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Full text of "University of Maryland men's football media guides"

THE 1 958 MARYLAND 



0-YARD 




FRED COLE 
Tackle 



BOB RUSEVLYAN 
Quarterback 



1958 CO-CAPTAINS 



STAR RETURNING LETTERMEN FOR '58 




KURT SCHWARZ 
Tackle 




RON SHAFFER 
.End 




BEN SCOTTI 
End 




TOM FLOR 
Tackle 




RON LANEVE 
Guard 






TOM GUNDERMAN 
Outstanding Guard 



7 

VICTOR SCHWARTZ 
Center 




GENE VERARDI 
Halfback 




JOHN FORBES 
Halfback 




DICKIE LEWIS 
Quarterback 




FOR PRESS, RADIO and TELEVISION 

This is your 1958 Maryland football bro- 
chure, "The 50- Yard Line." It is published in 
hope that it offers you helpful information for 
your coverage of Terp games this season. With 
this book goes an invitation to you to visit us 
as often as possible in our offices in Cole Field 
House. In return, I will try to visit you as 
often as I can and extend every assistance pos- 
sible. For any information, you can reach me 
day and night at UNion 4-4076. When it is real 
late at night, I can be contacted at WArfield 
7-3800, Extension 512. 

Applications for tickets should be made the 
first part of the week of the game to allow 

time for mailing. Wire and telephone requirements should be made 
through your local Western Union office. 

Every effort will be made to furnish all the services in the press box 
available, so that your accounts of the game can be most adequate for 
your readers. Statistics, both half-time and final figures; a quarter play- 
by-play; game leaders in all departments; substitutions, etc. will be 
ready a few minutes after the game. 

Many thanks for all your cooperation and favors of the past. 

JOE F. BLAIR 
Sports Publicity Director 
University of Maryland, 
College Park, Maryland. 

Table of Contents 

Page 

'58 Schedule; Bowl Record; '57 Results; Itinerary ... 2 

Athletic Council; Dept. of Intercollegiate Athletics . 3 

The Terp Press ............ 4 

President Wilson H. Elkins 5-6 

Director of Athletics William W. Cobey 7-8 

Coach Tommy Mont 9-10 

Assistant Coaches and Trainers . 1 1-15 

The 1958 Terps 16 

Terp Opponents 17-26 

1953 Squad Roster , . . 34-35 

Opponents' Outlook, Concluded ....... 36-37 

Terp Thumbnail Sketches ........ 38-47 

'57 Terp Honorary Selections; All-Americans . 48-51 

1957 Statistical Summary ....... 52-54 

Freshman Schedule ........... 55 

All-Time Records .......... 56-57 

Year by Year Records .......... 59-6? 

'53 National Champions (Photo) ...... 63 

Brief History of the University ...... ■ 67 

Sketch on Breedlove ■ 68 



1958 SCHEDULE 



Sept. 


20 


Sept- 


27 


Oct. 


4 


Oct. 


11 


Oct. 


18 


Oct. 


25 


Nov. 


1 


Nov- 


8 


Nov. 


14 


Nov. 


22 



Wake Forest at Winston-Salem. N. C. 
N. C. State at Raleigh, N. C. 
Clemson at College Park, Md. 
Texas A&M at College Park, Md. 
North Carolina at Chapel Hill, N. C 
Auburn at Auburn, Ala. 
South Carolina at College Park, Md. 
Navy at Baltimore, Md. 
Miami at Miami, Fla. 
Virginia at Charlottesville, Va. 



KICKOFF 


PRICE 


2 P.M. EST 


$3.50 


1:30 P.M. EST 


$4.00 


1:30 PM. EDT 


$4.00 


1:30 P.M. EDT 


$4.00 


2 P.M. EST 


$4.50 


2 P.M- CST 


$4.00 


1:30 P.M. EST 


$4.00 


2:00 P M. EST 


$4.00 


8:15 PM. EST 


$4.00 


2 P. M. EST 


$3.50 



MARYLAND'S BOWL RECORD 



1948 


'Gator Bowl 


Maryland 


20 


Georgia 


20 


1950 


'Gator Bowl 


Maryland 


20 


Missouri 


7 


1952 


Sugar Bowl 


Maryland 


28 


Tennessee 


13 


1954 


Orange Bowl 


Maryland 





Oklahoma 


7 


1956 


Orange Bowl 


Maryland 


6 


Oklahoma 


20 



Won: 2— Lost: 2— Tied: 1 



1957 Results 



Maryland 




Opponeni 


Maryland 




Opponent 


13 


Texas A&M 


21 


10 


S. Carolina 


6 


13 


N. C- State 


48 


7 


Clemson 


26 





Duke 


14 


16 


Miami, Fla. 


6 


27 


Wake Forest 





12 


Virginia 





21 


N. Carolina 


7 


- — 




— 





Tennessee 


16 


119 




144 



MARYLAND'S ITINERARY FOR 1957 SEASON 



DATE OPPONENT 



HEADQUARTERS 



Robert E. Lee Hotel, Winston-Salem, N. C 
N. Carolina State Hotel Sir Walter, Raleigh, N. C. 
North Carolina Washington Duke Hotel, Durham, N. C- 

Ralston Hotel, Columbus, Ga. 

The Diplomat Hotel, Hollywood, Fla. 

The Monticello, Charlottesville, Va. 



Sept. 20 Wake Forest 

Sept. 27 

Oct. 18 

Oct. 25 

Nov. 14 

Nov. 22 



Auburn 

Miami 

Virginia 



THE 
ATHLETIC COUNCIL 



Mr. Geary F. Eppley 
lairman 



Lhf" 







Mr. William W. Cobey 
Director of Athletics 

Mr. H. A. (Bud) Millikan 
Ass't. Director of Athletics 

Mr. Joseph Deckman Alumni Association 

Dr. James H. Reid, Ass't. Dean, School of Business & Pub. Adm. 

Dr. Jack Faber Head, Bacteriology Department 

Dr. Leland Scott Horticulture Department 

Dr. Warren Johnson School of Physical Education 

Mr. Charles Hayleck School of Engineering 

Mr. Vernon Briggs President, Student Government Ass'n. 

Department of Intercollegiate Athletics 

Equipment Manager Kermit "Chief" Cissell 

Assistant Equipment Manager Albert Johnson 

Head of Facilities Charles "Lindy" Kehoe 

Chief of Concessions Fred Layman 

Ticket Manager Eddie Bean 

Office Secretary to Mr. Cobey Mrs. Dorothy Hunt 

Office Secretary to Mr. Mont Mrs. Dorothy Zinn 

Office Secretary to Mr. Blair Mrs. Dorothy S. Duncan 

Head Trainer Alfred "Duke" Wyre 

Assistant Trainer , Bill "Spider" Fry 

Head Football Coach Tommy Mont 

Basketball Coach H. A. "Bud" Millikan 

Assistant Basketball Coach Perry Moore 

Baseball Coach H. Burton Shipley 

Lacrosse Co-Coaches Jack Faber and Al Heagy 

Track, Cross-Country Coach Jim Kehoe 

Soccer, Tennis Coach Doyle Royal 

Swimming Coach Bill Campbell 

Wrestling Coach V^illiam E. "Sully" Krouse 

Golf Coach Frank Cronin 

Rifle Coach T/Sgt. David P. Pruitt, Jr. 



THE TERP PRESS 

*GEORGE BOWEN, The Associated Press 
MAX FULLERTON, The Associated Press 
LOU PANOS, The Associated Press 
JACK DAVIS, The Associated Press 
ERNIE BARCELLA, The United Press 

-BOB SERLING, The United Press 
EV GARDNER, Sports Editor, The Washington Daily News 

*HENRY FANKHAUSER, The Daily News 

*MORRIS SIEGEL, Columnist, The Daily News 
CHUCK EGAN, Sports Editor, The Washington Evening Star 
FRANCIS STANN, Columnist, The Evening Star 

•■MERRELL WHITTLESEY, Sports Department, The Evening Star 
GEORGE HUBER, Sports Department, The Evening Star 
BILL FUCHS, Sports Department, The Evening Star 
BUS HAM, Sports Editor, The Washington Post and Times-Herald 
SHIRLEY POVICH, Columnist, The Post and Times-Herald 
BOB ADDIE, Columnist, The Post and Times-Herald 

*HERMAN BLACKMAN, The Post and Times Herald 
MAURY FITZGERALD, The Post and Times-Herald 
MARTIE ZADRAVEC, The Post and Times-Herald 
PAUL MENTON, Sports Editor, The Baltimore Evening Sun 
MURRAY WEIMAN, Sports Department, The Evening Sun 
RANDALL CASSELL, Columnist, The Evening Sun 
WALTER TAYLOR, Sports Department, The Evening Sun 

*DOUG BROWN, Sports Department, The Evening Sun 
JESSE LINTHICUM, Sports Editor, The Morning Sun 

*ED BRANDT, Sports Department, The Morning Sun 
C M. GIBBS, Columnist, The Morning Sun 

*ED ATWATER, Sports Department, The Morning Sun 
JOHN STEADMAN, Sports Editor, The News-Post 

*AL COSTELLO, Sports Department, The News-Post 
HUGH TRADER, Columnist, The News-Post 

J. SUTER KEGG, Sports Editor, The Cumberland Evening Times 
C. V. BURNS, Sports Editor, The Cumberland Morning News 
DICK KELLY, Sports Editor, The Hagerstown Mail 
FRANK COLLEY, Sports Editor, The Hagerstown Herald 
ED NICHOLS, Sports Editor, The Salisbury Times 
HENRY DECKER, Sports Editor, The Frederick Post 
THE FREDERICK NEWS 

BOB LAYTON, Sports Editor, The Cambridge Banner 
HYMY COHEN, Sports Editor, The Annapolis Evening Capital 
♦Cover Daily 

RADIO and TELEVISION 

BALTIMORE ^on Wilner, WAYE 

Mat Thomas, Don Bruchey, Bailey Goss, Bi " Shriver ' WTOW 

Chuck Thompson, WMAR-TV WHUIMrmM 

Nelson Baker, Tommy Dukehart, Joel WMon I i\i(j iuim 

Chaseman, Jim Killian, Nick Campofreda, J'mmy Gibbons. WRC-TV, WOL-Radio 

WAAM-TV Bi " Malone WMAL-TV and Radio 

Joe Croghan, WBAL-TV Jim Simpson, WRC-TV and Radio 

Eddie Fenton, WCBM Ray Michael, WRC-TV and Radio 

Vince Bagley, WWIN Arch McDonald, WTOP-Radio 
Nick Campofreda, Harry Shriver, WFBR Dan Daniels, WTOP-TV an'd Radio 

Russ Hall, Gil Kriegel, WITH Bob Wolff, WWDC-Radio 

Joe Croghan, WBAL Sam Kaufman, WOL-Radio 

Roger Griswold, WBMD Nat Allbright, WEAM-Radio 




DR. WILSON H. ELKINS 

PRESIDENT, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Since his appointment as President of the University of Maryland 
four years ago, Dr. Wilson H- Elkins has worked tirelessly to make 
the University more and more renowned. The College Park under- 
graduate campus as well as the Professional Schools' campus in Balti- 
more are growing in leaps and bounds. And the tremendous Overseas 
Educational Program is continuing its great expansion to the far corners 
of the world. Thus progress is being made toward attaining the early 
goals set by the young President to make the University known the world 
over, just as he is known as one of the nation's top educators and ad- 
ministrators. 

Presidency of a large school is not an unfamiliar role to Dr. Elkins. 
He came to Maryland from Texas Western College, El Paso, Texas, 
where he headed that institution's program. 

Dr. Elkins was born in Median, Texas, July 9, 1908. With his father 
and mother, Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Elkins, he moved to San Antonio at an 
early age. 

After completing his grade and high school education in San Antonio, 
Dr. Elkins attended Schreiner Institute from 1926 to the spring of 1928 
when he entered the University of Texas. From Texas University in 1932, 



he received both the Bachelor of Arts and Master of Arts Degrees. 

Receiving a Rhodes Scholarship, Dr. Elkins attended Oxford University 
from 1933 to 1936, receiving degrees of Bachelor of Letters and Doctor 
of Philosophy. 

Combining outstanding academic and athletic abilities during his stu- 
dent days at the University of Texas, he was elected to membership in 
Phi Beta Kappa and earned eight varsity letters in football, basketball, 
and track. In his final year at Texas, he captained the basketball team 
and was elected president of the student association. 

Dr. Elkins lettered in football on the 1929, 1930, and 1931 teams at Texas 
and was the regular quarterback in his final two seasons, the one in 1930 
winning the Southwest Conference title. That team ranks among Texas' 
all-time best- A soph end with that team was Edwin B. Price, former 
famous head coach at Texas. 

He lettered on the 1930, '31, and '32 basketball teams. He was captain 
his senior year and also the squad's leading scorer. He lettered in track 
in 1931 and '32 as a sprinter and broad jumper. He was a member of 
the national championship football shuttle relay team at the Drake Re- 
lays in 1931. 

Dr. Elkins married Dorothy Blackburn of Berclair, Texas, in 1927. 
They have two daughters, Carole Ann and Margaret Elise. 

His career as an educator began in 1932 when he was named athletic 
director of Cisco High School. In 1936, Dr. Elkins joined the faculty of 
the University of Texas as an instructor in history. He held this position 
until 1938 when he went to San Angelo as president of the Junior Col- 
lege. 

He remained there until January, 1949, when he was chosen president 
of Texas Western College. This position he held until his appointment 
as the President of the University of Maryland. 

Dr. Elkins is a member of numerous learned societies including the 
Texas State Teacher's Association, National Educational Association, Phi 
Beta Kappa, Alpha Gamma, and is listed in Who's Who in American 
Education. He is a member of Sigma Nu fraternity. 

Dr. Elkins is a member of the Methodist Church and the Rotary Club. 
He is a constant contributor to national education periodicals. 





WILLIAM W. COBEY 

DIRECTOR OF ATHLETICS 

In his second year heading the athletic program at the University 
that he was so instrumental in building prior to his appointment, Bill 
Cobey again saw gratifying results as Terp athletic teams continued to 
dominate the Atlantic Coast Conference championships. 

Cobey had been the man behind the scenes as Graduate Manager of 
Athletics since 1948. He was Jim Tatum's top man and efficiently 
handled the big job of top administrator along with the tremendous 
task of arranging all other teams' schedules as well as all the many 
details that accompany the assignment of directing the vast Maryland 
athletic program. He now, as Director of Athletics, continues to carry 
out these duties as always. 

The program as outlined by Cobey is a most successful one and the 
popular favorite son is certain to carry on its well respected athletic 
program. 

The Cobey name is not new, even to old-time University graduates. 
Bill's father, W. W. Cobey, was a 1901 graduate and a letterman in track 
and manager of the baseball team. He became a famous agricultural 
scientist and while in Florida, he was one of the pioneers in the discovery 
of leaf tobacco. Cobey also had two uncles graduate from the University. 



Bill, as he is known to the many friends he has made around home 
and throughout the athletic fraternity, came to Maryland in the fall of 
1926 following graduation from Fort Meyer, Fla. High School. Born and 
raised in Quincy, still his native home, Cobey attended Quincy through 
eleventh grade before the family moved to Fort Meyer. 

After playing freshman lacrosse, Cobey had to cast aside any athletic 
team participation in order that he might get a job to help him through 
school. This employment was in the Cashier's office where he worked 
until his graduation in 1930. He belonged to the Kappa Alpha Fraternity 
while an undergraduate. 

Following graduation, he returned to Quincy, Fla., and worked with 
his uncle on a truck farm. He returned to the University to accept the 
job as Cashier of the University. It was this job he held for 17 years, 
until 1948 when he accepted the position as Graduate Manager of Ath- 
letics. Then came the appointment as Director of Athletics, February 1, 
1956. 

Cobey is active in community affairs, having been a past president of 
University Park PTA; councilman for University Park two years, first 
president of the University branch of the Maryland Classified Employee's 
Assn.; and is active in the affairs of Northwestern High School. 

Cobey married the former Mary Gray Munroe, also of Quincy, Fla., 
in 1935. They have six children, three daughters and three sons. Their 
oldest daughter, Mary Patricia, is a graduate of the University. William, 
a Northwestern High School graduate, is a freshman at Emory College; 
Julia Ann is a freshman at Wesleyan College, Ga., while Betty is in 
tenth grade. A son Elwood is in seventh grade while the baby of the 
family, Munroe, is six. 

The Cobeys are members of the University Methodist Church, College 
Park. 





/ r v;I 



M^kM: 




TOMMY MONT 

HEAD FOOTBALL COACH 

Ready to embark on his third year as head coach of the Maryland 
Terrapins, Tommy Mont appears set to offer his finest gridiron edition 
since he took over the top job two years ago. There is a well-coached 
aggregation of material returning this fall which should give the Terps 
their first opportunity to return to the national scene since Mont became 
head coach- 

Everybody in the football world sympathized with Mont his first 
year at the helm when his team was hit by an unprecedented number 
of losses to key players before and during the season. Then last fall, 
his Terrapins came along strong and finished with a .500 season to set 
them up for a possible better mark in 1958, although a murderous 
schedule faces him. Winning five of their last seven was an encouraging 
ending to the '57 campaign. 

The 35-year old Mont now seems on the threshold of success in the 
coaching fraternity. 

Mont is one of the all-time athletic names at the University. He has 
the rare distinction of being a three-sport athlete four years at Mary- 
land, lettering in football, basketball, and lacrosse. A graduate of Cum- 
berland's Allegany High School, he started his collegiate athletic career 



9 



in 1941. He was in school two years before entering the service in the 
spring of 1943. He played tailback in 1941, then quarterback on the '42 
T eleven. It was then that he laid the groundwork to become a great 
football player, even in those lean war seasons. Also, both years he won 
his basketball and lacrosse monograms. He won all-America mention as 
well as first team all-Conference and the Washington-Maryland out- 
standing college player awards in 1942. 

During the war, Mont served 42 months in the Army, 18 of which were 
spent in the ETO. He played ball throughout his long hitch in the serv- 
ice. He was tailback on the Fort Benning Post championship team of 
1943. As quarterback and head coach, he led the 3rd Infantry team to 
the ETO title. He also was at the helm of the 7th Army All-Star team. 

Following his discharge, Mont returned to Maryland and was quarter- 
back on the 1946 team as he gained all-American mention and all-Con- 
ference honors. 

Drafted by the Washington Redskins, Mont had four brilliant years 
as quarterback. Then came the call from Jim Tatum back to his alma 
mater as backfield coach. 

During his stay at Maryland, he worked with the Maryland High 
Schools. For three summers he spent two weeks as an advisory coach 
at National Polytechnic Institute in Mexico City. He was responsible 
for arranging the "international game" between the Terp frosh and the 
Institute's team, won by the Terps, 26-13. He also put in the T forma- 
tion for Scrappy Moore's University of Chattanooga eleven in 1949. In 
the summer of 1954, he also was asked to assist teaching the Split-T for 
the Parris Island service team. He also was a collegiate talent scout 
for the Los Angeles Rams, and sent his own product, Ronnie Waller, to 
the Rams, who was "55 Rookie of the Year." 

Mont married the former Virginia Askins, Baltimore, and a Maryland 
student, in 1943. They have three sons, Steve 10, Jeffrey 8 and Danny 7. 



10 



ASSISTANT COACHES 



JACK HENNEMIER 

A characteristic of Maryland's great 
football teams has been the outstanding 
line play, featured by the excellent de- 
fensive achievement of these teams. One 
of those most responsible for the fabulous 
reputation of Terp linemen and Terp line 
play was Jack Hennemier. 

The highly regarded and most respected 
native of Savannah, Ga., returned to 
College Park at the beckon of his close 
friend Tommy Mont, to be a Terp assistant 
and of course to work with the line coach- 
ing chores. 

Hennemier returned to Maryland last fall 
after serving as head coach for a year and 
a half of the Calgary Stampeders, Canada. 
He had been line coach for former Terp 
coach Jim Tatum from 1949 through 1954 

before he went North. It was during this period that Hennemier and 
Mont served together on the Terp staff; Mont as backfield coach and 
Hennemier as line coach. It was in this period that the Terp line 
received so much national recognition, not only for individuals, but for 
their units leading the nation in defensive statistics. And it was Mont's 
backfields that set so many national marks and set many University 
(Continued on page 58) 




BILL "Whitey" DOVELL 

Another Maryland graduate who turned 
down leaving his alma mater to stay on and 
coach under Tommy Mont. Dovell was 
another of the Terps who played under Jim 
Tatum then was retained by the Carolinian 
as an assistant coach. 

Dovell, following his graduation with a 
Bachelor's Degree from the School of 
Physical Education in 1953, heeded Tatum's 
plea to stay on at his alma mater as a 
member of the coaching staff. The decision 
was a good one for Maryland football since 
"Whitey" coached three winning freshman 
teams and has been responsible for mold- 
ing some of today's present stars. In 1955 
his frosh eleven brought to Maryland the 
school's first undefeated freshman team. 
From this team the Terps have had an out- 
standing nucleus for varsity teams. The big win was the "international" 
victory over Mexico Polytechnic Institute, 26-13, played across the border 
(Continued on page 58) 




11 




FRED LAYMAN 

One of the most outstanding halfback 
prospects ever to come to Maryland, Lay- 
man, although an injury kept him from 
playing, was another of the Tatum tutored 
pupils who stayed with Mont after serving 
for several campaigns with the old regime. 
He brought his brother Bob to Maryland 
two years ago who now is one of the Terps' 
top backs. 

Layman's collegiate career was inter- 
rupted as the up-coming star sustained a 
serious injury on the last day of spring 
practice during his freshman year. 

Following his recovery after six months 

hospitalization, he returned to school the 

fall of 1952 to complete his education. He 

received his Bachelor of Science Degree. 

1954, from the School of Business and Public Administration, with a 

major in Transportation. 

While completing work for his Degree, he assisted Dovell with the 
freshmen as backfield coach. He has worked with the varsity 
(Continued on page 65) 

ED FULLERTON 

When the all-time history of Maryland 
football is recorded, the name of Ed Fuller- 
ton will be one of the most prominent. 
His name will be high on the list as one 
of the most brilliant backs who contributed 
so greatly to the gridiron fortunes of his 
alma mater while starring on the football 
field, 1949-52. 

This will be his third campaign as a 
Terp backfield coach having returned to 
College Park at the call of his former back- 
field coach and now head coach, Mont. 

It was an indelible record the native of 
West View, Pa. made as a fullback and 
halfback his four years on the College Park 
campus. 

The 27-year old Fullerton still is con- 
sidered the top athlete to come out of West 

View High School in a tough Western Pennsylvania League. He lettered 
four years in football and basketball and two in baseball. He was se- 
lected Athlete of the Year his senior season and was named on the top 
WPIAL selections his junior and senior year. 

The highly touted back came to Maryland in the fall of 1949. Lettered 
three years, playing his sophomore and senior year at fullback and his 
junior year at halfback. It was his third year and the Sugar Bowl game 

(Continued on -page 65) 




12 




JOHNNY IDZIK 

Another former star Maryland halfback 
who helped get the Terps started in their 
national climb, Idzik returned to be a back- 
field aide for the Red and White. Besides 
his coaching chores, he, along with Dovell 
are the chief scouts. 

Idzik came to Maryland in the fall of 
1947 as one of Philadelphia's most publi- 
cized backs and during his four years of 
varsity competition for the Terps proved 
this reputation on the collegiate gridirons. 
At Northeast Catholic High in Philadelphia, 
the fine two-way back was an all-City and 
all-Catholic selection his senior year in both 
football and baseball. He was all-Catholic 
selection in football his junior year. He 
captained both squads his senior year. He 

played tailback and quarterback. He was named the outstanding athlete 
at Northeast his senior year and also was runnerup to Red Bagnell, later 
a star back at Penn, as the top football player in the city. 

At Maryland, he starred all four years, both offense and defense, and 
his senior year found him one of the South's top defensive backs. He 
f Continued on page 66) 

ROY LESTER 

Following two years as varsity assistant 
and head freshman coach, Lester has moved 
up to full-time varsity assistant and will 
coach the ends, a position at which he 
starred at West Virginia University. The 
Mountaineer came to Maryland as fresh- 
man football and basketball coach in the 
fall of 1956. His freshman basketball team 
of 1956 had a 12-2 mark and his two years 
with the freshman gridders netted him 
eight wins and two losses. 

^^d JSflfefe The native of Spencer, W. Va., came to 

gjflll BK Jffl the University from Allegany High School 

■f Mm in Cumberland, Md. where he had tre- 

Mm mendous success as football and baseball 

IHMMHUr MilHliBM coach for four years. He also assisted the 

basketball coach. He was a history profes- 
sor at Allegany. 

After graduation from Spencer where he 
was a 3-sport letterman he entered the 
University in the fall of 1941. Here he played basketball, baseball and 
football his first two years before he went into the Navy. During his 
stay in the States, he played all three sports at Great Lakes and Jack- 
sonville. It was at the latter he played end under Missouri's Don Faurot 

(Continued on page 66) 




13 



GENE ALDERTON 
Generally regarded as Maryland's alltime 
best offensive center, Alderton accepted 
Coach Mont's offer to return to his alma 
mater to be head freshman coach and to 
assist working with the varsity center can- 
didates. 

The affable Alderton had been drafted by 
the Detroit Lions and was making a fine 
impression in their early summer practice 
when Mont asked him to take the fresh- 
man job. He had been conceded an excel- 
lent chance to stay with the Lions. 
Wfc^jM A native of Cumberland, Md., and a 

_^mm gm M product of the famed Fori Hill High 

JM j r ^k School, Alderton came to Maryland as one 

I JSM JH >' r its I'M titer prospects. He proved his 

reputation throughout his four years for 
the Terps. His reputation as the Terps' 
top pivot man cannot be contested. His sophomore year found him hav- 
ing a sensational debut as second team center, playing behind every- 
body's all-America, Bob Pellegrini. He was first team center his last 
two years, and in both 1956 and 1957 was rewarded as he was named 
to the honorable mention all-America of the Associated Press and United 
Press. Also, he was named to the all-Atlantic Coast Conference teams. 
After last season, he was awarded the TEKE Trophy given to the stu- 
dent who during his four years at the University has rendered the 
greatest service to football. 




1957 FRESHMAN RESULTS 



MARYLAND 

7 
20 
33 

7 
31 



OPPONENT 




North Carolina 


14 


George Washington 





West Virginia 


6 


Navy Plebes 


6 


Virginia 






WON: 4— LOST: 1 
Head Coach: Roy Lester 



14 



THE TRAINERS 



ALFRED J. "Duke" WYRE 

In the athletic training fraternity across the 
nation, Maryland's "Duke" is regarded as one 
of the best. The tremendously popular and 
respected Terp trainer has been a long-time 
pioneer among the reputable veterans of the 
training world. 

Many honors have been afforded "Duke." In 
1956 he was elected Chairman of the Board oi 
Directors of the National Trainers' Associa- 
tion, a position he still holds. 

Now ready for his twelfth year as head 
trainer at Maryland, Duke first arrived on the 
scene in 1947 when former head coach Jim 
Tatum was gathering top men for the nucleus 

of his organization. It was on his long and reputable experience and 
high recommendations that Tatum brought him in as a top trainer in 
the country. 

He has authored many articles and manuals on training methods, and 
is always in demand to give lectures on athletic training methods at 
numerous clinics. He also has devised various equipment pieces that are 
used for athletic injuries and prevention of injuries. 

"Dapper Duke" as he is known because of his natty dress habits, was 
trainer at Yale for 15 years before he moved to Holy Cross for another 
(Continued on page 66) 





BILL "Spider" FRY 

When head trainer Duke Wyre needed a new 
full-time assistant, he beckoned the services of 
his former student trainer, Bill 'Spider" Fry. 
"Spider," as he is and was known while in 
school, is a native of Norristown, Pa., and re- 
turned to his alma mater in 1956. 

Fry, a 1951 Maryland graduate, prepared 
at Elkton High School, Md., where he played 
and lettered for three years in soccer and 
basketball. 

He entered the University in the fall of 1946 

and assisted Wyre in the training room as a 

student trainer all four years. He graduated 

with a B.S. Degree from the School of Physical 

Education. 

Following graduation, he went into the Air Force and was assigned 

to Jet Engine Training. During his four-year stay, he was stationed 

at Davis-Monthan Air Base in Tucson and Great Falls Air Base, Montana 

assigned to jet duty. He also was trainer for the base athletic teams. 

He was discharged June, '55. 

Returning to Maryland, he entered Graduate School and continued 
his schooling until his appointment as assistant trainer. 



A 



k 



15 



THE 1958 TERPS 

Looking over his 1958 prospects, Mont says that Maryland will have 
a fine representative football team with which to tackle another top 
schedule. The Terps play each Atlantic Coast Conference school with 
the exception of Duke. Their intersectional schedule calls for games 
with national champion Auburn; '58 Cotton Bowl winner, Navy; '58 
'Gator Bowl participant, Texas A&M, and always tough Miami of Fla. 

The Terps lost 15 lettermen from the '57 team that won 5 and lost 5. 
They have 23 returning, two at quarterback; five at halfback; two at 
fullback; one center; four guards; four tackles; and five ends. 

Most notable losses were honorable mention all-Americas and all-Con- 
ference selections, end Ed Cooke and center Gene Alderton. Other top 
losses were center Wilbur Main; quarterback John Fritsch; halfbacks 
Howie Dare and Fred Hamilton; fullback Phil Perlo, tackles Don Healy 
and Tom Stefl. 

Aside from his great tackle Fred Cole, who was injured for the final 
four games of the '57 season, Mont will have returning eight of his start- 
ers. He lost only Cooke, Alderton, and Perlo from his starting eleven. 
Cole is back at his first team tackle spot. The eight returning starters are 
end Ben Scotti, tackle Kurt Schwarz, guards Rodney Breedlove, the 
Terps' outstanding all-America candidate and Tom Gunderman; half- 
backs Ted Kershner and Bob Layman, and quarterback Bob Rusevlyan. 
On the basis of their spring work, these eight should answer the call. 

Filling in at the other end is the star soph end of last year Ronald 
Shaffer. At center will be Victor Schwartz, who played number two 
guard last fall. The powerful running Jim Joyce, who started several 
games last year, is at fullback. 

Mont is of the opinion that he will have two real good teams with 
some real good help coming from boys on the third unit. He and his 
staff have been tremendously impressed with the line play of his two 
units. They have excelled defensively and showed more and more ef- 
fectiveness blocking, especially their downfield activity. 

Another reason for some tone of optimism is that the Terps kept 
looking better as the 1957 season progressed while using the majority 
of the returning lettermen on the two units last fall. The Red and 
White, after dropping their first three games, finished strong to win five 
of the last seven games. 

The positions that cause most concern to Mont are center and full- 
back. The Terps lost two great centers in Alderton and Main and have 
moved Schwartz from guard to give only one letterman at the pivot spot 
and of course he won the monogram as a sophomore playing guard. 
That leaves center with no varsity experience. All other center candi- 
dates are upcoming sophomores. 

The fullback spot has Joyce and Hatter returning. Joyce was a most 
pleasant surprise as a sophomore and is expected to have a great junior 
year.Hatter, first string as a soph, was used sparingly last fall because 
of an injury. Much is expected of a vastly improved Larry Casparro. 
Upcoming sophs must help take up some of the slack in order to have 
any depth. 

An early glance indicates all other positions will have most adequate 
C Continued on page 6 if) 

16 



TERP OPPONENTS 



MARYLAND vs WAKE FOREST 

2:00 P.M. (E.S-T.) 

at Bowman Gray Memorial Stadium (16,850) 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 

FACTS ABOUT THE DEACONS 

CONFERENCE: Atlantic Coast 

LOCATION: Winston-Salem, N. C. 

HEAD COACH: Paul J. Amen (Nebraska '38) 

COLORS: Old Gold and Black 

ENROLLMENT: 2,400 

TYPE OFFENSE: Split-T 

1957 RECORD: Won 0, Lost 10 



20 SEPTEMBER 




Coach Paul Amen 



DEACON'S RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS 

(Maryland: Won 5, Lost 1, Tied 1) 





Maryland 


Wake Forest 




Maryland 


Wake Forest 


1917 


29 


13 


1954 


13 


13 


1943 


13 


7 


1955 


28 


7 


1944 





39 


1956 


6 











1957 


27 






TOTAL POINTS: Maryland 116, Wake Forest 79 

1958 CO-CAPTAINS: Charlie Carpenter and Frank Thompson 

LETTERMEN RETURNING: 20— Lost 8 



1958 SCHEDULE 

Sept. 20 Maryland 

Sept. 27 at Virginia Tech (Night) 

Oct. 4 at Florida State (Night) 

Oct. 11 North Carolina State 

Oct. 18 at Villanova 

Oct 25 at North Carolina 

Nov. l at Clemson 

Nov 15 Duke 

Nov. 22 at Auburn 

Nov. 27 at South Carolina 



1957 YARDSTICK 


WAKE 
FOREST 

First Downs 12 

Rushing yardage.... 85 
Passing yardage.... 88 

Passes 6 — 11 

Passes intercepted by 1 

Punts 6—34 

Fumbles lost 1 

Yards penalized .... 74 


MARYLAND 
16 
119 
193 
9—22 
1 
7—35 

89 
7 20—27 
0—0 


Wake Forest 


Maryland scoring: Touchdowns, Frit- 
sch (1, plunge) ; Forbes (1, plunge) ; 
Dare (19, pass-run from Rusevlyan) ; 
Verardi (61 pass-run from Lewis). 
Conversions, Fritsch (3). 







17 



MARYLAND vs N. C. STATE 27 SEPTEMBER 




2:00 P.M. (E.S.T.) 
at Riddick Stadium (19,000) 
Raleigh, N. C. 
FACTS ABOUT THE WOLFPACK 
CONFERENCE: Atlantic Coast 
LOCATION: Raleigh, N. C. 
HEAD COACH: Earle Edwards 
COLORS: Red and White 
ENROLLMENT: 5,800 
TYPE OFFENSE: Multiple 
1957 RECORD: Won 7, Lost 1, Tied 2; ACC 
Champions 



Coach Earle Edwards 



WOLFPACK'S RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS 

(Maryland: Won 6, Lost 5, Tied 3) 





Maryland 


N.C. State 




Maryland 


N.C. State 


1908 


6 


23 


1947 








1917 


6 


10 


1949 


14 


6 


1921 


6 


6 


1950 


13 


16 


1922 


7 


6 


1951 


53 





1923 


26 


12 


1954 


42 


14 


1924 





9 


1956 


25 


14 


1946 


7 


28 


1957 


13 


48 



TOTAL POINTS: Maryland 218, N. C. State 183 
1958 CAPTAIN: Bill Rearick 
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 16— Lost 18 





1958 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


20 at North Carolina 


Sept. 


27 Maryland 


Oct. 


4 at Virginia 


Oct. 


11 at Wake Forest 


Oct. 


18 at William and Mary 


Oct 


25 at Duke 


Nov. 


1 Virginia Teen 


Nov. 


8 Miss. Souther l at Mobile 


Nov. 


15 Clemson 


Nov. 


22 at South Carolina 



1957 YARDSTICK 



N.C. Mary- 
State land 

First downs 8 11 

Rushing yardage 178 71 

Passing yardage 64 94 

Passes 5-6 9-20 

Passes intercepted by 3 

Punts 4-41 6-30 

Fumbles lost 1 

Yards penalized 30 65 

Maryland 7 6—13 

N. C. State 7 14 14 13-^18 

Maryland scoring Touchdowns: Dare, 
Layman, conversions: Fritsch (1). 

N. C. State scoring touchdowns: 
Collar, Christy (3), Hunter, Trow- 
bridge. Read; conversions: Hunter (5), 
Lawrence 1. 



18 



MARYLAND vs CLEMSON 4 OCTOBER 

BAND DAY 

1:30 P.M. (E.D.T.) 

at Byrd Stadium (35,000) 

College Park, Md. 

FACTS ABOUT THE TIGERS 

CONFERENCE: Atlantic Coast 

LOCATION: Clemson, S. C. 

HEAD COACH: Frank Howard 

COLORS: Purple and Orange 

ENROLLMENT: 3-500 

TYPE OFFENSE: Split-T 

1957 RECORD: Won 7, Lost 3, Tied 

Coach Frank Howard 




TIGERS' RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS 

(Maryland Won 4, Lost 1, Tied 1) 

Maryland Clemson 

1952 28 

1953 20 

1954 16 

1955 25 12 

1956 6 6 

1957 7 26 
TOTAL POINTS: Maryland 102, Clemson 44 

1958 CO-CAPTAINS: center Bill Thomas; fullback Rudy Hayes 
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 19— Lost 12 





1958 SCHEDULE 


Sept 


20 Virginia 


Sept 


27 North Carolina 


Oct. 


4 at Maryland 


Oct 


11 Vanderbilt at Nashville (night) 


Oct. 


23 at .South Carolina 


Nov. 


1 Wake Forest 


Nov. 


8 at Georgia Tech 


Nov. 


15 at N. C. State 


Nov. 


22 Boston College 


Nov. 


29 Furman 







1957 YARDSTICK 




First downs 

Rushing yardage ... 


Clem- 
son 
8 

202 
94 


Mary- 
land 
12 
222 
11 
2-14 

7-36.7 

80 
0—7 
6 20—26 
us : Ker- 
Fritsch. 
ns : Jor- 
e) ; Usry 
; Mathis 
nversions 


Passes-intercepted 


5-9 
2 
6-25.5 




5 


Yards penalized ... 
Maryland 


10 
7 
.00 


Maryland scoring — Touchdow 
shner (4, run). Conversion, 

Clemson scoring — Touchdow 

1 dan (64, run-pass from Whit 

(27, run) ; Spooner (2, run) 

(20, run-pass from White). Co 

Barbary, White. 



19 



MARYLAND vs TEXAS A & M 



II OCTOBER 




Coach Jim Myers 



PARENTS' DAY 
1:30 P.M. (E.D.T.) 
at Byrd Stadium (35,000) 
College Park, Md. 
FACTS ABOUT THE AGGIES 
CONFERENCE: Southwest 
LOCATION: College Station, Texas 
HEAD COACH: Jim Myers 
COLORS: Maroon and White 
ENROLLMENT: 7,000 (men only) 
TYPE OFFENSE: SingleWing 
1957 RECORD: Won 8, Lost 2 

(Los-t to Tenn. in 'Gator Bowl — 3-0) 



AGGIES' RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS 

(Maryland: Won 0, Lost 1, Tied 0) 



1957 



Maryland 
13 



Texas A&M 
21 



TOTAL POINTS: Maryland 13, Texas A&M 21 
1958 CAPTAIN: None selected 
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 16— Lost 14 





1958 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


20 Texas Tech at Dallas (Night) 


Sept. 


27 at Houston (Night) 


Oct. 


4 Missouri (Night) 


Oct. 


11 at Maryland 


Oct. 


18 TCU 


Oct. 


25 at Baylor (Night) 


Nov. 


1 Arkansas (Night) 


Nov. 


8 SMU at Dallas 


Nov. 


15 at Rice 


Nov. 


27 at Texas 



1957 YARDSTICK 

Texas Mary- 
A&M land 

First downs 18 9 

Rushing yardage 244 123 

Passing yardage 97 3 

Passes attempted 12 1 

Passes completed 6 1 

Passes intercepted 1 1 

Punts 5 7 

Punting averages 35.4 27.9 

Fumbles 3 1 

Fumbles lost 1 1 

Yards penalized 90 42 

Maryland 7 6 — 13 

Texas A & M 7 14—23 

Maryland scoring: touchdowns — 
Lewis (3-yard run): Dare (2-yard 
plunge). Extra point — Fritsch. 

Texas A&M scoring touchdowns— 
Osborne (6-inch plunge) ; Tracey (7- 
yard pass from Osborne) ; Milstead (3- 
yard plunge). Extra point — Taylor, 3. 



20 



MARYLAND vs NORTH CAROLINA 

2:00 P.M. (E-S.T.) 

at Kenan Stadium (43,971) 

Chapel Hill, N. C. 

FACTS ABOUT THE TARHEELS 

CONFERENCE: Atlantic Coast 
LOCATION: Chapel Hill, N. C. 
HEAD COACH: James M. Tatum 
COLORS: Carolina Blue and White 
ENROLLMENT: 7,000 
TYPE OFFENSE: Split-T 
1957 RECORD: Won 6, Lost 4 



18 OCTOBER 




Coach Jim Tatum 



TARHEELS' RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS 

(Maryland: Won 9, Lost 13, Tied 1) 





Maryland 


N.C. 




Maryland 


N.C 


1920 


13 





1935 





33 


1921 


7 


16 


1936 





14 


1922 


3 


27 


1946 





13 


1923 


14 





1947 





19 


1924 


6 





1948 


20 


49 


1925 





16 


1950 


7 


7 


1926 


14 


6 


1951 


14 


7 


1927 


6 


7 


1953 


26 





1928 


19 


26 


1954 


33 





1929 





43 


1955 


25 


7 


1920 


21 


28 


1956 


>■■ 6 


34 








1957 


21 


7 



TOTAL POINTS: Maryland 255, North Carolina 359 

1958 CO-CAPTAINS: Tackle Phil Blazer and quarterback Curtis Hatha- 
way 
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 20— Lost 13 





1958 SCHEDULE 


Sept 


20 North Carolina State 


Sept 


27 at Clemson 


Oct. 


3 at Southern California (Night) 


Oct. 


11 South Carolina 


Oct. 


18 Maryland 


Oct. 


25 Wake Forest 


Nov. 


1 at Tennessee 


Nov. 


8 at Virginia 


Nov. 


15 at Notre Dame 


Nov. 


22 Duke 



1957 YARDSTICK 

N. C. Maryland 

First downs 10 13 

Rushing yardage 145 240 

Passing yardage .... 20 40 

Passes 2 — 12 5 — 17 

Passes Int. By 1 1 

Punts 9 — 39 6 — 38 

Fumbles lost 1 2 

Yards penalized 50 35 

North Carolina 7 0—7 

Maryland 7 14—21 

North Carolina scoring — Touchdowns: 
Goff (11 run) ; Conversions : Blazer. 

Maryland Scoring — Touchdowns 
Rusevlyan (1 foot plunge) ; Kershner, 
(81 run); Joyce (13 run). Conversions: 
Fritsch 2, Lewis. 



21 



MARYLAND vs AUBURN 25 OCTOBER 

2:00 P.M. (C.S.T.) 

Cliff Hare Stadium (35,000) 

at Auburn, Ala- 

FACTS ABOUT THE TIGERS 

CONFERENCE: Southeastern 
LOCATION: Auburn, Ala. 
HEAD COACH: Ralph Jordan 
COLORS: Burnt Orange and Navy Blue 
ENROLLMENT: 8,700 
TYPE OFFENSE: Split-T 
1957 RECORD: Won 10, Lost 
Coach Ralph Jordan 




TERPS RECORD AGAINST THE TIGERS 
(Maryland: Won 1, Lost 0, Tied 0) 

Maryland Auburn 

1952 13 7 

TOTAL POINTS: Maryland 13, Auburn 7 

1958 CAPTAIN: Lloyd Nix 

LETTERMEN RETURNING: 23— Lost 14 

1958 SCHEDULE 

Sept. 27 Tennessee at Birmingham 

Oct. 4 Chattanooga 

Oct. 11 at Kentucky 

Oct. 18 at Georgia Tech 

Oct. 25 Maryland 

Nov. 1 at Florida 

Nov. 8 Mississippi State 

Nov. 15 Georgia at Columbus, Ga. 

Nov. 22 Wake Forest 

Nov. 29 Alabama at Birmingham 



22 



MARYLAND vs. SOUTH CAROLINA I NOVEMBER 



HOMECOMING 
1:30 P.M. (E.ST.) 
at Byrd Stadium (35,000) 
College Park, Md. 
FACTS ABOUT THE GAMECOCKS 
CONFERENCE: Atlantic Coast 
LOCATION: Columbia, S. C. 
HEAD COACH: Warren Giese 
COLORS: Garnet and Black 
ENROLLMENT: 5,000 
TYPE OFFENSE: Split T 
1957 RECORD: Won 5, Lost 5 




Coach Warren Giese 



GAMECOCKS' RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS 

(Maryland: Won 9, Lost 5, Tied 0) 





Maryland 


S.C. 




Maryland 


S.C 


1926 





12 


1948 


19 


7 


1927 


26 





1949 


44 


7 


1928 


7 


21 


1953 


24 


6 


1929 





26 


1954 


20 





1945 


19 


13 


1955 


27 





1946 


17 


21 


1956 





13 


1947 


19 


13 


1957 


10 


6 



TOTAL POINTS: Maryland 222, South Carolina 145 
1958 CO-CAPTAINS: King Dixon, Alex Hawkins, Dwight Keith 
LETTERMEN RETURN I NG : 24— Lost 12 

k 





1958 SCHEDULE 


Sept 


20 Duke (Night) 


Sept. 


27 at Army 


Oct. 


4 at Georgia 


Oct. 


11 at North Carolina 


Oct. 


23 Clemson 


Nov 


1 at Maryland 


Nov. 


8 at Furman 


Nov. 


15 Virginia 


Nov. 


22 N. C. State 


Nov. 


27 Wake Forest 



1957 YARDSTICK 



South Mary- 
Carolina land 

First downs 10 14 

Rush yardage 161 191 

Passing yardage 52 23 

Passes 4-7 2-6 

Passes intercepted 1 

Punts , 1-29.0 5-33.2 

Yards penalized 6-40 9-70 

Fumbles 3 2 

Maryland , 3 7—10 

South Carolina 6 0—6 

Maryland scoring: Touchdowns — 
Joyce (run, 1-yard). Field Goal — 
Fritsch (24-yard placement). Point 
after touchdown — Fritsch (placement). 

South Carolina scoring: Touchdown — 
Dixon (run, 3 yards). 



23 



MARYLAND vs NAVY 8 NOVEMBER 

2:00 P.M. (E.S.T.) 
at Memorial Stadium (50,000) 

Baltimore, Md. 
FACTS ABOUT THE MIDDIES 
CONFERENCE: Eastern Intercollegiate 
LOCATION: Annapolis, Md. 
HEAD COACH: Eddie Erdelatz 
COLORS: Navy Blue and Gold 
ENROLLMENT: 3,800 (men) 
TYPE OFFENSE: T and Split-T 
1957 RECORD: Won 8, Lost 1, Tied 1 

Won Cotton Bowl, 20-7, over Rice 
Coach Eddie Erdelatz 




MIDDIES' RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS 

(Maryland: Won 4, Lost 10, Tied 0) 





Maryland 


Navy 




Maryland 


Navy 


1905 





17 


1930 





6 


1906 


2 


12 


1931 


6 





1907 





12 


1932 


7 


28 


1908 





57 


1934 


13 


16 


1913 





76 


1950 


35 


21 


1916 


7 


14 


1951 


40 


21 


1917 





62 


1952 


38 


7 



TOTAL POINTS: Maryland 148, Navy 349 
1958 CAPTAIN: Dick Dagampat 
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 13— Lost 17 

1958 SCHEDULE 

Sept. 27 William & Mary 

Oct. 4 at Boston U. 

Oct. 11 at Michigan 

Oct. 18 Tulane at Norfolk 

Oct. 25 at Pennsylvania 

Nov. 1 at Notre Dame 

Nov. 8 at Maryland (Baltimore) 

Nov. 15 at George Washington 

Nov. 29 Army 



24 



MARYLAND vs MIAMI . . . 14 NOVEMBER 

8:15 PI. (E.S.T.) 

at Orange Bowl Stadium (76,000) 

Miami, Fla. 

FACTS ABOUT THE HURRICANES 

CONFERENCE: Independent 
LOCATION: Coral Gables, Fla. 
HEAD COACH: Andy Gustafson 
COLORS: Orange, Green and White 
ENROLLMENT: 13,364 
TYPE OFFENSE: Miami Drive Series 
1957 RECORD: Won 5, Lost 4, Tied 1 

Coach Gustafson 




HURRICANES' RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS 

(Maryland: Won 4, Lost 2, Tied 0) 



1948 
1949 
1953 
1954 
1956 
1957 



Maryland 


Miami 


27 


13 


13 





30 





7 


9 


6 


13 


16 


6 



TOTAL POINTS: Maryland 99, Miami 39 
1958 CAPTAIN: Joe Plevel 
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 17— Lost 5 





1958 SCHEDULE 


Oct. 


26 Wisconsin 


Oct 


4 at Baylor 


Oct. 


10 at LSU 


Oct. 


25 at Boston College 


Oct. 


31 Vanderbilt 


Nov. 


7 Florida State 


Nov. 


14 Maryland 


Nov. 


21 Houston 


Nov. 


29 at Florida 


Dec. 


6 U. of Oregon 



1957 YARDSTICK 



Maryland Miami 

First downs 18 15 

Rushing yardage 143 209 

Passing yardage 118 81 

Passes 11-17 9-17 

Passes intercepted 1 

Punts 3-27.3 3-31.7 

Fumbles 1 1 

Yards penalized 90 106 

Maryland 10 6 0—16 

Miami 6 0—6 

Maryland scoring: Touchdowns — Perlo 
(2, plunge) : Dare (1, pass from 
Rusevlyan). Conversion ■ — Rusevlyan. 
Field goal — Fritsch. 

Miami Scoring : Touchdown — Varone 
(7, run). 



25 



MARYLAND vs VIRGINIA 



22 NOVEMBER 

2:00 P.M. (E-S.T.) 

at Scott Stadium (30.000) 

Charlottesville, Va. 

FACTS ABOUT THE CAVALIERS 

CONFERENCE: Atlantic Coast 

LOCATION: Charlottesville, Va. 

HEAD COACH: Dick Voris 

COLORS:: Orange and Blue 

ENROLLMENT: 4,500 

TYPE OFFENSE: Spilt-T 

1957 RECORD: Won 3, Lost 6, Tied 1 



Coach Richard Voris 

CAVALIERS' RECORD AGAINST THE TERPS 
(Maryland: Won 11, Lost 9, Tied 2) 








Maryland 


Virginia 




Maryland 


Virginia 


1919 




13 







1935 




14 


7 


1925 









6 


1936 




21 





1926 




6 




6 


1937 




3 





1927 









21 


1938 




19 


27 


1928 




18 




2 


1939 




7 


12 


1929 




13 




13 


1940 




6 


19 


1930 




14 




6 


1942 




27 


12 


1931 




7 




6 


1943 







39 


1932 




6 




7 


1944 




7 


18 


1933 









6 


1945 




19 


13 


1934 




20 







1957 




12 





TOTAL 


POINTS: 


Maryland 232, 


Virginia 


220 






1957 


CO-CAPTAINS: 


Reece Whitley and 


Frank 


Call 




LETTERMEN RETURNING: 14— Lost 11 











1958 SCHEDULE 




Sept. 


20 at Clemson 




Sept 


27 Duke 




Oct. 


4 North Carolina State 




Oct. 


11 VPI at Roanoke 




Oct. 


18 at Army 




Oct. 


25 at Vanderbilt 




Nov. 


1 VMI at Norfolk 




Nov. 


8 North Carolina 




Nov. 


15 at South Carolina 




Nov 


22 Maryland 





1957 YARDSTICK 

Maryland Virginia 

First downs 11 8 

Yards Rushing 163 25 

Forward attempts 13 22 

Forward completed .... 4 8 

Yards passing 48 101 

Total yards 211 126 

Passes intercepted 4 1 

Punt average 36 30 

Fumbles recovered 2 

Yards Penalized 25 30 

Virginia — 

Maryland 6 6—12 

Maryland touchdowns Rusevlyan (3 
run i; Scotti (6. pass from Rusevlyan). 



26 



OPPONENTS' OUTLOOK 
Wake Forest 

By MARVIN FRANCIS 

The off-season football drills at Wake Forest produced restrained 
optimism among coaches who suffered through 10 consecutive defeats 
last season. Head Coach Paul Amen readily admits he expects a sub- 
stantial improvement and even says the spring squad would push the 
1957 varsity "right off the field." But Amen also strikes a significant 
note of caution when he says, "We must be careful that we don't be- 
come overenthusiastic over our possibilities." 

Amen stresses that the 1958 Deacon squad will probably be the most 
inexperienced in the ACC. Asked to spell out the amount of improve- 
ment which may reasonably be expected, Amen says, "It will be rela- 
tive- We'll definitely be better but we were so far behind last season 
that it's a question of whether we can move far enough to catch up 
with the other teams. I'm just not sure." 

The Wake Forest mentor calls the Deacons' passing offense and 
defense, which was woefully weak last fall, "infinitely better." The 
offensive improvement he credits to quarterbacks Charlie Carpenter 
and soph Norman Snead. Carpenter, the No. 2 passer in the ACC in 
1956 was forced to miss the entire 1957 campaign after undergoing 
surgery for a ruptured spinal disc, was a standout in the spring drills. 
Snead, an outstanding high school performer at Warwick, Va., threw 
9 touchdown passes for the Wake Forest freshmen last fall. 

To help improve end play Amen shifted junior Pete Manning, the 
No. 2 fullback last season, to a flank position. Barry Hines, another 
letterman who missed the 1957 season due to an injury, is expected to 
be ready this fall. 

The interior line play "should be more rugged" Amen says. Bob 
Smith and Bob McCreary are two very promising sophomore tackles. 
Co-Capt. Frank Thompson and Eddie Ladd are the only lettermen re- 
turning at the tackle slot. 

Hughie Lewis, Nick Patella and Bruce Smathers are the veteran 
guards. Tom Spicer, who did not play last season, along with letter- 
men Buck Jolly and Karl Munn will make center strong. 

Fullback Neil MacLean, the club's leading ground-gainer last fall, 
could easily be one of the standout runners in the South this year. 
He'll be supported by non-letterman Kenny Ferrell and soph Joe 
Bonecutter, a standout for the frosh in 1957. 

There should be excellent depth at the halfback posts. Jim Dal- 
rymple, last year's No. 1 QB is back at his old left half slot- Buster 
Ledford, George Parsha and Larry Brooks are all lettermen. Sophs 
Bobby Robinson, Winston Futch and Carl Blum will push the veterans 
for starting assignments. 

^Sorth Carolina State 

By BILL HENSLEY 

"Our prospects are a cloudy issue," Coach Earle Edwards says. "We 
lost 18 boys from last year's championship team, including some of our 

27 



most prominent players." 

Edwards cites heavy personnel losses and inexperience as the main 
reasons for the not-too-clear outlook for '58. "We lost eight of our 
eleven starters," he explains, "and 16 of our first 22. That leaves a 
lot of gaps to be filled." 

Edwards says it's a cinch that this year's team won't be able to 
match the '57 squad in experience, a major factor in the success of any 
team. "Our success will have to depend upon the play of the new- 
comers," the Wolfpack coach declared. 

On a 68-man squad, State has 45 sophomores, 11 juniors and 12 sen- 
iors. That breakdown explains Edwards' outlook on the '58 season. 

Despite the heavy sprinkling of rookies throughout the squad, 
Edwards is not pessimistic. "I think we could have a good team," he 
vows, "and I'm fairly confident as I look forward to '58. However, I 
fully realize that a good season, won and lost-wise, depends upon the 
strength of the opponents- We have ten tough ones coming up, in- 
cluding all seven of our Atlantic Coast Conference foes." 

On the credit side of the ledger is the possibility of having a letter- 
man at each position on the probable starting team, since 16 monogram 
wearers will return this fall. 

The '58 Wolfpack, the fifth under the Edwards regime, will be 
sparked by end Bob Pepe, guards Bill Rearick and Joe Rodri and half- 
back Ken Trowbridge, four players who appear as the best bets for 
grabbing the headlines. 

Trowbridge and right halfback Ron Podwika have the unenviable 
task of taking over in the absence of All-America Dick Christy and 
speedy Dick Hunter, two of the finest halfbacks in Wolfpack history. 

The starting lineup at the end of a successful spring practice, which 
was hampered only by bad weather, had Pepe and Jim Crain at ends, 
Fran Palandrani and Larry Dixon at tackles, Rearick and Rodri at 
guards, and Paul Balonick at center. The backfield included Ernie 
Driscoll at quarterback, Trowbridge and Podwika at halfback and 
hard-running Don Hafer at fullback. All are lettermen. 

Other lettermen who figure prominently in Edwards' plans are 
tackles John Lawrence and Kelly Minyard, guards Frank Marocco and 
Jim Sherron and quarterback Frank Cackovic. Non-lettermen are end 
Finley Read, guard Bill McClain, center Ron Savage, halfbacks Bernie 
Latusick and Ken Nye and fullback Arnold Nelson. 

The team has good size in the line and speed in the backfield plu? 
a competitive spirit which reached new heights last fall when the 
Wolfpack won seven games, lost only one and tied two. "The returnees 
have played under pressure," Edwards said, "and know what it takes 
to have a winner. If our newcomers do the job I think they're ca- 
pable of, our season could be a successful one." 

Several changes have been made in State's colorful multiple of- 
fense which stepped-up the attack. The defense, a strong point last 
year, also looked good during spring practice. 

Clemson College 

By BOB BRADLEY 

Coach Frank Howard has 19 lettermen in the fold for his 19th sea- 
son.. Eight of them are at two positions (halfback and fullback) while 

28 



the other 11 lettermen are divided among the remaining five spots. 

There is one returnee that many coaches would trade three lettermen 
for just to get his right arm. He's Harvey White who made every all- 
conference team as a sophomore and set school and ACC records right 
and left in his march as the top first-year-man in the loop. 

But White isn't by himself in the backfield. There is plenty of talent 
there. Howard himself is the first to admit that White & Company is 
probably the best backfield material he's had at Clemson since he 
turned head coach in February, 1940. 

At the two halfback positions there are five lettermen — and a few 
promising sophomores. Back are Bob Chatlin, Charlie Home, Bill Math- 
is, Sonny Quesenberry and George Usry. Home is the only senior in the 
group but he is the leading ground gainer returning (335 yards in 70 
carries). 

Better than five yard averages are owned by Usry (5.4), Mathis (5.7) 
and Chatlin (5.8) as sophomores. And three fullbacks — two seniors and 
a junior — gained 509 yards in 106 attempts (4.8) last season. Doug Cline 
(37-185-5.0), the junior, is sandwiched in between Rudy Hayes (54-269- 
4.9) and Mike Dukes (15-55-3.6). 

That's the letterman crop in the backfield. But who's backing up 
these ball carriers? 

Behind White is sophomore Lowndes Shingler who played with Har- 
vey in high school and who is said to possess considerable promise. 
Showing well in the spring game was non-letterman junior Johnnie 
MacGoff who teams with White and Shingler to give the Tigers a trio 
of talented signal callers. 

Trying to crash through the halfback sound barrier are Harold Smith, 
Herby Burnette, Tyson Leonard, Bob Morgan Roger Hough and Doug 
Daigneault. All but the latter are sophomores. 

Hayes, Cline and Dukes will make the fullback spot crowded, but 
willing to show their wares are Jerry Golden, Jack Sloan, and Carroll 
Herr, all sophomores also. 

Three lettermen flankmen — Wyatt Cox, Ray Masneri and Jack Webb 
— give a pretty good start. 

Bobby DeBardelaben, Leroy Ednie and George Tupper have all seen 
non-lettering varsity time at end. 

Tackle is short on experience. Senior letterman Jim Padgett, junior 
monogramer Harold Olson and Donnie Meador, a junior non-letterer, 
are it. 

Guard worries Howard the most, especially on the right side of the 
line. Letterman Jim Payne apparently has the left side taken care of 
with backing from sophomores Larry Wagner, Don Harro and Calvin 
West. Dave Lynn ran on the first unit in the spring. 

There's one hope that guard will be strengthened if letterman Jim 
McCanless can play. McCanless, who played guard his sophomore year 
and tackle the next, suffered a neck injury last summer and was un- 
able to play in '57. 

There is right much experience at center with state blocking trophy 
winner Bill Thomas head and shoulders above everybody else. Senior 
non-letterman Joe Pilot showed exceptional progress in the spring. 

Howard said following spring drills that he believes he knows just 
where every boy can play — through three deep — with the exception of 
right guard. He definitely feels the backfield will be as good or better 

29 



next fall but doesn't expect such big strides of improvement as in '57. 
"Most of those backs last year were sophomores and they had room 
for improvement," he says. "Now they know a little bit about football 
and their enthusiasm will carry them more than their progress. I think 
we are capable of having an 8-2 season." 

Texas A & M 

By JONES RAMSEY 

The thinnest Aggie team in four years will make the changeover from 
the split T to the single wingback this fall under the guidance of 
Jim Myers, new A & M coach who replaced Paul Bryant last January. 
The 1958 Aggies will be as inexperienced as Bryant's first year team 
in 1954. That club had 26 players on the roster. Myers' team has more 
quantity but no more football players. Myers calls his 1958 club "the 
most inexperienced I have ever seen." 

At the conclusion of spring training only three players could feel 
fairly sure of starting berths — end John Tracey, tackle Ken Beck and 
back Richard Gay, all seniors and two-year lettermen and the only top 
players from the 1955 freshman crop. 

Seven starters are missing from the 1957 team that won eight in 
a row and was No. 1 in the nation for three weeks. The '57 team was 
thin but not like the current one. After those eight wins the Aggies 
ran out of gas and lost three games by one, two and three points. 
Among the missing are 14 lettermen including the top three halfbacks — 
Heisman trophy recipient John Crow, Loyd Taylor and Bobby Conrad; 
Quarterbacks Roddy Osborne and Jimmy Wright; all conference end 
Bobby Marks; all-America tackle Charley Krueger who averaged 
55 minutes per game; Center John Gilbert who played over 50 minutes 
per game and six others off the second and third units. 

The current Aggie team lacks depth everywhere and doesn't have 
the team speed of the last two seasons but possibly will have a better 
passing and kicking game. The running is doubtful at this stage be- 
cause the backs were so far ahead of the linemen in the spring drills. 

Two "castoffs" who returned in the spring after missing the 1957 
season hold the key to much of the team's success. They are Backs Ed 
Dudley and Luther Hall, both of whom looked promising in the spring. 
Dudley lettered as a sophomore halfback in 1955, played but didn't 
letter in 1956 and didn't report in 1957. Hall played but not enough 
to letter in 1956 and didn't play last year. Dudley proved himself a good 
runner from the tailback slot this spring and nailed down the No. 2 
spot behind Charley Milstead. Hall, given a try at tailback, will be 
given a chance at fullback this fall. Myers is counting heavily on these 
players and says a "come-through" performance by both is a must. 

North Carolina 

By JAKE WADE 

The Tar Heels in their second year under Jim Tatum as head coach, 
began to move in 1957. 
They turned out a surprisingly fine record of 6-4. Their wins were 

30 



over otherwise undefeated Navy, Clemson, South Carolina, Miami, 
arch-rival Duke and Wake Forest. 

They lost to N. C. State, Maryland, Virginia and Tennessee- 

This very fine team has suffered the losses of several key men, in- 
cluding end and Co-Captain Buddy Payne, All-ACC and the team's 
leading pass catcher; center Jim Jones, halfback Ron Marquette, and 
tackle Stuart Pell. 

The Tar Heels of 1958 shape up as better in the backfield with more 
speed at halfback, more consistency at fullback and more experience 
at quarterback. Also, the team seems to have lost its "defeatest atti- 
tude," having shown great spirit and esprit de corps in spring practice. 

Quarterbacking is in wonderful hands. Jack Cummings heads a re- 
markable crew of young signal callers. At most of the other positions 
there seems to be improvement. 

As the result of such keen competition for positions, absence of sev- 
eral candidates from spring practice because of injuries and temporary 
ineligibility and other factors, coaches could not definitely pick a 44- 
man varsity squad or designate a depth chart that did not stand to be 
radically revised in the fall. 

At the end of spring practice, however, the tentative top men: 

Left End: Schroeder, Crist, Riggs, Detanna. 

Left Tackle: *Blazer, R. Smith, *Steele, Crabtree. 

Left Guard: *Swearingen, Russell, Massey, Kordalski. 

Center: *Koes, Hawkins, Nead, Hardison. 

Right Guard: Mueller, Branson, Eanes, Wooldridge. 

Right Tackle: *Redding, Butler, Bardy, Joy. 

Right End: *Kemper, *Goldstein, Rice, B. Smith. 

Quarterback: * Cummings, Lowe, Clements, Hollers. 

Left Halfback. *Schuler, *W. Smith, *DeCantis, M. Smith. 

Right Halfback: *Goff, Droze, Folckomer, Sloop. 

Fullback: *Coker, Shupin, Lipski, Wall- 

Auburn 

By BILL BECKWITH 

Coach Ralph Jordan says — 

"We should have another good Auburn football team in 1958, com- 
parable to the teams we've fielded since 1953 (39-9-2). 

"Losses from the 1957 National Championship team were extremely 
severe, losing six of our 11 starters, and five of the second unit men. 
Starters lost through graduation were All-American End Jimmy Phillips, 
All SEC Fullback Billy Atkins, Second String All-SEC Guard Tim 
Baker, Third String All-SEC Left Tackle Ben Preston, Right Tackle 
Dan Presley, and Righthalf Bobby Hoppe. From the second unit, we lost 
Right End John Whatley, Center Billy Austin, Right Guard Jeff Week- 
ley, Left Tackle James Warren, and Lefthalf Pat Meagher. 

"Compared with the 1957 team, we are weaker at fullback, right 
guard, and right end. The other positions return veterans or promising 
newcomers. Fullback seems to be the most questionable position and 
might hold the key to our success. 

"Individual positional problems have a tendency of working them- 
selves out. We will have the biggest psychological problem of any team 
in the nation however. Winning the mythical National Football Cham- 

31 



pionship leaves us in a position of little room for improvement. Also, 
we are on the spot and will be the chief target of the ten teams we 
face during the coming season. 

"Offensively, we have two proven quarterbacks in Lloyd Nix and 
Bryant Harvard (one-two in 1957) . . . Versatility in Halfbacks Tommy 
Lorino, Lamar Rawson, and Bobby Lauder . . . Stronger tackles in Jim 
Jeffery, Ted Foret, Cleve Wester, and Ken Paduch, and outstanding 
sophomores Ken Rice and Leon Myers ... A proven guard, Zeke 
Smith . . . Strong ends in Jerry Wilson, Leo Sexton, Bobby Wasden. and 
Mike Simmons, and a promising newcomer in Joe Leichtnam . . . Strong 
in starter Jackie Burkett at center but lacking in reserves. 

"Defensively, we couldn't hope to be as strong as 1957 when we were 
the nation's leader . . . The secondary will be near— par with experience 
iij^Nix, Lorino, Harvard, Rawson, Lauder . . . Guard and tackle play 
will be about the same, but losing Phillips at right end will be tre- 
mendous — plus the linebacking of Atkins." 



University of South Carolina 

By DON BARTON 

Although he considered spring football practice sessions highly satis- 
factory and propitious, South Carolina's head coach Warren Giese still 
cites several problems that must be solved before his 1958 Gamecocks 
can cope with the ten rugged opponents on the schedule. 

Giese calls this "the most experienced team I've had at Carolina," 
but he adds that "simply having a lot of lettermen doesn't necessarily 
indicate a strong position." 

If the Gamecock coach were asked to point to the brighter aspects of 
his 1958 team, he would mention his terrific halfback twosome of Alex 
Hawkins and King Dixon, along with a supply of promising tackles. 

Coach Giese comments,"I believe we will be just as good offensively 
as we were in 1957 (set a new school scoring record of 202 points), and 
our defense could be somewhat better." 

To mold his 1958 team Giese will have 24 lettermen from the 1957 
squad, while the losses amount to 12 lettermen, including first-stringers 
Julius Derrick at end, Addison and Weston at guard and Don Johnson 
at fullback. 

At the end of spring practice the outlook by positions was as follows: 

At left end Jim Duncan, who finished the season as a starter in 1957, 
has held on to the post, but fast-improving Buddy Mayfield and Eddie 
Beall, who started some games last year, are close on his heels. 

At right end Weems Baskin, who also started some last fall, must 
ward off the challenges of junior letterman Bucky Walker, and a big 
sophomore named Jack Pitt. 

Don Rogers remains atop the left tackle position. 

At right tackle Ed Pitts, a rough junior from Clinton, has moved 
ahead of capable John Kompara, but the final word hasn't been said 
at the position. 

Corky Gaines, senior letterman, held a slight edge over 220-pound 
junior Jack Ashton at left guard, and this position supplied another 
pleasant sophomore surprise in Ken Derriso. 

Jimmy Merck, only 190 pounds but quick, is the only letterman at 

32 



right guard, and his relief must come from sophomores. 

Two returning lettermen who battled for the starting position last 
year, Lawton Rogers and Dwight Keith, are again in hot pursuit of the 
center post. 

At quarterback, Bobby Bunch, the regular last year before he injured 
a shoulder after the fourth game of the season, is back and apparently 
solid again, and his 1957 successor, Stan Spears, heads into his junior 
year as a stronger contender. 

Lettermen W. L. Strickland and Steve Satterfield, two juniors, and 
sophomore Harvey Shiflet strengthened the ranks. 

Dixon is entrenched in the left-half position, and Hawkins at right 
half, is described by Giese "as good on all-around halfback as any in 
the country." 

Behind Dixon is Joe. Gomes, a junior singled-out by Giese as the 
squad's most-improved player, and sophomore Steve Kopian, progressing 
well. Hawkins' replacements are John Dorsett and Ken Norton. 

Giese considers his fullback position better, as far as running is con- 
cerned with bullish John Saunders and Phil Lavoie running one-two. 

U. S, Naval Academy 

By JOHN T. COX 

Due to heavy graduation losses, this will be a rebuilding year at 
Navy. Seven of last year's starters, six from the second unit and five 
members of the third team are missing from the '57 squad which won 
eight, lost one (North Carolina) and tied one (Duke) during the regular 
season, and defeated Rice 20-7 in the Cotton Bowl. 

Line starters graduating in June were Pete Jokanovich, one of the na- 
tion's leading pass-catchers last season; Tony Anthony, Tony Stremic, 
selected as the "outstanding lineman" in the Cotton Bowl game; Wayne 
McKee, QB Tom Forrestal, who made several All-American selections 
and was voted the "outstanding back" in the Cotton Bowl; HB Ned 
Oldham, the team's leading ground-gainer in '55 and '56 and who scored 
every point in Navy's 14-0 win over Army, and HB Harry Hurst, who 
nosed out Oldham as the team's leading ground-gainer in '57. 

"The Fleet is going to have a good football team next season," Coach 
Eddie Erdelatz says in listing his losses. "Some mighty fine football 
players graduated and it's going to be tough to replace them." 

Top holdovers are All-American tackle Bob Reifsnyder, who is "20 
percent better than he was last Fall," according to Erdelatz; Captain 
Dick Dagampat, fullback converted to halfback, who missed the last 
half of the '57 season due to a knee injury; center Milan Moncilovich, 
guard George Fritzinger, end John Kanuch, and fullback Ray Wellborn, 
who was selected as the "outstanding back of the week" by the As- 
sociated Press after he had scored three touchdowns against Notre 
Dame. , , ... 

Joe Tranchini, who has moved into the No. 1 quarterback spot with 
the graduation of Tom Forrestal. Larry Boyer, No. 2 right tackle last 
year has been switched to left tackle in a move which Erdelatz terms 
"very successful." Three reserve halfbacks of the '57 team — Dick Zem- 
brzuski, Roland Brandquist and Bob Correll— along with Dagampat fi- 
gure to fill the big gaps left at the halfback spots. 
(Continued on page 36) 

33 



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(Continued from page 33) 

Most promising newcomers up from last year's Navy plebe team which 
had a 4-2 record are FB Joe Matalavage, hard-hitting 195-pound full- 
back; HB Joe Bellino, heralded 185-pounder who averaged 20 yards 
per carry for the plebes last Fall; HB John Prichard, one of the stars 
of Navy's final spring practice scrimmage, and Ronald Erchul, 6:3, 222- 
pound sophomore tackle. 

"Our first two units were very close throughout the spring drills. In 
fact, they were even-up after several scrimmages. There was pressure 
at just about every position" Erdelatz explained. 

The Navy coach definitely plans to use unit substitution, "regardless 
of the situation. Football has ceased to be an 11-man game," he said. 

University of Miami 

By GEORGE GALLET 

Granting that experience is one of the major factors in moulding a 
successful football team, it'll have to be conceded that the University 
of Miami is one of the teams which is in position to move into the na- 
tion's spotlight this fall. 

It's a team rich in experience, blooming from a sophomore-studded 
ball club of last year, which had a 5-4-1 record, held foes to under 100 
yards per game on the ground to rank second only to mighty Auburn 
in ground defense and weren't exactly helpless in air defense. 

For this club, Miami retains 9 of 11 starters, including the fabulous 
Fran Curci, quarterback, and from the alternate team only a few ad- 
ditional players are missing. The open spots could be filled from re- 
turning reserves — however, some rugged sophomores have bobbled up 
from one of the better U-Miami frosh aggregations in recent years. 

Coach Andy Gustafson this fall will have depth on the U-M team, 
something he lacked last year. He won't have the problem which faced 
him in 1957 when it was necessary to toss a flood of sophomores into 
the breach before they were ready. 

This fall with plenty of vets around to man the first two teams, the 
more talented sophs can be infiltrated with only a minimum of pressure 

Defensively, Miami should be strong against ground attack and pretty 
tough against aerials. Offensively, the ground game could be real potent 
and the passing, just fair last year, should move up several notches. 

The all— American selectors may find two names with which to con- 
jure in the Miami lineup. Fran Curci, the fabulous little quarterback, 
received enough votes as a sophomore last year to earn an honorable 
mention rating on the 1957 ail-American team. 

With a year's experience on the varsity, Curci should be one of the 
truly greats of this land this fall and move in line for all-American 
honors. His southpaw passing is dangerous, his running of the option 
play out of this world because of his amazing split second timing. On 
defense, he's a great ball hawk against aerial bombs. He's called by 
Coach Andy Gustafson a greater player today than he was last fall. 

Up front, Miami has a brilliant all-American tackle candidate in Gary 
Greaves, who, in two seasons of play, has made more tackles than any 
other Miami tackle made in three years of competition. 

36 



Greaves, who, in two seasons of play, has made more tackles than 
any other Miami tackle made in three years of competition. 

Captain Joe Plevel, who is the other half of the famous Miami lateral 
combination, Curci to Plevel, is expected to have his best year at left 
halfback. "Joltin Joe" is murder on sweeps. 

Miami has two brilliant sophomore fullback prospects this fall in Jim 
Stevens and Frank Bouffard. They appear to be the sophs who should 
click first this fall. They have been waging a tremendous battle at full- 
back and Miami's strength in this position may well be awesome. 

University of Virginia 

By DICK TURNE.R 

For the second time in three years the University of Virginia 
approaches a football season with a completely new coaching staff. 

Dick Voris, line coach and chief assistant to Colonel Earl Blaik at 
Army for the past three years, arrived in February to take over for 
Ben Martin, who moved on to the Air Force Academy. 

It was a sudden change, but spring practice started on the designated 
date and ended on schedule with a 26-7 win over alumni opposition in 
the annual spring game. About spring practice and the season ahead, 
Voris said: 

"We accomplished a great deal during spring practice, with defensive 
improvement being our main objective." 

"We have a few very capable juniors and seniors and are hopeful 
that some of our new boys will be heard from, but we are a long way 
from being prepared to cope with Clemson's superior material and 
experience in our opener." 

The 14 returning lettermen include seven usual game starters of the 
'57 season. They are Reece Whitley, quarterback; Rip Moser and Tom- 
my iGravins, halfbacks; Dave Graham, end; Frank Call and Jim 
McShane, guards; and Bob Canevari, center. Special mention goes to 
Whitley and Call, co-captains for '58, and Graham. 

The missing regulars — forming a big four — are Fred Polzer, the 
ACC's leading pass catcher for the past two years; Jim Keyser and 
Harold Outten, big line fixtures for three seasons, and Jim Bakhtiar, 
of AU-American fullback fame. 

The other returning lettermen are Bob Williams, end; George Sem- 
peles, tackle; and Alvin Cash, Jim Roberson, Duane Shelton, Ulmo 
Randle and Alan Reynolds, backs- 

Non-lettering members of the '57 squad who will figure in game 
action next season include Mike Riley and Smythe Wood, ends; Irvin 
Shendow, Wayne Whelan, Frank Kessler and Bob Carlisle, tackles; 
Charles Tingley, guard; Bob Edwards, center; and Fred Russell, Bob 
Davids, Mike Scott, and Jack Gravins, backs. 

The most prominent members of the new sophomore class appear 
to be Maynard Rice and Brerry Jones, ends; Frank Hamilton and Louis 
Martig, guards; John Marlow, tackle, and Arnold Dempsey and John 
Barger, backs. Martig and Barger are the brightest prospects for the 
first team, with Barger going at fullback. 

37 



Terp Thumbnail Sketches 



ENDS 



BEN SCOTTI, 21, 6-1, 185, Senior from Long Branch, N J. — the Terps for years have 
had.' a steady parade of fine ends, but Ben Scotti is considered one of the all-time 
best . . . the fiery flankman starts his third season as the Terps' number one right 
end ... he had a sensational freshman year and has come through with two brilliant 
varsity seasons ... he is being hailed as the top all-around end in the Conference 
. . . works seriously and magnificently as he is all business on the field, both in 
practice and in a game ... is outstanding defensively and excels equally offensively 
. . . does a great job blocking and has tremendous speed and maneuverability when 
out on a pass play . . . has a real sure pair of hands . . . he is leading returning 
pass receiver, having caught seven last year for 88 yards and one score . . . has ex- 
ceptional desire and eagerness . . . one of the games' most aggressive ends . . . 
. . . Coach Mont labels him probably the most aggressive . . . with another good 
year, the hard-working Scotti sure bet for high recognition . . . was all-State in 
high school . . . was also 175-pound state wrestling champion . . . was honorable 
mention all-Catholic. all-American in football ... in School of Arts and Science 

RONALD SHAFFER, 20, 6-2, 205, Junior from Cumberland, Md. — comes from what 
is generally considered one of the finest high schools in the State, Fort Hill, and defi- 
nitely one that year in and year out produces top-flight college football prospects under 
the capable tutelage of Coach Bill Hahn . . . the strapping young star for the Ter- 
rapins came through last fall as predicted by coaching staff and had a great year 
as a soph . . . divided the left end chores with big Ed Cooke, now graduated . . . 
Shaffer looked better than ever in spring drills and is slated for a big year as top 
man on the left side ... a fine blocker with real good speed and a defensive demon 
... is a strong and sure tackier ... his speed and finesse makes him a dangerous 
pass receiving threat ... a fine receiver ... is one of the juniors who bear close 
watching for top performances . . . made a great catch in the North Carolina game 
that kept Terps' first td march going . . . caught three for 23 yards during season 
. . . was all-City and honorable mention all-State ... in School of Education. 

BILL MARTIN, 22, 6-1, 200 Senior from Kittanning, Pa.— has been one of the Terps' 
hardest and most conscientious workers past two seasons . . . had a good spring 
practice to serve notice he wants the number two spot . . . the former Kittanning 
star has a fine pair of hands . . . has a great determination and desire . . . will 
help keep the Terp end position a good one . . . was all-section in football, basket- 
ball, and baseball in high school . . . Pre-Dent School . . . married. 

BILL STEPPE, 22, 6-1, 200, Senior from Cumberland, Md. — has come up with two 
good seasons and is slated for another in '58 . . . does a real good job both often- 
sively and defensively . . . more noticeable as a pass receiving threat . . . has the 
potential to give the boys in front of him a tough battle for their job . . . another 
serious hard worker . . . caught one for 19 yards last year . . . another product 
of Fort Hill high school . . . there he won the James Turner Memorial Award and 
the Hazelwood Award for his star career . . . was President of the National Honor 
Society ... in School of Education . . . married and has a daughter. 

VINCENT SCOTT, 19, 5-11, 195, Sophomore from Wilmington, Del — it is the usual 
custom for a coaching' staff to be moderate in their evaluation and use of adjectives 
on freshmen . . . this is caution . . . when a boy impresses during his freshman 
play he can be labeled as a good prospect . . . however, when a boy does what 
Vincent Scott did as a freshman, then in spring practice and finally is "Mr. Head- 
lines" in the windup Varsity-Alumni game played against 28 professional players, 
he MUST be considered a great prospect . . . that is exactly only moderate descrip- 
tion for Scott ... the most used long list of superlatives are certain to be written 
to describe the play of this boy ... he already has exhibited his great ability and 
is the type player that won't lose it . . . the former great from Salesianum High 
School was the big news of the Alumni game and was awarded for his showing 
against the pros and all-Americans with headlines and exciting copy on his play 
... he was called the most exciting player on the field, a fabulous compliment for 
a rookie ... he definitely is a future star for the Terps ... not only is he a 
brilliant end, but he possesses one of the nation's most reputable "kicking toes" 
... he already has become known far and wide for his fabulous place-kicking 
... he has hit from as far out as 45 yards and anything inside the 25-yard line 

38 



can almost be counted on for three points ... he booms his kickoffs into the end 
zone consistently . . . it is a rarity when the kickoff doesn't reach the goal line 
. . . Scott is tabbed for regular duty with the second unit and will keep pushing 
for a starting assignment . . . exceptionally serious. . . . very hard worker . . . 
tough defensively ... a real good receiver . . . caught the only pass thrown him 
in Alumni game . . . was all-State in 1955 and 1956 . . . was on the 5th all- 
American high school team in '56 as well as on the all-Catholic second team . . • 
a standout in baseball also in High School . . . played for Terp frosh nine after 
spring practice . . . also starred in track and basketball at Salesianum . . . defi- 
nitely one of Maryland's greatest end prospects ... in School of Business and 
Public Administration. 

ANTHONY SCOTTI, 19 f 6-1, 185, Sophomore from Long Branch, N. J. — brother of 
first team end Ben ... he too* is considered as another top-flight end for the Terps 
up from the freshman team . . . made a big impression for the baby Terps and came 
up with a most encouraging spring practice . . . was the top receiver for the frosn 
and is one of the strongest defensive players on the squad . . . like Ben, he is most 
aggressive . . . has a great deal of desire . . . fine blocker with real good speed 
. . . was all-State at St. Benedict's Prep in '56 . . . was all-City, all-Metropolitan, 
and all-County . . . also a member of the New Jersey AlU-Stars . . . was state 
heavyweight wrestling champion . . .one of the newcomers to watch closely as a 
future star for the Terp grid fortunes ... in School of Arts and Science. 

EDWARD BECKER, 19, 6-3, 195, Sophomore from Quakertown, Pa. — still another 
outstanding end candidate up from the freshman team . . . made an indelible im- 
pression for the frosh . . . has one of the finest pair of hands in the game ... a 
definite threat as a receiver with his big hands and exceptional long reach . . . ac- 
companied by good speed, Becker will be expected to break in and help a great deal 
. . . the glue-Angered receiver also is strong defensively . . . another hard worker 
who wants to play . . . one of Quakertown's all-time athletes . . . was all-State 
in football and also listed on the high school all-«American ... on the all-Bux-Mont 
first team, the area selection , . . also on the all Suburban team . . . star basket- 
hall player named on the all-State team and and the all-Bux-Mont eleven . . . also a 
track star . . . was class president . . . member of the National Honor Society of 
-which he served as President also ... in School of Business and Public Administration. 

LARRY LOUGHMAN, 19, 6-3, 190, Sophomore from Rochester, Pa. — up from the 
freshman team and a boy who shows a lot of promise . . . has the potential to push 
some of the boys in front of him . . . has a fine pair of hands also with a good 
reach ... a fine receiver . . . with some seasoning and experience, he is sure to 
be heard from in the future . . . could break into lineup this fall . . . quiet and 
a hard worker . . . easy to coach with willingness to learn to be better . . . was 
second team all-County at Rochester, a top producer of football talent . . . also 
lettered in track ... in School of Business and Public Administration. 

NORMAN KAUFMANN, 20, 6-0, 190, Sophomore from Brooklyn, N. Y.— after a year 
with the B squad the likeable hard-working Kaufmann returns with definite chance to 
step into varsity competition ... he will give every minute of hard work and con- 
centration to realize this endeavor . . . has good strength and with his desire and 
determination could help the depth at the flanks ... in the School of Business and 
Public Administration. 

AL BEARDSLEY, 22, 6-0, 185, Senior from Pittsburgh, Pa. — one of Maryland's finest 
end prospects who has had more tough luck because of injuries than any Terp in 
many years . . started out with an all-star future ahead of him, but the highly re- 
garded and very ' respected end came up with an injury that would keep him out most 
■of the season ... an excellent two-way end, and if ha stays well for the '58 cam- 
paign, will give the Terps even more outstanding depth and respect at end . . . has 
tremendous ability . . . this, accompanied by his desire to play makes him another 
top end . . . does a great job defensively . , . good speed and a fine receiver ... in 
School of Business and Public Administration majoring in Public Relations. 

TACKLES 

FRED COLE, 21, 5-11, 230, Senior from Newark, N. J.— the husky likeable Terp Co- 
Captain is ready for his third and final season and all indications are that it will 
be his best ... one of the most highly regarded tackles to come to Maryland in its 
long history of great tackles, Cole has more than lived up to his advanced billings 
of past years . . . slated for national honors last fall, the hard-working alum of 

39 



West Side High School, missed half of the season because of injury to his ankle . . . 
however, his play was so noticeable in the games that he played that he received 
a lot of praise and again this fall is being tabbed as one of the games' best tackles 
and is listed in the group of elites in the South ... he will be counted on to be 
the important leader of the linemen, the real strong spot of the Terp team . . . 
it will be on him that the coaches will place many special tasks during the season 
. . . has exceptional speed and uncanny reactions . . . can move with precision 
and purpose forward and laterally . . . one of the most picturesque blockers Terps 
have had in long line of outstanding tackles ... is exceptionally strong on defense 
... a real hard and sure tackier . . . Cole noted for doing his great job in a 
quiet methodical fashion . . . had a stand-out spring practice and another eye- 
catching performance in the Alumni game . . . after his sophomore year in the 
Alumni game, he was singled out by a dozen pro scouts in the press box as the 
top lineman on the field . . . this is most complimentary since the Alums had a 
couple all-pro teams on the field . . . with ten good games this fall, he is a sure 
T>et for many honors ... he also puts the shot . . . younger brother Bob will be 
a sophomore . . . Fred a good student in School of Engineering. 

KURT SCHWARZ, 22, 5-11, 205, Junior from Hackensack, N. J.— here again we 
come up with another outstanding tackle, one of the finest . . . with Cole, Coach 
Mont believes the duo to be the best in the league and two of the finest in football 
on the same team . . . the easy going ex-GI becomes one of the most fierce when 
on the field doing a phenomenal job both on offense and defense . . . made many 
eye-catching and spectacular tackles last fall as a soph . . . took over the top left 
spot in spring after he returned to Maryland following two years in the service 
and there was no doubt from then on that he was going to get the assignment 
. . . after a sensational soph year in '57, Schwarz is mentioned prominently among 
the top players in the league . . . another one of Maryland's really better tackles 
... he continues to raise the eyebrows of opposing coaches and players . . . does 
a brilliant job defensively . . . has fine reactions which help him pursue the play 
so well, allowing him to come through for so many tackles, many of which are 
"key" plays . . . has tremendous strength and endurance . . . one of the strongest 
players Terps have had in a long time . . . will be worth watching closely ... a 
three-sport star at Hackensack ... in School of Business and Public Administration. 

TOM FLOR. 21. 5-11. 230. Junior from Elizabeth, N. J.— came through last fall 
with exhibitions that label him for this fall as one of the top tackle reserves 
. . . has taken over the second unit job and with continued top effort will be ready 
for a lot of good football . . . big and strong with better knack defensively ... a 
sure tackier . . . has a lot of desire with keen intent on playing a lot of good 
ball . . . his potential Dure to be realized after gaining valuable experience last fall 
as a soph and coming through with a good spring practice . . . one of team's 
most pooular . . . was all-S f a*e at Thomas Jefferson as well as all-County and on 
the all-Star team . . . former Terp all-America guard and assistant coach Bob Ward 
brought him to Terpville . . . married and has a daughter ... in School of Busi- 
ness and Public Administration. 

JOE GARDI, 20, 5-10, 215, Junior from Harrison, N. J. — with four tackle lettermen 
returning, Gardi completes the tackle foursome from our neighboring state. New 
Jersey . . . following a year on the B squad, the big and strong Gardi came through 
last year with consistent and fine performances ... a steady player who should 
be a big help to the tackle corps this fall . . . good blocker . . . does a noticeable 
job defensively . . . with another good year, he will insure strong depth at tackle 
spot ... in School of Business and Public Administration. 

ED NICKLA. 24, 6-3, 225. Junior from Merrick, Long Island, N. Y. — in Nickla. the 
Terps have come up with a sure-bet star tackle ... he represents the biggest at 
6-3 and one of the best tackle prospects at Maryland! ... a transfer . . . played 
as a freshman at Tennessee in 1951 and admits he played against Terps in Vols' 
loss to Terps in Sugar Bowl game of January 1, 1952 . . . after frosh year at 
Tennessee, he went into the Air Force for four years and was an all-Service selec- 
t ! on while playing tackle at nearby Boiling Field ... he was discovered here by 
Terp backfield coach Ed Fullerton who at the time was Nick'a's coach at Boiling 
. . . when Fullerton was added to the Terp staff in 1956, he made certain that 
Nickla was convinced that he should enter Maryland when he was discharged . . . 
Nickla heeded the request and now after sitting out his required year, is ready to 
be the scourge on the collegiate field as he was for Boiling ... a truly ^reat 
prospect . . . likes to mix it up and has the facilities with which to do it . . . 
does a real fine job both ways ... a fierce tackle with better than average speed 

40 



for a big man . . . does an excellent job offensively ... his efficient blocking will 
help open up the way for the backs ... is out to do a top job and should . . . 
another of Terps' fine linemen worth watching . . . married and has a daughter 
... a top student in the School of Physical Education, Recreation and Health. 

BOB COLE, 19, 5-11, 210, Sophomore from Newark, N. J. — younger brother of co- 
Captain and first team tackle Fred . . . built like his brother, Bob came to Mary- 
land in the spring semester of '57 . . . had a great year with the freshman team 
that prompted coaches to tab him as another top tackle prospect for the future 
and one who has the potential to liken himself to the reputation of Fred . . . does 
a picturesque job also both ways . . . serious hard worker . . . has good speed 
and strength . . . will be out to make varsity and will make the boys up front 
hustle all the way . . . was all-City, all-County, and all-State at West Side High 
. . . also held offices in class and Student Government ... a track letterman 
also ... in School of Business and Public Administration. 

GEORGE DRAKSLER, 19, 6-1, 225, Sophomore from Homer City, Pa. — the soft- 
spoken Draksljer is considered one of the surest bets to become another whose name 
will be placed alongside the many past star tackles to represent the Red and White 
... is highly regarded by the coaching staff and equally highly respected by his 
teammates . . . offers outstanding potential to be one of finest . . . has exceptional 
physical equipment that will develop and provide him with even greater talent to 
he a future star . . . exceptionally strong . . . has a lot of football knowledge 
and savvy that accompanies a top player . . . will give the veterans fits for their 
position . . . also is the fair-haired boy of track Coach Jim Kehoe . . . starred 
as frosh shot-putter and is key man for the varsity next three years . . . has 
tossed over 50 feet as a frosh and sure to better that mark . . . won the Atlantic 
Coast Conference freshman title this spring . . . was all-Scholastic at United Joint 
High as well as all-County and listed as top all-opponent played against ... in 
School of Engineering. 

JIM BOFF, 19, 6-0, 225, Sophomore from Library, Pa. — still another of the coaches' 
real good friends since he is rated highly as a future star tackle who promises to 
come through as one of the big nanmes up front . . . starred for the '57 freshman 
team on the first line and came up with a sterling show in spring practice . . - 
conscientious hard worker who wants to play ball . . . has the physical attributes 
and the football know-how to assist his realization in becoming a top-flight tackle 
. . . does a good job offensively and is a fine defensive stalwart ... a newcomer 
to watch . . . also lettered in soccer at Snowden Twp. High ... in School of 
Business and Public Administration. 

GUARDS 

RODNEY BREEDLOVE, 20, 6-2, 215, Junior from Cumberland, .Md. — Coach Mont 
liked what he saw while he watched the strapping young Breedlove as a freshman 
then during his first spring practice ... in fact, he saw so much that he thought 
that he was the finest prospect the Tlerps have had as a lineman in some time 
. . . then came the switch to guard from end where he had a brilliant frosh year 
.... this was done when his overall greatness was realized by the coaching staff 
... he made the move look genius-like for Mont as he came up with probably the 
greatest rookie year in the history of Maryland linemen ... he received more honors 
as a sophomore than any soph in Terp history . . . for his outstanding play he 
is being rewarded early this season with pre-season all-America ratings by the 
experts . . . there is little doubt that the fiery, somtetimes hot-headed national 
figure will substantiate their copy that he will be one of the nation's best ... he 
impresses with every play and puts on exciting exhibitions on defense as he roves 
from his linebacking spot knocking down passes, making tackles, and chasing the 
onDonent ... is mo^t zpnirvus and features intense anxiety toward his opponent . . . 
was all-City in '55 and '56 as well as all-State his senior year . . . was a mem- 
ber of National Honor Society . . . FOR A COMPLETE SKETCH ON BREEDLOVE, 
SEE PAGE 68. 

TOM GUNDERMAN, 20, 5-10, 210, Junior from Franklin, N. J. — a brilliant football 
player who came up with a sensational sophomore year . . . started the season as 
the first team right guard and there was nohody who could come near challenging 
him for the job ... he and Breedlove give- Maryland a pair of the greatest guards 
to play on the same team . . . they won their number one jobs as sophs after 
both had exceptional freshman records and it looks safe for two more years, a nice 
thing for Terp coaches to smile about ... a truly great player who is a tower 

41 



of strength both on offense and defense ... is most impressive as he works like 
a charm guard every play . . . he too can be seen making tackles all over the 
field . . . has good speed and a fine football mind . . . takes great pride in his 
position . . . his good size and compactness give him the facility to move well 
... is a fine diagnostician, a sure tackier, extremely agile, wards off blockers, 
and pursues well . . . quick as a cat and has a tremendously fast charge . . - 
strong as the "Rock of Gibralter" say his opponents . . . hits with demoralizing 
power. . . with a repeat performance of his great '57 play, he is sure to add luster 
to his reputation and be added to the all-s'tar list for the Terps ... he is being 
billed nationally as another TOP GUARD for the fall— and he should be that . . . 
this fabulous quick charge he has literally blasts out the opposing lineman . . . has 
uncanny reactions and pursuit . . . definitely one of the game's all-time best and 
leaves little doubt his name will be seen on the all-star list . . . following graduation 
from Franklin High in '55, he attended Greenbrier Military Academy ... in High 
School he was all-State and all-County ... at Greenbrier he won the highest athletic 
award, the "Gregg Athlete Award" for excellence in athletics and academics ... he 
was a member of the National Honor Society in Prep School . . . also played base- 
ball ... a brother Bob graduated from University of Virginia two years ago ... in 
School of Business and Public Administation. 

RONALD LANEVE. 21. 6-2, 200. Senior from Pittsburgh, Pa.— a real too flight veteran 
ready to offer another year of good guard play . . . has turned in two stellar years 
for Terps although his soph year was cut short bv an attack of yellow jaundice . . . 
ha* a lot of determination and wants to play a lot of football . . . does a nice job 
both ways . . . efficient blocker . . . most notable for his defensive skills ... is 
an exce'^nt lmeback^r . . . has a fine attitude . . . good steadv performer . . . 
was all-City in tough Pittsburgh citv school league . . . married". . . in School of 
Physical Education, Recreation and Health. 

FRED KERN. 21, 5-10, 200, Junior from Baltimore, Md. — did a real fine job last 
fall as a reserve guard and lettered for his efforts ... a big strong boy that came 
along very well with each game last fall . . . counted on for heavy duty this fair 
. . . has a fine opportunity again this year with his potential fully realized . . . has 
a fine attitude . . . does a pood i^h defensively . . . pursues well and has fine re- 
actions . . . had a good spring during which time he concentrated a great deal on 
his tackling . . . also player on the Terp lacrosse team . . . was all-State at Poly 
and won the CHARLES P. McCORMICK UNSUNG HERO AWARD at Poly . . . alsc 
was on the all -Prep lacrosse team. . . lettered in baseball and wrestling also . . . 
married this summer ... in School of Physical Education, Recreation and Health. 

BILL LAZARO. 20, 5-11. 205. Sophomore from Turtle Creek, Pa.; RON BINETTI. 20. 
5-10, 185, Sophomore from Baltimore, Md.: JOE HEURING. 21, 5-11, 185, Junior from 
Rochester Pa.: PETER BOINIS. 21. 5-10. 205, Sophomore from Washington. D. C: and 
CLEMENT REYNOLDS. 19. 5-10, 195. Sophomore from Washington, D. C. are all be- 
ing counVd on to pr-ovide some va'uable assistance at the guard position . . . thev 
represent excellent talent from which Mont Will be able to get outstanding reserve 
strength . . . LAZARO and BOINIS given inside track to make the grade . . . both 
had fine spring practices. 

CENTERS 

VICTOR SCHWARTZ, 20, 6-0. 195, Junior from Port Reading, N. J.— the lone letter- 
man returning at the center position and it was won playing guard last fail as a 
sophomore . . . with the loss of two outstanding centers, Mont moved the very cap- 
able SCHWARTZ back to his old position after a fine reserve piece of work at guard 
... he had a great freshman year as number one center, so he was the logical 
choice for the oivot assignment for the '58 campaign . . . made the changeover with 
ease and looked good . . .does a real top job offensively ... a fine blocker and a 
good rough and tough boy who has a lot of skill to accompany his ruggedness . . . 
. . . does an extra special job defensively . . . fine pursuit and good tackier ... has 
put on some needed weight to stabilize his work at the difficult center spot ... a 
good rough and tough boy who has a lot of skill to accompany his ruggedness . . ■ 
the potential, ability, and desire is there . . . should have a real good year and make 
the change easily ... in School of Business and Public Administation. 

LEROY DIETRICH. 20. 6-1. 200, Sophomore from Philadelphia, Pa. — after a year with 
the B squad during which time he gained a great deal of experience and confidence. 

42 



the big raw-boned rugged DIETRICH has given indication he is ready for top-flight foot- 
ball this year . . . has a good frame for the center spot . . . came up with an im-- 
pressive and most encouraging spring practice ... he is being counted on to be a 
big help at the position that needs most help . . . has a fine disposition with an in- 
tense desire to play . . . very coachable . . . was a star athlete at Northeast Catholic 
,. . . in School of Business and Public Administration. 

-SAM ACHTZEHN, 20, 5-10, 185, Junior from West Newton, Pa. — another hard working 
returnee who got some valuable experience last fall, but didn't letter ... is being 
counted on to come in for the big battle for 1 the assignment behind Schwartz as he com- 
petes with Dietrich and the fine freshman center, Lou Ingram . . . Achtzehn would 
like nothing better and is out to do the job and gain the second berth ... a most 
willing student of the game with intense desire to play . . . has given indication of 
being a fine two-way pivot man . . . with a good fall practice then some valuable ex- 
pedience, he will be heard from . . . was all-County at West Newton and the affable 
Keystoner was his senior class president ... in School of Business and Public Ad- 
ministration. 

LOUIS INGRAM, 19, 6-1, 200, Sophomore from Pittsburgh, Pa. — here is a boy who 
came up with a great freshman year and cintlnlued to please the Terp coaches with 
his standout and consistently noticeable work this spring ... he managed to stay in 
close pursuit to the front runner ... a highly touted prospect who' is sure to be one 
of the future's best . . . big strong boy with kfen desire for comnetition . . . does a 
good job blocking the nivot spot and is highly regarded and respected for his 
defensive work ... as Coach Mont says, "he hasn't yet realized his overall notential 
■which will come with playing" . . . one of the newcomers to watch ... he definitely 
will help . . . was a star athlete at the highly regarded: North Catholic High in Pitts- 
burgh ... in School of Business and Public Administration. 

BOB HACKER, 19, 6-1, 195, Sophomore from New Brighton, Pa.; and BOB WEAVER, 
19, -6-0, 205, Sophomore from Johnstown, Pa., are two boys coming up from the 
freshman team that will get a lot of attention from center coach Whitey Dovell ... it 
is hp'ieved that either or both could lend a needed hand . . . both have the physical 
potential and could make it with an impressive early showing this fall! . . . both are 
strong and broueht outstanding records to Maryland . . . Hacker in Pre-Dental School 
and Weaver in School of Engineering. 

QUARTERBACKS 

BOB RUSEVLYAN, 22, 5-11, 175, Senior from Washington, D. C. — thisi is the little guy 
about whom so many superlatives were written last fall as he daringly threw his 
frail frame into playing with reckless abandon and was credited with the Terps' fast 
finish as they won five of their last seven in a 5-5 season . . . RUSEVLYAN, who 
the previous year was the "trouble-shooting" back as he filled in as needed as quar- 
terback and halfback, alternated with Dickie Lewis in '57 as the pair shared the sig- 
nal calling duties . . . came up With an excellent performance each game . . . coaches 
tab him as the slick, tricky type quarterback who keeps the opponent worried all the 
time and gives the defense fits with his play calling and split-second decisions with his 
ball handling . . . has a good football mind . . . looks good as he mixes up his se- 
quence with good calls, some daring, and some fancy running ... a very good and 
elusive runner for his size . ..a smart runner . . . takes a lot of punishment when 
tackled by the big boys but always gets up and keeps going . . . his size a slight 
drawback on long passes but he can get them off . . . does a good job with the 
short ones ... to solidify his position as a top flight quarterback who does a good 
job both ways, the wiry little senior was voted the team's "outstanding defensive 
back" awarded his sophomore year . . . then last season, he was voted the team's 
"outstanding offensive back" award ... he is one of the toughest on defense ... he 
led the team in pass interceptions his sonh year ... he pursues well in the secondary 
and is a real fine tackier . . . proof of his running ability on the keeper is shown with 
a 3 8 T-nshingr average last y«ar for 55 carries as he picked up 209 yards ... he com- 
pleted 26 of 58 passes for 297 yards and three scores ... he had only four intercepted 
... his total offense was a fine 4.5 yard average for 113 total plays ... he scored 
twir-A and kicked one extna point ... he had two punt returns good for but four 
vards and returned two kickoffs for 33 yards . . . was a three sport star at St. John's 
lettering in football, basketball, and baseball ... he led the Johnnies to the City 
title in football . . he won all J Metropolitan honors in football and basketball . . ■ 
married and is expecting first child in early September ... in School of Business and 
Public Administration. 

DICKIE LEWIS, 20, 5-11, 180, Senior from Martinsburg, W. Va. — the highly touted and 

43 



most respected LEWIS returns for what should be another banner season . . . coming 
into the picture sensationally as a freshman, the slick all-around qb led the baby 
Terps to their first and only undefeated season in history of school . . . touted to be 
a soph great in '56, he was injured in early fall practice when he hurt his ankle . . . 
it was in final game with N. C. State that he played and showed why he was a star 
quarterback ... he easily won the starting job for last year and turned in an over- 
all outstanding exhibition each game ... he and Rusevlyan alternated, being used 
about equally . . . this two-some gives Maryland the strongest one— two quarterback 
punch in the league for this season . . . LEWIS is the real triple-threat quarter- 
back who can run, pass, and kick and do all well . . . too, he is a smart performer 
and a good selector of plays . . . he is a good two-way pAayer, coming through with 
excellent defensive play ... he has good speed which gives him the advantage of 
being dangerous when he keeps ... a hard runner ... a good passer . . . has better 
accuracy with the short ones, but can hit on, the long ones alsol . . . connected with 
halfback Gene Verardi for a 61-yard pass-run td in Wake Forest game . . . had 50% 
completions in his soph year ... hit on 13 of 45 last fall for 153 yards and one 
score . . . had five picked off . . . had a 2.3 rushing average on 63 carries . . . had 
a 2.8 mark in total offense for 108 plays . . . punted 11 times for a 30-yard average 
. . . scored once and had one extra point . . . intercepted one pass . . . had one punt 
return and two kickoff returns . . . with his all-around finesse, it is expected he will 
again be counted on for a big year ... he missed most of spring drills because of a 
stomach disorder, but came back the latter part of the session to make his usual im- 
pression . . . made all-Section at Martinsburg for two years and honorable mention 
all-State . . . all-State baseball player . . . also track man . . . member of Na- 
tional Society ... in School of Business and Public Administration. 

DALE BETTY, 20, 6-0, 175, Sophomore from Butler, Pa. — here is a boy who warmed 
the hearts of the coaches and his teammates this spring with an outstanding perform- 
ance . . . the strong BETTY, a standout his freshman year, was held out last fall 
for seasoning and experience . . . the extra work paid off visibly as he played fine ball 
all spring while working with the second unit ... he exhibited tremendous poise and 
finesse ... an excellent ball handler as well as a fine passer . . . did a good job 
running the team . . . also a fine hard runner, difficult to bring down . . . his potential 
and all-around ability is there to become another really fine quarterback . . . does an 
adequate job defensively also ... a good punter too which tabs him a triple threat 
. . . coaches definitely counting on hijm to be a big help this fall . . . the experience 
will be most valuable as he is groomed for the future ... he will be watched 
closely ... a serious hard worker who wants to play . . . was a star athlete at 
Butller High, one of the largest in Western Pennsylvania ... in School of Business 
and Public Administration. 

DICK SCARBATH, 20, 6-2, 195, Sophomore from Baltimore, Md. — a very promising 
all-around quarterback prospect ... is the brother of Maryland's 1952 all-America 
quarterback and Back of the Year. Jack . . . with hopes of a fine record this fall. 
Mont and staff counting on Scarbath to aid greatly in future gridiron success for 
the Terps . . . had a great debut as a freshman and did a fine job last fall with the 
B squad as he was sitting out the year working on his academics ... he already 
excells as a passer . . . throws a fine long pass and is accurate with both the short 
and long . . . the best punter on the team, a duty which will be his . . . fine ball 
handler and signal-oaller . . . Mont believes that after he gets the needed experience 
from varsity competition, both offensively and defensively, he will give Maryland some 
outstanding performances . . . his offensive talents far surpass his defensive, although 
the latter is gained with game competition ... a big strong boy . . . has shown 
capacity to take a lot of punishment . . . potential plentiful . . . also a standout 
lacrosse player . . . graduate of Poly High School ... in School of Education major- 
ing in Education for Industry. 

HALFBACKS 

TED KERSHNER, 21, 6-0, 185, Senior from Martinsburg, W. Va. — you might say, "the 
fleet is in!" . . . that describes the scintillating running of the fast-stepping back from 
nearby Martinsburg . . . ever since his fabulous debut as a frosh when his grea' run- 
ning enabled the yearlings to go undefeated for rhe first time, the nsme of Kershner 
has been the one that everybody knew was the one who could "go all the way" . . . 
although he was in and out of the lineup a lot his sophomore year because of injuries, 
he was the big ground gainer . . . the Maryland fortunes for '58 are going to start 
off with a "well" Kershner, one with two good knees and a bit more weight with 
still his blazing speed ... all this adds up to a warning to opponents that the highly 
touted Mountaineer is set to give his greatest show as he conlinues to bid for stardom 
as one of the Terp's finest running backs ... he is the leading 1 regular halfback re- 

44 



turning . . . KERSHNER made world gridiron fame and history for himself last fall 
with a "command performance" before the Queen of England, Elizabeth II and her 
husband Prince Philip ... he streaked 81 yards for a tie-breiaking touchdown against 
North Carolina, the "QUEEIN'S GAME" to give Maryland the lead and sure victory 
before Her Majesty . . . the Queen and Prince said it was most exciting and it was 
one of the few times they rose to their feet to watch the play of the game ... he 
was the big running star of the game, a feat that could easily be his each Saturday 
... a well Kershner is a great Kershner . . . once he gets shot through a hole, he 
can go all the way ... he also is most efficient as punt and kickoff return artist. . . 
onde he gets up his speed, he becomes tough . . . fine defensive back also . . . ex- 
tremely good in pursuit and a sure tackier . . . had a most respectable 5.7 rushing 
average as a soph and hit the mark for a 5.5 avenage last fall in 41 carries ... a 
good passer, hitting on 4 of 5 last year for 32 yards and one score . . . the other was 
intercepted . . . his total offense read 5.6 yards a play in 46 total plays . . . caught 
three aerials for 33 yards . . . scored twice . . . returned 2 punts for 17 yards and 
led the team in kickoff returns for second straight year with 8 for 161 yards ... he 
led in punt returns his soph year . . . the serious Kershner a definite must for a good 
year . . . lettered in football and track four years in high school . . . was a hurdler 
and dash man . . . second team all -State and first team all-Section his senior yeai 
... in School of Business and Public Administration. 

BOB LAYMAN, 21, 5-11, 185, Senior from Pittsburgh, Pa. — one of the strongest and 
most capable and consistent halfbacks the Terps have had in a long time . . . excels 
both ways in a convincing manner . . . took over the top right halfback spot near 
mid-season last fall . . . brother of assistant coach Fred Layman, Bob definitely is 
one of the league's top hacks as the type who conscientiously goes out and does his job 
without fanfare and puts on an outstanding show . . . came in as a soph which turned 
out to be an excellent move . . . came through with a fine junior year . . . has fine 
speed with tremendous power which makes him a dangerous power runner . . . his 
running style makes him hard to bring down . . . comes up with stellar methodical 
exhibitions ... he possesses a great deal of finesse running the ball . . . came through 
with several outstanding games when not carrying the ball as he carried out his block- 
ing assignments with perfection . . . accompanying his running abilities are his top- 
notch defensive attributes . . . he's considered to be the best defensive half- 
back for the Terps and his consistently 1 fine defensive work bears out the claim . . . 
an excellent pass defender and a real good and sure tackier , . . had a 3 yard rushing 
= average for 52 carries ... for 55 total plays he averaged 3.2 yards ... hit one of 
three passes for 16 yards . . . caught three passes for 39 yards and one score . . . 
hit pay dirt for one score . . . returned 7 punts for 41 yards and one kickoff for 16 
yards ... a star athlete at Brentwood High . . . highly sought after as a college 
prospect . . . lettered in basketball, track, and tennis, along with football . . . mar- 
ried ... in School of Arts and Science. 

JOE BEHRMANN, 21, 5-11, 180, Senior from Hackensack, N. J.— one of the squad's 
real fine guys who works intensely all the time ... a serious and conscientious player 
. . . oame in two years ago to have a real fine soph year and last season did another 
good job . . . is a good runner with adequate speed . . . also works well in secondary 
. •. . should be a big help in the Terp offensive plans this year . . . caught one aerial 
last fall . . . threw one but incomplete . . . was all-Northern New Jersey . . . 
all-Bergen County and all-State in Jersey's Group 3 ... a brothejr played for and 
graduated from Wake Forest ... in School of Arts and Science, a Pre-Dental Student. 

JOHN FORBES, 20, 5-10, 195, Junior from Basking Ridge, N. J. — came to Maryland 
as a highly touted back and following an outstanding frosh year and an equally repu- 
table Showing last fall as a soph, the big runner continues to keep the label as a fu- 
ture star and a boy to watch the next two years ... it was in spring practice that 
FORBES was really sprung loose and exploded his potential ... he came up with 
probably the best running exhibitions of all the backs, a good indication for a 
big junior year ... is a tremendously hard runner with great speed . . . his size 
and speed make him hard to bring down ... he played fullback as a frosh and last 
fall played both fullback and halfback ... in spring drills he concentrated his talents 
at right halfback . . . does a top job on defense also . . . has exceptional strength 
. . . being counted on for a big year . . . had a 3.6 average in '57 for 18 carries 
. . . scored one td . . . caught one pass . . . had one kickoff return for 17 yards . . . 
was a big star at Bernard's High . . . many schools sought his services . . . invited to 
play in the ail-American high school game ... in School of Arts and Sciences. 

GENE VERARDI, 20, 5-10, 180, Junior from Freeport, Pa. — one of the most exciting 
running halfbacks to come to Maryland since the Hanulak-Wiailer era and follows sen- 
ior left halfback Ted Kershner as one of the most highly touted and most respected 

45 



for his blazing speed . . . VERARDI had a great freshman year as he tabbed himself 
<as one to watch ... he gave indications then as the fleet type runner the coaches said 
they were looking for to give more speed in the backfleld and to enable the back to 
take advantage of the fine blocking by the boys up front ... to accompany his great 
speed is his unusual running style . . . his style makes him most deceptive ... he 
has the tremendous knack of doing a mammoth job cutting and faking . . . his fakes 
are something to watch as he is streaking along to baffle the defender . . . has tre- 
mendous ouiside speed and goes like a deer once he gets daylight downfield . . . his 
compact size, speed, and strong running power makes him a difficult target to tackle 
... a dangerous ball carrier . . . with more experience going both ways, he will be 
one of the finest all-around back9 ... he is a fine passer and also a very dangerous 
receiver because of his speed ... he can get by defenders quickly and be an open 
target for the passer . . . Mont gave his little protege a chance early last fall and he 
immediately found himself getting headlines and had the fans talking about their new 
speed-flash find . . . his first big game was the Wake Forest game in which he came in 
and proceeded to open up the gates with his running and pass receiving ... he snagged 
three passes for 115 yards, a record for one game in receiving . . . .the big one was 
a 61-yard pass-run play from qb Dickie Lewis . . . his speed got him behind the Dea- 
con defenders and Lewis laid it in his hands and the little speedster went all the way 
. . . for his brilliant game, he was named Atlantic Coast Conference "Sophomore of 
the Week" ... he also was nominated for that honor for his fine game in the "Queen's 
Game" .1 . . a real elusive, fast, hard-/running back . . . had the second best rushing 
average fori - '57 with a 4.4 mark but for only 15 carries . . . was 0-3 in passing . . . 
had a 3.7 total offense average for 17 plays . . . caught 3 for 115 yards and one 
score . . . had one punt return and two kickoff returns for 32 yards . . . was a quar- 
terback at Freeport High where his senior year he led his team to an undefeated sea- 
son . . . highly sought after . . . one to watch for a big year . . . came up with a 
3.8 academic mark last semester for Dean's List and on the all-Conference academic 
team ... in School of Education. 

DWAYNE FLETCHER, 19, 5-11, 170, Sophomore from Front Royal, Va the "hottest" 

of them all as a prospective great star halfback for the Terps . . . was the big news 
of the baby Terps as he came up with some fabulous runs, including many long iaunta 
... is another of the terrific backs to hit Maryland in last few years ... is highly 
regarded and gives expectations that he will become a big name in Terp football 
before he leaves . . . main forte is his terriffic speed and running ability ... he is like 
Verardi in many ways . . with his blinding speed, he has that unusual style which 
makes him hard to pursue and harder to bring down . . . could be the main answer 
to the much sought after break-away type runner Mont has been trying tc get . . . 
does tricks as he rambles in the open . . . cuts sharply . . , has intense 
desire to play football . . . does a good all-around job for a -ookie . . . his defense 
sure to come along with game experience . . . will be another threat as a pass re 
ceiver . . . came to Maryland highly touted and could, by living up to his reputation, 
come in for a lot of praise early in his grid career . . . was on the third team oJl- 
State at nearby Front Royal High ... in School of Business and Public Adminis- 
tration. 

BOB GALLAGHER, 19, 5-10, 180, Sophomore from Pittsburgh, Pa. — another out- 
standing product of the highly respected North Catholic High in Pittsburgh . . . 
came to Maryland with a terrific high school record and immediately set out to 
add to his reputation by having a real fine freshman year . . . served notice that 
he will be ready to contest for a good varsity job this fall as he recorded a most 
impressive spring practice . . . the quiet hard-working Gallagher is the tough hard- 
running power type runner . . . has real good speed to go along with a real 
powerful pair of legs . . . runs with reckless style which will make him a definite 
contender . . . good strong boy with a lot of desire who wants to play and could 
b'-eak in . . .a fine blocker and does an adequate job defensively . . . one of 
the finer prospects who is a boy to watch in the future . . . won the most- 
valuable player award in high school and was team oaptain . . . also lettered thret 
years in boxing and baseball ... in School of Business and Public Administration, 
majoring in Public Relations. 

OTHER OUTSTANDING HALFBACKS CANDIDATES: JOHN STITT. 20, 5-10, 185, 
Sophomore from Pittsburgh, Pa.; and DAVE STOCKMAN, 21, 5-10, 170, Sophomore 
from Baltimore, Md. 

FULLBACKS 

JIM JOYCE, 20, 5-10, 200, Junior from Philadelphia, Pa. — the slick Atlas-built 
star is now ready to go all the way and definitely establish himself as one or 

46 



the nation's top fullbacks . . . he is sure to be the best fullback to be found 
on the rosters of the Conference . . . touted to the extreme when he enrolled 
at Maryland after shunning many offers from other schools, the rock-like back 
responded with a great freshman year to set him up for a possible outstanding 
rookie year . . . following a brilliant erhibition in his first Varsity Alumni game, he 
was named the big star of the game ... is hoped continued success will bring him 
the ultimate reputation expected of htim as one of Terps' all-fttma backs . . . Mont, 
himself an admirer of great backs, says he can't miss ... so far Joyce has upheld 
the prediction . . . the powerfully built all-everything from Bishop Neuman High has 
reminded veteran observers of the great pile-driving bull-dozing type punning backs 
. . . has most powerful legs, mindful of former fabulous Terp ball carriers, fullback 
all- Americas Ed "Mighty Mo" Modzelewski and Dick Bielski . . . his power gen- 
erated from such stacked legs gives him a most potent weapon ... he is a 
murderous line plunger, a human battering ram . . . his forte isn't only his 
powerful running, but is as colorful and effective on defense . . . tackles, with 
great impetus and sureness ... he outs would-be tacklers down in a precision 
manner . . . once again this year in the sprting game, he was the big running 
star, an indication for good things to come thisi fail . . . had a 3 yard average 
as a soph for 41 carries . . . scored twice . . . picked off one enemy aerial 
. . . should make an indelible impression this year as one of the game's most 
powerful ball carriers . . . has the equipment to be a great one ... in School 
of . Business and Public Administration. 

LARRY CASPARRO, 21, 6-0, 200, Junior from Bloomfield, N. J. — the big hard- 
running fullback appears ready to give the Terps the type performance long pre- 
dicted for him ... a real outstanding prospect who has been in and out of the 
picture because of injuries. . . . was headed for a big year in '57 before the 
injury plague hit him and kept him out of the game after early season participation 
. . . has great potential which could be utilized and help improve the depth sit- 
uation at fullback . . . has real good speed and a solid stocky build which makes 
him a power-running threat ... a bruisiing type runner who prefers to rock— em 
as he runs . . . likes to bull over wflfuld be tacklers and oan when he gets going 
full steam ahead . . . had an encouraging storing practice . . . definitely should 
help ... is being counted on . . . second team all-State . . . first team all- 
county . . . also a three-year letterman in basketball and track . . . class officer 
. . . fine student ... in School of Arts; and, Science. 

JIM HATTER, 21, 5-10, 185, Senior from Rome, N. Y. — the powerful little guy made 
the fine reputation of a real big-leaguer when he brake in as a rookie in '56 and 
did a terrific job ... all set to take up where he left off last fall, he was hit by 
the injury jinx and was unable to continue his outstanding exhibitions, both offen- 
sively and defensdvedsy ... he showed in spring drills that he was ready 
for his comeback and will give the big effort in early fall drills . . . has definite 
determination to get back up on top ... a real aggressive and hustling competitor 
has strong pair of legs which gives him his powerful running facility ... a 
vicious tackier and an exceptionally sharp blocker . . . carried 7 times for 17 yards 
for a 2.4 average and had one kickoff return for 14 yards ... a well Hatter will 
be good news for the Terps and bad news for the opponents ... on all-state team 
. . won the senior athlete award . . . was third in Prep national) wrestling cham- 
pionships ... in School of Business and Public Administration. 

EVERETT CLOUD, 19, 6-0, 180, Sophomore from Falls Church, Va.— if the Terps are 
going to have outstanding depth at the fullback slot, this newcomer is an outstand- 
ing candidate to provide some sensational help for Joyce, Casparro, and Hatter . . . 
he definitely will be ready to step in for a lot of duty and give the veterans a 
run for their position . . . Cloud represents one of the finest looking prospects to 
hit the Terp camp ... he has all the equipment to become one of the best full- 
back rookies in the league . . . brought to College Park one of the most talked 
about reputations for an area boy . . . highly sought after . . . responded to his 
reputation with a great freshman performance ... he followed it with a strong 
showing in spring practice ... a powerfully built bay with extremely good run- 
ning ability ... has speed and power and likes to bulldoze his way: downfield . . . 
quiet and determined to play a lot of ball this fall . . . will get defensive skill 
through coaching and experience . . . likes it rough and tough ... a very 
noticeable and eye-catching ball carrier ... a slashing blocker . . . this is a boy to 
watch closely for a big helping hand this year and one whose future play will set him 
up for the future all-star roll calls . . Coach Mont and staff very high on this boy 
was all-Metropolitan on all Washington, D. C. selections . . . was all-County 
and all-northern Virginia . . . also honorable mention all-State . . .was a class 
president at McLean High School and a Senator Senior . . . also starred in baseball 
and basketball ... in School of Physical Education, Recreation and Health. 

47 



TERPS ON HONORARY SELECTIONS - 1957 

RODNEY BREEDLOVE 

Honorable Mention All-America — AP, UP, NEA, Sporting News 
First Team All-Conference — Associated Press 
First Team All-Conference — Southern Writers' Assn. 
Second Team All-Conference — United Press 

Nation's "Lineman of the Week" Runnerup after North Carolina game 
"Sophomore of the Week" in ACC after North Carolina game 
First Team All-Area, selected by Washington Post and Times-Herald 
Washington Post "Co-Player of the Week" after Virginia game 
Voted Best Defensive Lineman by squad 

Won "Dapper Dan" Award as the one who did most to publicize city 
of Cumberland during '57 

ED COOKE 
Honorable Mention All-America — AP, UP, NEA 
First Team All-Conference— Associated Press 
First Team All-Conference — United Press 
First Team All-Conference — Southern Writers' Assn. 
First Team All-Area, selected by Washington Post and Times-Herald 
ACC "Lineman of Year" as selected by ACC Club of Washington 
Won the M Club's "Bill Guckeyson Award" as Maryland's top athlete 
Received "The Maryland Ring" emblematic of Maryland's top athlete 
Member of Blue Team in annual Blue-Gray Game 
Third draft choice of Chicago Bears 
Played in the Chicago All-Star Game 

GENE ALDERTON 
Honorable Mention All-America — AP, NEA 

Second Team All-Conference — AP, UP, Southern Writers' Assn. 
Voted TEKE Trophy by squad 
Drafted by Detroit Lions 
Co-Captain of 1957 team 

TOM GUNDERMAN 
Voted Best Offensive Lineman by squad 

Washington Post "Co-Player of Week" after Virginia game 
Honorable Mention All-Conference — UP 

DON HEALY 
First Team All-Area, selected by Washington Post and Times-Herald 
Voted ANTHONY C. NARDO TROPHY 
Honorable Mention All-Conference — UP 
Member of East team in annual East-West Shrine game 
Member of Chicago Tribune All-Star squad 
Member of North squad in annual Senior Bowl game 
Drafted by Chicago Bears 

RONALD SHAFFER and HOWIE DARE 
Honorable Mention All-Conference — UP 

GENE VERARDI 
"Sophomore of the Week" in ACC after Wake Forest game 

BOB RUSEVLYAN (1958 Co-Captain) 
Voted Best Offensive Back by squad 

BOB LAYMAN 
Voted Best Defensive Back by squad 

48 



TERP ALL-AMERICA PLAYERS 

1949 — Ray Krouse, Tackle — Second Team 

1950 — Bob Ward, Guard — First Teams 

1951 — Bob Ward, Guard — First Teams 

1951 — Ed "Big Mo" Modzelewski, Fullback — First and Second Teams 

1951 — Dick "Little Mo" Modzelewski, Tackle — One First Team; Most 

Second Teams 
1952 — Jack Scarbatb, Quarterback — First Teams 
1952 — Dick "Little Mo" Modelewski, Tackle — First Teams 
1952 — Tom Cosgrove, Center — Second Team 
1953 — Stan Jones, Tackle — First Teams 
1953 — Bernie Faloney, Quarterback— Eight First Teams; all Second 

Teams 
1953 — Chester Hanulak, Halfback — Second Teams 
1954 — Dick Bielski, Fullback — Third Teams 
1954 — Jack Bowersox, Guard — First Team (Gridiron Index) 
1954 — Bill Walker, End— Second Team (AP) 

1955 — Bob Pellegrini, Center — UNANIMOUS First Team All-America 
1955 — Ed Vereb, Halfback — First Team, Movietone News; First Team, 

N.Y. Daily News; First Team, Extension Magazine; Second 

team, INS; Second Team, Hearst "Big 6"; Third Team, AP, 

UP, Sporting News 
1955 — Mike Sandusky, Tackle — First Team, Sporting News; Extension 

Magazine; Second Teams 
1955 — Jack Davis, Guard — Honorable Mention, AP, UP, NEA 
1955 — Frank Tamburello, quarterback — First Team, Movietone News; 

Honorable Mention, AP, UP, NEA 
1955 — Bill Walker, End — Second Team, UP; Sporting News; Honorable 

Mention, NEA 
1955 — Russell Dennis, End — First Team, N.Y. Daily News 
1955— Ed Heuring, Tackle — Honorable Mention, AP, UP 
1956 — Mike Sandusky, Tackle — Honorable Mention, AP, UP, INS, NEA 
1956 — Jack Davis, Guard — Honorable Mention, AP, UP, INS, NEA 
1956 — Gene Alderton, Center — Honorable Mention, AP, UP 
1957 — Gene Alderton, Center — Honorable Mention, AP 
1957— Ed Cooke, End— Honorable Mention, AP, UP, NEA. 
1957 — Rodney Breedlove — Honorable Mention, AP, UP, NEA, Sporting 

News 

Additional Honors for Terp All-Americas 

BOB WARD— 1951 

"Lineman of Year" as selected by Washington Touchdown Club; re- 
ceived the Knute Rockne Memorial Trophy. 

"Lineman of Year" as selected by Philadelphia Sportswriters' Assn. 
Runner-up to Stanford's Bill McColl as Associated Press Lineman 
of Year. 

"Player of the Year" in iSouthern Conference, 1951. 
Most Valuable Player of '50 Gator Bowl as a sophomore. 
Voted Most Valuable Player Award by his teammates four consecu- 
tive years. 



49 



JACK SCARBATH— 1952 

Runner-up to Billy Vessels, Oklahoma, for Heisman Memorial Tro- 
phy as nation's outstanding football player. 
"Back of the Year" selected by COLLIER'S Magazine. 
"Sportsman of the Year" Award given by SPORT Magazine. 
Second high vote getter in United Press "Player of Year" poll. 
Third high vote getter in Associated Press "Player of Year" poll. 
'Player of the Year" in Southern Conference, 1952. 
"South's Most Valuable Player" in North-South Shrine Game, Miami, 
Fla. 

First draft choice of Washington Redskins. 
Third high vote getter in Associated Press "Player of Year" poll. 

DICK "Little Mo" MOD2ELEWSKI— 1952 

"Lineman of Year" Award, LOOK Magazine as selected by Grantland 

Rice and Football Writer's Assn. of America. Received the John B. 

Outland Memorial Trophy for this selection. 

"Lineman of Year" as selected by Washington Touchdown Club; 

received the Knute Rockne Memorial Trophy. 

Second high vote getter in United Press "Lineman of Year" poll. 

Second high vote getter in SPORTING NEWS "Lineman of Year" 

poll. 

Fourth high vote getter in ASSOCIATED PRESS "Lineman of Year" 

poll. 

Second draft choice of Washington Redskins. 

STANLEY JONES— 1953 

"Lineman of Year" awarded by COLLIER'S Magazine. 

"Lineman of Year" as selected by Washington Touchdown Club; 

received the Knute Rockne Memorial Trophy. 

Runnerup to J. D. Roberts, Oklahoma, for ASSOCIATED PRESS 

"Lineman of Year" award. 

Fifth draft choice of Chicago Bears as a junior. 
BERNIE FALONEY— 1953 

Named to the "All-America Backfield" selected by the Washington 

Touchdown Club. 

"Player of the Year" of the Atlantic Coast Conference. 

First team ACADEMIC All-American. 

Fifth highest vote getter in AP "Back of the Year" poll. 

First draft choice of San Francisco Forty-Niners. 
DICK BIELSKI— 1954 

Voted "Most Valuable Player Award" in North-South Shrine Game. 

First draft choice of Philadelphia Eagles. 
BOB PELLEGRINI— 1955 

"Football Player of the Year" and winner of the WALTER CAMP 

MEMORIAL TROPHY as selected by COLLIER'S Magazine and the 

American Football Coaches' Assn. 

"Lineman of the Year" as selected by COLLIER'S Magazine and the 

American Football Coaches' Assn. 

"Lineman of the Year" as selected by the Washington Touchdown 

Club, awarded KNUTE ROCKNE MEMORIAL TROPHY by TD Club. 

"Lineman of the Year" as selected by the United Press. 

"Lineman of the Year" as selected by the Philadelphia Sports Writer's 

Association. 

50 



TOP LINEMAN in HEISMAN TROPHY balloting. 

UNANIMOUS ALL-AMERICA 

PLAYER OF THE YEAR of Atlantic Coast Conference as selected by 

the Associated Press and Southern Writers' Association. 

Winner of the JACOBS BLOCKING TROPHY as best blocker in 

Atlantic Coast Conference. 

FIRST DRAFT CHOICE of the Philadelphia Eagles.. 

Played in North-South All-Star Game. 

Co-Captain of All-Star for Chicago All-Star-Pro game in August and 

voted the Outstanding Player Award after the game. 

ED VEREB— 1955 

Runnerup to Pellegrini as ACC "Player of the Year." 

First Draft Choice of the Washington Redskins. 

Played in North-South All-Star Game. 

Set a new school and conference scoring record with his 102 points. 

MIKE SANDUSKY— 1956 

Played in East-West Shrine Game. 
Played in Chicago Tribune All-Star Game. 
Fifth Draft Choice of San Francisco 49'ers. 

JACK DAVIS— 1956 

Played in East-West Shrine Game. 
Washington Redskin Draftee. 

RODNEY BREEDLOVE— 1957— as a Sophomore 

National "Lineman of the Week" Runnerup after North Carolina 

game 

"Sophomore of the Week" in ACC after North Carolina game 

Voted Best Defensive Lineman by squad 

Won "Dapper Dan" Award as the one who did most to publicize the 

city of Cumberland during the year of 1957 

ED COOKE— 1957 

ACC "Lineman of the Year" as selected by ACC Club, Washington 

Won the M Club's "Bill Guckeyson Award" as Maryland's top 

athlete 

Received the "Maryland Ring" emblematic of Maryland's top athlete 

Member of Blue Team in annual Blue-Gray Game 

Played in Chicago Tribune All-Star game 

Third draft choice of Chicago Bears 

GENE ALDERTON— 1957 

Voted TEKE Trophy by squad 

Drafted by Detroit Lions 

Played in North-South Shrine Game, Miami, Fla. 

Co-Captain of 1957 team 



51 



FINAL 1957 TEAM STATISTICS 



FIRST DOWNS 

Rushing 

Passing 

Penalties 

TOTAL YARDS RUSHING 

Yards Lost Rushing 

NET YARDS RUSHING 

FORWARD PASSES ATTEMPTED 

FORWARD PASSES COMPLETED 

NET YARDS PASSING 

TOTALYARDS GAINED (Rush & Pass) _ 

PASSES INTERCEPTED BY 

YARDS INTERCEPTIONS RETURNED _ 
TOTAL NUMBER PLAYS (Rushing) __ 

TOTAL NUMBER PUNTS 

PUNTING AVERAGE 

TOTAL NO. KICKOFFS RETURNED __ 

TOTAL NO. PUNT RETURNS 

PENALTIES 

OWN FUMBLES 

OWN FUMBLES LOST 

TOTAL POINTS SCORED 

Touchdowns 

Extra Points 

Field Goals 

Safety 

INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS--1957 

RUSHING 

Carries Gain Lost Net Avg. 

Lewis 63 205 58 147 2.3 

Perlo 67 174 3 171 2.6 

Rusevlyan 55 221 12 209 3.8 

Layman 52 185 25 160 3.0 

Kershner 41 234 7 227 5.5 

Joyce 41 130 5 125 3.0 

Dare 38 131 5 126 3.3 

Hamilton 24 90 12 78 3.3 

Forbes 18 64 64 3.6 

Verardi 14 76 14 62 4.4 

Fritsch 9 26 11 15 1.7 

Casparro 8 22 22 2.6 

Hatter 7 19 2 17 2.4 

Johnstone 3 6 6 2.0 

Hawkins 1 3 3 3.0 

Scotti 1 1—1 —1.0 

Cooke 1 5—5 —5.0 

52 



MARYLAND 


OPPONENTS 


115 


123 


76 


92 


30 


25 


9 


6 


1576 


2052 


159 


302 


1417 


1750 


146 


113 


51 


53 


599 


731 


2016 


2481 


10 


12 


95 


149 


470 


500 


63-2151 


51-1783 


34.1 


35.0 


28-628 


29-680 


23-127 


32-310 


58-556 


61-505 


18 


32 


9 


20 


119 


144 


17 


21 


11 


16 


2-5 


0-1 





Tenn. 



TOTAL OFFENSE 

Total Plays Net Gain Avg. 

Rusevlyan 113 506 4.5 

Lewis 108 300 2.8 

Layman 55 176 3.2 

Kershner 46 259 5.6 

Dare 41 126 3.0 

Fritsch 33 116 3.5 

Hamilton 29 78 2.7 

Verardi 17 62 3.7 

Hawkins 2 3 1.5 

Behrmann 1 0.0 

all others same as above rushing 



PUNTING 

No. 

Cooke 39 

Lewis 11 

Layman 8 

Fritsch 4 

TEAM 1 



Yards 

1409 

330 

247 

165 

(blocked — Tenn.) 



Avg. 

36.1 

30.0 
30.9 
41.2 



PUNT RETURNS 

No. Yards Returned 

Dare 10 49 

Layman 7 41 

Kershner 2 17 

Rusevlyan 2 4 

Hawkins 1 13 

Verardi 1 3 

Lewis 1 

KICKOFF RETURNS 



No. 

Kershner 8 

Dare 6 

Hamilton 2 

Rusevlyan 2 

Verardi 2 

Lewis 2 

Forbes 1 

Layman 1 

Hatter 1 

Cooke 1 

Fritsch 1 

Martin 1 



Yards Returned 
161 

264 
42 
33 
32 
29 
17 
16 
14 
13 

7 





53 



Att. 

Rusevlyan 58 

Lewis 45 

Fritsch 24 

Kershner 5 

Hamilton 5 

Layman 3 

Dare 3 

Verardi 3 

Hawkins 1 

Behrmann 1 



PASSING 




Had 




Comp. 


Yds. 


Int. 


TDs. 


26 


297 


4 


3 


13 


153 


5 


1 


7 


101 


2 





4 


32 


1 


1 














1 


16 

























































PASS RECEIVING 



Cooke 

Scotti 

Turner __. 
Hamilton . 

Dare 

Verardi _. 
Layman _. 
Kershner . 
Shaffer __. 
Steppe __. 
Behrmann 
Forbes __. 



o Cauaht 


Yard: 


14 


137 


7 


88 


6 


61 


5 


37 


4 


49 


3 


115 


3 


39 


3 


33 


3 


23 


1 


19 


1 


3 


1 


—3 



TDs. 


1 


2 
1 
1 








TD PASSES THROWN 
Rusevlyan — 3; Kershner — 1; Lewis — 1 

TD PASSES CAUGHT 
Dare — 2; Layman — 1; Verardi — 1; Scotti — 1 



TDs. 

Dare 4 

Fritsch 1 

Rusevlyan 2 

Joyce 2 

Kershner 2 

Lewis 1 

Layman — 1 

Forbes 1 

Verardi 1 

Scotti 1 

Hatter 



SCORING 








PATs 


fig 


Total Pts. 










24 


9—12 


2- 


-5 


21 


1—3 







13 










12 










12 


1—1 







7 










6 










6 










6 










6 


0—1 











54 



PASS INTERCEPTIONS 
No. 

Dare 4 

Perlo 2 

Hamilton 1 

Lewis 1 

Joyce 1 

Gunderman 1 



Yards Returned 

20 
45 
10 









FRESHMAN FOOTBALL SCHEDULE FOR '58 



DATE 




OPPONENT 


PLACE 


October 


4 


West Virginia 


Martinsburg, W. Va, 
(Night) 


October 


17 


George Washington 


Home 


October 


31 


North Carolina 


Away 


November 


7 


Virginia 


Away 


November 


14 


Navy Plebes 


Away 



:p§M:^0::m!«S0":. 



M^tM^s 




BYRD STADIUM 

HOME OF THE TERRAPINS 
Capacity: 35,000 



55 



ALL-TIME MARYLAND FOOTBALL RECORDS 

OFFENSE AND DEFENSE 

BEST SEASON: 

1951, 1953 and 1955: Won 10— Lost 0. 1951 record includes the 28-13 
Sugar Bowl win over Tennessee. The '53, 10-0 record is regular sea- 
son. Terps lost Orange Bowl, 7-0 to Oklahoma. 1955, lost to Okla- 
homa in Orange Bowl, 20-6. 

WORST SEASON: 

1944— Won 1, Lost 7, Tied 1. 

MOST POINTS SCORED IN ONE SEASON: 

353 in 1951 in 9 games. 381 in 1951 in 10 games including the 28-13 
victory over Tennessee in the Sugar Bowl. 

LEAST POINTS SCORED IN ONE SEASON: 
39 in 1940 in 9 games. 

MOST POINTS SCORED BY OPPONENTS IN ONE SEASON: 
216 in 1938 in 9 games. 

LEAST POINTS SCORED BY OPPONENTS IN ONE SEASON: 
31 in 1953 in 10 games. 

MOST POINTS SCORED BY MARYLAND IN ONE GAME: 
Maryland— 80; Washington College— 0; (1927). 

MOST POINTS SCORED BY OPPONENTS IN ONE GAME: 
Navy 76;— Maryland 0; (1913). 

ALL-TIME LEADING SCORER: 

Ed Vereb with 102 points in 1955 in 11 games, including one TD in 
Orange Bowl against Oklahoma. 

OFFENSIVE TEAM RECORD FOR ONE SEASON: 

3822 yards in 1951 in 9 games. 2921 rushing and 901 passing. 
4174 yards in 1951 in 10 games, including the 28-13 victory over Ten- 
nessee in the Sugar Bowl. 3210 rushing and 964 passing. 

OFFENSIVE TEAM RECORD FOR ONE GAME: 

602 yards in 1951 against West Virginia — 523 yards rushing and 79 
passing. 

LEAST YARDAGE ONE GAME: 
69 against Vanderbilt in 1948. 

MOST TOUCHDOWNS SCORED IN ONE SEASON: 

52 in 1951 in 9 games — 56 in 1951 in 10 games including the 28-13 
victory over Tennessee in Sugar Bowl. 

DEFENSIVE RECORD FOR ONE SEASON: 

1,707 yards in 1949 in 9 games — 868 rushing and 893 passing for fifth 
place in nation. 

DEFENSIVE RECORD FOR ONE GAME: (Rushing): 
29 by Washington and Lee in 1951. 

MOST YARDS RUSHING BY INDIVIDUAL IN ONE SEASON: 
Ray Poppleman with 1,350 yards in 10 games in 1931. 

MOST YARDS RUSHING BY INDIVIDUAL IN ONE GAME: 

Ray Poppleman with 201 yards in 24 carries against Western Mary- 
land. 

LONGEST RUN FROM SCRIMMAGE: 

Dick Burgee for 90 yards and touchdown against University of Mis- 
souri in 1954. 

56 



PASSING RECORDS 

TEAM PASSING FOR SEASON: 

90 completions in 170 attempts for 1364 yards in 1942 in 9 games. 
TEAM PASSING FOR ONE GAME: 

Joe Tucker with 9 completions in 12 attempts for 178 yards and Stan 

Lavine, 4 for 5 for 129 yards for total of 307 yards against South 

Carolina in 1949. 
WORST PASSING RECORD BY MARYLAND: 

completions in 12 attempts against Vanderbilt in 1948. 
INDIVIDUAL PASSING RECORD FOR ONE SEASON: 

Jack Scarbath in 9 games in 1952 — 59 completions in 113 attempts 

for 1149 yards. 
INDIVIDUAL PASSING RECORD FOR ONE GAME: 

Tommy Mont — 9 completions in 14 attempts for 215 yards against 

U of Connecticut in 1942. 
LEADING PASS RECEIVER FOR ONE SEASON: 

Lloyd Colteryahn — 32 receptions for 593 yards in 1952 in 9 games 
LEADING PASS RECEIVER FOR ONE GAME: 

Lou Weidensaul — 8 receptions for 95 yards and one touchdown 

against Navy in 1951. 

Lloyd Colteryahn — 8 receptions for 131 yards against Alabama in 

1952 
LONGEST FORWARD PASS PLAY: 

Stan Lavine to Ed Bolton for 92 yards and touchdown against South 

Carolina in 1949. Pass 15 yards; run 77 yards. 
LONGEST RETURN OF INTERCEPTED PASS: 

Joe Horning for an official 100 yards and touchdown against Mis- 
souri in 1951 as a freshman. Actual return from inside end zone was 

105 yards. Dickie Lewis for an official 100 yards and touchdown in 

1956 against N. C. State Actual return from inside end zone was 

103 yards. 

KICKING RECORDS 

MOST POINTS AFTER TOUCHDOWNS: 

Don Decker— 37 for 51 attempts in 9 games in 1951. 41 for 55 at- 
tempts in 10 games in 1951 including the 28-13 victory over Tennes- 
see in the Sugar Bowl. 

LONGEST PUNT: 

Brooke (Untz) Brewer for 93 yards against V.M.I, in 1916. John 
Fritsch for 88 yards against Miami, Fla., in 1956. Set a new ACC 
record. 

BEST OFFICIAL AVERAGE ONE GAME: 

Bill Guckeyson for 51 yards in 10 punts against Syracuse in 1936. 
(Note: Brewer against Syracuse in 1920 and Guckeyson against 
Florida in 1936 both averaged better than 60 yards but official fig- 
ures could not be obtained from these schools and papers didn't carry 
the punting statistics.) 

LONGEST PUNT RETURN: 

Dick Nolan — 90 yards— against Clemson for TD in 1953. 

MOST PUNT RETURNS FOR SEASON: 

Bob Shemonski— 28 for 505 yards in 1950 in 10 games. 

57 



LONGEST KICKOFF RETURNS: 

90 yards and TD — Lewis Thomas against Washington College in 1927; 
Bill Guckeyson against Georgetown in 1935; Sam Behr against Vir- 
ginia in 1945; Dick Nolan against Mississippi in 1952. 

LONGEST FIELD GOAL: 

Dick Bielski, 47 yards against Mississippi in 1953. 

LONGEST PUNT RETURN AGAINST MARYLAND: 

Frank Brady of Navy for 100 yards and touchdown in 1951. 

LONGEST KICKOFF RETURN AGAINST MARYLAND: 

Jim McPherson of North Carolina for 93 yards and TD in 1926. 

LONGEST PUNT AGAINST MARYLAND: 

Charlie Justice of North Carolina for 84 yards in 1948. 



Jack Hennemier 

(Continued from page ID 

marks with their fabulous ground gaining achievements and scoring 
jaunts. 

When Hennemier's services became available, Mont lost little time in 
luring him away from 6Cores of other schools who were bidding for 
him. The former Duke graduate had made his mark here at Maryland, 
and so returned. 

Hennemier even today is a big name in the annals of Duke football 
history. Weighing only 150 pounds while playing center, he made fame 
for himself in '33, "34 and '35 as the star Blue Devil center. He un- 
doubtedly was and still is, one of the smallest players ever to play the 
pivot position. Because of his outstanding football ability, for such 
a "little guy," he was nicknamed "Scrappy Jack," and still carries the 
name on and off the field. 

A 60-minute man, he won the most valuable player award as voted 
by his teammates in '35. The same year he made Ail-American Mention 
and the All-Conference team. 

In 1939, he went to Washington and Lee University as Line Coach. 
He stayed there through '41 before being called into the Navy in '42 
at Pensacola Naval Air Station. He coached and played center on the 
Base team. After 3V 2 years of duty, he returned to Duke in '45 as 
assistant line coach and freshman coach. 

He joined the Terp staff in 1949 and stayed until he went to Canada 
in the spring of 1955. Then he came back to Maryland in 1957. 

Whitey Dovell 

(Continued from page ID 
in Mexico City. 

The former Terp guard from Redbank, N. J. also handles the vast 
film library. "Whitey" is generally regarded as a hard working per- 
fectionist, on and off the field. 

He married the former Clair Benson. They have a one and one-half 
year old daughter. 

58 



YEAR BY YEAR RECORDS 



MARYLAND 
AGGIES 

1892 (0-3-0) 

St. Johns 50 

Johns Hop 62 

Episcopal Hi. -16 

1893 (6-0-0) 

36 Eastern Hi 

10 Central Hi 

18 Bait. City Col... 

6 St. Johns Col... 

18 W. Md. Col ....10 

16 Orient Ath. CI. 6 

1894 (3-3-0) 

52 W. Md. Col 

12 Wash. Col 

6 St. Johns 22 

6 Georgetown .... 4 
Col. Ath. CI. -26 
Mt. St. Marys „24 

1895 — No team 
No Games 

1896 (6-2-2) 

Eastern Hi 6 

Gallaudet 

34 Business Hi .... 

10 Central Hi 6 

18 Alexandria Hi.. 
20 Bethel Mil Ac ..10 

Episcopal Hi. .. 6 

16 West. Md 6 

14 Central Hi 

U. of Md 

1897 (2-4-0) 

24 Central Hi 6 

4 Eastern Hi 

J. Hopkins 30 

4 St. Johns 6 

6 Gallaudet 16 

Bait. Med Col...l0 

1898 (2-5-0) 

5 Columbian U. -17 
West. Md 32 

36 Eastern Hi 

Gallaudet 33 

Johns Hop 16 

Episcopal Hi —37 

27 Rock Hill Col... 

1899 (1-4-0) 

West Md 21 

26 Eastern Hi 

Johns. Hop 40 

Delaware Col. 34 
St. Johns 62 

1900 (3-4-1) 

Western Hi .... 
Gib. Ath. CI 17 



G'town Prep .. 5 
6 Episcopal Hi ....34 

5 Gonzaga Hi 11 

15 G'town Prep .. 
21 Gonzaga Hi .... 
21 Char Hall Ac .. 

1901 (1-7-0) 

6 Del. Col 24 

10 Gallaudet Re. ..11 

Johns Hop 6 

6 Rock Hill Col.-ll 
Central Hi 11 

27 U.S. Marines .. 
Wal'k Ath Ol ..36 
West. Md 30 

1902 (3-5-2) 

Georgetown ....27 

5 Mt. St. Jos 

11 Columbian U. ..10 

6 Olympia Ath. .. 

Wash. Col 

Mt. St. Marys .. 5 

6 West. Md 26 

U. of Md 5 

Johns Hop 17 

Del. Col 

1903 (7-4-0) 

Georgetown —28 

5 Clifton Ath 

21 Gunton Tern. .. 
St. Johns 18 

28 Wash. Col 

27 Tech Hi 

Mt. St. Mar .... 2 

6 West. Md 

11 U. of Md 

Dela. Col 16 

6 Columbian U. .. 

1904 (2-4-2) 

Georgetown ....22 
Ran. Macon .... 
Ftress Monroe 

11 Mt. St. Mar 6 

West. Md 5 

22 Gallaudet 5 

U. of Md 6 

Dela. Col 18 

1905 (6-4-0) 

20 Bait Poly In .... 

16 Gallaudet 

West. Md 10 

Navy 17 

17 Wm. & Mary .. 

28 Mt. St. Josephs 
27 St. Johns 5 

Wash. Col JL7 

23 U. of Md 5 

Dela. Col 12 

59 



1906 (5-3-0) 

5 Tech Hi 

22 Bait City Col .. 
Navy 12 

Georgetown ....28 
Mt. Wash. CI. -29 

20 St. Johns 4 

16 Rock Hill Col. 
35 Wash. Col 

1907 (3-6-0) 

13 Tech High 

Georgetown —10 

5 Richmond Col-11 
Navy 12 

6 Mt. St. Mar 12 

10 Geo. Wash 

10 Wash. Col 5 

St. Johns 16 

Gallaudet 5 

1908 (3-8-0) 

5 Central Hi 

5 Tech High 6 

Richmond Col..22 

Johns Hop 10 

Navy 57 

5 Gallaudet 

Fred'bg Col 10 

12 Balto Poly 6 

St. Johns 31 

Wash. Col 11 

Geo. Wash 57 

1909 (2-5-0) 

Richmond Col. 12 
Johns Hopkins 9 
Tech High 11 

5 Rock Hill 

George Wash. 26 
N. Ca. A&M —33 

14 Gallaudet 12 

1910 (4-3-1) 

12 Central Hi 

20 Richmond Col. 

11 Johns Hop 11 

21 Catholic U 

11 Geo. Wash 

V.M.I 8 

St. Johns 6 

3 West. Md 17 

1911 (4-4-2) 

6 Tech Hi 

Richmond 

5 Fred'bg Col 

Central Hi 14 

3 Johns Hop 6 

6 Catholic U 6 

St. Johns 27 

5 Wash. Col 17 

6 West Md 

6 Gallaudet 2 



1912 (6-1-1) 

31 Tech Hi 6 

46 Richmond Col. 

58 U. of Md 

13 Johns Hop 

St. Johns 27 

13 Gallaudet 7 

17 West Md 7 

13 Penn Mil. Col. 13 

1913 (6-3-0) 

27 Balto City J.0 

45 Richmond Col. 
20 Johns Hop 

46 West Md. 

Navy 76 

13 St. Johns 

26 Wash. Col 

Gallaudet 26 

7 Penn Mil 27 

1914 (5-3-0) 

Balto. Poly 6 

6 Catholic U 

13 West Md 20 

14 Johns Hop 

10 St. Johns 

3 Wash. Col 

Gallaudet 23 

26 Penn Mil 

1915 (6-3-0) 

31 Balto Poly 

Haverford 7 

Catholic U 16 

10 Gallaudet 3 

14 Penn Mil 13 

27 St. Johns 14 

28 Wash Col 13 

51 West Md. 

Johns Hop 3 

MARYLAND 
STATE 

1916 (6-2-0) 

6 Dickinson 

7 Navy 14 

15 V.M.I 9 

6 Haverford 7 

31 St. Johns 6 

10 N.Y.U 7 

13 Catholic U 9 

54 Johns Hop 

1917 (4-3-1) 

20 Dela. Col 

Navy 62 

14 V.M.I J.4 

29 Wake Forest ..13 

6 N.C. State 10 

13 St. Johns 3 

Penn State 57 

7 Johns Hop 

1918 (4-1-1) 

6 American U 13 

7 V.M.I 6 



19 West Md 

6 New York U. .. 2 

19 St. Johns 14 

Johns Hop 

1919 (5-4-0) 

6 Swarthmore ....10 
13 Virginia 

West Va 27 

Va. Poly 6 

Yale 31 

27 St. Johns 

13 Catholic U 

20 West Md 

14 Johns Hop 

UNIVERSITY 
OF MARYLAND 

1920 (7-2-0) 

54 Randolph Ma .. 

Rutgers 7 

Princeton 35 

14 Catholic U 

27 Wash. Col 

7 Va. Poly 

13 North Car 

10 Syracuse 7 

24 Johns Hop 7 

1921 (3-5-1) 

3 Rutgers 

Syracuse 42 

3 St. Johns 7 

10 Va. Polv 7 

7 North Car 16 

Yale 28 

16 Catholic U 

Carnegie Tech 21 

1922 (4-5-1) 

6 N. C. State 6 

7 Third Army .... 

Richmond 

Pennsylvania ..12 

Princeton 26 

3 North Car 27 

Va. Poly 21 

3 Yale 45 

3 Johns Hop 

54 Catholic U 

7 N. C. State 6 

1923 (7-2-1) 

53 Randolph Ma... 
3 Pennsylvania .. 

23 Richmond 

9 Va. Polv 16 

14 North Car 

28 St. Johns 

14 Yale 16 

26 N. C. State 12 

40 Catholic U 6 

6 Johns Hop 6 

1924 (3-3-3) 

23 Wash. Col 

7 Wash. & Lee ..19 

60 



38 Richmond 

Va. Polv -12 

6 North Car 

Catholic U 

Yale 47 

N.C. State 

Johns Hop 

1925 (2-5-1) 

13 Wash. Col 

16 Rutgers 

Va. Poly 3 

Virginia 6 

North Car 16 

14 YaL 3 43 

3 W. & L 7 

7 Johns Hop 7 

1926 (5-4-1) 

63 Wash. Col 

South Car 12 

Chicago 21 

8 Va. Poly 24 

14 North Car 6 

38 Gallaudet 7 

15 Yale 

6 Virginia 6 

W. & L 3 

17 Johns Hop 14 

1927 (4-7-0) 

80 Wash. Col 

26 South Car 

6 North Car 7 

13 Va. Poly 7 

10 V. M. 1 6 

6 W. & L 13 

6 Yale 30 

Virginia 21 

20 Vanderbllt 39 

13 Johns Hop 14 

6 Florida 7 

1928 (6-3-1) 

31 Wash. Col 

19 North Car 26 

7 South Oar 21 

13 West Md 6 

V. M. 1 

6 Va. Poly 9 

Yale 6 

18 Virginia 2 

6 W. & L 

26 Johns Hop 6 

1929 (4-4-2) 

34 Wash. Col 7 

North Car 43 

South Car 26 

13 Gallaudet 6 

6 V. M. 1 7 

13 Virginia 13 

13 Yale 13 

24 Va. Polv 

39 Johns Hop 6 

West Md 12 



1930 (7-5-0) 

60 Wash. Col 6 

13 Yale 40 

21 North Car 28 

21 St. Johns 13 

20 V. M. 1 

14 Virginia 6 

41 W. & L 7 

13 V. Poly 7 

Navy 6 

21 Johns Hop 

7 Vanderbilt 22 

West Md 7 

1931 (8-1-1) 

13 Wash. Col 

7 Virginia 6 

6 Navy ._ 

6 Kentucky 6 

41 V. M. 1 20 

20 Va. Poly 

12 Vanderbilt 39 

13 W. & L 7 

35 Johns Hop 14 

41 West Md 6 

1932 (5-6-0) 

63 Wash. Col 

6 Virginia 7 

6 Va. Poly 23 

Duke 34 

24 St. Johns 7 

12 V. M. 1 7 

Vanderbilt 13 

7 Navy 28 

6 W. & L 

23 Johns Hop 

7 West Md 39 

1933 (3-6-0) 

20 St. Johns 

Va. Poly 14 

Tulane —.20 

13 V. M. 1 19 

7 West Md 13 

Virginia 6 

7 Duke 38 

27 Johns Hop 7 

33 W. & L 13 

Florida 19 

1934 (7-3-0) 

13 St. Johns 

W. & L 7 

13 Navy 16 

14 Va. Poly 9 

21 Florida 

20 Virginia 

23 V. M. 1 

14 Indiana 17 

6 Georgetown .... 
19 Johns Hop 



1935 (7-2-2) 

39 St. Johns 6 

7 Va. Poly 

North Car 33 

6 V. M. 1 

20 Florida 6 

14 Virginia 7 

7 Indiana 13 

W. & L 

12 Georgetown .... 6 

Syracuse 

22 West Md 7 

1936 £6-5-0) 

20 St. Johns 

6 Va. Po'ly 

North Car 14 

21 Virginia 

20 Syracuse 

6 Florida 7 

12 Richmond 

7 V. M. 1 13 

6 Georgetown ... . 7 

19 W. & L 6 

West Md 12 

1937 (8-2-0) 

28 St. Johns 

21 Pennsylvania ..28 

6 West Md 

3 Virginia 

13 Syracuse 

13 Florida 7 

9 V. M. 1 7 

14 Penn State 21 

12 Georgetown .... 2 

8 W. & L 

1938 (2-7-0) 

6 Richmond 19 

Penn State 33 

Syracuse 53 

14 West Md 8 

19 Virginia 27 

14 V. M. 1 47 

7 Florida 21 

7 Georgetown —.14 

19 W. & L 13 

1939 (2-7-0) 

26 Hamp.-Syd 

12 West Md. - 

7 Virginia 12 

12 Rutgers 25 

Florida 14 

Penn State 12 

Georgetown —.20 

V. M. 1 13 

7 Syracuse 10 

1940 (2-6-1) 

6 Hamp.-Syd 7 

Pennsylvania ..51 

61 



6 Virginia 19 

Florida 19 

6 West Md 

Georgetown ....41 
V. M. I. 20 

14 Rutgers 7 

7 W. & L 7 

1941 (3-5-1) 

18 Hamp.-Syd 

6 West Md. ...... 6 

Duke 50 

13 Florida 12 

6 Pennsylvania ..55 
Georgetown ....26 

Rutgers 20 

V. M. 1 27 

6 W. & L 

1942 (7-2-0) 

34 Connecticut .... 

14 Lake NAS 

27 Rutgers 13 

V. M. 1 29 

51 West Md 

13 Florida 

Duke 42 

27 Virginia 12 

32 W. & L 28 

1943 (4-5-0) 

7 Curtis B. CG ..13 
13 Wake Forest - 7 

19 Rich. AAB 6 

2 West Va 6 

Penn State 45 

43 Greenv. AAB ..18 

Virginia 39 

Bainbridge 46 

21 V. M. 1 14 

1944 (1-7-1) 

Hamp.-Syd 12 

Wake Forest -39 

6 West Va 6 

Mich. State .... 8 

6 Florida 14 

7 Virginia 18 

Mich. State ....33 

19 Penn State 34 

8 V. M. 1 6 

1945 (6-2-1) 

60 Guilford Col. .. 6 

21 Richmond 

22 Merch. M. A 6 

13 Va. Poly 21 

13 West Va 13 

14 W. & M '....33 

38 V. M. 1 

19 Virginia 13 

19 South Car 13 



1946 (3-6-0) 

54 Bainbridge 

7 Richmond 37 

North Car 33 

6 Va. Poly 

7 W. & M 41 

17 South Car 21 

24 W. & L 7 

14 Mich. State 26 

7 N. C. State 28 

1947 (7-2-2) 

19 South Car 13 

43 Delaware 19 

18 Richmond 6 

7 Duke - 19 

21 Va. Poly 19 

27 West Va 

32 Duquesne 

North Car 19 

20 Vanderbilt 6 

N. C. State .... 

(Gator Bowl, 
Jan. 1, 1948) 

20 Georgia .-._ 20 

1948 (6-4-0) 

19 Richmond 

21 Delaware 

28 Va. Poly 

12 Duke ..' 13 

47 Geo. Wash 

27 Miami 13 

19 South Car 7 

20 North Car 49 

Vanderbilt 34 

14 West Va 16 

1949 (9-1-0) 

34 Va. Poly 7 

33 Georgetown .... 7 
7 Mich. State -.14 

14 N.C. State 6 

44 South Car 7 

40 Geo. Wash 14 

14 Boston U 13 

47 West Va 7 

13 Miami 

(Gator Bowl, 

Jan. 1, 1950) 

COACH 
1892— W. W. Skinner 
1893— S. H. Harding 
1894 — J. G. Bannon 
1895— G. M. Harris 
1896 — Grenville Lewis 
1897 — John Lillibridge 
1898— J. F. Kenly 
1899— S. M. Cooke 
1900— F. H. Peters 
1901— E. B. Dunbar 
*Above Teams Coached by 

Captains 
1902 — D. John Markey 

(Western Md.) 



20 Missouri 7 

1950 (7-2-1) 

7 Georgia 27 

35 Navy 21 

34 Mich. State .... 7 

25 Georgetown —.14 

13 N. C. State 16 

26 Duke 14 

23 Geo. Wash 7 

7 North Car 7 

41 West Va 

63 V. P. 1 7 

1951 (10-0-0) 

54 W. & L 14 

33 Geo. Wash 6 

43 Georgia 7 

14 North Car 7 

27 Louis. State .... 

35 Missouri 

40 Navy 21 

53 N. C. State 

54 West Va 7 

(Sugar Bowl, 

Jan. 1, 1952) 

28 Tennessee J.3 

1952 (7-2-0) 

13 Missouri 10 

13 Auburn 7 

28 Clemson 

37 Georgia 

38 Navy 7 

34 L. S. U 6 

34 Boston U 7 

14 Mississippi 21 

7 Alabama 27 

1953 (10-1-0) 

20 Missouri 6 

52 W. & L 

20 Clemson 

40 Georgia 13 

26 North Car 

27 Geo. Wash 6 

30 Miami (Fla.) .. 

24 South Car 6 

38 Mississippi 

21 Alabama 

*0 Oklahoma 7 

* (Orange BoWl) 
ES THROUGH THE Y 
1903— Markey 
1904— Markey 
1905 — Fred Nielsen (Neb.) 
1906— Nielsen 
1907— C. G. Church (Va.) 

and C. W. Melick (Neb.) 
1908 — Bill Lang (Delaware) 
1909 — Barney Cooper 

(Md. '08) and E. P. 

Larkin (Cornell) 
1910— R. Alston (G.W.) 
1911— C. F. Donnelly 

(Trinity) and H. C. Byrd 

(Maryland '08) 

62 



1954 (7-2-1) 

20 Kentucky 

7 U. C. L. A 12 

13 Wake Forest....l3 

33 North Car 

7 Miami, Fla 9 

20 South Car 

42 N.C. State 14 

16 Clemson 

48 Geo. Wash 6 

74 Missouri 13 

1955 (10-1-0) 

13 Missouri 12 

7 U. C. L. A 

20 Baylor 6 

28 Wake Forest .. 7 
25 North Car 7 

34 Syracuse 13 

27 South Car 

13 L. S. U 

25 Clemson 12 

19 Geo. Wash 

*6 Oklahoma 20 

*Orange Bowl 

1956 (2-7-1) 

12 Syracuse 26 

6 Wake Forest— 

Baylor 14 

6 Miami, Fla. __13 

6 N. Carolina —34 

7 Tennessee 34 

Kentucky 14 

6 Clemson 6 

S. Carolina ___13 

25 N. C. State ___14 
1957 (5-5-0) 

13 Texas A&M___21 
13 N. C. State —48 

Duke 14 

27 Wake Forest— 

21 N. Carolina— 7 
Tennessee 16 

10 South Carolina 6 

7 Clemson 26 

16 Miami, Fla 6 

12 Virginia 

EARS 

1912-34— H. C. Byrd 

(Md. '08) 
1935-39— Frank Dobson 

(Princeton) 
1940-41— Jack Faber ('26), 

Al Heagy. C30), and Al 

Woods C33) all of Md. 
1942 — Clark Shaughnessy 

(Minnesota) 
1943-44 — Clarence Spears 

(Dartmouth) 
1945 — Paul Bryant (Ala.> 
1947-55— Jim Tatum (N.C.) 
1956-57 — Tommy Mont (Md.) 



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THE 1958TERPS 

(Continued from page 16 J 

personnel with experience which will lend valuable depth to the Terp 
squad. The line positions seem to be especially talented two-deep. The 
backfleld should be geared by the experienced quarterbacking of Rusevl- 
yan and Dickie Lewis, the '57 duo that came through so well plus the 
appearance on the scene of another promising all-around signal-caller 
by the name of Scarbath. This time it is sophomore Dick Scarbath, 
younger brother of the Terps' all-America of '52, Jack. Mont believes 
that after Dick gets the needed experience from varsity competition he 
will give Maryland great performances in the future. He already excels 
as a passer and punter and play caller. He will come along with his 
ball handling and defense with experience. Still another quarterback 
who deserves reckoning is soph Dale Betty. He too has all the potential 
of making a fine all-around quarterback. 

Veteran halfbacks Bob Layman and Ted Kershner give Mont an out- 
standing ball-carrying nucleus. Layman is one of the finest two-way 
backs the Terps have had. He is a slick, high-stepping hard runner and 
is tops defensively. Kershner has great speed and the top threat to go all 
the way. 

To go along with these expected strong points and to help bolster 
the weak ones, Maryland has come up with another top-notch group of 
freshmen who will move up to the varsity and some definitely figure 
in the plans for this fall. 

Up front, the outstanding newcomer should be end Vincent Scott, 
Wilmington, Del. His terrific all-around end play so impressed the 
coaches that he was running second team in spring practice and looked 
as though he would keep the job he won. His value is not only in his 
end play, but as a place-kicker. He kicks off to and into the end zone 
and can hit field goals from as far out as 40 yards. He will see a lot 
of duty this fall. Another is end Tony Scotti, Newark, N. J., younger 
brother of regular right end Ben Scotti. He was a standout for the 
frosh and came up with a real good impression in spring drills. Tackle 
Ed Nickla, Long Island, is another of the new stars. Nickla came to 
College Park following a hitch in the Air Force at Boiling Field. He 
has two years to play for the Terps and the big 6-3, 225-pounder does 
a great job at his tackle spot. He is one of the most highly regarded 
to come along in a long time. 

In the backfield, besides Scarbath and Betty, a name to put in your 
little black notebook is that of halfback Dwayne Fletcher, a fleet- 
footed little guy from Front Royal, Va., just 40 miles down the road 
from campus. He has warmed the hearts of the Maryland coaches and 
could be the answer, along with returning halfback Gene Verardi, to 
that back who can take advantage of a block or two and go all the 
way with speed and finesse. He is being compared to a couple of the 
Terps' all-time great runners, Chet "the jet" Hanulak and Ronnie 
Waller. Fullback Everett Cloud of nearby Falls Church, Va., and half- 
back Bob Gallagher, Pittsburgh, are another pair of fine looking pros- 
pects who should help carry the mail for the Terps. 

64 



Fred Layman 

(Continued from page 12) 

backlield and handled the B squad as he will do this fall. Besides his 
coaching duties, he is working secretary for the Terrapin Club and 
Concessions Manager. 

Layman, native of Brentwood, Pa., was a three year letterman in 
football, basketball, and tennis at Brentwood High School. Following 
graduation, he spent a semester at Kiski Prep before enrolling at Col- 
gate in February '51. He transferred to Maryland in the fall of '51. A 
quarterback in high school, prep school and Colgate, Tatum moved him 
to halfback where he made a big impression. It is believed he would 
have been one of the Terps' best. 

He married the former Jane Murray of Brentwood. They have two 
daughters, Lee Ann and Robin. 



Ed FuMerton 

(Continued from "page 12) 

that brought Fullerton his and Maryland's greatest football hour. He 
heroically disproved the general feeling that the 60-minute man in foot- 
ball was a thing of the past while the two-platoon was still the trend. 
Because of a late injury to offensive fullback Ralph Felton, he was 
moved over to take care of those offensive chores and still played his 
defensive halfback spot. All he did was score two touchdowns, pass for 
a third and recover a fumble that led to the Terps' fourth score in lead- 
ing the Red and White to a 28-13 win over Tennessee. He was named 
to the United Press all-Bowl team. Following his senior year he was 
selected to the first all-Conference eleven. He was Co-Captain of the 
1952 team. 

Following graduation in 1953 from the School of Business and Public 
Administration with a Personnel Major, he played with the Pittsburgh 
Steelers that fall. An injury kept him out most of the season. 

In January, 1954 he went into the Air Force as a 2nd Lt., and after 
training schools was assigned to Boiling Air Force Base as Ass't. Elec- 
tronics Officer. 

At Boiling he was player-coach, and his second year found him just 
coaching and the team won the all-Service title. Following his discharge 
in January of 1956, he accepted Coach Mont's call to return to Mary- 
land. 

Ed married the former Joan Walton, high school sweetheart. They 
have two sons, Ed, jr., 4, and Michael 2. 

65 



Johnny Idzik 

(Continued from page 16) 



played in the 'Gator Bowl games of 1948 against Georgia and 1950 
against Missouri. Idzik also lettered in baseball his last two years as 
shortstop and third baseman. He turned down pro baseball offers as well 
as pro football opportunities with the Philadelphia Eagles, who drafted 
him. Instead, following graduation in 1951 from the School of Physical 
Education, he stayed on at Maryland as assistant coach through most 
of the '51 season before he went into the Marine Corps. 

Stationed at Parris Island, Idzik played halfback the season of '52 and 
for leading them to the All-Marine Championship, he was named to the 
All-Marine eleven. After his transfer to Quantico he was given S/Sgt. 
rating and assigned to Special Services. He played and coached the 
season of 1953. 

After his discharge, he was named assistant coach at the University 
of Tennessee the season of 1954. In the spring of 1955 he accompanied 
one of the Vol. coaches to Ottawa, Canada where he was backfield coach 
of the Roughriders. 

Idzik married the former Joyce Hoppensteadt, Maryland coed and 
graduate, in January 1953. 

Roy Lester 

(Continued from page 13) 

In January 1945 he was sent to Bainbridge, Md. to Physical Instructors 
School and upon completion of that training was sent to Hawaii as an 
instructor for a year. 

Following his discharge in '46, he returned to West Virginia to com- 
lete work for his degree. Again he played all three varsity sports and 
finished with nine varsity letters. He was an end on the Mountaineers' 
Sun Bowl team of '49. He got his B.A. in Political Science in the spring 
of 1949. 

After a year with the Eagles, he returned to W. Va. to begin work 
on his Masters Degree. He then took the job of coaching football, basket- 
ball, and baseball at Walton, W. Va. High where he stayed two years 
Then he transferred to Cumberland and Allegany High. 

He married the former Sylvia Watson. They have a son, Elwood Roy, 
jr., four months old. 

Duke Wyre 

(Continued from page 15) 

year. Then in '47 he came to Maryland and has been head trainer ever 
since. 

A Navy veteran, Wyre served as physical education instructor in 
the V-12 program 

He was the first president of the Southern Conference Trainers' Assn. 
He previously has been on the board of the National Trainers' Assn.. 
and now his most recent appointment, Chairman of the Board. In '49, 
he was named the top trainer in the East. 

66 



BRIEF HISTORY OF THE UNIVERSITY 

The history of the present University is the history of two institutions: 
the old privately-owned and operated University of Maryland in Balti- 
more and the Maryland State College (formerly Maryland Agricultural 
College) at College Park. These institutions were merged in 1920. 

In 1807, the College of Medicine of Maryland was organized, the fifth 
medical school in the United States. The first class was graduated in 1810. 
A permanent home was established in 1814-1815 by the erection of the 
building at Lombard and Green Streets in Baltimore, the oldest structure 
in America devoted to medical teaching. Here was founded one of the 
first medical libraries (and the first medical school library) in the United 
States. In 1812 the General Assembly of Maryland authorized the College 
of Medicine of Maryland to "annex or constitute facilities of divinity, 
law, and arts and science," and by the same act declared that the "col- 
leges or faculties thus united should be constituted an university by the 
name and under the title of the University of Maryland." By authority 
of this act, steps were taken in 1813 to establish "a faculty of law," and 
in 1823 a regular school of instruction in law was opened. Subsequently 
there were added: in 1882 a Department of Dentistry which was absorbed 
in 1923 by the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery (founded in 1840, 
the first dental school in the world); in 1889 a School of Nursing; and 
in 1904 the Maryland College of Pharmacy (founded in 1841, the third 
oldest pharmacy college in the United States). 

The Maryland State College was chartered in 1856 under the name of 
the Maryland Agricultural College, the second agricultural college in the 
Western Hemisphere. For three years the College was under private 
management. In 1862 the Congress of the United States passed the Land 
Grant Act. This act granted each State and Territory that should claim 
its benefits an appropriate amount of unclaimed western lands, in place 
of scrip, the proceeds from the sale of which should apply under certain 
conditions to the "endowment, support, and maintenance of at least one 
college where the leading object shall be, without excluding other scien- 
tific and classical studies, and including military tactics, to teach such 
branches of learning as are related to agriculture and the mechanic arts, 
in such a manner as the Legislatures of the States may respectively pre- 
scribe, in order to promote the liberal and practical education of the in- 
dustrial classes in the several pursuits and professions of life." This grant 
was accepted by the General Assembly of Maryland, and the Maryland 
Agricultural College was named as the beneficiary of the grant. Thus 
the College became, at least in part, a State institution. In the fall of 
1914 control was taken over entirely by the State. In 1916 the General 
Assembly granted a new charter to the College, and made it the Mary- 
land State College. 

In 1920, by an act of the State Legislature, the University of Maryland 
was merged with the Maryland State College, and the resultant institu- 
tion was given the name University of Maryland. 

67 



MARYLAND'S ALL-AMERICA CANDIDATE 

RODNEY BREEDLOVE, 20, 6-2. 215, Junior from Cumberland, Md, 

"He could be the greatest and most exciting football player in many 
years at Maryland, or at any other school. He definitely is an ail-Ameri- 
can and could have made it last year if he hadn't been a sophomore. I 
never saw a greater guard in my life, and I am recalling the three fort- 
unate years I had playing at Maryland and the five years I coached 
there." These are the words of one who should know an all-America 
football player, especially a guard, the Terps' two-year all-America BOB 
WARD. This was what he had to say about his pupil before he left for 
his coaching assignment this spring at Iowa State. Ward, an all-America 
as a junior and senior, last year helped mold Breedlove into a tremen- 
dous two-way football player at guard after he had starred at end as 
a freshman. Coach Tommy Mont needed help at guard, so knowing 
Breedlove to be a great all-round football player made the smart move. 

Breedlove won more honors last year than any sophomore in Maryland 
grid history. He was all-America honorable mention on ALL selections 
. . . was named to the all-Conference first team guard position by all 
three selections; the AP, UP, and the Southern Writers' Ass'n. . . was 
selected ACC "Soph of the Week" twice and nominated most every 
week . . . was runnerup as the National Lineman of the Week by AP 
for his great game against North Carolina, witnessed by Queen Elizabeth 
and Prince Philip . . . was mentioned for national lineman honors after 
Tennessee game and was fourth in the national balloting following the 
Miami game . . . was one of the few sophs so honored by the national 
boards last fall . . . was named the nation's top sophomore lineman 
in the final consensus poll for sophs. , 

He was honored by his coaching staff when he was named the team's 
best defensive lineman award . . . also honored by home town of 
Cumberland Dapper Dan Club as "Athlete of the Year" for the athlete 
who did most during the year for the city of Cumberland . . . the strap- 
ping Breedlove, a real fire-ball, has uncanny all-around football ability 
... he has great speed and maneuverability . . . can out-run all line- 
men and a lot of backs ... he is a great rover on the field because of 
his quickness and reactions and brilliant diagnosis of plays . . . his un- 
touchable defensive play thrills the fans and shakes up the opponents 
. . . does a fabulous job from his linebacking spot . . . has unusual faci- 
lity of getting to the qb at the snap of the ball . . . roams so effectively 
that he knocks down numerous passes. 

In final game of '57 he batted down six, one into teammates hands 
for interception. . . has fierce and intense desire and determination. . . 
a vicious and sure tackier . . . has exceptional and unexhausting strength 
. . Mont calls him the best and his "other" QB ... all opposing coaches 
and players lauded his play as a soph . . . Jim Tatum of North Carolina 
says, and this is typical: "He is one of the finest football players I have 
ever seen and definitely the finest guard I saw last year. A true all- 
America; he has my vote." 

68 




;^i0^ jfm*»& 




THE TERP BACKFIEL0 




m 




TED KERSHNER— HB 



V_«*l 



BOB LAYMAN- HB 



> 





BOB RUSEVIYAN— QB 



JIM J0YCF— FB