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Full text of "University of Maryland men's football media guides"






THE 1959 MAR 



4 4 



50-YARD LINE" 



( 



COACH TOM NUGENT 



s* 








"*•**?* *m*i 



'■%& 





L»*i»*> 







TONY SCOTTI 
End 


JOE GARDI 
Tackle 


KURT SCHWARZ 
Tackle 


BOB COLE 

Tackle 


VINCENT SCOTT 
End 


BILL LAZARO 

Guard 


BOB GALLAGHER 

Halfback 





I 






I 




v.. 





J 



i 




FOR PRESS, RADIO and TELEVISION 

This is your 1959 Maryland football brochure, 
"The 50-Yard Line." It is published in hope 
that it offers you helpful information for your 
coverage of Terp games this season. With this 
book goes an invitation to you to visit us as 
often as possible in our offices in Cole Field 
House. In return, I will try to visit you as 
often as I can and extend every assistance 
possible. For any information, you can reach 
me day and night at UNion 4-4076. 

Applications for tickets should be made the 
first part of the week of the game to allow 
time for mailing. Wire and telephone require- 
ments should be made through your local 
Western Union office. 

Every effort will be made to furnish all the services in the press box 
available, so that your accounts of the game can be most adequate 
for your readers. Statistics, both half-time and final figures; a quarter 
play-by-play; game leaders in all departments; substitutions, etc. will 
be ready a few minutes after the game. 

Many thanks for all your cooperation and favors of the past. 

JOE F. BLAIR 
Sports Publicity Director 
University of Maryland, 
College Park, Maryland. 

Table of Contents 

Page 

'59 Schedule; Bowl Record; '58 Results; Itinerary . . 2 

Athletic Council; Dept. of Intercollegiate Athletics ... 3 

The Terp Press 4 

President Wilson H. Elkins ....... 5-6 

Director of Athletics William W. Cobey .... 7-8 

Coach Tom Nugent 9-10 

Assistant Coaches and Trainers 1 1-15 

Freshman Football Schedule 14 

The 1959 Terps 16 

Terp Opponents 17-26 

Opponents' Outlook 27-33 

1959 Squad Roster 34-35 

Opponents' Outlook, Concluded 36-37 

Terp Thumbnail Sketches 38-47 

'58 Terp Honorary Selections; All-Americans .... 48-51 

1958 Statistical Summary 52-54 

All-Time Records 55-57 

Brief History of the University 58 

'53 National Champions (Photo) 59 

Year by Year Records 60-63 

1959-60 Varsity Basketball Schedule 67 

1 



1959 SCHEDULE 



Sept. 


19 


Sept. 


26 


Oct. 


3 


Oct. 


10 


Oct. 


17 


Oct. 


31 


Nov. 


7 


Nov. 


14 


Nov. 


21 


Dec. 


5 



West Virginia at College Park, Md. 
Texas at Austin, Texas (Night) 
Syracuse at Syracuse, N. Y. 
Wake Forest at College Park, Md. 
North Carolina at College Park, Md. 
South Carolina at Columbia, S. C. 
Navy at Baltimore, Md. (Night) 
Clemson at Clemson, S. C. 
Virginia at College Park, Md. 
N. C. State at College Park, Md. 



KICKOFF 


PRICE 


1:30 P.M. 


EDT 


$4.00 


8:00 P.M. 


CST 


$4.00 


2:00 P.M. 


EDT 


$4.00 


1:30 P.M. 


EDT 


$4.00 


1:30 P.M. 


EDT 


$4.00 


2:00 P.M. 


EST 


$4.65 


8:00 P.M. 


EST 


$5.00 


2:00 P.M. 


EST 


$4.50 


2:00 P.M. 


EST 


$4.00 


2:00 P:M 


: EST 


$4.00 



MARYLAND'S BOWL RECORD 



1948 


'Gator Bowl 


Maryland 


20 




Georgia 


20 


1950 


iGator Bowl 


Maryland 


20 




Missouri 


7 


1952 


Sugar Bowl 


Maryland 


28 




Tennessee 


13 


1954 


Orange Bowl 


Maryland 







Oklahoma 


7 


1956 


Orange Bowl 


Maryland 


6 




Oklahoma 


20 




Won: 2 - 


- Lost: 2 — 


Tied: 


1 








Coach of All Bowl Teams - 


Jim Tatum 





1958 RESULTS 



Maryland 




Opponent 


Maryland 




Opponent 





Wake Forest 


34 


10 


South Carol 


ina 6 


21 


N. C. State 


6 


14 


Navy 


40 





Clemson 


8 


26 


Miami, Fla. 


14 


10 


Texas A&M 


14 


44 


Virginia 


6 





North Carolina 


— 




— 


7 


Auburn 


20 
Won: 4- 


132 
-Lost: 6 




175 



MARYLAND'S ITINERARY FOR 1959 SEASON 

HEADQUARTERS DATE OPPONENT 

Commodore Perry Hotel, Austin, Tex. 
Hotel Syracuse, Syracuse, New York 
Hotel Columbia, Columbia S. C. 
Poinsett Hotel, Greenville, S. C. 



Sept. 


26 


Texas 


Oct. 


3 


Syracuse 


Oct. 


31 


South Carolina 


Nov. 


14 


Clemson 




THE 
ATHLETIC COUNCIL 

Mr. Geary F. Eppley 
Cliairman 

Mr. William W. Cobey 
Director of Athletics 

Mr. H. A. (Bud) Millikan 
Ass't. Director of Athletics 

Mr. Harry A. Boswell. Jr Alumni Association 

Dr. James H. Reid, Ass'f. Dean, School of Business & Puh. Adm. 

Dr. Jack Faber Head, Bacteriology Department 

Dr. Leland Scott Horticulture Department 

Dr. Warren Johnson School of Physical Education 

Mr. Charles Hayleck School of Engineering 

Mr. Robert Yellowlees President, Student Government Assn. 

Department of Intercollegiate Athletics 

Equipment Manager Kermit "Chief" Cissell 

Assistant Equipment Manager Albert Johnson 

Head of Facilities Charles "Lindy" Kehoe 

Chief of Concessions Perry Moore 

Ticket Manager Eddie Bean 

Office Secretary to Mr. Cobey Mrs. Dorothy Hunt 

Office Secretary to Mr. Nugent Mrs. Dorothy Henderson 

Office Secretary, Football & Basketball Coaches Mrs. Francis Henry 

Office Secretary to Mr. Blair Mrs. Betty Francis 

Head Trainer Alfred "Duke" Wyre 

Assistant Trainer Bill "Spider" Fry 

Head Football Coach Tom Nugent 

Basketball Coach H. A. "Bud" Millikan 

Assistant Basketball Coach Perry Moore 

Baseball Coach H. Burton Shipley 

Lacrosse Co-Coaches Jack Faber and Al Heagy 

Track, Cross-Country Coach Jim Kehoe 

Soccer, Tennis Coach Doyle Royal 

Swimming Coach Bill Campbell 

Wrestling Coach William E. "Sully" Krouse 

Oolf Coach Frank Cronin 

Rifle Coach T/Sgt. David P. Pruitt, Jr. 

3 



THE TERP PRESS 



*GEORGE BOWEN, The Associated Press 
MAX FULLERTON, The Associated Press 
LOU PANOS, The Associated Press 
JACK DAVIS, The Associated Press 
ERNIE BARCELLA, The United Press 

*BOB SERLING, The United Press 
EV GARDNER, Sports Editor, The Washington Daily News 

*HENRY FANKHAUSER, The Daily News 

*MORRIS SIEGEL, Columnist, The Daily News 
CHUCK EGAN, Sports Editor, The Washington Evening Star 
FRANCIS STANN, Columnist, The Evening Star 

*MERRELL WHITTLESEY, Sports Department, The Evening Star 
GEORGE HUBER, Sports Department, The Evening Star 
BILL FUCHS, Sports Department, The Evening Star 
BUS HAM, Sports Editor, The Washington Post and Times-Herald 
SHIRLEY POVICH, Columnist, The Post and Times-Herald 
BOB ADDIE, Columnist, The Post and Times-Herald 

*HERMAN BLACKMAN, The Post and Times Herald 
MAURY FITZGERALD, The Post and Times-Herald 
MARTIE ZADRAVEC, The Post and Times-Herald 
PAUL MENTON, Sports Editor, The Baltimore Evening Sun 

-BILL TANTON, Sports Department, The Evening Sun 
RANDALL CASSELL, Columnist, The Evening Sun 
WALTER TAYLOR, Sports Department, The Evening Sun 

*DOUG BROWN, Sports Department, The Evening Sun 
BOB MAISEL, Sports Editor, The Morning Sun 

*ED BRANDT, Sports Department, The Morning Sun 
C. M. GIBBS. Columnist, The Morning Sun 

*ED ATWATER, Sports Department, The Morning Sun 
JOHN STEADMAN, Sports Editor, The News-Post 
AL COSTELLO, Sports Department, The News-Post 

*KARL FELDNER, Sports Department, The News-Post 
HUGH TRADER, Columnist, The News-Post 

J. SUTER KEGG, Sports Editor, The Cumberland Evening Times 
C. V. BURNS, Sports Editor, The Cumberland Morning News 
DICK KELLY, Sports Editor, The Hagerstown Mail 
FRANK COLLEY, Sports Editor, The Hagerstown Herald 
ED NICHOLS, Sports Editor, The Salisbury Times 
HENRY DECKER, Sports Editor, The Frederick Post 
THE FREDERICK NEWS 

BOR LAYTON. Sports Editor, The Cambridge Banner 
BOB WACHTER, Sports Editor, The Annapolis Evening Capital 
*Cover Da \y 

RADIO and TELEVISION 



BALTIMORE 

Mat Thomas, Don Bruchey, Bailey 

Chuck Thompson, WMAR-TV 
Nelson Baker, Tommy Dukehart, 

Chaseman, Jim Killian, WJZ-TV 
Joe Croghan, WBAL-TV 
Eddie Fenton, WCBM 
Vince Bagley, WWIN 
Russ Hall, WITH 
Joe Croghan, WBAL 
Roger Griswold, WBMD 
Ron Wilner, WAYE 



Goss, 
Joel 



Bill Shriver. WTOW 

WASHINGTON 

Jimmy Gibbons. WRC-TV, WOL-Radio 
Bill Malone. WMAL-TV and Radio 
Jim Simpson, WRC-TV and Radio 
Ray Michael, WRC-TV and Radio 
Arch McDonald, WTOP-Radio 
Dan Daniels, WTOP-TV and Radio 
Bob Wolff, WWDC-Radlo 
Rnm Kaufman, WOL-Radio 
Morris Siegel, WMAL-TV 




DR. WILSON H. ELKINS 

PRESIDENT, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Dr. Wilson Homer Elkins assumed the Presidency of the University 
of Maryland on September 1, 1954. His formal inauguration as the 
twenty-first head of the institution took place on January 20, 1955. 

He has brought to the University of Maryland an outstanding pro- 
fessional record of proven leadership in educational administration, and 
an unusual background of high scholastic achievement and demon- 
strated athletic ability during his undergraduate and graduate career. 

At Maryland, he has stressed the obligation of the state to provide a 
quality education for all Maryland youth who demonstrate their ca- 
pacity to learn. On the subject of sports, he has said that values and 
attitudes developed in activities outside of the classroom, including 
football, are important elements of a liberal education. 

Dr. Elkins is a native Texan. He was a Rhodes Scholar from 1933 
to 1936. He received the B. Litt. and D. Phil, degrees from Oxford Uni- 
versity, England, in 1936. He received his undergraduate education at 
the University of Texas from 1928 to 1932. At Texas he earned eight 
varsity letters in football, basketball and track. He was elected presi- 
dent of the Student Association and captain of the basketball team in 



his senior year. He is a member of Phi Beta Kappa and of Omicron 
Delta Kappa. He was graduated from the University of Texas in 1932 
with B.A. and M.A. degrees. In addition, he holds two honorary de- 
grees: a Doctor of Laws from Washington College in 1954 and a Doctor 
of Laws from The Johns Hopkins University in 1955. 

Dr. Elkins began his professional career in education as an instructor 
in history at the University of Texas in 1936. He held two presidencies 
prior to assuming this office at the University of Maryland. From 1938 
to 1949, he was President of San Angelo Junior College, San Angelo, 
Texas; and he was president of Texas Western College, a branch of 
the University of Texas, from 1949 to 1954. 

In 1937, Dr. Elkins was married to the former Dorothy Blackburn 
of Berclair, Tex. They have two daughters, Carole Ann and Margaret 
Elise. 




WILLIAM W. COBEY 



DIRECTOR OF ATHLETICS 

One of the most respected and most popular figures in Athletics to- 
day, William W. Cobey continues to give his every effort to make the 
athletic program at the University of Maryland one of the best in the 
country. 

During the three years that he has been the Director of Athletics, 
Cobey has seen the Terrapins dominate the Atlantic Coast Conference 
championships in the twelve recognized championship sports. 

Prior to his appointment in February of 1946, Cobey was Graduate 

Manager of Athletics for nine years. It was he who administered and 
handled the vast overall athletic program. His program called for all 
the scheduling for all sports except football, heading the business 
office, and making the numerous arrangements that accompanied the 
success of the program. 

Long devotion to the University wasn't new to the affable Cobey. 
He came to the Athletic Department after having served 17 years 
as Cashier of the University. 

The Cobey name is not new, even to old-time University graduates. 
Bill's father, W. W. Cobey, was a 1901 graduate and a letterman in 
track and manager of the baseball team. He became a famous agri- 



cultural scientist and while in Florida, he was one of the pioneers in 
the discovery of leaf tobacco. Cobey also had two uncles graduate from 
the University. 

Bill, as he is known to the many friends he has made around home 
and throughout the athletic fraternity, came to Maryland in the fall of 
1926 following graduation from Fort Meyer, Fla. High School. Born 
and raised in Quincy, still his native home, Cobey attended Quincy 
schools through eleventh grade before the family moved to Fort Meyer. 

After playing freshman lacrosse, Cobey had to cast aside any athletic 
team participation in order that he might get a job to help him through 
school. This employment was in the Cashier's office where he worked 
until his graduation in 1930. He belonged to the Kappa Alpha Fra- 
ternity while an undergraduate. 

Following graduation, he returned to Quincy, Fla., and worked with 
his uncle on a truck farm. He returned to the University to accept the 
job as Cashier of the University. It was this job he held for 17 years, 
until 1948 when he accepted the position as Graduate Manager of Ath- 
letics. Then came the appointment as Director of Athletics, February 
1, 1956. 

Cobey is active in community affairs, having been a past president 
of University Park PTA; councilman for University Park two years, 
first president of the University branch of the Maryland Classified 
Employee's Assn.; and is active in the College Park Rotary Club. 

Cobey married the former Mary Gray Munroe, also of Quincy, Fla., 
in 1935. They have six children, three daughters and three sons. Their 
oldest daughter, Mary Patricia, is a graduate of the University; William 
is a Pre-Med. Student at Emory College; Julia Ann is a Sophomore 
at the University, while Betty is in eleventh grade. A son, Elwood is 
in eighth grade while the baby of the family, Munroe, is in second 
grade. 

The Cobeys are members of the University Methodist Church, College 
Park. 



8 




TOM NUGENT 

HEAD FOOTBALL COACH 

The University of Maryland's gridiron fortunes for the next four 
years have been given to one of the game's finest young football minds, 
Tom Nugent. The popular young master of one of football's most 
imaginative and successful offensive formations, the "I," begins his first 
year at College Park with sincere expectations of bringing to Mary- 
land the winning formula in future years. 

Of the 46-year old former Florida State head coach and athletic 
director, Maryland President Dr. Wilson H. Elkins commented: "We 
are most fortunate in securing Tom Nugent as our football coach. He 
is an exceptionally fine man, one of fine character and one who defin- 
itely will be accepted by the University, our community, and press. 
Nugent has had fine records and has had successful experience as head 
coach and athletic director. His football is original with an interesting 
style of play." 

Nugent has gathered together an outstanding staff that has many 
years of coaching experience. Their future depends not on this year's 
record or even the next, for it will take these first years to train and 
coach the personnel that enroll on the College Park campus this fall, 
the next, and the next. With the material already here upon his arrival 
and the influence of the outstanding players he will bring to Maryland 



in the future, Nugent will mold the teams of the new era. The freshman 
class for the 1959 season that Nugent and his staff enrolled, is believed 
to be one of the finest ever to enter the University. The Terp staff got 
r very, very late start recruiting because of the late date that Nugent 
took over the helm, but worked tirelessly with the results overwhelm- 
ingly satisfactory. 

The thoughts are that Nugent will do the job for he often is referred 
to as the "magician" of football in the South. He has had two former 
assignments, V.M.I, and Florida State and brought both from obscurity 
to success, through winning records. There is little reason to believe 
the same won't be accomplished here, for he and his staff have access 
to a much better area for recruiting through the excellent geographic 
location of the University. 

The sharp-minded new Terrapin mentor has become known nationally 
for his bright innovations. It was Nugent who presented to football 
the now famous "I" formation, the typewriter huddle, and the double 
quarterback. The coaching fraternity considers his new football wrinkles 
the finest and most exciting. 

In 1954, he started the Florida State Football Clinic and saw it de- 
velop to be considered the top football clinic in the country. The 1958 
clinic attracted nearly 1000 coaches from all parts of the country. His 
program was headlined by a "Who's Who" of big name coaches each 
year. 

Nugent's first head coaching job was at Virginia Military Academy. 
In four years, 1949-52, he compiled a 19-18-2 record. The 1951 season 
found the Keydets tied with Maryland for the Southern Conference 
championship. Both had 5-0 marks in the league. It was during this 
season, his team scored a mighty upset over Georgia Tech in Atlanta. 

The affable Nugent moved to Florida State for the season of 1953 
and in six years his Seminoles had been brought out of the football 
doldrums and became known to all as he guided his teams to 34 vic- 
tories, 27 defeats, and one tie. His ten-year record reads 53 wins, 
45 losses, and three ties. 

A native of Lawrence, Mass., he attended and graduated from Ithaca 
College in 1936. 

He married the former Peg Foley, and they have nine children, four 
girls and five boys— Tommy, 16; Kerry, 15; Peggy, 13; T. D., 11; Patty, 
9; Timmy, 5; Mary Ann, 4; Jerry, 3; and John Michael, one. 



10 




ASSISTANT COACHES 

BILL "WHITEY DOVELL 

A 1953 graduate from the School of 
Physical Education, Recreation, and Health, 
Dovell has been a member of the Terp 
staff since that time. 

The former Terp guard was appointed 
freshman coach and also assisted the var- 
sity and scouted future Terp opponents. As 
freshman coach, he led the Terp yearling; 
to three winning seasons, highlighted by 
the 1955 undefeated team. The '55 frosh 
unit represented the iirst and only fresh- 
man team to have an unblemished record. 
The big game was the linal one of the 
season. It was the much publicized "inter- 
national" grid attraction between the Terp 
frosh and Mexico Polytechnic Institute. 
Playing across the border in Mexico City, 
Dovell's team won 26-13. 

Following the '55 season, he became assistant line coach, a post he 
has held since. 

New head coach Tom Nugent retained Dovell as a member of his 
staff on the splendid recommendations of others who know of Dovell's 
value and as one to whom Nugent could turn to in helping to evaluate 
the Terp team he inherited. 

Dovell also handles the film library. On and off the field, he is a con - 
st ant hardworking coach and perfectionist of line play. 

He married the former Clair Benson. They have two daughters. 

LEE CORSO 

The sudden rise of Florida State under 
Nugent was accelerated greatly when Nu- 
gent came up with a great quarterback, 
Lee Corso. To this day, the wiry little Cor- 
so is "Mr. Quarterback" at Florida State. 
His outstanding inspirational play brought 
the Seminoles under Nugent very much in- 
to the grid picture across the country as 
the magician who made the "I" formation 
known. That is one of the reasons Nugent 
kept him on as a member of his staff fol- 
lowing graduation. With the move to Mary- 
land, Nugent naturally wanted Corso to 
follow, and he did. 

A native of Miami, Fla., Corso had a 
brilliant career in football, baseball, and 
basketball. He was selected first team all- 
State in each sport his senior year. He won 
the honor in basketball also his junior year. Also, he was named "Ath- 
letic-Scholar of the Year" his final term and was on the all-Southern 

(Continued on page 6Jf) 




11 




a»jjw 



BERNIE REID 

Nugent persuaded Bernie Reid, one of 
the most popular and most successful high 
school coaches in the South, to be a mem- 
ber of his new staff. 

Reid, enjoying great success at Albany, 
Ga. High School, comes to Maryland with 
an outstanding reputation and rave notices 
on his accomplishments from the Southern 
press. 

The 34-year old Reid is a native of Ham- 
ilton, Ohio. He graduated from Hamilton 
ggtfj f ffljji i , High "' 1942 where he was a three year star 

.jftjpP^ A] and a weight man on the track team. 

Jl M Following his high school graduation, he 

■ Mr entered the University of Cincinnati that fall. 

| J^ J| He stayed long enough to play the fresh- 

man grid schedule, then enlisted in the 
Merchant Marine where he stayed 18 months 
Discharged in January of 1944, he entered the University of Georgia 
in the spring semester. He played the fall of '44 for Coach Wally Butts 
as a guard but the Army then called him into the service, in De- 
cember. He served in Germany 22 months with the 78th Infantry. He 
was discharged in January of 1947. 

He returned to Georgia and completed his studies and played his 
junior and senior seasons. He graduated in June of 1949. Reid was 
Captain of the team his senior year and was first team all-Southeast 

(Continued on page 6GJ 

ALF SATTERFIELD 

For the past several seasons, V.P.I, has 
returned to be one of the finer teams in the 
South, and much of the credit for their suc- 
cess, their great line play, and top defense 
is attributed to Alf Satterfield, another of 
the very outstanding men brought to Mary- 
land by Nugent. With his top coaching 
abilities, Satterfield is considered one of 
the best recruiters in football. 

The 36-year old Satterfield comes to Mary- 
land after eight years at V.P.I, as their line 
coach and after helping develop their grid 
fortunes back to the winning ledger. 

A native of Russellville, Ark., he attended 
that high school and graduated in 1940. There 
he was a three-sport star in football, basket- 
ball and baseball. He lettered all three years 
in each sport. A center in football, he was named to 
team his senior year. He also was chosen to play 
school all-American game in Memphis, Tenn. 

Following graduation, he entered Vanderbilf University and played 

(Continued on page 65) 




the all-State first 
in the first high 



12 




CHARLIE GUY 

The final addition to the staff brought 
back to Maryland a familiar face and 3 
warm welcome by many of his former as- 
sociates, Charlie Guy, a former head coach 
at Johns Hopkins and assistant coach at Vir- 
ginia. 

Guy, in business in recent years, has out- 
standing athletic background as a player and 
coach. He is a graduate of the United States 
Naval Academy in 1945; was athletic direc- 
tor and football coach at Bullis Prep School, 
Silver Spring, Md., was assistant lostball 
coach at the University of Virginia and 
then head football coach at Johns Hopkins 
for two years. 

Following his graduation from New Trier 
High School, Chicago in 1941, he attended 
Severn Prep School, Severn, Md. There he 
was captain of the football team and played lacrosse and was on the 
wrestling team. Then he entered the Naval Academy and was a three 
sport star. He played end on the football team; was a defenseman in 
lacrosse, and wrestled. He was all-America two years in lacrosse and 
won the Schmeisser Award as the outstanding defenseman in the State 
in 1945. He also was Captain of the 1945 lacrosse team. 

He then entered the service and served on several amphibious ships 

(Continued on page 65) 

ROLAND ARRIGONI 

Given one of the biggest and most im- 
portant assignments, Roland Arrigoni has 
been delegated by Nugent as the coach of 
the all-important 1959 freshman team. 

Nugent brought the 25-year old Arrigoni 
to Maryland with him after serving with 
him last season at Florida State. Nugent be- 
lieves the hard-working conscientious Arri- 
goni has one of the best coaching futures 
that will be aided greatly with experience. 
Arrigoni is a native of Chicago, but moved 
to Albuquerque, New Mexico at a young 
age and received his early schooling there. 
He attended Albuquerque High School, 
graduating in June of 1951. There he letter- 
ed three years in football as a tackle and 
three years as a catcher in baseball. 
He entered the University of New Mexico in the fall of 1951. He 
graduated in 1956 with a Bachelor of Science degree in Physical Educa- 
tion. While at New Mexico, he was a star tackle for three years 
and again lettered three years in baseball as a catcher. He was offered 
a chance to enter the New York Yankee farm system, but his service 

(Continued on page 65) 




13 



FRANK TOOMEY 

When Nugent came to Maryland, there 
was a coach on his staff at Florida State 
that he wanted very much to come with 
him. Frank Toomey accepted his call. 

Toomey brings with him one of the finest 
reputations as a backfield coach in college 
football today. He is highly regarded, re- 
spected, and considered one of the best. Al- 
so, he is known widely, and by Nugent and 
his past teams in particular, as one of the 
top scouts of the game. With his backfield 
chores, he will be one of the chief scouts of 
future opponents. He also is a fine recruiter. 

The serious, hard-working Toomey grad- 
uated from Ithaca College and following his 
4-year tour of duty in the Marine Corps, 
returned to Ithaca to receive his Master's Degree. While with the 
Marines, he won a Presidential Citation and the Purple Heart. 

While working on his Master's, he coached the Ithaca varsity backfield 
and freshman basketball and varsity baseball teams. 

After completing work on his Degree, Toomey went to Waverly, N. Y. 
High School as head coach in 1948. He compiled the enviable record of 39 
wins against eight losses. He also coached the baseball team at Waverly. 

He went to Florida State as Nugent's assistant in 1954 and has been 
with him since. He was responsible for developing the backs of FSU 
that in recent years have become known nationally. 

He is married and has a son, Michael, 7. 




FRESHMAN FOOTBALL SCHEDULE FOR 1959 



DATE 

October 2 

October 24 
October 30 
November ti 
November 13 



OPPONENT 

South Carolina 

Norlh Carolina 

Virginia 

George Washington 

Navy 



PLACE 

Home 
Home 
Home 
Home 
Awav 



Coach: Roland Arrigoni 



14 



THE TRAINERS 

ALFRED J. "Duke" WYRE 

"Duke" Wyre, one of the nation's top ath- 
letic trainers, begins his 13th year as head 
trainer for Maryland athletic teams this fall. 

The "Dapper Duke" came to Maryland in 
'47 as the Terrapins were undergoing a com- 
plete re-organization of the staff. Today the 
tremendously popular and respected Terp train- 
er is known throughout the training world as 
one of its finest. He heads two of the most 
modern and best equipped training rooms in 
the country. 

Many honors have come his way in his many 
years of taking care of many athletes. Perhaps 
the most cherished and most honored is and 

will be his selection to be one of the eight United States trainers for 
the 1960 Olympic Games to be held in Rome. His appointment is the 
culmination of these many years as a trainer. In 1956, he was elected 
Chairman of the Board of Directors of the National Trainers' Associa- 
tion, a position which he still holds. 

He has authored many articles and manuals on training methods, and 
is always in demand to give lectures on athletic training methods at 
numerous clinics. He also has devised various equipment pieces that are 
used for atrfletic injuries and prevention of injuries. 

Wyre was trainer at Yale for 15 years before he moved to Holy 

(Continued on page 51) 




BILL ''Spider" FRY 
Starting his fourth year as Wyre's full-time 
assistant, Bill 'Spider" Fry returned to his alma 
mater in 1956 following his service hitch with 
the Air Force. 

Fry worked four years as a student assistant 
for Wyre in the Terp training room while at- 
tending the University. Following his discharge 
in June 1955, he returned to Maryland and en- 
tered Graduate School. When the opening oc- 
curred for an assistant trainer, he was ap- 
pointed. 

A native of Norristown, Pa., Fry attended 
Elkton High School, Md., where he played and 
lettered for three years in soccer and basket- 
ball. 
He entered the University in the fall of 1946 and graduated with a 
B.S. Degree from the School of Physical Education. 

Following graduation in June of 1950, he went into the Air Force 
and was assigned to jet Engine training. During his four years, he was 
stationed at Davis-Monthan Air Base in Tucson and Great Falls Air 
Base, Montana, assigned to jet duty. He also was trainer for the base 
athletic teams. 




15 



THE 1959 TERPS 

The University of Maryland's gridiron fortunes for the next four 
years have been given to one of the games' finest young football minds, 
Tom Nugent. The popular young master of one of football's most imag- 
inative and successful offensive formations, the "I", begins his first year 
at College Park with sincere expectations of bringing to Maryland the 
winning formula in future years. 

Nugent, who in his ten years of head coaching, brought V.M.I, and 
Florida State winning football teams, inherits a Terrapin team that 
had a 4-6 log for the 1958 season. It will be a couple of years before 
he can build his own team, a goal that he assures will be realized 
with his every effort. 

Too, Nugent must start at Maryland by facing the usual rugged Con- 
ference and intersectional schedule. The Red and White plays each At- 
lantic Coast Conference school with the exception of Duke. The inter- 
sectional schedule calls for games with West Virginia, Texas, Syracuse, 
and Navy. To make the road more difficult, the Terps play the Moun- 
taineers, Longhorns, and Orangemen the opening three weeks of the 
season. 

The sharp-minded new Terrapin mentor inherits a team that lost 16 
lettermen from the '58 team. There are 20 lettermen returning: three 
at quarterback, four at halfback, one fullback, two centers, four guards, 
four tackles, and two ends. 

Most notable losses were end Ben Scotti, tackles Fred Cole and Ed 
Nickla, guards Ron Laneve and Fred Kern, quarterbacks Bop Rusevlyan 
and Dick Lewis, and halfbacks Bob Layman and Ted Kershner. Scotti, 
Cole, Rusevylan, Layman and Kershner were on the first team. 

Returning from the '58 first unit are end Ron Shaffer, tackle Kurt 
Schwarz, guards Rodney Breedlove and Tom Gunderman, center Victor 
Schwartz, and fullback Jim Joyce. In his search for talent to place his 
personnel where best suited, Nugent during spring drills moved Shaffer 
from end to tackle; Schwarz from tackle to guard; and Breedlove from 
guard to halfback. Joyce represents the lone starter returning in the 
backfield. All changes looked excellent in spring practice. Shaffer and 
Schwarz were then moved back to their end and tackle positions in 
late summer. 

With only 19 days of spring drills to "learn" his personnel and teach 
them his offensive and defensive principles, Nugent and staff were 
pleased with the results. They held the all-pro, all-America alumni team 
to a 16-9 win and could have had a victory except for two touchdown 
passes dropped. The Terps blocked exceptionally well, had no penalties 
called on them, and were tough defensively. 

Nugent's big job is to find a quarterback. He had two returnees in 
Dick Scarbath and Dale Betty to accompany upcoming sophs Dick 
Novak and Don Henry. Scarbath broke a bone in his hand the second 
day of spring drills, denying Nugent a look at him. Fleet junior half- 
back Dwayne Fletcher was moved into the signal calling post and he 
along with Novak and Henry took charge of the teams in spring drills. 
Nugent also says that he must develop deep backs, and get the right 
combination offensively. From the early drills, it will be touch arid go 
between Fletcher, Novak, and Scarbath at quarterback, with Joyce at 

(Continued on page 51) 

16 



TERP OPPONENTS 



MARYLAND vs WEST VIRGINIA 19 SEPTEMBER 

1:30 P.M. (E.D.T.) 

at Byrd Stadium (35,000) 

College Park, Md. 

FACTS ABOUT THE MOUNTAINEERS 

CONFERENCE: Southern 

LOCATION: Morgantown, W. Va. 

HEAD COACH: Art Lewis 

ENROLLMENT: 6500 

COLORS: Old Gold and Blue 

TYPE OFFENSE: Split-T 

1958 RECORD: Won 4, Lost 5, Tied 1 

PUBLICITY DIRECTOR: Edgar O. Barrett 




TERPS' RECORD AGAINST THE MOUNTAINEERS 
(Maryland: Won 4, Lost 3, Tied 2) 



Maryland West Virginia 

1919 27 1948 

1943 2 6 1949 

1944 6 6 1950 

1945 13 14 1951 
1947 17 



Maryland West Virginia 
14 16 

47 7 

41 

54 7 



TOTAL POINTS: Maryland 204, West Virginia 82 
1959 CAPTAINS: Game captains appointed 
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 14— Lost 16 

1959 SCHEDULE 



Sept. 


19 


Sept. 


26 


Oct. 


2 


Oct. 


9 


Oct. 


17 


Oct. 


24 


Oct. 


31 


Nov. 


7 


Nov. 


14 


Nov. 


21 



at Maryland 

Richmond 

at Boston (Night) 

at George Washington (Night) 

Pittsburgh 

at Syracuse 

Penn State 

at Southern California 

Virginia Tech 

The Citadel 



17 



MARYLAND vs TEXAS 26 SEPTEMBER 

8:00 P.M. (C.S.T.) 

at Memorial Stadium (65,498) 

Austin, Tex. 

FACTS ABOUT THE LONGHORNS 

CONFERENCE: Southwest 
LOCATION: Austin, Texas 
HEAD COACH: Darrell Royal 
COLORS: Orange and White 
ENROLLMENT: 17,500 
TYPE OFFENSE: T-Formation 
1958 RECORD: Won 7, Lost 3 
PUBLICITY DIRECTOR: Wilbur Evans 

Darrell Royal 




TERPS' RECORD AGAINST THE LONGHORNS 



(This is first meeting between the two schools) 



1959 CO-CAPTAINS: Fullback Don Allen; End Monte Lee 



LETTERMEN RETURNING: 22— Lost 9 



1959 SCHEDULE 

Sept. 19 at Nebraska 

Sept. 26 Maryland (Night) 

Oct. 3 California (National TV) 

Oct. 10 Oklahoma at Dallas 

Oct. 17 at. Arkansas (Night) 

Oct. 24 Rice (Night) 

Oct. 31 at Southern Methodist 

Nov. 7 Baylor 

Nov. 14 Texas Christian 

Nov. 26 at Texas A&M 



18 



MARYLAND vs SYRACUSE 3 OCTOBER 

2:00 P.M. (E.D.T.) 
at Archbold Stadium (39,701) 
Syracuse, New York 
FACTS ABOUT THE ORANGEMEN 
CONFERENCE: Eastern Intercollegiate 
LOCATION: Syracuse, New York 
HEAD COACH: Ben Schwartzwalder 
COLORS: Orange and Blue 
ENROLLMENT: 9500 
TYPE OFFENSE: Unbalanced T 
1958 RECORD: Won 8— Lost 1 

Lost to Oklahoma in Orange Bowl, 21-6 
PUBLICITY DIRECTOR: Val Pinchbeck, Jr. 

Ben Schwartzwalder 




TERPS' RECORD AGAINST THE ORANGEMEN 

(Maryland: Won 4, List 4, Tied 1) 





Maryland 


Syracuse 




Maryland 


Syracuse 


1920 


10 


7 


1938 





53 


1921 





42 


1939 


7 


10 


1935 








1955 


34 


13 


1936 


20 





1956 


12 


26 


1937 


13 












TOTAL POINTS: Maryland 96, Syracuse 151 
1959 CAPTAIN: None selected as yet 
LFTTERMEN RETURNING: 23— Lost 18 

1959 SCHEDULE 



Sept. 


26 


Kansas 


Oct. 


3 


Maryland 


Oct. 


10 


Navy at Norfolk, Va 


Oct. 


17 


Holy Cross 


Oct. 


24 


West Virginia 


Oct. 


31 


at Pittsburgh 


Nov. 


7 


at Penn State 


Nov. 


14 


Colgate 


Nov. 


21 


at Boston U. 


Dec. 


5 


at UCLA 
19 



MARYLAND vs WAKE FOREST 10 OCTOBER 




BAND DAY 
1:30 P.M. (E.D.T.) 
at Byrd Stadium (35,000) 
College Park, Md. 
FACTS ABOUT THE DEACONS 
CONFERENCE: Atantic Coast 
LOCATION: Winston-Salem, N. C. 
HEAD COACH: Paul Amen 
COLORS: Old Gold and Black 
ENROLLMENT: 2321 
TYPE OFFENSE: Split-T 
1958 RECORD: Won 3— Lost 7 
PUBLICITY DIRECTOR: Marvin Francis 



Paul Amen 



TERPS' RECORD AGAINST THE DEACONS 

(Maryland: Won 5, Lost 2, Tied 1) 





Maryland 


Wake Forest 




Maryland 


Wake Forest 


1917 


29 


13 


1955 


28 


7 


1943 


13 


7 


1956 


6 





1944 





39 


1957 


27 





1954 


13 


13 


1958 





34 



TOTAL POINTS: Maryland 116, Wake Forest 113 

1959 CO-CAPTAINS: Fullback Neil MacLean and Center Buck Jolly 

LETTERMEN RETURNING: 20— Lost 14 



1959 SCHEDULE 

Sept. 19 at Florida State (Night) 

Sept. 26 Virginia Tech 

Oct. 3 at Tulane (Night) 

Oct. 10 at Maryland 

Oct. 17 at N. C. State (Night) 

Oct. 24 North Carolina 

Oct. 31 Virginia 

Nov. 14 at Duke 

Nov. 21 at Clemson 

Nov. 28 South Carolina at Charlotte 









1953 YARDSTICK 








Wake 




Maryland 


Fores 1 


Total first downs 


.... 11 


19 
11 


First downs rushing ... 


9 


First downs passing ... 


2 


8 


First downs penalty ... 








Yards gained rushing 


104 


241 


Yards lost rushing ... 


19 


3C 


Net yards rushing 


85 


211 


Passing yardage 


69 


94 


Passes 


7-25 : 


10-20 



Passes had intercepted 


2 


Punts 


6.31 3-37.0 


Fumbles lost 


1 


1 


Yards penalized 


60 


50 


Maryland 





0— 


Wake Forest 


7 7 14 
?an 4 run 


6—34 

(Mac- 


Wake Forest : MacL 


Lean kick). Dalrympl 


e 32 pass 


from 


Snead (MacLean kick). Manning 22 


pass from Snead (Mac 


Lean kick 


. Dal- 


rymple 11 pass from 


Snead (MacLean 


ki^ki. Robinson 32 p 


iss from 


Parker 


i kick failed) . 







20 



17 OCTOBER 



MARYLAND vs NORTH CAROLINA 

PARENTS' DAY 
1:30 P.M. (E.D.T.) 
at Byrd Stadium (35.000) 
College Park, Md. 
FACTS ABOUT THE TARHEELS 
CONFERENCE: Atlantic Coast 
LOCATION: Chapel Hill, N. C. 
HEAD COACH: Jim Hickey 
COLORS: Carolina Blue and White 
ENROLLMENT: 7,513 
TYPE OFFENSE: Split T 
1958 RECORD: Won 6, Lost 4 
PUBLICITY DIRECTOR: Jake Wade 

Jim Hickey 
TERPS' RECORD AGAINST THE TARHEELS 
(Maryland: Won 9, Lost 14, Tied 1) 






Maryland 


N.C. 




Maryland 


N.C 


1920 


13 





1936 





14 


1921 


7 


16 


1946 





13 


1922 


3 


27 


1947 





19 


1923 


14 





1948 


20 


49 


1924 


6 





1950 


7 


7 


1925 





16 


1951 


14 


7 


1926 


14 


6 


1953 


26 





1927 


6 


7 


1954 


33 





1928 


19 


26 


1955 


25 


7 


1929 





43 


1956 


6 


34 


1920 


21 


28 


1957 


21 


7 


1935 





33 


1958 





27 



TOTAL POINTS: Maryland 255, North Carolina 386 

1959 CO-CAPTAINS: HB Wade Smith and QB Jack Cummings 

LETTER MEN RETURNING: 20— Lost 10 







1959 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


19 


Clemson 


Sept. 


26 


at Notre Dame 


Oct. 


3 


N. C. State 


Oct. 


10 


South Carolina 


Oct. 


17 


at Maryland 


Oct. 


24 


at Wake Forest 


Oct. 


31 


Tennessee 


Nov. 


6 


at Miami, Fla. (Night) 


Nov. 


14 


Virginia 


Nov. 


26 


at Duke 



1958 YARDSTICK 

Maryland UNC 

First downs 16 16 

Rushing yardage 56 190 

Passing yardage 239 151 

Passes 21-35 9-17 

Passes intercepted by .... 3 

Punts 4-37 4-37 

Fumbles lost 1 

Yards penalized 55 25 

Maryland - — 

North Carolina 6 14 7—27 

North Carolina: Lipski 4. run (run 
failed). Schroeder 19, pass from Cum- 
mings Decantis, pass from W. Smith. 
Goldstein 46, intercepted pass (pass 
failed). Droze 6, pass from Cummings 
kick, Blazer). 



21 



MARYLAND vs SOUTH CAROLINA 31 OCTOBER 

2:00 P.M. (E.S.T.) 
at Carolina Stadium (42,250) 
Columbia, S. C. 
FACTS ABOUT THE GAMECOCKS 
CONFERENCE: Atlantic Coast 
LOCATION: Columbia, S. C. 
HEAD COACH: Warren Giese 
COLORS: Garnet and Black 
ENROLLMENT: 5500 
TYPE OFFENSE: Split-T 
1959 RECORD: Won 7— Lost 3 
PUBLICITY DIRECTOR: Don Barton 




\ 1 

Warren Giese 



\ 



TERPS' RECORD AGAINST THE GAMECOCKS 

(Maryland: Won 10, Lost 5, Tied 0) 





Maryland 


S. Carolina 




Maryland 


S. Carolina 


1926 





12 


1948 


19 


7 


1927 


26 





1949 


44 


7 


1928 


7 


21 


1953 


24 


6 


1929 





26 


1954 


20 





1945 


19 


13 


1955 


27 





1946 


17 


21 


1956 





13 


1947 


19 


13 


1957 


10 


6 








1958 


10 


6 



TOTAL POINTS: Maryland 232, South Carolina 151 

1959 CO-CAPTAINS: Tackle Ed Pitts and Fullback John Saunders 

LETTERMEN RETURNING: 24— Lost 16 







1959 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


19 


Duke (Night) 


Sept. 


26 


Furman 


Oct. 


3 


Georgia 


Oct. 


Id 


at North Carolina 


Oct. 


22 


Clemson 


Oct. 


31 


Maryland 


Nov. 


7 


at Virginia 


Nov. 


13 


at Miami, Fla. (Night) 


Nov. 


21 


N. C. State 


Nov. 


2G 


at Wake Forest 



1958 YARDSTICK 

Maryland S.C. 

First downs .8 15 

First downs rushing 8 12 

First downs passing 3 

Net yards rushing 145 191 

Passing 2-4 3-8 

Total yards gained 152 238 

Passes intercepted by .... 2 1 

Punts 6-39 2-38 

Fumbles lost 1 

Penalties 5-35 3-25 

Maryland 3 7— 1C 

South Carolina 6 — 6 

Maryland: Field goal, Ruseviyan, 29. 
Layman. 2, plunge; V. Scott (kick). 

South Carolina: Spears, 1, plunge, 
kick failed. 



22 



MARYLAND vs NAVY 7 NOVEMBER 

8:00 P.M. (E.S.T-) 

at Memorial Stadium (57,000) 

Baltimore, Md. 

FACTS ABOUT THE MIDDIES 
CONFERENCE: Eastern Intercollegiate 
LOCATION: Annapolis, Md. 
HEAD COACH: Wayne Hardin 
COLORS: Blue and Gold 
ENROLLMENT: 3.800 (Men) 
TYPE OFFENSE: T and Split-T 
1958 RECORD: Won 6, Lost 3 
PUBLICITY DIRECTOR: John T. Cox 

Wavne Hardin 
TERPS' RECORD AGAINST THE MIDDIES 

(Maryland: Won 4, Lost 11, Tied 0) 










Maryland 


Navy 




1905 









17 


1930 


1906 






2 


12 


1931 


1907 









12 


1932 


1908 









57 


1934 


1913 









76 


1950 


1916 






7 


14 


1951 


1917 









62 


1952 
1958 


TOTAL 


POINTS: Maryland 


162,, Navy 389 


1959 


CAPTAIN 


: Center Jim 


Dunn 




LETTERMEN 


RETURNING 


—15— Lost 11 



iryland 


Navy 





6 


6 





7 


28 


13 


16 


35 


21 


40 


21 


38 


7 


14 


40 







1959 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


19 


at Boston College 


Sept. 


26 


WilUrvn and Mary 


Oct. 


3 


at S.M.U. 


Oct. 


10 


Syracuse at Norfolk 


Oct. 


16 


at Miami. Fla. (Night) 


Oct. 


24 


at Penn 


Oct. 


31 


at Notre Dame 


Nov. 


7 


Maryland at Baltimore 

(Night i 


Nov. 


14 


George Washington 


1 Nov. 


2S 


Army at Philadelphia 



1958 YARDSTICK 

Maryland Navj 

First downs 15 24 

Rushing 7 12 

Passing 7 11 

Penalties 1 1 

Net yards rushing 82 232 

Passing 12-24 15-24 

Net yards passing 140 212 

Total yards gained 

'rush and pass) 222 444 

Passes intercepted by .... 1 4 

Punts ". 3-29 1-31 

Fumbles lost - 1 2 

Penalties 4-40 7-85 

Navy 12 14 14 — 40 

Maryland 7 7—14 

Maryland: Layman. 1 plunge (Scott, 
kick'. Forbes 2 plunge (Scott kick». 

Navy: Tenbrook 4 (pass failed). 
Matalavage 36 run (Bellino nm). Pari- 
seau 23. intercepted pass (kick failed). 
Kanuch pass from Tranchina (pass 
failed). Zembrzuski 1 plunge < Max- 
field pass to Zembrzuski). 



MARYLAND vs CLEMSON 14 NOVEMBER 




Frank Howard 



2 P.M. (40,000) 
at Memorial Stadium (40,000) 

Clemson, S. C. 
FACTS ABOUT THE TIGERS 
CONFERENCE: Atlantic Coast 
LOCATION: Clemson, S. C. 
HEAD COACH: Frank Howard 
COLORS: Purple and Orange 
ENROLLENT: 3,750 
TYPE OFFENSE: Split-T 
1958 RECORD: Won 8, Lost 2 

Lost to Louisiana State in Sugar Bowl: 7-0 
PUBLICITY DIRECTOR: Bob Bradley 



TERPS' RECORD AGAINST THE TIGERS 



(Maryland: Won 4, Lost 2, Tied 0) 



1952 
1953 
1954 
1955 
1956 
1957 
1958 



Maryland 
28 
20 
16 
25 

6 

7 





Clemson 






12 

6 
26 

8 



TOTAL POINTS: Maryland 102, Clemson 52 

1959 CO-CAPTAINS: Quarterback Harvey White and Center Paul Synder 

LETTERMEN RETURNING: 23— Lost 13 







1959 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


19 


at North Carolina 


Sept. 


26 


at Virginia 


Oct. 


3 


at Georgia Tech 


Oct. 


10 


N. C. State 


Oct. 


22 


at South Carolina 


Oct. 


31 


at Rice (Night) 


Nov. 


7 


Duke 


Nov. 


14 


Maryland 


Nov. 


21 


Wake Forest 


Nov. 


28 


at Furman 



1958 YARDSTICK 

Maryland Clemson 

First downs 12 18 

Total yards rushing .... 194 234 

Yards lost rushing 33 20 

Net yards rushing 161 214 

Forwards attempted 16 13 

Forwards completed .... 11 7 

Net yards passing 83 118 

Total yards gained 244 332 

Passes intercepted by .... 

Punts 4-46 2-32 

Yards kickoffs returned 31 2 

Yards punts returned .. 10 13 

Fumbles 4 3 

Own fumbles recovered l 

Y'rds lost by penalties 68 5 

Maryland 0— 

Clemson 8 — 8 

Cox (50 yard pass from White), 
I I sry run). 



24 



MARYLAND vs VIRGINIA 21 NOVEMBER 

HOMECOMING 

1:30 P.M. (E.S.T.) 

at Byrd Stadium (35,000) 

College Park, Md. 

FACTS ABOUT THE CAVALIERS 

CONFERENCE: Atlantic Coast 
LOCATION: Charlottesville, Va. 
HEAD COACH: Richard Voris 
COLORS: Orange and Blue 
ENROLLMENT: 4,500 
TYPE OFFENSE: Split -T 
1958 RECORD: Won 1, Lost 9 

PUBLICITY DIRECTOR: Dick Turner Richard 

TERPS' RECORD AGAINST THE CAVALIERS 
(Maryland: Won 12, Lost 9, Tied 2) 




1919 
1925 
1926 
1927 
1928 
1929 
1930 
1931 
1932 
1933 
1934 



Maryland 
13 



6 


18 
13 
14 

7 

6 


20 



Virginia 







1935 


6 


1936 


6 


1937 


21 


1938 


2 


1939 


13 


1940 


6 


1942 


6 


1943 


7 


1944 


6 


1945 





1957 




1958 



Maryland 
14 
21 

3 
19 

7 

6 
27 



7 
19 
12 
44 



Virginia 

7 




27 
12 
19 
12 
39 
18 
13 

I) 

6 



TOTAL POINTS: Maryland 276, Virginia 226 
1959 CO-CAPTAINS: To be appointed 
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 9— Lost 15 







1959 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


19 


William and Mary 


Sept. 


26 


Clemson 


Oct. 


3 


at Florida 


Oct. 


10 


VMI at Lynchburg 


Oct. 


17 


VPI at Richmond 


Oct. 


24 


Vanderbilt 


Oct. 


31 


at Wake Forest 


Nov. 


7 


South Carolina 


Nov. 


14 


at North Carolina 


Nov. 


21 


at Maryland 



1958 YARDSTICK 






Maryland 


Virginia 


First downs 


19 


12 


Rushing yardage .... 


... _ 127 


44 


Passing vardage 


330 


161 


Passes attempted 


40 


35 


Passes completed .... 


18 


11 


Passes intercepted .... 


6 


2 


Number of punts 


5 


7 


Punting average 


41 


32 


Fumbles lost 






30 


Yards penalized 


125 


Maryland 


.... 21 


9 14—44 


Virginia 





6—6 


Maryland: Layman 


48 runback of in- 


tercepted pass (Scott kick>. 


Joyce 1 


plunge (Scott kick). 


Kershner 


26 pass 


from Scarbath (Leu 


is kick i 


Cole 2 


plunge (Rusevlyan kick). Safety. Gra- 


vins tackled in end zone on attempted 


punt return. Steppe 


1 plunge 


(Hatter 


kick). Hatter 14 run 


(Kershner kick). 


Virginia: Shelton 1 


plunge ( 


run fail- 


ed). 







25 



MARYLAND vs N. C. STATE 5 DECEMBER 

1:30 P.M. (E.S.T.) 

at Byrd Stadium (35,000) 

College Park, Md. 

FACTS ABOUT THE WOLFPACK 
CONFERENCE: Atlantic Coast 
LOCATION: Raleigh, N. C. 
HEAD COACH: Earle Edwards 
COLORS: Red and White 
ENROLLMENT: 5,750 
TYPE OFFENSE: Multiple 
1958 RECORD: Won 2, Lost 7, Tied 1 
PUBLICITY DIRECTOR: Bill Hensley 
Earle Edwards 

TERPS' RECORD AGAINST THE WOLFPACK 

(Maryland: Won 7, Lost 5, Tied 3) 






Maryland 


N.C. State 




Maryland 


N.C. State 


1908 


6 


23 


1947 








1917 


6 


10 


1949 


14 


6 


1921 


6 


6 


1950 


13 


16 


1922 


7 


6 


1951 


53 





1923 


26 


12 


1954 


42 


14 


1924 





9 


1956 


25 


14 


1946 


7 


28 


1957 


13 


48 



1958 



21 



TOTAL POINTS: Maryand 239, N. C. State 186 

CO-CAPTAINS: Tackle Kelly Minyard and Center Paul Balonick 

LETTERMEN RETURNING: 16— Lost 11 







1959 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


19 


VPI at Norfolk (Night) 


Sept. 


26 


Open 


Oct. 


3 


at North Carolina 


Oct. 


10 


at Clemson 


Oct. 


17 


Wake Forest (Night) 


Oct. 


24 


Duke 


Oct. 


31 


Wyoming 


Nov. 


7 


Miss. Southern at Mobile 


Nov. 


13 


at UCLA (Night) 


Nov. 


21 


at South Carolina 


Nov. 


28 


Open 


Dec. 


5 


at Maryland 



1953 YARDSTICK 

Maryland NCS 

First downs 18 10 

Rushing yardage 151 137 

Passing yardage 142 152 

Passes 9-13 6-12 

Passes intercepted by .... 2 2 

Punts 3-24 2-45.5 

Fumbles lost 3 2 

Yards penalized 25 17 

N. C. State 6—6 

Maryland 7 6 8—22 

Maryland: Forbes 4 run (Rusevlyan 
kick*; Forbes 70 run (Fletcher run 
failed); Rusevlyan. 1 run (Rusevlyan 
run i . 

N. C. State: Harrell. 15 run (Macini 
pass failed). 



26 



OPPONENTS' OUTLOOK 
West Virginia University 

By EDGAR BARRETT 

With the loss of more than half of the lettermen who compiled a 
4-5-1 record in 1958, Wetrl Virginia's football outlook would appear dim 
But a host of good-looking sophomores promise to make the season 
interesting for fans and opponents. There were 42 sophomores on the 
67-man roster issued in the spring. 

Coach Art Lewis went through his first losing season in eight years 
but the Mountaineers finished strong. Four defeats came by a total of 
17 points. They outplayed Syracuse's Orange Bowl team, losing 15-12, 
and tied Penn State 14-14. Lewis is rounding out a decade at West 
Virginia. 

Here are the factors in the 1959 football outlook: 

Experience: Five regulars and six members of the alternate unit re- 
turn; a total of 14 of 30 who lettered last season. The problem continues 
to be the attrition of those who matriculated in 1956; only four are on 
hand as seniors to lead the team. There are all sophomores vying at 
right guard and right end and a real shortage of material at the 
tackles. 

System: Split linemen, flankers, man in motion, belly series, rollout 
plays. Two alternate teams will be used again. 

Back field: Most important loss is QB Dick Longfellow, who ranked 
sixth nationally in passing, seventh in total offense. Danny Williams 
moves into the starter's role, is a good runner and pass defender. Car- 
men Pomponio logically advances to lead the alternate team, and a 
volunteer, Dale Evans, has looked the best of a rookie quintet. Ray 
Peterson and Dave Rider hold over as regular halves, though John 
Marra and sophs Dick Herrig and Jim Bargeloh are pressing for their 
jobs. Third stringer Bob Benke is back at full, 1955 letterman Tom 
Huston is back from service and soph Curt Harmon hopes to make it 
interesting at this position. 

Line: A fairly strong tirst line looms but only the center post has 
much depth. Ben McComb and Tony Tallarico are experienced at one 
end, but the other shows all sophs including Ray Borlie, Dave Hess 
and Bob Lavelle. A stalwart is left tackle Carl Dannenberg, and Pete 
Tolley will shore up the other side unless needed to back up the line. 
Bill Lopasky returns as the left, or middle guard. Right guard is a 
toss-up among Paul Gatton, Fred Adkins and Bill Winter, all new- 
comers. Center is well fixed, with Chuck Billak who started the first 
four games before being injured, Joe Wirth who started the last six, and 
Charles Lanasa, their understudy. 

Sophomores: Certain to start at right guard (Gatto, Adkins or Winter) 
and right end (Borlie, Hess, Lavelle). Bargeloh and Herrig are battling 
Rider at right half, and Harmon should make it at fullback. Among 
other good prospects are end Bob Timmerman and tackles John Peters 
and Fred Deluzio. 

Kickers: Williams is a proven fine punter, averaged 36.6 yards last 
year. Huston, Timmerman and Marra are prospects. 

Outstanding Players: LT Carl Dannenberg stepped into a strange 

27 



position and started the Pitt game, beginning when West Virginia was 
an improved team. LG Bill Lopasky won his spurs in the Oklahoma 
game, blocking a punt and scoring a touchdown, starred on defense. 
LH Ray Peterson has gained 727 yards rushing, 270 on 21 pass recep- 
tions, 380 on 25 runbacks, scored six touchdowns as a varsity perform- 
er. QB Danny Williams has plenty of tools needed at his position. LE 
Ben McComb, C Chuck Billak, RT Pete Tolley and RH Dave Rider are 
above-average veterans. 

University of Texas 

By WILBUR EVANS 

Coach Darrell Royal has always operated on the premise that a good 
defense will win more football games than offense. The Longhorns play 
percentages, employ the quick kick more than most teams and try to 
keep the opposition under intense pressure in its end of the field. 

Last Fall Texas operated with few speedsters, a situation deplored 
by Royal. The outlook is better this year, particularly in the back- 
field. Half-back Rene Ramirez is no comet, but the galloping gaucho 
was the team's second ranking rusher last Fall and shared touchdown 
honors with quarterback Bobby Lackey, each with five. 

Ramirez and Lackey are among nine returning lettermen backs but 
upcoming sophomore stars could shove either aside. Jack Collins, a 
member of the Steers' unbeaten freshman squad last year, is a fine 
halfback with a deceptive change of pace. Two soph quarterbacks, Mike 
Cotten and James Saxton, furnish a startling injection of speed and 
fullback Don Allen is a dependable short yardage man. Allen will serve 
as co-captain with end Monte Lee. 

Lackey, who played the second highest number of minutes (334) last 
year, is an all-round performer, dependable on defense and showing oc- 
casional brilliance offensively. He also averaged 40 yards as a punter. 

The Texas line will be big, strong and experienced. Only guard Bob 
Harwerth is shy of the 200-pound level but he is a bristling competitor 
and line-backer at 190 pounds. Harwerth is called "Spook" because he 
is so hard to block. Tackle Tillman O'Brien (220), and ends Lee (205) 
and Maurice Doke (200) are capable of earning All-Conference consid- 
eration. 

The additional backfield speed will offer the Longhorns more striking 
power than in recent years. 

Syracuse University 

By VAL PINCHBECK, JR. 

Schwartzwalder Says: "The 1959 season should be an interesting one, 
but I'd sure hate to have to pick wins and losses. We have a number 
of good-looking boys back from last year, but our schedule is a good 
deal tougher and we have to start over from scratch at a key position, 
quarterback. I'd say that our depth will be respectable, but team speed 
still remains a problem. A couple of things are for sure, though. We'll 
hustle, and our kids won't be afraid to make contact with the enemy." 

28 



Outstanding Returnees: 

Roger Davis . . . An agile 6-3, 228-pound former high school end, 
this smooth-working guard should bid strongly for All-American honors. 
Syracuse best football player, according to Schwartwalder. Ranked even 
with All-American Ron Luciano as a forward by many last season. 
Excellent blocker. Quick linebacker, too. 

Gerhard Schwedes . . . German-born athlete who led SU in both 
rushing and pass receiving from right half post last fall. Not a speedst- 
er, but an exceptionally hard runner. Averaged 4.3 per carry in 1958. 
Firm tackier on defense and team leader. A 6-1, 187-pounder. 

Dave Baker . . . Fearless-type end who picked up 231 yards on 10 
pass receptions last season. Former halfback with fine speed that helps 
on both offense and defense. A 6-1, 187-pounder who missed spring drills 
with a bad leg. 

Art Baker ... A 6-0 205-pound speedster who led the front-line 
ball carriers in average with a 4.7 mark. One of the standouts of spring 
practice. Much improved on defense. NCAA 191-pound wrestling 
champion. 

Others to Watch: 

Maury Youmans . . . Elongated 6-6, 220-pound tackle who came fast 
after being switched from end last year. Should be a top-notch per- 
former. 

Bruce Tarbox ... A surprise package last season. A 6-2, 212-pound 
tackle. 

Bob Yates . . . Hefty 6-1, 220-pound tackle who doubles as SU's left 
footed place kicker. 

Fred Mautino ... A 6-3 end who is rugged ion defense. 

Bob Thomas . . . Aggressive senior who will probably open season at 
Key quarterback spot. Tossed three TD passes against Cornell in '58. 

Dave Applehof . . . Veteran center. Blocks well on offense. 

Al Bemiller . . . Junior center who may displace veteran Applehof 
as starting pivot. 

Tom Gilburg . . . Lanky 6-4 end who ranked second in East in 
punting with 39.4 average last season. 

Gerry Skonieczki . . . Fine pass-catching end who could beat Mautino 
out of right end job. 

Mark Weber . . . Hard-running 196-pound left half who, could move 
into starting job if rookie Ernie Davis falters. 

Dick Reimer . . . Right half who was No. 3 scorer in '58. Good speed 
and quick on defense. 

Dave Sarette . . . Good prospect at quarterback who was inactive in '58. 
Outstanding Sophomore Prospects: 

Ernie Davis ... A 6-2, 205-pound sprinter who also hits hard. Ran 
wild with unbeaten frosh eleven last fall, gaining over 100 yards 
rushing in three of four games. Called top prospect to appear at SU 
since Jim Brown. Could develop rapidly. 

Ken Ericson . . . Transfer student who will keep more seasoned 
ends on toes. Come rapidly during spring sessions. 

Dick Feidler . . . Converted end who should win guard spot with 
alternate unit. 

Bob Stem . . . Rookie center rated highly by coaching staff. 

Pete Brokaw . . . Quarterback with excellent speed. 

29 



Wake Forest College 

By MARVIN FRANCIS 

With 10 lettermen, including six who were regulars at the close 
of the 1958 campaign, slated for starting assignments this fall, the Wake 
Forest grid outlook appears most promising. 

"We'll be bigger and stronger and have a little more depth," is the 
way Coach Paul Amen sizes up the situation, but he hastens to add 
that a lack of experience among the reserves could be a big problem. 

Several sophomores are being counted on to furnish front-line reserve 
action, and how fast these newcomers develop could be a major factor 
in the success of the team. 

Interior line positions, especially at guard, gave the Deacon coaching 
staff its biggest concern during spring practice. Veteran Nick Patella 
is the lone experienced guard while none of the four lettermen tackles 
saw a great deal of action last fall. To help the guard situation, Amen 
moved Carl Blum from halfback and Bob Irwin from fullback. 

End Pete Manning, a second team All-ACC selection last fall, center 
Buck Jolly and Patella are expected to anchor the forward wall. 

Norman Snead, another second team All-ACC choice last year, heads 
the backfield which will have more size and better speed. Snead has 
added 20 pounds to his 6-4 frame and expects to play at 200 pounds. 

There are four lettermen halfbacks along with converted fullback 
Bill Skippon. Veterans Neil MacLean, the Club's leading scorer and top 
groundgainer the past two seasons, and Joe Bonecutter provide an 
excellent one-two fullback punch. 

Probable Standouts: End Pete Manning; Guard Nick Patella; Center 
Buck Jolly; Quarterback Norman Snead; Halfback Jerry Ball; Fullback 
Neil MacLean. 

Promising Newcomers: End Bill Hull. End Bill Ruby. Tackle John 
Muse, Guard Carl Blum, Quarterback Chuck Reiley, Halfback Bill Bur- 
gess, Halfback Alan White, Fullback Craven Williams. 

University of North Carolina 

By JAKE WADE 

An excellent spring practice, climaxed by exsiting performances in 
the Blue-White squad game, gave rise to optimism in football at North 
Carolina for 1959. The late coach Jim Tatum said: "It was three times 
the calibre of football we have played here in the spring before. We 
are looking forward with high expectations to the new season." 

Newly aDpointed coach Jim Hickey has accepted the challenge to 
head the Tarheels. 

Several key men were lost, including tackle Phil Blazer and center 
Ronnie Koes, a pair of greats, but keen competition for berths has 
turned up an exceptional spirit and the squad looks to be sound, big 
and fast. Twenty-four returning lettermen include six of last year's 
starters. These are ends Al Goldstein and John Schroeder, guard Fred 
Mueller, quarterback Jack Cummings, halfback Wade Smith and full- 
back Don Klochak. Cummings was one of the nation's finest passers 
last year and Goldstein made the All-America team. The 1959 Tar Heels 

30 



appear to be unusually strong in passing and kicking. 

Rip (The Ripper) Hawkins, 6-3, 212, has All-American potential at 
center, where he will share the job with Jimmy Davis. Don Stallings, 
243, and Earl (Moose) Butler, 238, are as good as any tackles. Rugged 
Fred Mueller, 216, was good enough to start as a sophomore guard last 
year. Guard Bob Shupin, a converted fullback, looks like a great find 
at his new position. If Goldstein and Shroeder aren't ready to handle 
the terminals, Mike Greenday, Jimmy Rice and Rabe Walton, lettermen 
all, will divide the chores with Charlie Rogers, ex-GI soph standout. 

Nine of the 24 returning lettermen are backs. Dashin' Don Kloachak, 
217, a human battering ram at fullback, is at his best in a broken field. 
He averaged 5.4 for 60 carries. Jack Cummings, who hit 68 of 
134 passes for 1,139 yards and 11 TD's, is one of the slickest QB's in 
college ranks. With Cummings missing Spring drills because of an attack 
of yellow jaundice, Henry (Skip) Clement developed into a superior 
field general. Soph Ray Farris is slated for stardom. Wade Smith, who 
rushed 102 times for a 4.5 average, leads a bevy of hard-running half- 
backs. Sonny Folckomer promises to come into his own after shaking 
off a leg injury and the sophomore jinx. 

University of South Carolina 

By DON BARTON 

Head coach Warren Giese, whose Gamecocks won 19 and lost 11 dur- 
ing his first three seasons at South Carolina, must replace two half- 
backs who were starters for him during those three productive years. 
They are Alex Hawkins, voted the ACC's "player-of-the-year" last fall, 
and King Dixon, given the award as the Gamecocks' most valuable 
player. 

The halfback problem joins the search for a topnotch quarterback 
and replacements for the 1958 first and second unit centers as big as- 
signments to be faced. 

The Gamecocks should come up with another solid line, and, if the 
backfiield shapes-UTj. properly, South Carolina could again be a top 
contender for the Atlantic Coast Conference title. 

Among the prospects for filling the halfback positions are Joe Gomes, 
Steve Kopian and Jim Bowman of last year's squad, Jimmy Hunter, 
voted the outstanding junior varsity back, and several members of 
the 1958 freshman team. 

At quarterback lettermen Harvey Shiflet, Buddy Bennett and Steve 
Satterfield will be contenders, but freshman David Sowell, a service 
veteran, could move in. 

Jim Nemeth, a promising transfer from the University of Toledo, 
could ease the center problem. He'll compete with returnees John 
Gordon and Bobby Long, the latter out with a knee injury most of 
last season. 

Depth at tackle could be a problem, but Kirk Phares, a second-unit 
guard at the end of last season, has been moved back to tackle to help 
the situation. 

Fullback is no problem, with the great John Saunders ready for an- 
other season, backed up by capable Phil Lavoie and Bob Farmer, plus 

31 



contributions from the freshman squad. 

Conley Taylor, a red shirt, may figure into the end situation, with 
first-stringer Jerry Frye and lettermen Jim Duncan and Jack Pitt. 
Taylor is a 200-pounder from Richmond, Va. 

The guard positions are in pretty good hands, with capable Jake 
Bodkin back from last year's squad, along with Jack Ashton, Ken 
Derriso and Wayne Shiflet. Don Miles, a red shirt who transferred 
from Kansas State, is a bright newcomer to the position. 

Defensively, the Gamecocks should be solid. Only one team — Army — 
scored more than two touchdowns against them last fall, and they held 
six of their opponents to one touchdown or less. 

Offensively, power should again be the by-word, with possible changes 
in the overall system being effected by Giese and his staff before the 
Sept. 19 opener with Duke. 

The schedule is arranged slightly better than in 1958, when the 
Gamecocks had to face a gauntlet of Duke, Army, Georgia, North Caro- 
lina, Clemson and Maryland in the first six games. They won three 
of those contests and finished by taking their final four in a row. 

U.S. Naval Academy 

By JOHN T. COX 

Navy will have a new head coach this Fall, but the Middies' style 
of play will be "basically the same." That's the word from Wayne 
Hardin, successor to Eddie Erdelatz at the Academy. "The things we 
have done in the past have been staff efforts. We will carry out the 
offensive plans mapped in spring drills. The staff has worked closely 
together on it. This is our thinking and we'll go with it. I plan few 
changes," Hardin says. 

"I think we are going to have a very good ball club. Our players 
are very enthusiastic. They like the stuff we introduced in the spring. 
We have an excellent leader in Center Jim Dunn, our Captain. I am 
eager for this opportunity and anxious to meet the challenge," the 32- 
year-old Navy grid leader declares. 

The Midshipmen will go all-out in platooning this year. They will 
employ a starting team, a replacement team and a second or reserve 
unit. There will be no such thing as a first team. 

"We plan on using the starting unit and the replacement outfit ap- 
proximately IV-i minutes each quarter. Under our system our best play- 
ers will be sprinkled through the starting and replacement teams. 
Usually the best 11 men are found on the first team. This way the two 
teams will be about even in strength and therefore eliminate the drop 
that normally takes place through substitution. It will give more boys 
a chance to play football," Hardin explained. 

This plan differs from the three-team system used successfully by 
Paul Dietzel at L.S.U. last year. Unlike the renowned "Chinese Bandits" 
of L.S.U. who were defensive specialists and never played offense, none 
of Navy's three outfits will specialize. "Each team will be expected to 
do the job well on both offense and defense," Hardin explained. 

Navy has 15 lettermen returning from its '58 squad which posted a 
6-3 record. Last year's starters returning are End Tom Albershart, 
Tackles Larry Boyer and Bill Thomas, Center and Captain-elect Jim 

32 



Dunn, Quarterback Joe Tranchini and Left Halfback Joe Bellino. Eleven 
letter-winners will be lost through graduation, including Guards George 
Fritzinger and Don Chomicz, End John Kanuch, Halfback Dick Dag- 
ampat and Fullback Ray Wellborn from the first unit. 

"We are fortunate in having two experienced quarterbacks of about 
equal ability. Both Joe Tranchini and Jim Maxlield won their letters 
last year and we are confident that either of them can do the job. Both 
men would be welcome additions to any football team in the nation," 
Hardin says. 

Clemson College 

By BOB BRADLEY 

Coach Frank Howard, who will field his 20th Clemson team, 
believes the outlook is good for another outstanding team. But he 
is quick to point out that every opponent on the 1959 slate will 
also be stronger. The Tigers have two of their toughest games in a 
space of 15 days, opening with North Carolina Sept. 19 and Georgia 
Tech Oct. 3 with Virginia sandwiched in the middle. 

There are 23 lettermen listed on the 1959 squad, but there is a 
possibility that end Jack Webb and halfback Sonny Quesenberry will 
sit out the season due to injuries received last season. 

The Tigers are fortified at end with three lettermen and one of the 
best crops of sophomores ever to hit the campus. Junior Sam Anderson 
and sophomore Gary Barnes were the first team flankmen after spring 
practice. 

At tackle there are three lettermen with Harold Olson, Lou Cordile- 
one and Jack Smith leading the way. Cordileone should be the out- 
standing lineman on the team and one of the best in Clemson history. 
Jimmy King and Ronnie Osborne were both held out last year and 
add depth to tackle. 

Four lettermen guards, all rising juniors, give the interior line good 
depth with Dave Lynn and Larry Wagner running first, just ahead of 
Dave Olson and Sammy Crout. 

There is only one letterman center, Paul Snyder, and this is one 
of Clemson's shallowest spots as far as experience goes. Sophomores 
Ron Andreo and Jack Veronee back up Snyder. 

Quarterback has the 1-2-3 boys of '58 back in Harvey White, 
Lowndes Shingler and Johnnie Mac Goff. White had a shoulder opera- 
tion this spring, and it proved successful. White and Goff are seniors, 
Shingler a junior. 

Five experienced halfbacks, excluding Queensberry, make up the 
" express" group. George Usry was switched from left to right half- 
back during the spring to make room for Bill Mathis to move up and 
these two are backed by two light-weights, Bob Morgan and Bob 
Chatlin. Most promising sophomores here are Jim Wilson and Harry 
Pavilack. 

Doug Cline is about it at fullback. He was Clemson's leading ground 
gainer in '58 and is being backed by sophomore Ron Scrudato and 
letterman Doug Daigneault, who switched from halfback during spring 
drills. 

(Continued on page 36) 

33 



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35 



University of Virginia 

By DICK TURNER 

"We will have a young team which will have to grow up under fire. 
But green as we are, we will have more individual size. We also will 
have better team speed." — Dick Voris. 

tOnly 9 of Va.'s '58 lettermen, fewest in recent memory, will be re- 
turning, but they will have the company of a sizeable group of sopho- 
mores, foremost of whom are Ron Gassert, tackle, and Ted Denby, HB. 
Major losses are Reece Whitley, QB, who ranked high in total offense 
when he was hurt in the 4th game last season, and Ulmo Randle, one 
of the outstanding pass catchers of the year. 

Ends — Brerry Jones, lone letterman, and Smythe Wood, Sr., won 
first team recognition in spring practice. Soph, additions include 
Park Plank, Edward Menzer, Terry Canale and Timothy Hapgood, 
headed by Plank. 

Tackles — Ron Gassert, tabbed as the squad's outstanding lineman as 
a soph., and John Marlow, unlettered Jr., were first comers in spring 
practice. There are 2 lettermen, Bob Carlisle and Wayne Whelan, who 
started several times last year. Other sophs, of note include Henry 
Koehler, Bill Kanto, Dick Fogg and Gardner Smith. Both game starters 
probably will be new. 

Guards — Louis Martig, only letterman, and Glen Sacco, soph., are the 
indicated selections over Roger Zensen, unlettered Sr. and Ted Green, 
Jim Johnson and John Docherty, sophs. Both guards will be new as 
starters. 

Centers — The fixture is Bob Edwards, who moved into the starting 
lineup in the early stages of last season. No. 2 is Emory Thomas, 
freshman regular last year and regarded as an excellent varsity line 
prospect. 

Quarterbacks — Arnold Dempsey is back for his second varsity season. 
Played regularly during the last half of last season, finishing as ACC's 
leading passer in number of completions. Back of him are Jr. Wayne 
Ballard, a fine punter, and Stanwood Fischer and Ted Kempski, who 
divided the freshman quarterbacking last year. 

Halfbacks — Ted Denby, big and fast, is the brightest ball-carrying 
prospect as a sophomore. His running mate may be George Toth. 
Freshman regular in '57 who was ineligible last year. Two lettermen 
are Tom Gravins and Fred Shepherd. Also back from last year's varsity 
squad are Skip Weitz and Gary Pritchard, who were prominent in 
spring practice. Other sophs, who may be heard from are Tony Sepp. 
John Storkerson, Joe Board and Hunter Faulconer, Jr., Sepp and 
Board having less than 10-second speed and Storkerson being about 
even. 

Fullback — John Barger, game starter all last season as a sophomore, 
will get strong support and competition from Harold Rust and Tony 
Ulehla, superior sophomore prospects. 

36 



North Carolina State 

By BILL HENSLEY 

The Wolfpack expects to have a good football team in 1959, despite 
a lack of experience among the reserves. The probable starting team 
has a letterman at each position, except quarterback. But that spot 
will be filled by Roman Gabriel, one of the most promising players in 
State College history. 

At the end of spring practice there were 44 sophomores on the 
75-man squad, and seven starters from the 1958 team were missing. 
But a lot was accomplished during the off-season drills, and the new- 
comers who will fill key positions this fall performed admirably. 

The '59 Wolfpack will be a dangerous ciub, sparked by the sensa- 
tional passing of Gabriel and a ground attack which features half- 
backs Claude Gibson, Ron Podwika, Randy Harrell, and Bernie Latu- 
sick, and fullbacks Arnold Nelson and Jim D'Antonio. 

Up front, State will rely upon a rugged line anchored by tackles 
Kelly Minyard and Dick (Tiny) Reynolds, guard Frank Marocco and 
center Paul Balonick. 

The Wolfpack is anxious to make up for a disappointing season in 
1958, caused by an abundance of injuries to key players. The squad 
has good spirit and is overflowing with optimism. 

Coach Earle Edwards says, "Lack of game experience among the re- 
serves will be our biggest problem, but I can't help but be optimistic 
as I look forward to 1959. We will play a lot of good teams, thereby 
giving us an opportunity to show what we can do against the nation's 
top clubs. We want to win and if desire is any criterion, we will be 
a contender." 




BYRD STADIUM 

HOME OF THE TERRAPINS 
Capacity: 35,000 



TERP THUMBNAIL SKETCHES 



ENDS 



RONALD SHAFFER, 21, 6-2, 203, Senior 
from Cumberland, Md. — came through with 
an outstanding junior year following a 
brilliant debut as a soph . . . always 
considered as one of the finest two-way 
ends for the Terps . . . now with the 
Terps sure to be looking for more pass 
completions with Nugent's fine pass of- 
fense, the big strapping native of the 
famed Fort Hill High School in Cumber- 
land could be the target for most of the 
aerial shots . . . during the spring drills 
Nugent moved him to tackle to help 
that spot as he moved the veteran tackle 
Kurt Schwarz to guard, but moved both 
back to their old positions to take ad- 
vantage of their know-how at these 
critical johs . . . considered one of the 
finest blockers on the team . . . especially 
eAicient with his downfield blocking . . . 
has fine speed . . . exceptionally hard 
worker . . . plays a fine defensive game 
. . tough to move . . . tied for the 
niss receiving leadership last season with 
18 receptions for 141 yards and one touch- 
f'>wii . . . snagged three for 23 yards 
his soph, year . . . was all-City and 
honorable mention all -State ... in School 
of Education, majoring in industrial Edu- 
cation. 

VINCENT SCOTT, 20, 5-11, 183. Junior 
from Wilmington, Del. — one of the most 
sought after stars ever to enroll at Mary- 
land ... as a freshman he made a 
brilliant impression as an end, both of- 
fensively and defensively and was an 
outstanding receiver ... he also made 
a tremendous impression with his kicking 
ability . . . following this initial record 
for a freshman, he continued his great 
play in his first spring practice and was 
the big hero of the Varsity victory over 
the star-studded alumni ... he was 
labeled the most exciting player on the 
field . . . the former two-year all-State 
selection from Salesianum High came up 
with a fine year last fall, but was slowed 
down by injuries ... he came up with 
another top showing in spring practice, 
with Nugent particularly happy with the 
spirit, eagerness, and desire of Scott . . . 
he could be the star predicted for him 
. . . Scott's great kicking abilities makes 
him even a more respected prospect for 
top honors . . the pro scouts are 

waiting for him to graduate so they can 
vie for his signature and his "kicking 
toe" ... he can hit from as far out 
as 45 yards and anything inside the 25 
can almost be counted on for three points 
. . . the wider goal posts will be an. 
added incentive for an almost automatic 
three points ... his kickoffs get to 
the goal line and often times into the 
end zone . . . shouldn't have any trouble 
keeping a starting assignment, for hustle 



is his password . . . caught two for 
eight yards last fall . . . was all-State 
in 1955 and 1956 . . . was on the all- 
America high school team of '56 as well 
as the all-Catholic second team . . . was 
a star baseball, track, and basketball 
performer in High School . . . one to 
watch carefully ... in School of Busi- 
ness and Public Administration, majoring 
in Public Relations. 

ANTHONY SCOTTI, 20, 6-1, 187, Junior 
from Long Branch, N. J. — the star grad- 
uate of St. Benedict's Prep in '57 is an- 
other of the highly regarded Terp ends 
. . . had a fine sophomore year as num- 
ber two end . . . will be hard to keep 
off the first unit . . . was the top re- 
ceiver his freshman year and last fall 
snagged six for 66 yards . . . one of the 
most aggressive and hard working boys 
on the team . . . reported to spring 
practice late because of an operation and 
wasn't expected to help Nugent in spring 
drills . . . but the serious Scotti who 
loves to play football worked hard and 
got himself ready for the latter part of 
the spring practice and was around long 
enough to make a splendid showing 
has good speed ... a fine blocker 
strong defensively ... has a good pair 
of h-nds . . . was all-State at St 
Benedict's . . . was all-County, all-City, 
and all-Metropolitan . . . was a member 
of the New Jersey all-star team . . . was 
state heavyweight wrestling champion 
in School of Arts and Science. 

HENRY PONIATOWSKI. 25, 6-1, 186, 
Sophomore from Syracuse. N. Y. — one of 
the real good newcomers up for the 
varsity this fall and one whom Nugent 
is looking to for a lot of fine football 
the next three seasons . . . "Hank" is 
the "Daddy" of the young Terp squad 
. . . following his graduation from East- 
wood High and a year's work, he served 
four years in the Army ... he came 
to Maryland from nearby Fort Lee ... his 
visits to the campus were many while !n 
the service ... he was first team all- 
Army as an end and on the Washington 
Post all-Service eleven . . . had a good 
freshman season and looked most im- 
pressive in spring drills . . . has tre- 
mendous determination and wants to play 
. . . will be a top candidate for top 
job . . . most adequate both ways . . . 
in School of Physical Education. Recrea- 
tion, and Health. 

JOE MONA. 19, 6-1, 172, Sophomore from 
Camp Springs, M'd. — the hard working 
likable Mona is one of the most highly 
sought after and most publicized football 
nlayers to come to Maryland in many 



38 



years . . . his many high school honors 
react like many of the Terp all-Americas 
of the past . . . that goal for the star 
youngster could be realized during his 
three years with Nugent . . . made a 
tremendous impression in spring practice 
following an unusually successful and 
brilliant freshman year . . . Mona repre- 
M-nts one of the finest all-around ath- 
letes on the squad and one of the most 
conscientious and easiest to coach ... a 
fine receiver with good speed . . . blocks 
well . . . exceptional defensive strength 
for his size . . . quiet and determined 
. . . could be one of Terps' bright stars 
on the horizon . . . seems a sure bet 
for future stardom . . . Mona represents 
one of St. John's greatest names in the 
history of the famous Washington Prep 
school ... he was selected to the Prep- 
High School All-America football team 
and played in the first high school ail- 
Americans versus the Big 33 of Pennsyl- 
vania all-stars in Hershey, Pa. . . . was 
the star defensive player in this game 
. . . was named on the first teams on 
the all-City selection; the all-Catholic 
team: the all-prep first teams as select- 
ed by the Washington News. Post and 
Times-Herald, and Star; and was also 
first team on the all-Metropolitan team 
selected by the same three newspapers 
... he still holds the record for most 
passes received in one season. 1958 . . . 
he also was a three year 'etterman in 
three other sports and named to the all- 
star teams selected in baseball, basket- 
ball, and track . . . one to watch 
close'v for future stardom ... in school 
of Business and Public Administration, 
majoring in Real Estate and Insurance. 

GARY COLLINS, 19. 6-2. 200, Sophomore 



from Williamstown, Pa. — another of the 
Terps' prize packages up from the fresh- 
man team ... the lean Collins is an 
outstanding receiver and the finest punt- 
er on the team . . . was a three-sport 
star at Williamstown High . . came to 
Maryland after having offers' from a 
great number of schools ... a definite 
threat as a receiver with a fine pair of 
bands and long reach . . was all- 

Conference his junior and senior year 
was all-Twin Valley selection . . honor- 
able mention all-State . . . was all- 
Conference basketball player . . star 
baseball player also . . . married und 
has a son ... in School of Physical 
Education. Recreation, and Health. 

JOHN GIANNETTI, 19, 6-1. 177, Sopho- 
more from Mt. Rainier, Md.— came up 
with a fine spring practice . . one of 
the unnoticed from the freshman team 
who had everyone noticing him during 
the spring . . . could be one of the real 
fine surprises of the team . . should 
help a great deal . . . looked excep- 
tionally good defensively . . was an 
honorable mention all-Prep, all-Metro- 
politan, and all-Catholic at Archbishop 
Carroll High School ... in School of 
Business and Public Administration. 

DON TRUST, 18. 6-1. 176. Sophomore 
from Bel Air, Md. — another boy up from 
the freshman eleven who impressed dur- 
ing spring drills . . . will be one to 
watch for some important help at the 
end spot . . . fine prospect . . his 
brother Bill star performer for Terp base- 
ball team . . Don was all-Countv. 
captain of the team, and honorable men- 
tion iall-State ... in School of Engi- 
neering, majoring in chemical engineering 



TACKLES 



KURT SCHWARZ. 24, 5-11, 205. Senior 
from Hackensack, N. J. — counted on as 
one of the best tackles in the league and 
could be one of the finest in the game 
. . . has had two outstanding years . . . 
Nugent put him at guard during spring 
ball and took to the assignment without 
any trouble but with his great tackle 
play needed, he was switched back to 
his old spot . . . came back to Mary- 
land after two years in the service and 
took over the top job almost immediately 
and has kept it ever since ... he has 
had two brilliant years at the left tack'e 
slot ... an outstanding football nlayer 
with exceptional ability both offensively 
and defensively . . . one of the school's 
all-time better tackles . . . has fine re- 
actions which help him pursue the play 
so well, allowing him to come through 
for so many tackles, many of which are 
key tackles . . . strong blocker and has 
exceptional strength on defense . . one 
of the team's leaders . . . three-sport star 



at Hackensack . . was all-State in foot- 
ball ... in School of Physical Education, 
Recreation, and Health. 

JOE GARDI, 20, 5-10, 209, Senior from 
Harrison, N. J. — in Gardi. the Terps have 
come up with one of the hardest work- 
ing boys on the team with an intense 
desire to play ball ... has all the 
qualifications to come through with a 
great year for Nugent . . . had a real 
good spring practice . . . does a fine 
job both ways . . . fine blocker and a 
sure tackier . . . has better than average 
speed . . . pursues well . . . will defin- 
itely be one of the top interior linemen 
this season . . . will be expected to give 
solid boost to Terp tackle play . . . was 
all-State and all-County at Harrison, 
N. J. High where he also lettered in 
*-<=eball and basketball ... in School of 
Business and Public Administration m->jar- 
ing in Marketing. 



39 



TOM FLOR, 22, 6-0, 206, Senior from 
Elizabeth, N. J. — one of the veteran 
tackle returnees who with Schwarz and 
Gardi compose the top trio that will 
head the tackle corps . . . Flor has had 
two good years with the Terps at a much 
heavier weight, playing last season near 
the 230-pound range . . . this spring 
he took the advice of Nugent and brought 
h ; s weight near the 200 mark and cam- 
up with a brilliant spring practice . . . 
he liked playing lighter and his per- 
formances bore it out . . . has ex- 
ceptional strength and moves well . • 
good blocker ... has outstanding de- 
fensive abilities ... one of team's most 
popular . . • was all-State and all- 
County at Thomas Jefferson High . . 
also lettered in basketball, baseball, 
wrestling, and track . . . brought to 
Maryland by former Terp all-America 
guard, Bob Ward . . . married and has 
a daughter ... in School of Business 
and Public Administration. 

BOB COLE, 20, 5-11, 217. Junior from 
Newark N J. — another of the "New 
Jersey" tackles . . . Nugent and team 
could benefiit greatly at the tackle spot 
if Cole comes through ... has good 
S i ze _ w ill probably play at lighter weight 
than listed . . • has outstanding po- 
tential . . if realized he definitely will 
help . '. . does a fine job blocking and 
is a tower of strength on defense . 
will be given good chance to battle it 
out with the boys in front of him and 
could make the grade . . . was all-City, 
all-County, and all-State at West Side 
High . . . also lettered in track and 
swimming ... in School of Business and 
Public Administration. 

GEORGE DRAKSLER, 20, 6-1, 210, Soph- 
omore from Homer City, Pa. — following 
a season with the B squad of '58, the 
quiet hard-working Draksler now is con- 
sidered even better than the high regard 
held for him after a brilliant freshman 
year . . . with the extra year's experi- 
ence and a fine spring practice under 
Nugent, Draksler is being counted on to 
give added strength and depth to the 
Terp tackle spot . . . offers outstanding 
potential to be one of the finest . . . 
game experience will help . . . has ex- 
ceptional all-around ability ... is quick 
and h«s good reactions . . . lettered for 
Jim Kehoe's track team as top shot put 
man . . . won the ACC freshman title 
and was number two man in league 
list spring . . . hits 50 feet most of 
the time . . . expected to do much 
better this year . . . was all-District 
and all-County .at United Joint High . . . 
listed as the top "all-opponent" played 
against by other team . . . won the 
most valuable track participant in Indiana 
Pa. County as well as most valuable in 
the Jmnita Relays his senior year 
. . . also voted 1 lie best athlete award 



of Indiana County ... a member of 
the National Honor Society ... in School 
of Business and Public Administration. 
JIM BOFF, 20, 6-0, 197, Sophomore from 
Library, Pa. — along with Draksler, he was 
on the B unit last fall for experience 
and he too is now ready to come through 
with flying colors and uphold the sterl- 
ing reputation as a star player that he 
gained, along with Draksler, as a top 
performer on the freshman team . . . 
after a most successful spring practice 
that pleased Nugent and staff. Boff 
• continues to be labeled as one who should 
help the cause up front ... he will 
be counted on heavily . . . could be 
future star . . . hard worker, consci- 
entious, and has intense desire to play 
ball . . . has strength and fine mobility 
. . . lettered in soccer at Snowden High 
. . . in School of Business and Public 
Administration. 

TOM SANKOVICH. 19, 6-0, 195, Sopho- 
more from Uniontown, Pa. — comes to 
Maryland as one of their finest tackle 
prospects in a long time . . . played 
brilliantly for the frosh of '58 . . . has 
exceptional strength, football knowledge, 
and speed . . a real competitor who 
likes to "knock" . . . fine offensively with 
good reactions, letting him pursue well 
. . . real tough and hard to move de- 
fensively . . . vicious tackier . . . 
big star at North Union Twp. High . . . 
could be same for Terps . . . will be 
one to watch for he could do a big 
job for the Terp line . . . was first 
team all-Conference and all-County . 
second team all-Western Pennsylvania . . . 
an all-State honorable mention . . . class 
officer . . . was most valuable player 
senior year in football and baseball and 
also lettered in basketball . . . ?n School 
of Physical Education, Recreation, and 
Health. 

BILL KIRCHIRO, 19, 6-1, 203, Sopho- 
more from Basking Ridge, N.J. — Another 
of the real outstanding newcomers up from 
the freshman team . . . highly rated as 
a future star who promises to come 
through as one of the big names up 
front . . . starred for the '58 freshman 
team on the first line at one of the 
guard spots and made his mark then as 
one of the future greats . . . was moved 
to tackle this spring ... an early knee 
injury and subsequent minor operation 
kept him out of spring practice . . . 
knee well now, and Kirchiro ready to 
show his ability, which he has . . . has 
outstanding potential to be one of the 
best and can be used at either tackle or 
guard . . . good strong boy accompany- 
ing his potential . . was all-County at 
Bernards High and on the all--Sertional 
state championship team . . . also letter- 
ed in track . . . fine shot putter . . . 
will be on Terp team this year also . . . 
in School of Arts and Science. 



40 



DICK BARLUND, 19, 6-4, 208, Sopho- 
more from Woodbridge, N. J.- could be 
one of the newcomers to come through 
and make the boys in front of him 
hustle to keep their jobs ... a very 
fine prospect with an excellent chance to 
be one of the best ... is a tall rangy 
boy with unlimited possibilities . . . had 
a "good freshman year, one of the better 
nncs . . . impressed in spring practice 
to the extent that a good early fall 
practice will make him a strong candi- 
date for a lot of duty this season . . . 
with his standout physical facilities, he 
does a good .iob . . . with experience. 
he should make it more pleasant living 
up front . . . could be a big help this 
year . . . has desire and determination 
to go with his physical potential . . . 
is the son of the famous boxer, Gunnar 
Barlund . . . was all-County at Wood- 
ridge High . . . also lettered in base- 
ball and basketball, making the all- 
county selection in basketball ... in 
School of Business and Public Admin- 
istration. 

LOU INGRAM, 20. 6-1, 199, Junior from 
Pittsburgh, Pa. — big and strong. Ingram 
looks ready to have a big year follow- 
ing a fine debut last fall as a soph . . . 
came up after a great freshman season to 
give a lot of help at the center position 
in '53 . . did a good job . . . can 
also play guard and this spring was 



moved to tackle . . . could go back to 
the middle again . . had an impress- 
ionable spring to further help along the 
One reputation he gained earlier . . . 
hard worker and one who is easy to 
coach . . . wants to learn and to play 
. . . fine blocker and a top defensive 
performer . . . doesn't lack the desire 
for competition . . . one to watch close- 
ly .. . could be a big help . . . was 
a star athlete at the highly regarded 
North Catholic High in Pittsburgh . . . 
in School of Business and Public Admin- 
istration. 

IRVIN FAUNCE, 20, 6-2, 199, Sopho- 
more tro - i Silver Spring, Md. -one of 
the fine local boys from Montgomery 
Blair High who looks ready to come 
through and play some football for the 
Terps . . . didn't play last fall because 
of injury and operation, but gave indi- 
cations in spring practice that he is on 
the move . . . good size and speed . . . 
experience will be big help . . . works 
very hard in his bid for varsity duty 
. . . could be big help . . . was . all-State 
second team, all-Metropolitan second team 
and all-Bi-County first team . . . won 
the Cushman award his senior year as 
the outstanding football player . 
also lettered in basketball and track at 
Blair ... in School of Business and 
Public Administration. 



GUARDS 



TOM GUNDERMAN. 21, 5-10, 205, Senior 
from Franklin, N. J. — one of the best 
football players to play at Maryland in 
many years . . . Gunderman is con- 
sidered " one of the best in the select 
group of plavers chosen nationally, and 
definitelv is one of the finest players and 
guards in the South ... the Terps 
won't come near facing one of his talent 
this fall . . has been brilliant since 
his first game as a freshman ... as a 
sophomore, he started the season as first 
team right guard and there he has 
been since . . . none of his competition 
could come near taking the job from 
him ... a truly great player who hasn't 
received the deserved honors usually 
accorded the star Terp players ... if 
the Terps come up with a winning record, 
needed to attain all-star recognition, 
Gunderman will be rewarded ... is most 
impressive as he works like a charm 
guard every play . . . can be seen 
making tackles all over the field . . . 
has good speed and a fine football mind 
. . . takes great pride in his position 
. . . his good size, excellent condition 
gives him the facility to move well . . . 
is a fine diagnostician, a sure tackier, 
extremely agile, wards off blockers, and 
pursues well . . quick as a cat and 
has a tremendously fast charge . . . 
a tower of strength . . . hits with de- 
moralizing power ... he is being hailed 
nationally as one of the BEST guards 
for this fall . . . this fabulous quick 



charge he has literally blasts out the 
opposing lineman . . . has uncanny re- 
actions and pursuit . . . rough and tough 
as they come . . . likes to mix it up 
. . . following graduation ' from Franklin 
High in '55, he attended Greenbrier Mili- 
tary Academy ... in ' High School he 
was all-State and all-County . . . also 
lettered in basketball and baseball 
. . . at Greenbrier he won the highest 
athletic award, the "Gregg Athletic 
Award" for excellence in athletics and 
academics . . . was a member of the 
National Honor Society at Greenbrier . . . 
a brother Bob graduated from Virginia 
in '56 where he was a star end . . . 
in School of Business and Public Ad- 
ministration majoring in Marketing. 

BILL LAZARO. 22, 5-11, 186, Senior from 
Turtle Creek, Pa. — one of the top boys 
on the squad and one of the most 
serious and hard working . . . the quiet 
Lazaro has come along to be an out- 
standing performer and a top candidate 
for front line duty . . . had a fine season 
last fall, giving a methodical consistent 
performance each game . . . gave indi- 
cations that this was going to be his 
big year as he showed well during spring 
practice . . . definitely made himself 
heard from and coaches liked it . . . 
has a lot of desire and determination 
and wants to play a lot of football . . . 
does a nice job both ways . . . efficient 
blocker . . . most notable for his de> 



41 



fensive play . . has a fine attitude 

. . . was all -State at Turtle Creek High 
and also an all-W.P.I.A.L. selection 
also lettered in basketball, baseball, and 
track . . . was President of the Student 
Council and Vice-President of his senior 
class . . in School of Engineering, 

majoring in Mechanical Engineering. 

PETE BOINIS, 22, 5-10, 188, Junior from 
Washington, D.C. — represents one of the 
outstanding guards in Terpville in the 
last few years . . . came to Maryland 
following his hitch in the service . . . 
had a fine freshman year, then last fall 
through his hard work and tireless efforts 
came up with a most impressive season 
that was very pleasant to see . . . 
was praised for his fine play on many 
occasions . . continued to impress this 
spring and Nugent and staff are counting 
on him to be a top guard for them 
this fall . . . definitely will be in the 
thick of the battle ... a serious consci- 
entious boy who goes all out every 
minute of practice and while in the game 
. . has a powerful offensive charge 
and real tough on defense . . . continued 
fine play by Boinis who exhibits extreme 
eagerness will surely ease the guard 
worry . . . lettered at Woodrow High 
and Bullis Prep in baseball also . . . 
a brother John will be on the freshman 
team this fall, and is considered an 
outstanding prospect ... in School of 
Education, majoring in Industrial Educa- 
tion. 

TOM LAIRD, 10, 5-10, 197, Sophomore 
from Ridley Park, Pa. — after a very 
fine freshman year. Laird came up with 
one of the finest individual performances 
of any lineman, during spring practice 
. . he impressed to the extent that he 
could become a strong candidate to battle 
it out for starting team honors early in 
the season . . . early fall practice will 
be a big factor in this youngster's bid 
. . regardless of the final result, he 
is one of the very best in camp and 



seems destined to be the star expected 
of him . . . 4 future top attraction . . . 
one to watch closely . . . has excep- 
tional strength ... a hard worker . . . 
was all-Delaware County and greater 
Philadelphia area all-Scholastic . . . was 
most valuable player in third Delaware 
County all -Star game . . . prepped at 
Valley Forge Military Avademy ... in 
School of Business and Public Admin- 
istration. 

TOM BROUMEL, 20, 5-10, 202, Sopho- 
more from Bel Air, Md. — another of the 
• fine prospects up from the freshman 
team ... he too is considered most 
capable of taking a good shot at the 
veterans, making the guard position more 
secure . . . starred for the frosh and 
continued to impress during spring drills 
. . . Nugent and staff hoping the big 
boy comes through . . . has top physical 
potential which could be realized early 
. . . a fine two-way player . . . does 
a good job defensively . . . was all Bi- 
County at Bel Air High and honorable 
mention all-State . *■. . also lettered in la- 
crosse ... in School of Physical Edu- 
cation, Recreation, and Health. 

GARY JANKOWSKI, 19, 5-11, 181, Sopho- 
more from Burtington, N.J. — will be an- 
other of the '58 yearlings that is coming 
up as a varsity candidate with a fine 
background and a good freshman season 
. . . hard worker with intense desire 
to play and has all the physical facili- 
ties to help him . . . hard-nosed com- 
petitor . . . likes to mix it up . . . 
a tower of strength . . he too being 
counted on for a lot of football . . . 
with experience, his desire and know how 
will make him one to watch for future 
outstanding play . . . was all-Burlington 
County . . . honorable mention all- State. 
Group III ... on South Jersey first 
team . . . class officer . . . also letter- 
ed in track . . . took first place in 
county pole vault meet and third in 
discus ... in School of Physical Edu- 
cation, Recreation, and Health. 



CENTERS 



VICTOR SCHWARTZ, 22, 6-0, 181, Senior 
from Port Reading, N.J, — with an out- 
standing year behind him at the pivot 
spot, the former watch charm guard is 
the "big" man to head the center posi- 
tion . . . Schwartz lettered as a soph 
at the guard spot, but was moved to 
the middle last year and performed like 
a veteran . . for his size, he does 

one of the best jobs of any in the league 
. . . is one of the finest blockers on 
the team . . . has a good charge after 
centering, many times cleaning out the 
opponent who is much bigger . . , has 
excelled defensively . . . has quick re- 
actions enabling him to roam and make 
a great many tackles . . . has a lot 
of football skill and ability ... a tough, 
rugged boy who enioys competition . . . 
was all-State at Woodbridge High . . . 
also lettered in baseball and wrestling 



in high school . . . married ... in 
School of Physical Education, Recreation, 
and Health. 

LEROY DIETRICH. 21, 6-1. 197, Junior 
from Philadelphia, Pa. — one of the finest 
and most popular boys on the squad. 
Dietrich represents a tower of strength 
and exceptional ability for the center 
job . . . lettered last year as he wwke ' 
behind Schwartz . . . did an outstanding 
job and continued to make his mark 'n 
spring drills . . . impressed Nugent great- 
ly and was giving the top iob a fool 
battle ... it was touch and go during 
spring practice between the two with 
both working on the first unit about equal 
time . . the same could happen in 
early fall drills . . . h^s intense desire 
lo , : ic{-ompany his grid talents . . the 
big raw-boned Dietrich a hard worker and 



42 



most conscientious ... a fine two-way 
player . . . was a star athlete at North- 
east Catholic High . . . was second 
team all-Catholic and honorable mention 
all -Scholastic . . . lettered in track and 
basketball also . . . class officer and an 
honor student ... in School of Arts 
and Science, majoring in History. 

BOB HACKER, 19, 6-1. 187, Sopho-nore 
from New Brighton, Pa.— after a year 
on the B squad that gave him a great 
deal of experience and confidence, Hacker 
came up with a most impressive spring 
practice and is being counted on heavily 
to give the center position a lot of help 
. . . big and strong, he moves well . . . 
does an extra special job offensively . . . 
real good with the QB and does a good 
job centering for punts . . . tough to 
move on defense . . . likes to mix it up 
. . . fine competitor . . . good strong 
and sure tackier . . . could move up 
the ladder quick . . . was all-County 



at Freedom High School . . . also lettered 
in basketball ... in school of Physical 
Education, Recreation, and Health. 

JOHN REILLY, 19, 6-1, 185, Sophomore 
from Philadelphia, Pa. — here is a boy 
who came up with one of the most 
brilliant exhibitions in spring drills . . . 
could have won the vote of staff as the 
top performer in spring of the new- 
comers . . . will be counted on to play 
a lot of ball as a soph ... a very 
explosive all-around player . . . one who 
really likes contact and the rougher the 
better . . . has exceptional desire and 
determination . . . has good speed and 
really rocks on defense . . . surely a 
future star . . . one to watch closely 
was all-Catholic at Father Judge 
High School . . . captain of the football 
team senior year . . . class officer . . . 
also lettered in track ... in School of 
Education. 



QUARTERBACKS 



DALE BETTY, 21, 6-0, 171, Junior from 
Butler, Pa. — with the signal calling posi- 
tion for the Terps the most critical for 
Nugent. Betty and the four other candi- 
dates vie for the all-important assign- 
ment . . . one off two quarterback letter- 
men returning . . . Scarbath the other 
. . job is wide open and Betty has 
the abilities to come through ... al- 
though a fine runner, the speed Nugent 
requires of this job might hold him back 
some . . . had a real outstanding fresh- 
man year, then on the B team before 
varsity duty last fall . . . one of the top 
ball handlers ... a good passer, long 
and short — better with the short throws 
. . . also fine punter . . . good defense 
also ... hit on six of ten for 58 yards 
last season . . . had one interception 
. . . had a 2.9 total offense mark . . . 
was all-WPIAL and all-Allegheny-Kiski 
Valley in a real tough league . 
honorable mention all -State . . . played 
in the Western Penna. Jaycee all-Star 
game . . . lettered in basketball, baseball, 
and track . . . was all-WPIAL basket- 
ball in his section ... on the all- 
tournament teams ... in baseball, was 
on the prep league all-star team two 
years . . honor student and president 
of senior class . . . studying Metallurg- 
ical Engineering. 

DWAYNE FLETCHER, 19, 5-11, 162, 
Junior from Front Royal, Va. — in the 
quest for a quarterback. Nugent' s big 
move was bringing the fleet-footed Fletch- 
er from his left halfback post to try the 
signal calling job . . . Fletcher, a great 
halfback because of his outstanding speed, 
fits into the picture and was most im- 
pressive in spring practice . . . tha 
Nugent quarterback always poses the 
great running threat, so the hb star 
could be the answer . . . looked good 
m-'ny times during spring drills as he 
rolled out then took off for long gains 



. . . does a good job passing . . . 
worked all summer practicing throwing 
long and will be worked with during 
fall drills perfecting the long pass . . . 
fine short and middle distance passer . . . 
being counted on heavily as possibly the 
answer . . . came to Terps as one of 
the finest running backs to hit camp 
since the big names of Hanulak. Waller. 
Vereb, and company . . . had a brilliant 
frosh year that set him up as one of 
the future big names . . . bd a good 
soph season as a substitute halfback . . . 
carried 28 times for 109 yards and a 3.9 
rushing average . . . caught ten passes 
tor 88 yards . . . intercepted one enemy- 
pass . . . returned three pun's for 
eleven yards and five kickoffs for 98 
yards and a 19.6 average . . has 

blinding speed and talented running habits 
. . . hard to bring down . has 

terrific balance accompanying his speed 
. . . good open field runner with tricky 
maneuvers . . . his speed helps his de- 
fensive game which will come along with 
experience . . . was a big star at War- 
ren County High . . . was third team 
all-State and first team all-District . . . 
also lettered in track four years and 
basketball, two ... in school of busi- 
ness and Public Administration, majoring 
in Air Transportation. 

DON HENRY. 19. 5-9, 166, Sophomore 
from Front Royal. Va. — a high school 
teammate of Fletcher, now a qb candi- 
date for the Terps . . . Henry quarter- 
backed the outstanding teams of Warren 
County High and Fletcher was the "hot" 
halfback . . . with Fletcher a senior 
and Henry a junior, the combination was 
the finest ever for the school . . . Henry 
comes up to the varsity after he too 
came up with a brilliant freshman 
season . . during spring drills the 

combination found them vieing for the 
same job now. quarterback . . . Henry 
looked real good in early practice . . 



43 



he has the top speed needed for the job 
and has a sharp right arm ... he 
throws very well with a bit more empha- 
sis on the long heaves ... a fine ball 
handler ... his size makes him strong 
running threat . . . hard to get to and 
stop . . . fine competitor . . has tre- 
mendous desire to play . . . was all- 
District two years and third team all- 
Metropolitan . . also lettered in base- 
ball and basketball ... led the District 
in hitting his junior and senior years 
. . . captain of all three sports, foot- 
ball, baseball, and basketball ... in 
School of Physical Education, Recreation, 
and Health. 

DICK NOVAK, 18. 5-10, 158, Sophomore 
from Uniontowh, Pa. — one of the most 
sought after players in the "gold mine 
of football" area, Western Penna. in a 
long time . . . Terps landed the all- 
around star athlete who has exhibited 
brilliantly and definitely has established 
himself as a future star ... a terrific 
triple-threat type quarterback ... he 
can run. pass, kick, call a fine sequence 
of plays, play defense and all with 
excellence ... he could be the one to 
lead the Terps out of the woods and be 
the answer to Nugent's need for a quart- 
erback ... it may not come immediately 
and it may ... if not. it seems he 
shouldn't be too long before he comes 
through to do the job . . . reminds one 
of the former great Terp triple-threat 
artist and all-America of 1953, Bernie 
Faloney . . . will be after the top job 
with intense earnestness . . . has all 
the physical and, mental equipment to be 
a most serious contender . . . one of 
the future stars being counted on early 
.. could be the big surprise package 
at a spot where needed most . . .was 
a fabulous athlete at Uniontown's South 
Union High . . . was selected to the 
pU-Ciass A team of Pa. and the all- 
County eleven that claims so many great 
players . . . was honorable mention all- 
State and honorable mention All-America 
on the Wigwam-Wiseman selection . . . 
was named most valuable football player 
at South Union . . . was vice-president 
of junior and senior class . . . also 
starred in basketball, baseball and track 



. . . was voted the most valuable ath- 
lete in all three of these sports also; was 
all-County and all-WPIAL in basketball 
. . . was most valuable player in his 
basketball Section . . . honorable men- 
tion all -State in basketball . . . holds 
the record of scoring the most points in 
one game, an amazing 54 . . . holds 
the school and county record for the 
broad jump, 21' 8V4," . . . was the 
WPIAL broad jump champion ... re- 
ceived the scholarship award; as the most 
valuable athlete in Fayette County . . . 
one to watch closely ... in School ' of 
Business and Public Administration. 

DICK SCARBATH, 21, 6-2, 190. Junior 
from Baltimore Md. — with Betty. the 
other returning letterman at quarterback 
. . . and like Betty, all their play came 
in a substitute role behind Bob Rusevlyan 
and Dickie Lewis ... in his limited play 
last fall, Scarbath came through in the 
latter part of the season with some fine 
football . . . was counted on to be top 
candidate for this year but he got far 
behind as he was unable to show Nugent 
his talent because of a broken bone 
suffered in his left hand the secnd day 
of spring practice ... he will have to 
make his bid for the job in early fall 
practice . . . has all the facilities to be- 
come a top-notch quarterback . . . Ms 
speed running outside however doesn't 
compare with Fletcher, Henry, and Novak 
. . . has a great throwing arm . . . 
tosses the long ones with ease and is 
a fine short passer . . . excellent ball 
handler and calls a fine game . . . one 
of team's best punters . . . quick to 
pick the opponents defense apart . . . 
big strong boy . . . hard to bring down 
once he gets running steam up . . . 
does a good defensive job . . . hard 
tickler ... hit on 27 of 59 passes for 
356 yards and one touchdown . . . had 
six picked off . . . had a total offense 
mark of 334 yards for 81 plays for 
average of 4.1 . . . had a 39.1 yard 
ounting average for six kicks 
lettered in lacrosse as a defenseman . . 
his availability and realized potential 
cou'd mean a lot . . . graduate of Poly 
High School ... in School of Educa- 
tion majoring in Education for Industry. 



HALFBACKS 



RODNEY BREEDLOVE, 21, 6-2, 209, 
Senior from Cumberland, Md. — when Nu- 
gent took over the helm of the slumping 
Terrapins, he studied all the past game 
movies and talked personnel with the 
remaining Terp coaches . . . the right 
halfback is a very important man in 
his offense ... it requires size, strength, 
speed, quickness, agility, outstanding 
blocking ability, and most outstanding as 
a pass receiver . . . the result was 
one of Nugent's brow-raising moves, 
Guard Breedlove to Halfback . . . the 
big boy who has been honored for his 
great play at guard as all-America and 
all -Conference both his sophomore and 
junior years, made the move easily and 



looked good in doing it ... he filled 
all the requirements called for . .his 
speed and fine pair of hands makes him 
a top pass receiving threat ... he is 
a vicious and crisp blocker ... he is 
brilliant on defense ... a linebacker 
the past two years, he gave thrilling 
performances each game with his stell r 
and spectacular defensive work ... he 
tied for the Conference interception lead 
with a halfback, both pickmg oft live 
to lead the league ... he batted flown 
numerous others . . . much is expected 
of Breedlove this fall ... his desire 
and determination assures a top flight 
job . . . his name still on the all-star 
lists for he has convinced everybody that 



•14 



ho is a great football player . . . he 
starred as a freshman for the Terps as 
an end ... it was then his pass 
catching talents received rave notices . . . 
he usually gets anything near him . . . 
one on the mark is a sure completion 
. . . the need for help at guard came 
and knowing his outstanding grid ability. 
he was the logical choice for the move 
... he made the move look good as 
he came along to win national recogni- 
tion and many honors . . . many coaches 
and opposing players praised his play 
and all gave him all-America rating . . . 
last fall he made all the pre-season all- 
America selections, but a losing season 
dampened the post season choices . . . 
now as a halfback, the fiery quick- 
tempered star could complete the cycle 
in the same brilliant manner he has 
conquered before ... he won more 
honors as a soph than any rookie in 
Maryland grid history ... he has won 
the all-America mention and all-Con- 
ference honors both years . . . was 
runnerup as National Lineman of the 
Week by AP for his terrific game against 
North Carolina, witnessed by Queen Eliza- 
beth and Prince Phillip . . . was named 
the nation's top sophomore lineman in 
the final consensus poll for sophs . . . 
was all-City in '55 and '56 and all-State 
his senior year . . . was a National 
Honor Society student . . . also a base- 
ball and basketball star at Allegany 
High . . married and has a daughter 
. . . in School of Arts and Science, 
majoring in Government and Politics. 



EVERETT CLOUD, 20, 6-0, 186. Junior 
from McLean Va. — one of the finest look- 
ing backfield prospects to be at Mary- 
land . . . came here highly touted and 
sought after by many schools along with 
major league baseball scouts . . . after 
deciding on college education over base- 
ball contract, Cloud settled down to hit 
the Terp camp with explosiveness and 
came up with a brilliant freshman year 
this bore out his greatness and 
potential . . . was all set to be one of 
whom a lot of play could be expected 
. . . practice sessions with hard work 
saw him give top-flight performances at 
both halfback and fullback . . . but 
the '58 campaign found him used spar- 
ingly, although he lettered . . . carried 
three times for ten yards . . . returned 
one kickoff for 30 yards . ' . . caught 
one aerial for nine yards . . . Cloud 
took the wraps off once again in spring 
practice and Nugent liked what he saw 
. . . a fine two-way player . . . has 
all the equipment to become one of the 
best ... a powerfully built boy with 
extremely good running ability . . . has 
good speed and runs hard . . . likes to 
bulldoze his way over tacklers . 
strong defensively . . . hits hard and 
a sure tackier . . . good blocker . . . 
shou'd be one of the top new faces in 
the Terp backfield . . . has a fine atti- 
tude . . . with his known capabilities. 
he definitely will be candidate for future 
all-star selections . . . even todav. his 



name is Mr. Everything at McLean . . . 
he still is the all-time big-name of Mc- 
Lean . . . was all -Metropolitan on all 
Washington, D.C. selections . . . was 
all-County and all-Northern Virginia . . . 
also honorable mention all-State . . • 
was a class president at McLean and a 
Senator Senior in Student Government 
. . . along with baseball, he starred 
in basketball . . . was named the out- 
standing football player in Northern Vir- 
ginia in 1956 ... in School of Physical 
Education, Recreation, and Health. 

JIM DAVIDSON. 19, 5-11. 166, Sopho- 
more from Marlton, N.J. — one of the very 
best of the newcomers up from the fresh- 
man team . . . has set his sight on a 
halfback job and has an excellent chance 
to get one following an outstanding show- 
ing this spring . , Nugent and staff liked 
what they saw '. . . the former Mt. Holly 
High star has blazing speed labeling him 
as a dangerous break-away type back 
that will see a >ot of dutv . . . one of 
the real good finds of the '58 rookie 
crop i . . with his speed, he is a strong 
type runner and hard to bring down 
. . . cuts well . . . made an ex- 
ceptional showing defensively also . . 
could be a real package of dynamite 
. made a brilliant record at Mt. 
Holly High ... he is the only five- 
snort letterman in the history of the 
school . . . lettered in football, base- 
ball, basketball, track, and tennis . . . 
was all-South Jersev in football and 
honorable mention all-State . . . was 
rll-Delaware County -nd fii-Bu-Mn^on 
County . . . was voted the best football 
nlaver two years; best baseball player 
three years; and was voted the best f»th- 
ilete award his senior year . . . another 
to watch dosely . . .in School of 
Physical Education. Recreation, and 
Health. 

BOB GALLAGHER, 20. 5-10. 170. Junior 
from Pittsburgh, Pa. — here is a boy who 
loves to play football and wants to play 
60-minutes each game ... he has out- 
standing two-way ability which makes 
him a top candidate to realize his am- 
bition . . the equipment, phvsical -"nd 
mental is there . . . another fine player 
from the highly respected North Catholic 
High in Pittsburgh . . . came to Mary- 
land with p terrific reoutation .and fab- 
ulous high school records . . . definitely 
one of the finer halfbacks to hit the 
Terp camp . . . starred as a freshman 
. . . lettered as a substitute last fall 
as a soph . . . carried 14 times for 56 
yards for a 4-yprd aver-ge . . . c-ush' 
six passes for 100 yards . . . punted 
twice for 32.5 yard average . . . led 
fiio te"' v i ; " k'ek^ff return yardage with 
five for 113 yards returned for a re- 
spectable 22.6 yard average . . . had a 
real fine spring practice and made a most 
indelible impression on Nugent and staff 
. . . a quiet hard worker with top atti- 
tude ... is the rough-tough hard 
running power type ball carrier . . . has 
real good speed to go along with a 
powerful pair of legs . . . cracks hard 



45 



and tough to bring down . . . also an 
efficient crisp blocker . . . fine receiver 
and punter . . . excells defensively also 
. . should be one of the best with 
Nugent . . . stardom isn't too much 
to expect of this top-notch player . . . 
a perfectionist with intense desire and 
determination . . . one to watca close- 
ly .. . was all-City and won the most 
valuable player award and was team 
captain . . . lettered three years in 
boxing and baseball . . . was a boxing 
champion of the City High Schools . . . 
was salutatorian of his class, was school 
president, and president of the student 
council ... in School of Business and 
Public Administration, majoring in Public 
Relations. 

DON VanREENAN, 21, 5-9, 175, Sopho- 
more from Marlinton, West. Va. — this 
little guy, after working for a year 
following high school graduation and not 
being hounded by college scouts, dropped 
into the Terp camp following his dis- 
covery by assistant coach Whitey Dove'.l 
and has caused the biggest explosion in 
a long time ... it has stayed that 
way since and there is every reason to 
believe that his name will hit the national 
scene over night . . . the squat but 
powerfully built rookie is believed to be 
the fastest halfback in Maryland history 
. . . this is just what the doctor o dereJ 
and Nugent and staff have a bag full of 
medicine ready to cure with ... in 
this bag are footballs and they are for 
VanReenan to tuck under his arm and 
take off for those precious six points, which 
he can do . . . performed brilliantly m 
spring practice . . . has the ground speed 
of an air "jet" . . . many many times 
he broke loose for long touchdowns and 
long gains ... his speed is so ex- 
plosive that he is by the defender in a 
split second if there is a shadow of 
daylight for him to go through . . . 
once in the open, he seems untouchable 
and uncatchable ... a powerful boy 
who runs with initial power to start 
himself . . . once loose, his chances for 
the big one are good ... his speed is 
realized by one of his track performances 
... in the Indoor Conference Track meet 
this past winter, he broke Dave Sime's 
record for the Freshman Indoor 60-yard 
dash . . . VanReenan streaked the 
challenge in 6.3 seconds breaking Sime's 
mark of 6.4 seconds . . . one to watch 
. . . he could easily become the one 
to change the picture ... he should 
bear out the nave notices his young 
career has given him ... he could he'p 
overnight . . . seems as though future 
honors can't elude him . . . will be ex- 
citing to watch . . . was on the all-St te 
Class B first team selection at Marlin- 



ton High . . . also lettered in Laseball 
tnree years ... in School of Physical 
Education, Recreation, and Health 
GENE VERARDI, 21, 5-10, 165, Senior 
trom Freeport, Pa. — another of the excit- 
ing exceptionally fast halfbacks that Nu- 
gent likes and will want to see him go 
. . . he too can scamper . . . very 
quiet, serious hard worker with the am- 
bition to play a lot of football, which 
he is capable of doing . . . has blazing 
speed and can give you the break-away 
run the new Terp offense offers . . Ver- 
ardi had a great freshman year ih^n 
broke into the headlines as a soph . . . 
he came up with an average junior year 
. . has outstanding potential which is 
bound to show playing ... an unusual 
running style accompanies his speed . . . 
most deceptive . . has the quickness 
and sharpness to do a fine job cutting 
and faking ... his fakes are something 
to watch as he is streaking downfield 
. . . the defender finds himself in real 
trouble . . . has tremendous outside 
speed and goes like a deer once he hits 
daylight downfield . . . compact size. 
speed, and strong running power makej 
him a difficult target to tackle . . . 
a dangerous ball carrier ... a good 
passer also ... a good target for 
passes because of his speed . . . he his 
knack of getting behind defenders to ho 
open target for the pass . . . fine punter 
also . . . used last fall with his quick 
kick weapon . . . did a good job with 
them . . . averaged 35.8 yards for 12 
kicks ... as a soph, he won ACC 
"Soph of the Week" honors and nominated 
another . . . had a 4.4 running average 
as a soph and 2.1 last year on 55 
carries for 116 yards . . . was one for 
one passing good for four yards . . • 
caught 8 for 63 yards . . . intercepted 
two . . . returned two punts for seven 
yards . . . returned three kickoffs for 
43 yards . . was a quarterback at 

Freeport where he led the team that he 
captained to an undefeated season . . . 
highly touted prospect . . . was all- 
WPIAL, Class A . . . co-captain of 
basketball and baseball teams also . . . 
was named to the West all-Star team in 
basketball . . . fine student . made 

the national academic all-America team 
last year, was on the Dean's List and 
a member of the ACC all-academe tern 
. . in School of Education, majoring 
in Mathematics and minoring in Science. 

OTHER TOP HALFBACK CANDIDATES 
UP FROM THE FRESHMAN TEAM ARE 
RONALD MACE, 19, 5-11. Sopho- 
more from Williamstown, Pa., and BILL 

NOONAN, 19, 5-8, 168, Sophomore from 
S Iver Spring, Md. 



FULLBACKS 



JIM JOYCE, 21, 5-10, 190, Senior from 
Philadelphia, Pa. — although he missed 
some of spring practice, Nugent saw 
enough of his great fullback Joyce to be 
most happy about him . . . the outstanding 
potential Joyce has packed in his Atlas 



built frame could be a big factor in the 
outcome of the season ... he came to 
Maryland as a much heralded star and 
has played brilliantly for the Terps, but 
his cause needs some vic'ories and he 
is all set to cap his grid career with 



46 



smashing success ... he has had two 
good years, averaging three yards as a 
soph and he led the Terp ball carriers 
in '58 with 4. '2 rushing mark (or 97 
carries and 406 yards ... he repre- 
sents the lone returning backfield starter 
from last season . . Joyce could and 
should be the best fullb-xck in the leagu • 
and in many other areas . . . touted 
to the hilt when he enrolled at Maryland, 
the rock-like fullback has responded 
enough to establish him as one of ths 
better fullbacks ... in his first Varsity- 
Alumni game, he was named the big star 
of the game . . . with a good senior 
performance, he could attain the fam? 
predicted for him . . . the powerfully 
built Joyce from Bishop Neumann High 
where he did everything and won every 
honor, is a great pile-driving bull-dozing 
type runner ... a crack at the line 
always means three yards or more . . . 
his power packed legs afford him the 
ability to drag tacklers with him . . . 
he is a murderous line plunger . ..he 
batters the line with reckless abandon 
.... he also excels on defense ... a 
hard and sure tackier . . . lik°s to mix 
it. ud ... a tremendous blocker . . . 
it looks like the swipe of a scythe 
as he blocks . . . scored once last year, 
twice as a soph . . . caught two aerials 
had one kickoff return for 15 
yards . one of the game's most 

powerful ball carriers . . . should be 
a great one ... in School of Business 
and Public Administration. 

KEN HOUSER, 21, 6-0, 185, Sophomore 
from Palmyra, Pa. — it won't take long 
for the word to get out on Houser . . . 
it could come Sept. 19 when the Terps 
open the season against West Virginia 
. . . here is a boy who should be a 
great football player and a great star 
for three years for the Terps . . . he. 
along with the veteran Joyce and a couple 
other newcomers, Pat Drass and Bruce 
Coultas, noted below, gives Maryland its 
greatest fullback strength in many years 
... all are outstanding football players 
. . Houser represents one of the BEST 
. . . Nugent has tabbed him as one of 
the finest looking football players he ever 
has seen and has labeled him as a future 
great after having his heart warmed many 
times while watching him show so mag- 
nificently in spring practice . . . aa 
outstanding prospect . . is a fabulous 
hard runner with tremendous power and 
great speed ... he delights in hitting 
with authority ... if he gets daylight 
after shattering a defender, his speed 
makes him a dangerous threat . . . could 
be another of the real finds and early 
season sensations ... a strong de- 
fensive player . . . the serious soft- 
spoken Houser loves the game . 
easy to coach . . . has intense desire 
and determination . . . was all-Conference 
his junior and senior year . . . also 
lettered in basketball, baseball, and track 
was all-county in basketball 
. . . won track award for scoring high- 
est number of points in county track 



meet . . . was class officer all four 
years . . . another to watch closely 
. . . will definitely make an indelible 
impression and an impressive debut . . . 
in School of Physical Education, Recrea- 
...m. and Health. 

PAT DRASS, 18, 5-10, 181, Sophomore 
from Philadelphia, Pa. — if the Terps are 
going to have outstanding depth at the 
fullback slot, and possibly the greatest 
strength at that position in a long time, 
this newcomer is an outstanding candidate 
to provide some sensational play and help 
... he definitely will be ready to step 
in and make his bid for the position, 
which he could have . . . that is how 
good Drass is . . . here is another boy 
destined to be one of the finest in Mary- 
land . . . Drass represents one of the 
finest looking prospects to hit the Terp 
camp also ... he has tremendous foot- 
ball ability '. . . highly sought after 
. . . responded to his reputation with 
a great freshman year ... he followed 
it with a strong showing in spring prac- 
tice ... a powerfully built boy for his 
5-10 frame ... a very noticeable and 
eye-catching type ball carrier . . . has 
real good speed that he uses well . . . 
also can batter the line with a full blast 
of steam . . . most effective blocker and 
extremely hard-nosed defensively . 
real fine tackier . . . was all-Catholic 
selection at Bishop Neumann High where 
he was big star ... he followed his 
high school teammate, Joyce, to the posi- 
tion . . . now for the Terps the identical 
healthy situation occurs . . . was honor- 
able mention all-America and honorable 
mention all-Scholastic ... an honor 
student . . . class officer . . : in School 
of Business and Public Administration. 

BRUCE COULTAS, 19. 6-0. 183, Sopho- 
more from Madison, N.J. — still another of 
the outstanding prospects up from the 
freshman team where he had a top-flight 
year . . . caught the eye of Nugent and 
staff during spring practice with his 
standout play ... he comes along to 
give the Terp fullback play the finest 
prospects in a long time . . . one of 
the most sought after players in New 
Jersey . . . expected to be one of the 
best ... a definite candidate for all- 
star honors . . . slated to see a lot 
of duty . . . the chance will be given 
for it is known that he is one of the 
finest all-around backs . . . the potential 
is there and with experience should be 
realized ... a fine runner with good 
speed . . . hits hard and effectively 
. . a top defensive boy who likes to 
hit hard . . . blocks well . . . highly 
recommended . . . was all-State and all- 
County . . . also all-Conference . . . 
was voted the most valuable player award 
. . . also lettered in baseball and basket- 
ball . . . was all -conference and all- 
County in baseball . . . was class officer 
soph, and junior years . . in School of 
Business and Public Administration. 



47 



TERPS ON HONORARY SELECTIONS -- 1958 



RODNEY BREEDLOVE 

Honorable Mention All-America — AP, UPI, NEA, Sporting News 

First Team All-Conference — Associated Press 

First Team All-Conference — United Press International 

Second Team All-Conference — Southern Writers' Assn. 

Second Taem All-Area, selected by Washington Post and Times-Herald 



TOM GUNDERMAN 

Second Team All-Conference — United Press International 
Honorable Mention All-Conference — Southern Writers' Assn. 



FRED COLE 

Honorable Mention All-America — AP, UPI 
Second Team All-Conference — Associated Press 
Second Team All-Conference — Southern Writers' Assn. 
Honorable Mention All-Conference — United Press International 
Ninth draft choice of Chicago Bears 
Played in Blue-Gray All-Star Game 
Voted Best :Offensive Lineman by squad 

Voted the Anthony C. Nardo Memorial Trophy as the best football line- 
man of the year. 



BEN SCOTT I 

Second Team All-Conference — United Press International 
Second Team All-Conference — Southern Writers' Assn. 
Voted Best Defensive Lineman by squad 
Washington Redskins — Free Agent 



BOB RUSEVLYAN 

Voted the TEKE TROPHY as the student who during his four years 

at the University has rendered the greatest service to football 
Voted Best Offensive Back by squad 



TED KERSHNER 

Voted the Alvin L. Aubinoe Football Trophy, for the unsung hero of 
the '58 season. 

JIM JOYCE 
First Team All-Area, selected by Washington Post and Times-Herald 

48 



TERP ALL-AMERICA PLAYERS 

1949 — Ray Krouse, Tackle — Second Team 

1950 — Bob Ward, Guard — First Teams 

1951 — Bob Ward, Guard — First Teams 

1951 — Ed "Big Mo" Modzelewski, Fullback — First and Second Teams 

1951 — Dick "Little Mo" Modzelewski, Tackle — One First Team; Most 

Second Teams 
1952 — Jack Scarbath, Quarterback — First Teams 
1952 — Dick "Little Mo" Modelewski, Tackle — First Teams 
1952 — Tom Cosgrove, Center- Second Team 
1953 — Stan Jones, Tackle — First Teams 
1953 — Bernie Faloney, Quarterback — Eight First Teams; all Second 

Teams 
1953 — Chester Hanulak, Halfback — Second Teams 
1954 — Dick Bielski, Fullback — Third Teams 
1954 — Jack Bowersox, Guard — First Team (Gridiron Index) 
1954 — Bill Walker, End— Second Team (AP) 

1955 — Bob Pellegrini, Center — UNANIMOUS First Team All-America 
1955 — Ed Vereb, Halfback — First Team, Movietone News; First Team, 

N.Y. Daily News; First Team, Extension Magazine; Second 

team, INS; Second Team, Hearst "Big 6"; Third Team, AP, 

UP, Sporting News 
1955 — Mike Sandusky, Tackle — First Team, Sporting News; Extension 

Magazine; Second Teams 
1955 — Jack Davis, Guard — Honorable Mention, AP, UP, NEA 
1955 — Frank Tamburello, quarterback — First Team, Movietone News; 

Honorable Mention, AP. UP, NEA 
1955 — Bill Walker, End — Second Team, UP; Sporting News; Honorable 

Mention, NEA 
1955 — Russell Dennis, End — First Team, N.Y. Daily News 
1955 — Ed Heuring, Tackle — Honorable Mention, AP, UP 
1956— Mike Sandusky, Tackle— Honorable Mention, AP, UP, INS, NEA 
1956 — Jack Davis, Guard — Honorable Mention, AP, UP, INS, NEA 
1956 — Gene Alderton, Center — Honorable Mention, AP, UP 
1957 — Gene Alderton, Center — Honorable Mention, AP 
1957— Ed Cooke, End— Honorable Mention, AP, UP, NEA. 
1957 — Rodney Breedlove, Guard — Honorable Mention, AP, UP, NEA, 

Sporting News 
1958 — Rodney Breedlove, Guard — Honorable Mention, All-America, AP, 

UPI, NEA. Sporting News 
1958 — Fred Cole, Tackle — Honorable Mention, All-America, AP, UPI 

Additional Honors for Terp All-Americas 

BOB WARD— 1951 

"Lineman of Year" as selected by Washington Touchdown Club; re- 
ceived the Knute Rockne Memorial Trophy. 

"Lineman of Year" as selected by Philadelphia Sportswriters' Assn. 
Runner-up to Stanford's Bill McColl as Associated Press Lineman 
of Year. 

"Player of the Year" in Southern Conference, 1951. 
Most Valuable Player of '50 Gator Bowl as a sophomore. 

49 



Voted Most Valuable Player Award by his teammates four consecu- 
tive years. 
JACK SCARBATH— 1952 

Runner-up to Billy Vessels, Oklahoma, for Heisman Memorial Tro- 
phy as nation's outstanding football player. 
"Back of the Year" selected by COLLIER'S Magazine. 
"Sportsman of the Year" Award given by SPORT Magazine. 
Second high vote getter in United Press "Player of Year" poll. 
Third high vote getter in Associated Press "Player of Year" poll. 
"Player of the Year" in Southern Conference, 1952. 
"South's Most Valuable Player" in North-South Shrine Game, Miami. 
Fla. 

First draft choice of Washington Redskins. 
Third high vote getter in Associated Press "Player of Year" poll. 

DICK "Little Mo" MODZELEWSKI— 1952 

"Lineman of Year" Award, LOOK Magazine as selected by Grantland 

Rice and Football Writer's Assn. of America. Received the John B. 

Outland Memorial Trophy for this selection. 

"Lineman of Year" as selected by Washington Touchdown Club; 

received the Knute Rockne Memorial Trophy. 

Second high vote getter in United Press "Lineman of Year" poll. 

Second high vote getter in SPORTING NEWS "Lineman of Year" 

poll. 

Fourth high vote getter in ASSOCIATED PRESS "Lineman of Year" 

poll. 

Second draft choice of Washington Redskins. 

STANLEY JONES— 1953 

"Lineman of Year" awarded by COLLIER'S Magazine. 

"Lineman of Year" as selected by Washington Touchdown Club; 

received the Knute Rockne Memorial Trophy. 

Runnerup to J. D. Roberts, Oklahoma, for ASSOCIATED PRESS 

"Lineman of Year" award. 

Fifth draft choice of Chicago Bears as a junior. 
BERNIE FALONEY— 1953 

Named to the "All-America Backfield" selected by the Washington 

Touchdown Club. 

"Player of the Year" of the Atlantic Coast Conference. 

First team ACADEMIC Ail-American. 

Fifth highest vote getter in AP "Back of the Year" poll. 

First draft choice of San Francisco Forty-Niners. 
DICK BIELSKI— 1954 

Voted "Most Valuable Player Award" in North-South Shrine Game. 

First draft choice of Philadelphia Eagles. 
BOB PELLEGRINI— 1955 

"Football Player of the Year" and winner of the WALTER CAMP 

MEMORIAL TROPHY as selected by COLLIER'S Magazine and the 

American Football Coaches' Assn. 

"Lineman of the Year" as selected by COLLIER'S Magazine and the 

American Football Coaches' Assn. 

"Lineman of the Year" as selected by the Washington Touchdown 

Club, awarded KNUTE ROCKNE MEMORIAL TROPHY by TD Club. 

"Lineman of the Year" as selected by the United Press. 

50 



"Lineman of the Year" as selected by the Philadelphia Sports Writer's 

Association. 

TOP LINEMAN in HEISMAN TROPHY balloting. 

UNANIMOUS ALL-AMERICA 

PLAYER OF THE YEAR of Atlantic Coast Conference as selected by 

the Associated Press and Southern Writers' Association. 

Winner of the JACOBS BLOCKING TROPHY as best blocker in 

Atlantic Coast Conference. 

FIRST DRAFT CHOICE of the Philadelphia Eagles.. 

Played in North-South All-Star Game. 

Co-Captain of All-Star for Chicago All-Star-Pro game in August and 

voted the Outstanding Player Award after the game. 

ED VEREB— 1955 

Runnerup to Pellegrini as ACC "Player of the Year." 

First Draft Choice of the Washington Redskins. 

Played in North-South All-Star Game. 

Set a new school and conference scoring record with his 102 points. 

MIKE SANDUSKY— 1956 

Played in East-West Shrine Game. 
Played in Chicago Tribune All-Star Game. 
Fifth Draft Choice of San Francisco 49'ers. 

JACK DAVIS— 1956 

Played in East-West Shrine Game. 
Washington Redskin Draftee. 

RODNEY BREEDLOVE— 1957— as a Sophomore 

National "Lineman of the Week" Runnerup after North Carolina 

game 

"Sophomore of the Week" in ACC after North Carolina game 

Voted Best Defensive Lineman by squad 

Won "Dapper Dan" Award as the one who did most to publicize the 

city of Cumberland during the year of 1957 

ED COOKE— 1957 

ACC "Lineman of the Year" as selected by ACC Club, Washington 

Won the M Club's "Bill Guckeyson Award" as Maryland's top 

athlete 

Received the "Maryland Ring" emblematic of Maryland's top athlete 

Member of Blue Team in annual Blue-Gray Game 

Played in Chicago Tribune All-Star game 

Third draft choice of Chicago Bears 

GENE ALDERTON— 1957 

Voted TEKE Trophy by squad 
Drafted by Detroit Lions 

Played in North-South Shrine Game, Miami, Fla. 
Co-Captain of 1957 team 
FRED COLE— 1958 

Voted Anthony C. Nardo Trophy 
Ninth draft choice of Chicago Bears 
Played in Blue-Gray All Star Game 

51 



1958 FINAL TEAM STATISTICS 



FIRST DOWNS 

Rushing 

Passing 

Penalties 

TOTAL YARDS RUSHING 

Yards Lost Rushing 

NET YARDS RUSHING 

FORWARD PASSES ATTEMPTED 

FORWARD PASSES COMPLETED 

NET YARDS PASSING 

TOTAL YARDS GAINED (rush-pass) __ 

PASSES INTERCEPTED BY 

YARDS INTERCEPTIONS RETURNED^ 

TOTAL NUMBER PLAYS (rush) 

TOTAL NUMBER PUNTS 

PUNTING AVERAGE 

TOTAL NO. KICKOFFS RETURNED ... 

TOTAL NO. PUNTS RETURNED 

PENALTI ES _.. 

OWN FUMBLES 

OWN FUMBLES LOST 

TOTAL POINTS SCORED 

Touchdowns 

Extra points — kick 

run 

pass 

Field Goals 

Safety 



ARYLAND 


OPPONENTS 


148 


148 


90 


83 


53 


58 


5 


7 


1634 


1818 


274 


171 


1360 


1647 


204 


163 


103 


79 


1270 


1199 


2620 


2846 


15 


19 


224 


190 


437 


425 


49-1771 


40-1385 


36.1 


34.6 


33-546 


25-486 


17-102 


18-124 


58-503 


35-304 


22 


22 


12 


11 


132 


175 


18 


26 


14 


7 


1-3 


2-5 


0-0 


4-12 


2-3 


0-1 


1 






1958 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS 



Carries 

Joyce 97 

Forbes 60 

Layman 59 

Verardi 55 

Rusevlyan 49 

Fletcher 28 

Kershner 22 

Scarbath 22 

Lewis 15 

Gallagher 14 

Hatter 5 

Betty 5 

Cloud 3 

Steppe 2 

Cole 1 



RUSHING 








Gain 


Lost 


Net 


Avg. 


409 


3 


406 


4.2 


228 


13 


215 


3.6 


288 


10 


278 


4.7 


152 


36 


116 


2.1 


181 


56 


125 


2.5 


120 


11 


109 


3.9 


58 


12 


46 


2.0 


50 


72 


—22 


—1.0 


42 


38 


4 


.3 


56 





56 


4.0 


29 





29 


5.8 


8 


23 


—15 


—3.0 


10 





10 


3.3 


1 





1 


.5 


2 





2 


2.0 



52 



TOTAL OFFENSE 

Total Plays Net Gain 

Rusevlyan 158 782 

Scarbath 81 334 

Layman 60 278 

Verardi 56 120 

Lewis 39 189 

Betty 15 43 

all others same as above rushing 

PUNTING 

No. Yards 

Layman 22 832 

Verardi 12 429 

Scarbath 6 235 

Lewis 6 208 

Gallagher 2 65 

PUNT RETURNS 

No. Yds. Returned 

Rusevlyan 3 25 

Kershner 3 20 

Layman 3 12 

Fletcher 3 11 

Verardi 2 7 

Forbes 1 12 

KICKOFF RETURNS 

No. Yds. Returned 

Gallagher 5 113 

Fletcher 5 98 

Kershner 5 76 

Layman 4 79 

Verardi ..._ 3 43 

Forbes 2 26 

B. Scotti 2 13 

Cloud 1 30 

Hatter 1 17 

Joyce 1 15 

Rusevlyan 1 13 

Scott 1 13 

Shaffer 1 10 

Lewis 1 



Avg. 
4.9 
4.1 
4.6 
2.1 
4.8 
2.9 



Avg. 
37.8 
35.8 
39.1 
34.5 
32.5 



Avg. 
8.3 
6.7 
4.0 
5.5 
3.5 

12.0 



Avg. 
22.6 
19.6 
15.2 
19.8 
14.3 
13.0 

6.5 
30.0 
17.0 
15.0 
13.0 
13.0 
10.0 

0.0 



Att. 

Rusevlyan 109 

Scarbath 59 

Lewis 24 

Betty 10 

Verardi 1 

Layman _... 1 



PASSING 

Comp. 
59 
27 
10 

6 

1 





Yds. 

657 

356 

185 

58 

4 





Had 
Int. 
11 

6 

3 

1 







TDs 
2 
1 
1 






53 



PASS RECEIVING 

No. Caught Yards TDs 

B. Scotti 18 282 1 

Shaffer 18 141 1 

Layman 12 151 

Fletcher 10 88 

Verardi 8 63 

Gallagher 6 100 

Tony Scotti 6 66 

Becker 5 78 

Kershner 5 96 1 

Martin : 3 27 

Scott 2 8 

Joyce 2 — 1 

Forbes 1 71 1 

Lewis 1 29 

Hatter 1 16 

Steppe 1 12 

Nickla 1 10 

Cloud 1 9 

Rusevlyan 1 — 2 

TD PASSES THROWN 

Rusevlyan — 2; Lewis — 1; Scarbath — 1 

TD PASSES CAUGHT 

Forbes — 1; Shaffer — 1; B. Scotti — 1; Kershner — 1 

PASS INTERCEPTIONS 

No. Yds. Returned TDs 

Breedlove 5 68 

Layman 3 62 1 

Verardi 2 25 

Hatter 1 22 

B. Scotti 14 

Kershner 10 

Fletcher 10 

Rusevlyan 1 43 

SCORING 

TDS R P K FG TP 

Forbes 6 36 

Rusevlyan" 2 1—1 0—0 3—3 1—2 20 

Layman 3 18 

Scott 7—7 1—2 10 

Hatter 10 1—2 7 

Kershner 10 1—1 7 

Shaffer 10 6 

B. Scotti 10 6 

Joyce 10 6 

Cole 10 6 

Steppe 10 6 

Lewis 0—1 1—1 1 

Fletcher 0—1 

54 



ALL-TIME MARYLAND FOOTBALL RECORDS 

OFFENSE AND DEFENSE 

BEST SEASON: 

1951, 1953 and 1955: Won 10— Lost 0. 1951 record includes the 28-13 
Sugar Bowl win over Tennessee. The '53, 10-0 record is regular sea- 
son. Terps lost Orange Bowl, 7-0 to Oklahoma. 1955, lost to Okla- 
homa in Orange Bowl, 20-6. 

WORST SEASON: 

1944— Won 1, Lost 7, Tied 1. 

MOST POINTS SCORED IN ONE SEASON: 

353 in 1951 in 9 games. 381 in 1951 in 10 games including the 28-13 
victory over Tennessee in the Sugar Bowl. 

LEAST POINTS SCORED IN ONE SEASON: 
39 in 1940 in 9 games. 

MOST POINTS SCORED BY OPPONENTS IN ONE SEASON: 
216 in 1938 in 9 games. 

LEAST POINTS SCORED BY OPPONENTS IN ONE SEASON: 
31 in 1953 in 10 games. 

MOST POINTS SCORED BY MARYLAND IN ONE GAME: 
Maryland— 80; Washington College— 0; (1927). 

MOST POINTS SCORED BY OPPONENTS IN ONE GAME: 
Navy 76;— Maryland 0; (1913). 

ALL-TIME LEADING SCORER: 

Ed Vereb with 102 points in 1955 in 11 games, including one TD in 
Orange Bowl against Oklahoma. 

OFFENSIVE TEAM RECORD FOR ONE SEASON: 

3822 yards in 1951 in 9 games. 2921 rushing and 901 passing. 
4174 yards in 1951 in 10 games, including the 28-13 victory over Ten- 
nessee in the Sugar Bowl. 3210 rushing and 964 passing. 
OFFENSIVE TEAM RECORD FOR ONE GAME: 

602 yards in 1951 against West Virginia — 523 yards rushing and 79 
passing. 

LEAST YARDAGE ONE GAME: 
69 against Vanderbilt in 1948. 

MOST TOUCHDOWNS SCORED IN ONE SEASON: 

52 in 1951 in 9 games — 56 in 1951 in 10 games including the 28-13 
victory over Tennessee in Sugar Bowl. 

DEFENSIVE RECORD FOR ONE SEASON: 

1,707 yards in 1949 in 9 games — 868 rushing and 893 passing for fifth 
place in nation. 

DEFENSIVE RECORD FOR ONE GAME: (Rushing): 
29 by Washington and Lee in 1951. 

MOST YARDS RUSHING BY INDIVIDUAL IN ONE SEASON: 
Ray Poppleman with 1,350 yards in 10 games in 1931. 

MOST YARDS RUSHING BY INDIVIDUAL IN ONE GAME: 

Ray Poppleman with 201 yards in 24 carries against Western Mary- 
land. 

LONGEST RUN FROM SCRIMMAGE: 

Dick Burgee for 90 yards and touchdown against University of Mis- 
souri in 1954. 

55 



PASSING RECORDS 

TEAM PASSING FOR SEASON: 

90 completions in 170 attempts for 1364 yards in 1942 in 9 games. 
TEAM PASSING FOR ONE GAME: 

Joe Tucker with 9 completions in 12 attempts for 178 yards and Stan 

Lavine, 4 for 5 for 129 yards for total of 307 yards against South 

Carolina in 1949. 
WORST PASSING RECORD BY MARYLAND: 

completions in 12 attempts against Vanderbilt in 1948. 
INDIVIDUAL PASSING RECORD FOR ONE SEASON: 

Jack Scarbath in 9 games in 1952 — 59 completions in 113 attempts 

for 1149 yards. Tied by Bob Rusevlyan — 1958 — 59 completions in 

113 attempts for 657 yards. 

INDIVIDUAL PASSING RECORD FOR ONE GAME: 

Tommy Mont — 9 completions in 14 attempts for 215 yards against 

U. of Connecticut in 1942. 
LEADING PASS RECEIVER FOR ONE SEASON: 

Lloyd Colteryahn — 32 receptions for 593 yards in 1952 in 9 games. 
LEADING PASS RECEIVER FOR ONE GAME: 

Lou Weidensaul — 8 receptions for 95 yards and one touchdown 

against Navy in 1951. 

Lloyd Colteryahn — 8 receptions for 131 yards against Alabama in 

1952. 
LONGEST FORWARD PASS PLAY: 

Stan Lavine to Ed Bolton for 92 yards and touchdown against South 

Carolina in 1949. Pass 15 yards; run 77 yards. 
LONGEST RETURN OF INTERCEPTED PASS: 

Joe Horning for an official 100 yards and touchdown against Mis- 
souri in 1951 as a freshman. Actual return from inside end zone was 

105 yards. Dickie Lewis for an official 100 yards and touchdown in 

1956 against N. C. State Actual return from inside end zone was 

103 yards. 
MOST PASSES ATTEMPTED ONE GAME: 

40 against Virginia — 1958. 
MOST PASSES COMPLETED ONE GAME: 

18 against Virginia — 1958. 
MOST PASSING YARDAGE ONE GAME: 

330 against Virginia — 18 out of 40. 
MOST INTERCEPTIONS ONE SEASON: 

Rodney Breedlove — guard — 5 — 1958. 

KICKING RECORDS 

MOST POINTS AFTER TOUCHDOWNS: 

Don Decker — 37 for 51 attempts in 9 games in 1951. 41 for 55 at- 
tempts in 10 games in 1951 including the 28-13 victory over Tennes- 
see in the Sugar Bowl. 
LONGEST PUNT: 

Brooke (Untz) Brewer for 93 yards against V.M.I, in 1916. John 
Fritsch for 88 yards against Miami, Fla., in 1956. Set a new ACC 
record. 

56 



BEST OFFICIAL AVERAGE ONE GAME: 

Bill Guckeyson for 51 yards in 10 punts against Syracuse in 1936. 
(Note: Brewer against Syracuse in 1920 and Guckeyson against 
Florida in 1936 both averaged better than 60 yards but official fig- 
ures could not be obtained from these schools and papers didn't carry 
the punting statistics.) 

LONGEST PUNT RETURN: 

Dick Nolan — 90 yards— against Clemson for TD in 1953. 

MOST PUNT RETURNS FOR SEASON: 

Bob Shemonski — 28 for 505 yards in 1950 in 10 games. 

LONGEST KICKOFF RETURNS: 

90 yards and TD — Lewis Thomas against Washington College in 1927; 
Bill Guckeyson against Georgetown in 1935; Sam Behr against Vir- 
ginia in 1945; Dick Nolan against Mississippi in 1952 

LONGEST FIELD GOAL: 

Dick Bielski, 47 yards against Mississippi in 1953. 

LONGEST PUNT RETURN AGAINST MARYLAND: 

Frank Brady of Navy for 100 yards and touchdown in 1951 

LONGEST KICKOFF RETURN AGAINST MARYLAND: 

Jim McPherson of North Carolina for 93 yards and TD in 1926 

LONGEST PUNT AGAINST MARYLAND: 

Charlie Justice of North Carolina for 84 yards in 1948. 



Duke Wyre 

(Continued from page 15) 

Cross for another year. Then in '47 he came to Maryland and has been 
head trainer ever since. 

A Navy veteran, Wyre served as physical education instructor in the 
V-12 program. 

He was the first president of the Southern Conference Trainers' Assn. 
He previously has been on the board of the National Trainers' Assn. 
and now his most recent appointment, Chairman of the Board. In '49, 
he was named the top trainer in the East. 

The 1959 Terps 

(Continued from page 16) 

fullback. Up front, to go along with the veteran interior linemen, 
Vincent Scott and Tony Scotti, second team ends in '58, will be the 
flankmen with Shaffer. 

In the backfield, other lettermen returnees include a trio of stand- 
out halbacks. Gene Verardi, Everett Cloud, and Bob Gallagher. Up front, 
center Leroy Dietrich returns along with guards Bill Lazaro and Pete 
Boinis; and tackles Joe Gardi, Tom Flor, and Bob Cole. 

Newcomers to watch from last year's freshman team include ends 
Henry Poniatowski, Gary Collins, and Joe Mona; tackles Bill Kirchiro, 
Tom Sankovich, and Dick Barlund; guards Tom Laird and Tom Brou- 
mel; and center Jack Reilly. In the backfield, the best along with Van- 
Reenan, Novak and Henry should be fullbacks Ken Houser, Pat Drass, 
and Bruce Coultas, and halfback Jim Davidson. 

From the '58 B squad, a great deal of help will come from guard Jim 
Doff and tackle George Draksler. 

57 



BRIEF HISTORY OF THE UNIVERSITY 

The history of the present University is the history of two institutions: 
the old privately-owned and operated University of Maryland in Balti- 
more and the Maryland State College (formerly Maryland Agricultural 
College) at College Park. These institutions were merged in 1920. 

In 1807, the College of Medicine of Maryland was organized, the fifth 
medical school in the United States. The first class was graduated in 1810. 
A permanent home was established in 1814-1815 by the erection of the 
building at Lombard and Green Streets in Baltimore, the oldest structure 
in America devoted to medical teaching. Here was founded one of the 
first medical libraries (and the first medical school library) in the United 
States. In 1812 the General Assembly of Maryland authorized the College 
of Medicine of Maryland to "annex or constitute facilities of divinity, 
law, and arts and science," and by the same act declared that the "col- 
leges or faculties thus united should be constituted an university by the 
name and under the title of the University of Maryland." By authority 
of this act, steps were taken in 1813 to establish "a faculty of law," and 
in 1823 a regular school of instruction in law was opened. Subsequently 
there were added: in 1882 a Department of Dentistry which was absorbed 
in 1923 by the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery (founded in 1840, 
the first dental school in the world); in 1889 a School of Nursing; and 
in 1904 the Maryland College of Pharmacy (founded in 1841, the third 
oldest pharmacy college in the United States). 

The Maryland State College was chartered in 1856 under the name of 
the Maryland Agricultural College, the second agricultural college in the 
Western Hemisphere. For three years the College was under private 
management. In 1862 the Congress of the United States passed the Land 
Grant Act. This act granted each State and Territory that should claim 
its benefits an appropriate amount of unclaimed western lands, in place 
of scrip, the proceeds from the sale of which should apply under certain 
conditions to the "endowment, support, and maintenance of at least one 
college where the leading object shall be, without excluding other scien- 
tific and classical studies, and including military tactics, to teach such 
branches of learning as are related to agriculture and the mechanic arts, 
in such a manner as the Legislatures of the States may respectively pre- 
scribe, in order to promote the liberal and practical education of the in- 
dustrial classes in the several pursuits and professions of life." This grant 
was accepted by the General Assembly of Maryland, and the Maryland 
Agricultural College was named as the beneficiary of the grant. Thus 
the College became, at least in part, a State institution. In the fall of 
1914 control was taken over entirely by the State. In 1916 the General 
Assembly granted a new charter to the College, and made it the Mary- 
land State College. 

In 1920, by an act of the State Legislature, the University of Maryland 
was merged with the Maryland State College, and the resultant institu- 
tion was given the name University of Maryland. 

58 



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YEAR BY YEAR RECORDS 



MARYLAND 
AGGIES 

1892 (0-3-0) 

St. Johns 50 

Johns Hop 62 

Episcopal Hi. -.16 

1893 (6-0-0) 

36 Eastern Hi 

10 Central Hi 

18 Bait. City Col... 

6 St. Johns Col... 

18 W. Md. Col ....10 

16 Orient Ath. CI. 6 

1894 (3-3-0) 

52 W. Md. Col 

12 Wash. Col 

6 St. Johns 22 

6 Georgetown .... 4 
Col. Ath. CI. ..26 
Mt. St. Marys ..24 

1895 — No team 
No Games 

1896 (6-2-2) 

Eastern Hi 6 

Gallaudet 

34 Business Hi ... . 

10 Central Hi 6 

18 Alexandria Hi.. 
20 Bethel Mil Ac ..10 

Episcopal Hi. .. 6 

16 West. Md 6 

14 Central Hi 

U. of Md 

1897 (2-4-0) 

24 Central Hi 6 

4 Eastern Hi 

J. Hopkins 30 

4 St. Johns 6 

6 Gallaudet 16 

Bait. Med Col...l0 

1898 (2-5-0) 

5 Columbian U. ..17 
West. Md 32 

36 Eastern Hi 

Gallaudet 33 

Johns Hop 16 

Episcopal Hi -.37 

27 Rock Hill Col... 

1899 (1-4-0) 

Wast Md 21 

26 Eastern Hi 

Johns. Hop 40 

Delaware Col. 34 
St. Johns 62 

1900 (3-4-1) 

Western Hi .... 
Gib. Ath. CI 17 



G'town Prep .. 5 
6 Episcopal Hi ....31 

5 Gonzaga Hi 11 

15 G'town Prep .. 
21 Gonzaga Hi .... 
21 Char Hall Ac .. 

1901 (1-7-0) 

6 Del. Col 24 

10 Gallaudet Re. ..11 

Johns Hop 6 

6 Rock Hill Col-11 
Central Hi 11 

27 U.S. Marines .. 
Wal'k Ath CI ..36 
West. Md 30 

1902 (3-5-2) 

Georgetown ....27 

5 Mt. St. Jos 

11 Columbian U. ..10 

6 Olympia Ath. .. 

Wash. Col 

Mt. St. Marys .. 5 

6 West. Md 26 

U. of Md 5 

Johns Hop 17 

Del. Col 

1903 (7-4-0) 

Georgetown —.28 

5 Clifton Ath 

21 Gunton Tern. .. 
St. Johns 18 

28 Wash. Col 

27 Tech Hi 

Mt. St. Mar .... 2 

6 West. Md 

11 U. of Md 

Dela. Col 16 

6 Columbian U. .. 

1904 (2-4-2) 

Georgetown ....22 
Ran. Macon .... 
Ftress Monroe 

11 Mt. St. Mar 6 

West. Md 5 

22 Gallaudet 5 

U. of Md 6 

Dela. Col 18 

1905 (6-4-0) 

20 Bait Poly In .... 

16 Gallaudet 

West. Md 10 

Navy 17 

17 Wm. & Mary .. 

28 Mt. St. Josephs 
27 St. Johns 5 

Wash. Col 17 

23 U. of Md 5 

Dela. Col 12 

60 



1906 (5-3-0) 

5 Tech Hi O 

22 Bait City Col .. 

Navy 12 

Georgetown ....28 
Mt. Wash. CI. -29 

20 St. Johns 4 

16 Rock Hill Col. 
35 Wash. Col 

1907 (3-6-0) 

13 Tech High 

Georgetown —10 

5 Richmond Col-.ll 
Navy 12 

6 Mt.St. Mar 12 

10 Geo. Wash 

10 Wash. Col 5 

St. Johns 16 

Gallaudet 5 

1908 (3-8-0) 

5 Central Hi 

5 Tech High 6 

Richmond Col..22 

Johns Hop 10 

Navy 57 

5 Gallaudet 

Fred'bg Col 10 

12 Balto Poly 6 

St. Johns 31 

Wash. Col 11 

Geo. Wash 57 

1909 (2-5-0) 

Richmond Col. 12 
Johns Hopkins 9 
Tech High 11 

5 Rock Hill 

George Wash. 26 
N. Ca. A&M ....33 

14 Gallaudet 12 

1910 (4-3-1) 

12 Central Hi 

20 Richmond Col. 

11 Johns Hop 11 

21 Catholic U 

11 Gso. Wash 

V.M.I 8 

St. Johns 6 

3 West. Md 17 

1911 (4-4-2) 

6 Tech Hi 

Richmond 

5 Fred'bg Col 

Central Hi 14 

3 Johns Hop 6 

6 Catholic U 6 

St. Johns 27 

5 Wash. Col 17 

6 West Md 

6 Gallaudet 2 



1912 (6-1-1) 

31 Tech Hi 6 

46 Richmond Col. 

58 U. of Md 

13 Johns Hop 

St. Johns 27 

13 Gallaudet 7 

17 West Md 7 

13 Penn Mil. Col. 13 

1913 (6-3-0) 

27 Balto City 10 

45 Richmond Col. 
20 Johns Hop 

46 West Md. 

Navy 76 

13 St. Johns 

26 Wash. Col 

Gallaudet 26 

7 Penn Mil 27 

1914 (5-3-0) 

Balto. Poly 6 

6 Catholic U 

13 West Md 20 

14 Johns Hop 

10 St. Johns 

3 Wash. Col 

Gallaudet 23 

26 Penn Mil 

1915 (6-3-0) 

31 Balto Poly 

Haverford 7 

Catholic U 16 

10 Gallaudet 3 

14 Penn Mil 13 

27 St. Johns 14 

28 Wash Col 13 

51 West Md 

Johns Hop 3 

MARYLAND 
STATE 

1916 (6-2-0) 

6 Dickinson 

7 Navy 14 

15 V.M'.1 9 

6 Haverford 7 

31 St. Johns 6 

10 N.Y.U 7 

13 Catholic U 9 

54 Johns Hop 

1917 (4-3-1) 

20 Dela. Col 

Navy 62 

14 V.M.I 14 

29 Wake Forest ..13 

6 N.C. State 10 

13 St. Johns 3 

Penn State 57 

7 Johns Hop 

1918 (4-1-1) 

6 American U 13 

7 V.M.I 6 



19 West Md 

6 New York U. .. 2 

19 St. Johns 14 

Johns Hop 

1919 (5-4-0) 

6 Swarthmore —.10 
13 Virginia 

West Va 27 

Va. Poly 6 

Yale 31 

27 St. Johns 

13 Catholic U 

20 West Md 

14 Johns Hop 

UNIVERSITY 
OF MARYLAND 

1920 (7-2-0) 

54 Randolph Ma .. 

Rutgers 7 

Princeton 35 

14 Catholic U 

27 Wash. Col 

7 Va. Poly 

13 North Car 

10 Syracuse 7 

24 Johns Hop 7 

1921 (3-5-1) 

3 Rutgers 

Syracuse 42 

3 St. Johns 7 

10 Va. Polv 7 

7 North Car 16 

Yale 28 

16 Catholic U 

Carnegie Tech 21 

1922 (4-5-1) 

6 N. C. State 6 

7 Third Army .... 

Richmond 

Pennsylvania ..12 

Princeton 26 

3 North Car 27 

Va. Poly 21 

3 Yale 45 

3 Johns Hod 

54 Catholic U 

7 N. C. State 6 

1923 (7-2-1) 

53 Randolph Ma... 
3 Pennsylvania - 

23 Richmond 

9 Va. Polv 16 

14 North Car 

28 St. Johns 

14 Yale 16 

26 N.C. State 12 

40 Catholic U 6 

6 Johns Hop 6 

1924 (3-3-3) 

23 Wash. Col 

7 Wash. & Lee ..19 

61 



38 Richmond 

Va. Polv 12 

6 North Car 

Catholic U 

Yale 47 

N.C. State 

Johns Hop 

1925 (2-5-1) 

13 Wash. Col 

16 Rutgers 

Va. Poly 3 

Virginia 6 

North Car 16 

14 Yale 43 

3 W. & L 7 

7 Johns Hop 7 

1926 (5-4-1) 

63 Wash. Col 

South Car 12 

Chicago 21 

8 Va. Poly 24 

14 North Car 6 

38 Gallaudet 7 

15 Yale 

6 Virginia 6 

W. & L 3 

17 Johns Hop 14 

1927 (4-7-0) 

80 Wash. Col 

26 South Car 

6 North Car 7 

13 Va. Poly 7 

10 V. M. 1 6 

6 W. & L 13 

6 Yale 30 

Virginia 21 

20 Vanderbilt 39 

13 Johns Hop 14 

6 Florida 7 

1928 (6-3-1) 

31 Wash. Col 

19 North Car 26 

7 South Car 21 

13 West Md 6 

V. M. 1 

6 Va. Poly 9 

Yale 6 

18 Virginia 2 

6 W. & L 

26 Johns Hop 6 

1929 (4-4-2) 

34 Wash. Col 7 

North Car 43 

South Car 26 

13 Gallaudet 6 

6 V. M. 1 7 

13 Virginia 13 

13 Yale 13 

24 Va. Polv 

39 Johns Hop 6 

West Md 12 



1930 (7-5-0) 

60 Wash. Col 6 

13 Yale 40 

21 North Car 28 

21 St. Johns 13 

20 V. M. 1 

14 Virginia 6 

41 W. & L 7 

13 V. Poly 7 

Navy 6 

21 Johns Hop 

7 Vanderbilt 22 

West Md 7 

1931 (8-1-1) 

13 Wash. Col 

7 Virginia 6 

6 Navy __.. 

6 Kentucky 6 

41 V. M. 1 20 

20 Va. Poly 

12 Vanderbilt 39 

13 W. & L 7 

35 Johns Hop 14 

41 West Md 6 

1932 (5-6-0) 

63 Wash. Col 

6 Virginia 7 

6 Va. Poly 23 

Duke 34 

24 St. Johns 7 

12 V. M. 1 7 

Vanderbilt 13 

7 Navy 28 

6 W. & L 

23 Johns Hop 

7 West Md 39 

1933 (3-6-0) 

20 St. Johns 

Va. Poly 14 

Tulane 20 

13 V. M. 1 19 

7 West Md 13 

Virginia 6 

7 Duke 38 

27 Johns Hop 7 

33 W. & L 13 

Florida 19 

1934 (7-3-0) 

13 St. Johns 

W. & L 7 

13 Navv 16 

14 Va. Poly 9 

21 Florida 

20 Virginia 

23 V. M. 1 

14 Indiana 17 

6 Georgetown .... 



1935 (7-2-2) 

39 St. Johns 6 

7 Va. Poly 

North Car 33 

6 V. M. 1 

20 Florida 6 

14 Virginia 7 

7 Indiana 13 

W. & L 

12 Georgetown .... 6 

Svracuse 

22 West Md 7 

1936 (6-5-0) 

20 St. Johns 

6 Va. Poly 

North Car 14 

21 Virginia 

20 Syracuse 

6 Florida 7 

12 Richmond 

7 V. M. 1 13 

6 Georgetown .... 7 

19 W. & L 6 

West Md 12 

1937 (8-2-0) 

28 St. Johns 

21 Pennsylvania ..28 

6 West Md 

3 Virginia 

13 Svracuse 

13 Florida 7 

9 V. M. 1 7 

14 Penn State 21 

12 Georgetown .... 2 

8 W. & L 

1938 (2-7-0) 

6 Richmond 19 

Penn State 33 

Svracuse 53 

14 West Md 8 

19 Virginia 27 

14 V. M. 1 47 

7 Florida 21 

7 Georgetown ....14 

19 W. & L 13 

1939 (2-7-0) 

26 Hamp.-Svd 

12 West Md 

7 Virginia 12 

12 Rutgers 25 

Florida 14 

Georgetown ....20 

Penn State 12 

V. M. 1 13 

7 Syracuse 10 

1940 (2-6-1) 

6 Hamp.-Syd 7 

Pennsylvania ..51 

62 



6 Virginia 19 

Florida 19 

6 West Md 

Georgetown ....41 
V. M. 1 20 

14 Rutgers 7 

7 W. & L 7 

1941 (3-5-1) 

18 Hamp.-Syd 

6 West Md 6 

Duke 50 

13 Florida 12 

6 Pennsylvania ..55 
Georgetown ....26 

Rutgers 20 

V. M. 1 27 

6 W. & L 

1942 (7-2-0) 

34 Connecticut .... 

14 Lake NAS 

27 Rutgers ...13 

V. M. 1 29 

51 West Md 

13 Florida 

Duke 42 

27 Virginia 12 

32 W. & L 28 

1943 (4-5-0) 

7 Curtis B.CG..13 
13 Wake Forest .. 7 

19 Rich. AAB 6 

2 West Va 6 

Penn State 45 

43 Greenv. AAB ..18 

Virginia 39 

Bainbridge 43 

21 V. M. 1 14 

1944 (1-7-1) 

Hamp.-Syd 12 

Wake Forest -39 

6 West Va 6 

Mich. State .... 8 

6 Florida 14 

7 Virginia 18 

Mich. State ....33 

19 Penn State 34 

8 V. M. 1 6 

1945 (6-2-1) 

60 Guilford Col. .. 6 

21 Richmond 

22 Merch. M. A 6 

13 Va. Poly 21 

13 West Va 13 

14 W. & M 33 

38 V. M. 1 

19 Virginia 13 



1946 (3-6-0) 

54 Bainbridge 

7 Richmond 37 

North Car 33 

6 Va. Polv 

7 W. & M 41 

17 South Car 21 

24 W. & L 7 

14 Mich. State 26 

7 N. C. State 28 

1947 (7-2-2) 

19 South Car 13 

43 Delaware 19 

18 Richmond 6 

7 Duke 19 

21 Va. Poly 19 

27 West Va 

32 Duquesne 

North Car 19 

20 Vanderbilt 6 

N. C. State .... 

(Gator Bowl, 
Jan. 1, 1948) 

20 Georgia 20 

1948 (6-4-0) 

19 Richmond 

21 Delaware 

28 Va. Poly 

12 Duke ..' 13 

47 Geo. Wash 

27 Miami 13 

19 South Car 7 

20 North Car 49 

Vanderbilt 34 

14 West Va 16 

1949 (9-1-0) 

34 Va. Poly 7 

33 Georgetown .... 7 
7 Mich. State -.14 

14 N.C. State 6 

44 South Car 7 

40 Geo. Wash 14 

14 Boston U 13 

47 West Va 7 

13 Miami 

(Gator Bowl, 

Jan. 1. 1950) 
20 Missouri 7 

1950 (7-2-1) 

7 Georgia 27 

35 Navy 21 

34 Mich. State .... 7 

25 Georgetown .—14 
13 N. C. State 16 

26 Duke 14 

23 Geo. Wash 7 

7 North Car 7 

41 West Va 

63 V. P. 1 7 



1951 (10-0-0) 

54 W. & L 14 

33 Geo. Wash 6 

43 Georgia 7 

14 North Car 7 

27 Louis. State .... 

35 Missouri 

40 Navy 21 

53 N.C. State 

54 West Va 7 

(Sugar Bowl, 

Jan. 1, 1952) 

28 Tennessee 13 

1952 (7-2-0) 

13 Missouri 10 

13 Auburn 7 

28 Clemson 

37 Georgia 

38 Navy 7 

34 L. S. U 6 

34 Boston U 7 

14 Mississippi 21 

7 Alabama 27 

1953 (10-1-0) 

20 Missouri 6 

52 W. & L 

20 Clemson 

40 Georgia 13 

26 North Car 

27 Geo. Wash 6 

30 Miami (Fla.) .. 

24 South Car 6 

38 Mississippi 

21 Alabama 

*0 Oklahoma 7 

*(Orange Bowl) 

1954 (7-2-1) 

20 Kentucky 

7 U. C. L.A 12 

13 Wake Forest....l3 

33 North Car 

7 Miami, Fla 9 

20 South Car 

42 N.C. State 14 

16 Clemson 

48 Geo. Wash 6 

74 Missouri 13 

1955 (10-1-0) 

13 Missouri 12 

7 U. C. L. A 

20 Baylor 6 

28 Wake Forest .. 7 

25 North Car 7 

34 Syracuse 13 

27 South Car 

13 L. S. U 

25 Clemson 12 

19 Geo. Wash 

*6 Oklahoma 20 

*Orange Bowl 

63 



1956 (2-7-1) 

12 Syracuse 26 

6 Wake Forest-. 

Baylor 14 

6 Miami, Fla. __13 

6 N. Carolina __34 

7 Tennessee 34 

Kentucky 14 

6 Clemson 6 

S. Carolina ___13 

25 N. C. State —14 

1957 (5-5-0) 

13 Texas A&M___21 
13 N. C. State —48 

Duke 14 

27 Wake Forest__ 
21 N. Carolina— 7 

Tennessee 16 

10 South Carolina 6 

7 Clemson 26 

16 Miami, Fla 6 

12 Virginia 

1958 (4-6-0) 

Wake Forest _34 
21 N. C. State — 6 

Clemson 8 

10 Texas A&M — _14 

N. Carolina -—27 

7 Auburn 20 

10 S. Carolina ___ 6 

14 Navy 40 

26 Miami, Fla. —14 
44 Virginia 6 



COACH 

1892— W. W. Skinner 
1893— S. H. Harding 
1894— J. G. Bannon 
1895— G. M. Harris 
1896 — Grenville Lewis 
1897— John Lillibridge 
1898— J. F. Kenly 
1899— S. M. Cooke 
1900— F. H. Peters 
1901— E. B. Dunbar 
*Above Teams Coached by 

Captains 
1902— D. John Markey 

(Western Md.) 



ES THROUGH THE YEARS 



1903— Markey 

1904— Markey 

1905— Fred Nielsen (Neb.) 

1906— Nielsen 

1907— C. G. Church (Va.) 

and C. W. Melick (Neb.) 
1908— Bill Lang (Delaware) 
1909 — Barney Cooper 

(Md. '08) and E. P. 

Larkin (Cornell) 
1910— R. Alston (G.W.) 
1911— C. F. Donnelly 

(Trinity) and H. C. Byrd 

(Maryland '08) 



1912-34— H. C. Byrd 

(Md. *08) 
1935-39— Frank Dobson 

(Princeton) 
1940-41— Jack Faber ('26), 

Al Heagy, ('30) , and Al 

Woods C33) all of Md. 
1942 — Clark Shaughnessy 

(Minnesota) 
1943-44 — Clarence Spears 

(Dartmouth) 
1945— Paul Bryant (Ala.) 
1947-55— Jim Tatum (N.C.) 
1956-58— Tommy Mont (Md.) 



Lee Corso 

(Continued from page 11) 



ail-American football team. Too, he was named to the Wigwam All- 
America team his senior year. He was a member of the National Honor 
Society. 

Following graduation, he entered Florida State in the fall of 1953. 
He won letters in football and baseball four years, with freshmen 
eligible to play then. 

For his brilliant play, honors were many. He was on the all-State 
Florida colleges team his junior and senior year. He was named as 
all-America honorable mention his senior year, a most cherished honor 
inasmuch as Corso was the first Florida State football player to re- 
ceive that high rating in the history of the school. He was voted 
the National Player of the Week by INS for his sterling performance 
in guiding the upset over N.C. State. He was voted the "Back of the 
Week" honors among Florida schools several times. His grid career 
was capped by his winning the Athlete of the Year award at Florida 
State. The 23-year-old Corso also played in the annual Blue-Gray game 
in Montgomery as quarterback. At FSU, he set the total rushing 
record; most pass interceptions one game, 3; pass receiving record for 
one game, 8, as he played halfback part of his second season; and has 
the high mark for kickoff return average for a season, 35 yards. 

On the diamond, Corso was an all-State and all-District 3 out- 
fielder. With the Seminoles, he played in the District 3 playoffs two 
years. He hit .400 as a freshman. 

Corso was voted a member of Omicron Delta Kappa (ODK), national 
men's honorary leadership fraternity and Phi Delta Kappa, national 
education honorary. He graduated in June '57 with a Bachelor of 
Science Degree in Education. 

Nugent appointed him assistant coach following graduation. He pur- 
sued his Master's Degree and received it in August 1958 in Education 
and Administration. 

He married the former Betsy Youngblood, Tampa, Fla. They have 
one son, Steven Lee, age, 1. 



64 



Alf Satterfield 

(Continued from page 12) 

tackle as a freshman and two varsity seasons prior to his entering 
the Army in February, 1943. While in the service, he served with 
the 90th Infantry Division in the European Theater of Operations. He 
was discharged in January of 1946. 

He returned to Vanderbilt for the spring term of '46. He was elected 
Captain of the team for his senior year. He won third team all-America 
honors and first team all-Southeast Conference. He graduated in June 
of '47 with a Bachelor of Science in History. 

Satterfiield then went to the San Francisco 49'ers and played tackle 
for one year. 

In 1948, he coached at Little Rock Catholic High School. The fall of 
1949 he got the call to be an assistant coach at Louisiana State and 
stayed two years. It was in the spring of 1951 that he went to V.P.I, 
and stayed until the call to College Park. 

He married the former Bobbie Sue Wright of Forest City, Ark. They 
have a daughter, Susan, age, 7. 



Charlie Guy 

(Continued from page 13) 

and in an underwater demolition team. 

In 1947, he was appointed Athletic Director, football coach, and 
wrestling coach of Bullis Prep School. While there, he played defense 
for the Mt. Washington lacrosse team of Baltimore. In the fall of 
1948, he went to Virginia as assistant football coach, assistant wrestling 
coach, and head lacrosse coach. Then in 1950 and 1951, he was head 
football coach at Johns Hopkins. He has been in business since in 
Baltimore, Fort Lauderdale, Fla., and most recently in Tampa. 

It was while at Tampa that he scouted future Florida State oppon- 
ents for Nugent. The Terp coach considers him as one of the very 
best and most thorough scouts. 

Guy is a native of Pittsburgh. His family home is Mansfield, Ohio. 
He is married and has a son Charles 12, and daughter Kathy, eight. 



Roland Arrigoni 

(Continued from page 13) 

obligation prevented his signing a contract. 

He was drafted into the service in August of 1956. He was assigned 
to Fort Bliss, Tex., and put in his two years of duty there. He played 
baseball for the base team and was an assistant football coach and 
scout for the Ft. Bliss grid teams. 

Following his discharge he joined Nugent and his staff at Florida 
State where he was the 1958 freshman coach. Then the move to Mary- 
land with Nugent. 

65 



Bernie Reid 

(Continued from page 12) 

Conference and the all-Southern team. He was president of the varsity 
letterman "G" Club and of the Student Athletic Council. His team- 
mates voted him the most valuable lineman trophy for his outstanding 
play his senior year. 

Following graduation, he went to Fitzgerald High School, Ga., as 
line coach. He was there one year before moving on to the line 
coaching job at Albany High in 1950. In 1951, he was appointed 
head coach, and held that position until Nugent brought him to Mary- 
land. At Albany, he compiled the enviable record of 57 wins, 20 losses, 
and three ties in a Triple-A league. His teams won the Region 1, AAA 
crown three years and was runnerup to the state championship in 
1952. He was voted region Coach of the Year twice. He points with 
justifiied pride at the great number of his boys that have gone on to 
college and done exceptionally well. 

Reid married the former Kathryn Herold of Hamilton. They have 
two daughters, Karolyn, 10, and Paula, 8. 



66 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



1959-60 Varsity Basketball Schedule 



George Washington 

'Virginia 
Georgetown 

*Wake Forest 
1^ I tie Grass Tournament 

Yale 
' : 'South Carolina 

Georgetown 
:!: l)ul<e 
''North Carolina State 

Navy 
:: 'North Carolina 
: \YaI<e Forest 

Virginia 
'''North Carolina State 
*CIemson 
*Duke 

George Washington 
"North Carolina 
'"Clemson 
'South Carolina 

*AtIantic Coast Conference Game 



Decenihor 


5 


Dec ember 


Q 


1 )ecemr>er 


1 1 


December 


IS 


December 


28-29 


January 


4 


January 


8 


January 


15 


January 


10 


January 


18 


January 


20 


February 


5 


February 


6 


February 


10 


February 


11 


February 


15 


February 


18 


February 


20 


February 


25 


February 


26 


February 


27 



I here 
I lome 
I lome 
I lome 

Louisville, Ky, 

Home 

I lome 

I here 
J here 
Home 
There 
Home 
There 
There 
There 
Home 
Home 
Home 
There 
There 
There 



HEAD COACH: H. A. 'Bud" Millikan 



ASSISTANT COACH: Perry Moore 



67 



— NOTES — 



68 



\'-:\ 




y 

i 



A 



V 






// 



DICK 

SCARBATH 
Quarterback 



VICTOR SCHWARTZ 
Center 



DALE BETTY 
Quarterback 



TOM FLOR 

Tackle 



EVERETT CLOUD 

Halfback 








% 



PETE BOINIS 
Guard 



LEROY 

DIETRICH 
Center 



^^K 








i 



5 





DWAYNE 

FLETCHER 

Quarterback 



TOM GUNDERMAN 
Guard 




GENE VERARDI 
Halfback 




RON SHAFFER 
End 



JIM JOYCE 

Fullback 




RODNEY 

BREEDLOVE 

Halfback 




»