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Full text of "University of Maryland men's football media guides"

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HOW OLD LINERS AND TERRAPINS ORIGINATED 

It has been well established that Old Liners, along with almost equally-used Terrapins or 
Terps, is a fitting and proper nickname for the University of Maryland, its athletes and other students 
and thai it is a fighting sobriquet. 

Of several theories advanced, the two most plausible are widely divergent in origin. The ex- 
planation generally accepted, however, is the one that emanated from the New York campaign of the 
War of the Revolution. 

V muling to the story, the Continental troops were drawn up across Long Island facing south, 
with a similar array of the British directly opposite. The Maryland troops held the center position of 
the American lines. During the course of the battle, the Continental troops flanking the Marylanders began to give way under the 
pressure of the British attack, bul Maryland held her ground. The line of battle thus became bow-shaped, with the Free Staters at 
the most advanced portion of the arc. The American commanding officers thus began to refer to the lines of battle as "the old line," 
and "the new line." 

Bui the British advantage was brief and after a few hours the tide of the battle turned in favor of the Americans, inspired no 

doubt by the tenacity of the boys from Maryland. Upon seeing the lines of battle begin to straighten out to their original position 
again, Col. Smallwood, commanding a Maryland regiment cried out "See 1 The old line holds'" 

From thenceforward, the Maryland soldiers were known as "The Old Line" regiments, and upheld their glorious record through- 
out the rest of the war. 

The other story is about the fierce skirmishes between the Marylanders and the Pennsylvanians over the then indefinite bound- 
ary between the States. It seems that there were two lines, the original known as "The 
Old Line," being the one most favorable to Maryland. The Marylanders, of course, de- 
fended this border, while the Pennsylvanians fought for a newer line, which would give 
them more land. It is said that the Marylanders held so strenuously for the old marker 
that they earned Maryland its name as "The Old Line State." 

Finally, after Mason and Dixon surveyed the boundary, completing it in 1767, 
the quarreling came to an end, and the Mason and Dixon line became even more famous 
than the "Old Line." 

President Hyrd was responsible for Terrapins. Not so many years ago the Diamond- 
back Terrapin was one of the State's most noted products, and when the University student 
paper was seeking for a name, Diamondback was suggested by him and accepted. It was 
not long after this that the Maryland athletes and teams began to be designated as the 
Terrapins and the newspapers were responsible for the briefer Terps. It fits better in the 
headlines. A little later the year book changed its name from the Reveille to the Terrapin- 
so the name now is inseparably tied up with the University. 

Coach Shaughnessy, when he was at Mankind before, liked the Old Liners much better, and tried to minimize Terrapins, 
but it was no go. He now is reconciled to both names, especially after it was explained to him that the Diamondback Terrapin was 
a ferocious, not a docile, cutter as he had assumed. Now he plans to call his two squads Old Liners and Terrapins. 

He still insists, however, that persons not in Maryland's bailawick, especially those west of the Mississippi, would not recognize 
the College Park teams if Terrapins was used but would do so immediately if they were referred to as Old Liners. 

Bui as Terps makes the going much easier than Old Liners or Maryland for the headline writers (and being one of the tribe 
we know i it is a cinch thai it is going to predominate in the newspapers in the College Parkers natural scope at least. 

The Terrapin pictured above is a replica of the bronze mascot that sits in front of Ritchie Coliseum at College Park. It was 
modeled after a live Diamondback Terrapin that was brought from Crisfield, Mil., President Byrd's home town, and tied to a light 
rope he unveiled his ow n Statute at fitting ceremonies. The Terrapin was the gift of E. C. Mayo, head of the ( lorhain Manufacturing 
Co., of Providence, I!. I., who played quarterback for Maryland back in 1903. 

SPORTS VI MARYLAND RULED BY ATHLETIC HO\KD 




Sports al Maryland are controlled by 

.in Vthletic Bo hi h mto 

m.'iticall . I leary (S 

Eppli ithletic director. 

( Ither mi i tt> ire I >r. Ernest \. 

Dl ., '12; 

Dr. William ( '. Su] . Col. 
Harland ( '. < Iriswold, 



md md Tactics. Ml. except 

( lol. ( Iriswold, are foi iiH'i ( >ld Line 

athletes and grads and members of the 
Facultj . 

Dr. < or\ , football captain in 1908 and 
i on the track team, i- head of 
Entomology I >epartmen1 ; I >r. Kemp, grid 
ictoi oi ' he Expet i 



ment Station, and Dr. Supplee, gridiron 
end who was named on several 1923 all- 
Vmeriea teams, and basket ball and track 

ace, is assistant professor in chemistry. 

Dr. Supplee was given leave to enter 
the sen ice as e majoi in the I nited States 

Sanitary Corps m the Bpring of 1942 and 

-prut mm i ni in- time m the European 

nicl ivated only recentK 




OLD LINERS-TERRAPINS 

Publ Uhletic I; 

I nncr sity of Maryland, I . Md, 

\\ II. Bill) II. .ii(l. Direcl I 

Publirity, Edit 

one Warfield 2807; Warfield 3800, 
Branch 21 




MARYLAND'S 1<M(> \ \KSITY FOOTBALL SCHEDI LE 

Septembei 28 iNil'Iiii I ainbridgr Naval Training Station at College Park 8:00. 

October -4 (Night University of Richmond :.i College Park, s:(Mi. 

October 12 University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, N. ('. 

October is (Night Virginia Polytechnic Institute at College Park, s : oo. 

Octobei 26 t>ix-n date and no game ie planned. 

Novembei 2 William and Mary College at Williamsburg, Va. 

November University of South Carolina at College l'ark, 2:30. 
Homecoming game 

Novembei 16 Washington and Lee University at College Park, 2:30. 

November 23 Michigan State College at 1-ansing, Mich. 

November 30 — North Carolina State College at Kaleigh. 

Reserved seats a- well as all others for Maryland's home garnet* will be $2.40 incJuding tax. In ordering by mail please include 
l*> .ints extra for sending by registered mail. 




WARNING \M> Sn.t.KSTiON 

\\ . . of COUr8e, u ill be -ending out plenty 
of stuff of our own free will and without 

provocation, hut if there is anything 
lal you fellow-typewriter hounds and 
broadcasters would like to have ju 
us know and we will do our durndi 
supply it. \V. H. H. 




OLD LINERS NEED ADDED STRENGTH TO COPE WITH RIVALS 



ich Clark Shaughnessy, in his 
Maryland, has inherited a 
prctt rridders, but the 

squad, as a whole, is light and will 

iderably augmented to cope with 

ind ol opposition the Old Linei 
sure tu lace in tliis season of returned GI's. 
Thai 194 Paul Bryant's, which 

wiui six games, tied one and lust two 
i>k;»y as a wartime outfit, but with its 
shortage of poundage, would lie in for a 
rough tunc against the greatly bolsl 
postwar aggregations. Reports from all 
Maryland's 1946 nvals give the same farts 
of the influx of old and new stalwarts that 

make Coach Shaughness} shiver when he 
reads them. 

Maryland will have at hast 181ettermen 
back, unless the unforseen happens, ami 
is hopeful that an added numbei ol the 
boys who went off to war will be returning 

bat there will he some new com 
marked ability, particularly linemen with 
weight and speed. 

More Weight is Needed 

Shaughnessy, of course, got a good line 
on the material at hand during the spring 
drills, lie was shocked at the lightni 
many of players. In fart, the Old Liners 
last fall conceded much weight to every 
team they nut hut made up for this in 
speed and efficiency of then attack. It is 

safe to saj that T-timer Shaughnessy also 

will have the offense hut he's coin lined 
it will take a lot of defensive power to 
stave off the 1946 foi 

Maryland wound up its spring drills 
with a game in which the Blacks, 
manded by Al Heagy, heat the Golds, led 
by Al Wood-, 2.~i to o, hut the score does 
not tell the unvarnished truth. In 
it was the Golds' lack of an experienced 
fullback that, in Shaughnessy's opinion, 
kept i ■ from being even. 



John (Reds) Wright, 225-pounder who 
fullbacked for Shaughnessy in 1942 and 

who had been traveling like an expo-- in 
scrimmages, was kept out because of a 

cracked lib, and Joe Pokorny, hu-sky 
rookie reserve, was injured early in the 

second period. This gummed up the 

• ■ of the fluids who were holding 
their own when Pokorny went out. 

Line-up in Spring Game 

Here is how the teams lined up at the 
-Mi t of that scrap: 

Blacks To- <,iiliU 

*Roy Morter 1.1 Chuck Curtis 

•Walter Fehr IT 'John Bissell 

'Dick Johnston LG Pete Pinnoci 

John Han ill C Arthur Simpson 

' 1 anile Fritz RG 'Ed Schwarz 

'Joe Drach RT Dan Marowitz 

*Boh Crosland RE mcis Evans 

'Vic Turyn QB Jim Kurz 

•Sam Behr II B -Joe Pietrowski 

'Harry Bonk FB Joe Pokorny 

"Boh Piker HB -Jack Toler 

'194.3 I.etternian 

All of the Blacks, with the exception 

of Harvill at center, were last year's 

rs, and only Curtis, at end; Simpson. 

at center; Marowitz, at tackle, and Kurz, 

at quarterback, of the Golds were new- 
comers. 

Kurz, one of the hie men of the squad, 

played on the 1942 Maryland frosh team 

■it in some football in the European 

Zone after the war ended. Harvill went 
into the Army from Tech High of Wash- 
and played at Keesler Field. 

Some of Main Helpers 

Turyn, tall, rangy 173-pounder, who 

d quarter in 104.") until forced out 
with an injured shoulder; indicated that 
he would meet Shaughnessy '> exacting 
requirement- in the key position, with a 



VOICES DETERMINATION TO SUCCEED 



Clark Shaughnessy, when he accepted 

the bid to return to Maryland, in a public 

1 he intended to do 

"the best job of coaching I've ever done" 

for Mai viand. 

"If ' eh should do a good 

for an) body it i- up to me to 

job fi Bj id I want I 

Shaughni 

' job in the country 

he would : still 



"1 felt 1 owed them something aftci 
the way I left", he said. "It was 
i thing 1 ever did." 

It might be ol interest to recall the 1942 

Shaughnessy season at Maryland in 
which he defeated University of Con- 
necticut, 3-1-0; Lakehurst Naval 
Station, 14-0; Rutgers, 27-13; N • 
Maryland, 51-0; Morula, 13-0; Virginia, 
27 12, and Washington and Lee, 32-28 

II, lost to V.M.I., '-".'-0. and to Duke. 12 0, 
the only surpii I the 

About the onl> team Maryland 
-haded m material was Western Mary- 
complishment should not 
be minimi 



running mate needed; there is no belter 
guard in the Nation than Fritz and 
Johnston, despite he scales only 170 at 
tops, is ju-t about :rs good; Behr, who 
carried a kicknff 00 yards lor a touchdown 
against Virginia and who made several 
other long trips for .-core-, should give 
the opposition jitters; Bonk and Reds 
Wright who could loosen up any line 
and Crosland, a crackerjack end who 
scored twice on intercepted passes 
year, are hoys who should he among the 
Terp leaders, to mention a few. 

And Kurz, (j feet 2 and powerful, if lie 
doesn't land one of the general-hip jobs, 
will he heard from some place. "He may 
not be fully equipped to be a quarter- 
back", Shaughnessy said, "hut 1 don't 
think there's another position 00 the team 
he couldn't make." 

Of the varsity squad of .'!•"> in 1942 and 
a like number on the freshman aggregation 
that year just -ix finished their football. 
Only Wright and Kurz resumed their 
studies at the start of the midterm, but it 
is expected that numerous others will 
return. 

Werner anil Simler Due 

Among them are Lieut. Huhcy Werner, 
a flashy soph hack for Shaughnes-y in 
1042 and on whom the coach reall\ is 

"sweet", and Maj. George Simler, a 
squadron commander in the AAF, who 

as a freshman promised to lie one of the 
greatest ends ever to play for Terps, 
I.ieut. Bill By id of the Marine-, -on of the 
prcxy who played center and guard in 
1 012, and ex-marine Lieutenant Marshall 
Brandt, a big end, it is known will reenter 
the University in the fall and there surely 
will be more who'll renew their educational 
endeavors. 

Maryland will have a total of about 
:{..")(X) GI's in school next Kail and i.- 

certain to gam some surprise talent. 

Coach Burton Shipley of the baseball 
team got a squad mostly "out of the clear 
sky" and it was one of his hest in years, 
winning 13 of is game-. Tin- caused 
Shaughnessy to opine that, "I hope 
lightning strikes me, t 



IT m\ VERSA I II I VTIII.KTK 
Vic Turyn, tall and agile quarterback 

of the football team a basket 

hall ace during the winter season ami 
doubtless could have made the hall cluli 

i outfielder had not spring grid 

practice interfered. He was out 

while hut other- had gained precedence 

over him. 



SHAUGHNESSY II \s BEEN (<>\<lll\<. EVER SINCE l«H 1 



Clink Shaughnessy, who has returned 
., Maryland's head football coach 
a thi been 

(I up in the grid tutoring bu 

r\ ei since i>r c pleted his plaj ing 

in 191 I. 

He became an assistant coach at hi« 

alma mater thai Fall after ln'inc one "I 

the Gophers' greatest fullbacks, and it 

in his bom rice. 

.ughneesy traveled South and \\ ■ ■■• 

to coach football al four other big scl le 

before finally making his first bow in the 
it College Park in 1942. 
He iru at Tulane from 1916 to 1926 

ami then Btepped "across t lie street 

Loyola "i the South in 1927 to remain 
through 1932. He went to Chicago in 1933 

ami stayed then' through the M'.'i'.i cam- 
paign. He then made the move that g 
him the most fame, going 66 Stai 
where he installed Ins "T" system that 
carried the Indians to an undefeated 
ii in nine regular games and a victory 
ovei Nebraska in the Rose Bowl. 

Stanford won only six of nine names foi 
him in 1941 but the three losing tilts 
were bo dose that he lust no prest i| 
himself or his system. 

Two Spot- Hurl Mini 

In fact, Shaughnessy was highly suc- 
il in all lii- coaching ventures e 
at Chicago where the grid pastime w 
the way out when he arrived and during 
the past three years at Pitt. They were 
the only places where Shaughnessy went 
into the "red". Despite Ins setbacks with 
the Mam,, n- and Pitt he -till h 
laudable all-timi ■ with 135 vic- 

against 103 defeats and 14 tii 
Ins 29 j <':i hing. 

Hi- most notable trams were thoi 
1924, when Tulane won eight games and 
lost one, and in 1925, when it won nine 
tames ami tied one. Among the Tulane 
victories ol 1925 was an is to 7 defi 
Northwestern, which was Big Ten 
ference champion that season. Tins | 
was invited to play in the Tournami 

: when the 'I'ulanr authorities 

would not accept, Coach Shaughnessj 
persuaded the wi o take Alabama, 

which scored a victor] over the University 
of Washington that started the Crimson 

Tide to lame. 

Shaugl s-v was horn March 6, 1892, 

at St. Cloud. Minn., and attended North 

St Paul high school, graduating in 1908. 
He then entered M 

ed in econoi - and political sci< 

He played varsity football in 1911, 1912, 
and 1913. Minnesota grains then were 
coached by Dr. Homy I.. Williams, and 
Shaughnes! ates included Hemic 




Clark Shaughnessi In his coaching 



Bierman, now head coach at Minnesota. 
Bierman was Shaughnessy's assistant at 

Tulane. and succeeded linn as head 
when Shaughnessy went to Loyola. 

Battles \\ a> to Job 

At Minnesota, Shaughnessj madi 

football team in (Iranian Not 

he was standing on the sid< 
watching b ge. Needing a guard, 

Dr. William- puked the first man hi 
That put Shaughnessy in action for the 
tn-t time, but he made n im- 

,n that he immediately was given 
a chance as a regular, although Di 
Williams hail to ask hi- name. In his first 
yeai he was a star at end. but next - 
he was moved over to tackle, whet 
wa- just as effective. In his u the 

Gophers needed a fullback and Shaugh- 
the job. 

I ball team 
in the same way, being called out 

to take a train to Champaign with 



quad, although he had never l>een 

on the II Ih untried that he 

was not allowed to practice 1 

hut when the whistle blew he fol- 
lowed instruction- ami smothered the 
Illinois star forward he wa- told to -top. 
He played on the liasket hall team for 
two years and also competed in track one 
season, w inning hi- Ii half miler. 

He married Mae Hamilton, of New 

'17. They have 

children, (.'lark 1 )., Jr., born I '< 

O, 1918; Marcia Mae, bom Vugust 7, 

July 21, 

1923. All now ed. 

Sbaugbne — >'- coaching record: 

Scl W 1. T 

Tulane 191 

Loyola ol South 1927 19 

1940 1941 
and 1942 7 

Pittsburgh 1943 1945 10 17 




Jl 



£: 



~~&^^^r 




warn '.j '. c- +■*&. .* u ..-:.' .'.,.-,. 
Herm \\ Bali 

Rail, who came to Maryland three 
i> a membei of the physical 
education staff, ami who assisted Paul 
Bryant las) season ami helped Coach 
Shaughnessy this spring, has become chief 
-rout for the Washington Redskins. 

Hall came to Maryland from Alleganj 
High nl Cumberland where he was a 
purveyor of the T. A graduate "i Davis 

Elkins, I oached football at Allegany 

I'm seven years ami hail three unbeaten 



MERE COMPARISONS 

Vlthough I'i'ii re worth little 

in these days of tin- til influx ami the 
reshmen, Maryland ' 
! all record last fall than any 

in- mi its Itlli. The 

lost tun ami tie. | one 
red a- follows: 

Richmond i 
Xortl 
Virginia 1 1 

Soul I. I 

Michigan State 



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SWEDE EPPLEY IS MARYLAND LANDMARK 



Col. Geary F. (Swede) Eppley, who is 
Maryland's athletic director, also is head 
track mentor and dean of men and handles 
so many kinds of jobs in the last named 
capacity that it is difficult for him to 
remember all of them. 

Eppley, who served in both World 
War I and II, was a one-time track star 
and one of the best ends ever to play for 
Curley Byrd. He first took over the job 
a- athletic di recti 1936. As athletic 

director, he is chairman of the Athletic 
Board, governing group of old lane 

His duties at the University have in- 
cluded, besides those mentioned, associate 

professor ol agr my, chairman of the 

Student Life Committee and faculty 
adviser on finances to the various student 
organizations. 

Eppley, one of the landmarks of the 
University, went into service in World 
War II, in March, 1941, anil ihil not get 

out until late last Fall when he returned 
to his old duties immediately. He was 
stationed at the War College in Wash- 
ington on staff duty with the exception 
of a short tour at Fort Meade. He received 
the Legion of Merit for his services. 

Ills Inline is m College Park. He has 
three children, two girls and a boy, and 
In.- eldest daughter is a student in the 
I 'niversity. 

Suede went into the service in World 
War I when he u as a student at Maryland 
in 1917 and was not returned to civil life 




Geuo (Swede) Eppley 

until July, 1919. Then a lieutenant, he 
served oversea- with the 2d Cavalry for 
15 m nit lis. 

That fall he reentered the University 

and received his degree the following June. 
For a time he was with the Veterans 
Bureau in Washington but returned to 
College Park in October, 1922, to join the 
teaching staff and has been connected « ith 
the University ever since, with the excep- 
tion of liis services in World War II. 




Total* 



33 






BOHLER BACK ON JOB 

George M. Bohler, who was with (lark 
Shaughnessy at the University in 1912. 
has returned as trainer of all Old lane 
athletic teams and equipment manager. 

During Ins previous Army assignment 

at College Park, Bohler was an assistant 
in the militarj department ami also was 
in charge of equipment as the program was 

more or less on an Army basis. 

lie recently was retired a- a lieutenant 

colonel after MO years service in the \im\ 
and paid a visit to Sliaughne-sy during 
the spring grid drills. In lad, he helped 
out for a leu days in the training room 

then, looking , uple oi injured 

boys who needed special attention. 

Holder is a graduate of Wasl 

State College, and his brother, .1. Fled 
Holder, i- director ol athletii 

SllBUghl ■ led OVd the addition 

nl Holder, with whom he long has been 

acquainted, and declared, "'S ou could 
h the counl d sou wouldn't 

tin. I a better or re intelligent 



HEAG^ \M) WOODS HAVE BECOME STANDBYS VI COLLEGE l*\KK 







Albert I v. Heagi 



\\ hile < lai k Sh - 

\ hi.. i Lindskog being the 

"lil\ IK « 

>•■ t I ,;i t \lliell 

I \\ Is « ill remain cm tin 

The) are n couple ol 

Hi ag) , in fact, is what might be termed 
Shaughnei been 

on the campus ever since he was graduated 
in 1930, being exempted in the la.te war 
because Ins work in the I 
Department was "highlj essential". lb- 
also i- the daddv of two children, a boy 
and a girl. 

Heag) has efficiently figured inn variet) 

of coaching tasks at Maryland, in football, 

basket ball and lacrosse, and with Dr. 

John I-. .lark 1 laln'i shared the grid 

in 1936 and 1940 and 1941. 

W Is also was a member of the trium- 

iii i he latter two yi 

Defense Coach in Lacro — e 
Heagj -till is defense coach in lacn 

ol which l-'aher is lirail mentor, anil took 

the top place successfully in 

» l,i ii .\laj. I alii-r was in t lit- sei 

Heag] was one of Maryland's besl all- 
around athletes in the history of these! I. 

He was a smooth guard in basket ball, 
All-America as a defense player in lacrosse 
and just about a- good an end n? ever 
charged down the field for the < H.l I 
He was a consistent star for three years in 
all these sports, finishing with the lacrosse 
season of 1930. 

Woods, played only football but he 
played that up to the liilt. He «:i> a 
blocking and defensive quarterback par- 
exceUence for three years, 1930, 1931 and 



BIACK \M> GOLD BECOME STANDARD 



Maryland's football players will weai 
black and gold, the 1 niversitj colors, nexl 
fall exclusively and their type of uniform 
doubtless will be made standard for all 
old 1 mi' athletic team.-. This not only 
is the idea of Prexy Curley Byrd and 
Athletic Director Suede Eppley, but is 
backed b) Coach (lark Shaughnessy, 
although lie Bprung that brilliant red stuff 
mi the tans in 1942. 

The jersey will be black, probably 
« itlmut stripes any place, and the numbers 
will be in big gold letters mi both back 

and fmnt. Tins certainly will be g I 

to the newspaper men and broad- 
casters who have tried vainly in the past 
tu read the numerals on jerseys which 
had stripes running through the numbers. 



It is planned to have gold pants, if 
they are available, for football the 
lacrosse players wore them this spring 

but white pants will be worn if the gold 

are not obtainable for the 1946 season. 

All of the stuff will be of the he.-t quality 
available and you can bet your old boots 
that no gridders will !«• better dn 
than the Tt i ps 

Of course, there may have to be some 
variation as to color for baseball suits, but 
ill the future the trim is sure to be black 
and gold with stockings of those colors. 

A vanity of equipment likely will lie 
seen on the practice fields for -nine time 
until the stuff on hand, which includes 

quite a hit of the icd, i- u-ed up. Hut 
from now on black and gold will prevail. 



i 







Ai.iu.ui I \\ 

1932 and in li Bl his 

persistent plea to carry the hall 
finally was answered, "went to town" 
with the pig-kin. 

Wood- was Marine Captain 

Woods, who left the Mamie Corps 
when he became a -Indent at Mai 
went back into thi in World 

\\::i II a- fir-t lieutenant and ■ 
captain when he was discharged on 
I'eliruarv 20, 1 9 Hi, having attained that 
rank on July 1, 1945. 

Woods left the Tinted State- on 
February 23. 1944, and served with the 

Kirst Marine Division in the operations 

at Russell Islands, IVlehii, Okinawa and 

in China, before returning on November 

19, l!li:. 

During his previous sojourn at Mary- 
land he taught agronomy in addition to 
hi- coaching duties but now is a member 

of the College oi Education -tuff as 
instructor in physical educatii 

• • • 

Tl MINSKI LOOKING TO GRID 

Among the newcomers to the grid squad 
next fall will be Al Tuminski vv ho played 
the infield on tl 
stocky and rugged 185-poundi 

i leak. He got In- "iily football 
ill. 



LINDSKOG IS VDDED TO COACHING STAFF 



Victoi Lindskog, who played renter for 
Clark Shaughnessy on the 1940 Stanford 
Bowl team that ticked Nebraska 
unbeatten season and who 
for the past twi has performed at 

center for the Philadelphia Eagles of the 
National Football League, has been added 
as a Fulltime coach at Maryland. 

He will coach the centers and guards 
in football and during the winter season 
will help Heinle Miller, head boxing 

, with t he scrappers, 

Vdvice Proves Sound 

Lindskog, who also played center in 1941 
for Stanford, »;h a backfield candidate 
when Shaughnessy took over at Palo 
Alto, although he had been a snapperback 
in high school and lor the Indian freshmen. 
He switched back to the pivot position on 
the advice of Shaughnessy, who told him 
that he never would be anything but a 
mediocre back but could be one of the 
game's greatest centers. He did that, 

uiiiing iill-1'ac iln I loast .-election. 

Lindskog wa< hue coach at Stanford 
under Marchment Swart/, in 1942 and in 
1943 was physical instructor in an Army 
athletic program there. When Stanford 
gave up football, Lindskog remained as 
boxing coach and while playing for the 

Eagles has helped with the grid coaching 
at Palo Alto during the off-season. 

lie was Pacific Coast intercollej! 
boxing champion and also engaged in 
quite a few professional bouts. 

Fine Physical Specimen 

Standing 6 feel I inch and scaling 205 

pounds, Lmdskog is a marvelous physical 
specimen. Horn in Roundup, Montana, 
he has been making his home in I'alo 

Alto. He is married and has two children, 

the eldest a boy of six. He doubtless will 
bring his family to College Park as 
as the housing situation can he solved. 

When speaking of Lindskog the other 

day, Shaughnessy facetiously remarked: 

"When I go any place in the future where 

I a bodyguard, I'm going to take 

Vic with me. 1 used to he able to take 

elf, Imt I'm not as nimble as 
I once was would feel safe with 

Lindskog along." 




WHAT PAST TELLS 

Man land, on past performances against 
the elevens it will meet this fall, should 
do no worse than a 50-50 record. In 80 
clashes with the eight outfits it will 

battle m 1946, the old Liners have won 
37 games, lost a like number and figured 
in six ties as follows: 



Team 

Richmond l". 

North ( arolina 
Virginia Tech 

William and Mary 

South ( tarolina 

Washington and Lee 
Michigan State 
State 

Totals 



\Y 

7 

4 
11 

1 

2 
1(1 



2 



L 
3 

9 
12 
1 
3 
."> 
2 
2 



T 
2 




2 

2 



37 37 6 



Victor Lindskog 



1915 GRID RECORD 

Sept 28 Maryland, 60; Guilford 0. 
i >i t. li Maryland, 21; Richmond, 0. 

At Richmond . 
li't. 12 Maryland. 22; I . S. Merchant 

Marine Academy, 6. 
(let. 20 Maryland, 13; Virginia Tech. 21. 

At Blacksburg . 
Oct. 27 Maryland, i;i; West Virginia, 13. 

At Morgantow n . 
Nov. :'. Maryland, 11; William and 

Mary, 33. 
Nov. 10 Maryland. 38; V. M. I., 0. 

I Homecoming i. 
Nov. 24— Maryland, 19; Virginia, 13. 
(Griffith Stadium, Washington . 
Dec. 1— Maryland, 19; South Carolina, 13. 
At Columbia . 



Rl LE CHANGES SEEN AS AIDING T - SETl P 



YOI \(. BYKD'S START HI GGI l> 

Kill Byrd, son ol - his 

earlj 
the "College Park SI pretty 

rugged outfit. lie late, ,,| ,.,,,| :lt 

M< I lonogh School in Baltin 



Changes made by the National Athletic 
Association Football Rules Committee 
last January at a meeting in St. Louis 

were effected with the idea of adding 
offensive power. 

William .1. Bingham of Harvard, 

chairman of the group, believes deception 

has been added to the T-formation and 

the single wing, lie feels that it might 

i 'ii the addition of a "T-wing" setup. 

He explained that one revision pro- 
vide?, that the quarterback reaching under 
the center with his hands in position to 
receive the hall. I- in a legal position even 
though less than a yard behind the line of 
mage when the hall is passed. Pre- 

viousl) the quarterback had to receive 

II in w it hdraw his hands to a point 

behind t he line of scrimm 

(MIm included: 

I. On an illegal pass by either team the 

penaltj i- .". yards from 1 1 the 

ilso involves thi down 



if made by the team which put the hall 

into play by scrimmage. The rule formerly 
provided that in case of an illegal pass, 
the hall was brought hack to where it 
originally was put in play lor the penalty. 

2. The number of time-outs in each 
half has been increased from three to four 
hut when the watch is stopped by sub- 
stitution only sufficient time to complete 
the substitution will he allowed. 

3. The size of numerals on pin 
jersey- must he increased from fi to 8 
nches in front and from S to 10 inches 
on the hack. Numerals must he -ingle 
contrasting color-. 

I The penalty foi a foul committed 
on a kicked hall w hen the foul occurs after 
the hall ha.- crossed the line of scrimmage 

and before it has been touched by the 

receiving team is made from when 
hall is put into play. This removes an 

unduK severe penalt) undei winch the 

hall went to the offending team at the 

BpOt ol the hull. 



HERE'S HOW MARYLAND'S (.KID FOES SIZED-1 P \s OF |l \\ I 



l \l\ i i;si n 01 RI< HMOND 
While i he Spidet hope to ha\ e a much 
better squad than la John 

I i nl. .11. foi mil i leorge \\ a hingtoi 
i hat il « ill take .it lea i th 

to recoup. He admits he hat some ti I 

harks and :i great one in Jack Wilbourne 
.iml some power in all posit iona but 
there ia a crying need for tackles. Maybe 

tus w ill visit him before i hi 
term begii 

NOR I'll C \K« >l I \ \ Maryland had 
bettei be hoi w hen il plays i he In 1 i> • 
ni it will j 1 1 ^ t be too bad. Carl G. Snavely, 

Lebai Vallej grad, back as head roach 

i ..null, usuall; 
plentj of talent and 1948 will be no 
exception. To begin with he baa 23 men 
win. have won letters in pa 
plus Charlej Justice, freshman back, who 
was :i Bensation for Bainbridge Naval 
Training Center. Hill Britt, a soph back 
who played with Justice at A-l 
High, also ia said to be just as good as 
3naveh had 77 in Spring drills, 
with nil positions ablj manned. 

\ [R0IN1 \ TECH Head I 
.liniiux l\itt-, pass-minded tutor from 

Southern Methodist, ia back n war 

I reports from the < Mil 1 dominion 
are that the Gobblers are "loaded for 
bear". kitts, in fact, Iki~ the Southern 
Conference title a> ln> goal. Included in 
Tech's influx ol talent are a number of 
prewar aces and the Gobblers will present 
a bunch of wrecking tackles, the lightest 
of which weighs 196 pounds. More than 
100 drilled during the Spring and 
optimism prevailed. Maryland will find 
it tough to get revenge for that 21-13 
upset last fall. 

Will [AM ANDMAR"} Coach Rube 
McCray, Kentucky Wesleyan product, 
hail a rugged bunch l;i>t season, which 
with some good breaks, whipped Mary- 
land, 33-14, after trailing ti-14 early in 
the game and we have the word of a 
Richmond expert that the Indiana will 
present a powerhouse in 1946. Many of 
McCray'a t..|i gridmen are returned 

■ men who played mi William anil 

Mary's 1942 Southern Coi ham- 

pionship eleven. An. I Borne of the new- 
comers, it ia asserted, won't hurt the 
Indians a bit. tough revenge- 

seeking task for the Terps. 

SOI I'll CAROLIN \ The Game- 
cocks, tutored by Notre Darner Rex 

jht, who had a good team la>> 
and figured in the unusual by playing 
tlm^e ties, plan on noirtfc places this fall. 
:lent i> able and there will be 




J f\>4^ 



Barnes, who played quarterback under 
Shaughnessy in 1942 and who figured in 
>.>me names for Paul Bryant in 19 15, aided 
considerably in the spring by helping t.. 
tutor the would-be generals. Barnes, who 
also played at Maryland in 1941, was a 

first lieutenant with the IJth A A I' as a 

photo-reconnaissance pilot on the Italian 
front. He went into t he service in February 
1943. He wears the Air Medal, four Oak 
Leaf Clusters and the I >istinguished Flying 
Cross. 



notable additions, One is Hill Milner, who 
made many all-America teams while play- 
mi; for Duke in 1943. others include Pat 
Tresh, all-Southern back in 1941, and a 

pair nl powerful tackles. Um. 

and 235-pound "Dynamite l>.'m" Fusci. 
Carter was all-Southern in 1941 ami Fusci 
was picked on a number of Dixie elevens 
in 1944. 

WASHINGTON AND LEE Fielding 
it> first team since 1942 with Art I 
little All-America tackle whil 
University at the helm. He also played 

with the pin New York Giants anil 

Cleveland Rams. He was in the N'avv 



an. I coat hed Si \l . Pn Sigh 
he brought threi 
to I cxington < 'hat 

in! ii \1 ■ 
labcli 

\i i; the other bul 

• lil W I Jim Prat t . i 

Ja linemen; John Bell, hi 

'enter. I tick \\ 01 kllif. t hi IW IliK 

back from Balti 

the < >M l.mei - in 1942, al 

The ' 

impn >. .n. 

MICHIGAN SI \ I I Vlw 

und out t« 

1944, tin Sparti ppeai to h 

old hurdle, altl v the 

field. New talent and returning 
servicemen give a silver lining to the 
situation Vmong the la eight 

members "I the Spartan soph outfit which 
upset ( oeat Lakes, 14-0, in 1942. \ i 
m the hue is Walt Vezmar, 220-pound 
i 1 1 .- 1 1 lej Bachman, then able 
poach, who first battled the < >ld Liners 
he was at Florida, « ill make the 
most "i his assets. He's a Notre Darner of 
the old scl 

NORTH CAROLINA STATE I 
Beat t ie I 'eat hei ■ sees a much more power- 
ful ami experienced outfit than he had 
i, more like the squad "I 1944 
which won seven of nine games, II. 

ig nucleus of 194."> veterans and 
ex-servicemen. Howard Turni 
"dynamite kill", gained a berth 
tailback for the past two years on the 
All-Southern elevens and should be the 
key figure in the 1946 quartet. Also 

ling to the backfield are Bill Stanton, 

Charlie Richkus, and Bobby Worst. Curt 
Ramsey, a 215-pounder and Fred Wagoner 
who exceeds 200, are tackle bulwarks and 
illustrations of the general strength "f 

the In 



HE'S TOPS TO HALAS 

owner and coach of the 

fa ii 

Football League, rate- (lark Shaugl 

- m the end tutoring profession and 
him full credit for the develo] 

ol the T « hich bi — ime to the 

Windy ( 'ity pn 

"We never could net around end with 
the T formation until Shaii- 

a and DOW we have full 

u ning the trick", Halas said. 



PREXY CURLEY BYRD HAS RIGHT TO BE ATHLETIC .MINDED 



Maryland in President II. ('. (Curley 
Byrd der who is 

:i firm believer in athletics but who also 
firmlj believes in keeping them within 
rids. 

There is no rei ol course, « hy he 

shouldn't be athletii if and one 

liiii reason why he should. It was football 
thai paved the way tor his return to 
Maryland and led t . > the opportunities 
thai made him prex; I the lead- 

ing and fastest growing universities in the 
Nation. 

In fact, it was one grid game in the fall 

II that earned him his hit chance. 

He was brought back to his Alma Mater 

to coach a floundering train that had not 

scored :i victory to battle a Western 

Maryland outfit that had been 01 t the 

lions of the year. Followers of the 
Terror eleven were giving 30 points and 
money, but when the smoke of 
battle had cleared the then Maryland 
Aggies had won, 6-0, and Byrd had blazed 
the trail for his unusual, eventful, brilliant 
I irring career. 

Prof. Richardson (iets Credit 

That i <'\t fall he was back at College 
Park, due to the sagacity and insistence of 
Prof, ( 'harles S. Richardson, then head ol 
the Athletic Board, who prevailed despite 

considerable object - that "Byrd is too 

young." (He thru was only 23 years old). 

Byrd taught English and history foi 
a while in addition to Ins grid coaching 
but gradually drifted into executive chores 
where his personality and political acumen 
shot him upward. 

Byrd first came to Maryland as a stu- 
dent in the fall of 1905 from Crisfii'ld, Md., 
and had been a star athlete in track, 
football, baseball and tennis for three 
years before graduating in engineering. 
He was captain of the eleven in 1907. He 
figured in a number of pursuits in the 
intervening four years, professional base- 
ball, newspaper writing and high school 
Coaching, before being called "home". 

In fact, he could have been a big 

league ball player, as he was due to K" 

from the Sacramento Club of the Pacific 
League, for which he was pitching 
in 1910, to the Chicago White Sox the 
next Spring. Byrd, however, not homesick 
in the midi I id returned 

I :i I to Hive up pro baseball altogi 

I I • • coai hed at Western High ol Washing- 
ton and had a length; ion with the 
Washington Star as a sports writer. 

At one time he handled all the sport* 
Maryland supported, except lacrosse, but 
gradually was forced to give them up as 

nt up t he la del 




Dr. H. C. K'iki.ev Byrd 
As a "disinterested" spectator at one of 194.") football games. 



until the "last horn blew", not entirely 
severing his connection with the gridders 
until alter the 1933 season, although he 
did no active coaching that year. 

Mis -teps along executive lines came as 

assistant to the president in 1918, vice 
president in 1932, acting president on 

July I, 1932, and president on Fehruar\ 
21, 1936. Byrd's interest in clean, whole- 
some athletics is just as keen as ever, 
lie in-ists athletics he conducted sanely 

ami that scholastic matters come fii^t 

but, recently declared: "I'm not in favor 
oi losers, either. We should always strive 

tic win in anything we undertake." 

In oui op and we saw that I'll I 

and plent I hat Mai 



has played in the 35 years Mine we rate 
Curley the peer of any end mentor. Me 
matched his executive \\ izardy with his 
football coaching ability, or vica versa. 

Belong With Topnotchera 

Byrd, whom we feel could think fastei 

m a pinch and take advantage of situa- 

tions as (hey arose in a game better than 
anyone we ever have observed, also, we 
an- convinced, did more with lees material 
than any other mentor during his 21 
veals at the helm al College Park. Despite 

that In- was carrying more weighty execu- 
tive problems on his shoulders most ol 

the lime, he compiled a lecord ol 104 wills 

(( 'ontintied <m next /my i 



I'KKMOIS (iVMKS WITH im FOES 



I NIVERS1TY OF RICHMOND 

1907 Rich., 11; M \ I 

IQ08 Rich., 22; M \ I '., 0. 

1910 M \ i ' . 22; Rich . 0, 

191 1 M. A.C.,0; Ri< I. .. 0. 

1912 M \ C, 12; Rich , 

1913 M \ I '., 15; Rich . 

1922 I "i M., 0; Rich., 0. 

1923 I ol M , 23; Rich . 0. 
1934 I . ol M .. 38; Rich . 
1936 I nl M . 12; Rich., 0. 
1938 Rich., 19; I ol M., 8. 
1945 I ol M . 21; Rich., O. 

NOKTII CAROLIM V 

1920 I of M., 13; \. i '.. 

1921 N. ('., 16; I ..i M , 7 

1922 \ i . 27; I . ol M 

1923 I . ol M , 14; N. C, 6 

1924 I . ol M.. 6;N. C, 0. 
N.C., 16; I . ol \1 . 0. 

1926 I ol M-. I I; \ c . 6. 

1927 \ < . 7; I of M., 6 

1928 \ . ( '., 26; I . ol M., 19. 

1929 V C, 13; I . oi M . 

1930 V C, 28; I. of M.. 21. 
\. ('., 33; r. of M., ii. 

1936 \ ( .. I I; I'. of M., n 

VIRGINIA TECH 

1897 M. \ i . 18; Tech, I 

1898 \l V. C, 23; Tech, 
1901 Tech, IS; M. A. C, 0. 
1911 Tech, II; M \ C, 0. 
1919 Tech, 7; M.I. State, 0. 
(920 I . of M.. 7; Tech, 0. 

1921 I . ol M.. IO;Tech, 7. 

1922 Tech, 21; I. oi M.o. 

1923 I'.vl,. 16; I. ..i M . 7 

1924 Tech, 12; U. of M.. 0. 

1925 I'.vl, . 3; V. of M , n. 

1926 Tech, 24; Q. ..I M.. 8. 

1927 I . ..i M . 13; Tech, 7. 

1928 Tech, 9; I . of M . 6 

1929 I ol M . 21; 'Pell. ii. 

1930 I ..i M . 13; Tech, 7 

1931 I . ol M . 20; Tech, 0. 

1932 Tech, '->:{; U. of M., 0. 

1933 Tech, 14; U. of M.. 0. 

1934 I ol M . II; Ted 

1935 I. of M . 7; Tech, 0. 

1936 I . ..i M . 7; Tech, 0. 
1945 Tech, 21; I ol M 

\\ II I I \M VM) M \m 

1905 M. \ i .. 17; W. and M., 0. 
U and M . 33; I ol M., 14. 

SOI "I'll < kROLIN \ 

1926 S. < , 12; U. of M., 0. 

1927 I of M 0. 

1928 s. i .. 21; I. ol M.. 7. 

1929 S i 20; i ol M 
1945 L'. ol M 13 



\\ \MII\(. ION \\l> I I I 

1924 \\ and I . 19; I. ol M 

1925 \\ and I. , 7, I ol M 

1926 W. :.n. I I... 3; I". ..I M . n. 

1927 W. and I... 13; IT. ol M . 6 

1928 I oi M , 6; N. and L., 

1930 I', of M , II; W. and I... 6. 

1931 I . ol M , 13; W. and I., 7 

1932 1 ..i M , 6; W and L, 

1933 I'. of M., 33; W and I.., 13. 

1934 U and 1.7.1 of M., 0. 

1935 I . of M.. ii; W. and I.., 0. 
l<i:iii I . .,i M.. 19; W. and I... 0. 

1937 I . of M.,8; \\ . and I , 

1938 I. of M.. 19; W. and I... 13. 

1939 Shift in Thanksgi\ ing I »aj 

canccllat f ^;iin.'. 

1940 I ..I M„ 7; U . and I... 7. 

1941 I ol M . 6; \\ . and I . 0. 

1942 i of M„ :?2; W. and L. 28. 

MICHIGAN STATE 

1944 M. S., 8; U. of M., 0. 
( 'ollege Park 

1944 M. S.. 33; I .,1 M..0. 

NORTH CAROLINA STATI 

1909 N. C. State won. 

1917 V C. S., Hi; M.I. St., 6. 

L921 I ". ol M.. '"■; V < S., 6. 

1922 1. ol M.. 7; \. C. S., 6 

1923 I. of M.. 26; \. C. S., 12. 

1924 I. of M.. 0; N. C. S., 0. 





lei l'>i rd in 1905 n hen hi 
football debut nt College I 



against 71 defeats and 15 i 

average of .600. And along tlil> long trail 

he upset such powerful outfit 

Penn, Syracuse, Rutgers, and others 

« hich were rulers ol the roost in hi 

Byrd never had an unbeaten reason, the 
caliber of his schedules and generally 
outmatched material preventing this, his 

best year c ingin 1931 when eight games 

were won, Kentuckj ti.-.l :it ii-:ill and a 

i suffered :it the hands 
Vanderbill Included in thi 

umphs ws 
Washington. 

Byrd, of course, put his stamp of his 
estimation of Shaughnessy's ability, when 
liired him. At t hat tunc, Byrd said : 

"Shi i- one of the bi 

i hree coaches in \n.. ■ ica. I hi fact that 
he has had difficulties :it Pitt di 
the fa. 



KKIIU 



•M" til I! LEAOEK 



i Byrd in 1912 when he took 
n coach. 



\\:i tackle on the grid U 

■ I " Club t.i 
which all lettermen are eligible. All 

uli aims 

tramurals. 



MARYLAND GRID SQUAD AS OF 1946 SPRING PRACTICE 



Nan 

Bank, Burton L. 
vBehr, Samuel 
Bigelow, Hubert D, 
v-xBissell, John L. 
\ xBonk, Harry 

Brewington, Robert 
( Vskv , Albert 
t ook, Robert 
v xCrosland, Robert I !. 
Curtis, Chuck 
Danowski, Howard 
Durst, Harold E. 
v- \1 >rach, Joe 

Eckert, Herbert 
Elias, William 
v xEvans, Francis W. 

Feehly, George 
v-xFehr, Walter F. 
v-xFritz, Emile Jr. 
xGetz, Gene 
Gibbons, Thomas J. 
(lies, Edward C. 
< riggard, I !arl 
\ ( Ireer, William 
xHarvill, John H. 
xJennings, .lames P. 
v-xJohnston, Richard 
xKurz, James 

Lynch, .lames D. 
xMarow itz, Daniel 
v xMcCarthy, Pat 

xMorrisette, Ernie 
v- xMorter, LaRoy 
\ -xPietrowski, Joe 
v xPiker, Robert 
xPinnoci, Pete 

xPokorny, Joseph K. 

Roberts, C. bee 

vRosenthal, Malcolm 

v xSchrecengost, John 

v xSchwarz, Edward J. 

xSimpson, Arthur 

Smith, < lerald 

Stofko, Stephen 

xStorti, Raj 
v xToler, Jack ('. 
v-xTuryn, Victor 

Van Wagner, ( ieorge 
v xWright, John < I. I Reds) 

Wright, John R. 

V Lettei nun; \ ( ;1 











Yrs. on 






Bos. 


Age 


Hi. 


Wt. 


Sq. 


High School 


Place 


HH 


23 


5-7 


160 


2 


City Col. 


Baltimore, Md. 


HB 


18 


5- 1 1 


160 


2 


Talladega 


Talladega, Ala. 


HB-E 


23 


6-1 ! i 


190 





Sandlot 


Baltimore, Md. 


T 


22 


ti 


195 


1 


Oilman 


Baltimore, Md. 


FB 


20 


5 in 


190 


1 


Port Jeff. 


Coram, L. I. 


T 


18 


6-2 


182 





Tech, D. C. 


Hyattsville, Md. 




lit 


5-9' 2 


176 


1 


City Col. 


Baltimore, Md. 


HB 


17 


5- 1 1 


152 





No. Exp 


Washington, 1). C. 


E 


21 


6 


175 


l 


( 'liarlotte 


Punt a Gorda, Fla. 


E 


21 


6 


177 





No Exp. 


Brandywine, Md. 


QB 


18 


6-2 


IN.". 





East Sataukel 


East Sautauke, L. I. 


E 


20 


5-11 


160 





No Exp. 


Washington, D. C. 


T 


21 


6 


194 


1 


X. E. Cath. 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


C 


18 


6-1 


203 





No Exp. 


Takoma Park, Md. 


HB 


23 


5-10 • 2 


192 


1 


Martin's Ferry 


Martin's Ferry, Ohio 


E 


20 


lil 


182 


1 


Tech 


Springfield, Ma.ss. 


E 


19 


6 


165 





Patterson Park 


Baltimore, Md. 


T 


24 


6 


200 


1 


Evanston 


Evanston, 111. 


G 


26 


5-11'. _. 


198 


1 


McGill Inst. 


Mobile, Ala. 


HB 


24 


5-10 


17(1 





N. W. Mil. Acad. 


Rock Island, Til. 


G 


19 


6-3 


210 





Mt. St. Joe 


Baltimore, Md. 


HB 


19 


5-10 


it;;. 





No Exp. 


Herald Harbor, Md. 


T 


18 


6-8 


230 


1 


Xii Exp. 


Hempstead, Md. 


HB 


21 


5-8 


150 


2 


Mercersburg 


Bel Air, Md. 


C 


21 


6-2 


192 





Tech 


Washington, D. C. 


T 


23 


5-10 


200 





Tech 


Washington, 1). C. 


G 


21 


5-9' i 


170 


1 


Orlando 


Orlando, Fla. 


QB 


22 


6 2 


212 





Central 


Washington, D. C. 


C 


22 


5-10] 


170 


11 


McDonogh, Balto. 


Plattsburg, N. V. 


T 


24 


6 2 


218 


1 


West Ph. la. 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


E 


21 


6 


185 


2 


St. John's 


Washington, D. ('. 


HB 


22 


5 8 


1S4 





Tech 


Washington, D. C. 


E 


19 


6 


166 


1 


Baldwin 


Baldwin, N. V. 


HB 


25 


5-1 VA 


175 


1 


Dickson ( 'itj 


Dickson City, Pa. 


HB 


20 


5 8 


160 


1 


Tech, D. C. 


T.os Angeles, Calif. 


G 


22 


6 


1 85 


1 


Attaboro and Dean 
Academy 


Hebronville, Mass. 


FB 


22 


0-1 


220 





City Col. 


Baltimore, Md. 


T 


17 


6 


210 


1 


Mount Vernon 


Mount Vernon, Va. 


G 


19 


ti 


200 


2 


Fores! Park 


Baltimore, Md. 


C 


19 


6 


175 


1 


Erie, Pa. Acad. 


Cincinnati, ( )hn. 


G 


20 


.", 11 


185 


1 


Strong-Vincent 


Erie, Pa. 


C 


23 


ti 


20* 





Martin's Ferry 


Martin's Ferry, Ohio 


G 


19 


5 s 


180 


1 


( 'entral 


Washington, I). C. 


HB 


22 


:, 9 


160 





Sandlot 


Pottstown, Pa. 


HB 


22 


5 II'.. 


171 


1 


Aldrich 


Norwood, Conn. 


HB 


19 


5 7 


185 


1 


Baker, La. 


■S ak.i.ia, \\ 


QB 


24 


6 


175 


1 


No Kxp. 


Holden, West Va. 


HB 


19 


5-11 


181 


1 


Wilson-] ic\ .tt 


Washington, D, C. 


FB 


25 


6 


225 


2 


City Col. 


Baltimore, Md. 


HB 


19 


:, 11 


17:. 


1 


Bet l.esda 


Bethesda, Md. 



Honk, Crosland, Drach, Evans, Fritz, Johnston, Piker, Scbrecengost, Schwarz, Toler and Turyn were among those to come to 

Maryland with Paul Bryant from North Carolina Preflight School. Bill (Red) Poling, who did some great work as a back last Fall; 

Gene Kinm ble tackle; Ferd Schultz, end and quarterback and Don ( ileasner, ace pass catching wingman, were other Pre- 

fiighters on the i 15. Poling, though in school, did not come out for spring practice; Kinney also passed up the drills as he 

will ha ir to help at home, He hopes to return for 1946-47. Schultz, a dental student, transferred to Baylor, near 

he found it difficult to p mute to the Dental School in Baltimore and then plaj football. Gleasner may 

play unless he ai l ball offer, 

Lee I'll'., in end i and Les Smith, backs, were letter men to be 1ob( bj graduation. 



GRIDDERS WHO FIG! Ki:i» IN SPRING DRILLS M COLLEGE l»\KK 




FRONT ROW Harrj Bonk, fullback; Herbert Eckert, center; Tom Gibbons, guard; John Bissell, tackle; Joe Drach, tackle; 

Sam Behr, hack; Ed Murphy, guard; Jim Kurz, hack. 
81 t i>\H ROW Gene Getz, back; Arthur Simpson, center; Chuck Curtis, end; Al Cesky, guard; Walter Fehr, tackle; 

l'at McCarthy, end; Lee Roberts, tackle; Emile Fritz, Jr., guard; Dick Johnston, guard. 
THIRD ROW Earl Giggard, tackle; Vic Turyn, back; Malcolm Rosenthal, guard; John Screcengost, center; EkJ Schw 

guard; Moeer; Ray Storti, back; Pete Pinnoci, guard; Howard Danowski, back. 
I'm Kill i:i>\\ Reds Wright, back; Joe Pietrowski, hack; Bob Piker, hack; Ernie Morrisette, back; John Harvill, ce 

Jim Jennings, tackle; George Feehly, end; Francis Evans, end; Stephen Stofko, hack. 
BACK ROW lack Toler, hack; Bill Elias, hack; Dan Marowitz, tackle; Joe Porkony, back; Burton Hank, back; Jim 

Lynch, center; Gerry Smith, guard. 



•l)ISCO\ERERS" Ol CURLE\ RYKI) LIVE IN COLLEGE l»\RK 



>ns w ho reall) put Cut-lev 
Byrd on the football ladder on which he 
climbed to his altua 

mater live in ( 'ollegi I ired from 

the I niversity. 

Dr. II. J. Patterson was president when 
Cur lev Byrd, Engineering "08, came hack 
1 1» the scene of ln> studies and athletic 

In in ln> char 

show liis nd political talents 

by making him Ins assHant in 1918. 



It was Prof. Charles S. Richardson, 
former head of the Public Speaking 
Department, who really was the fit 
< >l mm i the door to Byrd. He was head of 

ithletic Hoard which lured Curies 
others \\ ho 
■ young. 

Byrd, however, paved his own way. He 

ibtained to handle the then Maryland 
- in the fall ol 191 I for a game with 
in Maryland after the coach in 



charge had met with calamity in pi' 
name-. Curley took a forlorn aggregation, 
changed the player- about some and 
with two n whipped 

Westei n Mai \ land outfit 
that was supposed to win ae it pli 
In fact, Western Maryland stu 
giving M\ points and 
All of them went home bl 
without needed 

That 
Bvrd 



ORIGIN OF SPORTS AT COLLEGE PARK 



Just how old athletics arc at the 
1 'dp Maryland is not a definite 

ill. 
There we modi sports and 

itition at the Baltii 
schools of the I'niversity far back in the 
past but there were hardly enough for 
rd ami all of the real athletic back- 
ground of the present institution is gi 
from tlio activities at College Park. 

Baseball apparently was t he first sport 
to be established at College Park. While 
some of the teams were rather informal at 
the outset, they performed in the name of 
the Maryland Agricultural College as 

early as 1886. In fact, the team of 1887 
traveled to Annapolis and heat St. John's 
in the morning and Navy in the after n 

i hall was put on a recognized basis 
in the Fall of 1892, relations being estab- 
lished that year with St. John's College 
anil Johns Hopkins. 

It was in 1889, however, when George 
Hoblitzel organized a team, that the real 
foundation for the gridiron pastime was 
laid. The rather informal outfit of thai 
year continued to function in 1890 ami 
1891 and several games were played. 

Track, with William ('. Neshit as 
captain and .1. A. E. Eyster as manager, 

and tennis were mentioned in the 1897- 
1898 term, and both evidently obtained 
a firm foothold in the following year. 
Eyster, '99, incidentally, became na- 
tionally famous as a physiologist. 



E. E. Powell, now donor ol a trophy 
for the outstanding Maryland lacrosse 

player of the year, gave tin- spoil it- first 
impetus in 1910. Two games were played 
that season with Baltimore City College. 

w ith no si i ded, and in 191 I a 

regular schedule was arranged. Prof. R. 
V. Truitt, who followed Powell and played 
and coached during Ins connection with 
the sport, developed the game. 

Basketball was mentioned now and 
then in the student publications as far 
back as 1905, but seldom was a result 
given. Teams represented Maryland Agri- 
cultural College in the years following, 
though not regularly, and the Bporl was 
not put on a sound basis until the first 
gymnasium was provided at College Park 
in the Fall of 1923 and Burton Shipley 
hired as coach. 

Boxing is the baby sport at Maryland. 
It was established on a collegiate basis in 

1931 and the Old Liners now an f the 

powers in the ring pastime. 

These seven sports for both varsity and 
freshman teams, along with rifle shooting, 
have been carried on for years. 

Soccer, wrestling and golf are recognized 
as minor sports and numerous other 
pastimes are fostered in an intensive 
intramural program. 

The coed- too, have a varied physical 
education program, with rifle as their only 

intercollegiate test. 



55th GRID SEASON 

Maryland this Kail will be playing its 
55th -eason of football, which was begun 

back in 1892 in games with St. John's of 

Annapolis and Johns Hopkins of Haiti- 
more. Both games were lost. 

Coaches who preceded Clark Shaugh- 
nessy in his second term w. 

1892-96— Prof. H. M. Strickler of 

Randolph Macon, who also acted as 
athletic director; 

1897-99- No coach, athletic committee 
in charge; 

1900— Roy Mackall of St. John's; 

1901-04 1). John Markey, Western 
Maryland; 

1905-06 — Fred Nielsen, Nebraska; 

1907— C. G. Church, Virginia, and 
Charles W. Melick, Nebraska; 

1908— William Lang, Delaware; 

1909— Dr. Edward P. Larkin, Cornell 
and Georgetown, and Barney Cooper, 
Maryland. 'OS; 

1910— P. Alston, George Washington; 

1911— C. F. Donnelly, Trinity of 
Connecticut, and H. C. Byrd, Maryland 
'OS, who coached the then Aggies for the 
Western Maryland game, which was won, 
6-0, in a stunning upset; 

1912-32- H. C. Byrd; 

1933-36— Jack Faber, Maryland, '26; 

1937-40— Frank Dobson, Princeton; 

1940-41— Jack Faber, Al Heagy, '30, 
and Al Woods, '33, all Maryland. 

1942 — Shaughnessy, Minnesota; 

1943-44 — Clarence Spears, Minnesota; 

1945 — Paul Bryant, Alabama. 



SHAl GHNESSY RATED NO. 1 COACH OF NATION BY NOTED WRITER 



There is one man at least who firmly is 
convinced that Clark Shaughnessy, Mary- 
land's football coach, really is tops. He is 
Alfred Smart, editor and owner of Esquire 
who doesn't mince any words in the 
following: 

"Clark Shaughnessy stands today as 
the country's No. I football coach not 
only on the basis of what he has accom- 
plished with his players, but also on the 
score that he is the only coach in the last 

decade .11 e who has contributed 

anything important to the science of the 
game. 

"He was a star, first at tackle and later 
at fullbai I i aduate da ' in 

the old rough oid rugged era ol football at 

Mini" coaching found him 

'building up' at Tulane, helping to create 
t he present the Soul h. 

When he came north to Chicago in 1933, 

he con! Hilled In build up, 

"I banco led I dship w ith 



Comdr. George Halas of the Chicago 
Bears. Halas had players and they put 
Shaughnessy 's ideas to the test in crucible 
of competition. In a period when defense 
everywhere was accepted as the funda- 
mental of football, Shaughnessy always 
was thoroughly, intensively and dramati- 
cally offense minded. By virtue of his 
move to Stanford, where chance gave him 
four remarkable backs for his style of play, 
he did football a service by shaking it out 
of the doldrums ol lived and worn-out 
-\ stems of attack. 

"To accomplish this he shuttled his 
tackle- and ends back and forth along the 
line of scrimmage laterally, and shifted his 
guards sometimes to an unbalanced and 
sometimes to a balanced line. He has 
used two other striking maneuvers: the 

man-in-motion and the quarterback hand- 
ling the ball (T-formal 

"Tin- maneuvering of the shuttling 

tackles and end-, the shifting guard 

i he defense out 



of a set position. He has added so much 
mobility to the offense that he has im- 
posed the 'war of movement' on the 
defense. 

"Shaughnessy will la- given credit for 
this important step forward in the develop- 
ment in the game. Not only has he in- 
jected maneuverability to the extreme in 
his offense but he has sought through 
deceptive ball handling and histrionics to 
so confuse the defense that they cannot 
anticipate the point of attack. 

"I find it most interesting that Shaugh- 
ne--\ '- dose analysis of the physics of the 
game, plus his natural instinct to tr\ 
always to do something spectacular (his 
obsession for moving things i, plus the plaj 
of circumstances upon him, both the 

lucky and apparently unlucky, have com- 
bined over tin' years to make him the 
No. 1 coach of the era. Probably from such 
a career ami BUCh experience there is much 

to be learned that applies to hie in general 

as well as to football." 



IKK) OF \\ iSHINGTON REDSKINS PHONE KM, HELP IN 1HHELS 




Wayne Mi 



Fred I>wi- 



Wilbi ii Moore 



Clark Shaughnessj figures he was 
extremely fortunate in Ins Spring drills in 
having a complete staff of aides who fully 
understood the T. In addition to those 
who were on hand when he arrived A I 
Heagy, Al Woods ami Herman Ball he 
obtained three of the T-minded v, 
ington Redskins to assist In handling 



tin' his; squad. More than '.>() were out at 
one time and about 60 stayed to the 
finish. 
Wayne Millner, all-America end while 

at Notre 1 )ame; Wilbur M 

scintillating backfield product of Minne- 
sota, anil Fred Davis, 240-pound tackle, 
who shone lor Alabama, were the pros 



SEES |»KO \SSOCI\TION \S HELPFl'L 



Clark Shaughnessy, in addition to liis 
(Mil Line-Terp coaching job, as probably 
every cue knows who is at all familiar 
with football, also is advisory mentor of 
the Washington Redskins of the National 
Football League. 

It was tin- connection that caused him 
to decide definitely to leave Pitt, which 
insisted that if he stayed that he must 
give up his pro associations. In a letter 
to Dr. R. E. Sherrill, chairman of the 
Pitt faculty committee, he explained Ins 
is follows: 

"I have maintained, and will continue 

to maintain, that it is up to me to qualify 

II in every waj |HisahU> to do the best 

liinii football within my power, 

bearing in mind all the Bpecial phases that 



accrue to such a profession. In line with 
this concept of my position, I always have 

taken every opportunity to learn all 1 

could about thi football, and to 

keep abreast with every new development, 
I always attend everj high Bchool, college 
and professional game I ran. 

"I definitely consider it an unusual op- 
inity to have the privilege of 'sitting- 
in 1 on professional games and to know 
what they are attempting to do. Thi 
strategy, tactics and execution of football 
fundamentals are found in pro football and 
that is the school of which all coaches 
who hope to keep abreast of the times 
should take advantaf 

He also pointed out that a college coach 

pro and in the -as > 09 

gridmen who play the name for a living. 



to do yeoman service in tin 

Millner anil Moore, who have been out- 
Standing pro perfoii 

doubtless will be part-time aides in the 

fall. Shaughnessy would take either or 

both on a full time basis but the Redskins 
value them too highly, mainly for their 
coaching ability now, and won't consider 
cutting them loose. So smarter gridmen 
ever played the came, in Shaughi 
opinion. 

While much progn ide in the 

spring drills, especially i i the 

mentors were si conversant with the T, 
Shaughnessy kept the drills from be- 
coming burdensome to the players and 

all apparently enjoyed them. He hunted 
his daily sessions to an hour and a half 
and gave the b unlay 

off. In fact, he figured the squad v 
the field only :io days during the ne 
weeks and that actual!) only IS hours 
onsumed. 

i the new men will 

not be started until August 19, although 

thej could l» 

under the • rules, and 

toiled in the spring will not be 

return until Monday 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND NOW IS IN ITS 150TH YEAR 



While Maryland is planning ite 1946 

npaign with great interest, the 

University is looking to its 150th term 

with the College Park campus filled with 

.1,000 students, a majority of them GI's. 

Founded in 1807, the College of Medi- 
cine of Maryland in Baltimore, the fifth 
oldest untry, was the progenitor 

of the present University. The Baltimore 
Infirmary, now the University Hospital, 
and the .School of Law, fourth in the United 



States, were built in 1823. A Department 
of Dentistry was added in 1SS2 and the 
School of Nursing in 1889. In 1904, the 
Maryland College of Pharmacy 1 1S41 I, the 
third in the V. S., was merged with the 
University, and in 1923, the Baltimore 
College of Dental Surgery (1840), the 
oldest dental school in the world, was 
amalgamated with the School of Dentistry. 
This is the background of the original 
University of Maryland whose phenomenal 
growth in every way in the past 15 years 
has been amazing. 



However, the present seat of the Uni- 
versity came into being with the chartering 
of Maryland Agricultural College at Col- 
lege Park in 1856, the second agricultural 
College on the Western Hemisphere. It 
was made Maryland State College in 1910 
and by an act of the State Legislature in 
1920, the Baltimore and College Park 
units were merged, forming the great and 
still vastly expanding institution now 
known as the University of Maryland. 



SONGS THAT INSPIRE MARYLAND ATHLETIC TEAMS 



MARYLAND 
Tune: CMadelon") 



In the very heart of Maryland, 

In the heart of every Maryland man, 

There's a spirit so endearing 

It will win your heart and hand. 

Sht doth hold the sway, 

She will win the day, 

And her glorious men will erer win the fray. 



Then it's Hurrah! Hurrah! for Maryland. 
Then it's Hurrah! Hurrah! for U. of M. 
With our banners ever streaming high. 
We will always win or die. 
Never forget the glories of the past. 
Carry on triumphant to the last. 
For we love, we love old Maryland. 
Hurrah! Hurrah! Hurrah! 



VICTORY SONG 
(Words and Music by Thornton W. Allen) 



Down an the field they're playing, 

Pride of the Black and Gold, 

Men, ev'ry one of them, 

Warriors of U. of M., 

Our honor they'll uphold. 

Onward toward the goal they're marching. 

It will not take them long, 

So, let's give a cheer 

For the men we hold dear, 

And sing to them our Vict-ry Song. 



CHORUS: 
Maryland, we're all behind you; 
Wave high — the Black and Gold. 
For there is nothing half so glorious 
As to see our men victorious; 
We've got the team, boys, 
So Keep on fighting, don't give in: 
MA—R—Y—L—A—N—D 
Maryland will win. 




VI. MA MATER 
(Tune: "Maryland, My Maryland") 



Thy sons and daughters throng thy door, 

Maryland! My Maryland! 
They come from mountain, farm and 
*l< ore, 

Maryland, oh, Maryland! 
Their heart!' and hopes they bring to thee, 

And phi, i n,, m in thy custody 



Thy Alma Mater's names and fame. 
Oh. keep alive her holy flame. 

Until her hearts OS one esclaim: 
Maryland! My Maryland! 

Cheer, Hint times cheer, and one 
cheer more 
For Maryland, dear Maryland! 



Proud heart* llmt pledge their tore far 
thei 

Maryland I in ity! 
Go forth, bran yo\ ' the State, 

Maryland! My Mtl rid! 

A nd hi/ i/imr action treat, 

Maryland! out Maryland! 



Send forth that cry from hill to shore- 
Maryland University! 

Fair Mother of our brightest dreams, 
Bhsi giver of life's precious tilings, 
To each heart its service brings 
Maryland! My Maryland!