. The thesis 
defense is the final examination for a student selecting the 
thesis option. 

A student selecting the non-thesis option must pass a 
final examination administered by the student's Advisory 
Committee. Example questions relating to subject matter 
for the examination will be prepared by the Advisory 
Committee and given to the student at least 30 days prior 
to the examination date. The student will prepare 
responses to these questions and make an oral 
presentation to members of the Committee that is based 
upon the prepared responses. Committee members may 
question the student on any and all aspects of the relevant 
test material. 

A student selecting the Medical Physics concentration 
should do so prior to enrolling. The Medical Physics 
concentration is designed for students wishing to pursue 
careers in such medical fields as radiology or medical 
imaging or as a research scientist/ technician with 
companies developing and manufacturing medical 
equipment. 

The medical physics concentration is designed to accept 
students having undergraduate majors in physics, 
chemistry, and engineering. Applicants for admission to 
the Medical Physics concentration must, as a minimum, 
present earned credit for the equivalent of the UNC 
Charlotte courses listed below. 

PHYS 2101 and 



PHYS 2101L Physics for Science and Engineering I - 

4 credit hours 
PHYS 2102 and 
PHYS 2102L Physics for Science and Engineering II 

- 4 credit hours 
PHYS 3101 Topics and Methods of General 

Physics - 3 credit hours 
PHYS 3141 Introduction to Modern Physics - 3 

credit hours 
MATH 1241, 1242, 2241, 2242, and 2171 - 15 credit 

hours 
CHEM 1251, 1251L, 1252, 1252L - Principles of 

Chemistry - 8 credit hours 

Students lacking courses in anatomy and physiology will 
be required to take BIOL 1273 and 1273 Laboratory - 
Human Anatomy and Physiology - 4 credit hours. 
Students lacking courses in basic circuit theory and 
electronics will be required to take ECGR 2161 - Basic 
Electrical Engineering 1-3 credit hours. 

A candidate for the degree must present credit for the 
following courses. 

PHYS 6210 

PHYS 5232 

PHYS 5242 

PHYS 6261 

PHYS 6301 

PHYS 6302 
PHYS 6303 
PHYS 6304 

PHYS 6401 



Theoretical Physics 

Electromagnetic Theory II 

Modern Physics II 

Nuclear and Particle Physics 

Radiation Detection, Instrumentation, 

and Data Analysis 

Radiation Protection and Dosimetry 

Imaging in Medicine 

Physics of Diagnostic Radiology and 

Radiotherapy 

Clinical Medical Physics (6 credit 

hours) 



Entering students not having the equivalent of PHYS 
4222, PHYS 4232, or PHYS 4242 are required to take 
PHYS 5222, PHYS 5232, and/or PHYS 5242, as 
appropriate, before the end of their first year of residence. 
A student may, with departmental approval, apply up to 9 
semester hours from such related areas as Optics, 
Mathematics, Chemistry, and Engineering toward the 30 
credit hour degree requirement. 

Additional Admission Requirements 

In addition to fulfilling the university's general 
requirements for graduate admission at the Master's level, 
applicants seeking admission into the M.S. in Applied 
Physics program must also: 

1) Possess a Bachelor's degree in Physics, or a closely 
allied field, usually from an accredited college or 
university. Applicants from fields other than Physics 
may expect to be required to remove deficiencies in 
their physics background. 

2) Present satisfactory scores on the aptitude portion of 
the Graduate Record Examination. 

3) Possess an overall grade point average of at least 2.75 
(based on a 4.0 scale) on all of the applicant's 



134 College of Arts and Sciences 



previous work beyond high school. The average in 
the major should be 3.0 or better. 

4) Present satisfactory scores on the Test of English as 
a Foreign Language, if the applicant is from a non- 
English speaking country. 

5) Demonstrate evidence of sufficient interest, ability, 
and preparation in physics to adequately profit from 
graduate study, as determined by the Physics 
Department's Graduate Committee. 

Admission to Candidacy 

In addition to the general requirements for admission to 
candidacy, students enrolled in the Master of Science 
program in Applied Physics program should have: 

1) Removed all identified entrance deficiencies by the 
time of application for admission to candidacy, 

2) Completed at least 1 8 approved credit hours with a 
GPA of 3.0 or better, and 

3) Selected a major advisor and formed an advisory 
committee. 



Assistantships 

Support for beginning graduate students is usually a 
teaching assistantship. Continuing students are often 
supported by research assistantships. 



Comprehensive Examination 

All candidates for the degree must pass a final 
examination. The thesis defense is the final examination 
for those students who select the thesis option. 

A student selecting the non-thesis option must pass a 
final examination administered by the student's Advisory 
Committee. Subject matter for the examination will be 
prepared by the student's Advisory Committee and given 
to the student at least 30 days prior to the examination 
date. The student will make an oral presentation to 
members of the Committee that is based upon the 
prepared response. Committee members may question 
the student on any and all aspects of the relevant test 
material. 

Advisory Committee 

Each student in the M.S. in Applied Physics Program 
must have a major advisor and an advisory committee. 
The student should select a major advisor before the end 
of the first year of residency. The student and the major 
advisor jointly determine the advisory committee. The 
advisory committee must have at least 3 members, the 
majority of which must be from the Department of 
Physics and Optical Science. The major advisor and the 
advisory committee must be in place prior to applying for 
degree candidacy. 



Courses in Physics 

Anj physics course at the 5000 or 6000 level can be applied to the 
30-hour requirement. Any other courses to be applied toward the 



30-hour-course requirement must be approved, in advance, by the 
Physics Department. Courses approved by the Physics Department 
as appropriate for meeting the 30-hour-degree requirement are listed 
below. A minimum of 15 credit hours must be in courses with a 
6000 number. 

PHYS 5000. Selected Topics in Physics. (0-4) 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Selected advanced 
topics in physics. May be repeated with approval of the 
Department. (On demand) 

PHYS 5210. Theoretical Physics. (3) Prerequisite: 
Consent of instructor. Topics include: Matrices, power 
series, solutions to ordinary and partial differential 
equations, Hilbert space, Fourier integrals, boundary 
value problems, Green's functions, and complex analysis. 
(Fall) 

PHYS 5220. Computational Methods in Physics. (3) 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Use of computers in 
solving physics problems including computational and 
mathematical methods to solve problems in classical 
mechanics, quantum mechanics, electromagnetism, 
nuclear physics, optics, and solid state physics. Computer 
solutions include numerical methods of integration, 
solving differential equations, curve fitting, and statistical 
analysis in physics. (On demand) 

PHYS 5222. Classical Mechanics II. (3) Prerequisite: 
PHYS 3121 and MATH 2241. Continuation of PHYS 
3121. The second course of a two-semester sequence 
treating particle dynamics, the motion of systems of 
particles, rigid body motion, moving coordinate systems, 
Lagrange's equations, Hamilton's equations, and small 
oscillations. Three lecture hours a week. (Spring) 

PHYS 5231. Electromagnetic Theory I. (3) 

Prerequisites: For physics majors, PHYS 3121 with a 
grade of C or better; Others: consent of instructor; 
MATH 2171, MATH 2241. Corequisite: MATH 2242. 
The first course of a two-semester sequence. Topics 
considered include electrostatics and magnetostatics in 
free space and in matter, the motion of charged particles 
in electric and magnetic fields, capacitance, dielectric 
theory, field energy, electromagnetic induction and 
inductance, vector and scalar potentials, magnetic 
properties of matter. Maxwell's equations, solutions of 
Maxwell's equations in free space and in matter, 
propagating electromagnetic waves, and boundary value 
problems. (Spring) 

PHYS 5232. Electromagnetic Theory II. (3) 

Prerequisite: PHYS 4231. Continuation of PHYS 4231. 
The second course in a two-semester sequence. Topics 
include magnetostatics in free space and in matter, 
electromagnetic induction, vector and scalar potentials, 
magnetic properties of materials, Maxwell's equations in 
free space and in matter, propagating electromagnetic 
waves, and boundary value problems. Three lecture hours 
a week. (Fall) 



College of Arts and Sciences 135 



PHYS 5242. Modern Physics II. (3) Prerequisite: 
PHYS 4241. An extension of PHYS 4241 to include more 
advanced topics such as generalized eigenvalue problems, 
angular momentum, spin, the hydrogen atom, and 
perturbation theory, with selected applications from 
atomic, solid state, and nuclear physics. Three lecture 
hours a week. (Spring) 

PHYS 5271. Principles of Geometrical and Physical 
Optics. (3) Prerequisites: PHYS 2102 with a grade of C 
or better, senior standing, and MATH 2171. Exceptions 
by consent of the instructor. Topics include the 
mathematics of wave motion, light as an example of an 
electromagnetic wave, the superposition of periodic and 
non-periodic waves, and selected topics from geometrical 
and physical optics. (Fall) 

PHYS 6101. Biophysics. (3) Prerequisite: Consent of 
instructor. Will include principles of physics relevant to 
biological media; electrical activity, optical microscopy, 
and spectrophotometry. Photosynthesis and light 
absorption. Models of blood flow and the cardiovascular 
system. Dynamics of membrane lipids and ionic flow. 
Visual and audio systems. Radiation biophysics, ultrasonic 
interaction in biological media. Credit cannot be awarded 
for both PHYS 6101 and 8101. (Fall) 

PHYS 6121. Classical Dynamics. (3) Prerequisite: 
PHYS 4222. Variational principles and Lagrange's 
equations. Hamilton's principles and mechanics of 
particles. The two-body central force problem. Rigid body 
motion. Small oscillations and the eigenvalue equation. 
(Spring, alternate years) 

PHYS 6131. Classical Electromagnetism I. (3) 

Prerequisite: PHYS 4232. Electrostatic and boundary 
value problems. Multipole expansions, dielectrics and 
magnetostatics. Maxwell's equations, time varying fields 
and conservation laws. Plane electromagnetic waves and 
wave propagation. Wave guides and resonant cavities. 
Simple radiating systems. Scattering and diffraction 
theory. (Fall, alternate years) 

PHYS 6132. Classical Electromagnetism II. (3) 

Prerequisite: PHYS 6131. Special theory of relativity. 
Dynamics of relativistic particles and electromagnetic 
fields. Charged particle collisions and scattering. 
Radiation by moving charges. Bremsstrahlung, virtual 
quanta, and beta decay theory. Multipole expansions and 
fields. Radiation damping. Self-fields of particles. 
Scattering and absorption of radiation by a bound system. 
(On demand) 

PHYS 6141. Quantum Theory I. (3) Prerequisite: 
PHYS 4242. Principles of non-relativistic wave 
mechanics. The Schrodinger equation, linear harmonic 
oscillator and WKB approximation. Central forces and 
angular momentum. The hydrogen atom. (Fall, alternate 
years) 



PHYS 6142. Quantum Theory II. (3) Prerequisite: 
PHYS 6141. Scattering theory, linear vector spaces, spin, 
two level systems. Quantum dynamics, symmetry 
operations, bound state and time-dependent perturbation 
theory. Theory of scattering, angular momentum, and 
identical particles. (On demand) 

PHYS 6201. Fourier Optics. (3) Prerequisite: PHYS 
4271 or consent of instructor. Principles of scalar, 
Fresnel, and Fraunhofer diffraction theory. Coherent 
optical imaging systems, optical filtering, optical data 
processing, and holography. Application of Fourier optics 
and holography. (Fall, Even Years) 

PHYS 6210. Theoretical Physics. (3) Prerequisite: 
Consent of Department. Topics include: Matrices, power 
series, solutions to ordinary and partial differential 
equations, Hilbert space, Fourier integrals, boundary 
value problems, Green's functions, and complex analysis. 
(Fall) 

PHYS 6211. Introduction to Modern Optics. (3) 

Prerequisite: PHYS 4271 or consent of department. 
Theory of laser oscillation, optical resonators, interaction 
of radiation and atomic systems, giant pulsed lasers, laser 
systems. Wave propogation in non-linear media, 
modulation of optical radiation, noise in optical detection 
and generation. Interaction of light and sound. Laser 
types and applications including the free-electron laser. 
(Spring) 

PHYS 6220. Computational Methods in Physics. (3) 

Prerequisite: PHYS 5210. Use of computers in solving 
physics problems including computational and 
mathematical methods to solve problems in classical 
mechanics, quantum mechanics, electromagnetism, 
nuclear physics, optics, and solid state physics. Computer 
solutions include numerical methods of integration, 
solving differential equations, curve fitting, and statistical 
analysis in physics. (On demand) 

PHYS 6221 Optical Communications I. (3) 

Prerequisite: Prerequisites: PHYS 4242, 6241, or ECGR 
5165. Introduction to optical communications. Optical 
waveguides (attenuation, dispersions, etc.). Basic 
communication blocks such as lasers, optical modulators, 
and optical transceivers. Passive and active photonic 
components such as tunable lasers, optical amplifiers, 
SOAs, 1-converters, and filters. Coherent and incoherent 
detection. Signal processing, photonic switching, and 
point-to-point connections. Three lecture hours per week. 
(Spring) 

PHYS 6241. Light Sources and Detectors. (3) 

Prerequisite: PHYS 4241 or consent of department. Wave 
nature of light, basic semiconductor properties, light 
sources, light detectors and modulators, optical 
waveguides, optical systems with applications, and 
selected topics in non-linear optics. (Fall, Odd Years) 



136 College of Arts and Sciences 



PHYS 6251. Statistical Physics. (3) Prerequisite: 
Consent of instructor. Classical and quantum statistical 
mechanics. Statistical thermodynamics. Ensembles, 
partition functions, fluctuations, ideal Fermi and Bose gas 
systems. (On demand) 

PHYS 6261. Nuclear and Particle Physics. (3) 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Properties of nuclei, 
nuclear models, and interactions. Nuclear reactions, 
fission, and fusion. Alpha, beta, and gamma decay. One 
and two particle states. Relatrvistic kinematics, principle 
of invariance, quantum numbers, elementary particles and 
models. (On demand) 

PHYS 6271. Advanced Solid State Physics. (3) 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Crystal structure. 
Electromagnetic, electron, mechanical, and elastic wave 
interactions with crystals. Theory of X-ray diffraction. 
Energy band theory of metals and semiconductors. 
Optical properties of solids, phase transitions, and 
amorphous solids. Quantum mechanics of covalent 
bonding, phonon excitation, and thermal energy. (On 
demand) 

PHYS 6281. Modern Optics Laboratory. (3) 

Prerequisite: PHYS 3281 or consent of instructor. 
Selected experiments in such modern optics areas as fiber 
optics, holography, spectroscopy, and Fourier optics. Six 
laboratory hours each week. (Spring Even Years) 

PHYS 6301. Radiation Detection, Instrumentation, 
and Data Analysis. (3) Corequisites: PHYS 6261 . 
Charged particle, neutron, and photon detection. Signal 
processing and data recording methods including 
techniques of data analysis and error propagation. The 
course will consist of two lectures and one two-hour 
laboratory each week. The course will emphasize 
application of radiation detectors used in radiotherapy 
and diagnostic radiology. Two lecture hours and one two- 
hour laboratory each week. (Fall) 

PHYS 6302. Radiation Protection and Dosimetry. (3) 

Corequisites: PHYS 6261. Radiation dosimetry 
fundamentals including photon, electron, and neutron 
dosimetry. Radiation transport. Fundamentals of radiation 
protection and shielding. Assessment of effective dose. 
Three lecture hours per week. (Fall) 

PHYS 6303. Imaging in Medicine. (3) Prerequisites: 
PHYS 6210 and PHYS 6301. The fundamental 
conceptual, mathematical, and statistical aspects of 
imaging science, and a survey from this formal viewpoint 
of various medical imaging modalities, including 
film-screen radiography, positron and x-ray computed 
tomography, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance 
imaging. (Spring) 

PHYS 6304. Physics of Diagnostic Radiology and 
Radiotherapy. (3) Prerequisites: PHYS 5210 and PHYS 
6302. Physics of x-ray diagnostic procedures and 



equipment Physics of the interaction of the various 
radiation modalities with body-equivalent materials. 
Physical aspects of clinical applications including radiation 
therapy to cause controlled biological effects in patients. 
Three lecture hours per week. (Spring) 

PHYS 6401. Clinical Medical Physics. (1-3) 
Prerequisite: Consent of Program Director. Eighty to one 
hundred supervised contact hours of clinical internship at 
a regional health care system. May be repeated for a 
maximum of 12 credit hours. Graded Pass/No-credit. 
(Fall, Spring, Summer) 

PHYS 6991. Physics Thesis Research I. (1-3) 

Prerequisite: admission to candidacy and consent of 
instructor. Research for the thesis. Letter grade assigned. 
May be repeated to accumulate a maximum of 6 hours 
credit. (Fall, Spring, Summer) 

PHYS 6992. Physics Thesis Research II. (1-4) 

Prerequisite: PHYS 6991 and consent of instructor. 
Research for the thesis. Graded pass/no-credit. May be 
repeated to accumulate a maximum of 4 hours credit. 
(Fall, Spring, Summer) 

PHYS 7999. Graduate Residence (1) Required of all 
masters students who are working on or defending thesis 
projects, and/or are scheduled for comprehensive 
examinations, but who are not enrolled in other graduate 
courses. (Fall, Spring, Summer) 

PHYS 8101. Biophysics. (3) See PHYS 6101 for Course 
Description. 



PSYCHOLOGY 

Department of Psychology 

4018 Colvard Building 

704-687-4731 

Degree 

MA. 

Clinical/Community Coordinator 

Dr. Richard Tedeschi 

Industrial/Organizational Director 

Dr. Steven Rogelberg 

Graduate Faculty 

Clinical/ Community Psychology 

Art Blume, Associate Professor 
Lawrence G. Calhoun, Professor 
James R. Cook, Associate Professor 
George Demakis, Assistant Professor 



College of Arts and Sciences 137 



C. D. (Denny) Fernald, Associate Professor Emeritus 

Ryan Kilmer, Assistant Professor 

Albert A. Maisto, Bonnie Cone Distinguished Professor 

Richard D. McAnulty, Associate Professor 

Amy Peterman, Associate Professor 

Sam Simono, Professor Emeritus 

Richard Tedeschi, Professor and Coordinator 

Industrial/Organizational 

Anita Blanchard, Assistant Professor 

Kimberly K. Buch, Associate Professor 

David C. Gilmore, Associate Professor 

Eric Heggestad, Assistant Professor 

Jo Ann Lee, Associate Professor 

Charlie Reeve, Assistant Professor 

Steven Rogelberg, Associate Professor and Director 

William D. Siegfried, Associate Professor 

Other members of the Graduate Faculty 

Arnie Cann, Professor 

Brian Cuder, Professor 

Mark Faust, Assistant Professor 

Paul W. Foos, Professor 

Virginia Gil-Rivas, Assistant Professor 

Jane F. Gaultney, Associate Professor 

Paula Goolkasian, Professor 

Nakia Gordon, Assistant Professor 

Douglas L. Grimsley, Professor 

Susan K. Johnson, Assistant Professor 

W. Scott Terry, Professor 

Lori Van Wallendael, Associate Professor 

Jennifer Welbourne, Assistant Professor 



MASTER OF ARTS 

Clinical/Community Psychology 

The objective of the master's degree program in 
Clinical/Community Psychology is to train psychologists 
in the knowledge and skills necessary to address problems 
encountered in modern living. The program provides a 
foundation in the research methods and content of basic 
psychology as well as training in the applied skills of 
professional practice. The relatively small, competitively 
selected student body receives individual attention from 
faculty members who maintain rigorous standards of 
academic excellence. 

Students develop knowledge and skills in psychological 
assessment, learn various treatment and intervention 
strategies, and work with a variety of populations in 
consultation, evaluation, and research. An extensive 
practicum component utilizes the Charlotte area as a 
setting for applied experience. 

The program prepares students for the North Carolina 
psychology licensure exam and for positions in diverse 
settings such as community mental health centers, 
correctional facilities, and other human service programs. 



A number of graduates have gone on to pursue a doctoral 
degree. 

Additional Admission Requirements 

To be considered for admission to graduate study in 
Clinical/Community Psychology, a student must present 
the following requirements in addition to those required 
by the Graduate School: 

1) Completed application by March 1 

2) 18 hours of undergraduate psychology including 
Introductory Psychology & Research Methods 

3) An undergraduate course in statistics 

4) Acceptable scores on the Verbal and Quantitative 
GRE 

5) The GRE subject test in psychology is strongly 
recommended 

Admission to the program is very competitive for the 
spaces available each year. Most students who are 
admitted have much better records than the minimum 
required. The primary Clinical/Community Psychology 
application deadline is March 1 for admission in the fall 
semester, but if space is still available, late applications 
will be considered until May 1 . Students may not begin 
the program during the spring semester. 

Degree Requirements 

The Clinical/Community Psychology program requires at 
least 48 semester hours of graduate coursework. Full-time 
students should be able to complete the program in two 
calendar years. A thesis and comprehensive exam are 
required. 

Basic Knowledge and Methods in Psychology (14 

hours) 

PSYC6102 Research Design and Quantitative 

Methods in Psychology (3) 
PSYC6107 Ethical and Professional Issues in 

Psychology (2) 
PSYC6999 Thesis (3) 
and two courses (6 hours) selected from the following: 

PSYC6010 Topics in Learning and Cognition (3) 
PSYC6015 Topics in Perception and Physiological 

Psychology (3) 
PSYC6020 Topics in Developmental Psychology 

(3) 
PSYC6030 Topics in Social Psychology and 
Personality (3) 

Clinical/ Community Coursework (34 hours) 

PSYC6050 Topics in Psychological Treatment (3) 
PSYC6141 Intellectual Assessment (4) 
PSYC6142 Personality Assessment (4) 
PSYC6145 Applied Research Design and Program 

Evaluation (3) 
PSYC6 1 50 Psychological Treatment (4) 
PSYC61 51 Behavior Disorders (4) 
PSYC6155 Community Psychology (3) 
PSYC6450 Practicum in Clinical Psychology (3) 



138 College of Arts and Sciences 



PSYC6455 Practicum in Community Psychology 

(3) 
Or a second 

PSYC6450 Practicum in Clinical Psychology (3) 
Elective (Selected in consultation with adviser.) (3) 

Hours beyond the 48 hours may be required by the 
academic adviser and the Clinical/Community Program 
Committee. The faculty conduct a thorough review of 
student performance on a regular basis. Continuation in 
the program is contingent upon a favorable review during 
these evaluations. Students who consistendy show 
borderline course performance, who are not developing 
good applied skills in the practice of psychology, who fail 
to complete coursework in a timely basis, or who 
otherwise perform unprofessionally or unsatisfactorily, 
may be required to complete additional courses or 
practicum work, or may be removed from the program. 
The enrollment of a student who receives three grades of 
C or one Unsatisfactory grade during his or her graduate 
career is automatically terminated. 

Comprehensive Examinations 

All students are required to successfully complete 
comprehensive examinations covering research design, 
ethics and knowledge of clinical/ community psychology. 
Students who fail the comprehensive exam twice are 
removed from the program. 

Assistantships 

A variety of resources are available for financial 
assistance. These include teaching assistantships to 
proctor the general psychology laboratory, research 
assistantships from faculty grants, and graduate 
assistantships in other campus units such as the Learning 
Center and Disability Student Services. These range in 
pay from $8,000 to $12,000 per academic year. 

Research Experiences 

Students are encouraged to become involved in ongoing 
research in the department, and they are required to 
complete a thesis. 

Practica 

Practica, involving practical experience working with 
human service agencies in the region, are a required part 
of the program. 



MASTER OF ARTS 

Industrial/Organizational Psychology 

The objective of the master's degree program in 
Industrial/Organizational Psychology is to train students 
in the knowledge and skills necessary to research and 
improve the world of work from both an employee and 
organizational point of view. The program provides a 
foundation in the research methods and content of basic 
psychology as well as training in the applied skills of 



professional practice. Among the issues students learn 
about include personnel selection, training and 
development, performance evaluation, workplace health, 
employee attitudes and satisfaction, work motivation, 
team and organizational effectiveness, and change 
management. The relatively small, competitively selected 
student body receives individual attention from faculty 
members who maintain rigorous standards of academic 
excellence. 

Additional Admission Requirements 

To be considered for admission to graduate study in 
Industrial/Organizational Psychology, a student must 
present the following requirements in addition to those 
required by the Graduate School: 

1) Completed application by February 1 

2) Acceptable scores on the Verbal and Quantitative 
GRE 

1 8 hours of undergraduate psychology including 
Introductory Psychology, Research Methods, and 
Statistics are recommended. 

Admission to the Industrial/Organizational program is 
very competitive for the spaces available each year. The 
primary application deadline is February 1 for admission 
in the fall semester, but if space is available, late 
applications will be considered until May 1 . Students may 
not begin the program during the spring semester. 

Degree Requirements 

The Industrial/Organizational program requires at least 
48 semester hours of graduate coursework as specified 
below. Full-time students should be able to complete the 
program in two calendar years. 

Basic Knowledge and Methods in Psychology (14 

hours) 

PSYC6102 Research Design and Quantitative 

Methods in Psychology (3) 
PSYC6107 Ethical and Professional Issues in 

Psychology (2) 
PSYC6999 Thesis (3) 
and two courses (6 hours) selected from the following: 

PSYC6010 Topics in Learning and Cognition (3) 
PSYC6015 Topics in Perception and Physiological 

Psychology (3) 
PSYC6020 Topics in Developmental Psychology 

(3) 
PSYC6030 Topics in Social Psychology and 
Personality (3) 

Industrial/ Organizational Psychology (22 hours) 
PSYC6140 Psychological Measurement and 

Evaluation (3) 
PSYC6171 Industrial/Organizational Psychology 

(3) 
PSYC6171L Laboratory in I/O Psychology (1) 
PSYC6172 Personnel I (3) 
PSYC6174 Organizational Dynamics I (3) 



College of Arts and Sciences 139 



PSYC6175 Organizational Dynamics II (3) 

PSYC6177 Personnel II (3) 

PSYC6477 Projects in I/O Psychology (3) 

Electives selected in consultation with Adviser (12 

hours) 

PSYC6124 Psychology of Aging (3) 
PSYC6176 Counseling in Organizations (3) 
PSYC6899 Readings and Research (3) 
Graduate courses from other disciplines 
Additional thesis hours 

Students who consistently show borderline course 
performance, who fail to complete coursework on a 
timely basis, or who otherwise perform unprofessionally 
or unsatisfactorily, may be required to complete 
additional courses or may be removed from the program. 
The enrollment of a student who receives three grades of 
C or one Unsatisfactory grade during his or her graduate 
career is automatically terminated. 

Comprehensive Examinations 

I/O students are not required to take an independent 
comprehensive exam. Instead, all students are required to 
successfully defend their thesis project near the end of 
their program of study. The thesis defense itself is 
considered to be a comprehensive exam. The thesis 
defense can cover topics pertaining to research design, 
ethics, practical implications, and 
Industrial/Organizational Psychology in general. 

Assistantships and Other Financial 
Assistance 

A variety of resources are available for financial 
assistance. These include teaching assistantships to 
proctor the general psychology laboratory, research 
assistantships to assist on faculty grants, and graduate 
assistantships in psychology and other campus units such 
as the Learning Assistance Center and the University 
Honors Office. These range from S8,000 to $12,000 per 
academic year. Information on loans, grants and 
employment opportunities is available from the Financial 
Ad Office. 

Research Experiences 

In addition to the completion of a thesis, students have 
the opportunity to work with individual faculty members 
on their research. The Department of Psychology has an 
energetic and dynamic faculty of more than 30 
psychologists who are committed to education and have 
established an excellent record or productivity in all the 
major areas of psychological research and professional 
practice. Students also have the opportunity to work 
closely with the Management Department faculty 
affiliated with the program (Chris Henle, Doug Pugh, 
Beth Rubin, Ben Tepper, Kelly Zellars) as well as two 
I/O faculty members from Davidson College affiliated 
with the program (John Kello, Scott Tonidandel). 



Practica 

An extensive practicum component utilizes the Charlotte 
area as a setting for applied experience. All students must 
complete 3 hours of Projects in I/O Psychology (PSYC 
6477) and they are strongly encouraged to take 6 hours. 



Courses In Psychology 

PSYC 6010 Topics in Learning and Cognition. (3) An 

examination of selected topics in the areas of learning, 
memory and cognition, and behavior modification, with 
an emphasis on the applications to the areas of clinical, 
community and industrial psychology. May be repeated 
for credit with the permission of department. (Alternate 
years) 

PSYC 6015. Topics in Perception and Physiological 
Psychology. (3) An examination of selected topics in the 
areas of sensation and perception, physiological and 
neuropsychology, with an emphasis on the applications to 
the areas of clinical, community, and industrial 
psychology. May be repeated for credit with the 
permission of department. (Alternate years) 

PSYC 6020. Topics in Developmental Psychology. 

(3) An examination of selected topics in child and adult 
development, aging, and developmental disabilities, with 
an emphasis on the applications to the areas of clinical, 
community, and industrial psychology. May be repeated 
for credit with the permission of department. (Alternate 
years) 

PSYC 6030. Topics in Social Psychology and 
Personality. (3) An examination of selected topics in 
personality and social psychology, with an emphasis on 
the applications to the areas of clinical, community, and 
industrial psychology. May be repeated for credit with the 
permission of department. (Alternate years) 

PSYC 6050. Topics in Psychological Treatment. (3) 

Prerequisite: PSYC 6151. A topical course which will 
focus on issues in treatment, alternative treatment 
perspectives, special client populations. May be repeated 
for credit with departmental permission. (Yearly) 

PSYC 6099. Topics in Psychology. (3) A discussion of 
selected topics in psychology. (On demand) 

PSYC 6102. Research Design and Quantitative 
Methods in Psychology. (3) Prerequisites: MATH 1222 
and PSYC 2102 or equivalent. Experimental and 
correlational methods of psychological research, including 
single subject designs with emphasis on research design 
and the application of statistical methods to psychological 
research. (Fall) 

PSYC 6107. Ethical and Professional Issues in 
Psychology. (2) Roles and responsibilities of 
psychologists, including ethical standards in professional 



140 College of Arts and Sciences 



practice, testing and research; expectations and problems 
confronting psychologists in industrial, clinical and 
professional organizations. (Fall) 

PSYC 6111. Psychology of Learning and Memory. (3) 

Principles, theories and current research in learning with 
emphasis on human learning and memory. (On demand) 

PSYC 6112. Applied Behavior Analysis. (3) Use of 

behavior principles in applied settings. Topics include: 
behavioral assessment, positive and negative 
reinforcement, punishment, extinction, stimulus control, 
maintenance and generalization of behavior change. Each 
student will design and carry out a behavior change 
project. (On demand) 

PSYC 6113. Physiological Psychology. (3) The 

relationships between the nervous system and behavior. 
Topics include the structure of the nervous system and 
nerve conduction, the functional organization of the 
central nervous system, neuronal and hormonal control 
of behavior, biofeedback and other appropriate topics. 
(On demand) 

PSYC 6115. Sensation and Percepdon. (3) Processes 
involved in receiving and interpreting sensory data 
including all the sensory systems with an emphasis on 
vision. (On demand) 

PSYC 6120. Developmental Psychology. (3) 

Psychological development across the lifespan. (On 
demand) 

PSYC 6124. Psychology of Aging. (3) Psychology of 
aging with particular emphasis on issues related to 
community/clinical psychology and 
industrial/organizational psychology. Topics include 
myths and stereotypes about aging, problems faced by 
older workers, retirement, mental health and normal 
aging, counseling the older adult, and psychological 
disorders in later life. (Spring) 

PSYC 6130. Social Psychology. (3) Human social 
behavior; topics include affiliation, person perception, 
conformity and attitudes. (On demand) 

PSYC 6135. Psychology of Personality. (3) A critical 
evaluation of major personality theories including an 
extensive survey of current research. (On demand) 

PSYC 6140. Psychological Measurement and 
Evaluation. (3) Prerequisite: PSYC 6102. Measurement 
of psychological characteristics; scaling, reliability, validity 
and norms; construction and use of the intelligence tests, 
personality inventories, interest tests, attitude scales, etc., 
interviewing, survey techniques and behavioral 
assessment. (Spring) 

PSYC 6141. Intellectual Assessment. (4) Theories of 
intelligence and methods of intellectual assessment, 



including practice in administering intelligence tests, 
interpreting results, and writing evaluation reports. Three 
lecture hours and one two-hour lab per week. (Fall) 

PSYC 6142. Personality Assessment. (4) Prerequisite: 
PSYC 6151, 6141 or permission of department. Theories 
and methods used in the assessment of personality and 
psychopathology, including practice in administering 
personality tests, interpreting results and writing 
evaluation reports. Three lecture hours and one two-hour 
lab per week. (Spring) 

PSYC 6145. Applied Research Design and Program 
Evaluation. (3) Prerequisite: PSYC 6102. Models of 
evaluative research; also techniques, designs and 
administration of program evaluation. Topics include role 
conflicts, entry issues, goal setting, research for program 
planning and implementation and examples of actual 
program design and evaluation. (Spring) 

PSYC 6150. Introduction to Psychological 
Treatment. (4) Prerequisite: PSYC 6151. Major 
approaches to psychological intervention, including 
psychodynamic, behavioral, humanistic and cognitive- 
behavioral systems. Emphasis on practical therapy 
considerations, including crisis intervention, client 
behaviors at various stages of therapy, handling difficult 
clients and ethical and professional issues. Three lecture 
hours and one two-hour lab per week. (Spring) 

PSYC 6151. Behavior Disorders. (4) Diagnostic systems 
in current use and the implications of these systems for 
psychologists; several perspectives on psychological 
processes, behavior disorders and diagnosis including 
psychodynamic, behavioral and social models; practice in 
diagnostic interviewing. Three lecture hours and one two- 
hour lab per week. (Fall) 

PSYC 6153. Classification of Psychological 
Dysfunctions. (3) Introduction to systems for classifying 
psychological disorders for counselors and review of 
current theoretical, experimental, and clinical perspectives 
on abnormal psychology, including the current Diagnostic 
and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Credit will 
not be given for both PSYC 6153 and PSYC 6151. 
(Spring) 

PSYC 6155. Community Psychology. (3) Research, 
intervention techniques and settings associated with 
major approaches in community psychology including the 
mental health, organizational, ecological and social action 
models. (Fall) 

PSYC 6171. Industrial/Organizational Psychology. 

(3) Human behavior within organizations. Topics include 
personnel selection and placement, job analysis, 
motivation, satisfaction, consumer psychology and 
ergonomics. (Fall) 



College of Arts and Sciences 141 



PSYC 6171L. Laboratory in Industrial/ 
Organizational Psychology. (1) Corequisite: PSYC 
6171. Practice in administration and scoring of surveys 
and tests. Experience in role plays, training practices, and 
interviews. (Fall) 

PSYC 6172. Personnel I. (3) Prerequisite or corequisite: 
PSYC 6171, 6140. Techniques of applied personnel 
psychology. Topics include job analysis, testing in 
industry, interviews, personality measures, assessment 
centers, job evaluation, and polygraphs. (Spring) 

PSYC 6173. Individual Dynamics. (3) The individual 
within the organization. Special emphasis on theories of 
motivation and job satisfaction. (On demand) 

PSYC 6174. Organizational Dynamics I. (3) 

Prerequisite: PSYC 6171. Group processes, including 
group formation, group decision making, leadership and 
group structure. (Spring) 

PSYC 6175. Organizational Dynamics II. (3) 

Prerequisite: PSYC 6174. Organization theories and 
organizational change methods. (Fall) 

PSYC 6176. Counseling Psychology in 
Organizations. (3) Application of psychology to special 
problems within the organization, especially the 
counseling of employees experiencing life problems: for 
example, retirement, alcoholism, interpersonal conflict. 
(On demand) 

PSYC 6177. Personnel II. (3) Prerequisite: PSYC 6172. 
Theoretical bases of personnel psychology. Topics 
include performance appraisal, legal issues, personnel 
strategies, validation issues, utility analysis, human 
resource planning and training. (Fall) 

PSYC 6200. Health Psychology. (3) Intensive review of 
the contributions of the discipline of psychology to the 
promotion and maintenance of health, the prevention and 
treatment of illness, and the improvement of the health 
care system. The course will examine links between 
psychology and health by emphasizing interactions 
among biological, behavioral and social systems that 
impact health and illness experiences. Topics will include 
stress, coping, pain, chronic disease and 
psychoneuroimmunology. Emphasizes the relevance of 
age, gender, personality, and culture for understanding 
health related behaviors. (Fall) 

PSYC 6202. Methods in Health Psychology. (3) 

Prerequisite: PSYC 6102 and PSYC 6200. Advanced 
review of qualitative and quantitative issues relevant to 
the conduct of health and behavior research. Topics 
include assessment of quality of life; instrument 
sensitivity, specificity, and responsiveness; and, the 
evaluation of health service delivery. Emphasizes the 
development of methodological, analytical, and 



interpretive skills necessary to evaluate practices, 
programs, and policies in health psychology. (Spring) 

PSYC 6213. Physiological Foundations of Health 
Psychology. (3) Prerequisite: PSYC 6200. Biological 
theories and models will be introduced and applied to 
health issues. Topics may include addiction, mental 
illness, neuropsychology, and psychophysiology. 
Emphasizes the relation between the nervous system and 
behavior for understanding health and illness. (Fall) 

PSYC 6230. Applications of Social Psychology to 
Health Psychology. (3) Prerequisite: PSYC 6200. Social 
psychology theories and models will be introduced and 
applied to health issues. Topics may include the role of 
social perception processes in understanding and 
adjusting to illness, social influence strategies and 
promoting health-maintaining behaviors, self-efficacy and 
coping, and other factors related to health maintenance or 
recovery. (Spring) 

PSYC 6260. Topics in Health Psychology. (3) 

Prerequisite: PSYC 6200. An examination of selected 
topics in Health Psychology. May be repeated for credit 
with departmental approval. (On demand) 

PSYC 6261. Independent Study in Health 
Psychology. (1-3) Prerequisite SYC 6200. Directed 
individual study of an issue in health psychology arranged 
with a faculty member. May be repeated for credit. (Fall, 
Spring, Summer) 

PSYC 6262. Internship in Health Psychology. (1-3) 

Prerequisite: PSYC 6200 and permission of the 
department. Experience in assessment and treatment with 
clients at local health agencies under supervision from a 
faculty member on campus. Applications of the principles 
of health psychology to special problems with in a health 
care organization or setting. May be repeated for credit 
with departmental approval. (Fall, Spring, Summer) 

PSYC 6450. Practicum in Clinical Psychology. (1-3) 

Prerequisites: PSYC 6150 and permission of department. 
Experience in clinical assessment and/or psychotherapy 
with clients at local agencies under supervision from a 
faculty member on campus. May be repeated for credit 
with departmental approval. (Fall, Spring, Summer) 

PSYC 6455. Practicum in Community Psychology. 
(1-3) Applications of the principles of community 
psychology to special problems within an organization or 
community setting. The project might include, but would 
not be limited to, consultation, program development, 
training, community education or program evaluation. 
May be repeated for credit with departmental approval. 
(Fall, Spring) 

PSYC 6477. Projects in Industrial/Organizational 
Psychology. (1-3) Prerequisite: PSYC 6171. A structured 
practicum experience or research paper in 



142 College of Arts and Sciences 



industrial/organizational psychology. May be repeated for 
credit with departmental approval. (Fall, Spring, Summer) 

PSYC 6899. Readings and Research in Psychology. 
(1-4) Prerequisite: permission of instructor and 
department to be obtained in the semester preceding the 
semester in which the course is to be taken. Individual 
study in psychology which may take the form of 
conducting empirical research or formulating a critique 
and synthesis of existing research. May be repeated for 
credit. (Fall, Spring Summer) 

PSYC 6999. Thesis. (1-3) The thesis is coordinated with 
the student's interests and practical experience during the 
second year to allow the development of an area of 
specialization. Thesis projects can be of three types: an 
original experiment that will contribute to the 
psychological literature; a thorough case analysis including 
literature review and application; the development of a 
community psychology program or intervention to 
accomplish an important, well-defined goal. A completed 
paper and oral presentation are required. May be repeated 
for credit with departmental approval. (Fall, Spring, 
Summer) 

PSYC 7999. Masters Degree Graduate Residence. (1) 

(Fall, Spring Summer) 



PUBLIC 
ADMINISTRATION 

Department of Political Science 

440 Fretwell Building 

704-687-2577 

http://www.mpa.uncc.edu 

Degree 

M.P.A., Certificate 

Director 

Dr. David Swindell 

Graduate Faculty 

A. Hunter Bacot, Associate Professor 

William P. Brandon, Metrolina Medical Foundation 

Distinguished Professor of Health Policy 
Joanne Carman, Assistant Professor 
Gary Johnson, Assistant Professor 
Suzanne Leland, Assistant Professor 
Gary R. Rassel, Associate Professor 
David Swindell, Associate Professor 
Bradley Wright, Assistant Professor 



MASTER OF PUBLIC 
ADMINISTRATION 

The primary objective of the Master of Public 
Aclministration (M.P.A.) Degree program is to provide 
professional training in public administration. The 
curriculum of this accredited program emphasizes the 
analysis of the political and administrative environments 
as well as the administrative decision-making approaches 
of public aclministration. Application of techniques and 
administrative skills to the management of nonprofit 
organizations is also included in the curriculum. The 
methods of instruction employed in the program expose 
students to a variety of approaches to public 
management. 

Students may enroll in the Master of Public 
Aclministration program on either a full-time or part-time 
basis. The majority of classes are scheduled in the evening 
throughout the year. However, some classes are 
scheduled on Saturdays and during the afternoon. Classes 
meet on the main campus and at UNC Charlotte Uptown 
Center. 

Admission Requirements 

Admission to the Master of Public Administration 
program is open to qualified graduates of recognized 
colleges and universities accredited by a regional or 
general accrediting agency. There are seven major 
requirements for admission: 

1) Application in writing submitted to the Graduate 
Admissions Office, accompanied by the application 
fee, which is neither deductible nor refundable. 

2) Possession of a bachelor's degree, or its equivalent, 
from an accredited college or university. 

3) An undergraduate grade point average of at least 3.0 
on a 4.0 scale. 

4) An appropriate score on the Verbal, Quantitative, 
and Analytical portions of the Graduate Record 
Exam (GRE). Although there is no required score 
for these exams, typically an acceptable score would 
be above the 35th percentile. 

5) A written statement of professional career goals and 
a description of any significant work experience, 
particularly in the public or nonprofit sectors. 

6) Three supporting letters of recommendation from 
professors or employers. 

7) Submission of two official transcripts from all 
postsecondary educational institutions in which the 
candidate was enrolled. 

Prerequisite Requirements 

In addition to the admission requirements, MPA students 
must complete the following prior to taking certain core 
courses and the comprehensive exams: POLS 1110, 
Introduction to American Government (or the 
equivalent); STAT 1222, Elementary Statistics for the 
Social Sciences (or the equivalent); and demonstrate 



College of Arts and Sciences 143 



proficiency in computer applications. However, students 
may complete these after admission to the program. 

Degree Requirements 

The Master of Public Administration program is 
structured in three distinct phases: 1) core, 2) advanced 
work, and 3) directed study or research project. In all, the 
program requires 40 hours of graduate credit for 
completion of the degree. The MPA Program Handbook, 
available on the program web site, presents the most up- 
to-date listing of degree requirements. 

1) Core 

All students are required to complete 19 hours in core 
areas as defined by the program. The emphasis in the 
core is twofold: (a) Understanding the various managerial 
and analytical approaches salient to the environment of 
public administration, and (b) Achieving an overall 
perspective on the problems of public administration. 
After completing the core requirements each student 
must successfully complete a comprehensive examination 
covering the core courses. The core courses are: 

MPAD6102 Foundations in Public Administration 

(3) 
MPAD6104 Public Organizations and Management 

(3) 
MPAD6125 Quantitative Research Methods in 

Public Administration (3) 
MPAD6125L Computer Laboratory in Quantitative 

Research Methods (1) 
MPAD6128 Public Policy Analysis and Program 

Evaluation (3) 
MPAD6 1 3 1 Public Budgeting and Finance (3) 
MPAD6134 Human Resources Management (3) 

2) Advanced Courses 

a) Elective s : The MPA program offers several 
advanced elective courses in areas important to 
public administrators including application of 
analytic tools and understanding of public 
administration processes. With the approval of the 
Director, students may take advanced elective work 
with other departments. Students are required to take 
a minimum of nine hours of advanced electives. The 
MPA electives are: 
MPAD6000 Topics for Graduate Study in Public 

Administration (1-4) 
MPAD6140 Labor Management Relations in 

Government (3) 
MPAD6141 Conflict Management in Public 

Organizations (3) 
MPAD6142 Managing Grants and Contracts in the 

Public & Nonprofit Sectors (3) 
MPAD6143 Introduction to Administrative Law (3) 
MPAD6144 Changing the Public Organization (3) 
MPAD6160 Information Systems in Public 

Administration (3) 
MPAD6170 Communication Law and Policy (3) 
MPAD6172 Administration of Health Care Systems 

in the U.S. (3) 



MPAD6174 Public Policy and Politics in Health 

Care Administration (3) 
MPAD6176 Trends and Issues in Health Care 

Administration (3) 
MPAD6185 Intergovernmental Relations (3) 
MPAD6210 Aging and Public Policy (3) 
MPAD621 1 Administration of Aging Programs (3) 
MPAD6310 Foundations of the Nonprofit Sector 

(3) 
MPAD631 1 Introduction to Nonprofit 

Management (3) 
MPAD6320 Strategic Planning for Nonprofit 

Organizations (1) 
MPAD6321 Resource Development in Nonprofit 

Organizations (1) 
MPAD6322 Volunteer Management (1) 
MPAD6323 Grant Writing (1) 
MPAD6324 Financial Analysis for Government and 

Nonprofit Organizations (3) 
MPAD6325 Legal Aspects of Nonprofit 

Organizations (1) 
MPAD6820 Independent Study (1-3) 

b) Capstone Seminar : Students are required to 
complete MP AD 6187: Advanced Seminar in Public 
Management Problem Solving as a capstone course 
after successfully completing the comprehensive 
examination. 

3) Directed Study or Research Applications (each 
MPA student must complete one of the options "a" or 
"b" for 6 credits). Students must successfully complete 
the comprehensive examination prior to enrolling in any 
courses listed in this section. 

a) Directed Study : Students who select this option 
will complete a written project on a topic of 
significance based on a field experience or research 
in public administration or nonprofit management. 
The Directed Study requires the following courses, 
graded on a pass/fail basis: 

MPAD6800 Directed Study in Public 

Administration (Proposal) (3) 

MPAD6801 Directed Study in Public 

Administration (Completed Study) (3) 

University regulations governing the preparation and 
submission of Master's theses apply to the Directed 
Study option. Rules for the Directed Study 
committee are provided in the MPA Program 
Handbook. 

b) Research Applications: Students who select this 
option will complete a one-semester written project 
on an approved topic of significance in public 
administration or nonprofit management. The 
project will include the submission of revised paper 
drafts based on instructor evaluation. Students must 
enroll in the following course which is graded A, B, 
C, or U: 



144 College of Arts and Sciences 



MP AD 6188 Research Applications in Public 
Administration (3) 

Students who select option "b" must also take one 
additional elective course for 3 credits to complete 
the 40 hours required for the MPA degree. 

Admission to Candidacy Requirements 

Students are required to complete an "Application for 
Admission to Candidacy" due November 1 st (for May 
graduation), September 1 st (for December graduation), or 
May 1 st (for August graduation). This form lists all 
courses to be counted toward the degree. It must be 
signed by the student and returned to the MPA Program 
office. The form is available online from the Graduate 
School web page. 

Assistantships 

The department offers a number of graduate 
assistantships each academic year. To apply for an 
assistantship students must submit a completed 
"Application for Graduate Assistantship" form and a 
copy of their resume to the MPA Director. Graduate 
assistantships are also available in several administrative 
units on campus. The application form is available online 
from the Graduate School web page. 

Internships 

Each student in the Master of Public Administration 
Program is required to complete a field experience. This 
requirement may be satisfied in one of these ways: (1) 
through a position in a public or nonprofit organization; 
(2) through a position in a business where the work 
experience is approved for internship by the MPA 
director; or (3) through an approved internship in a public 
or nonprofit organization. Each student must complete 
an "MPA Internship Information" form and submit it to 
the MPA office for approval. Forms to evaluate the 
internship experience must also be completed. These 
forms are available in the main MPA office. Current 
guidelines for the internship requirement are provided in 
the MPA Program Handbook. 

Track Descriptions 

Currently the MPA Program has a concentration in the 
Management of Nonprofit Organizations. This 
concentration requires completion of the core MPA 
courses and MP AD 6187. The nonprofit concentration 
consists of 15 credit hours within the MPA curriculum (as 
part of the 40 hours required for the degree). MP AD 
6310, Foundations of the Nonprofit Sector; MP AD 6311, 
Introduction to Nonprofit Management, are required, 
both for three credits each. Students in this 
concentration have the option of taking the Directed 
Study option (MP AD 6800 and MP AD 6801) for three 
credits each. The focus of the project must be an 
approved topic in the nonprofit field. Alternatively, 
nonprofit students may opt to take the MP AD 6188, 
Research Applications option, for three credits. The 
focus of the paper in MP AD 6188 must be an approved 



topic in the nonprofit field. An additional 6 or 9 credit 
hours from the following courses are also required, 
depending on which research option was selected: 

MPAD6142 Grant and Contract Management in 

the Public and Nonprofit Sectors (3) 
MPAD6320 Strategic Planning for Nonprofit 

Organizations (1) 
MPAD6321 Resource Development in Nonprofit 

Organizations (1) 
MPAD6322 Volunteer Management (1) 
MPAD6323 Grant Writing (1) 
MPAD6324 Financial Analysis for Government and 

Nonprofit Organizations (3) 
MPAD6325 Legal Aspects of Nonprofit 

Organizations (1) 

Students may petition to take courses from other 
departments as well. 

The program anticipates offering two additional 
concentrations beginning in Fall, 2005. These include 
Emergency Management Services, and Urban 
Management and Policy. 

Capstone Experiences 

Students are required to complete the following capstone 
course after successfully completing the comprehensive 
examination: MP AD 6187, Advanced Seminar in Public 
Management Problem Solving. 

Advising 

Each student is assigned an advisor and given access to 
the MPA Program Handbook when admitted to the 
program. The advisor is a member of the MPA Program 
faculty. Students should meet with their advisors each 
semester to develop a schedule before registering. 
Students are also encouraged to meet with the Program 
Director for additional advising when necessary. 

Transfer Credit 

Up to 6 credits taken at another University can be 
transferred to the MPA program on the recommendation 
of the Director and the Dean of the Graduate School. 

Comprehensive Examination 

Upon completion of the core courses, each student must 
successfully complete a written comprehensive 
examination designed to test knowledge and/or skills of 
administrative analysis and administrative theory and 
practice. It is the responsibility of the student to take the 
requisite courses and the comprehensive examination in a 
timely-fashion. All MPA core courses are offered at least 
once a year either during the fall, spring or summer 
semesters. Comprehensive exams are administered twice 
a year; once in January and again in August. 
Comprehensive exams must be completed before 
students can take the capstone course, Directed Study or 
Research Applications. Furthermore, it is strongly 
recommended that students take the comprehensive 
exams prior to elective courses. Students failing the exam 



College of Arts and Sciences 145 



must retake it at the next time the exam is scheduled. 
Students are allowed only two attempts to pass the 
comprehensive exams. Failing a second opportunity leads 
to termination from the program. 

Application for Degree 

Students are required to file an "Application for Degree" 
with the Graduate School due October 1 st (for May 
graduation), August 1 st (for December graduation), or 
May 1 st (for August graduation). The form is available 
online from the Graduate School web page. 

Research Opportunities/Experiences 

Many faculty have grants which help them employ 
graduate students to aid them in research. 

Scholarships 

1) The North Carolina City and County Management 
Association funds a scholarship for an MPA student to 
help train students for careers in North Carolina local 
government. The MPA Program selection committee 
nominates the eligible recipient each fall. 2) Burkhalter 
Alumni Scholarship. The MPA Alumni Association has 
established a scholarship fund to honor a former 
Charlotte City Manager. 3) Brown-Dorton MPA 
Scholarship. The MPA selection committee nominates 
eligible recipients to community officials in Concord who 
determine the winner each fall. 4) Other awards are 
available on a competitive basis through the Graduate 
School. 4) Other professional associations occasionally 
offer scholarships for which MPA students have 
competed successfully. 

Tuition Waivers 

Out-of-state tuition waivers are available to students 
appointed to graduate assistantships. These are awarded 
on a competitive basis. Partial waivers of in-state tuition 
are also awarded competitively to students who are 
residents of North Carolina. A limited number of partial 
tuition awards are made available through the Graduate 
School. 

Financial Assistance 

Other forms of financial aid, such as loans, are available. 
Students should contact the Financial Aid Office at 704- 
687-2461 for further information. Several administrative 
units on campus also employ graduate students. 



GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN 
NONPROFIT MANAGEMENT 

The Graduate Certificate in Nonprofit Management at 
the University of North Carolina at Charlotte is designed 
to provide graduate education in nonprofit management 
for those individuals who are currently serving as 
managers or volunteers in nonprofit organizations, or 
those who might want to pursue careers in nonprofit 
management. The certificate is also intended to serve the 



interests of students currently enrolled in UNC Charlotte 
graduate programs. 

Admission Requirements 

Admission to the Graduate Certificate program in 
Nonprofit Management is open to graduates of colleges 
and universities accredited by a regional or general 
accrediting agency. To apply, the student must meet the 
following requirements: 

1) A completed Graduate Admissions application form 
and statement of professional goals 

2) Two official transcripts from post secondary 
educational institutions 

3) Three letters of recommendation from academic or 
professional sources 

4) An overall GPA of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale 

Certificate Requirements 

The Graduate Certificate program in Nonprofit 
Management requires 1 5 credit hours. The following 
courses are required: 

MPAD6310 Foundations of the Nonprofit Sector 

(3) 
MPAD631 1 Introduction to Nonprofit 

Management (3) 
MPAD6324 Financial Analysis for Government and 

Nonprofit Organizations (3) 

An additional six credit hours from the following elective 
courses are also required: 

MPAD6142 Grants and Contract Management in 
the Public and Nonprofit Sectors (3) 
MPAD6320 Strategic Planning for Nonprofit 

Organizations (1) 
MPAD6321 Resource Development in Nonprofit 

Organizations (1) 
MPAD6322 Volunteer Management (1) 
MPAD6323 Grant Writing (1) 
MPAD6325 Legal Aspects of Nonprofit 
Organizations (1) 
Other electives as approved by the MPA Director and 
faculty. 

Note: Students who have completed the Duke Certificate 
in Nonprofit Management may be eligible to substitute 
that for three hours of elective credit. 



Courses In Public Administration 

MP AD 6000. Topics for Graduate Study in Public 
Administration. (1-4) Intensive study of a topic in public 
administration. The topic of investigation may vary from 
semester to semester. May be repeated for credit. (On 
demand) (Evening) 

MP AD 6102. Foundations in Public Administration. 

(3) Corequisite: Introduction to American Government 
(or the equivalent). Consideration of the political context 
of contemporary public administration, with attention to 



146 College of Arts and Sciences 



the role of administration in the policy process, the legal 
basis for public administration, legislative-executive 
relations, and accountability and responsibility in 
democratic administration. (Fall, Spring) (Evening) 

MP AD 6104. Public Organizations and Management. 

(3) Changing images of people, organizations and 
organizational environments; research findings and 
applications related to organization structure, motivation, 
leadership, communications, decision-making, group 
dynamics, interpersonal skills; ethics and values important 
to the study and practice of organizational leadership; and 
assessment of value systems and the impact of competing 
value systems on public and organizational policy making. 
(Fall, Spring) (Evening) 

MP AD 6125. Quantitative Research Methods in 
Public Administration. (3) Corequisite: MP AD 6125L. 
Prerequisite: elementary statistics or equivalent. 
Introduction to the use of quantitative analysis in 
administration. Special emphasis on issues of research 
design, data collection, elementary statistical analysis, and 
the interpretation and presentation of research findings. 
(Fall, Spring) (Evening) 

MP AD 6125L. Computer Laboratory in Quantitative 
Research Methods in Public Administration. (1) 

Corequisite: MP AD 6125. Hands-on computer 
experience to master the substantive materials taught in 
Quantitative Research Methods. (Fall, Spring) (Evening) 

MP AD 6128. Public Policy Analysis and Program 
Evaluation. (3) Prerequisite: MP AD 6125. Application 
of analytic tools for decision making in public 
administration through the practical implementation of 
the design developed in MP AD 6125. Covers and array 
of statistical and decision analysis tools commonly 
encountered in the field. Includes extensive use of 
computers in the manipulation and analysis of data. (Fall, 
Spring) (Evening) 

MPAD 6131. Public Budgeting and Finance. (3) An 

introduction to the basics of public finance and an 
examination of the theory and development of public 
budgeting, the budget processes, the budget cycle, budget 
reforms, capital budgets, revenue sources, taxation 
policies and processes, intergovernmental fiscal relations 
and governmental accounting practices, debt management 
and cash management in public organizations. (Spring) 
(Evening) 

MPAD 6134. Human Resources Management. (3) 

Corequisite: POLS 1110, Introduction to American 
Government (or the equivalent). Study of the context of 
public personnel administration; basic functions of job 
evaluation and compensation, employee rights and 
responsibilities; the legal constraints including equal 
opportunity, health and safety, collective bargaining; 
government productivity. (Same as HADM 6147) (Spring) 
(Evening) 



MPAD 6140. Labor Management Relations in 
Government. (3) Public employee unionization, 
collective bargaining, unit determination and recognition; 
negotiation; third-party process; administration of 
agreements. (On demand) (Evening) 

MPAD 6141. Conflict Management in Public 
Organizations. (3) The role of the administrator as a 
focal point in social change and the management of the 
conflict that occurs. Perspectives on the negotiation and 
bargaining process will be reviewed. (On demand) (Evening) 

MPAD 6142. Managing Grants and Contracts in the 
Public & Nonprofit Sectors. (3) Understanding 
government contracting and practice in government grant 
proposal writing with the development of contract 
administration skills. (On demand) (Evening) 

MPAD 6143. Introduction to Administrative Law. (3) 

Prerequisite: MPAD 6102 or consent of the instructor. 
Examines the legal principles governing the modern 
administrative state, including: the Constitutional status of 
administrative agencies; legislative, judicial, and executive 
control of administrative agencies; discretion in making, 
adjudicating, and enforcing law and policy; the 
Administrative Procedures Act; and judicial review of 
agency action. (On demand) (Evening) 

MPAD 6144. Changing the Public Organization. (3) 

Overview of concepts and methodologies of organization 
development, diagnosing organizational needs, change 
strategies and interventions. (On demand) (Evening) 

MPAD 6160. Information Systems in Public 
Administration. (3) Issues involved in administering and 
managing information system resource activities in public 
organizations. Topics include the system development life 
cycle including issues ranging from information system 
design and development through installation and 
evaluation. Special emphasis on challenges to achieving 
improved performance through information technologies 
in the public sector. (On demand) (Evening) 

MPAD 6170. Communication Law and Policy. (3) 

This course is designed for those students with an interest 
in the law of public communication. Subjects such as 
First Amendment theory, censorship, hate speech, libel, 
invasion of privacy, obscenity, indecency, and commercial 
speech rights will be examined. Through a casebook and 
lecture approach, students will become well versed in 
current Constitutional law in these and other areas. No 
prior legal coursework is required. (Same as COMM 
6170) (On demand) (Evening) 

MPAD 6172. Administration of the Health Care 
Systems in the United States. (3) Components of die 
health care system in the United States, with emphasis on 
the relationships among public (local, state and federal), 
private, voluntary and nonprofit entities; including points 



College of Arts and Sciences 147 



of access for recipients of health care; relationships with 
other human services and professions involved in 
providing health care; and the regulatory environment 
governing these relationships. (Same as HADM 6100) (On 
demand) (Evening) 

MP AD 6174. Public Policy and Politics in Health 
Care Administration. (3) Prerequisite HADM 6100; 
MP AD 6172. Examination of the formulation, adoption 
and implementation of public policy for health care 
through federal, state and local political processes. (Same 
as HADM 6142) (On demand) (Evening) 

MP AD 6176. Trends and Issues in Health 
Administration. (3) Examination of current issues 
confronting health care managers and an assessment of 
current programs and management responses to emerging 
trends in the health care field, including delivery systems, 
marketing/competition, strategic planning, financial 
management and/or epidemiological changes. (Same as 
HADM 6204) (On demand) (Evening) 

MP AD 6185. Intergovernmental Relations. (3) Survey 
of the complex relationships of governments in an urban 
environment set in the federal system. A review of the 
problems created by that system and the approaches to 
their solutions. (On demand) (Evening) 

MP AD 6187. Advanced Seminar in Public 
Management Problem Solving. (3) Seminar viewed as 
a capstone to the student's coursework in public 
management and is required to be taken by all students. 
Seminar devoted to topics in public management, which 
involve problem identification and solution. Permit Only. 
(Fall, Spring) (Evening) 

MP AD 6188. Research Applications in Public 
Administration. (3) Prerequisite: all core courses and 
passing of comprehensive examination. Preparation of a 
major paper on a topic of significance in public or 
nonprofit administration. Topics must be approved by 
the instructor, and paper drafts will be revised by the 
student following evaluation by the instructor. Each 
paper must be well grounded in the appropriate 
professional literature and must demonstrate competence 
in professional communication skills. Permit Only. (Fall, 
Spring) (Evening) 

MPAD 6210. Aging and Public Policy. (3) 

Examination of the public policy making process with 
attention to aging policy. Consideration of determinants 
of aging policy and institutions and actors in the policy 
making process and piecemeal development of legislation 
will be analyzed as factors related to the making of policy 
for the aged. (Same as GRNT 6210) (Yearly) (Evenings) 

MPAD 6211. Administration of Aging Programs. (3) 

Focus will be the implementation of public policies and 
programs for the aged and the development and 
administration of these programs. Students will become 



familiar with the process through which policies are 
transformed into aging programs and the budgetary, 
management and evaluative considerations that must be 
considered. (Same as GRNT 621 1) (Yearly) (Evenings) 

MPAD 6310. Foundation of the Nonprofit Sector. (3) 

Survey of the history, culture and legal foundation of the 
nonprofit sector. Key definitions, scope and relationships 
between the nonprofit, for profit and government sectors 
are discussed. Examines current policy issues confronting 
nonprofits. (Fall) 

MPAD 6311. Introduction to Nonprofit 
Management. (3) Examination of the structure, 
function and administration of nonprofit organizations. 
Developing strategies to insure financial and ethical 
management. (Spring) 

MPAD 6320. Strategic Planning for Nonprofit 
Organizations. (1) Long and short range planning. 
Developing mission statements, conducting 
environmental assessments, writing, implementing, 
evaluating, and revising the plan will be covered. 
Addresses strategies for incorporating staff, board and 
community viewpoints. (On demand) 

MPAD 6321. Resource Development in Nonprofit 
Organizations. (1) How nonprofit organizations set 
revenue goals, select fund-raising techniques, allocate 
personnel and volunteers and evaluate results. How 
nonprofit organizations should manage their relationships 
with different funding sources to maximize fund raising 
potential. (On demand) 

MPAD 6322. Volunteer Management. (1) Examines 
the changing role of volunteerism in the nonprofit 
organization. Topics include developing a strong and 
diverse volunteer work force and recruiting, screening 
and placement, orienting, managing, evaluating and 
recognizing volunteers. (On demand) 

MPAD 6323. Grant Writing. (1) Topics include 
conducting prospect research, making initial contacts with 
funders and preparing, submitting and following up on 
grant proposals. (On demand) 

MPAD 6324. Financial Analysis for Government and 
Nonprofit Organizations. (3) Topics include fund 
accounting basics for government and nonprofit 
organizations, preparation and analysis of financial 
statements, evaluating and monitoring financial condition, 
capital budgeting and investment analysis, debt policy and 
management. (On demand) 

MPAD 6325. Legal Aspects of Nonprofit 
Organizations. (1) The legal requirements and issues of 
liability for nonprofit organizations. These include: 
required financial reports; tax-exempt status; tort liability; 
and legal responsibilities of boards of directors. (On 
demand) 



148 College of Arts and Sciences 



MPAD 6800. Directed Study in Public 
Administration. (3) Prerequisite: all core courses and 
passing of comprehensive examination. Individual project 
proposal on a directed topic of significance based on field 
experience in public administration. Pass/In Progress 
grading. Permit Only. (Fall, Spring) (Evening) 

MPAD 6801. Directed Study in Public 
Administration. (3) Prerequisite: MPAD 6800. 
Individual project report on a directed topic of 
significance based on field experience in public 
administration. Pass/In Progress grading. Permit Only. 
(Fall, Spring) 

MPAD 6820. Independent Study. (1-3) Prerequisite: 
consent of the instructor and the MPAD Director. 
Supervised study of a public administration topic or 
problem of special interest to the student, within the 
instructor's expertise, and normally an extension of 
previous coursework with the instructor. (Fall, Spring 
Summer) 

MPAD 7999. Graduate Residence. (1) Maintains 
continuous enrollment as required by University policy. 
(Fall, Spring Summer) (Evenings) 



PUBLIC POLICY 

Ph.D. in Public Policy 

704-687-4520 
http://www.uncc.edu/ppol/ 

Degree 

Ph.D. /Doctor of Philosophy in Public Policy 

Director 

Dr. Gerald L. Ingalls, Interim 

Department of Geography and Earth Sciences 

Graduate Faculty 

Criminal Justice 

Bruce Arrigo 

Beth Bjerregaard 

Paul Friday 

Vivian Lord 

Economics 

John Gandar 

Benjamin Russo 

Peter Schwarz 

Jennifer Troyer 

Geography and Earth Sciences 

Kenneth Chilton 

Harrison Campbell 

Owen Furuseth 

Bill Graves 



Edd Hauser 

Gerald Ingalls 

Ronald Kalafsky 

Jiyeong Lee 

Tyrel Moore 

Heather Smith 

Wei-Ning Xiang 

Health Behavior and Administration 

William McAuley 

Lutchmie Nurine 

Gerald "Jerry" Pyle 

Shirley Travis 

History 

Gregory Mixon 

Management 

Beth Rubin 

Philosophy 

Rosemarie Tong, 

Political Science 

Theodore Arrington 

William Brandon 

Ken Godwin 

Gary Johnson 

Suzanne Leland 

Schley Lyons 

Tiffany Manuel 

Gary Rassel 

David Swindell 

Richard Waterman 

Sociology and Anthropology 

Charles Brody 

Yang Cao 

Scott Fitzgerald 

Rosemary Hopcroft 

Janet Levy 

Roslyn Mickelson 

Stephanie Moller 

Teresa Scheid 

Murray Webster 

Joseph Whitmeyer 

Diane Zablotsky 



PH.D. IN PUBLIC POLICY 

The Ph.D. in Public Policy at UNC Charlotte is an 
interdisciplinary program focusing on the study of urban 
regional development. It stresses the development of 
skills, tools, and specialties that contribute to our 
understanding of the structure of urban/regional systems 
and sub-systems and of how policy should be shaped 
within urban regions. 

The Ph.D. in Public Policy at UNC Charlotte prepares 
students to be researchers, decision makers and policy 
analysts in academia, local, state or federal government 
and not-for-profit and for-profit institutions. The 
Program stresses applied and empirical policy research 
that is grounded in an interdisciplinary theoretical 
foundation. Students will become versed in analytical 



College of Arts and Sciences 149 



techniques suitable for research and policy analysis to 
address substantive issues and problems in the context of 
urban regions. The intellectual focus of the Program is 
guided by three overarching themes: (1) Interdisciplinary 
Perspective: Effective policy analysis and policy 
formation are not informed by any single discipline. 
Rather, public policy requires knowledge of the historical, 
cultural, political, institutional, geographic, and economic 
dimensions of urban places. (2) Applied and Empirical 
Policy Analysis: Public policy is an inherently applied 
endeavor that seeks practical solutions and cogent 
analysis. While all research and analysis is informed by 
theory, the purpose of policy research is to elevate public 
discourse and improve public decision-making. (3) Place- 
Based Research: To exercise applied policy analysis in an 
interdisciplinary context, policy research must be place- 
based. Real policy analysis, based on real data, applied to 
actual urban settings is a strength of the Program. 

Admission Requirements 

The following are general guidelines for successful 
admissions into the Ph.D. in Public Policy: 

1) A master's degree in a social science or other field 
related to policy studies is required for admission to 
full standing in the Ph.D. in Public Policy. 

2) Exceptional performance at the master's level is 
required. This means a GPA of at least 3.3 in a 
master's degree program is required for admission. 
Students with baccalaureate degrees may be admitted 
on a conditional basis if they have an overall 
undergraduate GPA of at least 3.2 and are currently 
enrolled in a master's level program at UNC 
Charlotte in a field related to policy studies. But such 
students will not formally be admitted to the Ph.D. 
program until completion of the requirements for 
the master's degree. 

3) Admission to the program will require strong scores 
on the verbal, quantitative, and analytic sections of 
the Graduate Record Examination. The Graduate 
Record Examination is a required part of the 
application package. 

4) Three strong, positive letters of recommendation, at 
least two of which must come from faculty in the 
student's previous academic programs. All letters 
should be written by individuals in a position to 
judge the applicant's likely success in a Ph.D. level 
program. Letters should address the applicant's 
suitability for a Ph.D. program and ability to 
complete the program in a timely fashion. Letters 
from the student's master's level program are 
preferred. 

5) Admission to the program of students who are not 
native English speakers will require strong scores on 
the TOEFL exam. The TOEFL exam is a required 
part of the application package for non-native 
English speakers. 

6) Students entering the program will be expected to 
remedy any course work deficiencies identified by 
their advisory committee in the first semester after 
enrolling in the program. The amount and kinds of 



remedial course work required for the program will 
depend on the background of the student and will be 
established by the Graduate Admissions Committee 
and the student's advisory committee. Possible 
deficiencies are indicated in the prerequisites for the 
required core courses of the program. However, it is 
important to note that this program will emphasize 
the quantitative and analytical skills necessary to 
confront the challenges of urban and regional growth 
and development. 

Documents to be submitted for application for 
admission: 

1) Official transcripts from all colleges and universities 
attended 

2) Official GRE scores (verbal, quantitative, and 
analytical) 

3) The UNC Charlotte application for graduate 
admission form 

4) Three letters of reference from academics who have 
taught or worked directly with the applicant. 

5) An essay that addresses professional goals and 
motivation for pursuing the degree, suitability for the 
program, career goals following the degree, and the 
policy specialty the applicant would pursue within 
the Program. 

6) TOEFL scores (if the student is not a native English 
speaker) 

Admission Assessment 

1) An Admissions Committee will review applications 
and recommend to the Program Director whether 
each applicant should be admitted and, if so, under 
what conditions. 

2) The Program's Admissions Committee will assess 
each student's previous academic coursework in light 
of the student's stated direction of study. This 
assessment will be used to identify the strengths and 
weaknesses of the student's previous academic 
history and to suggest specific course work for the 
student's public policy program. Any remedial course 
work required for the program will depend on the 
student's background and will be established by the 
Admissions Committee and confirmed by the 
Program Director. The Admissions Committee may 
also suggest specific coursework based on the 
student's intended direction of study within the 
program. The Admissions Committee will conduct 
this assessment upon the student's acceptance and 
formal declaration of intent to attend. For each 
entering student, a member of the Public Policy 
Faculty will be selected to serve as his or her major 
advisor for the first year in the Program. 

Student Responsibility 

Students entering the program must present evidence that 
their background is sufficient to undertake the 
coursework required of them. Such evidence must 
include: 



150 College of Arts and Sciences 



1) familiarity with political and legal processes, 
behaviors, and institutions; 

2) familiarity with the nature of urban regions; 

3) a graduate level social science methods or statistics 
course; 

4) college course work in both macro- and micro- 
economics; 

5) a course in Geographic Information Systems (GIS); 
and 

6) substantial background in a public policy specialty 



Students may have completed appropriate courses to 
provide this background elsewhere. Normally, transcripts 
will provide the evidence required by the Admissions 
Committee. However, if the student's previous 
experience is offered as evidence, the student must 
document such experience. A more detailed list of the 
types of pre-requisite coursework can be found on the 
Program's website. 

Admission to Candidacy Requirements 

After completing the core courses, students will be 
required to write a qualifying exam covering the nature of 
the field, methodology, and applied skills. After 
completing the core examination, students will be 
required to write a comprehensive exam covering their 
area of specialty expertise. Successful completion of both 
core and specialty examinations allows students to 
proceed to the dissertation proposal preparation and 
defense stage. 

Assistantships 

The Ph.D. in Public Policy is committed to year around 
funding for all fulltime students. Available options for 
funding include graduate assistantships, full and partial 
tuition waivers and scholarships. For more information 
on funding options contact Dr. Gerald Ingalls, Director, 
Ph.D. in Public Policy. 

Tuition Waivers 

A limited number of out-of-state tuition waivers are 
available for the qualified students. 

Degree Requirements 

The total number of hours will be established by the 
student's advisory committee according to a plan of study 
that must be presented after the successful completion of 
1 8 hours of coursework. However, the Ph.D. Program 
requires: 30 hours of core course credit, 18 hours of 
dissertation credit (enrollment contingent on admission to 
candidacy) and a minimum of 15 hours credit for 
specialty electives. It is unlikely that students will be able 
to complete this degree, including mastery of a subject- 
matter specialty, in 65 hours; 70 - 75 hours is a more 
likely norm. 



Core Courses: 

The Ph.D. program requires 30 hours of core course 
credit. 

The Nature of the Field 

PPOL8600 Policy Process I 
PPOL8602 Research Design 
PPOL8635 Ethics of Public Policy 
PPOL8690 Seminar in Public Policy* 

Methods of Analysis 

PPOL8620 Quantitative Analysis I 
PPOL8621 Quantitative Analysis II 
PPOL8622 Qualitative Analysis 
PPOL8630 Advanced Program Evaluation 



Economic Analysis 
PPOL8640 
PPOL8641 
PPOL8801 



Economic Analysis I 
Economic Analysis II 
Dissertation 



* PPOL8690 is a one credit hour course. Students must 
enroll in it three separate times. 

Track Descriptions 

In addition to completing 30 core course hours and 18 
hours of dissertation, the student is expected to have 
broad knowledge of a relevant subject matter specialty. 
Students are required to complete a minimum of 5 classes 
in a coherent specialty area. The Public Policy Ph.D. 
program has the following specialty areas: health policy, 
social policy, urban regional development, criminal justice 
policy, and environment/infrastructure policy. A student 
may design a program of study with a different focus by 
combining classes in several of these specialty areas with 
the approval of the student's advisor and the Program 
Director. While the particular courses required in each 
specialty area may vary according to pre-requisites needed 
by the student or individual programs of study, the 
minimum number of required courses in any given 
specialty area is 5 for 15 credit hours. 

Urban Regional Development and Infrastructure 

The Urban & Regional Development Specialization 
stresses applied and empirical policy research that is 
grounded in an interdisciplinary theoretical foundation. 
Students will be prepared in analytical techniques suitable 
for research and policy analysis through courses 
addressing several topics at the neighborhood, city and 
regional levels, including: Economic Development; 
Transportation Policy; Infrastructure Provision ; Public 
Service Delivery ; Growth Management ; Regionalism and 
Governance 

Required courses for this specialty include: 

PPOL8610 Urban Regional Environment 
PPOL8611 Metropolitan Governance and 

Administration 
PPOL86 1 3 Transportation Policy 
Two Additional Courses from These Choices: 



College of Arts and Sciences 151 



PPOL8612 Theory of Urban Development 

PPOL86 1 4 Colloquium in 20th Century Black 

Urban History 

PPOL861 5 The Restructuring City 

PPOL8616 Urban Planning Theory and Practice 

PPOL8617 Law and Management 

PPOL8618 Growth Management Systems 

PPOL8642 Regional Economic Development 

PPOL8643 Rural Development Issues 

PPOL8644 Public Budgeting and Financing 

Environmental Policy 

The Specialization in Environmental Policy focuses on 
environmental issues impacted by energy production and 
consumption, growth, pollution, and population change. 
This specialty allows interested students to gain 
knowledge on the economic factors related to 
environmental degradation and improvement. It also 
allows them the opportunity to become familiar with the 
scientific aspects of urban air, water, and earth systems. 
Policy making and policy analysis related to these issues 
will all be covered by courses in this specialty. 

Required courses for this specialty include: 

PPOL8613 Transportation Policy 
PPOL8650 Environmental Policy 
PPOL8652 Energy and Environmental Economics 
Select two additional classes from the list below: 
PPOL8653 Urban Air Quality 
PPOL8655 Watershed Science and Policy 
PPOL8656 Earth Systems Analysis: 
Biogeochemical cycles 

Health Policy 

The Specialization in Health Policy focuses on applied 
research in the organization, delivery and financing of 
health care and population-based issues in health 
(including mental health). A multidisciplinary faculty in 
epidemiology, health economics and finance, health 
policy, medical sociology, bioethics, and health law is 
ideally suited to prepare quantitative health service 
researchers and health policy analysts. Qualified students 
without a relevant Master's degree can prepare for the 
Ph.D. by completing coursework in the masters in health 
administration (MHA), the MA in medical sociology, or 
the MS in Health Promotion while enrolled in the PhD 
with a Specialization in Health Policy. 

Required courses for this specialty include: 

PPOL8661 Social Organization of Health Care 
PPOL8663 Health Policy 
PPOL8665 Analytic Epidemiology 
PPOL8667 Economics of Health and Health Care 
PPOL8669 Investigating Health and Health 
Services 

Justice Policy 

The Justice Specialization provides an interdisciplinary 
approach to the study of crime and society's response to 
it. This concentration prepares students to conduct 



research and policy analysis on local, state, and national 
policies and policy initiatives and provide information for 
policy makers. The primary goal of this specialization is to 
provide students with the tools necessary for critically and 
objectively assessing policies related to the administration 
of justice. Toward that end, students gain the appropriate 
analytical skills, an understanding of the nature of 
criminal behavior and its impact, and knowledge about 
the criminal justice system as well as about a variety of 
issues related to the control of crime. They also become 
familiar with the process of making and implementing 
justice policy and with those organizations involved in 
this process. 

Required courses for this specialty include: 

PPOL8671 Criminal Justice Policy 
PPOL8672 Theories of Crime and Justice 
PPOL8673 Law and Social Control 
PPOL8681 Race, Gender, Class and Public Policy 
One other class from the other specialties 

Social Policy 

The Specialization in Social Policy prepares scholars, 
researchers, practitioners, and policy makers to address 
crucial social issues facing communities and our nation 
including social welfare, education, poverty, housing and 
homelessness and the role of public, nonprofit, and 
private sectors in alleviating and contributing to such 
problems. In addition to dealing with these topics in their 
own right, the social policy specialization focuses on the 
complex interrelationships among these issues and the 
manner in which they are influenced by— and in turn 
influence—prevailing patterns of racial, ethnic, and gender 
stratification. The social policy specialization provides the 
theoretical background, methodological training, and 
substantive knowledge that will allow students to make 
important contributions to the development, 
implementation, and evaluation of public policies 
addressing these most vexing and important social issues 
of our time. 

Required courses for this specialty include: 

PPOL8681 Race, Gender, Class and Public Policy 
PPOL8682 Stratification and Social Policy 
PPOL8683 Population Dynamics and Social Policy 

The student needs to select two additional classes from 

the list below: 

PPOL8685 Aging and Social Policy 
PPOL8687 Education Policy 
PPOL8688 Political Economy & School Reform 
PPOL8689 The Social Context of Schooling 

Students may also develop a focus in other related fields 
or design their specialty based on faculty resources 
available. As with all programs, such a program would 
need the approval of the student's advisor and the 
Director of the Program. Program faculty will continue to 
develop additional substantive and methods courses. 



152 College of Arts and Sciences 



Advising/Committees 

Students will be assigned to an advisor soon after 
enrolling in the Program and will work closely with that 
advisor on suggested schedules of classes, research 
options, and other issues important to success. Students 
will be responsible for forming their dissertation 
committees. Following completion of the comprehensive 
and qualifying examinations, students will choose a 
dissertation advisor and form a dissertation committee. 

Grades Required 

A student must maintain a cumulative average of 3.0 in all 
course work taken for graduate credit. An accumulation 
of two C grades will result in termination of the student's 
enrollment in the graduate program. If a student receives 
a grade of U in any course, enrollment in the program will 
be terminated. 

Transfer Credit 

The Program will accept up to two courses in the core 
curriculum as transfer credit from other regionally 
accredited doctoral institutions, providing that the 
Admissions Committee determines that these courses are 
equivalent to those offered in the core or one of the 
specialty areas. The acceptance of transfer credit is subject 
to the approval of the Graduate School. The grade in 
these transfer credits must have been A or B. All of the 
dissertation work must be completed at UNC Charlotte. 

Language Requirement 

There is no foreign language requirement. 

Dissertation 

The program requires that the student complete 1 8 hours 
of dissertation credit. Enrollment in dissertation credit is 
contingent on admission to candidacy. The dissertation 
topic may be proposed after the student has passed the 
qualifying and comprehensive exams. The doctoral 
student advances to candidacy after the dissertation 
proposal has been defended to, and approved by, the 
student's advisory committee and reported to the 
Director of the Ph.D. in Public Policy and the Dean of 
the Graduate School. The student must complete and 
defend the dissertation based on a research program 
approved by the student's dissertation committee that 
results in a high quality, original, and substantial piece of 
research. 

Other Requirements 

Public Policy Seminar Series. Students in the Program 
will develop their appreciation of the varied nature of 
policy applications and improve their communications 
skills by participating in at least three seminar series 
throughout the course of their program. Each term a 
series of guest speakers will prepare monthly seminars 
reflecting a range of policy issues and challenges. 



Research Opportunities 

The Ph.D. Program in Public Policy has an extensive 
pool of professors to enhance the research opportunities 
and experiences for the students. Each program of study 
could be individually tailored for the research of the 
student with the possibility of individual studies under the 
supervision of an advisor. 

Application for Degree 

Students must apply for the degree when they are close to 
completing the Program. After successful defense of the 
dissertation, a student will be conferred with the doctoral 
degree. 

Residency Requirement 

Students must satisfy the residency requirement for the 
program by completing 21 hours of continuous 
enrollment, either as course work or dissertation credits. 
Residence is considered continuous if the student is 
enrolled in one or more courses in successive semesters 
until 21 hours are earned. All 18 hours of dissertation 
credit must be earned at UNC Charlotte. 

Time Limits for Completion 

The student must achieve admission to candidacy within 
six years after admission to the program. All requirements 
for the degree must be completed within eight years after 
first registration as a doctoral student. These time limits 
are maximums; full-time students will typically be 
expected to complete the degree requirements in five 
years. 



Courses in Public Policy 

PPOL 8000. Topics in Public Policy. (1-4) Pre- 
requisites: Full graduate standing in the Ph.D. in Public 
Policy or permission of the Instructor. Study of selected 
topics in Public Policy. Maybe repeated for credit. (On 
Demand) 

PPOL 8600. Policy Process I. (3) Prerequisites: Prior 
course work or experience relevant to political and legal 
processes, behaviors, and institutions. Examination of the 
field of public policy analysis to include both theory and 
practice. Process includes everything from sources of 
public problems to feedback mechanisms after policy 
implementation. Emphasis on the policy process in 
growing urban regions and the ability to communicate 
with stakeholders to determine value conflicts and to 
communicate policy solutions. Examination of the 
context (legal, institutional, historical, philosophical, 
social, political, physical and spatial) within which policy 
is made with sensitivity to gender, race and ethnicity, and 
class concerns. (Fall) 

PPOL 8601. Policy Process II. (3) Pre-requisite: PPOL 
8600. Continuation of Policy Process I. Includes more 
specific application of theory to specific public problems 



College of Arts and Sciences 153 



in a variety of specialties, and the variation in 
communication problems that arise in these sub-systems. 
Emphasis on interaction of all aspects of urban regions, 
which produce public problems and determine which 
policies will be acceptable and effective. (Spring) 

PPOL 8602. Research Design in Public Policy. (3) 

Introduces students to various quantitative and qualitative 
approaches to doing policy research. Considers such 
major issues in philosophy of science as causality, 
measurement, and post-positive approaches to research. 
Students may use the course to prepare their dissertation 
proposals or research grant and contract proposals. 
Students should have completed at least two quantitative 
analysis courses and one qualitative analysis course before 
registering for PPOl 8602. (Spring) 

PPOL 8610. Urban Regional Environment. (3) 

Prerequisite: Prior course work or experience relevant to 
the nature of urban regions. Examination of the nature of 
urban regions. The basic factors that shape urban regions 
as they grow. Impact of: geography; history; social factors; 
economic factors; concerns about gender, race and 
ethnicity, and class; and other determinants of the nature 
of urban regions, their problems, and possible policy 
solutions. (Fall) 

PPOL 8611. Metropolitan governance and 
administration. (3) Pre-requisite: Full graduate standing 
in the Ph.D. in Public Policy or permission of the 
Instructor. Introduction of major issues in urban politics 
and related trends and problems in urban governance and 
administration. (Spring) 

PPOL 8612. Theory of Urban Development. (3) Pre- 
requisite: Full graduate standing in the Ph.D. in Public 
Policy or permission of the Instructor. Analysis of urban 
economics and politics within the context of public policy 
and planning. Focuses on theory and application to 
understand the rationale for and effects of urban policy, 
urban economic development, and planning. Provides 
basic understanding of the operation of urban real estate 
markets and the motivation for public sector 
interventions. Applies theoretical foundations to the 
study of current urban problems and controversies. 
Familiarity with introductory microeconomics is required. 
(Fall) 

PPOL 8613. Transportation Policy. (3) Pre-requisite: 
Full graduate standing in the Ph.D. in Public Policy or 
permission of the instructor. This course examines 
surface transportation from a broad public policy 
perspective with a special focus on its institutional 
components and the changing role of government in 
transportation policy-making including the evolution of, 
and relationships among, various federal, state and local 
policies that affect investment decisions in transportation 
infrastructure. (On demand) 



PPOL 8614. Colloquium in 20th Century Black 
Urban History. (3) Pre-requisite: Full graduate standing 
in the Ph.D. in Public Policy or permission of the 
Instructor. Examination of major and topical 
monographic works in African-American urban history 
during the twentieth century. The focus will be on such 
topics as" classical urban examinations by black scholars, 
ghettoization and alternative theories, community and its 
institutions, riot sand urban rebellions, biography, black 
mayors, and urban policy. (Fall as needed) 

PPOL 8615. The Restructuring City. (3) Prerequisite: 
Full graduate standing in the Ph.D. in Public Policy or 
permission of the Instructor. This course places at center 
stage the causes and consequences of contemporary 
urban restructuring and evaluates the theoretical, 
planning, and policy challenges inevitably presented. 
(Spring) 

PPOL 8616. Urban Planning Theory and Practice. (3) 

Pre-requisite: Full graduate standing in the Ph.D. in 
Public Policy or permission of the Instructor. Alternative 
planning theories and application of theories in urban 
planning practices. (Alternate years) 

PPOL 8617. Law and Management. (3) Pre-requisite: 
Full graduate standing in the Ph.D. in Public Policy or 
permission of the Instructor. Constitutional and 
administrative law issues, including a survey of academic 
debates over contested issues, and selected areas in 
constitutional law on civil liberties and civil rights. (Spring) 

PPOL 8618. Growth Management Systems. (3) Pre- 
requisite: Full graduate standing in the Ph.D. in Public 
Policy or permission of the Instructor. Exploration of 
growth management programs, legal and planning issues, 
and legislation to determine their merits, weaknesses and 
abilities to promote more sustainable development 
patterns. Will emphasize difficulty of changing traditional 
procedures of development and land use. (On demand) 

PPOL 8620. Quantitative Methods in Public Policy I. 

(3) Prerequisite: graduate level social science methods or 
statistics course. Advanced quantitative methods as 
applied to analysis and solution of public problems. Use 
of quantitative methods to analyze public problems; 
devise appropriate, effective, acceptable public policies; 
evaluate public programs; and present the results of 
quantitative analysis to appropriate audiences. (Fall) 

PPOL 8621. Quantitative Methods in Public Policy 

II. (3) Prerequisite: PPOL 8620, Quantitative Methods in 
Public Policy I. Advanced quantitative methods as applied 
to analysis and solution of public problems. Use of 
quantitative methods to analyze public problems; to 
devise appropriate, effective, acceptable public policies; to 
evaluate public programs; and to present the results of 
quantitative analysis to appropriate audiences. (Spring) 



154 College of Arts and Sciences 



PPOL 8622. Qualitative Methods in Public Policy. 

(3) Advanced qualitative methods as applied to analysis 
and solution of public problems. Use of qualitative 
methods to analyze public problems, devise appropriate, 
effective, and acceptable public policies; evaluate public 
programs; and present the results of qualitative analysis to 
appropriate audiences. (Spring) 

PPOL 8625. Advanced Seminar in Spatial Decisions 
Support Systems . (3) Pre-requisite: GEOG 5120 or 
consent of the Instructor. Theoretical aspects of spatial 
DSS including technical, social, political and psychological 
considerations; system s design; systems manipulation; 
and case studies. Three hours of lecture and one-two 
hour lab per week. (Fall) 

PPOL 8630. Advanced Program Evaluation. (3) 

Development and application of policy analysis to the 
evaluation of existing public policies. Particular attention 
to the use of multiple techniques of analysis and 
presentation of program evaluations to relevant 
audiences. (Fall) 

PPOL 8635. Ethics of Public Policy. (3) Ethical 
questions in the study, formation, implementation, and 
evaluation of public policies. Ethical dilemmas faced by 
the public policy analyst, and the importance of use of 
values analysis. Emphasis on understanding how values 
are communicated by a variety of stakeholders in policy 
systems and how communicating public policy solutions 
involves an understanding of the role of values in 
successful policy formation and implementation. (Spring) 

PPOL 8640. Economic Analysis of Public Policy I. 

(3) Economic role of government, efficiency versus 
equity, externalities, and public goods, market failures and 
government failures, economics of centralized versus 
decentralized decision making, public choice theory, 
economics of privatization, economic role of non-profits 
and non-governmental organizations. (Fall) 

PPOL 8641. Economic Analysis of Public Policy II. 

(3) Prerequisite: PPOL 8640. Economics of taxation and 
government borrowing, benefit-cost analysis, regional 
growth and development, econometric analysis of local 
and regional public policy issues. (Spring) 

PPOL 8642. Regional Economic Development. (3) 

Pre-requisite: Full graduate standing in the Ph.D. in 
Public Policy; PPOL 8610; Intermediate microeconomics; 
or permission of the Instructor. Course covers classical, 
neo-classical and contemporary theories of trade, 
economic geography, and regional development. Topics 
include theories of urban and regional growth, location 
theories, human capital, labor force and entrepreneurial 
contributions to growth. Policy dimensions of urban 
growth and development are addressed from theoretical 
and empirical perspectives. (Fall) 



PPOL 8643. Rural Development Issues. (3) Pre- 
requisite: Full graduate standing in the Ph.D. in Public 
Policy or permission of the Instructor. This course 
provides research experiences that focus on policy 
formulation, and demographic, economic and planning 
issues in rural areas. (Fall) 

PPOL 8644. Public Budgeting and Financing. (3) 

Pre-requisite: Full graduate standing in the Ph.D. in 
Public Policy or permission of the Instructor. Focus is on 
the public budget process as a means of policy 
development, analysis and implementation. It will also 
address in more depth issues of financing the policies 
authorized in the budget and for which appropriations are 
sought. (Spring) 

PPOL 8650. Environmental Policy. (3) Prerequisite: 
Full graduate standing in the Ph.D. in Public Policy or 
permission of the Instructor. This course draws upon 
concepts and tools from economics, geography, law, 
sociology, political science, and planning to explore the 
concept of sustainable development, a central tenet of 
environmental policy. Environmental policy will be 
analyzed within the federalist framework. (On demand) 

PPOL 8652. Energy and Environmental Economics. 

(3) Pre-requisite: Full graduate standing in the Ph.D. in 
Public Policy or permission of the Instructor. Economics 
issues of both energy and environment. Energy issues 
include the historical development of energy resources, 
supply and demand considerations, and projections of the 
future energy balance. Environmental issues are 
externalities, common property resources, and 
government regulation. Policy considerations include 
environmental standards, pollution charges, and property 
rights. Cost-benefit analysis and microeconomic theory 
are applied. (On demand) 

PPOL 8653. Urban Air Quality. (3) Pre-requisites: 
Ph.D. student and permission of instructor. Examination 
of the relationships between climatic processes and urban 
air quality with emphasis on trends and patterns. Topics 
will include health and environmental effects of air 
pollution, ozone climatology, pollutant transport, 
transportation related emissions, risk assessment, and air 
quality management. (Fall) 

PPOL 8655. Watershed Science Policy. (3) Pre- 
requisite: Full graduate standing in the Ph.D. in Public 
Policy or permission of the Instructor. Examination of 
the cycling of water and chemical elements within 
forested, agricultural and urbanized watersheds. Land use 
regulations designed to protect water quality are examined 
with respect to hydrologic and biogeochemical process 
that operate at the watershed scale. (On demand) 

PPOL 8656. Earth Systems Analysis: Biogeochemical 
Cycles. (3) Pre-requisite: Full graduate standing in the 
Ph.D. in Public Policy or permission of the Instructor. 
This course examines die Earth's water and major 



College of Arts and Sciences 155 



elemental cycles including those of carbon, nitrogen, 
sulfur, phosphorus and the major crustal elements. 
Uncertainties in the current state of global elemental 
cycles are examined. Special emphasis is placed on how 
these cycles are currently being modified through human 
activities. (On demand) 

PPOL 8661. Social Organization of Health Care. (3) 

Pre-requisite: Full graduate standing in the Ph.D. in 
Public Policy or permission of the Instructor. Focuses on 
the structures and operations of health care institutions 
and providers. The topics covered include the socio- 
historical development of the existing health care system, 
health care occupations and professions, professional 
power and autonomy, professional socialization, inter- 
professional and provider-client relations, health care 
organizations, and how change affects the delivery of 
health care services. (Summer) 

PPOL 8663. Health Policy. (3) Pre-requisite: Full 
graduate standing in the Ph.D. in Public Policy and a 
graduate level course providing an adequate introduction 
to the U.S. health care system such as HADM 61 12, 
MP AD 6172, HPKD 8112 or permission of the 
Instructor. This doctoral seminar examines the 
formulation, adoption, implementation, and evaluation of 
health policy at national, state, and local levels through 
extensive readings in relevant health and policy literatures. 
(Spring) 

PPOL 8665. Analytic Epidemiology. (3) Pre-requisite: 
Full graduate standing in the Ph.D. in Public Policy and a 
graduate level courses such as HPKD 6189 and HADM 
6103 or permission of the Instructor. Principles and 
methods of studying advanced epidemiology, with 
emphasis on analytical approach. Includes advanced 
techniques in the establishment of disease causation in 
groups and communities. Such topics as risk assessment, 
environmental exposures, stratification and adjustment, 
and multivariate analysis in epidemiology are covered. 
(Fall) 

PPOL 8667. Economic of Health and Health Care. 

(3) Pre-requisite: Full graduate standing in the Ph.D. in 
Public Policy, PPOL 8640 and PPOL 8641 or permission 
of the Instructor. This course will use economic theory 
and econometrics to analyze the functioning of the health 
care sector and appropriate public policy. Topics will 
include: how markets for medical care differs from other 
markets, the demand for medical care, the demand and 
supply of health insurance, the role of competition in 
medical markets, managed care, managed competition, 
and the role of the public sector in regulating and 
financing health care. (Fall) 

PPOL 8669. Investigating Health and Health 
Services. (3) Pre-requisite: Full graduate standing in the 
Ph.D. in Public Policy and PPOL 8620 and PPOL 8621 
or permission of the Instructor. The emphasis of this 
course is how to conduct and evaluate research necessary 



to health policy. Students will be expected to conduct 
research utilizing a variety of methodologies and will also 
learn how to access available secondary data sets relevant 
to health care and policy. The specific topics include: 
multidisciplinary collaboration, measurement of health 
related constructs and health care outcomes, and health 
evaluation (cost, quality, access). Students will be 
expected to develop their dissertation proposals as one 
outcomes of this class. This class is designed to be a 
seminar, and active participation in class discussion and 
activities is essential. (Fall) 

PPOL 8671. Criminal Justice. (3) Prerequisite: Full 
graduate standing in the Ph.D. in Public Policy or 
permission of the Instructor. Examination of the criminal 
justice subsystems (law enforcement, courts, corrections) 
with particular focus on the development of policy and 
the effectiveness of current policies aimed at reducing 
crime. (Fall) 

PPOL 8672. Theories of Crime and Justice. (3) Pre- 
requisite: Full graduate standing in the Ph.D. in Public 
Policy or permission of the Instructor. This course is 
designed to expose students to mainstream and critical 
theoretical approaches to crime, justice, and criminal 
behavior. An emphasis on both broad conceptual 
orientations allows us to assess the development of 
criminology within an array of historical and 
philosophical contexts during the past three centuries. 
(On demand) 

PPOL 8673. Law and Social Control. (3) Prerequisite: 
Full graduate standing in the Ph.D. in Public Policy or 
permission of the Instructor. Examines how the criminal 
law functions as a powerful tool of social control in our 
society. Particular emphasis is given to understanding the 
constitutional limitations placed on construction of law, 
the elements of criminal offenses, and criminal defenses. 
(Spring) 

PPOL 8681. Race, Gender, Class and Public Policy. 

(3) Prerequisite: Full graduate standing in the Ph.D. in 
Public Policy or permission of the Instructor. This course 
is designed as an overview of major theories, trends and 
debates on the topic of gender, race and economic 
inequality in the contemporary United States. (On demand) 

PPOL 8682. Stratification and Social Policy. (3) 

Prerequisite: Full graduate standing in the Ph.D. in Public 
Policy or permission of the Instructor. This course 
examines (a) structures and processes underlying social 
stratification in the United States, particularly the 
inequality that is grounded in social class, gender, 
ethnicity, and race; and (b) the social policy implications 
that follow from our analysis of the nature and sources of 
stratification. (On demand) 

PPOL 8683. Population Dynamics and Social Policy. 

(3) Prerequisite: Full graduate standing in the Ph.D. in 
Public Policy or permission of the Instructor. Basic 



156 College of Arts and Sciences 



population characteristics, such as age distribution, life 
expectancy, fertility, and trends in these characteristics are 
relevant to nearly all social policy. This class is an 
introduction to basic concepts and tools of demographic 
analysis and how they may be applied to the study of 
social policy including family policy, aging policy, and 
minority groups' policy. (On demand) 

PPOL 8685. Aging and Social Policy. (3) Prerequisite: 
Full graduate standing in the Ph.D. in Public Policy or 
permission of the Instructor. This course is designed to 
utilize the concepts of social gerontology as a 
Springboard for examining social policy for an aging 
population. Examination of the public policy making 
process with attention to aging policy. Consideration of 
determinants of aging policy and institution and actors in 
the policy making process and piecemeal development of 
legislation will be analyzed as factors related to the 
making of policy for the aged. (On demand) 

PPOL 8687. Education Policy. (3) Prerequisite: Full 
graduate standing in the Ph.D. in Public Policy or 
permission of the Instructor. This course examines 
equity, efficiency, and diversity tradeoffs among 
alternatives systems of delivering K-12 education. The 
course also examines how to evaluate educational policies 
and programs. (On demand) 

PPOL 8688. Political Economy of School Reform. (3) 

Prerequisite: Full graduate standing in the Ph.D. in Public 
Policy or permission of the Instructor. This course 
examines between business leaders' vision for school 
reform and the school restructuring movement, the 
reforms which arise from their construction of the 
problem, local educational restructuring efforts within the 
context of the larger national reform movement, and the 
opportunities and dangers of corporate-inspired 
educational policies. (On demand) 

PPOL 8689. The Social Context of Schooling. (3) 

Prerequisite: Full graduate standing in the Ph.D. in Public 
Policy or permission of the Instructor. The purpose of 
this course is to examine the relationships among certain 
aspects of the contemporary social structure and 
educational processes and outcomes. It explores the ways 
that the social class structure, race, and gender 
stratification affect the ways individuals experience, 
understand, and acquire education. (On demand) 

PPOL 8690. Seminar in Public Policy. (1) Pre- 
requisite: Full graduate standing in the Ph.D. in Public 
Policy or permission of the Instructor. Series of guest 
speakers giving monthly seminars on a range of policy 
issues. Designed to increase familiarity with the variety of 
topics and methods covered by policy making and 
analysis. Student participation and oral critique of a 
selected speaker and their topic. (Fall/ 'Spring) 

PPOL 8800. Independent Study in Public Policy. (1- 

6) Pre-requisite: Full graduate standing in the Ph.D. in 



Public Policy and the permission of the Instructor. (On 
demand) 

PPOL 8801. Dissertation. (1-9) Prerequisite: passage of 
qualifying examinations, and approval of dissertation 
topic by the student's advisory committee. In-depth study 
of a practical problem in public policy. Analysis of the 
problem, preparation of a policy solution, and 
presentation of the solution to appropriate stakeholders 
and the public. Pass/no credit grading. Maximum of 1 8 
hours allowed under this course designation. (Fall, Spring, 
Summer) 

PPOL 8802. Dissertation Residence. (1) Prerequisite: 
completed enrollment in 18 hours of dissertation with 
grade of IP, In Progress. This course is to allow a student 
who has taken all permissible 18 hours of dissertation to 
remain in residence to finish work on the dissertation. 
Pass/no credit grading. Credit for this course does not 
count toward the degree. (Fall, Spring) 

Changes to the core or the specially area courses can be found on the 

Program's website: 

http-J I www. uncc. edu/ppol/ 

or at the Graduate School website 

http:/ 1 www. uncc. edu/gradmiss/ 

Notes on course frequency and prerequisites: 

1) The core courses listed above are available only to 
students admitted into the Ph.D. in Public Policy or 
to students admitted to other Ph.D. programs. 

2) Consent of the instructor is required on all classes in 
the Public Policy Ph.D. 

3) There are no specific prerequisites for many of the 
courses listed above; however the general levels of 
preparation are described in greater detail on the 
program's website. 

Many of these courses will be offered during one of the 
summer sessions as well as during the semester specified 
in the course description. 



RELIGIOUS STUDIES 

Department of Religious Studies 

210 Macy Building 

(704) 687-4598 

http://www.religiousstudies.uncc.edu 

Degree 

M.A. 

Coordinator 

Dr. John C. Reeves 

Graduate Faculty 

Ann Burlein, Assistant Professor 
Richard A. Cohen, Professor 



College of Arts and Sciences 157 



Kathryn Johnson, Associate Professor 

Sean McCloud, Assistant Professor 

Jeffrey F. Meyer, Professor 

John C. Reeves, Professor 

Jeremy Schott, Assistant Professor 

Joanne Maguire Robinson, Associate Professor 

James D. Tabor, Professor 

J. Daniel White, Associate Professor 



MASTER OF ARTS IN RELIGIOUS 
STUDIES 

The program approaches the academic study of religion 
and religions from a variety of critical and 
interdisciplinary perspectives, with an emphasis placed on 
the global and multicultural aspects of religion. The 
department offers courses in Asian, Middle Eastern, 
European, and American religious traditions which focus 
on aspects of both their historical and contemporary 
manifestations. 

Additional Admission Requirements 

In addition to meeting the university's graduate admission 
requirements, all prospective students must submit an 
essay (statement of purpose) that specifically addresses 
their motivation for pursuing the M.A. in Religious 
Studies, including some discussion of their research 
interests and career or professional goals. Standardized 
test scores and letters of reference can be no more than 
five years old. 

Degree Requirements 

The Master of Arts in Religious Studies requires the 
completion, with a GPA of 3.0 or better, of a minimum 
of 30 semester hours of approved graduate course work. 
At least 1 5 hours of this total must be in courses open 
only to graduate students (i.e., at the 6000 level or higher). 
Upon the completion of 24 hours of course work, 
students must pass a comprehensive written examination 
based on their studies. Students have the option of 
writing a thesis (6 semester hours credit) or of compiling 
a portfolio of selected research papers written for courses 
in the program (no additional credit). In either case the 
candidates must pass an oral examination based on their 
thesis or writing portfolio. Students completing a thesis 
may take 6 hours of thesis preparation (RELS 6999) 
toward their 30 hours. All degree requirements, including 
the comprehensive examination, thesis or portfolio, and 
oral defense, must be completed within six calendar years 
of first enrollment in the program. 

Core Courses 

All M.A. candidates must complete RELS 6101 
(Approaches to the Study of Religion), normally during 
their first semester of course work, with a grade of B (3.0) 
or better. 



Elective Courses 

Up to 6 semester hours of related graduate credit may be 
earned outside the Department of Religious Studies. 
Such courses must be formally approved by the director 
of graduate studies. 

Admission to Candidacy Requirements 

An Admission to Candidacy form is normally filed upon 
the completion of 24 hours of course work. 

Advising 

The director of graduate studies serves as formal advisor 
to the graduate students. 

Transfer Credit 

Up to 6 semester hours earned from other accredited 
institutions may be eligible for transfer credit. Formal 
approval must be obtained from the director of graduate 
studies and the Dean of the Graduate School. 

Language Requirement 

Although students are not required to demonstrate 
proficiency in a foreign language as a formal matriculation 
requirement of the program, they are expected to acquire 
competency in and use whatever languages they need to 
pursue their research interests. 

Comprehensive Examination 

Every student must satisfactorily complete a 
comprehensive written examination upon the conclusion 
of their coursework. This examination is normally taken 
during the third or fourth semester (for full-time 
students). Students who elect to write a thesis become 
eligible for the comprehensive examination after 
completing 24 hours of course work; all others become 
eligible after completing 30 hours of course work. 

Committees 

Three-member faculty committees, consisting of two 
graduate faculty members from the Department of 
Religious Studies and a third member selected from 
Religious Studies or another department, conduct the 
comprehensive examinations and oversee the student's 
thesis work. 

Thesis 

Students have the option of writing a thesis (6 semester 
hours credit) or of compiling a portfolio of selected 
research papers written for courses in the program (no 
additional credit). In either case the candidates must 
complete an oral examination based on their thesis or 
writing portfolio. 

Application for Degree 

The Application for Degree is submitted on the form 
supplied by the Graduate School no later than the 
deadline specified in the University calendar. 



158 College of Arts and Sciences 



Courses in Religious Studies 

RELS 5000. Topics in Religious Studies. (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. May be repeated 
for credit. (On demand) 

RELS 5010. Major Figure in Religious Studies. (3) 

The life and works of a major figure who has contributed 
to religious studies. May be repeated for credit for 
different figures. (On demand) 

RELS 5101. Religion and Modern Thought. (3) The 

interaction of modern thought and modern religious 
sensibilities. (Alternate years) 

RELS 5107. Early Judaism. (3) Prerequisite: RELS 
2104 or 2105 or 31 10 or consent of the instructor. 
Comparative historical and literary study of the varieties 
of Judaism evidenced during late antiquity (circa 70-640 
C.E.), with special attention devoted to the formation and 
development of rabbinic Judaism. (On demand) 

RELS 5108. Medieval Judaism. (3) Prerequisite: RELS 
2104 or 31 10 or consent of the instructor. Comparative 
historical and literary study of the varieties of Judaism 
evidenced in Western Europe, the Byzantine Empire, and 
Islamicate realms from approximately 640 C.E. to 
approximately 1492 C.E. (On demand) 

RELS 5109. Modern Judaism. (3) Prerequisites: RELS 
3110 or 4107 or 4108 or permission of the instructor. 
Historical and conceptual study of Judaism and Jewish 
experience in Europe, America, and Israel, from the 1 6th 
century to the present, with special attention paid to the 
development of denominations, Zionism, and the 
Holocaust. (On demand) 

RELS 5110. Contemporary Jewish Thought. (3) An 

examination of philosophy, religion, morality, politics, 
sociality, culture, family, and self-identity, in the light of 
modern and recent Jewish thought. (Alternate years) 

RELS 5201. Religion, Morality, and Justice. (3) 

Explores the ethical and social dimensions of selected 
religious traditions in their cultural contexts. (On demand) 

RELS 6000. Topics in Religious Studies. (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. May be repeated 
for credit. (On demand) 

RELS 6101. Approaches to the Study of Religion. (3) 

This course provides students with critical tools for 
research, analytical thinking, and writing in the academic 
study of religion. The topics and individuals this course 
covers represent several major currents of thought in the 
field of religious studies. (Fall) 

RELS 6103. Material Christianity. (3) Explores the 
ways in which individuals and societies throughout tine 



Christian tradition have invested material objects with 
sanctity and power. (Alternate years) 

RELS 6104. Religion and Art in Islam. (3) Explores 
the relationships between Islamic thought and the 
development of Islamic art and architecture. (Alternate 
years) 

RELS 6105. Religion, Art and Architecture of East 
Asia. (3) A study of the religious ideas in physical forms 
in the cultures of China and Japan. The course focuses on 
the Confucian, Daoist, and Buddhist traditions. (Alternate 
years) 

RELS 6111. Qumran and its Literature. (3) A study of 
the manuscripts recovered from the caves of Qumran. 
Attention given to their connections to Second Temple 
Judaism, early Christianity, and later developments in 
Islam. (Alternate years) 

RELS 6602. Seminar in the Religion of Ancient 
Israel. (3) Current and seminal issues related to the study 
of the religion of ancient Israel. A general theme will be 
chosen which at times will be keyed to the pertinent 
archaeological evidence available for evaluating the 
complex scope of Israelite religiosity, but which at other 
times may selectively focus on narratological descriptions 
of religious behavior (e.g., the religious ideology of 
Deuteronomy). Extensive attention will be devoted to the 
comparative study of Israelite religion within its ancient 
Near Eastern context. (On demand) 

RELS 6603. Seminar in Early Judaism. (3) Current 
and seminal issues related to the historical-critical study of 
early Judaism and its literature. A general theme will be 
chosen: a narrative source (Mishnah, Midrash, Talmud); a 
subdivision of texts (Jewish apocrypha and 
pseudepigrapha) or literary genres (apocalyptic literature); 
a single ancient text (1 Enoch; Avot de R Natan); or a 
topical investigation (written and oral Torah; construction 
of authority in rabbinic Judaism; sectarian disputes within 
early Judaism; cultural impact of the Roman destruction 
of the Temple). (On demand) 

RELS 6612. Seminar in Christian Origins. (3) Current 
and seminal issues related to the historical-critical study of 
the origins and development of earliest Christianity. A 
general theme will be chosen: an historical figure (John 
the Baptist, Jesus, Paul, James); an ancient text (a New 
Testament document; Gospel of Thomas; the Gnostic 
Nag Hammadi codices); or a topical investigation (Jesus 
and the Dead Sea Scrolls; the development of early 
Christian liturgy; the development of early Christian 
Christology; ancient Judaism and emerging Christianity). 
(On demand) 

RELS 6622. Seminar in Religion and Modern 
Culture. (3) A seminar on issues related to the historical- 
critical study of the interaction between religion and 
modern culture. One or more general themes will be 



College of Arts and Sciences 159 



chosen: leading theorists, appropriate historical contexts, 
global contexts, or a topical investigation. (Yearly) 

RELS 6800. Directed Readings/Research. (1-3) 

Prerequisite: prior written consent of instructor. (Fall, 
Spring) 

RELS 6999. Thesis. (3 or 6) May be repeated by 
permission, if taken for three hours credit. Six hours of 
Thesis may be taken during a single semester. 
Appropriate research and written exposition of that 
research is required. (On demand) 

RELS 7999. Master's Degree Residence. (1) (Fall, 
Spring, Summer) 



SOCIOLOGY 

Department of Sociology 

476 Fretwell Building 

704-687-2252 

http://www.socanth.uncc.edu/sociology/maprogram.ht 



Degree 

M.A., Master of Arts 

Director 

Dr. Lisa S. Rashotte 

Graduate Faculty 

Judy R. Aulette, Associate Professor 
Charles J. Brody, Professor and Chair 
Yang Cao, Assistant Professor 
Scott Fitzgerald, Assistant Professor 
Rosemary L. Hopcroft, Associate Professor 
Larry M. Lance, Associate Professor 
Julie McLaughlin, Assistant Professor 
Roslyn Mickelson, Professor 
Stephanie Moller, Assistant Professor 
Lisa S. Rashotte, Associate Professor 
Teresa L. Scheid, Associate Professor 
Murray Webster, Jr., Professor 
Joseph M. Whitmeyer, Professor 
Diane Zablotsky, Associate Professor 
Wei Zhao, Assistant Professor 



MASTER OF ARTS IN 
SOCIOLOGY 

The Master of Arts in Sociology degree program provides 
students with skills for analysis of social phenomena, 
from contemporary social problems to theoretical issues. 
Training concentrates on research design, data analysis, 
interpretation and application of sociological theory, and 



core substantive areas of sociology. As culmination, 
students complete either a thesis or, with a more applied 
focus, a research practicum. 

Program of Study 

The MA. curriculum is designed to meet the needs of 
students seeking master's level research skills for 
occupations requiring such expertise: in government, 
marketing, program planning and evaluation, business, 
the media, and the non-profit sector. The curriculum also 
prepares students who wish to pursue the Ph.D., whether 
in sociology or a related discipline (such as public policy 
or criminology). Coursework in the program 
concentrates on building skills in research design, data 
analysis and interpretation and application of sociological 
theory. Students complete either a thesis, with oral 
defense, or a research practicum. Either option entails 
the student applying sociological knowledge to a 
problem/topic of his/her interest. 

Additional Admission Requirements 

1) An overall undergraduate GPA of 3.0 or better 

2) An acceptable score on the Graduate Record 
Examination (GRE) 

3) Demonstrated undergraduate competence in 
research methods, theory and statistics for social 
research. 

4) Eighteen credit hours of social science undergraduate 
courses. 

Prerequisite Requirements 

Research Methods, Theory, Statistics for Social Research 

Degree Requirements 

The program requires 35 semester hours of coursework. 
To provide all students with a solid grounding in theory 
and methods of sociological inquiry, 12 hours of core 
courses are required (Pro-Seminar, Social Theory, 
Statistics, and Research Methods). In addition to the core, 
students must take one additional course in research 
methods and at least two elective courses in the 
department. Students must complete either a thesis (6 
hours) or a research practicum (6 hours). The remaining 8 
hours are electives. 

Students must earn at least a B in each core course. 
Students earning a C in one of these courses must repeat 
the course and earn at least a B the next time it is offered. 
Students earning a C in two of these courses will be 
suspended from the program. 

Admission to Candidacy Requirements 

Completion of at least 24 hours of required work. 

Assistantships 

The Department of Sociology offers both teaching 
assistantships and research assistantships; the latter are 
dependent upon faculty research funding. Teaching 
assistants assist faculty with coursework, or teach the 



160 College of Arts and Sciences 



undergraduate lab sections in research methods and 
statistics. They are paid approximately $9,000.00 for nine 
months of twenty hours per week work during the 
academic year. The workload and pay for research 
assistants varies. Assistantships are awarded on the basis 
of merit and experience. 

Internships 

While there is no formal system of ongoing internships, 
agencies do contact the department to find students who 
would be interested in an internship. Consequently, 
internships are optional and dependent upon a match 
between an agency's needs and a student's skills and 
interests. 

Core Courses (must take all four) 

SOCY5151 Pro-Seminar: Social Problems and 

Social Policy (3) (Fall) 
SOCY6651 Social Theory (3) (Fall) 
SOCY6652 Issues in Social Research (3) (Spring) 
SOCY6653 Advanced Quantitative Analysis (3) 

(Fall) 

Additional Courses in Research Methods (must take 
at least one) 

SOCY6136 Qualitative Research Methods (3) (On 

demand) 
SOCY661 7 Data Utilization (3) (On demand) 
SOCY6630 Investigating Health and Health 

Services (3) (On demand) 
SOCY6640 Evaluation Research for Applied 

Sociology (3) (On demand) 

Outside Electives 

Students may take electives (up to 6 hours) from other 
departments as long as courses are at the graduate level 
(5000 or above). 

Advising 

The Graduate Director advises all graduate students until 
they select a person to serve as their Committee Chair. 

Transfer Credit 

With departmental approval, students may transfer in up 
to six hours of graduate work for which the applicant 
received a grade of B or better from another institution, 
related UNC Charlotte degree program or related post- 
baccalaureate work. 

Committee 

The student's committee shall consist of three faculty 
members: the Chair and two other individuals who assist 
with completion of the thesis or research practicum. One 
member of the committee, not the chair, may be from 
outside the department. 



Thesis 

Students formulate a research question or argument and 
collect empirical evidence to answer that question or 
support their argument. 

Research Practicum 

As an alternative to the traditional thesis, students have 
the option of a research practicum. This may be 
combined with an internship. The student works with an 
organization or agency to complete a research evaluation 
project for the agency. 

Research Opportunities/Experiences 

Faculty members are actively engaged in research and 
students are strongly recommended to work with faculty 
to develop research expertise. In addition, a number of 
faculty members have funded research projects or 
internships on which qualified graduate students are able 
to work. 

Tuition Waivers 

Both out-of-state and in-state tuition assistance is 
available and is awarded on the basis of merit and 
experience. 

Financial Assistance 

Other than the assistantships and waivers described 
above, the Department offers the Pearson Fellowship, 
which is awarded annually to a graduate or undergraduate 
student who has interests and goals in improving race 
relations, expanding social justice, and establishing a more 
peaceful world. The award is made every spring and 
consists of $500 to be applied to tuition at UNC 
Charlotte. 



Courses in Sociology 

SOCY 5090. Topics in Sociology. (3) Prerequisite: 
Consent of the instructor. Intensive treatment or survey 
of related topics, depending on student needs and 
interests. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. (On 
demand) 

SOCY 5111. Social Inequality. (3) Distribution of 
power, privilege and prestige; correlates and 
consequences of inequality; national and international 
comparisons. (Yearly) 

SOCY 5125. Urban Sociology. (3) Cross cultural 
analysis of urban development, social structure, ecology, 
demographic composition, and social problems. (Yearly) 

SOCY 5130. Sociology of Health and Illness. (3) The 

cultural and structural influences on die definition of 
health and illness; models of illness behaviors; health 
demography and epidemiology; social influences on the 
delivery of health care; ethical issues surrounding health 



College of Arts and Sciences 161 



and illness; the development of relevant social policy. 
(Yearly) 

SOCY 5131. Family Policy. (3) Critical analysis of four 
aspects of family policy; the historical and cultural factors 
that have resulted in specific policies affecting the family; 
the specification of contemporary family policy at both 
the national and state level; the intended and actual 
application of existing family policy; and the implications 
and impact of policies as they are interpreted and 
implemented. (On Demand) 

SOCY 5134. Families and Aging. (3) Theories 
explaining the formation and functioning of American 
families with emphasis on the impact of the aging of 
society; examination of the current demographic trends 
and expectations of multigenerational families as well as 
the future demands and modifications. (On Demand) 

SOCY 5135. Sociology of Education. (3) Educational 
institution; the school class as a social system; the school 
as a social environment and a complex organization. 
(Yearly) 

SOCY 5150. Older Individual and Society. (3) Review 
of the theories explaining the formation and functioning 
of American families with emphasis on the impact of the 
aging of society. Examination of the current demographic 
trends and expectations of multigenerational families as 
well as the future demands and modifications. (Yearly) 

SOCY 5151. Pro-seminar: Social Problems and Social 
Policy. (3) Prerequisite: graduate student in sociology or 
senior sociology major. Introduction to the discipline of 
sociology and the UNC Charlotte department; basic skills 
for graduate school. (Fall) 

SOCY 5154. Contemporary Social Theory. (3) 

Elements and process of theory construction; 
contemporary social theories such as theories of social 
order and causation, power, class structure and inequality; 
group process theories; post-modern theories. (On 
demand) 

SOCY 5631. Seminar in Family Violence. (3) 

Prerequisite: senior, graduate student or consent of the 
instructor. Family violence in the context of a changing 
society and family system. Principal foci: child abuse, 
sexual abuse, spouse abuse; other forms of family 
violence. Investigation of these topics in terms of 
sociocultural influences and internal dynamics of families. 
(On demand) 

SOCY 5632. Changing American Family. (3) Family 
theories; family system in relation to other social systems; 
integration of marital, parental and occupational roles in 
context of changing socioeconomic influences; traditional 
versus contemporary family roles; breakdown in stable 
family functioning. (On demand) 



SOCY 6090. Topics in Sociology. (3) Prerequisite: 
consent of department. Intensive treatment of a topic or 
survey of related topics, depending on student needs and 
interests, may be repeated for credit as topics vary. (On 
demand) 

SOCY 6130. Sociology of Aging: Theories and 
Research. (3) Application of stratification theories and 
demography are applied to the older population. Issues of 
race, gender, socio-economic status, age, and geographic 
distribution are examined to investigate the diversity of 
the older age group and their access to resources. 
(Alternate years) 

SOCY 6135. Social Context of Schooling. (3) The 

political economy of schooling; race, class, and gender 
effects on educational processes and outcomes; the 
school as a complex organization; the sociology of school 
reform movements. (Alternate years) 

SOCY 6136. Qualitative Research Methods. (3) 

Collection and analysis of qualitative data including use of 
grounded theory and a variety of qualitative techniques, 
consideration of ethical issues and the use of data. (On 
demand) 

SOCY 6137. The Political Economy and School 
Reform. (3) Prerequisite: SOCY 4135, graduate status, or 
consent of instructor. Relationship between the business 
community's vision for school reform and the school 
restructuring movement locally and nationally, including 
social and political processes associated with corporate 
involvement in defining the problem with schools and 
shaping solutions, the intersection of education and the 
economy, and the relationship between schooling and 
social inequality. (On demand) 

SOCY 6138. Social Organization of Health Care. (3) 

Focuses on the structures and operations of health care 
institutions and providers. The topics covered include the 
socio-historical development of the existing health care 
system, health care occupations and professions, 
professional power and autonomy, professional 
socialization, inter-professional and provider-patient 
relations, health care organizations and the delivery of 
services, and how social change affects the health care 
sector. (On demand) 

SOCY 6614. Self and Society. (3) Examination of 
theoretical constructs and substantive concerns relevant 
to the socialization process; comparison of symbolic 
interactionism, ethnomethodology, phenomenology; 
emphasis on social construction of reality in various 
"social worlds" (deviant, work, family). (Alternate years) 

SOCY 6615. Dilemmas in Organizations. (3) 

Examines organizational theory and research focused on 
organizational behavior, inter-organizational relations, 
relations with external stakeholders and organizational 
culture. Case study analysis, group-problem solving and 



162 College of Arts and Sciences 



the study of concrete organizational dilemmas. (On 
demand) 

SOCY 6616. Stratification and Inequality. (3) 

Examination of theories of stratification and the causes, 
processes and social consequences of economic and 
political inequality; assumptions behind, mechanisms for, 
and consequences of government and private sector 
strategies to address problems associated with inequality. 
(Alternate years) 

SOCY 6617. Data Utilization. (3) Methodological and 
statistical strategies for applied sociological research 
within organizational settings; selecting the best strategies 
consistent with budgetary, manpower and organizational 
constraints; interpreting and communicating research 
results in ways understandable to and useful for 
organizational decision-makers. (Alternate years) 

SOCY 6630. Investigating Health and Health 
Services. (3) Prerequisites: SOCY 4130, or graduate 
standing, or permission of instructor. Useful to those 
seeking research careers, to administrators in health care, 
and to primary care providers. How to conduct and 
evaluate research in health care settings, emphasizing 
both quantitative and qualitative methodologies as well as 
the utilization of secondary data. (Alternate years) 

SOCY 6640. Evaluation Research for Applied 
Sociology. (3) Prerequisites: SOCY 6652 and 
introductory statistics. Evaluation research from an 
applied sociological perspective, including incorporation 
of social theory, substantive social science knowledge, 
and research techniques into the evaluation of a variety of 
programs, interventions, and policies. (On demand) 

SOCY 6651. Social Theory. (3) Analysis of 
contemporary social theories, with emphasis on their 
implications for planned change. (Fall) 

SOCY 6652. Issues in Social Research. (3) 

Examination of epistemology of social research; 
assumptions and methods of specific research strategies; 
ethical and policy issues of applied and academic research. 
(Spring) 

SOCY 6653. Advanced Quantitative Analysis. (3) 

Prerequisites: six hours in Introductory Statistics and/or 
Research Methods. Contemporary techniques of data 
analysis, management and processing applied to specific 
topics; measurement models, data reduction strategies, 
and multivariate procedures. (Fall) 

SOCY 6895. Tutorial in Sociology. (1-4) Prerequisite: 
permission of instructor. Directed reading and/or 
research; development of expertise in substantive area. 
May be repeated for credit. (Fall, Spring, Summer) 

SOCY 6897. Research Practicum. (1-6) Prerequisite: 
SOCY 6651 and 6652. Preparation of research paper 



based upon research completed within a community 
organization or agency. The student will develop a 
consultant-client relationship with the agency or 
organization and conduct a research/evaluation project 
on behalf of the agency or organization (such as a needs 
assessment, program evaluation, social impact assessment 
or policy analysis. (Fall, Spring) 

SOCY 6996. Thesis. (1-6) Prerequisites: completion of 
all other coursework and admission to candidacy by 
Graduate Committee. Applied, academic, or theoretical 
research project, defended before graduate faculty. May 
be repeated for credit up to six hours. (Fall, Spring 
Summer) 

SOCY 7999. Graduate Residence. (1) Continuation of 
individual thesis project (Fall, Spring Summer) 



SPANISH 

Department of Languages and Culture 
Studies 

427 College of Education Building 
704-687-8753 or 704-687-8754; Fax 704-687-3496 
http://www.languages.uncc.edu/index.htm 

Degree 

M.A; Graduate Certificate in Translating and Translation 
Studies 

Coordinator 

Dr. Ann B. Gonzalez 
Graduate Faculty- 
Spanish 

Jose Manuel Batista, Assistant Professor 

Carlos Coria-Sanchez, Assistant Professor 

Colleen Culleton, Assistant Professor 

Michael Scott Doyle, Professor 

Robert M. Gleaves, Associate Professor (Emeritus) 

Conception Godev, Associate Professor 

Ann B. Gonzalez, Associate Professor 

Jasleen Kohli, Assistant Professor 

Maryrica Ortiz Lottman, Assistant Professor 

Martha LaFollette Miller, Professor 

Anton Pujol, Assistant Professor 

Classical Languages 

Dale Grote, Associate Professor 

French 

Michele Bissiere, Associate Professor 
Marie-Therese Noiset, Associate Professor 
Russell Rose, Associate Professor 
Robert Sandarg, Associate Professor 
Katherine Stephenson, Associate Professor 



College of Arts and Sciences 163 



Christine Vance, Associate Professor 

German 

Anabel Aliaga-Buchenau, Assistant Professor 
Paul Youngman, Assistant Professor 
Robert Reimer, Professor 



MASTER OF ARTS IN SPANISH 

The Master of Arts in Spanish is designed to provide a 
rich variety of graduate coursework in a major world 
language that is becoming increasingly important in the 
United States. The program builds on a comprehensive 
undergraduate curriculum and consists of two tracks: 
Language, Literature and Culture (LLC) and Translating 
and Translation Studies (TTS). The MA. in Spanish 
serves individuals who seek a greater understanding of 
Spanish language, literatures and cultures, and who seek 
career and professional advancement opportunities in 
education, translation, applied language (Business 
Spanish), or who contemplate pursuing a Ph.D. in 
Spanish linguistics or literature. 

Admission Requirements 

In addition to the general requirements for admission to 
the Graduate School, the following are required for the 
M.A. in Spanish: 

1) A baccalaureate degree in Spanish or in a related field 
that required upper-division coursework in 
undergraduate Spanish (e.g., Latin American Studies, 
International Studies, International Business), with 
an overall GPA of at least 2.75 (on a 4.0 scale). 

2) An acceptable score on the Aptitude Portion of the 
Graduate Record Examination (GRE). 

3) An essay that addresses the applicant's motivation 
for enrolling in the M.A. in Spanish, to include 
particular areas of research interests and career or 
professional goals. Students seeking enrollment in 
the LLC track should write this essay in Spanish and 
demonstrate a high level of proficiency in Spanish by 
attaching an additional writing sample (a college term 
paper or similar document). Students seeking 
enrollment in the TTS track may write the essay in 
either English or Spanish but must demonstrate high 
levels of literacy and proficiency in both languages by 
providing writing samples in each. 

4) An oral interview with the Graduate Coordinator. 

5) Three letters of reference. For those interested in the 
LLC track, at least two of the letters must be from 
professors. For those interested in the TTS track, at 
least one of the letters must come from a professor, 
and letters not written by a faculty member must be 
from professionals working in the field of Spanish, 
translating and interpreting, or a closely related area 
(Latin American Studies, International Studies, 
International Business, etc.). 



Prerequisite Requirements 

Applicants who do not have advanced-level 
undergraduate coursework in Spanish language and the 
literature and culture of Spain and Latin America will be 
required to take a minimum of two courses in these areas 
as part of their preparation for enrollment in the M.A. 
program. Such coursework may be taken as a post- 
baccalaureate graduate student (PBG), and up to six 
hours of such coursework may be transferred forward to 
the M.A. program upon admission to the program. 

Degree Requirements 

The Master of Arts in Spanish requires 36 graduate credit 
hours: either 36 hours of graduate coursework or 30 
hours of graduate coursework plus a master's thesis (6 
credit hours). For any course to count toward the M.A. in 
Spanish, it must have been taken within six years from the 
date of enrollment in the program. All coursework must 
have a grade of A or B in order to be counted toward the 
M.A. in Spanish. 

Admission to Candidacy Requirements 

Upon successful completion of a minimum of 18 
semester hours of graduate coursework, and in no case 
later than four weeks prior to the beginning of the 
semester in which he/she expects to complete all 
requirements for the degree, a student should file for 
admission to candidacy on a form that is available in the 
Graduate School. This application is a check sheet 
approved by the student's advisor, and program 
administrator listing all coursework to be offered for the 
degree (including transferred credit and courses in 
progress). 

Assistantships 

A limited number of graduate assistantships are available 
each year. Applications must be submitted by May 1 for 
assistantships beginning the following academic year. 
Further information is available in the Department. 

Internships 

The Department offers a limited number of internships 
(SPAN 5410 and TRAN 6480S) which provide program- 
related experience for graduate students who seek to 
develop their Spanish skills in a professional setting. 
Further information is available in the Department. 

Practica 

The Department offers TRAN 648 IS, Translation 
Cooperative Education (1-3 hours of credit) to provide 
on-site work in translating texts or interpreting, 
English<->Spanish. Site, workload and remuneration to be 
determined in consultation with employer and one faculty 
co-op advisor. Provides practical and professional training 
experience under conditions that the University cannot 
duplicate. 



164 College of Arts and Sciences 



Core Courses 

All M.A. candidates, regardless of which track option is 
pursued — Language, Literature and Culture (LLC) or 
Translating and Translation Studies (TTS) — must 
complete four graduate core courses (12 hours) 
distributed as follows: one in Spanish literature, one in 
Spanish American literature, one in Spanish or Spanish 
American civilization and culture, and one in Spanish 
linguistics. 

Track descriptions 

Track I: Language, Literature and Culture (LLC). 

The LLC track formally consists of 24 hours of graduate 
credits in addition to the 1 2 core hours — either 24 hours 
of graduate coursework or 18 hours of graduate 
coursework plus a master's thesis (6 credit hours) — in 
Spanish and Spanish American literature, Spanish and 
Spanish American civilization and culture (including film 
studies), Spanish linguistics, methodology, applied 
language (Spanish for business and international trade), 
special topics in Spanish, and may include up to 3 hours 
of professional internship in Spanish. The LLC track 
allows for an in-depth development of Spanish language 
skills and is especially recommended for teachers of 
Spanish. It also provides excellent preparation for 
individuals who may wish to pursue the Ph.D. in Spanish, 
for whom courses in literature are especially 
recommended. 

Track II: Translating and Translation Studies (TTS). 

The TTS track formally consists of 24 hours of graduate 
credits in addition to the 1 2 core hours — either 24 hours 
of graduate coursework or 18 hours of graduate 
coursework plus a master's thesis (6 credit hours) — in the 
history and theory of translation, and the analysis and 
translation of different types of texts and discourse: 
business, technical, medical, legal, scholarly, and literary. 
It may also include special topics courses in 
Spanish<->English translation, up to 3 hours of 
professional internship in translating, and a translation 
thesis (equivalent to 6 hours). Coursework in applied 
language areas such as Business Spanish is especially 
appropriate for the TTS track. This specialized track 
serves individuals interested in a career in professional 
translation or in enhancing their career or work 
opportunities as language and culture specialists. 

Electives 

With the approval of the department, a student may take 
3 hours of elective credit in related areas as part of the 30- 
36 hours. The student must submit a written request to 
the Graduate Coordinator explaining how these hours of 
elective credit will enrich his/her program. 

Advising 

Graduate students will be advised by the Graduate 
Coordinator and by designated graduate faculty members 
in good standing. 



Transfer Credit 

Up to six hours of appropriate graduate credit may be 
accepted for transfer from another accredited institution. 
Additional non-residence credit for graduate study abroad 
may be possible via departmental pre-approval. 

Licensure 

Students seeking licensure in Spanish should obtain 
information on requirements from the Teacher Education 
Advising and Licensure Office (TEAL) in the College of 
Education. 

Comprehensive Examination 

Students must satisfactorily complete a combined written 
and oral examination based partly on a core Reading List 
and partly on the coursework completed. The Reading 
List is available in the Department office and is published 
in the Department Web Page (Spanish). The oral and 
written examination may not be attempted before the last 
semester of coursework, exclusive of thesis credits. 
Students must be enrolled during the semester in which 
they take the comprehensive examination. 

Thesis 

The M.A. thesis is optional for both tracks: Language, 
Literature and Culture (LLC) and Translating and 
Translation Studies (TTS). 

Application for Degree 

Follows University policy. 

Tuition Waivers 

One or more in-state as well as out-of-state tuition 
waivers may be available for new graduate assistants 
and/or outstanding applicants. 



GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN 
TRANSLATING AND 
TRANSLATION STUDIES 

(GCTTS: English to Spanish and Spanish to 
English) 

The Department of Languages and Culture Studies at 
UNC Charlotte offers a Graduate Certificate in 
Translating and Translation Studies (TTS) designed for 
post-baccalaureate, graduate, and post-graduate students. 
Students can complete the required 1 8 graduate credit 
hours in three semesters, and may begin the program in 
either the fall or spring semester, or during the summer. 
Students enrolled in the Language, Literature and Culture 
track (LLC) of the M.A. in Spanish program can receive 
the Graduate Certificate in TTS by completing the 12 
hours of Certificate Requirements indicated below. 
Students interested in adding on the Graduate Certificate 
in TTS to the M.A. in LLC must apply separately for the 
Certificate. One application does not cover both 
programs. Students in the Certificate Program will study 



College of Arts and Sciences 165 



the history, theory, and profession of translation; work 
intensively in the analysis and translation of different 
types of discourse, including non-literary and literary 
texts; become familiar with computer-assisted translation; 
and develop advanced post-editing skills. Graduate level 
coursework may also include special topics courses in 
translation and up to 3 hours of professional internship 
credit in translating. Translating is done from both 
Spanish to English and English to Spanish. 

Admission Requirements 

Students must apply for admission to the Graduate 
School and must have a minimum undergraduate GPA of 
2.75. Applicants will generally have a baccalaureate degree 
in Spanish or in a closely related area that requires 
sufficient upper-division coursework in Spanish (e.g., 
Latin American Studies, International Studies, 
International Business), or an undergraduate degree, 
certificate or minor in translation (English to Spanish, 
Spanish to English). They will be required to submit: 

1) A current GRE or MAT score (international students 
have an additional requirement of submitting official 
scores on the Test of English as a Foreign Language 
[TOFEL]). 

2) A well-developed essay in English that addresses the 
applicant's motivation for enrolling in the Graduate 
Certificate. 

3) Three letters of reference (from professors, 
specialists in translation, and/ or employers). 

4) An oral interview with the Graduate Coordinator. 

5) A portfolio of best writing samples in both English 
and Spanish or of translations into each language 
(with original text to accompany each translation 
submitted). 

Certificate Requirements (12 hours) 

TRAN6001S History and Theory of Translation 
TRAN6472S Advanced Non-Literary Translating I 

(Business, Legal, Governmental) 
TRAN6474S Advanced Non-Literary Translating II 

(Medical and Technical) 
TRAN6476S Advanced Literary and Cultural 

Translating 

Electives (6 hours) 

SPAN6001 Advanced Studies in Spanish Language 
(especially recommended) 

TRAN6003S Translating and the Computer 

TRAN6480S Translation Internship 

TRAN6900S Special Topics in English<->Spanish 
Translation Studies 

TRAN6901S Advanced Project in English<->Spanish 
Translating 

Other Courses 

As appropriate and approved by the Department. 
Graduate courses in Hispanic literature, civilization and 
culture, and linguistics are especially recommended 
because of the insight they provide into the Spanish 



language and Hispanic cultures (see courses offered in the 
LLC track of the Spanish M.A.). 

Generally, only graduate courses taken at UNC Charlotte 
will count toward the Graduate Certificate. However, up 
to a maximum of 6 hours of coursework may be 
transferred into the Certificate program if the courses are 
approved by the Department of Languages and Culture 
Studies. Twelve of the 18 credit hours for the Graduate 
Certificate must be taken in residency. 



Courses In Spanish 

SPAN 5050. Selected Topics in Spanish. (1 2 3) 

Prerequisites: Post-baccalaureate status, BA. in Spanish, 
or permission of the Department. Consideration of a 
predetermined topic. May be repeated for credit as topics 
vary. (On demand) 

SPAN 5120. Advanced Business Spanish I. (3) 

Prerequisites: Post-baccalaureate status, BA. in Spanish, 
or permission of the Department. Advanced studies in 
Business Spanish, intensive practice in speaking, listening 
comprehension, reading, writing, and translation in 
functional business areas such as economics, 
management, and marketing. (Fall) 

SPAN 5121. Advanced Business Spanish II. (3) 

Prerequisites: Post-baccalaureate status, BA. in Spanish, 
or permission of the Department. Advanced studies in 
Business Spanish, intensive practice in speaking, listening 
comprehension, reading, writing, and translation in 
functional business areas such as marketing, finance, and 
import-export. (Spring) 

SPAN 5201. Nineteenth Century Spanish Literature. 

(3) Prerequisites: Post-baccalaureate status, BA. in 
Spanish, or permission of the Department. Survey of 
Peninsular literature from Costumbrismo through the 
Generation of 1 898. Lectures, discussions, and reports. 
(On demand) 

SPAN 5202. Twentieth Century Spanish Literature. 

(3) Prerequisites: Post-baccalaureate status, BA. in 
Spanish, or permission of the Department. Treatment of 
major literary developments from the Generation of 1898 
to present day. Lectures, discussions, and reports. (On 
demand) 

SPAN 5205. Novel of the Golden Age. (3) 

Prerequisites: Post-baccalaureate status, BA. in Spanish, 
or permission of the Department. El Lazarillo through El 
Criticon. Lectures, discussions, and reports. (On demand) 

SPAN 5206. Theater of the Golden Age. (3) 

Prerequisites: Post-baccalaureate status, B.A. in Spanish, 
or permission of the Department. Study of works of the 
leading dramatists of the period. Lectures, discussions, 
and reports. (On demand) 



166 College of Arts and Sciences 



SPAN 5210. Studies in Spanish American Poetry. (3) 

Prerequisites: Post-baccalaureate status, B.A. in Spanish, 
or permission of the Department. Studies of 19th and 
20th century Spanish American poetry. (On demand) 

SPAN 5211. Studies in Spanish American Prose 
Fiction. (3) Prerequisites: Post-baccalaureate status, B.A. 
in Spanish, or permission of the Department. Studies of 
19th and 20th century Spanish American prose fiction. 
(On demand) 

SPAN 5212. Studies in Spanish American Theater. 

(3) Prerequisites: Post-baccalaureate status, B.A. in 
Spanish, or permission of the Department. Studies of 
20th century Spanish American theater. (On demand) 

SPAN 5213. Don Quijote. (3) Prerequisites: Post- 
baccalaureate status, B.A. in Spanish, or permission of the 
Department. Study of Cervantes' masterpiece. (On demand) 

SPAN 5410. Professional Internship in Spanish. (1-6) 

Prerequisites: Post-baccalaureate status, B.A. in Spanish, 
and consent of the Department. Faculty-supervised field 
and/or research experience in a cooperating profession 
(e.g. business) or community organization. Contents of 
internship based upon a contractual agreement among the 
student, department, and business or community 
organization. Offered on a Pass/No Credit basis. (Fall, 
Spring, Summer) 

SPAN 5800. Directed Individual Study. (1-3) 

Prerequisite: Post-baccalaureate status, B.A. in Spanish or 
permission of the Department. Individual work on a 
selected area of study. To be arranged with the instructor, 
generally during the preceding semester. By special 
permission only. May be repeated for credit. (On demand) 

SPAN 6001. Advanced Studies in Spanish Language. 

(3) Selected topics in Spanish linguistics. Topics may 
include a) history of the Spanish language; b) introduction 
to Spanish phonology and morphology; and c) Spanish 
dialectology. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. 
(On demand) 

SPAN 6003. Studies in Hispanic Culture and 
Civilization. (3) Selected topics on the civilization and 
culture of the Spanish-speaking world. Possible emphases 
include 1) the press in Spanish America; 2) song texts of 
the Hispanic world; 3) Spanish cinema; 4) Spain since 
Franco; 5) Hispanics in the United States. May be 
repeated for credit as topics vary. (On demand) 

SPAN 6005. Advanced Studies in Spanish Literature. 

(3) Study of selected works and writers from Spain. May 
be repeated for credit as topics vary. (On demand) 

SPAN 6007. Advanced Studies in Spanish American 
Literature. (3) Study of selected works, writers, literary 



genres, periods, and schools from Spanish America. May 
be repeated for credit as topics vary. (On demand) 

SPAN 6201. Hispanic Language and Culture through 
Media. (3) In-depth study of contemporary Hispanic 
culture and language through media sources, including 
print, radio, film, Internet, and television. The course 
provides cultural exposure, and practice in written and 
oral communication, and training in the use of 
technology—assisted instruction. (On demand) 

SPAN 6901. Advanced Project. (3) Appropriate 
research and written exposition of that research. The 
proposed project, as well as the final product, will be 
approved by a committee of three faculty members 
appropriate to the topic, appointed by the Chair of the 
department after consultation with the student and the 
Graduate Coordinator, on the basis of a written proposal 
from the student. (On demand) 

SPAN 6902. Thesis. (6) Appropriate research and 
written exposition of that research. The proposed project, 
as well as the final product, will be approved by a 
committee of three faculty members appropriate to the 
topic, appointed by the Chair of the Department after 
consultation with the student, on the basis of a written 
proposal from the student. (A statement of 
recommendations and requirements for form and 
procedure is available in the office of the Department of 
Languages and Culture Studies.) (On demand) 



Courses In Translating And 
Translation Studies 

TRAN 6001S. History and Theory of Translation. (3) 

Theories of translation from Horace and Cicero to the 
present. Provides a historical, theoretical, and sociological 
framework for the translation enterprise. Emphases may 
differ from year to year. (On demand) 

TRAN 6003S. Computer-Assisted Translating. (3) 

Focus on discourse and textual typologies (representative 
kinds of writing and kinds of documents and texts) that 
the practicing translator may encounter. Development of 
reading, recognition, and reproduction skills. Strategies 
for lexical development and terminology management. 
(On demand) 

TRAN 6472S. Workshop on Non-Literary Topics I 
(Business, Legal, Governmental). (3) Theory-based 
workshop practicum dealing with the English<->Spanish 
translation of authentic business, legal, and/or 
governmental documents. Emphasis may center on any 
one of these types of discourse or any combination 
thereof. (On demand) 

TRAN 6474S. Workshop on Non-Literary Topics II 
(Medical and Technical). (3) Theory-based workshop 
practicum dealing with the English<->Spanish translation 



College of Arts and Sciences 167 



of authentic medical, technical, and/or scientific 
documents. Emphasis may center on any one of these 
types of discourse or any combination thereof. (On 
demand) 

TRAN 6476S. Workshop on Literary and Cultural 
Topics. (3) Theory-based workshop practicum dealing 
with the English*->Spanish translation of literary and/or 
cultural texts. Emphasis may center on one or both of 
these types of discourse. (On demand) 

TRAN 6480S. Translation Internship. (1-3) On-site 
work in translating texts or interpreting, 
English<->Spanish. Site and workload to be determined in 
consultation with employer and one faculty internship 
advisor. Provides practical and professional training 
experience under conditions that the University cannot 
duplicate. (On demand) 

TRAN 6481S. Translation Cooperative Education. (1- 

3) On-site work in translating texts or interpreting, 
English<-»Spanish. Site, workload and remuneration to be 
determined in consultation with employer and one faculty 
co-op advisor. Provides practical and professional training 
experience under conditions that the University cannot 
duplicate. (On demand) 

TRAN 6900S. Special Topics in English<->Spanish 
Translation Studies. (3) Selected topics in 
English<->Spanish Translating and Translation Studies, 
e.g., continued study of theories of translation, translation 
of a literary genre such as prose fiction, drama or poetry, 
translation of historical, political or social documents, or 
interpretation. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. 
(On demand) 

TRAN 6901S. Advanced Project in English<-> Spanish 
Translating. (3) Selected topics in English<->Spanish 
Translating and Translation Studies, e.g., continued study 
of theories of translation, translation of a literary genre 
such as prose fiction, drama or poetry, translation of 
historical, political or social documents, or interpretation. 
May be repeated for credit as topics vary. (On demand) 

TRAN 6902S. Thesis. (6) Appropriate research and 
written exposition of that research, or substantial 
English<->Spanish translation project with critical 
introduction and commentary. The proposed thesis work, 
as well as the final product, will be approved by a 
committee of three faculty appropriate to the topic, 
appointed by the Chair of the Department after 
consultation with the student and the Graduate 
Coordinator, on the basis of a written proposal from the 
student. (A statement of recommendations and 
requirements for form and procedure is available in the 
office of the Department of Languages and Culture 
Studies.) (On demand) 



GENERAL GRADUATE 
COURSES IN ARTS AND 
SCIENCES 

Anthropology 

ANTH 5090. Topics in Anthropology. (3) Prerequisite: 
consent of the instructor. Intensive treatment of a topic 
in anthropology or survey of related topics. Examples: 
Religion, Art, and Archaeology; Islam and Globalism. 
May be repeated for credit as topics vary. (On demand) 

ANTH 5120. Intercultural Communications. (3) 

Prerequisite: ANTH 1101 or consent of instructor. 
Learning to cope with cultural differences; contrasting 
value systems; cross-cultural and communication styles; 
nonverbal communication; cultural relativity; culture and 
business; ethnocentricism; cultural shock. (Yearlj) 

ANTH 6132. Culture, Health and Aging. (3) 

Exploration of the interaction between culture and the 
aging experience, with a particular emphasis on issues of 
health and the health care system. (On demand) 



Foreign Language, French, And 
German 

Foreign Languag e 

FORL 5050. Topics in Foreign Language. (3) 

Prerequisite: Post-baccalaureate status, B.A. in French, 
German or Spanish, or permission of the Department. 
Studies in a selected field of interest. May be repeated for 
credit with change of topic. (On demand) 

FORL 5200. Secondary Methods—Foreign 
Languages. (3) Prerequisite: Post-baccalaureate status, 
B.A. in French, German or Spanish, or permission of the 
Department. Current trends and practices in teaching 
foreign and second languages in the middle school and 
high school, with emphasis on practical applications. 
Addresses state mandated competencies. Required for 
licensure in the teaching of foreign language and 
recommended for licensure in teaching English as a 
Second Language. (On demand) 

FORL 5201. Foreign Languages in the Elementary 
School Methods. (3) Prerequisite: Post-baccalaureate 
status, B.A. in French, German or Spanish, or permission 
of the Department. Current trends and practices in 
teaching foreign and second languages in the elementary 
school, with emphasis on practical applications. 
Addresses state mandated competencies. Required for 
licensure in the teaching of a foreign language and 
recommended for licensure in teaching English as a 
Second Language. (On demand) 



168 College of Arts and Sciences 



FORL 5800. Directed Individual Study. (1-3) 

Prerequisite: Post-baccalaureate status, B.A. in French, 
German or Spanish, or permission of the Department. 
Individual work on a selected area of study. To be 
arranged with the instructor, generally during the 
preceding semester, and by special permission only. May 
be repeated for credit. (On demand) 

French 

FREN 5003. Studies in French Literature. (3) 

Prerequisite: Post-baccalaureate status, B.A. in French, or 
permission of the Department. Course may be repeated 
with change of topic. (On demand) 

FREN 5005. Studies in the French Language. (3) 

Prerequisites: Post-baccalaureate status, B.A. in French, 
or permission of the Department. Course may be 
repeated with change of topic. (On demand) 

FREN 5007. Studies in French Culture and 
Civilization. (3) Prerequisites: Post-baccalaureate status, 
B.A. in French, or permission of the Department. Course 
may be repeated with change of topic. (On demand) 

FREN 5050. Topics in French. (1-3) Prerequisites: 
Post-baccalaureate status, B.A. in French, English 1102 or 
equivalent if taught in English. May be taught in French 
or English. Will not count toward the major if taught in 
English. Course may be repeated with change of topic. 
(On demand) 

FREN 5120. Advanced Business French I. (3) 

Prerequisites: Post-baccalaureate status, B.A. in French, 
or permission of the Department. Advanced studies in 
Business French, with intensive practice in speaking, 
listening comprehension, reading, writing, and translation 
in functional business areas such as economics, 
management, and marketing. (On demand) 

FREN 5121. Advanced Business French II. (3) 

Prerequisites: Post-baccalaureate status, B.A. in French, 
or permission of the Department. Advanced studies in 
Business French, with intensive practice in speaking, 
listening comprehension, reading, writing, and translation 
in functional business areas such as marketing, finance, 
and import-export. (On demand) 

FREN 5201. Survey of French Literature I. (3) 

Prerequisite: Post-baccalaureate status, B.A. in French, or 
permission of the Department. The major literary 
movements from the Middle Ages to the Enlightenment, 
with sample texts. Emphasis on continuity and change. 
(On demand) 

FREN 5202. Survey of French Literature II. (3) 

Prerequisite: Post-baccalaureate status, B.A. in French, or 
permission of the Department. The major literary 
movements from the Enlightenment to the contemporary 
period, with sample texts. Emphasis on continuity and 
change. (On demand) 



FREN 5410. Professional Internship in French. (1-6) 

Prerequisites: Post-baccalaureate status, B.A. in French, 
or permission of the Department. Faculty- supervised field 
and/or research experience in a cooperating profession 
(e.g., business) or community organization. Contents of 
internship based upon a contractual agreement among the 
student, department, and business or community 
organization. Offered on a Pass/No Credit basis. (Fall, 
Spring, Summer) 

FREN 5800. Directed Individual Study. (1 3) 

Prerequisite: Post-baccalaureate status, B.A. in French, or 
permission of the Department. Individual work on a 
selected area of study. To be arranged with the instructor, 
generally during the preceding semester, and by special 
permission only. May be repeated for credit. (On demand) 

German 

GERM 5010. Periods in the History of German 
Literature. (3) (a) Medieval literature, (b) Classicism, (c) 
Romanticism, (d) Nineteenth Century, (e) Contemporary 
literature. Prerequisites: Post-baccalaureate status, B.A. in 
German, or permission of the Department. Study of the 
major writers and works in a given period. Readings, 
lectures, and reports. May be repeated for major credit 
with change of topic. (On demand) 

GERM 5020. The Chief Genres in German 
Literature. (3) (a) Novel, (b) Theater, (c) Lyric poetry, 
(d) short prose fiction. Prerequisites: Post-baccalaureate 
status, B.A. in German, or permission of the Department. 
An analysis of a major genre and its development within 
German literary history. Readings, lectures and reports. 
May be repeated for major credit with change of topic. 
(On demand) 

GERM 5050. Special Topics in German. (1-3) 

Prerequisite: Post-baccalaureate status, B.A. in German, 
or permission of the Department. Treatment of a special 
group or figure in German literature, specialized topic in 
German culture or language, or special problems in 
German conversation. May be repeated for credit with 
change of topic. (On demand) 

GERM 5120. Advanced Business German I. (3) 

Prerequisites: Post-baccalaureate status, B.A. in German, 
or permission of the Department. Advanced studies in 
Business German, intensive practice in speaking, listening 
comprehension, reading, writing, and translation in 
functional business areas such as economics, 
management, and marketing. (On demand) 

GERM 5121. Advanced Business German II. (3) 

Prerequisite: Post-baccalaureate status, B.A. in German, 
or permission of the Department. Advanced studies in 
Business German, intensive practice in speaking, listening 
comprehension, reading, writing, and translation in 
functional business areas such as marketing, finance, and 
import-export. (On demand) 



College of Arts and Sciences 169 



GERM 5203. Survey of German Literature I. (3) 

Prerequisites: Post-baccalaureate status, B.A. in German, 
or permission of the Department. General introduction 
to German literature from the Middle Ages to the 
Classical Period. Book reports and class discussion on 
collateral readings. (On demand) 

GERM 5204. Survey of German Literature II. (3) 

Prerequisite: Post-baccalaureate status, B.A. in German, 
or permission of the Department. German literature since 
Classicism. Book reports and discussions on collateral 
readings. (On demand) 

GERM 5410. Professional Internship in German. (1- 

6) Prerequisites: Post-baccalaureate status, B.A. in 
German, or permission of the Department. Faculty- 
supervised field and/or research experience in a 
cooperating profession (e.g., business) or community 
organization. Contents of internship based upon a 
contractual agreement among the student, department, 
and business or community organization. (Fall, Spring? 
Summer) 

GERM 5800. Directed Individual Study. (1-3) 

Prerequisite: Post-baccalaureate status, B.A. in German, 
or permission of the Department. Individual work on a 
selected area study. To be arranged with the instructor, 
generally during the preceding semester, and by special 
permission only. May be repeated for credit. (On demand) 

Political Science 

POLS 6000. Topics for Graduate Study in Political 
Science. (1-4) Intensive study of a topic in Political 
Science. The topic of investigation may vary from 
semester to semester. May be repeated for credit. (On 
demand) 

POLS 6800. Independent Study. (1-3) Prerequisite: 
consent of the instructor. Supervised investigation of a 
political problem that is (1) of special interest to the 
student; (2) within the area of the instructor's special 
competence; and (3) normally an extension of previous 
coursework with the instructor. A student may take more 
than one course under this number but not more than 
three hours a semester. (Fall, Spring, Summer) 

Women's Studies 



WMST 6800. Directed Reading/Research. (3) 

Prerequisites: prior written permission of instructor and 
Women's Studies Director. Independent investigation of 
a problem or a topic in Women's Studies, culminating in a 
research paper or a final report. Student must provide a 
written plan of work before registering for the course. 
May be repeated for credit. (On demand) 



WMST 5050. Topics in Women's Studies. (1-3) 

Prerequisites and credit hours vary with topics. Special 
topics in Women's Studies. May be repeated for credit as 
topics vary. (On demand) 

WMST 6050. Topics in Women's Studies. (1-3) 

Prerequisites and credit hours vary with topics. Special 
topics in Women's Studies. May be repeated for credit as 
topics vary. (On demand) 



170 College of Business Administration 



Belk College of Business Administration 



The Belk College of Business Administration is accredited 
by AACSB International, the premier accrediting agency 
for academic programs in business administration and 
accounting. Our challenging masters programs in 
Accountancy, Business Administration, Economics and 
Mathematical Finance provide graduates with the tools 
they need to succeed in business. Courses are taught by 
full-time faculty with Ph.D.s from top schools whose 
research is published in top-level journals and whose 
expertise is highly sought after by industry executives. 
Students have the opportunity to network with 
professionals from a variety of fields, and interact with 
alumni and leaders from Charlotte's dynamic business 
community. These programs provide flexible schedules 
with courses offered both at UNC Charlotte's main 
campus and at our uptown campus in the heart of 
Charlotte's center city, so that working professionals may 
earn their graduate degree without interrupting their 
careers. 

Graduate Degree Programs 

Master of Accountancy 

Master of Business Administration 

Master of Science in Economics 

Master of Science in Mathematical Finance (The 

Department of Finance and the Department of Economics in 

the Belk College of Business Administration are participating 

departments in the Inter-College Master of Science in 

Mathematical Finance program. See the Inter-College 

Graduate Programs section of this Catalog for complete 

information and program requirements.) 

Graduate Non-Degree Programs 

MBA PLUS Post-Masters Certificate 



ACCOUNTING 

Department of Accounting 

259 Friday Building 

704-687-2445 

http://www.uncc.edu/macc 

Degree 

Master of Accountancy (MACC) 

Coordinator 

Dr. Jack Cathey 

Graduate Faculty 

Sak Bhamornsiri, Associate Professor 
Alan Blankley, Associate Professor 
Cindy Blanthorne, Assistant Professor 



Hughlene Burton, Assistant Professor 

Jack Cathey, Associate Professor 

Nabil Elias, Associate Professor 

Howard Godfrey, Professor 

John Griffing, Adjunct Faculty 

Bob Guinn, Associate Professor 

David Kerr, Associate Professor 

Michele Matherly, Assistant Professor 

Richard Schroeder, Professor 

Suzanne Sevin, Assistant Professor 

Casper Wiggins, Big Five Distinguished Professor 



MASTER OF ACCOUNTANCY 

The Master of Accountancy program is a multiple track 
program designed to prepare accountants for the rapidly 
changing expectations of the profession. The program 
has three tracks: Professional Accounting, Financial 
Accounting/ Auditing and Tax. The program also 
includes the option for development of an individualized 
program of study. Completion of the Professional 
Accounting track or the Financial Accounting/ Auditing 
track will enable students to pursue licensure in states 
requiring 150 semester hours. 

Additional Admission Requirements 

In addition to the general requirements for admission to 
the Graduate School, an acceptable score on the verbal 
and quantitative portions of the Graduate Management 
Admission Test is required for graduate study in 
Accounting. 

Degree Requirements 

The program leading to the Master of Accountancy 
degree consists of 30 semester hours (10 graduate classes) 
of course work. The 30 hours are divided into two 
components: accounting classes and elective classes. See 
the track descriptions below for more information on 
required and elective classes. 

A maximum of six hours of transfer credit can be 
accepted from another accredited business school upon 
approval by the program coordinator and the Dean of the 
Graduate School. A 3.0 GPA is required in all courses 
taken for graduate credit and a maximum of three C's is 
permitted for continuation in the program. The residence 
requirement is satisfied by completion of at least three- 
fourths of the required courses while in residence. 
Neither a comprehensive examination nor a thesis is 
required. 

Admission to Candidacy Requirements 

An Admission to Candidacy form listing graduate-level 
course that apply to the degree must be submitted to the 



College of Business Administration 171 



Graduate Coordinator one month prior to the semester in 
which the student plans to complete the course work for 
the degree. 

Assistantships 

Assistantships are available on a competitive basis. 

Accounting Program Tracks 

Professional Accounting Track 

The Professional Accounting Track is designed for 
students who have an interest in preparing for careers in 
public accounting, consulting, and corporate accounting. 
The track is designed for students who do not have an 
undergraduate degree in accounting. It is also designed 
for students who have an undergraduate degree in 
accounting from outside of the United States. The 
program is offered in both full-time and part-time 
formats with classes offered both during the daytime and 
in the evenings. 

Prerequisite classes: Intermediate Financial Accounting I 
and II (ACCT 3311 and 3312) or equivalent. 

The required classes for this track are: 
ACCT5220 Income Tax 
ACCT5230 Advanced Income Tax 
ACCT6210 Advanced Accounting Information 

Systems 
ACCT6260 Advanced Financial Accounting I 
ACCT6270 Advanced Financial Accounting II 
ACCT6220 Financial Statement Auditing 
ACCT6230 Advanced Managerial Accounting 

In addition to the required classes a student is expected to 
complete three elective classes. 

Financial Accounting/ Auditing Track 

The Financial Accounting/ Auditing track is designed for 
students wishing to pursue careers in public accounting, 
consulting, and corporate accounting. The track is 
designed for students who have an undergraduate degree 
or equivalent in accounting from a U.S. university. The 
program is offered in both full-time and part-time 
formats with classes offered both during the daytime and 
in the evenings. 

The required classes for this track are: 

ACCT6260 Advanced Financial Accounting I 
ACCT6270 Advanced Financial Accounting II 
ACCT6210 Advanced Accounting Information 

Systems 
ACCT6220 Financial Statement Auditing 
ACCT6230 Advanced Managerial Accounting 
ACCT5230 Advanced Income Tax 

In addition to the required classes a student is expected to 
complete four elective classes. 



Tax Track 

The Tax track is designed for students who wish to 
specialize in taxation. Student can enroll in the Tax track 
with or without an undergraduate degree in Accounting. 
The program is offered in both full-time and part-time 
formats with tax classes offered in only the evenings. 

Prerequisite classes: An Introduction to Financial 
Accounting (ACCT 2121 or equivalent) and Federal 
Taxation (ACCT 4220/5220 or equivalent). 

The required classes for this track are: 
ACCT5230 Advanced Income Tax 
ACCT6110 Tax Research and Planning 
ACCT6120 Taxation of Corporations and 

Shareholders 
ACCT6130 Taxation of Pass-Through Entities 

In addition to the required classes a student is expected to 
complete six elective classes including at least two 
electives in taxation or accounting. Electives are available 
for students who wish to specialize in tax and also 
prepare for the CPA exam. 

Individualized Track 

The Individualized Track is designed for students with 
unique career and professional goals that are not met by 
the other tracks. Consultation with the Graduate 
Coordinator is required for this track. 

Advising 

Prior to, or concurrent with, the start of the first semester 
of study each student will be expected to complete a 
program of study listing each class the student expects to 
take as a part of the program. 

Application for Degree 

An Application for Degree form must be completed and 
submitted with the graduation fee to the Registrar's 
Office by the published deadline. 

Program Certifications /Accreditation 

The Belk College of Business and the Department of 
Accounting are accredited by The Association to 
Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB 
International). 



Courses In Accounting 

ACCT 5220. Income Tax. (3) An introduction to the 
Federal income tax system with emphasis on concepts 
and procedures applicable to all types of entities. (Fall) 

ACCT 5230. Advanced Income Tax. (3) An 

examination of advanced tax topics regarding 
corporations, partnerships, and individuals. In addition, 
estate and gift, fiduciary accounting, tax-exempt entities 



172 College of Business Administration 



and retirement plans will be examined at an introductory 
level. (Fall, Spring) 

ACCT 6110. Tax Research and Planning. (3) Tax 

research techniques applicable to federal tax law affecting 
individuals, corporations and partnerships, including use 
of traditional and computerized tax services to solve tax 
problems. Emphasis on tax planning principles and 
related tax practice matters, including handling tax 
compliance issues and dealing with the Internal Revenue 
Service. (Fall) 

ACCT 6120. Taxation of Corporations and 
Shareholders. (3) This course examines the federal and 
state tax law applicable to corporations and their 
shareholders. The course covers tax compliance matters, 
strategies for minimizing tax liabilities and strategies for 
handling tax controversies. (Spring) 

ACCT 6130. Taxation of Pass-Through Entities. (3) 

Tax law applicable to partnerships, Limited Liability 
Companies and S corporations, including tax compliance 
matters strategies for minimizing tax liabilities and 
strategies for handling tax controversies. (Fall) 

ACCT 6140. Taxation of Estates, Gifts, and Trusts. 

(3) Wealth transfer taxes and taxation of estates and 
trusts, including integration of these taxes and tax 
planning opportunities for minimizing tax liabilities. 
{Summer) 

ACCT 6150. Tax Strategy and Policy. (3) Tax 

strategies in all phases of business operations, including 
creation of the business, choice of the type of business 
entity, financing, operations, distributions to owners, 
expansion, reorganization and liquidation with emphasis 
on minimizing taxes and avoid tax traps. Analysis of 
business planning cases and completion of a 
comprehensive project with the results presented in both 
an oral and written report. (On demand) 

ACCT 6160. Advanced Individual Taxation. (3) This 
course focuses on topics related to the taxation of 
individuals to enable the student to better advise 
taxpayers on theses matters, identify problem areas and 
assist in tax planning matters to minimize the amount of 
tax due. Topics include: passive loss limitation rules, 
interest categorization and limitations, individual 
alternative minimum tax, individual net operating loss 
rules and rules concerning divorced taxpayers. (On 
demand) 

ACCT 6199. Topics in Taxation. (1-4) This course 
covers topics in the area of taxation that go beyond the 
coverage in other existing courses by either addressing 
new tax issues or by delving more deeply into a tax topic. 
(On demand) 

ACCT 6210. Advanced Accounting Information 
Systems. (3) Documentation and evaluation of current 



accounting information systems, evaluation of potential 
new systems, to extract data from existing systems from 
analysis, and examination of emerging technologies which 
have potential uses in accounting information systems. 
(Fall) 

ACCT 6220. Financial Statement Auditing. (3) 

Analysis of the accounting control systems and the 
independent auditor's examination of the system and 
other evidence as a basis for expressing an opinion on 
financial statements. (Spring) 

ACCT 6230. Advanced Managerial Accounting. (3) 

Management's use of and need for accounting 
information, which is necessary for effective managerial 
decision-making. Emphasis is on understanding 
managerial accounting information, specifically its 
purpose, its effect on managerial behavior, and its use in 
formulating and implementing strategy. Topics include 
relevant information for activity and process decisions, 
and issues involved with management control system's 
design and operation. (Fall) 

ACCT 6260. Advanced Financial Accounting I. (3) 

Advanced concepts and practices in financial reporting 
with special emphasis on the use of accounting 
information in capital markets and accounting theory and 
research. In addition, the course will examine current 
topics and emerging issues in financial reporting. (Fall) 

ACCT 6270. Advanced Financial Accounting II. (3) 

Advanced concepts and practices in financial reporting 
with special emphasis on business combinations, 
consolidated financial statements and financial reporting 
issues and practices for governmental and other not-for- 
profit entities. In addition, the course will examine 
current topics and emerging issues in financial reporting. 
(Spring) 

ACCT 6290. Accounting Practice. (3) Pre/Co- 
requisites: ACCT 5230 and ACCT 6260. This course 
examines business transactions from an integrated 
perspective. The financial, managerial, systems, 
assurance, and tax dimensions of common business 
transactions including, for example, inventory, fixed asset 
leasing and purchase, executive compensation, debt and 
equity issuance are considered. In addition new and 
emerging issues facing the accounting profession are 
examined. (Spring) 

ACCT 6299. Topics in Financial Accounting and 
Auditing. (1-4) This course covers topics in the area of 
financial accounting and auditing that go beyond the 
coverage in other existing courses by either addressing 
new issues or by delving more deeply into a topic. (On 
demand) 



College of Business Administration 173 



BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION 

Director 

Dr. Casper Wiggins 

Associate Dean of Graduate Programs 

209 Friday Building 

704-687-2569 

704-687-2809 (fax) 

www.mba.uncc.edu 

Degrees 

MBA; MBA PLUS Post-Masters Certificate 

Graduate Faculty 
Accounting 

Sak Bhamomsiri, Associate Professor of Accounting 
Alan Blankley, Associate Professor of Accounting 
Cynthia Blanthorne, Assistant Professor of Accounting 
Hughlene A. Burton, Chair and Associate Professor of 

Accounting 
Jack M. Cathey, Associate Professor of Accounting 
Nabil Elias, Associate Professor of Accounting 
L. Howard Godfrey, Professor of Accounting 
Robert E. Guinn, Associate Professor of Accounting 
Michele Matherly, Assistant Professor of Accounting 
Richard G. Schroeder, Professor of Accounting 
Suzanne K. Sevin, Assistant Professor of Accounting 

Business Information Systems and Operations 
Management 

Frank C. Barnes, Professor of Operations Management 
W. Douglas Cooper, Professor of Operations 

Management 
Abdullah Dasci, Assistant Professor of Operations 

Management 
Moutaz J. Khouja, Chair and Professor of Operations 

Management 
Ram L. Kumar, Associate Professor of Management 

Information Systems 
Gordon H. Otto, Visiting Professor of Operations 

Management 
Baba C. Prasad, Assistant Professor of Management 

Information Systems 
Stephanie S. Robbins, Associate Professor of 

Management Information Systems 
Cem Saydam, Professor of Operations Management 
Michael A. Smith, Assistant Professor of Management 

Information Systems 
-Anthony C. Stylianou, Associate Professor of 

Management Information Systems 
Chandrasekar Subramaniam, Assistant Professor of 

Management Information Systems 
Susan J. Winter, Assistant Professor of Management 

Information Systems 

Economics 

Louis "Ted" Amato, Professor of Economics 



John E. Connaughton, Professor of Economics 

William Y. Davis, Jr., Professor of Economics 

John M. Gandar, Chair and Professor of Economics 

Phillip Jeon, Adjunct Lecturer 

Hwan C. Lin, Associate Professor of Economics 

Gaines H. Liner, Associate Professor of Economics 

Ronald A. Madsen, Professor of Economics 

Rob Roy McGregor, Associate Professor of Economics 

Stanislav I. Radchenko, Assistant Professor of Economics 

Benjamin Russo, Associate Professor of Economics 

Peter M. Schwarz, Professor of Economics 

Ellen M. Sewell, Assistant Professor of Economics 

Jennifer Troyer, Assistant Professor of Economics 

Hui-Kuan Tseng, Associate Professor of Economics 

Richard A. Zuber, Professor of Economics 

Finance and Business Law 

Lloyd P. Blenman, Associate Professor of Finance 

Richard J. Buttimerjr., Associate Professor of Finance 

Steven P. Clark, Assistant Professor of Finance 

T. Daniel Coggin, Lecturer in Finance 

William F. Kennedy, Associate Professor of Finance 

J.Jerome Miller, Lecturer of Business Law 

Ben H. Nunnally Jr., Professor of Finance 

Steven Ott, Professor of Finance 

D. Anthony Plath, Associate Professor of Finance 

Judson W. Russell, Adjunct Faculty, Finance and 

Principal, Global Corporate & Investment Banking 

Bank of America 
Calvin W. Sealey, Chair and The Torrence E. Hemby, Sr., 

Distinguished Professor in Banking 
Louis A. Trosch, Professor of Business Law 

Management 

Joyce M. Beggs, Associate Professor of Management 
Rosemary Booth, Associate Professor of Management 
Claudio Carpano, Associate Professor of Management 
Richard M. Conboy, Interim Associate Dean for 

International Programs and Associate Professor of 

Management 
Kent E. Curran, Professor of Management 
Frances Fabian, Assistant Professor of Management 
Christine Henle, Assistant Professor of Management 
I. Edward Jernigan III, Associate Professor of 

Management 
Daryl L. Kerr, Associate Professor of Management 
Gary F. Kohut, Professor of Management 
John G. Michel, Assistant Professor of Management 
Doug Pugh, Assistant Professor of Management 
Beth A. Rubin, Associate Professor of Management 
Bennett J. Tepper, Professor of Management 
Kelly L. Zellars, Assistant Professor of Management 

Marketing 

Christie H. Amato, Professor of Marketing 
Charles D. Bodkin, Associate Professor of Marketing 
Fred H. Campbell, Professor of Marketing 
Sunil Erevelles, Associate Professor of Marketing 
Alan T. Shao, North Carolina Ports Professor of 
Marketing and International Business 



174 College of Business Administration 



Thomas H. Stevenson, Charles E. Cullen Distinguished 

Professor of Marketing 
Linda E. Swayne, Chair and Professor of Marketing 



MASTER OF BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION (MBA) 

The primary objective of graduate study in business is to 
develop candidates for leadership positions in complex 
organizations. The MBA program focuses on developing 
the expertise to lead, influence, and persuade others 
through effective written and spoken communications; 
the ability to approach complex problems both 
systematically and imaginatively; the confidence to make 
decisions in the face of imperfect information, competing 
objectives, and technological change; the insight to 
recognize the ethical dimensions of organizational and 
individual decisions; the sensitivity to recognize that 
organizational decisions involve teamwork and 
consensus-building across diverse groups of individuals; 
and the awareness that business represents an inherently 
multinational enterprise that exists without geographical 
or cultural boundaries. 

MBA courses are scheduled to accommodate both 
working professionals and full-time students. Full-time 
students may enroll in up to four courses each semester, 
while working professionals normally enroll in two 
courses each semester. Classes are held in the evening 
throughout the year on campus and at UNC Charlotte 
Uptown. A working professional student can complete 
the program in 24 months. Full-time students may 
complete the program in four semesters, depending upon 
scheduling of courses. 

Additional Admission Requirements 

In addition to the general requirements for admission to 
the Graduate School, the following are required for 
graduate study in Business Administration. 

1) A generally satisfactory undergraduate record from 
an accredited college or university. 

2) A satisfactory score on the Graduate Management 
Admission Test (GMAT). 

3) A full resume or a description of significant work 
experience. 

Degree Requirements 

The MBA degree program comprises 37 graduate hours, 
including a Core Functional Component and an Elective 
Component. Up to 6 hours of course work may be 
transferred from an AACSB-accredited institution or 
equivalent, based on a recommendation of the relevant 
academic department, approval of the Director of the 
MBA program, and approval of the Graduate School. 
Necessary preparatory work will be determined during the 
admissions process, and courses to meet the specific need 
will be available in the Preparatory Component. All 



students in the program must meet the Graduate School's 
requirements for a Master's Degree. 

Preparatory Component 

Prerequisites (10 credit hours) - These courses may be taken after 
admission to the MBA. These courses are not required prior to 
admission to the MBA program. Courses in the MBA 
Preparatory Component must be completed before enrolling in 6000- 
level courses except by permission of the Director of the MBA 
program. 

MBAD5112 Foundations of Microeconomics (2) 
MBAD5113 Foundations of Macroeconomics (1) 
MBAD51 31 Fundamentals of Financial Accounting 

and Financial Management (3) 
MBAD5141 Business Statistics (2) 
MBAD5142 Quantitative Analysis in Business (1) 
MBAD5191 Legal Environment in Business (1) 

I. Functional Component (28 hours) 

A. Primary Block (13 hours) 

Prerequisites: All requirements for admission to the 
program and Preparatory Component, except as 
approved by the MBA Director. 

MBAD6100 Leadership, Ethics and the Business 
Environment Seminar (1) 

MBAD6112 The Economics of Business Decisions 

(3) 
MBAD6121 Business Information Systems (3) 
MBAD6 1 3 1 Management Accounting (3) 
MBAD6141 Operations Management (3) 

B. Intermediate Block (12 hours) 

Prerequisites: All requirements for admission to the 
program and the Preparatory Component. Completion of 
the Primary Block is strongly recommended. 
MBAD6152 Financial Management (3) 
MBAD6161 Organizational Leadership & Behavior 

1(3) 
MBAD6 1 7 1 Marketing Management (3) 
MBAD6193 International Business Concepts (3) 

C. Advanced Block (3 hours) 

Prerequisites: All functional courses, listed above, in 
Primary Block and Intermediate Block should be 
completed before MBAD 6194 is taken. 
MBAD6194 Management Strategy (3) 

II. Concentration and Elective Component (9 hours) 

Students complete nine hours of elective courses 
specified for a concentration or as free electives. Students 
may enroll in electives as soon as they complete the 
prerequisites for each course. MBAD 6890 (Directed 
Individual Study) and MBAD 7090 (Special Topics in 
Business) may be included in a concentration with 
permission of the MBA Director and the related 
Department. 



College of Business Administration 175 



Concentration and elective requirements: 

Business Finance 

Prerequisite: MB AD 6152 
Requirement: The following course: 

MBAD6157 Theory of Corporate Finance (3) 
Plus two of the following courses: 

MBAD51 59 Student Managed Investment Fund II 

(3) 
MBAD6151 Financial Institutions and Markets (3) 
MBAD6153 Investment Management (3) 
MBAD6154 Applied Business Finance (3) 
MBAD6155 Multinational Finance (3) 
MBAD6158 Real Estate Finance and Development 

(3) 
MBAD6159 Real Estate Development (3) 
MBAD6160 Real Estate Capital Markets (3) 

Economics 

Approval of the Department of Economics is required 

before enrolling in 6000 level ECON courses or the 

Economics Concentration. 

Requirement: The following two courses: 

MBAD61 1 1 Macroeconomics and Business 

Forecasting (3) 
ECON6112 Graduate Econometrics (3) 

Plus one of the following courses: 

ECON6201 Advanced Macroeconomic Theory (3) 
ECON6202 Advanced Microeconomic Theory (3) 
ECON6218 Advanced Business Forecasting (3) 

Financial Institutions/Commercial Banking 

Prerequisite: MBAD 6152 
Requirement: The following course: 

MBAD6156 Commercial Bank Management (3) 
Plus two of the following courses: 

MBAD5159 Student Managed Investment Fund II 

(3) 

MBAD6058 Special Topics in Financial Services (3) 

MBAD6151 Financial Institutions and Markets (3) 

MBAD6153 Investment Management (3) 

MBAD6154 Applied Business Finance (3) 

MBAD6155 Multinational Finance (3) 

MBAD6158 Real Estate Finance and Development 

(3) 
MBAD6I59 Real Estate Development (3) 
MBAD6160 Real Estate Capital Markets (3) 

Information and Technology Management 

Prerequisite: MBAD 6121 

Requirement: The following two courses: 

MBAD6201 Data and Knowledge Management (3) 
MBAD6202 Business Information Systems 
Development (3) 
Plus one of the following courses: 

MBAD6203 Information Systems Economics, 

Strategy, and Policy (3) 
MBAD6204 Business Data Communications (3) 



International Business 

Prerequisite: MBAD 6193 

Requirement: The following three courses: 
MBAD6174 International Marketing (3) 
MBAD6155 Multinational Finance (3) 
MBAD6197 International Business Strategy (3) 

Management 

Prerequisite: MBAD 6161 

Requirement: Three of the following courses: 
MBAD6162 Organizational Leadership and 

Behavior II (3) 
MBAD6163 Human Resource Management (3) 
MBAD6164 Executive Communication (3) 
MBAD6191 Entrepreneurship (3) 
MBAD6192 Business and Society (3) 
MBAD6195 Strategic Management of Technology 

(3) 
MBAD6196 Strategic Planning (3) 
MBAD6197 International Business Strategy (3) 

Marketing 

Prerequisite: MBAD 6171 

Requirement: Three of the following courses: 
MBAD6172 Marketing Research (3) 
MBAD6173 Promotional Strategy (3) 
MBAD6174 International Marketing (3) 
MBAD6175 Logistics Management (3) 
MBAD6176 Consumer Behavior (3) 

Real Estate Finance & Development 

Prerequisite: MBAD 6152 

Requirement: The following two courses: 

MBAD6158 Real Estate Finance & Investment (3) 
MBAD6159 Real Estate Development (3) 

Plus one of the following courses: 

MBAD6160 Real Estate Capital Markets (3) 
MBAD6258 Site Feasibility Analysis (3) 
MBAD6259 Applied Real Estate Development (3) 

Supply Chain Management 

Prerequisite: MBAD 6141 

Requirement: The following two courses: 

MBAD6122 Technology-Enhanced Decision 

Making 
MBAD6208 Supply Chain Management 
Plus one of the following courses: 

MBAD6142 Quality and Manufacturing 

Management 
A department approved elective 

Student Structured Concentration 

Students may propose a nine-semester hour, three-course 
concentration in a significant area of interest for approval 
by the Director of the MBA program. This concentration 
may include graduate courses from other programs within 
the University with approval of the related Department. 



176 College of Business Administration 



Admission to Candidacy 

An Application for Admission to Candidacy form listing 
graduate-level courses that apply to the degree must be 
submitted to the MBA Office four weeks prior to the 
start of the semester in which the student plans to 
complete the course work for the degree. 

Application for Degree 

An Application for Degree form must be submitted to 
the Graduate School by the published deadline. 

Assistantships 

A limited number of assistantships are available each year. 
In order to be competitive, applications should be 
submitted by March 1 5. Additional information is 
available in the MBA office and the Graduate School 
website. 

Advising 

Advising is done by the Director and Associate Director 
for the MBA Program. 

Transfer Credit 

Up to six hours of appropriate graduate credit may be 
accepted for transfer from another AACSB-accredited (or 
equivalent) MBA program. Only courses where grades of 
"B" or better have been earned will be considered. 
Approval of the Program Director or Associate Director 
and the Graduate School is also required. All other 
Graduate School policies regarding transfer credit apply. 

Program Certifications/Accreditation 

The MBA Program and all degree and certificate 
programs offered by The Belk College of Business are 
accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate 
Schools of Business (AACSB-International). 



MBA PLUS POST-MASTERS 
GRADUATE CERTIFICATE 

The MBA PLUS Post-Masters Graduate Certificate 
program provides an opportunity for graduates of 
AACSB-accredited MBA programs to broaden and 
update their business education. As business conditions, 
tools, and techniques change rapidly, a major way of 
staying at the forefront of knowledge is through 
additional university education. The MBA PLUS 
Certificate makes courses in the Belk College's MBA 
Concentrations available to persons who already have 
MBA degrees. 

Admission Requirements 

Applicants must satisfy the general requirements 
established by the Graduate School for admission to a 
graduate certificate program. Applicants must provide 
two official transcripts indicating the awarding of an 
MBA degree from an AACSB-accredited institution or 



equivalent, along with the Graduate application and 
application fee. (Graduates from the MBA program at 
UNC Charlotte are not required to send an official 
transcript.) Applicants will not be required to retake the 
GMAT. 

Completion Requirements 

The MBA PLUS Certificate requires completion of 
twelve or more semester hours of 6000-level courses. At 
least nine hours must be electives. One 3-hour course 
may be a repeat of a course previously taken. A student 
may repeat more courses, but only one such repeated 
course will be counted toward the certificate. The nine- 
hour elective requirement of the MBA PLUS corresponds 
to the nine-hour concentrations in the MBA program. 

It is expected that most students will use their twelve 
hours or more to gain a concentration in a particular 
functional area of interest. However, a broader program 
that draws from a number of areas may be pursued. 

Transfer credits are not accepted in the MBA PLUS 
Certificate program. To receive the certificate, students 
must complete all courses with a grade of "B" or better 
within four years from the time of enrollment in the first 
certificate course. 

An Application for Candidacy for a Graduate Certificate 
(candidacy form) and an Application for Certificate 
should be completed prior to the last semester of MBA 
PLUS course work. Consult Graduate School published 
deadlines. 



MBA INTERNATIONAL 
PROGRAMS 

The Belk College of Business in partnership with the 
Graduate School of Business and Leadership (EGADE) 
at Tec de Monterrey, Mexico offers a dual degree 
program where a student may earn the Belk MBA and a 
Master of Administration from EGADE. This is a full- 
time, cohort based program, with all coursework taught in 
Mexico. Courses are taught in English. Students 
interested in more information about this program should 
contact the Associate Dean for International Programs 
office. 



Courses In Business Administration 

MBA Program Preparatory Courses 

MBAD 5112. Foundation of Microeconomics. (2) 

This course focuses on topics related to the scope and 
methodology of economics as a social science, the 
analysis of markets, the development of market structure, 
the characteristics of market failure, problems of 
economic concentration, and the theory of income 



College of Business Administration 177 



distribution. Enrollment is limited to admitted MBA 
students. (Fall, Spring) 

MB AD 5113. Foundation of Macroeconomics. (1) 

This course focuses on topics related to the scope and 
methodology of economics as a social science, the 
measurement of national income, the theory of national 
income determination, money and banking, monetary and 
fiscal policy, and international economics. Enrollment is 
limited to admitted MBA students. (Fall, Spring) 

MBAD 5131. Fundamentals of Financial Accounting 
and Financial Management. (3) Accelerated and in- 
depth study of conceptual foundations and applications 
of financial accounting and financial management with 
emphasis on building accounting and finance information 
bases for external decision making. (Accounting and 
finance preparation to enter the MBA. May not be taken 
for credit toward any undergraduate degree within the 
Belk College of Business Administration or used as 
equivalent credit for ACCT 2121-2122). Enrollment is 
limited to admitted MBA students. (Fall, Spring) 

MBAD 5141. Business Statistics. (2) This course is 
designed to bring MBA students up to an acceptable level 
of analytical capability in the areas of probability theory 
and business statistics. Enrollment is limited to admitted 
MBA students. (Fall, Spring) 

MBAD 5142 . Quantitative Analysis in Business. (1) 

This course is designed to bring MBA students up to an 
acceptable level of analytical capability in the areas of 
basic linear mathematics (algebra and matrix algebra) and 
basic differential and integral calculus. Enrollment is 
limited to admitted MBA students. (Fall, Spring) 

MBAD 5191. Legal Environment in Business. (1) 

Legal environment in which business operates today; 
Legal, social, and ethical considerations of managers 
within the framework of federal and state regulatory laws; 
role and function of federal regulatory agencies and their 
impact on business activities. Enrollment is limited to 
admitted MBA students. (Fall, Spring) 

Graduate Only 

MBAD 5158. Student Managed Investment Fund I. 

(3) Prerequisites: FINN 3120 or MBAD 6152, and FINN 
3222 or FINN/MBAD 61 53. Management of an actual 
portfolio consisting of a portion of the University's 
Endowment Fund. Admission is by permission of 
instructor. Students selected for the course are required 
to take MBAD 5159. (Same as FINN 5158) (Fall) 

MBAD 5159. Student Managed Investment Fund II. 

(3) Prerequisites: FINN 3120 or MBAD 6152, and FINN 
3222 or FINN/MBAD 61 53. Management of an actual 
portfolio consisting of a portion of the University's 
Endowment Fund. Admission is by permission of 
instructor. Student cannot enroll in this course without 



successfully completing MBAD 5158. (Same as FINN 
5159) (Spring) 

MBAD 6028. Topics in Business Information 
Systems. (3) Prerequisite: MBAD 6121. Selected topics 
in information systems. Potential topics include 
information resource management, database management 
systems, management support systems, information 
systems in the financial and banking industry, information 
systems in manufacturing, information systems in health 
care, and EDP auditing. May be repeated for additional 
credit as the topics vary and with permission of MBA 
director. (On demand) 

MBAD 6058. Special Topics in Financial Services. 

(3) Prerequisite: MBAD 6152. Each year, the subject 
matter of this course deals with a different specialized and 
contemporary topic of interest to students who are 
preparing for management careers in the financial services 
industry. The topics are chosen and covered in a way that 
builds on and supplements the topics covered in other 
courses in the Financial Institutions/Commercial Banking 
concentration. Emphasis is placed on the managerial 
implications of the subject matter as well as the impact on 
the financial system. Topics covered in this course may 
vary from semester to semester, and the course may be 
repeated a maximum of one time for academic credit. (On 
demand) 

MBAD 6100. Leadership, Ethics, and the Business 
Environment Seminar. (1) Prerequisite: None. An 
introduction to leadership, ethics, and other essential 
skills and concepts for success in the current business 
environment. The particular topics and activities included 
will vary each semester as the business environment 
changes. This course is to be taken by MBA students in 
their first semester. (Fall, Spring) 

MBAD 6111. Macroeconomics and Business 
Forecasting. (3) Prerequisite: MBAD 5112, 5113, 5141, 
and 5142 or equivalents. Advanced studies of the 
interrelations of markets in national and international 
economies; mechanisms of monetary policy and interest 
rate effects, foreign exchange rates and inflation; relations 
between national saving, fiscal policy, foreign debt and 
investment; short-run and long-run effects of economic 
policy; tax policy, government spending and economic 
growth; types of economic forecasts; value and limits of 
forecasts. (On demand) 

MBAD 6112. The Economics of Business Decisions. 

(3) Prerequisites: MBAD 5112, 5113, 5141, and 5142 or 
equivalents. Economic concepts in the decision-making 
process. Topics include scarcity; marginal analysis and 
tools of optimization; demand and supply analysis and 
market structure; economic efficiency; regression analysis; 
risk analysis and game theory; and international issues. 
(Fall, Spring) 



178 College of Business Administration 



MBAD 6121. Business Information Systems. (3) 

Prerequisite: Basic computer knowledge and skills are 
assumed. Examination of how information systems are 
developed and used in organizations, how information 
resources are managed, and the potential strategic and 
competitive impact information systems have in domestic 
and global business environments. (Fall, Spring) 

MBAD 6122. Technology-Enhanced Decision 
Making. (3) Prerequisite: MBAD 5141 and 5142 or 
equivalents. An analytical approach to the management 
process. Generalized models for decision making with 
major emphasis on application of the scientific method to 
management problems. (Spring) 

MBAD 6123. Applied Management Science. (3) 

Prerequisite: MBAD 6122. Mathematical model building 
aimed at integrating methods and applications. Overview 
of mathematical programming in practice and a series of 
projects implementing models in business and the public 
sector. (On demand) 

MBAD 6131. Managerial Accounting. (3) Prerequisite: 
MBAD 5131 or equivalent. This course deals with using 
accounting information for strategic, tactical, and 
operating decisions with a focus on strategic cost 
management. Emphasis is on using cost and other 
management accounting information in making sound 
decisions, its effect on managerial behavior, and its use in 
formulating and implementing strategy, and issues of 
design and operation of management control systems 
including the intended and unintended consequences of 
performance measurement. (Fall, Spring) 

MBAD 6141. Operations Management. (3) 

Prerequisite: MBAD 5141 and MBAD 5142 or 
equivalents. Design, operation, and control of service 
and manufacturing systems. Emphasis on using analytical 
tools for problem solving in process analysis and re- 
engineering, work-force management, material and 
inventory management, aggregate planning, total quality 
management, and others. (Fall, Spring) 

MBAD 6142. Quality and Manufacturing 
Management. (3) Prerequisite: MBAD 6141. Current 
issues and advances in operations management including 
just-in-time inventory management, total quality 
management, continuous improvement, flexible 
manufacturing systems, computer integrated 
manufacturing systems, technology evaluation and 
selection, and operations strategy. (Fall) 

MBAD 6151. Financial Institutions and Markets. (3) 

Prerequisite: MBAD 6152. Major financial institutions, 
particularly commercial banks, and their role in the 
intermediation process and as suppliers of funds to the 
money and capital markets. Comparative financial 
policies of these institutions are examined in the context 
of their legal and market environment. (Same as FINN 
6151) (Yearly) 



MBAD 6152. Financial Management. (3) Theory and 
practice of corporate finance including asset management, 
cost of capital and capital budgeting, optimization 
problems and socio-economic aspects of financial 
management. Computer technology may be employed 
when applicable. (Same as FINN 6152) (Fall, Spring) 

MBAD 6153. Investment Management. (3) 

Prerequisite: MBAD 6152. Theory and practice of 
investment decisions of individuals and fund managers. 
Topics include the status of capital market theory, the 
efficient market hypothesis literature, and a portfolio 
performance measurement. Standard institutional and 
investment analysis topics, futures and options markets, 
and international investment topics are covered. (Same as 
FINN 6153) (Yearly) 

MBAD 6154. Applied Business Finance. (3) 

Prerequisite: MBAD 6152. Examination of business 
finance topics which typically confront the firm's primary 
finance functional areas (CFO, Treasurer, Controller). 
The purpose is to develop advanced analytical skills in 
those topic areas. The following topics form the basis of 
the course: lease vs buy (borrow); leveraged buy-outs: 
merger analysis (emphasis on valuation); international 
operations of American firms (capital budgeting and cost 
of capital); capital structure; risk management. Such 
additional topics as working capital management; risk 
management; and relevant current topics will be included 
as time permits. (Same as FINN 6154) (On demand) 

MBAD 6155. Multinational Financial Management. 

(3) Prerequisites: MBAD 6152. Financial management of 
the multinational firm including management of foreign 
exchange risk and political risk, and the control and 
evaluation of financial policies of multinational firms. 
(Same as FINN 6155) (Yearly) 

MBAD 6156. Commercial Bank Management. (3) 

Prerequisite: MBAD 6152. Techniques for the 
management of commercial banks. Topics of study 
include industry structure, administrative organization, 
management of assets, liabilities, and capital, and financial 
analysis of the banking firm. (Same as FINN 6156) 
(Yearly) 

MBAD 6157. Theory of Corporate Finance. (3) 

Prerequisite: MBAD 6152. Theories of modern 
corporate finance, including theory of efficient capital 
markets; uncertainty and the theory of choice; market 
equilibrium asset pricing models (capital asset pricing 
model, arbitrage pricing theory, Black-Scholes); theories 
of capital structure and the cost of capital; dividend 
policy; and leasing. (Same as FINN 6157) (Yearly) 

MBAD 6158. Real Estate Finance and Investment. 

(3) Prerequisite: MBAD 6152. This course focuses on 
the techniques used to analyze, finance and structure real 
estate transactions. Topics include: an overview of the 



College of Business Administration 179 



real estate space and capital markets; the techniques of 
financial analysis; project ownership, taxation and 
financial structure; determining the financial feasibility of 
real estate development; and corporate real estate 
strategies. (Yearly) 

MBAD 6159. Real Estate Development. (3) 

Examination of the real estate development process. 
Identification and evaluation of the critical assumptions 
and issues related to market and site feasibility, financial 
feasibility, planning, acquisition, construction, and 
operation of economically viable commercial real estate 
projects. (Same as GEOG 6103) (Yearly) 

MBAD 6160. Real Estate Capital Markets. (3) 

Prerequisite: MBAD 6152. This course focuses on the 
techniques used to analyze, finance and structure real 
estate transactions, and emphasizes the role of the capital 
markets in facilitating development and investment in 
commercial real estate. Topics include: real estate in an 
investment portfolio; valuation and investment analysis 
for direct (private) real estate equity investment including 
coverage of valuation using real option methodology; 
primary and secondary commercial mortgage markets 
(CMBS); and, analysis of publicly traded equity real estate 
investment trusts (REITs). (Yearly) 

MBAD 6161. Organizational Leadership and 
Behavior I. (3) Behavioral knowledge and skills essential 
to becoming an effective manager/leader including 
behavior and motivation in an environment of complexity 
and rapid change and ethical implications of actions and 
their effects on demographically diverse and increasingly 
international work force. (Fall, Spring) 

MBAD 6162. Organizational Leadership and 
Behavior II. (3) Prerequisite: MBAD 6161. 
Continuation of MBAD 6161. Examines performance 
determinants and appraisal, design of complex 
organizations, team building, organizational change, 
career development and conflict management. (On 
demand) 

MBAD 6163. Human Resource Management. (3) 

Prerequisite: MBAD 6161. An examination of the 
current critical issues and strategic questions associated 
with managing employees. Case material, readings and 
audiovisual material will be used to stimulate discussion 
of the most important and strategic questions to be 
tackled by general managers today and in the future in the 
relationship between management and workers. (Yearly) 

MBAD 6164. Executive Communication. (3) Intensive 
study of communication in organizations from middle 
and upper management perspectives with special 
attention to corporate communication, media relations, 
technologically mediated communication, crisis 
communication and public affairs. Case studies, readings 
and project assignments will be used in a variety of 
business situations. (Yearly) 



MBAD 6171. Marketing Management. (3) A 

managerial approach to strategic marketing decision- 
making. Topics include promotional strategy, channels of 
distribution, demand analysis and pricing, e-marketing, 
and international marketing. Case studies, readings and 
simulations are used. (Fall, Spring) 

MBAD 6172. Marketing Research. (3) Prerequisite: 
MBAD 6171. Planning, execution and evaluation of 
marketing research activities. Emphasis on the 
techniques and methodology used in the collection, 
analysis and interpretation of economic, demographic and 
sociological data for use in marketing decision making. 
(Fall) 

MBAD 6173. Promotional Strategy. (3) Prerequisite: 
MBAD 6171. Opportunities and challenges for an 
organization through advertising, personal selling, sales 
promotion and publicity. It includes analysis of the legal 
and ethical problems involved in this area. Case studies 
and a project assignment are used. (Spring) 

MBAD 6174. International Marketing. (3) 

Prerequisite: MBAD 6171. Study of opportunities, 
problems and techniques involved in marketing 
internationally. Analysis of environmental forces which 
affect international marketing and the methods 
companies utilize to market effectively on an international 
scale. (Spring) 

MBAD 6175. Logistics Management. (3) Prerequisite: 
MBAD 6171. Study of the logistics system as a source of 
profitability and competitive advantage. Component 
activities (customer service, inventory, storage, 
transportation) are examined individually and as parts of a 
larger whole, with emphasis on effective management of 
the overall system of finished goods distribution. Special 
attention is given to managing the transportation function 
in a deregulated environment. (On demand) 

MBAD 6176. Consumer Behavior. (3) Prerequisite: 
MBAD 6171. Graduate standing or permission of 
department. The consumer is the central focus of all 
business activity. This course is designed (a) to 
understand people's consumption-related behaviors, and 
(b) to develop and evaluate marketing strategies to 
influence those behaviors. Concepts from the behavioral 
sciences will be analyzed from the perspective of the 
marketing manager, and will be used to develop dynamic 
and effective marketing strategies. (Yearly) 

MBAD 6181. E-Business Concepts. (3) Prerequisite: 
MBAD 6121. An overview of the business practices and 
strategies used to compete in the new inter-networked 
global marketplace. Critical, technical, and managerial 
issues relating to establishing and maintaining a 
competitively successful E-Business are explored. (On 
demand) 



180 College of Business Administration 



MBAD 6182. E-Business Systems. (3) Prerequisites: 
MBAD 6181 and a programming language such as Visual 
Basic, C, C++, or Java. A study of the evolving business 
information systems facilitating electronic commerce. 
This course provides the basic skills required to develop 
successful E-Business systems. The course uses hands-on 
lab sessions, classroom demonstrations, on-line resources, 
and individual and group projects that include self- 
learning. (On demand) 

MBAD 6183. E-Business Marketing. (3) Prerequisites: 
MBAD 6182 and MBAD 6171. This course integrates 
marketing analysis and issues with the design and 
implementation of E-Business marketing programs. 
Major topics include customer behavior (business to 
business and business to consumer), marketing strategy 
(targeting, positioning, and marketing mix) with an 
emphasis on marketing channels and communications 
problems/opportunities arising from the application of 
internet technologies. An E-Business marketing plan will 
be developed. (On demand) 

MBAD 6189. E-Business Strategy. (3) Prerequisites: 
MBAD 6182 and MBAD 6183. E-Business Strategy is 
designed to integrate the business concepts and 
environmental issues that are essential for success in 
today's commercialized Internet setting. The course will 
consider the opportunities and problems posed by E- 
Business through the application of analytical models and 
case studies. This course addresses the changed priorities 
in strategic management resulting from the emergence of 
the Internet by emphasizing those strategic management 
concepts that are not the focus of traditional strategy core 
classes. (On demand) 

MBAD 6191. Entrepreneurship. (3) Prerequisites: 
MBAD 6131, 6152, 6171, or permission of the MBA 
director. An examination of entrepreneurship and 
entrepreneurs. Focus on planning the start-up of a fast- 
growth enterprise with the aim of rewarding the founders 
and initial investors with significant capital gains. 
Extensive use of case studies will provide a background 
of classroom activities to assist students in the 
preparation of a detailed plan for the hypothetical start-up 
of a fast-growth firm. (On demand) 

MBAD 6192. Business and Society. (3) Ethical, moral, 
political and social aspects of policy formulation and 
implementation. Management's responsibilities to 
consumers, employees, investor/owners, and society are 
stressed. Case studies are used. (Yearly) 

MBAD 6193. International Business Concepts. (3) 

Prerequisites: MBAD 6152, 6171, or permission of the 
MBA director. An overview of international business 
management. Specifically, the functional areas of 
business are covered to provide an international 
perspective. (Fall, Spring) 



MBAD 6194. Management Strategy. (3) Prerequisite: 
All courses in the primary and intermediate block of the 
Functional Component or permission of the Director of 
the MBA program. Examination of the need to integrate 
the functional activities of the firm in planning corporate 
objectives and achieving operating results. Emphasis on 
ability to identify issues and problems of the firm as a 
whole, to explore alternatives and to make decisions 
which recognize the interrelationships of the functional 
specialties within the total organization. Application and 
integration of knowledge and skills of analysis developed 
in the preceding courses of the MBA program. (Fall, 
Spring) 

MBAD 6195. Strategic Management of Technology. 

(3) Prerequisites: MBAD 6141, 6152, and 6171. Impact 
of changing technology upon industries and companies 
and the consequent challenges for business managers. 
Major topics include: the historical context of change and 
innovation; organization and innovation; technology and 
business strategy; impact on functional areas; managing 
linkages; venturing and organization learning; government 
influence on innovation; executive leadership; the 
management of innovation and change. A 
comprehensive written report covering a significant 
aspect of emerging technology is required. (On demand) 

MBAD 6196. Strategic Planning. (3) Prerequisite: 
Permission of instructor. Strategic planning within a 
rapidly changing environment including changing industry 
conditions as well as technological, social, political and 
economic changes. Examination of strategic planning 
techniques being developed by researchers and by 
corporate practitioners. (On demand) 

MBAD 6197. International Business Strategy. (3) 

Prerequisites: MBAD 6152 and 6171. Management 
challenges associated with the development of 
international strategies and the management of 
organizations in business enterprises whose operations 
stretch across national boundaries; how multinational 
enterprises (MNEs) work. Case studies, projects, and 
presentations are used to help students apply concepts 
and theories. (Yearly) 

MBAD 6198. Professional Applications. (3) 

Prerequisites: Completion of the Functional Component. 
Team-taught, multidisciplinary course based on (1) 
structured, written cases and (2) contemporary 
management problems/issues presented in a non- 
structured, non-case format. Requires formal written 
position papers evaluating current business problems 
which are presented and defended before an audience of 
peers, faculty members, and business leaders. (On demand) 

MBAD 6201. Data and Knowledge Management in 
Business. (3) Prerequisite: MBAD 6121 or consent of 
the department. An overview of the business approach 
to identifying, modeling, retrieving, sharing, and 
evaluating an enterprise's data and knowledge assets. 



College of Business Administration 181 



Covers the organizational, technological and management 
perspectives. (Fall) 

MBAD 6202. Business Information Systems: 
Analysis, Design, and Management. (3) Prerequisites 
MBAD 6121 or consent of the department. Examination 
of managerial issues associated with the study of business 
processes and the development of supporting 
information systems. Emphasis on the application of 
appropriate methodologies, techniques, and tools to 
analyze, design, and implement business information 
systems. Study of relevant IS project management and 
quality assurance techniques. (Spring) 

MBAD 6203. Information Systems Economics, 
Strategy and Policy. (3) Prerequisite: MBAD 6121 or 
consent of the Department. This course examines a 
collection of topics that deal with the strategic use of 
information systems. These topics include Business 
Value of IS, Network Economics, use of IS for 
competitive advantage, IS Planning and policy setting, IS 
evaluation selection and sourcing. (Fall) 

MBAD 6204. Business Data Communications. (3) 

Prerequisites: MBAD 6121 or consent of the department. 
Examination of the information communication 
requirements of business environments, the fundamentals 
of communication technology, and the application of the 
technology for solving business problems. Emphasis on 
understanding communication technologies to assess 
needs, plan for the introduction of hardware and 
software, and manage these communication systems. 
(Spring) 

MBAD 6208. Supply Chain Management. (3) 

Prerequisites: MBAD 6141 or consent of the 
Department. Supply chain management is concerned 
with all of the activities performed from the initial raw 
materials to the ultimate consumption of the finished 
product. From a broad perspective, the course is 
designed to examine the major aspects of the supply 
chain: the product flows; the information flows; and the 
relationships among supply chain participants. The 
course content is interdisciplinary in nature and will cover 
a variety of topics such as supply chain information 
technologies, supply chain design, strategic alliances 
between supply chain participants and supply chain 
initiatives. (Spring) 

MBAD 6258. Site Feasibility Analysis. (3) 

Prerequisites: consent of instructor. Examination of 
factors affecting the feasibility of land parcels for 
commercial and residential development with emphasis 
on the physical evaluation of a given site, the market 
support for its intended use and the financial support for 
the proposed development. (Same as GEOG 6102) (Fall) 

MBAD 6259. Applied Real Estate Development. (3) 

Prerequisite: MBAD 6159, GEOG 6103, or ARCH 5068. 
This course focuses on the application of the processes 



involved in real estate development. Students will work in 
groups on a semester project to select a site and prepare 
an appropriate development plan that emphasizes the 
market and financial feasibility of the real estate 
development. (Same as GEOG 6105 and ARCH 5069) 
(Yearly) 

MBAD 6500. Cooperative Education Experience. (0) 

Prerequisite: Completion of nine hours of graduate 
coursework. Participation in the Co-op program enables 
MBA students to pursue practical work experience that is 
complementary to their major course of studies. Each 
student's program must be approved by the director of 
the MBA program. (Fall, Spring) 

MBAD 6890. Directed Individual Study. (3) Directed 
individual study and in-depth analysis of a special area of 
management, economics, business or accounting. The 
course may be used to satisfy up to six semester hours of 
graduate credit requirements in the Master of Business 
Administration degree program and may be repeated for 
credit provided a different area of study is undertaken 
each time. Permission of a member of the graduate 
faculty who would direct the study and permission of the 
MBA director must be secured before registering for the 
course. (Fall, Spring) 

MBAD 7090. Special Topics in Business. (1-4) This 
course covers special topics in any of the functional areas 
of business. Topics will vary. May be repeated for credit 
for different topics. (On demand) 

MBAD 7999. Master's Degree Graduate Residence. 

(1) See Department for more information. 



ECONOMICS 

Department of Economics 

220 Friday Building 

704-687-2185 

http://www.belkcollege.uncc.edu//economics/MS/ 

ms.htm 

Degree 

M.S. 

Coordinator 

Rob Roy McGregor III, rrmcgreg@email.uncc.edu 

Graduate Faculty 

Louis H. Amato, Professor 

John E. Connaughton, Professor 

W. Young Davis, Professor 

John M. Gandar, Professor 

B. Philip Jeon, Adjunct Lecturer 

Hwan C. Lin, Associate Professor 

Gaines H. Liner, Associate Professor 



182 College of Business Administration 



Ronald A. Madsen, Professor 
Rob Roy McGregor III, Associate Professor 
Stanislav Radchenko, Assistant Professor 
Benjamin Russo, Associate Professor 
Peter M. Schwarz, Professor 
Ellen Sewell, Assistant Professor 
Jennifer L.Troyer, Assistant Professor 
Hui-Kuan Tseng, Associate Professor 
Richard A. Zuber, Professor 



MASTER OF SCIENCE IN 
ECONOMICS 

The Master of Science degree program in Economics 
features a curriculum that is flexible yet thorough in its 
approach to theoretical training and applied course work. 
The program offers concentrations in Economics and in 
Economics/Finance. Students completing this program 
are prepared for analytical and management positions that 
require the integration of economic analysis and advanced 
quantitative methods. Employment opportunities for 
economists with a master's degree exist in both the public 
and private sectors. In addition, students with a master's 
degree may choose to pursue additional graduate 
education leading to a doctoral degree in Economics or in 
Finance. 

Additional Admission Requirements 

In addition to the general requirements for admission to 
the Graduate School, the following are required for 
graduate study in Economics: 

1) Undergraduate coursework that includes: Calculus, 
Econometrics (or equivalent), Intermediate 
Macroeconomic Theory, Intermediate 
Microeconomic Theory, and Mathematical 
Economics. (Students missing some of these courses 
can be admitted conditionally.) 

2) A satisfactory score on the aptitude portions of the 
Graduate Record Examination. The Graduate 
Management Aptitude Test may be substituted for 
the GRE with the permission of the program 
coordinator. 

Degree Requirements 

The program leading to the Master of Science degree in 
Economics requires at least 30 hours of graduate credit, 
with a maximum of six hours of transfer credit accepted 
from an accredited institution. (Credit applied toward an 
awarded graduate degree will not be accepted as transfer 
credit.) Courses taken at other accredited institutions 
after enrollment may receive residence credit if approved 
by the department and the Dean of the Graduate School. 
All credit hours applied toward the degree must be in 
courses open only to graduate students. No more than 
two C's are permitted in the program and at least 1 8 
semester hours must be completed before admission to 
candidacy. A GPA of at least 3.0 is required to graduate. 



The program is organized into three curriculum 
components: 

1) a core curriculum in economic theory and 
quantitative methods; 

2) a concentration to be selected from one of the two 
described below; and 

3) a research project or thesis. 

Admission to Candidacy Requirements 

An Admission to Candidacy form listing graduate-level 
courses that apply to the degree must be submitted to the 
program coordinator one month prior to the semester in 
which the student plans to complete the course work for 
the degree. 

Assistantships 

A number of graduate assistantships are available each 
year. To be fully competitive, applications must be 
submitted by March 15. Contact the coordinator for 
further information. 



Core Courses 

ECON6201 
ECON6202 
ECON6112 
ECON6218 



Advanced Macroeconomic Theory (3) 
Advanced Microeconomic Theory (3) 
Graduate Econometrics (3) 
Advanced Business and Economic 
Forecasting (3) 



In addition, students who choose to complete a thesis 
must successfully complete six hours of ECON 6999 
(Master's Thesis), while students enrolled in the non- 
thesis option must complete ECON 6901 and ECON 
6902 (Research Methods I and Research Methods II). 

Concentrations 

1) Economics 

The purpose of the economics concentration is to 
provide students with the opportunity to acquire 
specialized theoretical skills related to their areas of 
interest and expertise. This concentration can be 
completed in one full year of study. 

Students in this option must complete the core 
curriculum for the M.S. in Economics and the thesis or 
research project. In addition, they must complete 12 
hours of electives chosen from the fields of 
macroeconomics and monetary policy, finance and 
banking, environmental economics, international trade 
and international finance, economic modeling and 
simulation, urban economics, public finance and 
cost/benefit analysis, or economic and business 
forecasting. The program also permits the development 
of individualized specializations in areas that are 
complementary to economic theory and analysis. 

2) Economics/Finance 

There are two options available in the 
Economics/Finance Concentration: die Financial 
Management Option and the Quantitative Finance 
Option. 



College of Business Administration 183 



i. Financial Management Option 
The Financial Management Option is designed for 
students interested in pursuing careers in corporate 
finance or financial planning. This option can be 
completed in one full year of study. 

Students in this option must complete the core 
curriculum for the M.S. in Economics and the thesis or 
research project. In addition, they must complete 

FINN6152 Financial Management (3) 

(Prerequisite: MB AD 6131 or 6 hours 
of undergraduate accounting and 
approval of the program coordinator) 

FINN6153 Investment Management (3) 

FINN6157 Theory of Corporate Finance (3) 

and one of the following: 

FINN6155 Multinational Financial Management 

(3) 
ECON6235 Monetary and Financial Theory (3) 
OR An Approved Elective. 

ii. Quantitative Finance Option 

The Quantitative Finance Option is designed for students 
interested in pursuing careers in portfolio management or 
financial risk management. The Quantitative Finance 
Option can also provide an excellent foundation for 
students who wish to pursue additional graduate study 
leading to a doctoral degree in Finance. This option can 
be completed in one and a half years. 

Students in this option must complete the core 
curriculum for the M.S. in Economics and the thesis or 
research project. In addition, they must complete 



Thesis 

Students who choose the thesis track must successfully 
complete six hours of ECON 6999 (Master's Thesis). 
The thesis must be written and defended within six 
calendar years after admission into the M.S. in Economics 
program. The Thesis Committee, which must be 
approved by the program coordinator, will consist of a 
Chair and at least two other faculty members. ECON 
6999 is graded on an A, B, C or U basis. 

Application for Degree 

An Application for Degree form must be completed and 
submitted with the graduation fee to the Registrar's 
Office by the published deadline. 

Tuition Waivers 

A limited number of in-state and out-of-state tuition 
waivers are made available each year. These waivers are 
competitively awarded using the same application 
required for assistantships. 

Program Certifications /Accreditations 

The Belk College of Business is accredited by the 
Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business 
(AACSB). 



Courses in Economics 

ECON 5116. Public Sector Economics. (3) Revenue 
and expenditure problems of governmental units, 
intergovernmental financial relationships and the impact 
of federal fiscal policy upon the American economy. (On 
demand) 



ECON6203 Financial Economic Theory (3) 
ECON6219 Financial Econometrics (3) 
FINN6210 Derivatives I: Financial Elements of 

Derivatives (3) 
and one of the following: 
FINN621 1 Risk Management and Fixed Income 

Derivatives (3) 
ECON6235 Monetary and Financial Theory (3) 
OR An Approved Elective. 

Minors 

The Department of Economics also participates in the 
program leading to an interdisciplinary graduate minor in 
Operations Research. See Operations Research Section 
of this Catalog for complete information and program 
requirements. 

Advising 

Prior to, or concurrent with, the first semester of study, 
each student will be expected to complete a program of 
study listing each class the student expects to take as a 
part of the program. The program of study requires the 
approval of the coordinator. 



ECON 5135. Economics of Growth and 
Development. (3) Theories of economic growth and 
development applied to varying economic and social 
systems. Current theoretical models and their relevance 
to efficient allocation of resources to both the developed 
and the developing nations. (On demand) 

ECON 5160. Economics of Transportation. (3) 

Analysis of transportation systems. Topics include the 
historical development of various modes, costs and rate- 
making, regulation and national transportation policy. (On 
demand) 

ECON 5171. Economics of International Trade. (3) 

Theory of international trade including determination of 
international trade patterns, welfare implications of 
international trade, economic integration, and effects of 
tariffs and quotas. (On demand) 

ECON 5172. Economics of International Finance. 

(3) Survey of international monetary theory. Topics 
include exchange rate determination, balance of payments 
and adjustment, international liquidity, capital 



184 College of Business Administration 



movements, international financial organizations, and 
monetary reform proposals. (On demand) 

ECON 5180. Industrial Organization and Public 
Policy. (3) An examination of monopolistic competition, 
oligopoly, and monopoly and questions of public policy 
in dealing with problems created by industrial 
concentration. (Spring Summer) 

ECON 5181. Energy and Environmental Economics. 

(3) Economic issues of both energy and environment. 
Energy issues include the historical development of 
energy resources, supply and demand considerations, and 
projections of the future energy balance. Environmental 
issues are externalities, common property resources, and 
government regulation. Policy considerations include 
environmental standards, pollution charges, and property 
rights. Cost-benefit analysis and microeconomic theory 
are applied. (On demand) 

ECON 6001. Advanced Topics in Macroeconomics. 

(3) Prerequisites: ECON 6112, 6201 and 6202. 
Advanced treatment of selected issues in 
macroeconomics. (On demand) 

ECON 6002. Advanced Topics in Microeconomics. 

(3) Prerequisites: ECON 6112, 6201 and 6202. 
Advanced treatment of selected issues in 
microeconomics. (On demand) 

ECON 6090. Topics in Economics. (1-3) Prerequisite: 
consent of the department. Topics from various areas of 
economics. Credit hours will vary with the topic offered. 
May be repeated for credit as topics vary. (On demand) 

ECON 6100. Graduate Mathematical Economics. (3) 

Economic problems are analyzed with quantitative 
techniques. Topics covered include the study of 
economic growth models, utility maximization, 
homogeneous functions, dynamic systems, applications of 
linear programming, and constrained optimization. (On 
demand) 

ECON 6112. Graduate Econometrics. (3) 

Prerequisites: Admission to graduate program and 
permission of program coordinator. Advanced study of 
the theory and application of statistics to economic 
problems. Topics include derivation of least-squares 
estimators; maximum likelihood estimation; and problems 
of multicollinearity, heteroskedasticity, and 
autocorrelation. (Fall) 

ECON 6201. Advanced Macroeconomic Theory. (3) 

Prerequisites: Admission to graduate program and 
permission of program coordinator. Theories of 
aggregate income determination, inflation, 
unemployment, interest rates and economic growth; 
macro-economic consumption and investment behavior; 
the business cycle. (Fall) 



ECON 6202. Advanced Microeconomic Theory. (3) 

Prerequisite: Admission to graduate program and 
permission of program coordinator. Theories of the firm, 
of the consumer, and of resource owners; determination 
of prices under different market structures; general 
equilibrium analysis and welfare economics. (Fall) 

ECON 6203. Financial Economic Theory. (3) 

Prerequisites: Admission to the graduate program and 
permission of the program coordinator. Review of 
financial economic theory using discrete-time models. 
Topics include: risk measurement; choices under 
uncertainty; portfolio selection; capital asset pricing 
model (CAPM); Arrow-Debreu pricing; options and 
market completeness; the Martingale measure; arbitrage 
theory; consumption based CAPM; and valuation of the 
firm. (Fall, Spring) 

ECON 6218. Advanced Business and Economic 
Forecasting. (3) Prerequisite: ECON 6112. Develops 
forecasting techniques used in business decision making 
and techniques used in forecasting macroeconomic 
variables. Topics include: estimation, identification and 
prediction using ARMAX, state space, and Box-Jenkins 
models; spectral analysis; linear filtering. (Spring) 

ECON 6219. Financial Econometrics. (3) Prerequisite: 
ECON 6218 or MATH 6201. Advanced time series with 
financial applications. Topics include: time series 
regressions (univariate and multivariate, stationary and 
non-stationary) and time series models (including ARMA, 
ARCH, GARCH, stochastic volatility and factor models). 
The emphasis will be on model properties, estimators, 
test statistics, and applications in finance. (Fall or Summer) 

ECON 6235. Monetary and Financial Theory. (3) 

Prerequisites: ECON 6112 and either ECON 6201 or 
6202. Theory and empirical tests of money supply, 
money demand, and financial markets; portfolio theory 
with special attention to portfolio choices of banks; term 
structure of interest rates; dynamic models of money and 
economic activity. (On demand) 

ECON 6240. Economics of International Finance. 

(3) Prerequisites: ECON 6112, 6201 and 6202. Open 
economy macroeconomics, international transmission of 
inflation and unemployment, internal and external 
balance; balance of payments and international payments 
mechanisms; determination of exchange rates and effects 
of hedging and speculation. (On demand) 

ECON 6241. Economics of International Trade. (3) 

Prerequisites: ECON 6112, 6201 and 6202. Examines 
the causes and consequences of trade using Ricardian and 
neoclassical models. Considers extensions, modifications, 
and empirical tests of these models. Analysis of tariffs, 
quotas, other trade restrictions, export subsidies, and 
trends in current trade policy. (On demand) 



College of Business Administration 185 



ECON 6250. Advanced Urban and Regional 
Economics. (3) Prerequisite: Admission to graduate 
program. Applications of microeconomic theory to 
problems of cities, metropolitan areas and regions; 
methods in regional analysis, location theory, land-use 
planning, measurement of economic activity; 
transportation, housing, poverty, and growth issues. 
(Spring) 

ECON 6255. Benefit-Cost Analysis. (3) Principles, 
practices, and applications for defining and comparing the 
benefits and costs of public policy programs and private 
sector projects, including techniques useful for organizing 
and analyzing data, evaluating programs systematically, 
and developing a framework for decision making while 
recognizing ethical implications, measurement problems, 
and time value problems. (On demand) 

ECON 6800. Directed Study in Economics. (1-3) 

Prerequisite: Admission to graduate program. 
Independent study of a theoretical and/or a policy 
problem in a special area of economics. Topics of the 
investigation may originate from the student or from the 
faculty member supervising the study. May be repeated 
for up to 6 hours of credit with the approval of the 
program coordinator. (On demand) 

ECON 6901. Research Methods for Economists I. 

(3) Prerequisites: ECON 6112, 6202 and either ECON 
6201 or ECON 6203. Research programs in economics; 
problem identification; interpretation of statistical results; 
bibliographic search; data sources and collection; 
selection of statistical technique; preparation of reports 
and proposals. (Spring) 

ECON 6902. Research Methods for Economists II. 

(3) Prerequisite: ECON 6901. Critique of economic 
research and reports, presentation of econometric results 
and reports. The student will develop a research project, 
perform statistical tests, and present the results orally and 
in a major research paper. (Summer) 

ECON 6999. Graduate Thesis Research. (1-6) 

Individual investigation culminating in the preparation 
and presentation of a thesis. May be repeated for credit. 
(On demand) 

ECON 7999. Masters Degree Graduate Residency. 

(1) (Fall, Spring, Summer) 



GENERAL GRADUATE 
COURSES IN BUSINESS 

Finance Courses 

FINN 5158. Student Managed Investment Fund I. 

(3) Prerequisites: FINN 3120 or MBAD 6152, and FINN 



3222 or FINN/MBAD 6153. Management of an actual 
portfolio consisting of a portion of the University's 
Endowment Fund. Admission is by permission of 
instructor. Students selected for the course are required to 
take FINN 5159. (Same as MBAD 5158.) (Fall) 

FINN 5159. Student Managed Investment Fund II. 

(3) Prerequisites: FINN 3120 or MBAD 6152, and FINN 
3222 or FINN/MBAD 6153. Management of an actual 
portfolio consisting of a portion of the University's 
Endowment Fund. Admission is by permission of 
instructor. Student cannot enroll in this course without 
successfully completing FINN 5158. (Same as MBAD 
5159.) (Spring) 

FINN 6058. Special Topics in Financial Services. (3) 

Prerequisite: MBAD 6152. Each year, the subject matter 
of this course deals with a different specialized and 
contemporary topic of interest to students who are 
preparing for management careers in the financial services 
industry. The topics are chosen and covered in a way that 
builds on and supplements the topics covered in other 
courses in the Financial Institutions/Commercial Banking 
concentration. Emphasis is placed on the managerial 
implications of the subject matter as well as the impact on 
the financial system. Topics covered in this course may 
vary from semester to semester, and the course may be 
repeated a maximum of one time for academic credit. 
Same as MBAD 6160.) (On demand) 

FINN 6151. Financial Institutions and Markets. (3) 

Major financial institutions, particularly commercial 
banks, and their role in the intermediation process and as 
suppliers of funds to the money and capital markets. 
Comparative financial policies of these institutions are 
examined in the context of their legal and market 
environment. (Same as MBAD 6151) (Yearly) 

FINN 6152. Financial Management. (3) Theory and 
practice of corporate finance including asset management, 
cost of capital and capital budgeting, optimization 
problems and socio-economic aspects of financial 
management. Computer technology may be employed 
when applicable. (Same as MBAD 6152) (Fall, Spring) 

FINN 6153. Investment Management. (3) 

Prerequisite: MBAD 6152. Theory and practice of 
investment decisions of individuals and fund managers. 
Topics include the status of capital market theory, the 
efficient market hypothesis literature, and a portfolio 
performance measurement. Standard institutional and 
investment analysis topics, futures and options markets, 
and international investment topics are covered. (Same as 
MBAD 6153) (Yearly) 

FINN 6154. Applied Business Finance. (3) 

Prerequisite: MBAD 6152. Examination of business 
finance topics which typically confront the firm's primary 
finance functional areas (CFO, Treasurer, Controller). 
The purpose is to develop advanced analytical skills in 



186 College of Business Administration 



those topic areas. The following topics form the basis of 
the course: lease vs buy (borrow); leveraged buy-outs: 
merger analysis (emphasis on valuation); international 
operations of American firms (capital budgeting and cost 
of capital); capital structure; risk management. Such 
additional topics as working capital management; risk 
management; and relevant current topics will be included 
as time permits. (Same as MBAD 6154) (On demand) 

FINN 6155. Multinational Financial Management. 

(3) Prerequisites: MBAD 6111 and 6152. Financial 
management of the multinational firm including 
management of foreign exchange risk and political risk, 
and the control and evaluation of financial policies of 
multinational firms. (Same as MBAD 6155) (Yearly) 

FINN 6156. Commercial Bank Management. (3) 

Prerequisite: MBAD 6152. Techniques for the 
management of commercial banks. Topics of study 
include industry structure, administrative organization, 
management of assets, liabilities, and capital, and financial 
analysis of the banking firm. (Same as MBAD 6156) 
(Yearly) 

FINN 6157. Theory of Corporate Finance. (3) 

Prerequisite: MBAD 6152. Theories of modern corporate 
finance, including theory of efficient capital markets; 
uncertainty and the theory of choice; market equilibrium 
asset pricing models (capital asset pricing model, arbitrage 
pricing theory, Black-Scholes); theories of capital 
structure and the cost of capital; dividend policy; and 
leasing. (Same as MBAD 6157) (Yearly) 

FINN 6203. Financial Economic Theory. (3) 

Prerequisites: Admission to Graduate Program and 
Permission of program director. Review of financial 
economic theory using discrete-time models. Topics 
include: risk measurement; choices under uncertainty; 
portfolio selection; capital asset pricing model (CAPM); 
Arrow-Debreu pricing; options and market completeness; 
the Martingale measure; arbitrage theory; consumption- 
based CAPM; and valuation of the firm. (Same as ECON 
6203) 

FINN 6210. Derivatives I: Financial Elements of 
Derivatives. (3) Prerequisite: FINN 6152 or equivalent, 
or permission of Department. Theory and practice of 
financial derivatives markets including forwards, futures, 
and options markets. Topics include the economics of 
derivatives markets, pricing models for instruments in 
these markets, strategies for hedging and speculation, as 
well as regulatory and governance issues. 

FINN 6211. Risk Management and Fixed Income 
Derivatives. (3) Prerequisite: FINN 6210 or permission 
of Department. Risk management of fixed income 
portfolios as well as the theory and practice of fixed 
income markets. Topics include fixed income 
instruments, term structure models, pricing methods, 



portfolio management, duration and convexity, 
securitization, and hedging. 

FINN 6219. Financial Econometrics. (3) Prerequisites: 
ECON 6218 or MATH 6201. Advanced time series with 
financial applications. Topics covered include time series 
regressions (univariate and multivariate, stationary and 
non-stationary) and time series models (including ARMA, 
ARCH, GARCH, stochastic volatility and factor models). 
The emphasis will be on model properties, estimators, 
test statistics, and applications in finance. (Same as 
ECON 6219.) 



College of Education 187 



College of Education 



At the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, graduate 
students in the College of Education have many different 
opportunities to expand their knowledge and skills in 
preparation for new educational roles and increased 
leadership responsibilities. While many professional 
education programs lead to advanced NC licensure, other 
programs lead to both initial and advanced licensure, and 
still others are not associated with licensure. The College 
of Education is accredited by the National Council for 
Accreditation of Teacher Education. All licensure 
programs are approved by the North Carolina 
Department of Public Instruction. Program graduates 
positively influence their peers, clients, and students; 
contribute to the development of effective schools and 
agencies for all children; and work to alleviate and 
prevent many of today's educational and social obstacles. 

One of the college's most important functions is to serve 
as a regional resource in education, research, and service 
to help address the challenges of urban schools. The 
college has a strong partnership with the 14 school 
districts in the region and is located within the bounds of 
Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools, a large urban district 
enrolling more than 1 16,000 students. 

Programs are listed by degree and discipline below, then 
details are presented in alphabetical order by discipline. 
The Master of Arts in Teaching and the Fast Track Initial 
Licensure Program are described in a separate section. 



Doctoral Programs 

Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) 

Educational Leadership: Specialisations in (1) The 

Superintendency, (2) Curriculum and Supervision, or (3) 
Community Leadership 

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) 

Counseling 

Curriculum and Instruction: Specialisations in (1) 

Urban Education, (2) Literacy Education, (3) 

Mathematics Education 
Special Education 

Masters Degree Programs 

Master of Arts (M.A.) 

Counseling: Agency 

Counseling: School (Licensure program) 

English Education (Advanced licensure — Also see English 

Department) 
Mathematics Education (Advanced licensure — Also see 

Mathematics Department) 



Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.) (Combines initial 
and advanced licensure) 

Elementary Education 

Fine and Performing Arts Education: Art, Dance, 

Music, or Theatre 
Foreign Language Education: French or German 
Middle Grades Education: English Language Arts, 

Mathematics, Science, or Social Studies 
Secondary Education: English, Mathematics, 

History/Comprehensive Social Studies, 

Comprehensive Science, Biology, Chemistry, 

Earth Sciences, or Physics 
Special Education: General Curriculum or Adapted 

Curriculum 
Teaching English as a Second Language 

Master of Education (M.Ed.) (Advanced licensure) 
Child and Family Studies (B-K) (Also offers 
combination of initial and advanced licensure) 
Curriculum and Supervision 
Elementary Education 
Instructional Systems Technology (Also offers a non- 

licensure track) 
Middle/Secondary Education 

Middle Grades track: English Language Arts, 

Mathematics, Science, or Social Studies 
Secondary Education track: 

History/Comprehensive Social Studies, 
Comprehensive Science, Biology, 
Chemistry, Earth Sciences, or Physics 
Reading Education 
Special Education: 

Academically Gifted 
Adapted Curriculum 
General Curriculum 
Teaching English as a Second Language 

Master of School Administration (M.S.A.) (Advanced 
licensure) 

School Administration 

Graduate Non-degree Programs 

Fast Track Initial Licensure Programs 

Child and Family Development 

Elementary Education 

Fine and Performing Arts Education: Art, Dance, 

Music, or Theatre 
Foreign Language Education: French, German, or 

Spanish 
Middle Grades Education: English Language Arts, 

Mathematics, Science, or Social Studies 
Secondary Education: English, Mathematics, 

History/ Comprehensive Social Studies, 

Comprehensive Science, Biology, Chemistry, 

Earth Sciences, or Physics 



188 College of Education 



Special Education: General Curriculum or Adapted 

Curriculum 
Teaching English as a Second Language 

Graduate Certificate Programs 

Child and Family Development: Early Intervention 
Substance Abuse Counseling 
Curriculum and Supervision 
Academic or Intellectually Gifted 
Supported Employment and Transition 



CHILD AND FAMILY 
STUDIES: EARLY 
EDUCATION 

Department of Special Education and Child 
Development 

348 College of Education Building 

704-687-8830 

http://education.uncc.edu/spcd/ 

Degree 

M.Ed., Graduate Certificate 

Coordinator 

Dr. Richard White (Interim) 

Graduate Faculty 

Kim Brooks, Lecturer 

Deborah Ceglowski, Associate Professor 

Deana Deason, Lecturer 

Lyn Rhoden, Assistant Professor 

Bobbie Rowland, Professor Emeritus 

JaneDiane Smith, Assistant Professor 

JoAnn Springs, Assistant Professor 

MASTER OF EDUCATION IN 
CHILD AND FAMILY STUDIES: 
EARLY EDUCATION 

The M.Ed, in Child and Family Studies: Early Education 
prepares professionals for leadership positions that serve 
young children with and without disabilities and their 
families. It is conveniently designed for prospective 
students already working full-time in professional settings 
who wish to pursue an advanced degree on a part-time 
basis and for those who wish to pursue a degree on a full- 
time basis. There are three different tracks within the 
M.Ed, program- 2 for candidates seeking both initial and 
advanced birth- kindergarten [B-K] licensure and one 
track for individuals with an initial B-K license seeking 
advanced licensure. The graduate degree program is for 
professionals who teach or provide services or 



interventions in infant, toddler, and preschool and 
kindergarten settings that include young children with and 
without disabilities; who administer preschool and family 
agency programs that have a child development and 
family relations focus; who work as consultants, parent 
educators, inclusion specialists, program coordinators, 
supervisors, and staff development trainers; or who seek 
research and evaluation expertise in child and family 
studies and community leadership in child and family 
programs. Graduates will qualify for the Master's Level 
"advanced competencies" Birth-Kindergarten (B-K) 
Teaching License issued by the North Carolina 
Department of Public Instruction upon completion of 
the program. 

Program Objectives 

The M.Ed, degree in Child and Family Studies: Early 
Education prepares each advanced master's degree 
student with skills to: 

1) Integrate and apply empirical and theoretical 
knowledge of the growth and development of young 
children with and without disabilities. 

2) Conduct research on individual and family 
development and behavior 

3) Employ interdisciplinary approaches to the study of 
child development, the family, and other social 
institutions that include the influence of social context 
and policy variables on children and their families. 

4) Take leadership roles in programs that support the 
development of infant, toddler, preschool, and 
kindergarten children with and without disabilities. 

5) Demonstrate advanced knowledge and understanding 
of interrelationships of families, family dynamics, and 
children within these contexts. 

6) Design and evaluate inclusive learning environments 
that promote the development of children of all 
developmental levels and abilities. 

Degree Requirements 

The M.Ed, in Child and Family Studies: Early Education 
requires a total of 39 semester hours of course work. 

Track A: For candidates with a B-K license: 

Core Courses (1 8 hours) 

CHFD6102 Learning and Development (3) 
CHFD6200 Curriculum and Learning 

Environments for Young Children (3) 
CHFD6210 Inclusive Education for Young 

Children (3) 
CHFD6220 Family Theory and Research (3) 
CHFD6230 Emerging Literacy and Mathematical 

Understanding (3) 
CHFD6000 Topics in Child and Family 

Development (3) 

Applied Research/Evaluation (6 hours) 

RSCH6101 Educational Research Methods (3) 
CHFD6900 Research in Child and Family Studies 
(3) 



College of Education 189 



Thematic Electives (9 hours) 
To be selected from the categories of Education of 
Young Children; Family Studies; Early Intervention; 
Adrninistration/Supervision; or individually planned 
option, with advisor approval. 

Internship/Seminar (6 hours) 

CHFD6400 Internship in Child and Family Studies 

(3) 
CHFD6600 Seminar: Leadership in the Education 
of Children and Families (3) 

Track B: Candidates with an elementary or special 
education teaching license but without a B-K license; or 
individuals with undergraduate degrees in child 
development: 

Phase 1(18 hours): 

CHFD6102 Learning and Development (3) 
CHFD6200 Curriculum and Learning 

Environments for Young Children (3) 
CHFD6220 Family Theory and Research (3) 
CHFD6230 Emerging Literacy and Mathematical 

Understanding (3) 
SPED51 1 1 Issues in Early Intervention (3) 
SPED5210 Methods in Early Intervention: B - K 

(3) 

Phase 2 (21 hours) 

RSCH6 101 Research Methods (3) 

SPED5112 Assessment of Young Children with 

Disabilities: B - K (3) 
CHFD6130 Concepts of Teaching and Learning: 

Child's Play (3) 
CHFD6240 Advanced Studies in Infant and Child 

Development (3) 
CHFD6210 Inclusive Education for Young 

Children (3) 
CHFD6600 Seminar: Leadership in the Education 

of Children and Families (3) 
CHFD6900 Research in Child and Family Studies 

(Master's Project/Thesis) (3) 

Track C: Individuals with a provisional (lateral entry) or 
emergency teaching license and those without a teaching 
license: 



Phase 1 (27 hours): 

CHFD6102 Learning and Development (3) 
CHFD6220 Family Theory and Research (3) 
CHFD6230 Emerging Literacy and Mathematical 

Understanding (3) 
SPED51 1 1 Issues in Early Intervention (3) 
SPED5112 Assessment of Young Children with 

Disabilities: B-K (3) 
SPED 5210 Methods in Early Intervention: B - K 

(3) 
CHFD6210 Inclusive Education for Young 
Children (3) 



CHFD6240 Advanced Studies in Infant and Child 

Development (3) 
CHFD6400 Internship: Child and Family Studies 

(3) 

Phase 2 (12 hours) 

RSCH6101 Research Methods (3) 
CHFD6200 Curriculum and Learning 

Environments for Young Children (3) 
CHFD6600 Seminar: Leadership in the Education 

of Children and Families (3) 
CHFD6900 Research in Child and Family Studies 

(Master's Project/Thesis) (3) 

Admission Requirements 

1) An application in writing accompanied by the 
application fee; 

2) Evidence of a bachelor's degree from an accredited 
college or university; 

3) Official transcripts of all previous academic work 
showing evidence of an overall grade point average 
(GPA) of 2.75 or above and a junior/senior GPA of 
3.0 or above; 

4) Evidence of satisfactory scores on the Graduate 
Record Examination (GRE) or the Miller Analogies 
Test (MAT); 

5) A personal statement outlining why the applicant 
seeks admission to the program and describing 
professional experiences with young children and 
their families; 

6) Three letters of recommendation from persons 
familiar with the applicant's personal or professional 
qualifications. 

Admission to Candidacy Requirements 

Upon successful completion of a minimum of 24 
semester hours of graduate work and in no case later than 
four weeks prior to the beginning of the semester in 
which he/she expects to complete all requisites for the 
degree, a student should file for admission to candidacy 
on a form supplied by the Graduate School. This 
application is a check sheet approved by the student's 
advisor and graduate coordinator listing all course work 
to be offered for the degree (including transferred credit 
and courses in progress). 

Assistantships 

Each Department in the College of Education funds a 
limited number of graduate teaching assistantships. 
Information about these assistantships, including 
application materials is available in the department office. 

Internships 

The internship is an intensive, culminating experience in 
which students assume a professional role in a child and 
family development setting and demonstrate the ability to 
provide direct services, to apply research and theory in a 
field-based setting, and to assume leadership roles. A 
minimum of 200 clock hours is required. 



190 College of Education 



Advising 

Upon admission, each student is assigned a faculty 
advisor who helps the student develop his or her program 
of study and must approve that program of study. Each 
student must also assemble a graduate committee for 
consultation and evaluation. Members of the committee 
include the student's faculty advisor and at least two other 
faculty members who represent major areas of 
concentration in the student's program. 

Licensure 

Candidates enrolled in Track B or C will qualify for the 
initial level B-K Teaching License issued by the North 
Carolina Department of Public Instruction upon 
completion of the first part of their program. Graduates 
will qualify for the Master's Level "advanced 
competencies" Birth-Kindergarten (B-K) Teaching 
License issued by the North Carolina Department of 
Public Instruction upon completion of the program. 

Comprehensive Exam 

An oral exam may follow the student's master's 
project/thesis completion. The oral exam is designed to 
provide the student with feedback from the members of 
the student's graduate committee about the written 
project/thesis. 

Committees 

Students should consult with their academic program 
advisor in the selection of the committee. The following 
guidelines are intended to assist the student and his or her 
academic program advisor in constituting the master's 
committee. 

1) Chair - selected for content knowledge of the subject 
area that is selected for the culminating experience. 
This person may be, but need not be, from your 
department. It is recommended, however, that this 
person hold a graduate faculty appointment in your 
department. 

2) Second and third members - selected for knowledge 
and expertise in the subject area (can be external to 
your department). 

3) Technical advisor - (Thesis and Research Projects 
only) - selected for technical support (e.g., specialized 
skills in program evaluation, technical writing, 
assessment, curriculum design, graphics, ethnography, 
and survey research methodology). This person may 
be, but need not be from your department. 

4) Additional members - may be added if the committee 
chair agrees. These members may be from - 
departments of the College other than your 
department, and may be from other colleges in the 
University or from outside the University with the 
prior written permission of the Dean of the Graduate 
School. (This whole process should start at the 
beginning of the semester prior to graduation. 
However, the student may begin anytime after 
completing 1 8 hours.) 



Master's Project/Thesis 

The nature of the project/ thesis is developed by the 
student in consultation with the major professor and 
presented to the Advisory Committee for approval. The 
project is usually something that is practical and will be 
useful to the student in the professional role that will be 
assumed upon the completion of the degree. The thesis 
takes a more research-oriented approach. 

Research Opportunities/Experiences 

Students have the option of completing either an applied 
master's project or a research project/thesis related to 
their specialty area. 

Program Certification/ Accreditation 

The College of Education is accredited by the National 
Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education 
(NCATE) and approved by the North Carolina 
Department of Public Instruction (NCDPI) to offer a 
master's degree program in Child and Family Studies: 
Early Education. Graduates will qualify for the 
Master's/Advanced Competencies "M" license and 
prepare them to pursue national certification through the 
National Board for Professional Teaching Standards 
(NBPTS). 



GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN 
CHILD AND FAMILY 
DEVELOPMENT: EARLY 
INTERVENTION 

The Graduate Certificate in Child and Family 
Development: Early Intervention is a 12-hour program. 
The certificate provides students with some of the 
coursework on services for infants, toddlers, and 
preschoolers with disabilities or at-risk of developmental 
delays that is required in order to obtain a North Carolina 
initial teaching license Birth-Kindergarten (B-K). Course 
content addresses current issues, service models for 
young children with disabilities, appropriate assessment, 
effective early intervention, and building more inclusive 
environments for young children with disabilities. 

Course Requirements 

SPED51 1 1 Issues in Early Intervention for 
Children with Disabilities (3) 

SPED5112 Assessment of Young Children with 
Disabilities: B - K (3) 

SPED521 Methods in Early Intervention: B - K 

(3) 
CHFD6210 Inclusive Education for Young 
Children (3) 

Admissions Requirements 

1) Students must have a bachelor's degree from a 
regionally accredited university. 



College of Education 191 



2) Students must provide original transcripts that 
indicate a minimum overall GPA of at least 2.75 and a 
junior/senior GPA of at least 3.0. 

3) Students are not required to take the GRE or MAT. 
However, student's wishing to apply Graduate 
Certificate coursework to the M.Ed, must take the 
GRE or MAT prior to being admitted to the Child 
and Family Development graduate program. 

4) The twelve (12) hours taken toward a Graduate 
Certificate may be applied to the advanced master's 
degree program in Child and Family Development 
with the consent of the graduate program 
coordinator. 

5) Admission to the Graduate Certificate program does 
not ensure admission to the master's degree program. 



Courses in Child and Family 
Development 

CHFD 5000. Topics in Child and Family 
Development. (1-6) May include classroom and/or 
clinical experiences in the content area. With department 
approval, may be repeated for credit for different topics. 
(Fall, Spring, Summer) 

CHFD 6000. Topics in Child and Family 
Development. (1-6) May include classroom and/or clinic 
experiences in the content area. With department 
approval, may be repeated for credit for different topics. 
(Fall, Spring, Summer) 

CHFD 6100. Adjustment Issues: Children in Family 
Context. (3) Study of adjustment problems of childhood 
and adolescence with emphasis on the context and 
patterns of the family-of-origin system that influence 
behavior and attitudes as children with and without 
disabilities grow and develop. (On demand) 

CHFD 6102. Learning and Development. (3) In-depth 
study of selected theories of learning and development. 
(Fall, Spring Summer) (Evenings) 

CHFD 6110. Parenting Education. (3) Prerequisite or 
corequisite: CHFD 6102. An examination of the 
principles and practices of parenting education in terms 
of research, program implementation, evaluation, and 
collaboration. In-depth study of developmental designs, 
supportive programs designed to prevent problems, and 
programs and organizations which respond to parent 
needs and interests. Emphasis is placed on the process of 
parent involvement, communication, and collaborative 
leadership. (On demand) 

CHFD 6115. Child and Family Advocacy. (3) 

Prerequisite: CHFD 6102. Study of the principles and 
practices of child and family advocacy. (On demand) 

CHFD 6120. Creativity, Learning Environments and 
Experiences. (3) Investigation of theories of creativity 



and their relationship to curriculum development. (On 
demand) 

CHFD 6130. Concepts of Teaching and Learning: 
Children's Play. (3) Examination of theories, trends and 
current practices in children's play. (On demand) 

CHFD 6200. Curriculum and Learning 
Environments for Young Children. (3) Prerequisite or 
corequisite: CHFD 6102. Theoretical and research 
foundations for designing, implementing, adapting, and 
evaluating curriculum that is responsive to the needs of 
young children with and without disabilities. 
Observational strategies are used to assess both the child 
(individual, sociocultural, and developmental 
characteristics) and the environment in order to identify 
best practices. (Spring) 

CHFD 6210. Inclusive Education for Young 
Children. (3) Prerequisite or corequisite: CHFD 6102. 
Inclusive education provides the opportunity for children 
with and without developmental disabilities to learn 
together. Inclusive early childhood curricula and 
instructional strategies are emphasized as is the 
professional role of interdisciplinary team member. 
Legislative mandates for inclusion are studied. (Fall) 

CHFD 6220. Family Theory and Research. (3) 

Prerequisite or corequisite: CHFD 6102. Study of family 
theories and research which employ the contextual 
framework of the family as a system and which explain 
family of origin, family functioning, family structure, and 
family process. Application of theory and research will 
include an understanding of the various levels of family 
functioning as a model for developing family support and 
intervention plans. (Fall) 

CHFD 6230. Emerging Literacy and Mathematical 
Understanding. (3) Prerequisite or corequisite: CHFD 
6102. Emergent development of literacy and 
mathematical understanding in the home and preschool 
settings for young children with and without disabilities. 
Language and cognitive development theories and 
research are linked to home and classroom experiences 
that enhance literacy and mathematical understanding 
through developmentally appropriate practices. (Spring) 

CHFD 6240. Advanced Studies in Infant and Child 
Development. (3) Prerequisite: CHFD 6102. An 
advanced course to extend knowledge of infant, toddler, 
and preschool development of children with and without 
disabilities. Developmental domains of infants and young 
children and their relationships within family and society 
will be emphasized. (Fall) 

CHFD 6400. Internship in Child and Family Studies. 

(3) Prerequisite: completion of at least 24 hours of 
graduate program. Corequisite: CHFD 6600. An 
intensive, professional supervised internship in which 
students demonstrate the ability to provide direct service, 



192 College of Education 



to apply research and theory in a field-based setting, and 
to assume leadership roles. A minimum of 200 clock 
hours is required. (Spring) 

CHFD 6600. Seminar: Leadership in Education of 
Children and Families. (3) Prerequisite: completion of 
at least 24 hours of graduate program. Corequisite: 
CHFD 6400. A synthesizing course of study focusing on 
review, compilation, analysis, and evaluation of the 
literature, research, and experiences relevant to the 
student's specialty area. Students will demonstrate 
leadership by conducting a program evaluation, creating 
innovative solutions to challenges, and initiating and 
creating collaboration among persons and across 
agencies. (Spring) 

CHFD 6800. Individual Study in Child and Family 
Studies. (1-6) Prerequisite: a written plan of study 
approved by the student's advisor and the individual 
study director. Designed to allow a student to pursue 
specialty interests under the supervision of an appropriate 
faculty member. Permission of the student's advisor and 
appropriate individual study director. May be repeated for 
credit. (Fall, Spring, Summer) 

CHFD 6900. Research in Child and Family Studies 
(Master's Project/Thesis). (3) Prerequisites: RSCH 
6101; completion of at least 24 hours of graduate 
program. Design, implementation, presentation, and 
evaluation of an approved applied research project in 
student's specialty area. The applied project is of the 
student's own design under the supervision of an advisor 
and graduate committee. Graded Pass/No Credit only. 
(Fall) 

Advanced Graduate Only 
CHFD 7135. Readings in Learning and 
Development. (3) Examines research data about the 
development of human behavior interpreted in terms of 
multiple disciplines, including psychology, anthropology 
and ethnology. (On demand) 



COUNSELING 

Department of Counseling 

College of Education Building 

704-687-8960 

http://education.uncc.edu/counseling 

Degrees 

M.A., Ph.D., Certificates 

Department Chair 

Dr. Susan Furr 



Coordinators 

Dr. Phyllis Post - Doctoral coordinator 
Dr. Henry L. Harris - Master's coordinator 

Graduate Faculty 

Dr. Lyndon Abrams, Assistant Professor 

Dr. Bob Barret, Professor 

Dr. Jack Culbrefh, Assistant Professor 

Dr. Susan Furr, Assistant Professor 

Dr. Henry Harris, Associate Professor 

Dr. Pam Lassiter, Assistant Professor 

Dr. Kok-Mun Ng, Assistant Professor 

Dr. Phyllis Post, Professor 

Dr. Ed Wierzalis, Assistant Professor 



MASTER OF ARTS IN 
COUNSELING 

The M.A. program in Counseling is accredited by the 
Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related 
Educational Programs (CACREP) in both school 
counseling and community counseling. Both 
specializations quality graduates to become Licensed 
Professional Counselors in North Carolina and for 
certification eligibility by the National Board of Certified 
Counselors. The school counseling specialization qualifies 
graduates for advanced-level K-12 school counseling 
licensure in North Carolina. 

Program Objectives 

As prospective professional counselors, graduates of the 
program are prepared to: counsel clients, both 
individually and in groups, on educational, career, life 
planning, social, emotional, physical, spiritual, and 
organizational concerns; provide information to clients 
for educational, social, career, and/or life planning; 
consult with other professionals concerning client needs; 
and conduct needs assessments, evaluations, and other 
activities for program design. 

Additional Admission Requirements 

In addition to the general requirements for admission to 
the Graduate School, the criteria for admission to the 
M.A. program in Counseling include an applicant's 
potential success in forming effective interpersonal 
relationships in individual and small-group contexts; 
aptitude for graduate-level study; vocational goals and 
objectives; openness to self-examination; and potential 
for personal and professional self-development. 
Admission decisions are based on applicants' individual 
profiles and made by a committee of program faculty. 
Applicants with the highest profile rankings are invited to 
campus for an interview process; the number invited is 
determined by the number of anticipated openings in the 
program. Students are admitted to the program in die 
spring of each year, and they are expected to begin their 
studies die following summer or fall. The application 



College of Education 193 



deadline for each year's admissions process is November 
15. 

Prerequisite Requirements 

Students are not required to have an undergraduate major 
in any particular field to enter the counseling program. 

Degree Requirements 

The M.A. program in Counseling requires a total of 60 
hours of core courses for all students and specialization 
courses for students in either school counseling or community 
counseling. Both specializations include a series of required 
courses, clinical experience courses and elective courses. 

Admission to Candidacy 

In addition to meeting Graduate School academic 
regulations, counseling students should submit a 
completed Application for Admission to Candidacy when 
they submit their application for the program's capstone 
experience to the Department of Counseling, Special 
Education, and Child Development. 



Core courses for 

CHFD6102 

Or 

EDUC6100 

RSCH6101 

RSCH6109 

CSLG6100 

CSLG6101 

CSLG6110 

CSLG6111 

CSLG6120 

CSLG6121 

CSLG6145 

CSLG6150 



All Students (33 credits): 
Learning and Development 

Learning and Development 

Educational Research Methods 

Assessment and Evaluation Methods 

Counseling Theories 

Ethics in Counseling 

Counseling Techniques 

Advanced Techniques 

Group Counseling 

Structured Groups 

Multicultural Counseling 

Career and Lifestyle Development 



School specializations courses (27 credits): 

Required (9 credits): 

CSLG7141 School Counseling 

CSLG7646 Administration and Leadership of 

School Counseling Services 
Elective from other Department in College (e.g., 

Special Education course) 

Clinical experiences (two of three must be in a 

school setting) (9 credits): 

CSLG7430 Practicum in Counseling (1 50 hrs) 
CSLG7435 Internship (300 hrs) 
CSLG7435 Advanced Internship (300 hrs) 

Elective Courses (9 hours). These courses must be 
approved by the student's advisor. 

Community Specialization courses (27 credits): 

Required (6 credits): 

CSLG7170 Community Counseling and 
Management 



PSYC61 53 Classification of Psychological 
Dysfunctions 

Clinical experiences (two of three should be in a 

community setting) (12 credits): 

CSLG7430 Practicum in Counseling (150 hrs) 
CSLG7435 Internship (300 hrs) 
CSLG7435 Advanced Internship (300 hrs) 

Elective Courses (12 hours). These courses must be 
approved by the student's advisor. 

Comprehensive Exam or Master's Project 

Students must successfully complete either a written 
comprehensive examination or a master's project near the 
end of their program of study. Students are expected to 
consult with their advisors during the first 24 hours of 
course work concerning procedures and preparation for 
this experience. 

Advising 

All students should plan their program of study by 
December of their first year of study with their advisors. 

Licensure 

Students who graduate from the school counseling track 
are eligible, upon passing the exam required by the North 
Carolina Department of Public Instruction (DPI), to be 
recommended for school counseling licensure from the 
North Carolina DPI. All graduates are eligible to apply 
for the credential of Licensed Professional Counselor 
through the NCBLPC. 

Program Certifications/Accreditation(s) 

The school and community tracks are accredited by the 
Council for the Accreditation of Counseling and Related 
Education Programs (CACREP). 



PH.D. IN COUNSELING 

The Ph.D. in Counseling is designed to provide doctoral- 
level preparation for professionals who seek advanced 
clinical training and leadership positions in the counseling 
field. A unique feature of this program is its emphasis on 
increasing knowledge, awareness, and skills in interacting 
with socially and culturally diverse populations. Doctoral- 
level counselors may work as counselor supervisors, 
direct service providers, counselor educators, program 
consultants, researchers, program evaluators, and in other 
roles that require leadership in the areas of human 
services, family development, community organizations, 
and counseling. Potential employment settings include 
schools, hospitals, employee assistance programs, 
substance abuse treatment centers, community mental 
health agencies, and private practice centers, as well as 
institutions of higher education. 



194 College of Education 



The Ph.D. in Counseling requires a minimum of 57 
semester hours beyond those earned in an accredited 
master's program of at least 48 semester hours. Advanced 
preparation will be required in the following areas: 

1) implications of ways in which diversity (e.g., race, 
gender, age, religion, spirituality, ethnicity, 
mental/physical ability, nationality, and sexual 
orientation) influence counseling practice and 
counselor education; 

2) theories pertaining to the principles and practice of 
counseling, career development, group work, and 
consultation; 

3) clinical skill development in counseling, group work, 
and consultation; 

4) theories and practice of counselor supervision; 

5) design and implementation of quantitative research 
and methodology (e.g., univariate, multivariate, single 
subject design); 

6) design and implementation of qualitative research and 
methodology (e.g., grounded theory, ethnography, 
and phenomenological methodologies); 

7) models and methods of assessment and use of data; 

8) ethical and legal considerations in counselor education 
and supervision; 

9) instructional theory and methods relevant to 
counselor education. 



Prerequisite Requirements 

Applicants should possess a CACREP approved Master's 
Degree in counseling with a cumulative GPA of 3.5 (on a 
scale of 4.0) or higher. Students with master's degrees 
requiring less than 60 semester hours may need to 
complete prerequisite courses. Two years of experience as 
a professional counselor preferred. 

Degree Requirements and Course 
Scheduling 



Year 1: Fall 

CSLG8100 
CSLG8345 
RSCH8110 
CSLG8000 

Year 1: Spring 

CSLG8431 
CSLG8346 
RSCH 8120 



Advanced Counseling Theories 
Advanced Multicultural Counseling 
Statistics 1 
Professional Orientation 



Doctoral Practicum in Counseling 
Applied Multicultural Counseling 
Statistics 2 



Year 1: Summer 

RSCH8210 Applied Research 
CSLG8203 Instructional Theories 



Program Objectives 

The Program Objectives are: 

1) To acquire, integrate, and apply empirical and 
theoretical knowledge of the field of counseling. 

2) To develop leadership skills in counselor education, 
supervision, advanced counseling practice, and 
research. 

3) To apply advanced skills and competencies in field- 
based settings. 

4) To conduct research and generate new knowledge in 
counseling. 

5) To design, adapt, and evaluate curricula in the field of 
counseling. 

6) To develop depth and breadth in professional growth 
and continued life-long learning. 

7) To examine the influence of social context and policy 
variables on human behavior. 

8) To show increased sensitivity and clinical skills that 
demonstrate awareness of the diversity of race, 
gender, age, religion, ethnicity, mental/physical ability, 
nationality, and sexual orientation as relevant to 
counseling professionals. 

In addition, doctoral students will participate in internship 
experiences of at least 600 clock hours that may include 
counselor education, supervision, advanced counseling 
practice, and research. 

Students also collaborate with faculty as a part of their 
Professional Development plan in teaching, supervision, 
counseling services, research, professional writing, and 
service to the community, region, and profession. 



Year 2: Fall 

CSLG8110 
CSLG8998 
RSCH8140 

Year 2: Spring 

CSLG8410 
CSLG8440 
Elective 



Clinical Supervision in Counseling 
Prospectus Design 
Multivariate Statistics 



Practicum in Clinical Supervision 
Internship I 



Year 2: Summer 

CSLG8999 Dissertation 

Year 3: Fall 

CSLG8440/8445 Internship 

CSLG8999 Dissertation 
Elective 



Year 3: Spring 

CSLG8999 

(CSLG8445 



Dissertation 
Internship II) 



Admission to Candidacy Requirements 

Students are considered candidates for the doctoral 
degree on successful completion of the Comprehensive 
Examination and acceptance of the Dissertation 
Proposal. 

Assistantships 

Graduate Assistantships are available in various offices on 
campus. Applications must be submitted to individual 
departments/offices. 



College of Education 195 



Internships 

Doctoral students are required to complete a total of 600 
clock hours (spread over two semesters) of internship 
(CSLG 8440). One internship will be devoted to 
developing clinical skills; the other may be either further 
clinical development or, for those interested in counselor 
education as a career, may be directed towards teaching 
with the Counseling Faculty. 

Practica 

A Doctoral Practicum is taken in the first year of study. 
The practicum requires 1 50 hours over the course of a 
semester at an approved site in the community. The 
Practicum will involve the acquisition of new skills and 
learnings regardless of the site selected. 

Electives 

There are two elective courses in the curriculum. These 
are most commonly taken within the Counseling 
curriculum but may be taken in other departments as long 
as the courses are designated at the 8000 level. 

Advising 

Each student is assigned a faculty advisor when admitted 
to the program. The advisor assists student during the 
initial stages of the program. By the end of the student's 
first semester the advisor will have assisted the student in 
developing a Program of Study. The Program of Study 
must be approved by and filed with the Doctoral 
Program Coordinator. Advisors will also assist students in 
identifying faculty whose research interests and expertise 
are congruent with the student's probable area of inquiry 
for the dissertation. The assistance of the advisor does 
not relieve the student of responsibility for completing 
required work and following departmental and university 
procedures. As students approach candidacy and a 
concentration area for the dissertation is identified the 
student may request a change of advisors, and the new 
advisor will become the Dissertation Committee Chair. 

Comprehensive Exam 

The main objective of the written portion of the 
qualifying exam is to ensure that the student is adequately 
prepared to write a dissertation to complete the Ph.D. 
degree requirements. Being prepared means the 
following: 

1) examinees must be able to analyze and synthesize 
information obtained from coursework and research 
within a multicultural counseling context; 

2) examinees must demonstrate advanced knowledge in 
the core areas of supervision and counseling theory; 

3) examinees must demonstrate competencies in 
research methodology and evaluation. 

The exam will be a 4.5 day take-home exam and will be 
administered in the fall and spring semesters. 

Dissertation Committee 

A Dissertation Committee comprised of at least five 
faculty members will be formally appointed for each 



student after admission to candidacy. At least three 
committee members must be on the Counseling Program 
faculty and one member will be appointed by the 
Graduate School. A person outside the university may 
serve as a full member of the Dissertation Committee in 
situations where knowledge or expertise of a particular 
nature is desired. With the mutual consent of the student 
and the faculty member, a faculty member who is 
recommended by the Doctoral Program Coordinator and 
appointed by the Department Chair will be designated to 
serve as the Chair of the Doctoral Committee. The Chair 
of the Doctoral Committee will provide program 
advisement through the Comprehensive Exam process, 
the internship experiences, the remainder of the student's 
program of study, and is, at all times following 
appointment, the advisor and coordinator of the student's 
doctoral study. Chairs of Doctoral Committees are 
specifically responsible for seeing that the student 
progresses in an expeditious manner towards completion 
of the degree. Chairs will assist students in organizing 
committee meetings, conducting original research, 
presenting the proposal, and organizing the dissertation 
defense. Eligible Faculty are all tenured faculty 
(Professor/Associate Professor). Assistant professors 
who have been reappointed for their second term may 
chair dissertation committees as follows. In their initial 
role as dissertation chairs, Assistant Professors will chair 
two committees with the assistance of a tenured faculty 
mentor. During the mentoring process the two faculty 
members will develop a clear understanding of the roles 
and responsibilities of each, and the student will be fully 
informed of this agreement. After serving as chair on two 
successfully completed dissertations, assistant professors 
may serve as chair without mentoring. Each appointed 
Committee Member will have both voice and vote on all 
relevant matters pertaining to a doctoral student's 
progress towards the degree. At least four committee 
members must be present for the oral defense of the 
dissertation. The oral defense is considered satisfactory 
upon the positive vote of at least four committee 
members. Prior to and following the appointment of this 
committee students are encouraged to work with faculty 
on dissertation ideas. 

Dissertation 

Each candidate for the doctoral degree is required to 
prepare and present a dissertation that shows 
independent investigation and is acceptable in form and 
content to the Dissertation Committee. A doctoral 
dissertation must demonstrate the candidate's ability to 
conceive, design, conduct, and interpret independent, 
original, and creative research and must make a unique 
contribution to knowledge in the field of counseling. 
Under the direct supervision of the Doctoral Committee 
Chair, students are encouraged to consult regularly with 
their Dissertation Committee members during the 
planning, conducting and writing of the dissertation. 
Following the approval of the dissertation proposal 
students are required to maintain continuous enrollment 
(fall and spring semesters) for dissertation study until 



196 College of Education 



work is completed. Continuous enrollment begins on the 
date the Graduate School approves the student's 
dissertation topic. Students who exceed the required 
number of hours for degree completion will register for 
CSLG 8999 for three credits each semester until degree 
requirements have been completed. 

Financial Aid/Financial Assistance 

There is limited financial aid available in the form of 
grants and tuition waivers. The exact amount of funds 
available for any given year varies. 

Program Certifications/Accreditation(s) 

The program has been accredited by the Council for the 
Accreditation of Counseling and Related Education 
Programs (CACREP). 



CERTIFICATE IN SUBSTANCE 
ABUSE COUNSELING 

A curriculum has been established for a specialty in 
substance abuse counseling. The four courses CSLG 
6160/8160: Theories of Chemical Dependence; CSLG 
6161/8161: Chemical Dependence: Assessment and 
Diagnosis; CSLG 6162/8162: Chemical Dependence: 
Counseling Individuals, Families, and Groups; CSLG 
6163/8163: and Chemical Dependence: Treatment 
Planning and Relapse Prevention compose a specialty in 
substance abuse counseling. These four courses plus 600 
hours of supervised field experiences in substance abuse 
treatment facilities are components of a university- 
approved certificate program. Students who successfully 
complete the four courses along with the 600 hours of 
field experience, and hold a master's degree in counseling 
or related field are exempt from the written portion of the 
exam required for certification by the North Carolina 
Substance Abuse Professional Certification Board. 
Applications for admission to the Certificate Program will 
be considered as they are received and admissions will be 
ongoing. Students are admitted to the Graduate School 
in a special category for certificate students. 

Additional Admission Requirements 

In addition to the general requirements for admission to a 
certificate program, applicants must provide official 
transcripts, three letters of recommendation from persons 
familiar with the applicant's personal and professional 
qualifications, and an essay describing the applicant's 
relevant experience and objectives in undertaking the 
certificate program in substance abuse counseling. 

Financial Assistance 

Financial assistance is available on a limited basis for 
students enrolled in the Substance Abuse Certificate 
Program. Contact the Department of Counseling for 
information on scholarship application. 



POST-MASTERS CERTIFICATE 
IN SCHOOL COUNSELING 

The post-masters certificate in school counseling consists 
of a coherent program in school counseling. Successful 
completion of the program requirements will enable the 
counselor to be recommended for licensure in school 
counseling from the North Carolina Department of 
Public Instruction. A minimum of twelve credit hours is 
required for the post-masters graduate certificate. All 
course work applied to a certificate must be completed 
within four years. Transfer credit is not normally accepted 
into the certificate program. 

Program Description 

This program has been designed for counselors who want 
to become eligible for licensure as school counselors by 
the Department of Public Instruction in North Carolina. 
The completion of this program, in addition to passing 
the PRAXIS II Specialty Area Test for School 
Counselors, will qualify students to become licensed 
School Counselors. Requirements for completion of the 
program are CSLG 7 141. The School Counselor (Fall), 
CLSG 7646. Administration and Leadership of School 
Counseling Services (Spring), CSLG 7435. Internship 
(School-based Clinical) (Fall/Spring), a School-based 
Elective (Fall, Spring, Summer) and any additional course 
work based on an individual review of each applicant's 
graduate transcript(s) and selected program option. 

Additional Admission Requirements 

1) A master's degree in counseling from an accredited 
university. 

2) Written application to Graduate Admissions 
accompanied by the application fee in effect. 

3) GPA required for entry into a master's degree 
program. 

4) Official transcripts 

Program Options 

OPTION A: For counselors who graduated from a 60 

credit CACREP accredited program. 

Program Requirements: 

Based on a review of the applicant's transcript, a program 

of study will be designed that indicates the counselor has 

completed the following courses: 

CSLG7141 The School Counselor (3 credits) 
CSLG7646 Administration and Leadership of 

School Counseling Services (3 credits) 
CSLG7435 School-based Internship (3 credits) 
An additional school-based elective (3 credits) 

OPTION B: For counselors who graduated from 
CACREP accredited programs with less then 60 credits. 
Program Requirements: 

Based on a review of applicant's transcript, a program of 
study will be designed that is equivalent to a 60 credit 



College of Education 197 



school counseling program, including the following 

courses: 

CSLG7141 The School Counselor (3 credits) 
CSLG7646 Administration and Leadership of 

School Counseling Services (3 credits) 
CSLG7435 School-based Internship (3 credits) 
An additional school-based elective (3 credits) 

OPTION C: For counselors who graduated from non- 

CACREP accredited programs. 

Program Requirements: 

Based on a review of applicant's transcript, a program of 

study will be designed that is equivalent to a 48 credit 

school counseling program, including the following 

courses: 

CSLG7141 The School Counselor (3 credits) 
CSLG7646 Administration and Leadership of 

School Counseling Services (3 credits) 
CSLG7435 School-based Internship (3 credits) 
An additional school-based elective (3 credits) 

Additional Program Requirements 

In addition to completing required courses, students must 
pass the PRAXIS II Specialty Area Test for School 
Counseling to qualify for state licensure. 



Courses in Counseling 

CSLG 6000. Topics in Counseling. (1-6) May include 
classroom and/or clinic experiences in the content area. 
With department approval, may be repeated for credit for 
different topics. (Fall, Spring, Summer) 

CSLG 6100. Counseling Theories. (3) Examination of 
the counseling relationship from various theoretical 
frameworks, including client-centered, psychoanalytic, 
Gestalt, transactional analysis, rational emotive, reality, 
and behavior theories. (Fall, Summer) 

CSLG 6101. Ethical and Professional Issues In 
Counseling. (3) Ethical and legal responsibilities, ethical 
standards, interpretations of laws by local authorities, and 
court decisions that impact the counseling profession. 
Skills of practical, ethical, and legal consultation are also 
emphasized. (Fall, Summer) 

CSLG 6109. Research in Counseling. (3) Examination 
of principles and practices for research and development 
of programs in counseling with emphasis on 
developmental designs, preventive programs, objectives 
and organizations. (On demand) 

CSLG 6110. Counseling Techniques. (3) Examination 
of concepts of individual counseling and the means for 
establishing facilitative relationships including 
competence in basic counseling skills and interventions. 
(Fall, Spring) 



CSLG 6111. Advanced Counseling Techniques. (3) 

Prerequisites: CSLG 6100 and 6110. Counseling 
interventions useful in facilitating client change and 
growth from an action-oriented, problem management 
perspective. Strategies for cognitive, affective, and 
behavioral change will be practiced. (Fall, Spring, Summer) 

CSLG 6115. Person-to-Person Relationships. (3) 

Examination of concepts and methods for improving 
human relationships. This course has an experiential 
component. (On demand) 

CSLG 6120. Group Counseling. (3) Investigation of 
concepts of group counseling and the means for 
developing facilitative interaction in groups which will 
include an experiential component as a major learning 
activity. (Fall, Spring) 

CSLG 6121. The Leadership and Design of 
Structured Groups. (3) Methods of creating 
psychoeducational groups. Focus on applying 
psychological theories to the selection of group content. 
Leadership issues such as screening, dealing with difficult 
members, and leader roles are addressed. (Fall, Spring) 

CSLG 6145. Multicultural Counseling. (3) Approaches 
to counseling that focus on multicultural differences so 
the counselor will be more effective in dealing with clients 
from a variety of cultural backgrounds. (Spring, Summer) 

CSLG 6150. Career and Lifestyle Development. (3) A 

counseling-oriented course designed to help the 
counselor and/or career education teacher develop the 
ability to use career information with emphasis on 
understanding of occupational information, systems of 
collection and usage forms. (Spring Summer) 

CSLG 6152. Approaches to Career Development (K- 
12). (3) Counselors and vocational development 
coordinators gain an understanding and skills necessary 
for (1) the development, management and evaluation of a 
comprehensive, competency-based K-12 career 
education/ counseling program, (2) infusing career 
education into K-12 curriculum in a counselor/consultant 
capacity, and (3) establishing and leading successful 
individual and group career development activities. (On 
demand) 

CSLG 6160. Theories of Chemical Dependence. (3). 

Introduction to the theoretical, philosophical, and 
historical premises upon which chemical dependence is 
explained and treatment and prevention are based. 
Biological, psychological, and sociological etiologies of 
substance abuse and dependence are studied. (Alternate 
Fall, Even years) 

CSLG 6161. Assessment and Diagnosis of Chemical 
Dependency. (3) Process and procedures for 
professional biopsychosocial assessment and diagnosis of 
substance abuse and dependence in adolescents and 



198 College of Education 



adults are studied. Implications of chemical dependence 
for clients and their families are addressed. (Alternate 
Spring, Odd years) 

CSLG 6162. Chemical Dependency: Counseling 
Individuals, Families, and Groups. (3) A counseling 
techniques course designed to help students who have 
worked as professional substance abuse counselors and 
those who have litde or no experience working with 
substance dependent individuals and their families. 
(Alternate Fall, Odd years) 

CSLG 6163. Chemical Dependency: Treatment 
Planning and Relapse Prevention. (3) An introduction 
to the principles and practices upon which chemical 
dependence treatment and relapse prevention are based. 
Computerized programs will be used to aid students in 
assessment, diagnosis, and in planning treatment for 
chemically dependent clients (Alternate Spring Evenyears) 

CSLG 6200. Introduction to Theories of Family 
Counseling. (3) Examination of appropriate 
interventions in working with families focusing on major 
theorists and techniques in the field. (Spring) 

CSLG 6201. Counseling Needs of Women. (3) 

Women's development and needs, the problems they 
bring to counselors, strategies for helping with them, 
myths about women and biases in psychological research. 
(On demand) 

CSLG 6800. Individual Study in Counseling. (1-6) 

Prerequisite: Permission of the student's adviser. 
Independent study under the supervision of an 
appropriate faculty member. May be repeated for credit. 
(Fall, Spring, Summer) 

CSLG 7110. Individual Assessment. (3) Prerequisite: 
RSCH 6109 or PSYC 4140. Examination of the major 
aptitude, intelligence and other psychological tests 
commonly used in counseling with emphasis on test 
theory as well as the administration, scoring and 
interpretation of tests and the communication of their 
results. (On demand) 

CSLG 7120. Administration and Supervision of 
Counseling Services. (3) Planning, operation, 
implementation and supervision of counseling and 
guidance services in schools and agencies with emphasis 
on the development of administrative and supervisory 
skills. (On demand) 

CSLG 7140. Elementary School Counseling and 
Guidance. (3) Introduction to the guidance function in 
the elementary school with emphasis on the counselor's 
role in counseling, consulting and coordinating school 
and community resources for the optimum benefit of the 
child. (On demand) 



CSLG 7141. The School Counselor. (3) Development 
of functional skills necessary for integration of counseling 
activities into the school curriculum. Focus on the role of 
the counselor in counseling individuals, small group 
counseling, classroom guidance, consultation, program 
design, coordinating school and community resources, 
and administration of special programs. (Fall) 

CSLG 7142. Introduction to Play Therapy. (3) 

Examination of concepts of play therapy and the means 
for establishing facilitative relationship with children 
under the age of ten years. (Summer) 

CSLG 7143. Advanced Play Therapy: Extending the 

Skills. (3) Prerequisite: CSLG 7142. Focuses on 
advanced play therapy skills and introduces concepts and 
skills for training parents/teachers to be therapeutic 
agents in their children's lives through the utilization of 
play therapy skills. (Alternate Fall, Evenyears) 

CSLG 7151. Approaches to Adult Career 
Development. (3) Prerequisite: CSLG 6150. For the 
career development specialist who needs to survey an 
environment in which adults are seeking career 
counseling; assess needs; develop interventions strategies 
to meet needs; and assess outcomes. (On demand) 

CSLG 7153. Research Techniques and Computer 
Applications in Career Counseling. (3) Prerequisites: 
RSCH 6101, 6109 and 6110. Skills in preparing a 
literature review upon which to base a research study; 
critiquing theoretical, philosophical, and research material 
and reports; and conducting and reporting a research 
study. Focus on understanding the effective application 
of computer technology to the provision of career-related 
services in mental health, education, rehabilitative or 
other human services settings. (On demand) 

CSLG 7160. Solution-Focused Brief Therapy. (3) 

Prerequisites: CSLG 6110; CSLG 6100; CSLG 7430. An 
introduction to counseling in a time-limited manner while 
helping clients understand how they maintain their 
problems and how to construct solutions. (Summer) 

CSLG 7170. Community Counseling and 
Management. (3) Counseling in community agency 
settings, including the roles and functions of a 
professional counselor, assessing the needs of an agency 
population and the interworkings of various agencies and 
agency networks. (Fall) 

CSLG 7190. Introduction to Pastoral Counseling. (3) 

Prerequisites: CSLG 6100, 6110. Introduction to the field 
of pastoral counseling including both theological and 
counseling dimensions. (On demand) 

CSLG 7191. Advanced Issues in Pastoral Counseling. 

(3) Prerequisite: CSLG 7190. Specific content relevant to 
pastoral counseling including didactic and experiential 
foci. (On demand) 



College of Education 199 



CSLG 7205. Techniques of Family Counseling. (3) 

Prerequisites: CSLG 6100, 6200. An overview of 
techniques used by family counselors working from 
communications, structural or strategic orientations. (On 
demand) 

CSLG 7430. Practicum in Counseling and Guidance. 

(3) Prerequisites: CSLG 6100, 6101, 6110, and 7142 if 
working in an elementary school setting . Supervision of 
individual and group counseling interventions conducted 
in field settings; special attention to the development of 
evaluative criteria for self and peer assessment. A 
minimum of 10 hours per week in field placement. 
Offered on a pass/no credit basis. May be repeated once 
for credit with departmental approval. (Fall, Spring) 

CSLG 7435. Internship in Counseling. (3) Prerequisite: 
CSLG 7430 and 7142 if working in an elementary school 
setting. Students will participate in delivering counseling 
services in a field setting and receive supervision of their 
work in weekly seminars. A minimum of 20 hours per 
week in field placement. Offered on a pass/no credit 
basis. (Fall, Spring) 

CSLG 7436. Advanced Internship. (3) Prerequisite: 
CSLG 7435. Continuation of CSLG 7435. Students will 
function as counselors in field settings and have the 
opportunity to demonstrate advanced level skills in 
weekly seminars. A minimum of 20 hours per week in 
field placement. (Fall, Spring) 

CSLG 7600. Sexual Orientation Diversity in Clinical 
Practice. (3) The course considers the experience of 
being gay, lesbian, bisexual or transgendered in our 
society. Theoretical understandings of sexual orientation 
are covered, as well as the impact of societal prejudice on 
gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgendered individuals and 
their communities. The experience of diversity with such 
communities is discussed, especially racial/ethnic 
diversity. Exploration of individual values combines with 
an emphasis on clinical practice to make this course 
relevant both personally and professionally. (Spring) 

CSLG 7601. Counseling: The Spiritual Dimension. 

(3) This course is designed to assist counselors in 
understanding and facilitating the development of their 
personal spirituality as well as the spirituality of others 
with whom they provide counseling services. Spirituality 
is viewed as an important component to achieving mental 
health and to a balanced sense of wellness. Basic beliefs 
and various spiritual systems including major world 
religions will be examined (Spring) 

CSLG 7644. Theory and Practice of Play Therapy. (3) 

An advanced exploration of fundamental issues involved 
in play therapy, this seminar course will focus on an in- 
depth study of various theoretical approaches underlying 
the practice of play therapy. Historical and theoretical 
foundations of play therapy are presented as are current 



issues in providing appropriate counseling services to 
children aged two to ten years old. (On Demand) 

CSLG 7645. Cognitive-Behavior Theory and Practice. 

(3) An introduction to the theory and practice of 
cognitive-behavior therapy that can be applied in the 
school setting. The major theories (cognitive therapy, 
cognitive behavior modification, REBT, and reality 
therapy) will be examined, and treatment planning and 
application of techniques will be studied. {Summer) 

CSLG 7646. Administration and Leadership of 
School Counseling Services. (3) This course will focus 
on the organization, planning, management, and 
evaluation of school counseling programs. Current issues 
impacting school counselors will be explored and 
intervention strategies will be examined. (Spring) 

CSLG 7680. Crisis Counseling. (3) This course will 
focus on a general crisis intervention model and its 
application to specific crisis situations. Topics include: 
suicide intervention, rape crisis, telephone counseling, and 
disaster intervention. (Summer) 

CSLG 7681. Grief and Loss Counseling. (3) This 
course examines the theory of loss, the tasks involved in 
grieving, and the skills needed by a counselor working 
with grief and loss issues. Loss will be examined from a 
broad perspective and includes issues associated with 
death, loss of relationships, and loss of abilities. (Fall) 

CSLG 7800. Individual Study in Counseling. (1-6) 

Prerequisite of the student's advisor. Independent study 
under the supervision of an appropriate faculty member. 
May be repeated for credit. (Fall, Spring Summer) 

CSLG 7999. Graduate Residence. (1) Meets Graduate 
School requirement for continuous enrollment during 
completion of capstone project or comprehensive 
examination. (Fall, Spring, Summer) 

CSLG 8000. Topics in Counseling. (1-6) May include 
classroom and/ or clinic experiences in the content area. 
With department approval, may be repeated for credit for 
different topics. (Fall, Spring Summer) 

CSLG 8100. Advanced Counseling Theory Seminar. 

(3) The principles and practices of traditional and more 
current counseling theories are studied. Students will 
examine the rationale and consequences of their pre- 
conceived notions about conditions that influence human 
behavior and change. Students will develop their own 
theory of counseling. (Fall) 

CSLG 8105. Seminar in Research in Counseling. (3) 

This course focuses on exploring the outcome research in 
counseling and career development, as well as the 
variables that influence the counseling process. Special 
focus will be on developing areas of personal expertise, 



200 College of Education 



developing research theses, and writing critical literature 
reviews. fO» Demand) 

CSLG 8110. Clinical Supervision in Counseling. (3) 

This course provides a critical overview of the conceptual 
and empirical literature on counseling supervision, 
including models, approaches/techniques, relationship 
and process issues, and ethical and legal considerations. 
Students will develop conceptual knowledge, skills, and 
self-awareness concerning these topic areas through 
readings, seminar discussions, and application via 
supervising master's level students. (Fall) 

CSLG 8111. Solution-Focused Brief Therapy. (3) 

Prerequisites: CSLG 6110; CSLG 6100; CSLG 7430. An 
introduction to counseling in a time-limited manner while 
helping clients understand how they maintain their 
problems and how to construct solutions. (Summer) 

CSLG 8142. Introduction to Play Therapy. (3) 

Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. Examination of 
concepts of play therapy and the means for establishing 
facilitative relationship with children under the age of ten 
years. (Summer) 

CSLG 8143. Advanced Play Therapy: Extending the 

Skills. (3) Prerequisite: CSLG 7142. Corequisite: None. 
Introduces concepts and skills for training parents to be 
therapeutic agents in their children's lives through the 
utilization of play therapy skills. (Alternate Fall, Even years) 

CSLG 8160. Theories of Chemical Dependence. (3). 

Introduction to the theoretical, philosophical, and 
historical premises upon which chemical dependence is 
explained and treatment and prevention are based. 
Biological, psychological, and sociological etiologies of 
substance abuse and dependence are studied. (Alternate 
Fall, Evenyears) 

CSLG 8161. Assessment and Diagnosis of Chemical 
Dependency. (3) Process and procedures for 
professional biopsychosocial assessment and diagnosis of 
substance abuse and dependence in adolescents and 
adults are studied. Implications of chemical dependence 
for clients and their families are addressed. (Alternate 
Spring Oddyears) 

CSLG 8162. Chemical Dependency: Counseling 
Individuals, Families, and Groups. (3) A counseling 
techniques course designed to help students who have 
worked as professional substance abuse counselors and 
those who have little or no experience working with 
substance dependent individuals and their families. 
(Alternate Fall, Oddyears) 

CSLG 8163. Chemical Dependency: Treatment 
Planning and Relapse Prevention. (3) An introduction 
to the principles and practices upon which chemical 
dependence treatment and relapse prevention are based. 
Computerized programs will be used to aid students in 



assessment, diagnosis, and in planning treatment for 
chemically dependent clients (3) (Alternate Spring, Even 
years) 

CSLG 8200. Introduction to Theories of Family 
Counseling. (3) Examination of appropriate 
interventions in working with families focusing on major 
theorists and techniques in the field. (Spring) 

CSLG 8201. Counseling Needs of Women. (3) 

Women's development and needs, the problems they 
bring to counselors, strategies for helping with them, 
myths about women and biases in psychological research. 
(On demand) 

CSLG 8203. Instructional Theory in Counselor 
Education. (3) This course will prepare the student to 
become a professor in counselor education. An 
examination of the theories and methods of teaching in 
higher education will be explored. Readings from 
professional journals, lecture, discussion, and practical 
application in the classroom will be used to meet course 
objectives. (Summer) 

CSLG 8345. Advanced Multicultural Counseling. (3) 

An advanced exploration of fundamental issues involved 
in culturally competent counseling, this seminar course 
will focus on an in-depth study of various cultures 
seeking counseling services. Students will examine various 
oppression models and have an opportunity to apply 
them to cultures in our community. (Spring) 

CSLG 8346. Applied Multicultural Counseling . (3) 

This course focuses on the impact of oppression on the 
daily lives of marginalized groups. Students conduct 
extensive field-based investigations into various cultures 
in order to gain mastery-level knowledge of the practical 
day-to-day experiences especially as they involve 
accessing mental health services. Special focus will be on 
counseling applications that are appropriate within and 
between cultures. Learning to utilize systems 
interventions and the mastering the skills of consultation 
are key components of this course. (Fall) 

CSLG 8410. Practicum in Clinical Supervision. (3) 

This course will provide students with the practical 
experiences necessary to provide individual supervision of 
counselors, including field supervision and analyses of 
counseling audio and videotapes. Students will have the 
opportunity to test their conceptual knowledge, skill, and 
self-awareness developed through prerequisite 
coursework. Offered on a pass/no credit basis. (Spring) 

CSLG 8431. Doctoral Practicum in Counseling. (3) 

Practicum is an applied course where students will 
develop and/or refine their counseling skills. These skills 
will be conceptually linked counselor education and 
supervision. Working in sites throughout the community, 
students will produce audio and/or video tapes of 



College of Education 201 



individual and group counseling practice for supervision. 
Offered on a pass/no credit basis. (Spring) 

CSLG 8440. Internship I. (3) Student will deliver 
counseling services in a field setting and receive individual 
and group supervision of their work weekly. A minimum 
of 300 clock hours is required. Offered on a pass/no 
credit basis. (Fall, Spring) 

CSLG 8445. Internship II. (3) Students will participate 
in 300 hours internship experience in field settings that 
are appropriate to their career objectives under the 
supervision of a University program faculty member. 
Offered on a pass/no credit basis. (Fall, Spring) 

CSLG 8600. Sexual Orientation Diversity in Clinical 
Practice. (3) The course considers the experience of 
being gay, lesbian, bisexual or transgendered in our 
society. Theoretical understandings of sexual orientation 
are covered, as well as the impact of societal prejudice on 
gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgendered individuals and 
their communities. The experience of diversity with such 
communities is discussed, especially racial/ethnic 
diversity. Exploration of individual values combines with 
an emphasis on clinical practice to make this course 
relevant both personally and professionally. (On Demand) 

CSLG 8601. Counseling: The Spiritual Dimension. 

(3) This course is designed to assist counselors in 
understanding and facilitating the development of their 
personal spirituality as well as the spirituality of others 
with whom they provide counseling services. Spirituality 
is viewed as an important component to achieving mental 
health and to a balanced sense of wellness. Basic beliefs 
and various spiritual systems including major world 
religions will be examined. (On Demand) 

CSLG 8604. Counseling Sexual Minority Families 
and Couples. (3) This course will focus on the unique 
challenges facing the counselor who is providing clinical 
services to gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgendered 
families and couples. Topics include the impact of 
oppression on primary relationships, the political 
implications of sexual minority relationships, relationship 
models, parenting, and interacting with the outside world. 
(On Demand) 

CSLG 8644. Theory and Practice of Play Therapy. (3) 

An advanced exploration of fundamental issues involved 
in play therapy, this seminar course will focus on an in- 
depth study of various theoretical approaches underlying 
the practice of play therapy. Historical and theoretical 
foundations of play therapy are presented as are current 
issues in providing appropriate counseling services to 
children aged two to ten years old. 
(On Demand) 

CSLG 8645. Cognitive-Behavior Theory and Practice. 

(3) An introduction to the theory and practice of 
cognitive-behavior therapy that can be applied in the 



school setting. The major theories (cognitive therapy, 
cognitive behavior modification, REBT, and reality 
therapy) will be examined, and treatment planning and 
application of techniques will be studied. (Summer) 

CSLG 8646. Administration and Leadership of 
School Counseling Services. (3) This course will focus 
on the organization, planning, management, and 
evaluation of school counseling programs. Current issues 
impacting school counselors will be explored and 
intervention strategies will be examined. (Spring) 

CSLG 8680. Crisis Counseling. (3) This course will 
focus on a general crisis intervention model and its 
application to specific crisis situations. Topics include: 
suicide intervention, rape crisis, telephone counseling, and 
disaster intervention. (Summer) 

CSLG 8681. Grief and Loss Counseling. (3) This 
course examines the theory of loss, the tasks involved in 
grieving, and the skills needed by a counselor working 
with grief and loss issues. Loss will be examined from a 
broad perspective and includes issues associated with 
death, loss of relationships, and loss of abilities. (Fall) 

CSLG 8800. Individual Study in Counseling. (1-6) 

Prerequisite of the student's advisor. Independent study 
under the supervision of an appropriate faculty member. 
May be repeated for credit. Offered on a pass/no credit 
basis. (Fall, Spring, Summer) 

CSLG 8998. Seminar in Prospectus Design. (3) This 
course will provide students the opportunity to identify 
and define a research area of inquiry and develop a 
proposal draft for the dissertation study. Students will be 
expected to select, plan and outline an original research 
study appropriate for the dissertation requirement. (Fall) 

CSLG 8999. Dissertation. (9) Under the direction of a 
dissertation advisor and committee, the student is 
expected to design and execute an original research study. 
This study should address a significant issue or problem 
related to counseling or counselor education. Offered on 
a pass/no credit basis. (Fall, Spring, Summer) 

CSLG 9999. Graduate Residence. (1) Meets Graduate 
School requirement for continuous enrollment. (Fall, 
Spring Summer) 



202 College of Education 



CURRICULUM AND 
INSTRUCTION 

Department of Middle, Secondary & K-12 
Education 

College of Education Building 317 

704-687-8887 

http://education.uncc.edu/phdci 

Degree 

Ph.D. 

Coordinator 

Dr. David K. Pugalee 

PH.D. IN CURRICULUM AND 
INSTRUCTION 

The Ph.D. in Curriculum and Instruction is designed to 
prepare teacher education faculty and other educational 
professionals in various agency and educational settings. 
The program is interdisciplinary involving faculty from 
the Departments of English; Mathematics; Middle, 
Secondary, & K-12 Education; and Reading and 
Elementary Education. The program focuses on issues 
and perspectives related to curriculum and instruction 
with specializations in literacy education (oriented toward 
reading or English education), mathematics education, 
and urban education. Studies include a substantive core 
in urban education and educational research. Students 
may focus their study on education for learners at 
elementary, middle grades, secondary, K-12, or post- 
secondary/ adult levels. 

Curriculum Objectives 

1) Lead inquiry into the nature of curriculum theory 
and the relationship that theory has upon the major 
sources, components, and processes required in 
curriculum development, particularly within 
expanding urban-regional environments. 

2) Demonstrate relationships among curriculum theory 
and design, models of and research about teaching 
and learning, variations among learners, and the 
ideological, social, and disciplinary contexts of 
teaching and learning, including the influence on 
urban-regional schools of state and national policies, 
curriculum philosophy, and political pressures. 

3) Guide curriculum development and evaluation in its 
pragmatic context by applying curriculum theory, 
policy, and practice for diverse learners within a 
variety of educational settings. 

Research and Evaluation Objectives 

4) Use appropriate quantitative and qualitative research 
methods to solve problems in urban education and 
related disciplines, detect new patterns, and assess 



the effectiveness of instructional programs and 
teaching methodologies for all learners. 

5) Communicate research and evaluation findings in a 
variety of written and electronic formats, such as 
evaluation reports, professional articles, grant 
proposals, conference presentations, and technical 
reports with the consistent underlying purpose of 
supporting educational effectiveness and reform in 
urban-regional environments. 

Specialty Objectives 

6) Apply theory and research in one's area of 
specialization to detecting new patterns, identifying 
problems, and solving urban-regional problems of 
curriculum, teaching, learning, and assessment 
through collaborative problem identification, 
research projects, policy formation, and staff 
development. 

7) Exhibit sustained intellectual curiosity, broad 
understandings, specialized knowledge, and 
professional commitments pertaining to one's 
selected area of specialization within the context of 
urban-regional schools. 

Additional Admission Requirements 

Students should submit a current vitae and a professional 
writing sample. An interdisciplinary review committee 
will perform an initial review of application materials and 
recommend applicants for an on-campus interview. The 
interdisciplinary Curriculum and Instruction Committee 
will then make final recommendations to the Graduate 
School relative to acceptance into the program based on 
the merits of the application materials and the interview 
process which includes an on-campus writing exercise 
requiring the applicant to read a selected passage and 
react to a prompt. 

Prerequisite Requirements 

The intended audience for the Ph.D. in Curriculum and 
Instruction is comprised of education professionals who 
hold the master's degree. It is anticipated that most 
applicants will be experienced teachers or school leaders 
with the North Carolina "G" or "M" license or equivalent 
licenses from other states. However, the program will 
welcome and accommodate non-licensed candidates with 
appropriate professional experiences who have been 
involved in teaching or educational program development 
and evaluation. 

Degree Requirements 

The Ph.D. in Curriculum and Instruction requires a total 
of 60 semester hours of coursework, including the 
dissertation. A student must maintain a cumulative 
average of 3.0 in all coursework taken. An accumulation 
of more than two C grades will result in termination of 
the student's enrollment in the graduate program. If a 
student makes a grade of U in any course, enrollment in 
the program will be terminated. The program will 
consider the transfer of limited number of courses from a 
regionally accredited institution (typically no more than 



College of Education 203 



six hours), providing the Curriculum and Instruction 
Committee determines that the course or courses to be 
transferred are appropriate for the program of study and 
are graduate-level courses beyond the master's degree. 
The grade in these transfer courses must be an A or B. 
All dissertation work must be completed at UNC 
Charlotte. Students must successfully complete 
requirements for the qualifying examination and 
dissertation. All students must complete a residency 
requirement of at least 1 8 credit hours over three 
successive terms of enrollment. Students must complete 
their degree, including dissertation, within eight years. 

15-Hour Research Requirement 

Required of all students: 

RSCH82 1 Applied Research Methods (3) 

RSCH8110 Descriptive and Inferential Statistics (3) 

Three additional research courses such as the 

following 
RSCH821 1 Qualitative Research Methods (3) 
RSCH821 2 Survey Research Methods (3) 
RSCH8213 Single-case Research (3) 
RSCH8120 Advanced Statistics (3) 
RSCH8130 Presentation and Computer Analysis of 

Data (3) 
RSCH8140 Multivariate Statistics (3) 
RSCH8296 Program Evaluation Methods (3) 
EDCI8113 Research in Mathematical Education 

(3) 
EDCI8250 Applied Research in Literacy 

Education (3) 
EDCI8061 Topics in Urban Educational Research 

(3) 
EDCI8121 Applied Research Methods in the 

Teaching of English (3) 
EDCI8131 Research in English Studies (3) 
EDCI8132 Research in Literary Theory (3) 

12-Hour Common Core 

Required for all students: 

EDCI8180 Critical Issues and Perspectives in 

Urban Education (3) 
ADMN8122 Advanced Curriculum Theory (3) 

Leadership in Urban Education theme. Choose one 

such as the following: 
EDCI8070 Topics in Urban Educational 

Leadership (3) 
EDCI8420 Writing Program Administration and 

Supervision (3) 
EDCI8141 Policy-making in Literacy Education 

(3) 
ADMN8489 Practicum in Staff Development (3) 
ADMN8660 Instructional Leadership Seminar (3) 

Urban-Regional Issues theme. Choose one such as 

the following: 
EDCI8075 Topics in Urban-Regional Education 

(3) 



EECI8186 Comparative Education (3) 
ADMN8130 Educational Governance and Policy 

Studies (3) 
EIST81 50 Systemic Design of Educational 

Systems (3) 
PPOL86 1 Urban Regional Environment^) 
PPOL86 1 5 The Restructuring City (3) 
PPOL8681 Race, Gender, Class, and Public Policy 

(3) 
PPOL8689 The Social Context of Schooling (3) 

9 Hours of Dissertation Credit 

EDCI8699 Dissertation Proposal Seminar (3) 
EDCI8999 Dissertation Research (6) 

24 Hours of Specialization Core (Must Include The 
Appropriate Readings Course) 

Appropriate Readings Course 

EDCI8640 Readings in Literacy Education (3) 

Or 

EDCI8610 Readings in Mathematics Education 

Research (3) 
Or 
EDCI8660 Readings in Urban Education Research 

(3) 

21 hours of Specialis ation Courses 

Advising 

An advisor will be assigned to each student within the 
first year of studies. The Advisor along with the Doctoral 
Coordinator will provide initial advising until the end of 
the first year (12 hours) and will work with the student in 
developing the Program of Study. By the beginning of 
the second year the student is required to submit a 
Program of Study which is approved by the Advisor and 
the Doctoral Program Coordinator. Advisors will also 
support the student in identifying faculty whose research 
interests and expertise are congruent with the student's 
probable area of dissertation inquiry. The assistance of 
the Advisor does not relieve the student of responsibility 
for completing required work and for following 
departmental or university procedures. In the semester in 
which the student takes the Comprehensive Exam, the 
student will reach agreement with a faculty member to 
serve as Dissertation Chair. The Chair must be a member 
of the Curriculum & Instruction Faculty. 

Admission to Candidacy Requirements 

Students are considered candidates for the doctoral 
degree upon: (a) successful completion of the 
Comprehensive Examination, (b) approval of the 
Dissertation Proposal, and (c) submission of the 
Application for Candidacy form. Both the Petition for 
Topic Approval and the Application for Candidacy 
should be submitted together. Candidacy must be 
achieved at least six months before the degree is 
conferred. 



204 College of Education 



Application for Degree 

Students must submit an Application for Degree in the 
semester in which they successfully defend their 
dissertation proposal. Adherence to Graduate School 
deadlines and requirements is expected. Degree 
requirements are completed with the successful defense 
of the dissertation and file the final copy of their 
dissertation in the Graduate School. 



Ph.D. Courses in Curriculum and 
Instruction 

EDCI 8004. Topics in Analysis. (3) Cross-listing with 
MATH 6004. 

EDCI 8008. Topics in Geometry and Topology. (3) 

Cross-listing with MATH 6008. 

EDCI 8010. Advanced Topics in Mathematics 
Education. (3) Prerequisites: Enrollment in the 
Mathematics Education specialization of the Doctoral 
Program in Curriculum and Instruction. Advanced 
research topics in the teaching and learning of 
mathematics. Includes a survey, interpretation, and 
synthesis of contemporary research problems in 
mathematics teaching and learning. Can be repeated for 
credit. (On demand) 

EDCI 8020. Topics in English Education. (3) 

Examination of special topics germane to English 
education in urban-regional environments at the 
elementary, middle, and secondary school levels as well as 
the community and four-year college, including historical 
perspectives on current problems, effectiveness of 
programs and practices in urban schools, and emerging 
theories on teaching and learning. Extensive reading and 
discussion of topics from multiple perspectives. May be 
repeated for credit for different topics. (On Demand) 

EDCI 8040. Topics in Reading Education. (3) 

Examination of special topics germane to reading 
education in urban-regional environments at the 
elementary, middle, and secondary school levels as well as 
the community and four-year college, including historical 
perspectives on current problems, effectiveness of 
programs and practices in urban schools, and emerging 
theories of learning. Extensive reading and discussion of 
topics from multiple perspectives. May be repeated for 
credit for different topics. (On Demand) 

EDCI 8070. Topics in Urban Educational Research. 

(3) Examination of the research in specific areas germane 
to urban educational settings and problems. Emphasis on 
different research questions and methodologies used to 
investigate similar problems. Examination of alignment 
of research findings with educational change in urban 
environments of the elementary, middle, and secondary 
school levels as well as the community and four-year 



college. May be repeated for credit for different topics. 
(On Demand) 

EDCI 8070. Topics in Urban Educational 
Leadership. (3) Examination of special topics germane 
to leadership in urban education environments at the 
elementary, middle, and secondary school levels as well as 
the community and four-year college. Extensive reading 
and discussion of topics from multiple perspectives. May 
be repeated for credit for different topics. (On Demand) 

EDCI 8075. Topics in Urban-Regional Education. 

(3) Examination of special topics germane to education in 
urban-regional environments at the elementary, middle, 
and secondary school levels as well as the community and 
four-year college. Extensive reading and discussion of 
topics from multiple perspectives. May be repeated for 
credit for different topics. (On Demand) 

EDCI 8100. Foundations of Mathematics. (3) Cross- 
listing with MATH 6100. 

EDCI 8101. Foundations of Real Analysis. (3) Cross- 
listing with MATH 6101. 

EDCI 8102. Calculus from an Advanced Standpoint. 

(3) Cross-listing with MATH 6102. 

EDCI 8103. Computer Techniques and Numerical 
Methods. (3) Cross-listing with MATH 6103. 

EDCI 8105. Problem-Solving in Discrete 
Mathematics. (3) Cross-listing with MATH 6105. 

EDCI 8106. Modern Algebra. (3) Cross-listing with 
MATH 6106. 

EDCI 8107. Linear Algebra. (3) Cross-listing with 
MATH 6107. 

EDCI 8112. Theoretical Foundations of Learning 
Mathematics. (3) Introductions to theories of learning 
that have influenced the teaching of mathematics in K-12. 
An overview of theories that have guided reforms in 
mathematics teaching; contemporary constructivist 
theories of mathematics learning. (Alternate years) 

EDCI 8113. Research in Mathematics Education. (3) 

Prerequisites: An introduction and overview of research 
in the teaching and learning of mathematics in K-12. 
Overview of contemporary research perspectives and 
paradigms; interpreting and synthesizing the research 
literature; survey of contemporary research problems in 
mathematics teaching and learning; development of 
classroom-based research studies. (Alternate years) 

EDCI 8115. Issues in the Teaching of Secondary 
School Mathematics. (3) Prerequisites: Students must 
be enrolled in the Masters of Arts in Mathematics 
Education Program. Study of major issues affecting 



College of Education 205 



secondary mathematics education: analysis of the impact 
of learning theories on methods of teaching; assessment 
methods for improving mathematics learning; analysis of 
the historical and programmatic development of the 
secondary school mathematics curriculum leading to 
current trends, issues, and problems; and analysis of the 
role of technology in the secondary mathematics 
classroom. (Alternate years) 

EDCI 8118. Non-Euclidean Geometry. (3) Cross- 
listing with MATH 6118. 

EDCI 8120. Literacy and Educational Public Policy. 

(3) Examination of competing definitions of literacy and 
development of literacy practices related to debates in 
American education public policy about the ends of 
schooling, the strategies of teaching, and the priorities of 
the language arts curricula. Evaluation of assumptions, 
reasoning, and research bases linking literacy to policy. 
Study of the historical and current methods of 
establishing district, statewide and federal policies about 
literacy education programs, materials, personnel, grants, 
and licensure. (On demand) 

EDCI 8121. Applied Research Methods in the 
Teaching of English. (3) Gross-listing with ENGL 
6674. 

EDCI 8129. Linguistics and Language Learning. (3) 

Cross-listing with ENGL 8263. 

EDCI 8131. Research in English Studies. (3) Cross- 
listing with ENGL 6101. 

EDCI 8132. Research in Literary Theory. (3) Cross- 
listing with ENGL 6102. 

EDCI 8133. Multiculturalism and Children's 
Literature. (3) Cross-listing with ENGL 6104. 

EDCI 8134. Early Black American Literature. (3) 

Cross-listing with ENGL 6147. 

EDCI 8135. African American Literary Theory and 
Criticism. (3) Cross-listing with ENGL 6158. 

EDCI 8137. Language and Culture. (3) Cross-listing 
with ENGL 6165. 

EDCI 8138. Comparative Language Study. (3) Cross- 
listing with ENGL 61 66. 

EDCI 8139. Perspectives in African-American 
Literature. (3) Cross-listing with ENGL 62476. 

EDCI 8180. Critical Issues and Perspectives in 
Urban Education. (3) Introduction to critical issues in 
urban education, from the historical roots to present 
crises and solutions. Examination of multiple 
perspectives on issues such as poverty, English as a 



second language, single-parent families, crime and drug 
abuse, school failure, discipline problems, under- 
preparedness for the next level of schooling, integration 
and re-segregation. (Fall) 

EDCI 8183. Teaching English as a Second 
Language. (3) Cross-listing with TESL 6103. 

EDCI 8186. Comparative Education. (3) Cross-listing 
with EDUC 8126. 

EDCI 8250. Applied Research in Literacy Education 

(3) Introduction to the research interests of faculty, with 
emphasis on research in urban educational issues and 
problems. Seminar and individual support for replication 
attempts, instrument development and field-testing in 
pilot studies, practice in and critique of different methods 
of data-gathering and data analysis. (On Demand) 

EDCI 8420. Writing Program Administration and 
Supervision. (3) Study of and supervised experiences in 
the development, administration, supervision, and 
evaluation of writing programs in urban educational 
settings. Students may focus on programs at the 
elementary, middle, or secondary schools or within 
community and four-year colleges. Emphasis on 
program development that supports writers from diverse 
backgrounds. (On demand) 

EDCI 8460. Internship in Urban Education. (3) 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Internship 
experiences planned and guided cooperatively by 
University and school personnel. (On demand) 

EDCI 8462. Supervision of Student Teachers. (3) 

Concentrated practice in the supervision of student 
teachers with emphasis on support of student teachers in 
urban schools. Internship experience with direct faculty 
supervision in seminars and school settings. (Spring, odd 
years) 

EDCI 8609. Seminar. (3) Cross-listing with MATH 
6609. 

EDCI 8610. Readings in Mathematics Education. (3) 

Prerequisites: Enrollment in the Mathematics Education 
specialization of the Doctoral Program in Curriculum and 
Instruction. Readings in the teaching and learning of 
mathematics K-16; analysis of the historical development 
of the K-16 mathematics curriculum leading to current 
trends, issues, and problems; theory, methods, and 
techniques for assessment; and analysis of contemporary 
issues impacting the teaching of mathematics. (Spring) 

EDCI 8640. Readings in Literacy Research. (3) Study 
of methodology and findings of historical and current 
research about needs and characteristics of diverse 
literacy learners in urban-regional environments, 
successful programs and policies, and promising solutions 



206 College of Education 



to educational challenges confronting literacy teachers 
and literacy learners. (Spring) 

EDCI 8660. Readings in Urban Educational 
Research. (3) Study of methodology and findings of 
historical and current research about needs and 
characteristics of urban schools, diverse populations in 
urban-regional environments, legal and ethical issues, 
policy-making, and promising solutions to educational 
challenges of poverty, social justice, language differences, 
and conflicting values. (Spring) 

EDCI 8681. Seminar in College Teaching. (3) Issues, 
theories, and research about teaching late adolescent and 
adult learners. Supervised teaching experiences with 
faculty who supports students as they teach or co-teach 
undergraduate professional education, English, or 
mathematics courses. (On demand) 

EDCI 8682. Seminar in Professional and Grant 
Writing. (3) Introduces the forms of professional and 
grant writing expected of education professionals. 
Emphasis on writing for publication and writing for 
federal and state funding. Collaborative writing and peer 
assessment will be part of the process. (On demand) 

EDCI 8699. Dissertation Proposal Seminar. (3) 

Prerequisite: Permission of Program Coordinator. 
Identification of a research question and development of 
the proposal for an original research study appropriate for 
the dissertation requirement. (Spring) 

EDCI 8880. Independent Study in Urban Education. 

(3) Prerequisite: Permission of the student's advisor. 
Independent study of an urban education problem or 
issue under the supervision of an appropriate faculty 
member. May be repeated for credit. (On demand) 

EDCI 8999. Dissertation Research. (3) Prerequisite: 
Committee approval of the dissertation proposal. 
Execution of original research study that addresses the 
solution to an urban educational problem in curriculum, 
teaching, learning, or leadership. (May be repeated for 
credit). (Fall, Spring Summer) 

EDCI 9999. Doctoral Residency Credit. (1) (Fall, 
Spring Summer) 



CURRICULUM AND 
SUPERVISION 

Educational Administration: Curriculum Leadership 

Department of Educational Leadership 

Chair, Dr. J. Allen Queen 

26 1C College of Education Building 

704-687-8856 

http://www.uncc.edu/colleges/education/eart/ 

Degree 

M.Ed. 

Coordinator 

Dr. Corey Lock 

Graduate Faculty 

Corey Lock 
Michael Jazzar 
James Lyons 
J. Allen Queen 
Wayne White 



MASTER OF EDUCATION IN 
CURRICULUM AND 
SUPERVISION 

The M.Ed, in Curriculum and Supervision is designed to 
prepare highly competent program leaders for the school 
systems of North Carolina. UNC Charlotte is particularly 
dedicated to serving the 23 school districts located in the 
Southwestern Piedmont area of the state. To achieve its 
objectives, the program is designed to attract high-quality 
students and help them develop specific competencies to 
enable them to define, communicate, interpret, and assess 
teachers in the implementation of state and local 
curricula. 

Program Objectives 

The major educational objectives of the program are to 
develop instructional leaders who have advanced 
knowledge and skills in curriculum development and 
supervisory practices to assist the school system by: 

1) Guiding principals and teachers in the interpretation 
of curriculum standards and specific competencies 
for instructional development. 

2) Directing teachers in curriculum and instructional 
alignment to maximize success for the highest levels 
of student achievement possible. 

3) Promoting the expectations that effective teachers 
are masters of their subject content, highly 
knowledgeable of human dynamics, directly 
responsive to individual differences in students and 
are well accomplished in the art and science of 
pedagogy and student assessment. 



College of Education 207 



4) Encouraging participants in the program to self- 
direct their personal and professional growth as 
educators by: 

a) Taking responsibility for their own learning; 

b) Initiating professional inquiry through 
conversations with colleagues; 

c) Critically reading the professional literature; 

d) Participating voluntarily in personal and 
professional development opportunities; and 

e) Setting high expectations for their professional 
performance. 

5) Guiding participants to promote in teachers the skills 
to respond effectively to children's differences as 
influenced by development, exceptionalities, and 
diversity by: 

a) Developing and advanced understanding of 
human development; 

b) Expecting and respecting differences among 
children that are influenced by development, 
exceptionalities, and diversity; 

c) Promoting understanding and respect for all 
members of the classroom community; 

d) Helping students, parents, and colleagues 
develop a global perspective; and 

e) Applying their knowledge at all levels of 
interaction with students: from modifying 
instruction for individuals to creating classroom 
environments where all students feel welcome 
and can be successful learners. 

6) Demonstrating advanced knowledge of the content 
and pedagogy in curriculum and supervision by: 

a) Demonstrating advanced knowledge of the 
range of appropriate content; 

b) Helping children to acquire the knowledge and 
skills appropriate for specific grade levels and 
development through many effective 
instructional and assessment practices; 

c) Using technology in a variety of ways to support 
learning; 

d) Helping students develop competencies 
applicable across the curriculum; and 

e) Helping children make sense of their learning by 
connecting school content and students' lives 
outside of school and by integrating curriculum. 

7) Improving educational practice through self- 
refection, self-evaluation, and applied research by: 

a) Engaging in study that leads to continuous 
improvement of teaching and learning; 

b) Actively investigating and solving educational 
problems through data gathering and 
assessment; 

c) Continuously monitoring the learning problems 
and successes of each learner; 

d) Making appropriate adjustments in both 
instruction and learning environments based on 
analysis of data; and 

e) Regularly monitoring the effects of their actions 
on academic achievement. 

8) Serving as educational leaders by: 



a) Actively participating as leaders in areas in which 
they can contribute to solving educational 
problems, such as School Advisory Teams and 
committees in professional organizations; 

b) Taking responsibility for sharing in decision- 
making relative to school-wide and/or system- 
wide issues; 

c) Readily asking for and sharing successful 
instructional approaches and solutions with 
colleagues, supervisors, and educational leaders; 
and 

d) Providing mentoring for colleagues. 

The Program 

Today, curriculum specialist and instructional supervisors 
must be able to elicit support and create program 
structures and climates that foster the kinds of creativity, 
change, and innovation that will educate the most 
diversified group of children ever in America's schools. 
To meet this challenge, the M.Ed, program focuses on 
curriculum development. It enables candidates to develop 
specific competencies related to curriculum leadership, 
instructional practice and supervisory roles. It emphasizes 
performance and competence in school-based leadership 
and the overall quality of K-12 instruction. 

The M.Ed, program provides for 33 credits of classroom 
study followed by an internship. In the cohort, a part- 
time student can complete the program in two years. 
Students average two courses per semester while the final 
six credit hours of each student's program are in the 
internship and a seminar. The internship semester is 
undertaken on a full-time basis (typically during the 
summer term just prior to graduation). The program 
faculty will work with students and school districts to 
arrange for the internships to be completed with 
minimum impact on their current positions. 

General Curriculum Plan 

The 39 semester-hour M.Ed, program includes nine 
hours of professional education core courses and 30 
hours of course work in curriculum and educational 
administration and leadership (including academic 
experience in internships and seminars). 

Professional Education Core Courses (9) 

EIST61 01 The Adult Learner 
RSCH6101 Educational Research Methods 
CUSU6100 Fundamentals of Educational 
Leadership 

Core Courses in Educational Administration and 
Leadership (21) 

CUSU6122 Foundations of Curriculum Theory 

and Development 
CUSU6123 Designs in Curriculum Practices 
CUSU6105 Legal Aspects of Schooling 
EIST5000 Instructional Technology 
CUSU6130 Supervision of Instruction 



208 College of Education 



RSCH6196 Program Evaluation Methods 

An elective or CUSU 6120: Instructional Leadership 

Internship/Seminars (9) 

CUSU6601 Seminar in Curriculum and Supervision 
CUSU6491 Internship and Seminar: Curriculum 
and Supervision 

Additional Admissions Requirements 

In order to be considered for admission to the M.Ed, 
program, applicants are expected to submit the following 
materials to the Graduate Admissions Office: 

1) A written application; 

2) Evidence of a bachelor's degree or its equivalent 
from an accredited institution with an overall GPA 
of at least 3.00; 

3) Two official transcripts of previous academic work 
attempted beyond high school; 

4) A score of 50th percentile or higher on the Graduate 
Record Examination or the Miller Analogies test 
taken within the previous five years; 

5) Three professional recommendations, including one 
from the applicant's immediate supervisor; 

6) A description of previous relevant employment, 
including evidence of at least two years of successful 
teaching experience in K-12; 

7) Evidence of a clear "A" level license 

8) Applicant must be a full time teacher 

9) A personal statement of purpose or intent for 
entering the program. 

Applications to the program will be accepted by 
November lfor admission the following spring semester. 
The November 1 deadline requires a complete admissions 
packet. The application process is designed to ensure 
selection of a highly competent and diverse cohort of 
students. The number admitted each year will be based on 
current resources, but it is expected to be approximately 
20 students. Upon successful completion of the program 
and Praxis examination, graduates will receive a 
recommendation for North Carolina licensure as a 
Curriculum-Instructional Specialist (licensure area 113 
Level I). 



POST-MASTERS GRADUATE 
CERTIFICATE IN CURRICULUM 
AND SUPERVISION 

Educators who hold a master's degree in an educational 
area and who possess an "M" level teaching certificate 
can apply for the 21 semester hour Advance Certificate in 
Curriculum and Supervision. The Advance Certificate 
leads to state licensure as an Instructional Specialist 
(licensure area 113 Level I). 

The Advance Certificate program provides for 1 5 credits 
of classroom study followed by an internship. Students 
average one course per semester with an internship in the 



final semester. The internship semester is undertaken on a 
full-time basis. The program faculty will try to work with 
students and school districts to arrange for the 
internships to be completed with minimum impact on 
their current positions. 

General Curriculum Plan 

CUSU 6100 Fundamentals of Educational 

Leadership 
CUSU 6122 Foundations of Curriculum Theory 

and Development 
CUSU 6123 Designs in Curriculum Practices 
CUSU 6130 Supervision of Instruction 
CUSU 6601 Seminar in Curriculum and Supervision 
CUSU 6491 Internship and Seminar: Curriculum 

and Supervision (6 hrs) 

Additional Admissions Requirements 

In order to be considered for admission to the Advance 
Certificate program, applicants are expected to submit the 
following materials to the Graduate Admissions Office: 

1) A written application; 

2) Evidence of a master's degree in education or its 
equivalent from an accredited institution with an 
overall GPA of at least 3.5; 

3) Two official transcripts of previous academic work 
attempted beyond the bachelor's degree; 

4) Three professional recommendations, including one 
from the applicant's immediate supervisor; 

5) A description of previous relevant employment, 
including evidence of at least three years of 
successful teaching experience in K-12; 

6) Evidence of a clear "M" level license; 

7) Applicant must be a full time educator; 

8) A personal statement of purpose or intent for 
entering the program. 

Applications to the program will be accepted until 
November for admission the following spring semester. 
The November ldeadline requires a complete admissions 
packet. This process is designed to ensure selection of a 
highly competent and diverse group of students. The 
number admitted each year will be based on current 
resources. Upon successful completion of the program 
and Praxis examination, completers will receive a 
recommendation for North Carolina licensure as a 
Curriculum-Instructional Specialist, licensure area 113 
level I. 



Courses in Curriculum and Supervision 

CUSU 6100. Fundamentals of Educational 
Leadership. (3) The developing role of educational 
organizations in the United States and the societal and 
cultural influences that affect the deliver)' of schooling. 
Structure and organization of American schools, 
administrative and organizational theory, legal, moral, and 



College of Education 209 



ethical dimensions of schooling within the context of 
restructuring and reform. (Spring) 

CUSU 6105. Legal Aspects of Schooling. (3) 

Education law for education professionals which focuses 
on the legal rights and responsibilities of students, 
teachers, and administrators and how these legal 
provisions affect educational policy and practice. (Fall) 

CUSU 6122. Foundations of Curriculum Theory and 
Development. (3) Foundations of historical curriculum 
development, philosophic beliefs, and understanding of 
the development of the American public school system. 
(Summer) 

CUSU 6123. Designs in Curriculum Practices. (3) 

Examines the field of curriculum with particular emphasis 
on the change process. (Summer) 

CUSU 6130. Supervision of Instruction. (3) 

Introduction to clinical supervision and development of 
skills in classroom observation, analysis, evaluation, and 
assistance. Systems of observation, principles of adult 
development in school settings, techniques for 
conducting classroom observations and conferences, and 
development of staff development programs to remedy 
assessed weaknesses. (Fall) 

CUSU 6601. Seminar in Curriculum and Supervision. 

(3) Capstone class in curricular and supervisory 
leadership. Exploration of seminal topics and preparation 
for the internship. (Spring) 

CUSU 6490. Internship in Curriculum and 
Supervision. (6) Prerequisite: Department approval. 
Internship under the supervision of University and on- 
site personnel in a setting consistent with the student's 
professional goals in which the student will be involved in 
the diverse activities expected of the professional 
administrator. (Summer) 



EDUCATIONAL 
ADMINISTRATION 

Educational Administration: Principalship 

Department of Educational Leadership 

Interim Chair, Dawson Hancock 
261 -C College of Education Building 
704-687-8856 
http://www.uncc.edu/colleges/education/eart/ 

Degree 

M.S.A. 

Coordinator 

Glenda Poole 



Graduate Faculty 

Professors 

Bob Algozzine 
John Gretes 
Corey Lock 
Jim Lyons 
J. Allen Queen 
Associate Professors 
Claudia Flowers 
Dawson Hancock 
Richard Lambert 
Ann McColl 
Assistant Professors 
Adam Friedman 
Richard Hartshorn 
Lisa Howley 
Michael Jazzar 
Grace Mitchell 
Glenda Poole 
Eric Porfeli 
Chang Wang 
Wayne White 



MASTER OF SCHOOL 
ADMINISTRATION 

The mission of the Master of School Administration 
(M.S.A.) ) program is to prepare innovative, collaborative, 
effective, and reflective leaders who are prepared to 
develop school environments that ensure equitable and 
quality learning opportunities for a rapidly changing and 
increasingly diverse population and focus on improving 
the learning for ALL students. Program graduates qualify 
for two licenses; a PreK-12, Level 1 School 
Administrator's license (Principal) and a PreK-12, Level I 
Curriculum Instructional Specialist license (Supervisor). 

Program Objectives 

Program objectives are aligned with the approved 
national standards of the Educational Leaders 
Constituent Consortium, the North Carolina Department 
of Public Instruction, and the National Council for 
Accrediting Teacher Education. In particular there are six 
basic standards that serve as core curriculum 
components: 

1) visioning for school improvement, 2) creating a 
positive school culture, providing an effective 
instructional program, and designing comprehensive 
professional growth plans, 3) managing the 
organizational, 4) collaborating with families and 
community, responding to diverse interests and needs, 5) 
acting with integrity, fairly, and equitably, and 6) 
interacting and influencing the larger political, social, 
economic, legal, and cultural context. 



210 College of Education 



Additional Admission Requirements 

In addition to the general requirements for admission to 
the Graduate School, applicants must have a minimum of 
three years successful teaching experience, a Class A 
North Carolina teaching license or equivalent, a statement 
of purpose using guidelines provided the website (see 
http://education.uncc.edu/EART/SchoolAdmin.html), a 
complete resume showing evidence of leadership, a copy 
of the teacher license, and recommendations from school 
administrators who can attest to your potential success as 
a school principal. Application deadline is January 1 5 for 
enrollment in either the following summer or fall 
semesters. 

Admission decisions are based on an analysis of applicant 
profiles made by program faculty and clinical instructors. 
Applicants with the highest profile rankings are invited to 
participate in interviews in March. Program faculty, 
clinical faculty, acting principals/assistant principals, and 
student interns serve on interview teams. These 
interviews are designed to provide the applicant an 
opportunity to show evidence of academic strengths, 
leadership potential, and personal characteristics. After 
the interview, the applicant will provide a writing sample 
from a given prompt. 

The Master of School Administration Program faculty is 
committed to achieving diversity among the students 
admitted in each year's cohort group and will make 
admission decisions accordingly. The Graduate School 
will notify applicants of their admission status by mid- 
April. 

Degree Requirements 

The M.S.A. program requires a total of 48 hours in a 
combination of courses in educational leadership, 
research, technology, curriculum, and instruction. All 
students must complete a ten-month, full-time internship 
under the direction of a principal-mentor and a university 
supervisor. Prior to beginning the internship, the student 
must pass a written comprehensive examination. The 
exam challenges students to demonstrate a thorough and 
well-integrated understanding of the basic principles, 
research findings, and theories covered in their course 
work and apply these to educational practice and 
leadership situations. 



RSCH7196 


Educational Program Evaluation 




Methods (3) 


EIST5100 


Computer Applications in Education 




(3) 


EIST6101 


The Adult Learner (3) 


Elective 


3 Credit Hours at the 6000 or higher 




level 



Courses 

ADMN6000 
ADMN6100 

ADMN6105 
ADMN6120 
ADMN6130 
ADMN6140 
ADMN6161 
ADMN6410 
ADMN6420 
RSCH6101 



Topics in Educational Leadership (3) 
Fundamentals of Educational 
Leadership (3) 

Legal Aspects of Schooling (3) 
Instructional Leadership (3) 
Supervision of Instruction (3) 
Curriculum Leadership (3) 
The Principalship (3) 
Internship and Seminar Part I (6) 
Internship and Seminar Part 1 1 (6) 
Educational Research Methods (3) 



Capstone Experiences 

The full-year internship requires the productive 
application of knowledge, skills, and dispositions, to the 
problems of practice. The experience provides a 
multitude of opportunities for the intern to progressively 
develop administrative competence. Interns are guided 
through their experience by their school-site mentor and 
university clinical supervisor. 

Principal Fellows 

Each year a limited number of scholarship/loans for 
persons seeking an M.S.A. as full-time students are 
available from the North Carolina Principal Fellows 
Program (http://www.ga.unc.edu/Principal Fellows/). 
Funded by the North Carolina General Assembly to help 
highly qualified persons study school administration on a 
full-time basis, the program provides $40,000 over a two- 
year period and requires repayment with either four years 
of service as a school administrator in a North Carolina 
public school or monetary reimbursement of the original 
loan, plus interest. 



Courses in Educational 
Administration 

ADMN 6000. Topics in Educational Administration. 
(1-6) May include classroom and/or clinic experiences in 
the content area. With department approval, may be 
repeated for credit for different topics. (Fall, Spring 
Summer) 

ADMN 6100. Fundamentals of Educational 
Leadership. (3) The developing role of educational 
organizations in the United States and the societal and 
cultural influences that affect the delivery of schooling. 
Structure and organization of American schools, 
administrative and organizational theory, legal, moral, and 
ethical dimensions of schooling within the context of 
restructuring and reform. (Fall) 

ADMN 6105. Legal Aspects of Schooling. (3) 

Education law for education professionals which focuses 
on the legal rights and responsibilities of students, 
teachers, and administrators and how these legal 
provisions affect educational policy and practice. (Spring) 

ADMN 6106. Legal Issues in Special Education. (3) 

Survey of federal and state statutory and administrative 
provisions governing the delivery of education and related 
services to exceptional students. (On demand) 



College of Education 211 



ADMN 6107. School Law for Counselors and Related 
Professionals. (3) Legal issues and problems of special 
relevance to school counselors, psychologists, social 
workers, and related professionals who work with school- 
age children. (On demand) 

ADMN 6110. School Leadership and Management. 

(3) Examination of school leadership and administration, 
focusing on the role, tasks, and responsibilities that 
accompany school-based leadership. (Summer) 

ADMN 6120. Instructional Leadership. (3) 

Examination of research-based teaching/learning models 
and the relationship between instructional decisions and 
curriculum experiences. Dynamics of group development 
and problems/practices related to providing instructional 
assistance to teachers. (Summer) 



ADMN 6490. Internship and Seminar: 
Administration. (3-6) Prerequisite: Department 
approval. Internship under the supervision of University 
and on-site personnel in a setting consistent with the 
student's professional goals in which the student will be 
involved in the diverse activities expected of the 
professional administrator. Seminars are held 
concurrendy. (On demand) 

ADMN 6491. Internship and Seminar: Supervision. 
(3-6) Prerequisite: Permission of the department. 
Internship under the supervision of University and on- 
site personnel in a setting consistent with the student's 
professional goals in which the student will be involved in 
the diverse activities expected of the curriculum- 
instructional specialist. Seminars are held concurrendy. 
(On demand) 



ADMN 6130. Supervision of Instruction. (3) 

Corequisite: ADMN 6410. Introduction to clinical 
supervision and development of skills in classroom 
observation, analysis, evaluation, and assistance. Systems 
of observation, principles of adult development in school 
settings, techniques for conducting classroom 
observations and conferences, and development of staff 
development programs to remedy assessed weaknesses. 
(Fall) 

ADMN 6140. Curriculum Leadership. (3) 

Examination of internal and external influences on 
curriculum formation and development at the building 
level with emphasis on development of administrative 
strategies for curriculum decision-making which are 
driven by staff involvement. (Spring) 

ADMN 6161. The Principalship. (3) Examination of 
school administration focusing on the role, task and 
responsibilities associated with the principalship with 
special attention to the conceptual, human and technical 
skills associated with the principal. (On demand) 

ADMN 6166. Educational Leadership. (3) 

Examination of leadership in formal organizations and 
social and behavioral science research concerning 
leadership ability with emphasis on educational 
organizations and the role of the leader in the 
accomplishment of organizational goals. (On demand) 

ADMN 6410. Internship and Seminar Part I. (3-9) 

Corequisite: ADMN 6130. Full-time, academic year 
internship in educational administration designed to allow 
theoretical and course-based practical learning to be 
translated and interwoven into a supervised field-based 
experience. (Fall) 

ADMN 6420. Internship and Seminar Part II. (3-9) A 

continuation of the internship experiences and seminar 
begun in ADMN 6410. (Spring) 



ADMN 6601. Seminar in Administration and 
Supervision. (1-3) Prerequisite: Permission of the 
department. Examination of selected areas of interest in 
educational administration and supervision. May be 
repeated for credit with departmental approval. (On 
demand) 

ADMN 6800. Individual Study in Educational 
Administration. (1-6) Prerequisite: Permission of the 
student's advisor. Independent study under the 
supervision of an appropriate faculty member. May be 
repeated for credit. (Fall, Spring, Summer) 



EDUCATIONAL 
LEADERSHIP 

Advanced Educational Leadership 
Department of Educational Leadership 

College of Education 

Suite 261 College of Education Building 

704-687-8730 

http://education.uncc.edu/eart 

Degree 

Ed.D. 

Coordinator 

Dr. Grace Mitchell 

Graduate Faculty 

Robert Algozzine, Professor 
Claudia Flowers, Associate Professor 
Adam Friedman, Assistant Professor 
John Gretes, Professor 
Dawson Hancock, Associate Professor 
Richard Hartshorne, Assistant Professor 
Lisa Howley, Assistant Professor 
Michael Jazzar, Assistant Professor 



212 College of Education 



Richard Lambert, Associate Professor 
Corey Lock, Professor 
James Lyons, Professor 
Ann McColl, Associate Professor 
Grace Mitchell, Assistant Professor 
Glenda Poole, Assistant Professor 
Erik Porfeli, Assistant Professor 
J. Allen Queen, Professor 
Chuang Wang, Assistant Professor 
Wayne White, Assistant Professor 



ED.D. IN EDUCATIONAL 
LEADERSHIP 

The Ed.D. program in Educational Leadership is 
designed to prepare educational administrators who can 
assume mid-level and senior-level leadership positions in 
pre-collegiate educational or non-public school settings. 
The program includes two specializations, a school 
specialization and community specialization. 

Program Objectives 

Graduates of the program are prepared to: 

1) exhibit a broad understanding of their roles as 
educational leaders in the organizations they serve. 

2) demonstrate leadership competencies and skills 
necessary to accomplish the goals of complex 
organizations. 

3) interact successfully with the numerous institutions 
and interests that influence their organizations 

4) understand theoretical concepts that under gird 
organizational theory and behavior, leadership, social 
psychology, policy development, and organizational 
change. 

5) address basic issues that face educational leaders, 
including resource acquisition and management, 
policy development and analysis, program 
management, personnel selection and evaluation, 
community relations and curriculum development. 

Note to Students in School Specialization: The 

Department of Educational Leadership follows the 
standards and guidelines of the ISLLC / ELCC for the 
school specialization. A complete copy of the standards 
and guidelines are available at the following web sites: 

http://www.npbea.org/ELCC/ 

http://www.ccsso.org/projects/Interstate_School_L 
eaders_Licensure_Consortium/ 



Ed.D. in Educational Leadership 

School Specialization 

Superintendent Focus and Curriculum/Supervision 

Focus 

Overview 

The program is designed to serve the needs those 
interested in the study of issues regarding the 



administration of PK-12 public and private educational 
institutions. These students pursue careers as 
superintendents and senior level administrators. In 
addition to the program requirements regarding 
leadership experiences, (see below), these prospective 
students must hold a Master of School Administration, 
Master of Education in Curriculum Supervision, Master 
of Education in Instructional Technology, or a 
comparable program. These students must already have a 
valid certificate in an appropriate field. Appropriate PK- 
12 North Carolina licensure will be recommended at 
graduation. A Superintendent Focus or Curriculum / 
Supervision Focus may be chosen by working with your 
advisor and selecting the courses and experiences 
required for the licensure selected. 

The Ed.D. program consists of a minimum of 60 credit 
hours beyond the master's degree: 

1) 15 semester hours in RSCH Prefix Courses: 
RSCH 8210 Applied Educational Research 
RSCH 8110 Descriptive/Inferential Statistics 
RSCH 8120 Advanced Statistics 

ADMN 8699 Proposal Development 
One Research Elective Courses (Work with your 
advisor) 

2) 33 semester hours of specialization coursework 
which includes one of the following areas of focus: 
Educational Leadership/Superintendency; 
Curriculum Leadership and Instructional 
Supervision. See complete listing of courses for each 
focus 

3) 6 semester hours of electives * 

4) 6 semester hours of dissertation credits ** 

* Elective Courses: An elective course must be at the 8000 
level and offered within the University. Permission of the 
department offering the course and approval by the 
student's advisor and doctoral coordinator is required. 
**Srudents continue to enroll in dissertation study until 
the completion of the degree. 



Ed.D. in Educational Leadership 

Community Specialization 

Overview 

The mission of the Department of Educational 
Leadership is to prepare educators as leaders. This 
program within the department emphasizes leadership in 
the areas of curriculum development and instructional 
supervision in non public school settings. It is designed 
for those interested in careers as senior level 
administrators in educational organizations or for those 
whose professional responsibilities relate to the 
supervision of instruction in other contexts. To ensure 
the effectiveness and competence of individuals in such 
positions, coursework within the program also reflects the 
need for proficiency in program design, evaluation and 
research. 



College of Education 213 



Prospective students should already have a Master's 
degree in an appropriate and related field. They are not 
required to hold N.C. PK-12 licensure nor will any license 
or certificate be recommended upon graduation. 

This Ed.D. program consists of a minimum of 60 credit 

hours beyond the Master's degree in the following areas: 

15 Semester Hours - Foundations Coursework* 

33 Semester hours - Specialization Coursework 

15 Semester Hours - Ed. Research and Evaluation 

1 8 Semester Hours - Subspecialty Coursework 

6 Semester Hours - General Electives** 

6 Semester Hours - Dissertation Coursework*** 

*Suggested Foundations Coursework 

ADMN 8160 Educational Leadership 

EIST 8101 Adult Learner 

ADMN 8121 Doctoral Seminar in Curriculum 
Design 

ADMN 8660 Instructional Leadership Seminar 

ADMN 8110 Organizational Theory and Behavior 
**Elective Courses: An elective course must be at the 
8000 level and offered within the University. Permission 
of the department offering the course and approval by 
the student's advisor and doctoral coordinator is required. 
***Students continue to enroll in dissertation study until 
the completion of the degree. 



School and Community Specializations 
Degree Requirements 

School Specialization 
Superintendent Focus 

Foundations and Specialty: 33 Semester Hours 
ADMN8610 Interdisciplinary Seminar 
ADMN8160 Educational Leadership 
ADMN8121 Doctoral Seminar in Curriculum 

Design 
ADMN8140 Advanced School Finance 
ADMN8130 Educational Government & Policy 
ADMN8110 Organization Theory & Behavior 
ADMN 8 120 Advanced School Law 
EIST8101 The Adult Learner 
ADMN 8 150 Human Resources & Development 
ADMN 8410 Adv Internship in Educational 

Leadership Part 1 

ADMN8420 Adv Internship in Educational 

Leadership Part 2 

Research: 15 Semester Hours 

RSCH8210 Applied Educational Research 
RSCH8 110 Descriptive/Inferential Statistics 
RSCH8120 Advanced Statistics 
ADMN8699 Proposal Design 
Research Elective 3 Semester Hours 

Dissertation 6 Semester Hours 
ADMN8999 Dissertation** 

Electives 6 Semester Hours * 

*Elective Courses: An elective course must be at the 8000 

level and offered within the University. Permission of the 



department offering the course and approval by the 
student's advisor and doctoral coordinator are required. 
**Students continue to enroll in dissertation study (a 
minimum of 6 hours) until the completion of the degree. 

School Specialization 
Curriculum & Supervision Focus 

Foundations and Specialty: 33 Semester Hours 
ADMN8610 Interdisciplinary Seminar 
ADMN8160 Educational Leadership 
ADMN8121 Doctoral Seminar in Curriculum 

Design 
ADMN8140 Advanced School Finance 
ADMN8125 Doctoral Seminar in Instruction 
ADMN8660 Instructional Leadership Seminar 
ADMN 8 122 Advanced Curriculum Theory and 

Development 
ADMN8120 Advanced School Law 
EIST8101 The Adult Learner 
ADMN 8489 Practicum in Staff Development 
Specialization Elective 3 Semester Hours 
Research 1 5: Semester Hours 

RSCH8210 Applied Educational Research 
RSCH8110 Descriptive/Inferential Statistics 
RSCH8120 Advanced Statistics 
ADMN8699 Proposal Design 
Research Elective 3 Semester Hours 
Dissertation 6 Semester Hours 

ADMN8999 Dissertation** 
Electives 6 Semester Hours* 

*Elective Courses: An elective course must be at the 8000 
level and offered within the University. Permission of the 
department offering the course and approval by the 
student's advisor and doctoral coordinator are required. 
**Students continue to enroll in dissertation study (a 
minimum of 6 hours) until the completion of the degree. 

Community Specialization 

Foundations and Specialty: 33 Semester Hours 

ADMN8160 Educational Leadership 

EIST81 01 The Adult Learner 

ADMN8121 Doctoral Seminar in Curriculum 
Design 

ADMN8660 Instructional Leadership Seminar 

ADMN 8110 Organizational Theory 

1 8 Semester Hours of Specialty Coursework 
Research 15: Semester Hours 

RSCH8210 Applied Educational Research 

RSCH8110 Descriptive/Inferential Statistics 

RSCH8196 Program Evaluation 

ADMN8699 Proposal Design 

Research Elective 3 Semester Hours 
Dissertation 6 Semester Hours 

ADMN8999 Dissertation** 
Electives 6 Semester Hours * 

*Elective Courses: An elective course must be at the 8000 
level and offered within the University. Permission of the 
department offering the course and approval by the 
student's advisor and doctoral coordinator are required. 



214 College of Education 



**Students continue to enroll in dissertation study (a 
rninirnurn of 6 hours) until the completion of the degree. 

Additional Admission Requirements 

School Specialization 

In addition to the general requirements for admission to 
the Graduate School, applicants must have a master's 
degree from an accredited institution. Candidates must 
have an entry-level license in educational administration 
or supervision; and they must have a minimum of three 
years of successful leadership experience, which may 
include the full-time internships. Applicants must also 
submit a personal essay of purpose; a description of their 
previous relevant employment, highlighting their 
leadership experiences in school-settings; and 
recommendations from school administrators and former 
university instructors. 

Admission decisions are based on a comparison on of 
applicant profiles and are made by a departmental 
admissions committee that includes program faculty. 
Applicants with the highest profile rankings are invited to 
participate in interviews that are conducted by the Ed.D. 
Admissions Committee is designed to provide evidence 
of an applicant's academic strength, leadership potential, 
and personal characteristics. Admission decisions are 
based not only on the comparative profiles of all 
applicants, but also on the commitment of the 
Admissions Committee to achieve diversity among the 
students admitted in each year's cohort group. Admission 
decisions are made in the spring, with the expectation that 
admitted students will begin their course work in the 
summer. 

Community Specialization 

In addition to the general requirements for admission to 
the Graduate School, applicants must have a master's 
degree from an accredited institution. Applicants must 
have a minimum of three years of documented successful 
work related experience. They must also submit a 
personal essay. The applicant should provide a statement 
of purpose, description of previous relevant employment, 
and the nature of previous educational experiences in the 
essay. Recommendations from employers and former 
university instructors are required. 

Admission decisions are competitive. These decisions are 
made by a departmental admissions committee that 
includes program faculty. Applicants with the highest 
profile rankings are invited to participate in interviews 
that are conducted by the Ed.D. Admissions Committee 
is designed to provide evidence of an applicant's academic 
strength, leadership potential, and personal 
characteristics. Decisions are based not only on the 
comparative profiles of all applicants, but also on the 
commitment of the Admissions Committee to achieve 
diversity among the students admitted each year. 
Admission decisions are made in the spring of each year. 



Admission to Candidacy Requirements 

Students are recommended for admission to candidacy 
after successfully completing the written and oral 
comprehensive examination. 

Internships 

All students (in the School Specialization) seeking 
licensure are required to complete an internship or 
practicum in a K- 12 school district. The internship is 
based upon identified objectives and organizational areas 
within the school system of the internship assignment. 
Students are also required to complete a project based 
upon a current educational leadership topic related to 
student achievement. 

Advising 

Doctoral students will have the benefit of three phases of 
advising as they pursue their degree. 

Phase 1: The doctoral coordinator will serve as the 
"temporary advisor" when students enter the program. 
During this phase, the advisor plans a course of study 
with students during the initial stages of the program. A 
Program Planning Sheet is used to document tentative 
plans for projected coursework. The planning sheet 
should be kept by the student and a copy should be 
provided to the advisor. 

Phase 2: At the beginning of the second semester but no 
later than the end of the first year of the program, 
students will select a "program advisor" to serve as a 
guide through the completion of the coursework. This 
person will also serve as the coordinator of the process to 
complete the Qualifying Comprehensive Examinations. 
This advisor also helps the student identify faculty whose 
research interests and expertise are congruent with the 
student's probable area of inquiry for the dissertation. 
This advisor in consultation of the student has the 
responsibility for creating a "doctoral committee" that will 
be made up of the faculty who will prepare and evaluate 
the written and oral comprehensive qualifying exam. (See 
Qualifying Comprehensive Examination section of the 
Handbook. 

The responsibility of the doctoral committee members 
includes: 

1) the approval of the student's course of study 

2) approval of the dissertation proposal and 

3) evaluation of the final dissertation and oral defense. 

Phase 3: Upon successful completion of the Qualifying 
Comprehensive Examinations, students are 
recommended for admission to candidacy. They may then 
select a "dissertation advisor" and a dissertation 
committee and complete a "Change of Advisor Form" if 
needed. These committee members are appointed to 
serve on the committee with mutual consent between the 
student and each faculty member. The committee consists 
of four members of the Graduate Faculty: the 
Chairperson and two other members from the 



College of Education 215 



Department and one member appointed by the Graduate 
School from outside the College of Education. 

The purpose of this process is to provide students with 
an opportunity to develop a direct working relationship 
with several faculty members. At the same time, it 
provides an individualized and personalized approach to 
the advising process. For example, some students may 
choose to keep the same faculty member to serve as both 
the program advisor and the dissertation advisor. 
Likewise, the doctoral committee and the dissertation 
committee could include some or all of the same faculty. 

Comprehensive Examination 

Students are required to successfully pass a written and 
oral examination. The examination is based upon the core 
areas of the respective specializations. 

Dissertation 

Students must complete and defend a dissertation 
focused on a specific problem or question relevant to 
their specialization. Students must be continually enrolled 
in ADMN 8999 (3 hrs) (fall, summer and spring sessions) 
for dissertation research credit, beginning with the 
semester following completion of the comprehensive 
examination and continuing through the semester of their 
graduation. Defense of their dissertation is conducted in a 
final oral examination that is open to members of the 
University community. 

Application for Degree 

Students may submit an Application for Degree during 
the semester in which they successfully defend their 
dissertation proposal. Adherence to Graduate School 
deadlines is expected. Degree requirements are completed 
when a student successfully defends the dissertation and 
files the final copy of the dissertation in the Graduate 
School. 

Program Certification/Accreditations 

National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher 

Education (NCATE) 
North Carolina Department of Public Instruction 

(NCDPI) 



Courses In Educational Leadership 

Doctoral Students Only 

ADMN 8000. Topics in Educational Leadership. (1-6) 

Requires departmental approval may be repeated for 
credit for different topics. (Fall, Spring Summer) 

ADMN 8110. Organizational Theory and Behavior. 

(3) Prerequisite: Admission to Ed.D. program in 
Educational Leadership. Analysis of the structure and 
organization of public education in the United States in 
terms of organizational theory and historical 
development. Consideration of organizational change 



theory, organizational development, and the planning 
process. (Fall) 

ADMN 8120. Advanced School Law. (3) Prerequisite: 
ADMN 6105 or 6107 or permission of the instructor. 
Current policy issues, including educational finance, 
testing/grouping, desegregation/integration, and the 
provision of public educational services to private-school 
students. (Spring) 

ADMN 8121. Doctoral Seminar in Curriculum 
Design. (3) Examination of principles and practices for 
educational leaders in program design, implementation 
and evaluation. (Spring) 

ADMN 8122. Advanced Curriculum Theory & 
Development. (3) An examination of philosophic 
thought and its relationship to educational theories which 
have led to assumptions for educational practices in 
American schools. (Fall) 

ADMN 8125. Doctoral Seminar in Instruction. (3) 

Analysis of models of teaching and the match between 
attributes of the models and the instructional outcomes 
desired by the teacher. (Summer) 

ADMN 8130. Educational Governance and Policy 
Studies. (3) Prerequisite: Admission to Ed.D. program in 
Educational Leadership. An examination of the 
institutional structure for policy-making in American 
education and the theories, models and practices that 
relate to policy-making in education. (Summer) 

ADMN 8140. School Finance. (3) Prerequisite: 
Admission to Ed.D. program in Educational Leadership 
or permission of instructor. An examination of the theory 
and operation of public school finance systems and 
school business administration with special attention to 
local, state, and federal sources of revenue and such 
business functions as budgeting and financing capital 
outlay projects. (Summer) 

ADMN 8150. Human Resources Development and 
Administration. (3) Prerequisite: ADMN 8110 or initial 
licensure as school administrator. Examination of 
personnel administration in educational institutions, 
including administration of personnel at the school 
district level and its contribution to the overall 
management and operation of a school system. (Fall) 

ADMN 8160. Introduction to Educational 
Administration. (3) Examination of behavioral 
components of administrative theory, organization, 
decision-making and planning for educational 
development including appraisal of significant functions, 
techniques, practices and problems as they relate to public 
school systems, social institutions, and the system of 
social and governmental agencies. (Fall) 



216 College of Education 



ADMN 8410. Advanced Internship in Educational 
Leadership Part I. (3) Prerequisites: ADMN 8110, 8120, 
8130, and 8140. Internship experiences planned and 
guided cooperatively by University and school personnel, 
including some work in private, community, or social 
service organizations. Accompanying cohort seminar for 
integrating and synthesizing knowledge and skills useful 
to practicing school leaders. (Fall) 

ADMN 8420. Advanced Internship in Educational 
Leadership Part II. (3) Prerequisite: ADMN 8410. 
Continuation of ADMN 8410. (Spring) 

ADMN 8489. Practicum in Staff Development. (3) 

Examination of techniques of delivering in-service 
training and development of leadership for in-service 
educational programs including design and 
implementation of a staff development program in a 
school setting. (Spring) 

ADMN 8610. Interdisciplinary Seminar. (3) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Ed.D. program in Educational 
Leadership. Ideas, values, cultures, and contemporary 
issues affecting society generally and education 
particularly and principles and practices for responding to 
the publics with whom school leaders interact. May be 
repeated for credit. (Summer) 

ADMN 8660. Instructional Leadership Seminar. (3) 

Prerequisite: EDUC 8122. Investigation and evaluation of 
current trends and issues in supervision as they relate to 
the role of the educational leader, with special attention to 
the role of facilitating the teaching/learning process. 
(Summer) 



substantive educational leadership or programmatic issue. 
(Fall, Spring Summer) 

EIST 8101. The Adult Learner. (3) The focus of this 
course will be on the examination of how adults learn in 
instructional settings. Characteristics of the adult learner 
will be examined. Students will investigate adult learning 
theory as well as current trends and advancements in 
adult learning. The focus will be on making better 
instructional decisions and media selection for the 
education and training of adults. (Fall, Summer) 



ELEMENTARY 
EDUCATION 

Department of Reading and Elementary 
Education 

367 College of Education Building 
704-687-8889 

Degree 

M.Ed. 

Coordinator 

Dr. Jack Piel 

MASTER OF EDUCATION IN 
ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 



ADMN 8695. Advanced Seminar in Teaching and 
Learning. (3) Examination of a number of current 
teaching models to provide a framework for choosing 
those appropriate for a given classroom setting with 
special attention to the relationship between teaching 
strategies and learning outcomes. (Spring) 

ADMN 8699. Dissertation Proposal Seminar. (3) 

Prerequisite: Completion of research requirements. 
Identification and definition of a research area and 
development of a proposal draft for an original research 
study appropriate for the dissertation requirement. (Fall, 
and On Demand) 

ADMN 8800. Individual Study in Educational 
Administration. (1-6) Prerequisite: Permission of the 
student's advisor. Independent study under the 
supervision of an appropriate faculty member. May be 
repeated for credit. (Fall, Spring Summer) 

ADMN 8999. Dissertation Research. (3) Prerequisite: 
Consent of Ed.D. program coordinator. Execution of 
original research study that addresses the solution to an 
educational or school-related problem or that addresses a 



The master's (M.Ed.) program in Elementary Education 
is a K-6 instructional degree that leads to the "M" level 
teaching license. This 39-hour program promotes the 
following strands of competence: 

1) Instructional Leader and Mentor 

This degree program enables graduates to develop 
leadership/mentorship skills 

2) Career Path for Teachers as Educational 
Leaders 

Learn "best practices" for instructional tactics based on 
current research findings in education. Completion of this 
degree program will enable graduates to advance up the 
pay scale through a 10% salary increase. 

3) National Board Certification Alignment 

Completion of this program will assist graduates in the 
pursuit of National Board Certification. 

Program Goals 

Master teachers are self-directed in their personal and 
professional growth as educators. 



College of Education 217 



Master teachers are responsive to children's differences 

influenced by development, exceptionalities, and 

diversity. 

Master teachers are well-grounded in the content and 

pedagogy of the entire elementary curriculum. 

Master teachers are elf-reflective, self-evaluative, and 

educational researchers. 

Master teachers are collaborative educational leaders. 

Instructional Phases 

This degree program is organized so that students will 
become instructional leaders through: 

1) Phase I Developing Perspectives 

Thirteen (13) hours of Professional, Theoretical, and 
Research coursework applicable to elementary education. 
This coursework establishes the basis for Phase II and 
Phase III. 

2) Phase II Content and Pedagogy 

Sixteen (16) hours of coursework based on current 
research findings. Graduates will investigate and share 
effective instructional practices designed to improve 
learning in the classroom. 

3) Phase HI Collaborative Leadership 

Four (4) hour block of coursework developed to help 
students achieve the necessary skills to become 
instructional leaders and mentors within a public school 
setting. 

Electives 

Six (6) hour requirement selected from a variety of course 
offerings designed to allow teacher leaders to guide their 
own learning relative to goals and interests 

Phase I. Developing Perspectives 

Complete Phase I core requirements according to 
approved plan before beginning Phase II