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Full text of "University of Maryland men's football media guides"

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UNIVERSITY 

OF 
MARYLAND 



Qoottall 

* 4 wo 



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1940 SCHEDULE FOR TERP VARSITY FOOTBALL TEAM 

September |«— Hamp den-Sydney College at College Park, 3 P. M. 
(All grandstand seats $1.00) 

October 5 — University of Pennsylvania at Philadelphia. 

October 12 — (Homecoming) — University of Virginia at College Park, 2:30 P. M. 
(Reserved seats $1.65 and $1.10) 

October 19 — University of Florida at Gainesville. 

October 25— Western Maryland College at Baltimore Stadium, 8:15 P. M. 
(Grandstand seats $1.65 and $1.10. Western Maryland's game) 

November 9 — Georgetown University at College Park, 2:30 P. M. 
(Grandstand seats $1.65 and $1.10) 

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October 16 — Virginia Military Institute at Lynchburg (Va.) Stadium. 

A/a' 

Qctobor 21 — (Thanksgiving) — Rutgers University at Baltimore Stadium, 2:30 P. M. 

(Grandstand seats $1.65 and $1.10) 

November 30 — Washington and Lee University at College Park, 2 P. M. 
(Grandstand seats $1.65 and $1.10) 

Those desiring tickets for Maryland's home games should write the Athletic Board at College Park. 
Prices include tax. When ordering tickets, check including postage costs, should accompany order. If 
tickets are desired by registered mail, 15 cents additional should be added. 

Athletic Office ticket Phone is Greenwood 3670. 



FRESHMAN GRID CARD FOR 1940 SEASON 

October 12 — Dickinson Seminary at College Park. 
Q ilubei 10— -G eorge WaGhingt o n Fr - cohman li t Wiuhiuglu n. 
October 25 — Washington and Lee Freshmen at Lexington. 
November 2 — Virginia Military Institute Freshmen at College Park. 
November 9 — Georgetown University Freshmen at College Park. 
November 16 — Western Maryland Freshmen at Westminster. 



Nicknames — Terrapins and Old Liners. (Terps for short.) 

Colors— Old Gold and I '.lack 

Director sport s publicity— W. H. HOTTEL 
College Park, Md. 

Warfield 2942 Warfield 3800 




BRIEF HISTORY OF UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 




Dr. II. C. Hvnl 

(Maryland B. S., '08) 
President of University who rose from Athletic Coach. 



While Maryland is looking forward to its L940 
foot hall campaign, the University is beginning its 

I I Ith term as an educational institution. 

Founded in 1807, the College of Medicine of 
Maryland in Baltimore, the fifth oldest in the coun- 
try, was the progenitor of the present University. 
The Baltimore Infirmary, now the University Hos- 
pital, and the School of Law, fourth in the United 
States, were built in L823. A Department of Dentis- 
try was added in 1882 and the School of Nursing in 
L889. In 1904, the Maryland College of Pharmacy 
ilsil ), the third in the U. S., was merged with the 
University, and in 1 « »i2 : » . the Baltimore College of 
I (ental Surgery i L840), the oldest dental school in the 
world, was amalgamated with the School of Dentis- 
try. This is the background of the original Univer- 
sity of Maryland whose phenomenal growth in every 
way in the past 15 years has been amazing. 

However, the present seat of the University 
came into being with the chartering of Maryland 
Agricultural College at College Park in 1856, the 
second agricultural College on the Western Hemi- 
sphere. 1 1 was made Maryland State College in 1916 
and by an act of the State Legislature in 1920, the 
I'.altimore and College Park units were merged, form- 
ing the strong institution now known as the University of Maryland. 

Where there were only a few more than 100 students at College Park a little more than 25 years ago, 
there now are approximately 3300 with about 1700 more in the professional schools in Baltimore. 

It was in the fall of 1912 when Harry Clifton (Curley) Byrd, now president of the University, made his 
return to ( 'ollege Park as athletic coach and English teacher that the institution and athletics really began 
to advance. 

Byrd had first come to Maryland as a student in the fall of 1905 from Crisfield, Md., had been a star 
at hlete in track, football, baseball and tennis for three years in which time he finished a 4-year engineering 
course. He was captain of the eleven in 1907. He figured in a number of pursuits in the intervening 
four years, professional baseball, newspaper writing and high school coaching, before being called to his 

alma mater. 

At one time he handled all the sports Maryland supported, except lacrosse, but he gradually was 
forced to give them up as he went up the ladder to the top. He stuck to football until the "last horn 
blew", not entirely severing his connection with the gridders until after the 1933 season, although he did no 
active coaching that year. 

His steps along executive lines came * * • 

as assistant to the president in 1918, 
vice president in 1932, acting president 
on July 1. 1932. and president on 
February 21. 1936. 

Geary Eppley, who now is Byrd's 
right hand man as dean of men and ath- 
letic director, as well as track coach, 
was one of the now president's best 
ends in 1919 and also was on the track 
team for four years. Eppley is one of 
those who has not left the College Park 
school since getting his degrees. 

Byrd's interest in clean, wholesome 
athletics is just as keen as when he was 
football coach. He insists athletics be 
conducted in a sane manner but, as he 
|said at a Maryland sports banquet, 
"I'm not in favor of losers, either. We 
should always play to win in sports as 
well as in the business of life." (Maryland B. S., '20, M. S., '21) 






'SWEDE EPPLEY, 
THE £>\<a BROTHER. 
OF ATHLETICS 

AT COLLEGE 

PARK 




MARYLAND'S TENTATIVE 1940 GRID SQUAD 



From 1939 Squad 



Name 


fos. 


*Leo Mueller L*" 


E 


* Frank Dwyer 


E 


♦Richard Shaffer 


E 


Jack Mueller 


E 


Larry MacKenzie 


E 


Ashton Garrett 


E-T 


*Bill Krouse 


T 


*Ralph Burlin 


T 


Paul McNeil 


T 


*George Gienger 


T-G 


"John Morton 


G 


Max Hunt 


G 


Frank Heyer 


G 


Frank Blazek 


C 


*James Wharton 


C 


♦Robert Smith 


C-B 


*Joe Murphy 


B 


*Fred Widener 


B 


*Milton Lumsden 


B 


*Bernie Ulman 


B 


Elmer Rigby 


B 


John Cordyack 


B 


James Dunn 


B 


*Mearle DuVall 


B 


*— 1939 Letter men. 











Yrs. on 




i-ge 


Wt. 


Ht. 


Squad 


High School 


22 


178 


6-2 Vi 


3 


City College 


23 


174 


6-2 


3 


Forest Park 


21 


181 


6-3 


3 


Ferndale 


22 


183 


6-1 


2 


City College 


20 


177 


6-1 


2 


Forest Park 


20 


187 


6-2 


o 


Rich.-Montg. 


23 


233 


6-2 


3 


Western 


22 


192 


6-1 


2 


Tome 


20 


186 


6 


3 


Kingston 


26 


201 


6 


3 


Scottsville 


20 


193 


5-10 


3 


Roxborough 


20 


188 


5-10 


2 


Towanda 


20 


184 


5-11 


3 


McDonogh 


21 


191 


6-1 


2 


Poly 


22 


160 


6 


•7 


Forest Park 


23 


190 


5-11 


3 


Tome 


23 


150 


5-10 


3 


Tome 


21 


173 


5-10 


3 


City College 


21 


184 


5-9 


3 


Poly 


99 


167 


6-1 


o 


Forest Park 


20 


170 


5-11 


1 


Forest Park 


22 


175 


6 


9 


Osceola Mills 


19 


160 


5-10 


9 


Staunton M. A. 


20 


169 


5-11 


2 


Mt. St. Joe 



Home 

Baltimore, Md. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Denton, Md. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Silver Spring, Md. 
Rockville, Md. 
Washington, D. C. 
Port Deposit, Md. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Brentwood, Md. 
Mt. Airy, Md. 
Silver Spring, Md. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Woodlynne, N. J. 
Carney's Pt., N. J. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Washington, D. C. 
Baltimore, Md. 



Letter men lost: Ends — Francis Beamer; Tackles — Ralph Albarano, Bob Brown, the best pair Maryland has had in years; 
Guards-George Lawrence and Ed Lloyd; Backs — John Boyda, Frank Skotnicki, Pershing Mondorff. All were regulars 
or near regulars, except Lloyd. 



Name 



Pos. 



Karl Gumnick 


E 


Reginald Vincent 


T 


Luther Conrad 


T 


Warren O'Neil 


G 


Lohr Dunlap 


T- 


John Sansone 


G 


Frank Maxson 


G 


William Jack 


G 


Al Ruppersberger 


C 


John Gilmore 


B 


Harold Berry 


B 


Joe Hoopengardner 


B 


Louis Chacos 


B 


Ramon Grelecki 


B 


Herb Gunther 


B 


Fred Bach 


B 


Donald Shoekey 


B 



From 1939 Freshman Class 



Age Wt. 



Ht. 



19 


180 


6 


20 


188 


6-1 


19 


186 


6 


20 


188 


5-11 


21 


186 


5-11 


18 


182 


5-9 


19 


180 


5-9 


19 


183 


5-10 


19 


160 


5-11 


19 


172 


6-1 


19 


185 


6 


19 


157 


5-8 


21 


173 


5-11 


20 


158 


5-9 


21 


174 


5-11 


19 


170 


5-9 


22 


198 


6 



Student Manager — George C. Moore, Jr., Queen Anne, Md. 



High School 

City College 

West Nottingham 

West Nottingham 

G. W. High 

Handley 

Southern 

Pingry 

Tome 

Forest Park 

Tech 

Tech 

Hagerstown 

Central 

City College 

Poly 

Tech 

Waynesboro 



Home 

Baltimore, Md. 
Colora, Md. 
Colora, Md. 
Alexandrea, Va. 
Winchester, Va. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Crawford, N. J. 
Port Deposit, Md. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Washington, D. C. 
Washington, D. C. 
Hagerstown, Md. 
Washington, D. C. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Washington, D. C. 
Waynesboro, Pa. - 



WHY THEY ARE LABELED OLD LINERS AND TERRAPINS 



University of Maryland athletes are Terrapins and Old Liners on about a 50-50 basis. 

Not so many years ago the Diamondback Terrapin was one of the State's most noted products, and when the University 
.student paper was seeking a name, Diamondback was suggested and accepted. 

It was not long after this that the Maryland athletes began to be designated as the Terrapins (now Terps, for short), 
as well as Old Liners. 

Maryland gained the name of the Old Line State during the Civil War, not only because the Mason and Dixon line really 
divided the North and the South, but for the fact that the State was the middle ground in providing troops for both sides. 






Jack FabER 
(Maryland H. S„ '126, M. S. 
Ph. D., '371 



Al. Heagy 

(Maryland B. S., '30) 



Ai. Woods 

(Maryland B. S., 



I 



MARYLAND HAS UNUSUAL FOOTBALL COACHING SET-UP 



Maryland's unusual grid coaching set-up, which held 
forth in Spring practice in approved style and which will 
handle a tough situation this Fall, is not dismayed by the 
task and success lor them fully commensurate with the 
material, is expected by those who are in the know. 

The Terps varsity football destinies are in the hands 
of an alumni-faculty staff composed of John E. (Jack) 
Faber, Albert Heagy and Al Woods, who are thoroughly 
conversant with the carious problems that confront them 
and ready to "work their heads off" to overcome them. 

Thoroughly Conversant II iih Problems 

Maryland depends almost wholly on "home" talent 
for its teams and as scholastic football in the State and in 
the District of Columbia does not match the brand of 
other sections, the Terps are under a great disadvantage. 

It takes coaches who are sympathetic with the unusual 



problems at Maryland to meet them with the proper 
fortitude and spirit and that is one of the reasons, despite 
their recognized coaching ability, that the three are the at 
helm. 

Spring practice, that was run off smoothly and ap- 
parently to great advantage, gave every indication that 
they would give the team the needed tutoring and direction 
this Fall. In fact, the Spring drills were tie peppiest held 
on the Maryland campus in years. 

Despite their youth, Faber, Heagy and Woods have 
been well tested as coaches. 

.ill llnvr If ml Coaching Experience 

Faber was head of a board that handled the team in 

1933, was head coach in 1934 and 1935 and had a record 

of 17 wins, 12 defeats and 'J ties when he turned the job 

over to Frank Dobson in 1936 and became the latter'-; 




H. BtKTos Shipley 

Maryland B. S., '14 



assistant. Dobson stepped out at the 
close of the 1939 campaign. 

Heagy and Woods both have 
handled the freshman and aided with 
the varsity. 

Faber is associate professor of 
bacteriology. Heagy is in the Chem- 
istry Department, and Woods is an 
instructor in agronomy. Faber also 
is head coach of lacrosse, with Heagy 
as his aide, and the latter handles 
the yearlong basketball squad. 

On Campus Long Time 

None of the three ever has left 
the Maryland campus since matri- 
culating and all have been associated 
with football as players or tutors 
during their entire stay. Last year 
Faber was first assistant. Heagy was 
line mentor and Woods handled the 
frosh in highly approved fashion. 

Faber and Heagy have proved 
their tutoring skill with the hi 





*yr/t 



C. LeRov M a'kkrt 
( Maryland B. A., '21, M. A., '22) 






Dick Shaffer, Senior End 



Frank Dwyer, Senior End 



Leo Mueller, Senior End 



SEVERAL PROBLEMS EXIST BUT TACKLES BIGGEST QUESTION 



team also, the Terps having won the national collegiate 
championship for the past two years. 

Allied with these three are two more Maryland products, 
H. Burton Shipley and Charles LeRoy Mackert. Ship's 
main jobs are varsity basket ball and baseball coach 
but he has charge of all athletic ec4uipment and is the trainer 
of the gridiron squad. 

Mackert, head of the men's physical education de- 
partment, does the scouting and when he has a spare 
moment can step down on the field and tell the tackles 
and fullbacks just how it should be done. 

Mackert is the only Terp who has won places at tackle 
and fullback on the all-time all-Maryland elevens. 

Shipley was highly skilled in baseball, football and 
basketball during his student days. 

Some Outstanding Players 

Maryland's greatest problem appears to be to find a 
pair of tackles to replace Ralph Albarano, one of the greatest 
ever to play the position for the Terps, and Bob Brown, 
another exceptional performer, who, however, was greatly 
retarded by a leg injury last Fall. 

George Lawrence, a fine guard; John Boyda, a versatile 
fullback who could carry the ball and block as well; Pershing 
Mondorff and Frank Skotnicki, near-regular backs, also 
will be missed. 

Other handicaps are the general lightness and in- 
experience of the gridders. There are only a half dozen 
on the squad who reach 190 pounds and, with few exceptions, 
the aggregation is made up of State and nearby boys. 
Only one gridder lives as far distant as 125 miles. 

lime Fifteen Leller Men Returning 

The Terps, though, will go into the 1940 campaign 
with 14 letter men, only three of them were regulars on 
the 1939 eleven. 

Letter men are: Dick Shaffer, Frank Dwyer and Leo 
Mueller, ends, who saw about 50 percent action; Bill Krouse 
and Ralph Burlin, who were reserve tackles; George Gienger, 
regular, and John Morton, guards; Hob Smith, regular, 
and Jim Wharton, centers, both of whom were out of the 
last two games because of injuries; Joe Murphy, Mearle 
DuVall, Bernie Ulman, Fred Widener and Milton Lumsden, 
backs, with only the first named as a regular. 

Owing to the scarcity of experienced tackles, Gienger 
was shifted from guard during the Spring practice and 
showed enough to be considered for this position this Fall. 
He'll be a regular some place. 

Smith, a great center when in trim, was bothered all 



last year with a bad knee and underwent an operation 
during the winter, leaving his status uncertain. 

Hoir They Might He Lined-up 

If a team had to be lined-up right now, it probably 
would be made up as follows: 

Shaffer and L. Mueller, ends; Krouse and Gienger, 
tackles; Morton and Max Hunt, a 1939 reserve, guards; 
Wharton, center; DuVall, Murphy, Ulman and Lumsden 
or Widener, backs. 

This outfit lacks a heavy duty back like Boyda, is not 
fortified in forward passers and the tackle play is uncertain. 

Reginald Vincent and Luther Conrad tackles; Don 
Shockey, a husky fullback; Lohr Dunlap, guard; John 
Gilmore, Louis Chacos, and Harold Berry, other fairsized 
backs, and Joe Hoopengardner, a scat back, may change the 
aspect of things in the September drills that precede the 
start of the campaign. They appear as the most promising 
sophs. 

I ersitile Attack May He Expected 

Maryland's offense may be expected to look different 
from last season, although most of the plays, as then, doubt- 
less will be run from single wing back formations. All of 
the coaches played under Byrd and have a fine knowledge 
and great respect for the aerials that used to be thrown by 
the Terps during his regime and the tricky running plays 
that were melded with the tosses. 

Joe Murphy, Maryland's Southern Conference champion 
in the 100 and 220 dashes for two successive years, should 
fit well into the scheme of things. Naturally, he is a fleet 
ball carrier and he is both a good pass thrower and receiver. 

At any rate, the Maryland team should be able to 
keep the fans on edge, winning or losing. 

In all 40 men were listed to be in the squad reporting 
for practice at College on September 2, with 24 members 
from the 1939 aggregation and Hi sophomores. 

Most of Foes Hare Iti-ller issets 

Maryland will be the underdog in seven of its nine 
games, for with the exception of Hampden-Sydney, on which 
they have the edge, and Western Maryland, which they 
match, the Terps do not come close to equalling the ma- 
terial of their rivals. 

Coming on October 5, the game with Pennsylvania 
will be a particularly tough spot, as the Red and Blue 
outfit is picked to be one of the East's outstanding elevens 
this year. 

Maryland purposely left November 2 open in order 
to give its squad a breathing spell in the middle of the 
campaign. 








V 



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MEARl i: Hi V VLL, Junior (,). /.'. 



Milton Lumsden, Senior /•'. /;. 




BERNIB ULMAN, Junior II. I',. 



AGE OF SPORT AT UNIVERSITY NOT DEFINITELY KNOWN 



.lust how old athletics are at the University of Maryland 
is not a matter of record, 

There were some spasmodic sports and outside com- 
petition at the Baltimore schools of the University well back 
in the past but there were hardly enough for record and all 
of the real athletic background of the present institution is 
gained from the activities at College Park. 

Baseball apparently was tile first sport to be established 
at College Park. While some of the teams were rather 
informal at the outset, they performed in the name of the 
Maryland Agricultural College as early as 1886. In fact, 
the team of 1887 traveled to Annapolis and beat St. John's 
College in the morning and the Naval Academy in the after- 
noon of the same day. 

Football <•<>( Slnrl In 1XH<) 

Football was put on a recognized basis in the Fall of 
lf<9'2, relations being established that year with St. John's 
College of Annapolis and Johns Hopkins. Both games were 
lost 

It was in 1889, however, when George Hoblitzel organ- 
ized a team, that the real foundation for the gridiron pastime 
was laid. The rather informal outfit of that year continued 
to function in 1890 and 189] and several games were played 
each of those years. 

Track, with William C. Nesbit as captain and C. A. E. 
Eyster as manager, and tennis were mentioned as far back 
as in the 1897-1 B98 term, and both evidently obtained a firm 
foothold in the following year. 

First Lacrosse Games In 1910 

F,. K. Powell, now donor of a trophy for the outstanding 
Maryland lacrosse player of the year, gave this sport its first 
(impetus in 1910. Two games were played that season with 
Baltimore City College, with no scores recorded, and in 1911 
a regular schedule was arranged. 



Prof. K. V. Truitt, who followed Powell and played and 
coached during his connection with the sport, was the 
fellow who developed the game. He still is a member of 
faculty as professor of acquiculture. 

Basketball was mentioned now and then in the student 
publications as far back as 1905, but seldom was a result 
given. Teams represented Maryland Agricultural College 
in the years following, though not regularly, and the sport 
was not put on a sound basis until the first gymnasium was 
provided at College Park in the Fall of 1923. 
Boxing Is Youngest Pastime 

Boxing, of course, is the baby sport at Maryland, as it is 
at most of the collegiate institutions that support it. It was 
established on a collegiate basis in 1931 and the Terps now 
are one of the powers in the ring pastime. 

A boxing club, though, was mentioned in the year book 
of 1912, of which K. Mudd was president, A. B. Duckett, 
vice president, N. L. Clark, secretary treasurer, and Kid 
Sullivan, a well known pro boxer of that time, as instructor. 
It apparently merely was a recreational venture. 

These seven sports for both varsity and freshman teams, 
along with rifle shooting, have been carried on for years with 
marked success. 

Many Intramural Pastimes Fostered 

Wrestling was recognized with a minor letter during th^ 
1939-40 term and now soccer has been placed on a collegiate 
basis. 

Golf and numerous other pastimes are fostered in an 
intensive intramural program and intramural teams of other 
schools are met in a number of sports. 

The coeds, of course, have their physical education 
department, which embraces most of the usual sports for 
girls, with rifle as their only intercollegiate competition. 




James (Pop) Wharton, Junior Center 



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Frank Blazek, Senior Center 



TERP CENTERS HAVE TOUGH TIME STAYING IN ACTION 



Maryland certainly had an unusual experience with 
its football centers during the 1939 season and in the 1940 
Spring drills, as on two occasions it was left entirely without 
a tested snapper-back. 

The Terps started the 1939 season with Bob Smith, 
the big regular, and Jim Wharton, a wiry and rugged 
160-pounder, seeming sure to give the team all the insurance 
it needed in the position. 

Smith, who had been bothered some with a trick knee 
during 1938, was the first to fall by the wayside, Wharton 
taking over completely and carrying on in good style until 
there were just two games left on the schedule. Then 
he was injured to such an extent that he was put entirely 
out of commission, joining Smith on the sidelines for the 
rest of the campaign. 

Blazek Rises Tn Occasion 

But as matters turned out, Maryland did not suffer 
to any noticeable extent for it gave to Frank 
Blazek, who had subbed at various times at 
guard and tackle, an opportunity to step into 
the picture and show the stuff of which he is 
made. 

Blazek, with only four days practice, took 
over the center assignment in the game with 
Virginia Military Institute, in which he was 
one of the most brilliant players on the field, 
and followed it up with an equally fine showing 
in the final battle of the season with Syracuse. 

Smith, who had an operation performed 
on his knee during the Christmas holidays, was 
unable, of course, to figure in the Spring drills. 
Blazek was taken sick just as practice started 
and confined to the infirmary for several weeks 
but Wharton and Carl Ruppersberger, of the 
1939 freshman team, were on the job and it 
was fully expected that they would be sufficient. 

Wiihftiii Center Second Time 

Doubtless they would have been but 
Wharton, with about 10 days of the grid 
practice period left, was allowed to go over 
with the varsity baseball team for which he 



played shortstop most all season. He had been gone only a 
couple days when Ruppersberger was hurt badly enough to 
keep him out of the remainder, of the drills. 

This situation, not nearly so serious or important as 
that was faced when Blazek came though in such magni- 
ficient fashion, gave the coaches a chance to test a couple of 
aspirants who had ideas that center is where they belong. 

These happenings, though, give a good idea of what 
a team with limited assets is likely to face at any time and 
to what great disadvantage it may be placed in meeting 
a foe which is three or four deep in every position. 

Smith May Play Fullback 

There is a possibility that this series of mishaps to 
the centers may make a fullback out of Smith. His knee 
apparently is okay again, but with Blazek having proved 
that center is the right spot for him, Wharton being as 
good as most fellows who outweigh by many pounds, and 
Ruppersberger being added to the list, Smith, who is an 
outstanding defensive player, may find himself knocking 
down ends and tackles as a blocker. 




Rohekt Smith, Senior Center or Fullback 



( HE MUS' B( * !"l 
/ UTTlE (MAN WHO , 
^WA<.MT THERE" <J \2k 




IT IS AiTOUMPl/vkS To .SEE H» 
WITHSTAND THE ATTACKS OF «E1 
OUTWEIGHING HIM BV SO POUWPS. 



JHURPHY 

MARYLAND'S MULTIPLE- 
THREAT ©UAeTES? BACK... 

a sou therm conference 
Track; champ 



This is what Jim Berryman, noted sports cartoonist of the Washington Star, thinks of the Maryland "meteor," as he called him. 

SPORTS YEAR IS NOTABLE DESPITE GRID LOSSES 



Maryland enjoyed a fine sports year - in fact, a highly 
notable one -dispite the bad start last Fall that netted only 
two victories in nine varsity football games. 

No other varsity combination, though, finished on the 
wrong side of the ledger and collectively the squads compiled 
62 percent triumphs, despite tough schedules in all pastimes. 
This is a little under the Terps usual average, which runs 
from 65 percent to above 70 in many of the years. 

Stickmen 4rnl Runners Shine 

Outstanding, of course, was the winning of the national 
lacrosse championship for the second successive year, al- 
though the Terps were not favored to repeat when they 
plunged into a testing 1940 campaign. They won all their 
10 collegiate games which included victories over Army, 
Navy, Princeton and Hopkins, four of the powers in the 
game. 

Maryland's runners also gained national fame, to back 

up other notable feats, by setting the pace in the Penn Relay 

Carnival last April with three triumphs-in the two mile, 

four mile and distance medley events — in which only six 

speedsters were used. They were Jim Kehoe, Mason 

Chronister, Alan Miller, Tommy Fields, Gene Ochsenreiter 

kand Bob Condon. A sad part of this story is that Kehoe, 

'Chronister and Miller were in the graduating class last June. 

The Terps also won six individual championships and 

the relay race in the Southern Conference title meet. 



Tennis, coached by Les Bopst, associate state chemist, 
who to the regret of all is relinquishing his tutoring job, 
enjoyed the best season in the history of the pastime at 
College Park, only one match being lost in nine played. 
The victory list doubtless would have been substantially 
increased had not rain prevented several matches in which 
Maryland was a top-heavy favorite. 

Freshmen Also Do H ell 

Freshman teams also did well, turning in 63 per cent, 
victories, with the yearling lacrosse squad being the only 
outfit to have a clean slate. 

Here is how the various teams fared: 



1 unity 


/ 


'lint s 




Freshman 


Tell 


ins 








w. 


L. 


T. 




W. 


L. 


T. 


Football 




o 


7 





Football 


2 


3 





Basket Ball 




13 


8 





Basket Ball 


8 


6 





Boxing 




2 


2 


1 


Boxing 





1 


1 


Lacrosse 




10 


1 





Lacrosse 











Baseball 




11 


9 





Baseball 


i 


2 


1 


Track 




3 


■> 





Track 


3 


1 





Tennis 




8 


1 





Tennis 


1 


2 





'Dual meets. 


— 


— 


— 




— 


— 


— 


Totals 




49 


30 


1 


Totals 


26 


15 


2 





{+ tfaar*' fit ,»,■ ■ is.- * ■ 




■ 


-:*• ^jM 






A *-M 


Pt 




11 Y J - ■ 


r 4 


m 


I — Z '^tt0^^^ 




-£' 


:-•■ •■-'■>-, ,v-** ,-ifi 





John Morton, Senior Guard 





Bill Krouse, Senior Tackle 



George Gienger, Senior Guard 



FACTS ABOUT LEADING MEMBERS OF VARSITY FOOTBALL SQUAD 



LETTER MEN 

Dick Shaffer — End — 6 foot 3 inch senior who scales 
181 pounds. He should have a good season. Also discus 
thrower on track team. In College of Education. 

Frank Dwyer — End — Senior who stands 6 feet 
2 inches and weighs 174 pounds. Utility man and pitcher 
on ball team. College of Commerce student. 

Leo Mueller — End — Another tall and rangy senior 
who scales 178 pounds and stands 6 feet 2' 2 inches. Was 
capable defense man on Maryland's collegiate championship 
lacrosse team. Rugged and aggressive. In College of Arts 
and Sciences. 

Bill Krouse — Tackle — Biggest man on the Maryland 
squad at 233 pounds which he carries well on a 6 foot 2 inch 
frame. Senior who has been understudy for two seasons 
and hopes to finish as a regular. College of Education 
student. 

Ralph Burlin— Tackle— Well-built 6 foot 2 inch, 
191 pound junior who has the physical assets but just is 
getting needed experience. Very rugged. Engineering 
student. 

George Gienger — Tackle or Guard — Senior who has 
played guard two years but shifted to tackle in Spring 
practice and likely will remain there. Has fine build, stand- 
ing 6 feet and scaling 201 pounds. Never played football 
before entering Maryland. In College of Engineering. 

John Morton — Guard — Compact and rugged 193 
pound senior who subbed in 1939 for both Gienger and 
George Lawrence, who was graduated. Difficult to dis- 
lodge and good blocker. In College of Arts and Sciences. 

Jim Wharton — Center — Junior 6-footer who totes only 
160 pounds but is rugged, aggressive and fine defensive 
player. Was regular shortstop on 1940 varsity nine. 
"Crazy" about football. In College of Education. 

Robert Smith — Center or Blocking Back- Pivot man 
for two years but knee injury kept him out most of last year 
and he may adorn the baekfield this fall. Rugged fellow 
who loves football. Is 5 feet 11 inches tall and weighs 190. 
Senior in College of Education. 



Joe Murphy — Back— Stands 5 feet 10 and weighs just 
150 pounds but can run with the best, kick and pass. Holds 
Southern Conference championships at 100 and 220 yards, 
winning both events two years in a row. College of 
Education senior. 

Milton Lumsden — Back — Stocky senior who carries 
184 pounds on a 5 feet 9 inch frame. Good blocker and 
defensive player and gives 100 percent in effort. College of 
Education student. 

Bernie Ulman — Back — Junior who is fine ball handler, 
ball carrier and pass receiver. Especially good on de- 
ceptive plays. Rangy, as he weighs only 167, although 
he is 6 feet 1 inch in height. In College of Commerce. 

Mearle DuVall — Back — Junior who did much of 
the passing and kicking last year and a good deal of ball 
carrying. Was in the injured list on two occassions. He's 
5 feet 11 inches tall and weighs 169. Was basketball 
regular and played on ball team as catcher. College of 
Education student. 

Fred Widener — Back — Senior who is good blocker, 
although scaling only 173 pounds and standing 5 feet 
10 inches. Also strong on defense. Letter man in lacrosse 
as defense player. Studying Agriculture. 

NON-LETTER MEN 

Jack Mueller — End — Cousin of Leo and they may 
pair on the wings. Is 6 feet 1 inch and weighs 179 pounds. 
Was outstanding midfielder on lacrosse team and showed 
well in spring grid practice before going over to the stick 
pastime. Was used some as reserve back in 1939. Junior 
in College of Commerce. 

Max Hunt— Guard— Fairly fast and rugged 188 
pounder who stands 5 feet 10 inches. Showed enough 
last year and in Spring practice to count him as a valuable 
asset this season. Pitcher on varsity nine. He's a junior 
in College of Agriculture. 

Frank Blazek — Center — Played remarkable football 
in the position in the last two games when he was drafted 
to till the job that was new to him when Bob Smith and Jim 
Wharton both were on the injured list. He's big enough, 
being 6 feet 1 inch in height and weighing 191 pounds. 
An outstanding student in the College of Engineering in 
which he is a senior. 



SCORES OF PAST GAMES WITH MARYLAND'S 1940 RIVALS 



II \\iri>l \-S> l>\IA COLLKG 



1939 Maryland, 26; Hampden-Sydney, 0. 



I M\ ERSm OF PENNS1 l.\ \M V 

1922 Pennsylvania, 12; Maryland, 0. 

1923 Maryland, :i; Pennsylvania, 0. 
1931 Penn \ Ivania, 28; Maryland, 21. 



I \l\ ERSIT1 OF \ lli<;i\l \ 

L919 Maryland State, 13; Virginia, 0. 

19 16 Virginia, 6; U. of M., 0. 

L926 l". of M.. ti; Virginia, 6. 

L927 Virginia, 21; U. of M., 0. 

1928 U. of M., is; Virginia, 2. 

1929 l'. of M.. L3; Virginia, 13. 
L930 V. of M., 14: Virginia, 6. 

1931 I', of M.. T: Virginia, 6. 

1932 Virginia, 7; U. of M., 6. 
1988 Virginia, 6; U. of M., 0. 
1984 U. of M.. 20; Virginia, 0. 
L9 16 l'. of M., 14; Virginia, 7. 
L986 U. <>f M., 21; Virginia, 0. 

1937 U. of M.. 3; Virginia, 0. 

1938 Virginia, 27: (J. of M., 19. 
L989 Virginia, 12; U. of M., 7. 





1 MM USI IV OF 


FLORIDA 


1927 


Florida, 7; U. of M., (i. 




L932 


Florida, 19; U. of M., 0. 




1934 


U. of M., 21; Florida, 0. 




1935 


U. of M., 20; Florida, 6. 




1936 


Florida, 7; U. of M„ 6. 




1937 


fj. of M., 13; Florida, 7. 




193S 


Florida, 21; U. of M., 7. 





1939 Florida, 14; U. of M., 0. 



GEORGETOWN I NIVERSITY 

1899 Georgetown, 17; M. A. C, 

I9iiii Georgetown, 27; M. A. C, 0. 

1903 Georgetown, 2s ; M. A. ('., 0. 

19H1 Georgetown, 22; M. A. C, 0, 

1906 Georgetown, 28; M. A. ('., o. 

1907 Georgetown, 10; M. A. ('., 0. 

Modern Serie 

1931 V. of M., (i; Georgetown, 0. 

1935 I'. of M., 12; Georgetown, 6. 

L936 Georgetown, 7; U, of M., 6. 

1937 1'. of M., 12; Georgetown, 2. 

L938 Georgetown, 1 1; U. of M., 7. 

1939 Georgetown, 20; U. of M., 0. 



VIRGINIA MILITARY [NSTITI II. 

1906— V. M. I., 33; M. A. C., 5. 
1910— V. M.I., 8; M. A. C, 0. 
1916— Maryland State, 15; V. M. I., 9. 
1917- Maryland State, 14: V. M. I., 14. 
1918 Maryland State, 7; V. M. I., 6. 
1927— U. of M., 10; V. M. I., 7. 
1928— U. of M., 0; V. M. I., 0. 
1929— V. M. I., 7; U. of M., 6. 
1930— U. of M., 20; V. M. I., 0. 
1931— U. of M., 41; V. M. I., 20. 
1932— U. of M„ 12; V. M. I., 7. 
1933— V. M. I., 19; U. of M„ 13. 
1934— U. of M., 23; V. M. I., 0. 
1935— U. of M„ 6; V. M. I.. 0. 
1936— V. M. I., 13; U. of M., 7. 
1937— U. of M., 9; V. M. I., 7. 
1938— V. M. I., 47; U. of M., 14. 
1939— V. M. I., 13; U. of M., 0. 



\\ ESTERN M VR\ LAND 

1893 M. A. ('.. is; Western Maryland, 10. 
ls;i4— M. A. C, 52; Western Maryland, 0. 

L896 M. A. C., 16; Western Maryland, 6. 

L898 Western Maryland, 32; M. A. C, 11. 

1S99 Western Maryland, 21; M. A. C, 0. 

19iU Western Maryland, 36: M. A. C, 0. 

1902 Western Maryland, 26; M. A. C, 0. 

19H3 M. A. ('., 6; Western Maryland, 0. 

1904 M. A. C, 6; Western Maryland, 0. 

1905 Western Maryland, 10; M. A. C, 0. 

1910 Western Maryland, 17: M. A. C, 3. 

1911 M. A. ('.. 6; Western Maryland, 0. 

1912 M. A. C. 17: Western Maryland, 7. 
1913- M. A. C, 46; Western Maryland, 0. 

1914 Western Maryland. 20; M. A. C, 13. 

1915 M. A. C., 51: Western Maryland, 0. 

191s Maryland State, 19: Western Maryland, 0. 

1919 Maryland State, 20: Western Maryland, 0. 

192S 1". of M., 13; Western Maryland, 6. 

1929 Western Maryland, 12: U. of M., 0. 

1930— Western Maryland. 7: I', of M., 0. 

1931— U. of M., 41: Western Maryland, 6. 

L932 Western Maryland, 39: U. of M., 7. 

1933- Western Maryland, 13: U. of M., 7. 
U935 U. of M.. 22; Western Maryland, 7. 
Jl936- Western Maryland, 12: U. of M., 0. 

1937 U. of M., 6; West.™ Maryland, 0. 

193s V. of M., 14; Western Maryland, 8. 

1939— U. of M., 12: Western Maryland, 0. 



RUTGERS I NIVERSm 



1920— Rutgers, 6; U. of M., 0. 
1921— U. of M., 3; Rutgers, 0. 
1925— U. of M., 16; Rutgers, 0. 
1939 Rutgers, 25; U. of M., 12. 



\\ ISHINGTON \M» LEE 



1924 

1925- 

1926- 

1927- 

192S 

1930- 

1931- 

1932- 

1933- 

1934- 

1935- 

1936- 

1937- 

1938- 

1939 



-W. and 
-W. and 
W. and 
-W. and 
-U. of M 
U. of M 
U. of M 
U. of M 
U. of M 
W. and 
U. of M 
-U. of M 
U. of M 
U. of M 
Did not 



L., 19; U. of M. 
L., 7: U. of M., 
L., 3; U. of M., 
L., 13; U. of M. 
., 6; W. and L., 

,41: W. and L. 
., 13; W. and L. 
., 6; W. and L., 

, 33; W. and L. 
L„ 7; U. of M., 

, 0: W. and L., 

, 19: W. and L. 
., 8; W. and L., 

, 19: W. and L. 

meet. 



3. 
0. 
, 6. 
0. 
, 6. 

0. 

. 13. 
0. 
0. 
, 0. 
0. 
, 13.