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Full text of "University of Maryland men's football media guides"

THE 1952 



YARD LINE 



* t 




imm&iuw mzziss remissee*) 



Maryland VV^'es Vo 
» ! And Suitor & V iL ?Sii 



JACK SCARBATH 
All-America Quarterback Candidate 




* 



W. Split-T" 

Had over 50% pass completions in '51. 
Led the nation's T Quarterbacks in rushing. 
Scored I touchdowns and passad for 8, 




FOR PRESS, RADIO and TELEVISION 




This is your 1952 Maryland football brochure, 
"The 50-Yard Line." It is published in hope 
that it offers you helpful information for your 
coverage of Terp games this season. With this 
book goes an invitation to you to visit us as 
often as possible in our offices in New Byrd 
Stadium. In return, I will try to visit you as 
often as I can and extend every assistance pos- 
sible. For any information, you can reach me 
day and night at UNion 4076. When it is real 
late at night, I can be contacted at WArfield 
3800, Extension 507. 

Applications for tickets should bo made the 
first part of the week of the game to allow 
time for mailing. Wire and telephone requirements should be made 
through your local Western Union office. 

Every effort will be made to furnish all the services in the press box 
available, so that your accounts of the game can be most adequate for 
your readers. Statistics, both half-time and final figures; a quarter play- 
by-play; game leaders in all departments; substitutions, etc. will be ready 
a few minutes after the game. 

Many thanks for all your cooperation and favors of the past. 




JOE F. BLAIR, 
Sports Publicity Director 
University of Maryland, 
College Park, Maryland. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



PAGE 

1— Message lo Press 

2-Dr. II. C. Byrd 

3— 'Athletic Council 

4— JDept. Int. Athletics 

5— Coach Jim Tatum 

6-9— Ass't Coaches— Trainers 
10—1952 Co-Captains 
11-16— Player Thumbnails 
17— Opponent s Schedules 
18-19— Squad Roster 
20-28— Terp Opponents 
29-33— Opponents Publicists' 
Reports 



PAGE 

33— '52 Schedule— 51 Results 

Maryland Bowl Record 
54— Game Officials 
35— Terp Coverage 
36-37— Sugar Bowl Yardstick 
38-1951 Highlights 
58— Byrd Stadium 
39— '51 Team Statistics 
40-41— '51 Individual Statistics 
42-43— AII-Time Records 
44-47— Year by Year Scores 
47— Coaches Through The Years 
48— History 




DR. H. C. BYRD 

PRESIDENT, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Dr. H. C. (Curley) Byrd, President of the University of Maryland, 
owns a distinction that no other college President can claim. He is the 
only President to ever play for, then coach, then become President of 
his alma mater. 

Dr. Byrd quarterbacked the Terp teams 1905-1907. He also was a 
pitcher on the baseball teams as well as a sprinter on the track team. 

From 1912 through 1934, he was head football coach. In those 25 
years, his teams compiled a 114-81-15 record. 

After becoming President, Dr. Byrd concentrated his efforts to 
making Maryland known the world over as one of the foremost educa- 
tional institutions. Today the University of Maryland has attained that 
goal set by its President. 

Too, his program called for a first class athletic curriculum. The 
1952 football season marks the third year that the Terps' new stadium 
will be used. When the time came for giving the stadium a name, there 
wasn't a moment's hesitancy that it should be called BYRD STADIUM. 

This tribute to one who has contributed an individual effort so un- 
tiringly to educate America's youth was the only appropriate thing to do. 



ATHLETIC COUNCIL 




Mr. G. F. Eppley Mr. James Tatum 




Mr 



Talbert Speer Dr. James H. Reid Col. Joseph Ambrose 




Dr. Jack Faber 



Dr. E. N. Cory Mr. Stan Rubenstem 

_ 3 — 



THE DEPARTMENT OF INTERCOLLEGIATE 
ATHLETICS 




WILLIAM W. COBEY 

The big job of scheduling athletic con- 
tests for 12 sports and making and taking 
rare of arrangements for these teams, both 
at home and away, falls on the shoulders 
of Bill Cobey, the Terps' pleasant and accom- 
modating Graduate Manager of Athletics. 

Cobey, who also acts in the capacity as 
contact man, is head of the ticket office, 
although he now has a full-time ticket 
manager in Bennie Robinson. 

Cobey comes from Quincy, Fla. His inter- 
est in Maryland stems from his being a 
member of an old Maryland family. His 
father graduated from the University in 
1901. Cobey is an alumnus of the class of 
1S31. 

Cashier at the University for 17 years, he moved to the Athletic 
Department in 1948. 

Cobey is married and has five children, three daughters and two 
sons. Shortly after publication of this book, he expects the sixth addi- 
tion to the family. 

Director of Athletics James M. Tatum 

Graduate Manager of Athletics William W. Cobey 

Athletic Publicity Director __ Joe F. Blair 

Equipment Head _ Kermit "Chief" Cissell 

Facilities Head H. Burton Shipley 

Chief of Concessions Vernon Seihert 

Ticket Manager Bonnie Robinson 

Office Secretary to Mr. Tatum Mrs. Ora Rutherford 

Office Secretary to Mr. Cobey Mrs. Doro'hy Hunt 

Head Trainer Alfred "Duke' Wyre 

Assistant Trainer John Lacey 

Football Coach James M. Tatum 

Basketball Coach H. A. "Bud" Millikan 

Boxing Coach Frank Cronin 

Baseball Coach H. Burton Shipley 

Lacrosse Co-Coaches Jack Faber, Al Heagy 

Track, Cross-Country Coach Jim Kehoe 

Soccer, Tennis Coach Doyle Royal 

Wrestling Coach Wm. E. "Sully" Krouse 

Golf Coach Frank Cronin 

Rifle Coach Col. Harland Griswold 

— 4 — 




JIM TATUM 

The 1951 record speaks for itself, but this is a New Year and a 
new schedule for Maryland and Jim Tatum, now ready for his sixth 
campaign at College Park. 

In five years, Tatum has taken his teams to three bowl games, 
evidence that he has been the good "doctor" of football at College Park. 

Coach of the Southern Conference as voted by the sportswriters and 
Coach of the year as selected by the Washington TD Club, the young Terp 
mentor now has a 39 — 9 — 3 record for his five-year tenure with the 
Red Shirts. His eight-year slate reads 61 — 16 — 5, impressive in any 
league. 

He was a member of this year's Ail-Star coaching staff. 

A native of McColl, S.C., Tatum started his athletic career at the 
University of North Carolina where he was a star tackle. After gradua- 
tion in 1935, he followed his coach, Car! Snavely, as assistant at Cornell. 
Returning to his alma mater for his first fling at head coaching, in 1942, 
his team compiled a 5-2-2 slate. 

World War II found Tatum in the Navy. It was then that he was to 
learn the Split-T formation from Missouri's Don Faurot as the latter's 
assistant at Iowa Pre-Flight. He later moved to Jacksonville Naval Air 
Station as head coach in 1945. 

After his Navy discharge, he molded a strong eleven at Oklahoma. 
He took the Sooners to the 1947 'Gator Bowl and trounced N. C. 
State, 34-13. 

Then followed the move to Maryland and in five years he has 
brought Maryland football to rank at the very top nationally. 

Tatum is married and has two children, Becky and Jimmy. Sometime 
during the season, they are expecting another addition to the family. 



ASSISTANT COACHES 



JACK HENNEMIER 

At 150 pounds, the Terps' Line Coach 
Jack Hennemier made football fame for 
himself when he played center in his col- 
lege days at Duke University, '33, '34, and 
'35. Undoubtedly one of the smallest players 
ever at the center of any line, Hennemier, 
a 60-minute man in '35, won the most val- 
uable player award as voted by his team- 
mates in 1935. This same year he made All- 
America Mention and the All-Conference 
team. 

Because of his outstanding gridiron prow- 
ess for his size, he is known, even today, as 
"Scrappy Jack." 

In 1939 he was lured to Washington and 
Lee University as Line Coach. He stayed 
there through 41, before being called into the Navy in '42. That year he 
played center and coached at the Pensacola Naval Air Station. 

After 3% years in the service, Hennemier returned to Duke in '45 as 
assistant line coach and freshman coach. 

He came to the Terps in '49 as line coach and handles the defensive 
team, an outstanding characteristic of Terp elevens under his tutelage. 




WARREN GIESE 

A native of Milwaukee, Wis., the 27-year 
old Maryland end coach began his athletic 
career in 1942 at Wisconsin State College. 
Here the Navy vet lettered playing end and 
won a monogram as a quarter-miler. 

Entering the service in June '43, he was 
sent to Central Michigan College to study 
under the V-12 program. He played right 
half before transferring to. Miami Training 
Center and then to Jacksonville in '45, 
where he played end under Coach Tatum. 

He kept his football career going by 
enrolling at Oklahoma in '46 to play for 
his Navy boss from Jacksonville. He won 
a berth on the All-Big 7 team that year. 

Giese returned to Central Michigan to 
play one more year and got his B.A. and B.S. 

In '49, Tatum beckoned his former star to Maryland as end coach. 
Mixing football with studies, Giese got his Master's in Physical Edu- 
cation in '49. 

He spent a month in Japan this summer as a member of the U.S. 
Coaching Staff sent there by the Army to conduct coaching clinics for 
various Army, Navy and Air Force bases. 

He will "observe" his first wedding anniversary December 23. 




TOMMY MONT 

One of the greatest athletes in the history 
of the University of Maryland, Tommy Mont 
returned to his alma mater in 1951 as Terp 
backfield coach. 

A four-year letterman in football, basket- 
ball and lacrosse, Mont returned to Mary- 
land after four brilliant years with the pro- 
fessional Washington Redskins. 

A home stater, coming from Cumberland, 
Md., Mont embarked on his athletic years 
in 1941. He got two years in before enter- 
ing the service in the spring oi '43. He 
played tailback in '41 then quarterback on 
the '42 T eleven. Both years he won his bas- 
ketball and lacrosse letters also. Mont won 
All-America Mention as well as being placed 
on the Conference team in '42, and was named the outstanding college 
player of the Washington-Maryland area that year. 

With 42 months in the service, 18 of which were spent in the ETO, 
Mont continued playing ball. He was tailback on the Fort Benning post 
championship team of '43. As quarterback and head coach, he led the 3rd 
Infantry team to the ETO championship. He also was at the helm of the 
7th Army All-Star team. 

Mont completed his college ball playing quarterback lor the Terps in 
'46 when he again won All-America Mention and All-Conference honors. 

He has three sons; ages 5, 3, and IV2. 




VERNON SEIBERT 

Another graduate of the University to 
return to his alma mater as assistant 
coach, Vernon Seibert begins his second 
year as defensive backfield coach for the 
Terps. He also is chief of concessions for 
all athletic events. 

An outstanding halfback 1946 thro.ugh 
the '49 season, playing offense for three 
years and defense his fourth campaign, 
he is best remembered for his great defen- 
sive play which tabs him as one of the 
finest safety men to play at Maryland. 

Before he returned to Maryland, Seibert 
was foc.tbcll and lacrosse coach at Balti- 
more Junior College for one year. 

He was a B-25 pilot in the South Pacific 
in World War 11. 

He is married and has no children. 





BOB WARD 

The all-time great name in the history 
of the University of Maryland football is 
that of Bob Ward. The two-year All- 
America Guard has decided to stay on at 
his alma mater to be the Terps' offensive 
line coach. 

Ward graduated this summer with a 
degree from the School of Business and 
Public Administration, finishing in the upper 
one-third of the class. He majored in Real 
Estate and Insurance. 

Following his discharge from the Army 
paratroopers in 1947, Ward came to Mary- 
land as one of the smallest guard prospects 
ever seen by Jim Tatum. Eut Tatum liked 
what he saw and now is moro than happy 
that Ward was on his side of the line for four years. The 185-pounder 
from Elizabeth, N.J., was outstanding every Saturday for the Terps. 

His many honors are too numerous to mention, but Ward was recip- 
ient of every award imaginable for any lineman. After making All- 
Americd his junior year for his excellent defensive play, he proved 
that he wasn't just an ordinary platoon football player by making 
everybody's All-America team in 1951 playing offense. Tatum himself 
credits the great success of his offensive team to his '51 Co-Captain, 
Bob Ward. When things got real rough for the Terps, Ward would 
trot in to play defense and stop the enemy threat. 

Besides the unanimous All-America selections last year, Ward was 
named "Lineman of the Year" by the Washington Touchdown Club and 
the Philadelphia Sportswriters' Assn. He was runnerup to Stanford's 
Bill McColl for the same Associated Press award. He was named the 
outstanding player of the Southern Conference. During the season, he 
was the nation's ' Lineman of the Week," after his great game against 
Georgia. 

Ward is married and has a son, Richard, 2, and a one-year-old daugh- 
ter, Kathie. 

EMMETT CHEEK 

Added to the staff last fall, Cheek came 
to the Terps from Guilford College, N. C, 
where he was line coach and baseball coach 
in '49 and '50. He will coach the Terp 
freshman team. He also is part-time instruc- 
tor in the physicial education department. 

A native of Chapel Hill, N. C, Cheek 
went to UNC. Starting in 1940, he was a 
guard under Tatum, who was' Freshman 
coach. After another year of football. Cheek 
was called into the service in '41, and as- 
signed to Army Medics. Returning' to Caro- 
lina, he completed his football career under 
Carl Snavely. He stayed there for graduate 
work in '48. 

He received his Master's Degree in Physi- 
cal Education from N.C. in 1950. 

Cheek is married and has one son. 





w* 



EDDIE TEAGUE 1 

I 

The newest addition to the staff, Teague 1 
comes to Maryland following his discharge | 
in mid-August from the U. S. Marine 
Corps after serving 15 months in the Infan- 
try, 1st Marine Division, Korea. A Captain § 
in the USMCR, Teague served three years I 
during World War II. 

He will be assistant freshman coach, and 1 
also teach physical education. 

Teague attended N. C. State College, 1941- 
43, then transferred to UNC via his Marine I 
Unit and received his A.B. Degree. Follow- 1 
ing his hitch in the service, he returned to 
Chapel Hill and got his Master's in '47 

He then went to Guilford College, N.C., as 1 
backfield coach and assistant director of |j 
physical education in 1947 and '48. He be- 
came head coach and athletic director in 1949-51; then was called to 
active duty. 

Teague is married and has a daughter, Peggy, four years old. 





THE TRAINERS 

ALFRED J. "DUKE" WYRE 

Kept quite busy spreading the good word 
of the best methods of training athletic teams 
through many lectures at clinics in the off- 
seasons, Maryland's trainer "Dapper Duke" 
Wyre lays aside his Esquire wardrobe for hi 
training togs for the sixth year at Maryland. 

An old Ivy-Leaguer, "Duke" was trainer at 
Yale for 15 years before he moved to Holy 
Cross for two more semesters, then he came 
to the Terps in 1947. 

A Navy veteran, Wyre served as a physical 
educational instructor in the V-12 program. 

He was the first president of the Conference 
Trainer's Assn. He presently is on the board 

o£ the National Trainers' Assn. In 1949, he was named the number one 
trainer in the East. 

JOHN LACEY 

Another of those accented Ivy-Leaguers, 
Lacey came to Maryland in the summer of 
1951 as the Terps' first full-time assistant 
trainer. 

Before the move to College Park, Lacey wa : 
assistant trainer at Yale for three years. He 
also has had long experience with pro teams. 
In early pro training periods, he had been 
trainer for the Chicago Cardinals, the New 
York Yanks, and was with the Baltimore Colts 
in 1950. 

He graduated from Tilton Academy in New 
Hampshire. 




'52 CO-CAPTAINS 
Ed Fullerton — John Alderton 



mmmmmmtmm9^i-' 




Ed Fullerton and John Alderton, pictured above, have the enviable 
distinction of being the Co-Captains of the 1952 Terrapins. 

Theirs' is the job of helping Jim Tatum and staff mold together 
another championship eleven for Maryland. They will be a big help, 
we know, even though losses from the '51 team were critical in some 
positions. The potential for another winning team definitely is available 
at College Park. Therefore, the role of team leadership is even more 
vitally important in the case of one roosting near the top. That is why 
Tatum will be counting on tlvem on and off the field to give confidence 
and exhibit the spirit evident among past Maryland elevens. 

Immediately following the Terps' Sugar Bowl victory, teammates 
unanimously gave the honor to two great football players and two great 
lenders, Fullerton and Alderton. 



THE OUTLOOK FOR 1952 

The "pickin" will be a bit tougher in '52 for the Yankee-most half- 
sister of the Southern Conference. The "slow-old" Terrapin has its grid- 
iron warriors taking it into the fast company of the deep South to meet 
five Southeastern Conference foes, Auburn, Georgia, LSU, 'Ole Miss, and 
Alabama. The Terrapin also will get to talk things over with its Con- 
ference half-sister, the Clemson Tiger. This meeting was brought about 
by what you might call mutual agreement. 

So while the two bowl participants of last January "sit out their 
year" by not playing in conference games, they will reach far and wide 
to complete their schedules. Maryland also must meet Missouri, Navy 
and Boston University. 

Terp Coach Jim Tatum, starting his sixth year as director of the big 
show from College Park doesn't hesitate in expressing his views of opti- 
mism about the '52 team. Today, this is almost unheard of in the coach- 
ing fraternity, even if the prospects look undeniably favorable. But 
Tatum doesn't try to imitate some blues singer when he talks about his 
team. This year he believes the team will be as good as if not better 
than the team which laid claim to the national championship after win- 
ning the Sugar Bowl game from the number one ranked Tennessee. 

To all this, there is no denying from any quarters. The Terps have 
a 12-game winning streak in the books and they want to add to that 
record. 

The loss of 17 lettermen is a blow to any team, however, a bit 
of comfort is evidenced with 24 lettermen returning. 

When speaking of the backfield, the big Red Shirts are: quarterback 
Jack Scarbath, who is a strong candidate for All-America honors; Senior 
and Co-Captain Ed Fullerton; junior halfbacks who run like a bunch of 
jack-rabbits, Chester Hanulak and Ralph Felton; along with Dick Nolan, 
and sophs Joe Horning and Ronnie Waller, and newcomers Charles Box- 
old, Leland Liebold, George Albrecht, and Bill Walker; fullbacks Ed Bar- 
ritt, Bob Laughery, and Dick Bielski; and quarterbacks Bob DeStefano, 
Bernie Faloney, and Lynn Beightol. Fullerton, Horning and Faloney will 
be first-string defensive secondary men but will be able to play offense. 

Offensively, up front, the Terps must build around center Tom Cos- 
grove, one of the game's finest; Stanley Jones, powerful 235-pound block 
of granite at tackle, and end Lou Weidensaul. 

Defensively, they have no great "situation" of frightening propor- 
tions. In ends co-captain John Alderton and Paul Nestor they have two 
of the best flanks in the nation. In their famous "M-Club" of All-America 
tackle Dick "Little Mo" Modzelewski, Bob "Blubber" Morgan, and Bill 
Maletzky, Maryland has a murderous trio; one that could be the most 
formidable middle of any defensive unit in football. Each little "M" 
goes 235 pounds and all are seasoned veterans. Morgan is a junior. 

Along with Fullerton, Faloney and Horning in the secondary, we 
will find some of the following as linebackers: Art Hurd, Marty Crytzer, 
Charlie Lattimer, Cliff Trexler, Walt Boeri, or newcomer Herb Hoffman. 

Last year's eleven emerged the nation's highest scoring team in the 
nation with 353 points; compiled the country's second best total offensive 
figure; and third best rushing average per game. 

In his five years at Maryland, Tatum has compiled the enviable rec- 
ord of 39 wins, 9 losses, and three ties. In the same span, his teams have 
gone to, three bowl games, winning two and tieing one. 



TERP THUMBNAIL SKETCHES 



ENDS 



JOHN ALDERTON. 21, 6-1, 185, Senior from Cumberland, Md. — Co-Captain of the '52 
Terrapins — the smallest lineman on the team but the most explosive — this will be his 
third campaign as first string defensive end — he hasn't given a remote indication of re- 
linquishing the job after he got it early in the '50 season — tabbed by coaches as the best 
defensive end in many a moon . . . "He could move a mountain if he had to" is an 
appropriate evaluation of his ability by Tatum . . . has the valuable knack of sidestepping 
or bowling over the opponent trying to stop him ... not unusual to find Johnny ramming 
through the interference to throw the ball carrier for long losses . . . distinguished him- 
self in North Carolina game when Te^ps were back on their heels late in the game and 
trying to save a 7-point lead by breaking through 4 straight downs to throw passer for 
a loss . . . Outstanding in the Sugar Bowl, drawing high praise from Tennessee Coach 
Bob Neyland as a great defensive end . . . may get the unusual but necessary switch to 
offense . . . honors in '51 included Southern Conference second team . . . Washington Post 
second team . . . All-Players All-South Hon. Mention . . . could be "sleeper" for best 
college end in '52 . . . letterman on the track team as a b:-oad jumper ... a four-sport 
star at Fort Hill High School. 

LOU WEIDENSAUL, 24, 6-2, 205, Senior from Ashland, Pa. — The Terps' fine offen- 
sive end . . . leading pass receiver last season with 18 receptions for 249 yards and 
4 td's . . . caught three st.ikes from Scarbath in the Sugar Bowl . . . makes a great 
effort to get every pass with big hands and long reach . . . made a circus catch 
in end zone in North Carolina game to give Terps margin of victory . . . set a new 
Maryland pass receiving record for number of catches in one game when he snagged 
8 in the Navy game . . . Played in Penna. All-Star game in '44 ... A Navy vet . . . 
United Press third team All-South and Washington Post Hon. Mention. 
!>AUL NESTOR, 21, 6-3, 202, Senior from Parsons, W. Va. — stepped into the first 
string defensive left end job last year and did a brilliant job . . . transfer from 
Potomac State, W. Va., where he played his first two years . . . rewarded for a 
great year as he was drafted by the Chicago Bears . . . also named on the All-Bowl 
team by the United Press following a great performance against the Vols . . . likes 
it rough and makes it tough to get around him . . . fast and a sure tackier . . . hopes 
to entei Dental School. 

LLOYD COLTERYAHN, 21, 6-2, 205, Senior from Brentwood, Pa. — big and fast . . . 
fine blocker and an excellent target for passes from the Terp backs . . . came along 
last year as expected after being out first part of season because of injury . . . caught 
8 aerials for 154 yards and 2 td's . . . was WPIAL (Pa.) star . . . played in Pitts- 
burgh all-star high school game. 

MARTIN CRYTZER, 20, 6-0, 210, Junior from Brackenridge, Pa. — another brilliant 
player from Har-Brack High School, the same school responsible for Terp stars Ed and 
Dick Modzelewski. and Joe Horning ... a big strong boy who likes it rough . . . 
did a fine job as a soph in '51 . . . should be the Terps' number one linebacker this 
year . . . can also fill in at the defensive end spot . . . has nearly an A average 
in Pre- Dental School. 

FRED HEFFNER, 20, 6-3, 210, Junior from Saxton, Pa. — a big. brawny blonde who 
is one of Terps' all-time punters . . . except for required short kicks, he would 
have had much higher average in '51 . . . had a 39.4 avg. for 15 kicks . . . boots 
'em long and high . . . undoubtedly will be number one replacement for Weidensaul 
and Colteryahn . . . Played in North-South High School All-Star game. 
ROBERT PIVEC, 19, 6-0, 190, Sophomore from Baltimore's Patterson Park High 
School — a rugged newcomer who should make an adequate offensive end replacement 
to spell the regulars . . . fast downfield . . . with a bit of experience he is sure 
to bolster the end position . . . All-State in 1949 and '50. 

RALPH BAIERL. 20, 6-3, 215, Sophomore from Pittsburgh, Pa. — held out last year 
afte ■ an early season injury . . . big and plenty rugged . . . will help bolster the 
linebacking duties ... a good prospect. 

TACKLES 

DICK "LITTLE MO" MODZELEWSKI, 21, 6-0, 235, Senior from West Natrona, Pa.— 
with a repeat performance of his outstanding play in '51, "Little Mo" will be a 
strong candidate for "Lineman of the Year" honors . . . can't miss laying further 
claim in bid as the Terps' all-time tackle . . . opposing coaches as well as Tatum 
call him the game's rest . . . great year as a junior brought him All-American 
honors . . . selected on Chicago Tribune's first team All-Players All-America, Asso- 
ciated Press second team. United Press third team . . . made first team onj All- 
Southern Conference selections, being named Co-Captain of the Conference eleven . . . 
made many other selections . . . drew endless praise from coaches, players, press, and 
fans for his outstanding game against Tennessee in the Sugar Bowl Game . . . was 
named on the United Press All-Bowl team . . . will lead the Terp defense and may 

— 12 — 



have to do double duty as offensive tackle if that position remains critical following 
pre-season practice . . . the big gun of the Terps' now famous "M" Club of 
"Modzelewski, Morgan, and Maletzky." 

BOB "BLUBBER" MORGAN, 22, 6-0, 235, Junior from Freeport, Pa. — the second % 
of the defensive "M" Club . . . stepped into the right tackle position opening game 
in '51 and gave a great show every Saturday . . . played his greatest game in Sugar 
Bowl . . . broke through on numerous occasions to throw ball carrier for losses, a 
specialty of Morgan . . . tougfy to get by . . . fast and quick as a eat . . . leaves 
little to be desired and with another fine year could be a sure bet to land many 
laurels for his gridiron b.illance . . . tackles "Little Mo" and "Blubber" offer a big 
challenge to the Terp opponents. 

STANLEY JONES, 20, 6-0, 235, Junior from Lemoyne, Pa. — is Tatum's big hope 
around which to build his offensive line . . . Jones was a big factor in success of Terp 
offensive in '51 . . . probably the strongest man on the squad ... is a big boy 
who can really move the defense out of the way . . . very fast . . . played every 
game last year without any doubt of superiority . . . Was All-Susquehanna Conference 
player and All-Harrisburg . . . State discus champ. 

TOM BREUNICH, 20, 6-2, 215, Sophomore from Pelham, N. Y. — Should be nearly 
what the doctor ordered to assist clear up the cloudy offensive tackle spot . . . held 
out last year because of illness . . . showed exceptionally well in spring practice . . . 
a fine prospect with great possibilities . . . has tremendous desire. 

RAY BLACKBURN, 20, 6-1, 212, Sophomore from Keyser, W. Va. — the picture may 
clear for Tatum's big tackle problem if Blackburn also comes through as expected . . . 
he too had a good spring practice until illness forced him out of the line-up . . . was 
an outstanding frosh for the Teips ... a tough big boy . . . was All-Conference 
and All-Ncrth All-America in High School . . . staff has high hopes for his potential. 
BILL VENTER, 19, 6-1, 225, Sophomore from New Kensington, Pa. — Another big 
tackle who will be in there with a 50-50 chance of playing a lot of ball this fall . . . 
is young and has no varsity experience but he was one of leading frosh . . . had a 
good spring practice . . . could turn out to be key man, defensively and offensively . . . 
has g eat ability . . . was all-WPIAL in High Schol. 

DOMINIC STALA, 20, 6-2, 218, Sophomore from Aliquippa, Pa. — another of those 
sophomore hopefuls Tatum has available . . . impressive as a frosh and in spring 
ball . . . with a bit of hustle he could move right up m there . . . lettered in foot- 
ball, basketball, baseball, and track at Aliquippa High School. 

RICHARD COWAN, 19, 6-2, 215, Sophomore from East McKeesport, Pa. — Has plenty 
of physical ability and only after more football savvy, which he should get early this 
fall will he become a serious contender for a top spot on the team . . . star foot- 
ball, basketball, and baseball athlete in High School. 

ED O'CONNOR, 23, 6-4, 220, Senior from Yonkers, N. Y. — returns to the squad after 
a hitch in the Marines . . . could be the surprise package of the line . . . might 
help offensive problem . . . can also play defense . . . confidence will help. 



GUARDS 

BILL MALETZKY, 22, 6-1, 235, Senior from White Plains, N. Y. — Big Bill is the 
third member of the "M" Club trio . . . enjoyed a great year in '51 . . . outstand- 
ing in Sugar Bowl . . . fast and a vicious tackier . . . hard to get around . . . not 
to be fooled . . . plays that middle of the line as if he owned it ... a real rock, 
making the Terps' "Rock of Gibralter" defensive set-up along the line complete . . . 
blocked two punts . . . comes from White Plains High School aiong with guard Frank 
Navarro, halfback Dick Nolan and graduate Hank Fox . . . drafted by Cleveland Browns 
. . . was All-Worchester County for two years in a tough league. 

RAY STANKUS, 21, 6-0, 207, Senior from Philadelphia, Pa. — after finishing strong 
last season and enjoying an impressive spring practice, Stankus looks like he is ready 
to step in to take over one of the offensive guard positions left vacated by loss of 
Bob Ward and Pete Ladygo . . . also capable on defense ... is very conscientious 
with a lot of drive and determination . . . was Co-Captain of Northeast Catholic 
where he won All-Catholic and All-Scholastic honors. 

DON DECKER, 20, 5-10, 215, Junior from Cumberland, Md. — A little rock of dyna- 
mite built close to the ground . . . has a good offensive charge ... in line to take 
ove as other offensive guard, if he wants it . . . likes to play hard so all comers 
will have tough assignment . . . was third highest sco' er on team in '51 as a re r u t 
of 37 extra points for 51 attempts as well as one field goal . . . had fourth best 
place-kicking percentage in the country ... at Fort Hill School, he was All-City. All- 
County two years, and All-State one year . . . given Honorable Mention All-America 
at Fort Hill also. 

FRANK NAVARRO, 22, 5-10, 190, Senior from White Plains, N. Y. — Has lettered 
both years . . . hard worker . . . plays a good steady game . . . excellent blocker 
for his size . . . will be out to nail down a starting berth . . . has plenty of hustle 
to make the grade. 

— 13 — 



WALTER BOERI, 21, 5-10, 200, Senior from Long Island, N. Y.— did a good job as 
a reserve offensive lineman in '51 . . . had a successful spring practice and undoubt-* 
edly will be moved to the defensive unit ... to give a needed hand at linebacking . . . 
plenty of brawn . . . was star fullback at Erasmus High. 

ART HURD, 22, 6-0, 210, Senior from Gardner, Mass. — Expected to be ace linebacker 
for the Terps . . . loves to play plenty of defense . . . likes it rough and tougli . . . 
should be able to handle the job adequately . . . finished strong last season ... is 
just as quiet off the field as he is tough on the field, so quiet in fact that his team- 
mates call him "Mother." 

JOHN GUENDER, 21, 5-11, 190, Junior from Plainfield, N.J Got valuable experience 

last season ... is sure to be an important man in helping the offensive guard slots . . . 
a hard worker . . . fast and a fine blocker ... An Army vet . . . JOHN BOWERSOX, 
19, 6-1, 200, Sophomore from Westminster, Md. — outstanding frosh lineman . . . great 
spring practice for a rookie . . . high in Tatum's plans to help line ... is fast and 
possesses a quick charge and follow through on his blocking . . . could play a lot of 
ball this fall . . . worth watching . . . All-State his senior yeftr . . . also lettered 
in basketball and baseball . . . GEORGE PALAHUNIK, 21, 6-1, 205, Sophomore 
from McKees Rocks, Pa. — A big strong boy with a lot of desire to play football . . . 
could be a big help after some experience. . . . LYNN SZAFRANSKI, 19, 6-0, 209, 
Sophomore from Carnegie, Pa. — One of top frosh linemen . . . looks promising . . . 
very serious about the game . . . was All-Cath/)lic in Western Pennsylvania. . . . 
TOM MC LUCKIE, 20, 5-11, 215, Sophomore from Midland, Mich. — big Tom could 
surprise a lot of folks . . . needs experience and confidence . . . All-State center. . . . 
BOB LYNN, 21, 6-0, 195, Sophomore from Washington, D. C. — After a year of sea- 
soning, Lynn should be ready to play some football . . . was All-Metropolitan at 
Eastern High. 



CENTERS 

TOM COSGROVE, 22, 6-3, 215, Senior from Philadelphia, Pa. — Maryland's all-time 
offensive center . . . has been first string since opening whistle of first game his soph 
year . . . Cosgrove could be best offensive center in college football today . . . moves 
defenders out of the way and keeps them out ... is big and exceptionally fast . . . 
an excellent blocker . . . gets his initial block and never quits . . . follows through* 
with accurate and vicious downfield blocking ... a key man to success of qb and 
Split-T . . . made Honorable Mention All-America, both Associated Press and All- 
Players and second team Washington Post All-Area . . . Drafted by the Cleveland 
Browns. 

CHARLES LATTIMER, 20, 6-1, 215, Junior from Cumberland, Md. — Came through 
for the Terps last season in fine fashion for a soph . . . did well enough to letter . . . 
big and rough . . . has one of the linebacking posts sewed up; his job will be to 
keep it . . . capable enough to be outstanding defensive ball hawk . . . Won All- 
City honors while at Fort Hill High School. 

CLIFFORD TREXLER, 21, 6-1, 200, Junior from New Florence, Pa. — Experience is 
the best teacher, so with enough seasoning from the '51 season under his belt, 
Trexler will be a valuable addition . . . possibly be in the thick of the running for 
a linebacking job . . . can also fill in at the offensive slot . . . good blocker on 
offense . . . pursues and follows play well on defense . . . Prepared at Kiski School 
in Pa. 

HERB HOFFMAN, 20, 6-0, 205, Sophomore from Hartford, Conn. — One of the nicest 
guys on the squad but one of the toughest ... is a sure bet to be in running for a 
top linebacking job . . . has hustle to spare . . . did outstanding job for frosh and 
carried the good work right on through spring practice . . . likes to use the phrase, 
"Let's be lean and mean!" . . . Follows the play well . . . hard to fake him out . . . 
JOHN IRVINE, 19, 6-2, 210, Sophomore from Evans City, Pa. — Has stepped into the 
offensive center's spot nicely . . . Being groomed to take Cosgrove's place after this 
year . . . fast and a good blocker ... is sure to spell Cosgrove during the season . . . 
on WPIAL football and basketball teams . . . also lettered in track and baseball . . . 
DON BROUGHER, 20, 6-2, 210, Sophomore from Edgewood, Pa. — A promising snapper- 
back . . . has the ability . . . needs experience then will be ready to help the 
offensive center spot. 



QUARTERBACKS 



JACK SCARBATH, 21, 

quarterback candidate 

eral in football today 



Scarbath 



6-1, 190, Senior from Baltimore, Md. — The Terps' All-America 
. . tabbed as one of the finest, if not THE finest, Split-T gen- 
much of Maryland's success this fall will depend upon 



it looks like this: "As Scarbath goes, so goes Maryland." 



14 — 



presently being compared with past all-time great quarterbacks . . . good as a sopho- 
more, outstanding as a junior, another great year will place him among the gridiron 
greats . . . After his outstanding exhibition in directing the Terp attack aganst 
Tennessee, the "daddy" of the Split-T, Missouri's Don Faurot, echoed of the con- 
test that Maryland's Scarbath operated the system better than any other qb since 
it's inception ten years ago . . . Jack seems to have his greatest days against the 
most formidable opponents ... He is a fine and accurate passer . . . Had over 50'% 
completions last year as he made good with 34 out of 67 attempts . . . Since the Terps 
didn't have to pass frequently in '51, he didn't call on his own aerial threat . . . 
But when he needed to pass, he did so well . . . However, the tremendously valuable 
asset he has is that he is an excellent ball carrier . . . this, with his great passing arm 
makes him even more of a sensation of a T quarterback through any success he might 
have ... He does an exceptional job on the Split-T "keep play" . . . His deception is 
something to watch and his fakes of hand-offs and pitch-outs keeps the defenders always 
waiting for most anything to happen once the ball is snapped ... He is fast and once 
beyond the line of scrimmage he keeps himself going with a pai of high churning legs 
... A big boy, Scarbath is a smart field general, too, in the sense that he never loses 
control of his command ... He calls a sma:t sequence of plays and he furthermore proves 
his ability by changing the play after he has spotted the opponents' defense . . . led the 
nation's T qbs in '51 in rushing . . . His 34 completions went for 675 yards and 8 scores 
. . . scored 7 times himself ... In the Sugar Bowl he completed 6 out of 9 aerials, the 
first six he threw . . . Was AP Hon. Men. All-America as well as All-Players . . . selected 
on Conference's second teams and the Washington Post first team All- Area . . . For the 
third straight year, he should lead Maryland to another successful season . . . 
BOB DeSTEFANO, 21- 5-11, 190, Senior from Providence, R.I. — Is first replacement be- 
hind Scarbath ... A fine passer . . . also calls an excellent series of plays . . . with not 
too much of an assignment in spelling Scarbath, Tatum has him playing in the defensive 
secondary where he has done a creditable job . . . undoubtedly will see a lot of action in 
same capacity this fall, . . . Serious and a hard worker. 

BERNIE FALONEY, 20, 5-11, 182, Junior from East Carnegie, Pa.— A real triple threat 
. . . great promise for a junior . . . might do most of the quarterbacking behind his 
room-mate, Scarbath . . . Faloney is a fine runner and a great passer . . . kicks superb- 
ly .. . handled the greater part of punting duties in '51 and averaged 33.7 yards for 27 
boots ... did a great job in Sugar Bowl by punting each of his 8 kicks away from the 
Vol safety man . . . passed 12 times for 6 completions,, two for scores . . . carried the 
ball 22 times for 168 yards for a 7.6 avg. . . . scored once . . . to go along with all this, 
he was number one defensive right half ... a keen defender . . . intercepted 3 enemy 
aerials for 50 yards return besides knocking down numerous others — one to watch care- 
fully . . . led the Terp baseball team in batting this spring while playing a great game 
of shortstop. 

LYNN BEIGHTOL, 18, 6-0, 175, Sophomore from Cumberland, Md. — One of the most 
sought after players in Maryland history ... a very outstanding qb prospect . . . should 
see enough action this year to prep him for the job in '53 . . . held ball for extra points 
. . . called plays in 3 games in '51 . . . rushed 7 times for 21 yards . . . sco ed once 
and completed one for one aerial . . . All-State qb for 2 years at Fort Hill High School 
. . . Player of Year Award in Cumberland for two years . . . also lettered in basketball 
and track. 



HALFBACKS 

ED FULLERTON. 21, 5-11, 190. Senior from West View, Pa. — Co-Captain . . . Heroically 
disproved the general feeling that the 60-minute man in football is a thing of the past 
with his brilliant one-man show in the Sugar Bowl game while playing offensive and 
defensive halfback . . . Scored twice, passed for another, and recovered a fumble that 
led to the other Terp touchdown . . . outstandng defensive halfback, so good that it 
might cost him the fullback job . . . hits harder in the open than any other player on 
the team . . . never loses the play . . . likes it rough all the time . . . that is how he 
got the "blood and guts" tag . . . snared 5 enemy aerials during the season and made 
numerous tackles in the secondary . . . while on offense, he compiled the best rushing 
ave-age of the team with 9 yards a carry although he rushed but 27 times . . . His 86 
yard td jaunt against Georgia set a new record for longest td run from scrimmage . . . 
Scored 6 times before the Sugar Bowl Game . . . Named on the United Press All-Bowl 
Team. 

RALPH FELTON, 20, 6-0, 190, Junior from Midway, Pa. — laved up to his prediction as 
being a real hot soph halfback prospect . . . The "Midway Express" took over the 
assignment and had a big year ... a powerful runner . . . ve y fast and hard to bring 
down . . . rushed 189 yards in 14 carries against North Carolina State . . . averaged 5.8 
yards with 485 for 83 carries . . . scored 4 times . . . had a good sp ing practice and 
should continue grinding out the yardage this fall . . . worth watching . . . was ALL- 
WPIAL two years. . . lettered 4 years in football, basketball and baseball. 

— 15 — 



CHESTER HANULAK, 19, 5-10, 165, Junior from Hackensack, N.J. — Little Hanulak from 
Hackensack . . . puts on a great show with his running . . . shows a peculiar hip move- 
ment which makes him hard to bring down . . . has great speed . . . very elusive . . . 
follows interference well . . . had 5 tds in his first 26 carries, for one score every fifth 
time he carried . . . finished the season with an 8.6 rushing avg. with 300 yards for 35 
rushes . . . lugged the pigskin 4 times against Tennessee and picked up 35 yards . . . 
could easily steal the show . . . keep a sharp eye on halfback Hanulak from Hackensack 
. . . lettered in baseball also last spring . . . was all-League and all-County in football 
and all-State in baseball. 

JOE HORNING, 19, 5-9, 165, Sophomore from Natrona Heights, Pa. — "Little Joe", small- 
est man of them all but as a frosh was the biggest surprise of all . . . fastest member 
of the squad . . one of the most wiry "kids" on the gridiron . . . can play offense and 
defense but he excels in the secondary . . . the speed demon frosh of '51 hit a "home 
run" every time out last year . . . should have the safety job all by himself . . . snagged 
six enemy aerials last year to lead the team in that department ... his interception gal- 
lop the length of the field for a td against Missouri set a new Terp record . . . could be 
used also to relieve on offense . . . went 76 yards for a score against W. Va . . . Another 
to watch. 

DICK NOLAN, 21, 6-1, 175, Junior from White Plains, N.Y. — Another two-platoon back 
. . . Can pick 'em up and lay 'em down . . . saw most duty in '51 on defense where 
he will be placed at start of this campaign . . . might get the call for a lot more 
offensive work . . . teammates call him "crazy legs" . . . intramural dash champion. 
RONNIE WALLER, 19, 5-11, 175, Sophomore from Laurel, Del. — The little town of 
Laurel just 12 miles from the Maryland border on the Eastern Shore gives Maryland one 
of its most star-studded athletes in Waller . . . one of the finest looking halfbacks ever 
to hit the Maryland football camp . . . did an outstanding job on the freshman team and 
has just finished a great spring practice . . . did participate in the Terps' opener against 
Washington and Lee last year and carired twice, picking up 19 yards for his two efforts 
. . . could give Hanulak fits for the lefthalf spot . . . Waller is built for his specialty, 
speed ... he does the 100 in ten flat . . . the young soph was named the outstanding 
athlete of the state in '51, his senior year at Laurel ... He brings back to football that 
old-fashioned weapon not seen too much today, the straight-arm ... He uses it very 
effectively too . . . Once beyond the line of scrimmage he becomes more dangerous . . . 
Does a good job throwing the SplitVT running pass . . . All-State 2 years, and second 
team All-State his soph year . . . awarded the best all-around athlete honor . . . Bears 
watching. 

CHARLES EOXOLD, 21, 5-11, 185, Sophomore from Providence, R.I. — Moved to half 
from qb . . . very fast with a lot of desire to play . . . some experience this year will 
help give Tatum more ieliable reserves. — LELAND LIEBOLD, 20, 6-1, 195, Sophomore 
from Smokeless, Pa. — Held out last year following an early injury . . . expected to give 
a lot of assistance in the backfield . . . power-type runner . . . also does a pretty good 
punting job, kicking from the left side . . . Was All-County and played in All-Star game 
while at Armagh High. — GEORGE ALBRECHT. 21, 5-11, 180, Sophomore from Home- 
ville, Pa. — A tower of strength on the defense . . . old injury which kept him out in '51 
should be healed giving Tatum a good fast hard runner who wants to play football. — 
BILL WALKER. 18, 6-1, 190, Sophomore from Homeville, Pa. — Same high school (Mun- 
hall » and home town as Alb»-echt . . . fine looking prospect up from the frosh . . . could 
see offensive and defensive duty. 



FULLBACKS 



ED BARRITT, 21, 5-10, 200, Junior from Long Island, N.Y. — After a great performance 
in spring drills, Barritt convinced Tatum and staff that he should be the number one 
fullback for the Terps this year ... in '51 he didn't get too much chance to prove his 
worth behind Ed "Mighty Mo" Modzelewski, so he saved his starring efforts for the all- 
important spring matinees ... as the season opens, the job is his and there is no reason 
to believe he doesn't intend to keep it ... he is a real bull-type runner 1 . . . has excep- 
tional speed, and is a fine blocker, very important for the Split-T fb . . . displayed 
ability to get through the line and keep right on going for a couple extra yards while 
tacklers are hanging on ... in 15 carries in '51, he picked up 105 yards for a 7 yard avg. 
romped 41 yards for a td in the opener . . . Starred at Mineola High School. 
BOB LAUGHERY, 21, 6-0, 200, Sophomore from Mill Run, Pa. — Another bull-type runner 
with speed who is ready to give battle for the fb job now that an old injury is healed . . . 
could be right there every Saturday . . . personally vows he is going to play a lot of 
ball this fall, a good omen for a sophomore back. 

DICK BIELSKI, 19, 6-0, 205, Sophomore from Baltimore, Md. — A lot is expected of this 
big lad . . . had a crack at it last year to get that touch of experience although he car- 
ried only 3 times to pick up 9 yards ... is another battering fb . . . good blocker . . . 
needs more speed and experience . . . Was All-State his senior year at Patterson Park. 

— 16 — 





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TERP OPPONENTS 



MARYLAND vs. MISSOURI 20 SEPTEMBER 

2:00 P.M. (C.S.T.) 

At Memorial Stadium (37,000) 

Columbia, Mo. 

FACTS ABOUT THE TIGERS 

CONFERENCE: Big Seven 
LOCATION: Columbia, Mo. 
HEAD COACH: Don Faurot 
COLORS: Black and Old Gold 
ENROLLMENT: 9000 
TYPE OFFENSE: Split-T — Spread 
Don Faurot 1951 RECORD: Won 2, Lost 8, Tied 

TIGERS RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS 

(Maryland Won 2, Lost 0, Tied 0) 

Maryland Missouri Maryland Missouri 

1950* 20 7 1951 35 

*'Gator Bowl Game 




TOTAL POINTS: Maryland, 55; Missouri, 7 

1952 CAPTAIN — None Selected — Probable Game Captains 
LETTERMEN RETURNING— 22 — LOST— 8 





1952 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


20— Maryland 


Sept 


27 — at California 


Oct. 


4 — at Kansas State 


Oct. 


11 — Southern Methodist 


Oct. 


18 — at Oklahoma A&M 


Oct. 


25 — Iowa State 


Nov. 


1 — at Nebraska 


Nov. 


8 — Colorado 


Nov. 


15 — at Oklahoma 


Nov. 


22— Kansas U. 



1951 YARDSTICK 
Maryland Missouri 

34 First Downs 13 

14 Rushing 6 

Passing 6 

Penalties 1 

362 Total Yards Rushing 124 

12 Yards Lost Rushing 32 

3n0 Net Yards Rushing 92 

Net Yards Forwards 103 

3 Forwards Attempted 23 

Forwards Completed 7 

2 Intercepted By 

120 .. Yards Interceptions Returned.. 

4 Punts 11 

1 No. Blocked By 

28 Punting Average 26 

7 Fumbles 1 

3 .... Own Fumbles Recovered .... 1 
38 .... Yards Lost By Penalties .... 10 

MISSOURI 0— 

MARYLAND 7 7 14 7 — 35 

MARYLAND SCORING: Touchdowns: 

Scarbath 2; Hanulak 2; Horning. 

Conversions: Decker (5). 



MARYLAND vs. AUBURN 

2:00 P.M. (C.D.T.) 
at Birmingham, Ala. 

FACTS ABOUT THE TIGERS 

CONFERENCE: Southeastern 

LOCATION: Auburn, Ala. 

HEAD COACH: Ralph Jordan 

COLORS: Burnt Orange and Navy Blue 

ENROLLMENT: 6000 

TYPE OFFENSE: T 

1951 RECORD: Won 5, Lost 5, Tied 



27 SEPTEMBER 




Ralph Jordan 



TIGER'S RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS 



(This is the first gridiron meeting of the two schools) 



1952 CAPTAIN — None Selected — Probable Game Captains 
LETTERMEN RETURNING— 18 — LOST— 11 



1952 SCHEDULE 

Sept. 27 — Maryland at Birmingham 

Oct. 4 — Mississippi at Memphis 

Oct. 11— Wofford 

Oct. 18 — Georgia Tech at Atlanta 

Oct. 25 — Tulane at Mobile 

Nov. 3 — Florida 

Nov. S — Mississippi State 

Nov. 15 — Georgia at Columbus 

Nov. 22 — Clemson 

Nov. 29 — Alabama at Birmingham 




MARYLAND vs. CLEMSON 4 OCTOBER 




Frank Howard 



DAD'S DAY 

2:00 P.M. (E.S.T.) 

at Byrd Stadium (35,000) 

College Park, Md. 

FACTS ABOUT THE TIGERS 
CONFERENCE: Southern 
LOCATION: Clemson, South Carolina 
HEAD COACH: Frank Howard 
COLORS: Purple and Orange 
ENROLLMENT: 3000 
TYPE OFFENSE: Single-Wing 
1951 RECORD: Won 7, Lost 2, Tied 
Lost to Miami (Fla.) in 'Gator Bowl, 14-0 



TIGER'S RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS 

(This is the first gridiron meeting of the two schools) 

1952 CAPTAIN: NONE SELECTED— Probable Game Captains. 
LETTERMEN RETURNING— 17 — LOST— 10 





1952 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


20 Presbyterian ( night > 


Sept. 


27 Villanova (night) 


Oct. 


4 at Maryland 


Oct. 


11 at Florida 


Oct. 


23 at South Carolina 


Oct. 


31 at Boston College ( night » 


Nov. 


8 at Fordham 


Nov. 


15 at Kentucky 


Nov. 


22 at Auburn 



1951 YARDSTICK 



DID 



NOT 



PLAY 



MARYLAND vs. GEORGIA 

2:00 P.M. (C.S.T.) 

At Sanford Stadium (45,000) 

Athens, Ga. 

FACTS ABOUT THE BULLDOGS 

CONFERENCE: Southeastern 

LOCATION: Athens, Ga. 

HEAD COACH: Wallace Butts 

COLORS: Red and Black 

ENROLLMENT: 5000 

TYPE OFFENSE: T 

1951 RECORD: Won 5, Lost 5, Tied 



11 OCTOBER 




Coach Butts 



BULLDOG'S RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS 



1948* 



(Maryland Won 1, Lost 1, Tied 1) 



Maryland 

20 

*'Gator Bowl 



Georgia 
20 1950 
1C51 



Maryland 

7 

43 



Georgia 

27 

7 



TOTAL POINTS: Maryland, 70; Georgia, 54. 
1952 CAPTAIN: Robert West -End 
LETTERMEN RETURNING— 28 —LOST— 20 



1951 YARDSTICK 

Maryland Georgia 

13 Total First Downs 19 

11 First Downs Rushing 8 

1 First Downs Passing 8 

1 First Downs Penalties 3 

361 Yards Gained Rushing 132 

5 Yards Lost Rushing 22 

356 Net Yards Rushing 110 

8 Passes Attempted 36 

3 Passes Completed 21 

7 Passes Intercepted By 1 

40 Yards Gained Passing 220 

396 .. Tot. Yds. Pass. & Rushing .. 330 

3 No. Punts 2 

35.3 Punting Average 47.5 

5 No. of Penalties 7 

45 .... Yards Lost by Penalties .... 75 

2 Fumbles Lost 2 

Georgia 7 0—7 

Maryland 10 7 19 7—43 

MARYLAND SCORING: Touchdowns: 
— Modzelewski, Felton, Hanulak (2). 
Scarbath, Fullerton. Conversions : — 
Decker (4). Field Goal — Decker 
(26 yards). 

GEORGIA SCORING : Touchdowns :— 
Harg.ove. Conversion: — Mvros. 





,. 




1952 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


20 Vanderbilt at Nashville 


Sept. 


27 Tulane at New Oi leans 


Oct. 


4 North Carolina 


Oct. 


11 Maryland 


Oct. 


18 at Louisiana State (night) 


Oct. 


25 Florida at Jacksonville 


j Nov. 


1 Alabama at Birmingham 


Nov. 


8 at Pennsylvania 


Nov. 


15 Auburn at Columbus, Ga. 


Nov. 


29 Georgia Tech 


Dec. 


5 at Miami. Fla. (night) 



MARYLAND vs. NAVY 



18 OCTOBER 




Conch Erdelatz 



2 P.M. (E.S.T.) 
At Byrd Stadium (35,000) 
College Park, Md. 
FACTS ABOUT THE MIDDIES 
CONFERENCE: EICAA 
LOCATION: Annapolis, Md. 
HEAD COACH: Eddie Erdelatz 
COLORS: Navy Blue and Gold 
ENROLLMENT: 3700 
TYPE OFFENSE: Single-Wing and 

Notre Dame Box 
1951 RECORD: Won 2, Lost 6, Tied 1 



MIDDIE'S RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS 
(Maryland Won 3, Lost 10, Tied 0) 





Maryland 


Navy 


1905 





17 


1906 


2 


12 


1907 





12 


1908 





57 


1913 





76 


1916 


7 


14 


1917 





62 





Maryland 


Navy 


1930 





6 


1931 


6 





1932 


7 


28 


1934 


13 


16 


1950 


35 


21 


1951 


40 


21 



TOTAL POINTS: Maryland, 110; Navy, 342. 
1952 CAPTAIN: John Gurski— End 
LETTERMEN RETURNING— 19 — LOST— 17 





1952 SCHEDULE 


Sept 


27 Yale at Baltimore 


Oct. 


4 at Cornell 


Oct. 


11 W. and M. at Annapolis 


Oct. 


18 at Maryland 


Oct. 


25 at Pennsylvania 


Nov. 


1 Notre Dame at Cleveland 


Nov. 


8 at Duke 


Nov. 


15 Columbia at Annapolis 


Nov. 


29 Army at Philadelphia 



1951 YARDSTICK 

Maryland Navy 

18 First Downs 8 

138 Ya:ds Gained Rushing 43 

285 ..... Yards Gained Passing 162 

423 Total Offense 208 

34 Passes Attempted 32 

16 Passes Comp.eted 12 

5 Passes Intercepted By 2 

7 No. of Punts S 

33 Punting Average 33 

36 Yards Punts Runback 118 

6 Fumbles 6 

5 Fumbles Lost 2 

10 No. of Penalties 3 

80 Yards Penalized 15 

Navy 7 14—21 

Maryland 7 7 20 6 — 40 

MARYLAND SCORING: Touchdowns: 

— Modzelevvski (2>, Fullerton (2), 

Weidensaul, Lindsay. Conversions: 

Decker (4). 
NAVY SCORING: Touchdowns:— Brady, 

Sieber, Smith. Conversions : — Snyder 

(3). 



MARYLAND vs. LOUISIANIA STATE UNIVERSITY 25 October 



HOMECOMING 

2:00 P.M. (E.S.T.) 

At Byrd Stadium (35,000) 

College Park, Md. 

FACTS ABOUT THE TIGERS 
CONFERENCE: Southeastern 
LOCATION : Baton Rouge, La. 
HEAD COACH: Gaynell Tinsley 
COLORS: Purple and Gold 
ENROLLMENT: 6000 
TYPE OFFENSE: T 
1951 RECORD: Won 7, Lost 3, Tied 1 




Coach Tinsley 



TIGER'S RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS 

(Maryland Won 1, Lost 0, Tied 0) 



1951 



Maryland 

27 



Louisiana State 




TOTAL POINTS: Maryland, 27; Louisiana State, 0. 

1952 CAPTAIN: None Selected — Probable Game Captains 

LETTERMEN RETURN I NG— 14 — LOST— 19 





1952 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


20 U. of Texas 


Sept. 


27 U. of Alabama j 


Oct. 


4 at Rice Institute 


Oct. 


11 at Kentucky 


Oct. 


18 U. of Georgia ! 


Oct. 


25 at Maryland 


] Nov. 


1 at Mississippi 


| Nov. 


8 Tennessee 


Nov. 


15 Mississippi State 


Nov. 


29 at Tulane 



1951 YARDSTICK 



Maryland 



LSU 



14 First Downs 14 

266 Rushing Yardage 154 

43 Passing Yardage 95 

309 .... Tot. Gain Rush. & Pass 250 

11 Passes Attempted 24 

3 Passes Completed 9 

3 Passes Intercepted By 2 

8 No. of Punts 10 

37.4 Punting Average 44.5 

2 Fumbles Lost 1 

10 Yards Penalized 25 

Maryland 13 7 7—27 

LSU — 

MARYLAND SCORING: Touchdowns: 
— Scarbath (2), Shemonski, Hanulak. 
Conversions: — Decker (3). 



— 25 



MARYLAND vs. BOSTON UNIVERSITY __ 1 NOVEMBER 

* 2:00 P.M. (E.S.T.) 

At Fenway Park (33,000) 
Boston, Mass. 

FACTS ABOUT THE TERRIERS 

CONFERENCE: EICAA 

LOCATION: Boston, Mass. 

HEAD COACH: Aldo (Buff) Donelli 

COLORS: Scarlet and White 

ENROLLMENT: 9000 

TYPE OFFENSE: T 

1951 RECORD: Won 6, Lost 4, Tied 




Aldo (Buff) Donelli 



TERRIER'S RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS 

(Maryland Won 1, Lost 0, Tied 0) 



l<)-4<) 



Maryland 
14 



Boston 
13 



TOTAL POINTS: Maryland, 14; Boston, 13. 
1952 CAPTAIN: BOB CAPUANO 
LETTERMEN RETURNING— 17 - LOST— 8 





1952 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


20 


at Wichita (night) 


Sept. 


26 


at Syracuse (night t 


Oct. 


4 


at Maiquelte (night > 


Oct. 


10 


Miami (Fla.i < night i 


Oct. 


18 


William and Mary 


Oct. 


25 


at Lehigh 


Nov. 


1 


Maryland 


Nov. 


8 


Temple 


Nov. 


15 


New York U. 


Nov. 


22 


at Villanova 



1951 


YARDSTICK 




Did 


Not 


Play 



MARYLAND vs. MISSISSIPPI ___ 

2:00 P.M. (C.S.T.) 

At Hemingway Stadium (35,000) 

Oxford, Miss. 

FACTS ABOUT THE REBELS 

CONFERENCE: Southeastern 

LOCATION: Oxford, Miss. 

HEAD COACH: John H. Vaught 

COLORS: Red and Blue 

ENROLLMENT: 3000 

TYPE OFFENSE: T and Split-T 

1951 RECORD: Won 6, Lost 3, Tied 1 



15 NOVEMBER 




John H. Vaught 



REBEL'S RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS 



(This is the first gridiron meeting of the two schools) 



1952 CAPTAIN: OTHAR CRAWFORD— Guard. 
LETTERMEN RETURNING— 31 — LOST— 13 





1952 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


19 at Memphis State (night) 


Sept 


27 at Kentucky 


Oct. 


4 Auburn at Memphis 


Oct. 


11 at Vanderbilt 


Oct. 


18 at Tulane 


Oct. 


25 Arkansas at Little Rock 


Nov. 


1 Louisiana State 


Nov. 


8 at Houston University 


Nov. 


15 Maryland 


Nov. 


22 Mississippi State 




MARYLAND vs. ALABAMA 22 NOVEMBER 




Harold (Red) Drew 



2 P.M. (C.S.T.) 

At Ladd Stadium (45,000) 

Mobile, Ala. 

FACTS ABOUT THE CRIMSON TIDE 

CONFERENCE: Southeastern 

LOCATION: Tuscaloosa, Ala. 

HEAD COACH: Harold D. (Red) Drew 

COLORS: Maroon and White 

ENROLLMENT: 5500 

TYPE OFFENSE: T and Split-T 

1951 RECORD: Won 5. Lost 6, Tied 



CRIMSON TIDE RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS 



(This is the first gridiron meeting of the two schools) 



1952 CAPTAIN: BOBBY MARLOW 
LETTERMEN RETU RN I NG— 24 — LOST— 16 





1952 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


19 Mississippi Southern at 

Montgomery (night) 


Sept. 


27 at LSU (night) 


Oct. 


3 at Miami, (Fla.) (night) 


Get. 


11 Virginia Teeh 


Oct. 


18 at Tennessee 


Oct. 


25 Mississippi State 


Nov. 


1 Georgia at Birmingham 


Nov. 


S Chattanooga 


Nov. 


15 at Georgia Tech 


Nov. 


22 Maryland at Mobile 


Nov. 


29 Auburn at Birmingham 




THE OUTLOOK FOR OUR OPPONENTS AS 
REPORTED BY THEIR PUBLICITY DIRECTORS 

University of Missouri 

By BILL CALLAHAN 

Using both his patented Split T offense, and the spread formation he 
exploited last year, Missouri Coach Don Faurot looks for a generally im- 
proved 1952 Tiger football team. 

Some 20 veterans return, and there are hopeful signs in the M. U. 
camp that the team's ground attack — dormant last reason — will be re- 
juvenated this fall. Biggest cause for optimism ;'s a well stocked quar- 
terback post and the presence of a former West Point gridder — 195-pound 
Bill Rowekamp — as regular fullback. Except at center, the Tigers will 
man all stations with holdover veterans. 

Defense, however, is still a questionable item. Offensively, t^e 
Mizzou squad should carry a few more guns this season — with the 
probability that clever Jim Hook will lead the club's Split T maneuvers — 
and sophomore Tony Scardino will be a tailback in the spread formation. 

Scardino's passing as a freshman last season enabled M. U. to finish 
as the nation's second-best passing team. 

Probable line standouts for Missouri should be veteran Jack Lordo 
at guard, and two sophomores — end Jim Jennings and tackle Charley 
Bull. This will be Faurot's 15th gridiron edition at Missouri. 

Auburn 

by BILL BECKWITH 

Auburn will field a much improved football team this fall. The Ti- 
gers employed a new coaching staff, led by Ralph Jordan, before the 
1951 campaign opened and quickly went from a (0-10-0) record to 
(5-5-0). With a year behind them and the boys familiar to their style of 
play, Auburn will be ready. 

Offensively, Auburn lost the second leading ground-gainer in the 
SEC in fullback Homer Williams by graduation. Also gone from the 
backfield is first string quarterback Allan Parks, the chief engineer of 
Auburn's five victories. 

Defensively, Auburn lost 2nd All-SEC guard Foots Bauer and end 
Dave Ridgway. 

Other offensive men gone are the first string tackles, Gene Mulhall 
and Joe Tiburzi; guard Bauer, and end Ridgway. 

Defensively, the Tigers return everyone except Ridgway and Bauer, 
and no one in the backfield. 

Vince Dooley will be the spark of the Tiger team this fall. The 5-10, 
186 pound junior was 2nd team All-SEC last fall, spending three-fourths 
of his time on defense. He is not the world's best passer, but he is ac- 
curate on the short ones. His main threat will be on the ground. 

Standout in the line is 255-pound defensive tackle Bill Turnbeough. 
The half-blind tackle relies on ground vibrations to. determine the direc- 
tion of the ball carrier. 

Auburn was the slowest team in the SEC last fall, but it will be 
different this coming season. The sparkplug of the swift backfield is 
139-pound righthalf Jackie Creel, SEC 220 yard champ and 2nd place 
winner in the 100. The flying sophomore will probably start against 
Maryland. 

Auburn will open at tackle with Don and George Rogers on of- 



fense. Standing 6-5, and weighing 225-pounds each, they are the fastest 
tackles in the history of Auburn and are only sophs. 

All in ail, Auburn will be stronger at every position, but it is 
doubtful if the Tigers will finish the season with their 1951 record (5-5). 
Opening with Maryland, the number one team in the nation, and follow- 
ing up with Mississippi, the number one team in the SEC and one of the 
nation's best, Auburn can't hope to fare too well during the season. 

Clemson College 

by McNEIL HOWARD 

The 1952 Tigers will, in the words of Coach Frank Howard, be 
"stronger in the offensive backfield, less experienced in the offensive 
line, and about the same defensively." 

Reserves behind star Tiger backs Buck George and Billy Hair lead 
to the optimism about the offensive backfield. The loss of both guards, 
a tackle, and a tip-top end are responsible for the dull outlook in the line. 
The absence of only three regulars from the 1951 defensive team makes 
that part of the strategy seem tight. 

A total of 17 regulars will return. Ten of last year's lettermen were 
lost through graduation. 

The boys to watch will be the aforementioned Hair at tailback. 
George at wingback, Dreher Gaskin and Archie Baker at end, and Tom 
Barton at defensive guard. 

The standard single wing formation may be varied somewhat. 

University of Georgia 

by DAN MAGILL, JR. 

Coach Wallace Butts, as usual, is completely frank in analyzing 
Georgia's prospects for 1952 as he awaits the gong September 1 to be- 
gin his fourteenth season as head coach at the nation's oldest state 
chartered institution of learning (1785.) 

'We should have a dangerous passing attack," he says, "but we led 
the Southeastern Conference in pass offense last year (161.8 yards per 
game) and still won only half our games. The key men in our 1951 pass 
offense are still with us." 

"Our defense against both rushing and passing games was weak last 
year and, in our spring practice of 19^2, failed to show much improve- 
ment, if any. 

"We played our hardest schedule in our history in '51, completing it 
with a 5-5 record. Our 1952 schedule is even tougher. Therefore, our 
prospects to improve our 1951 won-lost mark are slim, indeed." 

The sinister overhead offensive will be launched by Zeke Brat- 
kowski, junior qb, who set a conference record by throwing for gains 
averaging 157.8 yards a game. His main target is a genuine All-America 
end candidate, Harry Babcock. The 6-3 glue-fingered terminal led the 
loop in pass catching with 41 receptions for 666 yards. 

Among the outstanding veterans offensively to help the Bratkowski- 
Babcock combination are ends Art DeCarlo and Johnny Carson; Joe 
Scichilone and Lauren Hargrove, right halfbacks; Conrad Manisera, left 
halfback; and Fred Bilyeu, fullback. 

Strong defensive men are Co-Captain Bob West, right end and Frank 
Salerno, left guard. 

Perhaps the 1952 Bulldogs' gro\vl might develop into, a few bad bites. 
It's time. 



U. S. Naval Academy 

by JOHN COX 

According to Coach Eddie Erdelatz — "We have a lot of fellows 
named 'Joe' who love to. play football. No one is outstanding and no 
one has his position cinched. Therefore, the competition is and will be 
keen. 

"Our spring practice was the best we have ever had, but because 
we gave no thought to defense during the spring workouts, I don't know 
whether we will use the two-platoon system. I am of the opinion that 
our new offense, a combination of the single wing and Notre Dame box, 
will give us the best offense we have had in my time here. The kids love 
it. 

"Our squad will be unusually small. In fact, this is by far the 
smallest team I have ever been connected with. Only five of the 46 
players on the roster go over 200 pounds, and only two of these weigh 
210. That was one of the factors that influenced our switch from the 
T-formation. In the T, the blocking is mostly man-to-man, while in 
the single wing you have two blockers on one man. With our light 
squad, I feel the latter will prove most advantageous to us." 

The 46-man squad listed by Erdelatz at the conclusion of Spring 
practice was composed of the following: 19 returning lettermen; 4 var- 
sity reserves who did not letter; 13 men up from last year's junior var- 
sity; and 10 members of the 1951 plebe team. Only one member of last 
year's starting offensive eleven is back — Fullback Fred Franco. 

Louisiana State University 

by JIM CORBETT 

A tough but attractive schedule, loss of 19 lettermen from 1951, 
and a sophomore-studded squad seasoned w'th talent but lacking exper- 
ience represents the prospectus for LSU in '52. 

In the words of Gaynell Tinsley, beginning his fifth year as head 
coach of the Bayou Bengals, the 1952 grid fortunes of Tigertown rest 
heavily and depend greatly on some 40-odd sophomores, a smattering of 
freshmen and seniors, and a lion's share of Lady Luck to "break even" 
with a terrific ten-game slate. 

Position by position Tinsley looks for under-par end play, average 
tackles and guards, improvement at the center slot, and a potentially- 
good backfield. 

Defensively the Bengals should be less potent than in '51, but offens- 
ive power should improve. Linebacking will net be adequate, but punt- 
ing and passing is expected to exceed last season's performance in tho~e 
departments. 

Fourteen starters on the Tiger's two-platoon system of last season 
have been lost, and the starting linebackers and entire backfield which 
began the 1951 season have completed their education. 

Tinsley will work with the "T" formation for the fifth straight 
season, and will modify both offense and defense according to needs and 
material. 

Veterans returning are Charlie Oakley, halfback; Leroy Labat, full- 
back; Norm Stevens, quarterback; Sid Fournet; Bob Lawrence, tackle; 
and Gary Dildy, center. 



Boston University 

by VIC STOUT 

The prospects are bright but the schedule is tough. That about sums 
up the early "look-see" into the situation at Boston University. 

Coach Buff Donnelli, with the great Gorgeous Greek Harry Agganis, 
should have a top aggregation to throw against his toughest schedule, 
thus making them a threat every Saturday. 

The Terriers have Aggann, and for any coach and team, that is 
plenty to start with. Agganis returned to the Hub last year after a 
hitch with the Marines and immediately took up where he left off his 
sophomore campaign. He completed 104 of 185 aerials for 1402 yards 
and 14 touchdowns. He also handles the kicking chores. 

One might say the B U hope lies in its offensive strength even 
though Johnny Kasten, high-scoring fullback; Lindy Hanson, halfback; 
and Tommy Oates, a great pa s receiver have gone. Replacing them will 
be Lou Petroka, fullback; Joe Terrasi and Red Salisbury, halfbacks. It 
is still problematical who might team with Bob Capuano as the other 
end. Capuana is alro one of the top returning veterans. 

Other top veterans teaming with Agganis and Capuano are Ray 
Cataloni, offensive guard; and Jim Meredith, defensive end. 

A fine selection of sophomores will dot the lineup this fall. Sure to 
see plenty of action are Terrasi and Salisburg; Grant Guiliano and Rich- 
ard McNally, centers; and Tom Gastall, end. 

Eight lettermen graduated but 17 are returning to give Donnelli a 
good nucleus with which to build his '52 eleven. 

Agganis will be the key to Donnelli's T formation. 

University of Mississippi 

by BILLY GATES 

Mississippi's football problems are basic. In the main they deal with 
the issue of replacing nine graduated veterans, six of whom were 1951 
regulars. Included were six cogs, four l'nemen and two backs, who. helped 
escort the Rebs to the top in the Southeastern's Statistical Derby. 

It's Texan Johnny Vaught's sixth turn at the Johnny Reb helm and 
he's facing what looms as h's most arduou mending task, that of re- 
building the touchdown-team line, the power side of the backfield, re- 
forming a partially-depleted defensive platoon, and polishing a set of 
spares for the first-teamers. 

For '52, there are 31 lettermen at hand, 17 playing on offense, 11 on 
defense and two sharing in both details. A dozen redshirts are moving 
up along with 15 sophomores and four mid-term frosh. 

Chief losses: Hal Maxwell, All-Sec defensive end; on offense, Max- 
well, Bill Watson at Left Tackle, Capt. Othar Crawford at Left Guard, 
Mel Singuefleld at Center, Lindy Callahan at Left Half Back and Show- 
boat Boykin at Fullback — he's the bloke who scored seven TD's vs. Miss. 
State last Dec. 1; on defense, Ken Barfield at Right Tackle and Carl 
West at Fullback (linebacker). 

Main men in '52: offense, Bud Slay at Left End, Frank Jernigan at 
Left Guard, Kline Gilbert at Right Tackle, Jimmy Lear at Quarterback, 
Red Muirhead at Right Halfback, Jim Matthews, Bags Brenner and Hal 
Lofton at Fullback; defense, Charles Montgomery at Left Tackle, Jim 
Ingram and Pete Mangum as linebackers, Crawford Mims at Right 
Guard, Wilson Dillard at Left Halfback (defense and offense), and Jack 
Reed at safety. 

Summary: If Rebs can avoid mistakes usually developing when re- 



building, they should hit mid-season in form displayed last term when 
Ole Miss won six and tied one in 10-game schedule and finished third in 
conference race. 



Univers 



of Alabama 



By FINUS C. GASTON 

Alabama's return to the top bracket of Southern football circles in 
1952 will depend directly upon the coaches and players ability to develop 
and execute a much better defense than was in evidence last fall. The 
1951 team had a better than average offense but defensive shortcomings 
were killing. 

Although ten starters were among the 15 lettermen lo~t in December, 
the upcoming squad should be a better offensive crew and the defense 
greatly improved. What that will mean remains to be seen as the Crim- 
son Tide plays a rough 11-game schedule including contests with four of 
last year's bowl participants — Maryland, Tennessee, Georgia Tech and 
Miami. Twenty-four lettermen will return. 

Top Bama performer of course is All-America candidate Bobby Mar- 
low — one of the nation's top all round players. He will likely stick to 
offense in '52 and this means trouble for all Tide foes. His top support 
in the backfield will come from quarterback Clell Hobson, and halfbacks 
Bobby Luna and Corky Tharp on offense. Bobby Wilson, the nation's 
number one punter, will lead the defense from a halfback post. 

Up front the key men for Coach Harold "Red" Drew are guard 
Jerry Watford and Tackle Travis Hunt on offense and guard Jess Rich- 
ardson and linebacker Harry Lee on defense. 



1952 SCHEDULE 

Sept. 20 Missouri at Columbia, Mo. ($3.60) 
Sept. 27 Auburn at Birmingham, Ala. ($3.80) 
Oct. 4 Clemson at College Park, Md. ($3.75) 

(DAD'S DAY) 
Oct. 11 Georgia at Athens, Ga. ($4.30) 
Oct. 18 Navy at College Park, Md. ($3.75) 
Oct. 25 Louisiana State at College Park, Md. 
(Homecoming) ($3.75) 

Nov. 1 Boston U. at Boston, Mass. ($3.60) 
Nov. 15 Mississippi, at Oxford, Miss. ($4.00) 
Nov. 22 Alabama at Mobile, Ala. ($3.80) 

Home Games Begin at 2:00 P.M. (E.S.T.) 
SEASON TICKET PRICE — $11.25 

For Ticket Information: 
Write: Ticket Office 
Box 295, 
College Park, Md. 



1951 RESULTS 

54 Washington & Lee 14 
33 George Washington 6 
43 Georgia 7 

14 North Carolina 7 

27 Louisiana State 

35 Missouri 

40 Navy 21 

53 North Carolina State 

54 West Virginia 7 
*28 Tennessee 13 



381 

* Sugar Bowl 



75 



MARYLAND'S 
IOWL RECORD 

1948 'Gator Bowl 
20 Georgia 20 
1950 'Gator Bowl 
20 Missouri 7 
1952 Sugar Bowl 
28 Tennessee 13 



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THEY COVER THE TERPS 

MAX FULLERTON, Associated Press 

GEORGE BOWEN, The Associated Press 

JACK DAVIS, Associated Press 

HERB FOSTER, United Press 

ERNIE BARCELLA, United Press 

BOB SERLING, The United Press 

EV GARDNER, Sports Editor, The Daily News 

DAVE SLATTERY, Sports Department, The Daily News 

CHUCK EGAN, Sports Editor, The Evening Star 

FRANCIS STANN, Sports Department, The Evening Star 

MERRELL WHITTLESEY, Sports Department, The Evening Star 

GEORGE HUBER, Sports Department, The Evening Star 

BUS HAM, Sports Editor, The Washington Post 

SHIRLEY POVICH, Sports Department, The Washington Post 

MORRIS SIEGEL, Sports Department, The Washington Post 

HERB HEFT, Sports Department, The Washington Post 

CHARLIE BARBOUR, Sports Editor, The Times-Herald 

BOB ADDIE, Sports Department, The Times-Herald 

DICK O'BRIEN, Sports Department, The Times-Herald 

MAURY FITZGERALD, Sports Department, The Times-Herald 

PAUL MENTON, Sports Editor, The Evening Sun 

RANDALL CASSELL, Sports Department, The Evening Sun 

WALTER TAYLOR, Sports Department, The Evening Sun 

JESSE LINTHICUM, Sports Editor, The Morning Sun 

LOU HATTER, Sports Department, The Morning Sun 

RONALD A. GIBBS, Sports Department, The Morning Sun 

RODGER PIPPEN, Sports Editor, The News-Post 

NORMAN P. CLARK, Sports Department, The News-Post 

HYMY COHEN, Sports Editor, The Evening Capital, Annapolis, Md. 

J. SUTER KEGG, Sports Editor, The Evening Times, Cumberland, Md. 

C. V. BURNS, Sports Editor, The News, Cumberland, Md. 

FRANK COLLEY, Sports Editor, The Herald, Hagerstown, Md. 

DICK KELLY, Sports Editor, The Mail, Hagerstown, Md. 

ED NICHOLS, Sports Editor, The Times, Salisbury, Md. 

HENRY DECKER, Sports Editor, The Post, Frederick, Md. 

RADIO and TV 

WASHINGTON BALTIMORE 

Bob Wolff and Ray Morgan, WWDC Bill Dyer, WCAO 

Steve Douglas and Dutch Bergmann, WRC chuck Thompson, WITH 

Jimmy Gibbons, WMAL ., . „ , ,.!,-„„ 

Arch McDonald, WTOP Ne,son Baker - WFBR 

Nat Albright, WEAM Bailey Goss, WBAL 

Sam Kaufmann, WOL Charles Rover, WCBM 

Jimmy Gibbons, WMAL-TV _ .. _ . ., . _,_ .»,«.» r> -r*, 

Jim Simpson WTOP-TV Ba,lev Goss and Nat Thomas, WMAR-TV 

Tony Wakeman, WTTG-TV Nick Campofreda, WAAM-TV 

Ray Michaels, WNBW-TV j oe Grogan, WBAL-TV 



THE SUGAR BOWL YARDSTICK 

TEAM STATISTICS 

MARYLAND TENNESSEE 

First Downs Rushing 14 6 

First Downs Passing 4 4 

First Downs Penalties 2 

TOTAL FIRST DOWNS 18 12 

Net Yards Gained Rushing 289 81 

Net Yards Gained Passing 63 75 

TOTAL YARDS RUSHING AND PASSING 352 156 

Passes Attempted 13 19 

Passes Completed 7 9 

Passes Intercepted By 4 1 

Yardage Intercepted Passes 70 

No. of Punts 8 7 

Average 38.0 43.0 

Punts Returned 4 2 

Yards Returned 29 16 

Punts Blocked By 

Kickoffs Returned 3 5 

Yards Returned 57 102 

Fumbles 7 2 

Fumbles Recovered 6 3 

Penalties 12 2 

Yards 120 20 

MARYLAND RUSHING 

Attempts Net Yards 

Ed. Modzelew.ki— fb 28 153 

Jack Scarbath — qb 6 14 

Ed. Fullerton— hb 9 22 

Bob Shemonski — hb 4 16 

Joe Horning — hb 4 16 

Chester Hanulak — hb 4 35 

Barney Scioscia — fb 5 19 

Dick Nolan— hb 3 10 

Bob DeStefano — qb 1 3 

TENNESSEE RUSHING 

Attempts Net Yards 

Dick Ernsberger — fb 6 6 

Hank Lauricella — tb 7 1 

Herky Payne — tb 11 54 

Andy Kozar — wb 9 29 

Ed. Morgan — tb 1 -9 

Jimmy Hahn — fb 1 2 

MARYLAND PASSING 

Attempts Comp. Had Int. Yds. 

Jack Scarbath — qb 9 6 51 

Ed. Fullerton— hb 110 6 

Bob Shemonski — hb 10 

Bob DeStefano— qb 2 10 

TENNESSEE PASSING 

Attempts Comp. Had Int. Yds. 

Herky Payne — tb 14 7 1 61 

Hank Lauricella — tb 5 1 3 14 

— 36 — 



Scenes From Maryland's Greatest Football Hour 

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Jacfc Scarbath, the Terps' All- America quarterback candidate, rifles 
a strike to Ed Fullerton as the Red Shirts rolled against the Tennessee 
Vols. Both played outstanding game of their gridiron career. 




Jubilant Terp players hoist their happy coach Jim Tatum to their 
shoulders as the 28-13 Sugar Bowl victory over Tennessee was written 
into the books. 



1951 HIGHLIGHTS 

LONGEST RUSH FROM SCRIMMAGE: 

Ed Fullerton — 86 yards for td against University of Georgia. 
LONGEST PASS COMPLETION: 

Jack Scarbath to. Paul Lindsay — 58 yards for td against Navy. 
MOST PASSES CAUGHT IN ONE GAME: 

Lou Weidensaul — 8 for 95 yards against Navy. 
MOST PASSES THROWN ONE GAME: 

Jack Scarbath — 23 with 14 completions for 243 yards against Navy. 
MOST PASSES COMPLETED ONE GAME: 

( % ) Jack Scarbath — 14 for 23 attempts in Navy game. 

Jack Scarbath — 6 for 9 attempts in Tennessee game. 
LONGEST PUNT RETURN: 

Joe Petruzzo — 21 yards against Missouri. 
LONGEST KICK-OFF RETURN: 

Ralph Felton — 27 yards against North Carolina. 
LONGEST PUNT: 

Fred Heffner — 57 yards against University of Georgia. 
LOW NET GAIN IN ONE GAME: (Rushing) 

138 yards against Navy. 
HIGH NET GAIN IN ONE GAME: (Rushing) 

523 yards against West Virginia. 
LEAST PASSING YARDAGE IN ONE GAME: 

yards against Missouri. Threw 3 passes entire game. 
MOST PASSING YARDAGE IN ONE GAME: 

285 yards against Navy. 
LONGEST INTERCEPTION RETURN: 

Joe Horning — 100 official yard; for td against Missouri; 105 actual. 
MOST TOUCHDOWNS SCORED IN ONE GAME: 

8 against Washington and Lee, N C State, and West Virginia. 

Ed Modzelewski scored two td's in W&L, GW, West Va., N. C. State, 

and Navy games. 
MOST POINTS SCORED: 

Ed Modzelewski — 66 (Second high in the Conferenec). 




BYRD STADIUM 

HOME OF THE TERRAPINS 
Capacity: 35,000 



1951 TEAM STATISTICS 



MARYLAND OPPONENTS 

First Downs 155 110 

Rushing 123 44 

Passing 29 56 

Penalties 3 10 

Total Yards Rushing *3101 991 

Yards Lost Rushing : ___- 180 331 

Net Yards Rushing *2921 680 

No. Rushing Plays 494 351 

Avg. Rushing Gain 5.91 1.93 

Forward Passes Attempted 120 290 

Forward Passes Completed 51 119 

Net Yards Passing 901 1391 

Forwards Intercepted by *34 9 

Yards Interceptions Returned 454 130 

Total Yards Gained — Rushing and Passing *3822 2071 

Total No. Punts 42 63 

Punting Average 35.8 35.6 

Punts Blocked By 4 

No. Kickoff Returns 16 56 

Yardage Kickoff Returns 320 878 

Avg. Kickoff Return 20.0 15.7 

Number Penalties 57 31 

Yards Penalized 40iy 2 263 

Fumbles 38 22 

Own Fumbles Recovered 14 13 

Touchdowns *52 9 

Extra Points Attempted *52 9 

Extra Points Made *38 8 

Field Goals 1 

TOTAL POINTS SCORED *353 62 

* NEW MARYLAND RECORDS 

— 39 — 



1951 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS 



(Figures on 1952 Squad Members Only) 



RUSHING 



Carries 

Felton, Ralph— hb 83 

Scarbath, Jack— qb 56 

Hanulak, Chester — hb 35 

Fullerton, Ed.— hb 27 

DeStefano, Bob— qb 24 

Faloney, Bernie — qb 22 

Barritt, Ed.— fb 9 

Beightol. Lynn — qb 7 

Laughery, Bob — fb 6 

Nolan, Dick — hb 5 

Horning, Joe — hb 4 

Bielski, Dick — hb 3 

Waller, Ronnie— hb 2 



Net Gain 


Avg. 


485 


5.8 


162 


2.9 


300 


8.6 


243 


9.0 


35 


1.5 


168 


7.6 


105 


11.7 


21 


3.0 


28 


4.7 


19 


3.8 


75 


18.7 


9 


3.0 


19 


9.5 



PASSING 

No. No. Had Net For 

Att. Comp. Int. Gain TD's 

Scarbath, Jack— qb 67 34 4 675 8 

Faloney, Bern'e— qb 12 6 1 54 2 

DeStefano, Bob— qb 12 4 2 70 1 

Felton, Ralph— hb 8 12 14 1 

Hanulak, Chester— hb 4 10 24 

Fullerton, Ed.— hb 2 1 

Beightol, Lynn— qb 110 6 

TOTAL OFFENSE 



Total Plays 

Scarbath, Jack— qb 123 

Felton, Ralph— hb 91 

Hanulak, Chester— hb 39 

Faloney, Bernie — qb 34 

DeStefano, Bob— qb 36 

Fullerton, Ed.— hb 29 

Beightol, Lynn — qb 8 

ALL OTHERS SAME AS ABOVE RUSHING FIGURES 



Net Gain 


Avg. 


837 


6.8 


499 


5.5 


324 


8.3 


222 


6.6 


105 


2.9 


243 


8.0 


27 


3.4 



KICKOFF RETURNS 



No. Returns Yds. Return Avg. 

Fullerton, Ed— hb 3 51 17.0 

Hanulak, Chester— hb 2 43 21.5 

Felton, Ralph— hb 1 27 27.0 

Alderton, John— e 1 19 19.0 

Nestor, Paul — e 1 11 H.o 

— 40 — 



PASS RECEIVING 

No. Caught Yards For TD's 

Weidensaul, Lou— e 18 249 4 

Colteryahn, Llo.yd — e 8 154 2 

Felton, Ralph— hb 4 62 1 

Fullerton, Ed.— hb 3 47 2 

HanuJak, Chester— hb 1 31 1 



PASS INTERCEPTIONS 

No. Int. Yards. Returned 

Horning, Joe — hb 6 147 

Fullerton. Ed— hb 5 61 

Faloney, Bernie — qb-hb 3 50 

Maletzky, Bill— g 2 12 

Lattimer, Charlie — g 1 5 

Modzelewski, Dick — t 1 5 

Crytzer, Marty — e 1 



PUNTING 



No. Yards 

Faloney, Bernie — qb 27 911 

Heffner, Fred— e 15 551 



Avg. Had Blocked 



33.7 
39.4 



PUNT RETURNS 



No. Ret. Yds. Ret. Avg. 

Faloney, Bernie — qb-hb 2 

Nolan, Dick— hb 1 

Laughery, Bob — fb 1 

Maletzky, Bill— g 1 

Fullerton, Ed.— hb 1 



18 


9.0 


14 


14.0 


6 


6.0 


5 


5.0 





0,0 



Scarbath, Jack — qb 7 

Fullerton, Ed.— hb 

Hanulak, Chester — hb 

Felton, Ralph— hb 

Weidensaul, Lou — e 

Colteryahn, Lloyd — e 

Horning, Joe — hb 2 

Barritt, Ed.— fb 

Beightol, Lynn — qb 

Faloney, Bernie — qb 1 

Decker, Don — g 

— 41 — 



SCORING 
TD's 

"7 


PAT 











37 for 51 


's 
1FG 


TOTAL 

42 


6 


36 


5 


30 


4 


24 


4 


24 


2 


12 


2 


12 


1 


6 


1 


6 


1 


6 





40 



ALL-TIME MARYLAND FOOTBALL RECORDS 

OFFENSE and DEFENSE 

BEST SEASON: 

1951 Won 10, Lost 0. Includes 28-13 victory over Tennessee in the 

Sugar Bowl. 
WORST SEASON: 

1944 Won 1, Lost 7, Tied 1. 
MOST POINTS SCORED IN ONE SEASON: 

353 in 1951 in 9 games. 381 in 1951 in 10 games including the 28-13 

victory over Tennessee in the Sugar Bowl. 
LEAST POINTS SCORED IN ONE SEASON: 

39 in 1940 hi 9 games. 
MOST POINTS SCORED BY OPPONENTS IN ONE SEASON: 

216 in 1938 in 9 games. 
LEAST POINTS SCORED BY OPPONENTS IN ONE SEASON: 

49 in 1934 in 10 games. 
MOST POINTS SCORED BY MARYLAND IN ONE GAME: 

Maryland 80, Washington College in 1927. 
MOST POINTS SCORED BY OPPONENT IN ONE GAME: 

Navy 76, Maryland in 1913. 
ALL-TIME LEADING SCORER: 

Bob Shemonski with 97 points in 1950 in 10 games. 
OFFENSIVE TEAM RECORD FOR ONE SEASON: 

3822 yards in 1951 in 9 games. 2921 rushing and 901 passing. 

4174 yards in 1951 in 10 games, including the 28-13 victory over 

Tennessee in the Sugar Bowl. 3210 rushing and 964 passing. 
OFFENSIVE TEAM RECORD FOR ONE GAME: 

602 yards in 1951 against West Virginia. 523 yards rushing and 79 

passing. 
LEAST YARDAGE ONE GAME: 

69 against Vanderbilt in 1948. 
MOST TOUCHDOWNS SCORED IN ONE SEASON: 

52 in 1951 in 9 games. 56 in 1951 in 10 games including the 28-13 vic- 
tory over Tenne see in the Sugar Bowl. 
DEFENSIVE RECORD FOR ONE SEASON: 

1,707 yards in 1949 in 9 games. 868 rushing and 893 passing for fifth 

place in Nation. 
DEFENSIVE RECORD FOR ONE GAME: (Rushing) 

29 by Washington and Lee in 1951. 
MOST YARDS BY INDIVIDUAL IN ONE SEASON: 

Ray Poppleman with 1,350 yards in 10 games in 1931. 
MOST YARDS BY INDIVIDUAL IN ONE GAME: 

Ray Poppleman with 201 yards in 24 carries against Western Mary- 
land. 
LONGEST RUN FROM SCRIMMAGE: 

Ed Fullerton for 86 yards and touchdown against University of 

Georgia in 1951. 

PASSING RECORDS 

TEAM PASSING FOR SEASON: 

90 completions in 170 attempts for 1364 yards in 1942 in 9 games 
TEAM PASSING FOR ONE GAME: 

Jo.e Tucker with 9 completions in 12 attempts for 178 yards and 

Stan Lavine, 4 for 5 for 129 yards for total of 307 against South 

Carolina in 1949. 
WORST PASSING RECORD BY MARYLAND: 

completions in 12 attempts against Vanderbilt in 1948. 

— 42 — 



INDIVIDUAL PASSING RECORD FOR ONE SEASON: 

34 completions in 67 attempts for 675 yards by Jack Scarbath in 9 

games in 1951. 

40 completions in 76 attempts for 732 yards by Jack Scarbath in 10 

games in 1951 including the 28-13 victory over Tennessee in the 

Sugar Bowl. 

66 completions in 127 attempts for 1,076 yards by Tommy Mont in 

9 games in 1942. 
INDIVIDUAL PASSING RECORD FOR ONE GAME: 

Tommy Mont, 9 completions in 14 attempts for 215 yards against 

U. of Connecticut in 1942. 
LEADING PASS RECEIVER FOR ONE SEASON: 

Pete Augsburger, 25 receptions for 422 yards in 1950 in 10 games. 
LEADING PASS RECEIVER FOR ONE GAME: 

Lou Weidensaul — 8 receptions for 95 yards and one touchdown 

aaginst Navy in 1951. 

Stanley Karnash, 7 receptions for 123 yards and two touchdowns 

against George Washington in 1949. 
LONGEST FORWARD PASS PLAY: 

Stan Lavine to Ed Bolton for 92 yards and touchdown against South 

Carolina in 1949. Pass 15 yards, run 77. 
LONGEST RETURN OF INTERCEPTED PASS: 

Joe Horning for an official 100 yards and touchdown against Mis- 
souri in 1951. Actual return from behind end zone was 105 yards. 

KICKING RECORDS 

MOST POINTS AFTER TOUCHDOWNS: 

37 for 51 attempts in 9 games in 1951. 41 for 55 attempts in 10 games 

in 1951 including the 28-13 victory over Tenn. in the Sugar Bowl. 
LONGEST PUNT: 

Brooke (Untz) Brewer for 93 yards against V. M. I. in 1916. 
BEST OFFICIAL AVERAGE ONE GAME: 

Bill Guckeyson for 51 yards in 10 punas against Syracuse in 1936. 

(Note: Brewer against Syracuse in 1920 and Guckeyion against 

Florida in 1936 both averaged better than 60 yards but official figures 

could not be obtained from these schools and papers didn't carry the 

punt.'ng statistics). 
LONGEST PUNT RETURNS: 

Lu Gambino against Delaware in 1947 and Stan Lavine against 

George Washington in 1948, each for 88 yards and touchdown. 
PUNT RETURNS FOR SEASON: 

Bob Shemonski, 28 for 505 yards in 1950 in 10 games. 
LONGEST KICKOFF RETURNS: 

Lewis Thomas against Washington College in 1927; Bill Guckeyson 

against Georgetown in 1935; and Sam Behr against Virginia in 1945, 

each for 90 yards and a touchdown. 
LONGEST FIELD GOAL: 

Untz Brewer, 46 yards by dropkick against John Hopkins in 1916. 

He also kicked another for 45 yards in same game. 
LONGEST PUNT RETURN AGAINST MARYLAND: 

Johnny Branch of North Carolina for 94 yards and touchdown in 1930. 
LONGEST KICKOFF RETURN AGAINST MARYLAND: 

Jim McPherson of North Carolina for 93 yards and TD in 1926. 
LONGEST PUNT AGAINST MARYLAND: 

Charlie Justice of North Carolina for 84 yards in 1948. 



YEAR BY YEAR RECORDS 



MARYLAND AGGIES 



1892 (0-3-0) 

St. Johns 50 

Johns Hop. ___62 
Episcopal Hi. _16 

1893 (6-0-0) 

36 Eastern Hi __ 
10 Central Hi __ 
18 Bait. City Col_ 
6 St. Johns Col._ 
18 M. Md. Col. __10 
16 Orient Ath CI. 6 

1894 (3-3-0) 

52 W. Md. Col. __ 

12 Wash. Col. ___ 

6 St. Johns _-_22 

6 Georgetown — 4 

Col. Ath. CI _26 

Mt. St. Marys_24 

1895 — No team 

No Games 

1896 (6-2-2) 

Eastern Hi ___ 6 

Gallaudet 

34 Busine;s Hi __ 
10 Central Hi ___ 6 
18 Alexandria Hi_ 
20 Bethel Mil Ac_10 

Episcopal Hi. _ 6 
16 West. Md. _— 6 
14 Central Hi __ 

U. of Md. ___ 

1897 (2-4-0) 

24 Central Hi ___ 6 
4 Eastern Hi ___ 
J. Hopkins 30 

4 St. Johns 6 

6 Gallaudet 16 

Bait. Med Col._10 

1898 (2-5-0) 

5 Columbian U. _17 
West. Md. ___32 

36 Eastern Hi 

Gallaudet 33 

Johns Hop. 16 

Episcopal Hi __37 

27 Rock Hill Col._ 

1899 (1-4-0) 

West. Md. —21 

26 Eastern Hi _ - 

Johns Hop. _40 

Delaware Col._34 



St. Johns 62 

1900 (3-4-1) 

Western Hi __ 
Gib. Ath. CI. _17 
G'town Prep _ 5 
6 Episcopal Hi __34 

5 Gonzaga Hi 11 

15 G'town Prep __ 
21 Gonzaga Hi __ 
21 Char Hall Ac _ 

1901 (1-7-0) 

6 Del. Col 24 

10 Gallaudet Re. _11 

Johns Hop. 6 

6 Rock Hill Col._ll 
Central Hi ___11 

27 US Marines 1- 
Wal'k Ath Cl-36 
West. Md. __.30 

1902 (3-5-2) 

Georgetown __27 

5 Mt. St. Jos. __ 

11 Columbian U. _10 

6 Olympia Ath. _ 
Wash. Col. ___ 
Mt. St. Marys - 5 
6 West. Md. ___26 
U. of Md. _— 5 
Johns Hop. __17 
Del. Col. 

1903 (7-4-0) 
Georgetown __28 

5 Clifton Ath. __ 

21 Gunton Tern. _ 
St. Johns _-_18 

28 Wash. Col. ___ 
27 Tech Hi 

Mt. St. Mar _ 2 

6 West. Md. ___ 
11 U. of Md. ___ 

Dela. Col. __16 
6 Columbian U. _ 

1904 (2-4-2) 
Georgetown __22 
Ran. Macon __ 
Ftress Monroe 
11 Mt. St. Mar. _ 6 
We t. Md. _—5 

22 Gallaudet 5 

U. of Md. ___ 6 
Dela. Col. ___18 



1905 (6-4-0) 

20 Bait Poly In _ 

16 Gallaudet 

West. Md. ___10 
Navy 17 

17 Wm. & Mary_ 
28 Mt. St. Josephs 
27 St. Johns — _ 5 

Wash. Col. __17 

23 U. of Md. ___ 5 

Dela. Col 12 

1906 (5-3-0) 

5 Tech Hi 

22 Bait City Col_ 

Navy 12 

Georgetown __28 
Mt. Wash. CI. _29 

20 St. Johns 4 

16 Rock Hill Col. 
35 Wash. Col. ___ 

1907 (3-6-0) 

13 Tech High ___ 
Georgetown __10 

5 Richmond Col_ll 
Navy 12 

6 Mt. St. Mar __12 
10 Geo. Wash. ___ 
10 Wash. Col. _- 5 

St. Johns 16 

Gallaudet 5 

1908 (3-8-0) 

5 Central Hi ___ 
5 Tech High ___6 
Richmond Col_22 
Johns Hop. __10 

Navy 57 

5 Gallaudet 

Fred'bg Col. __10 
12 Balto Poly __ 6 

St. Johns 31 

Wash. Col. ___11 
Geo. Wash. __57 

1909 (2-5-0) 

Richmond Col._12 
Johns Hopkins 9 
Tech High ___11 
5 Rock Hill ___ 
George Wash. 26 
N. Ca. A&M _33 

14 Gallaudet 12 



1910 (4-3-1) 

12 Central Hi ___ 

20 Richmond Col. 
11 Johns Hop. __11 

21 Catholic U. __ 
11 Geo. Wash. __ 

V. M. I. 8 

St. Johns — 6 
3 West. Md. ___17 

1911 (4-4-2) 

6 Tech Hi 

Richmond 

5 Fred'bg Col. _ 

Central Hi 14 

3 Johns Hop. 6 

6 Catholic U. __ 6 
St. Johns 27 

5 Wash. Col. __17 

6 West Md. ___ 
6 Gallaudet 2 

1912 (6-1-1) 

31 Tech Hi 6 

46 Richmond Col. 
58 U. of Md. ___ 
13 Johns Hop. ___ 

St. Johns 27 

13 Gallaudet 7 

17 West Md. 7 

13 Penn Mil. Col._13 

1913 (6-3-0) 

27 Balto City 10 

45 Richmond Col. _0 
20 Johns Hop. ___ 

46 West Md. 

Navy 76 

13 St. Johns 

2C Wash. Col. ___ 

Gallaudet 26 

7 Penn Mil. ___27 

1914 (5-3-0) 

Balto. Poly ___ 6 
6 Catholic U. ___ 

13 West Md. 20 

14 Johns Hop. 

10 St. Johns 

3 Wash. Col. — _ 

Gallaudet 23 

26 Penn Mil. 

1915 (6-3-0) 

31 Balto Poly __ 

Haverford 7 

Catholic U. __16 

10 Gallaudet 3 



14 Penn Mil. ___13 

27 St. Johns — — 14 

28 Wash Col. ___13 
51 West Md. ___ 

Johns Hop. __ 3 

MARYLAND 

STATE 

1916 (6-2-0) 

6 Dickinson 

7 Navy 14 

15 V. M. I. 9 

6 Haverford 7 

31 St. Johns 6 

10 N. Y. U. 7 

13 Catholic U. ___ 9 
54 Johns Hop. 

1917 (4-3-1) 

20 Dela. Col. 

Navy 62 

14 V. M. I. 14 

29 Wake Forest _13 

6 N. C. State __10 
13 St. Johns 3 

Penn State ___57 

7 Johns Hop. ___ 

1918 (4-1-1) 

6 American U. 13 

7 V. M. I. 6 

19 West Md. 

6 New York U. _ 2 

19 St. Johns 14 

Johns Hop. ___ 

1919 (5-4-0) 

6 Swarthmore 10 

13 Virginia 

West Va. 27 

Va. Poly 6 

Yale 31 

27 St. Johns 

13 Catholic U. ___ 

20 West Md. 

14 Johns Hop. 

UNIVERSITY 
OF MARYLAND 

1920 (7-2-0) 

54 Randolph Ma - 

Rutgers 7 

Princeton 35 

27 Wash. Col. — 

7 Va. Poly 

13 North Car. ___ 

14 Catholic U. ___ 

10 Syracuse 7 

24 Johns Hop. ___ 7 

— 45 — 



1921 (3-5-1) 

3 Rutgers 

Syracuse 42 

3 St. Johns 7 

10 Va. Poly ____ 7 
7 North Car. __16 
Yale 28 

16 Catholic U. ___ 
Carnegie Tech_21 

6 N. C. State —6 

1922 (4-5-1) 

7 Third Army __ 

Richmond 

Pennsylvania -12 

Princeton 26 

3 North Car. _-27 

Va. Poly 21 

3 Yale 45 

3 Johns Hop. ___ 

54 Catholic U. __ 

7 N. C. State ___ 6 

1923 (7-2-1) 

53 Randolph Ma. 
3 Pennsylvania _ 

23 Richmond 

9 Va. Poly 16 

14 North Car. ___ 

28 St. Johns 

14 Yale 16 

26 N. C. State __12 
40 Catholic U. ___ 6 

6 Johns Hop. — 6 

1924 (3-3-3) 

23 Wash Col. ___ 

7 Wash. & Lee _19 
38 Richmond 

Va. Poly 12 

6 North Car. ___ 
Catholic U. ___ 

Yale 47 

N. C. State -— 
Johns Hop — 

1925 (2-5-1) 

13 Wash. Col. _—0 
16 Rutgers 

Va. Poly 3 

Virginia 6 

North Car, ___16 

14 Yale 43 

3 W. & L. 7 

7 Johns Hop. 7 



1926 (5-4-1) 

63 Wash. Col. ___ 
South Car. ___12 

Chicago 21 

8 Va. Poly 24 

14 North Car. ___ 6 

38 Gallaudet 7 

15 Yale 

6 Virginia 6 

W. & L. 3 

17 Johns Hop. ___14 

1927 (4-7-0) 

80 Wash. Col. __ 

26 South Car. 

6 North Car. ___ 7 

13 Va. Poly 7 

10 V. M. I. 6 

6 W. & L. 13 

6 Yale 30 

Virginia 21 

20 Vanderbilt 39 

13 Johns Hop. __14 

6 Florida 7 

1928 (6-3-1) 

31 Wash. Col. _—0 

19 Norlh Car __ _26 

7 South Car. —21 
13 West Md. 6 

V. M. I. 

6 Va. Poly S 

Yale 6 

18 Virginia 2 

6 W. & L. 

26 Johns Hop. ___ 6 

1929 (4-4-2) 

34 Wash Cal. — 7 
North Car. ___ 43 
Couth Car. ___26 

13 Gallaudet 6 

6 V. M. I. 7 

13 Virginia 13 

13 Yale 13 

24 Va. Poly 

39 Johns Hod. ___ 6 
West Md. —12 

1?30 (7-5-0) 
60 Wash Col. ___ 6 

13 Yale 40 

21 North Car. ___28 
21 St. Johns 13 

20 V. M. I. 

14 Virginia 6 

41 W. & L. 7 

13 Va. Poly 7 

Navy 6 

21 Johns Hop. __ 



7 Vanderbilt —22 
West Md. 7 

1931 (8-1-1) 

13 Wa h Col. — 

7 Virginia (6 

6 Navy 

6 Kentucky 6 

41 V. M. I. 20 

20 Va. Poly 

12 Vanderbilt ___39 

13 W. & L. (7 

35 Johns Hop. —14 
41 West Md. 6 

1932 (5-6-0) 

63 Wash Col. 

6 Virginia 7 

6 Va. Poly 23 

Duke 34 

24 St. Johns 7 

12 V. M. I. 7 

Vanderbilt — 13 

7 Navy 28 

6 W. & L. 

23 Johns Hop. ___ 

7 West Md. 39 

1933 (3-6-0) 

20 St. Johns 

Va. Poly 14 

Tulane 20 

13 V. M. I. 19 

7 West Md. 13 

Virginia 6 

7 Duke 38 

27 Johns Hop — 7 

33 W. & L. 13 

Florida 19 

1934 (7-3-0) 

13 St. Johns 

W. & L. 7 

13 Navy IS 

14 Va. Poly 9 

21 Florida 

20 Virginia 

23 V. M. I. 

14 Indiana 17 

6 Georgetown — 

19 Johns Hop. — 

1935 (7-2-2) 

39 St. Johns 6 

7 Va. Pol y 

North Car. ___ 33 

6 V. M. I. 

20 Florida 6 

14 Virginia 

7 Indiana 13 

W. & L. 

— 46 — 



12 Georgetown __ 6 

Syracuse 

22 West Md. 7 

1936 (6-5-0) 

20 St. Johns 

6 Va. Poly 

North Car. ___14 

21 Virginia 

20 Syracuse 

6 Florida 7 

12 Richmond 

7 V. M. I. 13 

6 Georgetown 7 

19 W. & L. 6 

West Md. —12 

1937 (8-2-0) 

28 St. Johns 

21 Pennsylvania -28 

6 West Md. 

3 Virginia 

13 Syracuse 

13 Florida 7 

9 V. M. I. 7 

14 Penn State —21 
12 Georgetown 2 

8 W. & L. 

1938 (2-7-0) 

6 Richmond 19 

Penn State —33 
Svracuse 53 

14 West Md. —8 

19 Virginia 27 

14 V. M. I. 47 

7 Florida 21 

7 Georgetown 14 

19 W. & L. 13 

1939 (2-7-0) 

26 Hamp.-Syd. __ 

12 West Md. 

7 Virginia 12 

12 Rutgers 25 

Florida 14 

Penn State —12 
Georgetown __20 

V. M. I. 13 

7 Svracuse 10 

1940 (2-6-1) 

6 Hamp.-Syd. __ 7 
Pennsylvania -51 

6 Virginia 19 

Florida 19 

6 West Md. 

G Georgetown __41 
V. M. I. 20 

14 Rutgers 7 

7 W. & L. 7 



1941 (3-5-1) 

18 Hamp.-Syd. 

6 West Md. — 6 
Duke 50 

13 Florida 12 

6 Pennsylvania -55 
Georgetown — 26 

Rutgers 20 

V. M. I. 27 

6 W. & L. 

1942 (7-2-0) 

34 Connecticut 

14 Lake NAS — 
27 Rutgers 13 

V. M. I. 29 

51 West Md. 

13 Florida 

Duke 42 

27 Virginia 12 

32 W. & L. 28 

1943 (4-5-0) 

7 Curtis B. CG_13 
13 Wake Forest _ 7 
19 Rich. AAB ___ 6 

2 West Va. 6 

Penn State __45 

43 Greenv. AAB _18 

Virginia 39 

Bainbridge — 46 

21 V. M. I. 14 

1944 (1-7-1) 

Hamp.-Syd. __12 
Wake Forest _39 

6 West Va. 6 

Mich. State --8 

6 Florida 14 

7 Virginia 18 

Mich. State —33 

19 Penn State —34 

8 V. M. I. 6 



1945 (6-2-1) 

60 Guilford Col. _ C 

21 Richmond 

22 Merch. M. A. 6 
13 Va. Polv 21 

13 West Va. 13 

14 W. & M. 33 

38 V. M. I. 

19 Virginia 13 

19 South Car. ___13 

1946 (3-6-0) 

54 Bainbridge 

7 Richmond 37 

North Car. — _33 

6 Va. Poly 

7 W. & M. 41 

17 South Car. ___21 

24 W. & L. 7 

14 Mich. State —26 

7 N. C. State —28 

1947 (7-2-2) 

19 South Car. —13 
43 Delaware 19 

18 Richmond 6 

7 Duke 19 

21 Va. Polv 19 

27 West Va. 

32 Duquesne 

North Car. _.__19 

20 Vanderbilt — 6 
N. C. State __ 

(Gator Bowl, 
Jan. 1, 1948) 

20 Georgia 20 

1948 (6-4-0) 

19 Richmond 

21 Delaware 

28 Va. Poly 

12 Duke 13 

47 Geo. Wash. — 
27 Miami 13 



19 

20 


14 



14 
44 
40 
14 
47 
13 



20 

7 
35 
34 
25 
13 
26 
23 

7 
41 
63 

54 
33 
43 
14 
27 
35 
40 
53 
54 



28 



COACHES THROUGH THE 



South Car. 

North Car. _ 
Vanderbilt __ 
West. Va. — 

1949 (9-1-0) 

Va. Poly 

Georgetown _ 
Mich! State _ 
N. C. State _ 
South Car. __ 
Geo. Wash. __ 
Boston U. _.. 
West Va. ___ 
Miami 

(Gator Bowl, 
Jan. 1, 1950) 
Missouri 

1950 (7-2-1) 

Georgia 

Navy 

Mich, State _ 
Georgetown _ 
N. C. State - 

Duke 

Geo. Wash 

North Car. __ 
West Va. ___ 
V. P. I. 

1951 (10-0-0) 

W. & L. 

Geo. Wash. __ 

Georgia 

North Car. _ 
Louis. State - 

Missouri 

Navy 

N. C. State __ 
West. Va. __ 

(Sugar Bowl, 
Jan. 1, 1952) 
Tennessee 

YEARS 



. 7 
-49 
_34 
.16 

_ 7 
. 7 
.14 
. 6 
. 7 
.14 
.13 
. 7 
. 



.27 
.21 

. 7 
.14 
16 
.14 

. 7 
. 7 
. 
. 7 

14 
. 6 
_ 7 
. 7 
. 
. 
.21 
. 
. 7 



__13 



1892— W. W. Skinner 

1893— S. H. Harding 

1894— J. G. Bannon 

1895— G. M. Harris 

1896 — Grenville Lewis 

1897— John Lillibridge 

1898— J. F. Kenly 

1899— S. M. Cooke 

1900— F. H. Peters 

1901— E. B. Dunbar 

*Above Teams Coached by Captains 

1902 — D. John Markey (Western Md.) 

1903 — Markey 

1904 — Markey 

1905 — Fred Nielsen (Nebraska) 

1906 — Nielsen 

1907— C. G. Church (Virginia) 

and C. W. Melick (Nebraska) 



1908— Bill Lang (Delaware) 

1909 — Barney Cooper (Maryland '08) 

and E. P. Larkin (Cornell) 
1910 — R. Alston (George Washington) 
1911 — C. F. Donnelly (Trinity) 

and H. C. Byrd (Maryland '08) 
1912-34— H. C. Byrd (Maryland '08) 
1935-39— Frank Dobson (Princeton) 
1940-41— Jack Faber C26), Al Heagy, C30), 
and Al Woods C33) all of 
Maryland. 
1942 — Clark Shaughnessy (Minnesota) 
1943-44 — Clarence Spears (Dartmouth) 
1945 — Paul Bryant (Alabama) 
1946 — Shaughnessy 
1947-51 — Jim Tatum (North Carolina) 



BRIEF HISTORY OF THE UNIVERSITY 



The history of the present University is the histcry of two in- 
stitutions: the old privately-owned and operated University of Mary- 
land in Baltimore and the Maryland State College (formerly Maryland 
Agricultural College) at College Park. These institution were merged 
in 1920. 

In 1807 the College of Medicine of Maryland was organized, the 
fifth medical school in the United States. The first class was graduated 
in 1810. A permanent home was established in 1814-1815 by the erection 
of the building at Lombard and Greene Streets in Baltimore, the oldest 
structure in America devoted to medical teaching. Here was founded 
o.ne of the first medical libraries (and the first medical school library) 
in the United States. In 1812 the General A:sembly of Maryland author- 
ized the College of Medicine of Maryland to "annex or constitute facil- 
ities of divinity, law, and arts and sciences," and by the same act de- 
clared that the "colleges or faculties thus united should be constituted 
an university by the name and under the title of the University of Mary- 
land." By authority of thi3 act, steps were taken in 1813 to establish 
"a faculty of law," and in 1823 a regular school of instruction in law 
was opened. Subsequently there were added: in 1882 a Department of 
Dentistry which was absorbed in 1923 by the Baltimore College of 
Dental Surgery (founded in 1840, the first dental school in the world); 
in 1889 a School of Nursing; and in 1904 the Maryland College of 
Pharmacy (founded in 1841, the third oldest pharmacy college in the 
United States). 

The Maryland State College was chartered in 1856 under the name 
of the Maryland Agricultural College, the second agricultural college in 
the Western Hemisphere. For three years the College was under private 
management. In 1862 the Congress of the United States passed the Land 
Grant Act. Th : s act granted each State and Territory that should 
claim its benefits an appropriate amount of unclaimed western lands, 
in place of scrip, the proceeds from the sale of which should apply under 
certain conditions to the "endowment, support, and maintenance of at 
least one college where the leading object shall be, without excluding 
other scient'fic and classical studies, and including military tactics, to 
teach such branches of learning as are related to agriculture and the 
mechanic arts, in such a manner as the Legislatures of the States may 
respectively prescribe, in order to promote the liberal and practical 
education of the industrial classes in the several pur.u'ts and professins 
of life." This grant was accepted by the General Assembly of Maryland, 
and the Maryland Agricultural College was named as the beneficiary 
of the grant. Thus the College became, at least in part, a State institu- 
tion. In the fall of 1914 control was taken over entirely by the State. 
In 1916 the General Assembly granted a new charter to the College, and 
made it the Maryland State College. 

In 1920, by an act of the State Legislature, the University of Mary- 
land was merged with the Maryland State College, and the resultant 
institution was given the name University of Maryland. 



Outstanding Veteran Holdovers For 5 52 




ALL-AMERICA TACKLE DICK "LITTLE MO" MODZELEWSKI 




. 1951 HONORS 

1st Tear**— AH -Players Ait-America 
2nd Team—Associatetf Press 

3rd Team-SBwH^^Pjc&s 

1st Team and Co-Cap 

1 st Tea m—Coi t i e r's A If .Sou th 

1st Team— Washington Post Afl-Area Team