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Full text of "University of Maryland men's football media guides"

\/iA*y±A 'j* 




PAT DRASS 
Fullback 




TOM SANKOVICH 
Tackle 






3 





NORMAN KAUFMAN 
End 




HANK PONIATOWSKI 
End 



PETE BOINIS 
Guard 



FOR PRESS, RADIO and TELEVISION 

This is your i960 Maryland football brochun 
•'•[ iie . <>-\ ai'd Line." 11 is published in hop" 
thai it offers you helpful Information for your 
coverage of Terp games this season. Willi this 
book goes an invitation to you to visil us a 
often as possible in our offices in Cole Field 
House, in return, I will try to visil you as 
often as I can and extend every assistance 
possible. For any information, you can reach 
me da\ and nighl at UNion 4-4076. 

Applications for tickets should he made the 
firs' pari of the week of the game to allow 
time for mailing. Wire and telephone require- 
ments should be made through your local 
Western Union office. 

Every effort will be made to furnish all the services in the press box 
available, so that your accounts of the game can be most adequate 
for your readers. Statistics, both half-time and final figures; a quarter 
play-by-play; game leaders in all departments; substitutions, etc. will 
be ready a few minutes after the game. 

Many thanks for all your cooperation and favors of the past. 

JOE F. BLAIR 
Sports Publicity Director 
University of Maryland, 
College Park, Maryland. 




TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

'60 Schedule; Bowl Record; '59 Results; Itinerary 

Athletic Council; Dept. of Intercollegiate Athletics 3 

The Terp Press 4 

President Wilson H. Elkins 5-6 

Director of Athletics William W. Cobey 7-8 

Coach Tom Nugent 9-10 

Assistant Coaches and Trainers 11-14 

Facts About Maryland 15 

Terp Opponents 16-25 

Opponents' Outlook 26-36 

'53 National Champions (Photo) 37 

Coaches Through the Years 39 

1960 Squad Roster 40-41 

Terp Thumbnail Sketches 42-53 

'59 Terp Honorary Selections; All- Americans 54-58 

1959 Statistical Summary 59-62 

Maryland Football Records 63-71 

Brief History of the University 72 

Year by Year Records 73-76 

1960-61 Varsity Basketball Schedule 78 

'60 Freshman Football Schedule; '59 Results 79 

1 



1960 SCHEDULE 



Sept. 


17 


Sept. 


24 


Oct. 


1 


Oct. 


8 


Oct. 


15 


Oct. 


22 


Oct. 


29 


Nov. 


5 


Nov. 


12 


Nov. 


19 



West Virginia at Morgantown, W. Va. 
Texas at College Park, Md. 
Duke at College Park, Md. 
North Carolina State at Raleigh, N. C. 
Clemson at College Park, Md. 
Wake Forest at Winston-Salem, N. C. 
South Carolina at College Park, Md. 
Penn State at University Park, Pa. 
North Carolina at Chapel Hill, N. C. 
Virginia at Charlottesville, Va. 



KICKOFF 


PRICE 


1:30 P.M. EDT 


$4.00 


2:00 P.M. EDT 


$4.00 


2:00 P.M. EDT 


$4.00 


8:00 P.M. EST 


$4.00 


2:00 P.M. EDT 


$4.00 


8:00 P.M. EST 


$4 00 


2:00 P.M. EDT 


$4.00 


1:30 P.M. EST 


$4.00 


2:00 P.M. EST 


$4.50 


1:30 P.M. EST 


$4.00 



MARYLAND'S BOWL RECORD 



1948 


'Gator Bowl 




Maryland 20 




Georgia 


20 


1950 


'Gator Bowl 




Maryland 20 




Missouri 


7 


1952 


Sugar Bowl 




Maryland 28 




Tennessee 


13 


1954 


Orange Bowl 




Maryland 




Oklahoma 


7 


1956 


Orange Bowl 




Maryland 6 




Oklahoma 


20 




Won: 


: 2 


- Lost: 2 -- Tied: 


1 








Coach of 


All 


Bowl Teams - - Jim 


Tatum 





1959 RESULTS 



Maryland 




Opponent 


M 


aryland 




O 


pponent 


27 


W. Virginia 


7 




6 


S. Carolina 




22 





Texas 


26 




14 


Navy 




22 





Syracuse 


29 




28 


Clemson 




25 


7 


Wake Forest 


10 




55 


Virginia 




12 


14 


N. Carolina 


7 




33 


N. C. State 




28 



Won 5 



Lost 5 



MARYLAND'S ITINERARY FOR 1960 SEASON 



HEADQUARTERS 

Hotel Morgan, Morgantown, W. Va. 
The Sir Walter, Raleigh, N. C. 
Holiday Inn Hotel, Greensboro, N. C. 
The Autoport and The Ranch Court 

State College, Pa. 
The Washington Duke, Durham, N. C. 
Monticello Hotel, Charlottesville, Va. 



DATE 


OPPONENT 


Sept. 17 


West Virginia 


Oct. 8 


North Carolina State 


Oct. 22 


Wake Forest 


Nov. 5 


Penn State 


Nov. 12 


North Carolina 


Nov. 19 


Virginia 



THE 
ATHLETIC COUNCIL 

Mr. < -i ANY F. Eppley 
i airman 

y\u. William \\ r . Cobey 
/ Hrector of Athletics 

Mr. II. A. (Bud) Millikan 
Ass't. Director oj Athletics 




f 



Mr. Harry A. Boswell, Jr Alumni Association 

I )r. James II. Kckl, vlss'/. Dean, School <>/ Business & Pal). Adm. 

Dr. Jack Faber Head, Bacteriology Department 

I )r. I eland Scott Horticulture I Department 

Dr. Warren Johnson School of Physical hdacation 

Mr. friaries Haylecl< School of Engineering 

Mr. Tom Morrissey President, Student Government Assn. 

Department of Intercollegiate Athletics 

Equipment Manager Kertnit "Chief" Cissell 

Assistant Equipment Manager Albert Johnson 

H^ad of Eacilities Charles "Li^dy" Kehoe 

Chief of Concessions Perry Moore 

1 irlset Manager Eddie Bean 

Office Secretary to Mr. Cobey Mrs. Dorothy Hunt 

Office Secretary to Mr. Nugent Mrs. Frances Henry 

Office Secretary, Football & Basketball Coa< lies Mrs. Therese Ryan 

Office Secretary to Mr. Blair Mrs. Betty Francis 

Head Trainer Alfred "Diike" Wvre 

Assistant Trainer Bill "Spider" Fry 

Head Football Coach Tom Nugent 

Basketball Coach //. A. "Bud" Millikan 

Assistant Basketball Coacb Perry Moore 

Baseball Coach Elton S. "Jack" Jackson 

Lacrosse Co-Coaches Jack Faber and Al Heagy 

Trac!:. Cross-Country Coach Jim Kehoe 

Soccer, Tennis Coach Doyle Royal 

Swimming Coarh Bill Campbell 

W restling Coach William E. "Sully" Krouse 

Oolf Coach Frank Cronin 

Rifle Coacb T/Sgt. David P. Pruiit, Jr. 

■A 



THE TERP PRESS 

*GEORGE BOWEN, The Associated Press 
MAX FULLERTON, The Associated Press 
LOU PANOS, The Associated Press 
ERNIE BARCELLA, The United Press 

-BOB SERLING, The United Press 
EV GARDNER, Sports Editor, The Washington Daily News 

*HENRY FANKHAUSER, The Daily News 

-MORRIS SIEGEL, Columnist, The Daily News 
CHUCK EGAN, Sports Editor, The Washington Evening Star 
FRANCIS STANN, Columnist, The Evening Star 

*MERRELL WHITTLESEY, Sports Department, The Evening Star 
GEORGE HUBER, Sports Department, The Evening Star 
BILL FUCHS, Sports Department, The Evening Star 
BUS HAM, Sports Editor, The Washington Post and Times-Herald 
SHIRLEY POVICH, Columnist, The Post and Times-Herald 
BOB ADDIE, Columnist, The Post and Times-Herald 
MAURY FITZGERALD. The Post and Times-Herald 

-MARTIE ZAD, The Post and Times-Herald 
PAUL MENTON, Sports Editor, The Baltimore Evening Sun 

-BILL TANTON, Sports Department, The Evening Sun 
RANDALL CASSELL, Columnist, The Evening Sun 
BOB MAISEL, Sports Editor, The Morning Sun 

*JIM ELLIOTT, Sports Department, The Morning Sun 

-ED ATWATER, Sports Department, The Morning Sun 
JOHN STEADMAN, Sports Editor, The News-Post 

*KARL FELDNER, Sports Department, The News-Post 
STEVE O'NEIL, Sports Department, The News-Post 
J. SUTER KEGG, Sports Editor, The Cumberland Evening Times 
C. V. BURNS, Sports Editor, The Cumberland Morning News 
DICK KELLY, Sports Editor, The Hagerstown Mail 
FRANK COLLEY, Sports Editor, The Hagerstown Herald 
ED NICHOLS, Sports Editor, The Salisbury Times 
J. R. CASTLEMAN, Sports Editor, The Frederick Post 
BOB LAYTCN, Sports Editor, The Cambridge Banner 
BOB WACHTER, Sports Editor, The Annapolis Evening Capital 
*Cover Daily 

RADIO and TELEVISION 

BALTIMORE Bill Shriven, WTOW 

George Rogers, Don Bruchey, WMAR-TV ,..._._ .I/JJ/ ~.l >.,~. „ ... 

Nelson Baker, Tommy Dukehart, Keith Jlmmv G'bbons, WRC-TV, WOL-Rad,o 

McBee WJZ-TV Bi " Ma,one ' WMAL-TV and Radio 

Joe Croghan, WBAL-TV Jim Simpson, WRC-TV and Radio 

Eddie Fenton, WCBM Ray Michael, WRC-TV and Radio 

Russ Hall, WITH Arch McDonald, WTOP-TV and Radio 

Jim West, WBAL Dan Daniels, WTOP-TV and Radio 

Roger Griswold. WBMD Bob Wolff, WWDC-Radio 

Ron Wilner, WAYE Sam Kaufman, WOL-Radio 

Harry Shriver, Lou Corbin, WFBR Morris Siegel, WMAL-TV 




DR. WILSON H. ELKINS 



PRESIDENT. UNIVERSITY CF MARYLAND 

Dr. Wilson Homer Elkins assumed the presidency of the University 
of Maryland on ^> tpl imber 1. 195 1. His forma] inauguration as the 
twenty-first head of the institution took place on January 20, 1955. 

He has brought to the University of Maryland an outstanding pro- 
fessional record of proven leadership in educational administration, and 
an unusual background of high scholastic achievement and demon- 
strated athletic ability during his undergraduate and graduate career. 

At Maryland, he has stressed the obligation of the state to provide a 
quality education for all Maryland youth who demonstrate their ca- 
pacity to learn. On the subject of sports, he has .said that values and 
attitudes developed in activities outside of the classroom, including 
football, are important elements of a liberal education. 

Dr. Elkins is a native Texan. He was a Rhodes Scholar from 1933 
to 1936. He received the E. Litt. and D. Phil, degrees from Oxford Uni- 
versity, England, in 1936. He received his undergraduate education at 
the University of Texas from 1928 to 1932. At Texas he earned eight 
varsity letters in football, basketball and track. He was elected presi- 
dent of the Student Association and captain of the basketball team in 
his senior year. He is a member of Phi Beta Kappa and of Omicron 



Delta Kappa. He was graduated from the University of Texas in 1932 
with B.A. and M.A. degrees. In addition, he holds two honorary de- 
grees: a Doctor of Laws from Washington College in 1954 and a, Doctor 
of Laws from The Johns Hopkins University in 1955. 

Dr. Elkins began his professional career in education as an instructor 
in history at the University of Texas in 1936. He held two presidencies 
prior to assuming this office at the University of Maryland. From 1938 
to 1949, he was President of San Angelo Junior College, San Angelo, 
Texas; and he was president, of Texas Western College, a branch of 
the University of Texas, from 1949 to 1954. 

In 1937, Dr. Elkins was married to the former Dorothy Blackburn 
of Berclair, Tex. They have two daughters, Carole Ann and Margaret 
Elise. 





WILLIAM W. COBEY 



DIRECTOR OF ATHLETICS 



Bill Cobey starts his fifth year as Director of Athletics in directing the 
vast Maryland athletic program. One of the most popular and most 
outstanding in the field, Cobey directs his every effort to give the Terra- 
pins on'j of the finest programs in the country. 

During the four years he has headed the program, Cobey has seen the 
Terrapins dominate the Atlantic Coast Conference championships in the 
twelve recognized conference championship sports. 

Prior to his appointment in February of 195G, Cobey was Graduate 
Manager of Athletics for nine years. It was he who administered and 
handled the overall athletic program. 

Long devotion to the University wasn't new to the affable Cobey. 
He came to the Athletic Department after having served. 17 years 
as Cashier of the University. 

The Cobey name is not new, even to old-time University graduates. 
Bill's father, W. W. Cobey, was a 1001 graduate and a letterman in 
track and manager of the baseball team. He became a famous agri- 
cultural scientist and while in Florida, he was one of the pioneers in 



the discovery of leaf tobacco. Cobey also had two uncles graduate from 
the University. 

Bill, as he is known to the many friends he has made around home 
and throughout the athletic fraternity, came to Maryland in the fall of 
1926 following graduation from Fnrt Meyer, Fla. High School. Born 
and raised in Quincy, still his native home, Cobey attended Quincy 
schools through eleventh grade before the family moved to Fort Meyer. 

After playing freshman lacrosse, Cobey had to cast aside any athletic 
team participation in order that he might get a job to help him through 
school. This employment was in the Cashier's office where he worked 
until his graduation in 1930. He belonged to the Kappa Alpha Fra- 
ternity while an undergraduate. 

Following graduation, he returned to Quincy, Fla., and worked with 
his uncle on a truck farm. He returned to the University to accept the 
job as Cashier of the University. It was this job he held for 17 years, 
until 1948 when he accepted the position of Graduate Manager of Ath- 
letics. Then came the appointment as Director of Athletics, February 
1, 1956. 

Cobey is active in community affairs, having been a past president, 
of University Park PTA; councilman for University Park two years; 
first president of the University branch of the Maryland Classified 
Employee's Assn.; and is active in the College Park Rotary Club. 

Cobey married the former Mary Gray Munroe, also of Quincy, Fla., 
in 1935. They hsve six children, three daughters and three sons. Their 
oldest daughter, Mary Patricia, is a graduate of the University; William 
is a Pre-Med. Student at Emory College; Julia Ann is a Junior 
at the University, while Betty is in the twelfth grade. A son, Elwood is 
in ninth grade while the baby of the family, Munroe, is in third 
grade. 

The Cobeys are members of the University Methodist Church, College 
Park. 




TOM NUGENT 



HEAD FOOTBALL COACH 



Following his first season as Maryland's head football coach, there is 
little doubt that Tom Nugent has become the Tcrps' football man of 
the hour and definitely the right choice to guide the Maryland gridiron 
fortunes back to the winning formula. 

The big job of rebuilding the football program was given to Nugent 
last year. The popular young master of one of football's most imagina- 
tive and successful offensive formations, the 'T." Nuigent is considered 
by his fellow coaches to have one of the game's finest football minds. 
His play each Saturday is original and with an interesting style of play. 

Tiie sharp minded Nugent had a most successful debut at Maryland 
last fall, winning five games and losing five. The pre-season experts 
had picked his newly-inherited Terrapins to win one game. The Red 
and White won its last three games on the schedule and won over Con- 
ference champion Clemson and North Carolina, who finished one-two in 
the ACC. Nugent brought to Maryland and its fans the most interesting 
and exciting football it has seen in a long time. With time, it definitely 
looks like the winning type football. 

Nugent gathered together an outstanding staff that had many years 
of coaching experience. He also brought his own organizational and in- 



spirational genius that is his trademark. With him and his staff is their 
outstanding student recruitment also. Nugent's freshman class of last 
fall was thought to be one of the best ever to enroli at Maryland. With 
another outstanding class promised for this fall, Nugent's plans to fur- 
nish his every effort to bring Maryland back has a fine nucleus. The 
molding of the teams for the new era has been firmly laid. 

The thoughts are that Nugent will do the job. He often is referred 
to as the "magician" of football in the South. He has had two former 
assignments, V.M.I, and Florida State and brought both from obscurity 
to success, through winning records. There is little reason to believe 
the same won't be accomplished here, for ho and his staff have access 
to a much better area for recruiting through the excellent geographic 
location of the University. 

The sharp-minded new Terrapin mentor has become known nationally 
for his bright innovations. It was Nugent who presented to football 
the now famous "I" formation, the typewriter huddle, and the double 
quarterback. The coaching fraternity considers his new football wrin- 
kles the finest and most exciting. 

In 1954, he started the Florida State Football Clinic and saw it de- 
velop to be considered the top football clinic in the country. The 1958 
clinic attracted nearly 1000 coaches from all parts of the country. His 
program was headlined by a "Who's Who" of big name coaches each 
year. 

Nugent's first head coaching job was at Virginia Military Academy. 
In four years, 1949-52, he compiled a 19-18-2 record. The 1951 season 
found the Keydets tied with Maryland for the Southern Conference 
championship. Both had 5-0 marks in the league. Ic was during this 
season, his team scored a mighty upset over Georgia Tech in Atlanta. 

The affable Nugent moved to Florida State for the season of 1953 
and in six years his Seminoles had been brought out of the football 
doldrums and became known to all as he guided his teams to 34 vic- 
tories, 27 defeats, and one tie. His ten-year record reads 53 wins, 
45 losses, and three ties. 

A native of Lawrence, Mass., he attended and graduated from Ithaca 
College in 1936. 

He married the former Peg Foley, and they have nine children, four 
girls and five boys — Tommy, 17; Kerry, 16; Peggy, 14; T, D., 12; Patty, 
10; Timmy, 6; Mary Ann, 5; Jerry, 4; and John Michael, 2. 



10 



ASSISTANT COACHES 



>• 



BILL "WHITEY" DOVELL 

The L953 graduate from the School of 
Physic il Education, Recreation, and Health, 
is starting his eighth year as a member ol 

the Terp coaching stall. Dovell has I n a 

line coach since L955 after serving three 
years as freshman coach. 

When coach Tnm Nugenl came to Mary- 
land last year, he retained the popular Dov- 
ell as a member of his staff. 

Following graduation, the former Terp 
guard was appointed freshman coach and 
also assisted the varsity and scouted future 
Terp opponents. As freshman coach, he 
led the Terp yearlings to three winning sea- 
sons, highlighted by the 1955 undefeated 
team. The '55 frosh team represents the 
first and only freshman team to win all its 
games. The big game was the final one of 

the season. It was the much publicized "international" grid attraction 
between the Terp frosh and Mexico Polytechnic Institute. Playing across 
the border in Mexico City, Dovell's team won 26-13. 

Dovell is a tireless worker. Along with his coaching duties, he han- 
dles the film library for the staff. Those in the coaching fraternity com- 
pliment Dovell as one of its finest young members as having a fine foot- 
ball mind. 

He married the former Clair Benson. They have two daughters. 






&f <# 




LEE CORSO 

Until someone comes along in future 
years, the name of Lee Corso will continue 
to head the list as the all-time quarterback 
at his Florida State alma mater. And it 
was under the coaching hand of Tom Nu- 
gent that Corso helped bring Florida State 
and Nugent into national prominence. 

Following graduation in 1957, Nugent re- 
tained his brilliant quarterback as an as- 
sistant and brought him to Maryland last 
fall. His work coaching the defensive 
backs was outstanding. 

A native of Miami, Fla., Corso had a 
brilliant career in football, baseball, and 
basketball. He was selected first team all- 
State in each sport his senior year. He won 
the honor in basketball also his junior year. 
Also, he was named "Athletic-Scholar of 
the Year" his final term and was on the all-Southern all-American foot- 
ball team. Too, he was named to the Wigwam All-America team his 
senior year'. He was a member of the National Honor Society. 
Following graduation, he entered Florida State in the fall of 1953, 

(Continued on page 38) 




11 



BERNIE REID 

One of the most popular and most suc- 
cessful high school coaches during a long 
tenure in the South, Reid accepted the call 
of Nugent to come to Maryland with him 
last year, as assistant line coach. 

Reid had great success at Albany, Ga., 
High School and established an outstand- 
ing reputation as one of the best in coach- 
ing. He had sent many star players on to 
the large colleges and universities in the 
South. 
^g p jBh^wt The 34-year old Reid is a native of Ham- 

pi? J| ilton, Ohio. He graduated from Hamilton 

High in 1942 where he was a three year star 
4^p M and a weight man on the track team. 

M £ Following his high school graduation, he 

^^^^ ^^ f^^^^^^M entered the University of Cincinnati that 

fall. He stayed long enough to play the fresh- 
man grid schedule, then enlisted in the 
VIerchant Marine where he stayed 18 months 
Discharged in January of 1944, he entered the University of Georgia 
in the spring semester. He played the fall of '44 for Coach Wally Butts 
as a guard but the Army then called him into the service, in De- 
cember. He served in Germany 22 months with the 78th Infantry. He 
was discharged in January of 1947. 
He returned to Georgia and completed his studies and played his 

(Continued on page 39) 




ALF SATTERFIELD 

One of the most familiar names in coach- 
ing circles, Satterfield also joined Nugent's 
staff last year following a brilliant reputa- 
tion he made while line coach at V.P.I. As 
the Gobblers built fine teams, much of the 
credit was given the team's outstanding line 
play under the guidance of Satterfield. He 
handles the same line coaching chores for 
the Terps. 

The 38-year old Satterfield comes to Mary- 
land after eight years at V.P.I, as their line 
coach and after helping develop their grid 
fortunes back to the winning ledger. 

A native of Russellville, Ark., he attended 
that high school and graduated in 1940. There 
he was a three-sport star in football, basket- 
ball and baseball. He lettered all three years 
in each sport. A center in football, he was 

named to the all-State first team his senior year. He also was chosen 
to play in the first high school all-American game in Memphis, Tenn. 

Following graduation, he entered Vanderbilt University and played 
tackle as a freshman and two varsity seasons prior to his entering 
the Army in February, 1943. While in the service, he server! with 
the 90th Infantry Division in the European Theater of Operations. He 

(Continued on page 39) 




12 




ROLAND ARRIGON! 

Again this fall, the big and all-important 

job of tutoring the freshman team will be 
handled l>\ Arrigoni. 

Nugenl brought the 27-year old New 
Mexico Universitj graduate with him aft i 
he had served a year undi r him at Florida 

Stale 

Arrigoni is a native of Chicago, but 
moved to Albuquerque, New Mexico at a 
young age and received his early school- 
ing there. He attended Albuquerque High 
School, graduating in June of 1951. There 
he lettered three years in football as a 
tackle and three years as a catcher in 
baseball. 

He entered the University of New Mexico in the fall of 1951. He 
graduated in 1956 with a Bachelor of Science degree in Physical Educa- 
tion. While at New Mexico, he was a star tackle for three years 
and again lettered three years in baseball as a catcher. He was offered 
a chance to enter the New York Yankee farm system, but his service 
obligation prevented his signing a contract. 

He was drafted into the service in August of 1956. He was assigned 
to Fort Bliss, Tex., and put in his two years of duty there. He played 

(Continued on page 77J 

FRANK TOOMEY 

When Tom Nugent came to Maryland, 
he brought with him his top coach and 
strategist, Toomey, to continue his lin 
work with the backfield. The serious, hard- 
working Toomey, who works as a perfec- 
tionist with precision, is a most highly re- 
garded and respected backfield teacher. 

Toomey attended his native Niagara Falls 
St. Mary's High School then went to Canis- 
ius Prep in Buffalo where he lettered three 
years in football, baseball, and basketball. 
Following graduation from Canisius, he en- 
rolled at Ithaca College in 1941. Before 
going into the Marines in June of 1943, he 
played two years at Ithaca in all three 
sports. He was Captain of the football 
learn, playing tailback, as a sophomore and 
sva< captain of the basketball team as a 
freshman. He was a center fielder in baseball. 

His early Marine career sent him to Parris Island, Camp Lejeune, and 
in January, 1944 went to Officers' School at Quantico, and received his 
commission. He was assigned to Maui, Hawaii as Company Commander 
then led his unit in a first wave frontal assault at. Iwo Jima in Febru- 
ary of 1945. It was during this operation that he received the Purple 
Heart, a Presidential Citation, and the Navy Commendation. 

(Continued on page 77 J 




13 



THE TRAINERS 



ALFRED J. "Duke" WYRE 

One of the most popular and considered 
by the training fraternity as one of its best, 
the Terps' "Duke" Wyre starts his 14th year 
as head trainer at Maryland. 

Duke came to Maryland in 1947 under 
the reorganization plan of the department 
and has added to his reputation as a leading 
authority in the all-important field of train- 
ing athletic teams. He heads two of the best 
equipped and most modern training rooms in 
the country. 

Many honors have come to Duke in his 
many years with the training association. 
The fitting climax came this year as he was selected as one of the 
eight United States trainers for this year's Olympic games in Rome. 
Duke's primary assignment was to train the United States Olympic 
Crew, and happily the winning crew was that of the Terps' neighbors, 
Navy. His appointment was the culmination of the many years as a 
trainer. 

In 1956, he was elected Chairman of the Board of Directors of the 
National Trainers' Association, a position which he still holds. 

He has authored many articles and manuals on training methods, and 
is always in demand to give lectures on athletic training methods at 
numerous clinics. He also has devised various equipment pieces that are 
used for athletic injuries and prevention of injuries. 

(Continued on page 38) 





BILL "Spider" FRY 

Starting his fifth year as Wyre's full-time 
assistant, Bill 'Spider" Fry returned to his alma 
mater in 1956 following his service hitch with 
the Air Force. 

Fry worked four years as a student assistant 
for Wyre in the Terp training room while at- 
tending the University. Following his discharge 
in June 1955, he returned to Maryland and en- 
tered Graduate School. When the opening oc- 
curred for an assistant trainer, he was ap- 
pointed. 

A native of Norristown, Pa., Fry attended 
Elkton High School, Md., where he played and 
lettered for three years in soccer and basket- 
ball. 

He entered the University in the fall of 1946 and graduated with a 
B.S. Degree from the School of Physical Education. 

Following graduation in June of 1950, he went into the Air Force 
and was assigned to jet Engine training. During his four years, he was 
stationed at Davis-Monthan Air Base in Tucson and Great Falls Air 
Base, Montana, assigned to jet duty. He also was trainer for the base 
athletic teams. 




▲ 



14 



FACTS ABOUT MARYLAND 

FOUNDED 1807 

LOCATION College Park, Md. 

ENROLLMENT 9500 (Approx.) 

PRESIDENT Dr. Wilson H. Elkins 

ATHLETIC DIRECTOR William W. Cobey 

PUBLICITY DIRECTOR Joe F. Blair 

CONFERENCE Atlantic Coasl 

NICKNAME Terrapins (Terps) 

COLORS Red and Whiie; Black and Gold 

MASCOT A Terrapin 

STADIUM Byrd (35,000) 

HEAD COACH: Tom Nugent (Ithaca '36) Second season at Maryland - 

5-5-0 — 1st year. Overall 11-year coaching record: 58-50-3. 
ASSISTANTS: Bill Dovell (Maryland '53); Frank Toomey (Ithaca '47); 
Lee Corso (Florida State '56); Alf Satterfield (Vanderbilt '47); 
Bernie Reid (Georgia '49); Roland Arrigoni (New Mexico '56). 

TRAINER Alfred J. (Duke) Wyre 

ASSISTANT TRAINER Bill (Spider) Fry 

SYSTEM "I" Formation and "T" 



LETTERMLN RETURNING FROM 1959 SQUAD— SEV ENTEEN 



ENDS: Gary Collins, Norman Kaufman, Henry Poniatowski, Vincent 

Scott 
TACKLES: Dick Barlund, Bill Kirchiro, Tom Sankovich 
GUARDS: Pete Boinis 
CENTERS: Leroy Dietrich, Bob Hacker 

QUARTERBACKS: Dale Betty, Jim Davidson (HB in '59), Dick Novak. 
HALFBACKS: Everett Cloud, Dwayne Fletcher, Joe Mona 
FULLBACKS: Pat Drass 



LETTERMEN LOST FROM 19t>9 SQUAD— TEN 

ENDS: Ronald Shaffer 

TACKLES: Tom Flor, Joe Gardi, Kurt Schwarz 

GUARDS: Rodney Breedlove, Tom Gunderman, Bill Lazaro 

CENTERS: Victor Schwartz 

HALFBACKS: Gene Verardi 

FULLBACKS: Jim Joyce 

15 



TERP OPPONENTS 

MARYLAND vs WEST VIRGINIA 17 SEPTEMBER 

1:30 P.M. (E.D.T.) 

at Mountaineer Field (34,800) 

Morgantown, W. Va. 

FACTS ABOUT THE MOUNTAINEERS 

CONFERENCE: Southern 

LOCATION: Morgantown, W. Va. 

HEAD COACH: Gene Corum 

COLORS: Old Gold and Blue 

ENROLLMENT, 6,550 

TYPE OFFENSE: Split-T 

1959 RECORD: Won 3, Lost 7 

PUBLICITY DIRECTOR: Edgar O. Barrett 




Gene Corum 



TERPS' RECORD AGAINST THE MOUNTAINEERS 

(Maryland: Won 5, Lost 3, Tied 2) 





Maryl 


and 


W 


. Va. 




M 


aryland 


W. Va 


1919 









27 


1948 




14 


16 


1943 


2 






6 


1949 




47 


7 


1944 


6 






6 


1950 




41 





1945 


13 






13 


1951 




54 


7 


1947 


27 









1959 




27 


7 



TOTAL POINTS: Maryland 231, West Virginia 89 
1960 CAPTAINS: Game captains appointed 
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 17— Lost 9 



' 




1960 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


17 


Maryland 


Sept. 


24 


Virginia Tech at Richmond 


Oct. 


1 


at Illinois 


Oct. 


S 


Richmond 


Oct. 


15 


at Pittsburgh 


Oct. 


22 


Syracuse 


Oct. 


29 


at Penn State 


Nov. 


5 


Boston U. 


Nov. 


12 


at Oregon 


Nov. 


19 


Ge.orge Washington 



1959 YARDSTICK 

Maryland W. Va. 

First downs 16 16 

Rushing yardage 117 153 

Passing yardage 232 75 

Passes 18-34 5-14 

Passes intercepted .... 2 2 

Punts 3-43 4-35 

Fumbles lost 1 

Yards penalized 105 55 

Maryland 6 3 9 9—27 

West Virginia 7 0— 7 

Mnryland: Scott, 6 pass from Novak 
(kick failed*. Scott, field goal (31). 
Collins, 15 pass from Novak (kick 
failed). Scott, field goal (41). David- 
son. 40 pass from Novak (pass failed). 
Scott, field goal (48). 

West Virginia: Pomponio, 3 run 
(Thackston kick). 



16 



MARYLAND vs TEXAS 24 SEPTEMBER 

2:00 P.M. (E.D.T.) 

at Byrd Stadium (35,000) 

College Park, Md. 

FACTS ABOUT THE LONGHORNS 

CONFERENCE: Southwesl 
LOCATION: Austin, Texas 
I IK AD COACH: Dan ell Royal 
COLORS: Orange and White 
ENROLLMENT: 17,010 
TYPE OFFENSE: Wing T 
1959 RECORD: Won 9, Lost 1 

Lost to Syracuse in Cotton Bowl 23-14 
PUBLICITY DIRECTOR: Wilbur Evans 

Darrell Royal 




TERP3' RECORD AGAINST THE LONGHORNS 

(Maryland: Won 0, Lost 1, Tied 0) 



1959 



Maryland 




Texas 
26 



TOTAL POINTS: Maryland 0, Texas 26 

1960 CO-CAPTAINS: Guard Monte Lee; Tackle Dick Jones 

LETTERMEN RETURNING: 17— Lost 14 







1960 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


17 


Nebraska (Night) 


Sept. 


24 


at .Maryland 


Oct. 


1 


Texas Tech (Night) 


Oct. 


8 


Oklahoma at Dallas 


Oct. 


IS 


Arkansas < Night) 


Oct. 


22 


at Mice (Night) 


Oct. 


29 


Southern Methodist 


Nov. 


5 


at Baylor 


Nov. 


12 


at Texas Christian 


Nov. 


24 


Texas A&M 



1959 YARDSTICK 

Maryland Texas 

First downs 21 11 

Total yards rushing . 231 285 

Yards lost rushing 18 5 

Net yards rushing 213 280 

Yards gained passing 73 11 

Passes 9-24 1-4 

Passes Intercepted 2 

l'utal yards gained 

(rush and pass) 286 291 

Punts 5-34 6-39 

Fumbles last 4 2 

Yards penalized 100 128 

.Maryland — 

Texas 7 19 0—26 

Texas: Collins 84. run (Lacky kick" 
Branch 1. run (Lacky kick*. Ramirez 
22. run (pass failed). Russell 17. run 
(run failed) 



17 



MARYLAND vs DUKE 



OCTOBER 




William D. Murray 



BAND DAY 

2:00 P.M. (E.D.T.) 

at Byrd Stadium (35,000) 

College Park, Md. 

FACTS ABOUT THE BLUE DEVILS 

CONFERENCE: Atlantic Coast 

LOCATION: Durham, N. C. 

HEAD COACH: William D. Murray 

COLORS: Blue and White 

ENROLLMENT : 4,800 

TYPE OFFENSE: Split-T 

1959 RECORD: Won 4, Lost 6 

PUBLICITY DIRECTOR: Glenn (Ted) Mann 



TERPS' RECORD AGAINST THE BLUE DEVILS 

(Maryland: Won 1, Lost 7, Tied 0) 





Maryland 


Duke 




Maryland 


Duke 


1932 





34 


1947 


7 


19 


1933 





6 


1948 


12 


13 


1941 





50 


1950 


26 


14 


1942 





42 


1957 





14 



TOTAL POINTS: Maryland 45, Duke 192 
1960 CAPTAIN: Guard Art Browning 
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 18— Lost 15 

1960 SCHEDULE 



Sept. 24 at South Carolina (Night) 

Oct. 1 at Maryland 

Oct. 8 at Michigan 

Oct. 15 North Carolina State 

Oct. 22 Clemson 

Oct. 29 Georgia Tech 

Nov. 5 Navy 

Nov. 12 at Wake Forest 

Nov. 19 at North Carolina 

Dec. 3 at U.C.L.A. 
IS 



MARYLAND vs NORTH CAROLINA STATE 8 OCTOBER 

8:00 P.M. (E.D.T.) 

al Riddick Stadium < 19, mini 

Raleigh, N. C. 

FACTS ABOUT THE WOLFPACK 

CONFERENCE: Atlantic Coasl 
LOCATION: Raleigh, N. C. 
HEAD COACH: Earle Edwards 
COLORS: Red and While 
ENKOLLMKNT: 6,100 
TYPE OFFENSE: Winged-T Slotback 
1959 RECORD: Won 1, Lost 9 
PUBLICITY DIRECTOR: Frank Weedon 

Earle Edwards 

TERPS' RECORD AGAINST THE WOLFPACK 








(Maryland: 


Won 8 


S, Lost 5, 


Tied 


3) 










Maryland 


N.C. 


Star 


e 






Maryland 


N.C. 


State 


1908 


6 






23 




1949 






14 




6 


1917 


6 






10 




1950 






13 




16 


1921 


6 






6 




1951 






53 







1922 


7 






6 




1954 






42 




14 


1923 


26 






12 




1956 






25 




14 


1924 









9 




1957 






13 




48 


1946 


7 






28 




1958 






21 




6 


1947 














1959 






33 




28 



TOTAL POINTS: Maryland 272, N. C. State 216 

1960 CO-CAPTAINS: Guard Alex Gilleskie and Center Bill Hill 

LETTERMEN RETURNING: 17— Lost 10 







1960 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


17 


Virginia Tech 


Sept. 


24 


al 


North Carolina 


Oct. 


1 


Virginia 


Oct. 


8 


Maryland (Night > 


Oct. 


15 


at 


Duke 


Oct. 


oo 


at 


Miss. Southern (Night) 


Oct. 


29 


at 


U.C.L.A. (Night) 


tTov. 


5 


at 


Wake Forest 


Nov. 


12 


at 


Arizona State (Night, 


Nov. 


19 


at 


South Carolina 



1959 YARDSTICK 




Maryland 


N.C.S. 


First downs 15 


24 
143 


Rushing yardage 169 


Passing yardage 166 


292 


Passing 8-17 


2 1-.V1 


Passes intercepted 1 


3 


Punts 4-38 


5-28 


Fumbles lost 1 


2 


Y irds penalized 76 


50 


Maryland 7 19 7 


0—33 

7 '_> 


N. C. State - 7 7 7 


Maryland: Scott 2. pass from 


Betty 


(Scott kicked). Poniatowski 27 


pass 


Hum Betty (kick failed). Cloud 


pass from Betty (Scott kicked). 


Joyce 


•.;. run (run failed) Betty 5, run 


( Gal- 


lagher kicked) 




N C. State: Gabriel 1, run (Shaffer 


kick) Podwicka S, run (Shaffer 


kick t. 


Tapp 10, pass from Gabriel (Shaffer 


kick > Tapp 3 pass from Gabriel 


(Shaf 


fer kick) 





19 



MARYLAND vs CLEMSON 15 OCTOBER 

PARENTS DAY 

2:00 P.M. (E.D.T.) 

at Byrd Stadium (35,000) 

College Park, Md. 

FACTS ABOUT THE TIGERS 

CONFERENCE: Atlantic Coast 
LOCATION: Clemson, S. C. 
HEAD COACH: Frank Howard 
COLORS: Purple and Orange 
ENROLLMENT: 4,000 
TYPE OFFENSE: Split-T 
1959 RECORD : Won 8, Lost 2 

Won Bluebonnet Bowl 23-7 
over Texas Christian 
PUBLICITY DIRECTOR: Bob Bradley 




Frank Howard 



TERPS' RECORD AGAINST THE TIGERS 

(Maryland: Won 5, Lost 2, Tied 1) 





Maryland 


Clemson 




Maryland 


Clemson 


1952 


28 





1956 


6 


6 


1953 


20 





1957 


7 


26 


1954 


16 





1958 





8 


1955 


25 


12 


1959 


28 


25 



TOTAL POINTS: Maryland 130, Clemson 77 

1960 CO-CAPTAINS: Guard Dave Lynn, Quarterback Lowndes Shingler 

LETTERMEN RETURNING: 28— Lost 14 







1960 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


24 


at Wake Forest 


Oct. 


1 


Virginia Tech 


Oct. 


8 


Virginia 


Oct. 


15 


at Maryland 


Oct. 


22 


at Duke 


Oct. 


29 


at Vanderbilt 


Nov. 


5 


North Carolina 


Nov. 


12 


South Carolina 


Nov. 


19 


at Boston College 


Nov. 


26 


Furman 



1959 YARDSTICK 

Maryland Clemson 

First downs 15 22 

Rushing yardage 162 249 

Passing yardage 164 185 

Passes ..._ 8-15 10-14 

Passes intercepted 2 

Punts 6-40 4-36 

Fumbles lost 2 

Yards penalized 20 64 

Maryland - 7 7 14—28 

Clemson 7 6 12—25 

Maryland: Poniatovvski 6, pass from 
Betty (Scott kick). Joyce 1. run (Scott 
kick) Collins 49, pass from Betty 
(Scott kick) Collins 17, pass from 
Betty (Scott kick) 

Clemson: Mathis 41, pass from 
White (White kick). Cline 2. run (pass 
failed). Usry 4, pass from White (pass 
failed). Daigneault 2, run (pass failed) 



20 





MARYLAND vs WAKE FOREST 22 OCTOBER 

8:00 P.M. (E.D.T.) 

at Bowman Gray Stadium (16,841) 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 

FACTS ABOUT THE DEACONS 

CONFERENCE: Atlantic Coast 

LOCATION: Winston-Salem, N. C. 

HEAD COACH: Charles William (Billy) Hil- 

debrand 
COLORS: Old Gold and Black 
ENROLLMENT: 2,505 

TYPE OFFENSE: Wing-T p 

1959 RECORD: Won 6, Lost 4 ■ Jr 

PUBLICITY DIRECTOR: Marvin Francis 

"Billy" Hildebrand 

TERPS' RECORD AGAINST THE DEACONS 



Maryland Wake Forest 

6 
27 

34 

7 10 



TOTAL POINTS: Maryland 123, Wake Forest 123 

1960 CO-CAPTAINS: QB, Norman Snead; T, Wayne Wolff. 

LETTERMEN RETURNING: 26— Lost 6 





(Mai 


•yland: Won 5, 


Lost ' 




Maryland 


Wake Forest 




1917 


29 




13 


1956 


1943 


13 




7 


1957 


l'.Ml 







39 


1958 


1954 


13 




13 


1959 


1955 


28 




7 





1960 SCHEDULE 

Sept. 24 Clemson 

Oct. 1 at Florida State (Night) 

Oct. 8 at Virginia Tech 

Oct. 15 at North Carolina 

Oct. 22 Maryland (Night) 

Oct. 29 at Virginia 

Nov. 5 North Carolina State 

Nov. 12 Duke 

Nov. 19 at Louisiana State 

Nov. 26 at South Carolina 



1959 YARDSTICK 

Wake 
Maryland Forest 

First downs 15 1 ! 

Rushing yardage 180 1 04 

Passing yardage 43 113 

Passes 7-20 9-18 

Passes intercepted 

Punts , 5-42 8-40 

Fumbles lost 1 

Yards penalized 26 - 35 

Marvland 7 — 7 

Wake Forest 3 7 0—10 

Maryland: Joyce 6, run (Scott kick) 

Wake Forest :PatelIa 22, field goal, 
Ruby 14, pass from Snead (MacLean 
kick) 



21 



MARYLAND vs SOUTH CAROLINA 29 OCTOBER 

HOMECOMING 

2:00 P.M. (E.D.T.) 

a Byrd Stadium (35,000) 

College Park, Md. 

FACTS ABOUT THE GAMECOCKS 

CONFERENCE: Atlantic Coast 
LOCATION: Columbia, S. C. 
HEAD COACH: Warren Giese 
COLORS: Garnet and Black 
ENROLLMENT: 5,500 
TYPE OFFENSE: Split-T 
1959 RECORD: Won 6, Lost 4 
Warren Giese PUBLICITY DIRECTOR: Red Canup 

TERPS' RECORD AGAINST THE GAMECOCKS 

(Maryland: Won 10, Lost 6, Tied 0) 






M 


aryland 


S. Car. 




M 


aryland 


S. Car 


1926 







12 


1949 




44 


7 


1927 




26 





1953 




24 


6 


1928 




7 


21 


1954 




20 





1929 







26 


1955 




27 





1945 




19 


13 


1956 







13 


1946 




17 


21 


1957 




10 


6 


1947 




19 


13 


1958 




10 


6 


1948 




19 


7 


1959 




6 


22 



TOTAL POINTS: Maryland 248, South Carolina 173 

1960 CO-CAPTAINS: End Jerry Frye and Guard Jake Bodkin 

LETTERMEN RETURNING: 27— Lost 15 







1960 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


24 


Duke (Night) 


, Oct. 


1 


at Georgia 


Oct. 


14 


at Miami (Night) 


Oct. 


22 


North Carolina 


Oct. 


29 


at Maryland 


Nov. 


5 


at Louisiana State (Night) 


Nov. 


12 


at Clemson 


Nov. 


19 


North Carolina State 


Nov. 


26 


Wake Forest 


Dec. 


3 


Virginia 









1959 YARDSTICK 

Maryland S. C. 

First downs 10 13 

Rushing yardage 149 19G 

Passing yardage 96 26 

Passes 8-25 3-4 

Passes intercepted 2 

Punts 5-31 7-26 

Fumbles lost 1 

Yards penalized 55 40 

Maryland 6 — 6 

South Carolina 14 8—22 

Maryland: Schwartz 15. run with 
blocked punt (run failed) 

South Carolina: Gomes 7, pass from 
Norton (Satterfleld runt. Pitt 5. pass 
from Satterfleld (run failed'. Gomes 
12. run (Norton run) 



22 



MARYLAND vs PENN STATE 5 NOVEMBER 

1:30 P.M. (E.S.T.) 
at Beaver Stadium (44,00<i> 
University Park, Pa. 

FACTS ABOUT THE NITTANY LIONS 

CONFERENCE: Eastern [ntercollegiate 
LOCATION: University Park, Pa. 
HEAD COACH: Charles A. "Kip" Engle 
c< il.( >KS: nine and White 
ENROLLMENT: 13,848 
TYPE OFFENSE: Multiple-T 
1959 RECORD: Won 8, Lost 2 

Won Liberty Bowl 7-0 over Alabama 
PUBLICITY DIRECTOR: James I. Tarman 




TERPS' RECORD AGAINST THE NITTANY LIONS 
(Maryland: Won 0, Lost 6, Tied 0) 





M, 


aryland 


P 


enn State 


1917 









57 


1937 




14 




21 


1938 









33 


1939 
1943 










12 

45 


1944 




19 




34 



TOTAL POINTS: Maryland 33, Penn State 202 
1960 CAPTAIN: End, Henry Opperman. 
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 35— Lost 14 



1960 SCHEDULE 

Sept. 17 Boston University 

Oct. 1 Missouri 

Oct. 8 at West Point 

Oct. 15 at Syracuse 

Oct. 22 at Illinois 

Oct. 29 West Virginia 

Nov. 5 Maryland 

Nov. 12 at Holy Cross 

Nov. 19 at Pittsburgh 

23 



MARYLAND vs NORTH CAROLINA 12 NOVEMBER 

2:00 P.M. (E.S.T.) 

at Kenan Memorial (43,971) 

Chapel Hill, N. C. 

FACTS ABOUT THE TARHEELS 

CONFERENCE: Atlantic Coast 
LOCATION: Chapel Hill, N. C. 
HEAD COACH: Jim Hickey 
COLORS: Blue and White 
ENROLLMENT: 7,959 
TYPE OFFENSE: Split-T 
1959 RECORD: Won 5, Lost 5 
PUBLICITY DIRECTOR: Jake Wade 

Jim Hickey 

TERPS' RECORD AGAINST THE TARHEELS 

(Maryland: Won 10, Lost 14, Tied 1) 




Maryland N. Car. 



Maryland N. Car. 



Maryland N. Car. 



1920 


13 





1929 





43 


1953 


26 





1921 


7 


16 


1930 


21 


28 


1954 


33 





1922 


o 


27 


1935 





33 


1955 


25 


7 


1923 


14 





1936 





14 


1956 


6 


34 


1924 


6 





1946 





13 


1957 


21 


7 


1925 





16 


1947 





19 


1958 





27 


1926 


14 


6 


1948 


20 


49 


1959 


14 


7 


1927 


6 


7 


1950 


7 


7 








1928 


19 


26 


1951 


14 


7 









TOTAL POINTS: Maryland 269, North Carolina 393 

1960 CO-CAPTAINS: Tackle, Frank Riggs; Center, Rip Hawkins. 

LETTERMEN RETURNING: 21— Lost 18 







1960 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


24 


North Carolina State 


Sept. 


30 


at Miami (Night) 


Oct. 


S 


Notre Dame 


Oct. 


15 


Wake Forest 


Oct. 


99 


at South Carolina 


Oct. 


29 


at Tennessee 


Nov. 


5 


at Clemson 


'CnV. 


12 


Maryland 


Nov. 


19 


Duke 


Nov. 


26 


at Virginia 



1959 YARDSTICK 






Maryland 


N. C. 


First downs 

Yards rushing 

Passing 




19 

297 

6-9 

61 

358 

3 

4-39 

1 

7-45 

7 




10 

106 

S-20 

102 

20S 

1 

6-35 

1 

4-20 

7—14 

0— 7 


Yards passing 

Total yards gained 
Passes intercepted 
Pun's 






Fumbles last 

Penalties 

Maryland 







North Carolina 


7 


Maryland: Joyce 12, run 
Gallagher 9, pass from 
kick) 

North Carolina: Golds! 
with interception (Shupin 


(Scott 
Betty 

cin 4C 
kick) 


kick) 

(Scott 

run 



24 



MARYLAND vs VIRGINIA 19 NOVEMBER 

1:30 P.M. (E.S.T.) 

al Scotl Stadium (26,500) 

Charlottesville, Va 

FACTS ABOUT THE CAVALIERS 

( :i INFERENCE: Atlantic Coasi 
l.( »c.\rioN: Charlottesville, Va. 
HEAD COACH: Richard Voris 
COLORS: < (range and Blue 
ENROLLMENT: 5,400 
TYPE ( (EFENSE: Split-T 
L959 RECORD: Won 0, Los1 10 
PUBLICITY DIRECTOR: Dick Turner 

Richard Voris 

TERPS' RECORD AGAINST THE CAVALIERS 

(Maryland: Won 13, Lost 9, Tied 2) 




Maryland Virginia 



Maryland Virginia 



Maryland Virginia 



L919 


13 





1932 


6 


7 


1940 


6 


19 


1925 





6 


1933 





6 


1942 


27 


L2 


1926 


6 


6 


1934 


•Ml 





1943 





39 


1927 





21 


1935 


14 


7 


1944 


7 


18 


I92S 


18 


2 


1936 


21 





1945 


19 


13 


1929 


13 


13 


1 937 


3 





1957 


12 





1930 


14 


6 


1938 


19 


27 


1958 


44 


6 


1931 


7 


6 


1939 


7 


12 


1959 


55 


12 



TOTAL POINTS: 
1960 CAPTAIN: 



Maryland 331. Virginia 23S 
Guard Louis Martig. 



LETTERMEN RETURNING: 26— Lost 6 







1960 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


24 


William & Mary al Norfolk 


Oct. 


1 


at North Carolina State 


Oct. 


8 


at Clemson 


Oct. 


15 


V.M.I. 


Oct. 


22 


Virginia Tech at Roanoke 


Oct. 


2!' 


Wake Forest 


Nov. 


12 


at Navy 


Nov. 


19 


Maryland 


Nov. 


26 


North Carolina 


Dec. 


3 


at South Carolina 



1959 YARDSTICK 

Maryland Virginia 
First downs Hi 

Rushing yardage 72 

Passing yardage 1 17 172 

es 6-12 1 1-27 

es inteteepted 2 (> 

Punts 4-36 6-38 

Fumb'.es 1 2 

Yards penalized 121 .'!j 

Maryland 28 7 13 7—55 

Virginia 6 6 0—12 

Maryland: Wrardi 55. run (kick 
failed i Joyce 1, run (pass failed I. 
Joyce 9, run (Scott pass from Betty). 
Collins 17. pass from Betty (Collins 
pass from Betty). Verardi us. pass 
from Betty (Gallagher kick). Drass 
1, run (Gallagher kick). Joyce 4. run 
(Gallagher kick* Betty 11, run (pass 
failei 

Virginia: Shepard 1. run (run fail- 
ed) Gravins 14, run (pass failed! 



25 



OPPONENTS' OUTLOOK 
West Virginia University 

BY EDGAR BARRETT 

A new coacli and new players, coupled with more experience and 
better spirit, enhance West Virginia University's football outlook for 
1S60. After two losing seasons, in which the Mountaineers played 
some great games but fell victim to several upsets, new coach Gene 
Corum strives to maintain a high degree of morale that will insure 
consistent performance. 

With more than 50 sophomores listed on the spring roster, Corum 
injected new blood into his lineup. Veterans face a fight for at least 
six positions. Only RT Glenn Bowman and RH John Marra are 
fairly sure of retaining their positions among seven returning regulars. 
Corum figures on employing three units — a two-way team and sep- 
arate units for offense and defense. 

Here are the factors in the 1960 Mountaineer outlook: 
Experience: Seven return who led in minutes played at their posi- 
tions — LE Bob Timmerman, RG Pete Tolley, RT Glenn Bowman, RE 
Drve Hess, QB Danny Williams, RH John Marra and FB Bob Benke. 
Lettermen number 17 including a 1958 letterman who was injured patt 
of last season, center Charley Lanasa. 

Sophomores: May be the best since 1955, with 48 players up from 
the freshman ranks and nine who did not participate as sophomores 
last season. Best bets for starting assignments are LE Ken Herock, 
RG Bob Fuller and LH Jim Moss, the latter a replica of his brother 
Bob who was WVU's top ground gainer in the last 20 years. 

Backfield: Stronger runners and blockers in Marra, Moss and two 
other sophomore halfbacks, Tom Woodeschick and Eli Kosanovich. 
Holdover reserve lettermen at halfbacks are Roger Holdirsky, who 
ran the 100-yard dash this spring in 10.1 seconds, and Dick Herrig. 

Qioarterback is a real uncertainty in West Virginia's "T"-with-varia- 
tions offense. Danny Williams made a national "backfield of the week" 
selection for leading the great victory over Pitt and showed sparks 
of this form in spring practice. But the job was won, temporarily at 
least, by Dale Evans, an ex-GI volunteer for the team who played 
only 26 minutes last season. Letterman Carmen Pomponio likely will 
substitute on defense. 

At Fullback, Tom Huston had a spring edge over Bob Benke, who 
led him in time played last year. The linebacking needs improvement. 
Excepting Holdinsky, the backfield lacks speed. 

Line: Should be much better. Ends Herock and Dick Struck may 
oust Timmerman and Hess. Tackles Bowman and Bill Winter are 
undersized but tough and supported by big sophomores who will erase 
the major deficiency of last year's line. Tolley, Fuller and Keith 
Melenyzer make RG strong but LG was left void by Bill Lopasky's 
graduation and must be rated weakest position on the team. Lanasa 
leads a fair group of center aspirants. 

Kicking Game: Williams is a fine punter and Bob Lively, an able 
kickoff man, but the Mountaineers lost ace placekicker Johnny Thacks- 
ton who provided the margin of two victories with his field goals and 
led the team in scoring with 18 points. 

Passing Game: The weakest part of West Virginia's play last year, 

26 



Corum stressed this phase most, offensively and defensively. Team 
completed less than one-third of Its passes for only one touchdown 
compared to 49 percent and 13 TDs by opposition. The same quarter- 
backs remain, with Maria, Herock and Timmerman likely targets. 
Both protection and rushing by the line will he better. 

University of Texas 

BY WILBUR EVANS 

There is no basis for optimism at The University of Texas. Fourteen 
lettermen from last year's co-championship squad have departed. 
seven of whom were starters. The exodus included names that have been 
prominent in Texas' football comeback under Darrell Royal, three of 
the top four ball carriers of last season (Rene Ramirez, Mike Dowdle, 
Clair Branch), the leading scorer (Bobby Lackey), the leading passer 
and goal kicker (Lackey) and an al)-American linebacking guard 
(Maurice Doke). Better ball-carrying and stronger linebacking were 
the factors most responsible for the remarkable improvement last 
year, and most of the key figures in those phases have departed. Texas 
expects another tough defensive team that hits well and one that will 
have at least average team speed. 

Prominent among the returnees will be Co-Capt. Monte Lee, who 
has been converted from end to guard (a la Doke); Halfback Jack 
Collins, an outstanding outside runner who led the 1959 team in ball- 
carrying (5.1 on 89 carries), punting (41.3 on 30), passed well (7 of 11, 
97 yards, 1 TD), caught passes well (for 134 yards and 3 TD's) and 
led the team in touchdown production (7); and Mike Cotten, a letter- 
man quarterback who will carry a big load in rebuilding plans. The 
team will be quite inexperienced, however, with newcomers providing 
most of the depth at end, guard, fullback and quarterback. Lettermen 
are two deep only at the guard, center and halfback spots. 
RETURNING 1959 LETTERMEN - 17 

Left Ends — Larry Cooper 

Left Tackles — Don Talbert, Jim Bob Moffett 

Left Guards — Monte Lee, an end last year 

Centers — Bill Laughlin, Jim Rose 

Right Guards — David Kristynik 

Right Tackles — Dick Jones, Ed Padgett 

Right Ends — Deene Gott, a left end last year 

Quarterbacks — Mike Cotten 

Left Halfbacks • Jack Collins, Bart Shirley, David Russell 

Ripht Halfbacks - - Bobby Gurwitz, James Saxton, a quarterback 
last year, Drew Morris 

Fullbacks — None 
LETTERMEN OF PREVIOUS YEARS RETURNING - - 3 

Left guard — H. G. Anderson 

Center — Howard Jackson 

Right End — Roy Goodman 
LETTERMEN LOST — 14 

Ends — Richard Schulte, Kleo Halm 

Tackles — Larry Stephens 

Guards — Maurice Doke, Babe Dreymala, Bob Harwerth, Stuart 
Peake 

Centers — Jerry Muennink 

27 



Quarterbacks — Bobby Lackey 
Halfbacks — Rene Ramirez 

Fullbacks - - Clair Branch, Mike Dowdle, George Blanch, Don Allen 
PERSONNEL SUMMARY 

Lettermen Lost - - 14 (2 ends, 1 tackle, 4 guards, 1 center, 1 quarter- 
back, 1 halfback, 4 fullbacks). 
Lettermen Returning - 17 (2 ends, 4 tackles, 2 guards, 2 centers, 

1 quarterback, 6 halbacks, fullbacks). 
Starters Lost — 7 (0 ends, 1 tackle, 2 guards, 1 center, 1 quarter- 
back, 1 halfback, 1 fullback). 
Starters Returning 4 (2 ends one now at guard, 1 tackle, 

1 left halfback). 
Sophomores figured prominently in Texas' fine record last year, 
especially early in the year when their speed and enthusiasm was a 
tonic for the veterans. No such life is expected from the newcomers 
this year, although they will have to man 13 of the top 33 positions. 

Duke University 

BY TED MANN 

A squad that may balance its greenness with flaming desire and 
that numbers among its members some fine passers, some fine re- 
ceivers and some fast runners is the picture at Duke University at 
the close of 20 "snowy" days of off-season drills. 

The schedule is another lough one. In a row the Blue Devils face 
South Carolina, Maryland, Michigan. N. C. State, Clemson, Georgia 
Tech, Navy, Wake Forest, North Carolina and UCLA. 

Losses were heaviest from tackle to tackle where only one starter, 
Captain-elect and guard Art Browning, returns from the first team; 
and two, Alternate Captain-elect and center Butch Allie and Tackle 
Moose Bosson from the second outfit. 

COACH BILL MURRAY SAYS: 

"We will be greener than usual but we feel that we have a squad 
with great desire to be successful. We also feel that our offense will 
be more potent because we have better passers and better receivers 
and a group of fast runners." 

On the bright side Duke will have excellent ends, a fine pair of 
veteran halfbacks and some promising halfback newcomers, a veteran 
quarterback and two brilliant sophomore signal-calling prospects. 

Due to two reasons moie sophomores will play than in many 
years. The first reason is that the losses were heavy at certain spots. 
The second is that there are some highly promising newcomers on 
the squad. 

Ends: "Four Lettermen and Excellent Sophomores." This may be 
Duke's strongest position. Lettermen are Tee Moorman, Bob Spada, 
Danny Gelbert and Dave Unser and all of them saw much action. 
Pete Widener, Ed Chesnutt and Steve Kusmus are non-playing reserves 
from last season who were outstanding in spring drills. Bob Beasley, 
Zoph Potts and Ronnie Glosson are highly promising boys from the 
frosh. 

Tackles: "Potential Good But Experience Needed." Dave Bosson is 
the only tackle who saw much action returning, in spring drills uoacn 
Murray shifted Veteran End Dwight Bumgarner to tackle and the 

28 



6-6 225 pound giant looks great. Rod Kotchin and Joe Wuchina played 
enough to win letters. Fred McCollum, John Lomax and John Burger 
are non-playing reserves. Dave Condon and Art Gregory come up from 
the frnsh and may help. 

Guards'. "Same as Tackles." Captain-Elecl Art Browning is only 
starter returning from middle of line. He's a really good 'un. Jean 
Berry, Johnny Markas, Hick Havens, Rex Adams and Danny Roane 
are non-playing reserves and Dave Dalton a frosh with ability. 

Centers'. "Sami as Tackles and Guards." Alternate Captain-elect 
Butch Allie returns. He missed the last six contests due to a knee 
injury in the fourth game. Jan Kneib played enough to letter. Paul 
Bangel and Sonny Kern were non-playing reserves and looked good 
in spring drills. Ken Williams, Ken Thompson and John Kruzelyak are 
three coming from the frosh who may break in. 

Quarterbacks: "Good Prospects." Don Altman alternated at the job 
last year as a sophomore and the ace baseball pitcher looks like a 
real comer at the job. Walt Rappold, a non-playing reserve, was the 
big surprise of spring drills doing an excellent job. Gil Garner, Ron 
Davis and Jerry Stoltz are freshmen with line possibilities. 

Halfbacks: "Depth Problem." Joel Arringfon and Jack Wilson, after 
a year of experience as sophomores, are promising starters. Dean 
Wright, a highly rated sophomore who was injured most of last season 
and missed spring drills, and Bob Garda had some experience last 
season. Gary Wilson, Bobby Wyatt, Danny Bridges and Jack Garbinski 
come up from the non-playing reserves. A really bright prospect from 
the frosh is Mark Leggett, a standout in spring drills. Jim Guthrie and 
Bobby Hawn are another pair of frosh who looked good in off-season 
drills. Billy Futrell, injured in the fourth game as a frosh last season 
has a tine reputation but missed spring drills and the coaches are 
awaiting fall season to see what he can do. 

Fullbacks: "Still Looking." The coaches searched all last year and 
came up with Jerry McGee, a former quarterback ( and ne looks like 
the No. 1 man now. Help must come from Red Burch, shifted from 
halfback where he lettered in 1958 but missed last season after an 
opening day injury, John Tinnell, who made his letter as a center last 
season, Roy Bostock, a non-playing reserve shifted from quarterback 
Jack Bush, who played some last season, and three frosh — Van May, 
Barry Ramsey and Ray Barnes. 

North Carolina State 

BY FRANK WEEDON 

Quotes from Coach Earle Edwards: 

"There are only two departments in football — offense and defense — 
and I am confident that we will be improved in both this year. 

"Last year we finished with a 1-9 record. Five of our losses were by 
five points or less. It was obvious that we scored one less touchdown 
than it took to win, and and our opponents scored one too many. 
During spring practice we attempted to put more punch into our 
offense and more wallop into our defense. I noted improvements in 
both phases. 

"If we can keep our present personnel off the casualty list through- 
out the 60 season, we will have a lot more experience than we had 

29 



a year ago, especially at quarterback and end. We have some good 
football players on our squad. Only time will tell whether or not we 
have enough good players to do the job. 

"We have 17 lettermen returning. Ten of these players will be on 
the first team and six will be on the second unit. The remaining 
monogram winner is a boy who has been shifted to a new position and 
is working his way up the ladder. 

"In Roman Gabriel we have an excellent quarterback. He is as good 
a passer as there is in college foutball and, as a sophomore last year, 
showed poise and a desire for perfection. He should be ranked with 
the best. 

"Our running attack should be a good one, although we do not have 
a break-away runner of proven consistency. Players like John Stanton, 
Al Taylor, Claude Gibson and Randy Harrell, however, are de- 
pendable and will hit the 'home run' occasionally. Roger Moore, our 
sophomore fullback, is a first-rate runner with speed and power to 
burn and gives us a threat at that position. Fullback Ron Wojcicki, a 
converted quarterback, will be used extensively. 

"Our line shapes up as stronger than last year with a little more 
speed. Our receivers are better, too. 

"Last year we were handicapped at critical times by our own mis- 
takes. We have worked hard to eliminate these errors and have profit- 
ed from the extra practice." 

Clemson College 

BY BOB BRADLEY 

Coach Frank Howard, who will field his 21st Clemson team this 
September and mark his 30th year on the Tiger coaching staff, be- 
lieves he'll have another good team this fall, although the bad weather 
during the recent spring drills kept the squad inside eight of the 20 
practice sessions and many important phases had to be omitted. 

The "Baron" counts 28 lettermen right now, but two of those, end 
Jack Webb and halfback Sonny Quesenberry, might not be able to 
play their final year. Both were injured during the '58 campaign and 
were held out last year but their injuries still haven't responded to 
treatment as expected. 

The three strongest positions appear to be end, guard and quarter- 
back. At these three positions are 15 of the lettermen. End and guard 
have six lettermen each while quartrback has three. There are three 
lettermen tackles, two centers, four halfbacks and two fullbacks. 

Halfback is giving Howard the most worry now. Although there are 
four experienced men back, just two of them — Harry Pavilack and Jim 
Wilson — are listed on the first four squads. But there is a lot of 
promise here from sophomores. Coleman Glaze ran first team most of 
spring drills and he was backed by Elmo Lam and Mack Matthews. 
Jimmy Hardwick should lend a helping hand here also. 

Only three boys who started the Bluebonnet Bowl against Texas 
Christian are back. These are Sam Anderson and Gary Barnes at ends 
and Dave Lynn at guard. But Howard lost only one member of the 
alternate unit which saw as much action as the opening eleven, and 
most of the members of this team have moved up to a starting slot. 
Ends - Sam Anderson, Gary Barnes, Ed Bost, Ronnie Crolley, 
Tommy King, Jack Webb Emil Zager 



Tackles - Monis Keller, Jimmj King, Ronnie Osborne 

Guards Lon Armstrong, Sam Crout, Tommy Gue, Dave Lynn, 

Dave Olson, Calvin West 
Centers ■ Ron Andreo, Jack Veronee 

Quarterbacks Johnnie Mac Goff, Don Ileilig, Lowndes Shingler 
Halfbacks Bob Coleman, Harry I'avilack, Sonny Quesenberry, 

Harold Smith, Jim Wilson 
Fullbacks Wendall Black, Ron Scrudato 

Wake Forest College 

BY MARVIN FRANCIS 

Willi al least two letlermen available at every position with the 
exception of left end, right guard and fullback the outlook for the 
1960 season is an optimistic one. Provided there are no major lo 
due to injuries or scholastic trouble the I960 club should be equally 
as strong as Hie 195!) bam whicli compiled a 6-4 record for the firsl 
winning season at Wake Forest since 1955. Coach Bill Hildebrand in- 
herited a squad which included seven men who drew starting assign- 
ments in the final game of 1959 against South Carolina. 

The major losses were Pete Manning at left end, Buck Jolly at 
center, Nick Patella at right guard and Neil MacLean at fullback. 

Heading the list of returnees is quarterback Norman Snead, a 6-4, 
200-pound senior, who iinished fifth in the nation in total offense last 
fall. 

The major trouble spots at the present are fullback and guard. Joe 
Bonecutter is the lone letterman fullback while Bennett Williamson 
is the only experienced man at right guard. 

Hildebrand will remain with t,he same wide-open style of play, 
featuring two lonely ends, which proved so popular last fall. 
LETTERMEN LOST FROM 1959 SQUAD ((5>: 
Ends — Pete Manning. Sam Reese 
Guards — Nick Patella, Larry Fleisher 
Center — Buck Jolly 
Fullback — Neil MacLean. 
STARTERS RETURNING FROM 1959 SQUAD (7): 
Right End — Bobby Allen (two-year leterman) 
Right Tackle Wayne Wolff (two-year letterman; club's top 

punter) 
Left Guard — Paul Martineau (grabbed starting berth as sopho- 
more) 
Left Tackle — Al Conover (two-year letterman) 
Quarterback — Norman Snead (two-year letterman; one of na- 
tion's top passers) 
Left Halfback - Bobby Robinson (two-year letterman) 
Right Halfback — Jerry Ball (two-year letterman). 
PROMISING NEWCOMERS: Although the 1959 freshman squad 
failed to win in live games, Coach Hildebrand feels several boys off 
that squad will furnish good reserve depth this season. In addition he 
has several boys who were held out of varsity competition last year. 
Perhaps the outstanding newcomer is Kent Martin, a 6-3, 250-pound 
center, who transferred to Wake Forest after playing as a freshman 
at The Citadel. 

Other boys who did not play last season, but are being counted on 

31 



for the 1960 campaign include end Henry Newton, guards Wesley Cox 
and Tom Hartman and fullbacks Bruce McDonnell and Craven 
Williams. 

University of South Carolina 

BY RED CAN UP 

Before delving into the chances of the University of South Carolina 
in 1960 football warfare, a reference must first be made to the old 
football provrb, "Measure your strength by that of your opponents." 

And the strength of the Gamecocks' 1960 opponents will be the 
strongest ever because they will embark next fall on the most fear- 
some schedule in the history of the school. A schdule which includes 
such powers as LSU, Miami, North Carolina, Duke and Orange Bowl 
champion Georgia. 

With the above schedule in mind, Coach Warren Giese looks at his 
available material, which includes only three starters back from the 
1959 team which posted a winning 6-4 record despite a plague of 
injuries, with a bit of uncertain enthusiasm — uncertain in terms of 
depth and experience. 

Although 15 lettermen were lost, 27 return to the Gamecock fold 
plus a host of eager sophomores. 

Among these 27 returnees are three linemen who should be serious 
candidates for all-star honors next season. They are tackle Sam 
Fewell, guard Jake Bodkin and end Jerry Frye. 

Graduation dealt the tackle and fullback positions the hardest blow 
taking such aces as fullbacks John Saunders and Phil Lavoie, tackles 
Bill Jerry, Kirk Phares and All-ACC choice, Ed Pitts. 

The Gamecocks have come up with another tough line in keeping 
with past tradition and the starting forward wall should be able to 
stack up against any in the conference next year. 

At left end co-captain Frye returns with 6-3, 217, Conley Taylor 
backing him up. On the other side, seasoned campaigner Jack Pitt, 
220, rates as a top pass receiver with Junior Bob Drost, a 6-4, 220- 
pounder, adding depth. 

Fewell, of course, gives right tackle the star mark, but Harold 
Jones and Dwaine Godfrey, who back him up, need experience. Left 
tackle is supported by two consistent performers in Wayne Shiflet, 
228, and Frank Staley, 220. Staley appeared to have the edge at the 
end of spring drills. 

The right guard spot is well equipped with all star candidate Bodkin, 
a rugged 220-pound ex-paratrooper and co-captain of the 1960 squad. 
Behind him are two capable performers — Dave Adam, 190, and Howard 
Sohm, 220. 

The smallest starter in the line ranks, Don Miles, 190, left guard, 
looking impressive in spring drills but was pushed by senior Ken 
Derriso and junior Lane Lowder. 

With Jim Nemeth, 6-2, 230, and Jim McGovern, 215 the Gamecockr, 
will have size like they've never had before at center but lack sufficient 
experienced depth here. Nemeth qualified himself as a starter in spring 
drills but McGovern could still move in. 

In the backfield is experienced talent at quarterback but fullback 
boasts only one veteran, Bob Farmer, a senior, and the questionable 
halfback posts are ruled by juniors and sophomores. 

32 



'n Jim Coster the Gamecocks have come up with one of their 
besl field generals in a long time. Seniors Buddj Bennett and Elarvey 
Shiflet aliin^ with junior Dave Sowell offer unlimited backing for 
Costen. 

The fullback spot is wide open with cither Farmer or sophomores 
Dick Day, Carl Huggins and Jack Beason slated t'oi a starting job. 

The field should tilt to one side next year with the types of half- 
backs that have come up in the Gamecock R.oost. 

At the righl halfback post is sophomore Kin Kilrea, a 6-2, 217- 
pound import from Canada, while at the opposite halfback is Reggie 
Logan, a 145-pound seal back who earned a letter at Georgia Tech in 
1958. The other lift halfbacks -Jack Morris, Dean Fowble, and Jimmy 
Hunter — are all under 155 pounds. 

Billy Gambrell, another sophomore, could push Kilrea right out of 
a starting job. This Athens, Ga. 175-pounder was the sensation of the 
annual Varsity vs. Alumni spring game when he almost single handed- 
ly won it with a 51-yard touchdown run through the middle of the 
star-studded alumni line. 

With one last gaze into tin crystal ball, it looks like South Caro- 
lina's 1960 football fortunes will depend on the progress of the back. 1 --, 
but the Gamecocks will no doubt counter their lack of experience in 
the backfield with a few new offensive surprises that could one.' 
again make them an Atlantic Coast Conference title contender. 

Perm State University 

BY JIM TARMAN 

Of the two major problems faced by coac.n Rip Engle this year — 
development of a quarterback corps and the rebuilding of his interior 
line- spring drills appear to have solved at least the quarterback situa- 
tion. 

Although the loss of All-American Richie Lucas is bound to hurt, 
the quarterback position seemed to be in capable hands by the close 
of spring practice. There was little to choose between Galen Hall, who 
was superb as Lucas' understudy in 1959, and Dick Hoak, converted 
from the No. 1 left halfback position he held for two years. Their 
battle foi the first string assignment will continue in September, and 
no matter who wins, Engle should have no problems at quarterback 
on his first two teams. Both are fine runners and probably the equal 
of Lucas as passers. Neither will touch Lucas as a defensive player, 
although both do an acceptable job. The third string spot will go to 
Pete Liske or Dick Groben, both newcomers. 

The interior line, where graduation took three of the top four 1959 
guards (Earl Kohlhaas, Frank Koorbini, Sam Stellatella, aand three 
of the top four tackles (Andy Stynchula, Charles Janerette, Ton: 
Mulraney), remains a problem. Engle was especially concerned by the 
ineffective blocking of his inferior linemen which hampeved the inside 
running attack throughout most of the spring sessions. 

The one real bright spot on the interior line is light guard Bill 
Popp, voted the most improved player during spring drills. 

With Popp, tackle Stew Barber, and center Jay Huffman (who 
missed much of spring practice because of a leg injury) the only 
thoroughly tested players at their positions, Engle came up with 
wholesale position switching this spring, moving end Bill Saul to 

33 



guard and then to center, center Wayne Berfield (who missed the 
1959 season because of injury) to guard, ace frosh end Dave Robin- 
son to tackle, and fullback Bob Hart to guard. Dick Wilson, second 
string center in '59, missed the last half of spring practice because of 
a thumb fracture and probably will be shifted to guard or tackle. 

Berfield probably will join Popp as first unit guards, and Barber 
will team with Jim Smith (a non-letterman who played a total of 
32 minutes last year) at tackie, but Engle must turn to newcomers 
for reserve tackle, guard, and center strength. 

Coupled with the interior line problem is a questionable line- 
backing situation. Berfield, who has not played in a varsity game 
since 1958, and Huffman probably are the best of the lot, but neither 
equals the rugged line-backers of past seasons. 

On the plus side, spring drills gave evidence of an improved pass- 
ing attack, a strong end corps, improved punting and, despite the lack 
of interior line blocking a potentially strong rushing attack. 

The end corps is deep (graduation took only second stringer Norm 
Neff), and includes veterans Bob Mitinger, Henry Cppermann, John 
Bozick, Dave Alexander, and Dave Truitt. Mitinger shared laurels 
with Popp as the most talked-about players in spring camp, and 
rates definite All-Sectional and All-American possibilities, if not this 
year, certainly next. The coaches say he could become State's best 
flanker in a decade. 

An improved end corps coupled with the spring passing of Hall, 
Hoak, and Liske should mean more and better passing in 1960, and 
possibly an even more wide-open attack than the spectacular one 
directed by Lucas last year. Combine this with a potentially potent 
running game, and the Nittany Lions could present a well-balanced 
attack from their Multiple-T offense. 

A veteran corps of running backs will return (graduation took only 
third-stringer Jack Urban), headed by halfbacks Roger Kochman (who 
skipped spring drills for baseball), Jim Kerr, Dick Pae, and Eddie 
Caye, and fullbacks Sam Sobczak and Dennis Schaeffer. Add promis- 
ing newcomers Al Gursky, Buddy Torris, Dave Hayes, and Hal Powell, 
the ground shapes up as a strong one 'in spite of any offensive-line 
shortcomings. 

University of North Carolina 

BI r JAKE WADE 

Twenty-one lettermen, including seven of the men who started last 
season's wind-up game with Duke, are slated to be on hand when the 
University of North Carolina opens its 1960 football campaign. 

Many of the "name" players of the past few seasons, such as Jack 
Cummings, Al Goldstein, Don Klochak, Wade Smith, Don Stallings 
and "Moose" Butler have departed, but there are enough sound hold- 
overs along with a crop of bright newcomers, to justify quiet optimism 
among the Tar Heel loyalists. 

Coach Jim Hickey is building his second UNC team around Rip 
Hawkins, a brilliant senior linebacker from Cowan, Tenn., who is ex- 
pected to be a prime Ail-American candidate. The team should be 
strong down the middle, with three outstanding fullbacks in Bob 
Elliott, Joe Davies and George Knox, and highly promising quarter- 
backs in Ray Farris, Ward Marslender and John Flournoy. 

34 



Farris, who split duty with Cummings last season, is the only ex- 
perienced signal caller, but Marslender, who was not used in 1959 
and is a football sophomore, showed so much potential in spring prac- 
tice that his duel with Farris for the .starting job — will be one of the 
intriguing aspects ol the team this fall. Flournoy is a tough little 
fellow, ineligible as a transfer m 1959, who is ready to step in if 
either falters. 

Hickey, restrained and conservative in comments about prospects, 
can see a decided lack of depth in the guard and end positions. Also, 
the Tar Heels are yet to turn up another really outstanding halfback 
although the backs performed with distinction in the Blue-White 
game. They are sure to be solid and may develop to the flashy plane. 
"I suspect we will miss Wade Smith more than any other player," says 
Hickey. Smith was the best of the Tar Heel halfbacks the past two 
seasons, hard nosed and solid as they come. 

The Tar Heels, with live experienced tackles and at least one sopho- 
more (Tony Hennessey) of exceptionable promise, appear to be best 
fortified in that vital area than at any time recently. 

In addition to Hennessey, Marslender and Flournoy, newcomers who 
appear most likely to succeed this fall, based on spring practice, are 
center Joe Craver, guard Duff Greene, halfback Jimmy Addison and 
big tackle Don Scott, who has been around but has never played. 

COACH JIM HICKEY SAYS: "We stressed fundamentals in our 
off-season practice and we feel that we made some progress although 
bad weather greatly hampered our work. Our players worked and hit 
hard and that made us feel good. I certainly will be disappointed if 
it isn't a sounder and more consistent team than last year. It may be 
faster, too, and of course speed is one of our big objectives. 

"We have two fine co-captains in Rip Hawkins and Frank Riggs. 
We will depend heavily on them to help us come up with a team 
that will represent the University well." 

University of Virginia 

BY DICK TURNER 

With 26 lettermen, larger in total number of members and indi- 
vidual size and faster in team speed, the University of Virginia foot- 
ball squad has more of everything for 1960. By comparison, last year's 
squad had seven lettermen and about half as many 200-pounders. Here 
is the rundown: 

ENDS — Rating: Greatly improved. Returning lettermen: John Bar- 
ger, 198; Terry Canale, 198; Breny Jones, 190; Edward Menzer, 190; 
Kenneth Sappington, 208. Barger moves to end after two seasons of 
regular backfield play, mostly for defensive purposes. Jones was a game 
starter all last season, several taking turns at the other end. Leading 
sophomores: Dennis Andrews, 202; Jim Hedgepeth, 205; Joe Kehoe, 187. 
Lettermen lost: Smythe Wood and Dick Hunton. 

TACKLES — Rating: Greatly improved and strongest division. Return- 
ing lettermen: Richcrd Fogg, 220; Lee Fracker, 192; Ronald Gassert, 
235; Jan Kamfjord, 222; Bill Kanto. 218; Henry Koehler, 230: John Mar- 
low, 210. First team regulars last year were Gassert and Marlow: 
Leading sophomores: Frank Gildner, 210, and John Linn, 212. Letter- 
men lost: Roger Zensen. 

GUARDS — Rating: Improved. Returning lettermen: Jerry Gonyo, 188; 

35 



Frank Hamilton, 192; Louis Martig, 205; Glenn Sacco, 186; Emory- 
Thomas, 200. First unit regulars last year were Martig and Thomas. 
Leading sophomores: Robert Rowley, 210; Turnley Todd, 210; Francis 
McComas, 190; James Ayres, 200. Lettermen lost: None. 

CENTER — Rating: Improved but problems could arise. Returning let- 
termen: None. Returning non-lettermen: Ted Green, 210; Park Plank, 
218. Leading sophomores Bill Lang, 220; Henry Moran, 210; Alfred 
Alznauer, 210, Lettermen lost: Bob Edwards. 

QUARTERBACK — Rating: Much improved. Returning lettermen: 
Arnold Dempsey, 183; Stanford Fischer, 178. Last year's quarterbacks, 
were Dempsey, Fischer and Wayne Ballard, who has joined halfbacks. 
Leading sophomore: Gary Cuozzo, 195. Lettermen lost: None. 

HALFBACKS — Rating: Improved. Returning lettermen: Wayne Bal- 
lard, 167; Joe Board, 160; Hunter Faulconer, 170; Edward Ferris, 165; 
Fred Trainor, 165. Barger and Tom Gravins were the first team half- 
backs last year. Leading sophomores: Carl Kuhn. 180; Ted Rzempoluch, 
195; Robert Freeman, 175; Willard Wentz, 170. Lettermen lost; Tom 
Gravins. 

FULLBACKS — Rating: Improved. Returning lettermen: Fred Shep- 
herd, 185; Tony Ulehla, 195. Shepherd was usual starter last year. Lead- 
ing sophomores: Tom Griggs, 190; Mike Kudzma, 215. Lettermen lost: 
Harold Rust. 



36 



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Lee Corso 

(Continued from inge 11) 

He won letters in football and baseball four years, with freshmen 
eligible to play then. 

For his brilliant play, honors were many. He was on the all-State 
Florida colleges team his junior and senior year. He was named as 
all-America honorable mention his senior year, a most cherished honor 
inasmuch as Corso was the first Florida State football player to re- 
ceive that high rating in the history of the school. He was voted 
the National Player of the Week by INS for his sterling performance 
in guiding the upset over N.C. State. He was voted the "Back of the 
Week" honors among Florida schools several times. His grid career 
was capped by his winning the Athlete of the Year award at Florida 
State. The 23-year-old Corso also played in the annual Blue-Gray game 
in Montgomery as quarterback. At FSU, he set the total rushing 
record; most pass interceptions one game, 3; pass receiving record for 
one game, 8, as he played halfback part of his second season; and has 
the high mark for kickoff return average for a season, 35 yards. 

On the diamond, Corso was an all-State and all-District 3 out- 
fielder. With the Seminoles, he played in the District 3 playoffs two 
years. He hit .400 as a freshman. 

Corso was voted a member of Omicron Delta Kappa (CDK), national 
men's honorary leadership fraternity and Phi Delta Kappa, national 
education honorary. He graduated in June '57 with a Bachelor of 
Science Degree in Education. 

Nugent appointed him assistant coach following graduation. He pur- 
sued his Master's Degree and received it in August 1958 in Education 
and Administration. 

He married the . former Betsy Youngblood, Tampa, Fla. They have 
one son, Steven Lee, age 2. 



Duke Wyre 

(Continued from page 15) 

Wyre was trainer at Yale for 15 years before he moved to Holy 
Cross for another year. Then in '47 he came to Maryland and has been 
head trainer ever since. 

A Navy veteran, Wyre served as physical education instructor in the 
V-12 program. 

He was the first president of the Southern Conference Trainers' Assn. 
He previously has been on the board of the National Trainers' Assn. 
and now his most recent appointment, Chairman of the Board. In '49. 
he was named the top trainer in the East. 



3S 



COACHES THROUGH THE YEARS 



L892 W W, Skinner 
L893 S. 11 Harding 

i.vm J. <;. Bannon 
1895— G. M. Harris 
1896 — Grenvllle Lewis 
1897— John I.illibridge 
1898— J. F. Kenlj 
1899— S. M. Cooke 
1900 — F. II. Peters 
1901— E. B. Dunbar 
•Above Teams Coached by 

Captains 
1902— D. John Markey 

(Western Md.) 
1903 Markov 



i Markey 

1905— Fred Nielsen (Neb.) 
L906 Nielsen 
1907— C. G. Church (Va I 

and C. w. Meiiek (Neb. i 
1908 — Bill Lang (Delaware) 
1909— Barney Cooper 

(Md. '08) and K. P. 

Larkln (Cornell) 
1910— R. Alston (G.W.) 
1911— C. F. Donnelly 

(Trinity) and H. C. Byrd 

(Maryland '08) 
1912-34— H. C. Byrd 

(Md. '08) 



1935-39 Frank Dohson 

( i 'rlnceton > 
L940 11 Jack Faber C2C). 

Al Heagy, C30), and ai 

Woods (*33) all of Md. 
1942 Clark Shaughnessy 

i Minnesota I 
1943-44 — Clarence Spears 

(Dartmouth) 
1945 Paul Bryant (Ala.) 
L947 55 Jim Tatum (N.C. 
1956-58 Tommy Mont (Md 
L959 Tom Nugenl (Itl 



Bernie Reid 

(Continuu d from pagt I2J 

junior and senior seasons. He graduated in June of 1949. Reid was 
Captain of the team his senior year and was first team all-Southeast 
Conference and the all-Southern team. He was president of the varsity 
letterman "G" Club and of the Student Athletic Council. His team- 
mates voted him the most valuable lineman trophy for his outstanding 
play his senior year. 

Following graduation, he went to Fitzgerald High School, Ga., as 
line coach. He was there one year before moving on to the line 
coaching job at Albany High in 1950. In 1951, he was appointed 
head coach, and held that position until Nugent brought him to Mary- 
land. At Albany, he compiled the enviable record of 57 wins, 20 losses, 
and three ties in a Triple-A league. His teams won the Region 1, AAA 
crown three years and was runnerup to the state championship in 
1952. He was voted region Coach of the Year twice. He points with 
justifiied pride at the great number of his boys that have gone on to 
college and done exceptionally well. 

Reid married the former Kathryn Herold of Hamilton. They have 
two daughters. Karolyn, 11, and Paula 8. 

Alf Satterfield 

{Continued from page 12) 

was discharged in January of 1946. 

He returned to Vanderbilt for the spring term of '46. He was elected 
Captain of the team for his senior year. He won third team all-America 
honors and first team all-Southeast Conference. He graduated in June 
of '47 with a Bachelor of Science in History. 

Satterfiield then went to the San Francisco 49'ers and played tackle 
for one year. 

In 1948, he coached at Little Rock Catholic High School. The fall of 
1949 he got the call to be an assistant coach at Louisiana State and 
stayed two years. It was in the spring of 1951 that he went to V.P.I, 
and stayed until the call to College Park. 

He married the former Bobbie Sue Wright of Forest City, Ark. They 
have a daughter, Susan, age 8. 



39 



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41 



TERP THUMBNAIL SKETCHES 



e:nds 



GARY COLLINS, 20, 6-3, 205, Junior 
from Williamstown, Pa. — the Terp's bril- 
liant all-America candidate ... is one 
of the few ends at Maryland to ever es- 
tablish himself nationally as a soph . . . 
is being tabbed by early season experts 
as one of the country's leading candi- 
dates for top honors, and as a junior 
. . . the lean Collins set himself up for 
national acclaim with a brilliant debut 
last fall as a soph . . . having caught 
14 passes last season for 350 yards, he 
is a sure bet to eclipse the Terp season 
pass receiving mark of 32 . . . with the 
Maryland offense patterned after the wide 
open pass offense, the set-up is ideal for 
Collins . . . for his great play last year, 
Collins received all-America honorable 
mention from the AP and UPI and sec- 
ond team all -conference, AP . . . also 
given second place on all-Area team se- 
lected by Washington Post . . . for his 
standout game in the upset win over 
Clemson when he caught two td passes, 
the second a magnificent grab for the 
winning score, he was named "Atlantic 
Coast Conference Sophomore of the 
Week" and was runnerup as "National 
Lineman of the Week" . . . during the 
season, he was high on the national line- 
man list four weeks ... at the present 
time, he definitely is the finest pass re- 
ceiving end Maryland ever has had . . . 
he has a great pair of hands and is one 
of the most spectacular type receivers in 
football today ... it is a rarity when 
he drops the ball . . . has fine speed and 
has the uncanny way of getting in the 
open, completely puzzling his defenders 
... if a defender is on him, you can 
almost be sure he will come up with the 
ball ... he did many times last year 
with more than one hanging on him . . . 
seems easy for him to get behind the 
secondary . . . will certainly be the main 
target for Terp passes . . . Collins also 
has exceptional strength defensively . . . 
does a fine job rushing the passer and is 
hard to block out of the way ... is a 
real hard and sure tackier . . . the out- 
standing all-around star also is the 
Terps' top punter ... he had a 39.4 aver- 
age last season for 32 punts, second best 
in the ACC ... his kicks are the high 
booming type with good distance . . . his 
14 receptions for 350 yards gave him a 
25-yard average, best in the ACC as well 
as best for the team . . . was a three- 
sport star at Williamstown High . . . 
came to Maryland after having offers 
from a great number of schools . . . was 
all-Conference his junior and senior year 
. . . was all-Twin Valley selection . . . 
honorable mention all-State . . . was 
;: II -Conference basketball player . . . st;>r 
baseball player also. . . sure to have an 
outstanding year . . . married and has a 



son ... in School of Physical Education, 
Recreation, and Health. 

VINCENT SCOTT, 21, 5-11, 190, Senior 
from Wilmington, Del. — undoubtedly the 
most serious and hardest worker on the 
team, Scott will be at the right end spot 
for the Terps, the third consecutive season 
he has been a first team end . . . one of 
the most highly sought after stars ever 
to enroll at Maryland . . . has had two 
brilliant years for the Terps . . . this 
c.ould be his finest, and probably will 
... is one of the very best all-around 
players Maryland has had . . . with Col- 
lins, he gives the Terps two of the finest 
ends in college ball this season . . . along 
with his stellar end play, Scott has es- 
tablished himself as one of the nation's 
best place-kickers ... he is a fabulous 
field goal kicker ... in West Virginia 
opener last season, he kicked three and 
a fourth just went under the cross-bar 
. . . the three tied the national collegiate 
modern record of three per game . . . 
Scott's kicks were for 38, 41, and 48 
yards . . . the 48-yard boot set a new 
school and ACC mark ... he tied the 
modern record held by Mississippi's Paige 
Cothren kicked in 1956 for 26, 27, and 
35 yards, so Scott holds the distance 
mark . . . the former two-year all-State 
selection from Salesianum High is an 
outstanding two-way end ... he is an 
excellent receiver who runs like a back 
after he catches the ball . . . has good 
speed and power . . . one of the finest 
defensively . . . with his all-around end 
play and his stalwart kicking talent, the 
pro scouts already have placed him high 
on their, list for this year's draft . . . 
the "Toe" commands great respect from 
all, for his kicking talent can mean a 
field goal for the Terps any time they get 
near the goal and could use the three 
points ... he can hit from as far out 
as 45 yards and anything inside the 25 
can almost be counted on . . . too, his 
kickoffs get to the goal line and often 
times into the end zone . . . has great 
spirit, eagerness, and desire . . . caught 
11 for 147 yards for two touchdowns . . . 
second top scorer with 34 points ... 2 
td's, 3 field goals and 11 of 15 extra 
points . . . caught 2 as a soph . . . 
was all-State in 1955 and 1956 . . . was 
en the all-America high school team of. 
'56 as well as the all-Catholic second 
team . . . was a star basketball, base- 
ball, and trock performer at Salesianum 
... in School of Business and Public 
Administration. 

HENRY PONIATOWSKI, 26. 6-1. 190. 
Junior from Syracuse, N. Y. — another of 
the real fine lettermen returning to the 



42 



end corps . . . had a line freshman year 
then had a very outstanding debut last 
tall as a soph ... is battling hard all 
the time . . . fine two-way end . . . 
has exceptional defensive play . . . hard 
to get around . . . likes it good and 
rough . . . line receiver . . . had a most 
impressive spring practice . . . caught 
the ball with more sureness . . . snagged 
S for 102 yards and two scores as a 
SOph . . . "Hank" is the "Dad" of the 
Terp squad , , . following his graduation 
from Eastwood High and a year's work, 
he served four years in the Army . . . 
he came to Maryland from nearby Fort 
Lee . . . his visits to the campus were 
many while in the Service ... he was 
llrst team all-Army as an end and on the 
Washington Post llrst All-Service team 
. . . a tine competitor with tremendous 
desire and determination . . . can be 
depended on for another top performance 
and a line year ... in School of Physi- 
cal Education, Recreation, and Health. 

NORMAN KAUFMAN, 21, 6-0, 185, 
Senior from Brooklyn, N. Y. — the hard- 
working senior returns after a fine jun- 
ior year during which he gave a fine per- 
formance ... is a real good two-way 
player . . . does a most creditable job 
defensively ... a good receiver, although 
his tally for '59 was one caught for nine 
yards . . . however, it was a big one in 
the Terp's scoring drive against the Tar 
Heels . . . had a fine spring practice 
. . . caught the ball well . . . will be 
a big help to the pass conscious Terps 
. . . in School of Physical Education, 
Recreation, and Health. 

ANDY TERIFAY, 19, 6-1, 185, Sophomore 
from Philadelphia, Pa. — and they just 
keep coming to Maryland from Bishon 
Neumann High School . . . and now with 
another of their all-time greats to wear 
the Red and White for three years, Nu- 
gent and Maryland can be pleased to have 
Ten fay add to the glory of a pair of 
great predecessors from his high school, 
Jim .Joyce and Pat Drass ... if the fine 
looking and highly sought after Terifay 
lives up to his reputation and plays like 
he can and Joyce did and Drass is doing. 
Bishop Neumann could become the Terps' 
all-time high school alma mater for na- 
tional recognition . . . Terifay had a bril- 
liant career as a halfback and had a most 
impressive freshman year for the Terps 
. . . playing right half from the "I." he 
led the pass receivers with ten and one 
score ... he was moved tc end during 
spring drills . . . looked real good . . . 
has fine speed runs hard and has fine 
balanco and change of pace . . .will be 
wing for a lot of action this fall . . . 
has a fine pair of hands . . . strong de- 
fensively . . . good pass defender also 
... the highly regarded Terifay was all- 
America in High School as well as all- 



Catholic . . . was named to the all-City 
team two years and was honorable men- 
tion all-State his senior year ... a fine 
basketball and baseball player also . . . 
was second team all-Catholic in basket- 
ball . . . was Student Council Vice-Presi- 
dent ... in School of Business and Pub- 
lic Administration. 



ED ROG, 19, 6-0, 190, Sophomore from 
Binghamton, N. Y. — a roal line prospect 
that seems certain to become one of the 
future stars for the Terps . . . had a 
sensational high school record as a half- 
back as he won all-America honorable 
mention . . . looked like one of the best 
in a long time as a freshman, playing 
halfback . . . like Terifay, he was moved 
to end during spring drills because of his 
exceptional speed, blocking and pass 
catching abilities . . . caught seven as 
the Terps' right half last fall, one for a 
score . . . plays a fine all-around game 
. . . a real fine receiver and one who 
can go with the ball . . . has a hard to 
stop running style . . . had a real g iod 
spring practice and will be a great help 
for the pass offense . . . Nugent and 
staff counting heavily on a big year from 
Rog . . . was also named to the all- 
Triple Cities first team in New York . . . 
was a standout basketball and baseball 
player also . . . lettered four years in ail 
sports . . . was Most Valuable Player of 
his team and all-Triple Cities his junior 
and senior year in both ... in School of 
Physical Education. 



MIKE WING, 20. 6-2, 190, Sophomore 
from Allentown, Pa. — another of the 
really outstanding newcomers up from the 
freshman team . . . highly rated as a 
future star who promises to come through, 
as one of the big names in Terp football 
... a brilliant prospect who brought with 
him from Allentown High a brilliant past 
. . . after watching him perform as a 
frosh and in spring drills. Wing seems cer- 
tain to inscribe his name into the select 
long list of Terp greats ... he has all 
the equipment, mental and physical to as- 
sist his goal ... he is a terrific pass 
receiver ... he makes fine effort for the 
ball . . . caught six last tall, one for 
scire . . . does outstanding job defen- 
sively . . . was the most outstanding end 
defensively ... a fine pass rusher . . . 
Wing also was baby Terps top punter 
. . . average near 40 yards . . . will bear 
close watching . . . was a first team all- 
State in high school . . . was a member 
of the "Big 33" team, the cream of the 
crop in P^nn-J. . . . won best lineman 
award at Allentown and was named the 
school's "Athlete of the Year" . . . was 
also basketball and track star . . . top 
point man in track . . . has a brother. 
Tom. at William and Mary ... in School 
of Physical Education. Recreation, ar.d 
Health. 



43 



TAC 

BILL KIRCHIRO, 20, 6-1, 215, Junior 
fiom Basking Ridge, N. J. — following a 
fabulous sophomore year, Kirchiro is the 
top tackle to return to the Terp line . . . 
in fact, he is one of the top tackles in 
football today ... he has all the po- 
tential which he used last fall to become 
another of the very great tackles that 
adorn the elite list of tackles that have 
given Maryland such outstanding play in 
the past . . . with another two years to 
go, it seems a cinch that the strapping 
blonde will do it ... he excelled as a 
freshman then returned last season to 
give an almost unbelievable effort as a 
soph . . . Bill is one of the strongest 
tack'es ever at Maryland and he uses this 
facility with exceptional finesse and know- 
how . . . those who played against him 
last season all rated him as one of the 
best ... an outstanding football player 
with exceptional ability both offensively 
and defensively . . . has fine reactions 
which help him pursue the play so well, 
allowing him to come through for so 
many tackles, many of which are key 
tackles . . . picturesque blocker ... a 
hTd worker who wants to do well, and 
should . . . should be in line for early 
all-stir honors . . . was all-County and 
on all-Sectional state championship team 
at Bernards High . . lettered four years 
in track . . . holds shot put record . . . 
in School of Arts and Science. 
DICK BARLUND, 20, 6-4, 210, Junior 
from Woodbridge, N. J. — came through 
last season as soph and made tremendous 
impression . . . played real good foot- 
ball . . . caught Nugent and staff's eye 
as a potentially real good one and got a 
lot of experience and looked good getting 
it . . . has an excellent chance to be one 
of the best . . . has gained a world of 
confidence with his play of '59 and a 
fine spring practice . . . will be hard to 
beat now . . . gained the starting assign- 
ment in spring drills and aims to keep it 
. . . the rangy Barlund has good speed 
and quick reactions . . . does a good job 
blocking . . . works hard defensively . . . 
works hard and takes coaching easily 
. . . should be a real big asset to the 
tackle corps ... is the son of the fa- 
mous boxer, Gunnar Barlund . . . was 
all-County at Woodbridge . . . also let- 
tered in basketball and baseball, making 
the all-County selection in basketball 
... in School of Business and Public 
Artmin'stration. 

TOM SANKOVICH, 20, 6-0, 200, Junior 
from Uniontown, Pa. — following an out- 
standing debut last fall as a soph, the 
brilliant play of Sankovich is expected to 
he much more noticeable this season as 
he will be one of the main hopes at the 
tackle spot . . . has played at guard 
lis i and can play b,oth spots well ... a 
fine competitor who wants to play every 
minute and on the first unit ... he will 
be doing battle to get the job and could 



KLES 

... a real good all-around football player 
. . . came to Maryland as a top prospect 
with high rating ... he has brightened 
the rating with his shining play . . . likes 
to "knock" and hit somebody . . . strong 
defensively . . . spectacular type tackier 
. . . is quick, pursues well . . . fine 
blocker . . . will be one to watch to 
make big hit on Terp line . . . was first 
team all-County . . . second team all- 
Western Pennsylvania ... an all-State 
honorable mention . . . class officer . . . 
was most valuable player senior year in 
football and baseball and also lettered in 
basketball ... in School of Physical Ed- 
ucation, Recreation, and Health. 
IRVIN FAUNCE, 21, 6-2, 210, Junior 
from Silver Spring, Md. — with an old in- 
jury which kept him outlast season healed, 
and a most commendable spring practice, 
it looks as though the big conscientious 
local boy could lend a big hand to the 
lettermen tackles . . . Faunce has the 
size and speed to step in and play a lot 
of ball . . . does well defensively . . . 
also fine punter ... he could answer the 
call for some needed help . . . was all- 
State second team . . .all-Metropolitan 
second team ... all bi-County first 
team . . . won the Cushman award his 
senior year as the outstanding football 
player at Blair High . . . also lettered 
in basketball and track ... in School 
of Business and Public Administration. 
TERRY BILLINGSLEY, 19, 6-2, 205, 
Soptiomore from Bethesda, -Md. — to Bil- 
lingsley belongs the distinction of the 
modern football era of "just coming out 
for the team," — and making it . . . this 
doesn't happen too often these days . . . 
but the big hard-working rookie came into 
the freshman camp last fall and raised 
many an eyebrow as he won a starting 
berth for the opening game of the season 
... he continued to play good ball and 
is now being counted on to give a good 
account of himself this fall and help 
the varsity tackle corps . . . has good 
speed and is tough defensively . . . fine 
competitor with desire and determination 
. . . was a three sport star at Bethesda 
Chevy Chase High ... in School of Busi- 
ness and Public Administration. 
ROGER SHOALS, 21. 6-4, 225, Sophomore 
from Norwalk, Conn. — came to Maryland 
in 1957 and after a brilliant frosh year 
went into the Army . . . returned last fall 
and sat out the year . . . has caught 
the eye of Nugent and staff as the one 
who cou'd really come through and make 
the tackle position a very good and 
comfortable one . . . has tremendous 
physical potential ... a lot of good 
things seen in spring drills and it was 
a daily battle with the others for the 
first team job . . . will be out to take 
it this fall . . .size, speed, and strength 
could be of much needed help . . . does 
good job offensively and defensively both 
. . . moves well for his size . . . could 



44 



develop Into flne big tackle .. , gam 
c xperlence early will help , . . stai ath- 
lete ai Nmw.iik High . . . married . , . 
,11 School "i Physical Education, Recre- 
ation, and Health. 

GORDON BENNETT, 20, 6-3. 230. Sopho- 
more from Vienna, Va. — here is a new- 
comer up from Hi" Creshman team Lhat 
before i" i many days or games could 
"take it ail" is one of the finest ami 

biggest tackle prospects to Come along 

in some time . . . he already has been 
eyed by tin pros tor tin- future . . . ins 
size hasn't ben the lone attraction . . 
he came up with a strong showing last 

tall as Hist team tackle . . . made .i 
tremendous impression . . . has excep- 
tional strength . . , has agility tor his 
size ... a fine blocker and sure tacklei 
. . . likes to mix it up . . . offers out- 
Standing potential to he one of the best 
held in high regard by coaching 
brass . . . will be one to watch as a 
future star ... he could make it 
. . . was all-northern Virginia at Fairfax 
High and honorable mention all-state 
. . Lettered in track also ... in Arts 
and Science School, majoring in Pre- 
Dentistry. 

CHESTER DETKO. 20. 6-2, 210, Sopho- 
more from East Rutherford. N. J. — 
another of the outstanding big tackles 
up from the freshman team . . . expected 
to be another also who will make a 
brilliant debut for the Terps . . . should 
be one of the top candidates to give that 
big lift he is capable of doing . . . did 
a fine job for the frosh .... a serious, 
hard-working competitor with tremendous 
desire to play . . . has the physical fac- 
ulties to enable him to exploit early in 



his career possible brilliant play . . . the 

Terp stall w iiiid like nothing bettei than 

lo have the big bos- come through for 

them eaii> this year ... is a line blocker 
and is most notlceabli on defense . . 
will be given good chance to battle it out 

with tin' boys in front of him and should 
make the grade . . . was all-Stale at I 

Rutherford High . . . all-Metropolitan 
. . . all-County, ami all-Passalc-Bergen 

. . . also lettered three years in ti. 
. . . in School ol Business and Publli 

Administration. 

NORMAN HATFIELD. 20, 6-4, 220. 
Sophomore from Altoona, Pa. — one ol the 
really Rnesl looking prospects to hit the 
Maryland camp last fall . . . the tall 
highly sought after star from Altoona 
High is another ol the very line tackles 
to come into the Terp picture foi the 
future . . . did an outstanding job for 
the baby Terps and continued t;> Impress 
during spring practice . . . he's a line 
competitor who likes to play football and 
likes to have it rough and tough . . . 
gets over-anxious at times . . . digs in 
tough on defense and a fine tackier . . . 
has good speed with quick reactions . . . 
he will be given an extra special I ing 
look in early practice . . . Hatfield will 
be making his every effort a startling 
one in order to make the grade early, 
which he could do . . . definitely one to 
watch for future stardom in seasons 
hence . . . was honorable menlion all- 
State . . . was a member of the "Big 
33" team. Pennsylvania's high school best 
his senior year ... a member of Who's 
Who in American High Schools and was 
Cass president three years ... in School 
of Physical Education, Recreation, and 
Health. 



GUARDS 



PETE BOINIS. 23, 5-10, 200, Senior from 
Washington, D. C. ounce for ouncJ 

pound lor pound, the explosive watch 
charm type guard leads the corps of 
guards as the only lettcrman at the 
position as fall practice started and the 
only guard with more than a minute 
game experience ... of course. Boinis 
has had two full years of brilliant game 
experience and represents one of Mary- 
land's finest guards ... he is the spec- 
tacular type interior lineman that is 
most noticeable on every play ... he 
works tirelessly and is probably the most 
aggressive returning line veteran . . . has 
a powerful offensive charge as he blasts 
out with his exceptional strength . . . 
does a magnificent job defensively also 
. . . has good speed and a fine football 
mind . . . takes great pride in his work 
.on the field, both in the games and dur- 
ing practice ... is one of the hardest 
workers on the squad . . . wants to play 
every minute . . . definitely has chance 
to have a great year and make himself. 
la nd from around the league . . . came 



to Maryland following his hitch in the 
service . . . lettered at Woodrow Wilson 
high and Bullis prep in baseball also 
. . . was a standout guard at Bullis 
. . . his brother John was on the fresh- 
man team last fall and a top candidate 
for future Terp elevens ... in School of 
Education, majoring in Industrial Educa- 
tion. 

TOM BROUMEL. 21, 5-10. 200. Sophomore 
from Bel Air. Md. — the powerful guard 
hopeful that Nugent and staff are even 
more hopeful that he comes through as 
they believe he can to give the Terps 
strength at the critically inexperienced 
guard position . . . following a standout 
freshman year, he was on the B squad 
last fall and gained great experience that 
carried over through spring drills when 
he continued to look ready to get the 
nod for a starting berth . . . with a 
group of candidates battling for the 
other starting job. it was a keen battle 
during spring practice ... it will con- 
tinue this fall . . will be watched 
closely since he has the potential of be- 



4? 



coming a fine one for the Terps . . . his 
play needed ... a fine two-way player 
. . . was all Bi-County at Bel Air High 
. . . honorable mention all-State . . . 
also lettered in lacrosse ... in School 
of Physical Education, Recreation, and 
Health. 

GARY JANKOWSKI, 20, 5-11, 185, 
Sophomore from Burlington, N. J. — 
another of the highly touted guards com- 
ing up after a year on the B squad 
following a fine freshman season . . . 
one ,of the real top competitors who likes 
to mix it up . . . had a most impressive 
spring practice as he, with the other 
upcoming sophomores, is vying with all 
he's worth for the other starting as- 
signment ... he was in and out of it 
during spring drills, so he is to get in- 
side track for top duty . . . hard worker 
with intense desire to play . . . has 
exceptional strength for his size ... a 
real tough ball player . . . will be one 
to watch . . . the entire Terp camp h,opes 
he comes through with a big year . . . 
was all-Burlington County . . . honorable 
mention all-State, Group III ... on 
South Jersey first team . . . class officer 
.... also lettered in track . . . took 
first place in county pole vault meet and 
third in discus ... in School of Physical 
Eduoation, Recreation, and Health. 

JACK REILLY, 20, 6-1, 185, Sophomore 
■from Philadelphia, Pa. — joins Broumel and 
Jankovvski as the trio of fine guard 
candidates coming up from the B squad 
on whom Nugent is counting and most 
hopeful will come through with excellence 
and top performances for this all - 
important battle that should be most 
intense . . . with the others, Reilly is 
a fine two-way player with tremendous 
desire and determination ... a very 
explosive tough competitor ... a 
serious hard worker who likes contact 
. . . a strong tackier . . . has good 
speed to accompany his zealous all- 
around ability . . . was all-Catholic at 
Father Judge High . . . captain of the 
football team his senior year . . . class 
officer . . . also lettered in track . . . 
in School of Education. 

JOE HREZO, 18, 5-10, 1S5, Sophomore 
from New Salem, Pa. — here is a boy who 
hit the Maryland campus last fall with a 
great impact, made a magnificent repu- 
tation, from Uniontown High School stancl 
up, and now is about to set out on what 
could be one ot the most brilliant grid- 
iron careers in Maryland history ... at 
least that is what is predicted of him by 
Nugent and his staff . . . their prediction 
isn't just prejudice . . . the five oppon- 



ents the baby Terps faced all labeled 
Hrezo as an outstanding upcoming star 
. . . and. the baby Terps themselves all 
echoed the same . . . with his size, the 
likeable Hrezo becomes even more of a 
fabulous candidate for future stardom 
. . . . there have been a number of 
great guards at College Park in the 
modern era of so many national stars, 
and there is reason to place the lithe 
lnrd-working Hrezo on that list early, 
just as the others had been ... he 
was brilliant as a freshman playing first 
team guard and looked exceptional in 
spring practice . . . with the guard 
position open on one side, he set out to 
win the spot, and did . . .at the close 
of practice he was first team, battling 
the other promising candidates ... al- 
though the competition is going to be 
fierce this season, Nugent undoubtedly 
will go along with his brilliant protege 
who has come through so well for him 
. . . veteran observers and followers of 
the Terrapins were quick to liken and 
compare Hrezo with a former Terp that 
is considered Maryland's all-time great. 
Bob Ward . . . the former Terp gained 
all-America twice and fostered the iden- 
tical mannerisms and play in his early 
days as a Terp as has been observed 
of Hrezo . . . Ward was 5-10 and played 
at 182-185 ... the Terp soph is the 
same size ... to be likened to him is 
quite a challenge and going out on the 
limb ... at the present, at least, he 
could make his mark and establish him- 
self as a definite possibility to carve a 
niche in the annals of the former Terp 
stars ... he impresses with every play 
and puts on exciting exhibitions on de- 
fense as he roves, knocking down pisses, 
making tackles, and chasing the oppon- 
ent ... is most zealous and features 
intense anxiety toward his opponent . . . 
has uncanny all-around football ability 
. . . he has great speed and maneuver- 
ability . . . can out-run all linemen and 
a lot of 'backs ... he is a great rover 
on the field because of his quickness c^nd 
reactions and brilliant diagnosis of plays 
. . . quick as a cat and has a tremend- 
ously fast charge . . . defensively lias 
exceptional strength . . . barring the 
USU-M unforseen. Hrezo should begin what 
wou'd be a brilliant career ... a fine 
athlete at Uniontown . . . was all-State 
first team . . . was all-County and all- 
Conference . . . also lettered in wrestling 
and track, as a dash man ... a mem- 
ber of the national honor society . . . 
was class president, a member of the 
student senate and homeroom president, 
three years ... a good student ... in 
School of Business and Public Adminis- 
tration. 



CENTERS 



BOB HACKEP, 20, 6-1, 190, Junior from 
New Brighton, Pa. — with a most im- 
pressive year behind him as reserve center 
as a sophomore, the hard-working Hacker 



has taken over as the first te^m center 
and is counted on to do an excellent job. 
which he can and will . . .during spring 
drills, the rugged Hacker came through 



46 



with exceptional performances and won 
the bis Job 1 1 < mi a host ol competition 
. . . tin' job is his and he can be counted 
on to make tin- position one of the more 
sound up limit , . . with ins si/r and 
know -how .-it the ph ol spol . he coul I 
become one of the finest at M irj land 
in several years . . . has real good 

speed, quick reactions and does a g I 

|ob with ins :>nj-; in • ! blocking assignment 
.-it ter in' gel s rid <>i I he ball . . . cen- 
lers unerringly tor punts also . . . docs 

b real d Job defensively . . . has a 

i>>i .>i Football skill Willi excellent physical 
(acuities . . . wiih go/id strength and 
his standout ability handling the hall at 
center and his defensive skill, he ins 
surely healed the spot thai was hit by 
graduation . . . was all-County at Free- 
dom High School . . . married ... in 
School of Physical Education, Recreation, 
and Health. 

LEROY DIETRICH. 22. 6-1. 195, Senior 
from Philadelphia, Pa. — the popular big 
raw-boned Dietrich lends outstanding 
strength and experience at the center 

-pot . . . the important job will have 
t • he iiis and Hacker's as the lone re- 
turning lettermen at the position . . . 
the others are up from the freshman 
squad . . . Dietrich has had two fine 
years and all spring waged a hectic battle 
with Hacker for the first team berth . . . 
the battle will start all over as fall drills 
open with the affable Dietrich making 
the bid to move up . . . his good size 
makes him a tower of strength with fine 
two-way ability ... a hard conscientious 
worker . . . does an exceptional job 
blocking and does a good job in the 
bill exchange . . . performs well defen- 
sively . . . good tackier ... is one of 
the most popular men on the tetam . . . 
his popularity also extends across the 
campus into the student body as he was 
elected President of the Senior Class for 
this year . . . he also is the new Presi- 
dent of the Varsity "M" Club and was 
e'ected Vice-President of his fraternity, 
SAE ... he also is active in the New- 
man Club and is on many of the Student 
Government committees ... at North- 
east Catholic, he was Vice-President of 
his Senior Class and on the honor roll 
. . . one of his most cherished honors 
came last year when he was voted into 
Omieron Delta Kappa, national leadership 
honorary fraternity ... he also is a 
member of Who's Who in American Col- 



li [i anil Universities . . . was ,-i star 
athlete In high school . . . was second 
i' on all-Catholic and honorable mention 

all-Scholastic . . . lettered in track and 

basketball also , . . in School of Arts 
Science, majoring in History. 
DAVE CROSSAN, 20, 6-2. 20 c ', Sopho- 
more from Collingswood, N. J. — a line 
prospect coming up from the freshman 
i ei a . . . was the lirst teai r for 

the baby Terps . . . came through with 
a inn season . . . made a i il good im- 
pj e: sion on Nugent .hi i I i (I his i ■.; im to 
be one of the future top linemen for the 
Terps . . . does a commendable ] ,l> both 
ways . . . big and strong . . . hard to 
move 'Hit . . . came to Maryland with 
quite a reputation as a ball player . . . 
lived up to it as a frosh and is expected 
to give Hackei and Dietrich a lot ol good 
help . . . was all-America honorable men- 
tion at Collingswood High . . . was also 
all-State as selected by Newark News and 
AP, and was all-South New Jersey first 
team . . . also lettered in basketball. 
baseball, and track ... in School of 
Business and Public Administration. 

BILL NEVELING. 19. 6-0, 190 Sopho- 
more from Bellmnwr, N. J. — another fine 
center candidate from South Jersey com- 
ing up from the '59 frosh team . . . like 
Crossan, he will be given opportunity to 
give the Terps some depth at the center 
spol . . . game experience will be big 
help for the future . . . knowing that he 
can break into the varsity Neveling's in- 
tense desire to play will help make it 
quite a battle at the pivot spot . . . also 
a track man in high school . . . was all- 
Colonial Conference selection at Haddon 
Heights High and second team. South Jer- 
sey, Group Three ... in School of Phys- 
ical Education, Recreation, and Health. 
ED GILMORE. 19, 5-11, 190. Sophomore 
from North Bergen, N. J. — the fact that 
all three center candidates coming up 
from the '59 freshman team are from 
New Jersey is purely "coincidental" . . . 
Gilmore. a big strong boy also came 
highly touted after attending Mount St. 
Michael Academy . . . will make strong 
bid for varsity duty ... a good two-way 
performer . . . has fine potential . . . 
was all-City and all Metropolitan selec- 
tion tint included the New York City. 
Long Island, and New Jersey areas . . . 
also lettered in basketball and track . . . 
in School of Business and Public Admin- 
istration. 



QUARTERBACKS 



DALE BETTY. 22. 6-0. 170. Senior from 
Butler, Pa. — his great performances of 
last season thrilled Terp fans and sur- 
prised the football world as he put on 
brilliant passing exhibitions to lead the 
Red and White in their late season surge 
which saw them winning the final three 
games . . . Betty did what he knew 
could do and was given the chance in '59 



to do it . . . he came through with 
spine-tingling greatness as he made the 
"experts" of Ihe game sit up and take 
notice, then jumped on his band-wagon 
... of the five games the Terps won. 
Betty w?s at the signal calling post in 
four of the wins ... he came off the 
bench late in the third quarter for his 
first appeirance of the North Carolina 



47 



game and engineered a 64-yard winning 
scoring drive ... he passed to Bob 
Ganagner lor the winning score ... in 
the Clemson game, he put on a great 
one-man passing show as he threw three 
touchdown passes . . . the last and win- 
ning one came as he again was called 
off the bench with the Terps behind in 
the fourth quarter ... he called his se- 
quence expertly and passed magnificently 
in the drive that was culminated when he 
placed a perfectly thrown 17-yard scor- 
ing pass to end Gary Collins to win the 
game . . . he hit 7 of 8 passes against 
the Tigers for 152 yards ... in his next 
outing against Virginia, he threw two 
scoring passes and scored one himseif 
. . . and in the season's final against NC 
State, ne threw three touchdowns and 
scored one himself . . . and that is a 
brief summary of the almost unknown at 
the season's beginning when he was listed 
third and fourth team . . . along with his 
equally brilliant quarterback partner Dick 
Novak. he had a fine spring practice and it 
will be a comforting one-two punch for 
the Terps this fall . . . Betty is an out- 
standing passer, long and short . . . calls 
a fine sequence of plays and a fine ball 
handler ... off his brilliant passing of 
last fall, he quickly was acclaimed, but 
a most important asset was the beautiful 
faking that he does after he gets the ball 
. . . teaming with the fullback, the exe- 
cution of the fake is a thing to see . . . 
the opponents couldn't! . . . also an ade- 
quate runner, which he can do and did 
so well against the Tar Heels . . . Nu- 
gent will use the bespectacled Betty who 
wears contact lenses during the game 
strictly on offense this year along with 
Novak, making a very nice situation for 
the Terps . . . this is a tremendous one- 
two offensive punch for the Terps . . . 
the battle for the starting job will be 
neck and neck, but equal duty is fore- 
seen . . . Betty hit on 39 of his 76 passes, 
better th-^n 50%, for 552 yards and nine 
touchdowns, which led the team and sixth 
in the ACC in no. of completions . . . 
had a 2.6 rushing average with 88 yards 
in 34 carries . . . led the team in total 
offense, just ahead of Novak, with a 5.7 
mark for 638 yards for 110 total plays 
. . . this was fifth best in the ACC . . . 
a fine punter also, Betty had a 35.4 aver- 
age for seven kicks . . . had two kick- 
off returns for 40 yards . . . scored twice 
. . . will be counted on to have a real 
big year and help greatly in bringing the 
Terrapins a winning record, something 
that has avoided them since 1955 when 
1hey went undefeated ... at Butler High, 
he was all-WPIAL and all-Allegheny Kiski 
Valley in a real tough league . . . hon- 
orable mention all-State . . . played in 
the Western Penna. Jaycee all-Star game 
. . . lettered in basketball, baseball, and 
track . . . was all-WPIAL basketball in 
his section ... on the all-tournament 
teams ... in baseball, was on the prep 



league all-star team two years . . . honor 
student and president of senior class . . . 
was given a high honor this spring as he 
was voted into Omicron, Delta Kappa, na- 
tional leadership honorary fraternity . . . 
studying Metallurgical Engineering. 
DICK NOVAK, 19, 5-10, 160, Junior Iron; 
Uniontown, Pa. — the brilliant little signal 
calling master who came to Maryland 
from the fertile grid territory of West- 
ern Pa. as one of the most highly sought 
after quarterbacks around his senior year, 
was magnificent in. his collegiate debut 
against West Virginia last fall ... he 
was most conspicuous in tabbing himself 
as a great quarterback and his perform- 
ances throughout the year added greatly 
1o his initial luster ... it was a spine- 
tingling challenge to the little field gen- 
eral given the starting assignment for his 
first game and the first game under new 
coach Tom Nugent ... if he was under 
pressure, one couldn't find any ... he 
passed and ran the Mountaineers dizzy 
with his heroics as he threw three touch- 
down passes and ran for 44 yards . . . 
he hit on 11 of 18 for 184 yards, an 
amazing rookie show ... he received a 
standing ovation from the big crowd as 
he left the field with the game already 
won . . . this hasn't been done for a 
player in Byrd Stadium in a long time 
... he continued to make his mark each 
game, although s.ome in a losing effort 
... an injury kept him out of the Syra- 
cuse game and he was bothered with some 
aggravation in other games . . . Novak 
is a fine triple-threat type quarterback 
... he can run, pass, kick, and call a 
real smart sequence of plays ... he also 
is a good defensive player, but Nugent 
plans to use his tremendous talents offen- 
sively only this season, along with Betty 
. . . with two seasons with Nugent, he 
definitely can be the answer to any fu- 
ture success, the dead aim of Richie . . . 
he is best in the type offense Terps like 
. . . has all the mental and physical fea- 
tures needed to guide the teams' fortunes 
. . . had a real fine soph year and should 
be one of the league's best . . . completed 
32 of 72 oasses for 486 yards and four 
td's, eighth best in ACC . . . had a 3.8 
rushing average with 150 yards in 39 car- 
ries . . . his total offense was 5.7 yards 
per play for 111 plays, sixth best in ACC 
. . . had 3 punt returns for 21 yards and 
Ihree kickoff returns for 45 yards . . . 
intercepted one pass for 11 yard return 
. . . played consistently fine ball . . . 
looked real good again in spring practice 
and started against the star-studded alums 
and did a fine job . . . threw two td 
passes in the spring game and ran for 
21 yards on 3 carries . . . was an out- 
standing athlete at Uniontown's South 
Union High . . . was selected to the all- 
Class A team of Pa., and the all-County 
eleven that claims so many star players 
. . . was honorable mention all-State and 
honorable mention all-America on the 



48 



Wigwam-Wiseman selection . . . was 
n. imcd m .si valuable football player at 
South i mi. hi . . . was vice pre lidenl "i 
Junior and senior class , . . also starred 
in basketball, baseball, and track . . . 
was voted the most valuable athleti 
all tin i these also . . . was all- 
Count: ami all-WPIAL in basketball . . . 
was must valuable In ins basketball sec 
lion . . . honorable mention all-Sstate In 
basketball . . . holds the rec a d ol sc h 
Ing the in i i points In one game, an amaz- 
ing 54 . . . holds the school and County 
record Coi the bi oad jump, 21" 81-4" 
. . . was the WPIAL broad jump cham- 
pion . . . received the scholarship award 
the most valuable athlete In Fayette 
County ... in School of Business and 
Public Admmis! ration. 

JIM DAVIDSON. 20, 5-11, 165. Junior 
from Marlton, N. J. — one Ol the niosl 
outstanding backs In the Terp camp in 
some time . . . listed here as quarter- 
back, bul had a sterling rookie reason 
last fall as left halfback, starting mosl 
■ ■I the games as a soph . . . can plaj 
both positions and could see considerable 
halfback aetion again . . . he took his 
turns at the signal calling spot this spring 
and gave Nugent enough to give him a 
Shot behind tlu> center . . . but to start 
things off. the serious, hard-working 
Davidson is the quarterback of the de- 
Cense . . . the Terp mentor plans to 
platoon as much as the new rule permits 
and has placed Davidson to head the de- 
fensive secondary and use Betty 
Novak on offense ... so it will, at the 
outset, be Davidson playing strictly de- 
fense . . . this assignment is a sincere 
c impliment to the outstanding talents of 
Davidson ... he is one of the finest de- 
fensive backs seen at Maryland and could 
be its best . . . he has excellent speed 
and tremendously quick movements and 
reactions . . . this gives him such a jump 
in the secondary as he can cover so eas- 
ily and well . . . accompanying this im- 
portanl asset is the fact that he is a 
vicious and sure tackier ... he will be 
a most valuable safety valve in the Terp 
secondary ... if called for offensive 
duty, he can easily lit into the chores 
. . . with his blazing speed, he is a dan- 
gerous break-away and open field runner 
. . . had a 3.9 yard rushing average 
1-st year as a soph with 139 yards for 
35 carries . . . caught four passes for 
65 yards and one td . . . had a 36.3 punt- 
ing average for 11 kicks . . . intercepted 
two passe- for '_'l yard return . . . tied 
for leadership in punt returns with 7 for 
43 yards return, an average return of 
6.1 yards . . . returned one kickoff for 19 



yards . , scored one td . . . wa 
I ,- al Ml I follj High ... he is ti 
only Bve-sporl letti rman In thi 
the « hpol . lei tered In Cool ball base 
ball, basketb. II trai k, and tennis . . . 
was all-South Jersey In football and hon- 
irable mention all-State . . , was all- 
Delaware ("ount\- and all-Burlington Coun- 
ty .. . was voted the best football pla 
two years; besl baseball player I 
years; and was voted the b< I athlete 
award his senior > ear . one to wa 

. 1. 1 el> . . . a real good all-around In' ' 
. . in School ii Physical Education, 
reation and I fealth. 

KEN PSIRA, 24, 5-9, 170, Junior from 
Silver Spring. Md. — a real fine hard-work- 
ing quarterback who came out on his own 
to give the game he likes so well a whirl 
and has dene a line Job . . . earned his 
lettei last fall in playing seme good 
... he does a good job passing although 

he 'brew onlj three List fall for no com- 
pletions, but he can hit the target . . . 
is better short passer . . . has good speed 

which makes him a threat running and 
docs a good job defensively . . . had a 
3.2 rushing mark for f our carries toi L3 
yards . . . returned four punts for 
yards and six yard mark . . .with m ire 
experience early this fall, he could be a 
big help to quarterback corps . . . at- 
tended Roosevelt and .Montgomery Blair 
High, graduating from Blair ... he was 
all Bi-County at Blair in 195 1 and '5a 
. . . also lettered in baseball and basket- 
ball . . . majoring in advertising. 

DON WHITE, 19, 5-11, 175. Sophomore 
from Downingtown. Pa. — a highly s aught 
after quarterback who came to the Terps 
with fine reputation . . . did a magnifi- 
cent job and made a most favorable im- 
pression on Nugent . . . shows promise 
to step in and be a real fine quarterback 
for the future . . . will be groomed far 
that purpose ... an exceptionally fine 
passer . . . can hit the short and long 
ones both . . . calls a smart game . . . 
completed 26 of 47 passes for the baby 
Terps. five for touchdowns ... his stand- 
out efforts were 8 of 12 against North 
Carolina and 7 of 13 against Virginia 
... a good runner also . . . can pu^t 
well too . . . was honorable mention all- 
State at Downingtown as well as all- 
league two years . . . also was all-Scholas- 
tic tor the Philadelphia area . . . lettered 
also in basketball and baseball . . . was 
a member of the national honor society 
. . . will bear watching for his talents 
must be molded for future use ... in 
School of Physical Education. Recreation, 
and Health. 



HALFBACKS 



EVERETT CLOUD, 21, 6-0. 185, Senior 
from McLean. Va. — following two bril- 
liant years for the Terps. the '60 season 
play of Cloud should be an even greater 



one ... he represents one of the finest 
lacks to play for the Red and White and 
in the new football era of Nugent, nis 
all-around fine football talents are more 



49 



utilized . . . came here highly touted 
and sought, after by many schools along 
with major league baseball scouts . . . 
after deciding on college education over 
baseball contract. Cloud settled down to 
hit the Terp camp with explosiveness and 
has had a most impressive career, one 
that already has many of the pro teams 
keenly interested in him ... in the Nu- 
gent "I" and other variations in his of- 
fense, the right halfback is a most im- 
portant man ... it requires size, strength, 
speed, quickness, agility, most outstand- 
ing blocking ability and a standout pass 
receiver . . . after experimenting last 
fall, the one to excel and do the job 
best was Cloud ... he responded to the 
call in magnificent fashion and came up 
with a very fine season ... he looked 
good in doing all that is required of the 
right halfback ... he returns now for 
this season with a full year of experience 
at the new ch.ore and is expected to be 
cne of his best ... a fine two-way 
player as he excels defensively . . . uses 
his speed, quickness, and maneuverability 
to the utmost of efficiency in the second- 
ary ... is a vicious hard tackier, one 
of the very best ... is a fine diagnosti- 
cian of plays . . offensively, he gives 
an all-out effort in carrying out his as- 
signments . . . his important blocking as- 
signments are handled to perfection . . . 
he is a vicious and crisp blocker and when 
cal'ed on for a pass play, he runs his 
pattern perfectly and is a star target 
. . . has a good pair of bands and runs 
hard and with his top speed that he has 
. . . hard to bring down . . . has fine 
balance . . . has all the equipment to be- 
come one of the best . . . powerfully 
built, he h"s no fcrs whi'e on the fie'd 
. . . has intense desire to p'ay . . . should 
be one of the real good ones . . . has 
a fine attitude . . . with his known capa- 
bilities, he definitely will be a candidate 
for all-star se'ections . . . caught eight 
passes for 10S yards last fall and one 
score . . . ran the ball five times for 
3.2 average . . . had 4 kickoff returns 
tor 17.2 average ... 2 ount returns for 
4 5 average . . . even today, his ri'me is 
Mr. Everything at McLean ... he still 
is the all-time big name or McLean . . . 
was all-Metropolitan on all Washington. 
D. C. selections . . . was all-County and 
all-Northern Virginia . . . also honorab'e 
mention all-State . . . was voted the out- 
standing football player in Northern Vir- 
ginia his senior year . . . was a class 
president and a Senator Senior in Student 
Government . . . along with baseball, he 
starred in basketball ... in School 
of Physical Education, Recreation, and 
Health. 

nWAYNE FLETCHER. 20. 5-11, 165, 
Senior from Front Royal, Va. — here is a 
boy that can run and prob n b'y out-run 
many halfbacks in football today and yes- 
teryear . . . one of the fastest ever at 



Maryland, both his initial start and after 
he sets sail . . . runs with blinding speed, 
tremendous balance, and magnifieient 
change of pace . . . likes to slant to the 
sideline with his quickness that gives the 
defender fits . . . Fletcher came to Mary- 
land as .one of the "hottest" halfback 
prospects and quickly made an impres- 
sion . . . since his freshman year when 
he enjoyed a great season as he ran wild 
with the football, using his great speed to 
gain many long runs, he has been the 
fast break-away type runner any offense 
needs . . . the fleet-footed Virginian had 
a fine soph year as left half . . . when 
Nugent came last spring he used him at 
quarterback to utilize his running talents 
that he likes for his quarterback . . . the 
splintery-built Fletcher responded well but 
he was needed at left half and there he 
wis used last fall with great success . . . 
his open field running, with his tricky ma- 
neuvers, is nice to see . . . also one of the 
lop defensive backs on the team ... a 
good, sure tackier . . . had a spectacular 
spring practice which is a good omen for 
his expected efforts this fall ... is the 
top returning ground gainer from the '59 
eleven . . . had a 4.8 rushing average 
with 311 yards for 65 carries . . . threw 
22 passes for seven completions and 41 
yards . . . his seven punt returns tied 
him for the lead but he had more yard- 
age return as he came back 77 yards for 
an ] 1-yard average . . . led the kickoff 
returns with 8 for 155 yards and a 10.3 
mark . . . was a big star at Warren 
County High . . . was third team all- 
State and all-District . . . also lettered 
in track as a dash man four years and 
basketball two years ... an honor stu- 
dent ... in School of Business and Pub- 
lic Administration, majoring in Air Trans- 
portation. 

JOE MONA, 20, 6-1, 175. Sophomore 
from Oxon Hill, Md. — when the Terps 
finally "landed" Mona to come to Mary- 
land, they got one of the finest football 
players in. a long time . . . the likeab'e 
Mona was one of the most highly sought 
pfter and highly publicized football play- 
ers out of St. John's . . . his m^ny high 
school honors read like a "Who's Who" of 
grid greats . . . after a brilliant sopho- 
more year, his play the next two could 
bring him the many all-star hon.ors pre- 
dicted for him . . . made his name play- 
ing end at St. John's and as Terp frosh 
and early his soph year . . . with Nugent 
needing added help for Cloud at right 
halfback, he switched the fine all-around 
star to that spot and he made the move 
easily and looked good in doing it . . . 
he has all the requirements called for t^> 
play the all-important spot . . . has fine 
speed, is strong, an exceptional blocker, 
rnd definitely a brilliant pass receiver — 
all needed to fit the position ... he also 
is a strong defensive player and fine tack- 
ier . . . quiet and determined . . . hard 



50 



worker ano easy in coach . . . battled 
strongly during the spring for the start- 
ing job and gave Indications that the bat- 
tle Is on as the Beason opens . . . caught 

!l passes last fall for 53 yards . . . had 
one kickofi return for 13 yards . . . to- 
day he stiii has one of the top reputa- 
tions at St. John's . . . he was selected 
to the Prep-High School all-America root- 
ball team and played in the first high 
school all-America versus the Big 33 
of Pennsylvania all-stars in Hershey. Pa. 
. . . was the star defensive player in this 
game . . . was named on the first teams 
on the all-City selections; the all-Catholic 
team; the all-Prep first teams as selected 
by the Washington News. Post, and Star; 
and was also first team on the all-Metro- 
politan team selected by the same three 
newspapers ... he still holds the record 
lor most passes received in one season. 
1958 ... he also was a three year let- 
ternvin in three other sports and named 
to the all-star teams selected in baseball. 
basketball, and track ... in School of 
Business and Public Administration. 

DENNIS CONDIE. 19. 5-10 155. Junior 
from Madison. Pa. — this is the little guy 
who eou'd. before m?ny games are played, 
be the "big" surprise package of the Terp 
running attack ... the Terp staff found 
him last fall during fall practice running 
wild all over the place and with terrifying 
speed ... he was moved up with the 
varsity and gave every indication that he 
could be a tremendous help carrying the 
ball ... he runs with reckless abandon 
and throws his frail frame around as 
though it was somebody's other than his 
own ... is a slick little runner who 
once hits daylight can pick 'em up . . . 
his fine kn~-ck of picking a ho'e and tak- 
ing off. and the hole doesn't have to be 
very big for him . . . came through with 
an exceptionally fine spring practice and 
then gave indications that he nvght be one 
to watch this fall . . . Nugent and staff 
hope he comes through . . . his speed 
makes him a dangerous piss receiving 
threat also ... a keen competitor who 
wants to play ... in School of Business 
and Public Administration. 
DON VanREENAN. 22. 5-9. 180. Junior 
from Marlinton, W. Va. — this little guy. 
after working for a year following high 
school graduation at Washington Nation"'! 
Airport for Eastern Airlines, and com- 
pletely unknown to college scouts, dropped 
into the Terp camp following his discov- 
ery by assistant coach Whitev Dovell and 
quickly caused a big commotion . . . the 
commotion was over what an outstandm" 
prospect he really was . . . the small but 
powerfully built VanReenan is believed to 
be the fastest back in Maryland history 
. . . has the speed of a "jet" . . . had 
a remarkable spring practic? that h-^d Nu- 
gent and staff all excited . . . many times 
he wou'd bre°k loose for long touchdown 
runs, showing his blazing speed ... his 



speed is so explosive that he Is by the dc- 
U rider m a split second If there is a 
shadow of light for him to go through 
. . . Once in the open, he seems to tie 
untouchable and uncatchable ... a pow- 
erful boy who runs with initial power to 
start himself . . . once I >ose, his chances 
lor the big one are good . . . 1here was 
great hope for his fine play as the West 
Virginia opener came around last fall . . . 
but very early in the first quarter, the 
fourth play of the game, VanReenan 
caught a Mountaineer punt ami set sail 
. . . the angle man finally ran him out 
of bounds and into the West Virginia 
bench after a return of 28 yards ... he 
was carried off the field with a back in- 
jury and was out for the season . . . 
his return to spring practice saw him back 
at his old running tricks, and now he is 
ready to get a big season under his belt 
. . . his talent may be switched to full- 
back at any time . . . his speed is real- 
ized by one of his track performances . . . 
in the Indoor Conference Track meet as 
a freshman, he broke Dave Sime's record 
far the Freshman indoor 60-yard dash . . . 
VanReenan streaked the challenge in 6.3 
seconds, breaking Sime's mark of 6.4 
seconds . . . one to watch . . . was on 
the all-State Cass B first team selection 
in Marlinton High . . . also lettered 
in baseball three years ... in School 
of Physical Education. Recreation, and 
Health. 

DENNIS O'NEIL. 20. 5-11, 170, Sopho- 
more from Leetsdale. Pa. — one of the fir- 
est and hardest working men on the squad 
with a great desire to play ... he was 
on the B squ«d last fall but had to miss 
spring practice . . . how-eve*-, coaching 
staff was highlv impressed and heartened 
by Irs brilliant exhibitions last fall as 
he led the B squ°d as the onponents' team 
. . . can quarterh.ack. bu f ha'fback is his 
spot ... is a fine hard runner with a 
lot of power . . . likes it rough and hkes 
to ram over would be tacklers . . . has 
good speed and balance ... is strong 
defensively ... an excellent southpaw 
passer . . . his year's wrrk last fall 
helped a lot and with his io'erminat'.ori 
to play, he could easily he herd from 
. . . was all-Conference at Quaker Val- 
ley High ... he also lettered four years 
in basketball and baseball . . . was all 
section in bisketball and w*»s a member 
;.f the Hearst All-Star baseball team . . . 
in School of Business and Public Adminis- 
tration. 

RONALD MACE. 19. 5-11. 170. Sopho- 
more from Williamstown, Pa. — another of 
the real fine boys with intense desire to 
play with Inc attitude . . . was on the 
B squ-'d last fall, and like O'Neil made 
a most indelible impression on the staff 
... is an outstanding strong runner wirh 
blinding speed . . . compact size, speei. 
and strong running power makes him n 
difficult target to tackle . . . can also 



51 



play quarterback and even saw some duty 
at fullback and end this spring . . . his 
speed qualifies him as a definite threat at 
any of these positions ... if he comes 
around, it will be a big lift in giving fine 
depth at halfback . . . good passer also 
and is a good defensive back . . . class- 
mate and teammate of end Gary Collins 
. . . they came to Maryland together . . . 
was all-Conference at Williamstown . . . 
also lettered in basketball and baseball 
... in School of Business and Public Ad- 
ministration. 

TOM BROWN. 19, 6-0, 180, Sophomore 
from Silver Spring, Md. — it was a tough, 
long and hard struggle, but Nugent landed 
Tommy Brown, quite a catch . . . one of 
the most highly sought after schoolboy 
stars anywhere last year . . . surely one 
of the area's all-time star halfbacks . . . 
his reputation from Montgomery Blair 
High and Bullis Prep was a fabulous one 
. . . his laurels were many and stardom 
has been predicted for him . . . that goal 
could be realized during his three years 
with Nugent . . . made a tremendous 
impression in spring practice following an 
unusually successful and brilliant fresh- 
man year ... he zoomed fast in spring 
drills to the second unit and is a serious 
threat to the top job . . . there can't be 
a moment of relaxation for the fine all- 
around serious competitor wants to step 
in as quickly as possible ... an excit- 
ing speedster who knows how t,o run with 
the football . . . has blazing speed and 
can give you the break-away run the new 
Terp offense offers ... an unusual run- 
ning style accompanies his speed . . . 
most deceptive . . . has the quickness and 
sharpness to do a fine job cutting and 
faking . . . has tremendous inside and 
outside speed ... a good target for 
passes because of his speed ... on the 
basis of his impressive freshman season 
and a good spring. Brown could hit the 
top quickly . . . had 176 yards for 22 
carries for the frosh ... a fine receiver 
also . . . had several long scampers last 
fall . . . was all-State first team . . . 
was all-Metropolitan, on all DC selections 
also in baseball and basketball . . . excels 
in both and during summer plays base- 
ball and is bothered by pro scouts . . . 
a brother Dick was an outstinding bas- 
ketball and baseball star at Navy ... in 
School of Physical Education, Recreation, 
and Health. 



REX COLLINS, 19, 6-0, 185, Sophomore 
from Richmond. Va. — one of the most 
brilliant and unquestionably the finest high 
school quarterback to come out of Vir- 
ginia in a long time . . . was courted by 
a great many schools as his talents were 
highly sought after . . . Maryland is glad 
they got him ... a fine looking prospect 
with exceptional potential . . . was most 
impressive as a freshman and gave cause 
to be extremely pleased . . . definitely 
has established himself as a star for the 
future and it could begin this fall . . . 
a powerfully built boy who can give it 
and take it . . . was the top frosh sig- 
nal caller and did a fine job ... a real 
good passer and also a hard powerful 
runner ... hit 11 ,of 27 passes for two 
touchdowns ... he ran the ball IS times 
for 88 yards, near a five yard average 
. . . excels as a defensive back . . . 
worked a lot this spring getting acquainted 
defensively along with his offensive chores 
... is a real smart football player . . . 
will bear watching closely . . . has an 
all-star future ... at Hermitage High he 
was honorable mention all-America . . . 
was all-State . . . all-Southern, All-Cen- 
tral, and all-Metropolitan . . . lettered 
in track also two years ... in School 
of Business and Public Administration. 
MURNIS BANNER. 19, 5-10, 165, Sopho- 
more from Uniontown, Pa. — this is the 
boy that will definitely be given the op- 
portunity to show the class he has as a 
demon running with the football . . . 
was most impressive as a freshman until 
injured . . . came back in the spring to 
thrill the staff with his brilliant speed and 
the dazzling way he ran the ball 
. . . another of the real last halfbacks 
. . . has outstanding potential which is 
bound to show as he gets the game ex- 
perience . . . hits quickly and is gone 
. . . very quiet, serious hard worker, with 
the ambition to play a lot of football . . . 
. . . could be a big help and a big hit 
. . . was injured in the North Carolina 
game as he was hit and driven into the 
sidelines . . . had picked up 77 yards in 
four carries, one a 44-yard touchdown 
scamper on which not a Tar Heel laid 
hands ,on the speedster . . . was all- 
County at German Twp. High and on the 
all-WPIAL squad . . . also lettered in 
baseball, track, and basketball ... in 
School of Physical Education, Recreation, 
and Health. 



FULLBACKS 



PAT DRASS, 19, 5-10, 180, Junior from 
Philadelphia, Pa. — this brilliant all-around 
football player had a sensational sopho- 
more campaign last fall ... it was one 
of the most exciting and most successful 
ever given by a Terp football player . . . 
his performances were great ones and 
I' ii nothing to be desired . . . greatness 
should come to him this fall as the Terps 



employ the fullback to the fullest and the 
crashing, bull-dozing type runner that he 
is, will make his mark as a great one, 
which he is . . . hfs debut as a rookie 
was an auspicious one and amost con- 
spicuous one . . . could be the best full- 
back in the league and in many other 
areas ... a good winning year will 
bring him the notices that his perform- 



52 



ancea will Justify . , touted to the 
inii when he enrolled al Maryland, thi 
rock-like Fullback has excellent speed tor 
his now* i fully bulll 5 LO frame . , . his 

peed was betti r than bis si andoul prede 
cessor, Jim Joyce, who won many honors 
last season . . . Drass is likened to him, 
although the upcoming Junior had a de- 
cided edge in speed . . , thej bj e b »1 
trom the same high school. Bishop Neu- 

ii inn . . . nrass played behind Joyce 
there and a year for the Terps, bul now 

he has il all to himself ... if lit' Ins 

anything to do with It, then' Isn't any- 
bodj about !•> take the Job away from 
him . . . he is a murderous line plunger 
... a crack at the lino always means at 
least the Important three and more . . . 
he batters the line with reckless abandon 
... a noticeable and eye-catching type 
ball carrier . . . most effective blocker 
... it looks like the swipe of a scythe 
as he blocks ... a brilliant defensive 
back . . . one of the hardest nosed tack- 
lers in the game . . . likes to crack and 
hits hard . . . carried 77 times last sea- 
son for 264 yards and a 3.4 average per 
rush . . . scored once . . . caught two 
passes . . . returned two kickoffs for 37 
yards . . . was all-America honorable 
mention . . . also honorable mention all- 
Scholastic and was an all-Catholic selec- 
tion ... an honor student . . . class ofli- 
cer ... in School of Business and Public 
Administration. 

BRUCE COULTAS, 20. 6-0. 185. Sopho- 
more from Madison. N. J. — after a real 
lOd year on the B squad and an impres- 
sive spring practice, it looks as though 
Ihe hard-working Coultas will get the cail 
for a lot of duty this fall . . . the ex- 
perience gained last fall and the spring 
work has aided him to become an even 
more ol a top prospect ... he was that 
when he came to the Terps from Madi- 
son High ... he will be needed . . . this 
chance will be given fir tie has shown 
that he could be one of the better backs 
in camp . . . the potential is there . . . 
a fine runner with good speed . . . hits 
bard and effectively . . . good blocker and 
adequ"te defensively . . . was all-State 
and all-County . . . also all-Conference 



. . . was voted the most valuable pla 
award . also lettered in baseball 

basketball . . . was all-conference .and 

all-County in baseball . . . was class 

i ei ins i Hi, and lunioi y< ars ... in 
School oi Business and Public Adm 

I I al ion. 

KENNY SMITH, 20, 5-10, 130, Sopho- 
more from Bethesda, Md. — here is a boy 
named Smith whose name seems destined 
to reallj become well-known, and thai is 
Kenny Smith, the Maryland football pla 

. . . Smith is one who should he a g] 

football player and a great sbai foi three 
years for the Terps . . . he repn 

one oi the BEST . . . his high scl i 

record at Bethesda-Chevy Chase and Bul 
lis Prep was an enviable one . . . his 
scholastic brilliance spread across the na- 
tion and his collegiate efforts could easily 
do the same, hut with tremendous impact 
ami meaning as one of the game's most 
outstanding football players . . . has ail 
the attributes, potential, and tools to 
win himself this recognition and al the 
same time bring to Maryland some fine 
victories . . . Nugent, has tabbed him as 
one of the finest looking football players 
he ever has seen . . . the Terp coaches 
fought valiantly for his services as he 
was so highly sought after ... an out- 
standing prospect ... is a fabulous hard 
runner with tremendous power and out- 
standing speed ... he runs with author- 
ity .. . if he gets daylight, he is most 
dangerous with the football . . . should 
another of the very best . . . will be 
needed and if used, could be one of the 
early season sensations . . . also strong 
defensive player and a real fine blocker 
... led the baby Terp ball carriers with 
39 carries far 181 yards . . . had a 90 
yard kickoff return for TD against South 
Carolina . . . had a big day against Vir- 
ginia as he carried 21 times for 100 yards 
. . . was all-America in high school . . . 
also all-State and all-Metropolitan on all 
DC selections . . . also lettered in base- 
ball . . . second team all-Metropolitan 
. . . in School of Business and Public 
Administration. 



53 



TERPS ON HONORARY SELECTIONS - - 1959 

GARY COLLINS 

Honorable Mention All-America — AP, UPI 

Second Team All-Conference — Associated Press 

Second Team All-Area, selected by Washington Post and Times Herald 

"Sophomore of the Week" in ACC following the Clemson game 

Runner-up for "National Lineman of Week" following Clemson game 

RODNEY BREEDLOVE 

Honorable Mention All-America — AP, UPI, NEA 

Second Team All-Conference — Associated Press 

Second Team All-Conference — United Press International 

First Team All-Area, selected by Washington Post and Times Herald 

Played in North-South Shrine game 

Played in All-America Bowl game 

Played in Senior Bowl All-Star game 

Voted the Maryland Ring as the Maryland man who is adjudged the 

best athlete of the year 
Voted best defensive lineman by squad 

JIM JOYCE 

Honorable Mention All-America — AP, NEA 

First Team All-Conference — Associated Press 

Second Team All-Conference — Atlantic Coast Sportswriters Assn. 

Played in Blue-Gray All-Star game 

Played in Senior Bowl All-Star game 

Voted most valuable offensive player in Blue-Gray All-Star game 

Voted most valuable offensive player in Senior Bowl All-Star game 

First Team All-Area, selected by Washington Post and Times Herald 

Voted the Silvester Watch for excellence in athletics as the man who- 

typified the best in college athletics 
Voted best offensive back by squad 

TOM GUNDERMAN 

Honorable Mention All-America — AP, UPI 

First Team All-Conference — -Associated Press 

Second Team All-Conference — Atlantic Coast Sportswriters Assn. 

First Team All-Area, selected by Washington Post and Times Herald 

Played in the North-South All-Star game 

Voted the Anthony C. Nardo Memorial Trophy as the best football 

lineman of the year 
Voted best offensive lineman by squad 

KURT SCHWARZ 

Honorable Mention All-America — UPI 

Honorable Mention All-Conference — Associated Press 

First Team All-Area, selected by Washington Post and Times Herald 

Voted the Teke Trophy as the student who during his four years at 

Maryland has rendered the greatest service to football 
Voted the Jim Tatum Memorial Trophv as the outstanding Tackle bv 

the "M" club 

VIC SCHWARTZ 

Honorable Mention All-Conference — Associated Press 

Second Team All-Area, selected by Washington Post and Times Herald 

54 



JOE GARDI 

Voted the Alvin L. Aubinoe Football Trophy for the unsung hero of 
the '59 season 

evere:tt cloud 
Second Team All-Area, selected by Washington Posl and Tim* Herald 



TERP ALL-AMERICA PLAYERS 

1923— W. Supplee. End Second Team, AP ; 1923 Gerald Snyder, Full- 
back Second Team. AP 
The Following received AP Honorable Mention: Jess Kraicovic, Guard, 
1931; Norwood Sothoron.. Fullback, 1934; Vic Willis. End, 
1934; Bill Guckeyson, Halfback, 1934; Ed Minion. Tackle, 
1934; Bill Guckeyson, Halfback, 1935: Vic Willis, End, 1935; 
Guckeyson, 1936; Bob Smith, Center, 1940 
i 947 — Lou Gambino, Halfback — Honorable Mention, AP 
1947 — Gene Kinney, Center Honorable Mention, AP 
1948 — Ray Krouse, Tackle — Honorable Mention, AP, UP 
1948 Elmer Wingate. End — Honorable Mention, UP 
1949 — Ray Krouse, Tackle — Second Team 
1950 — Bob Ward, Guard — First Teams 
1951 — Bob Ward, Guard — First Teams 

1951 — Ed "Big Mo" Modzelewski, Fullback — First and Second Teams 
1951 — Dick "Little Mo" Modzelewski, Tackle — One First Team; Most 

Second Teams 
1952 — Jack Scarbath, Quarterback — First Teams 
1952 — Dick "Little Mo" Modzelewski, Tackle — First Teams 
1952 — Tom Cosgrove, Center — Second Team 
1953 — Stan Jones, Tackle — First Teams 
1953 — Bernie Faloney, Quarterback — Eight First Teams; all Second 

Teams 
1953 — Chester Hanulak, Halfback — Second Teams 
195-1 — Dick Bielski, Fullback — Third Teams 
1954 — Jack Bowersox, Guard — First Team (Gridiron Index) 
1954 — Bill Walker, End— Second Team (AP) 

1955 — Bob Pellegrini, Center — UNANIMOUS First Team All-America 

1955 — Ed Vereb, Halfback — First Team, Movietone News; First Team, 

N.Y. Daily News; First Team, Extension Magazine; Second 

team, INS; Second Team, Hearst "Big 6"; Third Team, AP, 

UP, Sporting News 

1955 — Mike Sandusky, Tackle — First Team, Sporting News; Extension 

Magazine; Second Teams 
1955 — Jack Davis, Guard — Honorable Mention, AP, UP, NEA 
1955 — Frank Tamburello, quarterback — First Team, Movietone News; 

Honorable Mention, AP, UP, NEA 
1955 — Bill Walker, End — Second Team, UP; Sporting News: Honorable 

Mention, NEA 
1955 — Russell Dennis, End — First Team, N.Y. Daily News 
1955 — Ed Heuring, Tackle — Honorable Mention, AP, UP 
1956— Mike Sandusky. Tackle— Honorable Mention, AP, UP, INS. NEA 
1956— Jack Davis, Guard—Honorable Mention, AP, UP, INS, NEA 
1956 — Gene Alderton, Center — Honorable Mention, AP, UP 
1957 — Gene Alderton, Center — Honorable Mention, AP 
1957— Ed Cooke, End— Honorable Mention. AP, UP, NEA. 

55 



1957 — Rodney Breedlove, Guard — Honorable Mention, AP, UP, NEA, 

Sporting News 
1958 — Rodney Breedlove, Guard — Honorable Mention, All-America, AP, 

UPI, NEA, Sporting News 
1958 — Fred Cole, Tackle — Honorable Mention, All-America, AP, UPI 
1959 — Rodney Breedlove, Guard--Honorable Mention, All-America, AP, 

UPI, NEA 
1959 — Jim Joyce, Fullback — Honorable Mention, All-America, AP, NEA 
1959 — Tom Gunderman, Guard — Honorable Mention, All-America, AP, 

UPI 
1959 — Kur<: Schwarz, Tackle — Honorable Mention, All-America, UPI 
1959 — Gary Collins, End — Honorable Mention, All-America, AP, "JPI 

Additional Honors for Terp All-Americas 

BOB WARD— 1951 

"Lineman of Year" as selected by Washington Touchdown Club; re- 
ceived the Knute Rockne Memorial Trophy. 

"Lineman of Year" as selected by Philadelphia Sportswriters' Assn. 
Runner-up to Stanford's Bill McColl as Associated Press Lineman 
of Year. 

"Player of the Year" in Southern Conference, 1951. 
Most Valuable Player of '50 Gator Bowl as a sophomore. 
Voted Most Valuable Player Award by his teammates four consecu- 
tive years. 

JACK SCARBATH — 1952 

Runner-up to Billy Vessels, Oklahoma, for Heisman Memorial Tro- 
phy as nation's outstanding football player. 
"Back of the Year" selected by COLLIER'S Magazine. 
"Sportsman of the Year" Award given by SPORT Magazine. 
Second high vote getter in United Press "Player of Year" poll. 
Third high vote getter in Associated Press "Player of Year" poll. 
"Player of the Year" in Southern Conference, 1952. 
"South's Most Valuable Player" in North-South Shrine Game, Miami. 
Fla. 

First draft choice of Washington Redskins. 
Third high vote getter in Associated Press "Player of Year" poll. 

MICK "Little Mo" MODZELEWSKI— 1952 

"Lineman of Year" Award, LOOK Magazine as selected by Grantland 

Rice and Football Writer's Assn. of America. Received the John B. 

Outland Memorial Trophy for this selection. 

"Lineman of Year" as selected by Washington Touchdown Club; 

received the Knute Rockne Memorial Trophy. 

Second high vote getter in United Press "Lineman of Year" poll. 

Second high vote getter in SPORTING NEWS "Lineman of Year" 

poll. 

Fourth high vote getter in ASSOCIATED PRESS "Lineman of Year" 

poll. 

Second draft choice of Washington Redskins. 

STANLEY JONES— 1953 

"Lineman of Year" awarded by COLLIER'S Magazine. 

"Lineman of Year" as selected by Washington Touchdown Club; 

received the Knute Rockne Memorial Trophy. 

56 



Runnerup Id J. D. Roberts, Oklahoma, for ASSOCIATED PRESS 

"Lineman of Year" award. 

Fifth draft choice of Chicago Bears as a junior. 

BERNIE FALONEY— 1953 

Named to the "All-America Backfield" selected by the Washington 

Touchdown Club. 

"Player of the Year" of the Atlantic Coast Conference. 

First team ACADEMIC All-American. 

Fifth highest vote getter in AP "Back of the Year" poll. 

First draft choice of San Francisco Forty-Niners. 

DICK BIELSKI— 1954 

Voted "Most Valuable Player Award" in North-South Shrine Game. 
First draft choice of Philadelphia Eagles. 

BOB PELLEGRINI— 1955 

"Football Player of the Year" and winner of the WALTER CAMP 

MEMORIAL TROPHY as selected by COLLIER'S Magazine and the 

American Football Coaches' Assn. 

"Lineman of the Year" as selected by COLLIER'S Magazine and the 

American Football Coaches' Assn. 

"Lineman of the Year" as selected by the Washington Touchdown 

Club, awarded KNUTE ROCKNE MEMORIAL TROPHY by TD Club. 

"Lineman of the Year" as selected by the United Press. 

"Lineman of the Year" as selected by the Philadelphia Sports Writer's 

Association. 

TOP LINEMAN in HEISMAN TROPHY balloting. 

UNANIMOUS ALL-AMERICA 

PLAYER OF THE YEAR of Atlantic Coast Conference as selected by 

the Associated Press and Southern Writers' Association. 

Winner of the JACOBS BLOCKING TROPHY as best blocker in 

Atlantic Coast Conference. 

FIRST DRAFT CHOICE of the Philadelphia Eagles.. 

Played in North-South All-Star Game. 

Co-Captain of All-Star for Chicago All-Star-Pro game in August and 

voted the Outstanding Player Award after the game. 

ED VEREB -1955 

Runnerup to Pellegrini as ACC "Player of the Year." 
First Draft Choice of the Washington Redskins. 
Played in North-South All-Star Game. 
Holds conference scoring record with his 102 points. 

MIKE SANDUSKY— 1956 

Played in East-West Shrine Game. 
Played in Chicago Tribune All-Star Game. 
Fifth Draft Choice of San Francisco 49'ers. 

JACK DAVIS— 1956 

Played in East-West Shrine Game. 
Washington Redskin Draftee. 

RODNEY BREEDLOVE— 1957— as a Sophomore 

National "Lineman of the Week" Runnerup after North Carolina 

game 

"Sophomore of the Week" in ACC after North Carolina game 

Voted Best Defensive Lineman by squad 

57 



Won "Dapper Dan" Award as the one who did most to publicize the 
city of Cumberland during the year of 1957 

ED COOKE— 1957 

ACC "Lineman of the Year" as selected by ACC Club, Washington 

Won the M Club's "Bill Guckeyson Award" as Maryland's top 

athlete 

Received the "Maryland Ring" emblematic of Maryland's top athlete 

Member of Blue Team in annual Blue^Gray Game 

Played in Chicago Tribune All-Star game 

Third draft choice of Chicago Bears 

GENE ALDERTON— 1957 

Voted TEKE Trophy by squad 

Drafted by Detroit Lions 

Played in North-South Shrine Game, Miami, Fla. 

Co-Captain of 1957 team 

FRED COLE— 1958 

Voted Anthony C. Nardo Trophy 
Ninth draft choice of Chicago Bears 
Played in Blue-Gray All Star Game 

RODNEY BREEDLOVE— 1959 

Played in North-South Shrine game 

Played in Ail-American Bowl game 

Played in Senior Bowl game 

Voted the Maryland Ring 

Voted Best Defensive Lineman by squad 

Third draft choice of San Francisco 49'ers 

JIM JOYCE— 1959 

Played in Blue-Gray game 

Played in Senior Bowl game 

Voted Most Valuable Offensive Player in Blue-Gray game 

Voted Most Valuable Offensive Player in Senior Bowl game 

Voted the Silvester Watch 

Voted Best Offensive Back by squad 

Accepted draft by Hamilton, Canada 

TOM GUNDERMAN— 1959 

Played in North-South game 

Voted the Anthony C. Nardo Memorial Trophy 
Voted Best Offensive Lineman by squad 
Accepted draft by Ottawa, Canada 

KURT SCHWARZ— 1959 

Voted the Teke Trophy 
Voted the Jim Tatum Memorial Trophy 
Drafted by Washington Redskins 
Went to Hamilton, Canada 

GARY COLLINS— 1959— as a Sophomore 

''Sophomore of the Week" in ACC following the Clemson game 
Runnerup for "National Lineman of Week" following Clemson game 

58 



1959 FINAL TEAM STATISTICS 



FIRST DOWNS 

Rushing 

Passing 

Penalties 

TOTAL YARDS RUSHING . 

Yards Losi Rushing 

NKT YARDS RUSHING 

FORWARD PASSES ATTEMPTED 

FORWARD PASSES COMPLETED 

NET YARDS PASSING 

TOTAL YARDS GAINED I rush-pass) ._ 

PASSES INTERCEPTED BY . 

YARDS INTERCEPTIONS RETURNED 

TOTAL NUMBER PLAYS (rush) 

TOTAL NUMBER PUNTS 

PUNTING AVERAGE 

TOTAL NO. KICKOFFS RETURNED __ 

TOTAL NO. PUNTS RETURNED 

PENALTIES 

OWN FUMBLES 

OWN FUMBLES RECOVERED 

TOTAL POINTS SCORED 

Touchdowns 

Extra points — kick 

run 

pass 

Field Goals 



MARYLAND 


OPPONENTS 


1 M 


164 


89 


94 


49 


58 


6 


12 


1976 


1910 


211 


239 


1765 


1671 


185 


174 


81 


90 


1120 


1138 


2885 


2809 


15 


15 


143 


15 1 


474 


485 


50-1906 


51-1792 


381 


35.1 


35-575 


35-708 


33-305 


33-335 


75-652% 


56-527 


20 


24 


10 


8 


184 


188 


26 


27 


15-19 


10-11 


0-2 


3-8 


2-5 


2-8 


3-11 


2-3 



1959 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS 



Joyce - - . 


Carries 
137 


RUSHING 

Gain 
571 


Drass 
Fletcher 


77 
65 


281 
360 


Novak 


39 


176 


Davidson - . 
Bettv . . _. 


35 
34 


143 

142 


Houser 


27 


77 


Verardi 


21 


148 


Henrv 


8 


26 


Cloud 
Psira 


5 

4 


21 
13 


Shimkus 


2 


7 


Collins 


2 


4 


Gallagher 


2 


3 


Condie 


1 


4 



Lost 

4 

17 

49 

26 

4 

54 

7 

28 

14 

5 





3 







Net 

567 

264 

311 

150 

139 

88 

70 

120 

12 

16 

13 

7 

1 

3 

4 



Avg. 

4.3 
3.4 
4.8 
3.S 
3.9 
2.6 
2.6 
5.7 
1.5 
3.2 
3.2 
3.5 
0.5 
1.5 
4.0 



59 



Yards 


Avg. 


1259 


39.4 


399 


36.3 


248 


35.4 



TOTAL OFFENSE 

Total Plays Net Gain Avg. 

Novak 111 638 5.7 

Betty 110 640 5.8 

Fletcher 87 352 4.0 

Verardi 22 120 5.5 

Henry 17 36 2.1 

Psira 7 13 1.8 

Collins 4 8 2.0 

all others same as above rushing 



PUNTING 

No. 
Collins 32 

Davidson 11 

Betty 7 



PUNT RETURNS 

No. Yards Returned Avg. 

Fletcher 7 77 11.0 

Davidson 7 43 6.1 

Verardi 5 61 12.2 

Psira 4 24 6.0 

Novak 3 21 7.0 

Cloud 2 9 4.5 

Van Reenan 1 28 28.0 

Gardi 1 20 20.0 

Poniatowski 1 13 13.0 

Gunderman 1 10 10.0 

Collins 1 4 4.0 

Condie 1 4 4.0 

*Schwartz ran blocked punt 14 yards for td. 



KICKOFF RETURNS 

No. Yards Returned Avg. 

Fletcher 8 155 19.3 

Cloud 4 69 17.2 

Verardi 4 48 12.0 

Novak 3 45 15.0 

Shaffer 3 21 7.0 

Betty 2 40 20.0 

Drass 2 37 18.5 

Scott 1 65 65.0 

Davidson 1 19 19.0 

Mona 1 13 13.9 

Collins 1 10 10.0 

Breedlove 1 9 9.0 

Gardi 1 0.0 

*Scott had a 62-yard return on handoff from Verardi 

60 



PASSING 

11;.. I 

Alt. Comp, Yd>. Ini. 

Betty 76 39 552 7 

Novak 72 32 486 4 

Fletcher 22 7 41 l 

Henry 9 1 24 2 

Psira 3 

Collins 2 2 7 

Verardi 10 1 

PASS RECEIVING 

No. Caught Yards 

Collins 14 350 

Scott U 147 

Mona 9 53 

Cloud 8 108 

Poniatowski 8 102 

Gallagher 6 99 

Scotti 5 49 

Davidson 4 65 

Joyce 4 14 

Shaffer 2 53 

Breedlove 2 28 

Drass 2 —3 

Condie 1 14 

Verardi 1 16 

Kaufman 1 9 

Honser 1 7 

Shimkus 1 3 

Fletcher 1 —3 

TD PASSES THROWN 

Betty— 9; Novak — 4 

TD PASSES CAUGHT 

Collins— 4; Scott— 2; Poniatowsk— 2; Scotti— 1; 
Davidson — 1; Gallagher — 1; Verardi — 1; Cloud — 1 

SCORING 

TDs R P K FG 

Joyce 8 0—0 0—0 

Scott 2 1 11—15 3—11 

Collins 4 1 0—0 0—0 

Verardi 2 — 0—0 

Betty 2 0—0 0—0 

Poniatowski 2 0—0 — 

Gallagher 10 4 — 4 0— C 

Scotti 10 0—0 — 

Davidson 10 fj — — 

Schwartz 10 0—0 0—0 

Drass 10 0—0 0—0 

Cloud 10 0—0 0—0 

61 



'I I >,, 
9 
1 









TDs 
4 
2 

1 
2 
1 
1 
1 






1 








PTS 

48 

34 

26 

12 

12 

12 

10 

6 

6 

6 

6 

6 



PASS INTERCEPTIONS 

No. Yards Returned 

Joyce 2 27 

Schwartz 2 27 

Scott 2 16 

Davidson 2 21 

Verardi 1 27 

Schwarz 1 S 

Breedlove 1 5 

Gallagher 1 5 

Novak 1 11 

Gunderman 1 2 

Boinis 1 



62 



MARYLAND FOOTBALL RECORDS 

SINGLE GAME RECORDS, Individual 

MOST POINTS SCORED: 31 by Bob Shomonski against VPI, 1950 
(5 td's, 1 Pat). 

MOST TD'S SCORED: 5 by Bob Shemonski against VPI, 1950. 

MOST PAT SCORED: 6 by Bob Dean against South. Carolina, 1949; 6 
by Don Decker against West Virginia, 1951. 

MOST TD PASSES CAUGHT: 2 by Don Gleasnor against Virginia, 
1945; 2 by Leroy Mortor against Michigan State, L946; 2 bj Lou 
Gambino against West Virginia, 1947; 2 by Elmer Wingate against 
George Washington, 1948; 2 by Stan Karnash against George Wash- 
ington, 1949; 2 by Pete Augsburger against South Carolina, 1949; 2 
by Henry Fox against Georgetown, 1949; 2 by Lloyd Colteryahn 
against LSU, 1952; 2 by Bill Walker against Alabama, 1953; 2 by 
Gary Collins against Clemson, 1959. 

MOST FIELD GOALS: 3 by Vincent Scott against West Virginia, 1959. 

MOST TD PASSES THROWN: 3 by Dick Novak against West Vir- 
ginia, 1959; 3 by Dale Betty Against Clemson, 1959; 3 by Dale 
Betty against North Carolina State, 1959; 3 by Jack Scarbath 
against LSU, 1952; 3 by Jack Scarbath against West Virginia, 
1951; 3 by Stan Lavine against George Washington, 1949; 3 by Vic 
Turyn against George Washington, 1948; 3 by Tommy Mont against 
Connecticut, 1942. 

MOST TD RESPONSIBILITY: 5 by Bob Shemonski against VPI, 1950 
(Scored 5); 4 by Dale Betty against North Carolina State, 1959 
(Scored 1 passed for 3); 4 by Ed Vereb against North Carolina, 
1955 (scored 3 passed for 1); 4 by Bernie Faloney against Georgia, 
1953 (scored 2 passed for 2); 4 by Stan Lavine against George 
Washington, 1949 (scored 1 passed for 3); 4 by Ray Poppleman 
against Western Maryland, 1931 (scored 3 passed for 1). 

LONGEST SCORING RUN FROM SCRIMMAGE: 90 yards by Dick 
Burgee against Missouri. 1954. 

LONGEST SCORING PASS: 40 yards by Dick Novak to Jim David- 
son against West Virginia, 1959. 

LONGEST SCORING PASS AND RUN: 92 yards by Stan Lavine to 
Ed Bolton against South Carolina, 1949 (pass 15 yards, run 77 
yards). 

LONGEST SCORING RUN AFTER PASS: 77 yards by Ed Bolton on 
pass from Stan Lavine against South Carolina, 1949. (Pass 15 yds). 

LONGEST FIELD GOAL: 48 yards by Vincent Scott against West Vir- 
ginia, 1959. 

LONGEST SCORING RETURN OF INTERCEPTED PASS: 100 yards 
(105 actual) by Joe Horning against Missouri, 1951; 100 yards (103 
actual) by Dickie Lewis against North Carolina State, 1956. 

LONGEST SCORING RETURN OF INTERCEPTED PASS BY OP- 
PONENT: 93 yards by Walter Matson of Pennsylvania, 1941. 

LONGEST PUNT RETURN FOR TD: 90 yards by Dick Nolan against 
Clemson, 1953. 

LONGEST PUNT RETURN FOR TD BY OPPONENT: 100 yards by 

63 



Frank Brady of Navy, 1951. 
LONGEST KICKOFF RETURN FOR TD: 90 yards by Lewis Thomas 
against Washington College, 1927; 90 yards by Bill Guckeyson 
against Georgetown, 1935; 90 yards by Sam Behr against Virginia, 
1945; 90 yards by Dick Nolan against Mississippi, 1952; 90 
yards by Howie Dare against North Carolina State, 1957. 
LONGEST KICKOFF RETURN FOR TD BY OPPONENT: 93 yards 

by Jim McPherson of North Carolina, 1926. 
LONGEST SCORING RUN WITH RECOVERED FUMBLE: 23 yards 

by Howie Dare against North Carolina State, 1954. 
LONGEST NON SCORING RUN FROM SCRIMMAGE: 76 yards by 

Harry Bonk against North Carolina, 1948. 
LONGEST NON SCORING PASS: 47 yards by Dale Betty to Ron 

Shaffer against Clemson, 1959. 
LONGEST NON SCORING RUN WITH RECOVERED FUMBLE BY 
OPPONENT: 75 yards by Dave Russell of Washington and Lee, 
1942. 
LCNGEST NON SCORING PASS AND RUN: 73 yards by Tom Mont 
to Hubie Werner against Lakehurst, 1942 (pass 32 yards run 
41 yards). 
LCNGEST NON SCORING RUN AFTER PASS: 41 yards by Hubie 
Werner against Lakehurst, 1942 on 32 yard pass from Tommy 
Mont. 
LONGEST NON SCORING RUN OF INTERCEPTED PASS: 74 yards 

by Bernie Faloney against LSU, 1952. 
LONGEST NON SCORING KICKOFF RETURN: 76 yards by Howie 

Dare against Miami, 1957. 
LONGEST NON SCORING PUNT RETURN: 67 yards by John Mc- 

Vicker against Syracuse, 1956. 
MOST RUSHES: 28 by Jim Joyce against Texas, 1959; 28 by Ed 

Modzelewski against Tennessee in 1952 Sugar Bowl. 
MOST YARDS GAINED RUSHING: (NET): 193 yards by Ray Popple- 
man against Western Maryland, 1931 (24 carries). 
BEST RUSHING AVERAGE: 18.7 by Joe Horning against West Vir- 
ginia, 1951 (4 carries) 18.7 by Joe Horning against George Wash- 
ington, 1954 (4 carries). 
MOST PASSES ATTEMPTED: 30 by Jack 'Scarbath against North 

Carolina State, 1950. (completed 11). 
MOST PASSES COMPLETED: 17 by Tommy Mont against Norih 

Carolina, 1946, (25 attempts). 
BEST COMPLETION PERCENTAGE: (minimum of 10 attempts): 
.800 by Tommy Mont against Bainbridge, 1946 (8 completions, 
10 attempts). 
MOST YARDS GAINED PASSING: 243 by Jack Scarbath against 

Navy, 1951 (14 completions, 23 attempts). 
MOST PASSES HAD INTERCEPTED: 3 by Charles Boxold against 
Wake Forest, 1954. 3 by Bob Rusevlyn against North Carolina, 
1958. 3 by Vic Turyn against North Carolina, 1948. 
MOST TOTAL PLAYS (rush and pass): 40 bv Jack Scarbath against 

North Carolina State, 1950 (30 passes, 10 rushes). 
MOST NET YARDS GAINED (rushing and passing): 251 by Jack 

Scarbath against Navy, 1951 (243 passing— 8 rushing) 
BEST OFFENSIVE AVERAGE (rushing and passing); (minimum 4 
plays) 19.0 by Dale Betty against Clemson, 1959 (8 plays 152 
yards). 

64 



MOST PASSES CAUGHT: 8 by Lou Weidensaul again I Navy, L951 
(95 yards), s in Lloyd Colteryahn againsl Alabama, L952 (131 

VI 1'( 1 s I 

MOST YARDS GAINED ON PASS RECEPTIONS: L31 yard bj Lloyd 
Colteryahn againsl Alabama, 1952 (8 receptions). 

MOST PASSES INTERCEPTED: 3 by Bob Shemonski againsl Geor- 
gia, 1951. 

MOST YARDS GAINED ON INTERCEPTION RUNBACKS: 111 yards 
by Dickie Lewis against North Carolina State, 1956). 

MOST PUNTS: 10 by Bill Guckeyson against Syracuse, 1936. 10 by 
Jack Targarona againsl Wesl Virginia, 1950. 

MOST TOTAL YARDS PUNTING: 510 by Bill Guckeyson again I 
Syracuse, 1936. 

BEST PUNTING AVERAGE: 53 yards by Lynn Beightol against Okla- 
homa, 1956 Orange Bowl (3 punts) (regular season game) 51.7 
yards by Fred Heffner againsl Washington and Lee, L953 (3 punts). 

LONGEST PUNT WITH ROLL: 88 yards by John Fritsch against 
Miami, 1956. (Note) "Untz" Brooke Brewer had a 93 yard punt 
against VMI, 1916. 

LONGEST PUNT WITH ROLL BY OPPONENT: 84 yards by Charlie 
Justice of North Carolina, 1948. 

MOST PUNTS RETURNED: 6 by Joe Petruzzo against LSU, 1951 
(67 yards). 

MOST YARDS GAINED RETURNING PUNTS: 146 by Bob Shemonski 
against North Carolina State, 1950 (5 returns). 

MOST PUNTS BLOCKED: 1 by several men. 

MOST KICKOFFS RETURNED: 3 by Bob Shemonski against Geor- 
gia, 1950. 3 by Ted Kershner against North Carolina State, 1957. 

3 by Howie Dare against North Carolina State, 1957. 3 by Dwayne 
Fletcher against South Carolina, 1959. 

MOST YARDS RETURNING KICKOFFS: 146 by Howie Dare against 

North Carolina State, 1957 (3 returns). 
MOST FUMBLES RECOVERED: 3 by Tom Gunderman against Miami, 

1957. 

SINGLE GAME RECORDS, Team 

HIGHEST SCORE: Maryland 80 Washington College 0, 1927. 

MOST TOTAL POINTS SCORED BY BOTH TEAMS: 87, 1954 (Mary- 
land 74. Missouri 13). 

HIGHEST SCORE BY OPPONENT: Navy 76, Maryland 0, 1913. 

MOST TD'S SCORED: 12 against Washington College, 1927. 

MOST PAT SCORED: 8 against Washington College, 1927; 8 against 
Missouri, 1954. 

MOST SAFETIES SCORED: 2 against Delaware, 1947, 2 against 
Georgetown, 1950. 

MOST FIELD GOALS SCORED: 3 against West Virginia, 1959. 

MOST TD'S SCORED PASSING: 4 against George Washington, 1948 
(3 by Vic Turyn. 1 by John Idzik); 4 against Navy, 1952 (2 by 
Jack Scarbath, 1 by Lloyd Colteryahn, 1 by Bernie Faloney) ; 

4 against George Washington, 1954 (2 by Frank Tamburello, 1 by 
Charles Boxold, 1 bv Lynn Beightol. 

MOST OPPONENTS TD'S* SCORED PASSING: 4 bv Wake Forest, 

1958 (3 by Norman Snead, 1 bv Charlie Parker) 
MOST TOTAL PLAYS: 92 against Texas, 1959. 

65 



MOST RUSHES: 76 against Miami, 1958. 

FEWEST RUSHES: 27 against West. Virginia, 1959. 

MOST NET YARDS GAINED RUSHING: 577 against VPI, 1950. 

FEWEST NET YARDS GAINED RUSHING: Minus 17 against George- 
town, 1939. 

FEWEST NET YARDS GAINED RUSHING BY OPPONENTS: Minus 
21 by West Virginia, 1951, Minus 21 by UCLA, 1955. 

BEST AVERAGE PER RUSH: 10.5 yards against VPI, 1950 (577 yds. 
in 55 rushes). 

MOST PASSES ATTEMPTED: 40 against Virginia, 1958 (18 comple- 
tions for 330 yds.) 

MOST PASSES COMPLETED: 21 against North Carolina, 1958 (35 
attempts). 

FEWEST PASSES COMPLETED: against Michigan State, 1944 (1 
attempt); against Vanderbilt, 1948 (12 attempts); against 
Missouri, 1951 (3 attempts). 

FEWEST PASSES ATTEMPTED: 1 against Michigan State, 1944. 

MOST PASSES ATTEMPTED BY OPPONENTS: 57 by West Virginia, 
1951 (19 completions). 

FEWEST PASSES COMPLETED BY OPPONENTS: by Syracuse, 
1939 (5 attempts); by Michigan State, 1944 (0 attempts); by 
Delaware, 1948 (3 attempts); by Boston University, 1952 (6 at- 
tempts); by Kentucky, 1956 (3 attempts). 

FEWEST YARDS GAINED PASSING BY OPPONENTS: Minus 1 by 
Clemson, 1956. 

MOST YARDS GAINED PASSING: 330 against Virginia, 1958 (18 
completions, 40 attempts). 

FEWEST YARDS GAINED PASSING: against Michigan State, 1944; 
Vanderbilt, 1948; Missouri, 1951. 

BEST COMPLETION PERCENTAGE: (min. 10 attempts) .800 against 
Georgia, 1952 (8 completions, 10 attempts). 

MOST PASSES INTERCEPTED: 7 against Georgia, 1951. 

MOST PASSES HAD INTERCEPTED: 6 by Pennsylvania, 1941. 

MOST TOTAL YARDS GAINED (rush and pass): 602 against West 
Virginia, 1951 (523 rushing, 79 passing). 

FEWEST TOTAL YARDS GAINED (rush and pass): 29 against Syra- 
cuse, 1959. 

MOST TOTAL FIRST DOWNS: 27 against' Washington & Lee, 1951, 
27 against LSU, 1952. 

FEWEST TOTAL FIRST DOWNS: 1 against Michigan State, 1944. 

MOST FIRST DOWNS RUSHING: 24 against Washington & Lee, 1951. 

FEWEST FIRST DOWNS RUSHING: 1 against Michigan State, 1944, 
1 against Syracuse, 1959. 

MOST FIRST DOWNS PASSING: 11 against George Washington, 1949. 

FEWEST FIRST DOWNS PASSING: against 12 teams (last one 
South Carolina 1958). 

MOST FUMBLES: 8 against Georgia, 1952 (lost 2). 

FEWEST FUMBLES: against Rutgers, 1940; against VMI, 1945; 
against Kentucky, 1954; against South Carolina, 1958; against 
South Carolina, 1959. 

MOST FUMBLES BY OPPONENTS: 8 by South Carolina, 1948; 8 by 
Mississippi, 1953. 

MOST FUMBLES LOST: 6 against North Carolina. 1947. 

MOST OPPONENTS FUMBLES RECOVERED: 5 against West Vir- 
ginia, 1950; 5 against Missouri in the 1950 Gator Bowl. 

66 



MOST PENALTIES: 18 against VPI, 1950. 

MOST PENALTIES BY OPPONENTS: 15 by Miami, L957. 

MOST YARDS PENALIZED: 130 againsl VPI. L948; L30 against VPI, 
1950. 

MOST YARDS OPPONENTS PENALIZED: 135 bj North Carolina, 
1953. 

FEWEST PENALTIES: againsl Duke, 1941. 

FEWEST PENALTIES BY OPPONENTS: by Western Maryland, 
L937; (i l)\ Western Maryland, 1939; by Florida, 1939; by Wash- 
ington & Lor, Kill; by William & Mary, 1945; by South Caro- 
lina. 1953. 

MOST PUNTS: 14 against Virginia, 1937; 14 againsl Western Mary- 
land. 1910. 

FEWEST PUNTS: 1 against Washington & Leo. 1953; 1 against Geor- 
gia, 1953; 1 against Syracuse, 1955; 1 against North Carolina 
Siato. 1954. 

MOST TOTAL YARDS PUNTING: 510 against Syracuse, 1936 (10 
punts). 

best punting average: 51.7 yards againsl Washington & Lee 

1951 (155 yds. on 3 punts). 

SEASON RECORDS, Individual 

MOST POINTS SCORED: 97 by Bob Shemonski in 10 games, 1950; 
96 by Lou Gambino in 10 games, 1947; 96 by Ed Vereb in 10 
games, 1955; Gambino added 3 td's in the 20-20 1948 Gator Bowl 
tie with Georgia for 11 game total of 114 points; Vereb scored 1 
Id. in the 20-6 loss to Oklahoma in the 1956 Orange Bowl for a 
11 game total of 102 points. 

MOST TOUCHDOWNS SCORED: 16 by Lou Gambino, 1947; 16 by Bob 
Shemonski, 1950; 16 by Ed Vereb, 1955; all in 10 games. Gambino 
added 3 in the 1948 Gator Bowl for 11 game total of 19 and Vereb 
1 in the 1956 Orange Bowl for 11 game total of 17. 

MOST PAT SCORED: 41 by Don Decker in 10 games, 1951, including 
4 for 4 in 28-13 victory over Tennessee in the 1952 Sugar Bowi. 
(55 attempts). 

MOST FIELD GOALS SCORED: 3 by Dick Bielski, 1953; 3 by Vincent 
Scott, 1959; (Note) "Untz" Brooke Brewer kicked 7 in 1916 and 
6 in 1921 employing both the drop kick and placement. 

MOST TD PASSES THROWN: 12 by Tommy Mont in 9 games, 1942. 

MOST PASSES ATTEMPTED: 127 by Tommy Mont in 9 games, 1942. 

MOST PASSES COMPLETED: 66 by Tommy Mont in 9 games, 1942. 

BEST PASSING PERCENTAGE: .542 by Vic Turyn, 1947, (32 comple- 
tions in 59 attempts). 

MOST YARDS GAINED PASSING: 1049 by Jack Scarbath, in 9 games. 

1952 (59 completions in 113 attempts). 

MOST PASSES CAUGHT: 32 by Lloyd Colteryahn in 9 games, 1952, 
(593 yards). 

MOST PASSES INTERCEPTED: 6 by Joe Horning in 9 games, 1951; 
6 by Bernie Faloney in 10 games, 1953; 5 by Ed Fullerton in 9 
games, 1951. Fullerton added 2 in the 28-13 win over Tennessee 
in the 1952 Sugar Bowl for a 10 game total of 7. 

MOST YARDS RETURNING INTERCEPTED PASSES: 147 by Joe 
Horning on 6 interceptions in 9 games, 1951. 

MOST RUSHES: 137 by Jim Joyce in 10 games, 1959; 125 by Lou 

67 



Gambino in 10 games, 1947; 113 by Ed Modzelewski in 9 games, 
1951; Modzelewski added 28 in the 28-13 victory over Tennessee in 
the 1952 Sugar Bowl for 10 game total of 141. Gambino added 
22 in the 20-20 tie with Georgia in the 1948 Gator Bowl for 11 
game total of 147. 

BEST RUSHING AVERAGE PER CARRY: 9.8 yards by Chet Hanu- 
lak, 1953. 

MOST NET YARDS RUSHING: 904 by Lou Gambino in 10 games. 
1947; 834 by Ed Modzelewski in 9 games, 1951; Gambino added 151 
yds. in 1948 Gator Bowl for 10 game total of 1069 yards; 
Modzelewski added 153 yds. in 1952, Sugar Bowl for 10 game total 
of 987 yards. (Note) Ray Poppleman gained 1350 yards, 1931 but 
his total was not NET total and is believed to be total offense. 

MOST AVERAGE NET YARDS RUSHING PER GAME: 92.7 by 
Modzelewski in 9 games, 1951; 90.4 by Lou Gambino in 10 games 
1947; Modzelewski added 153 yds. in 1952 Sugar Bowl for 10 game 
avg. of 98.7 yds. per game. Gambino added 151 yds. in 1948 Gator 
Bowl for 11 game average of 97.2 yds. 

MOST TOTAL YARDS (Rushing and Passing) 1286 by Jack Scarbath 
in 9 games, 1952. 

MOST PUNTS: 61 by Jack Targarona in 10 games, 1950. 

BEST PUNTING AVERAGE: 43.7 by Bill Walker in 10 games, 1955 
(15 punts); Walker added 4 punts in the 1956 Orange Bowl for a 
11 game average of 41.2 (19 punts). 

MOST PUNTS RETURNED: 28 by Bob Shemonski in 10 games, 1950. 

MOST YARDS GAINED ON PUNT RETURNS: 505 by Bob Shemonski 
in 10 games, 1950. 

BEST PUNT RETURN AVERAGE: (More than 3): 19.7 by Hubie 
Werner on 6 returns, 1947. 

MOST KICKOFFS RETURNED: 10 by Bob Shemonski for 259 yards, 
1950. 

MOST YARDS GAINED ON KICKOFF RETURNS: 264 by Howie 
Dare on 6 returns, 1957. 

BEST KICK OFF RETURN AVERAGE (more than 3): 44 yards by 
Howie Dare on 6 returns, 1957. 

SEASON RECORDS, Team 

MOST POINTS SCORED: 353 in 9 games, 1951; 381 in 10 games, 1951 
including 28-13 victory over Tennessee in the 1952 Sugar Bowl. 

FEWEST POINTS SCORED: 39 in 9 games, 1940. 

MOST OPPONENTS POINTS SCORED: 235 in 9 games, 1938. 

FEWEST OPPONENTS POINTS SCORED: 31 in 10 games, 1953; 38 
in 11 games including the 7-0 loss to Oklahoma in the 1954 
Orange Bowl. 

MOST TD'S SCORED: 52 in 9 garnet, 1951; 56 in 10 games, including 
the 28-13 victory over Tennessee in the 1952 Sugar Bowl. 

MOST FIELD GOALS: 3 in 1953; 3 in 1959. (Note) 7 in 1916 and 6 
in 1921 employing both the dropkick and placement. 

MOST PAT'S SCORED: 38 in 9 games, 1951; 42 in 10 games in- 
cluding the 28-13 victory over Tennessee in the 1952 Sugar Bowl. 

BEST PERCENTAGE KICKING PAT'S: .931 on 13 of 14 kicks, 1958. 

BEST SEASON: 1951, 1953 and 1955, Won 10— Lost 0; 1951 record 
includes the 28-13 1952 Sugar Bowl win over Tennessee. The 1953 
record is regular season. Terps lost 1954 Orange Bowl 7-0 to Okla- 

68 



homa. 1955 record is regular season, Terps lost to Oklahoma 20-6 

In the 1956 Orange Howl. 
WORST SEASON: 19 14: Won 1 Losl 7 Tied 1. 
MOST FIRST DOWNS: 167 in 9 games, 1952; 173 in L0 games in L! 

including the is in the 28-13 victory over Tennes ee in the 1952 

Sugar Howl. 
MOST FIRST DOWNS BY OPPONENTS: 164 in 10 games, 1959. 
MOST YARDS GAINED RUSHING: 2921 in 9 games, 1951; 3210 in 

10 games, 1951 including 28-13 victory over Tennessee in 1952 
Sugar Bowl. 

MOST YARDS GAINED RUSHING BY OPPONENTS: 2022 in 10 
games, 1956. 

MOST YARDS GAINED PASSING: 1366 in 9 games, 1942. 

MOST YARDS GAINED PASSING BY OPPONENTS: 1391 in 9 games, 
1951; L466 in 10 games including 28-13 victory over Tennessee in 
1952 Sugar Bowl. 

MOST NET YARDS GAINED (rushing and passing): 3822 in 9 games, 
1951 (2921 rushing and 901 passing); 4174 in 10 games including 
the 28-13 victory over Tennessee in the 1952 Sugar Bowl (3210 
rushing, 964 passing). 

MOST NET YARDS GAINED (rushing and passing) BY OPPONENTS: 
2S46 in 10 games, 1958 (1647 rushing, 1199 passing). 

FEWEST NET YARDS GAINED (rushing and passing) BY OPPON- 
ENTS: 1691 in 10 games, 1955 (761 yards rushing, 932 passing: 
Oklahoma gained 202 rushing, 53 passing in 1956 Orange Bowl for 

11 game total of 1946. 

MOST PASSES ATTEMPTED: 204 in 10 games, 1958 (103 completions). 

MOST PASSES COMPLETED: 103 in 10 games, 1958; (204 attempts 
for 1270 yards). 

BEST PASSING PERCENTAGE: .529 in 9 games, 1942 (90 comple- 
tions in 170 attempts). 

BEST PASSING PERCENTAGE BY OPPONENTS: .517 in 10 games, 
1959 (90 completions in 174 attempts). 

MOST PASS INTERCEPTIONS: 34 in 9 games, 1951, 38 in 10 games 
including the 28-13 victory over Tennessee in the 1952 Sugar Bowl. 

MOST PASS INTERCEPTIONS BY OPPONENTS: 23 in 10 games, 
1948. 

MOST FUMBLES: 44 in 10 games, 1950. 

MOST OPPONENTS FUMBLES: 37 in 10 games, 1950. 

FEWEST FUMBLES: 18 in 10 games, 1957. 

MOST PENALTIES: 78 in 11 games, 1953 (492.5 yards). 

MOST YARDAGE LOST PENALTIES: 694 in 10 games, 1956 (72 
penalties). 

MOST PUNTS: 63 in 10 games, 1957. 

MOST PUNTS BY OPPONENTS: 85 in 10 games, 1950. 

MOST YARDS ALL PUNTS: 2251 in 10 games, 1950 (62 punts). 

BEST PUNTING AVERAGE: 41.5 yards in 10 games, 1953 (37 punts). 

CAREER RECORDS, Individual 

MOST POINTS SCORED REGULAR SEASON: 126 by Ed Modzelewski, 
28 games, 1949-51 (21 td's) (note) he added 1 td in 1950 Gator 
Bowl for total of 132). 

MOST POINTS SCORED ALL GAMES: 133 by Bob Shemonski, 30 
games, 1949-5K 22 td's, 1 pat). Includes 2 td's in 1950, Gator Bowl, 

69 



1 td in 1952 Sugar Bowl. 
MOST POINTS BY PLACEKICKER REGULAR SEASON: 69 by Don 

Decker, 18 games, 1951-52 (63 pat, 82 att. 2 field goals). 
MOST POINTS BY PLACEKICKER ALL GAMES: 73 by Don Decker, 

19 games, includes 4 pat in 4 attempts in 1952 Sugar Bowl. (Total 
of 67 pat in 86 att, 2 field goals). 

MOST FIELD GOALS REGULAR SEASON GAMES: 4 by Dick Bielski, 

1951-54. (Note) "Untz" Brooke Brewer kicked 14, 1916-21 employ- 
ing both the drop kick and placement. 
MOST TD PASSES CAUGHT REGULAR SEASON: 8 by Lou Weid- 

ensaul, 1951-52 (18 games). 
MC'ST TOUCHDOWN PASSES THROWN REGULAR SEASON: 22 by 

Jack Scarbath, 28 games, 1950-52. 
MOST PASSES ATTEMPTED REGULAR SEASON: 260 by Jack 

Scarbath, 28 games, 1950-52. 
MOST PASSES ATTEMPTED ALL GAMES: 269 by Jack Scarbath, 

29 games, includes 9 in 1952 Sugar Bowl. 
MOST PASSES COMPLETED REGULAR SEASON: 125 by Jack Scar- 
bath, 28 games, 1950-52 (260 att.) 
MOST PASSES COMPLETED ALL GAMES: 131 by Jack Scarbath, 29 

games, includes 6 in 1952 Sugar Bowl. (269 att.) 
BEST COMPLETION PERCENTAGE REGULAR SEASON: .486 by 

Bob Rusevlyn, 30 games, 1956-58. (89 comp. 183 att.) 
BEST COMPLETION PERCENTAGE ALL GAMES: .487 by Jack 

Scarbath, 29 games, includes 6 comp. in 9 att. 1952 Sugar Bowl. 

(Total 131 comp., 269 att.) 
MOST YARDS GAINED PASSING, REGULAR SEASON: 2187 by Jack 

Scarbath, 28 games, 1950-52. 
MOST YARDS GAINED PASSING ALL GAMES: 2244 by Jack 

Scarbath, 29 games, includes 57 yds. in 1952 Sugar Bowl. (269 att., 

131 comp.) 
MOST PASSES CAUGHT REGULAR SEASON: 41 by Lloyd Cclter- 

yahn, 28 games, 1950-52. 
MOST YARDAGE GAINED BY PASSES REGULAR SEASON: 761 

by Lloyd Colteryahn, 28 games, 1950-52. 

MOST TOTAL YARDS GAINED RUSHING REGULAR SEASON: 1913 
by Ed Modzelewski, 28 games, 1949-51. 

MOST TOTAL YARDS GAINED RUSHING ALL GAMES: 2102 by Ed 
Modzelewski, 30 games, includes 36 yards in 1950 Gator Bowl and 
153 yds. in 1952 Sugar Bowl. 

MOST RUSHES REGULAR SEASON: 340 by Ed Modzelewski, 28 
games, 1949-51. 

MOST RUSHES ALL GAMES: 380 by Ed Modzelewski, 30 games, in- 
cludes 12 in 1950 Gator Bowl and 28 in 1952 Sugar Bowl. 

BEST RUSHING AVERAGE REGULAR SEASON: 8:1 yds. by Chet 
Hanulak, 28 games, 1951-53, (1544 yds., 190 carries). 

BEST RUSHING AVERAGE ALL GAMES: 7.9 yds. by Chet Hanulak, 

20 games, includes 35 yds. on 4 carries in 1952 Sugar Bowl and 39 
yds. on 12 carries in 1954 Orange Bowl. 

MOST TOTAL PLAYS (rush and pass) REGULAR SEASON: 499 by 

Jack Scarbath, 28 games, 1950-52. 
MOST TOTAL PLAYS (rush and pass) ALL GAMES: 514 by Jack 

Scarbath, 29 games, includes 15 in 1952 Sugar Bowl. (Avg. gain per 

play 5.9 yds.) 

70 



MOST TOTAL YARDS GAINED (rush and pass) REGULAR SEASON: 

2838 by Jack Scarbath, 28 games, 1950-52. 
MOST TOTAL YARDS GAINED (rush and pass) ALL GAMES: 2909 

by Jack Scarbath, includes 71 yds. in 1952 Sugar Bowl. <avg. 5.9 

yds. per play.) 



71 



BRIEF HISTORY OF THE UNIVERSITY 



The history of the present University is the history of two institutions: 
the old privately-owned and operated University of Maryland in Balti- 
more and the Maryland State College (formerly Maryland Agricultural 
College) at College Park. These institutions were merged in 1920. 

In 1807, the College of Medicine of Maryland was organized, the fifth 
medical school in the United States. The first class was graduated in 1810. 
A permanent home was established in 1814-1815 by the erection of the 
building at Lombard and Green Streets in Baltimore, the oldest structure 
in America devoted to medical teaching. Here was founded one of the 
first medical libraries (and the first medical school library) in the United 
States. In 1812 the General Assembly of Maryland authorized the College 
of Medicine of Maryland to "annex or constitute facilities of divinity, 
law, and arts and science," and by the same act declared that the "col- 
leges or faculties thus united should be constituted an university by the 
name and under the title of the University of Maryland." By authority 
of this act, steps were taken in 1813 to establish "a faculty of law," and 
in 1823 a regular school of instruction in law was opened. Subsequently 
there were added: in 1882 a Department of Dentistry which was absorbed 
in 1923 by the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery (founded in 1840, 
the first dental school in the world); in 1889 a School of Nursing; and 
in 1904 the Maryland College of Pharmacy (founded in 1841, the third 
oldest pharmacy college in the United States). 

The Maryland State College was chartered in 1856 under the name of 
the Maryland Agricultural College, the second agricultural college in the 
Western Hemisphere. For three years the College was under private 
management. In 1862 the Congress of the United States passed the Land 
Grant Act. This act granted each State and Territory that should claim 
its benefits an appropriate amount of unclaimed western lands, in place 
of scrip, the proceeds from the sale of which should apply under certain 
conditions to the "endowment, support, and maintenance of at least one 
college where the leading object shall be, without excluding other scien- 
tific and classical studies, and including military tactics, to teach such 
branches of learning as are related to agriculture and the mechanic arts, 
in such a manner as the Legislatures of the States may respectively pre- 
scribe, in order to promote the liberal and practical education of the in- 
dustrial classes in the several pursuits and professions of life." This grant 
was accepted by the General Assembly of Maryland, and the Maryland 
Agricultural College was named as the beneficiary of the grant. Thus 
the College became, at least in part, a State institution. In the fall of 
1914 control was taken over entirely by the State. In 1916 the General 
Assembly granted a new charter to the College, and made it the Mary- 
land State College. 

In 1920, by an act of the State Legislature, the University of Maryland 
was merged with the Maryland State College, and the resultant institu- 
tion was given the name University of Maryland. 

72 



YEAR BY YEAR RECORDS 



MARYLAND 
AGGIES 

1892 (0-3-0) 

St. Johns 50 

Johns Hop 62 

Episcopal Hi. ..16 

1893 (6-0-0) 

36 Eastern Hi 

10 Central Hi 

18 Bait. City Col... 

6 St. Johns Col... 

18 W. Md. Col ....10 

16 Orient Ath. CI. 6 

1894 (3-3-0) 

52 W. Md. Col 

12 Wash. Col 

6 St. Johns 22 

6 Georgetown .... 4 
Col. Ath. CI. ..26 
Mt. St. Marys ..24 

1895— No team 
No Games 

1896 (6-2-2) 

Eastern Hi 6 

Gallaudet 

34 Business Hi .-.. 

10 Central Hi 6 

18 Alexandria Hi.. 
20 Bethel Mil Ac -10 

Episcopal Hi. .. 6 

16 West. Md 6 

14 Central Hi 

U. of Md 

1897 (2-4-0) 

24 Central Hi 6 

4 Eastern Hi 

J. Hopkins 30 

4 St. Johns 6 

6 Gallaudet 16 

Bait. Med Col.-lO 

1898 (2-5-0) 

5 Columbian U. ..17 
West. Md 32 

36 Eastern Hi 

Gallaudet 33 

Johns Hop 16 

Episcooal Hi —37 

27 Rock Hill Col... 

1899 (1-4-0) 

West Md 21 

26 Eastern Hi 

Johns. Hop 40 

Delaware Col. 34 
St. Johns 62 

1900 (3-4-1) 

Western Hi .... 
Gib. Ath. CI 17 



G'town Prep .. 5 
6 Episcopal Hi —31 

5 Gonzaga Hi 11 

15 G'town Prep .. 
21 Gonzaga Hi — 
21 Char Hall Ac .. 

1901 (1-7-0) 

6 Del. Col 24 

10 Gallaudet Re. ..11 

Johns Hop 6 

6 Rock Hill Col-11 
Central Hi 11 

27 U.S. Marines .. 
Wal'k Ath CI ..36 
West. Md 30 

1902 (3-5-2) 

Georgetown —27 

5 Mt. St. Jos 

11 Columbian U. ..10 

6 Olympia Ath. .. 

Wash. Col 

Mt. St. Marys .. 5 

6 West. Md 26 

U. of Md 5 

Johns Hop 17 

Del. Col 

1903 (7-4-0) 

Georgetown —28 

5 Clifton Ath 

21 Gunton Tem. .. 
St. Johns 18 

28 Wash. Col 

27 Tech Hi 

Mt. St. Mar .... 2 

6 West. Md 

11 U. of Md 

Dela. Col 16 

6 Columbian U. .. 

1904 (2-4-2) 

Georgetown ....22 
Ran. Macon .... 
Ftress Monroe 

11 Mt. St. Mar 6 

West. Md 5 

22 Gallaudet 5 

U. of Md 6 

Dela. Col 18 

1905 (6-4-0) 

20 Bait Poly In — 

16 Gallaudet 

West. Md 10 

Navy 17 

17 Wm. & Mary .. 

28 Mt. St. Josephs 
27 St. Johns 5 

Wash. Col JL7 

23 U. of Md 5 

Dela. Col 12 

73 



1906 (5-3-0) 

5 Tech Hi n 

22 Bait City Col .. 
Navy 12 

Georgetown —28 
Mt. Wash. CI. -29 

20 St. Johns 4 

16 Rock Hill Col. 
35 Wash. Col 

1907 (3-6-0) 

13 Tech High 

Georgetown —10 

5 Richmond Col-11 
Navy 12 

6 Mt. St. Mar 12 

10 Geo. Wash 

10 Wash. Col 5 

St. Johns 16 

Gallaudet 5 

1908 (3-8-0) 

5 Central Hi 

5 Tech High 6 

Richmond Col..22 

Johns Hop 10 

Navy 57 

5 Gallaudet 

Fred'bg Col 10 

12 Balto Poly 6 

St. Johns 31 

Wash. Col 11 

Geo. Wash 57 

1909 (2-5-0) 

Richmond Col. 12 
Johns Hopkins 9 
Tech High 11 

5 Rock Hill 

George Wash. 26 
N. Ca. A&M —33 

14 Gallaudet 12 

1910 (4-3-1) 

12 Central Hi 

20 Richmond Col. 

11 Johns Hop 11 

21 Catholic U 

11 Geo. Wash 

V.M.I 8 

St. Johns 6 

3 West. Md 17 

1911 (4-4-2) 

6 Tech Hi 

Richmond 

5 Fred'bg Col 

Central Hi 14 

3 Johns Hod 6 

6 Catholic U 6 

St. Johns 27 

5 Wash. Col 17 

6 West Md 

6 Gallaudet 2 



1912 (6-1-1) 

31 Tech Hi 6 

46 Richmond Col. 

58 U. of Md 

13 Johns Hop 

St. Johns 27 

13 Gallaudet 7 

17 West Md 7 

13 Penn Mil. Col. 13 

1913 (6-3-0) 

27 Balto City 10 

45 Richmond Col. 
20 Johns Hop 

46 West Md 

Navv 76 

13 St. Johns 

26 Wash. Col 

Gallaudet 26 

7 Penn Mil 27 

1914 (5-3-0) 

Balto. Polv 6 

6 Catholic U 

13 West Md 20 

14 Johns Hop 

10 St. Johns 

3 Wash. Col 

Gallaudet 23 

26 Penn Mil 

1915 (6-3-0) 

31 Balto Poly 

Haverford 7 

Catholic U 16 

10 Gallaudet 3 

14 Penn Mil 13 

27 St. Johns 1* 

28 Wash Col 13 

51 West Md 

Johns Hop 3 

MARYLAND 
STATE 

1916 (6-2-0) 

6 Dickinson 

7 Navy 14 

15 V.M'.1 9 

6 Haverford 7 

31 St. Johns 6 

10 N.Y.U 7 

13 Catholic U 9 

54 Johns Hop 

1917 (4-3-1) 

20 Dela. Col 

Navy 62 

14 V.M.I 14 

29 Wake Forest ..13 

6 N.C. State 10 

13 St. Johns 3 

Penn State 57 

7 Johns Hop 

1918 (4-1-1) 

6 American U 13 

7 V.M.I 6 



19 West Md 

6 New York U. .. 2 

19 St. Johns 14 

Johns Hop 

1919 (5-4-0) 

6 Swarthmore —.10 
13 Virginia 

West Va 27 

Va. Poly 6 

Yale 31 

27 St. Johns 

13 Catholic U 

20 West Md 

14 Johns Hop 

UNIVERSITY 
OF MARYLAND 

1920 (7-2-0) 

54 Randolph Ma .. 

Rutgers 7 

Princeton 35 

14 Catholic U 

27 Wash. Col 

7 Va. Poly 

13 North Car 

10 Syracuse 7 

24 Johns Hop 7 

1921 (3-5-1) 

3 Rutgers 

Syracuse 42 

3 St. Johns 7 

10 Va. Polv 7 

7 North Car. ....16 
Yale 28 

16 Catholic U 

Carnegie Tech 21 

1922 (4-5-1) 

6 N. C. State 6 

7 Third Army .... 

Richmond 

Pennsylvania -12 

Princeton 26 

3 North Car. , 27 

Va. Poly 21 

3 Yale 45 

3 Johns Hop 

54 Catholic U 

7 N. C. State 6 

1923 (7-2-1) 

53 Randolph Ma... 
3 Pennsylvania - 

23 Richmond 

9 Va. Polv 16 

14 North Car 

28 St. Johns 

14 Yale 16 

26 N.C. State 12 

40 Catholic U 6 

6 Johns Hod 6 

1924 (3-3-3) 

23 Wash. Col 

7 Wash. & Lee ..19 

74 



38 Richmond 

Va. Polv -12 

6 North Car 

Catholic U 

Yale 47 

N. C. State 

Johns Hop 

1925 (2-5-1) 

13 Wash. Col 

16 Rutgers 

Va. Poly 3 

Virginia 6 

North Car 16 

14 Yale 43 

3 W. & L 7 

7 Johns Hop 7 

1926 (5-4-1) 

63 Wash. Col 

South Car 12 

Chicago 21 

8 Va. Poly 24 

14 North Car 6 

38 Gallaudet 7 

15 Yale 

6 Virginia 6 

W. & L 3 

17 Johns Hop 14 

1927 (4-7-0) 

80 Wash. Col 

26 South Car 

6 North Car 7 

13 Va. Poly 7 

10 V. M. 1 6 

6 W. & L 13 

6 Yale 30 

Virginia 21 

20 Vanderbilt 39 

13 Johns Hod 14 

6 Florida 7 

1928 (6-3-1) 

31 Wash. Col 

19 North Car 26 

7 South Car 21 

13 West Md 6 

V. M. 1 

6 Va. Poly 9 

Yale 6 

18 Virginia 2 

6 W. & L 

26 Johns Hop 6 

1929 (4-4-2) 

34 Wash. Col 7 

North Car 43 

South Car 26 

13 Gallaudet 6 

6 V. M. 1 7 

13 Virginia 13 

13 Yale 13 

24 Va. Polv 

39 Johns Hop 6 

West Md 12 



1930 (7-5-0) 

60 Wash. Col 6 

13 Yale 40 

21 North Car 28 

21 St. Johns 13 

20 V. M. 1 

14 Virginia 6 

41 W. & L 7 

13 V. Poly 7 

Navy 6 

21 Johns Hop 

7 Vanderbilt 22 

West Md 7 

1931 (8-1-1) 

13 Wash. Col 

7 Virginia 6 

(5 Navy 

(5 Kentucky 6 

41 V. M. 1 20 

20 Va. Poly 

12 Vanderbilt 39 

13 W. & L 7 

35 Johns Hop 14 

41 West Md 6 

1932 (5-6-0) 

63 Wash. Col 

6 Virginia 7 

6 Va. Poly 23 

Duke 34 

24 St. Johns 7 

12 V. M. 1 7 

Vanderbilt 13 

7 Navy 28 

6 W. & L 

23 Johns Hop 

7 West Md. 39 

1933 (3-6-0) 

20 St. Johns 

Va. Poly 14 

Tulane 20 

13 V. M. 1 19 

7 West Md 13 

Virginia 6 

7 Duke 38 

27 Johns Hop 7 

33 W. & L 13 

Florida 19 

1934 (7-3-0) 

13 St. Johns 

W. & L 7 

13 Navv 16 

14 Va. Poly 9 

21 Florida 

20 Virginia 

23 V. M. 1 

14 Indiana 17 

6 Georgetown .... 



1935 (7-2-2) 

39 St. Johns 6 

7 Va. Poly 

North Car 33 

6 V. M. 1 

20 Florida 6 

14 Virginia 7 

7 Indiana 13 

W. & L 

12 Georgetown .... 6 

Syracuse 

22 West Md 7 

1936 (6-5-0) 

20 St. Johns 

6 Va. Poly 

North Car 14 

21 Virginia 

20 Syracuse 

6 Florida 7 

12 Richmond 

7 V. M. 1 13 

6 Georgetown .... 7 

19 W. & L 6 

West Md 12 

1937 (8-2-0) 

28 St. Johns 

21 Pennsylvania ..28 

6 West Md 

3 Virginia 

13 Syracuse 

13 Florida 7 

9 V. M. 1 7 

14 Penn State 21 

12 Georgetown .... 2 

8 W. & L 

1938 (2-7-0) 

6 Richmond 19 

Penn State 33 

Syracuse 53 

14 West Md 8 

19 Virginia 27 

14 V. M. 1 47 

7 Florida 21 

7 Georgetown —.14 

19 W. & L 13 

1939 (2-7-0) 

26 Hamp.-Svd 

12 West Md 

7 Virginia 12 

12 Rutgers 25 

Florida 14 

Georgetown ....20 

Penn State 12 

V. M. 1 13 

7 Syracuse 10 

1940 (2-6-1) 

6 Hamp.-Syd 7 

Pennsylvania -51 

75 



6 Virginia 19 

Florida 19 

6 West Md 

Georgetown ....41 
V. M. 1 20 

14 Rutgers 7 

7 W. & L 7 

1941 (3-5-1) 

18 Hamp.-Syd 

6 West Md 6 

Duke 50 

13 Florida 12 

6 Pennsylvania ..55 
Georgetown ....26 

Rutgers 20 

V. M. 1 27 

6 W. & L 

1942 (7-2-0) 

34 Connecticut .... 

14 Lake NAS 

27 Rutgers 13 

V. M. 1 29 

51 West Md 

13 Florida 

Duke 42 

27 Virginia 12 

32 W. & L 28 

1943 (4-5-0) 

7 Curtis B. CG ..13 
13 Wake Forest .. 7 

19 Rich. AAB 6 

2 West Va 6 

Penn State 45 

43 Greenv. AAB ..18 

Virginia 39 

Bainbridgs 46 

21 V. M. 1 14 

1944 (1-7-1) 

Hamp.-Syd 12 

Wake Forest ..39 

6 West Va 6 

Mich. State .... 8 

6 Florida 14 

7 Virginia 18 

Mich. State ....33 

19 Penn State 34 

8 V. M. 1 6 

1945 (6-2-1) 

60 Guilford Col. .. 6 

21 Richmond 

22 Merch. M. A 6 

13 Va. Poly 21 

13 West Va 13 

14 W. & M 33 

38 V. M. 1 

19 Virginia 13 



1946 (3-6-0) 

54 Bainbridge 

7 Richmond 37 

North Car 33 

6 Va. Polv 

7 W. & M 41 

17 South Car 21 

24 W. & L 7 

14 Mich. State 26 

7 N. C. State 28 

1947 (7-2-2) 

19 South Car 13 

43 Delaware 19 

18 Richmond 6 

7 Duke 19 

21 Va. Poly 19 

27 West Va 

32 Duquesne 

North Car 19 

20 Vanderbilt 6 

N. C. State .... 

(Gator Bowl, 
Jan. 1, 1948) 

20 Georgia 20 

1948 (6-4-0) 

19 Richmond 

21 Delaware 

28 Va. Poly 

12 Duke 13 

47 Geo. Wash 

27 Miami 13 

19 South Car 7 

20 North Car 49 

Vanderbilt 34 

14 West Va 16 

1949 (9-1-0) 

34 Va. Poly 7 

33 Georgetown .... 7 
7 Mich. State .—14 

14 N. C. State 6 

44 South Car 7 

40 Geo. Wash 14 

14 Boston U 13 

47 West Va 7 

13 Miami 

(Gator Bowl, 

Jan. 1, 1950) 
20 Missouri 7 

1950 (7-2-1) 

7 Georgia 27 

35 Navy 21 

34 Mich. State .... 7 

25 Georgetown —.14 
13 N. C. State 16 

26 Duke 14 

23 Geo. Wash 7 

7 North Car 7 

41 West Va 

63 V. P. 1 7 



1951 (10-0-0) 

54 W. & L 14 

33 Geo. Wash 6 

43 Georgia 7 

14 North Car 7 

27 Louis. State .... 

35 Missouri 

40 Navy 21 

53 N. C. State 

54 West Va 7 

(Sugar Bowl, 

Jan. 1, 1952) 

28 Tennessee 13 

1952 (7-2-0) 

13 Missouri 10 

13 Auburn 7 

28 Clemson 

37 Georgia 

38 Navy 7 

34 L. S. U 6 

34 Boston U 7 

14 Mississippi 21 

7 Alabama 27 

1953 (10-1-0) 

20 Missouri 6 

52 W. & L 

20 Clemson 

40 Georgia 13 

26 North Car 

27 Geo. Wash 6 

30 Miami (Fla.) .. 

24 South Car 6 

38 Mississippi 

21 Alabama 

*0 Oklahoma 7 

*(Orange Bowl) 

1954 (7-2-1) 

20 Kentucky 

7 U. C. L.'A 12 

13 Wake Forest....l3 

33 North Car , 

7 Miami, Fla 9 

20 South Car 

42 N. C. State 14 

16 Clemson 

48 Geo. Wash 6 

74 Missouri 13 

1955 (10-1-0) 

13 Missouri 12 

7 U. C. L. A 

20 Baylor 6 

28 Wake Forest .. 7 

25 North Car 7 

34 Syracuse 13 

27 South Car 

13 L. S. U 

25 Clemson 12 

19 Geo. Wash 

*6 Oklahoma 20 

*Orange Bowl 

76 



1956 (2-7-1) 

12 Syracuse 26 

6 Wake Forest— 

Baylor 14 

6 Miami, Fla. __13 

6 N. Carolina __34 

7 Tennessee 34 

Kentucky 14 

6 Clemson 6 

S. Carolina —13 

25 N. C. State —14 

1957 (5-5-0) 

13 Texas A&M___21 
13 N. C. State —48 

Duke 14 

27 Wake Forest— 
21 N. Carolina—, 7 

Tennessee 16 

10 South Carolina 6 

7 Clemson 26 

16 Miami, Fla 6 

12 Virginia 

1958 (4-6-0) 

Wake Forest _34 
21 N. C. State 6 

Clemson 8 

10 Texas A&M ___ 14 

N. Carolina —27 

7 Auburn 20 

10 S. Carolina ___ 6 
14 Navy 40 

26 Miami, Fla. —14 
44 Virginia 6 

1959 (5-5-0) 

27 West Va. 7 

Texas 26 

Syracuse 29 

7 Wake Forest -10 

14 N. Carolina __ 7 
6 S. Carolina —22 

14 Navy 22 

28 Clemson 25 

55 Virginia 12 

33 N. C. State —28 



Roland Arrigoni 



(Continued from page 13) 

baseball for the base team and was an assistant football coach and 
scout for the Ft. Bliss grid teams. 

Following his discharge he joined Nugent and his staff at Florida 
State where he was the 1958 freshman coach. Then the move to Mary- 
land with Nugent. 

Frank Toomey 

(Continued from page 13) 

He was returned to the States and assigned as Athletic Officer at 
Pensacola Naval Air Station Here he helped coach the base football 
and basketball and baseball teams. 

Following discharge, he returned to Ithaca in the spring of 1946 to 
resume his studies and assist coaching the varsity football and baseball 
teams and coach of the freshman basketball and baseball teams. He 
graduated with a B.S. in Physical Education in June of 1947. He be- 
came backfield coach at Ithaca and freshman basketball and baseball 
coach. During this time, he was with the Utica baseball team, a Phillie 
farm. He received his Masters Degree in PE in June of 1948. He 
played pro baseball for a Niagara team in Canada. He has worked as 
a scout for the Phillies. 

In the Fall of 1948 he went to Waverly, N. Y. High School as head 
football and baseball coach. His grid teams of six years had the fine 
record of 39 wins against eight losses. His teams won the Southern 
Counties League Championship the last four years he coached. 

He went to Florida State as Nugent's assistant in 1954 and has been 
with him since. 

A high honor came to him last year when he was elected into the 
Hall of Fame at Canisius Prep School. 

He is married and has a son, Michael, 8. 



77 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

1960-61 Varsity Basketball Schedule 



December 


1 


Penn Slate 


Home 


December 


3 


*Virginia 


Away 


December 


6 


George Washington 


Home 


December 


10 


Minnesota 


Away 


December 


13 


Georgetown 


Away 


December 


17 


*Wake Forest 


Home 


December 


28-51 


Dixie Classic 


Raleigh, N. C 


January 


7 


*South Carolina 


Home 


January 


11 


Georgetown 


Home 


January 


14 


*Duke 


Away 


January 


16 


""'North Carolina 


Home 


January 


18 


Navy 


Home 


January 


21 


"North Carolina Slate 


Home 


February 


2 


''North Carolina 


Away 


February 


4 


*Wake Forest 


Away 


February 


10 


'Clemson 


Away 


February 


1 1 


"South Carolina 


Away 


February 


15 


*North Carolina State 


Away 


February 


10 


'Duke 


Home 


February 


18 


George Washington 


Away 


February 


22 


*Virginia 


Home 


February 


25 


' Clemson 


Home 


March 


2-4 


ACC Tournament 


Raleigh. N.G 



Atlantic Coast Conference Game 

HEAD COACH: H. A. "Bud" Millikan 

ASSISTANT COACH: Perry Moore 

78 



1959 FRESHMAN RESULTS 



OPPONENT 




MARYLAND 


19 


South Carolina 


20 


20 


North Carolina 


34 


22 


Virginia 


30 


14 


George Washington 
Won: 1 - Lost: 4 






FRESHMAN FOOTBALL SCHEDULE FOR 1960 



DATE 

September 30 
October 21 
October 29 
November 4 
November 11 



OPPONENT 

South Carolina 
George Washington 
Virginia 
Bullis Prep 
Navy 



PLACE 

Columbia, S. C. 
College Park, Md. 
Charlottesville, Va. 
College Park, Md. 
Annapolis, Md. 



Coach: Roland Arrigoni 




BYRD STADIUM 

HOME OF THE TERRAPINS 
Capacity: 35,000 



79 



— NOTES — 



Mi 



DICK BARLUND 
Tackle 





EVERETT CLOUD 
Halfback 



DWAYNE FLETCHER 
Halfback 



LEROY DIETRICH 
Center 



All-America 




Quarterback