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Full text of "University of Maryland men's basketball media guides"

MARYLAND BASKETBALL 
1974-75 Yearbook 



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U.V 



8th Annual Tourney in Mexico City 



TERPS WIN 
INTER- 
CONTINENTAL 
CUP 



The University of Maryland Basketball team captured 
the Eighth Intercontinental Cup Games in Mexico City, 
Sept. 10-14. The Terrapins were 5-0 in the round-robin 
competition, edging Ignis Varese of Italy, 81-80, in the 
championship game. 

All-American guard John Lucas won the scoring title 
with 138 points for a 27.6 average. The junior hit on 62 of 
125 floor shots for an average of .496. He was successful on 
14 of 21 foul shots, collected 28 rebounds and handed out 
29 assists in an impressive performance. 

Tom Roy was third in the rebounding race with 45. 
Rafael Rullan of Real Madrid won that title with 54. Roy, a 
6-9 senior, averaged 1 1 points a game for Maryland. 

Guard Maurice Howard was the Terps' second leading 
scorer, hitting 17.6. Howard was excellent from the field 
with a tournament performance of 42 for 68, a percentage 
of .618. The junior was also Maryland's best foul shooter, 
hitting eight of 1 from the charity line. 

Owen Brown was the squad's third leading scorer and 
second leading rebounder. The senior forward averaged 
14.2 points and eight rebounds in the five-game series. 
Brown was successful on 58.9 per cent of his foul shots. 

Steve Sheppard, a 6-6 sophomore, was the other double- 
figure scorer at 10 points a game. 

Maryland was the highest scoring team in the tourna- 
ment with a 94.6 average. The team hit 49.9 per cent of the 
floor shots and 63.2 per cent of their free throws. The 
Terps also collected an average of 43.8 rebounds a game in 
the international competition. 



1974-75 MARYLAND VARSITY BASKETBALL 

NO. NAME CLASS HGT. WGT. HIGH SCHOOL 



Freshman guard Brad 
Davis cuts the nets as 
the Terrapins cele- 
brate their Intercon- 
tinental Cup Champi- 
onship. The other 
players helping Davis 
are (from left) Steve 
Sheppard, John Boyle, 
Tom Roy and Mike 
Cherry. 




TEAM 

HOMETOWN 



5 


John Boyle 


Jr. 


6-7 


210 


Gonzaga 


Hyattsville, Md. 


10 


Steve Sheppard 


So. 


6-6 


210 


DeVVitt Clinton 


New York, N.Y. 


12 


Mike Brashears 


Fr. 


6-1 


170 


South Hagerstown 


Hagerstown, Md. 


13 


James Jones 


Jr. 


6-4 


205 


Central 


Seat Pleasant, Md. 


15 


John Lucas 


Jr. 


6-4 


170 


Hillside 


Durham, N.C. 


20 


John Newsome 


Fr. 


6-6 


195 


Norfolk Catholic 


Norfolk, Va. 


21 


Bill Hahn 


Sr. 


5-11 


150 


Penn 


Mishawaka, Indiana 


22 


Mike Cherry 


Fr. 


6-5 


190 


Elm City 


Elm City, N.C. 


24 


Maurice Howard 


Jr. 


6-3 


170 


St. Josephs 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


30 


Brad Davis 


Fr. 


6-3 


180 


Monaca 


Monaca, Pa. 


42 


Owen Brown 


Sr. 


6-8 


205 


Lyons Township 


LaGrange, III. 


44 


Chris Patton 


Fr. 


6-9 


210 


St. Francis (Buff.NY) 


Bessemer, Ala. 


45 


Tom Roy 


Sr. 


6-9 


210 


South Windsor 


South Windsor, Conn. 




MARYLAND 

1974-75 

BASKETBALL 

YEARBOOK 

TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Head coach Charles G. "Lefty" Driesell 

Assistant coach. 

The opponents 

1974-75 Maryland Terrapins . . 

Maryland Radio and TV 

Maryland Press coverage 

The University of Maryland . . . 

1973-74 in review 

Maryland Invitational Tournament 
Terrapins Records 



.2 
.7 
II 
12 
34 
35 
36 
53 
55 
56 



I yland in all its branches and divisions 
<|ual education opportunity for 
'Liins." 






(Larry Crousc and Richard 
/man, Phil Straw- 



's: Printed by University of 
i Manager 



CHARLES G. 
"LEFTY" DRIESELL 



Coaching Basketball is a way of life for Charles G. 
"Lefty" Driesell. The popular Terp Mentor is one of the 
most successful men in his profession. He ranks as one of 
the winningest active major college coaches in the nation. 
Even more importantly he ranks as the most successful in 
producing outstanding young men who also excell in their 
future endeavors. 

Few coaches ever produce a Rhodes Scholar. Lefty has 
coached two. Charles Thomas McMillen is currently a 
Rhodes Scholar at Oxford and Danny Carrell was a Rhodes 
Scholar from Davidson in 1963. 

Len Elmore bacame an instant millionaire upon gradua- 
tion from Maryland and when Moses Malone indicated his 
intentions to join the professional ranks Lefty made sure 
the youngster obtained the security from the professionals 
he deserved. 

Assistant Coaches and players alike benefit from their 
association with Lefty as he has contributed more than his 
share of assistants to Head Coaching duties throughout the 
nation. 

While his life revolves around the basketball court the 
Terp Mentor contributes greatly to the University Com- 
munity, the athletes, and his associates through his active 
participation in the academic life of the University, the 
charitable organizations of the community, and the church. 
He is a father away from home for his athletes. 




Over the years Lefty has gained a reputation as a 
superior recruiter and he has earned the reputation. He 
recruits not only outstanding basketball players but out- 
standing individuals. Those that join the Maryland program 
know that they will benefit from excellent coaching, but 
more importantly know they will leave the University with 
a bright future ahead of them. The future may be in pro- 
fessional basketball, continuation of their education, join- 
ing the educational and coaching ranks, or in a professional 
field such as Medicine or Law. Whatever their decision they 
know they will leave Maryland prepared to move ahead in 
the field of their choice. 

Lefty is always in close touch with his athletes, their 
professors and family. He often knows where they need 
help before they realize it themselves. The athletes are 
always welcome in his home and often have their Saturday 
buffets there with the coaching staff and their wives. 

Lefty has been a winner from the day he enrolled at 
Duke University. He was a Dean's List student at Duke 
where he received his B.A. degree. He later received his 
Master's in Education at William & Mary College where he 
was a member of Kappa Delta Pi Honorary Fraternity. 

He started his coaching career as a Junior Varsity Coach 
at Granby High School in Norfolk, Virginia (his hometown) 
and continued on to become the best in his profession in 
the history of the state with 59 consecutive wins at nearby 
Newport News High School. 

Lefty then accepted the challenge of collegiate coaching 
and took over a dormant basketball program at Davidson 
College. His coaching ability at the collegiate level was 
immediately evident as, with the talent on hand, he 
recorded the best record Davidson Basketball had achieved 
in five years and in only his second year led the Wildcats to 
their first winning season in 13 years. In only his third 
season Davidson had recorded its first 20 victory season in 
54 years of competition and had achieved national prom- 
inence. 

After leading Davidson to six 20 victory seasons (4 
teams in top 10) and a 27-3 record in 1969 Lefty accepted 
the challenge of another building program and moved on to 
College Park, Maryland. 

The Terrapins were also in the doldrums suffering 
through three consecutive losing seasons. During the 46 
years of competition Maryland had only achieved two 20 
victory seasons and the last of those came in 1958. 

Again Lefty transformed a loser into a winner, taking 
the talent on hand and recording 13-13 and 14-12 seasons 
in his first two years. Prior to his arrival the Terps had not 
won more than eight games in two years. 

In only his third season the Terrapins had shocked the 
basketball world with a 27-5 record and a National Invita- 
tional Tournament Championship. He followed that with a 



23-7 record and a berth in the NCAA Eastern Regional 
Finals and then a 23-5 season with third or fourth place 
national ranking depending on which poll or publication 
you follow. 

Only a 103-100 overtime loss to NCAA Champion North 
Carolina State in the finals of the 1974 ACC tournament 
prevented Lefty from achieving his goal of each session, the 
National Championship. 

Lefty earned the reputation as a superior recruiter by 
persuading top student-athletes to attend a University that 
had not excelled in their sport in the past. However 
statistics point out the fact that he is also a superior coach. 

Rebounding, free throw shooting, superior field goal per- 
centages, a fast break offense and man-to-man defense are 
all areas of the game that Lefty stresses along with con- 
ditioning, and his teams have excelled at each. 

In 14 years of coaching at the collegiate level he has 
never had a team that was out-rebounded and his last 13 
teams have hit better than 70 percent of their free throws. 

As is typical with Lefty Driesell coached teams, the 
1973-74 Terrapins were nationally ranked in scoring, 
margin of victory, rebounding and field goal percentage. 
The Terps hit 51 percent of their shots from the field, the 
fifth Driesell coached team to achieve the 50 percent mark 
and the seventh to score over 80 points a game. It also was 
his ninth team to win over 20 games in a season and seventh 
to rank among the top 1 1 teams in the nation. 

Lefty stresses the man-to-man defense, feeling that in 
order to be a well rounded basketball player, in order for a 
team to win a national championship, and in order for a 
team to utilize all of its natural talent it is necessary to play 
the game man-toi-man. 



The entire ACC has benefited from the hard work, 
dedication to the game and his profession, and the success 
of Driesell as everyone strives to keep up with the Terp 
Mentor. 

Driesell leaves nothing to chance, studying film hours at 
a time and is never caught without a projector at home or 
away. He supervises every phase of the program from the 
equipment to ticket sales and the athletes meals in addition 
to keeping close check on their classroom work. 

All of this has contributed to Lefty winning 276 basket- 
ball games in just 14 years for a winning percentage of .721 
and winning 100 games in just five years at Maryland. Prior 
to his arrival it took the Terps 10 years to win 100 games. 

Even when Lefty is taking one of his short vacations he 
is where the action is. On July 12 of 1973 while surf fishing 
at Bethany Beach, Delaware around Midnight Lefty was 
credited with saving the lives of at least 10 children and 
several adults from burning buildings in a townhouse com- 
plex near the beach. As a result of this Lefty was honored 
with the NCAA Award of Valor, becoming the first coach 
to receive this award. 

Lefty, his attractive wife Joyce and their children Patty, 
Pam, Carolyn and Charles are members of the Colesville 
Presbyterian Church and when traveling Lefty may be 
found every Sunday at the nearest church to the Motel 
where he is staying. Many of the members of the team 
accompany him to services when on the road. 

He is a member of the Branch Rickey Associated Fellow- 
ship of Christian Athletes. Lefty is also a member of the 
Beta Gamma Sigma Honorary at Maryland and is listed in 
Marquis' Who's Who in the South and the Directory of 
International Biography. 





Lefty with the Nations #1 
fan. President Gerald Ford 



)±.BU 

Joyce & Lefty 



rfjijM 



COACH DRIESELL'S RECORD 



1955-56 Granby High J.V. 
1956-57 Granby High Varsity 
1957-59 Newport News Varsity 
Four Year High School Record : 

(included a 57 game winning streak 
and State Championship) 
1960-61 Davidson 

Davidson 

Davidson 

Davidson 

Davidson 

Davidson 

Davidson 

Davidson 

Davidson 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 



Won 18 

Won 15 

Won 64 

Won 97 



1961-62 
1962-63 
1963-64 
1964-65 
1965-66 
1966-67 
1967-68 
1968-69 
1969-70 
1970-71 
1971-72 
1972-73 
1973-74 



Won 
Won 
Won 
Won 



9 
14 
20 
22 



Lost 4 

Lost 5 

Lost 6 

Lost 15 



Lost 14 
Lost 1 1 



Won 24 

Won 21 

Won 15 

Won 24 

Won 27 
Won 
Won 

Won 27 

Won 23 

Won 23 



13 
14 



Lost 
Lost 



Lost 
Lost 
Lost 
Lost 
Lost 1 2 
Lost 5 
Lost 3 
Lost 13 
Lost 12 
Lost 5 



FOURTEEN YEAR COLLEGIATE RECORD 
Won 276 Lost 107 Pet.— .721 

1965-66 Southern Conference Champions 

1967-68 Southern Conference Champions 

1968-69 Southern Conference Champions 

1971-72 NIT Champions 



LEFTY DRIESELL'S NATIONALLY RANKED TEAMS 



1964 
1965 
1968 
1969 
1972 

1973 

1974 



A.P. Poll 
A.P. Poll 
A.P. Poll 
A.P. Poll 
A.P. Poll 
U.P.I. Poll 
A.P. Poll 
A.P. Poll 



10th 
6th 
8th 
3rd 

11th 
6th 
8th 
4th 



Davidson 
Davidson 
Davidson 
Davidson 
Maryland 

Maryland 
Maryland 



COACH DRIESELL'S ALL-TIME COLLEGE COACHING STATISTICS 



Shooting 



Year 

1960-61 

1961-62 

1962-63 

1963-64 

1964-65 

1965-66 

1966-67 

1967-68 

1968-69 

1969-70 

1970-71 

1971-72 

1972-73 

1973-74 



FGA 
1,321 
1,411 
1,632 
1,644 
1,784 
1,713 
1,645 
1,791 
2,105 
1,709 
1,650 
1,877 
2,094 
1,012 



FGM 

571 

617 

792 

894 

908 

877 

76 

885 

984 

781 

735 

929 

1,089 

1,983 



Pet 
.432 
.437 
.485 
.543 
.509 
.512 
.466 
.494 
.467 
.457 
.445 
.495 
.520 
.510 



FT A 

596 

679 

641 

722 

672 

739 

709 

795 

886 

586 

715 

786 

606 

376 



FTM 

407 
493 
477 
534 
484 
563 
537 
562 
645 
417 
480 
586 
435 
504 



Rebounds 
Opp. 



Scoring 
Opp. 



Pet 
.683 

.726 
.744 
.739 
.720 
.762 
.757 
.708 
.728 
.712 
.715 
.746 
.718 
.746 



Avg 
41.6 
42.7 
42.8 
45.2 
47.3 
43.2 
43.0 
46.6 
51.0 
42.5 
44.4 
43.4 
45.4 
48.9 



Avg 
38.9 
39.4 
33.9 
34.3 
38.4 
37.4 
40.1 
37.6 
39.2 
41.6 
40.3 
32.5 
34.8 
38.1 



Avg 
67.4 
69.1 
76.3 
89.3 
88.5 
82.8 
76.6 
80.5 
87.1 
76.1 
75.0 
76.4 
87.1 
85.7 



Avg 
69.8 
69.8 
65.8 
70.5 
70.9 
70.8 
71.1 
68.9 
73.6 
74.7 
73.4 
65.8 
74.2 
69.0 



W 

9 
14 
20 
22 
24 
21 
15 
24 
27 
13 
14 
27 
23 
23 



L 

14 
11 
7 
4 
2 
7 
12 
5 
3 

13 

12 

5 

7 

5 



COACH DRIESELL'S 
OFFENSIVE PHILOSOPHY 



LEFTY'S ALL-TIME OFFENSIVE TEAM 



My offensive philosophy as a junior high school coach, 
high school coach and college coach has always been the 
same. We run a pro oriented offense which features a fast 
break and strong inside game. We try to get the highest 
percentage shot possible and never take a shot at the basket 
from outside unless we have 3 to 4 people in position to go 
to the offensive boards. 

Our first objective is to create a fast break situation on 
defense by 1) making our opponents turn the ball over, 2) 
getting a rebound and throwing the outlet pass quickly, 3) 
getting the ball in quickly after a made basket or free throw 
and advancing it up the court and getting an overload on 
transition. We have always been a fast breaking, high 
scoring, offensive team. 

If we are not successful in scoring on our "fast break 
offense" after a steal, rebound, or basket then we will go to 
our set offense which has always been inside oriented and 
in the past we have primarily run a double low post offense. 
However, at times we have run a stack offense using three 
inside men as we did in 73—74 with Tom McMillen, Len 
Elmore, and Owen Brown or Tom Roy in the line up. 
Again it is my philosophy that the more shots that we get 
in the free throw lane area the higher percentage we will 
shoot and the more fouls we will force our opponent into 
committing. Therefore our offense is predicated to getting 
the ball to the big men inside and as you can see we have 
had four legitimate All-American pivot men in Fred Hetzel 
(Davidson 1963), Mike Maloy (Davidson 1970), Len 
Elmore (Maryland, 1974) and Tom McMillen (Maryland, 
1974). However, if our opponents jam inside we must have 
excellent outside shooting wing men and point men. Dick 
Snyder (Davidson 1966) has been our all time leading 
scorer for 1 season average 27.8 points per game his senior 
year and John Lucas has been our all time leading point 
man averaging 20 points per game. Both of these men were 
also legitimate Ail-Americans. 

Our philosophy has always been that you must get 
everyone involved in the offense and you must have good 
movement of the ball and again get as many high per- 
centage shots as we can in the free throw lane area either 
with our fast break or double low post or stack offense. 

Our offense has produced 5 teams that shot over 50% 
from the floor, 2 that shot 49% and one 48%. 

We feel our offense is exciting, disciplined and similar to 
what our athletes will play in the pros. 



Fred Hetzel 6'9" 
Mike Maloy 6'8" 
Len Elmore 6'9" 



Dick Snyder 6'5" 
Jerry Kroll 6'3" 




Tom McMillen 6'1V 
Doug Cook 6'6" 
Bill Jarman 6'6" 



Terry Holland 67" 
Jim O'Brien 6*7" 



John Lucas 6'3" 
Dave Moser 6'1" 
Howard White 6' 1" 

#5 Men 
Mike Maloy 6'8" Davidson '70 24.6 pts-14.3 rebs, 2nd 
team All- American 1st Round Pro Pick, no cut contract 
Len Elmore 6'9" Maryland '73 14.6 pts-14.7 rebs 2nd 
team All- American 1st Round ABA and NBA pro pick, 
no cut contract 

Fred Hetzel 6'9" Davidson '65 27.3 pts 14.8 rebs 1st 
team Ail-American 1st Round Pro Pick (2,032) career 
pts #1 All time scorer. No cut contract 

#4 Men 

BillJarman 6'6" Davidson '63 21.5 pts— 1 1.1 reb. 
Tom McMillen 6'1 1" Maryland '73 21.2 pts-10 reb. 2nd 
Team Ail-American 1st Round ABA and NBA Pro Pick 
Doug Cook Davidson '70 All Conference, 2nd round 
NBA draft pick No cut contract 14.6 points per game 
9.6 rebs 

#3 Men 

Terry Holland 6'7" Davidson '64 15.7 pts-10.0 rebs. 
Jim O'Brien 67" Maryland '73 16.6 pts 7.8 reb 6th All 
Time Maryland scorer No cut contract, 1974 ABA 
Champs NY Nets 

#2 Men 

Dick Snyder 6'5" Davidson '66 27.8 pts-9.2 rebs 1st 
Team All- American 1st round Pro Pick 1,662 pts #2 All 
Davidson scorer No Cut contract 

#1 Men 

John Lucas 6'3" Maryland '76 20.1 pts All-American 
Dave Moser 6'1" Davidson '69 All Conference and start- 
ing point men (3 years) 

Howard White 6'1" Maryland '72 15.6 pts Presently 
Maryland Asst. Coach 



COACH DRIESELL'S 
DEFENSIVE PHILOSOPHY 



Throughout my coaching career as a junior varsity, high 
school and college coach I have always believed very 
strongly that I should teach my athletes to play hard nose 
man for man defense. This has always been our style of 
defense and if there is one thing that I strongly believe it is 
that your team is only as good as you are defensively. Our 
1973-74 (ranked 4th in the nation) team for example held 
our opponents to a field goal percentage of 39.9 percent for 
the year. I think we were able to accomplish this because 
we carried out our philosophy on defense which is not to 
allow our opponents any shots in the free throw lane area 
and to force them to shoot outside with pressure on them 
and to do an excellent job of blocking out and not allow 
any second shots. 

We like to overplay our man one pass from the ball and 
force our opponents out of their offensive patterns. We do 
a lot of sagging and helping when we are two passes from 
the ball. We have had some great defensive centers such as 
Len Elmore, Mike Maloy and Fred Hetzel who have done 
an excellent job of blocking shots and protecting the basket 
for us. We have also had some great defensive forwards such 
as Dick Snyder, who during his senior year held three 
opponents who were averaging over 20 points a game to 1 
point, 2 points, and points. 

We believe that we must dictate to the offensive man 
and team and not let them do what they want to do. How- 
ever, our philosophy is that if a players man scores a lay up 
on him, it is his fault and responsibility. However, if he 
shoots outside and we have pressure on him and he makes 
the basket it is my (coaches) fault and responsibility. We 
like to look at our shot charts at the end of a ball game and 
see how few layups and shots in the free throw lane area 
that we have allowed our opponents. Normally, if we do 
not give many shots or baskets inside we will come out on 
top. 

In order to have diversity we will also play a half court 
trap defense that we call our "Golash" defense and we will 
also play some type of zone each year for opponents that 
we feel are particularly weak against zones or for use at the 
end of a close ball game. 

We will also have full court man for man and zone 
presses in case we fall behind and feel that we must press in 
order to catch up. However, our money defense is our 
straight man for man defense and our "top ten" teams in 
the past have been very tough and aggressive on defense. 

Another strong reason for using a man for man defense 
is because we want to prepare our athletes for professional 
basketball. 



LEFTY'S ALL-TIME DEFENSIVE TEAM 



Don Davidson 6'5" 
Dick Snyder 6'5" 



Wayne Huckei 6'3" 
Barry Teague 6'2" 



/ 



Len Elmore 6'9" 

-Fred Hetzel 6'9" 

Mike Maloy 6'8" 




D. G. Martin 6'3" 
Doug Cook 6'6" 



Mo Howard 6'3" 
Bob Bodell 6'4" 



Centers 

Len Elmore 6'9" Maryland '74 
Fred Hetzel 6'9" Davidson '63 
Mike Maloy 6'8" Davidson '70 

Forwards 

D. G. Martin 6'3" Davidson '62 
Doug Cook 6'6" Davidson '70 
Don Davidson 6'5" Davidson '65 

Guards 

Mo Howard 6'3" Maryland '75 
Bob Bodell 6'4" Maryland '72 
Wayne Huckei 6'3" Davidson '70 
Barry Teague 6'2" Davidson '65 



ASSISTANT COACH 

JOE HARRINGTON 




Joe Harrington has been an important part of Maryland 
Basketball for the past eleven years. As an All-American 
player from Morse High School in Bath, Maine, Joe chose 
to attend the University of Maryland for it's academic 
excellence and awesome potential in basketball. During his 
playing career he was First Team, Co-Captain, and a pro 
draft selection of the World Champion Boston Celtics. 

When Coach Driesell was named Head Coach of the 
Terrapins, he hired Joe as an assistant. "Joe has been with 
me since my first day at Maryland and is extremely cap- 
able", said Coach Driesell. "With his experience in all 
phases of the Maryland program, I believe he has an excel- 
lent future in the coaching profession." 

Harrington, who played in the pre-Driesell era, has made 
many contributions towards establishing a tradition of 
winning and nationally ranked teams. However, he at- 
tributes this tradition to Coach DrieselTs unique ability to 
personally motivate, inspire, and work with everyone 
directly, or indirectly, associated with the Maryland Basket- 
ball program. Coach DrieselTs genuine concern for people is 
felt, whether discussing a player's academic goals with a 
professor, coaching on the floor of Cole Field House or 
speaking to the players, parents, alumni and friends at the 
annual basketball banquet." 

Coach Harrington is married to the former Ann Schop- 
fer, also a Maryland graduate. This past spring Ann received 
her degree from the University of Maryland Law School. 





ASSISTANT COACH 

DAVE PRITCHETT 




Dave Pritchett comes to the University of Maryland as 
one of the most sought after assistant coaches in the coun- 
try. 

Whether it be coaching or teaching on the floor to dia- 
gramming styles of play at one of the hundreds of coaching 
clinics he had attended, it all leads to one simple statement 
. . . Dave Pritchett is a winner. 

Every program Pritchett has ever been associated with 
moved to the top with over 20 game winning seasons within 
two years after his arrival on the scene. He is widely known 
for his organizational ability and great love and rapport 
with the players and staff. 

"The most forming day in my life was when Coach 
Driesell called and gave me a chance to be associated with 
him at the University of Maryland. Coach Driesell, without 
question, possesses the finest basketball mind in the game 
today and he is the outstanding basketball man of our 
times. 

"It has been my life long ambition to be associated with 
a man of Coach DrieselTs ability. I have always wanted to 
study under such a person, who through his thousands of 
hours of studying films and constant clinic study is so very 
talented on the floor." 

Coach Pritchett came to Maryland from Boston College 
where he served as the top varsity assistant over the past 
two years. Before Boston College, Dave served as assistant 
at Bluefield State College and Virginia Commonwealth 
University. His Bluefield State freshmen still hold the dis- 
tinction of being the only undefeated team in its history. 

Dave in a rare moment away from basketball will always 
be found at home with his wife, Judith Ann, and their three 
sons, Roger, David and Charles. 




ASSISTANT COACH 

HOWARD WHITE 








Coach White, in his playing days at Maryland, shooting over 
Virginia's All-American Barry Parkhill. 



Howard White, a native of Hampton, Virginia, one of 
Coach Lefty DrieseU's first recruits is a second year coach 
under Coach Lefty Driesell. 

White works with the guards on guard play. White, one 
of the great all time guards at the University of Maryland 
has turned has talents to the other aspect of the game. He 
has turned has talents away from making the plays into 
making the plays that win the games from the side. 

White has been termed by many of his colleagues as one 
of the best rising young coaches in the profession. White, a 
hard working hard hitting young coach has nothing but 
high acclaim for head mentor Coach Lefty Driesell. 

White who works in the dynamic Maryland backcourt 
and knows what makes it tick. "We have some outstanding 
guards, we have the guards that it takes to go all the way. 
We should be very interesting to watch. One thing is for 
sure we should be quick enough in the back to burn a few 
people." 

White, when asked about head coach Lefty Driesell says, 
"My experience under head Coach Lefty Driesell will be 
invaluable in my future endeavors whatever they may be. 
My years here at Maryland and under Coach Driesell have 
enlightened my life and shed a great deal of worldliness on 
basketball and on life itself." 




GRADUATE ASSISTANTS 




Rich Porac 
(Monroeville, PA.) 



Bob Bodell is a graduate assistant. He is getting his 
masters degree in Business Administration. During Bodell's 
years at Maryland the team's record was 87-29 which in- 
cluded an NIT Championship in 1972, reaching the NCAA 
Eastern Regional Finals in 1973, plus nationally ranked 
teams of 8th and 1 1th. During his junior year he led the 
team in field goal percentage with 58.9%, highlighted by 19 
points against Niagara in the NIT Championship. 

His senior year, he set a record unmatched by any other 
player in Maryland Basketball history, most consecutive 
games played, as a freshman and varsity player, 104. 

As a player he had a reputation as a great defensive 
player, highlighted by his holding All-American Barry Park- 
hill to 2 free throws in a game at College Park. 

This season he is assisting Coach Driesell in scouting and 
recruiting. 



Rich is doing post-graduate work in zoology. He plans to 
go to Dental School. 

During his four-year career at Maryland, Rich played on 
the undefeated 16-0 freshman team, an NIT Championship 
team, an NCAA Eastern Regional Finalist, and had a four 
year record of 89-17. 

Also included in Rich's plans is his upcoming marriage to 
former Maryland head cheerleader Carol Pender. 

Rich is assisting Coach Driesell with scouting and recruit- 
ing. 




Bob Bodell 
(Frankfort, KY.) 




Lee Williams, Executive Director of the Basketball Hall of Fame, stands with the uniforms of the only three high school 
players to be honored in the Hall of Fame. The three belong to Tom McMillen, Tom Roy and Moses Malone, all of whom 
chose Maryland as their college. 



10 



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11 



42 

OWEN 
BROWN 

SENIOR 6'9" 205 

highschool 

LYONS TOWNSHIP 

hometown 

LA GRANGE, ILLINOIS 




4X^>* 



-^fcwyow, 




Owen Brown started 1 1 games last year and the 
Terps won 10 with the only loss a 103-100 over- 
time decision to NCAA Champion North Carolina 
State in the finals of the ACC tournament . . . 
came to Maryland from Lyons Township high and 
LaGrange, Illinois where he an Illinois State 
Scholar . . . National Merit Achievement 
Scholar . . . consensus high school All-American 
and played in Dapper Dan Game . . . Player of the 
Year in Illinois-Honorary captain of the Chicago 
Daily News All-Star team ... led high school team to 
amazing 77-11 record and a state championship 
scoring over 1,500 career points ... single game 
high of 42 . . . MVP in hign school . . . named to 
ACC All-Tournament team as a junior . . . Terp 
Tri-Captain as a senior ... led Terp freshmen with 
341 points and a 21.3 scoring average . . played in 
30 games as a sophomore and all 28 games as a 
junior . . . averaged 8.4 points a game as a junior 
but scored at a 1 2.7 point a game pace as a starter 
. . . expected to provide scoring punch and re- 
bounding this year . . . can play the wing or inside 
with exceptional quickness and ball handling abil- 
ity for a man of his size . . . high game of 22 points 
against North Carolina in ACC semi-finals and 16 
rebounds against Virginia in final game of regular 
season as junior ... in first varsity start as a junior 
hit 1 9 points with 1 3 rebounds against Holy Cross 
in Maryland Invitational Tournament. A pre-law 
major . . . worked in law office this past summer 
. . . hopes to play pro basketball or go to law 
school. . . 

Owen's Mom is a counselor at an elementary 
school in Chicago while his father is a retired 
deputy Chief of Metropolitan Police for Wash- 
ington D.C. Another uncle, Dr. Arthur Davis, holds 
a Ph.D. in music and once was a professional 
singer. 




Mr. and Mrs. Winslow Brown 



Ron Nikcevich 

Head Coach 

Lyons Township High School 

Record: 207-104 

State Champion (31-0) 

in 1969-70 












































GAMES 


FGM 


FGA 


PCT 


FTM 


FTA 


PCT 


REBS 


PF-DSQ 


PTS 


AVG 


Freshman 


16 


139 


244 


.570 


63 


86 


.733 


189 


61-6 


341 


21.3 


Sophomore 


30 


52 


124 


.419 


18 


28 


.643 


72 


63-2 


122 


4.1 


Junior 


28 


99 


207 


.478 


37 


55 


.673 


142 


61-2 


235 


8.4 



Lefty says: 

"Owen is a fine player who worked his way into the starting lineup as a junior last season and helped us 
win nine straight games and a #4 National Ranking, before losing to eventual National Champion N.C. 
State, 103-100 in overtime in Finals ofA.C.C. Tournament. " 



13 



21 

BILLY 
HAHN 

SENIOR 5'"10 155 

high school 

PENN 

hometown 

MISHAWAKA, INDIANA 





i^ . -M 



Billy Hahn came to Maryland from Penn High in 
Mishawaka, Indiana as the first Maryland scholar- 
ship player from basketball rich Indiana . . . tri- 
captain and two year letterman for Terps . . . came 
off the bench against North Carolina State in finals 
of ACC tournament last year with the Terps trail- 
ing by four points . .,. came up with a crucial steal 
in three guard formation that overcame the Wolf- 
pack lead and sent the game into overtime ... as 
the point man had 1 1 6 assists in 1 6 games as a 
freshman and averaged 9. 1 points a game . . . twice 
recorded 1 2 assists in a game as a freshman . . . 
president of student council and honor student at 
Penn High . . . served as captain of team two years 
in high and as junior class president . .,. won third 
place in Indiana State Demonstration Speech Con- 
test in high ... set high school record with 46 
points in a game . . . also ran cross-country in 
high ... led Penn High team to 46-1 8 record . . . 
most valuable player as senior . . . member of Fel- 
lowship of Christian Athletes . . . played in 1 6 
games as a sophomore and 20 games as a junior . . . 
he is a natural leader with the ability to motivate 
others ... he is the team leader off the court and a 
student of the game with a desire to coach after 
graduation ... he is quick, aggressive and adds 
depth to the backcourt . . . member of ACC Honor 
Roll as junior. Major in Distributive Education 
. . . hopes to become a basketball coach. 








Mr. and Mrs. Dale Hahn 



James Miller 

Head Coach 

Penn High School 

Record : 265-94 

Eight Conference 

Championships 




^P 






GAMES 


FGM 


FGA 


PCT 


FTM 


FTA 


PCT 


REBS 


PF-DSQ 


PTS 


AVG 


Freshman 


16 


53 


108 


.491 


39 


51 


.765 


43 


37-1 


145 


9.1 


Sophomore 


16 


5 


7 


.714 





2 


.000 





8-0 


10 


0.6 


Junior 


20 


23 


23 


.522 


4 


5 


.800 


9 


13-0 


28 


1.4 



Lefty says: 

"Bill provides us with team leadership on and off the court. Asa tri-captain this year he will be an 
inspiration for us. " 



15 



45 
TOM 
ROY 



SENIOR 6'9" 210 

high school 

SOUTH WINDSOR 

hometown 

SOUTH WINDSOR, CONNECTICUT 



(^ 






Tom Roy came to Maryland from South Windsor High 
School where he was the All-Time New England leading 
scorer with 2501 points. . . .concensus High School All- 
American. . . .participated in the Dapper Dan All Star game 
. . .High School jersey retired in the basketball Hall of Fame 
in Springfield, Massachusetts. . .joining Tom McMillen as 
the second high school player to have his jersey displayed 
scored 60 points in one game in high school and aver- 
aged 33 points and 29 rebounds as a senior. . . .As a sopho- 
more at Maryland he has backed up both All Americans 
Tom McMillen and Len Elmore at both the center and for- 
ward positions. . . .As a junior he started the first 18 games 

for the nationally ranked #4 Terrapins In last years 

opening game against defending champs UCLA played for- 
ward All American Keith Wilkes and held him to 14 points 

Also held the nation's leading scorer All American 

Larry Fogle from Canisius to his lowest point total of the 
year. . . .For his great defensive efforts he was selected by 
the coaching staff as the 1973-74 Defensive player of the 
year. . . .As this years Tri-Captain of the Terrapin Tom will 
move back to his natural position at center replacing Len 
Elmore. . . .This fall he was 3rd leading rebounder in the 
Intercontinental Cup games held in Mexico City. . .Coach 
Driesell believes Tom's excellent ability at the center posi- 
tion will come through this season. . . .Tom's expected to 
score and rebound with the best in the ACC. It has been 
said of the year's team that "As Tom Roy goes, so go the 
Terrapins." 




Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Roy 



Charlie Sharos 

South Windsor Connecticut 

High School 

Almost 250 wins in eighteen seasons 

2 State Championships 







4~Sl 



L*A 




^ 






GAMES 


FGM 


FGA 


PCT 


FTM 


FTA 


PCT 


REBS 


PF-DSQ 


PTS 


AVG 


Freshman 


16 


99 


190 


.521 


68 


109 


.624 


203 


62-8 


266 


16.6 


Sophomore 


29 


46 


89 


.517 


36 


68 


.529 


77 


72-2 


128 


4.4 


Junior 


28 


50 


114 


.439 


27 


42 


.643 


152 


85-3 


127 


4.5 



Lefty says: 

"This is the opportunity that Tom has wanted, to be our starting center. I know he will do a fine job. " 



17 



5 

JOHN 

BOYLE 

JUNIOR 67" 195 

high school 

GONZAGA 

hometown 

WASHINGTON, D.C. 









- % \ * * 








l " Ir 










John Boyle joined the Maryland basketball team 
by impressing the coaching staff through a series of 
tryouts for the team . . . the local product from 
nearby Hyattsville and Gonzaga high school added 
depth for the Terps last year playing in 13 
games . . . With the front line in foul trouble 
against Real Madrid of Spain in the Intercontinen- 
tal Cup games in Mexico city he came off the 
bench to help preserve Maryland's 99-87 vic- 
tory ... he is a hard worker and is extremely valu- 
able to the squad in practice sessions as he does not 
hesitate to challenge on the boards . . . member of 
the First Team Sigma Chi Fraternity All Americans 
a major in Business Marketing . . . averaged 16 
points and 10 rebounds in high school . . . also an 
All-Metropolitian football player at Gonzaga 
. . . worked construction the past summer but 
hopes to work in Marketing upon graduation. . . 
John's father is a retired Air Force Captain and his 
mother is a Department of Agriculture Secretary. 




^ 




Mr. and Mrs. George Ginovsky 



Richard Ham 

Former Head Coach 

Gonzaga High School 

Now a practicing attorney 

Four former players playing 

major college basketball. 





Sophomore 



GAMES 
13 



FGM 
1 



FGA 
5 



PCT 
.200 



FTM 




FTA 




PCT 



REBS 
9 



PF-DSQ 
7-0 



PTS 
2 



AVG 
.2 



Lefty says: 

"John is a great guy. He's a non-scholarship player but he's our hardest worker in practice. " 



19 



24 

MAURICE 
HOWARD 

JUNIOR 6'2" 170 

high school 

ST. JOSEPH'S PREP 

hometown 

PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 






Maurice "Mo" Howard was the "Player of the 
Year" in the Philadelphia area while at St. Joseph's 
Prep . . . Parade Magazine and Scholastic Coach 
Ail-American in high . . . Captained the Pennsyl- 
vania team in the Dapper Dan game . . . had a 21.5 
scoring average in high where he was named to the 
All-Philadelphia team three consecutive years . . . 
received the Herb Good award as the Catholic 
League "Player of the Year" and the Markward 
Award as the "Outstanding Player" in the Philadel- 
phia area . . . joined John Lucas in forming one of 
the best backcourt combinations in the nation as a 
sophomore . . . played in 26 games and averaged 

12.2 points a game while leading the team in free 
throw shooting hitting 79 percent ... hit 55 per- 
cent of his shots from the field and contributed 75 
assists . . . career high of 22 points in overtime 
game against North Carolina State in finals of ACC 
Tournament . . . scored in double figures in 1 8 
games missing two games with injury . . . outstand- 
ing defensive player . . . hard worker . . . averaged 

18.3 points a game in six pre-season games hitting 
60 percent of his shots and 90 percent of his free 
throws . . . played in 29 games as a freshman on 
the varsity ... in semi-finals of ACC tournament 
last spring hit 20 points against North Carolina fol- 
lowing with the 22 against N.C. State the next 
night . .,. named to the All-ACC tournament first 
team as a sophomore along with Lucas in the back- 
court . . . upon choosing Maryland he noted that 
"It's the best place for me to go as far as furthering 
my basketball career. It's near Washington, which 
makes it a nice place because of the field of 
sociology in which I plan to major" . . . Mo first 
dunked a basketball when he was just a 5-foot- 10 
eighth grader . . . that year he averaged 3 5 points a 
game in the CYO league . . . Mo's mother and 
father, Katheren and Eddie, together have not 
missed a Maryland game since Mo's arrival. 




Mr. and Mrs. Ed Howard 



Edward Burke | 

Head Coach 

St. Thomas More High School 

Record: 100-53 

Twice Philadelphia Catholic 

League Coach of the Year 







GAMES 


FGM 


FGA 


PCT 


FTM 


FTA 


PCT 


REBS 


PF-DSQ 


PTS 


AVG 


Freshman 


29 


36 


89 


.404 


11 


19 


.579 


19 


31-1 


81 


2.8 


Sophomore 


26 


136 


246 


.553 


44 


56 


.786 


81 


67-2 


316 


12.2 



Lefty says: 

"A quality guard with great quickness, Maurice is among the best defensive guards in the country. 
A complete player who should have a super year. " 



21 



15 

JOHN 
LUCAS 

JUNIOR 6'4" 175 

high school 

HILLSIDE 

hometown 

DURHAM, N.C. 





m 



w 



John Lucas was an instant success for the Ter- 
rapins . . . When Lucas enrolled at College Park only 
Coach Driesell predicted great success for young 
Lucas . . . many said he was a better Tennis pros- 
pect . . . Lucas not only started as a freshman but 
became a legitimate All-American as a sophomore 
and is on all of the pre-season All-American teams 
as a junior . . . with only two years behind him and 
two more remaining he ranks tenth on the All- 
Time Maryland career scoring list with 989 points 
. . . Only three Maryland players ever scored more 
in a single season than the 564 points he scored as 
a sophomore while leading the Terps in scoring 
with a 20. 1 average ... he also hit 5 1 percent of 
his shots from the field and 75 percent from the 
free throw line while contributing 159 assists . . . 
All-ACC— All-ACC Tournament . . . third in voting 
for ACC Athlete of Year honors . . . started every 
game . . . runner-up for Outstanding Player of ACC 
Tournament honors as a freshman . . . ACC Tennis 
Champion . . . ACC Doubles Champion . . . reached 
final field of 32 in NCAA Tennis Champion- 
ships . . . Eastern Intercollegiate Tennis Champion 
... the list of awards and titles won continues . . . 
In six ACC tournament games and two NCAA 
tournament games he has failed to top 20 points 
only once and in that game he contributed 18 
points . . . high game as a sophomore was 3 1 points 
against Duke . . . topped the 20 mark in 1 8 of 28 
games as a sophomore and scored in double figures 
in the last 27 games of the season . . . when recruit- 
ing him Coach Driesell said "just the type of indi- 
vidual we want at Maryland he is a leader and an 
outstanding individual. I am impressed with his 
attitude, his speed and quickness and he is a tre- 
mendous shooter. He's also left-handed and that 
won't hurt him." While at Hillside high he scored 
1,890 points, surpassing the marks set by Pete 
Maravich in the same league, and averaged 34.5 
points a game as a senior . . . named the Outstand- 
ing Player in the World Cup Games in Puerto Rico 
this past summer and led all scorers in the Inter- 
continental Cup Games in Mexico City with a 27.6 
average . . . John's mom is a Junior High School 
Assistant Principal while Mr. Lucas is the Principal 
of Hillside High School and the President of the 
North Carolina Association of Educators. 




Mr. and Mrs. John Lucas Sr. 



Carl Easterling 

Head Basketball & Tennis 

Coach Hillside High School 

(now retired) 

80% Winning Record 

Several Times State Coach 

of the Year 







GAMES 


FGM 


FGA 


PCT 


FTM 


FTA 


PCT 


REBS 


PF-DSQ 


PTS 


AVG 


Freshman 


30 


190 


353 


.538 


45 


64 


.703 


83 


66-2 


425 


14.2 


Sophomore 


28 


253 


495 


.511 


58 


77 


.753 


82 


73-2 


564 


20.1 



Lefty says: 

"John is just a super person and athlete. Has proved he is the best college guard in America. " 



23 



14 

STEVE 

SHEPPARD 

SOPHOMORE 6'4" 205 

high school 

DE WITT CLINTON 

hometown 

BRONX, NEW YORK 






Steve Sheppard came to College Park with im- 
pressive credentials as the "Player of the Year" in 
New York City . . . the high school Ail-American 
from DeWitt Clinton high was ineligible as a fresh- 
man enrolling at Maryland on his own ... he is 
exceptionally strong and is certain to grab a place 
in the starting lineup somewhere ... he is a candi- 
date to play on the wing or he can also play inside 
. . . despite the year away from basketball com- 
petition he has come on strong this fall . . . played 
well in Mexico during the 8th Intercontinental Cup 
Games and has continually improved during several 
pre-season scrimmages . . . scored 30 points in the 
last Red-White scrimmage prior to the season 
opener . . . while playing at DeWitt Clinton, Steve 
led his team to two New York City championships 
. . . was All-N.Y.C. for two years and averaged 19 
points and 1 8 rebounds . . . during his senior year 
he received the "Iron Horse" award as the Player 
of the Year in New York City . . . was also Most 
Valuable Player in the Kutcher's All-American 
game . . . MVP in the Public-Catholic League AU- 
Star game . . . MVP in the New Jersey-New York 
All-Star game . . . nicknamed "the Bear" he comes 
out of a high school which has produced such 
college All-Americans and professional players as 
Tom Henderson, Nate Archibald, Ron Behagan and 
the Globetrotters' Pablo Robinson. 




Mr. and Mrs. David Sheppard 



John Wyles 

Head Coach 

DeWitt Clinton High School 

Record: 114-19 

Two New York City 

Championships 





^ 




1 972-73 N.Y. CITY PLAYER OFTHE YEAR 
1973-74 No Competition 



Lefty says: 

"This young man will have to come through for us on the backboards and on offense and defense. 
He has the potential. " 



25 



30 
BRAD DAVIS 

FRESHMAN 6'3" 175 

high school 

MONACA 

hometown 

MONACA, PENN. 







*S5 



Brad Davis was the first high school All-Ameri- 
can signed by Coach Driesell this past spring and 
immediately ended the search for a guard to join 
Lucas, Howard and Hahn . . . When signing Davis 
Coach Driesell said "Brad was the guard we really 
wanted. He is a excesslent student, outstanding 
basketball player, has a fine knowledge of the game 
and can play either the one-two or three positions 
for us." After six pre-season games Coach Driesell 
said "Brad could start on the point for us this year 
with Lucas moving to the wing. He could be as 
good a point man as Lucas." Davis averaged 27 
points a game as a senior at Monaco High in 
Monaco, Pennsylvania where he was a MVP selec- 
tion in section 17 of the WPIAL and all-state in 
class B as a junior and senior . . . during his three 
years Monaca high won 64 games with only 1 1 
losses on seasons of 19-3, 19-3 and 26-5 ... he 
scored 1,209 points with 829 rebounds and 351 
assists in three years ... he played in the Dapper 
Dan Classic and Quigley Classic . . . MVP in the 
Dapper Dan Classic . . . performed well in summer 
basketball in Washington, D.C.'s Urban Coalition 
League against the Washington Bullets and other 
pros ... as a senior he hit 58 percent of his shots 
from the field and 8 1 percent from the free throw 
line ... he also averaged 14.2 rebounds a game and 
at one point hit 28 consecutive free throws with- 
out a miss ... his brother Mickey Davis plays for 
the Milwaukee Bucks ... his Uncle Bill Reigel, 
former head basketball coach at McNeese State 
played basketball with Coach Driesell at Duke 
... he is majoring in communications. Also 
chosen to play in the Pittsburgh Pirates Baseball 
organization. 




Mr. and Mrs. Ed Davis 



David Nichol 

Head Coach 

Monaca High School 

Record: 108-46 

Never a losing season in 

16 years of coaching. 





1 973-74 HIGH SCHOOL ALL-AMERICAN 



Lefty says: 

"A fine ball-handler, dribbler and shooter. Brad, with improved defense and experience, can be 
outstanding. Will be an important part of our ball club this year. Watch his passes!" 

27 



20 

JOHN 

NEWSOME 

FRESHMAN 67" 195 

high school 

NORFOLK CATHOLIC 

hometown 

NORFOLK, VIRGINIA 




John Newsome joins the Terrapins from Coach 
Driesell's hometown of Norfolk, Virginia where he 
led the Norfolk Catholic team to a three year 
record of 70-27 ... He scored 1,668 points and 
pulled in 1,329 rebounds and was often used to 
bring the ball up court despite the fact that he 
played center for Norfolk Catholic . . . averaged 25 
points and 18 rebounds a game in his senior year 
... he has been a pleasant surprise during the early 
pre-season games ... a excellent ball handler and 
extremely coachable he has added depth to the 
front court . . . against a veteran Real Madrid team 
from Spain he came off the bench to score 1 1 
points and grab nine rebounds sparking Maryland 
to a 99-87 victory in the opening game of the 
Intercontinental Cup Games in Mexico City 
. . . selected to Catholic Prep Basketball Ail-Ameri- 
can team, the first player eveT choosen out of Nor- 
folk Catholic High School . . . first team All- 
Tourney in the 1974 U.S.-Pennsylvania Tourna- 
ment of Champions in Sharon, Pa. . . Coach Fraim 
says, "There is no question but that John can play 
in the ACC with Maryland." 




^ 




Mr. and Mrs. John Newsome Sr. 



Ed Fraim 

Head Coach 

Norfolk Catholic High School 

Record: 215-81 

15 Tournament Championships 

in 9 Seasons 





1973-74 NATIONAL CATHOLICTEAM ALL-AMERICAN 



Lefty says: 

"A real surprise for us. He has great offensive savvy and will play a great deal as a Freshman. 

29 



44 

CHRIS 
PATTO N 

FRESHMAN 6'9" 202 

high school 

ST. FRANCES PREP 

ATHOL SPRINGS, NEW YORK 

hometown 
BESSEMER, ALABAMA 



c^ctcM^ 







Chris Pattern was one of the top "big men" in 
the country last year while playing for St. Francis 
High in Athol Springs, New York ... A native of 
Bessemer, Alabama he elected to attend the Uni- 
versity of Maryland "because of the program, I like 
it. I like the place, the school and the ball players. I 
wanted to play with the best ball players and for 
the best coaches. I want to play pro ball and Mary- 
land's type of system is just right." . . . The center- 
forward is rated a exceptional shooter ... he aver- 
aged 28 points and 19 rebounds a game in high 
. . . all-league three consecutive years . . . All- 
Western New York selection by the Buffalo 
Courier-Express and named to Parade Magazine's 
All- American squad . . . All-State in New York and 
"small high school player of the year" in New 
York ... won league championship with 13-1 
record his senior year and during three years had a 
overall record of 47-15 ... his high school coach 
Bob Torgalski says "Chris has unbelievable ability, 
handles the ball as well as a guard and has the best 
shot on the team. His range is from 22 feet in and 
he can tip at ll-foot-10 on the rebounding 
machine." . . . played in the High School All-Star 
game at nearby Capital Centre in Largo . . . 
hampered by a knee injury early in practice this 
fall but expected to play . . . could start inside for 
Terps as a freshman. 





Mr. and Mrs. Tyson Patton 



Bob Torgalski 

Head Coach 

St. Francis High School 

Won 73 Lost 26 

No. 1 ranking for small high 

schools in New York State 

1973-74 




^ 




1973-74 HIGH SCHOOL ALL-AMERICAN 



Lefty says: 

"Injury has hampered him in preseason but he has the tools to play either forward or center. " 

31 



MARYLAND 1974-75 SCHEDULE 


November 






30 


RICHMOND 


9:00 


December 






4 


Wake Forest 


8:00 


7 


LONG ISLAND 


8:00 


10 


Georgetown at Capital Centre 


8:00 


12 


DEPAUW 


8:00 


21 


George Washington at Capital Centre 


2:00 


27-28 


MARYLAND INVITATIONAL TOURNAMENT 




27 


MARYLAND vs. GEORGIA TECH 


7:00 




UCLA vs. ST. BONAVENTURE 


9:00 


28 


THIRD PLACE GAME 


7:00 




CHAMPIONSHIP GAME 


9:00 


January 






2 


APPALACHIAN STATE 


8:00 


4 


NOTRE DAME 


1:00 


8 


DUKE 


8:00 


11 


WAKE FOREST 


1:00 


16 


N. C. STATE 


8:00 


18 


Navy at Baltimore Civic Center 


8:00 


22 


Clemson 


8:00 


25 


NORTH CAROLINA 


3:00 


February 






1 


N. C. State 


1:00 


4 


VIRGINIA 


8:00 


6 


Fordham at Madison Square Garden 


9:00 


8 


Duke 


3:00 


15 


North Carolina 


6:00 


19 


Virginia 


8:00 


23 


Duquesne 


3:00 


26 


CLEMSON 


8:00 


March 






1 


EAST TENNESSEE STATE 


8:00 


6-8 


ACC Tournament at Greensboro, N.C. 





33 



TV-RADIO 

Maryland basketball is constantly in the spotlight with 
the strongest television schedule in the nation in store for 
1974-75. 

Five national television games highlight the Maryland 
card, a development has is the envy of every major college 
power in the nation. 

Last season the Terrapins were seen four times on na- 
tional TV as they raced to a final ranking of fourth in the 
nation. 

This year's schedule shows 15 games on television not 
counting the Atlantic Coast Conference Tournament games 
on March 6-7-8, 1975. 

Russ Potts, Assistant to the Athletic Director, heads up 
the radio-television responsibility for the athletic depart- 
ment. The Winchester, Va. native has built the Terrapin 
radio network and Maryland television schedule into one of 
the most comprehensive and widely acclaimed packages in 
the nation. 

Through it's strong radio and television coverage, Mary- 
land basketball has been brought into the homes of virtually 
every Terp fan throughout Maryland and surrounding 
states, as well as exposing the University nationally on 
numerous occasions. 





MARYLAND RADIO NETWORK 


AM 




FM 


WTHU 


Thurmont, Md. 


WVOB Bel Air, Md. 


WKLP 


Keyser, West Va. 


WHDG Harve de Grace, Md. 


WCBM 


Baltimore, Md. 


WKLP Keyser, West Va. 


WFMD 


Frederick, Md. 


WVHR Norfolk-Hampton, Va. 


WARK 


Hagerstown, Md. 


WNBT Wellsboro, Pa. 


WASA 


Harve de Grace, Md. 


WMSG Oakland, Md. 


WHPL 


Winchester, Va. 


WCST Berkeley Springs, W. Va. 


WFMD 


Frederick, Md. 


WFRE Frederick, Md. 


WBOC 


Salisbury, Md. 


WHAG Hagerstown, Md. 


WAMD 


Aberdeen, Md. 


WEFG Winchester, Va. 


WCST 


Berkeley Spring, W. Va. 


WCUM Cumberland, Md. 


WMSG 


Oakland, Md. 


WBOC Salisbury, Md. 


WCUM 


Cumberland, Md. 




WCEM 


Cambridge, Md. 




WHVR 


Hanover, Pa. 




WKIK 


Leonardtown, Md. 




WHAG 


Hagerstown, Md. 




WEMD 


Easton, Md. 




WNBT 


Wellsboro, Pa. 




WVEC 


Norfolk-Hampton, Va. 




WCTR 


Chestertown, Md. 




WSMD 


La Plata, Md. 




WETT 


Ocean City, Md. 





GAMES ON TELEVISION 



NATIONAL GAMES 

Dec. 28 - Maryland Invitational Tournament 

Championship Game - 9 p.m. 

Jan. 4 - Notre Dame — 1 p.m. 
Jan. 16 - NC State - 8 p.m. 
Feb. 1 - NC State - 1 p.m. 
Feb. 15 - North Corolina - 6 p.m. 

REGIONAL GAMES 
Atlantic Coast Conference Game of Week 

Jan. 11 — Wake Forest - 1 p.m. 
Jan. 25 - North Carolina - 3 p.m. 
Feb. 8 - Duke - 3 p.m. 

WMALTV 

Nov. 30 - Richmond - 9 p.m. 
Dec. 4 - Wake Forest - 8 p.m. 
Dec. 27 - Maryland Invitation Tournament 

Georgia Tech vs Maryland - 7 p.m. 
UCLA vs. St. Bonaventure - 9 p.m. 
Dec. 28 - MIT Championship Game — 9. p.m. 
Jan. 4 - Notre Dame - 1 p.m. 
Jan. 11 - Wake Forest - 1 p.m. 
Jan. 16 - NC State - 8 p.m. 
Jan. 22 — Clemson — 8 p.m. 
Jan. 25 - North Carolina - 3 p.m. 
Feb. 1 - NC State - 1 p.m. 
Feb. 4 - Virginia - 8 p.m. 
Feb. 8 - Duke - 3 p.m. 
Feb. 15 - North Carolina — 6 p.m. 
Feb. 26 - Clemson - 8 p.m. 

***Jan. 26 - Immaculata vs. University of Maryland Women ■ 
1 p.m. (National TV) 



WDCATV 



Feb. 23 — Duquesne - 3 p.m. 



WMARTV 

Dec. 28 - Maryland Invitation Tournament Championship Game 

9 p.m. 
Jan. 4 - Notre Dame 
Jan. 11 - Wake Forest 
Jan. 25 - North Carolina 
Feb. 1 - NC State 
Feb. 8 - Duke 



WJZTV 

Nov. 30 - Richmond 
Jan. 16 - NC State 
Feb. 1 5 - North Carolina 
Feb. 26 - Clemson 

***Immaculata vs. University of Maryland Women - Jan. 26 
1 p.m. 



WBFFTV 

Dec. 4 - Wake Forest 

Dec. 27 - Georgia Tech vs. Maryland (MIT) 

Jan. 22 - Clemson 

Feb. 4 - Virginia 

Feb. 23 - Duquesne 



34 



tf^W 



w» 



c,w 



ft^ 



TheN, 




Maryland 
Press Coverage 

University of Maryland athletes receive the best press 
coverage in the nation. The Terrapins are in a unique situa- 
tion located just a few miles from the nations capital and 
two of the best known newspapers in the nation, the Wash- 
ington Post and the Star-News, while just a few miles to the 
north they have another major metropolitan area with the 
Baltimore Sunpapers and the News American. 

In addition there are 10 other daily papers publishing 
around the state and some of the finest weekly papers in 
the country. 

Thus the Terrapins have 15 daily papers covering their 
athletic activities including five major metropolitan daily 
publications. 

The 1 5 daily papers alone have a circulation of two mil- 
lion with the Washington Post alone reaching nearly 
700,000 homes every Sunday and the Star-News nearly 
half-a-million more. 

The Post, Star-News and Sunpapers are also known 
throughout the nation and are available on Newsstands in 
every major metropolitan area in the country. 

There are also 71 weekly newspapers published in the 
State of Maryland with circulation running as high as the 
34,000 of the Montgomery County Sentinel. 

The National Observer with over a half million circula- 
tion is published in nearby Silver Spring, Maryland and also 
follows the Terps fortunes. 

Both Wire services staff the Terrapin games with Re- 
gional Sports Editor Gordon Beard of Associated Press and 
Samm Fogg the Washington Bureau Sports Editor of United 
Press International. 

With Washington, D.C. the News Capital of the World 
every major publication and news outlet has a staff in Wash- 
ington giving Maryland national coverage of ah major 
events. 

Time Magazine, Sports Illustrated, Peoples Magazine, the 
Sporting News and many other national publications have 
carried major feature articles on the Terps in recent years. 

The Afro-American publishes its National Edition in 
Baltimore along with local editions for Baltimore and Wash- 
ington. The Baltimore edition has a circulation of over 
32,000 with another 34,000 printed for Washington. 




&5>eric an 



35 




Academics at the 
University of Maryland 



Situated in a pleasant suburban setting only nine miles 
from Washington, D. C, just thrity miles from the state 
capital of Annapolis and thirty-two miles from the port of 
Baltimore, the College Park Campus offers exceptional 
intellectual challenges and educational opportunities. 

The University of Maryland community has access to 
fine libraries, well-equipped science laboratories and exten- 
sive fine arts facilities on Campus. To compliment these 
learning centers are the unique cultural, political and scien- 
tific resources only found in the nation's capital. 

The Campus is composed of 1 ,300 acres and 228 major 
buildings, surrounding one of the largest and loveliest tree- 
lined malls of any university. 

New buildings include an Undergraduate Library of 
1,350,000 volumes; a Zoology-Psychology complex; a 
recently completed $6 million Physical Education facility; a 
new Arts and Humanities building as well as the world's 
largest spiral ridge cyclotron and a comprehensive computer 
science center. 

Among the outstanding research facilities are a nuclear 
reactor; scanning electron microscopes; subsonic and hyper- 
sonic wind tunnels; electron ring accelerator; and the 
Astronomy Observatory. 

The Campus is just a few miles from varied cultural and 
research facilities: the Kennedy Center, the Library of Con- 
gress; the National Archives; Folger Library; National 
Library of Medicine; Smithsonian Institution; National 
Institutes of Health; and the Goddard Space Center. 

A sophisticated student population came to College Park 
last year from 49 states and over 90 foreign countries. They 
brought to the University varied personalities and ideas, 
differing life-styles and goals. This diverse student body 
produces a stimulating Campus where a student can learn to 
live with others in an atmosphere of freedom that en- 
courages intellectual and social growth. 

Good students enroll at College Park: 35% of entering 
freshmen were in the top fifth of their high school calss and 
had a verbal SAT score of 480 and math SAT score of 520. 
In 1973-74 over 7,000 students received scholarship aid. 

College Park is a comprehensive educational unit offer- 
ing flexible possibilities for completing a degree. Majors in 
five divisions are possible: Agricultural and Life Sciences; 



Arts and Humanities; Behavorial and Social Sciences; 
Human and Community Resources; Mathematical and 
Physical Sciences and Engineering; and a Bachelor's Degree 
in General Studies. 

There are 71 undergraduate and 61 graduate programs 
leading to degrees. 

The student-faculty ratio is 16-1. 

The Honors Program offers around 600 academically 
talented students ususual flexibility. Special Honors 
sections emphasize small classes and independent study and 
Honors students may choose from among 25 departmental 
honors programs. 

Pre-professional programs are available at the College 
Park Campus in Pre-Law, Pre-Dentistry and Pre-Medicine. 

Special minority student opportunities are available. The 
Office of Minority STudent Education provides special at- 
tention to the needs and interest of all minority students. 

A full-time counselor provides personal and vocational 
guidance for all student athletes. 

Over 250 organizations offer opportunities for participa- 
tion in social activities. 

The Honors Program offers around 600 academically 
talented students unusual flexibility. Special Honors sec- 
tions emphasize small classes and independent study and 
Honors students may choose from amony 25 departmental 
honors programs. 

Pre-professional programs are available at the College 
Park Campus in Pre-Law, Pre-Dentistry and Pre-Medicine. 



*The University of Maryland School of Dentistry was 
the first dental school in the world. 

The School of Medicine, the fifth oldest in the U.S. 

*The School of Law is the fourth such school to be 
established in the United States. 

*The College of Agriculture, third oldest in the Western 
Hemisphere, was established in 1856. 

*In 1949, the University became the first American 
university to offer a full college degree program for Armed 
Services personnel and their dependents stationed overseas. 
Today, it has the largest such program in the world. 



36 



LOCATION 



Open, spacious campus near the varied 
activities of the Nation's Capitol- 
Alive with dynamic sports interest- 
Many recreational opportunities- 
Central East Coast location. 




NIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

/ 



"Washington is a great - v 
place to live and to coach 
Here is where history is 
made, here is where the 
most important people in 
the world live. " 

Vince Lombardi 



• RALEIGH, N.C. 
GREENSBORO 





37 



COLE FIELD HOUSE— 

HOME OF THE MARYLAND TERRAPINS 



*site of: NCAA Finals, NCAA Reginals and numerous professional games 




The home of the Maryland Terrapins is one of the finest 
facilities in the country. For over four years Maryland has 
averaged 12,000-plus fans per home game. The past two 
seasons the mark has been 12,600. The capacity of Cole is 
14,500, however the Field House record is 15,600 against 
North Carolina in 1973. Terp fans and players are particu- 
larly proud of Cole. The respect that Cole Field House is 
held in for its playing and viewing conditions is exhibited 
by the fact that it is in constant demand by various groups. 
Numerous professional teams, like the Washington Bullets, 
Boston Celtics, and New York Nets, have played at Cole. 

But the biggest thrill for the Maryland fans are the Ter- 
rapin home games. The crowd excitement and the pag- 
eantry make a Maryland basketball game a sight to behold! 




A mutual admiration society as the Maryland players rate 
their fans number one. 



38 



The University of Maryland 
Academic Resources and Points of Interest 



Y 



Baltimore 



MEMORIAL STADIUM 



\. 

SHADV GROVE MUSIC CENTER^ 



V ~ % JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS 1 




\ 



(DENTISTRY. LAW. MEDICINE, NURSING, PHARMACY 



SOCIAL WORK) 



IICTEI 



/ 



ATOMlcTENERGY COMMISSION 

NATIONAL BUREAU OF STANDARDS 

/ • 

/ 




PIMLICO 

"RACE HOME OF THE PREAKNESS" 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
BALTIMORE COUNTY 

/\ 

JOHNS HOPKINS WASH-BALT. INTERNATIO 

APPLIED PHYSICS LABORATORY / ■» 

• /' 



/ 



S 





W LAUREL RACE COURSE 



NAVAL ORDNANCE LABORATORY 



NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH 

/ NATIONAL AGRICULTURE LIBRARY 

NATIONAL MEDICAL LIBRARY / A 

/ / W 

3ETHESDA NATIONAL 

NAVAL MEDICAL CENTER / 




>^ 



DULLES 

INTERNATIONAL 
AIRPORT 
\ 
\ 
\ 
\ 



ARLINGTON NATIONAL 

-•cemetery « VxV.V __^ R F K S TA D I UM 



GODDARD SPACE.FL1GHT CENTER 

< 10 MILES 

\ UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

v COLLEGE PARK CAMPUS / 



Washington, L>C. 




NATIONAL AIRPORT f / w 




CENSUS BUREAU 



# BOWIE RACE COURSE 




1. NATIONAL ARCHIVES 

2. NATIONAL GALLERY OF ART 

3. NATIONAL MUSEUM OF SCIENCES ANO TECHNOLOGV 

4. U.S. CAPITAL 

5. WHITE HOUSE 

6. NAVAL OBSERVATORY 

7. FOLGER (SHAKESPEARE) LIBRARY 

8. TREASURY DEPT. 



9. WASH. CATHEDRAL 

10. SUPREME COURT 

11. NATIONAL ZOOLOGICAL PARK 

12. LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 

13. SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION 

14. WALTER REED ARMY MEDICAL CENTER 

15. NAVAL RESEARCH LABORATORY 



19 



SCALE IN MILES 



39 



Maryland Basketball Players 
Enjoy First Class 
Living Conditions 







The living conditions for the Maryland student-athlete are among the best in the nation. There are spacious dormitory 
rooms, study areas with tutors available. The players live in Ellicott Hall an eight story hi-rise that is one of the most modern 
on campus. It has numerous recreational facilities. However players may live wherever they choose. An in-season training 
table offers all you can eat with several entrees. 

There is a full-time trainer for the basketball team with modern training facilities and a team physician. A weight room 
features two universal machines for important off-season work. 

In all the on-campus living for the student-athlete provides the best possible conditions for learning and playing. 



40 




Social Life 






"There are all kinds of people on the Maryland 
campus. The diversity of personalities lias appeal 
for everybody. 
-John Boyle. 

"Whatever you want in social activity, you can 
find on the campus here at Maryland. " 
-Tom Roy. 




m 



'The social life on campus is SUPER! 
Steve "Bear" Sheppaid. 



"/ love the social life at Maryland. It has been the 
best time of my life. " 
-Owen Brown. 

"/ have grown more socially in the Maryland 
atmosphere than in any other phase of my life. " 
-Maurice "Mo" Howard. 




The student enrollment of over 30,000 the social life at 
Maryland offers a wide variety of personalities and enter- 
tainment. Most notable in on-campus entertainment is the 
Student Union. The Union has a movie theatre (at a frac- 
tion of current prices), bowling lanes, billiard room, TV 
i and several eating facilities. 

Maryland also has 54 national fraternities and sororities 
and numci i active groups versity also has 

excellent e ient come on ■< t shows at Cole 

Field House. Already this year Cole has been the site of the 
Elvis Presley Show, Santana, Chicago and the Ali-Foreman 
Championship Fight. 

The University offers extensive indoor and outdoor 

s and recreati students including 

s courts, swimming iole golf course 

and bowling alleys. In addition nearby areans offer the at- 

>>>n of professional liington, D.C. is the 

home of the NFL's Redskins, the NHL's Capitals, the 

NBA's Bullets and nearby Baltimore has the NFL's Colts 

and the Orioles of the American Baseball League. 




H 






41 



Religious Life 




University of Maryland Chapel 



There are over 1,200 churches of over 70 different denominations in the area surrounding the University of Maryland. The 
National Capital Area is the site of more than 20 national churches including the National Baptist Memorial Church, the 
Lutheran Peace Memorial Church and the National Cathedral. The Washington Episcopal Cathedral, the newly-constructed 
Mormon Temple (largest Mormon Temple in the world), the National Methodist Church and the National Presbyterian 
Church are also located in the area. 

Closer to campus, the University offers the Hillel House for Jewish students and the Newman Center for Catholic students. 
Our non-denominational University Chapel is one of the beauty spots on campus and offers a place to worship regardless of 
religious beliefs. 

42 



MARYLAND BASKETBALL BANQUET 

"A Season-Ending Honor to the Terrapins" 




Maryland Terrapins (from left) Maurice Howard, and Head 
Coach Lefty Driesell join last year's guest speaker, Ail-Time 
basketball great Bill Russell, along with Owen Brown and 
John Lucas. 



At the end of each season, the University of Maryland 
honors its basketball team with one of the finest banquets 
in the country. A crowd of 700-plus people has crowded 
the Sheraton-Lanham Hotel Ballroom to give the Terrapins 
one final cheer for their season's efforts. 

There are awards for the team's best rebounder, defen- 



sive player, outstanding senior, best foul shooter and the 
special awarding of the various All-American honors won. 
The list of presenters and honored guests at the Mary- 
land banquets is indeed impressive. In the past few year 
Governors, Senators and Congressmen as well as leading 
sports personalities have added their prestiage to evening. 



PREVIOUS GUEST SPEAKERS 






Adolph Rupp 

Former University of Kentucky Head Coach 



Red Aueibach 

General Mgr., Boston Celtics 



Jesse Owens 



43 



DRIESELL'S PLAYERS 




Calling Coach Driesell "one of college basketball's great 
coaches" is only an attempt to measure the man's accom- 
plishments and capabilities in his field. Not only does his 
coaching record speak for itself but, as a former player, I 
can attest to Coach 's unfaltering guidance and leadership 
during four of the most important years in a young man's 
life. As a mentor, he aided in my growth as a man. As a 
coach, fie armed me with the skills that enables me to 
become an Ail-American in college and now a professional 
player. Athletes who choose to attend the University of 
Maryland will benefit from his expertise. Coach Driesell is 
the "complete coach". 



Jim O'Brien (Maryland 73) now with Memphis of the 
American Basketball Association. 




"My four years at Maryland were marked by Coach 
Driesell's thorough approach to the game of basketball. Not 
just in fundamentals, which he covered so well, but in all 
areas of the game there was his constant insistence on ex- 
cellence that demanded one hundred percent from his 
players. 

My relationship with Coach Driesell goes far beyond the 
basketball court though his keen interest and concern in my 
life off the court left a lasting impression. It certainly 
reveals a side of Coach Driesell of which many are not 
aware!" 




Moses Malone first chose Maryland as his college then 
became the first high school player ever to go directly to 
the pros. He is with Utah of the ABA. 




44 



IN THE PRO RANKS 




}m **) 




Fred Hetzel, 

First Round Draft Choice 



Mike Maloy, 

First Round Draft Choice 



Dick Snyder, 

First Round Draft Choice 




Barry Yates (Maryland 71') A 6'-7" Forward, played for 
the Philadelphia 76'ers of the NBA. He is now an airplane 
pilot in California. 




K. C. Jones, coach of the Washington Bullets and Red 
Auerbach, General Manager of the World Champion Boston 
Celtics watch the Terps. 



Also present are Bob Ferry, General Manager of the Bullets 
and Bernie Bickerstaff Bullets assistant coach. The pro 
teams keep a watchful eye on the Terps. 



45 




Sam LeFrak (Maryland '40) is one of the biggest builders in 
the world. About one out of every 16 people in New York 
City live in his buildings. 




Jerry Bechtle (right) (Maryland '60), the Deputy Special 
Agent in Charge of the Presidential Protective Agency with 
President Ford. 




MARYLAND 

MEN 

SUCCEED 




Jay McMillen (Maryland '67) Doctor of Medicine 



Tom McMillen (Maryland 74) Rhodes Scholarship 





Tom Milroy (Maryland 70) Physician 



Gene Shue (Maryland '53) Head Coach, Philadelphia 76ers 



46 



TERP FOOTBALL 

Jerry Claiborne, Head Coach 





Head Coach Jerry Claiborne has received Atlantic Coast Conference 
and NCAA District III Coach-of -the- Year honors in turning the 
Maryland football program to winning ways. Coach Claiborne will 
start his fourth season at Maryland in 1975. 



Byrd Stadium, home for the Maryland Terrapins. Due to the excite- 
ment generated by the Terps, the seating capacity of Byrd had to be 
increased from 35,000 to 50,000-plus. 



1975 



1977 



Sept. 


13 


at Tennessee 




20 


at North Carolina 




27 


at Kentucky 


Oct. 


4 


SYRACUSE 




11 


N.C. STATE 




18 


at Wake Forest 




25 


VILLANOVA 


Nov. 


1 


PENN STATE 




8 


at Cincinnati 




15 


at Clemson 




22 


VIRGINIA 



Sept. 



Oct. 



Nov. 



10 


at Clemson 


17 


WEST VIRGINIA 


24 


at Penn State 


1 


at N.C. State 


8 


SYRACUSE 


15 


at Wake Forest 


22 


DUKE 


29 


NORTH CAROLINA 


5 


VILLANOVA 


12 


at Richmond 


19 


VIRGINIA 



1976 



1978 



Sept. 



Oct. 



Nov. 



11 


RICHMOND 


18 


at West Virginia 


25 


at Syracuse 


2 


VILLANOVA 


9 


at N.C. State 


16 


WAKE FOREST 


23 


at Duke 


30 


KENTUCKY 


6 


CINCINNATI 


13 


CLEMSON 


20 


at Virginia 



Sept. 



Oct. 



Nov. 



9 


TULANE 


16 


at Louisville 


23 


at North Carolina 


30 


KENTUCKY 


7 


N.C. STATE 


14 


at Syracuse 


21 


WAKE FOREST 


28 


at Duke 


4 


at Penn State 


18 


CLEMSON 


25 


at Virginia 



47 



DR. WILSON H. ELKINS 
President of the University of Maryland 

This year Dr. Elkins completed his twentieth year at the 
University as its twenty-first president. He is chief executive 
officer of the Board of Regents and head of the growing 
five-campus system which includes University College and 
its world-wide program of education. 

During his period in office, President Elkins has seen the 
University grow from an annual enrollment of 8,500 stu- 
dents to more than 70,000. The total operating budget 
which was $23 million in 1954 is more than $225 million 
this year. 

In addition to degrees from the University of Texas, Dr. 
Elkins earned his B.Litt. and Ph.D. degrees at Oxford Uni- 
versity as a Rhodes Scholar. 

Long a sports enthusiast and an avid golfer, Maryland's 
President was elected to the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 
1963 and was the recipient of the Distinguished Alumnus 
Award from the University of Texas in 1972. While an 
undergraduate there he earned eight varsity letters in foot- 
ball, basketball, and track. 

Dr. Elkins began his professional career as a history in- 
structor before serving as President of San Angelo Junior 
College and Texas Western College (the University of Texas 
at El Paso). 

He is a member of the Southern Regional Education 
Board and past president of the National Association of 
State Universities and Land-Grant Colleges, the Middle 
States Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools, and 
the Southern University Conference. 




DR. JOHN W. DORSEY 
Acting Chancellor, College Park Campus 



John W. Dorsey, a 38-year-old economist educated at 
the University of Maryland, the London School of Eco- 
nomics, and Harvard University, became Acting Chancellor 
on August 16 following the departure of former Chancellor 
Charles E. Bishop, who is now president of the University 
of Arkansas. 

Dr. Dorsey served as Vice Chancellor for Administrative 
Affairs at the University for the last four years— years that 
brought the first major enrollment drops and faculty cuts 
since World War II and the worst inflation since 1949. 

Stretching a $100 million budget far enough to sustain 
the quality of instruction and services at College Park in the 
face of continuing inflation will be a primary goal for the 
Phi Beta Kappa scholar who once served as staff economist 
with President Johnson's Council of Economic Advisers. 

Apart from that, Dr. Dorsey expects his term as Acting 
Chancellor to be one of relative calm and consolidation, 
following the many changes over the past four years, which 
included a major campus reorganization and the addition of 
new programs and degrees. 

Except for his one-year term with the Council of Eco- 
nomic Advisers, Dr. Dorsey has been a member of the Col- 
lege Park faculty since 1963. Before his appointment as 
Vice Chancellor for Administrative Affairs, he was Director 




of the Bureau of Business and Economic Research and an 
Associate Professor of Economics. 

Dr. Dorsey was born in Hagerstown, Maryland, and grew 
up in Sharpsburg. 



48 



DIRECTOR OF ATHLETICS 
JIM KEHOE 




James H. Kehoe assumed the duties of Director of Ath- 
letics at the University of Maryland on July 1, 1969 after 
serving as Maryland Track Coach for 23 years. 

His five years as Terrapin AD have been exciting to say 
the least. The Terps have become National Powers in 
basketball, football and lacrosse and host the Carmichael 
Cup, symbolic of athletic supremacy in the Atlantic Coast 
Conference. 

It was Kehoe who lured Coach Lefty Driesel] to Mary- 
land to become the Terp basketball coach and then ob- 
tained the services of Jerry Claiborne to guide the Terrapin 
football fortunes. He also brought Bud Beardmore back to 
Maryland to take charge of the lacrosse program. 

The combined record of basketball, football and lacrosse 
in 1968-69, the year prior to Kehoe 's taking over, was 
17-30. This past year with Driesell, Claiborne and Beard- 
more having established their programs the same three 
sports recorded a 39-1 1 record and national ranking in all 
three. 

Kehoe is directing one of the few athletic programs in 
the nation that is not operating at a deficit yet continuous 
improvement in the physical facilities is evident. 

He lured his former track teammate Col. Tom Fields 
into retirement from the Marine Corp to direct the Mary- 
land Educational Foundation and instituted a drive to 
revamp the image of Maryland athletics. This past year the 
Maryland Educational Foundation exceeded its 350,000 
dollar goal and the Terrapin Club increased its membership 
to over a thousand. 

The athletic image has benefited not only from winning 
but from one of the finest radio and television networks in 
the nation. Over three-quarters of a million fans watched 
the Terps in person last year and many more benefited 
from national telecasts in both football and basketball. In 
addition from 20 to 30 stations carry the football and 
basketball games on radio as compared to only one station 
in 1969. 

During his tenure as AD the Terps have won a NCAA 
Championship in Lacrosse and twice finished as runner-up 
for the National title, won the National Invitational 
Tournament Basketball Championship and gained the finals 
of the NCAA Eastern Regional Tournament for the first 
time, and the football team played in the Peach Bowl. It 
was the first Bowl appearance for the Terps since the 1955 
team visited the Orange Bowl and the best record in 18 
years. 

Within the ACC the Terps won 22 of 64 Championships 
under Kehoe direction as compared to 13 for runner-up 
North Carolina. Maryland has now captured 117 titles since 
the ACC was formed in 1953. North Carolina has won 54 
to rank second. 

He has the Terps competing against the best in the 
Nation as the basketball team opened the 1973 season at 
UCLA and in 1974-75 will host UCLA and Notre Dame in 
Cole Field House. Claiborne's football team closed out the 
1973 season with a 42-9 defeat of Tulane in Byrd Stadium, 
after hosting Penn State there earlier, opens the 1974 sea- 
son with Alabama and follows that with a trip to Tampa to 
meet Florida. 




wm 



As Maryland Track Coach Kehoe saw his teams capture 
the ACC Indoor and Outdoor Championships in all but one 
year of the ACC's existence. He won the first and last 14 in 
both and in addition captured eight cross Country titles 
including his last six as a coach. 

After taking over as Track and Cross Country Coach in 
1946 his teams won a total of 48 Southern and ACC team 
titles. In dual meet competition his teams were undefeated 
for his last nine years and the track team had a winning 
streak of 27 straight victories and the cross country team 
29 at his retirement. 

Maryland won the IC4A track titles in 1965-1966 and 
1969 to claim Eastern track supremacy. 

Perhaps his greater moment as a coach was reserved for 
his final season as track coach. In his final meet, by the 
margin of a single point, Maryland defeated heavily favored 
Villanova for the IC4A outdoor championship. Kehoe 
declared this his "greatest track victory" during his career 
as a coach. 

A native of Bel Air, Maryland, where he starred in several 
sports, Kehoe entered Maryland in 1936 and concentrated 
on track and cross country. He lettered in all three of his 
varsity seasons, was undefeated in dual meet competition 
and won several Southern Conference titles in indoor and 
outdoor competition. He also established indoor and out- 
door records in the 880 yard and two mile runs. 

While a student at Maryland he was president of the 
Men's League, and a member of Omicron Delta Kappa Na- 
tional Honorary Fraternity. 

In addition to coaching at Maryland he served as a 
Associate Professor of Physical Education and Director of 
Intramural Athletics. He holds an Honorary Doctors Degree 
from Steed College in Tennessee. 

During World War II he served as an officer with the 81st 
Infantry Division in the Pacific, rising from the rank of 
private to Lieutenant Colonel upon retirement. He partic- 
ipated in the Philippine Islands and Central Pacific Cam- 
paigns and was awarded the Bronze Star, American Service 
Medal, Asiatic Pacific Medal, Victory Medal and Philippine 
Liberation Medal. 

Kehoe is married to the former Barbara Riggs England, a 
1943 Maryland graduate. The Kehoe's have four children; 
daughters Courtney Ann, Barbara Sue and Mary Lou and a 
son Jim. Courtney Ann and Jim are graduates of the 
University. 



49 





CAREER SCORING 



Dr. Stanford A. Levine 
Team Physician 



1,807 


Tom McMillen 


1,397 


Gene Shue 


1,370 


Will Hetzel 


1,300 
1,266 


Jay McMillen 
Bob Kessler 


1,235 


Jim O'Brien 


1,094 
1,017 


Gary Ward 
Len Elmore 


1,016 
989 


Lee Brawley 
John Lucas 


987 


Pete Johnson 


972 


Bob O'Brien 


935 
875 
861 


Al Bunge 
Jerry Greenspan 
Nick Davis 


860 


Rod Horst 


854 


Bruce Kelleher 



(1971-74) 
(1951-54) 
(1967-70) 
(1964-67) 
(1953-56) 
(1970-73) 
(1963-66) 
(1971-74) 
(1949-52) 
(1972- ) 
(1966-69) 
(1954-57) 
(1957-60) 
(1960-63) 
(1954-57) 
(1967-70) 
(1958-61) 



SINGLE SEASON SCORING 



=ijBE~jpj==^n ™-~ q— -^ "^^ 




Equipment manager and Assistant, Jack 
Gable and Ronald Fulton 



667 


Tom McMillen 


1971-72 


654 


Gene Shue 


1953-54 


616 


Tom McMillen 


1972-73 


605 


Will Hetzel 


1968-69 


564 


John Lucas 


1973-74 


524 


Tom McMillen 


1973-74 


512 


Jay McMillen 


1964-65 


508 


Gene Shue 


1952-53 


498 


Jim O'Brien 


1972-73 


490 


Bob Kessler 


1955-56 


487 


Bob Kessler 


1954-55 


469 


Gary Ward 


1964-65 


430 


Gary Ward 


1965-66 


428 


Rod Horst 


1969-70 


424 


John Lucas 


1972-73 


414 


Will Hetzel 


1969-70 


401 


Charles McNeil 


1958-59 


396 


Jay McMillen 


1965-66 



SINGLE SEASON REBOUNDING 




Jim Morgan, Announcer 




John Pavlos, Team Manager 

50 



412 


Len Elmore 


351 


Len Elmore 


336 


Bob Kessler 


318 


Will Hetzel 


306 


Tom McMillen 


290 


Len Elmore 


289 


Al Bunge 


284 


Tom McMillen 


279 


Bob McDonald 


271 


Gary Ward 


269 


Tom McMillen 


265 


Al Bunge 


263 


Bob Kessler 


258 


Rod Horst 


250 


Bob Everett 


250 


Bob Kessler 


241 


Al Bunge 


241 


Gary Ward 


235 


Jerry Greenspan 


229 


Rod Horst 



1973-74 
1971-72 
1955-56 
1968-69 
1971-72 
1972-73 
1959-60 
1972-73 
1960-61 
1964-65 
1973-74 
1957-58 
1954-55 
1969-70 
1954-55 
1953-54 
1958-59 
1965-66 
1961-62 
1968-69 



MARYLAND BASKETBALL RECORDS AGAINST ALL OPPONENTS 



Alabama 

American University 
University of Arizona . . . 
Arizona State University 
Army 



W 

1 





1 

2 



2 

1 

2 

4 

3 

10 

1 

1 

1 

41 

2 



6 

1 

2 

1 

31 

Duquesne 3 

Eastern Kentucky 1 

Evansville 1 

Florida 

Fordham 4 

Fort Belvoir 

Gallaudet 6 

Georgetown 31 

George Washington 27 



Bainbridge Naval Station . 
Baltimore University 

Boston College 

Brown 

Buffalo 

Canisius 

Catholic 

Cincinnati 

Citadel 

City College of New York 

Clemson 

Columbia 

Connecticut 

Davidson 

Dayton 

Delaware 

Dickinson 

Duke 



Georgia 

Georgia Tech 

Hampden-Sydney .,. 

Holy Cross 

Houston 

Indiana 

Jacksonville 

Johns Hopkins 

Kansas 

Kansas State 

Kent State 

Kentucky 

Kentuchy Wesleyan 

Kings Point 

Lafayette 

Lehigh 

LIU 



LSU 

Louisville 

Loyola (Md) 

Loyola (Louisiana) . . . 

Maine 

Marine Corps Institute 

Marshall 

Memphis State 

Miami (Fla) 

Miami (Ohio) 

Michigan 

Michigan State 



1 
1 
2 
2 
1 

1 
18 

1 
1 
3 
1 

1 
1 
2 
2 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

3 
1 
1 




L 

1 
1 

8 
2 





6 
1 

1 

21 

1 
3 




51 



1 
2 
1 
1 

20 

20 
3 

2 


3 

5 
2 


4 

1 




1 
4 


1 
2 
2 
3 
1 
2 
1 



Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Mississippi Aggies 
Mississippi State . 
Montana State . . 
Navy 



W 

2 







1 

23 





1 

29 

19 



1 



1 

1 

4 

1 



2 

2 

1 



20 

2 

1 

9 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

29 



4 

3 

2 







1 

1 

UCLA 

U.S. Merchant Marine 1 

Vanderbilt 1 

Virginia 65 

Virginia Military Institute 40 

Virginia Tech 22 

Wake Forest 21 

Washington & Lee 26 

Washington College 13 

West Virginia 9 

Western Kentucky 1 

Western Maryland 12 

Wichita 1 

William & Mary 16 

Wisconsi n 

Woodrow General Hospital 1 

Wyoming 1 

Yale 1 



New Mexico A & M . 
New York University 

Niagara 

North Carolina 

North Carolina State 

Northwestern 

Ohio State 

Ohio Wesleyan 

Oklahoma State 

Pennsylvania 

Penn State 

Princeton 

Providence 

Quantico Marines . . . 
Randolph Macon . . . 

Rhode Island 

Rhode Island State . . 

Richmond 

Rutgers 

St. Francis (Pa) 

St. Johns (Md) 

St. Johns (NY) 

St. Joseph's 

San Francisco 

Santa Clara 

Seton Hall 

South Carolina 

Southern Illinois 
Stevens Institute 

Syracuse 

Tampa 

Temple 

Tennessee 

Texas El Paso 

Texas Tech 

Tulsa 



L 

1 
1 
2 


26 
1 
1 


59 

46 
1 

1 


11 
5 
3 
1 
2 
1 

1 

14 
2 

3 
1 



1 

23 
1 
1 



1 

2 
1 



1 

2 



32 

10 

4 

26 

24 

4 

18 







8 

2 

1 







127 
117 
115 
112 
111 



Brown 

George Washington 

Georgetown 

Fordham 

Miami (Fla.) 



ALL-TIME HIGH SCORING GAMES 

82 1972-73 
96 1971-72 

83 1973-74 
73 1973-74 
77 1970-71 



51 



110 


Virginia 


109 


Buffalo 


107 


George Washington 


107 


West Virginia 


107 


Canisius 



75 
70 
81 
92 
80 



1973-74 
1970-71 
1965-66 
1965-66 
1972-73 



MARYLAND CONFERENCE TOURNAMENT RECORDS 



SOUTHERN CONFERENCE 



ATLANTIC COAST CONFERENCE 











1953-54 










1964-65 






1922-23 
1923-24 
Md. 

1924-25 








Md. 


75 


Clemson 


59 




Md. 


61 


Clemson 


50 










56 


Wake Forest 


64 






67 


N. C. State 


76 


34 
25 


VMI 
Georgia 


19 
29 


1954-55 
Md. 

1955-56 
Md. 


67 
69 


Virginia 
Duke 


68 
94 




1965-66 

Md. 70 
1966-67 

Md. 54 


North Carolina 
South Carolina 


77 
57 


Md. 


27 


Alabama 


21 




















1925-26 
Md. 
1926-27 

Md. 


16 


N. C. State 


30 


1956-57 
Md. 


71 


Virginia 


68 




1967-6S 
Md. 54 


N. C. State 


63 


19 


Miss. Aggies 


22 




64 


South Carolina 


74 




1968-69 






1957-58 










Md 


71 


South Carolina 


92 


22 


Georgia 


27 


Md. 


70 
71 


Virginia 
Duke 


66 
65 




1 969-70 
Md. 57 


N. C. State 


67 


1927-28 










86 


North Carolina 


74 




1970-71 






Did noi enter 

1 mo on 




1958-59 










Md. 


63 


South Carolina 


71 


1 928-29 
Md. 

1929-30 
Md. 

1930-31 
Md. 


35 


Mississippi 


37 


Md. 
1959-60 


65 


Virginia 


66 




1971-72 

Md. 54 


Clemson 


52 


21 


Kentucky 


26 


Md. 
1960-61 


58 


N. C.State 


74 






62 

64 


Virginia 
North Carolina 


57 

73 


37 
19 
26 
29 


LSU 

North Carolina 

Georgia 

Kentucky 


33 
17 
25 
27 


Md. 

1961-62 
Md. 


91 
76 

58 


Clemson 
Wake Forest 

Duke 


75 

98 

71 




1972-73 

Md. 77 
73 
74 


Clemson 
Wake Forest 
N. C. State 


61 
65 
76 


1931-32 








1962-63 










1973-74 






Md. 


24 


Florida 


39 


Md. 


41 


Wake Forest 


80 




Md 


. 85 


Duke 


66 


1932-33 








1963-64 












105 


North Carolina 


85 


Md. 


28 


South Carolina 


65 


Md. 


67 


Clemson 


81 






100 


N.C. State 


103 


1933-34 


























Md. 
1934-35 


37 


Washington & Lee 


45 






INVITATIONAL TOURNAMENT RECORDS 




Did not enter 




1953-54 


All-American City Tournament 




Md. 


59 


Tennessee 


70 


1935-36 










Owensboro, Kentucky 






Md. 


75 


LSU 


65 


Md. 


47 


Duke 


35 


Md. 


65 


Arizona State 




50 




Evansville Invitational 






32 


Washington & Lee 


38 


Md. 


66 


Evansville 




58 


Md. 


54 


Arizona 


57 


1936-37 








Md. 


54 


Kentucky Wesleyan 




37 


Md. 


82 


Columbia 


76 


Md. 


35 


N. C. State 


42 


1954-55 


All-American City Tournament 




1964-65 


Hurricane Classic 




1937-38 










Owe 


nsboro, Kentucky 








Miami 


, Florida 




Md. 


45 


Citadel 


43 


Md. 


58 


Texas Tech 




54 


Md. 


66 


Tulsa 


59 




32 


Duke 


35 


Md. 


83 


Rhode Island 




66 


Md. 


73 


Miami (Fla) 


80 


1938-39 








Md. 


78 


Cincinnati 




61 


1965-66 


Sugar 


Bowl Tournament 




Md. 


47 


Richmond 


32 


1955-56 


Mid Winter Festival 








New Orleans, Louisiana 






53 


N. C.State 


29 


Md. 


75 


Michigan State 




95 


Md. 


69 


Houston 


68 




27 


Clem son 


39 


Md. 


75 


St. Francis 




66 


Md. 


77 


Dayton 


75 


1939-40 








1956-57 


All-American City Tournament 




1966-67 


Memphis State Invitational 




Md. 


43 


Washington & Lee 


30 




Owensboro. Kentucky 








Memphis, Tennessee 






32 


Duke 


44 


Md. 


89 


Montana State 




72 


Md. 


50 


Oklahoma State 


49 


194041 








Md. 


43 


New Mexico A & M 




45 


Md. 


53 


Memphis State 


55 


Did not enter 




Md. 


43 


Virginia 




39 




Charlotte Invitational 




194142 




















Charlotte. North Carolina 




Did not enter 




1957-58 


Suga 


r Bowl Tournament 






Md. 


66 


Davidson 


65 


1942-43 

Did not enter 




Md. 


New 
71 


Orleans, Louisiana 
Vanderbilt 




56 


Md. 
1967-68 


57 Army 

Sun Carnival Tournament 


54 


194344 








Md. 


46 


Memphis State 




47 




El Paso, Texas 




Md. 


23 


N. C.State 


42 


1958-59 


Sugar Bowl Tournament 






Md. 


53 


Texas El Paso 


70 


194445 










New Orleans, Louisiana 






Md. 


72 


Southern Illinois 


73 


Md. 


49 


Duke 


76 


Md. 


45 


Miss. State 




56 


1968-69 


Marsh 


all Invitational 




194546 








Md. 


54 


Loyola 




50 




Huntinqton, West Virginia 




Md. 


27 


N. C. State 


54 


1959-60 


Blue 


Grass Tournament 






Md. 


89 


Marshall 


80 


194647 










Louisville, Kentucky 






Md. 


85 


Miami (Fla) 


92 


Md. 


43 


N. C. State 


55 


Md. 


63 


Indiana 




72 




Charlotte Invitational 




194748 








Md. 


76 


Fordham 




54 




Charlotte, North Carolina 




Md. 


51 


Davidson 


58 


1960-61 


Dixie Classic 






Md. 


69 


Davidson 


83 


194849 










Ralei 


gh, North Carolina 






Md. 


95 


Wichita 


83 


Md. 


61 


North Carolina 


79 


Md. 


57 


North Carolina 




81 


1969-70 




1970-71 




1 949-50 








Md. 


67 


N. C.State 




75 


None 




None 




Did not enter 




Md. 


84 


Wyoming 




77 


1971-72 NIT 






1950-51 








1961-62 


Sugar Bowl Tournament 






Md. 


67 


St. Joseph's 


55 


Md. 


50 


Clemson 


48 




New 


Orleans, Louisiana 








71 


Syracuse 


65 




45 


N. C.State 


54 


Md. 


62 


Miss. State 




64 




91 


Jacksonville 


77 


1951-52 








Md. 


64 


Louisville 




83 




100 


Niagara 


69 


Md. 


48 


Duke 


51 


1962-63 










1973-74 


Cable 


Car Classic 




1952-53 








None 












San F 


rancisco, Cal. 




Md. 


74 


Duke 


65 


1963-64 


VPI 


Invitational Tournament 






78 


San Francisco 


60 




59 


Wake Forest 


61 




Blacksburg, Virginia 








53 


Santa Clara 


32 



52 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND FINAL VARSITY BASKETBALL STATISTICS 1973-74 

WON 23 LOST 5 





GP 


FGM 


FGA 


PCT 


FTM 


FTA 


PCT 


REBOUNDS 


ASSIST 


PF DSQ 


POINTS 


AVE 


John Lucas 


28 


253 


495 


.511 


58 


77 


.753 


82 


159 


73-2 


564 


20.1 


Tom McMillen 


27 


214 


404 


.530 


96 


126 


.762 


269 (10.0) 


41 


69-1 


524 


19.4 


Len Elmore 


28 


170 


324 


.525 


69 


91 


.758 


412 (14.7) 


48 


74-0 


409 


14.6 


Maurice Howard 


26 


136 


246 


.553 


44 


56 


.786 


81 


75 


67-2 


316 


12.2 


Owen Brown 


28 


99 


207 


.478 


37 


55 


.673 


142 (5.1) 


20 


61-2 


235 


8.4 


Jap Trimble 


23 


51 


111 


.460 


36 


43 


.837 


50 


26 


37-0 


138 


6.0 


Tom Roy 


28 


50 


114 


.439 


27 


42 


.643 


152 (5.4) 


23 


85-3 


127 


4.5 


Rich Porac 


16 


14 


32 


.438 


3 


5 


.600 


6 


23 


16-0 


31 


1.9 


Billy Hahn 


20 


12 


23 


.522 


4 


5 


.800 


9 


24 


13-0 


28 


1.4 


Stan Swetnam 


12 


7 


13 


.539 


2 


2 


1000 


6 


1 


2-0 


16 


1.3 


John Boyle 


13 


1 


5 


.200 



Team 





89 


9 





7-0 


2 


0.2 












Dead Ball 


43 












OTHERS 




5 


9 


- 





2 


- 


8 





2-0 


10 


- 


TOTALS 


28 


1012 


1983 


.510 


376 


504 


.746 


1368 (48.9) 


450 


492-10 


2400 


85.7 


OPPONENTS 


28 


798 


1993 


.400 


335 


475 


.705 


1066 (38.1) 


278 


513-11 


1931 


69.0 












Dead Ball 


54 













ATTENDANCE FOR 1973-74 
Games 



Home 


13 


Away 


15 


Total 


28 



Total 


Average 


157,357 


12,104 


131,407 


8,760 


288,764 


10,313 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 1973-74 RESULTS 



MD. 


OPPONENT 




64 


UCLA 


65 


106 


Eastern Kentucky 


57 


115 


Georgetown 


83 


78 


San Francisco 


60 


53 


Santa Clara 


32 


102 


Holy Cross 


75 


58 


Boston College 


37 


96 


Richmond 


60 


89 


Clemson 


60 


72 


Wake Forest 


59 


74 


N.C. State 


80 


112 


Fordham 


73 


72 


Navy 


50 


86 


Camsius 


73 


73 


North Carolina 


82 


80 


N.C. State 


86 


104 


Duke 


83 


88 


Virginia 


81 


92 


George Washington 


71 


91 


North Carolina 


80 


56 


Clemson 


54 


98 


Duquesne 


72 


64 


Duke 


61 


77 


Wake Forest 


68 


110 


Virginia 


75 


85 


Duke 


66 


105 


North Carolina 


85 


100 


N.C. State 


103 



ATTENDANCE 





1 2,853 


Home 


13,304 


Home 


10.876 




6,404 




4,751 


Home 


12,861 


Home 


13,208 




4,241 


Home 


14,210 




8,200 




12,400 


Home 


1 1 ,362 




5,255 


Home 


8,600 




8,800 


Home 


14,500 


Home 


10,104 




8,250 




8,500 


Home 


13,121 




9,200 


Home 


7,600 




8,600 


Home 


13,111 


Home 


14,500 


ACC 


15,451 


ACC 


15,451 


ACC 


15,451 



Md. Top Scorer 

19 Elmore 

26 McMillen 
28 Lucas 

22 Lucas 

23 Lucas 
28 Elmore 

18 McMillen 
25 Lucas 
17 Lucas 

19 McMillen 

24 McMillen-Lucas 

23 McMillen-Lucas 

27 McMillen 

25 McMillen 

20 Lucas 

28 McMillen 
31 Lucas 
28 Lucas 

24 McMillen 

26 McMillen 
15 Elmore 

27 Lucas 
22 Elmore 

22 McMillen 

23 McMillen 
20 Lucas 

24 Lucas 

22 McMillen-Howard 



Md. Top Rebounder 

14 Elmore 
21 Elmore 

19 Elmore 

14 Elmore 
11 Elmore 

16 Elmore 

7 Elmore-Brown 

20 Elmore 

17 Elmore 

15 McMillen 

11 McMillen 

19 Elmore 
15 McMillen 

15 Elmore 
10 Elmore 
14 McMillen 

20 Elmore 

12 Elmore 

12 McMillen 

21 Elmore 
10 Elmore 
17 Elmore 
17 Elmore 
26 Elmore 

16 Brown 

17 Elmore 

13 Elmore 
13 Elmore 



53 




Driesellin Hero 's Role 



Coach Driesell receives NCAA Honor 
from NCAA Secretary-Treasurer 
Richard Koenig for his life saving 
efforts. 



V 



Lefty Driesell, Maryland's flam- 
boyant basketball coach, earned a 
hero's label on the night of July 12- 
13 when he and two fishing compan- 
ions saved at least 10 children from 
a fire which raged through four 
townhouses at Bethany Beach, Del. 

"Let's face it, Driesell was a 
hero," said Samuel Meloy, a Prince 
Georges County circuit court judge 
who was vacationing and witnessed 
the incident. "There were no inju- 
ries, and it was a miracle because 
the firemen didn't come for at least 
30 minutes." 

Driesell modestly tried to play 
down his role. 

"Hey, man, don't build me up as 
any kind of hero," the Terps' 41- 
year-old coach begged. "All we did 
was try to get the kids out. It was 



just lucky that we were fishing right 
in front of the houses." 

At least one resident of the burn- 
ing houses didn't appreciate Drie- 
sell's valor at first, Meloy said. Not 
realizing that the house was ablaze, 
a woman ran outside screaming 
about an intruder after Driesell 
broke in the door. 

Equal heroism was demonstrated 
by Driesell 's companions: Paul Wil- 
liamson, athletic director for Dur- 
ham, N.C., high schools, and anoth- 
er man whose identity Driesell said 
he did not know. 

The fire occurred in a subdivision 
about four miles from Rehoboth 
Beach where Driesell and his family 
were vacationing. 

—Dick Heller 



'All we did was try to get the kids out.' 

— Driesell 







INDIVIDUAL GAME TOTALS - 


1973-74 










Tom 


John 


Len 


Mo 


Owen 


Jap 


Tom 


BUI 


Maryland 


OPPONENT 


McMillen 


Lucas 


Elmore 


Howard 


Brown 


Trimble 


Roy 


Hahn 


Team Totals 
Points (REB) 


UCLA 


12(9) 


7(6 


) 19(14) 


14(5) 


4(1) 


— 


8(11) 


— 


64(51) 


E. Kentucky 


26(12) 


24(1 


) 11(21) 


0(0) 


8(5) 


12(4) 


13(13) 


0(1) 


106(68) 


Georgetown 


23(14) 


28(2 


> 22(19) 


8(1) 


9(7) 


8(2) 


7(7) 


2(1) 


115(57) 


San Francisco 


11(10) 


22(8 


1 17(14) 


6(3) 


4(6) 


5(2) 


11(10) 


0(0) 


78 (63) 


Santa Clara 


15(8) 


23(6" 


1 6(11) 


6(5) 


0(0) 


3(0) 


(3) 


0(0) 


53 (37) 


Holy Cross 


- 


18(2' 


1 28(16) 


19(3) 


19(13) 


10(2) 


4(9) 


0(3) 


102(61) 


Boston College 


18(3) 


14 (1 


1 9(7) 


6(5) 


0(7) 


4(1) 


3(1) 


2(0) 


58 (29) 


Richmond 


17(12) 


25 (i; 


10(20) 


14(6) 


8(3) 


10(5) 


4(3) 


2(0) 


96(51) 


Clemson 


14(11) 


17(1] 


16(17) 


12(2) 


6(3) 


9(3) 


11(10) 


— 


89 (55) 


Wake Forest 


19(15) 


18(6; 


1 8(12) 


12(1) 


7(1) 


4(1) 


4(3) 


0(0) 


72 (42) 


N.C. State 


24(11) 


24 (4; 


13(9) 


11 (3) 


0(2) 


2(0) 


0(1) 


0(1) 


74 (34) 


Fordham 


23(6) 


23(1] 


13(19) 


14(8) 


8(5) 


14(2) 


7(11) 


4(0) 


112(57) 


Navy 


27(15) 


16(0] 


10(10) 


6(3) 


5(6) 


0(2) 


4(8) 


0(0) 


72 (48) 


Canisius 


25(13) 


20(1] 


10(15) 


18(2) 


3(0) 


— 


10(13) 


— 


86 (46) 


North Carolina 


17(9) 


20(4; 


1 6(10) 


15(6) 


8(2) 


2(3) 


5(9) 


— 


73 (49) 


N.C. State 


28(14) 


21 (5; 


4(11) 


14(2) 


6(3) 


— 


7(9) 


0(0) 


80 (48) 


Duke 


17(6) 


31 (0; 


16(20) 


12(2) 


11(7) 


11(2) 


2(5) 


4(0) 


1 04 (48) 


Virginia 


20(10) 


28(1] 


20(12) 


9(2) 


2(2) 


4(4) 


5(5) 


(0) 


88 (41) 


Geo. Washington 


24(12) 


20(5] 


16(10) 


12(5) 


9(6) 


8(3) 


1(2) 


2(0) 


92 (52) 


North Carolina 


26(12) 


20(2] 


10(21) 


18(2) 


15(5) 


2(2) 


0(0) 


0(0) 


91 (43) 


Clemson 


6(4) 


10(6 


15(10) 


- 


13(4) 


12(4) 


0(1) 


— 


56(31) 


Duquesne 


15(5) 


27(5 


26(17) 


- 


16(10) 


4(3) 


6(4) 


0(0) 


98 (50) 


Duke 


11(8) 


13(3) 


22(17) 


10(2) 


7(3) 


0(0) 


1(2) 


— 


64 (42) 


Wake Forest 


22(11) 


11(1] 


19(26) 


18(6) 


7(8) 


0(1) 


0(0) 


— 


77 (55) 


Virginia 


23(13) 


22(2] 


12(11) 


14(1) 


12(16) 


12(5) 


2(7) 


8(2) 


110(63) 


Duke 


19(13) 


20(2] 


16(17) 


6(2) 


12(9) 


2(1) 


6(2) 


2(0) 


85 (49) 


North Carolina 


20(6) 


24(3] 


17(13) 


20(3) 


22(6) 


- 


0(0) 


2(1) 


105 (39) 


N.C. State 


22(7) 


18(3 


18(13) 


22(3) 


14(2) 


- 


6(3) 


0(0) 


100(35) 



54 



MARYLAND 
INVITATIONAL 
TOURNAMENT 




RESULTS: 

1971 - First Round 

Maryland 103, Western Kentucky 67 

St. John's 94, Harvard 88 

Harvard 107, Western Kentucky 89, consolation 

Maryland 90, St. John's 69, championship 

1972 - First Round 

Maryland 90, Georgia Tech 55 

Syracuse 74, Bowling Green 73 

Bowling Green 102, Georgia Tech 87, consolation 

Maryland 90, Syracuse 76, championship 

1973- First Round 

Maryland 1 02, Holy Cross 75 
Boston College 94, Michigan State 81 
Michigan State 97, Holy Cross 85, consolation 
Maryland 58, Boston College 37, championship 

MOST VALUABLE PLAYER AWARD 

1971 — Len Elmore, Maryland 

1972 — Tom McMillen, Maryland 

1973 — Len Elmore, Maryland 



INDIVIDUAL GAME 

MOST POINTS: 35 by Jim Fitzsimmons (Harvard) ag Western 
Kentucky, 1971 

MOST REBOUNDS: 21 by James Brown (Harvard) ag St. John's, 
1971 

MOST ASSISTS: 14 by Jeff Montgomery (Bowling Green) ag Syra- 
cuse, 1972 

MOST FGA: 29 by Mel Davis (St. John's) ag Harvard, 1971 

MOST FGM: 16 by Jim Fitzsimmons (Harvard) ag Western Ken- 
tucky, 1971 

BEST FG PERFORMANCE: (10 or more attempts) 10 of 11,91% 
by Floyd Lewis (Harvard) ag Western Kentucky, 1971 

MOST FTA: 14 by Bob Carrington (Boston College) ag Michigan 
State, 1973 

MOST FTM: 9 by Bill Schaeffer (St. John's) ag Harvard, 1971; by 
Bob Carrington (Boston College) ag Michigan State, 1973 

BEST FT PERFORMANCE: (5 or more attempts) 8 of 8, 100% by 
Cornelius Cash (Bowling Green) ag Georgia Tech, 1972 



INDIVIDUAL TOURNAMENT 

MOST POINTS: 59 by Jim Fitzsimmons (Harvard), 1971 

MOST REBOUNDS: 38 by Cornelius Cash (Bowling Green), 1972 

MOST ASSISTS: 23 by Jeff Montgomery (Bowling Green), 1972 

MOST FGA: 47 by Jim Fitzsimmons (Harvard), 1971 

MOST FGM: 27 by Jim Fitzsimmons (Harvard), 1971 

BEST FG PERFORMANCE: (1 or more attempts) 14 of 17,82% 

by Tom McMillen (Maryland), 1972 
MOST FTA: 16 by Malcolm Moulton (Holy Cross), 1973; by Bob 

Carrington (Boston College), 1973 
MOST FTM: 12 by Bill Schaeffer (St. John's), 1971; by Jeff Mont- 
gomery (Bowling Green), 1972 
BEST FT PERFORMANCE: (10 or more attempts) 12 of 14, 86% 
by Bill Schaeffer (St. John's), 1971 



TEAM GAME 

MOST POINTS: 107 by Harvard ag Western Kentucky, 1971 
(107-89) 

LARGEST VICTORY MARGIN: 36 by Maryland ag Western Ken- 
tucky, 1971 (103-67) 

MOST POINTS BY BOTH TEAMS: 196 by Harvard (107) and West- 
ern Kentucky (89), 1971 

FEWEST POINTS: 37 by Boston College, 1973 

FEWEST POINTS BY BOTH TEAMS: 95 by Maryland (58) and 
Boston College (37), 1973 

MOST FGA: 91 by Holy Cross ag Maryland, 1973 

MOST FGM: 45 by Harvard ag Western Kentucky, 1971; by Michi- 
gan State ag Holy Cross, 1973; by Maryland ag Holy Cross, 1973 

BEST FG PERFORMANCE: 43 of 67, 64% by Maryland ag Western 
Kentucky, 1971 

MOST FTA: 35 by Bowling Green ag Georgia Tech, 1972 

MOST FTM; 28 by Bowling Green ag Georgia Tech, 1972 

BEST FT PERFORMANCE: 15 of 21, 71% by St. John's ag Mary- 
land, 1971 

MOST REBOUNDS: 67 by Harvard ag Western Kentucky, 1971 

MOST FOULS: 29 by Michigan State ag Boston College, 1973 

FEWEST FOULS: 12 by Maryland ag Georgia Tech, 1972; by Mary- 
land ag Syracuse, 1972 

TEAM TOURNAMENT 

MOST POINTS: 195 by Harvard, 1971 

FEWEST POINTS BY OPPONENTS: 112 by Holy Cross and Boston 

College ag Maryland, 1973 
MOST FGA: 171 by Western Kentucky, 1971 
MOST FGM: 82 by Harvard, 1971 

BEST FG PERFORMANCE: 79 of 126, 62.7% by Maryland, 1972 
MOST FTA: 56 by Maryland, 1971 

MOST FTM: 37 by Maryland, 1971 ; by Bowling Green, 1972 
BEST FT PERFORMANCE: 16 of 21, 76% by Georgia Tech, 1972 
MOST REBOUNDS: 124 by Harvard, 1971 
MOST FOULS: 47 by Michigan State, 1973 
FEWEST FOULS: 24 by Maryland, 1972 



55 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND BASKETBALL RECORDS 



Single Game — Team 

MOST POINTS: 127 against Brown, Nov. 1972 

FEWEST POINTS: 15 against Seton Hall, Dec. 1941 (15-59) 

MOST POINTS BY OPPONENT: 107 by North Carolina. Feb. 

1969(107-87) 
FEWEST POINTS BY OPPONENT: 12 by Navy, 1926 (12-21) 
MOST POINTS BY BOTH TEAMS: 213 by Maryland and George 

Washington, Dec. 1971 (Md. 117-G.W. 96) 
FEWEST POINTS BY BOTH TEAMS: 33 by Maryland & Navy, 

1926 (Md. 21 - Navy 12) 
MOST FIELD GOALS: 55 against Brown, Nov. 1972 
FEWEST FIELD GOALS: 6 against Seton Hall, Dec. 1941 
FEWEST FIELD GOALS BY OPPONENTS: 6 by Navy, 1926 
MOST FREE THROWS: 40 against North Carolina in ACC Tourna- 
ment final 1958 (52 attempts) 
FEWEST FREE THROWS: against Wake Forest, Feb. 1973, in 

Winston-Salem. 
MOST FREE THROWS BY OPPONENT: 40 by Clemson, Ian. 

1968, (53 attempts) 
MOST FREE THROW ATTEMPTS: 57 against North Carolina, Jan. 

1953, (made 36) 
FEWEST FREE THROWS ATTEMPTS: 1 against Wake Forest, Feb. 

1973, (a technical) in Winston-Salem. 
MOST FREE THROW ATTEMPTS BY OPPONENT: 51 by North 

Carolina, Jan. 1964 
MOST FIELD GOAL ATTEMPTS: 93 against George Washington, 

Dec. 1971 (made 47) 
FEWEST FIELD GOAL ATTEMPTS: 18 against South Carolina, 

Jan. 1971 (made 15) 
MOST REBOUNDS: 74 against Penn State, Dec. 1964 
MOST FOULS: 44 against William & Mary, Feb. 1952 
MOST FOULS BY OPPONENT: 37 by North Carolina, Jan. 1953 
FEWEST FOULS: 7 against Buffalo, Jan. 1972. 
BEST FREE THROW PERCENTAGE: .926 against Clemson, Feb. 

1962(25-27) 
BEST FIELD GOAL PERCENTAGE: .833 against South Carolina, 

Jan. 1971 (15-18) 
LARGEST MARGIN OF VICTORY: 45 against Brown, Nov. 1972 

(127-82) 
LARGEST DEFEAT MARGIN: 63 points by Army, 1944 (85-22) 

MOST POINTS IN ONE HALF: 73 against Brown in second half, 

Nov. 1972 



Single Game-Individual 

MOST POINTS: 43 by Al Bunge against Yale, Jan. 1960 (14 FG - 
15 FT) 

MOST FIELD GOALS: 16 by Gene Shue against Wash. & Lee, Feb. 
1953 (34 att.) 

MOST FREE THROWS: 17 by Tom McMillen against Canisius, 
Dec. 1971 (att 20) 

MOST REBOUNDS: 26 by Len Elmore against Wake Forest, Feb. 
1974 

MOST FREE THROW ATTEMPTS: 20 by Tom McMillen against 
Canisius, Dec. 1971 (made 17) 

MOST FIELD GOAL ATTEMPTS: 34 by Gene Shue against Wash. 
& Lee, Feb. 1953(16) 

MOST CONSECUTIVE FREE THROWS: 14 by Jerry Greenspan 
against Minnesota, Dec. 1961 

MOST CONSECUTIVE FIELD GOALS: 10 by Barry Yates against 
Miami (Fla.), December 1970 

BEST FREE THROW PCT.: 1,000 (ONLY 10 or more listed) 

Jerry Greenspan against Minnesota 1961 14-14 

Lee Brawley against North Carolina 1951 13-13 

BiU Stasiulatis against Wake Forest 1961 12-12 

Lee Brawley against North Carolina 1951 12-12 

Bob Kessler against George Washington 1956 12-12 

Jerry Bechtle against North Carolina 1960 10-10 

Tom Milroy against Penn State 1968 10-10 

BEST FIELD GOAL PCT. 1,000 (ONLY more than five listed) 

Gary Williams vs South Carolina, Dec. 1966 8-8 

Jack Clark vs South Carolina, Jan. 1964 6-6 

MOST FREE THROW ATTEMPTS BY OPPONENT: 21 by Bernie 
Janiciki of Wake Forest, 1953 (15) 
21 by Pete Brennan of North Carolina, 1958 (15) 56 



MOST POINTS AWAY FROM HOME: 40 by Gene Shue against 
Wake Forest, 1953. 

Season Records — Team 

MOST POINTS: 2613 in 1972-73. 
HIGHEST SCORING AVERAGE: 87.1 in 1972-73. 
HIGHEST OPPONENT SCORING AVERAGE: 84.1 in 1968-69 
(2188 points in 26 games) 

MOST POINTS BY OPPONENTS: 2226 in 1972-73 

MOST FIELD GOALS: 1089 in 1972-73. 

MOST FIELD GOAL ATTEMPTS: 2094 in 1972-73. 

MOST FREE THROWS MADE: 590 in 1957-58 (29 games 858 
attempts) 

MOST FREE THROWS ATTEMPTED: 858 in 1957-58 (made 590 
in 29 games) 

BEST FIELD GOAL PERCENTAGE: .5 20 in 1972-73. 

LOWEST FIELD GOAL PERCENTAGE: .346 in 1951-52 

BEST FREE THROW PERCENTAGE: .747 in 1959-60 (534 at- 
tempts-made 399 in 23 games) 

LOWEST FREE THROW PERCENTAGE: .617 in 1952-53 

HIGHEST AVERAGE MARGIN OVER OPPONENTS: 16.7 in 
1973-74 (28 games - 85.7 to 69.0) 

BEST REBOUND PERCENTAGE: .585 in 1954-55 

BEST REBOUND AVERAGE: 49.1 in 1954-55 

MOST REBOUNDS: 1388 in 1971-72 

MOST PERSONAL FOULS: 579 in 1951-52 

FEWEST PERSONAL FOULS: 378 in 1966-67 

LARGEST ATTENDANCE: 353,436 in 1971-72 (32 games) 

LARGEST HOME ATTENDANCE: 184,323 in 1971-72 (14 games) 

LARGEST AVERAGE HOME ATTENDANCE: 13,294 for 13 
games in 1972-73. 

BEST START IN A SEASON: 10 consecutive victories in 1972-73. 

Season Records — Individual 

MOST POINTS: 667 by Tom McMillen, 1971-72 (32 games) 
MOST FIELD GOALS: 253 by John Lucas, 1973-74 (28 games) 
MOST FREE THROWS: 197 by Tom McMillen, 1971-72 (32 

games) 
MOST REBOUNDS: 412 by Len Elmore, 1973-74 (28 games) 
BEST FIELD GOAL PCT: .621 by Rick Wise, 1965-66 (25 games, 

140 att-made 87) 
BEST FREE THROW PCT: .873 by Bob McDonald 1960-61 (26 

games 69 of 79) 
BEST SCORING AVERAGE: 23.3 by Will Hetzel 1968-69 (26 

games 605 pts) 
BEST REBOUNDING AVERAGE: 14.7 by Len Elmore, 1973-74 

(28 games) 
MOST CONSECUTIVE FREE THROWS MADE: 27 by Bob 

O'Brien 1956-57 
MOST CONSECUTIVE FIELD GOALS MADE: 12 by John Lucas, 

1972-73. 

CAREER RECORDS 
MOST POINTS SCORED: 1,807 by Tom McMillen in 1971-74 (88 

games) 
BEST SCORING AVERAGE: 20.5 by Tom McMillen in 1971-74 

(88 games, 1,807 points) 
MOST FIELD GOALS: 699 by Tom McMillen in 1971-74 (88 

games) 
MOST FREE THROWS: 409 by Tom McMillen in 1971-74 (88 

games, 512 attempts) 
BEST FIELD GOAL PERCENTAGE: .555 by Tom McMillen, 

1971-74 (699 of 1,259) 
BEST FREE THROW PERCENTAGE: .803 by Jim O'Brien, 

1970-73(301 of 375). 
MOST REBOUNDS: 1,053 by Len Elmore, 1971-74 (86 games) 
MOST CONSECUTIVE FREE THROWS MADE: 32 by Bob 

O'Brien in 1955-56 (last five in opening game of 1956 season) 
MOST GAMES PLAYED IN (VARSITY): 88 by Bob Bodell, 

1970-73;by Tom McMillen, 1971-74 
MOST CONSECUTIVE GAMES PLAYED IN (VARSITY): 88 by 

Bob Bodell, 1970-73; by Tom McMillen, 1971-74 
MOST GAMES PLAYED IN ALL GAMES: 104 by Bob Bodell, 

1969-73 (includes 16 freshman games); by Tom McMillen, 

1970-74 (includes 16 freshman games) 

ALL-TIME TEAM RECORDS 

MOST CONSECUTIVE WINS AGAINST NON-ACC OPPONENTS: 

31 (1970-73). 
MOST CONSECUTIVE WINS: 14 over 1970-72 and 1972-73 

seasons. 



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