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Full text of "University of Maryland men's football media guides"

THE 1953 

YAUD 





Dikfl 




MARYLAND'S "60-MINUTE" BACKFIELD FOURSOME 




RALPH FELTON — FB 



D«CK NOLAN—RHS 




FOR PRESS, RADIO and TELEVISION 

This is your 1953 Maryland football brochure, 
"The 50-Yard Line." It is published in hope 
that it offers you helpful information for your 
coverage of Terp games this season. With this 
book goes an invitation to you to visit us as 
often as possible in our offices in New Byrd 
Stadium, in return, 1 will try to visit you as 
often as I can and extend every assistance pos- 
sible. For any information, you can reach me 
day and night at UNion 4-4076. When it is real 
late at night, I can be contacted at WArfield 7- 
3800, Extension 507. 

Applications for tickets should be made the 
first part of the week of the game to allow time 

for mailing. *Wire and telephone requirements should be made through your 

local Western Union office. 

Every effort will be made to furnish all the services in the press box 

available, so that your accounts of the game can be most adequate for your 

readers. Statistics, both half-time and final figures; a quarter play-by-play; 

game leaders in all departments; substitutions, etc. will be ready a few minutes 

after the game. 

Many thanks for all your cooperation and favors of the past. 

JOE F. BLAIR 

Sports Publicity Director 
University of Maryland, 
College Park, Maryland. 




TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Page 

1 Message to Press 

2 President, Dr. H. C. Byrd 

3 Athletic Council 

4 Department of Intercol- 
legiate Athletics 

5 Coach Jim Tatum 

6-9 Ass't Coaches - Trainers 

10-19 .... Terp Opponents 
20-24 .... Opponents' Publicists' 

Reports 

25 Opponents' Schedules 

26-27 • • • • Squad Roster 

28-33 • • • ■ Terp Thumbnails 

33 Terps in Post-Season All- 

Star Games 



Page 

34 Terp AlkAmerica Players 

34 Honorary Selections, 1952 

35 Game Officials 

36 Press Covering Maryland 

37 1952 Highlights 

37 Byrd Stadium 

38 1952 Team Statistics 

38 '53 Schedule ; '52 Results ; 

Maryland Bowl Record 
39-40 .... '52 Individual Statistics 
41-42 All-Time Maryland 

Records 
43-46 .... Year by Year Scores 

47 History of U. of Maryland 

48 . . . New U. of Maryland 

Activities Building 




DR. H. C. BYRD 

PRESIDENT, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Dr. H. C. (Curley) Byrd, President of the University of Maryland, 
owns a distinction that no other college President can claim. He is the only 
President to ever play for, then coach, then become President of his alma 
mater. 

While a student on the College Park campus, Dr. Byrd quarterbacked 
the Terp teams 1905-1907. He also was a pitcher on the baseball teams as 
well as a sprinter on the track team. 

In his 25 years of head coaching, 1912-34, he compiled a 114-81-15 record. 

Since becoming President, Dr. Byrd concentrated his efforts to make 
Maryland one of the world's foremost educational institutions. That goal has 
been attained and even today, through his exhaustive efforts, the University 
is still growing, not only at home but in far reaching corners of the world. 

Too, his program called for a first class athletic curriculum. The 1953 
season marks the fourth year that the Terps' new stadium, one that bears 
Dr. Byrd's name, will be used. His latest effort in giving Maryland a most 
adequate athletic plant is now being built. A Physical Activities Building, 
which will seat 17,000 spectators for indoor events, as well ao house the 
Physical Education Department's program, is expected to be completed by- 
next September. 

Dr. Byrd's untiring individual efforts for Maryland places him among 
the nation's outstanding educators. 

— 2 — 



ATHLETIC COUNCIL 




Mr. G. F. Eppley 
(Chairman) 



Mr. James Tatum 




Dr. Albert E. Goldstein Dr. James H. Reid Col. Joseph Ambrose 




Dr. Jack Faber 



THE DEPARTMENT OF INTERCOLLEGIATE 
ATHLETICS 




f 



WILLIAM W. COBEY 

The big job of scheduling athletic contests 
for 13 sports and making and taking care of 
arrangements for these teams, both at home 
and away, falls on the shoulders of Bill 
Cobey, the Terps' pleasant and accommodating 
.Graduate Manager of Athletics. 

Cobey, who also acts in the capacity of 
contact man, is head of the ticket office. 
Also on the staff is Bennie Robinson, athletic 
ticket manager of the University. 

Cobey comes from Quincy, Fla. His inter- 
est in Maryland stems from his being a mem- 
ber of an old Maryland family. His father 
graduated from the University in iooi. Cobey 
is an alumnus of the class of 1930. 

Cashier at the University for 17 year-, 
he moved to the Athletic Department in 1948. 

Cobey is married and has six children, three daughters and three sc 




Director of Athletics lames M. I alum 

Graduate Manager of Athletics \V///inni VV. Cohey 

Athletic Publicity Director Joe /'. Blair 

Equipment Head Kermil "Cliief" Cissell 

Facilities Head Charles "Lindy" Kelioe 

Chief of Concessions Vernon Seiheri 

Ticket Manager Bonnie Rnhinson 

Office Secretary to Mr. Tatum Mrs. Ora Rutherford 

Office Secretary to Mr. Cobey Mrs. Doro'.hv llnnl 

Head Trainer Alfred "Duke" Wyre 

Assistant Trainer John Lacey 

Football Coach James M. Tatum 

Basketball Coach 77. A. "Bud" Mdlikan 

Boxing Coach Frank Cronin 

Baseball Coach H. Burton Shipley 

Lacrosse Co-Coaches Jack Faber, Al Heagy 

Track, Cross-Country Coach Jim Kehoe 

Soccer, Tennis Coach Doyle Royal 

Wrestling Coach Wm. E. "Sully" Krouse 

Golf Coach Frank Cronin 

Rifle Coach M/Sgt. Paul Barnes 

_ 4 ._ 




JIM TATUM 



With nine years as a head coach, six of them at Maryland, the Terp's 
Jim Tatum has become one of the most successful and respected coaches in 
the game today. In his six-year tenure at College Park, he has brought 
Maryland to rank with the nation's best gridiron teams and has organized its 
finest athletic program as Athletic Director. 

His latest contribution to football is his book, "Coaching Football and 
the Split-T," off the presses late this August. 

In six years, Tatum has taken his teams to three bowl games. Until losing 
to Mississippi last fall, he had the nation's second best winning streak in the 
books, having won 19 straight and 22 without defeat. In his six years he 
has developed six All-Americas ; more Terps have been drafted by profes- 
sional teams in the past two years than any other school ; and five boys were 
in this year's All-Star game, another high. 

Coach of the Southern Conference in 195 1 and Coach of the Year as se- 
lected by the Washington TD Club, the young Terp mentor now has a rec- 
ord of 46-1 1-3. His nine year slate reads 68-18-5, impressive in any league. 

He was a member of this year's American Football Coaches' Assn. 
Clinic Staff, lecturing to the Association on Split-T play. 

A native of McColl, S. C, Tatum started his athletic career at the Uni- 
versity of N. C. where he was a star tackle. After graduation in 1935, he fol- 
lowed his coach, Carl Snavely, to Cornell. He returned to his alma mater for 
his first fling at head coaching, in 1942. 

World War II found Tatum in the Navy. It was then that he was to 
learn the Split-T from Missouri's Don Faurot as the latter's assistant at Iowa 
Pre-Flight. In '45 he was head coach at Jacksonville Naval Air Station. 

After his Navy discharge, he molded a strong eleven at Oklahoma. He 
took the Sooners to the 1947 'Gator Bowl and trounced N. C. State, 34-13. 

Tatum is married and has three children, Becky, Jimmy, and a 11-month 
old daughter, Reid. 

— 5 — 



ASSISTANT COACHES 




JACK HENNEMIER 

One of the smallest football players ever 
to play at the center spot, the Terps' Line 
Coach," Jack Hennemier, made football fame 
for himself, weighing only 150 pounds, when 
he played at Duke University, '33, '34, and '33. 

A 60-minute man, Hennemier won the 
most valuable player award as voted by his 
teammates in '35. This same year he made 
All-America Mention and the All-Conference 
team. 

Because of his outstanding football ability 
for such a "little guy", he was nicknamed 
"Scrappy Jack," and even today carries the 
name on and off the field. 

In 1939 he went to Washington and Le^ 
University as Line Coach. He stayed there 
through '41, before being called into the Navy in '42, at Pensacola Naval Air 
Station. Here he coached and played center on the Service team. After 3 l / 2 
years of duty, he returned to Duke in '45 as assistant line coach and 
freshman coach. 

Hennemier will be handling the defensive assignments for the fifth year 
with the Terps, an outstanding characteristic of Maryland elevens under his 
tutelage. 

WARREN GIESE 

A fine student of the game, the Terps' end 
coach, Warren Giese, spent many exhaustive 
weeks this past spring and summer assisting 
Coach Tatum in writing their book, "Coach- 
ing Football and the Split-T." Last summer 
he spent a month in Japan as a member of 
the U. S. Coaching Staff, sent there by the 
Army to conduct coaching clinics for various 
Army, Navy, and Air Force bases. 

Giese, a native of Milwaukee, embarked on 
his collegiate athletic career at Wisconsin 
State College. Here the Navy vet lettered 
playing end and also won his monogram as 
a quarter-miler. 

Under the V-12 program, Giese studied at 
Central Michigan College. Here he played 
right halfback before being transferred to Miami Training Center and then 
to Jacksonville in '45, where he played end under Coach Tatum. 

Following his military discharge, Giese went to Oklahoma in '46 to play 
end for his former Navy boss. He was named to the All-Big 7 team for 
his one year performance at end. 

Giese returned to Central Michigan and played another year while com- 
pleting his work on his B. A. and B. S. degrees. 

In '49, Tatum beckoned his former star to Maryland as end coach. He 
rceived his Master's in Physical Education that year. 




TOMMY MONT 

One of the greatest athletes in the history 
of the University of Maryland, Tommy Mont 
returned to his alma mater in 195 1 as Terp 
backfield coach. 

A four-year letterman in football, basket- 
ball and lacrosse, Mont returned to Mary- 
land after four brilliant years with the pro- 
fessional Washington Redskins. 

A home stater, coming from Cumberland, 
Md., Mont embarked on his athletic years 
in 1 941. He got two years in before enter- 
ing the service in the spring of '43. He 
played tailback in '41 then quarterback on 
the '42 T eleven. Both years he won his bas- 
ketball and lacrosse letters also. Mont won 
All-America Mention as well as being placed 
on the Conference team in '42, and was named the outstanding college 
player of the Washington-Maryland area that year. 

'. With 42 months in the service, 18 of which were spent in the ETO, Mont 
continued playing ball. He was tailback on the Fort Benning post champion- 
ship team of '43. As quarterback and head coach, he led the 3rd Infantry 
team to the ETO championship. He also was at the helm of the 7th Army 
All- Star team. 

Mont completed his college ball playing quarterback for the Terps in 
'46 when he again won All-America Mention and All-Conference honors. 

This summer he spent three weeks as an advisory coach at National 
Polytechnic Institute in Mexico City. 




VERNON SEIBERT 

An outstanding halfback 1946 through '49, 
Seibert returned to his alma mater as assist- 
ant coach in 1951. 

Seibert played offense for three years and 
defense his last season. He is best remem- 
bered for his great defensive play which tabs 
him as one of the finest safety men ever to 
play at Maryland. 

Tatum beckoned his former backfield ace 
from Baltimore Junior College where he 
coached football and lacrosse for a year fol- 
lowing his graduation. 

He was a B-25 pilot in the South Pacific 
during World War II. 

Besides his coaching duties, Seibert is in 
charge of concessions for all athletic events. 

He became a proud "papa" for the first 
time this spring with the arrival of a son, Christopher 




BOB WARD 

The all-time great name in the history of 
the University of Maryland football is that 
of Bob Ward, a two-year all-America guard. 
He handles the offensive line coaching 
chores. 

Ward graduated in 1952 with a degree from 
the School of 'Business and Public Adminis- 
tration, finishing in the upper one-third of 
the class. He majored in Real Estate and 
Insurance. 

Following his discharge from the Army 
paratroopers in 1947, Ward came to Mary- 
land as one of the smallest guard prospects 
ever seen by Jim Tatum. But Tatum liked 
what he saw and now is more than happy 
that Ward was on his side of the line for four years. The 185-pounder 
from Elizabeth, N. J., was outstanding every Saturday for the Terps. 

His many honors are too numerous to mention, but Ward was recipient 
of every award imaginable for any lineman. After making All-America his 
junior year for his excellent defensive play, he proved that he wasn't just 
an ordinary platoon football player by making everybody's All-America team 
in 1951 playing offense. Tatum himself credits the great success of his of- 
fensive team to his '51 Co-Captain, Bob Ward. When things got real rough 
for the Terps, Ward would trot in to play defense and stop the enemy threat. 

Besides the unanimous All -America selections his senior year. Ward was 
named "Lineman of the Year" by the Washington Touchdown Club and the 
Philadelphia Sportswriters' Assn. He was runnerup to St:nford's Bill Mc- 
Coll for the same Associated Press award. He was named the outstanding 
player of the Southern Conference. During the '51 season, he was the na- 
tion's "Lineman of the Week," after his great game against Georgia. 

The Wards are expecting a third child near the end of September. They 
have a son, Richard, 3, and a daughter, Kathie, aged 2. 




EMMETT CHEEK 

A native of Chapel Hill, X. C, Cheek at- 
tended the University of North Carolina. He- 
started at UNC in 1940 and as a freshman 
played under Coach Tatum, then Tarheel 
freshman coach, as a guard. After another 
year of football, Cheek was called into the 
service in '41, and assigned to Army Medics. 

Returning to Carolina, he completed his 
football career under Carl Snavely. He stay- 
ed on and did graduate work in '48. He re- 
ceived his Master's Degree in Physical Edu- 
cation from NC in 1950. 

Added to the staff in '51, he came to the 
Terps from Guilford College, N. C, where 
he was line coach and baseball coach in '4) 
and '50. Besides his duties as assistant 
coach, Cheek is a part-time instructor in the Physical Education department. 

Cheek is married and has one son, Tommy. 





*pf~* 




EDDIE TEAGUE 

Added to the staff last fall, Teague came 
to Maryland following his discharge in mid- 
August of '52 from the U. S. Marine Corps j 
after serving 15 months in Korea with the | 
Infantry, 1st Marine Division. A Captain in 1 
the USMCR, he served three years during I 
World War II. I 

Teague attended N. C. State College, 1941- 1 

43, then transferred to UNC via his Marine 1 

Unit and received his A. B. Degree. He was 1 

an outstanding three-sport man, lettering in I 

football, basketball, and baseball. He received I 

All-America mention his senior year as a 1 

tailback and also named to the All-Confer- 1 
ence eleven that year. 

Following his World War II service, he 1 
returned to UNC and got his Master's in '47. 

He then went to Guilford College, N.C., as back field coach and assistant 

director of physical education in 1947 and '48. He became head coach and 
athletic director in 1949-51 ; then was called to active duty. 

Teague is married and has a daughter, Peggy, five .years old. 

THE TRAINERS 

ALFRED J. "DUKE" WYRE 

Considered as one of the top athletic trainers 
in the country, the Terp's "Dapper Duke" begins 
his seventh year as trainer of Maryland teams. 

"Duke" has many years experience to back his 
reputation. He has authored several training- 
articles and is kept busy spreading the good 
word of the best methods of training athletic 
teams through many lectures. 

An Ivy-Leaguer, "Duke" was trainer at Yale for 
15 years before he moved to Holy Cross for two 
more remesters, then came to the Terps in 1947. 

A Navy veteran, Wyre served as a physical 
education instructor in the V-12 program. 

He was the first president of the Southern Conference Tr 
presently is on the board of the National Trainers' Assn. 
named the top trainer in the East. 

JOHN LACEY 

Another Ivy-Leaguer, Lacey came to Maryland 
in the summer of 1951 as the Terps' first full- 
time assistant trainer. 

Lacey too has had vast experience with ath- 
letic teams. Before coming to College Park, he 
was assistant trainer at Yale for three years. He 
also has had long experience with pro teams. In 
early pro training seasons, he had been trainer 
for the Chicago Cardinals, the New York Yanks, 
and was with the Baltimore Colts in 1950. 

He graduated from Tilton Academy in N. H. 

— 9 — 




TERP OPPONENTS 



MARYLAND vs. MISSOURI 19 SEPTEMBER 

(2:00 P. M. (C.S.T.) 

At Memorial Stadium (37,000) 
Columbia, Mo. 

FACTS ABOUT THE TIGERS 
CONFERENCE: Big Seven 
LOCATION: Columbia, Missouri 
HEAD COACH: Don Faurot 
COLORS: Black and Gold 
ENROLLMENT: 7000 
TYPE OFFENSE: Split-T — Spread 
Coach Don Faurot 1952 RECORD: Won 5, Lost 5, Tied 




TIGERS* RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS 

(Maryland Won 3, Lost 0, Tied 0) 



Maryland 
1250 20 

1951 35 

1952 13 
'Cator Eowl Game 



Missouri 
7 

10 



TOTAL POINTS: Maryland, 68; Missouri, 17 

1953 CAPTAIN: None Selected — Probable Game Captains 

LETTERMEN RETURNING— 19 — LOST— 15 





1953 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


19 


Maryland 


Sept. 


26 


Purdue 


Cct. 


3 


at Colorado 


Oct. 


9 


at Southern Methodist 
(night) 


Oct. 


17 


at Iowa State 


Oct. 


24 


Nebraska 


Oct. 


31 


at Indiana 


Nov. 


7 


Oklahoma 


Nov. 


14 


Kansas State 


Nov. 


21 


at Kansas U. 



1952 YARDSTICK 




Maryland 


Vlissou/i 


13 First downs 


i 


211 Rushing yardage .. 


62 


112 Passing yardage 


143 


12 Passes attempted 


24 


4 .'. Passes completed 


10 


2 Passes intercepted 


2 


4 Punts 


6 


36 Punting average .... 


49 


3 Fumbles lost 


2 


11 Yards penalized 


15 


Score by periods : 




Maryland 


13— "3 


Missouri 10 


0—10 


Scoring summarv — Maryland: 


Touch- 


downs, Felton and Colteryahn. Point 


after touchdown: Decker M 


ssouri — 


Touchdown: Makin. Field goal 


Fuchs. 


Point after touchdown: Fuchs 


(place- 


ment >. 





MARYLAND vs. WASHINGTON & LEE 26 SEPTEMBER 



(SENIOR DAY) 

2:00 P. M. (E.DT.) 

at Byrd Stadium (35 000) 

College Park, Md. 

FACTS ABOUT THE GENERALS 

CONFERENCE: Southern 
LOCATION: Lexington, Va. 
HEAD COACH: Carl Wise 
COLORS: Blue and White 
ENROLLMENT: 1100 
TYPE OFFENSE: Split-T 
1952 RECORD: Won 3, Lost 7, Tied 




Coach Carl Wise 



GENERAL'S RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS 

(Maryland Won 12, Lost 5, Tied 2) 





Marvland 


W&L 


1924 


7 


19 


1925 


3 


7 


1926 





3 


1927 


6 


13 


1928 


6 





1930 


41 


7 


1931 


13 


7 


1932 


6 





1933 


33 


13 





Maryland 


W&L 


1934 





7 


1935 








1936 


19 


6 


1937 


8 





1938 


19 


13 


1940 


7 


7 


1941 


6 





1942 


8 





1946 


24 


7 


1951 


54 


14 



TOTAL POINTS: Maryland, 250; Washington & Lee, 123 
1953 CAPTAIN: Bill McHenry— Center 
LETTERMEN RETURNING— 10 — LOST— 16 





1953 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


19 


Shepherd College 


Sept. 


26 


at Maryland 


Oct. 


3 


at North Carolina 


Oct. 


10 


at West Virginia 


Oct. 


17 


Richmond 


Oct. 


24 


at Virginia Tech 


Oct. 


31 


George Washington 


Nov. 


7 


Davidson at Winston- 
Salem, N. C. 


Nov. 


14 


Virginia 


Nov. 


21 


at William and Mary 





1952 YARDSTICK 


Did 






Not 




Play 



MARYLAND vs. CLEMSON 3 OCTOBER 




Coach Frank Howard 



2:00 P. M. (E.S.T) 

at Memorial Stadium (20,500) 

Clemson, S .C. 

FACTS ABOUT THE TIGERS 
CONFERENCE: Atlantic Ccast 
LOCATION: Clemson, 6. C. 
HEAD COACH: Frank Howard 
COLORS: Orange and Purple 
ENROLLMENT: 2600 
TYPE OFFENSE: Split-T 
1952 RECORD: Won 2, Lost 6, Tied 1 



TIGERS RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS 



1952 



Maryland 
28 



Clemson 




TOTAL POINTS: Maryland, 28; Clemson, 

1953 CO-CAPTAINS: Dreher Gaskin— End; Nathan Gresette— Tackle 

LETTERMEN RETURNING— 19 — LOST— 21 





1953 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


19 


Presbyterian 


Sept. 


26 


at Boston College 


Oct. 


3 


Maryland 


Oct. 


9 


at Miami (night' 


Oct. 


22 


at South Carolina 


Oct. 


31 


Wake Forest 


Nov. 


7 


at Georgia Tech 


Nov. 


14 


at The Citadel 


Nov. 


21 


Auburn 





1952 YARDSTICK 






Maryland 


Clemson 


20 

10 






12 
9 


Rushing 




7 .... 


Passing 




3 


3 .... 


Penalties 







293 


.. Total yards rushing 




172 


23 


.... Yards lost rushing .. 




. 48 


270 


--.. Net Yards rushing .. 




. 124 


183 


.. Net yards to wards 




38 


17 


.. Forwards attempted 




. 12 


10 ..... 


.. Forwards completed 




3 


2 .. . 


Intercepted by .... 




9 


48 Yards interceptions returned 


31 


4 


Punts 




8 


37 


Punt average 




. 41 


100 .... 


Yards lost by penalties .. 


. 60 


Score 


by periods: 






Maryland ... 7 14 7 


0- 


-28 


Clemson 


0- 


- 


Touchdowns — Scarbath, Hanulak, 


Fullertc 


n. Weidensaul. Extra 


points — 


Decker 


(4). 








MARYLAND vs. GEORGIA 10 OCTOBER 

(BAND DAY) 

2:00 P. M. (E.S.T.) 

at Byrd Stadium (35,000) 

College Park, Md. 

FACTS ABOUT THE BULLDOGS 

CONFERENCE: Southeastern 

LOCATION: Athens, Ga. 

HEAD COACH: Wallace Butts 

COLORS: Hed and Black 

ENROLLMENT: 4500 

TYPE OFFENSE: T 

1952 RECORD: Won 7, Lost 4, Tied Coach Wally Butts 

BULLDOG'S RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS 

(Maryland Won 2, Lost 1, Tied 1) 

* 1C48 
1950 
1S51 
1S52 

* 'Gator Bowl Game 

TOTAL POINTS: Maryland, 107; Georgia, 54 
1253 CAPTAIN: Zeke Bratkowjki — Quarterback 
LETTERMEN RETURNING— 20 — LOST— 28 



Maryland 


Georgia 


20 


20 


7 


27 


43 


7 


37 






1952 YARDSTICK 

Maryland G20rgia 

25 Fi st downs 11 

375 Rushing yardage 100 

114 Passing yardage 152 

10 Passes attempted 28 

8 Passes completed 11 

2 Passes intercepted 

3 Punts 7 

36.9 Punting average 38.4 

20 Fumbles lost 50 

20 Yards penalized 50 

Score by periods : 

Maryland 17 14 6—37 

Georgia 0—0 

Scoring: Maryland, touchdowns — 
Hanulak, Scarbath, Bielski, Fullerton, 
Liebold Field goal — Laughery. Con- 
versions — Decker (4) . 





1953 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


19 


Villanova at Connie Mack 
Stadium 


; Sept. 


26 


Tulane 


Oct. 


3 


Texas A&M at Dallas 
(night) 


Oct. 


10 


at Maryland 


Oct. 


17 


Louisiana State 


Oct. 


24 


North Carolina 


Oct. 


31 


Alabama 


Nov. 


7 


U. of Florida at 

Jacksonville 


Nov. 


14 


Auburn at Columbus, Ga. 


Nov. 


21 


Mississippi Southern at 
Jackson 


Nov. 


28 


at Georgia Tech 



MARYLAND vs. NORTH CAROLINA 17 OCTOBER 




Coach George Barclay 



2:00 P. M. (E.S.T.) 

at Kenan Stadium (44,000) 

Chapel Hill. N. C. 

FACTS ABOUT THE TARHEELS 

CONFERENCE: Atlantic Coast 

LOCATION: Chapel Hill, N. C. 

HEAD COACH: George Barclay 

COLORS; Carolina Blue and White 

ENROLLMENT: 5200 

TYPE OFFENSE: Split-T 

1952 RECORD: Won 2, Lost 6, Tied 



TARHEELS' RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS 
(Maryland Won 5, Lost 12, Tied 1) 





Maryland 


N. C. 




Maryland 


N. C 


1920 


13 





1929 





43 


1921 


7 


16 


1930 


21 


28 


1922 


3 


27 


1935 





33 


1923 


14 





1936 





14 


1924 


6 





1946 





13 


1925 





16 


1947 





19 


1926 


14 


6 


1948 


20 


49 


1927 


6 


7 


1950 


7 


7 


1928 


19 


26 


1951 


14 


7 



TOTAL POINTS: Maryland, 144; North Carolina. 311 
1953 CAPTAIN: Ken YarboroUgh— Tackle 
LETTERMEN RETURNING— 37 — LOST— 8 





1953 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


26 


N. C. State 


Oct. 


3 


Washington and Lee 


Oct. 


10 


at Wake Forest 


Oct. 


17 


Maryland 


Oct. 


24 


at Georgia 


Oct. 


31 


Tennessee 


Nov. 


7 


at South Carolina 


Nov. 


14 


Notre Dame 


Nov. 


21 


at Virginia 


Nov. 


28 


at Duke 



1952 YARDSTICK 



DID 



NOT 



PLAY 



MARYLAND vs. MIAMI 23 OCTOBER 

8:15 P. M. (E.S.T.) 

at Orange Bowl Stadium (65,000) 

Miami, Fla. 

FACTS ABOUT THE HURRICANES 

CONFERENCE: Southern Intercollegiate Ath- 
letic Association 
LOCATION: Coral Gables, Fla. 
HEAD COACH: Andy Gustafson 
COLORS: Orange, Green and White 
ENROLLMENT: 10,000 
TYPE OFFENSE: T 
1952 RECORD: Won 4, Lost 7, Tied Coach Andy Gustafson 




HURRICANE'S RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS 

(Maryland Won 2, Lost 0, Tied 0) 

Maryland Miami 

1948 27 13 

1C49 13 

TOTAL POINTS: Maryland, 40; Miami, 13 
1953 CAPTAIN: None Selected — Probable Game Captains 
LETTERMEN RETURNING— 24 — LOST— 16 



1953 SCHEDULE 

Sept. 25 Florida State 

Oct. 2 Baylor 

Oct. 9 Clemson 

Oct. 17 at Nebraska 

Oct. 23 Maryland 

Oct. 31 at Fordham 

Nov. 6 Auburn 

Nov. 13 Virginia Tech 

Nov. 28 U of Florida 




MARYLAND vs. SOUTH CAROLINA 31 OCTOBER 





Coach Rex Enright 



(HOMECOMING) 

2:00 P. M. (E.S.T.) 

at Byrd Stadium (35 000) 

College Park, Md. 

FACTS ABOUT THE GAMECOCKS 
CONFERENCE: Atlantic Coast 
LOCATION: Columbia, S. C. 
HEAD COACH: Rex Enright 
COLORS: Garnet and Black 
ENROLLMENT: 3500 
TYPE OFFENSE: T 
1952 RECORD: Won 5, Lost 5, Tied 



GAMECOCK'S RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS 
(Maryland Won 5, Lost 4, Tied 0) 





Maryland 


s c 


1926 





12 


1927 


26 





1928 


7 


21 


1929 





26 





Maryland 


s. c 


1945 


19 


33 


1946 


17 


21 


1947 


19 


13 


1948 


19 


7 


1949 


44 


7 



TOTAL POINTS: Maryland. 141; Couth Carolina, 120 
1953 CAPTAIN: Gene Wilson— Halfback 
LETTERMEN RETURNING 25 — LOST— 13 





1953 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


19 


Duke (night > 


Sept. 


26 


The Citadel (night 1 


Oct. 


3 


at Virginia 


Oct. 


10 


Furman 


Oct. 


22 


Clemson 


Oct. 


31 


at Maryland 


Nov. 


7 


North Carolina 


Nov. 


11 


at West Virginia 


Nov. 


21 


Wofford 


Nov. 


26 


Wake Forest at Charlotte 





Coach "Bo" Sherman 



MARYLAND vs. GEORGE WASHINGTON 7 NOVEMBER 

2:00 P. M. (E.S.T.) 

at Griffith Stadium (30,000) 

Washington, D. C. 

FACTS ABOUT THE COLONIALS 

CONFERENCE: Southern 

LOCATION: Washington, D. C. 

HEAD COACH: Eugene "Bo" Sherman 

COLORS: Buff and White 

ENROLLMENT: 11,500 

TYPE OFFENSE: Split-T 

1952 RECORD: Won 6, Lost 2, Tied 1 

COLONIAL'S RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS 

(Maryland Won 8, Lost 3, Tied 3) 

Mai 
1897 
1898 
1902 
1903 
1904 
1907 

TOTAL POINTS: Maryland, 177; GW, 153 

(First 5 games of series, GW was Columbian U.) 

1953 CO-CAPTAINS: Steve Korcheck— Center ; Dick Drake— Tackle 

LETTERMEN RETURNING— 20 — LOST— 10 



Maryland 



G.W. 






32 


11 


10 


6 






11 









Maryland 


G.W. 


1908 





57 


1909 





26 


1910 


6 





1948 


47 





1949 


40 


14 


1950 


23 


7 


1951 


33 


7 





1953 SCHEDULE 


Sept 


26 


at V. M. I. 


Oct. 


3 


North Carolina State at 
Alexandria 


Oct. 


10 


Virginia at Alexandria 


Oct. 


16 


West Virginia (night) 


Oct. 


24 


at William and Mary 


Oct. 


31 


at Washington and Lee 


Nov. 


7 


Maryland 


Nov. 


14 


at Davidson 


Nov. 


21 


Richmond 




MARYLAND vs. U. OF MISSISSIPPI 14 NOVEMBER 

(DAD'S DAY) 

2:00 P. M. (E.S.T.) 
at Byrd Stadium (35,000 
College Park, Md. 

FACTS ABOUT THE REBELS 
CONFERENCE: Southeastern 
LOCATION: Oxford, Miss. 
HEAD COACH: John H. Vaught 
COLORS: Red and Blue 
ENROLLMENT: 3800 
TYPE OFFENSE: T and Split-T 
1952 RECORD: Won 8; Lost 0; Tied 2 

Lost to Georgia Tech 24-7 in 
Coach John H. Vaught Sugar Bowl 




REBEL'S RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS 

(Maryland Won 0, Lost 1, Tied 0) 



1952 



Maryland 
14 



Mississippi 
21 



1953 CAPTAIN: None Selected — Probable Game Captains 
LETTERMEN RETURNING— 25 — LOST— 25 





1953 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


19 


U. of Chattanooga at 

Jackson 


Sept. 


26 


Kentucky 


Oct. 


3 


at Auburn 


Oct. 


10 


Vanderbilt 


Oct. 


17 


at Tulane 


Oct. 


24 


Arkansas at Memphis 


Oct. 


31 


at Louisiana State 


Nov. 


7 


North Texas State 


Nov. 


14 


at Maryland 


Nov. 


28 


at Mississippi State 





1952 YARDSTICK 




Maryland Mississippi 


8 




19 


90 

33 

14 

3 

1 

8 

47.6 

1 

30 


.. Rushing yardage .. 
.... Passing yardage .... 
.. Passes attempted .. 
.. Passes completed .. 
.. Passes intercepted ... 

Punts 

.... Punting average ... 

Fumbles lost 

Yards penalized .... 


197 

264 

20 

13 

1 

6 

32.7 

2 

20 


Score by periods: 

Maryland 14 

Mississippi 7 


0—14 
14—21 


Touchdowns — Mississippi: Howell. 
Dillard 2; Maryland: Hanulak, Nolan. 
Points after touchdown — Mississippi: 
Lear. 3; Maryland: Decker. 2. 



MARYLAND vs. ALABAMA 21 NOVEMBER 



(AIR FORCE R.O.T.C. DAY) 

2:00 P. M. (E.S.T.) 

at Byrd Stadium (35,000) 

College Park, Md. 

FACTS ABOUT THE CRIMSON TIDE 
CONFERENCE: Southeastern 
LOCATION: Tuscaloosa, Ala. 
HEAD COACH: Harold D. (Red) Drew 
ENROLLMENT: 6000 
TYPE OFFENSE: T and S'p'it-T 
1952 RECORD: Won 9, Lost 2, Tied 

Defeated Syracuse 61-6 in 
Orange Bowl 




Coach "Red ' Drew 



CRIMSON TIDE RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS 

(Maryland Won 0, Lost 1, Tied 0) 



1952 



Maryland 

7 



Alabama 
27 



1S53 CAPTAIN: Bud Willis— End 
LETTERMEN RETURNING— 26 — LOST— 13 





1953 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


18 


Miss. Southern at 

Montgomery (night) 


Sept. 


26 


Louisiana State at 

Mobile (night) 


Oct. 


3 


at Vanderbilt 


Oct. 


10 


Tulsa 


Oct. 


17 


Tennessee at Birmingham 


Oct. 


24 


Mississippi State 


Oct. 


31 


at Georgia 


Nov. 


7 


Chattanooga 


Nov. 


14 


Georgia Tech at 

Birmingham 


Nov. 


21 


at Maryland 





1952 YARDSTICK 




Maryland Alabama 


17 

154 

152 

19 

10 



4 

41.8 

3 

26 




12 

241 

11 

2 
1 
2 
7 
40.9 
1 
... 25 


... Rushing yardage 

Passing yardage 

... Passes attempted 

... Passes completed 

... Passes interceptel 

Punts 

.... Punting average 

Fumbles lost 

Yards penalized 


Score by periods : 

Maryland 7 

Alabama 6 7 7 7 


— 7 
—17 


Maryland scoring: Touchdown — Weid- 
ensaul. Point after touchdown — 
Decker. 


Alabama scoring: Touchdowns — 
Lewis, Marlowe, Ingram. Points 
touchdowns — Luna 3. 


Luna, 
after 



THE OUTLOOK FOR OUR OPPONENTS AS 

REPORTED BY THEIR PUBLICITY DIRECTORS 

University of Missouri 

By Bill Callahan 

Replacing three-fourths of his 1952 starting backfield is the No. 1 prob- 
lem of Mizzou Coach Don Faurot who'll be charting strategy for his 18th 
Tiger football squad this autumn. 

"We feel our personnel will adapt to the new substitution rule quite 
well," says Faurot. "We're more concerned with the job of finding success- 
ors for Jim Hook, Bill Rowekamp and Nick Carras. Those men gave us 
most of our punch last year." 

The Tigers will rebuild their backfield around Tony Scardino, the tiny 
sharpshooter at quarterback who will be a junior in '53 with two varsity 
campaigns already behind him. With Scardino pegging to a quartet of sure- 
fingered ends— John Will son, Jim Jennings, Pete Corpeny and sophomore 
Harold Burnine — Mizzou should be able to mount a sharp passing attack. 
But Faurot knows he must own a rushing offense if his club is to go any- 
where against Maryland in the Sept. 19 opener at Columbia. 

Best bets for an early call in the Tigers' backfield are : Bob Schoonmaker 
and Ed "Skimp" Merrifield, halfbacks; and Bob Bauman or sophomore Ray 
Detring, fullbacks. Schoonmaker and Merrifield, stalwarts in the defensive 
secondary last year, missed spring ball — while Detring also laid out of driils 
due to a siege of yellow jaundice. 

Defensively, OF Mizzou will be thin at guard and tackle, especially after 
losing guard Jim Martin, the club's best all-purpose lineman, to the Army 
draft this summer ; however, the Gold and Black squad returns its entire 
defensive secondary intact. 

Touted as best of the sophomore "rookie" crop are : Burnine, a clever 
receiver at end ; Al Portney, a swarthy tackle with good mobility ; and Det- 
ring, perhaps the swiftest of the backs and a powerful runner at 6-ft. 3 and 
195. 

About twenty Tiger lettermen are due to report for the Sept. 1 muster. 
Four of these were regulars on the offensive platoon in '52, and eight started 
for the defensive outfit. 

Washington and Lee University 

By Jack Carper 

Washington and Lee's football fortunes for 1953 rest largely upon a big, 
rugged line headed by Captain Bill McHenry, one of the South's finest centers, 
whose performances as a one-platoon footballer during the days of two- 
platoon drew the envy of a score of coaches. McHenry, a product of the 
rock 'em, sock 'em school, weighs 210, stands 6'3". 

Seasoned guards in Tom Fieldson, Jack Kibler, Hurdie Parsons, Don 
Weaver and rugged tackles in the persons of Bob Lafferty, Harold Brooks, 
Chuck Rauh and Jerry Murphy give the Generals what should be their finest 
line since the 1950 Southern Conference championship team. 

The big problem facing Coach Carl Wise is to uncover replacements 
for last year's terrific halfback duo, Wes Abrams and Randy Broyles, who 
finished 1-2 in Southern Conference rushing statistics. Joe Lindsey, who im- 
proved with each chance in '52, is back at quarterback, and Ciro Barcellona 
is a fullback returnee. The latter will be helped by two big, inexperienced 
men, Walt Degree and Dewey Oxner. 



Clemson College 

By Brent Breedin 

Clemson's football outlook for 1953 is questionable, for Coach Frank 
Howard's 50-man varsity squad includes the names of 30 rising sophomores. 
Barring injuries, however, to the starting eleven — ten of whom were either 
regulars on offense or defense last fall — the Tigers could surprise. 

Co-Captains Dreher Gaskin (end) and Nathan Gressette (tackle) are 
both double duty men and lead the starting team of lettermen Scott Jackson 
and Gaskin at the ends, Clyde White and Gressette at the tackles, Joe 
LaMontagne and Charlie Wyatt at the guards, Andy Smalls at center, Don 
King at quarterback, Kenneth Moore at right half, Buck George at left half 
and Red Whitten at fullback. 

Clemson, whose single wing teams of 1948 and 1950 went undefeated and 
were victorious in the Gator and Orange Bowls respectively and whose 1951 
eleven played in the 1952 Gator Bowl, will operate from the split-T offense 
this fall. The youthful Tigers appeared to catch on fast to the new system 
during 20 days of spring training. 

Gone from last year's Clemson team are 21 lettermen. On hand for 
another season are 19 players who have lettered. 

University of Georgia 

By Dan Magill, Jr. 

Wallace Butts, now the dean of Southeastern Conference head football 
coaches following the retirement of Gen. Bob Neyland at Tennesse?, believes 
his fifteenth Georgia team will be a "good club but hardly a championship 
contender." Defense has been the Bulldogs' weakness the past two sea ons 
and still appears to be the no. 1 problem. Simply no linebackers pre-ent. 

The Bulldogs also are depending much on three "if" boys: c:nter Der- 
went Langley, fullback Bob Clemens and end Gene White, who underwent 
knee operations since the close of last season and who missed spring prac- 
tice. They are question marks. 

Georgia again expects to be a colorful, passing team, with Captain Zek2 
Bratkowski back for his senior season at T-quarterback. Bratkowski has 
been responsible for the Bulldogs leading the Southeastern Conference in 
pass offense the past two seasons. He holds the SEC 10-game and 11-game 
passing records, and led the entire nation in yards gained passing in 1952 
with 1,824. 

Bratkowski's favorite receiver of last season, left end John Carson, is 
back for his senior year. Carson led the conference in passes caught (32) 
and vards gained on passes (467) last season. 

Two other spectacular Bulldogs are likely to be halfback Jimmy Cam- 
pagna, who led the conference last year in longest punt return (100 yards vs. 
Vanderbilt) and longest kickoff return (96 vs. Auburn), and right end Joe 
O'Malley, all-SEC defensive end last season. 

Georgia returns 20 lettermen, having lost 28. 

University of North Carolina 

By Jake Wade 

This is a year of transition in football in Chapel Hill. George Barclay is 
t'"e new head coach ?nd he has named new assistants in Marvin Bass, Bill 
Edwards, Steve Belichick and Dick Jamerson. Jim Gill remains on the staff, 
in charge of the frosh. 

There are 37 lettermen who are counting on better luck. Only six of 
the eight lettermen lost saw extensive action last season. End George Norris 



fullback Bud Wallace and tackle Tom Higgins will be missed most. 

Captain Ken Yarborough, tackle, and Marshall Newman, sophomore qb, 
are considered the squad's two top players. Flo Worrell is expected to be 
the most dangerous halfback. He is the fastest back on a squad not dis- 
tinguished for its speed. Ken Keller is a shifty soph back who may give 
the attack the spark it lacked last season. The squad abounds in able half- 
backs but none so far has been a really outstanding star. Larry Parker, Bob 
White, and Billy Williams are players of that stripe. 

Yarborough is the line's mainstay and much better play is counted on 
at the other tackle from big Francis Fredere. George Wallin is a sound 
fullback. 

Dick Kocornik, Dan Mainer, Will Frye, and Bill Baker make up a 
quartet of competent ends but must improve in pass receiving. There art- 
seven lettermen guards with Steve Marcinko and Ed Patterson the front run- 
ners. The pivot position should be taken care of capably with lettermen 
Bill Kirkman and soph Bill Koman chief candidates for the post. 

University of Miami 

Bj- George Gallet 

Any football team with a bona fide all-America candidate, plus some truly 
dangerous passing, excellent punting and a full quota of athletes, who have 
plenty of fighting spirit, is one which needs to be reckoned with when the 
men stand up to be counted. 

That's the situation at University of Miami today where Coach Andy 
Gustafson after fielding two successive bowl clubs, had his 1952 team col- 
lapse to a 4-7 season. 

Gustafson' s veterans failed to help him much in 1952, and the Miami 
coach used his freshmen extensively. He has 20 promising sophomores 
among his list of '53 candidates. 

This 1953 Miami team looms as no world beater; it is short handed in 
some positions, lacks a breakaway runner and may have insurmountable 
weaknesses at center and guard. 

However, Gustafson believes he has four of the best ends in college foot- 
ball in Frank McDonald, the all-America candidate; Bob Nolan, Jim LaRussa, 
and Tom Pepsin. 

Three good passers, Don James, Carl Garrigus, and John Melear can use 
the flankers as targets as the Hurricane quarterbacks. 

Sophomore backs, who saw little or no varsity action last fall, are fall- 
ing all over one another battling for attention, and from among Joe Cardinale, 
Whitey Rouviere, Jack Losch, Al Ciarrochi, Don Gilmore, John Siegel, and 
Nick Domnick, the Hurricanes may yet come up with the long ground gainer 
they have lacked. Gordon Malloy, shifted to fullback, seems read}' to hit 
stardom in that role. 

Miami will show improvement at tackle but loss of ten men at guard 
and center, most of them lettermen, poses a problem which the present ma- 
terial doesn't seem capable of solving. 

University of South Carolina 

By Don Barton 

The University of South Carolina will share many question marks and 
experiments with the other college football teams, as the Gamecocks adapt 
themselves to "one-platoon" football for 1953. 

Coach Rex Enright, beginning his 13th season at Carolina, will have 
25 lettermen available, but will miss 13 letter-winners, including All-South- 



ern Tackle Don Earley, End John Latorre and Halfback Norris Mullis. 

Leading the returning candidates will be Captain Gene Wilson, Co- 
Captain Clyde Bennett, Quarterback Johnny Gramling, Guard Frank Mince- 
vich, Center Leon Cunningham and Fullback Bill Wohrman. Bennett was 
the second leading pass receiver in the Southern Conference last year, and 
Gramling was fourth in pass completions. 

Wohrman appears to be ready for a good year of fullbacking and line- 
backing, while Wilson will furnish steadiness at the left halfback position. 
Finding a right halfback to go fulltime will be a minor headache, but Bob 
Korn, Carl Brazell or Buddy Morrell might furnish a cure. 

Bennett and Warren Clarke, a defensive regular last year, appear to have 
the inside track on the end positions and are the only returning lettermen on 
the flanks. Robert Brunson, now playing end, won a letter at center last 
season and could be a big help. 

Tackles Gene Kopec, Charlie Camp, Ned Brown, and Harry Lovell, a 
converted offensive guard, will battle for starting positions, while Mincevich, 
Ed Wilson, Marion Lee, Joe DeFore and Bob King, all lettermen, lead the 
candidates at guard. 

The center position should be in good hands, with Cunningham, who 
made everybody's All-Southern as a linebacker, and Hugh Bell. 

In general it appears that the Gamecocks will be a good football team. 

The George Washington University 

By Tom Beale 

Last year the George Washington University football team took on a 
new look. With a new head coach and an entirely different playing system, 
the Colonials racked up a season record of 6 wins, 2 losses, and I tie for its 
best showing since 1936. Spring practice showed us that the change back to 
one-platoon football will be a help because many of our players have played 
both offense and defense in previous years. 

Although we lost 10 men in last year's graduating class, we would like 
to point out that our two leading ground gainers were underclassmen and 
are still with us; fullback "Dutch" Danz is a junior and halfback Len 
Ciemniecki is just a sophomore. Co-captains Steve Korcheck and Dick Drake 
spark the forward wall with the able assistance of such seasoned veterans as 
Carl Bodolus, Bill Neal, John Prach, Tom Bosmans, and John Ziamandanis. 
Ray Fox has been shifted from quarterback to help Jack Daly and Pat Kober 
with end assignments. 

Coach "Bo" Sherman warns opponents not to be deceived by his young 
backfield. John Saffer and Bob Sturm, both of whom lettered in their fresh- 
man year, are handling quarterback chores. Veteran Richie Gaskell has been 
moved from end to bolster sophomores Ciemniecki, Lou Donofrio, and Dickie 
Phillips with halfback duties. 

All in all, twenty lettermen are returning with excellent supporting play- 
ers to pace the Colonials towards another successful season. 

University of Mississippi 

By Billy Gates 

No matter the chain of events developing as Mississippi strides into its 
!953 football campaign, one factor is paramount: if the Rebels are to make 
solid their grid imprint, 12 — a full dozen — sophomores are going to have to 
achieve maturity in a hurry. 

Coach Johnny Vaught used 30 performers in last November's 20-14 up- 



set of Maryland and 17 of these Rebs, 15 of them starters via two-platoon 
play, have moved on. In all, including i5 graduates. 2? of the 50 1952 let- 
termen have departed the Ole Miss campus. 

Only two members of last fall's touchdown unit, center Ed Beatty and 
fullback Harol Lofton, remain to furnish scoreboard statistics this term. 

The Rebs should produce a solid primary punch at the pivot and the two 
guard holes. They'll show with a flyaway ground attack. But it's an all- 
soph cast at left end and left tackle, an all-rookie crew in Jimmy Lear's 
quarterback role. And not one member of the tackle contingent has levied 
an offensive block in game action. 

Battle tested vets returning include end George Harris, tackle Henry- 
Linton, guards Crawford Mims, a prospective all-star ; Ray James, Blackie 
Jernigan and Dennis Ott; center Beatty, and backs Lofton, Jack Reed, who 
transfers to QB after two stints as the defensive deepback starter; Lea 
Paslay, Red Muirhead, Jim Patton and Pete Mangum. 

Important among the two-year olds are ends Bob Adams and Billy Yel- 
verton, tackles Dick Weiss and Dick Goehe, guard Archie Shepherd, quar- 
terbacks Houston Patton and Eagle Day, halfbacks Earl Blair, Billy Kinard 
and Bobby Childres, and fullbacks Bobby McCool and Johnny Williams. 

University of Alabama 

By Fin us Gaston 

A year ago Alabama's defense was tabbed with a big question mark but 
offense has moved into the doubtful spot as the number one problem for 
1953. Head Coach Harold "Red" Drew foresees an Alabama defense equal 
to that of last season and the offense below par. 

Coach Drew sized up his Alabama squad in this manner: 

ENDS — No Change — Losses are regulars Joe Curtis and Hyrle Ivy, 
both offensive experts. Bud Willis and Jerry Lambert, both lettermen and 
regular defensive ends should get number one jobs. 

TACKLES — No Change — Ed Culpepper heads six man letterman brigade 
which should keep position as strong as '52. 

GUARDS — Much Weaker — Hard hit even though only three lettermen 
departed, all-SEC and All-Southern Jerry Watfor and Fred Mims, offensive 
regulars, and Jess Richardson, defensive regular for three years, also miss- 
ing. Have three guard lettermen back in Bob Wilga, Charles Eckerly, and 
Jim Davis. Center Harry Lee shifted to guard to help strengthen position. 

CENTERS — Some Improvement — In better shape than a year ago with 
Ralph Carrigan, all-SEC linebacker for two years, John SnodeVly and Yince 
DeLaurentis back. 

QUARTERBACK— Much Weaker— Two top men gone in Clell Hobson 
and Bobby Wilson. Three sophs, Bart Starr, Albert Elmore and. Bob Miller 
and a defensive back. Buster Hill, expected to carry the load. 

LEFT HALFBACK— Stronger— No losses . . . j'uniors Bobbv Luna and 
Cecd Ingram in the top two jobs. Ingram was top safety man "in SEC, in- 
tercepting 10 passes. 

RIGHT HALFBACK — Weaker — Gone is the greatest runner in modern 
Alabama history, Bobby Marlovv. Junior Corky Tharp expected to fill 
Marlow's shoes. 

FULLBACK— Stronger— Losses are Bob Conwav and Bill Kilrov. Tom- 
my Lewis expected to have his best year. Classified bv Coach Drew as best 
fullback he has coached. 





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TERP THUMBNAIL SKETCHES 



ENDS 



MARTIN CRYTZER. 21. 6-0, 205, Senior from Brackenridge, Pa. — another brilliant 
player from Har-Brack High School, the same school that brought to Maryland their 
famous brother all-Americas, Ed and Dick Modzelewski, and Joe Horning, a junior half- 
back on the '53 team ... is tha lone end of proven expe. ience returning this fall 
has lettt'ed his scph and jurlior years as defensive end and linebacker . . _ will 
have to work on pass receiving, his high school specialty, but defensively he is sure to 
sparkle . . . likes it rough . . a sure tackier with a keen sense of pursuit . . : 
has close to an A average for three years in Pe- Dental SchooL 

JIM PARSONS, 24, 6-2, 185, Sophomore from Washington, D. C. — after a hitch in the 
Navy, Parsons came out to College Park last fall, and was moved right into the var- 
sity picture as a frosh . . . played enough to letter . . . used mostly on defense and 
gave an outstanding performance for a lookie . . . should be able to develop into a 
good receiver . . . will have to hustle and improve blocking to keep several up-coming 
sophs from pushing him out of picture. 

PAUL KRAMER, 19, 6-3, 210. Sophomore from Benwood, W. Va. — an outstanding pros- 
pect expected to help the critical non-experienced end situation . . . played last year 
as a frosh, but not enough to letter . . . had enough playing time however to prove 
his spoxl and blocking ability . . . hailed as a great receiver . . . caught 1 for 12 
yards last year ... an all-state West Virginia star. 

FRED HEFFNER. 21, 6-3, 210, Senior from Saxton, Pa. — a big brawny blonde who 
has lettered both years ... is a long distance punter used when quarterback Bernie 
Falone// is out of the game . . . had a S9.4 avg. for 15 kicks as a soph and a 39.8 
avg. for 11 punts last season . . . used exclusively as substitute offensive end . . . 
wit' have to work hard to improve defense in order to help at end this year . , . 
played in North-South High School all-Star game. 

BILL WALKER. 20. 6-0. 185. Sophomore from West Mifflin. Pa. — went to same high 
schrol as teammate George Albrecht, Munhall High . . . because of speed and rug- 
gedness, he was moved to end from halfback this spring and made the move look 
good ... a fine two-way player with good speed . . . fine blocker . . . could be one 
of starting ends 

TIMOTHY FLYNN. 19, 6-2, 195, Sophomore from Chevy Chase, Md a most out- 
standing end prospect is this rugged lad who prepped at St. John's in Washington . . . 
had a good frosh year and brought a few smiles from end coach Warren Giese in 
spring pracftice even though he played with a cast on his wrist . . . is sure to see 
■plenty of action . . . could easily win a starting job . . . fast, a good blocker, a 
good receiver, and a demon on defense . . . has possibilities to be Terp's rookie ot 
the year . : . high on Tatum's list . . . son of Hugh "Bingo" Flynn, former Presi- 
dent of Washington Touchdown Club. 

DON ESPY, 19, 6-3, 205, Sophomore from Brookville. Pa. — another fine rookie pros- 
pect who has all the tools to vie strongly for a front-line job; speed, size, aggressive- 
ness and desire . . . makes a great effort to catch passes . . . speed big asset 
. . . best on offense . . . fine blocker . . . will improve with experience. 
JOE PONZO. 20, 6-3, 205, Sophomore from Newark, N. J. — still another of the fine 
crop of rookie ends on hand to try to stem the loss of the Terp's four great ends. 
Alderton, Colteryahn, Weidensaul, and Nestor . . . had a good spring practice playing 
both ways ... a rugged boy who likes it rough ... a good pair of hands help him 
show well catching passes . . . fast and another fine blocking end ... he too should 
play a lot of ball this fall. 

RUSSELL DENNIS. 20, 6-3, 210, Sophomore from Norwalk. Conn. — another rugged 
newcomer who handles offensive and defensive duties capably ... a big strong boy 
who was impressive in spring drills . . . will be out to push for a regular job along 
with other rookies. 

TACKLES 

BOB "Blubber" MORGAN, 21, 6-0, 235, Senior from Freeport, Pa. — with a repeat pe-- 
formance of his outstanding play of last season, the Terp's Co-Captain will be a strong 
candidate for all-America honors . . . drew endless praise from opposing players and 
coaches after each game and played on equal terms with the Terps' all-America tackle 
Dick "Little Mo'' Modzelewski practically every game . . . will be the main defensive 
hope for Tatum since he made his mark as a soph breaking up opponent's plays and 
making spectacular tack'es . . . quick as a cat and has a tremendously fast charge 
. . . strong as the "Rock of Gibraltar" — has had enough experience on offense to in- 
sure a brilliant performance . . . because of his great ability and experience he is sure 

— 28 — 



to be a durable "60-minute'' performer this fall . . . should be one of nation's finest 
. . . his play was so noticeable that he was drafted by the Los Angeles Rams Profes- 
sional team last spring. 

STANLEY JONES, 21, 6-0, 245, Senior from Lemoyne, Pa — what we have noted above 
about Morgan's defensive work, can easily be applied to Jones and his great past 
playing offense . . . then this spring Jones was most outstanding in taking over his 
defensive duties . . . the biggest and strongest player on the team, Jones too, teaming 
with Morgan, will be a strong candidate for national honors . . . they will give limited 
substitution football two of its greatest tackles . . . Jones has been big factor for suc- 
cess of Maryland offense the past two years ... is nothing to see him move his man 
back into the secondary ... a very outstanding blocker and defensively he left little 
to be desired this spring ... he has such natural football ability, Tatum isn't worried 
that he won't excel as a "60-minute" man . . . selected to the All-Players All- America 
honorable mention team . . led the voting for offensive tackles in Southern Conference 
Sports' Writers all-Conference first team balloting . . . greatness recognized when 
d afted as a junior by the Chicago Bears . . . Was State discus champ in high school. 
TOM BREUNICH, 21, 6-2, 210, Junior from Pelham, N. Y. — did a great job last year 
as the other offensive tackle, as a soph . . . has tremendous desire . . . one of the 
best blockers to appear in Terp uniform for many seasons . . . strong with a vicious 
charge . . . had a fine spring session on defense and should offer an outstanding 
"thi d" at the tackle position with Morgan and Jones. 

ED O'CONNOR, 24, 6-3i, 220, Senior from Yonkers, N. Y. — shcAjJd complete the exper- 
ienced "foursome" at the tackle posts . . . was a most adequate substitute last seas- 
on both on offense and defense . . . big and rugged on the field . . . fine blocker 
. will be counted en heavily to insure four good experienced tackles . . . married 
last August. 

DICK SHIPLEY, 21, 5-10, 230, Junior from Frederick, Md. — gained a lot of valuable 
expedience last fall playing both ways as a substitute . . . likes defense and likeness 
showed up in his play ... a fine tackier . . . hard to get by . . . offensively, a good 
blocker aided by great strength which helps move his defensive man out of the play 
. . . could make it tough to keep him from playing a great deal of football . . . had 
good spring practice. 

AL WHARTON, 19, 6-1, 220, Sophomore from Sewickley, Pa. — Picked by the staff as 
the outstanding soph lineman prospect . . . the highly touted red head got off to a 
discouraging start with the frosh when he dislocated his shoulder . . . came spring 
practice and Wharton was making himself look like an old pro . . . has exceptional 
speed giving him that very important quick charge on offense . . . quick as a cat; hard 
to confuse . . . grdat blocker . . . defensively, like a rock . . . should be a tre- 
mendous asset to bolster the tackle position. 

JIM RYAN, 18, 6-2, 240, Sophomore from Barking, Pa. — If this big boy can come 
through as hoped, the all-important tackle spot will be the brightest of all . . . has 
great possibilities . . . with his physical ability, needs experience and confidence . . . 
showed well both ways in the spring ... a vicious tackier when he gets serious and 
he can move them out with his 240 pounds. 

JOHN UZICK, 19, 6-3, 215, Sophomore from Tuscarora, Pa. — Another big soph tackle 
who could be a big help both ways this fall . . . was outstanding as a frosh and had 
a commendable spring practice . . . tough on defense . . . needs offensive experience. 
BILL VENTER, 20, 6-3, 225, Sophomore from New Kensington, Pa — Another big tackle 
who will be in there with a 50-50 chance of playing a lot of ball this fall . . . held 
out last year for experience, which helped a lot . . . has great physical ability . . . 
needs more determination . . . could sneak in to become a strong contender, offensively 
and defensively. 

STANLEY POLYANSKI, 19, 6-3, 215, Sophomore from Baltimore, Md. — another of those 
sophomore hopefuls Tatum has available . . . impressive as a frosh and in spring ball 
. . . has plenty of physical ability and only after more football! savvy will be become 
a serious contender for a top spot on the team . . . hustle, with desire and determina- 
tion will help. 

GUARDS 

HERB HOFFMAN, 21, 6-0, 200, Junior from Hartford, Conn With the loss of all four 

first string guards, Hoffman, with a great soph year behind him, becomes the out- 
standing guard candidate for the Terps ... he should be one of the better linemen 
i . .played both ways as a soph, so new rule will be nothing new for one of the 
nicest guys on the team but one of the toughest . . . likes it rough and has patented 
the phrase, "let's be lean and mean!" . . . excels on defense ... is sure to handle 
offense adequately . . . fine speed and good blocker . . . will be worth watching. 
GEORGE PALAHUNIK, 22, 6-1, 200, Junior from McKees Rocks, Pa. — should be the 
other guard with Hoffman . . . got a world of experience as soph second stringer with 

— 29 — 



Hoffman ... a hard worker with tremendous desire to accompany his aggressiveness 

. . has good charge ... a sound, well-knit football player . : . has fine attitude. 
JACK BOWERSOX, 20, 6-1, 205, Junior from Westminster, Md. — a great prospect last 
year ... was being groomed for all-America Bob Ward's job . . . piayed about a 
minute in opening game against Missouri then got yellow jaundice which kept him out 
of school . . . returned this spring and took up where he left off . . . still a great 
prospect and intends to be in the starting lineup ... is exceptionally fast and possess- 
es a quick charge and follow through on his blocking . . . good defensively . _ . 
has plenty of football skill. 

TOM McLUCKIE, 21, 5-11, 215, Junior from Midand, Mich. — enjoyed a good soph year 
as substitute both on offense and defense so big Tom is well equipped for '53 brand of 
football . . . defense is his specialty . . . doesn't like to give an inch . . . smart ball 
player . . . will go all out for a number one job and could get it ... an all-State center. 
LYNN SZAFRANSKI, 20, 6-0, 210, Sophomore from Carnegie, Pa. — a rough and tough 
lad held out last season for experience . . . could be one of top linemen once he realized 
he has everything it takes to move right in and take ove.- . . . has great potential . . . 
. . . needs to buck.e down and gain some cunhdence . . . was All-Catholic in Western 
Pennsylvania. 

BOB PELLEGRINI, 18, 6-2, 215, Sophomore from Yatesboro, Pa. — VIC GILONA, ZO, 6-0, 
220, Sophomore from White Plains, N. Y. ; and HAL TRAY, 19, 6-0, 210, Sophomore 
from Baltimore, Md., are three rookies who could play a lot of ball as reserves. PELLE- 
GRINI, a high school quarterback, has shown a lot of "two-way" football to the staff 
and is a go^d bet to give the veterans fits for their job. 

CENTERS 

JOHN IRVINE, 21, 6-2, 210, Junior from Evans City, Pa. — should be the number one 
team center . . . was Tom Cosgrove's relief man last year as a soph and made an 
indelible impression . . . took over the job at beginning of spring practice and refused 
to relinquish it to crop of good cente.s . . . fast and a good blocker . . . does fine jJb 
downfield . . . from his defensive efforts exhibited during spring practice, he should 
handle one of the linebacking jobs adequately. 

CHARLIE LATTIMER. 23, 6-2, 220. Senior from Cumberland, Md. — has had two fine 
years specializing on defense as a linebacker . . . used last year to center on extra 
points . . . got plenty of offensive chores in spring ball so is well equipped to t.y to 
move Irvine out . . . big and tough and likes it rough. ' 

DON BROUGHER, 21, 6-2, 210, Junior from Edgewood, Pa. — expected by many to be 
main candidate for the job after falL practice gets into full swing . . . needs more de- 
fensive experience . . . does an outstanding job offensively . . . considered one of team's 
best blockers . . . good physique and fine attitude. 

FRED TULLAI. 22, 6-0. 200, Sophomore from Essington, Pa.; and AUGIE WAIBEL, 19, 
6-1. 200. Sophomore from Baltimore. Md. are two very promising sophs who have 
shown well both offensively and defensively. Tullai is a veteran ; Waibel lettered in la- 
crosse as a frosh. 

QUARTERBACKS 

BERNIE FALONEY, 21, 6-0, 185, Senior from East Carnegie, Pa. — If the.e ever was a 
"triple threat ' quarterback, experienced, and if there is going to be one in the foot- 
ball campaign of 1953. it surely will be the 'i'erps' Bernie Faloney, team Co-Captain . . . 
the smooth operating husky, with the new rule, brings back to football that old typo 
player who can RUN, PASS, AND KICK ... he does all this, and does it well, besides 
being the fiejd general ... he is a real 60-minute triple threater, seemingly a must 
for an all-America qb this season . . . defensively, Maryland doesn't have to worry 
about Faloney since he has been first string defensive right halfback for the past two 
years .... he was named to the all-Conference defensive second team last year . . 
over this span, he has been the leading pass interceptor . . . also, the "nifty" quarter- 
back has been the team's leading punter, averaging 40 yards per kick for the two year 
pe iod . . . Faloney was the number two qb for the Terps for two years and there was 
no doubt as to who would inherit the job from all-America signal caller Jack Scarbath 
. . . Falcney's best ability as a Split-T qb is his running ability . . . when he goes 
back to pass, he is a real double threat for if he gets trapped, he gets in high gear 
running and with the defense spread from the pass play commitment, he really can 
take off ... if able to get the ball off to one of his ends or haLfbacks, you can be sure 
of its accu acy for that is one of his assets, a very accurate passer ... he has a great 
"jump pass" — and it can be thrown whether standing still in his pocket or if he is 
running full speed, either to his left or to his right . . . one might call Faloney a 
reckless ball carrier for come hell or high water, he is going to get yardage when he 
runs ... he plays with reckless abandon . . . rushed 29 times for a 2 yard avg. . : : 
passed 28 times for 11 completions, for 176 yards and one td . . . had 8 punt returns 

— 30 — 



for 13.6 avg. . . led interceptors with 3 and 90 yd. return . . . barring any physical 
unpleasantries, Faloney could be one of the nation's finest two-way quarterbacks. 
LYNN BEIGHTOL, 19, 6-0, 185, Sophomore from Cumberland, Md. — Although not ex- 
actly a newcomer, Beightol will be a soph ... the highly sought after qb, a pre-dental 
student, stayed out of football last season to concentrate on his studies . . . used en- 
ough as a frosh to letter and get a good baptism of the Split-T and varsity competition 
. . . definitely in line to become a great signal caller . . following a superb spring 
practice, Beightol has shown he is about ready for the big 'leagues . . . will undoubtedly 
be the second and fourth quarter qb, if such sequence is used by the Terps . . an 
outstanding passer and smart signal caller . . . experience will be his best contributor 
to his running game . . . has exceptional natural ability . . completed 5 out of 6 
passes in Varsity-Alumni game ... has had plenty of defensive duty and is no slouch 
as a defender . . . his value further realized since he is an excellent punter . . . still 
young, 19 . . . good f.ame for qb . . . worth watching ... all state qb for 2 years 
at Fort Hill High . . . player of year award for 2 years . . won track and basketball 
letters. 

CHARLEY BOXOLD, 21, 5-11, 185, Junior from Providence, R. I. — has Junior status 
although not in action but a couple of minutes in '52 season . . rushed once in open- 
ing Missouri game then broke his leg in practice the next week 'and was out the rest 
of season ... a fine qb prospect who should offer valuable insurance to the qb situa- 
tion . . . has fine speed and accurate passer . . . has good attitude with tremendous 
desire to play. 

FRANK BARTKO, 20, 5-11, 185, Sophomore from Renton, Pa. — held out last season for 
experience and maturity ... his value is his passing ability . . . has a good footbaU 
head ... a bit slow a-foot . . , should fit into the picture to give some help this fall. 
BILL AMOS, 19, 6-1, 185, Sophomore from Washington, Pa. — son of one of football's 
most famous centers, Bill Amos, Sr., all-America at his home town school, Washington 
and Jefferson College ... a big rugged boy with every faculty to become a great 
Split-T general . . . fits the new system since he is a fine defensive back . . . good 
passer and runner ... led the frosh to a fine season last year ... if injury which kept 
him out of spring ball doesn't return, he could be big addition to qb assignment, 

HALFBACKS 



CHESTER HANULAK, 21, 5-10, 165, Senior from Hackensack, N.J. — Halfback "Hanulak 
from Hackensack! . . . this phrase was read and heard in many quarters last year and 
in 1951 as the Terps' outstanding swiftie from Hackensack was running wild for the 
Red Shirts . . . the squatty Hanulak puts on a great show with his running . . . 
shows a peculiar hip movement which characterizes his elusiveness . . . very hard to 
catch, let alone tackle . . . has a great burst of speed once daylight comes beyond the 
line of scrimmage . . . the 5-10, 165-pound flash was the Terps' leading scorer and 
leading ground gainer last season, scoring 6 tds and had a rushing average of 6.3 
with 491 yds. for 78 carries ... he tossed 7 aerials and completed 3 for 40 yards and 
one td . . . Tatum also used his speed as his main kickoff return man . . . Hanulak 
ran back six for 118 yards ... he also was third best pass receiver, behind ends 
Colteryahn and Weidensaul, with 7 receptions for 135 yards and 1 td . . . the Hacken- 
sack streak gave notice that he would be one of the Terps' future star's when playing 
number 2 man as a soph ... he had a phenomenal 8.6 rushing average as he gathered 
300 yards in 35 carries and scored 5 tds his soph year . . . Hanulak also is a fine 
passer and will be a bigger threat there this year ... he could be one of the nation's 
best, for playing both ways, he is sure to be a standout on defense ... in fact, he 
took to defense so well, that after nine practices, Tatum left him go with the 
baseball team full time ... he was the team's second leading hitter, .371; led the 
team in rbi's with 20, and led in stolen bases with 14 . . . was All-Conference . . . 
His great speed is his biggest asset on defense, plus his quick reactions an1 
football savvy ... he undoubtedly will get the call at safety . . . many top flight 
coaches, visiting Maryland's early spring practice, said Hanulak was one of the most 
outstanding halfbacks they had seen . . . was second team All-Conference last year 
. . . Hanulak could and should have a big year and could sneak in there for real high 
national honors . 

DICK NOLAN, 22, 6-1, 185, Senior from White Plains, N.Y "Crazy legs" Nolan as 

his teammates call him gets his big break for offensive duty this fall after 
starring for two years as a defensive halfback ... he has the right half spot sewed up 
and intends to keep it from his keen competitors . . . always has been an offensive 
threat but was most valuable in the secondary . . . second leading punt return player 
on the team with 11 for 102 yards and a 9.3 average . . . tiejd with Hanulak for lead- 
ership 1 in kickoff return department with 6 for 180 yards for a 30.0 avg. . . . tied all- 
time Maryland record for longest kick-off return when he scampered 90 yards' for a td 
against Mississippi . . . intercepted 3 aerials for 13 yard return . . . completed only 

— 31 — 



pass he threw for 14 yards . . . one cf fastest men on team . _ . a real natural for 
one-platoon football. 

RONNIE WALLER, 20, 5-11, 175, Junior from Laurel, Del. — Could sneak in as the 
"dark horse" star for the Terps . . . one of the best looking running halfbacks to hit 
the Maryland camp . . . showed flashes of brillliance as a soph last year in seeing not 
a great deal of action behind Hanulak . .. with the new substitution rule, he undoubt- 
edly will get tried more seriously . . . rushed 30 times for a 4.3 avg. and had several 
long runs called back . . . caught 4 passes for 20 yards . . . ieturned 3 punts for 13 
yard return . . . brought back 3 kickoffs for 72 yards and a 24 yard avg. . . _ Waller 
is built for his specialty, speed . . . can do the 100 in 10 flat . . . the youngster from 
the Eastern Shore was named the outstanding athlete of the state in his senior year 
in high school . . .Waller brings back to football that old-fashioned weapon not seen 
too much today, the straight-arm ... he uses it very effectively, too . . . once beyond 
the line of scrimmage, he becomes more dangerous . . . does a good job of throwing 
the running pass, and is a good receiver . . . had a great spring practice . . . looked 
ve^y good as defensive halfback so no worry there, either . . . bears watching. 
JOE HORNING. 20, 5-10, 165, Junior from Natrona Heights, Pa. — Little jovial Joe, 
durable as they come . . . smallest man on the team but the fastest . . . this name 
becoming popular in football circles since breaking in as a frosh and has played offense 
and defense in great style both years . . . was regular safety man both years although 
he suffered a case of sophomoritis, dropping a number of punts and kickoffs . . . still 
led the team in punt returns with 15 for 61 yards . . . brought back 3 kickoffs for 77 
yards . . . intercepted 2 aerials with 57 yard return . . . rushed 6 times for 33 yards 
and a 5.5 avg. . . . led the team in pass interceptions his frosh yeaf with 6 . . . 
brought one back 100 yards against Missouri to set a new Maryland record . . . with 
his exceptional speed he is a big threat since he is a real tricky ball carrier . . . has 
plenty of "guts" . . . great desire and a sure-fire proven two-way back . . . one of 
the most "wiry" little kids seen on the gridiron . . . one to watch carefully . . . 
another fine two-way ace in Tatum's backfield. 

ED VEREB, 19, 6-0, 185, Sophomore from Pittsburgh, Pa. — A very outstanding halfback 
prospect ... he is far ahead of the field, both offensively and defensively, of all the 
upcoming frosh ... a big boy with great speed and an abundance of stamina . . . 
never wants to quit . . . keeps churning his legs like pistons and loves to butt over 
would be tacklers, and does . . . hard to bring down . . : a dangerous threat with the 
running pass . . . also a good receiver . . . did a real efficient job on defense in spring 
practice . . . should see a lot of action . . . was the big gun on Pittsburgh's Central 
Catholic eleven for three years . . . very fast . . . quiet and serious. 

TOM SELEP, 18, 6-1, 190, Sophomore from California, Pa. — Another real honey of a 
halfback . . . gives Tatum's backfield more of that important depth and speed and 
sureness of a good halfback when needed now with limited substitution . . . could be 
used as one of his "spot" halfbacks to be used at opportune time both offensively and 
defensively . . . hard runner with good speed and tremendous desire ... a real "two- 
way" football player. 

TOM SCHLOEMER, 20, 5-11, 165, Sophomore from Chappaqua, N.Y. — Was brought up 
from the frosh team in mid-season last year ... a good one-platoon player . . . excels 
offensively . . . throws a fine pass . . . biggest asset is speed which will surely be 
utilized this fall. 

DICK BURGEE, 21, 5-10, 130, Sophomore from Frederick, Md., and JOHN MERRICKS, 
21, 5-11, 195, Sophomore from College Park, Md. — Two backs who could lend adequate 
service after they gain some much needed experience. 

FULLBACKS 

RALPH FELTON, 21, 5-10, 195, Senior from Midway, Pa. — In 1951, when Coach Tatum 
saw that he had to move Ed "Big Mo" Modzelewski to fullback, he was left without 
a right halfback. Tatum had a big rugged kid coming up from the freshman team 
named Ralph Felton . . . only a couple of performances in spring practice were needed 
to convince Tatum and staff that they had found a good halfback . . . come the first 
game in September, '51, Felton started the ball game and since then has been number 
one right halfback and had to be used at fullback last year when Ed Fullerton was 
injured . . . Felton, the "Midway Express" made their selection stand as he was second 
only to Big Mo in rushing his soph year ... he averaged 5.8 yards in 83 carries 
... in the North Carolina State contest, lie rushed for 186 yards in 13 carries for 14.3 
yards . . last season, Felton again was a shoo in for the right halfback spot. He 
averaged 4 yards per carry getting 314 yards in 80 carries . . . scored 4 tds . . . when 
Fullerton was injured in the LSU games, Felton was called on to take over the fullback 
job for the remainder of the season ... his performances sewed up the job for him 
this fall . . . Rugged Ralph is a great blocker; undoubtedly the most vicious blocker 
we have in the backfield and is a real hard runner ... he is very fast and hard to 
bring down ... in spring practice, he was unstoppable . . . defensively Felton looked 
equally outstanding as he was with his offensive chores ... he has been playing as a 
linebacker and about that Coach Tatum says: "never saw anything like it." . . . Felton, 

— 32 — 



being so strong, really cracks the ball carrier . . . his performance all spring and 
finally in the Varstiy-Alumni game, was most encouraging. He played brilliantly . . . 
will be one of the best. 

DICK BIELSKI, 20, 6-0, 200, Junior from Baltimore, Md Big hope that this terrific 

potential will materialize this fall is uppermost in the minds of the Terp staff . . . 
has-n't come up to full expectations yet but the services of this big strong boy are badly 
needed . . . looked as though he had finally found himself in the Georgia game last year 
whcji he bulled his way through the Bul.dogs for 67 yards in 9 carries, but had 
trouble next time out . . . has potential to be a great fullback . . . improvement 
needed in speed and blocking . . . rushed 28 times for 135 yards 'and a 5.5 avg. 
... if he comes through, fullback spot will be in good shipe . . . all-State his senior 
year at Patterson Park . . married and has a son. 

GEORGE ALBRECHT, 22. 5-11, 185, Junior from Terrace, Pa. — Lettered last season as 
a fine substitute defensive halfback . . . looked so good this spring offensively that he 
was moved to fullback to help ease that critical spot . . . did a fine job , . . a 
hard runner with great speed . . . has great desire to be number one behind Felton. 
JIM SKARDA, 19, 6-1, 190, Sophomore from Baltimore, Md. — A big-bone toughie who 
has shown plenty of stuff ... a powerful runner who wants to play ball, a good omen 
for a sophomore . . . also good defensively. 



TERPS IN POST-SEASON ALL-STAR GAMES 

1952 - '53 



NORTH - SOUTH SHRINE GAME 
Orange Bowl Stadium, Miami, Fla. 
Christmas Night 
Jack Scarbath, Quarterback (Voted South's Most Valuable Player) 
Dick "Little Mo" Modzelewski, Tackle (Co-Captain) 
Ed Fullerton, Halfback 
John Alderton, End 
Tom Cojgrove, Center (Co-Captain) 

BLUE - GRAY GAME 
Montgomery, Alabama 
Dec. 27, 1952 
Lloyd Cclteryahn, End (Co-Captain) 

SENIOR BOWL GAME 
Ladd Memorial Stadium, Mobile, Ala. 
January 3, 1953 
Jack Scarbath, Quarterback (Captain) 
Dick "Little Mo" Modzelewski, Tackle 
Lloyd Colteryahn, End 
Tom Cosgrove, Center 

CHICAGO TRIBUNE ALL-STAR GAME 
Soldier's Field, Chicago, III. 
August 14, 1953 
Jack Scarbath, Quarterback 
Dick "Little Mo" Modzelewski, Tackle 
Tom Cosgrove, Center 
Uohn Alderton, End 
Ed Fuilerton, Halfback 
(These 5 Terp players represent more than played from any other school) 



TERP ALL-AMERICA PLAYERS 

1949 — Ray Krouse, Tackle Second Team 

1950 — Bob Ward, Guard First Team 

1951 — Bob Ward, Guard First Team 

Ed "Big Mo" Modzelewski, Fullback First Team 

Dick "Little Mo" Modzelewski, Tackle 1 First Team; Most 

Second Teams 
1952 — Jack Scarbath, Quarterback First Team 

Dick "Little Mo" Modzelewski, Tackle First Team 

Tom Cosgrove, Center Second Team 



TERPS ON HONORARY SELECTIONS, 1952 

JACK SCARBATH, Quarterback — Unanimous All-America; Runnerup to 
Billy Vessles for Heisman Memorial Trophy as nation's outstanding foot- 
ball player; COLLIER'S Magazine "Back of the Year"; third high vote 
getter in Associated Press "Back of Year"; second high vote getter in 
United Press "Player of Year"; SPORT Magazine's "Sportsman of the 
Year"; unanimous All-South; All-Southern Conference; Southern Con- 
ference "Player of the Year"; voted "South's Most Valuable Player" in 
annual North-South Shrine Game at Miami, Fla. 

DICK "Little Mo" MODZELEWSKI, Tackle— Unanimous All-America; 
received LOOK Magazine's John B. Outland Memorial Trophy as the 
"outstanding lineman of the year" selected by Grantland Rice and Foot- 
ball Writer's Association of America; awarded the Washington Touch- 
down Club's Knute Rockne Trophy as the "outstanding college lineman"; 
second highest vote getter in United Press All-America, top lineman; 
second highest vote getter in THE SPORTING NEWS' All-America, top 
lineman; fourth top vote getter in Associated Press "Lineman of Year" 
balloting; unanimous All-South; unanimous All-Southern Conference. 

TOM COSGROVE Center — All-Player's All-America Second Team; All- 
Southern Conference Second Team; All-Players All-South, Second Team. 

JOHN ALDERTON, End— All-Southern Conference First Team; All- 
Player's All South First Team. 

ED FULLERTON, Halfback— All-Southern Conference First Team. 

BILL MALETZKY, Guard — All-Southern Conference Second Team; 
United Press All-Conference Second Team. 

FRANK NAVARRO, Guard — All-Southern Conference Second Team. 

*STANLEY JONES, Tackle — All-Players All-America Honorable Men- 
tion; All-Southern Conference First Team; All-Players All-South Second 
Team. 

-BERN IE FALONEY, Halfback — All-Southern Conference Second Team. 

^CHESTER HANULAK, Halfback — All-Southern Conference Second 
Team. 

^Returning to 1953 Team. 



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THEY COVER THE TERPS 

MAX FULLERTON, The Associated Press 

GEORGE BOWEN, The Associated Press 

BOB McHUGH, The Associated Press 

HERB FOSTER, The United Press 

ERNIE BARCELLA, The United Press 

BOB SEALING, The United Press 

EV GARDNER, Sports Editor, The Daily News 

DAVE SLATTERY, Sports Department, The Daily News 

DAVE REQUE, Sports Department, The Daily News 

CHUCK EGAN, Sports Editor, Th e Evening Star 

FRANCIS STANN, Sports Columnist, The Evening Star 

MERRELL WHITTLESEY, Sports Department, The Evening Star 

GEORGE HUBER, Sports Department, The Evening Star 

BUS HAM, Sports Editor, The Post 

SHIRLEY POVICH, Sports Columnist, The Post 

HERMAN BLACKMAN, Sports Department, The Post 

HERB HEFT, Sports Department, Th e Post 

MARTI E ZADRAVEC, Sports Department, The Post 

CHARLIE BARBOUR, Sports Editor, The Times-Herald 

GARRETT WATERS, P. M. Sports Editor, The Times-Herald 

BOB ADDIE, Sports Columnist, The Times Herald 

MAURY FITZGERALD, Sports Department, The Time:-Herald 

DICK O'BRIEN, Sports Department, The Times-Herald 

PAUL MENTON, Sports Editor, The Evening Sun 

RANDALL CASSELL, Sports Department, The Evening Sun 

WALTER TAYLOR, Sports Department, The Evening Sun 

JESSE LINTHICUM, Sports Editor, The Morning Sun 

LOU HATTER, Sports Department, The Morning Sun 

RONALD A. GIBBS, Sports Columnist, The Morning Sun 

RODGER PIPPEN, Sports Editor, The News-Po.t 

NORMAN P. CLARK, Sports Department, The News-Post 

HUGH TRADER, Sports Columnist, The News-Post 

J. SUTER KEGG, Sports Editor, The Evening Times, Cumberland, Md. 

C. V. BURNS, Sports Editor, The Morning New.-, Cumberland, Md. 

FRANK COLLEY, Sports Editor, The Herald, Hagerstown, Md. 

DICK KELLY, Sports Editor, The Mail, Hagerstown, Md. 

ED NICHOLS, Sports Editor, The Times, Salisbury, Md. 

HENRY DECKER, Sports Editor, The Post, Frederick, Md. 

HYMY COHEN, Sports Editor, The Evening Capital, Annapolis, Md. 



RADIO and TELEVISION 



WASHINGTON 
P^b Wolff and Ray Morgan, WWDC 
Steve Douglas, Dutch Betgmann, WRC 
Ray Michaels, WRC, WNBW-TV 
J mmy Gibbons. WMAL and WMAL-TV 
Arch McDonald, WTOP 
Nat Allbright, WEAM 
Sam Kaufman, WOL 
Jim Simpson, WTTG-TV 
Morris Siegel, WTOP, radio and TV 
Bill Malone, WMAL 



BALTIMORE 

Roger Griswold, WCAO 

Chuck Thompson, WITH 

Nelson Baker, WFBR 

Bailey Goss, WBAL 

Jchn McLean. WCBM 

Bailey Goss and Nat Thomas, WMAR-TV 

Nick Campofreda. WAAM-TV 

Joe Crogan, WBAL-TV 

Ralph Penniwell, WWIN 



1952 HIGHLIGHTS 

LONGEST RUSH FROM SCRIMMAGE: 

Chester Hanulak — 43 yards against Clemson 
LONGEST PASS COMPLETION: 

Jack Scarbath to Lou Weidensaul — 50 yards against Clemson 
MOST PASSES CAUGHT IN ONE GAME: 

Lloyd Colteryahn — 8 for 131 yards against Alabama 
MOST PASSES THROWN ONE GAME: 

•Jack Scarbath — 18 with 11 completions for 181 yards and 3 TDs, 

against LSU 
MOST PASSES COMPLETED ONE GAME: 

(%) Jack Scarbath: 7 for 9 against Clemson; 5 for 6 against 
Georgia; 11 for 18 against. LSU; 8 for 12 against Boston U.: 
10 for 16 against Alabama. 
LONGEST KICK-OFF RETURN: 

Dick Nolan — SO yards and TD against Mississippi to tie all-time 

Maryland record. 
LONGEST PUNT RETURN: 

Bernie Faloney — 24 yards against Georgia. 
LONGEST PUNT: 

Bernie Faloney — 53 yards against LSU. 
LOW NET GAIN IN ONE GAME: (Rushing) 

95 yards against Mississippi. 
HIGH NET GAIN IN ONE GAME: (Rushing) 

340 yards against Georgia. 
LEAST PASSING YARDAGE IN ONE GAME: 

33 yards against Mississippi. 
MOST PASSING YARDAGE IN ONE GAME: 

241 yards against Navy. 
LONGEST INTERCEPTION RETURN: 

Bernie Faloney — 74 yards against LSU. 
MOST TOUCHDOWNS SCORED IN ONE GAME: 

5 — against Georgia, Navy, LSU, and Boston U. 
MOST POINTS SCORED: 

Chester Hanulak — 36 points. 





BYRD STADSUM 



HOME OF THE TERRAPINS 
Capacity: 35,000 

— 37 — 



1952 TEAM STATISTICS 

MARYLAND OPPONENTS 

First Downs 167 38 

Rushing 105 53 

Passing 52 33 

Penalties 10 2 

Total Yards Rushing 2442 1330 

Yards Lost Rushing 363 277 

Net Yards Rushing 2079 1053 

Forward Passes Attempted 155 130 

Forward Passes Completed 77 52 

Net Yards Passing 1316 755 

Forwards Intercepted By 14 9 

Yards Interceptions Returned 194 125 

Total Yards Gained — Rushing and Passing 3395 1808 

Total Number Punts 40 67 

Punting Average 40.4 40.6 

Punts Blocked By 2 1 

Number Kickoff Returns 22 34 

Yardage Kickoff Returns 539 624 

Avg. Kickoff Return 24 5 18.3 

Number Penalties 54 40 

Yards Penalized 424 38L 

Fumbles 39 25 

Own Fumbles Recovered 22 10 

Touchdowns 31 12 

Extra Points Attempted 31 12 

Extra Points Made 26 10 

Fie'd Goals 2 

TOTAL POINTS SCORED ~218 ~85~ 



1S53 Schedule 

Sept. 19 Missouri at Columbia, Mo. ($3.63) 
Sept. 26 Washington and Lee 

at College Park. Md. ($3 75) 
Oct. 3 Clemson at Clemson, S. C. ($3.50) 
Oct. 10 Georgia at College Park, Md. ($3.75) 
Oct. 17 North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 

N. C. ($3.50) 
Oct. 23 Miami (Fla.) at Miami, Fla. ($400) 
Oct. 31 Scuth Carolina at College 

Park, Md. ($3.75) 
Nov. 7 George Washington at 

Griffith Stadium ($3.50) 
Nov. 14 Mississippi at College Park, 

Md. ($3.75) 
Nov. 21 Alabama at College Park, Md. ($3.75) 

Heme Games Begin at 2 P. M. (E.S.T.) 

W & L game begins at 2 P. M. (E.D.T.) 
SEASON TICKET PRICE (5 Games) $18.75 
For Ticket Information: 

Write: Ticket Office 

Box 295. College Park, Md. 

Call: WArfield: 7-2807 

— 38 — 



1952 Results 



13 


Missouri 


10 


13 


Auburn 


7 


28 


Clemson 


C 


37 


Georgia 





38 


Navy 


7 


34 


LSU 


6 


34 


Boston U. 


7 


14 


Mississippi 


21 


7 


Alabama 


27 


218 




85 



MARYLANDS 
BOWL RECORD 

1948 'Gator Bowl 
20 Georgia 20 
1950 'Gator Bowl 

20 Missouri 7 
1952 Sugar Bowl 
28 Tennessee 13 



1952 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS 



RUSHING 

Carries 

*Scarbath, Jack— qb 102 

Felton, Ralph— hb 80 

Hanulak, Chester — hb 78 

*Fullerton, Ed— fb 51 

Faloney, Bernie — qb 29 

Eielski, Dick— fb 28 

*Liebold, Leland— hb 33 

Waller, Ronnie— hb — — 30 

*Barritt, Ed— fb 26 

*Laughery, Bob — fb — 12 

*DeStefano, Bob — qb 7 

Horning, Joe — hb 6 

*Colteryahn, Lloyd — e 2 

Boxold, Charles— hb 1 

PASSING 

No. 
Att. 

*Scarbath, Jack — qb 113 

Faloney, Bernie — qb 28 

Hanulak, Chester — hb 7 

*Liebold, Leland— hb 3 

*DeStefano, Bob — qb 2 

*Colteryahn, Lloyd — e 1 

Nolan, Dick — hb 1 



Net Gain 


Avg. 




237 




2.3 




314 




39 




491 




6.3 




296 




58 




58 




20 




135 




4.8 




182 




5.5 




130 




43 




120 




4.6 




58 




48 




25 




3.6 




33 




5.5 




7 




3.5 




-3 




-3.0 


No. 


Had 


Net 


For 


Comp. 


Int. 


Gain 


TD's 


59 


5 


1149 


10 


11 


3 


176 


1 


3 





40 


1 


2 





15 








1 








1 





22 


1 



14 



TOTAL OFFENSE 

Total Plays 

*Scarbath, Jack — qb 215 

Hanulak, Chester — hb 85 

Faloney, Bernie — qb 57 

*Liebold, Leland — hb 36 

*DeStefano, Bob — qb 9 

*Colteryahn, Lloyd — e 3 

Nolan, Dick — hb 1 

ALL OTHERS SAME AS ABOVE RUSHING FIGURES 



Net Gain 


Avg. 


1385 


6.4 


531 


6.3 


234 


4.1 


197 


5.5 


25 


2.8 


29 


9.7 


14 


14.0 



KICKOFF RETURNS 

No. Returned Yds. Returned Avg. 

Hanulak, Chester— hb 6 118 19.7 

Nolan, Dick— hb 6 180 30.0 

Horning, Joe — hb 3 77 25.6 

Waller, Ronnie — hb 3 72 24.0 

*Laughery, Bob — fb 2 62 31.0 

*Fullerton, Ed — fb 1 17 17.0 

*DeStefano, Bob— qb 1 13 13.0 

* — Not a Member of 1953 Team 

— 39 — 



PASS RECEIVING 

No. Caught Yards For TD's 

*Colteryahn, Lloyd— e 32 593 4 

*Weidensaul, Lou— e 15 270 4 

Hanulak, Chester— hb 7 135 1 

Felton, Ralph— hb 6 99 2 

*Liebold, Leland— hb 5 94 2 

*Fullerton, Ed— fb 4 55 

Waller, Ronnie — hb 4 20 

*Laughery, Bob — fb 2 10 

*Fiseher, Stanley— e 1 18 

Kramer, Paul — e 1 14 

Heffner, Fred — e 1 12 

PASS INTERCEPTIONS 

No. Int. Yards Returned 

Faloney, Bernie — qb 3 90 

Nolan, Dick— hb 3 13 

Horning, Joe — hb 2 57 

*DeStefano, Bob — qb 1 25 

Lattimer, Charles — c 1 7 

*Boeri, Walter — g 1 2 

*Fullerton, Ed— fb 1 

Morgan, Bob — t 1 

Hoffman, Herb — g 1 

PUNTING 

No. Yards Avg. Had Blocked 

Faloney, Bernie— qb 29 1137 39.2 

Heffner, Fred— e 11 478 39.8 

PUNT RETURNS 

No. Ret. Yds. Ret. Avg. 

Horning, Joe— hb 15 61 4.0 

Nolan, Dick— hb 11 102 9.3 

Faloney, Bernie— qb 8 109 13.6 

Waller, Ronnie— hb 3 13 4.3 

SCORING 

TD's PAT's TOTAL 

Hanulak, Chester— hb 6 36 

Felton, Ralph— hb 4 24 

*Fullerton, Ed— fb 4 24 

*Colteryahn, Lloyd— e 4 24 

*Weidensaul, Lou — e 4 24 

*Scarbath, Jack— qb 3 18 

*Liebold, Leland— hb 3 18 

*Laughery, Bob— fb 1 1 FG 9 

Bielski, Dick— fb 10 6 

Nolan, Dick— hb 10 6 

*Decker, Don— g 26-31 1 FG 29 

*— Net a Member of 1953 Team 

— 40 — 



ALL-TIME MARYLAND FOOTBALL RECORDS 

OFFENSE and DEFENSE 

BEST SEASON: 

1951 Won 10, Lost 0. Includes 28-13 victory over Tennessee in the 

Sugar Bowl. 
WORST SEASON: 

1944 Won 1, Lost 7, Tied 1. 
MOST POINTS SCORED IN ONE SEASON: 

353 in 1951 in 9 games. 381 in 1951 in 10 game3 including the 28-13 

victory over Tennessee in the Sugar Bowl. 
LEAST POINTS SCORED IN ONE SEASON: 

39 in 1940 in 9 games. 
MOST POINTS SCORED BY OPPONENTS IN ONE SEASON: 

216 in 1938 in 9 games. 
LEAST POINTS SCORED BY OPPONENTS IN ONE SEASON: 

49 in 1934 in 10 games. 
MOST POINTS SCORED BY MARYLAND IN ONE GAME: 

Maryland 80, Washington College in 1927. 
MOST POINTS SCORED BY OPPONENT IN ONE GAME: 

Navy 76, Maryland in 1913. 
ALL-TIME LEADING SCORER: 

Bob Shemonski with 97 points in 1950 in 10 games. 
OFFENSIVE TEAM RECORD FOR ONE SEASON: 

3822 yards in 1951 in 9 games. 2921 rushing and 901 passing. 

4174 yards in 1951 in 10 games, including the 28-13 victory o.ver 

Tennessee in the Sugar Bowl. 3210 rushing and 964 passing. 
OFFENSIVE TEAM RECORD FOR ONE GAME: 

602 yards in 1951 against West Virginia. 523 yards rushing and 79 

passing. 
LEAST YARDAGE ONE GAME: 

69 against Vanderbilt in 1948. 
MOST TOUCHDOWNS SCORED IN ONE SEASON: 

52 in 1951 in 9 games. 56 in 1951 in 10 games including the 28-13 vic- 
tory over Tennersee in the Sugar Bowl. 
DEFENSIVE RECORD FOR ONE SEASON: 

1,707 yards in 1949 in 9 games. 868 rushing and 893 passing for fifth 

place in Nation. 
DEFENSIVE RECORD FOR ONE GAME: (Rushing) 

29 by Washington and Lee in 1951. 
MOST YARDS RUSHING BY INDIVIDUAL IN ONE SEASON: 

Ray Poppleman with 1,350 yards in 10 games in 1931. 
MOST YARDS RUSHING BY INDIVIDUAL IN ONE GAME: 

Ray Poppleman with 201 yards in 24 carries against Western Mary- 
land. 
LONGEST RUN FROM SCRIMMAGE: 

Ed Fullerton for 86 yards and touchdown against University of 

Georgia in 1951. 

PASSING RECORDS 

TEAM PASSING FOR SEASON: 

90 completions in 170 attempts for 1364 yards in 1942 in 9 games. 
TEAM PASSING FOR ONE GAME: 

Joe Tucker with 9 completions in 12 attempts for 178 yards and 

Stan Lavine, 4 for 5 for 129 yards for total of 307 against South 

Carolina in 1949. 
WORST PASSING RECORD BY MARYLAND: 

completions in 12 attempts against Vanderbilt in 1948. 

— 41 — 



INDIVIDUAL PASSING RECORD FOR ONE SEASON: 

59 completions in 113 attempts for 1149 yards by Jack Scarbath in 9 

games in 1952. 
INDIVIDUAL PASSING RECORD FOR ONE GAME: 

Tommy Mont, 9 completions in 14 attempts for 215 yards against 

U. of Connecticut in 1942. 
LEADING PASS RECEIVER FOR ONE SEASON: 

Lloyd Colteryahn, 32 receptions for 593 yards in 1952 in 9 games. 
LEADING PASS RECEIVER FOR ONE GAME: 

Lou Weidensaul — 8 receptions fox 95 yards and one touchdown 

against Navy in 1951. 

Lloyd Coltervahn — 8 receptions for 131 vards against Alabama 

in 1952. 
LONGEST FORWARD PASS PLAY: 

Stan Lavine to Ed Bolton for 92 yards and touchdown against South 

Carolina in 1949. Pass 15 yard , run 77. 
LONGEST RETURN OF INTERCEPTED PASS: 

Joe Horning for an official 100 yards and touchdown against Mis- 
souri in 1951. Actual return from behind end zone was 105 yard?. 

KICKING RECORDS 

MOST POINTS AFTER TOUCHDOWNS: 

37 for 51 attempts in 9 games in 1951. 41 for 55 attempts in 10 

games in 1951 including the 28-13 victory over Tennessee in the 

Sugar Bowl by Don Decker. 
LONGEST PUNT: 

Brooke (Untz) Brewer for 93 yards against V. M. I. in 1916. 
BEST OFFICIAL AVERAGE ONE GAME: 

Bill Guckeyson for 51 yards in 10 punts against Syracuse in 1936. 

(Note: Brewer against Syracuse in 1920 and Guckey on against 

Florida in 1936 both averaged better than 60 yards but official figures 

could not be obtained from these schools and papers didn't carry the 

punt'ng statistics). 
LONGEST PUNT RETURNS: 

Lu Gambino against Delaware in 1947 and Stan Lavine against 

George Washington in 1948, each for 88 yards and touchdown. 
PUNT RETURNS FOR SEASON: 

Bob Shemonski. 28 for 505 yards in 1950 in 10 games. 
LONGEST KICKOFF RETURNS: 

Lewis Thomas against Washington College in 1927; Bill Guckeyson 

against Georgetown in 1935; Sam Behr against Virginia in 1945; 

Dick Nolan against Mississippi in 1952, each for 90 yards and a 

touchdown. 
LONGEST FIELD GOAL: 

Untz Brewer, 46 yards by dropkick against John Hopkins in 1916. 

He also kicked another for 45 yards in same game. 
LONGEST PUNT RETURN AGAINST MARYLAND: 

Frank Brady of Navy for 100 yards and touchdown in 1951. 
LONGEST KICKOFF RETURN AGAINST MARYLAND: 

Jim McPherson of North Carolina for 93 yards and TD in 1926. 
LONGEST PUNT AGAINST MARYLAND: 

Charlie Justice of North Carolina for 84 yards in 1948. 



YEAR BY YEAR RECORDS 

MARYLAND 1900 (3-4-1) Navy 17 

AGGIES Western Hi __ 17 Wm. & Mary_ 

1RQ9 m <? m ° Gib - Ath - C1 - - 17 28 Mt - St. Josephs 

St Johns' ___50 g'town Prep 5 27 St. Johns ___ 5 

Johns Hop. —62 J Episcopal Hi -34 o Wash. Col. __17 

Episcopal Hi. _16 * G ° nzagaHl —11 23 U of Md. - _ 5 

iHoct r« n m 15 G town Pre P ~ ° ° Dela - c °l 12 

36 Eastern Hi 21 Gonza S a Hi - ° 1906 (5-3-0) 

10 Centra? H "'"" 21 Char Hal1 Ac " ° 5 Tech ™ — - 

18 Bait Citv Col" 19 ° 1 (1 " 7 - 0) 22 Balt Cit y Col ~ ° 

fi ? Tn?n« Pol 6 DeL C01 24 ° Na ^ ----- 12 

18 M Md Co? 10 10 Gallaudet Re - - 11 Georgetown __28 

SS^-S HHS ~™- 

fi St Tohns 2? W h C 3 1907 (3-6-0) 

b St. Johns — _■_■ w t Md 30 13 T v 

6 Georgetown __ 4 1q0? /o * o^ * i, Ln , gn — - " 

n r-r,i Ath m 9fi ~ ,-, (-*-_-_:) o Georgetown __10 

Col. Ath. CI _2b Georgetown __27 e R : ohmnnH Pnl 11 

Mt. St. Marys_24 5 Mt . | t Jos __ „ J ™ nd Col -ll 

^NrGamls^ " C ° lumbian U ' "^ 6 Mull Mar"^ 

1896 7? 2 » 6 G1 y m P ia Ath - " ° 10 Geo.. Wash. ___ 
Eastern Hi" 6 ° Wash " C ° L -~ ° 10 Wash. Col. __ 5 

Sllaudet " " ° Mt " St " MaryS " 5 ° St - Johns -—16 

Gallaudet U 6 w t Md _ ___ 26 GallaudPt 

34 Busine s Hi __ n TT nf M(1 - u ^ allau det o 

10 Central Hi ___ 6 ° V" °* Hon ~"l7 _ 19 ° 8 (3 - 8 " 0) 

18 Alexandria Hi_ ° S5 r S P ' 5 Central Hi " " ° 

20 Bethel Mil Ac_10 ° ^,7 4 £" 5 ^ Ch High "" 6 

Fnisconal Hi 6 ~ I ^ oq ° Richmond Col_22 

u episcopal m. _ o Q Georgetown __28 n TnHri _ Hnr , in 

16 West. Md. — 6 5 cnft( J n Ath . __ ° J° h » s Ho P- -g 

14 Central Hi . _ 21 Gunton Tem . _ ° JJjvy — — - -57 

U. of Md. ___ o St. Johns —18 g S"h h?rof ""lO 

1897 (2-4-0) 2 o Wa „ h Col Ircdbg Col. __10 
24 Central Hi ___ 6 1° {^J :_£ oL ™ " 12 Balto Po!y __ 6 

4 Eastern Hi ___ 2 l " M "-- ? ° St " J ° hns " " 31 

J. Hopkins —30 ° west Md " ° Wash " C ° L ~" U 

4 St. Johns _____ 6 £ West Md. — Geo . Wa:h . __ 57 

6 Gallaudet ___ _16 1 i U r .° t fl p ol — -.g 1909 (2-5-0) 

Bait. Med CoL-10 2 Columbian U0 2 ?^ nmo " d CoL 12 

hoqq /o c m b <- 01umDian u. _ u o Johns Hopkins 9 

1898(2-5-0) 1904(2-4-2) Tech High 11 

n S? T iS? "S ° Ceorgetown __22 5 Rock Hifl ." 

West. Md. — 6Z Ran. Macon __ George Wash. 26 

36 Eastern Hi ___ Q Ftress Monroe ON. Ca. A&M 33 

Gallaudet 33 n Mt gt Mar _ 6 14 Gallaudet ___ 12 

Johns Hop. __16 Q West Md —5 19 1 (4-3-1) 

Episcopal Hi __37 r, 9 p a ii auf q P t 5 12 Central Hi __ 

27 Rock Hill Col._ n „ nf Mf1 " " R 20 Richmond Col. 

1899 (1-4-0 ° ^ pl ° f col "~18 n Johns Hop T - " X l 

West Md. ___ 21 ° D ^ a _ Gol 4 Q :- 18 21 Catholic U. __ 

26 Eastern Hi __ 9n R 1 _?° 5 P ( ^; 4 ^ n H Geo. Wash. __ 

Johns. Hop. _ 40 2 9 Bait Poly In _ V. M. I. 8 

Delaware Col 34 16 Gallaudet St. Johns — 6 

St. Johns — _ 62 West. Md. —10 3 West. Md. __ 17 

— 43 — 



1911 (4-4-2) 

6 Tech Hi 

Richmond 

5 Fred'bg Col. _ 

Central Hi 14 

3 Johns Hop. — 6 

6 Catholic U. __ 6 
St. Johns 27 

5 Wa h. Col. —17 

6 West Md. _— 

6 Gallaudet 2 

1912 (6-1-1) 

31 Tech Hi 6 

46 Richmond Col. 
58 U. of Md. _— 
13 Johns Hop. ___ 

St. Johns 2 7 

13 Gallaudet 7 

17 West Md. 7 

13 Penn Mil. Col._13 

1913 (6-3-0) 

27 Balto City 10 

45 Richmond Co 1 . _0 
20 Johns Hop. ___ 

46 West Md. 

Navy 76 

13 St. Johns 

2C Wash. Col. 

Gallaudet 26 

7 Penn Mil. ___27 

1914 (5-3-0) 

Balto. Poly ___ 6 
6 Catholic U. ___ 

13 West Md. 20 

14 Johns Hop. 

10 St. Johns 

3 Wash. Col. ___ 
Gallaudet 23 

26 Penn Mil. 

1915 (6-3-0) 

31 Balto Poly __ 
Haverford ___ 7 
Catholic U. __16 

10 Gallaudet 3 

14 Penn Mil. ___13 

27 St. Johns 14 

28 Wa h Col. ___13 
51 West Md. ___ 

Johns Hop. __ 3 

MARYLAND 

STATE 

1916 (6-2-0) 

6 Dickinson 

7 Navy 14 



15 V. M. I. 9 

6 Haverford 7 

31 St. Johns 6 

10 N. Y. U. 7 

13 Catholic U. ___ 9 
54 Johns Hop. 

1917 (4-3-1) 

20 Dela. Col. 

Navy 62 

14 V. M. I. 14 

29 Wake Forest _13 

6 N. C. State __10 
13 St. Johns 3 

Penn State _-_57 

7 Johns Hop. ___ 

1918 (4-1-1) 

6 American U. 13 

7 V. M. I. 6 

19 West Md. 

6 New York U. _ 2 

19 St. Johns 14 

Johns Hop. 

1919 (5-4-0) 

6 Swart hmore --10 
13 Virginia 

West Va. 27 

Va. Poly 6 

Yale 31 

27 St. Johns 

13 Catholic U. ___ 

20 West Md. 

14 Johns Hop. 

UNIVERSITY 
OF MARYLAND 

1920 (7-2-0) 

54 Randolph Ma _ 

Rutgers 7 

Princeton 35 

27 Wash. Col. ___ 

7 Va. Poly 

13 North Car. ___ 

10 Syracuse 7 

24 Johns Hop. ___ 7 

14 Catholic U. ___ 

1921 (3-5-1) 

3 Rutgers 

Syracuse 42 

3 St. Johns 7 

10 Va. Poly 7 

7 North Car. __16 
Yale 28 

16 Catholic U. ___ 
Carnegie Tech_21 

— 44 — 



6 N. C. State —6 

1922 (4-5-1) 

7 Third Army __ 

Richmond 

Pennsylvania _12 

Princeton 26 

3 North Car. __2 7 

Va. Poly 21 

3 Yale 45 

3 Johns Hop. 

54 Catholic U. __ 
7 N. C. State — 6 

1923 (7-2-1) 

53 Randolph Ma. 
3 Pennsylvania _ 

23 Richmond 

9 Va. Poly 16 

14 North Car. ___ 

28 St. Johns 

14 Yale 16 

26 N. C. State __12 
40 Catholic U. ___ 6 

6 Johns Hop. 6 

1924 (3-3-3) 

23 Wash Col. ___ 

7 Wash. & Lee -19 
38 Richmond 

Va. Poly 12 

6 North Car. ___ 
Catholic U. ___ 

Yale 47 

N. C. State — 
Johns Hop 

1925 (2-5-1) 

13 Wash. Col. ___ 

16 Rutgers 

Va. Poly 3 

Virg"nia 6 

North Car. ___16 

14 Yale 43 

3 W. & L. 7 

7 Johns Hop. ___ 7 

1926 (5-4-1) 

63 Wash. Col. ___ 
South Car. ___12 
Chicago 21 

8 Va. Poly 24 

14 North Car. ___ 6 
38 Gallaudet 7 

15 Yale 

6 Virginia 6 

W. & L. 3 

17 Johns Hop. ___14 



1927 (4-7-0) 

80 Wash. Col. __ 

26 South Car. ___ 

6 North Car. ___ 7 

13 Va. Poly 7 

10 V. M. I. 6 

6 W. & L. 13 

6 Yale 30 

Virginia 21 

20 Vanderbilt 39 

13 Johns Hop. __14 

6 Florida 7 

1928 (6-3-1) 

31 Wash. Col. ___ 
19 North Car —26 

7 South Car. —21 
13 West Md. 6 

V. M. I. 

6 Va. Poly 9 

Yale 6 

18 Virginia 2 

6 W. & L. 

26 Johns Hop. ___ 6 

1929 (4-4-2) 

34 Wash Cal. ___ 7 
Nojeth Car. ___43 
'South Car. —28 

13 Gallaudet 6 

6 V. M. I. 7 

13 Virginia 13 

13 Yile 13 

24 Va. Poly 

39 Johns Hop. ___ 6 

West Md. ___12 

1930 (7-5-0) 

60 Wash Col. ___ 6 

13 Yale 40 

21 North Car. —28 
21 St. Johns 13 

20 V. M. I. 

14 Virginia 6 

41 W. & L. 7 

13 Va. Poly 7 

Navv 6 

21 Johns Hop. __ 

7 Vanderbilt —22 
West Md. 7 

1931 (8-1-1) 

13 Wah Col. — 

7 Virginia (6 

6 Navv 

6 Kentucky 6 

41 V. M. I. 20 

20 Va. Poly 

12 Vanderbilt —39 



13 W. & L. (7 

35 Johns Hop. 14 

41 West Md. ____ 6 

1932 (5-6-0) 

63 Wash Col. ___ 
6 Virginia 7 

6 Va. Poly 23 

Duke 34 

24 St. Johns 7 

12 V. M. I. 7 

Vanderbilt — 13 

7 Navy 28 

6 W. & L. 

23 Johns Hop. — 

7 West Md. 39 

1933 (3-6-0) 

20 St. Johns 

Va. Poly 14 

Tulane 20 

13 V. M. I. 19 

7 West Md. 13 

Virginia 6 

7 Duke 38 

27 Johns Hop — 7 

33 W. & L. 13 

Florida 19 

1934 (7-3-0) 

13 St. Johns 

W. & L. 7 

13 Navv 16 

14 Va. Poly 9 

21 Florida 

20 Virginia 

23 V. M. I. 

14 Indiana 17 

6 Georgetown __ 

19 Johns Hop. -—0 

1935 (7-2-2) 

39 St. Johns 6 

7 Va. Poly 

North Car. —33 

6 V. M. I. 

20 Florida 6 

14 Virginia 7 

7 Indiana 13 

W. & L. 

12 Georgetown — 6 
Syracuse 

22 West Md. 7 

1936 (6-5-0) 

20 St. Johns 3 

6 Va. Poly 

North Car. —14 

21 Virginia 

20 Syracuse 

6 Florida 7 

— 45 — 



12 Richmond 

7 V. M. I. 13 

6 Georgetown __ 7 

19 W. & L. 6 

West Md. —12 

1937 (8-2-0) 

28 St. Johns 

21 Pennsylvania _28 

6 West Md. 

3 Virginia 

13 Syracuse 

13 Florida 7 

9 V. M. I. 7 

14 Penn State —21 
12 Georgetown __ 2 

8 W. & L. 

1938 (2-7-0) 

6 Richmond 19 

Penn State —33 
Syracuse 53 

14 West Md. — 8 

19 Virginia 27 

14 V. M. I. 47 

7 Florida 21 

7 Georgetown 14 

19 W. & L. _— 13 

1939 (2-7-0) 

26 Hamp.-Syd. __ 

12 West Md. 

7 Virginia 12 

12 Rutgers 25 

Florida 14 

Penn State -—12 
Georgetown __20 

V. M. I. 13 

7 Syracuse 10 

1940 (2-6-1) 

6 Hamp.-Syd. __ 7 
Pennsylvania -51 

6 Virginia 19 

Florida 19 

6 West Md. 

GeoT-ge-own 41 

V. M. I. 20 

14 Rutgers 7 

7 W. & I... 7 

1941 (3-5-1) 

18 Hamp.-Syd. __ 
6 West Md. — 6 
Duke 50 

13 Florida 12 

6 Pennsylvania _55 

Georgetown 26 

Rutgers 20 

V. M. I. 27 

6 W. & L. 



1942 (7-2-0) 

34 Connecticut __ 
14 Lake NAS — 
27 Rutgers 13 

V. M. I. 29 

51 West Md. 

13 Florida 

Duke 42 

27 Virginia 12 

32 W. & L. 28 

1943 (4-5-0) 

7 Curtis B. CG-13 
13 Wake Forest - 7 
19 Rich. AAB ___ 6 

2 West Va. 6 

Penn State __45 
43 Greenv. AAB _13 

Virginia 39 

Bainbridge —46 
21 V. M. I. 14 

1944 (1-7-1) 

Hamp.-Syd. --12 
Wake Forest -39 

6 West Va. 6 

Mich. State — 8 

6 Florida 14 

7 Virginia 18 

Mich. State --33 

19 Penn State —Si 

8 V. M. I. 6 

1945 (6-2-1) 

60 Guilford Col. _ 6 

21 Richmond 

22 Merch. M. A. 6 
13 Va. Poly 21 

13 West Va. 13 

14 W. & M. 33 

38 V. M. I. 

19 Virginia 13 

19 South Car. ___ 13 



1946 (3-6-0) 

54 Bainbridge 

7 Richmond 37 

North Car. ___ 33 

6 Va. Poly 

7 W. & M. 41 

17 South Car. —21 

24 W. & L. 7 

14 Mich. State —26 

7 N. C. State —28 

1947 (7-2-2) 

19 South Car. ___ 13 

43 Delaware 19 

18 Richmond 6 

7 Duke 19 

21 Va. Polv 19 

27 West Va. 

32 Duquesne 

North Car. — 19 

20 Vanderbilt ___ 6 
N. C. Slate __ 

(Gator Bowl, 
Jan. 1, 1948) 

20 Georgia 20 

1948 (6-4-0) 

19 Richmond 

21 Delaware 

28 Va. Poly 

12 Duke 13 

47 Geo. Wash. __ 
27 Miami 13 

19 South Car. 7 

20 North Car. __49 
Vanderbilt ___34 

14 West. Va. 1G 

1949 (9-1-0) 

34 Va. Poly 7 

33 Georgetown __ 7 
7 Mich. State _-14 

14 N. C. State __ 6 

44 South Car. ___ 7 



40 Geo. Wash. ___ 14 
14 Boston U. —13 

47 West Va. 7 

13 Miami 

(Gator Bowl, 
Jan. 1, 1950) 

20 Missouri 7 

1950 (7-2-1) 

7 Georgia 27 

35 Navy 21 

34 Mich. State — 7 

25 Georgetown _-14 

13 N. C. State —16 

26 Duke 14 

23 Geo. Wash — 7 

7 North Car. ___ 7 

11 West Va. 

63 V. P. I. 7 

1951 (10-0-0) 

54 W. & L. 14 

33 Geo. Wash. ___ 6 
43 Georgia 7 

14 North Car. __ 7 

27 Louis. State -- 

35 Missouri 

40 Navy 21 

53 N. C. State ___ 

54 West. Va. ___ 7 
(Sugar Bowl, 
Jan. 1, 1952) 

28 Tennessee 13 

1952 (7-2-0) 
13 Missouri 10 

13 Auburn 7 

28 Clemson 

37 Georgia 

38 Navy 7 

34 L.S.U. 6 

34 Boston U. ___ 7 

14 Mississippi 21 

7 Alabama 27 



COACHES THROUGH THE YEARS 



1892— W. W. Skinner 

1893— S. II. Harding 

1894— .T. G. Bannon 

1895— G. M. Harris 

1896— Grenville Lewis 

1897— John Lillibridgc 

1898— J. F. Kenly 

1899— S. M. Cooke 

1900— F. H. Peters 

1901— E. B. Dunbar 

*Above Teams Coached by Captains 

1902— D. John Markey (Western Md.» 

1903— Markey 

1904— Markey 

1905 — Fred Nielsen (Nebraska) 

1906— Nielsen 

1907 — C. G. Church (Virginia) 

and C. W. Melick (Nebraska) 



1908— Bill Lang (Delaware) 

1909— Barney Cooper (Maryland '08) 

and E. P. Larkin (Cornell) 
1910 — R. Alston (George Washington) 
1911— C. F. Donnelly (Trinity) 

and H. C. Byrd (Maryland '08) 
1912-34— H. C. Byrd (Maryland '08) 
1935-39— Frank Dobson (Princeton) 
1940-41— Jack Faber C26).A1 Heagy, C30), 
and Al Woods C33) all of 
Maryland. 
1942 — Clark Shaughnessy (Minnesota) 
1943-44 — Clarence Spears (Dartmouth) 
1945 — Paul Bryant (Alabama) 
1946 — Shaughnessy 
1947-52— Jim Tatum (North Carolina) 



BRIEF HISTORY OF THE UNIVERSITY 



The history of the present University is the history of two institutions : 
the old privately-owned and operated University of Maryland in Baltimore 
and the Maryland State College (formerly Maryland Agricultural College) 
at College Park. These institutions were merged in 1920. 

In 1807, the College of Medicine of Maryland was organized, the fifth 
medical school in the United States. The first class was graduated in 1810. 
A permanent home was established in 1814-1815 by the erection of the build- 
ing at Lombard and Green Streets in Baltimore, the oldest structure in America 
devoted to medical teaching. Here was founded one of the first medical 
libraries (and the first medical school library) in the United States. In 1812 
the General Assembly of Maryland authorized the College of Medicine of 
Maryland to "annex or constitute facilities of divinity, law, and arts and 
sciences," and by the same act declared that the "colleges or faculties thus 
united should be constituted an university by the name and under the title of 
the University of Maryland." By authority of this act, steps were taken in 
1813 to establish "a faculty of law," and in 1823 a regular school of instruction 
in law was opened. Subsequently there were added : in 1882 a Department of 
Dentistry which was absorbed in 1923 by the Baltimore College of Dental 
Surgery (founded in 1840, the first dental school in the world) ; in 1889 a 
School of Nursing; and in 1904 the Maryland College of Pharmacy (founded 
in 1841, the third oldest pharmacy college in the United States). 

The Maryland State College was chartered in 1856 under the name of 
the Maryland Agricultural College, the second agricultural college in the 
Western Hemisphere. For three years the College was under private manage- 
ment. In 1862 the Congress of the United States passed the Land Grant Act. 
This act granted each State and Territory that should claim its benefits an 
appropriate amount of unclaimed western lands, in place of scrip, the proceeds 
from the sale of which should apply under certain conditions to the "endow- 
ment, support, and maintenance of at least one college where the leading object 
shall be, without excluding other scientific and classical studies, and including 
military tactics, to teach such branches of learning as are related to agriculture 
and the mechanic arts, in such a manner as the Legislatures of the States may 
respectively prescribe, in order to promote the liberal and practical education 
of the industrial classes in the several pursuits and professions of life." This 
grant was accepted by the General Assembly of Maryland, and the Maryland 
Agricultural College was named as the beneficiary of the grant. Thus the 
College became, at least in part, a State institution. In the fall of 1914 control 
was taken over entirely by the State. In 1916 the General Assembly granted 
a new charter to the College, and made it the Maryland State College. 

In 1920, by an act of the State Legislature, the University of Maryland 
was merged with the Maryland State College, and the resultant institution was 
given the name University of Maryland. 




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Outstanding Veteran Holdovers For '53 




« -.iK'j- ~.^ i"t •%t^ 





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8 -Blubber"' MORGAN 



STANLEY JONES 



TOUTED BY OPPONENTS AND COACHES AS TWO OF THE 

M'AflON -1 O v »?WK «'G '■.."::- 



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MARTY CRVTZER 



IERB HOFFMAN 





of Football's Outstanding "Triple-Threat" Stars 
Terp's Top Defensive Back