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Full text of "University of Maryland men's football media guides"

1950 



FOOTBALL 





$mw*i:ttiifZ; 



University of Maryland 



Sept. 
Oct. 

Nov. 
Dec. 



Sept. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 

Nov. 
Nov. 



1950 SCHEDULE 

HOME 

(All Home Games 2 p.m.) 

50~Navy 

21^-North Carolina Stale (Homecoming) 

4— George Washington 

2— Virginia Tech 

AWAY 
(All Games Away, 2 p.m.) 

23— Georgia, (Athens, Ga.) 

7— Michigan State, (E. Lansing. M/r/i.) 
14 — Georgetown, (Was/u'nqron, O. C.) 
28-Duke; (Durham, N. C.) 
ll~\orth Carolina (Chapel Hill. N. C.) 

8— West Virginia (Morgantown, W. Va.) 



TICKET INFORMATION 



Home Games 

Navy: Price, $3.73; $2.50 
N. C State: Price, $3.00 
Geo. Wash.: Price, $3.00 
Virginia Tech.: Price. $5.00 
Season Ticket for 



Away Games 

Georgia: Price, $5.60 
Michigan State: Price. $2.50 
Georgetown: Price, $2.50 
Duke: Price, $5.50 
North Carolina: Price. $5.00 
Home Games: Price, $12.75 West Virginia: Price. $5.00 

(all prices include tax) 

FRONT COVER— 1950 Co-Captains RAY KROUSE, Left Tackle (Upper) 

and JAKE ROWDEN, Center, will lead Terps in September 30th Inaugural 

of new 47,000-seating Byrd Stadium. 

BACK COVER— BOB WARD, Left Guard, Candidate for Ail-American 

honors. 



PAGE TWO 



ATHLETIC COUNCIL 




Mr. G. F. Eppl,ey Mr. James Tatum Mr. Wm. Cobey 




Dr. Wm. Kemp Dr. Wm. Supplee Col. J. C. Pitchford 




Mr. C. V. Koons Dr. E. N. Cory 



Mr. Fred Stone 

PAGE THREE 



ATHLETIC STAFF 




DR. H. C. "CURLEY" BYRD: HE ALONE 
HAS PLACED THIS UNIVERSITY ON TOP, 
as one of the foremost educationally and ath- 
letically in the nation. A former star athlete 
and coach at Maryland, he rose from the 
ranks to become President. A champion of 
the State, he works hard and long for the 
betterment of Terrapin relations. 



JAMES M. TATUM: Director of Athletics. He 
has a keen sense of athletic business judgment 
and organization. Since his arrival on the 
Maryland scene, he has furthered all-out ath- 
letic betterment. His ability in business has 
gone right along with his success in the foot- 
ball coaching profession. 





WILLIAM W. COBEY: Graduate Manager of 
Athletics. A shrewd business executive, he 
has cemented good relations with the many 
business houses and schools the University- 
deals with. A graduate of the University, 
"Old Scrooge," as he is lovingly named, is 
the supreme overseer of athletic schedules 
for our many teams. He's been around a long 
time, long enough in fact to have a wife and 
five children. 



GEORGE L. CARROLL: Director of Athletic 
Publicity. Heads up publicizing all sports and 
with the new full time assistant Joe F. Blair 
hopes to extend to. the gentlemen of the press, 
radio and television, the greatest aid and cor- 
diality in the support of all athletic events. 



PAGE FOUR 




FACTS FOR THE PRESS, RADIO AND TELEVISION 

Our department is enlarged this year to serve you better. I would 
like to introduce Joe F. Blair, the First full time assistant in the sports 
section. Joe is a recent graduate of the U. of Missouri Journalism 
School. He comes highly recommended to Maryland and we expect 
a great job from him. A native of Freeport, Pa., he is an Army Air 
Corps Veteran. 

This year for our immediate area we both hope to get around and 
visit all the gentlemen of the press, radio and TV more frequently. 
Feel free at any time to call on us for issuance of information, ou.' 
stock of action glossy prints, mats, cartoons etc. Our aim is to 
please you. 

For your phone list: 

George L. Carroll, UNion 4076 (Day) APpleton 5057 
(Night and Day). 

Joseph F. Blair, UNion 4076 (Night and Day). 

Facts on the New Stadium and Press Box: 

The Press Box is 151 feet long and 27 feet wide. The working 
press section is 70 feet long and contains two rows. Two radio, 2 
TV, and a PA Scout Booth are included. This year, due to the rush 
of work to get the stadium 100% complete, several other comforts 
that were originally planned are not ready. In the press box we will 
have a 24-foot snack bar for your convenience. It is planned that 
a luncheon be served before each game. Phones will be included; 
a direct PA; statistics; quarter resumes, and everything else that we 
can offer for your comfort. 

Special Parking Areas will be set aside for all working press, 
radio and TV. The Press are invited to make application to Mr. 
Sweeney, Western Union, D. C. for copy arrangements. All new 
printers will be installed in the Press Box. 

Some Facts on the New Stadium; 

There are 8,000 tons of concrete in the stadium. The seats are of 
select hard redwood from California and some 200,000 lineal feet 
has been used. Laid end to end it would stretch from Washington 

to Baltimore. The seats are contoured for the comfort of one's a , 

to use a method of description. Holding up the seats are 
snecial aluminum brackets that will bear a weight of 16,500 pounds. 
There is 72 of a bracket for each person in the stands . . . but don't 
take any. 

PAGE FIVE 



The Playing Field: 

The entire circumference is 515 feet by 208 feet wide or 45,560 
square feet. In it is contained 2 and Vl acres of greensward. (Wnaf 
that word means I don't know, I understand they used it in the 
days of King Arthur, quote, Geo. Weber, Business Manager). 
Blue Grass has been laid on 12 inches of prepared top soil. 150 tons 
of Michigan Peat and Fertilizer. 

The track is made up of head engine cinders, approximately 750 
tons. It is 24 feet wide and will contain six running lanes. It has 
a 220 yard straightaway. 

There are six types of underground plumbing, which add up to 
12 miles of pipes. 

You may think the stadium looks like a horseshoe; well, it is and 
it isn't. According to the architect, it is a PARABOLA, which 
means that it is built like a theatre. The person in back is afforded 
a better view, while looking over your Stetson. 

There is a two inch decking on the roof with an iron railing for 
use by photographers. 

Dressing Rooms: 

Two large ones with six shower heads in each. There are other 
rooms containing individual showers. We have a modern training 
room on either side. For the general public, there are three rest 
rooms, one part of which contains the ticket booths. A total of 65 
women's toilets; 25 men's closets, and a whole slew of urinals. 

We have 5 main entrances; 18 individual entrances on horse- 
shoe. 4 on the open end. 

The eight-foot chain link fence contains 10,000 lineal feet. The 
public milling section is 87 ! /2 from the fence to the top row of 
seats. There are 45 rows of seats in each section, a total of 54,500. 
With the temporary seats, our total capacity will be 50,000. A total 
of 10.000 cars can be parked . . . we have five practice fields and 
one baseball field at the east end . . . lights are on the agenda for 
next year. 

The scoreboard is all electric. 15 feet by 45 feet. Our new PA 
system is the latest by RCA. 

To make way for overall construction; 28 tons or 280.000 cubic 
yards of dirt was removed for the natural bowl. 

The cost of the stadium is less than one million dollars. 
PAGE SIX 



THE DEPARTMENT OF INTERCOLLEGIATE 
ATHLETICS 

Director of Athletics James M. Tatum 

Graduate Manager of Athletics Wm. W. Cobey 

Director of Athletic Publicity George L. Carroll 

Assistant Director Joseph F. Blair 

Equipment Head Kermit "Chief" Cissell 

Facilities Head Major George Bohler 

Chief of Concessions Joseph T. Tucker 

Ticket Manager Bennie Robinson 

Assistant Ticket Manager James Flynn 

Office Secretaries .... Mrs. Dorothy Hunt, Mrs. Eva Lou Fegan 

Head Trainer Alfred "Duke" Wyre 

Football Coach Jim Tatum 

Basketball Coach Bud Millikan 

Boxing Coach Col. Harvey L. Miller 

Baseball Coach H. Burton Shipley 

Lacrosse Co-Coaches Jack Faber, Al Heagy 

Track, Cross-Country Coach Jim Kehoe 

Soccer, Tennis Coach _ Doyle Royal 

Wrestling Coach Wm. E. "Sully" Krouse 

Golf Coach Frank Cronin 

Rifle Coach Col Harland Griswold 

Gym Coach Dave Field 



PAGE SEVEN 



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PAGE NINE 



BIOGRAPHY RECOUNT, THE TERPS OF '50 



LEFT ENDS 

ELMER WINGATE, 6'3", 215, from 
Baltimore . . was all all-state in '46 . . 
big and rough, plays on left side of line 
that Coach Tatum calls, "Best in college 
football" . . was first string in lacrosse, 
instructs in YMCA in summer .... TED 
BETZ, 6'1", 205, from Dundalk, Md. . . 
tall blonde haired youth, was All-State 
Virginia, 1946 at Fork Union M. A. . . 

played sand lot ball in summer 

BILL RUEHL, 6'2", 195, from Cumber- 
land, Md. . . expected to see plenty of 
action in this his junior year . .played 
for Massanutten, M. A. in Va. . .worked 
this summer on University swimming 
pool .... LLOYD COLTERYAHN, 6'2", 
200, from one of the sophs expected to 
do plenty, end Coach Giese has high 
hopes for his pass snatching ability . . 
in his frosh year he snared three td 
passes to help in the yearlings, 5 and 1 
record .... ART HURD, 6', 206, from 
Gardner, Mass. A New England addi- 
tion, he was a star New England con- 
ference end. The balding youth takes a 
lot of ribbing with his "baked bean" 
accent. 

LEFT TACKLES 

RAY KROUSE, 6'3", 248, from Wash- 
ington, D. C, is co-capt. elect and the 
Terps bid for All-America. He made first 
team Southern Conf., 2nd team AP, All- 
American in '49 . . . plays both offense 
and defense and worked on construction 
of the new stadium this summer, took 
time out to get married . . . BOB 
DEAN, 6', 210, from Pittsburgh, Pa. 
He's the Terps educated toe man. Last 
season he converted 30 out of 39 con- 
versions and acts as kicking off ex- 
pert . . . JOE MOSS, 6'1", 205, from 

Ridgeley. W. Va once a star high 

school back and leading scorer in Po- 
tomac Valley Conf. . . . worked on swim- 
ming pool this summer . . . JIM MOL- 
STER, 6'3", 210, from Portsmouth, Ohio 
. was top football and basketball ace 
in land of good football . . . ALDEN 
MURPHY, 6'1", 213, from Melrose, Mass. 
. . . was named All-Scholastic in New 
England. 

LEFT GUARDS 

BOB WARD, 5'10". 189, from Eliza- 
beth, N. J. One of the best linemen to 
ever play for the Terps. He is defi- 
nitely All-American material and received 
much recognition in early season prog- 
nostications. Soph lineman of year in 
Southern Conference . . . top man on 
field in Gator Bowl win over Missouri 
married this summer . . . CHICK FRY, 

PAGE TEN 



6'3", 235, from Reading, Pa. The pret- 
zel city blonde youth is big and rug- 
ged . . . picked to be one of the top 
linemen this season by coaches . . . DICK 
MODZELEWSKI, 6' 235, from W. Na- 
trona, Pa., brother of Ed, Terps' 
halfback . . . Possible switch to tackle 
. . . RAY STANKUS, 5'11", 200, from 
Phila., Pa. . . . was All-Catholic, All- 
Scholastic, 1945. 

JOE KATONA, 6', 190, from Connells- 
ville. Pa., and Frank Bottone, 5'10", 195 
from Livingston. N. J., both sophs and 
hopeful aspirants with fine high school 
and frosh backgrounds. 

CENTERS 

JAKE ROWDEN, 6'2", 198, from Dun- 
can, Ariz, (co-capt. elect in '50), the 
roughest and toughest line backer in 
captivity. Played for Coach Tatum at 
Jacksonville Navy . . . has keen sense 
of offensive center well adept in the 
split-T . . . married ... ED KENSLER. 
6', 200, from Lawrenceville. 111. . . . was 
captain, 1945, Illinois Ail-Star team. 
Mentioned on All-State, became father of 
8-pound, 6-oz. bov this summer . 
JEFF KEITH, 6'3", 190, from Birming- 
ham, Ala. . . . was all-county in 1945. 
Jeff. Co. Ala. . . . will work right along 
with Rowden . . . TOM COSGROVE. 
6'3", 210, from Philadelphia, Pa., where 
he played on championship team in '46. 
Was also star basketbal player . . . 
may fit in picture very well this season 
worked on campus construction 
this summer ... ED FINCKE, 5'11". 
180, from Pittsburgh, Pa. . . . small 
in framework but a good ball handler . . . 
married this past summer . . . ROY 
MARTI NE, 6', 190, from E. Orange, N.J., 
and CHARLES LATTIMER, 6'1", 210, 
from Cumberland, Md., both sophs who 
did quite well for the Terp yearlings last 
season . . . line Coach Hennemier thinks 
highly of both ... he should be a 
good judge being one of Duke University's 
best all-time centers. 



RIGHT GUARDS 

JOHN TROHA, 6'2", 215, from Mun- 
hall, Pa. . . . switched to guard last 
season from end, he proved a very good 
switch . . . took up lacrosse this spring 
for the first time and played a pretty 
good defensive game . . . TOM McHLiGH. 
6'1", 215, from Phoenixville, Pa. . . . 
played a lot of guard last year and 
can be called on for point kicking duty . . 
became a "pappy" this past summer . . . 
DAVE CHRISTIANSON, 6'2", 205, from 
Cumberland, Md. . . . long arms and a 
lot of determination in the defensive 
post . . . the squad artist, draws cari- 



catures of opponents for the amusement 
of team before games . . . BOB MOR- 
GAN, 5'11", 220, from Freeport, Pa. . . . 
switched from tackle to guard in this his 
soph year . . . sidekick of Dick Modzel- 
ewski in receiving many WPIAL (Pa.) 
honors . . . starred in Pittsburgh "Dap- 
per Dan" game . . . BILL MALETZKY, 
5'11", 208, from White Plains, N. Y. . . . 
received many All-honors in high school, 
captained his team . . . RUDY GAYZUR, 
6'1", 210, from Yonkers, N. Y. . . . was 
all-county, all-city in high school, re- 
ceived letters for basketball, baseball and 
swimming . . . BILL DOVELL, 6'2", 
from Newark, N. J. . . . was voted all- 
state while playing for St. Benedict's . . . 
FRANK NAVARRO, 5'10", 190, from 
White Plains, N. Y. . . . up from the 
frosh, young and eager. 

RIGHT TACKLES 

CHESTER GIERULA, 6'2", 220, from 
Allentown, Pa. . . . first string last year, 
the big lad is expected to be more power- 
ful this season . . . played lacrosse this 
past spring for the first time ... ED 
POBIAK, 6'2", 190, from Springdale, Pa. 
First on offense . . . his brother Al is 
Terp frosh baseball mentor . . . MAR- 
VIN KRAMER, 6'2", 210, from Atlantic 
City, N. J., where he spent the summer 
as a life guard . . . was all-state, all- 
city, in South Jersey . . . STANLEY 
JONES, 6' 225, from Lemoyne, Pa. . . . 
young soph who is mighty big. One of 
finest footballers turned out of Harris- 
burg. Pa., area ... ED O'CONNOR, 
6'4", 245, from Yonkers, N. Y., was 
first string on Quantico Marine team 
two ''ears back. Was All-State in High 
Schorl from Cardinal Hayes High . . . 
BOB RICCI, 6'3", 220, from Providence, 
R. I. . . . like O'Connor, will play both 
offense and defense . . . Ricci is a soph. 
He was out most of his frosh year with 
broken ankle. 

RIGHT ENDS 

STAN KARNASH, 6'2", 205, from 
Pittsburgh, Pa. . . . slated to be lead- 
ing pass snatcher this season . . . played 
mid-field in lacrosse past spring, very 
fast . . . former WPIAL (Pa.) star . . . 
HANK FOX, 6'3", 190, from White 
Plains, N. Y., like Karnash, he'll be one 
of the Terps leading offensive lights . . . 
PETE AUGSBURGER, 6'4", 212, from 
Mt. Labanon, Pa., has gotten bigger and 
better each year. Caught 8 passes last 
season. 3 for td's . . . BOB CHIODI, 6', 
185, from Souderton, Pa. . . . former 
high school captain . . . also quite a 
basketball and track man . . . JOHN 
ALDERTON, 6'1", 175, from Cumber- 
land, Md. . . . starred at Fort Hill 
High, a soph this year along with LEWIS 
WEIDENSAUL, 6'2", 200 from Ashland, 



Pa. . . . Both boys snared td passes 
for the frosh in '49, expected to go 
places in Terp Varsity land. 

QUARTERBACKS 

JOHN IDZIK, 6', 190, from Phila, Pa. 
. . . just switched to qb. Coach Tatum 
feels he'll do ok . . . for his stay at 
Maryland has been mostly defense, safety 
. . . was All-Catholic, All-City in High 
School . . . JOHN SCARBATH, 6'1", 185, 
from Baltimore, Md. . . . played for Poly, 
one of city's best . . . was standout on 
frosh, hurled most of td passes . . . 
possesses good arm, should fit in . . . 
FRANK ARMSWORTHY, 6', 180, from 
Baltimore, Md. . . . was out for foot- 
ball in frosh year, gave it up to devote 
time to basketball . . . came out in 
spring . . . looked very well in split-T qb. 
BOB DESTEFANO, 5'11", 185, from 
Providence, R. I. . . . was All-New 
England . . . fans didn't get much 
chance to see him perform in spring 
due to broken wrist . . . had a good 
frosh year . . . expected to help, very 
much. 

RIGHT HALFBACKS 

ED "MIGHTY MOE" MODZELEWSKI, 
6', 205, from W. Natrona, Pa. . . . was 
All-PIAA in High School . . . carried 
ball 132 times for 625 yards last year, 
one of teams leading scorers with 36 
points . . . brother of guard, Dick . . . 
they have brother in pro fighter, Joe 
Modzel, fights in Ezzard Charles stables 
. . . JACK TARGARONA, 6', 185, from 
Baltimore, Md. . . . has been used at qb. 
but with his punting ability . . . coaches 
feel he'll be more apt at hb . . . he'll 
replace Earl Roth as Terps No. 1 punt- 
er .. . LYNN DAVIS, 5'11,,' 175, from 
Baltimore ,Md., was 2nd team All-Md. 
in High School . . . plays both offense 
and defense ... ED FULLERTON 
5'11, 185, from West View, Pa. . . . 
looked exceptionally well in spring, as 
sophomore may give Modzelewski a run 
for his money . . . GENE PYCHA, 5'11\ 
177, from Baltimore, Md., played on 
frosh. on offense is one of the fastest. 

LEFT HALFBACKS 

BOB SHEMONSKI, 5'10", 162, from 
Archbald, Pa. "Old Shoo-Shoo," is swift 
afoot, carried ball 47 times for 229 yards 
last year and scored 2 td's in Gator 
Bowl against Missouri . . . the brat 
should be mighty hep this year . . . JOE 
PETRUZZO, 5'11", 175, from Mamaro- 
neck, N. Y., was one of best sophs who 
showed in the spring . . . plenty fast and 
good receiver . . . HAROLD "BUCK" 
EARLEY, 5'10", 170, from Hagerstown, 
Md. . . . was All-State and leading 
scorer in high school, may play quite a 

PAGE ELEVEN 



bit of safety this season . . . KENNY 
DAVIS, 5'7", 175, from Washington, D. 
C. . . . showed up last spring for first 
time, played high school ball in D. C, 
may be a spark-plug with his speed . . . 
JOE KUCHTA, 5'9", 170, from Springdale, 
Pa. . . . plagued by injuries most of 
last season, his leg has healed and he 
is expected to return to his old speed 
of '48 . . . CHARLES FALLER, 5'9", 
150, from Washington, D. C, showed 
speed on the frosh team . . . may fit 
in varsiity picture very well . . . DICK 
BELINS, 5'10", 170, from Haddon Hghts. 
N. J. ... a soph, was all-sectional in 
Jersey . . . coaches have an eye for 
his fitting into defensive picture. 

FULLBACKS 

KARNEY SCIOSCIA, 5'10", 200, from 
Westfield, N. J. . . . built like a bull, 
he can hit as hard as one . . . didn't 
see too much action last year due to 
auto accident injuries . . . was all- 
state in New Jersey ... ED BOLTON, 
6', 195, from Miami, Fla. . . . was a 
halfback at one time but now will see 
action in ball carrying and blocking as- 
signments . . . improved very much last 
season . . . DAVE CIANELLI, 6', 210, 
from Hagerstown, Md. ... the bull in 
a china closet . . . played guard last 
season but showed such speed, Coach 
Tatum switched him to full for '50, 
intercepted winning td against NCS . . . 
WALT BOER I, 5'10", 190, from Flush- 
ing, Long Island, was leading high school 
ace . . . DAN STAFFIERI, 5'S". 195, 
from Philadelphia. Pa. . . . switched 
from guard to fullback post ... ED 
BARRITT, 5'10", 195, from Long Island. 
N. Y. . . . a soph hopeful. 



RECORD AGAINST 
1950 GRID FOES 



The Terps have played football, 
since it was started in 1892, under 
three names — Maryland Agricul- 
tural College through 1915, Mary- 
land State College from 1916 
through 1919 and University of 
Maryland since 1920. Past results 
against 1950 opponents were: 



W. L. T. 

GEORGIA— 0—0— 1 

1948—20 Georgia— 20 

(Gator Bowl Game) 



NAVY— 1—10— 



1905— 

1906— 2 

1907— 

1908— 
1913— 

1916— 7 

1917— 

1930— 

1931— 6 

1932— 7 
1934—13 



Navy— 17 
Navy— 12 
Navy— 12 
Navy — 57 
Navy— 76 
Navy — 14 
Navy— 62 
Navy— 6 
Navy— 
Navy 28 
Navy— 16 




MICHIGAN STATE— 0—4 — 

1944— 0-0 Michigan State— 8-33 

(Home and Home) 
1946—14 Michigan State— 26 

1949— 7 Michigan State— 14 



DUKE— 0—6— 



1932— 

1933— 7 

1941— 

1942— 
1947— 7 
1948—12 



Duke— 34 
Duke— 38 
Duke— 50 
Duke— 42 
Duke— 19 
Duke— 13 



PAGE TWELVE 



RECORD AGAINST 1950 GRID FOES 

fContinuedJ 
N. C. STATE— 3— 3— 3 GEO. WASH I NGTON— 6— 3— 2 



1909- 


- 6 


N. C. State- 


-23 


1897- 


- 


Columbian U.- 


- 


1917- 


- 6 


N. C. State- 


-10 


1898- 


- 


Columbian U.- 


-32 


1921- 


- 6 


INT. C. State- 


- 6 


1902- 


-11 


Columbian U.- 


-10 


1922- 


- 7 


N. C. State- 


- 6 


1903- 


- 6 


Columbian U.- 


- 


1923- 


-26 


N. C. State- 


-12 


1904- 


- 


Columbian U.- 


- 


1924- 


- 


N. C. State- 


- 


1907- 


-11 


George Washington- 


- 


1946- 


- 7 


N. C. State- 


-28 


1908- 


- 


George Washington- 


-57 


1947- 


- 


N. C. State- 


- 


1909- 


- 


George Washington- 


-26 


1949- 


-14 


N. C. State- 


- 6 


1910- 


- 6 


George Washington- 


- 










1948- 


-47 


George Washington- 


- 










1949- 


-40 


George Washington- 


-14 


p l- ,~, r> ."■ - ~r A/M A HI n 




(Originally Columbian U.) 
WEST VIRGINIA— 2— 3— 2 




1899- 


- 


Georgeto.wn- 


-17 




1902- 


- 


Georgetown- 


-27 










1903- 


- 


Georgetown- 


-28 


1919- 


- 


West Virginia- 


-27 


1904- 


- 


Georgetown- 


-22 


1943- 


- 2 


West Virginia- 


- 6 


1906- 


- 


Georgetown- 


-28 


1944- 


- 6 


West Virginia- 


- 6 


1907- 


- 


Georgetown- 


-10 


1945- 


-13 


West Virginia- 


-13 


1934- 


- 6 


Georgetown- 


- 


1947- 


-27 


West Virginia- 


- 


1935- 


-12 


Georgetown- 


- 6 


1948- 


-14 


West Virginia- 


-16 


1936- 


- 6 


Georgetown- 


- 7 


1949- 


-47 


West Virginia- 


- 7 


1937- 


-12 


Georgetown- 


- 2 










1938- 


- 7 


Georgetown- 


-14 










1939- 


- 


Georgetown- 


-20 


VIRGINIA TECH— 13— 10— 




1940- 


- 


Georgetown- 


-41 










1941- 


- 


Georgetown- 


-26 


1919- 


- 


Virgin'a Tech.- 


- 6 


1949- 


-33 


Georgetown- 


- 7 


1920- 


- 7 


Virginia Tech- 


- 










1921- 


-10 


Virginia Tech- 


- 7 










1922- 


- 


Virginia Tech- 


-21 


NORTH 


CAROLINA— 4— 12— ( 


D 


1923- 
1924- 


- 7 

- 


Virginia Tech- 
Virginia Tech- 


-16 
-12 










1925- 


- 


Virginia Tech- 


- 3 


1920- 


-13 


North Carolina- 


- 


1926- 


- 8 


Virginia Tech- 


-24 


1921- 


- 7 


North Carolina- 


-16 


1927- 


-13 


Virginia Tech- 


- 7 


1922- 


- 3 


North Carolina- 


-27 


1928- 


- 6 


Virginia Tech- 


- 9 


1923- 


-14 


North Carolina- 


- 


1929- 


-24 


Virginia Tech- 


- 


1924- 


- 6 


North Carolina- 


- 


1930- 


-13 


Virginia Tech- 


- 7 


1925- 


- 


North Carolina- 


-16 


1931- 


-20 


Virginia Tech- 


- 


1926- 


-14 


North Carolina- 


- 6 


1932- 


- 


Virginia Tech- 


-23 


1927- 


- 6 


North Carolina- 


- 7 


1933- 


- 


Virginia Tech- 


-14 


1928- 


19 


North Carolina- 


-26 


1934- 


-14 


Virginia Tech- 


- 9 


1929- 


- 


North Carolina- 


-43 


1935- 


- 7 


Virginia Tech- 


- 


1930- 


-21 


North Carolina- 


-28 


1936- 


- 3 


Virginia Tech— 


- 


1935- 


- 


North Carolina- 


-33 


1945- 


-13 


V'rginia Tech- 


21 


1936- 


- 


North Carolina- 


-14 


1946- 


- 6 


Virginia Tech- 


- 


1946- 


- 


North Carolma— 


-13 


1947- 


-21 


Virginia Tech- 


-19 


1947- 


- c 


North Carolina- 


-19 


194S- 


-23 


Virginia Tech- 


- 


1948- 


-20 


North Carolina— 


-49 


1949- 


-34 


Virginia Tech— 


- 7 



PAGE THIRTEEN 



THE COACHING STAFF 



JIM TATUM, Head Football Coach: A grad- 
uate of the University of North Carolina, he 
played tackle under Coach Carl Snavely. He 
is beginning his fourth season with the Terps 
and his 1949 record was nine wins and one 
defeat. This included a win over Missouri in 
the Gator Bowl. He has led Maryland to two 
Bowl games in his career here and this sea- 
son has lined them up with one of the tough- 
est schedules they ever had. Before Maryland, 
he was head coach at Oklahoma, North Caro- 
lina and Jacksonville Navy. He also assisted 
at Cornell and Iowa Sea Hawks. Married, he 
resides with his wife Edna and son and daugh- 
ter in College Park. 





JACK HENNEMIER: The "old raid head" 
from Savannah, Georgia, was one of Duke 
University's all time centers and weighed in 
at only 155. He was an assistant at Duke 
before joining the Terp staff two years ago. 
Jack previously was a high school coach in 
Savannah and an assistant at W & L. He 
handles the line and doubles as a scout. 
Married, he resides with his wife Mary Vir- 
ginia in College Park. 



BILL MEEK. The former Tennessee football 
ace is one of the originals on the staff. He 
is beginning his fourth season and this year 
will head the backfield. He has had sev- 
eral years doing a good job with the frosh. 
Greatest happiness this summer, he improved 
his golf game. Married, he resides in College 
Park with his wife, two sons and daughter. 





WARREN GIESE, handsome bachelor on the 
coaching staff, most eligible, too. Played for 
Coach Tatum at Oklahoma and finished up his 
career at Central Michigan. This year he will 
be head coach of the frosh, which Coach 
Tatum deems a most important assignment. 
He handles the ends. 



PAGE FOURTEEN 



DENVER CRAWFORD: The newest addition 
to the staff will help on the line. Last sea- 
son he assisted at W & L and before that 
played pro football with the New York Yank- 
ees. Another former Tennessee gridster, he 
was one of the Vols top linemen. He played 
in the Blue Gray Game on two occasions and 
in the All-Star Game in Chicago in 1945. 
Married, he resides with his wife Betty and 
one son in College Park. 





FLUCIE STEWART: "The big-red haid" is 
back on full time football coaching and scout- 
ing after a lapse of two seasons in which 
time he handled basketball. Known for his 
proficiency in scouting, the former Furman U. 
all around athlete has had a lot of coach- 
ing experience. Furman, Clemson, Applachian 
State, Tampa were handled by him. Married, 
he resides with his wife "Miss Bess," known 
for her good Southern Cookin' right here in 
College Park. 



JOHN CUD MO RE: An old hand around the 
Terps he played for Stetson U. and coached 
the Fort Benning Army team to a Service 
Championship during the war. Married, he 
resides with his wife Louise and two, boys in 
College Park . . . Three newcomers to the 
coaching staff, who will work mostly with the 
frosh, are JIM LARUE, JOE TUCKER, and 
GENE KINNEY, all recent footballers under 
Jim Tatum. Larue and his wife Betty, and 
Tucker and his wife, Nancy, together with 
their son, reside in College Park. Kinney, like 
Giese, is a bachelor. 







DUKE WYRE, head trainer. This is his fourth 
-season with the Terps. He formerly trained 
at Yale and Holy Cross. Wyre is President of 
the Southern Conference Trainers' Association, 
and on the Board of the National Association. 
Good for morale, he's "Mother Duke" to the 
boys. Married, he lives with his wife Marion 
in College Park. 



PAGE FIFTEEN 



MARYLAND'S COMPLETE GRID RECORD 

By Bill Hottel 

Here is Maryland's football record by years of collegiate games only. 
Before the Curley Byrd coaching regime began in 1912 it was not un- 
usual to play two or more high schools of the vicinity each season. 
Some were practice games, others real contests but often the score 
was not even recorded. The records were checked and rechecked during 
the past summer and, if not 100 percent, doubtless are as correct as they 
ever can be made! 

First 10 years when captains coached (1892-1901) 

Coach 
1892— W. W. Skinner— a: 
1893.-S. H. Harding 
1894__J. G. Bannon 

1895- _G. M. Harris <No football c 

1896__Grenville Lewis 
1897_ -John Lillibridge 
1898.-J. F. Kenly 
1899— S. M. Cooke 
1900- _F. H. Peters 
1901__E. B. Dunbar 

os— Only Hopkins and St. John's played. 9 27 5 238 723 

Next 10 years under coaches (1902-191 1) 

Coach 

1902- _D. John Markey (Western Md.i 

1903— Markey 

1904_ -Markey 

1905—Fred Nielsen (Nebraska) — y 

1906_ -Nielsen 

1907— C. G. Church (Virginia) 

and C. W. Melick (Nebraska) 
1908_ -Bill Lang (Delaware) 
1909— Barney Cooper (Maryland '08) 

and E. P. Larkin (Cornell 
1910__R. Alston (George Washington) 
1911— C. F. Donnelly (Trinity) 

and H. C. Byrd (Maryland '08)— z 

30 41 8 460 776 
y — Coach who developed Byrd. z — Byrd coached team for last 
two games with Western Maryland and Gallaudet and won both 
and a job at College Parle starting in the fall of 1912. 

PAGE SIXTEEN 







Opp. 


W. L. 


T. 


Pts. Pts. 


2 





120 


2 





24 6 


2 2 





70 50 


:o dispute v, 


1th 


commandant) 


1 


2 


16 6 


1 6 


1 


44 94 


1 5 





27 125 


6 





6 216 


1 1 


2 


23 23 


1 5 





28 83 











Opp. 


W. 


L. 


T. 


Pts. 


Pts. 


1 


6 


2 


22 


95 


5 


3 


1 


62 


64 


4 


4 


2 


56 


55 


4 


4 





83 


66 


3 


2 





71 


44 


2 


6 





32 


71 


2 


7 





10 


211 


2 


3 





25 


70 


4 


3 


1 


67 


42 


3 


3 


2 


32 


58 



Gurley Byrd Regime (1912-1934) 



1912. 
1913- 
1914_ 
1915- 
1916_ 
1917- 
1918_ 
1919- 
1920_ 
1921_ 
1922_ 
1923_ 
1924_ 
1925_ 
1926_ 
1927_ 
1928_ 
1929_ 
1930- 
1931- 
1932_ 
1933- 
1934_ 



Coach 
_H. C. Byrd 
_Byrd 
_Byrd 
_Byrd 
_Byrd 
-Byrd 
_Byrd 
-Byrd 
_Byrd 
-Byrd 
-Byrd 
_Byrd 
-Byrd 
_Byrd 
-Byrd 
-Byrd 
-Byrd 
-Byrd 
-Byrd 
-Byrd 
-Byrd 
-Byrd — X 
-Byrd — x 











Opp. 


w. 


L. 


T. 


Pts. 


Pts. 


5 


1 


1 


156 


53 


5 


3 





157 


116 


5 


2 





72 


43 


5 


3 





130 


69 


6 


2 





142 


52 


4 


3 


1 


88 


159 


4 


1 


1 


57 


35 


5 


4 





92 


74 


7 


2 





149 


55 


3 


5 


1 


45 


127 


4 


5 


1 


77 


137 


7 


2 


1 


212 


56 


3 


3 


3 


74 


78 


2 


5 


1 


53 


82 


5 


4 


1 


161 


93 


4 


7 





186 


144 


6 


3 


1 


132 


70 


4 


4 


2 


148 


127 


7 


5 





231 


142 


8 


1 


1 


194 


98 


5 


6 





148 


151 


3 


7 





107 


149 


7 


3 





143 


49 



114 81 15 2,954 2,159 

x—Jack Fdber (Maryland '26) was field coach in 1933 
and 1934. 



After-Byrd (1935-1949) 













Opp. 


Coach 


W. 


L. 


T. 


Pts. 


Pts. 


-Frank Dobson (Princeton) 


7 


2 


2 


127 


71 


-Dobson 


6 


5 





117 


59 


-Dobson 


8 


2 





127 


65 


-Dobson 


2 


7 





86 


216 


-Dobson 


2 


7 





64 


104 


-Jack Faber C26), Al Heagy C30), and 










Al Woods C33), all of Maryland 


2 


6 


1 


39 


172 


_Faber, Heagy, Woods 


3 


5 


1 


49 


196 


.-Clark Shaughnessy (Minnesota) 


7 


2 





198 


124 


-Clarence Spears (Dartmouth) 


4 


5 





105 


194 


-Spears 


1 


7 


1 


46 


170 


-Paul Bryant (Alabama) 


6 


2 


1 


219 


105 


-Shaugnessy 


3 


6 





136 


193 


-Jim Tatum (North Carolina) 


7 


2 


2 


228 


140 


-Tatum 


6 


4 





207 


132 


-Tatum 


9 


1 





266 


82 



1935. 
1936. 
1937. 
1938. 
1939. 
1940- 

1941. 
1942. 
1943- 
1944_ 
1945- 
1946_ 
1947_ 
1948_ 
1949- 



Grand Total 



73 63 8 2,014 1,941 
226 212 36 5,666 5,599 



PAGE SEVENTEEN 



LEADING 1949 STATISTICS 

BALL CARRYING 

Times Carried Net Yds. Gained Pts. Scored 
Modzelewski 140 

Shemonski 54 

L. Davis 41 

PASS RECEIVING 

Modzelewski 

Augsburger 

Karnash 

PUNTING 

Targarona 
EXTRA POINTS 
Dean 

Overall Team Statistics, 10 games. 

Points 266-points against, 82 — 1st downs rushing 88, nets yds. 1821— 
Total passes 149, nets yds. 952, 60 completions. 

(Note: the above excepting the team total only include men on the 
'50 squad.) 



1950 FRESHMAN FOOTBALL SCHEDULE 

Sept. 23__William and Mary, home 
Oct. 6__George Washington U., home 
Oct. 19 — West Virginia, away 
Oct. 27 — North Carolina, home 
Nov. 25_ -Navy Plebes, away 



625 


36 


238 


18 


110 


12 


No. Caught 


Ydi.Gained 


8 


108 


8 


164 


17 


252 


Times 


Yds. Kicked 


2 


73 


Times 


Con. Made 


39 


30 



PAGE EIGHTEEN 



BRIEF HISTORY OF THE UNIVERSITY 

The history of the present University is the history of two in- 
stitutions: the old privately-owned and operated University of Mary- 
land in Baltimore and the Maryland State College (formerly Maryland 
Agricultural College) at College Park. These institutions were merged 
in 1920. 

In 1807 the College of Medicine of Maryland was organized, the 
fifth medical school in the United States. The first class was graduated 
in 1810. A permanent home was established in 1814-1815 by the erection 
of the building at Lombard and Greene Streets in Baltimore, the oldest 
structure in America devoted to medical teaching. Here was founded 
one of the first medical libraries (and the first medical school library) 
in the United States. In 1812 the General Assembly of Maryland author- 
ized the College of Medicine of Maryland to "annex or constitute facil- 
ities of divinity, law, and arts and sciences," and by the same act de- 
clared that the "colleges or faculties thus united should be constituted 
an university by the name and under the title of the University of Mary- 
land." By authority of this act, steps were taken in 1813 to establish 
"a faculty of law," and in 1823 a regular school of instruction in law 
was opened. Subsequently there were added: in 1882 a Department of 
Dentistry which was absorbed in 1923 by the Baltimore College of 
Dental Surgery (founded in 1840, the first dental school in the world) ; 
in 1889 a School of Nursing; and in 1904 the Maryland College of 
Pharmacy (founded in 1841, the third oldest pharmacy college in the 
United States). 

The Maryland State College was chartered in 1856 under the name 
of the Maryland Agricultural College, the second agricultural college in 
the Western Hemisphere. For three years the College was under private 
management. In 1862 the Congress of the United States passed the Land 
Grant Act. This act granted each State and Territory that should 
claim its benefits an appropriate amount of unclaimed western lands, 
in place of scrip, the proceeds from the sale of which should apply under 
certain conditions to the "endowment, support, and maintenance of at 
least one college where the leading object shall be, without excluding 
other scientific and classical studies, and including nrlitary tactic?, to 
teach such branches of learning as are related to agriculture and the 
mechanic arts, in such a manner as the Legislatures of the States may 
respectively prescribe, in order to promote the liberal and practical 
education of the industrial classes in the several pursuits and professions 
of life." This grant was accepted by the General Assembly of Maryland, 
and the Maryland Agricultural College was named as the beneficiary 
of the grant. Thus the College became, at least in part, a State institu- 
tion. In the fall of 1914 control was taken over entirely by the State. 
In 1916 the General Assembly granted a new charter to the College, and 
made it the Maryland State College. 

In 1920, by an act of the State Legis'ature, the University of Mary- 
land was merged with the Maryland State College, and the resultant 
institution was given the name University of Maryland, 



PAGE NINETEEN 





A 



-J 

r