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Full text of "University of Maryland men's football media guides"

1949 



MARYLAND 
FOOTBALL 




1949 FOOTBALL SCHEDULE 

Date Opponent Time 

Sept. 24 Virginia Tech at Blacksburg, Va. 2:15 p. m. 

Sept. 30 Georgetown at College Park, Md. 8:15 p. m. 

Oct. 8 Michigan State at East Lansing, Mich. 2:15 p. m. 

Oct. 22 ___ North Carolina State at Raleigh, N. C. 2:15 p. m. 

Oct. 29 ___ South Carolina U. at College Park, Md. 2:15 p. m. 

Nov. 5 George Washington U. at College Park, Md. __ 2:15 p. m. 

Nov. 12 Boston University at Boston, Mass. 2:15 p. m. 

Nov. 24 West Virginia U. at College Park, Md. 2:15 p. m. 

Dec. 2 Miami University at Miami, Fla. 8:15 p. m. 

(South Carolina game is Homecoming) 



1948 FOOTBALL RESULTS 

Md. Team Their Score 

19 Richmond 

21 Delaware 

28 Virginia Tech 

12 Duke 13 

47 George Washington 

27 Miami 13 

19 South Carolina 7 

20 North Carolina 49 

VanderbiU 34 

14 West Virginia 16 



Home Game Ticket Prices 

GRANDSTAND, all games: $3.00 each, inc. tax 
GRANDSTAND, end zone, all games: $2 50 each, inc. tax 



Prepared and Edited 
by 
George L. Carroll 
Director Athletic Publicity 
Phone UN ion Jf076 
FOR INFORMATION WRITE P. O. BOX 295, COLLEGE PARK, MD. 
PAGE TWO 




DR. H. C. "CURLY" BYRD: often called 
"The pigskin professor and educator." A 
former great athlete and coach, he values 
in education a sound athletic program. 
Head coach of the Terps for quite a few 
years, he rose in ranks to his present posi- 
tion as President of the University. His 
ability and workhardiness has established 
this school of learning as one of the fore- 
most in the nation today. 



JAMES M. TATUM: Director of Athletics. 
Besides heading up the football program 
Coach Tatum directs the huge athletic 
program of the University. His contacts 
with the coaches of other sports here at the 
University has established one happy family 
at College Park. A smart business or- 
ganizer, ability that carries all the way to 
his success on the football field. 





WILLIAM W. COBEY: Graduate Manager 
of Athletics. This is Bill's second year at 
this newly created office. His job embodies 
all the intricate details of an athletic pro- 
gram that goes all the way from pricing a 
new stadium to the cost of a pair of laces 
for football shoes. Tickets are his main job, 
he likes to sell them. A graduate and staff 
man at Terp-town for some 20 years, he has 
more children than any other member of 
the staff, FIVE. 



GEORGE L. CARROLL: Director of Ath- 
letic Publicity. His job is to publicize all 
sports at Maryland, head up the press box 
and coordinate all radio and television 
activity. Prime ambition is to help create 
an All-American football player. Got mar- 
ried this past summer, settled down. 




PAGE THREE 



ALL-TIME . . . ALL-OPPONENT RECORD 



VIRGINIA TECH 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE 



Yr. 

1897 
1901 
1911 
1919 
1920 
1921 
1922 
1923 
1924 
1925 
1926 
1927 
1928 
1929 
1930 
1931 
1932 
1933 
1934 
1935 
1936 
1945 
1946 
1947 
1948 
Maryland 



We 

18 







7 
10 



7 





8 
13 

6 
24 
13 
20 




14 

7 

6 
13 

6 
21 
28 
13, Va. 



They 

4 

18 

12 

6 



7 

21 

16 

12 

3 

24 

7 

9 



7 



23 

14 

9 





21 



19 



Tech 12 



Yr. 

1899 
1902 
1903 
1904 
1906 
1907 

1934 
1935 
1936 
1937 
1938 
1939 
1940 
1941 



GEORGETOWN 

We 








Modern Series 

6 
12 

6 
12 

7 









They 
17 
27 
28 
22 
28 
10 



6 

7 

2 

14 

20 

41 

26 



Maryland 3, Georgetown 11 
MICHIGAN STATE 

Yr. We They 

1944 8 

1944 33 

1946 14 26 

Maryland 0, Michigan State 3 

PAGE FOUR 



Yr. 

1909 
1917 
1921 
1922 
1923 
1924 
1946 
1947 



We 

6 
6 
7 

23 

7 




They 

23 

10 

6 

6 





28 





Maryland 2, N. C. State 3 
Three ties 



Yr. 

1926 
1927 
1928 
1929 
1945 
1946 
1947 
1948 



SOUTH CAROLINA 

We They 

5 12 

26 

7 21 

6 26 

19 13 

17 21 

19 13 

19 6 



Maryland 4, S. Carolina 4 
GEORGE WASHINGTON 



Yr. 

1897 
1898 
1902 
1903 
1904 
1905 
1907 
1908 
1909 
1910 
1948 



We 




11 

6 




11 





6 
47 



They 



32 

10 









57 

26 







Md. 5, Geo. Washington 3 

Three ties 

BOSTON UNIVERSITY 

(Never met before) 

WEST VIRGINIA 

Yr. We They 

1919 21 

1943 2 6 

1944 6 6 

1945 13 13 

1947 27 

1948 14 16 
Maryland 1, W. Virginia 3 

Two ties 

UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI 
Yr. We They 

1948 27 13 



MARYLAND FACTS FOR 1949 

Press, Radio, Television and Magazine Accommodations 

This year football comes back to the campus and all borne 
games will be played at Byrd Stadium, College Park. Tbe seat- 
ing capacity bas been enlarged so that nearly 18,000 people will 
be able to witness games. Of these, however, nearly 10,000 will 
be students and they are served first. 

We ask the members of the press, radio, etc., covering the 
game to bear with us in ticket allotments due to our limited space. 
On the other hand we are attempting to provide better press box 
arrangements and more room. Accommodations for working 
photographers, news-reel and video-reel men will also be ar- 
ranged. 

Space has been provided for special parking of press cars. 
Tickets will be given out and you 'will be notified before game 
time of the location. Runners will be on hand to assist you in 
anything. 

In the enlarged box, we are attempting to have Western 
Union move their facilities so that they will be directly in back of 
the correspondents. Either contact us or Mr, Sweeney of the 
Washington Bureau and he will provide a telegrapher for you. 
It is important to decide whether it is play by play or after game 
file. 

In the Press Box itself a competent spotter from both teams will 
be on hand with the Maryland man handling a small microphone 
to keep you abreast of tackles, subs, etc It is his aim and our 
primary endeavor to see that he does not antagonize the members 
of the fourth estate." 

A professional statistician and chart man "will be provided 
and working press men will receive complete statistics at the end 
of the half and the game. You will also receive at your assigned 
space a program, with numerical team lists of both squads, injury 
lists and all important announcements. 

Typewriters, paper, pencils, coffee, sandwiches with mustard 
— and even such extra-curricular activities as blondes, brunettes, 
redhaids and after-hour club cards might even be supplied, for 
our prescribed duty is to entertain and assist our working visitors. 

PAGE FIVE 



THE DEPARTMENT OF INTERCOLLEGIATE 
ATHLETICS 

Council 

Geary F. Eppley, Dean of Men, chairman; Dr. Wm. B. 
Kemp, Dr. Ernest N. Cory; Dr. Wm. C. Supplee; the President 
of the Student Government, Joseph Tydings; the Chairman of 
the Alumni Council, Dr. Arthur I. Bell; Director of Athletics, 
James M. Tatum. 

The Department 

Director of Athletics James M. Tatum 

Graduate Manager of Athletics Wm. W. Cobey 

Director of Athletic Publicity George L. Carroll 

Equipment Head Kermit 'Chief' Cissell 

Facilities Head Major George Bohler 

O^^ C . ^. . ( Mrs. Dorothv Hunt 

ffice Secretaries I A » ,-, T -a 

( Miss cva Lou Lmmons 

Head Trainer Alfred "Duke'' Wyre 

Football Coach Jim Tatum 

Basketball Coach A. L. "Flucie'' Stewart 

Boxing Coach Col. Harvey L. Miller 

Baseball Coach H. Burton Shipley 

Lacrosse Co-Coaches Jack Faber, Al Heagy 

Track, Cross Country Coach Jim Kehoe 

Soccer, Tennis Coach Doyle Royal 

Wrestling Coach William E. "Sully" Krouse 

Golf Coach Frank Cronin 

Rifle Coach Col. Harland Griswold 

ADDRESS: all correspondence concerning athletic business to 

P. O. Box 295, College Park, Md. 

Phone UNion 4584, WArfield 2807 
page six 



BRIEF HISTORY OF THE UNIVERSITY 

The history of the present University is the history of two in- 
stitutions: the old privately-owned and operated University of Mary- 
land in Baltimore and the Maryland State College (formerly Maryland 
Agricultural College) at College Park. These institutions were 
merged in 1920. 

In 1807 the College of Medicine of Maryland was organized, the 
fifth medical school in the United States. The first class was 
graduated in 1810. A permanent home was established in 1814-1815 
by the erection of the building at Lombard and Greene Streets in 
Baltimore, the o,Idest structure in America devoted to medical teach- 
ing. Here was founded one of the first medical libraries (and the first 
medical school library) in the United States. In 1812 the General 
Assembly of Maryland authorized the College of Medicine of Maryland 
to, "annex or constitute faculties of divinity, law, and arts and 
sciences," and by the same act declared that the "colleges or faculties 
thus united should be constituted an university by the name and under 
the title of the University of Maryland." By authority of this act, 
steps were taken in 1813 to establish "a faculty of law," and in 1823 
a regular school of instruction in law was opened. Subsequently 
there were added: in 1882 a Department of Dentistry which was 
absorbed in 1923 by the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery (founded 
in 1840, the first dental school in the world) ; in 1889 a School of 
Nursing; and in 1904 the Maryland College of Pharmacy (founded in 
1841, the third oldest pharmacy college in the United States). 

The Maryland State College was chartered in 1856 under the 
name of the Maryland Agricultural College, the second agricultural 
college in the Western Hemisphere. For three years the College was 
under private management. In 1862 the Congress of the United States 
passed the Land Grant Act. This act granted each State and Terri- 
tory that should claim its benefits an appropriate amount of unclaimed 
western lands, in place of scrip, the proceeds from the sale of which 
should apply under certain conditions to. the "endowment, support, 
and maintenance of at least one college where the leading object shall 
be, without excluding other scientific and classical studies, and includ- 
ing military tactics, to teach such branches of learning as are related 
to agriculture and the mechanic arts, in such a manner as the 
Legislatures of the States may respectively prescribe, in order to 
promote the liberal and practical education of the industrial classes 
in the several pursuits and professions of life." This grant was 
accepted by the General Assembly of Maryland, and the Maryland 
Agricultural College was named as the beneficiary of the grant. 
Thus the College became, at least in part, a State institution. In the 
fall of 1914 control was taken over entirely by the State. In 1916 
the General Assembly granted a new charter to the College, and 
made it the Maryland State College. 

In 1920, by an act of the State Legislature, the University of 
Maryland was merged with the Maryland State Co'lege, and the 
resultant institution was given the name University of Maryland. 

PAGE SEVEN 



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PAGE TEN 





















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PAGE ELEVEN 




HEAD COACH: JIM TATUM (Gloomy Jim, 
Sunny Jim), he's been tabbed with both 
nicknames. A graduate of the U. of North 
Carolina, where he was an All-Southern 
Conference tackle. This is his third season 
with the Terps and he led them to their 
first Bowl Game (Gator) in 1943 (20-20 tie 
with Georgia). 1947 Record, 7 wins, 2 
losses, 2 ties; 1948 Record, 6 wins, 4 losses. 
He has been head coach at North Carolina, 
Oklahoma and Jacksonville Navy. Assistant 
coach at Cornell, Iowa Sea Hawks. Played 
pro baseball. Married, has two children. 



JACK HENNEMIER: first year with the 
Terps, he came from Duke where he played 
and coached. The "red-haid" from Georgia 
was one of the Bluedevils foremost centers 
and weighed in at 155 pounds. He coached 
high school ball in Savannah, was assistant 
at W&L before joining Coach Wallace 
Wade's staff. A proficient scout, and smiling 
personality. Married, no children. 





BILL MEEK: The handsome man on the 
staff (next to Tatum) is a vet having come 
here with head coach Tatum. Last year he 
did a great job with the frosh and will head 
up that department this season, although he 
will work with the varsity also. A grad of 
Tennessee, where he was a back sensation, 
he played in several all-star and bowl 
games. Married, has two children. 



MAX REED: first year with the Terps. H? 
came from North Carolina where he was 
one of Coach Tatum's college coaches and 
later worked with him at Cornell. A grad 
of Bucknell, he played pro ball with the 
New York Giants and later coached at 
Bucknell, besides Cornell and North Caro- 
lina. The oldest man in point of coaching 
on the staff, he is beginning his 20th season. 
Married, one child. 




PAGE TWELVE 




WALTER "BABE" WOOD: first year with 
the Terps. Fresh out of the Navy where 
he was athletic officer at Pensacola Air 
Station. Two years ago he was assistant 
coach of North Carolina State when they 
tied the Terps, 0-0. Another former Tenn- 
essee football great, he likewise brings a 
world of experience to the staff. Married, 
has one child. 



WARREN GIE8E: The youngest man on 
the staff, he assisted Bill Meek with the 
frosh last season. Warren played end for 
Coach Tatum at Oklahoma and later 
matriculated at Central Michigan. He is 
also on the physical education staff at 
Maryland. Not married. 





Ah WOODS: a football byword at Mary- 
land. Graduate of the institution, he played 
under Curly Byrd and was one of the best 
footballers ever here. Al also played on 
the championship U. S. Marine teams of the 
1928-29 era. A member of the Physical 
Education staff, married, no children. 



DUKE WYRE: head trainer. This is "The 
Duke's" third year at Terp-town. Pre- 
viously he saw service for some 17 years 
with Yale, Holy Cross and the Navy. 
President of the Conference Trainers Asso- 
ciation, he was named top trainer in the 
east last year. Author of many articles on 
training of athletes, he is married, no 
children. 




PAGE THIRTEEN 



THE FRESHMAN OUTLOOK FOR 1949 

The frosh this season will be once again coached by Bill Meek, 
former Tennessee backfield great who is beginning his third year 
with Jim Tatum. Meek will likewise work with the varsity in many 
important assignments. 

Assisting him this year will be John Cudmore, a two year veteran. 
The team of Meek and Cudmore has been intact for quite a few 
seasons having coached together while in the Army at Fort Benning, 
Georgia. "Quiet John" played at Stetson U. (Fla.) and also dabbled 
in professional ice hockey. 

Two newcomers to coaching this season will be Francis Evans 
and Bernie Sniscak. Both men finished their playing careers with 
the Terps last year and have been invited to assist in moulding future 
Old Line power. Evans was an end; Sniscak a halfback. 

Using both the split-T and the single wing in his teachings, 
Coach Meek will likewise drill his charges into platoon-system foot- 
ball. Having lost only to William and Mary last season by one point, 
they went on to win over Fork Union Military, Georgetown, George 
Washington and West Virginia. This last mentioned game is some- 
what the highlight of the season as it is played on neutral grounds, 
Cumberland, Md., for a Knights of Columbus charity. 

Just who to watch for at this date in frosh football is far fetched 
and besides since the men aren't to be registered as official students 
until later, it's somewhat against the rule. 

From the frosh, though, stems the future fodder for the varsity. 
Head coach Jim Tatum of the varsity looks with eager eyes to their 
doings all during the season and a careful check is kept of all boys, 
for in them rests the future of good football at Maryland. 



The Frosh 1949 Schedule 

Oct. 1 — Fork Union Military Academy, away 

Oct. 22 — Georgetown, home 

Oct. 27 — West Virginia, Cumberland, Md. 

Nov. 4 — North Carolina, away 

Nov. 11 — George Washington, home 

PAGE FOURTEEN 



MARYLAND FOOTBALL THROUGH THE YEARS 

(Editors Note: The history of football here has been compiled 
by Bill Hottel, who for some 25 years has been Mr. Maryland Sports. 
In order to bring it up to date with all records correct, a painstaking 
survey has been made in which correspondence has gone out all over 
the country tracking down the true story. With great pleasure and 
many thanks, it is hereby presented for your perusal.) 

The first 20 years of football at Maryland were the hardest and 
still are for the historian who strives for accuracy. About the only 
thing definite and undisputable is that the grid sport was started of- 
ficially in 1892 and that the game, like the institution, is rapidly grow- 
ing in size and caliber. 

Since football was started it has been fostered under three dif- 
ferent names: the original Maryland Agricultural College, Maryland 
State College from 1916 to. 1919, inclusive, and the University of Mary- 
land since 1920. Byrd, now president of the University, was gradu- 
ated from M. A. C. in the class of '08 and coached under aT of the 
institution's titles. He had been an all-around athlete in his under- 
graduate days, being outstanding in football, baseball and track. 

There has been much confusion, and it never will be fully clari- 
fied, about the coaching of the early teams. However, it is pretty 
well established that the captain of the squad on the elevens from 
1892 through 1901 was the playing mentor and that D. John Markey, 
a graduate of Frederick High School who had studied at Western 
Maryland College, was the first full-time coach. He took over in 
1902 and remained through 1904. Markey, now a retired Army gen- 
eral living at Walkersville, Md., served in the Spanish-American War, 
enlisting at the age of 15, and also served conspicuously in World 
Wars I and II. In telling about his grid experience and verifying 
his three-year stay at College Park, he said: 

"When I came out of the Army at the close of the Spanish- 
American War, where I played on an all-college regimental eleven 
of the First Maryland Volunteer Infantry, I organized a team that 
played games in the State and the District of Columbia in the season 
of 1900. I then was assistant coach of Western Maryland under 
Mickey Whitehurst, one of the best known athletes of his time." 

Harry D. Watts of New York, one o,f Maryland's nationally prom- 
inent alumni, who was captain and fullback in 1903, recalls with 
pleasure playing under Markey in 1902. Watts, who also recalls the 
captain coaching system, started playing in 1901 when E. B. Dunbar 
functioned as mentor and leader. 

While the captain did the coaching in the years from 1892 through 
1901 — and this also is verified by Clifton Fuller of Cumberland, who. 
played on the 1892 and 1893 teams, and Grenville Lewis, the great 
fullback who led the 1896 outfit and now lives in Southern Mary- 
land — there always was a higher authority in charge. Prof. H. M. 
Strickler, who came from Randolph-Macon, directed affairs from 
1892 through 1897 and also played on some of the teams. He was 
described by Fuller as a physical education teacher who knew little 
about football. An athletic committee ruled the roost in 1898 through 

PAGE FIFTEEN 



1899 and in 1900 the late Prof. Charles S. Richardson came on to the 
scene to head the Athletic Board until his retirement in 1939. He 
was the person mainly instrumental in bringing Byrd back to his 
alma mater. He wasn't a football expert, either, but he knew and 
apreciated human values. 

In 1893, the Farmers or Aggies, as they then were labeled, cap- 
tained and tutored by S. H. Harding, won all six games, defeating 
Eastern High School, 36-0; Central High School, 6-0, and Orient A. C, 
16-6, all of Washington; Baltimore City College, 18-0; St. John's Col- 
lege of Annapolis, 6-0, and Western Maryland, 18-0. 

One of the most confusing factors in efforts to unravel the Old 
Line football puzzle of yesteryears is that in the early days of the 
game the Medical School in Baltimore had a team. In fact, M. A. C. 
and the Medical School met seven times, according to our records, 
each winning three games and playing a tie. However, the trouble 
arises from Maryland's opponents, some of whom whipped the Medi- 
cal School and wanted to charge it against the College Park Insti- 
tution. Most of this, we believe, finally has been ironed out, making 
the records against our present rivals as correct as possible. 

But getting back to those unbeaten seasons, M. A. C. had another 
in 1896 when the team was led and coached by Lewis, rated an all- 
time great on the diamond as well as on the gridiron. Mainly on the 
strength of his own skill and fortitude, Business High and Central 
High of Washington were beaten, 34-0, and 10-0; Bethel Military 
Academy, 20-0; Alexandria High, 18-0; Western Maryland, 16-6, and 
the Maryland Medical School and Gallaudet College elevens were held 
to scoreless ties. Lewis also had to do some reorganization work 
as there was no football in 1895 due to a dispute with the M. A. C. 
commandant. In fact, there practically was no competition at all 
during the 1895-96 term. 

Byrd came closest to a sweep in 1931 when the Old Liners won 
eight games, tied the powerful Kentucky team that contained Ship- 
wreck Kelly and other noted stars, and lost only to Vanderbilt at 
Nashville. Navy was one of the victims and this was the team that 
wrecked the Dick Harlow coached Western Maryland juggernaut, 
41-6. Seven of the starters were all-State choices — Al Pease, end; 
Ernie Carliss, tackle; Jess Krajcovic, guard, and the entire backfield 
of Ray Poppleman, Bozie Berger, Shorty Chalmers and Al Woods, the 
same balding burnt-almond haired guy who is still holding forth in 
football and physical education at College Park. 

Another noted old Terp, as player and coach, is Burton Shipley, 
who has "earned his oats" on past performances, not to mention his 
present worth. He was a stripling when Byrd came back to College 
Park and was one of Curley's foremost all-around athletes for several 
years, the only Old Liner to ever win six letters in both football and 
baseball. There were prep and sub-freshman years in those days in 
addition to four collegiate terms. Ship quarterbacked the eleven in 
that startling 6-0 win over Western Maryland in 1911, scoring the 
only touchdown. Byrd was special coach for that game and the 
triumph blazed the trail for his permanent return to his alma mater 
and subsequent fame. Burt, who also is in the Physical Education 
Department, has tutored the varsity nine for 26 years and handled 
basketball for 24 years before giving it up. 

PAGE SIXTEEN 



And also outstanding in that old regime, and still the best lacrosse 
coaching pair in the country, are Jack Faber and Al Heagy, who 
along with Woods, were the highly capable and willing "lambs" 
whenever a snarl occurred in the football coaching set-up. They 
with the late Roy Mackert, equally great as a fullback and tackle in 
his grid days, were Byrd's righthand men who. carried on gracefully 
when material, as a whole, was far from being as plentiful and pro- 
ficient as nowadays. However, to us old-timers, those were the happy 
days when Byrd was content to win 60 percent of his games with the 
added relish of upsetting one of the big-timers most every season, 
such as Penn, Yale, Syracuse, Rutgers, etc. 

And on the famous 1923 team, that whipped Penn and greatly 
outplayed and came within an ace of licking Yale's Eastern champion- 
ship eleven that had routed all other opposition, were five linemen 
who never had played football before matriculating at College Park. 
The score was 16-14, Yale. All the writers said it should have been 
28-10, Maryland. And the Bill Supplee, who played on that team and 
who was chosen All-America end by three leading authorities, is the 
same Dr. Supplee who is a valued professor on the University faculty 
and a mmber of the Athletic Board. 

And in mentioning the old-timers, and space limits us to a few, 
we certainly should not overlook United States Senator Millard E. 
Tydings, a member of the Board of Regents, who managed the 1908 
eleven and Dr. Ernie Cory, who captained it. Dr. Cory, a familiar 
figure around the campus, is State entomologist, an Athletic Board 
member for many years and perennial treasurer of the "M" Club. 

And getting down to present day football, it certainly has become 
pretentious and complex. Where if you had a fairly good starting 
line-up and a half-dozen reserves in Byrd's day and a good many 
years following you were considered well fixed, we have reached the 
stage of 44 varsity players, sometimes 55, the two platoon system, one 
for defense and the other for offense, and unlimited substitutions. 

But to get back to the historical angle, which we were supposed 
to write about, George Hoblitzell, of whom we have no real back- 
ground, was the organizer of football at College Park. While a 
student he formed an informal team in 1888 that continued through 
1897 and played several games with minor teams. It also is note- 
worthy that Dr. W. W. Skinner of Kensington, Md., now retired, and 
former chairman of the Board of Regents, was captain and quarter- 
back of the first team in 1892 and generally active in fostering M.A.C. 
athletics during his undergraduate days 

* * * * 

Big Jim Tatum is beginning his third football season here at 
Maryland. He came to Terp land from Oklahoma where he had an 
enviable record. In his first year with Maryland his record was 
seven wins, two defeats and two ties. The season brought an invita- 
tion — and eventual tie-game — with Georgia (20-20) in the 'Gator 
Bowl. This was the first Bowl game in which a Terp 11 had ever 
participated. 

One of the most publicized, if not one of the greatest backs in 
Maryland history, was also produced on that 1947 aggregation in the 
person of Lu Gambino. His career was closed for 1948, however, when 

PAGE SEVENTEEN 



he was declared ineligible. This hurt the Terps' running attack and 
perhaps played the major part in the six win, four loss record for 1948. 

However, with an eye for the future, Tatum has supplemented 
his already experienced staff for 1949 with three very competent and 
top coaches in Jack Hennemier, Max Reed and Babe Wood. He has 
also on tap another possible football great in Ray Krouse, giant tackle. 

Other top men to look for are Bob Ward, guard of distinction, 
and Jim Brasher, center. Filling that offensive center post will be 
most important and it still is a toss-up. Good sophs to look at are 
linemen Bill Dovell, Chick Fry, Charles Theiber and backs "Mighty 
Moe" Modzelewski, Buck Early, Walt Boeri, Shoo-shoo Shemonski 
and several others. 

Here are the records by years of collegiate games only, with the 
captain of the team listed as coach from 1892 through 1901: 

First 10 years when captains coached (1892-1901) 

Opp. 
Coach W. L. T. Pts. Pts. 

1892__W. W. Skinner— a; 2 120 

1893— S. H. Harding 2 24 10 

1894— J. G. Bannon 2 2 70 50 

1895— G. M. Harris (No football due to dispute with commandant) 

1896__Grenville Lewis 1 2 16 6 

1897__John Lillibridge 2 5 1 62 86 

1898- _ J. F. Kenly 1 5 27 119 

1899_ _S. M. Cooke 6 6 216 

1900_ _F. H. Peters 112 23 23 

1901__E. B. Dunbar 16 1 28 100 

x — Only Hopkins and St. John's played. 10 27 



Coach 
1902— D. John Markey (Western Md.) 
1903— Markey 
1904— Markey 

1905__Fred Nielsen (Nebraska) — y 
1906_ -Nielsen 
1907__C. G. Church (Virginia) 

and C. W. Melick (Nebraska) 
1908_ _Bill Lang (Delaware) 
1909__Barney Cooper (Maryland '08) 

and E. P. Larkin (Cornell) 
1910__R. Alston (George Washington) 
1911— C. F. Donnelly (Trinity) 

and H. C. Byrd (Maryland '08)— z 

30 41 8 492 831 
y — Coach who developed Byrd. z — Byrd coached team for last 
two games with Western Maryland and Gallaudet and won both 
and a job at College Park starting in the fall of 1912. 

PAGE EIGHTEEN 



10 


27 6 


256 


730 


C 1 902- 1911) 












Opp. 


w. 


L. T. 


Pts. 


Pts. 


l 


6 2 


17 


95 


5 


3 1 


72 


64 


4 


4 2 


79 


55 


4 


4 


83 


66 


3 


2 


71 


44 


2 


5 


42 


61 


2 


8 


10 


266 


2 


3 


19 


80 


4 


3 1 


67 


42 


3 


3 2 


32 


58 



Curly Byrd regime (1912-1934) 



1912_ 
1913_ 
1914_ 
1915- 
191S_ 
1917- 
1918_ 
1919- 
1920_ 
1921_ 
1922_ 
1923_ 
1924_ 
1925 _ 
1926_ 
1927_ 
1928_ 
1929_ 
1930_ 
1931_ 
1932_ 
1933- 
1934_ 



Coach 
_H. C. Byrd 
-Byrd 
_Byrd 
-Byrd 
_Byrd 
-Byrd 
-Byrd 
-Byrd 
-Byrd 
-Byrd 
-Byrd 
-Byrd 
-Byrd 
-Byrd 
_Byrd 
-Byrd 
-Byrd 
-Byrd 
-Byrd 
_Byrd 
_Byrd 
_Byrd — x 
_Byrd — x 











Opp. 


w. 


L. 


T. 


Pts. 


Pts. 


5 


1 


1 


160 


59 


5 


3 





157 


116 


5 


2 





72 


43 


5 


3 





130 


69 


6 


2 





142 


62 


4 


3 


1 


88 


159 


4 


1 


1 


57 


35 


5 


4 





92 


74 


7 


2 





149 


55 


3 


5 


1 


45 


127 


4 


5 


1 


77 


137 


7 


2 


1 


212 


56 


3 


3 


3 


74 


78 


2 


5 


1 


53 


82 


5 


4 


1 


161 


S3 


4 


7 





186 


144 


6 


3 


1 


132 


170 


4 


4 


2 


148 


127 


7 


5 





231 


136 


8 


1 


1 


189 


98 


5 


6 





148 


158 


3 


7 





107 


149 


7 


3 





143 


49 



114 81 15 2,953 

x — Jack Faber (Maryland '26) was field coach in 1933 
and 1934. 

After-Byrd (1935-1948) 



1935. 
1936. 
1937. 
1938. 
1939. 
1940. 

1941. 

3942. 
1943. 
1944. 
1945. 
1946. 
1947. 
1948. 



2,266 













Oop. 


Coach 


W. 


L. 


T. 


Pis. 


Pts. 


-Frank Dobson (Princeton) 


7 


2 


2 


122 


78 


-Dobson 


6 


"5 





117 


59 


-Dobson 


8 


2 





125 


65 


-Dobson 


2 


7 





83 


235 


-Dobson 


2 


7 





64 


104 


-Jack Faber '26), Al Heagy C30), and 












Al Woods C33), all of Maryland 


2 


6 


1 


39 


172 


_ v aber, Heagy, Woods 


3 


5 


1 


49 


196 


-Clark Shaughnessv (Minnesota) 


7 


2 





198 


124 


-C'arence Spears (Dartmouth) 


4 


5 





105 


175 


-Spears 


1 


7 


1 


46 


170 


-Paul Bryant (Alabama) 


6 


2 


1 


219 


99 


-Shaughnessy 


3 


6 





136 


193 


-Jim Tatum (North Carolina) 


7 


2 


2 


207 


121 


_Tatum 


6 


4 





206 


132 




64 


62 


8 


1,716 


1,923 



Grand total 



218 211 37 5,417 5,750 
PAGE NINETEEN 



Ray Krouse — Maryland's 1949 
Ail-American Tackle Candidate