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Full text of "University of Maryland men's basketball media guides"

, i ■■: /■ 






TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

5 i— i Facts About the University of Maryland; 
Athletic Council; Department of Intercollegiate 
Athletics 

4 ~ Head Coach H. A. "Bud" Millikan 

5 i— i University of Maryland Student Activities 

Building 

6-7 — 1955-56 Prospectus 

7 *- 1954-55 All-Opponent Team 

8-12 <—> Terp Thumbnail Sketches 

13 i— i 1954-55 Final 24-Game Cumulative Statistics 

14 i— i Varsity Squad Roster 

1 5 ~ Freshman Squad Roster 

16 — Atlantic Coast Conference Basketball Standings 
17-25 ~- Terp Opponents 

24 •—• All-Time Coaches' Records 

25 i— University of Maryland Tournament Records 
26-27 ^ University of Maryland Basketball Records 

27 ~ Freshman Basketball Schedule 

28 i-* (Back Cover) Varsity Basketball Schedule 



FACTS ABOUT THE 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

President — Dr. Wilson H. Elkins 

Location — College Park, Maryland 

Founded — The history of the present University is the history of 
two institutions: the old privately-owned and operated University of 
Maryland in Baltimore and the Maryland State College (formerly 
Maryland Agriculture College) at College Park. They merged in 1920. 

In 1807, the College of Medicine of Maryland was organized, the 
foundation of the University. The Maryland State College was char- 
tered in 1856 under the name of the Maryland Agricultural College. 

In 1920, by an act cf the State Legislature, the University of Mary- 
land was merged with the Maryland State College, and the resultant 
institution was given the name University of Maryland. 

Enrollment — 13,500 (approximate — all schools) 
Athletic Conference — Atlantic Coast 
Nickname of Teams — Terrapins 
Colors— Red and White, Old Gold and Black 

ATHLETIC COUNCIL 

Mr. Geary Eppley, Chairman 

Mr. James M. Tatum, Director of Athletics 

Mr. J. H. Remsberg, President, Maryland Alumni Association 

Dr. James H. Reid, Ass't. Dean, Business and Public Administration 

Col. James Ambrose, Dean, Military Science 

Dr. Jack Faber, Head, Bacteriology Department 

Dr. E. N. Cory, Head Entomology Department 

Dr. Leland D. Scott, Horticulture Department 

Mr. Charles Wickard, President, Student Government Association 

DEPT. OF INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS 

Director of Athletics — James M. Tatum 

Graduate Manager of Athletics — William W. Cobey 

Athletic Publicity Director — Joe F. Blair 

Equipment Head — Kermit "Chief" Cissell 

Facilities Head — Charles "Lindy" Kehoe 

Chief of Concessions — Fred Layman 

Ticket Manager — Bennie Robinson 

Office Secretary to Mr. Tatum — Mrs. Ora Rutherford 

Office Secretary to Mr. Cobey — Mrs. Dorothy Hunt 

Office Secretary to Mr. Blair — Mrs. Nell Beasley 

Head Trainer — Alfred "Duke" Wyre 

Assistant Trainer — John Lacey 

Football Coach — James M, Tatum 

Basketball Coach — H. A. "Bud" Millikan 

Baseball Coach — H. Burton Shipley 

Lacrosse Co-Coaches — Jack Faber, Al Heagy 

Track, Cross Country Coach — Jim Kehoe 

Soccer, Tennis Coach — Doyle Royal 

Wrestling Coach — William E. "Sully" Krouse 

Golf Coach — Frank Cronin 

— 3 — 



H. A. "Bud" MILLIKAN — Head Coach 




In the spring of 1950, Maryland 
Athletic Director Jim Tatum saw the 
need for a basketball coach to help lift 
the Terp floor game to a bit more 
prominence than enjoyed in previous 
years. Tatum was in the process of 
leveling off his planned program to 
have the best possible in all sports at 
Maryland. 

To get the best, Tatum contacted 
the best — Hank Iba, the great coach at 
Oklahoma A&M. Iba non-hesitatingly 
recommended Millikan, one of his 
many all-Americas, who then was 

\lfc "^^^Sfcuil coaching at Newton High School in 
*f| ^^^ Iowa. Tatum wasted little time in 
9k ££;;■ convincing the young high school coach 

that he could coach a college five. Iba 
had told Tatum that it would be Millikan he would like to have coach 
A&M in the event he finished his coaching tenure at the Oklahoma 
school. 

Millikan, in five years, has brought Maryland basketball out of the 
doldrums and cellar-mats they had dominated for so long, to national 
prominence. The past two seasons when he compiled a 23-7 and 17-7 
won-loss mark, the Terps finished in the top 20 teams in the country. 
It was while the new Student Activities Building was being built last 
year that thousands of fans were turned away from Ritchie Coliseum, 
the old home of Terp basketball. Now the 12,500-seat Activities Build- 
ing is the new home for Terp court fans and it is reasonable to expect 
that Millikan will continue his greatest efforts to try to maintain his 
splendid reputation. 

The affable 35-year old native of Maryville, Mo. came to College 
Park in the spring of 1950 and inherited a team that had won only 
seven games the previous year and lost 18. When the season was over, 
he had won 15 and lost 10. He won the opening round game of the 
Southern Conference Tournament, then lost a heart-breaker to N.C. 
State. His second year saw him winning 13 and losing eight and quali- 
fying for the tournament again. His third campaign brought another 
winning season, 14 wins against half as many losses. In the league 
tourney, :he Terps went into the semi-finals but lost to Wake Forest 
in the final two minutes of the game. Then followed his two best 
records, 21-7 and 17-7. For this reason Millikan has become the most 
respected coach in the Conference and thus labeled himself as one of 
the country's top young coaches. 

Millikan graduated from Maryville High School in 1938 after 
completing all his prep work in the Maryville School System. He was 
a four-year letterman in football, basketball, track, and tennis. 

Following high school, he enrolled at Oklahoma A&M and was a 
star guard of the varsity for three years. He was named to the all- 
America team for his outstanding performances of the 1941-42 season. 
He stayed on at A&M for one year as freshman coach before entering 
the service. The great all-America Bob Kurland was one of his playen 
that year. 



While a student at A&M, Millikan won honors in the classroom 
also. He was listed on the Dean's list all four years as an honor 
student. 

After two years in the United States Navy, he went back to A&M 
to assist Iba during the 1944-45 campaign, a team that won the Na- 
tional Championship that year. 

He then went back to Maryville High School where he coached for 
two years and then moved to Newton, Iowa High School where his 
teams wen their conference titles both years. 

Then the College Park assignment was accepted. With the de- 
velopment of top college fives in his brief tenure at Maryland and 
prospects for another winning ledger this year, the Millikanmen can 
point with pride to their young hard-working coach. 

"Bud" as he is known to all, married the former Maxine Louthan, 
native of Maryville. They have a son, Marshal, age 9, and a daughter 
Maria Rae, age 4. 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES BUILDING 

Home of Terp Basketball 

The Student Activities Building is a very complete indoor athletic 
plant at the University of Maryland. The building has some unusual 
and ingenious features, both as to the manner of construction and as 
to the utilization of space and facilities. 

The structure is Georgian in design, in keeping with the archi- 
tectural motif of the campus. It contains the second largest indoor 
auditorium in the East, exceeded in size o-nly by Madison Square 
Gardens. Capacity is 12,000 permanent seats with provision for 4,000 
additional seats if needed. 

The auditorium section of the building has been built as though 
it were an indoor amphitheater. The seating area has been "scooped" 
out with concrete step slabs providing supports for the seats with 
the ground carrying the load. This eliminates the elaborate structural 
frame, which would have been needed if the seats were built above 
ground. This procedure resulted in a considerable lessening of cost. 

Beside the playing and spectator facilities, normally found in such 
a building, the outer periphery of the building provides offices and 
classrooms for the College of Physical Education, Recreation and 
Health, a gymnasium for instructional purposes and smaller rooms for 
boxing and wrestling. Other unique features are sleeping facilities 
for visiting teams and combination apartment-offices for visiting 
coaches. 

SPECIFICATIONS 

FOUNDATION: Auditorium section reinforced concrete walls below 
grade with membrane waterproofed exterior, piers and thrust footings 
supporting long span steel arches over auditorium roof. Seating area 
is reinforced concrete slab on sloped grade. 

WALLS: Face brick curtain walls, slag block backup. Limestone 
trim base course, sills and coping. Parapet around building. Wood 
double hung windows. Interior painted all exposed areas. Wood 
panelling and plastered walls in lobby and office areas. 

FLOORS: Reinforced concrete slab floor supported by structural 

steel frame in classroom and office areas throughout. Toilet and 

showers have ceramic tile floors; playing floor is maple; stair treads, 

(See ACTIVITIES BUILDING, Page 23 J 

— 5 — 



1955-56 PROSPECTUS 

Sophomores hold the key to the success of the 1955-56 University 
of Maryland basketball team, and the potential of some of the sopho- 
mores could make it a highly successful court campaign. With six 
sophomores among the top 11 boys who figure to do most of the play- 
ing for the Terrapins this year, Coach H. A. "Bud" Millikan will have 
an inexperienced squad. But should the inexperienced members de- 
velop fast, the Terrapins could floor another potential big winner. 

Experience will not be the only drawback. The toughest schedule 
in Maryland's basketball history will not make Millikan's task any 
easier. Meeting the likes of Kentucky, North Carolina State, George 
Washington (all ranked in the pre-season top 10), Duke, North Caro- 
lina, Wake Forest, Georgetown and Navy is a difficult task for a vet- 
eran-loaded team, much less than a team composed of many sopho- 
mores. 

Only two seniors are among the five lettermen returning, with 
three juniors — only one a regular — as holdovers from the team which 
won 17 and lost seven last year. 

Defense, the trademark of the Oklahoma A&M schooled Millikan, 
will be hurting in 1955-56. The extremely young team will not have the 
defensive savvy characteristic of the Terps of the past five years. 
Millikan feels it is impossible for a boy to be a top defensive man until 
he has had at least a year's experience playing his brand of a tight 
defensive game. With the youth that prevails, it appears the Maryland 
defense, which ranked 15th in the nation last year, will not be as 
strong. 

Playing a tall schedule without tall men is another difficult ob- 
stacle the basketballing Marylanders will have to overcome. The im- 
portant phase of rebounding, at which the Terps had a 350 margin 
over the opposition a year ago, will undoubtedly drop off from last 
year. With only one 6'5" veteran and a 6'7" sophomore on the squad 
roster, the Terps will be only fair in rebounding — lacking the big 
experienced backboard hound. But helping to make up for the big man 
off the boards is senior Bob Kessler, all-America candidate, who with 
his 6'4" frame, can outrebound men several inches taller. Kessler set a 
new Maryland rebound record last year, pulling in 263 stray shots. 
Millikan has often said he wished he had five rebcunders like Bob. 

Finding the height to play the center position vacated by the 
graduation of Bob Everett, has been one of Millikan's biggest problems 
in the pre-season drills. John Urbanik, the 6'7" sophomore, could be 
the answer, but the 230 pound Elizabeth, N.J. youngster seems to be 
a year away from top form. The Terps' hopes for a successful 1955-56 
season could sky-rocket if "Big John" could develop rapidly. If not, the 
Terps' pivot spot could prove to be troublesome. It would be hard for 
Millikan to pit Urbanik against such outstanding pivot-men as Ronnie 
Shavlik of North Carolina State, Bob Burrows of Kentucky, or Joe 
Holup of George Washington, unless he can gain the poise and polish 
needed in a hurry. 

Opening up the 12 foot lane should help the Terps, Millikan as- 
serted, because the big men will not have as much advantage as in 
the past. The wider lane should make for more open play inside, but 
it doesn't necessarily make much difference on defense. 

While the Terrapin basketball picture isn't as rosy as it has been 
in the past few years, all is not so gloomy. Not only will Maryland 



have a bright new basketball court, but the prospects of Nick Davis, 
the bright, promising freshman star, teaming up with veteran sharp- 
shooters Bob Kessler and Bob O'Brien should give the Terps more out- 
side scoring. Kessler, the high-scoring forward who led the Terps in 
total points, field goals, free throws and rebounds last year while 
averaging 20.3 points per game, should prove the bulwark of the attack. 
O'Brien, whose deadly-set-shots enabled the Terps to rally and defeat 
North Carolina State last year, will be back at the guard position to 
fire away from far out. Davis, with one of the softest set shots ever 
displayed in the East, will undoubtedly play along side O'Brien at 
guard. "Slick Nick" is also a wizard at dribbling. His "fancy-Dan" 
tactics, as Coach Frank McGuire of North Carolina called Davis' sleight 
of hand maneuverings, paced the 1954 Terp yearlings to an outstanding 
season. 

Senior veteran letterman John Sandbower, rated by Millikan as 
his top defensive standout, has improved immensely on his outside 
shooting and along with 6'5" junior Drew Schaufler, figures to com- 
plete the Terps' early season starting line-up. 

The sophomore contingent, which will figure prominently in the 
final evaluation of the Terps, will find Urbanik, 6'4" Perry Moore and 
6'5" Don Dunlap vying for the center position. Should all three fail to 
make the early season grade, Millikan will call on Schaufler to play the 
post. Moore is also regarded as a valuable substitute at forward, as is 
6'3" John Nacincik. Six-footer John Love, with a great set, will chal- 
lenge for a starting guard position. 

The Terps get a break in their rough schedule by having the first 
ten games at home. This should give the sophomores a chance to gain 
more poise and polish before partisan crowds, and get them accustomed 
to playing in the new Student Activities Building. If the sophs can 
develop rapidly and mold in as a unit with the veteran holdovers, the 
Terps should be able to meet the calibre of teams that are scheduled 
for 1955-56. 

Millikan has never had a losing season in his previous five years at 
College Park, with a 15 and 10 record his "poorest" season. But with 
the rawness of the sophomores and the rugged opposition, the former 
Oklahoma A&M all-America will be happy if the Terps can finish better 
than .500 for the season. Cracking the "Big Four" North Carolina 
schools of North Carolina State, North Carolina, Duke and Wake 
Forest m the Atlantic Coast Conference will be a tremendous task for 
Maryland. The Mid-Winter Festival in late December will also find 
Maryland in competition with Michigan State, G.W., and St. Francis of 
Loretta, Pa. But with Millikan's ability to mold winners and to have his 
teams "up" for big games, it would >not surprise if Maryland were to 
again prove a title threat in the ACC. 

1954-1955 ALL-OPPONENT TEAM 

First Team Second Team 

* Wilkinson, Virginia 1. Twyman, Cincinnati 

* Shavlik, N.C. State 2. Rosenbluth, North Carolina 
Mayer, Duke 3. Molodet, N.C. State 
Yarborough, Clemson 4. Devlin, George Washington 
Belmont, Duke 5. Davis, Wake Forest 
* Unanimous selection 

Outstanding Player — Wilkinson, Virginia 
Outstanding Team Faced — North Carolina State 

— 7 — 



TERP THUMBNAIL SKETCHES 

BOB KESSLER — Senior — Forward — 
6'4" — The leading scorer from last year's 
team, Kessler again is expected to be the 
Terrapins' scoring sensation and one of the 
top players of the South. A strong candidate 
for all-America honors, "Kess" just missed 
the 500 point in scoring in 1954 with 487 
points for a 20.3 scoring average . . . While 
Kessler's scoring will be greatly depended 
upon, it's the outstanding job of rebounding 
that Millikan is counting on from the Alex- 
andria, Va. senior. "I wish I had five re- 
bounders like him," said Millikan of the 6'4" 
Kessler, who pulled in 263 rebounds last 
year . . . Bob has a very good drive-in shot, 
both to his left and right, and with his deft jump shot from around the 
key-hole, is a strong scoring threat every time he has the ball near 
the bucket. 

"Kess" led the 1954 Terps in field goals scored, free throws scored, 
rebounds, total points and scoring average. As a freshman he scored 
182 points, and 289 as a sophomore to go along with his 487 of last 
year. This year he shoots at Gene Shue's all-time Maryland mark of 
654 for a single season. Bob is a business major in the College of Busi- 
ness and Public Administration. 

Bob was all-State at George Washington High in Alexandria in 
1950-51 and played in the high school ail-American game. As a junior, 
he was named to the second team All-Atlantic Coast Conference squad. 




NICK DAVIS — Sophomore — Guard — 
6'1%" — The sophomore given the best 
chance to break into the starting lineup, 
from the opening game of the season. Davis 
will help break up the opposition's defense 
with his amazingly soft set shot that just 
seems to hang in the air. If stopped from 
outside, his uncanny dribbling ability en- 
ables him to drive-in for two-points. "Nick" 
paced the freshman team to a 9-3 record last 
year with his 20.3 scoring average on 244 
points. But it was his dribbling ability that 
pulled in the early crowds that preceded the 
varsity contests. Boasting the largest hands 
of any member of the squad, Nick put on 
one-man freeze demonstrations last year with his "fancy Dan" dribbling. 
Dubbed "Slick Nick" by the Terrapin fans, Davis proved to be es- 
pecially slick at the foul line, scoring on 58 of 67 foul shots for an 
86.6 percentage. If the Rankin, Pa. youngster can gain the defensive 
know-how that Millikan requires, he should prove to be one of the 
most outstanding sophomores in Maryland's basketball history. He is 
more advanced as a soph than was Gene Shue as a second year man. 
Nick is majoring in Business and Public Administration, and wants to 
play AAU ball when finished his schooling. 




BOB O'BRIEN — Junior — Guard — 
6'3" — Added scoring punch from the out- 
side is expected to be furnished by O'Brien, 
who, according to Coach Millikan, has poten- 
tially the best set shot since the amazing 
Gene Shue of two seasons ago. If early sea- 
son practice is any indication, Bob should 
have a much better year than when he scored 
292 points (12.2 per game average) during 
his sophomore year. Not only has the Mc- 
Mechen, West Virginian been hitting with 
consistency on his set-shot, but improvement 
on his driving shot has made him a bigger 
scoring threat. The defensive experience be 
gained as a soph will prove valuable in '55-'56. 

Bob might be the guy to make the offense go, loosening up the defense 
with his long sets. He hit on 40 percent of his shots last year. A 
good pair of hands off the backboards make him a big factor in that 
department. An outstanding ball handler — could be the top play 
maker. A Physical Education major who plans to coach upon gradu- 
ation, Bob married his home-town girl just before school started in 
September. An all-Stater while at Benwood High. 




JOHN URBANIK — Sophomore — Center 
— 6'7" — The big man who could solve the 
height problem that faces the Terps in the 
coming season. If Maryland is to have a 
big man, Urbanik has to be it. Develop- 
ment of agressiveness is all that is keeping 
him from becoming a good ball-player and 
a possible starter. John reported a half- 
houv earlier to practice each day during fall 
practice to get special individual attention 
from Millikan and last year's center, Bob 
Everett. "Big John" has been working on a 
hook shot, both right and left handed to 
go along with a good jump shot. How fast 
Urbanik can pick up this desire for aggres- 
siveness and polish will determine how much action he will see early 
in the season. His size is definitely needed for heavy duty on the 
boards. If the desire is ignited, he could easily approach the 
11.2 scoring average he attained as a freshman. His defensive ability 
is that expected of a big and inexperienced sophomore — but which 
will improve under game fire. The Elizabeth, N.J. hopeful is in the 
College of Business and Public Administration. 




— 9 — 



JOHN SANDBOWER — Senior — Guard 
— 6'4" — Coach Millikan is looking towards 
Sandbower as the stabilizer of the sophomore 
dominated 1955-56 squad. A starter from last 
year, John is one of the two seniors on the 
team. The Baltimorean is one of the real 
rugged men off the backboards, and it is in 
this capacity that John should shine. "A 
rebound scrapper," is Millikan's description 
of Sandbower. He was one of the top de- 
fensive men in the Atlantic Coast Confer- 
ence last year, and should again be a Terp 
defensive ace. John again will draw the 
toughest defensive assignments, including 
men inches taller than himself. A sharp 
jump shot is Sandbower's best offensive weapon. The jump shot, 
which has practically no arch to it, is most effective around the key- 
hole. John's work all summer on an outside set has shown dividends 
in fall practice sessions and should enable him to become more of a 
scoring threat. As a junior, he scored 150 points for a 6.3 per game 
average. Sandbower is in the College of Business and Public Adminis- 
tration. 




PERRY MOORE — Sophomore — Cente - 
Forward ■ — 6'4" — A hustling sophomoie 
who could move right into the starting line- 
up without too much trouble. While only 
6'4", Moore will have the assignment of 
guarding men 6'6" and 6'7" due to his tre- 
mendous "leap". The agility and the spring 
that he possesses should enable Millikan to 
assign him to the opposition's big men with- 
out too much fear. The rebounding potential 
is there and his defensive ability lies in his 
alertness off the boards. Has to watch over 
eagerness on fouls. Pei'ry will undoubtedly 
play a lot at the post position and should 
furnish the Terps some inside scoring. He 
was second highest scorer on frosh team last year with 10.4 scoring 
average. He has been developing a one-hander from outside. Moore 
is also an outstanding track performer, and three years ago finished 
fifth in the National Decathlon, while in the Navy. One of the 
three married men on the squad. 




— 10 



DREW SCHAUFLER — Junior — Center 
— 6'5" — If he can continue to display the 
form he showed at the end of the past cam- 
paign, it will be hard to keep him off the 
starting five. Drew, one of the top men to 
come out of Philadelphia two years ago, will 
probably have double duty this year as a 
forward and center. His size will help at the 
pivot and his clever ball handling will be a 
key to Millikan's "pattern of play" type of- 
fense off the post. His jump shots from the 
corners and a soft push shot that just seems 
to get over the top of the defense will make 
Drew dangerous at the forward position. A 
better than average rebounder and driver, 

Drew should be one of the top scorers for the 1955-56 Terps. His 
hustle and desire to play are contributing factors to his improvement 
over sophomore year. Schaufler is a Public Relations major in the 
College of Business and Public Administration. 




JOHN LOVE — Sophomore — Guard — 
6'0" — Could be the surprise sophomore of 
the year. Love has a tremendous set-shot 
from way out, and he hit real well during the 
fall drills. Should be a fine substitute to 
spell O'Brien and Davis at guard. His set 
is the kind that could break a zone-defense 
wide open. He scored 91 points in 12 games 
as a freshman, mainly on the set, but was 
also effective on a drive-in shot. Coach 
Millikan has said he has as much hustle as 
any two men and is a real scrapper. Love 
came to Maryland on his own, out of the 
service. The amount of action he sees will JBt> 

depend on how quickly he gets the poise and 
polish that Millikan expects. Love is from Camden, New Jersey. 




fmcm 



JOHN NACINCIK — Sophomore — For- 
ward — 6'3" — Another service veteran who 
could see a great deal of action. About a 
week before the season opened, Nacincik was 
alternating between fifth and sixth man. He 
has a pair of good basketball hands and a 
good "sixth basketball sense." For his size 
Nacincik pulls in a good share of rebounds. 
John might be the sophomore defensive ace 
who could be called upon to cool off the 
hot hand of one of the opposition. He has 
the speed to keep tight with his offensive 
man. He has a good drive-in shot from the 
corner, and a jump shot off the drive makes 
him extremely tough to guard. His main 

trouble is to refrain from fouling so much. He fouled out of three of 
the frosh's 12 games last year, yet scored 106 points. He is an Indus- 
trial Education major. 

— 11 - 





BOB HARDIMAN — Junior — Guard — 
6'3" — ■ Saw limited action as a sophomore 
last year, but is counted on to be one of the 
top substitutes for this season. Hardiman is 
one of the five lettermen returning. Bob 
was commanding attention during the early 
fall drills, until he received a broken nose 
in a scramble for a loose rebound. This set- 
back put him behind some of the other boys, 
but before the season is too far along, Bob 
should be right back battling for a high 
position on the team. His two-handed set 
shot has improved, making him a more dan- 
gerous scorer and the experience he gained 
with his sophomore appearances should make 
him a better player. The Salisbury, Maryland native is good off the 
backboard which should make him a valuable first-line replacement. 
Bob is i>n the Business and Public Administration College. 

JACK DOANE — Sophomore — Guard — 5'11" — A sophomore from 
Montgomery Blair High in Silver Spring, Md. who was held out for 
experience last year. Very fast and is deft as a ball-hawk. A broken 
ankle received while sliding into base during last baseball season has 
slowed him down a bit. A good floor man who can dribble effectively 
on a drive in shot. He also possesses a nice set-shot. If the ankle in- 
jury doesn't slow him down he could prove to be a valuable sub. 

AL BLEICH — Sophomore — Guard — 6'2" — Another one of the 
sophomores who was held out of action last year to gain valuable ex- 
perience in the practice sessions. He proved to be a good dependable 
performer on the frosh team of two years ago. He has an adequate set 
shot but has to improve on his drive. Played his high school ball at 
Western High in Washington, D. C. 

CURT PR INS — Sophomore — Forward — 6'2y 2 " — A former intra- 
mural player in the University's intra-mural program who looked good 
enough to try out for the varsity. Prins has shown promise to stick to 
the squad. He needs some seasoning, then should fit kito Millikan's 
plans. Played high school ball at Bethesda Chevy-Chase. 

BOB NARDONE — Sophomore — Forward — 6'3V2" — A good in- 
side man during his play at Bloomfield High in Bloomfield, N.J., who 
has found a lack of height an obstacle for inside play in college. He has 
a good scoring touch in close around the key-hole, but the lack of an 
outside shot has held him back from a starting position. He has the 
desire to play and is a good ball handler. His determination should 
improve his playing. 

DON DUN LAP — Junior — Center — 6'5" — Dunlap played some 
for Millikan as a sophomore three years ago, and since his discharge 
from the Navy has returned to add much needed height to the center 
position. Don has an effective hook shot from around the keyhole and 
is proficient on rebounding. Should add some scoring punch to the 
Terps, if he can pick up experience and polish during the early part of 
the season. 

PAT CLARKE and WAYNE McGINNIS — Two sophomores who 
need to gain experience before playing much for the Terps. Millikan 
will probably hold both of them out for practice session experience. 
McGinnis' 6'6'' build could find him playing some near the end of the 
season, if Millikan can't work out the right center combination. Clarke 
played for Anacostia High in Washington, D. C. and McGinnis for 
Hereford High, just outside Baltimore. 

— 12 — 



1954-55 Final 24-Garne Cumulative Statistics 



FIELD GOALS 


FREE THROWS 


Re- 


Total 




PLAYER Atts. 


Scored 


Pet. 


Atts. 


Scored 


Pet. 


bound 


5 PtS. 


Avg. 


Kessler, Bob 468 


178 


38.0 


204 


131 


64.2 


263 


487 


20.3 


Everett, Bob 192 


92 


47.9 


182 


125 


68.7 


250 


309 


12.9 


O'Brien, Bob 325 


130 


40.0 


58 


32 


55.2 


124 


292 


12.2 


Sandbower, J. 159 


57 


35.9 


53 


36 


67.9 


154 


150 


6.3 


Dilworth, Bob 96 


46 


47.9 


51 


25 


49.0 


155 


117 


4.9 


Schaufler, D. 33 


12 


36.4 


20 


17 


85.0 


36 


41 


2.4 


Webster, Dave 24 


4 


16.7 


18 


12 


66.7 


22 


20 


1.2 


Hardiman, Bob 4 


1 


25.0 


6 


3 


50.0 


5 


5 


0.4 


Murray, Bob 4 


1 


25.0 











2 


2 


0.5 


*Fuqua, Frank 108 


42 


38.8 


87 


64 


73.5 


118 


148 


9.8 


*Vodopia, Mark 4 








3 


2 


66.7 


2 


2 


0.2 


TOTALS 1417 


563 


39.8 


682 


447 


65.7 


1178 


1573 


65.5 


OPPONENTS 1519 


517 


34.0 


649 


451 


63.0 


834 


1485 


61.8 


ineligible to play after 


15 games. 












OVERALL 


RECORD: 




WON 


17 


LOST: 


7 




A.C.C. RECORD 






WON 


10 


LOST: 


4 




A.C.C. TOURNAMENT 




WON 





LOST: 


1 





1954-1955 SCORES 

Maryland — 

Jan. 10 68 

Jan. 13 68 

Jan. 18 53 

Jan. 29 60 

Feb. 5 67 

Feb. 8 67 

Feb. 12 63 

Feb. 15 68 

Feb. 19 58 

Feb. 21 71 

Feb. 24 57 

Mar. 3 67 

* Overtime Games 
** Double Overtime 
x Ail-American City Tournament Champions 



1aryl 


and— 








Dec. 


4 


60 


Georgetown 


43 


Dec. 


7 


49 


Duke 


47 


Dec. 


10 


58 


Wake Forest 


62 


Dec. 


14 


72 


Virginia 


69 


Dec. 


17 


61 


Duke 


68 


Dec. 


18 


70 


North Carolina 


60 


Dec. 


27 x 


58 


Texas Tech 


54 


Dec. 


28 x 


83 


Rhode Island 


66 


Dec. 


30 x 


78 


Cincinnati 


61 


Jan. 


4 


68 


South Carolina 


51 


Jan. 


6 


78 


Virginia 


65 


Jan. 


8 


71 


Clemson 


63 



South Carolina 52 



N. C. State 

G. Washington 

Navy 

Wm. & Mary 

G. Washington 



64 
75 
54 
62 
73 



North Carolina 61 



Clemson 
N. C. State 
Wake Forest 
Georgetown 
Virginia 



66 

78 
75 
49* 
68* 



NDIVIDUAL HIGHS FOR THE SEASON: 

Total Points: Bob Kessler — 31 against Clemson 
Most Field Goals: Bob Kessler — 13 against Clemson 
Free Throws Scored: Bob Kessler — 13 against Navy 
Most Rebounds: Bob Kessler — 19 against Wake Forest 

-- 13 — 



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— 15 — 





All G 


ames 




/on 


Lost 


Pts. 


Opp. 


21 


6 


2,250 


1,816 


23 


7 


1,953 


1,673 


17 


12 


2,210 


2,028 


26 


7 


2,687 


2,258 


11 


10 


1,439 


1,335 


11 


16 


1,693 


1,816 


16 


11 


2,149 


2,013 



ATLANTIC COAST CONFERENCE BASKETBALL STANDINGS 

1953-54 SEASON 

Conference Games 
Team Won Lost Pts. Opp. 

Duke 9 1 818 710 

MARYLAND 7 2 621 504 

Wake Forest 8 4 978 853 

N. C. State 5 3 656 580 

North Carolina .... 5 6 749 721 

South Carolina .... 2 8 600 758 

Virginia 1 4 333 373 

Clemson 9 502 758 5 18 1,433 1,802 



CHAMPIONSHIP TOURNAMENT 

(Played at Reynolds Coliseum, Raleigh, N.C., March 4-5-6.) 

First Round — Duke over Virginia, 96-68; MARYLAND over Clem- 
son, 75-59; Wake Forest over South Carolina, 58-57 (overtime); N.C. 
State over North Carolina, 52-51. 

Semi-finals — N.C. State over Duke, 79-75; Wake Forest over 
MARYLAND, 64-56 (overtime). 

Finals — N.C. State over Wake Forest, 82-80 (overtime). 



1954-55 SEASON 

Conference Games 

Team Won Lost Pts. Opp. 

N.C. State 12 2 1,283 1.0S6 

Duke 11 3 1,212 990 

MARYLAND 10 4 923 881 

Wake Forest 8 G 1,176 1,121 

North Carolina ..8 6 1,124 1,107 

Virginia 5 9 1,255 1,255 

South Carolina .. 2 12 970 1,168 

Clemson - 14 1,020 1,355 



CHAMPIONSHIP TOURNAMENT 
(Played at Reynolds Coliseum, Raleigh, N.C, March 3-4-5.) 

First Round — N.C. State over Clemson, 101-76; Duke over South 
Carolina, 83-76; Virginia over MARYLAND, 68-67 (overtime); Wake 
Forest over North Carolina, 95-82. 

Semi-finals — N.C. State over Wake Forest 85-70; Duke over Vir- 
ginia, 90-77 (overtime). 

Finals — N.C. State over Duke, 87-77. 

— 16 — 





All G 


ames 




i/on 


Lost 


Pts. 


Opp. 


28 


4 


2,839 


2,449 


20 


8 


2,386 


2,037 


17 


7 


1,573 


1,485 


17 


10 


2,315 


2,139 


10 


11 


1,592 


1,599 


14 


15 


2,605 


2,449 


10 


16 


2,043 


2,158 


2 


21 


1,634 


2,147 



TERP OPPONENTS 
Virginia 

FACTS ABOUT THE CAVALIERS: 

Conference — Atlantic Coast 

Location — Charlottesville, Va. 

Head Coach — Evan J. "Bus" Male 

Coaching Record — Won 51, Lost 52 (4 years) 

Colors — Orange and Blue 

Home Court — Memorial Gymnasium 

Capacity— 2,500 

Athletic Publicity Director — Dick Turner 

1954-55 Record— Won 14, Lost 15 

CAVALIERS' RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS: 

(Maryland; Won 37, Lost 18) 



Maryland Virginia 


Maryland 


Virginia 


Maryland 


Virginia 


1924—13 26 


1934—43 


20 


1947—44 


64 


1925—24 18 


1934—28 


25 


1947—56 


68 


1925—36 25 


1935—44 


24 


1948—47 


53 


1926—28 34 


1935—33 


32 


1948—43 


79 


1926—30 21 


1936—40 


34 


1949—56 


66 


1927—17 22 


1937—37 


23 


1949—70 


52 


1927—29 28 


1938—39 


23 


1950—59 


57 


1928—26 20 


1939—31 


21 


1950—46 


43 


1928—12 34 


1941—18 


41 


1951—59 


42 


1929—30 22 


1942—35 


34 


1951—63 


53 


1929—25 22 


1942—36 


26 


1952—71 


61 


1930—54 20 


1943—53 


49 


1952—59 


56 


1930—51 29 


1943—56 


42 


1953—70 


64 


1931—31 34 


1944—20 


52 


1953—70 


56 


1931—34 21 


1944—26 


49 


1954—72 


69 


1932—36 31 


1945—26 


57 


1955—78 


65 


1932—46 18 


1945—33 


61 


1955—67 


68* 


1933—19 26 


1946—45 


48 






1933—37 28 


1946—37 


36 






*Overtime 











17 



William and Mary 

FACTS ABOUT THE INDIANS: 

Conference — Southern 

Location — Williamsburg, Va. 

Head Coach — Boydson Baird 

Coaching Record — Won 69, Lost 95 

Colors — Green, Silver and Gold 

Home Court — Blow Gymnasium 

Capacity — 2,5C0 

Athletic Publicity Director — Pete Franklin 

1954-55 Record— Won 11, Lost 14 

INDIANS' RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS 

(Maryland: Won 36, Lost 17) 



Md. Wm. 


& Mary 


Md. Wm. 


& Mary 


Md. Wm. 


& Mary 


1928—30 


20 


1942—42 


32 


1951—50 


55 


1930—27 


23 


1943—51 


36 


1952—54 


53 


1936—41 


39 


1945—53 


46 


1952—66 


71 


1937—41 


29 


1946—36 


42 


1953—64 


61 


1938-^5 


38 


1946—42 


49 


1953—79 


57 


1939—49 


57 


1950—52 


56 


1954—69 


54 


1941—40 


58 


1950—56 


64 


1954—74 


55 


1942—34 


39 


1951—48 


41 


1955—67 


62 



Wake Forest 

FACTS ABOUT THE DEACONS: 

Conference — Atlantic Coast 

Location — Wake Forest, N. C. 

Head Coach — Murray Greason 

Coaching Record— Won 238, Lost 219 (21 years) 

Colors — Gold and Black 

Home Court — Gore Gymnasium 

Capaciiy — 2,200 

Athletic Publicity Director — Marvin Francis 

195^-55 Record— Won 17, Lost 10 

DEACONS' RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS 

(Maryland; Won 1, Lost 5) 

Md. Wake Forest Md. Wake Forest Md. Wake Forest 

1952—59 61* 1954—74 53 1955—58 62* 

1954—54 71 1954—56 64* 1955—71 75 



IS — 



Kentucky 



FACTS ABOUT THE WILDCATS: 

Conference — Southeastern 

Location — Lexington, Ky. 

Head Coach — Adolph Rupp 

Coaching Record — Won 519, Lost 85 (25 years) 

Colors — Blue and White 

Home Court — Memorial Coliseum 

Capacity— 11,500 

Athletic Publicity Director — Ken Kuhn 

1954-55 Record— Won 23, Lost 3 

WILDCATS' RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS: 

(Maryland: Won 2, Lost 1) 



Md. 

1928—37 

1930—21 

1931—27 

Finals Southern Conference 



Kentucky 

7 
26 
25* 
Championship Tournament. 



North Carolina 



FACS ABOUT THE TARHEELS: 

Conference — Atlantic Coast 

Location — Chapel Hill. N.C. 

Head Coach — Frank McGuire 

Coaching Record — Won 141, Lost 66 (8 years) 

Colors — Carolina Blue and White 

Home Court — Woolen Gymnasium 

Capacity— 6,000 

Athletic Publicity Director — Jake Wade 

195^-55 Record— Won 10, Lost 11 

TARHEELS' RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS: 

(Maryland: Won 19, Lost 26) 



Md. N. 


Carolina 


Md. N. 


Carolina 


Md. N. 


Carolina 


1924—20 


26 


1935—31 


39 


1947— 43 


48 


1925—16 


21 


1936—32 


44 


1948—46 


70 


1926—23 


22 


1936—24 


41 


1948—47 


51 


1927—28 


23 


1937—35 


44 


1949-47 


55 


1927—23 


32 


1938—24 


43 


1949—42 


66 


1928—23 


19 


1939—34 


32 


1950—53 


58 


1929—22 


28 


1939—66 


41 


1950—56 


69 


1929—29 


22 


1941—36 


55 


1951—66 


59 


1930—36 


24 


1941—29 


44 


1951—56 


55 


1930—22 


19 


1942—30 


34 


1952^47 


51 


1931—33 


31 


1942—47 


40 


1952—71 


51 


1932—26 


25 


1943^0 


31 


1953-49 


59 


1932—26 


32 


1945—28 


53 


1953—68 


66 


1933—42 


29 


1946—28 


64 


1955—70 


60 


1934—24 


28 


1946—31 


33 


1955—63 


61 



— 19 



South Carolina 

FACTS ABOUT THE GAMECOCKS: 

Conference — Atlantic Coast 

Location — Columbia, S.C. 

Head Coach — Frank Johnson 

Coaching Record — Won 136, Lost 126 (12 years) 

Colors — Garnet and Black 

Home Court — USC Field House 

Capacity — 4,000 

Athletic Publicity Director — Don Barton 

195^-55 Record — Won 10, Lost 16 

GAMECOCKS' RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS: 

(Maryland: Won 11, Lost 4) 



Md. S. 


C 


arolina 


Md. S. 


Caro'ina 


Md. S. 


Carolina 


1925—38 




22 


1949—79 


49 


1951—47 


37 


1935—35 




21 


1949—57 


56 


1954—53 


49 


1940—30 




33 


1950—56 


61 


1954—79 


48 


1948—68 




54 


1950—44 


59 


1955—68 


51 


1948—54 




53 


1951—43 


70 


1955—68 


52 



George Washington 

FACT ABOUT THE COLONIALS: 

Conference — Southern 

Location — Washington, D.C. 

Head Coach — Bill Reinhart 

Coaching Record — Won 206, Lost 83 (13 years) 

Colors — Buff and Blue 

Home Court — Uline Arena 

Capacity — 7,200 

Athletic Publicity Director — Carroll Hall 

1954-55 Record— Won 24, Lost 6 

COLONIALS' RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS: 

(Maryland: Won 5, Lost 18) 



Maryland 


G.W.U. 


Maryland 


G.W.U. 


Maryland 


G.W.I 


1924—41 


22 


1947—44 


43 


1952—56 


57 


1924—19 


20 


1947--48 


63 


1953—62 


63 


1939—24 


37 


1948—49 


65 


1953—66 


53 


1940—26 


44 


1948—35 


59 


1954—68 


61 


1941—28 


61 


1949—54 


66 


1954—57 


70 


1942—29 


47 


1949-^2 


61 


1955—53 


75 


1943—43 


48 


1950—51 


72 


1955—67 


73 


1946—48 


35 


1951—47 


67 







— 20 



Clemson College 

FACTS ABOUT THE TIGERS: 

Conference — Atlantic Coast 

Location — Clemson, S.C. 

Head Coach — Banks McFadden 

Coaching Record — Won 76, Lost 116 (9 years) 

Colors — Purple and Orange 

Home Court — Clemson Field House 

Capacity — 3,500 

Athletic Publicity Director — Bob Bradley 

1954-55— Won 2, Lost 21 

TIGERS' RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS: 

(Maryland: Won 12, Lost 7) 

Maryland Clemson Maryland Clemson Maryland Clemson 



1939—45 


35 


1948—63 


61 


1954—81 


41 


1939—27 


39 


1948^9 


68 


1954—75 


54 


1940—53 


26 


1949—55 


60 


1954—75 


59 


1940—30 


48 


1949—68 


70 


1955—71 


63 


1941—34 


48 


1950—44 


50 


1955—68 


66 


1947^9 


42 


1950—54 


50 






1947—74 


50 


1950—50 


48 







North Carolina State 

FACTS ABOUT THE WOLFPACK: 

Conference — Atlantic Coast 

Location — Raleigh, N.C. 

Head Coach — Everett Case 

Coaching Record — Won 243, Lost 56 

Colors — Red and White 

Home Court — Reynolds Coliseum 

Capacity— 12,400 

Athletic Publicity Director — Bill Hensley 

195^-55 Record— -Won 28, Lost 4 

WOLFPACK RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS: 
(Maryland: Won 10, Lost 8) 



Md. N.C. 


State 


Md. N.C. 


State 


Md. N.C. 


State 


1924—18 


30 


1937—33 


35 


1944—57 


42 


1927—23 


38 


1937—41 


33 


1946^47 


39 


1928—36 


24 


1939—40 


46 


1946—37 


33 


1930—26 


28 


1939—53 


29 


1950^5 


54 


1930—21 


19 


1940-^5 


36 


1955—68 


64 


1935—36 


43 


1944-^6 


32 


1955—58 


78 



— 21 — 



Duke University 



FACTS ABOUT THE BLUE DEVILS: 

Conference — Atlantic Coast 

Location — Durham, N.C. 

Head Coach — Hal Bradley 

Coaching Record — Won 150, Lost 59 (8 years) 

Colors — Blue and White 

Home Court — Duke Indoor Stadium 

Capacity— 9,000 

Athletic Publicity Director — Ted Mann 

195^-55 Record— Won 20, Lost 8 

BLUE DEVILS' RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS: 
(Maryland; Won 15, Lost 25) 



Maryland 


Duke 


Maryland 


Duke 


Maryland 


Dul 


1926—41 


20 


1938—32 


35 


1946—43 


38 


1930—27 


28 


1939—37 


34 


1947—38 


40 


1930—24 


39 


1939—60 


44 


1947—42 


53 


1931—32 


24 


1940—32 


30 


1949—46 


58 


1932—20 


18 


1940—37 


48 


1950—67 


57 


1933—30 


28 


1940—32 


44 


1951—40 


49 


1934—37 


33 


1941—17 


43 


1951—51 


56 


1935—39 


48 


1941—20 


40 


1952—48 


51 


1936—38 


34 


1942—33 


37 


1953—74 


65 


1936^7 


35 


1942—46 


64 


1954—61 


68 


1937—31 


34 


1943—43 


46 


1955^49 


47 


1937—30 


34 


1945—24 


51 


1955—61 


68 


1938—40 


35 


1945—49 


76 






1938—34 


44 


1946—25 


59 







Georgetown University 

FACTS ABOUT THE HOYAS: 

Conference — Independent 

Location — Washington, D. C. 

Head Coach — Harry "Buddy" Jeanette 

Coaching Record — Won 37, Lost 38 (3 years) 

Colors — Blue and Gray 

Home Court — McDonough Gymnasium 

Capacity — 4,000 

Athletic Publicity Director — Billy Gilbert 

1954-55 Record— Won 12, Lost 13 

HOYAS' RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS: 

(Maryland: Won 10, Lost 13) 



Md. G 


eorgetown 


Md. G 


eorgetown 


Md. G 


eorgetown 


1935—24 


25 


1943—36 


46 


1952—61 


71 


1936—47 


39 


1947—59 


50 


1953—45 


54 


1937—27 


39 


1948—42 


50 


1953—48 


49 


1938—39 


57 


1948—52 


56 


1954—56 


58 


1939—25 


39 


1949—51 


53 


1954—53 


50 


1940—28 


27 


1950—71 


65 


J 955—60 


43 


1941—34 


51 


1951—58 


47 


1955—57 


49 (20T) 


1942—51 


42 


1952—55 


40 







— 22 — 



United States Naval Academy 

FACT ABOUT THE MIDDIES: 

Conference — Independent 

Location — Annapolis, Md. 

Head Coach — Ben Carnevale 

Coaching Record — Won 180, Lost 70 (11 years) 

Home Court — McDonough Hall 

Capacity— 3,600 

Colors — Blue and Gold 

Athletic Publicity Director — John T. Cox 

1951,-55 Record — Won ll.Lost 9 

MIDDIES' RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS: 
(Maryland: Won 9, Lost 20) 



Maryland 


Navy 


Maryland 


Navy 


Maryland 


Na\ 


1925—16 


23 


1935—36 


43 


1947—27 


55 


1926—21 


12 


1936—32 


20 


1948—47 


51 


1927—30 


32 


1937—37 


53 


1949—46 


52 


1928—26 


35 


1938—34 


37 


1950—62 


75 


1929—30 


27 


1939—37 


47 


1951—47 


51 


1930—43 


39 


1942—47 


61 


1952—48 


45 


1931—33 


36 


1943—63 


53 


1953—47 


51 


1932—26 


15 


1944—35 


69 


1954—61 


60 


1933—21 


59 


1945—33 


70 


1955—60 


54 


1934—27 


46 


1946—35 


44 







ACTIVITIES BUILDING 

( Continued, fmm, Paae 5) 

platforms and landings are alberene stone set in reinforced concrete 
slab. Offices, apartment and dormitory floors are asphalt tile; lobby 
and corridor floors are terrazzo. 

ROOF: Batten seam aluminum roofing over auditorium on 
structural 2 in. insulating board attached to steel purlins carried by 
welded steel frame arch with end panels of protected metal and IV2 
in. insulation. Office classroom areas are 20-year bond, bunlt-up 
roofing over fiber board insulation, with vapor seal under insulation 
in high humidity areas, carried by concrete slab and structural steel 
frame. Metal gravel stops. Galvanized iron drains, copper flashing 
and downspouts. 

INTERIOR FINISH: Ceilings — open finish in auditorium and 
painted concrete in most other areas. Suspended acoustical ceilings in 
trophy room, telephone booths, main lobby, promenade corridor and 
soffits of stairs. Walls — slag block and asbestos board partition 
walls painted. Wood interior doors and frame. Painting wainscoting 
in corridors, stairs, exposed concrete columns and lobby over glazed 
tile base. 

A FEW ADDITIONAL NOTES ON THE BUILDING: The build- 
ing is being paid for entirely with student funds. The $3.25-million 
combination gymnasium-auditorium, Physical Education-Athletic De- 
partment structure has been over five years in the planning, two and 
one-half years in the building. 

The new Student Activities Building is as wide as a football 
gridiron, a third again as long, and stretches up to a height of 33 
yards from the main playing floor to the rooftop. 

— 23 — 



ALL-TIME COACHES' RECORDS 



TEAMS COACHED BY H. BURTON SHIPLEY: 

REG. SEASON CONF. GAMES 

Won Lost Won Lost 

1923-24 4 6 12 

1924-25 11 4 3 1 

1925-26 14 2 7 1 

1926-27 - 10 9 6 4 

1927-28 14 4 8 1 

1928-29 7 8 2 5 

1929-30 16 5 9 5 

1930-31 14 4 8 1 

1931-32 16 3 8 2 

1932-33 11 8 7 3 

1933-34 11 7 6 1 

1934-35 8 10 4 3 

1935-36 13 5 4 3 

1936-37 9 10 48 

1937 38 14 8 6 4 

1938-39 - 13 8 8 3 

1939-40 13 8 7 4 

1940-41 1 21 13 

1941-42 7 15 3 8 

1942-43 8 8 5 5 

1943-44 4 13 2 1 

1944-45 2 13 2 5 

1945-46 9 11 5 4 

1946-47 14 9 9 4 

243 199 124 91 

TEAMS COACHED BY "FLUCIE" STEWART: 

1947-48 11 

1948-49 9 

1949-50 7 

27 

TEAMS COACHED BY 

1950-51 15 

1951-52 13 

1952-53 15 

1953-54 23 

1954-55 17 

83 40 49 22 



13 9 

17 8 

18 5 


7 

7 

13 


48 22 


27 


BUD MILLIKAN: 




10 11 
8 9 
8 12 
7 7 
7 10 


8 
5 
3 
2 

4 



— 24 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND TOURNAMENT 

RECORDS 
Conference Tournaments 

(Until 1954 with adoption of the Atlantic Coast Conference, 
all tournaments in Southern Conference) 



MARYLAND OPPONENT MARYLAND OPPONENT 


1924—34 


V.M.I.— 19 


1939—47 


Richmond — 32 


25 


Georgia — 29 


52 


N. C. State— 29 


1925—27 


Alabama — 21 


27 


x Clemson — 39 


18 


N. C. State— 30 


1940—43 


Wash. & Lee— 30 


1926—19 


Miss. A.&M.— 22 


32 


Duke — 44 


1927—22 


Georgia— 27 


1945—49 


Duke— 76 


1929—35 


Mississippi — 37 


1946—27 


North Carolina — 54 


1930—21 


Kentucky— 26 


1947—43 


N. C State— 55 


1931—37 


Vanderbilt— 21 


1948—51 


Davidson — 58 


19 


North Carolina — 17 


1949—61 


North Carolina— 79 


26 


Georgia — 25 


1951—50 


Clemson — 48 


29 x 


Kentucky — 27 


45 


N. C. State— 54 


1932—24 


Florida— 39 


1952—48 


Duke— 51 


1933—28 


South Carolina — 65 


1953—74 


Duke— 65 


1934—37 


Wash. & Lee— 45 


59 


Wake Forest— 61 


1936—47 


Duke— 35 


1954—75 


Clemson — 59 


32 


Wash. & Lee— 38 


56 * 


Wake Forest— 64 


1937—35 


N. C. State— 42 


1955—67 * 


Virginia — 68 


1933^5 


Citadel — 43 






32 


Duke— 35 







Invitational Tournament Records 

1954 — Ail-American City Tournament (Owensboro, Ky.) 

Maryland — 65 Arizona State — 50 

Maryland— 66 Evansville (Ind.) — 58 

Maryland — 54 Kentucky Wesleyan — 37 x 

1955 — Ail-American City Tournament (Owensboro, Ky.) 

Maryland— 58 Texas Tech— 54 

Maryland — 83 Rhode Island St.— 66 
Maryland — 78 Cincinnati — 61 x 

x — Championship Games 

* — Overtime Games 



ALL-AMERICAS AT MARYLAND 

1931 — Louis "Bozey" Berger — Selected by New York Sports Writer's 

Assn. 

1932 — Louis "Bozey" Berger — Selected by New York Sports Writer's 
Assn. 

1953 — Eugene Shue — Second team Helm's Foundation 
1954— Eugene Shue — Second team Helm's Foundation — 16th man on 
Associated Press Poll. 

— 25 — 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND BASKETBALL 

RECORDS 

SEASON TEAM RECORDS: 
Most points scored — 1959 in 30 games during the 1953-54 season. 
Fewest points scored — 338 in 14 games by 1928 team. 
Highest Scoring average — 65.4 in 24 games — 1954-55 (G: 24 Pts: 
1573) 

Lowest scoring average — 24.1 in 14 games — 1928 (G: 14 Pts: 338) 
Highest opp. scoring avg.— 73.4 in 1940 (G: 22 Pts: 1615) 
Lowest opp. scoring ave— 20.5 by 1925 team (G: 16 Pts: 329) 
Best field goai average — 42.9—1953-54 season (att: 1661 made: 712) 
Best free throw average— 67.9 by 1950-51 team (att: 663 made: 450) 
Most personal fouls— 579 by 1951-52 team (G: 30 fouls 579) 
Fewest personal fouls— 385 by 1954-55 team (G: 24 fouls 385) 
Most rebounds — 1178 in 1955 
Best rebound average — 49.0 in 1955 

INDIVIDUAL: 

Most points scored — 654 by Gene Shue, 1953-54 season (30 games) 

Best scoring average — 22.1 by Gene Shue, 1952-53 season (G: 23 
Pts: 508) 

Best field goal avg.— 50.6 by Gene Shue, 1953-54 (attempts: 469 
made 237) 

Best free throw avg.— 78.9 by Gene Shue, 1953-54 (Att: 228 made: 
180 

Most field goals— 237 by Gene Shue, 1953-54 

Most free throws— 180 by Gene Shue, 1953-54 

Most rebounds — 263 by Bob Kessler in 1955 

Best rebounding average — 11.0 by Bob Kessler in 1955 (263 in 24 
games) 

INDIVIDUAL CAREER RECORDS: 

Most points scored— 157S by Gene Shue— 1950-54 (Including 181 
points as a freshman) 

Best scoring average — 17.7 by Gene Shue— 1950-54 (G: 89 Pts: 1578) 
Most field goals— 573 by Gene Shue— 1950-54 

Best free throw average — 72.3 by Gene Shue (att: 592 made: 428) 
Best field goal average— 45.6 by Gene Shue (att: 1256 made: 573) 
Most free throws — 428 by Gene Shue 

TEAM SINGLE-GAME RECORDS: 

Most points scored — 87 against Washington and Lee — at College Park 
—Feb. 14, 1953 

Most opponents points scored — 87 by West Virginia (87-71) — Dec. 14, 
1953 

Fewest points scored — 12 — Maryland lost to Virginia 34-12 — Feb 13, 
1928 

Fewest opponents points scored — 7 — Maryland defeated Kentucky 
37-7, 1928 (center-jump). 25— Md. defeated W.&L., 51-25— Feb. 4, 1954 

Largest victory margin — 40 points — Maryland defeated Clemson, 
81-41— Dec. 3, 1953 

Largest defeat margin — 63 points — Army defeated Maryland 85-22 — 
March 2, 1944 

— 26 — 



Largest combined score — 1.58 points — West Virginia defeated Mary- 
land 87-71— Dec. 14, 1953 

Smallest combined score — 33 points — Maryland defeated Navy 21-12, 
Dec. 1925 

Most field goals scored — 33 against South Carolina, Dec. 18, 1953 
Fewest field goals scored — 4 against Virginia — Feb. 13, 1928 
Best field goal average — 19%— (32-65) Md. vs. Wm. and Mary, Feb. 
17, 1953 

Most field goals attempted — 88 against Wash. & Lee, Feb. 14, 1953 
Most free throws scored — 34 against North Carolina, 1C55 (34-49) 
Fewest free throws scored — 4 against Virginia — Feb. 13, 1928 
Best free throw average — against North Carolina, Jan. 2, 1951 — (24 
out of 30). Against North Carolina State, March 2, 1951 (19-22) 
Most free throws attempted — 49 against North Carolina, 1955 
Fewest free throws attempted — 8 against Virginia, Feb. 13, 1928 
Fewest field goals attempted — 16 against Virginia, Feb. 13, 1928 
Most rebounds — 64 against Cincinnati, 1955 
Most personal fouls — 34 against Richmond, Jan. 8, 1953 
Fewest personal fouls — 10 against Pennsylvania, Dec. 10, 1952. 

INDIVIDUAL SINGLE-GAME RECORDS: 

Most points scored — 41 — Gene Shue against Wash. & Lee, Feb. 14, 
1953 

Most field goals scored— 16 — Gene Shue against W.&L , Feb. 14, 1953 

Most free throws scored — 14 — Gene Shue (14-15) against George- 
town, 1953-54 

Most field goals attempted— 34 — Gene Shue against W.&L., Feb. 14, 
1953 

Most free throws attempted — 15 by Gene Shue, against Georgetown, 
1954 

Best field goal average — 74% by Gene Shue — 15 for 21 attempts — 
Wm. & Mary— Feb. 17, 1953 

Best free throw average — 13 for 13 by Lee Brawley, Jan. 2, 1951 — 
North Carolina. 12 for 12 by Lee Brawley, Dec, 1951 — North Carolina. 
14 for 15 by Gene Shue, against Georgetown, 1954 — last 13 were scored 
in a row. 

Most rebounds — 19 by Cob Kessler vs. Wake Forest, 1955 

1955-56 FRESHMAN BASKETBALL SCHEDULE 

Dec. 10 — St. Francis Prep — Home 

Dec. 15 — Roslyn Air Force Base — Home 

Dec. 17 — North Carolina — Home 

Jan. 5 — George Washington JV — Home 

Jan. 12 — Arlington Hali — Home 

Jan. 18 — Bullis Prep — (Walter Reed Hosp. 4 p.m.) — Away 

Jan. 21 — Georgetown — Away 

Feb. 1 — St. John's — Home (Afternoon) 

Feb. 11 — Navy Plebes — Away 

Feb. 14 — Bullis Prep — Home 

Feb. 17 — George Washington JV — Away 

Feb. 25 — Georgetown — Home 

(All Home Games Start at 6:15 P.M.J 

COACH: BOB EVERETT 

- 27 — 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
1955-56 Basketball Schedule 



DATI 


E 
2 


PRICE 




OPPONENT 


Dec. 


$2.00 


VIRGINIA 


• 




(Dedication 


—doors open 6 p.m.) 


Dec. 


5 






ALUMNI 


Dec. 


8 


$1.50 




WILLIAM & MARY 


Dec. 


10 


$1.50 




WAKE FOREST 


Dec. 


15 


$2.00 




KENTUCKY 


Dec. 


17 


$2.00 




NORTH CAROLINA 


Dec. 


29-30 




(Mich 
St. 


Mid Winter Festival 
. State, George Wash., 
Francis, Maryland) 


Jan. 


4 


$1.50 




SOUTH CAROLINA 


Jan. 


5 


$2.00 


GEORGE WASHINGTON 


Jan. 


7 






Clemson 


Jan. 


9 






South Carolina 


Jan. 


12 


$2.00 


NORTH CAROLINA STATE 


Jan. 


14 






Duke 


Jan. 


16 






North Carolina 


Jan. 


21 






Georgetown 


Feb. 


4 


$2.00 




NAVY 


Feb. 


7 


$2.00 




DUKE 


Feb. 


II 






George Washington 


Feb. 


14 


$1.50 




CLEMSON 


Feb. 


18 






North Carolina State 


Feb. 


20 






Wake Forest 


Feb. 


23 






Virginia 


Feb. 


25 


$2.00 




GEORGETOWN 


Mar. 


1-2-3 






A.C.C. Tournament 



Home Games Indicated by Opponents Names in 
Capital Letters 

All Home Games — 8./5 P.M.