(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "University of Maryland men's football media guides"

THE 1955 MARYLAND 

0-YARD LINE 





" : -!WI #: 






BOB PELLEGRINI 
Center 



ED VEREB 
Halfback 



I 955 CO-CAPTAI N S 



rtARS LEADING THE TERP ATTACK 




TOW SELEP— -PB 







FRANK TAMBURELLO— Q 



W* 




X 





HOWIE DARE—H8 






CO-CAPTAIN 
ED VEREB— HB 



FOR PRESS, RADIO and TELEVISION 

This is your 1955 Maryland football brochure, 
"The 50- Yard Line." It is published in hope 
that it offers you helpful information for your 
coverage of Terp games this season. With this 
book goes an invitation to you to visit us as 
often as possible in our offices in New Byrd 
Stadium. In return, I will try to visit you as 
often as I can and extend every assistance pos- 
sible. For any information, you can reach me 
day and night at UNion 4-4076. When it is real 
late at night, I can be contacted at WArfield 7- 
3800, Extension 507. 

Applications for tickets should be made the 
first part of the week of the game to allow time 

for mailing. Wire and telephone requirements should be made through your 

local Western Union office. 

Every effort will be made to furnish all the services in the press box 

available, so that your accounts of the game can be most adequate for your 

readers. Statistics, both half-time and final figures; a quarter play-by-play; 

game leaders in all departments; substitutions, etc. will be ready a few minutes 

after the game. 
Many thanks for all your cooperation and favors of the past. 

JOE F. BLAIR 

Sports Publicity Director 
University of Maryland, 
College Park, Maryland. 




TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Page 

1 Message to Press 

2 '55 Schedule; '54 Results; 

Tatum's Record 

3 Athletic Council 

4 Dept. of Intercollegiate 

Athletics 
5-6 President Wilson H. 

Elkins 

7-8 Coach Jim Tatum 

9-13 Assistant Coaches and 

Trainers 

14 '53 National Champions 

15 1955 Terp Prospectus 

16-25 ....Terp Opponents 
26-31 ....Opponents' Publicists' 

Reports 
32-33 ....Squad Roster 

34 Terp 4-Deep 

35-41 ....Terp Thumbnails 

42-43 ....'54 Honorary Selections 



Page 

44-45 ....Terp All-Americas 

46 '54 Highlights 

47-49 ....'54 Statistics 
50-51 ....Ail-Time Maryland 

Records 
52-55 ....Year by Year Records 
56 Coaches Through The 

Years; '55 Prospectus 

(Cont.) 

57 Terp Press 

58 Assistant Coaches (Cont.) 

59 Terp Opponents (Cont.) 

60 History of University 

61 Physical Activities Bldg. 

62 Pronunciation Guide; 

Terp Itinerary; Fresh- 
man Schedule 

63 Notes 

64 Pellegrini Award Picture 



— 1 — 



1955 SCHEDULE 

KICK-OFF TIME PRICE 

Sept. 17 Missouri at Columbia, Mo. 1:30 P.M. (CST) $3.50 

Sept. 24 U.C.L.A. at College Park, Md. 2 P.M. (EDT) $4.00 

Oct. 1 Baylor at Waco, Texas 8 P.M. (CST) $3.25 
Oct. 8 Wake Forest at College Park, Md. 

(Dads Day) 2 P.M. (EST) $3.75 

Oct. 15 North Carolina at Chapel Hill, N.C. 2 P.M. (EST) $4.00 

Oct. 22 Syracuse at Syracuse, N. Y. 1:30 P.M. (EST) $3.50 
Oct. 29 South Carolina at College Park, Md. 

(Homecoming) 2 P.M. (EST) $3.75 
Nov. 5 Louisiana State at College Park, Md. 

(Air Force ROTC Day) 2 P.M. (EST) $3.75 

Nov. 12 Clemson at Clemson, S. C. 2 P.M. (EST) $3.50 
Nov, 19 George Washington at College Park, 

Md. (Band and Senior Day) 2 P.M. (EST) $3.75 

TATUM - MARYLAND BOWL RECORD 

1947 'Gator Bowl Oklahoma 34 N.C. State 14 

1948 'Gator Bowl Maryland 20 Georgia 20 
1950 'Gator Bcwl Maryland 20 Missouri 7 
1952 Sugar Bowl Maryland 28 Tennessee 13 
1954 Orange Bowl Maryland Oklahoma 7 

Won: 3 — Lost: 1 — Tied: 1 

TATUM'S ALL-TIME 
COLLEGIATE COACHING RECORD 

YEAR WON LOST TIED SCHOOL 

1942 5 2 2 North Carolina 

1946 8 3 Oklahoma 

IQ47 7 2 2 Maryland 

1948 6 4 o Maryland 

1949 9 1 o Maryland 

1050 7 2 1 Maryland 

105 1 10 Maryland 

1952 7 2 Maryland 

1953 10 * 1 o Maryland 

*Loss in Orange Bowl 

1954 7 2 1 Maryland 

TOTAL 75 19 6 

(Tatum had a 9-2-0 record in 1945 as Head Coach at Jacksonville Naval Air 
Station. This makes his all-time head coaching record read: 8^-21-6.) 

1954 RESULTS 

20 Kentucky 42 N.C. State 14 

7 U.C.L.A. 12 16 Clemson 

13 Wake Forest 13 48 George Washington 6 

33 North Carolina 74 Missouri 13 

7 Miami, Fla. 9 

20 South Carolina 280 67 

— 2 — 



ATHLETIC COUNCIL 





Mr. G. F. Eppley 
Chairman 



Mr. James Tatum 





Mr. J. H. Remsberg Dr. James H. Reid Col Joseph Ambrose 




Dr. Jack Faber 



THE DEPARTMENT OF INTERCOLLEGIATE 
ATHLETICS 




f?9\ 



WILLIAM W. COBEY 

A 1930 University graduate, Bill Cobey 
moved into the big job as Graduate Manager 
of Athletics in 1048. His is the task of sched- 
uling for all other athletic teams except foot- 
ball, which numbers thirteen. 

The pleasant Cobey also acts in the capacity 
of contact man and heads the athletic ticket 
office- A member of his staff is Bennie Robin- 
son, ticket manager for all University athletic 
events. 

A native of Quincy, Fla., his interest in 
Maryland stems from his being a member of 
an old Maryland family. His father gradu- 
ated from the University in 1901. 

Cobey received his Bachelor's Degree from 
the School of Business and Public Adminis- 
tration. Following graduation he became 

Cashier of the University, a job he had for 17 years before his move 
Athletic Department. 

The Cobey's have six children, three daughters and three sons. 



tn 




to the 



Director of Athletics James M. Taturn 

Graduate Manager of Athletics William W. Cobey 

Athletic Publicity Director Joe F. Blair 

Equipment Head Kermit "Chief" Cissell 

Assistant Equipment Head Albert Johnson 

Facilities Head Charles "Lindy" Kehoe 

Chief of Concessions Fred Layman 

Ticket Manager Bennie Robinson 

Office Secretary to Mr. Tatum Mrs. Ora Rutherford 

Office Secretary to Mr. Cobey Mrs. Dorothy Hunt 

Office Secretary to Mr. Blair Mrs. Nelle Beasley 

Head Trainer Alfred "Duke" Wyre 

Assistant Trainer John E. Lacey 

Football Coach ...James M. Tatum 

Basketball Coach H. A. "Bud" Millihan 

Baseball Coach H. Burton SJiipley 

Lacrosse Co-Coaches Jack Faber, Al Heagy 

Track, Cross Country Coach Jim Kehoe 

Soccer, Tennis Coach Doyle Royal 

Wrestling Coach William E. "Sully" Krouse 

Golf Coach Frank Cronin 

Rifle Coach M/Sgt. Carroll W. Oliff 

— 4 — 




DR. WILSON H. ELKINS 

PRESIDENT, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Assuming the Presidency of the University of Maryland last Sep- 
tember 1, Dr. Elkins has made great strides for the University in just 
one year's tenure. He has worked long and hard and has endeared 
himself to students and faculty of the University, an institution that 
is known the world over. Dr. Elkins was introduced to the vast over- 
seas educational program of the University this summer when he at- 
tended graduation exercises in Germany. 

Dr. Elkins, former president of Texas Western College of the Uni- 
versity of Texas at El Paso before his Maryland appointment, was born 
in Median, Texas, July 9, 1908. With his father and mother, Mr. and 
Mrs. W. B. Elkins, he moved to San Antonio at an early age. 

After completing his grade and high school education in San 
Antonio, Dr. Elkins attended Schreiner Institute from 1926 to the 
spring of 1928 when he entered the University of Texas. From Texas 
University in 1932, he received both the bachelor of arts and master 
of arts degrees. 

Receiving a Rhodes Scholarship, Dr. Elkins attended Oxford Uni- 



versity from 1933 to 1936, receiving degrees of Bachelor of Letters and 
Doctor of Philosophy. 

Combining outstanding academic and athletic abilities during his 
student days at the University of Texas, he was elected to member- 
ship in Phi Beta Kappa and earned eight varsity letters in football, 
basketball, and track. In his final year at Texas, he captained the 
basketball team and was elected president of the students' association. 

Dr. Elkins lettered in football on the 1929, 1930, and 1931 teams 
at Texas and was the regular quarterback in his final two seasons, 
the one in 1930 winning the Southwest Conference title. That team 
ranks among Texas' all-time best. A soph end with that team was 
Edwin B. Price, now head coach at Texas. 

He lettered on the 1930, '31, and '32 basketball teams. He was 
captain his senior year and also the squad's leading scorer. He lettered 
in track in 1931 and '32 as a sprinter and broad jumper. He was a 
member of the national championship football shuttle relay team at 
the Drake Relays in 1931. 

Dr. Elkins married Dorothy Blackburn of Berclair, Texas, in 1927. 
They have two daughters, Carole Ann and Margaret Elise. His career 
as an educator began in 1932 when he was named athletic director of 
Cisco High School. In 1936, Dr. Elkins joined the faculty of the Uni- 
versity of Texas as an instructor in history. He held this position 
until 1938 when he went to San Angelo as president of the Junior 
College. 

He remained there until January, 1949, when he was chosen presi- 
dent of Texas Western College. This position he held until his recent 
appointment as the President of the University of Maryland. 

Dr. Elkins is a member of numerous learned societies including the 
Texas State Teacher's Association, National Educational Association, 
Phi Beta Kappa, Alpha Phi Gamma, and is listed in Who's Who in 
American Education. He is a member of Sigma Nu fraternity. 

Dr. Elkins is a member of the Methodist Church and the Rotary 
Club. He is a constant contributor to national education periodicals. 



— 6 — 




J!M TATUM 

NATION'S TOP COACH FOR 10-YEAR PERIOD 

Starting his ninth year as head football coach and Athletic Director 
at the University of Maryland, the youthful, hard-working Tatum 
again looks to another winning ledger. In his eight years on the 
College Park campus, one at North Carolina, his alma mater, and 
one at. Oklahoma, ten in all, he always has come through with better 
than .500 seasons. In fact, most of them have been near perfect 
seasons — and two of them were — 1951 and 1953. A recent survey 
revealed he has the best won-lost coaching record for a ten year period. 

The 41-year old Tatum guided the Terrapins to the 1953 National 
Championship, and it was during his season of '51 that Maryland came 
up with the first undefeated season in the history of the school. 

Tatum has had many honors given him as he has been recognized 
as one of the all-time great football coaches, even though to date he 
has had what is usually regarded as a brief tenure as a head coach. His 
coaching fraternity voted him national "Coach of the Year" honors in 
1953 as did members of his Conference, the Atlantic Coast League. In 
1951, he earned Southern Conference "Coach of the Year" honors. 

Along with assistant Coach Warren Giese, he co-authored a book 
for the football libraries in 1953 — "Coaching Football and the Split-T." 
It is being revised currently, and is in its fifth printing. 

Every other year since coming to Maryland in 1947, his teams have 
gone to a major Bowl game. When the Terps haven't been in a Bowl, 
Tatum has assisted Miami's Andy Gustafson coaching the South team 



for the annual North-South Shrine game in the Orange Bowl at 
Christmas. 

This summer he was chosen by the Government to conduct a 
month's clinic tour for the Armed Forces in Hawaii, the Far East, and 
Alaska. 

In the past eight campaigns, the Terps have won 63, lost 14, and 
tied four. Tatum has taken the big Red Shirts to four post-season 
bowl classics. The 7-0 loss to Oklahoma in the '54 Orange Bowl was 
his first bowl loss. His overall record coaching collegiate teams which 
numbers ten years (one at North Carolina and one at Oklahoma) is 
76 wins, 19 losses, and six ties. This does not include a 9-2-0 record 
when he was head coach at Jacksonville Naval Air Station during the 
war. 

A former star tackle at the University of North Carolina C35), 
Tatum probably is the most defense-minded coach in America. At 
least that is what his colleagues say about him. 

But despite this accent on defense, his Split-T offense is one of the 
best. Tatum's almost every available off-season moment is spent lec- 
turing on the Split-T, both offense and its defense. 

Back of Tatum's coaching success is his greatest asset — the ability 
to organize. Dr. H. C. Byrd, president emeritus of the University, him- 
self, of course, a former Terp football coach, terms Tatum the greatest 
organizer he has met. Tatum's coaching staff, his coaching system, his 
planning for practice, his preparation for games are part of his close- 
knit organization. His day in football season starts at 6:30 a.m. It is 
over around midnight. A big fellow, he has the drive to carry through 
a season on this schedule. 

AU-Americans, pro prospects, and members of all-star teams virtu- 
ally were unheard of at Maryland before Tatum came. Maryland has 
placed two players on most of the All-Americans for five years; in '51, 
'52, and '54, more Terps were drafted by the pros than any other 
school; and in '53 and '54 Maryland had more players in the All-Star 
game than any other school. 

After his graduation from North Carolina in '35, the native of 
McColl, S. C. followed his coach, Carl Snavely, to Cornell. He returned 
to his alma mater for his first fling at head coaching in 1942. 

World War II found Tatum In the Navy. It was then that he was 
to learn the Split-T from Missouri's Don Faurot as the latter's assist- 
ant at Iowa Pre-Flight. In '45, he was head coach at Jacksonville 
Naval Air Station. 

After his Navy discharge, he molded a strong eleven at Oklahoma, 
then came to Maryland. 

The Tatums have three children, Becky, fifth grade; son, Jimmy, 
third grade; and a three-year old daughter, Reid. Mrs. Tatum is a 
native of Ayden, N. C, 




ASSISTANT COACHES 

WARREN GIESE 

As early as 1948, Coach Tatum called 
on Giese, who had played end for him in 
the Navy and at Oklahoma, to become 
End Coach for the Terrapins. Since the 
departure of Jack Hennemier to Calgary, 
Canada, Giese becomes the oldest member 
of the coaching staff in length of service 
with Tatum and Maryland. * *,,- 

An All Big Seven end at Oklahoma in y 

1946, Giese, a hard worker and fine stu- \ 

dent of the game, spent the summer work- 
ing on various chapter revisions of the 

book he co-authored with Tatum in 1953, \ • / 

"Coaching Football and the Split-T." The ■*. / 

book now is in its fifth printing. J 

In the summer of '52, he spent a ~ ^^ — ' 

month in Japan as a member of the U.S. Coaching Staff. He assisted 
Tatum in the College All-Star camp last summer. 

A native of Milwaukee, Giese started his collegiate athletic career 
at Wisconsin State College. Here the Navy vet lettered playing end 
and also won his monogram as a quarter-miler. 

Under the V-12 program, Giese studied at Central Michigan Col- 
lege. Here he played right halfback before being transferred to Miami 
Training Center and then to Jacksonville in '45 where he first played 
end for Tatum. In '46 he followed Tatum to Oklahoma and subse- 
quently won first team Big Seven honors. 

He returned to Central Michigan and played another year while 
completing his work for his B.A. and B.S. degrees. In '48, Tatum 
added his former star to the Terp staff. While at Maryland he has 
received his Master's in Physical Education, and now is working on 
his Doctorate. 

The Giese's have two daughters. 

TOMMY MONT 

One of the all-time three-sport ath- 
letes in the history of the University of 
Maryland, Tommy Mont has been tutor- 
ing the Terps' backfield since his return 
to his alma mater in the fall of 1951. 

A four-year letterman in football, bas- 
ketball, and lacrosse, Mont returned to 
Maryland after four brilliant yeans with 
the professional Washington Redskins. 

A native of Cumberland, Maryland., 
Mont started his collegiate athletic career 
in 1941. He was in school two years be- 
fore entering the service in the spring of 
'43. He played tailback in '41, then quar- 
terback on the '42 T eleven. Both years 
he also won his basketball and lacrosse 
monograms. Mont won All-America mention as well as first team 
(Continued an page 58 i 
— 9 — 






BOB WARD 

The all-time great name in the history 
of Maryland football is that of the senior 
line coach assistant, Bob Ward. Follow- 
ing his graduation in 1952, Coach Tatum 
immediately found a place on his staff for 
his two-year All-America guard. 

Following his discharge from the 
Army paratroopers in 1947, Ward came to 
Maryland as one of the smallest guard 
prospects ever seen by Jim Tatum. But 
Tatum liked what he saw and now is 
more than happy that Ward was on his 
side of the line for four years. The 185- 
pounder from Elizabeth, N. J., was out- 
standing every Saturday. 

Ward graduated in 1952 with a degree 
from the School of Business and Public Administration, finishing in the 
upper one-third of his class. He majored in Real Estate and Insurance. 

His many honors are too numerous to mention, but Ward was 
recipient of every award imaginable for any lineman. After making 
All-America his junior year for his excellent defensive play, he proved 
that he wasn't just an ordinary platoon football player by making 
everybody's All-America team in 1951 playing offense. Tatum himself 
credits the great success of his offensive team, highest scoring machine 
in the country, to his '51 Co-Captain, Ward. When things got tough, 
Ward would trot in to play defense and stop the enemy threat. 

Besides the unanimous All-America selections his senior year, 
Ward was named "Lineman of the Year'' by the Washington Touch- 
down Club and the Philadelphia Sportswriters' Assn. He was runnerup 
to Stanford's Bill McColl for the same Associated Press award. He was 
named the outstanding player of the Southern Conference. During the 
'51 season, he was the nation's "Lineman of the Week" after his great 
game against Georgia, played with a broken hand. 

The Ward's have three children, two boys, Jim, 5, and Bob, Jr., 2, 
and a daughter, Kathie, four years old. 

EMMETT CHEEK » 

The hard-working native of Chapel 
Hill, N. C, Cheek begins his fifth year as 
a member of the Terp coaching staff. 
Tatum beckoned his old acquaintance from 
his alma mater of North Carolina in 1951. 

Born and raised in Chapel Hill, Cheek 
played in 1940 as a freshman for Coach 
Tatum, then Tarheel freshman coach, as a 
guard. After another year of football, he 
was called into the service in '41, and 
served in the Army Medics. 

Returning to Carolina, Cheek complet- 
ed his football career under Carl Snavely. 
He stayed on and did graduate work in 
'48. He received his Master's Degree in 
Physical Education from UNC in 1950. 

(Continued on page 58) 
— 10 — 





EDDIE TEAGUE 

Beginning his fourth year on the 
Terp coaching staff, Teague's undergradu- 
ate record shows he was a brilliant three- 
sport athlete at North Carolina State and 
the University of North Carolina. 

Tatum brought the Tarheel graduate 
to Maryland following his discharge in 
mid-August from the U.S. Marine Corps 
after serving 15 months in Korea with the 
Infantry, 1st Marine Division. A Captain 
in the USMCR, he served three years 
during World War II. 

Teague attended N.C. State College, 
1941-43, then transferred to UNC via his 
Marine Unit and received his A. B. De- 
gree. Lettering in football, basketball, 
and baseball, he received All-America mention his senior year at UNC 
as a tailback and also was named to the All-Conference team that year. 

Following his World War II service, he returned to UNC and got 
his Master's in '47. 

He then went to Guilford College, N. C, as backfield coach and 
assistant director of physical education in 1947 and '48. He was head 
coach and athletic director 1949-'51 before he was called to active duty. 

Besides his coaching duties, Teague, along with Cheek, scouts for 
the Terps. He has authored a book on scouting which will be off the 
press this fall. He also is an instructor in the School of Physical Edu- 
cation. He is studying for his Doctorate in Physical Education. 

The Teagues have a daughter, Peggy, seven. 

ED KENSLER 

Another prize pupil of Coach Tatum's 
was recalled to his alma mater this win- 
ter when Tatum was faced with finding 
a capable replacement to fill the big job 
of line coach Jack Hennemier who had 
taken the head coaching position in Cal- 
gary, Canada. 

He only had to go to Lexington, Va., 
where he had recommended his former 
line star, Ed Kensler, for a coaching job 
at Washington and Lee, just three years 
ago. The affable Kensler, at V.M.I, at the 
time, following W&L's decision not to 
have a major football schedule, accepted 
the beckoning of his former teacher and 
now is another valuable addition to 
Tatum's youthful and capable staff. 

Kensler, a -native of Lawrenceville, 111., came to Maryland in the 
fall semester of 1948 following his discharge from the U.S. Marine 
Corps after a two-year hitch. He played center two years for the 

(Continued on paae 58 J 




11 




BILL "Whitey" DOVELL 
Freshman Coach 

Still another product of Tatum as a 
player, Dovell begins his third season at 
his alma mater as head freshman coach. 
The former guard of the '49 and '50 teams, 
received his Bachelor's in Physical Educa- 
tion in 1953. 

Tatum used Dovell part time as an 
undergraduate while completing his aca- 
demic work. He was so pleased with his 
handling of various coaching duties that 
he was placed on the staff on full-time 
basis for the '53 campaign. 

He has had two winning seasons and 
has produced some real outstanding boys 
for the varsity. 

This fall, October 15, Dovell will take the Terp yearlings to Mexico 
City for an international clash with Mexico Polytechnic Institute. 

"Whitey," a hard working perfectionist on and off the field, also 
handles the film library. He is working on his Master's Degree in 
Physical Education. 

He married the former Clair Benson last spring. 

FRED LAYMAN 

One of the most outstanding halfback 
prospects at Maryland during the Tatum 
regime, Fred Layman's collegiate foot- 
ball career was halted as the prospective 
star received a serious injury his fresh- 
man year the last day of spring practice. 
At the time, Layman, newly appointed 
varsity assistant coach replacing Vernon 
Seibert, was running second team half- 
back as a freshman. 

Fred was hospitalized for six months 
and after his recovery, he returned to 
school the fall of 1952 to complete his 
education. He received his Bachelor of 
Science Degree this August from the 
School of Business and Public Administra- 
tion, majoring in Transportation. 

For the past two seasons he has been freshman backfield coach. 
His appointment to full-time duty as varsity assistant coach was an- 
nounced July 1. Besides his coaching duties he will be working secre- 
tary of the Terrapin Club, and Concessions Manager. 

Layman, native of Brentwood, Pa., was a three year letterman in 
football, basketball, and tennis at Brentwood High School. Following 
graduation he spent a semester at Kiski Prep before e-nrolling at 
Colgate in February '51. He transferred to Maryland in the fall of 
'51. He was a quarterack in High School, Prep School and at Colgate. 
With a fine group of quarterbacks on hand at Maryland, Tatum moved 
him to halfback where he made quite an impression. It was believed 
he would have been one of the Terp's best until his injury. 

Fred is married to the former Jane Murray of Brentwood. 




THE TRAINERS 




ALFRED J. "DUKE" WYRE 

Beginning his ninth year as head train- 
er of Maryland athletic teams, Duke came to 
College Park with Tatum in 1947. It was his 
long and reputable experience that convinced 
Tatum he had one of the top trainers in the 
country. 

He has authored many articles and manu- 
als on training methods and is kept busy 
spreading the good word of the best meth- 
ods of training athletic teams through many 
lectures. 

The "Dapper Duke" was trainer at Yale 
for 15 years before he moved to Holy Cross 
for another year. Then in '47, he came to Maryland and joined Tatum. 

A Navy Veteran, Wyre served as a physical education instructor 
in the V-12 program. 

He was the . first president of the Southern Conference Trainer's 
Assn. He is on the board of the National Trainer's Assn. In '49, he 
was named the top trainer in the East. 

Duke, and his assistant, John Lacey, pride themselves in having 
one of the best equipped and most modern training rooms in the 
country. 




JOHN E. LACEY 

When the Maryland athletic program 
reached its peak, the necessity for a full-time 
assistant trainer became inevitable. So in 
1951, another Ivy-Leaguer, John Lacey came 
highly recommended by his associates. The 
popular and capable Lacey is the first full- 
time assistant trainer the Terps have had. 

A native of Connecticut, Lacey studied 
and graduated from Tilton Academy, N. H. 

He, too, has had vast experience with 
athletic teams. Before coming to Maryland, .,.,..., Mk> 

Lacey was assistant trainer at Yale for three 
years. He also had long experience with 

pro teams. In early pro training seasons, he had been trainer for the 
Chicago Cardinals, the New York Yanks, and was with the Baltimore 
Colts in 1950. 

Following the football season, Lacey travels with the basketball 
and lacrosse teams. 




T-Hc^covfincDt-cca". o 



I- M 



THE 1955 TERPS 

Maryland's 1955 football team, at an early glance prior to the 
squad even putting on a pad before fall practice begins 1 September, 
should be another outstanding edition of Jim Tatum's coaching tenure 
at College Park. 

The Terps, who ran into a little trouble at the beginning of the 
1954 season, came along in their expected strong fashion by mid-season 
as the all-important quarterback and tackle positions molded into the 
usual fine category that have always been a strong point in the Mary- 
land attack. 

Maryland lost 14 lettermen, including the entire starting backfield 
of quarterback Charles Boxold, halfbacks Roomie Waller and Joe Horn- 
ing, and fullback Dick Bielski. Another loss in the backfield was full- 
back George Albrecht. Up front they will be minus tackles Ray Black- 
burn, Ralph Baierl, and "Dick Shipley; guards Jack Bowersox, George 
Palahunik, and Tom McLuckie; and centers John Irvine, Don Brougher, 
and Dick O'Donnell. 

Returning are 20 lettermen from the '54 squad. They include five 
ends, four tackles, two guards, one center, five halfbacks, two quarter- 
backs, and one fullback. 

The early prediction on the Maryland team is that the line will 
be one of the fastest since Tatum came to College Park i>n 1947. The 
backfield also has fine speed and experienced finesse, led by a great 
one-platoon quarterback, Baltimore's Frank Tamburello. 

Leading the charges on the forward wall will be center and All- 
America candidate Bob Pellegrini. Tatum considers him to be one of 
the finest football players he has ever coached. He was acclaimed 
highly for his playing last year as a junior and certainly as co-captain 
is being counted upon to lead Maryland through its tough ten-game 
schedule. Along with Pellegrini up front are five veteran ends, led by 
Bill Walker, second team All-America last year, and Russell Dennis, 
an outstanding two-way end. They are backed up by Tim Flynn, Jim 
Parsons, Jean Waters and newcomers Bob Alexander, Dick Porter and 
Bill Turner. 

The tackle situation has improved greatly, with Ed Heuring and 
Mike Sandusky — two of the finest tackle prospects we have had since 
the days of Modzelewski, Morgan, Jones, Moss, and Krouse. Both are 
big and strong and extremely fast. They are backed up by still ade- 
quate replacements in Al Wharton, Joe Lazzarino, and newcomers Don 
Healy, a super frosh; Stan Polyanski, Dick Bittner, and Tom Stefl. 

At the guard position, the Terps seem well fixed with a great pros- 
pect handling the right side in junior Jack Davis, being compared to the 
outstanding feats of Maryland's all-time All- America guard Bob Ward. 
He will be backed up by a pair of B team sophs in Ron Athey, Nick 
DeCicco, and Bob Griffith, up from the frosh team. On the left side 
is the fast Gene Dyson, the Terps' top shotput and discus man, along 
with George Kolarac, Bob Suchy, and Paul Tonetti. 

To spell Pellegrini, whom Tatum believes could be the "Lineman of 
(Continued on page 56) 



TERP OPPONENTS 

MARYLAND vs MISSOURI 17 SEPTEMBER 

1:30 P.M. (C.S.T.) 

At Memorial Stadium (37,000) 

Columbia, Mo. 

FACTS ABOUT THE TIGERS 

CONFERENCE: Big Seven 

LOCATION: Columbia, Missouri 

HEAD COACH: Don Faurot 

COLORS: Black and Gold 

ENROLLMENT: 8,000 

TYPE OFFENSE: Sliding T 

1954 RECORD: Won 4, Lost 5, Tied 1 




Coach Don Faurot 



TIGERS' RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS 

(Maryland: Won 5, Lost 0, Tied 0) 





Maryland 


1950 


20 


1951 


35 


1952 


13 


1953 


20 


1954 


74 


'Gator Bowl 





Missouri 

7 


10 

6 
13 



TOTAL POINTS: Maryland, 162; Missouri, 36 
1955 CAPTAIN: None Selected 
LETTERMEN RETURN I NG— 16 — LOST— 15 





1955 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


17 


Maryland 


Sept. 


24 


at Michigan 


Oct. 


1 


Utah 


Oct. 


7 


at Southern Methodist 
(Night) 


Oct. 


15 


at Iowa State 


Oct. 


22 


Nebraska 


Oct. 


29 


at Colorado 


Nov. 


5 


Oklahoma 


Nov. 


12 


Kansas State 


Nov. 


19 


at Kansas 



1954 YARDSTICK 

Maryland Missouri 

22 First Downs 24 

492 Yards Rushing 109 

109 Yards Passing 283 

6 Passes Attempted 45 

4 Passes Completed 20 

3 Passes Intercepted By 

2 Punts By 4 

52.5 Punting Average 29.0 

1 Fumbles 3 

1 Fumbles Lost 1 

65 Yards Penalized 50 

Score by Periods: 

Maryland 21 6 27 20—74 

Missouri 7 6 — 13 

Maryland Scoring Touchdowns: Biel- 
ski (2); Tamburello, Selep, Nusz. Kra- 
mer. Waller. Dare. Albrecht, Skarda, 
Burgee. Conversions: Bielski (4); Al- 
brecht (2>; Selep, Skarda. 

Missouri Scoring Touchdowns : Bur- 
nine, Curley. Conversion: Fox. 



— 16 — 



MARYLAND vs U.C.L.A. 24 SEPTEMBER 



2:00 P.M. (E.D.T.) 

at Byrd Stadium (45,000) 

College Park, Md. 

FACTS ABOUT THE BRUINS 
CONFERENCE: Pacific Coast 
LOCATION: Los Angeles, Calif. 
HEAD COACH: Henry R. "Red" Sanders 
COLORS: Navy Blue and Gold 
ENROLLMENT: 14,000 

TYPE OFFENSE: Balanced-line Single Wing 
1954 RECORD: Won 9, Lost 0. Pacific Coast 

Conference and National 

Champions 




Coach "Red" Sanders 



BRUINS' RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS 

(Maryland: Won 0, Lost 1) 



1954 



Maryland 

7 



U.C.L.A. 
12 



TOTAL POINTS: Maryland, 7; U.C.L.A., 12 
1955 CAPTAIN: (Unnamed yet) 
LETTERMEN RETURNING— 23 — LOST— 12 





1955 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


16 


Texas A&M (Night) 


Sept. 


24 


at Maryland 


Oct. 


1 


at Washington State 


Oct. 


7 


Oregon State (Night) 


Oct. 


15 


at Stanford 


Oct. 


21 


Iowa (Night) 


! Oct. 


29 


California 


Nov. 


5 


at College of the Pacific 

(Night) 


Nov. 


12 


Washington 


Nov. 


19 


Southern California 



1954 YARDSTICK 

Maryland U.C.L.A. 

11 First Downs 10 

143 Rushing Yardage 225 

63 Passing Yardage 6 

9 Passes Attempted 2 

4 Passes Completed 1 

Passes Intercepted By 2 

6 Number Punts 8 

35.5 Punting Average 37.2 

1 Fumbles Lost 

59 Yards Penalized 60 

Score by Periods: 

Maryland 7—7 

U.C.L.A 6 6—12 

Maryland Scoring Touchdowns: Dare. 
Conversion: Bielski. 

U.C.L.A. Scoring Touchdowns: Daven- 
port (2). 



— 17 — 



MARYLAND vs BAYLOR 1 OCTOBER 

\s 8:00 P.M. (C.S.T.) 

at Baylor Stadium (50,000) 
Waco, Texas 

FACTS ABOUT THE BEARS 

CONFERENCE: Southwest 
LOCATION: Waco, Texas 
HEAD COACH: George H. Sauer 
COLORS: Green and Gold 
ENROLLMENT: 5,000 
TYPE OFFENSE: T-Formation 
1954 RECORD: Won 7, Lost 3, Tied (Does 
not include loss in 'Gator 
Coach George Sauer Bowl to Auburn) 




MARYLAND'S RECORD AGAINST THE BEARS 

(This is the first gridiron meeting of the two schools.) 



1955 CAPTAINS: Henry Gremminger, end; Weldon Holley, halfback 





1955 SCHEDULE 




1954 YARDSTICK 


Sept. 


17 *Hardin-Simmons 






Sept. 
Oct. 


24 *at Villanova 
1 'Maryland 




DID 


Oct. 


8 'Arkansas 






Oct. 


15 at Washington 






Oct. 
Oct. 


22 at Texas A&M 
29 Texas Ch-istian 




NOT 


Nov. 


5 at U. of Texas 






Nov. 


12 Open 






Nov. 


19 Southern Methodist 






Nov. 


26 at Rice 

* Night Games 




PLAY 



— 18 — 



MARYLAND vs WAKE FOREST 

(DAD'S DAY) 

2:00 P.M. (E.S.T.) 

at Byrd Stadium (35,000) 

College Park, Md. 

FACTS ABOUT THE DEACONS 

CONFERENCE: Atlantic Coast 
LOCATION : Wake Forest, N. C. 
READ COACH: Tom Rogers 
COLORS: Old Gold and Black 
ENROLLMENT: 1,500 
TYPE OFFENSE: T Formation 
1954 RECORD: Won 2, Lost 7, Tied 1 



8 OCTOBER 




Coach Tom Rogers 



DEACONS' RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS 

(Maryland: Won 2, Lost 1, Tied 1) 



1917 
1943 
1944 
1954 



Maryland 

29 

13 



13 



Wake Forest 

13 

7 

39 

13 



TOTAL POINTS: Maryland 55, Wake Forest 72 

1955 CAPTAINS: Tackle Bob Bartholomew and Quarterback Nick 
Consoles 

LETTERMEN RETURNING— 17 — LOST— 12 





1955 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


17 


VPI 


Sept. 


24 


South Carolina at Win- 
ston-Salem 


! Oct. 


1 


at West Virginia 


Oct. 


8 


at Maryland 


| Oct. 


15 


at NC State 


Oct. 


22 


North Carolina 


Oct. 


29 


at Clemson 


Nov. 


5 


William and Mary 


Nov. 


12 


at U. of Virginia 


Nov. 


19 


at Duke 



1954 YARDSTICK 

Maryland Wake Forest 

11 First Downs 11 

16S Rushing Yardage 149 

94 Passing Yardage 64 

14 Passes Attempted 13 

5 Passes Completed 7 

1 Intercepted By 3 

3 Number Punts 7 

40.0 Punting Average 38.7 

3 Fumbles Lost 1 

33 Yards Penalized 20 

Score by Periods: 

Maryland 7 6 — 13 

Wake Forest .... 6 7 0—13 
Maryland Scoring Touchdowns: Blel- 
ski, Boxold. Conversion: Bielski. 

Wake Forest Scoring Touchdowns: 
Parham, Daniels. Conversion: White. 



19 



MARYLAND vs NORTH CAROLINA 



15 OCTOBER 



2:00 P.M. (E.S.T.) 

at Kenan Stadium (35,000) 

Chapel Hill, N. C. 

FACTS ABOUT THE TARHEELS 

CONFERENCE: Atlantic Coast 
LOCATION : Chapel Hill, N. C. 
HEAD COACH: George Barclay 
COLORS; Carolina Blue and White 
ENROLLMENT: 6,000 
TYPE OFFENSE: Split-T 
Coach George Barclay 1954 RECORD: Won 4, Lost 5, Tied 1 

TARHEELS' RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS 

(Maryland: Won 7, Lost 12, Tied 1) 




1920 
1921 
1922 
1923 
1924 
1925 
1926 
1927 
1928 
1929 



Maryland 
13 

7 

3 
14 

6 


14 

6 
19 





N. C. 






1930 


16 


1935 


27 


1936 





1946 





1947 


16 


1948 


6 


1950 


7 


1951 


26 


1953 


43 


1954 



Maryland 
21 








20 

7 
14 
26 
33 



TOTAL POINTS: 
1955 CAPTAIN: 



Maryland, 203; North Carolina, 311 



N. C. 
28 
33 
14 
13 
19 
49 

7 

7 







Roland Perdue, Tackle. Alternate Captain, Will Frye, 
End. 



LETTERMEN RETURNING— 17 



Lost— 12 





1955 SCHEDULE 




Sept. 


24 


Oklahoma 




Oct. 


1 


at NC State 




Oct. 


8 


at Georgia 




Oct. 


15 


Maryland 




Oct. 


22 


at Wake Forest 




Oct. 


29 


Tennessee 




Nov. 


5 


South Carolina at 


Nor- 
folk 


Nov. 


12 


Notre Dame 




Nov. 


19 


Virginia 




Dec. 


3 


at Duke 





1954 YARDSTICK 

Maryland North Carolina 

23 First Downs 8 

330 Rushing Yardage 67 

118 Passing Yardage 53 

13 Passes Attempted 10 

8 Passes Completed 6 

Intercepted By 

2 Number Punts 7 

31.5 Punting Average 33.0 

2 Fumbles Lost 2 

95 Yards Penalized 76 



Score by Periods: 

Maryland 7 

North Carolina 



7 19—33 
0—0 



Maryland Scoring Touchdowns: Biel- 
ski, Waller, Selep, Dare, Nusz. Con- 
versions: Bielski (2), Selep. 



— 20 



MARYLAND vs SYRACUSE 22 OCTOBER 



1:30 P.M. (E.D.T.) 

at Archbold Stadium (39,500) 

Syracuse, N. Y. 

FACTS ABOUT THE ORANGE 

CONFERENCE: Eastern College Athletic 

LOCATION: Syracuse, N. Y. 

HEAD COACH: Floyd (Ben) Schwartzwalder 

COLORS: Orange 

ENROLLMENT: 8,883 

TYPE OFFENSE: Unbalanced Winged-T 

1954 RECORD: Won 4, Lost 4, Tied 




Coach Schwartzwalder 



ORANGE RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS 
(Maryland: Won 3, Lost 3, Tied 1) 



1920 
1921 
1935 
1936 
1937 
1938 
1939 



Maryland 


Syracuse 


10 


7 





42 








20 





13 








53 


7 


10 



TOTAL POINTS: Maryland, 50; Syracuse,112 
1955 CAPTAIN: Game Captains To Be Appointed 
LETTERMEN RETURNING— 16 — LOST— 13 





1955 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


24 * Pittsburgh 


Oct. 


8 *Boston U. 


Oct. 


15 at Army 


Oct. 


22 Maryland 


Oct. 


29 at Holy Cross 


Nov. 


5 at Perm State 


Nov. 


12 Colgate 


Nov. 


19 at West Virginia 




*Night Game 



1954 YARDSTICK 

DID 

NOT 



PLAY 



MARYLAND vs SOUTH CAROLINA 29 OCTOBER 

HOMECOMING 

J0 2:00 P.M. (E.S.T.) 

at Byrd Stadium (35,000) 
«*» W College Park, Md. 

FACTS ABOUT THE GAMECOCKS 

CONFERENCE: Atlantic Coast 
LOCATION: Columbia, S. C. 
HEAD COACH: Rex Enright 
COLORS: Garnet and Black 
ENROLLMENT: 4,000 
TYPE OFFENSE: T 
Coach Rex Enright 1954 RECORD: Won 6, Lost 4 




GAMECOCKS' RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS 

(Maryland: Won 7, Lost 4, Tied 0) 





Maryland 


S. C. 




Maryland 


S. C 


1926 





12 


1947 


19 


13 


1927 


26 





1948 


19 


7 


1928 


7 


21 


1949 


44 


7 


1929 





26 


1953 


24 


6 


1945 


19 


13 


1954 


20 





1946 


17 


21 









TOTAL POINTS: Maryland, 185; South Carolina, 126 

1955 CO-CAPTAINS: Carl Brazell, Halfback; Hugh Bell, Center. 

LETTERMEN RETURNING— 18 — LOST— 11 





1955 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


17 


Wofford (Night) 


Sept. 


24 


Wake Forest at Winston- 
Salem 


Oct. 


1 


Navy 


Oct. 


8 


Furman 


Oct. 


20 


Clemson 


Oct. 


29 


at Maryland 


Nov. 


5 


North Carolina at Nor- 
folk 


Nov. 


12 


Duke 


Nov. 


19 


Open 


Nov. 


26 


at Virginia 



1954 YARDSTICK 

Maryland South Carolina 

17 First Downs 13 

272 Rushing Yardage 93 

30 Passing Yardage 77 

302 Total Yardage 170 

8 Passes Attempted 20 

3 Passes Completed 11 

1 Intercepted By 

6 Number Punts 6 

38.5 Punting Average 41.3 

1 Fumbles Lost 2 

91 Yards Penalized 36 

Score by Periods: 

Maryland 6 14 — 20 

South Carolina — 
Maryland Scoring Touchdowns: Tam- 
burello (2) ; Bielski. Conversions : Biel- 
ski (2). 



MARYLAND vs LOUISIANA STATE . 
AIR FORCE ROTC DAY 

2:00 P.M. (E.S.T.) 

at Byrd Stadium (35,000) 

College Park, Md. 

FACTS ABOUT THE TIGERS 

CONFERENCE: Southeastern 

LOCATION : Baton Rouge, La. 

HEAD COACH: Paul Dietzel 

COLORS: Purple and Gold 

ENROLLMENT: 9,000 

TYPE OFFENSE: T 

1954 RECORD: Won 5, Lost 6, Tied 



5 NOVEMBER 





Coach Paul Dietzel 



TIGERS' RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS 

(Maryland: Won 2, Lost 0, Tied 0) 



1951 
1952 



Maryland 
27 
34 



LSU 

6 



TOTAL POINTS: Maryland, 61; LSU, 6. 

1955 CAPTAIN: None selected. Probable Game Captain. 

LETTERMEN RETURNING— 15 — LOST— 11 





1955 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


17 


Kentucky ! 


Sept. 


24 


at Texas A&M 


Oct. 


1 


at Rice 


Oct. 


8 


Georgia Tech 


Oct. 


15 


at Florida 


Oct. 


29 


U. of Mississippi 


Nov. 


5 


at Maryland 


Nov. 


12 


Mississippi State 


Nov. 


19 


at Arkansas 


Nov. 


26 


Tulane 



1954 


YARDSTICK 


DID 


NOT 








PLAY 



23 — 



MARYLAND vs CLEMSON 12 NOVEMBER 




Coach Frank Howard 



2:00 P.M. (E.S.T.) 

at Memorial Stadium (20,500) 

Clemson, S. C. 

FACTS ABOUT THE TIGERS 

CONFERENCE: Atlantic Coast 

LOCATION: Clemson, S. C. 

HEAD COACH: Frank Howard 

COLORS: Orange and Purple 

ENROLLMENT: 2,700 

TYPE OFFENSE: Split-T 

1954 RECORD: Won 5, Lost 5, Tied 



TIGERS' RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS 

(Maryland: Won 3, Lost 0, Tied 0) 



1952 
1953 
1954 



Maryland 
28 
20 
16 



Clemson 






TOTAL POINTS: Maryland, 64; Clemson, 0. 
1955 CAPTAIN: Don King, Quarterback. 
LETTERMEN RETURNING— 21 — LOST— 15 





1955 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


17 


Presbyterian (Night) 


Sept. 


24 


at Virginia 


Oct. 


1 


Georgia 


Oct. 


8 


at Rice (Night) 


Oct. 


20 


at South Carolina 


Oct. 


29 


Wake Forest 


Nov. 


5 


Virginia Tech at Roanoke 


Nov. 


12 


Maryland 


Nov. 


19 


Auburn at Mobile 


Nov. 


26 


Furman at Greenville 









Marylar 

8 

144 

58 

9 

3 

2 


1954 YARDSTICK 
d 


Clemson 
18 


... Rushing Yardage .. 
... Passing Yardage .. 
... Passes Attempted .. 
... Passes Completed - 


267 

58 

13 

3 

4 


6 

41 

1 
25 

Score 

Maryl 

Clems 

Maryl 

ler (2) 

Goal: E 




Punting Average .... 

Fumbles Lost 

Yards Penalized .... 

by Periods : 
and 6 7 
on 


32 

3 

13 

3—16 
0— 
s: Wal- 
Field 


and Scoring Touchdown 
Conversion : Bielski 
ielski. 



MARYLAND vs GEORGE WASHINGTON 19 NOVEMBER 



BAND and SENIOR DAY 

2:00 P.M. (E.S.T.) 

at Byrd Stadium (35,000) 

College Park, Md. 

FACTS ABOUT THE COLONIALS 

CONFERENCE: Southern 

LOCATION: Washington, D. C. 

HEAD COACH: Eugene H. (Bo) Sherman 

COLORS: Buff and Blue 

ENROLLMENT: 11,500 

TYPE OFFENSE: Split-T 

1954 RECORD: Won 1, Lost 7, Tied 1 




Coach "Bo" Sherman 



COLONIALS' RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS 

(Maryland: Won 10, Lost 3, Tied 3) 





Maryland 


G.W. 




Maryland 


G.W 


1897 








1910 


6 





1898 





32 


1948 


47 





1902 


11 


10 


1949 


40 


14 


1903 


6 





1950 


23 


7 


1904 








1951 


33 


7 


1907 


11 





1953 


27 


6 


1908 





57 


1954 


48 


6 


1909 





26 









TOTAL POINTS: Maryland, 252; George Washington, 159. 

(First five games of series, G.W. was Columbian U.) 
1955 CAPTAIN: None Selected. Probable Game Captain 
LETTERMEN RETURNING— 17 — LOST— 11 





1955 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


24 


V.M.I, at Roanoke 


Oct. 


1 


at Virginia 


Oct. 


8 


U. of Florida at Jack- 
sonville 


Oct. 


15 


at Pennsylvania 


Oct. 


22 


at William and Mary 


Oct. 


29 


V.P.I. 


Nov. 


4 


West Virginia 


Nov. 


12 


at Richmond 


Nov. 


19 


at Maryland 



1954 YARDSTICK 

Maryland G.W. 

17 First Downs 8 

352 Rushing Yardage 127 

168 Passing Yardage 55 

19 Passes Attempted 15 

5 Passes Completed 5 

2 Intercepted By 

4 Number Punts 9 

42 Punting Average 32 

2 Fumbles Lost 2 

65 Yards Penalized 25 

Score by Periods: 

Maryland 6 7 29 6—48 

G.W 6—6 

Maryland Scoring Touchdowns: Kra- 
mer, Parsons, Flynn, Horning, Walker, 
Vereb. Waller. Conversions: Bielski 
(2), Albrecht (2). 

Safety: Ciemnicki, G.W., tackled in 
end zone by Albrecht and Blackburn. 



— 25 



THE OUTLOOK FOR OUR OPPONENTS AS 
REPORTED BY THEIR PUBLICITY DIRECTORS 

University of Missouri 

By Bill Callahan 

Short perhaps on experience and overall savvy, Missouri will field 
a young, eager football team this fall — one with more speed in the line 
and baekfield than any of its predecessors in recent years. 

Loss of seven first-stringers, including three-fourths of the Tigers' 
starting baekfield, means that Mizzou Coach Don Faurot must do 
plenty of remodeling. Of his 17 veteran returnees, only four were 
regulars in '54 — Tony Karakas, center; Al Portney, tackle; Harold 
Burnine, end; and Jimmy Hunter, quarterback. 

Burnine understudied Jack Hurley, regular right end, over most of 
the season, starting the last two games when Hurley was lost with a 
knee injury. Hunter, who took over the No. 1 left-half job late in 
the campaign, was switched to quarterback last spring. 

Chief among M. U.'s talent losses off the 1954 club, which fashioned 
a 4-5-1 record and a tie for third in the Big Seven standings, were 
quarterbacks Vic Eaton and Tony Scardino — the loop's two best pass- 
ers — fullback Bob Bauman, and four senior ends. 

Missouri's hopes for an improved defensive team this autumn hinge 
around the fitness of two senior linebackers, Terry Roberts and Bobby 
Gooch, who return to grid warfare after undergoing knee operations 
last year. Also back from service is Jim Martin, chunky guard, who 
was regular middle-man in M. U.'s 1952 defensive line. 

With a -new baekfield built around the 195-pound Hunter at 
Quarterback, Mizzou will turn loose a speedy halfbacking duo of John 
Powell and Joe Wynn — and a ramming fullback in Gene Roll, 210- 
pound plunger. Hunter and Roll lettered as sophomores last year 
while Powell spent the season in drydock with a shoulder separation. 
Wynn was the yearlings' No. 1 fullback in 1954. 

Wynn, tackles Frank Czapla and Don Hopkins, and guards Bob 
Lee and Julius Jenson are the rookie »newcomers most apt to be 
playing on the first two Tiger elevens this fall. 

M. U.'s line will be fortified by an All-Big Seven tackle, swarthy 
Al Portney, and will include the loop's best pass-catcher in '54, Harold 
Burnine. He caught 22 aerials for 405 yards. 

U.C.L.A. 

By Vic Kelley 

Don't look fur U.C.L.A.'s two-time Pacific Coast Conference and 
1954 National Champions to come up with anything like the team that 
beat Maryland, 12-7, in Los Angeles last fall. But by the same token, 
don't look for the Bruins to be pushovers. Teams coached by Red 
Sanders never are. 

Sanders has lost seven of the 11 starters from the 1954 Maryland 

— 26 — 



game and nine of the 11 regulars at the end of the season. 

But back again will be blasting Bob Davenport, the fullback- who 
shredded the middle of the Terrapin line, carrying the amazing total 
of 23 times for 87 yards and both U.C.L.A. touchdowns. And also re- 
turning is Wingback Jim Decker, whose 96 yards and 12-yard average 
kept Maryland at bay part of the time. 

Also back is starting Tailback Doug Bradley, who gave way later 
in the season to the now graduated Primo Villanueva, and Center Steve 
Palmer, who performed for no less than 56 minutes for ailing Captain 
Johnny Peterson. 

But gone is the massive and unyielding line anchored by All- 
Americans Jack Ellena and Jim Salsbury. And gone are the ranging 
and troublesome Bob Long and Bob Haydenfeldt at the ends. Much of 
the vaunted depth of the '54 team has graduated, too. 

In their places are a good line, even if it fails to reach greatness. 
At the wings will probably be Left End Johnny Hermann, the made- 
over Wingback, and 205-pound Rommie Loudd, who was switched 
from the left to right side of the line. Loudd was the top receiver 
last season and is a great threat. Hermann will undoubtedly be 
under-rated. 

The tackles, Gil Moreno on the right and Roger White on the left, 
with ex-center Jack McKay and Preston Dills, will have to give tre- 
mendous come-through performances to even come close to the capa- 
bilities of Ellena and running-mate Joe Ray. 

Lettermen Jim Brown and Hardiman Cureton (200 and 220) should 
be top performers, but depth is uncertain here, too. 

Lack of overall manpower and the essence of "greatness" are the 
items that disturb the Bruin coach. The 1954 reputation is one for all 
teams to shoot at. And Maryland catches U.C.L.A. one week after rug- 
ged Texas A & M gets through with them. 

But if the Maryland-U.C.L.A. encounter is half the hard-hitting 
game the 1954 tilt was, it'll still be the greatest game in America on 
Sept. 24. 

Here's the Bruin situation from Red Sanders, the man who just a 
year ago said U.C.L.A.'s 1954 team would be the best he'd ever had and 
picked SC to play in the Rose Bowl: "On a factual basis, you think 
of a football team in terms of 11 men. When you recognize that we 
lost 9 of the 11 starts from last year's team, you must recognize that 
we have a large rebuilding job to do. With the entire first string line 
gone, we'll have some pretty inexperienced linemen. In addition, 
U.C.L.A. is undertaking the most difficult schedule we have ever faced. 
Geographically, it is conceivable that we are meeting the top teams in 
their sections. Maryland is No. 1 in the East and Southeast and maybe 
No. 1 in the country; Texas A & M is a top contender in the South- 
west Conference; Iowa may certainly be tops in the Big 10; and SC is 
the team to beat on the West Coast. There's a schedule in itself. We 
must face these and six other top clubs wih the same sort of spirit 
and determination that have characterized our past teams." 

— 27 — 



Baylor University 

By George Wright 

Returning five starters and 17 lettermen, Baylor has hopes of as 
good a season as was experienced in 1954, expects to have a team of 
approximately the same strength, comparable over-all team speed and 
offense-defense balance. 

The Bears should have good passing, good power, own a good No. 
1 team. The chief problem is lack of proven reserves, particularly at 
tackles and in the backfield. 

Outstanding linemen are expected to include Co-Capt. Henry 
Gremminger, end; Tackle Bill Glass (moved from center); and Dan 
Miller at guard. 

In Soph Doyle Traylor, Baylor expects to have as good quarterback- 
ing and passing as it had a season ago with Bill Hooper, now gradu- 
ated. The experienced No. 1 backfield also offers good power in FB 
Reuben Saage and RHB Weldon Holley (Co-Capt.), plus a strong 
breakaway threat in LHB Delbert Shofner. 

The Bears offer a junior team, with 7 juniors, only 3 seniors, on their 
No. 1 team; 12 juniors, only 4 seniors, among their first 22 players. 
Best depth should be at the ends and guards. 



Wake Forest College 

By Bill Hensley 

Wake Forest is looking for one of its best teams in recent years in 
1955 and the Deacons promise to prove troublesome for their opponents. 

Coach Tom Rogers is optimistic despite a schedule which includes 
games with every team in the Atlantic Coast Conference and three 
Southern Conference foes. 

"I think we will have one of the most improved teams in the 
conference," Rogers says frankly. "We have experience, speed and 
more depth than in the past. I think the spirit alone could carry us 
a long way." 

Wake Forest could start a team of 11 lettermen, most of whom 
have been playing together for three years. In all, 17 lettermen are on 
the 46-man squad. Twelve lettermen were lost, with Ed Stowers, Nick 
Maravic, Bob Frederick and J. C. Turner the major losses. 

The Deacons' big problem is defense in the backfield. The lack 
of an adequate pass defense led to Wake Forest's downfall last year 
but it is hoped that the headaches can be cured in 1955. 

Heading the returning stars is All-Ameriqa tackle Bob Bartholo- 
mew. He ranks among the nation's top linemen and will spearhead 
the Deacons offensively and defensively. Quarterback Nick Consoles, 
Halfback Bill Barnes, Fullback Gerald Huth and End Jack Ladner are 
other stars who will carry the brunt of the T-formation attack. 

Depth at quarterback with Consoles and sophomores Charlie Car- 
penter and Dickie Newsome available should be a strong point in the 
Deacons' bid for success. All are top notch passers and field generals 
and should add variety to the offense. 

— 28 — 



University of North Carolina 

By Jake Wade 

General overall improvement is expected for the 1955 edition of 
the University of North Carolina football team but a tough schedule, 
made even tougher by the addition of Oklahoma, will make it difficult 
for the Tar Heels to improve on their 1954 record of four wins, five 
losses and one tie. 

Biggest jobs with the '55 Tar Heels will be to replace five gradu- 
ating lettermen guards and to come up with a starting quarterback. 
All the other positions are pretty much lined up. 

John Jones, a letterman at tackle last season and one of the most 
promising linemen on the roster, has been shifted over to guard to go 
with Bill Koman, the only returning letterman guard. They will prob- 
ably handle the starting .duties. 

Five boys, three of them rising sophomores, are going for the 
number one quarterback slot, with Ronald Marquette, one of the rising 
sophs, rated tops at this time. Lon Bullock, who handled most of the 
team's QB starting assignments last season, returns, and Dave Reed, 
Buddy Sasser and Doug Farmer round out the list. Reed and Sasser 
are rising sophs and Farmer a rising junior. Bullock is a rising senior. 
The depth at QB will make that position much stronger for the '55 
campaign than it was last season. 

Ends, tackles and halfbacks should be improved and center and 
fullback on a par with 1954. 



Syracuse University 

By Arnie Burdick 

Syracuse came fast at the end of the 1954 campaign, and Coach 
Ben Schwartzwalder is hoping that the Orangemen will continue to 
improve this fall. 

He has good reason, for his line should be big, strong and agile and 
somewhat deeper than they were a year ago. His backs lack experi- 
ence, for the most part, but potentially he has some flyers who should 
raise havoc with opposing defenses. 

There's Jimmy Brown, for example. He's a 212-pound sprinter 
who should be as fine a left halfback as there is in the 'nation this 
autumn. Eddie Albright, returning regular at the important signal- 
calling post, enjoyed a fine spring, and he should be able to work the 
run-pass option series in high style. 

Ed Coffin, Don Laaksonen, Ron Tyler, Bobby Hart and Billy Micho 
will be augmented by the returning Mark Hoffman to form the sec- 
ondary. 

Up front, Ben has moved End Pete Schwert and Guard Joe Krivak 
to center. Both looked like able linebackers. At the ends, Jimmy 
Ridlon and Tom Richardson, veterans, head up the list, while Jerry 
Cashman, Jim Podraza, Gerry Hershey and Jim Brill look like the 

— 29 — 



tackles. Chuck Strid, Cal Smith, Rudy Farmer and Ed Bailey will 
divide the guard duties, with Bailey a standout. 

It's a team which has an unusually tough schedule with Maryland, 
Army, Pittsburgh and West Virginia having been added this year. 
However, the Orange is hopeful of breaking even in that rugged 
company. 

University of South Carolina 

By Don Barton 

South Carolina's Gamecocks shape-up as a dangerous offensive foot- 
ball team for 1955, despite the loss of such outstanding 1954 regulars 
as All-America guard Frank Muncevich, all-conference center Leon 
Cunningham, conference blocking trophy winner fullback Bill Wohr- 
man, tackles Harry Lovell and Gene Kopec and end Spec Granger. 

The gap left by those men is enough to alarm a coach of even Rex 
Enright's composure. 

More comforting, however, is the backfield consisting of quarter- 
back Mackie Prickett, the 1955 Atlantic Coast total offense and passing 
champ, and halfbacks Mike Caskey and Carl Brazell. Caskey's 556 
rushing yards and 6.7 average was second only to Ronnie Waller of 
Maryland in Ihe ACC last year, and Brazell, a breakaway runner of 
talent, was the league's leading pass receiver. 

If one of the fullbacks, sophomore Bobby Barrett, or lettermen 
Crosby Lewis and Jim Jarrett, produces, the Gamecocks' offense will 
move. 

Stopping the opposition is the question. 

The ends should be adequate. Julius Derrick, the star of winter 
practice, is ready for his first varsity action, and returning lettermen 
Joe Silas, Larry Gosnell, Buddy Frick, Bill Rivers and Don Sehulster 
add to the security there. 

Sophomore tackles were the most impressive in winter drills, in- 
cluding 225-pounder Tommy Addison and 215-pound Al Plaskey. Sam 
Deluca is the only returning letterman there. 

Returnee Dick Covington was the regular right guard last fall, and 
Bill Floyd, Rick Ericsson and Bill Weston won letters. Ericsson could 
be the top man on the guard list, or 230-pound sophomore Harrison 
Sartor could make himself heard from. 

Hugh Bell, an understudy to Cunningham three years, finally gets 
his chance to shine at center. He can compete with the best of them. 
A replacement for him is a problem. 

When Bell needs rest non-lettermen Harry Crowley and Aubrey 
Reed or sophomore Charlie Johnson must be called to the rescue. 

The Gamecocks face a rugged schedule and shape-up as a team 
that will get progressively stronger as an abundance of green men 
gain in experience. 

Louisiana State University 

By Ace Higgins 

Coach Paul Dietzel, in his first year as head man of the Tigers, 
has inherited a back-breaking schedule and a small band of courageous 
warriors with which to negotiate the rugged road. 

Talent-wise, the Bengals figure to be too thin to cause anyone too 



much concern. A gaping hole in the middle of the line, left by gradu- 
ation vacancies of both starting tackles and the only two lettermen 
centers poses a hurdle that may be too much to overcome. 

In case the breaches are plugged, the Tiger T may find need of 
additional fuel, since the two top quarterbacks of last season, Al 
Doggett and Win Turner, have also departed. 

Add to these losses the explosive power that left when big Lou 
Deutschmann signed a professional baseball contract and you have the 
makings of a headache that would send most men diving for the aspirin 
bottle. An overdose would be average if those in charge ponder over 
the fact that one of the missing tackles is Sid Fournet, the only legiti- 
mate Tiger All-America since the hey-day of Ken Kavanaugh. 

Solving these problems and others makes the success of the 1955 
Tigers doubtful, but Coach Dietzel and his staff have met the challenge 
head on and with the available material on hand, plus several top flight 
sophomores and junior college transfers, the wiley old Bengals could 
surprise a few sleeping giants this year. Fullback O. K. Ferguson, 
halfback Chuck Johns and end Joe Tuminello figure to be the best 
Tigers this year. Matt Burns, a junior is the only experienced quarter- 
back, but he may be pushed by sophomore M. C. Reynolds. End Billy 
Smith, tackle Al Aucoin and guard Ed Cassidy are top soph prospects 
and tackle Earl' Leggett (265) and guard Don Scully look like the best 
of the JC transfers. 

Clemson CoSSege 

By Brent Breedin 

Clemson Coach Frank Howard, a two-platoon or dual-unit advocate 
for the past five years, figures he might return to the one-team plan, 
with occasional substitutions, in 1955. 

"On the basis of what I've seen in spring practice," he says, "I just 
don't feel we have enough experienced players at every position to be 
using the complete platoon system for substitution." 

In one respect — injuries to players who need practice — the spring 
drills were a failure. Several of the most promising freshmen — 
tackle Johnny Thomason of Olanta, ends Bill Breedlove of Abbeville 
and "Whitey" Jordan of Florence, center Jack Steinbrecher of Hunt- 
ington, W. Va., and halfback Harold Strange of Columbia — missed more 
than two-thirds of the work, causing only conjecture among the Clem- 
son coaches. 

In spring practice Dick Marazza blossomed into one of the finest 
tackles ever to play on Memorial Stadium turf; Joel Wells showed 
conclusively that his strong finish in 1954 at halfback was no fluke; 
and a pair of "bohunkkig" sophomores — fullback Bob Spooner and cen- 
ter Donnie Bunton — earned first eleven births with their hustle. 

Quarterbacks Don King and Charlie Bussey, for whom the "K" 
and "B" football units were named last fall, looked sharp all spring. 
They give the Tigers two of the finest quarterbacks in the Atlantic 
Coast Conference. 

The center position will be one of the strongest if veteran standout 
Wingo Avery is ready. He missed all of spring practice with a sore 
back. Behind him are "surprise starter" Bunton and the veteran 
Hampton Hunter. 

At guard, letterman Dick DeSimone is the bright light, while best 
(Continued on page 59/ 



in 

Q *- 

Z 

< 



> 



U. 

O 

> 

(/) 

u 



o 
DC 



o 
o 



> 




z 

D 


(T3 
> 


Ld 




I 




h 


to 






U 



c 


o> 






= 


as 






g 


U 




>j 


■4-J 
1/3 


> 


^ 


4-1 
U 



Q c • 

3 U 
o 



.O S 



cS 



PL, 

as - • 
Pk M^ ^ 



e i— 1 M 

.5 c3 Oi 

s ^ * 

£ £ U Oh W Ph £ 



Pu . 
bo* 5 * 



3 -* 



•° ^ OT rt 

fJ o> zi -z 



3 _» 
So 



18 n 



3 £ x B . . 

i; Oh to a) 

a. v £ — 



01 

s^ 

3 .3 o 



>> ! : 

C : cD ; !=j M ■ 
O ^ C «8 JZj 3 ' 



^OW^ PQ w 



^ £ 3 " 5 £' 



• 



0) 0> 0) 0> 0) 0) 

S-, Sh S-i hi Sh hi 

q o o o o o 

.2 .2 .9 .2 .2 .2 £ £ ^ ^ ^ ^ 
o>o>o>o>33oooooo 

HH^HMi-idocsiciciai 



doqrqfdddcddcdHH'*' 

tDC£>tOCDCOCO5£tDt0tOCDC£> 



lninwoininoLooinoo 
ooroooHOJCinmoroow 

THiH^(MiHr-l(MTHC<Ii-ICvlCSl 



3 : S 



OT 3 



pq 



3 ot- £ .*_ 



PQ 



qpq £ °m£g 

^^^HhQ^PUH^PUW^U 
■"J * * * * * 

z 



eg 

s 



o> ca ° 



... o r-i cm co in t- oo 

'"tnoooocooooow 



^ d 
PS 



rt 



d 5 

" " as eS »o ej 

. C O) =« X ~ . ^ 

oi g p ^ o X ajrt 

So£o% Sot 
0«30^03 
PwW UPi U5PQ g h 



T3 PQ 

o 

O 1^3 

5 c 

T3 3 
rj O 



^ S u >> ~ o 

> ^ 0) 0> C <1 



eS 

3 

o) £ o> rt 

'^S £ 

rt 



fc^q Spq Pim fctf&o^tf h 



- -- 

o o 



o o o 

ESS 

o o o 



l-i u u 

o o o 



o o 

s s 

o o 



.9 .2 £ £ .£ .2 .2 .2 £ ^ 

3300033300 
i-st-saiWWH-it-st-sWM 



o o cd-aJ rodddcid 



^HCOHCOOHTffOfC 



Looooommoinin 

fO-rtl^tlCSlCNlT-liHr-li-lTH 



o> 



- o 



LU N 

o * 
h t- 



c-H^ -S c 

h ,• - W) X OT .-- »"3 

3 C o> .3 ti 5 4> .; 
'rt^— -c s-, ^ 5 bnX 

5o>^.-3o.^ On 
y3ffiy3pqffi>PL,KP 



0) ,D 



bo i iS 

HI ' OP 

|3-S a) 
3 W c ^ 

0) o >»' 



2 "^ 

v SB ^ 

O 3 O ^ . 

35« Z . 

..-Co 

" rt 5 h, 0) 
DC Q<OQ! 
< * 

O tO (D (D (Dl 



32 — 





T3 


Ph 






- c - rja 


X 
o 
o 


i-ssaf 


T3 


% & °? OJ .Q 
0) C .i3 T3 en 

4J c u m +; 




Sh 


oj ^ w u a 


pq 


>n UHfeU, 



o3 



H -P ,^ 'C +J 

(8 ^ » «) 3 

^ O »i (h o 

W tn H En (73 



o 

a 

5 £ S 

'5 a'2 
o 



2 a 



WMBJbB] 



ro O O CM CM 
tD CO CD CD tD 



inooinin 
noiooio 

(N rH CN ■ " 



CD 



73 



*h n3 c^ 

sh P - a> 
o <jj « c a) 



u u 



*** 

o ^ 

S .3 CD 
. rt -IS V° 

+-> co S3 

05 J? 3 

M £ U 









cfl 


»-H 


Ph 


"3 




fa 


CD 






cS 


M 


Sh 


o 


cS 


c 


bo 



CO ^h to 



52 ^ ffi « 
+J l~5 +J I - ; 






afa 

- — J V +J O Q ;^H 

Pn W fa W fa 02 Zi 



cd 



o 

£ 



CD (D 0) CD 

Sh Sh Sh Sh 

o o o o 

s a s 2 

o o o o 

. . A A A A 

c as a a a & 

2- O O) o o o o 

1-5 WW W w w w 



in in in cd in co to 



C O >)» 
w CD 2 0) 

K CQtf fa 

* 



s3£ 

o . 

*~3 CD 
_rT O 

"o to 

CO £ 

.•gJ3 

r ° 
fa i-3 



o th cn >* in 



U 

,q c a S ^p ai o^ 

C"^3 CD72 w CO- ! o 






ffi 



a cd 

►^ CD co +J +j T3 

-> O C Sh CD 

. . O CD O U 



Sh rt 



d) 



0) <D 

Sh Sh 



0) 



o 

a 2 a a'2 a'2 '2 

O3OO0OCID 



Wi-sWWWWWWW 



cr 


C 


cr 


CC 


r- 


cr 


r- 


i- 


C73 


i— 


CN 


i- 


i- 


CN 


i- 


CN 


CN 


tH 




7- 


r- 


t- 






C 


C 


r- 



01HHH005HHH 
i i i i i i i i i 

ininmincDinininin 



rt 3 

--T cu 

3 % 



O Ph 



C 

sh-Q 

CD 

r^ CD 



o> X 

> 2 



« 1^ Sh >-* Sh CO ctf 



£ S <?' -^ 

r cd" cc Ph 



g £ o, 



S3 cd 03 O 

U3 pquu 



S3 



cd o 



fi o 


-^ hJ Sh C 


2 ^ 

03 t3 


O S 33 




'2 d *3 



O O 



J3 

a S3 
o 3 _ 



O 

2 

0) 3 



Orirlri 

ci co cd in 



o m in o 

O O C3 o 
CM CN iH CM 






S3 

33 £ S3 ^ 

^3 ;z" S3 
_ O - 



e ^ a s: 

g a «j ■ a 

° ^ cd 2 
M w w g 



HCSIMO 

Tj< T^ ^ Tf 



— 33 





c 
UJ 


Walker 
Parson 
Flynn 


c 

cS 

X 


o 














-E 


«3 


re 














O) 






ja 






fl 








be 


<= & rH 

00 °o 00 




re 

I 


CD 


CD 


o 

1 
















!h 


si a 














■M 


cd 


3 CD 


as 








D 
j* 


-* .5 






P 


pq W 


X 








o 




E 


rH 


CN ^ 


re 








re 

1- 


3 05 >. 




<N 


co co 


CS 




aJ 




C N Cfl 

c3 * £ 


CD 












g 




£ 


W J K 


zn 
















S3) 
















!>» 




£ 


rH O CM 


CO 












c 




t- t- t- 


t- 












c3 




















CD 




















bo 


Q. 
UJ 
Ld 

Q 


■o 

L. 

re 

3 

o 


avis 
they 
eCicco 


x: 
1 


X 

o 

re 

-O. 


o 

u 

3 


,C CD 


73 

c 


C 
C3 
>> 


S 
cS 

CJ 

o 


■ 


£ 


Q < Q 


O 


0) 


g 


bfl in 


£ 


CD 

73 


o 


UJ 


D) 

ir 


O H CO 

co co to 


CM 

CO 


L. 

re 


cC 

Eh 


- CD CD 
PQ Oh 




3 


S 1 








3 










3 


> 








o 


O 


cn in 


r4 


-* 


73 








rH 


rH rH 


r4 


rH 






















T3 


h 




1 c 














cS 


< 




M ■- t 


cd 
> 












CD 


h 


i_ 


* « S 


CD 












O 

H-) 


z 
u 




cd 3 ^ 

Oh e-i <: 


cC 












O 

cd 

Sh 


<u 


O CN) rH 


in 












ft 


O 


in in in 


in 








73 




M 
















X 




.5 


DC 


■a 


u 




O 

re 


CD 


-3 o 

cfl £ 


CJ 

'£ 

S-i 
CD 

O 

-r 






LJ 

1- 


re 

3 

o 

•*- 


Dyson 

Kolara 

Suchy 


cd 
e 
o 
H 


.□ 

"5 
li. 


CO 


x o 




C 

c 

O 

73 

C3 




<L> 


to t> LO 


00 














—1 


co co to 


CO 












X3 

73 
ft 




a> 

o 

re 


Heuring 
Wharton 
Polyansk: 


CD 

c 

+-> 

n 


o 

re 




S-i 






3 
CD 

c 




a> 


co t- oo 


in 


x 




CD 










J 


t> t- t- 


t- 


re 

I 


CD 

Sh 
CD 


X 

o 

N C 
73 >> 

3 cj 


3 








■o 


.2 u S 


CD 

c 




>^K 








c 


j- 0) <D 


<L) 

-1 


o 


CO rH 


o 








UJ 


? "£ «S 


!h 


co 


co co 


~i 








•*- 


0) O ^ 

Q 0. > 


3 

H 
















4) 

-1 


co t- in 


00 
















00 00 00 


00 















34 — 



TERP THUMBNAIL SKETCHES 

ENDS 

BILL WALKER, 21, 6-0, 185, Senior from West Mifflin, Pa. — selected to the second team 
Associated Press All-America last Fall after following up a sensational soph year 
which tabbed him as a future gridiron great — one of Maryland's all-time ends . . . re- 
ceived United Press honorable mention All-America and first team Atlantic Coast 
Conference on both the Southern Writers' ballot and the Associated Press . . . received 
the highest honor given a lineman during his soph year as he was named the nation's 
"Lineman of the Week" for his great game against Alabama, both offensively and 
defensively . . . should have another fine year . . . loves to play ... a smart ball 
player . . . has exceptional speed, a good blocker, and fine receiver . . . makes out- 
standing effort to catch passes . . . one of the best defensively . . . was the Terps' 
leading receiver last Fall with 13 receptions for 209 yards and one score . . . also 
team's leading punter with a 39.8 yard average for 14 punts . . . the son of a former 
major league baseball player with the Cardinals, Walker has led the Terp baseball 
team the past two campaigns ... he hit .365 his soph year and led the team this 
season with a .309 average which included two homers, one triple, and three doubles 
. . . also led in RBI's with 19 . . . the outfielder was named to the All-Conference base- 
ball nine this Spring . . . came to Maryland as a halfback . . . was a three year letter- 
man in high school in football, baseball, and basketball . . . was All-WPIAL in 
football and baseball . . . ma.ioring in Sociology. 

RUSSELL DENNIS. 22, 6-3, 207, Senior from Norwalk, Conn — should have the number 
one job on the right terminal sewed up, a duty he performed last year brilliantly . . . the 
big strong clever pass receiver could give Walker battle for national honors . . . 
excels offensively . . . fine blocker . . . the conscientious "Connecticut Yankee" plays 
a strong and smart' defensive game ... a hard worker with tremendous desire to 
excel every minute in practice as well as in a game ... a keen competitor . . . 
caught six passes for 1S6 yards and 2 touchdowns . . . early season thoughts of 
coaching staff indicate big things for the star end . . . the fine looking Dennis is 
majoring in Public Relations. 

TIMOTHY FLYNN, 21, 6-2, 190, Senior from Chevy Chase, Md.— another of the Terps' 
top flight ends, a position that gives them the finest corps of flank men in many 
years . . . Flynn, a big strong rugged boy, has had two good years, most of it 
from the number two team . . . has great potential but has been retarded both 
years by injuries . . . barring same, he should have good year . . . has all qualifica- 
tions for an end — good speed, fine blocker, top receiver and a terror defensively . . . 
came to Maryland from Bullis Prep after brilliant career at St. John's High School 
in Washington . . . son of Hugh "Bingo" Flynn, former president of the Washington 
Touchdown Club and one of Catholic University's all-time grid greats . . . caught 
two passes last year for 36 yards and one score ... a public relations major in the 
School of Business and Public Administration. 

JIM PARSONS, 24, 6-2, 190, Senior from Washington, D. C. — following a fine junior 
year and a strong finish in Spring practice, Parsons, along with Flynn, will be keeping 
the pressure on Walker and Dennis ... a Navy veteran who starred at Washington's 
Woodrow Wilson High School . . . this will be his fourth varsity term, and he has 
lettered his previous three years playing outstanding ball . . . excels defensively . . . 
makes it tough for opponent to get around him . . . smart player . . . caught three 
aerials for 58 yards and one TD last fall . . . majoring in Biological Science. 

JEAN WATERS, 23, 6-0, 195, Junior from Charleston, S. C lettered last Fall as a 

soph ... a fine prospect who will give the Terp fine end corps a lot of help . . . 
a veteran of the Army Paratroopers, Waters came to Maryland with guard Jack 
Davis following their discharge . . . the pair were close friends in the same unit for 
three years so the Carolinian decided to follow Davis to his home state and attend 
the University here . . . has a lot of desire and could give the boys up front trouble 
. . . good two-way player . . . caught one pass for 12 yards last season . . . married 
and has one child . . . majoring in Physical Education. 

DICK PORTER, 21, 6-2, 195, Junior from Pittsburgh, Pa. — a fine prospect counted on 
to give a big helping hand in relief this Fall . . . played some last season but not 
enough to letter . . . had a good Spring practice . . . shows fine speed and has good 
pass catching ability . . . adequate defensively . . . won All-City honors while 
playing for Pittsburgh's Schenley High School . . . studying Civil Engineering. 
BILL TURNER, 21, 6-3, 205, Sophomore from Silver Spring, Md. — has one of the finest 
chances to play a lot of ball this Fall . . . good prospect . . . held out last year 
to get experience . . . came along fast in Spring drills . . . has speed and fine 
blocker . . . plays well defensively . . . was All-State tackle at Montgomery Blair 
High School . . . majoring in Transportation. 

— 35 — 



BOB ALEXANDER, 19, 6-0, 195, Sophomore from Pleasant Hills, Pa. — a four-sport 
letterman at Baldwin High School, Alexander joins the Terp end corps with a 
promising future . . . hard worker . . . has the desire . . . sure to be tested this 
Fall . . . majoring in Animal Husbandry. 

JOE PONZO, along with freshmen BILL STEPPE, BILL MARTIN, and ED COOKE, also 
are varsity candidates at end. 

TACKLES 

MIKE SANDUSKY, 19, 5-11, 235, Junior from Manville, N. J. — one of Maryland's finest 
tackles in Tatum regime . . . along with ED HEURING, the rugged Sandusky priming 
himself for stardom to take his place alongside of other great Terp tackles . . . Coach 
Bob Ward says he is one of the best . . . has tremendous strength which he uses at 
all times on the field . . . great blocker and a demon on defense . . . has a quick 
charge and a lot of savvy in play diagnosis . . . moved in at middle of last Fall 
to eliminate the severe tackle problem that existed first five games . . . came to 
Maryland as high school heavyweight champion of New Jersey . . . was undefeated as 
a Terp frosh then won the Conference heavyweight title last Winter . . . threw the 
shot and discus this Spring ... a terrific 3-sport athlete . . . continued to raise eye- 
brows with fine Spring practice . . . should have a great year . . . worth watching 
for high honors . . . majoring in Animal Husbandry. 

ED HEURING, 20, 6-0, 215, Junior from Rochester, Pa. — the other boy who broke 
into the starting line in mid-season to give the Terps their much needed outstanding 
tackle play . . . has exceptional strength and is quick as a cat . . . moves well 
either way . . . could be the best tackle . . . blasts away efficiently all the way 
. . . has good speed, one of the finest blockers and surest of all defensively . . . along 
with SANDUSKY, the front line tackle situation seems well fortified, reminiscent of 
the old days of two and three years ago when big strong tackles were a "must" on 
Tatum's teams ... a three-sport letterman at Rochester High School . . . named 
on the All-County All-America team his senior year . . . bears careful watching this 
Fall . . . lettered as a soph . . . majoring in Criminology. 

AL WHARTON, 20, 6-1, 215, Junior from Sewickley, Pa. — as an outstanding tackle 
prospect, Wharton, after overcoming early injuries that kept him out a year, lettered 
last Fall as he too came in to help plug the gap at the tackle slot . . . did an out- 
standing job, as he fulfilled early prediction of Tatum that he would be another great 
tackle . . . best remembered last season for his crashing head-on tackle of Miami's 
Gordon Malloy . . . the big "red head" has top speed and real good defensive skill . . . 
keen competitor . . . was All-State and All-Western Pennsylvania in high school . . . 
a Pre-Dental student. 

JOE LAZZARINO, 20, 6-4, 235, Junior from Brooklyn, N. Y. — another of the big fine 
tackles coming back for his second season after lettering his soph year when he was 
inserted into the lineup to help the early tackle problem . . . performed like a 
veteran and will be out to push for a number one job ... a real lean and mean 
product with tremendous power and unused potential . . . was injured in an auto 
accident over Christmas holidays at home and was out most of Spring ball . . . 
came back for final week of drills and was like a "tiger" ... is sure to be a top 
performer, giving the Terp tackle corps adequate strength . . . majoring in Commercial 
Art. 

STAN POLYANSKI, 20, 6-4, 220, Junior from Baltimore. Md has the potential to 

make it most uncomfortable for the boys in front of him . . . played some last year, 
getting needed experience . . . did good work in Spring practice and is being counted 
on to play a lot of ball . . . has good reaction and added a lot of aggressiveness 
this Spring ... an honor student majoring in Marketing. 

TOM STEFL, 20, 6-1, 220, Sophomore from Brownsville, Pa — fine prospect held out 
last year for experience . . . the big raw-boned Pre-Med student ready now to step 
into lineup for a lot of duty . . . has fine potential . . . aggressiveness will help, has 
the desire ... a Pre-Medical student. 

DON HEALY, 18, 6-3, 240, Sophomore from Rome, N. Y. — this boy showed more as a 
freshman last year than any tackle in history of Tatum regime . . . really raised the 
eyebrows in Spring ball as he was in and out of the first string lineup . . . Tatum 
says that as a frosh, he was way ahead of any other Terp tackle at the same time, 
meaning that he has exhibited more than the big names of Krouse, Modzelewski, Moss, 
Morgan, and Jones did when they were yearlings . . . has a big frame that is all 
worth a lot of football . . . excels both offensively and defensively . . . will bear 
watching as season progresses for he seems sure bet to play a great deal . . . will 
be hard to keep him out ... in School of Business and Public Administration. 

GUARD? 

JACK DAVIS, 22, 5-10, 200, Junior from Bladensburg, Md.— after hitting the College 
Park campus with terrific impact with a great freshman year, the highly touted Davis 

— 36 — 



came along to play sensational ball his soph year, earning his letter, and leads the 
highly respectable crew of guards for this Fall . . . many observers have tabbed him 
another "Bob Ward" and his All- America line coach agrees that Davis is one of the 
finest he has seen . . . excels both ways with a fabulous quick charge offensively 
that literally blasts out the opposing lineman . . . follows the play well with uncanny 
pursuit . . . loves it rough and is a sure tackier ... a veteran of three years duty 
in the Paratroopers, Davis brought his GI friend, Jean Waters with him to Maryland 
— the South Carolinian broke into the lineup as a soph and also lettered . . . this 
could be a great season for the eager guard . . . married and has a daughter Deborah 
. . . majoring in Public Relations. 

GENE DYSON, 20, 6-2, 205, Junior from Brentwood, L. I., N. Y after B-teaming it 

for a year the strong Dyson broke into the lineup last Fall, then really showed his 
wares this Spring and won a starting job on the left side . . . worked hard for the 
job and has the good football skills to keep the assignment . . . outstanding blocker, 
both initial and downfleld . . . good defense . . . lettered on the track team as top 
distance man, throwing shot and discus ... a Physical Education major. 

GEORGE KOLARAC, 20, 5-10,200, Junior from Harrisburg, Pa. — along with Davis, a 
returning letterman . . . had a real good soph year spelling the front line guards . . . 
has come along fast showing his expected form in Spring practice . . . one of the team's 
most serious and most keen competitors . . . has a strong desire to play . . . good reac- 
tions accompany his mobility" . . . likes to mix it up, especially defensively . . . 
is hard to fool . . . was honorable mention All-State at Harrisburg Catholic High School 
. . . majoring in Physical Education . . . married and has one son. 

NICK DeCIOCO, 19, 5-11, 215, Sophomore from Brooklyn, N. Y. — with a fine year on the 
B-squad and a good Spring practice, "Nick" will be counted on heavily for the number 
two line which should see as much duty as the front line . . . will be out to make it 
tough for Davis and Dyson ... a real good prospect with keen desire to make good . . . 
has power and a lot of know-how . . . blocks well and does most adequately on defense 
. . . self confidence will help . . . ability and potential there ... in School of Business 
majoring in Transportation. 

RONALD ATHEY, 20, 6-0, 200, Sophomore from Cumberland, Md. — another in a long 
line of fine football players from Cumberland's Fort Hill High School and Bill Hahn's 
tutelage ... a real promising prospect . . . did well in Spring drills and was running 
in and out of the first line . . . sure to work on the second eleven and will be going all 
out for a starting berth . . . has good equipment for two-way football . . . one of 
strongest men on squad . . . was All-State and honorable mention high school All- 
America . . . majoring in Industrial Education. 

BOB SUCHY, 6-2, 215, Sophomore from Baltimore, Md. — still another of the fine guard 
candidates . . . has gained so much more confidence in his ability after being held out 
last season . . . put in a fine exhibition during Spring practice when he made a good 
impression . . . after a bit of battle he should be a big help . . . big strong boy with 
good action and attitude . . . played lacrosse after spring practice . . . studying Civil 
Engineering. 

BOB GRIFFITH, 19, 6-0, 210, Sophomore from Monogahela, Pa. — with PAUL TONETTI, 
the Terps have come up with two outstanding guard prospects . . . Griffith is a real 
package of dynamite . . . does good job offensively and is like a bear on defense . . . 
drives all the time and has taken as well as dished out a lot of punishment for a 
yearling . . . never stops working . . . lean and mean . . . likes it rough . . . has 
speed, power, desire and most efficient ball player ... in Pre-Dental School. 

PAUL TONETTI 18, 6-2, 205, Sophomore from Massapequa, N. Y the other half of 

the top pair of guards that had a sensational year as frosh . . . like "Griff", the quiet- 
spoken New-Yorker is dynamite on the field ... a hard worker with tremendous desire 
. . . certain to be heard from as a soph . . . loves the game . . . has great 
possibilities . . . should get bigger which won't hurt him . . . has the frame for heavy 
duty . . . quick charge and good mobility ... a standout defensively . . . will bear 
watching. 

DICK WEBER, 19, 5-11, 195, Sophomore from Braddock, Pa. — has the potential and 
certainly the desire to become a real fine guard substitute . . . improvement and 
confidence will come with experience . . . this he could master this Fall . . . did a 
good job as a frosh and worked hard in Spring practice . . . good guy for squad morale. 

CENTERS 

BOB PELLEGRINI, 21, 6-3, 225, Senior from Yatesboro, Pa. — the Terps' top flight 
All-America candidate and as Tatum expounds, "He could easily be the Nation's 
'Lineman of the Year' "... this explains the tremendous feeling the coaching staff 
and numerous others who have observed Bob in his two previous years as an outstanding 

— 37 — 



guard have for his football ability . . . when the center situation became severe 
after all three veteran lettermen graduated. Tatum took his star lineman and moved 
him to center, knowing that he could be the one to best fill the big gap . . . the 
move, as shown in Spring practice, proved to be the right one as Pellegrini looked 
like a veteran at the position . . . always a tremendous offensive man at his old 
guard spot, he continued to give a top offensive performance . . . defensively, he is 
one of Maryland's all-time best ... is one of the game's top attractions for the fans 
and press with his spectacular tackling, pursuit . . . very aggressive . . . seldom 
does a play get by him . . . was praised by all opposing coaches and players last 
year as a junior . . . U.C.L.A.'s "Red" Sanders said he was one of the best he has 
seen ... in the Miami game. "Rocky" set a new Orange Bowl record for tackles and 
assists ... he made 12 "solo" tackles and assisted on seven others . . . the old 
record of nine had stood since 1940 . . . Miami coach Andy Gustafson. on a visit to 
College Park this Spring personally asked Bob to be a member of his South All-Star 
game next Christmas for the Shrine game ... at the close of last season, his team- 
mates voted him "the outstanding lineman of the '54 team" ... he received the coveted 
Anthony C. Nardo Memorial Trophy, a former Terp lineman in whose memory the 
award is given . . . was most outstanding each game . . . played with the first 
team a great deal of the time, especially after mid-season . . . received honorable men- 
tion All-America on United Press team . . . made All-Conference second teams . . . the 
Charlotte News picked him on its first team ... he is expected to lead the Terp for- 
ward wall and be the mainstay on defense . . . the Terp co-captain was a star quar- 
terback in high school but wisely moved to the line when he came to Maryland . . . 
should be one of Tatum's finest products . . . majoring in Physical Education. 

FRED TULLAI, 24. 6-0. 200, Senior from Essington, Pa. — stayed out last season but has 
come back for his last year and should help the center job . . . does a real good job on 
offense and is adequate defensively . . . was a reserve center his other two years 
. . . counted on to be the number two center . . . married this Summer ... a Marine 
veteran ... in School of Business and Public Administration, majoring in Marketing. 

GENE ALDERTON, 20, 6-0. 190. Sophomore from Cumberland, Md. — Gene should be a 
very valuable addition to the pivot spot this Fall . . . strong boy who loves to play and 
likes to mix it up . . . not as big as centers usually go, but his potential and ability 
more than make the difference . . . good blocker with fine speed . . . has 
fine defensive skill . . . will be after the second team job and could do it . . . top 
student . . . majoring in Industrial Education. 

WILBUR MAIN, 21, 6-2, 195, Junior from Frederick, Md. — comes to the Terps this Fall 
as a transfer student from Potomac State Junior College, same school as Paul Nesto^ 
and Pete Ladygo attended before coming to Maryland ... is highly recommended and 
definitely will help the center situation . . . word comes that he was one of their best. 

RONALD LANEVE. 18, 6-2, 205. Sophomore from Pittsburgh, Pa. — an outstanding 
prospect up from last year's fine freshman team ... is a tower of strength of both 
offense and defense . . . made quite an impression in Spring practice . . . has the 
potential to come through and make it tough on the veterans . . . one of Terp's finest 
center prospects . . . was a top performer at Pittsburgh's South Hill High School. 

QUARTERBACKS 

FRANK TAMBURELLO, 20, 5-10. 185, Junior from Baltimore, Md. — the clever Balti- 
morean comes along as a junior to give Maryland another great Split-T signal calling 
genius . . . follows in the popular line of Tatum quarterbacks of Scarbath. Faloney. 
and Boxold . . . made it evident that he would be another top QB for Tatum as a 
freshman, when he had a big year . . was an All-State QB at Patterson Park his 
senior year after coming there from Mt. St. Joseph High . . . also on the all-star 
lacrosse and ice hockey teams ... a real triple threat quarterback who can run. 
pass, punt, call an outstanding sequence of plays and also rate as the best defender in 
the secondary ... he does all this and does it well . . . the "nifty Tambo" is like a 
carbon copy of the Terps' great Bernie Faloney of the '53 season . . . his ability as 
an all-around top QB is recognized since he is most efficient and capable of top per- 
formances in each phase of his duties . . . was second man last Fall until he hit his 
peak about mid-season then tucked the job away . . . led the Terps to victories their 
last five games . . . made an indelible impression and was recognized across the 
country for getting the Terps on the way to big victories ... he should be one of 
the nation's finest this Fall as a junior . . . will be the key man in the attack . . . 
is tremendous defensive player . . . his two interceptions in last year's Kentucky opener, 
his first collegiate game, led to two Maryland scores . . . was the team's leading pass 
thief with four interceptions for 140 yards . . . sharp tackier also . . . made many 
saving tackles in the secondary . . . completed 15 of 35 aerials for 248 yards and 

— 38 — 



three TDs . . . scored three himself, one an interception return of 57 yards against 
Missouri . . . top punter with a 34.6 yard average for 15 punts . . . very accurate 
passer, both short and long heaves . . . also a good punt and kickoff return man . . . 
one of the fastest boys on the squad which makes him more dangerous as a running 
fool off the QB option . . . played lacrosse this Spring and was one of the unsung 
stars . . . lettered as a midfielder . . . with an expected good ball club, all eyes will 
be on the slick "Tambo" ... a Pre-Law student, "Tambo" is an excellent 
LEADER for the squad ... a very serious boy about the game and a terrific 
competitor. 

LYNN BEIGHTOL, 21, 5-11, 185, Senior from Cumberland, Md — one of the nation's 
most sought after high school quarterbacks . . . has lettered three years for the Terps 
. . . was considered to be the best QB prospect ever at Maryland when he came in 
'51 . . . when the rule change came from two-platoon football, Lynn seemed to become 
a victim of the change which required two-way skill . . . not having played defense in 
high school as he was making fame as a great quarterback with a terrific throwing 
arm, he has had to work hard learning the defensive phase . . . last season he saw 
the outstanding "Tambo" take over because of his defensive ability . . . this Spring 
Beightol looked great on defense and seems now ready to be a fine two-way signal 
caller . . . will alternate with "Tambo" ... a dandy offensive man . . . has one 
of the finest throwing arms of any former Terp QB ... a fine runner and he too, has 
top play calling sequence . . ." the baby-faced father of three children has exceptional 
natural offensive ability . . . had a 44.4 yard punting average for nine boots, one a 
beaut of 79 yards seen across the nation on TV Thanksgiving day against Missouri 
. . . had 4 completions for 12 attempts . . . one a TD . . . looked his best 
in Spring practice and again in Varsity-AlUmni game . . . All-State QB for two 
years at Fort Hill High School . . . player of year award also for two years . . a 
Pre-Med student. 

RALPH HAWKINS, 20, 5-10, 185, Sophomore from Washington, D. C. — another fine QB 
prospect . . . did a good job last year on B team . . . got a lot of valuable experience 
... a hard and serious worker . . . ready for varsity duty . . . good two-way boy 
with plenty of defensive finesse . . . has top offensive potential . . . good passer, runner, 
and punter . . . could even play halfback if needed there . . . was All-Metropolitan 
three years in football, basketball, and baseball at St. John's High School . . . majoring 
in Criminology. 

BOB RUSEVLYAN, 19, 6-0, 175, Sophomore from Washington, D. C. — this wiry little 
package of football player looks like real dynamite . . . did an outstanding job with 
the Terp frosh last year . . . good passer and clever runner . . . elusive and hard to 
bring down . . . has exceptional defensive skill for such a little guy . . . shows a lot 
of guts with his desire and determination to play ... he too could be utilized at 
halfback . . . was All-Metropolitan in both football and basketball at St. John's. 

FRED PETRELLA, 19, 5-11, 210, Sophomore from Baltimore, Md. — big strong stocky 
boy who performed with the B team last Fall . . . with more experience, he should help 
the signal calling spot ... is a fine passer . . . good runner as well . . . wants to 
play, so could make himself heard from early this Fall ... a star at Baltimore's 
Polytechnic High School. 

JOHN FRITSCH, 18, 6-0, 1S5, Sophomore from Carnegie, Pa.— and WILLIAM JOHN- 
STONE, 18, 6-0, 175, Sophomore from Niagara Falls, N. Y., are two outstanding boys 
up from the frosh team . . . FRITSCH helped a great deal in leading the baby Terps to 
a good year . . . both fine boys . . . conscientious workers and good students . . . 
FRITSCH from Bernie Faloney's High School. 

HALFBACKS 

ED VEREB, 21, 6-0, 1S5, Senior from Pittsburgh, Pa. — Co-Captain Eddie falls in line 
as another of the Terps' great halfbacks . . . played and lettered both previous years 
as he was one of the finest ball carriers of the fine corps the Terps had . . . expected 
to be the big offensive gun for Maryland this Fall ... a well-knit boy with a lot 
of guts when loves the game . . . has top speed and has a real good change of pace 
and can cut well to either side ... at times he "bulls" his way over would-be tacklers 
... a real power runner to go with his speed and finesse . . . due to give flashy 
performances ... an outstanding leader is this soft-spoken star ... a real competitor, 
type needed for the leadership Maryland will need for a winning season . . . Eddie 
a top defensive back . . . has a lot of skill in the secondary and with his quickness 
and savvy offers a very alert defender against opponents' aerials . . . with his mobility, 
he pursues running plays well . . .a sure tackier . . . had a good year last Fall as 
number two left halfback . . . averaged eight yards a carry, picking up 135 yards 
in 17 attempts ... he scored twice . . . good man on punt and kickoff returns . . . 
returned five punts for 58 yards and two kickoffs for 38 . . . intercepted one pass . . . 

— 39 — 



was an outstanding star for Pittsburgh's Central Catholic team for three years . . . 
worth watching for stardom ... a Pre-Med Student, and a good one. 

HOWARD DARE, 20, 5-11, 185, Junior from Baltimore, Md. — fulfilled all expectations 
from a great freshman year as he broke into the starting right halfback post as a 
soph . . . Howie doesn't run, he gallops . . . played brilliantly last Fall as he averaged 
6.3 yards per carry ... a terrific runner, a good passer and is a threat at receiving 
passes . . . has a good strong frame . . . has a terrific running style that makes him 
extremely dangerous and hard to bring down . . . elusive type runner . . . had a big 
Spring practice . . . looked more than adequate on defense . . . his speed, like Ve'eb 
and the other Terp halfbacks, makes him a top defensive halfback . . . caught 
seven passes for 104 yards and two TD's . . . scored four all told . . . threw once 
for an eight yard completion . . . returned four punts for 26 yards and two kickoffs 
for 77 yards . . . will keep hustling to keep job ... a big star at Baltimore's Poly 
High School making the All-Maryland team . . . another Terp star in the making 
... in School of Business and Public Administration. 

DAVE NUSZ, 21, 5-10, 180, Senior from Avalon, Pa. — the slick fast-stepping Nusz had a 
big year last season and made his mark for another expected to be even better . . . 
was a real pleasant surprise as he rambled easily with his high-kicking stride . . . one 
of the fastest boys on the squad . . . seems to have come into his own . . . didn't 
let anybody down in Spring ball . . . had a fine exhibition and tabbed himself for 
a big year . . . will be pushing the boys ahead of him on the number one unit . . . 
averaged 8.4 yards in 20 carries last Fall . . . scored twice . . . returned two punts 
. . . another good boy in the secondary on defense . . . picked off two enemy 
aerials . . . married this Summer to Maryland co-ed ... a Physical Education major. 

DICK BURGEE, 21, 5-10. 130, Senior from Frederick, Md. — Dick did a fine job last 
Fall in relieving the front-running backs . . . carried but seven times and ave"aged 
16.4 yards, one a 90-yard jaunt in the Missouri game to set a new Terp record for 
longest rush fiom scrimmage . . . loves to play as shown when he commuted from 
Maryland Law School in Baltimore all last Fall for practice ... an honor student in 
Law School . . . missed Spring ball so he could devote full time for study . . . 
plays defense adequately ... is married. 

JACK HEALY. 19, 5-11, 185, Sophomore from Brooklyn, N. Y. — after performing like 
a real pro as a frosh, Jack ran on the B team last Fall and continued to create quite 
a lot of excitement . . . maintained this terrific pace during Spring ball and is a 
bet to be one of the big stars this Fall ... a real speedster with tremendou,-'. drive in 
his powerful legs . . . one of the best defensive backs on the squad . . . has tremendous 
desire and will to play . . . won New York State's coveted Lou Gehrig Award fo:- 
excellence in athletics and academics as well as the Lenny Singer Award, a similar 
recognition ... a Public Relations major. 

JOHN McVICKER, 19, 5-9, 185, Sophomore from Cumber-land, Md. — if only this b:>y 
would explore his potential, he could be one of the greatest backs in Terp history . . . 
shows flashes of brilliance many times . . . looked exceptional again in Spring practice 
... a standout for the B team last Fall ... if and when he releases this potential. 
he could make an indelible impression and make the boys really hustle to keep their 
jobs ... an All-Stater in football at Fort Hill High School ... a three-year letterman 
in football, basketball, and track . . . won Hazelwood Award and Player of Year 
Award his senior year ... in School of Arts and Science. 

HAROLD HULL, 19. 5-9, 185, Sophomore from Cumberland, Md. — a good rugged boy 
and a teammate of McVicker's at Fort Hill . . . they were known as the "Touchdown 
Twins" . . . now they are known as the "Gold Dust Twins" ... a lot similar ball 
player . . . runs hard with good speed and finesse . . . had a good Spring practice . . . 
does an excellent job defensively . . . should easily break into the varsity lineup . . . 
majoring in Industrial Education. 

PHIL PERLO, 19, 5-11, 175, Sophomore from Washington, D. C. — this little guy an- 
other package of dynamite who is sure to be a help, quite possibly this year . . . has 
a lot of knowhow . . . one of the best upcoming prospects . . . can and has played 
both quarterback and halfback . . . plays with reckless abandon . . . fine defensive 
halfback . . . bears watching for he will be out to make the varsity squad . . . 
All-Metropolitan. 

FRED HAMILTON, 19, 5-11, 185, Sophomore from Freeport, Pa. — this highly sought 
after boy is one of the brightest looking prospects to hit the Terp camp in a long 
time . . . was a tremendous 60-minute man for the frosh last year . . . wants to play 
football more than anything else ... a February '54 frosh, so he has gained very 
valuable experience with frosh year plus two Spring practices . . . his first Spring 
practice raised all eyebrows and caused Tatiim to remark that he would like to have 
him playing for the varsity last Fall . . . Fred is one of the keenest defensive 

— 40 — 



backs seen in many a moon ... he could have been playing on the first unit, 
according to the Terp boss ... a real rugged boy with great power and most of all 
he possesses delirious desire to play football ... a real fine offensive back to go 
along with his defensive skills . . . Freshman Coach "Whitey" Dovell predicts nothing 
but greatness for him . . . excelled in Spring ball . . . can be used at either halfback 
and might be seen at fullback this Fall . . . when slight injuries kept the fullbacks out 
of action a couple scrimmages this Spring, Tatum had the squat swiftie running on the 
first unit at fullback besides alternating him on either side as a halfback . . . 
very difficult to keep him out of play . . . keen reactions . . . bubbles over with 
enthusiasm when it gets rough, the way he likes it ... a star player at little Freeport 
High School . . . majoring in Physical Education. 

FULLBACKS 

TOM SELEP, 21, 6-1, 195, Senior from California, Pa. — came through last Fall as a 
pleasant surprise and at times looked like the best running fullback of the lot . . . 
has great potential which can be promised to be Utilized this Fall . . . had a 5.7-yard 
average for 27 rushes ... is probably the fastest fullback the Terps have had in quite 
a number of years . . . sprints like a halfback once he gets a bit of daylight beyond 
the line of scrimmage . . . has come a long way since sophomore year . . . likes 
to bull his way over tacklers . . . has a strong pair of legs which gives him so much 
more powerful charge . . . looked extremely good in Spring practice . . . Tom also a 
giant on defense . . . has good play diagnosis and is tough competitor . . . one of 
best tacklers on the team . . . besides his fine offensive and defensive ability. Selep 
is another "Big Toe" at place-kicking . . . kicked 5-7 extra points last season and 
boots the ball far downfleld on kickoffs . . . being counted on to be one of the big 
guns in the Terp attack for '55 ... a three-sport three year letterman in high 
school . . . averaging over "B" work in Engineering. 

JIM SKARDA, 20, 6-1, 205, Junior from Baltimore, Md. — this boy has great possibilities 
but question is, just when will they show . . . staff hopes this Fall . . . came around 
good near end of season and had a fine Spring practice . . . Jim has all that it takes 
to be a great fullback . . . some days he looks like a million dollars as he performs 
brilliantly both on offense and defense . . . what coaches want is consistent performance, 
which Jim could do ... a powerful runner with average speed . . . also good place- 
kicker . . . had 1-2 last Fall ... a defensive stalwart and when he wants he is 
untouchable on defense . . . Terps need this boy for a lot of top-flight duty this Fall 
... a good student in Engineering. 

BILL KOMLO, 20, 6-0, 200, Sophomore from Uniontown, Pa. — came to Maryland as 
one of all-time top fullback prospects . . . still is . . . played on the B team last 
Fall to get experience and has shown vast improvement . . . another boy with tre- 
mendous stored up potential . . . has the framework to make him explosive . . . Komlo 
is a murderous line plunger with adequate speed ... his wickedness as a battering 
type fullback makes him a leading candidate to pull a few surprises this Fall . . 
will be after the number one job so will keep Selep and Skarda hustling ... if his 
potential materializes, he could be fierce ... is a very effective defensive player as 
a linebacker . . . follows the play well and tackles with great impetus and sureness 
. . . has great ability also at place-kicking . . . gets a lot of mileage from his power- 
ful right leg . . . married and has a daughter ... in School of Agriculture majoring 
in Pre-Veterinarian . . . should be a big help ... he will be needed. 



TERPS ON HONORARY SELECTIONS — 1954 



DICK BIELSKI 

All-Players All-America Third Team 

Honorable Mention All-America Associated Press 

Honorable Mention All-America United Press 

Atlantic Coast Conference First Team Associated Press 

Atlantic Coast Conference First Team, Southern Writers' Assn. 

All-South Second Team, Associated Press 

First Team, Atlantic Coast Conference, Durham Herald 

Second Team, Atlantic Coast Conference, Charlotte News 

RONNIE WALLER 

Honorable Mention All-America Associated Press 

Honorable Mention All-America United Press 

First Team, Atlantic Coast Conference, Associated Press 

First Team, Atlantic Coast Conference, Southern Writers' Assn. 

First Team, Atlantic Coast Conference, Durham Herald 

First Team, Atlantic Coast Conference, Charlotte News 

JACK BOWERSOX 

First Team, All-America, Gridiron Index- 
Honorable Mention All-America, Associated Press 
Honorable Mention All-America, United Press 
Second Team, Atlantic Coast Conference, Associated Press 
Third Team, Atlantic Coast Conference, Southern Writers' Assn. 
Second Team, Atlantic Coast Conference, Charlotte News 

JOHN IRVINE 

Honorable Mention All-America, United Press 
Seco-nd Team, Atlantic Coast Conference, Associated Press 
Second Team, Atlantic Coast Conference, Southern Writers' Assn. 
First Team, Atlantic Coast Conference, Charlotte News. 
Second Team, All South, Associated Press 

*BILL WALKER 

Second Team, All-America, Associated Press 

Honorable Mention All-America, United Press 

First Team, Atlantic Coast Conference, Associated Press 

First Team, Atlantic Coast Conference, Southern Writers' Assn. 

Second Team, Atlantic Coast Conference, Charlotte News 



-BOB PELLEGRINI 

Honorable Mention All-America, United Press 

Voted the Anthony C. Nardo Memorial Trophy as the "Best All-Around 

Lineman of 1954." 
First Team, Atlantic Coast Conference, Charlotte News 
Second Team, Atlantic Coast Conference, Associated Press 
Second Team, Atlantic Coast Conference, Southern Writers' Assn. 
Second Team, Atlantic Coast Conference, Durham Herald 

GEORGE PALAHUNIK 

Honorable Mention All-America, United Press 

TOM McLUCKIE 

Pigskin Club of Washington Award — "The outstanding football player 
of the Washington area." 

* Returning to 1955 Team 



■ - ■■■■ v • •»•'•• • •■• -■•^•■•^' £■• 



■ ^*3£:.^J- i.ii^* 






BYRD STADIUM 

HOME OF THE TERRAPINS 
Capacity: 35,000 



— 43 — 



TERP ALL-AMERICA PLAYERS 

1949 — Ray Krouse, Tackle — Second Team 

1950 — Bob Ward, Guard — First Teams 

1951 — Bob Ward, Guard — First Teams 

1951 — Ed "Big Mo" Modzelewski, Fullback — First and Second Teams 

1951 — Dick "Little Mo" Modzelewski, Tackle — One First Team; Most 

Second Teams 
1952 — Jack Scarbath, Quarterback — First Teams 
1952 — Dick "Little Mo" Modzelewski, Tackle — First Teams 
1952 — Tom Cosgrove, Center — Second Team 
1953 — Stan Jones, Tackle — First Teams 

1953 — Bernie Faloney, Quarterback — Eight First Teams; all Second Teams 
1953 — Chester Hanulak, Halfback — Second Teams 
1954 — Dick Bielski, Fullback — Third Teams 
1954 — Jack Bowersox, Guard — First Team (Gridiron Index) 
1954 — Bill Walker, End— Second Team (AP) 

ADDITIONAL HONORS FOR TERP ALL-AMERICAS 

BOB WARD— 1951 

"Lineman of Year" as selected by Washington Touchdown Club; re- 
ceived the Knute Rockne Memorial Trophy. 

"Lineman of Year" as selected by Philadelphia Sportswriters' Assn. 

Runner-up to Stanford's Bill McColl as Associated Press Lineman 
of Year. 

"Player of the Year" in Southern Conference, 1951. 

Most Valuable Player of '50 Gator Bowl as a sophomore. 

Voted Most Valuable Player Award by his teammates four consecu- 
tive years. 

JACK SCARBATH— 1952 

Runner-up to Billy Vessels, Oklahoma, for Heisman Memorial Tro- 
phy as nation's outstanding football player. 

"Back of the Year" selected by COLLIER'S Magazine. 

"Sportsman of the Year" Award given by SPORT Magazine. 

Second high vote getter in United Press "Player of Year" poll. 

Third high vote getter in Associated Press "Player of Year" poll. 

"Player of the Year" in Southern Conference, 1952. 

"South's Most Valuable Player" in North-South Shrine Game, 
Miami, Fla. 

First draft choice of Washington Redskins. 

DICK "Little Mo" MODZELEWSKI— 1952 

"Lineman of Year" Award, LOOK Magazine as selected by Grant- 
land Rice and Football Writer's Assn. of America. Received the John 
B. Outland Memorial Trophy for this selection. 

"Lineman of Year" as selected by Washington Touchdown Club; re- 
ceived the Knute Rockne Memorial Trophy. 

Second high vote getter in United Press "Lineman of Year" poll. 

Second high vote getter in SPORTING NEWS "Lineman of Year" 
poll. 

Fourth high vote getter in ASSOCIATED PRESS "Lineman of 
Year" poll. 

Second draft choice of Washington Redskins. 

— 44 — 



STANLEY JONES— 1953 

"Lineman of Year" awarded by COLLIER'S Magazine. 

"Lineman of Year" as selected by Washington Touchdown Club; re- 
ceived the Knute Rockne Memorial Trophy. 

Runnerup to J. D. Roberts, Oklahoma, for ASSOCIATED PRESS 
"Lineman of Year" award. 

Fifth draft choice of Chicago Bears as a junior. 

BERN IE FALONEY— 1953 

Named to the "All-America Backfield" selected by the Washington 
Touchdown Club. 

"Player of the Year" of the Atlantic Coast Conference. 

First team ACADEMIC All-American. 

Fifth highest vote getter in ASSOCIATED PRESS "Back of the 
Year" poll. 

First draft choice of San Francisco Forty-Niners. 

DICK BIELSKI— 1954 

Voted "Most Valuable Player Award" in North-South Shrine Game, 
Miami, Fla. 

First draft choice of Philadelphia Eagles. 



— 45 — 



1954 HIGHLIGHTS 

LONGEST RUSH FROM SCRIMMAGE: 

Dick Burgee — 90 yards against Missouri for touchdown. 

LONGEST PASS COMPLETION: 

Frank Tamburello to Paul Kramer — 76 yards for touchdown against 
George Washington. 

MOST PASSES CAUGHT ONE GAME: 

Bill Walker— 3 for 48 yards in N.C. State game; 3 for 27 yards in 
North Carolina game. 

Ronnie Waller — 3 for 25 yards in North Carolina State game. 

MOST PASSES THROWN ONE GAME: 

9 for 2 completions and 28 yards and one TD against George Wash- 
ington by Charles Boxold. 

MOST PASSES COMPLETED ONE GAME: 

Charles Boxold — 5 out of 7 for 105 yards and 1 touchdown against 
North Carolina State. 

LONGEST KICK-OFF RETURN: 

Howard Dare — 54 yards against North Carolina State. 

LONGEST PUNT RETURN: 

Ronnie Waller — 68 yards and touchdown against North Carolina 
State. 
LONGEST PUNT: 

Lynn Beightol — 79 yards against Missouri. 
LOW NET GAIN IN ONE G AM E— ( Rushing) : 

12S yards against Kentucky. 
HIGH NET GAIN IN ONE G AM E— ( Rushing) : 

492 yards against Missouri. 
LOW NET GAIN BY OPPON ENT— ( Rushing) : 

67 yards by North Carolina. 
HIGH NET GAIN BY OPPON ENT- -( Rushing) : 

267 yards by Clemson. 
LEAST PASSING YARDAGE ONE GAME: 

19 yards against Miami, Fla. 
MOST PASSING YARDAGE ONE GAME: 

168 yards against George Washington. 
LEAST PASSING YARDAGE BY OPPONENT ONE GAME: 

6 yards by U.C.L.A. (threw only twice). 
MOST PASSING YARDAGE BY OPPONENT ONE GAME: 

283 yards by Missouri. 
LONGEST INTERCEPTION RETURN: 

Frank Tamburello — 69 yards and TD against Missouri. 
MOST TOUCHDOWNS SCORED IN ONE GAME: 

11 against Missouri. 
MOST POINTS SCORED: 

54 by Dick Bielski. 
LONGEST FIELD GOAL: 

Dick Bielski — 39 yards against Clemson. 



1954 TEAM STATISTICS 

MARYLAND OPPONENTS 

First Downs 149 140 

Rushing 116 81 

Passing 31 50 

Penalty 2 9 

Total Yards Rushing 2718 1675 

Yards Lost Rushing 230 332 

Net Yards Rushing 2488 1343 

Forward Passes Attempted 111 198 

Forward Passes Completed 44 96 

Passes Intercepted By 18 8 

Yards Interceptions Returned 285 41 

Net Yards Passing 901 1130 

Total Yards Gained (Rush & Pass) 3329 2473 

Total Number Punts 41 59 

Punting Average 39.3 34.2 

Total Points Scored 279 67 

Touchdowns 41 10 

Extra Points 29-41 5-10 

Field Goals 1-4 

Safeties 1 1 



1954 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS 



RUSHING 

Carries C 

*Bielski (9G) 79 

'"Waller G6 

*Horning 42 

*Boxold 37 

*Albrecht 43 

Tamburello 33 

Dare 32 

Selep 27 

Nusz 20 

Beightol IS 

Vereb '. 17 

Burgee 7 

Skarda - 2 

*Weiciecowski 1 

Walker 1 

PASSING 

Atts. 

*Boxold (9G) 59 

Tamburello 35 

Beightol 12 

* Waller 4 

Dare 1 

— 47 — 



Sain 


Loss 


Net 


Avg. 


406 


1 


405 


5.1 


601 


9 


592 


9.0 


350 


27 


323 


7.7 


162 


79 


83 


2.2 


240 


20 


220 


5.1 


100 


31 


69 


2.0 


205 


4 


201 


6.3 


156 


2 


154 


5.7 


175 


8 


167 


8.4 


60 


38 


22 


1.2 


135 





135 


8.0 


115 





115 


16.4 


2 





2 


1.0 


4 





4 


4.0 





6 


-6 
Had 


-6.0 


Comp. 


Yds. 


Int. 


TDs 


23 


525 


4 


6 


15 


248 


3 


3 


4 


47 


1 


1 


1 


13 








1 


8 









TOTAL OFFENSE 

Total Plays Gain Avg. 

*Boxold (9G) 96 615 6.4 

♦Waller,. 70 600 8.6 

Tamburello 66 323 4.9 

Beightol 30 71 2.4 

Dare 33 209 6.3 

all others same as above RUSHING 
PASS RECEIVING 

No. Caught Yards TDs 

Walker 13 209 1 

Dare 7 104 2 

Dennis 6 186 2 

♦Waller 5 88 1 

Parsons 3 58 1 

♦Kramer 2 111 2 

Flynn 2 36 1 

♦Horning 1 27 

Waters 1 12 

♦Albrecht 2 -7 

PASS INTERCEPTIONS 

Number Yds. Ret. 

Tamburello 4 140 

♦Boxold 2 19 

Nusz 2 9 

♦Waller 2 47 

Pellegrini 1 24 

♦Albrecht 1 20 — TD 

♦Horning 1 18 

♦Bowersox I 12 

♦Bielski 1 2 

Vereb 1 

Skarda 1 27 — TD 

Dare 1 

TD PASSES THROWN 

♦Boxold 6 

Tamburello 3 

Beightol 1 

TD PASSES CAUGHT 

Dare 2 

Dennis 2 

♦Waller 1 

Walker 1 

♦Kramer 2 

Parsons 1 

Flynn 1 

PUNTING 

No. Yards Avg. 

Walker 14 557 39.8 

Tamburello 15 519 34.6 

Beightol 9 400 44.4 

♦Bielski 2 94 47.0 

Bielski had a 14 and 42 yd. FG att. 

— 48 — 



PUNT RETURNS 

No. 

*Waller 13 

*Horning 8 

Vereb 5 

Dare 4 

Nusz 2 

Burgee 1 

*Irvine 1 

Tamburello 1 

KICKOFF RETURNS 

No. 

* Waller 4 

*Boxold : 3 

Dare , 2 

Vereb 2 

*Horning 1 

Parsons 1 

*Bielski 1 

Tamburello 1 

Wharton 1 

*Shipley , 1 

SCORING 

TDs 

*Bielski 6 

*Waller 7 

Dare 4 

*Albrecht 2 

Tamburello 3 

Selep 2 

*Boxold 2 

Dennis 2 

*Horning 2 

Vereb 2 

Nusz 2 

*Kramer 2 

Skarda 1 

Burgee 1 

Flynn 1 

Parsons „.. 1 

Walker 1 

* Graduated 



Yards Ret. 


TDs 




199 




1 




61 









58 









26 









13 









12 









9 









6 







Yards Ret. 


TDs 




121 









82 









77 









38 









51 









25 









12 









10 









10 









2 







PATs 




FGs 


Total 


15-19 




1-4 


54 










42 










24 


8-12 







20 










18 


5-7 







17 










12 










12 










12 










12 










12 










12 


1-2 







7 





















6 










6 










6 



ALL-TIME MARYLAND FOOTBALL RECORDS 

OFFENSE AND DEFENSE 

BEST SEASON: 

1951 and 1953: Won 10— Lost 0. 1951 record includes the 28-13 Sugar 

Bowl win over Tennessee. The '53, 10-0 record is regular season. 

Terps lost Orange Bowl, 7-0 to Oklahoma. 
WORST SEASON: 

1944— Won 1, Lost 7, Tied 1. 
MOST POINTS SCORED IN ONE SEASON: 

353 in 1951 in 9 games. 381 in 1951 in 10 games including the 28-13 

victory over Tennessee in the Sugar Bowl. 
LEAST POINTS SCORED IN ONE SEASON: 

39 in 1940 in 9 games. 
MOST POINTS SCORED BY OPPONENTS IN ONE SEASON: 

216 in 1938 in 9 games. 
LEAST POINTS SCORED BY OPPONENTS IN ONE SEASON: 

31 in 1953 in 10 games. 
MOST POINTS SCORED BY MARYLAND IN ONE GAME: 

Maryland— 80; Washington College— 0; (1927). 
MOST POINTS SCORED BY OPPONENTS IN ONE GAME: 

Navy 76;— Maryland 0; (1913). 
ALL-TIME LEADING SCORER: 

Bob Shemonski with 97 points in 1950 in 10 games. 
OFFENSIVE TEAM RECORD FOR ONE SEASON: 

3822 yards in 1951 in 9 games. 2921 rushing and 901 passing. 

4174 yards in 1951 in 10 games, including the 28-13 victory over Ten- 
nessee in the Sugar Bowl. 3210 rushing and 964 passing. 
OFFENSIVE TEAM RECORD FOR ONE GAME: 

602 yards in 1951 against West Virginia — 523 yards rushing and 79 

passing. 
LEAST YARDAGE ONE GAME: 

69 against Vanderbilt in 1948. 
MOST TOUCHDOWNS SCORED IN ONE SEASON: 

52 in 1951 in 9 games— 56 in 1951 in 10 games including the 28-13 

victory over Tennessee in Sugar Bowl. 
DEFENSIVE RECORD FOR ONE SEASON: 

1,707 yards in 1949 in 9 games — 868 rushing and 893 passing for fifth 

place in nation. 
DEFENSIVE RECORD FOR ONE GAME: (Rushing): 

29 by Washington and Lee in 1951. 
MOST YARDS RUSHING BY INDIVIDUAL IN ONE SEASON: 

Ray Poppleman with 1,350 yards in 10 games in 1931 
MOST YARDS RUSHING BY INDIVIDUAL IN ONE GAME: 

Ray Poppleman with 201 yards in 24 carries against Western Mary- 
land. 
LONGEST RUN FROM SCRIMMAGE: 

Dick Burgee for 90 yards and touchdown against University of Mis- 
souri in 1954. 

PASSING RECORDS 

TEAM PASSING FOR SEASON: 

90 completions in 170 attempts for 1364 yards in 1942 in 9 games. 

— 50 — 



TEAM PASSING FOR ONE GAME: 

Joe Tucker with 9 completions in 12 attempts for 178 yards and Stan 

Lavine, 4 for 5 for 129 yards for total of 307 yards against South 

Carolina in 1949. 
WORST PASSING RECORD BY MARYLAND: 

completions in 12 attempts against Vanderbilt in 1948 
INDIVIDUAL PASSING RECORD FOR ONE SEASON: 

Jack Scarbath in 9 games in 1952 — 59 completions in 113 attempts 

for 1149 yards. 
INDIVIDUAL PASSING RECORD FOR ONE GAME: 

Tommy Mont — 9 completions in 14 attempts for 215 yards against 

U of Connecticut in 1942. 
LEADING PASS RECEIVER FOR ONE SEASON: 

Lloyd Colteryahn — 32 receptions for 593 yards in 1952 in 9 games 
LEADING PASS RECEIVER FOR ONE GAME: 

Lou Weidensaul — 8 receptions for 95 yards and one touchdown 

against Navy in 1951. 

Lloyd Colteryahn — 8 receptions for 131 yards against Alabama in 

1952. 
LONGEST FORWARD PASS PLAY: 

Stan Lavine to Ed Bolton for 92 yards and touchdown against South 

Carolina in 1949. Pass 15 yards; run 77 yards. 
LONGEST RETURN OF INTERCEPTED PASS: 

Joe Horning for an official 100 yards and touchdown against Mis- 
souri in 1951 as a freshman. Actual return from inside end zone was 

105 yards. 

KICKING RECORDS 

MOST POINTS AFTER TOUCHDOWNS: 

Don Decker — 37 for 51 attempts in 9 games in 1951. 41 for 55 at- 
tempts in 10 games in 1951 including the 28-13 victory over Tennes- 
see in the Sugar Bowl. 

LONGEST PUNT: 

Brooke (Untz) Brewer for 93 yards against V.M.I, in 1916. 

BEST OFFICIAL AVERAGE ONE GAME: 

Bill Guckeyson for 51 yards in 10 punts against Syracuse in 1936. 
(Note: Brewer against Syracuse in 1920 and Guckeyson agains. 
Florida in 1936 both averaged better than 60 yards but official fig- 
ures could not be obtained from these schools and papers didn't carry 
the punting statistics.) 

LONGEST PUNT RETURN: 

Dick Nolan — 90 yards— against Clemson for TD in 1953. 

MOST PUNT RETURNS FOR SEASON: 

Bob Shemonski — 28 for 505 yards in 1950 in 10 games. 

LONGEST KICKOFF RETURNS: 

90 yards and TD — Lewis Thomas against Washington College in 1927; 
Bill Guckeyson against Georgetown in 1935; Sam Behr against Vir- 
ginia in 1945; Dick Nolan against Mississippi in 1952. 

LONGEST FIELD GOAL: 

Dick Bielski, 47 yards against Mississippi in 1953. 

LONGEST PUNT RETURN AGAINST MARYLAND: 

Frank Brady of Navy for 100 yards and touchdown in 1951. 

LONGEST KICKOFF RETURN AGAINST MARYLAND: 

Jim McPherson of North Carolina for 93 yards and TD in 1926. 

LONGEST PUNT AGAINST MARYLAND: 

Charlie Justice of North Carolina for 84 yards in 1948. 



YEAR BY YEAR RECORDS 

MARYLAND 1900 (3-4-1) Navy 17 

AGGIES Western Hi __ 17 Wm. & Mary- 

1892 f0 3 0) ° Gib - Ath ' C1 - - 17 28 Mt - st - Josephs 
St. Johns _"___-50 g' town Pr <;P -J 27 St. Johns ... 5 
Johns Hop. ___62 * Episcopal Hi 34 Wash. Col. __17 
Episcopal Hi. _16 ^ Gonzaga .Hi ___11 23 U. of Md. ___ 5 

1893 (6 01 Wn Prep — ° ° Dela - Co1 12 

36 Eastern Hi 21 Gonzaga Hi __ 1906 (5-3-0) 

10 Central Hi 21 Char Hal1 Ac - ° 5 Tech Hi 

Is Ba"t. City Coll 6 D lf Vol" 7 " 0) 24 22 5 T alt Clty Co1 - ° 

6 St. Johns COL. -§ %*\\™ -~-f Navy 12 

18 M. Md. Col. __10 10 n S nc Ho? fi n G T eor S et0wn - 28 

16 Orient Ath CI. 6 ° p° -W H H1 rof"i? o SI*" WaSh " CL " 29 

iRQd ^ s m ck HlU Col - n 20 St. Johns 4 

52 W Md Col ° Centml Hi — U 16 Ro ^ Hill Col. 

12 wash d bS° '_:: 2 l llT^asl 35 Wash - CoL - ° 

6 St. Johns ___22 ° *£? ** ^5 13 Tec?/ A^ 

6 Georgetown __ 4 1qn? ,- R 9 ^ " i* cn W1 § n — u 

Col Ath. CI .26 Georgetown * 27 2 Georgetown -.10 

Mt. St. Marys.24 5 Mt ft^s 5 R ;fmond Col.ll 

1895— No team n rnlumhian U 10 ^ ,; Vy 12 

No Games ~ ™ umbian U. _1U 6 Mt gt M __ 12 

ino uames g Qlympia Ath. .0 ln Con w^h n 

1896 (6-2-2) a wash Pol ^ „ Wash. ... 

Fastprn Hi 6 « Wash. Col. ... u 10 W ash. Col. __ 5 

„ S f, ^ . "~ a ° Mt - St - Mai 'y s - 5 St Johns Ifi 

Gallaudet _ 6 West Md ___ 26 U St. Johns ____16 

34 Business Hi ._ n TT , M - . u Gallaudet o 

10 Central Hi ... 6 " £. °J Hod "~17 c 1908 (3 - 8 " 0) 

18 Alexandria Hi. ° JS S r S ~ n 5 Centml Hi ™ ° 

20 Bethel Mil Ac.10 ° U 1 e ., C J d ^~ 5 Tech High — 6 

Episcopal Hi. _ 6 G 1 e ™ e town } __28 ° ^mond Col 22 

16 West. Md. ___ 6 5 C]ifto \ Ath . __ Johns Hop. __10 

14 Central Hi . . 21 Gunton Tem _ Navy -——57 

U. of Md. ... a o t TnhnQ -,0 5 Gallaudet 

1897(2.4-0) 28 Wash Col III ° S^™' "^ 

24 Central Hi ___ 6 97 ., H; n 12 Balto Poly __ 6 

4 Eastern Hi ... Z ' ^ e t M ar"" 9 ° St " Johns — " 31 

J. Hopkins 30 J! Set tvth ~ n ° Wash - CoL — u 

4 St. Johns -.- 6 £ ^est Md. - - Geo . Wa3h . __ 5? 

6 Gallaudet 16 ^ u rio , ri a tr, "~ " 1909 (2-5-0) 

Bait. Med Col-10 ~ pEhmIT n ° Richmond Col. 12 

1898 (2-5-0) 6 C ?m2 ,? d F; " ° R i ohns Hopkins 9 

5 Columbian U 17 a J 904 ( 2 " 4 " 2 ) Tech High __11 
West Md 32 ° Georgetown __22 5 Rock H ill ... 

Sfi SrnHi ° Ran - Macon ~ ° ° George Wash. 26 

a o 11 , . """„ Ftress Monroe ON. Ca. A&M 33 

Gallaudet 33 n Mt gt> Mar> _ 6 14 Gallaudet ... 12 

Johns Hop^ __16 We:t. Md. ___5 1910(4-3-1) 

Episcopal Hi 37 22 Gallaudet ____ 5 12 Central Hi __ 

27 Rock Hill Col._ n U of Md 6 20 Richmond Col. 

1899 (1-4-0 n npl p ' " - 1R 11 Johns Hop. __ II 
West Md. ... 21 u , e ' a c ~ 01 : -— LO 21 Catholic U. __ 

26 Eastern Hi __ __ J?°Vi t a n Geo. Wash. _. 

Johns. Hop. _ 40 20 Balt Pol y In - ° V. M. I. 8 

Delaware Col. 34 16 Gallaudet St. Johns ... 6 

St. Johns 62 West. Md. ___10 3 West. Md. __ 17 



1911 (4-4-2) 

6 Tech Hi 

Richmond 

5 Fred'bg Col. _ 

Central Hi 14 

3 Johns Hop. — 6 

6 Catholic U. __ 6 
St. Johns 27 

5 Wash. Col. —17 

6 West Md. ___ 

6 Gallaudet 2 

1912 (6-1-1) 

31 Tech Hi 6 

46 Richmond Col. 
58 U. of Md. ___ 
13 Johns Hop. ___ 

St. Johns 27 

13 Gallaudet 7 

17 West Md. 7 

13 Penn Mil. Col._13 

1913 (6-3-0) 

27 Balto City 10 

45 Richmond Col. _0 
20 Johns Hop. 

46 West Md. 

Navy 76 

13 St. Johns 

20 Wash. Col. ___ 
Gallaudet 26 

7 Penn Mil. ___27 

1914 (5-3-0) 

Balto. Poly ___ 6 
6 Catholic U. ___ 

13 West Md. 20 

14 Johns Hop. 

10 St. Johns 

3 Wash. Col. ___ 
Gallaudet 23 

26 Penn Mil. 

1915 (6-3-0) 

31 Balto Poly __ 

Haverford 7 

Catholic U. __16 

10 Gallaudet 3 

14 Penn Mil. ___13 

27 St. Johns 14 

28 Wash Col. ___13 
51 West Md. ___ 

Johns Hop. 3 

MARYLAND 
STATE 

1916 (6-2-0) 

6 Dickinson 

7 Navy 14 



15 V. M. 1. 9 

6 Haverford 7 

31 St. Johns 6 

10 N. Y. U. 7 

13 Catholic U. ___ 9 
54 Johns Hop. 

1917 (4-3-1) 

20 Dela. Col. 

Navy 62 

14 V. M. I. 14 

29 Wake Forest _13 

6 N. C. State __10 
13 St. Johns 3 

Penn State ___57 

7 Johns Hop. ___ 

1918 (4-1-1) 

6 American U. 13 

7 V. M. I. 6 

19 West Md. 

6 New York U. _ 2 

19 St. Johns 14 

Johns Hop. 

1919 (5-4-0) 

6 Swarthmore 10 

13 Virginia 

West Va. 27 

Va. Poly 6 

Yale 31 

27 St. Johns 

13 Catholic U. ___ 

20 West Md. 

14 Johns Hop. 

UNIVERSITY 
OF MARYLAND 

1920 (7-2-0) 

54 Randolph Ma _ 

Rutgers 7 

Princeton 35 

14 Catholic U. ___ 
27 Wash. Col. ___ 

7 Va. Poly 

13 North Car. ___ 

10 Syracuse 7 

24 Johns Hop. ___ 7 

1921 (3-5-1) 

3 Rutgers 

Syracuse 42 

3 St. Johns 7 

10 Va. Poly 7 

7 North Car. __16 
Yale 28 

16 Catholic U. ___ 
Carnegie Tech_21 

— 53 — 



1922 (4-5-1) 

6 N. C. State —6 
7 Third Army __ 

Richmond 

Pennsylvania -12 

Princeton 26 

3 North Car. —27 

Va. Poly 21 

3 Yale 45 

3 Johns Hop. G 

54 Catholic U. __ 
7 N. C. State __ _ 6 

1923 (7-2-1) 

53 Randolph Ma. 
3 Pennsylvania _ 

23 Richmond 

9 Va. Poly 16 

14 North Car. — _ 

28 St. Johns 

14 Yale 16 

26 N. C. State —12 
40 Catholic U. ___ 6 

6 Johns Hop. — 6 

1924 (3-3-3) 

23 Wash Col. __ _ 

7 Wash. & Lee _19 
38 Richmond 

Va. Poly 12 

6 North Car. ___ 
Catholic U. — 

Yale 47 

N. C. State — 
Johns Hop — 

1925 (2-5-1) 

13 Wash. Col. 

16 Rutgers 

Va. Poly 3 

Virginia 6 

North Car. —16 

14 Yale 43 

3 W. & L. 7 

7 Johns Hop. — 7 

1926 (5-4-1) 

63 Wash. Col. __ _ 
South Car. —12 
Chicago 21 

8 Va. Poly 24 

14 North Car. ___ 6 
38 Gallaudet 7 

15 Yale 

6 Virginia — , 6 

W. & L. 3 

17 Johns Hop. ___ 14 



1927 (4-7-0) 

80 Wash. Col. __ 

26 South Car. ___ 

6 North Car. ___ 7 

13 Va. Poly 7 

10 V. M. I. 6 

6 W. & L. 13 

6 Yale 30 

Virginia 21 

20 Vanderbilt 39 

13 Johns Hop. __14 

6 Florida 7 

1928 (6-3-1) 

31 Wash. Col. ___ 

19 North Car —26 

7 South Car. ___21 
13 West Md. 6 

V. M. I. 

fi Va. Poly 9 

Yale 6 

18 Virginia 2 

fi W. & L. 

26 Johns Hop. ___ 6 

1929 (4-4-2) 

34 Wash Cal. ___ 7 
iMorth Car. —43 
South Car. ___26 

13 Gallaudet 6 

fi V. M. I. 7 

33 Virginia 13 

13 Yale 13 

24 Va. Poly 

39 Johns Hop. 6 

West Md. —12 

1930 (7-5-0) 

60 Wash Col. ___ 6 

13 Yale 40 

21 North Car. —28 
21 St. Johns 13 

20 V. M. I. 

14 Virginia 6 

41 W. & L. 7 

13 Va. Poly 7 

Navy 6 

21 Johns Hop. __ 
7 Vanderbilt —22 
West Md. 7 

1931 (8-1-1) 

13 Wash Col. ___ 

7 Virginia (6 

6 Navy 

6 Kentucky 6 

41 V. M. I. 20 

20 Va. Poly 

12 Vanderbilt —39 



13 W. & L. (7 

35 Johns Hop. 14 

41 West Md. 6 

1932 (5-6-0) 

63 Wash Col. ___ 
6 Virginia 7 

6 Va. Poly 23 

Duke 34 

24 St. Johns 7 

12 V. M. I. 7 

Vanderbilt —13 

7 Navy 2S 

6 W. & L. 

23 Johns Hop. ___ 

7 West Md. 39 

1933 (3-6-0) 

20 St. Johns 

Va. Poly 14 

Tulane 20 

13 V. M. I. 19 

7 West Md. 13 

Virginia 6 

7 Duke 38 

27 Johns Hop ___ 7 

33 W. & L. 13 

Florida 19 

1934 (7-3-0) 

13 St. Johns 

W. & L. 7 

13 Navv 16 

14 Va. Poly 9 

21 Florida 

20 Virginia 

23 V. M. I. 

14 Indiana 17 

6 Georgetown __ 

19 Johns Hop. — 

1935 (7-2-2) 

39 St. Johns 6 

7 Va. Poly 

North Car. —33 

6 V. M. I. 

20 Florida 6 

14 Virginia 7 

7 Indiana 13 

W. & L. 

12 Georgetown 6 

Syracuse 

22 West Md. 7 

1936 (6-5-0) 

20 St. Johns 

fi Va. Poly 

North Car. —14 

21 Virginia 

20 Syracuse 

6 Florida 7 

— 54 — 



12 Richmond 

7 V. M. I. 13 

6 Georgetown 7 

19 W. & L. 6 

West Md. -__12 

1937 (8-2-0) 

28 St. Johns 

21 Pennsylvania _28 

6 West Md. 

3 Virginia 

13 Syracuse 

13 Florida 7 

9 V. M. I. 7 

14 Penn State —21 
12 Georgetown 2 

8 W. & L. 

1938 (2-7-0) 

6 Richmond 19 

Penn State -—33 
Svracuse 53 

14 West Md. ___ 8 

19 Virginia 27 

14 V. M. I. 47 

7 Florida 21 

7 Georgetown 14 

19 W. & L. 13 

1939 (2-7-0) 

26 Hamp.-Syd. __ 

12 West Md. 

7 Virginia 12 

12 Rutgers 25 

Florida 14 

Penn State —12 
Georgetown —20 

V. M. I. 13 

7 Svracuse 10 

1940 (2-6-1) 

6 Hamp.-Syd. __ 7 
Pennsylvania -51 

fi Virginia 19 

Florida 19 

6 West Md. 

Georgetown — 41 
V. M. I. 20 

14 Rutgers 7 

7 W. & L. 7 

1941 (3-5-1) 

18 Hamp.-Syd. — 
6 West Md. _—6 
Duke 50 

13 Florida 12 

6 Pennsylvania _55 

Georgetown 26 

Rutgers 20 

V. M. I. 27 

6 W. & L. 



1942 (7-2-0) 

34 Connecticut __ 

14 Lake NAS 

27 Rutgers 13 

V. M. I. 29 

51 West Md. 

13 Florida 

Duke 42 

27 Virginia 12 

32 VV. & L. 28 

1943 (4-5-0) 

7 Curtis B. CG_13 
13 Wake Forest - 7 
19 Rich. AAB ___ 6 

2 West Va. 6 

Penn State __45 
43 Greenv. AAB _18 

Virginia 39 

Bainbridge 46 

21 V. M. I. 14 

1944 (1-7-1) 

Hamp.-Syd. __12 

Wake Forest -39 

6 West Va. 6 

Mich. State — 8 

6 Florida 14 

7 Virginia 18 

Mich. State —33 

19 Penn State —34 

8 V. M. I. 6 

1945 (6-2-1) 

60 Guilford Col. _ 6 

21 Richmond 

22 Merch. M. A. 6 
13 Va. Poly 21 

13 West Va. 13 

14 W. & M. 33 

38 V. M. I. 

19 Virginia 13 

19 South Car. ___13 

1946 (3-6-0) 

54 Bainbridge 

7 Richmond 37 

North Car. __ _33 

6 Va. Poly 

7 W. & M. 41 

17 South Car. ___21 

24 W. & L. 7 

14 Mich. State ___26 

7 N. C. State —28 



1947 (7-2-2) 

19 South Car. ___13 

43 Delaware 19 

18 Richmond 6 

7 Duke 19 

21 Va. Poly 19 

27 West Va. 

32 Duquesne 

North Car. __ _19 

20 Vanderbilt ___ 6 
N. C. State __ 

(Gator Bowl, 
Jan. 1, 1948) 

20 Georgia 20 

1948 (6-4-0) 

.19 Richmond 

21 Delaware 

28 Va. Poly 

12 Duke 13 

47 Geo. Wash. __ 
27 Miami 13 

19 South Car. __ _ 7 

20 North Car. __ 49 
Vanderbilt ___ 34 

14 West. Va. 16 

1949 (9-1-0) 

34 Va. Poly 7 

33 Georgetown 7 

7 Mich. State —14 

14 N. C. State __ 6 

44 South Car. __ _ 7 

40 Geo. Wash. ___ 14 
14 Boston U. — _13 
47 West Va. 7 

13 Miami 

(Gator Bowl, 

Jan. 1, 1950) 

20 Missouri 7 

1950 (7-2-1) 

7 Georgia 27 

35 Navy 21 

34 Mich. State — 7 

25 Georgetown 14 

13 N. C. State --16 

26 Duke 14 

23 Geo. Wash ___ 7 

7 North Car. ___ 7 

41 West Va. 

63 V. P. I. 7 

1951 (10-0-0) 

54 W. & L. 14 

33 Geo. Wash. __ _ 6 



43 Georgia 7 

14 North Car. __ 7 

27 Louis. State — 

35 Missouri 

40 Navy 21 

53 N. C. State — 

54 West. Va. 7 

(Sugar Bowl, 
Jan. 1, 1952) 

28 Tennessee 13 

1952 (7-2-0) 
13 Missouri 10 

13 Auburn 7 

28 Clemson 

37 Georgia 

38 Navy 7 

34 L.S.U. 6 

34 Boston U. ___ 7 

14 Mississippi 21 

7 Alabama 27 

1953 (10-1-0) 
20 Missouri ____ 6 
52 W. & L. 

20 Clemson 

40 Georgia 13 

26 N. Carolina _ 
30 Miami (Fla.) 
24 S. Carolina — 6 

27 Geo. Wash. __ 6 
38 Mississippi 

21 Alabama 

*0 Oklahoma 7 

* (Orange Bowl) 

1954 (7-2-1) 

20 Kenutcky — 

7 U.C.L.A. 12 

13 Wake Forest_13 

33 N. Carolina- _ 

7 Miami, Fla.__ 9 

20 S. Carolina.— 

42 N. C. State— 14 

16 Clemson 

48 Geo. Wash. __ 6 

74 Missouri 13 



— 55 



COACHES THROUGH THE YEARS 



1892— W. W. Skinner 
1893— S. H. Harding 
1894— J. G. Bannon 
1895— G. M. Harris 
1896 — Grenville Lewis 
1897— John Lillibridge 
1898— J. F. Kenly 
1899— S. M. Cooke 
1900— F. H. Peters 
1901— E. B. Dunbar 
*Ahovn Teams Coacherl by 

Captains 
1902 — D. John Markey 

(Western Md.) 



1903 — Markev 

1904 — Markey 

1905 — Fred Nielsen (Neb.) 

1906— Nielsen 

1907— C. G. Church (Va.) 

and C. W. Melick (Neb.) 
1908 — Bill Lang (Delaware) 
1909 — Barney Cooper 

(Md. '08) and E. P. 

Larkin (Cornell) 
1910— R. Alston (G.W.) 
1911— C. F. Donnelly 

(Trinity) and H. C. Byrd 

(Maryland '08) 



1912-34— H. C. Byrd 

(Md. '08) 
1935-39— Frank Dobson 

(Princeton) 
1940-41— Jack Faber C26), 

Al Heagy. ('30), and Al 
Woods C33) all of Md. 
1942— Clark Shaughnessy 

(Minnesota) 
1943-44 — Clarence Spears 

(Dartmouth) 
1945— Paul Bryant (Ala.) 
1946 — Shaughnessy 
1947-54— Jim Tatum (N.C.) 



THE 1955 TERPS 

(Continued from page 15) 

the Year" will be veteran Fred Tullai and a pair of newcomers in 
Gene Alderton and Ron Laneve. Help could come from a Potomac 
State transfer — Wilbur Main, product of Frederick, Md. 

The Terp backfield suffered a severe loss this summer when Fred- 
die Lee, Walton, W. Va., was killed in an auto accident near his home. 
He was due to be one of the key backs in Terp plans for this season. 
Lee could have been used at either halfback and could have been in- 
serted at quarterback if needed. He was one of the very best defensive 
halfbacks who would have been utilized at either corner or at safety. 
This will be one of the big problems to iron out in early fall practice. 

Otherwise, the starting foursome will be Tamburello, Co-Captain 
Ed Vereb, another tremendous Terp halfback to go along with such 
other greats as Ed Fullerton, Bob Shemonski, Chet Hanulak, Dick 
Nolan, Ronnie Waller, Joe Horning and others on the left side. He 
will be helped by Dave Nusz and John McVicker, a promising soph. On 
the right side will be Howie Dare, who had a big year as a soph, Dick 
Burgee, B-teamers Jack Healy and Harold Hull; along with fine frosh 
prospects Fred Hamilton and Phil Perlo. Hamilton could be the best 
of the rookies. At fullback, veteran Tom Selep should have a great 
year. He has great speed and is most adequate defensively. Jim 
Skarda and Bill Komlo, two real block-busters, will battle it out with 
Selep for top honors. 

The quarterback situation seems ideal with Tamburello one of the 
best two-way signal callers we have had backed up by the veteran 
Lynn Beightol who is extremely capable offensively and certainly ade- 
quate on defense. A trio of rookies — Fred Petrella, Ralph Hawkins, 
and Bob Rusevlyan — will lend a big hand. 

The road to victory will be rough, and Tatum and his staff realize 
this. Games with top teams in seven of the nation's Conferences 
mean a lot of fret and fear. 



— 56 



THE TERP PRESS 



*GEORGE BOWEN. The Associated Press 
MAX FULLERTON, The Associated Press 
BOB McHUGH, The Associated Press 
LOU PANOS, The Associated Press 
HERB FOSTER, The United Press 
ERNIE BARCELLA, The United Press 

*BOB SERLING, The United Press 
EV GARDNER, Sports Editor, The Daily News 

*HENRY FANKHAUSER, The Daily News 
CHUCK EGAN, Sports Editor, The Evening Star 
FRANCIS STANN.. Sports Columnist, The Evening Star 

*MERRELL WHITTLESEY, Sports Department, The Evening Star 
GEORGE HUBER, Sports Department, The Evening Star 
BILL FUCHS, Sports Department, The Evening Star 
BUS HAM, Sports Editor, The Post Times-Herald 
SHIRLEY POVICH, Sports Columnist, The Post Times-Herald 

*DAVE BRADY, Sports Department, The Post Times-Herald 
BOB ADDIE, Sports Department, The Post Times-Herald 
MAURY FITZGERALD, Sports Department, The Post Times-Herald 
HERMAN BLACKMAN, Sports Department, The Post Times-Herald 
MARTI E 2ADRAVEC, Sports Department, The Post Times-Herald 
PAUL MENTON, Sports Editor, The Evening Sun 

-RANDALL CASSELL, Sports Department, The Evening Sun 
WALTER TAYLOR, Sports Department, The Evening Sun 
MURRAY WEIMAN, Sports Department, The Evening Sun 
JESSE LINTHICUM, Sports Editor, The Morning Sun 
RONALD GIBBS, Columnist, The Morning Sun 

*ED BRANDT, Sports Department, The Morning Sun 
ED ATWATER, Sports Department, The Morning Sun 
WALTER HERMANN, Sports Department, The Morning Sun 
ROGER PIPPEN, Sports Editor, The News-Post 
HUGH TRADER, Sports Columnist, The News-Post 

*AL COSTELLO, Sports Department, The News-Post 
J. SUTER KEGG, Sports Editor, The Cumberland Evening Times 
C. V. BURNS, Sports Editor, The Cumberland Morning News 
FRANK COLLEY, Sports Editor, The Hagerstown Daily Herald 
DICK KELLY, Sports Editor, The Hagerstown Daily Mail 
ED NICHOLS, Sports Editor, The Salisbury Times 
HENRY DECKER, Sports Editor, The Frederick Post 
THE FREDERICK NEWS 

BOB LAYTON, Sports Editor, The Cambrige Banner 
HYMY COHEN, Sports Editor, The Annapolis Evening Capital 
*Cover Daily 

RADIO and TELEVISION 

WASHINGTON BALTIMORE 

Jimmy Gibbons, WMAL-TV and Radio Roger Griswold, WCAO 

Bill Malone, WMAL-TV and Radio Chuck Thompson, WCBM 

Jim Simpson, WRC-TV and Radio Nelson Baker, WWIN 

Ray Michael, WRC-TV John McLean, WMAR-TV 

Morris Siegel, WTOP-TV Mat Thomas, WMAR-TV 

Arch McDonald, WTOP Nick Campofreda, WFBR-TV 

Bob Wolff, WWDC Joe Croghan, WBAL-TV 

Sam Kaufman, WOL Vince Bagley, WBAL 

Nat Allbright, WEAM Tommy Dukehart, WAAM-TV 

Jim Killian, WAAM-TV 
Joel Chaseman, WITH 
Bailey Goss and Ernie Harwell 
— 57 — 



TOMMY MONT 

(Continued from page 9) 

All-Conference and the Washington-Maryland outstanding college play- 
er awards in 1942. 

During the war, Mont served 42 months in the Army, 18 of which 
were spent in the ETO. He played ball throughout his long hitch. He 
was tailback on the Fort Benning Post championship team of '43. As 
quarterback and head coach, he led the 3rd Infantry team to the ETO 
title. He also was at the helm of the 7th Army All-Star team. 

Following his discharge, Mont returned to Maryland and was 
quarterback of the '46 team as he gained All-America mention and All- 
Conference honors. 

For the past three summers, he has spent two weeks as an advis- 
ory coach at National Polytechnic Institute in Mexico City. His work 
there has been responsible for Tatum scheduling the Terp frosh to take 
a trip to Mexico City for a game with Poly, October 15. 

The Monts have three sons; Steve, Jeff, and Danny. 

EMMETT CHEEK 

(Continued from page 11) 

Before coming to Maryland, Cheek was line coach and baseball 
coach in '49 and '50 at Guilford College, N. C. 

Cheek, along with Eddie Teague, are the Terp scouts during the 
season. Also, he is an instructor in the Physical Education Department. 

Cheek and Teague have just completed an outstanding publication 
on scouting. The book will be published early this fall. 

The Cheeks have one son, Tommy. 

ED KENSLER 

(Continued from page JO) 

2nd Marine Division at Camp Lejeune, N. C, Atlantic Fleet Champions 
in 1947. 

At Maryland, he had four brilliant years, lettering all four seasons 
playing tackle, guard and center. His career was topped off his senior 
year as he was named to the All-Conference first team and was select- 
ed to play in the annual Chicago-Tribune All-Star classic along with 
teammates Bob Ward, Ed Modzelewski, and Joe Moss. His standout 
performance in the Sugar Bowl victory over Tennessee also was an- 
other highlight of his senior year, as he won additional laurels for his 
stellar defensive play as a linebacker. 

Following graduation in '52 from the School of Physical Education, 
Kensler was named line coach at Washington and Lee. He stayed there 
for two seasons and then moved to V.M.I, as line coach. He was 
added to the Terp staff this January. 

Kensler married a former Maryland co-ed, Judy Speake. They 
have two children, Richard, 5; and a daughter, Jay, one. 



CLEMSON COLLEGE 

( Continued from, page 31) 

of those behind him are letterman Buck Priester, non-letterman Earl 
Greene and freshman star John Grdijan. 

B. C. Inabinet and Marazza, "B" unit regulars at tackle last fall, 
give the first eleven tremendous blocking power up front. 

End is shallowest of all positions once past veterans Walt Laraway 
and Willie Smith. A pair of '53 lettermen, Pete Wall and Joe Bowen, 
and junior Dalton Rivers are battling rising sophomores Bill Few, Jor- 
dan and Breedlove for the runner-up spots. 

Behind King and Bussey at quarterback there's little experience. 

Converted lettermen — quarterback Tommy Williams and fullback 
Crimmins Hankinson — are running two-three at left halfback behind 
Wells, while husky Joe ,Pagliei and mighty mite Lem McLendon are 
below Jim Coleman at right half. 

Fullback is the most solidly entrenched spot. Spooner has "beaten 
out" for the time being lettermen Bill O'Dell, Neuf Ankuta and Frank 
Griffith, but any of this quartet can operate on offense. 

George Washington University 

By Carroll Hall 

Colonial Coach, Eugene H. (Bo) Sherman looked toward his fourth 
season as George Washington University's head coach with optimism. 

He has reason to be with 17 lettermen returning, and a host of 
newcomers from the junior varsity squad, which compiled a 3 and 2 
record 

Returning starters are: center, Dick Gaspari, selected on the All- 
Southern Conference team last year; guards, Bob Sutton and Ed 
Sakach; tackles, Dave Liddick, Bill McHenry and John Posta; ends, 
George Dancu and Paul Thompson; quarterback Bob Sturm; halfbacks 
Len Ciemiecki and Bill Weaver. 

Claude Bo Austin and Skinny Saffer, who saw a great deal of 
action in the Colonial backfield are also back for action. Along with 
Mike Sommer, speedy halfback from Woodrow Wilson High, are Joe 
Rosania, Pete Spera, and Jim Wagner. Bob Shuba, Nat Naddeo and 
Dick Claypool are slated to see action at fullback. 

Lou Donofrio, formerly a halfback and Bill Berry, tackle, have 
been switched to end. Sherman is expecting great things from guards 
Ed Solack and Bob Murray, and reserve center, Joe Hince, who also 
lettered last year. Ray Looney and Jack Henzes are vying for the 
quarterback role along with Sturm. 

G.W. lost the services of Richie Gaskell, All-Conference end; Pat 
Kober and Jack Daly, two other outstanding wingmen; John Ziaman- 
danis, tackle; Al Solomon, guard; and fullbacks, Norb Danz and Joe 
Boland. 

"We'll have more experience in the forward wall this year, and we 
should have more speed in the backfield" Sherman stated, "and we are 
hoping to do a lot better than last year." 



— 59 — 



BRIEF HISTORY OF THE UNIVERSITY 



The history of the present University is the history of two institutions : 
the old privately-owned and operated University of Maryland in Baltimore 
and the Maryland State College (formerly Maryland Agricultural College) 
at College Park. These institutions were merged in 1920. 

In 1807, the College of Medicine of Maryland was organized, the fifth 
medical school in the United States. The first class was graduated in 1810. 
A permanent home was established in 1814-1815 by the erection of the build- 
ing at Lombard and Green Streets in Baltimore, the oldest structure in America 
devoted to medical teaching. Here was founded one of the first medical 
libraries (and the first medical school library) in the United States. In 1812 
the General Assembly of Maryland authorized the College of Medicine of 
Maryland to "annex or constitute facilities of divinity, law, and arts and 
sciences," and by the same act declared that the "colleges or faculties thus 
united should be constituted an university by the name and under the title of 
the University of Maryland." By authority of this act, steps were taken in 
1813 to establish "a faculty of law," and in 1823 a regular school of instruction 
in law was opened. Subsequently there were added : in 1882 a Department of 
Dentistry which was absorbed in 1923 by the Baltimore College of Dental 
Surgery (founded in 1840, the first dental school in the world) ; in 1889 a 
School of Nursing; and in 1904 the Maryland College of Pharmacy (founded 
in 1841, the third oldest pharmacy college in the United States). 

The Maryland State College was chartered in 1S56 under the name of 
the Maryland Agricultural College, the second agricultural college in the 
Western Hemisphere. For three years the College was under private manage- 
ment. In 1862 the Congress of the United States passed the Land Grant Act. 
This act granted each State and Territory that should claim its benefits an 
appropriate amount of unclaimed western lands, in place of scrip, the proceeds 
from the sale of which should apply under certain conditions to the "endow- 
ment, support, and maintenance of at least one college where the leading object 
shall be, without excluding other scientific and classical studies, and including 
military tactics, to teach such branches of learning as are related to agriculture 
and the mechanic arts, in such a manner as the Legislatures of the States ma}' 
respectively prescribe, in order to promote the liberal and practical education 
of the industrial classes in the several pursuits and professions of life." This 
grant was accepted by the General Assembly of Maryland, and the Maryland 
Agricultural College was named as the beneficiary of the grant. Thus the 
College became, at least in part, a State institution. In the fall of 1914 control 
was taken over entirely by the State. In 1916 the General Assembly granted 
a new charter to the College, and made it the Maryland State College. 

In 1920, by an act of the State Legislature, the University of Maryland 
was merged with the Maryland State College, and the resultant institution was 
given the name University of Maryland. 



— 60 — 




OJ 


CD 


ac 


O 


M 


^ 


a 


o 


CD 


h 


2 


csf 


c 






rH 


U 


OT 


3 








,Q 




CD 


c 




03 


JZ 


a> 





CD 




> 


A 


K 



O Ri 

CD T3 

« .5 

CD ft 

£_, CD 



g 13 £ 






«4-l 

o 


T3 


-O 


Q 


CD 

3 


CD 

M 

3 


S 

CD 
CJ 


5 


CD 
CD 




CD 

Q 


LQ 


CO 


f-l 






ctf 






CD 






CO 


£ 


0) 


Ctf 


W 


+J 


3 


: — 


CD 


CD 


1— 


,Q 


,£ 


M 








J-l 


> 


S 


co 
as 


> 


H 
O 
< 


O 

to 


J3 
>> 
O 


o 
>> 


_l 


rt 




.rt 


< 

o 


X 


2 


CO 
CD 



s. o> 3 3 

i a 5 & 

£ cS X 

co a g +* 



cd 

0) 


pS 


3 

cm 




3 


3 




tH 


T3 




3 
CD 


o 


0) 


CD 


CD 


,3 
CD 


s 

3 


> 

CD 


fl 






CJ 








.2 


3 


3 


+j 


3 
CJ 

3 
T3 


■u 

CD 

X 

CO 

3 


,3 


CD 

3 

■*-> 

3 



co H xi 
DC 

uj 73 



«4— I 3 

o cd 



Sr— I W 

O "H 

3 CD _. 

S «s rt 



— 61 — 



PRONUNCIATION GUIDE 



Steppe — STEP-e 
Lazzarino — Laz-a-RENO 
Stefl — STEF-el 
Heuring — YOUR-ing 
Wharton — WAR-ton 
Polyanski — Poly-ANN-ski 
Uzick — YOU-zic 
Athey — A-the (like tree) 
DeCicco — De-CHEEK-o 
Suchy — SUE-chy (like tree) 
Dyson — DYE-son 



Kolarac — Ko-LAR-ic 

Tamburello — Tam-bew-RELLO 

Tullai — TO-lie 

Pellegrini — Pel-AGREE-ni 

Beightol — BECK-toll 

Rusevlyan — Ru-SEV-a-lynn 

Vereb — VARE-ebb 

Nusz — NOOSE 

Komlo — COMB-low 

Selep — SEE-lep 



MARYLAND'S ITINERARY FOR 55 SEASON 



HEADQUARTERS 

Daniel Boone Hotel, Columbia, Missouri 

The Roosevelt Hotel, Waco, Texas 

Washington-Duke Hotel, Durham, N. C. 

Hotel Syracuse, Syracuse, N. Y. 

The Clemson House, Clemson, S. C. 



DATE 


OPPONENT 


Sept. 17 


Missouri 


Oct. 1 


Baylor 


Oct. 15 


North Carolina 


Oct. 22 


Syracuse 


Nov. 12 


Clemson 



FRESHMAN FOOTBALL SCHEDULE FOR '55 



DATE 
Oct. 7 
Oct. 15 
Oct. 28 
Nov. 12 
Nov. 18 



OPPONENT PLACE 

Virginia Away 

Mexico Poly Mexico City 

North Carolina Home 

Navy Away 

George Washington (J.V.) Home 



— 62 — 



— NOTES — 




BOB PELLEGRINI — University of Maryland All-America candidate, 
pictured with Terps' Line Coach and former two-year All-Americart Bob 
Ward as Pellegrini receives the coveted ANTHONY C. NARDO Trophy 
as the outstanding Maryland lineman of the 1954 season. Tatum believes 
the Terps' star a definite candidate for "Lineman of the Year" honors. 



— 64 



OUTSTANDING HOLDOVERS FOR '55 




PAVE NUSZ 
Halfback 




RUSSELL ©£NNi$ 

,£rid.:._ , 



JACK DAVIS 
Guard 




GENE DYSON 
Guard 



ED HEURiNG 
Tackle 



BILL WALKER 

'54 Ait-America Ert< 




MIKE SAN DUSKY 

. 1%C'k!e-. 



I - 



.YNN BEIGHTOL 

* i -aack 







JOE LAZZARINO 
Tackle 



D!CK BURGEE 

Halfback 



JIM PARSONS 

End 



TIM FLYNN 
End 



AL WHARTON 
Tackle 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
1955-56 Basketball Schedule 

DATE OPPONENT 



*Dec. 


2 




Virginia 


*Dec. 


5 




Alumni 


Dec. 


8 




William and Mary 


Dec. 


10 




Wake Forest 


*Dec. 


15 




Kentucky 


Dec. 


17 




North Carolina 


*Dec. 


29-30 


Mid-Winter Festival 








(Michigan State, George Washington, 








St. Francis, Maryland) 


*Jan. 


3 




South Carolina 


*Jan. 


5 




George Washington 


Jan. 


7 




Clemson 


Jan. 


9 




South Carolina 


*Jan. 


12 




North Carolina State 


Jan. 


14 




Duke 


Jan. 


16 




North Carolina 


Jan. 


21 




Georgetown 


*Feb. 


4 




Navy 


*Feb. 


7 




Duke 


Feb. 


II 




George Washington 


*Feb. 


14 




Clemson 


Feb. 


18 




North Carolina State 


Feb. 


20 




Wake Forest 


Feb. 


23 




Virginia 


*Feb. 


25 




Georgetown 


Mar. 


1- 


2-3 


A.C.C. Tournament 
(Raleigh, N. CO 






- Head 


Coach: H. A. (Bud) Millikan — 


^Denotes 

I 


Home 


Game