(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "University of Maryland men's football media guides"

THE 1951 



YARD LINE 



LAN 





BOB WARD— THE TERPS' FIRST ALL-AMERICA 

It is only appropriate that Bob Ward, the first All-America football 
player at the University of Maryland should be placed on our cover, peen 
on the gridiron before 43,836 fans in Byrd Stadium where he distin- 
guished himself and established his claim as All-America timber on every 
play. 

Ward, 185 pounds of explosive dynamite, is so highly respected by his 
opponents that they have double-teamed and sometimes triple-teamed 
him in an effort to keep him out of their baokfield. He often is referred 
to as the fifth man in the opponents' backfield. Averaging 50 minutes a 
game last year is evidence that he is invaluable to the team both on 
offense and defense. 

Gifted with great speed and quick reactions, he has one of the fastest 
and most vicious charges of any lineman in football today. 

Ever since his first year, his spectacular play raised the experts' eye- 
brows in amazement over the great football he played against robust 
opponents. As a sophomore he was selected Lineman of the Year in the 
Southern Conference and voted the most valuable player of the '50 
Gator Bowl game against Missouri. 

Coach Tatum smiles at the mention of his name then goes on to say: 
"He's the greatest little football player I've seen, ounce for ounce!" 

Last year he won nearly every honor that a lineman could receive. 
Below is a list of them. 

ASSOCIATED PRESS— 1st Team— All-America 

LOOK MAGAZINE— Grantland Rice and the Football Writers Asso- 
ciation of America 1st Team — All-America 

NEA — 1st Team — All- America 

WEEKLY GRIDIRON RECORD— 1st Team— All-America 

EXTENSION MAGAZINE ALL-CATHOLIC ALL-AM ERICA— 1st Team 

UNITED PRESS— 2nd Team— All-America 

INS — 2nd Team — All-America 

CHICAGO TRIBUNE ALL-PLAYERS ALL-AM ERICA— 1st Team 

THE QUARTERBACK— 2nd Team— All-America 

COLLIER'S ALL-SOUTH ALL-STAR TEAM— 1st Team 

COLLIER'S ALL-AMERICA— All-America Specialist 

ALL-CONFERENCE — Selected by Southern Conference Sports Writers 
Association — 1st Team 

ASSOCIATED PRESS ALL-SOUTHERN CON FE RENCE— 1st Team 

UNITED PRESS ALL-SOUTH— 1st Team 

INS ALL-SOUTH— 1st Team 

HELM'S ATHLETIC FOUNDATION— 1st Team— All-America 

OTHER AWARDS 

Awarded the Leigh Williams Memorial Trophy by the Norfolk Sports 

Club as the Outstanding Collegiate Player within the bounds of the 

Southern Conference. 

Received the Washington Touchdown Club Robert Smith Trophy as the 

outstanding collegiate player of the year in the area. 

Was named the most valuable player on the team for the third straight 

year by his teammates. 

Was named on every All-Opponent Team. 




FOR PRESS, RADIO and TELEVISION 

This is your 1951 Maryland football bro- 
chure, "The 50-Yard Line." It is published 
for your information. I hope it will help 
you in your coverage of Terp games this sea- 
son. With this book goes an invitation to you 
to visit us. We never have the door closed. 
In return, I will try to. visit you as often as 
I can and extend every assistance possible. 
For any information you can reach me day 
and night at UNion 4076. 

Applications for tickets should be made 
the first part of the week of the game to 
allow time for mailing. Wire and telephone 
requirements should be made through your 
local Western Union office. 

Every effort will be made to furnish all the services of the game 
for your stories. Statistics, both half-time and final, quarter play-by- 
play, game leaders, substitutions, etc., will be ready a few minutes 
after the game. 

JOE F. BLAIR, 
Sports Publicity Director, 
University of Maryland, 
College Park, Maryland. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



PAGE 



PAGE 



1— Message to Press 


18-26— Terp Opponents 


2-Dr. H. C. Byrd 


27— Gridiron History 


3— Athletic Council 


28-50 Highlights 


4— Dept. Int. Athletics 


28— Byrd Stadium 


5— Coach Jim Tatum 


29— '50 Team Statistics 


6-8 — Ass t. Coaches-Trainers 


30-32 — Individual Statistics 


9— Opponent s Schedules 


33-34— All-Time Records 


10-13— Player Thumbnails 


55-56— Complete Grid Record 


14-15— Squad Roster 


3 7— History 


16— Game Officials 


38-40— For Your Notes 


17— Terp Coverage 






DR. H.C. BYRD 

PRESIDENT, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Upon the insistence of everyone, the Board of Regents, University 
officials, the Athletic Department, students, fans, and just plain John Q. 
Public, the Terp's new million dollar football plant appropriately was 
named BYRD STADIUM. 

It is easy to see why there was never a minute spent behind closed 
doorj seeking a name for the stadium. Prom the time the very first 
shovel of the 28 tons of dirt was removed from the stadium, it was 
known that University President, H. C. Byrd, would receive the honor 
and tribute due him by having it bear his name. 

It has been through the exhaustive efforts of Dr. Byrd that the 
University of Maryland is known today as one of the foremost educa- 
tional institutions in the Nation. By the same token, he has made pos- 
sible this new stadium as part of the program to give Maryland a first 
class athletic curriculum. All this is due to his long time desire to build 
Maryland into one of the best equipped Universities in the country. 

Athletics is nothing new to Dr. Byrd. It was back in 1905 that he 
first played for the Terps. From 1912 through 1934, he was head coach. 
In those 25 years his teams compiled a 114-81-15 record 



ATHLETIC COUNCIL 





Mr. G. F. Eppley 



Mr. James Tatum 





Mr. Talbert Speer Dr. Wm. Supplee Col. J. C. Pitchford 




Dr. Jack Faber Dr. E. N. Cory Mr. Frank Wright 



THE DEPARTMENT OF INTERCOLLEGIATE 
ATHLETICS 



WILLIAM W. COBEY 

To those who know him, this big grin is 
nothing new to Bill Cobey, Graduate Man- 
ager of Athletics. 

An alumnus of 1931, Cobey comes from 
Quincy, Fla. His interest in Maryland stems 
from his being a member of an old Mary- 
land family. His father graduated in 1901. 

Cashier at the University for 17 years, 
Cobey moved to the Athletic Department in 
1948. Ha has the big job of scheduling 
teams for all sports besides looking after 
tickets. 

Married and has five children, three 
daughters and two sons. 




i 




Director of Athletics James M. latum 

Graduate Manager of Athletics William W. Cobey 

Athletic Publicity Director Joe F. Blair 

Equipment Head Kermit "Chief" Cissell 

Facilities Head H. Burton Shipley 

Chief of Concessions Vernon Seibert 

Ticket Manager Bennie Robinson 

Office Secretary to Mr. Tatum Mrs. Ora Rutherford 

Office Secretary to Mr. Cobey Mrs. Dorothy Hunt 

Head Trainer Alfred "Duke' Wyre 

Assistant Trainer John Lacey 

Football Coach James M. Tatum 

Basketball Coach H. A. "Bud" Millikan 

Boxing Coach Frank Cronin 

Baseball Coach H. Burton Shipley 

Lacrosse Co-Coaches Jack Faber, Al Heagy 

Track, Cross-Country Coach Jim Kehoe 

Soccer, Tennis Coach Doyle Royal 

Wrestling Coach _ Wm. E. "Sully" Krouse 

Golf Coach Frank Cronin 

Rifle Coach Col. Harland Griswold 

Gym Coach Dave Field 

— 4 — 







■MR MBBM WMS i H i MHi 



JIM TATUM 

HEAD FOOTBALL COACH AND ATHLETIC DIRECTOR 

In just four years, Jim Tatum has brought the University of Mary- 
land out of the football doldrums, and today the Terps from the little 
college town of College Park, Md., are recognized as one of the foot- 
ball powers of the nation. 

Evidence that the gridiron drought has ended since the Tatum 
regime started in 1947 is realized by his four-year record, 29-9-3. 

Tatum, a native of McColl, S. C, started his athletic career at the 
University of North Carolina, where he was a star tackle. After grad- 
uation in 1935, he followed his coach, Carl Snavely, as assistant at 
Cornell. Returning to his alma mater for his first fling at head coach- 
ing, in 1942, his team compiled a 5-2-2 slate. 

World War II found Tatum in the Navy. It was then that he was 
to learn the Split-T formation from Don Faurot as the latter's assistant 
at Iowa Preflight School. He later moved to Jacksonville Naval Air 
Station as head coach in 1945. 

After his Navy hitch, Tatum molded a strong eleven at Oklahoma. 
His Sooners went to the 1947 'Gator Bowl and beat N. C. State, 34-13. 

The call to Maryland came next, and grid fortunes here skyrocketed. 
The future should be fruitful under a young coach who has the early 
distinction in the profession as one of the best. 

Tatum is married and has two children, Becky and Jimmy. 



ASSISTANT COACHES 




JACK HENNEMIER 

At 150 pounds, the Terps' Line Coach 
Jack Hennemier made football fame for 
him elf when he played center in his col- 
lege days at Duke University, '33, '34, and 
'35. Undoubtedly one of the smallest players 
ever at the center of any line, Hennemier, 
a 60-minute man in '35, won the most val- 
uable player award as voted by his team- 
mates in 1935. This same year he made All- 
America Mention and the All-Conference 
team. 

Because of his outstanding gridiron prow- 
ess for his size, he is known, even today, as 
' Scrappy Jack." 

In 1939 he was lured to Washington and Lee University as Line 
Coach. He stayed there through '41, before being called into the Navy 
in '42. That year he played center and coached at the Pensacola Naval 
Air Station. 

After 3M> years in the service, Hennemier returned to Duke in '45 
as assistant line coach and freshman coach. 

He came to the Terps in '49 as line coach and handles the defensive 
team, an outstanding characteristic of Terp elevens under his tutelage. 

TOMMY MONT 

Tommy Mont, one of the greatest athletes 
in the history o.f the University of Mary- 
land, returns this year to his alma mater to 
handle the offensive backfield duties for the 
Terps. 

Mont, a four-year letterman in football, 
basketball, and lacrosse, comes to Maryland 
after four brilliant years with the profes- 
sional Washington Redskins. 

A home stater, coming from Cumberland, 
Md., Mont embarked on his athletic years 
in 1941. He got two years in before enter- 
ing the service in the spring of '43. He 
played tailback in '41 then quarterback on 
the '42 T eleven. Both years he won his bas- 
ketball and lacrosse letters also. Mont won 
All-America Mention as well as being placed on the Conference team 
in '42, and was named the outstanding college player of the Washing- 
ton-Maryland area that year. 

With 42 months in the service, 18 of which were spent in the ETO, 
Mont continued playing ball. He was tailback on the Fort Benning 
post championship team of '43. As quarterback and head coach, he led 
the 3rd Infantry team to the ETO championship. He also was at the helm 
of the 7th Army All-Star team. 

Mont completed his college ball playing quarterback for the Terps 
in '46, when he again won All-America Mention and All-Conference 
honors. Has three sons, ages 4, 2, and 10 months. 





WARREN GIESE 

A Navy vet, Giese, a native of Milwaukee, 
Wis., began his career in 1942 at Wisconsin 
State College where he lettered playing end 
in football and won a monogram as a 
quarter-miler. 

Entering the service in June '43, he was 
sent to Central Michigan College to study 
under the V-12 program. He played right 
half before transferring to Miami Training 
Center and then to Jacksonville in '45 
where he played end under Coach Tatum. 

He kept his football career going by en- 
rolling at Oklahoma in '46 to play for his 
Navy boss from Jacksonville. He won a 
berth on the All Big 7 team that year. 

Giese returned to Central Michigan to 
play one more year and got his B.A. and B.S. 

In '49, Tatum beckoned his former star to Maryland as end coach. Mix- 
ing football with studies, Giese got his Master's in Physicial Education 
in '49. 

DENVER CRAWFORD 

One of the finest tackles produced at the 
University of Tennessee, the Terps' of- 
fensive line coach, Denver Crawford, came 
to Maryland last year from W.&L., where 
he was line coach in '49. 

Crawford played one year of varsity ball 
in '42 before joining the Army Air Force; 
playing at Maxwell field and Fort Worth 
Air Base. 

Returning to Tennessee, he played on the 
Neyland teams of '46 and '47. Crawford 
made All-SE tackle all three years he play- 
ed for the Vols and made the All-America 
mention list in '42 and '47. Following grad- 
uation in '48, he was drafted by and played 
for the professional New York Yanks. 

Crawford comes from Kingsport, Tenn. 
He is married and has two sons. 

VERNON SEIBERT 

The newest addition to the staff. Seibert 
returned to his alma mater July 1 to be 
defensive backfield coach. Also he will be 
chief of concessions. 

An outstanding halfback for the Terps 
1946 through the '49 season, he is best re- 
membered as one of the finest safety men 
at Maryland. 

Last year he was football and lacrosse 
coach at Baltimore Junior College. He 
claims he was the girl's basketball coach 
also. 

Seibert was a B-25 pilot in the South 
Pacific in World War II. 

Married and has no children. 




EMMETT CHEEK 

A new addition to the staff this fall, Cheek 
comes to the Terps from Guilford College, 
N.C., whe-e he was line coach and baseball 
coach In '49 and '50. He will handle the im- 
portant job of teaching Terp football to the 
freshmen. 

A native of Chapel Hill N.C., Cheek stay- 
ed in his back yard and went to UNC. Start- 
ing in 1940, he was a guard under Tatum 
who was Freshman coach for the Tarheels. 
After another year of football, Cheek was 
called into the service in '41, and assigned to 
Army Medics. Returning to Carolina, he 
completed his football career under Carl 
Snavely. He stayed there for graduate work 
in '48. 

Cheek received his Masters degree in 
phys. ed. from Carolina last summer. 
He is married and has one son. 

THE TRAINERS 

ALFRED J. "DUKE" WYRE 

Head Trainer 

"Dapper Duke" an old Ivy-leaguer, will step 
out of Esquire into his training tog^, for the 
fifth year at Maryland. Duke, off the field, 
dresses as though he is trying to break into 
the top 10 best dressed in the country. 

Wyre was trainer at Yale for 15 years then 
moved to Holy Cross for two more before com- 
ing to. the Terps in 1947. 

During his three years in the Navy, he was 
a phys. ed. instructor in the V-12 program 

He was the first president of the Conference 
Trainer's Assn. He is on the board of the 
National Assn. and was named the number one 
trainer of the East in 1949. 

Duke is married and has no children. 



JOHN LACEY 

A full-time assistant trainer has been added 
to the staff this fall. 

Another of those accented Ivy-leaguers, 
Lacey comes to Maryland from Yale where he 
was assistant trainer for three years. He has 
had long experience with pro teams also. In 
early pro training periods, he has been trainer 
for the Chicago Cardinals, the N. Y. Yanks, 
and last year was with the Baltimore Colts. 

He graduated from Tilton Academy in New 
Hampshire. 

Lacey is married and has no children. 






TERP THUMBNAIL SKETCHES 



ENDS 

LLOYD COLTERYAHN, 20. 6'2". 200. Junior from Brentwood. Pa. Looks like the best 
bet for number one offensive end. Fast, a good blocker, and has a high long stride mak- 
ing him hard to bring down. Played some end and backfield last year. Caught 1 for 14 
and carried the ball 10 times for 34 yds. Much better suited at offensive end. Might 
also play some safety. Played and lettered 4 years in football, basketball, and track in 
high school. Was WPIAL (Pa.) star. Played In Pittsburgh All-Star game. 

JOHN ALDERTON, 20 6-1. 175. Junior from Cumberland, Md. As a soph in '50, he dis- 
tinguished himself as one of the finest defensive ends in the Conference. Played nearly 
every minute of defense each game. Should be one of Old Liners' best. Tremendous 
desire and determination. Also lettered in track as broad jumper. Star at Fort Hill. 
LOU WEIDENSAUL. 23. 6-2, 200, Junior from Ashland, Pa. Played defense as soph but 
being groomed for starting berth as offensive end this year. Has a long reach and big 
hands. Good receiver, fast, and fair blocker. Plaved in Pa. All-Star game in '44. Navy 
vet. 

BILL RUEHL. 19, 6-2, 195. Junior from Cumberland, Md. With a good year of experi- 
ence behind him. he should have inside track for other defensive terminal, Prepped at 
Massanutten M.A. in Virginia. Got married this summer. 

HENRY "HANK" FOX, 22. 6-3. 200. Senior from White Plains. N.Y. Letterman. Will 
be out to anchor an offensive job. Could do it. Good receiver and adequate blocker. 
Played freshman basketball. 

ART HURD, 22, 6-2. 210. Junior from Gardner, Mass. The "bald eagle" of the team. 
Held out last year. A good shot to play plenty of defensive end. Likes it rough. 
All-around athlete at Gardner High. 

PAUL LINDSAY, 19, 6-2, 205, Sophomore from Ridgeley, W. Va. Could be the surprise 
package in this department. A fine receiver, good blocker, and a hard worker. Very 
aggressive on the field. Outstanding four-sport high school athlete. 

MARTIN CRYTZER, 19. 6-0. 200, Sophomore from Brackenridge, Pa. Was a standout 
on frosh team. Has potentialities for playing defense, which he likes, and offense. An 
excellent student. Had almost an A average in Pre-Med in frosh year. 

FRED HEFFNER, 19. 6-3, 205, Sophomore from Saxton, Pa. Will see a lot of punting 
duty besides being counted on to play offensive end. Averaged 60 yards per kick as a 
frosh. Played in North-South football All-Star Game. All-League in basketball. 

RALPH BAIERL, 18, 6-3, 215, Sophomore from Pittsburgh, Pa. Out last season with 
injuries. Big and husky. Lacks experience but has a lot of Are. LEONARD MAHONEY. 
20. 6-3. 200, Sophorome from Baltimore, Md. Fine frosh offensive end. With a little 
more push and experience he could help the end problem. BOB DELLAFORIA, 19, 6-2, 
175, Sophomore from Edmon, Pa. Played halfback as a frosh. Fast and aggressive. Could 
be big help to Terp ends. 

TACKLES 

DICK "LITTLE MO" MODZELEWSKI. 20, 6-0, 235, Junior from West Natrona, Pa. 
The younger but "bigger" half of Terps' first brother act on the gridiron. Won every 
kind of award at Har-Brack High School. Stepped into Navy game last year and won 
first team berth on brilliant game as a soph. Had outstanding day against Michigan 
State. Fast and rugged. Tough to get around. Coaches say he is best defensive tackle in 
many a moon. Watch this boy. He's sure to put on a spectacular show every Saturday, 
making a strong bid for future' All-America honors. 

JOE MOSS, 21, 6-1, 205, Senior from Ridgeley, W. Va. A back in high school, Moss has 
lettered as offensive lineman for Terps. Was leading scorer in Potomac Valley Conf. in 
tiigh school, where he made the all P.V.C. teams. Will be depended upon considerably 
this year as number one offensive left tackle. 

CHICK FRY, 21, 6-3, 230, Senior from Reading, Pa. The "brainiest" player on the 
squad, with straight A's in Business School. A rough boy on the field. Likes to mix it 
up. Should help the offensive tackle situation considerably Will probably get extra point 
assignment. Chick is V-P of Monogram Club and Senior Class. PETE LADYGO, 23, 6-2, 
210, Senior from Pittsburgh, Pa. Spent two years at Potomac State before coming to 
Maryland. All-City in High School. Played linebacker last year but has been moved to 
tackle to help this critical position. Intercepted two passes last year for 34 yards, one a 
td against Michigan State. 

— 10 — 



BOB "BLUBBER" MORGAN, 21, 6-0, 235, Sophomore from Freeport, Pa. Outstanding 
high school lineman . . . selected on state and county teams. Held out last year. Is 
considered to be top defensive soph and will probably get starting assignment at left 
tackle if fall practice follows a great spring demonstration. High on Tatum's list. 

STANLEY JONES, 19. 6-0, 235, Sophomore from Lemoyne, Pa. Football, basketball and 
track star in high school. Was AU-Susquehanna Conference player and All-Harrisburg. 
State discus champ. Held out last year. Solid as a rock. Has been moved from guard 
to bolster the offensive tackles. Fast and a good blocker. Probable starter. 

PAUL NESTOR, 20, 6-3, 205, Junior from Parsons, W. Va. Went to Potomac State for 
two years. Held out last year. Had a great spring practice. Will undoubtedly play a 
lot of defensive end plus offensive tackle. One of roughest boys on the team. A good 
student . . . DAVE CHRISTI ANSON, 22, 6-2, 200, Senior from Baltimore, Md. The 
artist of the squad specializing in "morale" cartoons before games. Will play defense. 

TOM BREUNICH, 19. 6-2, 210, Sophomore from Pelham, N.Y. Had a fine frosh year. 
Missed spring ball because of illness. A fine prospect with a lot of possibilities. 

RAY BLACKBURN, 19, 6-2, 220, Sophomore from Keyser, W. Va. Outstanding frosh. A 
tough guy to get around. Was All-Conference and All-North All-America in high school. 
Should fit into the picture . . . DON MOLTER, 19, 6-0, 210, Sophomore from Pittsburgh, 
Pa. Has ability but lacks experience. Seasoning will help. 



GUARDS 



BOB WARD, 24, 5-10, 185, Senior from Elizabeth, N.J. The Terps' first All-America. 
Named to practically everybody's All team. Averaged better than 50 minutes last year. 
Will play that if not more this season. Ward charges so fast you can't trap him. say 
his opponents. Has the ability to jump over a line, keep his balance, and make the 
tackle. Never satisfied until he get a piece of the ball carrier. Has won opposing 
coaches' highest praise his soph and junior years, a great tribute to any athlete. Co- 
Captain along with Cianelli. A fine leader. Vice-President of Student Gov't. Married and 
has a "little All-America," Jimmy. Vet of Army pa.atroopers. 

ED KENSLER, 23, 6-0, 210, Senior from Lawrenceville, III. Played outstanding as re- 
serve last year. Clinched the right guard defensive assignment with a fine demonstration 
during spring drills. A smart, heads-up player with a vicious charge. Tackles hard. 
Very fast and makes many tackles covering punts. A Marine veteran; married and has 
one son, Richard, age 13 months. 

BILL MALETZKY, 21, 6-1, 220, Sophomore from White Plains, N.Y. Another soph hold- 
over who figures prominently in Terps' defensive plans. Will be right behind Ward. One 
of brightest sophs. Is fast, strong and, a vicious tackier. Was All-County two years 
in high school. 

FRANK NAVARRO, 21, 5-10, 195, Junior from White Plains, N.Y. Won starting berth 
and letter last year as a soph. One of top blockers on team. Has a lot of determination 
and drive. Was outstanding teammate of Maletzky's at White Plains High. 
WALTER BOERI, 20, 5-10, 200, Junior from Long Island. Fullback last year. Moved 
to guard to help offensive line. Did a good job in spring ball. Was high school star. Car- 
ried last year 4 times for 60 yards. RUDY GAYZUR, 22, 6-i, 210, Senior from Yonkers, 
N.Y. Lettered in '49. Held out last year after early practice injury. Could be a key 
man in line. Strong and lots of fire. Was a four sport athlete in high school. Ray 
STANKUS. 20, 6-0, 200, Junior from Philadelphia. Held out last year. Needs a little 
seasoning; then should prove valuable on either offense or defense. Co-Captain of North- 
east Catholic where he won All-Catholic and All-Scholastic honors. JOHN GUENDER, 
22, 6-0, 205, Sophomore from Plainfield, N.J. Should see a lot of action. Showed well 
in spring practice and has qualifications of becoming a valuable defensive man. Played 
on high school championship team. An Army vet. DONALD DECKER, 19, 6-0, 215, 
Sophomore from Cumberland, Md. One of frosh best lineman. May get double duty as 
place-kicker. At Fort Hill High, he was All-City, All-County two years, and All-State, 
one year. Got Honorable Mention All-America also. CHARLES JAKSEC, 19, 5-10, 190, 
Sophomore from Pittsburgh, Pa. Just moved there from Hastings. Mich., where he went 
to high school. Was held out last year after transferring from Notre Dame. Could be a 
big help after some experience. BOB LYNN, 20, 5-11, 210, Sophomore from Washington, 
D.C. A bulwark of frosh line. Looks promising. Was All-Metropolitan at Eastern High. 



CENTERS 

TOM COSGROVE, 21. 6-3, 215, Junior from Philadelphia. Stepped in last year as soph 
at offensive post and never relinquished it. Tatum says he is one of best offensive 
centers he has coached. Can really push them out of his way after he snaps the ball. 
Needs watching. Star at North Catholic in football and basketball. Played varsity bas- 
ketball year before last for the Terps. 

JEFF KEITH, 24, 6-3, 195 Senior from Tarrant, Ala. A veteran linebacker, Jeff will 
get same assignment this year. Hard tackier. Good pass defender. A newlywed this 
summer. Was All-State in high school. A Marine vet. 

ED FINCKE, 25, 5-11, 180, Senior from Etna, Pa. Papa of the team. Fine offensive 
center who specializes exclusively in centering on the punt play. Fast and a good tack- 
ier. Makes many tackles of punt receiver. Married and an Army Air Corps vet. ROY 
MARTINE, 21, 6-1, 200. Junior from East Orange, N.J Lettered in '50 as defensive 
center. Missed spring practice. Hard to get around. Prepped at Fork Union M.A., Va. 

CLIFFORD TREXLER, 21, 6-1, 200, Sophomore from New Florence, Pa. A fine offensive 
center prospect. Did a great job as a frosh. Will be valuable addition Excellent blocker. 
Likes it rough and loves to play. Prepped at Kiski in Pa. 

CHARLES LATTIMER. 21. 6-1, 200, from Cumberland, Md. Held out last year for 
seasoning. Big and rough. Should give royal battle for Cosgrove substitute. Won All- 
City honors while at Fort Hill High. DON BROUGHER. 19, 6-1, Sophomore from Edge- 
wood, Pa. Another promising snapper-back up from the frosh. Needs experience and 
confidence. 

QUARTERBACKS 

JACK SCARBATH. 21. 6-1. 185. Junior from Baltimore. One of country's finest soph 
generals last year. Named sophomore of week in Southern Conference for outstanding 
game against Navy and Michigan State. Also had a big day against Duke. With a 
year's experience tucked under his belt, he could hold the key to a successful year. 
Everyone will be watching Scarbath. A very capable Split-T qb. Runs well on the keep 
play and is a good passer. Carried the ball 81 times for 252 yards and passed 80 times 
for 463. four for TD's; total offense 715 yards. Scored three times, his first being the 
first td in Byrd Stadium against Navy. Worth watching. Here on Charlie Keller 
scholarship. 

BOB DESTEFANO, 20. 5-11, 190, Junior from Providence. R.I. Was number one substi- 
tute for Scarbath last year. Excellent student of the Split-T. Fine passer. Completed 18 
out of 29 for 282 yards and 2 td's. the scores coming against G.W. when he rifled 9 
receptions in 15 attempts. Like Scarbath. the sophomoritis will be absent. 

DICK NOLAN, 20, 6-1, 175, Sophomore from White Plains, N.Y. Be on the lookout for 
"crazy-legs" Nolan. Flashed signs of greatness during spring ball after a big frosh 
year. Calls a smart sequence of plays and can throw the ball. A tricky and elusive 
runner. Leaves the boys in the dust doing wind sprints. Takes everything seriously. Will 
be hard to keep out. Outstanding high school athlete at White Plains. 

BERNIE FALONEY, 19. 5-11, 180. Sophomore from East Carnegie, Pa. Another good 
qb prospect. If experience comes this year, he should prove helpful. Can run and 
pass. Enjoyed a successful frosh year. All-Star high school player at Scott Twp. 

JIMMY PANTOS, 19, 5-10, 155, Sophomore from Washington, D. C, and CHARLES 
BOXHOLD, 20, 5-11, 185, Sophomore from Providence, R. I., have been sidelined with 
injuries and probably won't break into lineup until late in season, if at all. Pantos is 
excellent passer and safety man. 

HALFBACKS 

BOB SHEMONSKI. 21, 5-11, 175, Senior from Archbald. Pa. Set an all-time Mary- 
land scoring record with 97 points last year. This was good enough to be high in 
the Conference, and sixth in nation. Fast and shifty. Smart runner. Had 560 yards 
rushing for 101 carries and 196 passing, giving him 5.8 avg., best of the team. Two- 
year total offense is 1021 yards. Led team in kick-off returns, 10 for 259 yards; 
punt returns, 28 for 408 yards; pass interceptions, 4 for 40 yards: and he caught 
11 aerials for 160 yards. His 1 for 1 extra point in last game of season enabled 
him to break school record. Selected to 3rd team All-Conference, honorable men- 
tion AP All-Conference, and honorable mention, UP. Should go as "hot" again in '51. 

— 12 — 



JOE PETRUZZO, 21, 5-11, 185, Junior from Mamaroneck, N. Y. One of best all- 
around athletes to enter Maryland, but has confined his talents to football. Expected 
to play baseball next spring, however. Here on Charley Keller scholarship. A fast 
stepping back both on offense and defense. Should really sparkle this fall. Gained 
125 yards in 19 carries for 6.5 last year. Completed 3 for 5 passes for 43 yards. 
Caught 2 for 30. Thrives on defense also. Returned 13 punts for 276 yards and 
3 kick-offs for 40. Intercepted 3 enemy aerials for 102 yards, one a td snag for 45 
yards on last play of game against Duke. Scored 2 td's. Strong candidate for punt- 
ing duties. All-County for 3 years and most valuable player in Westchester Co. in '47. 

ED FULLERTON, 20, 5-11, 190, Junior from West View. Pa. His teammates call him 
"blood and guts." Appropriately so, for Ed is mean and rugged on the field. Fast 
and never gives up. Switched from full to half this spring and did justice to the 
move. Carried 47 times for 209 yards. Scored 3 td's. Should have a great year. 

LYNN DAVIS, 24, 5-11, 170, Senior from Baltimore, Md. Ace defensive back. Fast 
and keen diagnosis of plays coming his way. Hard to block. Star back at Patterson. 

RALPH FELTON, 19, 6-0, 185, Sophomore from Midway, Pa. "The Midway Express." 
The hottest soph halfback in spring ball. An unusually shifty ball carrer with a powerful 
charge. Tough to follow. Blessed with a left-handed passing arm, a valuable find for 
Tatum. Will be tough to keep out of a number 1 slot. Was All-W.P.I.A.L. Will play 
baseball for Terps. 

CHESTER HANULAK, 18, 5-10, 165, Sophomore from Hackensack, N. J. Another 
better than average soph. Fast shifty runner; shakes off tacklers with peculiar hip 
movement. Sure to break into lineup. All-League and All-County at Hackensack. 

LELAND LIEBOLD, 19, 6-1, 190, Sophomore from Smokeless, Pa. The home town 
name by no means is indicative of his football savvy. He shows a lot of "smoke." 
May be doing some of the punting. He kicks from the "port" side. Was All-County 
and played in All-Star game at Armagh High. GEORGE ALBRECHT, 21, 5-11, 180 
Sophomore from Munhall Pa. A tower of strength as defensive half. Fast, hard 
runner. Should fit into defensive picture. BOB LAUGHERY, 20, 6-0, 200, Sophomore 
from Mill Run, Pa. QB on the frosh team. Shifted to half. Fast, power-type runner. 
Experience this year would be big help. 

EUGENE PYCHA, 21, 5-11, 180, Sophomore from Baltimore, Md. Has a lot of desire 
but might be a year away from varsity ball. 



FULLBACKS 



ED "MIGHTY MO" MODELEWSKI, 22, 6-0, 210, Senior from West Natrona, Pa. The 
other half of the brother act. One of biggest names in all-time turf annals at Mary- 
land. Big, strong and powerful runner. Also a good blocker. Moved to full this year 
to give Terps that bull -dozing power lunge that is his specialty. In final spring prac- 
tice game he picked up 138 yards in 13 tries from the single wing. In Duke game 
he missed outgaining entire Blue Devil output by 2 yards and missed the same feat 
by 4 yards in N. C. State game. He picked up 95 against Duke and 124 against the 
Wolfpack. Picked up 553 yards in 119 carries to run his 2-year output to 1178 yards, 
best on the team. Caught 8 aerials for 110 yards and passed 12 times for 83. 
Returned 5 kick-offs for 81. Scored 30 points, second to Shemonski. Missed two games 
because of injuries. Barring same, he should be hard to stop in '51. Made AP and 
UP All-America Honorable Mention; AP and Southern Football Writers' All-Conference 
3rd team. 

DAVE CIANELLI, 24, 6-0, 215, Senior from Hagerstown, Md. Carried as full, but 
Dave's dish is defense, where he has been outstanding. Should be one of nation's best 
linebackers. Whether he backs up the middle or the outside, Cianelli will be one of the 
toughest men to get by. The rougher it gets the better he likes it. Is Co-Captain with 
Ward. Superb leadership. Married and has one daughter, age 2. Navy vet. 

KARNEY SCIOSCIA, 22, 5-10, 200, Senior from Westfield, N. J. A slashing blocker, 
an important asset for Split-T fullback. Does a neat job ahead of ball carrier. Fast 
and aggressive. Carried last year 22 times for 110 yards. Caught 1 pass for 21. 
All-State at Westfield High. 

ED BARRITT, 21, 5-10, 200, Sophomore from Long Island, N. Y. Held out last year. 
Sho'ild be an adequate reserve for the offense. All-Scholastic. 



DC 
UJ 

h 

O 
cc 

< 

D 

O 
(/) 

>- 
h 

(/) 

DC 
< 

> 






-o 3 
d§> cc 

k . .Oh 

'o 3^.3 ,? 



o 3 >; 
5= C.2 

"3. $ CD >;0 

] cd cd cd 

l-i -h -h 
O OO 

'ggg 

c s aaa 

3 3 O O O 
t-s i-j 73 73 73 



-C 



.* d 



0) 



& 05, 



(1) 



- C ; 3 CD.* 3 o 



f^ cu —. , > — — ^ 
C£ (h 3 05— 3 

3 t« 03 CT ^ o5 TS 






ffi o5 = 2 

O co 03 CT 



flCCC 
3 3 3 CD 

1-3 1-3 "-3 Ol 



g^s 



Mr/5 H 



05 +f cd 

a> a* a> 
u u .Sh 

o o o 

ggg 

o o o 

x:x:x: 

3. Q 3 
O O O 

737373 



d d 



0) 3X2 o3 X2 
cuccd "1,3 «g 
.3 tn .- a .3 



>1 

cd^cd g^ 
cu af r 3.2 



- MJiSjC^ 



^r of- 1 -: 

.2 Ks cd as 



CD 



CD CD 
. t-i S-i 
O O O 

n ° o ° O 
.2 .£.2 .3 .3 

s as aa 

CD O CD O O 
73 73 72 73 73 



CD^" 



d 

*> d J£ 

« - 8 n? S 

^ 3 >-. 3 C f-i 

^ o o- S g 

k? 05 CD CD 3 V 



g cob bcK 

m § %£ a * 

03 3 CD CD 3 CD 



^ b 



g 
H % o 



2 .2 Jc ° 2 x: 
c '3 as 3 a 

3 3 O CD CD O 
1-3 i-s 73 73 W W 



-3^ 



H& 



•5=0 



+jQj to 

CD L 
X2 CD CD 

Ir 1 n 



CO.— 

- C 5 3." 

CJ 3 _^ 

CfT co M 

CD^ Mc 



N ' 






f * CC ™ 



! ^ ! 

o 



0^5 

c a"3 

CD O CD 
73 737! 



10 

3 

cU'S 

(j » 

C S £° 
cd 1 ^ M s 

"5 <D C » 

Ox; «g co 

^Si5 05 

! CD CD 

t4 In U 
OOO 

S 'gg 

3.2^3 

as aa 
0300 
73^7373 



Q 
Z 
< 

> 
DC 
< 

o 

> 

(/) 
DC 

u 

> 



CNCNCNCOCO 
I I I I I 

CO CD CD CO CD 



ocboho 

CN >H CM C-4 <M 






3 a ^1 
coSS^'oi^ 

3) jITJ CD J3 
Ho 3.g'S CD 

UJ 



rH CN CM CO O CO CN 
C£> CD CD CO CD CD CD 



I I 

inoooooio 

t-OHOOOt- 
iH CM CM CM CM CM >H 



3 
BO 
X3iJ 

o . 

-7 C cn<; 
UJ t^ CD - 
I - -3 CD 3 



3 3 

•h CD 

too 
3 ^M 

^^ J 

wCajo 
' £ 2 «s 
d CjS ^ 



rHOCMCMO 
1 1 1 1 1 

CO CD CD CD CO 



minooo 

OCOHHH 
CM CM CM CM CM 



CC-^ocn^cn 01- 
CO CD Tf cm lo mi- 



g 

JD CD O 

o-SH a 
-IcdW^ o 
^ o . x; 1 - 1 
o^ 1 c o".2 c 

< . re M 3 53 

> co M >, 3 jjs 
° 3 £ ° 

HSSfJPQf? 
LU 

,Hrf CDlOrH 

—i ^rcoromoo 



OrOOCOCMCM 
CD CD CD CD CD CD 



minmooo 

rOOCMfOOCM 
CM CM CM CM CM CM 



W F_ 

-I -3 3 
^"SoS 

< CD . 

ha- ^ 

l F§F^ 



> 

3 

co 3 
3 " 



or 



73.3 oj 3 

-U-^XJ 

co co^ 

CD «— CJ 
C >> 3 3 

O Sh .3— 1 

bfc UDQ 



1 1 1 1 1 1 1 
cothcmothojo 

CM CM CM CM CM rH CM 



OHHKOOH 

' -l .i,i.i'-l'-lTH 

1 CDCDCO 1 1 1 



I I I 
I I I 

mooomoo 



CO 

QfQ 



=3 >> 

ml 



:m>» 



< 

D rrt-t3!3 . 

tu' 



^ co 
3^ 
3 J., 
S" 3 

Pmx: _ 

2 .w 

f^3>= 

Zr-3hJ 



i— i >H cSTJ 

S £ xf 2 "o 
> -clc c 

C 0) w CD iH 

F-. c ttf cc-g 



cj^ ass 
C o 3 tfK 

5.5 M -^ 

55 nS * ^r Sh 

CSr2 h O O 

la. ' |o 



Sh o M *H o 

2.C 2 2,c 

c fl'c c a 

tt) o 3 3 o 
WCQhsHbM 

i i i i i 



03 T5 

Q. CS 

o> 5c 1 ,* 

T5 a> c 

£ 3 cS 
CUUH 



cs u 
C 
ai 



cs 
aTdn 
M 

C r 






> C w tuO 

O +j CS-e 



flffi Cfl 

CS Sh 

5 s-«SJ=j 



c ft'2 

3 O O 



o . _ 

.SXi 
C O 

? C Sh M 

O-Jj CO 

ai ! ! ai 

Sh Sh 

o o 

s s 

£22-2 
ac c o- 

O 0) 3 O 



■pi 

^ C - 

CD CS cj 

oO-, 5 

S a>S 
■■C.-S > 

cscr ^ 



CS . 



aJ M p4 

0§ 0) 
C +j CJ 

cs — cd 
U-S-a 

.CV 

J 71 ; 
i uO CS P 
I CS »-^ Sh 



CS cj 

Eg 

>..t- > 
■*■£ S 

O^ .s-i 



S 

ojs o 
c o-'c 



£ c 
^ls£ 

o c o 

O CD h 

000 

Sh Sh Sh 
OOO 

see 

OOO 

.cc.c 

can. 
000 



H5 

.55 



<L> 



o o 

C rrt cs c 

?lc§° 

SH CS *H -> ,-. 

cs,q aiffi c 

S cj u~~ 

* u cs— cc 



CC O 0> 0) Sh 

S^2 cij 

i5 Sh «3 O CS 

I !oO ! 
.Sh Sh 
OO 

SS 

oog.go 

S'S ftft'S 

3 a> o o a> 



& cS'O 
^ -Dh§ • 
CS^"^ CS 

b >,2 o o 

.-- q s id 



a 

<D 
cfl 

O 
1-3 

^ CS tt+? cS 

^ > csw^; 
[ ai a> a> o 

U Sh Sh Sh 
OOOO 

Soooo 
.2 £ jq X X 

3 o O o o 



Hit: >h" 

cs"^ 1- :^! 
c ,-rlz - 

nS25 

^ ShCC 1 ^ 

+J CD +-> hr 
co bx cfl p 



S^O« 

pq shcc o 

7(l)tJ(i) 
cS cS^-h 



Sh Sh Sh o 

2 2 2j= 
'Sec ft 

OOOO 

wwww 



C0CNOO05 
CNCNININrH 

I I I I I 



H CT> CO O ■* r-t 05 
(M H CM <M CS| CN rH 

I I I I I I 1 



oooairoo 

CNCNCNrHrHCN 

I I 1 I 1 I 



rHiHOOOCO 
(MCMrHCMCM 

I I I I I 



OG5C75 050 

<M r-l tH t-H <M 

I I I I I 



OOOOO 
1 ■ 1 — I ■ ■ 

tDCC 1 COtO 



01000m 
hoooh 
cncncncncn 



CO -g 

<s; 

. C O 
1-0)3 

o 

•v-CNO 

tt mcN 



T3 
Sh >.13 



Sh c-h 

0S0) 
CQc/}Q 



CO rH CO rH rH rH rH 

cicicoti 1 coci 



inoinoooo 
Homoooocn 

(M CM t-H CN rH CN rH 



CD Sh' 

> o 
CO o c 

cc ^ S 

"■ txC 
UJ OT_ 

|_ O CS 



c 



o W 
. 5 o c •£ L 

HM K^.rH M 

■S2.S«8 



' m 10 Tf 1 CO CO CO t- 



CO^J 

< 2 
dQhC'Q 

LU^C 

|- Sh CS 

OCgo 

<c«^; 

OcNir: 

COCN 



o 



O C £7* 

HH qj C CS 
-CQ Ch- 

g 5° 

CS >! - - 

<*h a> cnx; 

11 c 0, n 

+J S+J o 

yj^ c y, 

O CS CS o 
Q&hChPh 



HHOOH 



wininoo 

CXDt-COOt- 
rHrHrHCNT-l 



CO 

O a;PQ 
,0 w 

— I N C 

<f N O 

igs 

+J o 

UJ 
ICDC- 

-"CNrH 



o 

o 
j=« c 
"U .c 

X ShJ 

CS o 

C 3 > 
cS cS cS 



rHOrHi-HrH 

^ciciV'T 



CO 

O ' '^^s? 

<X3hC S C O 

^ M &h5 0) 0) 

P w -j o MO 

U. .^J 3 

<2 -X3 >S 

_3 0.2>.a 

JtHtnJfjH^ 



O 000 



o 1000 

HHOO 
CN CNCNCN 



T3 

H 
.« o 

'J3 CS 
X CD 

^X3 O 
DQ o c 
_l5 cS 

- 1 * U 

D 

li_C33t- 



CD 



O 

C ; -^ 

Sh ' 1-1 

iKvit: w 



.2 -- 

O 



o 



•r; ts 
o-sh c 

; cj ^ 



COtJicNiH 



X 



-I 

< 

O 
L_ 

O 

UJ 

< 






CO cti 

■SO 

Q 



ptj 


o 


pci 


£ 


U 


£ 




_ 


,_ 


,_, 


c 


G 


u 


£ 


£ 




o 


o 


w 


+J 




w 


b 


b 


c/3 






V 






X 










3 


<D 


Cy 


P 







u 

x 

to 
'3 



DO 


U 


O 

cu 


w 


O 






t« 




0) 


c 


^ 


'2 


3 


M 


P 


d 


ti 


H 


> 



W 



o 




< 


UJ 




1- 
o 




z 
_l 


< 

1- 

co 




z 




o 




I 

CO 

< 


< 


DC 
< 

o 


< 
z 
< 

CO 


CC 


£ 


o 
cc 


I 

h 


D 

o 

CO 
CO 


6 


o 


cc 


D 


u 


UJ 


o 


o 




o 


o 


z 


_l 


i 





UJ 


o 




h 


QC 




< 






h 


> 




CO 




> 




h 


> 
< 


d 


co 

UJ 


z 


z 


£ 



THEY COVER THE TERPS 



EV GARDNER, Sports Editor, The Daily News 

EDDIE COOK, Sports Department, The Daily News 

CHUCK EGAN, Sports Editor, The Evening Star 

FRANCIS STANN, Sports Department, The Evening Star 

MERRELL WHITTLESEY, Sports Department, The Evening Star 

GEORGE HUBER, Sports Department, The Evening Star 

BUS HAM, Sports Editor, The Post 

SHIRLEY POVICH, Sports Department, The Post 

MORRIS SIEGEL, Sports Department, The Post 

HERB HEFT, Sports Department, The Post 

CHARLEY BARBOUR, Sports Editor, The Times-Herald 

DICK O'BRIEN, Sports Department, The Times-Herald 

MAURY FITZGERALD, Sports Department, The Times-Herald 

PAUL MENTON, Sports Editor, The Evening Sun 

RANDALL CASSELL, Sports Department, The Evening Sun 

HARRY BEAUDOUIN, Sports Department, The Evening Sun 

JESSE LINTHICUM, Sports Editor, The Morning Sun 

LOU HATTER, Sports Department, The Morning Sun 

RODGER PIPPEN, Sports Editor, The News-Post 

NORMAN P. CLARK, Sports Department, The News-Post 

MORTY COHEN, Sports Editor, The Evening Capital, Annapolis, Md. 

J. SUTER KEGG, Sports Editor, The Evening Times, Cumberland, Md. 

C. V. BURNS, Sports Editor, The News, Cumberland, Md. 

FRANK COLLEY, Sports Editor, The Herald, Hagerstown, Md. 

DICK KELLY, Sports Editor, The Mail, Hagerstown, Md. 

ED NICHOLS, Sports Editor, The Times, Salisbury, Md. 

HENRY DECKER, Sports Editor, The Post, Frederick, Md. 

BILL KELLER, Sports Editor, The Alexandria Gazette Alexandria Va. 

M. A. DUCKSON, Sports Editor, The Arlington Daily, Arlington, Va. 



RADIO and TV 



WASHINGTON 

Bob Wolff and Ray Morgan, WWDC 

Steve Douglas and Dutch Bergmann, WRC 

Jimmy Gibbons and Dean Luce, WMAL 

Arch McDonald, WTOP 

Nat Albright, WEAM 

Sam Kaufmann, WOL 

Jimmy Gibbons and Dean Luce, WMAL-TV 

Jim Simpson WTOP-TV 

Tony Wakem'an, WTTG-TV 

Ray Michaels, WNBW-TV 



BALTIMORE 

Bill Dyer, WWIN 

Chuck Thompson, WITH 

Nelson Baker, WFBR 

Bailey Goss, WBAL 

Charles Rover, WCBM 

Bailey Goss and Nat Thomas, WMAR-TV 

Nick Campofreda, WAAM-TV 

Joe Grogan, WBAL-TV 



TERP OPPONENTS 




MARYLAND vs. WASHINGTON & LEE 29 SEPTEMBER 

2:00 P. M. (E.S.T.) 

At Wilson Field (7,000) 

Lexington, Va. 

FACTS ABOUT THE GENERALS 
CONFERENCE: Southern. 
COLORS: Blue and White. 
LOCATION: Lexington, Va. 
ENROLLMENT: 1500 (Men). 
HEAD COACH: George Barclay. 
TYPE OFFENSE: Split-T. 
• 1950 RECORD: Won 8, Lost 2, Tied, 0. 

Coach Barclay (Southern Conference Champions). 

GENERAL'S RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS 

(Maryland won 11, lost 5, tied 2) 

1934 
1935 
1936 
1937 
1938 
1940 
1941 
1942 
1946 
206; Washington & Lee, 109. 

-15— LOST— 15 







Maryland W&L 


1924 




7 19 


1925 




3 7 


1926 




3 


1927 




6 13 


1928 




6 


1930 




41 7 


1931 
1932 




13 7 
6 


1933 




33 13 


TOTAL 


POINTS: Maryland 


1951 


CAPTAIN— Gil Bocetti 


LETTERMEN RETURNING- 



Maryland 


W&L 





7 








19 


6 


8 





19 


13 


7 


7 


6 





8 





24 


7 





1951 


SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


22- 


-Furman (27-6 » 


Sept 


29- 


-Maryland 


Oct. 


6- 


-West Virginia (26-7) 


Oct. 


13- 


-Virginia (21-26 1 


Oct. 


19- 


-Miami. Fla. 


Oct. 


27- 


-Davidson (47-12) 


Nov. 


3- 


-Virginia Tech (25-7) 


Nov. 


10- 


-Tennessee (20-27) 


Nov. 


17- 


-Louisville (33-28) 


Nov. 


22- 


-Richmond (67-7) 



1950 


YARDSTICK 




Did 


Not 






PI 


ay 



MARYLAND vs. GEORGE WASHINGTON 

2:00 P. M. 

At Byrd Stadium (35,000) 

College Park, Md. 

FACTS ABOUT THE COLONIALS 
CONFERENCE: Southern. 
COLORS: Buff and Blue. 
LOCATION: Washington, D. C. 
ENROLLMENT: 10,000. 
HEAD COACH: John H. "Bo." Rowland. 
TYPE OFFENSE: Single Wing. 
1950 RECORD: Won 5, Lost 4, Tied 0. 



6 OCTOBER 




Coach Rowland 



COLONIAL'S RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS 

(Maryland won 7, lost 3, tied 2) 





Maryland 


GW 




Maryland 


GW 


1897 








1908 





57 


1898 





32 


1909 





26 


1902 


11 


10 


1910 


6 





1903 


6 





1948 


47 





1904 








1949 


40 


14 


1907 


11 





1950 


23 


7 



TOTAL POINTS: Maryland, 144; GW, 146. 
(First 5 games of series, GW was Columbian U.) 
1951 CAPTAIN— Andy Davis— Tailback 
LETTERMEN RETURN I NG— 17— LOST— 11 





1951 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


22 — Georgia 


Sept. 


29— Virginia (0-19) 


Oct. 


6— Maryland (7-23) 


Oct. 


12— Virginia Tech (42-7) 


Oct. 


19 — Wake Forest (0-13) 


Oct. 


26— Furman (34-7) 


Nov. 


3— South Carolina (20-34) 


Nov. 


17 — Kentucky 


Nov. 


30 — Richmond. 



1950 YARDSTICK 

Maryland Geo. Wash. 

11 First downs 12 

119 Net yards rushing 51 

194 Net yards forwards 168 

19 Forwards attempted 28 

11 Forwards completed 13 

2 Intercepted by 2 

71... Yards interception return .... 

9 Punts 8 

31.3 Punt average 40.6 

60 Yards kickoffs returned 72 

76 Yards punts returned 15 

5 Fumbles 5 

4 Own fumbles recovered 1 

126 Yards lost by penalties 15 

Maryland 7 7 9 — 23 

George Washington ...... 7 — 7 

Maryland scoring: Touchdowns — She- 
monski, Karnash, Fullerton. Conver- 
sions — Dean (3). 

G. W. scoring: Touchdowns — Samuel- 
son.' Conversion — Shullenbarger. 



— 19 — 



MARYLAND vs. GEORGIA 




Coach Butts 



13 OCTOBER 

8:15 P. M. 

At Sanford Stadium (45,000) 

Athens, Ga. 

FACTS ABOUT THE BULLDOGS 
CONFERENCE: Southeastern. 
COLORS: Red and Black. 
LOCATION: Athens, Ga. 
ENROLLMENT: 6500. 
HEAD COACH: Wallace Butts. 
TYPE OFFENSE: T and Split-T. 
1950 RECORD: Won 6, Lost 2, Tied 3. 



BULLDOG'S RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS 



Maryland 
1948 20 

('Gator Bowl) 



(Maryland won 0, lost 1, tied 1) 
1950 



Ga. 

20 



TOTAL POINTS: Maryland, 27; Georgia, 47. 
1951 CAPTAIN— Claude Hipps— Halfback 
LETTERMEN RETURN I NG— 35— LOST— 16 



Maryland 

7 



Ga. 

27 





1951 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


22 — Geo. Washington 


Sept 


29— North Carolina (0-0 1 


Oct. 


6— Miss. State (27-0) 


Oct. 


13— Maryland (27-7) 


Oct. 


20— L. S. U. (13-131 


Oct. 


27— Boston College (19-7) 


Nov. 


3— Alabama (7-14) 


Nov. 


10— Florida (6-0) 


Nov. 


17 — Auburn (12-10) 


Dec. 


1 — Georgia Tech (0-7) 



1950 YARDSTICK 



Maryland Georgia 

10 First downs 10 

129 Rushing yardage 185 

80 Passing yardage 70 

19 Passes attempted 10 

7 Passes completed 6 

Passes intercepted 1 

6 Punts 9 

33 Punting average 42.9 

5 Fumbles lost 

45 Yards penalized 100 

Maryland 7 — 7 

G S orgia 7 7 12—27 

Scoring Touchdowns : Maryland — She- 
monski. Conversion — Dean. Touch- 
downs — Georgia Bilyeu, Cook, Mixon. 
Raber. Conversions — Walston (3). 



MARYLAND vs. NORTH CAROLINA 20 OCTOBER 



2:00 P. M. 

At Byrd Stadium (35,000) 

College Park, Md. 

FACTS ABOUT THE TARHEELS 
CONFERENCE: Southern. 
COLORS: Columbia Blue and White. 
LOCATION: Chapel Hill, N. C. 
ENROLLMENT: 7500. 
HEAD COACH: Carl Snavely. 
TYPE OFFENSE: Single Wing and 

balanced T. 
1950 RECORD: Won 3, Lost 5, Tied 2. 



Un- 



Coach Snavely 



TAR HEEL'S RECORD AGAINST TERPS 

(Maryland won 4, Lost 12, Tied 1) 



1920 


13 





1921 


7 


16 


1922 


3 


27 


1923 


14 





1924 


6 





1925 





16 


1926 


14 


6 


1927 


6 


7 


1928 


19 


26 



1929 





43 


1930 


21 


28 


1935 





33 


1936 





14 


1946 





13 


1947 





19 


1948 


20 


49 


1950 


7 


7 



TOTAL POINTS: Maryland, 130; North Carolina, 304. 
1951 CAPTAIN— Joe Dudeck— Guard 
LETTERMEN RETURN I NG— 25— LOST— 15 



1950 YARDSTICK 



Maryland North Carolina 
11 First downs 12 

118 Rushing yardage 96 

103 Passing yardage 91 

14 Passes attempted 18 

7 Passes completed 10 

1 Passes intercepted 1 

9 Punts 9 

39.5 Punting average 42.1 

Fumbles lost 1 

65 Yards penalized 5 

Maryland 7 — 7 

North Carolina 7 — 7 

Maryland scoring: Touchdown — Shem- 

onski. Conversion — Dean. 

North Carolina scoring: Touchdown — 

Wallace. Conversion — Dean. 



1951 


SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


22- 


-No. Carolina St. (13-7) 


Sept. 


29- 


-Georgia (0-0) 


Oct. 


6- 


-Texas 


Oct. 


13- 


-South Carolina (14-7) 


Oct. 


20- 


-Maryland (7-7) 


Oct. 


27- 


-Wake Forest (7-13) 


Nov. 


3- 


—Tennessee (0-16) 


Nov. 


10- 


—Virginia (13-44) 


Nov. 


24- 


-Duke (0-7) 


Nov. 


17- 


—Notre Dame (7-14) 



MARYLAND vs. LOUISIANA STATE UNIVERSITY 27 OCTOBER 

8:15 P. M. (C.S.T.) 

At Tiger Stadium (45,000) 
Baton Rouge, La. 

FACTS ABOUT THE TIGERS 

CONFERENCE: Southeastern 
LOCATION: Baton Rouge, La. 
HEAD COACH: Gaynell Tinsley 
COLORS: Purple and Gold 
ENROLLMENT: 9000 
TYPE OFFENSE: T 




Coach Tinsley 



1950 RECORD: Won 4, Lost 5, Tied 2 



TIGER'S RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS 



(This is the first gridiron meeting of the two schools) 



1951 CAPTAIN— Warren Virgets— End 
LETTERMEN R ETU RN I NG— 25— LOST — 13 





1951 SCHEDULE 


Sept 


22— Miss. Southern 


Sept. 


29 — Alabama 


Oct. 


6— Rice (20-351 


Oct. 


13— Georgia Tech (0-13) 


Oct. 


20— Georgia (13-13) 


Oct. 


27 — Maryland 


Nov. 


3 — Mississippi (40-14) 


Nov. 


10— Vanderbilt (33-7) 


Nov. 


17— Miss. State (7-13) 


Nov. 


24— Villanova (13-7) 


Dec. 


1— Tulane (14-14) 




MARYLAND vs. MISSOURI 

2:00 P.M. 



._ HOMECOMING 



3 NOVEMBER 



At Byrd Stadium (35,000) 
College Park, Md. 

FACTS ABOUT THE TIGERS 

CONFERENCE: Big Seven 

LOCATION: Columbia, Mo. 

HEAD COACH: Don Faurot 

COLORS: Black and Old Gold 

ENROLLMENT: 9000 

TYPE OFFENSE: Split-T 

1950 RECORD: Won 4, Lost 5, Tied 1 




Coach Faurot 



TIGER'S RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS 

(Maryland Won 1, Lost 0, Tied 0) 
1950 'Gator Bowl Game at Jacksonville, Fla. 

Maryland 20 Missouri 7 



(This was the only meeting of the two schools) 



1951 CAPTAIN— Junior Wren— Halfback 
LETTERMEN RETU RN I NG— 1 1 — LOST— 20 





1951 


SCHEDULE 


Sept 


22— 


-Fordham 


Sept 


29- 


-Oklahoma A&M (27-0) 


Oct. 


6- 


-S. M. U. (0-21) 


Oct. 


13- 


-Colorado (21-19) 


Oct. 


20- 


-Iowa State (20-20) 


Oct. 


27- 


-Nebraska (34-40) 


Nov. 


3- 


-Maryland 


Nov. 


10- 


-Oklahoma (7-41) 


Nov. 


17- 


-Kansas State (28-7) 


Dec. 


1- 


-Kansas (20-6) 



1950 


YARDSTICK 




Did 


Not 






PI 


ay 



— 23 — 



MARYLAND vs. NAVY 10 NOVEMBER 




Coach Erdelatz 



2:00 P.M. 

At Memorial Stadium (43,000) 
Baltimore, Md. 

FACTS ABOUT THE MIDDIES 

CONFERENCE: EICAA 

LOCATION: Annapolis, Md. 

HEAD COACH: Eddie Erdelatz 

COLORS: Navy Blue and Gold 

ENROLLMENT: 3700 

TYPE OFFENSE: T 

1950 RECORD: Won 3, Lost 6, Tied 0. 



MIDDIE'S RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS 
(Maryland Won 2, Lost 10, Tied 0) 





Maryland 


Navy 




Maryland 


Navy 


1905 





17 


1917 





62 


1906 


2 


12 


1930 





6 


1907 





12 


1931 


6 





1908 





57 


1932 


7 


28 


1913 





76 


1934 


13 


16 


1916 


7 


14 


1950 


35 


21 



TOTAL POINTS: Maryland, 70; Navy, 321. 

1951 CAPTAIN— Frank Hauff— Halfback 
LETTERMEN RETU RN I NG— 22— LOST— 13 



1950 YARDSTICK 

Maryland Navy 

12 First downs 19 

122 Yards gained rushing 198 

14. ... Forward passes attempted .... 24 

7... Forward passes completed .... 12 

192. Yards gained completed pass.. 179 

3 Passes intercepted by 1 

32..Runback of intercepted pass... 15 

4 Number of punts 3 

32 Average distance 36 

2 Punts returned by 2 

25 Yards punts returned 26 

3 Kickoffs returned by 6 

33 Yards kickoffs returned 105 

4 Fumbles 4 

3.. Opponents' fumbles recovered .. 2 

11 Penalties 8 

66 Yards lost penalties 100 

Navy 7 14 — 21 

Maryland 7 14 14 — 35 

Scoring: Navy, touchdowns — Adorn- 
ey. Wilson, Kukowski. Points after 
touchdow-n — Drew (3). Maryland, 
touchdowns — Scarbath, Karnash, Augs- 
burger, Wingate, Modzelewski, Points 
after touchdown — Dean (5). 





1951 


SCHEDULE 


Sept 


29- 


-Yale 


Oct. 


6- 


-Princeton (14-20) 


Oct. 


13- 


-Rice 


Oct. 


20- 


-Northwestern (0-22) 


Oct. 


27- 


-Pennsylvania (7-30) 


Nov. 


3- 


-Notre Dame (10-19) 


Nov. 


10- 


-Maryland (21-35) 


Nov. 


17- 


-Columbia (29-7) 


Dec. 


1- 


-Army (14-2) at Phila. 



MARYLAND vs. N. C. STATE 

DAD'S DAY 

2:00 P.M. 

At Byrd Stadium (35,000) 
College Park, Md. 

FACTS ABOUT THE WOLFPACK 

CONFERENCE: Southern 

LOCATION: Raleigh, N.C. 

HEAD COACH: Beattie Feathers 

COLORS: Scarlet and White 

ENROLLMENT: 4500 

TYPE OFFENSE: Single Wing 

1950 RECORD: Won 5, Lost 4, Tied 1 



17 NOVEMBER 




Coach Feathers 



WOLFPACK'S RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS 

(Maryland Won 3, Lost 4, Tied 3) 

Maryland N.C. State Maryland N.C. State 

1909 6 23 1924 

1917 6 10 1946 7 28 

1921 6 6 1947 

1922 7 6 1949 14 6 

1923 26 12 1950 13 16 

TOTAL POINTS: Maryland, 85; N. C. State, 107. 

1951 CAPTAIN — James O'Rourke — Fullback 
LETTERMEN RETURN I NG— 22— LOST 8 



1950 YARDSTICK 

Maryland N. C. State 

15 First downs 6 

7 First downs, rushing 4 

8........ First downs, passing 1 

Penalizing 1 

152 Total yards, rushing 139 

13 Yards lost rushing 40 

139 Net yards, rushing 99 

174 Net yards, forwards 15 

39 Forwards attempted 1 

13 Forwards completed 1 

Intercepted by 3 

0.. Yards, interceptions returns .. 20 

5 Punts 13 

9 Punts returned by 4 

39 Punt average 41 

3 Kickoffs returned 4 

82 Yards, kickoff returns 61 

172 Yards, punt returns 86 

6 Fumbles 2 

■3 Own fumbles recovered 2 

30 Yards lost by fumbles 60 

N. C. State 9 7 — 16 

Maryland 13 — 13 

N. C. State scoring: Touchdowns, 
Mooney (2). Conversions, Barkovski 
(2). Safety, Tencick. 

Maryland scoring: Touchdowns — 
Shemonski, Augsburger. Conversion — 
Dean 





1951 SCHEDULE 




Sept. 


15— Catawba (7-6) 




Sept. 


22— North Carolina (7-13) 




Sept. 


29— Wake Forest (6-6) 




Oct. 


6— Clemson (0-27) 




Oct. 


13— Duke (0-7) 




Oct. 


20 — William & Mary (0-34) 




Oct. 


27— Virginia Tech (34-6) 




Nov. 


3 — Louisville 




Nov. 


10— Davidson (15-7) 




Nov. 


17— Maryland (16-13) 



MARYLAND vs. WEST VIRGINIA 24 NOVEMBER 




Coach Lewis 



2:00 P.M. 

At Byrd Stadium (35,000) 
College Park, Md. 

FACTS ABOUT THE MOUNTAINEERS 

CONFERENCE: Southern: 

LOCATION: Morgantown, W. Va. 

HEAD COACH: Art "Pappy" Lewis 

COLORS: Old Gold and Blue 

ENROLLMENT: 6000 

TYPE OFFENSE: T 

1950 RECORD: Won 2, Lost 8, Tied 



MOUNTAINEER'S RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS 
(Maryland Won 3, Lost 3, Tied 2) 





Maryland 


W. Va 


1919 





27 


1943 


2 


6 


1944 


6 


6 


1945 


13 


13 





Maryland 


W. Va 


1947 


27 





1948 


14 


16 


1949 


47 


7 


1950 


41 






TOTAL POINTS: Maryland, 150; West Virginia, 75. 

1951 CO-CAPTAIN— Jim Danter— Guard 

Keresiz Konstantinos — Tackle 

LETTERMEN R ETU R N I NG— 15— LOST— 17 



1950 YARDSTICK 



M a ry I a n d 



West Virginia 



11 First downs 8 

116 Rushing yardage 69 

111 Passing yardage 79 

20 Passes attempted 26 

8 Passes completed 12 

6 Passes intercepted 3 

10 Number of punts 10 

36.1 Punting average 35 

1 Fumbles lost 5 

35 Yards penalized 47 

Maryland 7 20 7 7 — 41 

West Virginia — 

Maryland scoring: Touchdowns — E. 
Modzelewski (2), Fullerton, Shemon- 
ski (3). Points after touchdown — 
Dean (3) (placements). Fry (2) 
(placements). 



1951 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


22 — Waynesburg 


Sept. 


28 — Furman 


Oct. 


6— Wash. & Lee (7-26) 


Oct. 


13— Richmond (46-7) 


Oct. 


20 — Geneva 


Oct. 


27— Penn State (0-27) 


Nov. 


3— Western Reserve (38-13) 


Nov. 


10 — South Carolina 


Nov. 


17— Pittsburgh (7-21) 


Nov. 


24 — Maryland (0-41) 







TERP GRIDIRON HISTORY 
IN THE MAKING 




mw 



Jack Sca,rbath, the Terps' sensational sophomore quarterback 
last year, is shown making gridiron history for Maryland as he 
scampers 21 yards to score the first touchdown in New Byrd 
Stadium. The scone came, appropriately, early in the first 
quarter in the dedication game against Navy September 30 be- 
fore Jf3,836 fans. 



1950 HIGHLIGHTS 

LONGEST RUSH FROM SCRIMMAGE: 

Joe Petruzzo — 52 yards against V.P.I. 
LONGEST PASS COMPLETION: 

Scarbath to Augsburger — 58 yards against Navy. 
MOST PASSES CAUGHT ONE GAME: 

Augsburger — 5 for 127 yards against Navy. 
MOST PASSES THROWN ONE GAME: 

Scarbath — 30 with 11 completions and 149 yards against N. C. State. 
MOST PASSES COMPLETED ONE GAME: 

( % ) DeStefano — 9 for 15 attempts in George Washington game. 
LONGEST PUNT RETURN: 

Shemonski — 82 yards for TD against V.P.I. 
LONGEST KICK-OFF RETURN: 

Shemonski — 45 yards against George Washington. 
LONGEST PUNT: 

Targarona — 58 yards against George Washington. 
LOW NET GAIN IN ONE GAME: 

113 yards against West Virginia. 
HIGH NET GAIN IN ONE GAME: 

577 yards against V.P.I. 
LEAST PASSING YARDAGE IN ONE GAME: 

16 yards against V.P.I. 
MOST PASSING YARDAGE IN ONE GAME: 

202 yards against Navy. 
LONGEST INTERCEPTION RETURN: 

Rowden — 41 yards for TD against V.P.I. 
MOST TOUCHDOWNS SCORED IN ONE GAME: 

Shemonski — 5 against V.P.I. 
MOST POINTS SCORED: 

Shemonski— 97— AN ALL-TIME MARYLAND RECORD and Con- 
ference leading scorer for 1950. 

BYRD STADIUM 

New Byrd Stadium has a permanent seating capacity of 34,680. To 
accommodate larger crowds, temporary bleachers can be set up around 
the top rim of the parabola type stadium, making 50,000 or better 
capacity. 

At the open end of the field is the Athletic Administration Offices, 
training room, equipment rooms, and the varsity and freshman locker 
rooms. A conference room and the Monogram Club room also are 
located in the "A" building. 

On each side of the field is a dressing room with sleeping quarters on 
the second floor. One will be used by the visiting team on the day of 
the game. 

All other sports, except basketball and wrestling will use these facili- 
ties. This includes Terp athletic teams as well as visitors. 

The outdoor track around the field, which has a 220 straightway, will 
be ready this spring. 

Sod has been laid around the perimeter of the new plant to just about 
put the finishing touches to the stadium. 



1950 TEAM STATISTICS 

MARYLAND OPPONENTS 

First Downs 134 109 

Rushing 88 53 

Passing 42 46 

Penalties 4 10 

Total Yards Rushing 2391 1481 

Yards Lost Rushing 279 466 

Net Yards Rushing ■ 2112 1015 

No. Rushing Plays 472 391 

Avg. Rushing Gain 4.50 2.59 

Forward Passes Attempted 167 204 

Forward Passes Completed 67 97 

Forward Passes Intercepted By 24 17 

Net Yards Passing 1096 1084 

Scoring Passes 7 3 

Yards Interception Returned 408 76 

Total Yds. Gained (Rushing and Passing) 3208 2099 

Punting yardage 2251 3253 

Punting Average 36.3 38.2 

Punts Blocked By 

Number Punts 62 85 

Yards all Kick Returned 1288 1343 

Punt Returns 870 304 

Number Punt Returns 57 30 

Average Punt Returns 15.3 10.4 

Average Kick-off Rteurns 14.3 15.6 

Number Penalties 75 58 

Yards Penalized 682 448 

Fumbles 44 37 

Opponent's Fumbles Recovered By 22 22 

Touchdowns 40 17 

Extra Points Attempted 40 17 

Extra Points Made 28 16 

Points by Safeties 6 2 

TOTAL POINTS SCORED 274 120 

— 29 — 



COMPLETE 1950 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS 



RUSHING 



Carries 

Shemonski, Bob-hb 101 

Modzelewski, Ed - hb 107 

Scarbath, Jack - qb 81 

Fullerton, Ed - fb 47 

DeStefano, Bob - qb 33 

Scioscia, Karney - fb 22 

Petruzzo, Joe - hb 19 

Colteryahn, Lloyd - hb 10 

Cianelli, Dave - fb 8 

Boeri, Walt - fb 4 

Davis, Lynn - hb 2 

*Kuchta, Joe - hb 4 

*Gierula, Chester - t 3 

*Krouse, Ray - t 2 

Ward, Bob - g 2 

*Troha, John 1 

*Armsworth, Frank - qb 3 

*Wingate, Elmer - e 2 

"Karnash, Stanley - e 3 

*Idzik, John - hb 2 

*Earley, Buck - hb 1 

*Betz, Ted - e 2 

*Targarona, Jack - hb 4 

*Bolton, Ed - hb 8 

:i: Rowden, Jake - c 1 



Gain 


AVG. 


560 


5.5 


470 


4.4 


252 


3.1 


209 


4.2 


29 


.9 


110 


5.0 


125 


6.5 


34 


3.4 


33 


4.1 


60 


15.0 


13 


6.5 


-4 


-1 


5 


1.7 


13 


6.5 


46 


23.0 


18 


18.0 


8 


2.7 


9 


4.5 


65 


21.6 


45 


22.5 


2 


2.0 


14 


7.0 


-10 


-3 


10 


2.0 


-4 


-4 



TOTAL 



472 



2112 



4.4 



TOTAL OFFENSE 

Total Plays 

Shemonski, Bob - hb 134 

Modzelewski, Ed - hb 119 

Scarbath, Jack - qb 161 

DeStefano, Bob - qb 62 

Petruzzo, Joe - hb 24 

All others as above or with 10 or less carries 

TOTAL 639 



Gain 


Avg 


783 


5.8 


553 


4.6 


715 


4.4 


311 


5.0 


168 


7.0 



3208 



5.0 



— 30 — 



PASSING 

Had Net 

Att. Comp. Int. Gain TD's 

Scarbath, Jack - qb 80 32 5 463 4 

DeStefano, Bob - qb 29 18 4 282 2 

Shemonski, Bob - hb 33 9 196 1 

Madzelewski, Ed - hb 12 3 1 83 

Petruzzo, Joe - hb 5 3 43 

;; Armsworthy, Frank - qb 4 2 2 29 

i: Bolton, Ed - hb 10 1 

!: Targarona, Jack - hb 3 

TOTAL 167 67 13 1096 7 



No. Reti 

Shemonski, Bob -hb 10 

Modzelewski, Ed - hb 5 

Petruzzo, Joe - hb 3 

Fullerton, Ed - fb 1 

*Idzik, John - hb 1 

*Betz, Ted - e 1 

*Karnash, Stan - e 1 

*Dean, Bob - t 1 

TOTAI 23 



<ICK-OFF RETURNS 




ns Yds. Return 


AVG 


259 


25.9 


81 


16.2 


40 


13.3 


15 


15.0 


10 


10.0 


9 


9.0 


4 


4.0 





0.0 



418 



18.1 



PASS RECEIVING 

No. Caught Yards 

*Augsberger, Pete - e 25 422 

*Karnash, Stanley - e 13 235 

Shemonski, Bob - hb 11 160 

Modzelewski, Ed - hb 8 110 

Petruzzo, Joe - hb 2 30 

*Targarona, Jack - hb 2 43 

Fox, Hank - e 2 23 

Scioscia, Karney - fb 1 21 

*Bo.lton. Ed - hb 1 27 

Co^eryahn, Lloyd - hb 1 14 

*Wingate, Elmer - e 1 11 

TOTAL 67 1096 

* Not a member of 1951 Team. 



*Targarona, Jack - hb 
Petruzzo, Joe - hb _. 



No. 

61 

1 



PUNTING 



Yds. 

2213 
38 



Avg. 
36.3 
38.0 



Blocked, 





TOTAL 



62 



2251 



36.3 



Shemonski, Bob - hb 
Petruzzo, Joe - hb __. 

Davis, Lynn - hb 

"Kuchta, Joe - hb 

:|: Rowden, Jake - c 

TOTAL 



PUNT 


RETURNS 


No. Ret. 


Yds. Ret. 


AVG. 


28 


408 


18.0 


13 


276 


21.2 


9 


70 


7.8 


6 


112 


18.6 


1 


4 


4.0 



57 



870 



15.4 



PASS INTERCEPTIONS 



Shemonski, Bob - hb __ 

Petruzzo, Joe - hb 

*Rowden, Jake - c 

*Wingate, Elmer - e — 

Ladygo, Pete - c 

Cianelii, Dave - fb 

Davis, Lynn - hb 

Colteryahn, Lloyd - hb 
Weidensaul, Lou - e __ 

*Idzik, John - hb 

"Kuchta, Joe - hb 

Keith, Jeff - c 

Kensler, Ed - g 

TOTAL 



. Int. 


Yds. Return 


4 


40 


3 


102 


3 


60 


2 


55 


2 


34 


2 


17 


2 


1 


1 


29 


1 


26 


1 


24 


1 


18 


1 


5 


1 






24 



411 



TD'S 

Shemonski. Bob - hb 16 

Modzelewski, Ed - hb 5 

Scarbath, Jack - qb 3 

Fullerton, Ed - hb 3 

*Karnash, Stan - e 3 

*Augsburger, Pete - e 2 

Petruzzo, Joe - hb 2 

*Wingate, Elmer - e 1 

Ladygo, Pete - c 1 

*Idzik, John - hb 1 

DeStefano, Bob - qb 1 

:!: Gierula, Chet - t 1 

*Ro.wden, Jake - c 1 

! Dean, Bob - t 

Fry, Chick - g 

*Krouse, Ray - t 

*Armsworthv Frank - 

SAFETIES (3) 

TOTAL 40 

— 32 — 



SCORING 




PAT'S 


TOTAL 


1-1 


97 





30 





18 





18 





18 





12 





12 





6 





6 





6 





6 


0-1 


6 


0-1 


6 


(24 for 33) 


24 


( 2 for 2) 


2 


0-1 





1-1 


1 




6 


(28 for 40) 


274 



ALL-TIME MARYLAND FOOTBALL RECORDS 

INDIVIDUAL AND TEAM 

These records, compiled by Bill Hottel after long research are not 
guaranteed by him to be 100 per cent correct, but he's sure they are as 
near to it as anyone ever will come. 

OFFENSE and DEFENSE 

BEST SEASON: 

1949 Won 9, Lost 1. Includes 'Gator Bowl victory over Missouri in '50. 
WORST SEASON: 

1944 Won 1, Lost 7 Tied 1. 
MOST POINTS SCORED IN ONE SEASON: 

274 in 1950 in 10 games. 
LEAST POINTS SCORED IN ONE SEASON: 

39 in 1940 in 9 games. 
MOST POINTS SCORED BY OPPONENTS IN ONE SEASON: 

216 in 1938 in 9 games. 
LEAST POINTS SCORED BY OPPONENTS IN ONE SEASON: 

49 in 1934 in 10 games. 
MOST POINTS SCORED BY MARYLAND IN ONE GAME: 

Maryland 80, Washington College in 1927. 
MOST POINTS SCORED BY OPPONENT IN ONE GAME: 

Navy 76, Maryland in 1913. 
ALL-TIME LEADING SCORER: 

Bob Shemonski with 97 points in 1950 in 10 games. 
OFFENSIVE TEAM RECORD FOR ONE SEASON: 

3,290 yards in 1949 in 9 games. 2,432 yards rushing and 858 passing. 
OFFENSIVE TEAM RECORD FOR ONE GAME: 

590 yards in 1950 against V. P. I. 577 yards rushing and 13 passing. 
LEAST YARDAGE ONE GAME: 

69 against Vanderbilt in 1948. 
DEFENSIVE RECORD FOR ONE SEASON: 

1,707 yards in 1949 in 9 games. 868 rushing and 893 passing for fifth 

place in Nation. 
DEFENSIVE RECORD FOR ONE GAME: 

64 yards bv V. P. I. in 1949. 41 rushing and 23 passing. 
MOST YARDS' BY INDIVIDUAL IN ONE SEASON: 

Ray Poppleman with 1,350 yards in 10 games in 1931. 
MOST YARDS BY INDIVIDUAL IN ONE GAME: 

Ray Poppleman with 201 yards in 24 carries against Western Mary- 
land. 
LONGEST RUN FROM SCRIMMAGE: 

Hubey Werner for 82 yards and touchdown against West Virginia 

in 1948. 

PASSING RECORDS 
TEAM PASSING FOR SEASON: 

90 completions in 170 attempts for 1364 yards in 1942 in 9 games. 
TEAM PASSING FOR ONE GAME: 

Joe Tucker with 9 completions in 12 attempts for 178 yards and Stan 

Lavine, 4 for 5 for 129 yards for total of 307 against South Carolina 

in 1949. 
WORST PASSING RECORD BY MARYLAND: 

completions in 12 attempts against Vanderbilt in 1948. 
INDIVIDUAL PASSING RECORD FOR ONE SEASON: 

66 completions in 127 attempts for 1,076 yards by Tommy Mont in 

9 games in 1942. 

_ 33 — 



INDIVIDUAL PASSING RECORD FOR ONE GAME: 

Tommy Mont, 9 completions in 14 attempts for 215 yards against 
U. of Connecticut in 1942. 

LEADING PASS RECEIVER FOR ONE SEASON: 

Pete Augsburger, 25 receptions for 422 yards in 1950 in 10 games. 

LEADING PASS RECEIVER FOR ONE GAME: 

Stanley Karnash, 7 receptions for 123 yards and two touchdowns 
against George Washington in 1949. 

LONGEST FORWARD PASS PLAY: 

Stan Lavine to Ed Bolton for 92 yards and touchdown against South 
Carolina in 1949. Pass 15 yards, run 77. 

LONGEST RETURN OF INTERCEPTED PASS: 

Tommy Mont for 98 yards and touchdown against Washington and 
Lee in 1946. 

KICKING RECORDS 

LONGEST PUNT: 

Brooke (Untz) Brewer for 93 yards against V. M. I. in 1916. 

BEST OFFICIAL AVERAGE ONE GAME: 

Bill Guckeyson for 51 yards in 10 punts against Syracuse in 1936. 
(Note: Brewer against Syracuse in 1920 and Guckeyson against 
Florida in 1936 both averaged better than 60 yards but official figures 
could not be obtained from these schools and papers didn't carry the 
punting statistics.) 

LONGEST PUNT RETURNS: 

Lu Gambino against Delaware in 1947 and Stan Lavine against 
George Washington in 1948, each for 88 yards and touchdown. 

PUNT RETURNS FOR SEASON: 

Bob Shemonski, 28 for 505 yards in 1950 in 10 games. 

LONGEST KICKOFF RETURNS: 

Lewis Thomas against Washington College in 1927; Bill Guckeyson 
against Georgetown in 1935; and Sam Behr against Virginia in 1945, 
each for 90 yards and a touchdown. 

LONGEST FIELD GOAL: 

Untz Brewer, 46 yards by dropkick against John Hopkins in 1916. 
He also kicked another for 45 yards in same game. 

LONGEST PUNT RETURN AGAINST MARYLAND: 

Johnny Branch of North Carolina for 94 yards and touchdown in 1930. 

LONGEST KICKOFF RETURN AGAINST MARYLAND: 

Jim McPherson of North Carolina for 93 yards and touchdown in 
1926. 

LONGEST PUNT AGAINST MARYLAND: 

Charlie Justice of North Carolina for 84 yards in 1948. 

— 34 — 



MARYLAND'S COMPLETE GRID RECORD 



First 10 years when captains coached (1892-1901) 

Opp. 

Coach W. L. T. Pts. Pts. 

1892__W. W. Skinner— x 2 120 

1893__S. H. Harding 2 24 6 

1894__J. G. Bannon 2 2 TO 50 

1895 G. M. Harris (No football due to dispute with commandant) 

1896__Grenville Lewis 1 2 16 6 

1897_ -John Lillibridge 16 1 44 94 

1898__J. F. Kenly 1 5 27 125 

1899_ _S. M. Cooke 6 6 216 

1900- _F. H. Peters 112 23 23 

1901— E. B. Dunbar 15 28 83 



x — Only Hopkins and St. John's played. 9 27 5 238 723 



Next (0 years under coaches (1902-191 1) 



Coach 

1902--D. John Markey (Western Md.) 

1903__Markey 

1904_ -Markey 

1905__Fred Nielsen (Nebraska) — y 

1906_ -Nielsen 

1907—C. G. Church (Virginia) 

and C. W. Melick (Nebraska) 
1908- _Bill Lang (Delaware) 
1909__Barney Cooper (Maryland '08) 

and E. P. Larkin (Cornell 
1910--R. Alston (George Washington) 
1911--C. F. Donnelly (Trinity) 

and H. C. Byrd (Maryland '08) — 



y — Coach who developed Byrd. z — Byrd coached team for last 
two games with Western Maryland and Oallaudet and won both 
and a job at College Park starting in the fall of 1912. 











Opp. 


w. 


L. 


T. 


Pts. 


Pts. 


1 


6 


2 


22 


95 


5 


3 


1 


62 


64 


4 


4 


2 


56 


55 


4 


4 





83 


66 


3 


2 





71 


44 


2 


6 





32 


71 


2 


7 





10 


211 


2 


3 





25 


70 


4 


3 


1 


67 


42 


3 


3 


2 


32 


58 


30 


41 


8 


460 


776 



Curley Byrd Regime (1912-1934) 



1912. 
1913- 
1914_ 

1915- 
1916_ 
1917_ 
1918_ 
1919- 
1920. 
1921- 
1922- 
1923- 
1924_ 
1925_ 
1926_ 
1927_ 
1928_ 
1929_ 
1930- 
1931- 
1932_ 
1933- 
1934- 



Coach 
_H. C. Byrd 
-Byrd 
_Byrd 
.Byrd 
_Byrd 
_Byrd 
-Byrd 
-Byrd 
_Byrd 
-Byrd 
-Byrd 
_Byrd 
-Byrd 
-Byrd 
_Byrd 
_Byrd 
_Byrd 
-Byrd 
-Byrd 
-Byrd 
-Byrd 
-Byrd — x 
Byrd— a? 











Opp. 


w. 


L. 


T. 


Pts. 


Pts. 


5 


1 


1 


156 


53 


5 


3 





157 


116 


5 


2 





72 


43 


5 


3 





130 


69 


6 


2 





142 


52 


4 


3 


1 


88 


159 


4 


1 


1 


57 


35 


5 


4 





92 


74 


7 


2 





149 


55 


3 


5 


1 


45 


127 


4 


5 


1 


77 


137 


7 


2 


1 


212 


56 


3 


3 


3 


74 


78 


2 


5 


1 


53 


82 


5 


4 


1 


161 


93 


4 


7 





186 


144 


6 


3 


1 


132 


70 


4 


4 


2 


148 


127 


7 


5 





231 


142 


8 


1 


1 


194 


98 


5 


6 





148 


151 


3 


7 





107 


149 


7 


3 





143 


49 



114 



81 15 

x — Jack Faber (Maryland '26 ) was field coach in 1933 
and 19 3 If 



2,954 2,159 



After-Byrd (1935-1949) 



Coach 



1935_ -Frank Dobsan (Princeton) 

1936__Dobson 

1937__Dobson 

1938-_Dobson 

1939__Dobson 

1940- -Jack Faber C26), Al Heagy C30), and 

Al Woods C33), all of Maryland 
1941_ -Faber, Heagy, Woods 
1942__Clark Shaughnessy (Minnesota) 
1943- -Clarence Spears (Dartmouth) 
1944_ -Spears 

1945_ -Paul Bryant (Alabama) 
1946_ -Shaughnessy 
1947_ .Jim Tatum (North Carolina) 
1948__Tatum 
L949_-Tatum 
1950_ -Tatum 



Grand Total 











Opp. 


w. 


L. 


T. 


Pts. 


Pts. 


7 


2 


2 


127 


71 


6 


5 





117 


59 


8 


2 





127 


65 


2 


7 





86 


216 


2 
i 


7 





64 


104 


1 

2 


6 


1 


39 


172 


3 


5 


1 


49 


196 


7 


2 





198 


124 


4 


5 





105 


194 


1 


7 


1 


46 


170 


6 


2 


1 


219 


105 


3 


6 





136 


193 


7 


2 


2 


228 


140 


6 


4 





207 


132 


9 


1 





266 


82 


7 


2 


1 


274 


120 


80 


65 


9 


2288 


2061 


233 


214 


37 


5940 


5719 



BRIEF HISTORY OF THE UNIVERSITY 



The history of the present University is the history of two in- 
stitutions: the old privately-owned and operated University of Mary- 
land in Baltimore and the Maryland State College (formerly Maryland 
Agricultural College) at College Park. These institutions were merged 
in 1920. 

In 1807 the College of Medicine of Maryland was organized, the 
fifth medical school in the United States. The first class was graduated 
in 1810. A permanent home was established in 1814-1815 by the erection 
of the building at Lombard and Greene Streets in Baltimore, the oldest 
structure in America devoted to medical teaching. Here was founded 
one of the first medical libraries (and the first medical school library) 
in the United States. In 1812 the General Assembly of Maryland author- 
ized the College of Medicine of Maryland to "annex or constitute facil- 
ities of divinity, law. and arts and sciences," and by the same act de- 
clared that the "colleges or faculties thus united should be constituted 
an university by the name and under the title of the University of Mary- 
land." By authority of this act, steps were taken in 1813 to establish 
"a faculty of law," and in 1823 a regular school of instruction in law 
was opened. Subsequently there were added: in 1882 a Department of 
Dentistry which was absorbed in 1923 by the Baltimore College of 
Dental Surgery (founded in 1840, the first dental school in the world) ; 
in 1889 a School of Nursing; and in 1904 the Maryland College of 
Pharmacy (founded in 1841, the third oldest pharmacy college in the 
United States). 

The Maryland State College was chartered in 1856 under the name 
of the Maryland Agricultural College, the second agricultural college in 
the Western Hemisphere. For three years the College was under private 
management. In 1862 the Congress of the United States passed the Land 
Grant Act. This act granted each State and Territory that should 
claim its benefits an appropriate amount of unclaimed western lands, 
in place of scrip, the proceeds from the sale of which should apply under 
certain conditions to the "endowment, support, and maintenance of at 
least one college where the leading object shall be, without excluding 
other scientific and classical studies, and including military tactics, to 
teach such branches of learning as are related to agriculture and the 
mechanic arts, in such a manner as the Legislatures of the States may 
respectively prescribe, in order to promote the liberal and practical 
education of the industrial classes in the several pursuits and professions 
of life." This grant was accepted by the General Assembly of Maryland, 
and the Maryland Agricultural College was named as the beneficiary 
of the grant. Thus the College became, at least in part, a State institu- 
tion. In the fall of 1914 control was taken over entirely by the State. 
In 1916 the General Assembly granted a new charter to the College, and 
made it the Maryland State College. 

In 1920, by an act of the State Legislature, the University of Mary- 
land was merged with the Maryland State College, and the resultant 
institution was given the name University of Maryland. 



—NOTES— 



—NOTES— 



—NOTES— 



- 40 - 



&^z&mm 



Sill il 







■-H i 



in 




HhBt 



P^" l 4E« V *>*fa c . . 



lilllliill 








111 


^m^ 




\ iii 

10 


^it^ffllllllt 


«*>■ ■ llpSifc 
3f|;.JIj§j|fl| 


fill. 


p 




Mm 











ALL-AMERICA BOB WARD AND DAVE CIANELLI 
1951 Co-Captains 



Outstanding Holdovers Who Will Help Ward and Ganelli 
Lead '51 Terps . . . 




JOHN ALDERTON 




■ :. 





JACK SCARBATH 



tf> 



H* 



0<*** 



#& 



BOB SHtMONSKI 




*0 



^ 



l **r< 



Ofy 





DICK MODZEUEWSKI 



TOM COSGROVE