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Full text of "University of Maryland men's football media guides"

THE 1956 MARYLAND 

50'YARD LINE 



t t 





/^A 



BACKFIELD STARS LEADING THE TERP ATTACK 








FRED HAMILTON LHB 



FRANK TAMBURELLO— QB 









JACK HEALY RHB 



TOM SELEP— FB 




FOR PRESS, RADIO and TELEVISION 

This is your 1956 Maryland football brochure, 

"The 50- Yard Line." It is published in hope 

that it offers you helpful information for your 

coverage of Terp games this season. With this 

book goes an invitation to you to visit us as 

often as possible in our offices in New Byrd 

.Stadium. In return, I will try to visit you as 

^ - often as I can and extend every assistance pos- 

-, - sible. For any information, 3'ou can reach me 

(lay and night at UNion 4-4076. When it is real 

late at night, I can be contacted at WArfield 7- 

-^ J 3800, Extension 507. 

^ X 'jr^y^-- > ! .Applications for tickets should be made the 

fir.st part of the week of the game to allow time 
for mailing. Wire and telephone requirements should be made through your 
local Western Union office. 

Every effort will be made to furnish all the services in the press box 
available, so that your accounts of the game can be most adequate for your 
i-eaders. Statistics, l)oth half-time and final figures; a quarter play-by-play; 
game leaders in all departments; .si;l) litutions, etc. will l)e ready a few minutes 
after the game. 

Many thanks for all your cooperation and favors of the past. 

JOE F. BLAIR 

Sports Publicity Director f\ 

University of Maryland, 
College Park, Maryland. 



TABLE OF 

Page 

1 Message to Press 

2 '56 Schedule; Maryland's 

Bowl Record; '55 Re- 
sults; Maryland's Itin- 
erary 

3 Athletic Council; De- 
partment of Intercollegi- 
ate Athletics 

4 The Terp Press 

5-6 ...President Wilson H. 

Elkins 
7-8 Director of Athletics 

William W. Colbey 

9-10 Coach Tommy Motit 

11-15 —.Assistant Coaches and 

Trainers 

16 ....The 1956 Terps 

17-26 ....Terp Opponents 
27-35 -...Opponents' Puiblicists' 

Reports 
36-37 ....Squad Roster 
38 Terp 4-Deep 



CONTENTS 

Page 

39-46 ....Terp Thumbnails 

47-48 .—'55 Honorary Selections 

49-50 .—Terp All-Americas 

51 '55 Highlights 

52-54 ....'55 Statistics 



55-56 



Bowl Yard- 



'56 Orange 

stick 
57-58 .-Ail-Time Maryland 

Records 
59-62 ....Year by Year Records 

63 '53 National Champions 

64-65 ....1956 Terps (Cont.) 
65-6S ....Assistant Coaches (Cont.) 
68 Freshman Football 

Schedule 

68 Pronunciation Guide 

69 History of University 

70 '56-'57 Basketball 

Schedule 

71 1955 Team Picture 

72 Notes 



1956 SCHEDULE 



Sept. 22 Syracuse at College Park, Md. 

Sept. 29 Wake Forest at Winston Salem, N.C. 

Oct. 6 Baylor at Co'lege Park, Md. 

(Dad's Day and Senior Day) 
Oct. 12 Miami at Miami, Fla. 
Oct. 20 North Carolina at Chapel Hill, N.C. 
Oct. 27 Tennessee at Knoxville, Tenn. 
Nov. 3 Kentucky at Co'lege Park, Md. 

( Homecoming) 
Nov. 10 Clemson at College Pirk, Md. 

(Air Force ROTC and Band Day) 
Nov. 17 SoutJh Carolina at Columbia, S.C. 
Nov. 22 North Carolina State at Raleigh, N.C. 



KICKOFF 


PRICE 


2 P.M. (EDT) 


$3.75 


2 P.M. (EST) 


$3.50 


2 P.M. (EDT) 


$3.75 



8:15 P.M. (EDT) $4.00 

2 P.M. (EST) 54.00 

2 P.M. fEST) $4.00 

2 P.M. (EST) $3.75 



2 P.M. (EST) 



$3.75 



2 P.M. (EST) $3.60 

1:30 P.M. (EST) $3.50 



MARYLAND'S BOWL RECORD 



1948 


'Gator Bowl 


Maryland 


20 


Georgia 


20 


1950 


'Gator Bowl 


Maryland 


20 


Missouri 


7 


1952 


Sugar Bowl 


Maryland 


28 


Tennessee 


13 


1954 


Orange Bowl 


Maryland 





Oklahoma 


7 


1956 


Orange Bowl 


Maryland 


6 


Oklahoma 


20 




Won: 2 - 


- Lost: 2 — Tied: 1 







1955 RESULTS 



Mary 


land 





pponents 


M a ry 


land 


13 


Missouri 




12 


13 


LSU 


7 


UCLA 







25 


Clemson 


20 


Baylor 




6 


19 


George Washington 


28 


Wake Forest 




7 







25 


North Carolina 




7 


211 




34 


Syracuse 




13 


6 


Oklahoma 


27 


South Carolina 









(Orange Bowl) 



Opponents 

12 


57 
20 



MARYLAND'S ITINERARY FOR 1956 SEASON 



DATE 


OPPONENT 


Sept. 29 


Wake Fore^*; 


Oct. 12 


Miami, Fla. 


Oct. 20 


North Carolina 


Oct. 27 


Tennessee 


Nov. 17 


South Carolina 


Nov. 22 


N. C. State 



HEADQUARTERS 

Hotel Robert E. Lee, Winston-Salem, N.C. 
The Sheliborne, Miami Beach, Fla. 
The Washington Duke, Durham, N.C. 
Andrew Johnson Hotel, Knoxville, Tenn. 
Hotel Columbia, Columibia, S.C. 
The Sir Walter, Raleigh, N.C. 



— 2 - 




ATHLETIC 
COUNCIL 



Mr. Geary F. Eppley 
Chairman 



iMr. William W. Cobey : Director of Athletics 

Mr. J. H. Remsberg Alumni Association 

Dr. James H. Reid Ass't. Dean, School of Business and 

Puhlic Administration 

Dr. Jack Faber Head, Bacteriology Department 

Dr. Leland E. Scott Horticulture Department 

Mr. John Buffincton President Student Government Assn. 

THE DEPARTMENT OF INTERCOLLEGIATE 

ATHLETICS 

Director of Athletics V^^illiam W. Cohey 

Athletic Publicity Director Joe F. Blair 

Equipment Head ..... Kermit "Chief" Cisstill 

Assistant Equipment EIead Albert Johnson 

Facilities Head Charles "Lindy" Kehoo 

Chief of Concessions Fred Layman 

Ticket Manager Bennie Robinson 

Office Secretary to Mr. Cobey Mrs. Dorothy Hunt 

Office Secretary to Mr. Mont Mrs. Dorothy Zinn 

Office Secretary to Mr. Blair Mrs. Nelle Beasley 

Head Tr.ainer Alfred "Duke" Wyrc 

Assistant Trainer Bill "Spider" Fry 

Head Football Coach Tommy Mont 

Basketball Coach H. A. "Bud" Millikan 

Assist.\nt Basketball Coach Roy Lester 

Baseball Coach H. Burton Shipley 

Lacrosse Co-Coaches Jack Faber and Al Heagy 

Track, Cross Country Coach Jim Kehoc 

Soccer, Tennis Coach Doyle Royal 

Swimming Coach Bill Campbell 

Wrestling Coach William E. "Sully" Krouse 

Golf Coach Frank Cronin 

Rifle Coach M/Sgt. Carroll W. Oliff 

'— 3 — 



THE TERP PRESS 



'GEORGE BOWEN. The Associated Press 
MAX FULLERTON, The Associated Press 
LOU PANOS. The Associated Press 
JACK DAVIS, The Associated Precs 
ERNIE BARCELLA, The United Press 

'BOB SERLING, The United Press 
EV GARDNER, Sports Editor, The Washington Daily News 

''HENRY FANKHAUSER, The Daily News 

CHUCK EGAN, Sports Editor, The Washington Evening Star 
FRANCIS STANN, Columnist, The Evening Star 

"MERRELL WHITTLESEY, Sports Department, The Evening Star 
GEORGE HUBER, Sports Department, The Evening Star 
BILL FUCHS, Sports Department. The Fvening Star 
BUS HAM, Sports Editor, The Washington Post and Times-Herald 
SHIRLEY POVICH, Columnist, Tae Post and Time: Herad 

*DAVE BRADY, Sports Department, The Post and Timc3-Hera'd 
BOB ADDIE, Columnist, The Post and Times-Herald 
HERMAN BLACKMAN, The Post and Times-Herald 
MAURY FITZGERALD, The Post and Times-Herald 
MARTIE ZADRAVEC, The Post and Times Herald 
PAUL MENTON, Sports Editor, The Baltimore Evening Sun 

*MURRAY WEIMAN, Sports Department, The Evenin-j Sun 
RANDALL CASSELL, Columnist, The Evening Sun 
WALTER TAYLOR, Sports Department, The Evening Sun 
JESSE LINTHICUM, Sports Editor, The Morning Sun 

*ED BRANDT, Sports Department, The Morning Sun 
RONALD GIBBS, Columnist, The Morning Sun 
ED ATWATER, Sports Department, The Morning Sun 
WALTER HERMANN, Sports Department, The Morning Sun 
RODGER PIPPEN, Sports Editor, The Baltimore News-Post 

*AL COSTELLO, Sports Department, The News-Post 
HUGH TRADER, Columnist, T e News-Post 

J. SUTER KEGG, Sports Editor, The Cumberland Evening Times 
C. V. BURNS, Sports Editor, The Cumberland Morning News 
DICK KELLY, Sports Editor, The Hagerstown ivinil 
FRANK COLLEY, Sports Editor, The Hagerstown Herald 
ED NICHOLS, Sports Editor, The Salisbury Times 
HENRY DECKER, Sports Editor, The Frederick Post 
THE FREDERICK NEWS 

BOB LAYTON, Sports Editor, The Cambridge Banner 
HYMY COHEN, Sports Editor, The Annapolis Evening Capital 
*Cover Daily 

RADIO and TELEVISION 



WASHINGTON 
Jimmy Gibbons, WMAL-TV and Radio 
Bill Malone, WMAL-TV and Radio 
Jim Simpson, WRC-TV and Radio 
Ray Michael. WRC-TV and Rad o 
Morris Siegel, WTOP-TV 
Arch McDonald, WTOP-Radio 
Bud Sobei, WTOP-TV 
Bob Wolff, WWDC-Radio 
Sam Kaufman, WOL-Radi-) 
Nat Allbright. WEAM-RadiD 



BALTIMORE 

Roger Griswold, WCAO 
Chuck Thompson. WCBM 
Nelson Baker, WWIN 
John McLean, WMAR-TV 
Mat Thomas. WMAR-TV 
Nick Campofreda, WFBR-TV 
Joe Croghan, WBAL-TV 
Vince Bagley. WBAL 
Tommy Dukehart, WAAM-TV 
Jim Killian, WAAM-TV 
Joel Chaseman, WITH 
<r>-.ii=y Goss and Ernie Harwell 




DR. WILSON H. ELKINS 

PRESIDENT, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



One of the nation's most prominent and most respected educators, 
Dr. Wilson H. Elkins has already made tremendous strides in the 
further development of the University since his appointment just tw^o 
years ago. 

It is his promised effort that he work toward the go-il of continu- 
ing to make the University of Maryland known the world over. Just 
this past school year, approximately 20,000 military personnel took ad- 
vantage of the University's vast overseas college program. Recently, 
Dr. Elkins announce 1 that the great Maryland Overseas Program no^v 
will extend to the Far East with academic centers of the University 
located in Japan, Formosa, and Korea. 

Meanwhile the University continues to grow at the undergraduate 
College Park campus and the Professional School campus in Baltimore. 

Dr. Elkins, former president of Texas Western College of the Uni- 
versity of Texas at El Paso before his Maryland appointment, was born 
in Median, Texas, July 9, 1908. With his father and mother, Mr. and 
Mrs. W. B. Elkins, he moved to San Antonio at an early age. 

After completing his grade and high school education in San 



Antonio, Dr. Elkms attended Schreiner Institute from 1926 to the 
spring of 1928 when he entered the University of Texas. From Texas 
University in 1932, he received both the bachelor of arts and master 
of arts degrees. 

Receiving a Rhodes Scholarship, Dr. Elkins attended Oxford Uni- 
versity from 1933 to 1936, receiving degrees of Bac'.ielor of Letters and 
Doctor of Philosophy. 

Combining outstanding academic and athletic abilities during his 
student days at the University of Texas, he was elected to member- 
ship in Phi Beta Kappa and earned eight varsity letters in football, 
basketball, and track. In his final year at Texas, he captained the 
basketball team and was elected president of the student's association. 

Dr. Elkins lettered in football on the 1929, 1930, and 1931 teams 
at Texas and was the regular quarterback i^n his final two seasons, 
the one in 1930 winning the Southwest Conference title. That team 
ranks among Texas' all-time best. A soph end with that team was 
Edwin B. Price, now head coach at Texas. 

He lettered on the 1930, '31, £-nd '32 basketball teams. He was 
captain his senior year and also the squad's leading scorer. He lettered 
in track in 1931 and '32 as a sprinter and broad jumper. He was a 
rr.ember of the national championship football shuttle relay team at 
the Drake Relays in 1931. 

Dr. Elki-ns married Dorothy Blackburn of Berclair, Texas, in 1927. 
They have two daughters, Carole Ann and Margaret Elise. 

His career as an educator began in 1932 when he was named 
athletic director of Cisco High School. In 1936, Dr. Elkins joined the 
faculty of the University of Texas as an instructor in history. He held 
this position until 1938 when he went to San Angelo as president of 
the Junior College. 

He remained there until January, 1949, when he was chosen presi- 
dent of Texas Western College. This position he held until his appoint- 
ment as the President of the University of Maryland. 

Dr. Elkins is a member of numerous learned societies including the 
Texas State Teacher's Association, National Educational Association, 
Phi Beta Kappa, Alpha Gamma, and is listed in Who's Who in 
American Education. He is a member of Sigma Nu fraternity. 

Dr. Elkins is a member of the Methodist Church and the Rotary 
Club. He is a constant contributor to national education periodicals. 



6 — 





WILLIAM W. COBEY 

DIRECTOR OF ATHLETICS 



There seemed little doubt that University President Wilson H. 
Elkins a^nd the Board of Regents would name Bill Coibey as the man 
to guide the future of the Maryland sports program as the new 
Director of Athletics, succeeding Jim Tatum who held the dual role 
of head football coach and Athletic Director. 

The assignment can't appear strange to the pleasant Cobey for it 
was he who was Tatum's top administrative right haad man since he 
came to the Athletic Department in 1948 as Graduate Manager of 
Athletics. It was his duty to master tlie task of arranging all the 
details for Maryland atliletic teams, including football. And too, it was 
Cobey who completed, along with each coach, the tedious job of making 
schedules for all the other sports at the University. He headed the 
business office a^nd the ticket office among other daily problems that 
confronted his busy office. A member of his staff is Bennie Robinson, 
ticket manager for all University athletic events. 

And so, upon the recommendation of his predecessor and certainly 
sanctioned by University officials, the Maryland athletic department 
claimed a favorite-son to run its program. 

The Cobey name is not new, even to old-time University gradu- 

— 7 — 



ates. Bill's father, W. W. Cobey, was a 1901 graduate and a letter- 
man in track and manager of the 'baseball team. He became a 
famous agricultural scientist and while in Fiorida, he was one of 
the pioneers in the discovery of leaf tobacco. Cobey also had two 
uncles graduate from the University. 

Bill, as he is known to the many friends he has made around 
home and throughout the athletic fraternity, came to Maryland in 
the fall of 1926 following graduation from Fort Meyer, Fla. High 
School. Born and raised in Quiflcy, still his native home, Cobey at- 
tended Quincy through elevent.i grade before the family moved to 
Fort Meyer. 

After playing freshnian lacrosse, Cobey had to cast aside any 
athletic team participation in order that he might get a job to 
help him through school. This employment was in the Cashier's office 
where he worlved until his graduaticn in 1933. He belonged to the 
Kappa Alpha Fraternity while an undergraduate. 

Following graduation, he returned to Quincy, Fla., and worked 
with his uncle on a truck farm. He returned to the University to 
accept the job as Cashier of the University. It was this job he held 
for 17 years, u^ntil 1948 when he accepted the position as Graduate 
Manager of Athletics. Then came the appointment as Director of 
Athletics, February 1. 

Cobey is active in community affairs, having baen a past presi- 
dent of University Park PTA; councilman for University Park two 
years, first president of the University branch of the Maryland Classi- 
fied Employee's Assn.; and is active in the affairs of Northwestern 
High School. 

Cobey married the former Mary Gray Munroe, also of Quincy, 
Fla., in 1935. They have six children, three daughters and three sons. 
Their eldest daughter, Mary Patricia, is a junior at the University 
and last spring was elected Vice-President of the Junior Class. 
William is a senior at Northwestern High School and plans to enter 
the University in the fall of '57; Julia Ann is a Junior at North- 
western while Betty is in eighth grade of junior high. A son, Elwood, 
is in fifth grade while the baiby of the family, Munroe, is four and 
plans to enter kindergarten school this fall. 

The Cobeys are members of the University Methodist Church, 
College Park. 





TOMMY MONT 



HEAD FOOTBALL COACH 



When the head coaching job at Maryland was vacated by the 
resignation of Jim Tatum, Dr. Wilson H. Elkins, University President, 
said that those within the staff would receive first consideration for 
the job and if one qualified, he would be privileged to recommend 
him to the Board of Regents for approval. Tommy Mont, v/ho had 
been on the Terp staff longer than the others, was the first coach 
interviewed and it was the former Maryland great that Dr. Elkins 
and the Board chose. 

Thus begins another tenure of head coaching on the College Park 
campus, and it has fallen into the very capable hands of the youthful 33- 
year old Mont, a native of Cumberland, Md. 

Mont, too, was the first choice of his former boss, Tatum. It was 
his backfield coach ' for tne past five years to whom Tatum gave his 
personal green light for the joib. 

Following nine years of the greatest football in the land under 
Tatum that featured three undefeated teams, a national champio'nship, 
five bowl games, all sorts of all-Americans and pro selections, Mont 

— 9 — 



realizes that the challenge he accepted was one of the biggest in 
modern football history. 

Immediately following his appointment as head coach, Mmit 
wanted to keep some of the fine Terp coaching talent and nobody 
could lure away his choices of Bob Ward, Bill "Whit?y" Dovell, and 
Fred Layman. After he was set with this coaching nucleus, he set 
out to complete his staff with a brilliant group of fornier young stars, 
three of whom were top stars and students at Maryland. Th;^ return- 
ing alumni included John Idzik, 1951; Joe Moss, 1952; and Ed Ful- 
lerton, 1953. He brought in also his former teammate of the Redskins, 
Jim Peebles, a Vanderbilt graduate; a-nd Roy Lester, a highly success- 
ful high school coach from Allegany High in Cumberland, to handle 
his freshman team. 

The affable Mont is one of the all-time athletic names at the 
University. He has the rare distinction of being a three-sport athlete 
four years at Maryland, lettering in football, basketoall, and lacrosse. 
A graduate of Cumberland's Allegany High School, he started >.is 
collegiate athletic career in 1941. He was in school two years before 
entering the service in the spring of 1943. He played tailback :a 1941, 
then quarterback on the '42 T eleven. It was then that he laid th3 
groundwork to become a great football player, even in those lean 
war seasons. Also, both years he won his basketball aad lacrosse 
monograms. He won all-America mention as well as first team all- 
Conference and the Washington-Maryland outstanding coF.ege player 
awards m 1942. 

During the war, Mont served 42 months in the Army, 18 of 
which were spent in the ETO. He played hall throughout his long 
hiteh in the service. He was tailback on the Fort Banning Post 
championship team of 1943. As quarterback and head coach, he led 
the 3rd Infantry team to the ETO title. He also was at the helm of 
the 7th Army all-Star team, of which Coach Pesbles was a member. 

Following his discharge, Mont returned to Maryland and was 
quarterback on the 1946 team as he gained all-America mention and 
all-Conference honors. 

Drafted by the Washington Redskins, Mont had four brilliant 
years as quarterback. Then came the call from Tatum back to his 
alma mater as backfield coach. 

During his stay at Maryland, he worked with the Maryland High 
Schools. For the past three summers he has spent two weeks as an 
advisory coach at National Polytechnic Institute in Mexico City. He 
was responsible for arranging the "i-nternational game" last fall be- 
tween the Terp frosh and the Institute's team, won by the Terps, 26-13. 
He also put in the T formation for Scrappy Moore's University of 
Chattanooga eleven in 1949. In the summer of 1954, he also was 
asked to assist teaching the Split-T for the Parris Island service team. 
He also was a collegiate talent scout for the Los Angeles Rams, and 
sent his own product, Ronnie Waller, to the Rams, who was " '55 Rookie 
of the Year" by many picks. 

Mont married the former Virginia Askins, Baltimore, and a 
Maryland student, in 1943. They have three sons, Steve 8, Jeffrey 
6, and Danny 5. 



ASSISTANT COACHES 




BOB WARD 

When Tommy Mont was appointed th3 
new Terp head coach, c^ne of his first 
^'musts" w^as to keep Bob Ward at College 
Park. The reason was obvious and simple 
for Ward had been the big influence the 
past four years in the development of the 
great Maryland lines. Mont wanted to 
keep Ward so that he would have the 
experienced and former two-year Terp 
all-America guard to head his li-ne coach- 
ing assignments. Even today, Ward is 
still considered the all-time great name in 
the history of Maryland football. 

A veteran of the Army paratroopers, ^^ 

Ward came to Maryland in 1947 as one of ^^P ^ 

the smallest guard prospects — 180 pounds — ^ .f^ 

ever seen by former coach Jim Tatum. 
But Tatum liked what he saw; consequently, Maryland's finest lineman. 

Ward, from Elizabeth, N. J., graduated in 1952 wita a degree 
from the School of Business and Public Administration, finishing in the 
upper one-third of his class. He m.ajored in Real Estate and Insurance. 

His many honors are too numerous to mention, but he received 
every award locally and nationally, that is given a lineman. After 
making all-America his junior year for his excellent defensive play, he 
proved that he wasn't just an ordinary platooin. football player by 
making everybody's all-America team in 1951, his senior year, playing 
offense. Tatum himself credited the success of his offensive team, 
highest scoring team in the country that year, to his '51 Co-Captain, 
(Continued on page 65) 




BILL "Whitey" DOVELL 

Another product of the Tatum "player, 
then coach" system, Dovell, too, turned 
away from other offers to stay on at 
Maryland to coach under Tommy Mont. 

Dovell, following his graduation with 
a Bachelor's Degree from the School of 
Physical Education in 1953, heeded 
Tatum's plea to stay on at his alma mater 
as a member of the coaching staff. The 
decision was a good one for Maryland 
football since "Whitey" coached three 
winning freshman teams and has been re- 
sponsible for molding some of today's 
preseat stars. Just last season, his frosh 
eleven brought to Maryland the school's 
fi^st undefeated freshman toam. From 
this team the Terps have an outstanding ■nucleus for varsity teams the 
next three years. The big win on last year's clean slate was t^ie "in- 
iContinuecl on page 65) 




— 11 — 




>r>»»*i«i»»pr 



FRED LAYMAN 

Tho youngest of the former Maryland 
students and players who became coaches 
for Tatum is Layman, and last year's var- 
sity backfield assistant lil<ewise, with 
Ward and Dovell, stayed at his alma mater 
to be an assistant coach on Mont's staff. 

One of the most outstrnding halfback 
prospects at Maryland during the Tatum 
regime, Layman's collegiate career was 
interrupted as the up-coming star sus- 
tained a serious injury on the last day of 
spring practice during his f:'eshman year. 

Following his recovery after six 
months hospitalizatic'n, ho returned to 
school t'le fall of 1952. to complete his 
pducation. He roreived his Bachelor of 
Science Degree, 1954, from the School of Business and Public Adminis- 
tration, with a major in Transportation. 

While completing work for his Degree, he assisted Dovell with the 
freshmen as backfield coa?h. Last season he worked with the back- 
field as he will do this fall. Besides his coachi-ng duties, he is work- 
ing secretary for the Terrapin Club and Concessions Manager. 

Layman, natix-e of Brentwood, Pa., was a three year letterman in 
football, basketball, and tennis at Brentwood High School. Following 
{Continued on page 65) 




ED FULLERTON 

One of the most brilliant backs in 
history of Maryland football, the wiry 
Fullerton was Tommy Mont's pick to re- 
turn to his alma mater to help coach the 
future fortunes of Terp backs, along with 
Terp grad Johnny Idzik. 

It was an indelible record the -native 
of West View, Pa. made as a fullback and 
halfback his four years on tie College 
Park campus. 

The 25-ycar old Fullerton still is con- 
sidered the top athlete to come out of 
West V'cv Hich School in a tough 
Western Pennsylvania League. He lettered 
four years in football and basketball an.i 
two in baseball. He was selected Athlete 
of the Year iiis senior season and was named on 
selections his junior and senior year. 

The highly touted back came to Maryland in the fall 
Lettered three years, playing his sophomore and senior year 
back a-nd his junior year at halfback. It was his third year 
Sugar Bowl game that brought Fullerton his and Maryland's 
football hour. He heroically disproved the general feeling 
60-minute man in football was a thing of the past while 
(Contimied on page 66) 




WPIAI 



of 1949. 
at full- 
and the 
greatest 
that the 
the two- 




JOE MOSS 

Returnmg to his alma mater with a 
fine opportunity offered him by Mont is 
Joe Moss, a star three-year tackle while 
in college. 

Moss, a •native of Ridgeley, W. Va., 
comes back to Maryland after his hitch 
in the service and playing professional 
ball with the Washington Redskins and 
Ottawa, Cana,da Roughriders. 

The 26-y.3ar old Moss graduated in 
February 1953 with a Bachelor of Science 
Degree from the School of Business and 
Public Admifiistration. 

A three-sport letterman at Ridgeley 
High School, basketball, track, and foot- 
ball, he came to Maryland in 1948. At 
Ridgeley he was an end his first two years then fullback his last two 
seasons. As fullback, he was the leading scorer of the Potomac Valley 
Conference his senior year. At Maryland he became a tackle his 
freshman year a^nd was one of the Terp's real good tackles. He is 
best remembered for a great season in 1951 as the top offensive tackle 
and a star of the Sugar Bawl win over Tennessee. 

Drafted by the Los Angeles Rams, Moss effected a trade to be 
with the Redskins so that he could attend school the fall semester of 
'52 to complete his work for his degree. 

Followi'ng graduation and his commission from the Air Force 
ROTC, he went into the service and was at Air Force Schools in Texas 
{Continued on page 66) 






JOHNNY IDZIK 

A halfback who helped get the Terps 
started to their national status, hard- 
working Johnny Idzik returns to his alma 
mater as a backfield aid for Mont. 

Idzik came to Maryland in the fall of 
1947 as one of Philadelphia's most pub- 
licized backs and during his four years 
of varsity competition for the Terps 
proved this reputation on the collegiate 
gridirons. At Northeast Catholic High in 
Philadelphia, the fine two-way back was 
an all-City and all-Catholic selection his 
senior year in both football and baseball. 
He was all-Catholic selection m football 
his junior year. He captained both squads 
his senior year. He played tailback and quarterback. He was named 
the outstanding athlete at Northeast his senior year and also was run- 
nerup to Red Bagnell, later a star back at Penn, as the top football 
player in the city. 

At Maryland, he starred all four years, both offense and defense, 

(Continued on page 67) 




— 13 — 



JIM PEEBLES 

Cne of the two non-Maryland gradu- 
ates selected by Mont for his coaching 
staff, Jim Peebles, the big ex-Vanderoilt 
University and Washington Redskin star, 
definitely has roadily made his selection 
as Terp end coach a good move hy Mont, 
who first met and saw Peebles play while 
overseas then later whe^n both were m-3m- 
bers of the Redskin teams. They becama 
friends while in Germany, during World 
War II. 

A nativ.3 of Columbia, Tenn., the 36- 
year old Peebles prepped at Columbia Mli- 
tary Academy and played footba'.l and 
basketball tnere four years. He was an 'all- 
State selection his se^nior yoar. Highly 
sought after by Southeastern schools, he cast his lot with Vanderbilt 
in the fall of 1938. He lettered his t'lree varsity years at tackle and 
was selected to the all-Southeastern Sophomore eleven. He was alter- 
nate captain of the football team his senior year. 

With the break-out of World War II after the Pearl Harbor inci- 
dent, Peet.'es left Vanderbilt m December 1941 during his senior year 
and enlisted in the Infantry. Following his commission from Officers' 
Candidate School he was assigned as an Infantry Officer to the 69th 
Divisicn. He played service ball in 1942. 

While overseas in combat duty, Peebles was wounded while lead- 
ing his unit on a night patrol. 

With the war ended, Peebles was assigned to the 29th Division and 
(Continued on page 67) 




ROY LESTER 

A native of Spe^ncer, W. Va., and a 
graduate of the University of West Vir- 
ginia, Lester comes to Maryland as 
freshman football and freshman basketball 
coa:h. This is the first full-time coaching 
assignment for Maryland freshman bas- 
ketball. 

Lester comes to Maryland from Al- 
legany High School in Cumberland, Md. 
w.iere he had tremendous success as 
foot'jall and baseball coach the past four 
years. He also assisted the basketball coac'.i 
He was a history professor at Allegany. 

After graduation from Spencer where 
he was a 3-sport letterman he entered the 
University in the fall of 1941. Here he 
played basketball, baseball and football his first two 
went i'nto the Navy. During his stay in the States, he 
sports at Great Lakes and Jacksonville. It was at the 
end under Missouri's Don Faurot whose assistant was 
(Continued on page 68) 




■ M 



years before he 
played all three 
latter he played 
Jim Tatum. In 



— 14 



THE TRAINERS 




ALFRED J. "Duke" WYRE 

Regarded as one of the nation's top 
athletic trainers, the widely known "Duke" 
just this summer again was honored by his 
fellow training fraternity when he was 
elected Chairman of the Board of Directors 
of the National Trainers' Association at 
their annual meeting in Bostca. 

Now beginning his tenth year as head 
trainer at Maryland, Duke first came to the 
College Park campus in 1E47 when former 
head coac.i Jim Tatum was gathering the 
nucleus for his orga-nization. It was on his 
long and reputable experience and high rec- 
ommendations that Tatum brought him in as a top trainer in the 
country. 

He has authored many articles and manuals on training methods, 
and is always in demand to give lectures on athletic training methods 
at numerous clinics. He a'so has devised various equipment pieces 
that are used for athletic injuries and preve^ntion of injuries. 

"Dapper Duke" as he is known because of his natty dress habits, 
was trained at Yale for 15 years before he moved to Holy Cross for 
another year. Then ^n '47 he came to Maryland and has been head 
trainer ever since. 

A Navy vetera-n, Wyre served as a physical education instructor in 
the V-12 program. 

He was the first president of the Southern Conference Trainer's 
Assn. He previously has been on the board of the National Trainer's 
Assn., and now his most recent appoi'ntrnent, Chairman of the Board. 
In '49, he was named the top trainer in the East. 




BILL 'Spider" FRY 

A native of Norristown, Pa., "Spider" 
as he is known around Maryland and by his 
associates, was appointed the new assistant 
trainer this spring following the resignation 
of John Lacey who went to North Carolina 
as trainer for the Tar Hee.s. 

Fry, a 1951 Maryland graduate, prepped 
^ at Elkton High School, Md., where he played 

\ and lettered for three years i^n soccer and 

_^^^g -^ ^^'- basketball. 

f^tj^^mA J^^^^ Hg entered the University in the fall of 

HHHbA ifl^HHl 1946 and assisted Wyre in the training room 

as a student trainer all four years. He 
graduated with a B.S. Degree from the School of Physical Education. 
Following graduation, he went i'nto the Air Force and was as- 
signed to Jet Engine Training. During his four-year stay, he was 
stationed at Davis-Monthan Air Base in Tucso'n and Great Falls Air 
Base, Montana assigned to jet duty. He also was trainer for the 
base athletic teams. He was discharged last June. 

Returning to Maryland, he entered Graduate School and continued 
his schooling until his appointment as assistant trainer. 



15- 



THE 1956 TERPS 

Tommy Mont, young, capable, and amibitious, was the first choice 
of his former head coach and he was the man in whom the University 
administration has placed the destiny of future football fortunes at 
College Park. When "Mr. FootbiU", Jim Tatum resigned his coaching 
duties at Maryland, it was his backfield coach Mont that got his 
personal recommendation for the joj a-nd Mont accepted. 

Mont, himself a Marylander (native of Cumberland) and graduate 
and one of the school's all-time athletes and great quarterbacks, took 
hold of the big strapping Terp team this spring and performed like 
a veterafi with the squad. 

Following nine years of the greatest football in the land under 
Tatum that featured three undefeated teams, a national championship, 
five bowl games, and all sorts of all-Americas and pro selections, Mont 
realizes that the chal]e-nge he ac:epted was one of the biggest in 
modern football history. The gridiron dynasty that was built by 
Tatum at Maryland made the Red and White teams among the most 
respected in the country. Material that was brought to Maryland by 
Mont and the other Terrapin assistants is believed to be some of t.:e 
finest ever at College Park. Evidcfice of this is the fact that the 
Baby Terps went undefeated last fall for the first time in the school's 
history. 

After a most successful and encouraging spring pra:t:ce and a fine 
showing in the 12-14 loss to an all-pro alumni I'^neup, the 33-year old 
Mont has expressed an optimistic outlook for his first season as the 
Terps' head football coach. He begins with a 15-gam? regular season 
winning streak. 

Although 13 lettermen were graduated, the Terps have 23 return- 
i^ig. Most notable of the absentees are all-Americans center Bob 
Pellegrini and halfback Ed Vereb. Pellegrini was the "Player of 
the Year" as well as "Lineman of the Year" and the Philadelphia 
Eagles' number one draft choi:e. Vereb, who set a now conference 
scoring record with 96 points and a 'new scbool mark of 102 points 
when he scored the lone touchdown against Oklahoma in the Cvange 
Bowl, was the first draft pick of the Washington Redskins. He later 
signed to play with Vancouver of the Canadian league at one of the 
highest figures ever paid a rookie, in the States or in the Northern 
Leagues. 

There is no sense in kidding anybody — Maryland will have an- 
other fine team this fall. It will compare to those of the past five 
seasons that lost only four games and tied one during the regular 
season. It will be an exciting team that definitely will emphasize 
defense, as always, 'but by the same token will try to be a bit more 
glamorous offensively with Mont promising more passing than used 
hy past Terp elevens. 

The lone positic-n that might dampen the bright outlook is the 
end position, so important to a passing team. Gone are five ends who 
played and lettered for three years. Bill Walker, second team all- 
America and Russell Dennis are the most noticeable vacancies. This 
slack may be assumed by four boys from last year's squad and two 
very outstanding players up from the frosh team. Veterans Jean 
Waters, Ed Cooke, Bill Turner and Dick Porter team up with frosh 
standouts Al Beardsley and Ben Scotti to comprise the hopeful status 
of the end position. Cooke, an upcoming junior, is an outstanding 
(Continued on page 64) 
— 1.B — 



TERP OPPONENTS 



MARYLAND vs SYRACUSE 22 SEPTEMBER 

2:00 P.M. (E.D.T.) 

at Byrd Stadiium (35,000) 

Coillege Park, Md. 

FACTS ABOUT THE ORANGE 
CONFERENCE: Eastern College Athletic 
LOCATION: Syracuse, N. Y. 
HEAD COACH: Floyd (Ben) Schwartzwalder 
COLORS: Orange 
ENROLLMENT: 9,000 

TYPE OFFENSE: Unbalanced Wiruged-T 
1955 RECORD: Won, 5, Lost 3, Tied Coach Sehwartzwalder 

ORANGE RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS 

(Maryland: Won 4, Lost 3, Tied 1) 




1920 
1921 
1935 
1936 
1937 
1938 
1939 
1955 



Maryland 
10 




20 
13 



7 
34 



Syracuse 

7 
42 






53 
10 
13 



TOTAL POINTS: Maryland 84, Syracuse 125 
1956 CAPTAIN: (None Selected Yet) 
LETTERMEN RETURNING — 16 — LOST 



13 





1956 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


22 


at Maryland 


Sept. 


29 


at Pittsburgh 


Oot. 


6 


Open 


Oct. 


13 


West Virginia 


Oct. 


20 


Army 


Oct. 


27 


at Boston 


Nov. 


3 


Penn State 


Nov. 


10 


Holy Cross 


Nov. 


17 


Colgate 



1955 YARDSTICK 

Maryland Syracuse 
16 First Downs 10 

221 Rushing Yardage 115 

101 Passing Yardage 64 

16 Passes Attempted 11 

5 Passes Completed 4 

1 Passes Intercepted By 2 

1 Punts 5 

14 Punting Average 3S.4 

5 Fumbles Lost 3 

75 Yards Penalized 25 

Score by Periods : 

Maryland 14 6 14 0—34 

Syracuse 7 6—13 

Maryland Scoring — Touchdowns: 

Perlo (6, buck) ; Dennis (17, pass from 

Vereb) ; Vereb (3, off -tackle) ; J. Healy 

(3, buck; 7 end run). Conversions: 

Laughery 2, Perlo 2. 
Syracuse Scoring — Touchdowns: 

Althouse (30. pass from Hoffman) ; 

Brown (2, dive). Conversions: .1. 

Brown. 



17 



MARYLAND vs WAKE FOREST 23 SEPTEMBER 




Cor. 



An-.en 



2:00 P.M. (E.S.T.) 

at Bowman Gray Memorial Ctadium (16,850) 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 

FACTS ABOUT THE DEACONS 
CONFERENCE: Atlantic Coast 
LOCATION: Win:jton-Salcm, N. C. 
HEAD COACH: Paul J. Amon 
COLORS: OM Oo'd arcl Bla k 
TYPE 0.-FEN3E: Split-T 
ENROLl MENT: 1 8"0 
1C55 RECCRD: \7on 5, Lo3t 4. Tied 1 



DEACONS' RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS 
(Maryland: Won 3, Let 1, Tied 1) 



1917 
1943 
1944 
1S54 
1955 



Maryland 


Wa!:e Fores 


29 


13 


13 


7 





39 


13 


13 


28 


7 



TOTAL POINTS: Maryland 83, Wake Forest 79 
1956 CAPTAINS: Bill Barnes and David Lee 
LETTERMEN RETURNING — 13 — LOST — 18 





1956 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


22 


at William and Mary 


Sept 


29 


Maryland 


Oct. 


6 


at Virginia 


Oct. 


13 


Clemson 


Oct. 


20 


at Florida State 


Oct. 


27 


at North Carolina 


Nov. 


3 


N. C. State 


Nov. 


10 


at Virginia Tech 


Nov. 


17 


Duke 


Nov. 


22 


South Carolina at Char- 
lotte, N. C. 



1955 YARDSTICK 

Maryland Wake Forest 

17 Fir.st Downs 9 

2H7 Rushing Yardage 7 

151 Passing Yardage 141 

13 Passes Attempted 24 

15 



8 

29 



30 



7 Passes Comp'eted 

1 Passes Intercepted By .... 

2 Punts 

40 Punting Average 

2 Fumbles Lost 

45 Yards Penaii ed 

Score by Periods: 

Maryland 7 14 7- 

Wake Forest .... 7- 



Maryland Scoring — Touchdowns: 
Tamburello (1 foot, run); Vereb 2 (1 
foot, run; 1 foot, rum; Hamilton <1 
foot, run). Conversions: Laughery 3. 
.<omlo. 

Wake Forest Scoring - Touchdowns: 
Daniels (11, pass from Consoles), 
^"onversion: Parham. 



MARYLAND vs BAYLOR 6 OCTOBER 



2:00 P.M. (E.D.T.) 

al Byrd Stadium (35,000) 

College Park, Md. 

FACTS ABOUT THE BEARS 

CONFERENCE: Loulihwest 

LOCATION: Waco, Texas 

HEAD COACH: Sam B. Boyd 

COLORS: Green and Gold 

ENROLLMENT: 5,610 

TYPE OFFENSE: Multiple T (Conventional, 

Wing and £)p'Lt ) 
1955 RECORD: Won 5, Lost 5, Tied 




Coach Sam Boyd 



MARYLAND'S RECORD AGAINST THE BEARS 

(Maryland: Won 1, Lost 0, Tied 0) 



1S55 



IMaryland 
20 



Baylor 
6 



TOTAL POINTS: Maryland 20, Baylor 6 

1S56 CO-CAPTAINS: Tony DeGrazier and Bobby Jones 

LETTERMEN RETURNING — 23 — LOST — 8 





1956 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


22 


at California 


Sept. 


29 


Texas Tech 


Oct. 


6 


at Maryland 


Oct. 


13 


at Arkansa.s 


Oct. 


20 


Open 


Oct. 


27 


Te.xas A&M (night) 


Nov. 


3 


at Texas Christian 


Nov. 


10 


Texas University 


Nov. 


17 


at Nebraska 


Nov. 


24 


at Southern Methodist 


Dec. 


1 


Rice Institute 



1955 YARDSTICK 

Maryland Baylor 

11 First Downs 13 

145 Net Yards Rushing 71 

12 Passes Attempted 25 

6 Passes Completed 11 

105 Yards Passing 175 

5 Passes Intercepted By 1 

5 Number of Punts 4 

37 Punting Average 3S 

8 Number of Penalties 4 

80 Yards Penalized 40 

1 Fumbles Lost 2 

Score by Periods : 

Maryland 13 7—20 

Baylor 6 0—6 

Maryland Scoring — Touchdowns: 
Dennis (30, pass, run from Tambur- 
ello). Dare (18, pass from Nusz), 
Healy (4, pass from Tamburello). Con- 
versions: Laughery 2. 

Baylor Scoring — Touchdown: Shof- 
ner (2, run). 



19 



MARYLAND vs MIAMI 12 OCTOBER 




Coach Andy Gustafson 



8:15 P.M. (E.S.T.) 

at Orange Bowl Stadium (76,000) 

Miami, Fla. 

FACTS ABOUT THE HURRICANES 
CONFERENCE: Independent 
LOCATION: Coral Gables, Fla. 
HEAD COACH: Andy Gustafson 
COLORS: Orange, Green and White 
r.NROLLrNlENT: 12,500 

TYPE OFFENSE: "Miami Drive Series" 
1955 RECORD: Won 6. Lest 3 



HURRICANES' RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS 

(Maryland: Won 3, Lost 1, Tied 0) 



1948 
1949 
1953 

1S54 



Maryland 
27 
13 
30 

7 



Miami 

13 





9 



TOTAL POINTS: Maryland 77, Miami 22 

1956 CAPTAIN: Don Bosseier 

LETTERMEN RETURNING — 16 — LOST — 11 





1956 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


2S 


South Carolina (N) 


Oct. 


5 


Boston College (N) 


Oct. 


12 


Maryland (N) 


Oct. 


19 


Georgia (N) 


Oct. 


27 


at TCU (N) 


Nov. 


2 


Florida State (N) 


Nov. 


16 


Clemson (N) 


Nov. 


23 


West Virginia (N) 


Dec. 


1 


U. of Florida 


Dec. 


8 


U. of Pittsburgh 




20 — 



MARYLAND vs NORTH CAROLINA __. 

2:00 P.M. (E.S.T.) 

at Kenan Ltadium (35,000) 

Chapel Hill, N. C. 

FACTS ABOUT THE TARHEELS 
CONFERENCE: Atlantic Coasit 
LOCATION: Chapel Hill, N. C. 
HEAD COACH: James M. Tatum 
COLORS: Carolina Blue and Whivte 
ENROLLMENT: 6,500 
TYPE OFFENSE: Sipliit-T 
1355 RECORD: Won 3, Lost 7, Tied 



20 OCTOBER 




Ccach Jim Tatum 



TARHEELS' RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS 

(Maryland: Won 8, Lost 12, Tied 1) 





Maryland 


N.C. 




Maryland 


N.C 


1920 


13 





1935 





33 


1921 


7 


16 


1936 





14 


1922 


3 


27 


1946 





13 


1923 


14 





1947 





19 


1924 


6 





1948 


20 


49 


1925 





16 


1950 


7 


7 


1926 


14 


6 


1951 


14 


7 


1927 


6 


7 


1953 


26 





1928 


19 


26 


1954 


33 





1929 





43 


1955 


25 


7 


1930 


21 


28 









TOTAL POINTS: Maryland 228, North Carolina 318 
1956 CAPTAIN: (None selected as yet.) 
LETTERMEN RETURNING — 18 ~ Lost 9 





1956 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


22 


N. C. State 


Sept. 


29 


at Oklahoma 


Oct. 


6 


at South CaroHna 


Oct. 


13 


Georgia 


Oct. 


20 


Maryland 


Oct. 


27 


Wake Forest 


Nov. 


3 


at Tennessee 


Nov. 


10 


at Virginia 


Nov. 


17 


at Notre Dame 


Nov. 


24 


Duke 





1955 YARDSTICK 




Maryland North 


Carolina 


15 ... 


First Downs 


10 


na ... 


Rushing Yardage .. 


18 


91 ... 


Passing Yardage .... 


93 


12 ... 


Passes Attempted .. 


24 


6 ... 


Passes Completed .. 


11 


5 ... 


... Passes Intercepted By 


1 


5 ... 


Punts 


7 


31.2 




36.3 


3 .. 


Fumbles Lost 





90 .. 


Yards Penalized .... 


90 


Score by Periods: 




Maryland 7 12 


6—25 


North Carolina 7 


0— 7 


Maryland Scoring — Touchdowns: | 


Vereb 


3 (6, run). (3, run), (3, run); | 


Dare 


(9. pass from Vereb). 


Conver- 


sion: 


Laughery. 




North Carolina Scoring — 


Touch- 


down 


Jim Jones (35, intercepted pass). 1 


Conversion : Keller. 


1 



— 21 — 



MARYLAND vs TENNESSEE 27 OCTOBER 

2:00 P.M. (E.;S.T.) 

at Shields-Watkins Field (50,000) 

Knoxville, Tennessee 

FACTS ABOUT THE VOLS 

CONFERENCE: Soulheas/tern 
LOCATION: Knoxville, Tennessee 
HEAD COACH: Bowden Wyatt 
COLORS: Orange and White 
ENROLLMENT: 7,500 
TYPE OFFENSE: ilmgle Wing with a 

balanced line 
1955 RECORD: Won 6, Lost 3, Tied 1 




Coach Bowden Wyatt 



VOLS RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS 

Maryland defeated Tennessee in the Sugar Boa\'1 on January 1, 1952 
by a score of 28-13. 



1956 CAPTAIN: John Gordy, Tackle 
LETTERMEN RETURNING — 22 — LOST — 8 





1956 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


29 


Auburn at Birmingham 


Oct. 


6 


at Duke 


Oct. 


13 


Chattanooga 


Oct. 


20 


Alabama 


Oct. 


27 


Maryland 


Nov. 


3 


North Carolina (HO 


Nov. 


10 


at Georgia Tech 


Nov. 


17 


Mississippi 


No\-. 


24 


Kentucky 


Dec. 


1 


at Vanderbilt 



1255 


YARDSTICK 


DID 


NOT 


PLAY 



MARYLAND vs KENTUCKY 3 NOVEMBER 



HOMECOMING 

2:00 P.M. (E.S.T.) 

at Byrd Stadium (35,000) 

College Park, Md. 

FACTS ABOUT THE WILDCATS 

CONFERENCE: Southeaatern 

LOCATION: Lexington, Ky. 

HEAD COACH: Blanton Collier 

COLORS: Blue and White 

ENROLLMENT: 7,500 

TYPE OFFENSE: £iplit-T 

1955 RECORD: Won 6, Lost 3, Tied 1 




Coach Blanton Collier 



WILDCATS' RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS 

(Maryland: Won 1, Lost 0, Tied 1) 



1931 
1954 



Maryland 


Kentucky 


6 


6 


20 






TOTAL POINTS: Maryland 26, Kentucky 6 

1956 CO-CAPTAINS: Dave Kuhn and Roger Pack 

LETTERMEN RETURNING — 23 — LOST 14 





1956 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


22 


Georgia Tech 


Sept. 


29 


Mississippi at Memphis (N) 


Oct. 


6 


at Florida 


Oct. 


13 


Auburn (N) 


Oct. 


20 


LSU (N) 


Oct. 


27 


at Georgia 


Nov. 


3 


at Maryland 


Nov. 


10 


Vanderbilt 


Nov. 


17 


Xavier 


Nov. 


24 


at Tennessee 



1955 


YARDSTICK 


DID 


NOT 


PLAY 



— 23 — 



MARYLAND vs CLEMSON 10 NOVEMBER 

(Air Force R.O.T.C. and Band Day) 

2:00 P.M. (E.S.T.) 

at Byrd Stadium (35,000) 

College Park, Md. 

FACTS ABOUT THE TIGERS 

CONFERENCE: Atlantic Coast 
LOCATION: Clemson. S. C. 
HEAD COACH: Frank Howard 
COLORS: Oranje and Purple 
ENROLLMENT: 3,400 
TYPE OFFENSE: Split-T 
Coach Frank Howard 1955 RECORD: Won 7, Lost 3, Tied 




TIGERS' RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS 
(Maryland: Won 4, Lost 0, Tied 0) 



1952 
1953 
1954 
1955 



Maryland 
28 
20 
16 
25 



Clemson 







12 



TOTAL POINTS: Maryland 89, Clemson 12 

1956 CAPTAIN: Charlie Bussey 

LETTERMEN RETURNING — 24 LOST — 14 





1956 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


22 


Presbyterian (N) 


Sept 


29 


at Florida 


Oct. 


6 at N. C. State (N) 1 


Oct. 


13 


at Wake Forest 


Oct. 


25 


at South Carolina 


Nov. 


3 


V.P.I. 


Nov. 


10 


at Maryland 


Nov. 


16 


at Miami, Fla. (N) 


Nov. 


24 


Virginia 


Dec. 


1 


Fu'-man 



1955 YARDSTICK 

Maryland Clemson 

14 First Downs 12 

208 Rushing Yardage 157 

110 Passing Yardage 70 

11 Passes Attempted 13 

5 Passes Completed 4 

3 Passes Intercepted By 

5 Punts 4 

39.8 Punting Average 50.7 

1 Fumbles Lost 

40 Yards Penalized 20 

Score by Periods : 

Maryland 6 7 12—25 

Clemson 6 6 — 12 

Maryland Scoring — Touchdowns: 
Vereb 2 (1, plunge; 18, pass-run from 
Beighton ; Tamburello (8. runi; Wal- 
ker (16. pass fi-om Beightoll. Conver- 
sion : Laughery. 

Clemson Scoring — Touchdowns : 
Rivers (14. pass from King) ; Wells 
(50. rum. 



24 



MARYLAND vs SOUTH CAROLINA 

2:00 P.M. (E.S.T.) 

■at Carolina Stadium (33,908) 

Columbia, S. C. 

FACTS ABOUT THE GAMECOCKS 
CONFERENCE: Aitlantic Coast 
LOCATION: Columbia, S. C. 
HEAD COACH: Warren Giese 
COLORS: Garnet and Black 
ENROLLMENT: 4,300 
TYPE OFFENSE: SpLit-T 
1955 RECORD: Won 3, Lost 6, Tied 



17 NOVEMBER 




Ccach Warren Giese 



GAMECOCKS' RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS 

(Maryland: Won 8, Lost 4, Tied 0) 





Maryland 


S. C. 




Miaryland 


S. C 


1926 





12 


1947 


19 


13 


1927 


26 





1948 


19 


7 


1928 


7 


21 


1949 


44 


7 


1929 





26 


1953 


24 


6 


1945 


19 


13 


1954 


20 





1946 


17 


21 


1955 


27 






TOTAL POINTS: Maryland 212, South Carolina 126 
1956 CO-CAPTAINS: Buddy Frick and Mackie Prickett 
LETTERMEN RETURNING — 17 — LOST 14 





1956 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


15 


Wofford (N) 


Sept. 


22 


Duke (N) 


Sept. 


28 


at Miami, Fla. (N) 


Oct. 


6 


North Carolina 


Oct. 


13 


Virginia at Richmond 


Oct. 


25 


Clemson 


Nov. 


3 


at Furman 


Nov. 


17 


Maryland 


Nov. 


22 


Wake Forest 



1955 YARDSTICK 

Maryland South Carolina 

17 First Downs 12 

249 Rushing Yardage 71 

71 Passing Yardage 119 

7 Passes Attempted 26 

5 Passes Completed 10 

4 Passes Intercepted By 1 

4 Punts 6 

40 Punting Average 37 

2 Fumbles Lost 

95 Yards Penalized 53 

Score by Periods: 

Maryland 13 7 7—27 

South Carolina 0—0 
Maryland Scoring — Touchdowns: 
Vereb (3, plunge; 10, run; 19, run), 
Dare (10, pass from Nusz). Conver- 
sions: Komlo, Laughery, Perlo. 



— 25 — 



MARYLAND vs N. C. STATE 27 NOVEMBER 




Coach Eaiie Edward; 



1:30 P.M. (E.S.T.) 

at RiddLck S>*:r.dium (20 000) 

Raleigh, N. C. 

FACTS ABOUT THE WOLFPACK 
CONFERENCE: Atlantic Coast 
LOCATION: Raleigh, N. C. 
HEAD COACH: Earle Ediwards 
COLORS: Red and White 
ENROLLMENT: 4,700 
T^'PE OFFENSE: Multiple 
1CQ5 RECORD: Won 4, Lost 5, Tied 1 



WOLFPACKS' RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS 

CMaryland: Won 5, Lost 4, Tied 3) 





Maryl 


and 


N 


C. State 




Ala 


■yland 


N.C. S'at 


1S08 


6 






23 


1946 




7 


28 


1917 


6 






10 


1947 










1921 


6 






6 


1949 




14 


6 


1922 


7 






6 


1950 




13 


16 


1923 


26 






12 


1951 




53 





1924 









9 


1954 




42 


14 



TOTAL POINTS: Maryland ISO, N. C. State 121 
1956 CAPTAIN: None selected as yet 
LETTERMEN RETURNING — 19 — LOST — 11 





1956 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


22 


at North Carolina 


Sept. 


29 


V.P.I, at Norfolk, Va. 


Oct. 


6 


Clemson (N) 


Oct. 


1.3 


Florida State (N) 


Oct. 


20 


at Dayton 


Oct. 


27 


at Duke 


:jov. 


3 


at Wak-; Fore.st 


Nov. 


10 


South Carolina 


Nov. 


17 


at Penn State 


N )V. 


22 


Maryland 



1953 


YARDSTICK 


DID 


NOT 








PLAY 



OPPONENTS' PROSPECTUS AS 
REPORTED BY THEIR PUBLICITY DIRECTORS 

Syracuse University 

By Arnie Burdick 

Except for a single-point upset by Pemi State, blowing a late third- 
period lead of 20-7, the Orange, which wound up 5 and 3, would have 
had as just a claim as anyone to the Eastern title last year. Floyd 
(Ben) Schwartzwailder this year says his team, more experienced, will 
be faster and deeper. 

Jimmy Brown, 212-pound workhorse left half, durable acid hard- 
running, is heading for a oig senior yeir. He will operate behind a 
more m.obile line end complemented by other good backs, provided 
the new Loy at quarterback, Ferd Kuczala, delivers as director of the 
unbalanced* T. 

C'nly real loss was Ed Albrig'it, a steady performer who gemeraly 
came up with the t.-g play in 1955. Kuczala and homebred sophomore 
Charley Zimmerman, the top signal callers, carry the fate of the 
Oraneemen. 

Jimmy Ridlon, converted to wingback last year but shifted to end 
after an injury in the Maryland grm.e, has "now been assigned the 
right halfback spot. Ridlon is most adequate as a runner, receiver, and 
tops defensively. Fullback Gus Zaso, pa;t-time regular in '55, rounds 
out the ball-carrying corps which has Ernie Jackson aad Bo'O Vel'e 
as soph understudies in addition to Zimmerman. 

The reinforced line, averaging 205, consists of ends Dick Lasse and 
Don Althouse, a boomkig punter; tackles C :arlie Strid and Ed Bailey, 
a '54 regular Vw-ho sat out last season with an injured shoulder; guards 
Ralph Farmer and Mike Bill, a 212-pound converted halfba:k, and 
center Bi:l Brown. With 17 lettermen returning, the number two 
team stalwarts are Jerry Cashmc.a and Jce Krivak along with sophs 
Maurice Youmsns, a 6 6 end and Bi'l Petcos and John Seketa. 

Spring practice was resumed this year by Schwartzv/alder Lecause 
of a schedule lie calls, "murderous." 

Wake Forest CoiEege 

By Marvin Francis 

Paul Amen, the affaible former West Point assistant who is 
stepping into his first head coaching job, isn't out to fool anybody mto 
thinking that the 1956 Wake i oiest Demon Deacons will be an out- 
standing football club, but at the same tim.e he doesn't want to leave 
the impressica that his team will be a pushover. 

The lack of experience and depth, especially in the line, mark the 
Deacs as a big quiestion mark in this season's football wars. Amen has 
only 13 boys Wiio have any varsity game action under their belts, and 
only cne drew a starting assignment in all 10 games on the 1955 slate. 

Twenty-nine of the LO players who took part in spring workouts 
cam.e up from last year's fieshman outfit, which failed to win in five 
outings. The remainder of the squad included eight boys who were 
iield out of varsity competition last fall. 

Bill Barnes, the most u^nder-rated halfback in the ACC last season, 



is the lone returnee who was a starter in all games during 1955, and 
end Ralph Brewster is the only other squad member who was consid- 
ered a regular at the end of the campaign. 

Gone from the 1955 club is the starting left end, both of tho regu- 
lar tackles, the three top guards, two centers, and the No. 1 quarter- 
back, right half, and fullback. In all, 17 lettermen have departed since 
the close of the season. 

Perhaps the prized possessions on the 1956 squad aro two of the 
finest backs in the conference — Barnes and quarterback Charlie Car- 
penter. The former set a new ACC record last season by catching 31 
passes in addition to leading the Deacs in rushing with 401 yards in 
116 carries, while the latter has c'omonstrated that he's really an out- 
standing passer. 

Carpenter, who completed 24 of 52 passes as Nick Consoles' under- 
study in 1955, was clearly the outstanding star in the two spring prac- 
tice games. 

Backing up Carpenter will be Pete Barham, a letterman halfback 
in 1955. 

With Barnes a sure starter, the other halfback slot is expected to 
be manned by Dick Daniels, a little-ucod performe • last year. Jim 
Dalrymple, held out last season, will see considerable a:tion. Larry 
Brooks and Roy Ledford are the two most promising halfbacks up from 
the freshman ranks. 

Deane Hillonhrand and Bob Caesar, both seniors, are expected to 
divide the fullback assignment. Neither is very big, but they are the 
only experienced men for the post. 

The ond positions appear to be the strongest spots in the forward 
wall. David Lee, slated for a starting berth last fall before suffering 
an injury which sidelined him for the entire season, shared the spot- 
light with Carpenter in the spring games. Jack Ladner and Ralph 
Brewster saw considerable action last year and should bo even better 
this time around. Sophomore Henry Martin should round out the top 
four flankmen. 

George Johnson and Frank Thompson, the latter a holdout last 
season, appear to have the inside tracks on the tackle spots. Eddie 
Ladd, the barefooted kicker who set out the '55 slate, and sophomore 
Thurman Spach just about complete the picture at tackle. 

Jim Horn and Bo Claxton should draw the starting guard assign- 
ments with a couple of sophomores — Sam Butler and Hughie Lewis — 
as the top replacements. 

Eddie Moore, who came along fast at the close of his sophomore 
year, should get the nod at center with Bruce Smathers his No. 1 
understudy. 

Baylor University 

By George Wright 

Baylor expects to field a squad in 1956 bigger, deeper, more ex- 
perienced than the 1955 squad which finished in a tie for 5th in the 
SW Conference ... It should be a squad that compares in experienced 
depth with the 1954 team which tied for 3rd in the league and finished 
with a 7-3 record. 

The Bears should have above average passing plus the size and 
speed for good running. After compiling a 38-19-3 mark in six years 
under George Sauer, this fall play their first season under Sam Boyd, 



an all-time end for Baylor i-n 1937 and 1938. He moved up from end 
coach to succeed Sauer, the latter moving to athletic director. 

Baylor again will be very strong and deep at end, and should be 
considerably stronger at tackle, a thin spot in 1955. Center should be 
v.oll man'ned, and t'.ie same is true at quarterback and fullack- The 
halfbacks, a thin spot in 1955, should be much deeper and better 
manned. Guard is still a question mark, the chief problem spot for 
1S56. Four of the better guards of 1955 have departed. Bill Glass, a 
1955 tackle and CharLas Horton, star 1955 frosh tackle have been 
moved to guard in an effort to strengthen that positicn. Baylor should 
te strongest at end with five lettermen, and at fullback with t iree 
senior lettermen. 

University of Miami 

By George Gallet 

Th>3 U'Hiversity of Miami Hurricanes had a 6-3 record last year, 
losing only to Notre Dame, Georgia Tech and Texas Christian in close 
ball games, two of which could have gone the other way. 

Sixteen of 27 lettermen from that 1955 team return, but only throe 
of these returning letter winners were consistent starters. Three others 
started in some ball games. 

Half of the U-M regular backfield returns. All-Am.orican fullback 
candidate Don Bosseler, hailed by Coach Andy Gustafson as "one of 
the greatest football players I have ever coached," returns as a s-anior 
along with quarterback Sam Scarnecchia. Gone from the backfield 
are the two regular halfbacks Whitey Rouviore and Jack Losch. 

In the line the only consistent starter returning is end Don John- 
son. Three other men who started some of the ball games last yoar — 
Bob Cunio, a^nd Tom Pratt, guards; and Mike Hudock, center — also will 
be back for the 1956 season. 

The 1956 U-M squad has 15 seniors, eight juniors and 23 sop.io- 
mores. While half the squad is made up of sophomores, however, the 
sophs are some of the most promising in the history of the school. 
These sophomores could prove the key to Miami's success in 1956. If 
they come through, Miami could wind up with a good football team. 

An all-senior starting line is in prospect for the Hurricanes. Don 
Johnson and Phil Bennett, ends; Charley Hutchings and Chuck DeVore, 
tackles; Bob Cunio and Tom Pratt, guards, and Mike Hudock, center, 
are the senior line returneos. All won letters in 1955. 

Miami's real strength in the backfield comes at fullback where 
Don Bosseler, the Hurricanes' great All-Amorican candidate returns. 
Already, in two seasons as a fullback, Bosseler has gained nearly 1,000 
yards. He is backed up by another tough husky, Paul Hefti, who 
made the longest run in Am.orican football in 1954. 

With Sam Scarnecchia returning to his regular quarterback post, 
and backed up by Junior Gene Reeves and two six-foot sophomore 
prospects — ^Don Krall and Bonnie Yarbrough — ^Miami is expectod to 
be better at quarterback this fall. 

John Varone, who pressed Whitey Rouviere at right half last year, 
will take over this post in 1956. His average gain last year was seven 
yards per carry. 

Sophomore Claude Casey, a six foot, three inch 180 pounder from 
West Palm Beach, has made the grade in the Miami backfield, taking 
over th.3 left halfback post from where Jack Losch graduated. Though 



still a green back, Gustafson expects Casey to develop into a tough 
halfback with breakaway possibilities. 

As a whole, promising sophomores are available at every position — 
but whether they deliver this fall is what puts Miami's 1956 outlook 
into the uncertain class. 

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

By Jake Wade 

With the annual quarterback problem apparently solved by Dave 
Reed's improvement during spring sessions, North Carolina's welfare 
in 1956's football wars depends largely on how well Jim Tatum's husky 
forward wall comes around. 

In his first season as North Carolina's coach, Tatum inherited a 
fine group of backs, and some beef up front, but tackle and guard 
problems loom large. 

The 1956 Tar Heels should have much more offensive spark than 
last season, as shown by the all-offensive 34-34 spring Blue-White 
game. Speed and a new-found spirit will be trademarks of the club. 

The same fearsome schedule looms ahead and Tatum kids no one 
when he sees names like Notre Dame, Oklahoma, Maryland, Tennessee, 
Georgia and Duke on the slate. 

The improvement of Reed over last season stru:k the highest 
■note of optimism. And with Ron Marquette and sophomore Curtis 
Hathaway behind him, the Tar Heels appear well-heeled at this poit. 

Sparked bv sensational Ed Sutton, the rest of the backfield shapes 
up fast and shifty. Buddy Sasser, last year's quarterback, is running 
at half, ack, and returnees Larry McMullen, Jim Varnum and Steve 
Kupchick look good. Soph Emil DeCantis impressed in spring drills. 
At fu'-lback are dependables Don Lear and Giles Gaca, whose struggle 
for starting positions should give the Tar Heels strength here. 

Up front. Buddy Payne's questionable knee poses a question on end 
strength. Tackle has been fortified by moving huge (6-3, 230) S':ewart 
Pell from center. Hap Setzer and converted fullback Howard Williams 
lend strength at guard along with Jim Jones, converted center, anl 
newcomer Ray Kryzak. 

Vet George Stavnitski returns to center, backed up by Ronnie Koes. 

University of Tennessee 

By Gi's Manning 

Tennessee's 1956 football team will face the toughest schedule ever 
encountered by a Vol football team. Their 1956 schedule (which in- 
cludes five bowl teams) was selected hy a conference poll as the most 
difficult schedule of any team in the league. In addition to their 
rough conference schedule the Vols also play the perennial powers of 
the Atlantic Coast Conference — Maryland, Duke, and rejuvenated 
North Carolina. 

Tennessee lost eight veteran lettermen from the 1955 squad but 
has 22 returning. Chief losses from last year's squad include guard 
Charlie Coffey, center Lamar Leachman, blocking back Jim Beutel, 
and extra point specialist Tommy Priest who kicked 15 out of 15 
attempts for an all time school record. Heading the array of return- 
ing lettermen is John "Drum" Majors, the Vols diminutive tailback 
who was selected by the SEC coaches as the most valuable player in 

— 30 — 



the league in 1955. Majors was selected on the pre-season all- 
conference team and is Tennessee's leading contender for national 
honors in 1956. E^nd Buddy Cruze, Tennessee's leading pass receiver 
last season, was also selected on the pre-season all-conference team. In 
tackle John Gordy, captain-elect of the 1956 team, the Vols have one 
of the most versatile tackles in the league if not the entire cou»ntry. 

Coach Bowden Wyatt says, "I was very well satisfied with the 
team's spirit and enthusiasm throughout spring pactice, and if the 
same spirit prevails during the 1956 season, this should be an interest- 
ing team to watch." 

University of Kentucky 

By Ken Kuhn 

Development of adequate replacements for seven starters among 14 
graduated lettermen, including a duo that ruled as one of the nation's 
best aerial combinations, and the degree to which anticipated general 
improvement from withi^n the squad will be offset by a schedule classed 
as the toughest in the Southeastern Conference loom as the prime 
factors affecting Kentucky's football outlook for 1956. 

The Wildcats' prospects for a successful season might even b3 
classed in the "good" category, though certainly not "terrific," despite 
the heavy losses if it weren't for the toughest schedule ever arranged 
for a Ke'ntucky eleven. 

All told, Kentucky will be missing 14 men. Besides All-Conference 
quarterback Bob Hardy, the nation's eleventh-ranking pas:er, and All- 
America end Howie Schnellenberger, starti-ng players lost include half- 
back Dick Maloney, tackle Bill Wheeler, end Bradley Mills, and guards 
Ray Callahan and O. E. Philpot. 

Personnel-wise, the '56 edition of Wildcats stacks up fairly well 
despite the losses. There is a "hard core" of 23 returning letter 
v/inners, although three of them are just back from the service and 
several are without extensive game duty under their belts, plus a bevy 
of promising young sophomores anxious to take up the slack. 

The standouts are beefy tackle Lou Michaels, one of the top young- 
sters in the nation last year and an All-Conference Sophomore Team 
selection who attracted wide attention in late season; an ace line- 
backing center, Co-Captai'n Dave Kuhn, who was named on the pre- 
season All-SEC eleven and designated by league coaches as "best 
linebacker"; battering-ram fullback Bob Dougherty, the team's leading 
ground gainer a year ago with a creditable 4.3 average; and veteran 
guard Duke Curnutte, back after a season's layoff due to scholastic 
trouble. 

No sophomore appears to stand a good chance to break into the 
select circle of starters before the season gets underway, but there's 
plenty of confidence in the Kentucky camip regarding their potential 
abilities. Back from the service to help out at quarterback is Bill 
Farlye, who was an uiiderstudy to All-America Babe Pariili in his last 
season at UK in 1951. 

With Dougherty and the three other top ground gainers of '55 
returning, the prospects for a good running attack might seem to be 
fairly good. However, Coach Collier points out that the ground gamie 
was ■not one of Kentucky's long suits last season. 

Although the top passing duo will be missing, the Wildcat aerial 
warfare should not suffer too greatly. On hand to take over the 



pitching chores will be capable understudy Delmar Hughes. Stepping 
in as heir-apparent to top receiving duties is Co-Captain Roger Pack. 

Defensively, the '56 Wildcats should be a tough force to deal v^^ith, 
basi'ng strength estimates on normal improvement minus losses. Ken- 
tucky ranked as the sixth best pass defense outfit in the country last 
year and virtually the same men primarily responsible are back. 
Against a ground attack, the status of defense appears hinged to the 
development of replacements at key positions S'od leadorship from 
defensive signal caller Kuhn. 

Boiling it down to essentials, Kentucky in 1956 should be able 
to field a hustling ball club of average overall experience, some out- 
standi'ng personnel, fair running ability, questionable passing potential 
and hopeful defensive strength. 

Clemson College 

By Bob Bradley 

Clemson will probably have about the same caliber of football team 
this fall as the one whi:?h represented the school last year. Three 
starting members of the 1955 backfield are gone as are two good li'ne- 
mon. However, some good reserve lettermen are back whic'.i should 
make the Tigers another interesting team to wat?h. 

There are 24 returning lettermen while 14 were lost to graduation. 

The Tigers will base their attack around the captain and alternate 
captain of the te.2m, C'.iarlie Bussey at quarterback and Joel Wells at 
left halfback. Head Coach Frank Howard calls Bussey "one of the 
headiest" quarterbacks he has ever seen. 

Howard calls Wells "the best back in the Atlantic Coast Confer- 
ence" and he is pretty sure that Wells is one of the finest backs in the 
country. Wells made every All-Atlantic Coast Conference team last 
year and was the leading ground gainer in the conference with 782 
yards gained in 135 plays. 

Expected to round out the backfield with Wells and Bussey are 
Jim Coleman at right halfback and Bob Spooner, one of the three 
starting juniors, at fullback. 

Anchoring down the foi'ward wall is Senior Dick Marazza, a giant 
(6-4, 225) of a tackle from Greensiburg, Pa. Marazza is especially 
noted for his downfield blocking. 

Howard will probably open this football season with eight seniors 
and three juniors on the first team. Besides Spooner, other juniors are 
ccn'.er Dick DeSimone and right guard John Gridijan. 

Others who are expected to be starters are Earle Greene (LG), 
Bill Hudscn (RT), Willie Smith (RE) and Dalton Rivers (LE). 

The second team is made up of six juniors and five sophomores. Two 
of the most heralded are right halfback Charlie Home and left half- 
back Rudy Hayes. Home, a transfer from Georgia Tech, gained the 
most yardage in the spring game and also had the longest run, 42 
yards. 

A bright end prospect is Ray Masneri, a 6-3, 195-poU'nder from 
California, Pa. H. B. Bruorton, a starter in 1954 but not in school last 
year, is expected to push Gridijan for a starting guard post. 

Howard believes the team will be better prepared this year to 
withstand any mass substitution made against Clemson. In the last 
encounter with Maryland, the Clemson first team actually outplayed 
the Terps, but Maryland was able to substitute more freely. 

— .32 — 



The Clcmson head coach sums up the situation by saying: "We 
are wealc at end a-nd quarterback. We have three ends who will play 
quite a bit for us, but the picking kinda thins out aftar that. Bussey 
is the only player with much quarterback experience behind him and 
our hope is that he doesn't get hurt. Wingo Avery and Hampton 
Hunter will be hard to replace at center as will quarterback Don King, 
halfback Joe Pagliei and fullback Billy O'Dell, but if we can get a 
little help for Wells, I think we'll do all right in the backfield." 

"I am pretty well satisfied with our guards and tackles. I am 
two and three deep in lettermen at both positions. All of the coaches 
were fairly we'll pleased with our spring practice game." 

University of South Carolina 

By Bob Isbell 

South Carolina's football outlook — though never before so risky 
to predict — has a high degree of positiveness about it in 1956. 

A tough schedule is faced in seven conference foes and three out- 
siders, including Miami's Hurricane . . . mighty ambitious considering 
that the Gamecocks have only 17 returni'ng lettermen from a team 
that won only three of its nine games last >-3ar. 

However, there's "new blood" in the Carolina camp, and there's 
new spirit. Warren Giese, former assistant to Jim Tatum at Maryland, 
took over Rex Enright's duties early this year when Enright retired 
to devote full time to his job as athletic director. 

Physically the 1956 G.3mecocks look average. Team speed is at 
best average, but the spirit, the will to play and determi-nation to win 
are without equal in the memory of veteran Gamecock followers. 

Giese plans to employ the two-unit system with a third team as 
a substitution reservoir. The first two squads will be of fairly equal 
caliber. 

Ends — Buddy Frick, called by Giese "one of the best all-around 
ends I've ever coached." Frick is fast and depe>ndable on offense. He 
hits as hard as any man on the team. Tie other end post will go to 
junior Julius Derrick. Buddy Mayfield and Columbian Eddie Beall, are 
the best newcomers. 

Tackle — ^Sam DeLuca will be one of the strongest in the Atlantic 
Coast Cctnference. Tony Byers is choice for the other tackle spot. 
The second unit will be headed probably by Tommy Addison. Senior 
Glen Pelletier and four sophomores — Bill Yenco, Ted Girardeau, John 
Kompara and Tom Wezorek — ^will be fighting for the other position. 
The tackle situation is one of the brighter spots for Giese. 

Guards — ^Depth ■needed. Nelson Weston, Bill Floyd, Rick Ericsson 
and Bill Bullard are the experienced men. Big Luke Beasley is the 
most likely to succeed for the fourth position. 

Centers — ^Behind Lawton Rogers are three other good men, making 
depth at center strong. Charlie Johnson, a letterman, is a solid per- 
former. Two sophomores, To-ny Gialenios and Dwight Keith, are big 
and fast. Rogers, according to Giese, may be the sophomore to watch. 

Quarterbacks — ^Offensively, the Gamecocks are well fixed here. 
Veterans Mackie Prickett, Bobby Bunch and Jack Hall afford both 
quality and depth. Each can pass fairly well and each is a good ball 
handler. Prickett has gained 1404 total yards in two years. Sam 
Vickers is promising and may move up. 

Halfbacks — Several good mon in this spot make it a scramble for 

— 33 - - 



first string honors. King Dixon and Carrol McClain are exceptional 
broken-field runners. Dixon, a sophomore, is a 10-second man. 
McClain hits the line with tremendous speed. Alex Hawkins, another 
sophomore, is one of the bast all-around backs on the squad. And, 
Frank Destino who at 190 pounds is the squad's heaviest halfback 
could be a triple threat of the old-time variety. 

Fullback — ^Bobby Barrett, always an offensive threat, has shown 
improvement on defense. Don Johnson and Dan South are leading 
candidates for the second unit spot. 

North Carolina State 

By Bill Hensley 

Earle Edwards, beginning his third year at North Carolina State 
College, is leaning toward the optimistic side when the subject of his 
1956 football team is mentioned, but th-are are three factors which pull 
the Wolfpack coach toward the pessimistic side. 

"I think we will have a good team," Edwards said, "and one that 
will bear watching. But you can't overlook the fact that we haven't 
found an experi-enced quarterback to replace Eddie West, we are short 
of experience at guard, and our schedule has been greatly improved 
from last year." 

The key to State's 1956 grid success is in the hands of five players 
who are fighting it out for the quarterback spot, and at this point the 
job is wide open. 

Candidates for the position are Tom Katich, a non-letterman 
junior; seniors Billy Franklin aiid Colbert Micklem, both of whom have 
lettered but have limited experience; and sophomores Frank Cackovic 
and Ernie Driscoll, up from the freshman team. 

CTie thing is certain about the Wolfpack eleven. It will have a 
good ru'nning attack spearheaded by RHB Dick Christy and a host of 
fleet-footed backs who know their way around. 

Christy, a 5-foot-lO, 183 pound triple threat star, is the Wolfpack's 
first All-America candidate in recent years. As a soph last year he 
gained 602 yards in nine games for a 7-1 rushing average. 

At left halfback, two stellar performers head the list and two 
promising rookies are behind them. They are Dick Hunter, a swift 5- 
foot-7 scoring ace who scooted for eight touchdowns last year, and 
George (Wagon Wheels) Marinkov, also 5-foot-7, who has been a 
mainstay for the past two seasons. The 'newcomers are Ken Nye and 
Ken Trowbridge, both of whom were spectacular during spring prac- 
tice. 

Marinkov compiled a six-yard rushing average a year ago and 
led the nation in kickoff returns in 1954 with a 35.3 average for 13 
returns. Hunter, a 155-pounder, had a 5-3 rushing mark. 

Mike Miller, who plays behind Christy, adds depth to the running 
game and is one of the best defensive backs on the team. 

Tony Guerrieri is the man to h?at out for the fullback spot. A 
rugged little 5-foot-7, 175-pounder, his runni^ng has improved steadi'.y 
and his lineibacking has been adequate. Tony will do most of the 
punting. Wally Prince and sophomore Don Hafer are the top reserves. 

The line will be manned by a host of experienced stalwarts except 
at guard where lettermen are lacking. 

John Collar, an All-Conference end, returns for his junior year 



after breaking a school record with 14 catches good for five TDs Icist 
season. A tough 205-pounder, he teams with senior John Lowe on 
the flanks. Ronnie Gall and Bob Pepe, a soph, are pushing the 
starters. 

At tackle, 218-pound senior John Szuchan and junior Dick 
DeAngelis, who weighs 203, appear to have the inside track on the 
starting positions. But two husky first-yearmen are in the thick of 
the fight. 

They are Francis Palandrani, a strong 220-pounder, and Larry 
Dixon, 206. 

The test of the guards are juniors Francis Tokar, Julius Compton, 
Ed Hordubay and Joe Monalian, none of whom reaches the 200-pound 
mark. All are limited in experience, since Al D'Angelo and Mike 
Nardone did most of the playing in 1955. 

Jim Oddo is the number one candidate for center. Al Henery, a 
senior, is a capable reserve. 

In all, 20 lettermen are on the 69-man squad, which includes 35 
sophs, 21 juniors and only 13 seniors. 




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— 38 — 



TERP THUMBNAIL SKETCHES 

ENDS 

JEAN WATERS. 2'., 6-0, 195, Senior from Charleston, S. C. — a two-year veteran 
letterman . . . has the most experience of any of the ends coming back this fall 
after the Terps lost four 3-year stars by graduation . . . took over top job this 
spring and should keep it although the fierce competitor knows there are keen 
youngsters coming up . . . has lot of desire and fine two-way ability, especially 
keen on defense . . . has good speed, good receiver, and a most efficient blocker . . . 
a veteran of the Army Paratroopers . . . came to Maryland with Army buddy 
Jack Davis. Tern guard and co-captain . . . their friendship still close . . . 
married and has a son, Steve ... in School of Physical Education. 

ED COOKE, 20, 6-4, 235, Junior from Norfolk, Va. — the big and most pleasant 
surprise of last year's sophomore ends . . . looks like prize package and sure future 
star if his potential is realized . . . tallest and biggest (235) end Terps have 
had since Pete Augsburger of 1950 and Lloyd Colteryahn, 1952 . . . made a 
tremendous debut last year when he rose from nowhere to find himself making 
great defensive plays against UCLA, the Terns' second game ... on first play 
Bruins ran at his end. the lean and mean hoy spilled the hall carrier for a 12-yard 
loss . . . did this on several occasidns during the game and continued to play 
outstanding hall remainder of season . . . has eixceptional speed; he is probably 
the fastest lineman, and has long reach and great pair of hands . . . tremendous 
strength with speed makes him one of Terps' all-time end prospects ... a good 
season will set him up for national attantion his senior year . . . was e.xcused 
from most of spring practice to work with track team . . . set a new school mark 
in the shot and won the conference shot-put title with throw of 51' 5V2", a new 
ACC mar'k . . . he throws co,n.sistently over 50' . . . also throws the discus . . . 
in School of Business and Public Administration. 

BILL TURNER, 20, 6-3, 210, Junior from Silver Spring, Md. — along with Waters and 
Cooke, "the Moose" as his team mates call him, is the other letterman end returning 
. . . did a fine job as a soph and had a most impressive spring practice . . . 
has good hands that along with his speed and agility make him a dangerous receiver 
. . . fine blocker . . . defensive play has been most prominenft . . . married . . . 
in School of Business and Public Administration majoring in Transportation. 

DICK PORTER, 22, 6-2, 195, Senior from Pittsburgh, Pa. — raised Coach Mont's hopes 
for a good crew of ends this fall when he came through with one of the teams' 
outstanding performances in spring practice . . . has had experience both previous 
campaigns . . . has top receiving ability — good knack of getting into the open 
with better than average speed . . . will be sure to give all-out effort to push for 
starting job. which he conld do . . . gives good account on defense . . . this 
could and should be his year . . . won All-City honors while playing for Pittsburgh's 
Schenley High . . . studying Civil Engineering. 

JOE PONZO, 22, 6-3, 200, Junior from Newark, N. J. — one of the real hard- 
working boys on the team . . . saw some action last fall, but limited . . . 
consciantious with a lot of desire . . . has potential that should materialize to 
help the end position this fall . . . early season experience will help . . . should 
be good iwo-way player then ... a Public Relations major. 

AL BEARDSLEY, 19, 6-0, 185. Sophomore from Pittsburgh, Pa. — when former Terp 
coach Jim Tatum first saw Beardsley, he said he would be one of the greatest foot- 
ball players ever to play for him . . . after he saw him play as a frosh last year, 
he added even more emphasis to his original statement about the outstanding prospect 
. . . now new Terp Coach Tommy Mont has inherited this prize performer and 
after spring practice he added even higher praise on his upcoming sophomore end 
. . . one of the most zealous players on the squad with exceptional all-around 
ability ... "a real football player" has tremendous desire and uncanny reactions 
. . . already shows signs of being one of the school's most aggressive ends . . . 
defensive play most noticeable . . . hard to get around or by him . . . will be 
pushing for top position . . . starred on the undefeated freshman eleven. 

BEN SCOTTI, 19, 6-1, 180, Sophomore from Long Branch, N. J. — another of the 
really top ends to com.e up from the frosh . . . with Beardsley, this pair gave the 
Terps a great duo of flankmen for what is expected to he a lot of help this fall . . . 
Scotti too a very aggressive type player ... has exceptional eagerness and desire 
. . . conscientious and consistent . . . tough defensively and flashy on offense . . . 
good blocker . . . will surely make himself known to friend and foe. 

BILL STEPPE, 20, 6-1, 200, Sophomore from Cumbo\.-land, Md. — with a good spring 
practice after a year on the "B" squad, Steppe's potential expected to get h'.m 



some varsity duty ... he could help ... a good receiver . . . married . . . Other 
B squad ends whom Mont would like to fit into the picture are B7b Alexander, 
Bill Martin, and service returnee Dave Ritter. Another Cumberlander, Ken Poling, 
up from the '55 frosh team also could break mto the traveling squid. Pnling is a 
fine-looking prospect with a very promising future. 

TACKLES 

MIKE SANDUSKY. 20. 5-11. 235. Senior from Manv lie, N. J. — an all-America 
tackle in his junior .year, iust as many had predicted tor the ex-heavyweight high 
school wrestling champion of New Jersey . . . Mike undoubtedly had one of the 
greatest if not THE greatest years as a iunior in Terp history . . . only the incom- 
parable Bob Ward, a unanimous all-America his junior year, won more honors than 
the affable Sandusky . . . headed for a grand slam this fall and strong candidate 
for "Lineman of the Year" honors, just as his teammate of last year, center BOB 
PELLEGRINI, if his performances each Saturday are like those of the '55 season 
even in defeat, he was one of the outstanding LINEMEN on the field during 
the Orange Bowl, playing near 60-minutes, which he can be called on to do even 
in the usual complete "team" substitutions . . . opposing coaches as well as former 
coach .Tim Tatum and nr>.v Mont mW him the game's best ... a great blocker, 
attested by seeing him open huge hole tor ball carrier . . . often times he con- 
tains his man far back and away from the play . . . quick as a cat and has a 
tremendously fast charge . . . strong as the "Rock of Gibralter" said opposing 
players . . . his great experience and desire insures a brilliant and efficient per- 
formance . . ■ his speed awes observers and demoralizes the opponent ... a 
good play diagnostician . . . has tremendous strength which he uses at all tim^s 
on and off the field ... a defensive Olia'h ... his defensive prowess especially 
noted in the UCLA, Clemson and Oklahoma Bowl game ... it was aga'nsl 
Clemson that he made seven of the first eight tackles . . . often times Sandu.k/ 
makes the tackle on kickoffs, a tip-off to his soeei ... he nevf|- gives up . . . 
because of his top football ability and leadership, teammates voted him '56 ci- 
captain alcng with star guard .TACK DAVIS . . . has been the Atlantic Coast 
Conference heavyweight wrestling champion the past two years . . . went to the 
NCAA finals where he was eliminated in the quarter-final rourd on a referees' 
decision . . . also throws the shot and discus for the track team . . . because of 
his great junior year, coaching staff and playc.s voted him the ANTHONY C. NARDO 
MEMORIAL TROPHY, an award given as the team's outstanding lineman ... ho 
follows his coach Boh Ward and last year's teammate Boh Pellegrini in receiving 
this top award in the iunior year . . . among other top honors received: first team 
All-America. The SPORTING NEWS' QUAiHERBACK; first team all- America. 
EXTENSION Magazine; second leam all-Ame. i'a. UNITED PRESS; second team 
all-America, NEA; second team al!-Amc ica, I ;, Y. DAILY NEWS; Honorable 
Mention all-America. AS.SCCIATED PRESS; first team all-South. N. Y. DAILY 
NEWS and INS; first team all-Confeience on all boards, the ASSOCIATED PRESS, 
UNITED PRESS, and the SOUTHERN WRITERS' ASS'N. ... he also received two 
votes in the UNITED PRESS "Lineman of Year", balloting . . . a B student in 
Animal Husbandry. 

AL WHARTON, 20, 6-1, 215, Senior from Sewickley. Pa. — another of the top tackles 
that Maryland is blessed with again this year . . . with three such nationally 
ranked tackles as Sandusky. Wharton and Ed Heuring. they are being referred in 
as "The Terrific Te. p Tackle Triumvirate" . . . this trio definitely has no equal 
this year in college ball . . . Wharton had a top year in '55 . . . played fine 
ball as a soph as he came in at the middle of the '54 season with Sandusky and 
Heuring to overcome the severe Terp tackle situation . . . one of the hardest workers 
on the team . . . does magnificient job offensively and has equal brilliance on 
defense . . . has good speed and uses it well on dovvnfield blocking . . . smart 
football player ... a keen competitor ... a Pre-Dentistry student. 

ED HEURING, 20, 6-0, 215, Senior from Rochester, Pa. — the third star of the 
"Terps' Tackle Triumvirate" is this strong lean and mean two-year tackle veteran 
. . . has been most responsible for giving Tern teams the outstanding play en- 
joyed previous years . . . broke into the starting line mid-season as a soph during 
the only "critical era" of tackle play, and has been main stalwart ... he and 
Wharton "touch-and-go" for starting assignment ... as Mont so well puts it. 
"there are no three better tackles in college football today than Sandusky, Wharton, 
and Heuring" . . . true, it is a shame that all three can't be playing at same 
time . . . Heuring has exceptional strength and lightning speed . . . most bri'.lant 
on offense . . . uses his strength and savvy to blast out the opposing assignment 
. . . does this very well ... as the other members of the tackle trio, he has 
no peer in being a "sure" tackier . . . for his fine play during the '55 season, he 
was awarded by being named Honorable Mention all-America by both ASSOCIATED 
PRESS and UNITED PRESS and Honorable Mention in the Conference ... a three- 

— 40 — 



sport letterman at Rochester High . . . named on the All-County all-America team 
his senior year ... his brother Joe is candidate for varsity this year after p'.aying 
first string guard on Terps' undefeated frosh eleven last fall . . . married to former 
Maryland coed July 28 . . . majoring in Criminology. 

TOM STEFL, 20, 6-1, 220. Junior from Brownsville, Pa. — still another of the 
Terps' fine big-strong tackles . . . came through in most satisfying style last season 
as a soph ... he gave many notable performances, much more than expected of 
soph inexperience . . . potential of the rawboned Pre-Medical student developed 
quickly as he utilized known ability both offensively' and defensively . . . should 
be a sure bet to lend a big hand to the Terps this year and next . . . will get 
better as the season goes on . . . star athlete at Brownsville. 

DON HEALY, 1fl, 6-3. 240. .lunior from Rome. N. Y. — another of the real fine 
hig tackle stalwarts of the Terps . . . played a lot of good ball for the '55 
team as a soph . . . was better tlian average substitute as was Stefl ... if 
ability and strength realized he's sure to make big difference in line ploy for 
his unit . . . starred as a freshman and with more varsity competition could 
be .lust as noticeable ... in School of Business and Public Administration. 

JOE LAZZARINO, 21, 6-4; 240, Senior from Brooklyn, N. Y. — after lettering his soph 
year with an outstanding debut and tagged as one who had great grid future ahead, 
"Big Joe" was in.iured in the Baylor game and didn't see action rest of season . . . 
practiced near end of campaign and readied himself for the Orange Bowl . . . has 
"giant" strength and potential ... a well Lazzarino this fall will be important 
factor in Mont's plans . . . married this summer . . . majoring in Commercial Art. 

CHARLES KICHMAN, 20, 6-3, 220, Sophomore from Mschanicsburg, Pa. — following 
a top season with the B squad, still another fine looking tackle prospect enters the 
Terp varsity picture in Kichman ... a highly rated school star, the hard work- 
ing and soft-spoken Pennsylvanian now appears ready to step in and offer a great 
deal of top football . . . has a lot of desire and determination which Terp 
coaches are sure he would like to e.xhibit on the varsity ... is fully recovered 
from jaw injury . . . should be one of the new tackles to watch carefully after 
a bit of game e.xperience. 

FRED COLE, 19, 5-11, 220, Sophomore from Newark, N. J. — every year for the past 
si.x, the Terps have come up with a real topnotch freshman tackle, one who has 
always come through to live up to his notices and take away many honors for his 
top tackle play . . . last year's freshiman team was no exception, for it was 
FRED COLE who led the line play of the Terp yearlings to the school's first unde- 
feated-untied freshman team . . . "Whitey" Dovell, his coach, in rating his team, 
said he was one of the best if not the best frosh tackle he has coached . . . former 
coach Jim Tatum said he should rank along with the other great Maryland tackles 
before he finishes school . . . with an outstanding freshman year behind him and 
a remarkable spring practice, there is little reason to believe he won't make his 
presence known on the field this fall . . . definitely a future star and one to tab 
"watch this boy" . . . has tremendous ability, both offensively and defensively and 
likes to play all the way. 

CHARLES CARROLL, 19, 6-1, 220, Sophomore from Ph ladelphia. Pa. — like C .le. 
he made a brilliant showing last fall as the other big and eager frosh Terp tackle 
. . . Dovell. Tatum, Mont, and the other coaches during spring drills echoed nothing 
out the highest praise on the fine hard-working tackle . . . does a good job both 
ways and can, be counted on for top performance at all times . . . leaves little to 
be desired and with experience, will be hard to keep from near the top . . . easy 
boy to coach . . . another future star Terp tackle. 

JIM HODGES, Rome, N. Y., TOM MYERS, Baltimore, and JOHN BOWLER, Hyatts- 
ville, Md. are a trio of big tackles counted on for a lot of help this fall. 

GUARDS 

JACK DAVIS, 23, 5-10, 212, Senior from East Riverdale, Md. — born and raised just 
a couple miles from the University campus, the all-America guard candidate and 
'56 co-Captain came to his state university three years ago after serving in the 
Army Paratroopers ... at his high school, Bladensburg, he played but one year 
football, but after he hit the College Park Campus with terrific impact with a great 
freshman year, he left little doubt that he had established himself a future great 
... he had a sensational sophomore year as first year varsity man and it was 
then opposing coaches and players noticed and praised his play ... he gave a 
repeat performance last fall but added brilliant luster to his reputation ... he made 
indelible impression with everybody, evidenced by the honors he won for his out- 
standing efforts last season . . . national ratings list him as one of the country's 

— 41 — 



TOP GUARDS for this fall— he should be that . . . many have tabbed him another 
Bob Ward and his all-America line coach agrees that Davis is the finest he has 
seen excels both ways with a fabulous quick charge offensively that literall> 

blasts out the opposing lineman ... has uncanny reactions and pursuit . . . can 
be seen making tackles anyplace the play goes . . . many, many tackles made in 
opponents' backfleld by the hard-charging eager blonde Paratrooper veteran .^ 
received honorable mention ALL-AMERICA by ASSOCIATED PRESS. UNITED 
PRESS, and NEA . . . first team all-Conference on AP and Southern Writers' Ass n. : 
INS second team, all-South; and second team all-Conference. UP . . . married and 
has a daughter, Debbie 4. and a new daughter, Kathleen, born August 17 ... a 
i^ublic Relations maior. 

GEORGE KOLARAC, 20, 5-10, 205, Senior from Harrisburg, Pa. — one of the more 

outstanding guard returnees who will team with Davis as other starter, although the 
top performer knows he is being pushed by a good crop of boys behmd him ... 
has had two real good years and letterei both ... one of the mo3t serious hard- 
working competitors Terps have had in long time . . . came back after in.iury to 
recapture first team berth . . . excels defensively and does top offensive work . . . 
hard to move out . . . spectacular tacklo;- . . . married and his a son . . . 
majoring in Physical Education. 

PAUL TONETTI, 20, 6-2, 205, Junior from Massapequa. N. Y — certainly one of the 
finest of the neiwromers last fall . . . played hrilliantlv in all phases . . . gave 
valuable e.xhibitions each game with his consistently fine play . . . will be vying 
for starting lob which he had in Kolarac's absence . . . made many key tackles last 
season and made a key fumble recovery in the Qemson game that led to Terps' 
score that put them on victory trail ... a sure and vicious tackier . . . likes 
contact ... his top shov.:ng was hoped for since he had a sensational reputation 
as a frosh . . . the soft-spoken New Yorker is dynamite and all business on the 
field ... a hard worker with tremendous desire . . . commendable offensive work 
stems from good speei. quick charge, and good mobility . . . keen play diagnostician 
. . . in School of Business and Public Administration. 

NICK DcCICCO, 20, 5-11, 210, Junior from Brooklyn, N. Y. — had a good season 
last fall as a soph . . . should come into his own this year and will make it 
tough for the boys ahead of him, as assignment he would like and could get . . . 
a top-flight prospect . . . has keen desire . . . has power and lot of k.iovv-how 
. . . good offcnsi\e man and is tough to handle defensively . . . has the requisites 
of strength, ability and pjtcr.Lal which will make him prominent candidate for a 
lot of duty this season ... in School of Business and Public Administrati jn 
majoring in Transportation. 

RONALD ATHEY, 21, 5-10, 200, Junior from Cumberland, Md. — another in a 1 nj 
line of fine football players fiom Cumberland's Fort Hill High School . . . one oC 
the strongest members of the squad . . . played a lot of real good football last 
fall . . . was doing excellent two-way job until injury in LSU game hit ani was 
out the remainder of the season . . . worked hard this spring healing injury and 
at end of the drills was pronounced fit for full duty this fall . . . should be cne 
of the best guards for the Terps . . . married and has a daughter . . . majoring 
in Industrial Education. 

BOB SUCHY, 20, 6-2, 215, Junior from Baltimore, Md. — a fine guard candidate who 
after an impressive showing as a soph letterman should lend most adequate rein- 
forcement to the position . . . had a good spring practice . . . big strong biy with 
plenty of desire and good attitude . . . studying Civil Engineering. 

BILL KOMLO. 20, 6-0, 200, Junior from Uniontown, Pa. — one of the all-time Te'p 
fullback prospects to come to Maryland, the conscientious Komlo's career has b^ea 
hit by injuries and just this spring he was shifted to guard to utilize his known 
quantity, after the coaching staff decided to move him from fullback because of 
repeated aggravation to his injury as a ball carrier . . . took the change well and 
is expected to lend important help . . . very effective defensive player and good 
tackier . . . adequate blocker and should improve this phase of line play after more 
experience . . . married and has a daughter Debbie and a new son this summer, 
Jeffrey ... in School of Agiiculture majoring in Pre-Veterinarian. 

BILL BURGLY, 20, 6-3, 200, Sophomore from New Kensington, Pa. — after a year 
with the B squad, it looks like the hard-working lineman hit his peak in spring 
drills and now is ready to offer an important assist to the good Terp line . . . one 
of the most impressive line men in early practice . . . outstanding blocker and a 
demon on defense . . . extremely difficult to move him out of the way . . . 
good offensive charge and pursuit . . . with a game or two of battle, he could 
bear watching. 

FRED KERN, 19, 5-10, 200, Sophomore from Baltimore, Md JOE HEURING, 18, 

— 42 — 



5-11, 185, Sophomore from Rochester, Pa., and TOM FLOR, 19, 6-0, 215, Sophomore 
from' Elizabe'.h, N. J. are a trio of outstanding line prospects up from last year's 
best freshman team ... all were first team boys and are being counted on to pick 
up some valuable e.xperience this fall on the varsity ... all are top-notch offen- 
sive and defensive players . . . Heuring is the brother of star tackle Ed, a senijr 
this year. . . . Other guard candidates are BOB GRIFFITH from the B team and 
BILL LAZARO, a promising soph. 

CENTERS 

GENE ALDERTON, 20, 6-0, 200, Junior from Cumberland, Md. — inherits the jjb of 
filling the graduated shoes of all-America and Player of the Year canter BOB 
PELLEGRINI . . . coaches are confident he will do more than asked ol' him . . . 
he is most capable of doing just that ... a really great center, whom you might 
say was an "unfortunate football player" playing behind one of Maryland's all-t.m^ 
great stars . . . the outstanding Alderton could easily have been first string center 
on most any football team in the country, he is that sensational ... he gave en 
e:;cellent account of himself each game . . . excels offensively . . . outstanding 
blocker with a lot of finesse . . . keen defensive player being one of the finest 
linebackers in the game ... an all-around spectacular player . . . sure fuLure 
star . . . majoring in Industrial Education. 

RONALD LANEVE, 19, 6-2, 200, Sophomore from Pittsburgh, Fa. — was a top 

prospect last fall after a real good freshman year but had to drop out of school 
for the semester because of illness in the family . . . returned in the spring and 
took hold of his reputation and came through in fine style in spring drills . . . 
expected to be first replacement for Alderton but will have to keep play above par 
to stay in front of strong pursuers ... a tower of strength as a two-way center 
. . . good linebacker . . . was a star performer for Pittsburgh's South Hill High 
School. 

WILBUR MAIN, 22, 6-2, 195, Junior from Frederick, Md. — came to the Terps last 
fall as a transfer from Potomac State, highly recommended . . . with center spot 
in good shape, he was held out of competition although he made the trips in case of 
need . . . hard woL-^ker and likes it rough . . . lean and mean ... in School 
of Physical Education. 

LYNN ATHEY, 19, 6-2, 210, Sophomore from Front Royal, Va. — another highly 
touted boy who came to Maryland with fabulous record and recommendations . . . 
with a great fresliman year behind him and one of the most impressive performances 
of the yearlings in spring drills, Athey vows to be top varsity candidate . . . 
fits into Mont's plans for this fall . . . big strong boy with a lot of potential 
which his desire and eagerness will bring out . . . experience will help and at 
close of year will be dangerous ... in School of Arts and Science. 

CORBETT KERIN, 26, 6-3, 225, Sophomore from New Britain, Conn. — one of the 
real fine morale guys on the squad . . . big boy with quite a service background 
. . . was a deep-sea diver four years and has spent his summers diving up north . . . 
big boy vv'hose potential and ability could be realized with one solid effort ... al- 
ways trying . . . never quits and gives his all every minute on the field ... in 
School of Business and Public Administration. 

QUARTERBACKS 

FRANK TAMBURELLO, 22, 5-10, 185, Senior from Baltimore, Md. — the clever 
.■^plit-T general is another in the line of great Maryland quarterbacks . . . after 
showing better than any prospects as a freshman, the slick ball handler came 
along brilliantly his sophomore year and took over at mid-season to lead the Terps 
to iheir final five victories of '54 . . . then last season he performed his Split-T 
magic like the magicians that preceded him, Scarbath. Faloney. and Boxold, and 
led the Terps to their third unbeaten season in the past five years . . . his 
record now shows 15 regular season wins in a row for the Terps and it is Mont 
who has inherited the talented "Tambo" who can do the real "Mambj" with a 
football ... it is on his highly respected football ability that the Terps hope 
to get off to a good start under their new coach, and there is none more capable 
of taking the reins than "Tambo" ... he definitely wiil be in for all- America 
honors if he leads the Terps to a good season . . . many observers believe the 
deceptive "Tambo" will be more outstanding this fall than his first two years . . . 
a sort of carbon copy of the former All- America two-way qb, Bemie Faloney 
a real triple threat operator who can run, pass, punt, call a masterful sequence oi' 
plays and still rate as the top defender in the secondary . . . also dangerous on 
punt and kick-off returns . . . has much better than average speed for a qb . . . 
in fact, he is one of fleetest afoot on the team . . . early fall rankings tout' him 
as one of nation's top 3 quarterbacks ... his brilliant leadership record, and play 
definitely qualifies him for this high esteem by coaches, players, and experts 

— 43 — 



will be key to Mont attack . . . the "nifty Tambo" won high honors for his play 
as a iunior ... he was honorable mention all-America AP, UP, and NEA . . . 
first team Movietone News; first team all-Conference on AP ballot; second team all- 
Conference UP and Southern Writers' ; and second team, INS, all-South . . . had a 
1.2 rushing average for 81 keeps (all losses coming on pass attempts) ... hit for 
28 of 58 passes for 497 yards and 4 tds. . . had four interceoted . . . had a 4.3 
total offense figure . . . punted 5 times for 21.2 average . . . intercepted one pass 
for 21 yard return . . . returned two kickoffs for 78 yards . . . one punt return 
for three yards . . . scored twice . . . was hit by a throat infection and played 
with second unit in Clemson game and still led team to a score ... a two-year 
lacrosse letterman . . . married ... a Pre- Law Student. 

JOHN FRITSCH, 19, 6-0, 185, Junior from Carnegie, Pa. — a real classy quarterback 
... if his showing in his appearances in games of last season are indication of 
his future. Mont's signal-calling department has no problem facing it ... a "true" 
one-platoon qb, and as the coaches say of him, "he seems born for the job" . . . 
the husky lad from all-America Bernie Faloney's high school, Scott Twp., seems to 
have followed his pattern to be a quarterback for the highly promising young star 
can do everything on offense and defense and do it well ... he leaves little to be 
desired in the way of calling plays ... he has the added attribute of leadership 
on and off the field . . . one of Terps' finest passers, both hjng and short . . . 
looked brilliant in spring practice hitting his receivers with pin-point accuracy and 
gene/ally mixing up his offense to the satisfaction of the coaches . . . does top 
punting job . . . could be team's number one punter . . . outstanding runner with 
keen judgment on the keep play . . . should make his maik this fall for future 
honors ... in School of Arts and Science. 

BOB RUSEVLYAN, 20, 6-0, 175, Sophomore from Washington, D. C. — one of th? 
finest athletes to come out of St. John's High in D. C. — was all-Metropolitan in 
football and basketball . . . has had a profitable year experience with the B team 
and can be used at quarterback or halfback . . . good little team leader ... a 
wiry package of good football material . . . good passer . . . clever and elusive 
runner . . . has abundance of desire and determination . . . has exceptional defen- 
sive skill for his size . . . good sure tackier ... in School of Business and Public 
Administration. 

DICKIE LEWIS, 19, 5-11, 175, Sophomore from Martinsburg, W. Va. — one of ths 
top "finds" of the year was this exceptional star who led the Maryland freshmen 
team to its first undefeated, untied season in the school's history . . . outstanding in 
every department, Lewis handled the team like a veteran Split-T operator and has 
given the Terps high hopes for continued great quarterbacking for the future . . . 
his senior year at Martinsburg, he led the team to the school's first undefeated 
mark in history of the high school . . . made all-Section in W. Va. his junior 
and senior years . . . every action he has displays magnificience both offensively 
and defensively . . . one of best passers in a long time ... in School of Business 
and Public Administration 

HALFBACKS 

JACK HEALY, 20, 5-11, 135, Junior from Brooklyn, N. Y. — one of the real big 
pleasant surprises last year . . . came back for fall drills and won the starting 
role at right half as a soph from the veteran letterman Howie Dare . . . starred 
both offensively and defensively every game ... a real speedster with tremend .u; 
power in his legs . . . has abundance of desire and will to play . . . one of the 
best defensive backs on the squad . . . created a lot of excitement with his 
stellar two-way exhibitions . . . was ACC "Sophomore of the Week" after a 
brilliant game against Wake Forest . . . had a 4.8 rushing average with 276 yards 
in 56 carries . . . passed twice for no completions . . . caught 10 passes for 182 
yards and two scores . .. intercepted three passes for 51-yard return . . . scared 
four touchdowns . . . had four kickoff returns for 89 yards . . . seven punt returns 
for 70 yards . . . statijitics show his great all-arou:id value to the team . . . 
should have a great year . . . won New York State's coveted Lou Gehrig Award 
for excellence in athletics and academics as well as the Lenny Singer Award, a 
similar lecognition ... a Public Relations Major. 

FRED HAMILTON, 20, 5-11, 180, Junior from Freeport, Pa. — after an astonishing 
brilliant year playing fullback as a sophomore at 170 pounds. Mont has moved the 
boy whom former coach Tatum called "one of the greatest all-around football players 
I ever have coached" back to halfback with the return of a well 205-pound fullback 
Tom Selep ... it was the iniury to Selep the first day of fall drills in '55 that 
prompted Tatum to move his "prize pupil" to the all-important Split-T fullback job 
. . . halfback is his original position as it was when he starred at Freeport High 
. . . highly sought after, the hard-working Hamilton came through spectacularly at 
his new assignment . . . knowing he was a great football player, the staff had 

— 44 — 



utmost confidenoe that he. would do the job. both offensively and defensively and the 
smallest fullback ever to play for Tatum responded with outstanding performances 
... he made his mark as a freshman as he became one of the brightest looking 
prospects to hit the Terp camp in a long time ... the never tiring junior can be 
counted on for fiO-minnte performances, if needed . . he had ' several such 

exhibitions as a fre.'ihman ... a real rugged hoy with great power and most 
of all he pns.sesses delirious desire to play and he carried this asset through each 
minute he olayed . . . still termed by his freshman coach Dovell, now varsity 
assistant, as the best he has had . . . one of the keenest defensive backs and a 
real sure and rugged tackier . . . biggest offensive showing was at Baylor .^ame 
when he led the Terp ball carriers . . . suffered a shoulder iniury in the North 
Carolina game and missed the Syracuse game . . . came back" to join the first 
unit . . carried 50 times for 243 yards, and a 4.9 average, not losing a yard 
. . . this IS best average of returning backs . . . caught 2 passes for 27 yards 
. . . intercepted 1 oas=: for .36 yard return . . . scoired one td playing the 

fullback slot brought out another of his outstanding attributes, that of blocking 
as high scoring Vereb co:"^mended liim. "T wouldn't have scored half that many 
tds If It hadn t been for the great blocks Hamilton threw for me" . . undoubtedly 
the most famous of them all was the block of UCLA's Jim Dekker as he cut him 
down to allow Vereb to shoot untouched for 17 yards and the big td of the year 
. . did a good lob at left half this spring but will have to keep on his toes with 
first-class players pushing hard ... in School of Physical Education. 

HOWIE DARE. 21. 5-'1. 185, Senior from Baltimore, Md. — as a soph, he crashed 
into the starting lineup with exceptional skill as ball carrier and defensive back and 
one of team's most dangerous threats with punt and kickoff returns . . . reluctantly 
relinquished job last fall to hustling and hard to keep out Healy . . . however, the 
Baltimore flash came through with a big year in playing nearly half the time . . . 
finished the season with a 4.6 yard average for 60 carries with 278 yards ... he 
averaged 6.3 yards as a soph ... a terrific runner, in fact the hard runner with 
such great speed as he twists and turns literally gallops . . . the galloping Dare's 
unusual running style makes him extremely dangerous and hard to get a good 
crack at by tacklers . . . also a good passer and a top threat as a receiver with 
his deceptiveness . . . caught 10 passes for 74 yards and three scores ... his total 
of 3 tds all came on these pass receptions . . . had one 45-yard kickoff return . . . 
brought back 7 punts for 70 yards . . . quite a baseball player . . . was excused 
from spring grid practice so he could play baseball . . . was the leading hitter for 
the Terps, coming home with a .361 average. 4th best in the ACC ... his speed 
got him 9 stolen bases . . . second team all-Conference in baseball . . . scouts after 
him . . . bears watching for a return to the number one right half position . . . 
all-State in Maryland as a star halfback . . . married this summer ... in School 
of Business and Public Administration. 

.lOHN McVICKER. 20, 5-9, 195, Junior from Cumberland, Md. — has poss bly the 
greatest running potential of any Terp back . . . wasn't used a great deal last fall 
but is expected to be one of the big boys this year . . . will be pushing for the 
first string job . . . has jet speed with a fabulous change of pace without slowing 
him down . . . Georgia Coach Wally Butts, in watching a spring practice, said he 
was cne of the BEST he has seen ... he is the same Coach who vi'anted Dare so 
bad'y ... if he should explode his potential, he could make a lot of coaches and 
other folks most happy . . . (and others unhappy) . . . although he has looked all- 
America in past spring drills, he looked even better this spring . . . tremendous 
offensively and ccnfidence with his offensive chores would help develop himself de- 
fensively . . . with his explosiveness and speed, he is type runner that is a threat 
to go all the way anytime he gets the ball . . . carried just 7 times last fall for 
3.7 mark . . . made one interception for 17 yard return and returned on kickoff for 
10 yards ... an all-Stater in football at Fort Hill High ... a three-year letterman 
in football, track, and basketball . . . won Hazelwood Award and Player of Year 
Award his senior year ... in School of Arts and Science. 

TED KERSHNER, 19, 6-0, 175, Sophomore from Martinsburg, W. Va. — if there was 
ever a boy who must be placed in the "we told you so" category, it is this flaet 
and fabulous standout just a little over an hour's ride from the College Park campus 
and just across the border into W. Va., Ted (Teddy) Kershner ... if ever there 
has been a Terp halfback that runs like the wind or a Western gazelle or appears 
like a jet on foot, it is Kershner . . . already he is likened to the all- American 
Chet "the jet" Hanulak and Ronnie Waller as they wrote gridiron history for the Red 
and White their senior years, but this boy, as a freshman and in spring drills, once 
the gun sounds, is off the mark with shot-like propulsion ... he has three years 
in which to try to make the old guard forget the likes of Hanulak, Waller, and 
the hard-running high-scoring Vereb of last fall . . . coaches and teammates say he 
can do it and all in the Terp camp welcome the opportunity of being here to help 
him ... it was his terrific all-around play that helped so much in bringing the 
frosh its first clean record in school's history, just as he helped accomplish for his 

— 45 — 



high school team the previous year as a senior at Martinsburg High . . . you might 
call him the consistent tyoe hall player, then in the same breath. c.hU him the 
"clutch" player, also . . . just like the "real clutch hitter" at the plate ... he 
always does a good job. but when most needed he came through with some of tha 
longest runs to score or set \ip a Id ... in the big "International" battle last 
October in Mexico City against Mexico Poly, in rarifled air, Kersher went 97 yards 
for a score in the final period after playing most of the game ... he led the 
Terp yearlings in scoring, 8 tds in five games . . . against the Navy Plebss he 
went 87. 56. and 12 yards for scores . . . taking a handoff is not only his forte 
... he is dangeiGus punt and kickoff return man ... he had three punt returns 
over 40 yards, a kickoff return of 56 and another for 60 and a td against Carolina's 
Tar Babies . . . smart player who loves the game . . . more adequate defensively, 
also . . . good passer and good receiver . . . one of the BEST . . . bears watching 
. . . lettered in football and track fours years in liigh school . . . was a hurdler 
and dash man, a good combination for a hard-running back . . . second team all- 
State and first team all-section his senior year ... in School of Business and Public 
Administration. 

RALPH HAWKINS, 20, 5-10, 185, Junior f i om Washington, D. C. — a three-sport lat- 
terman at St. John's three years in fo itball. basketball, and baseball . . . highly 
touted District boy who, after a yeai's holdout, got varsity experience last year, 
mostly defense . . . good two-way halfback and has been used as quarterback, his 
position in high school . . . strong and smart ball player . . . Moat exceptionally 
pleased with his fine offensive work this spring at right halfback . . . already a 
known quantity on defense . . . good passer, runner, and one of team's top punters 
. . . should be ready to play a lot of ball this fall . . . being counted on . . . 
all-Metropolitan three years in all three sports . . . majoring in Criminology. 

BOB LAYMAN, 19, 5-11, 180, Sophomore from Brentwood. Pa. — brother of ass'stant 
coach Fred Layman, who himself was an all-time halfback prospect for the Terps 
. . . Bob still another outstanding candidate up from the freshman team . . . has 
inherent abilities which label him as one of the boys to count on for the future 
. . . could be this season ... a standout for Dovell last year . . . impressive in 
spring drills . . . runs hard with good speed and finesse . . . has a good football 
mind . . . has defensive skill ... in the School of Arts and Science. 

FULLBACKS 

TOM SELEP, 21, 6-1, 205. Senior from Califo.-nia, Pa. — with a knee injury hitting 
the powerful fullback the first day ui fall practice in '55. the highly regarded Selep 
had to stay out the season and his early loss caused great concern in the Terp 
camp . . . now a well Selep has been the early sensation in Mint's plans for his 
first season as head coach ... he gave one of the most impressive displays of tre- 
mendous fullback play this spring and showed no indications of favoring the old 
injury . . . many think he looked his all-time best in the spring, a gojd omen for 
the attack this fall . . . has great potential which can be utilized this fall ... as 
a junior he had a 5.7 rushing average for 27 carries ... is probably the fastest 
fullback the Terps have had in quite a number of years . . . actually spr.nts like 
a halfback once he gets a bit of daylight beyond the line of scrimmage . . . likes to 
Inill his way over tacklers and r-an ri.j . . . has a strong pair of legs which gives 
him so mucn more powerful charge ... is also a master on defense . . . has good 
play diagnosis and is tough competitor . . . one of best tacklers on tha team . . . 
besides his fine two-way ability Selep is an excellent place-kicker and kick-off man 
. . . being counted on to be one of the big guns in Terp attack . . . important to 
the fullback post, he has uncanny blocking skills ... a three-sport three year let- 
term.an in high school . . . married this summer . . . averaging over "B" woik i-i 
Engineering. 

JIM SKARDA, 21. 6-1, 205, Senior from Baltimore, Md. — with tha fullback situation 
a little thin in e.xperienced reserves, it will be Skarda, a two-year letterman, upon 
vvhcm the coaches are counting on for his biggest year more than anybody else . . . 
has shoun flashes of brilliance at times both offensively and defensively, but Jim 
must become a consistent running fullback in order to come through as hoped . . . 
he is a hoy who certainly has the physical equipment for a bone-cracking touglr 
running fullback ... a fine blockei- and a defensive stalwart . . . nice boy on 
and off the field . . . even a bit more lean and mean on the field wouldn't change 
e\erybody liking the serious "nice guy" Skarda ... in Engineering School. 

LARRY CASPARRO, JIM HATTER, and JACK MILLER are three top candidates up 
from the freshman team that definitely will be counted on for varsily duty to give 
the needy hand to Selep and Skarda . . . spring practice showed all three at about 
the same pace so it will be the impression in early fall diills that will dec.de the 
3 and 4 fb . . . the coaches might ha\e given a slight nod to Hatter, a fine two- 
way prospect. 

-- 46 — 



TERPS ON HONORARY SELECTf ONS — 1955 

BOB PELLEGRINI 

PLAYER OF THE YEAR — UNANIMOUS ALL-AMERICA 

PLAYER OiF THE YEAR and winner of the WA: TER CAMP MEM- 
ORIAL TROIPHY as selected by COLLIER'S Magazine and the 
American Footiball Coaches' Association. 

Li'neman of the Year as selected by Washington Touclidown Club. 

Awarded the KNUTE ROCKNE MEMORIAL TROPHY by TD Club. 

LINEMAN OF THE YEAR as selected by UNITED PRESS. 

First Team All-America, Collier's Magazine. 

First Team All-America LOOK Magazine. 

First Team All-America, Associated Press 

First Team All-Am.erica, United Press. 

First Team All-America, International News Service. 

First Team All-America, NEA. 

Top Lineman in HEISMAN TROPHY balloting. 

First Team All-America, New York Daily News. 

First Team All-America, GRIDIRON RECORD. 

First Team All-America, The Quarterback, SPORTING NEWS. 

First Team All-America, Christy Walsh. 

First Team All-Amerioa, William Randolph Hearst "Big-6". 

First Team All-America, NBC. 

First Team All-America, TV Guide by Frank Leahy. 

First Team All-America, Movietone News. 

First Team All-America, Paramount News. 

First Team All-America, Jet Miagazine. 

First Team All-America, Extension Magazine. 

First Team All-America, Gene Ward, N.Y. Daily News, "Inside Sports". 

Atlantic Coast Conference PLAYER OF THE YEAR, Associated Press. 

Atlantic Coast Conference PLAYER OF THE YEAR, Southern Writers' 
Assn. 

Win^ner of Conference JACOBS BLOCKING TROPHY — Best Blocker 
in Conference. 

First Team All-Conference, Associated Press. 

First Team, All-Conference, United Press. 

First Team, All-Conference, Southern Writers' Assn. 

First Team, All-South, N.Y. Daily News. 

First Team, All-South, International News Service. 

PLAYER OF THE YEAR, Washington Area by Washington Post and 
Times-Herald. 

First Draft Choice of PHILADELPHIA EAGLES. 

LINEMAN OF THE YEAR, Philadelphia Sports Writers' Associatica. 

ED VEREB 

First Team All-America Movietone News. 

First Team All-America, Gene Ward, New Yorl<: Daily News, "Inside 
Sports" 

First Team All-America, Extension Magazine. 

Second Team All-America, I-nternational News Service 

Second Team All-America, William Randolph Hearst "Big 6" 

Third Team All-America, Associated Press. 

Third Team All-America, United Press. 

Third Team All-America, The Quarterback, SPORTING NEWS. 

Honorable Mention All-America, NEA. 

First Team All-South, N.Y. Daily News. 

— 47 — 



First Team All-South, International News Service. 
First Team All-Conference, Associated Press. 
First Team All-Conferance, United Press. 
First Team All-Conference, Southern Writers' Assn. 

Runnerup to Pellegrini as Conference PLAYER OF THE YEAR, South- 
ern Writers' Assn. 
First Draft Choice of WASHINGTON REDSKINS. 

MIKE SANDUSKY 

First Team All-America, The Quarterback, SPORTING NEWS. 

First Team All-America, Extension Magazine. 

Second Team All-America, UNITED PRESS. 

Second Team All-America, NEA. 

Second Team All-America, N.Y. Daily News. 

Honorable Mention All-America, Associated Press. 

First Team All-South, New York Daily News. 

First Team All-South, International News Service. 

First Team All-Conference, Associated Press. 

First Team All-Conference, United Press. 

First Team All-Conference, Southern Writers' Assn. 

Two Votes in United Press LINEMAN OF YEAR balloting. 

JACK DAVIS 

Honorable Mention All-America, Associated Press. 
Honorable Mention All-America, United Press. 
Honorable Mention All-America, NEA. 
First Team All-Conference, Associated Press. 
First Team All-Conference, Southern Writers' Assn. 
Second Team All-South, International News Service. 
Second Team All-Conference, United Press. 

FRANK TAMBURELLO 

First Team All-Ameri>'a, Movietone News. 

Honorable Mention All-America, Associated Press. 

Honorable Mention All-America, United Press. 

Honorable Mention All-America, NEA. 

First Team All-Conference, Associated Press. 

Second Team All-South, International News Service. 

Second Team All-Conference, United Press. 

Second Team All-Conference, Southern Writers' Assn. 

BILL WALKER 
Second Team All-America, United Press. 

Second Team All-America, The Quarterback, SPORTING NEWS. 
Honorable Mention All-America, NEA. 
First Team All-South, N.Y. Daily News. 
First Team All-Conference, United Press. 
Second Team All-Conference, Associated Press. 
Second Team All-Conference, Southern Writers' Assn. 

RUSSELL DENNIS 
First Team All-America, Gene Ward, N.Y. Daily News, "Inside Sports". 
Second Team All-Conference, Associated Press. 
Second Team All-Conference, United Press. 
Second Team All-Conference, Southern Writers' Assn. 

ED HEURING 
Honorable Mention All-America, Associated Press. 
Honorable Mention All-America, United Press. 

— 48 — 



TERP ALL-AMERICA PLAYERS 

1949 — Ray Krouse, Tackle— Second Team 

1950 — Bob Ward, Guard — First Teams 

1951 — Bob Ward, Guard — First Teams 

1951 — ED "Big Mo" Modzelewski, Fullback — First and Second Teams 

1951 — Dick "Little Mo" Modzelewski, Tackle — One First Team; Most 

Second Teams 
1952 — Jack Scarbath, Quarterback — First Teams 
1952 — Dick "Little Mo" Modzelewski, Tackle — First Teams 
1952 — Tom Cosgrove, Center — Second Team 
1953 — Stan Jones, Tackle — First Teams 
1953 — Bernie Faloney, Quarterback — Eight First Teams; all Second 

Teams 
1953 — Chester Hanulak, Halfback — Second Teams 
1954 — Dick Bielski, Fullback — Third Teams 
1954 — Jack Bowersox, Guard — First Team (Gridiron Index) 
1954— Bill Walker, End— Second Team (AP) 

1955 — Bob Peileigrini, Center — UNANIMOUS First Team All-America 
1955 — Ed Vereb, Halfback — First Team, Movietone News; First Team, 

N.Y. Daily News; First Team, Extension Magazine; Second 

team, INS; Second Team, Hearst "Big 6"; Third Team, AP, 

UP, Sporting News 
1955 — Mike Sandusky, Tackle — First Team, Sporting News; Extension 

Magazine; Second Teams 
1955 — "ack Davis, Guard — Honorable Mention, AP, UP, NEA 
1955 — Frank Tamburello, quarterback — First Team, -Movietone News; 

Honorable Mention, AP, UP, NEA 
1955 — Bill Walker, End — Second Team, UP; Sporting News; Honorable 

Mention, NEA 
1955 — Russell Dennis, End — First Team, N. Y. Daily News 
1955 — Ed Heuring, Tackle — Honorable Mention, AP, UP 

ADDITIONAL HONORS FOR TERP ALL-AMERICAS 
BOB WARD— 1951 

"Linema-n of Year" as selected by Washington Touchdown Club; re- 
ceived the Knute Rockne Memorial Trophy. 

"Lineman of Year" as selected by Philadelpiiia Sportswriters' Assn. 

Runner-up to Stanford's Bill McColl as Associated Press Lineman 
of Year 

"Player of the Year" in Southern Conference, 1951. 

Most Valuable Player of '50 Gator Bowl as a sophomore. 

Voted Most Valualble Player Award by his teammates four consecu- 
tive years. 

JACK SCARBATH— 1952 

Runner-up to Billy Vessels, Oklahoma, for Heisman Memorial Tro- 
phy as nation's outstanding football player. 

"Back of the Year" selected by COLLIER'S Magazine. 

"Sportsman of the Year" Award given by SPORT Magazine. 

Second high vote getter in United Press "Player of Year" poll. 

Third high vote getter in Associated Press "Player of Year" poll. 

"Player of the Year" in Southern Conference, 1952. 

"South's Most Valuable Player" in North-South Shrine Game, 
Miami, Fla. 

First draft choice of Washington Redskins; 

— 49 — 



DICK "Little Mo" MODZELEWSKI— 1952 

"Lineman of Year" Award, LOOK Magazine as solected by Grant- 
land Rice and Football Writer's Assn. of America. Received the John 
B. Outland Memorial Trophy for this selection. 

"Lineman of Year" as selected by Washirigton Touchdown Club; re- 
ceived the Knute Rockne Memorial Trophy. 

Second high vote getter in United Pres:^ "Lineman of Yaar" poll. 

Second high vote getter in SPORTING NEWS "Lineman of Year" 
poll. 

Fourth high vote getter in ASSOCIATED PRESS "Liiiem.an of 
Year" poll. 

Se?ond draft choice of Washington Redskins. 
STANLEY JONES— 1953 

"Lineman of Year" awarded by COLLIER'S Magazine. 

"Lineman of Year" as selected by Washington Touchdown Club; re- 
ceived the Knute Rockne Memorial Trophy. 

Runnerup to J. D. Roberts, Oklahoma, for ASSOCIATED PRESS 
"Lineman of Year' award. 

Fifth draft choice of Chicago Bears as a junior. 
BERNIE FALONEV— 1953 

Named to the "All-America Backfie'.d" selected by the Washington 
Touchdown Club. 

"Player of the Year" of the Atlantic Coast Conference. 

First team ACADEMIC All-American. 

Fifth highest vote getter in AP "Back of the Year" poll. 

First draft choice of San Francisco Forty-Niners. 
DICK BIELSKI— 1954 

Voited "Most Valuable Player Award" in North-Sou'jh Shrine Game. 

First draft choice of Philadelphia Eagles. 
BOB PELLEGRINI— 1955 

"Football Player of the Year" and winner of the WALTER CAMP 
MEMORIAL TROPHY as selected by COLLIER'S Magazine and the 
American Football Coaches' Assn. 

"Lineman of the Year" as selected by COLLIER'S Magazine and tlie 
American Football Coaches' Assn. 

"Lineman of the Year" as selected by the Washington Touchdown 
Club, awarded KNUTE ROCKNE MEMORIAL TROPHY by TD Club. 

"Lineman of the Year" as selected by the United Press 

"Lineman of the Year" as selected by the Philadelphia Sports Writ- 
ers' Association. 

TOP LINEMAN in HEISMAN TROPHY balloting. 

UNANIMOUS ALL-AMERICA 

PLAYER OF THE YEAR of Atlantic Coast Conference as selected by 
the Associated Press and Southern Writers' Association. 

Winner of the JACOBS BLOCKING TROPHY as best blocker in 
Atlantic Coast Conference. 

FIRST DRAFT CHOICE of the PHILADELPHIA EAGLES. 

Played m NORTH-SOUTH All-Star Game. 

CO-CAPTAIN of ALL-STAR for Chicago ALL-STAR-PRO GAME 
in August and voted the Out.standinig Player Award after the game. 
ED VEREB — 1955 

Runnerup to Pellegrini as ACC PLAYER OF THE YEAR. 

FIRST DRAFT CHOICE of the WASHINGTON REDSKINS. 

Played in NORTH-SOUTH All-Star Game. 

Set a new school and conference scoring record with his 102 points. 



1855 HIGHLIGHTS 

LONGEST RUSH FROM SCRIMMAGE: 

66 yards by Ed Vereb against Oklahoma in Orange Bowl. 
LONGEST PASS COMPLETION: 

Lynn Beightol to Russ Dennis, 41 yards for touchdown against G.W. 
MOST PASSES CAUGHT ONE GAME: 

Ed Vereb — 3 for 74 yards in Wake Forest game. 

Jack Healy — 3 for 77 yards in Clemson game. 

Howie Dare — 3 for 15 yards in North Carolina game. 
MOST PASSES THROWN ONE GAME: 

9 for 5 and 107 yards against Wake Foresit by Tamburello. 

9 for 5, and 87 yards and two TDs against Baylor by Tambure^lio. 

8 for 4 completions and 83 yards and two TDs against Clemson by 
Lynn Beightol. 

MOST PASSES COMPLETED ONE GAME: 

Frank Tamburello — 5 out of 9 for 107 yards against Wake Forest. 
Frank Tamburello — 5 out of 9 for 87 yards, 2 TDs at Baylor. 

LONGEST KICK-OFF RETURN: 

Howard Dare — 45 yards against North Carolina. 
LONGEST PUNT RETURN: 

Howard Dare — 28 yards against Syracuse. 
LONGEST PUNT: 

Lynn Beightol — 51 yards against LSU. 

Bill Walker — 51 yards against UCLA. 
LOW NET GAIN IN ONE GAME — (Rushing): 

147 yards againrt UCLA. 
HIGH NET GAIN IN ONE GAME — (Rushing): 

249 yards against South Carolina. 
LOW NET GAIN BY OPPONENT — (Rushing): 

Minus 21 yards by UCLA. 
HIGH NET GAIN BY OPPONENT — (Rushing) : 

157 yards by Clemson. 
LEAST PASSING YARDAGE ONE GAME: 

22 yards against Missouri. 
MOST PASSING YARDAGE ONE GAME: 

151 yards against Wake Poorest. 
LEAST PASSING YARDAGE BY OPPONENT ONE GAME: 

39 yards by LSU. 
MOST PASSING YARDAGE BY OPPONENT ONE GAME: 

175 yards by Baylor. 
LONGEST INTERCEPTION RETURN: 

Fred Hamilton — 36 yards against Wake Forest. 
MOST TOUCHDOWNS SCORED IN ONE GAME: 

Ed Vereb — 3 against North and South Carolina. Vereb also 
passed for a fourth against North Carolina. 
MOST TEAM TOUCHDOWNS SCORED ONE GAME: 

5 against Syracuse. 
MOST POINTS SCORED: 

96 by Ed Vereb. He scored in the Orange Bowl to give him 102 
points and a new school record. 



FINAL 1955 TEAM STATISTICS 

MARYLAND OPPONENTS 

First Downs 143 100 

Rushing 106 48 

Passing 32 43 

Penalties 5 9 

Total Yards Rushing 2317 1139 

Yards Lost Rushing 355 378 

Net Yards Rushing 1962 761 

Average Yards Rushing 196.2 76.1 

Forward Passes Attempted 112 195 

Forward Passes Completed 48 83 

Net Yards Passing 838 932 

Passes Intercepted By 30 12 

Yards Interceptions Returned - 324 89 

Total Yards Gained (Rush & Pass) 2800 1691 

Average Total Gain Per Game 280.0 169.1 

Total Number Punts 43 63 

Punting Average 37.8 37.5 

Total Points Scored 211 57 

Touchdowns 32 9 

Extra Points 19-32 3-9 

Field Goals 0-4 

1955 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS 

RUSHING 

Carries Gain Loss 

*Vereib 113 655 13 

Tamiburello 81 256 159 

Dare 60 311 33 

J. Healy (9 Gm.) 56 280 4 

Hamilton (9 Qm.) 50 243 

Perlo (9 Gm.) 42 181 3 

*Nusz (9 Gm.) 41 208 7 

*Beightol 33 37 109 

*Burgee 15 51 5 

McVicker 7 26 

Skarda 5 36 

Fritsch 5 1 14 

*Lauigihery 3 18 

Hawkins 3 9 7 

*Walker 12 

*Parsons 110 

PASSING 

Att. Comp. Yds. 

Tamiburello 58 28 497 

*Beightol 20 9 159 

*Vereib 15 6 87 

*Nusz 9 4 67 

Fritsoh 5 1 28 

Dare 3 

J. Healy 2 

— 52 — 



Net 


Avg. 


642 


5.7 


97 


1.2 


278 


4.6 


276 


4.8 


243 


4.9 


178 


4.2 


201 


4.9 


-72 


-2.2 


46 


3.0 


26 


3.7 


36 


7.2 


-13 


-2.6 


18 


6.0 


2 


.7 


2 


2.0 


1 


1.0 


Had 




Int. 


TDs 


4 


4 


2 


3 


3 


2 


1 


2 


1 





1 












TOTAL OFFENSE 

Total Plays Net Gain Avg. 

Tamburello 139 594 4 3 

*Vereb 128 729 5.7 

Dare 63 278 4.4 

J. Healy 58 274 4.7 

*Beightol 53 110 2.0 

*Nusz 50 267 5.3 

Fritsch 10 16 1.6 

all others same as afeove RUSHING figures 

PASS RECEIVING 

No. Caught Yards TDs 

J. Healy 10 182 2 

Dare 10 74 3 

*Denniis 6 170 3 

*Vereb 5 111 1 

*Parsonis 4 90 

*Walker 4 87 2 

Cooke 2 46 

''^Plynn 2 36 

Hamilton 2 27 

Perlo 2 20 

PASS INTERCEPTIONS 

No. Int. Yds. Ret. 

*Vereb 4 38 

*Nusz 4 ■ 31 

J. Healy 3 51 

*Pellegrini 2 7 

Hamilton 1 33 

*Parsons 1 34 

*Burgee 1 26 

Tamburello 1 21 

Weber 1 19 

McVioker 1 17 

Dare 1 12 

Skarda 1 8 

Alderton 1 8 

Kolarac 1 5 

*Beighitol 1 3 

'^^Walker 1 3 

Athey 1 3 

*TulLai 1 3 

*Dyson 1 

HaAvkiins 1 

Perlo 1 

TD PASSES THROWN 

Tamiburelilo 4 

*Beightol 3 

*Vereb 2 

*Nusz 2 

— 5.3 — 



Yards 


Avg. 


701 


35.0 


656 


43.7 


106 


21.2 


77 


38.5 


24 


24.0 



Yds. Ret. 


TD3 


81 


U 


70 





32 





37 





11 





4 





3 






TD PASSES CAUGHT 

Dare 3 

*Denn.is 3 

J. Healy 2 

*Walker 2 

*Verco 1 



PUNTING 

No. 

■■Beightol 20 

^Walker (9 Gm.) 15 

Tamburello 5 

^Nuisz 2 

Hawkins 1 



PUNT RETURNS 

No. 

*Vereb 10 

Dare 7 

*Nusz 5 

*Burgee 3 

J. Healy 2 

^Dennis 1 

Tamburello 1 



KICKOFF RETURNS 

No. 

*Vereb 5 

J. Healy 4 

Tamburello 2 

*BeigMol 2 

Care 1 

*Nusz 1 

^Parsons 1 

McVicker 1 

*Dennis 1 



SCORING 

TD3 

*Vereb 16 

J. Healy 4 

Dare 3 

*Dennis 3 

*Laughery 

Tamburello 2 

*Walker 2 

Perlo 1 

Hamdlton 1 

Komlo 

* Graduated 

— 54 — 



Is. Ret. 


TDs 


114 





89 





78 





36 





45 





25 





li 





10 












PATs 


FG 


Total Pts. 


C 2 





96 








24 








18 








18 


14-20 


0-3 


14 








12 








12 


3-6 





9 








6 


2-3 


0-1 


2 



THE 1956 ORANGE BOWL YARDSTICK 
TEAM STATISTICS 

MARYLAND OKLAHOMA 

First Downs Rushing '7 14 

First Downs Passing 2 2 

First Downs Penalties — 

TOTAL FIRCT DOWNS 9 16 

Rus.hdng Plays 47 64 

Yards Gained Rushing 206 244 

Yards Lost Rushing 19 42 

NET YARDS RUSiHING 187 202 

Forward Passes Attempted 10 10 

Forward Passes Completed 3 4 

Yards Gained Passing 46 53 

TOTAL YARDS, RUSHING AND PASSING 233 255 

Oiwn Passes Initerceipted 3 1 

Numlber oif Punts 7 8 

Punting Average 40 34 

Ciwn Fumbles -_ 3 1 

Own Fumbles Lost 2 1. 

Yards Penalized 61 35 

MARYLAND RUSHING 

Attempts Net Yards 

Vereb 8 108 

Perlo 6 22 

Hiamiilton 8 17 

J. Healy 4 12 

Beightol 6 11 

Dare 3 10 

Nusz 2 5 

Tamburello 10 2 

OKLAHOMA RUSHING 

Attempts Net Yards 

Harris 9 50 

Burris 9 30 

Pricer 6 29 

O'Neal 12 25 

Thomas 5 19 

D. Morris 4 17 

Dodd 4 17 

McDonald 11 13 

D. Derrick 1 2 

MARYLAND PASSING 

Attempts Comp. Had Int. Yds. 

Beightol 7 2 2 35 

Tamburello 2 1 1 11 

OKLAHOMA PASSING 

Attempts Comp. Had Int. Yds. 

Harris 5 3 34 

McDonald 4 1 1 19 

O'Neal 1 

— 55 — 



MARYLAND RECEIVING 

Caught Yards 

Cooke 1 21 

Flynn 1 14 

J. Healy 1 11 

OKLAHOMA RECEIVING 

Caught Yards 

Burris 2 28 

Pricer 1 19 

McDonald 1 6 

MARYLAND INTERCEPTIONS 
Pellegrini 1 for 9 yard return 

OKLAHOMA INTERCEPTIONS 

Dodd 1 for 82 yard return for touchdown 

Harris 1 for 12 yard return 

Tubbs 1 for yard return 

MARYLAND PUNTING 

No. Yards Avg. 

BeigMol 3 159 53.0 

Walker 4 126 31.5 

OKLAHOMA PUNTING 

No. Yards Avg. 

Pricer 5 166 33.2 

Thomas 3 110 36.7 

OKLAHOMA 14 6 — 20 

MARYLAND 6 — 6 

OKLAHOMA SCORING: Touchdowns McDonald (4, run); O'Neil 
<1, sneak); Dodd (82, returned intercepted pass); Conversions: Pri:er, 2. 
MARYLAND SCORING: Touchdowns: Vere-b (15, run). 



ALL-TIME MARYLAND FOOTBALL RECORDS 

OFFENSE AND DEFENSE 

BEST SEASON: 

1951, 1953 and 1955: Won 10— Lost 0. 1951 record includes the 28-13 
Sugar Bowl win over Tennessee. The '53, 10-0 record is regular sea- 
son. Terps Host Orange Bowl, 7-0 to Oklahoma. 1955, lost to Okla- 
homa in Orange Bowl, 20-6. 

WORST SEASON: 

1944— Won 1, Lost 7, Tied 1 

MOST POINTS SCORED IN ONE SEASON: 

353 in 1951 in 9 games. 381 in 1951 in 10 games including the 28-13 
victory over Tennessee in the Sugar Bowl 

LEAST POINTS SCORED IN ONE SEASON: 
39 in 1940 in 9 games. 

MOST POINTS SCORED BY OPPONENTS IN ONE SEASON: 
216 in 1938 in 9 games. 

LEAST POINTS SCORED BY OPPONENTS IN ONE SEASON: 
31 in 1953 in 10 g?mes. 

MOST POINTS SCORED BY MARYLAND IN ONE GAME: 
Maryland— 80 ; Washington College— 0; (1927). 

MOST POINTS SCORED BY OPPONENTS IN ONE GAME: 
Navy 76;--Mary]and 0: (1913). 

ALL-TIME LEADING SCORER: 

Ed Vereb with 102 points in 1955 in 11 games, including one TD in 
Orange Bowl against Oklahoma. 

OFFENSIVE TEAM RECORD FOR ONE SEASON: 

3822 yards in 1951 in 9 games. 2921 rushing and 901 passing. 
4174 yards in 1951 in 10 games, including the 28-13 victory over Ten- 
nessee in the Sugar Bowl 3210 rushing and 964 passing 

OFFENSIVE TEAM RECORD FOR ONE GAME: 

602 yards in 1951 against West Virginia — 523 yards rushing and 79 
passing. 

LEAST YARDAGE ONE GAME: 
69 against Vanderbilt in 1948. 

MOST TOUCHDOWNS SCORED IN ONE SEASON: 

52 in 1951 in 9 games — 56 in 1951 in 10 games including the 28-13 
victory over Tennessee in Sugar Bowl. 

DEFENSIVE RECORD FOR ONE SEASON: 

1,707 yards in 1949 in 9 games — 868 rushing and 893 passing for fifth 
place in nation. 

DEFENSIVE RECORD FOR ONE GAME: (Rushing): 
29 by Washington and Lee in 1951. 

MOST YARDS RUSHING BY INDIVIDUAL IN ONE SEASON: 
Ray Poppleman with 1,350 yards in 10 games in 1931. 

MOST YARDS RUSHING BY INDIVIDUAL IN ONE GAME: 

Ray Poppleman with 201 yards in 24 carries against Western Mary- 
land. 

LONGEST RUN FROM SCRIMMAGE: 

Dick Burgee for 90 yards and touchdown against University of Mis- 
souri in 1954. 

PASSING nECQRDS 

TEAM PASSING FOR SEASON: 

90 completions in 170 attempts for 1364 yards in 1942 in 9 games. 



TEAM PASSING FOR ONE GAME: 

Joe Tucker with 9 completions in 12 attempts for 178 yards and Stan 

Lavine, 4 for 5 for 129 yards for total of 307 yards against South 

Carolina in 1949. 
WORST PASSING RECORD BY MARYLAND: - 

completions in 12 attempts against Vanderbilt in 1948 
INDIVIDUAL PASSING RECORD FOR ONE SEASON: 

Jack Scarbath in 9 games in 1952 — 59 coinpletions in 113 attempts 

for 1149 yards. 
INDIVIDUAL PASSING RECORD FOR ONE GAME: 

Tommy Mont — 9 completions in 14 attempts for 215 yards against 

U of Connecticut in 1942. 
LEADING PASS RECEIVER FOR ONE SEASON: 

Lloyd Colteryahn — 32 receptions for 593 yards in 1952 in 9 games. 
LEADING PASS RECEIVER FOR ONE GAME: 

Lou Weidensaul — 8 receptions for 95 yards and one touchdown 

against Navy in 1951. 

Llovd Colteryahn — 8 receptions fcr 131 yards against Alabama in 

1952. 
LONGEST FORWARD PASS PLAY: 

Stan Lavine to Ed Bolton for 92 yards and touchdown against South 

Carolina in 1949. Pass 15 yards; run 77 yards. 
LONGEST RETURN OF INTERCEPTED PASS: 

Joe Horning for an official 100 yards and touchdown against Mis- 
souri in 1951 as a freshman. Actual return from inside end zone was 

105 yards. 

KICKING RECORDS 

MOST POINTS AFTER TOUCHDOWNS: 

Don Decker— 37 for 51 attempts in 9 games in 1951. 41 for 55 at- 
tempts in 10 games in 1951 including the 28-13 victory over Tenn :>s- 
see in the Sugar Bowl. 

LONGEST PUNT: 

Brooke (Untz) Brewer for 93 yards aganst V.M.I, in 1916. 

BEST OFFICIAL AVERAGE ONE GAME: 

Bill Guckeyson for 51 yards in 10 punts against Syracuse in 1936. 
(Note: Brewer agaxist Syracuse in 1920 and Guckeyson ai;ain3t 
Florida in 1936 both averaged better than 60 yards but official fig- 
ures could not be obtained from these schools and papers d'dn't carry 
the punting statistics.) 

LONGEST PUNT RETURN: 

Dick Nolan — 90 yards— against Clemson fcr TD in 1953. 

MOST PUNT RETURNS FOR SEASON: 

Bob Shemonski— 28 for 505 vard.s in 1950 in 10 games. 

LONGEST KICKOFF RETURNS: 

90 yards and TD — Lews Thomas against Washington College in 1927: 
Bill Guckeyson against Georgetown in 1935; Sam Behr against Vir- 
ginia in 1945; Dick Nolan against Mississippi in 1952. 

LONGEST FIELD GOAL: 

Dick Bielski, 47 yards against Mississippi in 1953. 

LONGEST PUNT RETURN AGAINST MARYLAND: 

Frank Brady of Navv for 100 yards and touchdown in 1951 

LONGEST KICKOFF RETURN AGAINST MARYLAND: 

Jim McPherson of North Carolina for 93 yards and TD in 1926 

LONGEST PUNT AGAINST MARYLAND: i? "T 

Charlie Justice of North Carolina for 84 yards in 1948. '-. 

— 58 — 



YEAR BY YEAR RECORDS 



MARYLAND 
AGGIES 

1892 (0-3-0) 

St. Johns 50 

Johns Hop. ......62 

Episcopal Hi. -16 

1893 (6-0-0) 

36 Eastern Hi ...... 

10 Central Hi 

18 Bait. City Col- 

6 St. Johns Col... 

18 W. Md. Col ....10 

16 Orient Ath. CI. 6 

1894 (3-3-0) 

52 W. Md. Col 

12 Wash. Col 

6 St. Johns 22 

6 Georgetown .... 4 
Col. Ath. CI. -.26 
Mt. St. Marys ..21 

1895 — No team 
No Games 

1896 (6-2-2) 

Eastern Hi 6 

Gallaudet 

34 Business Hi .... 

10 Central Hi 6 

18 Alexandria Hi.. 
20 Bethel Mil Ac -10 

Episcopal Hi. .. 6 

16 West. Md. 6 

14 Central Hi 

U. of Md 

1897 (2-4-0) 

24 Central Hi 6 

4 Eastern Hi 

J. Hopkins 30 

4 St. Johns 6 

6 Gallaudet 16 

Bait. Med Col.-lO 

1898 (2-5-0) 

5 Columbian U. -17 
West. Md 32 

36 Eastern Hi .-... 

Gallaudet 33 

Johns Hop 16 

Episcopal Hi —37 

27 Rock Hill Col... 

1899 (1-4-0) 

West Md 21 

26 Eastern Hi 

Johns. Hop 40 

Delaware Col. 34 
St. Johns 62 

1900 (3-4-1) 

Westerti Hi .... 
Gib. Ath. CI 17 



G'town Prep .. 5 
6 Episcopal Hi ....31 

5 Gonzaga Hi 11 

15 G'town Prep .. 
21 Gonzaga Hi — 
21 Char Hall Ac - 

1901 (1-7-0) 

6 Del. Col 24 

10 Gallaudet Re. ..11 

Johns Hop 6 

6 Rock Hill C0I...II 
Central Hi 11 

27 U.S. Marines .. 
Wal'k Ath CI ..36 
West. Md. -.-..30 

1902 (3-5-2) 

Georgetown ....27 

5 Mt. St. Jos 

11 Columbian U. -19 

6 Olympia Ath. .. 
Wash. Col. -.- 
Mt. St. Marys .. 5 

6 West. Md 26 

U. of Md. 5 

Johns Hop 17 

Del. Col 

1903 (7-4-0) 

Georgetown —28 

5 Clifton Ath 

21 Gunton Tern. .. 
St. Johfis ..18 

28 Wash. Col 

27 Tech Hi 

Mt. St. Mar .... 2 

6 West. Md 

11 U. of Md 

Dela. Col 16 

6 Columbian U. .. 

1904 (2-4-2) 

Georgetown ....22 
Ran. Macon .... 
Ftress Monroe 

11 Mt. St. Mar 6 

West. Md 5 

22 Gallaudet 5 

U. of Md 6 

Dela. Col ..18 

1905 (6-4-0) 

20 Bailt Poly In — 

16 Gallaudet 

West. Md 10 

Navy 17 

17 Wm. & Mary .. 

28 Mt. St. Josephs 
27 St. Johns 5 

Wash. Col 17 

23 U. of Md 5 

Dela. Col 12 



1906 (5-3-0) 

5 Tech Hi 

22 Bait City Col .. 

Navy 12 

Georgetown ....28 
Mt. Wash. CI. -29 

20 St. Johns 4 

16 Rock Hill Col. 
35 Wash. Col 

1907 (3-6-0) 

13 Tech High 

Georgetown ....10 

5 Richmond Col-11 
Navy 12 

6 Mt.St. Mar 12 

10 Geo. Wash. ...... 

10 Wash. Col 5 

St. Johns 16 

Gallaudet 5 

1908 (3-8-0) 

5 Central Hi 

5 Tech High 6 

Richmond Col..22 

Joh^s Hop .10 

Navy 57 

5 Gallaudet 

Fred'bg Col 10 

12 Balto Poly 6 

St. Johns 31 

Wash. Col. ......11 

Geo. Wash 57 

1909 (2-5-0) 

Richmond Col. 12 
Johns Hopkins 9 
Te-jh High 11 

5 Rock Hill 

George Wash. 26 
N. Ca. A&M ....33 

14 Gallaudet 12 

1910 (4-3-1) 

12 Central Hi 

20 Richmond Col. 

11 Johns Hop .11 

21 Catholic U 

11 Ceo. Wash 

V.M.I 8 

St. Johns 6 

3 West. Md 17 

1911 (4-4-2) 

6 Tech Hi — 

Richmond 

5 Fred'ibe Col 

Central Hi 14 

3 Johns Hod. 6 

6 Catholic U 6 

St. Johns 27 

5 Wash. Col 17 

6 We'^t Md 

6 Gallaudet 2 



1912 (6-1-1) 

31 Tech Hi 6 

46 Richmond Col. 

58 U. of Md 

13 Johns Hop 

St. Johns 27 

13 Gallaudet 7 

17 West Md 7 

13 Penn Mil. Col. 13 

1913 (6-3-0) 

27 Balto City 10 

45 Richmond Col. 
20 Johns Hop 

46 West Md 

Navy 76 

13 St. Johns 

26 Wash. Col 

Gallaudet 26 

7 Penn Mil 27 

1914 (5-3-0) 

Balto. Poly 6 

6 Catholic U 

13 West Md 20 

14 Johns Hop 

10 St. Johns 

3 Wash. Col 

Gallaudet 23 

26 Penn Mil 

1915 (6-3-0) 

31 Balto Poly 

Haverford 7 

Catholic U 16 

10 Gallaudet 3 

14 P.3nn Mil 13 

27 St. Johns 14 

28 Wash Col 13 

51 West Md 

Johns Hop 3 

MARYLAND 
STATE 

1916 (6-2-0) 

6 Dickinson 

7 Navy 14 

15 V.M'.I 9 

6 Haverford 7 

31 St. Johns 6 

10 N.Y.U 7 

13 Catholic U 9 

54 Johns Hop 

1917 (4-3-1) 

20 Dela. Col 

Navy 62 

14 V.M.I 14 

29 Wake Forest ..13 

6 N.C. State 10 

13 St. Johns 3 

Penn State 57 

7 Johns Hop 

1918 (4-1-1) 

6 American U 13 

7 V.M.I 6 



19 West Md 

6 New York U. .. 2 

19 St. Johns 14 

Johns Hop 

1919 (5-4-0) 

6 Swarthmore ....10 
13 Virginia 

West Va 27 

Va. Poly 6 

Yale -■ 31 

27 St. Johns 

13 Catholic U 

20 West Md 

14 Johns Hop 

UNIVERSITY 
OF MARYLAND 

1920 (7-2-0) 

54 Randolph Ma .. 

Rutgers 7 

Princeton 35 

14 Catholic U 

27 Wash. Col 

7 Va. Poly 

13 North Car 

10 Syracuse 7 

24 Johns Hop 7 

1921 (3-5-1) 

3 Rutgers 

Syracuse 42 

3 St. Johns 7 

10 Va. Polv 7 

7 North Car 16 

Yale 28 

16 Catholic U 

Carnegie Tech 21 

1922 (4-5-1) 

6 N. C. State 6 

7 Third Army .... 

Richmond 

Pennsylvania -12 

Princeton 26 

3 North Car 27 

Va. Poly 21 

3 Yale -- 45 

3 Johns Hop 

54 Catholic U 

7 N.C. State 6 

1923 (7-2-1) 

53 Randolph Ma... 
3 Pennsylvania - 

23 Richmond 

9 Va. Polv 16 

14 North Car 

28 St. Johns 

14 Yale 16 

26 N. C. State 12 

40 Catholic U 6 

6 Johns Hop. 6 

1924 (3-3-3) 

23 Wash. Col 

7 Wash. & Lee ..19 

— 60 — 



38 Richmond 

Va. Poly 12 

6 North Car 

Catholic U 

Yale 47 

N.C. State 

Johns Hop 

1925 (2-5-1) 

13 Wash. Col 

16 Rutgers 

Va. Poly 3 

Virginia 6 

North Car 16 

14 Yals 43 

3 W. & L 7 

7 Johns Hop 7 

1926 (5-4-1) 

63 Wash. Col 

South Car 12 

Chicago 21 

8 Va. Poly 24 

14 North Car 6 

38 Gallaudet 7 

15 Yale 

6 Virginia 6 

W. & L 3 

17 Johns Hop 14 

1927 (4-7-0) 

80 Wash. Col 

26 South Car 

6 North Car 7 

13 Va. Poly 7 

10 V. M. I." 6 

6 W. & L 13 

6 Yale 30 

Virginia 21 

20 Vanderbilt 39 

13 Johns Hop 14 

6 Florida 7 

1928 (6-3-1) 

31 Wash. Col 

19 North Car 26 

7 South Car 21 

13 West Md 6 

V. M. 1 

6 Va. Poly 9 

Yale 6 

18 Virginia 2 

6 W. & L 

26 Johns Hop 6 

1929 (4-4-2) 

34 Wash. Col 7 

North Car 43 

South Car .26 

13 Gallaudet 6 

6 V. M. 1 7 

13 Virginia 13 

13 Yale 13 

24 Va. Polv 

39 Johns Hop. .-. 6 
West Md 12 



1930 (7-5-0) 

60 Wash. Col 6 

13 Yale 40 

21 North Car 28 

21 St. Johns -13 

20 V. M. I 

14 Virginia 6 

41 W. & L 7 

13 V. Poly 7 

Navy 6 

21 Johns Hop 

7 Vanderbilt 22 

West Md 7 

1931 (8-1-1) 

13 Wash. Col 

7 Virginia 6 

6 Navy 

6 Kentucky 6 

41 V. M. 1 20 

20 Va. Poly 

12 Vanderbilt 39 

13 W. & L 7 

35 Johns Hop I'l 

41 West Md 6 

1932 (5-6-0) 

63 Wash. Col 

6 Virginia 7 

6 Va. Poly 23 

Duke 34 

24 St. Johns 7 

12 V. M. 1 7 

Vanderbilt 13 

7 Navy 28 

6 W. & L. - 

23 JohTis Hop 

7 West Md 39 

1933 (3-6-0) 

20 St. Johns 

Va. Poly _..14 

Tulan.-^ 20 

13 V. M. I .....19 

7 West Md 13 

Virginia fi 

7 Duke .38 

27 Johns Hop. .... 7 

33 W. & L 13 

Florida 19 

1934 (7-3-0) 

13 St. Johns 

W. & L 7 

13 Navv 16 

14 Va. Poly 9 

21 Florida 

"0 Virginia 

?3 V. M. 1 

14 Indiana 17 

6 Georgetown — . 
19 Johns Hop 



1935 (7-2-2) 

39 St. Johns 6 

7 Va. Poly 

North Car 33 

6 V. M. 1 

20 Florida 6 

14 Virginia 7 

7 Indiana 13 

W. & L 

12 Georgetow-n .... 6 

Syracuse 

22 West Md 7 

1936 16-5-0) 

20 St. Johns 

6 Va. Poly 

North Car .14 

21 Virginia 

20 Syracuse 

6 Florida 7 

12 Richmond 

7 V. M. 1 13 

6 Georgetown .... 7 

19 W. & L 6 

West Md 12 

1937 (8-2-0) 

28 St. Johns 

21 Pennsylvania ..28 

6 West Md 

3 Virginia 

13 Syracuse 

13 Florida ..- 7 

9 V. M. 1 7 

14 Penn State 21 

12 Georr;otown .... 2 

8 W. & L 

1938 (2-7-0) 

6 Richmond 19 

Pena State 33 

Syracuse 53 

14 West Md 8 

19 Virginia 27 

14 V. M. 1 47 

7 Florida 21 

7 Georgetown ....14 

19 W. & L. 13 

1939 (2-7-0) 

26 Hamp.-Syd 

12 West Md 

7 Virginia 12 

12 Rutgers 2T 

Florida 14 

Penn State ......12 

Georgetown ....20 

V. M. 1 13 

7 Syracuse 10 

1940 (2-6-1) 

6 Hamp.-Syd 7 

Pennsylvania -51 

— 61 — 



6 Virginia 19 

Florida 19 

6 West Md 

Georgetown ....41 
V. M. 1 20 

14 Rutgers 7 

7 W. & L 7 

1941 (3-5-1) 

18 Hamp.-Syd 

6 West Md 6 

Duke 50 

13 Florida 12 

6 Pennsylva'nia ..55 
Georgetown ....26 

Rutgers 20 

V. M. 1 27 

6 W. & L 

1942 (7-2-0) 

34 Connecticut .... 

14 Lake NAS 

27 Rutgers 13 

V. M. 1 29 

51 West Md 

13 Florida 

Duke 42 

27 Virginia 12 

32 W. & L 28 

1943 (4-5-0) 

7 Curtis B.CG..13 
13 Wake Forest - 7 

19 Rich. AAB 6 

2 West Va 6 

Penn State 45 

43 Greeny. AAB ..18 

Virginia 39 

Bainbridge 43 

21 V. M. I. 14 

1944 (1-7-1) 

Hamp.-Syd 12 

Wake Forest ..39 

6 West Va 6 

Mich. State .... 8 

6 Florida 14 

7 Virginia 18 

Mich. State ....33 

19 Penn State 34 

8 V. M. I - 6 

1945 (6-2-1) 

60 Guilford Col. - 6 

21 Richmond 

22 Merch. M. A 6 

13 Va. Poly 21 

13 West Va 13 

14 W. & M 33 

38 V. M. 1 

19 Virginia 13 

19 South Car. ......13 



1946 (3-6-0) 

54 Bainbridge 

7 Richmond 37 

North Car 33 

6 Va. Poiv 

7 W. & M 41 

17 South Car 21 

24 W. & L - 7 

14 Mich. State 26 

7 N. C. State 28 

1947 (7-2-2) 

19 South Car 13 

43 Delaware 19 

18 Richmond 6 

7 Duke 19 

21 Va. Polv 19 

27 West Va 

32 Duquesne 

n North Car 19 

20 Vanderbilt ...- 6 
N. C. State .... 

(Gator Bowl, 
Jan. 1, 1948) 

20 Georgia ..20 

1948 (6-4-0) 

19 Richmond 

21 Delaware 

28 Va. Polv 

12 Duke 13 

47 Geo. Wash 

27 Miami 13 

19 South Car 7 

20 North Car 49 

Vnnderbilt - 34 

14 West Va 16 

1949 (9-1-0) 

34 Va. Poly 7 

33 Georgetown .... 7 
7 Mich. State ....14 

14 N. C. State 6 

44 South Car 7 



40 Geo. Wash 14 

14 Boston U 13 

47 West Va 7 

13 Miami 

(Gator Bowl, 
Jan. 1, 1950) 
20 Missouri 7 

1950 (7-2-1) 

7 Georgia 27 

35 Navy 21 

34 Mich. State -. 7 

25 Georgetown ....14 

13 N. C. Stat.- 16 

26 Duke 14 

23 Geo. Wash 7 

7 North Car 7 

41 West Va 

63 V. P. I. 7 

1951 (10-0-0) 

54 W. & L 14 

33 Geo. Wash 6 

43 Georgia 7 

14 North Car 7 

27 Louis. State .... 

35 Missouri 

40 Navy 21 

53 N. C. State 

54 West Va 7 

(Sugar Bowl, 

Jan. 1, 1952) 

28 Tennes.see .13 

1952 (7-2-0) 

13 Missouri 10 

13 Auburn 7 

28 Clemson 

37 Georgia 

38 Navy 7 

34 L. S. U 6 

34 Boston U. 7 

14 Mississippi 21 

7 Alabama 27 



1953 (10-1-0) 

20 Missouri 6 

52 W. & L 

20 Clemson 

40 Georgia 13 

26 North Car 

30 Miami (Fla.) .. 
24 South Car 6 

27 Geo. Wash 6 

33 Mississippi 

21 Alabama 

*0 Oklahoma 7 

*( Orange Bowl) 

1954 (7-2-1) 

20 Kentucky 

7 U. C. L. A 12 

13 Wake Forest....l3 

33 North Car 

7 Miami, Fla 9 

20 South Car 

42 N. C. State 14 

16 Clemson 

48 Geo. Wash 6 

74 Missouri 13 

1955 (10-1-0) 

13 Missouri 12 

7 U. C. L. A 

20 Baylor 6 

28 Wake Forest .. 7 
25 North Car 7 

34 Syracuse ...- 13 

27 South Car 

13 L. S. U 

25 Clemson 12 

19 Geo. Wash 

*6 Oklahoma 20 

*Orange Bowl 



62 




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63 — 



THE 1956 TERPS 

(Continued fro in page 16) 
prospect. He is the ACC shot put champion and scored many points 
in the discus during the track season. 

From tackle to tackle, the Terps probably haven't been so strong 
since 1953 or before. This unit will have real good size and excep- 
tional speed. AH-America candidate Mike Sandusky leads the tackle 
corps. Along with him are Al Wharton and Ed Heuring. As Mont 
put it so well, it is a shame, in a nice sort of way since he has them, 
that all three boys can't play at the same time. Wharton and 
Heuring are touch and go all the time. He thinks there are no three 
better tackles in the country. 

The guard slot is another strong one with another all-America 
hopeful Jack Davis leading the list. Davis is the chap who was tabbed 
another Bob Ward when he blossomed as a freshman and he has 
played like the former two-time all-America the past two seasons. 
Aiding Davis are George Kolarac, Paul Tonetti, Nick DeCicco, 
Ronald Athey, Bob Suchy and Bl'.l Komlo, converted from fullback. 

Gene Alderton, junior, who played so brilliantly as a soph behind 
Pellegrini at center last fall, will have no peer at the pivot spot, 
either offensively or defensively. Ron Laneve, a good boy back in 
school this year after leaving early last fall because of sickness in the 
family, will be more than an adequate "push" to Alderton. Wilbur 
Main, Corbett Kerin and the fine frosh center Lynn Athey round out 
the strong center candidates. 

Mont has some great talent with which to work in the backfield. 
The 1956 edition of the Maryland backfield could present the greatest 
list of backs in the history of Maryland backfield play. With a great 
fullback returning in Tom Selep after being sidelined last fall with a 
knee injury, the Terps have one of the games' hard-running fullbacks. 
He was the big excitement of spring practice. The 205-pound Engineer- 
ing student has tremendous driving power in his legs to accompany 
speed that no other Maryland fullback in Tatum's nine years had, 
with the possible exception of Ed "Big Mo" Modzelewski. 

The first backfield is one that will feature S3lep. At quarterback 
and at both halfbacks, a host of fine talent is available. At the close 
of spring drills, the veteran star Frank Tamburello was at quarterback 
and the halfbacks were tlie two bright sophomores of last fall who 
were starters in the Terp backfield, Fred Hamilton and Jack Healy. 
With the return of Selep, Mont nas moved the versatile Hamilton to 
halfback, his original position. Expected to accelerate Tambo's per- 
formance is the very fine junior quarterback John Fritscb, a spec- 
tacular athlete. Fritsch's punting, passing, and field generalship make 
him a dangerous contender. Back of him is Bob Rusevlyan and the 
star qb of the undefeated frosh team Dickie Lewis. Mucb will be 
heard from this quarterback and it might be this fall. 

Hamilton and Healy must avoid the pressing shadows of the fleet 
John McVicker and Howie Dare, plus the veteran Ralph Hawkins, 
possibly a sleeper. Then these stars must watch one of tbe finest 
halfback prospects ever to come to College Park in Ted Kershner. 
He is the fleetest runner in camp since Hanulak or WaHer. Take 
your pick — some already are taking Kershner! Joe Behrman is 
another good candidate. 

Behind Selep is the veteran of '55 Jim Skarda. He is equipped 
potentially more than any of the others, has turned in good days and 



is counted on for real good duty his senior year. Larry Casparro, 
Jim Hatter and Jack Miller, bright stars of the frosh eleven, aim to 
make them all uncomfortable. 

And so as another new era in Maryland football is about to 
begin, the wish of everybody echoes, "Good Luck, Tommy." 



BOB WARD 

(Continued fro'in page 11) 

Ward. And whctn the defense got in trouble. Ward, the '51 "offensive 
specialist" was put into the game to help stop the oppo'nents' attack. 

Besides the unanimous all-America selections his senior year, Ward 
was named "Lineman of the Year" by the Washington Touchdown Club 
and the Philadelphia Sports' Writers Assn. He was runnerup to Stan- 
ford's Bill McColl for the same Associated Press award. He was named 
the outstanding player of the then Southern Conference. During the 
'51 season, he was the nation's "Lineman of the Week" after his out- 
standing game against Georgia, in which he played with a broken hand. 
He also played in the Chicago All-Star game. 

The Wards have three children: two boys, Jim 6, and Bob, Jr., 4, 
and a daughter, Kathie, five years old. 



WHITEY DOVELL 

(Continued from page 11) 

ternational" victory over Mexico Polytechnic Institute, 26-13, played 
across the border in Mexico City. 

Mont has moved Dovell up to be a varsity assistant working with 
the linemen. 

The former Terp guard from Redbank, N. J. also handles the vast 
film library. "Whitey" is generally regarded as a hard working per- 
fectionist, on and off the field. He is working on his Master's degree 
in Physical Education. 

He married the former Clair Be^nson, February 1955. 



FRED LAYMAN 

(Continued from page 12) 

graduation, he spent a semester at Kiski Prep before enrolling at 
Colgate in February '51. He transferred to Maryland in the fall of '51. 
A quarterfback in high school, prep school and Colgate, Tatum moved 
him to halfback where he made a big impression. It is believed he 
would have bee^n one of the Terps' best. He has a brother, Bob, at 
Maryland who promises to be a top-notch halfback for Mont. 

He married the former Jane Murray of Brentwood. Their first 
child, a daughter, Lee Ann, was born this July. 



ED FULLERTON 

(Continued from page 12) 

platoon was still the trend. Because of a late injury to offensive 
fullback Ralph Felton, he was moved over to take care of those 
offe^nsive chores and still played his defensive halfback spot. All 
he did was score two touchdowns, pass for a third and recover a 
fumble that led to the Terps' fourth score in leading the Red and 
White to a 28-13 win over Tennessee. He was named to the United 
Press all-Bowl team. Following his senior year he was se.ected to 
the first all-Conference eleve^n. 

Following graduation in 1953 from the S:hool of Business and 

Public Administration with a Personnel Major, he p'ayed with the 

Pittsburgh Steelers that fall. An injury kept him out most of the 
season. 

In January, 1954 he went into the Air Force as a 2nd. Lt., 
and after training schools was assigned to Boiling Air Force Base as 
Ass't. Electronics Officer. 

At Boiling he was player-coach, and his second year found him 
just coa:hing and the team won the all-Service title. Followi'ng his 
discharge in January of this year, he accepted Coach Mont's call to 
return to his alma mater. 

Ed married the former Joan Walton, high school sweetheart. They 
have a son Ed, jr., 2, and a new son, Michael born August 6. 



JOE MOSS 

(Continued from page 13) 

and Illinois before his assignment to Boiling Air Force Base where he 
was Assistant Director of Personnel Services for Headquart-srs Com- 
mand. At Boiling, he played tackle on the Base team for two years. 
He was an All-Air Force selection his first year and was a player- 
coach his second year. 

After his discharge in May 1955, he went to Canada as a sales 
employee of Remington-Rand Company and it was while there he 
signed to play with Ottawa, joining former Marylanders Jack Scarbath, 
Pete Ladygo, and backfield coach John Idzik. He got the call from 
Mont to return to Maryland as a line coach in February of this year 
and accepted. 

He married the former Betty Gulick, Cumberland in April 1952. 
They have two children, a daughter Nancee Gay, 3, and a son Joe, Jr., 
G-ne and one-half years old. 



66 



JOHN IDZIK 

{Continued from page 13) 

and his senior year found him one of the South's top defensive tacks. 
He played in the 'Gator Bowl games of 1948 against Georgia aod 1953 
against Missouri. Idzik also lettered in baseball his last two years as 
shortstop and third baseman. He turned down pro baseball offers as 
well as pro football opportunities with the Philadelphia Eagles, who 
drafted him. Instead, following graduation in 1951 from the S:hool 
of Physical Education, be stayed ca at Maryland as assistant coach 
through most of tl'.e '51 season before he went into the Marine Corps. 

Stationed at Parris Is'.and, Idzik played halfback the season of '52 
and for leading them to the All-Marine Championship, he was namod 
to the A'.l-Mari'ne eleven. After his transfer to Quantico he was given 
S/Sgt. rating and assigned to Special Services. PIo played and coached 
the soason of 1953. 

After his dis:harge, he was named assistant coach at the University 
of Tennessee the oaason of 1954. In the spring of 1955 he accompanied 
one of the Vol coaches to Ottawa, Canada where he was backfield 
coach of the Roughriders. This winter, Mont brought him back to 
College Park. 

Idzik married the former Joyce Hoppensteadt, Maryland coed and 
graduate, in January 1953. 



JIM PEEBLES 

(Continued from page 14) 

was a player-coach for their team whieh played against Mont's squad; 
thus, their first meeting. Later he was a member of the All-Star team 
coached by Mont. 

Followi'ng his discharge in April '45 as a Captain, he returned to 
Vanderbilt to complete work for his degree. It was that fall that he 
signed to play with the Redskins and he played end for the DC team 
that season as well as '47 through '49 and again in 1951. He received 
his B.A. Degree in 1948. After the '49 reason with the 'Skins, he went 
to Riverside Military Academy, Georgia, as football coach and stayed 
until June '51. After the fall season with 'Skins, he went to Gallatin, 
Tenn. High as coa:h. He stayed on for 2% years before going to 
Sewanee, the University of the South, as assistant coach until the call 
to Maryland from Mont. 

He married t":e former Ne'.le Gilchrist, Courtland, Ala., an Auburn 
graduate, m 1947. They have a daughter, Betty Bringle 7, and a son, 
Jim, Jr., 4. 



ROY LESTER 

(Continued from page 14) 

January 1945 he was sent to Bainbridge, Md. to Physical Instructors 
School and upon completio-n of that training was sent to Hawaii as an 
instructor for a year. 

Following his discharge in '46, he returned to West Virginia to 
complete work for his degree. Again he played all three varsity sports 
and finished with nine varsity letters. He was an end ca the Moun- 
taineers' Sun Bowl team of '49. He got his B.A. in Political Science 
in the spring of 1949. 

After a year with the Eag'.es, he returned to W. Va. to begin 
work o^n his Masters Degree. He then took the job of coaching 
football, hasketlball, and baseball at Walton, W. Va. High where he 
stayed two years. Then he transferred to Cumberland and Allegany 
High. 

Needing an all-important freshman coach, Mont and Millikan 
decided on the persona/ble Lester. 



FRESHMAN FOOTBALL SCHEDULE FOR '56 



DATE 

October 5 
October 12 
October 19 
November 2 
Novemiber 16 



OPPONENT 

Virginia 

North Carolina 
Bainbridge NTC 
George Washington 
Navy Plebes 



PLACE 

Away 
Away 
Away 
Home 
Away 



PRONUNCIATION GUIDE 



Tamburello — Tam-bew-RELLO 
Rusevlyan — Ru-SEV-a-lynn 
Behnman — BEER-man 
Selep — SEE-lep 
Canparro — Cas-PARROW 
Athey (tooth Ronald and Lynn) — 

A-the (like tree) 
DeCicco — De-CHEEK-o 
Suchy — SUE-chee 



Komlo — COMB-low 
Kolarac — Ko-LAR-ic 
Tonetti — Toe-NET-e 
Heuring (both Ed and Joe) 

YOUR-ing 
Lazaro — La-ZAR-o 
Lazzarino — Laz-a-RENO 
Steifl — STEF-el 
Steppe — STEP-e 



— 68 — 



BRIEF HISTORY OF THE UNIVERSITY 



Tlie history of the present University is the history of two institutions : 
tlie old privately-owned and operated University of Maryland in Baltimore 
and the Maryland State College (formerly Maryland Agricultural College) 
at College Park. These institutions were merged in 1920. 

In 1807, the College of Medicine of Maryland was organized, the fifth 
medical school in the United States. The first class was graduated in 1810. 
A permanent home was established in i8iz|-i8i5 by the erection of the build- 
ing at Lombard and Green Streets in Baltimore, the oldest structure in America 
devoted to medical teaching. Here was founded one of the first medical 
libraries (and the first medical school library) in the United States. In 1812 
the General Assembly of Maryland authorized the College of Medicine of 
Marjdand to "annex or constitute facilities of divinity, law, and arts and 
sciences," and by the same act declared that the "colleges or faculties thus 
united should be constituted an university by the name and under the title of 
the University of Marjdand." By authority of this act, steps were taken in 
. 1813 to establish "a faculty of law," and in 1823 a regular school of instruction 
in law was opened. Subsequently there were added : in 1882 a Department of 
Dentistry which was absorbed in 1923 by the Baltimore College of Dental 
Surgery (founded in 1840, the first dental school in the world) ; in 1889 a 
School of Nursing; and in 1904 the Maryland College of Pharmacy (founded 
in 1841, the third oldest pharmacy college in the United States). 

The Maryland State College was chartered in 1S56 under the name of 
the Maryland Agricultural College, the second agricultural college in the 
Western Hemisphere. For three years the College was under private manage- 
ment. In 1862 the Congress of the United States passed the Land Grant Act. 
Tiiis act granted each State and Territory that should claim its benefits an 
appropriate amount of unclaimed western lands, in place of scrip, the proceeds 
from the sale of which should apply under certain conditions to the "endow- 
ment, support, and maintenance of at least one college where the leading object 
shall be, without excluding other scientific and classical studies, and including 
military tactics, to teach such branches of learning as are related to agriculture 
and the mechanic arts, in such a manner as the Legislatures of the States may 
respectively prescribe, in order to promote the liberal and practical education 
of the industrial classes in the several pursuits and professions of life." This 
grant was accepted by the General Assembly of Maryland, and the Maryland 
Agricultural College was named as the beneficiary of the grant. Thus the 
College became, at least in part, a State institution. In the fall of 1914 control 
was taken over entirely by the State. In 1916 the General Assembly granted 
a new charter to the College, and made it the Maryland State College. 

In 1920, by an act of the State Legislature, the University of Maryland 
was merged with the Maryland State College, and t!'e resultant institution was 
given '^'-e name University of Maryland. 



— 69 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

1956 Basketbalf Schedule 

Dec. I Virginia Away 

Dec. 6 Fcrdham Home 

Deo. 10 Wake Forest Home 

Dec. 15 Kentucky Away 

Dec. 17 Nortli Carolina Away 

Owensboro, Ky. 

Away 
Away 
Home 
Away 
Home 
Home 
Home 
Away 
Home 
Home 
Home 
Away 
Away 
Away 
Horns 
Away 
Raleigh, N. C. 
COACH: H. A. "Bud" Millikan 

— 70 — 



Dec. 


28, 




29 


1, 31 


All American City Tournament 


Jan. 


1 


II 


Jaii. 


4 


Clemson 


Jan, 


5 


South Carolina 


Jan. 


10 


Duke 


Jan. 


12 


George Washington 


Jan. 


14 


South Carolina 


Jan. 


IE 


Georgetown 


Jan. 


19 


North Carolina State 


Jan. 


31 


Duke 


F£b= 


2 


George Washington 


Feb. 


5 


North Carolina 


Feb. 


12 


Virginia 


Feb. 


18 


Wake Forest 


Ftb, 


16 


Ncrth Carolina State 


Feb. 


23 


Navy 


Feb. 


25 


Clemson 


Feb. 


27 


Georgetown 


Mar. 


7-8-9 A.C.C. Tournament 






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— 71 — 



— NOTES 



— 72 — 



STAR RETURNING LETTERMEN FOR '56 






GENE ALDERTON 
Center 



ED HEURING JIM SKARDA 

Tackle Fullback 




PAUL TONETTI 
Guard 




AL WHARTON 
Tackle 




GEORGE KOLARAC 
Guard 




TOM STEFL 

Tackle 




JOHN FRITSCH 
Quarterback 






JEAN WATERS 
End 



BILL TURNER 

End 



ED COOKE 

End 



JOHN McVICKER 
Halfback 



■Mu^ 



HOWIE DARE 

Halfback 




MSKE SANDUSKY 
Tackle 



JACK DAVIS 
Guard 



1956 CO-CA PT A I NS 

AII'America Candidates