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Full text of "University of Maryland men's football media guides"

THE 1954 MARYLAND 

0-YARD LINE 



t * 



Maryland 20 

lissouri 6 

Maryland 52 

V. & L. 

Maryland 20 

lemson 

Maryland 40 

»eorgia 13 

/laryland 26 

J. Carolina 

Maryland 30 

/liami (Fla.) 

/laryland 24 

>. Carolina 6 

Maryland 27 

ieo. Washington .. 6 

/laryland 38 

Mississippi 

/laryland 21 

vlabama 



The Rev. J. Hugh O'Donnell Trophy 
Emblematic of 
National Championship 




DICK BIELSKI 
Fullback jfi 



Pf 




JOHN IRVINE 



1954 CO-CAPTAINS 

ALL-AMERICA CANDIDATES 



TERPS' VETERAN "60-MINUTE" BACKFIELD FOURSOME 





RONNIE WALLER— LH8 



i.i « 



CHARLEY BOXOLD || 
QS 








H 



JOE HORNING — RHB 






CO-CAPTAIN 
DICK BIELSKI—FB 




FOR PRESS, RADIO and TELEVISION 

This is your 1954 Maryland football brochure, 
"The 50- Yard Line." It is published in hope 
that it offers you helpful information for your 
coverage of Terp games this season. With this 
book goes an invitation to you to visit us as 
often as possible in our offices in New Byrd 
H Stadium. In return, I will try to visit you as 
often as I can and extend every assistance pos- 
sible. For any information, you can reach me 
day and night at UNion 4-4076. When it is real 
late at night, I can be contacted at WArneld 7- 
3800, Extension 507. 
• Applications for tickets should be made the 

first part of the week of the game to allow time 
for mailing. Wire and telephone requirements should be made through your 
local Western Union office. 

Every effort will be made to furnish all the services in the press box 
available, so that your accounts of the game can be most adequate for your 
readers. Statistics, both half-time and final figures; a quarter play-by-play; 
game leaders in all departments; substitutions, etc. will be ready a few minutes 
after the game. 

Many thanks for all your cooperation and favors of the past. 

JOE F. BLAIR 

Sports Publicity Director 
University of Maryland, 
College Park, Maryland. 



TABLE OF 

Page 

1 Message to Press 

2 '54 Schedule ;' 53 Results 

3 Athletic Council 

4 Department of Intercol- 
legiate Athletics 

5-6 President, Dr. Wilson 

H. Elkins 

7-8 Coach Jim Tatum 

9-13 Ass't Coaches, Trainers 

14 1953 National Cham- 
pions 

15 1954 Terp Prospectus 

16-25 .... Terp Opponents 
26-31 .... Opponents' Publicists' 

Reports 

32 Opponents' Schedules 

33 Game Officials 

34-35 .... Squad Roster 
36 Terp 4-Deep 

37-42 .... Terp Team Thumbnails 
43-45 .... 1953 Game Thumbnails 

— 1 



CONTENTS 

Page 

46-47 .... Honorary Selections, 
1953 

48 Terp All-America 

Players and Additional 
Honors 

49 Press Covering Mary- 
land 

50 1953 Highlights 

51 1953 Team Statistics 

52-53 .... 1953 Individual Statis- 
tics 

54-55 .... All-Time Maryland Rec- 
ords 
56-59 .... Year by Year Scores 

60 History of U. of 

Maryland 

61 New U. of Maryland 

Activities Building 

62-63 .... Terp Prospectus, 

(cont.) ; "It Happened 
in '53" 



1953 SCHEDULE 

KICK-OFF TIME PRICE 
Sept. 18 Kentucky at Lexington, Ky. 2 P.M. (C.S.T.) ($3 50) 

Oct. 1 UCLA, at Los Angeles, Calif. 8:30 P.M. (P.ST.) ($3 50) 

Oct. 9 Wake Forest at Winston-Salem, NC. 2 P.M. (E.ST.) ($4.00) 

Oct. 16 North Carolina at College Park, Md. 2 P.M. (E.ST.) ($3 75) 
Oct. 22 Mi?.mi at Miami. Fla. 8:15 P.M. (EST.) ($4.00) 

Oct. 30 South Carolina at Columbia, S C. 2 P.M. (EST.) ($3.60) 
Nov. 6 N.C. State at College Park. Md. 

(Homecoming) 2 P.M. (E.S.T.) ($3.75) 
Nov. 13 Clemson at College Park, Md. 

(Air Force ROTC— Band Day) 2 P.M. (EST.) ($375) 
Nov. 20 George Washington at College Park. 

Mr). (Senior Day) 2 P.M. (EST.) ($2.50) 
Nov. 25 Missouri at College Park, Md. 

(Dad's Day) 12 NOON ($3.75) 

Write: Ticket Office, University of Maryland Athletic Dept., 
PO Box 295, College Park, Md. Call: WArfield: 7-2807. 

TATUM - MARYLAND BOWL RECORD 

1947 'Gator Bowl Oklahoma 34 N.C. State 14 

1948 'Gator Bowl Maryland 20 Georgia 20 
1950 'Gator Bcwl Maryland 20 Missouri 7 
1952 Sugar Bowl Maryland 28 Tennessee 13 
1954 Orange Bowl Maryland Oklahoma 7 

The loss to Oklahoma was the first Tatum defeat in a bowl game. 

TATU MS ALL-TIME 
COLLEGIATE COACHING RECORD 

YEAR WON LOST TIED SCHOOL 

1942 5 2 2 North Carolina 

1946 8 3 Oklahoma 

1947 7 2 2 Maryland 

1948 6 4 Maryland 

1949 9 1 Maryland 

1950 7 2 1 Maryland 

1951 10 o Maryland 

1952 7 2 o Maryland 

1953 IO * 1 Maryland 

* Loss in Orange Bowl 

TOTAL 69 17 5 

(Tatum had a 9-2 record in 1945 as Head Coach at Jacksonville Naval Air 
Station. Tliis makes his all-time head coaching record read: 78-19-5.) 

1953 RESULTS 

20 Missouri 6 27 Geo. Washington 6 

52 Washington & Lee 38 Mississippi 

20 Clemson 21 Alabama 

40 Georgia 13 — . — 

26 North Carolina 298 31 

30 Miami (Fla) ORANGE BOWL 

24 South Carolina 6 Oklahoma 7 

— 2 — 



ATHLETIC COUNCIL 






Mr. G. F. Eppley Mr. James Tatui 

Chairman 




Col. O. H. Saunders Dr. James H. Reid Col Joseph Ambrose 




THE DEPARTMENT OF INTERCOLLEGIATE 
ATHLETICS 



WILLIAM W. COBEY 

A 1930 University graduate, Bill Cob?}' 
moved into the big job as Graduate Manager 
of Athletics in 1048. His is the task of sched- 
uling for all other athletic teams except foot- 
ball, which numbers thirteen- 

The pleasant Cobey also acts in the capacity 
of contact man and heads the athletic ticket 
office- A member of his staff is Bennie Robin- 
son, ticket manager for all University athletic 
events. 

A native of Quincy, Fla., his interest in 
Maryland stems from his being a member o; 
an old Maryland family. His father gradu- 
ated from the University in 1Q01. 

Cobey received his Bachelor's Degree from 
the School of Business and Public Adminis- 
tration. Following graduation he became 
Cashier of the University, a job he had for 17 years before 
Athletic Department. 

The Cobey's have six children, three daughters and three 





lis move t<> the 



Director of Athletics James A/. Tahim 

Graduate Manager of Athletics William W. Cohev 

Athletic Publicity Director Joe F. Blair 

Equipment Head ..Kennit "Cliief" Cissell 

Facilities Head .Charles "Lindy" Kehoo 

Chief of Concessions Vernon Seiberl 

Ticket Manager Bennie Robinson 

Office Secretary to Mr. Tatum ...Mrs. Ora Rutherford 

Office Secretary to Mr. Cobey ..Mrs. Dorothy Hunt 

Office Secretary to Mr. Blair Miss Barbara Dorman 

Head Trainer ...Alfred "Duke" Wyre 

Assistant Trainer ..John Lacey 

Football Coach James M. latum 

Basketball Coach H. A. "Bud" Millikan 

Boxing Coach Frank Cronin 

Baseball Coach ...H. Burton Shipley 

Lacrosse Co-Coaches Jack Faber, Al Heagy 

Track, Cross Country Coach Jim Kehoe 

Soccer, Tennis Coach Doyle Royal 

Wrestling Coach William E. "Sully" Krouse 

Golf Coach Frank Cronin 

Rifle Coach Arthur Cook 

— 4 — 




DR. WILSON H. ELKINS 

PRESIDENT, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



In this space, it is only proper that sportswriters and sportscasters across 
the nation would want us to say "Thank you, Dr. Byrd; a job well done. 
Good luck". 

Too, the sports world says, "Welcome, Dr. Elkins. May your stay as the 
new University President be as happy, enjoyable, and prosperous in education, 
athletics, and all aspects of University life as it has been." 

Dr. Elkins assumed the big chore of heading the vast University of 
Marj'land September r. He was the successor named to Dr. Byrd from over 
ioo candidates. Dr. Byrd, who in 20 years of untiring efforts building the 
University of Maryland to one of the world's foremost educational institu- 
tions, resigned this year to run for the governorship of the State. He won 
the primary and his bid for Governor will be decided in the November elec- 
tion. 

Dr. Elkins, former president of Texas Western College of the Univer- 
sity of Texas at El Paso before his Maryland appointment, was born in Medi- 
an, Texas, July 9, 1908. With his lather and mother, Mr. and Mrs. W- B. 
Elkins, he moved to San Antonio at an early age. 

After completing his grade and high school education in San Antonio, Dr. 
Elkins attended Schreiner Institute from 1926 to the spring of 1928 when he 



entered the University of Texas. From Texas University in 1932, he received 
both the bachelor of arts and master of arts degrees. 

Receiving a Rhodes Scholarship, Dr. Elkins attended Oxford University 
from 1933 to 1936, receiving degrees of Bachelor of Letters and Doctor of 
Philosophy. 

Combining outstanding academic and athletic abilities during his student 
days at the University of Texas, he was elected to membership in Phi Beta 
Kappa and earned eight varsity letters in football, basketball, and track. In 
his final year at Texas, he captained the basketball team and was elected 
president of the students' association. 

Dr. Elkins lettered in football on the 1929, 1930, and 193 1 teams at 
Texas and was the regular quarterback in his final two seasons, the one in 

1930 winning the Southwest Conference title. That team ranks among Texas' 
all-time best. A soph end with that team was Edwin B. Price, now head 
coach at Texas. 

He lettered on the 1930, '31, and '32 basketball teams. He was captain 
his senior year and also the squad's leading scorer. He lettered in track in 

1931 and '32 as a sprinter and broad jumper. He was a member of the 
national championship football shuttle relay team at the Drake Relays in I93 1 - 

Dr. Elkins married Dorothy Blackburn of Berclair, Texas, in 1927. They 
have two daughters, Carole Ann and Margaret Elise. His career as an edu- 
cator began in 1932 when he was named athletic director of Cisco High 
School. In 1936, Dr. Elkins joined the faculty of the University of Texas as 
an instructor in history. He held this position until 1938 when he went to 
San Angelo as president of the Junior College. 

He remained there until January, 1949, when he was chosen president of 
Texas Western College. This position he held until his recent appointment 
as the President of the University of Maryland. 

Dr. Elkins is a member of numerous learned societies including the Texas 
State Teacher's Association, National Educational Association. Phi Beta 
Kappa, Alpha Phi Gamma, and is listed in Who's Who in American Educa- 
tion. He is a member of Sigma Nu fraternity- 

Dr. Elkins is a member of the Methodist Church and the Rotary Club. 
He is a constant contributor to national education periodicals. 




JIM TATUM— 1953 COACH OF THE YEAR 

Having just completed his seventh year coaching Maryland to the highest 
pinnacle in collegiate football, the 1953 National Championship, Jim Tatum's 
fellow coaches rewarded the young 40-year old grid master by naming him 
their "Coach of the Year" by a record landslide vote. He had guided Mary- 
land to its second undefeated and untied season in three campaigns and the 
terrible Terrapins were the only major undefeated and untied team in the 
nation. 

The most deserving honor for the hard working Tatum, who in such a 
short span has put previously unheard of Maryland football on top, came just 
a few days after the Terps were awarded the O'Donnell Trophy as National 
Champions for finishing on top in the season's final Associated Press poll. 

Man-land also was top-ranked in the United Press coaches' poll, the INS 
national poll, and Tatum was "Coach-of-the-Year" in the new Atlantic Coast 
Conference of which Maryland is a member. Too, the Terps were the unani- 
mous choice of the ACC to be the representative in the Orange Bowl. 

This summer he was head coach of the College All-Stars who lost to 
the Detroit Lions, professional football kingpins, in the annual Chicago- 
Tribune Charity mid-summer classic. 

The '54 season marks Tatum's eighth season at College Park. There is 
little reason to even think that Maryland will not have another winning season, 
somthing the Terp fans haven't experienced since the Tatum regime began 
in 1947- In the past seven campaigns, the Terps have won 56, lost 12, and tied 
three. Tatum has taken the big Red Shirts to four post-season bowl classics. 
The 7-0 loss to Oklahoma last January was his first bowl loss. His overall 
record coaching collegiate teams which numbers nine years (one at North 
Carolina and one at Oklahoma) is 69 wins, 17 losses and five ties. This does 



not include a g-2-0 record when he was head coach at Jacksonville Naval Air 
Station during the war. 

A former star tackle at the University of North Carolina ('35), Tatum 
probably is the most defense-minded coach in America. The '53 National 
Champions topped the country in rushing defense and were fourth in total 
defense. Maryland scored six shutouts last year. Only 31 points were 
scored against them in ten regular season games. 

But despite this accent of defense, his Split-T offense is the best. 
Tatum and assistant Warren Giese authored "Coaching Football and the 
Split-T" for the football book shelves last summer. He spends almost even- 
available off-season moment lecturing on his Split-T offense. This summer's 
clinics carried him to the West Coast for a month- Yet his personal pride 
is his team's defensive record. 

Back of Tatum's coaching success is his greatest asset — the ability to 
organize. Dr. H. C. Byrd, president emeritus of the University, himself of 
course a former Terp football coach, terms Tatum the greatest organizer he 
has met. Tatum's coaching staff, his coaching system, his planning for 
practice, his preparation for games are part of his close-knit organization. 
His day in football season starts at 6:30 a.m. It is over after midnight. A 
big fellow, he has the drive to carry through a season on this schedule. 

All-Americans, pro prospects, and members of all-star teams virtually 
were unheard of at Maryland before Tatum came. Maryland has placed two 
players on most of the respected ail-Americans for four years; this was the 
second year in a row that the Terps had more players in the all-star game 
than any other school, and in '51 and '^2, more Terps were drafted by the 
pros than any other school. Last year, seven out of nine were drafted and 
an eighth would have been if end Marty Crytzer hadn't made known his in- 
tentions to skip pro ball for Maryland Dental School. 

After his graduation from North Carolina, the native of McColl, S. C, 
followed his coach Carl Snavely, to Cornell. He returned to his alma mater 
for his first fling at head coaching in 1942. 

Warld War II found Tatum in the Navy. It was then that he was to 
learn the Spit-T from Missouri's Don Faurot as the latter's assistant at Iowa 
Pre-Flight. In '45, he was head coach at Jacksonville Naval Air Station. 

After his Navy discharge, he molded a strong eleven at Oklahoma then 
came to Maryland. 

The Tatum's have three children, Becky, fourth grade ; son Jimmy, sec- 
ond grade; and a two-vear old daughter, Reid. Mrs. Tatum is a native of 
Ayden, N. C. 



ASSISTANT COACHES 




JACK HENNEMIER 

Weighing only 150 pounds when he played 
at Duke University, '33, '34, and '35, Jack 
Hennemier made gridiron fame as he became 
one of the all-time few who played a great 
game at center for his size. 

A 60-minute man, the Terps' Line Coach 
won the most valuable player award as voted 
by his teammates in '35. The same year he 
made All-America Mention and the All-Con- 
ference team. 

Because of his outstanding football ability 
for such a "little guy", he was nicknamed 
"Scrappy Jack", and still carries the name on 
and off the field. 

In 1939 he went to Washington and Lee 
University as Line Coach. He stayed there 
through '41 before being called in to the Navy 
in '42 at Pensacola Naval Air Station. He coached and played center on the 
Base team. After 3V2 years of duty, he returned to Duke in '45 as assistant 
line coach and freshman coach. 

Hennemier joined the Terp staff in 1949 and has coached the defensive 
football, a task he has mastered, evidenced by Maryland's outstanding de- 
fensive record each season. He assisted Tatum at the College All-Star 
camp this summer. 

WARREN GIESE 

After first playing ball for Tatum while in 
the Navy, Warren Giese, Terp's end coach, 
has stayed right on with his former Navy boss 
to become one of the finest students of the 
game and another fine representative of the 
Maryland coaching staff. 

Giese co-authored with Tatum last sum- 
mer an exhaustive and informative football 
book, "Coaching Football and the Split-T." 
The book now is in its third printing. 

In the summer of '52, he spent a month in 
Japan as a member of the U.S. Coaching 
Staff. This summer he assisted Tatum in the 
College All-Star camp. 

A native of Milwaukee, Giese started his 
collegiate athletic career at Wisconsin State 
College. Here the Navy vet lettered playing 
end and also won his monogram as a quarter-miler. 

Lender the V-12 program, Giese studied at Central Michigan College. 
Here he played right halfback before being transferred to Miami Training- 
Center and then to Jacksonville in '45 where he first played end for Tatum. 

Giese went to Oklahoma in '46 with Tatum and won all Big Seven honors. 

He returned to Central Michigan and played another year while completing 
his work for his B.A. and B.S. Degrees. 

In '49, Tatum added his former star to the Terp staff. He received his 
Master's in Physical Education, and now is working on his Doctorate. 

The Giese's have a one-year old daughter, Anne Allison. 




TOMMY MONT 

One of the greatest athletes in the history 
of the University of Maryland, Tommy Mont 
has been tutoring the Terp's fine backs since 
his return to his alma mater in the fall of I95 1 - 

A four-year letterman in football, basket- 
ball, and lacrosse, Mont returned to Maryland 
after four brilliant years with the professional 
Washington Redskins. 

From Cumberland, Md., Mont started his 
collegiate athletic career in 1941- He was in 
school two years before entering the service 
in the spring of '43. He played tailback in '41, 
then quarterback 011 the '42 T eleven. Both 
years he also won his basketball and lacrosse 
monograms. Mont won all-America mention 
as well as first team all-Conference and the 
Washington-Maryland outstanding college 
player awards in 1942. 

Serving 42 months in the Army, 18 of which were spent in the ETO, 
Mont continued playing ball. He was tailback on the Fort Benning post 
championship team of '43. As quarterback and head coach, he led the 3rd 
Infantry team to the ETO championship. He also was at the helm of the 
7th Army All-Star team. 

Returning to Maryland following his discharge, Mont was quarterback of 
the '46 team as he gained all-America mention and all-Conference honors. 

In the summer of '^3, he spent three weeks as an advisory coach at Na- 
tional Polytechnic Institute in Mexico City and returned this summer. 

The Mont's have three sons; Steve, Jeff, and Danny. 




VERNON SEIBERT 

Another Terp alumnus to return to his 
alma mater as an assistant coach. Seibert re- 
turned in 1951 to the scene of his undergradu- 
ate playing days when he was an outstanding 
halfback. 

In his four seasons of varsity competition, 
he played offense three years and defense his 
final year. He is best remembered for his 
great defensive play which tabs him as one of 
the finest safety men ever to play for Mary- 
land. 

Tatum called on his former wiry backfield 
star from Baltimore Junior College where he 
had coached football and lacrosse for a year 
following his graduation. 

He was a B-25 pilot in the South Pacific 
during World War II. 

Besides his coaching duties, Seibert is in charge of conces 
letic events. He also handles the football film library. 

A son, Christopher, one and one-half years old, is the Se 




sions 
ibert's 



only 



th- 

child. 




He majored in Real Estate 



BOB WARD 

When Bob Ward, the all-time great name 

in the history of the University of Maryland 

football graduated, Coach Tatum immediately 

found a place on his staff for his two-year 

all-American guard. He wanted Ward to 

teach others to be as much like he was on and 

off the field. 

Following his discharge from the Army 

paratroopers in 1947, Ward came to Maryland 

as one of the smallest guard prospects ever 

seen by Jim Tatum. But Tatum liked what he 

saw and now is more than happy that Ward 

was on his side of the line for four years. 

The 185-pounder from Elizabeth, N. J., was 

outstanding every Saturday for the Terps. 
Ward graduated in 1952 with a degree from 

the School of Business and Public Administra- 
tion, finishing in the upper one-third of the class, 
and Insurance. 

His many honors are too numerous to mention, but Ward was recipient of 
every award immaginable for any lineman. After making All-America his 
junior year for his excellent defensive play, he proved that he wasn't just an 
ordinary platoon football player by making everybody's All-America team in 
1951 playing offense. Tatum himself credits the great success of his of- 
fensive team, highest scoring machine in the country, to his '51 Co-Captain, 
Bob Ward. When things got real tough for the Terps, Ward would trot in 
to play defense and stop the enemy threat. 

Besides the unanimous All-America selections his senior year, Ward was 
named "Lineman of the Year" by the Washington Touchdown Club and the 
Philadelphia Sportswriters' Assn. Pie was runnerup to Stanford's Bill Mc- 
Coll for the same Associated Press award. He was named the outstanding 
player of the Southern Conference. During the '51 season, he was the nation's 
"Lineman of the Week", after his great game against Georgia, played with a 
broken hand. 

The Wards have three children, two boys, Jim, 4, and Bob, Jr., 1, and a 
daughter, Kathie, three years old. 
EMMETT CHEEK 

A graduate of North Carolina, Cheek joined 
the Terp coaching staff in 1951. 

Born and raised in Chapel Hill, home of his 
alma mater, Cheek played in 1940 as a fresh- 
man for Coach Tatum, then Tarheel freshman 
coach, as a guard. After another year of 
football, he was called into the service in '41, 
and served in the Army Medics. . 

Returning to Carolina, Cheek completed 
his football career under Carl Snavely. He 
stayed on and did graduate work in '48. He 
received his Master's Degree in Physical Edu- 
cation from UNC in 1950. 

Prior to his accepting the Maryland post, 
Cheek was line coach and baseball coach in 
'49 and '50 at Guilford College, N. C. 

Besides his coaching duties, he is an in- 
structor in the Physical Education Department. 
Tommy. 




The Cheeks' have one son, 




EDDIE TEAGUE 

An outstanding three-sport athlete at N. C- 
State and University of North Carolina, 
Teague was added to the Terp staff in 1952. 

Tatum brought the Tarheel graduate to 
Maryland following his discharge in mid- 
August of '52 from the U. S. Marine Corps 
after serving 15 months in Korea with the 
Infantry, 1st Marine Division. A Captain in 
the USMCR, he served three years during 
World War II. 

Teague attended N. C. State College, 1941- 
43, then transferred to UNC via his Marine 
Unit and received his A.B. Degree. Lettering 
in football, basketball, and baseball, he re- 
ceived Ail-American mention his senior year 
at UNC as a tailback and also was named to 
the All-Conference team that year. 

Following his World War II service, he returned to UNC and got his 
Master's in '47. 

He then went to Guilford College, N. C, as backfield coach and assist- 
ant director of physical education in 1947 and '48. He was head coach and 
athletic director 1949-51 ; then was called to active duty- 

Teague now is studying for his Doctor's Degree. He also teaches in the 
School of Physical Education. 

The Teague's have a daughter, Peggy, six. 




BILL "Whitey" DOVELL 
Freshman Coach 

A guard on the Terp teams of '49 and '50, 
the "blonde buster" from Redbank, N. J. 
stayed on to help coach in the fall while com- 
pleting his work for B-A- in Physical Educa- 
tion. 

Tatum was so pleased with his handling 
various coaching duties that he gave him full- 
time job as freshman coach last fall. 

Dovell did one of the most outstanding jobs 
on any Baby Terp eleven, one of the best in 
many years at College Park. Their only regu- 
lar season loss was to a pro-studded Bainbridge 
Navy team. They compiled victories over the 
Navy Plebes, first in Maryland history, Vir- 
ginia and George Washington. All three were 
supposed to have had their finest yearling 
squads in a long time. 

'Whitey", a hard working perfectionist on and off 
studying for his Master's Degree in Physical Education. 




the field, is also 



THE TRAINERS 




ALFRED J. "DUKE" WYRE 

When Tatum came to Maryland in 1947 ^ e 
set out to get a top trainer and that he did in the 
long training experienced Duke Wyre. Today, 
Wyre is considered one of the top athletic 
trainers in the country. This will be his eighth 
year as the good doctor of Terp athletes. *"V |J 

"Duke" has many years of experience t<> kick 
his reputation. He has authored several training " a .^» 

manuals and is kept busy spreading the good 
word of the best methods of training athletic 
teams through many lectures. : 4, 

An Ivy-Leaguer, "Duke" was trainer at Yale ,11 

for 15 years before he moved to Holy Cross for 
two more semesters. Then in '47, the move to Maryland. 

A Navy veteran, Wyre served as a physical education instructor in the 
V-12 program. 

He was the first president of the Southern Conference Trainer's Assn. He 
is on the board of the National Trainers' Assn. In '49, he was named the top 
trainer in the East. 

Duke and his assistant, John Lacey, pride themselves in haying one of the 
best equipped training rooms in the country. 



JOHN LACEY 

The Terp's first full-time assistant trainer is 
the popular and capable John Lacy, a long time 
friend of trainer Duke Wyre. Lacy came to Col- 
lege Park in the summer of '51. 

A native of Connecticut, Lacy studied and 
graduated from Tilton Academy in New Hamp- 
shire. 

He too has had vast experience with athletic 
teams. Before coming to Maryland, Lacey was 
assistant trainer at Yale for three years. He 
also has had long experience with pro teams. In 
early pro training seasons, he had been trainer 
for the Chicago Cardinals, the New York Yanks, 
and was with the Baltimore Colts in 1950. 

Following the football season, Lacy travels with th 
teams. 




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THE 1954 TERPS 

University of Maryland's 1954 football team has a big job cut out for 
itself in more ways than one. Not only are they faced with another tough 
schedule, one that includes five Atlantic Coast Conference teams, a Southern 
Conference opponent, and four top intersectional battles, but they must make 
the big effort to defend the 1953 National Championship title it was voted 
unanimously last season after completing the only major schedule in the 
country unbeaten and untied. Too, Terp Coach, Jim Tatum, voted the 1953 
"Coach of the Year" by his colleagues, must try to keep himself in the usual 
high esteem of the nation's coaches with another winning season. 

What sort of formula has Tatum and his staff concocted for the 1954 
product? It is no concealed fact that the Terps lost seven of their starting 
11 from the national championship team, plus two other top substitutes. 
Missing will be the all-time backfieid foursome in Maryland history: 
All-America quarterback Bernie Faloney, all-America halfback Chester 
Hanulak who also was the nation's leading ground gainer per carry last 
season; halfback Dick Nolan, and fullback Ralph Felton. Up front, two 
great tackles, all-America Stan Jones and Bob "Blubber'' Morgan are gone 
along with a great two-way end Marty Crytzer. Center Charlie Lattimer 
and end Fred Heffner also have graduated. 

"We will be just as good offensively, with the defense, both up front 
and in the secondary, our biggest problem. A great job will be to find re- 
placements for Jones and Morgan at the tackle position. We have four fine 
boys coming back in Ray Blackburn, Tom Breunich, Ralph Baierl, and Tom 
McLuckie, so I think we should be able to find a good combination from 
these boys," Tatum said. 

"We should have two of the finest ball players in the country in our 
Co-Captains, fullback Dick Bielski and center John Irvine. They are both 
great one-platoon players and form the nucleus of our backfieid and up 
front where Irvine is just like a coach on the field." 

The Terp's halfbacks lend a big lift to the '54 team It is a fast back- 
field ; it could be faster than last year. They will be tops offensively but a 
shade lesser defensively. Quarterback Charlie Boxold, a great runner,passer, 
and play analyst is predicted to come into his own at the outset of the 
season. He will be backed up by Lynn Beightol and a fine-looking soph 
prospect, Frank Tamburello. The Terp halfbacks seniors Ronnie Waller and 
Joe Horning both have great experience offensively and defensively. Waller, 
playing in the shadows of Hanulak for two years, might be one of the 
nation's best. He could be a real national sleeper. Horning is a 10-second 
man and "sure" as they come on defense. They are backed up by most 
adequate one-platoon players in Dick Burgee, Eddie Vereb, John Weiciecow- 
ski and a host of fine sophs in Howard Dare, Ralph Hawkins, Harold 
Hull, John McVicker, and Jack Healy. 

With the great all-around playing of Bielski insuring the fullback spot, 
the Terps have some boys behind him to take over in George Albrecht, Bill 
Komlo and Jim Skarda, the latter two upcoming sophs. 

Maryland has one of the finest guard duos returning in George Pala- 
hunik and Jack Bowersox. Both are two-year veterans and last year played 
perfect ball both ways to establish themselves as real stars for this fall. 
With center Irvine and guards Palahunik and Bowersox, the Terps should 
have one of the finest "middles" of any line in the country. Junior Bob 
Pellegrini and Senior Dick Shipley, both lettermen lend outstanding support 
to the strong guard position. Soph Jack Davis is worth watching. 

The real rookies of the team, but a definite strong point, are our ends. 
(Continued on page 62) 



TERP OPPONENTS 



MARYLAND vs KENTUCKY 18 SEPTEMBER 

2:00 P. M. (C.S.T.) 
At McLean Stadium (36,000) 

FACTS ABOUT THE WILDCATS 

CONFERENCE: Southeastern 
LOCATION: Lexington, Kentucky 
HEAD COACH: Blanton Collier 
COLORS: Blue and White 
ENROLLMENT: 6000 
TYPE OFFENSE: Split-T 
Coach Blanton Collier 1953 RECORD: Won 7, Lost 2, Tied 1. 




WILDCATS' RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS 

(One 6-6 Tie) 



1931 



Maryland 
6 



Kentucky 
6 



TOTAL POINTS: Maryland, 6; Kentucky, 6 

1954 CO-CAPTAINS: Joe Koch, Guard; Harry Kirk, Tackle 

LETTERMEN RETURN I NG— 22 — Lost— 18 





1954 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


18 


Maryland 


Sept. 


25 


Mississippi at Memphis 
(Night) 


Oct. 


2 


Louisiana State (Night) 


Oct. 


9 


Auburn (Night) 


Oct. 


16 


at Florida 


Oct. 


23 


at Georgia Tech 


Oct. 


30 


Villanova 


Nov. 


6 


Vanderbilt 


Nov. 


13 


Memphis State 


Nov. 


20 


at Tennessee 





1953 


YARDSTICK 


DID 




NOT 


PLAY 











MARYLAND vs UCLA 1 OCTOBER 



8:30 P. M„ (P.S.T.) 

At Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum (102,000) 

Los Angeles, Calif. 

FACTS ABOUT THE BRUINS 

CONFERENCE: Pacific Coast 
LOCATION: Los Angeles, Calif. 
HEAD COACH: Henry R. "Red" Sanders 
COLORS: Dark Blue and Gold 
ENROLLMENT: 13,002 

TYPE OFFENSE: Balanced-line Single Wing 
1952 RECORD: Won 8, Lost 2, including 27-20 
loss in Rose Bowl game 



Coach "Red" Sanders 



BRUINS' RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS 

(This is the first gridiron meeting of the two schools.) 



1954 CAPTAIN: (Unnamed yet.) 



LETTERMEN RETURNING— 22 — LOST— 15 





1954 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


18 


San Diego Navy (Night) 


Sept. 


25 


at U. of Kansas i 


Oct. 


1 


Maryland (Friday Night) | 


Oct. 


9 


Washington at Seattle 


Oct. 


16 


Stanford 


Oct. 


23 


Oregon State at Corvallis 


! Oct. 


30 


California at Berkeley 


] Nov. 


6 


Oregon 


Nov. 


13 


Open Date 


Nov. 


20 


University of Southern 
California 





1953 


YARDSTICK 


DID 




NOT 


PLAY 



MARYLAND vs WAKE FOREST 9 OCTOBER 




Coach Tom Rogers 



2:00 P. M., (E.S.T.) 

At Bowman Gray Stadium (21,000) 

Winston Salem, N. C. 

PACTS ABOUT THE DEACONS 
CONFERENCE: Atlantic Coast 
LOCATION: Wake Forest, N. C. 
HEAD COACH: Tom Rogers 
COLORS: Old Gold and Black 
ENROLLMENT: 1450 
TYPE OFFENSE: T 
1953 RECORD: Won 3, Lost 6, Tied 1 



DEACONS' RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS 
(Maryland, Won 2, Lost 1, Tied 0) 





Maryland 


Wake Forest 


1917 


29 


13 


1943 


13 


7 


1944 





39 



TOTAL POINTS: Maryland, 42; Wake Forest, 59 

1954 CAPTAIN: None Selected; Probable Game Captains 

LETTERMEN RETURNING— 20 — LOST— 8 





1954 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


IS 


G.W. 


Sept. 


25 


V.P.I, at Richmond. Va. 


Oct. 


2 


North Carolina State 


Oct. 


9 


Maryland at Winston- 
Salem, N. C. 


Oct. 


23 


North Carolina at Chapel 
Hill 


Oct. 


30 


Clemson at Charlotte, N.C. 


Nov. 


6 


at Richmond 


Nov. 


13 


Duke 


Nov. 


20 


at William and Mary 


Nov. 


27 


at South Carolina 





1953 


YARDSTICK 


DID 




NOT 


PLAY 



MARYLAND vs NORTH CAROLINA 16 OCTOBER 



2:00 P. M. (E.S.T.) 

at Byrd Stadium (35,000) 

College Park, Md. 

FACTS ABOUT THE TARHEELS 
CONFERENCE: Atlantic Coast 
LOCATION: Chapel Hill, N. C.. 
HEAD COACH: George Barclay 
COLORS: Carolina Blue and White 
ENROLLMENT: 7000 
TYPE OFFENSE: Split-T 
1953 RECORD: Won 4, Lost 6, Tied 




Coach George Barclay 



TARHEELS' RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS 

(Maryland: Won 6, Lost 12, Tied 1) 





Maryland 


N. C. 




Maryland 


N C 


1920 


13 





1930 


21 


28 


1921 


7 


16 


1935 





33 


1922 


3 


27 


1936 





14 


1923 


14 





1946 





13 


1924 


6 





1947 





19 


1925 





16 


1948 


20 


49 


1926 


14 


6 


1950 


7 


7 


1927 


6 


7 


1951 


14 


7 


1928 


19 


26 


1953 


26 





1929 





43 









TOTAL POINTS 
1954 CAPTAIN: 



Maryland, 170; North Carolina, 311 
None Selected — Probable Game Captains 



LETTERMEN RETURNING— 21 



LOST— 16 





1954 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


25 


N. C. State 


Oct. 


2 


Tulane at New Orleans 


Oct. 


9 


Georgia 


Oct. 


16 


at Maryland 


Oct. 


23 


Wake Forest 


Oct. 


30 


Tennessee at Knoxville 


; Nov. 


6 


South Carolina 


Nov. 


13 


at Notre Dame 


Nov. 


20 


at Virginia 


Nov. 


27 


Duke 





1953 YARDSTICK 




Maryland North 


Carolina 


15 

259 

108 

15 

6 

1 

5 

46.6 

3 

92 




10 


... Rushing Yardage .. 
... Passing Yardage .. 
... Passes Attempted .. 
... Passes Completed .. 
Passes Intercepted By 

Punts 

.... Punting Average ... 

Fumbles Lost 

Yards Penalized .. 


153 
25 

!_3 

3 
1 
8 
41.2 
2 
135 


Score by Periods: 

Maryland 14 6 

North Caro 


6—26 
0— 


Touchdowns: Faloney, Boxold, Fel- 
ton, Dennis. Extra Points: Felton, 
Bielski. 



MARYLAND vs MIAMI 22 OCTOBER 




fit 



Coach Andy Gustafson 



8:15 P. M. (E.S.T.) 

at Orange Bowl Stadium (65,000) 

Miami, Fla. 

FACTS ABOUT THE HURRICANES 

CONFERENCE: Southern Intercollegiate 

Athletic Association 
LOCATION: Coral Gables, Fla. 
HEAD COACH: Andy Gustafson 
COLORS: Orange, Green and White 
ENROLLMENT: 10,500 
TYPE OFFENSE: T 
1953 RECORD: Won 4, Lost 5, Tied 



HURRICANES' RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS 

(Maryland: Won 3, Lost 0, Tied 0) 

Miami 

13 





TOTAL POINTS: Maryland, 70; Miami, 13 

1954 CAPTAIN: None Selected — Probable Game Captains 

LETTERMEN RETURNING— 21 — LOST— 9 





Maryland 


1948 


27 


1949 


13 


1953 


30 





1954 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


24 


Furman 


Oct. 


1 


Baylor 


Oct. 


8 


Holy Cross 


Oct. 


15 


Mississippi State 


Oct. 


22 


Maryland 


Oct. 


29 


Fordham 


Nov. 


6 


at Auburn 


Nov. 


19 


Alabama 


Nov. 


27 


at Florida 


(All Home Games at Night) 



Marylar 
14 
6 
20 
54 
269 
55 
214 
10 
7 
153 
367 .... 
4 
93.0 
1 

25 
Score 
Mary 
....Miam 
Mary 
Hanula 
tra Poi 
Goal: 


1953 YARDSTICK 

d 

. First Downs Rushing . 
. First Downs Passing . 
... Total First Downs ... 


Miami 

8 

4 

12 

34 


Yards Gained Rushing 
. Yards Lost Rushing . 
. Net Yards Rushing . 
. Forwards Attempted . 
. Forwards Completed . 

Yards Gained Passing 
Total Net Yards Gained 


152 

48 

104 

21 

8 

79 

.... 183 

2 


Punt Average 


39.7 
3 


Fumbles Lost 2 

Yards Penalized 15 

by Periods: 

and 20 7 3—30 

i 0—0 

and Scoring: Touchdowns: 
k, Crytzer, Felton. Waller. Ex- 
nts: Felton, 2; Bielski. Field 
Bielski. 



MARYLAND vs SOUTH CAROLINA 30 OCTOBER 




Coach Rex Enright 



2:00 P. M. (E.S.T.) 

at Carolina Stadium (34,000) 

Columbia, S. C. 

FACTS ABOUT THE GAMECOCKS 
CONFERENCE: Atlantic Coast 
LOCATION: Columbia, S. C. 
HEAD COACH: Rex Enright 
COLORS: Garnet and Black 
ENROLLMENT: 4000 
TYPE OFFENSE: T 
1953 RECORD: Won 7, Lost 3, Tied 



GAMECOCKS' RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS 

(Maryland: Won 6, Lost 4, Tied 0) 





Maryland 


S. C. 




Maryland 


S. C 


1926 





12 


1946 


17 


21 


1927 


26 





1947 


19 


13 


1928 


7 


21 


1948 


19 


7 


1929 





26 


1949 


44 


7 


1945 


19 


13 


1953 


24 


6 



TOTAL POINTS: Maryland, 165; South Carolina, 126 

1954 CO-CAPTAINS: Bill Wohrman, Fullback; Harry Lovell, Guard 

LETTERMEN RETURNING— 19 — LOST— 12 





1954 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


25 


at Army 


Oct. 


2 


West Virginia (Night) 


Oct. 


9 


Furman at Greenville, S.C. 


Oct. 


21 


Clemson 


Oct. 


30 


Maryland 


■ Nov. 


6 


at North Carolina 


Nov. 


13 


Virginia 


Nov 


20 


at Duke 


Nov. 


27 


Wake Forest 


Dec. 


4 


The Citadel at Charleston, 
S. C. 



Mar 

16 

213 

37 

250 

8 

2 

1 
16 

3 
94 
42 
43 

5 

2 

25 


1953 YARDSTICK 

yland South Car 


Dlina 

11 

37 

122 

159 

23 

12 

1 

4 

7 

13 

34 

79 

3 

3 




Net Yards Rushing 

Net Yards Passing 

.. Total Yds. (Rush & Pass) . 

Passes Attempted 

Passes Completed 

Intercepted by 

.... Yds. Interceptions Ret. ... 


Yds. Punts Returned 

Punting Average 

Yds. Kickoffs Ret 


.... Own Fumbles Recovered .... 
... Yards Lost by Penalties ... 


Score by Periods: 

Maryland 14 3 7— 

South Carolina 6 0— 


24 
6 


Maryland Scoring: Felton, Hanu- 
lak. Vereb. Extra Points: Felton (2), 
Bielski. Field Goal: Bielski. 

South Carolina Scoring: Wohrman. 



MARYLAND vs NORTH CAROLINA STATE 6 NOVEMBER 




Coach Earle Edwards 



HOMECOMING 

2:00 P.M. (E.S.T.) 

at Byrd Stadium (35,000) 

College Park, Md. 

FACTS ABOUT THE WOLFPACK 
CONFERENCE: Atlantic Coast 
LOCATION: Raleigh, N. C. 
HEAD COACH: Earle Edwards 
COLORS: Scarlet and White 
ENROLLMENT: 4000 
TYPE OFFENSE: Single-Double Wing; 
1953 RECORD: Won 1, Lost 9, Tied 



WOLFPACKS' RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS 

(Maryland: Won 4, Lost 4, Tied 3) 



Maryland N.C. State 

1908 6 23 1946 

1917 6 10 1947 

1921 6 6 1949 

1922 7 6 1950 

1923 26 12 1951 

1924 9 



Maryland N.C. State 

7 28 



14 6 

13 16 

53 



TOTAL POINTS: Maryland, 138; N. C. State, 107 
1954 CAPTAIN: Don Langston, Fullback 
LETTERMEN RETURN I NG— 16 — LOST— 6 





1954 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


18 


at Virginia Tech 


Sept. 


25 


at North Carolina 


Oct. 


2 


at Wake Forest 


Oct. 


9 


at William and Mary 


Oct 


16 


Florida State (Night) 


Oct. 


23 


Duke (Night) 


Oct. 


30 


Furman (Night) 


Nov. 


6 


at Maryland 


Nov. 


13 


Richmond 


Nov. 


20 


at West Virginia 





1953 


YARDSTICK 


DID 




NOT 


PLAY 



MARYLAND vs CLEMSON 13 NOVEMBER 



(BAND and AIR FORCE ROTC DAY) 

2:00 P. M. (E.S.T.) 

at Byrd Stadium (35,000) 

College Park, Md. 

FACTS ABOUT THE TIGERS 

CONFERENCE: Atlantic Coast 

LOCATION: Clemson, S. C. 

HEAD COACH: Frank Howard 

COLORS: Orange and Purple 

ENROLLMENT: 2600 

TYPE OFFENSE: T 

1953 RECORD: Won 3, Lost 5, Tied 1 




Coach Frank Howard 



TIGERS' RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS 

(Maryland: Won 2, Lost 0, Tied 0) 





Maryland 


1952 


28 


1953 


20 



Clemson 





TOTAL POINTS: Maryland, 48; Clemson, 

1954 CO-CAPTAINS: Scott Jackson, End; Clyde White, Tackle, Mark 
Kane, Guard; Buck George, HB. 

LETTERMEN RETURN I NG— 22 — LOST— 13 





1954 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


18 


Presbyterian (Night) 


Sept. 


25 


at Georgia 


Oct. 


2 


Virginia Tech 


Oct. 


9 


Florida at Jacksonville 
(Night) 


Oct. 
Oct. 


21 
30 


at South Carolina 

Wake Forest at Charlotte 


Nov. 


6 


Furman 


Nov. 


13 


at Maryland 


Nov. 


20 


at Auburn 


Nov. 


27 


The Citadel 





1953 YARDSTICK 




Maryland 


Clemson 


13 

3 

16 

302 

14 

4 



103 

432 

2 

34.5 
35 

5 

3 

Score 
Maryl 
Clems 


First Downs Rushing 
. First Downs Passing 
. Total First Downs 
. Net Yards Rushing 
... Passes Attempted .. 
... Passes Completed .. 

Passes Intercepted By 
. Net Yards Passing 
... Net Yards Gained .. 


7 

2 

9 

162 

10 

2 

2 

21 

183 

7 


.... Punting Average .. 
... Yards Penalized .. 

No. Fumbles 

Fumbles Lost . -. 

by Periods: 
and 7 7 
on 


39.8 
5 


2 



6—20 
0— 


Maryland Scoring Touchdowns: Fal- 
oney, Nolan, 2. Conversons: Felton, 
Bielski. 



MARYLAND vs GEORGE WASHINGTON 20 NOVEMBER 




Coach "Bo" Sherman 



(SENIOR DAY) 

2:00 P. M. (E.S.T.) 

at Byrd Stadium (35.000) 

College Park, Md. 

FACTS ABOUT THE COLONIALS 
CONFERENCE: Southern 
LOCATION: Washington, D. C. 
HEAD COACH: Eugene "Bo" Sherman 
COLORS: Buff and Blue 
ENROLLMENT: 11,500 
TYPE OFFENSE: Split-T 
1953 RECORD: Won 5, Lost 4, Tied 



COLONIALS' RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS 

(Maryland: Won 9, Lost 3, Tied 3) 





Maryland 


G.W. 




Maryland 


G.W 


1897 








1909 





26 


1898 





32 


1910 


6 





1902 


11 


10 


1948 


47 





1903 


6 





1949 


40 


14 


1904 








1950 


23 


7 


1907 


11 





1951 


33 


7 


1908 





57 


1953 


27 


6 



TOTAL POINTS: Maryland, 204; George Washington, 153 

(First 5 games of series, G.W. was Columbian U.) 
1954 CO-CAPTAINS: Pat Kober, End; Norb "Dutch" Danz, Fullback 
LETTERMEN RETURNING— 13 —LOST— 7 





1954 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


18 


at Wake Forest 


Sept. 


25 


VMI at Alexandria, Va. 


Oct. 


2 


at Virginia 


Oct. 


9 


at West Virginia 


Oct. 


16 


at Penn 


Oct. 


22 


William and Mary (Night) 


Oct. 


29 


Richmond (Night) 


Nov. 


5 


Virginia Tech (Night) 


Nov. 


20 


at Maryland 



1953 YARDSTICK 



Maryland 



G. W. 



13 First Downs 8 

241 Net Yards Rushing 33 

61 Passing Yardage 75 

13 Passes Attempted 19 

3 Passes Completed 8 

2 Passes Intercepted By 2 

4 No. Punts 9 

29 Punting Average 30 

2 Fumbles Lost 2 

30 Yards Penalized 20 

Score by Periods: 

Marvland 7 13 7—27 

G.W 6 0—6 

Maryland Scoring Touchdowns: Fel- 
ton. Hanulak. Faloney. Horning. Con- 
versions: Felton (2); Bielski. 

G.W. Scoring Touchdowns: Gaskell. 



MARYLAND vs MISSOURI 25 NOVEMBER (Thanksgiving) 

(DAD'S DAY) 

12 O'Clock NOON (E.S.T.) 
at Byrd Stadium (35,000) 

FACTS ABOUT THE TIGERS 
CONFERENCE: Big Seven 
LOCATION: Columbia, Missouri 

HEAD COACH: Don Faurot gg 

COLORS: Black and Gold 
ENROLLMENT: 7200 
TYPE OFFENSE: Sliding T 
1953 RECORD: Won 6, Lost 4, Tied Coa<ii Cm,,, i-mmi 




TIGERS' RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS 

(Maryland: Won 4, Lost 0, Tied 0) 





Maryland 


1950 


20 


1951 


35 


1952 


13 


1953 


20 


'Gator Bowl 


Game 



Missouri 

7 



10 

6 



TOTAL POINTS: Maryland, 88; Missouri, 23 

1954 CAPTAIN: None Selected — Probable Game Captains 

LETTERMEN RETURNING— 19 — LOST— 13 





1954 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


25 


at Purdue 


Oct. 


2 


at Kansas State 


Oct. 


9 


Southern Methodist 


Oct. 


16 


Indiana 


Oct. 


23 


Iowa State 


Oct. 


30 


at Nebraska 


Nov. 


6 


Colorado 


Nov. 


13 


at Oklahoma 


Nov. 


20 


Kansas 


Nov. 


25 


at Maryland 



1953 YARDSTICK 

Maryland Missouri 

14 First Downs 10 

225 Rushing Yardage 99 

86 Passing Yardage 89 

16 Passes Attempted 18 

6 Passes Completed 7 

4 Passes Intercepted By 2 

6 No. Punts 5 

38.8 Punting Average 38.6 

3 Fumbles Lost 2 

70 Yards Penalized 20 

Score by Periods: 

Maryland 7 13—20 

Missouri 6 0—6 

Maryland Scoring Touchdowns: Han- 
ulak, Faloney, Kilgallen. Conversions: 
Felton, Bielski. 

Missouri Scoring Touchdowns: Scar- 
dino. 



THE OUTLOOK FOR OUR OPPONENTS AS 
REPORTED BY THEIR PUBLICITY DIRECTORS 

University of Kentucky 

By Ken Kuhn 

The road from Maryland to Tennessee in Kentucky's 1954 football trek 
could be one of the most difficult, ever experienced. With a new coach in the 
driver's seat, a squad lacking both physical size and general experience and a 
man-sized headache schedule, the Wildcats may find the going rather difficult 
this season. As if their other problems were not enough, some very big gaps 
were created with the departure of such standout contributors as Steve Meil- 
inger, the versatile All- America halfback-end-quarterback; Ray Correll, an 
All-America guard; Ralph Paolone, stellar fullback and leading ground gainer; 
and Joe Piatt, regular halfback who had an 8.3 average gain during the 1953 
campaign. 

All told 13 letter winners will be among the missing when the first col- 
legiate grid aggregation of Coach Blanton Collier takes the field against 
defending national champion Maryland next September. To plug the gaps and 
take up slack, twenty-two players return who won letters last season. Among 
them are five linemen and one back who started the Tennessee game climaxing 
Kentucky's great comeback season of 1953, but the missing links more than 
make up for what might be an optimistic look based on these returnees. 

The line should be adequate except for a lack of depth. The backfield 
will not only be minus three starters who were the top ground starters and 
gainers last year, but the replacements will lack both experience and size. 
Quarterback Bob Hardy, who came out of nowhere to lead the Wildcats 
undefeated through their final eight games of the '53 season, will be the biggest 
at 190. His running mates in the "Pony" backfield are expected to be left 
half Dick Mitchell, 159; right half Dick Maloney, 175; and fullback Hayden 
Hooper, 168. Collier expects to retain the Split T style of attack and likely 
will rely on speed to make up his team's lack of size. 

UCLA. 

By Vic Kelley 

UCLA's Pacific Coast Conference football champions will again depend 
on one of the nation's outstanding lines for much of their 1954 success, despite 
loss of four Rose Bowl line starters and all the regular backfield. 

Anchored by Left Tackle Jack Ellena and Right Guard Jim Salsbury, 
two All-America candidates, Coach Red Sanders' Bruin line again may 
prove stingy in giving up touchdowns. Both Ellena and Salsbury weigh in the 
neighborhood of 215 pounds. 

The backfield, despite loss of Ail-American tailback Paul Cameron, may 
still be a versatile and colorful crew with 160-pound Primo Villanueva oper- 
ating at left half and a truly outstanding performer in Bob Davenport (193) at 
fullback. Other possible backfield starters include quarterback Terry Debay 
and either one-year vet Johnny Herman or Santa Clara University transfer 
Jim Decker at wingback. 

In addition to the pass-conscious Villanueva, UCLA has several good- 
sized and promising wingmen, including Bob Heydenfeldt (6-2), Rommie 
Loudd (6-2%), Bob Long (6-4) and Johnny Smith (5-11). 

Along with Ellena, Salsbury, the likes of left guard Sam Boghosian, 
center Johnny Peterson and right tackle Joe Ray should give the Westerners 



a large, mobile front wall, behind which the famed Sanders balanced-line 
single wing attack can operate. 

The contest between the Bruins and Maryland on the night of Oct I could 
result in a new national night attendance record. The old record of 97,802 
was set last September in Philadelphia when Villanova and Georgia met. The 
previous high was at the 1946 UCLA-St. Mary's game, seen by 92,976 in the 
Los Angeles Coliseum. 

Wake Forest College 

By Bill Hensley 

The Demon Deacons of Wake Forest appeared headed for the football 
dumps last year but ended the season on a pleasant note by dumping heavily- 
favored South Carolina 19-13. 

Wake Forest had a 3-6-1 record last year for its worst record since 1937, 
but the team which finally got rolling and upended the Gamecocks is back, 
with a few exceptions, and shows promise of a much better season in 1954. 

Leading the way for the Deacons will be Bob Bartholomew, a block- 
busting tackle who is a leading candidate for All-America, and Quarterback- 
Joe White, a pass-minded field general who engineered the upset wins over 
South Carolina and Villanova. 

Wake Forest will depend upon speed and experience. A number of 
sophomores will be counted upon in key positions but the starting eleven will 
be made up mostly of veterans who weathered the blues in 1953. 

Coach Tom Rogers says "we will be better on defense and our offense 
will improve if we can use our speed to its best advantage." 

Biggest losses are End Bob Ondilla, Halfback Bruce Hillenbrand and 
Quarterback Sonny George. 

University of North Carolina 

By Jake Wade 

General over-all improvement is expected for the University of North 
Carolina football team in 1954- 

Specifically, this team should have much more speed than recent Tar Heel 
editions. A considerably sharper passing attack is counted on. Indications are 
the line will be stouter and quicker. 

Head Coach George Barclay will be disappointed if the Tar Heels do not 
win at least six games on the team's customary strong schedule and predicts 
that they will. Last }'ear they won four and lost six. 

There is a general feeling that the Tar Heels are gradually working their 
way back to their former and traditionally high standing in the game. 

Twenty-two lettermen are listed on the roster. The standouts among 
these veterans are left halfback Ken Keller, right halfback Connie Gravitte, 
guard Jimmy Neville and tackle Jack Maultsby. 

Keller last year as a sophomore, despite being handicapped by injuries, was 
the team's best ground gainer in collecting 432 yards with a 5-2 yards-per- 
carry average. Gravitte was second in yards gained with 302, and had a 4.9 
average. Both are dangerous, explosive runners, geared to go all the way with 
proper collaboration from their mates. 

Guard Neville is one of the squad's most improved players. Maultsby, 
who weighs 220, should be the bulwark of the line and has promise of being 
one of the nation's really great tackles. 

Larry Parker is a sound and solid senior back and Flo Worrell is a speedy 
veteran back, both strong fortifications in the ball carrying department. 



Senior guard Ed Patterson, considered the team's best lineman last year, 
looks for another fine season but he has stong competition for a starting berth 
from junior Bill Koman, switched from center. 

Most promising sophomores are fullback Larry McMullen, 200 but fast; 
end Darden Livesay (194 and 6-2) ; tackle John Bilich (210 and 6-3) ; and 
center George Stavnitski (210 and 6-1). All are challenging for starting posi- 
tions. 

Quarterback is still a moot position, as it has been since the Split-T at- 
tack was installed here two years ago. Three lettermen quarterbacks are 
Marshall Newman, Albert Long and Len Bullock. The latter had to miss 
spring practice as the result of an operation. Newman, a great defensive 
player, and Long, flashier at the ball handling job, likely will alternate at 
running the team. 

Improving passing is expected because Newman has developed a better 
passing touch and the receivers looked sharper in the spring. Ends Will Frye, 
Dick Starner, Larry Muschamp and Darden Liversay are all skilled receivers, 
along with halfbacks Connie Gravitte and Ken Keller. 

University of Miami 

By George Gallett 

University of Miami, holding a 4-5 record in 1953, will be much stronger 
in 1954. Freshmen and sophomores of 1953 who were busy routing veterans 
out of their jobs during the week and then making game-losing mistakes on 
weekends, have now become poised veterans on their own. 

Twenty-three lettermen return from 1953, P m s Carl Garrigus, a 1952 
letterman who was out for all save five minutes of the 1953 campaign. 
They give the Hurricanes two lettermen for every position save tackle, where 
three lettermen are available for the four first two tarn spots. 

The troublesome quarterback spots of the last two years seem solved 
by the return to action of Garrigus, and the availability of Mario Bonofiglio, 
a colorful guy who is a terrific runner and triple-threat back. Bosseler, a 
fleet 200 pound sophomore, should be one of the south's better backs. Gordon 
Malloy, senior, who moves to left halfback, will be better at that post than at 
fullback, where he played last year. 

Miami's 1953 ends were rated among the best of the country. They're all 
back plus some late developing replacements. The guards, green a year ago, 
now have savvy. Tackles will be a shade better. Mike Hudock, idle last 
year, is a jolting center who may crowd Ernest Tobey off the first team — and 
Tobey was voted the most valuable lineman on the 1953 squad. 

Coach Andy Gustafson believes this team will have the best offense 
Miami has been able to muster since 1950. In addition to that, it is faster, 
heavier, and more spirited than recent Miami clubs. 

One thing is certain. Miami will have its greatest running attack in 
years. 

University of South Carolina 

By Don Barton 

Despite the loss of such standouts as Quarterback Johnny Gramling, End 
Clyde Bennett, Halfback Gene Wilson, Guard Bob King, and others, prospects 
are for another strong team at Carolina. The Gamecocks face a tougher 
schedule in 1954, however, meeting nine of the ten teams on the '53 schedule 
and replacing Wofford with Army. 

Leading the Gamecocks into the season will be Co-Captains Bill Wohr- 



man, fullback and voted the most outstanding blocker in the ACC last year, 
and Tackle Harry Lovell. 

Nineteen lettermen return from the 1953 team, including such standouts 
as All-America center candidate Leon Cunningham and Guard Frank (The 
Friendly Bear) Mincevich. 

Defensively, the team should be as well off as it was last year, but on 
offense there might be a drop. Gramling's passing will be missed, along with 
the running of Wilson and Halfback Blackie Kincaid. 

Harold Lewis is the probable successor to Gramling at quarterback, where 
depth is lacking. Sophomore Mackie Prickett is coming along gradually in that 
position. 

The halfbacks will be well set for offense, with hard-running Mike 
Caskey on the left and shifty Carl Brazell on the right. Both averaged over 
six yards per try last season. Bobby Drawdy, who bohunked last season to 
learn defense, Bill Tarrer, and dashman Tommy Woodlee figure in as leading 
replacements. 

Wohrman has fullback competition from big Ed Adams, a 220-pound 
transfer student from Baltimore, Md. Adams runs hard and at the worst will 
be an adequate reserve. 

Don Sehulster, who didn't play much last season was a pleasant surprise 
at end in winter practice. He may be the starter on the left side, with Larry 
Gosnell on the right. Lettermen Joe Silas and Spec Granger will be breath- 
ing down the necks of those two for starting positions. Leading sophomore 
hopes are Julius Derrick, Joe Frederick and Billy Rivers. 

Lovell and Hugh Merck, an all-state choice in 1953, ' ea d the tackle 
returnees. Behind them are lettermen Gene Kopec and Bob Schwartz, two 
dependables. Sophomores Jack Salsibury and Sam DeLuca figure to rise to 
contention during the first weeks of fall practice. 

Mincevich appears headed for his best year at left guard, and Dick Cov- 
ington, a rising junior, came into his own at right guard during winter prac- 
tice. Covington moved ahead of Joe DeFore, who played right behind King 
last season. 

The center situation is in good hands, with Cunningham pointing for 
another good season. Cunningham made all of the all-conference teams the 
past two years. Hugh Bell would make a fine first-team center, if Cunning- 
ham were not around, and the position will be in good hands whenever he is 
called upon. Dick Camilucci, a transfer student, looks like a real prospect for 
the future. 

North Carolina State 

By Ed Storey 

Earle Edwards, former end coach at Michigan State, has begun the re- 
building of North Carolina State's football fortunes and while there is evi- 
dence that the Wolfpack of 1954 will be improved over last year, Edwards is 
by no means a miracle man. Edwards assumed the reins of State football on 
Feb. 9 under a new three-year contract. 

The first task of the new regime was to install a new system of attack, 
which is based on the Michigan State-style of play, commonly called a "mul- 
tiple offense". The system is devised to use the best features of three forma- 
tions — ie — single-wing, double-wing and T-formation, which operates from the 
unbalanced line. Last year the Wolfpack utilized the split T. 

Several newcomers are certain to play a big part in the 1954 play- 
Quarterback Billy Franklin of Farmville, Va. turned in an excellent job at 



quarterback in spring drills and shows promise of becoming a capable passer. 
Eddie West, who held the job regularly last year, was unable to participate 
in the spring game because of a shoulder injury sustained in the final game of 
last season. 

Other backs who were impressive in the spring game were Fullback Don 
Langston, Halfbacks Bill Teer and Ed Gelsdorf, Ted Kilyk and John Zubaty. 
Langston should be one of the best backs in the Atlantic Coast Conference. 
He has led the team in rushing for the last two years and his up-coming 
senior season should be his best. He is the fastest man on the team and has 
plenty of hitting power. 

Two backs who did not play in the spring game should be key men in 
next season's plans. Halfback Monte Seehorn was kept out with an ankle 
injury, but he had been one of the leaders in early drills. Harrison Mac- 
Keever, a rising soph, can be of extensive value as Langston's understudy at 
fullback. 

The line has capable lettermen returning from last year, but not much 
depth. Several players were unable to play in the spring game, including 
All-State Guard Al D'Angelo, perhaps the best lineman on the squad, who 
was out with a broken arm. D'Angelo, Soph Darrell Dess, Seniors Bud Davis 
and Jim Frazier, converted fullback Mike Nordone and John Szuchan should 
handle the guards. John Bagonis, who was out of school last year, is due to 
return. This perhaps is the strongest line post. 

The tackles are a bit questionable. C. M. Price and Ben Kapp look like 
the leaders with capable support from Tony Leone, Hank Spivey, Ken Urgo- 
vitch and Bob Dunnigan. 

The center and end positions are problems. Only Dick Tonn has seen 
much service at the pivot of the line and his replacements are question marks. 
Four capable ends were graduated last year and the ranks are thin this season. 

That the overall picture is improved over 1953 does not indicate that there 
will be any great improvement in the won-lost record. The opposition ap- 
pears to be equally as rough as last season with such teams as Maryland, 
Duke and West Virginia due to be national powers, a tagline certainly not due 
to be State's lot in 1954. 

Clemson College 

By Breat Breedix 

A more versatile offense, added depth and experience are the reasons for 
optimism in the Clemson football camp as the 1954 season approaches. 

In their second year as a T-formation team, Coach Frank Howard's 
Tigers showed anywhere from a 100 per cent to 400 per cent improvement on 
offense _ in spring practice — or so observers from other schools said after 
witnessing the conclusion to Clemson's successful out-of-season drills. 

Don King, rated best T-quarterback in the nation by manv but better 
remembered by Maryland players for his great defensive play in 1953. will 
have plenty of help in the Clemson backfield. Billy O'Dell will" be at fullback, 
Jim Coleman at right half and Buck George at left half. All four positions 
have three-team depth of a reliable nature. 

In the line, only losses off the 1953 team were Co-Captains Dreher Gaskin 
and Nathan. Expected to start the season are Scott Jackson and Walt Lara- 
way at_ the ends, Clyde White and Tommy Mattos at the tackles, Mark Kane 
and Dick DeSimone at the guards and Hampton Hunter at center. All but 
DeSimon are lettermen. 



George Washington University 

By Frank Continetti 

George Washington football is definitely on the upswing. Head Coach 
Eugene "Bo" Sherman, the most successful grid mentor to arrive on the GW 
scene in over a decade, will greet what shapes up as one of his better squads 
wnen pre-season drills open beprember 1st. 

With lettermen returning to man every backfield position and four top 
flight ends on hand the Colonials should improve on their 5-4 record of last 
season. The front line situation, from tackle to tackle, finds two battle tested 
veterans returning, bpring drills revealed that sophomore linemen are ready 
to fill in where needed. 

Sherman will not be lacking in line busters with three fullbacks ready 
to go. Tops among this group is Co-Captain Norb "Dutch" Danz, a proven 
power runner. Joe Boland and Jim Naddeo will share duties with Danz. 
Billy Weaver, the most versatile youngster on the team, has one halfback spot 
all to himself. Len Ciemnecki, Skinny Saffer, Lou Donofrio and Bo Austin 
are all battling for the other running slot. All letter winners save Austin 
who comes up from the frosh unit with loud recommendations. 

The flanks will be capably handled by an all veteran contingent of 
Richie Gaskell, All- Southern Conference and Honorable Mention All-America 
in 'S3', Co-Captain Pat Kober, a vicious defense man, Jack Daly and George 
Dancu will fill in nicely when Gaskell and Kober need a breather. Dick 
Gasperi, the most proven "inside" lineman on the squad, will man the center 
position while John Ziamandanis, another veteran, has tabs on one tackle 
post. 

University of Missouri 

By Bill Callahan 

The forecast is for a good, veteran football team at Missouri in 1954. 

With 19 lettermen due back, the Tigers of Don Faurot still are not deep- 
ly rooted at all positions. The backfield picture looks quite secure, with three 
senior quarterbacks returning, and with experienced depth evident at the other 
ball-carrying slots. 

But you still win football games in the line, and Mizzou's backlog of 
seasoned hefties, after the probable starters are checked off, is not too re- 
assuring. Guard and tackle stations appear to be the most short-handed. 

However, Faurot's T-sprung gridmen — who tied Kansas State for sec- 
ond place in the conference last year — could improve on 1953's overall 6-4 
showing — if their solid core of seniors plays up to expectations. 

The Missourians will rely heavily on veteran leadership and savvy to do 
battle with a stiff intersectional line-up (Purdue, S.M.U., Indiana and 
Maryland) — and with Big Seven foes. 

Seniors — mostly from the group who were eligible for varsity competi- 
tion as freshmen in 1951 — could take over nine of M.U.'s starting berths. Not 
more than a half-dozen rookies, off a freshman team that was twice beaten, 
are likely to help the varsity this year. 

Mizzou's No. 1 backfield could be all-senior — with Vic Eaton rating the 
early-September edge over Tony Scardino at quarterback; Jerry Schoon- 
maker, ail-American baseball outfielder at left half ; lefty Jack Fox at right 
half ; and rugged Bob Bauman at fullback. 

Starters in the line probably will have : Pete Corpeny and Jack Hurley, 
ends ; Charley Bull and Al Portney, tackles ; Terry Roberts and Jake 
Shiveley, guards and Ton} 7 Karakas, center. 

Bauman at fullback, and linebacker Roberts, won all-Big Seven laurels 
last year. 





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TERP THUMBNAIL SKETCHES 

ENDS 

BILL WALKER, 21, 6-0, 185, Junior from West Mifflin, Pa. — stepped into the National 
limelight and tabbed himself a future all-America for his great play as only a 
sophomore last season . . . the son of a former major league baseball player with 
the Cardinals, Walker made a terrific bid for future gridiron stardom playing as the 
only soph on the '53 National Championship eleven . . . was one of the most pleasant 
boys to watch play consistent good ball . . . gave excellent performances offensively 
and defensively each game . . . very fast, good blocker, and great receiver . . . has a 
good pair of "sure" hands . . . also- excelled on defense . . . received one of the rare 
honors accorded a soph when he was named the nation's "Lineman of the Week'' for 
one of the most brilliant exhibitions of end playing seen in the Alabama game . . . 
caught two td passes and threw 'Bama ball carriers for huge losses all day . . . also 
named Washington Post "Player of the Week" after the Alabama game . . . made 
United Press Honorable Mention; all-Conference 2nd team on both the AP and Southern 
Writer's Ass'n . . . second highest pass receiver with nine receptions for 229 yeards and 
three scores . . . intercepted a pass for 12 yard return ... a good punter but had to 
punt only once, the final punt of the game in the finals with Alabama, for 34 yeards . . . 
came to Maryland as a halfback . . . Tatum excused Walker from, spring practice after 
a week so he could play baseball . . . topped the Marylanct batters with a healthy 365 
average, fourth high in the ACC, which included a pair of doubles and five triples . . . 
played the outfield and also caught . . . went to same high school as teamate George 
Albrecht, fullback. 

RUSSELL DENNIS, 20, 6-3, 210, Junior from Norwalk, Conn. — has the inside track for 
the other starting end position , . . was a top replacement last season for Marty 
Crytzer and did an outstanding job as another of a fine crop of sophomore ends ... a 
big strong boy with good hands capable of making great effort for the ball . . . has 
good speed . . . fine blocker . . . most outstanding on defense, ; crashes and floats 
well . . . caught five for 165 yards and one td . . . a fine looking boy who had a good 
rookie year due to be another star end . . . majoring in public relations. 
TIMOTHY FLYNN, 21, 6-2, 195, Junior from Chevy Chase, Md — a big lean rough lad 
on the field but always a smile off the field . . . prepped at Bullis Prep in nearby 
Silver Spring, Md., after an outstanding high school career at St. Johns . . . another 
of the Terp's outstanding ends with a good rookie year behind him . . . will be out to 
nail down first team . . . battled Walker for the starting job and won it for the Missouri 
opener ... a first period injury sidelined him for several weeks and with the injury 
went his first string job . . . came back and soon had the second team assignment . . . 
good speed, fine blocker, a top receiver, and a demon on defense . . . caught two passes 
for 42 yards . . . son of Hugh "Bingo"' Flynn, former President of the Washington 
Touchdown Club ... a major in School of Business and Public Administration. 
PAUL KRAMER, 20, 6-3, 210, Junior from Benwood, W. Va. — another outstanding end 
who made an indellible impression his soph year . . . has his eye on starting job which 
he could realize . . . played in '52 as a frosh ... is a great receiver . . . has the 
potential to be the best pass catcher on the team . . . has good speed and did a fine 
defensive job, alternating on second and third team . . . worked most of spring practice 
on second eleven . . . with Terns throwing little in '53, Kramer caught 2 for 58 
yards ... an all-State West Virginia star ... in the School of Business and Public 
Administration. 

JIM PARSONS, 23,6-2, 185, Junior from Washington, D.C. — rounds out the veteran 
sophomore group of ends from last season ... A Navy vet . . . played as a freshman 
and did well enough to letter as he did last season . . . does better job defensively . . . 
has speed and is adequate receiver . . . caught two, both out-of-this-world catches, for 
80 yards last year . . . missed half of spring practice with injury but will be ready to 
vie for top position . . . majoring in biological science. 

JIM KILGALLEN, 21, 6-2, 190, Junior from Brooklyn, N.Y. — saw limited duty last 
season, not enough to letter ... did make the ink in the scoring column with an 18-yard 
td reception from Boxold against Missouri in the opener on the last play of the game 
. . . will have to hustle to keep pace with those in front of him and fine frosh moving 
up . . . in Business school. 

,JOE PONZO, 21, 6-3, 205, Sophomore from Newark, N.J. — with a fine spring practice 
behind him, Ponzo, held out last season for further seasoning, will be a big asset for the 
Terp terminals . . . climbed to number three team this spring ... a rugged boy who 
likes it rough . . . fine receiver with good speed and blocking ability . . . determined 
to make showing his potential offers , . . was all-County and all-State Catholic while 
at Seton Hall High School . . . studying pre-dentistry. 

JEAN WATERS, 22, 6-0, 195, Sophomore from Charleston, S.C a real fine prospect . . . 

a veteran who came to Maryland with guard Jack Davis following their discharge from 
the Army paratroopers . . . Waters and Davis were close friends in the same unit for 
three years and the Carolinian decided to follow Davis to College Park ... a rugged 
player who excels on defense . . . should be a big help insuring good end play for the 
Terps. 



BOB ALEXANDER, 18, 6-0, 195, Sophomore from Baldwin Twp., Pa. — made a fine 
showing in soring drills and is certain to see a good bit of action this fall ... a real 
nice guy . . . quiet off the field but makes himself heard from on the field . . . has 
tremendous desire and determination . . . loves the game. 

DICK PORTER, 20, 6-2, 190, Sophomore from Pittsburgh, Pa. — another fine prospect 
who will be vieing for varsity duty . . . held out last season because of injury . . . 
plaved first string latter part of spring drills and looked good . . . moved in when 
Walker, Flynn. and Parsons were out of the lineup and made handsome strides toward 
pushing the front-line boys to put out their all this fall . . . has good speed and a 
good receiver . . . blocks well and adequate defensively . . . studying civil engineering. 
BILL TURNER, 19, 6-3, 205, Sophomore from Silver Spring, Md., and GENE SULLI- 
VAN, 20, 6-3, 210, Sophomore from Pittsburgh. Pa.. — are two hoys who have to get 
added experience to break into the lineup . . . both have great potential and desire . . . 
good receivers and both have shown outstanding play . . . TURNER was an all-State 
tackle ... he is in Business and Public Administration ... SULLIVAN is majoring 
in bacteriology. 

TACKLES 

TOM BREUNICH. 22. 6-2. 210. Senior from Pelham, N.Y. — one of the finest offensive 
tackles in the garre , . . returns for his third year as the top prospect to anchor the 
"thin" tackle problem facing the Terps this year . . . was first string offensive tackle 
in '52. last year of two-platoon ball and was number 1 tackle last fall for four games as 
Bob Morgan was out with injuries . . . did a fine job as a one-platoon player . . . was 
the top substitute for Morgan and Jones ... a real fine all-around ball player with 
tremendous desire to play ... an efficient crisp blocker with a good charge and second 
reaction . . . offense his forte hut has good savvy of defense to make him a good 
one-platoon tackle . . . married this summer . . . majoring in industrial education . . . 
a real fan of the "hot-rod" racers. 

RALPH BAIERL. 21. 6-3. 220. Senior from Pittsburgh, Pa. (Harmony Junction) — his po- 
tential realized last season as a top offense-defense substitute, the husky Terp played most 
all spring practice on the first eleven . . . should retain the job. but the tackle position 
will be the most bitter fought with Breunich, Baierl, Blackburn, and Shipley vieing for 
first team assignments . . . Baierl did a fine job last season with his defensive chores 
overshadowing his offensive talents . . . but a good spring practice showed he will be a 
good two-way tackle, sorely needed ... he owns a powerful charge and has good speed 
and movement . . . majoring; in criminology. 

DICK SHIPLEY, 21, 5-10, 230, Senior from Frederick, Md. — an outstanding platoon 
tackle for his size, both ways . . . has exceptional strength and even more is extremely 
fast . . . had a good year although sidelined mid-season with an injury but got back 
into the lineup near close of season to be a big help to Terps. especially final two 
games when the Terps were out to whitewash Mississippi and Alabama . . . Shipley, 
stnrring on defense, gave excellent performance both games . . . does a good job 
offensively also . . . but defense his specialty — a fine tackier . . . hard to get by . . . 
likes it rough . . . captain of high school team . . . all-State and all-County two years 
... in School of Business and Public Administration. 

RAY BLACKBURN, 21, 6-1, 210, Junior from Keyser, W. Va. — had a fine sophomore 
year and continued his good offensive and defensive play in spring practice . . . finished 
the early drills on the first team, proving his desire and determination to fill the gap 
created at tackle by graduation of Jones and Morgan . . . blasts his man out well 
offensively, and is a good pursuer on defense . . . plays real good steady ball . . . will 
battle it out with the other three veterans who all must watch out for the fine crop of 
rookies coming up . . . Ray was high school all-America ... in Pre-Law School. 
AL WHARTON, 20, 6-1, 220. Sophomore from Sewickley, Pa. — one of the most out- 
standing tackle prospects in last two years, Wharton has been plagued by injuries his 
freshman and soph, years . . . the staff is expecting the big "red head" to be ready 
this fall to help the tackle spot . . . did well in spring practice . . . has execptional 
speed giving him that very important quick charge on offense . . . defensively, like a 
rock . . . has tremendous desire to play . . . would be a big help to the Terp tackle cause 
. . . was all-State and all-Western Pennsylvania in high school ... a Pre-Dental student. 
MIKE SANDUSKY, 19, 5-11, 235, Sophomore from Bound Brook, N.J. — a real fine' 
rugged boy, one of the best athletes to enroll at Maryland in recent years ... a real 
good two-way player, outstanding both ways . . . opened a lot of eyes with his play as 
a frosh . . . continued to play havoc in spring ball . . . expected to play a lot of ball 
this fall . . . Coach Bob Ward says he has the potential of becoming another of the 
Terp's great tackles . . . fast, good blocker, and a vicious tackier . . . pursues well . . . 
was heavyweight wrestling champion of New Jersey his senior year . . . pinned all his 
opponents as a member of frosh wrestling team . . . tossed the shot for the track team 
this sprins . . . sure to be a 3-spon letter man . . . studying animal husbandry. 
JOE LAZZARINO, 19, 6-4, 235. Sophomore from Brooklyn, N.Y. — another big powerful 
upcoming soph from the freshman team . . . .has ability, potential, and desire to be a 
big help this fall . . . good reaction and plenty of aggressiveness . . . moves well and has 

— 38 — 



shown willingness to take to the one-platoon . . . does a good job blocking and is hard 
to get through on defense . . . experience will be best tonic. 

BOB SUCHY, 19, 6-2, 215, Sophomore from Baltimore, Md. — another fine looking soph 
up from the good freshman team . . . impressive as a frosh and continued his good 
work in spring practice . . . will be almost a certainty to play a lot of ball . . . en- 
rolled in School of Engineering. 

TOM STEFL, 19, 6-0, 215, Sophomore from Brownsville, Pa. — another good candidate 
who has an excellent chance of playing ball as a rookie and help ease the situation for 
the four top veteran tackles . . . big strong boy with good action, and fine attitude . . . 
had a good freshman season and adequate in spring ball ... a lot of hustle from these 
soph tackles a good recipe to develop rock-ribbed performances from the front-line boys 
... a Pre-Medical student. 

GUARDS 

GEORGE PALAHUNIK, 22, 6-1, 200, Senior from McKees Rocks, Pa — a sound, well- 
knit football player . . . truly one of the finest ball players on the team and one of the 
most looked up to by teammates ... a great two-way guard, supplying the dynamite on 
the right side of what could be the best "middles" of any line in the country with Irvine 
at center and Bowersox at left guard . . . takes the game seriously and rewarded by 
regard voiced by opposing coaches and players . . . outstanding blocker with good speed 
... a real defensive hawk who moves with the play and seldom if ever taken out of a 
play entirely . . . quick, alert, and aggressive? . . . consistent for 60-minutes if called on 
for lengthy duty . . . was outstanding each Saturday . . . one of the hardest workers 
on a Maryland team in the Tatum regime . . . good student in Agriculture Economics. 
JACK BOWERSOX, 21, 6-1, 200, Senior from Westminster, Md. — another really great 
guard ... is on the left side of Irvine, completing the outstanding "trio" the Terps 
have in the middle of the line . . . has turned out to be everything predicted of him by 
the coaching staff long time ago . . . "almost" another Bob Ward, they said; and he 
hasn't let them down . . . played a top offensive and defensive game each Saturday . . . 
one of best guards since Ward . . . yellow jaundice kept him out his soph year after a 
brief appearance in. the Missouri opener . . . exceptionally fast and possesses a quick 
charge and follow through on his blocking . . . has plenty of football skill ... in on 
numerous tackles besides many solos . . . selected to the first team all-Conference by 
the Southern Sports Writers; second team all-Conference Associated Press; and second 
team all-South, United Press . . . married this summer . . . all-state in high school . . . 
in School of Business and Public Administration. 

BOB PELLEGRINI, 19, 6-2, 195, Junior from Yatesboro, Pa. — one of '53's outstanding 
newcomers, a real "find" ... a quarterback in high school made the shift to the line 
look miracle like for the staff . . . terrific competition keeping veterans Palahunik 
and Bowersox on their toes . . . made outstanding plays each Saturday . . . turned out 
to be big favorite of fans and press with his great play accentuated by his aggressivness, 
tackling, pursuit, and second reaction, defensively . . . likes to blast his man back on 
offense and does it frequently and does it well ... a boy to watch closely this year . . . 
a Physical Education major. 

TOM McLUCKIE, 21, 5-11, 215, Senior from Cumberland, Md. — went to high school in 
Midland, Mich, before moving to Cumberland; . . . was all-State in. Michigan as a center 
. . . had a good year in '53, with the one-platoon game making him look better than as 
a soph when he played defense which is still his specialty . . . tough ball player who 
moves well . . . has come along, fast offensively with a good showing in spring practice 
. . . strong . . . has good equipment for two-way ball ... in the School of Business 
and Public Administration. 

JACK DAVIS, 21, 5-10, 190, Sophomorei from Bladensburg,. Md. — there hasn't been a 
football player enroll at Maryland in many a moon that has hit the College Park campus 
with such fabulous force as Jack Davis . . . the squatty little Davis from a stone's 
throw from the campus was little less than a sensation his freshman year following three 
years in the Army paratroopers ... it ,was during his hitch with Uncle Sam that he 
met freshman end Jean Waters and became close friends and brought the South Carolinian 
to Maryland with him ... a great looking prospect who is sure to see a great deal of 
action this fall . . .from his performance, which is expected to be great, will hinge the 
future stardom of another guard, similar to his coach, Bob Ward ... he gave brilliant 
performances last year as a frosh and played havoa with the "big" boys in scrimmages 
and then later in spring practice ... he excels both ways with little doubt of ability, 
desire, determination, and efficiency ... he looks like a sure bet . . . married and 
has a daughter, Deborah. 

ED HEURING, 19, 6-0, 200, Sophomore for Rochester, Pa. — has the heft and ability 
to come along as a real fine guard substitute . . . rugged competitor and willing to mix 
it up . . . improvement will come with experience ... in School of Education, majoring 
in History. 

RONALD ATHEY,19, 6-0, 200, Sophomore from Cumberland, Md. — another product of 
Coach Bill Hahn and Cumberland's Fort Hill High School ... a good prospect . . . 
a bit of confidence that will come with experience will counteract rookie year attitude 
. . . had a promising spring practice . . . was all-State and honorable mention high school 
all-America . . . majoring in Industrial Education. 

— 39 — 



CENTERS 

JOHN IRVINE. 21. 6-2, 215, Senior from Evans City, Pa. — a brilliant all-America can- 
didate at the pivot post . . . Irvine, after two thrilling campaigns will have his best in 
'54, as the big Co-Captain "improves with age" ... he is one of the games' best one- 
platoon gridders excelling as what Tatum calls him. "A Coach on the Field" . . . has a 
brilliant football mind, on and off the field ... is seldom, if ever, fooled on defense . . . 
a great defensive signal-caller and linebacker . . . the raw boned powerful Irvine, son 
of a bank president, leaves little to be desired offensively . . . outstanding blocker, 
initial and downfield . . . blasts out from his center position with vicious impetus, 
clearing the path for the Terp backs ... is the anchor man, of the Terp line and the 
middle man of one of the games' most potent "middles" of the line with Jack Bowersox 
on his left and George Palahunik on his right ... a great leader whose personality is 
accentuated by an always "Ipana" smile . . . along with an ATO fraternity brother, 
Irvine holds the trophy as the University's top bridge player . . . sure to go into Terp 
annals as all-time center . . . intercepted two passes for 32 yard-return and blocked a 
punt in the VV&L game and fell on it in end zone for a td . . . left a most pleasant 
impression with everybody . . . all-America honorable mention . . . 2nd team AP all- 
Conference . . . 3rd learn on writer's ballot ... an Economics major, history minor 
. . . worked as a bank teller during the summer. 

RICHARD "Rip" O'DONNELL, 24, 6-0, 210, Senior from Altoona, Pa Returned to 

College Park last fall following two years in the service . . . played one year before 
joining with Uncle Sam's forces . . . did a good job both ways but stood out defensively 
. . . had a good spring practice and was blocking well offensively . . . rugged player 
suro to be a big help anchoring the second Terp front-line . . . married and has a 
daughter . . . all-State football and basketball his senior year ... in Schood of Educa- 
tion. 

DON BROUGHER, 22, 6-2, 210, Senior from Edgewood, Pa. — has exceptional blocking 
skill which explains his moving back and forth from center to tackle . . . plays both 
well and chances are he will see tackle duty this fall . . . did a good job playing be- 
hind Morgan at the tackle spot in'53 . . . has good action . . . wants to play . . . lias 
fine attitude . . . all-Western Pennsylvania second team. Class B ... in School of 
Business and Public Administration majoring in Transportation. 

GENE ALDERTON, 20, 6-0, 185, Sophomore from Cumberland, Md. — one of the "surest 
shots" Iii play a lot nl ball ... up from the freshman team . . . cousin of the Terps' 
great end from Cumberland, John Alderton . . . does a good job over the ball, fine blocker 
. excels defensively . . . shows a lot of promise for a soph . . . has great desire to 
play . . . enrolled in Education, majoring in industrial education. 

GENE DYSON, 21, 6-2, 200, Sophomore from Brentwood, L-l. N.Y., and AUGIE 
WAIBEL. 20, 6-1, 210, Sophomore from Baltimore, Md. — two sophs who will be trying 
to break into lineup . . . could help, but both need added offensive experience. Dyson a 
track letterman, the Terps' top shot-putter . . . Waibel a lacrosse letterman as' a de- 
fenseman . . . both are Physical Education majors. 

QUARTERBACKS 

CHARLEY BOXOLD. 23. 6-0. 185, Senior from Providence, R.I. — the slender crew-cut 
Terp quarterback inherits the big job of guiding the '54 fortunes of the National Champ- 
ions . . . Tatum says he will be great, another great Maryland qb as were his pre- 
decessors. Jack Scarbath and Bernie Faloney . . . Boxold has all the necessary tools 
to show the football world that the Orange Bowl tiff might have been a myth as far as 
he was concerned ... the personable Boxold inherited the job at the last minute and 
gave a good account of himself under great pressure . . . actually, Boxold is a better 
passer than was Faloney and his equal at the running game on the keep play . . . 
Charley has come along strong defensively to establish himself as outstanding as any 
quarterback in the game . . . played about half of each game last fall . . . gave an ex- 
cellent account of himself and gained added confidence and poise as the season progressed 
. . . throws accurately with the "home run" pass his specialty . . . carried 40 times 
for 154 yards for a 3.9 average . . . passed 26 times for 11 completions for 328 vards 
and three tds . . . only one intercepted . . . had total offense of 482 yards for 66 plays 
for <3 average per play . . . punted twice lor 20-yard average . . . scored once . . . 
excellent student of the game with great desire and attitude . . . married and at press 
tirne for the brochure was waiting arrival of first child ... in School of Business and 
Public Administration. 

LYNN BEIGHTOL, 20, 5-11, 185, Junior from Cumberland, Md. — one of the nation's 
most sought after high school athletes in 1951 . . . played as a frosh ; stayed out his 
second year; then came back last fall to letter again . . . has the potential of becoming 
a top spht-T quarterback . . . seems to be a definite victim of the rule change from 
two-'platoon to one-platoon football as he has had difficulty adjusting his talent to de- 
tense . . . spent most of spring practice under special coaching tutelage and finished the 
20-day session much improved ... a dandy qb for offensive duty ... can run, kick, 
and pass well and calls a good sequence of plays . . . with what seems like no effort 
at all the baby-faced father of two children, throws beautiful passes . . tossed only 
7 ,/ or . 2 completions for 81 yards in brief appearances . . . natural ability stored up 
offensively and might go to waste if he fails to make adequate defensive strides . . . 



a fine punter; booted 5 for an avg. of 39.8 yards ... all state qb for 2 years at Fort 
Hill High . . . good student ... in Pre-Medical School. 

FRANK TAMBURELLO. 19, 5-10. 180, Sophomore from Baltimore, Md. — a real classy 
qb up from the frosh squad ... led the little Terps to a great season, with their first 
win over the Plebes as well as a good pasting to Virginia' and George Washington who 
were writing about their best yearlings in many moons . . . picked up the intracies of 
the Spilt-T with little difficulty . . . looks real good both ways . . . definitely will keep 
Boxold and Beightol on their toes . . . wants to play but must adjust to coaching . . . 
outstanding star athlete at Patterson Park High. 

RALPH HAWKINS, 19, 5-10, 175, Sophomore from Washington, D.C. — another outstand- 
ing prospect up from the frosh team . . . looked exceptionally good . . . has a lot of 
savvy and know-how with great desire to play . . . does a good job at the qb spot and 
has been tried at halfback where he showed adequate ability . . . good runner with speed 
and agility . . . plays defense well . . . was all-Metropolitan three years running in 
football, basketball, and baseball at St. John's High . . . should play a lot of ball as 
a soph . . . majoring in Public Relations. 

HALFBACKS 

RONNIE WALLER, 21, 5-11, 175, Senior from Laurel, Del — this outstanding athlete 
from Maryland's Eastern Shore could easily "sneak" in as one of the nation's 
hottest halfbacks . . . Waller, loaded with potential and talent which he has exhibited 
while playing in the shadows of Chet (the jet) Hanulak, is one of the best halfbacks, 
with previous reputation, to hit the Terp football camp . . . now that the job is his 
and since he made such a terrific defensive impression for the '53 National Champions, 
there is little doubt he will be one of the country's best "60-minute" halfbacks ... a 
10-second man with a fancy change of pace . . . uses the almost forgotten straigh-arm 
weapon effectively . . . with a bit of an opening his fury becomes more dangerous and 
apt to go all the way . . . really a smart, tough defensive player . . . outstanding tackier 
. . . has drawn praise from all corners of the football world . . . loked "wicked" in a 
good sense to his teammates this spring . . . outstanding blocker ... his block of a 
Mississippi halfback was seen across the nation in theater newsreels and on television 
and hon^T-Pd with the "bl^ck of the week" which later was awarded the "Block of the 
year" distinction ... it allowed teamate Ralph Felton to romp 42 yards for a score . . . 
was all-State four years in fou*- sports at Laurel High, football, basketball, baseball and 
track . . . named the "Outstanding Athlete of Delaware" his senior year . . . majoring 
in Government and Politics. 

JOE HORNING, 21, 5-10, 165. Senior from Natrona Heights, Pa. — "Little Joe" as his 
teamates call him . . . but this wiry little kid is only little in stature but big in his 
football playing . . . smallest player on the squad but fastest ... he and Waller usually 
dead-heat a 100-yard dash, but Horning cuts the tape more often . . . starting his fourth 
year for the Terps after three brilliant seasons of the "kid" playing with and against 
those "big boys'' . . . jovial Joe is durable as they come . . . gets racked up but is back 
in there tearing away at the opponent . . . excels defensively as he has specialized to 
date, but this year has the number one right half position tucked away in his hip pocket 
and in no danger of relinquishing it . . . gets chance to show his offensive prowess which 
is known but hasn't been utilized . . . scribes across the nation familiar with this little 
fella's name made for his top efforts past 3 years . . . should give Terps flashy offensive 
performance in backfieM that could come close to the '53 foursome . . . led the team in 
pass interceptions his freshman year with 6 pickoffs . . . one for a 100-yard record re- 
turn against Missouri . . . was regular safety man his first two years in two-platoon ball 
. . . has plenty of "guts"; bubbles over with enthusiasm . . . carried 17 times for 62 
yards for 3.6 avg . . . returned 3 punts for 30 yards . . . scored 2 tds . . . another ace 
halfback in most promising backfield ... in Buisness and Public Administration. 
ED VEREB, 20, 6-0, 1S5, Junior from Pittsburgh, Pa. — was one of the finest soph half- 
backs for the Teros — a well-knit boy with good speed and stamina . . . never wants to 
quit ... a hard "fullback" type runner, hard to bring down . . . did a real efficient job 
defensively ... a promising star . . . distinguished himself by winning the number 2 
halfback job as a soph and hasn't relinquished it, and shouldn't . . . likes to rack'em 
up defensively and run over and around them offensively . . . wants to play 60 minutes 
each game . . fine competitor . . . carried 17 times for 81 yards for 4.8 average . . . 
passed twice tor one completion . . . caught one for 17 yards . . . brought back 3 punts 
for 38 yards and one kickoff for 13 vards . . . also intercepted one for 15 yard return 
. . . was the star of Pittsburgh's Central Catholic High for three years . . . should come 
into real limelight this fall ... a Pre-Medical student. 

HOWARD DARE. 19. 6-0, 180, Sophomore from Baltimore, Md. — -looks like the best of 
a fine crop of halfbacks . . . topped the list at end of freshman year after gallopping all 
season like a deer . . . fine runner, nasser. and receiver . . . returned 2 punts and a 
kickoff for scores, showing his potential as a future star . . . played brilliantly as' de- 
fensive halfback . . . keeping the vets honest with his pursuit of their jobs . . . after 
a brilliant spring practice, the former Poly star was still number 2 halfback, running 
mate of Vereb's . . . worth watching. 

DICK BURGEE, 21, 5-10, 175, Junior from Frederick, Md. — another back who came in 
last season to relieve the playing time of the veterans . . . used most on defense . . . 
carried but once . . . did good job in secondary and looked good in spring practice . . . 

— 41 — 



also made fine impression carrying the pigskin ... in '53, he intercepted two passes 
both in critical parts of ball games . . . will be in there a lot this faU . . . married 
this summer. 

HAROLD HULL, 19, 5-9, 135, Sophomore from Cumberland, Md. — "Gassy" is a real 
good-bet as a soph to break into tha traveling roster . . . had a good frosh year and 
displayed his wares as a hard running speedster in spring practice . . . impressive de- 
fensively . . . has that important asset— desire to play . . . rugged boy . . . majoring 
in Industrial Education. 

JOHN WEICIECOWSKI, 21, 5-8, 170, Senior from Baltimore, Md. — "Mo" moved into the 
varsity last fall ... a keen and serious competitor on the field and a morale builder 
off the field . . . carried only 4 times . . . saw most duty on defense . . . has good speed 
and is a crack tackier . . . should see a lot of action this fall . . . with good competition 
he could move right up the ladder . . . married this summer ... a Physical Education 
major. 

DAVE NUSZ, 21, 5-10, 180, Senior from Pittsburgh, Pa. — has played both quarterback 
and halfback 'posts . . . has shown flashes of greatness at intervals ... a good ball 
carrier as a halfback; can play under the center, but not adaquate there . . . specialty 
is defense in the secondary but with more opportunity could be adequate on offense . . . 
a Physical Education major. 

JOHN McVICKER, 19, 5-9, 185, Sophomore from Cumberland, Md., and JACK HEALY, 
19, 5-11, 180, Sophomore from Brooklyn, N.Y. — two promising soph halfbacks with a 
chance to break into the crowded Terp backfleld . . . McVicker has "stored" potential to 
be a great ball player . . . needs only to release it . . . HEALY did a whale of a job 
is a trosh and looked like a real "comer" in spring ball . . . has vast amount of desire 
and determination . . . with this and his ability he stands good chance of seeing duty 
. . . has speed and defensive ability . . . fine student. 

FULLBACKS 

DICK BIELSKI, 21, 6-0, 208, Senior from Baltimore, Md. — The slick Atlas-built Co- 
Captain has an excellent chance to be the "BEST FULLBACK" in the country . . . 
this fine leader and all-America candidate has come a long way since his freshman year 
and following a brilliant performance in '53, his name has spread like wild fire as the 
"big" man of the Terp attack this fall, and he will be . . . with Boxold, he holds the 
key to the Terp attack but it falls more on his shoulders since he will be around when all 
the qbs are being used ... he has a most potent weapon — the most powerful pair of 
legs in college football ... he made his mark last year when he became the rage be- 
cause of his all-around brilliance in all phases of the game, including kicking . . . 
Bielski startled coaches and visiting writers this spring with his ferocious well-balanced 
and well-coordinated play . . . they all left saying there could be none better . . . 
Tatum confessed that he might very well be the best in the nation and he would make 
Terp fans forget the greatness of their all-America fullback of 51, Ed "Big Mo" 
Modzelewski . . . Bielski is a murderous line plunger, a human battering ram ... in the 
spring game against an all-pro line, he gained 88 yards in 11 carries . . . this stowed 
away potential materialized last fall as fiercely and suddenly as a submarine sneaks 
up on a surface vessel and unleashes its full attacking load .... result is blasting into 
submission . . . Bielski's only forte isn't his powerful running but is as colorful and 
effective as a linebacker . . . follows the play like a cat and tackles with great im- 
petus and sureness . . . offensively, not only does he bull his way through the line and 
ramble over would-be-tacklers, but a favorite weapon is to "butt* the tackier to the 
ground with his head and shoulders while collecting steam in his legs ... his blocking 
is a thing to watch; Terp coaches call it "picture" blocking . . . Dick has come to be 
known as the "Collegiate Toe" with his expert long field goals and kickoffs that go deep 
into the end zone ... he kicked 12-14 extra points and 3 for 5 field goals . . . one 
was 47 yards including the collegiate 10-yard end zone, another was 41 yards . . . 
carried the ball 40 times for 257 yards for a 6.4 mark . . . scored once ... so in 
Bielski. Maryland has a true "60-minute'' multiple purpose fullback, even down to the 
kicking game ... he excels in all . . . was all-State his senior year at Patterson Park 
High . . . married and has a daughter, Debbie . . . majoring in Sociology. 
GEORGE ALBRECHT, 23, 5-11, 185, Senior from Terrace, Pa. — a terrific competitor with 
keen desire to play every minute . . . one of, the better secondary men . . . tackles hard 
and sure . . . has good speed and hard to bring down . . . will be good relief for Bielski 
. . . has lettered two years; this should be his best year . . . carried 10 times for 52 yards 
last fall for 5.2 avg. went to Munhall High School, as did Bill Walker . . . inseparable 
buddies in college . . . graduated this summer, but has year of eligibility left so will 
do graduate work. 

JIM SKARDA, 20, 6-1, 190, Sophomore from Baltimore, Md looked like a real fine 

addition to the fullback foursome . . . was held out last year for seasoning which proved 
to be proper tonic . . . the raw-boned Baltimorean has good fullback physique and 
looked good carrying the ball . . . came along well defensively ... a good power runner 
with accompanying speed . . . studying Civil Engineering. 

BILL KOMLO. 19, 6-0, 190, Sophomore from Uniontown, Pa probably one of the best 

fullback prospects since Bielski's days as a frosh . . . was a real linebuster last year for 
the baby Teips . . . runs hard and has a wicked bit of power in his legs . . . has 

— 42 — 



I the framework to add a few good solid pounds to add to his explosiveness . . . needs 
to pick up SDeed . . . good defensive hawk . . . nice quiet boy whose aim other than 
to go to Veterinarian School is to be top flight ball player ... he should also realize 
that ambition along with his doctorate for he is a good student. 

RALPH WARD, 19, 6-0, 185, Sophomore from Silver Spring, Md another bright spot 

up from the frosh team . . . has played both halfback and full, and at end of spring 
practice landed in the fullback slot ... is a good competitor with good attitude . . . 
could come along, after a bit of experience to play ball this fall . . . has good reactions 
with better than average speed ... in School of Business and Public Administration. 

THUMBNAILS OF MARYLAND GAMES— 1953 

MISSOURI 

The University of Maryland opened its season against a strong Missouri team and 
for the first time in three years were considered underdogs by betting fraternity. The 
game was quickly taken in hand by the Terps when Chet (the jet) Hanulak burst through 
the middle of Missouri's line and sped 65 yeards for a touchdown on the second play 
from scrimmage. Missouri came back strong and using a short passing attack marched 
for a td but missed the extra point. The half ended 7-6 with Maryland in charge. The 
Terrapins came back strong and stomped the length of the field at the outset of the third 
quarter to take a 14-6 lead. Playing a possession game throughout the third and fourth 
quarters, Maryland controlled the game, scoring on the last play when reserve quarter- 
back Charlie Boxold and fourth string end Jim Kilgallen, who almost didn't make the 
trip teamed up for a 17-yard td pass play. The teacher Don Faurot had lost to his pupil 
Jim Tatum for the fourth straight time. One-platoon made its debut here and Bernie 
Faloney played 58 minutes and 15 seconds. 

MARYLAND 7 13—20 Touchdowns: Hanulak, Faloney, Kilgallen 

MISSOURI 6 0—6 PAT: Felton, Bielski 

WASHINGTON AND LEE 

Maryland opened its home stand against a courageous but outmanned band of "Little 
Generals." Using reserves liborally, the score still mounted to a hefty 52-0. Ronnie 
Waller, second team left halfback, had a field day returning punts and kickoffs and 
averaging 12.5 yards every time he carried the ball from scrimmage. His great effort 
netted him three touchdowns and the crowd left wondering how this speedster could be 
kept out of the starting lineup but in subsequent games soon discovered why in Hanulak. 
Washington and Lee was the first of six opponents destined to be held scoreless by the 
strong Terp defense. 

MARYLAND 7 19 20 6—52 Touchdowns: Waller (3); Faloney, Hor- 

WASH- & LEE o 0—0 ning, Felton, Irvine, Albrecht 

PAT: Felton (2); Bielski (2) 

CLEMSON 

Maryland scouts reported that Clemson had one of the largest teams the Terps would 
face this season and a tough battle was anticipated. The Clemson Tigers lived up to ex- 
pectations and fought a terrific defensive battle during the first half, which ended 7-0. 
Maryland got this with an 88-yard opening kickoff return by Bernie Faloney. The Terps 
came back back strong in the third period. Faloney passed to Dick Nolan for a 65-yard 
scoring play. The Clemson team was handicapped in its offensive efforts due to the loss 
of their star quarterback Don Kins: at the end of the first half but surged back to threat- 
en the Terp goal line. Late in the fourth quarter, Clemson punted to Maryland's Dick 
Nolan who took the ball on the 10-yard line and behind beautiful blocking, Nolan "cake- 
walked" 90 yards through the entire Tiger team to end the scoring with Maryland in 
command, 20-20. 

MARYLAND 7 7 6 — 20 Tounchdowns: Nolan (2); Faloney 

CLEMSON 0—0 PAT: Felton, Bielski 

GEORGIA 

Maryland's fourth opponent was tough Southeastern Conference Georgia. The Terps 
quickly took charge with Faloney passing to right end Bill Walker for 18 yards and a td. 
After an exchange of punts. Faloney opened the throttle once again and using the bull-like 
rushes of Ralph Felton, fullback, to approach the Georgia goal line, Faloney drove over. 
Georgia at this point opened up and gave the partisan Maryland crowd many anxious 
moments with their beautiful passing. They scored on a Zeke Bratkowski to Johnny 
Carson pass of nine yards. 

Faloney, putting in his strongest bid of the season for all-America honors which he 
was to receive at the end of the campaign, then rallied the Terps to a 92-yard drive 
climaxed by his second td toss of the half, a 24-yard strike to his right halfback Dick 
Nolan. The Bulldogs were not to be denied and near the end of the half, thrilled the 
crowd with another score, a three-yard jaunt by Jimmy Campagna. The drive featured 
the great Bratkowski-Carson combination, both on the Terp's all-opponent eleven. 

— 43 — 



Still very much in the game, Wally Butts' boys came back with the second half kickoff 
and started right off with Bratkowski's great right arm. But Faloney was "johnny-on-the- 
spot" proving why he is one of the game's outstanding defensive backs when he snagged 
the second attempt and went 35 yards for the fourth Terp score. Following the kickoff, 
center John Irvine picked oil another Georgia pass and that set up the Terps' fifth td 
with Hanulak hot-footing it the last 12 yards. The big Red and White was to add another 
in the third period when Ed Vereb, second string right halfback, bulled his way for six 
yards and the 39th point. Dick "Collegiate Toe' Bielski added the 40th and final point. 
The fourth stanza, with all the reserves sprinkled into the lineup liberally, was scoreless. 
Faloney was runnerup for national honors as the nation's "Back of the Week" for his 
great performance, his fourth in a row. 

MARYLAND 14 7 19 — 40 Touchdowns: Faloney (2); Walker, Nolan, 

GEORGIA 13 — 13 Hanulak, Vereb 

PAT: Felton (.2) ; Bielski (2) 

NORTH CAROLINA 

The University of North Carolina Tarheels, riding the crest of a three game winning 
streak, were next to lock horns with the Maryland juggernaut. Coach Jim Tatum was 
fearful that his ball club might let down after its convincing 40-13 win over strong 
Georgia. His fears proved groundless for the Terps ran and passed to a convincing 26-0 
victory. Charlie Boxold, second string signal-caller, emerged as the game's top ground 
gainer hitting four out of five passes for a total of 97 yards and adding three more run- 
ning for a total of 100 yards. Faloney and Hanulak had done a great job before retiring 
to the bench. Late in the game North Carolina had the ball on the Terps' six-yard line 
with first down but couldn't push it over. As all season, the great line play was led by 
All-America tackle Stan Jones and tackle Blubber Morgan, center John Irvine, guards 
Jack Bowersox and George Palahunik and ends Marty Crytzer and Bill Walker. Faloney, 
Felton. Waller and end Russell Dennis scored. Faloney was again runner-up to the 
nation's "Back of the Week." 

MARYLAND 14 6 6 — 26 Touchdowns: Faloney, Boxold, Felton, 

NORTH CAROLINA .... — Dennis 

PAT: Felton, Bielski 

MIAMI (FLA) 

With talk that this is the team that will return to the Orange Bowl Stadium come 
January 1 the Terps put on a convincing show for the Miamians as they made real pro- 
phets out of their supporting cast of the "fourth-estate." With electrifying pace, the Terps 
made their breaks as any good ball team will do and put 20 points on the huge Orange 
Bowl scoreboard in the first quarter. First Hanulak scored on a handoff, then Faloney hit 
Marty Crytzer in the end zone with an 8-yard td pass, then Felton drove a yard for the 
third score. In the second quarter, Ronnie Waller, second team left halfback, racked up 
the fourth and final td. Fullback Dick Bielski booted his first of three field goals for the 
season in the final chapter to give the Terps a 30-0 victory. 

MARYLAND 20 7 3—30 Touchdowns: Hanulak, Crytzer, Felton, 

MIAMI — Waller 

PAT: Felton (2); Bielski 

Field Goal: Bielski 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

The Gamecocks from Columbia came to the Terps' Homecoming with only one loss 
and that a 20-7 defeat by Duke in the season's opener. The game was one of the finest 
played by each team during the season. The Terps again rolled on the ground passing 
only eight times. The Carolina backs could get only 37 net yards from the big Maryland 
line so passed 23 times for 12 completions and 122 yards. As in every game, Tatum' s 
terrible Terps got off to a first period lead, scoring twice. Fullback Ralph Felton hurdled 
the line for the final yard for the first score and Chet (the jet) Hanulak took a punt and 
streaked 66 yeards for the second td in the opening quarter. Dick "Collegiate Toe'' Bielski 
put his toe into the ball for a 40-yard field goal in the second period to give the Terps a 
17-0 lead. South Carolina, on Johnny Gramling's sensational passing, earned a score when 
Bill Wohrman went the final yard, leaving the score 17-6 at half-time. 

After a scoreless third quarter, the Maryland reserves took over and Ed Vereb 
scored the final touchdown early in the final chapter from six yards out. 

MARYLAND 14 3 7—24 Touchdowns: Felton. Hanulak, Vereb 

SOUTH CAROLINA 6 0—6 PAT: Felton (2): Bielski 

Field Goal: Bielski 

GEORGE WASHINGTON 

With snow shoveled knee deep along the sidelines but the field dry, Maryland went 
after its eighth straight win, and got it. over cross-town rival George Washington. The 
Terps met another underdog team whirh refused to take the title lightlv as they put up a 
fine scrap against the all-conquering Terrapins. At the end of the first half it was a 7-6 



game favoring Maryland. Fullback Ralph Felton had scored from the two-yard line in 
the first period after Faloney and Hanulak, the big hero of the victory, had worked a 
40-yard pass play. The Colonials scored late in the second quarter after a pass inter- 
ception. Bill Weaver passed 16 yards to end Richie Gaskell in the end zone. The Terps 
came back in the third period with Hanulak scampering 38 yards. The third td came 
after Faloney recovered a fumble then scored on a 3-yard sneak. 

The final score came when third-string halfback Joe Horning went around left end 
for 11 yards and the final points. 

The Terps moved for 241 yards, more than 1/-3 of it by the fleet and nimble Hanulak 
from Hackensack who picked up 86 yards rushing. The almost impregnable Terp defense 
limited the Colonials to 33 yards net rushing. 

MARYLAND 7 13 7 — 27 Touchdowns: Felton, Hanulak, Faloney, 

G. WASHINGTON 6 0—6 Horning 

PAT: Felton (2); Bielski 

MISSISSIPPI 

This was the big one for Tatum and his highly-touted team. The Rebels had broken 
Maryland's streak of 19 straight and 22 with defeat a year ago at Oxford and were the 
leading team of the SEC as they came into College Park. Needless to say, Tatum and the 
team were "high as a kite." Final score: Maryland: 38; Mississippi: 0. 

Bernie Faloney was named the nation's "Back of the Week" for his great per- 
formance. Hanulak had another field day with 76 yards in five carries. The first period 
was scoreless as each team played cautiously. Then the flood gates broke wide open as 
the Terps put 24 points on tha scoreboard in the second quarter. Faloney scored the first 
two, one a yard sneak, and the other a nine yard jaunt through center. Ralph Felton 
showed why he was one of the best fullbacks in the game when he bulled his way into 
the open then went 42 yards for the third score with the help of the prettiest block of the 
season by sub halfback Ronnie Waller. With 1 second left in the half, Bielski kicked his 
third field goal of the year, 37 yards from scrimmage which is 47 with the 10-yard end 
zone. After a 0-0 third quarter, third string qb Lynn Beightol sneaked for a yard and 
the fourth touchdown. The final score came on a 31-yard dash by fullback Bielski. The 
Terps remained undefeated and untied and had tagged the second loss of the season on 
the Rebels who had entertained visions of a bowl bid. 

MARYLAND 24 14—38 Touchdowns: Faloney (2); Felton, Bielski, 

MISSISSIPPI 0—0 Beightol 

PAT: Bielski (3); Felton , Albrecht 

Field Goai: Bielski 

ALABAMA 

With the largest crowd of the season looking on, a full-house of 36,000, Maryland 
took strong Alabama 21-0 to end the season as the only major undefeated and untied 
eleven in the nation. They also took over the top spot in the national polls and were a 
week later to win the National championship. This was the second undefeated team for 
Tatum in the last three years. The Terps had lost only two games in the past three 
years. Mississippi and Alabama. The Crimson Tide had just beaten Georgia Tech and were 
showing their usual November surge. The win was a costly one for Faloney as he suffered 
an injury before the half ended and could not return to the game. 

The Terps put the game on ice early as Hanulak exploded on the second offensive 
thrust of the game and went 81 yards untouched into the land of milk and honey. Fol- 
lowing an exchange with the Red Elephants, Faloney and Hanulak took the Terps from 
near their end zone and Faloney connected with end Bill Walker for a 52 yard td pass. 
Faloney had been injured two plays before he pitched the strike but stayed in the game. 
After another exchange with 'Bama, Faloney hit Hanulak with a 22-yard pass and there 
was hit hard and had to be taken off the field. Charley Boxold came in and in a couple 
of plays got the Terps to the 25 where he threw a payoff pitch, again to Walker. 

The second half saw Boxold and his mates threatening but a mistake always stopped 
the drive. Red Drew's team threatened five times within the 10-yard line and each time 
was held by a great Maryland defense. 

They could get only 96 net yards from the nation's stingiest team on the ground. 
Bill Walker, a soph, gained "Lineman of the Week" honors for a great offensive and 
defensive game and Faloney and Hanulak were high on the list for "Back of the Week" 
honors. Hanulak closed his brilliant career with 132 yards in 10 carries, giving him a 
9.8 average for each time he carried during the season, tops in the nation. 

MARYLAND 14 7 0—21 Touchdowns: Walker (2); Hanulak 

ALABAMA _ — PAT: Felton (3) 



TERPS ON HONORARY SELECTIONS — 1953 

STAN JONES— UNANIMOUS ALL-AMERICA 

Collier's All-America — Selected as Collier's "Lineman of the Year" 
Washington Touchdown Club "Lineman of the Year" — Awarded Knute 

Rockne Memorial Trophy 
Associated Press First Team All-America 
International News Service First Team All-America 
United Press First Team All- America 
LOOK Magazine First Team All-America 
All-Players All-America First Team 
NEA All-America First Team 
Christy Walsh First Team All-America 
Xew York Daily News First Team All-America 
Washington Daily News First Team All-America 
The Quarterback - Sporting News First Team All-America 
National Broadcasting Company First Team All-America 
Bill Stern's First Team All-America 
Time Magazine Consensus First Team All-America 
First Team All-America Paramout News, Movietone News, MGM-News of 

the Day 
All-Conference First Team Associated Press 

All-Conference First Team Southern Sports Writers' Association 
All-South Associated Press; All-South United Press 
All-Plavers All-South 



BERNIE FALONEY 

All-Players All-America First Team 

International News Service First Team All-America 

First Team All-America selected by United Press Writer Steve Snider 

Time Magazine Consensus First Team All-America 

National Broadcasting Company First Team All-America 

Williamson's First Team All-America 

Bill Stern's First Team All-America 

First Team All-America Paramount News, Movietone News, MGM News of 

the Day. 
Associated Press Second Team All-America 
United Press Second Team All-America 
New York Daily News Second Team All-America 
Washington Daily News First Team All-America 
NEA Second Team All-America 

The Quarterback - Sporting News Second Team All-America 
All-America Backfield First Team selected by Washington Touchdown Club 
Atlantic Coast Conference "PLAYER OF THE YEAR" 
First Team All-Conference Associated Press 

First Team All-Conference Southern Sports Writers Association 
All-Players All-South 
All-South Associated Press 
All South L'nited Press 

Associated Press "BACK OF THE WEEK", runnerup twice, third once. 
United Press member of "BACKFIELD OF WEEK" twice. 



CHESTER HANULAK 

International News Service Second Team All-America 

Associated Press All-America Honorable Mention 

United Press All-America Honorable Mention 

NEA All-America Honorable Mention 

Associated Press All-Conference First Team 

First Team All-Conference Southern Sports Writers Association 

United Press All-South 

New York Daily News All-South 

Washington Daily News Second Team All-America 

Associated Press "Back of the Week" Mention 

RALPH FELTON 

Associated Press All-America Honorable Mention 

United Press All-America Honorable Mention 

NEA All-America Honorable Mention 

First Team Associated Press All-Conference 

United Press All-South 

Second Team All-Conference of Southern Sports Writers Association 

* JACK BOWERSOX 

First Team All-Conference Southern Sports Writers Association 
Second Team Associated Press All-Conference 
Second-Team United Press All-South 

* BILL WALKER 

United Press All-America Honorable Mention 
Second Team All-Conference Associated Press 

Second Team All-Conference Southern Sports Writers Association 
Nation's "LINEMAN OF THE WEEK", Associated Press after Alabama 
game 

BOB MORGAN 

United Press All-America Honorable Mention 

Associated Press Second Team All-Conference 

Southern Sports Writers Association Second Team All-Conference 

* JOHN IRVINE 

United Press All-America Honorable Mention 
Associated Press Second Team All-Conference 
Third Team Southern Sports Writers All-Conference 

MARTY CRYTZER 

Associated Press Third Team All-Conference 

Third Team Southern Sports Writers Association All-Conference 

Third Team All-America, Washington Daily News 

DICK NOLAN 

Associated Press Third Team All-Conference 

* TOM BREUNICH 

Associated Press All-Conference Honorable Mention 
* Returning to 1954 Team 

— 47 — 



TERP ALL-AMERICA PLAYERS 

1949 — Ray Krouse. Tackle — Second Team 

1950 — Bcb Ward, Guard — First Teams 

1951 — Bob Ward, Guard — First Teams 

1951 — Ed "Big Mo" Modzelewski, Fullback — First and Second Teams 

1951 — Dick "Little Mo" Modzelewski, Tackle — One First Team; Most 

Second Teams 
1952 — lack Scarbath. Quarterback — First Teams 
1952 — Dick "Little Mo" Modzelewski, Tackle — First Teams 
1952 — Tom Cosgrove, Center — Second Team 
1953 — Stan Jones, Tackle — First Teams 

1953 — Bernie Faloney, Quarterback — Eight First Teams; all Second Teams 
1953 — Chester Hanulak, Halfback — Second Teams 

ADDITIONAL HONORS FOR TERP ALL-AMERICAS 
BOB WARD— 1951 

"Lineman of Year" as selected by Washington Touchdown Club ; re- 
ceived the Knute Rockne Memorial Trophy. 

"Lineman of Year" as selected by Philadelphia Sportswriters' Assn. 
Runner-up to Stanford's Bill McColl as Associated Press Lineman of Year. 
"Player of the Year" in Southern Conference, 1951. 
Most Valuable Player of '50 Gator Bowl as a sophomore. 
Voted Most Valuable Player Award by his teammates four consecutive years. 
JACK SCARBATH— 1952 

Runner-up to Billy Vessels, Oklahoma, for Heisman Memorial Trophy 
as nation's outstanding football player. 

"Back of the Year" selected by COLLIER'S Magazine. 
"Sportsman of the Year" Award given by SPORT Magazine. 
Second high vote getter in United Press "Player of Year" poll. 
Third high vote getter in Associated Press "Player of Year" poll. 
"Player of the Year" in Southern Conference, 1952. 

"South's Most Valuable Player" in North-South Shrine Game, Miami, Fla 
First draft choice of Washington Redskins. 
DICK "Little Mo" MODZELEWSKI— 1952 

"Lineman of Year" Award, LOOK Magazine as selected by Grantland 
Rice and Football Writer's Assn. of America- Received the John B. Outland 
Memorial Trophy for this selection. 

"Lineman of Year" as selected by Washington Touchdown Club ; re- 
ceived the Knute Rockne Memorial Trophy. 

Second high vote getter in LJnited Press "Lineman of Year" poll. 
Second high vote getter in SPORTING NEWS "Lineman of Year" poll. 
Fourth high vote getter in ASSOCIATED PRESS "Lineman of Year" poll. 
Second draft choice of Washington Redskins. 
STANLEY JONES— 1953 
"Lineman of Year" awarded by COLLIER'S Ma°;azin<\ 

"Lineman of Year" as selected by Washington Touchdown Club; received 
the Knute Rockne Memorial Trophv. 

Runnerup to J. D. Roberts, "Oklahoma, for ASSOCIATED PRESS 
"Lineman of Year" award. 

Fifth Draft choice of Chicago Bears as a junior. 
BERNIE FALONEY— 1953 

Named to the "All-America Backfield" selected by the Washington 
Touchdown Club. 

"Plaver of the Year" of the Atlantic Coast Conference. 

First team ACADEMIC all-American. 

Fifth highest vote getter in ASSOCIATED PRESS "Back of the Year" poll. 

First draft choice of San Francisco Forty-Niners. 

— 48 — 



THEY COVER THE TERPS 



MAX FULLERTON, The Associated Press 

*GEORGE BOWEN, The Associated Press 
BOB McHUGH, The Associated Press 
HERB FOSTER. The United Press 
ERNIE BARCELLA, The United Press 
BOB SERLING. The United Press 
EV GARDNER, Sports Editor, The Daily News 
DAVE REQUE. Sports Department, The Daily News 
CHUCK EGAN, Sports Editor, The Evening Star 
FRANCIS STANN, Sports Columnist, The Evening Star 

*MERRELL WHITTLESEY, Sports Department, The Evening Star 
GEORGE HUBER, Sports Department, The Evening Star 
BUS HAM, Sports Editor, The Post Times-Herald 
SHIRLEY POVICH. Sports Columnist. The Post Times-Herald 

*HERB HEFT, Sports Department, The Post Times-Herald 
BOB ADDIE, Sports Department, The Post Times-Herald 
MAURY FITZGERALD, Sports Department, The Post Times-Herald 
HERMAN BLACKMAN, Sports Department, The Post Times-Herald 
MARTI E ZADRAVEC, Sports Department, The Post Times-Herald 
PAUL MENTON, Sports Editor, The Evening Sun 
-RANDALL CASSELL, Sports Department, The Evening Sun 

WALTER TAYLOR, Sports Department, The Evening Sun 

JIM ELLIS. SDorts Department, The Evening Sun 

JESSE LINTHICUM, Sports Editor, The Morning Sun 
*LOU HATTER. Sports Department. The Morning Sun 

RONALD GIBBS, Sports Department, The Morning Sun 

ED BRANDT, Sports Department, The Morning Sun 

ROGER PIPPEN, Sports Editor, The News-Post 
*NORMAN P. CLARK, Sports Department, The News-Post 

HUGH TRADER, Sports Columnist, The News-Post 

J. SUTER KEGG, Sports Editor, The Evening Times, Cumberland, Md. 

C. V. BURNS, Sports Editor, The Morning News, Cumberland, Md. 

FRANK COLLEY, Sports Editor, The Herald, Hagerstown, Md. 

DICK KELLY, Sports Editor, The Mail, Hagerstown, Md. 

ED NICHOLS, Sports Editor, The Times, Salisbury, Md. 

HENRY DECKER. Sports Editor, The Post, Frederick, Md 

THE FREDERICK NEWS 

THE CAMBRIDGE BANNER 

HYMY COHEN, Sports Editor, The Capital, Annapolis, Md. 
*Cover Daily 

RADIO and TELEVISION 

WASHINGTON BALTIMORE 

Bob Wolff, WWDC Roger Griswold, WCAO 

Dutch Bergman, WRC Chuck Thompson. WITH 

Ray Michael, WNBW-TV; WRC Nelson Baker, WFBR-TV 

Jimmy Gibbons. WMAL and WMAL-TV Bailey Goss, WBAL 

Bill Malnne. WMAL John McLean. WCBM 

Morris Siegel, WTOP-TV Bailey Goss and Nat Thomas, WMAR-TV 

Arch McDonald. WTOP Nick Campofreda. WAAM-TV 

Pete O'Reilly, WTOP Joe Crogan, WBAL-TV 

Jim Simpson, WTTG-TV Raich Penniwell. WWIN 

Nat Allbright, WEAM Eddie Fenton, WCBM 

Sam Kaufman, WOL 



1953 HIGHLIGHTS 

LONGEST RUSH FROM SCRIMMAGE: 

Chester Hanulak — 81 yards against Alabama for touchdown. 
LONEST PASS COMPLETION: 

Bernie Faloney to Dick Nolan — 65 yards for touchdown against 
Clemson. 
MOST PASSES CAUGHT ONE GAME: 

4 and 57 yards and 1 touchdown against Georgia by Bill Walker. 
MOST PASSES THROWN ONE GAME: 

14 for 5 completions and 68 yards against Missouri by Bernie Faloney. 

10 for 7 completions and 148 yards against Georgia by Bernie 
Faloney. 
MOST PASSES COMPLETED ONE GAME: 

Bernie Faloney — 7 out of 10 for 148 yards and 2 touchdowns against 
Georgia. 

Charlie Boxold — 4 out of 5 for 97 yards and 1 touchdown against 
North Carolina. 
LONGEST KICK-OFF RETURN: 

Bernie Faloney — 88 yards and TD against Clemson. 
LONGEST PUNT RETURN: 

Dick Nolan — 90 yards and TD against Clemson to set new all-time 
Maryland record. Old record was 88 yard return set by Lu Gambino 
against Delaware in 1947 and Stan Lavine against GW in 1948. 
LONGEST PUNT: 

Lynn Beightol — 58 yards against Georgia. 
LOW NET GAIN IN ONE GAME (Rushing): 

212 yards against Clemson. 
HIGH NET GAIN IN ONE GAME (Rushing) 

351 yards against Washington and Lee. 
LOW NET GAIN BY OPPONENT (Rushing): 

30 yards by George Washington. 
HIGH NET GAIN BY OPPONENT (Rushing): 

162 yards by Clemson. 
LEAST PASSING YARDAGE ONE GAME: 

37 yards against South Carolina. 
MOST PASSING YARDAGE ONE GAME: 

154 yards against Miami. 

LEAST PASSING YARDAGE BY OPPONENT ONE GAME: 

21 yards by Clemson. 
MOST PASSING YARDAGE BY OPPONENT ONE GAME: 

245 yards by Alabama. 
LONGEST INTERCEPTION RETURN: 

Bernie Faloney — 35 yards and TD against Georgia. 
MOST TOUCHDOWNS SCORED IN ONE GAME: 

8 against Washington and Lee. 
MOST POINTS SCORED: 

54 by Bernie Faloney. 
LONGEST FIELD GOAL: 

Dick Bielski — 47 yards against Mississippi. 



1953 TEAM STATISTICS 

MARYLAND OPPONENTS 

First Downs . 161 106 

Rushing Attempts 483 362 

Total Yards Rushing 2834 1166 

Yards Lost Rushing 256 317 

Net Yards Rushing 2578 849 

Forward Passes Attempted 110 215 

Forward Passes Completed ■ 46 87 

Yards Gained Passing 1017 1093 

Total Yards Gained — Rushing and Passing 3595 1942 

Passes Intercepted By 20 10 

Yards Interceptions Returned 254 74 

Total Number Punts 37 68 

Punting Average 41.5 30.8 

Yards Punts Returned 554 155 

Fumbles 39 32 

Ball Lost on Fumbles 24 14 

Games Won 10 

Total Points Scored 298 31 

Touchdowns 43 5 

Extra Points 31 1 

Field Goals 3 



1953 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS 



RUSHING 

Carries Gain 

Felton, Ralph ioo 558 

Hanulak, Chester 77 765 

Faloney, Bernie 75 316 

Nolan, Dick 50 262 

Bielski, Dick 40 257 

Boxold, Charlie 40 185 

Waller, Ronnie 35 igg 

Vereb, Ed 17 89 

Horning, Joe 17 8g 

Beightol, Lynn 12 28 

Albrecht, George 10 S3 

Selep, Tom 5 21 

Weiciecowski, John 4 9 

Burgee, Dick 1 2 

PASSING 

Att. Com p. 

Faloney 68 31 

Boxold 26 11 

Beightol 7 2 

Nolan 3 1 

Vereb 2 1 

Hanulak 2 

(Continued on page 52) 
— 51 — 



Loss 


Net 


Avg. 


2 


556 


5-0 


12 


753 


98 


121 


195 


26 


3 


259 


52 





257 


0.4 


31 


154 


3-9 


20 


170 


4.9 


8 


81 


48 


27 


62 


3-6 


13 


15 


13 


1 


52 


52 


2 


19 


3-8 


7 


2 


•5 





2 


2.0 


Yds. 


Int. 


TDs 


599 


7 


5 


328 


1 


3 


81 


1 





15 








7 


1 















TOTAL OFFENSE 
Total Plays 

Faloney 143 

Hanulak 79 

Boxold 66 

Nolan 53 

Vereb 19 

Beightol 19 

all others same as RUSHING figures 



Net Gain 


Avg. 


794 


56 


753 


9-5 


482 


7-3 


274 


5-2 


88 


4.6 


96 


50 



KICKOFF RETURNS 
No. 



Yards Returned TDs 



Hanulak 6 

Faloney 2 

Nolan 2 

Crytzer 2 

Waller 1 

Felton 1 

Vereb 1 



PASS RECEIVING 

No. Caught 

Hanulak 10 

Walker, Bill 9 

Nolan 8 

Dennis, Russ 5 

Waller 3 

Parsons, Jim 2 

Kramer, Paul 2 

Flynn, Tim 2 

Crytzer, Marty 2 

Kilgallen, Jim 1 

Vereb, Ed 1 

Felton 1 



PASS INTERCEPTIONS 
No. Int. 

*Faloney 6 

*Nolan 3 

Burgee 2 

Irvine, John 2 

*Felton 2 

*Hanulak 2 

Nusz, Dave 

Vereb 

Walker 

Parsons 

Lattimer, Charley 

PUNTING 

No. 

*Faloney 19 

*Hefrner, Fred 10 

Beightol 5 

Boxold 2 

Walker 1 



131 





116 


1 


30 





16 





28 





18 





13 





Yards For 


TDs 


152 





229 


3 


185 


£* 


165 


I 


45 





80 





58 





42 





21 


I 


18 


1 


17 





5 


c 


Yds Returned 


TDs 


67 


I 


28 


I 


29 





32 





27 











26 





15 





12 





4 





16 





Yards Ave 


rage 


755 


397 


424 


42.4 


199 


39-8 


40 


20.0 


34 


34-0 



PUNT RETURNS 
No. 

Waller n 

*Hanulak 10 

"Nolan 6 

Vereb 3 

Horning 3 

Selep i 

Irvine i 

Scoring 

TDs 

*Faloney 9 

*Felton 6 

*Hanulak 6 

Bielski i 

Waller 4 

*Nolan 3 

Walker 3 

Vereb 2 

Horning 2 

Albrecht I 

Irvine I 

Boxold I 

Kilgallen i 

Dennis I 

*Crytzer I 

Beightol I 

* — Not a Member of 1954 Team 



Yards 


Returned 


TDs 




137 




1 




163 




1 




150 




1 




38 









30 









4 














l 


PATS 


FGS 


Total Pts 










54 


17-23 







53 










36 


12-14 


3-5 




27 


0-1 







24 










18 










18 










12 










12 


1-1 







7 










6 










6 










6 










6 










6 










6 




BYRD STADIUM 

HOME OF THE TERRAPINS 
Capacity: 35,000 



53 — 



ALL-TIME MARYLAND FOOTBALL RECORDS 

OFFENSE AND DEFENSE 

BEST SEASON: 

1951 and 1953: Won 10— Lost 0. 1951 record includes the 28-13 Sugar 

Bowl win over Tennessee. The '53, 10-0 record is regular season. 

Terps lost Orange Bowl, 7-0 to Oklahoma. 
WORST SEASON: 

1944— Won 1, Lost 7, Tied 1. 
MOST POINTS SCORED IN ONE SEASON: 

353 in 1951 in 9 games. 381 in 1951 in 10 games including the 28-13 

victory over Tennessee in the Sugar Bowl. 
LEAST POINTS SCORED IN ONE SEASON: 

39 in 1940 in 9 games. 
MOST POINTS SCORED BY OPPONENTS IN ONE SEASON: 

216 in 1938 in 9 games. 
LEAST POINTS SCORED BY OPPONENTS IN ONE SEASON: 

31 in 1953 in 10 games. 
MOST POINTS SCORED BY MARYLAND IN ONE GAME: 

Maryland— 80; Washington College— 0; (1927). 
MOST POINTS SCORED BY OPPONENTS IN ONE GAME: 

Navy 76;— Maryland 0; (1913). 
ALL-TIME LEADING SCORER: 

Bob Shemonski with 97 points in 1950 in 10 games. 
OFFENSIVE TEAM RECORD FOR ONE SEASON: 

3822 yards in 1951 in 9 games. 2921 rushing and 901 passing. 

4174 yards in 1951 in 10 games, including the 28-13 victory over Ten- 
nessee in the Sugar Bowl. 3210 rushing and 964 passing. 
OFFENSIVE TEAM RECORD FOR ONE GAME: 

602 yards in 1951 against West Virginia — 523 yards rushing and 79 

passing. 
LEAST YARDAGE ONE GAME: 

69 against Vanderbilt in 1948. 
MOST TOUCHDOWNS SCORED IN ONE SEASON: 

52 in 1951 in 9 games — 56 in 1951 in 10 games including the 28-13 

victory over Tennessee in Sugar Bowl. 
DEFENSIVE RECORD FOR ONE SEASON: 

1,707 yards in 1949 in 9 games— 868 rushing and 893 passing for fifth 

place in nation. 
DEFENSIVE RECORD FOR ONE GAME: (Rushing): 

29 by Washington and Lee in 1951. 
MOST YARDS RUSHING BY INDIVIDUAL IN ONE SEASON: 

Ray Poppleman with 1,350 yards in 10 games in 1931 
MOST YARDS RUSHING BY INDIVIDUAL IN ONE GAME: 

Ray Poppleman with 201 yards in 24 carries against Western Mary 

land. 
LONGEST RUN FROM SCRIMMAGE: 

Ed Fullerton for 86 yards and touchdown against University of 

Georgia in 1951. 

PASSING RECORDS 

TEAM PASSING FOR SEASON: 

90 completions in 170 attempts for 1364 yards in 1942 in 9 games 
TEAM PASSING FOR ONE GAME: 

Joe Tucker with 9 completions in 12 attempts for 178 yards and Stan 



Lavine, 4 for 5 for 129 yards for total of 307 yards against South 

Carolina in 1949. 
WORST PASSING RECORD BY MARYLAND: 

completions in 12 attempts against Vanderbilt in 1948 
INDIVIDUAL PASSING RECORD FOR ONE SEASON: 

Jack Scarbath in 9 games in 1952—59 completions in 113 attempts 

for 1149 yards. 
INDIVIDUAL PASSING RECORD FOR ONE GAME: 

Tommy Mont — 9 completions in 14 attempts for 215 yards against 

U. of Connecticut in 1942. 
LEADING PASS RECEIVER FOR ONE SEASON: 

Lloyd Colteryahn — 32 receptions for 593 yards in 1952 in 9 games 
LEADING PASS RECEIVER FOR ONE GAME: 

Lou Weidensaul — 8 receptions for 95 yards and one touchdown 

against Navy in 1951. 

Lloyd Colteryahn — 8 receptions for 131 yards against Alabama in 

1952. 
LONGEST FORWARD PASS PLAY: 

Stan Lavine to Ed Bolton for 92 yards and touchdown against South 

Carolina in 1949. Pass 15 yards; run 77 yards 
LONGEST RETURN OF INTERCEPTED PASS: 

Joe Horning for an official 100 yards and touchdown against Mis- 
souri in 1951 as a freshman. Actual return from inside end zone was 

105 yards. 

KICKING RECORDS 

MOST POINTS AFTER TOUCHDOWNS: 

Don Decker— 37 for 51 attempts in 9 games in 1951. 41 for 55 at- 
tempts in 10 games in 1951 including the 28-13 victory over Tennes- 
see in the Sugar Bowl. 

LONGEST PUNT: 

Brooke (Untz) Brewer for 93 yards against V.M.I, in 1916. 

BEST OFFICIAL AVERAGE ONE GAME: 

Bill Guckeyson for 51 yards in 10 punts against Syracuse in 1936. 
(Note: Brewer against Syracuse in 1920 and Guckeyson against 
Florida in 1936 both averaged better than 60 yards but official fig- 
ures could not be obtained from these schools and papers didn't carry 
the punting statistics.) 

LONGEST PUNT RETURN: 

Dick Nolan — 90 yards — against Clemson for TD in 1953. 

MOST PUNT RETURNS FOR SEASON: 

Bob Shemonski — 28 for 505 yards in 1950 in 10 games. 

LONGEST KICKOFF RETURNS: 

90 yards and TD — Lewis Thomas against Washington College in 1927; 
Bill Guckeyson against Georgetown in 1935; Sam Behr against Vir- 
ginia in 1945; Dick Nolan against Mississippi in 1952. 

LONGEST FIELD GOAL: 

Untz Brewer, 46 yards by dropkick against Johns Hopkins in 1916. 
He also kicked another for 45 yards in same game. 

LONGEST PUNT RETURN AGAINST MARYLAND: 

Frank Brady of Navy for 100 yards and touchdown in 1951. 

LONGEST KICKOFF RETURN AGAINST MARYLAND: 

Jim McPherson of North Carolina for 93 yards and TD in 1926 

LONGEST PUNT AGAINST MARYLAND: 

Charlie Justice of North Carolina for 84 yards in 1948. 



YEAR BY YEAR RECORDS 

MARYLAND 1900 (3-4-1) Navy 17 

AGGIES Western Hi __ 17 Wm. & Mary.. 

iqoo mri« ° Gib - Atn - Cl - - 17 28 Mt - st - Josephs 

c? TnhnV 50 ° G ' tOWn Pr6P " 5 27 St - Johns — 5 

n ili7 nn """w 6 Episcopal Hi __34 Wash. Col. __17 

Johns Hop -62 _ Gon ffi n 23 -- Md ___ 5 

Episcopal Hi. .16 15 G>town Prep __ Q DeJa Cq1 ._ 

1893 (6-0-0) 21 Gonzaga Hi __ 19 06 (5-3-0) 

* pastern Hi __ u 2 1 Char Hall Ac _ 5 Tech Hi 

Jq ?w ^- + o 1" n 1901 ( 1 " 7 -°) 22 Balt City Col_ 

18 Bait. City Col_ 6 De l. Col 24 Navy 12 

,« ?J- ™* n % ?° L "in 10 Gallaudet Re - - 11 Georgetown _.28 

18 M. Md. Col. 10 Johns Hop. __ 6 Mt. Wash. Cl. _29 

16 Orient Ath Cl. 6 6 Rock Hin C ol._ll 20 St Johns 4 

C o ,x1 8 ^^ (3 A. 3 " 1 0) n ° Central Hi — n 16 Rock Hill Col. 

52 W. Md. Col. __ 27 US Marines — 35 Wash Col _ _ 

12 Wash. Col. ___ Wal'k Ath Cl-36 190 7 (3 6 0) 

6 St. Johns _—22 West. Md. —30 13 Tech High _ 

6 Georgetown 4 1902 (3-5-2) Georgetown -10 

Col. Ath. Cl .26 Georgetown —27 5 Richmond Col 11 

Mt. St. Marys.24 5 Mt. St. Jos. __ q Navy " 12 

1895 — No team 11 Columbian U. _10 6 Mt st Mar _~ 12 

No Games 6 Olympia Ath. _ 10 Geo.. Wash _ U 

1896 (6-2-2) Wash. Col. ___ 10 Wash CoL "~ 5 

Eastern Hi . _ 6 Mt. St. Marys _5 St. Johns ____16 

Gallaudet 6 west. Md. ___26 Gallaudet ____ 5 

34 Business Hi __ U. of Md. ___ 5 iqnfi n R m 

10 Central Hi 6 Johns Hop. -17 5 c ™ a i Hi L 

on JTf.n ?'"in ° DeL C ° L "~ ° 5 Te <* H *gh —6 

20 Bethel Mil Ac.10 1903 (7-4-0) Richm0 nd Col_22 

Episcopal Hi. _ 6 Georgetown -28 Jo , R 1Q 

16 West. Md. ___ 6 5 Clifton Ath. __ JJ n™ P " 57 

*n T C i ent f al ^H Hi ■ - n 2 \ Gunto " Tem - " ° 5 Gallaud'et":::: 

U. of Md. ___ St. Johns —18 Fred - b „ Col 10 

94 rl 8 n 9 t 7 .«, (2 H- 0) fi 28 WaSh - C ° L - ° " Balto Poly I lb 

24 Central Hi ___ 6 2 7 Tech Hi st Johns * 31 

fSinl 1 -30 ° ML SL Mar " 2 Wasn Col."::S 

J. Hopkins 30 6 West Md ___ r Wa h - 7 

4 St. Johns _____ 6 n u. of Md. ___ ° £^5 0) 

6 Gallaudet —16 Dela. Col. -16 R ^ nd C 1 12 

Bait. Med Col.-lO 6 Columbian U. _ John? Hopkfns 9 

_ J? 98 (2-5-0) 1904 (2-4-2) Tech High -11 

5 Columbian U. _17 Georgetown __22 5 Rock Hill — _ 
West. Md. __ _32 Ran. Macon __ George Wash. 26 

36 Eastern Hi __ _ Ftress Monroe ON. Ca. A&M 33 

Gallaudet 33 n Mt st Mar 6 14 Gallaudet — 12 

Johns Hop. —16 We t ' Md _5 1910 (4-3-1) 

Episcopal Hi -37 2 2 Gallaudet "____ 5 \l g? 1 ? 1 "* 1 ,,?* ", £ 

27 Rock Hill Col._ U. of Md. ___ 6 ?0 ^hmond Col 

OWeT^- 4 ' 21 Dela. Col. ___18 g cSholifu". "Jl 

26 Eastern Hi"" 1905 (6 " 4 - 0) n Geo - Wash. __ 

Johns Hop " 40 20 Balt Pol y In " ° V. M. I. 8 

n npiawarp Pnl 34 16 Gallaudet St. Johns 6 

St Jcjfns _- 62 West. Md. —10 3 West. Md. __ 17 

— 56 — 



1911 (4-4-2) 

6 Tech Hi 

Richmond 

5 Fred'bg Col. _ 

Central Hi 14 

3 Johns Hop. 6 

6 Catholic U. __ 6 
St. Johns 27 

5 Wash. Col. —17 

6 West Md. ___ 
6 Gallaudet 2 

1912 (6-1-1) 

31 Tech Hi 6 

46 Richmond Col. 
58 U. of Md. ___ 
13 Johns Hop. ___ 

St. Johns 27 

13 Gallaudet 7 

17 West Md. 7 

13 Penn Mil. Col._13 

1913 (6-3-0) 

27 Balto City 10 

45 Richmond Col. _0 
20 Johns Hop. — _ 

46 West Md. 

Navy 76 

13 St. Johns 

2C Wash. Col. ___ 

Gallaudet 26 

7 Penn Mil. ___27 

1914 (5-3-0) 

Balto. Poly ___ 6 
6 Catholic U. ___ 

13 West Md. 20 

14 Johns Hop. 

10 St. Johns 

3 Wash. Col. ___ 
Gallaudet 23 

26 Penn Mil. 

1915 (6-3-0) 

31 Balto Poly __ 

Haver ford 7 

Catholic U. __16 

10 Gallaudet 3 

14 Penn Mil. ___13 

27 St. Johns 14 

28 Warn Col. ___13 
51 West Md. ___ 

Johns Hop. — 3 

MARYLAND 

STATE 

1916 (6-2-0) 

6 Dickinson 

7 Navy 14 



15 V. M. 1. 9 

6 Haverford 7 

31 St. Johns 6 

10 N. Y. U. 7 

13 Catholic U. ___ 9 
54 Johns Hop. __ _ 

1917 (4-3-1) 

20 Dela. Col. 

Navy 62 

14 V. M. I. 14 

29 Wake Forest _13 

6 .N. C. State —10 
13 St. Johns 3 

Penn State ___57 

7 Johns Hop. ___ 

1918 (4-1-1) 

6 American U. 13 

7 V. M. I. 6 

19 West Md. 

6 New York U. _ 2 

19 St. Johns 14 

Johns Hop. 

1919 (5-4-0) 

6 Swarthmore —10 
13 Virginia 

West Va. 27 

Va. Poly 6 

Yale 31 

27 St. Johns 

13 Catholic U. __ _ 

20 West Md. 

14 Johns Hop. 

UNIVERSITY 
OF MARYLAND 

1920 (7-2-0) 

54 Randolph Ma _ 

Rutgers 7 

Princeton 35 

14 Catholic U. __ _ 
27 Wa;h. Col. __ _ 

7 Va. Poly 

13 North Car. ___ 

10 Syracuse 7 

24 Johns Hop. — _ 7 

1921 (3-5-1) 

3 Rutgers 

Syracuse 42 

3 St. Johns 7 

10 Va. Poly 7 

7 North Car. —16 
Yale 28 

16 Catholic U. __ _ 
Carnegie Tech_21 

— 57 — 



1922 (4-5-1) 

6 N. C. State —6 
7 Third Army __ 

Richmond 

Pennsylvania _12 

Princeton 26 

3 North Car. —27 

Va. Poly 21 

3 Yale 45 

3 Johns Hop. G 

54 Catholic U. __ 
7 N. C. State __ _ 6 

1923 (7-2-1) 

53 Randolph Ma. 
3 Pennsylvania _ 

23 Richmond 

9 Va. Polv 16 

14 North Car. ___ 

28 St. Johns 

14 Yale 16 

26 N. C. State —12 
40 Catholic U. __ _ 6 

6 Johns Hop. 6 

1924 (3-3-3) 

23 Wash Col. ___ 

7 Wash. & Lee -19 
38 Richmond 

Va. Poly 12 

6 North Car. ___ 
Catholic U. — _ 

Yale 47 

N. C. State — 
Johns Hop 

1925 (2-5-1) 

13 Wash. Col. __ _ 

16 Rutger- 

Va. Poly 3 

Virg'nia 6 

North Car. —16 

14 Yale 43 

3 W. & L. 7 

7 Johns Hop. _.._ 7 

1926 (5-4-1) 

63 Wash. Col. ___ 
South Car. __ _12 
Chicago 21 

8 Va. Poly 24 

14 North Car. ___ 6 
38 Gallaudet 7 

15 Yale 

6 Virginia 6 

W. & L. 3 

17 Johns Hop. ___14 



1927 (4-7-0) 

80 Wash. Col. __ 
26 South Car. ___ 

6 North Car. ___ 7 

13 Va. Poly 7 

10 V. M. I. 6 

6 W. & L. 13 

6 Yale 30 

Virginia 21 

20 Vanderbilt 39 

13 Johns Hop. __14 

G Florida 7 

1928 (6-3-1) 

31 Wash. Col. ___ 

19 North Car —26 

7 South Car. —21 
13 West Md. 6 

V. M. I. 

6 Va. Poly 9 

Yale 6 

18 Virginia 2 

6 W. & L. 

26 Johns Hop. __- 6 

1929 (4-4-2) 

34 Wash Cal. — 7 
North Car. —43 
'South Car. ___ 26 

13 Gallaudet 6 

6 V. M. I. 7 

13 Virginia 13 

13 Yale 13 

24 Va. Poly 

39 Johns Hop. 6 

West Md. —12 

1930 (7-5-0) 

60 Wash Col. ___ 6 

13 Yale 40 

21 North Car. ___ 28 
21 St. Johns 13 

20 V. M. I. 

14 Virginia 6 

41 W. & L. 7 

13 Va. Poly 7 

Navy 6 

21 Johns Hop. __ 

7 Vanderbilt ___ 22 
West Md. 7 

1931 (8-1-1) 

13 Wash Col. ___ 

7 Virginia (6 

6 Navy 

6 Kentucky 6 

41 V. M. I. 20 

20 Va. Poly 

12 Vanderbilt —39 



13 W. & L. (7 

35 Johns Hop. 14 

41 West Md. 6 

1932 (5-6-0) 

63 Wash Col. ___ 
6 Virginia 7 

6 Va. Poly 23 

Duke 34 

24 St. Johns 7 

12 V. M. I. 7 

Vanderbilt —13 

7 Navy 28 

6 W. & L. 

23 Johns Hop. ___ 

7 West Md. 39 

1933 (3-6-0) 

20 St. Johns 

Va. Poly 14 

Tulane 20 

13 V. M. I. 19 

7 West Md. 13 

Virginia 6 

7 Duke 38 

27 Johns Hop ___ 7 

33 W. & L. 13 

Florida 19 

1934 (7-3-0) 

13 St. Johns 

W. & L. 7 

13 Navv 15 

14 Va. Poly 9 

21 Florida 

20 Virginia 

23 V. M. I. 

14 Indiana. 17 

6 Georgetown 

19 Johns Hop. — 

1935 (7-2-2) 

39 St. Johns 6 

7 Va. Poly 

North Car. —33 

6 V. M. I. 

20 Florida 6 

14 Virginia 7 

7 Indiana 13 

W. & L. 

12 Georgetown 6 

Syracuse 

22 West Md. 7 

1936 (6-5-0) 

20 St. Johns 3 

6 Va. Poly 

North Car. ___14 

21 Virginia 

20 Syracuse 

6 Florida 7 

— 58 — 



12 Richmond 

7 V. M. I. 13 

6 Georgetown __ 7 

19 W. & L. 6 

West Md. —12 

1937 (8-2-0) 

28 St. Johns 

21 Pennsylvania _28 

6 West Md. 

3 Virginia 

13 Syracuse 

13 Florida 7 

9 V. M. I. 7 

14 Penn State —21 
12 Georgetown __ 2 

8 W. & L. 

1938 (2-7-0) 

6 Richmond 19 

Penn State —33 
Svracuse 53 

14 West Md. — 8 

19 Virginia 27 

14 V. M. I. 47 

7 Florida 21 

7 Georgetown 14 

19 W. & L. 13 

1939 (2-7-0) 

26 Hamp.-Syd. __ 

12 West Md. 

7 Virginia 12 

12 Rutgers 25 

Florida 14 

Penn State —12 
Georgetown __20 

V. M. I. 13 

7 Syracuse 10 

1940 (2-6-1) 

6 Hamp.-Syd. 7 

Pennsylvania -51 

6 Virginia 19 

Florida 19 

6 West Md. 

Georgetown __41 
V. M. I. 20 

14 Rutgers 7 

7 W. & L. 7 

1941 (3-5-1) 

18 Hamp.-Syd. __ 
6 West Md. _—6 
Duke 50 

13 Florida 12 

6 Pennsylvania -55 

Georgetown 26 

Rutgers 20 

V. M. I. 27 

6 W. & L. 



1942 (7-2-0) 

34 Connecticut 

14 Lake NAS — _ 
27 Rutgers 13 

V. M. I. 29 

51 West Md. 

13 Florida 

Duke 42 

27 Virginia 12 

32 W. & L. 28 

1943 (4-5-0) 

7 Curtis B. CG-13 
13 Wake Forest - 7 
19 Rich. AAB ___ 6 

2 West Va. 6 

Penn State __45 
43 Greenv. AAB _18 

Virginia 39 

Bainbridge — 46 
21 V. M. I. 14 

1944 (1-7-1) 

Hamp.-Syd. __12 
Wake Fo.rest -39 

6 West Va. 6 

Mich. State — 8 

6 Florida 14 

7 Virginia 18 

Mich. State —33 

19 Penn State —34 

8 V. M. I. 6 

1945 (6-2-1) 

60 Guilford Col. _ 6 

21 Richmond 

22 Merch. M. A. 6 
13 Va. Polv 21 

13 West Va. 13 

14 W. & M. 33 

38 V. M. I. 

19 Virginia 13 

19 South Car. —13 

1946 (3-6-0) 

54 Bainbridge 

7 Richmond 37 

North Car. —33 
6 Va. Poly 



7 W. & M. 41 

17 South Car. __ _21 

24 W. & L. 7 

14 Mich. State ___ 26 

7 N. C. State —28 

1947 (7-2-2) 

19 South Car. ___13 
43 Delaware 19 

18 Richmond 6 

7 Duke 19 

21 Va. Poly 19 

27 West Va. 

32 Duquesne 

North Car. ___19 

20 Vanderbilt ___ 6 
N. C. State __ 

(Gator Bowl, 
Jan. 1, 1948) 

20 Georgia 20 

1948 (6-4-0) 

19 Richmond 

21 Delaware 

28 Va. Poly 

12 Duke 13 

47 Geo. Wash. — 
27 Miami 13 

19 South Car. — 7 

20 North Car. __ 49 
Vanderbilt —34 

14 West. Va. 16 

1949 (9-1-0) 

34 Va. Poly 7 

33 Georgetown 7 

7 Micl-L State —14 

14 N. C. State __ 6 
44 South Car. ___ 7 
40 Geo. Wash. —14 
14 Boston U. _.— 13 
47 West Va. 7 

13 Miami 

(Gator Bowl, 

Jan. 1, 1950) 

20 Missouri 7 

1950 (7-2-1) 

7 Georgia 27 



35 Navy 21 

34 Mich. State — 7 

25 Georgetown 14 

13 N. C. State —16 

26 Duke 14 

23 Geo. Wash — 7 
7 North Car. ___ 7 

41 West Va. 

63 V. P. I. 7 

1951 (10-0-0) 
54 W. & L. 14 

33 Geo. Wash. ___ 6 
43 Georgia 7 

14 North Car. __ 7 

27 Louis. State — 

35 Missouri 

40 Navy 21 

53 N. C. State ___ 

54 West. Va. ___ 7 
(Sugar Bowl, 
Jan. 1, 1952) 

28 Tennessee 13 

1952 (7-2-0) 
13 Missouri 10 

13 Auburn 7 

28 Clemson 

37 Georgia 

38 Navy 7 

34 L.S.U. 6 

34 Boston U. ___ 7 

14 Mississippi — 21 
7 Alabama 27 

1953 (10-1-0) 

20 Missouri 6 

52 W. & L. 

20 Clemson 

40 Georgia 13 

26 N. Carolina _ 
30 Miami (Fla.) 

24 S. Carolina — 6 

27 Geo. Wash. __ 6 
38 Mississippi __ 

21 Alabama 

*0 Oklahoma 7 

*( Orange Bowl) 



COACHES THROUGH THE YEARS 



1892— W. W. Skinner 
1893— S. H. Harding 
1894 — J. G. Bannon 
1895 — G. M. Harris 
1896 — Grenville Lewis 
1897— John Lillibridge 
1898— J. F. Kenly 
1899— S. M. Cooke 
1900— F. H. Peters 
1901 — E. B. Dunbar 



1903 — Markey 

1904 — Markey 

1905 — Fred Nielsen (Neb.) 

1906— Nielsen 

1907— C. G. Church (Va.) 

and C. W. Melick (Neb.) 
1908— Bill Lang (Delaware) 
1909 — Barney Cooper 

(Md. '08) and E. P. 

Larkin (Cornell) 



*Ahnvn Teams Coached by 1910 — R. Alston (G.W.) 

Captains 1911— C. F. Donnelly 
1902 — D. John Markey 

(Western Md.) 



1912-34— H. C. Byrd 

(Md. '08) 
1935-39 — Frank Dobson 

(Princeton) 
1940-41— Jack Faber C26), 

Al Heagy. C30), and Al 

Woods C33) all of Md. 
1942 — Clark Shaughnessy 

(Minnesota) 
1943-44 — Clarence Spears 

(Dartmouth) 
1945 — Paul Bryant (Ala.) 
(Trinity) and H. C. Byrd 1946 — Shaughnessy 
(Maryland '08) 1947-53— Jim Tatum (N.C.) 



59 — 



BRIEF HISTORY OF THE UNIVERSITY 



The history of the present University is the history of two institutions: 
the old privately-owned and operated University of Maryland in Baltimore 
and the Maryland State College (formerly Maryland Agricultural College) 
at College Park. These institutions were merged in 1920. 

In 1807, the College of Medicine of Maryland was organized, the fifth 
medical school in the United States. The first class was graduated in 1810. 
A permanent home was established in 181-J-1815 by the erection of the build- 
ing at Lombard and Green Streets in Baltimore, the oldest structure in America 
devoted to medical teaching. Here \va« founded one of the first medical 
libraries (and the first medical school library) in the United States. In 1812 
the General Assembly of Maryland authorized the College of Medicine of 
Maryland to "annex or constitute facilities of divinity, law, and arts and 
sciences," and by the same act declared that the "colleges or faculties thus 
united should be constituted an university by the name and under the title of 
the University of Maryland." By authority of this act, steps were taken in 
1813 to establish "a faculty of law," and in 1823 a regular school of instruction 
in law was opened. Subsequently there were added: in 1882 a Department of 
Dentistry which was absorbed in 1923 by the Baltimore College of Dental 
Surgery (founded in 1840, the first dental school in the world); in 1889 a 
School of Nursing ; and in 1904 the Maryland College of Pharmacy (founded 
in 1841, the t':ird oldest pharmacy college in the United States). 

The Maryland State College was chartered in 1856 under the name of 
the Maryland Agricultural College, the second agricultural college in the 
Western Hemisphere. For three years the College was under private manage- 
ment. In 1862 the Congress of the United States passed the Land Grant Act 
This act granted each State and Territory that should claim its benefits an 
appropriate amount of unclaimed western lands, in place of scrip, the proceeds 
from the sale of which should apply under certain conditions to the "endow- 
ment, support, and maintenance of at least one college where the leading object 
shall be, without excluding other scientific and classical studies, and including 
military tactics, to teach such branches of learning as are related to agriculture 
and the mechanic arts, in such a manner as the Legislatures of the States may 
respectively prescribe, in order to promote the liberal and practical education 
of the industrial classes in the several pursuits and professions of life." This 
grant was accepted by the General Assembly of Maryland, and the Maryland 
Agricultural College was named as the beneficiary of the grant. Thus the 
College became, at least in part, a State institution. In the fall of 1014 control 
was taken over entirely by the State. In iqiS the General Assembly granted 
a new charter to the College, and made it the Maryland State College. 

In 1920, by an act of the State Legislature, the University of Maryland 
was merged with the Maryland State College, and the resultant institution was 
given the name University of Maryland. 







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(Continued from Page 15) 
All were sophs last year, so go into the '54 season with a year's experience 
behind them. One of the nation's finest is Bill Walker, whose 6-0 on 185 
pounds gives him the appearance of anything but an end. Walker was selected 
as honorable mention all-America for his great play last season and after 
the Alabama game was selected AP's Lineman of the Week for his brilliant 
performance. At the other end is Russell Dennis, a fine receiver and good 
defensively. Tim Flynn, Jim Parsons, and Paul Kramer complete the five 
top boys who make up one of the finest corps of ends Maryland has had in 
a long time. 

With the expected breaks that come in a football game, and not too 
many unexpected ones, Maryland could make good its great challenge as 
defending National Champions. 

"IT HAPPENED IN '53" 

Maryland won its first National Intercollegiate Football Championship, 
unanimously. 

Jim Tatum, Terp coach, was overwhelmingly voted "1953 Coach of the 
Year" by fellow members of the American Football Coaches' Association. 
Runnerup was UCLA'S Henry (Red) Sanders. Tatum polled 151 first place 
votes to in for Sanders. 

^i ifi :£ ^ 

Maryland produced its second All-America quarterback in two years in 
Bernie Faloney who succeeded the 1052 all-America signal caller, Jack Scar- 
bath. 

Maryland was the only major college team to go through the season 
unbeaten and untied with its 10-0-0 record. 

* * * * 

Bernie Faloney, the Terp's all-America quarterback, also was named the 
"Most Valuable Player" of the new-born Atlantic Coast Conference. 

^ ♦ * * 

Twenty-nine victories out of their last 31 starts was the Terps' three-year 
scoreboard reading after the finale with Alabama. 

Chet (the jet) Hanulak, the Terps' all-time halfback with the self-starter 
who made a couple all-America teams along with unanimous teammate choices 
Bernie Faloney and Stan Jones, was the nation's leading ground gainer per 
carry with a 9.8 average per carry. In 77 carries, "Hanulak from Hacken- 
sack" streaked 733 yards. 

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With its rock-ribbed defense, University of Maryland led the nation in 
rushing defense, permitting the opposing ten teams a meager 83.9 yards per 
game. 

The Terps announced a home-and-home series with UCLA, making their 
first trip to the West Coast in school's history for a Friday night October 1 
game. The opposing coaches were 1-2 in the Coach of the Year poll; Tatum 
winning on record ballot. 

* * * * 

Governor Theodore R. McKeldin of the Free State, in a letter to Coach 
Jim Tatum, praised the Terp grid-master as a "magnificent" coach and 
thanked him for "bringing high honor and renown to the State." 



The 1953 Terrapins brought the second perfect season in three years to 
the College Park campus. The '51 eleven had a 9-0-0 regular season record. 

Of the four teams that scored on the '53 Terps, only Georgia crossed the 
double stripe more than once. Final : Maryland 40 ; Georgia, 13. 

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Stan Jones, the second unanimous all-America tackle at Maryland in two 
years, was named "Lineman of the Year" by COLLIER'S and the Washing- 
ton Touchdown Club. He was second to Oklahoma's J. D. Roberts in the 
AP lineman poll. 

* * # * 

Maryland allowed only 2.32 yards per play to its 10 opponents last season. 

Center John Irvine and Fullback Dick Bielski, both outstanding for the 
Terps for the second consecutive year were named co-Captains by their team- 
mates. Ironically, they are Terps' "best bets" in '54; both all-America candi- 
dates. 

* * * * 

Maryland, which held 10 opponents to an average of 83.9 yards a game, to 
top the nation's teams in rushing defense, has a five year, 47-game average of 
94.3. No other team is under the 100-yard figure for the 1949-54 span. 

* * * * 

Dick Bielski, all-America fullback candidate, was tagged the "Collegiate 
Toe." The swarthy Bielski kicked two 40-yard plus three-pointers and hit 
high mark with a 47-yard effort against South Carolina. 

Limiting their ten opponents to 193.2 total yards per game placed the 
Terps the third best total defense ranking in the nation. 

Maryland averaged 359.5 total yards per game last season, sixth best in 
the country. 593 offensive plays netted the National Champions 3595 yards. 

* # # # 

Seven of the nine seniors on the '53 team were drafted by the profes- 
sionals. An eighth, end Marty Crytzer would have been sought by the "play- 
for-pay" clubs, but he made known his intentions to enter the Maryland Dental 
School before the draft. 

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The Terps were never scored on in the first, third, or fourth periods in 
their all-winning 10-game slate. All 31 points made by the four teams that did 
score on the Red and White were registered in the second period. (Ed. Note: 
In '54, January 1, the Oklahoma Sooners won the Orange Bowl with their 
seven points in the second stanza.) 

2$: ^ 3(C ^ 

Maryland was never behind or tied in winning the National title in '53. 

The nation's only sophomore to be honored as AP's "Lineman of the 
Week" was the Terps' standout end Bill Walker for his great play against 

Alabama. 

•% :£ ^ % 

Jim Tatum was hospitalized first week of practice in September with a 
kidney stone. Out of the hospital three days before the Missouri opener, 
Tatum made the flight with the team to St. Louis and had to be taken to 
Columbia in an ambulance. 

— 63 — 



With the return to one-platoon football, Bernie Faloney, Terp all-America 
quarterback, played the most consecutive time in one game, 58 minutes and 
15 seconds in the Missouri opener. 

Maryland ran its streak of scoring in every game to 51; a string that 
went back to next-to-last game of 1948 when they were shut-out by Vander- 
bilt, 34-0. The scoring record was broken the first day of '54 in the Orange 
Bowl by Oklahoma. 

Dick Bielski, the "Collegiate Toe" and the Terps' all-America fullback 
candidate, failed to put the ball in the end zone only twice out of 27 kick-offs. 
He kicked three booming field goals and had 12-14 extra points. 



OUTSTANDING HOLDOVERS FOR '54 




BOB PELLEGRINI 
Guard 




DICK SHIPLEY 

Tackle 





ED VEREB 

Halfback 




TOM McLUCKIE 

Guard 



tALPH, 8%fERL 
Tackle 



tUSHEt-L DENNIS 

E*id 





DON BRO.UGHER RAY BLACKS! 
Center Tackle 




JfcN GEORGE ALBRECHT 
Fullback 




TOM BREUNICH BILL WALKER 

Tackle End 



One of the Finest "Middles" of Any 
Collegiate Line in the Nation — an 
Outstanding Offensive-Defensive Trio 




CO-CAPTAIN JOHN IRVINE 
Center