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Full text of "University of Maryland men's football media guides"

THE 1957 MARYLAND 

50-YARD LINE 

For Press, Radio and TV 



JnanjlaYLO vvYeLcornes the \J.ueem 

At Maryland, 1957 will be the year we will remember as the one 
when we played a command performance before royalty. 

We feel singularly honored that Queen Elizabeth of England and 
Prince Philip chose Maryland when they wanted to see a typically 
American sport, football. 

We enjoyed the distinction of having the WAife House announce 
the great event. 

Our own Governor Theodore R. McKeldin and University Presi- 
dent Wilson H. Elhins had the high honor of being hosts to the 
royal party. 

The citizens of our Free State can boast of historical kinship with 
our British cousins because Maryland was settled by the English. 

On the field of sport itself the record bespeaks the common in- 
terests of Maryland fans and the visiting royalty. 

No school in the United States has achieved national recognition 
in athletics as quickly as did Maryland in the last decade. 

No British monarch in history has matched the high interest in 
sports displayed by the Queen and her husband. 

Queen Elizabeth has knighted two sports figures, jockey Sir Gor- 
don Richards and cricket great Sir Jack Hobbs. She has decorated 
more athletes from the British Commonwealth of Nations than any 
previous monarch. 

Her Majesty, like Queen Mother Elizabeth, maintains a racing 
stable. Her horse, Countryman, won a gold medal in the 1956 
Olympics. Queen Elizabeth II rides and likes swimming and salmon 
fishing. 

Prince Philip prefers polo, yachting and cricket as a participant 
and is keen on soccer (English football) and rugby as a spectator. 

It was fortunate indeed that Her Majesty was visiting our country 
at the exact time that our Terrapins happened to be scheduled against 
their arch rival, North Carolina. 

The coincidence made it possible for North Carolina coach Jim 
Tatum to share in Maryland's good fortune. After all, it was under 
Tatum that Maryland attained big-time stature before bequeathing 
the responsibility to our own coach, Tommy Mont. 

Long live the Queen. 

Cover: Color Photo by Wide World. Made 
in Buckingham Palace. Queen Elizabeth 
wears the habit of the Order of the Garter. 



1957 SCHEDULE 



Sept. 


21 


Sept. 


28 


Oct. 


5 


Oct. 


12 


Oct. 


19 


Oct. 


26 


Nov. 


2 


Nov. 


9 


Nov. 


15 


Nov. 


23 



Texas A&M at Dallas, Texas 

N.C. State at College Park, Md. 

Duke at Durham, N.C. 

Wake Forest at College Park, Md. 

North Carolina at College Park, Md. 

Tennessee at College Park, Md. 

South Carolina at Columbia, S.C. 

Clemson at Clemson, S.C. 

Miami at Miami, Fla. 

Virginia at College Park, Md. 





KICKOFF 


PRICE 


3 


P.M. CST 


$3.50 


1 


30 P.M. 


EDT 


$3.75 


1 


30 P.M. 


EST 


$3.50 


1 


30 P.M. 


EDT 


$3.75 


1 


30 P.M. 


EDT 


$3.75 


1 


30 P.M. 


EDT 


$3.75 


1 


30 P.M. 


EST 


$4.25 


1 


30 P.M. 


EST 


$3.75 


8 


15 P.M. 


EST 


$4.00 


1 


30 P.M. 


EST 


$3.75 



Maryland's Bowl Record 



1948 


'Gator Bowl 


Maryland 


20 


Georgia 


20 


1950 


'Gator Bowl 


Maryland 


20 


Missouri 


7 


1952 


Sugar Bowl 


Maryland 


28 


Tennessee 


13 


1954 


Orange Bowl 


Maryland 





Oklahoma 


7 


1956 


Orange Bowl 


Maryland 


6 


Oklahoma 


20 



Won: 2— Lost: 2— Tied: 1 



1956 Results 



Maryland 
12 
6 

6 
6 
7 



Syracuse 
Wake Forest 
Baylor 
Miami, Fla. 
N. Carolina 
Tennessee 



Opponent 
26 

14 
13 
34 
34 



Maryland 



6 



25 



68 



Kentucky 
Clemson 
S. Carolina 
N. C. State 



Opponent 

14 

6 

13 

14 



168 



Maryland's Itinerary for 1957 Season 



DATE 


OPPONENT 


Sept. 21 


Texas A&M 


Oct. 5 


Duke 


Nov. 2 


South Carolina 


Nov. 9 


Clemson 


Nov. 15 


Miami 



HEADQUARTERS 

The Statler Hilton, Dallas, Texas 
Scandia Village, Raleigh, N. C. 
Hotel Columbia, Columbia, S. C. 
The Clemson House, Clemson, S. C. 
The Shore Club Hotel, Miami Beach, Fla. 



— 2 




FOR PRESS, RADIO and TELEVISION 

This is your 1957 Maryland football bro- 
chure, "The 50-Yard Line." It is published in 
hope that it offers you helpful information for 
your coverage of Terp games this season. With 
this book goes an invitation to you to visit us 
as often as possible in our offices in Cole Field 
House. In return, I will try to visit you as 
often as I can and extend every assistance pos- 
sible. For any information, you can reach me | 
day and night at UNion 4-4076. When it is real 
late at night, I can be contacted at WArfield 1 
7-3800, Extension 507. I 

Applications for tickets should be made the 
first part of the week of the game to allow 

time for mailing. Wire and telephone requirements should be made 
through your local Western Union office. 

Every effort will be made to furnish all the services in the press box 
available, so that your accounts of the game can be most adequate for 
your readers. Statistics, both half-time and final figures; a quarter play- 
by-play; game leaders in all departments; substitutions, etc. will be 
ready a few minutes after the game. 

Many thanks for all your cooperation and favors of the past. 

JOE F. BLAIR 
Sports Publicity Director 
University of Maryland, 
College Park, Maryland. 

Table of Contents 

PAGE 

'57 Schedule; Bowl Record; '56 Results; Itinerary ... 2 

Message To Press 3 

Athletic Council; Dept. of Intercollegiate Athletics ... 4 

President Wilson H. Elkins . 5-6 

Director of Athletics William W. Cobey ...... 7-8 

Coach Tommy Mont ........... 9-10 

Assistant Coaches and Trainers . 11-15 

The 1957 Terps 16 

Terp Opponents 17-26 

Opponents' Publicists' Reports 27-35 

1957 Squad Roster ........... 36-37 

Terp 4-Deep 38 

Terp Thumbnails 39-48 

'56 Honorary Selections and Terp All-Americas .... 49-52 

Statistical Summary ........... 53-64 

Freshman Schedule; Freshman Results; Pronunciation Guide 57 

Coaches Through the Years ......... 64 

'53 National Champions (Photo) ........ 65 

1957 Terps (photos) . 70-71 

The Terp Press 72 



THE 
ATHLETIC COUNCIL 

Mr. Geary F. Eppley 
Chairman 

Mr. William W. Cobey 
Director of Athletics 

Mr. H. A. (Bud) Millikan 
Ass't. Director of Athletics 




■ » 



Mr. Joseph Deckman Alumni Association 

Dr. James H. Reid, Ass'f. Dean, School of Business & Pub. Adm. 

Dr. Jack Faber Head, Bacteriology Department 

Dr. Leland Scott Horticulture Department 

Dr. Warren Johnson School of Physical Education 

Mr. Charles Hayleck School of Engineering 

Mr. Howard Miller President, Student Government Assn. 

Department of Intercollegiate Athletics 

Equipment Manager Kermit "Chief" Cissell 

Assistant Equipment Manager Albert Johnson 

Head of Facilities Charles "Lindy" Kehoe 

Chief of Concessions Fred Layman 

Ticket Manager Eddie Bean 

Office Secretary to Mr. Cobey Mrs. Dorothy Hunt 

Office Secretary to Mr. Mont Mrs. Dorothy Zinn 

Office Secretary to Mr. Blair Mrs. Dorothy S. Duncan 

Head Trainer Alfred "Duke" Wyre 

Assistant Trainer Bill "Spider" Fry 

Head Football Coach Tommy Mont 

Basketball Coach H. A. "Bud" Millikan 

Assistant Basketball Coach Roy Lester 

Baseball Coach H. Burton Shipley 

Lacrosse Co-Coaches Jack Faber and Al Heagy 

Track, Cross-Country Coach Jim Kehoe 

Soccer, Tennis Coach Doyle Royal 

Swimming Coach Bill Campbell 

Wrestling Coach William E. "Sully" Krouse 

Golf Coach Frank Cronin 

Rifle Coach M/Sgt. Robert W. Wilt 




DR. WILSON H. ELKINS 

PRESIDENT, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Since his appointment as President of the University of Maryland 
three years ago, Dr. Wilson H. Elkins has worked tirelessly to make 
the University more and more renowned. The College Park under- 
graduate campus as well as the Professional Schools' campus in Balti- 
more are growing in leaps and bounds. And the tremendous Overseas 
Educational Program is continuing its great expansion to the far corners 
of the world. Thus progress is being made toward attaining the early 
goals set by the young President to make the University known the world 
over, just as he is known as one of the nation's top educators and ad- 
ministrators. 

Presidency of a large school is not an unfamiliar role to Dr. Elkins. 
He came to Maryland from Texas Western College, El Paso, Texas, 
where he headed that institution's program. 

Dr. Elkins was born in Median, Texas, July 9, 1908. With his father 
and mother, Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Elkins, he moved to San Antonio at an 
early age. 

After completing his grade and high school education in San Antonio, 
Dr. Elkins attended Schreiner Institute from 1926 to the spring of 1928 



— 5 



when he entered the University of Texas. From Texas University in 1932, 
he received both the Bachelor of Arts and Master of Arts Degrees. 

Receiving a Rhodes Scholarship, Dr. Elkins attended Oxford University 
from 1933 to 1936, receiving degrees of Bachelor of Letters and Doctor 
of Philosophy. 

Combining outstanding academic and athletic abilities during his stu- 
dent days at the University of Texas, he was elected to membership in 
Phi Beta Kappa and earned eight varsity letters in football, basketball, 
and track. In his final year at Texas, he captained the basketball team 
and was elected president of the student association. 

Dr. Elkins lettered in football on the 1929, 1930, and 1931 teams at Texas 
and was the regular quarterback in his final two seasons, the one in 1930 
winning the Southwest Conference title. That team ranks among Texas' 
all-time best- A soph end with that team was Edwin B. Price, former 
head coach at Texas. 

He lettered on the 1930, '31, and '32 basketball teams. He was captain 
his senior year and also the squad's leading scorer. He lettered in track 
in 1931 and '32 as a sprinter and broad jumper. He was a member of 
the national championship football shuttle relay team at the Drake Re- 
lays in 1931. 

Dr. Elkins married Dorothy Blackburn of Berclair, Texas, in 1927. 
They have two daughters, Carole Ann and Margaret Elise. 

His career as an educator began in 1932 when he was named athletic 
director of Cisco High School. In 1936, Dr. Elkins joined the faculty of 
the University of Texas as an instructor in history. He held this position 
until 1938 when he went to San Angelo as president of the Junior Col- 
lege. 

He remained there until January, 1949, when he was chosen president 
of Texas Western College. This position he held until his appointment 
as the President of the University of Maryland. 

Dr. Elkins is a member of numerous learned societies including the 
Texas State Teacher's Association, National Educational Association, Phi 
Beta Kappa, Alpha Gamma, and is listed in Who's Who in American 
Education. He is a member of Sigma Nu fraternity. 

Dr. Elkins is a member of the Methodist Church and the Rotary Club. 
He is a constant contributor to national education periodicals. 







WILLIAM W. COBEY 

DIRECTOR OF ATHLETICS 



In his first year heading the athletic program at the University that 
he was so instrumental in building prior to his appointment, Bill Cobey 
saw gratifying results as Terp athletic teams took six championships and 
were runnersup in two others among the twelve recognized teams of the 
Atlantic Coast Conference. 

Cobey was named to succeed Jim Tatum as Athletic Director following 
the latter's resignation and the likeable Maryland graduate took charge 
like the veteran that he is. 

He had been the man behind the scenes as Graduate Manager of Ath- 
letics since 1948. He was Tatum's top man and efficiently handled the 
big job of top administrator along with the tremendous task of arrang- 
ing all other teams' schedules as well as all the many details that ac- 
company the assignment of directing the vast Maryland athletic pro- 
gram. He now, as Director of Athletics, continues to carry out these 
duties as always along with heading the Ticket Office. 

The program as outlined by Cobey is a most successful one and the 
popular favorite son is certain to carry on its well respected athletic 
program. 



The Cobey name is not new, even to old-time University graduates. 
Bill's father, W. W. Cobey, was a 1901 graduate and a letterman in track 
and manager of the baseball team. He became a famous agricultural 
scientist and while in Florida, he was one of the pioneers in the discovery 
of leaf tobacco. Cobey also had two uncles graduate from the University. 

Bill, as he is known to the many friends he has made around home 
and throughout the athletic fraternity, came to Maryland in the fall of 
1926 following graduation from Fort Meyer, Fla. High School. Born and 
raised in Quincy, still his native home, Cobey attended Quincy through 
eleventh grade before the family moved to Fort Meyer. 

After playing freshman lacrosse, Cobey had to cast aside any athletic 
team participation in order that he might get a job to help him through 
school. This employment was in the Cashier's office where he worked 
until his graduation in 1930. He belonged to the Kappa Alpha Fraternity 
while an undergraduate. 

Following graduation, he returned to Quincy, Fla., and worked with 
his uncle on a truck farm. He returned to the University to accept the 
job as Cashier of the University. It was this job he held for 17 years, 
until 1948 when he accepted the position as Graduate Manager of Ath- 
letics. Then came the appointment as Director of Athletics, February 1, 
1956. 

Cobey is active in community affairs, having been a past president of 
University Park PTA; councilman for University Park two years, first 
president of the University branch of the Maryland Classified Employee's 
Assn.; and is active in the affairs of Northwestern High School. 

Cobey married the former Mary Gray Munroe, also of Quincy, Fla., 
in 1935. They have six children, three daughters and three sons. Their 
eldest daughter, Mary Patricia, is a senior at the University. William, 
a Northwestern High School graduate, is in the Army; Julia Ann is a 
Senior at Northwestern while Betty is in ninth grade of junior high. A 
son, Elwood is in sixth grade while the baby of the family, Munroe, is 
five and attends kindergarten school. 

The Cobeys are members of the University Methodist Church, College 
Park. 





TOMMY MONT 

HEAD FOOTBALL COACH 



It has been said, heard, and printed over and over again that the mis- 
fortunes that befell the first year coaching job of the Terps' Tommy 
Mont were unprecedented. Not only were they unprecedented as the 
34-year old Maryland graduate was in his rookie year as a head coach, 
but numerous veteran observers believed that the injuries and other 
unexpected woes that hit Mont hadn't been experienced by any of the 
veterans who were speaking of their own long-time coaching careers. 

Mont inherited one of the finest coaching jobs in the country last year 
and had another highly ranked eleven returning for what was expected 
to be another great record in Maryland football. 

But lady luck went against the Terps and Mont and a 2-7-1 record was 
the result. First Uncle Sam took his ail-American quarterback Frank 
Tamburello two days before the Syracuse opener, then yellow jaundice 
took his great halfback Howie Dare just one day before the opener and 
the season, and then a continuous loss of key players because of injuries 
became more prominent as the days and weeks went by. But Mont and 
his staff kept their poise and made a good showing even in losing. But 



this is another year, and as the hard-working affable Mont says, "It just 
can't happen two years in a row." 

Mont is one of the all-time athletic names at the University. He has 
the rare distinction of being a three-sport athlete four years at Mary- 
land, lettering in football, basketball, and lacrosse. A graduate of Cum- 
berland's Allegany High School, he started his colllegiate athletic career 
in 1941. He was in school two years before entering the service in the 
spring of 1943. He played tailback in 1941, then quarterback on the '42 
T eleven. It was then that he laid the groundwork to become a great 
football player, even in those lean war seasons. Also, both years he won 
his basketball and lacrosse monograms. He won all-America mention as 
well as first team all-Conference and the Washington-Maryland out- 
standing college player awards in 1942. 

During the war, Mont served 42 months in the Army, 18 of which were 
spent in the ETO. He played ball throughout his long hitch in the serv- 
ice. He was tailback on the Fort Benning Post championship team of 
1943. As quarterback and head coach, he led the 3rd Infantry team to 
the ETO title. He also was at the helm of the 7th Army all-Star team, of 
which Coach Peebles was a member. 

Following his discharge, Mont returned to Maryland and was quarter- 
back on the 1946 team as he gained all-American mention and all-Con- 
ference honors. 

Drafted by the Washington Redskins, Mont had four brilliant years 
as quarterback. Then came the call from Tatum back to his alma mater 
as backfield coach. 

During his stay at Maryland, he worked with the Maryland High 
Schools. For three summers he spent two weeks as an advisory coach 
at National Polytechnic Institute in Mexico City. He was responsible 
for arranging the "international game" between the Terp frosh and the 
Institute's team, won by the Terps, 26-13. He also put in the T forma- 
tion for Scrappy Moore's University of Chattanooga eleven in 1949. In 
the summer of 1954, he also was asked to assist teaching the Split-T for 
the Parris Island service team. He also was a collegiate talent scout 
for the Los Angeles Rams, and sent his own product, Ronnie Waller, to 
the Rams, who was " '55 Rookie of the Year" by many picks. 

Mont married the former Virginia Askins, Baltimore, and a Maryland 
student, in 1943. They have three sons, Steve 9, Jeffrey 7, and Danny 6. 



— 10 — 



ASSISTANT COACHES 



BOB WARD 

The great line play of Maryland football 
teams that has been prominent for nearly 
a decade can be attributed greatly to Bob 
Ward, the Terps' hard working line coach. 
Both as a player for four years and now as 
a Terp coach for the past five years, Ward 
has been instrumental in the reputation 
owned by Red and White linemen. One of 
Tommy Monts' "musts" when he was get- 
ting his staff together, Ward demonstrates 
his vast experience with knowledge and au- 
thority. The former two-year all-America 
guard is still considered the all-time great 
name in tke history of modern Maryland 
football. 

A veteran of the Army paratroopers, 
Ward came to Maryland in 1947 as one of 
the smallest guard prospects — 180 pounds — 
ever seen by former coach Jim Tatum. But Tatum liked what he saw; 
consequently, Maryland's finest lineman. 

Ward, from Elizebeth, N. J., graduated in 1952 with a degree from 
the School of Business and Public Administration, finishing in the upper 
one-third of his class. He majored in Real Estate and Insurance. 
(Continued on page 60) 




BILL "Whitey" DOVELL 

Another Maryland graduate who turned 
down leaving his alma mater to stay on and 
coach under Tommy Mont. Dovell was 
another of the Terps who played under Jim 
Tatum then was retained by the Carolinian 
as an assistant coach. 

Dovell, following his graduation with a 
Bachelor's Degree from the School of 
Physical Education in 1953, heeded Tatum's 
plea to stay on at his alma mater as a 
member of the coaching staff. The decision 
was a good one for Maryland football since 
"Whitey" coached three winning freshman 
teams and has been responsible for mold- 
ing some of today's present stars. In 1955 
his frosh eleven brought to Maryland the 
school's first undefeated freshman team. 
From this team the Terps have an out- 
standing nucleus for varsity teams. The big win was the "international" 
victory over Mexico Polytechnic Institute, 26-13, played across the border 
in Mexico City. 

(Continued on page 60) 




— 11 — 




^Ngp^N 



FRED LAYMAN 

One of the most outstanding halfback 
prospects ever to come to Maryland, Lay- 
man, although an injury kept him from 
playing, was another of the Tatum tutored 
pupils who stayed with Mont after serving 
for several campaigns with the old regime. 
He brought his brother Bob to Maryland 
two years ago who now is one of the Terps' 
top backs. He had a great year last fall as 
a sophomore. 

Layman's collegiate career was inter- 
rupted as the up-coming star sustained a 
serious injury on the last day of spring 
practice during his freshman year. 

Following his recovery after six months 
hospitalization, he returned to school the 
fall of 1952 to complete his education. He 
received his Bachelor of Science Degree, 

1954, from the School of Business and Public Administration, with a 

major in Transportation. 

While completing work for his Degree, he assisted Dovell with the 

freshmen as backfield coach. Last season he worked with the varsity 

(Continued on page 69) 




ED FULLERTON 

When the all-time history of Maryland 
football is recorded, the name of Ed Fuller- 
ton will be one of the most prominent. 
His name will be high on the list as one 
of the most brilliant backs who contributed 
so greatly to the gridiron fortunes of his 
alma mater while starring on the football 
field, 1949-52. 

This will be his second campaign as a 
Terp bacKfield coach having returned to 
College Park at the call of his former back- 
field coach and now head coach, Mont. 

It was an indelible record the native of 
West View, Pa. made as a fullback and 
halfback his four years on the College Park 
campus. 

The 26-year old Fullerton still is con- 
sidered the top athlete to come out of West 

View High School in a tough Western Pennsylvania League. He lettered 
four years in football and basketball and two in baseball. He was se- 
lected Athlete of the Year his senior season and was named on the top 
WPIAL selections his junior and senior year. 

The highly touted back came to Maryland in the fall of 1949. Lettered 
three years, playing his sophomore and senior year at fullback and his 
(Continued on page 67) 




— 12 



JOHNNY IDZIK 

Another former star Maryland halfback 
who helped get the Terps started in their 
national climb, Idzik came back last fall 
at Mont's call to be a backfield aide for the 
Red and White. Besides his coaching chores 
last season, he, along with Dovell were the 
chief scouts. 

Idzik came to Maryland in the fall of 
1947 as one of Philadelphia's most publi- 
cized backs and during his four years of 
varsity competition for the Terps proved 
this reputation on the collegiate gridirons. 
At Northeast Catholic High in Philadelphia, 
the fine two-way back was an all-City and 
all-Catholic selection his senior year in both 
football and baseball. He was all-Catholic 
selection in football his junior year. He 
captained both squads his senior year. He 

played tailback and quarterback. He was named the outstanding athlete 
at Northeast his senior year and also was runnerup to Red Bagnell, later 
a star back at Penn, as the top football player in the city. 

At Maryland, he starred all four years, both offense and defense, and 
his senior year found him one of the South's top defensive backs. He 
(Continued on page 68) 




JIM PEEBLES 



The big likeable ex-Vanderbilt University 
and Washington Redskin star came to 
Maryland last fall as the Terps' end coach. 
Mont was most familiar with Peebles' abil- 
ity and knowledge of end play for he saw 
him play while in the service and then later 
as teammates with the Redskins. They be- 
came friends while in Germany during 
World War II. 

Along with his coaching duties, Peebles 

I handles the academic guidance program of 

the Athletic Department for the football 

squad. Once he gets them registered, he 

follows their classroom progress daily with 

reports from the professors. This past year, 

i not one member of the team was dropped 

from school because of academic failure. 

A native of Columbia, Tenn., the 37-year 

old Peebles prepped at Columbia Military Academy and played football 

and basketball there four years. He was an all-State selection his senior 

year. Highly sought after by Southeastern schools, he cast his lot with 

Vanderbilt in the fall of 1938. He lettered his three varsity years at 

tackle and was selected to the all-Southeastern Sophomore eleven. He 

was alternate captain of the football team his senior year. 

(Continued on page 69) 




13 — 



JACK HENNEMIER 

A characteristic of Maryland's great 
football teams has been the outstanding 
line play, featured by the excellent de- 
fensive achievement of these teams. One 
of those most responsible for the fabulous 
reputation of Terp linemen and Terp line 
play was Jack Hennemier. 

The highly regarded and most respected 
native of Savannah, Ga., has returned to 
College Park at the beckon of his close 
friend Tommy Mont, to be a Terp assistant 
and of course to work with the line coach- 
ing chores. 

Hennemier returns to Maryland after 
serving as head coach for a year and a 
half of the Calgary Stampeders, Canada. 
He had been line coach for former Terp 
coach Jim Tatum from 1949 through 1954 
before he went North. It was during this period that Hennemier and 
Mont served together on the Terp staff; Mont as backfield coach and 
Hennemier as line coach. It was in this period that the Terp line 
received so much national recognition, not only for individuals, but for 
their units leading the nation in defensive statistics. And it was Mont's 
(Continued on page 68) 




ROY LESTER 

A graduate of the University of West 
Virginia, Lester, along with Peebles, were 
the only non-Maryland grads on Monts' 
staff last fall. The Mountaineer came to 
Maryland as freshman football and fresh- 
man basketball coach. Last winter marked 
the first full-time coach for freshman 
basketball. He guided a fine team to a 12-2 
record. 

The native of Spencer, W. Va., came to 
the University from Allegany High School 
in Cumberland, Md. where he had tre- 
mendous success as football and baseball 
coach for four years. He also assisted the 
basketball coach. He was a history profes- 
sor at Allegany. 

After graduation from Spencer where he 
was a 3-sport letterman he entered the 

University in the fall of 1941. Here he played basketball, baseball and 
football his first two years before he went into the Navy. During his 
stay in the States, he played all three sports at Great Lakes and Jack- 
sonville. It was at the latter he played end under Missouri's Don Faurot 

(Continued on page 67) 




THE TRAINERS 




ALFRED J. "Duke" WYRE 

In the athletic training fraternity across the 
nation, Maryland's "Duke" is regarded as one 
of the best. The tremendously popular and 
respected Terp trainer has been a long-time 
pioneer among the reputable veterans of the 
training world. 

Many honors have been afforded "Duke" and 
last year he was elected Chairman of the Board 
of Directors of the National Trainers' Associa- 
tion, a position he still holds. 

Now ready for his eleventh year as head 
trainer at Maryland, Duke first arrived on the 
scene in 1947 when former head coach Jim 
Tatum was gathering top men for the nucleus 

of his organization. It was on his long and reputable experience and 
high recommendations that Tatum brought him in as a top trainer in 
the coimtry. 

He has authored many articles and manuals on training methods, and 
is always in demand to give lectures on athletic training methods at 
numerous clinics. He also has devised various equipment pieces that are 
used for athletic injuries and prevention of injuries. 

"Dapper Duke" as he is known because of his natty dress habits, was 
trainer at Yale for 15 years before he moved to Holy Cross for another 
(Continued on page 69) 




BILL "Spider" FRY 
When head trainer Duke Wyre needed a new 
full-time assistant, he beckoned the services of 
his former student trainer, Bill 'Spider" Fry. 
"Spider," as he is and was known while in 
school, is a native of Norristown, Pa., and re- 
turned to his alma mater last spring. 

Fry, a 1951 Maryland graduate, prepared 
at Elkton High School, Md., where he played 
and lettered for three years in soccer and 
basketball. 

He entered the University in the fall of 1946 

and assisted Wyre in the training room as a 

student trainer all four years. He graduated 

with a B.S. Degree from the School of Physical 

Education. 

Following graduation, he went into the Air Force and was assigned 

to Jet Engine Training. During his four-year stay, he was stationed 

at Davis-Monthan Air Base in Tucson and Great Falls Air Base, Montana 

assigned to jet duty. He also was trainer for the base athletic teams. 

He was discharged June, '55. 

Returning to Maryland, he entered Graduate School and continued 
his schooling until his appointment as assistant trainer. 




THE 1957 TERPS 

The Terps of Coach Tommy Mont completed their 20 days of spring 
drills in the seventh annual Varsity-Alumni game, a popular feature of 
the closing of spring practice at College Park. For the second consecu- 
tive year, the star-studded Alumni won in the extra-point department, 
14-13. The grads had 13 former Terp ail-Americans in their lineup and 
26 who had played or are still playing for some professional football 
team. 

Last spring, after the Varsity had performed so well against just such 
an Alumni team, Mont was most optimistic about his 1956 prospects. 
This was his first year as head coach of the Red and White. This is his 
second, and although he is not as optimistic, he is encouraged with the 
progress of his 1957 team. 

Maryland's 1956 record was 2-7-1; most unexpected. Now as we head 
into his second season, we must remember that an unprecedented num- 
ber of "bad breaks" hit the Maryland football camp. Expert veteran ob- 
servers said it was unheard of in major collegiate football circles. Two 
days before the Syracuse opener, the Terps lost their all-America quarter- 
back candidate, Frank Tamburello, to the service. Tambo had led the 
Terps to 15 consecutive victories over the '54 and '55 seasons. The day be- 
fore the game, his top halfback, Howie Dare came down with the yellow 
jaundice and was lost for the season. With Tambo gone, Mont also was 
without his freshman star signal caller Dickie Lewis, the victim of an 
ankle injury September 15, the last day of intra-squad scrimmages. Lewis 
was unable to play until the seventh game. That left the quarterback 
job to John Fritsch, who had figured in only ten offensive plays as a 
soph. Mont moved halfback Bob Rusevlyan to quarterback to help out 
as well as working hard with Fred Petrella. 

In the first game, his other fine running left halfback John McVicker 
received a knee injury and was out for the season. Quickly, during the 
season, 17 of the top 22 men who played so well during the spring and 
were counted on to be the Terrapin team of '56, missed from two games 
to seven and four were out for the season. In the backfield, Mont was 
unable to start the same foursome two games in a row. In fact, only 
regular Fred Hamilton started each game in the backfield. He played 
a minimum of 55 minutes in 6 of the 10 games. Injuries necessitated 
juggling the backs each week. Hamilton, the work-horse of the team 
the past two years, played fullback and halfback. 

So, when Mont looks ahead to the 1957 season, although encouraged, 
he talks with "Tongue-in-cheek" as he recalls the unfortunate personnel 
losses of last year. "It can't happen to us two years in a row," he says. 

Can Maryland come back and install itself as a football power again? 
Yes. The 1957 edition has fine personnel and certainly is a team that 
has experience at each position. Because of the number of boys who 
played last season that might not have if the injury plague had not hit 
the Terp camp, Mont has 29 returning lettermen. Two of these are letter- 
men from the '55 season, Dare and fullback Phil Perlo. Perlo returns 
after dropping out of school for a year because of illness. He definitely 
adds a big assist to the fullback position. Three other lettermen will 
not return: McVicker, guard Bill Komlo, and tackle Joe Lazzarino. 
(Continued on page 66) 



TERP OPPONENTS 



MARYLAND vs TEXAS A & M 21 SEPTEMBER 

3 p.m. (C.S.T) 

at Cotton Bowl (75,000)— National Television 

Dallas, Texas 

FACTS ABOUT THE AGGIES 
CONFERENCE: Southwest 
LOCATION: College Station, Texas 
HEAD COACH: Paul Bryant 
COLORS: Maroon and White 
ENROLLMENT: 7,000 (men only) 
TYPE OFFENSE: Split-T 
1956 RECORD: Won 9, Lost 0, Tied 1 Coach Paul Bryant 




AGGIES' RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS 

(No previous game) 

1957 CAPTAIN: Not named 
LETTERMEN RETURN I NG— 18— Lost— 12 









1957 SCHEDULE 


Sept 


21 Maryland at Dallas 


Sept. 


28 At Texas Tech (N) 


Oct. 


5 At Missouri 


Oct. 


12 Houston (N) 


Oct. 


19 At Texas Christian 


Oct. 


26 Baylor 


Nov. 


2 At Arkansas 


Nov. 


9 Southern Methodist (N) 


Nov. 


16 At Rice 


Nov. 


28 Texas 



1956 YARDSTICK 



DID 



NOT 



PLAY 



MARYLAND vs N. C. STATE 28 SEPTEMBER 




1.30 P.M. (E.D.T.) 

at Byrd Stadium (35,000) 

College Park, Md. 

FACTS ABOUT THE WOLFPACK 
CONFERENCE: Atlantic Coast 
LOCATION: Raleigh, N. C. 
HEAD COACH: Earle Edwards 
COLORS: Red and White 
ENROLLMENT: 5200 
TYPE OFFENSE: Multiple 
Coach Earle Edwards 1956 RECORD: Won 3, Lost 7 

WOLFPACK'S RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS 

(Maryland: Won 6, Lost 4, Tied 3) 







Maryland 


N.C. State 






Maryland 


N.C 


. State 


1908 






6 


23 


1947 












1917 






6 


10 


1949 




14 




6 


1921 






6 


6 


1950 




13 




16 


1922 






7 


6 


1951 




53 







1923 






26 


12 


1954 




42 




14 


1924 









9 


1956 




25 




14 


1946 






7 


28 












TOTAL 


POINTS: Mar) 


'land 205, N 


C. State 


135 








1957 


CAPTAIN 


: Dick 


Hunter 












LETTERMEN 


RETURNING— 19— 


Lost— 13 















1957 SCHEDULE 


Sept 


21 


At North Carolina 


Sept 


28 


At Maryland 


Oct. 


5 


At Clemson 


Oct. 


12 


At Florida State (N) 


Oct. 


18 


At Miami (N) 


Oct. 


26 


Duke 


Nov. 


2 


Wake Forest 


Nov. 


9 


William and Mary 


Nov. 


16 


Virginia Tech at Roanoke 


Nov. 


23 


At South Carolina 





1956 YARDSTICK 




N.C. 

14 

259 

20 

7 

3 

76 

4 

171 

42.7 

1 
50 

Score 


State 
Total First Downs 


Md. 
19 
265 

9 

6 


37 

5 
137 
27.5 

1 
92 


Net Yards Rushing 

Forward Passes Attempted 
Forward Passes Completed 
Passes Intercepted By 
Yards Gained Passing 

Number of Punts 

Punting Yardage 

Punting Average 

Fumbles Lost By 


by Periods : 


Maryland 7 12 

N. C. State 7 7 


6—25 
0—14 


Maryland scoring: Touchdowns — 
Fritsch (7, run), Kershner (25, run), 
Lewis (14, run), Lewis (103, run). 
Conversion — Fritsch. 


N. C. State scoring: Touchdowns — 
Christy (2, run), (70, run), Conver- 
sions — Hunter 2. 



— IS — 



MARYLAND vs DUKE 5 OCTOBER 



1:30 P.M. (E.S-T.) 

at Duke Stadium (57,000) 

Durham, N. C. 

FACTS ABOUT THE BLUE DEVILS 
CONFERENCE: Atlantic Coast 
LOCATION: Durham, N. C. 
HEAD COACH: William D. Murray 
COLORS: Blue and White 
ENROLLMENT: 5,000 
TYPE OFFENSE: Split-T 
1956 RECORD: Won 5, Lost 4, Tied 1 Coach Murray 

BLUE DEVILS' RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS 

(Maryland: Won 1, Lost 6, Tied 0) 






Maryland 


Duke 




Maryland 


Duke 


1932 





34 


1947 


7 


19 


1933 





6 


1948 


12 


13 


1941 





50 


1950 


26 


14 


1942 





42 









TOTAL POINTS: Maryland 45, Duke 178 
1957 CAPTAIN: Harold McElhaney 
LETTERMEN RETURN I NG— 22— Lost— 13 





1957 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


21 At South Carolina 


Sept. 


28 Virginia 


Oct. 


5 Maryland 


Oct. 


12 At Rice 


Oct. 


19 Wake Forest 


Oct. 


26 At North Carolina State 


Nov. 


2 At Georgia Tech 


Nov. 


9 Navy at Baltimore 


Nov. 


16 Clemson 


Nov. 


23 North Carolina 





1956 


YARDSTICK 


DID 




NOT 










PLAY 



19 



MARYLAND vs WAKE FOREST 12 OCTOBER 

1:30 P.M. (E.D.T.) 

at Byrd Stadium (35,000) 

College Park, Md. 

FACTS ABOUT THE DEACONS 
CONFERENCE: Atlantic Coast 
LOCATION: Winston-Salem, N. C. 
HEAD COACH: Paul J. Amen (Nebraska '38) 
COLORS: Old Gold and Black 
ENROLLMENT: 2,400 
TYPE OFFENSE: Split-T 
Coach Paul J. Amen i 956 RECORD: Won 2, Lost 5, Tied 3 

DEACONS' RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS 

(Maryland: Won 4, Lost 1, Tied 1) 






Maryland 


Wake Forest 




Maryland 


Wake Forest 


1917 


29 


13 


1954 


13 


13 


1943 


13 


7 


1955 


28 


7 


1944 





39 


1956 


6 






TOTAL POINTS: Maryland 89, Wake Forest 79 
1957 CAPTAINS: George Johnson and Eddie Moore 
LETTERMEN RETURNING — 16 — Lost — 8 





1957 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


28 At Florida 


Oct. 


5 Virginia 


Oct. 


12 At Maryland 


Oct. 


19 At Duke 


Oct. 


26 North Carolina 


Nov. 


2 At N.C. State 


Nov. 


9 Virginia Tech 


Nov. 


16 West Virginia 


Nov. 


23 At Clemson 


Nov. 


30 South Carolina 



Md. 

11 

188 

39 

10 

4 

1 

5 
29.4 

2 
40 



1956 YARDSTICK 



Wake Forest 

First Downs 15 

Rushing Yardage 257 

Passing Yardage 59 

Passes Attempted 17 

Passes Completed 4 

Passes Intercepted By .. 1 

Punts 7 

Punting Average 34.3 

Fumbles Lost 3 

Yards Penalized 45 



Score by Periods: 

Maryland 6 0—6 

Wake Forest 0—0 

Maryland Scoring — Touchdown: J. 
Healy (6, pass from Kershner). 



20 — 



MARYLAND vs NORTH CAROLINA 19 OCTOBER 

1:30 P.M. (E.D.T.) 
at Byrd Stadium (35,000) 
College Park, Md. 
FACTS ABOUT THE TARHEELS 
CONFERENCE: Atlantic Coast 
LOCATION: Chapel Hill, N. C. 
HEAD COACH: James M. Tatum 
COLORS: Carolina Blue and White 
ENROLLMENT: 6500 
TYPE OFFENSE: Split T 
1956 RECORD: Won 2, Lost 7, Tied 1 
*Two games won and one tied forfeited by ACC ruling 
because of use of ineligible player. Coach Jim Tatum 

TARHEELS' RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS 

(Maryland: Won 8, Lost 13, Tied 1) 






Maryland 


N.C. 




Maryland 


N.C 


1920 


13 





1935 





33 


1921 


7 


16 


1936 





14 


1922 


3 


27 


1946 





13 


1923 


14 





1947 





19 


1924 


6 





1948 


20 


49 


1925 





16 


1950 


7 


7 


1926 


14 


6 


1951 


14 


7 


1927 


6 


7 


1953 


26 





1928 


19 


26 


1954 


33 





1929 





43 


1955 


25 


7 


1930 


21 


28 


1956 


6 


34 



TOTAL POINTS: Maryland 234, North Carolina 352 
1957 CO-CAPTAINS: Dave Reed and Buddy Payne 
LETTERMEN RETURNING— 24 — Lost— 10 





1957 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


21 N. C. State 


Sept. 


28 Clemson 


Oct. 


5 Navy 


Oct. 


11 At Miami (N) 


Oct. 


19 At Maryland 


Oct. 


26 At Wake Forest 


Nov. 


2 Tennessee (Homecoming) ) 


Nov. 


9 South Carolina 


Nov. 


23 At Duke 


Nov. 


30 Virginia 



1956 YARDSTICK 

Md. N. C. 

13 First Downs 15 

113 Net Rushing 197 

134 Net Passing ..'. 133 

9-19 Passes Completed 6-17 

1 Intercepted By 1 

8 Punts 4 

37.4 Punting Average 40.0 

2 Fumbles Lost By 1 

73 Yards Penalized 105 

Score by Periods : 

Maryland 6 0—6 

North Carolina 13 7 7 7—34 

Maryland Scoring — Touchdowns: 
Beardsley (27, pass). 

North Carolina Scoring — Touch- 
downs: Jim Jones (22, pass); Decantis 
(2, run; 7, run); Reed (1, run); 
Robinson (18, pass), Conversions: 
Blazer 3, Vale. 



21 



MARYLAND vs TENNESSEE 26 OCTOBER 




Coach Bowden Wyatt 



1:30 P.M. (E.D.T.) 

Homecoming 

at Byrd Stadium (35,000) 

College Park, Md. 

FACTS ABOUT THE VOLS 
CONFERENCE: Southeastern 
LOCATION: Knoxville, Tennessee 
HEAD COACH: Bowden Wyatt 
COLORS: Orange & White 
ENROLLMENT: 7,800 
TYPE OFFENSE: Single Wing with a 

balanced line 
1956 RECORD: Won 10, Lost 0, Tied 



VOLS' RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS 





Maryland 


Tennessee 




1952 


28 


13 


Sugar Bowl 


1956 


7 


34 





TOTAL POINTS: Maryland 35, Tennessee 47 

1957 CAPTAINS: Guard Bill Johnson and Wingback Bill Anderson 

LETTER MEN RETURN I NG— 28— Lost— 15 





1957 SCHEDULE 


Sept 


28 Auburn 


Oct. 


5 Mississippi State 


Oct. 


12 Chattanooga 


Oct. 


19 Alabama at Birmingham 


Oct. 


26 At Maryland 


Nov. 


2 At North Carolina 


No. 


9 Georgia Tech 


Nov 


16 Mississippi at Memphis 


Nov 


23 At Kentucky 


Nov 


30 Vanderbilt 



1956 YARDSTICK 



Maryland 



Tennessee 



20 

214 

148 

21 

11 

2 

1 
32.0 

2 
85 



.. First Downs 16 

.. Rushing Yardage 188 

.. Passing Yardage 103 

.. Passes Attempted 12 

.. Passes Completed 7 

.. Passes Intercepted By .... 3 
.. Punts 



. Punting Average 47.0 



Fumbles Lost 

.. Yards Penalized 85 

Score by Periods : 

Tennessee 14 14 6—34 

Maryland 7 0—7 

Tennessee scoring: Touchdowns — ■ 
Cruze (5, pass from Majors), Sandlin 
(28, pass from Majors), Anderson (13, 
pass from Majors), Urbano (84, inter- 
cepted pass), Smith (3, plunge). Con- 
versions: Smithers 2, Burklow 2. 

Maryland scoring: Touchdown — 
Fritsch (1, plunge). Conversion — 
Komlo. 



22 



2 NOVEMBER 



MARYLAND vs SOUTH CAROLINA 

1:30 P.M. (E.ST.) 

at Carolina Stadium (42,000) 

Columbia, S. C. 

FACTS ABOUT THE GAMECOCKS 
CONFERENCE: Atlantic Coast 
LOCATION: Columbia, S. C. 
HEAD COACH: Warren Giese 
COLORS: Garnet and Black 
ENROLLMENT: 5,000 
TYPE OFFENSE: Split-T 
1956 RECORD: Won 7, Lost 3, Tied none Coach Warren Giese 

GAMECOCKS' RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS 

(Maryland: Won 8, Lost 5, Tied 0) 






Maryland 


S.C. 




Maryland 


S.C. 


1926 





12 


1948 


19 


7 


1927 


26 





1949 


44 


7 


1928 


7 


21 


1953 


24 


6 


1929 





26 


1954 


20 





1945 


19 


13 


1955 


27 





1946 


17 


21 


1956 





13 


1947 


19 


13 









TOTAL POINTS: Maryland 212, South Carolina 139 
1957 CO-CAPTAINS: Nelson Weston and Julius Derrick 
LETTERMEN RETURN I NG— 20— Lost 14 





1957 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


21 Duke (N) 


Sept. 


28 Wofford (N) 


Oct. 


5 Texas at Austin (N) 


Oct. 


12 Furman 


Oct. 


24 Clemson 


Nov. 


2 Maryland 


Nov. 


9 North Carolina at Chapel Hill 


Nov. 


16 Virginia at Charlottesville 


Nov. 


23 N. C. State 


Nov. 


30 Wake Forest at Winston- 
Salem, N.C. 







1956 YARDSTICK 

S.C. Md. 

14 .... First Downs 7 

217 .... Rushing Yardage 107 

28 .... Passing Yardage 15 

9 .... Passes Attempted 8 

3 .... Passes Completed 2 

2 .... Passes Intercepted By 2 

7 .... Punts 8 

30.3.... Av. Dist. of Punts, Yds. .. 39 



.... Fumbles Lost .. 
50 .... Yards Penalized 







Score by Periods : 

Maryland 0—0 

South Carolina 13—13 

South Carolina scoring: touchdowns 
— Johnson (23, run), Prickett (3 
inches, plunge). Conversion — Hawkins. 



— 23 



MARYLAND vs CLEMSON 9 NOVEMBER 



1:30 P.M. (E.ST.) 

at Memorial Stadium 

Clemson, S. C- 

FACTS ABOUT THE TIGERS 
CONFERENCE: Atlantic Coast 
LOCATION: Clemson, S. C. 
HEAD COACH: Frank Howard 
COLORS: Purple and Orange 
ENROLLMENT: 3,350 
TYPE OFFENSE: Split-T and T 
Coach Frank Howard 1956 RECORD: Won 7, Lost 2, Tied 2 

TIGERS' RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS 

(Maryland: Won 4, Lost 0, Tied 1) 






Maryland 


Clemson 


1952 


28 





1953 


20 





1954 


16 





1955 


25 


12 


1956 


6 


6 



TOTAL POINTS: Maryland 95, Clemson 18 

1957 CO-CAPTAINS: John Grdijan and Leon Kaltenbach 

LETTERMEN RETURN I NG— 21— Lost— 12 





1957 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


21 Presbyterian 


Sept. 


28 At North Carolina 


Oct. 


5 N. C. State 


Oct. 


12 At Virginia 


Oct. 


24 At South Carolina 


Nov. 


2 At Rice (N) 


Nov. 


9 Maryland 


Nov. 


16 At Duke 


Nov. 


23 Wake Forest 


Nov. 


30 At Furman 



1956 YARDSTICK 

Md. Clemson 

9 First Downs 13 

9 Rushing 12 

1 Passing 

Penalties 1 

136 Net Yards Rushing 178 

12 Net Yards Passing 1 

148 Total Yards Gained 177 

1-7 Passes 1-6 

2 Intercepted By 1 

S-35 Punts 33 

3 Fumbles 2 

1 Fumbles Lost 1 

10-76 Yards Lost By Penalties 2-30 

Score by Periods: 

Maryland 6—6 

Clemson 6 0—6 

Maryland scoring: Touchdown — Selep 
(2, plunge). 

Clemson scoring: Touchdown — Spoon- 
er (1, plunge). 



21 



MARYLAND vs MIAMI 15 NOVEMBER 



8:15 P.M. (E.S.T.) 

at Orange Bowl Stadium (76,000) 

Miami, Fla. 

FACTS ABOUT THE HURRICANES 
CONFERENCE: Independent 
LOCATION: Coral Gables, Fla. 
HEAD COACH: Andy Gustafson 
COLORS: Orange, Green and White 
ENROLLMENT: 12,500 
TYPE OFFENSE: Miami Drive Series 
1956 RECORD: Won 8, Lost 1, Tied 1 




Coach Gustafson 



HURRICANES' RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS 

(Maryland: Won 3, Lost 2, Tied 0) 



1948 


Maryland 
27 


Mia 
13 


1949 


13 





1953 


30 





1954 


7 


9 


1956 


6 


13 



TOTAL POINTS: Maryland 83, Miami 33 
1957 CAPTAIN: John Varone 
LETTERMEN RETURN I NG— 13— Lost— 17 





1957 SCHEDULE 


Sept 


21 At Houston 


Oct. 


5 Baylor 


Oct. 


11 North Carolina 


Oct. 


18 North Carolina State 


Oct. 


25 Kansas 


Nov. 


1 Villanova 


Nov. 


8 At Florida State 


Nov. 


15 Maryland 


Nov. 


30 Florida 


Dec. 


7 Pittsburgh (Day Game — all 
others night) 



1956 YARDSTICK 

Miami 

12 Total First Downs 

147 Net Yards Rushing 

12 Passes Tried 


Md. 

11 

91 

23 

11 

109 

200 

. 2 

6 

38.8 



1 

68 

0—13 
6— 6 

Book- 
John- 
irsion : 

idown : 


9 Passes Completed 

121 Yards Passing 

268 Net Yards Rushing, Pass 
Passes Had Intercepted ... 
6 Punts 


37.3 Average Yards Punts 

Punts Blocked 


90 Yards Penalized 

Miami 6 7 

Maryland 

Miami scoring touchdowns : 
man (pass from Scarnecchia) ; J. 
son (pass from Yarbrough). Conv( 
Oliver. 

Maryland scoring — Toucr 
Petrella. 



25 



MARYLAND vs VIRGINIA 23 NOVEMBER 

(AFROTC and PARENTS DAY) 

1:30 P.M. (E.S.T.) 

at Byrd Stadium 

College Park, Md. 

FACTS ABOUT THE CAVALIERS 
CONFERENCE: Atlantic Coast 
LOCATION: Charlottesville, Va. 
HEAD COACH: Ben S. Martin 
COLORS: Orange and Blue 
ENROLLMENT: 4500 
TYPE OF OFFENSE: Split-T 
Coach Ben Martin 19 56 RECORD: Won 4, Lost 6, Tied 

CAVALIERS' RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS 
(Maryland: Won 10, Lost 9, Tied 2) 






Maryland 


Virginia 




Maryland 


Virginia 


1919 


13 





1935 


14 


7 


1925 





6 


1936 


21 





1926 


6 


6 


1937 


3 





1927 





21 


1938 


19 


27 


1928 


18 


2 


1939 


7 


12 


1929 


13 


13 


1940 


6 


19 


1930 


14 


6 


1942 


27 


12 


1931 


7 


6 


1943 





39 


1932 


6 


7 


1944 


7 


18 


1933 





6 


1945 


19 


13 


1934 


20 












TOTAL POINTS: Maryland 220, Virginia 220 
1957 CAPTAIN: Jim Bakhtiar 
LETTERMEN RETURNING— 14 — Lost— 11 





1957 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


21 At West Virginia 


Sept. 


28 At Duke 


Oct. 


5 At Wake Forest 


Oct. 


12 Clemson 


Oct. 


19 Va. Tech at Richmond 


Oct. 


26 Army 


Nov. 


2 VMI 


Nov. 


16 South Carolina 


Nov. 


23 At Maryland 


Nov. 


30 At North Carolina 



1956 YARDSTICK 



DID 



NOT 



PLAY 



— 26— 



OPPONENTS' PROSPECTUS AS REPORTED 
BY THEIR PUBLICITY DIRECTORS 

Texas A & M 

By Jones Ramsey 

Strength by Positions 

LE — Bobby Marks, returning starter and 2-year letterman plus two 
sophomores in Byron Caruthers and Harold King who showed marked 
improvement in spring.. 

LT — Two returning lettermen including all-America Charles Krueger, 
returning starter and 2-year letterman. Also, Darrell Brown, letterman 
in 1954 and 1955 who was ineligible in 1956. Probable top sophs — Robert 
Garner and Ben Havard. 

LG — Chief problem and weakness with loss of Dee Powell, 3-year 
regular. One letterman back in Tommy Howard who played sparingly 
behind Powell. Probable best sophs — Joe Munson, Al Taylor plus squad- 
man Carl Luna. 

C — Another problem. John Gilbert a 2-year letterman but he played 
little back of all-SWC Lloyd Hale, a regular for 3 years and who played 
more than any of 1956 players. Probable top sophs — Henry Bonorden, 
Bill Darwin, Bill Godwin. 

RG — Third major weakness in middle of line. Two lettermen back 
in Harold Price and Jim Langston, neither of whom played much behind 
all-SWC Dennis Goehring, 3-year regular. Probable top sophs — Bubby 
Payne and Gerald Moore. Bill Webb, mammoth junior college transfer 
from San Angelo, could help if he gets his weight down around 230. 
Weighed 260 at end of spring drills. 

RT — Adequate with Lettermen Ken Beck and Jim Stanley. Both played 
last year behind Regular Bobby Lockett with Stanley playing some 
guard. Gale Oliver and Max Woodard probable top sophs. 

RE — Adequate with Starter John Tracey and letterman Don Smith 
back plus Soph Ed Neill who improved vastly this spring. 

QB — Good depth with holdover two-year lettermen Roddy Osborne 
and Jimmy Wright back plus Soph Charles Milstead who looked good 
offensively in spring. 

LH — Good one deep with John Crow. A problem back of Crow with 
best bets being Sophs Dick Lewis and Bob Sanders plus Letterman Carlos 
Esquivel. 

RH — Good one deep with Loyd Taylor. Soph Jim Frost improved in 
spring. Bobby Conrad also returns. 

FB — No Pardees here but Dick Gay improved offensively in 
spring and is adequate linebacker. Behind Gay is Soph Gordon LeBoeuf. 

Depth this year is better at tackle and end than last year but real 
problem is depth in backfleld at the three deep backs plus center and 
both guards. Quantity not a problem. There are plenty of players but 
none of top quality. 

Coaches will spend much time on movies this summer taking 11 best 
players and placing them by positions; then taking next best 11, etc. 
With the right changes next fall Aggies could have good first team but 
would still face problem of second team as during 1956 campaign. 



— 27 



Team speed not as good as at the end of 1956. Osborne the only quick 
player returning. Because of injuries in spring team could not work as 
unit and must develop team speed early in fall. 

Marks, Krueger, Tracey, Osborne, Crow and Taylor are returning 
starters. Starters gone are Powell and Goehring at guards, Hale at cen- 
ter, Pardee at fullback and Lockett at right tackle. Nineteen lettermen 
return. Eleven gone. 

Sophs who showed most improvement in spring: Ends Neill, Caruthers, 
King, Guards Payne and Munson plus Backs Milstead, Lewis, Frost, 
Sanders and LeBoeuf. 



North Carolina State College 

By Bill Hensley 

"If I were a sportswriter," Earle Edwards said, "I would say that 
North Carolina State is going to be an improved football team in 1957. 
On paper, prospects for a good season are bright. 

"However," the Wolfpack coach continued, "I'm a coach and naturally 
I avoid sounding too optimistic, knowing that a lot of things could hap- 
pen between now and the end of the season. 

"I will say this . . . I'll be greatly disappointed if we aren't better than 
we've been for the past several years." 

And that, briefly, is a head coach's outlook on the '57 season. 

Edwards, beginning his fourth year at State, has reasons for his mod- 
est optimism. Nineteen lettermen are on hand this year, including one 
at each position on the sarting eleven. Only one starter — tackle John 
Szuchan — is missing from last year. 

In addition, the squad has more depth than any State team in the past 
ten years, more experience, more size in the line, and a fast backfield 
sparked by two great halfbacks in Dick Christy and Dick Hunter. 

"I rate Christy and Hunter with the best college football has to offer," 
Edwards says frankly. "Both are fine runners, passers, kickers and 
blockers and their defensive play is topnotch. I don't know anything 
else a coach could ask for in a player." 

In the line, the Wolfpack has two ends who will vie with Christy and 
Hunter for the headlines this year. They are John Collar, a senior, and 
Bob Pepe, a junior. Both are excellent two-way performers. 

"In the past," Edwards said, "we have been hurt when we had to sub- 
stitute. Now we can make changes at several positions without weaken- 
ing the team." 

On the debit side of the ledger is a tough schedule which calls for only 
three home games. State's first five games are on the road, which doesn't 
make things any easier. The Wolfpack meets North Carolina, Maryland, 
Clemson, Duke, Wake Forest and South Carolina in the Atlantic Coast 
Conference and has intersectional contests with Florida State, Miami, 
Virginia Tech and William and Mary. 

Several promising sophomores, excellent team spirit and a successful 
spring practice are other factors which are causing the Wolfpack to look 
forward to the 1957 season. On paper, the prospects are bright. 



— 28 — 



Duke University 

By Ted Mann 

There are some real men on this up-coming Duke University football 
team — men who believe that the easiest way to the goal line is to take 
the ball and run over the opposition. The Blue Devils will be big, strong 
and powerful — a bit slow maybe — but we repeat, "big, strong and power- 
ful." 

With such tried and true boys in the middle of the line as Roy Hord, 
Buzz 'Guy, Tom Topping, and Wady Byrd and a bevy of the fine backs 
in Harold McElhaney, Phil Dupler, Wray Carlton, Eddie Ruston, Skitch 
Rudy, George Dutrow and Bobby Honeycutt, the Blue Devils are not 
likely to "roll over and play dead" this fall. 

If all material is available for the season, Duke will have the equip- 
ment to execute the Split-T system to the highest degree. There are 
backs who can run up the middle or around the ends; there are boys 
who can pass and those who can receive. 

Let's hear from Coach Murray on the situation: 

"We had a very enthusiastic spring practice and we feel we will have 
a spirited well-organized squad with enough experienced candidates at 
each position to field at least one good team. Our big problem this fall 
is to replace a truly great quarterback in Sonny Jurgesen and six start- 
ers from our first team line. Though we are optimistic as to our chances 
to have a good team, we realize more than anyone else that our pros- 
pects depend a lot on having all of our good football players back with 
us this fall and free from injuries during the season because at many 
places there is not too much depth." 

Position by Position: ENDS: "Good but not deep." There are five ex- 
perienced boys from the 1956 squad — Bill Thompson, Dave Hurm, Bert 
Lattimore, Doug Padgett and Jim Bartal. TACKLES: "Biggest problem." 
Lack of experience is the reason this is labelled as is. Tom Topping who 
played much last year is the outstanding candidate. John Keresy and 
Bill Recinella both had limited experience last season. GUARDS: "Very 
good." Roy Hord and Buddy Stanley, alternate starters last year at left 
guard return. CENTER: "Good, with question mark." Wade Byrd, who 
had much seasoning last season, is back and so is Jack Harrison, a top 
player before hurt in second game of season. QUARTERBACK: "Good" 
A host of good candidates removes any fear of depth with Bob Brodhead 
and Pryor Millner the leading candidates. HALFBACK: "Excellent." 
A plentiful supply of outstanding candidates makes the halfback posts 
one of the strongest positions. Candidates covered above. FULLBACK: 
"Excellent." The three fullbacks from last year's squad, McElhaney, 
Dupler and Jim Harris are back for another year. 

Wake Forest College 

By Marvin Francis 

Coach Paul Amen earned the coveted honor of "Coach Of The Year 
In The ACC" in his first season at the Wake Forest helm when he guided 
the Demon Deacons to a 2-5-3 record last fall. This year he faces a much 
tougher assignment as indications point to a much rougher schedule. 



Sixteen lettermen from the 1956 club are back, but only six of them 
saw considerable action last season. The Deacon mentor will be forced 
to build an entirely new backfield. The squad was handed a tough blow 
early in the summer when last year's No. 1 quarterback, Charlie Car- 
penter, had to undergo surgery for a ruptured spinal disc and will be 
out for the entire campaign. 

Jim Dalrymple, last year's starting left half, was switched to quarter- 
back during spring practice, and he and sophomore Charles (Preacher) 
Parker will have to shoulder the entire load this fall. 

Finding a replacement for All-America fullback Bill Barnes is another 
major problem. Barnes established two new ACC records last season 
when he gained a total of 1,010 yards rushing. All candidates for the 
fullback spot, an all-important position in Amen's Army-T attack, are 
sophomores. Neil MacLean, a 195-pound ex-serviceman, and Pete Man- 
ning, a 200-pounder, are the leading candidates. 

Ralph Brewster is the lone experienced flankman, but the remainder of 
the forward wall, from tackle-to-tackle, appears capable of handling the 
job. Co-captains George Johnson at tackle and Eddie Moore at center 
will anchor the line. 

Amen expects to have a more versatile attack despite the loss of 
Barnes, and the club should have a little more depth at all positions than 
in the past. 

University of North Carolina 

By Jake Wade 

Jim Tatum will open his second campaign this fall at his alma mater, 
and as he so aptly puts it, "the only way we can go is up." 

The big Tar Heel saw his first one at Chapel Hill turn out to be 
a disastrous one, especially after the ACC took away his two wins and 
a tie to give him an 0-10 season. The ACC took the action after it 
was discovered that an ineligible player had participated in these games. 
The Tar Heel staff was not aware of his status during the season. 

There was a great Spring practice at Chapel Hill, with keen competition 
for each position. Halfback Ed Sutton was the principal loss. Other- 
wise, the Blue and White has a fine group of upcoming sophomores; 
they were last year's frosh team, the one brought in after Tatum 
returned to Carolina. Also there are a couple of fine transfers to go 
along with the lettermen returning who were schooled last year under 
the Tatum way of playing football. 

Quarterback Dave Reed is the big boy in Tatum's attack this fall. 
He holds the key to winning games. He is an exceptional play caller, 
fine runner, good ball handler, and fine passer. This is the required 
equipment for a Split-T general. 

Emil DeCantis, Danny Droze, and Daley Goff lead the returning backs 
along with fullback Bob Shupin, University of Washington transfer 
and halfback Jim Shuler, Georgia transfer. Newcomers of great value 
will be Cornell Johnson and Wade Smith. 

The line stacks up with Buddy Payne and Jimmy Jones at the ends; 
Leo Russavage and Phil Blazer, tackles; sophomore Don Stallings and 
Jack Lineberger, guards; and Fred Swearingen and Jim Davis, center. 

The feeling in the Tar Heel camp re-echoes Tatum's remarks, "The 
only way we can go is up." 



— 30 



University of Tennessee 

By Gus Manning 

During the 1957 football season Coach Bowden Wyatt will use his tra- 
ditional single-wing system with a balanced line. The single-wing is a 
power formation that depends upon the double team block, the trap, and 
the wide end sweep that consists of the option run or pass. 

Tennessee's running game is based on power, with much deception 
shown in the backfleld. The running game will be led by two powerful 
running fullbacks, Tommy Bronson and Carl Smith. Sophomore Neyle 
Sollee will add the elusiveness to the fullback position. Although tailback 
Bobby Gordon runs with the power of a fullback, he is also a very de- 
ceptive runner; Al Carter and George Wright are other tailbacks with 
varied running ability. Wingbacks Bill Anderson and Bobby Sandlin will 
attempt to keep the famous Tennessee reverse alive. Paving the way 
for the Vol ball-carriers will be Stockton Adkins, selected as the out- 
standing blocker in the conference last season, and Bill Bennett, the 
No. 2 blocking back last season. 

The key loss from last year's team was tailback John Majors. One 
could go on endlessly reciting the accomplishments of the diminutive 
halfback but replacing him in the Vol backfleld is a major problem to 
the Tennessee coaching staff. 

Up front in the line, where football games are won and lost, Tennessee 
lost six of their starting seven linemen from last year's championship 
team. The departure of ends Buddy Cruze, Roger Urbano, and Edd Can- 
trell have created additional problems for Coach Wyatt and his staff. 
All-Southeastern Conference tackle John Gordy and Charles Rader were 
starters for the past two seasons. Dependable Bruce Burnham was a 
guard without a weakness. Reliable Bubba Howe was an equal to any 
center in the South last season. At the present time Tommy Potts and 
Landon Darty have the inside on the Vol flank positions. 

Jim Smelcher will be one of the smallest tackles in college football, 
and has won the admiration of his coaches by his aggressiveness and 
desire to play. Smelcher's running mate Frank Kolinsky will be the 
largest man on the Vols' starting team at 205 pounds. 

Guards Bill Johnson (the only regular lineman on the 1956 team) and 
Bobby Urbano, give the Tennessee line the fastest pair of guards in the 
history of Tennessee football. Versatile Lon Herzbrun is capable of play- 
ing either guard position. . 

Ray Moss or Ray Brann will perform the center chores. Bill Lanter, 
undoubtedly the lightest center in the league at 178 pounds will be used 
offensively. Dave Stottlemyer, two year veteran at the center position, 
has undergone a knee operation and his status is undetermined. 

The 1957 football squad will consist of 17 seniors, 16 juniors, and 28 
untried sophomores. The Tennessee team will have plenty of speed and 
determination but will be lacking in size, experience, and depth. Coach 
Bowden Wyatt and his squad of Volunteers will be called upon to play 
the toughest schedule in the Southeastern Conference, and although the 
Vols should be a very interesting team to watch they are a long way 
from being a championship team. 



University of South Carolina 

By Bob Isbell 

Last year, Warren Giese's first season as head coach of South Caro- 
lina's Gamecocks, he had a team dominated by sophomores. 

This year, he says the team has even less experience. 

"We've got less experience in six of the 11 starting posts," he says, 
"But the team speed is about the same. Perhaps there's a shade more 
speed at tackle." 

Last season, Giese indicated that his raw talent had fine spirit, and 
that such cooperation would go a long way toward making up for the 
inexperience. 

The Gamecocks came through with seven victories and but three de- 
feats. They never won a game by more than two touchdowns and never 
lost by more than one. 

This spring the 1957 Gamecocks "have as much competitive spirit as 
any squad I've ever seen," Giese said: "I think the type of team we 
have will play the same exciting football that characterized last season 
when eight of 10 games were decided in the fourth quarter." 

One of the Gamecocks' big problems this year is replacing Mackie 
Prickett who quarterbacked the team for three years. Only one man, 
Sam Vickers, saw any experience at all in 1956 as signal caller. Vickers 
underwent a shoulder operation this spring and his status remains ques- 
tionable. 

Gone also are all-Atlantic Coast Conference end Buddy Frick and 
tackle Sam DeLuca, a second-round draft choice by the New York 
Giants. 

However, 19 lettermen will return, and among the brightest stars of 
the lot is big John Kompara, DeLuca's understudy last year. 

Other all-star contenders among the returning Gamecocks are rising 
juniors King Dixon and Alex Hawkins, the sensational sophomore touch- 
down twins of last year. Together they gained almost 1,500 yards, the 
most any sophomore combination ever recorded for the school. Dixon 
runs, kicks, passes and receives. Hawkins runs, passes, and receives and 
kicks extra points. 

Julius Derrick and Eddie Beall head the ends, and Don Rogers appears 
to be Kompara's tackle-mate. Others are guards Nelson Weston and 
Tommy Addison, center Lawton Rogers and fullbacks Don Johnson and 
Bobby Barrett. 

Brightest among the newcomers appear to be John Saunders, fullback, 
and tackles Kirk Phares and Ed Pitts. 



Clemson College 

By Bob Bradley 

Rookie quarterbacks Harvey White and Johnnie Mac Goff hold the key 
to whatever success the Tigers enjoy this season. However, Coach 
Frank Howard says coyly, "I don't think there is a school anywhere 
with two soph quarterbacks who could come near being the ball players 
these are." White is a 6-2, 200-pounder with Goff a 165-pounder and 



32 



5-10. Their worth may be noted in the fact that Clemson threw only 
80 passes all last season. In the spring practice game, the pair tried 
31 and completed 19. 

"We are going to have to throw the ball more. That's something 
we couldn't do last season. Our Orange Bowl squad was more business- 
like and didn't get fired up like this one this spring. If soph tackles 
Harold Olson, Jim Padget, Lou Cordilaone and Morris Keller reach 
their potential right quick-like, there's no telling how good we might 
be," Howard said. The Tigers had 14 rookie tackles on the roster. 
The lone veteran tackle and a good one, is Jim McCanless. 

The big loss in the backfield of course is halfback Joel Wells. How- 
ever, Rudy Hayes, moved from fullback to halfback and Charlie Home 
make a pair of fine hard-running halfbacks who also are tops defen- 
sively. The fullback duties will be handled by the fine veteran Bob 
Spooner. 

Co-captains Leon Kaltenback and John Grdijan lead the fine battle 
for the guard positions. There are four other lettermen at this spot 
and some fine newcomers. 

Donnie Bunton and Bill Thomas will handle the pivot chores. 

Four lettermen ends return to try to keep their places from a hungry 
gang of eleven yearlings. 



University of Miami 

By George Gallet 

University of Miami finished the 1956 football season as the No. 6 
ranking football team in the nation in all three national polls. 

The team finished No. 1 in the defensive statistics after holding TCU, 
Clemson and West Virginia scoreless and allowing only Pittsburgh to 
score more than one TD. 

A two-unit attack — called alternate teams — was employed by Coach 
Andy Gustafson with great success in '56. The units were almost of equal 
strength. 

When the 1957 season rolls around, one of these units will be missing — 
having been lost by graduation. Most of the other unit will be back and 
will form the backbone of the new Hurricane grid machine. 

From last year's squad, only 13 out of 30 lettermen return, while the 
1957 squad has more sophomores, than juniors and seniors put together. 

However, despite the great losses, there has been little in the way of 
weeping by the coaching staff. The sophomore talent is some of the finest 
seen at Miami in some years and close followers of southern football 
say: "Don't be surprised if coach Andy Gustafson comes up with another 
tough ball club this coming fall." 

Indications point toward the Hurricanes having a tougher line — par- 
ticularly on offense — in 1957. Gustafson himself has said on a number 
of occasions that Miami's offensive line play in '57 will be stronger than 
last year. 

Vester Newcomb, the great Miami center of last year who was one of 
the men who helped make the Hurricanes No. 1 in the nation on defense, 



looks like a lineman of all-American calibre. He's rated down here as 
one of the finest all-around centers and line-backers ever to come out of 
Miami. 

Charley Diamond, a 220 pound, 6-3, tackle, who last year started half 
of the Miami ball games despite the fact that he was just a sophomore, 
is another great player in the Miami line and a potential ail-American. 
Still ano^er rugged and powerful player in the Hurricane line is the 
other tackle, Gary Greaves. Miami's tackle play in 1957 could be the 
best in the school's history. 

As for the Miami backfield, Captain John Varone may be hard man 
to stop at right halfback. Varone came to Miami as an all-American 
high school football player from Boston, Mass., and in his sophomore year 
in 1955 (two years ago), he had a 7.04 running average; helped Miami 
beat Pitt at Pitt Ltadium, and was a big star against Notre Dame in the 
Orange Bowl. Miami's attack last year was built around All-American 
Don Bosseler at fullback, so Varone was somewhat in the background. 
However, the Boston strong boy, a great runner, pass receiver and de- 
fensive man, displayed more in the spring drills than any time he has 
been here and a great year is predicted for him. 

Following the recent spring drills, Coach Gustafson commented: 
"Varone has shown his greatest play since coming to Miami and we ex- 
pect him to have his greatest year in 1957." 

Bonnie Yarbrough, one of the two quarterbacks who led Miami's at- 
tack last year, has returned and will have help from two talented sopho- 
more quarterbacks Maury Guttman and Fran Curci. All three Miami 
quarterbacks are left handed passers and the southpaw flingers are ex- 
pected to cause the U-M opposition no little bit of trouble when they 
start throwing their running passes. Guttman can pitch the ball with 
either hand. 

Joe Plevel is Miami's left halfback. Last year he played three posi- 
tions — quarterback, left halfback and right halfback. 

Bill Sandie, who came to Miami from New York as an all-American 
h:gh school player, will seek to fill the shoes of all-American Don Bos- 
seler a fullback. Harry Deiderich, a promising sophomore, appears next 
in line. 

The 1957 Miami team may be better balanced than last year when 
Bosseler was the main show. The team will be a young club. It needs 
some mileage, but once the burly U-M sophomores catch on and gain 
early season experience, the U-M ball club could be a tough one. 



University of Virginia 

By Dick Turner 

Ben Martin, looking ahead to his second season at Virginia, has an- 
nounced that "we will have an improved team on the field in '57, led 
by our inspirational captain, Jim Bakhtiar." 

Bakhtiar approaches his third and final varsity season with good pros- 
pect? of making it his best. He gained 879 yards last year to rank fifth 
among the national rushing leaders and otherwise distinguished himself. 

The 198-pound fullback will have the same company of Nelson Yar- 
brough, quarterback, and Sonny Randle and Alvin Cash, halfbacks, who 



34 



were the usual game starters last season. Yarbrough was the ACC's 
leading passer for '56. 

In the second backfield at the end of spring practice were Reece Whit- 
ley, quarterback; Ralph Kneeland and Carl Moser, halfbacks, and Bob 
Davids, fullback. Whitley was the No. 1 quarterback as a sophomore 
last Fall until he broke his throwing arm in the second game, being dis- 
abled for the rest of the season. Kneeland is a two-year letterman, while 
Moser and Davids will be sophomore beginners. 

The first line, solid with carry-over veterans, was formed by Fred 
Polzer and Pat Whitaker, ends; Joe White and Harold Outten, tackles; 
Jim Keyser and Frank Call, guards, and Scott Teunis, center. Keyser, 
who won All-ACC honors at center last year, will carry on as a line- 
backer on defense. Another major shift sent Outten to tackle from guard. 

As it was this Spring, the most important item on the practice schedule 
in September will be the continuous development of a supporting line. 
Nine departing seniors who leave some thin spots are Bob Gunderman 
and Tucker McLaughlin, ends; Henry Jordan, Don Kovach, Jim St. Clair 
and Ron Melnik, tackles, and Jay Corson, Ben Petrilli and Frank Fan- 
non, guards. 

"A number of new men will be seeing action during the season as we 
try to mould a second unit to relieve the first team," Martin has said. 
"In the line, you will be seeing and reading about boys like Dave Graham, 
Mike Riley, John McCaffrey, George Sempeles, Bob Carlisle, Wayne 
Whelan, Bob Edwards and Roger Zenson." 

Finishing Spring practice as the second line were Graham and Riley, 
ends; John Diehl and Sempeles, tackles; Jim Candler and Jim McShane, 
guards, and Bob Canevari, center. Diehl, who is 6-6 and weighs 275, is 
the only letterman of the second seven. 

"Our success in facing 10 major opponents will depend primarily on 
the strength of our second team, and will be further dependent on the 
development of our sophomores," is the way Martin sees it. 




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.S8 



TERP THUMBNAIL SKETCHES 



ENDS 



ED COOKE, 21, 6-4, 235, Senior from Norfolk, Va. — one of the Terps' finest end pros- 
pects since the early 50' s when the Red and White had such lanky stalwarts as Pete 
Augsberger and Lloyd Colteryahn, but Cooke, after a sensational sophomore year, be- 
came victimized by the injury plague which hit the Terp camp in so many places last 
fall . . . with a great outdoor effort in track behind him, it looks like the big boy has 
mended and could come up with a top-notch year, a feat that he is most capable of 
doing . . . one of the fastest men on the team, outrunning some of the backs . . . his 
speed, size, and exceptional ability to catch a pass makes him a dangerous target . . . 
with his great strength, he is a fine defensive player; hard to get by or around . . . 
practiced spring ball as well as competing full time for the track team . . . was indoor 
and outdoor shot-put champion of the ACC for the second consecutive year . . . set a 
new school and ACC dual meet maik with a toss of 53 feet 1% inches in the Virginia 
meet . . . set a new ACC meet record with a mark of 52 feet 4 inches ... is now 
being considered one of the nation's best and has this indoor and outdoor season to 
perform . . . also throws the discus and javelin . . . won all three events in Virginia 
meet and won shot and discus in all six dual meets as well as the ACC outdoor crowns 
in shot and discus . . . could be one of the big stars for the Terp gridders . . . married 
former cheerleader and Homecoming Queen Jody Floyd last November ... in School 
of Business and Public Administration. 

BEN SCOTTI, 20, 6-1, 1S5, Junior from Long Branch, N. J. — after making his bid as 
freshman as a top candidate for a first team job when he made the step up to the 
varsity, the rugged Scotti did just that . . . showed exceptional skill in early fall prac- 
tice and won a starting job and never relinquished it . . . was the lone steady performer 
each game . . . conscientious hard worker . . . has exceptional eagerness and desire 
. . . has fine speed and a good pair of hands making him top receiver . . . very aggres- 
sive which helps him to excel defensively ... a tough man to beat . . . always gives 
top effort . . . good offensive showings last year as a soph which labeled him as one 
of team top blockers . . . younger brother Anthony, all-State, a freshman for the Terps 
. . . caught two passes for 18 yards and had one interception for 13 yard return . . . 
was all-State in high school . . . was also 175-pound state wrestling champion . . . was 
honorable mention all-Catholic ail-American in football ... in School of Arts and Science. 

BILL STEPPE, 21, 6-1, 200, Junior from Cumberland, Md. — came into the picture last 
fall to play some top football ... a fine two-way player who has a good habit of getting 
in the open . . . fast and a sure receiver . . . makes good effort for the ball, like 
Scotti ... his potential proven this spring as he made a good impression . . . 
played first team on the left side and the job is his this fall . . . Bill will be out 
to keep it in one of the main battles for starting assignments on the team . . . serious, 
hard worker . . . won the James Turner Memorial Award and the Hazelwood Award at 
Fort Hill High for his star career there . . . was President of the National Honor Society 
... in School of Education . . . married and has a daughter. 

AL BEARDSLEY, 22, 6-0, 185, Junior from Pittsburgh, Pa. — another of the Terps' 
most talked about end prospects . . . had a great frosh year and started the '56 cam- 
paign with excellent promise . . . injuries throughout the season kept him on the 
sidelines most of the year . . . one of the most respected men on the squad. . . 
real strong with a lot of two-way ability which he exhibits and makes his play 
most noticeable . . . flashy defensive player . . . brought a fabulous reputation 
with him from St. Justin High School and has two more years to cash in after the 
injury soph year slowed him down . . . good speed ... lot of desire and determina- 
tion . . . caught four passes for 97 yards and a touchdown pass in Miami game . . . 
picked off one enemy aerial . . . will be pushing for return to first team ... in 
School of Business and Public Administration. 

BILL TURNER, 23, 6-3, 205, Senior from Silver Spring, Md. — a two-year end letter- 
man ready for another fine effort . . . has contributed two good years . . . "Moose" 
as his teammates call him is a top all-around competitor . . . shows well both 
offense and defense . . . had a good spring practice and is counted on for heavy 
duty this year . . . good speed and top receiver . . . tough on defense . . . was 
the top receiver of '56 as he snagged seven passes for 74 yards . . . was all-State 
tackle at Montgomery Blair High . . . married ... in School of Business and 
Public Administration with an Industrial Management major. 



39 



BILL MARTIN, 21, 6-1, 200, Junior from Kittanning, Pa. — after working hard for 
the B squad last year and coming up with a very promising spring practice, a lot 
ot help is expected of the former Kittanning star . . . big boy with fine pair of 
hands and pretty fair speed . . . could be a real good receiver . . . serious hard 
worker who has a lot of desire to play . . . has a good chance to make the boys 
up front hustle . . . all-section in football, basketball, and baseball in high 
school . . . Pre-Dent School . . . married. 

BOB ALEXANDER, 22, 6-0, 200, Junior from Pleasant Hills, Pa. — coaches have 
hopes that the hard-working "Alec" will play a great deal this fall . . . has fine 
two-way abilities featured by his pass receiving . . . good defensive player . . . 
desire to play big attribute . . . was a Baldwin High School star in tough WPIAL 
league ... in School of Agriculture. 

RONALD SHAFFER. 19, 6-2, 205, Sophomore from Cumberland, Md. — one of the 
most recent "stars" to come to Maryland from Fort Hill High, and Coach Bill Hahn 
. . . a fine looking prospect who came up with a sensational freshman year . . . 
caught many passes and made an indelible impression on defense ... a serious 
hard working player who should make his mark this fall and establish himself as 
one of the big stars for the future . . . offensively he is a fine blocker, has real 
good speed and a glue-fingered receiver . . . should give the veterans fits for their 
job . . . was all-City and honorable mention all-State ... in School of Education. 

KEN POLING, 20, 6-2, 195, Sophomore from Cumberland, Md. — another of the top- 
flight Fort Hill boys who has a great chance to be a star performer as a Terp 
end . . . after a year on the B squad and a fine spring practice the former Fort 
Hill ace should be ready, with a bit of experience, to lend some good play to the end 
corps ... in Pre-Dental School. 

TACKLES 

FRED COLE, 20, 5-11, 225, Junior from Newark, N.J. — billed last fall as one of the 
future great tackles at Maryland following a sensational freshman year, the big like- 
able Engineering student more than lived up to his reputation . . . playing behind 
the much heralded Mike Sandusky, the husky sophomore made a great reputation 
with his outstanding offensive and defensive heroics . . . when FRED came to College 
Park, he was labeled by former coach Jim Tatum as another all-American and one 
who would take his place alongside the many great Terp tackles whose names as 
all-AAmericans are still memorable in Terp football history the past decade . . ■ 
definitely a great star and one who should assist greatly in the expected top line 
play this season ... it will be on him that the coaches will place many special 
tasks during the year . . . has exceptional speed and uncanny reactions, forward 
and lateral . . . picturesque blocker and great diagnosis of plays making him a 
noticeable defensive analyst . . . other than the Terp staff realizing his greatness, 
he took the eye of a dozen pro coaches in the press box during the varsity-alumni 
game ... he was singled out as the top lineman, along with center Gene Alderton 
. . . one went so far to say: "If I had a game tomorrow, and he was my tackle, 
he would be first team, even better than those I have now. He's a great ball player." 
. . . these are rather powerful words to place on the then sophomore tackle who had 
just completed his first season of varsity competition and had also just finished 
playing against an all-pro team of former Terp players . . . there is every reason 
to predict that he could be one of the top tackles in the country today and maybe 
even more select ... a sure bet for many high honors this year ... he also 
is a shot putter . . . younger brother Bob entered school in February ... in School 
of Engineering. 

DON HEALY, 21, 6-3, 235, Senior from Rome, N.Y. — another big strong tackle from 
whom the Terp coaches expect a banner year ... a fierce competitor who never 
wants to slow up . . . has had two outstanding seasons and this will be his best 
effort as the front man on the powerful left side of the line ... an excellent 
blocker and most powerful defensively . . . has exceptional strength and uses it 
well in blocking his opponent and following through ... a keen competitor . . . 
also played baseball and hockey at Rome Acedemy . . . was honorable mention 
all-State ... a Pre-Dental student. 

TOM STEFL, 22, 6-1, 220, Senior from Brownsville, Pa. — with two outstanding years 
behind him. the big strong veteran has himself ready to move in if the other boys 
let down a bit . . . always giving his best which has been a first class effort 
wihle in the game . . . has real good speed and a tower of strength on defense 
... a fine tackier and good blocker . . . works hard all the time and has a lot 



of determination . . . will be one of the better linemen this fall if past performances 
and experience are indicative . . . ability is there . . . was a three sport star at 
Brownsville and highly sought after ... a Pre-Medical student. 

CHARLES CARROLL. 19, 6-1, 220, Sophomore from Philadelphia, Pa. — here is a boy 
who has had the coaches beaming for two years . . . was on the B squad last fall 
after a great frosh performance . . . was brilliant last fall for the B team and this 
spring . . . another of the "better" tackle prospects in the Terp camp for some 
time . . . with the added experience gained last fall, the big strong hard-working 
affable soph is counted on to give additional strength at tackle spot . . . gives all- 
out brilliant efforts all the time, offensively and defensively . . . was tabbed for 
stardom early and with continued top play, will be ... he and Stefl "must" for 
Mont . . . was all-Catholic and all-Scholastic at LaSalle as well as a star track 
man ... in School of Business and Public Administration. 

BILL BURGLY, 23, 6-3, 205, Junior from New Kensington, Pa. — the big rangy 
Pennsylvanian turned in a fine '56 season and a good spring practice labeled him 
as one to see a lot of duty this fall in helping to bolster the fine tackle spot for 
the Terps . . . "Buck" as his teammates call him, is a hard working goliath, 
especially on defense ... he likes it rough and tough, as several opponents learned 
last fall . . . difficult to move him out of the play ... an efficient blocker . . . 
should have a real good year ... in School of Agriculture. 

KURT SCHWARZ, 21, 5-11, 200, Sophomore from Hackensack, N.J. — came to Mary- 
land as a highly regarded prospect and with the help of Chet (the Jet) Hanulak. 
Terp all-America halfback from Hackensack . . . raised the eyebrows of then Coach 
Jim Tatum and his staff as a freshman and was labeled as truly one of the all- 
timers for Maryland . . . Kurt went into the service and returned last year . . . 
during spring practice, he played guard and tackle and will probably see both this 
fall . . . but it doesn't make much difference for he gave a brilliant exhibition in 
spring drills . . . easily one of the BEST linemen . . . could give the veterans 
something to watch for . . . does a brilliant job offensively and defensively, especially 
shows signs of brilliance on defense ... he will be a great addition for Mont . . . 
one to watch closely this fall ... he will make himself noticed ... in School of 
Business and Public Administration . . . was a three-sport star at Hackensack. 

TOM FLOR, 20, 6-0, 215, Sophomore from Elizabeth, N.J. — still another of the fine 
Terp tackle candidates who was lured to College Park by line coach Bob Ward, an 
Elizabeth native . . . has good size and a vast potential . . . with some game 
experience, he is sure to help the tackle cause . . . was held out last fall and did 
a good job then and again this spring . . . was all-State at Thomas Jefferson as 
well as all-County and on the all-Star team ... in School of Business and Public 
Administration. 

GUARDS 

PAUL TONETTI, 22, 6-2, 210, Senior from Massepequa, N.Y has come up with 

two excellent seasons and in the '56 campaign he took over the number one job for 
the most part and played skillfully all the time ... a much heralded ball player 
who has come through as one of the Terps' finest guards . . . consistent fine play 
. . . Ward labels him one of easiest boys to coach . . . always trying to learn and 
do better . . . due to carve a "star" niche in Terp annals this fall ... a standout 
two-way performer . . . has good speed, quick charge and moves easily with the 
play as a keen and quick follower of the play ... a powerful tackier and his 
all-business-like mannerisms on the field make him a most valuable player . . . one 
of the finest offensive blockers seen on a Terp line . . . will be another seeking 
all-star honors . . . sure to be one of the most looked at in the Conference . . . 
all-County in New York in football . . . also on track team ... in School of 
Business and Public Administration. 

RONALD ATHEY, 21, 5-10, 200, Senior from Cumberland, Md.— with Tonetti, the 
Terps figure to get some of their finest play at the guard spot . . . Athey has 
been a student two years and the '56 season saw him excel . . . was more than a 
capable replacement for Jack Davis, the much talked about right guard last year . . . 
another product of the Fort Hill High, he is one of the strongest men on the team 
. . . has fine blocking skills and is as tough to move as they come on defense . . . 
a vicious tackier and an efficient tackier . . . pursues the play well . . . counted on 
to give the right side of the line a big boost with Cole and Scotti ... a quiet 
hard worker who goes about his assignment methodically and gets it done . . . one 
to watch this fall . . . married and has a daughter . . . was all-city, county, and 
state ... in School of Education. 



41 — 



RODNEY BREEDLOVE, 19, 6-2, 215, Sophomore from Cumberland, Md. — this boy 
a product of Allegany High, not Fort Hill ... in fact he is a product of freshman 
coach Roy Lester who talked Breedlove into coming to College Park with him when 
Lester was named freshman coach . . . this is the upcoming boy to watch ... he 
definitely, on the basis of his freshman year and spiing practice has to be tabbed 
a future big star as a great at Maryland ... as Coach Mont has said, he is the 
finest prospect we have had as a lineman, in some time . . . most of the time a 
boy will show his greatness potential as a sophomore following some experience or 
early his junior year, but Breedlove showed it as a freshman and playing end . . . 
as a frosh end. he caught five td passes and three extra point passes ... he 
has great speed and tremendous hands and ability to catch the ball if it is near 
him ... he has top maneuverability . . . however, where he really impresses is on 
defense . . . nothing could get near him that he wasn't making the tackle or 
helping with it . . . he's a great rover, making tackles all over the place and 
rushes well also . . . during spring drills, Mont moved him to guard to take ad- 
vantage of his defensive skills as a linebacker . . . Ward says he is the finest 
young prospect and one of the best he has coached . . . has tremendous strength, 
is agile, and has an intense desire to play football ... his desire and over anxiety 
to get his hands on somebody sometimes gets him into trouble ... he must com- 
pletely overcome the habit of losing his temper . . . was all-City in '55 and '56 
as well as all-State his senior year . . . member of National Honor Society . . . 
in Arts and Science, majoring in Government and Politics. 

NICK DECICCO, 21, 5-11, 210, Senior from Brooklyn, N.Y.— a top-rated boy who 
has given the Terps two exceptional years of guard play . . . has been in and 
out of the number one spot and is sure to be pushing early this fall to start the 
A&M game . . . has a lot of fight and spirit and is one of most popular boys on 
the team ... a powerful guard with plenty of know-how both blocking and tackling 
. . . good at cleaning out his man and opening a nice hole . . . one of team's keen 
competitors . . . should have good year ... is chief cook for annual spaghetti 
dinner after season closes . . . won the best athlete award senior year in high 
school and also won the George Wingate award ... in Scool of Business and Public 
Administration. 

RONALD LAN EVE, 20, 6-2, 200, Junior from Pittsburgh, Pa. — counted on heavily 
to give another fine showing this fall as a guard . . . was switched from center this 
spring to give some help . . . last year as a soph, Laneve started out with an ex- 
ceptional impression and was doing a fine job as number two center behind regular 
Gene Alderton until hit by yellow jaundice after the Miami game, the fourth of the 
season ... he had to miss the remainder of the season, with teammate Howie Dare 
who missed the entire season with jaundice ... by spring, he was able to practice 
and worked at both center and guard . . . will be able to utilize talent at both spots, 
depending on where needed . . . fine blocker, initial and downfield . . . most notice- 
able defensively as a linebacker . . . will be a valuable spot man . . . was all-City 
in the tough and top-ranking Pittsburgh city schools ... in School of Physical Edu- 
cation. 

TOM GUNDERMAN, 19, 5-10, 200, Sophomore from Frartklin, N.J. — a big star for 
the baby Terps last fall . . . one of the most highly regarded of the newcomers who 
has convinced the staff that he will play a great deal for the varsity this year . . . 
opponents listed him as one of the best they faced ... is another of the finer boys 
who definitely will help . . . can be regarded as one of the boys to watch closely 
... a future star ... is a tower of strength both ways . . . tough and impressive 
defensively . . . fast and has a lot of football savvy . . . shows great deal of interest 
in his play, on and off the field . . . one of the all-time athletes from Franklin 
High School. 

LYNN ATHEY, 20, 6-2, 210, Sophomore from Front Royal, Va. — a highly sought after 
boy with tremendous recommendations and record at Warren County High ... a 
big strong boy that Mont held out last season in order to give him a good year to 
gain experience with the B squad . . . has a fine future ahead of him should his 
potential be exposed and utilized . . . has a fine attitude with keen desire and de- 
termination . . . another who can be used at center, a job he had as a freshman 
when he exhibited some great play . . . size and over-all gridiron ability prompted 
the move to give assistance at the guard position . . . fine blocker and sure defender 
. . . was all-District two years . . . also played basketball, baseball, and track . . . 
in Pre-Medical School. 

GUARDS FRED KERN, RON BINETTI, and LEROY DIETRICH will be additional 
candidates vieing for positions on the varsity . . . this trio has the potential of 
furnishing one or all three to the top four squads ... all are young but most cap- 
able players. 



CENTERS 

GENE ALDERTON, 22, 6-0, 200, Senior from Cumberland, M'd a really great center 

who proved just that last season after the "nice-guy" had a sensational year as a 
sophomore but was in the shadow of notoriety as he played behind the Terps' great 
all-time center and Player of the Year, Bob Pellegrini .... greatness was predicted 
for Alderton, another Fort Hill product ... he has lived up to his expectations and 
reputation as he came through with a second brilliant year in '56 . . . his performance 
was noticed and rewarded as he was given all-America honorable mention by the Asso- 
ciated Press and United Press ... he also was named all-Conference first team center 
by the Associated Press . . . the Southern Writers placed him on their third squad . . . 
he possesses great skill that a center needs and is a tremendous linebacker ... he can 
be seen making tackles all over the field ... a blocker that seems to have no equal 
from the pivot spot . . . drives his man out and goes on to clean out other tacklers . . . 
has great speed and a fine football mind . . . takes pride in his position as center . . . 
his good size and compactness permit him the maneuverability to handle most any 
blocking assignment ... he is a natural and fiery leader ... he was elected co-cap- 
tain for the year by his teammates . . . has uncanny accuracy in centering the ball to 
a punter whether in close or spread punt ... on defense, he is a fine diagnostician, a 
sure tackier, wards off blockers, and pursues well . . . truly one of the fine centers 
in football today ... a bona fide all-America candidate ... it will be Alderton's big 
chore to lead the Terp line to any success expected of them this fall . . . was all-City 
and second team all-State at Fort Hill . . . member of National Honor Society ... in 
School of Education, majoring in Education for Industry. 

WILBUR MAIN, 22, 6-2, 195, Senior from Frederick, Md. — a highly touted and rec- 
commended transfer from Potomac State College . . . came through last fall with an 
exceptional year playing center and guard . . . another who can play either spot, and 
play it well . . . one of the team's most conscientious workers on the field . . . al- 
ways working hard . . . likes to mix it up and does a top two-way job . . . efficient 
blocker with good habits from the pivot spot ... is tough to move out of the way 
. . . . does top work defensively . . . fine linebacker ... is sure to have a good 
year playing center and guard, if called on . . . was all-State ... in School of Physi- 
cal Education. 

BOB SUCHY, 22, 6-2, 210, Senior from Baltimore, Md. — a big strong boy with two good 
years' experience behind him ... he too can be used at either guard or center . . . 
has had most playing time past two years as a guard . . . has a fine disposition with 
an intense desire to play football . . . plays both ways well . . . effective defen- 
sively . . . noticeable tackier . . . pursues well . . . was a star at Loyola High . . . 
majoring in Civil Engineering. 

VICTOR SCHWARTZ, 19 6-0, 185, Sophomore from Port Reading, N. J. — here is a boy 
that came up with a great freshman year and continued to please the Terp coaches, espe- 
cially center coach Whitey Dovell with his standout and consistently noticeable work 
this spring ... he managed to give the veterans a run for their money and in many 
of the spring scrimmages, he was the number two center . . . this is a spot he could 
keep if he continues to show so well in the early fall practices . . . not the biggest 
center candidate in the world, but every bit of him is always giving everything he has 
. . . just a good rough and tough player who has a lot of skill to accompany his zeal- 
ous efforts ... he could be real good this fall . . . the potential, ability, and 
willingness is there . . . will be out to give the veterans a hard time for the runnerup 
spot ... in School of Business and Public Administration. 

QUARTERBACKS 

DICKIE LEWIS, 20, 5-11, 180, Junior from Martinsburg, W. Va. — there was little doubt 
last fall that with the sensational "find" of Lewis, the Terps would have undoubtedly 
some of the nation's greatest quarterbacking with Tambo, Fritsch, and Lewis . . . 
but the injury plague hit the slick Martinsburg signal caller and he wasn't able to dem- 
onstrate his outstanding potential until late in the season ... as matter of fact, it was 
in the final game with NC State that he really blossomed and gave indications that his 
bad ankle was completely healed . . . Lewis had led the Terp frosh to their first unde- 
feated season and then was labeled as another future great Maryland quarterback, a 
feature of the Red and White for so many years ... it is on his highly respected 



■43- 



ability that the Terps hope to come back this fall ... he will be handed the reins to 
lead the team as the season starts ... a fine triple-threat type qb who can run, pass, 
punt, and call a masterful sequence of plays . . . has better than average speed for 
a qb . . . a dangerous runner . . . passes well, better on the short ones, but can throw 
long . . . fine punter . . . has the attribute of top leadership, on and off the field . . . 
a fine defensive back ... it will be on his shoulders that Mont and staff will place 
the hopes of getting the Terps off to a good start and a successful campaign . . . had 
a one yard rushing mark for 32 carries . . . came up with a .500 throwing average 
with ten completions out of 20 attempts . . . for 90 yards . . . had two intercepted . . . 
punted nine times for a 36.6 average . . . had one kickoff return for eght yards . . . 
intercepted two for 111 yards return . . . set a new ACC interception return record with 
a sensational 103-yard runback of an NC State pass for the clinching winning score . . . 
scored twice in the State victory . . . made all-Section at Martinsburg High two years 
and honorable mention all-State . . . all-State baseball player . . . also a track man 
member of National Honor Society ... in School of Business and Public Administration. 

JOHN FRITSCH, 21, 6-0, 185, Senior from Carnegie, Pa. — when the Terps' all-America 
quarterback Frank Tamburello was lost to the team two days before the opening game 
with Syracuse because of his induction notice, the task of leading the '56 highly touted 
Terps fell on the broad and capable shoulders of Fritsch, himself a most respected and 
highly regarded signal caller . . . John, who figured in only ten offensive plays as a 
soph, was counted on to split the qb chores with Tambo and upcoming star from the 
freshman team, Dickie Lewis . . . Fritsch, a slick Split-T operator, accepted the chal- 
lenge and came up with fine performances, even though the Red and White were taking 
their lumps . . . with injuries and sickness hitting the team daily, the Terp operation 
naturally was hurt . . . but Fritsch stayed with it and did his best and was capably 
helped by Bob Rusevlyan ... it wasn't until late in the season that Lewis, injured 
the week before the opener, was able to get into action . . . now with a year's experi- 
ence behind him, as well as Rusevlyan and Lewis, Fritsch certainly can be counted on 
for some excellent quarterbacking ... he is a good two-way player with better than 
average defensive ability ... a good tackier and adequate pass defender ... he is a 
fine play caller, with good offensive sequence ... is the Terps' best long passer and a 
good short chucker ... is an excellent punter . . . also a good hard runner for a qb 
. . . set a new ACC punt record with an 88-yard boot against Miami ... led the Terp 
scorers last season with three touchdowns and one PAT for 19 points . . . had a .5 
rushing mark for 39 carries with losses while back to pass slicing his several good runs 
. . . threw 52 passes for 23 completions and 219 yards . . . had four picked off . . . 
had a 38-yard punting average for 27 kicks . . . intercepted one pass for four yard 
return . . . comes from former Terp all-America qb Bernie Faloney's home town and 
high school. Scott Twp . . . also starred in baseball and soccer at Scott ... in School 
of Arts and Sciences, majoring in Sociology. 

BOB RUSEVLYAN, 21, 5-11, 175, Junior from Washington, D. C— this former St. 
John's great has come to be the Terps' "real" trouble-shooter . . . and an excellent 
one . . . with the injury toll last fall, the "Splinter" showed brilliantly while playing 
quarterback and halfback ... he would be seen playing halfback one series of plays 
and then quarterback in the next . . . does an excellent job at either spot . . . looks 
much better as a quarterback ... it is believed he has the best quarterback mind on 
the team . . . looks good as he mixes up his sequence with good calls and some fancy 
running ... a very elusive runner and a smart one . . . coaches say he is one that 
has some of all the qualifications for a quarterback . . . his size minimizes his passing 
ability, especially the long one . . . can but doesn't do punting, leaving it up to the 
halfback in his unit . . . along with his offensive adequacy, he is a top defensive back 
. . . his keen defensive skill enabled him to lead the team in pass interceptions with 
three for a 15 yard return ... at the close of the season, the coaches and teammates 
voted him the "outstanding defensive back" award . . . was one of DCs finest all-time 
athletes, gaining all-Metropolitan honors in football and basketball ... it is conceivable 
to believe that "The Splinter" will have a great year for the Terps . . . married this 
summer ... in School of Business and Public Administration. 

BILL JOHNSTONE, 20. 5-11, 175. Senior from Lewiston, N. Y. — one of the finest boys on 
the squad and definitely the most conscientious . . . has been on the Terp B squad and 
this fall should see varsity duty . . . Bill has handled the signal calling job for the 
B team, working the opponents plays and has done a top job . . . good left-handed 
passer . . . fine punter . . . could be a big help as substitute qb . . . has tremendous 



desire to play . . . was all-West New York League playing for Bishop Duffy High . . 
was valedictorian of his class as well as class president junior and senior years . . . has 
close to an A average in Pre-Medical School. 

DALE BETTY, 19, 6-0, 175, Sophomore from Butler, Pa. — the top quarterback coming 
up from the frosh team . . . was out a lot with injury but his potential and abilities 
are known and is labeled as another fine future signal caller . . . can call a fine game 
. . . punts and passes well ... a good runner and has real good defensive ability 
... he could be called on to help this year. 

HALFBACKS 

FRED HAMILTON, 21, 5-11, 1S0, Senior from Freeport, Pa. — after two brilliant years 
playing both halfback and fullback, the "workhorse" of the Terp backfield these two 
seasons, returns for his final chapter and with the recommendations of his own coaches 
and of the opponents coaches that he will be the main backfield candidate for all-star hon- 
ors for the Terps . . . made several all-opponent teams last year . . . Hamilton has missed 
only one game since he started the season of '55 and that was the Syracuse contest when 
he was recovering from a shoulder injury received as he starred in a victory over North 
Carolina the previous week ... he starred as a soph playing fullback at only 170 
pounds, then last season was used at both fullback and halfback; most of the time at 
right half after soph Jim Hatter came in to do such a good job . . . Hamilton, giving 
every minute of all-out football, was the only Terp back not to miss a game last fall 
as injuries hit the others . . . one week he would play fullback and the next be found 
at right halfback ... he always worked with a different backflelld since the same 
foursome wasn't able to start two games ... it was only Fred that was at the starting 
post each week . . .clever, hard -type runner who can dig for that extra yard after 
brought down ... in six of the ten games he played 55 minutes or more and in two, 
he played 58 minutes . . . Hamilton has been the star that was predicted for him by 
former Coach Jim Tatum who called him "one of the greatest all-around football players 
I ever have coached" . . . and Tommy Mont continues to put the same label on his 
hard-working veteran ... he started his career as the big star for the frosh team then 
as a soph, Tatum had to put him at fullback and he came through spectacularly, as a 
ball carrier, blocker, and defender . . .the never tiring back who wants to keep a start- 
ing job, is a real rugged boy with great power and most of all he possesses delirious 
desire to play . . . his great blocking was most noticeable from the fullback slot as a 
soph when he cleared the last man for many of high-scoring Ed Vereb's scores ... in 
one of Maryland's greatest football hours, the UCLA game of '55 in Byrd Stadium. 
Hamilton threw the block on the Bruin wing that enabled Vereb to scoot 17 yards for 
the only but winning score; Vereb paid him the great tribute by saying, "I wouldn't 
have scored half that many tds if it hadn't been for the great blocks Hamilton threw 
for me." . . . had a 4.9 rushing average his soph year and brings a 3.6 average back 
from his junior year, getting 273 yards for 75 tries . . . threw once . . . caught six 
passes for 58 yards . . . had three punt returns and four kickoff returns . . . after the 
season, coaches and teammates voted him "the outstanding offensive back" award . . . 
one to watch this fall. . . could have good chance for deserving honors ... in School 
of Physical Education. 

HOWIE DARE, 22, 5-11, 185, Senior from Baltimore, Md. — it is believed and hoped that 
Dare will provide the big offensive punch as the partial answer for what is expected to 
be a fine Terp offense this fall. . . a big star for two years, the scintillating running 
of the elusive halfback could make the difference to go along with Hamilton, Healy, 
Layman, Kershner and the other halfbacks that got so much fine work last fall while 
Dare was on the sidelines .... the high-stepping Dare and the Maryland camp was 
iolted severely the day before the opener last fall as he came down with a serious attack 
of yellow jaundice which sidelined him for the season ... he was hospitalized for three 
weeks ... his absence was most noticeable . . . his return this fall is a great shot 
in the arm to Mont and the squad ... the affable Dare is the spectacular type runner 
... a most dangerous type ... he has the ability to break away and go all the way 
he will be one to watch closely as the possible "pony" to lead the Terps in front at 
the finish wire ... has exceptional "kill as a ball carrier and defensive back . . . is 
extremely dangerous with punt and kickoff returns . . . good passer and top receiver 
... a terrific runner as he utilizes his great speed to tv/ist and turn . . . the galloping 
Dare's unusual running style makes him the dangerous runner he is reputed to be making 
him hard to bring down by tacklers ... a top baseball player ... has led the Terp 
batters the past two years, hitting .361 then .357 this spring . . . second team ACC 



— 45 — 



both years . . . set a new ACC stolen base mark this year as he picked off 31 bases 
for the new record . . . had three homers and nine doubles . . . had a 6.3 rushing 
average as a soph and a 4.6 mark his junior year . . . all-State at Poly High and on 
all-Star baseball team his senior year . . . Dare graduated in June from the School of 
Business and Public Administration with a major in Public Relations ... he enters 
Graduate School this fall . . . married and has a son. 

JACK HEALY, 21, 5-11, 185, Senior from Brooklyn, N. Y. — the popular Terp co-Captain 
is another of the star veteran halfbacks returning this fall . . . he, Hamilton, and 
Layman will vie for the right running spot, a pleasant situation . . . Jack was another 
of the outstanding backs that had it tough last fall because of repeated injuries . . . 
then it was in the Clemscn game that he injured his knee and had to undergo surgery 
immediately . . . although he didn't work during spring drills, he will be at full strength 
this season . . . Healy has been one of the big names in Terp football since he arrived 
on the scene ... he won a starting job as a soph and came up with a big year ... a 
star both offensively and defensively . . . has fine speed with tremendous power making 
him a dangerous power runner . . . always comes up with stellar exhibitions and looks 
spectacular as he does a methodical job . . . opponents say he is one of the hardest 
runners in the league; difficult to bring down with his hard-driving style . . . was "ACC 
Sophomore of the Week" after a brilliant show in the win over Wake Forest ... is most 
noted for his adeptness in punt and kickoff returns . . . fine passer and receiver also 
. . . good handyman with abundance of desire and leadership ... a fine all-around 
player . . . had a 4.8 rushing average as a soph and a three yard mark for 44 rushes 
last fall . . . threw two for no completions . . . caught the td pass from Kershner 
that won the Wake Forest game, 6-0 .. . had one punt return and four kickoff re- 
turns ... big star at Midwood High . . . was all-New York City and all-Metropolitan 
. . . won New York State's coveted Lou Gehrig Award for excellence in athletics and 
academics as well as the Lenny Singer and B'nai Brith Awards, similar recognition . . . 
graduated this summer with honors and will enter the University's Law School this fall. 

TED KERSHNER, 20. 6-0, 175, Junior from Martinsburg, W. Va. — as said last year, 
"if there ever was a boy who must be placed in the 'we told you so' category, it is this 
fleet and fabulous standout just a little over an hour's ride from the College Park cam- 
pus and just across the border into W. Va., Ted (Teddy) Kershner" . . . now after 
this soph year is over and he is headed for the junior year, the same must be said . . . 
and to continue to add to the woes of the opponents is the fact that the often-injured 
Kershner of last year is well and now expected to do the things expected of him as a 
well player, as he was when the ballyhoo began after his great performances as a fresh- 
man and his first stab at spring practice . . . Teddy was in and out of the lineup in 
'56, another victim of the series of injuries that Mont suffered over . . . but in the 
games he didn't have to care for the taped legs and knees, he did a fine job . . . his 
bid for stardom was easily exhibited in the final game against State when he was well 
and had no tape to slow him down as he scooted for 129 yards in 13 carries, one for 
a 34-yard td run . . . this is the type game he is capable of playing, one that will give 
him the name his performances will command ... he is the nearest 'fleet" type runner 
since Chet Cthe jet) Hanulak and Ron Waller, former Terp stars . . . once the jet-type 
runner is shot by the line of scrimmage, he is off with shot-like propulsion ... he is the 
all-the-way type runner . . . did this consistently as a frosh ... his longest td scampers 
were 97, 87, and 56 . . . is extremely dangerous with punt and kickoff returns . . . 
definitely must be tagged as one of the BEST who bears watching . . . good defense 
also . . . fine passer and receiver . . . tossed the winning pass to Healy in Wake Forest 
game . . .came up with a 5.7 rushing average with 273 yards in 48 carries . . . had the 
3ne completion for 6 throws . . . caught 4 passes for 47 yards . . . had one interception 
. . . led the team in punt returns with nine for 41 yards and kickoff returns with nine 
for 161 yards return . . . scored one . . . lettered in football and track four years in 
high school . . . was a hurdler and dash man. a good combination for an elusive, fast, 
hard-running back . . . second team all-State and first team all-Section his senior year 
... in School of Business and Public Administration. 

BOB LAYMAN, 20. 5-11, 185, Junior from Pittsburgh, Pa. — here is one of the real good 
all-around football players for the Terps . . . there is little doubt that the brother of 
assistant coach Fred Layman is one of the finest offensive and defensive backs seen in 
College Park in recent years ... he is tops as a keen competitor ... as a freshman, 
he showed that he would be one to watch as he was one of the big guns for Dovell's 
undefeated yearlings . . . then last year he really came through when the chips were 
down because of the multiple injuries that hit the Terp backs ... it was thought he 



46 — 



would B team it last fall to give him experience and a year's growth, but it turned out 
he didn't need it ... he came in and was a pleasant back to watch making his big- 
league debut . . . played well consistently as the second right halfback ... is a hard- 
driving runner with a great deal of finesse ... his running style makes him hard to 
bring down . . . excels defensively also ... a real good tackier . . . had a 2.7 rush- 
ing average for 109 yards in 41 carries . . . completed one of two passes for 12 yards 
. . . had other intercepted . . . intercepted one himself . . . returned five points for 
35 yards and one kickoff for 22 yards .... quite a fine punter . . . .had a 35.6 average 
for 20 punts . . . should have a good season . . . will be hard to keep out of the pic- 
ture in the interesting battle for the right halfback job ... in School of Arts and 
Science majoring in Criminology. 

RALPH HAWKINS, 22, 5-10, 185, Senior from Washington, D. C. — should be ready to 
have his best year for the Terps . . . played most defense as a soph but came up last 
fall with an excellent showing . . . finished with a 3.8 rushing mark for 31 carries 
for 117 yards . . . scored once . . . had one interception . . . had one punt return and 
three kickoff returns for 41 yards . . . one of team's best punters . . . was called on 
for four punts, averaging 26.5 ... a fine runner . . . hits hard into the line, and in 
the open can be dangerous . . . another good two-way halfback who could be called on 
to do some quarterbacking . . . most adequate defensive back with good tackling ability 
... a highly regarded star at St. John's, lettering three years in football, basketball, 
and baseball . . . all-Metropolitan in football and basketball and all-Prep in base- 
ball ... in School of Physical Education. 

JOE BEHRMANN, 20, 5-11, 180, Junior from Hackensack, N. J anotbe- of the fine 

surprises of '56 as he came in from the B list to give the Terp backfield a good 
mending following all the injuries. . . the affable hard-working serious half- 
back has tremendous desire and determination . . . never gives up and always working 
in practice . . . Mont believes he will be one of the big surprise boys this fall because 
of his known abilities as a good two-way player and his intense desire to play ... Is 
a good runner and adequate defense . . . rushed four times for 14 yards . . . threw 
one but had it picked off . . . caught one pass . . . was all-Northern New Jersey; all- 
Bergen County and all-State in Jersey's Group 3 . . . has a brother a graduate of Wake 
Forest who played for the Deacons and now playing for McGill University in Montreal, 
Canada ... in Arts and Sciences, a Pre-Dentai student. 

JIM JOYCE, 19, 5-10, 190, Sophomore from Ph'ladelphia, Pa. — the "hottest" of them 
all as a halfback and fullback coming up from last year's freshman squad on which he 
was the big running star ... is one of the finest backs to come to Maryland ... is 
highly regarded and gives expectations and hopes of becoming another future all- Amer- 
ica back to add to the long list of former all-time great backs . . . Mont, himself an 
admirer of great backs, says he can't miss and Joyce has so far done his part to uphold 
the prediction . . . the powerfully built all-everything from Bishop Neuman High in 
Philadelphia has reminded veteran observers of the great pile-driving bull-dozing type 
running backs . . . has most powerful legs, remindful of former fabulous Terp ball car- 
riers as Ed "Mighty Mo" Modzelewski and Dick Bielski ... he gave one of the most 
impressive displays of ball carrying ever exhibited for a rookie this spring and topped 
it off with getting all the headlines after the Varsity-Alumni game which ended spring 
practice . . . tremendous offensive ability which is equaled or even excelled by his keen 
defensive work . . . will be counted on to be one of the big guns for Mont and make a 
pleasant battle for the halfback positions ... a future star. 

OTHER OUTSTANDING HALFBACK CANDIDATES will be GENE VERARDI, 19, 5-10, 
180, Sophomore from Freeport, Pa.; — BILL SLADE, 19, 5-10, 185, Sophomore from 
San'dy Spring, Md.; — and JOHN STITT, 19, 5-10, 180, Sophomore from Ben Avon, Pa. 

all three up from last year's freshman team and any of them could step into the varsity 
picture. Verardi, an excellent all-around player who can go at quarterback or halfback 
. . . one of the fastest and shiftiest men on the team . . . goood runner and strong 
defensively . . . Slade and Stitt were big guns also for frosh and show much promise 
. . . Slade a real good ball carrier . . . they with Joyce and Forbes were the cream 
cf the '56 freshman halfbacks. 

FULLBACKS 

JIM HATTER, 21, 5-10, 185, Junior from Rome, N. Y. — to Hatter belongs the distinction 
of the "little man" coming through like a "big man" and in big-league style . . . the 
powerful little guy answered the call last fall to take over the fullback spot, which he 
won from several veterans . . . with injuries repeatedly keeping big Tom Selep on the 



■ 47 — 



sidelines, the hard-working Hatter proved himself to be one of the greatest fullback 
finds as he turned in exceptionally creditable performances . . . some of his play was 
on the sensational side ... he proved, like Hamilton as a soph, that guts and desire 
and determination to play were the requirements for a good football player, especially 
at a position that size was supposed ot be a handicap . . . Hatter had a great year 
as a soph playing the fullback spot and the job was won the hard way and it is his to 
keep . . . there will be a great deal of competition for the job from Perlo and Casparro. 
but Hatter's great play of '56 gives him the job and with his ability and attitude, it will 
be hard to take it from him . . . likes to bull his way over tacklers, which he can do 
. . . will help if at times he gives the tackier a good fake job and get away from him 
for he has top speed . . . has a strong pair of legs which gives him power charge . . . 
is also a master on defense ... is the lean and mean type player who likes it rough 
and tough . . . wicked tackier . . . always hustling ... a fine blocker also ... is 
counted on to have a big year ... he must have a good year to aid in Terp success 
. . . had a 3.4 rushing average for 43 carries . . . caught two passes . . . another 
young Terp who bears watching ... in School of Business and Public Administration. 

PHIL PERLO, 21, 5-11, 205, Junior from Washington, D. C. — after an outstanding year 
as a sophomore, the highly touted local star had to miss a complete year of school 
because of illness . . . returning last spring, he took up where he left off, and looked 
like the good fullback he was ... he is sure to help the position and will be vieing 
to take the chores of starting away from Hatter . . . worked hard this summer to pre- 
pare himself for a big year . . . could do just that, and of course, it is hoped for . . . 
an exceptional runner with a lot of football ability in his system ... as a soph, he 
tabbed himself as a great football player ... his overall skills could be utilized this 
year . . . Mont and staff are glad to see him back . . . was another of the most highly 
skilled District stars . . . captained the football, basketball, and baseball teams at 
Roosevelt . . . was all-City and all-Metropolitan in all three sports . . . was selected on 
the all-America high school team of '53 . . . invited to play in the all-American high 
school game . . . won the highest honor in school, the Citizenship Award . . . Perlo 
could furnish the two-deep offensive punch from the fullback slot ... a good defensive 
player . . . fine tackier ... in School of Business and Public Administration ... a 
Public Speaking major. 

LARRY CASPARRO, 20. 6-0. 200, Sophomore from Bloomfield, N. J. — after being held 
out last year, the big strong hard running rookie has the standout possibility of really 
giving Hatter and Perlo fits for their job ... is the real bruising type runner who also 
commands great respect for his ability to change directions . . . came up with one of 
the most promising jobs during spring practice . . . has unusual speed to accompany 
his powerful running . . . Mont really counting on him to come through and make a 
brilliant showing . . . has the potential and will get the opportunity ... is needed 
. . . first team all-County and second team all-State ... in School of Arts and Science. 

JOHN FORBES, 19, 5-10, 185, Sophomore from Basking Ridge, N. J. — another of the 
better rookies coming up from the freshman team . . . has given indications of becom- 
ing a future star . . . can be used either at halfback or fullback . . . had a fine year 
as a freshman . . . injury kept him out of most of spring drills . . . got back late and 
did a real good job. good enough that the coaches have high hopes that he comes through 
this fall ... is definitely one of the finest prospects and is sure to have Maryland foot- 
ball followers raving about him in the future . . . has tremendous desire and zeal to 
play . . . works hard every minute ... is the type player who wants to be playing 
every minute of the game or scrimmage . . . was a fabulous star at Bernards High . . . 
many schools sought his services . . . invited to play in the all-American high school 
game ... in School of Arts and Science . . . this is a boy to keep an eye on. 

OTHER FULLBACK CANDIDATES: WARREN RAUHOFER. 19, 5-11, 185, Sophomore 
from Montclair, N. J., and JACK MILLER, 20, 5-11, 190, Sophomore from Baltimore, 
Md. — Rauhofer is a good prospect up from the freshman team who looked good in spring 
drills . . . Miller, a real top runner with fine speed up from the B team . . . should be 
able to move up to the varsity. 



TERPS ON HONORARY SELECTIONS— 1956 

MIKE SANDUSKY 

Honorable Mention All-America — AP, UP, INS, NEA 

First Team All-Conference, Associated Press 

First Team All-Conference, United Press 

First Team All-Conference, Southern Writers' Assn. 

East-West Shrine Game 

Chicago Tribune All-Star Game 

Voted Best Defensive Tackle by squad 

Voted TEKE Trophy by squad 

Fifth draft choice of San Francisco 49'ers 

JACK DAVIS 

Honorable Mention All-America— AP, UP, INS, NEA 

First Team All-Conference, Associated Press 

First Team All-Conference, United Press — runnerup to Bill Barnes as 

top vote getter 
First Team All-Conference, Southern Writers' Assn. — runnerup to Barnes 

as top vote getter 
East-West Shrine Game 
Washington Redskin draftee 

GENE ALDERTON (1957 Co-Captain) 

Honorable Mention All-America — AP, UP 
First team All-Conference, Associated Press 
Third team All-Conference, Southern Writers' Assn. 

AL WHARTON 

All-Conference Honorable Mention, Southern Writers' Assn. 

Blue-Gray Game 

Chicago Tribune All-Star Game 

Voted Best Offensive Lineman by squad 

Voted ANTHONY C. NARDO TROPHY as best lineman by squad 

Voted the Alvin L. Aubinoe Trophy as "Unsung Hero" of squad 

FRED HAMILTON 

Voted Best Offensive Back by squad 

BOB RUSEVLYAN 

Voted Best Defensive Back by squad 



— 49 



TERP ALL-AMERICA PLAYERS 

1949 — Ray Krouse, Tackle — Second Team 

1950 — Bob Ward, Guard — First Teams 

1951 — Bob Ward, Guard — First Teams 

1951 — Ed "Big Mo" Modzelewski, Fullback — First and Second Teams 

1951 — Dick "Little Mo" Modzelewski, Tackle — One First Team; Most 

Second Teams 
1952 — Jack Scarbath, Quarterback — First Teams 
1952 — Dick "Little Mo" Modelewski, Tackle — First Teams 
1952 — Tom Cosgrove, Center — Second Team 
1953 — Stan Jones, Tackle — First Teams 
1953 — Bernie Faloney, Quarterback — Eight First Teams; all Second 

Teams 
1953 — Chester Hanulak, Halfback — Second Teams 
1954 — Dick Bielski, Fullback — Third Teams 
1954 — Jack Bowersox, Guard — First Team (Gridiron Index) 
1954 — Bill Walker, End— Second Team (AP) 

1955 — Bob Pellegrini, Center — UNANIMOUS First Team All-America 
1955 — Ed Vereb, Halfback — First Team, Movietone News; First Team, 

N.Y. Daily News; First Team, Extension Magazine; Second 

team, INS; Second Team, Hearst "Big 6"; Third Team, AP, 

UP, Sporting News 
1955 — Mike Sandusky, Tackle — First Team, Sporting News; Extension 

Magazine; Second Teams 
1955 — Jack Davis, Guard — Honorable Mention, AP, UP, NEA 
1955 — Frank Tamburelio, quarterback — First Team, Movietone News; 

Honorable Mention, AP, UP, NEA 
1955 — Bill Walker, End — Second Team, UP; Sporting News; Honorable 

Mention, NEA 
1955 — Russell Dennis, End — First Team, N.Y. Daily News 
1955 — Ed Heuring, Tackle — Honorable Mention, AP, UP 
1956 — Mike Sandusky, Tackle — Honorable Mention, AP, UP, INS, NEA 
1956— Jack Davis, Guard— Honorable Mention, AP, UP, INS, NEA 
1956 — Gene Alderton, Center — Honorable Mention, AP, UP 

Additional Honors for Terp All-Americas 

BOB WARD— 1951 

"Lineman of Year" as selected by Washington Touchdown Club; re- 
ceived the Knute Rockne Memorial Trophy. 

"Lineman of Year" as selected by Philadelphia Sportswriters' Assn. 
Runner-up to Stanford's Bill McColl as Assccia.ed Press Lineman 
of Year. 

"Player of the Year" in Southern Conference, 1951. 
Most Valuable Player of '50 Gator Bowl as a sophomore. 
Voted Most Valuable Player Award by his teammates four consecu- 
tive years. 

JACK SCARBATH— 1952 

Runner-up to Billy Vessels, Oklahoma, for Heisman Memorial Tro- 
phy as nation's outstanding football player. 



"Back of the Year" selected by COLLIER'S Magazine. 

"Sportsman of the Year" Award given by SPORT Magazine. 

Second high vote getter in United Press "Player of Year" poll. 

Third high vote getter in Associated Press "Player of Year" poll. 

"Player of the Year" in Southern Conference, 1952. 

"South's Most Valuable Player" in North-South Shrine Game, Miami, 

Fla. 

First draft choice of Washington Redskins. 

Third high vote getter in Associated Press "Player of Year" poll. 

DICK "Little Mo" MODZELEWSKI— 1952 

"Lineman of Year" Award, LOOK Magazine as selected by Grantland 

Rice and Football Writer's Assn. of America. Received the John B. 

Outland Memorial Trophy for this selection. 

"Lineman of Year" as selected by Washington Touchdown Club; 

received the Knute Rockne Memorial Trophy. 

Second high vote getter in United Press "Lineman of Year" poll. 

Second high vote getter in SPORTING NEWS "Lineman of Year" 

poll. 

Fourth high vote getter in ASSOCIATED PRESS "Lineman of Year" 

poll. 

Second draft choice of Washington Redskins. 

STANLEY JONES— 1953 

"Lineman of Year" awarded by COLLIER'S Magazine. 

"Lineman of Year" as selected by Washington Touchdown Club; 

received the Knute Rockne Memorial Trophy. 

Runnerup to J. D. Roberts, Oklahoma, for ASSOCIATED PRESS 

"Lineman of Year" award. 

Fifth draft choice of Chicago Bears as a junior. 

BERNIE FALONEY— 1953 

Named to the "All-America Backfield" selected by the Washington 

Touchdown Club. 

"Player of the Year" of the Atlantic Coast Conference. 

First team ACADEMIC All-American. 

Fifth highest vote getter in AP "Back of the Year" poll. 

First draft choice of San Francisco Forty-Niners. 

DICK BIELSKI— 1954 

Voted "Most Valuable Player Award" in North-South Shrine Game. 
First draft choice of Philadelphia Eagles. 

BOB PELLEGRINI— 1955 

"Football Player of the Year" and winner of the WALTER CAMP 

MEMORIAL TROPHY as selected by COLLIER'S Magazine and the 

American Football Coaches' Assn. 

"Lineman of the Year" as selected by COLLIER'S Magazine and the 

American Football Coaches' Assn. 

"Lineman of the Year" as selected by the Washington Touchdown 

Club, awarded KNUTE ROCKNE MEMORIAL TROPHY by TD Club. 

"Lineman of the Year" as selected by the United Press. 

"Lineman of the Year" as selected by the Philadelphia Sports Writer's 

Association. 



— 51 — 



TOP LINEMAN in HEISMAN TROPHY balloting. 

UNANIMOUS ALL-AMERICA 

PLAYER OF THE YEAR of Atlantic Coast Conference as selected by 

the Associated Press and Southern Writers' Association. 

Winner of the JACOBS BLOCKING TROPHY as best blocker in 

Atlantic Coast Conference. 

FIRST DRAFT CHOICE of the Philadelphia Eagles.. 

Played in North-South All-Star Game. 

Co-Captain of All-Star for Chicago All-Star-Pro game in August and 

voted the Outstanding Player Award after the game. 

ED VEREB— 1955 

Runnerup to Pellegrini as ACC "Player of the Year." 

First Draft Choice of the Washington Redskins. 

Played in North-South All-Star Game. 

Set a new school and conference scoring record with his 102 points. 

MIKE SANDUSKY— 1956 

Played in East-West Shrine Game. 
Played in Chicago Tribune All-Star Game. 
Fifth Draft Choice of San Francisco 49'ers. 

JACK DAVIS— 1956 

Played in East-West Shrine Game. 
Washington Redskin Draftee. 



- 52 •- 



1956 HIGHLIGHTS 

LONGEST RUSH FROM SCRIMMAGE: 

44 yards by Ted Kershner in N. C. State game. 
LONGEST PASS COMPLETION: 

John Fritsch to Ted Kershner for 29 yards against Kentucky. 
MOST PASSES CAUGHT ONE GAME: 

Fred Hamilton — 4 for 39 yards in Miami game. 
MOST PASSES THROWN ONE GAME: 

15 for 7 completions and 53 yards by John Fritsch against Miami. 

11 for 6 completions and 107 yards by Fred Petrella against North 
Carolina. 

9 for 3 completions and 59 yards by John Fritsch against Tennessee. 
MOST PASSES COMPLETED ONE GAME: 

John Fritsch — 7 for 15 and 53 yards against Miami. 

Fred Petrella — 6 for 11 and 107 yards against North Carolina. 
LEAST PASSES THROWN ONE GAME: 

7 against Clemson. 
LONGEST PUNT RETURN: 

John McVicker — 67 yards against Syracuse. 
LONGEST PUNT: 

John Fritsch — 88 yards against Miami. 
LOW NET GAIN IN ONE GAME: (Rushing) 

91 yards against Miami. 
HIGH NET GAIN IN ONE GAME: (Rushing) 

265 yards against North Carolina State. 
LOW NET GAIN BY OPPONENT: (Rushing) 

147 yards by Miami. 

HIGH NET GAIN BY OPPONENT: (Rushing) 

264 yards by North Carolina State. 
LEAST PASSING YARDAGE ONE GAME: 

12 yards against Clemson. 

MOST PASSING YARDAGE ONE GAME: 

148 yards against Tennessee. 

LEAST PASSING YARDAGE BY OPPONENT ONE GAME: 

Minus 1 yard by Clemson. yards by Kentucky. 
MOST PASSING YARDAGE BY OPPONENT ONE GAME: 

133 yards by North Carolina. 
LONGEST INTERCEPTION RETURN: 

.Dickie Lewis — 103 yards for touchdown against North Carolina State. 
MOST TOUCHDOWNS SCORED IN ONE GAME: 

Dickie Lewis— 2 against North Carolina State. 
MOST TEAM TOUCHDOWNS SCORED ONE GAME: 

4 against North Carolina State. 
MOST POINTS SCORED: 

19 by John Fritsch. 
MOST TEAM POINTS SCORED ONE GAME: 

25 against North Carolina State. 



53 — 



FINAL 1956 TEAM STATISTICS 



MARYLAND 


OPPONENT 


129 


137 


91 


96 


29 


28 


9 


13 


1845 


2220 


268 


298 


1577 


2022 


135 


111 


58 


49 


612 


664 


12 


14 


143 


187 


2189 


2686 


636 


616 


61 


51 


2170 


1783 


35.6 


35.0 


33-688 


20-360 


72-694 


75-700 


31 


24 


12 


13 


68 


168 


11 


25 


2-11 


18-25 


0-2 


0-4 



First Downs 

Rushing 

Passing 

Penalties 

TOTAL YARDS RUSHING 

Yards Lost Rushing 

NET YARDS RUSHING 

FORWARD PASSES ATTEMPTED 

FORWARD PASSES COMPLETED 

NET YARDS PASSING 

PASSES INTERCEPTED BY 

YARDS INTERCEPTIONS RETURNED 
TOTAL YARDS GAINED (Rush & Pass) 

TOTAL NUMBER PLAYS 

TOTAL NUMBER PUNTS 

PUNT YARDAGE 

PUNTING AVERAGE 

TOTAL NO. KICKOFFS RETURNED __ 

PENALTIES 

OWN FUMBLES 

OWN FUMBLES LOST 

TOTAL POINTS SCORED 

Touchdowns 

Extra Points 

Field Goals 



INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS— 1956 

RUSHING 

Carries Gain Loss Net Avg. 

Hamilton 75 273 

*Selep 62 315 

Kershner 48 287 

J. Healy 44 144 

Hatter 43 149 

Layman 41 128 

Rusevlyan 41 63 

Fritsch 39 70 

Hawkins 31 127 

Lewis 32 105 

*Skarda 17 48 

*Petrella 12 22 

McVicker 8 23 

Behrmann 4 14 

Komlo 4 2 

Toughill 2 22 



51 



4 


269 


3.6 





315 


5.0 


14 


273 


5.7 


9 


135 


3.0 


1 


148 


3.4 


19 


109 


2.7 





63 


1.5 


52 


18 


.5 


10 


117 


3.8 


73 


32 


1.0 





48 


2.8 


30 


—8 


—.7 





23 


2.9 





14 


3.5 


3 


—1 


—.2 





22 


11.0 



TOTAL OFFENSE 

Total Plays Net Gain Avg. 

Fritsch 91 237 2.6 

Hamilton 76 269 3.6 

Lewis 52 122 2.4 

Kershner 52 279 5.4 

Rusevlyan 57 113 2.0 

J. Healy 46 135 2.9 

Tetrella 46 121 2.7 

Layman 43 121 2.8 

Hawkins 32 117 3.7 

Behrmann 5 14 2.8 

all others same as above rushing 



PUNTING 

No. 
Fritsch 27 

*Layman 20 

*Lewis 9 

Hawkins 4 

* — 1 blocked 



Yards 


Avg. 


1020 


38.0 


713 


35.6 


329 


36.6 


106 


26.5 



PUNT RETURNS 

No. Yards Returned 

Kershner 9 41 

Layman 5 35 

Rusevlyan 3 36 

Hamilton 3 6 

McVicker : 1 67 

Hawkins 1 12 

J. Healy 1 9 

Cooke 1 



KICKOFF RETURNS 

No. Yards Returned 

Kershner 9 161 

Rusevlyan 7 100 

Hamilton 4 86 

J. Healy 4 76 

Hawkins 3 41 

Toughill 1 33 

Layman 1 22 

*Selep 1 15 

Komlo 1 13 

Lewis 1 8 

Main 1 



PASSING 

Had 

Att. Comp. Yds. Int. TDs. 

Fritsch 52 23 219 4 

*Petrella 34 19 235 3 1 

Lewis 20 10 90 2 

Rusevlyan 16 4 50 3 

Kershner 4 1 6 1 

Layman 2 1 12 1 

J. Healy 2 

Hamilton 10 10 

Hawkins 10 

Behrmann 10 10 

PASS RECEIVING 

No. Caught Yards TDs 

Turner 7 74 

Hamilton 6 58 

*Skarda 6 28 

Hawkins 5 66 

Beardsley 4 97 1 

J. Healy 4 41 1 

Kershner 4 47 

*Waters 4 38 

Rusevlyan 3 40 

*Selep 3 5 

*Heuring 2 23 

Beck 2 21 

Scotti 2 18 

Hatter 2 12 

Toughill 1 26 

*Porter 1 23 

Komlo 13 

Behrmann 1 — 7 

TD PASSES CAUGHT 

J. Healy 1 Beardsley 1 



TD PASSES THROWN 

Kershner 1 *Petrella 1 

PASS INTERCEPTIONS 

Rusevlyan 3 for 15 yard return 

• Lewis 2 for 111 yard return 

Scotti 1 for 13 yard return 

Fritsch 1 for 4 yard return 

Kershner 1 for yard return 

*Skarda 1 for yard return 

Hawkins 1 for yard return 

Beardsley 1 for yard return 

Layman 1 for yard return 

• 103-yard return for Td— N. C. State 



56 



SCORING 

TDs 

Fritsch 3 

Lewis 2 

Hawkins 1 

J. Healy 1 

*Petrella 1 

Beardsley 1 

^Selep 1 

Kershner 1 

Komlo 

Hamilton 

*Skarda 

* — Graduated 



PATs 


FG 


Total 


1—3 





19 








12 


0—2 





6 








6 








6 








6 








6 








6 


1—3 


0—2 


1 


0—1 








0—1 









FRESHMAN FOOTBALL SCHEDULE FOR 1957 



DATE 

October 4 
October 19 
November 1 
November 8 
November 15 



OPPONENT 

North Carolina 

West Virginia (Night) 

Virginia 

George Washington JV 

Navy Plebes 



PLACE 

Home 

Charleston, W. Va. 

Home 

Home 

Annapolis, Md. 



FRESHMAN RESULTS— 1956 



MARYLAND 


OPPONENT 




26 


Virginia 


12 





North Carolina 


21 


15 


Bainbridge NTC 


31 


6 


George Washington 


20 


13 


Navy Plebes 


20 



PRONUNCIATION GUIDE 



Rusevlyan — Ru-SEV-a-lynn 
Behrmann — BEER-man 
Toughill — TOE-hill 
Verardi — Ve-RAR-dee 
Casparro — Cas-PARROW 
Rauhofer — RAW-hoffer 
Suchy — SUE-chee 



Athey (Ronald and Lynn) — A-the 

(like tree) 
DeCicco — . De-CHEEK-o 
Stefl — STEF-el 
Tonetti — Toe-NET-e 
Steppe — STEP-e 



— 57 



ALL-TIME MARYLAND FOOTBALL RECORDS 

OFFENSE AND DEFENSE 

BEST SEASON: 

1951, 1953 and 1955: Won 10— Lost 0. 1951 record includes the 28-13 
Sugar Bowl win over Tennessee. The '53, 10-0 record is regular sea- 
son. Terps lost Orange Bowl, 7-0 to Oklahoma. 1955, lost to Okla- 
homa in Orange Bowl, 20-6. 

WORST SEASON: 

1944— Won 1, Lost 7, Tied 1. 

MOST POINTS SCORED IN ONE SEASON: 

353 in 1951 in 9 games. 381 in 1951 in 10 games including the 28-13 
victory over Tennessee in the Sugar Bowl. 

LEAST POINTS SCORED IN ONE SEASON: 
39 in 1940 in 9 games. 

MOST POINTS SCORED BY OPPONENTS IN ONE SEASON: 
216 in 1938 in 9 games. 

LEAST POINTS SCORED BY OPPONENTS IN ONE SEASON: 
31 in 1953 in 10 games. 

MOST POINTS SCORED BY MARYLAND IN ONE GAME: 
Maryland— 80; Washington College— 0; (1927). 

MOST POINTS SCORED BY OPPONENTS IN ONE GAME: 
Navy 76;— Maryland 0; (1913). 

ALL-TIME LEADING SCORER: 

Ed Vereb with 102 points in 1955 in 11 games, including one TD in 
Orange Bowl against Oklahoma. 

OFFENSIVE TEAM RECORD FOR ONE SEASON: 

3822 yards in 1951 in 9 games. 2921 rushing and 901 passing. 
4174 yards in 1951 in 10 games, including the 28-13 victory over Ten- 
nessee in the Sugar Bowl. 3210 rushing and 964 passing. 

OFFENSIVE TEAM RECORD FOR ONE GAME: 

602 yards in 1951 against West Virginia — 523 yards rushing and 79 
passing. 

LEAST YARDAGE ONE GAME: 
69 against Vanderbilt in 1948. 

MOST TOUCHDOWNS SCORED IN ONE SEASON: 

52 in 1951 in 9 games — 56 in 1951 in 10 games including the 28-13 
victory over Tennessee in Supar Bowl. 

DEFENSIVE RECORD FOR ONE SEASON: 

1,707 yards in 1949 in 9 games — 868 rushing and 893 passing for fifth 
place in nation. 

DEFENSIVE RECORD FOR ONE GAME: (Rushing): 
29 by Washington and Lee in 1951. 

MOST YARDS RUSHING BY INDIVIDUAL IN ONE SEASON: 
Ray Poppleman with 1,350 yards in 10 games in 1931. 

MOST YARDS RUSHING BY INDIVIDUAL IN ONE GAME: 

Ray Poppleman with 201 yards in 24 carries against Western Mary- 
land. 

LONGEST RUN FROM SCRIMMAGE: 

Dick Burgee for 90 yards and touchdown against University of Mis- 
souri in 1954. 



PASSSNG RECORDS 

TEAM PASSING FOR SEASON: 

90 completions in 170 attempts for 1364 yards in 1942 in 9 games. 
TEAM PASSING FOR ONE GAME: 

Joe Tucker with 9 completions in 12 attempts for 178 yards and Stan 

Lavine, 4 for 5 for 129 yards for total of 307 yards against South 

Carolina in 1949. 
WORST PASSING RECORD BY MARYLAND: 

completions in 12 attempts against Vanderbilt in 1948. 
INDIVIDUAL PASSING RECORD FOR ONE SEASON: 

Jack Scarbath in 9 games in 1952 — 59 completions in 113 attempts 

for 1149 yards. 
INDIVIDUAL PASSING RECORD FOR ONE GAME: 

Tommy Mont — 9 completions in 14 attempts for 215 yards against 

U of Connecticut in 1942. 
LEADING PASS RECEIVER FOR ONE SEASON: 

Lloyd Colteryahn — 32 receptions for 593 yards in 1952 in 9 games 
LEADING PASS RECEIVER FOR ONE GAME: 

Lou Weidensaul — 8 receptions for 95 yards and one touchdown 

against Navy in 1951. 

Lloyd Colteryahn — 8 receptions for 131 yards against Alabama in 

1952. 
LONGEST FORWARD PASS PLAY: 

Stan Lavine to Ed Bolton for 92 yards and touchdown against South 

Carolina in 1949. Pass 15 yards; run 77 yards. 
LONGEST RETURN OF INTERCEPTED PASS: 

Joe Horning for an official 100 yards and touchdown against Mis- 
souri in 1951 as a freshman. Actual return from inside end zone was 

105 yards. Dickie Lewis for an official 100 yards and touchdown in 

1956 against N. C. State Actual return from inside end zone was 

103 yards. 

KICKING RECORDS 

MOST POINTS AFTER TOUCHDOWNS: 

Don Decker— 37 for 51 attempts in 9 games in 1951. 41 for 55 at- 
tempts in 10 games in 1951 including the 28-13 victory over Tennes- 
see in the Sugar Bowl. 

LONGEST PUNT: 

Brooke (Untz) Brewer for 93 yards against V.M.I, in 1916. John 
Fritsch for 88 yards against Miami, Fla., in 1956. Set a new ACC 
record. 

BEST OFFICIAL AVERAGE ONE GAME: 

Bill Guckeyson for 51 yards in 10 punts against Syracuse in 1936. 
(Note: Brewer against Syracuse in 1920 and Guckeyson against 
Florida in 1936 both averaged better than 60 yards but official fig- 
ures could not be obtained from these schools and papers didn't carry 
the punting statistics.) 

LONGEST PUNT RETURN: 

Dick Nolan — 90 yards— against Clemson for TD in 1953. 

MOST PUNT RETURNS FOR SEASON: 

Bob Shemonski— 28 for 505 yards in 1950 in 10 games. 



59 — 



LONGEST KICKOFF RETURNS: 

90 yards and TD — Lewis Thomas against Washington College in 1927; 
Bill Guckeyson against Georgetown in 1935; Sam Behr against Vir- 
ginia in 1945; Dick Nolan against Mississippi in 1952. 

LONGEST FIELD GOAL: 

Dick Bielski, 47 yards against Mississippi in 1953. 

LONGEST PUNT RETURN AGAINST MARYLAND: 

Frank Brady of Navy for 100 yards and touchdown in 1951 

LONGEST KICKOFF RETURN AGAINST MARYLAND: 

Jim McPherson of North Carolina for 93 yards and TD in 1926 

LONGEST PUNT AGAINST MARYLAND: 

Charlie Justice of North Carolina for 84 yards in 1948. 



BOB WARD 

(Continued from page 11) 

His many honors are too numerous to mention, but he received every 
award locally and nationally, that is given a lineman. After making 
all-America his junior year for his excellent defensive play, he proved 
that he wasn't just an ordinary platoon football player by making every- 
body's all-America team in 1951, his senior year, playing offense. Tatum 
himself credited the success of his offensive team, highest scoring team 
in the country that year, to his '51 Co-Captain, Ward. And when the 
defense got in trouble, Ward, the '51 "offensive specialist" was put into 
the game to help stop the opponents' attack. 

Besides the unanimous all-America selections his senior year, Ward 
was named "Lineman of the Year" by the Washington Touchdown Club 
and the Philadelphia Sports' Writers Assn. He was runnerup to Stan- 
ford's Bill McColl for the same Associated Press award. He was named 
the outstanding player of the then Southern Conference. During the 
'51 season, he was the nation's "Lineman of the Week" after his out- 
standing game against Georgia, in which he played with a broken hand. 
He also played in the Chicago All-Star game. 

The Wards have three children: two boys, Jim 7, and Bob, Jr., 5, and 
a daughter, Kathie, 6 years old. 



WHITEY DOVELL 

(Continued from page 11) 

The former Terp guard from Redbank, N. J. also handles the vast 
film library. "Whitey" is generally regarded as a hard working per- 
fectionist, on and off the field. 

He married the former Clair Benson. They have a five-month old 
daughter. 



— 60 



YEAR BY YEAR RECORDS 



MARYLAND 
AGGIES 

1892 (0-3-0) 

St. Johns 50 

Johns Hop 62 

Episcopal Hi. -16 

1893 (6-0-0) 

36 Eastern Hi 

10 Central Hi 

18 Bait. City Col- 

6 St. Johns Col... 

18 W. Md. Col ....10 

16 Orient Ath. CI. 6 

1894 (3-3-0) 

52 W. Md. Col 

12 Wash. Col 

6 St. Johns 22 

6 Georgetown — . 4 
Col. Ath. CI. -26 
Mt. St. Marys ..24 

1895 — No team 
No Games 

1896 (6-2-2) 

Eastern Hi 6 

Gallaudet 

34 Business Hi .... 

10 Central Hi 6 

18 Alexandria Hi.. 
20 Bethel Mil Ac ..10 

Episcopal Hi. .. 6 

16 West. Md 6 

14 Central Hi 

U. of Md. 

1897 (2-4-0) 

24 Central Hi 6 

4 Eastern Hi 

J. Hopkins 30 

4 St. Johns 6 

6 Gallaudet 16 

Bait. Med CO1...10 

1898 (2-5-0) 

5 Columbian U. ..17 
West. Md 32 

36 Eastern Hi 

Gallaudet 33 

Johns Hop 16 

Episcopal Hi — 37 

27 Rock Hill Col... 

1899 (1-4-0) 

West Md 21 

26 Eastern Hi 

Johns. Hop 40 

Delaware Col. 34 
St. Johns 62 

1900 (3-4-1) 

Western Hi .... 
Gib. Ath. CI 17 



G'town Prep .. 5 
6 Episcopal Hi ....34 

5 Gonzaga Hi 11 

15 G'town Prep .. 
21 Gonzaga Hi .... 
21 Char Hall Ac .. 

1901 (1-7-0) 

6 Del. Col 24 

10 Gallaudet Re. ..11 

Johns Hop 6 

6 Rock Hill Col-11 
Central Hi 11 

27 U.S. Marines .. 
Wal'k Ath CI ..36 
West. Md 30 

1902 (3-5-2) 

Georgetown ....27 

5 Mt. St. Jos 

11 Columbian U. ..10 

6 Olympia Ath. .. 

Wash. Col 

Mt. St. Marys .. 5 

6 West. Md 26 

U. of Md 5 

Johns Hop 17 

Del. Col 

1903 (7-4-0) 

Georgetown —.28 

5 Clifton Ath 

21 Gunton Tern. .. 
St. Johns 18 

28 Wash. Col 

27 Tech Hi 

Mt. St. Mar .... 2 

6 West. Md 

11 U. of Md 

Dela. Col 16 

6 Columbian U. .. 

1904 (2-4-2) 

Georgetown ....22 
Ran. Macon .... 
Ftress Monroe 

11 Mt. St. Mar 6 

West. Md 5 

22 Gallaudet 5 

U. of Md 6 

Dela. Col 18 

1905 (6-4-0) 

20 BaUt Poly In .... 

16 Gallaudet 

West. Md 10 

Navy 17 

17 Wm. & Mary .. 

28 Mt. St. Josephs 
27 St. Johns 5 

Wash. Col J.7 

23 U. of Md 5 

Dela. Col 12 

— 61 — 



1906 (5-3-0) 

5 Tech Hi 

22 Bait City Col .. 
Navy 12 

Georgetown ....28 
Mt. Wash. CI. -29 

20 St. Johns 4 

16 Rock Hill Col. 
35 Wash. Col 

1907 (3-6-0) 

13 Tech High 

Georgetown —.10 

5 Richmond Col-11 
Navy 12 

6 Mt.St.Mar 12 

10 Geo. Wash 

10 Wash. Col 5 

St. Johns 16 

Gallaudet - 5 

1908 (3-8-0) 

5 Central Hi 

5 Tech High 6 

Richmond Col..22 

Johns Hop 10 

Navy 57 

5 Gallaudet 

Fred'bg Col 10 

12 Balto Poly 6 

St. Johns 31 

Wash. Col 11 

Geo. Wash 57 

1909 (2-5-0) 

Richmond Col. 12 
Johns Hopkins 9 
Tech High 11 

5 Rock Hill 

George Wash. 26 
N. Ca. A&M ....33 

14 Gallaudet 12 

1910 (4-3-1) 

12 Central Hi 

20 Richmond Col. 
11 Johns Hop 11 

21 Catholic U 

11 Geo. Wash 

V.M.I - 8 

St. Johns — 6 

3 West. Md 17 

1911 (4-4-2) 

6 Tech Hi 

Richmond - 

5 Fred'bg Col 

Central Hi 14 

3 Johns Hop 6 

6 Catholic U 6 

St. Johns 27 

5 Wash. Col 17 

6 West Md 

6 Gallaudet 2 



1912 (6-1-1) 

31 Tech Hi 6 

46 Richmond Col. 

58 U. of Md 

13 Johns Hop 

St. Johns 27 

13 Gallaudet 7 

17 West Md 7 

13 Penn Mil. Col. 13 

1913 (6-3-0) 

27 Balto City 10 

45 Richmond Col. 
20 Johns Hop 

46 West Md 

Navy 76 

13 St. Johns 

26 Wash. Col 

Gallaudet 26 

7 Penn Mil 27 

1914 (5-3-0) 

Balto. Poly 6 

6 Catholic U 

13 West Md 20 

14 Johns Hop 

10 St. Johns 

3 Wash. Col 

Gallaudet 23 

26 Penn Mil 

1915 (6-3-0) 

31 Balto Poly 

Haverford 7 

Catholic U 16 

10 Gallaudet 3 

14 Penn Mil 13 

27 St. Johns 14 

28 Wash Col 13 

51 West Md 

Johns Hop 3 

MARYLAND 
STATE 

1916 (6-2-0) 

6 Dickinson 

7 Navy 14 

15 V.M'.1 9 

6 Haverford 7 

31 St. Johns 6 

10 N.Y.U 7 

13 Catholic U 9 

54 Johns Hop 

1917 (4-3-1) 

20 Dela. Col 

Navy 62 

14 V.M.I 14 

29 Wake Forest ..13 

6 N.C. State 10 

13 St. Johns 3 

Penn State 57 

7 Johns Hop 

1918 (4-1-1) 

6 American U 13 

7 V.M.I 6 



19 West Md 

6 New York U. .. 2 

19 St. Johns 14 

Johns Hop 

1919 (5-4-0) 

6 Swarthmore ....10 
13 Virginia 

West Va 27 

Va. Polv 6 

Yale ...._ 31 

27 St. Johns 

13 Catholic U 

20 West Md 

14 Johns Hop 

UNIVERSITY 
OF MARYLAND 

1920 (7-2-0) 

54 Randolph Ma .. 

Rutgers 7 

Princeton 35 

14 Catholic U 

27 Wash. Col 

7 Va. Poly 

13 North Car 

10 Syracuse 7 

24 Johns Hop 7 

1921 (3-5-1) 

3 Rutgers 

Syracuse 42 

3 St. Johns _ 7 

10 Va. Polv 7 

7 North Car 16 

Yale - 28 

16 Catholic U 

Carnegie Tech 21 

1922 (4-5-1) 

6 N. C. State 6 

7 Third Army .... 

Richmond ' 

Pennsylvania ..12 

Princeton 26 

3 North Car 27 

Va. Poly 21 

3 Yale 45 

3 Johns Hop 

54 Cat.holV U n 

7 N. C. State 6 

1923 (7-2-1) 

53 Randolph Ma... 
3 Pennsylvania .. 

23 Richmond 

9 Va. Polv 16 

14 North Car 

28 St. Johns 

14 Yale 16 

26 N.C. Statp 12 

40 Catholic U 6 

6 Johns Hod 6 

1924 (3-3-3) 

23 Wash. Col 

7 Wash. & Lee ..19 

— 62 — 



38 Richmond 

Va. Polv 12 

6 North Car 

Catholic U 

Yale 47 

N.C. State 

Johns Hop 

1925 (2-5-1) 

13 Wash. Col 

16 Rutgers 

Va. Poly 3 

Virginia 6 

North Car 16 

14 YaL 3 4°. 

3 W. & L 7 

7 Johns Hop 7 

1926 (5-4-1) 

63 Wash. Col 

South Car 12 

Chicago 21 

8 Va. Poly 24 

14 North Car 6 

38 Gallaudet ~ 7 

15 Yale 

6 Virginia 6 

W. & L 3 

17 Johns Hop. -.14 

1927 (4-7-0) 

80 Wash. Col 

26 South Car 

6 North Car 7 

13 Va. Poly 7 

10 V. M. I." 6 

6 W. & L 13 

6 Yale 30 

Virginia 21 

20 Vanderbilt 39 

13 Johns Hod 14 

6 Florida 7 

1928 (6-3-1) 

31 Wash. Col 

19 North Car 26 

7 South Car .21 

13 West Md 6 

V. M. 1 

6 Va. Poly 9 

Yale 6 

18 Virginia 2 

6 W. & L 

26 Johns Hop. .... 6 

1929 (4-4-2) 

34 Wash. Col 7 

North Car. ......43 

South Car 26 

13 Gallaudet 6 

6 V. M. I 7 

13 Virginia 13 

13 Yale ..13 

24 Va. Polv 

39 Johns Hop 6 

West Md 12 



1930 (7-5-0) 

60 Wash. Col 6 

13 Yale 40 

21 North Car 28 

21 St. Johns 13 

20 V. M. 1 

14 Virginia ~~ 6 

41 W. & L 7 

13 V. Poly 7 

Navy 6 

21 Johns Hop 

7 Vanderbilt --22 
West Md 7 

1931 (8-1-1) 

13 Wash. Col 

7 Virginia 6 

6 Navy 

6 Kentucky 6 

41 V. M. 1 20 

20 Va. Poly 

12 Vanderbilt 39 

13 W. & L 7 

35 Johns Hop 14 

41 West Md. 6 

1932 (5-6-0) 

63 Wash. Col 

6 Virginia 7 

6 Va. Poly 23 

Duke 34 

24 St. Johns 7 

12 V. M. 1 7 

Vanderbilt 13 

7 Navy 28 

6 W. & L 

23 Johns Hop 

7 West Md 39 

1933 (3-6-0) 

20 St. Johns 

Va. Poly 14 

Tulane -.20 

13 V. M. 1 19 

7 West Md 13 

Virginia 6 

7 Duke 38 

27 Johns Hop 7 

33 W. & L. 13 

Florida 19 

1934 (7-3-0) 

13 St. Johns 

W. & L 7 

13 Naw 16 

14 Va. Poly 9 

21 Florida 

20 Virginia 

23 V. M. 1 

14 Indiana 17 

6 Georgetown .... 
19 Johns Hop 



1935 (7-2-2) 

39 St. Johns 6 

7 Va. Poly 

North Car 33 

6 V. M. I 

20 Florida 6 

14 Virginia 7 

7 Indiana 13 

W. & L 

12 Georgetown .... 6 

Syracuse 

22 West Md 7 

1936 (6-5-0) 

20 St. Johns 

6 Va. Poly 

North Car 14 

21 Virginia 

20 Syracuse 

6 Florida 7 

12 Richmond 

7 V. M. I. 13 

6 Georgetown ... . 7 

19 W. & L. - 6 

West Md 12 

1937 (8-2-0) 

28 St. Johns 

21 Pennsylvania ..28 

6 West Md 

3 Virginia 

13 Syracuse 

13 Florida 7 

9 V. M. 1 7 

14 Penn State 21 

12 Georgetown ... . 2 

8 W. & L 

1938 (2-7-0) 

6 Richmond 19 

Penn State 33 

Syracuse 53 

14 West Md - 8 

19 Virginia -.27 

14 V. M. 1 47 

7 Florida 21 

7 Georgetown —.14 

19 W. & L .13 

1939 (2-7-0) 

26 Hamp.-Syd 

12 West Md. 

7 Virginia 12 

12 Rutgers 25 

Florida 14 

Penn State 12 

Georgetown .—20 

V. M. 1 13 

7 Syracuse 10 

1940 (2-6-1) 

6 Hamp.-Syd 7 

Pennsylvania -51 

— 63 — 



6 Virginia 19 

Florida 19 

6 West Md 

Georgetown ....41 
V. M. I ...20 

14 Rutgers 7 

7 W. & L 7 

1941 (3-5-1) 

18 Hamp.-Syd 

6 West Md. ...... 6 

Duke 50 

13 Florida 12 

6 Pennsylvania ..55 
Georgetown ....26 

Rutgers 20 

V. M. 1 27 

6 W. & L 

1942 (7-2-0) 

34 Connecticut .... 

14 Lake NAS 

27 Rutgers 13 

V. M. 1 29 

51 West Md 

13 Florida 

Duke 42 

27 Virginia 12 

32 W. & L 28 

1943 (4-5-0) 

7 Curtis B. CG ..13 
13 Wake Forest .. 7 
19 Rich. AAB ..._ . 6 

2 West Va 6 

Penn State 45 

43 Greenv. AAB ..18 

Virginia 39 

Bainbridge 46 

21 V. M. 1 14 

1944 (1-7-1) 

Hamp.-Syd 12 

Wake Forest ..39 

6 West Va 6 

Mich. State .... 8 

6 Florida 14 

7 Virginia 18 

Mich. State ....33 

19 Penn State 34 

8 V. M. 1 6 

1945 (6-2-1) 

60 Guilford Col. .. 6 

21 Richmond 

22 Merch. M. A 6 

13 Va. Poly 21 

13 West Va 13 

14 W. & M 33 

38 V. M. 1 

19 Virginia 13 

19 South Car 13 



1946 (3-6-0) 

54 Bainbridge 

7 Richmond 37 

North Car 33 

6 Va. Polv 

7 W. & M 41 

17 South Car 21 

24 W. & L 7 

14 Mich. State 26 

7 N. C. State 28 

1947 (7-2-2) 

19 South Car 13 

43 Delaware 19 

18 Richmond 6 

7 Duke 19 

21 Va. Poly 19 

27 West Va 

32 Duquesne 

North Car 19 

20 Vanderbilt 6 

N. C. State .... 

(Gator Bowl, 
Jan. 1, 1948) 

20 Georgia 20 

1948 (6-4-0) 

19 Richmond 

21 Delaware 

28 Va. Poly 

12 Duke 13 

47 Geo. Wash 

27 Miami 13 

19 South Car 7 

20 North Car 49 

Vanderbilt 34 

14 West Va 16 

1949 (9-1-0) 

34 Va. Poly 7 

33 Georgetown .... 7 
7 Mich. State -.14 

14 N.C. State 6 

44 South Car 7 

40 Geo. Wash 14 

14 Boston U 13 

47 West Va 7 



13 Miami 

(Gator Bowl, 
Jan. 1, 1950) 
20 Missouri 7 

1950 (7-2-1) 

7 Georgia 27 

35 Navy 21 

34 Mich. State .... 7 

25 Georgetown —.14 

13 N. C. State 16 

26 Duke 14 

23 Geo. Wash 7 

7 North Car 7 

41 West Va 

63 V. P. 1 7 

1951 (10-0-0) 

54 W. & L 14 

33 Geo. Wash 6 

43 Georgia 7 

14 North Car 7 

27 Louis. State .... 

35 Missouri 

40 Navy 21 

53 N. C. State 

54 West Va 7 

(Sugar Bowl, 

Jan. 1, 1952) 

28 Tennessee J.3 

1952 (7-2-0) 

13 Missouri 10 

13 Auburn 7 

28 Clemson 

37 Georgia 

38 Navy 7 

34 L. S. U 6 

34 Boston U 7 

14 Mississippi 21 

7 Alabama 27 

1953 (10-1-0) 

20 Missouri 6 

52 W. & L 

20 Clemson 

40 Georgia 13 

26 North Car 



27 Geo. Wash 6 

30 Miami (Fla.) .. 

24 South Car 6 

38 Mississippi 

21 Alabama 

*0 Oklahoma 7 

* (Orange Bowl) 

1954 (7-2-1) 

20 Kentucky 

7 U. C. L.A 12 

13 Wake Forest— 13 

33 North Car 

7 Miami, Fla 9 

20 South Car 

42 N.C. State 14 

16 Clemson 

48 Geo. Wash 6 

74 Missouri 13 

1955 (10-1-0) 

13 Missouri 12 

7 U.C.L.A 

20 Baylor 6 

28 Wake Forest .. 7 

25 North Car 7 

34 Syracuse 13 

27 South Car 

13 L. S. U 

25 Clemson 12 

19 Geo. Wash 

*6 Oklahoma 20 

*Orange Bowl 

1956 (2-7-1) 

12 Syracuse 26 

6 Wake Forest— 

Baylor 14 

6 Miami, Fla. —13 

6 N. Carolina —34 

7 Tennessee 34 

Kentucky 14 

6 Clemson 6 

S. Carolina —13 

25 N. C. State —14 



COACHES THROUGH THE YEARS 



1892— W. W. Skinner 
1893— S. H. Harding 
1894— J. G. Bannon 
1895— G. M. Harris 
1896 — Grenville Lewis 
1897— John Lillibridge 
1898— J. F. Kenly 
1899— S. M. Cooke 
1900— F. H. Peters 
1901— E. B. Dunbar 
*Above Teams Coached by 

Captains 
1902— D. John Markey 

(Western Md.) 



1903— Markey 

1904— Markey 

1905— Fred Nielsen (Neb.) 

1906— Nielsen 

1907— C. G. Church (Va.) 

and C. W. Meliek (Neb.) 
1908— Bill Lang (Delaware) 
1909 — Barney Cooper 

(Md. '08) and E. P. 

Larkin (Cornell) 
1910— R. Alston (G.W.) 
1911— C. F. Donnelly 

(Trinity) and H. C. Byrd 

(Maryland '08) 



1912-34— H. C. Byrd 

(Md. '08) 
1935-39— Frank Dobson 

(Princeton) 
1940-41— Jack Faber C26), 

Al Heagy, C30), and Al 

Woods C33) all of Md. 
1942— Clark Shaughnessy 

(Minnesota) 
1943-44 — Clarence Spears 

(Dartmouth) 
1945— Paul Bryant (Ala.) 
1947-55— Jim Tatum (N.C.) 
1956— Tommy Mont (Md.) 



— 64 




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65 — 



THE 1957 TERPS 

(Continued from page 16) 

The Terps graduated ten lettermen. The big losses were end Jean 
Waters; tackles Mike Sandusky, Al Wharton, and Ed Heuring; guards 
Jack Davis and George Kolarac; and fullbacks Tom Selep and Jim 
Skarda. 

Lettermen returning include five ends: seniors Ed Cooke, Norfolk, 
Va.; Bill Turner, Silver Spring, Md.; and juniors Al Beardsley, Pitts- 
burgh; Ben Scotti, Long Beach, N.J. ; and Bill Steppe, Cumberland. Five 
tackles returning include seniors Don Healy, Rome, N.Y.; Tom Stefl, 
Brownsville, Pa.; Bill Burgly, New Kensington, Pa.; and junior Fred Cole, 
Newark, N. J. Four guards return in seniors Paul Tonetti, Massepequa, 
N. Y- ; Ronald Laneve, Pittsburgh, converted from center. Two centers 
return in all-Conference and all-America candidate Gene Alderton, Cum- 
berland, and Wilbur Main, Frederick, Md. Alderton, also co-Captain with 
halfback Jack Healy, was all-Conference last year as a junior. 

Seven halfbacks return in seniors Fred Hamilton, Freeport, Pa.; Dare, 
Baltimore; Healy, Brooklyn; and Ralph Hawkins, Washington, D.C.; 
and juniors Bob Layman, Brentwood, Pa.; Teddy Kershner, Martins- 
burg, W. Va. ; and Joe Behrmann, Hackensack, N.J. Three quarterbacks 
return with senior Fritsch, Carnegie, Pa.; and juniors Lewis, Martins- 
burg, W Va. ; and Rusevlyan, Washington. Jimmy Hatter, Rome, N.Y. ; 
and a junior this fall, leads the fullback returnees with Perlo. 

The overall outlook is that the Terps will be better in '57 There is 
better balance and much more depth, now with so much experience 
coming back from the '56 team. Up front, the line, led by Alderton, Cole, 
and Tonetti lends a fast and mobile unit. The offensive line blocking 
will be much improved and the personnel gives an outlook for fine de- 
fensive play. Cole, a 225-pounder, is a tremendous tackle prospect. His 
play in the Alumni game caused the many professional coaches in the 
press box to single him out as the top lineman with Alderton. He is 
certain to become another of the long list of great Maryland tackles. 

Along with the better offensive-defensive prospects up front will be 
the better backfield situation. Fritsch, Lewis, and Rusevlyan offer high 
hopes for fine quarterbacking and with seven halfbacks returning, all 
with very valuable experience, and good fullback work from Hatter and 
Perlo, the Terps are expected to engineer much more offensive strength 
than last season and be a tight secondary. Hamilton, the 180-pound 
"work horse" again leads the returning backs. He is expected to get a 
lot of assistance from Dare, Layman, Jack Healy, and Ted Kershner, all 
top football players. 

Outstanding newcomers include halfback Jim Joyce, Philadelphia, the 
star of the varsity in the spring game; fullbacks Larry Casparro, Bloom- 
field, N.J. and John Forbes, Basking Ridge, N.J.; guards Rodney Breed- 
love, Cumberland, and Tom Gunderman, Franklin, N. J.; tackles Charles 
Carroll, Philadelphia, and Tom Flor, Elizabeth, N. J.; and end Ronald 
Shaffer, Cumberland, Md. 

Of this group, the top boys who should lend a great hand to the Varsity 
this fall are Breedlove, whom the coaches call another future all- 
America; Joyce, Carroll, and Casparro. The latter pair are from the B 



squad of last year. Breedlove played end on last year's freshman team 
and was an outstanding receiver of quarterback Dick Scarbath's passing 
and was a demon on defense. Scarbath failed out of school at mid-term, 
a big blow to the Terps. Because of his size, 6-2 and 215, Mont moved 
Breedlove to guard this spring to take advantage of his speed and great 
linebacking. He made the move look good as he soon had moved up to 
the second team. Joyce was the big answer to a good all-around back 
coming up from the yearlings. He is strong and powerful and hard 
to tackle. He can be used at halfback or fullback. 

ROY LESTER 

(Continued from page 14) 
whose assistant was Jim Tatum. In January 1945 he was sent to Bain- 
bridge, Md. to Physical Instructors School and upon completion of that 
training was sent to Hawaii as an instructor for a year. 

Following his discharge in '46, he returned to West Virginia to com- 
plete work for his degree. Again he played all three varsity sports and 
finished with nine varsity, letters. He was an end on the Mountaineers' 
Sun Bowl team of '49. He got his B.A. in Political Science in the spring 
of 1949. 

After a year with the Eagles, he returned to W. Va. to begin work 
on his Masters Degree. He then took the job of coaching football, basket- 
ball, and baseball at Walton, W. Va. High where he stayed two years. 
Then he transferred to Cumberland and Allegany High. 

He married the former Sylvia Watson June 29. 

ED FULLERTON 

(Continued from page 12) 
junior year at halfback. It was his third year and the Sugar Bowl game 
that brought Fullerton his and Maryland's greatest football hour. He 
heroically disproved the general feeling that the 60-minute man in foot- 
ball was a thing of the past while the two-platoon was still the trend. 
Because of a late injury to offensive fullback Ralph Felton, he was 
moved over to take care of those offensive chores and still played his 
defensive halfback spot. All he did was score two touchdowns, pass for 
a third and recover a fumble that led to the Terps' fourth score in lead- 
ing the Red and White to a 28-13 win over Tennessee. He was named 
to the United Press all-Bowl team. Following his senior year he was 
selected to the first all-Conference eleven. He was Co-Captain of the 
1952 team. 

Following graduation in 1953 from the School of Business and Public 
Administration with a Personnel Major, he played with the Pittsburgh 
Steelers that fall. An injury kept him out most of the season. 

In January, 1954 he went into the Air Force as a 2nd Lt-, and after 
training schools was assigned to Boiling Air Force Base as Ass't. Elec- 
tronics Officer. 

At Boiling he was player-coach, and his second year found him just 
coaching and the team won the all-Service title. Following his discharge 
in January of 1956, he accepted Coach Mont's call to return to Mary- 
land. 

Ed married the former Joan Walton, high school sweetheart. They 
have two sons Ed, jr., 3 and Michael 1. 



— 67 — 



JACK HENNEMIER 

(Continued from page 14) 

backfields that set so many national marks and set many University 
marks with their fabulous ground gaining achievements and scoring 
jaunts. 

When Hennemier's services became available, Mont lost little time in 
luring him away from scores of other schools who were bidding for 
him. The former Duke graduate had made his mark here at Maryland, 
and so returned. 

Hennemier even today is a big name in the annals of Duke football 
history. Weighing only 150 pounds while playing center, he made fame 
for himself in '33, '34, and '35 as the star Blue Devil center. He un- 
doubtedly was and still is, one of the smallest players ever to play the 
pivot position. Because of his outstanding football ability, for such 
a "little guy," he was nicknamed "Scrappy Jack," and still carries the 
name on and off the field. 

A 60-minute man, he won the most valuable player award as voted 
by his teammates in '35. The same year he made all-America Mention 
and the all-Conference team. 

In 1939, he went to Washington and Lee University as Line Coach. 
He stayed there through '41 before being called into the Navy in '42 
at Pensacola Naval Air Station. He coached and played center on the 
Base team. After 3% years of duty, he returned to Duke in '45 as 
assistant line coach and freshman coach. 

He joined the Terp staff in 1949 and stayed until he went to Canada 
in the spring of 1955. Now he has come back to Maryland. 



JOHNNY IDZIK 

(Continued from page 13) 

played in the 'Gator Bowl games of 1948 against Georgia and 1950 against 
Missouri. Idzik also lettered in baseball his last two years as shortstop 
and third baseman. He turned down pro baseball offers as well as pro 
football opportunities with the Philadelphia Eagles, who drafted him. 
Instead, following graduation in 1951 from the School of Physical Edu- 
cation, he stayed on at Maryland as assistant coach through most of the 
'51 season before he went into the Marine Corps. 

Stationed at Parris Island, Idzik played halfback the season of '52 and 
for leading them to the All-Marine Championship, he was named to the 
All-Marine eleven. After his transfer to Quantico he was given S/Sgt. 
rating and assigned to Special Services. He played and coached the 
season of 1953. 

After his discharge, he was named assistant coach at the University 
of Tennessee the season of 1954. In the spring of 1955 he accompanied 
one of the Vol coaches to Ottawa, Canada where he was backfield coach 
of the Roughriders. 

Idzik married the former Joyce Hoppensteadt, Maryland coed and 
graduate, in January 1953. 



JIM PEEBLES 

(Continued from page 13) 

With the outbreak of World War II after the Pearl Harbor incident 
Peebles left Vanderbilt in December 1941 during his senior year and 
enlisted in the Infantry. Following his commission from Officers' Can- 
didate School he was assigned as an Infantry Officer to the 69th Division. 
He played service ball in 1942. 

While overseas in combat duty, Peebles was wounded while leading 
his unit on a night patrol. 

With the war ended, Peebles was assigned to the 29th Division and 
was a player-coach for their team which played against Mont's squad; 
thus, their first meeting. Later he was a member of the All-Star team 
coached by Mont. 

Following his discharge in April '45 as a Captain, he returned to Van- 
derbilt to complete work for his degree. It was that fall that he signed 
to play with the Redskins and he played end for the DC team that season 
as well as '47 through '49 and again in 1951. He received his B.A. Degree 
in 1948. After the '49 season with the 'Skins, he went to Riverside Mili- 
tary Academy, Georgia, as football coach and stayed until June '51. 
After the fall season with 'Skins, he went to Gallatin, Tenn. High as 
coach. He stayed on for 2% years before going to Sewanee, the Uni- 
versity of the South, as assistant coach until the call to Maryland from 
Mont. 

He married the former Nelle Gilchrist, Courtland, Ala., an Auburn 
graduate, in 1947. They have a daughter, Betty Bringle 8, and a son, 
Jim, Jr., 5. 

FRED LAYMAN 

(Continued from page 12) 
backfield as he will do this fall. Besides his coaching duties, he is work- 
ing secretary for the Terrapin Club and Concessions Manager. 

Layman, native of Brentwood, Pa., was a three year letterman in 
football, basketball, and tennis at Brentwood High School. Following 
graduation, he spent a semester at Kiski Prep before enrolling at Colgate 
in February '51. He transferred to Maryland in the fall of '51. A quarter- 
back in high school, prep school and Colgate, Tatum moved him to half- 
back where he made a big impression. It is believed he would have been 
one of the Terps' best. 

He married the former Jane Murray of Brentwood. They have a 
daughter, Lee Ann. 

DUKE WYRE 

(Continued from page 15) 

year. Then in '47 he came to Maryland and has been head trainer ever 
since. 

A Navy veteran, Wyre served as a physical education instructor in 
the V-12 program. 

He was the first president of the Southern Conference Trainer's Assn. 
He previously has been on the board of the National Trainer's Assn., 
and now his most recent appointment, Chairman of the Board. In '49, 
he was named the top trainer in the East. 



69 — 



AL BEARDSLEY 



TED KERSHNER 




BILL TURNER 



FRED COLE 




THE TERP PRESS 



-GEORGE BOWEN, The Associated Press 
MAX FULLERTON, The Associated Press 
LOU PANOS, The Associated Press 
JACK DAVIS, The Associated Press 
ERNIE BARCELLA, The United Press 
BOB SERLING, The United Press 
EV GARDNER, Sports Editor, The Washington Daily News 

-HENRY FANKHAUSER, The Daily News 

-MORRIS SIEGEL, Columnist, The Daily News 
CHUCK EGAN, Sports Editor, The Washington Evening Star 
FRANCIS STANN, Columnist, The Evening Star 

-MERRELL WHITTLESEY, Sports Department, The Evening Star 
GEORGE HUBER, Sports Department, The Evening Star 
BILL FUCHS, Sports Department, The Evening Star 
BUS HAM, Sports Editor, The Washington Post and Times-Herald 
SHIRLEY POVICH, Columnist, The Post and Times-Herald 

■DAVE BRADY, Sports Department, The Post and Times-Herald 
BOB ADDIE, Columnist, The Post and Times-Herald 
HERMAN BLACKMAN, The Post and Times-Herald 
MAURY FITZGERALD. The Post and Times-Herald 
MARTIE ZADRAVEC, The Post and Times-Herald 
PAUL MENTON, Sports Editor, The Baltimore Evening Sun 

-MURRAY WEIMAN, Sports Department, The Evening Sun 
RANDALL CASSELL, Columnist, The Evening Sun 
WALTER TAYLOR, Sports Department, The Evening Sun 
JESSE LINTHICUM, Sports Editor, The Morning Sun 

*ED BRANDT, Sports Department, The Morning Sun 
C M. GIBBS, Columnist, The Morning Sun 
ED ATWATER, Sports Department, The Morning Sun 
RODGER PIPPEN, Sports Editor, The Baltimore News-Post 

-AL COSTELLO, Sports Department, The News-Post 
HUGH TRADER, Columnist, The News-Post 

J. SUTER KEGG, Sports Editor, The Cumberland Evening Times 
C. V. BURNS, Sports Editor, The Cumberland Morning News 
DICK KELLY. Sports Editor, The Hagerstown Mail 
FRANK COLLEY, Sports Editor, The Hagerstown Herald 
ED NICHOLS. Sports Editor, The Salisbury Times 
HENRY DECKER. Sports Editor, The Frederick Post 
THE FREDERICK NEWS 

BOB LAYTON. Sports Editor, The Cambridge Banner 
HYMY COHEN, Sports Editor, The Annapolis Evening Capital 
•'Cover Daily 

RADIO and TELEVISION 

BALTIMORE Ron Wilner, WAYE 

Mat Thomas, Don Bruchey, Bailey Goss, BiM Shriver, WTOW 

Chuck Thompson, W MAR -TV WASHINGTON 

Nelson Baker. Tommy Dukehart, Joel . _ 

Chaseman. Jim Killian, Nick Campofreda, Jimmy Gibbons, WRC-TV. WOL-Radio 

WAAM-TV Bi " Malone. WMAL-TV and Radio 

Joe Croghan, WBAL-TV Jim Simpson, WRC-TV and Radio 

Eddie Fenton, WCBM Ray Michael, WRC-TV and Radio 

Vince Bagley, WWIN Arch McDonald, WTOP-Radio 

Nick Campofreda, Harry Shriver, WFBR Dan Daniels. WTOP-TV an'd Radio 

Russ Hall, Gil Kriegel, WITH Bob Wolff, WWDC-Radio 

Joe Croghan, WBAL Sam Kaufman, WOL-Radio 

Roger Griswold, WBMD Nat Allbright, WEAM-Radio 

— 72 — 




THE TERP BACKFIELD 





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RED HAMILTON—HB 






JACK HEALY 
Halfback 



GENE ALDERTON 
Center 



1957 CO-CAPTAINS